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1" 

Six moHtSs 
Three Months 

lYdtii 
incTi^six months contracfcl^^' ^^ ,i^ffi<^*^.^^^ 


1.00 


AdUijtiring mtes, one ^olla/pAr inch: Sjfe^: pfices oYe^|^e 
Office 130§ Ceatrrf Ave., t<w Aftgele*; C^^ 


1; '»=' 





■;^ 




,pi Special i^iff Wrh|^ 

",' ;,' ■ ■"> ■■''a' . • -'i^ 'T-' 


iKF^ $2j(i(l Po^'tiAl oTg^riization fie'^jtgrees to help him get Ws nafuranzattcm 

_i-*l ..^ papers! . We shpuld not leave the I^tU4-altzatH:m p{ immigrants to 

poltticiaii^; We should establish schools where they can learn /what- 

it raeaD^ ib be an Amcrip^n citizen ajod to Icacn abdot 'Axntfican io- 
stitutions ftnd to help theniiget theirl naturalization paj>^rs, 

Yoii cati not have a superior gavemmetjt with atf inferior citi- 
zcnship[ A government is going to be just as goo<tas its ]citizen- 
sbip an(J no better. There are some people who mihk that a ^vern- 
ment sbould be as g'ood as its superior citizenship, but never bae 
wis bp^n accompliahed. Therefore ^we should make every citizen a 
unit of ,^his government and this umt should be educated-so that b* 
pr she tan intellig-ently perform the duties of Americ^i^citizenship. 


r* -**" 




la^the tributes paid the late editor of thie Liiberftor it is a |^ 

■ r ■ ■ t ■ ' w ' ' 

^ Therein ihpy loved htm for the enemies he made. ,. ' i^'. ' 





■jjw;-; We publish this week a very excellent article from the pep <rf 
!*^|jiie Hon. i'F. H. Mauser dealings on the all important subject of im- 
T£9#^ raigrationi. 






.^% i i' CllVe ^lievc that th& highest compliment we could pay ourselves 
• J . • 1*' tp nier^tion the ex-slave who, untutored, rose to be a' force in his 
real#i. i .■, 
V- Therefore, while we did not agree with J. L. Edmonds in 

^»rdly anything^, we differed as humans and not as beasts. Hence 
V. , '"oqr Velations were ijways friendly and each in our own w^y fought 
iy-4"^ we thought best in, our own way for the uplift of a race, 




ny 


CUT?- RATE DRUOQISTi' 


8pe<^tfUUne of Ggods 
^'if&n the EoUdayM ., 


FIFTH «Qd IfUH^SPP; ao4 
SECOND vS^MaM-L. 4 


Tel. Main 1223 


J^Wj^n 


•*r 


' ' S..,-l-^t4):NS<>.N;u^r 


•A' 


J^' 


St|ple aiif Fancy 0|j|<ii^ 

■ 'I Fruit« iCigars iand Tpbacca > 
give S. ijfeiiP. Green Trading Stamps— jpduble Sta - 


We 






§UptirvisQr Norton, whom they are seeking to recall, has proved 
fiinself a| consistent friend to his colored corlstituents, and worked 
and votejl to place the colored help that is at the county hospital 
^t present. We are. sorry to note that there are members of the 
race that' will join in a movement to dethfone the few friends we 
have, that are willing that we should have "J^i^^ition. We hope 
the' recall will fail, as it deserves to. 


1 . 




ife^ 


HON. S. M. SHORTfelDGE 

' ! For tfie U. S. Senate 

The icandidacy of the Hon. S. M- Shortridge for the Senaie ap- 
peaji strongly Jo the masses of the people, who want in the halls 
•■if Congtess a man who can at all times command the attention of 
that body. Andjin such a man as Mr. Shortridge the people would 
really have an advocate at court. With an ability second to none, 
a vast experiencej fits him especially for this position. His friend- 
ship and inter^t to the meek and lowly is well known, not of fhe 
bombastic pH'd set kind, but natural leaning toward the fellow who 
^^ Jsfig^emg'ihis way up. To the race which we represent he is of 
the kmd that can be placed in the category with the Lovejoys, Gar- 
, risons, the Lundys', the Phillips, and all of that galaxy that stood 

So. with a man like Shortridge in the U. S. Senate the people 
will again have in that body a strong force for the uplift of alL 


THE IMMIGRATION PROBLEM 


m 

.^ \^ ^y ^O" Frank H. Mouser, Assemblyman 74th District 

"' ImJi!!^ immigration problem is one of the important problems con- 
^n^c^in^K T'^^!^*^,.?r'"""^"t ^°^ solution. What immi- 
S^ A^-L^^^'''"'"^'?- ^^'^^^ i-^migrant shall be ref^j^ed admis- 
WK V? ^ .* •mm.grant shall be deported from this country? 
iSe^lv.^ T.°'''^'°K^';^'^''!;^'u^°^"^""'^°t by the various Sute 

.i^^h7^^Jl.f\ " '" ^^ ^f^'^ '^^' '^^ f"'^"! government will 

i^rl- ." ' ? ?^*^ someJkmd of restrictive legislation that will 

» i h ^ ?. U°^' f!il' • ^°'"- *''«ir«ent flood of utidesirable immigrants, 

t ilime " 'W .ntent.c:|^ discuss these questions at the present 

im Jli!«r^ intention fi9«iscuss briefly what we are to do with the 

Z^e^^K 1" '%^^'''-- ^h^" *^^ P^"*™* Canal opens 
U^K Tt^* °^.^M^ immigrants come to our country and it 
IL!1? J ?yi^iP*5*^^^^ find some way of taking care of 

"'"'iJL.'^itP^^' ^'\^" ^° "°* ^P***^ *"« English language 

aodfrfRip^g a c»rd to som(»i particular address. These addresses 
are pftenj old and the parties have moved. Therefore an immigrant 

4S!! "2^ ^^^^ ^^^ English langliage is greatly handic^ped. 

- ^^ '^*. ** ^°* ^"""^ ^" immigrant must have upon his ar- 

n|i^^e-a piaec to stay.' .Now. there are boarding houses which 

Xre «n?ply n«P .to geece the immigrants. There should be board- 

ing.fjpwses nm 6y the sUte, or under the control of the still where 

in^Wrants Bpon their arrival can receive proper protection. 

. iJ^^ilj, ^^'^y*" bairdicapped by being in a strange land without 

a wb- Most of tlSe Mamigraiits have little money and d^:nd adon 

S^iff4%S»Af>t. Therefore it is im^rt^anfth Jfee It^c 

:la»««r7^hag£tnYe»tmenfs^for those wanting to mafcelSl^stinents. 

A^j" *^»'^PPrtant that the State find employment for Jftos* 




every first and third Saturday of eacb month. 
600 Bast fifth street Ij6s Angeles 



J. 4 Jones. n. W. Sanders 1 B- L. Ware 

Telephone Broadway 119(5 ' 

Dresden I)ye Wiwrks 

Ladi^' and Gents' Garments Cleanedr Pressed and 
I Ilepaired 

Ha^s Clei^ned and Blocked— Work Called forind DeUvered 
1403 East Ninth Street, ps AnsraleaC«l. 




'W 


Frfl«{» Praters- 




I 


SAl 


T-Bone S^eak . ■ . 
Pot Boast' Prime...... 

Pork Rtfast .....'. .-,i 

Loin PoTkBxmt'-',' 
Shotdder^teaK . . . . . i 

Loi&Steak ..... '. 

Spare Bi):;s 

Saa^age ({ioroenui^ei 

Pork Chops ' 

Kib Roast Prinie ... 

Boi line Heat ^,-'-' 
Mutton Chop 1 . . r^. . . . 
Chi ttet ling ........ t. 


(Sell. 


SIMONPS SA 


laa SOUTH MAIN ST 


The Palace Cafe 

915 Central Avenue 

Theneatest. coziest and best place tb eat. Newly fitted u** 
nobbjr little booths, where parties may dine unmolested by the 
publiS gaze, Chinese and American dishes of the cheapest and 
daintiest and best jJishes served. Chop Suey and Noodles in 
American style 

Sunset west 1869 ■%'. Home 71996 

BEGKHf nfl'S MARREr 

;W. i. 'BBpKWITH, Pbop. j 

2974 WEST PICO ST. ,5 1 . Ne«r Hobart 

RANCH POULTRY DRESSED TO ORDER 
FRE^H FISH AND OYSTERS give MB A trial 

"my MOTTO: "LIVE AND LET LIVE" 


Established 1889 - I \' ■ Incorporated 1905 

BEEM4N ^ HENDHE ; 

Ladies Shirt We^to, Nieckwear,; Yarn*, In- 

fabt'8 Lay^tes. Children's Dressmaking, Dolls and Toys, 
ii^eedlework, Embroideries, Juvenile Clothing -; J|i 
^ PhQpe»7Homel02S9 Pacific Main 4998 

51-853 iSouth Broadway U nceleS 


"Where Quality is Always Considered!' Grow Bigger 

I * Hast Side Popular Trading Place for everything 

QOLDTEIN'S EMPORIUM t 
Mens, Ladies, ChiWrei is Outfitters 

Own Buildiutr. 711 East 5tb Street, Loa Aagelea, Cal. 



tEMEWBER 

It is 102ofc§t 

THlf^(^EW 

Baskei|lOM?oi^ 

SELt^ TOR L ESS 

Tf k«n yo» »r9 i* <toob 
and iaeamf, ■*« J. W. 
Saeond.' tkf awi> wkol 
tbooaand ia this eitr^t 
■oitabl* oceupfkiou th 
vr* Mcoidiac to Ae dict^ 
at* aai towUt^M j 



Mr. Col< 
funny tnulf, 
•dda t!fM» t» 
-wkM 
Colean: 
qoieVlj 
ea«t.| 


My c« 

lbaaiii«a»l 
borsalf — I 


If yoa are fcMddiig ta tfa« baat 
Country, call at ^« «fflee at onee^ 

PHOtTBS: A 


e 


i^^W 


Frank William^. . 
Jaa. C. Slaughter, ^ 


Grint Smith, Pres. and Gen.. |^. 
GurtiB Hammond, Viee Prta. 
R. B. Odom. Treaa. 

I^MITH &W1LL 

I fiinBral Directors: ind PI||^HH8lnei 

4 W^ guarantee our work ahipped to nJ^H^ 0^ the jrlobe' 

LADY ATTENDANT J^HOlSrE MAIN 3629 

Services the best Prices the lovesK^ 



S>6 i(cuXl 


RRA. Ra#Pemando St 


desmng work. In this State i. survey of the soil is being made so 
that our own citizens and the immigrant can havf correct informa- 
t^on^^hwe h» can settl. This information should be dijtributeTh, 
a^ret»5bfe manner to tb,: immigrant. For we c2n noTSS the 
>mm,grant^to become a-good Aqwric^i citizen if wfr ^IShL to 
or rnlT" ^^ atf "nscrupulousjlawyer, a croolred land agent 
or a di^pnest employment agent. We should s^ that the immi- 

SiJuiSs.' ''^''^'^'^ ^^ ^•"^""" govemm^t S AmS 

.. Sf Il^°"'n^,^T^*^r '"'P'^^^t collect information'Sit 

e^ soij many wdl locate m farming districts,- which will helpto 

(«vent<:ongestion in our large citicsir ^ •^ v* 

i We should alsoestablish^free eojploymcnt bureaus in this Stated 

A^njan whc» is sent ta work should not be imposed apoh fey^an 

e^jgloyment agent sinily to get a fee. Th^ State should honestly 

antee wo^J<!^p th^man who is sent to fOl a job. We can fl«J 

keep jip the standard of American liyiie H 
-niei»t agents to distribute lab<ir regafdfess 


and 


&:. 




JBIIS. TIIINABAUM'S 

' jlT 12(» CENTRAL AVE. 

Wh^ yoii can get Rca#-to-Wear Oothea. Mnk Tenn4- 

baum'a style* in Udiea' Wear are of the very lateal tlylea 

out of the Ittgh rent mttnct hot prieeii «re 

■'' '■ ''^^^ ' "^^--"^ ■ i£. ■- - ' < s . 


l)ein| 
onaUc 


PHONE 



Ten 


cent off all woi 
906 CENT 

^00 will secure Ijest ^wk and l§wi 
*nd courteous tri^bnent. Deiiy^ " 
Phone orders giveet'Striet atteqtiQO 

MAIN erei 1 -" '| ,''; 'iv''" 


\in of 


city wit 
'of city a<| 


I-. 



,08 Angeles, 




Sad 


iSiareetl 



California 


PM 


A. A. Q 

NOTARY 

Agent for Investmentos. BuiMltBg;|^ 
Loans, Insurance. Houses, Lota, 
and Acreage for sale 
1146 Central iJLTenue 


»' Stock 


^' <3illUMB| 



m Eati Fii 


ud P|m ai« a^ 

tttJitoBanaa^ 


street 
Pi 

^^>Qr< 


site Me 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


JM oootempUita coing 

BMt, and leun What 

« OMbmbb route it is. 

/^1* tlM Short Line from 

SoatiMn CaUfomia through 

Salt Lalc»CitT. with beautiful 

aMnie.attiaeaona and 

•xeallaat aercjce. 

Ton may travel first or 

Mcoad ciaaa in the 

Loa Aamlea Limitedof the 

Pacific umited, as UCey ham 

both StaD^ ">^iiJs,t SlMpara. 

Ron daily from^lj^ Ansalea 

to Chicago viaiCnuharin lew than 

i"^ «J». Vtth dlr«5t connectiona 


for Den' 

St Pi 

TheOv( 

throoi, 

Denver, 

Omalia 

AU 

*^-ar8wii 

•ervii 

Yoa wi; 

Atrip 


I City, SX Louia. 
[ ICnne^Jolia. 
* Expreaa has f 

Keepers to 

City, St. Louis, 
IQucaoo. 
lis have iMning 
■the best of 

I surely enjoy 
St over the 


I St any Ticicet Office. J 


THE 
THE 


WAY TO 
EAST 


Home 


sSriBrfe and¥lrstSt. SUtion 
iOQSl 



mGO NEWS 


lirpolsted 

1 1 have 

iBan and'^e other 

positions if T shonld 

' or of the Fourth 

P«|o me s fivor if you 

fthese (tateiqinitB as 

;.there is a reward of 

one that can prove 

sd( any so^^i^m- 

to say on sq^ioDor 

are r Urisljte i fln g 

Bore or lesi 1)han 

b— There , have 

' atones started^^ me 

I amnsing, andXwish 

'ia this <distriet to 

Vftui no' mut or m^ of 

ftooaiT«d «»7 Pnnnin 

losiak copi'es \>f litMra 
frien^ congratnlat-j 
my nomination, whi 
me for the past thirt; 

jdly i^^ t^«^ cai'e 

that a man who 
..action vork woald 
|o4 Supervisor, then 
for yours truly, 
)BEBT HOUGHTON. 

jCaCdidatef^ 

9«lof* tte Kezt Legis- 
["Vital V» 8«n Diego. 

hmd TMe Landit 

' ^Q and Maintenaticg 


to rank ■ «• a* upcigipt 
IS' gentlenuu^ attoog yoi^ 

roSld iper^SidefntTe^' 

[jand^litinlJGl^'d. . 

It }s tiiitiiinkabte Uiat the grejlt 



vtticultural- State in t)ie American 
Unon. Liet those vi^o advocate 
prc|iibition coBie forward w^ 
shWv where it has ever lessened 
thl evils of intemperance., Don't 
dpidg^ the issue by paitning in 
State^f California rwiU lend itseUlglfrfttg colors all the misery and 



of 


ig- 


I and Water Development 
Cooiriy. . • 
Powers and Mpmct- 

Ip f or Interests of City 

Other Hatters of Im- 

Kb^eial QwltflnatlnM fpr 
Ifl&r toot T<gWmii«wi 
Ided liOflBlatnre in intm- 


eam- 
or bonda. ^' f ; ' 
Attorney ^fbr State HarboriBd^- 
mission 1911-1913. , ^ # 

; Equipped by ^peridice abd fa- 
cial study of the law to wepaire 
and direct harbor legislatiio.' 

Attorney for the La Me^4 San 
Tsidro Irrigation Districttt 

Made special study pf tFe water 

and irrigation laws of Cilifomia. 

Trained by experiearato^ deal 

wit hl^e vit^ water proqco^ and 

water legislation. 




Dq)uty City Attoraeyi 
Diego 1909-1910. : 

In charge of aU street 
czimiaed prosecutions. 

Experienced in legis! 
tera and procedure thr 
for eit yatiast two sessi 
ifllature, > 

Wide aoDaamtancQi wU mem- 
bers of legalatnre and Ff bHc men 
of sts^ Slid regarded ^hlj by 

.,^ ,_.^ ^T»,,\Blk.knowledge 

rsad aMted materially in of cB.||^)Hnmt]r from 
>^^aMake_^_^Mbor' biU d6tA>^Vqiwt«Bt p 

I taxx its IiBXiidr laaa. 
irmber ot. Oor 


to siich an outrage. 

For sixty; years it has fostered, 
protected and assisted the wine in- 
dustry; it has established a sepa- 
rate defi^rtm^ in the State Uni- 
ver^ty to^^i^ch grape growing 
and ^ine 'tpaking; it has created 
an agric^Itjnral scboc^ at Davis 
where vit«+nlture is now taaght; 
it has sent its agents abroad to 
bring hundreds of new stocks to 
California for planting. It has 
lured thousands of people from 
abroad tojreclaim its hillsides; it 
has peopld our valleys and moun- 
iain slopes with men and women 
of thrifty j and temperate habiti, 
and has aCtorded to them an eqtiil 
place among the foremost citizen- 
ship of thje land. i 

What a|inswer shalh-we return to 
those whdm we divest of their 
property? ( 

What jasti&»tion shall we urge 
ior such ^vholesale -confiscation? 

Shall jwe reply that the vine- 
^rds of iCalifomia must be sacri- 
ficed up<j« the altar of the public 

If so.j.liox*' ' shsdL We further 
answer jwlten they demand that 
we, prod)uce,^oni instance where 
private jproperty has ever been 
taken fqF; the public welfare with- 
out fair; and just compenastion to 
it^ -owners? 

'i They 'will further- point out to 
us that the general good often re-; 
quires the takingrof property for 
railroads, highways,, telephone 
an^ P4#tr lines, btit'that judicial 

'« *'^*-^?*^^^8^®^ ^^ dcter- 
(i^^nia^iit >value of the 
^ 5>r^p^^ ,: whiA is • to Ae con- 
Wemne^. ■■>-; t-.' : '■ 

"Yes, it is true," replies the 
rabid prohibitionist^ "that private 
property can not be condemned to 
puijlicjuse without compensation 
tp IBI i o\yner, but vineyards and 
wineries shall be placed beyond 
th«^pale of the law, because no 
msm has thXinoral right to raise 
or crush grs«>ftj. for ■vyine." .Th.en 
he price^^^o impose -his^jartic^- 
lar view of moral rights upon oth- 
ers Ijy ffcgal comi^lsion. He 
urgesi that the right to prohibit 
the njanufacture of wine is'as con- 
sistent as the^ right to prohibit the 
retail sale of intoxicatign JUjuot: 
If he; werenbt blind in his zeal, he 
could distinguish th^ vast differ- 
enced between the two cases. 

The state has never inVited men 
to s^t up bar rooms; it has invited 
thMti to bnild wineries. - 

Tpe state^has never taught men 
the art Of mixing and serving jn- 
tbxicatingy drinks; but it has 
j^ught thotfj^aiids to plant wine 
gl^^S and make them into wine, 
how to treat them in the cellar, 
L. -i-N- -rand preserve them, ter man's ^f&^| 
rork )«»a Jf wine making is^*vrotM 
N^Siminoraii the State c^bCo^ 
|pr irtpre ttj»n half -jr-^iaqr 
*^ -- '-^ Active partntt- ^- 



wretchedness th^t are produced 
by intemperance. Such evasion 
is a sham and subterfuge. Point 
out where prohibiticm has operat- 
ed as an effective remedy 1 Don't 
hide under generalities, nor appeal 
to - prejudice and passion, but 
prove by history and experience 
that prohibition has cured, or even 
alleviated, the ills that you spend 
all of yo«»r time talking about. 
Remember tfiat it i» not sufficient 
to emphasize the curse of intem- 
perance. That is not the issue. 
The real question is whether or 
not state-wide prohibition will ex- 
tinguish intemperance, or even 
lessen it. ^ 

Once prove^nat prohibition ad- 
<rances the general welfare, that it 
means a moral uplift, the imp^ve- 
ment of social and economic con- 
ditions, and ,many. a man who 
raises Ki* voice against you will 
co-operate in some plan that will 
gradually Jake care of the vine- 
yards that have been planted and 
brought to maturity through the 
representations and -, encourage- 
ment of oHi^ state goyeniment. 

But I defy you i& show tha,ti 
prohibition has ever worked well, 
or that its effects can compare 
with those obtained;in states that 
have systems of licensiag and te:g- 
ulatic^ljtogether with local option 
laws. ■ ']' -1 ' ,- ■ 

Enotfra states have tried pro- 
hibitioQ^r long period of time to 
give us ^Ma fro mwhich we can 
determine whether it possesses 
any of the merits claimed by its 
advocates. Ne\y Hampshire tried 
it for 58 years i Vermont for 53 
years ; Massachusetts for 22 
years; Rhode Island for 14 years; 
Co^nefjticut for 18 years ; Michi- 
gari. for 20 years ; Iliinois for two 
years; Iowa for nine yjars; Ne- 
braska for three years ; South Da- 
kot«^ for six years; and Alabama 
for three years. 

All of these states abandoned it 
as a failure and resumed a more 
workable systepj of regulation 
and local option 

We challenge the prohibitii 
ists to showfcthat better cpndi 
exist in the present dry fe 
than among their neighbor: 
governors of dry states, 
doiibtedly good, wi 
we'must reihembet 
still- governors' of 
not expected to 
that is hot land; 
tem of laws tha 
ed by a majoril 
«nts. 

A^^ln I ^] 
tent 
pre 


you torn me do*ti.^ 



alone can a solutipn be b>und. 

We must leave "tb personal de- 
cision and individual choice a 
thousand things that we d*sire to 
correct, for ■ tibservation, history 
and experience have demonstrated 
that they can berft be settled with- 
in teh domain of personal liberty, 
Beyond a eertain pcMnt legal rer 
strictions and legal coei 
4not safely go, and the 
^lust take othes means. 
his lofty Tconception 
Vote No ort^P] 


Wrong. After being a participaflt 
iiivthat wrdng, the radical pr<Air 
bitioiyst would now have the state 
add)^crime that finds no iparallel 
■ Vminan history. " 
I cWllenge the advocates of 
aL|«-\^e prohibition to point to 
. Je instance in all the history of 
die yforW Vhere the neojrie of any 
*^-.te or natipnhajfijKtseriously 

' indus- 


der a fair ' 
data prodjl 

in drink] 
*S' Otho 


dress,i 
thii 
long^ 
jres 




MUTILATED PAflF 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


LBWIS X.jJ9BnC8- 


.Xocaismtor 


COnmSMNOKNTS. 


a. B. emn^ 


H. ■. gwwon 
a. i> c«wis — 


-BakanAeld 


tern A4k Tbomp 
Mm. B*miM~ 


X,oa AjifCiM 



I. r. SMdaraoo 

J. Allen Re«a«. Venice, C«L 

Kn. Mair Oron, AUenswortb. CaL 
^ >' t\ Mn. Pant Iawit WUiteM, B«ltet» 

•VBVCRIPTION RATES. 



MifVteF 

sis Month«„ 

TkTM Mentiw. 


1.M 


S I ^ 

T>' ft>Moai*ni*Ilr hwpMW that for aom* 

' ^j«aaM or otbar pepwra ar* mtaaad br b«- 

S 4^''l«l WlM^nt io^ or slntan. In eaM of 

• ^WHeiailiwii nift-Moaivlac th«lr vapwa. In- 

'.> tptai na btr poatal and wa shall ehacrtully 

~ a dnpUcat* oopy ot aald mlaalnc 


manhood as to be made tools of by 
this aspirant- for Negro jouiinal- 
istic honors, i. '" ' 


K 


\ Mo attaatloa vmU to mnanytatnaittmtm. 
Copjr nuut b« written plainly on on* 
of p<p«r, «ad to Inaura-lnMrtlon tn 
thU oflioa 
pi. 


nac* 


AOVKWriMNQ RATC9. lOe PEA INCH. 


VKwrwi 
REPU 


rBLICAN TICKET 
For Govemoe: 
JOHN D. niEDERieKS. 

of State I 

IFRANK E. JOiaSAN ;: 
\c United States Senatof^, 
)SEPH R. KNOWLiND. 
I^or General 
^NK E. WRIGHT 
^"d of Eqiiall2ation t 
'P WcELVAINE 

gjress, Stibr District 
l*J: C. ROBERTS 
^Cbngk-ess, 10th District: 

I Z. qSBORNE. 

JRi NON-PARTISAN 

TICKET 
l^f^ Superior Court: 
R. WILLIS. 
fPH COYNE. 

E. McDowell. 

SHENK 
FLEMING. 



1^. J. FORD 
Oar Candidata^or District Attorney 


Mr. Editor: , ; 

I wish to declare with reference' 
to the candidacy of Mr. W. S. 
Kingsbury of Los Angeles, candi- 
date for re-election as Surveyor 
General of the State of California, 
that his candidacy is one of the 
most iniportant and his election 
one of the most imperative needs 
before the people of the state. Mr. 
Kingsbury was elected to the office 
which he now, at the re<iuest of 
his friends and most reluctantly so 
far as he himself is concerned, 




:tbliP.M 


ison 


Los Angeles 

Irown. 

[EINCHILD 
?IELD 



5W seeks, eight years ag'o. That 
|ook possession- of said office, 
it in the hands of land 
rs and directly in the con- 
^he land thieves of the State 
smia. That those abuses 
3St entii'ely corrected and 
Gen. Kingsbury, and 
I he be returned to the 
ime system of fraud 
again take phce in 

se the people should 
prity retnrn him to 
;' would be a pub- 
ides, he has kept 
lb office all this 

^Central Ave, 

rch— 0' 


Eirctrj^f uaiiay Niitt, jlaces 

Eyary Wcdnasday, Ladles' Saata 

Friday October ^,] Barrel Rac» 

Saturday, Boxing Centes^ Comedy, 9 bouts 

■7 1 ;; AdmiaWten, Jp:-^Gi|l|A -" V\, 

Wat^h this Spaot for Special Announcement' 
M for Each Week ■. 

^ ' i: .__ ¥\ ^ 

I ELECT 

b. JOSEPH COYNE 

Judge of Superior Courf 

Nominated -at, the Primary. 

I More humanity; leas technirality. 
Favors to none; justice to all. 

Endoried and BUppor.ed by Mrs Eugene Walker, Mrs. James M. 

Vena, Mrs. J. 0. Banks, Paul M. Naeh, W. H. Shores, and othere 


ifar Coolers made of Plaster 
sheOs. Also flower | 



90S Central A^ 

YoH will Mjpi'® ^^>^"^ ^°^^ ^^ ^*^ 
with prompmand courteous treatoet 
all parts of^'y at low rate. PhoBe] 
strict attention^ 

IMAIN 8i51 


;■ 


HOMEfPHOME 4127 

THE 

505 BROADWAY A^ 

Large, well ventila 
fable board, Rooms by i 
and ftold batiu 


[ONT 


rNUE 

rooms. Piano ad 
or weelt. Tormf 



QrjV TERNO ^ 



a^r 

^*? 


*-t^ 




CI 



REPUBLICAN BALLOT 

fjk FOR THEaE OFFicaa as markux 

;E ARE REPUBLICANS 


lean Pai 


a + AT* 


y«U tar Owa 


>*H D. fASOCRICKS 


i. 


V««a l»r On* 



[ands! For 


''^:"'l^il&' 


JS ■: f 


V>»«»r 


^ 


Iff fpf On* 


RactLVAINK 


3 


eRtaaioNAL 

k**g«»» '' ' Vot» for On* 

kR. KNOWtANP 


Cen«r**l 
Oltrtet 


ft-dgress MPibiit Hysteria 
, Effidency Withou^t Extravagance 
protection pfl Ca^formVs Industi 


BSERir^- 




On* 


bte To^pfirdvar df 


Pmc&les Novemfielf 


SEJ^ON; T« IE FLAVOR 

rANO'jHEl PPICE. 


Comet "^Ip^ G?f»'°^'*' 




NGS 


'•y 


m 
— «r 


4686. I Tli r sherbets 

»d^ iulk indjpcue fruit joioee 

delioions sad ptre. At this 

j^asoi they are furhiefaiDg the put>. 

W?ii » gre»t .variety of theile de 

eioas sherbets. At ibn time .are 

Svrawberry, pineapple, Apdk»t, 

Or»Q|i;e an^ Lemoi^. 

" Special pricei^ *0 cbptcbes,- poti. 

etiee, etc, 

Broadwa; 


-1 


"Sutei you wopid,it( D if yoo, at». 
at the Co«y Deni pterj day iif the 
iweek, and SQadat 

of i^»ico 


J- 


ist; 


-r^'-' 


I Mrs. Ida ■" Bjailey 
Heights is on:ftcj sitk 

. ji j'i 

Mrs. Sktmai,: of lOtc Bertndo 
street, entertained he Pico 
Heights Social Club iid the Re- 
publican Auxiliary Nq^ 1 of Pico 
Heights, last Friday, fth a very 
nice lunchean. This tiis a social 
and political meeting combined. 
A large crowd of the members 
were present and enjoyed them- 
selves immensely. Anong the 
speakers wasM^. O. P Clark, -the 
president of the Repub<i:an Auxil- 
iary. - ,^-' , -{ 


Mr. ind Mrs.!N. \V. Davis re- 
turned Sunday from a 10 days" 
visit to San Diego. They report 
a royal time. . ' ' 

Rev. Byers and delegates from 
the Conference at Haaford, re- 
tunied Tuesday mori^n,^ 4; H 

W. J. McLamore, ed .o^lff^the 
Free Lance, and J. B. ^ss, 
itor of the Eagle, m: 


The Day Nursery gaevt a suc- 
cessful ba^r comer of Adams and 
Central avehue Wedite^y: eyea- 

;,'•-.. ^~" -"—^ — "'.■ ^ " ' '^ 

While in San Diegp we met Mr, 
Willie Hume, who'conducts the 
Wayfarers Club on_Sfarket street. 
We found him a \tell jKJSfed gen- 
tleman who is. ambitious to con- 
(fajcihis place on a high plane and 
along business lints and we are 
sure he will succeed^ i,:t V . r 

Dr. Leonard Stovall, oar suc- 
cessful Central aventte physician, 
is enjoying a splendid practice and 
i? growing in favor daily. 7.V; , , 

The Afro American Council met 
Wednesday evening at iPicb and 
Paloma. Willis O. Tyler, Capt. 
Crumley, Mr. Gynn and the chair- 
i^n, Attorney Bamett, addressed 
the meeting. ■ . ' r- - 

The mock congress at the A. 
M. E. church Wednesday evenihg 
was an interesting aflFair. 

m 

In the Superior Court on last 
Tuesday Mr. Brown, the white 
man who has gone daffy over run- 
ning a Negro newspaper, gained a 
temporary point over Bubber 
Brown, a young colored boy who 
nuis a paper for his race. Brown 
procured an injunction against 
Bubber prohibitirS^ him from us- 
ing»the name Los Angeles Post. 
This is only temporary, however 


Mr/and Mr^. W. J. laiii. 1464 
W. 85th place, desire tufetarn at>- 
preoiatiTe thanks to tbetr a^»Dy 
friends for kindneos i^own and 
sympathy expressed on oeca^n of 
tiie death qf Miss Hanter, ^r. Bl- 
He'd lister, last week.* ' / 


ProTidance Inst'l Bapt. Ohuroh 
had great^ success in its first rally 
last Sunday ■'^istht, raising ov«r 
if, COO, makings total of fl^6lf48 
(one thousand six hnndred fotir- 
^n dollars an^ forty-eiKhtoenta) 
raised' since organization six 
months ago. 4^1^^^^ ^^^ finished 
ivportiog. 1,._,^ -■ ''■ t -; 

Next Sunday Pastor WiUiamB, 
the great pastor leader and preach- 
er, will preach at both services. 
Sunday night he will deliver bis 
famous aadress, subject, ^^be 
Drunkard's Photograph " The 
Charch and p&etor wish to take 
this opportunity to 1 thank its 
friends fM tbeiir^iberal help. Dur- 
ing the last wt9\ the church has 


trip to San Diego ,Tu< 

Miss M. Lewis, aft{ 
a fortnight in our cit)[ 
home in San EKegc^*:- 


ed- 
flying 


visit of 
it for her 


Sam Langford, noted boji«i^ar 
rived in the city Wednei^ay and 
is a guest of the ^afden West 
hotel. He is look'thg the picture 
of health. In the party with him 
is his ina«ager, Joe Woodman, and 
^Wrtfainer. Sam Langford is a 
credit to the boxing ring and has 
the respect and confidence of not 
only the promoters but of the 
.\merican public in general. He 
stands today as the greatest boxer 
of his class . in America. He is 
here to fill an engagement. 

birthdaVanniversary 


Mrs. Bessie Bean I I retume|l 
from a trip to the A?l-ld's fair 
city, on the bay. 


Mr. Jamee 
a; B. Jones, die^'ttoibd] 
will be buried on Mondi 
ber 2nd from the Secoj 
Clrareh, *t 2 Volock. 


The cohcert giveit^ncp 
pices of the Pacific C< 
nacle and directed b^| 
Gr^, Ttjesday evenir 
ingfon hall, in which Mj 
kins Jones figwvi] a£ 
tion, was a gteit iucceJ 
<ach participarit^d cri 
occasion, and the big af 
paid Mrs. Gray f6r\th^ 
efibrts pttt ^rtfa. to. ma j 


1; 


Mr. and Mrs. franll 
nounce the marriagci 
daughter Beatrice to 
M. Johnson, Thureda| 
Novemb^ 2(5, at Mt. 
tist tiaadi. 

Miss Estella Rober 
jof undertaker Roberts| 
rjed Wednesday even 
Sojourner Truth He 
I Adams street. . 


Dr. C. H. Duvall Id 
rom an extended trip | 
jd vfQl furnish this r| 
•Blprt-^ the same. 


trof Mri^. 

' last aojdi 

\, Noveni- 

Baptist 


r theaus- 

ist Tabe'r- 

Mrs. M. 

It Wa^- 

L.Hayv- 
ir attrac- 
In fact 

it to the 
lieiKe -e- 
5trena( us 

it a s ic- 

" ■■ . ' 

[I^Ikran- 
of their 
James 
evcnfing, 

;:ion dap- 


daughter 
[was ^a^- 
ig at- tlK 

oil -^t 

|s retired 
the south 
Iper w>tf> ^ 



Prentic*! New 

■ '^-^ ■ > 

with great su J 


Ladii^' Aid gal 

at the reside^ 

. , vl Ceries aveml 
Jday eiaing. 


^ •'■*\ tea Cr«ar 
Cor. 8th\na San Pd 
Iways teiirf, » ^, j 
^visitor yijo ne, 

|txwcH--a\<|,in 
▼bo will ^p 
OT SandArkm^/ 
wants wr '" 

candy. 
line. 


?e Sub 
|s addresfeftl 
pngmen's clu 
fy evenini^; 

Wiisoi^ 
ichifd. 


lea Store is 

pess. ■■. . 

le a>betiefit 
}e of Mrs. 
Wed$es- 


PaHoirf 

^ro Str<|^ta 
ome to tlM 
a DB^ 1 
^ho dedfM % 
«t,all ii«r-. 
I dttrioiCitbe 
kak» <kiiown 
[ig in the io« 
and light 


and Fi S. 
le coldred 
last Wed- 
candidates 
(falter-; M. 


Last Thursday evening, Mrs V. 
Fingers of 625 E 8th street enter- 
tained a number of her friends at 
a beautifully appointed birthday 
reception. The house was pret- 
tily decorated ; the color scheme 
was pink and white. During the 
afternoon and evening more than 
a hundred ladies were received; 
and served to dainty refreshments. 
Those in attendance with Mrs. 
Fingers on this occasion were : 
Mrs. F. J. Johnson, Mrs. M! Stet- 
son, Mrs Hall, Mrs C. Allen, Mrs. 
J. Williams,- and Mrs. E. Warner. 

Those who were in attendance 
at the affair pronounced it one of 
the prettiest booked by society 
this season, and were loud in their 
praise of Mrs. l^'ingers as hostess 

Mrs Fingers entertained the six 
ladies whg helped her to receive 
at her birthday anniversaty last 
Sunday at a dinner party Sunday 
afternoon. 


GOV. ST. JOHN OF KANSAS 


Please? Large Ckdored Audience 
— Great Meeting Under Aus- 
pices of the Kansas- 
Missouri Club 


The Kansas-Missouri Qub 
again showed its usefulness to the 
community by holding a .great 
meeting on last Sunday in honor 
of ex-Governor St. John of that 
state. ; ^ 

The large auditorium <^ Wes- 
ley Chapel was filled to hear the 
distinguished visitor who for two 
terms presided over the destiny of 
the ^eat stater of Kansas. 

A special ' program v»s rep- 
dered. J. B* Bass was chairman, 
of the st^me and the great audi- 
ence seemed pleased with the ex- 
ercises of the afternoon and Gov, 
St. John received an ovation fren> 
the great audience. His address^, 
pleased them immen^ly itnd those 
who were so fortunate to attend 
will for many days cherish the 
memory ofJthis great occasion. 


Every 4»)r & tiM week yoo can 
satisfy your appetite and qoentit 
Xpor tbirat at tb« Cozy Den 


^r,#T 


Central 


£hd Millimry-SetO 
Central Ava. 



Owing to assail expense' eaji sell 
op to date n^iliBer^ at less than 
one half yon paj in down-tows 
stores. Lovely display on hand. 
Oar fare refunded. Remodelhig a i 
epeeialty. Trimming free of charge ' 


been helped 
churches and 
Pedigrew, Linoo! 
gregatiob cbarc 
Bapt. Dr. F. 
ley Chapel 
icOoy, 
THi 


K, 


ill. 


rzio 


the following 

tors: Dr. J. D. 

Memorial Con- 

f20a; Shiioh 

ite,$2.00, Wes- 

2.76; Dr. J. LJ 

Bapt, $5.65; Dr. J 

n Bapt., $».^i^r 


cured . permanent headquartets 

and will meet henceforth at Odd 

Fellows' hall, iiomer Wall and 

gth street, ia the banquet room 

on tbe first and ti^ird Sitttrday 

evening at 8 o'clockshaip. 

AH who have been residents of 

Los Angeles for *2S yearsi or 

longer are invited^tio come; out 

and join. »■ , '■ i 

l#rs. Elliza Warner* Pr««,,[ 

Mrs. E. Baker, Sei*, V K-V-^ 
'. ,-■ . _ _" ■.•■•.--(;■ 


'A 


"Say. BiU, 
healthy." 


you're looking 


'' y®]*t>'*?^ •"! P«f » »econd band Pti^Utt«,#»^ mt Eo9t9 

,,-:-;^;f^;\>*-;V: -;' Fornisbings call on- , ,■.%.-*' :.; 

J. M^YBRS, 3808-3810 Central A^ 

He has just bought the entirW stock's bdrtore of H. H. Tbrelkeld 
^nd hu some big bargains to of!e^- He will also do your moving, fix 
BtocM and J^ornrture^j hisol Thanks or do any old thing yon waoi 
,bin''tQ and- VF ''*■■' *^.iir/ M ■'■'". ' ■ '^ -'" ', J' - 

_^' 9«va Yotti 8onK» Monay 

Opsfi eveniDgi; Phone Sea* 4JM , ,, 

v.\.^ -i: famJtara Exchanged' ':i^kX^',#A^ri.5-r: 


LEGAL ADVICE 


By "Counsel' 


COLl^MN 


■r-*- 


w. 


es, Metropolitan ? 
)4.50; iev. A. Lively, First 
Venice, lia.70; Rev. A. P. 
Ramsey, Second Bapt. Long Beaoh, 
$13.70, Providence Church truly 
thanks bisr irienda for their help. 



Fran] 


itViWillisThe Eagle 
?pl^date For The 
Vi^uperjor Court* . ' 4 

: • M ' "v ., —- ■ '" ^ 

\WE$T END NEWS. 


Mrs. ^f^w: Whitley g»v« a party 
for her Sunday school class in bon. 
or Miss Besoie Greggs at beri resi- 
dent 3660 Halldale avenue Sat- 
urday, the 24th, aD of brer class 
were present as well as their 
mothers. Mrs. Whitley has been 
a teacher in the A. M. E. Sunday 
fchool 4or sixteen years and sbis 
can count many boys and girls?sbe 
has taught in this time, some has 
grown to man and womanhood 
who still regard hito as tfamr teach- 
er. Her happiest moments is when 
she is with the children. She is' 
tbe oldest teacher in point of, ser- 
vioe in the A. M. B. church at 
Eighth and Towns' streets. 


OTTB YEOAL DEPABTMENT 
A NEW FEATUBE 

The Calif oi|iia Eagle is always 
anxious to assist those in trouble. 
Many people are being defrauded 
ot their rights because of their igT 
norance of the law and it is for 
this reason that the "California 
Eagle has retained a well known 
Los' Angeles attorney to edit a 
"Legal Advice Column." Any, 
question that a reader may desire 
tp ask will be tmswered through 
our Legal A^dvice Column. No 
name or address will be disclosed. 
Each eommunication -will be con- 
sidered confidebtial. Have you a 
legal trouble T If so, state the 
facts, give your name and address, 
mail it to the California Eaglet 
and w^ch' tbe next issue. Do not 
fear publicity. No one will know 
$t your communication, except our 
liegal ad-viser. 

A party desires to know whether 
or not he can use the name of the 
person frpm when he has parchas- 
eq a business. He says that be 
purchased the stock, lease and good 
will of tbe businese. 

Thq fact that you purchased the 
good will does not give you the 
eight to use the name of the person 
from whou; it was scqoired. Sec- 
tion (J»92) of tbe Civil Q>dB ;0f 
Oalifornia, explains tuis tuUy-r The 
good will of a'business i« property 
transferrable like any ot 
the person transf^ring it m*5^ri 
fer wiih it the right of i^ingt|w 
name under which thi bopAesb jH 
cobdocted . A ik 

A reader desbes to knof . wfac^er' 
bj^slfable for a^romi|^tt^^;DOb^ 
* :wiifch'he signed ae BecarilyTbrthe 
jpayment of a gambling ddbt. 

Tou are not liable. ASt^qpu|ti8i 
will not enferce the pay^aent 
gambling debt, because it is agMilst 
pnblic policy. , '; .fr .v! 
An apartment house kMper 
sires to know whether or '^not sli^ 
can attach tbe goods of a pi^rty 
who is back in ber rent. 

No, yon cannot. , This right to 
attach is given to l]k>arding, booses, 
hot not to tb« apartment house 
keepers. This is a moat nn just 
law, and tbe apartment house peo- 
l^le are now endeavoring U> remedy 

it.. , ■ ■ ;- ?". ■ i " 



Since Alay Igt 

' I am located at j.^ ■' 
814 CENTRAL AVENUE 


<.'i«S 


Reduction in Sutniner Styles 

! Jn TISEBU, Titel Tailor 

OW address 816 CEiJTRAL AVE. LOS ANGELES CAL 
Where I will be glad to meet my jmany friends old and new 


chux 


ICX CBXAM SOFT DBUIKB 

|TI« KANSAS. mSSOUM, OATS 

if ] 403 £aSt.Yinth 

The Best Home Cooking Meals 15 Cts and up 

MRS. R. H. TODD. Prop. 


R. B. YOUNG & SON Architects 

. 702 LANKERSHIM BUILDING 

PHONR, MAHf 4149 


The m,embers of the A. ^.. B. 
obnrob of Eighth and Town* aven. 
ue, living in the West end met at 
the residence of Mrs St. P- Hookers 
Wednesday evening 
and perfected an oYganisation of 
mtomeberB living ia the district, 
their motto is "Bvery Member for 
Bvery Member." They Jbave ,a 
meinber in every block their doty 
is to find oat who are members of 
the A. M. S. church, whether 
strangers or not, and in ^is way 
they hope to bring'tbemselvef in a 
morjt closte unify for good, the 
woid good 0over9.aVery thing. This 
is onie of tb» greatest movements 
ever saw amoog the polored people 
What disttjot will be n«xt tO;^«r- 
ganize, not pnly the Methodist of 
A. M. E. o^orofa, but every denom- 
id((^n| sfadald'ImVe^ jnst such an 
tirganisation, 'ntft until then wi]} 
th^obtiilehjbe in a position to strike 
at f bat great evil that is abroaft in 



Cfr-'feMU^olc^Bottled In Bond 
t^^^W% K»ntocky WhUky 

td- ^ * Afollqnartonlj 



'^{ 


Other qoeations have been asked 
but tboy -arrived too late for this 
iseae. They will be answered next 
week.,- ' A ' 


; 


The Westside Punbar Literary 
Society held their meeting as us- 

ual last Tuesday evening. The 

Ooto^~21 c'c<^*'°°- of 'officers took place in 
which tbe same, officers were r^ 
elected. The program was splen- 
did and the church was crowded. 

Next Mt)nday night, the society 
is to defend its honors in ^ debate 
against Wesley^ Chap>el. The 
question is, cResolved, That the 
eight hour law sliould be adopted- 
and' added to thie constitution of 
California. Mr. J. Josephs and 
Mr. Beavers of the Dunbar So<H- 
ety will uphold tiie negative; th'e 
debaters of Wesley have not bee^ 
announced as yet. 



residence df^Hrs- SlappT'sba itbh 
day 36- Hext meeting will be at 
tbe (eeidedoe of Mrs. Dbannie An- 
derson on l^ormandie street. Rev. 
and Mrs. f Greggs was present to 
viftribemjBuccMS. Tin name of 
^^xik iit£» West Side Wiliing 
irkers: ■ " ; 


the land Baking whom it can 4e>«. 

voir* Laiit mwetiag was at the! The Pico Heig"'i4s Social Club 


The Dreamland Rink is si 
a lot of side attractions now andj 
the people are having bunches 
of enjoyment there. ' 'V\Sien one is 
feeling blu«, gi^ to the rink and 
^1 of the glooin will vanish.: 
l^eiy Tuesday night all-star rac- 
ingN^ednesday night, ladies free. 
Satum^y n^t, boxing bouts on 
skates.-'-'T*-- 


was entertained v^ifc elaborately 
at the beautiful hon\of Mrs. |, 
P. George on EUendale^eet. An 
elegant' three course h%h virjta 
servied. Some of the di^i?l|uishe(r 
guests were Mrs. Peterraiijjfcf the 
W. C T. U., wha spoke c\n |rohj- 
bitioo; and Atty. toiws S|k3<e in 
jbehallof Mr. Ford, _ who i^> be 
our next drstricrattoroejfi 

- IL 


Main 7698 



LOS augklb 


Home 409 


A. X ROBERTS, SIR & CO. 

Funeral Directors and Embalmers 

Funeral Parlors — > ...'...... 


; !*■ 


Twelfth and Los Angjsles 


L^dy Attendant 

streets 



COME TO THE 

Where You j6at#ie Best Senftice in .*; 



M' 


i^ 


i^<m^ House Wine and Lii 
•If 0|)po8ite New CityjMarket 


1905 BullcWhiakw 
E _ AfairOuart.- 


-90c, T*. Our Old 
60c " sii, I Sweet Winea 


912 S. San Pedro Sit < 


'3^ 


■^ 


Itain 4953 F 4154 


Staple 


O. J^ KR 

•akd I fancy k i^Qupceries 
ProYisioiis 

1401 F Street - - - Tel. 171? .~ 

Our goods gjuMranteed. 


i' .Ti'^4 


1M»<' 


Before buying your Wood. Ck>al. Blocks or Feed get our iHieeam 
KRUEGER'S. We «r« offerimr a spedal opportunity f» , 


FRESN 


ii 


saving znoqev 


CAUFORNIA 


THE MT.ZION BAPTIST CHURett 

Located on St^thenson^yenBe, just Sootti of Third St. • f- 


..^ 


ii ». . k.r-.'>ftl 



A AainChurehfora Piain Raopla. 

Tlw plaee where the old goqiel is preadied in the <rfd way, and Zion's 
songs axejTOiiC by eoostcrated men and women who represent the beet mosical 
talent in our dty. On each Lord's Day, tnoming and evening, a well attended 
and fOROJM servkels hel^ 

Hm PastOT, J. T. Bui, styles himself the "People's Pnaeher." His in- 
Itdleetaal aehMVeanats,' experience and old fashioned motiier wit, makes him 
'easily the^cboiee Of the people, in ghrmg ^vice and eoaadi peenljar to lus offieei 
The ebtir ci^SO voteea jptmrarted i^ a mall .forchaatiaJ tdns rank aaaong the 
best iBuonr city. To Bwnnon the , name of Minnie Albrititoo, BlaBnhtry, Q 
MofW and Archie J. WilUaais^ easQy explains the why. Ow ebnreh is the 
Sugest in the Wast among negiobaptuts. 


F. H. CRUMLBY 


I 


NOTARY PI 
REAL EST41 
FIRE D 


'T96 Sao Pe^Street 


MUTILATED PAGF CANNOT BE IMPROVFn 


mi 


uuLMV news 




H0M£ l^fiS f^ATUKES G/^E 


Tb« City Gn»rd band, tb«f««tioD< 
lal Cil^ bsnd, th« SMt8»a Di«go| 
fibfkna, tb* Sscoiidido ImihI And th«l 

Af7b«Americen band irtU fiupbb' 


•i>4 


h'-m 


[j^^^- 


i> Batlirt 


J«lintOR #<incc 


,im 


%. 


Tb« ^sM bfll igaYne between the 
1 'lOnUawa and Qepbie's Euccbrea at 
;;<'t6faD ^ark, Sunday, turnwJ out 
rW Iwaslng' fe^t «itb the latter 
having the beet of it by a scace of 
}7 to 8. Willief Simpsoo. tbe atar 
•pit-6«U,artiat bad his band rip- 
ped opeiD wUhjafoal ball vbich 
forced bipi to nitin from the game. 
r<^lile pWdr, ihe brilliant abort 
etop, wenf behind tbe bat«nd play- 
ing tinea waa phenonQMial. Caafa 
Buras ioade foot bits in as inany 
timee ap to batj Artliar Cetbow 
and Ctande Johnaon were {he 
heavy hitters of the day, both se- 
oaring a home run. The fiombte 
Bees' will m««t tbe Qechi's Bochrea 

^ next Sanday. 

The etandiog is ae followa: 
p. w. L. 
Bomble Bees...... 4 3 1 

Oeebia Easbia 4 3 1 

All^tara J.... 2 I'l 

OtttiawB :.... 1 1 


p. 

750 
7oO 
600 
000 


SAN DIEGO LOCALS 




Coants and jatory of tbe Wic- 
nere of tbe poj^olarity contest will 
appear in nexti weak^ iaane. 


MiM Edith Badgett won tbo 
popolaritf ooQtest by 150 votee. 
Hm nearest rival waa Hias Corona 
' white. 


Mr. Cortis Miller 
Eilia by 25 votiea. 


beat Frank 


Get next 
acconnta. 


week'a paper for full 


fine not to exceed f 500, wbere an;^ 
employer of labor holds back 5t 
ref aaes to pay a man his wages for 
t period of five daye after tbe em- 
ptoyee bas qait bis j^b p| .lMe94if- 
charged. '■■ 'Ki;'^'' ^''-;^-?;' 

Tl:e regular order of iSbm -coarta 
proceeding in a case of this obar- 
acteri upon tbe eoiplbyel being 
fouud, guilty, wonld be for tbe 
court to asSess a fine. ^ This- fine 
when paid to the court #ould then 
be turned over to tbe oponty 
treasurer. }. ■ . •-?■,;, ■"". 

On assuming tbe jadgsbip, Judge 
Keating announced from hia 
bench. "Well, what good doea ttiis 
law do th* roan it was intended to 
help, if the employer is to bt fined 
and the fine turned over to the 
county," where doea the employee 
get oS at?" This is a good laW and 
I'll^nd a way to make it work." 

In aocordanoe with this an- 
nouncement Jndge Keating, on tbe 
first case of this ofaaraeter coming 
before him, found the , employer 
guilty of withholding wagee in tbe 
sum of ISO. Judge Keating an. 
nounced bis judgment as foUow^: 
"I fine you $30, but if yoa will 
pay this amount to the wage earn, 
ar you owe it to, I'll spspend your 
fine and let you go." "I want the 
wage earner to get bis pay and not 
the County Treasurer, and this is 
the way I have worked out to give 
real force and effect to this law." 

So it has been in all the oases 
of this charactsi coming before 
Judge Keating, and in nearly ayery' 
case the employer and the em- 
ployee leave Keating's court with 
gobd will towards each other and 
the highest praise lor the. Judge 
who makes tbe law serve its real 
purpose, and who in this manner 
gives to the parties real and sub- 


by Afre-Amefiean 
Counctil for Jud9« «f;8v(^ 
vy-vWw Court. -'■ *»- ,]j;;S>?f3 

^*y A^rney TiB. t Cosgrove U 
maKing a winning race for the Su- 
perior Court. He is gaining votes 
daily frem all classes. Hisiaredi- 
dacy gained iiapetos this 4Nek t^ 
the action of the Afro- American 
Oooncil giving . fiim tbeir endorse, 
ment. This insoree tor bim a mlid 
snpport from thti lar^e body, and 
the support which he is receiving 
from all sources makes bim look 
at this ^Bse as a sure winoei^ ' '"^ 


. The White Mice Juniors' Club 
was eolertained by Mr- Frank El- 
lis and Frank Cloud Thursday 
evening at the former's home. 


stantial justice. 


FREDERICKS 



'Republican Rally. Parad< aitd 
Meeting . 


'lAs 

their vacatioii 


Mr. Curtiel Miller, the (^pular 
San Diego young man, will leave 
Nov. 1st, for Oaklan^^, Cal. 


"The Disappointed Bride," a 
comedy drama, in three acts, will 
be staged in the near future by tbe 
Magnolia Club of Bethel A. M. E.^ Friday Night. October 30, 1914- 
Church,. Miss Ida Arnold playing! 7:30 to 8:30 

"Julia," tbe leading lady., while- « 

Mr. Geo. Kamsey will fill that of "nder the auspices of Republic- 
'•Mr. Adams," leading man. 0th- *" ^«'>»'*' Committee. 
ers in the cast are Miss Nona Jack- i Meeting: Majestic Theatre, 3rd 
eon. Miss Lucile Brown ^nd tbe I "'^ ^ ^'^^^^^ 8=^ P- °>- Speaker, 
Shannon Sisters. Also Mr. Mirlen , Ho"' Frank Short. 
White, Frank Clond and others, f pakade 

I Major Herbert R. Fay grand 

A committee of young men gave marshal. 

a whist and dknsanl party at So- H^^y p Qr^eae, chief of staff. 

.-Cialiet Hall, j Friday evening, in , ^jj^g. ^ ^ jjj,,^^ g <, g-^Hy^ 

l^bnor of Mr. end Mjrs. Davie of c„, Lundquist; John M- Ward, 

Angeles, who ure spending Ed. F. Pray, Frank Golden, Chaf- 

in the Exposition {^ grant, Joe Sefton, yirgil Brus- 

chi, Robt. H. Hamilton, W. 0. Al- 

len,' C. A. Bachman. 

DIVIBIOKS ■' 

Chief Iodine, Indian sdout, mount- 
ed police, J. Keno Wilson, chief; 
rural patrol, C. L.Copeiand. X>e' 
tector chief Payson's Indians. 
G. O. P. float. C. G. Selleck. 
1— ^Fredericks flambeau clubj J. 
Carl Schindler,inatshal Fred- 
ericks float,; BiQck P> Moss* 
bolder. ' / 

2 — Frdericks Broom Brigade, H. 
L. Wortbem, marshal. ' 

3 — Afro- American CouncU, T. 
H Williams, marshal.. '. 

4 — Women's Republican league, 
Mrs. Clara L. Baldwin, marshal, 

5^ Women's Fredericks' league, 
Mrs. Marie R. Johnson, marshal. 
6 — Republican jSAdidates, Lin- 
coln Cla^, mairsbai. 

7— Young Republican club, E. 
Davin. marsfaal. 

5 — Industrial and individual 
&okve, BATton i. Titna, matabaU 

^— San Diego o6antx,X{d;|^i(Bkie, 
mirahal. '■' 'iX,:-^'^' . 

10— Citizene in automobiles, 
'Hw^ P. Moasholder^4aar»haL 

'^rade tdfisu at 7:00 p. wk at 


(City Attorney) 
Nominee for' 


mtiaic lor tt>e {wriMie. 

■■■; • a >-j-^ ■'-). . i' 


EndorActf 


i-f 


■i:-' 


.1, 


H:^-^^'Am> 


COLORED VOTEItSi; 

Enthii>iasticaiiy Grc«t Editor of 
The Ea|lc 


Tfae last meeting of \%* CouneU 
at Socialist Hall in Sad Diego. Irst 
Tuesday evening, will go down in. 
history -u a memorable otae. After 
tbe routine of busineae bad been 
transacted, wbieh included '^e en- 
dorsemient of a ticket for the sop- 
p<«rt of iu members, J. B. Base, 
editor of Tbe Eagle, waa intro- 
duced Now Mr. Bass is no Grang- 
er to an audience of Gbn Disgoans. 
But on this occaaion; in an address 
of 45 minutea,tb« people evoked 
the greatest of enthustasm, and 
time after time ' the speaker was 
fraeced^ mtb <iMti»BiB^ *pp}jnu» 
and cheers, ss be spoke along tbe 
lineS' of racial progress and the 
principles of tbe Republican par- 
ty. The members of the Council 
expressed their great appreciation 
for bis efiort and" service. They are 
doing a good work, and if they 
make mistakes the writer believes 
it of tbe head* and not of tbe 
heart. 


Jad|^ SuperkK Court 

San Diego County. 


|te-elect 

JUOGC:^#pRb KEATING 

le good, '"' 


"^^ ibent) 

II CooaUble for 
To*p«Wp 



DOiiEll LA FORTUNE 

Candidate for Conrtable San|C 
Township 

Deputy uitfer Sheriff Jennings for 
I years. Ehfction Nov. 8, 1914. 


ARTHUR L. DORN 

Caadidate for Jostiee of the Beaea 
* 9an Diego TAwnahikt 

(RepabKcaa) 


SOLON BRYAN 

Repabliean ea n dWa t a 
Joatica o< the Peace Sac 
Towsahip 

P res en t Incumbent. San 


a H. COOLEY 

(laetnabent) 
Candidate for Coostabla San 
Tow^idiip. ' Rapablican. 


uUx Frank Ellis and Walter 
Vmpaon will furnish a bay ride 
ir members and friends of the 
'W^ite Mice 01 ub. 

ir-:r:'^ \ ' , ' 

It is rumored that John Danger, 
of the colored race, will visit San 
Diego iffiiie near futnre. 


Miss BjBrtha Fairfax, comely 
daughter of Mrs. Marshall, has re- 
tamed to ifae| Exposition City and 
expects to r^ain until after the 
fair, -ii.-.:* 


^ofe for A 


h. Dan. 


^*^. B-'Cosgiiove, City Attorney, 
F^omanee for Jodge Sdperior Court, 
V%'>iVm«.k» * wwttin^ taoe tor office,' 
ad we have '.every reason to be- 
lieve thaitte wMl be successful. 


[odga Kaatin^s friends sa> 
Tto aaaeriton that Judge Ksat- 
I la ft Itisad ei tbe wage earner 
^ ^ awde lor fotitlral pnrpoees, 
hi a« sMlMiebw) laet, a 
^^iikirtht Method ad 
la tta 
wageaT 
I W* Tta Inw Aal 
^wei^a^^fHe ny 


When a business nian or a cor- 
poration goes to select the head 
of a department in his business, 
he looks up that man's record, his 
business ability, whether he can 
and will rriake good from all 
angles. In Dr. Charles L. Good, 
who received the highest vote for 
Supervisor of the Fourth Super- 
visoral District, we have a man 
whose record will bear investiga- 
tion, and who is the man for the 
lace. Dr. Good has lived here in 
San Diego and vicinity forfour- 
een years. He has been one of 
our consistent boosters, in fact 
has done his part in making San 
Diego and back country grow. 

Any busines's man in San Diego 
who has been here any, length of 
time Wnows that he has kfen 
executive and business ability. 
He has always been a Repub- 
lican, and was in the San~ Diego 
City Council some years ago, 
)vhere he made an enViable record 
for himselfi so when it cqmes to 
November 3 he sure aind put an X 
after Dr. G4>odJs name, ; • 
y,-,^ » j;i Ai ^ - •• 

A For business 'in connection with 
this paper— in pass you cannot get 
in toucb^ 'iritb».,^ar office V call 
Broadway 4467 and your^, call will 
receive prompt attenti6n^ 


For Coroner. 

OR. OTTO MARSH 

TbeManoftbaHbur. 

A San Diego man lor a 

a San Diego office 

LEST&R 0. WELCH , 
Rep, Caoditfate fat 
Stito Senator. 

GEORGE BUTLER 

Rep. Candidate for 
County Surveyor 

HON. C. N. ANDREWS 

(Present incumbent) 

Candidate for Judge of Superior 
Court 



A VOTE FOR i 

^^ ROBEilT ttOUGHTO!| 

Republican Nominee for Snpervi8or,v^ourth iXitri 
Thirty Years' Experience in Constm 
Look Hiht U0. He Ip Rig 


Ssn Diego Conotr';, 
Work ! 


-■>;■ 


Hon. C. N< Andrews is the kind 
of man that we should all cast our 
vote for. He is fair, competent and 
unprejudiced, always ready to help 
in tbe uplifting of the race. Our 
San Diego correspondent appeals 
to all voters in the city and county 
to vote solid for Hon. C. N. An- 
drews, the qualified candidate. 


Ror Constabre 

MARIUS F, SOREHSEN 

If EfTiciency Counts those Da; 

Vote f<|r SOBENSEN 


He'll do it in 3 steps, 
3 of the other fellows' 


it would reqviio 
Ho Fume 


A Vote for Edwin Reed 

For Public Adtniitistr^or 


IN THESUPERIOFi 0OyRT 



^ GRANT CONR4 

I ', REPUBUCAN NOMINEE 

For Member of Assembly 79th District. Cal.. 


Resident of San Diego sine* 1902 Mayor of San 

ELECTION NOV. 3.' 1914 


VOTE ROR 

D. V. MAHON 

The Man who is qualified for the oQk 
"Hie Man who stands for clean goven 


ofSanDicio) 

( V UM to ini 


Means 


a Vote for 'Competency, .EMi- 
dencyand Integrity. 


EDWIN. REED 


Of the State of California In and 
for the County of Los An- 
;geies, ■■ 

Annahd Roudez plaintiff,- vs. Louise 
Roades,^ defendant. 

Action brought in the Snperior Court 
of tbe State of California,* in and for 
the County of Los Angeles and the 
coiaplaiht filed in sud County of Los 
Aneeles, /in the office at the CWlc of 
Baia Superior Court. ' 

The People of the SUte of Califor- 
nia send greetings to: Louise Boodes, 
defendant. 

.You are hereby diiipeted to appear 
and arswer' the compTafa<.t in ian action 
entitled ss above, bioueht agliiiuK yoa 
in tbe Superior Court ox the County of 
Los Anesles, State of . C^ifomia, witb- 
Vn ten da^ after .the leEvice on ^U of 
this ' Wunroods — if served witUn this 
eptmti; wiHtMn thirty days if served 

^ And yon are hereby" noUfi»iL|||&lR tin- 
less yon appear and answ«j>'>a above 
required the said plidntiff#- wiQ take 
hiacment for any moiM#or daataces 
demaaded in the eom pl s p il^ as arlsmg 
upon oontraet or »M plvntiff— will ap- 
fo(H of Broadway and l»t«rtrtJW^^^J«»a «»"**««< other rehefde- 


latieats extending ikeith a«d aoath 
noon 
> .Bteadl w»f fBenlh oo itb, 
rk«t, eeetk on ^ii, 
an C tw8(dj|AMa|s«. 




iivthe 
Oivea utidar my f/nd ud seal of the 
^pertor.Cevrt »fjH>e Cooii^ of Los 
' jAtd Sta«» of JCalifontla. this Sd 
af^UitNHbe f A. D.. UU. 

By t . Boaaa/toN. D«p^ Chrk. 

Ud'^Tos Anflb Cal 


i? 


QrXhas. Good 

.^HEPUBUCAN 
Cantfidate faf Superyieof 

W^ is indoned Igr tje CaWfornia 
Eagb^ and we appeal to «or people «f 
Saa Disc^ to sapptttt t Dr. GeoS la tte 
iaing else tio! 


JUST MATS 

GO. i GO. 

MAHR the 

1010 Fifth 


LIHLE ANC 




WE ALL GO, -> 

HA^IERI 

street, between C and D, ' ^Saa Disgp^ Cal 

So Agent San Dieflp Count 



J HEADS 




VOTE FOR 

D. V. MAHOIM^ 

a 

1. 

Nominee for District Attomli 

MY POUCY : 

EnforcenAnt of all laws, without discrtminatV 
' Courteous tr*atDient to all. 

Prompt and dil;ig;ent performance of duties in ai^bsal 
A hearty co-oper«tinn with tbe Jav#nilc Ooor S tmi 

youthful offenders from a downward oourve. and «« - ^~- *" 

fort to make good cilisens of tbeai. 

A square deal for ail, wnetber rieb «r poor, biaet 
An economic administration, avoidanoe of all ei 

tbe cutting down of all unaeoea^y expeesas. 
• ^ 


WILLIAM R. GUSH 


■,v- 


*^. 




Of rmhiwn and Ihri^t Lft«T««* 

Pro^essive and Democrotk 

rr FOR ASBEMBLYMAN. 79th CITY DI8T1 



AMtt. 


A Representative who will represent Reference: 
. Vote for him November S, regardlaas of par^. 


:L 'pt<o|^ In to S«e Me 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 


T 


I1S-S14 Bytno Boitdiiur 


4967 





Cal. 


n-f''1ti 


MUTILATED PAfiF 


CANNOT BE 


Oar Goods ire intMd Ab«oiatel; Port. jAtyoiar Gzocen 
Retell focfSSe bq^*. foiptrvvd Export; Giiwer Al* ^^ 

all flavors, fioc ter ' vj T « .,; , 

Geo,. H6u^;*Jons|f ^t^'s^pf :':| 


J 


Manoffcta^ 


fl 


1441 eu^Ninth 







:« 






MOWII S KITCHEN CAPE 

THEm IJM:e IJIIOWN toIAt 


^It 


;^- 


4i^ 


LM B((«}M.'Cal. 


♦ .,■■» 


■-^^- 


L I Pprsons 

iU^dOE DRUG STORE 

-^W I TPIL^ ARTICLES 1^ 

if|T»l F^nly Realities . Preseriptioos a specialty 

. ^h and Central Avenue, 

W. H GME5T, F*.p. 



^ 

t 

K 

'i '. 

. 

¥^ 

■/y 

st^ 


^ 

;' 

l< 

s 

St 

ail 

^ 

V 

€^ 

f 

r- 

I 

Wi.- 

*.* 


t RUG GIST 


tionery 


fiuiliiaii a ot^i laiiu 


DISTRieiirrORS 


Grocejrs and frqcliic ^ 
fidl) ij^stanraiit Supplies 


m 


-MidSmi] 


■■^W^-|-»^8«l-. G$L 


In RmI Brauei that is listed with as from time to time Over 
.Tea Tew* oil e^ffNerienpe vjnth an acquaintance ^|th agents and 
owners eabs^ inc; to know the location atia values of both dtr ; 
axtd ooantry jproperty. Absolotelv no misrepresentetion— ^boold > 
jfta visb t»bar come in and talk it over; if -i have sot what J 
atills you, or witJjiB your means I \fjll try and pret it for you— ; 
Thr(H^phn«jroa{fcaBmMttfae owner— small pajm^tf accepted. 

■jVUl^iS W, LEWIS 

Sole Affent^|Mn^«i3»rt. Main S^net 3938 Res South 45 

49 Birtli St ;^* : 'c-tfc ■ Lcs ASgeles; California. 

— 'A-i"", M^'-' ■ rr ' — : 

NEWancf^OND ff AND tl|feviTURE 

PRICES AI^M^AlYS pair A!4 Ht^NEST 

2606 CEI4TRAL AVENU$ .* , LOS ANOELES; C^t. 


% 


Notions and toilet Articles 


\M and G«ptrat Av«||U« 


:< 


■ ' I I J l III . ' * I » ' 

trtrrhody ha* a Hobby-Cur Hobby U room*-^ 50c broom for 35c Dalhrerwl 
4l^^ya WeJtome Whether Looking or Buying 

j Brodine-lBerg: Furfflture Co. 

■ i 1-7*' i ■ ■ ^i- ." '" " - - ^ ■ 

I _*' :j ! ■ T« mple Street at B^i^nt 

m^??i?*** aay Pamiture :»U vnd pea as. or if you wat to sell your fomitar 
We wQ^eaU and aeeToo. Don't eaUua Down, call as Up-Wil«hirs 3417 


SEE OLD SANTA 

F. L PARK'S 



-u 


* ' "^01 CENTf^AL AV t L- 

Qreatest Variety of Holiday Season 
ladta Combs. Tottd Sats, Manicuring Sets, Pockat^ Cases. An 

, ' Glass NovclUes, Initial Stationery ^ 

At/. L PARK'S Al^UYS A BAfMiAiN 

Post Office in Connecion , 


rEED 


FUEL 




B.PMtit & Sons^ 


-.•■ MCA; 

Wilshire 346*..^ '' 


*t-' 


,^^^Mm^ 



H GROCERY / 

|t ay Yigstabiis. Fresh MHts 

J Np. 1654 Temple 
Residence Main 439 

A. \NHlfk 


Cepainnjr. Herscshoetng 
Vvopd Work 

Los Angel 8 


LL'^PHARMACV 

, Jefferson and Normandie.) 

tfOiis a Specialty 

V ICE CREAM , CANDT 


^itej^g; Market at 
Q^ton^ Ave. 



'C^i^or 1 



'?^ ^ 


I^E. Afer^ Ave. is a good place to trade. 

4612, artd' rhey 'teiltmerid your two-wheel horse at 
Jeffrie^jift. 2. ; harCware dealers, Pencille-Miller; hbld- 
" ']tod Ktori fc^Soii^at 4528 Coni^jton Ave. 

aJlBi^^ a Central Ave., the ofd reliafile grocer. 
' - ^ simit a? new af 2023 Ceitral Ave. 
B[rQs„,at M g&tral Ave, has the family mark con- 

Tl^ BRO^ 3Q ip. Vetnon Ave., is oh the feed and' 
Vfbm Beauty ai ; 

It iis always holid lAY DEPARTMENT STORE 
gather each commerc ^venience Mingles With Economy 
the Jwggestions for ec( i the Broadway. The great crowds that 
I; whidi make it look lil lay of the year at this store along with 
f the traely idea of the 1 lical housekeeping are- some of the things 
''at this great store, foi holiday all tjie year roand, and advances 
too rkh to be served ., "Don't Worry!" The result is you meet 
same cpoTteons treatr tbcj people; ^pr none comes too poor nor 
At the Rroadwaj fevety counter afld department vi-ith that 
jrou want. Even fant tfaait pervades over a^l. ' , 

that is lo^jnd in <ew <j re Js little or no trouble in finding what 
4 New Yorkers find here that convenience 

"JTiB new Hfll str department stores in the city. 
"Toyland" is not^tt latest Concession j 

'^iaddittoa ior it^H^^raince at ^e Broadiyay, where children's 
ildMn thnMm^ Saluable concession but a very convenient 
I ^wsavesj Able a^id tjine. Parents may take thei: 
'" Jrwithotit Iving the enconnt^of hauling them 'up- 
n-owd. i"B nejv anifex al^ contains one of the most 
1, glassw*e|i4 kitchen titensij department in the city. 
Hhts 'fee*! iflRie ^an^gers of the several departments, 
^e'pt to c !; ■. have jqined hands in selecting a most 
"■' of'hol la gifts. .- . . .'• ■ I - .■: ;.'•/ : ,.' ■ 

\t; .' ■ -I BI^S- AND JTRAHK ■, -^ [ •' -K '. ^ ^' •' ' •;' ' 
Jig the kac fi n eSMe and artistic furnishings in ladies' 
r w§re I^l b ; F^swc^ rank pre-eminent. Becaose ol its 
n-s in t>usifl|B< his firdt is ont pf the most reliable in the 


BASE BALL FREE! 


Bai 


li;:: ;, _■ 

theiil b 
fe 3h$st4 


be be 
aber ofj 
rday 


visit New York three times a year.TMnce 
tk l^^ttst cuifi sbides aad French touches. 
btg^ini vffiKT of' things. ^ -' ; j . 

aPlMntt«t» SlloA "t TWs Stork^Mt^^^^--- . 
of tfif'geateel and kindly treatment Xcrarcted 
grcM tbrong that crowd this ito|« 'nrery 
yean ^' ■;.-'" '* . ■ ■ ■ ■ ""'- " *rr ' - 
s tacM stlpU<9-<^ ^* ^ ** <^e of those big> 
Hi ^m#I^O«>«h his face.' ,, 

leci^tts !lw<^^b«ea csrefol^ made and y<|;^ 
at Harris & Fraidc before yon deddie. ^ 

^-11 


li, 


A1(^ach Jr. Rubber CeiMer. Horsehide Coyered Base 
_" Wjth each ^^.OO P«n;hase or over 

< iRISH MA1|. HANDCARS H0O«nd |4S0 ^ 

Safety Razors ... .: $1.00 to 1900 

Rash Lialns .3 1.00 to 3.00 

Pocket Knives 25c to 10.00 

Target :'t$ 1.50 to 3.00 

Air RIflo......: 85 to 3.00 

Roller Skates r .75 to 4-00 

Punching B<gs L50to8.00 

Badlct Balls.. 2.00to8.00 

' Base Ms........... 25 to 1.25 

Teiinw Raeketi ..,. \. I.00to8.00 

Sweaters j:L ..,;;..,.. i^. 5.00 to 12.00 

Autoinbbile Robes 6.00 to ia25 

F^shot^ Tackle, Kodaks, Cwing Sets, Tennis Pennants; j 
Huntihg Boot), Baseball Cap»,Cetlege Pillows ,' 
Palmetto Lawn tenti 

WM. HQBOflE: col INC. V 

.' . ISS-^-'a SOOTH MAIN STREET ' - .« 

>»iise»> » »eit» M e>»a»e>s< n »<»»» 


->;■ 


AUHH ueuveieu lu me^Rna 

Baptist B. Y- P. U J- 
By Myrtle AndeisOn. 

- Theer are inner beauties of the 
souT, hidden resources of nature 
and silent' inffu^nces that remain 
unnoticed, sajve iA their effects. 
Bnt there is a (piality or elemeat 
of human character which always 
demands and receives attention. 
That quality is courage. Some 
say that this quality is inherited, 
others that it is acquired. It'dis-' 
plays itself in many directions, 
But it may be arranged under 
thcee heads, i, e ' 

and mental. 

Physical courage is that power 
or determination which enables uf r 
to face the camion's, mputh or any 
coolness, j - 

I Moral courage maj^ be briefly 
, defined as that quality of affection 
■atid conscience which enables us 
Vto boldly declare the' truth under 
all circumstances; to k«p~Tour 
I selves Unspotted from ^he world, 
! Snd to die, if necessar^/^s marr 
l^tyrs for whit is conceived to be 
some grand truth or underlying 
principle,, - v^'l 

V Cental coiii-age enabletf one to 
imderC|Jce a great enterprise aM 
to carry into actipA any concep- 
tion of mind. , 

.Given this quality, courage, a 
man niay hftye his heist's desire. 
Stumbjing blocks disappear from 
his path like the frost from the 
window pane befpre the morning 
isun. Do not leaveopen any road 
for retreat, when once the on- 
ward march has begun. Bum the 
bridges behind you. In the busi- 
ness of life, the way to fail is to 
think what you undertake is im- 
possible of accomplishment. 
Lhiked with courage is persever- 
ence. If we are cdurageous we 
will not give up any task until it 
is accomplished. 

There are men in every com^ 
munity who arc entitled to repu 
tations for heroism. If they un- 
dertake any work or contract, 
their neighl)ors know it wiU\be 
brought to a perfect condusibp 
These men are living monuments 
not to a dead past. They are held 
up as examples to a rising gen 
cratiop. They become models for 
imitation, and many who in their 
after lives attain to greatness and 
succej?, trace their first incentives 
for the higher and brbader life| 
to such resources. They aspire 
to be to the young of thei,r geni 
eration, what these men have 
been to them. The good that we 
do lives after us, and is not in- 
terred with our bones. ( 

What though we do ' sometimes^ 
stumble and 'f?ll ; courage will set 
us on our feet again and strength- 
en our hearts for the performance 
of greater efforts. What though 
our B. Y. P. U. does sometimes 
seem to be making slow progress ; 
courage will set us on our feet 
and strengthen our hearts and 
g^ive us new zeal to press forward 
and hold high our banner. Life 
is not a level plain, but is a suc- 
cession of hills and valleys. They 
risebefore us on every hand-, and 
in. all matters of existence — in 
love, ambition, wealth, success or 
power; they are here, there — 
everjTwhpre. Look abojut you and 
see who it is that succeeds. Not 
the timid pnes who succumb to 
the first shadow which falls ath- 
wart t|ieir path ; not the man who 
gives up at the first trial, but to 
him who endureth unto the end. 
If ypu lack perseverence, have 
determination to^ cultivate it. If 
you lack money, have pluck to 
earn it. If you lack credit, be 
hqrif st and show people that y 
deserve their confidence. 

,If you are without a position, 
don't be afraid, to beg^ at the 
bdftbm of the ladder ^d work 


giibs-^*raminenr^V i»Iiots ' 
And Loctf News. 

By Joe J. Anderaoa 


DHQKnTORY FOR OUR 

entRrtainers 


:vri 



i . 


"Casino Sejrtette" —Jackson 
brothers, Ross, Gray, Black and 
Bryant are at the Casino Cafe. 

Tuxedo Five— Powers, Robin- 
son, Hicks, Richie and Stewart 
at Fairmount i i 

Orient Trio— Paynje, Wilson 
physical, moral and Ikmaldson at Murrays Cafe. 
At Lester Social Club — Mr. and 
Mrs. Morgan Prince. ; 

M. & M. Pour— Harris broth- 
ers, Deiiny and Banks at M. & M. 
Cafe, would like to hear from 
Geo. Johnson, Geo. Wolfson, J. 
C;sMcDonald and R. B. Johnson. 
Two Aces — Compton and Jpy- 
ner at St. Ffancis Qub, which naa 
been remodeled, where Bob -pj 
Brown and Thomas Foster coo-~ :|j| 
tinue to make things pleasant for ' " 
their patrons. 

ComjJton and Joyner would 
like to hear fro mWilson brothers. 

Leprotti. Davis, Mitchell and , . , 
Miss Nettie Compton still have ,l:;^>^-^^jl 
that inexhaustible remedy for th^ - «- 
blues at the new Elite Cafe. 

AndersPn & Johnson at the 
Workingmen's Club, tyhere the 
manager, L. V. ^aye, also con- 
ducts an employment bureau. ^ 
All, unemployed members kindly 
leave their names \\^th the Stew- 
art!, R, M. Wheeler.* 

In connection, the Misses Law- 
son and Taylor are serving the 
best meals in the city it jpopular , 
prices. 

Papa Spikes, Arthur- Bell at 
Railroad Boys' Clubj 

Henrv Hastings at the Bata-, 
croft Cafe and Hotel continues to .. 
please his many friends with 
songs and cordial manner. 

Ernest Burr arid Gillie Richarrfjf • 
»i)n are still at the Orient Cafe 
and Hotel, where they continue 
to please their many patrons. 

SPARKS FROM THE RAIL 

Winton's Spicy Gossio of Men 

\and Events in the Railroad 

By John R; Wmton 


The California Eagle, a race pa- 
oer of Los Anpeles. has a writer 
by the name of Sol Wortz of the 
Salt Lake Line, who is very much 
interested in the porters and wait- 
ers. He seems to leave the chefs 
out. Anyway, the writer wishes 
him success wim his colutan. 
Mr. Wortz speaks \>^ higUy^cff 
the men. ^ y.lL 


^'t 


^^y 



«^ .<v>i *» nj t . tb »i^* .kul^Wt AA« 


ALEXANDRIA ROOMING HOUSE 

: UMDBK^ilEWllANAGEafENT > 

At 768 WALL Street " 

Ei^Mit^y RHrnlrhed Room iMtween Maple and San f edre Css Itee 
with Mot 9x«cl(;;pl<S Bs^K ALBBRT PQIRT, M«ni««r. 


B. L. WILLIAMS, 

POOL AND BILLIARDS 
Porters' aii4|Waiters'_ Resort 

430 Caitral Ave. 


Sol Wti^ 

WAITERS AND WM 
Sol Wdfts 


iRTBRS 











.■■.-<■ 


up. 


1^ 


{ WESLEY CHAPEl, NOTES 


RIN 


-.;-.?• 



ieRiHi Plff^^lp^ 


nd'Rol^ f vet.;ni!Ji} fiarQqa(^tli| ill a^j 3^^i 
ENK^tntTi^ Article wa4tB- 
ReciAtered PhanaaeiiiJt wiirilispensa ij^- Preaerini 



0. 




.F-' 


All kinds of PouK 

bbiW G«««. Squabs, '^k^ya and Eggs. Pc 
' ^beased to Order. He^et's Market 

- ^ ^a AngetNi I 


Wesley Chapel is iitf the midst) 
of a great revival. Sister Dollie 
^e#is, wfjo has d6n^ such a von-; 
«terfp* work in Californtj^ is 
p<«|(lbiiig as: neyer before.. All 
dep|^rtp»cnts of the 'church are __ 
J^dc|[i«H^ neir life, Sunday is be- \ p,' 
ing ioofeed forward to with great 
interest. The great congr«igation 
is eiq)ec(ipf;! a great spiritual 

•-^5€.;:\.;-,:;;J ' ■ - , . "^ 

■ Wiliiiin^eoi days the Pekin the- 

atci,; a $10,000 building, willbe 

erected at Ninth and Central The 

iouse will furnish the bestjn high 

vaudeville and mOvbig pio-Ibej 
« ander the direction of P^ E^^j 
endersQn. 


\ 
ifrqf. Booker T. Washi^gto^ 
will pass three weeks in Southern 
lifomift, arriving on or a^ut 
March 7. He will speak in t^ 
First Congregational church 
Los Angeles on Sunday mpmingj 
•March 8, and at large mass meet- 
' ing the same aft^ooa in the in- 
terest of t^ cijl^p^. M. a 
Tuesday flight. Match l(Wi wffl 
be bis first address in Pasad 
under the auspices of ThroOp 
ture Course. Thursday night, 
12th. he will be the guest of honor 
and principal sp«A|er at the baa- 
fluet of Ae^t* YJ M. C A. con- ^ 
vention.to be heSd at tke Hotel 
Virmnia at Long Beach, Satnt- 
dayiS^ 14th, he wiU spend frift 
' lent Blaisdell at aaremont, 

speaaing to the Pomona college 
sSJnts and' others. President 
TfewTbf Ocddenital, who has 
char^ of Dr. Washington's itia- 
etmry'and program whSeiftScnA- 
eip California, has ia number <>f in- 
viUtions IbtDr. Washingt(a^i>«d 
is now arrangiftg the complettd''^ 
program. _Dt. Washingtofa wlli 





Raer% guest -whil^in 
.jCaltfomia, at Pa 
st Molan<l Plac^. 


MUTILATED PAGE I CANNOT BE 



LOCAL NEWS 


NJ, 


Mrs. Matthews, who has been 
here some weeks on a visit with 
her sons, left Tuesday *or her 
hoine in the southland vta Chi- 

Mrs. L. BtoSes aiW Miss E. 
Roberts, who have been visiting 
Mrs. E. W. Venters of Bakets- 
field, have returned to thei? homes 
and f eport a deBgbtf «1 trip 


f-^-:. 
y.:^ 




> 


Mr. H.. Shannon of San Fran- 
cisco is on a business trip to tjw 
city. He is stopping. at 912 E. 
12th street 


ir^: 


■A 


Miss C. A. S^ear, managing ed- 
itor of this journal, contmnes to 
be on the sick list. « . \ i 

• — ■ ~"n — -\' 

Mr. Sol Wprtz, our railroadYe- 
porter, is jin Long Beach this 
week re^ng up. \ 

J. B. Base after a six wee|c's trip 
in Northern California has re- 
turned to his home in this city, 




The Get Acquainted Qub met 
last Friday; evening at the resi- 
dence of Riv. A. C. Williams of 
1470 W. 36th ?lace. 


Dr. C. H, Duval will leave Sat- 
urday for Independence, Cal. 


>-^ 





.•4- 


^^ The colored Workingmen's 
Club is a new social organization 
'■ on East 9th street. 

■ ' There was a political meeting 
I held at Scott's hall ' on Central 
iAve. Friday evening. . >s. 


Wallace and Sons, who conduct 
the retail meat market at 1206 
Central avenue, appreciate then- 
large custom from our people and 
i- strive at all times to merit the 
> same by keeping the best on the 
' market a^t reasonable prices. 

' . The stori visited the home of 

Mr. and Mrs. Hezekiah Johnson, 

Af -1662 Lot;g Beach avenue, on 

^ftn*i 21st inst., and left a 9-pound 

■^ hojJ. I .:,■', ■ « ,■ . -r 

i' A"--. j^ ■-.--■ 

"Mrs. Kattie Morrison, *ho was 
1- caHed" to San Antonio, Texas, to 
the funeral of her sister, returned 
on the 28th inst. 



The exceptive board of the.Na- 
tional Industrial and/ Orpjoians 
School met at the residence of 
Mrs. Spiller Alexander "thursday 
evening. 

Dr.'.C. H. Duvall returned fwjm 
Lanfalr and surrotnuEng coimU:y^ 
this week. ^~. y- ^'_-' '^':' ' ' 'jl- /-: 

Mrs. R. H. Todd of Hemlpek 
stre^ is bff Uie sick list. '■' 

The Missoori and. Kansas Qub 
wili iheet at the residence of Mrs. 
Botts at 1432 W. 36th street next 
Tuesday evening. . i 

The Pewie Whist Ghafb juet -a* 
the residence of 5$rs: Cal. Brant- 
ley on East 18th atr^ecft, Jhursday 

evenijE|^< ' ""■-" '.J^'lVi^;-.'"'-- -;. ,\""4"- 
Kid Ashford is no(w wi^ ^e 
Quick Service Laundry and saiys 
save your duds until he calls. 

I iTie.Sons and Daughteti pf 
'Africa gave their first -banquet at 
the Odd FeUows Jitfli;^Triday 
evening. " "^^*%- 

Among the negroes in the 
Uriited States who have made 
that mark are Booker T. Wash- 
ington, president of the Tuskegee 
Institute; Kelly Miller, , educator 
and essayist, a dean in Howard 
University, Washington"; W. H. 
Lewis, fbfmer assistant attorney- 
general of the United Stafesi J. 
C. Napier of Tennessee, former 
registrar of \ the United ^tates 
Treasury; W\ H. VwAon of Mis- 
sissippi, forme^r r^sttar of the 
United States V^reasury ; H. L.i 
Johnson, former 'i^etiorder of deeds' 
of the District Of Cplunibia; R. 
R. Wright of Gedjrgia, president 
of -the Georgia Sta^c college and 
a former paymaster ip the United 
States army; Maj'or Charles 
Young, of the Ninth cavalry, U. 
S. A., a graduate of W^t Point ; 
Dr. S. C. puller, a psychiatrist of 
tlKU^Westboro, Mass., inss^ne asy- 
lurfi ; Dr. C. E. Bentley, a dentist 
of Illinois, who was head bf the 
clinical denital surgery at th^ St. 
Louis Exposition; Bishop B.\W. 
Lee of the African Methodist 
Church, who was leader of the 
New York Colored Democracy iii» 
the last National campaign; E.H.^ 
Morris, .of. Illinois, grand master 
0.f the grand lodge of colored Odd 
l?eHows'; A. H. Grinke, author 
a£id former Uniteid States consul 
at Santo Domingo; 'Mrs. Mary 
Qhurch Terrell, former member 
of the board of education at 
Washii^on ; T. Thomas Fortune 
of Nev^ York, iormre United 


HdmttF-tlffiOf 


ilaiaZSS 



Importen and WhnleiUe 

Liquor Aferchaiits 

Ej^C^regtonaBniDii;' WinMpod Cordiala 
to ■ - 


Hotnes f«r Sde er Rent > S^jUm 

M E Contor i6th Street and Lcag^Mdi Ay, 

:' ' LOS ANGEU 


Only Coterrt WawMta'a BarW 


$fjLA88LAPY BARBERS 

wUCOOC ■ 


BBOADWAT 

an ; 


A HAIR D«!jassiNa 

SiON SPBCIAUUST' 

ill town. MRS. C<«A EMGLI8H. Pbo 


%n- 



! ^ litttJa #aftiwtt^ Ota 

1 1^ ^^ I FWth street, We^temittf Hotdl Bldg. 4t|i 'k 
I; Entlrpnce. just a f«w doors EMt of libin siirMt H^ 




A ^uuc uomranr 


TIm^ NOAH D. THQMPSO EALTY CO. 


1!^ 


tmtihts for Bait 

tW m N. Broadway 


« 


ellBr# 


^QdJeiVelers 

-VXosAacaUai 
W«t|b£8 (|ec»rately repaired «t^ 
n«>d,eraiisipi>ieeS.^ JMwnolids re-set 


South ISM 


Main 


^^ Uemloek Street 

>!!». R. H. TODD, Proprktew 

fiotnV Cooking a Specialty. 
Best Meal in the city at the fewest prices 


T f% No a 


Main 7688 


A^ J, RQBEipS, SON &COK 


f HIrif Dip^s llli Mlilirs 
Fimer^ Parlors ^ I^Atteadant 

I 13tb f«d Us Aagclas St. : 




JOS ' LUCAS, PRt 

Lttdiet' and Gents,' Suitfi Ji deto^Of'dsr 
Gtainisc, Reinodelta& Sepnring and PcaMi^MM *t lowtAftkm 

i\^ Central Avenue / . '\ 


-L 


, ■;-;|<idie«G«rm«ii mod^- My **^t» 

HARVARD I 


Los Angeles. C^, 


Comer 7th and Central Avmme 


Leader Bakei 


; >t .^.r 


Wm. BP^ADHAO, Propl 


^treet 


Phcne BoyU 1466 


Angells. CiliJor 


Borne Friti 


South 2324 


Mr. WnuH. Fields, the gran^ _ 
master of the A. U. K. & D. of A\ I States minister tio Hayti and an 
will address the Forum Sunday at! sas, president of the National Col- 
4:30. Subject, "Fraterdal and! ored Baptist Association; Dr. W. 
Business Organizations Musi Get H. Furaess, United States"^ minitf- 
Togethcr." _ " ter to_5a3rti; Miss Lucy Laney, 

presidenit of the Haynes Institute, 
Georgia; W. R. Pettiford, a bank- 
er of- Birmingham, Ala., and Mat- 
thew Henson, who was with Rear 
his voyage to 


Laif^^nicl^elBaldng Ccppan^ 

-f 6606 Centrd Avenue 

Bread, Pies and Cakw$ v 


WeddiBK and Fancy Cakes a Feature 
6«t satisf aQtioo in price and quality. 


U)& Apgeles 


/. 


(^aPoi 


raia 


'-]^ 


f,|M. Albritti4'has been 
on the sic^ list all the #eek. 

Plans wew iformulated to make ^^g'^OTth Pole *" 
the club one of the biggest and 
best bureaus of information with 
1 regard to Negro literature. 

■ Rev. N. P. Gregg and congre- 
gation assi^ed Rev. Edwards at 
ithe Furlong tract last Sunday, af- 
ternoon. ^ 

The- Alumni Association will 
present a program at Wesley 
dupel on Lincoln Day, Feb. 12th. 




4- 


■'pMkSt- BIOHTB nr. CHRISTIAN 

^ ' ftahriees' February Ist. 1914: 

Bible-School 10 a. m. 
Preaehiiig 11' a. m. Subject 
''Abtind ittaajN^ open eyes." 

• ..k. % P. s.. -a .s.:7.p. tn. 

A*b*si1if ^ X». L. MeMickeii 
" 6io ]*, i V :.=:,Mra. H. E. Gould 
ddreas ' ' Dr. L, Stovall 
eetinff ledby Mrs. M. J- Peyton 
ddress 8 p. ^i. 

By W. H. fields of St Louis, Mo. 
Evcvyhe^ weleome. 

D. L- kcKICEBN, IbstSTsa ' 


At the present time the Tuske- 
gee institute has an endowment 
fund of $l,901,46a32, and its to- 
taltaij receipts from all sources 
last year were $359,493.94, an in- 
crease over the previous year of 
$61,433.60, while its expenditures 
for the year, exclusive pf new 
buildings, were $275767.97, a de- 
crease of $47,337.75- These fig- 
ures at once testify to the prac- 
tical interest shown in the institu- 
tion and to its efficient manage- 

A very hopeful item in the ac- 
count of receipts for the year lies 
'in the fact that $2^544 was con- 
tributed in sniall sums by negroes 
and one legacy of $10,000 was left 
to the institute by. Mrs; 'Ann 
Maria Fisher of BrooWyh» N. Y., 
i ntgreis. ' '\''::^.[' " -'. 

On the first dty of /snoary was 
a grand day at New Orieans. It 
was 'Exnancrpatioti Celebration 
dajr. Dir. Robt. "E. Jones was the 
prmdpal speaker. A telegram 
was «ent to Presid^ Wilson, 
asking hiin for. a man's chance 
among toen, and. for an open and 
square deal to make of thein- 
selvesl the best possible Ameri- 


YEF^S BROTHERS 
New knd Used Furniture and Stoves 


WTi iil.l 


vAnd £[ouse Furnishings of all K : pS 

W 3 iizi Central Avenu 


^■=PB 


FOR JIENT— We hkve s^eral 
houseke^ihg apartments of Ithree 
and four rooms for rent f verjE- 
che^. Also agood bu»inej/s site 

Apply Noah D. TliomL^ 

mi E. 55ti St 

Phone S. 1(551. - / 


Patroni^t^^^ul^nian's Store 
Feed ^Operati?e Drjr Mash 

An Honest, Econon^iesl balanced Egg rotation for Htos and 

\^ Growing Stock r i , 

Baby Chisks. Hatching Etc|^ Breeders, Everything in Poultry 
^ , Everytfains^to the Poultryman. Visit Our Store 

Poultryiiian,8^Co-Ope*'ative Ass'n. 


640 South MsJnStre^f 


Los Angeles, California 


*-f 


CHtJRCH Bulletin 


THE EAST EIGHTH STI^EET 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
p. L. McMickens, IKhister 
. Bible School, 10 a. tii. Superin- 
tendent, ^i J. "ftibm^ron, ''I ~; 
At 11 |i. m. 'the' pastor will 
preach the second sermon on the 
■subject, "IJVhy I Left the Church.'^ 
At-^**p| M- he wili -preach ^^e 



setond sermon on "Church I,.ead- 

*"-^ • 1 :!■■ - - 5, i ''-'- 

p.m.,Y.P. S.C;E:.iri8- 
rs. M. C. Bray. 

is gix(wing in every 
way. T*o persons took member- 
ship withVthe church last Sun- 

^y- . n v.. I 

-Everybodys^is welcQnie to these 
services. -. 


H. a VAN FOSSEP 

Groceries, Notions, Candies, Cit 
Wood, Coal, Kindling and Sunsl 
We recoTniQend l..eege <fe Haskil 
Peerless, Monado and Oriental! 

F^^ies Broadway 314 |fO| 

^AT HoiAii a 2663 flOl 


,rB, Ice Ommi^^X 
ine Polisli t •: ;: 
s Coffees, j-':. tj^^"-^ 

Blends. '«i>^c:i 1-. 

irSlOREET 


reed\aSd"Fuel 


STAPLE 

I%one ;We8t ^JpSZ 

'( 
/A 


T .£ l A '1 ! J , ' 


AND 


T. 


FANCY Gf 

: CX>R. 361 

^G A R Nj 


{OCERIES 

4 NORliAiq>IE AVB. 

R 


JW^Iajck:; 

' ' J. a iCcCUJHXY, Psoni 

FURl^TUHE. BEDDING 




Qealer in 


2703 N. Broadway and 


^ 


PICO RURNITUR 

2678 West Pico Street ( 

|i^ ILESS THAN DOWN-Ta|K PRICES 




CO. 


Anfeles* 


TeL West 366 
Home 18796 


H. F. BRAINARD, Pres. J 
C. ]^. BRAINAKD, Sec'y a^ 


Pii6D«c^oine 73829 . 

P. J. VIGUi 

GROCERIES AND D| 

St«4>Ie and Fancy Groceries, V( 
Prompt Delivery 

' f 2109 West Pico Stf^ 


MRS. J. M. TA 

jHair GoQda, Or 

Toilet Articles. Hair Dressing, Ma 

1408 EAST NINTH STREET Cor 



jia 


HemloA^i* 


JShainpopisg 
''PMpllain SOI 


•JUi- 


Pfaonea 71484 


,^- 


OXFORD 

j :i M. Thew 


t'-^.' 


West 3686 


ALL 



Modern :^»rtments foi 
1337 Newtoa street. 
3ld water convenii 

For rent b 
ith. <J. M, Ed 


reiifcat 

lol and 

>s and 


meetin^;^^. field in tfie ,. 
churcli Wednesday ^nigfit there 
were 402S Methodists represented 
in Pasadena and Scott Chapel was 
the only church that doubled its 
membership in 1913. : 

Dr. Duncan is doing a great 
work at Scott Cl»peL 

The VoraToryiWV meet at the 
Metropolitan B^rt on Wavetly 
Drive Stinday • aitemooo at 3 
o'clock. ; An jnea are iovited 
■ If yoa are wantiag in ftrmi 
of ch^acter, keep away £ 
temptation. 'Satisfy yow^ 
b«art . and ' sdf-respect, 1>t£ 


Mt. Zion iBaptist Chorch^. Alfired C. llVOlb^ A^: 

Tuesday— 8 P. MI— Meeting of the Get Acquaio 
Wednesday— 7. P. M.—jTeache^ Bible Sc^icd,^ 

■ ,r 8 P. MHPrajte,^enS«.£,lit^-T^vH''^fp^ 
Thur84ay— 3 : S) P.T|^-Woman> Missionary Cirajt 
Friday-^ PJ M.-^hdir AebearsaK 
Sutiday— 9:30 A. M.— Bible School. 


11 ,<» A. M.— Preachinjf and Praise Service. 

> ^"li^ •^^' '^' P- U. 
r 7^Jp|fP: M.-r-^reaching and Praise S^ce. 
F»rs^.i:r&jday»— 11 .00 A. M.— Preaching and iPrawe SerW 
^ 3K» p. M.— The Lord's Supper. 

7:3(i i^.>M.-*Sacred Musical. C9r '^rt. ^* = 


week or hawking about to see What othi 
Prop - f^tb*"'* or say* they wili come 

your way of thiiiking'>h^ a^d bji^l 


yard's Oy^pel. A. M. |S. 

'4^.V.oaa.; 
i-Xndeayor,/^ 

ink, IV 



d^^Miidster 


f^il-^'^i^^- 


0F RRl 



x^mj^ 


-^. 


Wi 


PODM 


IS SEASON 


Jplftr MY COL0NV^ AND <3ET 

. fol vaihM in ^ S&^e. Fine. iM> aoQ; 
S. F. a. B. andAcem to .ocean Ugiiway- 

Tbe Go¥«nuiif0nt LiMid AsobL 


SF^***" 


11 


ayt688 

a Fitli |«ii4 Poidi 

^ iVedh PWi Peultry and Oysters- 


\'l 


-»* thei 
■Vtoobt 


Jti'S- 


SwtSCfattr^ 


')j 




rket 




r ::-;'^"' - JEWELS] 
Cor. .WashiztgliB^ <& 
Watcbf Clock and Jej 
Worlc Called for 
Give me a 


L^toi 


21^74 


MUTILATED PAGE 



BE IMPROVED 



LINCOLN DAY QB^ltVB^ 



By Great Throng at 2lbi 
Church. J f 
Ltncols ptfy was dtil| obsexi^ed 
by * l»rgt concdurse bf p«4j^l« 
that ta:^cd the capacity | of Zic»i 
A. M. E. fcburch, corritr ot ftco 
iand i^oloma streets. Er^lmaiism 
ran high ; this Vinous spetdter^. 


AN iMdPORTANT CAlitPAIGN 


Liaceln Republic«a CIui> to>Iay 

Important ^ajct; for Re- . 
,.^.. ■ \ '■^piHblicaaiiaw.-:''^*. ' '' 

/13»e Lincoln Republican Club 
brujmized at Scotts' hall on the 
last Friday evening of January 
«^n inaugurate a strenudus cam- 
pit^ for th« sneces!^ of Repub^ 


paid growing tribute to i.iW'g:^eat|BuEnism at ttfe fall elections.. Tht 



9f Wesley CbapeU was atxrarded 
place with 268 points } Miss, 
of ^1^ Dunbar &)ciety, s|cc- 
oSd with 264 points. This. Wag 
the fitst of a series of tbfee de- 
tuite^ bfi^l|^eh the two isoci^tiea. 

THE NATIONAL WiSGRb 
CONGRESS j 

A Brief Review and Conun^tit aa 
: the Call and Purpoie 
By E. F. Henderson 
,s Dear Readers — -Doubtless njlany 
of you are aware of the fact that 
this call : has ~ been issued by a 
committee of^:race men fyom 
Washington, Di" C, Jthroi^gh 
James H. Hayes, a^orney at lasr, 
vAu? was I chosen as i^ exporn 


the ^jtext mail, that ive may use 
yptn^ame to the liali. i : 

W^l you also send us the names 
and ^ddresseS of a dozen or more 
of y<>Ur>most influential and best 
ka><i«^ citizens, token from the 
sections of your State ? 
y!oo also send us t^ie 
and' post offices of the dif- 
fer*?^ Negro newspapers and oth- 
er *«gro publications of your 

Sta^ ,'■..- 

Should you, for jany cause, not 
•feel interested in U>is iiiatter, will 
you litindly hand this to some one 
dscjwho, you- think, Will be? 

TWmking you in advance, and 
hoph% that you keenly recognize 
the Jainportance of the proposed 
meet^g and the peculiar neces- 


officer to give publicity of the Jn. sity ^ holdmg it early |n 1914. 


We print below the full text of 
a circular letter which has been 
sent out to representatives of the 
forty-eight states. This letter, as 
you can see, sets forth in part the 
purpose of the meeting: 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 2, 1913. 
NDear Sir : We ire preparing to 
hoUlv within the next ninety days 
or thereabouts, a l^tional Negro 


i |m, yours for the; Negroes' 
inteff sts, , ' 

V :^"\, JAMES H. HAjYES, 

v; '" Attorney at Law. 

i^ Tea Street, N. W- 
Washington, D. C. 
PUBLICITY TO THIS CALL 
. It ii the desire to give the wid- 
est, publicity to this call and 
J therefore we most earnestly urge 


best ^o advance the dvij and polit- 
ical ibttfests of t&ekegro, will be 
the 1 paramount Ifcnsider ation , 
withdiut fear of the political man- 
ipulations of any political parjy. 

In short, for the ifirdt time, the 
Negro is in a position to think 
and act for his own best interests; 
and this meetinglyf thought and 
good judgment can 'be made the 
most potential race- gatfhering of 
the Negro, by the Negro and for 


cemed. -You most not forget the. 
thought was best ; |or all con- 
fact that the success of the pro- 
poised N. N. coqgreSjS:, depends en- 
tirely upon the willingness of the 
raee politicians (who as individ- 
uals have gcme into this that and 
the other party) to leave them and 
to unite themselves together with 
all of their political influencees 
with members of their own race/ 
Past experience an dour oaser-, 
various with I the pofitical paiti^ 
of the country that race leaders 
should look after raciaJ interests 


try. 


the Negro, ever held in this coun- fir^tapd party interests last, ^ut 

we wish here to speak of a piiob- 
lem '^hich is all our own and the 
solution of which depends entire- 
ly uppn ourselves. That is a gen- 
eral awakenipg of -^the qualified 
voters of meihbers of the race to 
a more active exercise of their 


We subscribed our name to the 
list of formal indorsers to the 
movement which we think to be 
one of paramount importance. 

We have in the United States 
approximately in round numbers 
about 10,000,000 Negroes ; and 
about eigth tenths of them are 
Ilvirig in the southern states, 
where they are wholly or in part 
by their state laws denied their 
polkicai rights of franchise, which 
was' given I them by the federal 
government,' and which has been 
fictitiously denied them by class 
legislation in their respective 




*( ,(>ur preachers, teachers, our pub- I states, over whi<ih we as a rac9 

s-ha4f:, 
I free 


Congress to pass ujXn the foUow^^ women and men to do what- I hSve ne control. Yet we 


er.) 


Vena Orator At Lincoln Day Celrbratioja 


(1) Should the Negro return to mg. 
the Republican party? If so, why? C^-^imited number of 


ing questions: (Time and place \^^^^^^y .^^ consistently to ac- 
of Congress to be determined lat- ^uj^jnt the public of the- time. 


place and purposes of this meet- 


public 


emanci|)atQr, closing with Rev. 
ByeraT Address, "Lincoln," which 
l*ft tte audience with the highest 
feeling of patriotism. 

The songs and musical numbers 
rettderj^wjere highly creditable to 

theocca^iok 

. Th^ioilowing program was ren- 
dered.':'- ■ I - , . _ 

PROpBAM. \ 

qjUbs the eaettliia to order. 
8li*to»^"Ain«toi" -Audience 

■f~fMmtSaD~-~i R«^ *■ ^- KInchen 

ItiaUj-'-Our iFalaier- Roeboroogb 

Second. |B«ptl8t Chunti Chofr. 
Greellnx-BoiM'« Walker ETertdent of 
PedenUlAiiJ 8. P. Johnsnn, Master of 
CaremonIe*!|f 

Mn«te— SelectM — 

■k: M. E. Zion Church Choir 
Ad^tt«„-"n»^ AteB and ObJecU of Uie 

FedemUoo"!' — 

Ur. l«ne* ^ Vena, of the Budu^ 
State ABBOclation. 

HU-0-80U. I-....- - -««f*- 

jgj^ IbtM BatUe-DanSel, of tn« 

' Kentucky Society. , 

j^,j^,e»^"Wh«t the Negro WooMO of 
CmWornl* <>n Do for the VtOUt ;0< 

tjM) R»c«" ; — ' — *" 

^ e Baitxrt «»' 'he Teia* Boclefy. 

)(iMio-a»t*et^ T^ 

____.Kan»«-¥»««o»ri Society QBmrtette 

jkidre— — "OriBni^tlon ■ „.. p- 

K*«. i. i^- GoMon, D.D, or the I 
(jlaorsla Society. ] :[ 

Uo^e-PUnolaolo ^:.-MiSik*>^ 

MIM A- C.! Haitl», of the Ar lL»li— 
\ Society. 


■ra.<^^ Lacey of the V|r«t«#' - 

■'■> ' ] -'Society. i ■ J f.-\ 

jtttsJo-JB»»««n«»'*' Solo ._■ — : — m 

.^——L- LoDirfBB* SO^Ioty 


.>,-•:.... h.-^tj- --.-■■-•■ - ■l.^'x «.**»■ j; 

next meeting will be on the 2Sth, 
at which time there will be a pro- 
gram rendered and the spell- 
binders will put forth the grand 
old-time Republican doctrine. At- 
torney O. W. Tyler, who is presi- 
dent of the club, is preparing a 
close canvass and a campaign for 
5,000 members of the club. Chas 
Prince of Pasadena, first vice-pres- 
ident of the club, reports great in- 
terest in his section, as also does 
E. E. Woods of Watts and E. V. 
Moxley of Santa Monica. There is 
no question of the organization be- 
ing a gi^nd success and be the in- 
strument of much good for the 
cause of Republicanism for the 
coming election. 


"Jiiet Another LJBcOUl"— r 

.1.^ Mr. Bm»aa*l H«n 

'Abtaham Illncoln" _ "T^ 

i. 3. ByerB ot th« HOf^?' 


Rer. W. 

and SODth Carolina; Ro^jt^ f 
y^^gial-t^mek Within Thi w«ni"— d— 
; . - , . WMiiind BaptiEt Chweb C|holr 

fMitaiaOcm—i- R«v. J. U .**pOoy, 

The follovran gare the ofecei* of 

the Federation of N«gro State So- 

_.eietics}Sk, I '^r ' ' •■ 

Eugene Walker, preset; S. 

•3P. Johnson, vice-president; W^l- 

|,V, face Oark:,tfecording secretary; L; 

Stovall, M. D„ corre-sponding ?ec- 

Etary; J. A. Jackson, treisu^er; 

, J. J. Byers, chaplaija. 


THE DEBATE OF THE SEA- 
! SON 

The debate between the Wesley 
Chapel and Dunbar Literary so^ 
cieties Tuesday evening was the 
event of the season. Long before 
the hour of the debiate^the West- 
minster Presbyterian Chlirch was 
jammed to the doors with eager 
enthusiasts from both societies. 
Much applause greeted the debat- 
ers as they entered upon the plat- 
form and when Mrs. Alexander 
rose to tg)en the argument for the 
affirmative, the Dunbar Society, 
there was a breatMess silence. 

The^ Isubject, "Resolved, ^at 
the Federal Government shoiild 
own and control tj}e railroads in 
the United States," although dif- 
ficult, was brilliantly handled by 
boj^fa sides. Mrs. Alexander and 
Miss Kay of the Dunbar SobJety, 
on the affirmative, and Messrs. B. 
McDonald and Lewis Qeeks of 
Wesley Chapel, ,fl|a the iai^tiye 
Aft^a^inti^resting discussion of 
an hoqr, the judges, M": .Dr, N«l. 
son, Attys. Biintiett and Ceroti, 
.retirrf to form their decision. 

After a lengthy deliberation the 
judges decided the debat* in favor 
of • Wjtsley Cbapel. Lewi^ Be^s, 



rights as citizens of the Utiited 
States. It is a lamentable fact 
that notwithstanding we are con-' 
stantly howling about the cruelty 
of the Democratic party and the 
ex-rebels of the southern States 
having robbed us oi^ our fellow 
race m^ of Iheir political fran- 
chise in those sections of the 
country which lie wthin their 
power, we in other sections, •' 
whose rights have- not been mo- 
lested, have become too indolent 
,to register and go to the polU and 
cast our ballots. As we have stat- 
ed above, there are scattered over 
the country, ^mostly in the north- • 
em, eastern >nd western states, 
somewhere about 800,000 ^sotes, 
or eligible voters. Nowjin short. 


left something like 800,000 
votes belonging to the race which 
are. scattered all over the country. 

The object of^.this congress wilt ^^ ^^^ ^q g^y that unl 
be chiefly to discuss ways and j'haye engendered itito 
means whereby we may be able 
to concentrate these 800,000 votes 
which are now being given pro- 
miscuously to the several politi- 
cal parties, from which the race is 
receiving but little or no patron- 
age in return. The question to be 
decided >is..indeed a serious one, 
and it is one which should receive 
the very highest consideration 
from the best thinkers and lovers 
of the race. Hence we would 
urge the early calling of a local 
mass meeting of race men and 
women at some place to, take 
steps preparatory tb the pushing 
forward of the contemplated na- 
tional Negro congress. While it 
is true that many of our most 
active and best men and women 
who are true and tried lovers of 
the race have differed from each 
other in party affiliations in the 
past, it should be taken for grant- 
ed that they have done what they 



caL aspirations some 
en that will cause us 
ourselves to the extent* that 
may become better acquainted 
with men,' measures and issues 
which are constantly beingf- 
brought before the public to h€ 
settled by their votes, we had just 
as well to leave the whole matter 
where it is. While we admit to 
the fact that we need to have 
more ptolitical concentration in 
the exercise of our franchise, we 
also need to decrease the large' 
per cent of the 800,000 voters who 
do nothing with their political 
gifts. We think more of the one 
who jegisters and votes his hon- 
est convictiohs (even though he 
be wrong), than we do of the one^ 
who makes no effort as a citizen 
to forward the best interests of 
his country. It should be remem- 
bered by ail concerned that our 
highest right as citi2:ens of our 
country is the proper exercise of 
our franchise at the {Kills. In 

Continued on page 7 



,5Y.r 




The Emanc^itor 


sheets and their restricted circu- 
lation compel us to ask the pas- 
tors of our churches throughout 
the land to keep this matter be- 
fore their people and to lend their 
personal assistance and influence 
I j' ; to the selection of reputable and 

(4) Should the Negro tnaintain capable representation, 
district organizations during the We also ask the heads of our 


(2) Should the Negro continue 
to support the Democratic party? 
If 90, wby? 

(3) Should the Negro remain 
in the iVogressive party? If so, 
whyi^ j' 


coming Congressional caitopajgn 
of 1914?^ 

(5) What can we do to secure 
better ^ccbmmodations on the 
railroads of the SouthV 

(6) How can we obtain, and 
publish to the vs^orld,^ tihte truth 
about Sojuthem lynchingsj 

Before^ issuing ihe call ^nd fix- 
ing the tfme and place of taeeting, 
we shall ask a few prominiiit Ne- 
gro citizens in each one of lour 48 
States 4nd the District df Co- 
lombia tjo; sign the call for\the 
Cohgresi its importance needs 
no discussion. W«f invite you to 
be one oif the signers to this, call j 
and if ihe same be agreeable, 
kindly, a<ivise us affirmatively -by 


great organizat^n^ and the offi- 
cers of our many societies, clubs 
and associations, and the edit<irs 
of o«r varius newspapers and 
magazines to lend a handxih giv- 
ing notice of this meeting ind 
also in the selection of crediteb^e 
delegations. ; 

This will ibe an extraordinaxy 
meeting, fraught %ith grave re- 
sponsibilities, great possibilities 
and serious - c^isequencesj un- 
handicapped by the 'political of the 
national administration, absolute- 
ly free frottf the invisible coercion 
and selfish designs of office hold- 
ers; unfettere4 deliberation and 
freest discussion, as. to 



^.F 


':M 


; 'i' 


vf 


■^M^ 


M, y i». Bytrs, .Wh© M«k • ll«gnlfic«ni f dditM,^ «b SobjCjC. 
;5# B«lng -Abrahtm Uftedr^ 


\ 


MUTILATED PAGE I CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


rrrr 


who* never to flatter -wfilr<ieBeend, 
nor bend the knee to ^$awtsr. A 
luuSand to diilde me when I am 
wroni;; 017 inmost soul to s^, and 
that my loTO prove atr<mg5'f«r hi 
mas hia is for tfae. f , t /j " ^ 


l#'' 


Continued from Page One 
conclusion we would again urge 
the early calling of a mass meet- 
ing of citizens to decide as to the 
best methods to be used to further 
"the cause involved in the national 
/Macedonia;! call from Washing- 
ton, D. C, "Come over and help 

us." 

We sincerely hope that- some 
one who loves his race will, take 
this matter up at once. Let him 
'do so by conferring with either 
the -wrriter or any one else ■who 
he may choose. It doesn't require 
any gpreat number of pcr^ns to 
form a nucleus to reach tl^e ends 
desired in this matter. AH that is 
required is that two, thiree, or 
- more of right thinking race men 
•act at once, and not wait the one 
Cor the other. , 


=i?«5= 


«lll l«llll« l >ll«II H» ««'»»* 


PASADENA. 
Paragraphs 

itlll«lll l >llll«*lll>l l l» i 


Qen. Caxey plans to lead 500, 
doO men to Washington by May. 
He says he will organize the sec- 
ond march to the Capital. Gen. 
Jacob Bechler Coxey of Maseillon, 
who -went there 20 years ago to s-e 
Cnrrer Cleveland. He is Roing 
now.to aee President Wilson. The 
Democrats aurl something when 
they jjet in, don'l they? Tell 
Coxey 's army to "keep off 
1 1", 


the 



F. Akp* of the 
as a striking ar- 
ut issue of the San 
Examiner on "T b e 
Crime Against the Negro" Dr. 
. AkM characterizes lynching as a 
piational evil, and the WilsOn ad- 
ainistration aa a Southern admin- 
. ' istratinn with Southern preiudice 
^^. >^to the Negro. 

3Fr * >■ * ' 


-. lit. and Mrs. William Prince 
Imve a new-comer at their home 
Md mother and daughter are do- 
well. Mr. Prince is all smiles 

bishop Harztell has ju«l returned 
from an eight-months' tour of Ki- 
((ricaa cnisson, covering a distance 
of ^,000. He saje that, on the 
east coast, the government has 
giveo the Methodist Church, on 
favorable terms, 1,200 Hcres of 
Ixnd for the enlargement of its in- 
dxiBlrial mission. He says that at 
Laurence Marquez, East Coast, he 
was impressed by- the active^edu- 
i!)j6atfonal progress carried on among 
children, where a short time ago 
there was neither teacher nor 
sohoolbouse ; bat now it is a great 
tight to see the happy bovs and 
girlii with their books on the cars 
at in groups on the sidewalks. 

Siay. there is no color line, and 
thei Street cars provide free^ pas- 
sage for the school children. 

The Bishop wUl be in PiSadena 
Maich 10. 


ilege. Then wh&. yon begin to 
stop her die will begin- to weep. 
Trust not a woman when she 
weeps, for it is her natnre to weep 
when she wants her will ^The first 
person to ; wee^ was a yrjomaa. 
Hagar in the wil^emess. Bead 
Gen. 21^16. Men^-are .not crazy 
abont independence in woman. 
They prefv that they be. gentle 
and yieldinig. Men, will neyer ear© 
for a manish woman; what they 
want is a sweet lovable womanly 
woman. Woman is fast losing her 
charm of femininity. Many a 
man is ashamed of his wife be- 
caose of her drep^ but she says 
this is the style so yon better keep 
her away from con go Africa, as 
they have another style over 
there. Let them be as attractive 
as their grandmothers -were arid 
there will be more happiness in 
marraige than there is today. 
No race can rise higher than its 

women. Women are the same 
though their skin be white, black 
or yellow. Job 's wife told him to 
cnxse God and die. After be 
would not she said to Jiim your 
breath smells bad. The Bible t^lls 
us how Rebekah, daughter of La- 
ban, was tempted by jewels of 
gold and fine raiments to marry a 
man i^rhom she had never seen^and 
did nbt love and how she became 
a tricky, rapacious > wife and 
brought misery unto his house. 
In Los Angeles a few months ago 
a woman gave one man money to 
get a pistol to kill her husband 
with and he killed him. Another 
woman left the door of her house 
open Fo a man could come in and 
she held her husband while this 
man shot him. One of the men 
was hung while one of the men is 
serving life sentence, and the 
women go free. Solomon, even 
among his swarm of wives, was 
rasped to madness by one brilliant 
woman whose tongue wagged in- 
cessantly. So was Socrates. 
Shakespeare married a woman 
eight years older than he was so 
he could live happy. 

"Woman makes married life un- 
happy because the average woman 
is impatient, and desires to be her 
husband's equal; not only resents 
his natural place aa head of the 
family, and affronts this innate 
mastery, but fails. She is really 
after all only a woman. No wo- 
man, in spite of modem opinion 
and effort to that end, can fill a 
man's place in the world or at 
home. The Creator who made 
them two separate sorts has never 
undone his work, and his creatures 
never can undo' it. Many wives 
are ignorant of the moral duty of 
domestic service, are great tnisery 
makers and are accountable for a 
large proportion of matrimonial 
failures in the South, where di- 
vorce is still looked upon as a dis- 
grace and where religious feeling 
is more stringent than in any other 
part of the country. The old-fash- 
ioned domestic woman is still to 
be found. She is gentle, she has 
infiinite tact, she hates a fuss, she 
knows the art of managing men, 
and she is not often to blame if 
her home is unhappy. 

One woman said the, divorce 
court is jusl. behind the chureh, 
and if he don't please me I will 
go to it, and they go. Ninety per 
cent of the divorce- cases in this 
city are by women that work out 
from home by the day. They be- 
come dissatisfied at ho^e and will 
leave a six-room bungalow with 
all the modem conveniences' such 
as electric lights, hot and . cold 


atandiag with the Sir Kk^^h^ 


,/ 


y F, 


IfL HALL FOR GOVERNOR' 


M 


the 




Prbbmently Mentittied as 
Democratic Can^date. 

Oft a recfent visit "to Bakersfield 
an kagle scribe had the pleas- 
ly joif meeting- the Hon. F. E. 
ali, who is prominently men- 
tioned as a probable candidate for 
gubernatorial honors at the pri- 
m'arfcs on" the Democratic tjKCt. 
We ! found him to b* a broad- 
gau^d and libejal-nHnded man 
whO; is big enough for the job 
arftt no doubt if he entert» the 
race he will have a strong fdllow- 
!AU classes in the home city 
of him in the highest Aenns 
♦rill give to him, in csd^p h« 
idles to enter the race, 
■p^rt., • J 


- "JBnt every Sir En^t 8t«nds 
upon the hollow square with oat- 
rtretciied arms, for men, who 
praises the yirtue of ; Christian 
manhood. To be a Knight or 
Daughter of Tabor ydn must be 
worthy of love, there mtiBt he a 
love for efch other,^there is al- 
ways something in eadi Iknight to 
which the other can; look up to. ; 
"Each finds the pther snporibr 
in some things aind it is: this ct^- 
scions dcSciency lin'hiifiself^ joined 
with an appreciation of thi^ oppo 
site quality and longing to. possess 
it; that's what .binds knights to- 
gether), each Sir Knigit and 
Daughter enjoys implicit confi- 
dence in each other and should be' 
strictly honest in all our transac- 
tions and in order to be honest "we 
must ibe true to God, true to our 
neighbor and true to ourselves in 
the time of need fraternity stands 
out in all its beauty aiid majesty, 
springing to the rescue,! when all 
else has failed, it is then that fra- 
ternity puts its loving arms around 
us, lifts us up and encourages, 
soothes and comforts us. As mu- 
tual brothers we kndw what it is 
to be fondled with the same arms, 
to receive the loving care, to have 
the same loving tender hands. eool 
our burning brow, the same kind 
angel minister to our every waiit. 
W-e mnst remember, however, that 
before we. can expect others to 
extend fraterhity to us our lives 
should be worthy of j^ceiving 
kindness from , our Knights and 
Daughters ■^hich we would have 
them give unto us and be willing 
to act in accordance with the prin- 
ciple ot the Glolden Rule, do unto 

others as we would have others ido 
unto us. 

"^In conclusion let me;say 1 care 
not if you have passed the Mystic 
Barrier not! what you may have 
been robed. in, there is no order 
better. Thte International Order 
of Twelve, thk grand old Order is 
form ranks of Knights gave an 
exhibition drill and was marched 
into the chtirch for dismissal. The 
affair as a whole wib a perfect 
success. We know that E^V. Redd 
was delighted with the large gath- 
ering present. The chnroh was 
crowded to its utmost capacity, 
you beat usf This, I believe, will 
as good as the best aujd better 
than the rest. Last but not least 
we have our Maids and Pages of 
Honor with us, who have more 
money in their endowment treas- 
tu-e than all the Negro grand 
lodges combined in , this state. 
The Knights and Daughters of 
Tabor are collecting and pajring 
out one hundred thousand dollars 
per year for endowment. We 
have more than twenty-five thou- 
sand financial memb ers in" the Ark. 
Jurisdiction mor6 than 500. Taber- 
nacles 475, Temples 400, Tents in 
Arkv and Caf. Jurisdiction. Cah^ 
give yon a fair sight at the great- 
est Oirder in the world known to- 
day founded and operated by Ne- 
gro brains." 

After great applause the nni- 


LB. ROGERS 

PH(»n Bboadwat &gl 


Maavicaaat, FuBH ahd 

Smokso MiaTs- 


Ca^ Grocery 

746 CWTEib'AVINUB 


•*m^ 


'% 


?3- 


Groceries, Prutt and Vegetable! 

Qpedwi ImpoiifcMl OI^<c Oil. 3 Star Brand 
Fifth ank Glwfys Ave^ f - 1 ^MSt^ PlCOUlasf &Xo. 




"^'M 


■fc'i. 


•mmm 


Diy Goods, Ladies and Geitt^s Fumbhings, H<lts 
ARGAbE DEPARimENT STORE 

B. F. Hopkins' Old Stand Fifth and TQladys 


HAMPTON INSTITUTE NORTIL^ 


best 


They are out of the high rent district, and these goods are as good as the 
and prices^as low aa we lowest. 


Colored Voters of State of California 

Take Notice! — Not to use the Afro-American 
Federal name, unless you are registered 
therein. ...;' : I 

J. B. JUATTIIVIORE 

5400 Long Beach Avenue . . Los Angeles, CaL 


JOHNT. RElp 

GROCcRr-^StapIe and Fancy Groceries. Fruits and Vegetables 

Our Meat Market is a great addition to the s^re. 
We carry all sorta of Fresh and Salt Heate. 

. OUR PRICES ARE REASONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Cor. Kohler and E. 7th Si ; ~ , 


with that virtue and modesty 
which will make her an angel on 
earth. > = \ '• ' - 


water, bath, and telephone, and 
yet the same woman was hapj^ 
before she came west in a two- 
room shack in the east where die 
could see day in her house before 
it came. High life is the cause—" 
wine, auto riding at night, white 
shoes, black veUs, going to the 
beache, all-hight meetings in com-^ 
pany with divorced women, and as 
a rulfr they are the first to s^kll 
tears in claSs meeting, but that is 
not a sore sign of real religion, for 
a fountain pen does the' most 
blotting when it is nearest empty. 
This does not apply to all women 
that work out, for' there are many 
good ones that work out and who 
have to. The high life ones take 
advantage of that. 'We can not 
control those high-life women hut 
we can draw the line. 

We do not believe, ^that Isaac 
aod Rebecca would reibain happy 
if these divorced women were to 
visit Isaac 's house. It m as much 
impossible to have a happy home 
when they visit as it would be to 
dam up the Mississippi river at its 
month with natural gas. Best 
ehtldren, b«st-kept homes, best 
husbands and best wives are those 
that stay at home, like some other 
rades'do. ~ 

Be c<mtented with t^y lot, - ' 
ThoBgh it may be small;: 

Each must have their shure— 
One can not .havf; it all 

I want a warm and ihitlifdl htis- 
hapdito eheer the adverse <honr; 


. WOMAN 

, ... ' .^ '. ^ t 
{ By S. B. OaTF 

Who is to blame for the unhap- 
piness in marriage f Why Adam 
and Eve argued it at the outset of 
their wretched married ^ life 
Wretched because she 'was ambi- 
tious and thought she was sharp, 
and he was weak and a! glutton 
and tried to please her aud he got 
in bad. Who was to blame for the 
result? So yoii see it jm an old 
question. 1 

Who is to raise thfe eliildrent 
It takes "both father and] mother, 
for mother metms well and they 
have more patience than the fath- 
er in ^ bringing up chil^en, but 
they ove^o the matter jis the most 
of us kaiow. If nine out 4f every 
tep bad. boys were investigated it 
would be foimd that their mother 
was too easy and the father al- 
lowed them to go wrong tryiag to 
please their moth<er, . and often 
mothers t^e it npok theimselves 
to govern the family and arrange 
all details of daUy Hfe, bnt.in 
some, cases the mother have^^to 
taW thejlead as the fathfjr i^ too 
sld# and lasy to lead ; but -' he 
sl^mld take his dxttn of the re- 
fer the greatest 'dan- 
gefri'inJEe of breakuig vp >rhat 
waa flv a ba]»p7^ome la to .gixe 
yo^ i^e the'imuijg Und of jprit* 


. "Our bases are unity, race 
pride, fidelity, charity, purity and 
love. Then, helieving that this 
Order more than any other will 
unite the race and elevate us to 
the highest morel, religious and in- 
tellectual standpoint, I appeal to 
all lovers of the race to join us 
and help do the work for which 
this noble Order was OTganized."^ 

After much applause Sir Knight 
iKb gave the drill of the Order, 
whi^h was admired by all. 

Sir Deputy Orand Mentor W. B. 
Rich, feeling that the public was 
interested and ought to know 
m%re about the Order, especially 
on- this occasion, made the follow- 
ing reiiiarka. He said in part : 

Sir Einghts and Daughters, 
Maids and Pages of Honor, Ladies 
and Gentlemen : We. ate gathered 
together, here today for the pur 
pose of laying a comer stone for' 
the St. PaUl^^aptist Church by 
request of RW. Redd and other 
church officials of the church. 
This Christian and knightly mark 
iff apart of the duty we as Sir 
Kmghts and Daughters owe to our 
God and fellow men. Thisl)^g,a 
fact, J we are and should ^b^ im- 
bued with the spirit of Maternal 
brotherhood and sisterhood. Nat- 
urally the question arises, what is 
fraternity t Our answer would be, 
it is the relations of brotherly love 
of men and women associated to- 
getiier by a common bond of in- 
terest ; it is that part of man which 
is God-like, which never dies. This 
relationship causes ns' to symp- 
thize one with another and run 
to the relief of all who. are in dis- 
tress and moire especially a worthy 
Shr Knight or Daughter. Thjere is 
notiiing that beautifies character 
like t brotherly Bndness ; it is a 
grace whieh the heavenly host en- 
joy and which God approves- Our 
duty as Knights and Daughters 
is to make sweet the lines of man- 
kind in prdej^t}l8t we may enjoy 
the benefit of this great virtufe, the 
spirit of tme friendship and kind- 
ness should forever reign within us 
as men and women and EJajights 
and Daughters of Tabor. VNow 
before we can have true friend- 
ship we must have mutual worth, 
similari^: nrith minmr ^UfFerenee 
and the spirit of sacofice and gen* 
.erosity; knighthood is to put to 
the test, by lTials,,ahd dangers| 
true knighthood mi^t have for its 

foundation strong and noble char- 
acters, men with great hearts^ men 
who can stand erect and look the 
world in the face, and prove that 
trde frienddtip, as was exeijo^li- 
fied iv Father Moses Picksdn and 
the Knights of liberty.: Selflah-i 
lad, colarsrdnesa iisva no 


COBN^ STOMZ LAYINO Q> 

THE ST. PAXTL MISSION 

BAPTIST OHUBGH 

Bjy the S^ Knights and Daught- 

era (rf Tabars 


On Sunday last the jSir Knights, 
Daughters, Maids and Pages gath- 
ered at St. Paul Church on 23rd 
street near Hoopor, for the pur- 
pose of laying the comer stone to 
the church. This noble pld Order 
did honor to itself. It was quite 
surprising to see the large number 
in attendance. Tobar has grown, 
rapidly in the past few months. 

Among a large gathering of 
members and friends of the chtirch 
Sir Deputy Grand Menter W. B. 
Rich called his flock to gather and 
proceeded with the ceremony of 
laying the comer stone. Sir Dep^ 
uty Grand Mentor Rich presiding. 
Others participating in the ritual- 
istic work on this occasion were 
Sir Knight C. H. Anderson, Sir 
Knight I. Payne, Sir Knight A. 
Jenning, and Daughters D. Mont- 
gomery; and M. L. Gottschalk, and 
it was with much credit that each 
^ne filled their places. 

A generous collection was lifted 
which seemed to worry the little 
tots, to know that the money 
would remain in the stone. At 
this pvfit Daughter Josephine 
Brawn, a Past Grand (MScer of 
the Order in lUinois, and now a 
member of Star of Bethlehem Tab- 


Meta^.a p ffcs w Prmim Mftnk «r 
KniBWft SotfttiAm vwpMla . 
TIM BMCttags MA nadw the 
pkem a^ the Anastraag wanrlattoa ta 
(ha rtooklya Aeadeaqr of Maale iCon- 
day eTentng. Jan. 26, and at faraj^li 
hall, N«w York. TaeMlay, JulU, ia 
the Interest Of tbe Hampton (Ta.) ta- 
■tJtata were eacb largely atUnded atftt 
entiraslastlc. The plaatrtion aoags 
and otlwr melodies ntngl^ tke Hamp- 
pan stodanta were weU radarad aiad 
Ug^if enjoyed by tba atijBiwra at 
meetings. ^ ; 

Besides the popnlarity of the 
ta and what tliey said, the iiMat 1»- 
tereating feature of the meetlnsi was 
the moTing pictures alurving step br~ 
■tep the aDCceaB of John Henrr. a tjp- 
leal c uuutrj r boy (rom tbe tiin* IM 
left his borne in Kentncky onUl UB ', 
graduation ^m Hampton. ■TbeiHoa^ 
Job BL Hedges wai tbe chief, aguafcar 
at tbe Brooklyn me tlnf. He wit f«||>t^ 
lowed by Malor I. $• Uotsa}, wfea 
made a brief addre u 

Mr. Hedges In gli Ag blsiinpreaaiOBa 
of Hampton Instlti te aaW. ■'Hamptxw 
Is a good place f* wblte people b*- 
cause It makea tUem whiter. XMf* .' 
you Bad a sanctiij.of emottap that .. 
makes yon asbaned. At Hampttai 
true reUglon Is to be found. We aoina- 
iimea Ro to church becanae It la decent 
They go because they've got to hava 
it," be said. He spoke glowingly of 
Robert C. Ogdea "1 know of no placa 
where a dollar win breed mors dollats 
of value than at Hampton." 

Major Bobert R. Moton. dladpllaaiy 
officer at Hampton, said: "The mo^ 
serious problem of the nation la tt aaa^ 
Jnstment of tbe relatlona of the tw» 
races. Hampton Institute afforda a 
common platform for all men, black 
and white, north and sooth, to meet on.,' 
"SlaTery.* declared Mr. Moton. "left., 
the Negro with tbe Impreaaton that 
work with the handa waa desradteg 
and to be despised. Bnt Hampton la 
UolDg away with this tbooght Xto 
white race taagfat -oa that asythfac 
black wya to be deapiaed. HamptMi 
baa taught jny rw* to b» proud of It- 
self. Ood intended that 'th» Negro 
should be aa good aa any ^jjth ar raea. 
And what win go a great w^r toward 
the solving of the problem^ is a beUaC 
of white people In tha colored »■■_ 
and a belief by the colored man in tlia; 
white person." ' 

The Hon. George McAneay, prM» 
dent of the t>oard of aldermen. w)H^ 
the chief speaker at the Ca m egto hafi 
meeting In New fork. 






-1 


INCREASE IN FUNDS FOR 
FREEDMEN'S AID SCHOOLS. 


:.1 ■• 


emacle, was called 'upon for a few 
remarks. Sh6 said in part : 

"Sir Knights, Daughters, Maids, 
Pages iind Friends : We have as- 
sembled here today to do honor to 
the church of God by laying the 

comer stone for a new place of 
worship. We came to represent 
one of the grandest orders on 
earth. While very young in your 
midst, ye we are not; young by any 
means. So we have come to stay. 
The International Order of Twelve 
came before the public here^ in L09 
Angeles to fill one of the greatest 
needs of the rac. , 

"It dos ndt come /to an^g<)nize 
any oth^ society, but rather to 
aid all that have for their object 
the amelioration of. the. condition. 
o| oar raiie..; ^'''<i^ii^t^i^f^:\. -Cii'll 

"Omr objectris to improve th* 
heart, exalt the mind, promote vir- 
't|ne and inwality, to arouse and 
quicken acts of charity, fidelity 
and purity, and unity. Thetei^h- 
ii^inviHar lofdges ai»^W pride 
and moderation and forbearance. 

"t!he International Order of 
Twelye firowns itpou yiee^and im- 
morality in whatever 8hap« it may 
presmt itielf and I t^ that ifa 
mission eao not be ^•oeom] 
until evex7 tean of our raea _ 
elevatad to the -highest typ« of 
ataahoo4 and every iroman clothed 


New Bulldinga and Equipment With 
1 atrenger Faculties Alaa B sc wr ad 

The twent7-two sdioola under tlM 
auspices of the FYeedmen'a aid society 
of the Methodist Episcopal cborcb have ^ 
started upon a new era this year and -1 
with the brightest prospects for tiia 
second year of Itbe church qnadrenulnm 
In all the history of the sodety'a work. 
Additional appropriations have been 
made to most of tbe liiadtntiona. : the 
facuj.tle8 bare been streagtheoed, re- 
pairs are under way. ground has been 
broken tor a new dormitory at Walden 
university, new buildings have been 
recently erected at MorrtstoWn Normal 
and Industrial college and Claflln unl- 
Terslty. aod buildings under courae of 
erection at Wiley university and Phi- 
lander Smith college ai* adng eom- 
fdeted. \ 

B!i!i0p l^beodore & Henderaon. one 
•f the moat resourceful 'blsbopa In 
Methodism, has been relieved from tlw 
holding of spring conferences and la 
detailed by the board of btehopa to lead 
In a campaign for the Jabtlee among 
the white conferences In particular as 
exeentlve director In co-f^teratlon with 
the secretaries. All of the bishopa ns- 
Ident in tbe south are becking Seercta- 
tiea Maveety and Penn In their ptau^v.. 
and the brightest day In tbe forty^ ; 
seven years' blstory ot the aoetety iS , 
now at hand. ' K, 

Tbe schools fosbensd by -the 
and their location ari: i 

Gammon Theologleai ■eirilnsriy, 
Oa.; Flint Medlc&l cMage and 
New Orleans; Mehaify MsAMsl 
Naahyin*. Tenn. ; BenSett eoflSM 
boro. N. C; aaflin trntranltr, Oniis*' 
burg, & C: Oark unl^srHty. Atlanta. Qa.: 
Bam HoustoD oollege, MrMo, Tea.: Nsar 
Orleana university. Mew Ortsass; ftnst 
unlTerslty. Holly SpiinnC MIn.; Qaorg* 
R. Smith oollege, S«<iaUa. Mo.; PhflandT 
Smith eoDeae, Little Hoc^.Ark.: WaldtD 
university, .Vashvllte, Tana.; Wttey BBi- 
verslty. Manhall. Tex; CantlBl Alabama 
aeadetny, Birminsham, Alv; Ceokman B>- 
stttntSk Jacksonville, ria.; oniMrt aoaS^ 
amy, naldwin. La.; Haven academy. 
Waynutmro, Oa.; MeridiaA acBd«B>7. Me- 
ridian. Miaa.: Momstowa Nonoal and In- 
dttstrlal oollese, Morristowii, Teoa.; Mor- 
gan ooUege. Baltimore; Prtaosas Aana 
academy. Princess Ann^ Ui.; Virginia 
CollMdata and industrial |i> atllut» I^Ml)* 
bH(g. Va. '■ ■' «-> ^^^ 


m 


ll 


It!- 




I- 


,""T' 


BINGA'S GENEROUS ISIFt:^! 


VI" 


«v^ 


Chieaae Banker Oonalse laOQ to 
«f Nstiensi A s saai atl a n , 

Jesse Blnga. Chlcagcfa w«u 
banker, has given S500 «a tlw NatlaBal 
Association Pot the AdTaneetDMff oC 
Colorad f>eople. Mr. BlagK Is 
i n tyss t e d in the weirtt« of his 
tad lave this amount at tha racaot 
oeedng held at Uncpia Oaaiar ta OU- 
««C0 after Uatenlng tb I<>i<iMiw 3, B. 
SirtBian'sapaKb. 

Ja* Is Vacy entbivlutie aboot tte 
w«k of ttw ssKvcia^ and tatafcs that 
tba ttme i»s come ft^tfei 
pie to giva money 
l» retain ta* rlgfata 
Je9Baaa^g•iB 
»«•«»» «a» 


v-r 


■ A 


'<,;. 



MUTII ATPn Ok fie 


rANMnT RF iMPPOvrn 


t SNALS 

Mis» Blanch Wilson entertained 

Mr. amd Mrs. Calvin Brantley 

and Mr. Ray Matthews at her 

tiome, 920 East 31«t street, Tues- 

. «bg^iey^ng. 

fj^?" sDd pot fail tp attetod the meet- 
Tip^ ol the Lincola Republican 
^i: Club the fourth Friday evening 
r it W this month at Scott's hall. 


■W- ■-■■[' I 


Sut^ribs for aiid' read the! 
Ea£^e, ! the cddest apd best race 
journal on the Pacific slope. 


■>r; 




■ Mr v: Brit Oxiditie of San Fran- 
cisco, the greatest exponent of 
: Shakespeare that tie race has, will 
aeon make his appearance in this 
ci)ty. Particulars p our next is- 


:-X 


The Kewpi^ W ujt Club met 
a£ the residetK:e o Mrs. J. Pros- 
per, 1667 Wesi 36t street, Thurs 
*day evei»ing.^;One jf the mcJst en- 
joyable times of ne season was 
-repcst«L^ ; ,,^. , 

Politics Blast 1 e looking up. 
as:^ne of the reaj e -tate firms con- 
ducted by a race man has been 
turned into politici headquarters. 


Tj ■ East. 9th street h now looming 
;;-:iip in 1^ business vway an"* bids fair 
to become a businjess center. 

.,,f_^^;.- — * rr- 

' ; • The Eagle printed quite an ex 
'4 'tensive job for R. E. Magee, pro- 
. ■.ipnetor of the En:press Transfer 
1^;^ Company, 1038 East 9th street 
*> Jtfais week.. For lour heavy or 
; '..light hauling giVeiim a trial. 


Md was buried TliWsday after 
noon fro mthe Second Baptist 
Church, Rev. C. H. Anderison pre- 


\ 


% JMr. Qarence Iniln has been ill 
for a few days, but is rapidly im- 
pjroving. 

> r .'rte Wesley Chkpel, Literary is 
rapidly going to itfie vfront ; new 
life, new member^ and ideas be- 
ing the watchword * 

A valentine soctl will be given 
by the Willing V orkers of the 
Episcopal Church it their hall on 
East Fourteenth s reet, Saturday 
afternoon. 


m'^ 


' Dr. Si^th has* ft mded a young 
people's chapel on .N^aomi avenue 
for literary activities among the 
young people. 


Tbe Mt. Zion Baptist C 
choir will entertain the G. 
veterans with thei: annual e' 
tainment Friday evening. 


I 

efft 


rch 

R 

ter- 

The 


choir is doing. remarkably under 
the leadership of Mrs. Alfred Wil 
liams. 



Sirs. Ruth Temple and Rev 
Sheaf, the singing evangelist, 
furnished the usual large gather- 
ing of citizens at the Forum Sun- 
day with a splendid program- 
MrsC. Temple is the mother of 
Miss -.Ruth Tem[ile, the youn 
woman who by her unusual abj: 
jty gained a scholarship ftom t 
>Fdrum. 

• — - g., 

and Mrs. Jeff Boh tat 

ihed a large number 
ends at their li^autiful^e: 
dence on Pico street, 
evening. Music by the 
guests with many pioptilar 
afforded an unusuah eveninig 
enjoyment. The occasion was 
made more plea.sinn^ by the sump- 
tuous_refresbment> served by the 
host and hostess. Among those 
present were Mr." and Mrs. 
Brown, Patterson. Brow^n, Rose, 
Mesdames Graves, Jones? Moore 
and .Banton. Misses Banton, 
Todd, l^oward, BcTy, Bluitt and 
McDonald. Messrs. Howard, 
Ford, Stovall, il olden, Warren 
"and Beeks. 


The Standard Bearers' Society 
loi Wesley Chapel will give a 
grand oratorical and inusical next 
Wednesday- evening it - Wesley 
CljapeL Amo^g' the features Vi4il 
appear the orator/Mr. Atlgustus 
Martin. .■ ;. I; /j^,". 

The cnjAleriy meeting hi the 
Woman*?liome and Foreign Mis- 
sionary convention will convene 
at the Tabernacle Bapfist Church 
Thursday, Feb. 26, 1914. - 

9:30. The devotionaf service 
will be opened and conducted b;y 
Mrs. M. Wilson and Mrs. E. O^ 
Sermon of Pasadena, 

1»:00. Opening of the conven- 
tion. Remarks and appointments 
by the president. 

Introduction of visitors. 

Reading of credentials.; 

Duet, -Mrs. P. J. Johnson and 
Mrs; M. R.iCaviness. 

Welcom^address, Mrs. E. Kim- 
brough. ■■ / 

Response, Mrs. J. E. Williains. 

Singing by convention. '; 

Reading of letters^ 

1 ;O0. Morning session closes. 
AFTERNOON SESSION 

2:00. Devotional service con- 
ducted by Mrs. W. C. Dent and 
Mrs. Robinson. 

Convention reopens. 

Vocal solo, Mrs. E. Gould. 

Address, Mrs. S. B. Strickland. 
General discussion. / 

Paper, Mrs. M. B. Alve|> I#v. 
erside. 

Reports from local presidents. 

Singing, convention. 
' 4 :30. Benediction. 


^M t ( f ( \ W WW m\m '^'^''''''' "f'V ' " * ' ' " '''''''' WITTTTTTTTTTYTTnTTI^ 




HARRIS 


• Miss Minnie Albritton, the 
sweet voiced singer, charmed the 
large kudience Thursday evening 
at thei First M. F. Church with 
her lovely singini; In ber usual 
tmassuming mafiner she per- 
formed in' brilliant sj^le. 


Prof. Ghas. Alexander appeared 
in hf» Dunbar recital at the First 
M. E. Church Thursday, cveningi, 
Mr. Alexarider is without a peer 
in this locality as a render of Dun 
bar'r poems. 


Mr. Bdon, an old! residerit erf 
Pasadena,' was seriously injured 
Sunday in an autc.mo^)ile accident, 
which resoked in hisjdcath Tues- 
day. .His funeral tpolc place in 
Pasadena on Thursiby. 


FEDERATION 

1 Federation met 

g at the Y. M. Q. 

any ministers were 

Rev. A. C. .Caid- 

:a Monica, addire^i^ 

ion. His subect was, 

ty and Its Influericle?' 

. jGordon, pastor of the 

acle Baptist Church, will 

ss the fedefation next T6es-i 

% ^•^•■'' 

liemember tfie Rally for the 

Lincoln Memorial Con^egational 
Churdi, of which Rev. J. D. Petti- 
grew Is pastor, that will be at the 
Mount Zion Baptist Church, cor- 
ner Third street and Stephenson^ 
avenue, Sunday afternoon at 2 :30 
o'clock, Feb. 15, 1914. Everybody 
come and help the struggling 
chiu-ch to get established.. , 

Thi^ministers will be there, the 
great Mt. Zion choir will furnish i 
the music. 

Good speaking, good music, a 
delightful Christian fellowship. 
A grtat treat is in store for all. 
Ijkmjtj fail to come. i l\ s\. ■ 

Wesley Chapel will cele^riite 
the birthday of Lincoln Sunday 
evening. Among the participants 
on th eprogram are Mrs. Noah 
Thompson and Atty. McBethji^k 
J graduate of Harvard, who is tb 
furnish the principal address. Dr. 
Stovall, the popular physician. 


■:^"r--.'''-< !'.-'.■'? 


will be master of ceremonies 

Thi Georgia State Society 
meets Mosiday evening, the even- 
ing for social activity. The Soci- 
ety is progressing splendidly. . 
The cdlebration of the cotafed- 
Miss Elizabeth Ad^ms made aieration of State club\ at the A. 
splendid hostess at' » birthday "^ '^ ''' — "-^ « '"• 
party given in her |i<iior Monday 
afti^oooat the Cozy Den. Cov- 


ers were laid for t\^Q*t7^fcmr and 
her many Kttle friei^|^Rra(^ed her 


M. E. Zion Church Thurs<fay 
evening, proved a big and unusual 
drawing card. The federation of 
clubs is a newly organized body 
and bids fair ; to become an im 


many happy retunifii^ After a de- pbrtant factOTin future interest of 
lightful repast the Quests 5v«f« en- the race. - . 

tertained in the va rdlwth enjoy- ■' 


abfe 



^ Golden West Lodge No. 86. I. B. P. 0. E. of the World ^ 
^ I At Blanchard Hall, 231 So. Broadway ' ^ 

^- - Concert commences tit 8 o'clock Uiarp, Overture by the Los Angdes Entertainers. >i H*g , 

-^^- Welcome AddfcM* by E. Burton Ceruti. # ""^ 

1^^— ! Saxophone Sol<^ by Miss Mazie Mullm. * ..:•.'' \ —^ 

^•"' \ ' ThclBang ojwri li be danced under the direc|ion of Mrs., EJlworth Saunders. ""^ 

^^-'. Sax^Kon#Rd Trombone Duet by Miss iMazie Mullen and Prof. Harry Southern. —^0 

j?7' ' Sdection, by the a la Mode Quintette* under the management of Mrs. Lauretta E. Butler. "^ 

^>- No pains vrill be spared to make this number one of thq^Avemng j&ttractions. ' -r^g 

^ : Eadi partidpani a Soloist. "^ 

m J) ''■^ Souvenirs will be give% to each lady in the Elks Grand March. ^ 

^ jf We corjdially invite our friends to attend this Concert, as we are sure that you will be '^ 

^^— wdl pleased. The Committee will spare no pains to make this the event of tiie season —^ 

' ' ' f Mualc will be RuRnlshed by the i —^ 

Los Angeles Entertainers 


f 


_ COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS-^. B. Uving. Chairman; W. A. Shields, E. Lead- 

g— ing K.; Wm. SU^ighter, Trustee; R. Hite, Sec4 R. H. Ificks, Past Exalted Ruler. 

•g— I OFFICERS— E. B. C^ruti. Exalted Ruler, J. P. White, E; L. K.. E. Jackson, E. Loyal K.; 

^»^ Wm. Shdton, Treasurer; Wm. A. Hudson, Financial SosretfuTy. 

^ ! ipteneral Admission pS G^^ts 

^ Refreshntwit^Dl be «erved by the ladies. I^n't f oi^ day and ^te, Monday, Feb. 23 
Doors will la^en at 7-30 p. mr ^ 




iMj^en 


'1 


C^L YOUR FRIEND'S AnENTION Ti TH% 3 

\w i . ^ ^ ^W t ___o o..#i r\^\,^^^A ~._ ' .11 u.. 1 I 


OAKLAND A M. 


i 

E. CHURCH 


Dr. 


J. F. Peck at Helm, Partakmg 
-_of Remarkable Progress. 

' The Oakland charge known as 
{he Fifteenth Street A. M. E. 
Church is -and has been known 
what in" the eve^day parlance as 


date choir opened the morning 
service we marveled that such a 
change could be wrought in such 
a short time. When we later 
learned that ^his church had 
d some cents in a 
months we agais 
lotice. But when, 


v.? 


\'1. 

■■>■ '-.C 

^r^f 

' ■ , ' .' ^ \ 


m 





lan in-and-but chai^ifl 
magnetism and p«r|on^ity of Df : 
Peck, formerly oT thisv^^, a re- 


markable change his feteh expe--helm aiid then >t ceased to be a 


iili 


L 


rienced, and is verita;bly outdoing 
itself and really bidS fajr to take 
second place not eveii 19 this, city 
along the lines of religious prog- 
ress. A staff writer.of this paper 
recently visited there. eW were 
agreeably suiprised at the Metv 
ropolitajtt appearance of thisi 
charge, and wEen Dr. Pedc's iji-r 
Invented and now strictly /uivto- 


veiiat 


we Ihouiglit *g*'" ^* ^^''"^^ ""■ 
ravel it ^;k ^Nps Dr. P^k at the 


wonder, for the many years we 
b?ive knbvb him and knowfr of 
him, his pa(storate has beien a suc- 
cession <rf tfemarkable ac(tOmphsh- 
mcnts from the effete east to the 
middle west, the Mississippi alley, 
the west.atidto the Pacific coast 
this polishtd minister of the goi 
ptl whoi^akes everyone knr- 
that he is' just as big. as the 
fellow has been, a continued 


cess and Oakland can 'well be 
proud to have such an able divine 
as he is to minister their spiritual 
nees. We had the misfortune to 
mislay our data, afljjfwe intended- 
acquainting our readers with what 
the Oakland people! are doing in 
detail, the personnel of its leading 
spirits and the various auxiliaries 
of the church. We will as a re- 
sult thereof be compelled l^to fore- 
o the same and will" endeavor to 


•rf 
i. 


gire It in detail .a,t andth^ ^ne. 
We, however, will ss^l-that the 
choir is great and we 'were in- 
formed that Mrs. R. A. Brown 
could -not get jt)bes made fast 
enough for the new members. The 
choir at pakland Js^^a great one 
and with ,the BewE pipe oi^n 


s K- 


International Or«;ier' of Twelve 
meets as follows at Washingtoa 
and Central Hall: 1 ^' „_ 

Golden West Temple No.UlZ^ 
meets first Tuesday of each montfc 
at 8 o'clock p. m. , ^ 


^?a 


Pacific Coast Tabemacl*^ 
210 meets second and fourth 
Tuesday, at 8 o'cloc k p. mi f ^ 

New Beulah TaBemacle No. 43 
meets th^ second and foirtfT 
Thursday of each month ait 8 

o'clock,p. m. ;|, 




w'. 


:>Sfar of Bethlehem Tabernacle 


and second 


!m 
No. 382 meets the fi» 
Saturday at 2 p. m. 

Keddesh Royal House of Midit 

No. 79 nxeets the 'third TuesAi^. 

at 8 D. m. *. ^^ 



JUST OUT 

.F^ /^edititm <if ^'The Sci^ 
Book of Tips on the Race Prob- 
lemi" A choice sdtcrion of ex- 
tracts, clippings, historical fact^, 
and biographies of some 6i the 
greatest Negroes ^ the world. 
Also thati masterful speecJi ^., 
Judge Afircus A.- Kavanau^, 
judge of t!he Supreme 'Court of 



which is soon to ;b« installed the Illinois, in ius appeal for justice to . 

visitors fr^m the east who come n,^ vr,,^„ ; ami. u ♦ 7 T. 

to the raiJ^n«xt ye^r will see and*^^*^° \ A" should reJd this, 
hear as goo)!?!* hetter than if ^or sale i at this office, J. D. 
they were in Jfew ork. Reynolds, publisher. 


MUTILATED PAGE 


,^ 


IMPROVED 



$ 


Large audiences fenjoyed both on Sunday to hear Pastor Kin- 
the morning- aaLeviening services cheii's messages both at his momf- 
at Mt. Zion B^isi Church last r ^^,^^3 ^^d the evening. | 
Sunday. Th^|>asto|- preached, at ^he chuVch i? in the midst ok 
the momme: service upon, ine .;, > . .i -'*: 

Inevftablc in the Life of Christ." gresrt growth ind)a mighty spuit- 
-He held the audieni:e spelfbound ual .awakening which promises 
from 'the beginning to the ending; great things for the kingdom. _ 
but Sunday evening! he set things valued at $12,000.00. So this is in^ 
on fire when he pfeached upon, Sunday promises to be one of 
"The Friend of Publicans and ^1,^ greatest days in the history 
Sinners." When ^ev. Williams ^^ ,^e church. At 11- a. m. Pa.stor 

rSlrfelf^nHee ^^-^tl.lT^^cJ'S^ 
came forward , to Lte with the f?f:}^'^:^^°^ 
church. :V4./i > Y^'^'^'^"^^^^^^^^^^, 

Wc«edf not motion the work ^ Worry- Ji r j^^' - 

tb<. Mt. Zion Choi? is doing, for At|he evening service one of 
eve^ one icnows ^at that choir the; sSongest P^ogn.^^'jycrr^^ 
': ^; f:^ . j sented to a Los Angele^'audience 

^?i<J*i ai U Zion A wiU^. heard. Mrs. N<^ H 
s^ted-Sf Monday evening iffi Thompson, one of the mo^^e^- 
wiU continue 4ndeiitely. J Jed women o Amenca^^Bad 

\. iThepuipit at 11^, Zion Sunday. »^s the people on ^ Jital -J^ 
Feb: 15 will be ilied by Revs. Ject m connection with the Ufe 
*^imams and Fisher. We are not of Dougks and Lmtoln, and A^ 

^expectmgtheimemberstobe Hugh Mcbeath a former gradn^ 

■I ^ K & . . L .. uoi., ;„ th^ ate of Harvard, and one Ot the 

present every ,night to help in the -^'■^ "' • 

•^ i . , . ■ 1 „ „„^f th^ most brilliant lawyers of the race, 

reinval, but we a^lso expect the v 

" public at large to take part. The 
|choir willjb^ on hjand each eveur 
lag. 


I V/UIV 


ROUTES 


^K 


will speak on. "What the Negroes 
Contributed Toward ■•Their Own 
Emancipation." t ; • 



rj*f 


Miss Jessie Randolph was nJai*- 
ried at the home of her parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Randolph, last 
Thursday evening. The wedding 
was a very pretty affair. "Hie 
'bride was charmingly attired in a 
gown of white andj:atried a large 
boquet of white and pinq chrys- 
anthemums. Dainty refreshments 

' jrere served. 

. ?.' ■ -- — ' 

llr. J.>B. ^ess and Mrs. Mattie 
': HqUaad were quietly married lap 
,:W<KHiesda)r at the court house. 


tiee^ton Shannon. Advertising 
A\anagcr of The Cagk. 

The above is an ezxellent like- 
ness of ^r new hustling Advertis- 
ing Manager. He is a fornaer resi- 
dent of San Frandsco, and lived 
in California 13 years. Haa worked 
on The Outlook, Pacific Coast aP- 
peal and other race publications 
and is noted for letting raeolt* in 
the advertieintr line. In the re- 
organization of this joornal he 
takes the post on the very importr 
ant end of ^dvertisidg Maofage. }■ 














W^-: 






Ul» ^ ALONG CENTRAL AVENUE , f, 

Carrvdl W. Short, the druj^st^ located at 4400 So. Paik^^ 
Mrs. Tennabaum has the latest and best. , ^ij: i i;f ^ •• 1 ; \ 
Everybody's friend'-W. H. Guest at 12^h and C*ttli«t V' : • 
Schneider & Schultz, German wine 


{ vines Hbd bnu«!ics, 2056 SfnU F« avi 

Satisfaction, service and style' to c! 
Suit Shop. 326 W. 7|(i street. 



prpducts <UMi fiittilA pi»e 


and il^ it 'ti|&:Sampi 

Kftcwdl Bfos., at 12th and Ciatni^miilke^jfiMr'xs^M 7% 
•Ks-amd faitnisb 3rour Christmas jewebyl ^:] '^^ ^;V;,r*^M|'^':; ,,K 


g;lal»Ks 

Bicycle repairing, ■»rulcanizing and all kipds of soadries, Totty 
Pederico, 4002 fiL^eiitral Ave.. .^ _J ' ' '-'.■..^, ■-^^^-J.^'y^ ■ 


A. Zimbdmafa wiliim>v»i« 
St 38th and So. Park Av«. 


rda with groceries. 


. GeK 
b«st meats. 


ii^.i 


^.«^ 3701 So., Park Ave, is where 


cofaStdtW.It 



For praetidd^lttmbiag and gas^Sttl 
4318 Central Avei ; . 

. . W. E. Talbelt, 2306-10 San P^ ^Uiot painty varaisl|es,.cik 
Have your jhoes sewed, uailed, etc., at reasonable rttie, Hanjr 
GoMberg Shoe fospital, 5528 Central .^v^ 


Visit A. ffHartfield. at'3301 Saa iMteilSt. 
wechanics' toi.etc . |-'il;!/4 



iSfO' 


WW' 


■ ■■{'J- 


smm 


Ic 


ttenble D^i^a^rvice 19 NeW Or- 
leans an*^ ]8Hi< throctgh iHxie 
Land.. 






EL PASO 


t 


■'i 


s'if 


A-ji'l',- 


•I. 


"GOLDBN 8TATE LIMnjEIV' 

The t-ain de luxe, eiEelqsiVely I 

elass. ; ■'■'I^ ■ "i.,". . 

The "CAUfORNiAlii" for both 
'and second class travel.. ,.< 
Hie line otjow RltitudeB,,\ "J 


(KiDEN 


^^^tii 




■ * 


QVE 


'r. 



'■fbf, brail of tbe A^onklit»— 
vlW route of the: 

SAN FRAMGISCO 

THE "ROAD OF A THOUSAND 
WONDERS," tb the ISast through 

the great Northwest ; j , 

8be aqents 4 ! > ' ' 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Los Angeles Offices | ^^'1. 
''■" 212 West Seventh Street \ 

' . tlon. Fifth ani Central Avehu* 
Pi^'adena Office, 148 E. Colorado St 


I I. IIUL^Il I 

j ' . .%eaaFrya*oDHBeof . 

<MK)ds, Notrafhs/llad^ aiid Gents' Fumislt;^ 

l^gs. Quito and Rkmkds. Glovc^ C^nttt, Rftibow Em. 
broidery jiiid Ueo/ etc ^ TRY OUR HOSE 


2^-259S VVest PSeb atr^ to* 


California 


f^uebto MeaJt Markjet 

J«#eph Davis, ProjpmjtQr r 

MEAT AHD JFi»i 


TEU 
Ifain 

5897 



I 



nmntm 


. mrrfc^srs abd Cfai^keas f«r Chri8tml» a« ReMobable Ptic^ 
Premitun Bacon and~ 


Atm^S^M'^KEE iffARpWARE CO. 

■'W''r?Em 


f 


m 



SOUTH H/ONJ »T ANo »aB ^O^ Sf « peof&o 
Lp4 ANG£LES ^£A . 


) 


J. E.. Jones, G.W.Sanders . 

i Telephone Broadway 1196 


B^L. Ware 


Diresden Djie Works 


REMEMBER 


an^ 


Ladiesjf and Gents* Garments Cleaned, Pressed 
/ Repaired 

Hats CIeaDed4nd Blocked— Work Called for and Delivered 


The Palace Gafe 

915 Central Avenue !- 

The neatest eoziest and best place to eat. Newly fitted t| 
nobby little booths, where parties may dine unmolested by tb 
public gaze, Chinese and American dishes of the cheapestHiiid 
daintiest and best dishes served, Cfiop Suey and Noodl^ in 
American style . , _ j 


Sunset West 1861^ ' Home 71< 

BECKWirrH's Imarkef 

•W. ;E. BECKWitH, Prop. 
2S74 WEST PICO ST. Near Hobaijt 

RANCH Poultry dressed to order 

FRESH FISH ANIP OYSifERS give me a TRuii. 

ilY MOTTO: •"^]|^* MD LE T LIVE" j 

Estoblished 1889 ■^.. ^ . t ■,, „ Incorporated 1905 

BEEMAN A HENDEE . 

A '- .■■■---_ , ■ - 

JLadies Shirt Waists, Neckwear," Yams, In- 

fant'3 Layett^^ Children's Dretemaking:. Dolls and Toys, , 
NeedleiMrk, Embroideries, Juvenile Clotihinfir 
r> !{ Pbanes; Hbme 102X9 Pacifie Maia4998 

61-863 Soath i^roadway | i 


I NGELtrS 


"Where Qu^^ is AlwHys Consideted* 


'Qtom Bigger 


: Jl^t Side Popular Tradinjr Place for ejtr^tblng 

IN'S EMPORIUM 


Men 



Sf Childitiis Outfitters 


Own l^^ldp. T4^ Stb Street, Lod Angeleq, Cal, 


Gi^ntSmidl, 
Gnrtta"^-^ 




I5wa>- ' -'.ii' i. :?■ 


Prank wtlHMne, Auditor 
Jaa. C. aiaoghtw. Secy, 





i^JHfiitirsMfn^ EBttaloien 

«iV«orkiiri|iiii4|^ glob^ 

fr 4OTiitt"#nuirr ; PHONTE MAJJN 362^ 

■%-i 'h\;j|' iS^^^ceatlMibeat " -PrJcea theteiwat' '^.^'i;, 

6 64giirfeniwido8t 

Wbare yott on ^at RMi|(^lx»-WMriClotliM.| SMn* T«aii». 
"" nr^smof * 



aadbemc 
r«uoBaU4 


ilipw* ysjir •« of ,liiie irwy hiteat ttil^ 


Mb 


;UMtii ttO-aoiit 4164, j^ i^^^^^l^^^ ; •- 

i m CPHtrrtOf^TME 

Ik 


i»^OL vtmm.% 

.-r. .JPniviitar: 





HWheri You 6«e the Be6t Service in 

Fainily Trade 

912 Sm PWro St \ - - ■ Opp.CityMKk 


It ia^ 102(y East 


THE NE 
Basket Gr 



FOR LiSS 


BUSY 


V<AN 


u:-^# 


n^ 




When you are ia doobt a* to McaWtjok 
and io^me, ■• i J. W. Celcmaa, «f^ SJ 
Seeond. tke n ii> who has supplied saa z,--^'' 
thousand ia ^ hie city and TieiHi^ witfcyl s-^ 
suitable ocenpitioaa that •■aMe'^hea tf ' 
ive aecordii^: 4 the dietatea of tk« elia. 
ate and eonditi^i in aunay^^lMiferaiB;' .^7- 
Mr. Coleman ji eoD^enial di^oHtfia aiil ^ ~ 
>><»^ smile, ti^t ia erer «■ thp aiatfaM 
adi^piee to k^oatnral bastaiiBp q^afitiea 
-when yon art in ■•«] of worit vj^t Mr. 
Coleman and adjust yoorsetf — 1|« sets 
quic kly a nd auppliaa jt/ax ae«da«|t fittle 


ce«t.S 


'\ 


I 


country, e^ at h.. office at once Goed job. alway. o. |uu.d!\ f ' 

Phones: ^.2879 .. 2^^.^- 


*«ar«ff 



UNO & sdiy 

ITECTS 

im Building- . ;> 


. ■ ^r ■« ; 


l^'A 





>(b6ut fft? flH \ 


m 

^NTEaL AVENUB I ^^ ,T/ 
*oa will secui^ h^t work and lowest pricM in /i?*^ ^-^'^^^ 
■nd coortetHis treatment Delivery to fill oarta n* *S.^'l/''°"»* 
Phone orderemTen strict attantioA *^^^.^*^^»W.nie 


Fhom ordire tpren ^ct aptention 

MAii».;eiflr-i" r ^' 






A. AlCiRANT 

•• ( - 'NbTARY' -' [' : 
forlnTestments. Boilding, 
lioans, In$urance. Hoosea, Lots, 
; and Acreage for sale 
^146 Central Avenae 



% 


08 Angd^ 


jcalifomia 


PEflPlES 

Oiphai 
Shares!: 

*F. H. CRUM 

Tel. B^^iptKi^Jap 



^f^ 


Idea Bakery 


420 East Fiftih Street 


bakery Goods ^^sh P^try Daily 

1;' OrttAjjiextadCakaaaiidPteaariaHttlebettarwMifii-,^ "^ 

I W* can affMOia baeaue we do our OffnhS^^^^ 
; , par iPuties and Weddings Try OorjCake 



Ml.' : .'TBii'HDixnBsoir ;'- 

80% C4. ISf^Ctottal Aye. ^eL Sirath 871 Thj, j. oneaaong the 
<ddest and ]M«t knoira firms of ita kpd in our eify. °]fr. s. p Heo- 
doMon, the oi^cr and i9«erat«r of the hasinei^ j, ^^ katmn in the 
a^ ajtaan ol wide biiifaiasa i^^ jSa ia & 

bW of ^ ^ nd he ii ew on the «lnii te^rt that which 
and^beit fbr Ids pw^e. 
yeani a«;o when ha b^^ th^:«perstiaa «{ tte. realty 
ba»u«|n in the oifgr, it was qnite diffieolt for o^o^ agw^to gist 
d^aizabie; listings of Jropirty afther for salfc<t f^Wt to mmbm 
deraoil h|» apdeiteont A^tJ'iflg the raee,j^(i ^ i^^ 4one VeU hit 


eitjr 
tms 

is 


■ri. 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



Household Brand Flayonng Extracts 

Oar Goods are Guaranteed Absolutely Pure. At your Grocers 
Retail for 26c per bottle. Improved Export Ginger a1« and 
all flftTion. Soda Water. 

^ I tijGeb. J. House & Sons. 

Maoofactorer Los Angeles 

JMMOTHER'S KITCHEN CAFE 

;'| r • C;S- BRuWN, Proprietor 

||j THE BEST PUCE IN TOWN TO EAT 

':*| ." f Home Qooking ^A; Specialty 

BEST MEALS IN TOWN 

SHORT ORDERS 

1441 East Ninth It. \ los nKeles, Cal. 

, Chas. L. Parsons 

ARCADE DRUG STORE 

■■■'"" TOILET ARTICLES 

Ifyal Famly Remedies . Prescriptions a specialty 

Fifth sad Central Avenue. 

W. H. GUEST, P. D. 

,■ ■ DRUGGIST 

Stationery Notions and Toilet Articles 

• ( 12th and Central Avenue 

Kverybody has a Hobby — Our nobby is rooms— a 50c broom for 35c Delivered 
Always Welcome Whether Looking or Buying 

Brodine- Berg Furniture Co. 

Temple Street at Belmont 

If you ne«d any Furniture call and see us," ©r if you want to sell your fumitur 
W« will call and see you. I on't call us DoW^^call us Up— Wilshirs 3417 


Pbeow; Hooui J'-6SSS; lf^$lSI, 




>BS 

Whdesale Cjraciprs and Prodn 
Hotel and Re^utant Supplies 

924-26 San PedroSt, \ \ Lo^ Ai»el^Cal, 

I 


plSpi 



We Offer for Public Inspection The Bei^That 

In Real Estate that is listed with us from time to time. Ot« 
Ten Years of experience ^th an acquaintance with agents a or 
owners causes me to know the location and values of both city 
and country property. Absolutely no misrepresentetion^-ShpttUt 
you wish to buy come in and talk it over; if I have got wna^ 
suits you, or within your means I will try and Ret it for you— 
Through me you can meet the ovtrner— small payments accepted. 

MILTON W. LEWIS i j I 

liole Aqrent at Birch CDjrt. Main Str«et 3958 Hes'ijouth 45 

9 Birch St. Los Angelen, California. 

~ O. P.Kirinie 

NEW and SECOND HAND FURNITURE 

PRICES ALWAYS FACR And HONEST 

2606 CENTRAL AVENUE LOS ANGELES. CAL 


•-FEED 


-^FUEL 


M.B.Pettit & Sons 

, CASH GROCERY 

Pastry, Fruit and Vegetabias, Fresti Meats 

No. 1654 Temple 


Wilshire 3464 


Shop Main87. 


Residence Main 439 


W. A. WHITE 


General Blacksmithin?. Repairinsr, Hcrscshoeing 

Wood Work ^ 

North Center Street Los Angel s 


B LA I F^fi ILL'S PHARMACY 

erW. Jefferson and Normandie.) 

'fptions a Specialty 





ICE CREAM 


CANDr 



- •• — . . JM^^^^^^^ '^^ E. Vernon Ave. is a good place to trade. 
Mti S*iirtpd>Lve. 

J L., Either "early or late they will mend your two-wheel horse at 
' ,- ' VCompton Ave. reliable hardware dealers, Pencille-Miller, hold- 
, 4n|f4s>rt at 4612, and Keil & Son at 4528 Compton Ave. 
.^.HJ*'vB.'«. Jeffries at 2701 Central Ave., the old reliable grocer. 
yyi^.; ..Second Hand Furniture same as new at 2023 Central Ave. 
5.yl^■^' H.^iW. Mailman at 2601 Central Ave. has the family mark con- 
^ ((gfenialSly. ^ 

iS^S ' Newhall'Bros., at 1500 'K"' Vernon Ave., is on the feed and 
(i' fuet job. 

f..^: THE BROADWAY DEPARTMENT STORE 
/ Where Beauty and Convenience Mingles With Economy 

It is always hoUday af fee Broadway. The great crowds that 
Kitber^, each commercial day" of the year at this store along with 
;ihe saggestions for econornical housekeeping are some of the things 
Which njajce it l6ok like a holiday all the year round, and advances 
the timely idea of the house, "Don't Worry !" The result is you meet 
at this great store, for all the people; for none comes too poor nor 
too rich to be served at every counter and department with that 
sai|te courteous treatment that i>ervades over all. 

At the Broadway th. fe is little or no trouble in finding what 
jou want. Even fantasti: New Yorkers find here that convenience 
that is found in few other department stores in the city. 
' Its Latest Concession 

The new Hill street entrance at the Broadway, where children's 
"Toyland" is not only a \aluable concession but a very convenient 
addition for it saves trmble and time. Parents may take thei; 
children there without hwing the encounter of hauling them up- 
stairs in the crowd. Thi^ new annex also contains one of the most 
unique china, glassware and kitchen utensil department in the city. 

Just at this season the managers of the several departments 
from basement 4o ceilinjr, have joined hands in selecting a most 
choice variety of holiday jifts. 

HARRIS AND FRANK 
Among the leaders a style and artistic furnishings in ladies' 
and gents' ware Harris & Frank rank pre-eminent. Because of its 
many yucars in business this firm is one of the most reliable in the 
:'city. 1 

|t Why They Lead in Style 

Bedtose their buyers visit I^ew York three times a year, hence 
tb^ ,are ready with the latest cuts, shades and French touches. 
T»lit '% Hitle ahead of the general order of things. 
1 I Why It's a Pleasure to Shop at This Store 

, Iti»*y I* because t f the genteel and kindly treatment accorded 
r member of the ? reat throng that crowd this store every 

_^iefeial day of the year. 

JMf. Fran^^ who is mc i^ -always on the ob, is one of those big- 
Med mea whose soijl t <am8 through his face. 
JThe Christro^ selections have been carefully made and you 
larri^ & Frank before you decide. 



do well to svvp iqj at 


SEE OLD SANTA AT 

F.L PARK'S STORE 

Ol QENTRALAVE 

<: Greatest Varii^y of Holiday Season 
Ladies Combs, Toilet Sets, Manicuring Sets, Pocket Cases, i 

Glass Novelties, Initial Stationery 

At F. L PARK'S ALMAYS A BARGAIN 


/ 


Post Office in Connecion 




SHOES for 


ALL 


.525 South Broadwa.C 
240 South Spring Street 

Los Angeles, Caliorfn 


BASE BALL FREE! 

A Reach Jr. Rubber Center, Horsehide Covered Base Bal 

with each S§o.OO Purchase or over 

IRISH MAIL HANDCARS HOO and $4-50 

Safety Razors $L00 to $9 00 

Flash Lights 100 to 3.00 

PocKet Knives 25c to 10.00 

Target r"'''^ (.50 to 3.00 

Air Rifles 85 to 3.00 

Roller Skates 75 to 4.OO 

Punching Bags 1,50 toS.OO 

Basket Balls 2.00 to 8.00 

Base BaHs , 25 to 1.25 

Tennis Rackets. 1.00 to 8.00 

Sweaters , 5.00 to 12.00 

Automobile Robes 6.00 to 10.25 

Pishing Tackle, Kodaks, Carving Sets, Tennis Pennants, 
^Hunting Boots. Baseball Caps.Colleg{ Piilowi 
Palmetto Lawn Tents 

WM. HOEOEE CO. INC. 

I38-4-2 SOUTH MAIN STUtCT 



THE ALEXANDRIA ROOMING HOUSE 

UNDER new MAKAGE^IENT, 

AT 768 WALL Street '\ 

ISeat^Iy Purnlrhed Room between Mspie and San Pedre Ca« Line 
'With Hot and Cold Bath ALBERT PERRY, Manager. 


RING UP MAIN 8128 

OR F 7306 

r (13 Ruth Pharniacy 

E. 7th and Ruth Ave., will prDmiptly fill anldaliver your 
Drag and Toilet Article wanti 

Registered Pharmacist will dispense yout Prescriptions. 


0. Swan. AH KhaljM/^PouIt 


Poultry 


Ducks, Rabbits. Geese. Squabs. Turkeys wtiA Eggs, 
dreaaed to ordett ., Hewef s Ifarket 

[ Angdaa Street 


Pho&^F>7186 


w»- ■ 


.1A„ 




P 




r:«\c 


jQl^^^alri'jil 

wmk 

..■A V 1 

,_ / 




^■v4 i 


6o9dWork 
Sopenlsiiii Tsaclieil 

MAIY 1MPRQPEII& KUE 

Bofaemls and So^jii^ A|ipeet ef EtdnM- 
tioMl' Work Inj One Hutadr«4 Mid 
ThIHy CMint;** ; lit the' Seutheni 
at«tM Reviewredl by State SuiMrviaMf 

\<tackapii Davie »f Virginia.: i ^. . 

'Hoir indnstrlai training, onder a srs- 
tern o( ■upervising lodostrial teacbers, 
liaa &ot only vitalized tbe mral acbools 
amoiog the colore pet^le into wUcb 
It liaa been Introdaced, bnt la also baT- 
inS farreaebing econondc and social 
effects on raral conditibns generally, 
is described by itaclcson Davis, state 
sapsrvisor . of elemnttary schools in 
Virginia, tj) the Sontbero Workman. 
Mrl DaTis says in part: 

"A few efforts bad been made here 
and tbefe throogboat tbe sontb to tie 
np the work of tbe country school to 
tbe life of tbe home and tbe farm, bnt 
it was not nntil tbe estabUshinent of 
tbe Jeaaes fnnd for rural schools that 
a general effort was made in fbls di- 
rection. In Henrlc6 county, Va., In the 
fall of 1908, following a conference of 
the school officials of tbe county with 
agents of the Jeanes fund, a superrls- 
Ing industrial teacher was employed 
and put to work In all of the colored 
schools of tbe county. 

"Tbe pioneer work of Virginia Ran- 
dolph In overcoming the Indifference of 
her own people, organizing Improve- 
ment leagues at each school. Introduc- 
ing simple forms of Indostrial work 
and in the enlistment of tbe active in- 
terest of the white people"Tn these ef- 
forts for Improvement in practical 
ways. ^>et with such . success that a 
new spirit wae soon ablaze in each 
colored community, and the schools 
were transformed In appearance and 
in the general character of tbelr work. 
"The general plan, so successful in 
its early demonstration, has continued 
to grow and meet with approval. It 
has developed Initiative among the 
colored mral people, and it has tied 
their Interests together In a school for 
a better neighborhood. Tbe moral ef- 
fect has been noticed by the white 
people aronnrt them and their support 
of this movement has been hearty. 
Supervising industrial teachers were 
employed in 130 counties in tbe^sonth- 
em states last session, 

"This work has been inade possible 
In most cases by the Jeanes fund, but j 
the counties, as they see the splendid j 
results, are putting up more money j 
from local funds for the support of the 
work, and In some counties the teach- 
er's salary is paid entirely from local 
school funds. In sending out trained 
teachers to supervise the rural schools 
we are putting the best leadership of 
the Negro race to work In the task ^f 
bringing ibout bettfer tralnln&"*Better 
farming and better living. 

"The school is almost the only point 
where conscious effort is made by the 
white people to Influence and develop 
the Negro race, and here is a great op- 
portunity for constructive work, as in- 
deed the supervising teachers are 
showing. In organizing the school im- 
provement leagues tbey are bringing 
the older people together In the inter- 
est of t)etter things and are calling 
forth the spirit of self help. wUch is 
indispensable to their progress. 

"One of the most promising develop- 
ments In the work hns bt^n the co- 
operation of the supiTvlsins Industrial 
teachi.>r "Aiih tlif f:irMi rteinonstmtloD 
agent in nurkini; diiriir.; ihi- snninier 
months niUi rluliN nt mrN «ho make 
home enrriciis Mnrt <-;ui I!imii \ei;i't!ihie« 
and frnlLx for vvinin usi. I'liis fen 
ture of the wmk \v:is iit-tiiui ij^\lnnnia 
two years M{r<> in fmir <-»iiiiill.*s Diir 
Ing the past snnmi-r ii \vm> i-nrrled od 
in fourteen. IIiuIhi ilii^ pinn the In 
dustrial teachers are i-Mipiip,\vd for the 
entire twelve inciirths .\t the close of 
the school term Ihev (iiu.inlze garden 
clubs a mens the iiiiL'ei utrls They 
visit them In their hniiies. meet them 
In groups, give them pnictlcal Instruc- 
tion for their gardens and teach can- 
ning, cooking and sewing 10 their 
homes. 

"The teachers are In im-at' demand 
dnrlnf; the suniuier months, not only 
among the girls, bflt among their 
mothera as well, for the.r, too. have 
been eager to learn the 'government 
way* of canning vegetables 

"Bather as tenants, owners or labor- 
en tbe colored people cultivate farms 
In the south with an area of ,100.000,- 
000 acres. This is an area eqnal tb 
f««r times the state of Virginia. Mncb 
of tills land, as we know. Is cultivated 
tai the very poorest fashldn. We shall 
have a onesided cultivation as long aa 
w« bave twentieth centnry methods in 
<rar dUea and eigbteeatb centmr 
BMthoda on onr farma. 

"If we deny tbe Negro; tbe training 
which be needs to make « bettar cid- 
MB and a t)etter man and a better 
tatvaet, w« snppreaa onr mral life and 
hold down onr avovge to « lower level 
and we contintw to bare tdm wear oat 
the soil which la oar greatest nataral 
wealth. Training of tb^ right Und 
that wUI rapUce otMoJete imetbods with 
IntelUgent metbote. that will repUoa 
Inaanltary cabins wttb good dwelliuc 
bonsea, neglected abacka with attre^ 
Ut* achoolbooMii and an intelllgeiit 
««rk' fbr die cotBlng of the Usgdom. 
«f God on eartbHtbla la tbe rami elrl. 
ItatloB wblch ajmie UMbk Briat b* 
vr^MMEbt aa iff a 


^mOTHER" ZtOli'$ MEW jHOilg' 

P i« | rap of Well Known Ralifli^tw C«r- 
V poration In New York. 

Hrbe corporation of tbe Uotb^ ^ V* 
■1 SSion church baa pi>rehafc4tk«tiBti&- 
Ins «( tb* Church of th* Bed^aanir is 
W«t One Handred and Tbl^^txtb 
atraet, near Seventh lyrenne, Mew^ 
Xork. Atteratlona are to be made aal 
Coilowa: Tfie roof la to be ralaed and; 
gaUeslea erected, electrie Usbts wUI bej 
Installed abd decorations are ^ be op! 
to tbe modem idea. Tbe boUdlng when i 
completed will bave a aeatlng capaelty : 
ot from twelve to fifteen hundred, i 
and the members of tbe faiboDS old; 
IfotiMf SIM) wOl have one of jdM otostj 







beautifnl edifices in New Tot|^ city. It 
is located convenient to alf'Sr linea 
in tbe heart of the densely populated 
Harlem district and in easy reach of 
its communicants. :. 

These transactiotis speak well for the 
progressive Idea of the pastor, the Bev., 
J. W. Brown, formerly of Rochester, 
and his able staff of officials^' The 
church In West Eighty-ninth street, 
which is valuable, will be sold. Aside 
from the possession, of this property, 
Zion owm other properties of value 
and is considered one of the wealthiest 
churches of the denomination.-: 

It was founded In 1796, the first church 
being built at the comer of Church and 
Leonard streets In 1800. It was re- 
built in 1820. Thejfst annual confer- 
ence was organized in 1821. and the 
church was burned down In 1839 and 
again rebuilt In 1840. The Sabbath 
school was organized in 1845. and to 
1804 the church was moved to Tenth 
and Bleecker streets. From there it 
was removed in 1904 to Its present site 
In West Eighty-ninth street The pres- 
ent membership Is about 900. 

There Is no doubt that the glad tid- 
ings of its advancement wlllabe herald- 
ed abroad' throughout the country. It 
is expected that the building will be 
ready for occupancy by Easter Sunday. 
The present membera of the .board of 
trustees are B. D. Fenderson. Charles 
C. Groce. Andrew Mead, .lames E. 
^-j-i^WkBon. Alonzo A. Rives., WIHlam H. 
DeKalb. B- Herbert Porter. Marcus J. 
Baker. Louis M. Fenderson and James 
Chase. Mme. Minnie Johnson is or- 
ganist and directress. The late E. V. 
C. Eato was for tblrty-flve years a 
member of the board of trustees. 






t 

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THE ARMSTRONG LEAGUE. 

Richmond (Va.) Chapter Honors Mem- 
ory of Hampton Inetitute'a Founder. 

The Richmond (Va.» chapter of the 
Armstrong league held Interesting ex- 
ercises at the Ebenezer Baptist church 
In Richmond Sunday afternoon. Feb. 
L The occasion was tbe annual cele- 
bration of "Armstrong day" In honor 
of General Samuel Chapman Arm- 
strong, founder of the Hampton insti- 
tute. The&prlncipai address was de 
iivered by the Hon. R C Stearnes, 
state superintendent of public schools. 

Short addresses extolling the life and 
character of General Armstrong were 
made by Dr. J. A. CX Chandler, soper- 
intendent of the Richmond public 
schools; Hon. H. C. Pollard, city at- 
torney, and the Rev. R O. Johnson, 
pastor of the Moore Street Baptist 
church. • 

The offlcera of the Richmond chap- 
ter of the Armstrong league are Wil- 
liam D. Jones, president; H. C Mon- 
dln. treasurer, and Miss W. L. Brooks, 
secretary. W. D. Davenport was 
chairman of the committee of arrange- 
ments for the meeting. The jexerclses 
were well attended, and much public 
interest waa shown in the work wbldi 
the Armstrong leagne represents. 


I 


College IMen to laaue Monthly Magazine 
It is encouraging to note the increase 
in numbers and inOnence of the Alpha 
Phi Alpha fraternity of IntitrcoUeglate 
Greek letter m«i among Afro-Ametl- 
cana. The Brat issne of tbe Sphinx, 
the official organ of tbe tratemlty. Is 
dne to make Its appearance tbe Aral 
week in Febraarj. The seventh uh 
nnol conv«itloa of tbe YratendtT wfB 
be held at tbe seat of tbe nteta diaptar 
In Chicago rc»r three days' bnginnliit 
Monday. Dec.^2& Henry lAks DM»' 
erson of Ohio is president of the fta* 
teralty, and Roscoe W. Boos o< Oonill 
university is tbe secntaiy. < 


V 


■ Mi 




Big TradM Union Orsaiilasd la Porllk} 
Tbe trades union oreDlied by eoioi^ 
ed men In Parts the lottar port of Ja»- 
nary Is sold to hav* a memberaldp «( 
over 10.000. Tbs •hleet oT the mdM 
Is to resist tbe eSWta of tbe widts 
workmen, who' are eteimed to be st- 
tsmptlns to prevent the eotored ■■■ 
trtwi gettlna «a tnerpaM la pay. 




3 .■ 


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.ol~ THE CALIFORNIA CAOLE. 

: An eommunlcatlons thoul^ be addressed 
to Ttn Cailfarnla Eagle, 1034 East Ninth 
Streets.' Sunset Phone Broadway 7E67. 

Bantered as Second-class mail matter at 
the Postofflce of Ix» Angeles, Cal., under 
the Act or March 1, 187S. 

C. A, SPBAR. Manasing Editor 

' J. B. BASS Editor 

■■, H. SHANNON A.dvertislng Manager 

• 1 LEWIS K: BEEKS. Local Editor 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

8. B. Carr.—.- _ _ ...Pasadena 

H. E. Simpson Bakersfleld 

I E. L. Lewia.I- - Fresno 

Miss Ada Thompson...- - _ Oakland 

"Mrs. Evana ;... San Fraiiclsco 

• - ,J. J. Anderson San' Francisco 

B. F. Henderson Los Angeles 

SUBSCRIPTION BATES. 

One Year $2-00 

Six Months ._ 1.00 

T hree Months j|. - 5 

It occasionally happens that for some 
reason or other papers are missed by be- 
ing missent, ioet or stolen. In case of 
subscribers not receiving their pajpers. In 
form us by postal and we shall cheerfully 
furnish, a duplicate copy of said missing 
number. 

No attehtlon paid to anonymous letters. 

Copy must he written plainly on one 

' side of paper, and to insure insertion in 

■ current issue must reach this, office 

Thursday. Correspondents, please take 

notice. 

ADVERTISING RATES, 50c PER INCH. 


Governor Hiram was dowp 
with his grandeloquence Thurs- 
day, but his bombast will fall on 
deaf ears to the 50,000 colored 
voters in California this vear. 




One thing the Eagle has always 
been steadfast in — the tenents of 
Republicanism. And if the chick- 
ens are coming home to roost we 
have the consolation to know 
that we did not stav awav. 


It will not effect the colored sa- 
■ loon keeper if the liquor license is 
raised to $1000 per month, as 
they are not allowed to get such 
a thing as a saloon license in this 
city. After all it may be a good 
thing that such is the case. 


Vf-' 


We are now looking up records. 
We want to know just what As- 
semblymen voted for the full 
crew law put forth and passed at 
th&, behest of the labor organiza- 
tfottS at the last legislature, 
which turned more than 1,000 
negro train porters on the Santa 
Fe and Southern Pacific railroads 
out of employment. 


favorable auspices;^ oar chief of . 
staff has made the way easy; she 
has done a noble work, a work I 
alone and single handed that 99' 
per cent of our men or women I 
would have abandoned; therefore) 
she; is due unstinted praise for the 
manner an the staning that 
this journal now occuies and 
while some may withhold credit 
the pen that writes history will 
never lie down without recording 
the great part that the managing 
editress of the Eagle has done in 
making history for race progress 
on the Pacific slope. Therefore 
in the reorganization of the'forces 
of the Eagle vnthout division the 
policy remains unchanged and 
are to be guided by the same 
hand that has so successfully 
guided it since the death of J. 
J. Xeimore. 

Thus organized we shall aim to 
give to our patrons a real news- 
paper catering only to the plain 
everyday common people, a 
forum for them, we shall to the 
best of our ability espouse their 
cause at all times and on all oc- 
casions. We are going to boost 
for the race for Los Angeles, for 
California — for everything and 
everybody that ,have for their goal 
the uplift of the race and the bet- 
terment of humanity. 

Hew to the line ; let the chips 
fall where they may. - ' 


we either approve! or disapprove! 
of Chiei Sam's crusade in thi 
cotintry. I 

As a race we are too easily] 
carried off by wild fancies before] 
investigating real ,condi^c*is.l 
Now with the present status | of] 
affairs it is impossible for the 
American Negro to live and thrive 
in that portion of Africa from 
which Sam comes. In any case] 
it will be time enough for usitoi 
get back to Africa when the 
Dutch return to Holland^ the Ger-] 
mans to Gernriany, French ; to] 
France and the proud Englishman 
to England. 

. Household ob Ruth; No. 3309] 
held a class initiatiop Tuesday] 
evening. Fourteen^ candidatesi 
were initiated into the mysteriesi 
of the Order. This Household is| 
in a flourishing condition with| 
about 70 members — with Mrs. :V.i 
Fingers M. N. G. Mrs. J. B. 
Young. 


NEGRO BAITING BY VARDA- 

NEGRO BAITING BY VAR- 

DAMAN 


■^-i^: 
■ k 


\- The colored citizens do them- 
; selves honor when they annually 
i"meet to observe the birth of the 
;: great emancipator, and we are 
'-". glad to note that this year is no 
".exception to the past'. We hope 
,■ the services on the 12th of Feb- 
ruary each year will go on for- 
• ever and ever. 


m 


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Now we have had the learned, 
the eloquent and the famed ora- 
.tors" to' come through the land 
painting the beauties as only the 
theoretical can. And now, after 
ill, my friends, it is up to us to 
■,do, and to do it is necessary that 
we' gather close together, have 
heart to heart talks, and then get 
busy about our father's business. 
Our environment and what is best 
lor the community in which we 
,Jive for the greater number of 
people are the things that concern 
US most as a people. 


REORGANIZATION QF THE 
.. i> EAGLE 

•i 1r- 

) > By J. B. Bass 

There is no salutatory neces- 
sary. Suffice to say the Eagle 
|(i?is no changea poiicy; the only 
'^fcange is a toning up and more 
nMded assistance. It is obvious 
that the task of conducting a real 
newspaper is one that needs all 
of the support that is available; 
we therefore, as we came here 
without the crashing of cymbals 
or beating of torn toms, essay to 


K: 


Says It Would Be Godsend if 
They Couldn't Vote— Declares 
Reiiublicans Tired of Black in 
Politics— Opposes Their Parti- 
cipation in Agricultural Bill. 
Washington, Feb. 6.— After an- 
other debate on the race question, 

the Senate agreed today to vote 
tomorrow on the final passage of 
the Lever agricultural extension 
bill. 

Senator Gallinger started to- 
day's agrument with a statement 
in favor of the Jones amendment, 
providing that Xegro agricultural 
colleges in the South shall share 
in the administration of the pro- 
posed |und for farm demonstra- 
tion. This brought forth extend- 
ed remarks upon the Negro by 
Senator Vardaman, who declared 
it would be a godsend if the Ne- 
gro was not permitted to vote in 
any Slate. He added that the Re- 
publican party was getting tired 
of the black in politics and was 
considering a way to get him out 
of the national conventions. 

Describing present conditions 
in the "black belt," the Mississippi 
Sennator said the women of the 
southern states were living today 
in a state of siege with more dread 
than in the days when the wild 
man and wild beast roamed the 
frosrtier. 

"And yet," he added, "some 
men who know no more about the 
subject than I do about the polit- 
ical economv of the. planet Mars 
would tell you all about the Negro 
problem." ^ . . 

^ Senator William Alden Smith 
of Michigan expressed the opin- 
ion that the possession in the 
<;outh of $500,000,000 of property 
by the Negroes was a tribute to 
the latent ability of the race. 

It seems that in politics for the 
Afro-American, the cry has^gone 
forth that every tree that bnngeth 

forth not good fruit must be hewn 
down. Truly Vardaman suggests 
hewing down the entire race. But 
there is but one Vardaman, and 
ere long his mad doctrine of Ne- 
gro hatred will sleep in dull cold 
clay, where no mention more of 
it will be heard, while this de- 
spised people will go on to vic- 
tory with an unblemished record 


EDWARD W. WINTERS 

Of all the members of the race® 
who have made a success in the® 
commercial world of tile Pacificg 
slope there is none of whom aS 
greater inspiration can be had® 
than that of the subject of thisffi 
sketch, E. W. Winters of Bakers-| 
field. 

Born in obscurity among ,the§ 





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m^: 


—iM- 


Be One of the 
5000 Members 



For Great 



Affiliated with Republican Feder- 
ation of Southern California 



MR^. £ VV. WINTERS 
BtkerffiHld 


pine knots and turpentine camps 
of North Carolina, about eighteen" 
years ago he heard of the Golden 
State of California and journeyed 
here, landing in Fresno, doing odd 
jobs, butXhis success at Fresnq 
was not to his liking, so about 
brief the story of how an humble 
three years la,ter the oil fields and 
the bustling of business at f>ak- 
ersfield was music to his ears. So( 
he landed in that city about 12 
years ago, with a carpet bag and 
the munificent capital of ^ve dol- 
lars. 

He got busy as an artisan and 
;;oon was in the junk business and 
later founded the Bridges Win- 
ters Simpson Mercantile, Com- 
pany, which is probably the^most 
pretentious busmess venture con- 
ducted by meiTibers uf the race on 
the coast. His foresight in ac- 
quiring properly has made that 
five dollars that he landed witli in 
Bakersfield grow until today a 
conservative estimate of his hol^r 
ings is $7.S.00O.0O. Aside from his 
business and his up town prop- 
erty he (iwns a beautiful home 
valued at S12.000.00. 

So this is, in brief, the story of 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE 

FRIDAY, FEB 27 

For Place Sec Next hsue and Daily Papers 


same should be an inspiration to entertainments. He is prominent In sketching the, life of E. W. 
others that aspire to accomplish in fraternal circles, a Mason and Winters the El^WuId do' an 
something that it has, and what ^^j^, j,^,,^^^. j^ ^ p.^^^j^ent mem- i„ju,tice' to fj^fek of his 
has been can be brought about , -,,%., t- ^-i , , , 

again and again. - ''^'' "' ^^"^ ^- ^^- ^- '^h"'"'-''^- =^"'' lovable and accompijsbed l>Hde, 

And ii| gaining this competency ^as twice been elected as lay del- who is a produ<!^,6if otir pWn dty 
Mr. Winters has during his rise egate to the general conference at of flowers and wfcotlJ ^«^i 
and unto this day been a staunch Norfolk and Kansas Vity. resi>ec- knows her! to ItoVe^ her. WJUii' a 



do in this bailiwick, our home, th^ 

worklwijh.which we are most fa-,of having practice race hatred 


"njuliati and which'* we have had 
nearly a quarter of a century of 
experiencp. We waniNto do what 
we ca nto exploit the, accomplish- 
ments of the race, through a me- 
dium Vhich , is a credit to^he 
s»rae. We start under the mo^ 


toward another less fortunate con 
stjtueint of this g.epublic. _ 

Since the dailies are fiAding 
time to discuss one chief Safai, 
who recently hailcid froin Africa, 
and is inducing his kin in this 


llow an humble nlietriber of the 
race has come up to weaith and 
affluence- arid shovijs the possihjil- 
ities that ai* in stffre and can f>e 
country to rettTra ito the father- I ha4 by application along busin«s 
^nd, it is certainly high time that^^d commercial Knies, and the"* 




MR. E W 


\VmTERS\ MANSION', 

.V-4 i-^- 


BAKERSSFIEL'D 


./ 


MR E. W. WINTFR8 


race man. doing at all times his 
share and sometimes more for the 
uplift and advancement of his 
race. His head measure has not 
increased and as he has prosjiered 
he has shown the more interest 
in the progress of the race. And 
no-movement in the environs of 
the bailiwick in which he resides 
which has for its object the bet- 
terment of conditions for the race 
has lagged for the want of his 

support. 

He is one of tlje main cogs of 
the Western Grocery Company of 
Bakersfield, a rape enterprise. Ha 
is the owiier qf Winters' Hall, in 
which all; the colored organiza- 
tions meet and at which the col- 
ored citizens in general jhold their 


tively. In factv; is a part -of the sunny disposition and a kind 

plain common people ai<d held in for everybody, sunshine folldw) 

high esteem by all p^ruly a strong ■ . -. - "/ 

supporter of all raceXenterprises. 
Mr. Winters on the ZSth of last 

December in this city\narried ^ „ ^ 


in her wake. Mrs. V/inters fell 
call her Pearl) was reared ifi 6nr 
midst and at an early age'' devel- 
unsuual aptitude ia^ a ! 


Miss Pearl Lowry of this city, at „ „,• » ,„,i c\,L Ji/^ •■^. 

.u- ct, „„j T~.._- >_i...„i. \l_j vocahst and she was sfc^starxn per 

profession. She trtweled ext<!n-j ^ 
sively and ench^ted thousands V I 
with her sweet contralto -aniet^ \% 


the 8th and Towne ichurch,^nd 
they are now domiciled at theiif 
palatial home and With a com^ 
panion as lovable a$ jhe-is gener- 
ous it Is their life's ambition to 


vwith her sweet contralto voice^ 
\And when she retutned toTker 


make sunshine for ^11 knd ik^ep hoine to become the l»ride ofllr. I 
up in the great procession of Winters the people-vifld with eich-j 
progress for the race |nd^the; Com- ^^^^^ ^ do litr htMujir. and <|he I 

to have been ijxe. 


munity in which fliey H|iir^. I wedding 

MRS. PEARY iO^ i^iy; WINi greatest afl^'l^rer held in t^»i 
TERS \ . ?^tiop. 










REV. J. D. GORDON, ORATOR AT LINCOLN DAY BX^CISES. 


Job Printing ! 


We invite you to give us a trial 


We Print 


•6 





^^B^^"" 


^Kb.' 

' ■•'■■'■"■■^ 

^■^f. 

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^^R^:': 

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B-''-: 



E.-*: 

■kf.:-. 

¥fJ 

^^^L-;-.<^ 

t- ^ t, ■* 



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Letter Heads : 
Bill Heads 
Envelopes 
Cards 
Statements 
Shipping Tags 
Catalogues 
At Home Cards 
Visiting Cards 
Announcenvents 
Wedding Invitations 
Etc., Etc. 

AT REASONABLE PRICES ! 


/ 


The California Eagle 



Thx Sdup Boi&K. 


MISPLACED CONFIDENtE 





' i^i^Q 


>--^\i. 


^SrHBRE is an old, familiar saying that "A wise Dakn will change 
W hisDaind, but a foul never." The ''stand-patters" of Repnbli- 
can Negtoes are chuckling over the way the Democrats are treating 
the Negro. The cojored voters elected Wilson — they hold the bill 
ance of power at the polls; Some of the- most intellectual and pro- 
gresBive colored voters, both men and women, voted for Wilson — not 
as tk Democrat, but as one who would give 'them a square deal — 
the Democratic party not considered. Christ chose Judas as one 
of his disciples, and Judas betrayed Him 

The Negroes who elected Wilson are not the only ones disappoimted 
in the new administration. Let us see: 

(Extract from the N«ir York Tftnei July 16.) 

Emeterio De La Garaa, Ambassadbr of Mexico to the United 
States, bitterly denounced President Wilson for his attitude in 
persistently refusing to recognize the Hnerta Government. Ambas- 
sador Henry Lane Wilson to Mexico from the United States, having 
been recalled, said it was due to the courtesies of international law 
fo^ De La Garza to leave this country the same day that he (Wilson) 
leaves Mexico City. He saye the American people have been mis- 
led. The Government at Washington is wrong — absolutely wrong 
— and they now realize it too late, and to the regret of everybodv- 
President Wilson thought that he could ignore Mexico, but Mexico 
is too big a country to be ignored, and the only consequence of his 
unfair attitude to my country has been the great losses-to Americans 
in life and property. Americans have lost all their prestige in 
Mexico, due to their own government. The whole thing is a great 
''political blunder," and I am surprised that the Pre8id.ent of such a 
great country — th^t First Magistrate of the American people — the 
great, just and good American people — should be permitted to 
bring his country and our country into such a crisis — as it may be- 
come a crisis Which may end in a conflict ot- ihe United States with 
Europe, and with Asia too, peihaps. 

I want to denounce the attitude of President Wilson to all the 
Latin race and to all the.' civilized WDrld, because' his neutrality has 
helped, materially and rjorally, the revolution in Mexico and has 
been the cause of many deaths, lootings and of much destruction 
of property — and of min to a great, rich and friendly republic. 

(From EdltorUlof L. A. Ex»mlii«r July 17. 

, In this critical stage oi aSairs Secretary Bryan left on the I6th 
of July for Mountain Lake i* ark, Md, where he will lecture. Mr. 


UniJtLSDF 
SONIC ilBI 


Brlif OfltlioeXllii Frttir- 
ony's Basic PrI 

PRINGE HAli AS PlOMEER^ 


Th« Sckap Book 


Spirit ^f Brotharheed Whioh 
ths'Ranks of Tim* Henorad Hu e iHy 
Extolled— How the First Lodgo o^th*; 
Order Among Colored Men In Amori- 

ea Waa EeUbliehed. . } 

B]r RALPH W. T|ri.BR. 

The Masomlc fratemity is a. moat 
beneficent order. Its fondaniental 
principles know no color or laMb bo 
countr; or clime. With more tbaa' 
3.000 years of well doing behind It, it 
iB lost as earnest and Tlgoroos tb up- 
hold the traditions of the order' as ' 
when building the temple— to spread 
-the gospel of the brotherhood of man 
tbroughocu thb length and breadth of 
the land 

The legitimacy of Negro Masowr la 
today honored in the breach. If not In 
the observaoce, everywhere. In tlM 
face of historical facts and records tba , 
legitimacy of the Negro Mason cannot 
be questioned At one time oar legiti- 
macy was qu^tloned because - Prinea 
Hall, the foonder of the first Masonic 
lodge among colored men in this cotni- 
try. bad been made a Mason in an 
army lodge back In the BevolationajtT 
days. 

Laws and records, however, estab- 
lished the right for the existence of 
army lodges. After tlUs objection tiad 
been completely swept aside sfiU oar 
lei^timacy was qaeetloned. primarily 
.on the groand that two grand tM>dl«i 
could not exi«t in the same Jariadie- 
don. At one 'time, many years ago, 
white Masons made the toitattw 
proposition that if Negro JtfasoM 
woold prefix the descriptive word "Tie- 
gro" to oor grand lodges they woold 
recognise ns as Masonic brothers. 

The Negro Masons came back witll 
the reply that Masonry knows no eol- 
or. clime or conntry. 

When evidence was produced to 
prove that Prince Hall, the first NeglO 
Mason in the .United States, had been 


other countries. Mr. Bryan's incapacity has made not only a 
pleasure but a genuine privilege for the President to excuse his ab 
sence from Washington in many important emergencies. Mr. Bry- 
an's absenteeism from h ispost has excited the indignation of taxpay- 
ers and evoked an in quiry in Congress. Mr. Bryan's contempt for' "cognized by the grand lodee of 

, , ," . ,,-,., land, from which came the charter IOC 

'filthy lucre has already attained in public life to the same proper- the white Masons, 
tions as when, -n private life, he cried to deprive the widow of his 
dead friend (Bennett) of her inheritancec What a perfectly cork- 

ng time Mr. Bryan wouM have had as President 1 It is difficult 
to understand just :,Wliat, and also just which, Mr. Bryan really is — 
iSecretary of State^ Or editor of the Commoner, or "the best seller at 
the Chautauqua. '', 


t- 


PROGRESS AND WEALTH OF AMERICAN NEGRO 


Declaring the 10,000,000 negroes of the United States to be as good citi- 
zens of the nation as the whites, the Rev. A. B. Leonard, secretary emeritus 
of the Board of Foreign Missions of New York, who spoke October 1 to an 
audienoe ef several hundred members of the Methodist conference, bitterly 
denounced the plan of shipping tHe negroes back to Africa, and commended 
the great progress made by the race in learning and citizenship. 

"If all the ships that fly the American flag," said he; "were ens^aged i n 
carrying the negrc back to Africa they could not handle the natural increase 
of the race, whose numbers have grown from 4,000,000 at the time of the Civil 
War to 10,000,000 at the present time. ^ 

Since the emancipation of the slaves, who were set free without a dollar 
with no property, and only the clothes they had on, the negro race has accu- 
mulated more than $700,000,000 in property, owns and operates sixty-four 
banlcs with a capital of $1,600,000- 100 insurance companies ; 200 drug stores^ 
ind 20,000 stores of other kinds 

"Seventy per cent of the colored race can read and write, and through 
he church influence have now in successful operation 22 educational institu- 
tions, many of them colleges and academic schools, and more than 300,000 
members of the race are skilled mechanics. They own 20,000,000 acres of 
:land, equal to the combined areas of the States of Vermont, New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and show the most remarkable intellectua 
growth of any people on the face of the earth, who fifty „#ears before were 
held in bondage. 

Referring to the feeling in the South regarding the colored race, Rev. Mr. 
Leonard spoke of the fact that lynchings, so common in former years, are dis- 
appearing, and pointed out that while in 1885 there were 184 negn^es lynched 
only 64 were thus treated last year. 



rrHE FAMOUS: WHITB TEMf Lfi, J^AKSBSf ^^^ 


Hi 


The greet lesson which Maaomy' 
teaches its votaries is that "a man la ia1 
man for a' that." And tlie f on da mott - 
tal principles of Masonry te«d» 
we are all citizens of one eoaatty, 
which Is the whole world itself; mem- 
bers ot one family, which la tke entire 
hnman race, and children at one fk- 
ther, who is the Omnipotent God aboiw 
and around ns. 

Whether be comes' from the Jnnslca 
of Africa, the cotton plantations ot 
Mississippi, the plafns of Hindnataa. 
the burning sands of Arabia, the anov 
capped summits of Greenland or bOB , 
whatever nation or clime, if be is a 
Mas{i>n and can prove himself sncli, 
be should be welcomed as a man add - 
a brother. " , 

The. wisdom of Masonry is exanpO- 
Sed in establishing her basis on the.*. ' 
immutable foundation of tmtlL Tho ■ 
shackles fall frr^m the hands of pr^-c 
odice and bigotry at the entrance of 
her shrine. In her sacred retreat BV* »( 
ery discordant voice is bushed, and tho <>J.I 
bitterness of sectarian strife is abiuib- n;<| 
ed into silence in the awful preseacs V'^J 
of pare and absolute truth. , 

If Masonry were to require any Oliv- 
er creed than God is our Father 
that men are his children and tliera^~^ 
fore bound to love him and one anotb*. 
er, her grand object would at once be 
defeated Next to allegiance to Qo4 
and springing from )t, its controIUac 
principle is love for man as man. , 

Masonry meets man in all the vail^ .; j 
ties of bis condition with sympathy^^'^ 
and comprehends Mm in all of blpK 
complex nature. Before tbe altar aB.' 
distinctions iranlsh, and all 
prince or peasant, stand a\ik« In ttw 
presence and must meet upon tlie lereL 

Prince Hall was ifever disconracaO. 
When bitterly treated as a c l s n das j 
tine, be approached the fonntaln 
—the grand lodge of Enj^and 
he bad established the first 
among Negroes be wrote from 
under date of March 21. 178^ 
lows: *^ wonld Inform you that 
lodge bath been founded almost 
years. We have bad no opportnaify 
to apply for a warrant before, thongh 
we have been Importuned to send to 
France for one. yet we thought best to 
send to the fountain head from 
whence w« received die Ucbt tor a 
warrant-** 

Six months later, on Sept. 2S, 17 
129 years ago. tbe grand lodge of Bnv: 
land, whose grand east Is in Londa9,;''i 
granted his prayer by issnlnc to tbo 
fifteen color^ men wbo^ bad been In- 
itiated into the mysteries 9t Maaoary 
a warrant of eonstitntlon. Na 450. 
This warrant of eonstitntlon. was doly 
signed b7:B. Holt, depnty^i 
ter, and William White, grand 
tary of the grand lodge of Bni^ad. 
and bora its great seal. It la fiptta 
a matter of record that tor tbia' 1^u^ . 
rant Princw Ball forwaided to. 
grand lodge of Baglaad ttw osval Cm 
of £5I5b. . 

Tb«r» «aa bo no qoaadoa as to 
legltlBa# of tbo Negro Ma— . B* 
li as tsgolae as ths OMMit i 
llason idio teces ths i 
tto pinpsr signs boTM* Ite^l 
ligbtB. Bto wsRsat «c .<b 
■MkMihiBal 
etiot atime*. 



mmii. 


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BSB 


itJDD/%%#rf\ 


LEAOEB 





■«'«!Mr?>.,jS:!Vt, "'.*'. 






I 


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!' AT ZHS OHOBOBBI, 


b. 


rS;P. 


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iLI EttOii 


iBISEO II CH8RCH HISTORY 


'^' 


Tint EAST EKSHTH STREET 
„ CHRISTIAN CHURCH i: 
urn of flu da ' ^ ^ Mdiicken.. Mi-i««r 

ServleM for BmnO^, »*• 8, Ui4 

Sunday School at 10 k. m. Mr. 

"W. J, Thompson, Superintendent: 

Preaching at 11 a. m. by the 

pastor; subject, "The. Wild Olive 

Tree/' ; 

^ At 7 p. m. the Y. P. S. C. E. will 

IHif t w iiwry «f ttw A«hi«vM«Mita iff render a good program. Address 
«Im P t— idai it of th« B«pti«t Stat* by Mr. B. R. Tumage. Paper by 

ConvMitian of Alabami»— Author •» jjjgg E." Jackson." 'Solo, Miss 
9mmr»i Piuw For tho Futiiro Woi — Juanita B. Bausley. The meeting 
tor* of tho Oonemination. ^jn ^g Jgad by Mrs. B. H. Keith. 

• ^ Binningtea. Al..-Tho Baptist d* A* » P- °>.- 1^^ P?!*^^ ''^.P^^!!' 

aoolnatlon Id tbl. Mat« is growing bj on the subject, HobneM, Bom. 

Imps and boaods Id Dumbere, dnance 12. Everybody is invited to these 

•Ml IntelUgent leadership. The r^wrts services 

made by tiie various ctinrcbes at ttae | ' 

; lut state conventiOD covered a wide 
'' Mope of activities In and out of tbe In- 
. dlTldnal cbnrcbes tbemselves. Fore- | 
'Vj most anrang tbe many capable leaders 


I 


D. L. McMICKENS, 
Minister. 

MT. ZION BAPTIST 


J ' 


K !b tbe work of the deoomlDatlon is tbe I 


4" 


I 


Third and Stephenson Ave. 

Rev. A. C. Williams, pastor. 


1 


'•4 

:■ ?*- 


"i#- 


Kaiv. J. B. Eason, B D.. pastor of tbe 

jdtcksoo Street Baptist cburcb in tbls ' . 

vli ttt) and president of the Alabama g^rvices for Sunday, 


^ll Baptist state conrentlon. 

'v; Mr. Eason Is a nati-ve of Snroterrllle. 

I til's state, and was graduated from 

' Stima oniTersity In 1885 and from the 
Blcbmond iVa.i Tbeologlcal seminary 
lii 1880. After bis graduation in 1890 
Piofeasor E^son taught at Selma nni- 
TCfSity^ for seveu years. He w»8 o^ 


At 11 a. m., preaching, subject, 
7:30 p. m., preaching, subject. 


SECOND BAPTIST CHXTBCH 


2^ 


M 


dalned to tbe Baptist ministry In 1891. ! Maple Ave., bet. 7th ^ixd 8th StS. 

He has held many responsible posl- jj^y Joseph L. McCoy, pastor. 

ttons both a^ a churchman and an edu- preachine at 11 a. m. 

cator. Before ijeginulnB his pastorate t> v t> tt »t « .^n n »« 

at ths Jackson Street Baptist church ?• ^- /.• ^- , „*'oa ^' 

In this city he had been pastor of the Preaching at / -.dU p. m. 
Serenteentb Street Baptist church In 

Annlston for sixteen years. ' 

The Rev. Mr. E^ason has some very I - 

distinct views as to tbe work, doctrine FIRST A. M. E. OHuBOH 

Cor. Eiglith St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. N. Greggs, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. ^ 

Christian Endeavor at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m. , 





, *■▼. t. a. KASOK, B. D. 

and dlsdpllne of the Baptist denomina- 
tion. In a recent Interview be made 
tbe following statements: "For several 
yesrs 1 have made special study -of 
cburcb history and the Baptist denom- 
ination, i find the primitive form of 
tlie Baptist people was that of a mass 
meeting. They are a family. All otb- 
cr denominations are organizations. 
The Baptists are a growth, not an tn- 
stltntlon. In their nature. 

"To do tbe best work it is possible for 
OS as Baptists to 'do we will have to 
become sn organized family. 1 sbould 
not be surprised In tbe future to see 
tbe Baptists divided into two great 
Masses— namely, confederated Baptists 
.and the united Baptists. 

"Some years ago 1 drew op a conatt- 
tntlKi for the Alabama Baptist state 
'convention, which provided tiiat tbe 
one state convention be divided Into 
foor subordinate state district conven- 
ttapi, tile coming togetber once a year 


WESLEY CHAPEL 

' Comer Eighth and Wall 
Rev. Wesley E. Kurchen, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Young People 's meeting at 6 :30 
1). m. 

Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


TABEBNACLE BAPTIST 


Hemlock Street 

Rev. J. D. Gordon, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


MEW HOPE BAPTIST 

Paloma Ave., near 16th 
Rev. C. H. Anderson, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U., 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


A. M. E. 0HT7B0H 
Eighth and Towiie Ave. 
Usual service preaching by the 
of jOictw state distrfet eonventlana ti pastor. Dr. Gregg. 
fb« state convention. Many good and < 

fMat men in tbe state and oat of tlie I *= 

,aMt« predicted tbe state district coa-H 
C r "*s«Jons would secede from tbe one THE GOLDEN W£ST HOTEL 
' a' ' eetttial organisatiott. Bot tb»n an no 


lln keeping witb^its iiaine and 


of trouble yet Tke sekeoM M 
woHdng ntedy. 
*aa oar last co u fe« U on at ICoUK 

S^^t^^,J^^T^^ ^^^on as the b^gest and best 
mat we bare a eoncrests to investlgata hotel on the coast continues to 
ma restate tbo^MMtlew and doetdacs 
wUek the clRiKHa tliat are membeEs 
of the coov«!Btlon are.expaeted to sap-' 
jfttct aail |Hw(dbe> 

'I reason It commitfMp to raMM ttii 
Bible are wtse a sseettnc to iMk IMS 


give to its patrons the best pos- 
sible service. 

i Being centrally Io>cated between 

'the three great raHtrOad syetems 

coming into this city, the hotel 

siois otw wise « iBBOjan iiu ^mm- m«v ",, ,. • "L—* ..1.^ 1_ 

ttae practicee snd doetilMa ot tt* de- '"eets the demands itot^onir in 

noatfaattoo that rssu 0900 t&e UWa g«od service but likewisitj coate- 

<sr Ita only rule ol action aUgU aaCte nience. c. j : 

««t of order. Tbis laoaitlns .-Ml be 1 r ' ^ ■- V, ^ ' i| . 

bsid ■otne tlase nest year." ' • '• f ■ ■ ' " ' ' ''*'" " | ■ 

aweeaM jw^ s FOR RENT— We have several 


tie Fifesenth Amondnenii WIN ^taJM^, housekeeping apartments .^f.t&ee 


TfeabMrednciten of a maenm bHtie 
gtmnl amtnMj at (MnmUa, & O, 
Taeeat^ favoring tito Mpeal ef ths 
•neentb amendnMnt to the <M«al 
ewatttntiea .simply shown the etUtads 
er • small minority of aonthin white 
man teward tba colored eltls sa s of tbe 
eonatfy. Th* gicat bulk cit teteWicSBt 
wiittaB thtnnirtMiot ttae eoootrr woolft 
vote agalaat soeb a seiflsh msasnrs 
wsrs it to be Some a national trntm.. 


•vadsy •etiools to Afd'MlsslswsriSs 
n* foraign mission bMu>d«fr.the Mai 
ttoaal Baptist eanvsaUea le pnft^ 
so eUborate Bastes pieinMP fMr the 
aanday scboeia thtMcboot the eeoa- 
trjL Dr. h. <i. 3ard|as. aeezataiT. says 
vakv wtn omB eat at least 30MM «it 
•Ms* nnawma^to tte Bnaday eebefuls 
jh eeenr ataer aediiiw t» their etadMM 
hi Alvta aaA etlMr fMeivi. potets. 
the MM IS askbw far tUMOjMe lai> 
medisi* aee en th» lenM asM4 


aod four rooms fori^ 
cheap. Also A good 
Apply Noah D. Tl 


Phone's.' I^Sk if v ■■- y_ S 

\A n i .-. ' i' iH ii I I 11 ■'4 




Ho S. AK 

CUMIN'S 
MVEK fOMSKS 

One Hiindlred Vegeiable 1*1118 
for 25Centi 

These toUs are fMtnHbiebdfea ttit the 
belief Off O»nstipation, Sick Hoadadie, 
Biiioassess. ;• 

Cumhig't IHti j St«rt 

XivABUsasi) 7 TsAss ;i ,/j ^;^, - 
'407 East Hinth Bioedway 871 


QurU-. os«- spring liiLL Whiskey 

■ "' i, tl ■ BilTt- Fht WWakey- Blenda ' - -, - ^^ ""'■ ' ;'" 




_) ' 


? 


. ^ ^":h[ f ^l«»>rieriMidiWlw»li»i^ ■ 

s 4 r tj^iqa^f iVierchiints 

Owners "JU Crestotp Brwd" W!he^3M*#prfi 



■ -I 


FlfmrOLASSLAOY 

112 t<2^1|l^nnn^Um Street 


fraa 


MANICURINQ LADIBS A: ifl AlR ' jMOttMUNO 

PARUOR. SKIIS SPB0IALJ«T ;; - " ' 

Only Colored Woman's Bsrfcer Shop in town. MRS. QOBA BHQLtSH. P ■» 

113 East Fourth street, Westminster Hotel BMf. 4tli d. 
Entrance, juftt aiew doors East ol AliJn street g |i 


The Miss^iri& iCansasCafe 

968 Hemlock street 

Mrs. R. H. TODD, Proprietew 

I Home Cooking a Specialty. ^ ' 

Best Meal in the city at the lowest prices 


Main 5298 Home F-5083 

R. W. LEWIS 

Prescription Druggfist 

T F B No 9 . Comer 7th and Central Avenue 


Main 7698 Home Fr40d 

A. J. ROBERTS, SON &C0 . 

^ FiffiBril Dlrifitors »(f Entiilnirs 

Fiperal ParltNTs T ^ Lady Attendant 

X I2tli end Los Angeles St. 


e I e phone South 2824 


Langiuckle Baking Company 

I 5608 Central Avenue 

Bread, Pies and Cakvs 


Wedding and Fancy Cakes a Feature 
Get satisfaction in price and quality. 


Los Angeles 


California 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

Bought, Sold and Exchanged 

:- House Purnishlngs of All Kinds 

Phone South 4273 Avpf^ Rmthorc 

2627 Central Ave. Open Evenings. rXj^*^ UlUUVCl^ 


Patronize the Pouitryman's Store 
Feed Co-OperatiTe Dry Mash 

An Honest, Economical balanced ;Egsr rotation for Hens and 
vi rowing Stock 

Baby Chicks, Hatching Eggs, Breeders, Everything in Poultry 
^ fiyerything f oir the Poultryman. Visit Our Store 

Poultryniii|i,s Gp-Opcative Ass'n. 

640 IkHith Main street. ; i Los Angeles, California 


DIREetORY FOR OUR I 
^ENTERTAINERS 

"Casino]^ Sextette" — Jackron 
brothers, K6Mr Gray, Black and 
Bryant are at the Casino Cafe. 

Tuxedo Five — Powers, Robin- 
son, Hicks, ; Richie and Stewart 
at Fairmount. 

Orient Trio— Payne, Wilson 
and Donaldson at Murrays Cafe. 

At Lester Social Club— Mr. and 
Mrs. Morgan Prince, i :; ■ 

M. & M. Four — HaMs broth-' 
era, Denny and Banks at M. & M. 
Cafe, would like to hear from 
Geo. Johnson, Geo. Wolfson^ J. 
C. McDonald and R. B. Johnson. 

Two Aces — Coinpton and Joy- 
ner at St. ^Francis Citibi which has 
been remodeled, where Bob 
Brown and Thomas Foster con- 
thiae ^o inake thitigs pleasant for 
their pMrions.;;' - P ,1-. ,r'-'|..t\:: 

SVERYBO£>Y I* iiUYlkG 
HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H.iH. Williama about WU- 
min|ton iHtu-bof property. The 
l^reatest opportunity of youf life 
» rtLyour door now. i 

We hate 6 56-ft k>t8 we can sell 
lor $S50i only $10 down. $5 a 
mooth. We> also have 80 ^bex 
lots in same tract, but you wili 
have to be in a hurry | if you wish 
to get ih on the ground floorj 
.. Any day We get six or tight 
persons we wi|l take foa dq^ifi to 
see the lots* 4 ! 

H.RWI^14AMS. 
Cbniei- l^th and Hftlhlock. 


J>rof. Booker T. Washington 
will pass three weeks in Southern 
California, arriving on or about 
March 7. He will speak in the 
First Congregational church in 
Los Angeles on Sunday morning, 
March 8, and at large mass meet- 
ing the same afternoon in the in- 
terest of the colored Y. M. C A. 
Tuesday night, March 10th will 
be his Qrst address in Pasadenaf 
u6der the auspices of Throop Lec- 
ture Course. Thursday night, the 
12th, he will be the guest of honor 
aiid principal speaker at the ban- 
quet of the state Y. M..C. A. coiif- 
vention to be held at the Hotel 
Virginia at Long Beach, ' Satur- 
day, 'the 14th, he will spend with; 
President Blaisdell at Claremo«rt,i 
Sneaking td the Pomona college 
students and others. Presra^ 
B^er of Occidental, .who has 
c|iarg^ of Dr. Washington's itin^ 
eiary and ptogram while in South- 
eta California, has a number of in^ 
vitetions fori>r. Washington and 
is now arrang^g^the completed 
program. Dr. -)V5a8hington will 
be Dr. Baer's guest while in 
Southern California, at Pasadena 
at West Moland Place, 
ater, a $1(^000 building, will b« 
OTCted at Ntpth'and Central. The 
house wjll furnish the best in high 
dass vaudeville and moving ^i^'- 

£r^» under the direction of p. £. 
enderson. ■ 


i. 


J.U>l[ONDS,]IaiaflU NOAS D. THOMPSON, 8oad|iffl 

A SfOfre Deal Fbr Each CasiMner 

The W»H#.TpO^^ 

% fHoBses fer Salia WBent^ % Alio Apartments for B|nt 
iM 1^4;#w«i^ $tre«t>id Long Beaeh Ave, RmoiMI m N. Kaedvay 

-r-'',;:y. >....-■. VwLOSANGEUES- ai; -.■■■ ■ 



Watchmftkers 

Itihmmd Central Av» 

Watches aMtirately repairs^ at 
moderate prices. Diamonds re-set 


I- 


South 1S40 Ladiet Garmento Remodeled My Specialty 

THE HARVARD TAILOR 

JOS. LUCAS, PROP. 

tadie*' and Gewta! SulUx Made to Order ' 'l^lf'^^^ 
Cleanior, Remadeliiff, Repafainjt and Preaains: Done atLoweit Prieet 

211 Central AvMue j Los Angeles, C«l. 


The Leader Bakery 


/- 


-.■ :i:<. 


Wm. BROADHAQ. Prop.^ 

Pbone Boyle 1465 •-. 

2416 East First Street Los Angeks. Californ ''' 


H„ G. YAK. FOSSEN 


Qroceries, Notiolis, Candies, Cigars, Ice Cream - * "'' 


Wood, Coftl, Kindling and Stinshine Polish. 
We recommend Leege & Haskins Coffees, 
Peerless, Monado and ^ Oriental Blends. 


'A: 


ft. 


¥;-■ 


Phones Broadway 314 
Home A 2663 


«3I TEMPLE STREET 



FEED AND FUEL ;. ' 

STAPLE iAND FANCY GROCERIES^:' / 

Phone :West 4962 [ COR. 36TH & NORMANpIE AVB. 

L GARNER 

MACK'S a 

J. a McCL0Nay, Psofbiktok. 

^DMler in FURNITURE, BEDDING AND KITCHEN HARDWARE 
2703 N. Broadway and 112 N. Workman ■ r; ) 

PICO FURNITURE CO. ''•"''• ''^r--- 
26^8 We st Pico Street /i , Lois Angeles 

LESS THAN DOWN-TOWN PRICES r. ' t 

Td. West 366 H. F. BRAINARD, Prea. J. P. CROWDER, ^Tiee-Pim 
Home 73798 C. H. BRAINARD, Sec'y and Treas. 


i,J 


PhoneslHome 73829 


P. J. VIGUAN 

GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS 


Wertl£2S 


:)vf' ;^^ 


staple and Fancy Groceries, Vegetables and Fruit 
Prompt Delivery Best Treatment to Al 

2109 West Pico Street 


AIRS. J. H. TA.Y1X>R 




iHair Goods, Ornament^ ' 

Toilet Articles. Hair Dressing, Maniciiring, Shampooing 

1403 EAST NINTH STREET Cor. Hemlock Phone Maia QfT 


Phones 71484 


OXFORD MARKET 


WeetS586 


-tt 


%M- 


i M. THEW3, Proprietor f - f 4|^ ' 

Aa KINDS OF FRESH AND SALTED l|iAXS^ 


SAUSAGES, ETC. 


POULTBY US SIAfiOk J 


3012 W. PICO ST. 


JOIN MY COLONY AND GET YOU 


I- _,A FINE HOME IN n' 
, ^ ^ IN VICTOR V^I^USY, 

I have beatad 7 youBst iben, all from U A., ii^^MM of Otn'itfmt ' 

Au ▼aneyji in this sUte. fine, rich Mil} water aa^ to obtain: doia to 
8. F. R. R. and ocean to ocean hi|^iFf y- 

TheGojrwjmettt Land Agent, { p 4pij.i. WM. KENAiO) 



4 


Bes. bene JRnndway S688 


^ 


I .-: 


' A':. 



Fraa b Fiah Poultilr and Oystera— oaltry Dnesed to Order 

EaatWh^ati : ,;^,_.._.^;^_, Los Anfcelea-- ' 


;,/;.;,_.:' -t \' JEwkLEB 

V ! Cor. Washington & San Pfedro Sts ^ 

Wat6h, Clock and Jewelry Ropairinf m-*' 
Work Called for and Pelivofed 
Borne 2f474 Give me a trial Sunset So. 278 


MUTILATED PAGE 1 CANNOT BE IMPROVED 





Los Angeles, Cal., Feli 21, 1914 


Number | 


Progressive Administration HasVardamp Jim Crow Going At San Quentin 

Rdce MiningCompany 


Making BtgStrides 


In our next week's issue this ar 
tide will be followed by one cIbt 
livered by Atty. McBeth upon the 
same occasion. 


THE ELDORADO GOLD 
STAR MINING COMPANY 


L. K. Beeks 


THE PROGRESS OF THE 
NEGRO 


In order to formulate a perfect 
idea of the work and accomplish- 
ments of the above company, a 
visit was paid to their headtpiar- 
ters at 255 Wilson buildin":, 102 
S. Spring, by the local editor nt 
this paper. ' 

In their suitable apartments a 
most congenial staff of officers' in 
■the persons of Messrs. Howard 
Folke, secretary, C. V\'. 1! olden, 
the finance committee chairman, 
ahd Rev. G. W, Shields, fiscal 
agent, were met. 

-No persuasion was necessary 
from any source to iniUico ilie ui- 
fice force presentinc^ inimciliately 
all the information and details de- 
sired conicerning the company. 



■ H II>« l l l «I HH il " ■■ "« ** 

Mr. Howard Folke the un- 
tiring secretary of the Eldo- 
radp Mining company: labor 
■lug daily for the production 
of fortune and prosperity in 
the race. ' 

' iThe company possesses papers 
of Incorporation to work under 
two states — California and Neva- 
da ; the claims being located in the 
Eldorado Canyon district, Xob 
Hill section of the country. Opal 
range of mountain. s, Clark county, 
Nevada. 
. ; >^The- present company reore;an- 
ized June, 1910, incorporated at 
\ $100,000, selling shares at $1 each. 
^ The corporation owns the Gold 
' Star group of mmes, emb.-acmg 
J two claim&r Gold Star and Gold 
Stor No. 2, for which the board 
of directors have been successful 
_ jn clearing the title. They have 
I also just completed a contract for 
' -$1300 worth of improvements on 
the mines. 

Men have been kept continu- 
ously at work, during which time 
large bodies of ore have been ex- 
posed, carrying gold, silver and 
iron, with assay values averaging 
'from $10'- to $48 per ton in gold 
and sJlvef. The above figures are 
those advertised by the company, 
which were iomewhat questioned 
by some |)arties desiring to be- 
^ coroe -interested, at which dubi- 
ousness the staunch secretary in- 


vited -one Rev. William Roberts 
Church, to visit the mines and sat- 
( white), pastor of the Friends 
isfy his own curiosity, by saying, 
"I will tell you, sir, in the lan- 
guage of the queen M Sheba, the 
half has never yet been told." 

Upon this invitation and influ- 
enced by a desire to satisfy in- 
([uiries from friends. Rev. Rob- 
erts, bearing his expenses, yisited 
the mines — personalty extracted 
the ore and returned. I'pon sub- 
mitting the ore to r)averstock. 
Staples and Payne at 233 West 
First street, January 2*^, I'^H, as- 
savers, they rt ported the valua- 
tion, which doubled the values as 
Mr. Folke af<->restate<l, rangin<j 
from SI 7.45 to ?1 37.05, more than 
doubling the advertised \ahies of 
the company' — SIO to S4S. 

Mr. Roberts was more than con- 
vinced and has interested his 
friends strongly in the proposi- 
tion. 

F.special mention should be 
made of the fact th^t the ores sent 
by the corporation to the Califor- 
nia Ore Testing Company in San 
I'Vancisco, for a mill run and lab- 
oratorv test, to rletermine the 
character and kind of machinery 
to be installed for the milling of 
ores on the company's properties, 
all the high grade ores were elim- 
inated from the samples, this be- 
ing done because the companj- de- 
sired the final report based on the 
low-grade ores. Being tested by 
an expert, a graduate from the 
University of Germany, the report 
assured the company that with a 
sluicing plant estimated to cost 
S20,000, the company could pro- 
duce their ore in bricks at about 
S3.60 a ton, leaving an immense 
profit for the company after pro- 
duction. 

The engineer of the company, 
Mr. Cook, submits a process cya- 
nidation of the ore by all-sliming 
agitation methods which shows a 
saving of 90 per cent of gold aixl 
silver values at a cost of from $2 
to ;$2.50 per ton; this process has 
been adopted by the company |ind 
the 25 to 35-ton per day plant 
at about $20,000 will be erected. 

After thorough examination it 
is safe to say that 20,000 tons of 
ore can be treated at the mill 
transported and loaded at $3,60 a 
ton. ~ ^*^ 

The company now has firm 
bases to work on — the testimony 
of reliable parties and lawful su 
pervision the main thing is in the 
words of the reliable secretary, in 
order to save and operate this 
prosperous enterprise to our peo- 
ple, is to put energy, influence and 
financd into the proposition and 
bring m^ery prestige to bear for 
its ultiaiate success — by buying 
shares 


By Mrs. Noah H. Thompson 

(nee Eloise Bibbi 


fifths of whom are teachers in col- 
leges and advanced institutions of 
learning;, 

Frorh the erection of the very 
first school the freed Negro has 
^ided largely in their support. In 
1870, although in dire poverty, the 
freedmen donated seven hundred 
thbuSand dollars for school build- 
ings and the support of teachers. 
At the present time the Negro 
each year contributes a million 


Wesley Chapel's -^j 
Great Clelebration 


1 countrv. 


There is a time-worn theory of 
the sciewtist that litredity deter- 
mines the future of the man, for 
according to biological laws the 
phv-sical and psychical qualities 
of the parents are transmitted to' 
their ofTsprinpj- 

\ new ^psychology has arisen 
which affirms that environment 
and not heredity is the criterion 
of a man's future achievement. 

The majority of historians con- 
clude that the Negro has always 
been a hewer of wood and carrier 
of -water for his mpre favored 
brother, for on the very oldest 
monuments of Egypt, they tell us 
his black profile is represented as 
a slave; that "originating nothing, 
he owes everv onward impulsion 
to his FgvptTan or Arab conquer- 
or or to his Caucasian ma-ster;" 
"that the laws of heredity stand 
like a wall of iron against his ad- 
vancement." 

"S'et contrar\' fo the tiieiiries of 
psychologists and the deductionis 
of historians, notwithstanding his 
hercditv ni barbarism arid his en- 
,\ironment of slavery, the Negro 
has won recognition in all the 
epochs of this country's histor3', 
in its periods of war and in times 
of neace ; in the fields of battle, of 
reliction, of education, of music 
and the fine arts, and of econom- 
ics. ■ ■ 

Tn the Revolutionary war the 
first martvr in the cause ci Tnde- 
Iiendcnce was the Nefjro, Crisntis 
.\ttticks. Tn the war of 1812, two 
thousand black men were sent 
forward to the army at Sackett's 
Harbor. Tn the war of the Re 
bellion two hundred thousand 
Xegro soldiers were enlisted, en- 
£ra£;in,£j in many of the bloodiest 
battles of the war in which they 
particularly distinguished them- 
selves. Tn the Spanish .-\merica,Tj 
war the four Negro regiment; 
were among the very first-troops 
ordered to the front, winning" for 
themselves and their race great 
"Tlistinction by their bravery aiid 
daring. 

Tn the religious world Negto 
cluirches were organized atid 
erected by Negroes..as early as the 
eighteenth century, presided ovpr 
by black men whose learning and 
eloquence won for themselves reic- 
ognition and distinction, as in the 
case of Rev. Lemuel TTaynes, who 
in 1785 became pastor of a white' 
congregation at Torrington, Con- 
necticut. 

Tn, the educational field, Bow^ 
doin' College, in 1826 conferred the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts upon 
the Negro, John Brown Rus^s- 
nurm, and in 1841, cultured Eng- 
land listened with appreciation to 
the powerful elocjuence of Fred- 
erick Douglas, whose untiring ef- 
forts in th'e cause of freedom we 
are celebrating at this time. ■" 
.Leaving behind us that tragic 
period when the Negro, although 
in bondage, gave evidences jof 
ability, and glancing at his 
achievements during the past fif^y 
years of freedom, we find that jin 
1867 there were but six hundried 
colored teachers in the South, but 
in 1913 that number had increasied 
to thirty-four thousand, fotjr- 


They are estimated to 
dollars for the support of his}''^' ^"''th today more than seven 
schools I hundred million dollars. 

Thehighest earned degree con- Whence comes this unprece- 
ferred bv educational institutions ''^"ted success, this long Ime of 
is that of Doctor^.of Philosophy, P"?^'''"' ^'^^™ workmen whose 
which thus far has been cofnerred 
bv American universities upon 


eight men of Negro bloo<l. 

In music, and the fine arts we 
find writers who wrote more than 
forty years ago, com])ositions and 
ballads that are still favorites. 
And today De Koven Thompson's 
"Dear Lord, Remember Jle," and 
Coleridge Taylor's "Hiawatha," 
thrill with the mellow chords of 
genius. 

Upon th? walls of the famous 
Luxembourg gallery hang the 
paintings of the Negro, Henry O, 
Tanner; and in 1003, the sculp- 
tured group called "The \\'retch- 
ed," of a woman of color, were 
exhibited in the salons of Paris. 

Tn the literary world', we are 
aware that the poems of I'hillis 
Wheatley. a slave girl, were rec- 
ognized in the early days of this 
cbuntry's history as works of mer- 
it, calling forth unstinted praise 
from Gen. Washington, the first 
{President of the nation. Since 
then other Negro writers of po- 
etry Mid prose have demanded 
recognition in the field of letters. 

The Negro has also shown m- 


heredity and environment were 
not only deplorable, but adverse 
and unjielding? What of the sci- 
entists' theory of evolution — the 
philosophers' hypothesis of atav- 
ism? •■ 

Does it not prove, my friends, 
that the Negro is the descendant 
of an ancient and perished race. 


its true destiny by^ disregarding 
the laws of health, and the fact 
that tuberculosis is the most vital 
cause of mortality among them;. 
nor by failing to denounce the al- 
most universal practice of race- 
suicide. Too much can not be 
said against this growing evil, 
that defeats the purposes of Al- 
mighty God. 

Even if one's means do not ap- 
pear to" be adequate for the sup- 
port of a large family. God who 
clothes the lilies, will supply the 
needs of and abundantly bless 
the ruins of whose splendid mon- those who work with him to bring 
uments, rock-cut temples and co- forth laborers for the Negro's fu- 
lossal statues disclo.se a civiliza- jure harvest. Men and women of 
tion as high as the Egyptians this selfish age dare to reap the 
themselves? \ benefits and gratifications of mat- 

One of the disciples of Emanuel rimony, and year after year refuse 
Swedenborg assures us "that the to shoulder its obligations. "Be 
black races were -probably the old- 'not deceived; God is not mocked; 
est of all. Their lost continent as a man sows, st) shall he reap," 
lies between Africa and South ' and just .so sure as we sow the 
America. They contain, deeply |^vind of race extinction we shall 
hidden within them the tendencies 
and capacities of their most re- 
mote ancestors- -\ later, baser, 
heredity has been snpcrimposeil 


~'l an aveng- 


uprin thcra, and the jjroljlem now 
is, how to break thriiugh it. how 
to get rid of it, so that the inter- 
ior nature, long hidden, mai- blos- 
som forth." He adds again , 
"There is a vast spiritual life and 
power concealed in the bosom of 
ventive ability, for- ten thousan<r these people like the water in the 


rock until it was struck by the rod 

of Moses," 

Tt is but too true, friends, the 
structed bv a note<l Negro astron- later and baser heredity of een- 
omer. P.enjamin Banneker, He turies of slavery has been laid on 


patentsdiave been granted to him, 
The first clock inade in ,\nierica 
which appeared in 1734, was con- 





also assisted in laying out the T^is 
trict of Columbia. "His calcula 
tions concerning the rising and 
setting of the sun and the moon 
and the courses of the bodies of 
the planetary system was so exact 
as to call forth unstinted praise 
from eminent nien as Fox. I^itt 
and Wilberforce," The Negro 
has recently invented a telephone, 
registers, a weight motor for run- 
ning machinery, an automatic car- 
switch and feed-attachment, and 
several aeroplanes. 

The economic progress of the 
Negro has already been marvel 
lous. The census reports point to 
the fact, that there are but few, if 
any, pursuits followed by whites 
in which there are not found some 
Negroes. There are fifty thou 
sand Negroes in the professions, 
thirty thousand in various busi- 
ness pursuits, and three hundred 
thousand \vorking in trades re- 
quiring skill. 

There are now sixty-four Negro 
banks in the coiintry, capitalized 
at something like one million six 
hundred thousand dollars,^ doing 
a yearly business of about tWenty 
million dollans. 

Wb^ at the close of the civil 
war- the Negroes started on their 
career as fai^mers, they had no 
land and no experience as farm 
owners, none of them became 
farm owners by inheritance, yet 
today the Negroes of this country 
own twenty million acres of land, 
worth five hundred million dof- 
lars. 

The past fifty years has shown 
a marked and rapid increase in 
the wealth of the^Negroes of the 


the ancient civilization of the Ne- 
gro like mass upon mass of stony- 
material, until the rock of superfi- 
cial inferiority has hidden Lis 
wonderful capability. 

Great seers have had a clear 
vision of his capacity, and have 
risked health, reputation, the 
world's favor, even life itself to 
make possible his glorious future. 

When the great Livingstone 
undertook his second ^i^jedition 
into Africa for the purpose of sup- 
pressing the slave trade, he must 
have had a wonderful vision of 
the hidden possibilities of the 
Negro race ; for journeying 
through swamps and endless 
downpour of rain, attacked by fe- 
ver and climdtic diseases, hamp- 
ered by the imperfect setting of an 
arm crushed b\^ mi African lion, 
he, nevertheless ifi spite of these 
disasters, journeyed on for thirty 
years, forcing the conscience of 
the ciyilized world to ay^aken to 
the horrors of the slave-trade and 
causing its suppression through- 
out all Africa, 

Some prophetic insight of the 
Negro's hidden powers must have 
forced; itself upon Abraham Lin- 
coln, 'whose birthday we celebrate 
tonight, w^hen invoking "the con- 
siderate judgment of mankind and 
the gracious favor of Almighty 
God" he declared that, "All per- 
sons held as slaves within the 
United States should henceforth 
be free." 

But the terrible responsibility 
of proving to the world .at large 
the height of the Negro's capabil- 
ity rests upon the Neg^o himself. 
The colored race will not attain 


reap the whirlwind 
ing Providence, 

The Negro , will not realize his 
brilliant possibilities unless he 
shuns divorce, that reaper of fam- 
i!v iinitv, unless he remembers 
that the sweetest tlower in the 
garden of morals is wonianlv 
modestx- — that innate, intangible 
something that will not permit a 
true woman, notwithstanding the 
degenerate fasl'.ions of the "day, to 
ilisclose the sharp ontlines of her 
fiirure, aiui a])pear befi.ire the eyes 
of men in a niannc" conducive to 
the feeding of their worst appe- 
tites,. 

TrTa word, the Negro will Teach 
eminence through temperance, 
through restraint, by being care- 
ful not to imitate the lawdess char- 
acteristics of these profligate 
. times. 

> Religion has been the power 
that has brought victory to the 
Negro thus far; the moaning sup- 
plications of the old patient moth- 
ers in slavery, broke his shackles 
of bondage, and religion will be 
the force in the future that will 
"reconstruct all things up new 
foundations,"- for "more things 
are wrought by prayer than this 
world dreams of." 

The message I would bring to 
my race tonight is, faithfulness to 
the laws of our God ; I would ear- 
nestly entreat the Negro to be 
just in a land of injustice, to be 
moral in ai world of immorality, to 
be willing to deny himself in an 
.tmosphere of selfishness. I would 
pray him to retain his innate hu- 
mility, for ^ride is the source of 
man's downfall, to hold on to his 
natural gentleness, his almost su- 
perhuman patience, his God-like 
pOwer of returning good for evil, 
then, to conclude with the pro- 
phecy of an able thinker: "Alt 
the"clouds will eventually tlisap- 
pear. The divine order of a new- 
life will be established. The fed- 
eration of the world will cease to 
be a dream. All nations aod races 
will work harmoniously arid 
peacefully together like the sepa- 
rate organs of the human "body 
combining to one end. The Ne- 
gro will find hi$ true place as at 
once the least and the gteatest. 


the last and the first." 


Vj- 




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MUTILATED PAGE 



BE IMPROVED 


mOTHER'' ZION'S NEW 


PregrBM of Wall Known Roligioua Cor- 
poration In New York. 
T)ie corporation of the Mother A. M. 
SL Zion church has purchased the boUd- 
Ins of the Church of the Redeemer In 
West One Hundred and Thirty-sixth 
street, near Seventh avenue. New 
-Tork. Alterations are to be made as 
follows: The roof Is to be raised and 
Callerles erected, electric lights will be 
Installed and decorations are to be op 
to the modern Idea. T/he building when 
completed will have a seating capacity 
of from twelve to fifteen hundred, 
and the members of the famous old 
Mother Zion will have one of the most 






BKV J. W. BBOWN. 

beautiful edifices In New York city. It 
Is located couvenient to all car lines 
in the lieart of the densely populated 
Harlem fM.';trict and in easy reach of 
its communicants. 

These transactions speak well for the 
progressive idea of the pastor, tbc Rev. 
J. W. Brown, formerly of Rochester, 
and his able staff of officials. The 
church in West Eighty-ninth street 
which is valuable, will be sold. Aside 
from the possession of this property, 
Zion owiw i/ther properties of value 
and is considered one of the wealthiest 
churches of the denomination. 

It was founded in 1790. the first church 
being built at the corner of Church and 
Leonard streets in ISOO. It was re- 
built in 1820. The-first annual confer- 
ence was organized in 1821, and the 
church was burned down in 1S39 and 
again rebuilt in 1840. The Sabbath 
school was organized in 1845, and in 
1864 the church was moved to Tenth 
and Bleecker streets. From there it 
was removed in 1904 to its present site 
In West Eighty-ninth street The pres- 
ent membership is about 900. 

There is no doubt that the glad tid- 
ings of its advancement will be herald 
ed abroad throughout the country. I( 
Is expected that the building will be 
"tac occupancy by Easter Sunday. 
The present members of the board of 
trostees are B. D. Fenderson. Charles 
C Groce, Andrew Mead. .lames E. 
Nlckson, Alonzo A. Rives. William H. 
I>eKalb, B. Herbert Porter, Marcus J. 
Baker, Louis M. Fenderson and James 
Chase. Mme. Minnie Johnson is or- 
ganist and directress. The late E. V. 
O. E!ato was for thirty-five years a 
member of the board of trustees. 


-.THE ARMSTRONG LEAGUE. 

Richmond (Va.) Chapter Honors Mem- 
ory of Hampton Institute's Founder. 

The Richmond (Va.) chapter of the 
Armstrong league held interesting ex- 
ercises at the Ebenezer Baptist church 
in Rlcbmond Sunday afternoon, Feb. 
L» The occasion was the annual ceie-- 
bration of "Armstrong day" in honor 
of General Samuel Chapman Arm- 
strons, founder of the Hampton Instl- 
ttlte. The principal address was de- 
livered by the Hoil R. C. Steames, 
state superintendent of public schools. 

Short addresses extolling the Ufe and 
character of General Armstrong were 
made by Dr. J. A- C Chandler, super- 
intendent of the Richmond - public 
schools; Hon. H. C. Pollard, city at 
tomey, and the Rev. R. O. Johnson, 
pastor of the Moore Street Baptist 
church. 

The offlcers of the Richmond chajv 
ter of the ArmstroTg league are Wil- 
liam D. Jones, president; H. 0. Mun- 
ain, treasurer, and Miss W. L. Brooks, 
secretary. W. D. Darenport was 
chairman of the committee of arrange- 
ments for the meeting. The exercises 
were well attended, and much public 
Interest was shown in the work which 
the Armstrong league represents. 


Celloga Man to issue Monthly Magazine 
It to encouraging to note the mcrease 
in nnmbers and Influence of the Alpha 
Phi Alpha fraternity of intercollegiate 
Qreetr letter men among Afro- Ameri- 
cans. The first issue of the Sphinx, 
the official organ of the fraternity. Is 
dne to make Its appearance the first 
week In February. The seventh an- 
ntNl convention of the fraternity will 
be held at the seat of the Theta chapter 
In Chicago for three days be^nlng 
Monday, Dec 28. Henry Lake Dlck- 
eraon of Ohio Is president of the fra- 
ternity, and Roscoe W. Ross of OomeU 
nniversltr is the secretary. 


Big Trades Union Organized In ParISi 
The trades union organleed by color- 
ed men In Paris the latta: part of Jas- 
naiy la said to have a membership of, 
over idfiOO. The object of the anion 
is to KSiat the efforts Qf the white 
wortapen, who are claimed to be a^ 
Utftfttiag to prevent dM colored men 
ft! i Mj| s fH nK an Increaas.In pay. 



1 r-**?.- 


"si-^yy-' 



FADS AND FASHIONS 



L9 OK OUT ! 

FOR THE 

GRAND OPENING 

FEBRUARY 26 



i-. 


i'/-^. 


THE NATIONAL NEGRO 

CONGRESS 

A Brief Review and Comment on 

the Call and Purpose 

By E. F. Henderson 

Dear Readers — Doubtless many 
of you are aware of the fact that 
this call has been issued by a 
committee of race men from 
Washington, D. C, through 

James H. Hayes, attorney at law, 
who was chosen as the exponent 
officer to give publicity of the call. 

We prjnt below the full text of 
a circular lettter which has been 
sent out to representatives of the 
forty-eight states. This letter, as 
you can see, sets forth in part the 
purpose of the meeting: 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 2, 1913. 

Dear Sir : We are preparing to 
hold within'the next ninety days 
m 


Of tttereabotits, a Nattona} ^egro 
Congress to pass uponj the {ollow- 
ing qiiestionsr (Timei and place 
of Congress to be determined lat- 
er.) 

(1) Should Ihe Negfo return to 
the Republican party? If so, why? 

(2) Should the Negro cointinue 
to support the Democratic party? 
If so, why? 

(3) Should the Negro remain 
in the Progressive party? If so, 
why? ' 

(4) Should the Xegro maintain 
district organizations during the 
coming Congressional campaign 
of 1914? 

(5) What can we do to secure 
better accommodations on the 
railroads of the South? 

(6) How can wc obtain, and 
publish to the world, the truth 
^bout Southern lynchin 

Before issuing the call ind fix 
ing the time and place of meeti 
we shall ask a few prominent Xe- 
gro citizens in each one oiimir 48 
States and the District^of Co- 
lumbia to sign the X^U for the 
Congress. Its inifiortancc needs 
no discussion. /V\'c invite you tci 
be one of tlip/signcrs to this call; 
and if thx'^same be agreeable, 
kindly £Kl\ise us affirmatively by 

the /Hcxt mail, that wc may use 
vj>ur name to the call. 
/ \\'ill you alsn) sciul us the names 
and addresses of a dozen or more 
of ydiir most intluential and best 
known citizens, taken from , the 
different sections of your State? 

Will you also send us the 
names and post offices of the dif- 
ferent Xegro nowsiiajiers and oth- 
er Xegro publications of your 
State? 

.Should you. for any cause, not 
feel interested in this matter, will 
you kindly hand this to soifte one 
else, who, you think, will be? 

Thanking }-ou in, a(]\ance. and 
hf)ping that you keenly recognize 
the importance of the proposed 
meeting and the jjeculiar neces- 
sity of holding it early in 1914. %■ 

1 am. yours for the Xegroes' 
{""■terests. 

J.AMES H. HAYES, : 
.-\ttorney at Law. 

1307 Tea Street. X. W. 
AN'ashington, D. C. 
PUBLICITY TO THIS CALL 

It is the desire to give the wid- 
est publicity to this call and 

therefore we most earnestly urge 
our preachers, teachers, our pub- 
lic women and men to do what- 
ever they can consistency to ac- 
quaint the public of the time, 
place and purposes of this meet- 
ing. 

Our limited number of public 
sheets and their restricted' circu- 
lation compel us to ask the pas- 
tors of our churches throughout 
the land to keep this matter be- 
fore their people and to lend their 
personal assistance and influence 
to the selection of reputable and 
capable representation. 

We also ask the heads of our 
great organizations, and the offi-» 
cers of our many societies, clubs 
and associations, and the editors 
of our varius newspapers and 
magazines to lend a hand in giv- 
ing notice of this meeting and 
also in the selection of creditable 
delegations. 

I This will be an extraordinary 
I meeting, fraught with grave re- 
isponsibilities, great possibilities 
and serious consequences; un- 
handicapped by the political of the 
national administration, absolute- 
ly free from the invisible coercion 
and selfish designs of office hold- 
ers ; unfettered deliberation and 
freest discussion, as to what is 
best to advance the civil and polit- 
ical interests of the Xegro, wiil be 

the paramount consideration, 
without fear of the political) man- 
ipulations of any political party. 
In short, for the first time, the 
Negro is in a position to think 
and act for his own best interests ; 
and' this, meeting by thought and 
good judgment can be made ;the 
most potential race gathering ^.c^ 
the Negro, by tht Negro. j^d for 
the Negro, ever*held in.thi^ coun- 
try. 



, ^.f -•;! 


For Great Meeting 

Lincoln Republican 


Affiliated with Republican F-ieder-' 
ation of Southern California 


Club 


A. WARREN, Secretary, 
!957 Maple Avenue 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE 

FRIDAY, FEB. 27 

for Place See Next Issue and Daily Papers 




Jist of formal indorsers to the 
movement which we think to be 
one of paramount importance. 

We have in the United States 
approximately in round numbers 
about 10.000,000 Xegroes; and 
about eigth tenths of them are 
living in the southern states, 
where they are wholly or in part 
by their state laws denied their 
political rights of franchise, which 
was given them by the federal 
government, and which has been 
fictitiously denied them by class 
legislation in their respective 
states, over which we as a race 
have no control. Yet we have 
left something like 800.000 free 
votes belonging to the race which 
are scattered all over the country. 
The object of this congress will 
be chiefly to discuss ways and 
means whereby we may be able 
to concentrate these 800,000 votes 
which are now being given pro- 
miscuously to the several politi- 
cal parties, from which the race is 
receiving but little or no patron- 
age in return. The question to be 
decided is indeed a serious one, 
and it is one which should receive 
the very highest consideration 
from the best thinkers and lovers 
of the race. Hence we would 
urge the' early calling of a local 
mass meeting of race men and 
women at some • place to take 
steps preparatory to the pushing 
forward of the contemplated na- 
tional Negro congress. While it 
is true that many of our most i 
active and best men and women 
who are true and tried lovers of 
the race have differed from each 
other in party affiliations in the 
{last, it should be taken for grant- 
ed that they have done what they 
Icierned. You must not forget the 
thought was best for all con- 
fact that the success of the pro- 
posed N. N. congress depends en- 
'tjrely upon the willingness of the 

-pIAipUt SB Oq/VV) SUBIDI^IIod 3DEJ 

uals have gone into this that and 
the other oarty) to leavethem and 


Pueblo Meat Market 


TELEPHONE MAIN S89T 


. Joseph Davis, Proprietor 

All Fresh Meat and Fish 

Meats arc Covcrmcnt Inspected 

Premium Bacon and 'Mams 


UOHN T. REID 

GROCER — Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

Our Meat Market is a great addition to the store. 

We carry all sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats. 

OUR PRICES ARE REASONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Cor. Kohler and E. 7th St. 


NOTICEI 

Colored Voters of State of California 


Take Notice 
Federal name 
therein. 


Not, to use the Afro-American 
unless 2you Jare registered 


J. E. UATTIMORE 

5400 Long Beach Avenue Los Angeles, Cal. 

For Dependable 

Dry Goods, Ladies and Genb Furnishings, Hats 

Shoes, Etc., Go to - 

ARCADE DEPARTMENT STORE 

B. F. HOPKINS' OLD STAND FIFTH AND GLADYS 

They are out of the high rent district, aad these goods are as good as the ; 
best and prices as low as the lowest. 


to unite themselves together with 

I ajll of their political , influencees 

We subscribed our name t o the! with members of theic own race 


L. B. ROGERS 

Phone Broadway 2387 


Meat Market, Fresh and 
Smoked Meats 

Staplm Groceries 


Cash Grocery 

745 Central Avenue 


Groceries^ Fruit and Vegetables 

Grecian Imported Olive Oil, 3-Star Brand 
Fifth and Gliidys Ave. Gust. PicOUlast & Co. 




-*i-_ 


Sana's Market 


The Old Reiable, where you ^t 
your xaoomy's worth, along with 
courteous treatment. ' 


1914 East Seventh Street 

DEALER IN /ALL KINDS 0P-= 



Freshed Salt^McatsJ fine Sau«iges and LaNi 


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REV. J. D. GORDON, ORATOR AT LINCOLN DAY EXERCISES. 


Job Printing ! 


Wc invite you to give us a trial 


We Print 


if 


y .1 


4^1 


Letter Heads 
Bill Heads 
Envelopes 
Cards 

Statements 
Shipping Tags 
Catalogues 
At Home Cards 
Visiting Cards 
Announcements 
Wedding Invitations 
Etc., Etc. 

AT REASONABLE PRICES ! 


The California Eagle 

1034 E.9th street 



■-MmLATED PA ftp 


The Scbap Book 

MISPLACED CONFIDENCE 


^TTUBRE is an old, familiar saying that "A wise man will change 
VS/ his mind, but a fool never." The "stand-patters" of Repabli- 
can Negroes are chuckling; over the way the Democrats are treating 
the Negro. The colored voters elected Wilson — they hold the bill 
ance of power at the polls. Some \>f the most intellectual and pro- 
greeeive colored voters, both men and wonrien, voted for Wilson — not 
as a IDemocrat, but as one who would give them a square deal — 
the Democratic party not considered. Christ chose Juda* as one 
of his disciples, and Judas betrayed Him 

The Negroes who elf-ctpd Wilson are not the only ones disappointed 
in the new adminiBtraiion. Let us see: 

,. (Extract fr„in the N«w York Tlmei July 16.) 

Emeterio De La Garza, Ambassador of Mexico to the United 
States, bitterly 'deuounced PreeiJent Wilson for his attitude in 
persistently refusing to recognize the Huerta Government. -Ambas- 
sador Henry Lane Wilson to Mexico from the United States, ha^ng 
been recalled, said it was due to the courtesies of international law 
for De La Garza to leave this country the same day that he (Wilson) 
leaves Mexico City. He says the American people have been mis- 
led. The Government at Washington is wrong— absolutely wrong 
— and they now realize it too late, and to the regret of everybodv. 
Preiident Wilson thought that ha could ignore Mexico, but Mexico 
is too big a country to be ignored, and the only consequence of his 
unfair attitude to my country has been the great loflses-to Americans 
in Eife and property. Ameiicans have lost all their prestige in 
Mexico, due to their own government. The whule thing is a great 
''political blunder," and I am surprised that the President of such a 
great country — the First Magistrate of the American people — the 
great, just and gond American people — should be permitted to 
bring his country and our country into such a crisis — as it may be- 
come a crisis which may end in a conflict of the United States with 
Europe, and with Asia too, pethaps 

I want to denounce the attitude of President Wilson to all the 
Latin, race and to all the civilized wsrld, because his neutrality has 
helped, materially and r.joyillj, the revolution in Mexico and has 
been the cause of many deaths, lootings and of much destruction 
of property — and of ruin to a great, rich and friendly republic. 

(From Eilltorlal of I- A. Examli.er July 17 
In this critical stage ol affairs Secretary Bryan left on the l6th 
of July for Mountain Lake Park, Md , where he will lecture. Mr. 


JDEALSIIF 
MASONIC ORpER 

Brief Outline of tiie Fritir- 
nity's Basic Principles. 

PRINCE HALL AS PiONEEIL 




Spirit of Brotherhood Which Pervada* 
dis Ranks of Time Honored Sooiatjr 
ExtollM— How the Fir*t Lodg* of th« 
Order Among Colored Men In Amari- 
ca Was Established. 

By RALPH W. TYLER. 

The Masonic fraternity is a most 
beneficent order. Its fundamental 
principles know no color or race, no 
country or clime. WHh more tban 
3.00O years of Hs^jloing behind It It 
is just as earnest and vigoroua to up- 
hold the traditions of the^iTder as 
when" building the tiemplfr-to spread 
Uie gospel of the brotherhood of man 
throughout thfe length and breadth of 
the land. < 

The legitimacy of Negro Masonry U 
today honored in the breach. If not in 
the observance, everywhere. In the 
face of historical facts and records the 
legitimacy of the Negro Mason cannot 
be questioned. At one time our legiti- 
macy was questioned because Prince 
Hall, the founder of the first M^nlc 
lodge among colored men In tills conn- 
try, had been made a Mason in an 
army lodge back in the Eevolutlonaty 
days. ■ 

Laws and records, however, estatv . 
Usbed the right for the existence of 
army lodges. After this objection had 
been completely swept aside still our 
legitimacy was questioned, primarily 
on the ground that two grand bodies 
could not exist in the same Jurisdic- 
tion. At one time, many years ago. 
white Masons made the tentative 
proposition that if Negro Masons 
would prefix the descriptive word "Ne- 
gro" to our grand lodges they would 
recognize tis as Masonic brothers. 
I The Negro Masons came back wltb 
other countries. Mr. Bryan's incapacity has made not only a i the reply that Masonry knows no col- 
pleasure but a ..genuine privilege for the President to excuse his abj <""^^^ evidtencf^was produced to 
sence from Washington irt many important emergencies. Mr. Bry- ' prove that Prince Hall, the first Negro 
an's absenteeism from h ispost has excited the indignation of taipay- ; Mason in the Dnlted States, J>ad been 

ers arid evoked an in quiry in Congress. Mr. Bryan's contempt for ' F^^^^ "^ *^,« grand lodge of S^ 

* •' no •' f land, from which came the charter for 

"filthy lucre" has already attained in public life to the same propor- the white Masons. 

tions as when, 'n private- life, he cried to deprive the widow of his 

dead friend (Bennett) of her inheritance? What a perfectly cork- 

ng time Mr. Bryan wouW have had as President 1 It is difBcult 

to understand just what, and also just which, Mr. Bryan really is — 

iSecretary of State, or editor of the Commoner, or "the best seller at 

the Chautauqua. 


Thi Scrap Book 


PROGRESS AND WEALTH OF AMERICAN NEGRO 


Declaring the 10,000,000 negroes of the United States to be as good citi- 
zens of the nation as the whites, the Rev. A. B. Leonard, secretary emeritus 
of the Board of Foreign Missions of New York, who spoke October 1 to an 
audience of several hundred members of the Methodist conference, bitterly 
denounced the plan of shipping the negroes back to Africa, and commended 
the great progress made by the race in learning and citizenship. 

"If all the ships that fly the American flag," said he, "were engagcti i n 
carrying the negro back to Africa they could not handle the natural increase 
of the race, whose numbers have grown from 4,000,000 at the time of the Civil 
War to 10,000,000 at the present time. 

Since the emancipation of the slaves, who were set free without a dollar 
with no property, and only the clothes they had on, the negro race has accu- 
mulated more than $700,000,000 in property, owns and operates sixty-four 
banks with a capital of $1, 600,000' 109 insurance companies ; 200 drug'stores 
and 20,000 stores of other kinds 


The great lesson which Masoni7 
teaches its votaries is that "a mui la a 
man for a' that" And the fnndamen- 
tal principles of Masonry teacit 
we are all citizens of one conntry, 
which Is the whole world itself; mem- 
bers of one family, which is the entire 
human race, and children of one tfc- 
tber, who is the Omnipotent God atwv* 
and around us. 

Whether he comes from the jnnsles 
of Africa, the cotton plantations of 
Mississippi, the plains of Hindustan, 
the burning sands of Arabia, the snow 
capped summits of Greenland or trom 
whatever nation or clime, if be is a. 
Mason and can prove himself snctit 
be should be welcomed as a man and 
a brother. 

The wisdom of Masonry is eiempH- 
fled Id establishing her basis on ^ile 
Immutable foundation of tmth. The 
shackles fall from the hands of prej- 
udice and bigotry at the entrance of 
Iher shrine. In her sacred retreat ev- 
ery discordant voice is hushed, and the 
bitterness of sectarian strife is attasb- 
ed Into silence In the awful presence 
of pure and absolute truth. 

If Masonry were to require any oth- 
er creed than God is out Father and 
that men are his children and there- 


"Seventy per cent of the colored race can read and write, and through ; f^^ bound to love him and one anoth- 

he church influence have now in successful operation 22 educational institu- ! gj.^ jjer grand object would at once be 

tions. many of them colleges and academic schools, and more than 300,000 | defeated. Next to allegiance to God 


members of the race are skilled mechanics. They own 20,000,000 acres of 
land, equal to the combined areas of the States of Vermont, New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and show the most remarkable intellectua 
growth of any people on the face of the earth, who fifty ,^ars before were 
held in bondage. 

Referring to the feeling in the South regarding the colored race. Rev. Mr. 
Leonard spoke of the fact that lynchings, so common in former years, are dis- 
appearing, and pointed oUt that while in 1885 there were 184 negroes lynched 
only 64 were thus treated last year. 



:the itamous white temple, BAKERSFI^I'^ 


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and springing from it. Its eontroUinc 
principle is love for man as man. 

Masonry meets man in all the varie- 
ties of his condition with symwtthy 
and comprehends him In all of tils 
complex nature. Before the altar til 
' distinctions vanish, and ^ all men, 
prince or peasant, stand alike in tlM 
presence and must meet upon the level. 

Prince Hall was never discouraged, i 
When bitterly treated aS; a clandsB-i 
tine, be approached the fountain hea4| 
—the grand lodge of England, 
be had estaisllshed. the first Ic 

among Negroes he wrote from Bost^ 

under date of March 21, 1784. as 
lows- "1 would inform you that, 
lodge hath been founded almost ^Ight 
years. We have had no opportusity 
to apply for a warrant before, though 
we have been Importnned to send to 
France for one, yet we thought best to 
send to the fountain bead from 
whence we received the ticbt for &; 
warrant." 

Six months later, on Sept. 29, 17 
129 yeais ago, the grand lodge of Buf- 
land, whose grand east is In XiondoQ, ^] 
granted his prayer by iBsning to tiM 
fifteen colored men who bad t>een In- 
itiated Into the mysteries of MasonTy 
a warrant of constitution, N& 4tSB. 
This warrant of constltatlon was duly 
signed by R. Holt, deputy grand, maa-l 
ter, and William White, grand asct*- 
tary of the grand lodge of Bn^snd,' 
and bore its great seaL It is furtlMr 
a matter of record that for tills mo^ 
rant Prince Hall forwarded to th* 
grand lodge of England til* usual tee 
of £5 lOa. 

There caji be no queMlon m t» ttta ' 
tegitimacT of tiMi Nc^ Maaoa. Ha 
ts as regular as the oaoM ngolar wliite 
Mason wbo faces the Mst and 
tbe proper signs before tbe thne) 
Ugbta. His warrant of 
makee blm a brathir ngarOlesa dt. I 
.color oK^acek . 


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LEADER AMONG 
THEMPTISTS 

BniiDt Work of tin Roi 
J. H. EisoiL 


AT THE CHUBCHES 


VERSED IN CHURCH HISTORY 


Briaf •ummary of tha Aohiavamanta af 
tha Prasidant of tha Baptiat Stata 
Convantion of Alabama — Author of 
^ovaral Plana For tha Futura Wal- 
fara of tha Danomination. 

Btrmingbam. AJa.— Tbe aaptlat de- 
Domioatlon Id this state is growing by 
leape and bounds In oumbers, finance 
and tntelllseut leadensbip. Tbe reports 
made by the various cborcbes at tbe 
last Btato convention covered a wide 
scope of iictljjltles In and out of tbe In- 
divldual cbulicbes themselves. Fore- 
most among tbe many capable leaders 
In the work of the denomination is the 
Eev. J. H. Eason, B. D.. pastor of the 
Jackson Street Baptist church In this 
city and president of the Alabama 
Baptist state convention. 

Mr. Eason Is a native of SuratervlIIe. 
this state, and was graduated from 
Balma university In 1885 and from the 
Blchmond iVa.i Theological seminary 
In liBOO. After his graduation in 1890 
Professor Eason taught at Selma uni- 
versity for seven years. He was or- 
dained to the Baptist ministry in 1891 
He has held aiauy responsible posi- 
tions both as a churchman and an edu- 
cator. Before beginning his pastorate 
at the Ja<-l;8on Street Baptist church 
In this city he had been pastor of the 
Seventeenth Street Baptist church In 
Annlston for sixteen years. 

The Kev. .Mr. Eason has some very 
distinct views as to the worli, doctrine 


THE EAST EIGHTH STREET 
j CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
' D. L. McMickens, Minister 

Services for Sunday, Fel». 8, 1914 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. Mr. 
W. J. Thompson, Superintendent. 

Preaching at H a. m. by the 
pastor; subject, "The Wild Olive 
Tree." 

At 7 p. m. the Y. P. S. C. E. will 
render a good program. Address 
by Mr. R. R. Tumage. Paper by 
Miss E. Jackson. Solo, Miss 
Juanita B. Bausley. The meeting 
will be lead by Mrs. R. H. Keith. 

At 8 p. m. the pastor will preach 
on the subject, "Holiness," Rom. 
12. Everybody is invited to these 
services. 

D. L. McMICKENS, 

Minister. 

MT. ZION BAPTIST 

Third and Stephenson Ave. 

Rev. A. C. Williams, pastor. 


Services for Sunday, 

At 11 a. in., preaching, subject, 
7 :30 p. in., preaching, subject, 


SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Maple Ave., bet. 7th and 8th Sts. 

Rev. Joseph L. McCoy, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
R. Y. P. U. at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 



FIRST A. M. E. CHURCH 

Cor. Eighth St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. X. Greggs, pastor. 


i Preaching at 11 a. m. 

! Christian Eiuleavor at 6 :30 p. ni. 

I Preaching at 7 :3Q, p. nj. 


BIT i. B. EASON. B. O. 

and discipline of the Baptist denomina- 
tion. In a recent interview he made 
the following statements: "For several 
years i have made spe<-ial study of 
church history and the Baptist denom- 
ination, i find the primitive form of 
tbe Baptist |)eople was that of a mass 
, meeting. They are a family. All oth- 
er denominations are organizations. 
The Baptist." are a growth, not an In- 
stitution, in their nature. 

••To do the best worlj it is possible for 
ns as Baptists to do we will have to 
become an organized family. 1 should 
not be surprised In the future to see 
the Baptists divided Into two great 
classes— namely, confederated Baptists 
and the united Baptists. 

•'Some years ago 1 drew up a consO- 
tntlon for the Alabama Baptist state 
convention, which provided that tbe 
one state convention be divided Into 
fonr subordinate state district conven- 
tions, tbe coming together once a year 
of these state district conventions in 
tbe state convention. Many good and 
great men In the state and oat of the 
state predicted the state district cod- 
rentions would secede from the one 
central organtzatioa But there are no 
^gns of trouble yet. The scheme la 
working nicely. 

"In oar last convention at Mobile 
Ala, the brethren passed a recommen- 
dadoo which I oflered that provides 
that we have a congresa to Investigate 
and restate the practices and doctrlnea 
wblcb the charches that are members 
of tbe convention are expected to sup- 
port and practice. , 

•'I reason If comiglttees to revise tlie 
Bible are wise a oieeting to look Into 
tbe practices and doctrines of tbe de- 
nomination that rests apon tbe Bible 
for Ita only rule of action might not t>e 
OQt of order. This meeting will be 
held gome time next year." 


WESLEY CHAPEL 

Comer Eighth ajid Wall 

Rev. Wesley E. Kurchen, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Young People's meeting at 6:30 
|). m. 

Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


TABERNACLE BAPTIST 


Hemlock Street 

Rev. J. D. Gordon, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 

Paloma Ave., near 16th 
Rev. C. II. Anderson, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. i;.. 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


A. M. £. CHURCH 
Eighth and Towne Ave. 

Usual service preaching by the 
pastor. Dr. Gregg. 


OurLc . OER- SPRfNG HILL NA/hiskey 

Hilf's Fiiie Whiskey Blends 
Home F-4020 i ! i Hmin 269 

Hilf Mercaiitile Co. 

Imp(»'ters and Wholesale 

Liquor Merchants 

Owners "Ea Crestona Brand" Winea voA Cwdiali 

Lot Angeles ^ 


•^t 


THE GOLDEN WEST HOTEL 


I In keeping with its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continues to 
give to its patrons the best pos- 
sible service. 

i Being centrally located between 
the three great, railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel 
meets the demands not only in 
good service but likewise conve- 
nience. 


Tha Fifteenth Amendment Will Stand. 
The Introduction of a measure In the 
general assembly at Colamt>la. 8. Os 
recenti; favoring the repeal of tha 
flfteentb amendment to tbe federal 
eonatltutlonslmpi; shows the attltade 
of a small minority of sonthem white 
men l»ward the colored citizens of the 
country. Tbe great balk of Intelligent 
A whlties tbroaghqut tbe country would 
vote against sucb a selfish meaanre 
were It to become a national ianie. 


FOR RENT— We have several 

hoiisekeeping apartments of three 

.and four rooms for rent very 

cheap. Also a good business site. 

Apply Noah D. Thompson, 

1711 E. 55th St. 

Phone S. 1651. 


Sunday Schools to Aid MIsslonarias. 
Tbe foreign misstun board of tlM Na- 
tional Baptist convention is preparing 
an elaborate E^astier program for the 
Sanday schools tbrougboat tbe cons- 
try. Dr. L. G. Jordan, secretary, says 
Ibey wHI mail oa^ at least 2(X>,000 of 
theaa programs tO| tbe Snnday scboula 
Jn every state and jalao to their statio.,a 
in AMe* and other (ordgn pobits. 
Ttie IMMrd If aaktaic % $U|AIO (lor tuh 
medtaite^ilM en tiMMMgn iBeM. 


FIR8TCLA88LADY BAIIIBER8 

112 1.2 Wilmington Street ""^VsVe 

MAINICURIIVa UADIBS A MAJR DRBSSINO 
PARLOR,. \SK;irN SPECIALIST 

Only Colored Woman's Barber Shop in town. MRS. CORA ENGLISH, P BO 

113 East Fourth street, Westminster Hotel Bldg. 4th st. 
Entrance, just a few doors East of Main streeL g ^' 


The Missouri& KansasCafe 

968 Hemlock Street 

Mrs. R. H. TODD, Proprietess 

Home Cooking a Specialty. 
Best Meal in the city at the lowest prices 


Main 5298 


Home F-5083 


R. W. LEWIS 

Prescription Druggfist 


T F B No 9 


Corner 7th and Central Avenue 


Main 7698 Home Fr409 

A. J. ROBERTS, SON &C0 . 

Funeral Diraetors and EiDbalmars 

Funeral Parlors Lady Attendant 

12tli and Los Angeles St. 

e I 6 phone South 2824 

Langaickle Baking Company 

5608 Central Avenue 

Bread, Pies and Cakvs 


J. EDMONDS, Main 2061 


NOAH D. THOMPSON, Soa1i>X661- 


A Square Deal For Eac^ Customer 

ThrilOAH D. THOMPSON REALH CO. 

Houses f*r Sale or Rent Also Apartments for Rent 

N E Comor6&th Street and Long Bemch Ave, Room 209 132 N, Broadway 

LOS ANGELES i 


Farwell Bros 


Watchmakers 

and Jewelers 

Ifth and Central Ave 
Los Aneeles. 

Watches accurately repaired at 
moderate prices. Diamonds re-set 


t 

4 
/ 



South 1340 


Ladies Garments Remodeled My Specialty 


THE HARVARD TAILOR 


JOS LUCAS, PROP. 

Ladies' and Gents' Suitf Made to Order 

Cleaninf , Remodeliag, Repairing and Pressing Done at Lowest Price* ' 
211 Centra] Avenue Los Angeles, Cal. 


The Leader Bakery 

Wm. BROADHAQ, Prop. 

Phone Boyle 1455 
2416 East First Street Lqs Angeles, Californ 


Wedding and Fancy Cakes a Feature 
Get satisfaction in price and quality. 


Lo3 Angeles 


California 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

Bought, Sold and Exchanged 

house Furnishings of All Kinds 

Phone South 4273 Av(>r^ Rmthpr^ 

2627 Central Ave. Open Evenings. r\y<'*^ UlUllltlS 


Patronize the Poultryman's Store 
Feed Co-OperativeDry Mash 

An Honest, Economical balanced Egg rotation for Hens and 
oi rowing Stock 

Baby Chicks, Hatching Eggs, Breeders, Everything in Poultry 
Everything for the Poultryman. Visit Our Store 

Poultry man, s Co-Ope**ative Ass'n. 


640 South Main S^^t. 


Los Angeles, California 


H. S. A. CUMING 

CUMING'S 
LIVER TONERS i 

One Hundred Vegetable Pills 
for 25 Cents t 

These pills are recommended tot the 
relief of Constipation, Sick Headache, 
Biliousness. 

Cuming's Drug Store 

ESTIBLUHKD 7 YCABS 

:f407 EMt N inth Broadway 871 


:!f<\-- 


M'Tl-W*. 


DIRECTORY FOR OUR 
ENTERTAINERS 

"Casino Sextette" — Jackson 
brothers, Ross, Gray, Black and 
Bryant are at the Casino Cafe. 

Tuxedo Five — Powers, Robin- 
son, Hicks, Richie and Stewart 
at Fairmount. 

Orient Trio — Payne, Wilson 
and Donaldson at Murrays Cafe. 

At Lester Social Club — Mr. and 
Mrs. Morgan Prince. 

M. & M. Four — ^Harris broth- 
ers, Denny and Banks at M. & M. 
Cafe, would like to hear from 
Geo. Johnson, Geo. Wolfson, J. 
C. McDonald and R. B-- Johnson. 

"J^mo Aces — Compton and Joy- 
ner at gt. Francis Club, which has 
been remodeled, where Bob 
Brown and Tljomas Foster con- 
tinue to make things pleasant for 
their patrons. 4 

EVERYBODY IS BUYING 
HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Williams about Wil- 
mington Harbor property. The 
greatest opportunity of your life 
IS at your door now. 

We have 6 50-ft. lots we tan sell 
for $550, only $10 down, $5 a 
month. We also have 80 other 
lots in same tract, but ypu will 
have to be in a huB»y if yqii wish 
to get in on the ground floor. 

Ally day we get six or eight 
persons we will take you down tO 
see the lots. j 

I^. H. willHams. 


Prof. Booker T. Washington 
willpass three weeks in Southern 
California, arriving on or about 
March 7. He will speak in the 
First Congregational church in 
Los Angeles on Sunday morning, 
March 8, and at large mass meet- 
ing the same afternoon in the in- 
terest of the colored Y. M. C. A. 
Tuesday night, March 10th will 
be his first address in Pasadena 
under the auspices of Throop Lec- 
ture Course. Thursday night, the 
12th, he will be the guest of honor 
and principal speaker at the ban- 
quet of the state Y. M. C. A. con- 
vention to be held at the Hotel 
Virginia at Long Beach, Satur- 
day, the 14th, he will spend with 
President Blaisdell at Claremont, 
speaking to the Pomona college 
students and others. President 
Baer of Occidental, who has 
charge of Dr. Washington's itin- 
erary and program while in South- 
ern California, has a number of in- 
vitations for Dr; Washington and 
is now arranging the completed 
program. Dr. Washington iiwill 
be Dr. Baer's guest while in 
Southern California, at Pasadena 
at West MoJand Place, 
ater, a $10,000 building, will be 
erected at Ninth and Central. The 
house! will furnish the best in high 
class vaudeville and moving i pic- 
tures] under the direction of P. E. 
Henderson.- .]-■-'" ■•-'''-', ■ 


H. G. VAN FOSSEN 

Groceries, Notions, Candies, Cigars, Ice Cream 
Wood, Coal, Kindling and Sunshine Polish. 
We recommend J..eege & Haskins Coffees. 
Peerless, Monado and Oriental Blends. 

1131 TEMPLE STREET 


Phones Broadway 314 
Home A 2653 


FEED AND FUEL 


STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Phone IWest 4952 L COR. 35TH & NORMANDIE AVE. 


T. GARNER 


MACK'S 

J S. McCHNEY. Proprietor. 

Dealer in FURNITURE, BEDDING AND KITCHEN HARDWARE 

270S N. Broadway and 112 N. Workman 

PICO FURNITURE CO. 

2678 West Pico Street Los Angeles 

LESS THAN DOWN-TOWN PRICES i 

Tel. West 366 H. F. BRAINARD, Pres. J. P. CROWDER, Viee-Pres 
Home 73798 C. H. BRAINARD, Secy and Treas. 


PhoneslHome 73829 


West 1523 


P. J. VIGLIAN 


GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Vegetables and Fruit 
Prompt Delivery Best Treatment to Al 

2109 West Pico Street 


AIRS. J. M. TAYLOR 

Hair Goods, Ornaments 

Toilet Articles. Hair Dressing, Manicuring, Shampooing 

1403 EAST NINTH STREET Cor. Hemlock Phone Main 5167 


Phones 71484 . West 3586 

OXFORD MARKET 

M. THEWS, Proprietor 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH AND SALTED MEATS 

SAUSAGES, ETC. POULTRY IN SEASON 

3012 W. PICO ST. 


JOIN MY COLONY AND GET YOU 

A FINE HOME IN 
IN ViCrrOR VALLEY 

I have located 7 young ifaen.all from L. A., in one of the most beauti- ' 
o J D ^S '" ^^^^ state. Fine, rich soil; water easy to obtain; close to 
S. F. R. R. and ocean to ocean highway 

The Government Land Agent, WM. KENARD 

"'""'''^"" 618 E 8 Street 


Res. hone Broadway S588 

WILLIAM DA 

Fi«h and Poultry Market 

Fres h Fish Poultry and Oysters— oultry Dressed to Order 
East 9th St. Los Angeles 


Li W. CLARK 

JEWELER 
Cor. Washington & San Pedro Sts 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing ^ 
Work Called for and Delivered ' 

Home 21474; ^e me a trial Sunsdt So. 278 


iJIITII A 


DJl AT 


rkJAKHT DP iMPPnvrn 


Vol 



Los Angeles, Cad., Fel .21, 11914 


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TT 


Ntunber { 


P^^cssivc Administration Has Vardfflirtm Jim Crow Going At San Qucntin 

ace Mining Company 

■■ ■ Making BtgStrides . 



In bur next week's issue this ar' 
tide will be followed by one de- 
livered by Atty. MoBeth upon the 
same occasion. 


THE ELDORADO GOLD 
STAR MINING COMPANY 


L. K. Becks 


In order to formulate a perfect 
, idea of the work and accomplish- 
ments of the above company, a 
' visit was paid to their headquar- 
J ters at 255 Wilson building, 102 
' S.^pring, by the local editur of 
this paper. 

I-n their suitable apartments a 
i most congenial staff o£ officers in 
the persons of Messrs. 1 loward 
Folke, secretary, C. \\'. Hnlden, 
the finance committee chairman, 
and Rev. G. \\'. Shields, fiscal 
agent, were met. 
, -iio persuasion was necessary 
{rom ferny source to induce the of- 
fic«: force presenting! immediately 
all the information and details de- 
§itisi concerning , the company. 



■ ii»i ii i>i i ii« m i* n *** 


Mr. Howard Folke the un- 
tipring secretary' of the Eldo- 
rado Mining company: labor 
i ing daily for the production 

: of fortune and prosperity in 
I 
, : tie race- 


l 


•i ee#«<>< »»»»»»♦♦»»»»»♦»»»< 

The company possesses papers 

o: incorporation to work under 

; two states— California and Xeva^ 

• di ; the claims being located in the 

'' Ildorado Canyon district, Xob 

I [ill section of the country. Opal 

ringe of mountains, Clark county, 

-'Jlevada. 

The present company reortjan- 
ifed June, 1910, incorporated at 
I $100,000, selling shares at SI each. 
' The corporation owns the^Gold 
Star group of mines, embracing 
two claims, Gold Star and Gold 
Sitor N&, 2, for which the board 
qf directors^Jiave been successful 
i:i clearing the title. They have 
also just completed a contract for 
5 1300 worth of improvements on 
tbe mines. 

Men have been kept continu- 
ously at work, during which time 
lirge bodies of ore have been ex- 
fosed, carrying gold, silver and 
iron, with assay values averaging 
from $10 to $48 per ton in gold 
and silver. The above figures are 
tjhose advertised by the company, 
Vhich were somewhat questioned 
by some parties desiring to be- 
come interested, at which dubi- 
djosnessthe staunch secretary in- 


vited one Rev. William Roberts 
Church, to visit the mines and sat- 
(white), pastor of the Frieiids 
isfy his own curiosity, by saying, 
"I will tell you, sir, in the lan- 
guage of the queen of Sheba, the 
half liar never yet been told." 

Upon this invitation and influ- 
enced by a desire, to satisfy in- 
quiries from friends. Rev. Rob- 
erts, bearing his expense^s, visited 
the mines — personalty extracted 
the ore and returned. Upon siil)- 
mitting the ore to Raverstock, 
.Staples and Payne at 2,^,^ West 
First street. January 20, 1014, as- 
saver.s. thev reported the valua- 
tion, which doubled the' values as 
Mr, Folke aforestated, ranging 
from S17.45 to $137.0.^. more than 
doubling the adt'ertised values of 
the company — $10 to $48. 

^fr. Roberts was more than con- 
vinced and has interested his 
friends strongly in the prop<Tsi- 
tion. 

Especial mention should be 
made of the fact that the ores sent 
by the corp<iration to the Califor- 
nia Ore Testing Company in San 
I'Vancisco. for a mill run and lab- 
oratorv test, to determine the 
character and kind of machinery 
to he installed for the .milling of 
ores on the company's jiroperties, 
all the high grade ores were elim- 
inated from the samples, this be- 
ing done because the company de- 
sired the final report based on the 
low-grade ores. Being tested by 
an expert, a graduate from the 
University of Germany, the report 
assured the comi)any that with a 
sluicing plant estimated to cost 
■ $20.00 0. the company could pro- 
duce their ore in bricks at about 
$3.60 a ton, leaving an immense 
pr(^fit for the company after pro- 
duction. 

The engineer of the company, 
Mr. Cook, submits a process cya- 
nidation of the ore by all-sliming 
agitation methods which shows a 
saving of 'X) per cent of gold ainl 
silver values at a cost 'if from $2 
to $2.50 per ton ; this process has 
been adopted by the company and 
the 25 to 35-ton per day plant 
at about $20,000 will be erected. 

.•\fter thorough examination it 
is safe to say that 20.000 tons of 
ore can be treated at the mill, 
transported and loaded at $3.60 a 
ton. ~ *«' " 

The company now has firm 
bases to work on — the testimony 
of reliable parties and lawful su- 
pervision the main thing is in the 
words of the reliable secretarv, in 
order to save and operate this 
prosperous enterprise to our peo- 
ple, is\to put energy, influence and 
finance! into the proposition and 
bring «rery prestige to bear for 
its ultiwte success — by buying 
shares. 


THE PROGRESS OF THE 
NEGRO 

By Mrs. Noah H. Thompson 
(nee Eloise Bibb) 





!'*. 



There is a time-worn theory of 
the *;cie«tist that heredity deter- 
mines the future of the man, for 
according to biological laws thei 
physical and psychical qualities 
of the parents are transmitted to 
their offspring. 

.\ new psychology has arisen 
which affirms that environment 
and not heredity is the criterion 
of a man's future achievement. 

The majority of historians con- 
clude that the Xcgfo has always 
een a hewer of wood and carrier 
of xvvater for his more favored 
brother, for on the very oldest 
monuments of Egypt, they tell us 
his Idack profile is represented as 
a slave : thai *'<)riginating nothing, 
he (5wes every opward impulsion 
to his Egyptian or Arab conquer- 
or or to his, Caucasian master;" 
"that the laws of hercrlity ♦and 
like a wall of iron against his ad- 
vancement." X 

"'iet contrary to the theories of 
psyciiologists and tlie deiUtctions 
of historians, notwithstanding his 
hereditv of liarbarism and his en- 
vironment of slaverv, the Xegro 
has won recognition in all the 
epochs of this country's history, 
in its periods of war and in times 
of ueacc : in the fields of battle, of 
religion, of education,' of music 
and the fine arts, and of econom- 
ics. 

In the Revolutionary war the 
first martyr in the cause of Inde- 
pendence was the Negro. Crisnus 
•.\ttucks. In the war of 1R12. two 
thousand black men were sent 
forward to the army at Sackctt's 
Harbor. Tn the war fif the Re- 
bellion two himdred thousand 
Xegro soldiers were enlisted, en- 
caging in manv of the bloodiest 
battles of tlie war in which they 
particularly distinguished them- 
selves. Tn the Sparnish .Xmerican 
war the four X'egro regiments 
were among the very first troops 
ordered to the front, winning for 
themselves and their race^ great 
distinction by their bravery and 
daring. 

Tn the religious world Xegro 
churches were organized and 
erected by Negroes as early as the 
eighteentli century, presided over 
bv black men whose learning and 
eloquence won for themselves rec- 
ognition and distinction, as in the 
case of Rev. Eemue! TTaynes. who 
in 1/85 became pastor of a white 
congregation at Torrington, Con- 
necticut. 

Tn the educational field, Bow- 
doin College in 1826 conferred the 
degree of Bachelor of .-Xrts upon 
the Negro. John Brown Russ- 
nurm, and in 1841," cultured Eng-' 
land listened with appreciation to- 
the powerful eloquence of Fred- 
erick Douglas,. whose untiring ef- 
forts in the cjfuse of freedom we 
are celebrating at this time. 

Leaving behind us that tragic 
period when the Negro, although 
in bondage, gave evidences of 
ability, and glancing at his 
achievements during the past fifty 
years of freedom, we find that in 
1867 there were but six hundred 
colored teachers in the South, but 
in 1913 that number had increased 
to thirty-four thousand, four- 


his 


dollars for the support of 
schools. 

The highest earned degree con- 
ferred by educational institutions 
is that of Doctor of Philosophv, 
which thus far has been cofnerre'd heredity and environment were 


fifths of whom are teachers in col- 
leges and advanced institutions of 
learning. ',' 

Frorh. the erection of the very 
first school the freed Negro has 
^ided largely in their support. In 
1870, although in dire poverty, the 
frtedmen donated seven hundred 
thousand dollars for school build- 
ings and the support of teachers. 
At the present time the Negro 
each year contributes a million country. They are estimated to 

be worth today more than seven 
hundred million dollars. 

Whence comes this unprece-. 
dented success, this long line of 
superior Negro workmen whose 


Wesley ChapelV ^^\ ' 
Great Celebration 


»»> o ««<»» n »oeoooo»»o< l <o>o>o>eot»o»»>»t> m »« mm 


by American universities upon 
eight men of Xegro blood. 

In music and the fine arts we 
find writers who wrote more than 
forty years ago, compositions and 
ballads that are still favorites. 


not only deplorable, but adverse 
and unjielding? What of the sci- 
entists' theory of evolution — the 
philosophers' hypothesis of atav- 
ism? 

Does it not prove, my friends. 


Its true destiny by disregarding 
the laws of health, and the fact 
that tuberculosis is the most vital 
cause of mortality among them ; 
nor by faihng to denounce the al- 
most universal practice of race- 
.suicide. Too much can not be 
said against this growing evil, 
that defeats the purposes of Al- 
mighty God. 

Even if one's means do not ap- 
pear to be adequate for the sup- 
port of a large family. God who 


And today De Koven Thomi)son's that the Negro is the descendant clothes the lilies will' sunnlv thr 


"Dear Lord, Remember Jle," and 
Coleridge Taylor's "Hiawatha," 
thrill with the mellow chords of 
genius. 

Upon the walls of the famous 
Luxembourg , gallery hang the 
paintings of ^he X'egro, Henry O. 
Tanner; and in 1003, the sculp- 
tured group calted "The Wretch- 
ed," of a woman of color, were 
exhibited in the salons of Paris. 

In the literary world, we are 
aware that the poems of Phillis 
Wheatley.'a sl.ave girl, were rec- 
ognized in the early days of this 
C<)untry's history as works of mer- 
it, calling forth unstinted praise 
from\Gen. Washington, the first 
president of the nation. Siace 
then other Xegro svriters of po- 
etry "nd jirose have demanded 
recognition in the field of l etters . 

Tlie Xegro Iras also shown ni- 
\entive ability, for ten thousand 
patents have been granted to him 


hidden within them the tendencies 
and capacities of their most re- 
mote ancestors. .\ later, baselr, 
heredity has been superimposed 
vipon them, and the problem now 
is, how to break through it, how 
to get rid of it, so that the inter- 
ior nature, long hidden, may blos- 
som forth." He adds again, 
"There is a vast spiritual life and 
power Concealed in the bosom of 
these people like the water in the 
rock until it was struck by the rod 
The first clock made^aifc AnK-ricaj of Moses." 
which appeared in 1754\ was con-j It is but too true, friends, the 
structed by a noted Xegr\j astron- later and baser heredity of ccn- 
omer, Benjamin B>anneke\ ; He turies of slavery has been laid 


of an ancient and perished race, needs of and abundantiv bles» 
the rums of whose splendid mon- those who work with him to bring 
uments, rock-cut temples and co- f„rth laborers for the Negro's fu- 
lossal statues disclose a civiliza- ture harvest. Men and women of 
tion as high as the Egyptian^ this selfish age dare to reap the 
themselves? • benefits and gratifications of mat- 

One ol the disciples of Emanuel Hmony, and year after vear refuse 
Swedenborg assures us "that the to shoulder its obligat'ions. "Be 
black races'were probably the old- \,f,t deceived; God is not mocked- 
est of all. Their lost continent as a man sows, st. shall he reao," 
hes between Africa and South and^ just so sure as we sow the 
America. They contain, deeply |,vind of race extinction we .shall 


also assisted in laying out th^T^is- 
trict of Columbia. "His calcula- 
tions concerning the rising air 
setting of the sun and the moon, 
and the courses of the bodies of 
the planetary system was so exact 
as to call forth unstinted praise 
from eminent men a's Fox. Pitt 
and Wilbcrforce." The Xegro 
has rccentiv invented a telephone, 
registers, a weight motor for run 
ning machinery, an automatic car- 
switch and feed-attachment, and 
several aeroplanes. 

The economic jirogrcss of the 
Xegro has already been marvel 
lous. The census reports point to 
the fact, that tltere are hut few, if 
any. pursuits folrowed by whites 
in which there are h<:}t found some 
Negroes, There arh fifty thou- 
sand X'egroes in the p\ofessioi)s, 
thirty thousand in \ario^s busi- 
ness pursuits, and three hiindred 
thousand working in trades.. re- 
quiring skill. 

There are now si.xty-four X'egro 
hanks in the country, capitalized 
at something like, one million six 
hui.dred thousand dollars, doing 
a yearly busjness of about twenty 
million dollars. 

When at the close of the civil 
war the Negroes started on their 
career as farmers, they had no 
land and no experience as farm 
owners, none of them became 
farm owne:^ by inheritance, yet 
today the Negroes of this country 
own twenty' million acres of land 
worth five hundred million dol- 
lars. 

The pastififty years has shown 
a marked and rapid increase in 
the wealth of the Negroes of the 

i 


the ancient civilization of the Xe- 
gro like mass upon mass of stony 
material, until the rock of superfi- 
'\cial inferiority has hidden Lis 
wonderful capability. 

Great seers have had a clear 
visioi] of his capacity, and have] 
risked \ health, reputation, the 
world's iavor, even^ life itself to 
make possible his glorious future. 

When thb.^ great Livingstone 
undertook his^\second expedition 
into Africa for the purpose of sup- 
pressing the slave^N^rade, he must 
iiave had a wondefiul vision of 
the hidden possibilities of the 
Negro race ; for jcHirneying 
through swamj)s and endless 
downpour of rain, attacked hy fe- 
ver and climatic diseases, hamp- 
ered by the imperfect setting of an 
arm crushed by an African lion, 
he, nevertheless in spite of these 
disasters, journeyed on for thirty 
years, forcing the conscience of 
the civilized world to awaken to 
the horrors of the slave-trade and 
causing its suppression tlirough- 
otrt all Africa. 

Soine prophetic insight of the 
Negro\ hidden powers must have 
forced itself upon Abraham. Lin- 
coln, whosB birthday we celebrate 
tonight, whe^Ti invoking "t4+e con- 
siderate judgment of mankind and 
the gracious fat^or of Almighty 
God" he declared\hat, "All per- 
sons held as slaves^.^ within the 
United States should 'l^enceforth 
be free." \ ' 

But the terrible responkibility 
of proving to the world at large 
the height of the Negro's capabil- 
ity rests upon the Negro himself. 
The colored race will not attain 


reap the whirlwind of an aveng- 
ing Providence. 

The Negro will not realize his 
brilliant possibilities unless he 
shuns divorce, that reaper of fam- 
ily unity, unless he remembers 
that the sweetest flower in the 
garden of morals is womanlv 
modesty — that innate, intangible 
something that will not permit a 
true woman, notwithstanding the 
degenerate fashions of the day, to 
disclose the shar]) outlines of her 
figure, and appear before the eyes 
of men in a manner conducive to 
the feeding of their \vorst appe- 
tites. 

In a word, the X'egro will reach 
eminence through.;, temperance, 
through restraint, by being care- 
ful not to imitate the lawless char- 
acteristics of these profligate 
times. 

Religion has been the power 
that has brought victory to the 
X'egro thus far; the moaning sup- 
plications of the old patient moth- 
ers in slavery, broke his shackles 
of bondage, and religion will be 
the force in the future that will 
"reconstruct all things up new 
foundations," for "more things 
are wrought by prayer than this 
world dreams of." 

The message I would bring to 
my race toniight is, faithfulness to 
the laws of our God ; I would ear- 
nestly entreat the Negro to be 
just in a land of injustice, to be 
moral in a world of immoralitv. to 
be willing to deny himself in an 
.tmosphere of selfishness. I would 
pray him to retain his innate hu- 
mility, for pride is the, source of 
man's dowiifall, to hold on to his 
natural gentleness, his almost su- 
perhuman patience, his God-like 
power of returning good for evil, 
then, to conclude with the pro- 
phecy of an able thinker: "All 
the clouds will eventually disap- 
pear. The divine order of a new 
life will be established. The fed- 
eration of the world will cease to 
be a dream. All nations and races 
will work harmoniously and 
peacefully together like the sepa- 
rate organs of the human body 
combining to jone end. The Ne- 
gro will find his true place as at 
.pnee the least and the greatest, 
the last and the first." 




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MUTILATED PAGE CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


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Prograas of Wall Known R«liai«us Cor- 
poration tn New York. 
The corpontion of the Id other A. M. 
£1. Zton cbDrch has purchased the bnlld- 
iBC of the Church of th» Redeemer In 
West One Bnndred and Thirty-sixth 
Mieet, necu- Seventh avenae. New 
York. Alterations are to he made as 
follows: The roof is to be raised and 
(aHeries erected, electric lights will be 
Installed and decorations are to be np 
to the modem idea. The building when 
completed will have a seating capacity 
of from twelve to fifteen hundred. 
and the members of the famous old 
Mother Zion will have one of the most 



RKV. J. W. BROWN. 

beantirul edifices In New York city. It 
is located convenient to all car lines 
In the beart of tbe densely populated 
Harlem district and In easy reacb of 
Its communicants. 

These transactions speali well for the 
progressive idea of the pastor, tbe Rev. 
J. W. Brown, formerly of Rochester; 
and bis able staff of offlcinls. Tbe 
ChuH* In West Eigbty-nintb street, 
which is valuable, will be sold. Aside 
from the possession of this property, 
Zion owns other properties of value 
and is considered one of the wealthiest 
churches of the denomination. 

It was founded in 179C. tbe first churcb 
being bnilt at the corner of Cburcb and 
Leonard streets in ISOO. It was re- 
built In 1820. The first annual confer- 
ence was organized in 1S21. and tbe 
church was burned down in 1839 and 
again rebuilt in 1840. Tbe Sabbatb 
school was organized In 1845. and In 
1864 the churci was moved to Tenth 
and Bleecker streets. From there it 
was removed In 1904 to its present site 
In West Eighty-ninth street The pres- 
ent membership Is about 90O. 

There Is no doobt that the glad tid- 
ings of Its advancement will be herald- 
ed abroad throughout the country. It 
l8 expected that the bnllding will be 
ready for occupancy by Easter Sunday. 
The present members of the board of 
trnstees are B. D. Fenderson. Charles 
C Groce, Andrew Mead. James E. 
Nickson, Alonzo A. Rives, William H. 
I>eEalb, R. Herbert Porter, "Marcus J. 
Baker, Louis M. Fenderson and James 
Chas& Mme Minnie Johnson is or- 
ganist and directress. Tbe late EL V. 
C. Elato was for thirty-five years a 
member of the board of trustees. 


THE ARMSTRONG LEAGUE. 


Richmond (Va.) Chapter Honor* Mem- 
ory of Hampton Institute'* Founder. 

The Richmond (Va.) chapter of the 
Armstrong league held Interesting ex- 
ercises at the Ebenezer Baptist church 
In Richmond Simday afternoon, Feb. 
^. The occasion was the annual cele- 
bration of "Armstrong day" In honor 
of General Samuel Chapman Arm- 
strong, founder of the Hampton insti- 
tute; The principal address was de- 
livered by the Hoa E. 0. Steames, 
state superintendent of public schools. 

Short addresses extolling the life and 
character of General Armstrong were 
made by Dr. J. A. C. Chandler, super- 
intendent of the Richmond public 
schools; Han. H. C Pollard, city at- 
torney, and the Rev. R. O. Johnson, 
pastor of tbe Moore Street Baptist 
chnrclL 

The officers of the Richmond chap- 
ter of the Armstrong league are Wil- 
liam D. Jones, president: H. C. Jdnn- 
dtn. treasurer, and Miss W. L. Brooks, 
secretary. W. D. Davenport was 
chairman of the committee of arrange- 
ments for the meeting. The exercises 
wwe well attended, and much public 
interest was shown In the work which 
\tbe Armstrong league represents. 


Collaga Man to l*«ue Monthly Magazin* 
It is encouraging to note the increase 
In numbers and influence of the Alpha 
Phi Alpha fraternity of intercollegiate 
Greek letter men among Afro-Ameri- 
cans. The first Issue of the Sphinx, 
the official organ of the fraternity, is 
-fino to make its appearance tbe first 
\»eek in February. The seventh an- 
nual convention of the fraternity will 
be held at the seat of the Theta chapter 
In Chicago for three days beginning 
Monday, Dec. 28. Henry Lake Dick- 
enon of Ohio Is president of tbe fra- 
tMiiity, and Roscoe W. Ross of Cornell 
university is the secretary. 


Big Trades Union Organized In Paria. 
The trades union organlced by color- 
ed men in Paris the latter part of Jan- 
aai7 is said to have a membership of 
over 10,000. Thje object of tbe union 
is to resist tbe efforts of the white 
workmen, who are claimed to be at- 
t«BMting to prevent the colored men 
boi^fBltang an iocreaaa in pay. 



FADS AND FASHIONS 



ing questions:: (Tioie and place 
of Congress to bc;determmed;lpij-': 

"■) ".' J ^ '^!'^•^•^ 

(1) Should -Ifhe Negro retuj-n to 
the Republican partyi? If so>, *hy? 

(2) Should the Negro continue 
to support the Democratic birty? 
If so, why? I" I 

(3) Should the Negro rdirtain 
in the Progressive party? If so, 
why ? ' 

(4) Should the Negro maintain 
district organizations during the 
coming Congressional campaigfn 
of 1914? 

(5) What can we do to secure 
better accommodations oq the 
railroads of the South? 

(6) How can we obtain, and 
publish to the world, the truth 
about Southern lynchings? 

Before issuing the call and fix- 
ing the time and place of meeting, 
we shall ask a' few prominent Ne- 
gro citizens 'in each one of our 48 
States and the District of Co- 
kimbia to si,c;n the call for the 
Cpngress. Its importance needs 
no discussion. W'e invite you to 
be one of the signers to this call: 
and if the same l5c agreeable, 
kindly advise lis affirmatively by 

the next mail, tliat wc may use- 
vour name to the call. 

Will yon also send us the tiames 
and adtlresses of a dozen or. more 
of ynur most intluontial and best 
known citizens, taken from the 
different sections of your State? 

\\"\U you also send iis the 
names and post offices of the dif- 
ferent .\e,t;ro newspapers andoth- 
er Negro ])ublications of your 
State? 

.Should yon, for any cause, not 
feel interested iu this matter, will 
you kindh- hand this to some one 
else, who. you think, will be? 

Thanking you in advance, and 
hopini,^ that yon keenly recognize 
the importance of the jiroposed 
meeting and the peculiar neces- 
sity of holding it early in 1914. 

I am, yours for the .Negroes' 
interests. 

J,\MF.S II. IT.WES, . 
.XttjOFiiey at Law. 

1307 Tea Street, N. W. 
Washington. D. C. 
PUBLICITY TO THIS CALL 

It is the desire to give t)ie wid- 
est i)ublicity to this call and 

therefore we most earnestly urge 
our preachers, teachers, our pub- 
lic women and men to do what- 
ever they can consistently to ac- 
quaint the public of the time, 
place and purposes of this meet- 
ing. 

Our limited number of public 
sheets and their restricted; circu- 
lation compel us to ask the pas- 
tors of our churches throughqut 
the land to keep this matter be- 
fore their people and to lend their 
personal assistance and influence 
to the selection of reputable and 
capable representation. 

We also ask the heads of our 
great organizations, and the offi- 
cers of our many societies, clubs 
and associations, and the editors 
of our varius newspapers- and 
magazines to lend a hand in giv- 
ing notice of this meeting and 
also in the selection of creditable 
delegations. 

This will be an extraordinary 
meeting, fraught with grave re- 
sponsibilities, great possibilities 
and serious consequences; un- 
CONGRESS '. handicapped by the political of the 

A Brief Review and Comment on national administration, absolute 


LO OK OUT I 

FOR THE 



Be One of the 
5000 Members 


For Great Mcctins^ 

Lincoln Republican 


Afniiated with Republican Feder- 
ation of Southern Catlfornia 


Club 


J. A. WARREN, Secretary, 

!957 Maple Avenue 

f =^ 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE 

FRIDAY, FEB. 27 

For Place See Next Issue and Daily Papers 


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>i 


GRAND OPENING 

FEimUARY 2G 



THE N^ATIONAL NEGRO 


the Call and Purpose 

By E. F. Henderson 
Dear Readers — Doubtless many 
of you are aware of the fact that 
this call has been issued by a 
committee of race men from 
Washington, D. C., through 

James H. Hayes, attorney at law, 
who was chosen as the exponent 
officer to give publicity of the call. 

We print below the full text of 
a circular letter which has been, 
sent out to representatives' of the 
forty-eight states. This letter, as 
you can see, sets forth in part the 
purpose of the meeting: 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 2, 1913, 

Dear Sir : We are preparing to 
hold withir^thje next ninety days 


ly free from the invisible coercion 
and selfish designs of office hold- 
ers ; unfettered deliberation and 
freest discussion, as to what is 
best to advance the civil and polit- 
ical interests of the Negro, will be 
the paramount consideration, 
without fear of the political man- 
ipulations of any political party. 

- In short, for the first time, the 
Negro is in a position to think 
and act for his own best Interests ; 
and this meeting by thought and 
good judgment can be made the 
most potervtidl race gathering of 
the Negro, by the Negro and for 
the Negro, ever held in. this coun- 
try. ■ ; \[ ■ ' 
We subscribed our naijie to the I with members of their o wn race . 


Jist of formal indorsers t-o the 

movement which we think to be 
one of paramount importance. 

Wc have in the United States 
ajiproximately in round numbers 
ajjout 10,000.000 Negroes; and 
about eitjth tenths of them arc 
living in the southern states. 
where they are wholly or in part 
by their state laws denied' their 
political rights of franchise, which 
was given them by the federal 
government, and which has been 
fictitiously denied them by class 
legislation in their respective 
states, over which we as a race 
have no control. Yet we have 
left something like 800.000 free 
votes belonging to the race which 
are scattered all over the country. 
The object of this congress will 
be chiefly to discuss ways and 
means whereby we may be able 
to concentrate these 800.000 votes 
which are now being given pro- 
miscuously to the several politi- 
cal parties, from which the race is 
receiving but little or no iiatron- 
agejn return. The question to be 
decided is indeed a serious one, 
and it is one which should receive 
the very highest consideration 
from the best thinkers and lovers 
of the race. Hence we would 
urge the early Tailing of a local 
mass meeting of race men and 
women at some place to take 
steps preparatory to the pushing 
forward of the contemplated na- 
tional Negro congress. \Vhile it 
is true that many of our most 
active and best men and women 
who are true and tried lovers of 
the race have differed from each 
other in party affiliations in the 
past, it should be tal^ for grant- 
ed that the\ have done what they 
cerned. You must not forget the 
thought was best for all con- 
fact '.lat the success of the pro- 
posed N. N. congress depends en- 
tirely upon the willingness of the 

-plAipUt SB Ot(A\) SUBIDHipd 3DEJ 

uals have gone into this that and 
the other narty) to leavethem and 
to unite themselves together with 
all , of their political influencees 


Pueblo Meat Market 

TCLCPHONE MAIN 5697 

Joseph Davis, Proprietor 

All Fresh Meat and Fish 
Meats are Coverment Inspected 

F»t*emium Bacon and 'Mams 

JOHN T. REID 

GROCER — Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

Our Meat Market is a great addition to the store. 

We carry all sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats. 

OUR PRICES ARE REASONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Cor. Kohler and E. 7th St. 

NOTICE! 

Colored Voters of State of California 


Take Notice — Not to use the Afro-Americatr 

Federal name unless ^yti Jars 

t4tereiai- 


registered 


J. E. LATTIMORE 

5400 Long Beach Avenue Los Angeles, Cal. 


f^or Dependable 

Dry Goods, Ladies and Gents Furnishings, Hats 

Shoes. Etc., Go to 

ARCADE DEPARTMENT STORE 

B. F. HOPKINS' OLD STAND FIFTH AND GLADYS 

They are out of the high rent district, aad these goods are as good as the 
best and prices as low as the lowest. 


L. B. ROGERS 

Phone Broadway 2387 


Meat Market, Fresh and 
Smoked Meats 

Staplm Groceries 


Cash Grocery 

745 Central Avenue 


Groceries, Fruit and Vegetables 

Grecian Imported Olive Oil, 3-Star Brand 
Fifth and Gladys Ave. Gust. PicOUlast & Co. 


i :; i^ 

■ ••' -^r XS£ 

• -1 '-■"^ ^ 

im 

1 . w 

•t i^i 

1 i/-^^ 

■\ f' 

t \' li 


~; ,7 -, 


■- .1 J 

■0 


K 


:f- 
•■#■ 


\,-. 


Sam's Market 


The Old Reiable, where you get 
your monay's worth, along with 
courteous treatment. 


1914 East Seventh Street 

-DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF- 


Fresh and Salt Meats, Finft Sausages and Lard 



-fm 


*>-«4xi 



m 



MUTILATED PAGE I CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



^i:#^: 




NAMES AND TITLES 


m 




fig"'*'' 


A rose by any otier liame, we We told, would 'smel 
as sweet. It will be observed tbat it is the fragrance of 
the flower and the beauty of its form and color that at- 
tracts it to mankind. Ain article well advertised can 
bear up under the handicap of an unsuitable name. The 
name, from the beginning, has a commercial value, or 




mibt 


'■'or MASTEJi ' ■-' . '1'^' 


■H'l 


After more tlAn fifty jrears' service in one' family, Mary Ann Pearson 
— iKrho is 90 yea^ old, has bMn remembered by one of the sons of the family, 
Ferg^os D. Lee. In his-wiU he has bequeathed her $2,900, to be paid in 
monthly installments of ft6. ' 

In addition, the testatorls will provides that the aged "mammy" b« buried 
in the same tomb with him and that, after her burial, the to^nb be hermetic- 
cally sealed and no more placed in it. \ 


, , , , • J J xiL x-ii I- 1 • • ■ Mary Ann Ferg^uson nursed Lee from the time of his birth, and in spite 

lack of value ; indeed, as the name or title of anything is ' ^f her age, cared for him during his last illness, she is deeply grieved ovea 

" r~-^the first introduction, it ought to be as attractive and his death. Members of the Lee family fear she will not survive her favorite- 
Mary Ann Ferg^on cam|e into the Lee family when she was a yoang girly 
She was from Virginia and Was sold as a slave. When she was freed afte. 
the Civil War she did not leave the family About ten years ago the familj 
" ensioned her. 


H-. 


U-' : 




/ 


u 




fe-'S't . 

urH,-" '-'- 

m 


isuggestive as possible. Perhaps the advertising value of 
(a name can best be illustrated bv citing a few examples 
R>r instance, one of the best known astronomers of the 
world several years a^o published a book and named it 
"Popular Astronomy." Not one copy of that book was 
ever sold. The publishers, however, having confidence 
in the work, ran off a new edition, but called it "A Ro- 
mance of the Heavens." Several thousand copies of 
that book were sold before they were off the press, not- 
withstanding the fact not one single line of the text was 
changed in the entire book Except the title and running 
heads. There is no doubt, therefore, that the new name 
was responsible for the sale of the books and that, for 
some reason or other, the original name was an invisible 
bar to the sales. Did you ever hear anyone say they did 
not like the name of a book or a play? In all such cases 
th« name arouses a prejudice which must be overcome 
before the work can enjoy the run its merit warrant. 

THE SCRAP BOOK 

ov 
TIPS ON THE RACE PROBLEM 
i^^he title of this little book) is suggestive and also at- 
tractive. An original conception. 


INGERSOLL'S WARNING AGAINST INJUSTICE 


r 


The Scrap Book 

cult to tell which one has wrought the most havoc in married life. Many a 
home is destroyed by the lack of self control, and njany have been destroyed 
by intemperance in the use of intoxicating drinks. Sensible young women 
will no longer marry a man who drinks, with the expectation of reforming 
him. Young men will not marry a' girl who does not know how to hold he 
tongue and keep her temper. Self mastery lies at the basis of aoly ptr 
home. V'here it is lacking, home bee Omes a hell. \ 


,I,am going to try to put you in the way of living independently and prhs 
perously. I have a plantation here and I am going to make you an offer, p 
am going to cut it up into farms, build each of you a good house, stock each 
farm and let you run it yourse f, but on one condition that you must all agree 
to. You must not buy anything on credit. I have arranged with a bank to 
give each of you what you need, and you must let me 'know how much that 
^ ill be each month. Understand, this is only a condition that you ask credi 
of no one." 

The plantation to be divided is one of tne- finest in — oU'«iana. 


(An E^xtract from Col, Robt. G. Ingersoll's speech at Chicago, K»v. 13, 1879) 
OW, my friends, there is only one thing that troubles the average 
Southerner, and tbat is the idea that eomehow, in some way. the 
Negro will get to be the better man. It is the trouble in the 
Sout todiy, and I say to my Southern friends (and I admit there 
icdmen in the South, but the bad men are an overwhelming 
majority j me great masrof the population are cruel and revengeful, 
idle, hateful. And I tell that population if you don't go to work the 
Negro— bv his palient industry— WILL pass you in the long run. 
The nation that ia honest, the people who are industrious, wilU pass 
he people who are dishonest and the people who are idle. I pity the 
man whose only claim is that he is white. When I am reduced to 
that necessity, I believe shame 'will make me RED instead of v^rhite 
I belietve another thing. If I cannot hoe my row, I won't steal corn 
from the fellow that hoes his row. If I belong to the superior race 
it will be so superior that I will get my living without stealing from ar? 
inferior. I believe that every round of the ladder of fame, from the 
one that rests upon the ground to the last, that leans against the 
shining summit — Ambition — belongs to the foot that gets upon the 
first. Mr. Southerner, if you cannot climb, stand out of the way and 
let some deserving Negro pass. lam perfectly willing that any man 
in the world that can, shall pass me. I have never seen one yet, ex- 
cept when 1 looked over my shoulder. But if they can pass I shall 
be delighted. Whenever we stand in the light of genius we take our 
hats off ; whenever we stand in the presence of the great we do in- 
voluntary homage, as it were, in spite of ourselves. Any one who 
can go by is welcome — any one in the world. But, until somebody 
does go by of the Democratic persuasion I shall not trouble mysel 
with the fact that maybe, in some future time, they may get by. The 
Democrats are afraid of being passed because they are being passed 
Any race is inferior to the race it tramples upon and robs. Any race 
is inferior that tramples upon human rights. A government founded 
upon anything but human liberty and justice cannot and ought no 
to stand. All the wrecks on either side of the river of time; all the 
wrecks of the great cities, and all the nations that have passed away 
— all are a warning that no nation founded upon injustice can stand 
From sand-enshrouded Egypt, from the marble wilderness of Athens 
rom every, fallen, crumbling stone of the once mighty f^me, comes. 

a wail, as it wsre. The cry that no nation founded upon injustic e 

can permanently stand. ,, ' 


■ • I - ■ * 


i Thb Scrap Bo^; 

To bring my haughty ■piiitdMB , ]j . 
' To so much self-detual; | ' ~^- - 1 ;] 
But I rMolyed witli all my heart - ' 

To learn or perish trying-, 
For as Fthis had made a start 

I could not think of flyii^g.. 
With two strong hands 

I would clear the land 
And make the old trees rattle; 

Come home at night. 

Strike np the light, | 

And then renew the battle! 

I was sometimes up and sometimes down 

And sometimes on the level, 
Beset by trials all around — J 

The world, the flesh and devil ;| : < 
I thought I would prepare myself I 

To teach my sable nation, 
' And would not turn to right nor left 

From my first calculation. 
So on I would start, -^ i 

. With hand and heart, ' 

And head all set in order 
To persevere — 
From year to year — 

But never reach its border. 

I was brought up a farmer's Son, 

That makes all things come handy 
To any work my hands I turned, 

_But could not act the dandy; 
My labor made my food digest. 

Digestion tnade me healthy. 
With mental health I was richly blessed. 

And thus I felt quite wealthy. 
I plowed and mowed. 
And reaped and sowed, 

1 washed and cooked quite handy. 
I would fence and ditch 
For the poor and rich,. 

And drive old Buck and Dandy. 



■:W^ 


Zanesville, Ohio. 


JAMES McSIMPSdN. 


J^ SMALL scar may mar a beautiful face ; a slight rent a priceless canvas 
A slight stain a great marble; a tiny flaw a precious gem; a little faa;lat 
noble character. 


14 


The Scrap Book 


eloquence, diligent and fearless utterances ; who publishes the latest 
news Jf ertaining to the interests of bis race, giving every detail of thi 
wrongs against the Negro, suppressing nothing in The Crisis, wbceh 
he edits monthly. I read every one, as I take it from a local agent 
Every Negro, male or female, who is interested in the race unhesitat 
ingly pronounces Dr. DuBois the greatest represebtative and leaded.' 
of the race living today. Read "The Crisis." J. D. R 


Job Printing! 


Wc invite you to ^ivc us a trial 


Wc Print 


Letter Heads 
Bill Heads 
Envelopes 
Cards 
Statements 
Shipping Tags 
Catciiogues 
At Home Cards 
Visiting Cards 
Announcements 
Wedding Invitations 
Etc., Etc. 

.:. AT REASONABLE PRICES ! 


BIG UPLIFT FOR 
RURAUGHOOLS 

Good Work Being (lone by the 
Supervising Teachers. 

MANY IIVIPROVEMENTS MADE 


( 





• ji-'^^K 


j#- 


* -. /■'aB)-S4»>«,1 



^ 


Economic and Social Aspect of Eduei- 
tional Work In One Hundred arfd 
Thirty Counti'es In tha Southern 
State* Reviewed by Stat* Superviior 
Jackapn Davi* of Virginia. 

How industrial training, under a sys- 
tem of supefvislng industrial teachers, 
has npt only vitalized the rural schools 
among the colored people Into which 
It has been Introduced, but Is also hav- 
ing farreachlng economic and social 
effects on rural conditions generally. 
Is described by Jackson Davis, state 
supervisor of elementary schools In 
Virginia, In the Southej-n Workman. 
Mr. Davis says In part: 

"A few efforts had be^n made here 
and there throughout the south to tie 
np the work of the country school to' 
the life of the home and ;the farm, but 
it was not until the establishment of 
the Jeanes fund fur rurall schools tbat 
a general effort was made In this di- 
rection. In Henrico county, 'Va., In the 
fall of 1908, following a conference of 
the school officials of the county with 
agents of the Jennes fund, a supervis- 
ing Industrial teacher was employed 
and put to work in all df the colored 
schools of the county. 

"The pioneer work of Virginia Ran- 
dolph In overcoming the faidlSerence of 
her own people, organWlng Improve- 
ment leagues at each school. Introduc- 
ing simple forms 6f Industrial work 
and In the enlistment of the active In- 
terest of the white people In these ef- 
forts for Improvement ' In practical 
-ways, met with such success tbat a 
new spirit was soon ablaze in each 
colored community, and; tbe schools 
were transformed In appearance and 
In the general character qf tbeir work. I 

"The general plan, so Successful In 
Its early demonstration, has contlnaed 
JM grow and meet with iapproval. It 
bas developed InitlativeJ among tbe 
colored rural people, and it has tied 
their faiterests together in a school for 
a better neighborhood. The moral ef- 
fect baa been noticed Ijy tbe white 
people aronnd tbem and tbelr support 
of this movement lk-<8 been hearty. 
Sapervlsing indnstrlal t^ochers 'were 
fipployed in ISO conntlw 
^■■• ii E ta tea last aeaaion. 


RACE RIGHTS FIRMER HERE 

■ \l 

The State law protecting the colored men from race discrimina 
ation is still in force, says Lawyer Ben W. Slote in a communication 
with that great and eplendid daily. The Standard Union. The Fed- 
eral Civil Rights law has been declared unconstitutional by the Su- 
preme Court, but this does not extend to^the State statutes, according. '-'? 
to Mr. felote. He writes: 

"Inasmuch as New York State has a^law kftOWfi-aB'^the Uivil 
Rights Law (sections 40 apd 41 there''); making it not only a misde 
meanor for any innkeeper, theaJ/: proprietor or other public piac* to 
discriminate against a colored person or any other person by reaeon 
of race, creed or color, but also imposing a fine upon such person for 
the benefit of the person injured of not less than 1100 nor more than 
$500, each such injured person, pursuant to the laws as they now 
stand in New York State, has an absolute right to sue and receive r 
a balm for his injured feelings whenever he is discriminatea against i 
by reason of his color, religion or creed. |- 

"The reason I write you this is that I happened to appear as at- 
torney for the plaintiff in a similar case in the latter part of June of 
this year, in the case of Georgia Curry vs. Fox Varieties Co. {the 
owners of Fox's Folly Theater of Brooklyn), which case was tried be- ' 
tore Justice Callaghan in Third District Municipal Court, Brooklyn. 

Mr. Justice Callaghan, after going through the opinion of tbat 
case very thoroughly, and all other authorities cited by the attorneys 
for plaintiC and defendant in their respective briefs, decided that thet 
civil rights law of New York State was not unconstitutional, and. tha 
the decision of the United States Supreme Court in the case of Bu^ 
vs. Merchants' and Miners' Tranoportation Co. does not in any 
affect the New York State law, but on the' contrary strengthens it and 
gives it more vehemence, and accordingly rendered judgment for the^ 
plaintifi against the Fox Varieties Company in the sum of 1150." 

The Georgia Curry in question was a' colored woman who had beej 
as ked to vacate an orchestra seat in the theater. 


P.: 


In thh aouth- dmtilal tesx' 




"This work has been made possible 
In most cases by the Jeanes fund, but 
the counties, as they see the splendid 
results, are\ putting up more money 
from local funds for the support of the 
work, and in sonje counties the teach- 
er's salary Is paid entirely from local 
school funds. In sending out trained 
teachers to supervise the rural schools 
we are putting the best leadership of 
the Negro race to work In the task of 
bringing about better training, better 
farming and better living. 

"The school Is almost the only point 
where conscious effort is made by the 


. i»Bits montns. 
iMv school term thej organln 
clubs among the larger gtrla. 
visit them in their homes, meet tbsa 
in groups, give them practical lastmc 
aon for their gardens and teach caa- 
ning, cooking and sewing In thdc 
homes. 

"The teachers are in great donand 
daring the sammer months, not only 
among the girls, but among their' 
mothers as well, for they, too, have 
been eager to learn tbe 'gOTemment 
way' of canning vegetables. 

"Either as tenants, owner| A labor- 
ers the colored people cnltlwRe (arma 
in the soath with an area of 100,000,- 


whlte people to Influence and develop 000 acres. 


the Negro race, and here is a great op- 
portunity for constructive work, as In- 
deed the supervising ' teachers are 
showing. In organising the school Im- 
provement leagues they are bringing 
the older people together In the inter- 
est of better things and are calling 
forth the spirit of self help, which is 
indispensable to their progress. 

"One of the most promising develop- 
ments in the work has been the co- 
operation of the supervising industrial 
teacher with the farm demonstration 
agent In working during tbb sommer 
months with cluhs of girls who make 
home gardena and can their vegetables 
and fruits for 'winter use. ' ^ala fea- 
ture of the work was begu^ jjj yitgiBia 
two years ago in four eonna*. Dol- 
ing tbe past summer '^^ ^^ carded on 
In foDTteen. Dnder y^jg pj^n the in- 
;t_»-i.i »».„»^ ^ employed for fie 
At.tlMl4S»>^ 


This is an area equal to 


•.^|^t>'^'*¥tff: 


four times thesta>e of Virginia. 

of this land, as we know, U ctilOTated 
in the very poorest fashl«a. We shall 
have a onesided cultivation as long as_, 
we have twentieth century metbodg 1 
our cities and elgbteentb 
methods on our farms. 

"If we deny the Negro tlie 
which he needs to make a better < 
een and a better man and a bettarJ 
farmer, we suppress oor rural Ufa and'] 
hold down our average to a lower lSTCt,J 
and we contlnne to have blm 'wear i 
tbe soil which is onr greateaC 
wealth. Training of tbe rigbt 
that will replace obsolete methods l 
Intelligent methods, that wlB 
Insanitary cabins with good ij 
booses, neglected shacks 'wftb 
tlve. schoolbonaes and an iaije!] 
work for the coming of tha 
of God on earth— this la the i 
UiatloB wlticb some think 
HrroogbtaiJ kr « nlracia.'' 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



. — . — ^ ■^,r-K\ ■ 

THE CALIFORNIA EAQLEJ 

All o>mmunlcii.tion8 should be addressed 
to The California Eagle, 1034 East Ninth 
Streets. Sunset Phone Broadway 7667. 

Sntered as second-class mall matter at 
the PostoOice of Las Angeles, Cal., under 
the Act-ef Mar^h I, 1879. 

C A. SPEAR- _Maiia«lns Editor 

J. a BASS.-... -_ -.-.- Editor 

H. SHANNON A.dvertlslng Manager 

LEWIS K. BEEKS tiocal EdU«r 

i CORRESPONDENTS. 

S. B. Carr Pasadena 

H. E. Simpson ., Bakersfteld 

E. L. Lewis - - Fresno 

Miss Ada Thompson Oakland 

Mrs. Evans San Francisco 

J. J. Anderson ; San Frariclsco 

E. F. Henderson...--. Los Angeles 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year ^■■-— W-^ 

Six Months - ■'•*' 

Three M onths - ^ 

It occasionally happens that for some 
reason or other papers are missed by be- 
ing mlssent. lost or stolen. In case of 
subscribers not receiving their papers. In- 
form us by postal and we shall cheerfully 
furnish a duplicate copy of said missing 
number. 

No attention paid to anonymous letters. 

Copy must be written plainly on one 
side of paper, and to insure insertion in 
current issue must reach this office 
Thursday- Correspondents, please take 
notice- _ 

ADVERTISING RATES, 50c PER INCH. 


r* 


pdlii^" of tbif present administra- 
tion. I 

Of course, it is all right to be 
cheefrful and hope for the very 
best. But under Republican rule 
no parade of the unemployed is 
constantly with us and Coxey's 
armies are unheard of- Today 
they are all up and down this 
bioad land of ours and the end is 
not yet. 


The Fruition of a Prophesy 
at Hand. 


We are more than thankful for 
the many e.xpressioiis of good will 
and encouragement, for the suc- 
cess of this journal and we will 
strive to merit the same by our 
efforts to publish a real newspa- 
per for the continued exploitation 
of race progress. 


The federation of the various 
state societies is a move in the 
right direction and the spirit of 
get together: they must, howev- 
er, he eternally vigilant and see 
to it that desi,gning politicians are 
not suffered to lead it astray. W'e 
have everv' faith in its organizers 
and believe they will make good. 


Bevond question the famous 
9th Cavalry has again distinguish- 
ed itselC by capturing the famous 
Mexican brigand and his band of 
looters and murderers. 


Church Sunday 

jood one, an 


The Go to 

Movehlfirf _^ 

should be followed hy-^^^y ^*^t 
registering during the rest of the 
week. 


The following is a clipping from 
the Pacific Coast Appeal of June 
1, 1901: 

"Hon. P. M. Shortridge, in his 
brilliant epeech before the Repub- 
lican State convention said: 'They 
— the Democratic party -prate of 
their love for a free ballot and use 
the shotgnn argument to advance 
their cause. They affect solici- 
tude for Porto Ricans, and by chi- 
chcanery and cunning devices, 
under the guise of constitutional 
amendents, rob the Negio of his 
Tote — the Negro who fought for 
our liberties at Bunker Bunker 
Hill, to preserve the Union that 
had euslaved him, who with bared 
and bleeding breast carried thp 
flag up to victory and glory on 
San Juan Hill.' 

"Our comment at the time was 
as follows and we had occasasion 
to change: Behind these utter- 
ances was a deep meaning, one of 
which the thousands and tens of 
thousands who read that speech 
readily understood. Oh, for the 
day when California takes initiat- 
ive step on this coast and sends 
such a man as its representative to 
the upper house of. Congress. If 
the colored voters, numbering 
thousands in this etatis, wfre asked 
to speak, they would join in one 
acclaim. — S. M. Shortridge for U. 
S. Senator. 


9,4*^ 


"I do not think they MOf, 
plied Senator Jobes. " 1: 

."Then I have nothing fartbelri to 
say," replied Mr. Vardaman.j "I 
ooneider it a vaste of tim^ forj tne 
to argue with a man who ^f^ses 
o concede that the Japanese have 
qualities that would make ttiem 
the equal of the Negro in citizen- 
ship." : 

Senator Martin of Virginia; ex- 
plained that the Negroes werebet- 
ter understood by men of the South 
and that the Northern . Senators 
had so little knowledge of the! Ne- 
gro character that they were not 
as competent' to deal with the Ne- 
gro problem as Senators from the 
Southern States who were "born in 
the midst of Negroes and bad 
grown up surrounded by a Negro 
population." 

TELLS OF NEGROES IN THE NORTH. 

Senator Sherman of Illinois in- 
quired whether or not the Senator 
rom Virginia realized that some 
of the Senators from the Northern 
states represented a larger Kegro 
constituency than Senators! from 
fthe South. i 

Senator Lane of Oregon, a Dem- 
ocrat, remarked that he had read 
somewhere that the Negro farmers 
of the South were the most ad- 
vanced agriculturalists in the 
Union. 


tbeatrical world and will furnifb 
The Eagle the latest news in hia 
itihe for ttie delectation of the 
reiaders thereof. 


jonEs puts negroes above 

THE JAI 


'OR SAYS COLORED MEN MORE 
DESIRABLE AS CITIZENS THAN THE 
MIKADO'S MEN. 


lowing and S^eaping 

Lines to the Sunday Forum 
February 8. 1914. 


By Eva Carter I5uckner. 


In this busy world of action, 

In the strife for wealth and gain, 

There are few who stop a moment 
To relieve another's pain. 

But if we would count our mercies 
And the flowers which strew our way, 

Oh, perhaps we then would hasten 
Making glad some heart each day. 


For the world is full of shad^"'; _ 
Hearts are bowed b^ Vveight of care, 

And how grateful^ the burdened 
When some,P'.,e his burdens share ! 



THE PROGRESSIVES AND 
THE JIM CROW 

Segregation of prisoners by the 
Progressive party, or more prop- 
erly Governor Johnson's Board of 
Prison Directors, smacks strong- 
ly of the \'ardam3n Blease and 
JefT Davis methods in the South. 
It is hard for us to understand 
why a criminal's color gives him 
any preference, and we are con- 
strained to say that this segrega- 
tion in the state prison of Califor- 
nia is uncalled for and only, in 
keeping with the practices in 
vogue by the present party in 
power in this state, and on top of 
this they have some Xegro trim- 
mers who will apologize and have 
the brazen eflfrontery to ask Xe- 
gro voters to support the present 
state administration. Will they 
do it? Well, we guess not! 


:.i'05> 


THE FORUM LAUNCHES 
MERITORIOUS MOVE- 
MENT 

One of the very best and meri- 
torious movements ever inaugur- 
ated in the city was launched by 
the Forum last Sunday at the 
suggestion of T. J. Troy, and that 
was a concerted movement by all 
of our civic and religious bodies to 
join in together to care for the 
tubercular patients that are un- 
able to get or have the "proper 
treatment of such cases. The dif- 
ferent organizations are taking to 
the movement and no doubt in a 
short tiiiM somethir.g tangible will 
be pre««nted for this very laud- 
able andertaking which means 
mudi to the future of the race in 
this section. 

• Ko one should fail to register 
•nd join with the movement to re- 
deem thii^ute from the Jim Crow 



Washington, Feb. 5.— The Sen- 
ate indulged in a debate this af- 
teruoon that was suggestive of 
ante-bellum days when the Smith- 
Lever bill providing for Fedsral 
aid for college extension worke in 
connection with agricultural col- 
leges was up. 

Senator Jones of Washington 
had an amendment pending pro- 
viding in a general way that none 
of the appropriation should be 
available for any state which dis- 
criminated against the Negro, He 
read a statement which tended to 
prove that Negroes came out of 
slavery in a helpless condition, 
but that they had made remark- 
able progress since. 

This statemement stirred several 
Southern senators to action. The 
conditions of slavery days were 
reviewed and there were as many 
"thrills" and "sobs" as in a pro- 
duction of "Uncle Tom's Cabin." 

Senator Jones insisted that the 
condition of the Negro in slavery 
were bad, while Senator Martin 
and Senator Vardaman argued 
that they were far better off in 
slavery than they bad been since 
liberated. Senator Vai daman sug- 
gested that Senator Jones was ad- 
dressing the Senate from a "pro- 
fundity of misinformation" on the 
Negro question. 

WOULD OPPOSE THE JAPANESE. 

He asked Senator Jones whether 
or not he would be willing to have 
the Japanese on the Pacific Coast 
administer the education funds 
carried by the bill. Sen. Jones 
replied that the Japanese are Bot 
citizens of the United States and 
said that he would certainly op- 
pose allowing the Japanese to ad- 
minister the funds. 

"Are not the Japanese the 
equals of the Negroes in those 
qualities that go to make good oit* 
izens?" inquired Senator V 
man. 
\ 


God enjoins us to be loving, 
Duty's lamp be kept in trim. 
'As we do unto the least one. 
We do also unto Him." 

Now in this great Institution, 

He's inspired this brain and brawn 

Who so quietly are doing 
Golden deeds white passing on. 


Self and Mammon have not entered, 

For the birth of CSiarity 
Hath excluded the unwelcome 

And instills philanthropy. 


Broad the field for active service — 

Not a party, not a creed, 
But just helping worthy causes 

Here and there where'er the need. 

And the- aged, our dear loved treasures, 
By your sympathies and cheer. 

In their hearts you have engendered 
Sunshine that's reflected here. 

May the young whom you are helping 
Keep the moral standard high, 

Wielding thus a strong influence. 
They* are in the public eye. 


Labor on, 0, Sunday Forum I 
AH your deeds by Him are known. 

And when comes the final harvest 
"May ye reap as ye have sown." 


Our San Erancisco Musical 
Correspondent. 


THE NEGRO IN POLITICAL 

LIFE 

(A Review) 

By Prof. Charles Alexander 

"The Facts of ReconstTAiction," 


by Major John R. Lynch, is such 
an admirable book in every way 
that I thought it well to write 
fully about it here. There is np 
race prejudice exhibited in what 
the major has written. There is 
no show of sectional animosity or 
partisan bias. The book is free 
from any feature calculated to 
arouse racial antagonism. 

Beginning with 1866, the year 
marked for radical differences of 
opinion .between the president of 
the United States and national 
congress, over the question of the 
reconstruction of the states but 
lately in rebellion against the na- 
tional government, and running 
rapidly through the more import- 
ant steps in the political history 
of the state of Mississippi, touch- 
ing here and there national poli- 
tics, and ending with a conserva- 
tive statement of President Taft's 
grave errors in dealing with the 
Negro question, the author has 
illuminated in a most efTective 
fashion some of the most interest- 
ing pages of .\merican political 
history. 

The recital of the story of re- 
construction is in parts dramatic 
and in jiarts tragic. The strategy 
of de.signing politicians worked an 
apalling tragedy in the liie of the 
ambitious Xegro leader during 
the reconstruction period and es- 
pecially in 1874 when the radical 
Democrats came into power 
throughout the southern states. 
The conditions described so viv- 
idly were lamentable, illustrating 
the awful calamities suffered bv 
the weaker element of the body 
politic at tlie hands of the strong- 
er — it was clearly a riot of organ- 
ized fraud. _ . ■ ' ' ' 

ut Maior^J-^.-fic'h is not a pcs- 
.SHTIi.^t. He is a man with a great 
vision. He has seen the dawn of 
a new age "when each man's good 
sholl be all men's aim." ^^'e of 
this age may be a little apathetic 
about such matters as are set 
forth in this book, but it would be 
well for us to read (jver anil over 
again what this wise observer has 
written concerning our ])ast. The 
book presents facts as the author 
has witnessed them. His study of 
the political situation is both ana 
lytical and intensive, 
student of psychology. His is the 
advocacy .of civil and political 
rights of all citizens. 

M'ajor Lynch entered public 
life while "?]uite a young man. It 
was in 1869 that Governor Ames 
a])pointcd him justice of the peace 
in the town of Natchez, Missis- 
sippi, lie showed splendid exec- 
utive ability and was soon pro- 
moted by the people to a seat in 
the state legislature. His has 
been a brilliant career. There is 
hardly a Negro in the entire coun- 
try whose past life has been close- 
ly connected with the reconstruc- 
tion period and who is more high- 
Iv esteemed in the councils of the 
Republican party today than J<ihn 
R. Lynch. While serving in the 
national house of representatives 
he was a leader of powerful influ- 
ence. He was once honored by 
the national Republican conven- 
tion as temporary chairman. He 
has served as auditor of the Unit- 
ed .States Treasury and paymas- 
ter in the U. S. .Xrmy. The fact 
is,, he has occupied a unique place 
in .Xmerican politics. 

Because of his close contact 
with the great leaders in the Re- 
publican party and with the prob- 
lems in political life for the past 
forty years, Major Lynch is well 
qualified to write intimately con- 
cerning the subject treate<l in this 
book. He has given facts about 
such distinguished Nedfro leaders 


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Phone orders ^iven strict attention 


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ii 


The Eagle's theatrical entertain- 
ers and musical correspondent, 
Joe J. Anderson, is well known 
throughout the Northwest, West 
and down into Mexico. He is one 
of the greatest entertainers thatji" Mi-'^sissippi as Hon. Hiram R 

Revels, who rose to the position 
of United Statess senator. The 
story of how he won his seat in 
that distinguished body is well 
worth reading. Mr. Lynch also 
tells the reader how Hon. B. K. 
Bruce won his way to the senate, 
and how other men in the state 
of Mississippi played an honora- 
blie part in the making of the laws 
of the state, establishing the 
school system, asylums, hospitals, 
and other institutions now regard- 
ed as indispensable. 

There is no way of accounting 
for the wonderful sagacity and 
wisdom manifested by the Ne- 
groes during the reconstruction 
period. How they learned so 
quickly to conceive a.nd plan leg- 
islation of such far reaching im- 
. J portance is a puzzle ; but that they 

close touch with the musical and i^islated wisely, the laws of 
""^ j nany southern states do attest. 

J:-:-' i 



the race possesses. Boijh at Leav- 
enworth, Kansae, he is : a muBical 
'prodigy: Mr. Anderson keeps in! 


1 




.■^*-:^ 


r'im 


A 


The administration of Negro offi- 
cials in the state of Mississippi, 
whatever may be said to the con- 
trarv, is sweet and clean. It must 
be rem'embcred that the Xecjro 
had no historians to record his 
acts ; his critics were his enemies. 
.\nd yet, all things considered, no 
cleaner or better laws have ever 
been enacted in the history of the 
state than those placed upon the 
statute books during the lime the 
Negro was in power in the state. 

In 1874 nearly every state in 
the Union went Democratic. 
Even the great Abolition state of 
Massachusetts elected a Demo- 
cratic governor. Ever since that 
eventful year' the Democratic 
partv has been in power in the 
South.l A white man dare not de- 
clare himself a Republican in the 
South today. Odium is attached 
to the terni in that section. So- 
cial ostracism awaits the white 
man who would plead for equal 
civil and political rights lor the 
Negro. The Negro is openly de- 
prived of his rights, and it mat- 
ters not that he is uulustrions, 
thrifty, has wealth and learning. 
everywhere in the Southern states 
he is' denied the ballot. 

These facts are brought out 
most forcefully by Major Lynch. 
His appeal to the national Repub- 
lican convention in 1900 is one of 
the strongest pleas ever made for 
justice. Every Negro in the coun- 
try should read this wonderful 
book. It will inspire, it will help 
all to understand the responsibil- 
ity and the duty of the hour. Ma- 
jo'r Lvnch w»ould be glad to an- 
swer anv letter if addressed to 
him at 4321 Forestville avenue, 
Chicago. 111. The book contains 
325 pages and sells for $1.65 pos- 
tage perpaid. 


at 8 o'clock p. m. 


Pacific Coast Tabernacle No. 
210 meets second and fourth 
Tuesday, at 8 o'clock p. m. 


New Beulah Tabernacle No. 43 
meets the second and foi^th 
Thursdav of each month at 8 


o'clock p. m. 

Star of Bethlehem Tabernacle 
No. 382 meets the first and second 
Saturday at 2 p. m. 


. Keddesh Royal House of Midia 
No. 79 meets the third Tuesday 
at 8 p. m. 


■iii HM t i »ii i i«« m » "'» * 


International Order of Twelve 
meets as follows at Washington 
and Central Hall: 

Golden West Temple No. 412 
meets first Tuesday of each month 


THE RESULT OF THE 
CONGREGATIONAL RALLY 


The pastor and members of the Lin- 
coln Memorial Congregational Church 
take this means of expressing to the 
ministers, churches and friends of this 
city who lent them a hand to help them 
in their important rally last Sunday 
afternoon, their most sincere thanks 
for the aid they gave in helping them 
to realize the results that followed the 
rally. For want of space it will be im- 
possible to publish the name of every 
person who has given a small amount, 
but the gifts are included in our thanks 
and in the total amount raised and re- 
ported here as follows: 

East 8th St Christian Church $2.5 

Phillips Chapel, C. M. E. " 2.76 

Westminster Presbyterian " 2:24 

Mt. Zion Baptist " - 4.10 

Rev. J. W. Stout, Santa Monica _ 2.00 

General Collection at Rally 8.45 

Members and friends who pledged 91.85 

A Friend (white) 100.00 

A Friend (white) -1000.00 

Cong'l Church Bldg. Soc., N.Y., 

as a gift - 1000.00 

Cong'l Church Bldg. Soc, as a 

loan for 10 yrs. without int.. . 500.00 

Total Amount to Date 12,718.96 

For which, one and all please accept 
our most hearty thanks. 
REV. J. D. PETTIGREW, Pastor. 


yj 


J;;J- 





-:- iif 


MUTILATED PAGE CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


f-''-'3-f /^ \?i^]^./ 



RRST >^ M. E. CHURCH. 


■ The next moathly meeting of JHE 
the EanBafi and Missouri Club will 
be With the president, S. R John- 


MrB. Woods and family have 
moved from the Tennessee House 
U) 715 E. 16th street. 


Kelvin Shannon arrived in the 
city last Thursday froin San Fran- 
cisoo. 


Don't^fall to attend the Lincoln 
Republican club rally on next 
Friday evening. 


F. H- Alexander was in from his 
run to Chicago this week. He re- 
ports very cold weather in and 
around the Windy City. 


Deputy Sheriff J. B. Loving and 
H. M. Mirris were visitors among 
others at our sanctum this week. 


GOLDEN 


WfcST HOTEL 


Despite the cry of hard times 
and financial embarrassment, the 
"Golden West" still furnishes Us 
patrons and friends with high class 
service and entertainment. The 
convenience in location and effi- 
ciency of service is too well known 
for renumeration, so it suffices to 
say, all that is necessary to be con- 
vinced is for all who desire good 
service, food and entertainment, 
give the largest Negro hotel west 
of Chicago a trial. 

The "Golden West," near Third 
and Stephenson avenue. 


FOR RENT— Furnishpd 
Apartment for two gentle- 
men. Call at 

1017 East 9t]i street 


Rev. R. H. Lambert has been ill 
at his home on Wilson street for a 
few days but is fast recovering- 


The Georgia Society met at Wes- 
iley Chapel Monday. Much en- 
thusiasm was shown among the 
members. The Society meets ev- 
ery first and third Monday night. 


Miss Beulah Acton entertained 
at her home Sunday afternoon. 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams. Miss Min- 
nie Albritton and Mr. L. Beeks. 
A^nost enjoyable afternoon was 
apent by those present on the large 
ranch of the hostess, after which 
the party was brightly entertained 
by the renowned musician, Prof. 
W. Wilkins. 


' Mr. Wesley Wilkins, a young 
man of the city, is ardently work- 
ing with success in the Examiner 
contest. His ambitious e ff o r t s 
ahoold be appreciated. '^ 


The Forum is contemplating a 
good program Sunday. Miss Min- 
nie Albritton, the sweet .singer, of 
this city will participate. Lewis 
Beeks will deliver his oration, "The 
Vision of Human Hope." 


Mr. and Mrs. S. Thompson of 
749^ Ceres avenue announces the 
marriage of their sister, Miss Cora 
Adamson to J. E. Jones, Tuesday 
evening, February 24. . 


The Ancient United Sons and 
Daughters of Africa will meet on 
the First Monday of each month 
at Scott's Hall, 561 Central ave. 
Mrs. E. R. Baldwin, 

M. E. Q 
Miss M. Busnv, Sec'y 


The Fiist A. M.-K. Church ex- 
tends congratulations to the Cau- 
PORJJIA Eagle upon its reorganiza- 
ition, splendid form and pleasing 
appearance in its new dress. We 
pray for its continued success un- 
der its eflBcient, painstaking and 
business-like staff. 

The pastor and officers desire, 
through these columns, to express 
their heartfelt thanfes to all mem- 
bers and friends who so nobly 
stood by the church in its efforts 
to meet a greai emergency. Each 
of the auxiliaries of the church, 
including the choir, contributed 
its quota to the success of the 
whole. The Stewardess Auxiliar- 
es, leading with $25.00, 'the Stew- 
ardess Board $15.00, the Trustees' 
Auxiliaries leading with $25.00. 
the Stewardess board $15 00, the 
Trustees' Auxiliaries $15, the Choir 
$12.50 and the Deaconess board 
$7 00. See the bulletin board Sun- 
day forlist of all contributors and 
amounts. The splendid response 
to our appeal was $554.00, not in- 
cluding the general collection. 
Members who could not comply 
with our request at the time, have 
assured us that their part will be 
forthcoming next Sunday. We 
are, therefore, assured (D. V.) that 
on the 24th inst. we shall be ready 
to meet the obligation fully. 

Monday evening next an excel- 
lent program, under the auspices 
of the Missionary Society, will be 
rendered. This program is under 
the direct supervision of Mrs. J. 
M. Prentice and will present some 
of the best talent of four denomin- 
ations. Admission free. Refresh- 
ments served. You are expected 
Next Sunday is Young People's- 
Day. A sermon to 'the Endeavor- 
ers will feature the morning ser. 
vices. At 7.30 p. m. a well bal- 
anced program, including address- 
es and- papers by our young peo- 
ple, will be rendered. Special 
musicol numbers will intersperse 
the same. The youug people guar- 
antee a hearty welcome to all. 


The young men of the Oratorica 
Contest were the proud guests of 
Mn. J. Slaughter on E. 16th St., 
Saturday evening, at a Valentine 
Bocial. The guests, Messrs. Dun 
Jc»n, JoeeS, Reese, Muriel, McLem 
ore and Beeks were highly elated 
over the remarkable horoscope 
; presented by Mf. Duncan, after 
I irfaich every orator responded to 
Ihis prophecy. Further entertain- 
j ment was furnished by the Baker 
sisters, who charmed the listeners 
with their excellent music. Re- 
freshments were also served to the 
guests' pleasure. 


Mr. IT. Pufih of Butte, Mon- 
tana, is a visitor in our city. .\Ir. 
Pugh is here for the winter, hav- 
ing- come 'with the excursiomsts 
from the northwest. He is one of 
the progressive citizens from that 
section and we are glad to have 
his with us. He is custodian of 
one of the largest blocks in Butte 
and felt that after many months of 
unceasing duty he would take a 
winter vacation in Southern Cali- 
fornia. 


Memorial services will be held 
Sunday afternoon at Wesley Cha- 
pel in honor of the late Bishop 
Walden, one of the founders of the 
Freedman's Aid Society. Bishop 
Walden's career was filled with 
ffreat service and benefits to hu- 
manity. • Especially should the 
members of the Negro race honor 
this benefactor, and Tuesday will 
witness at Wesley Chapel fitting 
ceremonies, participated in by 
prominent men of both races from 
LSan Francisco and Los Angeles. 


T-he married ladies' art guild 
met at the residence of Mrs. Little 
on Amy street last Monday. 


ONE— EAGLE A1682 2-19 wr 
REVIVAL AT MT. ZION 


Tecpived many compliments. So- 
los by Madam Houghly, Miss Al- 
britton and a piano solo by Prof. 
Wilkins were distinct features and 
lasting impressions. Rev. Wil- 
liams' speech was most timely, in- 
strjuctive and eloquent. He sound- 
ed the note for a second emancipa- 
tioh, which shall be realized only 
by equal education and equal 
rights in the high compliments to 
thi emancipators and their chief, 
Lincoln. 

' ARCHIE J. WILLIAMS, 
j Church Reporter.' 


Chasi 


arsons-' Is ->^^^i:ir-*^ 


ARCADE DRUG STORE 

i TOILET ARTICLRS 

Nyal Famly Remedies . Prescriptions a specialty 

Fifth and Central Avenue. 


W. H. GUEST, P. D. 

• DRUGGIST 

Stationery Notions and Toilet Articles 

1 2th and Central A. venue ' 


WESLEY CHAPEL NOTES 

Last Sabbath was a day long to 
bq remembered in old Wesley. 

I From the moment the day 
clawned, at which time the early 
iniorning prayer service began, un- 
til the last tick of the watch that 
closed the evening services, there 
was the highest spirit of devotion 
and inspiration. The Sunday 
school under Prof. T. A. Greene, 
is surprising everyone by its great 
growth and interest. 

A great audience grecteil the 
pastor at 11 a. m. to hear his mes- 
sage on "The Big Gate and the 
Little Gate." Words can not de- 
scribe the wonderful evening 
service. The addresses nf Mrs. 
\oah H, Thompson and Atty. 
McBeath were superb. 

Pastor Kinchcn will preach on 
the following subjects on the Sab j 
hath, 11 a. m. "Sons of God, or 
Young Gods.". .Vt 7:30, "Seeing 
Things with Both Eyes, or 
■'Straining' a Gnat and Swallow- 
ijhg a Camel." 


MOTHER'S KITCHEN CAFE 

CS. BROWN, Proprietor , 

THE BEST PLACE IN TOWN TO EAT 

Home Cooking (A' Specialty 

B^:ST MEALS IN TOWN 

SHORT ORDERS , 

1441 East l.inth £.t. Los njreles. CaL { 

Household Brand Flavoring Extracts 

Oar Goods are Guaranteed Absolutely Pure. At your Grocers 
Retail for 25c per bottle. Improved Export Ging-er Ale and 
all flavors. Soda Water. 

Geo, J. House & Sons. 

* 

Manufacturer Los Angeles 


Mrs. A. Alexander, aseisted by 
Mrs. A. B. Browning and Mrs. 
A,lice Lucky, served the tea in La 
Simplas at the Sojourner Truth 
Vesper ^rvices last Sunday after- 
noon. 


MiSB A. C Harris has been ill 
lor a few days at her home on 16 th 
Btreet, but is improving. 


The Wesley Chapjel Literary So 
oiety held its usual interesting ses- 

rion Tueeday evemW- 

\ i '.^ - < • 


Mrs. Jessie Bailey is very ill at 
her residence, 843 Ceres avenue. 


Mrs. A. B. Browning entertained 
friends at a whist party at her 
residence last Thursday evening. 



JUST OUT 

First edition of "The Scrap 
Book of Tips on the Race Prob- 
lem." A choice selection of ex-- 
tracts. clippings, historical facts, 
and biographies of some of the 
greatest Negroes of the world. 
Also that masterful speech by 
Judf^ Marcus A. Kavanaugh, 
judge of the Supreme Court of 
Illinois, in his appeal for juftice to 
the Negro. All should read this. 

For sale at this-' office, J. D. 
Reypolds, publisher. 



We had a glorious time all day 
Sunday at the Mt. Zion Baptist 
church. Dr. E. J. Fisher, of the 
Mt. Olivet Baptist church of Chi-; 
cago, preached at both services.: 
At the morning service Dr. Fisher 
delivered a special message to the 
Christians. At the evening serv- 
ice, a special message to sinners. 
There were eleven accessions. 

Dr. Fisher will preach every 
night this week. He has a special 
message for all. Sunday, Feb. 22. 
The revival will continue until 
Tuesday, Feb. 24, after which wc 
will hold a financial campaign. 

On Wednesday evening, Feb. 
25, Dr. McCoy and the choir of 
the Second Baptist church wijl 
have charge of the services. On 
Thursday night. Dr. Byers and 
the choir of the Zion A. M. E. 
church, will have chargeof the 
services. On Friday night Dr. J. 
D. Gordon and the choir of the 
Tabernacle Baptist church will 
have charge of the services. On 
Sunday Drs. Fisher and Williams 
will have charge and will pull (?ff 
the record breaking rally. Each 
member is expected to ddAiis part. 
Those who have pledg/d $25.00 
and all are expected to do their 
best. _ i 

Mt. Zion choir, under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. A. C. Williams, is sfill 
winning fame for the church arid 
themselves as a choir. 

Miss Minnie Albritton, our tal- 
ented soprano, sang last Thursday 
night at the M. E. church, corner 
Sixth and Hill. She, as usual vwon 
for herseli distinction. 

On Friday night the choir sang 
for the veterans of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. The chioir 


THE WESLEY CHAPEL 
CHOIR 

The magnificent service lieing 
rendered by the Wesley Chapel 
choir is woEthy of great comment. 
Too much credit can not be given 
to the members of the choir and 
their efficient leader, Prof. Walter 
Howard, for no organization or 
au.Kiliary in the church has been 
more scr^'iceable than the faith- 
ful members- ^,of. that "singing 
choir." Last Friday evening the 
choir rendered an excellent pro- 
gram at the Union Ave. Church, 
which was very creditable and 
highly pleasing. The soloists of 
the occasion were Mesdames 
Steward and Smith and Miss Mc- 
Donald. Last evening the choir 
favored the inhabitants of Alham- 
bra with a high class program at 
the High School auditorium, plan- 
tation melodies being the feature. 
Taking everything into considera- 
tion the choir with Mrs. H. Mark- 
ham as organist is a well balanced 
organization of good singers, 
which is molding and shaping fa- 
vorable sentiment wherever it 
goes, not only for Wesley Chapel 
but for the race. 


Flverybcdy has a Hobby — Our Pobby is rooms— a 50c broom for 35c Delivered 
Always Welcome Whether Looking or Buying 

Brodine-Berg: Furniture Co. 

Temple Streets at Belmont 
If you need any Furniture call and see us, or if you want to sell your fumitur 
We will call and see vou. Don't call us Down, call us Up— Wilshirs 341 7 


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CASH GROCERY 

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UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 


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with Hot and Cold Bath 


AT 768 WALL Street . 

between Maple and San Pedre Cas Line 
ALBERT PERRY, Manager. 


PHONE 
Main 4953-Home 4154 


COME TO THE 


PAUL VENFELT, 

Proprietor 





k [\m CO 


Where You Get the Best Service in 

Family Trade 

912 San Tedro St. 0pp. City Markc 


9ke Xleung People's 

LITERARY^^SOCIETY 

9551-2 NAOMI STREEJ 

DR. J. M. SMITH, ' 

Founder and Organizer. 

WILLIE PAYNE, 
CLARENCE IRWIN, 

Assistant Managers. 


We desire to inform you that we 
have in progress a Young People's 
Literary Society, which everyone 
is invited to attend and become 
a member. Every Thursday eve- 
ning at 8 , o'clock we meet at 
the above named place. 

Miss Bernicb Moobe, Pres. 

MiSB KaTHELEEN BftAYE, 

Cof. Sec'y. 


' Piano Instruction. 

Mr. Clarence D. Cooksey, 
struction on the Piano. 

Bdwy 309 1246 Birch 


In- 



Grant Smith, Pres.' and Gen. Mgr.- 
Curtis Hammond, Vice Pres. 
R. B. Odom. Treas. 


Frank Williams. Auditor 
Jas. C. Slaughter, Secy. 


SMITH & WILLIAMS CO., Inc. 

?mn\ Direitors ind Prictleal Embalmers 

We guarantee'our work shipped to any part of the world' 

LADY ATTENDANT PHONE JSIAUST 3629 
Services the best Prices the lowest 


654 San Fernando St. 


J 


/ The Palace Cafe 

915 Central Avenue 

The neatest, coziest and best place to eat. Newly fitted 
nobby little booths, where parties may dine unmolest d by 
public gaze, Chinese and American dishes of the ch apes 
daintiest and best dishes served, Chop Suey and Noo 
American style 


\ 


J, E, Jones, 


C. W. Sanders 
Telephone Broadway 1196 


B. L. Ware 


Dresden Dye Works 

Ladies and Gents' Garments Cleaned, Pressed and 

\Repaired * .^ 

fiats Cleaned and Blocked— ^Y<)rk Called for and Delivered r . 


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i^d br6ught to Boston- 


ffk. 


GROCERY CO. 

I 

No. 1540 Fillmore St. 

H. G. FRANK, AUnager 

I Fancy and Staple Groceries, Fruit | 
^ and VejEjetables 

ipecial Rates to Hotels, Restauranb and 
< ■ Boarding Houses 

Consult Us Before Going Elsewhere 

PHONE WEST 4626 

MUSETTI:-:TAILOR 


1- 



he 


Colored Boys Friend 

537 South Broadway 



ENDORSED BV THE EAGLE CLUB 


To the Well Dressed Men 

Who Know tKe Value of Being Up-to-Date 


5HYLUS Wlieaa«r 
Maaa.. in the y^r f76t. At tHat time the people of Massachu 
setts held slavey. ^Th^ wifdspf John Wheatley of Boston had several 
slaves, but they were getting too old to be very active, and she wanted 
to purchase a young^rl %vhorii she could train in such a manner as 
to'make her a good domestic. \She visited the slave market for that 
purpose, and she saw a little g»l with no other clothing on than a 
piece of dirty, ragged carpeting t|ed around her litde waist She 
looked as though her health was f^ble. Mrs. Wlieattey was a kind 
and religious woman. She took the little girl home in her carriage, 
put her in a bath and dressed hex in dlean clothes. She could not 
speak English, but qpoke in an African eUalect. She soon learned 
to understand English, and whe^ she could not understand ELnglish 
she made gestures and signs- She leamed^ery rapidly. She did 
n-^t know her age, but as she was shedding hM' front teeth she was 
supposed to be about seven years old. She wa^ sent to school and 
learned readily. Her gratitude tof her kind, motherly mistress was 
unbounded and her greatest delight was to do aitything to please 
her. When she was fourteen she began to write pOctry. Owing to 
uncommon manifestations of intelligence and the delicacy of her 
health she was never put to hard household work- She soon ac- 
quired a good knowledge of geography, history and English 
poetry. There was no law in Massachusetts prohibiting slaves from 
learning to read and write. And the mistress, so far from trying to 
hinder her, did everything to encourage her love of learning. Stie 
always called her affectionately, "My Phyllis," and seemed : to be as 
proud of her attainments as though she had been her own daughter. 
Phyllis was of a very religious turn of mind, and when she was six\ 
teen she joined the Orthodox Church that worshiped in the Old 
South meeting house in Boston. Her character and deportment were 
such that she was considered an ornament to the church. Clergy- 
men and other literary persons wrho visited at Mrs. Wheatley's took a 
great deal of notice of her. Her poems were brought forward to be 
read to the company and were highly praised, i^he was hot infre- 
quently invited to the houses of wealthy and distinguished people, 
who liked to exhibit her as a kind of wonder. A son of Mr. Wheatley 
was going to England on commercial business and his mother pro- 
posed that Phyllis should go with him. In England she received 
even more attention than had been bestowed upon her at home. 
Several of the nobility invited her to their houses and her poems 
were published in a volume with an engraved likeness of the author. 
In the picture she looks gentle and thoughtful, and the shape of her 
head denotes intellect. She addressed a poem to the Earl of Dar- 
month, who was very kind to her during her visit to England. Hav- 
ing expressed a hope for the overthrow of tyranny, she says: 

"Should you, my lord, while you peruse ihy song. 

Wonder from whence my love of freedom sprung — 

Whence flow these wishes for the common good ' 


(Japitol. bat Uie U^MlUk arUHK 
make Acleanawreep. 


HOW I GOT MY EDUCATION 


Should get acquainted with 
our New English Tailor. 


F. DELUC 

The Merchant Tailor 611 Montgomery S 
San Francisco 


Godeau Funeral Service 

The Handsome Chapel and Private Rooms Free 

for those who dwell in apartments, flats, hotels, or where is insuf- 
cient accommodation at the time of death. Mr. or Mrs. J. S. 
Godeau will personally supervise all funeral arrangements and 
details. 

Godeau prices are only half the charges of the undertaker in your 
neighborhood, wno is controlled by the Funeral Trust. 

TELEPHONE 
lARKET 711; S- F. OAKLAND 4045, OAKLAND 

when death makes the nndertaker necessary 


By James McSimpson, Zanesville, O. 
/|THE question has often been asked by persons who think it quite a 
novelty to find a colored mari with education enough to "pass 
him through the world," how I got my education. And, in fact, it is 
a question of intere'ft to all person? who are acquainted with my 
pecuniary and other circumstances, a detail of which would occupy 
more space than you would be willing to spare ; but, as briefly as 
possible, I will answer the inquiry, hoping it may inspire the hearts 
of some young persons whose unfavorable circumstances have well 
nigh blasted the hopes and anticipations that heretofore have spon- 
taneously sprung up in their minds. 

Like Joseph, I was taken (not sold) from my parent (mother) 
when a child three years of age and bound to a farmer for a number 
of years. When my time was' u- (that is, when I was one and 
twenty) I was comparatively eduCfttiooless. 

Ist. I resolved, G>d bsing tcy helper, in spite of poverty or 
prejudice, to educate myself — ^^jnnugh, at least, to make myself useful 
aa a teacher among ignorant, dow "-trodden brethren. 

2d. I heard of Oberlin Colleg e, and understood the advantages 
that were there held out to the po r and^ penniless colored as well as 
white. I therefore left my home, riends and asquaintances. without 
one cent, or the value of on' cent, took my old clothes in a knapsack 
on my back and, as the saying is^ "I look my foot in my hand" and 
tramped 150 odd miles thro ugli ain, snow and deep mud, to reach 
that institution. 

3d. Having reached my des t ned spot,. and finding myself in the 
midst of entire strangers and without any pecuniary means whatever, 
r pulled off my Old coat and — 

With axe in hand, I went to work, 

My strength being all my riches ; 
I had but one old wornout coat 

And two old pairs of breeches. , 
I prayed to God both night and day, 

That he'd forever guide me, 
That from the right and perfect way 

No hardships would divide me. 
I looked on high for a rich supply. 
And asked God for his blessings, 
For grace to stand at his right, hand, 
And strength to get my lessons. 


iPiiu iNiwii, mm^mmmmm 

One Soathem member of the Houae of Reo 
res«iitativea,'apeakihg in caucus, stated ke stood for displacing evcjr 
colored man because he believed they were all Republicans, and 
dded, "I never saw a nigger that was a Democrat," 

It's a sad btlnch of men. the colored employees At the CapitoL 
many of whom T»as served as messenger, or laborer, or waiter or 
barber there for many years ; some have grown gray in the service. 
The Democrats, by caucus decision, have decided to dear them fJl 

out i 

Several of thern discussing the predicament they find themsehra^l 

in, knowing they hakre not long to serve Uncle Sam, and grown dea-T 
perate over the approaching loss of their positions, berated Bishop 
Walters most severely, and it would not have been good for the 
Bishop if he had happened around the Capitol when the decision of. 
the Democratic caucus had been communicated to the hundred or 
more colored empl<;>yees. Colored barbers and waiters, along widi 
the colored messengers and laborers are to go, by the decree of the i 
I Democratic caucus held Friday night .-'. 

The caucus also, by its artioin. went on record in favoring jth6 
segregation of colored employees in all branches of- the Govemmeok 
i n all States, and th^ eliminating of the colored man from positioni 
in the Government service not under the direct supervision ot 
Congress. ; 

Cyrus Field Adams, who served as Assistant Register of the^ 
Treasury under Presidents McKnley, Roosevelt and Taft has been 
discharged from the Government service. Just a day or two before 
President Taft's term was up he discovered Adams under the Civil 
Service and transferred him to a per diem clerkship at Chicago, to 
be him. TheJ Dsmocrats discovered old, unnoticed charges pref' 
erred against Adams on record and at once dismissed him from the 
service. Toe charges were not guch as reflected upon either his 
character or his abilitsr^or service, but they were sufficient for the 
Democrats, sinc« Adams was a colored man, although he has no 
emphasized the fact in late years that he is colored. t 

If Bishop Walters is a brave man he will come over to Wash- 
ington and try to save the colored barbers, waiters, messengers and 
laborers at the Capitol who are slated to go. If he 'is not brave and 
does not care to encounter the reproach and bitter denunciation ; of 
hese long-suffering, faithful employees who must step out of the 
Government service for no other reason than they are colored, the 
Bishop will remain a safe distance from Washington. 


■ fr..- 


A PLEA FOR JUSTICE 


JULIUS S. GODEAU 


41 Van Ness Ave.. S. F. 
305 Columbus Ave., S. F. 


210 Webster St., Oakland 
827 Figueroa St., Los Angeles 


Babt 


'NOT IN THK TRUST" 


O. Plioila 




66 


ArVMeat Market 


Best and Cheapest Choice Fresh Meats, 
Hams and Bacon, Wholesale and Retail 


Everythmg Guaranteed 


1540 Filmore Street 


Phone West 4626 


ALONG CENTRAL AVENUE 

Carroll W. Short, the druggist, located at 4400 So. Park .\ve. 
Mrs. Tennabaum has the latest and best. 
Everybody's friend— W. H. Guest at 12th and Central. 
Schneider & Schultz, German winery products and distils pure 
wines and brandies, 20.S6 Santa Fe avenue. 

Satisfaction, service and style in cloaks and suits at the Sample- 
Suit Shop, 326 W. 7th street. 

Farwell Bros., at 12th and Central, will test your eyes, fit your 
glasses and furnish your Christmas jewelry. 

Bicycle repairing, vulcanizing and all kinds of sundries, Tony 
Federico, 4022 Central Ave. 

A. Zimbelman will provide you with groceries, feed and fuel 
at 38th and So. Park Ave. 

Geo. A. Weber, at 3701 So. Park Ave., is where you get the 
best meats. 

For practical plumbing and gas-fitting consult W. H. Chollman, 
4318 Central Ave. 

W. E. Talbert, 2306-10 San Pedro St., for paints, varnishes, etc. ' 
Have your shoes sewed, nailed, etc., at reasonable rate, Harry 
Goldberg Shoe Hospital, 5528 Central Ave. 

HARRIS AND FRANK 

Among the leaders in style and artistic furnishings in ladies' 
and gents' ware Harris & Frank rank pre-eminent. Because of its 


Opinions and Clippiijgs CompilSd by J. D. Reynolds. 
7jN reference to Americane Being treated so badly in Mexico. I wish 
to say that this country is simply reaping what it has sown in 
her treatment of the Negro. Has not the N^gro fought.and died for 
this country in evfery important battle? Anx^ has not this country 
ignored his rights, lynched and burned innocent men, women and 
children, in many cases, and destroyed their hor^s, when their only 
offence was being born black and being more thrjfty than some of 
their white neighbors? The labor unions have also tried to starve 
him; but in spite of all he has ntade wonderful progress. I tell you 
God is a just God ! The American Negro can find justice in any V 
country in the world except hie own. In the British EmpiRg there is ' 
no discrimination on account of color ; in France there is ijo color 
line. The Army and Navy have colored officers ; there are buKiness 
and professional men of African descent who stand in the same class 
as other nationalities, rated according to their ability and financial ' 
standing. The latest outrage on a colored American citizen is the 
case of the Hon. W. H. Lewis, who was appointed as Assistant At- 
torney General of the United States by ex-president Roosevelt. 

Mr. William Henry Lewis was born in 1868 at Berkeley, Va., of 
ex-slave parents. It was young Lewis' fortune to get into school at ■ 
an early age by peddling matches and doing other jobs. He man- 
aged, in one way and another, to make his way through the Virginia 
Normal and Collegiate Institute, one of the early schools for the col- 
ored youth in that part of the country. From there he went to Am- 
herst College, Mass., from whicti he graduated in 1898. While the 
was at Amherst he did two things which, aside from the color of hie 
kiu, served to mark him off from the rest of the student body. He 
ade himself captain of the football team, and distinguished himself 
as an orator and debater. He not only carried off the prizes in a 
least two of the most important contests but was finally elected b 
his class at graduation to deliver the class day oration — an honor of 
which he is still very profid. - 

After Mr. Lewis had completed his eourse at Amherst he thoujsht 
he. would try further, so he went to Harvard Law School with the in- / 
tention ol studying law. While he was at Harvard he gained an al- 
most national reputation as a football player. It was his business 
he says, from his position in the center to hit the opposing line, and 
to hit it hard. ' He did bo well that in his (kiy he had the reputation 

Stump's Market at 1477 E. Vernon Ave. is a good place to trade. 
4421 Compton Ave. 

Either early or late they will mend your two-wheel horse at 

Compton .^ve. reliable hardware dealers, Pencille-Miller, hold- 
ing fort at 4612, and Keil & Son at 4528 Compton Ave. 

B. B. Jeffries at 2701 Central Ave., the old reliable grocer. 

Second Hand Furniture same as new at 2023 Central Ave. 
. H. W. Mailman at 2601 Central Ave. has the family mark con- 
geniality. 

Newhall Bros., at 1500 E.-- Vernon .\ve., is on the feed and 
fuel job. 

THE BROADWAY DEPARTMENT STORE 

Where Beauty and Convenience Mingles With Economy 

It is always holiday at the Broadway. The great crowds that 
gather, each commercial day of the year at^ this store along withC 
the suggestions for economical housekeeping are some of the things 
which make it look like a holiday all the year round, and advances ' 
the timely idea pf the house, ''Don't Worry !" The result is you meet 
at this great store, for all the people ; for none comes too poor nor | 
too rich to be served at every counter and department with that '' 
same courteous treatment that pervades over all. 

At the Broadway there is little or no trouble in finding what ' 
you want. Even fantastic New Yorkers find here that convenience i 
that is found in few other department stores in the city. - I 

Its Latest Concession 

The new Hill street entrance at the Broadway, where children's 
"Toyland" is not only a valuable concession tut a very convenient 
addition for it saves trouble and time. Parents may take thei: 
children there without having the encounter of hauling them up- 
stairs in the crowd. This new afinex also contains one of the most 
unique china, glassware and kitchen utensil department in the city. 
Just at this season the managers of the several departments, 
from basement to ceiling, have joined hands in selecting a most 
choice variety of holiday gifts. 

Why They Lead in Style ^\ 

Because theij: buyers visit New York three Jimes a year, hence 


.* 


many years in b"siness this firm is one of the most reliable in the they are ready with the latest cuts, shades and French toucti< 


aty. 


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Ju$t a little ahead of the general order of things. 


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PASADEN/t 


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Mr. and Mrs. William A. Coe- 
gina of Richmond, Ind., are guests 
of Mr. Lad Mrs. E. L. Gains of 
708 Cy^pirees avenue. 


rs Ii.fV. Stewart of Los An- 
geles wa» in the city Sunday in the 
intfereets of the Day Nureey. Mr. 
Stewart a^ompanied her on the 


lie Stiate Federation Society 

wa^'a i^rand success. Mr, James 

H. Vena was at his beat; Dr. J. 

,"1X1 Gordon, '•he matchless pulpit 

'orator- of the Georgia Society, "36- 

li'rtred what was considered by 

taany to be one of his finest ad- 

''dreasef, while Rev. J. J. ^yers was 

grand. "The Kentucky Society," 

by Mrs. Katie Battle Daniels made 

^toce believe one could almost see 

^^e Blue Crass growing. Too 

much cannot be said in praise of 

the President, Mr. Eugene Walker 

for the way he conducted the affair 


I Mr. Lawrence Cramer of Lob 
Angelee was married to Miss Kelly 
Scott of this city Tuesday evening. 
She is the youngest daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Scolt of South 
Vernon. 


l^ayprr v wDJcAT ESf oAvii 

IwlietpMii^AgairMt NotMl QMrgla Odd 
- F*Umv and Editor Dropped. ,, 

Alteota, Ga.-Benjamiii J. Davla^- ed- 
itor of tbe Atlanta Independent, i« re- 
ceiving congratiHatioDs from friends in 
all part* of tbe country on tbe wiping 
cat of tbe cbarge tbat tbe federal gov- 
ernment bad beld against bim tor 
twelve years. 

Upon tbe recommendation of Hooper 
Alexander, Doited States district at- 
torney for the northern district of 
Georgia, Attorney General McRey- 
Dolds ordered a stet to t>e entered. In 
signing tbe order of nolle prosequi 
Judge W. T. Newman wrote: "There 
has long beeo prevalent a general be- 
lief that the Indictment of Mr. Davis 
was secured by bfs political enemies od 
the slenderest evidence." 

In connection with this one of tbe 
attorneys in the case says: 

"This case was pending In tbe Unit- 
ed States district court from ten to 
twelve years. The indictment was 
! ind during Mr Angler's term of of: 
ace as United Stiites district attorney. 
Repeated efforts were madej by de- 
fendant's counsel. IJesser ft ferandon 
and C. P. Goree. for triaift this case 
from term 'to term wlthbut avail. 
There never was a time when the de- 
fendant could have been convicted un- 


iflftftfli^Sf 


■ ■i iiliirtij 



February 23 
i GEO.WASHIN0T 



Booker T. Washington is to 
speak to the colored people Sun- 
day evening, March 15 at the new 
high school on E street. L. G 
Robinson, chairman of the com- 
mittee on arrangements, called a 
meeting Sunday afternoon. Capt. 
W. M. Reynolds will have charge 
of the chorus; J. W. Lewis and W. 
Prince on Transportrtion' A- H. 
Evans and S. B. Carr on Publica- 
tion. This is hoped to be the 
grandest meeting ever held West 
of the ^Rockies. See one of the 
committee and get a ticket. 




aiVEIN BV THE 





This is the program that wag 
rendered Sunday night at the 
^ake Avenue M. E. Church; 
6:16 p.m. Epworth League. 
7:30 p. m. Sermon by Dr. W. 
B. R. Duncan, pastor of Scott 
Chapel. Subject: "The Homeless." 
Music by the choir of Scott 
Chapel. 
iMusic — Orgarl Prelude. 
, Anthem — Twelfth Mass Mozart 
Offertory Solo — "Golgotha" 
• i» 1 Couchais 

.1 Anthem— "O How Excellent" 
. , Belrly 

'Quartette — "Steal Away to Jesus" 
FoBtlude. 


BEKJAKIN J. DA Via 

der this indictment for tbe reason that 
the evidence upon which it was found- 
ed was Insufficient. 

"Mr. .\lexan<ler. the United States 
district nttorne.v, stated in open court, 
when the nolle prosequi was entered, 
that many of the acts relied upon for 
conviction under the indictment were 
barred by the statute of limitation 
when the indictment was found, and 
Investigation by Mr. Angier or his suc- 
cessor in office. Mr. Tate, would have 
adduced the same findings made by 
Mr. Aleiander. and it is passing 
strange that these officers representing 
the United States would permit an in- 
dictment to stand for twelve long 
years against a citizen of Georgia when 
it was absolutely baseless in fact. 

"It must be credited to Mr. Aleiander 
that be Is not only a competent officer, 
but tbat he is conscientious, pains- 
taking and courageous and dtscharges 
his duty as he sees it. He acted 
promptly In this case with a view to 
trying it. if there was anything In it. 
and. If not to give it the direction al- 
ready Indicated." 


^ Golden West Loclge J^Jo. 86, I. B. P. 0. E. o| the World ^ 

^ At Blartchard Hall, 231 So. BroadvMay ^ 

^»— Concert commences at| 8 o'clock sharp. Overture by the Los Angelas Entertainers. —^ 

2^ Welcome Address, by E. Burton Ceruti. -^^ 

^^ Saxophone Solo; by Miss Mazie Mullen. '^^ 

^~- 7he Tango will be daniced under the direction of Mrs. EUworth Saunders. _^ 

^_ Saxophone and Trombone Duet by Mis»4ilazie Mullen and Prof. Harry Southern. -^ 

^~- Selection, by the a la Mode Quintette, under the management of Mrs. Lauretta EL Butler. _ ^ 

^^ No pains will be spared to make this number one of the evening attreu:tions. ""^ 

* Each participant a Soloist. | ^ 

^^— Souvenirs will be given to each lady in the Elks Grand March. if -~^ 

^— Y^e cordially invite our friends to attend this Concert, as we are suip that you wUl be -^^ 
X— well plfeased. The Committee will spare no pains to make this the event I ' ' 


le season 


?7yiusic Will be Furnished by the I -^ 

Los Angeles Entertainprs ^ 

COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS— J. B. Loving. Chairman; W. ^. Shields, E. Lead- -^ 

ing K.; Wm. Slaughter, Trustee; R. Hite, Sec; R. H. Hicks, Past Exalted R|iler. Z^ 

OFFICERS— E. B. Ceruti, Exalted Ruler, J. P. White, E. L. K.. E. Jaekson, E. Loyal K.; Z^ 

Wm. Shelton, Treasurer; Wm. A. Hudson, Financial Secretary. i -^ 

General Admi-s^ion 3S Cei|its ^ 

i — ^^ 

Refreshment will be served by the ladies. Don't forget day and dat|, Monday, Feb, 23 
Doors will be open at 7-30 p. m. 


The aSair was a gr»nd success. 
Mrs. E M. Beavers led the choir 
Miss iGladys" Harris {resided 
the organ. The work of the choir 
is worthy of all praise. Dr. Dun- 
can's sermon was one of his best. 


Will Wed Monday. 


Next Monday evening, 23d inst., 
Miss Nellie GriflBn, daughter of 
Mr. Jaws GrifiBn, will become the 
bri^e oj|Mr. R. P. Soloman. The 
ceremony will be held at 807 Gar- 
field avenue, the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Carr. Mrs. Carr is 
a sister of the bride-elect. 

V Miss GriSin was educated in this 
city, and Mr. Soloman in his na- 
tive state. He was born in Amer- 
icas, Ga., and Miss GrilBn in At- 
lanta, 6s. Mr. Solomon gradua- 
ted with high honors, having taken 

' first honor. , 

The happy ^&»p1e will leave 

Mopday evening at 12 o'clock for 

Ssn Diego, where they will spend 

their honeymoon. Many recep- 

' tiODS have been given in their 

honor, among them those of Mr. 

aod Mrs. E. L. Gains, Miss Hattia 

Corry of South Pasadena. Mrs. 

<3rttmp gave a kitchen shower 

\ Thursday. Revs. Arline knd John- 

^ ton will peWorm the ceremoaj. 

Tbe Csliforaia Eagle wishes for 
them Bwmy bright da> 8^ 


MEETING IN THE INTEREST 
OF A BAPTIST UNIVERSITY. 


Naw England Convention Propoces the 
Erection of Big Religious School. 

Prominent Baptist ministers and lay- 
men of the New England Baptist mis- 
sionary convention will take part In an 
all day mass meeting to be held in the 
Bethany Baptist church, Newark, N. 
J., Feb. 12. The meeting Is to be held 
in ti^ Interest of the proposed North- 
em Baptist nnlverslty. The Idea of 
the movement was projected last Jane 
at the annual meeting of the New Eng- 
land Baptist missionary convention, of 
which the Rev. W. Bishop Johnson. 
£,L. D, Is president. 

The general topic for discussion at 
the three sessions to be held Is "The 
Northern Baptist University— Its Need, 
Purpose and Outlook." The speak- 
■ers for the morning session will 
t)e the following ministers, who have 
charges In New Jersey and in New 
York: Rev. Drs. George E. Morris, 
Morrlstown; H. H. Mitchell, Haddon- 
field; John W. Henderson. Atlantic 
City; E. E. Jackson and R. D. Wynn. 
Newark (Dr. Wynn is pastor of the 
church In which the meeting Is to be 
held); W. M. Moss. Brooklyn; G. H. 
Sims, New York city; J.. B. Boddie, 
New Rochelle; G. Hunt, Mount Ver- 
non; William P. Hayes, New York 
city; Mr. L. Williams, Brooklyn; Dr. 

D. C. Moon. New York. 

In the aftecpoon the following min- 
isters from Pennsylvania, Rhode Is- 
lailH and Confiectlcnt wUl speak: Drs. 

E. W. JohnsonI G. L. P. Tallafero. A. 
R. Boblnson and W. A. Credltt Phila- 
delphia; J. C. .lackson, Jenklnstown; 
Drs. D. S. .Klugh, New Haven; W. A. 
Harrod. Hartford; S. W. Smith and D. 
W. Wiley, Providence;" 

The principal speaker at the evening 
session will be' Dr. W. Bishop Johnson 
of Washington. Rev. J. Bl. Church- 
man, financial secretary of the move- 
ment, will also make an address. Mn- 
slc will be fnmlshed by a qnartet from 
Montdalr. N. J. Elev. J: a Love wUI 
proaldab 


^ CALL YOUR FRIEND'S ATTENTION Tp THIS ^ 



HAMPTCfJ 


fJORTf 


n 


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Voted SpeaUers Pn se Work of 
Know! Soutnern School. 

The iiicit.!i;_~ 1)1-. ■! uiiiiiT ihe aus- 
pices of tlif AiiM'-rrnii:; MS'-.n-ijition In 
the Brooklyn .Ai iiilftny of Miisli- .Mon 
day evening, Jnn. '1<\. iiiid iit Carnegie 
hall, .New Vork. Tiii'sdu.v. Jan. 27, In 
the Interest of tlie llaiii|iton (Va.) In- 
stitute were each liir;;el.v attended and 
entbusln.'itlc Th-.> plantation songi 
and otha' melodies sung by the Hamp- 
ton students were well rendered and 
highly enjoyed by the audience at bott 
meetings 

Besides the popularity of the speak- 
ers and what they said, the most In- 
teresting feature of the meetings was 
the moving pictures showing step by 
step the success of John Henry, a typ- 
ical country boy from the time he 
left his home In Rentuckj until hi: 
graduation from Hampton. The Hon 
Job EL Hedges was the chief speaker 
at the Brooklyn meeting He was fol- 
lowed by Major R. R. Moton, whc 
made a brief addresa 

Mr. Hedges tu giving his impressions 
of Hampton Institute said. "Hampton 
1b a good place for white people be- 
cause it makes them whiter. There 
you find a sanctity of emotion that 
makes you ashamed At Hampton 
true religion Is to be found. We some- 
times go to church because It Is decent 
They go because they've got to have 
It," he said. He spoke glowingly of 
Robert C. Ogdeu. "1 know of no place 
where adollar will breed more dollars 
of value than at Hampton." 

Major Robert R. Moton, disciplinary 
officer at Hampton, said: "The most 
serious problem of the nation Is the ad- 
justment of the relations of the two 
races. Hampton Institute affords a 
common platform for all men, black 
and white, north and south, to meet on. 

"Slavery." declared Mr. Moton, "left 
tbe Negro with the Impression that 
work with the hands was degrading 
and to be despised. Bnt Hampton la 
doing away with this thought The 
white race taught us that anything 
black was to be despised. Hampton 
has tanght my race to be proad of It- 
God Intended tbat . tb« NegrQ 


should Le !i> i; i as niiv inliiT riii-ej 

4.nd what will go a grenj way toward 
the solving of the problem Is a belief 
of white ptsple In tbe colored man 
and a belief by the colored man in the 
white person." 

The Hon. George McAneny, presi- 
dent of the board of aldermen, was 
the chief speaker at the Carnegie hall 
meeting In New York. 


Tda Scrap Be 


INCREASE IN FUNDS FOR 
FREEDMEN'S AID SCHOOLS. 


New Building* and Equipment With 
Strongsr Faculties Also Secured. 


The twenty-two schools under the 
auspices of the Freed men's Aid society 
of the Methodist Episcopal church have 
started upon a new era this year and 
with the brightest prospects for the 
second year of the church quadrennlum 
In all the history of the society's work. 

Additional appropriations have been 
made to most of the Institutions, the 
faculties have been strengthened, re- 
pairs are under way. ground has been 
broken for a new dormitory at Walden 
nnlverslty. new buildings have been 
recently erected at Morrlstown Normal 
and Industrial college and Claflln uni- 
versity, and buildings under course of 
erection at Wiley university and Phi- 
lander Smith college are being com- 
pleted. 

BisLop Theodore S. Henderson, one 
of the most resourceful bishops In 
Methodism, has been relieved from the 
holding of spring conferences and Is 
detailed by the board of bishops to lead 
In a campaign for the Jubilee among 
the wjhlte conferences In particular as 
executive director In co-operation with 
the secretaries. All of the bishops res- 
ident In the south are backing Secreta- 
ries Maveety and Penn in their plans, 
and the brightest day In the forty- 
seven years' history of the society is 
now at hand. 

The schools fostered by the society 
and their location are: 

Osmmon Theological seminary, Atlanta, 
Ga.; ! Flint Medical college and boapltal. 
New Orleans: Meharry Medical coll 
Tenn. ; Bennett college, rsre 


JUDGE iiADVOCATp:S JUSTICE FOR NEGROES 

^ 

A dispatch to the New York Age from Chicago, Oct. 14, said: Judge 
Marcus Kavanagh of the Supe^or Court made a stirring speech before the 
Irish Fellowship Club at the Ifotel LaSalle, in which he made a plea for 
'simple justice" for the American Negro. The speaker advocated the ap- 
pointment of a National Commission to inquire into existing prejudices which 
bar Negroes of good education] from competing with whites in the business 
world. The subject of his addr|ss was "TheFuture of the American Negro.'' 

In 1790 there were less th^ 800,000 Negroes in this country, and today 
we have more than 10,000,000, Ise said. "Few of these are of pure African 
blood, and nearly all have whiti blood ; millions more white than black. Here • 
they are about us, with white i|en's hearts and white men's brains, but shut 
out from everything in this lif^worth while. 

What is the cure for this s|uation? Why, the simple cure that has rem- 
edied every social evil since th^ world began-simple justice. .The first thing 
to be done is to free ourselvfe from prejudices, then to free others— and I 
propose the appointment of a Mational Commission to take evidence and re- 
port on this matter. i 


^ 





^^^K,\:Ji^^'-,^^y 


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WOMAN'S GIfOWING INDEPENOENCE 

Dr. Brougher Tells Ab^ut Modern Opportunities for the 
Emancipation ojf Women Without Sacrifice 

In a recent lecture at the temple Baptist Church Dr. Whitcomb Brougher 
endeavored to determine whyithere are so many unmarried persons in this , 
country. "Will the Coming »|an Marry?" was the subject. He said in part:1 
"Why are there 17,000 unmar|ed men in the United States? God thought it 
was not good for man to be |lone, that he should have a helpmeet. In the 
rst place, I think it is due t| "low ideals, and high living." Young men 
and young women have a greater ambition to keep in style, wear fitie clothes 
and keep pace with society th^ to economize and to lay by sufficient to found 
a home. I 

The salaries of our youn J men, even in good positions, are not equal to, 
maintaining a home when thelvife expects tio be supported in the latest fash-' 
ion. Marriage is being effe4ively discouraged by the ■ constantly increasing 
cost of living, bdth in the o|ies and the country. The double standard of 
morals has had its part to dgiin the destruction of the marriage tie and in 
preventmg hundreds of youngfceople from getting married. 

Young women are cominf to feel that there ought to be one standard of 
morals for both men and womln. They have lifted their ideals of the young 
men that they want to marry I But the young men go on living on the low 
standard of moral character.'land the young women rightly refuse to marry 
them. Young women are beiig educated to hold independent positions and to 
make their own living. The3|do not have to marry a man any more jOst to 
get a "meal ticket." Theylre able to command their salaries for them 
selve^'hnd do npt have to stojp to marry a man whose habits of life aiie be 
neatM their respect | . ] i 




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LEADER JlMON|^, 


f AXtBE CHURCHSSl 

IHt DArilolo .„.^.«.. 


BrIUiint Work of the Rev. 
J. H. EasoD. 


VERSED IN GHORGH HISTORY 


Briaf Summary of tiM A«hiev«monts t/f 
thfl President of the Baptiat State 
Convention of Alabama — Author of 
Several Plans For the Future Wel- 
fare of the Denpunination. 

Blrmiiigbam, Ala.— Tbe Baptist de- 
DomlnatloD In tbla state is growing by 
leaps aod bounds In Dumbers, finance 
and Intelligent leadership. The reports 
made by tbe various churches at the 
last state convention covered a wide 
■cope of activities in and out of the in- 
dividual cburcbes themselves. Fore- 
most among tbe many capable leaders 
In tbe worl: of the denominiition is the 
Bev. J. H. Easou, B D., pastqr of the 
Jackson Street Baptist cburcb in tills 
city and president of tbe Alabama 
Baptist state convention. 

Mr. Eason Is n native of Suintervllle, 
this state, and was graduated from 
Selma university in 18S5 and from the 
Richmond (V'a.i Theological seminary 
In 1890. After his graduation in 1890 
Professor Eason taught at Selma uni- 
versity for seven years. He was or- 
dained to the Baptist ministry in 1891. 
He bas held many responsible posi- 
tions both as a churchman and an edu- 
cator. Before beginning his pastorate 
at the Jackson Street Baptist church 
In this city he had been pastor of the 
Seventeenth Street Baptist church In 
Anniston for sixteen years. 

The Rev. Mr. Eason bas some very 
distinct vlevrs as to the work, doctrine 


THE EAST EIGHTH STREET 
1 CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

I D. L. McMickens, Minister 

I 

Services for Siinday, Feb. 8, 1914 

I Sunday School at IQ a. m. Mr. 

I W. J. Thompson, Superintendent. 

,1 Preaching at 11 a. m. by the 

'. pastor; subject, "The Wild Olive 

! Tree." 

1 At 7 p. m. the Y. P. S. C. E. will 
render a good program. Address 
by Mr. R. R. Tumage. Paper by 
Miss E. Jackson. Solo, Miss 
Juanita B. Bausley. The meeting 
will be lead by Mrs. R. H. Keith. 
At 8 p. ra. the pastor will preach 
on ih-i subject, "Holiness," Rom. 
12. Everybody is invited to these 
services. 

D. L. McMICKENS, 

Minister. 


BKV. 1. H. EASON. B. D. 

and discipline of tbe Baptist denomina- 
tion. In a recent interview he made 
the following statements: "Kor several 
years 1 liave made special study of 
church history and the Baptist denorp- 
inatlon I find the primitive form Sf 
tbe Baptist people was that of a mass 
meeting. They are a family." All oth- 
er denominations are organizations. 
The Baptists are a growth, not an In- 
stitution, In their nature. 

••T9 do tbe best work it is possible for 
US as Baptists to do we will have to 
become an organized family. 1 should 
not be surprised In tile future to see 
the Baptists divided Into two great 
classes — namely, confederated Baptists 
and the anited Baptists. 

"Some years ago i drew up a consti- 
tution for tbe Alabama Baptist state 
convention, which provided that the 
one state convention be divided Into 
four subordinate state district conven- 
tions, the coining together once a year 
of these stai* district conventions in 
llie state cotiventlon. Many good and 
great men In tbe state and out of the 
state predicted the state district con- 
ventions would secede from the one 
central organization. But there are no 
signs of trouble yet. The scheme Is 
working nicely. 

"In our last convention at Mobile. 
Ala, the brethren passed a recommen- 
dation which I offered that provides 
that we have a congress to investigate 
and restate the practices and doctrines 
which the churches that are members 
of the convention are expected to sup- 
port and practice 

"I reason If.committi^es to revise the 
Bible are wise a meeting to look into 
the practices;' and doctrines of the de- 
nomination that rests npon tbe Bible 
for its only rule of action might not be 
out of order. This meeting will be 
held some time next year." 


The Fifteenth Amendment Will Stand. 
The introduction of a measure in the 
general assembly at Columbia. S. C 
recently favoring the repeal of the 
, fifteenth amendment to the federal 
constitution simply shows the attitude 
of a small minority of southern white 
men toward the colored citizens of the 
country. The great bulk of Intelligent 
white* throughout the country would 
vote against such a selfish meaaut* 
were it to become a national IssneL 


Sunday Schools to Aid Missionaries. 
Tbe foreign mission board of tbe Na- 
tional Baptist convention la preparing 
an elaborate EJaster program for the 
Stinday schools throagfaont the conn- 
try. Dr. L. a. Jordan, secretary, says 
tber win mail oat at least 200.000 of 
these programs to tbe Sunday scbouia 
In every state and also to their statiena 

'^ Africa and other foreign' points, 
fnie board is aaking for $15,000 for im- 

.anefliUe mie on tbe foreign Held. 





MT. ZION BAPTIST 


Third and Stephenson Ave. 

Rev. A. C. Williams, pastor. 

Services for Sunday, 

At 11 a. m., preaching, subject, 
7 :30 p. m., preaching, subject. 


SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Maple Ave., bet. 7th and 8th Sts. 

Rev. Joseph L. IMcCoy, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. at 6 :30 p. m. ' 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m.- 



FIRST A. M. E. CHURCH 

Cor. Eighth St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. X. Greggs, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor at 6 :30 p. m. 

Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


WESLEY CHAPEL 

Comer Eighth and Wall 

Rev. Wesley E. Kurehen, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Young Poiile's meeting at 6:30 
,1. m. 
1 Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


TABERNACLE BAPTIST 


Hemlock Street 

. Rev. ^/,D. Gordon, pastor. 


Preachino: at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 

Paloma Ave., near 16th 
Rev. C. H. Anderson, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 'a. m. 
B. Y. P. U., 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


A, M. E. CHURCH 
Eighth and Towne Ave. 

Usual service preaching by the 
pastor. Dr. Gregg. 


THE GOLDEN WEST HOTEL 


In keeping with its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continues to 
give to its patrons the best pos- 
sible service. 

Being centrally located between 
the three great railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel 
meets the demands not only in 
good service but likewise conve- 
nience. 


FOR REXT— We have several 
housekeeping apartments of three 

and four rooms for rent very 
cheap. Also a good business site. 

Apply Noah D. Thompson, 
1711 E. S^th St. 

Phone S. 1651. 


H. S. A, CUMING 

CUMING'S 
LIVER TONERS 

One Hundred Vegetable yPills 
for 25 Cents 

These pills are recommended for the 
relief of Constipation, Sick Headache, 
Biliousness. 

Cumlnj's Drug Store 

ESTABUSHKD 7 YXARS 


407 Ea«t Ninth 


Broadway 871 


O uRLEADER-SPwNGiHILL NA^HJSKEY 

?^JHilf 's rSne WUiskey Blends .y , 


Home F-302IQ 


^^in•. 


Hilf Mei^smitile 

Importers and Wholesale 

Liqiior Merchants 

Owners '*Ea Crestpna Brand" Wines and Cordials 


Fl R8T CLA^S LADY BARBERS 

112 1-2 Wilmington Street ^^""^^o*!^ 

MANICURIIVa li^ADIES & HAIR DRESSINQ 
PARLOR. SKIN SPECIALIST 

Only Colored Woman's Barber Shop in town. MRS. CORA ENGLISH, Pro 

Mlxm BnlnmnBnn $c (He 

113 East Fourth street, Westminster Hotel Bldg. 4th st. 
Entrance, just a few doors East of Main street. -^ ( 


The Missiuii& KansasCafe 

968 Hemlock Sl;feet 

Mrs. R.:H. TODD, Proprietess 

Home Cooking a Specialty. 
Best Meal in the city at the lowest prices 


Main 5298 


Home F-5083 


R. W. LEWIS 

Prescription Druggist 

T F B No 9 r Corner 7th and Central Avenue 


Main 7698 Home Fr409 

A. J. ROBERTS, SON &C0 . 

Funeral Dinctors and Embalmsrs 

Funeral Parlors Lady Attendant 

l2th and Los Angeles St. 

e I ephone South 2824 

Langoickle Baking Company 

5608 Central Avenue 

Bread, Pies and Cakws 


^^fps. 



w 


M«a SO^ . : NOAH t>. THOMPSON; Sootii 1661 
A Sgoar^ Deal For Each Custoiner 

AH D, THOMPSON REALTY CO. 

i Houses iw Sale or Rent Also Apar^enta for Rent 

N E Cornor S^th Street and Long Beikch Ave, Room 209 182 N. Broadway 

LOS ANGELES 


Farwell Bros 

^atfh makers 
land Jewelers 

nth jd-nd Central Ave 

%o% Anceles. ' 

Watches iaccurateiy repaired! at 
moderate=^rices. Diamonds re-set 



South lUfiii 


Ladies Garments Remodeled My Spedaltj 


THE HARVARD TAILOR 


JOS LUCAS, PROP. 

Laities' and Gents' Suit.<t Made to Order . 

Cleaning, iRemodeling, Repairing and Pressing Done at liowest Pricea 


211 Central |Avenue 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


Wedding and Fancy Cakes a Feature 
Get satisfaction in price and quality. 


Los Angeles 


California 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

Bought, Sold and Exchanged 

House Purnishings of All Kinds 

Phone South 4273 AvpF^ Rrnfht>r« 

2627 Central Ave. Open Evenings. ^J^^ ^ L*' Ullltl 3 


Thie Leader Bakery 

jWm. BROADHAQ, Prop. 

- I Phone Boyle 1455 

2416. East First Street Los Anjfeies. Califor n 

_ : 

H. G. VAN FOSSEN 

Groceries, Notions, Candies, Cigars^ Ice Cream 
Wood, Coal, Kindling and Sunshine Polish. 
We recommend ]..eege tt Haskins Coffees, 
Peerless, Monado and Oriental Blends. 

1131 TEMPLE STREET 


Phones iBroadway 314 
Home A 2653 


FEED AND FUEL 


STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Phone W.^pt 4952 \ COR. 35TH & NORMANDIE AVE. 


T. GARNER 


MACK'S 


Patronize the Poultryman's Store 
Feed Co-Operative Dry Mash 

An Honest, Economical balanced Egg rotation for Hens and 
: *j rowing Stock 

Baby Chicks, Hatching Eggs, Breeders, Everything in Poultry 
Everything for the Poultryman. Visit Our Store 

Poultryman,s Co-Ope*'ative Ass'n. 


!: J S. McCLUNEY, Proprietor. 

Dealer i|i FURNITURE, BEDDING AND KITCHEN HARDWARE] 

1703 N. Broadway and 112 N. Workman 

I PICO FURNITURE CO. 

2678 We|t Pico Street Los Angeles] 

I LESS THAN DOWN-TOWN PRICES 

8 
Tel. West! 366 H. F. BRAINARD, Pres. J. P. CROWDER, Vice-Pres. 
Home 73718 C. H. BRAINARD, Secy and Treas. 

West 1523J 


Phones Hofae 73829 


P. J. VIGUAN 


640 South Main Street, 


Los Angeles, California 


GR.OCERIES AND DRY GOODS 

I ' Staple and Fancy Groceries, Vegetables and Fruit 
Prompt Delivery , Best Treatment to Al 

i 2109 West Pico Street 

I MRS. d. M. TAYLOR 

Hdii* Goods, Qrnaments 

Toilet Ajrticletf. Hair Dressing, Manicuring, Shampooing] 
1403 EjisT NINTH STREET Cor. Hemlock Phone Main 5167 




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H( 

:nders( 

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Prof. Booker T. Washington 
will pass three weeks in Soutliern 
California, arriving on or about 
March 7. He will speak in the 
First Congregational church in 
Los .'\ngeles on Sunday morning, 
March 8, and at large mass meet- 
ing the same afternoon in the in- 
terest of the colored Y. ]M. C. A. 
Tuesday night. March 10th will 
be his first address in Pasadena 
under the auspices of Throop Lec- 
ture Course. Thursday night, the 
12th, he will be the guest of honor 
and principal speaker at the ban- 
quet of the state Y. M. C. A. con- 
vention to be held at the Hotel 
Virginia at Long Beach, Satur- 
day, the 14th, he will spend with 
President Blaisdell at, Claremont, 
speaking to the Pomona college 
students and others. . President 
Baer of Occidental, who has 
charge of Dr. Washington's itin- 
erary and program while in South- 
ern California, has a number of in- 
vitations for Dr. Washington and 
is no\V arranging the xompleted 
program. Dr. Washington will 
be Dr. Baer's guestMwhile in 
Southern California, afrPasadena 
at West MoJand Plac?.^ 

$10,000 buildiiit, wni be 
erected at Ninth and Central. The 
house will furnish the be^ in high 
class vaudeville and moving pic- 
tures under the directioii of P. E. 


DIRECTORY FOR OUR 
ENTERTAINERS 


"Casino Sextette" — Jackson 
brothers. Ross. Gray, Black and 
Bryant are at the Casino Cafe. 

Tu.xedo Five — Powers, Robin- 
son. Hicks. Richie ind Stewart 
at F^airmount. 

• Orient Tfio — Payne, Wilson 
and Donaldson at Murrays Cafe. 

At Lester Social Club — Mr. and 
?ilrs. Morgan Prince. 

M. & ^L Four— Harris broth- 
ers. Denny and Banks at M. & M. 
Cafe, would like to hear frorli 
Geo. Johnson, Geo. Wolfson, J. 
C- McDonald and R. B. Johnson. 

Two Aces — Compton and Joy- 
ner at St. Francis Club, which has 
been remodeled, wher6 Bob 
Brown and Thomas Foster con- 
tinue to make things pleasant for 
their patrons. 

EVERYBODY IS BUYING 
HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Willian^ about Wil- 
mington Harbor property. The 
greatest opportunity of your life 
is at your door now. 

We have 6 50-ft. lots we can sell 
for $550, only $10 down, $5 a 
month. We also have 80 other 
lots in same tract, but you will 
have to be in a hurry if you wish 
to get in on the ground floor. 

Any day we get six or eight 
persons we will take you down to 
see ,the lots. 

H. H. WILLIAMS,; 
Corner 12th and Hemlock. 




phones 7!1|484 


West 3586 


OXFORD MARKET 

M. TifEWS, Proprietor 

ALL IflNDS OF PRESH AND SALTED MEATS| 

sa|jsages, etc. poultry in season 

f 3012 W. PICO ST. 


JP 


IN fflY COLONY AND GET YOU I 

A FLXE HOME IIV 
ITSr VICTOR V AIJLE Y 

I hav4 located 7 young men, all from L. A., in one of the most beauti- 
ful valfeyo in this state. Fine, rich soil; water easy to obtain; close to 
S. F. H. R. and ocean to ocean highway 

The Government Land Agent, WM K£NARD| 

Phon.Bwi^noi 618 E 8 Street 


Res. Jione Broadway S588 


WILLIAM DA 
Fish and Poultry Market 


u 


FreshgFisli Poultry and Oysters— oultry Dressfed to Order 
EasM9th St. - Los Apgeles 


ri 


1 JEWELER 

, j Cor. Washington & San Pedro 
'■\ Watch, Clock and Jewelry H^ pairing , 
I Work Called for and Digfivered 

Home ^1474 Give me a tifi^Jr Sunset Sp. Zi&\ 


I'fiJf'i 


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CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


Wc Stland For A United Effort Tha 



eace! Prqsper|ty! And Union! 


Attorney H. E. McBeth 

Mak^s Notable Address 


■y. 


THE >IEGRO'S PART IN THE 
, -ABOLITION MOVE- 

■ ■ \ , MENT. 
Mr. Chairman, Dr. Kinchenfi. La- 
dies and Gentlemen : 


. The subject' assigned me for 
this eveninfT. "The Negro's Part 
in tile Abolition Movement," is 
one of such tremendous moment 
in this present day and seemincflv [. 
critical situation of the races in 
I America, that T feel safe within 
' the bounds of truth when T sav 
"■ that the few minittes a11ew;ed me 
are bv no means adequate for the 
'f)roij>er consideration of such an 
jimpbrtant hit of research. T use 
ithe i term "research" advis*dlv. 
For while manv phases of X^srro 
activitv have heen covered bv the 
V'riters and historians, nresent 
day and pas', hut the dimmest 
Sugp^estion, has heen recorded of 
the p-loriotis and bv all means es- 
sential nart which the Xeijroes 
themselves plaved in that great- 
est of human dramas. "The F.inan- 
copation of the Afro-American 
slaves." 

Without anv further introduc- 
tory remarks we boll down to our 
subject with the .statement that, 
wben the full truth is recorded 
i and the last word on the sidiiect 
is 'written by the historian, it will 
be fully accepted by all liberal 
thinkin? minds that without the 
spilendid intellisrent. c^ er present. 
faithful, and efficient cr>-oneration 
rendered to Garrison and his loval 
band of white abolitionists by the 
dark-skinned sons and dausihters 
of Africa who labored iinHer the 
full oppression of .Americin slav- 
ery, or who sufFere<l in that ter- 
rible hell of half-slavery and half- 
freedom which characterized 
■vy^hat was known as the "free Xe- 
g)ro" prior to 1860, the Emancipa- 
tjori of the United States of Am- 
ejrica from the chains of human 
^feyery would never have been 
alcpcmplished! I make this state- 


freedom would yet be in the fu- 
ture. 

Histor^i^s have never agreed 
as to the«xact causes and motives 
which brought on our great Am- 
erican Civil War. Sonne have at- 
tributed it to reasons economic, 
others have attributed it to rea- 
sons political, and still others 
have found pleasure in placing it 
to the credit of the great sense of 
human fairness which underlies 
our .\merican people, .•'ind while 
there is an element of truth in 
each of these three positions, care- 
ful analysis of the situation has 
convinced me, and I submit it in 
the order of your conviction, that 
the great big motive which 
brought on our Civil War and 
which bathed our Southland in 
blood was not the motive of greed 
for money, — was not the motive 
of thirst for political power, — was 
not the Christ-like motive of hu- 
man righteousness. On the other 
hand, a deep and abiding sense of 
fear which the presence of the 

I African slaves in this country in 
vast and fast increasing numbers 
^nd in that increasingly restless 

' arid rebellious frame of mind 

I which the slaves manifested, was 
the real and primal cause of our 
great civil conflict. 

Th(?se who controlled the at- 
fairs of our country in those early 
days looked with growinij terror 

• upcJn the presence of the \ast and 
fast increasint; slave population. 
They trembled for their own insti- 
tutions and their owii homes j 
when thev thouijht far into the 
future a!,^;iinst the day when the 
slaves of .\merica would outnum- 
i)cr their masters. They thought, 
if vou please, with decided alarm, 
■and complained again and again 
of the tremendous economic and 
social expense of maintenance and 
operation of the great system of 
human slavery. The writings, the 
debates and the newspapers of 
those days are replete with com- 
plaints along this line. Indeed, it 
is so evident from the legislative 


ipent with full deliberation, and 

c records of those tunes that the 

Ol 


fcy no means am I unmindfu 
the fact that fully three-fourths of 
those i»fore me may have reason 
to refuse full credence to this 
Jjroposition. To such minds as 
find it difficult to believe that the 
^Emancipation of the .\merican 
' JNegro and eradication of human 
slavery, in the United States 
.would not have been possible 
without the assistance of the Am- 
lerican Negro himself, I can only 
say that such difficulty is by all 
means excusable; for in no par- 


fear of the slave population was 
the foundation rock of all slavery 
agitation, that the wonder is that 
ere this historians have not been 
compelled to record the naked 
truth of this situation. 

Again and again state legisla- 
tures and the national congress 
were importuned to manufacture 
laws to assist the slave owmers in 
makifig effectual the subjugation 
of their human chattels. Fugi- 
tive slave laws were on all sides 
the subject-matter of bitter con- 
The men of the North, 


tkfUlar liave-the historians of the 
United States, and of the world .tentions 
for that matter, exhibited such de 
liberate refusal to record the 'their Southern brethren were ex- 
truth, the whole truth, and noth- P^nencing in keepntg their bonds- 
ing but the truth, as thev have in I '"en in slavery, and wisely figur^ 
their records of Negro happen- i i^S into the future and conclud- 

That this I '"& against the adoption of such 


ings and achievements. 
is true of the present-day histor- 
ians, I take it not one in this pres- 
ence will deny. That it was true 
prior to the days of 1860 goes 
without argument. However, 
from the scraps accidentally en- 
eouched in the efforts to record 
the big events in American his- 
tory prior tQ i860, and from in- 
evitable deductions from other 
and admitted records, We are giv- 
en the foundation for our state- 
ment that the Negro contribiited 
so largely to his own emancipa- 
tion that; without the effort which 
he made in his own behalf his 


a terrible situation, on their part, 
based their opinions, not upon the 
fine and delicate motives of right 
and wrong, but upon the coarser 
and mo»e practical impulse of ex- 
pediency. You will search his- 
tory in vain to find any serious 
complainings on the part of any 
appreciable body of American cit- 
izeznzship against the institution 
of slavery in the days, when, be- 
cause of their small numbers and 
compartive complete servility of 
spirit, the black slaves dwelt in a 
condition of non-resistance and 


pacification. It . is only as he 
numbers of the black bondmen i' 
creased, and as their souls gre.w 
more restless against the institu- 
tion which bound them, that you 
find any evidence of the abolition 

sentiment in American history. 

I repeat, and as I repeat, I chal- 
lenge contradiction that were it 
not for the soul-deep opposition of 
the black men themselves to their 
serfdom, abolition would have 
been but a passing fancy, and the 
preservation of the Union would 
have been accomplished along the 
line of a slavery compromise. For 
it only was as the slave numbers 
increased and as their spirits grew 

more restless, that we note the 
increase in like proportion, of re- 
corded abolition sentiment. 

Tt is not necessary to recount 
the early days of the Negro's 
presence in America to prove our. 
statement that the Negro himself 
was an indispensable aid in ac- 
complishing his own freedom. 
You who have read closely, know 
only too well how those ancient 
slave ships, plyinq;^ from .Africa to 
.America's shores bathed their bot- 
4oms in the blood of black men 
and women who chose the resist- 
ance of death to enslavement. You 
kno w;only too w^ell, how many 
of our black forefathers and moth- 
ers on ship board from Africa to 
.America chose the grave in the 
bottomless deep in the stillness of 
night to the prospect of .American 
slaverw How many ships la<ien 
to gunwales with human freight, 
black human freight, if you please, 
ever reached these shores with 
half their initial cargo. God him- 
self only knows the number of 
those, brave gouls who found 
death preferable to stibjugation. 

How many of you recall Xat 
Turner of A^irginia, and his ter- 
rible hand of death dealers, who 
rocked A'irginia from one end to 
the other in the early eighteenth 
centurv in their efforts to eradi- 
cate their masters ! Have you for- 
gotten, or did you ever know, that 
Charleston. South Carrilina, the 
"cradle of secession," shr\'ered to 
its verv timbers when a half-hun- 
dred rebellious slave men took 
upon themselves to blow up the 
\erv citv in protest against their 
masters. Indeed, friends, in spite 
of the decided policy to suppress 
even all hearsay e^■idence of up- 
risings among the slaves, the rec- 
ords of at least one hundred and 
thirtv-two separate and distinct 
uprisings have been handed down 
to us by tradition. 1 hese facts qf 
the resentment on the part of the 
Negroes, of the institution of sla- 
verv are by no means to be lightly 
passed over; they in themselves 
furnish the mute and indisputable 
evidence of the fact that the un- 
derlying motive of the emancipa- 
tion of the .American Negro was 
not love, but fear agaifist the day 
of the slaves' complete wrath. 

However, the .American white 
man is decidedly loath to acknow- 
ledge his fear, though it all biit 
consumes him. In 18.S0 the insti- 
tution of slavery was tottering the 
.American government into almost 
complete annihilation. For over 
50 years it had been evident that 
slavery must go if the American 
government were to endure. It 
remained, however, for the gentle 
spirit of Abraham Lincoln to give 
the American people the opportu- 
nity they had long sought, viz., 
a practical white leader w;ho 
would urge the nation to heed the 
apparent fact. Lincoln, from his 
first appearance in public «majin- 
tained a decidedly Christian atti- 
tude with reference to human Sla- 


very His entire thought and con- 
ception of the slavery situation 
w^s in common with tljat of 
William Lloyd Garrison and his 
small band of abolitionists, "that 
slavery was essentially wrong be- 
cause the American ' Negro 
yearned for and was capable of, 
a^id was fighting for a higher citi- 
zenship." Lincoln and Garrison 
differed only in this wise: Garri- 
son maintained that the surest 
way to eradicate slavery was tq 
establish a new nation 6i states 
which prohibited slavery'. Lincoln 
maintained that the slavery ques- 
tion should be fought out in the 
nation as it then existed. The 
.sentiment against dissolving; the 
Union was decidedly strong. 

The activity of the slaves in 
making their way to freedom 
made it necessary to have the 
slave law Universal in the whole 
United States, if it were to con- 
tinue eflfectnal in any part. This, 
the Northern States feared to do, 
because of the dangerous nature 
of the institution of slavery as it 
had developed in the South. In- 
deed it may w'ell be observed here 
that if the men of the North 
thought the Negroes would for- 
ever stand enslavement, slavery 
would have extended, its borders 
from one end of this country to 
the other before such a terrible 
price would have been paid to 
curb it, as was our Sivil War 
i.And just here, friends, I pray God 
the power to burn this thought in 
the minds and ;hearts of you 
vounger Negroes, that the men of 
the North died by the thousands 
upon tile battle field, not primar- 
ily for your freedom and for my 
freedom, but to save their institu- 
tions, their homes and their loved 
ones against the day when you 
and I, our sons, or our grandsons 
would have overwhelmed the land 
in the physical wrath of our soul's 
insistence upon freedom. 

In other words, friends, it was 
the physical writhing of our en- 
slaved forefathers, their aigony of 
mind and of soul, ever increas- 
ing as were their numbers, 
through a period of two and a 
half centuries, which furnished 
the chief motive for their final 
emancipation. A\'itho,ut all this, 
the master minds of our country 
prior to I860, would have devised 
a means to -«ven up the distribu- 
tion of the w-ealth and the honors 
of our country in some manner 
consistent with the existence of 
the black slave population. To 
hold otherwise is but to close our 
eyes to the bold facts of our .Am- 
erican human nature, and to ac- 
cept the jdatitudes of "those who 
seek to sugar-coat unpleasant 
.truths with a false idealism. 

However, while it was true that 
the leading .American minds dur- 
ing the slavery period had con- 
demned that slavery as a danger- 
ous institution by reason of the 
growing wrath and growing 
numbers of the black slaves, these 
minds were but a small minority^ 
of the American people. Th^; 
great masses of the people, as did 
the great mass of the Russian peo- 
ple, prior to the Russo-Japanese 
war, flaunted their ability to over- 
come all adversaries, whether foe 
without, or serf within. And it 
was this ignorant obstinacy of the 
masses of the American whites 
which eflfectively negatived the ef- 
forts of that small but sincere 
band of abolitionists who sought 
to impose a reUgious ideal upon 
the hearts of a people whose Re- 
ligion was the Practical, and 
whose God was Expediency. 


Baptist 
Mel: at 



And thus i^ came to pai s during 
the decade df the '40s, i hile one 
faction sou^t to defend slavery 


ecutive Board 
e Tabernacle 




entirely, the other factior was but 
endeavoring; to postponi ' the in- 
evitable conflict until q popular 
issue could be framed tli it would 
inflame and unite the rr^ n of the 
North so th^t they migl t be the 
more formidable agai^ st their 
united and impassioned | southern 
adversaries. To undo 1 ie dead- 
lock of thi$ northern ; ituation. 
God produced an issueliand the 
same God raised up men;ifcvfen col- 
ored men, under the leadership of 
His chosen; ones, to turJ that is- 
sue into northern men's'iiearts. 

On the 15th day of! .August. 
1841, there met in >{jlntucket, 
Mass.. wha,t was left ofithe then 
wrangling factions of tie .Aboli- 
tionists. There had cofie down 
to that meeting from ISlew Red- 
ford, Mass.!, his home, a tall awk- 
ward young colored mail, an es- 
caped Maryland slave. I To the 
man at thejdoor, he whiskered his 
name- as Ffederick Douglass. He 
was given a seat in the audience. 
As the ifieeting worei on the 
wrangling 'of the faction! on mat- 
ters rif subordinate interlst cast a 
gloom over all. Many lof those 
iresent cojiceded the melting one 
of the last of its kind tclbe held. 
.->iH .\q mo paanod sb aJois s aji] 
sin JO (i^lpa-i l^m uiojj fEip ■jn.\3 
-.woi] 'ji aaiync; ■.Oois|i oi ;?oi 
a3.\3joj si;sdt;qj3d ii-^oads iv.\.[i ui 
pii;s st:.\\ bBipv -^II^'^^'hI ..'^V'^tu 
-aa .Siiij[t:i|[ y.Tt\ .\m ucSSq,, 'oiou.\< 
i31T;[ iiasuiiq .iq os puB uifiot 
-It^ld 3i{X, paqoBOjddB JssEp'inoo 

-iuno.C uducijssi] ipn^i ^^\\ 
■;s3J3lui lO 3.\0Jd iqnop on pinb.\\ 
.\jojs sajii asoii-w puv' 'ss^\v\ fiui 

-1S3J31U1 XIC aq Ol .\\3U| .\nBuosj3d 

aq uioq.w 3\r:\? 3.\ij|iSnt Suno.v 
siq; 33npoi}ui Ol Siiusain aqi 
]o uoissiuuad paSi^aq 3H IVOI 
-pan •''^3.> ti} q-^inqa Ht;aurv i[bius 
i; UI J3^1DE31 jooqo^ .'Ccpuuc; i: 
SE pauai?!] uaijo pBijjaq .luoq.w oj 
in;iu Suno.C v 'Suiujotti \\sk3 uiojj 
aautjpuanc lucisuoa! ui pauiEui 
-aj ptjq Qq.w 3.\v\f a.imiSnj Suno.v 
oqi UI ; paziuSo.iajjj 'uono^ -3 
■ ^\ ujii^ jc 'Sunaaiu pt[i ui sjapEaj 
aqi JO aiio 'uooujajj,'? aqj ui ajE'i 
young- pouglass (or rather by 
God through him, for it was his 
[first sctious effortjl, began the 
final movement which stirred' the 
linditTerent masses ^f the North- 
ern states to actioin, and which 
[finally cinded at Apiipmattox. Vir- 
: ginia. : The immQrtal William 
! Lloyd Garrison, who was present, 
was transfixed by ^he story and 
; the appeal of the n|naway slave. 
In one ;of his man^f writings on 
that historic speech! of Douglass, 
Mr. Garrison said.jf'The extraor- 
dinary emotion in i|iy own mind, 
of that wonderful aftd terrible ad- 
dress, and the povferful impres- 
sion exerted upqii the then 
crowded auditory ^eemed to lift 
us all to a new \^rld. Patrick 
Henry had never mide a more elo- 
quent speech than l|ie one we had 
just listened to fr<|m the hunted 
fugitive." «' I 

Froiti the moment of that 
speech the North |was given the 
issue it had long sought to raise 
its common people The real is- 
sue, the fear of thi enslaved mil- 
lions, would hav| been but a 
boomerang uponl the masses. 
Douglass, the fugitive slave, with 
almost divine grajp of the situa- 
tion, tiold his stofy of enslave- 


ment, of yearning for freedom, of 
his final break for liberty, in truly 
thrilling style ; and wound it up 
to a soul-stirring climax by an ap- 
peal to the hearts and the con- 
sciences of the North to release 
the bodies and the souls Oi his 
brethren who yet labored under 

the weight and the clank of the 
chain. 

From one end of the country to 
the other Douglass and his able 
band of colored men and women 
travelled, in company with their 
white abolitionist friends, preach- 
ing the gospel of mercy and a 
man's chance for the black slaves. 
In this band were numbered such 
able and noble spirits as Henry 
Highland Garn^tt, Dr. James Mc- 
Cune Smith. Samuel R. Ward, 
Mifflin W. Gibbs, David Ruggles 
of N^ew York, Secretary of the 
N'ew A'ork A'igilance Comnfittee, 
X'athan Johnson of New Bedford, 
Mass., and last, but by no means 
least, that plain, but truly won- 
derful woman — Sojourner Truth. ' 
I-'.ach of these characters', indeed. 
is well worthy of a separate e\ en- 
ing's study. 

While the master mind and ora- 
tory of Douglass exerted its won- 
derful hypnotic influence upon the 
minds of the masses of the North, 
stirring them indeed to almost re- 
ligious frenzy as only a slave him- 
self could do. in denunciation of 
the institution of slavery, those 
otlier colored master minds who 
(lid ttie effective, the practical 
work of the underground railway 
were liberating thousands! of 
slaves, and delivering thenr to 
places of comparative safety and 
freedom. j[n this bright page of 
mostly unwritten history the 
names of John Mason of Ken- 
tucky who alone aided over 1300 
slaves from Kentucky to freedom, 
tlie late Harriet Tubman, Ellen 
Craft, and a score of others, the 
mention of whose names time will 
not permit, shine out in brilliant 
lustre. 

The ocular demonstration of the 
ability and purpose of the black 
slaves as evidenced by Douglass 
and his immediate followers in 
working on the minds and souls 
of the masses of the Noilh from 
the platform, the pulpit ' and 
through the press and by John 
Mason and his followers in effect- 
ing the escape of hosts of their 
enslaved brethren, had the desired 
effect on the men of the North. 
Slavery, they were convinced by 
what they had seen with their 
own eyes and heard with their 
own ears from the fugitive slave 
Frederick Douglass, was wrong. ' 
The recurring slave uprisings 
and the growing effectiveness of 
the L'nderground Railway con- 
vinced them that the Negroes 
themselves had determined to be 
free. 

Accordingly the call to Fort 
Sumter was not a long one, and 
the great bloody conflict was on, 
fanned into flame by the tangues, 
the brain and the persistent 
breaks for freedom of the very 
slaves themselves. 

Time does not permit, were it 
necessary for me to remind you,, 
that even in that great physical 
conflict, brought into existence 
as it were, by the writhings, the 
wajlings, the pleadings and re- 


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MUTILATED PAGE I CANNOT 



IMPROVED 


BrflllaRt Work of ifn 
iL H. Earn 



VERS£D IN GflURCH HISTORY 






i' t 


■7i> 


t- 


:,R! 


I 


Briaf Summary of th* Achiev«menta af 
th« Pr««idant of the Baptist Stata 
Cenvantion of Alabama — Author of 
Savaral Plana For the Future Wel- 
fare of the Denomination. 

Blrmlngtiam, Ala.— Tbe Baptist de- 
nomination in tbls state Is growing by 
leaps and bounds In numbers, Qnance 
•ixniiTelilgent leadership. The reports 
made by the various churches at tbe 
last state convention covered a wide 
scope (^reactivities %\ and out of the in- 
dividual churches themselves. Fore- 
most among tbe many capable leaders 
In the work of the denomination is the 
■Rev. J. H. Eason, B. D., pastor of the 
'JaclcsoD Street Baptist church in this 
Clt7 and president of the AJabama 
Baptist state convention. 

Mr. Eason is a niitlve of Somtervllje. 
this state, and was graduated from 
Selma university In 1885 and from the 
Richmond (Va.t Theological seminary 
in 1S90. After his graduation in 1890 
Professor Eason taught at Selma unl. 
versity for seveu years. He was or- 
dained to the Baptist ministry In 1S91. 
He has held many responsible posi- 
tions both as a churchman and an edu- 
cator. Before beginninc his pastorate 
at the Jackson Street Baptist church 
In this city he had been pastor of the 
Seventeenth Street Baptist church In 
Aoniston for sixteen years. 

The Rev. Mr. Eason has some very 
distinct views as to the work, doctrine 


BSV 1. H. EASON. B. D. 


and discipline of the Baptist denomina- 
tion. Jd a re<ent Interview he made 
the following st.Ttements: "For several 
years 1 have made special study of 
church blstory and the Baptist denom- 
ination. I find the primitive form of 
the Baptist people was that of a mass 
meeting. They are a family. All oth- 
er denominations are organizations. 
The Baptists are a growtii, not an in- 
stitution. In their nature. 

■"To do the best work It is possible for 
us as Baptists to do we will have to 
become an organized family. 1 should 
not be surprised In the future to see 
the Baptists divided into two great 
classes— n.iuiely, confederated Baptists 
and the united Baptists. 

"Some years ago 1 drew up a consti- 
tution for the Alabama Baptist state 
convention, which provided that the 
one state convention be divided Into 
four subordinate state district conven- 
tions, the coming together once a year 
of these state district conventions in 
the state convention. Many good and 
great men In the state and out of the 
state predicted the state district con- 
ventions would secede from the one 
central organization. But there are no 
signs of trouble yeL The scheme is 
working nicely. 

"In our last convention at Mobile. 
Ala, the brethren passed a recommen- 
dation which I offered that provides 
that we have a congress to investigate 
and restate the practices and doctrines 
which the churches that are members 
of the convention are expected: to sup- 
port and practica 

"1 reason If committees to revise the 
Bible are wise a meeting to look into 
the practices and doctrines of tbe de- 
Domlnation that rests upon the Bible 
for its only rule of action might not be 
out of order. This meeting will be 
held some time next year." 

The R^eenth Amendment Will Stand. 
The Introduction of a measure In the 
general assembly at Columbia. S. C 
recently favoring the repeal of the 
fifteenth amendment to the federal 
coDstitutien simply shows the attitude 
of a small minority of southern white 
meti toward the colored citizens of the 
country. The great bulk of Intelligent 
wbltea throughout the, country would 
vote against such a selfish measure 
were It to become a national iasne. 


Sunday Schools to Aid MIsalonaries. 

The foreign mission board of the Na-' 
tlunal Baptist convention to preparing 
an elabf>rate Easter program for the 
Sanday scho(>ls throngboat the conn- 
try. Dr. L. G Jordan, secretary, says 
they will mall our at least 20a000 of 
these programs to the Sunday scboula 
In every, state and also to their stations 
hi Africa and other foreign points. 
Tbe board is asking for $15,000 for Im- 
mediite umc on the foreign field. 



faDS and fashions 




' no |disctissi«»n. \^fe invite yotji to 
be one of the sigfiie3"s to this <a\\; 
' and if the s^mja be agreeabl^, 

k'i^ kindly advise us affirmativclj l)y 
'^ijj the next mail, tliat we may uie 
your name to the call. 

Will you also send us the naniles^ 
and addresses of a dozen or more 
of your most influential and best 
known citizens, taken from ; the 
different sections of your Statie? 

Will you also send us the 
names and post offices of the dif- 
ferent Negrb newspapers and^oth- 
er Negro ' publications of your 
State? 

Should you, for any cause, not 
feel interested in this matter,: will 
you kindly hand this to some one 
else, who, you think, will be? 

Thanking you in advance, and 
hoping that you keenly recognize 
the importance of the • proposed 
meeting and the peculiar neces- 
sity of holding it early in 1914. 

I am, yours for the Negroes' 
interests, 

JAMES H. HAYES, 

Attorney ^t Law.* 

1307 Tea Street, N. W. i 

•r 

Washington, D. C. i 

We subscribed our name to the 
list of formal indorsers to the 

movement which we th+nk to be 
one of paramount importance. 

We have in the United States 

appro.ximately in round numbers 

about 10,000,000 Negroes;^ and 

about eigth tenths of them are 

living in the southern states, 

where they are wholly or in part 

by their state laws denied their 

political rights of franchise, w.hich 

was given them by the federal 

government, and which has been 

tictitiously denied them by class 

legislation in their respective 

over which we as a race 

no control. Yet \vc have 

>niething like 800.000 free 


states 

have 

left s 

votes belonging to the race which 

are scattere<l all over the country. 

The uljject of this congress 




Be One of the 
5000 Members 


For Ore 


Lincoln 


/^filiated with Republican Feder- 
. atfon of Southern California 


Cub 


A. WARREN, Secretary, 
!957 Maple Avenue 


NEXT MEEIiNG will BE ^. 

FRIDAYi MCH. 6 

Scott's Hall, 4^1 Oentral Ave. 




m^' 


THE NATIONAL NEGRO 
CONGRESS 

A Brief Review and Comment on 
the Call and Purpose 

r>y K. F. Ilendcr.son 

Dear Readers — Doubtless many' 
of you are aware of the fact that 
this call has been issued bv a 


committee ot 
Washington, 


race 
D. C 


men troni 
through 


James H. Have?, attorney at law, 
who was chosen as the exjjonent 
officer to give publicity of the call. 
\\ e print below the full text of 
a circular letter which has been 
sent out ti.i represeiitatix'es of the 
fortv-eight states. This letter, as 


vou can see. sets forth in part the i , , ,, , , i ^ .i 

^ ed that they have done what they 

purpose of the meeting: 


will 
be chiefly to discuss ways and 

means whereby we may be able 
to concentrate these 800,000 votes 
which are now being given pro- 
miscuously to the several ])oliti- 
cal parties, from which the race is 
receiving but little or no patron- 
age in return. The question to be 
decided is indeed a serious one, 
and it is (.me which should receive 
the verv highest consideration 

from the best thinkers and lovers i with' men, measures and 
of the_race. Hence we^ would | which are constantly 
urge the early calling of a local 
mass ineeting of race men and 
women at some place to take 
steps preparatory to the pushing 
forward of the contemplated na- 
tional Xegro congress. While it 

is true that many of our most 

active and best men and women I do nothing with their political 

who are true and tried lovers of gifl.;^ ^Ve think more of the one 

..1 1 i-o- 1 .f „™ „.,„!, who' registers and votes his hon- 

the race have differed from each " ^- . i i,„ 

^, . a-,- .-. -„ ,i,„icst convictions (even though he 

other in party afhliations in the P-- ■• , .'^ 

,',,,, , be \vrong), than we do of the one 

past, it should betaken for grant- | ^^.,^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^jji^^,, 

to forward the best interests of 


to register and go to the polls and 
cast our ballots. -A.s we have stat- 
ed above, there are .scattered over 
the country, mostly in the north- 
ern, eastern and western states. 
somewhere about 800.000 votes, 
or eligible voters. Now in short, 
we wish to say that unless we can 
have engendered into our. politi- 
cal aspirations some sort of. leav- 
en that will cause us to bestir 
ourselves to the extent that we 
may become better acquainted 

issues 
being 

brought before the public to be 
settled by their votes, we had just 
as well to leave the whole matter 
where it is. While we admit to 
the fact that wc need to have 
more political concentration in 
the exercise of our franchise, we 
also need to decrease the large 
jier cent of the 800.000 voters who 


Washington. D. C, Dec. 2. 1913. 
Dear Sir: We arc preparing to 
hold within the next ninety days 
o, mereabouts. a National Negro 
Congress to pass upon the follow- 
ing fjuestions,: (Time and i)lace 
of Congress to be determined lat- 

er.) 

(1) Should the Negro return Xri 
the Republican party? If so, why? 

(2) Should the Negro continue 
to sujiport the Democratic party? 

If so, why? 

{iy Should the 
in the Progressive party 
why? 

(A') Should the Negro maintain 
district organizations during the 
coming Congressional campaign 
of 1914? 

(5) What can we do to secure 
better accommodations on the 
railroads of the South? 

(6) How can we oljtain, and 
publish to the world, the truth 
about Southern lynchings? 

Before issuing the call and fix- 
ing the time and place of meeting, 
we shall ask a few prominent Ne- 


Ncgro remain 
? If so. 



cerned. You must not forget the 
thought was best for all Ccm- 
fact that the success of the pro- 
pcjsed X. N. congress depends en- 
tirely upon the willingness of the 
-pi.Mpui se oi[A\") suEioni[od iijva 
iials have gone into this that ami 
I the other party) to leave them anu 
.to tmite themselves together with 
!all of their political influencees 
'with members of their own- race. 
I Past ex|)erie!ice an dour ozser- 
i\ations with the ])olitical parties 
I of the cotmtry that race leaders 
should look after racial interests 
first and party interests last But 
we wish here to ?peak of a prob- 
lem which is all our own and the 
solution of which depends entire- 
ly upon ourselves; That is a gen- 
eral awakening of the qualified 
voters of members of the race to 
a more active exercise of their 
rights as citizens of the United 
States. It is a lamentabll; fact 
that notwithstanding we are con- 
stantly howling about the cruelty 
of the Democratic party and the 
ex-rebels of the southern 'States 
having robbed us or our fellow 
race rnen of their political fran- 
chise in those sections of the 
country . which lie within their 
power, we in other sections, 
whose rights have not be^n mo- 
lested, have become too indolent 


his copntry. It should be remem- 
bered by all concerned that our 
highest right as citizens of our 
countr}- is the proper exercise of 
our franchise at the polls- 

You must not forget the fact 
that the success of the proposed 
N. N. Congress will depend entire 
ly upon the willingneBS of the race 
politicians who have gone fnto the 
different partie? to leave tl.em and 
to uuite themselves with members 
of their own race. 

The Negro race political leaders 
have had ample lime to learn both 
from observation and their experi- 
ence with the political parties 
North and South,- that they 
should look after aacial interests 
first, and party interests lest. 


Puelplo Meat Market 

TELtPHONE MAIN 6897 

Joseph Davis, Proprietor 

411 Fresh Meat and Fish 

Mcatl arc Covcrmcnt Inspected 

I Premium Bacon and Mams 

I . 

\ JOHN T. REID 

GROCERl- staple and Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

rur Meat Market is a. great addition to the store. 
5 We carry all sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats. 

OUR pri|:es are reasonable in meats and groceries 

I Cor. Kohler and E. 7th St 

I NOTICE I ' • 

Colored Voters of State of California 


-Not to use the Afro-American 
unless jyou £are 


registered 


Tal# Notice- 
Fed|eral name 
the|ein. 

J. p.. LATTIMORE 

5400 Long Beacii Avenue Los Angeles, CaL 


For Oependatsle 

Dry Go<|ds, Ladies and Gents Furnishings, Hats 

Shoes, Etc., Go to 

CADE DEPARTMENT STORE 

B. F. H(|PKINS' OLD STAND FIFTH AND GLADYS 

They are |)Ut of the high rent district, aad these goods are as good as th^ 
best and pric^ as low as the lowest. 


Yet contrary to the theories of 
psychologists and the deductions 
of historians, notwithstanding his 
heredity of barbarism and his en- 
vironment of slavery, the Negro 
has won reco,gnition in all the 
epochs of this country's history, 
in its periods of war and in times 
of peace ; in the fields of battle, of 
religion, of education, of music 
and the fine arts, and of econom- 
ics. ■ ■ 


L. B. Kd)GERS 

Phone Broa|way 2387 


Meat Market, Fresh and 
Smoked Meats 

Staplm Groceries 


Cash Grocery 

745 Central Avfnue 


Grocdrics, Ff uit and Vegetables 

I Grecian Imported Olive Oil, 3-Star Brand 


Fifth and Giadys Ave, 


Gust. Picoulast & Co. 


The Old Reiable, where you get 
your money's worth, along with 
courteous treatment. 


Sam'l Market 

1914 East Seventh Street 

DEALER IN ALL K,INDS OF 

Fresh aid Salt Meats, Fine Sausages and Lard 


^t,kX£'% 






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M. TJtiws i 


"^^^^'trS"-- *"! 


I?^~'4- 


of the Santa Fe Red 
Cap force 


J. D. Reynolds 


Author of Raci^ 
Tips, of PullmamCo. 


And Other 


Active Railroad Men 
will Furnish the 'Doings 
of the 5000 Railroad 
Men Running to and 
on the Coast for THE 
EAGLE 


Job Printing ! 






WHICH 

WILL BE RUN 

ROR THE 

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PORTBRS - WAITERS 
dHElFS - MAIDS 

ED CAPS 
HOTEL MEN, ETC- 


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All communications should M addressed 
to The Callfornra Eagle, 1034' East Ninth 
Streets.. Sunset Phone Broadway 7667. 

Sintered as second-class mall matter at 
the Postoffice of Xx>s Angeles, Cal., Under 
the Act of March 1, 1878. 

C. A. SPEAR - - Managing Bdltor 

J. B. BASS - -..-Editor 

H. SHANNON ..AdverttelBg Manager 

LEWIS K. SEEKS Local Editor 

COBRESPONDENTS. 

8. B. Carr _ - Pasadena 

H. E. Simpson — Bakersfield 

E. L. Lewis — .Fresno 

Miss Ada Thompson , Oakland 

Mrs. Evans San Francisco 

J. J. Anderson San Francisco 

E. F. Henderson..-.- Los Angeles 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year...- - »•<» 

Six Months - ■'•"" 

Three Months ^ 

It occasionally happens that Tor some 
reason or other papers are missed by be- 
ing mlssenti lost or stolen. In case of 
subscribers not receiving their papers, In- 
form us by postal and we shaU cheerfully 
furnish a duplicate copy of said missing 
number. 

No attention paid to anonymous letters. 

Copy must be written plainly on one 
side of paper, and to insure insertion In 
current issue must reach this office 
Thursday. Correspondents, please take 
notice. - 

ADVERTISING RATES, 50c PER INCH. 


Of course, it is all right to be 
cheerful and hope for the very 
best. But under Republican rule 
no parade of the unemployed is 
constantly with us and Coxey's 
armies are unheard of. Today 
they are all up and down this 
bioad land of ours and the end is 
not yet. 


San Quentin is now much more 
inviting for the Southern criminal. 
The ProgreeBive administration 
hue made it so by separating all 
murderers, cutthroats, burglars and 
thieves, and for them it will now 
ba a better place to go. Jim Crow 
is now the order at that institution 
by Gov. Johnson's prison board. 


The Progressive Jim Crow ad- 
ministralion cannot longer deceive 
the colored voters, whose only ex- 
xuse for supporting that party in 
the past was that Roosevelt, who 
had preached the doctrine, "All 
men Up and no man down," stood 
BDonsor for the same. But with 
Gov. Johnson's administration 
putting in vogue V'ardaman, Hoke 
Smith, Jeff Davis et ^1., with such 
Jim Crow methods no colojjJd 
voter with self respect can stand 
with that party. 


uuiiflu HUBunsB wiM Mnpio^mwi 

to oar« tor their families, «to. 

JBat (1m labor. organisatiopB 
(whioh are noted for their hoBtility 
to the race) got their heads together 
and conetrticted what Lb kniwn as 
the Fdll Cbbw Law to. legislate 
the colored brother out, and it was 
sop to the present Progressive 
legislature that now has in vogue 
at their State iastitution Jim Crow 
methods, and they put the law 
through. And such is the Full 
Crew Law indeed a precious meas- 
ure which can be defended on no 
other grounds than to make places 
for the heelers of organizations. 


We are more than thankful for 
the many expressions of good will 
and encouragement, for the suc- 
cess of this journal and we will 
strive to merit the same by our 
efforts to publish a real newspa- 
per for the continued exploitation 
of race progress. 


Starting witn a democratic Gov- 
ernor in the State who was the 
first one to appoint a colored man 
as his messenger, down to Gover- 
nor Johnson, the colored represent- 
ation at the State Capitol has been 
never less than twenty employees. 
But with Johnson and his Jim 
Crow this has been reduced to the 
insignificant number of three jani- 
torships. Now the trimmers and 
apologists will have the nerve to 
ask the colored voters to vote for 
such an administration ! 


FOURTEEN COLORED ELE- 
VATOR OPERATORS DIS- 
MISSED FROM HAMBUR- 
GER'S. 

Why the fourteen colored op- 
errators were dismissed from the 
Hamburger employ is a ([uestion 
that is being loudly discussed by 
many of the colored citizens of 
I, OS Angeles. 

The Eagle is not prejjared here 
and now to discuss the merit of 
the question, involved in the con- 
troversy, which indeed is many 
sided. 

Monday morning when we en- 
tered the store, and found that 
the elevators were being operat- 
ed by white boys, we imniediate- 
Iv began an investigation. Had 
an interview with the superinten- 
dent, who assured us to a degree 
satisfactory that the boys were 
dismissed for other causes than 
race prejudice. .At this writing 
our investigation is not yet com- 
plete, hence we are not yet pre- 
pared to give out all information 
secured. Init we hope that our 
people will be cool-headed in this 
matter, fur we certainly depre- 
cate the attitude often assumed 
hv our people in such grave mat- 
ters. 

We are facing a peculiar eco- 
nomic competition in this as in 
other sections of the country at 
this time. Too little care or at- 
tention is given the laboring class 
of our people, especially the 
vounger set, who seem to have a 
faint conception of their position 
as employe vs. their employers. 

Let us see to it as a people that 
more of onr time is given the 
young men and women, who float 
into our city with no other ob- 
ject than to eke out an existence 
in the easiest and best avenue 
that is <ipen to them. 


In Assemblyman Mauser's dis- 
trict there are many of his con- 
stituents who are colored railway 
employees.. They have asked us 
•yto find out how Mr. Mauser stood 
\i the "full crew" bill. To date, 
we 4\^ve not had the opportunity 
of fincTiM out ; but, no doubt, 
that gentleman — whom we have 
found very affable and obliging — 
will come through with the desired 
information. 


THE 'FULL CREW" LAW. 


For the benefit of our readers 
we will, in a general way, explain 
wh»t ie meant by the Full Crbw 
Law. It is a measure that was 
introduced in 'the last legislature 
at the behest of the labor organi- 
zations of San Francisco. A.nd its 
provisions were such as to make it 
iipposeible for the railroads to 
operate for years with a colored 
man 'bo the head end who per- 
formed ^e functions of a brake- 
man and also looked after the 
porter work, fo/ which they re- 
ceived fair wages and the oppor- 
tunity to earh more for such du- 
rf> as he performed, it f 




T\V(1 K.\(;LI': Feb 27 ,2 

THE GOLDE NWEST HOTEL 
A Credit to the Race. 

The fame of the Golden West 

j Hotel has gone forth as not only 
I the largest hostelry for the ac- 
! cf)mmo(latioii of the race- in the 
I entire west, but also as an insti- 
tution which reflects high, credit 
not only on it\ management but 
to the race ond community. 

The jiresent management of 
Messrs. llrown and. Williams 
have dignified the jilace, and it 
has ijeen demonstrated that with 
the proper effort, as has been the 
case in this instance, that our 
race is capable of sustaining a 
highly creditable place, as is the 
case with any other class or race. 
So it is pleasing to know that 
these gentlemen have provided a 
place which the most fastidious 
and exacting can without fear of 
the least criticism visit a high- 
class place and partake of its ac- 
commodations which by all have 
be^n pronounced second to none. 
Mr. Virgil Williams, the genial 
manager of this hostelry, is expe- 
rienced in the- hotel business, and 
is painstaking in his efforts to 
please his patrons. The house 
employs a force of 16 men and 
three women, so in that alone it 
is an institution that not only ac- 
commodates the race as a hotel,! 
but largely employs them as well, 
and it is well deserving of the 


TBF 


EAGLE UEADS THEf ALL 

i 


ile we toot oar own 


V &ntf now we ar4 going to begparclo^ 
horn for a momei t. 

Any one who i« at all wcqaainted wit^ race joDrnaU can 
lo<>k over this pajifer and eee what it ^-eajly is— it speaks for 
itsjelJ. And it at bnce becomes apparent that it is not trail- 
ing in the wake jof any other race ioulrnal in the entire 
W^t ; but it actiiaUy leads the* ah. We do not aay this 
in! any boastful spirit, and only do so th show that we are 
eajnestly striring ti gire to the public a real newspaper. 
Tojdo this entails a heavy weekly eipense. and we want to 
urge on all of thjose who appieciate progress, and who be. 
lieVe in having ^ real live paper to chronicle the advance- 
ment and to ta^e up the taak of the exploitation of the 
accjomplishments jof the race, the necflssity of giving to the 
sanpe the support that it merits. It is not onr mission to 
decjry any other j(i)urnal. We will be found at all times' do- 
ing' what we can to hold them up, and the necessity of a 
strong support of all of our race was never more needed. So, 
while The Eagle has not been content, as the oldest Negro 
publication in th^ West, to stay in the old rut, we likewise 
want all of the people who stand for the advancement of the 
community, city. State and Nation to acjcord to us the sup- 
port that we merit, and — if they do that — we shall ever 
strive to go on and on until we have as nearly reached the 
acme of perfection as it is possible to attain. 

This is a cruciall moment in the aS&irsiof the Nation, and 
the part that the race is to play in the problems that con- 
front us is one that should interest all good citizens, regard- 
less of class or rape. And it shall be the aim of The Eagle, 
representing the great force which ha;8 at all times and on 
all occasions proved its worth, to chronicle those efforts and 
to help in all the great movements that tend to build a 
nation, and to stand as a sentinel to ward off danger. In 
this we are asking your support and have an abiding faith 
that it shall be forthcoming. 

As a matter of fact, in this progressive age, if a man, 
woman, a business, corporation or organization cannot keep 
up and show some improvement along these lines, they will 
get Run Over. These conditions and expectations are not 
for any one particular line, but applies to all alike. 

How futile it would be for this journal to stand on the 
housetops and halloo "Aduance !" and yet stand still itself ! 
Many of our enterprises fail for the reason that they do not 
try to keep pace with the advancement that is expected along 
business lines. 

Even the Negro bootblack is losing favor. 

Why ? 

Because he still keeps his ricketj stand, with chairs that 
came along in the 'BO's — some of the rungs out of them. 

But the Greek and the Mexican put up stands that are the 
latest creation in the market, embellished with mirrors and 
shining brass, and — he gets the business. 

The colored barber also has been going back because he 
has failed to keep up with the procession. The continuous 
effort must be to Keep Ur and, if possible, lead — but, at all 
hazards, Kefp Up with the Proces,sion ! 

All cannot lead— but in this age of progress the demand is 
kept up, the race looks on with equanimity, while the Jap 
and the Chinaman come to this country aliens, earn a com- 
petence and go back to the old country to enjpy themselves 
in old age. They come to this country and, as is self- 
evident, by their unity of purpose and a supreme willing- 
ness to. help one another, they build business blocks and be- 
come factors in the business world. Note in all California, 
where there are any Japanese they are conducting business 
— many of them on a pretentious scale. , .- 

It means something to be in the front rank and to keep step 
with the leaders — each class and race must make its own 
history. "How well are we doing that?" is the question con- 
fronting us all. Our bounden duty is to support race enter- 
prises when not incompatible with the greatest good for the 
greatest number. Yet, as evidenced at a Te6t:iurant on 9th 
street — wliicli closely adjoins another^one conducted by a 
^egro, the other by a Frenchman : GO by almost any time. 
the Frenchman's place will be crowded with none but Ne- 
groes, ana the Negro's place empty. Now, that same class, 
when trouble overtakes them, would be the first to cry for 
race patriotism. And yet they are the Irist ones to be of any 
material aid to build up enterprises conducted by members 
of their own race. Just as soon as that Frenchman gets 
heavy enough in pocket he will get a better place, in a- bet- 
ter location, and bar ail Negroes. 

These are shomeful facts to present to the public, but we 
hope that from this publicity some good will result — for tlje 
need of the hour is leadership, and the loyalty of one/o 
another — especially along the lines of business. -^ 


ALONG CENTRAL AVENUE 

Carroll W. Short, the druggist, located at 4400 So. Park Ave 
Mrs. Tennabaum has the latest and best. 
Everybody's friend — W. H. Guest at i2th and Central. 
Schneider & Schultz, German winery products and distils pure 
wines and brandies, 2056 Santa Fe avenue. 

Satisfaction, service and style in cloaks and suits at the Sample 
Suit Shop, 326. W. 7th street. j 

Farwell Bros., at 12th and Central, wijl test your eyes, fit your 
glasses and furnish- ycmr Christmas jewelry] ; 



1--;"' ';■■ • '/r/. 

is 


SUNSET 



Double Daily Service to New Or. 
leans ani East through Dixie 
Land. "^- 

EL PASO - 

"GOLDEN STATE LIMITED" 

The t-ainde luxe, exclusively firat 
class. ; 

The "Califoenian" for both fjret 
and second class travel. 
The line of low altitudes. 

OGDEN 

The trail of the Argonauts — 
The route of the 

SAN FRANGISCO OVERUND 
LIMITED" 

SHASTA 

THE "ROAD OF A THOUSAND 

WONDERS," to the East through 
the great Northwest 

See agents 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Los Angeles Offices 
. 212- West Seventh Street 

Station, Fifth and Central Avenue 

fas 1 ( 1 1 a ( fl I r , ' ; ! 1 . f ((.■<( ■ 


■--■^'■'M 


YGUNCi & SON 


ARCH ITECTS 

702 Lankershim Building 


Phone Main 4149 


Los AngeueS 


Quick Sei^ce Laundry 

!S QOS Central Ave. 

You will secure best work and lowest prices in city 
with, prompt and courteous treatment. Deiivery to " 

all parts of city at low rate. Phone orders Riven 
strict attention. 


MAIN 8151 


MAIN 8151 


A. A, GRANT 


Bicycle repairing, vulcanizing and all l^inds of sundries, Tony 
liberal patronage which is their.*!. Federico, 4022 Central Avt. 

i 
I 

- 1! .:. 


NpTARY ■ 
Agent for Inr^tments, Building, 
Loans, Insurajbce. Houses, Lots, 
and Aci^age for sale 

1146 Celitral Avenue JTel, 

Los Angeles, k California 1 


PEOPLE'S REHLTY CO. 


Capital Stock $75,000 
Shares $1.00 each 

F. H. CRUMBLY 

Agent 
Bwv 2528. 785 San Pedro 


BEQUEST OF $25,000 IS 

LEPIT TO TUSKEGEE 

Boston. Mass.— In the will of 
the late Benjamin Leeds, filed 
here last week, provisions are 
made for $325,000 in public Rifts. 
Among" the legatees the Tuskegee 
>.ormal andilndustrial Institute, 
which has been left a be<)uest of 
S2.-.000. 


THE COLOR LINE. 

Just as colc^red prisoners at San 
Quentin are' protesting at the 
drawing of t\\e color line there, a 
white man ^and a negro hn\c 
formed a paittnership here in the 
bandit busiir(|ss. 

If by an^ happ-^- chance this 
pair were tqj reach San (Jucntin 
their prescnde would tend to add 
complexity t|(D prison social con- 
ditions. :i 

■1; 

I 

Jl|ST OUT 

First edit&n of "The Scrap 
Book of Tip* on the Race Prob- 
lem." A ch|iice selection of ex- 
tracts, clippi|igs, historical facts, 
and biograpljies of some of the 
greatest NeSrocs of the world. 
Also that rfiasterful speech by 
Judge Marq|is A. Kavanaugh, 
judge of th« Supreme Court of 
Illinois, in hi| appeal for justice to 
the Negro. All should read this. 

For sale |t this office,'JT D. 
Reynolds, piiplisher. 


at- 8 o'tlock p. m. 


Pacific Coast Tabernacle No. 
210 meets second and fourth 
Tuesday, at 8 o'clock p. m. 

New Beulah Tabernacle No. 43 
meets the "second and fourth 
Thursday of each month at 8 ' 


o'clock p. m. 

Star- of Bethlehem Tabernacle 

Xo. 382 meets th<; first and second 

Saturday at 2 p. m. ,' 

» * » ■ — ' — 

Keddesh Royal House of Midia 

Xo. 79 meets the third Tuesday 
at 8 p. m. \ 


THE RESULT OF THE 
CONGREGATIONAL RALLY 


•llll«llt » 


-t 


|ii i i>l 


tiiaii m 


Internationil Order of Twelve 
meets as follpws at Washington 
and Central Kail : 


The pastor and members of the Lin- 
coln Memorial Congregational Church 
take this means of expres^in^ to the 
ministers, churches and friends of t&s ' 
city who lent them a hand to help them 
in their important rally last Sunday 
afternoon, their most sincere thanks 
for the aid they gave in helping them 
to realizefjthe results that followed the ' 
rally. For want of space it will be im- 
f)ossible to publish the name of every 
person who has given a small amount, 
but the gifts are included in our thanks 
and in the total amount raised and re- | 
ported here as follows: , 


East 8th St, Christian Church *3.6 ] 

Phillip? Chapel, C. M. E. " 2.76 

Westminster Presbyterian " 2.24 J 

Mt. Zion Baptist " 4.10] 

Rev. J. W,Stout, Sante Monica. 2.00 [ 

General Collection at Rally 8.45 1 

Members and friends who pledged 91.85 1 

A Friend (white) .: 100.00 

A Friend (white) _ aOOOJ»| 

Cong'lCKUrchBldg. Soc., N.Y., 

as a gift — ..__1000.00 | 

Cong'l Church Bldg. Soc., n a 

loan for 10 yrs. without int.. 500.tn j 

ToUl Amount to Date ^713.96 j 

For which, one and all please accept | 
our most hearty thanks. ' 
REV. J. D. PETTIGREW, Pastor. 


■•■ Xi 

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ifeife: i 

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fmm 


Golden W|st Temple No. 412 
meets firstftruesday of each month 


B^hi..-- I 


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CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



LdCAL HAPPENINGS 


"?' 'G«brge Gamble ie working with 
"T^^XJal. Brantley's force at theWeat- 
ern Union Building. 


Prof. Cbarles Alexander left 
for a tr^p throagb the State of 
Texas. 


The 'Life of Wright Cuney," by his 
daughter Mrs. Mnud Cuney Hart 
has reached the city and the die- 
tribution and sale qf the work is in 
the hande of W. E. Easton 442 E. 
30th. St. Phone Soutb 8cl9. The 
work is a neat cloth bound book it 
sells for $1.50 phone Mr. Easton 
who will deliver a copy at your 
door. 


Mrs. H. French gave a delightful 
birthday party laat Saturday eve- 
ning in honor of her daughter, 
Pansy Lee, at the Violet club 
house. Bowling, pool, and dancing 
were the principal features. Miss 
Eatelena Gibson received the 
guests. — 


Mr. IVestcott is conducting one 
of the cleanest and most up-to- 
date grocery stores on East 9ih 
street, between Ceres ana Gladys 
avenues. For anything in the 
grocery line, trade there. 


The editor was the guest at din- 
ner Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. M. 
Anderson, 1460 VV. 36th street. It 
was indeed like home, with pleas- 
ant surroundings and a cuisine 
that would please a king. 


Subscribe for and read The 
Eagle, the oldest, the largest and 
newsiest Negro journal in the en- 
tire West. 


The Kensington Art club met at 
the residence of Mrs. J. Slaughter, 
1415 E. 16th street, Tuesday after 
noon. 


Mrs. W. Coombs of Seattle, 
Wash., is a house guest with Mrs. 
Ragland, 1464 Central avenue. 


Mrs. L. Davis, 1464 Central 
enue, is on the sick list. 


FOR RENT— Furnished 
Apartment for two gentle- 
men. Call at 

1017 East 9th street 


Colored Voters' League. 


The Colored Voters' League, 
which has permanent headquar- 
ters at 855 Naomi street, held an 
enthusiastic meeting Wednesday 
evening. They were addressed by 
J. B. Bass, editor of The Eagle. 
The club is a permanent organiza- 
tion which meets every Wednesday 
Qvening. v isitors are welcome. 


Kid Asbford is still on the 
hurry up order and after the old 
clothes to clean and duds to wash. 
See him. 


THE GOLDEN WEST HOTEL 


G. V/. Hamilton of the S. P. 
Bed Cap corps is contemplating a 
trip to Kansas in the near future. 


Mrs. A. B. Browning^received 
the sad intelligence o| ttl^^^tlKoj 
her cousin at Denven|IC^., tltst 
^edaesday. ■' *^ 


Mrs. A. Spiller Alexan(ier, who 
was the first solicitor for The Eagle, 
26 years ago, and whose tieighbor 
we happen to be now, gave us a 
call at our sanctum this week, 
whicit' we appreciate very highly. 
Mrs. Alexander is a -staunch race 
woman, broad guaged and enter- 


Despite the cry of hard tinle 
and financial embarrassment, the 
"Golden West" still furnishes its 
patrons and friends with high class 
service and entertainment. The 
convenience in location and effi- 
ciency of service is too well known 
for renumeration, so it suffices to 
say, all that is necessary to he con- 
vinced is for all who cLeeire good 
service, food and entertainment, 
give the largest Negro hotel wes 
of Chicago a trial. 

The "Golden West," near Third 
and Stephenson avenue. 


A large crowd enjoyed the 
pleasing recital given by Mr. John 
(iray at Scott's Hall Monday eve- 
ning. Mr. Gray has a large fol- 
itnving which enjoys immensely 
his hrilljant recitals. 


Mr. Drew, the colored runner 
"f the I'niversity of Southern Cal- 
ifornia, ran away from his com- 
petitors in the 100 and 220 yard 
(lashes last Monday, winning his 
races in splendid time. 


Mr. \\'esley Williams, a colored 
lad in the Examiner contest, was 
running eighth this week, with n 
crlorious chance of climbing. Mr. 
Williams deserves credit and as- 
sistance. ■? 


Miss Irene Hughes was n-iar- 
ried to Mr. Emery I'.yrd Wednes- 
day evening. They will he at 
home to friends on Council street 
after this week. 


The Ancient Enited Sons 'and 
Dauehters of Africa will meet on 
the First Monday of each month 
at Scott's Hall, .^Bl Central ave. 
Mrs. E. R. Baldwin, 

M. E. Q 
Miss M. BiSRV, Sec'y 


Last Tuesday evening the resi- 
dence of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac John- 
son, was a pretty spot where 
about one hundred guests, young 
and old, gathered to witness the 
nuptials of Miss Cora Adamson 
and Mr. James E. Jones. 

The color scheme, carried out 
in the house decorations, was 
white and green. 

The bride wore a white satin 
gown, heavily draped in Irish 
point lace, and carried a large 
cluster of white roses. The maid, 
who was Miss Jessie Munro, 
wore white mull with lace trim- 
mings. Mr. Clarence Currw was 
best man. Miss Cornelia Leg- 
gett played Mendelssohn's Wed- 
ding March as the bride proceed- 
ed from the rear of the house. She 
was met by the groom, who came 
in the front. They took their 
places beneath a large bell of 
maiden-hair ferns and carnations 
that hung from the ceiling. Rev. 
W. J. ]. Byers iicrformed the 
ceremonv. 


LOOK OUT! 


The 


iiv- 


nu 


ming <it the greatest 
\merican t" otir southland 
in the person (if our own P.onkcr 
T. Washington should he an 
event centered in the heart of 
every colored .American in the 
city or its vicinity. 

Mr. Washington is to be the 
guest of Dr. Raer of Occidental 
College, which in itself speaks a 
high encomium for the peerless 
educator. Surely if the educa- 
tors of .Southern California are 
clamoring for an opportsnity to 
hear Mr. \\'ashington. every ne- 
gro should at least see him. Ik- 
is scheduled to arrive \farch 7. 
and will speak under the auspices 
of the Y. M. C. .\. at the Eirst 
M. E. ciiurch, March 8, at ?> p. m. 


The above is a remarkable like- 
ness of Mr. J. Allen Reese of 
\ cniccj Cat, whom we have the 
pleasure of announcing as our re- 
porter in that vicinity. 

Mr. Reese is an unusual char- 
acter with a highly pleasing per- 
sonality." He has been recently 
appointed as regular carrier in 
Venice and owing to the fact that 
he is very popular, industrious 
and active in religious alTairs, we 
feel highly elated over the addi- 
tion, f 


At the Forum. 

Last Sunday aftern(Min w;is a 
gala session for the l'"orum. Mr. 
Lewis K. I'eeks, our local editor, 
and one of the promising young 
men of the city, was orator on 
this occasion, and in his (jriginal 
oration, ".\ X'ision of Hope," he 
not only delighted the large aud- 
ience with his well chosen Eng- 
lish, and rhetorical flights into 
the beauty and sublimity of hope, 
but in the strong and masterly 
manner with which he called the 
attention of his hearers to the 
deeds of \alor and bravery exer- 
cised by men of the race in times 
of war and confusion. 

The entire oration was an o[)ti- 
mistic belief in the future of the 
negro. .Miss .Minnie .\lbrett(jn, 
the sweet-toned soprano, who has 
already won the distinction of 
prima donna of the West, was the 
other attraction. It is the ease 
and grace with which .Miss A\- 
bretton seems to be especially 
gifted that has aided her in the 
success she has attained as \o- 
calist S(j earl\- in life. 


Louisvijle; Atlanta, Philadelphia, 
and New York that in faiJcy we 
livere gUding over pfain and des- 
ert, in and out of crowded cities, 
and inljo peaceful little villages 
until wi reached the scene I of the 
convenliion at Nashville, i where, 
she alighted us, and refreshed 
our minds with hopefulness for 
the fut]ure, as she related facts 
and features of the convention, 
where eight thousand Afjo-'Am- 
ericansiwere met in annujal. ses- 
sion. jVlrs. Strickland's ajccount 
coincided in most instancefs with 
Rev. • Thomas' in which both 
seem to think this last this most 
inspirii^g session ever held by the 
Baptists of the country. 
Second; Baptist Women Surprise 
Executive Board^. 

The bfficers, and captains of the 
Missionary Society of the 'Second 
Baptist Church formed a cjommit- 
tee, and presented to the Board 
of Directors of the Old) Eolks' 
Home ;S300.00 (three hundred dol- 
lars), : which sum was ' turned 
over to be paid on the $1800.00 
(eighteen hundred dollairs) in- 
debtedness on the home. 'This is 
no -new record for the Missionary 
Sisters of the .Second j I'aptist 
Church, but a pace they spt years 
ago. and have alwavs lived up to 
it. .' . ' J 

Tabernacle Deserve Credit. 

We were unable to se^ it out, 
but we truly hope that the con- 
vention, before adjourning, was 
hearty in its appreciatiod for the 
servicies rendered i,n the, way of 
entert!ainnient by the Tali)ernacle, 
for certainly more kindly treat- 
ment in the way of refreshments, 
and either courtesies were never 
more lavishly c(.inferre(l: u])on a 
body. 

In its next session the board 
will i-fieet with the .Mt. Zion V>a.p- 
tist Church, 


ons :. -^-'M-f 

ARCADEIDRUG STORE 

TOIl|t ARTICLI-S | j 

Nyal Famly Remedies | . Prescriptions a specialty 
Fifth and (|entral Avenue. 

W. H. GljIEST, P. D. 

DRUPGIST I 

V stationery * >|jtions and Toilet Articles 

] 2th and (lertral Avenue j 


^MOTHER'S |<ITCHEN CAFE 

t' Rj- C.S.. BRcjfWN, 'Proprietor 


l'-:* 


tTHE BEST PLACiUN TOWN TO EAT 


ptm*- c = 


Home 'Cbokir.gl^A' Specialty 


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SHORt ORDERS 

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f 

Household Brancj Flavoring Extracts 

Oar Goods are Guaranteed Absolutely Pure. At your Grocers 
Retail for 25c per bottle. ; Improved Export Ginger Ale and 
all flavors. Soda Water. j ' 

Geq. J. liou^e & Sons. 

Manufacturer 


I 


bos Angeles 


GRAND OPENING OF THE 
NEW SANTA FE CAFE. 


.Vewly repaired, 
equipped' with Messn 


niodernly 
. Thomas 


and Hite as iiroprietors^ the new 
Santa h'e Cafe in the pid .stand 
promises the public thdbcst that 
is to be had in the waV of Cafe 
ser\ice, which was denfonstrated 
at the opening last Thursday eve- 
ning, when one of the largest 
gatherings of young f(.iliks packed 
the spacious dining hall, which 
was beautifully decorated in pink 
and white carnations and ferns: 
laughed, chatted, and u^ade merry 
to the strains of enchanting mu- 
sic furnishetrTiy the Santa h'e < )r- 
chestra. 


MEMORIAL EXERCISES. 

Sunday at Wesley chapel, the 
memorial exercises in honor of 
Bishop Waldron, were :i decided 
success. 

.\ large crowd turned out in 
the afternoon to show their .ap- 
preciation for the founder of the 
I'reedmen's .Aid Society. Many 
eulogistic remarks and high trib- 
utes were uttered in honor of the 
r.isho|). The occasion was vcrv 
lirofitaldc as well as instructive. 

.Mr. James \\'iniams(in has 
been ill at his home for a few 
(la\'s, but is improving. 

The fieorgia State Societv will 
meet Monda\' evening at Wesley 
Chapel. The society meets each 
first and third .Monday of each 
month. 


Eighth Street Christiiin Church 


ONE EAGLE A1934 Feb 27 2 
MEETING OF THE EXECU- 
TIVE BOARD OF THE 
WESTERN BAPTIST ASSO- 
CIATION. 


We are elated over the addi- 
tion of Miss Leona Baber as re- 
porter. The qualities and accom- 
prising. She is a staunch friend P'ishments of this young woman 
and igppprter of The Eagle. '^ too well-known to be comment 


The 1-Lxeciiti\e lloard (jf the 
U'estern Baiitist .-Xssociatiou and 
the Woman's Home and Foreign 
Missionary Convention, niet on 
Wednesday and Thursday of this 
week with the Tabernacle Baptist 
Church in a most interesting ses- 
sion. Many fpiestions of interest 
and importance were discussed, 
among which was the mainte- 
nance of the Old Folks' Home, 
an institution owned, managed 
and supported by the denomina- 
tion for the care of the old and 
dependent members of the racti; 

At the second, or woman's ses- 
sion, t^e most interesting feat- 
ures of the occasion was the re- 
port of Mrs. Strickland, State 
President, who has recently re- 
turned from n extended traip in 
the East and Eouth, where she at- 
tended the National Convention. 

Mrs. Strickland's report and 
account of the trip was full of in- 
formation, and interest. Start- 
ing at Los Angeles, her home 


Sunday, March 1. 

At 11 a. m. th«*' pastor will 
preach on the subject, "God and 
Hie Book." . 

At 7 the Y. B. P. C- E. will ren- 
der a splendid program. 

The meeting will be led by Mrs. 
S. Leo. , 

Address, Mr. R. R. Turnage 

Paper, Mi«8 Amanda Roe 

Instrumental Solo, 

Miss liertha Miller 
8.00 p. m., preaching by the pas- 
tor. Subject, "The First -Step 
Back to God." 

Board meeting next Tuesday at 
8 p. m. 

Everybody welcome. 

D. L. ^cMlCKEN, 
Minister. 


! '-1 ' 

9he Xleung Secple's 

LITERARY SOCIETY 

955 1-2 NAOMI STREET 

DR. J. M. SMITH, 

Founder and Organizer. 

WILLIE PAYNE, 
CLARENCE IRWIN, 

Assistant Managers. 


Every bod3rthaB;[a Hobby— Our Hobty is rooms— a 50c broom for 35c Dehvered 
i X Always Welcome Whether Lookir.g or Buying 

Brodine-BeiJg Furniture Co. 

ITemple $treet at Belmont 
If you need any Furniture call and see us, or if you want to sell your fumitur 
We will call and see you. Dbn?t callus Down, call us Up— Wilehirs 3417 


FEED 


FUEL 


M.B.Pettit & Sons 

CAShj GROCERY 

Pastry, Fruit aid Vegetabiss, Fresh Meats 

Wilshire 3464, i No. 1654 Tempi 


THE ALEXANDRIA ROOMING HOUSE 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

AT 768 iWALL Street 

INeatly Rurnlrhed Room between Maple and San Pedre Cas Line 


with Mot and Cold Bath 


ALBERT PERRY, Manager. 


PHONE 'i 

Main 4953- Home 4154 

COlViE TO THE 


PAUL VENFELT, 

Proprietor 



m nil 

Where You Get the Best Service in 

Family Trade 

912 San Pedro St. ,' ' 0pp. City Markc 


Grant Smith, Prf 8 and Gen. Mgr. 
Curtis Hammond, Vice Pres. 
R. B. Odom. Treas. 


Frank Williams, Auditor 
Jaa. C. Slaughter, Secy. 


^ITH & WILLIAMS CO., Inc. 

FuriKal Directors and Practical Embalmers 


We guarantee^Qjar work shipped to any part of the world' 

LADY ATTENDAisiqv PHOISTE MAIN 362 9 

Services tfte^best Prices the lowest 


654 San Fernando St. 


' -''. 


' We desire to inform you that we 
have in progress a Young People's 
Literary Society, which everyone 
is invited to attend and become 
■^ member. Every Thursday eve- 
ning at 8 o'clock we meet at 
th^ above named place. 

Miss Bern ICE lilooRE, Pres. 
Katheleen Bkaye, 

Cor. Sec'y. 


H 


-4.,-«it ;{*ii 


^£.. 


e^ nr, r*. c.,(c ^ , city, so vivid was the word pic- 

Sel a vil n M j ° '^^ *•'"' ^"^"^^^ ^ith which she took us 
a valuable addition. across the continent, visiting 

' such cities- as Denver, Minneapo- 


Piano Instruction. 
J^r. Clarence D. Cooksey, In- 
p^tuction on the Piaho. 
Blwy 309 1246 Birc* 


The Palacfe Caf e 

i 915 Central Aveni 


fcSi 



The neatest, coziest and best place to eat. J^wly fitted uP 
nobby little booths, where parties may dine unmoles^d by the 
public gaze, Chinese and American dishes of the cheapest and 
daintiest and best dishes served. Chop Suey and Nobdles in 
American style 


f~< 


\ C. W. Sanders 
Telephone Broadway 1196 


B. L. Ware 


J. E. Jones, 

Dresden Dye Works 

Ladies and Gents' Garments Cleaned, Pressed and 

Repaired 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked— Work Called for and Delivered 


iU 




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t'v-.-.ri.^ 


MUTILATED 



Cy^NNOT pE IMPROVED 






No. 1540 Fillmore St. 

H. G. FRANK, Mana^r t^ 

f^ncy and Staple Groceries, Fruit 
jand Vegetables 

Rate» tp Hotels^ Restauranb and 
Boarding Houses 

Consult Us Before Goings Elsewhere 

PHONE WEST m^ 


d@eS)@li@@r.M.i9@®®9®®is;Sl®£»SXsXS®S^^ 


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LESTER iMAPP 

PROPRIETOR 



STOP, LOOK, LISTEN! 
fWET WASH '"""ot^Z"''" 50c Sack 

The Hygienic Laundry has changed hands and will be run as a first class 
Wet Wask Laundry under the name of the NEW PROCESS LAUN- 
DRY CO. Wet wash. As our aim \k to protect your health through 
cleanliness and sterilization in doing yqur laundry work, we selected the 
name of Hygeia as more befitting to reipresent our purpose. We steri- 
lize all clothes by scientific process, safeguarding you against conta- 
gious diseases. We fesije^^tfully solicit your trade and will give the 
best of service. Kindly give^is a trial iand be convinced. 

NEW PROCESSN^UNDRY CO. ^Uh 

Phone Lakeside 1218 >^32 Poplar St-. Qakland 


the Colored Boys Friend 

J I 537 South Broadway 


Godeau Funeral Service 


tt 


The Handsome Chapel and Private Rooms Free 

for those who dwell in apartments, flats, hoftels, or where is insuf- 
cient accommodation at the time of death. Mr. or Mrs. J. S. 
Godeau will personally supervise all funeral arrangements and 
details. 

Godeau prices are only half the charges of the undertaker in your 
neighborhood, wno is controlled by the Funeral Trust. 

TELEPHONE 
MARKET 711; S- F. OAKLAND 4045. OAKLAND 

when death makes the undertaker necessary 

JULIUS S. GODEAU 


Phone Weet 6669 L HSI^uYUKf, Proprieto 

Cosmopolitan 
Dyeing and Cleaning Works 

1591 POST STREET, Near Laguna i SAN FRAN^igCO, CAL. 

Ladies and Gent's Suits Cleaning- Pressing, Dyejing 
and Repairing Guaranteed Satisfactory 


AND MADE TO 
LOOK LIKE NEW 


Goods Called' For 
and Delivered 


THE NEGRO IN POLITICAL 

LIFE 

(A Review) 

By Prof. Charles Alexander 

"The Facts of Reconstruftion," 


'^IfVan Ness Ave., S. F. 
305 Columbus Ave., S. 


F. 


210 Webster St. Oakland 
827 Figueroa St., Los Angeles 


tC ba»i 


"NOT IN THE TRUST" 


O. Pkn ne 


"Al" Meat Market 


:V.7 


Best and Chez pest Chuice Fresh Meats. 
Hams and Bacon, Wholesale and Retail 


Evei^ thing Guaranteed I540 Fllmore Street 


Phone West 4626 


EN00R8KD BY THE EAGLE CLUB 


^V 


To the Well Dressed Men 

Who Know the Value of Being Up-to-Datc 


Should get acquainted with 
our New English bailor. 


F.DfLUG 

The Merchant Tailor 611 Montgditteiy St' 

i ,-'^i- SanFfancHcoi il ' - .' . "^ 


i 


■ .r 


'^^ A^': 





by Major John R. Lynch, is such 
an admirable book in every way 
that I thought it well to write 
fully about it here. There is no 
race prejudice exhibited in what 
the major has written. There is 
no show of sectional animosity or 
partisan bias. The book is free 
from any feature calculated to 
arouse racial antagonism. 

Bearinning with 1866, the year 
mafked for radical differences of 
opinion between the president of 
the United States and- national 
congress, over the question of the 
reconstruction of the states but 
lately in rebellion against the na- 
tional government, and running 
rapidly through the more import- 
ant steps in the political history 
of the state of Mississippi, touch- 
ing here and, there national poli- 
tics, and ending with a conserva- 
tive statement of President Taft's 
grave errors in dealing ..with fhe 
Negro question, the author has 
illuminated in a most eflfective 
fashion some of the most interest- 
ing pages of American political 
history. 

The recital of the story of re- 
construction is in parts dramatic 
and in parts tragic. The strategy 
of designing politicians worked an 
apalling tragedy in the life of the 
ambitious Negro 'leader during 
the reconstruction period and es- 
pecially in 1874 When the radical 
Democrats came into power 
throughout the southern states. 
The conditions described so viv- 
idly were lamentable, illu^strating 
the awful calamities suffered by 
the weaker element of the body 
poiitip at the hands pf tlie strong- 
ifei>«^ilb was clearly a riot (sf organ- 
ized |rand»^ 
Btit Major i^^aciMs not a pes- 



shpll be all men's airji." We of 
this age may be a littile apathetic 
about such matters as are set 
forth in this book, butjit would be 
well for us to read o\-ler and over 
again what this wise Observer has 
written concerning our past.. The 
bobk presents facts asi the author 
has witnessed them. His study of 
th^ political situation; is both ana- 
lytjical " and intensive; He is a 
student of psychology. His is the 
advocacy of civil, and political 
rights of all citizens. 

Major Lynch entered .public 
life while quite a young man. It 
was in 1869 that Governor Ames 
appointed him justice (bf the peace 
in the town of JS'atchez, Missis- 
sippi. He showed splendid exec- 
utive ability and was soon pro- 
sirhist. He is a man with a great 
vision. He has seen the dawn of 
a new age "when each j man's good 
moted by the people to a seat In 
thi state legislature.: His (has 
been a brilliant careej. There is 
hardly a Negro irt the'tntire coun- 
try whose past life hasj been close- 
ly connected with the reconstruc- 
tion period and who isjmore high- 
ly {esteemed in the councils of the 
Reipublican party tcjday than John 
R. Lynch. While serk^ing in the 
national house of representatives 
was a leader of powerful influ 


worth reading;! Mr. L| nch al50{to8iMak,the7 would jem in one 
tells the readeri how H|n. B. K. *ccl«i«p.— 8. M. Shortrfdge loir V. 


,r ■■■;•. ■^:. 


he 

ence. 

the national R^ublicin conven- 
tion as temporary chairman. jHe 
ha;; served as auditor qf the Unit- 
ed States treasury arid payrnas- 
terj in the U. S. lArmyi The tact 
is, |he has occupied a unique place 
in LAmerican/ politics. : 

Becauseyt)f his close contact 
with the^reat Ijeadersj in the Re- 
puplicaiy party and with the prob- 
lerjis in/political life for thfepast 
forty years, Major Lynch is well 
quaji 

cti'ning the subject trekted in this 
book. He has gfiven facts about 
such xlistinguished Negro Headers 
in ,MJs*6issippi as Hon I^iranii R 
Rejvels, \whb ro^ to tbe •|iosition 


Bruce won his Way to t|e senate, 
and how o^er i men in Ithe state 
of Mississippi played al honora- 
ble part in the making ol the laws 
of the state,'; establisiing the 
school system, asylums, pospitals, 
and other institutions no|ir regard- 
«1 as indii^^ns^le, I . ; 

There is rip way of a|counting 
for the wonderful sagacfty and 
wisdom manifested by I the Ne- 
gi-oes during the recorlstruction 

period. How they lelrned so 
quickly to conceive and|plan leg- 
islation of such far reacfiing im- 
portance is a puzzle ; but that they 
legislated wisely, the ilawg of 
'lany southern states (fo attest. 
The administration of ?&gro offi- 
cials in the state of Mississippi, 
whatever may be said tcf the con- 
trary, is sweet and cleanj It must 
be remembered that tile Negro 
had no historians to record his 
acts; his criticfs were hisg enemies. 
And yet, all things consmered, no 
cleaner or better laws Ifave ever 
been enacted in- the histclry of the 
state than those placed lipon the 
statute books during theftime the 
Negro was in power in Ihe state. 

In 1874 nearly everyg state in 
the Union went D^nocratic. 
Even the great Abolitio^ state of 
Massachusetts elected k Demo- 
cratic governor. Ever ^nce that 
eventful year the D|mocratic 
party has been in pow|r in the 
.South. A white man dafe not de- 
clare himself a Republican in the 
South today. Odium islattached 
to the term in that section. So- 
cial ostracism awaits t|e white 
who would plead |or equal 
civil and political rights for the 
Negro. The N€gro is t3|)enly de- 
prived of his rights, an^ it mat- 
ters not that he i^\in(|ustrious, 
thrifty, has wealth and|l<arning, 
everywhere in the Southgrn stages 
he is denied the ballot. I 

These facts are bro|ight out 
most forcefully by MajcSr Lynch. 
His appeal to the national Repub- 
lican convention jn 1900|is one of 
the strongest pleas ever |nade for 
justice. Every Negro in |he coun- 
try should read this ^|onderful 
book. It will inspire, itfivill help 
all to understand the re|ponsibil- 
ity and the duty of the h|ur. Ma- 
jor Lynch would be gl^ to an- 
swer any letter if addfessed to 
him at 4321 Forestville avenue, 
Chicago, lit. The bookpcontains 
325 pages and sells for $il.65 pos- 
tage perpaid, I 


fl. 


Seoato^i 


1 


t 


■:-^^j 


JONES PUTS NEGROES ABQVE 
j TliE JAPANESE. 


-ar 




SENATOR SAV$ 


COLORED MEN 


DESIRABLE AS CITIZENS THAN THE 
MIKADO'S MEIL 


The Fruition of a Pr|>phe$y 
at Hand, f 


The following is aclipjiing from 
the Pacific Coast Appealiof June 
1, 1901: I 

"Hon. S. M. Shortridgi, in his 
brilliant speech before th^ Repub- 
lican State convention sa|i: 'They 
— the Democratic party |prate- of 
their love for a free ballof and use 
the sbotgun argument toiadvance 
their cause. They affedt solici- 
tude for Portu Ricane, and by chi- 
chcanery and cunning devices, 


under the guise of constitutioDal 
He was once Ifonored by amendents, rob the Negib of his 


Tote — the Negro 
our liberties at 


who fought for 
Bunker: Bunker 
Hill, to preserve the Ui^ion th^ 
had euslaved him, who wi^h bared 
and bleeding breast ca«ri*»d thp 
flag upi to victory and glory on 
San Juain Hill.' | 

"Our comment at the time Was 
as follojwu and we had (^ccasasion 
to change: 'Behind these utter- 
ances was a deep meaning, one of 
which the thou&ande a^d tens of 
thousand B who read tl|it speech 
readily nnderstood. Ob, for the 
day when California takes initiat- 
ive step on this coast and sends 
such a irian as iti^ representative to 
the npper hou^e of Congress. "" 


If 


\^u^it^ stat^ss sej^o4 ff he ^h^^, jT j^;;;;;^ 


There is a time-worn theojry.of 
the scientist that heredity, deter- 
mines the future of the man,' for 
according to biological laws the 

th« cojored voters, pumbering Pfe^.^IlV^I^^^ ^-^^^^ 
: * of the parents are transmitted to 

jirf ift ask « t heir offsp ring.^ 


«■«*■ 
«*ii«- 


z 


,-t-- '-^ 


«QRE 


Washington, Fob, B:r-The Sen- 
ate indulged in a dpbate this af- 
teruoon that was suggestive of 
antfc-bellum days when the Smith- 
Lever bill providing for Pedaral 
aid for college extension worke in 
connection with agricultural col- 
eges was up. 

Senator Jones of Washington' 
had an amendment; pending pro- 
viding iji a general 4ay that none 
of the appropriation should be 
available for any state which dis- 
criminated against the Negro, He 
read a statement which tended to 
prove that Negroes came out of 
slavery in a helpless condition, 
but that they had made remark- 
able progress since. 

Thisstatemement st'rred several 
Southern senators to action. The 
conditioDB of slavery days were 
reviewed and there were as many 
"thrills" and "sobs" as in a pro- 
duction of "Ujicle Tom's Cabin." 

Senator Jones insisted that the 
condition of the N§«ro in slavery 
were bad, while Senator Martin 
and Senator Vardaman argued 
that they were far better off in 
slavery than they had been since 
liberated. Senator Vardaman sug- 
gested that Senator Jones was ad- 
dressing the Senate from a "pro- 
fundity of misinformation" on the 
Negro question. 

WOULD OPPOSE THE JAPANESE. 

asked Senator Jones whether 
or not he^uld be willing to have 
the Japanese^Nt^the Pacific Coast 
administer the >djication funds 
carried by the bill^Sen. Jones 
replied that the Japanese are aot- 
citizens of the United States and 
said that he would certainly op- 
pose allowing the Japanese to ad- 
minisier the funds. 

"Are not the Japanese the 
equals of the Negroes in those 
qualities that go to make good cit- 
zens?" inquired Set.ator Varda- 
man. 

"I do not think they are," re- 
plied Senator Jones. 

"Then 1 have nothing further to 
say," replied Mr. Vardaman. "I 
consider it a waste of time for me 
to argue with a man who refuses 
o concede that the Japanese have 
qualities that would make them 
the equal of the Negro in citizen- 
ship." 

Senator Martin of Virginia ex- 
plained that the Negroes were bet- 
ter understood by men of the South 
and that the Northern Senators 
had so little knowledge of the Ne- 
gro character? that , they were not 
as competent to deal with the Ne- 
;gro problem as Senators from the 
Southern States who were "born in 
the midst of Negroes and had 
grown up surrounded by a Negro 
population." 

TELLS OF NEGKOES IN THE NORTH. 

senator Sherman of Illinois i n 
quired whether or not the Senator 
rom Virginia realized that some 
of the Senators from the Northern 
states represented a larger Negro^ 
constituency than Senators from 
fthe South. 

'•>»'■ L" I ' > ' Oregon, a Dem- 
ocrat, remarked that he had read 
somewhere that the Negro farmers 
of the South were the most ad- 
vanced ag^riculturalists in the 
Union. 


I 




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' Prof. J. reis home again 

He arrived TueBday. ,-,, / 

The committee on reception for 
Bboker T. Washingtou will meet 
at 4 o'clock Sunday at 109 South 
Fair Oaks avenue. Ml ministers 
ftre welcome. 

^i *•; ':■: ITATK FEDKBATIOH . 

The State Federation was a suc- 
Dr, Kinohen's prayer was as 
^sweet M only a Louisianian can 
.^produce. 

V j James Vena of Olio sooietv told 
if better than any of- the rest.; 
.^ if r An. Katie Battle Daniel of the 
I Kentucky society made us think 
I ,, we saw the hlue grass growing 
■ .^■]« ^.^Jiett she told us what the beautia 
4s, ''■■' '*sl wotfeanroguld do. 
^ X" ■ ^v. J. D.fiordon of the Georgia 
/,. i ■ociety — the pulpit orator — mad 
oBthink of the grand 3 manee-oa 
tion oration he delivered in Pa^? 
denain 1913, which will long b 
remeoobeied. Hoke Smith would 
have trembled in his shoes to hae- 
heard that most heart-rending 
news. Georgia, from Rabun coun- 
ty to Decatur county, and from 
Dade county to Camden county i" 
prond of him. 

Rev. Byers spoke for the Caroa 
linians strong enoujjh to crack the 
walls of ITort Sumpter and put 
Ben Tillman to flight. 


witjb thousands of dollars atnd toe 
most confidential mesuges eacjb 
day, and his picture adorns ~ the 
wall of the private office of Presjl- 
dent Sartori of the bank. Y0t 
Mr, Shores is only a messenger. 
With all the confidence in his hon- 
esty the bank retired him on half 
pay for life. 


The first meeting [^of the Federa- 
tion of State clubs, on the jevening 
of the 12th inst., was a grand suc- 
Cesp and marks the beginning of 
great times for the race, both local 
and general. Mr. Eugene Walker, 
its president, is a genuine lover of 
his race and will do all in his 
power to mako the organization, 
effective, and why not let this^fed- 
eration at once take up the matter 
of calling the mass meeting to for- 
ward the interests of the N. N 
Congress? 

yours for race success, 

E. F. HendR'rson. 


The Elks' Washington Birthday 
entertainment at Blanchard hall 
on Monday evening was a grand 
success. The grand march, a mag- 

, nificent affair, was led bj Past Ex- 

'' alted Buler R. H. Hicka. 


, Da. Booker T. Washingto n wil 
speak at the high school on March 
16th., Sunday night all of the chu- 
rches will be closed get tickets pf 
any og the pastors ftee of cost 


Miss Mattie Bowen one of the 
best known colored women pf 
Washington D. C. a ylatform 
speaker of ability and a teacher in 
the public schools of that cityfor 
many years died Feb. 5lh. 


The people are jcrowding We|iley 
Chapel to !hea,r | the great 'eingin 
by Prof. Howarfl and his choir 
and the gospel m^cag>^e by PaBtro 
Kincfaen. f" '''- '' ifP!^^^Si^ J' h ' 4 

Sunday will be| a great day, this 
being the first Sjunday the Lord'* 
Supper will be administered both 
morning and evening. ' 

At 11 a. m. Pastor Kinchen we- 
uee as a subject, f'The day of Har 
vest," and at 7:30 p. m. "Th 
March of the Kingdom of Chiiist.' 

The Literary society, under |Mr. 
L. y. Stewart, is growing in won- 
derful interest. Last ^'uesday the 
j:ompany Jiscussed the problem of 
employment and theduty of wi^ch- 
fulness. ' - ! 

Next Tuesday the great debate 
"Should the SUte Abolish Capital 
Punishment?" You ought to come 
out and get into this great work- 


Mr J. H. Blodgetc of Jacksdn- 
ville Fla. subscribed $2 000.00 to 
tbei Freed ma as aid societv, he is 
one of the wealthy contractors of 
that city . 


) ) ( ' i I .1 i I I I I ,r 

orning at Scotts chipjl his topic 
Hill be "Self denial" at 11 oclock 
t 7.30 "Value of the truth". 


The Booker T. Washington com 
mittee will meet at 4 oclock ,at th 
A. M. E. chnrch. 


Dr. M C B. Mason has tra ns 
fered from the Georgia conference 
to that of Florida this eloquent di 
vine will pay us a visit in th 
spring. 


Booker T. Wahington will be 
here, just forget the kickers that 
had a few axes to grind and if for- 
ced to furnish the rotary power 
for the grindstone they would not 
have been heard from when he 
comes ahd goes we will publish al 
letters then the public can judge 
we will give honor to whom it 
due. 


u- t 


: «»»^»„*^» V>i'<wr"o'*^^**"»» " •••» 


»5 FAl^ /£<IIG£, 03£XN 
PARK AND SANTA MONICA 




The Sojourner Truth club gave 
on Monday evening a Mar'ha 
Washington tea party, which is 
reported to have been quite a euc- 
ceas. 

"A, rolling stone gathers no 
noii" but it's a smooth one, just 
th* same. 

Green is a popular color, at , 
present, but no Georgian should ' 
be green with envy if their colors 
are green. 

Only the man who has more 
dollars than sense can afford to be 
sarcastic. 

Some men are always up and 
doing — others. 

WHat a woman saya goes — of 
course to another woman to make 

it *=>• i :, 

The busy bee is all right in his 
^lay; but one shoulil keep out Of 
kis way, for you know that it is 
Msictr to boast than it is to make 
goodV 

If a woman knows that a man 
^noWa what she is going to do 
next, she invariably does some- 
thing else. 

Jack Johnson said a few days 
ago fn Glasgow that be was a 
Socialist. Jeffries says that is no 
new party for Jack, as h<3 was a 
knocker before he left here, and 
ii yoa don't believe it jiist ask the 
people in Beno. 

Tha Security Trust and Savings 
Bank of Los Angeles in speaking 
of Mr. W. H- Shores, said he had 
been with the bank more than 20 
yeatfa in active service as head 
porter and had handled millions, 
and haa seen Los Angeles grow 
^v' bom * ▼i^l'^ to a "fip city. Mr. 
BhOrea was born iif?Virgioia^ in 
1850. Virginia is the mother of 
Presidents. Hr. Shores is trnsted 


J. ALLEN BEE9E, CORRESPONDEaJT 


It is rumored that a branch of 
the Eastern Star is to be organized 
on Sania Monica bay. 

Miss Victoria Johnson of Phila- 
delphia is now a resident of Santa 
Monica. i 

The rain of last week complete; 
ly inundated the bay district. 
Venice appearing to be Venice 
indeed. Notwithstanding this fact 
services were held at both churches 
and wore well attended. 

We are pleased to note the pres- 
pnoe of many of our people at the 
Santa Monica race course each 
morning. They witness the prac- 
tice for the great Vanderbilt Cup 
race and the Grand Prix race to be 
held Feb. 26 and 28. 

/^moQg the Venetians who made 
application for the railway mail 
service examination was Mr. Ed- 
ward A. Reese. The examination 
was held Feb. 26 in Los, Angeles. 

Brick masons on Wednesday 
morning broke ground to lay the 
foundation for J. Allen Reese's 
new bungalow. 


Revival and Financial Campaign 
at Mt. Zion Baptist Churqh. 

In spite of the, bad weatbei; las 
week, we held services every night 
with the exception of Friday nigbt 
Dr. Fisher preached at both ser- 
vices Sunday. The Doctor deliv- 
ered a special Sermon at the eve- 
ning service to the unsaved. There 
were fourteen accessions at this 
service. Dr. Fisher preached both 
Monday and Tuesday night this 
week. 

On Wednesday evening, Feb. 25, 
as was announced in The Eagia 
last week, the Kev. McCoy and 
choir ol the Second Baptist Church 
will have charge of the services ; 
I on Thursday evening Rev. Byers 
1 and choir of the A. M. E. Zion 
Church ; on Tuesday evening Rev. 
Gordon and choir of the Taber- 
nacle Baptist Church, and oB Sun- 
day Revs. Williams apd Fjeher 
will h OS ve charge. 

Rev. Fisher will preach Sunday 
morning, and after the morning 
service the Lord's Supper will be 
celebrated. ; In the afternoon a " 
2:30 there will be a financial mass 
meeting. There will be addresses 
delivered by some of the leading 
ministers of the city. 

At 6 p. m. there wi\l be baptiz. 

ing. At the evening service Rev. 

Dr. Fisher will preach his final 

eimcri, nd il.it Toil close the 

%iiy- 

On Monday night there will be 
held at Mt. Zirn a general business 
meeting and all the members are 
expected to be present. 

Archie J. Williams, 

Church Repor ter 


death.;. ; -. • ^j ''.'M 

We, the menbers of the 'New 
Hope choir, of ;er these foliobing 
resolutiohs in i memory of oar ^ear 
,b(i;lo<rad ;brotb(r and co-worxer, 
Bro. J. H Wation 

Whereas, the Great and Supreme 
Itiler of the i niverse has, in His 
infinite jwisdoin, removed from 
ai^ong us one of our worthy and 
esteemed, fellow laborer, Bro. J. 
H, Watson ; ard 

Whereas, th( close and intimate 
relation with h im in the faithful 
discbarge of hie duty in. this choir, 
makes it emirently befitting that 
we record our i.ppreciat^on of his 
work. Therefore, he it 

Resolved, That the wisdom and 
ability which he has exercised in 
the aid of our orgahization by Ber-|™"""'"'^^°""':^, 
vice, contribution and,'<;oun6el, willl 
be held in graceful remembrance 

Resolved, Tliat the removal of 
such a life from among us leaves a 
vacancy and a iihadow tihat will be 
deeply realized by all the mem- 
bers and frien(is of the choir and 
will prove a serious loss to the 
community and puiblic 

Resolved, That, with deep sym- 
thy with the bereaved wife and 
other relatives of the deceased, we 
express our hope that with so great 
a loss to us all, may be over-ruled 
for good by him who doeth all 
things well. 


The Negro Skull. 


,r.- 


IF YOU WANT TO RENT 
A ROOM OR A HOUSE 

OR TO 

BUy A LOT OR A HOME 

In Venice, Ocean Park or Santa 
I Monica, write 

J. ALLEN REESE, 
600 San Juan Avenue, Venice 


No trouble to answer questions 


•mi 



I am in a position to offer you 
Some of the Best Residence 
Property on tKe Bay. , 


*S£A 



The thickness of the Negro skull 
was practically demonstrated the 
other day in a cafe near the Place 
Pigalle, Paris. 

At one of the tables sat the col- 
ored boxer, Jim Johnson, who re 
cently met the redoubtable cham- 
pion. Jack Johnson. Jim was tran- 
quilly drinking a cordial and chat- 
ting with some boxing chums when 
"Kid" Hawkins, another Negro 
boxer, entered, and walking up to 
the table, made some derogaitory 
remarks, with the evident idea of 
provoking a quarrel. 

Jim Johnson's only reply was a 
shrug of the shoulders, whereupon 
'Kid" Hawkins, exasperated 
yond control, seized « water itti 
and flung it at" Johnson's head. 
The glass shivered on the Negro's 
skull and fell in fragments on the 
floor. Some of Johnson's friends 
rushed at the -aggressor, but the 
latter, deeming prudence the better 
part of valor, made for a taxicab, 
the windows of which he broke in 
his hurry to get into the vehicle. 

Jim Johnson suffered no injury 
ave a scarcely noticeable swe llin g 
where he was strucjt. He was an- 
noyed at the incident, hpwever, and 
has sent a message to Hawkins 
intirnating that if the m«nne^B of 
the letter do not improve be wiU 
deoline bis acquaintance. ' 



Telelbone mewhen ^onr FIRE INSURANCE will expla 
and I will renew it in any Company you may desire. 
llow you 8 per Cent, disoonnt. 

in 5429. |>r Call at 412 Germain BIdg. 
224 Sputh spring Street 

DrVEY f>. DOIVES 

Fire JMurancc No< 


PAfTERNS 


i; ■ 


s 


PiiMhr 




KScXt. CORSETS 


r-- 


e 12th Street Store 

N. W. Cor. 12th and Central Ave. ; - ^ 
"Umdeb New Managkhemt" .- '. 

Central Avenue's Bargain Center that gives i "Money Back 
- Guarantee with Every Purchase. 

1125 Central Avenue 

HYours to Please, The r2th St. Store" 


w4 


HoBwjaoM 


DECORATIONS i 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


Res. 131* Newton St 

A. and Arthur Grosser — Florists 

Proprietors of FERNDALE NDB^RY 

Floral Designs a Specialty 

1408-16 Central Avenue 


4-- 



TO BE NICELY DRESSEQ 

And Have a Good Look, You Must Have 
lYour Clothes Made at Sam Cook's 

|: 
Don't worry. jDur cleaning and Pressing is of the Highest Grade. 
We-Make Your Old Clothes Look Like New. 
I Like to order they are made. 

We are making '"ailing Suits from $1.5.00 up. 

Everybody sayp so. 

1314 Central Ave^ Los Angeles, Cal. 




--m^ 


Resolved, Taat a copy of these 
resolutions bt spread upon thej 
records of this organization and a 
copy sent the bereaved family, dna 
a copy be pijinted in the local 
pars. , 


All time and snalce controls ; > 

Above pie highest sphere we meet [ 
Unseen, unknowin) and greet as angels! 
greet. i i 

So then we do a4ticioate 
Our after-fate. 
And are alive in the skies, 
If thus our lips i^nd eyes 
Can speak like sbirits unconfined 


In 


Heaven, 
behind. 


their earthy bodies letf 


First A. M. E. Church. 


Oar street ptiving bill has been 
settled in full[ by the help of the 


Lord and the 
friends, whom 
thank for theii 
Young Peopl 
an inspiratioc 


oyal members and 
we again feel to 
help. 

e'siDay was indeed 
throughout. The 


choir was at itf best and the audi- 


ence seemed to 


Spirit. The program of the eve- 
ning was of a high order and the 
large audiebce was not slow in 
showing its appreciation. Because 
of the length oi the program, a few 
numbers were reserved for a future 
Sunday, at which time that very 
interesting program will be con 
eluded. 

The Martha Washington tea 
party of Sunday evening was a 
success from ev sry viewpoint. The 
program would have done justice 
to any occasion." Each partici- 


pant more 


tha 


J. M. Prentice, 


hereby extend 


m 

services 

Morning, "The 


have been in the 


Our work is very Good- 


THE TAILOR THAT 
EVERYBODY KNOWS 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

BOUGHT. SOLD AND EXCHANGED 

AYERS BROTHERS | 

2627 Central Avenue 


House Furnishings of All Kinds, 
Phone South 4273.: Open Evngs 


n merited the well- 


rounded applaase received. Mrs. 


under whose direc 


tion the program Was arranged, 
deserves much praise for same. 
The Missionary society desires to 


itf many thanks to 


all who took pert in the exercises, 
worked on the committees, or at- 
tended and contributed so liber- 
ally. 

Sunday is Communion day. Ser 
vices begin promptly at 10:50 a 
The pastoi will preach at both 
Subjects as follows 
Greatest Command 
ment." Evening,"Love Thy Neigh- 
bor as Thyself, 
to all 


Hearty welcome 


*1 
Mrs. Hughes of Tennessee 
street, has beei ill for a few days, 
but is ^ecupeiating. 


,.f 




ii4>k'::^'l 


^i^^'^tMti 



sistance of M black slaves, ex- 
tending over a"period of two and 
half cetituriei success was de- 
nied the Vyiioii arms, until as a 
dire and ne|:es4ary war measure, 
the black slaves were called from 
their fields and the fugitives from 
their homes in the North, to 
stamp out by, their brawn and 
their blood, the rebel hosts who, 
until this time had refused to 

yield. i , 

The story qf what happened 

from Fdrt Wagner to Fort Pil- 
low, and againi to the Crater at 
Petersburg, Virginia, is sufficient 
to thrill any man or woman with 

drop of liberty loving blood in 
his or her veinfe. 

Certainly that bloody history 
alone, warrants! this precious leg- 
acy to our children, that without 
the blow from 6ur bondmen fore- 
fathers, the chains would yet 
clank at our fept. 

Yes, my friends, we are tree 
men and >^•omen tonight, primari- 
ly because of what our forefath- 
ers braved, suflEered, and deliber- 
ately undertook in our behalf. 
And I for one confess that I am 
not quite so happv as when 1 
grasp the hand; and look into the 
Face of some grand old fighter of 

race iwho braved 


the 


Brotherhood of Man. 

And may it not be, in conclu- 
sion.-that somewhere in this aud- 
ience, or in some not distant aud- 
ience, a gaunt, Ethiopic figure 
will make its way to the front, 
and pronounce a truth which will 
fire the hearts of the American 
people to such frenzy that racial 
injustice will for all time give 
way to perfect human freedom.: 

H. E. Macbeth.1 ifi 




A large nuriber of friends en- 
joyed a pleasant evening at the 
miscellaneous shower given by 
Misses -Albrit ton and Griffin in 
honor of Misf Ir|«nc| Hughps on 
Monday. 


my own 
dangers of slavery and of war in 
my behalf, or when, perchance, 1 
am permitted to gaze o'er Wag- 
ner'sl rampartsi where sleep thfe 
fearless black regiment who 
marched in dollible quick step to. 
death on that ^hining white Car- 
olina strand, oi^ when I sit in the 
seat of the immortal Douglass at 
his historic Ce^ar Hill estate, at 
.\nacostia, D. ^., looking out and 
down upon thepgreat Capital City 
of our nation,; and contemplate 
even with his ipimortal spirit, the 
dav when shafckles of .prejudice 
and of political|and social oppres- 
sion, will be stricken forever 
from the tenle and straining 
limbs of the black slaves in W. 

For, friends, while it is true 
that the abolition of human sla- 
very is now an immutable fact, 
and primarily.; through the atti- 
tude of the sUves th_emselves, it 
is by every token, equally true, 
that America liyet labors in an- 
other slavery,!!: ten times worse 
than the slavery of clanking 
chains — that terrible slavery of 
the soul, race!: prejudice, which 
unfits men for {the great big sav- 


PASS ABSURD MEASURES 

IN SOUTH CAROLINA-' 
Lower House Favors Prohibiting 
the Whites from Teach- 
ing Negroes. j 
SENATE YET TO ACT 
The Columbia State Speaks Out 

Against Bleasism and Says 

Bill Is Undefcnsible in 

Morals. 

Columbia, S. C— By a vote of 
62 to 40 a bill has been passefd in 
the lower house of the South Car- 
olina legislature prohibiting whit4 
people from teaching Negro 
schools or Negroes from teaching 
in white schools, under penalty of 
a fine not exceeding $500 or im- 
prisonment for not more than 12 
£ionths. 

To show to the world that they 
were "upright, fair-minded Chris- 
tian gentlemen" an amendment 
was adopted providing that noth- 
ing in the bill should prohibit the 
teaching of the Bible or religious 
subjects to Nefiroes by whites. 
Sp 62 members of the South Car- 
olina legislature have gone on 
record that they believe that it is 
unlawful for whites to teach Ne- 
groes their A B C's, but do not 
thinik it a crime for whites to 
teach Negroes the Bible! 


DR. RUSSELL'S CHURCH 

DRAWS COLOR LINE 
Negroes Put in the Gallary in the 
Temple of Creation in 
Brooklyn. 
CHRISTIANITY UP-TO-DATE 
One of the Chief Aims of Bible 

Association Is "Promotion of 
Peace ^nd Righteousness. . 

Seats frefe! No collection L Free, 
to both rich and poor! fv ^ :■ 

Over on West 63rd street, n*ai:} 
Broadway, Brooklyn, is situated 
the Temple of Creation, a build- 
ing erected at a cost of $500,000 
for Pastor Russell, but which is 
used by the International Bible" 
Students' Association, of which 
he is president, for the purpose'of 
presentirfg a series of pi<^tures 
called the "Photo Drama of Crea- 
tion." ! ; 

An order has just bei?n issued 
forcing all colored people to occu- 
py the gallery. 





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CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


•ate corponiuon oc.in« Motner a^h. 
B. Zlon church has purchased the bsUd- 
tag of the Churcbr of the Bedeemer In 
West One Bandred and Thirty-slxtb 
■tre«t, near Seventh avenoe. New- 
York. AJteratlons are to be made as 
(oilowa: The roof Is to be raised and 
galleries erected, electric Hsbta will be 
Installed and decorationa are to be op 
t» ths modem idea. The boUdlns when 
eompletad will have a seaUns capacity 
ot from twelve to fifteen bondred; 
mad tbe members' of tbe famous old 
Mother Zion will hav^ one of the most 


^■ 


> 


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8KT. J. W. BBOWN. 

beaotifui edifices in New York city. It 
is located convenient to all car lines 
in tbe heart of tbe densely populated 
Harlem district and Id easy reach of 
its comniiinicant'4. 

These transactions speak well for the 
progressive Idea of tbe pastor, the Rev. 
J. W. Brown, formerly of Rochester, 
and his able staff of officials. The 
cburcb in West EiBhty-nlnth street, 
wtiicb Is valunble. will be sold. Aside 
from the posses.sion of this property. 
Zion owna other properties of value 
and is considered one of the wealthiest 
chnrches of the denomination. 

It was founded In 179C.the first church 
being built at the corner of Church and 
Leonard streets In 1800. It was re- 
built In 1820 The first annual confer- 
^«»ce was organized In 1821. and the 
church was burned down In 1839 and 
again rebuilt In 1^0. The Sabbath 
school was organized in IS45, and in 
1864 the cburcb was moved to Tenth 
and Bleecker streets. From there It 
was removed In lOQf^to Itf present site 
in West Elghty-nlnil^stiWt,' .The pres- 
ent membership Isibout^QtiO. 

There Is no dba^that the glad tid- 
ings of Its adva^^^nt will be herald- 
ed abroad tfirowR!;nt tbe country. II 
Is expected tb^u/be building will be 
ready for occupancy by Easter Sunday. 
The present members of the board of 
trustees are B. D Fenderson. Charles 
C. Groce. Andrew Mead, .lames E. 
Nickson. Alonzo A. RiveS. William H. 
DeKalb. R. Herbert Porter. Marcus J. 
Baker. Louis .M. Fenderson and James 
Chase. Mme .Minuie .lobnson is or- 
ganist and directress. The late E. V. 
C. Eato was for thirty-five years a 
memt>er of tbe board of trustees. 


THE ARMSTRONG LEAGUE.] 

Richmond (Va.) Chapter Honors MenM 
cry of Hannpton Institute's Foundei^ 
Tbe KlchmoDd (Va.) chapter of tb^ 
Armstrong league held interesting ex- 
ercises at the Ebenezer Baptist churck 
in Richmond Sunday afternoon, Fetk. 
L, The occasion was the annual cei^ 
bratlon of "Armstrong day" in bonoc 
of General Samuel Chapman Arm- 
strong, founder of tbe Hampton instt 
tute. Tbe principal address was d»- 
Uvered by tbe Hon. B. C. Steameo, 
state superintendent of public scbooia. 
Sboi^t addresses extolling the life and 
cliaracter of General Armstrong wer* 
made by Dr. J. A. C Cbandler, super- 
intendent of the Richmond public 
schools; Hon. H. C. Pollard, dty at- 
torney, and tbe Rev. R. O. Jo inson, 
pastor of tbe Moore Street [;aptist 
church. 

The officers of the Richmond chap- 
ter of the Armstrong league arc Wil- 
liam D. Jones, president: H. C Mun- 
dln. treasurer, and Miss W. L. Brooks, 
secretary. "W. D Davenport * was 
cludrman of the committee of arrange- 
ments for the meeting. Tbe exercises 
were well attended, and much pablic 
Interest was shown In tbe work wiilch 
the Armstrong league represents. 


Big Trades Union Organized In Paris. 
The trades anion organized by color- 
•1 men in Paris tbe ^tter part of Jas- 
oaiy Is said to have a membenUp of 
orer tOJOOO. The object of ttie mdOB 
la to reilat the efforts of the vUts. 
wortmen. wlio are claimed to Iw at- 
ts<>ptl"g to prevent the colored bmb 
froas.j(ltttix an Ihctmot te p«7- 


-t-TIHE EAST EIGH'^ STREET 

CHRISTIAN^ CHXIRCH I 
I D, L. McMickens, Minister 

If-"/' 'I 

Services for Sondi^, Feb. 8,'i914 

; Sunday Schoorat 10 a- m. Mr, 
W. J. Thompson, Superintendent. 

Preaching at 11 k. m. by the 
pastor;, subject, "The Wild Olive 
Tree." 

At 7 p. m. the Y. P. S. C. E. jwill 
render a good program. Address 
by Mr. R. R. Tumage. Paper by 
Afiss E. Jackson. Solo, |tfiss 
Juanita B. Bausley. The meejting 
■will be lead by Mrs. R. H. Kpith. 

At 8 p. m. the pastor will preach 
on tbc; subject, "Holiness," Rom. 
12. Everybody is invited to these 
services. 

D. L. McMICKENS, 

Minister. 


nut M 


't 



tile (JO. 


ImiwrceFs aad WMesale ; 'h 

Liquor Merciiafttt 




MT. ZION BAPTIST 

Third and Stephenson Ave. 

Rev. A. C. Williams, pastor. 


Services for Sunday, 

At 11 a. m., preaching, subject, 
7:30 p. m., preaching, subject. 


SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Maple Ave., bet. 7th and 8th Sts. 

Rev. Joseph L. McCoy, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


FIRST A. M. E. CHURCH 

Cor. Eighth St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. N. Greggs, pastor. 


CNobfg <"&a Creato4a Brand*' Wities ai]|d do^ials 
LmAnctti^! ' 


I 


Fl R8T CLA88 LADY 

112 1-2 Wilmini^ Street 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor at 6 :30 p. m. 

Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


WESLEY CHAPEL 

Comer Eighth and Wall 

Rev. Wesley E. Kurchen, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Young People's meeting at 6;30 
.>. m. 

Prea(;hing at 7 :30 p. m. 


TABERNACLE BAPTIST 


Hemlock Street 

Rev. J. D. Gordon, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :.30 p. m. . 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 

Paloma Ave., near 16th 
Rev. C. H. Anderson, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U., 6 :.30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:.30 p. m. 


A. M. E. CHURCH 
Eighth and Towne Ave. 

Usual service preaching by the 
, pastor, Dr. Gregg. 


THE GOLDEN WEST, HOTEL 


In keeping with its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continues to 
give to its patrons the best pos- 
sible service. 

Being centrally located between 
the three great railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel 
meets the demands not onlv in 
good service but likewise -<■ onve- 


Celleg* IMen to Issue Monthly Magazine 
It is encOui-aKlne to note the increase 
. In oambers and iDfluence of tbe Alplia 
Phi Alpha fratemit; of intercollegiate 
Greek letter men amonj; Afro- Ameri- 
cana. The iirst Issue of the Sphinx, 
the official organ of tbe fraternity, is 
dae to tnake its appearance the first 
week in February.' The seventh an- 
nual convention of the fraternity will 
be held at tbe seat of tbe Theta chapter 
in Ciiicago for three days beginning 
Monday, Dec: 28. Henry I^ke Dick- 
ersun of Ohio is president of the fra- 
ternity, and Roscoe W. Ross of Com^S 
qalrerslty is the secretary. 


FOR RENT— We have several 
housekeeping apartments of three 
and four rooms for rent very 
cheap. Also a good business site. 

Apply Noah D. Thompson, 
1711 E. 55th St. 

Phone S. 1651. 

H. S. A. CUMING 

CUMING'S 
LIVER TONERS 

One Hundred Vegetable Pills 
for 25 Cents 

These pills ace recommended for the 
reUef of Cd^tipation, Sick Headitche, 
; Biliousnevs.' 

Cuming's Drug Stor« 

KRABLUHID 7 YSABS I 

07 East Ninth BroadwftySTl. 


;^. 


ii'f 


'r$ 


V' .^•;?-'-i ■■.i%-i;;;f^:FJ--i 


■£L: 


MAJVlCURIISa L,ADIBS A HA.IR 
F>ARL,OR. \ SKIIS 

Only Colored Woman's Barber Shop in town. MRS. <t!ORA ENGLISH. PRO 


SRBdAL,IST 


" ffi 


f* 


BAVIBER8 

BBOADWJAT 
6606 


DRBSSINQ 


MlxMB Bulmamnn $c ffia 


1 13 East Foiir(|» streeJt, Westmihster 
Entrance, jiut a few doors Ejut of 


jotelBldg. 4th st. 
Main •treet H ^ 


The Missouri& KansasCafe 

968 Hemlock Street j , 

fMrs. R. H. TODD, Proprittess ; '^ 

Home Cooking a Specialty]. . ' 

Best Meal in the city at the lowest prices 


Main 5298 


Home F-5083 


R. W. LEWIS 

Prescrif^tion Drugfgfist 


T F B No 9 


Corner 7th and Central Avenue 


Main 7698 


HomeTr409 


Main Vbys i Home Fr4uy 

A. J. ROBERTS, SQN &C0 . 

Funeral Directors and Edbalmers 

Funeral Parlors Lady Attendant 

1 2th and Los Angeles St. 

'. 1 e phone South 2324 I ' 

Langnickle Baking Company 

5608 Central Avenue 

Bread, Pies and CakwS 


Wedding and Fancy Cakes a _ 
Get satisfaction in price and q 


Los A.ngeles 


P'eati: 


ure 
jality. 


Califbrnia 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

Bought, Sold and Exchanged 


House Furnishings of All Kinds 


Phone South 4273 
2627 Central Ave. Open Evenin«;s. 


Ayers Brothers 


Patronize thfe Poultryman^s Store 
Feed Co-Operativc Dr^ Mash 

An Honest^^conomical balanced Egg rotation for Hens and 
oi rowing Stock 1 

Baby Chicks, Hatching Eggs, Breeders, Everything in Poultry 
Everything for the Poultryman. Vjisit Our Store 

Poultryman^s Co-Ope-^tive Ass'n. 

640 South' Main Street, Los Angeles, California 


Prof. Booker T. \Vashington 
will pass three weeks in Southern 
California, arriving on or aboiit 
March 7. He will speak in the 
First Congregational church in 
Los Angeles on Sunday morning, 
March 8, and at large masjs meet- 
ing the same afternoon in; the in- 
terest of the colored Y. M. C. A. 
Tuesday night, March 10th will 
be his first address in Pksadena 
under the auspices of Thropp Lec- 
ture Course. Thursday night, the 
12th, he will be the guest of honor 
and principal speaker at the ban- 
quet of the state Y. M. C. A. con- 
vention to be held at the Hotel 
Virginia at Long Beach,, Satur- 
day, the 14th, he will spend with 
President Blaisdell at Clairemont, 
speaking to the Pomona; college 
students and others. President 
Baer of Occidental, who has 
charge of Dr. Wasliingto^^ itin- 
erary and program while iij Seuth- 
ern California, has a number ofin- 
vitations for Dr. Washington and^ 


DIRECTORY FOR OUR 
ENTERTAINERS 


imington ^li^arbor property. The 
is now arranging the completed Ip^atest o|>portunity of your life 


>l;- 


program; Dr. Washingtjon will 
be Dr. Bae^'s guest while in 
Southern California, at Pasadena 
at West Moland Place. 

$10,000 building, i will be 
erected at Ninth and CentjaL The 
house will furnish the best! in high 
class vaudeville and moving pic- 
tures under the direction jfjP. £■ 
^endersoo. 

I 


"Casino Sextette" — Jackson 
brothers, Ross, Gray, Black and 
Bryant are; at the Casino Cafe. 

Tuxedo I Five— Powers, Robin- 
son, Hicki, Richie and Stewart 
at Fairmoiint. 

Orient Trio — Payne, Wilson 
and Donaldson at Hurrays Cafe. 

At Lestejr Social Club — Mr. and 
Mrs. Morgan Prince. 

M. & M. Four — Harris broth- 
ers, Dennyi and Banks at M. & M. 
Cafe, would like to hear from 
Geo. Johnjson, Geo. Wolfson, J. 
C. McDonkld and R. B. Johnson. 

Two Acps — Compton and Joy- 
ner at St. Francis Club, which has 
been; remodeled, where Bob 
Brown and Thomas Foster con- 
tinue to m|ake things pleasant for 
their patrdns. . 

EVflRYBjODY IS BUYING 
HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Williams about Wil- 



is «ilM^our|door now. 

Weiiav^ 6 50-ft. lots we can sell 
for $550jonly $10 down, $5 a 
monthy We also have 80 other 
lots in > same tract, but you will 
have to Bfl in a hurry if you wish 
to get in*, on the ground floor. 

Any diy we get six or eight 
persons we will take you dowa to 
see the loi 

H. H. WILLIAMS, 
Corneir\l2{h and Hemlock. 


Hoijues ^r Sale or Rent Also Apartments for Rent 

^ E CJfEttor Bth Street and Long Beach Ave, Room 200 182 N. Bmodwiv 

LOSANGELES ' ^ ^ 



^ ' 


'*^^at|hmakersi 

nd Jewelers 

ind Central Ave 

|iw Ancelea. 

Watches Iccurately repaired|at 

moderate grices. Diamonds re-set 



South 1340i 


/■ -I. 
Ladies Garments RemodelM My Specialty 

THE HARVARD TAILOR f 

JOS LUCAS, PROP. 

Ladies' and Gents' Suits Made to Order 
Cleaning, iemodeliag, Repairing and Pressing Done at Lowest Prioei 
211 Centra) .|venue Los Angeles,; 


Th^ Leader Bakeiy 

m. BROADHAQ Prop. 

Pbone Boyle 1455 / 


2416 East Firit Street 


Los Angeles, Cslifcitt - 


H. G. VAN/f(OSSEN J; 

Grocelies, Notions, Cap<3ies, Cigars, Ice Cream 
Wood, Coal, Kindlin^ard Sunshine Polish. 
We reeommend J.,efege & Haskins Coffees, 
Peerless, Monado^and Oriental Blends. 

Phones Bro^dwsy^314 ,,3, J^f^^^^ STREff 


I 


FEED AiyO FUEL 

^^APLE AND FANCY GROCERIES ' 

Phone .West -^52 £ COR. feXH & NORMANDIE AVE 

T. G A R N E R 


f 


MACK'S 


r 1. ?■ McCLlNEY, Pbopeietoe. 

Dealer in FURNITURE, BEDDING AND KITCHEN HARDWARE 

*: 27Q3 N. Broadway and 112 N. Workman 

I j PICO FURNITURE CO. 

2678 |West Pico Street Los Angeles 

! LIsS THAN DOWN-TOWN PRICES 


X' 


Tel. West 366 
Home 73798 


H. F. BRAINARD, Pres. J. i». CROWDER, Vice-Ptes 
C. H. BRAINARD, Sec'y and Treas. 


Phones Home 73829 


West 1523 


1 P. J. VIGUAN 

CJROCERIES AND DRY GOODS \ 

I jStaple and Fancy Groceries, Vegetables and Fruit \ 

Prompt Delive^ Best Treatment itoAl 

! 2109 West Pico Street 1 


iVlRS. J. H. TAYLOR 5; 

Hair* Good-s, Ornaments 

Toilet Articles. Hair Dressing, Manicuring, Shampooing 

1403 EAST NINTH STREET Cor. Hemlock Phone Main 5167 


Phones 71484 


West 3586 


OXFORD MARKET 

M. THEW3. Proprietor 

ALL KIJSDS OF FRESH AND SALTED MEATS 

SAUSAGES, ETC POULTRY IN SEASON "^ 

3012 W. PICO ST. 


■^-t- 


JOIN MY COLONY AND GET YOU 

A FINE HOME IIV 
HVVICTOR VALLEY 

I have located 7 young men, all from L. A., in one of the most beanti> 
ful valleynjn this state. Fine, rich soil; watet; easy to obtain; doee to 
o. * . R. Jt; and ocean to ocean highway 


The Government Land Agent, 

phone BwdyltOI 


Res. hone Broadway 3588 


WM. KENARD 
618 E 8 Street 


t-^ 


WILLIAM DA 
/ish and Poultry M^ket 

Ff 3J ji Pi|h Poultry and Oysters— oultry Dressed to 6td«e4 
Bast 9tt St Log Angeles 


Bome 21^74 


-»--ki 


• L. W. OLARK i^ I 

JEWELBR ' 

Cor. Washington & San Pedro Sts 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repaixini I "I 
Work Called fbr and DeUvered . 

Give me atrial Sunset goi 278 



MUTILATED i PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 




olume 27 


Dr. Washington 


\ jLos Angeles^ Cal., March 14,191'^ 

at First Methodist Ch 


^S] Number 4^| 



urch last Sunday! Afternoor 


r. Washington 
Makes Great Speech 


]^0^K£R T. WASHINGTON, 
f NOTED EDUCATOR, TELLS 
LOS ANGELES OF PRO- 
GRESS OF RACE 


'the negro by the standard of the cepl^ quite simply i on their' 
' American ■white man, and that is worlih, and apparently nobody 
'a standard that is the highest in had ; any idea of discriminating^ 
the world. When the negro agaifist them in any official ori 
reaches that ideal he will have busijiess relations itecause ofj 
no equal. their color. A very great major- 
- "A significant fact in the edu- ity,of the negroes, and most of 
cation of the negro race in this the colored people — that is, the 
country," he declared, "is that 69 mulattoes and quadroons — do not 
among the best tilled, their per cent now read and write, as make their way up to the high- 
houses the cleanest and best built compared with only 3 per cent est positions, and they are pro- 
in the South. durinj^ the days of Lincoln, p'ortionately most plentiful in the 
"The Tuskegee School has Eighty-five per cent of the ne- lower ranks. Among the work- 
grown from thirty students, with groes of this country are on the ing enlisted men of the army and 
which I started, to a body of soil and it is our aim to keep navy, I saw many negroes work- 
1600 students, with 197 instruc- them there and make efficient 'n.g side by side in the same or- 
tors 'and assistants. We have farmers of them. At our com- ganizations with the whites, and 


: w« -^*-.,_i,4tjr»-4>»-|*.i2£i < 


Nc|tes and 

i^urrent Topics! 


'»♦♦»»■••»♦ ♦♦•• » t-*o< 


an intolerable method |)f solving 
the problem, and had tb be abol- 
ished. But the problerg itself re- 
mained in the negro." I 

1 

PflNSIONING OF tHK E3f- 
SLAVE ^ 


As the best representative of 

;his race and the world's greatest -^qqq ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^-^ ^^^^^ ^^^ jq7 n,g„(,g„.|g„t exercises we used to. apparently without any discrimi- (By Dennis S. Thompson, Bethel, 

buildings, and there is not a pen- have the 'Over the .Alps Lies nation being made against them. Kans.) | 

ny mortgaged. Italy' type of oration. Now we In Baiiia there is a very large _^_^ | 

"We do not teach agriculture have illustrated discussions of negr'o eletnent among the work- I 

at Tuskegee, nor domestic sci- how to cook a dinner for a farm- in.g class. Tn parts of Brazil it The pensioning of thg e.x-slaves 


educator, our own Booker 
"Washington addressed one of the 
largest gatherings of cobired peo- 
ple ever assembled in Los An- 
geles Sunday afternoon at the 
First M. E. Church. 


try that should be the leaders in 
this movement are talking 
against it, on the grounds that 
it is not in Order, but if we sit 
down all the time on the theory 
that we "cannot," we are not go- 
ing to get rtiuch in this world. 
Through the concentration of our 
forces only will \ve be able" to 
win: let us get together then and'' 
ask for what we want. 

The greatest fault with our 
people when thev ask for some- 


thing it is of 


no consequence. 


ence. The men and women we er or 'How to Raise a Successful is somewhat larger. In Rio it of the United States i| a matter Those who woitld ask are only 


Long before the time for tlie oughlv instructed 


graduate are plain farmers, thor- Crop of Turnips'." 


noticeable, but far less so than that Congress alone ha| the pow- specifying pensions for the ex- 


[• lecture the spacious church was 
packed to the doors and many de- 

I "sirous persons were turned away. 
Music was furnished by the con- 
gregation, with Revs. Kinchen 
and Gregg leading. 

Rev. J. D. Gordon introduced trades have been sent out from 
the General Y. M. C. .A. Secre- Tuskegee. to all parts of the 
tary, Mr. D. A. Luther, who in- South, and from the close watch 
troduced D. Baer, the president of which we keep on graduates, or 
Occidental College, who is re- on those who have spent any 


working .\fter his speech the educator in most of the cities nf the 


the women are good cooks, met Howard Drew, the 100-yard Southern T''nited States, 
have learned to prepare dash champion, congratulating Brazil is most fortunate 


S(iil ; 
who 

•wholesome food without waste. 
5000 Are Graduates. 
"Five thousand farmers, do- 
mestics, teachers and men of 


the 


him upon his success as an ath- fact that its white working popti- 
lete and wishing him success in lation has nothing of the parasite 
doin<f L'reat service for his race. about it. The whites do not en- 


'BRAZIL AND THE NEGRO' 


er to deal with, and fecessarily "^'aves. but when the Indian got [ 
nothing can be done i^ the way his allotment it was so much ^■ 
of securing the enactment of such money, and so many acres of 
a measure, until a rrfajority of 'and for himself and each mem- 
the members of that llody could '"^r of his family, 
be interested therein. iThere are ' ^ think if we are to ask any- 
deavor to live on the labor of the '"any negroes who aye against thing, it should be for the pen- 
blacks, the inevitable result of ^"^h a law. but who a|e drawing sioning of all ex-slaves, and all 
which, as shown in all other com 


"Brazil and the Negro' 


munities, is that ultimately the 

'■ "^ blacks crowd out of existence 

is the thosid who live on their labor. 


sponsible for the presence of the length of time at the school, we subject of an interesting article On *the f^ntrarv. the bulk of the 


i 



hv ^ picture we 
Rio. 


)Iack trrnndf.ithcr. 


1 


bv Theodore Roosevelt, appear- work, even in Rio, is done by 
ing in the current number of the nhite men. But these white men 
Outlook. The article: ^ draw_no line again.st the negro. 

If I were asked to name the and in the lower ranks intermar- 
one point in which there is com- riasres are frequent, especially be- 
plete difference between the Bra- tween nesjroes 'and the most nu- 
zilians and ourselves. I should merous of the iinmigijant 
sav that it was in the attitude Europe. 

toward the black man. As the Perhans t],e .nttitufle that the 
Indian becomes civilized he is Brnzilians. inchidincr the most in- 
absorbed into the population, as tellirent among the|m, take is 
is the case with us in Oklahoma, hest svmbolized 1 
rind whoe\er has Indian lilnod in '^aw in the art museum in 
him is proud of the fact. The Tt nortra\ed a 
President of Brazil is one of n nn'ilattn sun and a white grand- 
these men, and there are a num- child, the cxidcnt intention of the 
Her of others among the leaders naia'^cr heintr to exnress both the 
whom I inet. It is an entire mis- hone and the belief fhat the nc- 
take to speak as if the popula- pro was hein? ah(;orbed and 
'ion of Brazil were so mixed as transformed so that lie would he- 
to be wholly unlike that of Eti- come a white man. It is idle to 
rope and the Ignited States. It nronhesv for anv remote future. 
is mixed ^ only in the, sense in and it is a very doubtful thing to 
which the populations of Italy nrophesv even about the immedi- 
and Spain are mixed, as the pop- ate future, but my impression is 
Illation of southern France is that the cruidinkr or ruling: fclasses 
mixed, as the population is mixed of Brazil will continue to be al- 
•***» f **tt *•••**% t$$ f »»m in many parts of the I'nited most absolutely white, that in the 

States. ,Vs regards the major i^asses below them there will 
have been gratified to learn that nart of the population, the ''""tinue to be a certain small ab- 
'lave afterwards fallen "mixed race" is such onlv in the '^"'■ntion of neero blood, and that 
.audience as he presented amid from the high moral standard of sense in which that is al.so true ^'"^"^r the ordinarv people this 
I W T- ■ J^^^'''"^*°"- °''- the institution and been impris- of the I'nited States, and of most absorption will be lareer— larsre 

I Washington immediately capti- oned in jail or penitentiary. of the advanced nations of man- -nour^h to make a slight difTer- 

vated the great audience by pay- "Great Britain is spending $50,- kind. There is one real differ- enre in the tvpe. 

I ing- to them theh.gh and vvorthy 000,000 to remove her subjects ence. however. This difference The great majority of the men 

tnbute of being the worlds best from the yoke of the liquor traf- between the 'United States and -"'"'1 women I met, the leaders in 

singers and des.nng them at that fie. The United States each year Brazil is the tendency of Brazil the world of political and indus- 

time to sing the Old Time Re- gives $5,000,000 for the support to absorb the negro. Mv obser- ^Hal effort, and of scientific ac- 

ESanuelHln ^^^ ^' ^^'' °^ ^^^ I"«l'ans. The American '-.tion leads me to believe that in complishment. showed little, if 

i-p. A ^ t ' "^g^ro. with the aid of small per- "-ib^orb" I have used exactly tTte ""nv, more trace of: negro blood 

l>«o f* ^*^"*'^*°'' ^ "^t'^e w.t. VI- centages of these vast sums, is rieht expression to describe this than would be shown hv the like 

iS ^^^^"^ """"^ ^"^. <='^^'' f^st being reclaimed from illiter- Process. It is the negro who is number of similar n>en in a Eurt3- 

, lo^c made him popular with his acy ahd poverty arid brought near beine absorbed and not the negre ■>ean capital. Yet not onlv is 

in material welfare to the plane "'ho is absorbing the white man ^here in some classes a consider- 
of the other inhabitants of the The jrreat majority of the men able infiltration of negro blood 


a pension for their seri^ice in the the childfen of ex-slaves, born 
Civil War ; some wh(| saw two P^'or to |l872r In this way it 
and three years' service and six woiild help many persons of mid- 
months perhaps. | die age, who had not the oppor- 
I am proud that m^y of our tunity that the younger genera- 
people have the benefif of a pen- ''"" has, and who would expend 
siot?. as a recognitioi|^ of' theii their money in a way that would 

be he 

at of the the race at large. 

Would this be asking too 
much?" I do not think that the 


splendid work and gallantry in ^^ "eJpful to themselves and to 
but 


the Civil War 
ex slaves? 

Of course, there 


I 
w|re many 
races of '^'^o spent over two c^ituries in "^"ro will ever ask an amount 
bon<lage, ami then s|rved the '^l^'^alent to what this govern-' 


country in the Civil W^, but yet 
there were thotisands ijvbo were 
not able to take up^ 4^^^ — our 
mothers, I 

They were not ableito go tO 
war, but while the w4r was in 
progress thousands of |ur moth- 
ers and sisters remaine| loyal to 
their owners, helping! to keep 
tilings together until tfiey were 
released throusjh the^ |)roclawa- 
lion of President Lin<|pln. .Ml 
through the w;ealry yeslrs before 
the coming on of the Civil \\'ar 
many helpless men anp women 


ment owes him, and if the gov-, 
crnment does not reimburse the 
race in some form for its years 
of unpaid toil it will be a blot 
upon this government as long as 
it stands. 

N'ow, if the ex-slave shall be 
pensioned we have first to inter- 
est Congress to the extent that 
such a measure may be intro- 
duced, but it can hardly be done 
at this session. 


■■■■ ■•■■ iinnm »i«i« nni« 

DR. BOOKER T WASHINGTON 


great educator in the city. Dr. 
Bdermade a great hit with the but two 


of our race met their sdeath 


at 


, Challenging an implied sugges- 
tion by Senator Hoke Smith of 
Georgia, that there are no negro 
chemists in this country, during 
the debate on the agricultural ex- 
tension work bill in the Senate, 
Ralph AV. Tyler has sent a letter 
to Senator Smith naming a num- 


I audiences. 

Ten Million Ntgroes in U. S. 

back people in the Lmted States gee last year was $274,000. of ti"" in ^io 
[ at the close of the CivP war," 
he said, "there are now 10,000, 


the hands of some h|g-headed 
overseer, for no pifpvocation 
whatever other than that he had 
the power to do it. I 

After two hundred Ind forty- 
five years of unrequited toil, in , r u ■ * 

^ r ber of negro chemists. . 

which time the heaviest burden .,j ^^^^^ ^^-^^ ^ „^^^^ ^j^^^, 
of building up the country was ■^^,, ^^^^ ^^^ -^^^^j^ ^^ g^^^^^^ 

borne bv them, it w<Duld seem c -.^u u- u n j r »u iu i ... 
I Smith, which called forth the let- 

that the services of the negro ^gr from Mr. Tyler, In his letter 
ought to be recognized in some Mr. Tyler says: \ 
substantial manner. :^alf a cen- "At Tuskegee Institute they 
tury after freedom sed^s to be a have a negro agricultural chem- 
very late day to take dp the ques- ist, Professor Carver, a ^aduate 
tion. but there are ijow living of the University of Iowa, whom 
many who, if such aj; law Were former Secretary of Agriculture 
to be made, would rjtceive the Wilson pronounced one of > the 
benefit thereof, :| best agricultural chemists in the 

But it will not be done by a country. There is also now in 
single stroke of the hajmmer, nor the department of agriculture a\ 
can it be accomplished in one negro chemist, Richard H. Lewis ^' 
year; instead it will require some of the University of Illinois, who 


are 


of as unmixed *he mire necrro tvpe to disappear, 
which we received $100,000 from "'h'^e blood as the corresponding ^ut this process is regarded with 
our endowment /und and the rest '"''"'« in Paris or Madrid or Rome, heartv approval by the most 


ith a corresponding tendency of *"^^' '°^^ '"''"^y- ^"1l^ 'P'"' ^^ ^°" "^'^ P'^« *» competition with 

aggressiveness and lots of hard white chemists.". 


work on the negro's part. 
I do not believe tfiat one or 


A new colored theatre has been 


M^n of th n • ^"*"%P°P"- f-- °ther sources." The ^reat majority of the politi- thouehtful statesmen of the coun- TZ^'^ I 7 t, .' ^ '° T J" ^ashrngton. D. C, it 

lation of the Dominion of Can- Dr. Washington addressed the -^1 feaders are pure whites with -v. Their view, so different from '"^^'^'"^; ^"t whatever success being the Majestic, at the corner 

iite?t tr°s /'^' — ' ''"'^'"*^ ^* '^^ University of '-"^ occasional dash of Indian our own. can perhaps best be ex- '°'"'' '' "^"'^ ^°'^" '*''^°"^^ ^ °^ ^'"''' ^"^ ^"""^y'^^"*^^ 

-.♦«,-i.f° r^^?^*^°. ^""^""^ Southern California on Tuesday, hlood. But anv neero or mulit- "'•Cssed in the words of one of 

e-twenty-fourth of her total saying ii part: 

tes, and in Georgia paid takes 


mulit 
to who shows him.self fit is wfth- ihese very statesmen, himself of 
lr.n txii; IS nno u ; "'"'^^ great change in spirit of out ouestion eiven the place to nuire white blood, who said to me 

-'T?ey ow^ TriSr^^'"''"''^; u' "'^'° "^''^ '""^"'"^ ^° '^ '^- '^^''^ ^'^ ^'''"t'« ^"title him. I sufstantiallyr 

lland in th^ 'i !uu ^l^^ and willingness to gain an met one or two colored deputies. TOf course, the presence of the 

Uouses and t ""-^ ^ education along industrial lines is At one military school I met a ne^ro is the real problem, and a 

^knks ' ^P®""^^^ ^'^ty-three the greatest evidence of progress neerro professor. At one great veky serious probltm, both in 

«Th«, V, u . ' of my race today. laboratory I saw a colored doc- vojur country, the tlnited States, 

ineir .tann^ are becoming "Wg are accustomed to Judge tor. All of these men were ac- arid in mine, Brazil 





i'^ 






gh a of Ninth and PennsylvajHa ave- 
well organized body ^jvith sensi- ""e. It is under the management 
ble leaders at the front. But I of Frank Brown, a colored man. 
see the greatest opposition to This gives Washington tSvo large 
such a measure is toj be found modern vaudeville theatres oper- 
among the members off the negro ^ted by and for colored people, 
race who, when thej matter is Vernon, Oklahoma, is the latest 
mentioned, are quick ijto say: "It exclusively colored town in.Ok- 
cannot be done." .i , lahoma. It has a population o! 

„ Some of tl?e foremijst negroes more than three hundred, and is 

blavery was ^^^ ^^^ newspapers <k the coun- growing rapidly. The town is 


I'-: 


:^i:J^M 



.i- -vf- -■ - aifc 'a, 
^.1 .: ■•:.M.. ;■.■■>. 


named 




!i: 


after Dr. W. T. VeroMu 




n 



'■a: 




^m 
^ 


I 



PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


SOUTH t|£LB U. 5. BACK nV«»#»X«.AJJ KJtm\j\i\tL.A99 tA STOKY OF THE BOSTON 

. NEGROfSS V /^ r 


■ iiy ">)• M- 


i Manning Calls Class Control of 

Government During Early 
t Da5rs a Radical Wrong 




I - ♦^ 


The dominancy of government 
by a distinct class was a thing un- 
• known in the Northern States. It 
i is not strange, therefore, that 
, there arose from the hearts and 
the homes of the common people 
of the North a statesmanship 
which has left notable and endur- 
ing impress upon our great Amer- 
■ lean republic. It is not so won- 
. j derfnl, then that Lincoln the 
qf rail-splitter should become Lin- 
1 coin the emancipator! While the 
; sons of slave-owning fathers 
\ basked in the atmosphere of in- 
; dulgence, when the sons of the 
' poor whites of the South were 
: made to feel the sting of their al- 
leged inferiority, ttie youths of 
the North and the West were 
catching inspiration from the free- 
dom of their surroundings, and 
with the result that the educa- 
tional and 'material progress of 
these other sections so far out- 
stripped the South that there re- 
mained, for a long while, but an 
objection for comparison. 

The educational system in the 
South of slavery was such as that 
only the sons and daughters of the 
slave-owning class might avail 
themselves of the opportunity for 
obtaining learning. Until but re- 
cent years has this system been 
forced, bj' enlightened public sen- 
timent, to give place to the .^mer-, 
ican system of popular education 
and free schools, for which system 
the States of the South must ac- 
knowledge indebtedness to the al- 
ways free States of the North. .\ 
great stride would have been 
made in the cause of po])ular ed- 
'ucation in the States of the South 
had the Blair educational bill met 
the approval of Congress ; and 
iBourbon political sentiment did 
much to encompass the defeat of 
the philantiiropic measure. 

In the contemplation of chattel 
slaverv not alone must there be 
considered the wrongs inflicted 
upon the oppresse<l blacks arrow- 
ing otit of this inhuman institu- 
tion. It must be seen that the 
slave-owning S}stem worked in- 
justice to whites as well as blacks. 
This did much to hasten the over- 
throw of this great national 
wrong. In the basis of appor- 
tionment, embodied in the consti- 
tution, there was conceded to the 
States of the South three-tiths op 
the slave population to be count- 
ed in with the free whites as en- 
titled to representation in the 

affairs of the general govern- 
ment, which made five states 
- South equal to three free whites 
North in the basis of representa- 
tion. How short-sighted the 
leadership of the slave-owning 
system must appear in the con- 
templation of the conditions of 
the pr«sent. It can but seem 

1 Strange that the 500,000 slave- 

f • holders formerly dominating the 
States of the South could have 
cashed the 7,500,000 white popula- 
tion of the South, at that time, 
blindly and rashly along even tO 
the horrors of a dreadful war. 
Straijger still does it become in 

I thinking upon the fact that, in the 
'f face of the shortcomings of the 
leadership of the old regime, the 
same element of statesmanship 
yet fastens its non-progressive 
and ante-bellum clutches on the 
throat of the political Southland. 
The genius of this element is 
contrnpally absorbed, not in the 

" problem of how best to regenerate 
and uplift the whole South, bht in 
what to do to keep the reign of 
the old. Democratic political ma- 
chine fastened and riveted upon 
the back$ of the Southern people. 
. _ ; J, C. MANNING. 


Why Ithe Property Is Under a > ' ; 

Heavy Mortgage-New Light ^j^^ ^^^^^ ^^.^.^^ ^^ ^^ j^^^ 

' ' . p4the Subject Daniels' book, "In Freedom's 

Birthplace," or "A Story of the 

. - i — Boston Negroes," has just been 

issued. It is a fair and reasonably 
Washington.— There have been accurate discussion on the terri- 
a number of inquiries, says Ralph ble conflict between the good and 
W. Tyler of this city, as to the evil influences which have figured 
existing mortgage on the old largely in the development of l!he 
home here of the late Frederick Boston Negro. 
Douglass. Many cannot under- jt begins with the time when 
stand why the home should rest the Negroes were a part of the 
under a mortgage when Mr. cargo of tobScco trafficked from 
Douglass was supposed to have the Bahamas to Boston in 1638, 
been quite well off at his death, and comes down to within three 
The estate of Mr. Douglass did years, relating many incidents of 
mount up to quite a sum at his present day environments, 
death. A defective will, made de- Every Negro, man or woman, 
fective by an insufficient number ^yho has shown a sign of life in 
of witnesses, caused the property busy Boston's activities has re- 
to be distributed according to law ceived a mention, 
rather than according to the will The ministers are very severely 
of the testator. dealt with on immorality and the 

The widow of Mr. Douglass de- unbusinesslike handling of church 
sired that the old house, contain- property. The criticisms on Wil- 
ing a museum of anti-slavery and han Munroe Trotter and Theo- 
Douglass relics, the furniture, dore Ra^'mond, the real estate 
books, manuscripts and curios of giant of Cambridge, are among 
the great orator, publicist and the best that have ever been writ- 
anti-slavery leader, should be ten. 

bequeathed to the race as a me- The book shows that vitupera- 
morial to her husband. To do tive agitators are being rapidly 
this it was necessary for her to outnumbered by the silent work- 
buy in the home from the other ers, and great, advances are being 
heirs, that she might have a clear niade in commercial pursuits tp 
title to it. This she did, giving the future betterment of the 
$15,000 for the old homestead on masses. 

Cedar Hill. The clear and precise manner 

In order to make thfe purchase, '" ^^^ich Mr. Daniels has por. 

trayed the social life of the Bos- 
ton Negroes leads one to believe 
that he has made a profound 
studv of their habits. The book 
will be placed on the market for 
$1.50. .- j 


OF 


iPjj/ir^GeLCc) 



.Bsta^Ti^ repeating itself. An 
army of th$ unemployed march- 
ing on to .Washington !»: a re- 
minder of -the last :I>6nbcraitic 
administration, with Grover; 
Cleveland and hard times on 
hand. 


however, it was necessary for her 
to borrow money with which to 
purchase the equity of the other 
heirs. She died before she cotild 
pay off that mortgage. In her 
last will and testament she be- 

c]ueathed the home, with all its 

rich ami priceless possessions, to 

the race Mr Douglass had fear pADS AND FASHIONS 

lessly championed and served. 

She niitjlit have Iiec|ueatlied it to 

her ow-H relatives, but she chose 

to will it to the race with wdiich 

her husband was identified. This 

tells how that mortgage han- 

|>encd to be placed on tlie nld 

home of the great leader. 

By act of Congress a board of 
trustees was created to have 
charge of the home, but it caine ^/| 
to these congrcssionally-provideci 
administrators with a mortcjage 
and without funds to even keep up 
repairs, the result being that the 
once handsome home, the once 
fine old estate, is rapidly passing 
to decay and the mortgage is 
pressing for payment. 

-Several attempts have been 
made to arouse sufficient interest 
on the part of the race to.^ay off 
this mortg-age and put the home 
in proper repair, in order first to 
save the home to the race and to 
preserve^ the historical relics, 
ec, it contains, but not sufficient 
has been contributed to even keep 
up tlie interest on the debt. 

IfMs figured that if $15,000 is 
raised by the race it will be suffi- 
cient to pay olT the mortgage and 
restore the building and estate to 
its former beauty and make of 
the home a historical and memo- 
ria>vsite, to be visited by thou- 
sanjds each year, just as the old 
home of George Washington at 
Mount Vernon is maintained as 
a historical retreat. , ' 

There are fifteen acres in the 
Douglass estate, and it occupies 
the most beautiful point in all 
Washington, overlooking the Po- 
tomac as it does, and being within 
ten minutes' ride of the White 
House or the halls of Congress. 
But unless the race responds to 
the last appeal, and responds 
quickly, the old home may be 
lost. 

By the terms of the will it can 
be no other than a memorial to 
Mr. Douglass, free to the public, 
and consequently has no, earning 
power. When it ceases to be that 
— in case the mortgage should J)e 
foreclosed — the old Douglass 
homestead will pass from the 
race. As the legal owners of this 
estate, it is the duty of the race — 

every man, woman, child, church 

or; organization, fraternal or 
oth^-wise — to respond with conf: 
tributions to pay off this debt, and ^ 
this response should come quickly'. ^^ ; 



■jfca;. 




iv. 


Be Qne of the 
5000 Members 


For Great Meeting 

Lincoln l^cpublican 


Afniiated with Republican Feder- 
ation of southern California 



J. A. WARREN. Secretary, 
!957 Maple Avenue 


j NEXT MEETING WILL BE 

FRIDAY, MCH. 6 

si^ott'g Hall, 361 k^&rrtreil Ave. 




rMi:'. 




'it 


~i^m:^l 


,!<.' 


It] 


9he licunq i^ecple's 

LITERARY SOCIETY 

956 1-2 NA9MI STREET 

DR. J. M. 8MITH, 

Founder and Organizer. 

WILLIE PiYNE, 
' CLARENCE IRWIN, 

'Assistant Managers. 

\Vc desire to iifilorm you that we 
have in progree^ a Young People's 
Literary Societyi which everyone 
is invited to aUtend and become 
a member. Evtry Thursday «ve- 
ning at 8 o'clock we meet at 
the above named place. 

Miss Bern licE Moore, Pres. 
Miss Kathelken Bkaye, 

Cor. Sec'y 


i Pueblo Meat Market 


i TELEPHONE MAIN B89T 
r JOSEJPH D-WIS, ProI'KIETOR 

AH Fr^sh Meat and Fish 

Meats arc iCovcrmcnt Inspected 

Premium Bacon and Hams 


JQHN T. REID 

GROCER— staple and Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

Our Meat Market is a great addition to the store 
We carry bU sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats 
OUR PRICES ARE REASONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 
Cor, Kohlerand E. 7th St. 


H. S. A, 


CUMING 


CUAilNG'S 
LIVER TONERS 

One Hundred Vegetable Pills 
for 2& Cents 

These pills are recommended for the 
relief of Constipation, Sick Headache, 
Biliousness. 

Cuming's Drug Store 

ESTABLISKEU 7 YKAKS 

1407 Ea«t Ninth Broadway 871 


INO TICEI 


Colored Voters of State of California 

s Take Notice— Not to use the Afro-American 

Federal name unless you are registered 
therein. 

J. E. UATTIMORE 

5400 Long Beach Avenue Los Angeles, Cal • 



For Dependable 

Dry Goods, Ladjcs and Gents Furnishings, Hats 

i Shoes, Etc., Go to % 

ARCADE DEPARTMENT STORE 

B. F. HOPKINS' OLD STAND FIFTH AND GLADYS 

They are out of the high rent district, aad these goods are as eood as th* 


best and prices as low as the lowest. 


LR Dr^riFD^ ^lEAT Market, Fresh and r*^ L n 
. O. I\WVJLI\J 5 Smoked Meats L^dSn yrOCerV 

Phone Broadway 2387 j Staplm Groceries 746 Central Avfnub 


Groceries, Rruit and Ve^tables 

Grecian limported Olive Oil, 3-Star Brand 
Fifth and Gladys Av^ Gust. Picoulast & Co. 


The Old Reiable, where you get 
your money's worth, along with 
courteous treatment. 


Sam's Mcjrket 

1914 East Seventh Street 

EALEE IN ALL KINDSfOF— ^ 

Presh pad Sail Meats, f^\e Saus^es a^fl^arii 


^==-^ '-^-'-»:iJ 



PAGE 


CANNOT 6E IMPROVED 


M. T. Laws 


of the Santa Fe Red 
Cap force 


J. D. Reynolds 


Author of Race 
Tips, of Pullman«Co. 



m' 


And Other 


K -i 


-fi^r. 


Active Railroad Men 
will Furnish the Doings 
of the 5000 Railroad 
Men Running to and 
on the Coast for THE 
EAGLE 


Job Printing! 


We invite you to give us a trial 


Wc rt-int 


„[; , 



HIGH WIJ_L BE RUN 

THE 


5000 



Trainmen 


- * 


PORTERS[ - WAITERS 
. CHEFSi" MAIDS 

REDCAPS 
HOTEL |/l EN, ETC/^ 




# 


/■., 




CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


m- 


\ 




Ti IC CALIFORNIA EAGLE. 


i% tangiijle to s^w, not evea a is followiiig in.fke fotststeps o^iJ!' 


AB couimunicatlona should be addressed 
to TlM^Callfomla Easle, 1034 Ba^t Ninth 
Streets. Sunset Phone Broadway 7«6Y. 

Elntered as second-class mail matter at 
the PoBtoSce of Los Angeles, Cat, under 
the Act of March 1, 1879. 


c. 

A. 

SPEAR 

..Jlanagins Editor 

J 


T1A,«!.<! 

Kdltor 

H. 

HANNON Advertising Manager 

LEWIS K. BEEKS 

Local Editor 



CORRESPONDENTS. 

R 

B 

Carr... 

Pasadena 

H. 

E 

Simpson..- 

Bakersfleld 

B. 

L 

Lewi3..„ ...„ 

Fresno 

Miss 

Ada Thompson 

,Oalcland 

Mrs. 

Evans 

San Francisco 

J. 

J. 

Anderson 

San Francisco 

E. 

F. 

Henderson 

Los Angeles 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 


Year _ 

$2.00 

SI 

t 1 

Months 

_ 1.00 

Th 


.50 





It occasionally happens that Tor some 
reason or other papers are missed by be- 
ing miasent, lost or stolen. In case of 
subscribers not receiving their papers, in- 
form us by postal and we shall cheerfully 
furnish a duplicate copy of said missing 
number. 

No attentloti paid to anonymous letters. 

Copy must' be written plainly on one 
side of paper, and to insure insertion in 


dream of, an institution such as f^^j^^^ He hai been a resident ef 
Tuskegee, find titne to knock the 
one American who has revohition- 


ized the industry of the United 
States, and bid France, Germany 
and even proud mother England 
and Other countries of the Orient 
to take cognizance of his methods 
of industrial reform. 

So we advise that, if you cannot 
erect a Tuskogee, or publish a 
Crises, let down your bucket 
where you are and dignify wour 
present position, be it ever so 
humble, for there is room at the 
top in every avenue or profession, 
and the time that you spend criti- 
cising such men as Washington 
may be spent either in metnal or 
physical development for future 
usefulness. 


the city for aj score of years ; in 
1907 was married to Miss Irme 
Jones, and his life and worth to 
the community is inestimable. 


ECONOMICAL CONDITIONS 
GROW WORSE 

Months and months have passed 
current issue must reach this office since the passage of the tariff bill, 

Thursday. Correspondents, please taice , , ' tt 

notice. also the currency measure. Has 

"* ^1 llii cost of ' living declined? Nof 

ADVERTISING RATES, 50q PER INCH. I Clothing cost any less? Xo! oMre 

<-n'*n>-i' in vour pocket or in the 
-I he retrain of the jobless -Qn ^^^^^.i Xol' 

.A*H will admit that the times 
now" are 'at the lowest ebl) and 


to Washington I'' has been rudely 
interrupted at the capitol with 
Governor Jolinson, who poses as i ^^''" remember that eighteen 

months ago thev were fairlv good ; 


CONTRA COSTA COLORED 
VOTERS UNANIMOUS fJdR 
OWENS FOR SENAXpR 
AGAINST HIS RECALL. 

The two hundred colored voters 
of 'Contra Costa county are right- 
fullv against the recall of Senator 
J. C. Owens at the election which 
will be held -March 31st. The 
movement to bring about his re- 
call was born in iniquity and die 
in shame, and will not be hood- 
winked by the labor agitators 
from San I«"rancisco who try to 
destrov everybody who will not 
do their bidding. The Oakland 
representative of the Eagle called 
on Senator Owens at his home in 
Richmond this week. We il.so 
mingled amongst our people 
there. We find him to be a prime 
favorite with all the broad-gauged 
citizens, and oiir people are unan- 
imous in giving to him their gup- 
port against the reca 
sentiment 


LEADEji mim 

TiJEJAPTISTS 


*"rom the 
which we hear ex 


the especial friend of the lowlv 

.., , 111- ' I the people" had monev to spend. 

and weak, looking on readv to I .,,, . , , , \- ,« 

... - i I here is a great deal ot difference 

turn his militarv UDOn them if'- i ii ■■ ^i.- 

lay upuii uitm ii|,„ j],g problem; it things are 

they should show fight. (hi^h and yon have the money to 

* * * |buv, than wlien thev are low and 

-p, , . . ,, . : vfHi have not en the monev to buv, 

Ihe amalgamation (,t all tliCi' , " 

(■,,.,„ ,- .1 , . , ,lnit right now prices are not even j noinimou^ ( 

torees tor the advancement o! the!, , ., ■ r! 

race throughout tlie coiintrv was 

„ - ' inone\' to huv. Hut ilie time is' r ii, .- ,.;,.,,.: ,, li.^c.. Tmhi- 

ne\er more apparent . ■ ." • . , man of lilier \ie\s^ wnosc anmi 

ri"^inin(r ^k-1ipti the i^<'(iiil*> will wnL'o ' 

lion is to serve his constituqncy 
wav that the greatest good 


Brilliant Work of the Rev. 
J. H. Eason. 


VERSED IN CHURCH HISTORK 



iresscd we want to predict the ig 
(leefat of the recall. 


low and there is a scarcity of J \\y> found the Senator to be a 
inone\' to buy. Hut ihe time i 

.coniintr when tlie people will wak 

* * * - . • 

up. .\t loiii^ intervals the people 
Xet.x issue we shall ccrnimence become restless and tire of well j '" "^ - 
y featuring our railroad men's page, doing and want a chan.gc, and in ; f'"" the largest number will hei ac 
We shall keep in touch with our ! many instances as n.nv tliev re- 
railroad workers in all their va- i jrret it at the expense of 'their 
nous lines. W eshall ask them to stomach and general comfort. 

assist us by sending in !i\ e iieu's ; — •-- I 

pertinent to their line .of w(.rk. ; T. A. BAKER FOR SHERIFF 

* * * OF KERN COUNTY ^^^"^^ ^°' Decency. 
With Shortbridge. Knowhuur T. .\. Maker, as slicritf of Kern ' The real animus behind the re- 

and Hayes in the race on the Re- county serving his firts term, will call, it is generally conceded, was 
publican end for I'. S. Senator receive striiug sui.)port fur re- [the fact that it was Senator Owens 
there will he no dearth of stal- ; election to that position. It is the 
wart Republican timber. 


coinplislied. He showed us that 
he was on hand on all occasions 
when there were vital questior|s at 
hand in the interest of the peOple 


who introduced the bill to close 

justial custom tliat when a cnuntv 1 . , . r -, , 

\ or - ■ , - , ■ 'all saloons m the state from 2 to 

othcer serves taitiitullv and ac- ' 

cei)tal)lv t,, el,-,-t Iiim ,'- . .i3 a- 'H- which put out ot commis- 

te|)iaiji_\ , lo ei(.i.t mm to a second' 


F. X. nm^^f BakerMleld i. ^^^^^^ feds tint 'he'i's I ^i"" "''^ 'l'^'^^ =""' "^''" P'^^^* ^^^ 

showing great strenqtiMu his race leeis mat ne is : 

fortheDem.K-raticn.miinationi.r:^"*'''^'' t'.'''^^' ■'••'"le^-'-n^ideration'^Ii^'-epute ol the big cities, l.ut 

Governor. ;^"<1 "" his rec(.rd will go before 'the people will be with him on 

* * * " l^*" ^"^'i'^" f^"" re-election. It is Ithj, „,eritorious measure, and this 

jthe consensus of oiiinion by all 1 . , , r ,• i :l .i,„ 

The colored citizens of P.akers- that as sheriff .Mr! Bakers' has " '' ''"' '"' 

field are contemplating a prosper- ; made an excellent otficer accord- '"'"''"' "^ "^' '"'''''" "^^^^^^'"^ 
ous .season. All indications point j inp t,, all classes fair treatment 
to the same. !^„j conducted the office along 

It IS well that all sides are ^ee-!con..ervative Imes. He has not 


ing to it that a full registration is 


gained all over the state. It means 
th 


' I been carried off of his feet or been 


deserving of the highest MiX- 


THE GOLDEN WEST. 


at the people are waking up and ■ ^'''""'"^'''^'' ''*>■ '"'.^' '"'e or cry of With its evrlasting' reputation 


will vote to put the state again 
on a sound basis. 


We are told that about $700 was 
realized at the Booker Washing- 
ton Y. M. C. .\. rally last Sunday 
afternoon at the Fir.st Methodist 
church. We had. hoped that seven 
times this amount would be 
raised. 


any taction. i)ut has run his of- 
fice for ail the [jeople and upheld 
the dignity (jf the law. The sher- 
ilT will receive a strong support 
from all classes for re-election to 


of "biggest and best hotel" for 
men and woinen of color, the 
Golden West also enjoys the dis- 
tinction of setting the standard 

, . ,of entertaining newspaper and 

his second term, after which he ^ . ,■ • ■ , , • 

... , other public spirited people in a 

will be willing that it shall be , , , , ,,, 

manner long remembere<l' and 

cherished b\- them. 


passed around. 


MADE DEPUTY COUNTY | ^'essrs. Brown and Williams, 

I CLERK j the congenial proprietors, are 

Again, and more insi.stently do i Henrv S. Houston orominent ' r, ■ , ■ • i 

we issue our call, and urge that ! busine^; man and i^I^^lr '" "^ ""^"^'""^ ^""' 

ail colored women who are inter- i Bakersfield, bears the enviable I '^'^''^'"•"'^ '-""^ '" '""^•^'"S '^'^'^ general 

ested in the stand-pat Republican reputation of being the only ne- atmosphere congenial and home- 

gro deputy county clerk in the 

state. Mr, Houston received his 

appointment from I Miller 

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON county clerk of Kern county. The 


party, meet with us at our office^ 
1034 K. Xinth, Monday evening 
March 16th. 


THE GREATEST t)F 
THEM ALL. 

Within the past few months 
Los Angeles has been visited by 
four of the greatest Afro-.\mer- 
ican schoolers of this age — Du- 
bois, Vernon, Miller; but the 
greatest among them came Booker 
T. Washington, who, like Lincoln, 
frames his thoughts in (riie sim- 
plest possible language, and out 
of this thrills his hearers, because 
his soul speaks through his words 
and because he is not only a sayer 
but a doer of the doctrine that he 
promulgates. 

' Dr. Washington has not only 
wott the applause 'Of his own race 


but likewise of the world, and 

/,nlv i few negrort who have noth- 1 " ".'j' ^"" *j' ^""' _.""" "^ . ^ '^'^'^'^ 
only a ic" s ifeuilder, and «f affairs politicaLhe 


Citizens generally appreciate this 
recognition accorded to the race in 
this section; in fact the general 
trend in this section is that of 
fairness toward all of its citizens, 
from the board of supervisors on 
down the line the county officials 
generally are broad-gauged and 
believe as a rule in all having a 
fair chance. 

Mr. Houston is a wide-awake 
and progressive citizen. He owns 
one of the swellest tonsorial par- 
lors conducted for a mixed trade 
on the coast. The same is man- 
aged by his brother, Robert 
Houston. 

Mr. Houston is prominent in 
fraternal circles and as a race 


dike for their many guests, who 
come from all sections of the 
country. Their party service is 
also unchallenged in excellepce. 


WE WILL RUN I 

A Series of Articles 

On Texas 

By Prof. Charles Alexanjder 

The first installment will ap- 
pear in The Eagle next week. 


.«Ssi*> f'" 


The pen pictures of the Pro- 
fessor are so highly ap|(reci 
ated that no further words 
are needed itp apsure. our 
readers of a t^at indeH 



Brief Summary of the Achievements af 
the Pretident of the Baptist State 
Convention of Alabama — Author of 
Several Ptans For the Future Wel- 
fare of the Denomination. 

Btro^gbam. Ala.— The Baptist de- 
noniinljIloD In this state is growing by 
leaps and bounds in numbers, finance 
and irifellllgent leadership. The reports 
made l)y the various churches at the 
last st^e conventlou covered a wide 
scope of activities in and out of the in- 
dividual churches themselves. Fore- 
tnost among the many capable leaders 
In the work of the denomination is the 
Rev J. H. Eason, B D.. pastor of the 
Jackson Street Baptist church in this 
city and president of the Alabama 
Baptist state convention. 

Mr. KasoTi is a niitive of Suraterrllle, 
this state, .ind was graduated from 
Selma university in ISto and from the 
Richmond iVa.l Theological seminary 
In 1890. After his graduation in 1890 
Professor Eason Uiught at Selma uni- 
versity for seven years. He was or- 
dained to the Baptist ministry In 1891. 
He has held many responsible posi- 
tions both as a churchman and an. edu- 
cator. Before beginning his pastorate 
at the Jackson Street Baptist church 
In this city he lind been pastor of the 
Seventeenth Street Baptist church In 
Annlstou for sLtteen years. 

Tile Hev. Mr. Eason has some very 
distinct views as to the work, doctrine 


FOU 

ROUTES 

E / :* 


SUNSET 


Double D«iij,j8r,i,, lo Ne, Or- 
leans and F««t *i, ^'cwur- 
Land ' through Dixie 



EL PASO 

"GOLDEN STATE LIMITED" 
The^fainde luxe, exclu.ively first 

The"CALIFOR.MAN' for both first 
and second class travel . 

ihe line of low altitudes 

OGDEN 

The trail of the Argonauts- 
1 ne route of the 

SHASFA 

See agents 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Los Angeles Offices 
. 212 West Seventh Stree! 
Station, Fifth and Central Avenue 
t 1 • •■ < M . ( fi , , . . ( ] , , 


R. B YOUNG & SON 


T. 


Phone Maii|4149 


^ARCHITECTS 

702 Lankershim Building 


Los Angeles 


BBV J. H. EASON, B. D. 

and discipline of the Baptist denomina- 
tion. In a re<'ent interview he made 
the following statements: "P'or several 
years I have made special study of 
church history and the Baptist denom- 
ination I find the primitive form of 
the Baptist people was that of a mass 
meeting. They are a family. All oth- 
er denominations are organizations. 
The Baptists are a growth, not an in- 
stitution. In their nature. 

"To do the best work It is possible for 
us as Baptists to do we will have to 
become an organized family. 1 should 
not be surprised In the future i.to see 
the Baptists divided Into two great 
classes— n.nrnely. confederated Baptists 
and the united Baptists. 

"Some years ago 1 drew op a consti- 
tution for the Alabama Baptist state 
convention, which provided that the 
one state convention be divided Into 
four subordinate stJite district conven 
tlons, the coming together once a year 
of these state district conventions In 
the state convention. Many good and 
great men In the suite and out of the 
state predicted the state district con- 
ventions would secede from the one 
central organization. But there are no 
signs ol trouble yet. The scheme is 
worklng"*nl.:>ely. 

"In our last convention at Mobile. 
Ala., the brethren passed a recommen- 
dation which I offered that provides 
that we have a congress to investigate 
and restate the practices and doctrines 
which the churches that are members 
of the convention are expected to sup- 
port and practice. 

"I reason if committeeB to revise tile 
Bible are wise a mecHng to look into 
the practices and doctrines of the de- 
nomination that rests upon the Bible 
for Its only rule of action might not tie 
out of 'order. This meeting will be 
held some time next year," 


Quick Service Laundry 

jlQOS Central Ave. 

You Witt secure best work and lowest prices in citv 
wfth prompt and courteous treatment. Delivery to 
all parts of city at low rate. Phone orders given 
strict attention. 


MAIN 8151 


MAIN 8151 


A. A, ^RANTfPEOPliS fiE/LTY^o. 


The Fifteenth Amendment WUJ; Stand. 
The Introduction of a measure In the 
general assembly at X^himbla. S. C, 
recently favoring the repeal of the 
fifteenth amendment to the federal 
constitution simply shows the attitude 
of a small minority of southern white 
men toward the colored citizens of the 
country. The great hulk of Intelligent 
whites throughout the country would 
vote against aucb a selfish measore 
were it to t>ecoiQe a national inne. 


Sunday Schools to Aid Missionaries. 

The foreign otlsslun board of tbe Na- 
tional Baptist convendoD is preparing 
an elatK^rate Gastet' pjgigram Tor tbe 
Sanday schools througnuat the conn- 
try. Dr. L. U. Jordan, secretary, says 
they will mail out at least 200.000 of 
these itroKnma to the Sanday schools 
in ever; state and also to their stadona 
In Africa and other foreign points. 
Tke iMMird la asking for (ISJIOO for Im- 
DBdtat* OHe on. the foreign Held. 



Nf)TARY 
Agent for Inyeitments, Building, 
Loans, Insuraifce, Houses, Lots, 
and Acr^ge for sale 

1146 Cen|ral Avenue 
Angeles, | California 


Capital Stock $75,000 
Shares $1.00 each 

F H. CRUMBLY 

, ^ Agent 

Tel. Bwy 2528. 785 San Pedro 


International! Order of Twelve 

meets as folloi^'s at Washington 

I 
and Central H|ll : 


Golden We^ Temple, No. 412 
at 8 o'clock p.|m. 


Pacific Coa$t Tabernacle No. 
210 m^lts s^ond and fourth 
Tuesday, at 8 ©'clock p. ni. 


New BeulahlTabernacle No. 43 
meets the sc&ond and fourth 
Thursday of iach month at 8 
o'clock p. m. "^ 


Star of Bet|lehem Tabernacle 
No. 382 meets ihe first and second 
Saturday at 2 g. m. 


Keddesh Roi|aI House of Midia 
No. 79 meets ^he third Tuesday 
at 8 p. m. ^ 


IF YOU Wi|NT TO RENT 
A ROOM |)R A HOUSE 

o| TO 

BUY A;L0f OR A HOME 

In Venice, Oce^n Park or Santa 
Moni|a, write 

J. ALLEN. REESE, 
600 San Juaa Avenue, Venice 


No trouble tolanswer questiona 


I am in a 

Some of the 
Property 


poefltibn Id offer you 

Best Residence 
on the Bey. 


HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Williams about- Wil- 
mington Harbor property. The 
greatest opportunity of your life 
is at your door now. 

We have 6 50-ft. lots we can sell 
for $550, * only $10 down, $5 a 
month. We also have 80 other 
lots in same tract, but you will 
have to be in a hurry if you wish 
to get in on the ground floor.' 

Any day we get six dr eight 
persons we will take you down to 
see the lots. 

H. H. WILLIAMS, 
Corner 12th and Hemlock. 


In keeping with its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continues to 
give to its patrons the best, pos- 
sible service. 

Being centrally located between 
the three great railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel 
meets the demands not only in 
good Service but likewise conve- 
nience. 


FOR RENT— We have several 
housekeeping apartments of three 
and four rooms for rent very 
cheap. Also a good business site. 

Apply Noah D. Thompson, 

1711 E. 55th St. 


1 


Piano Instruction. I 
Mr. Clarence D. GookeEiy, 
iDstractioD on the Piano. 


BdwyaOf) 


'S^@^^SS^n«^I^E^B3Sf' 


isieBiUh: 

K 


-t.. \ 

1 

4... 

*T~ 


St 




CANNOT bE IMPROVED 


^ 



LOCAL . MAPPEf«liNGS 


NEGRO WOUpiN 



ACTIVITIES 


A New Field For Women. 


TheCjDDet Ice Cream Co. is now 
being operated by Mrs. Grahm and 
she is putting on the market a 
gradeiof cream that is unsurpassed 
by any in flavor and purity. 
' Women know — don't take my 
word for it — just try it once. 

Branch office at 944 Central Av. 


A. M. E. CHURCH. 


. ■ One of our subscribers, Mrs G- 
^. Batson, won fii-st prize of 130, 
iln 'The Pride of the West, No. 207' 
Oontest, for having taken in the 
greatest number of new members 
into the order. So much for Mrs. 
Batson'fl sunny disposition and 
sweet smile! Take the hint, sis- 
ters, for such is good medicine — 
not only for societies, but for home 
and husbands also. 


The members of the Mutual 
Aid, in their spotless attire, 
seemed to thorou,s;hly enjoy *he 
annual sermon to the SDciety bv 
the pastor last Sunday morning, 
riiey left the church with a new 
zeal for the work of the ore;aniza- 
tioii. The effects of the sermon 
will doubtless be seen throughout 
the year in the increased results 
of the labnrs of the members. A 
Ejreat volume of work has been 


If I were asked wlio are the 
workers of the world I should 
without reflection answer the 
negro women. On Sunday they 
begin the duties of the week by 
attending service at the different 
churclies, and perhaps any other 
service either fraternal or social 
that invites or solicits their atten- 
tion, then. there comes the Mon- 
day morning rush, for it is then 
that she really begins her week's 
work, which means that she must 
hustle and rustle until Saturday 
night for, far too often tfie hus- 
bandman is out of a job or his in- 
come is too small to keep up the 
current expenses of the home. • 

Then there is the oilier woman 
whose ambition runs in the, busi- 


;h»dTHER" ZION'S NEW 


lOME 


ProflreM of Well Known Religious Cor- 
poration In New York. 
Tte corporniiou of the Mother A. M. 
B. Zlon church h«s purchased ttie build- 
ing of the Church of the Redeemer In 
West One Hundred and Thirty-sixth 
street, near Seventh avenue. New 
York. Alterations are to be made as 
tollows: The roof Is to be raised and 
tallerles erected, electric lights\will be 
Installed and decorations are to be up 
to the modern Idea. The building when 
completed will have a seating capacity 
of from twelve to fifteen hundred, 
and the memt>ers of the famous old 
Mother Zlon will have one of the most 


Chas. LjPai*sons 

ARCif^DE DRUG STORE 

I TOILET ARTICLES 
Nyal Hamly Remedies . Prescriptions a specialty 

Fffth and Central Avenue, ^ 

W. Hi GUEST, P. D. 

,, t|)RUGGIbT 

Stationery I ; . Notions and^Toilet Articles 
' 1 2t||i-and Gertral Avenue 


I 


done this year bv the little hand- 1 '^"^ channel; which means that 



Miss Leona Baber. 
Our new Reporter. 


Miss Ethel BruinKti.n lia- re- 
turned to Monrovia after havint; 
spent a pleasant week with her 
mother in this city. 


Mrs. Morgan White and 
dcen have returned to the 
from Imperial alley. Mr-. 
White and family : 
turned. 


:hil- 

city 

Ada 

al-o re- 


The Pico Heights Literary and 
Social Club w.ll meet in open ses- 
sion Thursday evening, March 1-. 
from 8 to U P- m. The mcetmg 
' will be held at the home ot -Mrs. 
Fry of 1220 Hobart boulevard. Ice 
cream and other refreshments will 
be served. 


Little Miss Esther lleck is vis- 
iting her aunt, Mrs. J. L. f.ruing- 
ton of 975 Berendo street. 


full. S416.10 expended and a cash 
l)alance of ^674.57 is a creditable 
showing. 

Quite a number cif people from 
suburban cities, taking advantage 
of their triji to hear tlie inimitable 
Dr. Washins^ton, remained in the 
citv to attend services with us 
Sundav evening. We assure them 
that they were more than welcome 
and we trust they were so im- 
pressed as to C'line again. 

The pastiir and famil\'. also Mr. 
and Mrs. J. -M. I'rentice. were 
.Ljuests (if Mr. and Mrs. J. R. 
Meming of W est J7th street last 
Tuesdav evcninj;. the nccasion 
being the hirtlulay of Mr. I'lem- 
ini;-. Mrs. I'leming had prepared 
.-Mime chciice viands, the d.aintiest 
Calif, .rnia affords, in a manner 
peculiar t(.i Tennessee culinary 
artists. • 

.\cxt Sunday will be baptism 
(la.v. Sunday sch(«il ;it '':,i() a. ni. 
Christian l-'ndeavur meeting at O 
]). Ill, I'^special interest centers in 
this nueting because it is new 
music e\eninir. L'nder direction 
of f'rcif. !■-. I'.artlett many new 
S(_>ngs will be studied. You will 
enjny the meeting. Evening ser- 
vices at 7 :30. All are more than 
welcome. 

D(3kSl^.MENT aiiil a strong sup- 
port from all, which will be his. 

riiesda}- evening, .March lOlh. 
the Tabernacle IJaptist and the 
Xew Irlope will join forces in a 
great religious receptitm to be ten 
dered the Kev. 1'. K. White of Uk 
lahoma, who has been recently 
called to the pastorate of the Shi- 
luah Bajjtist church. 

Kev. W bite comes to our ci,.y 
ill hearty corporation with the 
other ministers of the city, and it 
is hoped that the church folk at 
large will come out ne.xt Tuesday 
evening and help to make it pleas- 
ant for the Kev. befor he returns 
to his old home in Oklahoma. 


she must be misunderstood, ham 
percd at every turn because of 
prejudices entertained by the nar- 
row mindetl of the race. 

And yet with these and other 
imiK'dimcnts <il even niorc serious 
nature the negro woman toils on 
hopeful all the way— with almost 
god-like self restraint she faces 
and withstands the abuses of the 
Caucassian race hater'; and pa- 
ticntlv ovcrloc)ks ' and forbears 
with the sliortcoifiings of her own 

men. 

.\nd yet without fear <.>1 coutrai 
diction f feel safe in saying that 
she is the foundation of the hcfme 
the jiower that operates the 
church, slimulates social dcvcloi> 
ment, and creates and directs 
nearly every commercial enter' 
prise of recognition and value. 



jyiOTHE^'S KITCHENjCAFE 

a.^r; BRcjWNVrProprietor ' .__ 




THE BEST PLACE IN TOWN TO'EAT * 

V *^^ Home 'Cookir.g '.A ( Specialty 

BEST MEALS IN TOWN 

SHORT ORDERS 

1441 East Ninth Lit. 


L03 ngeles, Cil, 


Household Brand Flavoring Extracts 

J Our Gocds are Guaranteed Absolutely Pure. At your Grocers 
Retail for 25c peV i bottle. Improved Export Ginp'er Ale and 
all flavors. Soda Water. I? 

Geo. J. House & Sons. 


The Ancient United Sons and 

Da-ighters of Africa will meet or 

ih( First Monday of each monti) 

<l Scott's Hall, 561 Central ave. i 

Mrs. E. R. Baldwin, 

M E. Q 

Mi.ss M." BisnY, Sec'y 


Notes From Phillips Chapel 
C. M. E. Church. 

Look out for the big "Feii.''L in 
tV-e Wilderness." at Phillips ehapei 
C. M. E. Church, l40b Newtoi 
ireet, Thursday evening, Marcl 
l9. An old time feaBt and jubilee 
mging. To miss it means regre' 
vdmission 10c. Supper 25c. Given 
ly the Seventeer. Club. 

Mrs, L Storrs, Cip'a ii 
Rkv S L H.\rius, P,isi> r 


REV. J. W. BEOWN. 

beautiful edltices In New York city. It 
Is located convenient to all car lines 
In the heart of the densely populated 
Harlem district and in easy reach of 
Its commvniiciints. 

These transactions speali well for the 
progressive idea of the pastor, the Rev. 
J. W. Brown, formerly of Rochester, 
and his able staff of officials. The 
church in West Eighty-ninth street 
which Is valuable, will be sold. Aside 
from the possession of this property, 
Zion owDd other properties of value 
and Is considered one of the wealthiest 
cljurches of the denomination. 

It was founded In ITOO.the Brst church 
being built at the corner of Church and 
Leonard streets In 1800. It was re- 
built In 1820. The first annual confer- 
ence was orpauized in 1821. and the 
church was burned down in 1839 and 
again rebuilt in 1840. The Sabbath 
school was organized in 1845, and In 
18(')4 the church was moved to Tenth 
and Fileecker streets. From there it 
was removed In 1904 to its present site 
In West Eighty-ninth street. The pres- 
ent membership is about 900. 

There is no doubt that the glad tid 
togs of Its advancement will be herald 
ed abroad throughout the country. I( 
Is expected that the building will be 
ready for occupancy by Easter Sunday. 
The present members of the board of 
trustees are B. D. Fenderson, Charles 
C. Groce, Andrew Mead, .lames E. 
Nlckson, Alonzo A. Rives. William H. 
DeKalb. R. Herbert ['orter, Marcus 
Baker, Louis M. Fenderson and James 
Chase. Mme. Minnie Johnson Is or- 
ganist and directress. The Inte E. V. 
G. Eato was for thirty-Bve years ■ 
member of the board of trustees. 

THE ARMSTRONe LEAGUL 


Manufacturer 


'J Los Angeles 


Everybody [. has a Htlly-C ur HcHy is ictrrs -a 50c broom for 35c Delivered 
((B». i Always Welcome Whether Lookirg or Buying : 


Brodiijie-Berg FurnitureXo. 

3 Temple Street at i^elmont". i 

\(V ri ( c ■ r y f vir ill it c tU ; i c : c < if. ( i if 


E 

If V u ri( c ■ ry f vir ill it c tU ; r c : c < if. ( i if y v v : r t to fell your fumitur 
We will call and see vop.&j,^ Dcn't callus Down, call usiUp-Wilshirs 3417 


M.B.kttit & Sons 

^^^^l|:i[QASH GROCERY 

^ Pastry, Fruit and Vegetaiilas, Fresli Meats 

J NO. 1654 Tempf 


Wilshire 3464 


-THE ALEXANDRIA ROOMING HOUSE 

■"""""""" 1;|UNDER NEWZMANAGEMENTI 

, kT!768 WALL Street 

rVeatly^P'urnlr-liecl Room [[ oetween Maple and San Pedre Gas L 
■with Mot and Cold Batn ALBERT PERRY, Manager. 


■4- 


mt 


who is spcre- 


Prof. S. A. Green 
tarv and general manager ot the 
work" is ardent and anxious in his 
everv effort to make the work a 
succ;ss, and every race-lovins. 
man or woman should unrtm.h- 
ingly shoulder his part of the bur- 
home-like home for o,.r many 
homeless youag men who come 

into the city. 

T^ Work that is really hem. 
Why the Y. M. C. A .s seldom 

published. Few people know hat 
it is the medium through which 
•'y-voung men secure good po- 
- sWons'iree of charge by Prof..sor 
Green's efEorte. Just last week a 
young man, one James Smith, was 
placed in a good position with one 

!>f the biggest and best firms a 
■ El Centro with a good salary an-l 
the promise of a raise. For this 
and other reasons we urge that 
you not only encourage but sup- 
port this work. | 

A large crowd enjoyed the 
pleasing recital given by Mr. John 
^xiiy M Scott's iiall Monday eve- 


FOR RENT— Furniehed 
Apartment lor two ^.entle 
Uali at 

lUlT East 9th 


men. 


stree 


Sichmond (Va.) Chapter Honor* Menr- 
ory of Hampton Institute'! Founder. 
The Uichmond (Va.) chapter of Xiu 
Armstrong league held Interesting ei 

— ^ ^ ercises at the El)euezer Baptist cbiirtb 

1 \n Richmond Sunday afternoon. Feb 

1. Tlie occasion was the annual cele 

Our Second Quarterly meetirg I bratlon of -Armstrong day" in honor 

t -11 u u,)A „, Pi.ili;,,^ ' of General Samuel Chapman A-rm- 

conference will be held at hliilli}it | "' "'^"^ u„mnrnn insti 

' strong, founder of the Hampton msu 

chapel, C. M. E. Church, 14Uo | ^^^ ^he principal address was de 
Newton street. March 22-23, Dr. i Uvered by the Hon. R. C. Stearaes. 

James A. Stout, C. E., will preach state ^"P-;;'"^^-"'''^"^' ''f''^ f.'fll'^^^f, 
' r^\^ ,j u Short addresses extollins the llfi? ana 

at 11 a. m. Dr. A- O. Caldwell o | p[jarj,(.ter of General Armstrong were 
Santa Monica will pieach at 3 p- j made by Dr. J. A. C. Chandler. »uper- 
m., and the P. E. at 7.45 p. m. We. Intendent of the Richmond public 
.... schools; Hon. 11. C. 1 ouara. city at 

invite the ministerB and the gener- 


j PHONE I 
Main 4953-Home i*154 

"~^ ! COME TO THE 


PAUL VENFELT, 

Proprietor 





k 


U 



! \|^here You Get the Best Service in 

If amily Trade 

\h2 San redro|St- I 0pp. City Markc 


FOR RENT. 


1' Five-roim, Modern Cottage on East 
Santa Barbara street. Nicely, lur- 
nished, including PIANO, by 
^^- HENDtRSON REALTX^CO., 

Tel. South 871. 


-Mr. Drew, the colored runner 
of the University of Southern Cal- 
ifornia, ran away from his com- 
petitors in the 100 and 220 yard 

dashes last Monday, winning his 
races in splendid time. 


al public to worship with us Sun- 
day at 3 p. m. Surday, the 23id 
That will be the las-t quarter be 
fore the annual conference, which 
meets in El Paso, Ttxas, April 15 
1914, 

Come and hear these great 
preachers and this fine choir, which 
charm all who hear them. 
; S. L. Hakri!-, Pastor. 


torney. and the Rev, R. O. Johnson, 
pastor of the Moore Street Baptist 
church. 

The officers of the Richmond chap- 
ter at the ArmstroMK league aru Wll 
11am D. Jones, president; H. C. Mun- 
din. treasurer, and Miss W. I.. Brooks, 
secretary. W D Davenport was 
chairman ot the committee of arrange- 
ments for the meeting. The exercises 
were well attended, and much public 
Interest was shown in the work which 
the Armstrong league represents. 


i 

Horse and Buggy For S 
\w^ CHEAP FOR CASH ! 

Lpply to J. N. LITTLEJtlHN 
1597 West 36th Plac 


■Mm ■'■'^■-*" ' '^^ '"I 

Phone' West 3063 , i 

STERLING DRUG C 

THE NYAL STORE 

Use'your telephone — all lines lead to our store. 
Complete line of EASTER NOVELTIES. 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST. 

Prompt Free Delivery. \ 

Cor. W. Jefferson St. and Western Ave. C. J. sLdler, Prop 



College Men to lisue Monthly Magazine 
. ,,''lt Is eucouiaplns to note the Increase 
/ In numbers and Influence of the«4.1pha 
' I Phi Alpha fraternity of lntercolleg.late 
Greek letter men amonn Afro-Ameri- 
cans. The first Issue of the Sphinx, 
the official organ of the fraternity, to 
due to make Its appearance the first 
week iB February. The seventh an: 
nual convention of the fraternity will 
be held at the seat of the Theta chapter 
In Chicago for three days beginning 
Monday. Dec. 28. Henry Lake Dlck- 
erson of Ohio Is president of the fra- 
ternity, and Roscoe W. Ross ot Cornel) 
onlverslty to the secretary. 


Grant Smith, Prifs. and Gen. Mgr. 
Curtis Hammon4, Vice Pres. 
Odom. Tr^s. 

SMIThf & WILLIAMS CO., Inc 

Funeral! Directors tnd Practical . Emtialmers 

■A 

We guarantee our work shipped to any part o f '"«' ^'■' 
LADY atteI^dant PHONE MAIN 362 
SO'vices the best . Prices the ]owe.st 


: 


654 San Feri^ndo St. 


i 


>^C 


Big TnuJe* Union Organized In Pari*. 
The trades union organized by coloi^ 
ed men In Paris the latter part of Jan- 
aary Is said to have a membership of 
over lO.OQO The Object of the onion 
)s to resist the efforts of the white 
workmen, who are claimed to be at- 
tempting to prevent the colored men 
from gettinR nn tn<rren** In pay. 


Tiie Palace Cafe 

I ; "9 15 Central Avenue 


\ 


'a . 

Theneate^;- coziest and best place to fat. Newly fitted up 
nobby little b(^ths, where parties may dine unmoleste'd by the * 
public gaze, (Chinese and American dishes bf the cheapest and • 
daintiest and hest dishes served. Chop Suey and Noodles in 
American stylel • 


J. E. Jones, 


C. W. Sanders ' B. L. Ware. 

Telephone Broadway 11% 


Dilesden Dye Works 

Ladies j* andj Gents' Garments Cleaned, Pressed and 
I Repaired 

Hats CleaBfd and Blocked— Work Called for and DelivsreT' , 


/I* 








iW- 


-■■! 




&i^-i 


t1J 


MUTILATED i PAGE I CANHOT iBE IMPROVED 


s 

& 



CO. 


m 


m 


F^ 

^m 


No. 1540 Fillmore St 

H. G. FRANK. Manager 

Fancy and Staple Groceries, Fruit- 
and Vegetables 

Special Rates to Hotels, Restaurants and 
Boarding Houses 

Consult Us Before Goin^ Elsewhere 

PHONE WEST 4626 


MUSETTI ~ TAILOR 



UJ 


1 1 
; I 
ii 





*•- 


THE PLACE NOT TO BE 



r> 


n 


Oo 


LESTER MAPP 

PROPRIETOR 


n 
in 


SEil 


SAN FRANCISCO 
NEWS LETTER. 



GOLDEN STATE LODGE'S 
ANNIVERSARY 


STOP, LOOK, LISTEN! 
WET WASH '^' iTJl'fT'"' 50c Sack 

The Hygienic I.aundrv has changed hands and will he run as a first class 
Wet Wash Laundry under the name of the NEW PROCESS LAUN- 
DRY CO. WET WASH. As our aim is to protect your health ihrouRh 
cleanliness and sterilization in doing your laundry work. We selected the 
name of Hygeia as more befitting to represent our purpose. We steri- 
lize all tlothes by scientific process, safeguarding you against conta- 
gious diseases. We respectfully solicit your trade and wdl give the 
best of service. Kindly give us a trial and be convinced. 

WET 
WASH 


NEW PROCESS 

Phone Lakeside 1218 


LAUNDRY CO 

2932 PopiarSt, Oakland 


Phone West 6669 ,/ H. Tsi vuki, Propriet o 

Cosmopolitan 
Dyeing and Cleaning Works 

1591 POST STREET, Near Laguna SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Ladies and Gent's Suits Cleaning. Pressing. Dyeing 
and Repairing Guaranteed Satisfactory 


A grand reception in Iionor of 
the thirty-fourth anniversary of 
Golden State Lodge No. 2007, G. 
U. O. of O. F., was h«ld at Scot- 
tish Rite t^ll, Sutter street and 
Van Ne.ss avenue, on Tuesday, 
March 3rd, that brolight happi- 
ness to many ranging from the 
younger set to that composed of 
"Admission by iii\ ita|ion," 8:30. 
Mr. H. E. Taylor, grajnd marshal 
of the day, decoialed^thc broth- 
ers of the Order in ^full regalia 
and at 9 o'clock mardhed in the 
hall, followed by the membc-s fif 
the San Francisco Patriarch, who 
was received with hcjncirs. The 
members of the Order formed a 
circle, but was called to order. It 
was a pleasant surprise to find 
the San Francisco banjaer club had 
fc.rcmd a similar circle on the 
stage and was awaitipg tlie op- 
portunity to greet thepi. 

.\ banner artisticaljy designed 
and of sufficient beau|y was pre- 
sented to Golden Stat^ ludge fmni 
the San I''rancisco I)ariiicr club by 
Mrs. Martha Wilson'.: The ban- 
ner was received by Co\. A. Du- 
mas Jones, who responded with 
much jiraise to the San Francisco 
banner club, and sucfcbss to Mrs. 
Wilson, who presented the ban- 
ner for the club to Goklen Giate 
I.odge No. 2007 on the occasion 
presented the first banner to this 
lodge over thirty years ago. It 
was destroyed by fire during the 
earthquake and tire of San I->an- 
cisco in 1006. ;• 

Captain .A. Stratlnr of the San' 
Francisco Patriarch Saluted Col- 


COliRT VINDICATES DAVIS. 


Indictment Against Noted Georgia Odd 
Fellow and Editor Dropped- 
AtlaDta, Ga.— Beujaiuln J. DaviB, ed- 
itor of the Atlanta Independent, Is re- 
ceiving congratulations from friends in 
all parts of the country on the wiping 
out of the charge that the federal gOT- 
ernment bad held against blm for 
twelve years. 

Upon the recommendation of Hooper 
Alexander, United States district at- 
torney for the northern district of 
Georgia. Attorney General McRey- 
nolds ordered a stet to be entered. In 
sluing' the order of nolle prosequi 
Judge W. T. Newman wrote: "There 
has long been prevalent a general be- 
lief that the indictment of Mr. Davis 
was secured by his political enemies on 
the slenderest evidence." 

In connection with this one of the 
attorneys In the case says: 

"This case was pending In the Dnit- 
ed States district court from ten to 
twelve years. The Indictment wag 
' iiid during Mr. Angler's term of of- 
tice as United States district attorney. 
Repeated efforts were made by de- 
fendant's counsel, Rosser & Brandon 
and C. P. Goree, for trial in this case 
from term to term without avail 
There never wns a time when the de- 
fendant could have been convicted od- 


AND MADE TO 
LOOK LIKE NEW 


. Goods Called For 
and Delivered 


W' 


The Colored Boys Friend 

537 South Broadway 

Godeau Funeral Service 


w- 


The Handsome Chapel and Private Rooms Free 

for those who dwell in apartments, flats, hotels, or where is insuf- 
rient accommodation at the time of death. I^r» or Mrs. J. S. 
Godeau will personally supervise all funeral arral^gements and 
details. 

Godeau prices are only half the charges of the undertaker in your 
neighborhood, wno s controlled by the Funeral Trust. 

TELEPHONE 
MARKET 711; S- F. OAKLAND 4045, OAKLAND 

{ when death makes the nndertaker necessary 

' JULIUS S. GODEAU 

41 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 210 Webster St., Oakland 

305 Columbus Ave., S. F. 827 Figueroa St., Los Angeles 


DREIEKV& NEVIS 

OAKLAND'S EXCLUSIVE 

SPORTING 5 ATHLETIC SHOPPE 


Phone Oakland 4052 
530 12th Street^ Near Clay 


OAKLAND, CAL. 


llH BlKBYv 


•NOT I^■ THE TRDST" 


■"Sl 


'Al" Meat Market 

Best and Chez pest Choice Fresh Meats, 
Hams and Bacon, Wholesale and Retail 

Hferything Guaranteed 1540 Filmore Street Phone West 4626 



BNDOBSKD BY THE EAGLE ULUB 


J. E HENDERSON 

UNDERTAKER 

2307 TELEGRAPH AVENUE, 

Telephone Oakland 1878. 



OAKLAND. CAL 


VSlarkei and '6xpress dterage 'Ce. 

CUT RATE SHIPPERS 

TO ALL POINTS EAST 

Also dealers in Hardware Tinware, Granite, Etc., Etc. 

Office and Sfore, 930 Seventh St. Bet. Market and Myrtl^ 

Phone Oakland 1325. R. G. MA RQUARDT, Mgr., Oakland. Gal. 


Phone Oak 2277 RENOVATING Res. Oak. 6238 

Ghas. J. Braun Mattress Co. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

MATTRESSES AND COUCHES 

Wire Mattresses Stretched. 1275 Seventh Sf, Oakland 


(inel Jones, received his orders, 
drilled his company to the south 
side of the hall and broke ranks. 
The members of the order 
marched tn the ante-room and dis- 
banded. 

Mr. C. !■'. York, flobr manager, 
who was very econonijcal with his 
time and more liberal with his 
whistle, look to the Orpheum or- 
chestra, which was sefected tn e)i- 
tertain for the occasidn. 

The sjrand march jkvas led by 
Mr. \V.- A. Rutler and Mi<=- K. 
Clayton, wlien the most fashion- 
able costumes of the":Seas..n were 
on display. Ideal Weather pre- 
vailed which assisted in the evcn- 
ng- outing. ■■ 

Everybodby enjoyed themselves 
• n dancing until a lat^ hour, uiin 
refreshments claimins^ its sliare of 
attention, they departed to their 
homes overjoyed. * 

Much credit is due Mr. .A. P. 
Alberga, chairman of the commit- 
tee, who s])ared neither time nor 
money in making the affair a suc- 
cess. 


DRINK THE BEST 


DIRECTORY FOR OUR 
ENTERTAINERS 


To the Well Dressed Men 


Who Know th^ Value of Being Up-to-Date 


Should get acquainted with 
our New English Tailor, 


i=. DELUC 


TheMeircluirt>Tailor£2 611 Montgomery Si 


Golden West 
Lager Beer 

SOm BY ALL DEALEI^S 

22d AND CHANCEI-LOR RICHMOND^ CALIPORNIA 


HARRIS AND FRANK 

Among the leaders in style and artistic furnishings in ladies' 
and gents' ware Harris & Frank rank pre-eminent. Because of its 
many years in business this firm is one of the most reliable in the 

city. !■-.:■ ■ 

Have yo6r shoes sewed, nailed, etc., at reasonabl|e rate, Harry 
Goldbei^ Shoe Hospital, 5528 Cenfal Avc^ 




.. :| 


■^f-iSs 


"Casino Sextette'! -r- Jackson 
brothers, Ross, Gray,: Black and 
Bryant are at the Casiiio Cafe. 

Tuxedo Five — Powijrs, Robin- 
son, Hicks, Richie aftd Stewart 
at Fairmount. f 

Orient Trio — Payne, Wilson 
and Donaldson at Mtjrrjvs Cafe. 


.■\t Lester Social Clt^b- 
Mrs. Morgan Prince. !i 


-Mr. and 


M. & M. Four— Harris broth- 
ers, Denny and Banksjat M. & M. 
Cafe, would like to? hear from 
Geo. Johnson, Geo. iVolfson, "J. 
C. McDonald and R. ^. Johnson. 

Two Aces— Comptoii and Joy- 
ner at St. Francis Club; which has 
been remodeled, \Yhere Bob 
Brown and Thomas. I^'ost^t^ con- 
tinue to make things ipeasanripr 
their patrons. 


1^ •• 





MEETING IN THE INTEREST 
OF A BAPTIST UNIVERSITY. 


New England Convention Propose* the 
Erection of Big Religioue School. 

Prominent Baptist ministers and lay- 
men of tile .New Rngland Ba|)tist mis 
slonary convention will take part in an 
all da.T mass meeting to be beld in the 
Bethan.v Baptist churcb, .N'enarli, N. 
I .1., Feb ilJ. The meeting Is to De held 
In the Interest of the proposed North- 
ern Baptist university. The idea of 
j the movement was projected last June 
I at the annual meeting of the New Eng- 
I land Baptist missionary convention, of 
which the Rev. W. Bishop .lohnson. 
LL. D.. is president. 
The general topic for discussion at 
► the three sessions to be held Is "The 
.Northern Baptist Unlverslt.v— its Need, 
Purpose and Outlook." The speak- 
ers for the morning session will 
be the following ministers, who have 
charges In .New Jersey and in .\ew 
York: Rev Drs. George E. Morris 
.Morristown: H. B. Mitchell. Haddon- 
fleid: .lohn W. Henderson. Atlantic 
City; E. E. .lackson and K. D. W.vnn, 
.Newark (Dr. Wynn Is pastor of the 
church In which the meeting Is to be 
held); W. M. Moss. Brooklyn; G. H. 
Sims, New York city; J. B. Boddie, 
New Rochelle; G. Hunt, Mount Ver 
non; William P. Hayes, New York 
city; Mr. L. Williams. Brooklyn; Dr 

D. C. Moon. New York. 

In the afternoon the following mln 
tsters from Pennsylvania, Rhode is 
land and Connecticut will speak: Drs. 

E. W. Johnson, G. L. P. Tallafero. A. 
R. Robinson and W. A.. Credltt Phlla 
delpbla; J. 0. Jackson, Jenklnstown; 
Drs. D. S Klugh. New Haven: W. A. 
qarrod, Hartford; S. W. Smith and D. 
W. Wiley, Providence. 

The prlDclpnl speaker at the evening 
session will be Dr. W. Bishop Johnson 
of Washington. Rev. J. El Church- 
man, financial secretary of the more- i 
ment will also make an address. Ha- I 
■Ic wUI be fumlsbed by a qoartet from j 
Montclalr, N. J. Rev. J. a Iiore wlU j 
de. 


,/^^"f , 


BENJAMIN }. DAVIS. 

der this indictment for the reason that 
the evidence upon which it was found- 
ed was insufficient. 

"Mr Alexander,-- the United States u 
district attonney, 'stated In open court, 
when the nolle prosequi was entered, 
that many of the acts relied upon for 
conviction under the indictment were 
haired by tlie statute of limitation 
when the indictment was found, and ^ 
Investigation by Mr Ansier or his suc- 
cessor In office. Mr. Tate, would have 
adduced the same findings made by 
Mr Alexander, and It is passing 
strange that these officers representing 
the United States would permit an in- 
dictment to stand for twelve long 
years against a citizen of Georgia when 
it was absolutely baseless in fact. 

"It must be credif.ed to Sir. Alexander 
that he Is not only a competent officer, 
but that he Is conscientious, pains- 
taking and courageous and discharges 
his duty as he sees it. He . acted 
promptly in this case with a view to 
tryiuK it, if there was anything in it, 
and. if not. to give it the direction al- 
ready Indicated." 


•■.4 ■' 


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y|st»t«i-'--f 


[^23B t> i «^a * «' i » i «i* i » i '« i « * « « »«» 


PASADENA. 

BY S. B. CAKR. 

♦4*1 l«l I I l« l t l l '» l ' H »» l l* *« 

The ignorance of the law ex- 
cuses no man. Ignorance is hated 
by God next to sin and some of 
the greatest crimes of the ages 
are the resuU of ignorance. Then 
why should a woman who can 
speak but one language talk 
enough for two' No one can tell 
what a day will bring forth or a 
night, either. Many a man thinks 
he is in a hole when he is only 
in a rut. 


Rev. R. W. Johnson ha> been 
confined to his bed for a few 
days, but he is much improved. 


Rev. Dyatt is preparing for a 
lair soon. Rev. Matt. S. Hughes 
will speak for him Line c\ening 
during the fair. 


Rev. Duncan will preach ."Sun- 
day at Scott Chapel at 11 o'clock. 
His subiect will be ■ 


There will be nc services at 
any of the churches .-utuhi)' 
night, as all are g^ing uut (m hear 
Dr. Hooker T. \\ ashiiiL;t-n. 



The I'.agle man on his semi-oc- 
casional visit to the oil city last 
week found everything moving 
on the even tenor of its way. W'e 
were congratulated on all sides 
by tlie great service of the l-'agle 
to the comnuinity. and we ar- 
ranged to. in the near future, de- 
liver a lecture on behalf of this 
publication. The people of Kern 
county are strong for the Eagle 
and we appreciate their support. 


\dt onlv among our own peo-. 
pie but the best of the ojiposite 
race say to us that they appreciate 
merit and that the Eagle is worthy 
of tile support of all tlie people 
eq-ardless of race or condition. 


.Xnidiig those wliom have al- 
ways been friends of our people 
ami wlui always ,L;ive them due 
recognition are the Hun. Mr. Jas- 
tro of the Kern (.'ountN' Land 
(.(.mpany ; Hon. 1". 11. Hall, the 
leading candidate f^r go\"ernor on 
tile democratic ticket; Sheriff lia- 
ker, and nian\- dtlier of the lead- 
ing- white citizens. 


All roads uill lea.l to the lliuh 
Schoi.d' Sitnda>- night \k' hear I^i". 
a transfer cast. -\ clioni- iii ?^} 
voices, led by I'rof. WiUiain^ 
Kevn-'ld, uill suil;. N'Ui iiuist 
not fail to hear thcni. \diiii>-.i' mi 
free. .Miss (il.advs Harri- i- in 
charge "f the ilecoratioii-. i .rcen 
ar'l white will lie the c^j. .r^, -. . 
let ii-> wear the L;reeii .\lan> 
are coming o\-er ir^m I .o~ An- 
geles, (let vi.ur transfer ca~l t" 
High School. 


' .\inoiig the' enterjirisini; and 
|progres>i\e citizeii> of oiir own 

r.ace who are makiii<j riaker.-lield 

,-! yooil |)|,ice to li\e ill are 1".. W. 
( \\ inters. I 1. E. Siiiip-on. 11. S. 
j 1 1. iii>ti 'II. !\e\ . 1 . W . 1 'rice. Ji iliii 

ivinkiiey. c'liarle- .\iikriini. .Mr. 

l\ii~on. -.M.aior .\\e~t. i-rank V. 

\\ a-hiiiut' 'II and main- ' ■tluT'-. 


Mr. Wesley William^, a col,,red 
lad in the l-'.xaniiner C'inte>t, wa-^ 
running eighth thi- week, with a 
glorious chance of climliing. .Mr. 
Williams deser\e> credit and as- 
sistance. 


i The I irL^aiii/ation- are il'iing 

, I'lcelw tile ch.urche- arc broad- 

' -:vu,L;e'l aiiil .abreast with the 

tunc-, .\iiioiig ilic Women Mi>-es 

."^iinp-oii.-. Mr-. I'carl Winters. 

.Mr-. S. v.. l)>-son. .Mrs. Smith. 

.Mi>. W a-hingt' 'II. Mrs. Kee>c, 

i .Mrs. I'rice and others are keepini; 

lip the reiire-eiitatioii C'f the fair 

M-x and tloing their part for the 

continued progrc-s of ijiir Uaker.-- 

tield citizenship. 


A LETTER TO J. D. REYNOLDS. 


TtLEPHOMf M50 HARLt* 


-HE lE»OiNC CQlORED mewspapeh 

(Ihr Amstprfiam 2fpiu£. 3inc. 

No. 17 WEST 135th STREET 

::e-.v Yrjrk. N-'/.. fob, IC, 191-1. 


fcr. J. D. f^■^■nold^. 

iJCo ?'.ir.T.ond ;.7-j.. 

Lob /iT^oloa , ::q1 1 f . 

De.'.r ZiT :~ 

Ke bo^ to Qcknowlodgo receipt of your scrnp 
book, entitled 'Ti-ps on the racq problom," and there 
nre rensona to bolleva that if you follow printing 
the scrap book in bold type on timely topics, auch 
as arc sho-.7n in the copy sabrnitted. 30 that any ordJ.nn,ry 
□an or wooan cnn predict tho ultimato future of your 
publi cation. 

■i¥o '.iTo Indood plad to bo the recipient of your 
courtoalos and forecnat a feast for thoso of rofinod 
tasta for fjood 1 ;. tor'.turo. 

1 ;t "ti [^3" r.ii-70 clear aniline and in due time 
the public .vill .--.r.xl jualy await the tip from John D, 
Hoynolds . 


^e 6cme 9atrioU Wife ^ave 5ene 


[(By J. B. Bass) 

■\Vjlh Apologies 10 \V. K. K irk 


(1). 


It's a good thing for L'Ouverture that he died when he did: 

This age is no time for a Warrior Kid , 

His wonderful conquests, his great hattle Hnes 

Would now be hailed with : "Back to the Mines !'.' 

I fear that our Toussant— were he to return 

And try with his swurd our country to free— ■ 

Would have to go after it hammer and tongs 

By handling recruits and singing swan songs. 

(2) . 

It's a good thing for Douglass, too, he isn't here now. 

With his glowing head of silver and magnificent brow. 

If he were Minister to Hayti he'd not hold hjs job — 

'Twould be segregation at Washington or his political shroud. 

Things were so different in years long ago i 

They used to appreciate manhood ; but now — the closed door ! \ 

He'd find but few of those that he had led. 

So I guess that our Douglass had better stay dead. 

(3) 

It's a good thing for Bruce that he' died long ago. 

For his statecraft now wouldn't have any show. 

It is true, lots of coin by freedmen has been spent — 

But the wiser ones got it and spent every cent. 

C. H. J. Taylor, too, would starve if he came back to earth - 

For the present powers shy at real worth. 

They were lucky "old timers," who were here and made good. 

And I don't think they'd want to come back if they could. 


i0«»»»'»»»»»O»»»»»»»»»»»»»»0 A »»»»»»»»»»»»»O»O««»0 0»»** 


ii\ iirri> 



^ 


»»»»»»»»»»»»»»0'»^»»»»»»»i ^<r^»»»frfr»»»»»»«■»<■»»»»»■»|;-^»<^ 


Notice to All Colore^! Property Owners : 

Telephone mewheh your FIRE INSURANCE will expire, 
and I will renew tt in any Company you may desire. I 
will allow you 5 per cent, discount. 

Call Main 5429. or Call at 412 Germain BItlg. 
224 South Spring Street 

SIDINEVi F>. DOINES 

Real Estate Fire insurance Notary Public 


BUTTERICK PATTERNS 


R. & G. CORSETS 


The 12th Street Store 

N. W. Cor. 12th and Central Ave. 

"Under New Management" 

Central Avenue's Bargain Center that gives a "Money Back 
Guarantee with Every Purchase. 

Phone 23756 1125 Central Avenue 

"Yours to Please, The 12th St. Store" 


Tclephane South 7653 Ee.'!. 13i9 Newton St. 

Wm. A. and Arthur Grosser — Florists 

Proprietors of FERNDALf; NURSERY 


Home 2205.'- 


DECORATIONS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


Floral Deiligns a SpecisJty 

i 1408-16 Central Avenue 


TO BE NICELY DRCSSED 

And Have a Ooojd Look, You Must Have . 
Your Clothes jMade at Sam Cook's 

Don't worry. Our cleaning a'nd Pressing is of the Highest Grade. 

We Make Your Olifl Clothes Look Like New. 

Like to or(|er they are made. 

We are making Tailing Suits fEom $15.00 up. Our work is very Good. 

Everybody sayp so. 

1314 Central Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 


THE TAILOR THAT 
EVERYBODY KNOWS 



New and Second Hand Furniture 

BOUGHT. SOl|) AND EXCHANGED 

AYERS Brothers 


House Furnishings of All Kinds. 
I'hone South 42T;i. (.)pen Evngs. 


2627 Central Avenue 


E. E. ANDREWS 

I Wc Duplicate Any Price Made 

f on the same class of Goods... 


Dry Goods, Furnishings 
Hardware, Paints, Oil... 


MAIN 
8-»T 


1 791 WJ JEFFERSON 


HOME 
T3.4-4e 


Howard iShoe Store 

Fine Shoes aild Shoe Repairing 

lOOl W. jjfffeirson Street 


The Newj Idea Bakery 


.Mr. li'iwaril I'. Hre-w mi i'k'I A cohircd l:i(l named I'lluitt cf 
L'nivcrMty oi Southern CalilMriii;i ' ti,^ [^. A. lii.i^h school is do.wj: ex- 
will have anuther uppurtuni-.y tu ' ^,^,„^.^^^ .^^ athletic activities 
<listiiif.^nish himself Satiirda;.' in 
tlie meet hetween the I Hi ver-ity 
iif Califdrnia and thel'iiix ersity nf 

Snutheni Caliinniia. ^^ ■ iiarker. the vuiiim colcred 

-Ijrinfer troni Pnmoiia, won in a 
walk in tlie 44()-yard d.ish last 
j. Saturday at tlie Manual .Xrt- 
lii!.;li ^chi il. \\ ith alxnit six nmi- 
petitiirs a.L;ainNt him he led all the 
\\a\-. ! 


420 Eijst Fiftli Street 


Bakery Goods 


Fresh Pastry 


Our assorted Cakes and||Pies are a little better and Cheaper 
ft 
We can afford thislbecause we do our own baking 

For Parties and IWeddings Try ()iir Cnkes. 


Home A5018 


Main 3625 


Tlie I,. .\. I iiant> are ai'aiii in 
the limelis.;ht. plax'iiiL; a nnniher 
nf the arnniid town leani-. 


W. .\,aiiL;lUoii, tlie i.;real -;port 
writer of f-'risco. died at hi-; lioiiic 
last week. 


I.' an aicha.-.po 
com? and . 


J]l\, . 


13 do3lrable. It ia yourn to 

?.03p! ctfully yours, 

AM;3TEHD»M .MEVfS PU3. CO.. 


.\ Cuhan player has been en- 
r(dled in the Los .Vntjeles te.ani lor 
a tryoiit. I'p to this time he has 
made jjood. 


Mr. Andrews, a \ouiii:: man whi 
iiif sexfen years held a ])ositioii as 
1)1 istal ' clerk in .\tlanta. (ia.. has 
come -to- try our citv to live. He 
is makint^r his home with his 
coiisiiij. Mrs. Dai^v Wilson of 
lL"^(i Xormandie/ avemie. Pic<i 
lleioiits. 


Good \^ork Quick Service 

Pacific Clothes Cleaning Works 

SUl|s $1.00 UP 

2358 East Ninth Street I ! Los Angeles, California 


O. W. pANSON 

1403 Mateo Street 

Dry Goods, Sl|ioes, Hats, INotlons 

NEW IDEA PATLERn;' 

-EVERY SIZE in EVERY STYI 


I with cutting diagram :ind seam allowance 
E 10 cents. 


>» 'l^a^. 


.•'-^^-"^iiitii.MiaiiiDianffi 


Its Latest Concession 

The new Hill street entrance at the Broadway, where children's 

- "Toyland" is not only a valuable concession but a very convenient 

addition for it saves trouble and time. Parents may take thei; 

children there without having the encounter of hauling them up- 

" stairs in the crowd. This new annex also contains one of the most 

unique china, glassware and kitchen utensil department in the city. 

At the Broadway there is little or no trouble in finding what 

*voti want. Even fantastic New Yorkers find here that convenience they are ready with the latest cilts. 


STORE 

With Economy 
prcat crowds that 
store alone with 


.'-.|Uat is found in few other department stores in the city. 


THE BROADWAY DEPARTMENl 

Where Beauty and Convenience Mingle 

It is always holiday at the Broadway. 
gather each cominercial day of the year at 

the suggestions for economical housekeeping /are some of the things 
which make it look like a holiday all the yelar riuiid, and advances 
the timely idea of the house. "Don't Worry !'/ Tlic result is vou meet 
at this great store, for all the people ; for .Jlone comes too poor nor 
too rich to be served at every counter a»id departrhent with that 
same courteous treatment that pervades cJvqt all. 

Why They Lead inf Style 
Because their buyers visit New Yor^ three times a year, hence 

hades and French touches 


Third Anniversary 

Good vafuer? given, worthjy of our three years of proaresi^. We are 
selling everything helnw co^. Beautiful Silk and Madrass Ladies 
Shirt Waists, extra value froi|i 50 cents up ' Dainty .Aprons and Work 
Aprons, AIho Hosiery. Ladies' an Gents' 8ilk and Lisle, from 19c 
Special Men's Work Shirts ifrom ^ "ic up. Men's Cilovee from 5c up 
to $1.50. Our Dress Making jBnd Tailoring Department, Ladies' Eve- 
ning Gowns and Coats. I 
411 East 7th Street f MRS. NINA E, THOMAS 


Farwell Brios 

Watchmakers! 

andJewefers 


I?fh and Central j^e 
Los Angeles, i 

N^'atches accurately repaiaed at 
moderate prices. Diamonds|re-set 





Just a little ahead of the general ord» of things. 



4fe«ia*j4.J k>fc«i,,SatiirS!u3jLkii.i 


-I 


ALONG |:ENTRAL AVENUE . ' 

Mrs. Tennabaum has tlfe latest and best. % 

Schneider & Schultz, Qerman winery products and distils;- pure 
wines and brandies, 2056 S£|ita Fe avenue. i 

Satisfaction,, service an| style in cloaks and suits at the Sample 
Suit Shop, 326 W. 7th streit. 

Farwell Bros., at l2th Ind Central, will test your eyes, fit your 
glasses and furnish your Ciristmas jewelry. | 


s :;. 


^^qe^ . 


ji 


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I. 


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have a slide trombone, 
violin, with the piano. On last 
Thursday evening the choir had 
tlie election of officers.; Prof. 
Win. I'ynum was retained as our 
instructor. Too much cannot be 
said about I'rof. Eynum, because 
he is a Ijroad-hearted, Christian 
man and an instructor indeed. 
Ij. F. Anderson was elected presi- 
dent ; W. !'). lirook, Cor. Sec; 
Mrs. Daisy Wilson, .Secretary: 
Mrs. Wood Wilson, Trcas. ; Mrs. 
1). Hrooks. -Assistant .Secretary; 
Uro. 11. C. Fousc, Chaplain. 

The cliiiir is plavinL,-" th come 
before tlic public in the near fu- 
ture witli ;i new i)lay called "The 
Xew -Minister." 

( )n Tuesday evening. March 
17. the -\e\v I lope liaptist C iioir 
will siui;^ at tlie Tabernacle I'ap- 
tist Church, of which Dif. J. D. 
( iordiin, 1 ). 1 )'., is pastor 


cornet, MINISTERS' FEDERAIOON 


The Ministerial Federation met 
Tuesday morning at the Y. M. C, 
-\. buildinja;. 

Rev. Mr. Lirown, pastor of the 
-A. M. E. Church of Watts, ad- 
dressed the federation upon 
"Christ's Method of Preaching."-. 

Prof. Higgers will address the 
federation Tuesday, 'March 17 j 

• ;:■ I 

' '■■'■ + 

GONE TO HIS REWARD "| ' 

-Mr. .\le,x -Martin, born at .'--hor- 
tervillc, -Ala.. 1870, .and died at 
r.arnwcll. ( al., on I'riday. hY-b.- 
27, ;it '' a. HI., was buried in 1 -os 
.\ngeles Mundax'. March 2, at 
2:M). -Mr. Martin was well 
known in l.os Anjieles. bavins: 



4— 





y-: 


^r^m^- 



A magnificent reception was 
accorded the C. '-A. R. and Span- 
ish-.American War X'eterans at 
their palatial quarters in the Hall 
of Records, set aside and ap|ior- 
tioned to them by the county. 
The Otis Camp (colored) was 
present and created much senti- 
ment and enthusiasm \vitli their 
l)rogram and courtesy. .\mong 
the participants was .\tty. \\ . ( ). 
Tyler, who dcli\ere(l a splendid 
address. 


The result nf the rail)' fur the 
Y. -M. t'. -A. Sun(ia\ is bciu.t; felt 
by the way the ljuikI ])e'i|)le ui 
Los -AnL;eles are respondiuL; to 
the aiii)cal. IVof. (ireene appears 
hi;.;lily pleased at the result-. 


The haben Phi ITaternity an- 
nounces their next social event nu 
h'.aster -Monday, .April 13, l'U4, in 
I'llanchard Hall. 

Invitations will follow this an- 
nouncement. The affair will be a 
Character liall and the yount; la- 
dies and gentlemen are already 
choosing, planning and devising 
tasty characters from history, fic- 
tion, and mythology as their own. 

The colors of the Fraternity are 
purple and gold. .A beautiful pur- 
ple ribbon will be awarded the 
young lady presenting the most 
artistic female character and a 
gold ribljon will be presented the 
gentlemen for the most artistic 
male character. 

This affair promises to eclipse 
all previous aftairs given by this 
well-known fraternity. 

(Signed) !•:. H. Russell, 
Chairman K.xecutive Com. 


In an .address m New ^'^)rk 
City. Dr. W. iC 11. Dubois, in 
uanimg treatment of the negni 
pri'hlem, which pruunses the best 
-""luti'iu, s.iid: "There are, three 
things ti) (1(1. \i/: ^'ou must treat 
tile ciiliired man as vou 'wiiubl 
wish til be treate<l if yuu were 
cnloreil : _\"i>ii must gixe him the 
b,-illi:t: yon must educate him." 
Thus |)r. Diibni- .a-ks the .\nieri- 
o:in uc'iple ti> pr.'ictice the golden 
rule. t(> L;i\e al-o In the negm the 
means ul' political self-defense 
' n if such is the balle'. ). and <\n 
their duty to him as ., backw.ard 
eiti/en, b_\- .•nhancing his intelli- 
gence thr'.n;^h ;iiiiple ediicatinn.il 
i.'ieilities. This is nut asking ton 
niMcli. I he .leni.-md has ;in iu- 
c-easing number of ad\-oc'ite- 
an.mg the best classes of our 
white .\iiierican fellow-citizens in 
;il| scctinns of our CDUntrv. 


Chief -Sam aiut his followers 
who are -African-boUnd, instead 
of setting sail for the marvelous 
Gold Coast spoken of, are jour- 
neying to Portland, Maine, to 
have the ship overhauled. Just 
leave it to Sam and the whole 
crew will need overhauling in a 
few more days. 


THE EAST EIGHTH STREET 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. Mr. 
,W. J. Thompson, Superintendent. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. by the 
.pastor; subject, "T^e Wild Olive 
Tcee." 


Urestes Zamor was elected to 
the Haytian presidency last week 
by the Haytian Congress with a 
\-ote of 9.3 (lut of a total vote of 
10."^. 'That was very decisive and 
puts the revolutirjn happily at an 
end for the present. Zamor was 
formerly governor of the north- 
ern department ' of Hayti, and 
seems to be capable of holding 
the office of president. Sannon 
and other aspirants will have to 
wait for other opportunities to 
secure the honor. The -marines 
of warships of several nations 
who had been landed in Haytian 
ports for the protection of for- 
eigners and the commercial inter- 
ests of those nationalities are go- 
ing back to their ships, since the 
fires of the revolution are appar- 
ently dying down. The niercurf- 
al temperament of Haytians can 
not be said to be characteristic- 
ally negro temperament, where 
he governs ; but the Haytian tem- 
jierament is tropical, for it is no 
worse in Hayti than in all those 
South -American and Central 
-American small countries of 
white populations which lie with- 
in the hot tropica] zone. 


The Sojourner of Truth dub 
will have Dr. Washington as its 
guest Saturday at its magnificent 
home on East .Adams street 


BOOKER T. WASHINGTON. 
The Man Behind His Race. 

\\'e Wlia\-e read jill kinds of \ersc 
iibciut llie man \viio is be- 
hind. 

I-"r(iin early iiHirii 'till l.iti' at nigh, 
until it's alniiisif made u.s 
blind; 

'Till our lirain goes wliirlinir. whirl- 
ing, iiiul we I'l-el .-iliotit til 
fall. 

I'"iii- We wimder (if the many w JKim 
til pity iiKist (if alb 

The lieanties and nei-essil ies nf lifi' 

w*^ si;o'ee enjiiy. 
I'm i-dur conscience so torments us 

like a very nauglity b(i\'. 
When we sit down to the table tc 

enjoy a hearty ineal. 
N'iee. fresh vi>getables so. templ- 
ing an ydou think That lifi 

is real. 
Soon '.iiii'll hea rtliaf little eon- 

seienee. t'or his voice you've 

Ic-irned to know. 
.\n(i he'll tidl you of the trials of 

th eiiiari ludiind the lioe. 

()!' in wintei- when the snow and 
wind drives at a furious 
L'ait. 

\nil .\(iu sit down to enjoy a blaz 
int: fire in the grate. 

1) IS then your thoughts will wan- 
der to the man liehind tin- 
pi ek, 

Ditrging gold and eiial Axhieh ywii 
enjoy and 'twill y(iiir eon- 
seienee priek. 

lint there's one A\liom we'x'e for- 
goTTen to devote a little 
space — 

()ne who also needs our sympathy 
-he's the man behind his 
race. 

l-eaving pleasant home and fire- 
side, the proud cold world 
to meet. 

The sueers and jeers he often gets 
are anything hut sweet. 

Hut he's brave and he's unselfish 

with hut one grand thought 

in view — 
Onward, upward to the summit. 

faith and prayer his 

strength renew. 
Best of all. he has the eolirage to 

stand up for the right. 
.\ti(l to ems hthe wrong where'er 

it's foimd and do it with a 

might. 

To encourage the old grandsires 

who eould not keepjapaee. 
.\n(] the rising generation; to be a 

credit to the race. ' 
In the kinde-st way he tells them 

that they may un(3erstand 
That trials afad, success ! in. this 

world ■:go hand in hpnd. 

ITe must rise at terly morning, .sit 
up late at might, 

Count and plan, Wve and spend 
to make tl^gs eome i out 
right. 

■So we thmk one so ,Mfeelfish ig de- 
serving of thiBtoaqe— 

Thi sbrave, nolile.,„Wed leader 
— the man bo)tJ^B his '•aee. 
_ • — Eva Carter ^Buelcner. 


lived here fnnr years. He came, 
here from 'Tamjia, T'l.a. He leaves 
.1 wife and a child fi\c months 

old, 

.\bout four months ago Mr, 

Martin was struck by ,-i str.'iuger 1 — ■ 

on Main street. The stranger ap- i'reaehiug|it 11 a. m. 

jiroached him and asked bini.for jj y p l_Ti g .30 p m 
2.S cents, Mr. Martin told the 


TABERi|aCL5^ BAPTIST 

Heiilock Street 
Rev. J. ^, Gordon, pastor. 


AT THE CHURCHES 


stranger that he did not ha\e 2,i 
cents. .Mr. Martin \vas struck by 
the str.inger. and it is believed 
th:it he ue\e'r got o\er this blow. 
Smith \- Williams Co. had 
eh.-irge of the fnner.al. Mrs. Mar- 
tin 1-- pleased with the wa\' these 
peoph' li.'indled the fiiuer.al. 


Preaehingiat 7:30 p. m. 

I »• 

i ■ 

NEW HOPE BAPTIST 

Paloma lAve., near 16th 

Rev. C. Ill Anderson, pastor. 

I 
Prea(diing|it 11 a. ni. 

H. Y. P. l|. f) ::?0 p. 111. 

Prea(dung|at 7 :3U p. m. 


MT. ZION BAPTIST 

Third and Stephenson Ave. 
Rev. A. C. "Williams, pastor. 
Services for Sunday, 

At 11 a. ni.. preaching, subject, 
7. -.30 p. m.. preaching, subject. 


MT. ZION BAPTIST CHURCH A ttfi'^. CHURCH 

Eighth|ind Towne Ave. 

The ser\iee~ at .Ml. Zion l,i--t Usual serfiee preaching by the 

Snii(la\ were \ery encouraging, pjistor. Dr. ^regg. 

l\e\. Mr. W'illi.'inis preached ;it ^! 

both ser\iee--. ,\t the morning I 

service he preached upon "The WESpY CHAPEL 

Wrong Ide.-i of Life and Its He- Comer |Eighth and Wall 

■-nit-." .\t the evening service p;,.v ^V,.sle| E. Kurehen,_ pastor. 

be preached upon "'The I,o\"e ol . i ,,, 

' ' . , ,, Preaehmgisat 11 a. ra. 

I ,oiI as (, omp,-ired w nil I aren 

,il l.ove." 


SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Maple Ave., bet. 7th and 8th Sts. 
Rev. Joseph L. :MeCoy, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. V. at 6:30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


Young People's nieeting at 6:30 


There were ti\c acces>ions ti 
he elinreh during the da>-. 'The 

'ollei-tioii wa-- g I. 'The ordi- 

n.-mee of hapti-m w:i- eelelir.ated 
■|t the niornim^ scr\ ii'e. 

Next Sunday I\e\'. W illiams 
.will ])reach ,'it the morning ser- 
\ ice from the subject: "Christ, 
the \'angii:ird of the Church." 
.\t the evening service T)r. Win. 
r.eckli.un. Tield Secretary of the 
\:ition.-il |','ipti-H Comention, will 
lirericli. Ml members ;in<l friends 
ol the ehiireh are expected to be 
pre-^en' ;it these services. 'There 
will be baptisni at the close of 
the morning service, 

AKCIIII-: I. WILLIAMS, 
Church Reporter, 


]). m. 


Preaehing|at 7:30 p, m. 


FIRST A. M. E. CHURCH 

Cor. Eighth St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. X. Greggs, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
Christian Endeavor at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m.' 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 


Sunday at Xew Hope was a 
day that the Holy Chost mani- 
fested itself among the children 
of men. It was a great day in 
Zion. Dr. .Anderson preached one 
ol the strongest and most power- 
ful sermons X'ew Hope has ever 
heard .Sunday morning. Dr. .An- 
derson's subject was: "There- 
fore, if .any man be in Christ he 
is a new creature" (2 Cor. .S:17). 

In his discourse the d(5ctor laid 
,great stress on the hearts of .the 
|ieoiile that they must be born 
again before they can see the 
kingdom of (iod. In the evening 
Dr. .Anderson's subject was "God 
Is Love" (1 John 4:8). He said 
in part : 

"In this was manifested the 
Io\e of God toward us because 
that God sent His only begotten 
Son into the world that we might 
live through Him. He that lov- 
eth not knoweth not God, for 
(iod is love." The doctor was 
the master of his text. 

New Hope Choir. 

Xew Jiriipe has a great choir. 
Sunday 'morning and evening the 
choir did credit to itself. The 
choir V-as at its best. We have 
added, 'a violin to the choir. We 



Rev. J. L. McCoy, 
Pastor of the Second Baptisi Church. 


y ■ 
i J t V, 


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greater activity, a number of con- 
versions werl obtained and added 
to the churcli. 

The choir.lundcr the able lead- 
ership of -At|y. Jones, is lending 
invaluable s|rvice to the church. 

Under the| present progressive 
administraticlh. the hope long en- 
tertained bv| the members may 
without a c|pubt be realized — a 
new church. I \ 


^ A very successful revival has 
just closed at the Second Baptist 
Church on Maple avenue, of 
which Rev. J. L. McCoy "is pagi' 
tor. -Assisted in a highly apreci- 
able manner by Rev. A. C. Wil- 
liams, the pastor of Mt. Zion^ 
Baptist Church and a creditable 
acquisition to the ministry of the 
city, the revival bore much fruit. 
Resides arousing the church to 




L£d^^^'1^« 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT &E IMPROVED 


^oHinie 27 


Los Angeles, Cai., March 21, 1914 


Number 5 


Dr. Washin gtdn a^Wcslcy Chapel Last Monday Evining 


[Dr. Washington 

Makes Great Speech 


THE MAN OF THE HOUR 


'God works in a mysterious 

v-ay his wonders to perform; He 
slants His footsteps upon the sea 
md rides upon the storm." 

Perhaps to tjreater evidonce 
las ever been manifested in and 
through any human leader of an\- 
race or of any people that he had 
stamped upon him the divine ap- 
jroval of the g'reat hand of tlie 

)eity, in modern times, than that 

irhich is beinf^ demonstrated 
through the works of Dr. Hooker 
Washington in the I'nited 
states and the world. In all ai^es 
if "the world's histnry of G^d," 

irhen He has tlesigned to wurk 

real changes in dispensatioiv-^, in 
lations, in kingdoms, and empires 
le has always done so through 
borne humble individual who was 

irholly without a reputation, and 
Dne who simply became -mighty 
Ind great in the thing to be done. 
[f we should take the time to 
search the pages f)f history from 
[he earliest periotl down to the 
present time we would find that 

le world's greate>t changes, di>- 
foveries, and inventions ha\e, 

rithout a single exception, been 
|)rought about through the in.-^tru- 

lentalities of men who were \\ ith- 
[)Ut a noted ancestry. And our own 

Jooker T. Washington is nc) ex- 
ception to his predecessors in this 

reat historic category. Indeed, 
!e was as poor and a.s, insigniti- 
lant as the lowest, and lie has by 
llis own efforts attained to height^ 
[when all things ha\e been con- 
pdered) as lofty as the highest ui 
Ihem ; and he has not yet complet- 
ed his 40 year period of history 
his career. Indeed we may say 
ithfully he is (jnly in the Iua 

incy of his well chosen wrk. 


Let us pause for a moment antl 
ask ourselves the question : What 
is really and truly his mission and 
in what class does he belong? 
The world has had its great in- 
dividual philosophers, educators, 
reformers, and its active operators 
who have distinguished them- 
selves as having been truly great 
in many ways, and along many 
lines, of the great needs of human 
uplift and expansion. Rut when 
they have attempted to enlarge 
their fields of activity and to com- 
bine their talents to do greater 
work, they have made wretched 
failures. 

The writer is of the opinion that 
when Dr. Washington's mission 
and work shall have been fully 
understood _ and (defined, that he 
will be placed where he rightly 
belongs, in a class to himself. In 
many respects he reminds us of 
the Christ of God. It is said of 
the Christ. "He was in the world 
and the world knew him not." 
Dr. Washington has been at his 
work for lo, these many vears, but 
It is only in the last few years that 
he is becoming so well and favor- 
ably known to his brethren, "lie 
came unto his Mwn and thev 
wouM not recei\e him." Rut it 
has been characteristic of him in 
all of his travails, just as has been 
in our city in his recent visit t(j 
us, he has been receixed and in- 
troduced by the white race and 
people. If we call him a diplomat, 
a race man, a statesman, an ora- 
tor, and educator, etc., he is all of 
these and mi>re. We reprint the ], az- 


ures men, it is, in the final anal- 
ysis, with the race as with the 
individual. The energy exerted 
in overcoming a handica]) devel- 
ops the true mettle, hardens the 
fiber and becomes a permanent 
possession. It is only discourage- 
ment and surrender that can keep 
a man or a race down. A black 
skin may be the original cause <jf 
the discouragement, but it is not 
and can not be the true cause of 
failure under any true standard." 

The above is only one of many 
similar editorials which have ap- 
peared in our city ])apers edited 
by white editors during Dr. 
Washington's itineracy in Los 
Angeles and Southern California. 
.And als<i we will invite you to 
think for a moment of the magnifi- 
cent introductions he has received 
from school and college [profes- 
sors, in the presence of their stu- 
dents. The writer lieartl him in- 
troduced as a great leader of • 
great race. The mind and heart 
and the life of l)r, Washington 
has been so very well prepared 
for his work that notwithstandmg 
the fact his stay with us was pro- 
tracted, his audiences became 
more and more inthusiastic at 
each gathering to the close of his 
itineracy in the community. 

It is to be hoped that during 
the itineracy ')f Dr. Washington 
in the Southland that all oi the 
pessimists, donliters, and grumb- 
lers went out to char him. If they 
did, we well know many of them 
must have become coiuerted to 
the fact that Dr. Washington is 
the man of tlie hour. Many of 
them ha\e re|)eate(lly said of him 
many careless things, and they 
have thrown many stumbling 
stones in his patlnvay. l'>iu if 
doubtiilLT Thomas him-ell h 


I nave cried < 
God." Let 
in the dail\- Tribune of our citv : age, and 


"Leading a Race Out of De- 
pression" 

".\i> one will 1 has read hjncr- 


t^»»»«»»»»»»»»»»»>t»»0 »»»»»»»♦<'»»» 



1 

been here and liearil linn he wi'uUl 

ut, "-\1 V Lord and M_\ 

lis take fresh ciiiir- 

renew our covenants 

God, and with e^cli ''iher, 

cciiitiiine our i'lurney with 

new vigor. 

v.. 1'. iii;.\'i)i:ksu.\'. 


with 
and 


chapter, composed of the iiegro 
college alumni |f)f Indianapolis, 
Ind, 


IFOOD IS HIGHER 


"Comparing 
[^cember L^ 


Democrats' Bluff About Reduc- 
ing Cost of Living Shown Up 
by Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Washington, March 10. — Just 
about one year ago the Demo- 
cratic party ])ledge(l its faith and 
its sacred honor that it w(.)uld 
reduce the high cost of living, 
which it promised to cut down 
through its own legislation. Savs 
the lUireau of Labor Statistics in 
a rejort just issued : 

retail prices on 
.013, with prices 

on the same date in I''12, twelve 
of the fifteen articles for which 
f|uotations are L,Mven were higher 
and three were lower." 

Thus pfitatoes, "the poor man's 
lood," had 'advanced 43,7 per 
cent: fresh eggs had gone uj) 21.9 
per cent: pork, beef, fowls, milk 
and lard all had risen : and f)nly 
sugar, butter and tlour showed 
even slight declines. 

.•\nd as with foodstuffs, so with 
clothing — prices arc rising, in- 
stead of falling. "Shoes," said 
the Democrats, "wr)uld be cheap- 
er, yet now comes warning from 
the manufacturers that 'ten dol- 
lar shoes' mav be expected in the 
near future, ;ind those who can 
not afford them may ijo barefoot. 
Yet, despite- the 'magnificent 
work' of the .State Department. 
I'rance, (iermany and Russia im- 
posed a dut\- of 40 to Ci\- a pair 
on .American shoes, as aijainst 20 
to 2,s cents on shoes imported b_\ 
those Countries from i'.iml.-ind." 

In these two citations ;done. 
mav be found sufticient re.ison 
for the Democrats to ni.-ike I'resi- 
dent Wilson personally the main 
issue ill the coming Congression- 
al cami)aign. They cannot "point 
with pr'Tde" to a reduction in the 
cost of liviim. 


Race Noties and 

Current Topics! 


ift's' Law of Compensation has 
Ued to be impressed with the 

impelling strength of its logic. 
,e people of Los Angeles have 

•ecently had the privilege of hear- 
g a distinguished representative 

i£ the Negro race discuss the sta- 
s of the Negro and the condi- 

ions under, which his final eman- 
ipation is to be worked out. 
"Booker Washington's mission 
life is to point out to members 

if his own race the principle un- 
rlying real success. He is do- 
g it with a persistency, courage 
id intelli)fence that challenge ad- 
tion from every man or wom- 


listinction. There is no gettffig 
away from it except through the 
slow spiritual culture of both 
races that must finally destroy 
false values, break down preju- 
dice and set up a justice that can 
stand the light of a God-crowned 
reason. 

"The colored boy or girl often 
finds the conditions of success pit- 
iless and cruel. Either he will 
give way to discouragement or he 
will begin and keep up to the end 
a heroic struggle of the kind that 


IOWA NEGROES ORGANIZE 
COLLEGE FRATERNITY 

Iowa t itv, lo\\a i. "special, i — 
The dream of the oldest living; 
negro alumnus of the State Ciii- 
versitv- of lo\\a was realized (in 
Saturday, March 7, l'>14, by the 
organization in Iowa L'itv oi a 
college; men's fraternitv composed 
exclusively of negro students and 
graduates of the state university. 

The name of this new Irater- 
nity is Ka])pa .Alpha Xu and is a 
branch of the national <jrganiza- 
tion of the same name and which 
was founded at the L'niversity of 
Indiana in the year I'UO and has 
for its purpose the creating of a 
social center for the negro men 
in attendance upon northern col- 
I'eges and luiiversities where tne 
great majority of the students 
are of the Caucasian race. 

Prof. I'", W. Diggs, superin- 
,tendent of negro schools of V'in- 
^tnnes, Indiana, founder and the 
pVesent Grand Polemarch of the 
national grand chapter, assisted 
by ^Wm. J. Prince, formerly of 
CoinXlowa, but at present a stu- 
dent \n^ the University of Illinois, 
and Lieutenant Grand Strategus 
of the bational grand chapter, 
and Paul '^Vi Kane, a student in 
the University of Indiana and a 
charter member of the national 
grand chapter;, were present and 


person in this state. .A co|iserva- 
tive estimate of .Sarah's |iet in- 
come in excess of the S.S,©00 ex- 
emption is $100,000 yearl_i^. The 
tax on the income of this^size is 
4 per cent, or a total of,<S4,000. 
The tax itself is so large -that it 
would be subject to incoAie tax 
were it an income. Rut tf^ere are 
further complications, Sa|ah has 
alKiut 840,000 of-'-r the ^inioney 
loaned out at eight per c|.'nt in- 
terest. This means an ■lannual 
uiconie of S4,000. This is* an in- 
come that is being carned|by the 
original income from oill roval- 
ties, and a legai questiln has 

leen raised whether . .r i^.t this 
secondary income is sullect to 
tax during the same year |iat the 
$100,000 is taxed. It is; quite 
probable that Sarah's incc^ne will 

e much greater than ^00.000. 
as big oil wells are being |)rought 
i'n on her farpi every moflth. It 
is expected that by the en|l of, the 
year her income will ha\e 
reached $150,000. in whic^i event 
her income tax would b^ $6,000 


insteail ..f $4,000. 


n 


AFRICA^ SHIP S4ILS 

Curityba Chartered by Ch'ief Sam 

Leaves for Portland En "Route 

to the Gold Coas|. 

After ne.-irly a month'| <lel.i\ . 
"I'fticf S;im," the lead^ of a 
"Rack-to-.\frica" moveir-ient to 
start a colony on the Goiy Coast, 
finally gave the order | to get 
starteil late I'ridav aftcrntion and 
the steamshii) C'urityba icast oft 

■ r the 


the city's honored guest, by Mr. 
and Mrs. Noah D. Thomp.son at 
the Cozy Den. 

To begin with, the Den is one 
of the UK.ist beautiful little cafe 
villas owned and op,erated by col- 
ored peo]ile on the .Atlantic or 
Pacific, and in keeping the with 
the definition of the ficean's name 
upon whose bfirder it rests ; un- 
der the management of Mrs. Dan- 
iel .Adams, it is one of those quiet 
little spots where beauty is linked 
with (lifj;nity and harmony reigns 
supreme. 

Rut upon this special occasic>n 
the little spot was especially pret- 
ty, because the master's hand 
seemed to have exercised special 
skill in arrangement. 

The guests, composed of the 
ministers of the city and the two 
newspaper editors, assembled on 
the first floor or saloon in pleas- 
ant chat, until the order came to 
come up higher, and after mount- 
ing a short flight of stairs sat 
down to refreshments that would 
charm the most fastidiijus in 
taste, 

- Dr. ^Washington was charmed 
with the affair and said that he 
had seen nothing in the States tci 
surpass^the scene. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thompson de- 
serve high praise and commenda- 
tion for the standard set by them 
on this occasion. 


Rrookl\-n,3 fi 


MORE WHITES THAN 
BLACKS 

N. Y. Times Table Shows Larger 

Number of Unqualified Males 

Among the Caucasians. 

IToni Re))resentati\ e T^'Wiier's 
rejiort 'iii the bill pr. ■\:ding for .i 
I'eder.il in(|uir\ iiu>i the e.uises 
of illiteracy, in which is included 
the rk'claration th.r. there are "2,- 
273,C)03 illiterate iii;iles of 21 _\e;irs 
and o\er in the Cnited .States, 
enough to determine any n.itional 
election ;it aii\- period in our his- 
torv," the Conclusion would n;itu- 
rally be drawn that ;i new and 
highly disquieting condition hail 
arisen in the nation. Such is not 
the case. The census fit;ures 
show that the number of white 
and black illiterates in the I'nit- '' 
ed .States had decreased substan- 
tially bet^veen 1900 and 1910, a 
decrease that is expected to con- 
tinue during the present decade. , , ,, . ., , 
jj.,g jQjgl was the holder ot any jland 


at l-'rie Rasin 

lou^ \iivagc. s 

I he ( urit\ba will firs; put in 
;it I'ortl.and, Me., to he oxer- 
hauled, after which i;he s.ail 
.•icross the ocean for thp prom- 
ised l;md will begin. All (|u hoard 
.ire eoliired except the |e;iptain. 
who is James Mackenzie|aiid the 
euuineer. Ira Renford. | 

'Lhc oilonists are all slsirehold- 
ers in "thief .""-am's" .\krjn Trad- 
ing Company, which conl-ern hasi 
sold them shares in ji^rcels ol 
land on the" Cold Coas^ at $2.s 
apiece. Here they expcci; to have 
an Elvsium all their own. The 
passengers ffre 'all frosi Okla- 
homa and o.t;hei' Southwestern 
States. ?■'. il 

When theSQirityba cast off a 

crowd xnf Women weTe| on the 

)id the colonists;|farewell. 

The faith in "Sam'' fias been 
rudely shaken in some oj his fol- 
lowers since the denial hy Rrit- 
ish authorities in .Africa^ that he 

on 



MR. S. COLE 


Who is starting in on a six 
months' term on the Federal jury, 
Mr. Cole is a race man and active 
in linee of endeavr that means 
race uplift* 


the Gold Coast or tha^ he was 
i even a chieftain. 


The figures showing 
number of illiterates and their 
percentage of the ivliole popula- 
tion are: Illiterates over 10 yearsj '^' I 
of age in 1900, whites 3,200,746, The Wesley Chapel ^Literary 
6,2 per cent; in 1910, 3,184,954, , Society was entertained sTuesday 
5 per cent; colored, in 1900, 2,- evening with a debate |between 
853,194, 44.5 per cent; in 1910, 2,-' ]\lessrs. Jas. Williamson iand Bert 


develops the very best sort of 

manhood and finally overcomes ( inaugurated tlie new chapter, 

by, dint of real worth. In doing L^^ich is the fourth in existence. 


who ^ has sense enough and] that he is lifting up a race andUnd is therefore named the Delta 

leading it out of the bondage ofLj^^ptgr, the other three bing Al- 

liraitation, L^a chapter in the University of 

"This process may be a long Indiana, at Bloomington ; \ Beta 

one, but the law of compensation 'chapter, in the University (if IHi- 


leart enougk to realize that the 
irorld has been applying false 
Standards of manhood and wom- 
ihood. 

"The child of the black man is 

rced to f^e a heartless and cruel I raatijts. Measured as. God meas- 


228,087, 30.4 per cent. 

Moreover, how many of Mr. 
Towner's 2,273,603 male illiter- 
ates of voting age have the bal- 
lot? A large proportion of them 
must be colored in the South, 
who are barred from the polls |\ir 
and hence cannot "determine any 
national election.'- 


McDonald upon the sub^'ect, "Re- 
solved, That capital punishment 
should be abolished." ^Ir. Wil- 
liamson was the victor, i 


The Missionary Society of the 
Second Baptist Church meets 
second and fourth Thursdays at 1 
o'cLo(k p. m , at Secopd Baptist 
Church, Maple avenue.. 

Mrs. W. J. Davis, Pres. 
Address, 176 Utah St. 

Tel. Boyle 2660 
-Mrs. J. E. Williams, 
Sec' 


-r 


GIRL 


IN- 


PAYS BIGGEST 
COME TAX 

Oklahoma City.— Sarah Rec- 
tor, the 10-year-old negro girl in 
Eastern Oklahoma, will pay the 


is as i certain as any law of mathe- nois, at Champaign, and Gimm^ J^*"?!.?^* federal infcome tax of any 




AND MRS. NpAU D. 
THOMPSON ENTERTAIN 
DR. BOOKER T. WASHING- 
TON, THE PULI^T AND 
THE PRESS AT TStE COZY 
DEN. r 

One of the most be^tiful and 
most sensibly arran^ecl social af- 
fairs was gis?en last Mc|iday com- 
plimentary to* Dr. Wijashington, 


The .colored citizens of Bakers- 
field are contemplating a prosper- 
ous season. All indications point 
to the same. 

It is well that all sides are see- 
ing to it that a full registration is 
gained all c5ver the state. It means 
that the people are waking up and 
will vbte to put the state again 
on a sound basis. 


BOOKER T. WASmNQTON. 
^e Man Behind His Race. 


/ 


■r 


'■"^ttm^w ffmrsf f 


i ;-^.-^i:i^rt_'!;^rk:=^ 


MUTILATED PAGE 1 CANNOT !BE IMPROVED 







GROCERY CO. 

No. 1540 Fillmore St. 

H. G. FRANK, Manager 

Fancy and Staple Groceries, Fruit 
and Vegetables ^ 

Special Rates to Hotels, Restaurants and 
Boarding Houses 

Consult Us Before Going Elsewhere 

PHONE WEST 4626 


on 

• ■■■ 

CO 


•XS®®S)®®®f«J 


X'O(n>>)f»»®(SX<0®®ci)3 S«Se)®®(3Svg®®®®® )®®®(1)®®®®®®®®®S)S 


MUSEHI -TAILOR 





tHE PLiCE NOT TO BE 
OViRLdOKED 





n 
5^ 


. H ■ ■! 


PE?N9IONlNG|OF THfe "EX- 

SLAVE 
(By Dennis S. Tpiompson, Bethel, 



00 


LESTER MAPP 

PROPRIETOR 


n 

■■■ • 

■■■ • 

in 


the race at Jarge. 

Would this be asking too 
much? I do not think that the 
negro will ever ask an amount 
equivalent to what this govern- 
ment owes him, and if the gov- 
ernment does not reimburse the 
race in some form for its yeirs 
of unpaid toil it will be a blot 
upon this f^overnment as long as 
it stands. 

Xow, if the ex-slave shall l)e 
pensioned we have first to inter- 
est Cont,^ress to the extent that 
such a measure may be intro- 
duced, but it can hardly be done 
at this session. 


STOP. LOOK, LISTEN! 
WET WASH """IZlM'"""' 50c Sack 

The HyRienic Laundry has changed hands and will be run as a first class 
Wet Wash Laundry under the name of the NEW PROCESS LAUN- 
DRY CO. WET WASH. Aa our aim is to protect your health through 
cleanliness and sterilization in doing your laundry work, we selected the 
name of Hygeia as more befitting to represent our purpose. We steri- 
lize all tlothes by scientific process, safeguarding yiu against conta- 
gious diseases. We respectfully solicit your trade and will give the 
best of service. Kindly give us a trial and be convinced. 

NEW PROCESS LAUNDRY CO. ^Uh 

Phone Lakeside 1218 2932 Poplar St , Oakland 


The pensionirig of the ex-slaves 
of the United ftates is a matter 
that Congress ^one has the pow 
er to deal witH, and necessarily 
nothing can bef;done in the way 
of securing the |nactment of such 
a measure, uri|5il a majority 01 
the menrbers ol that body could 
be interested therein. There are 
.many negroes 'who are against 
such a law, buf who are drawing 
a pension for tfieir service in the 
Civil War; sfwne who saw tt\VO 
and three yeags' service and six 
months jjerhajjfs. 

I am proud/ that .many of our 

people have tj^e benefit of a pen- 
sion, as a reco.gnition of theii 

splendid work and .ijallantry in 

tlTe Civil \yar, but what of the 

ex slaves? 

C)f course, there were many 

wlio spent over two centuries in 

bon(la,u:e. and then served the 

country in the Civil War. but yet 

there were thousands who were 

not able to take up arms — ouf 

mothers. 

Thev were not able to go to 

war, liut while the war was in 

riro^rcss thousands of our moth- 
ers and si^jiers remained loyal to Voted Speakers Praise Work of W»B 

their owners. helping to kee]V Known Southern School. 

things together until they were 
released tjjjrough the proclama- 
tion of Pjlpsident Lincoln. All 
throuiih tht wearv years before 


SAN FRANCISCO 
NEWS LETTER. 

DIRECTORY FOR OUR 

ENTERTAINERS 


Phone West 6669 


H. Tsi viKi, Propriet o 

Cosmopolitan 
Dyeing and Cleaning Works 

1591 POST STREET, Near Laguna SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Ladies and Gent's Suits Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing 
and Repairing Guaranteed Satisfactory 


AND MADE TO 
LOOK LIKE NEW 


Goods Called For 
and Delivered 


The Colored Boys Friend 

537 South Broadway 


Oodcau Funeral Service 

The Handsome Chapel and Private Kooms Free 

for those who dwell in apartments, flats, hotels, or where is insuf- 
cient accommodation at the time of death, Mr. or Mrs. J. S. 
Godeau will personally supervise all funeral arrangements and 
details. 

Godeau prices are only half the charges of the undertaker in your 
neighborhood, wno 's contruUed by the Funeral Trust. 

TELEPHONE 
MARKET 711; S- F. OAKLAND 4045, OAKLAND 

when death makes the nndertaker necessary 

JULIUS S, GODEAU 


DREIEK & NEVIS 

OAKLAND'S EXCLUSIVE 

SPORTING 2 ATHLE'IC SHOPPE 


Phone Oakland 4052 
530 12th Street, Near Clay 


OAKLAND. CAL. 


41 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 
305 Columbus Ave., S. F. 


210 Webster St., Oakland 
827 Figueroa St., Los Angeles 


IC 


Barry 

46 


■NOT l.\ THE TRLST" 


O. I'KNNE 


Al" Meat Market 

Best and Chespest Choice Fresh Meats, 
Hams and Bacon, Wholesale and Retail 


J. E HENDERSON 

UNDERTAKER 

2307 TELEGRAPH AVENUE, 

Telephone Oakland 1878, 


OAKLAND, 3AL 


"Casino Sextette"' 
brothers, Ross, Gray, 
Brvant are at the Casin 


— Jackson 
Black and 
i Cafe, 


Tuxedo Five — Powers, Robin- 
' son, llicks, Richie and Stewart 
at Fairinount. 

HAMPTON INSTITUTE NORTH. 


The nieeiiu;;s iield iiuder the aus- 
pices of the Armstrong association in 
the Brooklyn Academy of Music Mon- 
day evening. Jan, 20, and at Carnegie 
hall. New York, Tuesday, Jan. 27, in 

the coniinfl on of the Civil War the Interest ot the Hampton (Va.) tn- 

inanv helpless men and women 

of our raci niet tlicir death at 

the hands I of some lioor-lieadcd 

overseer, ffor no provocation 

whatever c|hcr than that he had 

the power ^o do it. 

. After \v^ liundred and f'lrty- 

five vears iof unrequited toil, in 

which tim| the heaviest burden 

of l)uildin,s| up the country was 

borne bv Jhem, it would seem 

■ % 
that the ^.Tvices of the ncarro 

oiiL,dit to l|c recognized in some 
substantialimanner. Half a cen- 
tury after f-eedom seems to be a 

ate d|_\' to take up the <|ue 

but ihere are nnw jixini. 


Everything Guaranteed 


1540 Frlmore Street 


Phone West 4626 



ENDORSED BV THK EAULE CLUB 


To the Well Dressed Men 


fMarket and Express dtcrage "Cc. 

CUT RATE SHIPPERS 

TO ALL POINTS EAST 

Also dealers in Hardware Tinware, Granite, Etc., Etc. 

Office and Store, 930 Seventh St. Bet, Market and Myrtle 

Phone Oakland 1325. R. G, MARQUARDT, Mgr,, Oakland, Cal. 

Phone Oak 2277 RENOVATING Res. Oak. 6238 

Chas. J. Braun Mattress Co. 


WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

MATTRESSES AND COUCHES 

Wire Mattresses Stretched. 1275 Seventh St' 


Oakland 


DRim THE BEST 


Who Know the Value of Being Up-to-Date 

Should get acquainted with 
our New English Tailor. 


F. DELUC 

The Merchant Tailor 611 Montgomery St. 
San Francisco 

r 

■ ! 

1 


tjolden West 
Lager 



SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 

22d AND CHANCELLOR RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 


VCTV 

til in. but I here are unw 
nian\' \\ hcf, if such a law were 
to l)c made, would receive the 
benefit thereof. 

Rut it will not lie done by a 
sinu'Ic stroke df tlie hammer, nnr 
can it be acciimplishcd in caie 
\ear; instead it will require some 
time, sonie money, and a spirit of 
ap.ijrcssiviencss and lots of hard 
work on the iie,yTo's part. 

T do i\ot believe that one or 
two uesroes will be able to do 
anvthini;, but whatever success 
comes it 'must come throuijh a 
well organized hodv with 


stltute were each largely attended and 
enthusiastic. The plantation sons* 
and oth«r melodies sung by the Etamp- 
ton students were well rendered and 
highly enjoyed by the audience at botfc 
meeting:8 

Besides the popularity of the speak- 
ers and what they said, the most In- 
teresting feature of the meetinKS wai 
the moving plctutes sbowlng step by 
step the success of John Henry, a typ- 
ical country boy from the time he 
left his borne tn Kentucky until hii 
graduation from Hampton. The Hon. 
Job E. Hedges was the chief speaker 
at the Brooklyn meeting He was fol- 
lowed by Major R R. Moton, whc 
made a brief address. 

Mr. Hedges In giving his Impressions 
of Hampton institute said, "Hampton 
Is a pood place for white people be- 
cause It makes them whiter. There 
you Bnd a sanctity of emotion that 
makes you ashamed At Hampton 
true religion Is to be found. We some- 
times go to church because it is decent 
They go because they've got to havel 
It," he said. He spoke glowingly of' 
Robert C. Ogden. "1 know of no place | 
where a dollar will breed more dollars 
of value than at Hampton." 

Major Robert R, Moton, disciplinary 
officer at Hampton, said; 'The most 
serious problem of the nation is the ad- 
justment of the relations of the two 
races. Hampton institute affords a 
common platform for all men, black 
and white, north and south, to meet on 

"Slavery," declared Mr. Moton, "left 
the Negro with the impression that 


work with the bands was degrading 

ijgnsj. and to be despised. But Hampton is 

■- .., doing away with this thought. The 

ble leader.'; at the Iront. l.ut 1 , ^mte race taught us that anything 

the jjreatcst opposition to! black was to be despised. Hampton 


has taught my race to be proud of It 
self. tk)d Ir. tended that the Negro 
Bhoiild be as f;i)od as sny other race 
4.nd what will go a great way toward 
the solving of the problem is a belief 
of white people in the colored man 
and a l>elief b.v the colored man in the 
white person." 

The Hon. George Mc.\neny. presi- 
dent of the board of aldermen, was 
the chief speaker at the Carnegie hall 
meeting in New York. > 

INCREASE IN FUNDS FOR 
FREEDMEN'S AID SCHOOLS. 


;ee tiie fjreaicst opposition 
-^uch a ineastire is to be found 
anioiitr the members of the neq;ro 
race who, when the matter is 
meiiti<iued. are quick to say: "It 
cannot he done." 

Some of the foremost neirroes 
and the rewspapers of the coun- 
trv that f^hould be the leaders in 
this miivenient are talking 
against jt. on the grounds that 
it is not- in order, but if we sit 
down all the time on the theory 
that we ''cannot," we are not go- 
ing to fjet much in this world. 
Through the concentration of our 
forces only will we be able to 
win : let us get together then and 
ask for what we want. 

The greatest fault with our 
people when they ask for some- 
thing" it is of no consequence. 
Those who would ask are only 

specifying pensions for the ex- j ,^^,^,^,^ ^^^^ ^^^ strengthened, re- 
slaves, but when the Indian ,got I pairs are under way, ground has been 
his allq^ment it was so nutch , broken for a new dormitory at Walden 

1 university, new buildings have been 
recently erected at Morrtstown Normal 
and Industrial college and Claflin nnl- 


N»w Buildings and Equipment With 
Stronger Faculties Aleo Secured. 

The twenty-two schools under the 

auspices of the Freedmen's Aid society 

of the Methodist Episcopal church have 

started upon a new era this year and 

with the brightest prospects for the 

j second year of the church quadrennlum 

! In all the history of the society's work. 

Additional appropriations have been 

I made to most of the institutions, the 


HARRIS AND FRANK 

Among the leaders in style and artistic ftirnishings in ladies' 
and gents' ware Harris & Frank rank pre-eminent. Because of its 
many years in business this firm is one of. the most reliable in the 
city. 

Have your shoes sewed, nailed, etc., at reasonable rate, Harry 
Goldberg Shoe Hospital; 5528 Central Ave. 

Stump's Market at 1477 E. Vernon Ave. is a goyd place to trade. 


m 


X >lit.j 


in; 



money, li and so many acres of 
iand fot! himself and each mem- 
ber of his family. 

I thitik if we are to ask any- 
thing, % should be for the pen- 
sioning':! of all- -ex-slaves, and all 
the children of ex-slaves, born 
prior to 1872, In this way it 
would Bielp many persons pf mid- 
dle agey who had not the oppor- 
tunity Ihat the younger genei^.- 
tion ha|, and who would expend 
their m|iney in a way that would 
be helplful 


verslty. and buildings under course of 
erection at Wiley university and Phi- 
lander Smith college are being com- 
pleted. 

BlsLop Theodore S. Henderson. om| 
of the most resourceful bishops In 
Methodism, has been relieved from the 
holding of spring conferences and IsJ 
detailed by the board of bishops to ieafl| 
In a campaign for the jubilee amongs 
the white conferences In particular as 
executive director In co-operation with 
the secretaries. All of the bishops rw- 
ident in the south are tmcking Secreta- 


f'lJri 


ries^^aveety and Penn Jn their plaiia, 

to themselves and to and tb«^ brightest day In the fott^ 

aeTOi yeftif ' ^ilstor; of the sodetf la 

ufm at 1 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT I BE IMPROVED 



TO MRS. fcVA CARTER BUCKNER ON THE DEATH OF 
HER BELOVED BROTHER, OLLIE CARTER. 


Ollie Carter Was Burned to Death Last Week on West Lake 
Avenue, Where He Has Lived For a Number of Years. 


; -:-^V.I-if 


;riiiN'};rr 


9c ifcme 9atkcta Wffc Have '3om 


|(By J. B. Bass) 

with Apologies to W. F. Kirk 


(1)1 


How often hast thou sent forth words of cheer, ' 
Where homes were comfortless 
And all life was drear. 

How often, too, hast thou met him 
Whose cup of sorrow was to the brim. 
And with thy soothing, tender words 
Grief was banished and joy entered, 

And now, it ie thy lot to weep ; 

But, rememi)er, God's children He has promised to keep. 

Thy fate is the common fate of all — 

For into every life some rain must fall. 


My Dear Mrs. Buckneb: 

As I review my past few years of labor in this city, and hink of 
the many occasions when my soul yearned with that longing which 
neither hunger nor thirst can cause, you have come, and — with a 
smile that radiated your soul — cheered me on. 

Words with which to express the grief I feel come not to me. I 
kno it is sad to part with one held so near and dear in your life, 
and espeeially when it was so sudden ; but, knowing your kindly 
nature, and that- it is coupled with good sense, I am sure that this 
ad experience will be a sweet benefaction in your already sweetly 
flavored life. 

Yours, in the hour of grief, 

C. A. S. 


BAKERSFIELD. 

Miss Anila McClanahan of this 
city who attended Howard College, 
Washington, D. C , will arrive in 
this city Monday. Miss McClan- 
ahan is charming in manner as 
well as in beauty. All Bakersfield 
will give her a warm welcome 
home. 

Mrs. E. J. Shelvey will enter- 
tain Mr. and i\lrs. Thomas F. Car- 
ter at dinner Thursday. 

Mrs. Gordon McPherson's sister 
is spending a few days with her. 

Major Young's Literary Mon- 
day night. Grand program. All 
are invited to attend. 

Citizen's League will meet Sat- 
urday night at Winter's Hall. Im- 
portant business. 

Miss Madeline Moulton Dsborne 
of Lob Angeles, has just returned 
from Kansas City, to visit her 
mother. She expects to return in 
April and will pay a visit to Bak- 

ersfield. 

Mios Cooper of Kansas City is 
visiting Mrs. Over of Allensworth, 
and spent a few hours in this city, 

Mrs. Vile Spikes Kicheu, pianist, 
Will open in recital the latter part 
of April, to aid building fund of 
Cain A. M. E. Church, Mrs, is 
one of our best artists. 

Mrs, Chester La Sell, after spend- 
ing a few months in Oakland, re- 
turned home recently. Mrs. La 
Sell is taking active part in morn- 
ing choir and was organist Sunday 
afternoon. 

Miss Willie Walker, new teacher 
of the beginner's class, is doing a 
good work and makes an excellent 
teacher. 

Miss Lillian Simpson has re- 
turned to her work as head milli- 
ner at Hochhimer's. Miss Simp- 
ion is one of the most expert in 
her line on the coast, 

The new Baptist church branch 
held their first meeting Sunday 
night at VV inters' hall, Re 7. Beck- 
er, pastor. 

"White Temple" Baptist Church 
is doing good work. Rev. J. G- 
McPhereon, pastor. 

^is8 Clara Atcheson, the clever 
little milliner, will be glad to 
make your Easter hat. Give her a 
•rial. 

Miss Howard of Los Angeles is 
?lBiting her brother, Mr. Gus How- 
ard, 

Mr. Anna Huston, after a short 
stop »t Fresno, returned home 
iMt week. 


An elab irate pink tea was held 
at the home of Mrs. Pearl Lowery 
Winters, given by Mrs. Maud 
Gillem and Mrs. H. Green in honor 
of Mrs. Thomas F. Carter. All of 
the fifty guests reported having 
had a delightful lime, deeming 
Miss Gillem and Miss Green most 
charming hosteseee. 

Mrs. Ethel Kinard spent a few 
months in the north and has now 
returned. .Mrs. Kinard is one of 
our leading hair dressers. We are 
glad to welcome her home. 

Miss Hazel Jones of Fresno is 
expecting to visit this city. 

Messrs, C, J. Barton and Thos. 
Edwasds have gone to Sanger to 
work for six week*. Mr. Barton 
is head usher of the. A, M. E, 
Church. 


Good Work Being Dona by thi 
Supervising Teaciiers. 

MANY IIMPRDVEIMENTS MADE 


j^ ^1 


Ecenomlo and Social Aspect of Educa- 
tional Work In Ono Hundred and 
Thirty Countiea In the Southarn 
ttatei Raviewed by Stat* Supervisor 
Jackaon Davia of Virginia. 

How Industrial training, under a sys- 
tem of supervising Industrial teachers 
has not only vitalized the rural schools 
among the colored people Into which 
It has been Introduced, but Is also hav- 
ing farreachlng economic and social 
effects on rural conditions generally, 
is described by Jackson Davis, state 
supervisor of elementary schools In 
Virginia, in the Southern Workman 
Mr. Davis says In part: 

"A few efforts had been made here 
and there throughout the south to tie 
up the work of the country school to 
the life of the home and the farm, but 
It was not until th* establishment of 
the .leanes fund for rural schools that 
a general effort was made in this dl-^ 
rectlon. In Henrico county, Va., In the 
fall of 1908, following a conference of 
the school offlclnis of the county with 
agents of the Jeanes fund, a supervis- 
ing Industrial teacher was employed 
and put to work In all of the colored 
schools of the county. 

"The pioneer work of Virginia Ran- 
dolph In overcoming the Indifference of 
her own people, organizing Improve- 
ment leagues at each school. Introduc- 
ing simple forms of Industrial work 
and In the enlistment of the active In- 
terest of the white people In these ef- 
forts for Improvement In practical 
wa78, met with such success that a 
new spirit was soon ablaze In each 
colored community, and the schools 
were transformed In appearance and 
In the general character of their work. 

"The general plan, so successful In 
its early demonstration, has contliined 
to grow and meet with approval. It 
has developed Initiative among the 
color'Ml rural people, and It has tied 
their Interests together In a school for 
a l>etter nelghlwrbood. The moral ef- 
fect has been noticed by the white 
people around them and their support 
of this movement has been hearty. 
Supervising industrial teachers were 
employed In 130 connOet in the sontb- 
em states last session. 


It's a good thing for L'Ouverture that he died when he did: 

This age is no time for a Warrior Kid — J 

His wonderful conquests,! his great battle lines 

Would now be hailed with : "Back to the Mines !" 

I fear that our Toussant — were he to return 

And try with his sword our country to free — 

Would have to go after it hammer and tongs 

By handhng recruits and singing swan songs. 

(2) 

It's a gooid thing for Douglass, too, he isn't here now. 

With his glowing head of silver and magnificent brow. 

If he were Minister to Hayti he'd not hold his job— 

'Twould lie segregation at Washington or his political shroud. 

Things were so different in years long agoi ■ 

They used to appreciate manhood ; but now— the closed door ! 

He'd find but few of those that he had led. 

So I guess that our Douglass had better stay dead. 

(8) 

It's a good thing for Bruce that he died long ago. 

For his statecraft now wfouldn't have any show. 

It is true, lots of coin by freedmen has been spent — 

But the wiser ones got it and spent every cent. 

C. H. J. Taylor, too, wo^ald starve if he came back to earth — 

For the present powers shy at real yorth. 

They were lucky "old tiipers," who were here and made good, 

And I don't think they'd want to come back if they could. 


A LETTER TO J. D. REYNOLDS. 


TtUMOM IMS WMiU»l 


all|j, Amatprbam Nproa. jnt. 

No. 17 WEST 136tm STREET 


Sew Tork. B.Y.. ?«b. It. 1»14^ 


Itr. ). D. Saynolda, 

196C Raymond AV9. , 

Los Aa^slas. Calif. 

Denr 31r:- 

*o bog to ackziowloil^e receipt of your eorfip 
book, entitled Tips on the roco problom,"* and thora 
nre renoons to boll ore that If you follow printing 
the scrap book In bold type on tinelj topics, such 
aa aro shown in the copy submitted, so that any ordijuury 
man or woman can prediot tha ultlmato future of your 
publication. 

-Wo aro indeed ^la0 to bo tha recipient of yoixr 
eourtesios and forecast' a feast for thoao of refined 
taste for good lltorstura. 

Let "tips'* have clear soiling and in due time 
the public will nnjtiously awoi't the tip from John D. 
Reynolds. 

If an azchan^o is daslrnbla. it is yours to 
cooDiajid. 

Respootfully yours. 

AMSTEHDAM NEWS PD3. CO.. 


MA/ML 


KanaciAC Editor. 


• ♦♦♦♦0»»0»0»»»0>>>««0000>>«»«>»«««««< 


SPom 


ti D>> iMitfttin^''*' «»****' -'-«-«"«"«-*-«-***'>**^^'"- 



/^ ^C^.^i-.^^T,,^' 


jumped 22 feet 8j4 inclies, easily 
winning first place. 


Notice to All Colored Property Owners : 


Telephone me when your FIRE INSURANCE will expire 
and I will reqew it in any Corn pan y you may desire. I 
will allow you 5 per cent, discount. 

Call Main 5429, or Call at 412 Germain BIdg. 
224 South Spring Street 


Real Estate 


SIDINEV P. DOINES 

Fire Insurance Notary Pubfic 


BUTTERICK PATTERNS 


R. & G. CORSETS 


The 12th Street Store 

N. W. Cor. i2th and Central Ave. 

"Under New' Man.\gemi.\t" 

Central Avenue's Bargain Center that gives a "Money Back 
Guarantee with Every Purchase. 

Phone 23756 1125 Central Av/nue 

"Yours to Please, The 12th St. Store" 


Telephone South 75Sg Res. 13i» Newton St. i Home 22088 

Wm. A. auid Arthur Grosser — Florists 

, Proprietors of FKRNDALE NURSERY 

Floral Designs a Specialty 
?^^°a\\"oTc'as.oks 1 408-1 6 Central Avenue 


TO BE NICELY DRESSED 

And Have a Good Look, You Must Have 
Your Clothes Made at Sam Cook's 

Don't worry. Our cleaning and Pressing is of the Highest Grade. 
We Make Your Old Clothes Look Like New. 
1 Like to order they are made. 

VVe are making Tailing Suits from $1.5.00 up. Our work is very Good. 

Everybody says io. 

1314 Central Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 


THE TAILOR THAT 
KVERVBODY KNOWS 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

BOUGHT. SOLD AND EXCHANGED 

AYERS BROTHERS 


House Furnishings of All Kinds. 
Phone South 4273. Open Evngs. 


2627 Central Avenue 


E. E. ANDREWS 


Dry Goods, Furnishings 
Hardware, Paints, Oil... 

1791 W. JEFFERSON 


Wc Duplicate Any Price Made 
on the same class of Goods... 


847 


HOME 
T3**8 


Hoxvard Shoe Store 

Fine Shoes and Shoe Repairing 

1601 NV. Jefferson Street 


The New Idea Bakery 


420 East Fifth Street 


Bakery Goods 


Fresh Pastry 


Our assorted Cakes and Piei are a little better and Cheaper 

We can afFo rd this because we do our own baking 

por Parties and Weddings Try Our Cakes. 


Home A5018 Good Work— Quick Service Main 3625 

Pacific Clothes Cleaning Works 

SUITS $1.00 UP 

2358 East Ninth Street Los Angeles, California 


G. W. DANSON 

l-*03 IVIateo Street 

Dry Goods, Shoes, .Hats, IVotions 

NEW IDEA PATLERNS— with cutting diagram and seam allowance 
-EVERY SIZE in EVERY STYLE-10 cents. 


Farwell Bros 

Watchmakers 
I and Jewelers 

Iffh and Central Ave 
j Lios AngreleB. 

\\'atcheis accurately repaired a^ 
mc derate prices. Diamonds re-se 



The Y. M. C. A. boys are pre- 
paring for a big track meet in 
tlie near future, led by Messrs. 
Drew, Lewis and "P«t" Young. 


Clarence Bluett of the Los .An- 
geles High School won third 
place in the shotput last Friday 
in a track meet between L. .\. 
and the Manual Arts High schoo 
and the Manual Arts High 
Schools. .. 


It 


^•->'Jj^"1^i#Jfttefi 




Vuv 


S"^ 




Last Saturday at the track 
meet between the Universities of 
California and Southern Califor- 
nia, which was won by the Uni- 
versity of Southern California, 
Mr. Howard Drew, the peerless 
runner, demonstrated his ability 
by running the 100-yard dash in 
•1 4-.^ seconds, one second behind 
the world's record, and toying 
with his competitors in the 220- 
yard dash. Mr. Drew caused a 
tumultuous shout to go up from 
the bleachers when he broad- 



i ALONG CENTRAL AVENUE ' 

■Mrs. Tennabaum has the latest and best. 

Schneider & Schultz, German winery products and distils pure • 
wines and brandies, 2056 Santa Fe avenue. 

Satisfaction, service and style in cloaks and suits at the Samp\e 
Suit Shop, 326 W. 7th street. 

Farwell Bros., at 12th and Central, will test your eyes, fit your 
glasses! and furnish your Christmas jewelry. 

Its -Latest Concession 

TKe new Hill street entrance at the Broadway, where children's 
"Toyland" is not only a valuable concession but a very conveni»'i:t 
addition for it saves trouble and time. Parents may take thek 
childreh there without having the encounter of hauling them up- 
stairs ip the crowd. This new annex also contains one of the most 
unique jchina, glassware and kitchen utensil department in the city. 

Atithe Broadway there is little or no trouble in finding what 
you w^t. Even fantastic New Yorkers find here that convenience 
that is found in few other department stores in the city. 


^4-t-i , 


Ife' 


'4-A, ^fi 


Mi 





MUTILATED PAGE CANNOT BE IMPROVED 




:l'< 


/ 


^LIFORNIA EAQLE. 

Alt couDDUJUcatiooi Bfaould b« addrnsed 
to Thit cfailfenila EagM, 10S4 Bast Mlnth 
Streata. ^dunset Phone Broadway 7667. 

Rnteretd as Becond-clasa mall matter at 
the Postofflce of Ix>a Angeles, Cal., under 
the Act of Mar«h 1, 1879. 

> ■•' - ' 1 "^ = 

C. A. SPEAR. .Managing Editor 

J. E BASS..1 Editor 

H. rfHAXNON Advertising Manager 

LEWIS K. BEEKS _ Local Editor 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

S. B. Carr Pasadena 

H. E. Simpson ^ Bakersfleld 

E. L. Lewis Fresno 

Miss Ada Thompson .^Dakland 

Mrs. Evans San Francisco 

J. J. .\nderson San Francisco 

2. F. Henderson Los Angeles 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

«Jne Year ^- K-OO 

Six Montht 100 

Three Months ■ - 50 

It occaBlonally happens that for some 
reason or other papers are missed by be- 
In^ missent. lost Or stolen. In case of 
subscribers not receiving their papers, in- 
form us by postal and we shall cl^eertully 
furnish a duplicate copy at said missing 
number. 

No attention paid to anonymous letters. 

Copy must be written plainly on one 
«;de of paper, and to insure Insertion in 
current issue rau.«t reach this office 
Thursday. Correspondents, please take 
notice. 

ADVERTISING RATES, 50c PER INCH. 

The ne,L;riies in all sections nl 
the country are u.iitiiii; lircath- 
lessly \o see what will become of 
the reappointment of Jn(lL;e Ter- 
rell. 


We are ijlad to note that thej 
country is rid of Chief Sam. the j 
supposed .\fri-c;in chief who has 
been for a numhcr of months road- 
intr throtiLrh the States scIliiiL,'. wc 
believe. iniat;inar\' shares in .\fn-i 
can lands to which he claims heri- 
tage. 


SOJUE OF THE STRUGGLES! 
OF THE NEGRO PRESS 1 

One eveninij; this week ai the 
close of a \er\' l>us\' da\' I drew 
me up at my desk, lleforc me' 
was scattered a mass nf newspa- 
pers, all hearin;^' the distinction of 
colored. M \' already tired brain 
and sun strained ives almost \v 
fused the task that was set be- 
fore. Hut from somewhere and 
> oniehow I yaimd c<inr;iL;e. and 
plunsjjed in b\ startinL; with the 
one on top--it was the < )klahonia ' 
— O, there I i^'o. 1 didn't mean to 
call any nanio, but the pres^ w ( .rk 
on that particular journal was so 
poor that one could not e\en 
properly translate the answers to 
P>(>oker Washini^aon's article, ask- 
ingf for better traceliiii:' acconuiio- 
dations for Xeijro pas.si'nL,'ers o\ cr 
certain railro.ad lines: which wa> i 
bravely undertaken. The Dallas 
Express came in for a similar crit- 
icism while the Uoston Alli.ance 
and (,'onser\Titive Couiisrll.ir is 
void of that harmonion^ toning; 
with other parts ..f tlic papers on 
acc^nint of too much front i)aije 
advertisement. In others there 
were similar and even more L;rie\- 
ou.s errors. 

The colored papers that take 
first rank in tyi)oi,fraphical clean- 
liness and mechanical accuracy 
are the .Vmstenlam .Xews. Rich- 
mond I'lanet. Kansas C'itv Sun, 
New \'()rk .\ye ;ind a few others. 
It is with no small dei,Tee of ap- 
preciation that I review the merits 
and demerits of these journals 
and journalists, wdio are strnp- 
glin.e: as I am; for to |)ublish a 
N'egTo journal at this period 
means sacrifice at every stopover. 
I see written in [^^reat red head- 
lines, at the head of the meanest 
effort in the way of a .Vegro jour- 
nal these wodrs. "Self ;Sacrifice." 
Our readers arc more sensitive 
to literary abuse in a race papir 
than they are to the big dailks. 
I often have a man coine.into my 
office to complain about a stick 
of matter upside down in the last 
issue or an article that was backed 
up the wrong way. Now, if he, 
perhaps, knew that my day had 
been 36 hours instead of eight in 
comparison with his, instead of 
criticising he wT)uld step in and 
offer to pay his subscription with 
the hope that his mite might help 
a little in relieving the situation. 
For whenever you see faults 
standing out conspicuously in Ne- 
gro papers there is but one con- 
clusion to come to, and that is 


Ft--' -'Jt- f -■ 
' % - 

that finance is oh, so short 

Now, don't stand apart and 
l^ugh jeeringly or criticise an ef- 
fort that you yourself are not 
brave enough to make. If you 
can not give thousands, you can 
give the widow's mite and the 
least you pay on your subscrip- 
tion will be precious in the edi- 
tor's sight. 

* * * 

San Joaquin County Officers Deal 

Justly with Colored Prisoner 

for Aggravated Crime. 

\\ hile in Stockton on business' 
we chanced to be in the court- 
house wlien the case of .Andrew 
King was called in Judge rium- 
iner's court. 

1 he case of King was an a,ggra- 
\fated one where much violence to 
commit robbery from an a.ged wo- 
man was used. He brazenly 
I>Ieaded ,guilty, admitted everv- 
thing including the brutal man- 
ner in which the robbery was 
committed, the court i)lainlv in- 
structed him in his rights in the 
premises. He waived them all. 
after which the court sentenced 
him to J,^ years in Folsom. 

.\ow we think that in this in- 
stance the prisoner was dealt with 
leniently, a big strapping healthy 
man who had served '* vears in 
the army wlio would stoop to 
such a dastardly crime 1? \ears 
was just. .And we commend 
jud.ge I'himmer for the same. 
Tlie officers from the sheriff, W. 
11. Reich s up, are to be congrat- 
ulated for the manner in which 
tlic\- uK-tcd out justice in this in- 
stance, which was quite in con- 
trast to the unregenerated sheet, 
the daily Record, which has 
sought to stir lip race i)rejutjice 
b\ its glaring headlines of a 
black negro brute. It w;is simph' 
• in ,i,gi.;ra\ atcd crime in which jus- 
tice w;is meter out in a fair ;md 
impartial manner. 



recgive a hearty sup|p0rt for' re- 
election from all classes. 

County Surveyor F. M. Quail 
has made an enviable record in 
this very important office and no 
doubt vvill receive a strong sup- 
port for re-election. 

One of the finest gentlemen 
whom we have ever met is the 
genial and kind Cheriff VV. H. 
Reichs of San Joacpiin county. 
;He has filled the office with great 
credit and as a result thereof will 
receive a stron.g support from a!l 
classes for a second term. We 
shall have something to say in 
relation to some of the candidates 
for the benefit of our Stockton 
reailers as the campai,gn pro- 
gresses. 

Mr. lohn 1). Maxey, presept re- 
r-ordcr and auditor, will this year 

make the race for re-election to 
the office of auditor; he has maile 
an excellent officer and will re- 
ceive a strong sU])])ort, 

STOCKTON LIVE WIRE. 

Rev. G. W. Reed, who is the 
■ pirit in the greatest 


THE GOLDEN WEST. 

With its evrlasting reputatiori 

of "biggest and b^st hotel" for 
men and women of color, the 
Golden West also enjoys the dis- 
tinction of setting the standard 
of entertaining newspaper and 
other public spirited people in a 
manner long remembered and 

cherished bv them. 

1 

; Messrs. Brown and Williams, 

I 

I , . , 

;the congenial proprietors, are 

careful in not only Riving good 
ser\ice but in making the general 
atnu)sphere congenial and home- 
like fcjr their many guests, who 
come fr(jm all sections of the 
country. Their party service is 
also unchallenged in excellence. 


FOUR 

ROUTES 

AST 


ading spirit m 
t'haut.aiupia to be helil at Sticra- 
mento in the near future is \ery 
bus\' exploiting the same, and he 
savs it will be one of the .greatest 
gatherings e\er held in this vi- 
cinity. 

Quite a .great deal of comment 
is heard unfavorable to District 
.\ttornc\- I'oltz for the treatment 
he accorded one of the colored 
wonien witnesses in a recent 
trial, for without cause at his or- 
der she was put in jail. 

l\e\. J. .\. nuucan reports .a 

gre.it success for his (|nar;crl\- 

coiilercnce that the record was 

broken for r;iisiug funds the last 

] (|u;irter. 

I'.ditor I. 1'.. I'.ass and .\d\ertis- 
ing M;in;iger .'^h.innon were visit- 
ors in our city this week in the in- 
terest of the l-'.agle. 


Max 


A. M. E. CHURCH. 


Phone Main 4149 


POLITICAL STRAWS OF SAN „.„,„,; 
JOAQUIN COUNTY. "' " 

P.. C". Wallace will a-ain seek 
re-election to the_i,t'ficc of coroner 
.•ind it seems th.at he will ha\c n. i 
o|,pMsition. 

< i. H. I'dack. the well-kiMwn 
deputy wh<i has been in the sher- 

itT s oflice for IZ years has rcsign- 

e.l his jxisitiou .-ind will seek the coiin:y . an. 1 will go before the pe 

nomination as head of that office. 

Mr r,l:ick has made a good officer 

and no doubt if nomin.ateil and 

elected would make ;in ideal sher- 

ill. lie has many friends an<l is 
making a strenuous can\-;iss. 


r Kubensteiu is a broad- 
I'tTici.al .and caters to mi 
class i nhis office, but is conduct- 
ing the affairs of the citv in a way 
that gi\es the greatest benefits to 
the L;re:ite-t unmber of jiei'iile. Me 
is the hiL;ht m.iii in the right 
place. 

Superior judge Smith has cred- 
it.-iblv filled tli.at iiositicin in this 


pie a,L;aiii with ;i record which will 
nil doubt mean his reiuimination 
;ind election. 

Ind^e rinmmer of the crimin.al 
br.-inch of the Sujierior court, h.as 
tilled this trying position to the j 
s;itisfaction of the jieople and \\\\\ 1 


Subject for the aermon next 
Sunday morning, ' Happineps " 

Be on hand early and secure a 
comfortable seat. An intpresting 
program will be rendered in the 
evening, conHisting of ptrong num- 
bers contributed by talented young 
people and especial music. Mr. 
Samuel C. Thompson, attorney and 
counselor at Uw, recently from 
Detroit, Mich , will make his ini- 
tial appearance before a Los An" 
geles audience on this occasion. 
Don't fail to hear him. 

The Sunda' -school has taken 
on new life. A new class of young 
ladies has been organized, with 
Mrs. Laura Young as teacher. 
Young ladies will do well to enroll. 
If yo are not attending Sunday- 
chool, try it next Sunday and you 
will see wfiat wonderful results it 
is possible to get therefrom. 

The Trustees' Auxiliary Board 
was most pleasantly entertained 
in the beautiful and epaeious home 
of Mrs. Fry of 1220 Hobait Boul- 
evard, last Friday afternoon. The 
meeting was a most profitable on 
rom every view-|ioint and some ] MAIN|8 1 51 
important ^TTork was done. ' =^ -I 

The Stewardess Auxilliary Board 
gave a jiound party for the unfor- 
tunate, Thursday evening. Many 
loyal members brought their 
pounds, and some brougf)t more, 
cheerfully giving the same for their 
Master's s.ike, to tho.=e who have 
need. 


SUNSET 

Double Daily iJervice to New Or- 
leans and East through Dixie 
Land 

EL PASO 

"GOLDEN STATE LIMITED" 

The tain de luxe, exchjBively first 
class. 

The "Califor.ni.^n" for both first 
and iecond class travel. 
The line of low altitudes. 

OGDEN 

The trail of the Argonauts — 
The route of the 

SAN FRANCISCO OVERLAND 
LIMITED" 

SHASTA 

THE "ROAD OF A THOUSAND 

WONDERS," to the East through 
the great Northwest 
See age.nts 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Los Angeles Offices 
212 West Seventh'Street 

Station, Fifth and Central Avenue 
t: tra Cffice, 418 E. Co 


R. B. YOUNG & SON 

A RCH IT ECTS 

702 Lankershim Building 


Los Angeles 


Qiiick Service Laundry 

% 905 Central Ave. 

i'ou will secure best work and lowest prices in city 
jvith prompt and courteous treatment. Delivery to 
iall parts of city at low rate. Phone orders given 
Strict attention. 

MAIN 8151 


A. A. GRANT PEOPIES 

I NOTARY 
Agent for Inyestments, Building, 
Loans^Insiirance. Houses, Lots, 

$nd Acreage for sale 

li46 Central Avenue i Tel, 

A 1 , i ■ California I 


RE/LTY GO. 

Capital Stock $75,000 
Shares $L00 each 

F. H. CRUMBLY 

Agent 
Bwy 2528. 785 San Pedro 


Three persons received Christian 
baptism last Sunday in what was 
said to be the most impressive 


Third Anniversary 

Good Values Given Worthy of Our Three Years 

of Progress 

We are Selling Everything Below Cost 

Beautiful Silk and Madras Ladies' .Shirt VV'aists, extra value, from 
50 cents up Dainty Aprons and Work Aprons, Also Hosiery. 
Ladies' and Gents' Silk and Li^le, from 19c, 

Special Men's Work Shirts from 3.5c up. Men'.- Gloves from -^c up 
to $1..50. Our Dress Making and Tailoring Department, Ladies' Eve- 
ning Gowns and Coats. 
411 E*8t 7th Street MRS. NL\A E, THOMAS 

H,OME 10849 Sunset Main 4632 

K. .J. \VAURi:X 

ASSOCIATED WITH 

THK FITZCiEUAI.n MUSIC STOUE 

947 -SOtTlH UKOADW.VV 

See him before purchasing your piano, 
He will be pleased to call if- you phone. 


I service for a long while. In the 

' mfternooii our pastor and quite a 

number of our members worshiped 

*ith the A. M. K. Church at 

jum (Juf own Bro. F. Halt 

{pang to the delight of all, and 

Bro. Faggleston won for himself a 

place in the hearts of tliat people 

""ith his saxaphone. 

The rally for the building fund 
of Cain Chapel, A. M. E. Church, 
was a grand success. Cash pledges 
$300. Go to church day. All are 
invited. "The Plan of Salvation," 
81:00a. m. 8:00 p. m, "The Sav- 
ior." Instruction to people on Go 
to church day. Rev. J. W. Price, 
Cain Chapel, cor. Cal. and O. Sts. 


Home 74680 


Sunset Vermont 3169 


C. B. OWEN 
Feed, Fuel and Transfer 

Wood, Coal, Hay and Grain. All Kinds of Chicken Feed 

Moving Household Goods a Specialty 

3566 WESTERN AVExNUE ' Los Angeles 


Drs. Claude Ballard and Leon- 
ard Stovall, whose office was for- 
merly at 1325 1-2 9th street, are 
now jointly located at 1201 1-2 
Central avenue. 


S. BROWM 


Main .1208 


laSH KAST 1 iTii ST. 

OPi>oni-nE niRCH mtukkt 

CuoiCK Staple Okoceries 

CIGARS, TOUACCOS 
CANDIKS, SOFT DRINKS 



International Order of Twelve 

meetsfas follows at Washington 

s 

and Central Hall ; 

i 

Gol|en West Temple No. 412 
at 8 olclock p. m. 

•j 
Paciiflc Coast Tabernacle Xo. 
210 meets second and fourth 
Tuesday, at 8 o'clock p. m. 


Xew Beiilah Tabernacle Xo. 43 
meets the second and fourth 
Thursday of each month, at 8 
o'cIoc|c p. m. ^ 


Star of Bethlehem Tabernacle 
Xo. 382 meets the first and second 
Saturday at 2 p. m. 


r 


Keddesh Rov^al House of Midia 
Xo. 79 meets the third Tuesday 
at 8 p. m. 


IF; YOU WANT TO RENT 
A i ROOM OR A HOUSE 

i OR TO 

BUY A LOT OR A HOME 

In Venice, Ocean Park or'^Santa 
I \ Monica, write 

ij. ALLEN REESE, 
600 $an Juan Avenue, Venice 


No tcpuble to answer questions 


'-ii^^:ri^^ '%^!i b^*l&fekfcfest 


mk 


'iiAk. 




.*. M 


.t*.!. 


:i^_xj''ii;|,i:''.nv. 


"•^l 




f 

I ao^ in a poeition to oSer you 

Sonie of the Best Residence 
: Property on the pay- 


-il 


HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Williams about Wil- 
mington Harljor property. The 
greatest opportunity of your life 
is at 3'our door now. 

We have 6 50-ft. lots we can sell 
for S550. only SIO down, $5 a 
month. We also have 80 other 
lots in same tract, but you will 
have to be in a hurry if you wish 
to get in on the ground floor. 
• Any day we get six or eight 
persons we will take you down to 
see the lots. 

H. H. WILLIAMS, 
Corner 12th and Hemlock. 


In keeping with its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continues to 
give to its patrons the best pos- 
sible service. 

Being centrally located between 
the three great railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel_ 
meets the demands not only in 
good service but likewise conve- 
nience. 


-M- 


FOR REN^>-We have several 
housekeeping apartments of three 
and four rooms for rent very 
cheap. Also a good business site. 

Apply Noah D. Thompson, 
1711 E. 5Sth,St. 


Piano Instruction. 

Mr. Clarence D. Cooksey, 
Inetruction on the Piano. 


^■u VM^ 


"4 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



iHM'Kyi 




I--- 


A New Field For Women. 


The CotBet Ice Cream Co. is now 
being operated by Mrs. Grahtn and 
she is putting on the market a 
grade of cream that is unsurpassed 
by any in flavor and purity. 

Women %now — don't take my 
word for it-t-JQ8t try it once. 

Branch office at 944 Central Av. 


' Mr. and Mrs. Hurbert Foster — 
(Mrs. Hurbert Foster was for- 
merly Miss Madlene Cole) — are 
the happy parents of a son. Both 
mother and son are doing well. 
Mother and Father Cole are be- 
ginniner to fccl important, since 
this is the Mrond grand in the 
family. 


Miss Minnie .-Mbrittoii was the 
pleasing- hostess at a dinner party 
given at her home Sunday after- 
noon. The g"uests of the occasion 
were much elated over the pleas- 
ant afternoon spent, especially 
the musical treats from Miss Al- 
britton and Messrs. Wilson and 
Wilkins. Those present were 
Misses .Albrittan. F.cton, F.rma 
Fields Polk and Mrs. Wilkins: 
Messrs. \\"ilson, F.adcs. Beeks. 
.■\dkins and Wilkins. 


Mr. .S. Cole, of 1328 E. 14th 
street, has sold out to Mr. Brown, 
who is conducting- a neat little 
g-rocerv. 


Xext Tuesdav evening at \\ es- 
lev Chapel a mock cungress will 
be held. This is something unus- 
ual and should pmvc beneficial. 


The ladies at the ."^i ijourner of 
Truth Home made tiie cccasi^n 
more fhan pleasant fur Dr. Wash- 
ington la:*t' .Saturday attcrni"in. 
Dr. Washington characterized the 
occasion as one of the happiest <if 
his life, wishing as he enjiivcd it. 
for his wife's presence. Xearlyi 
two hundred dined with and 
feasted up'in the useful remarks 
of Dr. Washington. 

.Mr. Walter Dubsnn has been 
suffering se\erely frum blui.d p"i- 
'soning at his home <.jn Tuwne 
avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stonewall Jackson 
of .Azusa were visitors in the city 
last Simdav. 


The Louisiana Club met at the 
residence of Mrs. Jones on Ceres 
avenue, Tuesday evening. De- 
lightful jirogram was rendered. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Batson's An- 
niversary Celebrated with Sur- 
prise Party by the Lend-a-Hand 
Society. 

The aTuii\ersary of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ci. R. llatson which was to 
have been celebrated February 23 
was celebrated .March 3r(l by the 
l.end-a-Hand Society, of which 
Mrs. liatson is a member and 
active worker. In token of their 
appreciation for excellent service 
as a worker the ."Society presented 
.Mrs. liatson a dozen cut-glass 
punch glasses. In appropriate 
wi^rds Mrs. Maggie I'erg made the 
presentation on behalf of the 
234.^(1 was 
ss .\. Col- 


j.">ociet\-. .\ beautiful 
|aI<o a present front M 

lins. 
i Music forjtlie occasion wa 

ni-hed by Mi-s A. Cdadden. 

freshments in tune with tlu 


tur- 
Re- 
sea- 


Mr. J. v.. 
editor, is still 
eating in the 
state. 


>ass. our ,'issociate 
>ut of the city rusti- 
II irtliern part^of the 


Mrs. S. Randolpl, , 
street entertained at 
Thursday evening Re\ 
A. C. Williams, their 


I \\-d<i '>th 
Hnner last 
; and Mrs. 
little sister 


son were >er\ cd. Ami the happy 
fiartv Nveiit a\\a\' feeling sure that 
this was realU' a >nrpri--e partv. 

It w.'is at the re-idence of Mrs. 
I'.at-on tliat the club held that 
\-er\- succes>fiil liojiilny-feast last 
lanuarv. ;it whicli thirty-fi\e were 
present. 

The I,end-a-l land Society will 
celebrate their annual sermon at 
Wesley I'hapel Simday, the 4th. 
Tvex-. Kenche will preach. 

Mr. and Mrs. P>at^on wish to 
thatik their nian\' friends of the 
I.end-a-1 1,-ind ."^ocietv for the 
pleasure they rccei\-cd at their 
bands at the bfrthday party. 
• 7 1 ,H7 ^ '"C 


Clara and Miss C. Si-)ear. .Mrs. 
Randolph is one of tlK.se cook^ 
that you read about, and certain- 
ly on this occasion, even tlnxigh 
she claims to ha\e made no spe- 
cial preparation, she distin- 
guished her ability, for the fried 
chicken, cakes and pies cotild not 
be surpassed in scientific jjrepa- 
ration. 

The dinner was served in the 
style which secures ease and 
grace for guests and hostess, and 
each parted from the other in an 
attitude of mind i:)nly developed 
bv such feasts. 


Mr. I. Jefferson, a member of 
the Tabernacle Baptist Chtirgh, 

' died at his home .m Lawrence 
street Monday evening. He was 
buried from "the Tabernacle Bap- 
tist Church Thursday afternoon. 

■; Mt^- Jefferson was about .55 years 


It you want an apron that looks 
and fits well, |)urc]iasc at the 
Apron I'actory, 74'' Ceres avenue, 
.Mrs. I'aniiie Johnson, proprietor 
and Lreneral manager. 


Mrs. M. J. Daxis and daughter, 
Mrs. Cook, were pleasant callers 
at the office this week. 

Mr. A. D. Lacey and T. .\. Cole 
Iliad a narrow escape from a burn- 
ling building last ■^londay after- 
noon. 

THE EAST EIGHTH STREET 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH 


D. L, McMiCKENs, Pastor. 
Bible school at 10 a. m. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. Subject, 
'What to Confess." 


BIG NEGRO INVESTMENT 
CO. FOR LOS ANGELES 

Wanted — Six men and six wo- 
men, well recommended with good 
business qualifications to canvas 
for the sale of shares ifi the Peo- 
ple's Realty Company of this city. 
This is a Negro enterprise, con- 
servatively managed and properly 
chartered by the laws of Califor- 
nia. The company has bought 
real estate in the city and in the 
country. No salary is paid to offi- 
cers. Liberal commission will be 
paid to agents. Call on F. PL 
Crumbly, agent, at 785 San Pedro 
street. Telephone Broadway 2528. 
This com])any is working along 
the line approved by Prof. Booker 
T. Washington. The officers are 
a board of directors; J. H. Shack- 
elford, president : Dr. J. S. Out- 
law, vice-president ; Eugene Walk- 
er, treasurer, and Dr. J. A. Som- 
ervillc is the secretary. .All stock 
sold by the company's agent at 
785 .^. .'^an Pedro street. 

Every colored man and woman 
in this great city ought to hold 
shares in this companv. Its fu- 
ture is a bright one and from 
small beginning it is the jdan of 
the company to be able to gi\e 
sidjstantialj emplovment to <iur 
people. ; 

ECONOMICAL CONDITIONS 

a GROW WORSE 

Months and months have passed 
since the passage of the tariff !)ill, 
also the currencv measure. Has 
the Cost of living declined?' No' 
Climbing cost any less? No 1 oMre 
monev in your pocket or in the 
bank? Xo ! 

.\1I will admit that the times 
now are at the lowest ebb and 
will remember that eighteen 
months ago thev were fairlv good : 
the people had monev to spend. 
There is a great deal of difference 
in the jiroblem : if things are 
high and you have the money to 
bu\-, than when they are low and 
vou b,i\e not go the money to buv, 
but right now prices are not even 
low and there is a scarcity of 
mone\' to buy. I'.ut the time is 
coming when the peo|)le will wake 
u]). .\t long intervals the people 
become restless and tire of well 
doing and w;int a change, and in 
many instances as now thev re- 
gret it at the expense of their 
stomach and general comfort. 


In an address in New York 
City, Dr. W. E, B. Dubois, in 
naming treatment of the negro 
problem, which promises the best 
solution, said: "There are three 
things to do, viz: You must treat 
the colored man as you would 
wish to be treated if you were 
colored; you must give him the 
ballot; you mu.st educate him." 
Thus Dr. Dubois asks the Ameri- 
can people to practice the golden 
rule, to give also to the negro the 
means of political self-defense 
(for such is the ballrt), and do 
their duty to him as a backward 
citizen, by advSncing his intelli- 
g'ence through ample educational 
facilities. This is not asking too 
much. The demand has an .in- 
creasing number of advocates 
among the best classes of our 
white -American fellow-citizens in 
all sections of our countrv. 


Chief Sain and his followers 
who are African-bound, instead 
of setting sail for the marvelous 
Cold Coast spoken of, are jour- 
neying to Portland, Maine, to 
have the ship overhauled. Just 
leave it to Sam and the whole 
crew will need overhauling in a 
few more days. 


Chas. L. P arsons 

ARCADE DRUG STORE 

■■ TOILET ARTICLES 

Myal Famly Remedies . Prescriptions a specialty 

Fifth and Central Avenue, 


W. H. GUEST, P. D. 

DRUGGIST 

Stationery Notions and .Toilet Articles 

12th and Central Avenue 


MOTHER'S KITCHEN CAFE 

cM. BROWN, Proprietor 

THE BEST PUCE IN TOWN TO^EAT 

^ Homfe'^CookingJ.A I Specialty 

BEST MEALS IN TOWN 

SHORT ORDERS 


1441 East Ninth LtJ 


Los ngeles. Cal. 


The Ancient United Sons and 
Da'ighters of Africa will meet on 
Ihr First Monday of each month 
Rl Scott's Hall, 5G1 Central ave. 
Mrs. E. R. Baldwin, 

M E. Q 
Miss M' Busby, Sec'y 


Household Brand Flavoring Extracts 

Our Goods are Guaranteed Absolutely Pure. At your Grocers 
Retail for 25c per Ibottle. Improved Export Ginger Alt and 
all flavors. Soda WaS;er. ' 

Geo. J. House & Son 

Manufacturer ,• 


Kveryb cdy has a Hobby— tur Hobby is rooms — a 60c broom for 35c Delivered 
f^ Always Welcome Whether Looking or Buying 

BrodinefBerg Furniture Co. 

Temple Street at Belmont 

ry fvnrilire (all iid iit uf, cr if 3<u wtrt to sell your fumitur 


If ycu r{<d 

We will call and see you.l^t 


Donft call us Down, call us^Up- Wilshirs 3417 


Notes From Phillips Chapel 
C. M. E. Church. 


At 7 p. m. the Y, P. S. C. E. will 
Of age an<l had been a resident of. '■«°<^«' ^ 8°°<^ program. 8 p. m 


Los Angeles for a number of 
"years. He laves a wife, three 
, daughters and two sons 

Dr. Washington was royally 
: received at the Temple .\uditori- 
i um Sunday morning and in his 
usual earnest, sensible manner, he 
drove home the thoughts which 
he presented for race unity and 
progress. The large audience con- 
^■.jtributed liberally to the cause he 
so nobly advocates. 


How to Bsgin a New Life,' 
men by the pastor. 


Ser- 


MADE DEPUTY COUNTY 
CLERK 

Henry .'^. Hnustnn, pnuninent 
business man ;m(l |i(ilitici;ui of 

riakerstield. he.irs the enviable 
reputation nf being tlic onlv nc- 
grii deputy county clerk in the 
state. .Mr. Houston recei\ecl his 
■i[)pointment from I. ?\Iillcr, 
county clerk of Kern count}'. The 
citizens generally ajipreciate this 
recognition accurded to the race in 
this section : in fact the general 
trend in this section is that of 
fairness toward all of its citizens, 
from the board of supervisors on 
down the line the county officials 
generally are broad-gauged and 
believe as a rule in all having a 
fair chance. 

Mr. Hou.ston is a wide-awake 
and progressive citizen. He owns 
one of the swellest tonsorial par- 

ors conducted for a mixed trade 
on the coast. The same is man-- 
aged by his brother, Robert 
Houston. 

Mr. Houston is prominent in 
fraternal circles and as a race 
builder, and in affairs political he 
is following in the footsteps of his 

father. He has been a resident of 
the city for a score of years; in 
1007 was married to Miss Irene 
bmes, and his life and worth to 
the communitv is inestimable. 


Look out for the big "Feast in 
the WiJdernesB," at Phillipp chapel, 
C. M. E, Church, 1406 Newton 
street, Thurfday evening, March 
19. An old time feast and jubilee 
singing. To miss it means regret 
Admission 10c. Supper 25c. Given 
by the Seventeen Club. 

Mii-s, L. Stokh-s, Captain 
Bkv.S. L. Hakkis Pasto 


EE 


M.B.Pettit & Sons 

^^ CASH GROCERY 

_ Pastry, Frlit and Vegetablas, Fresli Meats 

Wilshire 3464 i No. 1654 Tempi 


Our Second Quarterly meeting 
conference will be held at Phillips 
chapel, C. M. E. Church, 1406 
Newton street, March •22-23, Dr. 
James A. Stout, C. E., will preach 
at 11 a. m. Dr. A. C. Caldwell o 
Santa Monica will pieach at 3 p 
m., and the P. E. at 7.45 p. m. We 
invite the ministers and the gener- 
al public to worship with us Sun 
day at 3 p. m. Sunday, the 23rd 
That will be the last quarter be 
fore the annual conference, which 
meets in El Paso, Texas, April 15 
1914, 

Come and hear these great 
preachers and this fine choir, which 
charm all who hear them. 

S. L. Harris, Paetor, 


THE ALEXANDRIA ROOMING HOUS 

UNDER NEW.MANAGEMENT 

\Tl768 WALL Street 


ISeatlylFurnirhed Room 
with MotlandCold Batn 


oetween Maple and San Pedre Cas Line 
ALBERT PERRY, Manager. 


PHONE 
Main 4953— Home 4154 :* 

"^ dOMETO THE 


PAUL VENFELT, 

Proprietor 



I HiSE 111 k iiOE CO 

Where You Get the Best Service in 

Esuinily Trade 


912 San Pedro St. 


Wk^' 


0pp. City Markc 


Horse and Buggy For Sal3 

CHEAP FOR GASH ! 

Apply to J. N. LITTLEJOHN 
1597 West 36th Place 


Phone West 3068 

STERLING DRUG CO 

' THE NYAL STORE 

Use'your telephone — all lines lead to our store. 
Complete line of EASTER NOVELTIES. 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST. 
Prompt Free Delivery. 

Cor. W. Jefferson St. and Western Ave. C. J. Stadler. Pro, 


A new colored theatre has been 
opened in Washin.arton, D, C, it 
beinff the Majestic, at the corner 
of Xinth and Penn.'^vlvania ave- 
nue. It is under the manag'ement 
of Frank Brown, a colored man. 
This ffivcs Washington two large 
modern vaudeville theatres oper- 
ited by and for colored people. 

Vernon, Oklahoma, is the latest 
exclusively colored town in Ok- 
lahoma. It has a population of 
more than three hundred, and is 
growing rapidly. The town is 
named after Dr. W. T. Vernon. 


men. 




. t* ii>dU^. LH-iaiiii^ 


^^■iVJa'is.i.L.- ^r*.-.- 


FOR RENT— Furniehed 
Apartment for two gentle- 
Call at 
1017 East 9th street 




^^m^smmms 


Smith, Pres. afd Gen. Mgr. 
Grant Hammond, Vice Pres. 
CurtisOdom. Treas. 

SMITH & WILLIAMS CO., Inc. 

Funeral Directors ind PractJeal Embalmers 

We guarantee qur work shipped to any part of the eity 
LADY ATTENDANT Sevices the Best Prices the Lowest 

654 San Fern ando St 


The PeJace Cafe 

i 915 Central Avenue 

! 
The neatest, coziest and best place to eat. Newly fitted up 
nobby little booths, where parties may dine unmolested by the 
public gaze, Chinese and American dishes of the cheapest and 
daintiest and best dishes served. Chop Suey and Noodles in 
American style 


C. W. Sanders 
Telephone Broadway 1196 


B. I^ Ware 


J, E. Jones, 

Dresden Dye Works 

Ladies and Gents' Garments Cleaned, Pressed and 
ii Repaired 
Cleaned and Blocked— Work Called for and Delivered 


>.\ 


*-.M 


l^SSi^^SESs 


^A-Vi. 


'^■^imm 


,.^if 


MUTILATED PAGE CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


art musettm" in Rio. 
lytd a black grandfather, 
spn and a white grand-. 
evident intention pf the 
ier being to expreiss both the 
and the belief that the ne- 
gro was ' being absorbed and 
sformed so that he would be- 
come a white man. It is idle to 
prophesy for any remote future, 
id it is a very doubtful thing to 
irciphesy even about the immedi- 
atei future, but my impression is 
l^hajt the guiding or ruling classes 
TfOi Brazil will continue to be al- 
most absolutely white, that in the 
classes below them there will 
cdi|tinue to be a certain small ab- 
soi'ption of nef:;-ro blood, and that 
among the ordinary people this 
i^ absorption will be larger — large 
' enough to make a slight differ- 
ence in the type. 

The great mafbrity of the men 
and women I met, the leaders in 
the world of political and indus- 
trial effort, and of scientific ac- 
complishment, showjcd little, if 
any, more trace of negro blood 
than would be shown by the like 
number of similar men in a Euro- 
pean capital. Yet not only is 
there in some classes a consider- 
able infiltration of negro blood, 
with a corresponding tendency of 
*\he pure negro type to disappear, 
but this process is regarded with 
hearty approval by the most 
thoughtful statesmen of the coun- 
try. Their view, so different from 
our own, can perhaps best be ex- 
pressed in the words of one of 
these very statesmen, himself of 
pure white blood, who said to me 
substantially : 
I "Of course, the presence of the 
negro is the real problem, and a 
Very serious problem, both in 
your country, the United States, 
arid in mine, Brazil. Slavery was 
an intolerable method of solving 
the problem, and had to be abol- 
ished. But the problem itself re- 
mained in the negro." 


^„. FAD5 AND FA^IONS 

OF 


Challengint; an implied sui:;-tces- 
tion by Senator Hoke Smith of 
Georgia, that there are no negro 
chemists in this country, during 
the debate on the agricultural e.x- 
tension work bill in the Senate. 
Ralph W. Tyler has sent a letter 
. to Senator Smith naming a num- 
ber of negro chemists. 

"I do not know a negro chem. 
ist,'" was the remark of Senator 
Smith, which called forth the let- 
ter from Mr. Tyler. In his letter 
Mr. Tyler says : 

"At Tuskegee Institute they 
have a negro agrT(!tTk«xaiyTern- 
ist, Professor Carver, ^a-giaduaTe" 
of the University of Iowa, whoft 
former Secretary of Agriculture 
Wilson pronounced one of the 
best agricultural chemists in the 
country. There is also now in 
the department of agriculture a 
negro chemist. Richard H. Levvis 
of the University of Illinois, who 
!won his place in competition with 
(White chemists." 


r—. 


i Orestes Zamor was elected to 
jthe Haytian presidency last week 
!by the Haytian Congress with a 

Afote of 93 out ot a total vote of 
105. That was very decisive and 
puts the revolution happily at an 
end for the present. Zamor was 
.formerly governor of the north- 
ern department of Hayti, and 
seems to be capable of holding 
^he office of president. Sannon 
ind .other aspirants will have to 
wait for other opportunities to 
secure the honor. The marines 
pf warships of several nations 
who had been landed in Haytlsn 
ports'for the protection of for- 
eigners and the commercial inter- 
jests of those nationalities are go- 
ing back to their ships, since the 
iires of the revolution are appar- 

" iently dying down. The mercurt- 
]al temperament of Haytians can 

,r not be said to be characteristic- 
ally negro temperament, where 
he governs ; but the Haytian tem- 
perament is tropical, for it is no 
worse in Hayti than in all those 

i iSouth American and Central 
American small countries of 
white populations which lie with- 
in the hot tropical zone. 


"Brazil and the Negro" is the 
subject of an interesting article 
by Theodore Roosevelt, appear- 
ing in the current number of the 
Outlook. The article: 

If I were asked to name the 
one point in which there is com- 
plete difference between the Bra- 
zilians and ourselves, I should 
say that it was in the attitude 
toward the black man. As the 
Indian becomes civilized he is 
absorbed into the population, as 
is the case with us in Oklahoma, 
and whoever has Indian blood in 
him is prond of the fact. The 
President of Brazil is one of 
these men, and there are a num- 
ber of others among the leaders 
whom I met. It i.s~lin entire mis- 
take to speak as if the popula- 
tion of Brazil were so mixed as 
to be wholly unlike that of Eu- 
rope and the United States. It 
is mixed only in the sense in 
which the populations of Italy 
and Spain are mixed, as the pop- 
ulation of southern France is 
nii.xed, as the population is mi.xed 
in many parts of the United 
States. .As regards the major 
part of the population, the 
"mixed race" is such only in the 
sense in which that is also true 
of the I'nited States, and of most 
of the advanced nations of man- 
kind. There is one real differ-/ 
ence, however. This difference 
between the 'I'nited States and 
Brazil is the tendency of Brazil 
to absorb the negro. Mv obser- 
\ation leads me to believe that in 
"absorb" I have used exactly trie 
right expression to descrifie this 
process. It is the negro who is 
being absorbed and not the ncgr(- 
wlio is .-ibsorbiiifj the white man 
The great tiiajority of the men 
and women of hiLrli social fffisi- 
tii'H in Rio are of as unmixed 
white hlo(id .Ts the corresponding 
cl;iss ill Paris or M.-ulrid or Rome. 
I lie threat m.-ijoritv of -the politi- 
cil leaders ;ire pure whites, with 
;in occa-^ional dash of Indian 
blood. But any negro or mul.it- 
tn who shows himself fit is with- 
out question given the place to 
which his abilities entitle him. T 
met one or two colored deputies. 
.\t one military school T met a 
negro professor. .\t one great 
laboratory I saw a colored doc- 
tor. .\11 of these men were ac- 
cepted (piite simply on their 
worth, and apparently nobody 
Jiad_any;_ idea of discriminating 
against them- "uLlsny'^Tjffitral- -or-- 
busmf^-s— relations 
their color. .\ very great 
itv of the negroes, and most of 
the colored people — that is, the 
mulattoes and quadroons — do not 
make their way up to the high- 
est positions, and they are pro- 
portionately most plentiful in the 
lower ranks. Among the work- 
ing enlisted men of the army and 
navy, I saw many negroes work- 
ing side by side in the same or- 
ganizations with the whites, and 
apparently without any discrimi- 
nation being made against them. 
In Bahia there is a very large 
negro element among the work- 
ing class. In parts of P.razil it 
is somewhat larger. In Rio it 
is noticeable, but far less so than 
in most of the cities of the 
Southern I'nited States. 

Brazil is most fortunate in the 
fact that its white working popu- 
lation has nothing of the parasite 
about it. The whites do not en- 
deavor to live on the labor of the 
blacks, the inevitable result of 
which, as shown in all other com- 
munities, is that ultimately the 
blacks crowd out of existence 
those who live on their labor. 
On the contrary, the bulk of the 
work, even in Rio, is done by 
white men. But these white men 
draw no line against the negro, 
and in the lower ranks intermar- 
riages are frequent, especially be- 
tween negroes and the most nu- 
merous of the immigrant races of 
Europe. 

Perhaps the attitude that the 
Brazilians, including the most in- 
telligent among them, take is 









Be One of the 
5000 Members 


^ For Great} Meeting 

Lincoln 



Affiliated with Kepublican Feder- 
ation of Southern California 



J. A. WARREN, Secretary, 
!957 Maple Avenue 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE 

FRIDAY,! MCH. 6 

Scott's Hall, 361 Central Ave. 


>aaI •»'■ 


y^ 



9hellcung S'ecple's 

LITERARY SOCIETY 

;955 1-2 NAOMI [STREET 

DR. J. M. SMITH, 

Founder and Organizer. 

WILLIE PAYNE, 
CLARENCE IRWIN, 

JAssistant Managers. 

\Ve desire to inform^ you^that we 
have in £rog^res»«-Young People's 
literary Society, which everyone 
is invited to attend and become 
a member. Every Thursday pve- 
ning at 8 o'clock we \inpet at 
the above named place. ■; 
^ Miss Bernice Moore, Pres. 

Miss JVATHELEEN BkAYE, 

- ■ Cor. Sec'y 


n. S. A. CUMING 

CUMING'S 
LIVER TONERS 

One Hundred Vegetable Pills 
for 25 Cents 

These pills are recommended for the 
relief of Constipation, Sick Headache, 
Biliousness. 

Cuming's Drug Store 

EaTABLISHED 7 YEARS 

1407_Ea«t_Ninth_^ Broadway 871 


Pueblb Meat Market 


^i 


.TGLEPHONE MAIN 5897 


[~|i Josp;phJDavis, Proi-rietor 

I 

AIIJFresh Meat and Fish 

Meats 4rc Covcrmcnt Inspected 

Pejemium Bacon and Mams 

i JOHN T. REID 

GROCER — Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

? Our Jleat Market is a great addition to the store. 
i V^e carry all sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats. 
OUR PraCES|ARE REASONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 
i Cor. Kohlerand E. 7th St 





f NOTICEI 

Colored Voters of State fif California 

, Ta-ke N|)tice — Not to use the Afro-American 
'^Federal name unless 3-ou are registered 
therein! 

J. E^. UATTIMORE 

5400 Long B^cli Avenue l^os Angeles, Cal 


I Por Depenclat>le 

Dry Goodsl Ladies and Gents Furnishings, Hats 

I Shoes, Etc., Go to / 

ARQADE DEPARTMENT STOR^ 

B. F. HOPKlfs' OLD STAND FIFTH AND GLADYS 

They are out ojl the high rent dis-trict. aad these goods are as good as the 
best and prices as low as the lowest. ,• « 


Meat MarkeiS, Fresh and 


LD D/^r'.I^DC MEAT Marks*, Fresh and /^„_i /^ 
. D. i\\ju^iivj smoke^imeats ^asn Urocery 

Phone Broadway|2387 Staplm |;roceribs 745 Central Avenue 


Groceriejs, Fruit and Vegetables 

Grecian Imported Olive Oil, 3-btar Brand 
Fifth and Glad:|s Ave. Gust. Picoulast & Co 


The Old Reiable, where you get 
your money's worth, along with 
courteous treatment. 


Sam's j^^arket 

11914 East Seventh Street 
DEALER IN ALL KINDSIOF — - 

Fresh and | Salt Meats, Fine Sausages and Lard 


i '. 




^ 


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"' 1'-?^-:'' Tft^-' ci>t -■ - .^5.;? 



Mil- 


M. T. Laws 


of the Santa Fe Red 
Cap force 


J. D. Reynolds 


Author of Race 

Tips,!|of Pullman«Co.| 


And Other 


Active Railroad iMen 


will Furnish the Doings 
of the 5Q00 Railroad 
Men Running to and 
on the Coast for THE 
EAGLE 


I 


Job Printing! 


Wc invite you to give us a trial 


We Print 


Letter Heads 

Bill Heads 
Envelopes 

Cards 

Statements ; 
Shipping Tags 
Catalogues 

At Home Cards 
Visiting Cards 
Announcements 
Wedding Invitations 
Etc., Etc. 


-Li-- ' -> ill 


-'.fc M -itt-^S- 


MVC 



SPACE 




5 i^'^m"«j«42iw4»4i*'i4**»^''i 


-i . 

J • i 
1 1 - 

'4 

WHICH WILL BE RUN ' 

'. 

^ FOR THE 

vi 

i*'' ^-' 



5000 Ri R. Trainmen 


PORTERS - WAITERS 
CH^FS - MAIDS 

RED GAPS 

l-rpiiEL MEN, ETC 





■(...I 


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:.r:'. 


MINISTERS' FEDERATION 


1 IT! 11 GliHL 


REV. WM. BECKHAM AT MT. 
ZION 


>»>0»000'«»»»« 



The Ministerial Federation met 
Tuesday at the Y. M. C. A., its 
usual place of meeting. I'rof. 
Riggers was the order of the day. 
He demonstrated his work to the 
ministers. They were pleased 
with Mr. Higgcrs' work. 


CliDrcbs 


Xet.x issue we shall commence 
featuring our railroad men's page. 
We shall keep in touch with our 
railroad workers in all their va- 
rious lines. W eshall ask them to 
assist us by sending in live news 
pertinent to their line of work. 

With Shorthridge. Knowland 
and Hayes in the race on the Re- 
publican end for U. S. Senator 
there will be no dearth of stal- 
wart Republican timber. 


We had two strong sermons 
at Mt. Zion Sunday. At the 
morning service Rev. A. C. Wil- 
liams preached, using for a sub- 
ject "Christ, the Vanguard of the 
Church." At the evening service 
Rev. W^m. Beckham, Field Sec- 
retary of the National Baptist 
Con., preached, using for a sub- 
ject "Stability." We are always 
glad to have Rev. Iteckham with 
us, as he always has something 
good to tell us. The choir ren- 
dered good music last Sunday, 
and will do their best next Sun- 
day. J 

Rev. Williams will preach at 
I'Oth services Sunday. 

.■\t 2:30 Sundav afternoon 









to Washington !'' has been rudely 
interrupted at the capitol with 
Governor Johnson, who poses as 
the especial friend of the lowly 
and weak, looking on ready to 
turn his military upon them if 
they should show fight. 


AT THE CHURCHES 


there will be a mass iiie€ting of ■ 
The refrain of the jobless "On the missionary societies of the " 

various P>aptist churches of the 
city at Mt. Zion. Rev. Beckham ♦♦»o»»»»»»^»»»^»»»»o»*»»»» 

will he the princi])al speaker. .-Ml \. 


TABERNACLE BAPTIST 

Hemlock Street 
Rev. J. D. Gordon, pastor. 


welcome. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :30 p. m. 
Prea^'hing at 7 :30 p. m. 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 


The amalgamation of all the 
forces for the advancement of the 
race throughout the country was 
never more apparent . 


C. 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 

Paloma Ave., near 16th 
Rev. C. 11. Anderson, pastot. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U:,i6;30 p. m. 
Preaching ^t 7 :30 p. m. i 


F. X. Hall of Bakersfield is 
showing great strength in his race 
for the Democratic nomination for 
(iovernor. 


^ 


pastoFj Dr. Grdgg. 


The Faben Phi I'raternity an- 
nounces their next social event on 
Easter Monday. .\i)ril 13. 1014. in 
Blanchard Hall. 

Invitations will follow this an- 
nouncement. The atTair will be a 
Character Hail and the young la- 
dies and gentlemen are already 
choosing, planning and devising 
tasty characters from history, fic- 
tion, and mythology as their nwn. 

The colors of the I-"raternit\' are 
purple and gold. .\ beaiJitiful pur- 
pie ribbon will be awarded tiie 
young lady presenting the must 
artistic female ciiaracter and a 
gold ribbon will he presented the 
gentlemen for the nujst artistic 
male character. 

This atTair premises to eclipse 
all [)re\-ioiis aft'air^ gi\en b\- this 
well-known fraternitv. 

(Signed) l-.. II. Russell. 
Charrman l'xccnfi\e ( 'im. 

One of our subscribers, Mrs. G 
R. Bateon, won first prize of $30 
in 'The Pride of the West, No. 207 
contest, for having taken in the 
greatest number of new members 
into the order. So much for Mre. 
Batson's sunny disposition and 
sweet smile 1 Take the hint, sis- 
ters, for such is good medicine — 
not only for societiet, but for home 
and husbands also. 


BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 

THE GREATEST OF 

THEM ALL. 

Within the past few months 
Los Angeles has been visited by 
four of the greatest Afro-.\mer- 
ican sch(jolers of this age — Du- 
bois, \'ernon. Miller; but the 
greatest among them came P)Ooker 
T. Washington, who, like Lincoln, 
frames his thoughts in the sim- 
plest possible language, and out 
of this thrills his hearers, because 
his soul speaks through his words 
and because he is not only a sayer 
but a doer of the doctrine that he 
promulgates. 

Dr. Washington has not only 
won the applause of his own race 
but likewise of the world, and 
only a few negroes who have noth- 
ing tangible to show, not even a 
dream of an institution such as 
Tuskegee, find time to knock the 
one American who has revolution- 
ized the industry of the United 
States, and bid France^ Germany 



I 


1623 Paloma .Avenue. Re 
H. .Anderson. 1). D., pastor. 

The services at New Hope last 
Sunday will be long remembered. 
The church was crowded and tli^ 
spirit revealed itself to all of 
those i)resent. Dr. .Anderson's 
discourse was encouraging to the 
flowers of Christ. He took for 
his subject, ".And call upon me 
in the day of trouble. I will de- 
liver thee" (Psalms 50:15)'. He 
saitl in part, "()fFcr unto God 
thanksgiving and pay thy vows 

unto the Mnst High. P>ut unto Corner ^hth and Wall 

the wicked God said. What hast Rev. AVesleyJE. Kurehen, pastor. 

thou t(i do ti) declare mv statutes .r. , . ', n 

, , • , Preaching »t 11 a. ni. 
i>r talit the 111 slunildst take mv J 

. ■ ., ., , I „n Young Peojde's meeting at :.iO 

C(i\enant in tby moutli. .And call '^ M* ^ , 

upon me in the days of trouble, ]'■ ™- i 

1 will deli\"er thee and thou shall 
glorify me." .\t the evening ser- 
vices Rev. I. .\. Trimble f)rcached 
a \'Cr\- inspiring sermon. His 
subject was. "Why stand ye here 
all the day idle?" (Matt. 20:6). 
Rev. Trimble did justice to hi-^ 
text. It was \ery wholesome. 
He >aid that a Christian must 
work (.lit his own soul's salva- 
tion witii trembling and fear unto 
(iod. There were three accessions 
to the church during the da>-. 

The choir rendered beautiful 
music for both services. Xext 
Suiidti}-. March 11. Dr. Anderson 
will preach at the morning ser- 
vice. In the evening Dr. \\ m. 
Beckham, ImcUI Secretary of the 
Xtititjiial Baptist Conventicm, will 
preticb. The choir has arranged 
a special program for this ser- 
vice. 


MT. ZION BAPTIST 
Third and Stephenson Ave. 

Rev. A. C. Williams, pastor. 
Services for Sunday. 

At 11 a. ni.. preaching, subject, 
7:30 p. m.. preaching, subject, 


n — 

A. M. j:^ CHURCH 

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH 
* Eighth a^id Towne Ave. 
Usual service preaching by the Maple Ave., bet. 7th and 8th Sts. 


WESxJeJY CHAPEL 


Preaehing iat 7:30 p. m. 


Rev. Joseph L. ]\IeCoy, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
bTy.-P. U. at 6:.30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


/ 


FIRST A. M. E. CHURCH 

Cor. Eighth St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. X. Greggs. pagtor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
Christian Kiuleavor at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


SECOND BAPTIST 


DO NOT DELAY REGISTERING AS A 

REPUBLICAN 

THAT YOU MAY VOTE AT THE 

PRIMARY ELECTION 

rrUESDAY, AUf^UST 25TH, 1914 
For 

SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 
UNITED STATES SENATOR 


.Sun'flav morning Rev. Beck- 
ham, l-'ield Secretary of the Xa- 
tional Baptist Convention, made 
a few inspiring remarks to the 
Sunday school children. At the 
11 o'clock services he preached a 
powerful sermon on "Making 
Christ First." The revival spirit 
still remains. Two children were 
converted Sunday morning. The 
success of the revival has been 
among the children this year. 

The B. Y. P. U. is still in- 
creasing. Its meetings begin at 
6:30 p. ni. sha"^p. 

On Wednesaay evening, pray- 
er meeting. 



Re(v. J. D Gordon. 
Pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church. 


and even proud mother England present position, be it ever so 

and other countries of the Orient humble, for there is room at the 

to take cognizance of his methods top in every avenue or profession, 

r • J *.-,i reform and the time that you spend criti- 

of industrial reiorm. -' ^ 

So we advise that, if you cannot cising such men as Washington 
erect a Tuskogee, or publish a may be spent either in metnal or 
Crises let down your bucket physical development for future 
where you are and dignify wour usefulness. 


Rev. Wm. Beckham, Field Sec- 
retary of the Xational Baptist 
Convention, will address the Fed- 
eration next Tuesday. 

All ministers are requested to 
he present next Tuesday to elect 
officers for the ensuing six 
months. 


A laigi get-together meeting speaker of the occasion was Rev. 
was held'fat the Tabernacle Hap- White, tbe evangelist recently 
tist Chur:;h Monday evening by called to the Baptist Church of 
the New* Hope and Tabernacle which Rev. Wilson formerly paS- 
congregafions. The church was tored. Much credit is due the pas- 
crowded \ with members and tors. Revs. Gordon and Anderson, 
friends v\Jho desired to join in and f<ir the success and encourage- 
benefit %y the meeting. The ment of the occasion. 


S 




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MUTILATED PAGE CANNOT I BE IMPROVED 


3S±: 




ape 


Volume 87 


Los AngwlM» Oil., Mam^ SS8|i9l4i 


Republicar Party Will Battle to Wiit 



!B. Y. P. U. to Meet 

March 28th 


hM 


McKINLEY PARK CHAU- 
TAUQUA AT SACRA- 
MENTO. 
The McKinley Park Chautau- 
qua at Sacramento under the au- 
spices of the Sacramento Valley 
Baptist Young People is an as- 
sured fact. The grounds have 
been secured and the city park 
CQn>fnissioner» are leay.ing no 
It unturned to get the grounds 
-)ape and to make the park as 


^*«*r5 Y P°^**^ 5^7J°" would be a good thing to make 
T visited McKmley Park? It ^j^^ ^^^ ^ ^^^^^j ^^^ ^^^ ^^_^ 


idea a committee was appointed 
composed of the foUowin|(: Rev. 
G. W. Reed of Stockton,- cbair- 
man; Mrs. M. F. Qaitl^r of 
Woodland, Rev. W. M. IHsfti of 
Sacramento, Rev. J. L. AU«a o| 
Marys ville, Mrs.'L. S. Digg» of 
Woodland, Mr. ll Williamt ol 
Marysville and Prof. C. H. Toney 
of Vallejo, he being one of the 
pastors of the Sacramento Valley 
district The committee, after 
getting together, decided that it 


ever visited McKinley 
is one of the most beautiful places 
in all Califotrnia. It by* just 
sonth of Sacramento and ccfetains 
ab«at forty or fifty acres. The 
lai^ oak treof have made almost 
a continHoua canopy overhead, 
thereby shutti»g out the stih at aU 
hours of the day. Its pleasure 
features are almost yiex«:lled. 
[ There are grtat spaces for base- 
ball, lawn teanis, croquet and a 
Swimming pool, also a small zoo. 
The park aflFotds all the sport and 
Measure that one might look for. 
Main Feature^ of the Chautauqua. 
The main features of the Chau- 
tauqua will be a great gathering of 
prominent orators, the learned 
men of both races. For when we 
■telLyon. tbat-*be .cowiing -of ex- 
Attorney-General W. H. Lewis of 
Boston and Miss N. H. Burroughs 
is assured, together with the prob- 
able appearance of Bishop Parks 
of the A. M. E. Church; W. T. 
Vernon, ex-registrar of the treas- 
ury; Drs. McCoy and Gordon of 
Los Angeles, and other promi- 
nent men of the South, you will 
agree with me that there will be 
a great concourse of racial intel- 
lect that this race can be proud of, 
men able from every standpoint, 
orators of no mean ability, the 
most of them having national rep- 
utation. Together with the 
who are members of our race 
there will also be presient the gov- 
ernor of the state, the attorJey- 
general of the state, the Ujftited 
, States senator from our stp^e and 
[Congressmen from our stVte, to- 
gether -with such men of jTir gen- 
eral association as. Drs. ^M. Rid- 
dle, G. C. Coleman ^d J. T. 
Jones, Professor L. J/ Williams 
and others of our locatl district of 
the Young PeopleV U^ion and 
S.unday School. No'w when I say 
that McKinley Pafk during the 
23d of June and .'the 1st of July; 


; quamted with 
ligious and 

wijl say 
pL^'^rth pi 
liautauqna^ 
Purp«Nie 
'Thep 
[pie's Chautai 
labout a livf^ 
|ering of omr y< 
l;8ummer we 
[schools and jri 
[eties give 
Ltwo of tbit' 
rand young" 
[gather ti 
[pleasure. 

is not al^ 
Isirable kin^^l 
[fdent of oqr 

Y. P. ur 

[the idea of 
[ ing for the 
lento Vl 


ply to confine its pleasures to the 
young people of the Sacramento 
valley district, but to invite all 
the young people as well as the 
older people of Northern Califor- 
nia to participate at this great so- 
cial meeting. 

That something worth while 
might be the result of this great 
meeting the committee outlined 
the following as the plans for the 
Chautauqua for the social, indus- 
trial and religious benefit of the 
young people of our community 
and the outlying districts. To 
carry out this plan is the reason 
why we have gone to the expense 
and have invited the persons cited 
above. The seve.al district con- 
venti(!)ns which compose the" Gen- 
eral Baptist Association hae been 
invited to hold their respective 
conventions at McKinley Park 
during the Chautauqua, and there 
will be a day or days given to 
each of the district conventions 
for the purpose of holding their 
convention. Another great feat- 
ure of the Chautauqua will be a 
mammoth choir consisting of 150 
voices, under the directorship of 
several of the best singers obtain- 
able in Northern California. 
Itime, Place and Rates. 
The time of the beginning of 
best J tjie Chautauqua will be the 26d of 
June, and will hold eight days, 
closing on the first day of July. 

The place will be McKinley 
Park, southern section of Sacra- 
mento, the same being reached by 
two car lines running at intervals 
of live minutes from the uptown 
section of the city. 

Rates have been •secured from 
all roads entering into Sacra- 
mento of one and one-third fare 
for ihe round trip. 

Accommodations. 
Sleeping accommodations will 
be right on the grounds. There 
will be tents provided with two 
cots. The prices for lodging will 
not be over 25 cents, and prob- 
ably less, especially for parties 
who desire to stay longer than 
one night. The rates will be fixed 
according to the time the parties 
ai<» to hold the tent. 

^Refreshments of all kinds will 
be on the grounds. A great mam- 
moth platform is built for the 
[purpose of the meeting. This 
jted spcial gath-,pi^jfQrjj^ j^ surrounded by beauti- 
ig people. Each f^j ^^.^^^^ completely covering the 
that the Sunday Ipj^^f^^jj,^ thereby shutting out the 
ng people's soci^,^^^^ ^^^^j^^ ^^^ p^^^ ^o be cool 
OS where one or , j^^^^^j^^^^ ^j^^ ^^^ 
1 Sunday schools ^^^.^^ ^.^^^^^ ^ ^^^ b^o. 
ople's soaetiesj^^^ ^^^^ ^.^^ ^^ ^^^ ^j ^^e 

for their ^^^^^h^^i^ i^^t^^t^ ^^^^ eytning oi the 
leasure resorted ^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 

For further information con- 
cerning the Chautauqua you may 
address Rev. G. W. Reed, chair- 
man, box 692, Stockton, Gal., or 
Mrs. L. S. Diggs, 914 Ntorth 
^street. Woodland, Ca 


will be the Mecca fbr intelligence 

I fee] assured that you, after read- 

' ing the above nantes of the per- 

jsons spoken of, land being ac- 



from a re- 
al standpoint, 
me that it is 
k visit to the 

the Chautaqua. 

[f the Young Peo- 
iia is to brin^ 


SPAR^ AND RJBECHOB8 

Gathered from Dr. Washington's 
Recent Addrejsses in 
X Our City- 
Dear readersj now [that the great 
Southern champion of human 
rights has come and^mpleted his 
oiiswm with us, and gtK^e, he ha» 
left us under hevier respbnsibili- 
tica than we were before he came 
aoKMig us. ,. In propjortion as We 
lu^YCt. been enlighteneld through his 
n^QBderful lectures, our visions for 
Ipl^ter : active usefulness should 
have become broadet-, deeper and 
brighter, and hence our ambitions 
as individuals should be corre- 
spondingly stronger to get out of 
ourselves and to do more than 
ever for the uplift of the race. It 
should be remembered that the 
history of mankind as far back as 
we have any record shows that 
theer, has always been just three 
distinct classes in the world. First, 
the active and the public-spirited 
class, who knows that he is his 
brother's keeper, and who is will- 
ing to make sacrifice of time and 
means for the good of his brother. 
And second, the active and the 
conservative class, who take all of 
their time looking after themselves 
and their own pecuniary benefits. 
Third, we find the shiftless, and 
the careless class, neither caring 
for themselves or any one else. 

The human family all over the 
civilized world is made up of these 
three elements. We have them 
here in our city. God has s6- ar- 
ranged it, and He.has planted cer- 
tain gifts in the individual which 
seems to push him forward (some 
times) at a great sacrifice, to the 
rescue of men and races of whom 
them have no persona lacquaint- 
ance. This is class one. Class 
two are barely capable of looking 
after themselves, and perchance 
they may be large enough to think 
of their five brothers or their very 
near personal friends. Class three 
represents those who seems to be 
wholly unconcerned about the 
moral, spiritual, intellectual, or 
the financial welfare of them- 
selves, their children, or of any one 
else. 

This class represents the field 
of labor in which we are called 
upon to go into and work. Dr. 
Washingtori in all of his addresses 
urged us strong to reach this class 
and to try to arouse them to the 
sense of their responsibilities as 
iiuman beings. It is a fact that 
this class never come in direct con- 
tact with our great men. Many 
of our city do not even know of 
the great works of Dr. Washing- 
ton nor of his recefit visit to us, 
and many of them have never 
made a personal study of the 
Gospel and what it means to 
them. 

We have before us a great work. 
Let us make a few suggestions as 
to how you may become more 
able to enlarge your field for a 
more effective work as an indi- 
vidual. First, if you are not a sub- 
scriber to some one or another of 
our race papers, you should see to 
it at once that you subscribe. 
Don't depend upon getting your 
neighbor's paper, but pay for one 
yourself, and when you shall have 
finished reading it pass it to some 
one who don't take it, or perhaps 
who did not know that such a 
paper was being issued. Ask your 


it is in theni you gnd accounts of 
all ol your Icburch, society, club, 
lodge, births, marriages, and busi- 
ness doings of the race. I care 
not how many papers you may 
read edited by the white people, 
you can get more real neWs con- 
cerning the race (of which you are 
aipart) by reading one poor little 
Negro journal than you have been 
able to obtain from the great pile 
of those other papers you have 
been giving all of your time and 
money for. For the sake of your- 
self and your faimilies, let me urge 
you to patronize your own edi- 
tors, who are working so very 
hard to gather news and facts con- 
cerning the welfare of the race. I 
know of no other enterprise out- 
side of the church itself which is 
more deserving of your co-opera- 
tion than our colored editors are 
in their work. If it v\ere not for 
the Tuskegee Student, an organ 
which is sent out weekly in the 


Race Notes and 

Curprent Topics] 


Brunt, Miss Mat^ Van Brunt, all 
declaring Mrs. Dyson a charmin 
hostess. J 

Miss Varay Yfcung is spending 
sceveral monthsfin Los AngeleS 
since the sad de*h of her mother 
last month, has j returned to her 
aunt and uncle, |vir. and Mrs. B. 
G. Russel. m|ss Young was 
dreadfully missell by the A. M 
E. Sunday school, where she has 
been organist. S|ie filled her post 
of diity " SundaV morning and 
made all our hearts glad with her 
sweet music. Tjhe church and 
.'^unday School !jympathize with 
the family in theif bereavement. 


ns 




Mrs. J. J. Pifikney was the 
behalf of the school, much of good 'guest of Mrs. Frank Washington 


the yare doing would never be- 
come known to the public. What 
we need is to continue to send out 
those Negro journals, sparkling 
with gems of the doings of the 
race. 

Let me again admonish you to 
spend less for the things you do 
not need, and more for the things 
which are indispehsible to your 
success. You say you are for your 
race; if you are, you can prove it 
by helping those poor editors to 
bear your burden, bj adding your 
your name to their subscription 
list. S^ond, you should encour- 
age all members of your race 
everywhere who arc in business 
of any kind, especially when they 
are found to he meritorious and 
deserving. 

E. G. HENDER.SOX. 


.Saturday and punday. Mrs, 
Washington ent^jrtained with ^ 
luncheon Mrs. Pjnkney and sev-i 


say the colored, people of Pasa-, 
dena presente dhim with $77.33 
also one student goes from here tv 
his school. Pasadena leads while 
others follow. 

Had the late Mr. Methuselah 
been a woman the world never 
would have known how old she 
really was. 

Many a woman has taken steps 
for a divorce at a public dance. 

When a man starts out to make 
a fool of himself he usually works 
overtime on the job. 

Ohe of the worst things that 
c^ happen to a man is to win the 
first time he makes a befc 

A girl should never marry a 
young man until she knows all 


eral friends. Th? afternoon was|*'^°"'^ h'™" then the chances are 
spent in music. Mrs. Pinkney left'^^^ ^'^^ "«* ^are to,, 
Monday noon to visit her mother A kind word doesn't impoverish 

the giver and it oftentimes en- 
riches the receiver. 

What a woman says goes, for 
she says it to another woman so 
it can go. 

The long looked for debate be- 
tween Wesley Chapel Lutheran 
Society and the Y. M. A. Society 
of Pasadena will be held in this 
city on Tuesday, April 28th. 


who has been indisposed the past 

few weeks. j \ 

The Kern Valley Lodge enter-! 

tained the Housejhold and Juve-r 

Wednesday evening. j 


niles 


Mr. Thomas A Stewart, a Ne- 
gro, has been appointed chief 
messenger in the United States 
patent office, a ,$1000 job, succeed- 
ing a white man, who had held 
the position for fifteen years. Mr. 
Stewart was considered the best 
equipped man for the work, hav- 
ing been a messenger in the Pat- 
ent Office for twenty-five years 
and is said to be the first colored 
man appointed chief messenger in 
the Patent Office. 


BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 


•4^ 


[s of the most de- 
lerefore the presi- 
[acramento Valley 
'Mention conceived 
(itig a general ouf- 
'"^ng pei^U of Sajc- 
To cany ouj the 


■I 




fl(i>..- 


BAKERSFIELf). 

BY MRS. PEARL LOWERY WINTERS 

Last Sunday morning Rev. 
Price ])reached a stirring sermon; 
evening also. Sunday School Sun- 
day morning was well attended 
with thirty-nine pupils. We are 
glad, to say our Sunday S^ool is 
growing by leaps and bounds. 
The young women and young 
men and middle aged are laying 
aside the silly expression we hear 
too often expressed by our young 
that the Sunday School is only 
for children. Sunday-School is an 
tducation to us all. Let every 
young man and woman make new 
steps and go to some Sunday 
School Sunday morning. If not 
Cain's A. M. Church, the White 
Temple. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Car- 
ter were intertained with an 
eight-course dinner given by Mrs. 
S. E. Dyson Sunday week. The 


Mr. J. J. Pinkndy entertained at 
his beautiful horrle, corner of O 
street, in tae afternoon, the Golr 
den West Club with Mrs. Sadie 
Person, who hasi been pre^dent 
for six years. She has been a 
faithful member. ' They now own 
a beautiful cornejr lot; they arte 
hoping to build soon. The club 
members presented the president 
with a beautiful gold pen, which 
was .a great surj^ise. Mrs. Pei'- 
son made a beautiful speech. Let 
all boost this grar^ worker. He^p 
to make the clyl^ what it should 
be. ;| 

The Young Mkrried Women's 
Thimble Club m^ at Mrs. Frank 
Washington, president, last Fri- 
dav afternoon. iAfter a happly 
m 

ington served lo-\^ly lunch. Tljie | the year 
club meeting this Friday will be 
held at Mrs. A. Dresdon's. The 
following Friday pt Mrs. G. MaH- 
weirs. : - I 

Mrs. Maud Gill on her way 
home Friday Ivad a runaway, and 
.she is suffering dreadfully. 


AT SCOTT CHAPEL M. E. 
CHURCH 

Dr. F. D. Mather, the district 
superintendent, held his second 
quarterly conference Sunday even- 
ing and preached, taking as his 
text Daniel 6 :5. "Then said thesf 
men, we shall not find any occa- 
sion against this Daniel except we 
find it against him concerning the 
law of his God." It was a great 
sermon. He compared Lincoln, 
Garfield, McKinley and Gladstone 
as being faithful like Daniel. All 
eeting and sewjng Mrs.' Wash- ^church record was broken during 

' " ' The church has doubled 

its membership this year; and he 
said they had one of the best 
choirs in the district and too much 
praise can not be given Mrs. 
Ernestine Monroe Beavers, the di- 
rector of the choir. Also Miss 
Mme. Viola Spike Kichen will Gladys Harris, the organist, is one 
appear in recital of building ^f ^he best in the city; She is a* 
funds in the A. M. church Wed-, . , u- , , ' '• 

nesdav. April 15-14. Winters , ^^^^"^'^ ^^ ^^^ h,gh school and ' 
Hall under direction Mrs. Pearl will enter the U. S. C. next term.. 
Lowery. Winters add 35c. Mrs. Beavers is formerly fromi 

Major and Mrs. West were Cincinnati. Miss Harris 
called away to Pasadena, on ac- ,,3^;^^ daughter, 
count of the death of his brother- 
in-law. |j 

Don't forget the big recital ibn 
Wednesday, April 15. Mme. 
Kiche» pianist. 

Miss Netta McLanham arrived 
from Washi^;i.on Sunday morn- 
ing. Mis9^"McLanham in her 
charmigh and beautiful manner 
made a .beautiful speech at the 
Golden West Club. This should 
strengthen the young misses to 
work to make a showing as she 
has made. 


IS 


selves the question, where do you 1 table was beautifully decorated in 
go, or what papers do you read 
when jrou want the real news 
about the doings of your race? Is 
it, to the daily or the weekly pa- 


pers edited by the white people? 
I dare say no. jYou go to your 
own papers, you I well know that 




m>r' 


Dr. Booker T. Washington, 
A.M., LL.D., one of the greatest 
living Americans. Many thanks 
to Dr. John Willis Baer, the presi- 
dent of Occidental College and a 
bridal wreath and beautiful hand- 1 resident of Pasidena, for having 
painted place cards painted by brought him to the coast. Dr. 
the H=.,,crhfer Mi« Mnrv Van- Washington delivered three 

speeches in Pa^adena>^e also 


the daughter. Miss Mary Van 
brunt. Those present: Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank AVashington, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Winters, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Smith, Mr. Godwin 
Van Brunt, Miss Mary 



OUR PRESS GANG 

'I rejoice to find myself once 
more at liberty to write all of the 
news all of the time for all of-the 
people, and I do not want aijyone 
to know what church or society I 
am a member gf by reading what 
I write, so please let me know 
about the happenings, as I can 
only write what I hear. One of 
the greatest mistakes of some 
newspapers is they only write 
about theii friends and sometimes 
enterview themselves for publica- 
tion. Now we are going to have 
one page of this paper for Pasa- 
*dena. Help m* make out city not 
only crown in name, but in deed 


also, 
spoke to the alumni associatioi^ yours for race uplife, 
Tuskegee that reside in Los^Atv^ 
geles. They-pr^nted him vfith 
fifty dollars, but Iwe are proudf to 


'S^^ 


'Sv-^'i^ j' /TJ?;-; 


S. B. C. 


: t 


.>4 


^. 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 




THE HAN 


i,p 


i^ Sijff '^l^fc^pl^t^^t^C^- -j 


THE HOUR 


these and 


more. We reprint the 


following editorial which appeared 


"God works in a mysterious 
4ray his wonders to perform ; He in the daily Tribune of our city : 
plants His footsteps upon the sea "Leading a Race Out of De- 
and rides upon the storm." pression" 

' Perhaps to greater evidence .-^^ ^^^ ^^^ j^^^ ^^^^ g^^^. 
Has ever been manifested in and distinction. There is no getting 
through any human leader of any away from it except through the 
race or of any people that he had slow spiritual culture of both ', / 
Stamped upon him the divine ap- races that must finally destroy '";' 
jproval of the great hand of the faige values, break down preju- : 
i)eity, in modern times, than that ^jj-e and set up a justice that can T' 
^hich is being demonstrated stajij the light of a God-crowned ', V 
through the works of Dr. Booker reason. ^, 

T. Washington, in the United ..^j^^ ^^j^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^-^^ ^^^^^ J '^ 
States and the world. In all ages ^^^^ ^^^ conditions of success pi^ fe' 
of "the world's history of God," jj^^^ ^^j ^^^,g, Ej^^er he will i' i 
when He has designed to work ^j^^ ^^^ ^^ discouragement or he , , 
great changes in dispensations, in ^^.jj, ^^^.^ ^^^ j^^^p ^p ^^ ^j^^ J^ 
nations, in kingdoms, and empires ^ ^^^^-^ ^^^^^^j^ ^^ ^^^ ^-^^ ^j^^^ 
he has always done so through ^^^.^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ry best sort of | 
some humble mdividual who was ^^^^ood and finally overcomes 1 
wholly without a reputation, and ,^y ^-^^ ^^ ^^^j ^^^^^^ j^ ^.^^ i 
one who simply became mighty ^^at he is lifting up a race and 
and great in the thing to be done. ^^^^-^^ -^ ^^^ ^j ^j^^ bondage of 


AND FAfiilONS 
OF "^ 


# 

i>i>' 


•f*^ 


fti ^ 


If we should take the time to 
search the pages of history from 
the earliest period down to the 
present time we would find that 
the world's greatest changes, dis- 
coveries, and inventions ^have, 
without a single exception, been 
brought about through the instru- 
mentalities of men who were with- 
out a noted ancestry. And our own 
Booker T. Washington is no ex- 
ception to his predecessors in this 
great historic category. Indeed, 
he was as poor and as insignifi- 
cant as the lowest, and he has by 
his own efforts attained to heights 
(when all things have been con- 
sidered) as lofty as the highest of 
them ; and he has not yet complet- 
ed his 40 year period of history 
in his career. Indeed we may say 
truthfully he is only in the in- 
fancy of his well chosen work, 
son's Law of Compensation has 
failed to be impres.'ied with the 
compelling strength of its logic. 
The people of Los .Angeles have 
recently had the privilege of hear- 
ing a distinguished representative 
of the Negro race discuss the sta- 
tus of the Negro and the condi- 
lions lender which his final Linaii- 
fcipatiori is to be worked out. 

"Booker V'ashington's mission 
in life is to point out to members 
of his own race the principle un- 
derlying real success. He is do- 
ing it with a persistency, courage 
and intelligence that challenfrc ad- 


fwork, they have made wretched 
failures. 

The writer is of the opinion that 
when Dr. Washington's mission 
and work shall have been fully 
understood and defined, that he 
will be placed where he rightly 
belongs, in a class to himself. In 
many respects he reminds us of 
the thrist of God. It is said of 
the Christ, "He was in the world 
and the world knew him not." 
Dr. Washington has been at his 
<^Gt'k for lo, these many years, but 
it is only in the last few years that 
he is becoming so well and favor- 
ably known to his brethren. "He 
came unto his own and they 
■would not receive him." But it 
has been characteristic of him in 
all of his travails, just as has been 
in our city in his recent visit to 
us, he has been received and in- 
troduced by the white race and 
people. If we call him a dipilomat, 
a race man, a statesman, an ora- 
tor, and educator, et? , he is all of 


E. F. HL.XUERSOX. 



A r' 


^ 


yi 

^^^^^^p^ 

1 


I t 
! i 


limitation. 

"This process may be a long 
one, but the law of compensation 
is as certain as any law of mathe- 
matics. Measured as God meas- 
ures men, it is, in the final anal- 
ysis, with the race as with the 
individual. The energy exerted 
in overcoming a handicap devel- 
ops the true mettle, hardens the 
fiber and. becomes a permanent 
possession. It is only discourage- 
ment and surrender that can keep 
a man or a race dowtr:' .\ black 
skin may be the original cause of 
the discouragement, but it is not 
and can not be the true cause of 
failure under any true standard." 

The above is only one of many 
similar editorials which have ap- 
peared in our city papers edited 
by white editors during Dr. 
Washington's itineracy in Los 
-Angeles and Southern California. 
.\ntl also we will invite you to 
think for a moment of the magnifi- 
cent introductions he has received 
fruin school and college profes- 
sors, in the presence of their stu- 
dents. The writer heard him in- 
trtxluccd as a great leader i.if a 
great race. The mind and heart 
and the life of Dr. Washington 
has been so, very well prepared 
lor his work that notwithstanding 
the fact his stay with us was pro- 
tracted, his audiences became 
more and more inthusiastic at 


miration from every man or worn- each gathering to the close of his 
an who has sense enough and itineracy in the community. 
heart enough to realize that the It is to be hoped that during 
world has been applying false the itineracy of Dr. Washington 
standards of manhood and worn- in the Southland that all of the 
anhood. pessimists, doubters, and grumb- 

"The child of the black man is 'ers went out to ehar him. If they 
forced to face a heartless and cruel did, we well know many of them 

Let us pause for a moment and must have become converted to 
ask ourselves the question : What the fact that Dr. Washington is 
is really and truly his mission and the man of the hour. Many of 
in what class does he belong? them have repeatedly said of him 
The world has had its great in- ifany careless things, and they 
dividual philosophers, educators, have thrown many stumbling 
reformers, and its active operators,, stone*, in his pathway. But if 
who have distinguished them- doubting Thomas himself had 
selves as having been truly great '^een here and heard him he would 
in many ways, and along many have cried out, "My Lord and My 
lines, of the great needs of human "God." Let us take fresh cour- 
uplift and expansion. lUit when age, and renew our covenants 
they have attempts! to enlarge with God, and with each other, 
their fields of activity and to com- and continue our journey with 
bine" their talents to do greater new vigor. 





for Great Meeting 

Lincoln 



Affiliated with Republican Feder- 
ation of Southern California 


Club 


J. A. WARREN, Secretary, 
- !957 Maple Avenue 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE 


Scott's Hall, 361 Central Ave. 



E}.9il£.*a> »"• 



9he Xlcunq 9ecple's 

LITERARY SOCIETY 

^5 1-2 NAOMI rSTREET 

dr.:j. m. smith. 

Founder and Organizer. 

WILLIE PAYNE, 
CLARENCE IRWIN, 

Assistant Managers. 

Wc desire to inform you that w 
have in progress a Young People's 
Litfirarv Society, which everyone 
18 invited to attend and become 
a member. Every Thursday five- 
ning at 8 o'clock we meet at 
the above named place. 

Miss Bebnice Moore, Pres. 

Miss Kathelekn Braye, 

Cor. Sec'.y 


Pueblo Meat Market 


TELEPHONE MAIN S897 

Joseph Davis, Proprietur 

All Fresh Meat and Fish 

Meats arc Covermcnt Inspected 

Premium Bacori and ^Mams 


H. S. A. CUMING 

CUMING'S 
LIVER TONERS 

One Hundred Vegetable Pills 
for 25 Cents 

These pills are recommended for the 
relief of Constipation, Sick Headache, 
Biliousness. 

Cuming's Drug Store 

KSTAHLISHKI) T YlAKS 

Broadway 871 



JOHN T. F^ID 

GROCER — Staple and Fancy Groceries, \^rS:h and Vegetables 

Our Meat Market is a great addition to the store. 

We carry all sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats. 

OUR PRICES ARE REASONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Cor, Kohler and E. 7th St. 


NOTICE! 

Colored Voters of State of California 

,;Take Notice — Not to usi- the Afro-AmericfLi 
Federal name unless ymi are registerel 
therein. 

J. E. LATTIMORl 

5400^Long Beacli Avenue - ' Los Angelek, Cal 


Por Dependable 

Dry Goods, Ladies and Gents Furnishings, \Hats 

Shoes, Etc., Go to 

ARCADE DEPARTMENT STORE 

B. F, HOPKINS' OLD; STAND FIFTH AND GLADYS 

They are out of the high rent district, aad these goods are as good as Jthe 
best and prices as low as the lowest. 


L. B. ROGERS TI s:of.WAT ''''' Cash Grocejry 

Phone Broadway 2387 " jZ Staplm Groceries 


745 CE.NTRAL Ave 


X 


Groceries, Ftuit and Vegetables 

Grecian lipported Olive Oil, 3-Star Brand 
Fifth and Gladys Ave. I Gust. Picoulast & 


The Old Reiable, where yon gkt 
your money's worth, along wiF 
courteous treatment. 


Sam's Maijket 

||l4 East Seventh Street 

DEALER IN ALL KINDSIOF 

Fresh and Salt Meats, Fine Sausages and 


Is 


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M. T. Laws 


of the Santa Fe Red 
Cap force 


J. D. Reynolds 


Author of Race 

j,||ofj[Pullman Co. 


w 


And Other 


Active " Kailroad ^Men 
will Furnish the Doings 
of the 5000 Railroad 
Men Running to and 
on the Coast for THE 
E4GLE 


Job Printing! 


Wc invite you to give us a trial 


We Print 


Letter Heads 
Bill Heads 
Envelopes 
Cards 
Statements 
Shipping Ta^s 
Catalogues 
At Home Cards 
Visiting Cards 
Announcements 
Wedding Invitations 
Etc., Etc. 



■; ' ■ :'.'l. 1 .. \ 


V i- 



WHICH i/VILL BE RUN 

f|)r the 


5000 R.I R. Trainmen 



PORTERS - WAITERS 
CHEFS - MAIDS 


HOT^L MEN, ETC 


'K 



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"i:r. 



5I--J 


m 



1" 


THE CALIFORNIA EAQLK. 

All coumunications should be addrei86d 
to The Cairrornla Eagle, 1034 East Ninth 
Streets. Sunset Phone Broadway 7M7. 

Bntered as second-class mall matter at 
the Fostofflce of LiOs Angeles, CaL, under 
the Act Of March 1, 1879. 

C. A. SPKAR- -Managing Editor 

J. E BASS Editor 

H. SHANNON AdTertislng Manager 

LETWIS K. BEEKS _ Local Editor 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

S. B. Carr - Pasadena 

H. B. Simpson Bakersfleld 

E. L, Lewis - Fresno 

Miss Ada Thompson-..-^- _ Oakland 

Mrs. Evana .- San Francisco 

J. J. Anderson .•...^.....San Francisco 

Z. F. Henderson .1 Los Angeles 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year _ $2.00 

Six Months 100 

Three Months 50 

It occasionally happens that- for some 
reason or other papers are missed by be- 
ing missent, lost or stolen. In case of 
subscribers not receiving their papers, In- 
form us by postal and we shall cheerfully 
furnish a duplicate copy of said missing 
number. 
No attention paid to anonymous lettera 
Copy must be written plainly on one 
side of paper, and to Insure Insertion In 
current Issue must reach this office 
Thursday. Correspondents, please take 
notice. 

ADVERTISING RATES, 50c PER INCH. 

Subscribe for the California 
Eagle now. 

tl is just as essential for us to 
be active in politics as in society. 

* * * 

We hope that our wcunen will 
register and vote at the i>rimary. 

* * * 

We are i^Iad to note that Dr. R. 
T. Washingto nwas favnrably im- 
pressed with the race in Los An- 
geles and Southern California. 

* * * 

Our field agents and collectors 
are Miss Kathleen Bray, Mr. 
Lewis K. Beeks, Mr. Wesley Wil- 
liams. Subscribers will oblige us 
bv recognizing none other than 
these. We are trying to inake our 
paper grow and need your sup- 
port. We want no dealing with 
newspaper carpet baggers. 


Carr had intendea that it should 
have be«n, and. was misinterpret- 
ed by some. ." 

We want to say here, and now 
that we have no place in our col- 
umns to decry such men as Mr. 
Shores, for certainly if we did we 
should be the most ungrateful 
among the people. Mr. Shores 
and his splendid wife have been 
our sincere friends and staunch 
supporters since our very begin- 
ning as a newspaper editor in this 
city, because they believed that 
we had undertaken a task begun 
by a man, who even though he 
passed out before his work was 
scarcely begun, was loyal to his 
race. 

And since we are called upon 
to mention Mr. Shores at this 
time we wish to state that we be- 
lieve him tQ be one olpthe most 
exemplary characters of his peo- 
ple in this city, not only has he 
made good with the bank where 
he has done well his part; for af- 
ter all one position'is equal to an- 
other if both have been dignified 
according to their station. As a 
citizen, as a churchman, and as a 
parent, Mr. Shores ranks upper- 
niostin his community and city. 


THE REPUBLICAN PARTY. 

The old party has again rallied 


Mt. Zion Baptist Church Takes a 
Stand for What She Be- 
lieves Right. 

Last -Monday evening the 
church met in business session 
over which Rev, R. H. Wade pre- 

sitled. 

Rev. .A. C. Williams, acting pas- 
tor, who came to our city less than 
four months ago from Florida, 
where he has pastored three 
\ears, and where he began his pas- 
ti.iral efforts after graduating from 

I the .Atlanta Baptist College, At- 
lanta, Cia., with distinction and 
honor, w asreally the prime factor 
in the meeting; for since the very 

j beginning of his pastorate with 
the Mt. Zion Church, to which lie 
had been recommended by Rev. 
1{. F. 1- isher of Chicago, there had 
been a misunderstanding with re- 
gard to his relation to the church. 


and IS ready for business. Some ulue to the fact that Rev. Fisher 
of the oldest and strongest men | had misled the Rev. Mr. Williams, 
of the party are coming to the perhaps with no intention to do 


front and playing leading roles in 
the coming election. 

We arcnow enjoying the fruits 
of a Democratic administration, 
and the I'rogressive Farty early 
demonstrated what places they 
had for men of color. So we see 
that whatever we have received 
or ever hope to receive must come 
through the Republican Party. So 
let us rally to the front in this 
campai.gn, give our hearty sup- 
port to such men as we shall-keep 
before you as candidates from 
time to time. 


YOUNG RACEMAN GETS A 
SQUARE DEAL 

Endless credit belongs to the 
Los Angeles Examiner for the 
fair judgment exercised in the re- 
cent contest. 

Mr. Wesley Williams, a bril- 
liant young man of our commun- 
ity entered the race after a few- 
weeks' duration and won third 
place, receiving in return $100 for 
his services. 

Mr. Williams highly praises the 
Exanjlner and especially the Con- 
test Editor for the fair deal and 
courtesy extended him. 

Mr. Williams has been secured 
,as an assistant for the Eagle. He 
is contemplating entering school 
in the fall and with the local edi- 
tor, Lewis Beeks will dive into 
the work with a vim in an effort 
to secure school means. 

Help the good work along by 
encouraging the fellows willing 
to make an eflFort. 


.V few weeks ago our Pasadena 
correspondent, Mr, S. P>. Carr, 
wrote a little article touching on 
the relation or position of our 
friend and subscriber, Mr. W. H. 
Shores, who has filled a position 
at the Security Bank in this city 
for more than twenty-five years 
dignifying his position and doing 
credit to his race. 

We are writing this explanation 
because we fear that the comment 
was not published just as Mr. 


so, as to his call to the church. 

We are neither expressing fa- 
voritism lor Rev. Williams or for 
Rev. h'isher. 

But it seems that Rev. Williams 
gave up his charge in Florida with 
the understanding that he was to 
ser\e permanently as pastor of 
the Mt. Zion church while the 
church on the other hand had 
called Rev. l-"isher to be its pas- 
tor, and he, Rev. Fisher had ac- 
cepted the call with the under- 
standing with the church, that he 
would place Rev. Williams here 
in his place until he could wind 
up liisafTairs at Chicago. 

.After serving the church in ai 
creditable manner for more than I 
three months, Rev. Williams, be- 
ing a young man just beginning 
his career as a clergynum, and full 
.jfif ambition, began to pine under 
his (as he believed) deceptive re- 
lation to the church, and called 
the body together last Monday 
evening, and laid bare his future 
plans relating to the church, and 
Dr. Fisher. 

.After listening to Rev. W ill- 
iams' plea for justice, the church 
decided to consider the call of Dr. 
Fisher null and void and declared 
'he church free to call a pastor. 
Rev. Williams consented to serve 
temporarily. 

While Rev. Fisher is an old~war 
horse in the church, who has done 
much good for the development of 
the church and the growth of 
Christianity, Rev. Williams is one 
of the brainiest, cleanest, and best 
educated young men that we have 
in the ministry today. And since 
the future of the race depends up- 
on our young men and women it 
behooves us to strengthen and 
support instead of crush such 
young men as Rev. A. C. Will- 
iams. 


BLQW TO PREJUDICE. 

The second blow to segregatior. 
since the national anti-segregation 
petition by colored citizens wa 
presented to President Wilson i 


the White House by a delegation 
of the National Independent Po- 
litical League on November 6th 
last, was announced by the Wash- 
ington correspondent of the Bos- 
ton Advertiser as follows : 
"Boston Man Puts an End to Dis- 
crimination Against Negroes 
in Government Departments. 
(Special Dispatch). 

Washington, Mar. 6. — Colored 
people report that the last of Ne- 
gro Segregation in the depart- 
ments of the government has 
come to an end in an order issued 
by Charles S. Hamlin of Boston, 
the Senior Assistant Secretary of 
the Treasury. The segregation 
has hovered longest in the bu- 
reau of engraving and printing of 
the treasury, where some 300 Ne- 
gro girls were in the course of 
last summer ordered by Director 
Ralph to desist using the common 
dining room at the luncheon hour, 
hut to use instead a small room 
containing the lavatories assigned 
to colored people. The crowding 
was terrible and there were other 
obvious objections. 

Ralpli refused to make a 
change, however, and the former 
head of the fiscal division, jAsst. 
.'-iec. ]. S. Williams, a Virginian, 
did not make use of his authority, 
being in fact not a little responsi- 
ble for the endorsement in the 
Treasury Department of Negro 
segregation. 

Mr. Hamlin has now succeeded 
Mr. Williams and he has elimi- 
nated the last of the segregation, 
as reported, by ordering, now 
that the lUireau of Engraving and 
I'rinting is- to occupy its new 
cpiarters, that all employees shall 
use the common dining room 
there prcuided. 

The colored ])eople are very 
grateful to Mr. Hamlin. Today 
prominent .Vc.groes appeared in 
protest to a committee in Con- 
gress gi^•ing hearings on a bill 
]iur])0sing a legal enforcement of 
.\igro segre.gation in general in 
W ;ishington." — .Advertiser. 

W hen the dele.gation of the Na- 
tional Indeiiendent Political 
League made the argument 
again-.t segregation, the president 
jiromiscd an investigation, which 
he niaile. Later on in the .Audi- 
tor of the Postoffice Department a 
separate room for colored men 
was change('. 

When John .Skelton Williams 
was made comptroller of the 
Treasury, the League's secretary. 
W. Monroe Trotter asked Rep. 
Peters of P.oston to use his in- 
Huence for the appointment of 
Mr. Hamlin to first assistant 
treasurer, as the foliow-ing lettei 
to Mr. Trotter shows: 

"House of Representatives, 
Washington, D. C., 
Jan. 23, 1914. 
Mr. Wm. Monroe Trotter, 

Cornhill, Boston, Mass. 
Dear Trotter: 

Your wire is at hand. I wish to 
say that I am urging on Mr. Ham- 
lin the appointment of some one 


Unprejudiced to take Mr. Will- 
iams' place left ;vacant in t^ 
Treasury. 

Yours sincerely, 
(Signed) A. J. Peters,"' 

On February 19, Secretary 
Trotter telegraphed Rep. Peters 
to see Mr. Hamlin as to undoing 
segregation. In reply he wrote: 
"Have you any recent informa- 
tion which would show that the 
relief which was promised your 
committee is not being carried out 
in the department here?" In re- 
ply Secretary Trotter wrote on 
the 2nd inst., that the President's 
promise had not been carried out 
and urged action. Then came this 
reported blow to segregation by 
Assistant Secretary Hamlin on 
the 6th inst. 

When the League's delegation 
had its hearing being presented 
by Rep. Thacher of Massachu- 
setts, the League did not cease its 
work. At Christmas it issued a 
second appeal to the President, 
which was presented to him in 
jierson by Rep, Peters, before the 
President went South. Again on 
lanuary 23rd, the League had an- 
other protest on a clear case of 
railway postoffice segregation 
filed with the President by Rep. 
Thacher. 

The Massachusetts branch is 
now fighting a case of segrega- 
tion in the Boston Navy Yard. 


A YOUNG LADY PRAISED 

To the Editor Colorado States- 
man : 

Dear .Sir: Born and raised 
among colored people, my grand- 
fathers both slaveholders, I con- 
ceived the idea that the colored 
peo])le were an inferior race and 
had many traits that merited the 
treatment they received. .As a 
child I could not see any reason 
why it was considered legal to 
make slaves out of these people, 
neither could I understand why 
they insisted as a retaliation in 
abusing the whites, and confess I 
would not have indorsed slavery 
had 1 been of age. During my 
growth fn)m youth to manhood I 
ha\ e been compelled to change 
my 0])inion as again and again I 
ha\'e had proofs of genuine manly 
and womanly charactertistic feat- 
ures of my colored brethren and 
am convinced that they are desir- 
able citizens and most valuable 
assets to any community. 

In Denver we have an enterpris- 
ing, intelligent, honest set of col- 
ored people as a whole, whose 
records are to a great extent bet- 
ter than the whites. Even if they 
were born in the South they are 
intelligent enough to know that 
there are very few people living 
today who opposed the action 
taken on their behalf during the 
Civil War. Many of them are 
propertv owners, and contribute 
in a large measure, considering 
their numbers, to the treasury of 
the city and state. They deserve 
positions of responsibility because 
they are trustworthy citizens. 


Third Anniversary 

Good Values Given Worthy of Our Three Years 

of Progress 

We are Selling Everything Below Cost 

Beautiful Silk and Madras Ladies' Shirt Waists, extra value, from 
.50 centB up Dainty Aprons «r.d Work Aprons, Also Hosiery. 

Ladies' and Gents' Silk and Lisle, from 19c, 

Special Men's Work Shirts from 35c up. Men's Gloves from 5c up 
to $1,50. Our Drpss Making and Tailoring Department, Ladies' Eve- 
ning Gowns and Coats. 
411 East 7th Street MRS. NINA E. THOMAS 


Home 74680 


Sunset Vermont 3169 


C. B. OWEN 


Feed, Fuel and Transfer 

Wood, Coal, Hay and Grain. All Kinds of Chicken Feed 

Moving Household Goods a Specialty 

566 WE3T33RN AVENUE Lob Angeles 


8. BROWN 


Main 430B 


Mift^ 


1328 EAST 14th ST. 

OPPOSXTB BISCH STSKXT 

Choice Staple Groceries 

CIOAR8, TOBACCOS 
CANDIB8, SOFT DRINKS 


,i^ 




'-^ T >Ht-«g ? tiy« ' * i W^J':»» a i 



ROtlTES 
EASJ 


SUNSET 

Double Daily c38rvice to New Or- 
La'nd ''"^ ^'''' ^^'°"^^ ^'^'« 

EL PASO 

"GOLDEN STATE LIMITED" 
The fainde luxe, exclu«ively first 

The "CALIF0RMA.N" for both first 
ana second class travel. 
The line of low altitudes 

OGDEN 

The trail of the Argonauts— 
The route of the 

SAN FRANGISCO OVERLAND 
LIMITED" 

SMASIA 

THE "ROAD OF A THOUSAND 
WONDERS," to the East through 
the great Northwest 
See agents 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Los Angeles Offices 
212 West Seventh.Street 
Station, Fifth and Central Avenue 
Pasadena Office, 418 E. <>3lorado St. 


r\ 


JR. B YOUNO & SON 


I A R C H I T EiC T S 

f 702 Lankershim Buildirig: 

Phone IV^ain 4149 


Los Angeles 


Quick Service Laundry 

^^ QQS Central Ave. 

I 
Yo* will secute best work and lowest prices in city 

with prompt and courteous treatment. Deiivery to 
all parts of city at low rate. Phone orders given 
strict attention. » 


MAIN B^6^ 


MAIN 8151 


=r 


A. A. GRANT 

^ NOTARY 

Agent fori InTestmcnts, Building, 

Loans, Ii^urance, Houses, Lots, 

and Acreage for sale 

114@ Central Avenue 

A 1 ,' !l ; ;.■ cuitor.Tia 


PEOPLE'S RE/LTY GO. 

Capital Stock $75,000 
Shares |1. 00 each 

F. H. CRUMBLY 

Agent 
Tel. Bwy 2528. 785 San Pedro 


Intern^itional Order of Twelve 
meets a^ follows at Washington 
and Ceittral Hall : 


Golde^ West Temple No. 412 

at 8 o'c|)ck p. m. 

3 


Pacifi^ Coast Tabernacle No. 
210 m^ets second and fourth 
Tuesday, at 8 o'clock p. m. 


New |3eulah Tabernacle No. 43 
meets |he second and fourth 
Thursday of each month at 8 
o'clock 5. m. 


Star hi Bethlehem Tabernacle 
No. 382^ meets the first and second 
Saturday at 2 p. m. [ 


Ked([;esh Royal House of Midia 
No. 7^ meets the third Tuesday 


at 8 p.|m. 


; IF|r0U WANT TO RENT 

A fcoOM ORi A HOUSE 

s ! 

I OR to 

BU| A LOT 9R A HOME 

In Venice, Ocean tPark or Santa 
I Monica, write 

*J. ALLEN I REESE, 
600 pan Juan Avenue, Venice 


No tg)uble to answer questrone 


I aila in a position to offer you 
Sonne of the Best Residence 


HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Williams about Wil- 
mington Harbor property. The 
greatest opportunity of your life 
is at your door now. 

We have 6 50-ft. lots we can sell 
for $550, only $10 down, $5 a 
month. W'e also have 80 other 
lots in same tract, but you will 
have to be in a hurry if you wish 
to get in on the ground floor. 

Any day we get six or eight 
persons we will take you down to 
see the lots. 

H. H. WILLIAMS, 
Corner 12th and Hemlock. 


In keeping with its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continues to 
give to its patrons the best pos- 
sible service. 

Being centrally located between 
the three great railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel 
meets the demands not only rin 
good service but likewise conve- 
nience. ? 


FOR RENT— We have several 
housekeeping apartments of three 
and four rooms for rent very 
cheap. Also a good business site. 

Apply Noah D.' Thompson, 
1711 E. SSth St 


Piano InstrucUen. : 
Mr. Clarence D. Oeokaey, 
[nstrnction on titft Pisno. 


:s?,»»S4"i«.Sij;'"i 


■Sl.'-'fe 



MUTILATED PAGE I CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



IOWA NEGROES OkcSANIZE 
COLLEGE FRATERNITY 


The Con^t Ice Cream Co- is now 
being operated by Mrs. Grahm and 
she Ua putting on the market a 
f;ra(^e of cread| that is unsurpassed 
by any in flavVr and purity. 

women knew — don't take my 
woB for it— jusfctry it once. 

!^anch office S^ 944 Central Av. 


. "I- 

Infant son of Mfe and Mrs. A. 
Bowers, passed oi^ Wednesday, 
the 25th inst. The^ parents are 
active members of \^sley M. E. 
Church. 1 

i- 


Mrs. S. Quick and ^L C. Bray 
spent Tuesday in San Pedro. 


Misses Aline and Hazel .^nder- 
son, are new arrivals i<i oup cit^, 
formerly of San Jose, Gal. ^liss 
Aline is a college graduate. *, 


Mrs. Pauline Daniels of 128 
Tennessee Sffeet, is confined t'i^ 
her bed. The Eagle hopes for ari^small beginning it is the plan of 


BIG NEGRO INVESTMENT 
CO. FOR LOS ANGELES 

W^anted — Sr.x men and six wo- 
men, well recommended with good 
business qualifications to canvas 
for the sale of shares in the Peo- 
jile's Realty Company of this city. 
This is a Negro enterprise, con- 
servatively managed and properly 
chartered by the laws of Califor- 
nia. The company has bought 
real estate in the city and in the 
country. No salary is paid to offi 
cers. Liberal commission will be 
paid to agents. Call on F. H 
Crumbly, agent, at 785 San Pedro 
street. Telephone Broadway 2528. 
This company is working along 
the line approved by Prof. Booker 
T. \\'ashing-ton. The officers are 
a board of directors; J. H. Shack- 
elford, president; Dr. J. S. Out- 
law, vice-president ; Eugene Walk- 
er, treasurer, and Dr. J. A. Som- 
erville is the secretary. All stock 
sold by the company's agent at 
785 S. San Pedro street. 

Every colored man and woman 
in this great city ought to hold 
shares in this company. Its fu- 
ture is a bright one and from 


early convalescence. 


Mrs. Clarence Smith of this city 
passed away Monday, the 23rd 
inst., in Monrovia. 


^le company to be able to give 
.^bstantial employment to our 
p«f pie. 


Friends of- this city and Santa 
Monica are glad to receive the 
news of the wonderful progress of 
Miss Alberta Muse ot Waldon 
College, Nashville, Tenn. Miss 
Muse is the grand daughter of 
Mrs. S. .\. Wright of Santa^Mon- 
ica. 


Rev. G. C. Coleman, pastor of 
North Uakland Baptist Church, 
Oakland, and Rev. J. W . Jones, 
pastor of Second Baptist Church, 
Vallejo, Gal., are in the city in the 
interest of National Baptist Con- 
vention, which they hope to bring 

to this city in its ne.xt session. 

■ ■ ♦ « 

Mr. J. Bass of the Eagle staff, is 
still in the northern part of the 

State. 

The Sojourner Truth Club un- 
der the leadership of Mrs. Offutt 


and other ardent workers, are 

making every effort to pay off the 

indebtedness of the home. 
■ * » 

CARD OF THANKS. 

I wish to extend my most 
hearty thanks to the good people 
of Boyle Heights for their sym- 
pathy and kindness shown my sis- 
ter, Mrs. Scruggs of 2924 Michi- 
gan avenue, during her illness. 

Your kindness was much appre- 
ciated and will not soon be for- 
gotten by me. 

(Mrs.) H. H. SpiUow, 

542 Ceres ave. 


Last Friday evening at the 
Gamut auditorium. Dr. Booker T. 
Washington addressed under the 
auspices of the Episcopal church 
a large number of citizens. The 
Alumni was in attendanfce and 
made a splendid showing. Dr. 
Washington showed in his ad- 
dress the remarkable status of the 
negroes in America. 


Dr. Washington after a con- 
tinuous ovation in and about the 
city, departed Wednesday morn- 
ing- . ' 


1 


i 


ThI: HENDERSON REALTY 
1 COMPANY 

Has fOf rent, furnished, nice mod- 
ern 5-foom cottage, west side, 
S22. 50 : 'water paid. 


Iowa City, Iowa (Special.)— 
The dream of the oldest living 
negro alumnus of the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa was realized on 
Saturday, March 7, 1914, by the 
organization in Iowa City of a 
college men's fraternity composed 
exclusively of negro students and 
graduates of the state university. 

The name of this new frater- 
nity is Kappa Alpha Nu and is a 
branch :of the national organiza- 
tion of the same name and which 
was founded at the University of 
Indiana in the year 1910 and has 
for its purpose the creating of a 
social center for the negro men 
in attendance upon northern col- 
leges and universities where tne 
great majority of the students 
are of the Caucasian race. 

Prof. E. VV. Diggs, supeHn- 
tendent of negro schools of V in- 
ctnnes, Indiana, founder and the 
present Grand Polemarch of the 
national grand chapter, assisted 
by Wm. J. Prince, formerly of 
Coin, Iowa, but at present a stu- 
dent in the University of Illinois, 
and ^utenant Grand Strategus 
of the national grand chapter, 
and Paul W. Kane, a student in 
the University of Indiana and a 
charter member of the national 
grand chapter, were present and 
inaugurated the new chapter, 
which is the fourth in existence, 
and is therefore named the Delta 
chapter, the other three bing Al- 
pha chapter in the University of 
•Indiana, at Bloomingtcm; Beta 
chapter, in the University of Illi- 
nois, at Champaign, and Gamma 
chapter, composed of the' negro 
college alumni of Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


5-roi)in iTfedern cottage, fur- 
^licd. near San Pedro, including 


111 
ntan 


,'';22.50; water paid. 


2 and 3-rooin ap^artments. fur- 
nished. \ 
I 

5-rooni California houSe, $12.00; 
water paid. 


Two flats, 4 rooms each, mod- 
em, S16.00; East First St.; water 
paid. 


3-room California house, large 
barn, S12.00; near San Pedro. 


Also for sale, some fine bargains 
in city property which they can 
deliver on easy terms. Payments 
like rent. 


Also they have a market known 
as the Central Ave. Poultry and 
Rabbit Exchange. Market price 
paid for poultry and rabbit. They 
solicit your patronage. 1543 Cen- 
tral Ave. Tel. South 871. 

Unfurnished 6-room house, 
modern, close in, $20.00; water 
paid. .^ 


Drs. Leonard Stovall and Bal- 
lad have consolidated and are now 
located in their new apartments 
at 12th and Central avenue. 
They will be glad at their new 
offices to receive all of their pa- 
trons. 


The Eastern Stars will give an 
excellent program on Monday 
evening at the Masonic hall, cor- 
ner 12th and Central. 


The Georgia State Society will 
be entertained at the residence of 
Mrs. Hall on Long Beach avenue 
Friday evening. 


MORE WHITES THAN 

BLACKS 

N. Y. Times Table Shows Larger 

Number of Unqualified Males 

Among the Caucasians. 

l-"rom Representative Towner's 
report on the bill providing for a 
Federal inquiry into the causes 
of illiteracy, in which is included 
the deciaratiun that there are "2,-. 
273,603 illiterate males of 21 years 
and o\er in the United States, 
enough to determine any national 
election at any period in our his- 
tory," the conclusion would natu- 
rally be drawn that a new and 
highly disquieting condition had 
arisen in the nation. Such is not 
the case. The census figures 
show that the number of white 
and black illiterates in the Unit- 
ed States had decreased substan- 
tially between 1900 and 1910, a 
decrease that is expected to con- 
tinue during the present decade. 
The figures showing the total 
number of illiterates and their 
percentage of the whole popula- 
tion are: Illiterates over 10 years 
of age in. 1900, whites 3,200,746, 
6.2 per cent; in 1910, 3,184,954, 
5 per cent; colored, in ISXX), 2,- 
853,194, 44.5 per cent; in 1910, 2,- 
228,087, 30.4 per cent. 

Moreover, how many of Mr. 
Towner's 2,273,603 male illiter- 
ates of voting age have the bal- 
lot? A large proportion of them 
must be colored in the South, 
who are barred from the polls 
and hence cannot "determine any 
national election." 


Th« Ancient United Sons WbA 
Daughters of Africa will meet ofi 
lh<; First Monday of each ttionth 
«l Scott^a Hall, 561 Central ave. 

Mrs. E. R. Baldwin, 

M E. Q 
Miss M." Busby, Sec'y 


Notes From Phillips Chapel 
C. M. E. Church. 

Look out for the big "Feaet in 
the Wilderness," at Phillips chapel, 
C. M. E. Church, 140(3 Newton 
street, Thursday evening, March 
19. An old time feast and jubilee 
singing. To miss h- means regret 
Admission 10c. Supper 25c. Given 
by the Seventeen Club. 

Mrs, L. Stokrs, Captain 
Rev. S. L. Har * IS Pasio 


Our Second Quarterly meeting 
conference will be held at Phillips 
chapel, C. M. E. Church, 1406 
Newton street, March 22-23, -Dr. 
James A. Stout. C. E., will preach 
at 11 a, m. 1 r. A. C. Caldwell o 
Santa Monica will pieach at 3 p 
m., and the P. E. at 7.45 p. m. We 
invite the ministers and the gener- 
al public to worship with us Sun 
day at 3 p. m. Sunday, the 23rd 
That will be the last qtiarter be 
fore the annual conference, which 
meets in El 'Paso, Texas, April 15 
1914, 

Come and hear these great 
preachers and this fine^choir, which 
charm ail who hear them. 

S. L. Harris, Pastor. 


Mr. S. Cole, of 1328 E. 14th 
street, has sold out to Mr. Brown, 
who is conducting a neat little 
grocery. 


Hors and 'Buggy For Sala 
BD CHEAP FOR CASH ! 

Apply to J. N. LITTLEJOHN 
159 7 West 36:h PI ace 


A new colored theatre has been 
opened in Washington, D. C, it 
l)eing the Majestic, at the corner 
of Ninth and Pennsylvania ave- 
nue. It is under the management 
of Frank Rrown, a colored man. 
This gives .Washington two large 
modern vaudeville theatres oper- 
ated by and for colored people. 

\>rnon, Oklahoma, is the latest 
e.xclusively colored town in Ok- 
lahoma. It has a population of 
more than tjiree hundred, and is 
growing rapidly. The town is 
named after Dr. W. T. "Vernon. 


FOR RENT— Furni8hed 
Apartment for two gentle- 
men. Call at 

1017 East 9th street 


The Missionary Society of the 
Second Baptist Church meets 
second and fourth Thursdays at 1 
o'clock p. m., at Second Baptist 
Church, Maple avenue.. 

Mrs. W. J. Davis, Pres. 
Address, 176 Utah St. 

Tel. Boyle 2660 

'^ Mrs. J. E. Williams, 

Sd,'' 


The colored citizens of Bakers- 
field are contemplating a prosper- 
ous season. All indications point 
to the same. 

It is well that all sides are see- 
ing to it that a full registration is 
gained all over the state. It means 
that the people are waking up and 
will vote to put the state again 
on a sound basis. ' 


I ; I U A8S0CUTBD WITH 

THE FITZ?iERALX> MUSIC ST^OR E 

OJ,7 SOUTH BROA.DVrAY 

Purchase through him and he will save you money. 



W. H. GUEST, P. D. 

bRUGGIdT I 

Stationery, n Notions ^and Toilet Articles 

llthiand Central Avenue I 


MOTHER'S KITCHEN CAFE 

(|.S. BROWN, Proprietor i 

THE BESTj PLACE IN TOWN TOIEAT 

Home Cooking;! A' Specialty I 

-MEALS IN TOWN 


SHORT ORDERS 


1441 East Ninth|.t. 


LOS ngeles. Cal. 


Household f Brand Flavoring Extracts 

Our Goods are Gu'aranteed Absolutely Pure. At your Grocers 
Retail |pr 25c p|.'r jbottle. Improved Export Ging'er Ale and 
all flav^. SodaiWater. 

Geo. J. House & Son 

Manufacturer !; 


Rve rybodylhaa'aJHo^y — Our Hobby is rooms — a 50c broom for 35c Delivered 
I F^ Always Welcome Whether Lookir.g or Buying 

Brodii|e-Berg Furniture Co. 

S Temple Street at belmont 
If ycu rcfd £ry Fuu'itLif <i>n Jid f(t uf. cr if \<u wir.t to feil jcur furnitnr 
WT»rill call and see v!/u.||£. Don't call us Down, call usjUp— Wilshirs 3417 


M.Bfettit & Sons 

c|ashsgrocery 
Pastry^ Fruit and Vegetabiss, Fresh Meats 

Wilshire 3464 .• no. 1654 Tempi 


THE ALEXANDRIA ROOMING HOUSE 

^ UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

|lT 768 WALL Street 

H^^a^tlyiFuTiIi-lietl Room l[ oetween Maple and San Pedre Cas LiB» 
with Hot:and|;oIcl Batn ALBERT PERRY, Manager. 


PHONE r, PAUL VBNFELT, 

Main 4953— Home 454 " Proprietor 

ICOME TO THE 

i W^ere You Get the Best Service in 

■ Family Trade 


912 San Pedro S|. 


0pp. City Market 


Smith Pr;is. and Gen. Mgr. 
Grant Hammond, Vce Prea. 
Curtis Odom. Treas. , 


Frank Williams Auditor. ] 
Jas, Slaughter, Secy, , J 


SMITH |& WILLIAMS CO., Inc. 

Funeral llrectors and Practleai Enliaiiiiers 

We guarantee our work shipped to any part of the cHy 
LADY ATTEJVDANT!* Sevices the Best Prices the Lo west 

654 San F|rnando St. Phone Main 3629 


Phone West 8068 

STERLING DRUG CO^ 

THE NYAL STORE 

Use'your telephone — all lines lead to our store. 
Complete line of EASTER NOVELTIES. 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST. 
Prompt Free Delivery. 
Cor. W. Jefferson St. and Western Ave. C. J. Stadler, Prop 


Tie Palace Cafe 

I 015 Central Ave, 

NEATEST, f OSIEST AND BEST PLACE To EAT. The best 
iservice in both An^erican and Chinese dishes. Chop Suey and Noodles 
American and Chtoese fashion. 

A.T THE PELAGE- everybody is accorded the same poUte 

treatment. i 

— ! i ^ — — ] — 


J, E. Jones, ■ C. W. Sand«rs B. L. Ware 

A Telephon e Broadway 1196 

Dresden Dye Works 

Latdies and Ibents' GR ents Cleaned, Pressed and 
is «5 aired 

Cleaned a^d Blocked— Work Called for and Delivered 


ji.'.'v.r- 


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GROCERY CO. 

No. 1540 Fillmore St. 

H. G. FRANK, Manager 

Fancy and Staple Groceries, Fruit 
and Vegetables 

Special Rates to hotels, Restaurants and 
Boarding Houses 

Consult Us Before Goin^ Elsewhere 

PHONE WEST 4626 


CO 


MUSEHI - TAILOR 


V. 



CM 

LU 


THE PLAGE NOT TO BE 

I OVERLOOKED 



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00 


LESTER MAPP 

PROPRIETOR 


COME TA^ 



GIRL PAYS BIG<|eST IN- trast to the unregeni?teted sheet. 


I 


n 

C/3 


STOP, LOOK, LISTEN! 
WET WASH """ l'Zl\T'"' 50c Sack 

The Hygienic Laundry has changed hands and will be run as a fi;-st class 
Wet Wash Laundry under the name^of the NEW PROCESS LAUN- 
DRY CO. WET WASH. As our ain, is to protect your health through 
cleanliness and sterilization in doing your laundry work, we selected the 
name of Hygeia as more befitting to represent our purpose. We steri- 
lize all «lothes by scientific process, safeguarding y.iu against conta- 
gious diseases. We respectfully solicit your trade and will give the 
best of service. Kindly give us a trial and be convinced. 

NEW PROCESS 

Phone Lakeside 1218 


Oklahoma City. — ^^rah Rec- 
tor, the 10-year-old nigro girl in 
Eastern Oklahoma, vfill pay the 
largest federal incom^ tax of any 
person in this state. JK conserva- 
tive estimate of Sarah's net in- 
come in excess of th^ $3,000 ex- 
emption is $100,000rSearly. The 
tax on the income oC this size is 
4 per cent, or a tot^l of $4,000. 
The tax itself is so large that it 
would be subject toj: income tax 
were it an inconne. Sut there are 
further complications. Sarah has 
about $40,000 *of |the money 
loaned out at eight|per cent in- 
terest. This ,mean| an annual 
income of $4,000. Iliis is an in- 
come that is beir^g (;arned by the 
original income jfro^i oil royal- 
ties, and a legal Question has 
been raised whethel or not this 
secondary income p subject to 
tax during the samelyear that the 
$100,000 is taxed. | It is quite 
probable that Sarahls income will 
be much greater |ian $100,000. 
as big oil wells are being brought 
in on her farm evel'y month. It 
is expected that byljhe end of the 
year her incom(*, will have 
reached $150,000, i,^, which event 
her income tax wjuld be $6,000 
instead of $4,000. ,1 


the daily Record; whicl^ has 
sought to stir iip race prejudice 
by its glaring' headlines of a 
black negro brute. It was simply 
an aggravated crime in which jus- 
tice was Tneteriout in a fair and 
impartial manner. 

* * * 


in all sections of 
waiting breath- 


The negroes 
the country are 
lessly to see what will become of 
the reappointment of Judge Ter- 
rell. ; 

We are glad to note that the 
country is rid -of Chief Sam, the 
supposed African chief who has 
been for a number of mopths read- 
ing through the States Celling, we 
believe, imaginary shares in Afri- 
can lands to which he claims heri- 
tage! 


LAUNDRY CO. ^Uh 

2932 PopiarSt, Oakland 


Phone Weet 6669 H. T.'^uyuki, Proprieto 

Cosmopolitan 
Dyeing and Cleaning Works 

1591 POST STREET, Near Laguna SAN ERANCISCO, CAL. 

Ladies and Gent's Suits Cleaning. Pressing. Dyeing 
and Repairing Guaranteed Satisfactory 


AND MADE TO 
LOOK LIKE NEW 


Goods Called Fof 
and Delivered 


The Colored Boys Friend 

537 South Broadway 


Godeau Funeral Service 

The Handsome Chapel and Private l^ooms Free 

for those who dwell in apartments, flats, hotels, or where is insuf- 
cient accommodation at the time of death. Mr. or Mrs. J. S. 
Godeau will personally supervise all funeral arrangements and 
details. 

Godeau prices are only h«lf the charges of the undertaker in your 
neighborhood, wno 's controlled by the Funeral Trust. 

TELEPHONE 
MARKET 711; S- F. OAKLAND 4045, OAKLAND 

when death makes the nndertaker necessary 

JULIUS S. GODEAU 

41 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 210 Webster St., Oakland 

305 Columbus Ave., S. F. 827 Figueroa St., Los Angetes 


DREIER & NEVIS 

OAKLAND'S EXCLUSIVE 

SPORTING I ATHLETIC SHOPPE 


Phone Oakland 4052 
530 12th Street, Near Clay 


OAKLAND. GAL. 


Babrt 


"NOT IN THE TRUST" 


O. P«Jt»E 


W A 1« 


AI" Meat Market 

* Best and Cheapest Chuice Fresh Meats, 
^ Hams and Bacon, Wholesale and Retail 


Everything Guaranteed |540 Filmore Street 


Phone West 4626 



BNDORSBD BY TH£ KAGLK CLUB 


To the Well Dressed Men 


Who Know the Value of Being Up-to-Date 


Should get acquainted with 
our New English Tailor. 


J. E. HENDERSON 

UNDERTAKER 

2307 TELEGRAPH AVENUE, 

Telephone Oakland 1878. 


OAKLAND, OAL 


Market and t^press Storage %e. 

CUT RATE SHIPPERS 

TO ALL POINTS EAST 

.\lso dealers in Hardware Tinware, Granite, Etc., Etc. 

Office and Store, 930 Seventh St. Bet. Market and Myrtle 

Phone Oakland 1325. R. G. MARQUARDT, Mgr., Oakland, Gal. 


Phone Oak 2277 RENOVATING Res. Oak. 6238 

Chas. J. Braun Mattress Go. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

MATTRESSES AND COUCHES 

Wire Mattresses Stretched. 1275 Seventh Sf, Oakland 


DRINK THE BEST 


F. DELUC 


Golden West 
Lager Beer 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 

22d AND CHANCELLOR RICHMOND, CALIPORNIA 


AFRICAN smP SAILS 

Curityba Chartered by Chief Sam 

Leai/es for PortlMid En Route 

to the Gold Coast. 

After nearly .a hionth's delay, 
"Chief Sam," the leader of a 
"Back-to- -Africa fenovement to 
start a colony on jf-fie Gold Coast, 
finally gave the j order to get 
started late Fridaj* afterhoon and 
the steamship CuHtyba cast off 
at Erie Basin, Brpoklyn, for the 
long voyage. ? 

The Curityba v^ill first put in 
at Portland, Mei, to be over- 
hauled, after which the sail 
across the ocean; for the prom- 
ised land will begin. .All on board 
are colored except the captain, 
who is James Mackenzie, and the 
engineer, Ira Ber^rd. 

The colonists a^e all sharehold- 
ers in "Chief Sanfs" .\kim Trad- 
ing Company, which concern has 
sold them shared in parcels of 
land on the Gol(| Coast at $25 
apiece. Here the>i expect to have 
an Elysium all tbeir own. The 
passengers are 4'' from Okla- 
homa aad other! Southwestern 
States. i 

When the Curityba cast off a 
crowd of womeri were on the 
pier to bid the colonists farewell. 

The faith in "Sam" has been 
rudely shaken in isome of his fol- 
lowers since the' jdenial by Brit- 
ish authorities in' Africa that he 
was the holder df any land on 
the jGold Coast pr that he was 
even: a chieftain. ; 


The Merchant Tailor 611 Montgomer y St. 
'San Francisco 


HARRIS AND FRANK 

Among the leaders in style and artistic furnishings in ladies' 
and gents' ware Harris & Frank rank pre-eminent. Because of its 
many years in business this firm is one of the most reliable in the 
city. 

Have your shoes sewed, nailed, etc., at reasonable rate, Harry 
Goldberg Shoe Hospital, 5528 Central Ave. 

Stump's Market ^t 1477 E- Vernon Av^| a good place to trade. 


San Joaquin CouRty Officers Deal 

Justly with Cc^bred Prisoner 
for Aggravated Crime. 

While in Stoclitjton on business 
we chanced to-bie in the court- 
house when the pase of Andrew 
Kirtg was called fin Judge Plum- 
mer's court. f 

The case of Ki^^g was an aggra- 
vated one where tnuch violence to 
commit robbery from an aged wo- 
man was usedj; He brazenly 
pleaded guilty, ^.dmitted every- 
thing including the brutal man- 
ner in which the robbery was 
committed, the court plainly in- 
structed him in his rights in the 
premises. He waived them all, 
after which the' court sentenced 
him to 25 years in Folsom. 

Now we think that in this in- 
stance the prisoner was dealt with 
leniently, a big 'Strapping healthy 
man who had served 9 years in 
the army who;' would stoop to 
such a dastardfy crime 25 years 
was just. Aad we commend 
Judge Plummer for the same. 
The officers irom the sheriff, W. 
H. Reichs up, ire to be congrat- 
ulated for the {manner in which 
they meted outiijustice in this in- 
stance, which Tjfas quite in con- 


POLITICAL STRAWS OF SAN 
JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

R. C. Wallace will again seek 
re-election to the^office of coroner 
and it seems that he will have no 
opposition. 

G. H. Black, the well-knciwn 
deputy who has been in the sher- 
iff's office for 23 years has resign- 
ed his position and will seek the 
nomination 'as head of that office. 
Mr. P.lack has made a good ofl^cer 
and no doubt if nominated and 
elected would make Sn ideal sher- 
iff. He has 'many friends and is 
making a strenuous canvass, 
receive a hearty support for re- 
election from all classes. 

County Surveyor F. M. Quail 
has made an enviable record in 
this very important office and no 
doubt will receive' a strong sup- 
port for re-election. 

One of the finest gentlemen 
whom we have ever met is the 
genial and kind Cheriff W. H. 
Reichs of San Joaquin county. 
He has filled the office with great 
credit and as a result thereof will 
receive a strong support from all 
classes for a second term. We 
shall have ^something to say in 
relation to some of the candidates 
for the benefit of our Stockton 
readers as the campaign pro- 
gresses. 

Mr. John D. Maxey, present re- 
f-order and auditor, will this year 
make the race for re-election to 
the office of auditor; he has made 
an excellent officer and will re- 
ceive a strong support. 
* * * 

STOCKTON LIVE WIRE. 

Rev. G.sW. Reed, who is the 
leading spirit in the greatest 
Chautauqua to be held at Sacra- 
mento in ithe near future is very 
busy exploiting the same, and he 
savs it will be one of the greatest 
gatherings^ ever held in this vi- 
cinity. I 

Quite aigreat deal of comment 
is heard unfavorable to District 
-Vttorney (Foltz for the treatrnent 
he accorded one of the colored 
women witnesses in a recent 
trial, for without cause at his or- 
der she was put in jail. 

Rev. J. .A. Duncan reports a 
great success for his quarterly 
conference that the record was 
broken fc«" raising funds the last 
([uarter. 

Editor J. R. RasS and .Advertis- 
ing Manager Shannon were visit- 
ors in our;city this week in the in- 
terest of the Eagle. 


V 


J^ 


Mayor Rubenstein is a broad- 
gauged official and caters to no 
class i nhi^ office, but is conduct- 
ing the affairs of the city in a way 
that gives :the greatest benefits to 
the greatest number of people. He 
is the hight man in the right 
place. 

Superior Judg^ Smith has cred- 
itably filled that position in this 
county and will gO before thepeo- 
ple again .With a record which will 
no doubt mean his renomination 
and election. ' 

Now, /don't stand apart and 
laugh jefcringly ot criticise an ef- 
fort that you ypurself are not 
brave elough to make. If you 
can not -give thousands, you can 
give the| widow'p mite and the 
least yoti pay on your subscrip- 
tion will be precious in tbe edi- 
tor's sigj^t 


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CARD OF THANKS. 


THE GOLDEN WEST. 

With its evrlasting reputation 
of "biggest and best hotel" for 
men and women of color, the 
Golden West also eniovs the dis- 


We want to thank the friends 
who 80 kindly aseieted us in. any 
way at the time of our sudden and 
sad bereavement of our dear bro- 
ther, Ollie Carter, who departed tinction of setting the standard 
this life on the 11th inst. Also of entertaining newspaper and 
for the beautiful floral offerings, 
the kindly tribute by Miss C. A. t 


Spear, and for every comforting 
expression- 

Reipectfully, 

Mrs. Virginia C. Edmford 
Eva Carter Bucknkr. 

Notes From the Beaches. 


other public spirited people in a 
manner long remembered and 
cherished by them. 
Messrs Brown and Williams — 
the congenial proprietors — are 
careful in not only giving good 
service but in making the general 
atmosphere congenial and home- 
like for their many guests, who 
Miss Irene Givens tpent the come from all sections of the 
week-end at Venice, the guest o country. Their party service is 
Miss Haiel Sercey. 'also unchallenged in -excellence. 

Miss Genevieve Anderson an 
nounces an "Old Maids' and Bach. An elabjrate pink tea was held 
elors' contest" on Tuesday evening! i^t the home of Mrs. Pearl Lowery 

Winters, given by Mrs. Maud 
Gillem and Mrs. H. Green in honor 
of Mrs. Thomas F. Carter. All of 
the fifty guests reported having 
had a delightful time, deeming 
Miss Gilleai and Miss Green most 
tist Church of Venice. The Rev- charming hostesses, 
was well received and a Contribu- 1 Mrs. Ethel Kinard spent a few 


at and for the beneSt of Philips' 
Chapel, C. M . E. Church. 

Last Tuesday evening, Rev. \Vm. 
Beckham, field secretary of th« 
National Baptist Convention de- 
livered a sermon at the First Bap 


tion of $10.00 was giuen him to 
aid his most worty cause. 

It is indeed a pleasure to state 
that another race man of worth ia 
preparing to locate in^ Venice 
Rev. J. A. Trimble is snperintend. 
ing the construction of his 8-room 
on Broadway avenne, and when 
completed he will occupy same 
The Rev. also owns the lot adjoin- 
ine the one on which he is build- 
ing and in the not distant futur 
will erect a terrace for the accom. 
modation of beach visitors. This 
is the third bungalow erected in 
Venice to the credit of the Negro 
race within the last four weeks, 
and they are all in the heart of the 
residential section of the city 
There are not many colored famil- 
ies in Venice, but by rough esti- 
mate it ie safe to say that four 
fifths of them own their homes. 

Miss Maymts Carter entar- 
tained last Tuestlay evening with 
a '"box" party, there being seven 
young ladies present and an equal 
number of young men. The high- 
est bid of the evening was for Mips 


months in the north and has now 
returned. Mrs. Kinard is one of 
our leading hair dressers. We are 
glad to welcome her home. 

Miss Hazel Jones of Fresno is 
expecting to visit this city. 

Messrs, C, J. Barton and Thos. 
Edwasds have gone to Sanger to 
work for six weeki. Mr. Barton 
is head usher of the A, M. E, 
Church. 


Good Work Being Done by the 
Supervising Teachers. 

MANY IMPROVEMENTS MADE 


Economio and Social Aspect of Educa- 
tional Work In One Hundred and 
Thirty Counties In the Southern 
States Reviewed by State Supervisor 
Jackson Davis of Virginia. 

How Industrial tralntng, under a sys 
tem of supervising industrial teachers 


Flavia Whitley's box, by Mr. Ed- "as not only vitalized the rural schools 
„ , , . , . »< .,- among the colored people Into which 

Win Tabor, the price being ll.2o_ 

The second highest bid was for 

Miss Gertha Simpson's box at 

11.15, by Mr. Quince Tabor, and 

the third highest price paid was 

$1.10 for ^■liss Mayme Carter's box 

by Mr. Willie Edmonds. The 

proceeds will go toward the church 

allv. 


) 


Do not miss the famous drama, 
--•'East Lynne," at the T. M. A. 
Hall, Tuesday night, April 7. This 
beautiful play will be rendered by 
some of the best talent from the 
various churches of the city, and a 
rare treat is assured those who at- 
tend. Admission -SOc. Children 
1 5c. Mrs. O S. Fletcher A- Spur_ 
lock, managers; Chas. J. Eason 
director. 


Mrs, Chester La Sell, after spend- 
ng a few months in Oakland, re- 
urned home recently. Mrs. La 
Sell is taking active part in morn- 
ing choir and was organist Sunday 
afternoon. 

Miss Willie Walker, new teacher 
of the beginner's class, is doing a 
good work and makes an excellent 
teacher. 

Miss Lillian Simpson has re- 
turned to her work as head milli- 
ner at Hochhimer's. Miss Simp- 
son is one of the most expert in 
her line on the coast. 

Citizen's League will meet Sat- 
urday night at ^inter's Hall. Im- 
portant business. 

Miss Madeline Moulton Jsborne 
of Los Angeles, has just returned 
from Kansas City, to visit her 
mother. She expects to retui n in 
April a id will pay a visit to Bak- 

- ersfiela. ; 


y<j 3ome 9atriotii Wc Have 'Scm 


(By J. B. Bass) 

With Apologies to W. F. Kirk 

(1) 
It's a good thing for L'Ouverture that he died when he did: 
This age is no time for a Warrior Kid— 
His wonderful conquests, his great battle lines 
Would now be hailed with : "Back to the Mines !'* 
I fear that our Toussant — were he to return 
And try with his sword our country to free — 
Would have to go after it hammer and tongs 
By handling recruits and singing swan songs. 

(2) 

It's a good thing for Douglass, too, he isn't here now, 

With his glowing head of silver and magnificent brow. 

If he were Minister to Hayti he'd not hold his job— 

'Twould be segregation at Washington or his political shroud. 

Things were so different in years long ago i 

They used to appreciate manhood ; but now— the closed door ! 

He'd find but few of those that he had led. 

So I guess that our Douglass had better stay dead. 

(8) 

It's a good thing for Bruce that he died long ago. 

For his statecraft now wouldn't have any show. 

It is true, lots of coin by freedmen has been spent — 

But the wiser ones got it and spent every cent. 

C. H. J. Taylor, too, would starve if he came back to earth — 

For the present powers shy at real worth. 

They were lucky "old timers," who were here and made good, 

And I don't think they'd want to come back if they could. 


A LETTER TO J. D. REYNOLDS. 


TtUMOMl'MM HAMJa 


Tug LCAOINO COLOBCD NlW»PAP£« 

No. 17 WEST 135th STREET 

Saw York. H.Y.. F«b. 14, \<il\l\ 


"Mr. J. D. Reynolds . 

1966 RajiDond Atq. , 

Los Angalos. Calif. 

Donr 31 r;- 

*e bog to acknowlotS^a receipt of your 8crn.p 
book, entitled "Tips on the race problem." and there 
nra renoons to bolleve that If you, follow printing 
the scrap book in bold type on tinely topics, such 
aa aro shOTm In the copy subraitted, so that any ordlnorj 
nan or woman can predict the ultlionto future of your 
publication. 

ffo arc indeod glad to bo the recipient of your 
oourtoalos and forecast a feast for those of roflnod 
taste for good litoroture. 

Let "tips" havo clear sailing and in due time 
the public will anxiously await the tip from John D. 
Roynolda. 

If an exchange Is desirable, it Is yours to 
co.Tjnond. 

Respectfully yours, 

AMSTERDAM NEWS PU3. CO.. 


JHA/i;L 


(y UK^a,7Ln{! iJltor. 


>»»»»0»»»»0 »»»»♦»»»»»»» »»»»»» » »»»»»»»»»< 


\\m 




It has been introduced, but is also hav 
Ing farreaching economic and social 
effects on rural conditions generally. 
Is described by .Jackson Davis, state 
Bupervisor of elementary schools in 
Virginia. In the Southern Workman 
Mr. Davis snys In part: 

"A few efforts bad been made here 
and there throuchout the south to tie 
■sav the wort of the country school tu 
^the life of the home and the farm, but 
It was not until th*. establishment of 
the Jeanes fund for rural schools that 
a general effort was made In this di- 
rection. In Henrico county, Va., In the 
fall of 1908, followinR a conference of 
the school officials of the county with 
agents of the Jeanes fund, a supervls 
Ing Industrial leiiclier was employed 
and put to work In ail of the colored 
schools of the county. 

"The pioneer work of Vlrsinla Ran 
dolph In overcoming the indifference of 
ber own people. orKanizing Improve- 
ment leagues at each school, introduc- 
ing simple forms of Industrial work 
and In the enlistment of the active in- 
terest of the white people In these ef- 
forts for lin[)rovement In practical 
ways, met with such success that a 
new spirit was soon ablaze in each 
colored community, and the schools 
were transformed In appearance and 
in the general character of their work. 

"The general plan, so successful In 
Its early demonstration, has continued 
to grow and meet with approval. It 
has developed initiative among the 
colored rural people, and It has tied 
their Interests together In a school for 
a better neighborhood. The moral ef- 
fect has been noticed by the white 
people around them and their support 
of this movement has been hearty. 
Supervising Industrial teachers were 
employed in 130 counties in the south- 
ern states last session. 


"White Temple" Baptist Church 
is doing good work. Rev. J. G. 
McPherson, pastor. 

Miss Clara Atcheson, the clever 
little milliner, will be glad to 
make your Easter hat. Give her a 
trial. 

Miss Howard of Los Angeles is 
visiting ber brother, Mr, Gus How- 
ard, 







iVrv^fH^t'fv 


\&. 


Notice to All Colored Property Qwners : 

Telepbon^ me when your FIRE INSURANCE wiU expire 
and I willj renew it in any Company you may desire. I 
will ttllow^you 5 per cent, discount. i 

Call Main 5^29. or Call at 412 Germain BIdg. i 
^24 South Spring Street 

SIDINEV P. DOINES 

Real f state | Fire Insurance Notary Public 


BUTTERICK PATTERNS 


R. & 0. CORSETS 


Thcil2th Street Store 

N. W. Cor. 12th and Central Ave. 

"JJnder New Managembnt" 

. i 

Central Avenue's Bargain Center that gives a "Monej Back 
Guarantee with Every Purchase. 


Phone 23756 


1125 Central Avenue 


"You^B to Please, The I2th St. Store" 


Telephone South 75S8 Res. 13i» Newton St. Home 'IXOn 

Wm. Ai and Arthur Grosser — Florists 

ilroprlttors ot FERNDALE NURSERY ' 

Floral Desifns a Specialty ~^ 

•^ 1 408- 1 6 Central Avenue 


DECORATIONS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


TO BE NICELY DRESSED 

And H^ve a Good Look, You Must Have ' 
Yoijr Clothes Made at Sam Cook's 

Don't worry. Our;cleaning and Pressing is of the Highest Grade. 

We Ma|:e Your Old Clothes Look Like New. 

Like to order they are made. 

Wo are making Taili^ig Suits from $15.00 up. Our work is very Good. 
;: Everybody says so. 

1314 Central Av^., Los Angeles, Cal. 


THE TAILOR THAT 
EVERYBODY KNOWS 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

BOUpHT. SOLD AND EXCHANGED 

AYERS BROTHERS 


House Furnishings of All Kinds. 
Phone South 4273. Open Evngs. 


2627 Central Avenue 


E. E. ANDREWS 


Dry Goods, Furnishiijgs 
Hardware, Paints, Oil.. 

1791 W. JEFFERSON 


We Duplicate Any Price Made 
on the same class of Goods... 


MkIN 
847 


HOMC 
734*8 


Ho^^^ard Shoe Store 

Fine Shoes and Shoe Repairing; 

1601 W. Jefferson street 


The New Idea Bakery 


J420 East P^ifth Street 


Bakery Goods 


Fresh Pastry 


Qur assorted Cakes and Pie» are a little better and Cheaper 
' ■' We caa'aff ord this because we do our own baking 
For Parties and Weddings Try Our Qakes. 


Home A5018 


Main 3625 


Good Work— Quick Service 

Pacific Clothes Cleaning Works 

SUITS $1.00 UP 

2358 East Ninth Street Los Angeles, CaJifornia 


a. \V. DANSON 

; 1403 iVI«teo Street 

Dry QoocJs, Shoes, Hats, INotions 

NEW IDEA PATLERNS- with cutting diagram and seam? allowance 
—EVERY SIZE in EVERY STYLE -10 cents. 


Farwefl Bros 

Watchmakers 

and? Jewelers 

I'iHi and dpnfralAve 
Los Aiteeles. 

\Vatches accurately repaired at 
moderate prices.! Diamonds re-se 



The Y. M. C. \. boy.s are pre- 
paring' for a h\g track meet in 
the near future, led liv Messrs. 
Drew, Lewis and "Pat" Youh.l;'. 


Clarence Bluett of the Los An- 
ofeles High School won third 
place in the shotput last Friday 
in a track meet between L. A. 
and the Manual Arts High schoo 
and the Manual Arts High 
Schools. 

/ 


"ii'^ 


Last Saturday at the track 
meet between the Universities of 
California and Southern Califor- 
nia, which was won by the Uni- 
versity of Southern California, 
Mr. Howard Drew, the peerless 
runner, demonstrated his ability 
by running the 100-yard dash in 
'^ A-? seconds, one second behind 
the world's record, and toying 
with his competitors in the 220- 
vard dash. Mr. Drew caused a 
tumultuous shout to go up from 
the bleachers when he broad- 
jumped 22 feet %% inches, easily 
winning^ first place. 


' ALONG CENTRAL AVENUE 

Mrs. Tennalfaum has the latest and best. 

Schneider &. Schultz, German winery products and distils pure 
wines and brandies, 2056 Santa Fe avenue. "^ 

Satisfaction: service and style in cloaks and suits at the Sample 
Suit Shop, 326 jvV. 7th. street. 

Farwell Brfes., at 12th and Central, will test your eyes, fit your 
glasses and furijish'your Christmas jewelry. 

; Its Latest Concession I 

The new Hill street entrance at the Broadway, where children's 
"Toyland" is mjit only a valuable concession but a very convenient 
addition for itj saves trouble and time. Parents may take thei: 
children there ^without having the encounter of hauling them up- 
stairs in the cn>wd. This new annex also contains one of the most 
unique china, ^assware and kitchen utensil department in the city. 

At the Brpad^vay there is little or no trouble in finding what 
you want. Ev^n fantastic New Yorkers find here that convenienqe 
that is found i4 few other department stores in the city. 


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REV. WM.I BECKHAM 
THE MINISTERIAL 
FEDERATION. 


^T 


WESLEY CPAPEL. 


The pastor at Wesley Ch.apel 
will preach Sunday morning on 
the subject, "Make Room For 
Jesus." 

At 6 :30 p. m. the young people's 
meeting, the Intennediate League 


The Ministerial Federation met 
Tuesday morning at the Y. M. C. 
A. building. 

Rev. Wm. Beckham, field secre- hold their services, Miss Bertha 
tary of the National Baptist Asso- Howard leading, 
ciation, delivered a wonderful ad- ,p^^ ^^^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

dress upon "Watchman, What of . 

,T ,, subiect, Men Wanted to Meet 

the Hour. 

Rev. Gordon C. Coleman, pas- Conditions in Los Angeles." 

tor of the North Oakland Baptist ^; 


Church; Rev. J. W.- Jones, pastor 
of the Second Baptist Church, 
Vallejo, Cal., and Mrs. G. E. Of- 
fitt, president of the SonyuS 
Truth Club of Los Angeles, were 
I introduced to the Federation. 

The Federation elected its new 
oflficers for the ensuing six 
months: Rev. D, L. McMickens, 
pastor of the Eifrhth Street Chris- 
tian Church, was elected presi- 
dent ; Rev 

Mt. Zion Baptist Church, vice- 
president; .Archie J. Williams, re- 
elected secretary, and Rev. .'^. L. 
Harris, chairman of the program 
committee. 

Prof. .Archie J. Williams will 
address the Federation next Tues- 
dav upon "The .Xtmosplicre i>f the 
Church.'' 


The Wesley Chapel Choir went 
to Alhambra Friday evening and 
delivered a musical program. The 
details and success of the occasion 
will appear later. ^, 


The Faben Phi Fraternity an- 
nounces their next social event on 
Easter Monday, .April 13, 1914, in 
Blanchard Hall. 

Invitations will follow this an- 
nouncement. The affair will be a 
Character Ball and the young ia- 


which it promised to cut down 
through its own le.gislatiou. Says 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 
a rejort just issued : 


"Comparing retail prices on 
neceniher \5. 1913, with prices 


dies and gentlemen are already l^'i the same date in 1912r twelve 
choosing, planning and devising ''^t the fifteen articles f^r which 
tasty characters from history, fie- quotations are giv^n were higher 
tion, and mythology as their own. I 'Tnti three were lower." 

The colors of the Fraternity are 1 Thus potatoes, "the poor man's 
purple and gold. .\ beautiful pur-, food," had advanced ,43.7 per 
pie ribbon will be awarded the, cent ; fresh eggs had gone up 21.9 
young lady presenting , the most per cent; pork, beef, fowls, milk 


artistic female character and a 
gold ribbon will be presented the 
gentlemen for the most artistic 
male character. 

This affair promises to eclipse 
all previous affairs given by this 
well-known fraternity. 

(Signed) E. H. Russell, 
Chairman Executive Com. 


Continued from page 1. 
I quote specially the case of 
Frances Tucker of 1861 Curtis 
street, who found a pocketbook 
containing a large sum of money 
in my telephone booth and 
promptly turned it over to my as- 
sistant manager without extract- 
ing one cent. 

You may say no one deserves 


and lard all had 'risen; and only 
sugar, butter and flour showed 
even slight declines. 

.And as with foodstuffs, so with 
clothing — prices are rising, in- 
stead of falling. "Shoes," said 
the Democrats, "would be cheap- 
er, yet now comes warning from 
the manufacturers that 'ten dol- 
lar shoes' mav be expected in the 
near future, and those who can 
not afford them may go barefoot. 
Yet, despite the 'magnificent 
work' of the State Department. 
France, Germany and Russia im- 
posed a duty of 40 to 60c a pair 
on .American shoes, as against 20 
to 25 cents on shoes imported by 
those countries from England." 

In these two citations alone, 
mav be found sufficient reason 


credit for being honest, but I am i for the Democrats to make Presi- 
sure the world would be revolu- ; dent W'ilson personally the main 
■■'onized if the majority of people j issue in the coming Congression- 
were like Frances. There are ' al campaign. They cannot "point 
many people that need employes , with pride" to a reduction in the 
like Frances and you would be cost of living. 

•perfectly justified, Mr. Editor, in ; 

holding her up as a beautiful ex- 
ample of how honorable Denver 
colored people are. Hoping that 
you will continue the fight that 
you have been making against 
Race Prejudice, and while not a 
seeker after notoriety, I herein . Bills were presented and hotly 
subscribe myself as being always discussed by the various congress- 


Such enthusiasm as dominated 
in the "Mock oCngress" at the 
Wesley Chapel Literary Society 
Tuesday evening has never been 
witnessed in • the society before. 


a friend to merit and honesty, and 
will do anything righteously in the 
cause of the colored people, Be- 
lieve me. Very truly, 

A BUSINESS MAN. 


FOOD IS HIGHER 

Democrats' Bluff About Reduc- 
ing Cost of Living Shown Up 
by Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Washiogton, March 10.— Just 
about one year ago the Demo- 
cratic pjfrty pledged its faith aad 
its sacred ho«or that it would 
reduce the high cost of living, 


1 ' i 

^^ h 4 1^. , ' ^> 


men. Congressmen Williamson 
and McDonald on the majority. 
Beeks and Stevyard on the minor- 
ity. Speaker Lacey presided in 
excellent fashion. A bill produced 
at the close to be discussed at the 
next session, Tuesday, March 31. 
Keep on the lookout for the lar- 
gest program of the year Tuesday, 
April 8, of all the literaries at 
Wesley Chapel. 


\Vc held services all day Sun- 
day. Rev. .A. C. Williams preach- 
ed at both the morning and even- 
ing services. He preached a 
.A. C. Williams of the wonderful sermon at the evening 
service upon "Love." 

Rev. Wm. Beckham, field sec- 
retary of the National Baptist 
.\ssociation preached at the after- 
noon service, this service was a 
mass meeting of the Baptist Mis- 
sionary societies of the city. Rev. 
P.eckham told us many things of 
our race that we did not know. 
IvverylMDcly was [, (eased with the 
service. It was a success. 

.At the business meeting of the 
Zi(in llaptist Church oMnday 
ni^'ht after hearing Rev. A. C. 
Willianfs reason for resignation as 
temporary |)astor, tiie church re- 
considered the call of Rev. E. J. 
l~islier to the pastorate. The call 
was annulled and void. 

Rev. .A. C. Williams was asked 
liy the church to continue with 
'/ler until a pastor was called. 

We expect all the members and 
friends to be present Sunday. 
Rev. Williams will preach at the 
morning service upon "Courage- 
and Thanks"; evening upon "The 
Safety of 'Steadfastness.' " 



AT THE OHUBOHES 


TABERNACLE BAPTIST 

Hemlock Street 
Rev. J. D. Gordon, pastor. 


0»0< li »»»»«»»»»»»»»O«»»*»»»» 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :.30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


SECOND BAPTIST. 


Sunday morning, R^v. AlcCoy 
preached a very inspiring sermon 
on "Grace." .At the evening ser- 
vices Rev. Tremble also preached 
an inspiring sermon. 

Next Sunday will be Mission- 
ary .Sunday at the church. The 
Missionary .'^ciety will render a 
very good program at the even- 
ing services. Every one is wel- 
come. 

Sunday School, 9;30 a. m. 

P.. Y. P. r. 6:30 p. m. sharp. 


|fEW HOPE BAPTIST \^ 

Ifaloma Ave., near 16th 
ReV. C. H. Anderson, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. k. P. U., 6 :30 p. m. 
Pr^taching at 7 :30 p. m. 


MT. ZION BAPTIST 
Third and Stephenson Ave. 

Rev. A. C. Williams, pastor. 

Services for Sunday., 

At 11 a. m., preaching, subject, 
7:30 p. m.. preaching, subject. 


IIS A.M. E. CHURCH 

Eighth and Towne Ave. 

Us^al service preaching by the 
pastor, Dr. Gregg. 

l| 


WESLEY CHAPEL 


SECOND BAPTIST CHUSCH 

Maple Av<>., bet. 7th and 8th Sta. 
Rev. Joseph L. McCoy, pastor. \i 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7;30 p. m. 


The People's Realty Compan Call on K. " Crumbly, 785 San 

the Colored Man's Investmenty Pedro St., for Fire Insurance on 

Company — a safe, conservative and Baildings and Household Gojds 

economiciilly administered institu- 'Delay is dangerouj." Telephone 

.; Qi »i ru\ r»„ •-!„ „» Broadway 2528. 

tion. snareB, »I.l)0. On sale at -' 

office of Capt. F. H. Crumbly. 785 

an Pedro street. Tel. Broadway E*«t Lynae is coming April 7 

, ■' Given at the T. M. A. Hall, 231 

^^'^^■1 Spring street. 


ler Eighth and 'Wall 
Rev.. Wesley E. Kurchen, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Yopng People's meeting at 6:30 
p. m. I 

Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


FIRST A M. E. CHXTEOH 

Cor. Eighth St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. N. Greggs, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
Christian Endeavor at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at' 7:30 p. m. 


Home 18274 So. 5428 

V. Kogan's Pharmacy 

3728 Cental Ave. Corner 38th St 

We earry Toilet Articles, Stationery Drugs and Chemicals. 
Preacriptione our specialty. 

Orders given by Phone art delivtred. 


Go to H. H. FINN'S 

Meat Market and Grocery 

For th« good things to eat, where everything is clean and neat 
Prices are right. Give me a fair trial and be convinced. 

M. H. FIININ, 

3429 Central Ave. Sunset So. 957 


Hair D.IBH31.SI3, Mv^cji'vj 
Shampooing 


Residbnce Phone Main 5167 
Business Phoni 

METROPOLITAN HAIR STORE 

J. H. CUFFEE, Pkop.i O 

1403 1-2 EAST NINTH STREET Cor. HEMLOCK 


Mr. Monroe Dorsey was given . 
birthday party by his brother, Mr 
Geo. Dorsey, on the 12th of Feb. 


AT THE 2D BAPTIST CHURCH 

MONDAY, MARCH 30, I914 

A : GRAND : DEBATE 

1 

SUBJECT: 
Resolved, 'That Women's Smiles Are Dangerous." 

AffirmaUve. COL. ALLEN ALLENSWORTH 
W. J. J. BYERS „ , 

Negatiye: REV. E. W. KINCHEN 

REV. S. L. HARRIS 

' REV. N. P. GREGGS, Master of Ceremonies 

i Other ministers of the city will serve a« judges 



(SajnuelJiI. i^Jiortricfye 


■■'• . .i 


Te be given under the auspices of Company "0" 
REV. MRS. JOSEPH L, McCOY, Captain 


1 ,' 


|^^^4ii;'. 


f DO NOT DELAY REGISTERING AS A 

I REPUBLICAN 

I ' THAT YOU MAY VOTE AT THE 

PRIMARY ELECTION 

TUESDAY. AURUST 25TH, <914 
For 

SAMUEL M. SHQRTRIDGE 
UNITED STATES SENATOR 


?L' i 


^1 »x A- -* - 


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EAGI.E MAN MAKES EX- 
TENDED TRIP TIIRQUGH 
STATE 


Greeted Throughout San Joaquin 

Valley With Entbusiatsic 

Gatherings 

The editor of the California 
Eagle returned last Sunday morn- 
ing from an extended trip as far 
north as Richmond, Martinez, 
Sacramento and through the San 
Joaquin valley in the interest of 
this journal and with a message 
of hope to our people along the 
lines of racial progress and uplift. 
We were greeted everywhere with 
the greatest of enthusiasm and the 
colored people all vied with each 
Other t(3 make our stay in the va- 
rious communities both profitable 
and inspirifjg. 

Our first stop was at Bakers- 
field where we have a large fol- 
lowing. The families in that city 
where The Eagle is not a weekly 
visitor are scarce ; and here re- 
side a people that for thrift and 
enterprise take second place to no 
people on the entire Pacific Coast. 
We have often told in these col- 
umns of their progress and the 
enterprise among them and we 
never tire of exploiting the deeds 
of such citizenship as we have in 
Kern county. 

We were drafted here to assist 
in trying a cause in the great 
mock trial at Cairns Chapel. 

Rev. J. W. Price is doing a 
great work at the A. M. E. Church 
and will in the near future com- 
mence the erection of a new 
church edifice 'which will be a 
credit to anv on the second to 
none. 

Dr. T. Gordf)n McPhersnn is 
holding forth at the White Tem- 
ple and while his flock is scattered 
at present he is fighting with his 
back to the wall to hold his own, 
and if he wins he will truly live 
up to the name of the fighting 
parson. 

A Baptist mission has been or- 
ganized and is reported to have a 
Strong following. Rev. C. -A P-ig- 
gers is in charge. 

Both Odd Fellows and Masonic 
lodges are doing fine work and re- 
port a steady growth. 

Mr. H. S. Houston, one of the 
leading lights, is still maintaining 
one of the leading tonsorial par- 
lors of the city. He is also deputy 
county clerk. 

The firm of Winters. Simpson 
\$i Bridges is one of the leading 
Commercial concerns of the cit) 
^nd doing a nice business. 

The Western Grocery Com- 
pany, with Miss Marie Simpson 
as manager, is doing a nice busi- 
pess and deserves great credit. 
I Mr. John Pinkney is still one of 
ithe live ones of Bakersfield and 
lis doing his part to help out all of 
jthe racial enterprises. 
I Many others of the Eagle fam- 
jily are doing much to boost for the 
city and race. Mr. Chas. Ankrum. 
Walker, Mrs. Reese Person et al. 
are in line for Tdtct progress. 
At San Francisco 
We arrived at the northern me- 
i tropolis on the 4th and find here 
a great sentiment for a teal news- 
paper such as the California 
Eagle, procured many new sub- 
scribers and advised with our cor- 
respondents and "iiad the oppor- 
tuni^ of making sentiment for 
race journalism. 

Met Leading Candidate forVJ. S 
Senator 
Here we met the Hon. S. 
Shortbridge, leading candidate fol 


l^markable Inception To Cami'ma Easile All Ov^r |he Stat^ 


the three churches are 
along very well. .Rev. J. 
edd, ably assisted ^y his 
re doing good ifork §t the 
A. M. E. church. Rev. 
jj^fidered us all the Courtesies 
dUj^ilbie negro press and was pains- 
talOMrin making our stay a pleas- 


him to be a man fall of haman wife did much to make our stajr « 

sympathy, who without any reser- pleasant one. Among others who 

vation speaks right out his senti- are leading citizens are the two 

ments in regard to the injustice ' Knox families and Rev. Edwards. 

which has been heaped upon a Ninety per cent of the colored 

struggling race and that if he is families here own their own 

elected to the Senate We will' al- homes. 

ways find him an advocate for jus- j We met here the Hon. T. F. 

tice to the race, This should be [griffin, leading Democratic candi- an^W. He is a broad-gauged 

food for thought for our people i^^^^ f^^ United States Senator. «,itor of the gdspcl. 

as ,t has been a long time since we ^^ j^„„^ ^^,^ ^ ^,^^ ^^^ .^f^ble ^ gimpson. who is the pas- 
gentleman who stands for human tor in charge of the A. M. E. Zion 
rights and a consistent friend to chtqtjh, used us in a way which we 
all the people. hig^y appreciated, and invited us 

H. C. Reevy of the court house to «p9k at his church at any time 
we found willing to give recogni- we CiUi ^ arrange it. Rev. Simp- 
tion to his colored constituents by son i^ "the right man in the right 
patronizing their organ ; also we pla^and is doing a great work, 
found County Clerk Benson, who 
is the right man in the right place. 
Judge I-'ulker we found to be a 
man who has made good on the 
bench and gave us time from his 


have had a man in that body whi 
could speak up for a race which 
is deserving of more consideration 
than than he has received in that 
body far years. There are no In- 
galls or Forakers or Logans in the 
Senate today. Shortbridge's ex- 
pressed, sentiments are akin to the 
acts of these great men who un- 
flinchingly stood for human rights. 

While here we journeyed to 
Richmond, and our great fight 
against the efiforts of union labor 
to recall Senator Owens is well 
known. It was a great victory for 
our people to assist in defeating 
the organization which had the 
full crew law enacted to put black 
men out of jobs to support their 
families. 

We visited Martinez, the county 
seat of Contra Costa county. J. E. 
Colton of the winery we found to 
be a broad-gauged man who be- 
came one of the Eagle readers. 
.Also Mr. Geo. Meese. whi will 
soon be before the people for their 
suffrage, as also R. I), l.attimore. 
M. W. Hurley and the genial city 
attorney. R. l-~. 'roniilcy. the .Mar- 
tinez hotel and others. 
At Stockton. 

.\t SKickton. wl'ere large num- 
bers of our people live, we found 
them, while yot up with some of 
the other sections in a business 
wav, striving to do something, and 
doubt under the leailerslii]) of 
the ministry and either forces will 
n be in line to do their share 
along the lines of race progress. 
Rev. r;. W. Reed is doing a great 
work and is busy at this time as 
the leading force for the great 
Chautau<|ua t<i be held at Sacra-? 
mento in June. 

Rev. J. .-\. Duncan is doing a 
great work at the .A. M. E. church 
and the people are enthused over 
his work. His church is prosper- 
ing and he is the leading force in 
the movement to procure compe- 
tent and reliable help in this com- 
munity. We arranged while here 
to deliver our address at a future 
date and we are assured of a great 
gathering. 

Many new subscribers were ad- 
ded to our large Stockton list and 
met many of the city and county 
officials, among them E. M. Quail, 
the genial county surveyor 


worth while for racial ubUft. Aii^fci^TBrSt time to aSk 
we believe they are et^l In IM )jjl0ldt any kind whatso^ 
occasion. We are und«^ many «|K|||pkfl|irces he is receiviri i 
ligations to these young' mtat Wte n^>pert. There is no 4 
showed us so many favors. Mr. qhJ' colored people wt»: 
Lewis is our correspojadont hetei#tth a greater enthusi; 
and' he has quite a cha|ice. to c«.fe- ttty would for Col. Phi;- J.,, 
ate favorabel sentimeijit througfciia a, native of Missis^- H-"-';''i 
these columns. "j ^tlf^ y°" ^"^^ ^ ™*'' ^v J- --f 

' I f a&lstppi who is a Refiub 

Near th^ city in thii^otinty aii ^„„d he is a man th 


two of thfe most prosperous cot 


:f 


Rjp?. R. D. Arline has charge of 
the feptist church and seems to 
have* splendid opportunity. 

We spoke here under the aus- 
pice*; of the Missionary Society, 


arduous duties to present our of wfeich Mrs. Mills is the presi- 
cause. and presented with his com- dent. Mrs. Mills is a great Chris- 
plimennts the l-^agle to. one fif our tian worker and is broad-gauged, 
citizens. The Eagle is under many obliga- 


iipeiided on for a sq.uaf 
ak. 






ored settlements in tjie Cnited' 
States, Bowles and Fd\|fler. Here 
reside prosperous ne^o farmers 
who have land as fep^le as that 
along the valley of the ^ile. Farms 
that produce from $^0 to $300 
per acre. , We met one 'pi the lead- 
ing farmers from Bo^^les in the 
person of Mr. C. E. Or^ and others 
from that section. Th^ are mem- 
bers of thl; race wh<| stand f«^r 
progress. They complimented tts 

on the improvement (^ the Eagle at the hands of our people 
and extended an invitjjtion for us 
to come to their tow^ and visit 
their people and to deliver our 
message, which invitat|on we shall 
with pleasure accept. sThese gen- 
tlemen assured us ths|t they wel- 
come in their midst rajie men who 
are industrious and rtirifty ; that 
there are plenty of wi)rk and op- 
portunity to buy lanc| . At pres- 
ent they are compelled to hire 
Japanese labor becaH|e they can 
get no other. I 




im 


"Mr. Phillips is partia 
fdimpaign toward our cc^}'-') 
terprises. As he put it, ht 
to give them his card tot ;!, 
notwithstanding thousai '' 
other papers, the colprd 
would be the only one to q 
card, which will appeai^^i 
journal up to the .August- , 
ies. We bespeak for th< 
W. W. Phillips a strong s 


Horn F. H. Short is one c 
leading forces for Republica 
in this section and a friend to 
publication. 


■.8:^ 


.fM. 



d^miie/Jff. STioj'tnicfye 


Leading Reyublican Candidate For U. S. Senator 


Geo. T. Davis for Sheriff of Stan-jtions to her for her encouraging 


who 


islaus County 
Of all the genial and accommo- 



is worthy of the support of our 
people ; Judge Plummer and dating men that it comes one's lot 
Smith J. H. W. Harding of the to meet, we cannot imagine of a 
Southern Pacific car service ; Sher- fines or squarer man than Geo. T. 
^ff W. H. Reichs, who is as fineasjDavis, the present constable of 
they make them, who will receivt j Modesto township, recognized by 
and of whom everyone as a prince of good fel- 
lows. He is having an easy race 
for the office of sheriff. At the 
coming primaries he is receiving a 
strong support from all classes. 
After sizing up the situation we 
cannot help commend his candi- 
dacy to the favorable considera,- 
tion of our people that reside in 
this county. 


a strong support -i 

♦he Eagle will have much to sav 

during the campaign. 

Sacramento 

We visited the capital city and 
on account of the unemployed be- 
ing in their midst the city was 
very much agitated. But we added 
many new namesJto our list and 
arranged to speak at a future date. 

Returning to Stockton our next 
stop was at Modesto at which 
place we spoke to a large gather- 
ing. Enthusiasm ran high and at 
the unanimous request of the peo- 
ple assembled we agreed to a re 
turn date 
speak to them again 


remarks and for the opportunity of 
presenting our cause. 

We organized while here a Lin- 
coln Club which will be very, ac- 
tive in the pending campaign with 
an organized effort of the colored 
vote in Fresno county. They can 
at least help their friends and in 
some way secure some recogni- 
tion in the county ,with a deciding 
vote as to the fate of many of the 
oflfices. They should organize for 
the intelligent and organized sup- 
port of the various candidates.' 
This organization will also select 
candidates ori the state ticket. 

We put the work of organiza- 
tion to the young men of Fresno 


PoUticall5^ 

Here in Fresno county, as in all 
others for county offites, they all 

run at the primaries i|on-parti»:<0- 

the fate of many of *hese candi 

dates, and before the Campaign is 

3 
over this vote will be finich sought 

for, and it is up to o|ir people to 

see to it they give the^r support to 

no one but those who^are friendly 

and will to give due| recognition 
o a faithful cfinstitu>ncy. 
\Among those who Jean tints be 
rated are Justice G| W. Smith, 
whoNhas so faithfull|- filled that 
positlcX). He is onetof the best 
friends \hat the colored folk of 
I'resno haV.eand his ^upport from 
them will l)te unanim(|us. We will 
have much to\^ay of Judge Smith's 
candidacy as the campaign pro- 
ceeds. \ 

Constable G. E\M^ched of Jus- 
' tice Smith's court \4 also a ihor- 

'^\ 
ough gentleman and .otje of whom 

we are glad to say »■ giQod word, 
for without any ostentation he is 
willing to patroniz(! enteiqirises 
conducted by our pei^ple. \^ 
For T^ CoUejctor _ x 
Mr. Geo. M. Bolesi well known 




At Fresno 

We arirved in Fresno- unan-land on our return "ftfill hold a great 
nounced. We find here our people mass meeting, at which we hope to 
in large numbers and one lone col- meet all the citizens of Fresno an4 
ored woman is oiir representation a heart-to-heart talk along jpoliti- 
in the business lines. She con- cal and other lines for the contin- 
m the near future tolducts an eating house. So the city ued progresa of the race, 

Which has a negro population of So Messrs. Wilhe Lewis, Big- 
Mr W Grow is one of the old-more th^n 600 will not at least bee. Louis James and others have 
";nr.0«,«p.cu. ei««„s .,<*. ,e. sen. ^^^^-^^^ ^^^^^^^^ " 

^ - ■ ■ 


Shortbridge, leading candidate foil i^t and most respecrea citizens u. ..... , v». . — - o 

United ^tetes Senator, and findljlodesto and Wmself and his go<xlNational Negro Busmesj League 



For public administrator th 
is nothing to it but to support 
present incumbent, Geo. Andrev - 
who has so faithfully- filled the p< 
sition. Our people know that h 
stands for a square deal for al 
and will give to him an undivide( 
support. j ^ 

At Hanford [; 

,The city of Hanford; county 
Kiif^ ,^ounty. ^Japtains to 

the square incli a strong and in- 
dustrious colored citizenship. We 
are not a stranger to this people 
as we have met them and ad- 
dressed thejr meetings on former 
occasions. Hence we were glad 
to meet them again and to meet 
such an enthusiastic audience. -\t 
the conclusion it was the unani- 
mous desire of all that we should 
repeat our address at an early 
date, to which request we gladly 
acquiesced. \ 

At Visalia 
Here we met M. T. Love, who 
h^s resided in the county -sept of 
Tulare county since the rhemory 
of man runneth not to the con- 
trary. Mr. Love stands well in his 
home city and is one of our lead- 
ing citizens, being prominent in 
the fraternal circles of the state 
and has a large acquaintance 
throughout the state. Mr. Love 
made our visit to Visalia a pleas- 
ant one and we wish in this man- 
ner to thank him for the many 
courtesies shown. While we did 
not have the pleasure of address- 


''^■' -^-^^ 

■■1 


hi- ■ 
.-.S'i 


i 


ing the citizens, we made arrange- 
real estate man smdl city triistecj^gj^jg ^^ ^^ g^ q„ q^^ return to 
is" an aspirant for that position, 
who unhesitatingly .-^nd ungrudg- 
ingly gives to our people recog- 
nition by the way o| their official 
organ. And we sayfright now in 
this coming contest they cannot 
give thei rstrength ■■■ to a better 
man. We shall front time to time 
comment on our frfends, and the 
people knowing thit we are al- 
ways on the alert ^or friends or 
foe?, can govern themselves ac- 
cordingly. We say ^at Mr. Boles 
is ill right and deserves a hearty 
support from all classes. 

For State Treasurer 
Fresno 2boasts tji the leading 
candidate for statt treasurer in 


their city at an early date. 
Political Straws 

Tbis being the county seat of 
Tulare county, Visalia is the hub 
around which all things political 
turn. We^nd here a great people 
who all seeriV to stand for a square 
deal and for fairness and consid- 
eration. We wa^it to say that this 
citizenship canno\ be excelled no 
place on the globe. \We procured 
the announcement ori^very candi- 
date for public position which we 
visited and with only oV two ex- 
ceptions even had jn in'^rview 
with all of them, ■; . . \ 

We shall frpm tikne to tipie, 
commencing in this issue, gi\e 
brief write-ups giving to .'our Tu^ 


\- 


if;: 


'^1 


the person of the^ Hon. W. W. 

Phillips, who is nft only "one of j^^^g county readers 4 pen picture 
the most prominent citizens of his ^f q^j^g ^ few of them through 
home city but of|the state. In 'Messrs. Love and others. .A mon- 
times past his counsel in the sue- gter meeting is being arranged for 
cess of the Republican party has our next visit in Viaalia during 
really been invaluable, aqd this has been the coming month. 




I 



,w.. 






:3?.;';>.";|mI 


^ 


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m 


3an Diejcb'^^^owinjc 


S^c 


istry^ Ti^is church pfoperti^is 
valued at near the $50,000 mark, j 
Th6y expect to build a handsome I 
edifice soon. 
I _■_ leisen -Tent & Awning Co., Lois The East Side Church, presid- 

f- ■ ' Clothing Store, So. Motor Car ed over by Rev. J. E. Robinson, 

SiniDiego is one of the most q^ ^ Mission Motor Mart, Otto is moving on in the even tenor of 


ehttjrprising and broad gauged p g^jUg^ ;^uto Agency, McBride 
atiijs of the Pacific Coast and is ^ Masterson. Tioga Garage, 
ma(ie ,up of a citizenship that ^^^^^ ^^^j^ ^ Door.Co., McBride 
stand* for progress. We are (^^^ jj^chine Co., Simori Levi Co., 
• proudto state that in every^move- ^ ^ Goodrich Robber Co., Dixie 
mept for its continued V^S^^^^ Supply Co.. W. A., Hall, Camp- 
Shop 


:ibe: colored citizens are fowd on ^^^^j,^ Drapery 

the right side supporting^' these q^^^^ ^--^ 

moivements ; and in compiling this 

wc^k showing their status in this -^ 

icoiiimunity the following firms STATISTICAL REFERENCE 

i|geherouslv contributed to make ^jjp DIRECTORY OF SAN 
W same pos^e, for whith we--.' j^ . DfEiaO. .CAL. 

are very tha^^l 

i Jsfote— This work has been, ex 

'teLively published in the Galifor ^ u t 

rcwBiv*. J K of San Diego. In our research of 

nia Eagle and in the present book ^^^^-^^^^^y^^^ ^.j^^ ^^^ eflforts 

iorm. t* ■ ^"S^ to cxptS!t1flie status and accom- 

;Names of firms and B«^^"S':J|,,jgj^j^^^^g ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^ jl,^ p^. 

; contributing; • cific Coast, we have to-ifhronicle 

Lyons Implement Co., Whiting ^gf^ g citizenship that bids fair to 
Meade Ci>mmercial Co. 


TTie%rthermost point in South- 
ern California is the beautiful city 


its way and serving its needs in 
this locality. Their property has 
a valuation of $2,000. 

Lodge Directory 

Fidelity Lodge, No. 10, A. F/i& 
A.- M.— Meets at G. A. R. HalLOn 
Minerva the first and third Friday evening 
of each month. F. G. Williams, 
W. M.; N. J. Harris, S. W.;, 
Charles Goodin, J. W.; W. H. 
Meadows, secretary; W. D. Saun- 
ders, treasurer. 

Order of Eastern Star— Meets 
the first Thursday. Mrs. Ji^o. 
White, W. M. ', 

Mount Moriah Chapter, No. (4, 
Royal Arch Masons— Meets the 
first Monday evening of each 
month, Rev.'W. A. Mitchell, X. 
P.; H. A. Harvey, King; Rev. R. 
N. Haubert, Scribe; W. C. Mead- 



mm 


Johnson niake in the not far distant future o^s. Secretary; W. McTrent, 
Connell iKJ Saum, Book Lovers ^ highly commendable showing Treasurer. 

'Shop, T. .A. Jado.n Co., E. M. Rob- along all of the various lines Dunbar Lodge, No. 2, Knights 

of Pythias — Meets, second and 


of the ^xilized world to the prog 

of a possibly less favored G- A. R. Hall 


ress 


mi 


erts Co., -S. H. Price, E. C. Field, which has attracted the attention 
N. A. Graham Co, San Diego 
Grain & .Milling Co. Chas. Mc- 
, Gormick Lumber Co., Benson race 
liumber Co., Philip Morse, F. X 
Winter, Electric Laundry Co. 
Sanitary Laundry Co., W. -K 


Cowan Co., H. W. Rapor. Electric the best class of the opposite race. 
Compound Co., San Diego Steam who at all times are ready to aid 
Laundry, Citrus Soap Co., Excel- and assist them in an}- worthy un- 
sior Lat^ndry Co.. SchncU's Sani- dertaking. We met here the peo- 
tary Dairy. Syneders I. X. L. pig of both races in al lof the va- 
Laundry, Consolidated Brewing rious walks of life and find an op- 
Co., Mungers" Laundry Co., South- timistic feeling by all for a grater 
em California Laundry Co., Weil- and better ^an Diego. 
fland Laundry Co.. Chas. E. 
Jones, P. -A.. Grand & Co., Geo. 
^mith, Sperry Flour Co., J. S. 
Engmark. M. Thomas. H. \'. Wil- 
liams, L. M. Sylvester. C. H. Rod- 
din, A. Levi, E. P. .Vewton, Max- 
well Case Grocery Co.. 15roadway 
Garage, Griswokl & C'o., Western 
Leather Supply V Co., Oscar Heim 
Co., Nauman Cleaning & Dyeing world. 


fourth Friday of each month at 
R. I. Drake, C. C. ; 
Georg e Henry, V. C. ; W. C. 
In their efforts to rise in this Meadows, R. R. and S.; J. Wood- 
particular community, as in many en. Treasurer; H. King, M. F.; J. 
others, thev have the support of T. Brown, Prelate; William Met- 


With a negro population of 
more than 1000 as artisans, skilled 
and unskilled labor, and a sprink- 
ling following business pursuits, 
we can truly say that they are 
making an efF9rt to be counted as 
a part and parcel of this fifty year.s 
of progress which has challenged 
the admiration of the civilized 


Co., Frank Davenport Co.. .Arrow 
Market, De La Mater Bros,, G. O. 
Wilkerson, Hilcrest Drug Co.. 
Auto Metal Works,, Kruse Candy 
"'iSm^ Silver Gate Oil Co>', Lamb & 
Hinckley, Jno. Mayer, N. D. Nich- 
ols, Star Builders Supply Co., San 
Diego Feed Mi 
Transportation 


The following facts in figures 
will speak louder than words as 
to what this people have and are 
acconi9ih»HilK along these lines: 


Special Delivery, P. O. Bakery, 
T. Rossman, J. Fred Kahle, Elite 

; Printing Co., Green Rovia, Cal. 

; Garage Co., San Diego Desk Co., 
Denver Cash Market. S. R. Cobb, 
Ingle Mfg. Co., Pacific Transfer 

)Van & Truck Co.. Wilson S. 

^ Smith & Co., Geo. Walker for Xa- 

1 tional Cash Register Co., Wiley B. 

I Allen Co.. Wm. Holmes. R. L. G. 

i Wright. Geo. B. Irvin, W. T. Kir- 


ahieT)f cliurch property owned 

by them, S65.000; approximate 

value of property owned by them, 

~. Back Country $400,000 ; popfiilation, 1350;' voters, 

Co., Merchants ^,50. working at the trades, 83; 


chauffeurs, 17; jewelers, 2;. chir- 
opodist. 1 ; contractors, 8; garbage 
contractor for city, 1 ; employed 
by City Street Department, 15; 
employed by county, 2 ; restau- 
rants, 4; Hvery business, 1; mail 
carriers. 2; laundries, 2: rooming 
houses, 3; barber shops, 2; 
churches, 3; lodges, 4; pfiarmacist, 
1 ; grocery store, 1 ; social club. 1 ; 
civic organization, 1. 


run, M. W. 

.Aside from the many auxiliary 
clubs to churches, etc., there is 
one woman's -club, known as the 
Friday Afternoon Club, which is 
doing a great work. Officers ; 
Mrs. .\. Henderson. President; 
Mrs. M. Freeman, \ice-Presi- 
dent; Mrs. J. Gray, Secretary; 
Mrs. M. Jackson. Treasurer. 

Ouite a few beautiful homes are 
owned here by colored citizens, 
anil there are several who are con- 
ducting business on a large scale. 
Mr. K. W. .Anderson has the city 
contract for caring for the gar- 
bage, and works a crew of men 
averaging twenty-five. 

Palm Sunday, at Scott Chapel 
Mrs. Beavers will sing 'a solo, 
"The Palms." The church will be 
decorated yvith palms. 
^ "Rev. M^t^. S. lingh spoke at 
the A. M. E. Church Tuesday 
night to a large audience. He 
spoke on .Abraham Lincoln. 

Dr. Washington did some eoon 
.A bootblack who heard him Sun- 
day evening and morning was 
greatly impressed. He made his 
first deposit in a Pasadena bank. 

Pasadena will send one student 
to Tuskegee next fall. 

Some new ordinances passed by 
the city commissioners : Not to 
smoke on the street cars. It shall 
also be unlawful for any minor 
under eighteen years of age to 


by, J. M. Purdy, Henry Jordan, Directory of Churches, Fraternal smoke any cigars or cigarettes in 


Irwin & Co.', Pacific Sheet Metal 
Hub Clothing Co., Campbell Ma- 
chine Co.. Three Boys Transfer 
Co., Golden State Hat Co., A. N. 
Dauchy, Plaza Pharmacy, Mod- 
ern. Basket Grocery Co., Sanitary 
Ice Cream Co., Silver Gate Soda 
: Works, W. J. Bailey, Owl Ice 
: Cream Co., Hamilton. Demers and 
. Weitekamp, Whitney & Co., 
-.fierce Feld hardware Co., Hazard 
.^^Gould & Co., Ernsting Co., Ren- 
■ .bough & Gelors, Boston Store, 
; .Electric Home, Western Lumber 
\ Co., Chas. H. Nearpass, Farriss 
and Farris, Independent Meat 


and Other Organizations of 
San Diego 

Bethel A. M. E. Church, located 
on Front street, between Cedar 
and Date streets. Services Sun- 
day, 11 a. m., 8 p. m. S. C, 9:30 
a. m. Class and prayer meeting 
Wednesday evening. 7 :43 ; Sun- 
day, 6:43 p, m. R. H. Hanbert, 
pastor. 

First Street Baptist Church, 


any street, lane, alley, court, pub 
lie park, public building, or any 
other public place in the city of 
Pasadena. 

You rmist stop smoking when 
you get to Raymond Hotel and 
Columbia Street. 

(jo and registr today. . 

School' closed for ten days. ,,. 

Don't forget Sunday is Palm, 
Sunday. .''^'. 

Our press gang have; rose^ 
but al- 


j Market, San Diego Meat Market ^^ _ 

S^ Diego Hardware Co., W^jolff ^j ^ White, secretary 


near First and I-Vont streets- 
Services Stmday, 11 a. m. and 8 sometimes in their path 
p. m. Prayer meeting, Wednes- '''^y^ ^ave thorns, 
day evening; Missionary. Thurs- ^^n the evening of Friday, Feb. 
day evening; S. C, 9:30 a. m. -0*^. an article appeared in the 
Rev- W. .A. Mitchell, pastor; Mrs. I-os .Angeles Evening Record, 

with Mr. Shores' cut, under this 


Si^- 


Be One of the 
-§000 Members 



i ^) 


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Ih 


-^i 


For Great Mictin^ 

Lincoln Re 



Afniiated with Republican Feder- 
ation of Southern California 



J. A. WARREN, SecreUry, 
1957 Maple Avenue 


NEXT MEETING IVILL BE 


^1 


Scott's Hall, 361 Central Ave. 


r9ke licunq 9ecple's 

LITERARY SOCIETY 

9551-2 NAOMI STREET 
DR. J. M. SMITH, 

Founder and Organiier. 

WILLIE PAYNE, 
CLARENCE IRWIN, 

Assistant Managers. 


♦ \Vc desire to iniorm youtkat w 
have in progress a Young People's 
Literary Society, which everyone 
is invited to attend and become 
a member. Every Thursday "ve- 
ning at 8 o'clock we meet at 
the above named place. 

Miss Bernicb Moobe, Pres. 

Miss Katheleen Br.^ye, 

Cor. Sec'y 


head; 


"and Davidson, Mey«r,and David- Second Baptist Church, located 

son, M. F. Heller, J. P. Becker, q^ tj,e east side — Services Sunday, . 

'•!, "Ballard and Brockett, Benbough 11 a. m. and 8 j5. m.; S. C, 9:30 ' 

■Furniture Co.. Electric Equipment a. m. ; prayer meeting, Thursday Davenport Co., .Arrow Market, 

Co., G. & G. Hat Works,, San evening, J. E. Rob<^rtson, pastor ^^ ^.a Mater Bros., G. O. Wilker- 

Diego Gas Appliance Co., prevert We .will say .that the churches son, Hilcrest Dru^ Co., Aijto 
," Bledsoe Furniture Co., W.O.Tol- are presided ov^r by an inteUigent Metaf Works, Kruse Candy C^., 
''liver, Lynells, Rubins E\irniture,min;^try, who are doing a great Silver Gate Oil Co., Lambv& 

Co., Russ Lumber & Mill Co., C. .work for the spiritual aspect of Hinckley, John Mayer, N. ;p. 

S.Hardy, Eagle Drug Co., A. our people -N'ichols, Star Builders Supply Co., 

R. Miller, Pacific Coast Trunk & Rev. R. N. Haubert has just San Diego Feed Mills, Back Coun- 

Bag Co., Klauber & Wangen- completed the building of a hand- try Transportation Co., Merchants 
.h^imeCo., Beasley .Auto Works, some church edifice which will Special Delivery, P. O. Bakery, T. 
■B«ntley Bros., Warner M. Bat- compare favorably with any of the Rossn^an, J. Fred Kahle, Elite 

qian. Western Rubber & Supply churches owned by our people in 

Co., So. Cal. Music Co., Alfred any city of the coutny of its size. 

Stahl & Sons, Tibbias-Gavin Co., The church and property is valued 
•• Kellam Drug Co., Auto Tire Co., at $17,500. 

Jones Morse Paint House, Gray The First Street Baptist 

Thompson Music Co., Anderosn Chiir 

& Baxter, Southern Electric Co., Rev. 


Printing Co., Green Rovia, Cali- 
fornia Garage Co., San Diego 
Desk Co., Denver Cash Market, 
S. P. Cobb, Ingle Mfg. Co., Pacific 
Transfer Van & Storage Co., Wil- 
'.under the leadership of son S. Smith & Co., Geo. Walker 
A. Mitchell, is in a pros- for National Cash Register Co., 
Clark, Pioneer Trni'k Co., Miieh- perous conditiorir and,he is a wor- Wiley B. Allen Co., Wm. HoltBes, 
Holywasser Co., I^;., Foreman & tby, example olti^e Christian min- R. L., G. Wrijght, Geo.; B. Irvii^, 


H. S. A. CUMING 

CUMING'S 
LIVER TONERS 

One Hundred Vegetable Pills 
for 25 CentF 

These pills are recommended for the 
relief of Constipation, Sick Headache, 
Biliousness. 

Cuming's Drug Store 

EsTiELlsHEl) 7 Years 

1407 Ea«t Ninth Broadway 871 


'^'' 


/^U^^s^V 11 

L' 

n^j^ I WM 





Pueblo Meat Market 

TIO-EPHONC MAIN BattT 

\ Josep4 Davis, Proprietor 

All Fresii Meat and Fish 

Meats arc (Povcrmcnt Inspected 

Premlurii Bacon and Hams 


JOHN T. REID 

CjROCER — Staple and Scanty Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

Our Meat Mark|t is a great addition to the store 
We carry all -sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats 
OUR PRICES ARE REAj^ONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 
Cor. Kohler and E. 7th St 


U < ■ CE! 

Colored Voters of State of California 

Take Notice — M)t to use the Afro-American 
Federal name j unless you are registered 
therein. '| 

^. E. uKttimore 

Los Angeles, Cal 


5400 Long Beach Avenue 

I 
-^ i 


P^r Dependable 

Dry Goods. Udie$ and Gents Furnishings, Hats 

^•'"' '*- Shoes. Etc., Goto 

ARCAI>E PEPARTMENT ST6RE 

B. F. HOPKINS' OLD gTAND FIFTH AND GLADYS ' 

They are out of the higWrent dis-tdct. aad these goods are as good as the 
best and prices as low as th^ lowest. 


lifft.1^0GERS^t" 


Phone Broadway 2387»- 


Market, Fresh and 
Smoked Meats 


Staplm Groceries 


Cash Grocery 

745 Central Avbnue 


Groceries, Frfuit and Vegetables i 

Grecian l|iiported Olive Oil, 3-Star Brand 
Fifth and Gladys Ave. j ^ Qust. PicOUlast & Co 


Sam*s MafKet _^ 

EaslSeVentVsti 

lALERJN^ALifK: 

fresh afUtrSaJtllSi^^ 


The Old Reiable, where you get 
your nioney> worth, along with 
' '"*' ' reatment. 





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Author of Race 

Tips,l!of Pullman Co. 


And Other 


Active^ Railroad ia^ifit^ri 
will Furnish the Doings 
of the 5000 Railroad 
Men Running to and 
on the Coast for THE 
E4GLE 


;fi t-.f ;-' -'f 


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Job Printing! 


Wc invite you to ^ivc us a trial 


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Wc Print 


Letter Heads 
Bill Heads 
Envelopes 
Cards 
Statements 
Shipping Ta^s 

Catalogues 
At Home Cards 
Visiting Cards 
Announcements 
Wedding Invitations 
Etc., Etc. 

u .:. AT REASONABLE PRICES ! 


The California Eagle 

1034 E.9th Street 








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I'Tyv^'/^mf'^miMM'^M' "4''l 





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porters;- waiters 
chefs-- maids 

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REp CAPS 
CHOTEL JMEN, ETC 


RAILROAD CLATTER 

Through the Eagle megaphone 
-All a'bode ! 


Dr. Booker T, Washington, en 
route from Santa Barbara to Los 
Angeles last Wednesday on the 
Coast Line parlor car, gave Porter 
Reynolds a bunch of beautiful 
roses, telling him to give them to 
his wife. 


Jack Claybourne of the Coast 
Line dining car crew, is meeting 
with great success in disposingv,^f 
shares in his New Enterprise (dy- 
ing) and Cleaning. 


Mr. Sam jliornay, of New Or- 
leans, at jiresent employed as 
fourth cool^on the Coast Line, is 
to be marrred to one of his home 
town beauties this coming June. 
The young^ lady in question is at 
present residing at Oakland. Chef 
Swanson, n^ith whom he is asso- 
ciated wit|) on the car, we learn, 
is to be bc^t man. 


Geo. \V. Brown, Pullman por- Railroad ^afety Exhibit Attracts 

ter on the Coast Line, contem- ©luch Attention 

plates an extended trip through 

the entire East and South and a . . . , 

^ A ^, ^ r- v ij There- ijre many visitors to the 
stop over at Atlanta, Ga., his old X . •■ 

, T- ^ r free exhiBit bv photo and chart of 

home, rree transportation fur- .? ' ' . . 

... , r .. ct. • the various safety devices em 

nished on account oi the bhnners , , ? .. c *u d, -c ■„ 

. , nloved b^ the Southern Pacific in 

bpecial. ' -^ :"!. 

the operation of its trams now on 

display (|n the second floor of the 

Ferry building. 

It incllides a model in miniature 

of a secijion of track, with cars in 

motion, ^graphically showing the 

\vorking5 of the automatic electric 

iblbxk signal system installed on 

*"•"• ' , South^f^ Paci6c lines. 

Mr. Robert Fluellen is again | The §onthern Pacific holds the 

back to work as third chef, ovei igold m^al awarded by the Amer- 

Mr. Hornay after a forced lay ofl ican Museum of Safety for the 

for about three months is becom- best re<^rd in accident prevention 

ing real hard to get along with as in the h'car 1913, in competition 

the wrinkles of several weeks' rest with ag steam railroads of the 

disappear. United^States. 

if 

V i a 


During a period of five years I 
not passenger's life was lost ' 
through collision or derailment <rfj 
trains on Southern Pacific lines, > 
this remarkable record involving 
the movement of 200,000,000 pas- 
sengers. — Advt. 

Del Monte, on the Coast Line, 
continues to be the favorite place 
for those seeking rest and relaxa- 
tion, golf being more popular tha 
it has been this winter. So J. 
Reynolds says, who is running 
charge up there, from the loai 
of baggage and golf sticks. B 
he wears a smile that won't 
off. We a^ked the cause ; he saii 
he was thinking of little Margan 
and Tommy, his two little gran< 
children visiting from Coroni 
Beach, the children of Mrs. Ev4 
lyn and Dennis Wilson^ j 

The California Eagle fa few- 
THRE— Eagle A3557 4-2 ' 
at the Pullman Barber Shop, 
Ceres avenue. 

Subscriptions taken, office ll 
East 9th street, Los Angeles, 
California Eagle. 


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THE CALIFORNIA KAQLE; 


All coinmanlcatlons sbould be addreasea 
to The California Eagle, lOSt East Ninth 
Streets. Sunset Phone Broadwar 7167. 

£ntered as second-class mall matter aft 
the PoatolBce of Los Angeles, CaL. under 
the A«t p( Marob 1. 1879. 


C. A, SFIAK 

J. I BASS— — 
H. ,<HAWNON_. 


Maaaglnc Bditor 


LEWIS 


^dvertlftnr Uantfer 
BBSKS Local B41tor 


' 'U' 


f-:: J 




CORRESPONDENTS. 

S. B. CaiT FMad«na 

H. B. SlKpson . BakersSeld 

E. L. Lawis .^-Freano 

Miss Ada Thompson _ Oakland 

Mrs. Evans _ San Francisco 

J. J. Anderson San Francisco 

ZJ. F. Henderson Los Angeles 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year $2.00 

Six Mentha - _.. 1.00 

Three Months ._ 50 

^ 

It occasionaU]' happens that for some 
reason mr other papers are missed by be- 
ing mliMBt, lo«t or stotan. Ih case ot 
subscriber^ not receiving their papers, in- 
form us by postal and we sball cheerfully 
furnish a duplicate copy of said mlising 
number. 

No attention paid to anitnymons letters. 

Copy must be written plainly on one 
side of paper, and to inaure insertion In 
current issue must rasch thla offloe 
Thursday. Correspondents, please Cake 
notice. 


ADVERTISING RATES, SOc PER INCH. 



Some say that the Democratic 
administrati>in is wholly blame- 
less for the present condition of 
affairs but ever .since we have 
known anything about the govern- 
ment from actual experience, wc 
have noticed that Democracy and 
hard times seem to go hand in 
hand and all of it arrives on the 
same train and take their depart- 
ure likewise. 


, of 'power and actaplly elects the 
various oflfiicers in i^eir counties. 
This year we find * desire to or- 
jjanize and get tqeaher along this 
line and all alomfthey have asked 
us for adviceJBIonfr such lines, s" 
we are awlmging an itinerary for 
the tnpmth of May up the Coast 
Lm<^ to San Francisco, to Red- 
Irng back down through the San 
Joaquin \'alley at which we shall 
discuss the political issues of the 
day and organize to the end that 
our peoplp shall present a solid 
front for such measures and men 
that they may desire to support 


OUR TRIP POLITICALLY 

.Although early we found in 
many counties that the fight was 
on for political preferment, but in 
no case have we noted wherein 
that the colored voter has any 
great encouragement insofar as 
local politics are concerned for 
the colored brother to worrv. for 
in all of the counties save and ex- 
cept Kern county not a colored 
man receives any tangible recog- 
nition, not a janitoj-ship or white- 
wing job. Rut in this non-parti- 
san time it is to be hoped that our 
people in the various communities 

will so organize as to secure some 
recognition as in many of the 
counties the vote is .so close that 


OVER THE STATE 

We have just returned from a 
trip 6v«t the state. We always 
t^jf^Ji^^ our ears to the grass 
roa^^g^g^D what the next best 
mov^e for the great common every- 
day people of our race. The onJy 
way we can do that is to go out 
among them, talk to them and li.s- 
ten to them. For the past week 
we havehad a strenuous campaign 
along these lines, addressing large 
crowds almost nightly and on Sun- 
days speaking several times a day. 
We are trying to preach the same 
doctrine that He write and from 
the encouragement and requests 
that we receivp to appear in their 
midst again we believe our w(jrk 
is appreciated and we have just 
begun, to exploit the accomplish- 
ments of the race, to the end that 
we may create a greater incentive 
along the lines of race progress. 
FOURTEEN HOURS IN 

ALLENSWORTH COLONY 

The editor of the Eagle spent a 
busy fourteen hours in the Allens- 
worlh Colony looking up our cor- 
respondent agents and seeing the 
citizens in general. We were met 
at the deptot by our friend, Prof. 
W. E. Payne, who has charge of 
the public schools at that place. I 

After putting up at the hotel 
conducted by Mr. and Mrs. Mor 


ris, w%visked the store of our 

friend, «V. J. Singleton, who is 
postmstfter at the colony. We 
then visited the drug store con- 
ducted by Mrs. Mary Gross, fot- 
merly of our home state of Kan- 
sas, after which we met with the 
Horse Breeders' Association at 
the Hotel Morris. During the 
evening we met many of the citi- 
zens and on arising next morning 
we procured from the Carter Liv- 
ery Co. a splendid rig and drove 
throughout the colony, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Gross. We vis- 
ited the acreage held by Prof. 
Payne -and then to our old-time 
friend and former townsmen, Os- 
car Over, who lives about two 
miles from the colony proper. 
Oscar and his estimable wife are 
comfortably situated and are mak- 
ing good ; their home and farm 
has all of the modern and upto- 
date equipments of the successful 
farmer, and the test was soon pre- 
sented. We had driven out un- 
announced and h was out of the 
question to not take breakfast — 
and such a breakfast we have not 
had since we left the farm down 
home. Fresh milk, hot biscuits, 
ood old country ham, butter made 
while you wart — how we did en- 
joy that meal ! .\ffer driving over 
the irrigate sites, well, etc., we, 
after conferences witli Messrs. 
Hindsman, Carter, and others, 
made for the station to catch a 
train homeward bound, but before 
we left we made arrangements to 
address a meeting for a nearby 
date on the issues of the day along 
lines of racial progress. 

The California Ivagle has ar- 
ranged with -Mrs. Mary Gross, 
who conducts c)ur 4ocal drug store, 
•{orTm"ageric'>'t(ir ^heEas^*;' TWs 
paper can be procured from her 
either in single copies or by sub- 
scription. 

Mrs. Henry came up froin Exe- 
ter for an in<lefinite visit with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. .\rcher. 

The editor of the Eagle wa.s a 
visitor in the Colony on last Fri- 
day and Saturday. We were glad 
to see him and extend congratu- 
lations for the great paper which 
th^ are conducting at this time. 

J. W. Singleton has also made 
improvements at his place of 
business. Mrs. Mary Gross has 
also ^eatly improved her place of 
business and carries a full line of 
notions and standard drugs. The 
Co-operative Store is greatly im- 
proved and doing ^ nice business. 

The Colony wilusoon be favored 
with another visit by the editor 
of the Eagle, who? will discuss the 
issues of the day along the lines 
of race progress. 

The fight on one of the county 
candidates has been held in abey- 
ance until the promised investiga- 
tion of the Eagle. 

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WOMAN'S SMILES VERSUS 

HER TEARS 
By E. F. Henderson 

The .Second Baptist church on 
Maple avenue, was the center of 
attraction last Monday evening, 
March 30th, at which time and 
place the house was crowded with 
representative citizens, old, and 
voung, to hear the discussion, 
which proved to have been quite 
practical and timely. The subject 
was, "Resolved, That a Woinan's 
Smiles are More Effective Than 
Her Tears." The affirmative side 
was presented and defended by 
Col. .Allen .Mlensworth and Rev. 
J. J. Byas. The negative side was 
represented by Revs. E. W. Kin- 
chem and S. L. Harris. 

The judges were Rev. J. D. Gor- 
don. R. W." Lamborth, Rev. Evans, 
Mrs. Printice and Mrs. Stewart. 

These jurors were given a con- 
spicuous place upon the rostrum 
beside the speakers, where they 
each sat with pencil and notebook 
in hand from which point they 
seemed to note with more than 
ordinary care the every word, as 
well as the movements of the 
speakei's. ; Rev. Mr. Gregg acted 
as master of ceremonies. 

[ The opening prayer was offered 

'by the writer. 

Each speaker was given 20 min- 

iites in which to present his argti- 


ment. The subject was ijisctissed' 
upon its merits. The affirmative 
labored hard to show the great 
and paramount value of jwoman's 
smiles, and how she is using them 
as great levers to help elevate 

herself and her sex from her state 
of obscurity and domestic slavery, 
where their faces had been kept 
veiled for centuries and centuries 
in which condition, if she had 
smiled, it scould not havjs been 
known to the world. And in pro- 
portion as her face has been un- 
covered her smiles have been be- 
held by man. She has not ori|y 
made her own burdens lighter but 
she has gone on and she is going 
on with her sweet and charming 
smiles helping to free the world. 
It was said by one of the speakers 
that her grat work in saloons, hos- 
pitals, penitentiaries and even in 
our legislative halls, where she 
has gone with her plea for the 
freedom and the uplift of hn- 
manity ; which is resulting in such 
great gixid to ma,nkind, it is her 
smiles in those dark places which 
are her greatest asset and anxili- 
ary which are excelled only by her 
sweet womanhood itself. The 
case of Queen Esther before the 
king with her plea for the liberty 
of her people was cited by the 
affirmative as having been accom- 
panied with smiles; but the nega- 
tive set up a strong rebuttal, 
claiming that ihe queen made her 
frfea before the king iii briny tears 
and that it was through and by 
her tears that she melted the 
stonv heart of the king. She be- 
came victor in the behalf of hei 
people and the hanging of Hay- 
man upon his own gallows. .The 
negative attempted to show to tiie 
judges that woman had been, and 
tliat .she is ijow b.eing niorc effec- 
tive in her plea for mercy with her 
tears than she could he with her 

smiles. The case of Marv Mag- 
dalene washing the feet of the 

Christ with her tears and how 
through them she moved the hard 
hearted Jews, who had withstood 
e\en miracles of Christ': but soft- 
ened by the woman's tears. 

The arguments on both sides of 
the subject were strong, entertain- 
ing and instructive, from start to 
finish. 

The audience was indeed an 
ideal assembly, and upon the 
whole the occasion was one of 
which every one was proud. 

The decision was rendered in 
favor of the affirmative ajid hence 
the smiling woman was advised 
to "just keep smiling, smiling, all 
the time." 

While the judges were in the 
basement preparing the verdict 
the audience was favored bv two 
most excellent numbers, one a 
dramatic reading by Mr. I^wis, 
and the other an instrumental solo 
by Miss Young. 

Rev. J. L. McCoy made some 
explanations respecting old folks 
home, which were quite timely 
and well received by all 
among other things that hame was 
technically speaking a Tlaptist in- 
stitution, and while it was being 
crmtrolled by that denomination, 
that their object would be to care 
for the aged and the infirm of the 
race regardless as to what might 
have been their denomination. 
They have i)urchased 30 acres of 
land near the town of Watt.s upon 
which they have an old building 
which will serve as a splendid 


nucleus toward the charity work 

which they hopei to be able to do 

for the race. 

We gleaned from his statements 
that the property cost approxi- 
mately $5,000, of which amount 
they have paid ajl but about $1500. 
Their plans are to pay off this bal- 
ance as soon as possible and pro- 
ceed to build small bungalows or 
cottages, and to otherwise im- 
prove the property so that it 
might soon becptiie an ideal home 
for our aged poor. Mrs. McCpy 
was very much in evidence ip^the 
early part of the evening ait the 
door, where she greeted each com- 
er there to with such splendid 
smiles that quite a liandsome sil- 
ver offering was made to her and 
her assistant:.- 

We did npi learn how much the 
offering amounted to but it was 
large. .The second Baptist church 
is one of the pioneer colored 
chiirches in the state, and it has 
'done a splendid work for the race. 
It has only had two preachers in 
thirty years, and that speaks well 
for the preachers and the church 
as well. Their church property 
on Maple avenue is quite valua- 
ble, which the trustees hope to sell 
soon so that they may erect a 
modern edifice on their splendid 
of 14th and Paloma streets. This 
site which they own on the corner 
Ma])le axenue property should by 
no means pass from the ownership 
of the race. It is close in and we 
should by all means organize a 
company and buy it (Ourselves, t 
would indeed be an ideal site for 
an office building for the race 
where we could find shelter for 
our professional men who are be- 
ing'" kicked ■' and shoved around 
from jjillar to post by the other 
people. We have plenty of men 
and women who would take stock 
in an enterprise of this kind if it 
was onlv presented to thein in 
proper form. \\'hy do not some 
of our young race men take up 
this \ork and push it forward? 
If it is not done and that very 
soon the property will pass into 
the hands of other people and this 
opportunity will have forever van- 
ished. .And, dear reader, can you 
think of another place owned by 
the race which is half 'so good as 
this? The locality is all that one 
could wish. And if a syndicate 
was formed and the stock placed 
on the market by the right people 
it would go like hot cakes at a 
camp meeting. If some one will 
take this matter up at once and 
put forth the right kind of efforts, 
his work will be crowned with 
large success. The time is fully 
ripe for just such a move as this. 
^^'e have thought out some plans 
W'hich we will gladly give to the 
right person. 

THE GOLDEN WEST. 


ROUTE 
EAST 



SUNSET 

w!"'^ Daily Service to New Or- 
leans and East through Dixie 

EL PASO 

"GOLDEN STATE LIMITED" 
cthBa. 


,f'^j 


T^ tain de luxe, exclusively first 


I 


J^H "^^"J°?'''^" f°^ both first 
and second class travel. 

Tbe line rf 1©,^ altitudes 

OGDEiy 

The trail of the Argontuts— 
The route of the 

^j^JJ^FgANGISCO OVERUNO 

SHASTA 

*:"'^"^'*f • to tbe East through 
tbe gre^t Northwest 
See agents 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Los Angeles Offices 
212 West Seventh|Street 
Station, Fifth and Central Avenue 
Pasadena Office, 418 E. Colorado St. 


B. YOUNO & SON 

A' R C H I T EiC T S 


-^ 


I J 702 Lankershim Building 
Phone MainM149 Los Angeles 

v . 


With its evrlasting reputation 
of "biggest and best hotel" for 
men and women of color, the 
Golden West also enjoys the dis- 
lle said tinction of setting the standard 
of entertaining newspaper and 
other public spirited people in a 
manner long remembered and 
cherished by them. 
Mes4r^ Brown and William? — 
h e congenial proprietors — are 

careful in not only giving good 
service but in making the general 
atmosphere congenial and home- 
like for their many guests, who 
come from all sections of the 
country. Their party service is 
also unchallenged in excellence. 


Quic^ Service Laundry 

IQOS ^w^ntral Ave. 

YoH willi-secure best work and lowest prices in citv 

with pr(^pt and courteous treatment Deiivery to 

'all part^ of city at low rate. Phone orders piven 


strict attention. 


MAIN 8161 


MAIN 815t 


A. A. GRANT I PEOPLE'S RE/LTY GO. 

Capita! Stock |75,000 
Shares ^1.00 each ^ 


NOTARY 
Agent for InTcstments, Building; 
Loans, Insuraiiee. Houses. Lots, 
and Acreage for sale 

1146 Central Avenue 

A I r d ;i, ; Ciliforiii 


Tel. 


F. H. CRUMBLY 

Agent 
Bwy 2528. 785 San Pedro 


Internationa^ Order of Twelve 
meets as folloivs at Washington 
and Central liaW : 


Golden West Temple No. 412 
at 8 o'clock p., m. 


i 

Pacific CoajSt Tabernacle No. 
210 meets s'econd and fourth 
Tuesday, at 8; o'clock p. m. 


Third Anniversary 

Good Values Given Worthy of Our Three Years 
, of Progress 

We are Selling Everything Below Cost 

Beautiful Silk and Madras Ladies' Shirt Waists, extra value, from 
50 cents up. Dainty Aprons and Work Aprons. Also Hosiery 
Liidiee' and Gents' Silk and Lisle, from 19c, 

Special Men's Work Shirts from 35c up.' Men's Gloves from 5c up 
to 11,50. Our Dress Making and Tailoring Department, Ladies' Eve- 
ning Gowns any Coats. 
411 East 7th Street , MRS. NINA E. THOMAS 


New Beulafe Tabernacle Xo. 43 
meets the Second and fourth 
Thursday of| each month at 8 
o clock p. m. ; 


Star of Bethlehem Tabeniacle 
No. 382 meets the first and second 
Saturday at;2 p. m. 


HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Williams about Wil- 
mington Harbor property. The 
greatest opportunity of your life 
is at your door now. 

We have 6^50-ft. lots we can sell 
for $550, only $10 down. $5 a 
month. We also have 80 other 
lots in same tract, but you will 
have to be in a hurry if you wish 
to get in on the ground floor. 

Any day we get six or eight 
persons we will take you down to 
see the lots. 

H.p.: WILLIAMS, 
Corner 12th and Hemlock. 


Sunset Vermont 3169 


Home 74680 

C. B. OWEN 
Feed, Fuel and Transfer 

Wood, Coal, Hay and Grain. All Kinds of Chicken Feed 

Moving Household Goods a Specialty . ~ 

' ' ^B 1] Los Angelse 


Keddesh Royal House of Midia 
No. 79 meets the third Tuesday 
at 8 p. m. 


IF YOU WANT TO RENT 
A ROOM OR A HOUSE 

' OR TO 

BUY A .LOT OR A HOME 

In Venice, Ocean Park or Santa 
Honica, write 

J. ALLEN REESE, 
600 San iJuan Avenue, Venice 


In keeping with its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continat;s to 
give to its patrons the btst pos- 
sible service. 

Being centrally located between 
the three great railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel 
meets the demands not only in 
good service but likewise conve- 
nience. I 


No trouble to answer questions 


I am in % position to offer you 

Some o| the Best Residence 
Property on the Bay- 




I. 


f>'.-* 


J. 


-^•■' >^. 


FOR RENT— We have several 

housekeeping apartments of three 
and four rooms for rent very 
cheap. Also a good busihess site. 
Apply Noah D. Thompson, 

1711 E. 55th St. 


Piano Instruction. 

Mr. Clarence D. Coofeey, 
Instruction on *,he Piano. 


■'is i'j-i:--l 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



Local happenings 



BouKja^ 


e: 



3E 


A New Field For Women. 


the CotBet Ice Cream Co. is now 
being operated by Mrs. Grahm and 
she is putting on the market a 
grade of cream that is unsurpassed 
by any in flavor and purity. 

Women know — don't take my 
word for it— just try it once. 

Branch office at 944 Central Av 


For County Treatwer 

FOR COUNTY TREASURER 

I hereby announce myself as a 


For Coroner 


1 hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Coroner of TuUre county, subject 


.A^b.V^&J w 


The United Sons and 

Da ighters of Africa will meet on 
hi( First Monday of each oiontb 
«i Scott's Hall, 561 Central ave. 
Mb8. K. R. Baldwin, 

M K. Q 
Miss M? Busby, Sec'y 


candidate for the nomination of to the decision 'of the electors at 
Treasurer of the County of Tu- the coming primary election, 
are, subject to the decision of the 


< S^nnmr Maw 4Stt ' 

. ..AimEN 

is A8SOCIATEP WIT^ 

THE FITZG^RAI4> MUSIC STORE 

;94T SOUTH BROADWAY 

Purchase throughl him and he will save you money. 




electors- 
election. 


at the coming primary 


LOCALS 


J 


Rev. F. J. Pack of Oakland was 
a caller to our sanctum on Thurs- 
•day. He is in the city superin- 
tending improvement on his place 
and will return to his home on 
Saturday. He reports a great 
progress at the Oakland charge. 
His many friends are legion in 
this section and glad to hear of his 
great success. 


The Missouri and Kansas Club 
will meet on Tuesday evening at 
the residence of Mrs. Geo. Gam- 
ble, 920 E. 31st street. The same 
will be entertained by Mrs. Gam- 
ble and her uncle, J. B. Bass. 


Notes From Phillips Chapel 
C. M. E. Church. 

Look out for the big "Feaet in 
the Wilderness." at Phillips chapel, 
C. M. E. Church, 140« Newton 
street, Thursday evening, March 
19. An old time feast and jubilee 
singing. To miss it means regrtt 
Admission 10c. Supper 25c. Given 
by the Seventeen Club. 

Mrs, L. Storrs, Captain 
Rev. S. L. Har a is Paste 


HENRY XEWM.W. 
( Incumbent) 


LAWRENCE A. MOVE. 
For District Attorney 


For School Superintendent 
I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination for 
School Superintendent of Tulare 
county, subject to the decision ot 
voters at the coming August pri- 
mary, and respectfully solicit sup- 
port, 
AXNA MILLS JOHNSTON. 


I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
District Attorney of Tulare coun- 
ty, subject to the decision of th^ 
electors at the coming primary 
election. 


For County Tax Collector 

I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Ta.x Collector for Tulare county, 
subject to the decision of the elec- 
tors at the coming primary elec- 
tion. 

I. \V. FEWF.L (incumbent) 


W. H.sGUEST.P. D. 

DRUGGIoT 

Stationery | Notions and Toilet Articles 

1 2th and Central Avenue 


EARL A. RAG BY. 
For Sheriff 


I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Shen'fT of the County of Tulare, 
subject to the decision of the elec- 
tors at the coming primary elec- 
tion. 


Mr. \V. Costley ot San l-ran- 
cisco is a visitor in our city on 
ess for a week or ten days. 


bpsines 


Miss Blanch Wilscai of ''20 E. 
31st street, who was about ten 
days a^o called to the bedside of 
her sick mother at Kansas City, 
Mo., writes that her mother is 
miJch improved and that she has 
a y:earning when she recovers to 
com,e back to 


dear old California 


Our Second Quarterly meeting 
conference will be held at Phillips 
chapel, C. M. E.[ Church, 140 
Newton street, March 22 23, Dr. 
James A- Stout. C. E., will preach 
at 11 a. m. Dr. A. C. Caldwell o 
Santa Monica will pieach at 3 p 
m,., and the P. E. at 7.45 p. m. We 
invite the ministers and the gener- 
al public to worship with us Sun 
day at 3 p. m. Sunday, the 23rd 
That will be the last quarter be 
fore the annual conference, which 
meets in El Paso, Texas, April \h 
1914,; 

IJCome and hear these i?reat 
preachers and this fine choir, which 
charm all who hear them. 

S. L. Harbis, Pastor. 


The Women's .\u.xiliary of the 
Colored Voters League held an 
enthusiastic meeting at their hall. 
9.=;3 Naomi street, on last Wednes- 
da}^ evening. The club was fav- 
ored with an address by the editor 
of the Eagle which was highly 
appreciated by all who heard him. 


For County Clerk 

I herebv announce myself as a 
candidate for the office of County 
Clerk of Tulare county, subject to 
the decision of the electors at the 

Cdming primarv election. 

AVON M. COBURX. 
flncumbent.) 


For County Treasurer 

1 hereby annmincc myself as a 
candidate for the nominatinn of 
Treasurer of the County ■ of Tu- 
lare, subject to tlie decision of tlie 
electors at tlie coming primary 

election. 

R. O. N'FWM.W. 


W. W. COLLINS 
(Incumbent.) 


L. C. LOCEY (Incumbent.) 

For District Attorney 
I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
District .Attorney of. Tulare 
county, subject to the decision of 
the electors at the coming primary 
election. 


MOTHER'3 KITCHEN CAFE 

cM. ':t BROW N, Proprietor 

THE BEST PUCE IN TOWN TO EAT 

; HomelCookingXA' Specialty 

BEST Meals in town 

SHORT ORDERS 


1441 East Ninth E.t. | 


LOS ntreles, Cal. 


Household Beand Flavoring Extracts 

Our Goods are Guarai|teed Absolutely Pure. At your Grocer* 
Retail for 25c per f battle. Improved Export Ginger Ale and 
all flavors. Soda Wat«r. 

Geo^ J. l^ouse& Son 

Manufacturer I 


m 


m 




PHONE ^ 

Main 4953-Hoaie 4154 f 

CCmE TO THE 


PAUL VBNFELT, 

Proprietor 


Mrs. T. C. Calhun returned from 
the bedside of her husband, who 

is confined in the Santa Fe Hos- 
pital at San Francisco, .'^he re- 
ports him as improving slowly. 
Some three weeks ago he was 
viciously assautel at Tracy, where 
he is employed hy the Southern 
Pacific railroad in the red cap 
service. 


Hori and. " Buggy Forals 


'^HEAP FOR CASH ! 

Apply to J. N. LITTLEJOHN 

1597 We^t 3'ith PUc« 


For County Assessor 

1 herehv announce my.'^elf as a 
candidate for the ncmiinatioii of 
.\ssessor of Tulare county, subject 
ti> the decision of the electors at 
the coming primary electicm. 

TIIOS. H. r.L.MK 

(Incumbent.) 


FR.\XK L.^MBERSOX 

(Incumbent. ) 

For County Surveyor 

I hereby announce myself as a 

candidate for the nomination of 

C'luiity Surveyor of Tulare cnun- 

ty._subject to the decision of the 



Where "^ou Get the Best Service in 

Family Trade 

912 San Pedro St. | 0pp. City Market 




electors at 
election. 


the 


conuntj primarv 


Smith Pres. a^d Gen. Vgr. 
Grant Hammond, Vice I^es. 
Curtis Odom. Treas. } 


Frank Williams Auditor. 
Jas, Slaughter, Secy, 


For Constable 

1 hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Constable of \'i.saila township. 

subject to the decision of voters 
at the primarv election. 

T. \r. STEW.XRT. 
For County Recorder 


IS in- 
band 


Mr. R. N. Everly who 
structin^ the Y. M. C. .A 
each Tuesday and Friday 
ings at the Y. M. C. A., is mjfl^ing- 
an excellent effort to establish a 
strong' musical orsjanization which 
will be a creditable one. Everv 


A new colored theatre has been 
opened in Washington, D. C it 
being: the Majestic, at the corner 
of Xinth and Pennsylvania ave- 
nue. It is under the management 
of Frank Brown, a colored man. 
This gives Washington two large 
modern vaudeville theatres oper- 
ated by and for colored people. 

\^ernon, Oklahoma, is the latest 
exclusively colored town in Ok- 
lahoma. It has a population of 
more than three hundred, and is 
growing rapidly. The town is 
named after Dr. W. T. Vernon. 


I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for tlic nomination of 
Recorder of Tulare c<iunty. subject 
to the decision of the lectors at 
the coming primary election. 

!R.-\ CHRISM.-W' 
flncuinbcnt.) 
For Justice of the Peace 
I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
lustice of the Peace of \'isalia 
township, subject to tlie decision 
of voters at tlie primary election. 
J. S. CL.ACK. 
For County Treasurer 


FOR RENT— Furnished 
person desiring to learn or ic^en- ', ^ ^j.^j^gjjt for two gentle 


_tify themselves" in this connection 
see Mj. Everly at 103 \\'ilming-- 
ton street. 


The Eagle man was agreeably 

. surprised at the improvement that 

have taken place since hfs last 

visit there, the improvement not 

only in the town site itself but the 

incjividual improvements of their 

wfeness places. The Hindsman 

Mercantile Co. has a store which 

' is a credit. Los Angeels does not 

' have a place equal to it. conducted 

. b-y members of the race. 

^4 Mrs. S. Quick and M. C. Bray 
' spent Tuesday in San Pedro. 


MORE WHITES THAN 

BLACKS 

N. Y. Times Table Shows Larger 

Number of Unqualified Males 

Among the Caucasians. 

From Representative Towner's 
report on the bill providing for a 
Federal inquiry into the causes 
of illiteracy, in which is included 
the jdeclaration that there are "2,- 
273,603 illiterate males of 21 years 
and over in the United States, 
enough to determine any national 
election at any period in our his- 
tory," the conclusion would natu- 
rally be drawn that a new and 
highly disquieting condition had 
arisen in the nation. Such is not 
the case. The census figures 
show that the number of whit€ 
and black illiterates in the Unit- 
ed States had decreased substan- 
tially between 1900 and 1910, a 
decrease that is expected to con- 
tinue during the present decade. 
The figures showing the total 
number of illiterates and their 
percentage of the xhole popula- 
tion are: Illiterates over 10 years 
of age in 1900, whites 3,200,746. 
6.2 per cent; in 1910, 3,184,954. 
5 per cent; colored, in 1900, 2,- 
853,1'94, 44.5 per cent ; in 1910, 2,- 


SMITH & WILLIAMS CO., Inc. 

Funenl Dir^tors and Prietleal Enbalmers 

We guarantee oi^ work shipped to any part of the city 
LADY ATTENDANT 3 Sfvices the Best Prices the Lowest 


654 San Fernando St 


Phone Main 3629 


xy Palace Cafe 


i 015 Central Ave> 

NEATEST, COSpST AND BEST PLACE TO EAT. The beet 
hervice in both American and Chin€Be dishes. Chop Suey and Noodles 
American and Chines^ fashion. 

AT THE PALiV'DE everybody is accorded the same polite 
treatment. ' 


o the People of Tulare County; 
I hereby announce iny candi- 1228,087, 30.4 per cent. 


men. Call at 

1017 East 9th stree 


The Missionary Society of the 
Second Baptist Church meets 
second and fourth Thursdays at 1 
o'clock p. m., at Second Baptist 
Church, Maple avenue.. 

*Mrs. W. J. Davis, Pres. 
Address, 176 UtalJst. 

Tel. Boyle 2660 

Mrs. J. K. Williams 
Sec', 


(lacy for the office of L'ouuly 
Treasurer, and respectfully solicit 
the sti])port of all those wlio be- 
lieve, that if elected. 1 will dis- 
charge the duties of the office 
faithfully, capably and fearlessly. 
D. s' LIPSCOMR.' 


For Coroner 


1 hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for nomination of Coro- 
ner of Tulare county, subject to 
the \vish-of the voters at the Aug- 
ust primary election. 

A. E. BKOOK.S. 

Mr. S. Cole, of 1328 E. 14th 
street, has sold out to Mr. Brown, 
who is conducting a neat little 
grocery. 


Misses Aline an4 Hazel Ander- 
son, are new arrivals in our city, 
tormerlyof San Jose, Cal. Miss 
Aline is a college graduate. 

Infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Bowers, passed on Wednesday, I 
the 25th inst. The parents are 
active members of Wesley M. E. 
CWirch. 


Phone West 3068 

STERLING DRUG CO 

THE NYAL STORE 

Use' your telephone— all lines lead to our store. 
Complete line of EASTER NOVELTIES. 
,; PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST. 

Pronopt Free Delivery. 

Cor. V/., Jtfferson St. and Western Ave. 


Moreover, how many of Mr. 
Towner's 2,273,603 male illiter- 
ates of voting age have the bal- 
lot? A large proportion of them 
must be colored in the South, 
who are barred from the polls 
and hence cannot "determine any 
national election." 


IOWA NEGROES ORGANIZE 
COLLEGE FRATERNITY 

Iowa City, Iowa (Special.) — 
The dream of the oldest livin.i; 
negro alumnus of the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa was realized on 
Saturday, March 7, 1914, by the 
organization in Iowa City of a 
college men's fraternity composed 
exclusively of negro students and 
graduates of the state university. 
The name of this new frater- 
nity is Kappa Alpha Nu and is a 
branch of the national organiza- 
tion of the same name and which I 
was founded at the University of i 
Indiana in the year 1910 and has { 
for its purpose the creating of a 
social center for the negro men 
in attendance upon northern col- 
eges and universities where tne 
C. J. Stadier, Pro 1 great majority of the students 
are of the Caucasian race. 


I UKK^T^ 

Mnmii atib ilttf rarg S^rttal 

FRIDAY NIGHT. APRIL lOth. 

; ~ AT - 

®|bprttarlp Saptiat (Elfurrli. 

?rWEl.FTH AND HEMLOCK 

REV. ir. B. GORDON, Pastor, 

Opening ChoiiuB: "Our Father who art in Heaven" 

I College Choral Club 

Invocation..! Rev. J. D.Gordon 

Chorus ' Suiirise" College Choral Club 

Piano Solo, I'Nearer My God to Thee," in variation 

Drumheller-| Miss Elizabeth Norton 

Original Poeb, "Big Ealing on Easter" Prof. C,A. 

i Biggers 

Vocal, "To Restless Sea" Mrs. M B. Biggers 

f C. A- White 

Piano Solo, ; Selected Miss Maudetta Rosemond 

Vocal Du«, i"Come where vhe Rosebud Sleepetb" ' 

l|rt-. C. L. Moore and Mrs. M. B. Diggers 
Original Poe^. "Charcoal Man". Prof. C- A. Biggers 

Vocal Selected.... Mrs. H. Elizabeth Gould 

Piano Solo,; Selected Mii_8 VoTnire Dorman 

Jubilee Chorhs, selected College Choral Club 

Contralto Soto, "The Rosary" .... Mrs. G, L. Moore 

^ilverjl Offering. 
Original Po^m, "Dat Settles it". .Trot. C. A. Biggers 
Duet, "Ro^t". .Mrs. C. L. Moore and M. B. Biggers 
Given ^nder the auspices of BIQGER'S BUSI- 
NESS COLLEGE, p^^g ^ ^ BIGGERS, Mgr. 
MISS B^^IZABETH NORTON Accompanist. 
; Admission Free. 

All theibove participants are trained and experi- 

r^lfnspectlprogr^amme work, and each participant's 

"^tll auoof^ePted with a short charming encore. These 

S Zngfhe best talent in the city; the public may ex- 

pbectaa rare ^eat. 

■ I f«- 


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K 


':^.' 


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- j" 


\> 



^ 


l/-,s- 


I C.Pi 


4 ■^■ 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT iE IMPROVED 


,■1 





I 


No. 1540 Fillmore St. 

H. G. FRANK, Manager 


Fanjcy and Stapli Groceries, Fruit | 
and Vege 


Sf>«cial Ratcf to Hotels, ISestaarants and 

Boardint; HiMises i .^ 

Consult Us Before Going Ekewhere 

PHONE WEST 4626 


■lS@@@@®@r>r>i<x«@(S$>l®®®®S)®eS iStSSfS&S&B&a&S&S' IS®®®®®@®®®®®®®3 


MUSEni- TAILOR 




CO' 

lD 


It TI 



THEPLHUt ROT 

IVERLOOKE 



je 





n 


^. 


LESTER MAPP 

PROPRIETOR 


00 


o 


STOP, LOOK, LISTEN! 
WET WASH ''"'I'ZVor'"" 50c Sack 

The Hygienic Laundry has changed hands and will be run as a first class 
Wet Wash Laundry under the name of the NEW PROCESS LAUN- 
DRY CO. WET WASH. As our aim is to protect your health through 
. cleanliness and sterilization in doing your laupdry work, we selected the 
name of Hygeia as more befitting to represent our purpose. We steri- 
lize all tlothee by scientific process, safeguarding you against conta- 
gious diseases. We respectfully tolint your trade and will give the 
Best of service. Kindly give us a trial and be convinced. 


NEW PROCESS 

Phone Lakeside 1218 


LAUNDRY CO. 

2932 Poplar St-, Oakland 


WET 
WASH 


Phone West 6669 


H. TsuYUKi, Proprieto 


Cosmopolitan 
Dyeing and Cleaning Works 

1591 POST STREET, Near Laguna SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Ladies and Gent's Suits Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing 
and Repairing Guaranteed Satisfactory 


Jordan, Irwin &|Co., Pacific Sheet 
W..T. Kirby, ].)§&. Purdy, Hertry 

Metal Works, l|ub Clothing Co., 
Campbell Macfitve Co., Three 
Boys Transfer tyo., Golden State 
Hat Co., A. j| Dauchy, Plaza 
Pharmacy, Modern Backet Gro- 
cery Co., SanitcW'y Ice Cream Co., 
Silver Gate Sola Works, W. J. 
Builey, Owl Ice!<Iream Co., Ham- 
ilton, Demers ;(and Wfitekamp, 
Whitney & €6., Pierce-Field 
Hdwe. Co., Ha^rd, Gould & Co., 
Ernsting Co., Bienbough & Gelon,- 
Boston Store,' Electric Home, 
Western LumlSer Co., Chas. H. 
Nearpass, Farr^s & Farris, Inde- 
pendent Meat jjlarket, 'San Diego' 
Meat Market, San Diego Hard- 
ware Co., Wofe and ^Davidson, 
Meyer and Davidson, .M. F. Hel- 
ler, J." P. B^ker, Ballard and 
Brackett, Bei^rough Furniture 
Co., Electric Equipment Co., G. 
& G. Hat Woi$s, San Diego Gas 
Appliance Co| Frevert-Bledsoe 
Fur Co., W. C\. Tolliver Lynells, 
Rubins Fur Co| Russ Lumber and 
Mill Co., C. S. pardy. Eagle Drug 
Co., A. R. Mgier, Pacific Coast 
Trunk and Ba^ Co., .Klauber & 
WaugenheimefiCo., Beasley Auto 
Works, Bentle|' Bros., Warner M. 
Batman, Western Rubber and 
Supply Co., ^. Cal. Music Co., 
Alfred Stahl f&: Sons, Tibbias- 
Gavin Co.. l^ellam Drug Co., 
Auto Tire Co.,?Jones-Moore Paint 
House, Gray I Thompson Music 
Co., .A.nderson|S; Baxter, Southern 
Electric Co., I^lywasser Co., Inc., 
Foreman & Clark, Pioneer Truck 
Co.. Muehleis#i Tent & Awning 
Co., Eois Clofiiing StoreXSouth- 
ern Motor CarJCo.. Mission Motor 

Mart. Otto F. ^*tille. Auto .\gency, 
McHride & ^lasterson, Tioga 
Garage, Jonas Sash and Door Co., 
.[McBride Cox Machine Co.. Simon 
Levi Co., B. R/ Goodrich Rubber 
:Co.. Dixie Supijiy Co.. W. A. Xall, 
Campbell's DrMpery Shop. Miner- 
va Candy Co. | 


Wrtrulyhop^fiat otjr woineS^ 
will get in line and register in 
Orde| that they may be prepared 
to vote intelligently in the coming 
election. It is our aim to persent 
such persons for offices of honor 
and trust whose careers stand out 
as men and women of clean char- 
acters, and reputations that will 
stand the political test. 

A few weeks ago it was our 
privilege to interview the Hon. 
Samuel M. Shortridge of San 
Francisco, and we were impressed 
with him as being one of the big- 
gest, broadest men in the political 
arena today and we hopie that as 
we present the doing of Mr. 
Shortridge, as a lawyer, in this 
state, and his attitude towards our 
people, as we shall in later issues, 
that they will unflinchingly pledge 
him their support. 


AND MADE TO 
LOOK LIKE NEW 


Goods Called For 
and Delivered 


he Colored Boys Friend 

537 South &ro<|dway 


Godeau Funeral Service 

The Handsome Chapel and Private Kooms Free 

for those who dwell in apartments, flats, hotels, or where is insuf- 
cient accommodation at the time of death. Mr. or Mrs. J. S. 
Godeau will personally supervise all funeral arrangements and 
details. 

Godeau prices are only half the charges of the undertaker in your 
neighborhood, wno 's controlled: by the Funeral Trust. 

TELEPHONE 

MARKET 711; S- F. OAKLAND 4045, OAKLAND 

when death makes the undertaker necessary 

JULIUS S. GODEAU 

41 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 210 Webster St, Oakland 

305 Columbus Ave., S. F. 827 Figueroa St.. Los Angeles 


D REIER & NEVIS 

OAKLAND'S EXCLUiSIVE 

SPORTING I ATHLETIC SHOPPE 

Phone Oakland 4052 
530 12th Street, Near Clay . , OAKLAND. CAL. 


IC Basxt 


"NOT IN THK TRUST" 


O. Pekh* 


«« A •♦♦ 


Al" Meat Market 

Best and Cheapest Choice Fresh Meats, 
Hams and Bacon, Wholesale and Retail 

Everything Guaranteed 1540 Filmore Street Phone West 


■*.--; 


^) / 



■NOOKSSD BY THK BAGLK CLUB 


J. E HENDERSON 

UNDERTAKER 

2307 TELEGRAPH AVENUE, OAKLAND, CAL 

Telephone Oakland 1878. 


To Victory. 


STRAIGHT RUN 
ON GOOD ROADS. 


Wnfe Bootee, Booster, for 
Norton, Obstructionist. 


Auto Demand for Snpervisor, 
The Popular Demand. 


His 


District Sick of 
Strong- for Earle. 


Earl. 


CFtURCH 


Market and t^press iitcrage ^e. 
CUT RATE SHIPPERS ^ 

TO ALL POINTS EAST 

Also dealers in Hardware Tinware, Granite, Etc., Etc. 

Office and Store, 930 Seventh St. ' Bet. Market and Myrt 

Phone Oakland 1325. R. G. MARQUARDT, Mgr,, Oakland, Cal. • 


Phone Oak 22T7 


RENOVATING 


Res. Oak. 6238 


Chas. J. Braun Mattress Co. 

WHOLESALE AND RBTAIL 

MATTRESSES AND COUCHES 

Wire Mattresses Stretched. 11275 Seventh St", Oakland 


DRINK THE BEST 


To the Well Dressed Men 


Who Know the Value ©f Being Up-to-D»te 


Should get acquainted with 
our New English Tailor. 


F. DELUC 


Golden West 
Lager Beer 

I SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 

22d AND CHANCELLOR RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 

CF-iURCH 

1623 I^loma Ave. 

Rev. C. H. Anderson, D.D., Pastor 

In spite of tfie inclement weath- 
er last Sunday- New Hope was 
well attended^and Dr. Anderson 
preached a stpong sermon. Sub- 
ject. "Cornelias Sendeth for Pe- 
ter." Text. "I^nd the spirit bade 
me go." Actf 11-12. God was 
among his clii^dren and his power 
was in- our irjidst. Sunday was 
a home rally; day. We were 
blessed both Spiritually and finan- 
cially. Xe.xt iSunday, .^pril 3th. in 

the morninpjjwill be "Covenant" 

meeting; at ?Jhe -eVening service. 
Dr. Andersori wi|l preach and the 
Lord's Supp^ will be celebrated. 

lip. ANDERSON, 
S Church Reporter. 


Earle Y. Boothe, a leading auto-, 
mobile dealer, and one of the most 
capable and popular voung busi- 
ness men of Loe Angeles, bas en- 
tered the recall election contest in 
the Second Supt-rvitoral Dieirict 
against Supervisor R. H. Norton, 
Earlite obstructionist. 

Boothe has the enthusiastic sup- 



■^% 


The Merchant Tailor 611 /Aotkioum^ 
San Francisco 



' I HARRIS AND FRANK 

Among the leaders in style^nd artistic furnishings in ladies' 
and gents' ware Harris & Frank ran^ ^re-eminent. Because of its 
many years in bnsiness this firm is onj^NOf the most reliable in tlile 

city. - j \- ■.,-1.:. \ ', .. .'■ i:i \^ - ./ t 

■. Have ydur ^oes sewed, nailed, etp., at re^nable rate, Hari f 
C^ldberg Shpe Hospital, 5528 Central 4>ve. 
j ~ Slaimp'siMarl(etW 1477 B. Vernon Ave. is a good^J»lace to trade 


Our next ind last visit was at 
the .MlensN^orth Colony. See 
write-up uncfer heading of .'\llens- 
worth item<^ on another page of 
this paper, j, 

To my fritjnds that wafit to reg- 
ister, telephone Main 7793 up to 
2 p. m. Saturday. I will send a 
registrar to-.your home or place 
of business. ?- 

i T. A. COLE. 

814 Central'Ave. 

Among ogir new subscribers of 
this week VJere Mr. Shackelford, 
the furnituCe dealer of Central 
avenue, wh^ encouraged us to go 
forward in |!ur effort to make a 
newspaper |or the people and by 
the people. ; 

For the oast three weeks we 
have been fj^jblishing articles from 
the pen oflfour esteemed friend, 
Mr. E. F. Menderson, which we 
feel sure ha^e been highly appre- 
ciated by o^r readers. 


Earl Y. Boot:he, 

Candidate for Supervisor to suc- 
ceed R. H. Norton, against 
whom recall petitions have been 
lauDcbeda 


All mem^rs of the Kansas and 
Missouri Qiub are requested to 
meet Tuesday evening at 920 E. 
31st street, '?;esidence of Mrs. Dora 
Gamble, r 


F. N. Al[exander was in off of 
his run froiHi Chicago Wednesday. 


»-■ rv- 




/iP 


'Y- 


"A: 


■*: 


port of many influential busibeas 
and profeBsionftl men, as w.ell as 
hundreds of working people, who 
admire bis integrity and special 
fitness for the place. He is run- 
ning on • platform that strikes a 
popular note — that of good roads, 
good county government and mak- 
ing good. " 

He has resided in the Second 
District ever since- his arrival in 
this city, twenty-two years ago 
Since be entered the business field 
ten years ago he has been active in 
the business, progressive and civic 
life of the community. He has 
workecT bib way to bis present posi- 
tion by clean, bard work of bram 
and band. 

Because of bis interest in gdod 
roads and public smprovements in 
his dJQtrict, over 200 citizens of his 
district signed a letter requesting 
him to make the fight against Nor- 
ton, who has done all in his official 
power to block the building of good 
roads in Los Angeles county. Th« 
fact that Norton is Rebater Earl's 
{.ersoaally conducted tool on tihe 
Board of Supervisors is lanotiwr 
good reason why Bootb<^ was te- 
lected. , ' ; . 


H- 


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??n Episodes ?m 


t9»i9» f ••**•*•**••***•*****•«•**•*•••* f 9* f 9*9 •'m^ t 


The Alabamians permanently 
organized last Thursday evening 
at the home of Mrs. Albritton, 
into an excellent society. The of- 
ficers were elected as follows: 
President, Rev. S. E. Edwards; 
secretary. Miss Minnie Albritton; 
treasurer, Mr. Banks. Aft^r a 
splendid meeting- "refreshments 
were seiV-e'd. ' ^ 

The rnock- congress of the Wes- 
ley Chapel 'Literary Sociefy- con- 
vened last Tuesday evening and 
after a heated session killed the 
bill for the "Abolishment of Capi- 
tal Punishment." '' -^ 

The grandest out4ng of the year 
wilF be held at Seal Gardens Eas- 
ter Sunday, April 12, 1914. All 
kinds of attractions will be staged 
for those desiring a splendid out- 
ing as the guests of Truck Driv- 
ers. Tennis, ball games and races 
will be among the attractions. 
Music by the Creole Orchestra. 
Take Watts car tt> gate and see 
Mr. C. A. Slaughter, 244 E. Sec- 
ond street for concessions. 

A DRAMATIC TREAT 

The Southern California The- 
atrical Troupe will make their ini- 
tial appearance Wednesday even- 
ing, April \5. at T. M. A. Mall, 
231 'i S. Spring street, before the 
public, in a military play entitled, 
"On the Little liig Horn." 

Enjm all indications the public 
will miss an exceptional and rare 
treat if they do not witness this 
excellent play, whose cast has 
been selected from \arious parts 
of th ecountry. 

This play is being given for the 
benefit of the Colored lioy Scouts, 
Dr. J. Mitchell Smith, founder. 

The great battle of General 
Custer will be dramatized, the 
military tactics being under the 
supervision of Messrs. Walter B. 
Mosely and Clarence Wilson, for- 
mer soldiers in the United States 
Cavarty. 

Messrs. Jesse Irwin and W'm. F. 
Payne have the management of 
the company and will, with the 
necessary assistance, place an ex- 
cellent play before the public 

Our press gang has roses some- 
times in their path, but always 
have thorns. 

On the evening of Friday, Feb. 
20th, an article appeared in the 
Los Angeles Evening Record with 
Mr. Shores' cut, under this head ; 


NEGPO MESSENGER 
Guard of Millions 

'One of the best figures in the 
banks of Los Angeles, one who 
has handled millions of dollars 
and who has seen Los.,, .\ngeles 
grow from a village to a big city, 
is William Shores, who has served 
more than twenty-five years of 
active service as head porter for 
the Security Trust and Savings 
Bank. Born in slavery in 1856^ at 
the Nelson Mission at Yorktown, 
Va., he remained with that family 
until 1876. He came to Los An- 

f;s in 1887. When the Security 
k opened in 1899 he was cn- 
ed and has been with the in- 
ution ever since. Officers of 
bank bavejgreaV,4aitt^ ,ia him. 
He is trusted with thousands of 
dollars each day and the most con- 
fidential messages, and his picture 
adorns the wall of the private of- 
fice of President Sartori. 

The above is the way it a|>- 


from a sheep rancho to a beauti 
ful city and was with that bank 
fur 20 years and then the directors 
met and retired him on half pay 
for life, and the only thing they re- 
quired (3f him was tliat he not 
work for aW one. So he' received 
his clieck eacli month after he was 
^-eti^ed until death called him, and 
flvhen he di^d liis remarns were 
brought toi^asadena aud.njn. the 
dayj ,of the funeral the flag on the' 
bank was at half mast and the 
president, E. H. May. and many 
other bank officials, attended the 
funeral. .As he only worked 20 
years and Mr. Shores has worked 
25 years. 1 think that institution 
should do as much for hirri as the 
Pasaflena bank did for its head 
porter. What do you think about 
it? 

The truth of the whole thing is 
that .Mr. Shores is a strong sup- 
porter, friend and subscriber to 
the California Eagle, and he will 
continue to be until a better pa- 
per in [lublished. W'e can say this 
under the new management of 
.Miss C. .\. Spear the Eagle has 
not failed to come out in two 
years. That alone is something 
lor this l)ird ; it only has part of 
the old name, but it has a new 
home, new type and a new head, 
so if you want t(.> be sure you get 
a paper get the California Eagle. 
1 will .say this, Mr. Shores is one 
of my strongest friends for he has 
employed two of my hoys at the 
bank for a long time and for many 
vears a member of the church to- 
gether until I removed my mem- 
bership to I'asadena. Instead of 
trying to condemn, let me recom- 
mend that we have more men like 
Mr. .^hores in Los .Angeles. If 
comment was always published 
as written and understood as read 
there would not be so many 
thorns in <iur pathway. Mr. 
Shores, like l',iHiker T. Washing- 
ton, was born in Virginia, and 
learned to do hi»i' wi>rk well. 

First .\.',M. E. Church fair will 
open May 11th. 1914, the second 
Mondav evening, and wiil con- 
tinue for five evenings. It prom- 
ises tn be among the best, if not 
the very best, church fair ever 
given in this city. It is hoped 
that there will not be anything to 
conflict with the fair. F.ach even- 
ing there will be a program rend- 
ered. Watch the columns of this 
paper for further particulars and 
program in detail. The proceeds 
are to be applied on the debt of 
the church which we hope to re- 
duce considerably this conference 
year. 

GEORGIA STATE SOCIETY 
ENTERTAINED 

l-'ridav evening. March 27, Mrs. 
Willie Williams and Mrs. X. E. 
Hall, of 1240 Long Beach avenue, 
entertained at the cozy home of 
Mrs. Hall, the George State So- 
ciety. The home was tastefully 
decorated with the state colors, 
white and green entwined with 
white carnation sand ferns. The 
lavishly laden dining table was 
further beautified in the center 
with a hand painted vase contain- 
ing ferns and Eastef lillies in 
which' the roioms' W'ere also deco- 
rated. Each guest "was presented 
with a carnation and piece of feni. 
A high class literary program 
was rendered which was begun 
with prayer by Rev. Lambert, a 


■>'■»■ 


ffc ifome 9dtricta Who Have 'Sene 


' / ' j| (By J. E^ BA3S) i I r 

;! Wlti Apol«|,le^to.W.F.*lri( , 

It's a good tWing for L'Ouvertore that h«»di4d when he did: 
This age is no tiiM for a Warrior Ki«i^ 
His wonde;rfur conqaeais, fais great battle lines ' i 

Would now be, iiailed with : "Back to tiiijjiines !"- 
I fear that,^u(r TpuBsant — were he Jto reOu^i ■'['. ;, 
And try wtttt MB swotd;otir country to fj^— ' • '• -. " ' -' 
Would IiavetWgo after it bammar and .tfDga 'r--' 
,. By handling i^^ruits and singing; swaii 9i^fis, 

It's a gooci'lPig :^^j(Ui^igfte8, too, ^ i^'itliere iS90l*^ 
With his gtq0^g itl^l^ ifew aad iw^hMcsnt $«W«r. 
If he v^ere JH^istef'ifeprajp ffe'^ iopi^pf^i^ jofc#^^ j 

'Twould beawregirtioiF^t%aahingt<|h o^j.h{afpq)tui^^^jroud. 
' Things wdreSB different in years long agoi ' V w ' 

They used to- appreciate -manhood ; but now - the oloeed door ! 
He'd find but few of those th^t he had led. 
So I guess that our Douglass had better stay dead. 

It's a good thing foj: Bruce that he died long ago. 

For his statecraft now wouldn't have any show. 

It is true, lots of coin by freedmen has been spent- 

But the wiser ones got it and spent every cent. 

C. H. J. Taylor, too, would starve if he .carte back to earth— 

For the present powers shy at real worth. 

They were lucky "old timers," who were here and made good. 

And I don't think they'd want to come back if they could. 


■ -^Hh' 


^ 


A LETTER TO J. D. REYNOLDS. 


Ult;p Amsterdam Npiob. 3nr. 

Ho. 17 WEST 136tm STREET 


Notice to Al| Colored Property Owners : 't ^ 

; Telef^one me when your FIRE INSURANCE will expire ';-■ 
and Ifwill renew it in any Company you may desire. I S' - 
will h|1ow yon 5 per cent, discount. . ' 

dall Ai^n 542Q. or Call at 412 Germain Bld^. ',, 

^ 224 South Spring^ Street : 'K 

V SfOlNEY f>. DOINES ; K^\ 


rs 


Real Estate 


- i 


Fire Insurance 


Notary Public 


BUTTERICK PAlifERf>iS 


R. & 0. CORSETS 


The 12th Street Store 

I |>J. W. Cor. 12th and Central Ave. 

*'■ i "Under New MANAGErfjNT" i 

lifrAl Aveijnrfs Bl.rg!nn^6enfOT tll^V'gives a "Money Back 
' : Guarantee.wit^ Every- Purchase. 

Phone 23756 f 1125 Central Avenue 

'Woure to Pleape, The 12th St. Store" 


•i 


5' ciiii 


■4' 


Telephone South 78i8 i?" ^'"^ TSls. 13r9 Newton ^:' ''' ", BomeaoW 

Wni , A. and Arthur (sio%%et — Florists 

jl ProprUtorl of FKRNDaLK NUE8BRY 

^ Floral Designs a Specialty i 
?^*^^l??^ioN9i 1408-16 Cditral Avenue 

i 


Saw York. S.Y. 


reb. 1&. 1»14. 


TO BE NICELY DRESSED 

Ai^'d Have a Good Look, You Must Have 
';Your Clothes Made at Sam Cook's 

Don't worry, pur cleaning and Prei>8iDg is of the Highest Grade. 

WesMake Your Old Clothes Look Like New. j 

J Like to order they are made. ! 

We are making failing Suits from $15.00 up 
^ Everybody sayp so. 

1314 Central 4Ave^ |^os Angeles, Cal. 


Our work is very Good. 


THE TAILOR THAT 
EVERYBODY KNOWS 


J. D. Beyoolda, 
196C Raymond AT8. 
Los Angales. 


Calif. 


Donr Si ri- 


fe bog to acknowlodea roeslpt of your aornp 
book, entitled "Tips on the race problem," and there 
nre rsnsona to ball era that If you follow prlatlne 
the scrap book In bold type on tiaely toplee. such 
aa arc shown tn the copy submitted, so that any ordinary 
man or woman caa predict the tiltimato future of your 
publication, i 

Wo aro l&deod plad to be the recipient of your 
courtoeios and forecast a feast for those of refined 
taste for good lltorotuxe. 

Let "tips" hare clear salllBg and in due tine 
the public will anxiously await the tip from Joha D* 
Reynolds. 

If an exchange Is desirable. Lt ie yours to 

conmand. "i 

Respectfully yours, 

AMSTEaiwa SEWS pua. oo.. 


JHA/.HL 


i. 


// Manaflln« Editor. 


New and Second Hand Furniture 

^OUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED 

AY^RS BROTHERS 

2627 Central Avenue 


House Furnishingij of All Kinds. 
Phone South 4273.; Open Evngs. 


E. E. ANDREWS 


Dry Goods, Furnishings 
Hardware, Pait)b, Oil... 

t791 


We Duplicate Any Price Made 
on the same class of Goods.... 


MIkIN 


W. JEFFERSON 


HOME 
f344fl 


How#ird Shoe Store 

Fine ^hoes aitfl Shoe Repairing 

laOl \V. Jefferson Street 


Des|)itc tlie inclemency o\ the day evenintj of each month at 

weather sixty Ge(irj:;ians were We.sley chapel, corner Kighth and 

(Jjresent. to help make merry on .'^an Julian streets aird woiild like 

this occasion. to have all (ieorgians meet with 

The Georgia .^tate Society them. Dr. I,. .Stovall. president; 

meets every first and third .Mon- Dr. j. .^. Leggett. .secretary. 


If you ere hungry and in the city meet ycur friends at 

Marshall's Lunch l^oom 

141 WILMINGTON ST. 

For quick service, good meals and moderat« prices. We make a specialty of 

Southern dishes. Pigs' feet, tails, head and chitlins. 

VIOLET LAUNDRY 

1581 Post Street - - Telephone West 7942 


We do youa 
service. 


work promptly and give you good 


The |Ne\v Idea Bakery 

; 420 East Fifth Street 

Bakery^ Goods Fresh Pastry - 

Our as^rted Cakes and Pie» are a little better and Cheaper 

W^ can afford this because we do our own baking 

Fo^ Parties and Weddings Try Our Cakeg. 

Home A5018 \ Good Work— Quick Service Main 3625 

Pacifit Clothes Cleaning Works 

SUITS $1.00 UP 
2358 East Nii|lh Street Los Angelei, GalifomU 


Bowen Dairy and ke Cream Co. 

Wholesalers of I ofe tJi'eain and Id'es 
Modern,[up-to-date Sanitary Plant. :. Soda Fountain Supplies 

Our motto : Prompt dispatch and quality always. 
FRESNO. CAL. 


W. W. PHILLIPS 

Republican Candidate for 

riTATE TREASUREBL ^ | 

Your vote respectfully solicited. Primary election, Aug. 25, 1914 


MRS. TENNABAUM 

AT li08 CENTRAL AVE. 


peared in the Evening"Record -<inl ing, Mrs. E. Childress ; vocal solo, 
Friday, Feb. 20th, and the follow- Miss Rosemond; remarks, Dr. L. 
iitg is what I said. Get a copy of Storall ; reading, Mrs. Dr. Leg- 

gett ; vocal solo, Miss Nelson ; re- 
marks, Mr. Eugene Walker. 


'»After mRti^ fears of pxperience in the dry jjoods basineee Mrs 
solo MisS Cornelia Lece-ett • rekd- Tenlabaum bis developed jsxcellent taste in the eelectiou of women's 


apparel, and her Eastern goods in Ladid^' and childrens' garments at 
this time are especially pretty 


Gi W. DANSOiy 

I 1403 IViateo Street 

Dry Qoods, Shoes, Hats, INotions 

|^£V\/ IDEA PATLERNS — with cutting diagram and seam ! allowance 
^EVERY SIZE in EVERY STYLE^IO cents, ■ _ 


Farwell Bros 

Watchmakers 

aiid Jewelers 

I'^fh and Central Ave 
LoslAnBeleB, 

\\'atches HCC|rately repaired at 
tnoderate pritjes. Diamonds re-se 



Phone Broadway 4213, 


1345 QA)^j»ivi&0\ 


H. BAULIJNQER, P^p. 


Water 


the issue of the California Eagle, 
Feb. 28. Read on fifth page, first 
column : 


After the rendition of the pro- 


S. M. BASHOR, 
J. C. DEUEL. 


PHONE MAIN 3992 


I believe when any one who has gram the guests then assembled 
worked as honorable as Mr. jn tlie dining room and were 
Shores has for that bank for a served with a three course dinner, 
quarter of a century should be re-' The color scheme was carried out 
tired on pension. See what<the in the refreshments. The cream 
First National of Pasadena did vvas served in white bricks, each 
for its head Njorter, Mr. Samuel of which bore a "G" of mint in the 
Prince. He sd^ Pasadena grow center. 


M. BASHOR & CO. 

POULTRY AND RABBITS DRESSED TO ORDER 
F iEE DELIVERY 

934-936 Central Ave. Los Angeles, Cal. 


Hot and Co id Baths 


737 Paseo 


*il»-- 



-«it*-. 




'•M,.-: 




.m 


Bell Phone E. 3559 J 

Hotel Pa*eo and Cafe 

MRS. MARY KING, FRCP. \ 

Hot or cold lunbbes aad .meals. ■': Special attention given to par- 
. Cigars, 'tot4uMM>ii etc. A?! day aiad night ser.vice. . 


j The VarietvSto-e "^^ 

^t 1201 Central or Twelve and Central Ave. 
With the co?igei\ial Mr. Park as proprietor, is ready jfith a full line 

y of Eastern goods, such as 
Post Cards, !^oks, Periodicals, Fancy Candies, Toilet articles and Stationery 
Get your School Supplies at Parks. . 


•I 



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\ 


T'- f;-\ 
Coolers made of Plaster and '^^diworated ij^ 

s shells. Also flower pots. ' "^' 

I LOS ANGELES, CaJ - 


MUTILATED PAGE I CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


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j DUNBAR RARK 
Between the City and the Sea 


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LVNWOO'T) 


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SHOWING LOCATION 




OATES 

A new departure in Real Bstate operations where impr ve- 
ments are paid for by the promotore and where citizens are not 
debarred because of color. We believe in the plan of reetrictions. 
The Ic cation is especially good for high class homes:' Cheap 
transportation, gas, water, telr phone and power poles in alley, 
graded streets, sidewalks, curbs and parking. 

Property titles and funds will be handled through Title In- 
surance and Trust Co. 

Parked between the City and the Sea, it is the natural trend 
of develooment and cannot help growing. Evevthingnf the 
right kind is in the right place to make Dunbar Park the logical 
place to live. 

Will you be one of the first to make a selection of a lot in 
the new sub-division, DUNBAR PARK. We have seifeialon the 
waiting list now. 

Do it now -,'own a home between the City and, the Sea. If 
you are a good citizen you are eligible to buy oae or more of 
these large lots, containing nearly 7,000 square feet, as compared 
with the ordinary lot of about 3,100 square feat. 

Come to our office, get acquainted, get posted, eoi a hnme, 
%e\. it paid for and quit oaying rent. Make money by saving 
your earnings. 

We predict the values in DUNBAR PARK will greatly in- 
crease in a very short time- Lots sold on monthly payments. 

For prices and terms, call write or telephone. 

CiODUSO At THOMFSOIV, 

70.3 San Fernando Bldg., Los Angelcp. California 

Phone, Main 4148 


AT T«Ik{;HU£CHE8 
♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦< ^ »»»»»»e»eeo»e » e»» 


TABERNACLE BAPTIST 
Hemlock 8ti«et 

Rev. J. D. Gordon, pastor. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


NEW jBOPE BAPTIST 

Palomai Ave., near 16th 

Rev. C. H. Anderson, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B.-Y. P/U., 6:30 p. m. 
Preaehia^ at 7 :30 p.-m. . 


|B. Y. p. U. to Meet 

March 28th 


McKINLEY PARK CHAU- 
TAUQUA AT SACRA- 
MENTO. 

The McKinley Park Chautau- 
qua at Sacramento under the au- 
spices of the Sacramento Valley 
Baptist Youn? People is an a.s- 
sured fact. The grounds have 
been secured and the city park 
commissioners are leaving no 
stone unturned to get the grounds 
in shape and to make the park as 
attractive as possible. Have you 
ever visited McKinley Park?" It 
is one of the most beautiful places 
in all California. It lays just 
south of Sacramento and contains 
about forty or fifty acres. The 
large oak trees have made almost 
a continuous^ canopy overhead, 
thereby shutting out the sun at all 
hours of the day. Its pleasure 
features are almost unexcelled. 
There are great spaces for base- 
ball, lawn tennis, croquet and a 
swimming pool, also a small zoo. 
The park affords all the sport and 
pleasure that one might look for. 
Main Features of the Chautattqvia. 
The main features of the Chau- 
tauqua will be a great gathering of 
prominent orators, the learned 
men of both races. For when we 
tell you that the coming of ex- 
Attorney-General W. H. Lewis of 
Boston and Miss N. H. Burroughs 
is assured, together with the prob- 
able appearance of Bishop Parks 
of the A. M. E. Church ; W. T. 
Vernon, ex-registrar of the treas^ 
ury; Drs. McCoy and Gordon Of 
Los AngekS) and other promi- 
nent men of the South, you will 
agree with me that there will be 
a great concourse of racial intel- 
lect that this race can be proud of, 
men able from every standpoint, 
orators of no mftan ability, the 
most of them having national rep- 
utation. Together with the best 
who are members of our race 
there will also be present the gov- 
ernor of the state, the attorhey- 
j general of the stnte, the United 
- States senator from, our state and 
congressmen from our state, to- 
gether with such men of our gen- 
eral association as Drs J. M. Rid- 


dle G. C. Coleman and J. T. 
Jones, Professor L. J. Williams 
and others of our local district of 
the Young iPeople's Union and 
Sunday School. Now when I say 
that McKinley Park during the 
2,3d of June and the 1st of July 
will be the Mecca for intelligence 
I feel assured that you, after read- 
ing the above names of the per- 
sons spoken, of and being ac- 
cpiainted with them from a re- 
ligious and political standpoint, 
you will say with me that it is 
well worth paying a visit to the 
Chautauqua. 

The Purpose of the Chautaqua. 
The purpose of the Young Peo- 
ple's Chautauqua is to bring 
about a large united social gath- 
ering of our young people. Each 
summer we find that the Sunday 
schools and young people's soci- 
eties give picnics where one or 
two of the local Sunday schools 
and young people's societies 
gather together for their social 
pleasure. The pleasure resorted 
to is not always of the most de- 
sirable kind, therefore the presi- 
dent of Our Sacramento Valley 
B. Y. P. U. Convention conceived \ 
the idea of holding a general out- i 


might be the result of this great 
meeting the committee outlined 
tlie following as the plans for the 
Chautauqua for the social, indus- 
trial and religious benefit of the 
young people of our community 
and the outlying districts. To 
carry out this plan is the reason 
why we have gone to the expense 
and have invited the persons cited 
above. The seve.al district con- 
ventions which compose the Gen- 
eral Baptist .Association hne been 
invited to hold their respective 
conventions at McKinley Park 
during the Chautauqua, and there 
will be a day or days given to 
each of the district conventions 
for the purpose of holding their 
convention. .\nother great feat- 
ure of the Chautauqua will be a 
manfmoth choir consisting of L^O 
voices, under the directorship of 
several of the best singers obtain- 
able in \orthern California. 
Time, Place and Rates, 
The time of the beginning of 
the Chautauqua will be the 23d of , '^^"'^hen 


man, bo.x 692, Stockton, Cal., or 
Mrs. L. S. Diggs, 914 North 
street. Woodland, Cal. 


l\ev. .\. ('. Williams jjreached a 
\ery .strong sermon Sunday morn- 
ing. In spite of tite bad weather 
Sunda.N- evening we had good 
scr\ ices. 

.\c.\t Sunday Rev. Williams 

will preach. lie has a special 

message for the morning service. 

Minnie .Mhritton will song 

solo at the luoniing service. \\"e 
hope all nu'ml)ers and friends will 
be at all .services. The Lord's 
Supper will he celebrated at 3 
p. 111. 

.\t the .Ministerial Federation 
Prof. .Xrcliie Williams, with his 
address, "Tiie .Atmosphere of the 
Church." caused much discussion. 

The new officers of the Federa- 
tion were installed by Rev. W. F. 
Rev. D. L. Mc.Mickens, 


A. it. E. CHtJBCH 


MT. ZION BAPTIST 
Thirdand Stephenson Ave. 
Rev. A. C- Williams, pastor. 
Services for Sondav. 

At 11 a. m.. preaching, subject, 
7:30 p. m., preaching, subject. 


\ 


SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH 
Eighth and Towne Ave. 
Usual service preaching by the Maple Ave., bet. 7th and 8th Sta. 


pastor, Dr. (jregg. 


WEI^Y CHAPEL 

Comer.;Eighth and Wall 

Rev. Wesle|- E. Kurchen. pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Young Ftople's meeting at 6:30 
p. m. ^ 

Preaehingj at 7:30 p. m. 


Rev. Joseph L. McCoy, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. at 6 .-30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


FIEST A. M. E. CHTJBCH 

Cor. Eighth St. and Town Ave. 

Rev. N. Greggs, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
Christian Endeavor at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


Home X8274 So. 5428 

V. Kogan's Pharmacy 

3728 Cental Ave , CoEner 38th St 

We carry Toilet Articles, Stationery Drugs and Chemicals. . 
Prescriptions our specialty. 

Orders given by Phone an delivered. 


j Go to K. H. FINN'S 

Meai Market and Grocery 

For the good things to eat, where everything is clean and n€«t 
Frio^B are right. Give me a fair trial and be convinced. 


Re\^ 


Wil 


Tune, and will hold eight days. P''«'''flent : 
closing on the first day of July. v>^<-' president 

The place will be McKinley 
Park, southern section of Sacra- 
mento, the same being reached by 
two car lines running at intervals i 
of five minutes from the uptown 
section of the city. 

Rates have been secured from 
all roads entering into Sacra- 
mento of one and one-third Tare 
for the round trip. 

Accommodations. 

Sleeping accommodations will 


ing for the young people of Sac- | be right on the grounds 
ranientd Valley. To carrv out the 


idea a committee was appointed 
composed of the following : Rev. 
G. W. Reed of Stockton, chair- 
man ; Mrs. M. F. Gaither of 
Woodland, Rev. W. M. DixOn of 
Sacramento, Rev. J. L. Allen of 
Marysville, Mrs. L. S. Diggs of 
Woodland, Mr. L. Williams of 
Marysville and Prof. C. H. Toney 
of Vallejo, he being one of the 
pastors of the Sacramento Valley 
district. The committee, after 
getting together, decided that it 
would be a g^od thing to make 
the outing a general one, not sim- 
ply to confine its pleasures to the 
young people of the Sacramento 
valley district, but to invite all] 


There 
will be tents provided with two 
cots. The prices for lodging will 
not be over 25 cents, and prob- 
ably less, especially for parties 
who desire to stay longer than 
one night. The rates will be fixed 


A. C. Williams, 

I'rof. .-\rchie J. 

iams, secretat-y. and Rev. S. 

L. Harris, chairman of the i)ro- 

gram committee. 

Invitations for the Character 
P.all are out. It is to be given by 
the P'aben Phi Fraternity on Eas- 
ter Monday (April 13th) at Blan- 
chard FTall, and it promises to be 
very interesting and a rare treat. 
These young men, whose enter- 
tainment shave refreshing varietv 
and striking originality, are now 
affording their numerous and ap- 
preciative patrons an opportunity 
to display their own taste and 
skill in the portrayal of some well 
known character. In this medley 
of costumes you will likely see 
Pocahontas, Indian heroine, link 


i H. 

I 

3429 Central Ave. 


H. RIININ, 


Sunset So. 957 'd 


RcsiDBNdE Phone Main 5167 
BusiWkss Phon« — 

, METROPOLITAN 


Hair D=i3?st'i5, il^rjjRrNS 

SHAMPOOmc 

HAIR STORE 


I 


J. H. OUFFEE. Prop.i 


1403:1-2 EAST NINTH STREET Cor. HEMLOCK 


according to the time the parties armed with Garibaldi, Italian pat- 
a'p to hold the tent. 'riot, while dancing the hesitation 

Refreshments of all kinds will will be found Juno, the Greek god- 
be on the grounds. A great mam- dess, in the respectful embrace of 
moth platform is built for the Old Uncle Tom. 
purpose of the meeting This! ^^^^^^ j j^^.^ ^^^ W. Payne 
platform is surrounded by beauti- ^^^^ ..^^^.^ forget the play, 'Onl 
ful trees, completely cov.rmg the ^^^ kittle Big Jloft,,' Wednesday,' 
platform, thereby shuttmg out the ^p^, ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^„ 
sun,, causing the place t*) be cool 


DO NOT DELAY REGISTERING AS A 

REPUBLICAN 

THAT YOU MAY VOTE AT THE 

PRIMARY ELECTION 

ITUESDAY, AUr^UST 25TH. 1914 > 
For 

SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 
UNHED STATES SENATOR 


f 



throughout the day. 

.Motion pictures by our Bro.j 
Rev. Dixon will be one of the 
main features each evening of the 
the young people as 'well as the j Chautauqua, 
older people of Northern Califor- For further information con- 
nia to participate at this great so-ceming the Chautauqua you may 
cial meeting. address Rev. G. W. Reed, chair- 

That something worth while 


'. Mrs. Chester Olison of New 

' York City, has settled in our city. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Bond of 2340 


Damon, wishes to announce the' 


R.B^OSTBR. -"--t 


HOME A— 5121 


Cement Contractor | 

Abo If ante! Work, TUe or Brick , 

Do titat class work. Furnish any 

kind of reference. /! 


\ 


14 Carolina St. 


Los Angeles. 


fhoa* Kain 7695 a. L. Porter^ Pwpaietor 

II yoar clothes or hats ar« rick or Mady todye ring np 

Porter's Pantatorimn 

Cleaning, dyeing and pressing. Hate dyed, blocked and deaned. 

engagement of their daughter!"®™?* ***«°*'°'^ K^'*"* **^ ''O''^ Men'e suits ll 00 and np. Lakes' 
Stella to Mr. Clarence Wilson, of*'"^ " ^'^^'^- ^'^ ^cCrry St.. Lo. Angel- 

Santa Ana. The date for the wed- 
diifg is not yet decided upon. 


ifi' 


i^iM.^ 



':^>,-}l^^ipf^;:^- , 


MUTILATED PAGE CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



Full Crew Law Declared Void Victf-y For Coloered Trainmen 


Rev J.D.Herben 

Noted Divire 

Holding Great Meeting At Harmony 
Baptist Church Furlong Tract 


A FOREMOST BAPTIST 
DIVINE. 

One of the greatest divines of 
the Baptist Church is in our midst 
for an indefinite stay, in the per- 
son of Dr. J. Douglass Herben, 
late of Atlantic City, N. J., at 
which place for seven years he 
pastored the leading cinirch of 
that denomination. 


We want to compliment the 
church on the fact that they 
showed their appreciation of the 
service of Dr. Herben by giving 
him one of- the greatest farewell 
receptions ever tendered a prelate 
in this section, and we are glad 
to number the Second Baptist 
Church among the nobler 
churches of our denomination 
which are willing to give honor to 



OUR CITY FORUM 

According to Webster's defini- 
tion of the word, it was a public 
place in ancient Rome where 
causes were tried : a tribunal, 
Jewish diction. But according to 
a more modern use of the word, 
it is defined as being aft organiza- 
tion where public questions are 
discussed, for the purpose of as- 
sisting other kindred organiza- 
tions in the development of the 
highest possible public sentiment, 
in order that such decisions may 
be reached by the public that will 
be in harmony with the highest 
combined interest of all. 

Our city f(jruni was ofgajiized 
about fifteen years ago v^hen the 
colored population of the city was 
less than 2000. which was less 
than one-tenth of our present 
number. The t)rgan'ization has 
passed through niarjV' discourag- 
ing conflicts, which at times lias 
put the institution to the severest 
concei\able tests as to its right to 
live and flourish in the commu- 
nity. Through all of its strug- 
gling iieriods a faithful few have 
patiently clung to it. and con- 
niunitv as a sentiment, moulder, 
and an intellectual and a moral 
lever to helj) push forward all 
laudable causes of the race. The 
motto of the forum has at all times 


"J" ■'! EXAMPLE Off YOUNG BUSINESS 

MEN MAKING GOOD 


much to fne rrce, 
the rfghtSj^ian,' ■• d 7;e is in the 
right placi; also it ii'a. well known 1 
fact that iiaithful and c*'mpetent 
secretary jrf any institution means 
everythine to the life and the serv- 
ice of th« .organization. Such is 

our fortniie in the person of Mr. | Chairman Tro}? as an orator of the 
J. R. Scott,' He is truly a lover of | Du Bois type, which would have 
his race',, and a young man of embarrassed many of ouij lesser 
whom we.ishould all feel pround. lights, but .-Xfew difl not ^eeni to 
There are juite a '-^'''''i'number of have been daunted in the least by 
others., mfn and ■fC!*:<V;n who are the flattering introductioa which 
highly ti«ss*;rving «f prsonal men- he had received. He gavie sVjme 
tion, on ^.e accoun*' • f iheir im- very splendid definitiorEs, and 
tiring fidelity and "v 
welfare o the For''-' 



Among 


( for the drew some fine conclusions as to 
what constituted an efficiejit lead- 
ership for the people. But he said 
that no leader was efficient to lead 
the peojile who could notj impart 
tlie facts of his capabiliti| to the 
people themselves; and injjjropor- 
tion as the ])ublic could seje in the 
leaders those qualities \r^ could 
become an efficient race; leader. 

Upon the whole the address was 
a grand one. The yonug fnen did 
great credit to the race rand we 
h(*pe that they may soon Ije called 
again to appear before \)S. Our 
president closed the se^ion by 
urging the people to subs^jribe for 
our race papers. The writer was 
highly jjleased at his Remarks 
along this line; they wert> indeed 
timely and doubtless ma|iy wefe 
sufficientlv intlucnced by ;,them to 

ause them to do busin^'ss witli 
one or the other of our^cditors. 
We close this brief revie\^' of the 
I'oruni bv saving that whatsoever 
of credit it merits from thj public, 
the praise is all due to il's active 
members who are affiliatejd large- 
ly with the church. LcljCiod be 
praised for all good thing?. 'T-or 
it is in him we live and feave our 
being." j 

fl. I--. HENDEllSUX. 

: > 


MRS. J . DOUGLASS H 


; ] 


J. DOUGLASS HEREIN, D. D. 


T Dr. Herben comes to the Coast 
highly endorsed by his connec- 
tion throughout the country, his 
credentials from the church, the 
press, public officials and laymen 
paying him the highest tribute as 
* a pulpiteer and great force in the 
religious uplift of the race. His 
Strong forte seems to be his abil- 
ity to get results by saving souls 
and maintaining the church, and 
when the results of his et^orts as 
an evangelist and preacher are 
taken into account it is no wonder 
that his fame has preceded him 
here. 

He pastored the Second Baptist 
iChurch at Atlantic City for seven 
'years, and in that time he fellow- 
shipped to the membership there- 
of lf453 persons, and raised up- 
iwards of $30,000. A record which 
shows for itself his great ability. 

At a meeting of two weeks du- 
ration in Roanoke, Va., which he 
conductd, there were ninety-seven 
Conversions and fifty-six acces- 
sions. 

The following article from the 
Christian Banner, published at 
Philadelphia, will give an idea of 
i)r. Herben's great work in the 
East. 

I We are proud of the work that 
has been accomplished by Dr. 
Herben in Atlantic City, and of 
^e^ magnificent church which he 
tias gfjven to the Baptists of that 
it^. Itj^akes every Baptist feel 


been simple and nolilc. hut tinder 
some of. it< adniitii>tratrons its 
executives ha\c not l)een a> care- 
ful as thev S4)hul(l ha\e been in 
ruling out all part> iiniitics. sec- 
'tarianism and personal matters. 
Hencli niiich of the time was 
s|)ent clashing luer matters which 
were of biit little or no value to 
any one. We are proud to say 
now that we ha\e outlived those 
days of seed-sowing, and that we 
are now reaping splendid harv- 
ests from the same ground over 
"which we once carried grevious 
burdens. Our present administra- 
tion is one 'if the best that cquld 
have been had in this or in any 
other city: Capt. F. H. Crumbly, 
president ; Theo. W. Troy, chair- 
man of the committee on pjo- 
gram, and J. R. Scott, secretary. 

The splendid results which are 
being achieved through and by the 
Forum are largely dua|tp punc- 
tuality of those thrw-pfficers. 
Presi<i€nt Crumbly is a man of un- 
usual executive ability, and while 
he is well up in his knowledge of 
parliamentary usages, he is no 
slave to dead formalities. So con- 
sequently his rulings are of the 
very highest practical order. Mr. 
Troy is a man well informed as to 
the needs of the hour, and h^e is 
constantly on the alert for the 
right persons, to conre before. the 
Fofom and s^ak upon the right 


proud when he goes to Atlantic 
City to find there three of the 
largest and best churches, 
whom honor is due. 

So I.os Angeles. Baptist and re- 
ligious circles in general are glad 
tf) have in our midst such charac- 
trs as Dr. Herben, and feel hon- 
ored with his presence. He is at 
present conducting a series of 
meetings at Furlong Tract, at the 
Harmony Baptist Church. He is 
a forceful and eloquent speaker. 
and all of our people shoul.d avail 
themselves of the opportunity of 
hearing Dr. Herben. 

He is a rfian who does not stand 
and wait for things to turn up, but 
.goes aftr results, hence on his ar- 
rival in our city he got right into 
the harness to work and to do 
good. 

Great work is needed all over 
our land to keep up and maintain 
our religious institutions, -and we 
need in our midst-men of the type 
of Dr. Herben. And we truly hope 
that he will see fit to remain in 
this bailiwick and make even a 
greater record than he did in At- 
lantic City. 

Dr. Herben's wife is one of the 
leading educators of the East, ^nd 
has been of inestimable help id flae f ii ybj gctt ; and" as to how well he is 


great results which have be^ hfs. 


of the public schools at 
Virginia. 
The Doctor atthe^pWi^rit jime 


succeeding, one simply needs to 


She is at present principalibf oil« attend ;her sessions from time to 


them are Mrs. Owt.., ouj treas- 
urer, who never misses a meeting 
when it 19 possible for h^ to be 
present; A. J. Joiicr, '""vice-presi- 
dent, aiitl J. W. Coleman who is 
a splendid prospect as a presiden- 
tial possibility at our ne.xt elec- 
tion. The roll bof>k of the Forum 
is always open fo the increase of 
its membership, but only men and 
women who are of a good moral 
reputation are solicited, being a 
nvember of the Negri) race. 

The Forum is strictly a racial 
institution, <\nd a booster 'or the 
race everywhere. S^ ce yf.vTare a 
.Vegro. jnirc and: simple, the 
Forum invites you Uo come to its 
meetings. If you are rejoicing, it 
will help you to rejoice; and if 
_\*iu are an unfortunate or in ncecl F' 
it will seek to lighten y.uir bur- 
dens. We may truthfully sav 
here that a larger-hearted bodv of 
men and women do not assemble 
anywhere in our city than the 
body copitituting tlie I'orum, 
which meets at 4:30 p. m. every 
.*>unday at Odd h'cllows' hall at 
Kightli and \\ ^.W streets. There 
is no task too large for them to 
iniiiertake. if it is for the uplift of 
member of the race, regardless as 
to what church, no church, or of 

whatsoever political party you 

may belong. .\1I they demand of 

you i.s to know that you are a man 

or a woman of intergrity and a 

booster f^ if your race, so long as 

you do not attempt to bring those 

personal iiiatters into the. Forum. 

.Ml of the regular sessions of the 

I'onmi are opened and closed 

with prayer, and throughout all of 

the deliberations the very highest 

order and decorum is observed. 

Hence if you care to spend one 

antl one-half hours pleasantly and 

profitably, from 4:30 to 6:30 p. m.. 

you can do so at your leisure. 

Last .'^lmday was young men's, 
day at the Forum. The program 
was simply grand. The partici- 
pants were William Wilkins. a 
pianist who is destined, to become 
one of the- world's great wonders 
in music. .-Mso Mr. B. H. Jones, 
who is his close second, rendered 
a musical solo. Dr. Lenard Sto- 
vall had a paper on the needs of a 
hospital which was practical and 
instructive. The doctor outlined 
his subject under three distinct 
divisions: First; the hospital 'as a 
home for the patient ; second, as a 
school with object lessons for 
nurses and, third, the knowledge 
imparted indirectly to the public 
through resident nurses going out- * \ 

among the people, and in this way We take great pleasur^n intor- 
to a great extent the public gets ducing to our readers MS". Sidney 
vaiuabel lessons and knowledge in p. Dones, one of our yot|ng busi- 
the care of the sick in the home, ^gss men ; the whole ra,4e should 
Douglass Warren is a young man [^^\ proud of Mr. Don^s,' Vho is at 
of no mean ability as an orator, present engaged in the .^surance 
Indeed he is highly deserving of ^^^ ^eal estate business,|^12 Ger- 

ines c|e- 
l»ery col- 


Mr. Clarence Irwin, one of the 
energetic young business men of 
the city, an excellent judge of 
plays. ha\ ing participated in a 
large number, comments as fol- 
lows on the flrama. "CJ)n the little 
Piig Morn": "All lovers of good 
plays and persons interested to 
any extent in romantic drama, 
should by all means witness the 
above performance which is to be 
staged at Elk's Hall next Wed- 
nesday evening, h\>x\\ 15th. 

In the first place the play is be- 
ing staged by ambitious young 
actors desiring to place before the 
public something of merit and re- 



ceive m return just recognition. 

.X'othing cheap or frivolous is 
Iieing attempted but an instructive 
performance from which everyone 
present will dcri\c a lifelong les- 
son and benefit. 

Well trained i)layers., attractive 
scenery and brilliant cosUimes 


)rilliarLt 
will ivature the occasion as^'wetl 


as the literjiry qualifieatioas.' The 
prices arc rea.sonaWe ib that 
everybody can h a ve.tlie importu- 
nity of enjoying tlws tJ^et — meet 
there." 


mie and he or she will be made 
to "wonder where and how does 
Our program committee get in 


is field secretary of the Western touch with so very many of tljie 
Division of the Baptiist Gonven- right sort of persons to disctiss 


tioxtr 


iCl 


t I 



^ 




^J 


those live issues which mean so 


^.M 



mr| sidne y p. dones 


credit for all that the name . , -, .• „ m_ 1 
,^ , , , „ mam building. Mr. J 

Doug ass could mean to us. ., . ^ , 

T * u ^ ^ ^ , r , • serves the patronage of 

.Last but not the least of this per- . ■ ..u •*„ foJ.- v.». \k<s. 

„„ , ^. ■ , ^ . ored person in the city, fdr he nas 

sonal mention was the speech . , „ u:„ ,K3i;t,r oc a 

J . A , . , , , in the past proven his aoHity as a 

made by Attorney Afew Mc- *; , /^ . ,, ^,„T,nd his 

r»«. ^u u- ^ ^i. J r successful busmess man and "'s 

Dowell, subject, the ne«ds of an ./' . „. • i^L_ .t,_n 

_ . ^ , ' , . , . , rapid advancement is Imijire than 

efficient leadership for **«. race. I j.^|^j|jjjj^jjjg ' ;^i 

Mr. McDowel was introduced by I ^j^^^ calUng at the Jpffice of highly recommends Mr. Dones. 

^ri^ifc^^-i-;. i jiiJu' \l,>, -N J I 'r|)ivJ:v;i^^i^^Vfi^i'.^.rt^Sl^V"-.->' ■ 


Mr. Dones we always find him 
busily engaged transacting busi- 
ness with all classes and races. 

Mr. Dones is doing a splendid 
fire insurance business and it is 
but justice to the race as well as 
to this young man if every mem- 
ber of the race would allow him to 
look after his interests in this re- 
spect. He is now associated with 
the enterprising yomig attoriieyr 
Ci'^A: Jones, wh^re he extends^sa 
hearty welcome Ao all interested 
in his line of w6rk!lThe Eagle 


...JK 


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T > i I - I III ' . 1 ) 11 

P dcna Episodes 





i 



I iOur press g^ang has roses some- 
times in their path, but always 
have thorns. 

GEORGIA STATE SOCIETY 
ENTERTAINED 

Friday evening, March 27, Mrs. 
Willie Williams and Mrs. N. E. 
Hall, of 1240 Long Beach avenue, 
entertained at the cozy home of 
Mrs. Hall, the George State So- 
ciety. The home was tastefully 
decorated with the state colors, 
white and green entwined with 
white carnation sand ferns., The 
lavishly laden dining table was 
further beautified in the center 
with a hand painted vase contain- 
ing ferns and Easter lillies in 
which the rooms were also deco- 
rated. Each guest was presented 
with a carnation and piece of fern. 

A high class literary program 
was rendered which was begun 
with prayer by Rev. Lambert, a 
solo, Miss Cornelia Leggett ; read- 
ing,! Mrs. ^- Childress; vocal solo. 
Miss Rosemond; remarks, Dr. L. 
Storall ; reading. Mrs. Dr. Leg- 
gett; vocal solo, Miss Xelson; re- 
marks, Mr. Eugene Walker. 

After the rendition of the pro- 
gram the guests then assembled 
in the dining room and were 
served with a three course dinner. 
The color >cheme was carried out 
in the refreshnicuts. The cream 
was served in white bricks, each 
■ of which bore a "G" of mint in the 
center. 


First .\. M. E. Church fair will 
open May llth, 1014. the second 
Monday evening, and wiil con- 
tinue for five evenings. It prom- 
ises to be among the best, if not 
the very best, church fair ever 
given in this city. It is hoped 
that thet;e will not be anything to 
conflict with the fair. Each even- 
«^g:,;here will be^ program rend- 
ered. Watch the columns of this 
paper for further particulars and 
program in detail. The proceeds 
are to be applied on the debt of 
the church which we hope to re- 
duce considerably this conference 
year. 


VENICE, OCEAN PARK AND 

SANTA MONICA 

J. Allen Reese, Correspondent 

Our beach correspondent has 
been appointed beach agent for 
sales in Dunbar Tract, which has 
just been placed on the market by 
Coding & Thompson. 

Venice is soon to boast of a 
hotel, lunch room and soda foun- 
tain for the exclusive patronage 
of its colored residents and visittrs 
to the vicinity. This project is 
being f ostered by Mr. John 
Bridges, who has moved to the 
bejch and is located at Eifth and 
San Juan avenues. He expects to 
spend $4000 and will himself su- 
perintend the construction. 

With the municipal election 
near at hand the Venetian col- 
ored population is attracting no 
little attention. Xcme have pledged 
to support individual or party and 
as a consequence both political 
factions are baiting their hooks 
with attractive promises in order 
to land the much prized "negro 
vote.' '. , ■■ 

The Golden West Literary and 
Social Club, after marking time 
for three months, heard the com- 
mand "Forward March" on last 
Monday evening. The club met at 
the home of Quince Tabor, and 
there an enjoyable evening was 
had. .\n important feature of the 
meeting was the discussion of 
what would be done with ih.e S12 
in the treasury. 

Some were bent upon spending 
the money for a frolic. Manuel 
Murrell thought it best to buy 
Bibles and distribute them as sou- 
venirs to the club members. 

J. .Mien Reese thought it best 
to place $10 in the bank and keep 
$2 on Jiand for current expenses. 
The matter was voted upon and 
as a consequence the money was 
placed in the bank on term de- 
posit at 4 per cent. The club wil 
elect its officers at its last meet 
ing this month. Next meeting to 
be held on third Tuesday at the 
home of Walter Edmonds in Saw 
telle. 


a 


Al" 


Metropolitan Baptist Church 

tended for its rights in the com- 

Pasadena. Cal. .-\pri| 8. 1914. 

Sunday was a busy day and full 
of interest. Rev. Geo. W. Hall. 
acting pastor, gave a very inter- 
esting review of the Sunday 
school lesson after which he 
preached a soul-stirring sermon at 
11 o'clock, taking for his subject, 
"Christ our example for service," 
from Luke 22:1,^-27. In his dis- 
course he said true servants of 
God are those sent by the Holy 
Ghost. In the whole course of 
Jesus' life he ever took the place 
of a servant. Those who spread 
the palm Wranches one day, cried 
crucify him the next. 

Two were united to the church. 

At 3 p. m. the Eastern Star hold 
. services. Rev. Alfred C. Wil- 
liams not being present. Rev. Hill 
preached their sermon. Subject, 
"Follow the Star" Matt 2:2:; and 
low the Rev. has promised to fol- 
|Iow the star soon himself. The 
leverends Fleming and wife were 
present. 

Evening services, sermon from 
Matt. 10:38, "Take your cross." 
Jesus led the procession of cross- 
bearers. Let each of us take upon 
ourselves a personal cross. The 
•; communion was also given. 

W^e are learning to know Rev. 
Hill as an able minister and a man 
of business qualities. He was 
with us in our business council 
last Thursday evening. 
I ; MRS. G. W. HARTS, Clerk. 


ra Ch risman for 

County Recorder 

"A clean-cut man." Such was 
your editor's opinioa of the genial 
Recorder of Tulare county, whom 
we met on our recent visii to 
Viealia. 

Without any heBilation or ex- 
cuses Mr. Chriaman showed him- 
self to be the man whom we vouch 
for, as friendly and appreciative of 
his colored constituents. We are 
always ready to sing the praises 
of such, when we meet them. 

Mr. Chrisma 1 will receive fro 
our people a hearty and strong 
suptjort for reiiomination and elec 
tion to succeed himself a™ Ooy-u 
Recorder of Tulare county. . 


GROCERY CO. 

No. 1540 Fillmore St. 

H. G. PRANK, Manager 

Fancy and Staple Groceries, Fruit 
and Vegetables 

Special Rates to Hotels, Restaurants and 
Boarding Houses 

Consult Us Before Going Elsewhere 

PHONE WEST 4626 


on 

CO 

a. 


MUSEHI -TAILOR 





THE PUACE NOT TO BE 
OVERLOOKED 



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n 


00 


LEpTER MAPP 

? PROPRIETOR 


n 
o 

in 


STOP, tOOK, LISTEN! 

WET WASH ^°"' K>^r""* 50c Sack 

The Hygienic Laundry hjjs changed hands and will be run as a first class 
Wet Wash Laundry un*r the name of the NEW PROCESS LAUN- 
DRY CO .-WET WASH.J As our aim is to protect your health through 
cleanliness and sterilization in doing your laundry work, we selected the 
name of Hygeia as mor^ befitting to represent our purpose. We steri- 
lize all «lothes by scier^ific process, safeguarding i^ou against conta- 
gious diseases. We refpectfully solicit your trade 'and will give the 
best of service. Kindlyigive us a trial and be convinced. 

NEW PROCESS LAUNDRY CO. ^HUh 

Phone Lakeside 121(| 2932 Poplar St , Oakland 


Phone West 6669 


H. TsuYDKi, Proprieto 


Cosmopolitan 

and Cleaning Works 


1591 POST STREET.&vear Lagnna 8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

. ILadies and Gei^t's Suits Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing 
and Rep{|iring Guaranteed Satisfactory 


AND MADE TO 
LOOK LIKE NEW 


Goods Called For 
and Delivered 


The Colored Boys Friend 


537 South Broadway 


MORE WHITES THAN 

BLACKS 

N. Y. Times Table Shows Larger 

Number of Unqualified Males 

Among the Caucasians. 

From Representative Towner's 
report on the bill providing for a 
Federal inquiry into the causes 
of illiteracy, in which is included 
the declaration that there are "2,- 
273,603 illiterate males of 21 years 
and over in the United States, 
enough to determine any national 
election at any period in our his- 
tory," the conclusion would natu- 
rally be drawn thalt a new and 

highly disquieting condition had 


4«£We8t 3068 

! STERLING DRUG CO 


H 


THE NYAL STORE 

Use^your telephone — all lines lead to our store. 
Complete line of EASTEK NOVELTIES. 

prescriptio"n druggist. 

ProtDpt Free Delivery. 

tlUti' I St. trd Western Ave. C. J. Stadler, Pro 


Godcau Funeral Service 

The Handsome Chapel and Private Rooms Free 

for those who dwell in apartments, flats, hotels, or where is insuf- 
cient accommodation at the time of death. Mr. or Mrs. J. S. 
Godeau will personally supervise all funeral arrangements and 
details. 

Godeau prices are only half the charges of the undertaker in your 
neighborhood, wno 's controlled by the Funeral Trust. 

TELEPHONE 
MARKET 711; S- F. OAKLAND 4045, OAKLAND 

when death makes the nndertaker necessary 

JULIUS S. GODEAU 

41 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 210 Webster St., Oakland 

305 Columbus Ave., S. F. 827 Figueroa St., Los Angeles 


DR^IER & NEVIS 

OAKLAND'S EXCLUSIVE 

SPORTING !l ATHLETIC SHOPPE 

\ Phone Oakland 4052 
530 12th Street, Neir Clay OAKLAND, CAL. 


IC Barry 

66 


•NOT IN THE TRUST" 


' O. Pknn e 


AI" Meat Market 

Best and Cheapest Choice Fresh Meats, 
Hams and Bacon, Wholesale and Retail 

Everything Guaranteed 1540 Fll more Street Phone West 4626 



ENDORSED BY THE EAULE CLUB 


To the Well Dressed Men 

Who Know the Value of Being Up-to-Date 


J E HENDERSON 

UNDERTAKER 

2307 TELEGRAPH A\|eNU£, , OAKLAND, CAL 

telephone Oakland 1878. 


CUT RATE Shippers 

I TO ALL POINTS EAST 


Also dealers in jHardware Tinware, Granite, Etc., Etc. 

Office and Store, 930 Seventh St Bet. Market and Myrt 

Phone Oakland 1325. < R. G. MARQUARDT, Mgr., Oakland, Cal. 

I ^ 


T 


Phone Oak 2277 


RENOVATING 


Res. Oak. 6238 


Chas.y. Braun Mattress Co. 

f WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

MATTI^ESSES AND COUCHES 

Wire Mattresses Stretche^ 1275 Seventh Sf, Oakland 


DjRINK THE BEST 


Golden West 


Should get acquainted with 
our New English Tailor. 


F.DELUC 

The Merithant Tailor 611 Mont jo mery St 
' San Fraijiciico 



SOL|) BY ALL DEALERS 

22d AND CHANCE^OR RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 


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J.:i. 




' ^ HARRIS AND FRANK 

Amon^ the leaders in style and artistic furnishings in ladies' 
and gents' ware Haifis & Frank rank pre-eminent. Because of its 
many years in bnsinf^ this firm is one of the most reliable in the 

city. I 

Have your shoSs sewed, ifiailed, etc., at reasonable rate, Harry 
Goldberg Shoe Hospital, 552&' Central Ave. 

Stump's Market i^ 1477 E. Vernon Ave. is a good place to trade. . 


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Allcnsworth Notes 


CHURCH WORK AND 
CHURCH NOTICES 
By Mrs. Mary Gross 

Rev. J. L. Allen, the missionary 
of the Northern Baptist Associa- 
tion, was with us all last week. 
We held meetings every night and 
praver services in the afternoon. 
Eveiv one was revived and six 
added to the church, one by bap- 
tism. Rev. Allen is a noble work- 
er. His heart is in his work; 
therefore he is bound to succeed 
wherever he goes. 


Sunday, .\pril 5, Miss Reatrice 
Rainbow was baptized by Rev- 
Allen and received into the 
church. 


Sunday eveninij Rev. J. i.. .\llen 
organized a Christian Endeavor 
Society with Rrn. Payne, presi- 
dent. 

Rev. Allen leit Monday morn- 
ing to attend district convention 
at Stockton. As this was his first 
trip to Allensworth he was very 
much pleased with what he saw 
and intends to return so(in and 
make quite a stay. 


The officers and members of the 
First Baptist church of Aliens- 
worth have pledged themselves to 
begin work on their church in the 
near future. You will hear more 
about us soon. 


Rev Simpson of Fresno, pastor 
of the A. M. E. Zion church, is 
with us and will preach for us 
this evening. 


in the bigbeB of termts and are 
among her stauncbest supporters. 
She, through this medfum, solicite 
the support of our people to this 
position. 

F. H. Lambertson for Ccunly 
Attorney. 


Hon. F. H. Lambertson, our 
present and eflBcient County Attor- 
tney of Tulare county, ie up for re 
election to that position and is 
deserving of a' hearty support on 
the record he has made in that 
position. 

Mr. Lambertson has been tried 
and found true to the interests of 
all the people, and there is no 
question of him receiving a hearty 
support from all classes for nomin- 
ation and election to a second 
erm. 


I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate to the office of sherilT 
of Tulare County. Primaries 
.August 5, 1915. 


COURT SMITH. 
For Coroner 
I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Coroner of Tulare county, subject 
to the decision of the electors at 
the coming primary election. 
L. C. LOCEY (Incumbent.) 



_^ Notice to AB Colored Property Owners : 

Tel^lhone me when your FIRE INSURANCE will expire 
and'! will renew it in any Company you may desire. I 
willisiillow you 5 per cent, discount. 

Call AUin 5429. or Call at 412 Germain BIdg. 
I 224 South Spring Street 


Real Estate 


SjDINEV 

Fire 


F>. DOINES 

nsurance Notary Public 


Easter services Sundav. 


For County Surveyor 
I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
County Surveyor of Tulare coun- 
ty, subject to the decision of the 
electors at the coming primary 

election. 

LAWRENCE A. MOYE. 


c^aTTiuelJfl. SJtoj^Mcfye 


BUTTERICK PATTERNS : R. & 0. CORSETS 

Tfic 12th Street Store 

|l. W. Cor. 12th and Central Ave. 

'- "Under New Managembnt" 

Central Avenue's Bargain Center, that gives a "Money Back 
' Guarantee with Every Purchase. 

Phone 23756 1125 Central Avenue 

"A'ours to Please, The 12th St. Store" 

f ^ 

Telephone South 7553 Res. 13l» Newton St. Home 2205*. 

Wm^ A. and Arthur Grosser— Florists 

•' Prorrlttors o( FERNDALE NURSERY 

i Floral Designs a Specialty "- 

?5^°a\\^'o°c''c'a8ion8 I ' 1408-16 Central Avenue. 

TO BEfNICELY DRESSED 

An<| Have a Good Look, You Must Have 
Vour Clothes Made at Sam Cook's 

Don't worry. Our cleaning and Pressing is of the Highest Grade. 
We fiake Your Old Clothes Look Like New. j 

Like to order they are made. \ 

Wo are making Tj^ling Suits from $L5.00 up. Our work is very Good 
f Everybody says so. ^ ,g^ 

1314 Central Ajve., Los Angeles, Cal. 


THE TAILOR THAT 
BVERYBODY KNOWS 


Monday. April 6. Mrs. J. \V. 
Singleton entertained at Hotel Al- 
lcnsworth in honor of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. J. L. Williams ^;^'. Ala- 
meda. The ladies report a ijery 
pleasant time. (-f^ 


Mrs. Julia Smith, who s^tit the 
winter in Denver, Colo^ ^isiting 
her husband, returned home Mon- 
day morning. She says while her 
friends were kind to her and she 
had a pleasant time, but there's 
no place like home even if it is in 
.Mlensworth. 


For District Attorney 

I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
District Attorney of Tulare 
county, subject to the decision of 
the electors at the coming primary 
election. 

FRANK LAMBERSON 

(Incumbent.) 


DO NOT DELAY REGISTERING AS A 

REPU BLICAN 

THAT YOU MAY VOTE AT THE 

PRIMARY ELECTION 

:TUESDAY, AUfiUST 25TH, 1914 
Fori 

SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 
UNITED STATES SENATOR 


E4E. ANDREWS 

We Duplicate Any Price Made 
on the same class of Good .... 


Dry Goods, Furnishings 
Hardware, Paints, Oil... 


847 


1791 W. JEFFERSON 


HOME 
73446 


For District Attorney 


Mr. Grigsby, who works in Ba- 
kersfield, is spending his vacation 
here with his family. 

POLITICAL. 

Mr. Court Smith, candidate for 
election to the office of sheriflF of 
Tulare County, spoke to us at the 
schoolhouse. Some say they will 
vote for Mr. Smith. He is a boost- 
er for good roads. 


I hereby announce inyself as a 
candidate for, the. nomination of 
District Attoi'ney of Tulare coun- 
ty, subject to the decision of the 
electors at the coming primary 
election. 

EARL A. BAGBY. 


For Sheriff 


I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Sheriff of the County of Tulare, 

subject to the decision of the elec- 
tors at the coming primary elec- 
tion. 

W. W. COLLINS 
(Incumbent.) 


Bowen Dairy and lee Cream Co. 

Wholesalers of loe Oreajnand Iocs 
Modern,''up-to-date Sanitary Plant. : Soda Fountain Supplies 

Our motto : Prompt diepstch and quality alwsys. 
FRESNO, CAL. 


W. W. PHILLIPS 

Republican jCandidate for 

STATE TREASURER. 

Your vote respectfully solicited. Primary election, Aug. 25, 1914 


MRS. TENNABAUM 

AT li08 CENTRAL AVE. 

After many yeara of experience in the dry goods businees Mrs. 
Tennabaum has developed excellent taste in the Belecliou of women's 
apparel, and her Eastern goods in Ladies' and cbildrens' garments at 
this time are especially pretty. 


S. M. BASHOR, 
J. C. DEUEL. 


PHONE MAIN 3992 


For County Assessor 

I hereby announce myself as a 

, „ , I candidate for the nomination of 

Mr. Rosenthal of Tulare ac- 

, .Assessor of 1 ulare county, subject 
companied him. After the speak-' ,, , • ■ j- ., , . 

^ , „ - . , Ito the decision of the electors at 

ing was over the Progressive As-, . 

». . r , ., t the coming primary election. 

THOS. H. BLAIR 


sociation came to order, and the 
members of the election board 
were nominatd and elected. 


Mrs. Anna Mills Johoson for 
County Superintendent of 
Schools of Tulare County. 


(Incumbent.) 


The voters of Tulare county will 
have the opportunity of voting for 
a woman to supervise the schools 
of the county for the ensuing term, 
in the person of Mrs. Anna Mills 
Johnson of Viaalia, '% 

She is in erery way fitted 
for this most, important posi- 
tion. She has spent 26 ypars in 
the public schools of this county 
and haa always had the distinction 
of being one of the best teachers of 
the same. In her candidacy she 
has a large circle of friends and 
supporters who— knowin|j her real 
worth — will laave nothing undone 
to elevate her to this position. Our 
people will find in her a friend 
who will zealously guard the inter- 
ests ol all the people. The colored 
reaidenta of VisaKa speak of her 


For Constable 

I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Constable of Visaila township, 

subject to the decision of voters 

at the primary election. 

T. M. STEWART. 
For County Recorder 


8. M. BASHOR &, CO. 

POULTRY AND RABBITS DRESSED TO ORDER 

FREE DELIVERY 
934-936 Central Ave. Los Angeles, Cal. 


Hot and Cold Baths 


737 Paseo 


Howsird Shoe Store 

Fine Shoes and Shoe Repairing 

laOlKv. Jefferson Street 

The ^^ew Idea Bakery 

'■■ '\ 420 East Fifth Street 

Bakery Ooods Fresh Pastry 

Our assorted Cakes and Pie* are a little better and Cheaper 

We can afford this because we do our own baking 

For Parties and Weddings Try Our Cakes. 

! 
Home A6018 ; Good Work— Quick Service Main 3626 

Pacific Clothes Cleaning Works 

SUITS $1.00 UP 
2358 East Ninth S|reet Los Angeles. California 


G. \V. DANSON 


* 1403 IViateo Street 

Qoocjs, Shoes, Hats, 


Dry 

NE , 

—EVERY SIZE in EATERY STYLE— 10 cents. 


IVotlons 


NEW IDEA PJkTLERNS— with cutting diagram and seam| allowane« 
-fE ■ 


Bell Phone E. 36$9 J 

Hotel Paseo and Cafe 

MRS. MARY KING, FRCP. 

Hot or cold lunches and meals. 8p>ecial attention given to par- 
es. Cigars, tobacco, etc. All day and night service. 


I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Recorder of Tulare county, subject 
to the decision of the lectors at 
the coming primary election. 

IRA CHRISMAN 

(Incumbent.) 

For Justice of the Pe^j^e 
I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Justice of the Peace of Visalia 
township, subject to the decision 
of voters at the primary election 
2,- S- CLACK. 


For County Treasurer 
FOR COUNTY TREASURER 

I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Treasurer of the County of Tu- 
lare, subject to the decision of the 
electors at the coming primary 
election. 

HENRY NEWMAN. 
(Incumbent) 


I hereby announce myself as s 
candidate for nomination«6f Coro- 
ner of Tulare cxJunty, subject tc 
the wish of the voters at the Aug 
ust primary election. 

i- A. E. BROOKS. 


For School Superintendent 

I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination for 
School Superintendent of Tulare 
county, subject to the decision of 
voters at the coming August pri- 
mary, and respectfully solicit sup- 
Dort. 
ANNA MILLS JOHNSTON. 


For County Treasurer 

To the People of Tulare County 

I hereby aniio.unce my candi- 
dacy for the office of County 
Treasurer, and respectfully sobcit 
the support of all those who be- 
lieve, that if elected, I will dis- 
charge the duties of the office 
faithfully, capably and fearlessly. 
D. S. LIPSCOMB. 


Farwelf Bros 

Watchmakers 

and <leweler5 

Itth andCejitral Ave 
Los Anyeles. 

Watches accuratdy repaired at 
moderate prices, piamonds re-se 



For Coroner 




I 


For County Tax Collector 

I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the nomination of 
Fax Collector for Tulare county, 
subject to the decision of the elec- 
ors at the coming primary elec- 
tion. 

J. W. FEWEL (incumbent) 


For County Clerk 

I hereby announce myself as a 
candidate for the office of County 
Clerk of Tulare county, subject to 
the decision of the electors at the 
coming primary election. 

: AVON M. COBURN. 

(Incumbent.) 


:Eor County Treasurer 
I Hereby announce myself as a 
candi<Sate for the nomination of 
Treasurer of the County of Tu- 
lare, subject to the decision of the 


Phone Broadway 42)3, 1345 Channing St. 

H. pAUUIIVQER, Prop. 

Water Coolei^ made of Plaster and decorated with 
I ithells. Also flower pots. 

f LOS ANGELES, Cal. 

pThe Variety Stce 

At 1261 Central or Twelve and Central Ave, 
With the congenj|>l Mr. Park as proprietor, is ready with a fall line 
I of Eastern goods, sach as 

Post Cards, Books,! Periodicals, Fancy Candies, Toilet articles and Stationerx 
^et your School Supplies at Parks. 

i \ ::^ — 

If you are hun^fry and in the city meet your friends at 

Marshall's Lunch Room 

I 141 WILMINGTON ST. 

For quick service.^good meals and moderat* prices. We make a specialty'of 
Soo'^iem dishes. Pigs' feet, tails, bead and chitlins. 

" ■ r 


r 


MIOLET LAUNDRY 

1581 Post Jstreet - - Telephone West 7942 


electors at 
election. 


the 


coming primary 1 We do woua work promptly and give you good 



R. O. NEWMAN. 


j service. 


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THE CALIFORNIA EAQLE. 


All commimiotlona should be addressed 
to The California Eagle, 1034 Bast Ninth 
Streets. Sutiset Phone Broadway 7667. 

Bntered as second-class mail matter at 
the Postofflce of Los Angeles. Cai.. under 
the Act of March 1. 1879. 


C. A, SPEAH. 

Managing Editor 

J. E BASS 

-Editor 

H. «IANNON.._ -Advertising Manager 

LEWIS K. BEEitS 

Local Editor 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

8. B. Garr _ 

-.'Pasadena 

H. E. Simpson 

Bakersfleld 

BS. L.. Lewis 


Miss Ada Thompson 

Oakland 

Mrs. Evans _ 

San Francisco 

J. J. Anderson 

San Francisco 

Z. F. Henderson 

Los Angeles 

SUBSCRIPTION 

RATES. 


$2.00 

Six Months 

- -V loo 


50 



It occasionally happens that for some 
reason or other papers are missed by be- 
1ns mlssent, lost or stolen. In case of 
subscribers not receiving their papers, in- 
form us by postal and we shall cheerfully 
furnish a duplicate copy of said missing 
number. 

No attention paid to anonymous letters. 

Copy must be written plainly on one 
side of paper, and to insure insertion In 
current issue must reach this office 
Thursday. Correspondents, please take 
notice. 

ADVERTISING RATES, 50c PER INCH. 


swiftest runners. The reception 
will give an opportunity to the 
colored pteople of Los Angeles to 
show their appreciation of Drew's 
past performances here in the 
South, their appreciation of the 
glory he is bringing to the race 
especially in this section and to 
show an interest in the success 
that will attend him in future con- 
tests. 

A short program will open the 
reception and will include snappy 
addresses by leading pastors of the 
city and other prominent men by 
Coach Comstock of the U. S! C. ; 
"Uncle" John E. Lewis, trainer at 
U. S. C, Howard Drew and oth- 
ers. Musical numbers will com- 
plete the program, which is made 
especially short in order to give 
the many people who have read 
and heard of this champion sprin- 
ter a ciianceao meet him person- 
ally, encouraging him to inspire 
others among the youth of the 
race to emulate his example. -Ad- 
mission free to everybody. 


The recall election for siiper- 
visfir has now reached the bniling 
point. Th* ^firious candidate-^ are 
marshalling their forces ior the 
fray. 

* * * 

We are now investigatinyf what 
seems to iis to he a great injustice 
in the civil service department 
wherein a culored man has passed 
for a position and appointment j 


FRESNO NEWS. 
Ekiw. E. Lewis. 

.Mr. Bass of Los Angeles was in 
our city last week and was the 
house guest of Edw. E. Lewi»i*d 
mother. VVhile^n Fresno, -Mr. 
Mass delivered his famous lecture, 
"[•'ifty Years of Freedom," in tiie 
.Second Liaptist Cliurch audilo- 
riuin. 


Tlie Lincohi Republican Chib 
after appointment has been m.i.le'j^ ,^^^ outurowth of the visit of 


of men whose grades were wnv 
below this particular one. We 
want to see what is the matter 
and also if we re;illv lia\c ci\il 
service. 

* * * 

We iiuite our reader- tii he- 
come better acfiuainted with iis; 
we want you ;ill to fed that this 
journal is a nioiith|)irce h^v all, 
and when vou li;i\e anxthiny- .,f 
general interest come iin. tell us, 
or write of it and send the --amc 
to us. We will Ljladi* L;i\e the i 
same our attentii n. In otheri 
Tvords, we want to keep in tourh I 
tvith you to lietter enal>le us lo' 
figiit the batles of the gre.it 
masses, the common people. We 
al.so want tlie vount; people to 
take an interest in their newspa- 
per. Hi,ti;h school students and 
others, send in your matter; let it 
be ]nib1ished. in California's lead- 
ing race journal. 


.Mr. r.ass. The officers elected 
were: Wm. ISigby, president; 
Louie I'ear.son, vice-president; 
[■".dw. I-".. Lewis, >eeretary. 


POLITICAL PARASITES 

Just now the season is on for 
the |)oIitical parasite to pnev cm 
the unwary patriot who aspires to 
the honor and glor\- and the 
emoluments of public office, and 
just how some of these political 
leeches ingratiate themselves into 
the confidence of these both sea- 
soned and embryotic political as- 
pirants is .an eniq-ma that \vc .are 
unable to ravel. 

As a matter of fact, their t;low- 
ing promises to do somcthiuf^ .are 
only hot air. The great common 
people ^»)iun these parasites and 
are not intluenccd for one minute 
by them. Whenever there Are 
great questions to be decided, es- 
pecially wherein their suffrage is 
a factor, they seek knowledge and 
in doing so they are not going to 
look f<.)r it from these political 
leeches. 


PUBLIC RECEPTION FO^* 
HOWARD DREW 


World Champion Sprinter of the 
University of Southern Cali- 
fornici, at Eighth smd Towne 
Church Tuesday Night, April 
12th. 

ffoward Drew will be the guest 
of honor at a big public reception 
to be tendered by admirers at 
Eighth and Towne Church Tues- 
day night, April 14th, at 8 o'clock. 
Drew has made a marvelous rec- 
ord so far and will soon leave for 
the E^st to represent the Uni- 
versity of Southern California at 
the Pennsylvania games where he 


Don't fail to register at oiice- 
|oin the Lincoln Club and stay in 
the liraml old party, h'or further 
iiiformaiiou sec or write the sec- 

retar\ of the organization. 

l\e\. Sim])Sou i-- <ionig a threat 
wiirk at Zion .M . V.. Church. The 
edifice ha- been paintd and recar- 
jietcd. 

l-'resno ( )dd b'ellows are on foot 
again, thanks to such bustlers as 
Hannibal and C'ounsel. 


The funeral of the late S. Tru- 
ett, who departed this life last 
week in Sacramento, was held 
from the .\. M. F- Church. 


1-Viday afternoon at 2:30, Rev. 
Redd and Rev. .Morgan both told 
of the faithfulness and love that 
the deceased had for his home and 
family. The church was filled 
with Mirrowing friends long be- 
fore the hour of the funeral, and 
the lloral (jtTcrings were many and 
beautiful. 


and were highly entrtained by 
the McClendon_sistrs. 

The Lincoln Club is planning to 
have a rousing mass meeting next 
week. Notices will be issued to 
the various churches. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson of Los 
Angeles are living in our city dur- 
ing the spring and summer. At 
present they are stopping at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Barnes in 
"F" street. 


A Case of "The Blame 

But Not the Game.' 


A political meeting was held at 
Washington and Central ^all on 
Wednesday evening in the interest 
of Mr. Boothe for Supervisor. Cap- 
tain G. W. Hawkiae was the lead- 
ing spirit and presided. 


luigene Retry still remains very 
ill. Hi.- friends are an.xious to 
see liim out a,gain. 

The I'resno Junior Rand boys 
expect to send off for their in- 
struments the first of next week. 
Roost the boys ! 

.\lr. Harry Truett arrived in j 
our city Thursday from Rortland, , 
to ,itten<l the funeral of his father, j 

The h'resno Junior Cubs are do- 
ing fast playing. Last week they 
went to Selma and played the 
hi.c,di school team of that city, and 
hjsi only by a small margin, the 
final score being 3-4. 

Spring is here, and Count a la 

de will again intrwluce 

all of the latest styles. Cirls, 
watch for him blaster Sunday. 

Subscribe for the Eagle. See 
Ed! 


The cause of this wail is the fol 
owing clipping from a recent issue 
of the Topeka Plaindealer: 

"We note with pleasure that our 
old-tinip friend and co-worker, Jos. 
B. Bass, Editor of the Los An- 
geles California Eagle has recently 
taken unto himself a help-meet. 
The name of hia oride has been 
misplaced in our rush, and we are 
?orry'the same cannot be loaated. 

"However, Joe is one of the best 
old boys the country ever pro- 
duced, and from what information 
we have been able to glean from 
this great distance his bride is one 
of California's best— a woman of 
beauty, culture and refinement. 
With these high attainment?, and 
Joe's pleasant disposition and 
great hustling ability, their futur* 
will be bright and happy. 

"Mr. Bass has a host of warm, 
personal friends in this, his home 
city, among both races, who join 
with t h e Topeka Plaindealer 
and the entire staff in wishing 
him luck." 

We appreciate, more than words 
can tell, the sentiment expressed — 
especially coming from our old 
home and from those who have 
knownyus for a life time. But 
we look around, and — where is the 
Uame? We have it not ! 

On our return of a month's tour 
iif the State we found upwards of a 
hundred letters from friends 
throughout the country congratu- 
lating us; but — we cannot say 
"Thank you,'' as we have not — 
as yet — taken unto ourselves that 
'beautiful and accomplished 
bride. 

But, we promise — if we are ever 
so fortunate as to take unto our 
selves the same, we will notify our 
Alma Mater, and they will not 
take any "falls" out of our stock 
in the matrimonial field. 

The Henderson Realty Co. 

Has listed for sale many big bar. 

ains — in close — in city property. 

f you are looking for a home at 
the right price and on terms like 
rent, you should consult them at 
once. They have a 6-rGom modern 
bungalow, with rear house on alley 
near Central avenue. Cash 1200, 
balance easy. Also see them tor 
furnished cottages and apartments 
torrent. Office, 1543 Central Ave. 
Tel. So, 871. 


Oar managing editor an|d assist- 
ant manager are spreadingfthe glad 
tidings and Eagle gospel ita the ex- 
treme South this we^ at San 
Diego. 

We have a splendid news letter 
from tde pen of Mrs. H. C. Frank- 
lin, which reached us too late for 
our current issue. It will appear 
next week. 



TO VICTORY 


The East Eighth Street Chris 
tian Church has organized a club 
known as the "East Eighth Street 
Boogters' Club." It's object will 
be to boost all laudable institu- 
tions of the race. 


Miss .M. l^avis of liakersfield. 
a trained nurse from Washington, 

D, C, is attnding the "nurses' 
convention" in our city, and is 
being royally entrtained. She is 
a ^reat admirer of the Eagle and 
always glad to say a good word. 

Oi^' Monday evening last, Mrs. 

E, Coleman a'nd ^*s. L Wolfskill 
entrtained the Missionary Society 
at the lattr's home in "E" street. 

Mr. Rosenthal of Tulare, ac- 


The affair was a grand success. 

.■\lex Bost is home again, and 
can always be found on second 
base. 


On Friday, the third, Alex Bost 
and Edward E. Lewis motored 
through the country to Fowler 


STRAIGHT RUN ON GOOD ROADS. 

Write'Boothe Booster, for Norton, 

Obstnictionist. — Auto Demand for 

Supervisor, The popular Demarid. 

— His District Sick of Earl ; Strong 

, for Earle. 

Earle Y. Boothe, a leading auto- 
mobile dealer, and one of the most 
capable and popular young busi- 
ness men of Los Angeles, has en- 
tered the recall election contest in 
the Secund Supervisoral District 
against Supervisor R. ,H. Norton 
Earlite ob.structionist. 

Boothe has tlie enthusiastic sup- 
port of many influential busiress 
and professional men, as well as 

hundreds of working people, who 
admire his integrity and special 
fitness for the place. He' is run- 
ning on a platform that strikes a 
popular note — that of good roads, 
good county government and mak- 
ing good. 

He has resided in the Second 
District ever since his arrival in 
this city, twenty-two years ago, 

thece he entered the business field 
ten years ago he has been active in 
the business, progressive and civic 
life of the community. He has 
worked his way to his present posi- 
ion by clem, hard work of brain 
and hand. 

Because of his interest in good 
road^ and public smprovements in 
his district, over 200 citizens of his 
district signed a letter requesting 
hiui to mak,e the fight against Nor- 
to n, who b48\^one all in his official 
power lo block\the building of good 
roads in Lns Ah-geles county. Th 
fact that N(irton\s Ke baler Earl' 
j.9rsonally-conductedol tool on the 
Board o f SuperviseWs is another 
good reason why Boothe was se 
lected \ 

Earl Y- Booth^, 

ainlidalt! lor Suporvi.^dr to ruccc^ R. H 
Norton. EgHinu whom recall petitions 
liare been lauurhed. 


^ 




RdUTES 


SUNSET 

Double Daily iJervice to New Or- 
leans and East through Dixie 
Land. 

EL PASO 

"GOLDEN STATE LIMITED" 

The t-ainde luxe, exclusively first 
class. 

The "Califobman" for both first 
and second class travel. 
The line of low altitudes ' 

OGDEN 

The trail of the Argonauts 

The roHte of the 

SAN FRANOISCO OVERLAND 
LIMITED" 


SHASTA 


THE "ROAD OF A THOUSAND 

WONDERS," to the East through 
the great Northwest 
Ske agents 

SOUTMERN PACIFIC 

Los Angeles Offices 
212 ■West Seventh|Street 
Station, Fifth and Central Avenue 
Pasadena Office, 418 E. Colorado St. 


I R. B. YOUNG & SON 

I ARCHITEICTS 

4 702 Lankershim Building 

PhQne Main 4149 


Los Angeles 


Qliick Service Laundry 

^QOS ^wrttral Ave. 

-•you will secure best work and lowest prices in city 
'with prompt and courteous treatment Delivery to 
^all parts of city at low rate. Phone orders g-jven 
I strict attention. ' * 


MAI'?! 8f5t 


MAIN 8151 


T" 


A.iA, GRANT 

< NOTARY 

Ager^ for Inrestments, Building, 
Loaijs, Insurance, Houses, Lots, 

! and Acreage for sale 

■1146 Central Avenue 
Vtli ;;. Cilifar.i p 


PEOPLE'S REALTY GO. 

Capital Stock $75,000 
Shares $1.00 each 


F. H. CRUMBLY 

Agent 

785 San Pedro 


Tel. Bwy 2528 


International Order of Twelve 

m^gsts as follows at Washington 

an|j" Central Hall : 


s 
? t 
V, 


Golden West Temple No. 4i: 
at^'S o'clock p. m. 


Rev. Henderson's article in late 
weftk'a issue made him say that the 
Baptist connection had purchased 
30 acres for their Old Folks' Home. 
This was an error. They have 
bought four acres near Watts. 

Third Anniversary 

Good Values Given Worthy of Our Three Years 

of Progress 

We are Selling Everything Below Cost 

Beautiful Silk and Madras Ladies' Shirt Waists, extra value, from 
50 cents up. Dainty Aprons and Work Aprons, Aleq Hosiery 
Ladies' and Gents' Silk and Lisle, from 19c, ' 

Special Men's Work Shirts from 35c up. Men's Gloves from 5c up 
to $1,50. Our Dress Making and Tailoring Department, Ladies' Eve 
ning Gowns and Coats. 
411 East 7th Street MRS. NiNA E. THOMAS 


Home 74680 


Sunset Vermont 3169 


C. B. OWEN 
Feed, Fuel and Transfer 

Wood, Goal, Hay and Grain. All Kinds of Chicken Feed 

Moving Household Goods a Specialty 

R.^T AVE^JU8; Los AngeUe 


II ' 

iPacific Coast Tabernacle Xo. 
2^ meets second and fourth 
Tliesday, at 8 o'clock p. m. 

i — 

3Xew Beulah Tabernacle Xo. 43 
rrpects the second and fourth 
TTiursdav of each month at 8 
o'tlock p. m. 


^ HARBOR PROPERTY 

See H. H. Williams about Wil- 
mington Harbor property. The 
greatest opportunity of your life 
is at your door now. 

We have 6 50-ft. lots we can sell 
for S5S0. only $10 .down, $5 a 
month. We also have 80 other 
lots in same tract, but you will 
have to be in a hurry if you wish 
to get in on the ground floor. 

Any day we get six or eight 
persons we will take you down to 
see the lots. 

H. H. WILLIAMS, 
Corner 12th and Hemlock. 


'? (■ 


Star of Bethlehem Tabernacle 
f^o. 382 meets the first and second 
^turday at 2 p. m. 


\|Keddesh Royal House of Midia 
]|)s). 79 meets the third Tuesday 
^t 8\p. m. 


^ IF YOU WANT TO RENT 
j A ROOM OR A HOUSE 

bR TO 

I BUY A LOT OR A HOME 

Jn Venice, Ocean Park or Santa 
S Monica, Write 

]i ' J. ALLEN I^ESE, 

$00 San Juan Avenue, Venice 


In keeping whh its name and 
reputation as the biggest and best 
hotel on the coast continues to 
give to its patrons the best pos- 
sible service. 

Being centrally locatejid between 
the three great railroad systems 
coming into this city, the hotel 
meets tlie demands not only in 
good service but likewise conve- 
nience. 


jfJo trouble to answer Questions 

:? — ^ 


;;■ I am in a position to offer'you 

I Some of th* Best Residec^ce 
Property on the Bay- 


FO R RENT— We have several 
housekeeping apartments of three 
and four rooms for rent very 
cheap. Also a good business site. 

Apply X'oah D. Thompson, 
1711 E. 55th Sl 


Piano Instruction. 
Mr. Clarence D. CookBey, 
Instraction on the Pi&no. 


iiMi-i 


wm 


1 

it! -i. 


•^^'ibfcib 


":i 



i-^f^ 


MUTILATED PAGE I CANNOT jBE IMPROVED 


( i 


4— — 


■■^IlK^ :; ;;'!-il.;''P 


LOCAL HAPPENINGS 


■^■Wy^A^^^I^ »^»»»S,r>i%»% 


A N«w Field For Women. 


i The CoDiet Ice Cream Co. is now 
fajBing operated by Mrs. Grahm and 
■^ is 'patting on the market a 
g^e of cre*ra th^t is unsurpassed 
b(y any in flavor and parity. 

j Women know— doe't U^ my 
word for it — just try it oeee. 

' Branch oflBce at 944 Central At 



I 


'• ■,■■■ ^Mm:i!r^'^ 


'k!-- f 




|r Antstrr&m Urns. jhr. ^ 

M». 17 WfEST la^ra STREET 

iM*M«,'a.r.. r«k. I*, ttu.^ 


The Ancievf UbIM Sobc ud 

Daughters of AfrlM will oMet on 

hlo First MoMky of each oaoath 

a I Scott's H«I), 561 Oaatral aT*. 

Mm. S. ft. BALown^ 

M. 1. Q 

Miss M' Busby, Sec'y 


LOCALS 


Mme. Moberly reoeived the ctd 
news last Saturday^ March 4, of 
the dea^h of his father at Hopkins- 
Ville, Ky. Words of condoleooe 
by her many ftienda are given hlr, 
which she kindly apjweciates. 


FOR RENT— Furnished 
Apartment for two gentle 
men. Call at 

1017 East 9th stree 


•'East Lvnne," the play given at 
Elks' Hall Tuesday evening proved 
a decided success from the stand- 
point of skillful performing. The 
cast did credit to their aiflacult 
parts and justice to the occasion 
Although the house was a disap- 
pointment, the play was superb 
and would take well if repeated. 


Negro Slayer Captwed 
Oic^o. 


in &i 


19M iltMa< AT*. 
IS AncalM. 


om-iostt ' itg ,"''■-■ it" ,-^''sTO8rr Mam 46a 

^OCIATBD WITH 

THfi FITZGElIt ALD MUSICS TORE 

•.94.1 n^tVTB. BRQAXJ^VAY 

Purchase through tlim and he will save you money. 


P' 


m 


cut*. 


air:- 


Ito Mt «• aeteMlMa* MMtpt of jrow —Tf 
•nHU«< 'Up* on Vb* rfM jtoUm.- and «lMr* 
mil— t* b*ll»*« Vtm% a Ma tolle* prlntlac 
«M* la MU «!• M tlMlr topica. «uk 

ao tlia* mat oMlnaij 


In 

oaa vmMV 


mSST 


•lUaat* (Btar* ot yoar 


Lonnie Jones, the Negro who 
shot and killed William Martin in 
the Pallman clubrooBni at 581 
Ceres avenue Sunday night, Ang. 
5, was captured in San Diego next 
day and is now confined in jail 
there awaiting the arrival of Lo« 
Angeles police officers to bring him 
here. 

The shooting was one of the 
strangest in the history of crime 
here. 

Without any argument, without 
a word, Jones — who had been 
shooting craps with Martin — drew 
his revolver and shot. 

Martin died on the way to the 
receiving hospital. 

Jones ran west on Fifth street, 
hid until dark and then took a 
train to San Diego. 


pOMtMUOB. 

fle ar« inflaaa glad to b* tha r*sipl«it of ym 
oeartsslas ant foraoaat a faaat far tlioaa of vaflaad 
taata for good lltaratora. 

Lat "tlpa" hara olaar aalllne and la dna Uaa 
tha pabllo alll onxlooal; oaalt tha tip froa John D. 
Raynolda. 

If an axohanga la daalrabla. It la yonra to 


RaapaatfulVj Toor*. 

xKSTtsDAH son ?tIB. 


mjvi. 


// Hanaelnc Mltor. 


SCHWAEBE IN THE 
SUPERVISORS RACE 


Mr. J. H. Belks has been con- 
fined to his bed for a number of 
days. 


The Kansas and Missouri club 
met Tuesday evening at the resi- 
deuceof Mrs. Dora Gamble as the 
guests of Mrs. Gamble and J. B 
Bass. A delightful evenfng was 
I spent and the club adjourned to 
meet Tuesday evening at Morris' 
restaurant on 8th and Wall sts. 


Easter will be in full bloom next 
8unday. Let us swing with the 
tide. 


Many thanks to Capt. Crumbly 
for his timely remarks at the 
Forum Sunday, commenting on 
the Negro journals. We hope the 
seed fell on good ground, as it was 
well sown. 


Had a great day at New Hope 
Baptist church last Sunday, for 
God was in our midst. In the 
morning there was covenant meet- 
ing and the hearts of the people 
were filled with the Holy Ghost. 
At the evening service I>r. Ander- 
son ]3«ea»hed a strong sermon on 
"Tfce Crucifixion of Christ." Text, 
"For I say unto yon I will not 
drink of the fruit of the vine until 
the Kingdom of God shall come." 
—Lute 22. 18. The Lord's Supper 
was then celebrated. We were 
blessed spiritually and 6nancially. 
There were three accessions to the 
church during the day. 

Next Sunday, April 12, Dr. An- 
derson will deliver two special ser- 
mons. All membsrs and friends 
are requested to be present. 

B. F. Anderson, 
Church Reporter. 


Mrs. A. Lewij, a bride of six 
months, is residing- in Hollywood. 
She is a favorite with all who know 
her. 


Mrs. Dennis B. Wilson of Coro- 
nado BeachT with her two sweet 
little ones, Tommy and Margaret, 
who has been visiting her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Reynolds, for 
the last three weeks, has had a 
most enjoyable visit meeting old 
and new acquaintances. Their 
daddy and •grandparents at San 
Diego, Mr. and Mrs. Tnomas Wil- 
son, are anxiously awaiting their 
return. 


Mr. and 'Mrs. Thomas Hudson 
have opened a swell cafe at 824 


Central aveane. 
d couple. 


This is a nevvlv- 


Rev. J. D. Gordon prmiched a 
remarkable sermon Sunday after- 
noon for the "Eastern Stars." De- 
spite threatening weather a large 
number of persons asegsmbled and 
the occasion was worth witnessing. 


n.e;^ht person. 

THE GOLDEN WEST. 

With its evrlasting reputation 
of "biggest and best hotel" for 
men and women of color, the 
Golden West also enjoys the dis- 
tinction of setting the standard 
of entertaining newspaper and 
other public spirited people in a 
manner long remembered and 
cherished by them. 
Messrs Brown- and Williams — 
h e congenial proprietors — are 
careful in not only giving good 
service but in making the general 
atmosphere congenial and j^me- 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are also like for their many guestsPwho 
nioely located in Hollywood For- come from all sections of the 
merly of Denver, Col., they were country. Their party service is 
among ttie prominent citizenB of also unchallenged in excellence. 


Mrs. Jones, from the Sojourner 
Truth Home, who has now been in 
our city for four months, from 
Nashville, Tenn., ii well pleased 
with her Hollywood home and is 
I, now a Los Angeles fixture. 


Mr. Will H. Johnson, who runs 
in the Santa Fe dining service be- 
tween this city and San Francisco, 
is one of the most popular boys in 
railroad circles and has a host of 
friends on the Coast who will be 
glad to know that he is the proud 
parent of a fine girl, who has been 
christened "Mattie Johnson," born 
February 24, 1914. Will says tha 
life is now worth while, witn the 
best wife and two fine children — 
one a boy, the other a girl. He is 
the picture of happiness and con- 
tentment. 



W. H. QUEST, P. D. 

DRUGGIST 

Stationery \ Notions and Toilet Articles 

1 2th and Central Avenue 


MOTHER'S KITCHEN CAFE 

C.S. ^ROWN, .Proprietor 

THE BEST Pl^CE IN TOWN TO EAT 

Home'iSooking'I.A' Specialty 

BEST MEALS IN TOWN 

SHORT ORDERS 

1 441 East Ninth £.t. | Los njreles, Cal. 

Household Br|ind Flavoring F.xtracts 

Oar Goods are^uaraiitaeed Absolutely Pur«. At your Gm 
Retail for 25c^er b^fSe.' Improved Export ftturer A]t 
all flrfsrors. Soda Wate^. 

Geo, J.Hou& Son 

Manuf ar "nirer | 






s 
d 


-1^ 


PHONE 
Main 4953-Home 4154 


CO^E TO THE 


PAUL VBNFELT, 

Proprietor 




Wh ere Y;j)u Get the Best Service in 

Family Trade 

912 San Pedro St. j Opp City Market 

: I 

■a 


■i- 


Smith Pres. andrGen. 
Grant Hammond, Vice Pre^. 
Curtis Odom. Treas. ,i 


Mgr. 


Frank Williams Auditor. 
Jas, Slaughter, Secy, 


■W:\ 


SMITH & WILLIAMS CO., Inc. 

Funeral Direilrs and Practical Embalmers 

We gruarantee our f^ork shipped-to any part of the city 
LADY ATTENDANT i S-vices the Best Prices the Lowest 

654 San Fernando St. Phone Main 3629 


The i Palace Cafe 

bl5 Central Ave, 

NEATEST, COSIEST AND BEST PLACE TO EAT. The best 
service in hoth Americaniand Chinese dishes. Chop Suey and Noodles 
American and, Chinese f^hion. 

AT THE PALACft everybody is accorded the 
treatment. 


same polite 


The'- colored republican club auiialliary of the republl 
can central league Have endorsed Lewis H. Schawbe for 
supervisor and will give him their support in the pend- 
ing campaign. -- 

G. W. Hawkins President H. Williams Vice Presiden- 

J. S. Montgomery Sec. C. Johnson Treas. C. Olivier Chm 


Lawrence Moye for County 
Surveyor. 


Lawrence Moye is making a win- 
ning race for County Surveyor. He 
was reared in this county and hap 
had a rich and varied experience 
at his profession, that of civil en- 
gineering. 


heriff Collins to Be Re-elected 



Sheriff W. W. Collins of Tulare 
county has made good as the coun- 
ty's highest peace officer and he 
will receive from all classes a 
hearty support for re-election. 

While the county officers are 
now non-partisan, a great many 
will balk at votirg for a Demo- 
cratic sheriff ; and the colored 
voters of this county appreciate a 
man who is willing to give to all a 
square" deal, and no doubt when 
everything is thoroughly under- 
stood will give to the present sher- 
ffa inimouunas support. 


'm. 



i 

'^::, 




.I'LS^a.^ , 


M 


AWRBKGl MOYE #0R StBMYCE.' 

Having served as assistant to 
the County Surveyor for several 
years, he is well acquainted with 
the dutiee of that ofiSce. Mr. Moye 
is receiving a strong support from 



For more than three rears L. C 
Lacey has acceptably filled the 
oflBce of Coroner of Tulare county 
and asks at the hands of the voters 
of the county a second term. 

Mr. Lacey is receiving a strong 
support from all classes. 

The Eagle representative has 
never met a man who we think is 
more appreciative o^^ the support of 
our people than isJMr. Locey, and 
we have no heeitai^cy in commend- 
ing, his candidacy to our people, a 
we^'think he is all right. 


I 
% 

ilufitral fx^ Slit^rarg Umtal 

FRIDAY NIGHT. APRIL lOth. 

— AT — 

Utab^rnark SapttHt CCIptrrli. 

TWELFTH AND HEMLOCK 

REV. J.;D. GORDON, Pastor, 

Opening Chorust "Our Father who art in Heaven" 

i _ College Choral Clnb 

Invocation J Rev. J. D. Gordon 

Chorus ' Sunrisfe" College Choral Club 

Piano Solo, "Ngarer My God to Thee," in variation 
Drumheller- % Miss Elizabeth Norton 

Original Poem, ^'Big Eating on Easter" Prof. C,A. 

Biggers 

Vocal, "To Restless Sea" Mrs. M. B. Biggers 

■ ; C. A- White 

Piano Solo, Selected. ... Miss Maudetta Rosemond 
Vocal Due, "Come where the Rosebud Sleepeth" 

Mrii,:,C. L. Moore and Mrs. M. B. Diggers 
Original Poem. ''Charcoal Man". .Prof. C- A. Biggers 

Vocal, Selected. .Mrs. H. Elizabeth Gould 

piano Solo, Selected Mils Vonuie Dorman 

Jubilee Chorus, ^selected College Choral Club 

Contralto Solo, '"The Rosary'' Mrs. C, L. Moore 

SiiverJ Offering. 
Original Poem, ''Dat Settles it". .Prof. C. A. Biggers 
Duet, "Roset". .Mrs. C. L. Moore and M. B. Biggers 

Given unde| the auspices of BIGGER'S BUSI- 
NESS collegI;. . 

; PRES. C. A. BIGGERS, Mgr. 
MISS ELIZ4BETH NORTON Accompanist, 
iCdmission Free. 

All the above participants are trained and experi- 
anced in special ppogxamme work, and each participant's 
esrt is auppleme^ed vrith a short charnoing encore. Tkese 
eping mong the b^st talent in the city; the public may ex- 
pbectaa rare trea^i 


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M. T. Laws 


of the Santa Fe Red 
Cap force 


J. D. Reynolds 


Author of Race 

Tips,!|of Pullman Co. 


And Other 


Active" RailroadllMen 
will Furnish the Doings 
of the 5000 Railroad 
Men Running to and 
on the Coast for THE 
EAGLE 


=P 


WATCH THIS! SPACE 




PORTERS - WAITERS 
CHErsI - MAIDS 

RED GAPS 

HOTEL MEN, ETC 


RAILROAD CLATTER 

Throui^h the Eac^le megaphone 
-All a'hode! 


Cieo. VV. Lambert, a Pullman 
porter on the Qrand Trunk Rail- 
road between Montreal, Can., and 
Chicago, found $1,000 worth of 
diamonda and $150.00 in money 
belonging to Mr* and Mrs. Long of 
Montreal. The Longs were aboard 
the train that reached Chicago 
Thursday, March 19, late in the 
afternoon, just^st of Chicago. 
Mrs. Long took off her belt in the 
toilet room and left it there. The 
Longs took a Santa Fe train for 
Los Angeles, not knowirg of thei 
loss. 

The porter found the belt con- 
taining the $150 and diamonds 
worth 1,000. He turned the find 
over to the officials of the G. T. R. 
with the information that Mrs. 
Long was the last woman in the 
compartment. But the Longs 
m^sed the belt further on and are 
now on their way back to Chicago 
to reclaim it. 

No name of the porter was given 
in the article of a Chicago daily ; 
but ji Chicago Defender reporter 
learfted from the Pullman Co. that 
the reporter in question was Geo. 
W. Lambert and that he was as- 
aignM} to the Scttern Division un- 


U 


der Supt. Lynch. Further inquiry 
developed* the fact that Lambert 
resided at^j 3149 Indiana avenne, 
Chicago, slnd was the husband of 
Mme. Lambert of 'Guaranteed 
Feather" {ame. 

It was |dme. Lambert who greet- 
ed the ri^porter when he called. 
She had not read the morning 
paper auc: was surprised to learn 
it was h^f husband who had be 
come 80 {loted for his boneety. "I 
guess he did not think it import 
ant enough to tell her," thought 
the reporter. 

Mr. Lapibert has been employed 
by the Pftllman Co., over theG- T, 
ine, for paore than 15 years. If 
the simple, faithful performance of 
duty on the part of the employees 
is to be": noted, ihe Pullman Co. 
should Si^bstantially reward Mr. 
Lambertji 


[Fron^ the Chicago Defender.] 
Mr. W. L. Johnson, 281 Rondo 
street, 8j!. Paul, Minn., train porter 
w^th th(i "Soo" R. R. Co , is re- 
ported qa the sick list. He is also 
one of tlse wealthiest R. R. men ie 
St. Pauls 

Mr. J.SH. Bolden is chef in a 
parlor cir in the service of the 
ChicagQ^ and Great Western, as 
also is ^obt. Jones, better known 
as "Kidl? Jones, the fastest little 
chef in ibe United States. 


The Brotherhood of Railroad 
Train Reporters met March 17 at 
3640 State street and elected the 
following officers: John Coleman, 
president ; Chas. A. Wallace, vice 
president ; A. H. Miller, 2d vice 
president; N. H- Pryor, treasurer; 
R. H- Oliver, fin. see; John Win- 
ston, grand organizer, and Grant 
Ray, mgr. of publicity dept. 

Mr. John Ponder, Pullman por- 
ter on the "Lark" Coast Line, JR. 
ing agent for sale of The Californi*^ 
Eagle, and "The Scrap Book of 
Tips on the Race Problem," by J. 
D. Reynolds. Mr. Ponder resides 
at 1607 E. 26th St. and runs to 
Frisco And Oakland. Mr. WillianoB, 
custodian of the Porters' compart- 
ments at Oakland, has the book 
and The Eagle for sale. 


The California Eagfle is for sale 
THRE— Eagle A3557 4-2 yri 

at the Pullman Barber Shop, 519 
Ceres avenue. 

Subscriptions taken, office 1034 
East 9th street, Los Angeles, The 
California Eagle. _? 


Jack Claybourne of the Coast 
Line dining car crew, is meeting 
with great success in disposing of 
shares in his New Enterprise (<Jp^ 
ing) and Qleaning. '■ 


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San Diego Doings 


STATISTICAL 
AND DIRECTORY OF SAN 

DIEGO, CAL. 


REFERENCE! its way and serving its needs in 
[this locality. Their property has 
J a valuation of $2,000. 
I Lodge Directory 


■, Fidelity Lodge, Xo. 10, A. F. & 

, |a. M.— Meets at G. A. R. Hall on 
The furthermost pomt >" South-< ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^ ^^ 

pm California is the beautiful city| ... 
em v.diiiui ^^,.^v, „t^of each month. 

of San Diego. In our research otr 
in line with our efforts j 


statistics 


F. G. Williams, 
W. M.; N. J. Harris, S. W. ; 
Charles Goodin, J. W. ; W. H. 


to exploit the status and accorn ^^^^^^_ secretary ; W. D. Saun- 
plishments of the race on the Pa- 
cific Coast, we have to chronicle ders. reasurer. 
here a citizenship that bids fair to Order of Eastern Star-M 


Mrs. 


eets 
Tno. 


Mount Moriah Chapter, No. 4, 


make in the not far distant future! the first Thursday 
a highly commendable showing ! White, W. M. 
along all of the various lines 
which has attracted the attention | Royal Arch Masons— Meets the 
of the cixilized world to the prog-; first Monday evening of each 
possibly less favored ; month. Rev. W. A. Mitchell. X. 
;P.: H. \. Harvey, King: Rev. R. 
effort? to rise in thisX. llaubert. Scribe; W. C. Mead- 
as iri many 'ows. Secretan,-; W. McTrent, 


ress ot a 
race. 

In their 
particular community 

others, they have the support of ; Treasurer. 
the best class of the opposite race,| Dunbar Lpdge, No. 2 
■who at all times are ready to aid 


and assist them in any worthy un- 
dertaking. We met here the peo- 
ple of both races in al lof the va- 
rious walks of life and find an op- 
timistic feeling by all for a grater 
and better San Diego. 

With a negro population of 
more than 1000 as artisans, skilled 
and unskilled labor, and a sprink- 
ling following business pursuits, 
we can truly say that they are 
making an effort to be counted as 
a part and parcel of this fifty years 
of progress which has challenged 
the admiration of the civilized 
world. 

The following facts in figures 
will speak louder than words as 
to what this people have and are 
accomplishing along these lines: 

alue of church property owned 
by them, S65,000; approximate 
value of property owned by them, 
$400,000 : population, 1350 ; voters, 
-450 ■, working at the trades, 83; 
chauffeurs, 17; jewelers, 2; chir- 
opodist, 1 ; contractors, 8; garbage 
contractor for city, 1 ; employed 
by City Street Department, 15; 
employed by county, 2; restau- 
rants, 4; livery business, 1; mail 
carriers, 2; laundries, 2; rooming 
hoijses, 3 ; barber shops, 2 ; 
churches, 3 ; lodges, 4 ; pharmacist, 
1 ; grocery store, 1 ; social club, 1 ; 
civic organization, 1. 
Directory of Churches, Fraternal 
and Other Organizations of 
San Diego 

Bethel A. M. E. Church, located 
on Front street, between Cedar 
and Date streets. Services Sun- 
day, 11 a. 'm., 8 p. m. S. C, 9:30 
a. m. Class and prayer meeting 
Wednesday evening, 7:45; Sun- 
day, 6:45 p. m. R. H. Hanbert, 
pastor. 

First Street Baptist Church, 
near First and Front streets — 


Knights 
of Pythias— ^Meets second and 
fourth Friday of each month at 
G. A. R. Hall. R. I. Drake, C. C. ; 
Georg e Henry, V. C. ; W. C. 
Meadows, R. R. and S. ; J. Wood- 
en, Treasurer: H. King, M. F. ; J. 
T. Brown, Prelate; William Met- 
run, M. W. 

Aside from the many auxiliary 
clubs to churches, etc., there is 
one woman's club, known as the 
Friday Afternoon Club, which is 
doing a great work. Officers: 
Mrs. -A. Henderson, President; 
Mrs. M. Freeman, Vice-Presi- 
dent ; Mrs. J. Gray, Secretary ; 
Mrs. M. Jackson, Treasurer. 

Quite a few beautiful homes are 
owned here by colored citizens, 
and there are several who are con- 
ducting business on a large scale. 
'Mr. E. W. Anderson has the city 
contract for caring for the gar- 
bage, and works a crew of men 
averaging twenty-five. 

San Diego is one of the most 
enterprising and broad gauged 
cities of the Pacific Coast and is 
made up of a citizenship that 
stands for progress. We are 
proud to state that in every move- 
ment for its continued progress 
the colored citizens are found on 
the right side supporting these 
movements; and in compiling this 
work showing their status in this 
community the following firms 
generously contributed to make 
the same possible, for which we 
are very thankful 

Note— This work has been ex- 
tensively published in the Califor- 
nia Eagle and in the present book 
form. 


Lyons Implement Co., Whiting 
Meade Commercial Co., Johnson 

Connell & Saum, Book Lovers 
Shop, J. A. Jadoin Co., E. M. Rob- 
erts Co., S. H. Price, E. C. Field, 


Services Sunday, 11 a. m. and S'N- A. Graham Co, San Diego 
p. m. Prayer meeting, Wednes- ! Grain & Milling Co, Chas. Mc- 


V 


day evening; Missionary, Thurs- 
day evening; S. C, 9:30 a. m. 
Rev- W. A. Mitchell, pastor; Mrs. 
M. L. White, secretary. 

Second Baptist Church, located 

or^the east side — Services Sunday, 

Al a. m. and 8 p. m.; S. C, 9:30 

^ m. ; prayer meeting, Thursday 

evening. J. E. Robertson, pastor 

We will say that the churches 
are presided over by an intelligent 
ministry, who are doing a great 
Work for the spiritual aspect of 
our people 


Cormick Lumber Co., Benson 
Lumber Co., Philip Morse, F. X. 
Winter, Electric Ldundry Co., 
Sanitary Laundry Co., W. K. 
Cowan Co., H. W. Rapor, Electric 
Compound Co., San Diego Steam 
Laundry, Citrus Soap Co., Excel- 
sior Laundry Co., Schnell's Sani- 
tary Dairy, Syneders I. X. L. 
Laundry, Consolidated Brewing 
Co., Hungers' Laundry Co., South- 
ern California Laundry Co., Weil- 
eland Laundry Co., Chas. E. 


Jones, P. A. Grand & Co., Geo. 
Rev. R. N. Haubert has just Smith, Sperry Flour Co., J. S. 
completed the building of a hand- Engmark, M. Thomas, B. V. Wil- 


some church edifice which will 
compare favorably with any of the 
churches owned by our people in 
any city of the coutny of its size. 
The church and property is valued 
at $17,500. 

The First Street Baptist 


Hams, L. M. Sylvester, C. H. Rod- 
din, A. Levi, E. P. Newton, Max- 
well Case Grocery Co., Broadway 
Garage, Griswold & Co., Western 
Leather SupplyV Co., Oscar Heim 

Co., Nauman Cleaning & Dyeing 
Co., Frank Davenport Co., Arrow 


Church, under the lead^ship of (Market, De La Mater Bros., G. O. 
Rev. W. A. Mitchell, is ih a pros- ~ 

perous condition and he is a wor- 
thy example of the Christian min 


istry. This church property is 


Wilkerson, Hiicrest Drug Co., 

Auto Metal Works, Kruse Candy 

Co., Silver Gate Oil Co., Lamb & 
'night to a large audience, lie 


valued at near the $50,000 mark. 
They expect to build a handsome 
l^lifice soon. 

East Side Church, presid- day evening and 
Rev. J. E. Robinson,greatJy impressed. 


spoke on Abraham Lincoln. 

Dr. Washington did some goon 

\ bootblack who heard him 5un- 
omjng^was 

made his 


Pasadena will send one student 
to Tuskegee next fall. 

Some new ordinances passed by 
the city commissioners : Not to 
smoke on the street cars. It shall 
also be unlawful for any minor 
under eighteen years of age to 
smoke any cigars or cigarettes in 
any street, lane, alley, court, pub- 
lic park, public building, or any 
other public place in the city of 
Pasadena. 

You must stop smoking when 
you get to Raymond Hotel and 
Columbia Street. 

Go and registr today. 

School closed for ten days. 

Don't forget Sunday is Palm 
Sunday. 

Our press gang have roses 
sometimes in their path, but al- 
ways have thorns. 

On the evening of Friday, Feb. 
20th, an article appeared in the 
Los .\ngeles Evening Record, 
with Mr. Shores' cut, under this 
head : 

Hinckley, Jno. Mayer, N. D. Nich- 
ols, Star Builders Supply Co., San 
Diego Feed Mills, Back Country 
Transportation Co., Merchants 
Special Delivery, P. O. Bakery, 
T. Rossman, J. Fred Kahle, Elite 
Printing Co.. Green Rovia, Cal. 
Garage Co., San Diego Desk Co., 
Denver Cash Market, S. R. Cobb, 
Ingle Mfg. Co., Pacific Transfer 
Van & Truck Co., Wilson S. 
Smith & Co., Geo. Walker for Xa- 
tional Cash Register Co., Wiley B. 
Allen Co.. Wm. Holmes, R. L. G. 
Wright, Geo. B. Irvin, W. T. Kir- 
by, J. M. Purdy, Henry Jordan, 
Irwin & Co., Pacific Sheet Metal 
Hub Clothing Co., Campbell Ma- 
chine Co., Three Boys Transfer 
Co., Golden State Hat Co., A. N. 
Dauchy, Plaza Pharmacy, Mod- 
ern Basket Grocery Co., Sanitary 
Ice Cream Co., Silver Gate Soda 
Works, W. J. Bailey, Owl Ice 
Cream Co., Hamilton, Demers and 
Weitekamp, Whitney & Co., 
Pierce Feld hardware Co., Hazard 
Gould & Co., Ernsting Co., Ben- 
bough & Gelors, Boston Store, 
Electric Home, Western Lumber 
Co., Chas. H. Nearpass, Farriss 
and Farris, Independent Meat 
Market, San Diego Meat Market, 
San Diego Hardware Co., Wolff 
and Davidson, Meyer and David- 
son, M. F. Heller, J. P. Becker, 
Ballard and Brockett, Benbough 
Furniture Co., Electric Equipment 
Co., G. & G. Hat Works, San 
Diego Gas Appliance Co., Frevert 
Bledsoe Furniture Co., W. O. Tol- 
liver, Lynells, Rubins Furniture 
Co., Russ Lumber & Mill Co., C. 
S. Hardy, Eagle Drug Co., A. 
R. Miller, Pacific Coast Trunk & 
Bag Co., Klauber & Wangen- 
heime Co., Beasley Auto Works, 
Bentley Bros., Warner M. Bat- 
man, Western Rubber & Supply 
Co., So. Cai. Music Co., Alfred 
Stahl & Sons, Tibbias-Gavin Co., 
Kellam Drug Co., Auto Tire Co., 
Jones Morse Paint House, Gray 
Thompson Music Co., Anderosn 
& Baxter, Southern Electric Co., 
Clark, Pioneer Truck Co., Mueh- 
Holywasser Co., Int., Foreman & 

Davenport Co., Arrow Market, 
De La Mater Bros., G. O. Wilker- 
son, Hiicrest Drug Co., Auto 
Metal Works, Kruse Candy Co., 
Silver Gate Oil Co., Lamb & 
Hinckley, John Mayer, N. D. 
Nichols, Star Builders Supply Co., 
San Diego Feed Mills, Back Coun- 
try Transportation Co., Merchants 
Special Delivery, P. O. Bakery, T. 
Rossman, J. Fred Kahle, Elite 
Printing Co., Green Rovia, Cali- 
fornia Garage Co., San Diego 
Desk Co., Denver Cash Market, 
S. P. Cobb, Ingle Mfg. Co., Pacific 
Transfer Van & Storage Co., Wil- 
son S. Smith & Co., Geo. Walker 
for National Cash Register Co., 
Wiley B. Allen Co., Wm. Holmes, 
R. L. G. Wright, Geo. B. Irvin, 
Jordan, Irwin & Co., Pacific Sheet 
W. T. Kirby, J. M. Purdy, Henry 
Metal Works, Hub Clothing Co., 
Campbell Machine Co., Three 
Boys Transfer Co., Golden State 
Hat Co., A. H. Dauthy, Plaza 
Pharmacy, Modern Ba.\;ket Gro- 
.-cry Co., Sanitary Ice Cream Co., 
.-silver Gale Soda AVorks, W. J. 
Duilcy. Owl Ice Cream Co., Ham- 
ilton," Dcmcrs and WeStekamp, 
Whitney & Co., 



Be One of the 
5000 Members 


For Great Meeting 

Lincoln Republican 


Affiliated with Republican Feder- 
ation of Southern California 


Club 


J. A. WARREN, Secretary, 
1957 Maple Avenue 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE 


i 


Scott's Mall, 361 Central Ave. 


9ke Houng 9ecple's 

LITERARY SOCIETY 

"9551-2 NAOMI USTREET 
dr.:j. m. smith, 

Founder and Organizer. 

WILLIE PAYNE, 
CLARENCE IRWIN, 

AssiBtant Managers. 

» We desire to inform youthat w 
have in progress a Young People's 
Literary Society, which everyone 
ia invited to attend and become 
a member. Every Thursday eve- 
ning at 8 o'clock we meet at 
the above named place. 

Miss Bermici Moork, Pres. 

M1B8 Katheleen Brayk, 

Cor. Sec'y 


H. S. A, CUMING 

CUMING'S 
LIVER TONERS 

One Hundred Vegetable Pills 
for 25 Cents 

These pills are recommended for the 
relief of Constipation, Sick Headache, 
Biliousness. 

Cuming's Drug Store 

EBTABLIBHED 7 YXARS 

)407^E«».t Ninth,. Broadway 871 


Western Lumber Co., Chas. H. 
Nearpass, Farris & Farris, Inde- 
pendent Meat Market, San Diego 
Meat Market, San Diego Hard- 
ware Co., Wolff and Davidson, 
Meyer and Davidson, M. F. Hel- 
ler, J. P. Becker, Ballard and 
Brackett, Benbrough Furniture 
Co., Electee Equipment Co., G. 
& G. Hat Works, San Diego Gas 
Appliarice Co., Frevert-Bledsoe 
Fur Co., W. O. Tolliver Lynells, 
Rubins Fur Co,, Russ Lumber and 
Mill Co., C. S. Hardy, Eagle Drug 
Pierke-Field|co., A. Ti. Miller, Pacific Coast 


Pueblo Meat Market 

TCLCmiONE MAIN eaoT ^ 

JosKPH Davis, Proprietor ^ 

All Fresh Meat and Fish 

Meats arc Covcrmcnt Inspected 

Premium 3acon and Hams 


JOHN T. REID 

GROCER — Staple and Fapcy Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

Our Meat Market is a great addition to the store. 

We carry all sorts of Fresh and Salt Meats. 

OUR PRICES ARE REASONABLE IN MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Cor. KoMlerand E. 7th St. 


MICE! 

Colored Voters of State of California 

Take Notice^Not; to use the > Afro-American 
Federal name unless you are registered 
therein. ; 

J. E. UATTIMORE 

5400 Long Beach Avenue Los Angeles, Cal 


Por Dependable \ 

Dry Goods, Ladies and Gents Furnishingk, Hats 

Shoes, Etc., Go to 

ARCADE DEPARTMENT STORE 

B. F. HOPKINS' OLD STAND FIFTH AND GLADYS 

They are out of the high rentsdis-trict. aad these goods are as good as the 
best and prices as low as the lowest. 


L. B. ROGERS 

Phone Broadway 2387 


^fte even tenor offirst deposit in a PasacKna bank. 


Hdwe. Co., Hazard, GJould & Co., Trunk and Bag, Co., KJauber & 
Ernsting Co., Benbough itGelra, Waugenheimer Co., Bfiailey Auto 
Boston Store, Electric ^|mne, Works, B|^ll|t^..firos./Maper?*.; 


Meat Market, Fresh and 
Smoked Meats 

Staplm Groceries 


Cash Grocery 

745 Central Avenue 


Groceries, Fruit and Vegetables 

Grecian Imported Olive Oil, 3-Star Brand 
Fifth and Gladys Ave. I Gust. Picoulast & Co 


The Old Reiable, where you get 
your money's worth, along with 
courteous treatment. 


Sam's Market 

1914 East Seventh street 

. DEALBtl IN ALL "KINDS OF 

Fresh and Salt Me|ts, Fine Sausages and Lard 



■ Xt rresvnt 
timc^ arc hn 
count r.f ihe 
tion, I.i;t re 
readers, these i 
great nation r 
vidua). Wu. 
was work:ns^ 
years ago. he 
' job. getting- t+i 
he is grumbling 
Now. really a 
' so-called hard ; 
I about by our o 
I count of shiitle; 
! agance in the ti 
I To the young- i 
! you are working 
I your vocation m 
j how little you ar 
J can afford to go 
(and other places 
j.von can afford u 
pars in the bank. 
r-se your job rt 
:>u so much beca 
.yi a new job the 
an afford to spen 


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DUTMBAR PAR | 

Between the City and the Sea 


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LVNWOOT) 


■DOA"^ 



AT THE CHUBCHES 


TABERNACLE BAPTIST 

Hemlock Street 
Rev. J. D. Gordon, pastor. 


-^1 


•0 0>t»0»»»»»»»»»00»»» o »»»» 


NEW HOPE BAPTIST 

Paloma Ave., sear 16tli 

Eev. C. !p. Anderson, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U., 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching, at 7:30 p.' m. 


Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6 :30 p. m. 

Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


MT. ZION BAPTIST 
Third and Stephenson Ave. 
Rev. A. C. Williams, pastor. 
Services for Sunday, 

At 11 a. m., preaching, s^lbject, 
7:30 p. m., preaching, subject, 


SHOWING LOCATION 



GATES A»JAR 

A new departure in Real Estate operations where improve- 
ments are paid for by the promotors and where citizens are not 
debarred because of color. We believe in the plan of restrictions. 
The location is especially good for high class homes. Cheap 
transportation, gas, water, teh phone and power poles in alley, 
graded streets, sidewalks, curbs and parking. 

Property titles and funds will be handled through Title In- 
surance and Trust Co. 

Parked between the City and the Sea, it is the natural trend 
of development and cannot help growing. Everything of the 
right kind ia in the right place to make Dunbar Park the logical 
place to live. 

Will you be one of the first to make a selection of a lot in 
the new sub-division, DUNBAR PARK. We have several on the 
waiting list now. 

Do it now ; own a home between the City and the Sea. If 
you are a good citizen you are eligible to buy one or more of 
these larife lots, containing nearly 7,000 square feet, as compared 
with the ordinary lot of about 3,100 square feet. 

Come to our oflBce, get acquainted, get posted, get a home, 
gfft it paid for and quit oaying rent. Make money by saving 
your earnings. 

We predict the values in DUNBAE PARK will greatly in- 
crease in a very short time. Lots sold on monthly payments. 

For prices and terms, call write or telephone. 

OODINO & TIIOMPSOIV, 

703 San Fernando Bldg., Los Angeles, California 

Phone, Main 4048 


A. l4 E. CHUBOH 

: Eighth and Tovme Ave. 
Usual service preaching by the 
pastor. Dr. Gregg. 


WESLEY CHAPEL 

Comer kighth and Wall 
Rev. Wesley E. Kurchen, pastor. 

Preaching at 11 a. m. 

Young People's meeting at 6:30 
p. m. 

Preaching^ at 7 :30 p. m. 


SECOND BAPTIST CHUBOH 

Maple Ave., bet. 7th. and 8th Sti. 

Rev. Joseph L. McCoy, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
B. Y. P. U. at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7 :30 p. m. 


FIRST A. M. E. CHUBOH- 
Cor. Eighth St. and Town Av». 

Rev. N. Greggs, pastor. 
Preaching at 11 a. m. 
Christian Endeavor at 6 :30 p. m. 
Preaching at 7:30 p. m. 


Home 18274 go_ 5438 

"^ V. Koggfn's Pharmacy 

3728^0 ent alJ^Ave . Corner - 38th St 


Prescript 


:. We carry Toilet Articles, Stationery^Drugs and Chemicals. 
iriptiopB our specialty. '^^ US^ BSb- 

~ Orders. given'byJPhone art delivered. 3 


IB. Y. P. U. to Meet 

March 28th 


McKINLEY PARK CHAU- 
TA-UQUA AT SACRA- 
MENTO. 

The McKinley Park Chautau- 
qua at Sacramento under the au- 
spices of the Sacramento \'alley 
Baptist Young People is an a.';- 
surcd fact. The g:rounds have 
been secured and the city park 
commissioners are leavine; no 
stone unturned to jjet the ijrounds 
in shape and to make the park as 
attractive as possible. Have you 
ever visited T^TcKinlcy Park' Tt 
is one of the mo=t beautiful places 
in all California. It lays just 
south of Sacramento and contains 
about forty or fifty acres. The 
larpe oak trees have made almost 
a continuous canopy overhead, 
thereby shutting out the sun at all 
hours of the dayT Its pleasure 
features are almost unexcelled. 
There are great spaces for base- 
ball, lawn tennis, croquet and a 
swimming pool, also a small zoo. 
The park affords all the sport and 
pleasure that one might look for. 
Main Features of the Chautauqua. 

The main features of the Chau- 
tauqua will be a great gathering of 
prominent orators, the learned 
men of both races. For when we 
tell you that the coming of ex- 
.-\ttorney-General \\\ H. Lewis of 
P,oston and Miss N. H. P>urroughs 
is assured, together with the prob- 
able appearance of P,ishop Parks 
of the A. M. E. Church; W. T. 
Vernon, ex-registrar of the treas- 
ury; Drs. McCoy and Gordon of 
Los Angeles, and other promi- 
nent men of the South, you will 
agree with me that there will be 
a great concourse of racial intel- 
lect that this race can be proud of, 
men able from every standpoint, 
orators of no mean ability, the 
most of them having national rep- 
utation. Together with the best 
who are members of our race 
there will also be present the gov- 
ernor of the state, the attorney- 
general of the state, the United 
States senator from our state and 
congressmen from our state, to- 
gether with- such men of our gen- 
eral association as Drs. J. M. Rid- 


dle, Ci. C. Coleman and J. T. 
Jones. Professor L. J. Williams 
and others of our local district of 
the Young People's Union and 
Sunday School. Xow when I say 
that McKinley Park during the 
2.^(1 of June and the 1st of July 
will he the Mecca for intelligence 
I feel assured that you, after read- 
ing the abi.ive names of the per- 
sons spoken of and being ac- 
(|uainted with them from a re- 
lij^nous and political standpoint. 
you, will sav with me that it is 
well worth I>aying a Visit to the 
Chautauqua. 

The Purpose of the Chautaqua. 
The purpose of the Young Peo- 
ple's Chautauqua is to bring 
alx^iut a large united social gath- 
ering of our young peopje. Each 
summer we find that the Sunday 
schools and young people's soci- 
eties give picnics where one or 
two of the local Sunday schools 
anfl young people's societies 
gather together for their social 
[ileasure. The pleasure resorted 
to is not always of the most de- 
sirable kind, therefore the presi- 
dent of our 'Sacramento Valley 
n. Y. P. U. Convention conceived 
the idea of holding a general out- 
ing for the young people of Sac- 
ramento Valley. To carry out the 

idea a committee was appointed 
composed of the following: Rev. 
Cr. \\ . Reed of Stockton, chair- 
man; Mrs. M. F. Gaither of 
Woodland, Rev. W. AL DixOn of 
Sacramento, Rev. J. li. Allen of 
Marysville, Mrs. L. S. Diggs of 
Woodland, Mr. L. Williams of 
Marysville and Prof. C. H. Toney 
of Vallejo, he being one of the 
pastors of the Sacramento Valley 
district. The committee, after 
getting together, decided that it 
would be a good thing to make 
the outing a general one, not sim- 
ply to confine its pleasures to the 
young people of the Sacramento 
valley district, but to invite all 
the young people as well as the 
nia to participate at this great so- 
older people of Norther^ Califor- 
cial meeting. 
That something worth while 


might- be the result of this great 
meeting the committee outlined 
the following as the plans for the 
Chautauqua for the social, indus- 
trial and religious benefit of the 
young people of our community 
and the outlying districts. To 
carry out this plan is the reason 
why we lva\e gone to the expense 
and have invited the persons cited 
aI)Ove. The scve.al district con- 
ventions wliich compose the Gen- 
eral Baptist Association hae been 
invited to hold their respective 
conventions at McKinley Park 
during the Chautauqua, and there 
will be a day or days given to 
each of the district conventions 
for the purpose of holding their 
convention. Another great feat- 
ure of tlie Chautauqua will be a 
luamnioth choir consisting of LSO 
voices, under the directorship of 
several of the best singers obtain- 
able in Northern California. 
Time, Place and Rates. 


man, box 692, Stockton, Cal., or 
Mrs. L. S. Diggs, 914 North 
street, Woodland, Cal. 


Improvement Club 
of the A. M. 


E. Church 


On Wednesday night, April 4th, 
Mrs. J. C Slaughter entertained 
the members of her Sunday-school 
class at her home, 1535 E. 16th 
street. The purpose of the meet- 
ing was to effect an organization 
for the social, industrial and 
Christian uplift in the commun- 
ity. This was done. The club 
was organized with the following 
■ ilhcers; 

lo hn .McLemore, president; P.W . 
Ridgeway, vice president; J. J. 
Josephs, recording secretary; Bal- 
linger Kemp, corresponding secre- 
tary; William Foster, treasurer; J. 
E. Duncan, critic; D. W. Rose, 


I Go to H. H. FINN'SJ 

Mtai Market^and Grocery 

For thfi good things to eat,> Where everything is clean and neat 
Prices are right. Give me a fair trial and be convinced. 

j |H. M. RIIN^^f, 

3429 Cbntral Ave. Sunset So. 957 

— 
RESiDiNce Phone Main 5167 H.\[r Dis^sisi j .'VI vvna.^i.v- 

Buswgss Phons ,. Shampooing ^- ' ' " 

\ METROPOLITAN HAIR STORE 
I J. H. CUFFEE, Prop.i 

1403 142 EAST NINTH STREET Cor. HEMLOCK 


r.b:^oster, 


Do 


HOME A-5121 

Brick and Cement Contractor 

Also Mantel Work, Tile or Brick 

first class work. Furnish any 
kind of reference. 


514 Carolina St. 


Los Angeles. 


The time of the beginnine of, , t^ , . r>-i 

the Chautauqua will be the 23d of ^«"g«*"^-^'-*'"'°«> *"d ^^^P^ ^'^ 
June, and will hold eight days, : ^^^w, chairman of publication com 

closing on the first day of July. 

The place will be McKinley 
Park, southern section of Sacra- 
mento, the same being- reached by i 
two car lines running at intervals 


of five minutes from the uptown 
section of the city. 

Rates have been secured, from 
all roads entering into Sacra- 
mento of one and one-third fare 
for the round trip. 

Accommodations. 

Sleeping accommodations will 
be right on the grounds._ There 
will he tents provided .vy'th two 
cots. The prices for lodging 'will 
not be over 25 cents, anci prob- 
ablv less, especially for parties 
who desire to stay longer than 
one night. The rates will be fi.xed 
acf^ording to the time the parties 
a'i» to hold the tent. >-. 

Refreshments of all kinds will 
be on the grounds.. A great mam- 
moth platform is built for the 
purpose of the m«^ting. This 
platform is surrounded by beauti- 
ful trees, completely covering the' 
platform, thereby shutting out the! 
sun, causing the place to be cool 
throughout the day. i 

Motion pictures by our Bro. 
Rev. Dixon will be one of the 
main features €ach evening of the 
Chautauqua. ; 


mittee. 

The colors voted.^upon are purple 
and white. The motto: "Higher 
Even Through DifBculties." 
I A committee on "Constitution 
and By-Laws" was appointed and 
consisted of William Foster, Chair- 
man, J. .J. Josephs and J. E. Dun- 
can. 

The hostess of the occasion 
served a pleasant repast and the 
young men went home rejoicing 
over this accomplishment. 

The next meeting will be held 
Friday, April 24, and the first and 
third Fridays of each month there 
after. 


Phone Mail. 7695 a. L. Poner, Propai^etor 

If ypur clothes or hats are sick or rsady to dye ring up 

I Porter's Pantatorium 

Cleaning, dyeing and pressing. Hats dyed, blocked and cleaned 
Prompt attjjntion given all work. Men's suits $1 00 and up Lapies 
work a specialty. S'S McGarry St-, Los Angeles 


The Missionary Society of the 
Second Baptist Church meets 
second and fourth Thursdays at 1 
o'clock p. m., at Second Baptist 
Church, Maple avenue.. 

Mrs. W. J. Davis, Pres. 
Address. 17^ Utah St. 

Tel. Boyle 2660 
Mrs. J. K. William.s 
Sec'y 


BIG BARGAINS 


THIS WEEK 

Spe<:ial Price* for Readers of The Eagle.' 

Cheapest place in Los Angeles to Buy 


IRON BUDS 

?1.00 

IRONING BOARDS 

.35 

SPRINGS 

1.00 

FLAT IRONS 

.26 

MATRESSES 

.'.00 

TUBS 

.40 

CHAIR 

50 

'WASHBOARDS 

.30 

COMMODES 

1.25 

WASHING MACHINES 

$3.00 


Hundreds of Articles Given Away 
FREE WliTH PURCHASES 


Cocie in and see our -lock 
No Charge for l^oi^'^'Dg 


AYERS: BROS. 


i 


Open Evenings 


2627 CENTRAL AVENUE 


SOME FUN! 

Sunday at Seals Garden 


all 


\..* 


A.-k: 


Don't fail to vote for the Queen 

you wish to rule over the May 

Carnival at the A. M. E. Zion 

Church, 959 East Pico street. May 

11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 1914. Benefit 

For further information con- church debt. Votes 10 cents each, 

cerning the Chkutauqua you mayor five for 40 cents. 

address Rev. G. W. Reed, chair- ' '•^ 


1 I 
t 
r 


kinds of attractions will he staged 
for- those desiring a good time as 
the guests ,0f the Truck Drivers. 
The large and spacious grounds 
will be tuped over to the fun 
lovers for t|ie entire day. Tennis, 
ball game 4nd races will be mixed 
in to boost the great occasion 
long. The famous Creole orches 


T 


The Colored Voters' League met- 
at their hall on Thursday evening 
They met jointly with the Ladies' 
Auxiliary and had a most enjoy I 
able time. 


Mrs. Geo. Gamble of 920 E. 3lBt 
street, has moved to 1201 Central 
avenue, in the apartments adjoin- 
ing Dr. Stovall's office. 


Vernon, Oklahoma, is the latesj 
exclusively colored town in Ok- 


tra will be on hand and everyone' , . , 

. 1, tu„ m.iciral nart 'ahoma. It has a population of 

knows how well the musical pari ^ . j . . •. 

.,, , 1 11 J All tViat i<; more than three hundred, and is 

will be handled.. All that is ^^^ ^^^^ .^ 

necessary IS to board of Watts car l^^^^\^J ^^ w. T. Vernon. 

and step off at the gate. 

■ ' \. 

< . 


a 


-At pr.escnt 

time^ are broi 

count of the n 

tion. hut rem 

readers, these hj 

great jia^rinn m( 

vidua!. You ta 

was working fo 

years ago, he si 

job. getting the 

he is grumbling j 

Now. really a g 

so-called hard«tii 

' about by our ow 

i count of shiftj#5sl 

jagance in. the tim 

I To the young rnj 

I you are working. 

I your vocation ma} 

[how little you are 

I can afford Co go to 

land other places , 

pou can afford to ] 

[Jars in the bank T 

T'Se your job it w 

Du so much becan: 

-ret a new job th^j 

afford t-o ^enfe 


MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 


ILLEGIBLE ORIGINAL 



Number 


THE DANCE GOES ON ! 


lAvoid Hard Times . 

I Mr. Doncs Tells How 


TIMELY ARTICLE ON A 

TIMELY SUBJECT 

By S. P. Don«s 

I have been asked to write a 
few lines in regard to what we 
now all call hard times, the cause 
and hcrw to avoid them. Being 
asked to answer these two ques- 
tions at One time, I hardly know 
where to begin, but fearing you 
may get tired of reading before 
you finish this article, I will at- 
tempt to answer the most import- 
aYit one, which is, "How to av 
hard times?" First, I think ev-/ 
one should cut down their house- 
hold expenses in accordance with 
his or her income. I think every 
family should have t bank ac- 
count and use the checking sys- 
tem in paying off all bills. I be- 
lieve this to be one of the great- 
est ways to save money. I thmk 
in each family the husband or 
wife (whichever is the most con- 
serv itive) should handle the 
monev. and there should not be 
the same bills to pay indefinitely, 
except the telephone, gas. water, 
electricity and taxes— these bills 
we will always have to pay. R"t 
house rent is a bill that can be 
easilv adjusted. I only wish that 
everv member of my race that 
lives .n the city erf Las .\ngele? 
would say down.with paying rcnt^. 
Pav as much as you cun spar^- aiu'. 
as little as the owners will accept 
down, and begin buying a little 
home; have your monthly pay- 
ments a? light as possible. n<.n t 
pay everv cent you make on y.nir 
propertv, keep up your pavments 
snch as they are. continue to put 
a few dollars in the bank, because 
when these scmi-cnn.litums bor- 
dering on what IS calle.i Iftrd 
times, arrive, this w,Jl help you 
more than an equity in a hume. 
Don't buv a house that y.ni thmk 
you will never pay lor. get a nice 
little house large enough to cmih- 
fortablv house wife and the little 
ones, do not worry abcnit living 
far out, and d.m't worry ab^ut be- 
ing on the car line-a few blocks- 
walk will do you good Now when 
you are in your little home rear- 
ing your little doves in their own 
nest's, vou are in a position t.. con- 
sider what has caused the hard 
times. 

At present the so-called hard 
times are brought about on ac- 
count of the present administra- 
tion, but remember, my dear- 
readers, these hard times affect the 
great nation more than the indi- 
vidual. You take the man that 
was working for $75 per month 
years ago, he still has the same 
job, getting the same salary, yet 
he is grumblings about hard times. 
Now, really a' great part of our 
so-called hard times are brought 
about by our own selves, on ac- 
, count of shiftlessness and extrav- 
agance in the time of prosperity. 
|;'To the young man, while today 
■ you are working, no matter what 
your vocation may be, no matter 
^bow little you are earning, if you 
can afford to go to dances, shows 
fand other places of amusement, 
[you can afford to put a few dol- 
flars in the bank. Then when you 
se your job it will not worry 


home helping mother. From time 
io time I shall try to write a few 
lines on how to save a portion of 
your earnings. I shall be glad to' 
answer personal letters on this 
subject. I hope that every young 
man may be benefited in some- 
way by this and other articles 
which may appear in the Eagle. 
There is nothing sadder, more pa- 
thetic to my vision than to see the 
young men of my race spending 
their timer and money in idleness. 
You cannot save money and at the 
same time spend your evenings in 
plaving pool and other expensive 
pastimes. When we learn to save 
a dollar for a rainy day then we 
shall be able to call such times as 
we are having now, dull times and 
not hard times. 

Let us all look forward to bet 
ter times along the financial lines 
with the Panama Canal coming in 
191. S. There will be big things 
doing along commercial lines, but 
unless the individual learns to be 
conservative, and gets other sav- 
ings after 1Q15 has gone down in 
history and the great south will 
have reached its 1,000,000 basis 
and property " has doubled and 
trebled in value, there will still 
he a portion of our population con- 
sisting of those who get the hard 
titnes every time they lose a job. 


^^.50, by Mr. Hunt,] ^j|^ ^y^Wcer is sick at his 
I for Miss Reese's hand^me box- home|Second and L streets. 
third was $L35, by J. Allen Reese, ' 

for Mrs. A. L. Reese's well 
equipped box. Quite a sum was 
realized and all had a nice time. 
The proceeds go towards the fund 
started by the'au.xiliaries of the 
Baptist church for the expense of 
carrying on the cotiventioii in 
July. 


EAST EIGHTH ST. CHRIS- 
TIAN CHURCH 

Services for .Sunday. .'Kpril 19 
Bible school, 10 a. ni.. W. J. 
Thompson, supt. Preaching at 11 
a. m., subject, "The Hand of God 
in History," the first in a series on 
"The Hand of God in History.' 
At 6:30 p. m. the Y. P: S. C. E. 
will render a good program. Mrs. 
M. C. Bray, president. 7:45 p. m., 
preaching. "God with a plumb 
line in his hand." .^mos 7:7. 8. 
Everybody welcome. D. L. Mc- 
Mickens, pastor. 


Mr. Chas. Smith is quite ill at 
his home on Fourteenth street. 


Miss Mary Van Brunt has been 
on thtsick list; also Mrs. F. E. 
Washington. 


Race Notes and 


Mr;' Viola Spikes Kitchen is in 
our midst this week and was 
jjreeted with a crowded house. 


The southern cli\i^i'ln 'if the 
."^tats^ .Federation of Colored Wo- 
rn en'*s'ij[riub held their Reciprocity 
Day in Phillips Chapel. C, M.'K. 
Church. Santa Monica, ."^tate 
Presiilent Mrs. I'^. . Moxlev pre- 
siding. The morning session was 
given to the work of the executive 
hoard. .'\t noon the ladies had 
lunch. Afternoon ses^iifn began 
at 2 p. m. The repurt nl clubs anrl 
tjeneral business. The report of 
the northern division was read 
and approved. This marks one of 
the most important meetings we 
li;i\"e hrid this vear. .\t the close 
'if the meeting all the members of 
the I'ederatiiin were iinited by 
Mrs. Wright tn her home where 
she liarl prepared a very sumptu- 
•nis repast. .After spending the 
e\ening with .Mrs. Wright the 
ladies returned Imme having en- 
joyed the most ])leasant day. 
."^tate Federation meets in San 
Diego the latter part of julv. 


RACE PREJUDICE AND IN 
CONSISTENCY 

Of course as a race we 
against race prejudice and 
crimination 


are 

dis- 
But we can not be 


consistent. To some warped and 
misguided minds it- is only an in- 
justice when we are the \ictims. 
But, of course, we may righteous- 
ly arouse sentiment against the 
white man and thereby bar and 
prevent him from comjjeting with 
us. but when he re\erses the pro- 


wittingly or unwittingly, would 
make our gigantic struggle for 
recognition as gigantic a farce and 
a by-word to thinking people. To 
broad minded and intelligent peo- 
ple it is obvious that we must be 
willing to concede to others the 
rights and privileges we demand 
for ourselves. — Amsterdam News. 


Current Topics] 


world that the Negro not only was 
a man at Appomattox but was a 
citizen at Washington! Where 
then was DuBois? and where the 
Crisis .' Why DuBois was a shirt- 
tail-boy down in the swamps of 
Georgia, and the Crisis had not 
seen the light of day. This is the 
story. Let the Negro newspapers 
whose editors work to make the 
money to operate them desist from 
acrimonious discussion of the vain 
babblings of an ephemeral crea- 


VENICE, OCEAN PARK AND 

SANTA MONICA 

J. Allen Reese, Correspendent 

Quite an interesting Faster cel- 
;bration was held at the First 
Baptist'Church last Sunday. The 
program consisted of participants 
of both churches, and was excep- 
tionally interesting. After the 
program. Easter eggs were given 
all present. 


Am.ong the Venetians who were 
present at the "Drew Celebra- 
tion" on last Tuesday evening 
were Mrs. Eldridge, Mrs. Gentry 
and Mr. Jones. 


Miss Fanny Reese entertained 
at the home bi Mf. and Mrs. S. 
Howard, 546 San Juan avenue, at 
lU so much because you cannot a box party. The highest bid was 
fet a new job the next day— you $1.75 for Miss Simpson's beauti- 


.-f: 



r J 

. : ,.^^-^,. . .- 


- 1 

, 

/ 

P 


The colored man in .\merica 
has gone through the. same experi- 
ences as the white man. He gave i*"*"^ ^^'^''^'^ ^"^'^^s by sufferance 
250 years of unrequited toil to- ""'' '^''^''''y- They have wasted a 
build up the nation. In the Revo-'^*^^' '''''"^'^ ^"'^^ worthy of a bet- 
lutionary war Crispus' Attucks, a/^*" '^^"*^- ^^' "^ ''«'"'■" ^° ^he at- 
mulatto, was the first man to shed ' ^^"^^ °^ ^^^ common enemy— ig- 
diis blood that white men might be "°''^""' dependence, crime and 
really free. other things which just now con- 

One hundred and nine of thej^^'*"^^ ^^^ obstacles of a rising 
425 dauntless sailors who fought ' '"^'^^- .^'"^'^ Dubois! Ditto Crisisl 
with Perry at the battle of Lake ', '^".'^^'''^ ''^^^ ''^"'^ fo^ those things 
Erie were colored men. Nearly 
200,000 colored soldiers fought 
with white men in the slavehold- 
ers' rebellion in defense of their 
common country. In the Spanish- 
-American war the colored troop- 
ers did their duty splendidly at El 
Canev. • 


which are essential to progress 
and which are eternal ! — Dallas 
Express. 


FRESNO NEWS 


I'rom ar little farm owned by 
John Jones, a former slave in 
Shelby county. Tenn.. has come to 
the su[)reme court of the I'nited 
States the . <piestion of whether 
former slaves are entitled t>) in- 
herit from their lirothtrs and sis- 
ters wh(5 likewise were m servi- 
tude, i 



The supreme court jot Tennes- 
see had held that ex-slaves have 
no inheritable blood. One of John 
Jones' brothers has taken the case 
to the Uniteci Stnt^e.-; sujiremc 
court, seeking a re\'erial. 


MR. SIDNEY P. DONES 


BAKERSFIELD NOTES 

Our Bakersfield notes reached 
the Eagle office too late for publi- 
cation last week. 


Mrs. Lulu Pearson of Los An- 
geles visited her son, Wr. Pear- 
son, and Mrs. Lowry Winters, last 
week. Her visit was an agreeable 
surprise. 


eess and does the same thing — 
true, more etTeclively — we raise 
the hue and cry of race prejudice. 
.At least this appears to be the 
method of a few narrow ininded 
persons in our athVletic world 
today. 

They would have it that colored 

athletes be entered in the games 

and meets of the white athletes. 

They want the white man to give 

the colored professional a chance, 

but refuse to co-operate with the 

white man to that effect. They 

want good attractions, but cai} 

not supply them themselves and 

do not want others to do so. 

However, t^hese short-sighted ones 

"are in the minority. The public 

' demands good attractions and is 

Miss Anita McClanahan organ- not averse to taking them from 

ized a Young Woman's Auxiliary Nat C. Strong or anyone else who 

Club to the A. M. E. church ; can deliver the goods. 

meets at the parsonage weekly. I ,, ,■ ' . ,„ „„„j 

^ •= ■' , Many white promoters are good 

friends to the race, in that they 

accomplish more for its good than 


Rev. Henderson was a visitor to 
Cain Chapels Sunday school last 
week. He made a splendid ad- 
dress to the same. 


PASS THE CRISIS 

rile Wasliini^ton' Hee. the New 
^"ork .\ge and mayhap other of 
the faithful h;i\'e been wasting lots 
of ammmiition here of late on 
Diil'iois insomuch that we fear 
thev are reaching a Crisis, Boys, 
call off the dorrs' You are hunt- 
ing rabbits with a brass band! 
You are shooting a dead duck! 
Why DuPiois. the charity editor 
oi the Crisis is only a. boiled over 
bi-product of the .'\tlanta free 
school system, and what is all this 
fuss about? Just because DuBois 
took his Crisis and moved up in 
front, notifying the world that the 
Crisis was the Mahomet of Negro 
journalism and tJnat h^ (DuBois) 
was its prophet. NowJ gentlemen, 
the notification does not tell the 
truth and therefore is unworthy 
the advertising which is being 
given it. Every sensible Negro 
knows that away back yonder 
when the times tried men's souls, 
when the Ku-Klux an|i Red Shirt 
Brigades of the Soi|th and the 


Edward E. Lewis 

The above is an excellent like- 
ness of Mr. Jas. A. Coleman, one 
of Fresno's brightest voung busi- 
ness men. Although but a' recent 
(arrival, Mr. Coleman has opened 
I and now operated one of the clean- 
and up-to-date barber shops 
billiard parlors in this part of 
state. .Mr. Coleman is an ac- 
tive member of the Lincoln Re- 
publican Club and.a l.iver of race 
enterpri.se. M.s. J.-is. A. Coleman 
is an active member of the Sp 
Ijaptist church. 


est 

and 
the 


le >econd 


l-astcr was observed at all of 

the local churches. Special pro- 

tgram was rendered by Bethel 

Sunday school under the direction 

of -Mrs. Redd. 

'I~he band boys' .social, held at 
Second „ Baptist church, was a 
grand success. The boys will 
send off this week for their instru- 
ments. 

A large crowd attended the Eas- 
ter tango ball at Armory Hall un- 
der the auspices of the band boys. 

Mr. Jas. Ernest Trokey of 
Coalinga was a welcomed visitor 
■n our city last Friday evening en 
route to San Francisco, where he 
will spend Easter. 


Mr. Love of V 


isaha was 


n .^ o , r- u J Fresno Sunday and was the e-uest 

Cottonmouths and Copperheads _r ., ^ , i z^", . t^ .. guesr 

.. .,,„ M„..u ,..„.„ ,,..„.;„„ ^...,„.'°^ ^^^ '°'^''' Odd Fellows. 


of the North were hunting down 
every Negro who had the temer- 
ity to assert-iiis manhood, there 
were Negro editors then like Fred 
Douglas, Tom Fortune, E. E. 
Cooper, John Mitchell, W. A. 
Brinkley, J. C. Duke, M. E. Bry- 
ant, R. N. Countecf Peter Clark, 
John M. Langston, W. C- Chase 
ind C. A. Buchanan, who were 


Rev. Dr. Riddle of San Fran- 
cisco was in our city last Satur- 
day evening and was the guest of 
Mr. Ed Lewis. The Rev. left on 
a late train for the city.' 

Eugene Berry remains very ill 
at his home on "E" street. 

Don't fail to attend the Baptist 


giving the wofld the pimple story [-Sunday school convention which 
Mr. W. Austin and Mrs. A. L. the whole horde of inconsistent |of a struggling race. In their convenes in this city the 24th of 
'n afford to spend a few days at ful box, by Mr. Quince Tabor; ciark were married last week. and narrow minded kickers who, journals they were riotifying the April. 


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MUTILATED PAGE 


CANNOT BE IMPROVED 



5an Diego Doings 


STATISTICAL REFERENCE its way and serving its needs in 

I tills locality. Their property has 


AND DIRECTORY OF SAN 
DIEGO, CAL. 


I valuation of $2,000. 

' Lodge Directory 

. Fidelity Lodge, No. 10, A. F. & 

^, , ^ • ■ c ,1 'a. M.— Meets at G. A. R. Hall on 

The furthermost point in bouth- 

cm California is the beautiful city^"^e first and third Friday evening 
of San Diego. In our research of.-"' «ach month 


F. G. Williams, 
\V. M.; X. J. Harris, S. W.; 


Statistics in line with our efforts; 

to exploit the .status and accom-j Charles Goodm, J. W, : W. H. 

pHshments of the race on the Pa- • Meadows, secretary ; W. D. Saun- 
cific Coast, we have to chronicle ' ders, treasurer. 
here a citizenship that bids fair tof.' Order of Eastern Star— Meets 
make in the not far distant future"! the first Thursday. Mrs. Jno. 
a highly commendable showing [ white, W. M. 

along all of the various lines. Mount Moriah Chapter, No. 4, 
which hf^i attracted the attention | Koyal Arch Masons— Meets the 
of the cixili/.ed w(irl(l to the prog- first Monday evening of each 
ress of a possibly less favored nionth. Rev. W. A. Mitchell, N. 
race. F. : H. .\. Harvey. King: Rev. R. 

•In their effi.rts to ri>e in this \ Haubert, Scribe: W. C. Mead- 
particular comnuinity, as in many ows. Secretary; W. McTrent, 
others, they have the support of Trea.siirer. 
the best class of the opposite race. Dunbar Lodge, No. 2, Knights 


who at all times are ready to aid 
' and assist them in any worthy un- 
dertaking. We met here the peo- 
ple of both races in al lof the va- 
rious walks of life and find an op- 
timistic feeling by all for a grater 
and better San Uiego. 

With a negro population of 
more than 1000 as artisans, skilled 
and imskilled labor, and a sprink- 
ling following business pursuits, 
we can truly say that they are 
making an effort to be counted as 
a part and parcel of this fifty years 
of progress which has cliallenged 
the admiration of the civilized 
world. 

The following facts in figures 
will speak louder than words as 
to what this people have and are 
accomplishing along these lines: 
alue c.f church property owned 
by them, .^oJ.OOO; approximate 
value of property owned by them, 
$400,000; populatic'n. 13.S0: voters, 
650; working at the trades, 83; 
chauffeurs, 17; jewelers, 2: chir- 
opodist. 1 : contractors. 8; garbage 
contractor for city, 1: employed 
by City Street Department. 15; 
employed by comity, 2; restau- 
rants, 4; livery business, 1; mail 
cariners, 2 : laundries, 2 : rooming 
houses, 3; barber shops. 2; 
churches, 3 : lodges. 4 ; pharmacist, 

1 ; grocery store, 1 ; social club, 1 ; 
civic organization. 1. 
Directory of Churches, Fraternal 
and Other Organizations of 

San Diego 
Bethel A. M. E. Church, located 
on Front street, between Cedar 
and Date streets. Services Sun- 


of Pythias — Meets second and 
fourth Friday of each month at 
G. A. R. Hall. R. L Drake, C. C; 
Georg e Henry, V. C. ; W. C. 
Meadows, R. R. and S. : ]. Wood- 


en, Treasurer; H. King, M. F. ; J 

T. Brown, Prelate; William Met- tional Cash Register Co., Wiley B 


Pasadena will send one student 
to Tuskegee next fall. 

Some new ordinances passed by 
the city commissioners : Not to 
smoke on the street cars. It shall 
Jlso be unlawful for any minor 
under eighteen years of age to 
smoke any cigars or cigarettes, in 
any street, lane, alley, court, pub- 
lic park, public building, or any 
other public place in the citv of 
Pasadena. 

You must stop smoking when 
you get to Raymond Hotel and 
Columbia Street. 

Go and registr today. 

School closed for ten days. 

Don't forget Sunday is Palm 
Sunday. 

Our press gang have roses 
sometimes in their path, but al- 
ways have thorns. 

On the evening of Friday,. Feb. 
20th, an article appeared in the 
Los Angeles Evening Record, 
with Mr. Shores' cut^ under this 
lieatl : 

HincWky. Jno. Mayer, X. D. .Xich- 
ols. Star ]5uilders Supply Co., San 
Diego Feed Mills, Back Coimtry 
Transportation Co., Merchants 
Special Delivery, P. O. Bakery, 
T. Rossman, J. Fred Kahle, Elite 
Printing Co.. Green Rovia, Cal. 
Garage Co.. San Diego Desk Co., 
Denver Cash Market, S. R. Cebb, 
Ingle Mfg. Co., Pacific Transfer 
Van & Truck Co., Wilson S. 
Smith & Co., Geo. Walker foi^'a- 


Allen Co., Wm. Holmes, R. L. G. 
Wright, Geo. B. Irvin, W. T. Kir- 
by, J. M. Purdy, Henry Jordan, 
Irwin & Co., Pacific Sheet Metal 
Hub Clothing Co.. Camjibell Ma- 


run, M. W. 

-■\side from the many auxiliary 
clubs to churches, etc., there is 
one woman's club, known as the 
Friday .Afternoon Club, which is 
doing a great work. Officers : 
Mrs. .\. Henderson. President ;: chine Co., Three Boys Transfer 
Mrs. M. Freeman, Vice-Presi- j Co., Golden State Hat Co., A. N. 
dent. .Mrs. L Grav, Sccretarv ; f Dauchy, Plaza Pharmacy. Mod- 
Mrs. M. Jackson. Treasurer. ; ern Basl«^t Grocery Co., Sanitary 

Quite a few beautiful homes are! Ice Cream Co., Silver Gate Soda 
owned here by colored citizens, | Works, W. J. I'ailey, Owl Ice 


and there are several who are con- 
ducting business on a large scale. 
Mr. E. W. .Anderson has the city 
contract for caring for the gar- 
bage, and vvorks a crew of men 
averaging 'twenty-five. 


Cream Co., Hamilton, Demcrs and 
Weitekamp, Whitney & Co., 
Pierce Feid hardware Co., Hazard 
Gould & C(^., Ernsting Co.. Ben- 
bough & Gelors. Boston Store, 
F.lectric Home. Western Lumber 

c- r^- ■ r , Co., Chas. H. Xearpass, I-'arriss 

San Diego is one ot the most , ,- ■ r , , 

enterprising an.l bn.ad gauged =^"'' ^'^'''^- I'i''epcndent .Meat 
cities of the Pacfic Coa<t an<l ,s ^I''"-l<et, .^an Diego Meat Market, 
made up of a citizenship tliat ■'^'''" ^^'^^'' Hardware Co., W,,!ff 
stands for jirogress. \\\- arc '»'"' '^''^'■■idpon, .Meyer and David- 
proud to state that in every move- 1 ■'^'^"- ^^- ^- Heller, J. P. Becker, 
nient for its continued progress j '^''^"^'■'' ?"^ P.rockelt, Benbough 
the colored citizens are found on Eurniture Co., Electric Equipment 


the right side su])porting these 
mo\'ements ; and in compiling this 

work showing their status in this 
community the following firms 
generously contributed to make 
the same possible, for which we 
are very thankful 

Note — This work has been ex- 
tensively published in the Califor- 
nia Eagle and in the present book 


day, 11 a. m., 8 p. m. S. C, 9:30 
a. m. Class and prayer meeting 
Wednesday evening, 7:45; Sun- 
day, 6:45 p. m. R. H. Hanbert, 
r pastor. 

First Street Baptist Church, 
near First and Front streets — 

Services Sunday, 11 a. m. and 8 

p. m. Prayer meeting, Wednes-:^'- ■'^- Graham Co, San Diego 


form. 

Lyons Implement Co., Whiting 
Meade Commercial Co., Johnson 
Connell & Saum, Book Lovers 
Shop, J. A. Jadoin Co., E. M. Rob- 
erts Co., S. H. Price, E. C. Field, 


day evening; Missionary, Thurs- 
day evening; S. C, 9:30 a. m. 
Rev- W. A. Mitchell, pastor; Mrs. 
M. L. White, secretary. 

Second Baptist Church, located 
on the east side — Services Sunday, 
11 a. m. and 8 p. m.; S. C, 9:30 
a/^i. ; prayer meeting, Thursday 
irening. J. E. Robertson, pastor 

We will say that the churches 
are presided over by an intelligent 
ministry, who are doing a great 
work for the spiritual aspect of 
our people 


Grain & Milling Co, Chas. Mc 
Cormick Lumber Co., Benson 
Lumber Co., Philip Morse, F. X. 
Winter, Electric Laundry Co., 
Sanitary Laundry Co., W. K. 
Cowan Co., H. W. Rapor, Electric 
Compound Co., San Diego Steam 
Laundry, Citrus Soap Co., Excel- 
sior Laundry Co., Schnell's Sani- 
tary Dairy, Syneders I. X. L. 
Laundry, Consolidated Brewing 
Co., Mungers' Laundry Co., South- 
ern California Laundry Co., Weil- 


eland Laundry Co., Chas. E. 

Rev. R. N. Haubert has just'J^nes, P. A. Grand & Co., Geo. 

completed the building of a hand- Smith, Sperry Flour Co., J. S. 


some church edifice which will 
compare favorably with any of the 
churches owned by our people in 


Engmark, M. Thomas, B. V. Wil- 
liams, L. M. Sylyester, C. H. Rod- 
din, A. Levi, E. P. Newton, Max- 


any city of the coutny of its size, i ^e" Case Grocery Co., Broadway 
The church and property is valued Garage, Griswold & Co., Western 
at $17 500 I Leather Supply V' Co., Oscar Heim 

The First Street • Baptist Co.. Nauman Cleaning & Dyeing 
Church, under the leadership of Co., Frank Davenport Co., Arrow 
Rev. W. A. Mitchell, is in a pros- Market, De La Mater Bros., G. O. 
perous condition and he is a wor- \N'ilkerson, Hilcrest Drug Co., 
thy example of the Christian min- Auto Metal Works, Kruse Candy 
ist'ry. This church property is Co., Silver Gate Oil Co.. Lamb & 
valued at near the S50,000 mark, night to a large audience. He 
Thsy expect to build a handsome 
jedifice soon. 


^he East Side Church, presid- 


spoke on Abraham Lincoln 

Dr. Washington did some ?oon 
A bootblack who heard him Sun- P.mlcy. Owl Ice Cream Co., Ham 


Co.. G. & G. Hat Works, .'^an 
r)iego Gas .Appliance Co., Frevert 
Bledsoe Furniture Co., W. O. Tol- 
liver, Lynells, Rubins Furniture 
Co., Russ Lumber & Mill C<i., C. 
S. Hardy, Eagle Drug Co., A. 
R. Miller, Pacific Coast Trunk & 
Bag Co., Klauber & Wangen- 
heitne Co., Beasley Auto Works, 
Bentley Bros., Warner M. Bat- 
man, Western Rubber & Supply 
Co., So. Cal. Music Co., Alfred 
Stahl & Sons, Tibbias-Gavin Co., 
Kellam Drug Co., Auto Tire Co., 
Jones Morse Paint House, Gray 
Thompson Music Co.. Anderosn 
& Baxter, Southern Electric Co., 
Clark, Pioneer Truck Co., Mueh- 
Holywasser Co., Inc., Foreman & 
Davenport Co., .Arrow Market, 
De La Mater Bros., G. O. Wilker- 
son. Hilcrest Drug Co., .Auto 
Metal Works, Kruse Candy Co., 
Silver Gat^ Oil Co., Lamb & 
Hinckley, John Mayer, N. D. 
Nichols, Star Builders Supply Co., 
San Diego Feed Mills, Back Coun- 
try Transportation Co., Merchants 
Special Delivery, P. O. Bakery, T. 
Rossman, J. Fred Kahle, Elite 
Printing Co., Green Rovia, Cali- 
fornia Garage Co., San Diego 
Desk Co., Denver Cash Market, 
S. P. Cobb, Ingle Mfg. Co., Pacific 
Transfer Van & Storage Co., Wil- 
son S. Smith & Co., Geo. Walker 
for National Cash Register Co., 
Wiley B. Allen Co., Wm. Holmes, 
R. L. G. Wright. Geo. B. Irvin. 
Jordan. Irwin & Co., Pacific Sheet 
W. T. Kirby, J. M. Purdy, Henry 
Metal Works, Hub Clothing Co., 
Campbell Machine Co., Three 
Bovs Transfer Co.. Golden State 
Hat Co., A. H. Dauchy, Plaza 
Pharmacv. Modern Backet Gro- 
,erv Co.. Sanitary Tee Cream Co., 
Svher Gate Soda Works, W . J. 


T T P K" n '^^^' evening and morning was ilion. Dcmers and Weitekamp, 
gr by Kev I. t. KoDinson ^^^^ ^ Benbough & Gelon, Whitney & Co.,: Pierce- Field ' 

.on in the even tenor of ^ t-, • tt ttj U tr j r^ us r^ 

Bi.- -on Store, Electric Home, I^dwe. Co.fHazardj Gould; & Co., 


For Great Meeting 


Lincoln 



Affiliated with Republican Feder- 
ation of Southern California 


Club 


|. A. WARREN. Secretary. 
!957 Maple Avenue 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE 
FRIDAY EVENING APRIL 

Odd Fellows's Hall, 8th and Wall Sb. 
Scott's Hall, 361 Central Ave. 



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3- ',•'•!'■ |=tSt •'■?"«•« >=!i"i 


M. T. Laws 


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Cap force 


J. D. Reynolds 


Author of Race 
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And Other 


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PORTERS - WAITERS 
CHEFS - MAIDS 

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RAILROAD CLATTER 

Through the Eagle megaphone 
—All a'bode! 


The California Eagle is for sale 
at the Pullman Barber Shop, 519 

Ceres avenue. 

Subscriptions taken, office 1034 
East 9th street, Los Angeles, The 
California Eagle. 


A quaint wedding wan solemn- 
ired at high noon, April 8. 1914, at 
8t. Phillips Epiicopal Church. 
The paetqr. Father CleRhorn, oflB- 
ciating, when Miss Myrtle May 
fiaker, daughter of Mrs, Edward 
L. Baker, Jr. and the late Capl. E- 
L. Baker, U. S. A. of this city be- 
came the bride of Mr. Thomas 
Kuykendall, recently of Topeka, 
Kansai. The bride's mother, Mrs. 
K. L. Baker, Jr., assisted as matron 
of honor. The bride was born in 
Ft. Grant, Arizona, 22 years ago 
and later moved to the Philippine 
Islands, where her father was sta- 
tioned. The services took place in 
th