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W r E K L Y 


NOVFM 


3, 193 


REDUCED 


IF 


on the f| 
sidewalk 


POl 
' PARTMENT is being made ov- 


I OS ANGELES POLICE DE- 


BT. Frayed edges hitherto at the 
bottom «re being brushed, shined. 
and Bioved up. 

AikT while even greater chang- 
•V than these are in the offing, 
; OJloped police oncers are silent- 
^Ay wendering jiist what position 
jr they -will hold in the new arrange- 
r ment 

Promotions are often denied 

Nefrt>e9 in all departments of 

. government on the flimsy excuse 

th*t\th«y have not had sufficient 

'. training through application and 

; experience. 

Th» California Eagle not only 
believes, but firmly advocates the 
merit system by competitive ex- 
aminations for aU Americans in 
all departments of govemmentl. 

BRIDGING THE CHASM— But 
in order to bridge any excuse for 
• "no promotion" in the police de- 
partment while changes are in 
process, the Eagle is asking Mayor 
Bowron and Chief of Police James 
E. Davis to follow the example of 
such metropolitan centers as Chi- 
cago's great Southside and New 
York's Harlem in our Newton sta- 
tion set-up. 

The fuU complement of officers, 
clerics, stenographers, telephone 
operators, etc., should total 129— 
at Newton Street instead there 
are an hundred and eleven. A frac- 
tion of this small force are Ne- 
groes. 

Throughout the tangled under- 
growth of sub-departments which 
is a peculiar feature of the Los 
Angeles Police Department — the 
Bunco Squad, Intelligence divi- 
sion, etc.-^there are no Negroes. 
In this immense field of employ- 
ment Afro-Americans are not rep- 
resented. 

But in Newton Street the ges- 
ture has been made. Acting Cap- 
tain Homer C. Garrett has proved 
M himself an exceHoit public-' aer- 
^ pant, and the general conduct bt 
otber officers has been exemplary.' 
Since, then, this onecrevice in the 
city police system has been al- 
lowed black Americans, why not 
make it worth while? Why not 
give Ne^oes the opportunity to 
ftmction in all p4iases of the New- 
to nstreet service? In the great 
central bureaus and 'divisions they 
are tacitly excluded. Alright. But 
let us have this employment ex- 
r -rience in our own local station! 
Telephone opertaors, desk ser- 
geants, jailers, stenographers, 
clerks, departmental iMads, and 
the numberless in-between work- 
ers of the modern gendarmerie — 
all these should be Negroes! 

It was done in Chicago! It was 
done in New York! Why not in 
Los Angeles? 
•/ * 

THE RECENT HOP into the 
Republican ranks staged by 
Bobert F. Vanh. publisher of the 
Pittsburgh Courier, has met with 
come very bitter criticism here 
and there about the country. 

One prominent Negro Democrat 
termed the action 'Tjolitical de- 
sertion" a;^d ill-conceived "in a 
man who has gained so much 
t(u:ough democratic patronage." 

: It is recalled that Vann perpe- 
ti«ted » similar stunt in 1932 ' 
when he forsook battle-scarred ' 
OOP forces. 

Although several prdnMnent na- 
tional characters have seen fit 
to interpret this turn of affairs as 
seme sort of national c^Umity, 
wa cannot work up much emo- 
tiomal unrest over it. In fact, the 
'WtNBle exhibition reacts upon us 
M . ^rffth a great calmness — an almost 
\ stunning placfdity. 
^ ■ Pierhaps we are dense. At any 
rife, it is hard to perceive wherein 
tM political affiliation of such a 
fBghty individual as pubished 
VjKSA could be of far-reaching im- 
pbrtance one way or the other. In 
t&« immortal words of Al Smith 
^■^oit's look at the record!" Vann's 
c^rneer has been one long string of 
bfief BOJOums in one or the other 

3 both jartieSvHe has supported 
d denounced identical measures 
with, identical vigor. Indeed, 
V^ann holds some sort of national 
rtcord asia self-contradictor. The 
vieiasitudes of life are noaght 
compared with the vicissitude* of 
a'VkjOB editorial policy. You nev- 
ct know what to expect and n 
xm^By happens. 

"S^ now, the great political 
mfnift should ha^ enhanced 
"lig^ Vann" with, the label 

WHOLE TOWN'S in an 
vpioar." Thus wrote the Cali- 
fe*nia Eagle's first Texas repre- 
icntatiye from Galveston, where 
the venerable bird of the West 
haa aKfMed in its first journey 
mit <rf the home state. 

With subscriptions roUing mto 
the l<AC£CiE offices from Texas at 
the rate o£ fifty or more per week, 
a seaaational succew ia predict^ 
for the new "Texas supplement. 
Differing from "home town 
^ aections in other leading publica- 
tions, the BAGLE Texas division 
^^iH be no dull recital of unim- 
ilbortant town happenings. Replete 
" (ea^MCd ea page 7-A) 



Editor;s Radiotppo||Oj^^d Lftbor Bill 

Editorials ' i .1^ , _ M^^^' n « • 

Mold Opinion Reveal^o By Bai^kiiis 

AMEN DMENJr WOULD 
DEFINITELY CUiSSIFY 
LABOR CONTRACTOR 


FlyOliENCE COLE TALBOT, soprano, who will star in the giant 
benefit for the Tuberculosis Rest % le sponsorea by the Out- 
door Life and Health Association Au'.iliary No. I Sunday at the 
Patriotic Auditorium. 1816 South Figueroa Street. 



POSTPONE MEETING 
AT 2ND BAPTIST 

Because Governor Frank F. 
Merriam i? unavailable in the 
northern piart of the state, the 
meeting scheduled for tomorrow 
night at the 2rt<| Baptist . Chun* 
has been cancelled. However^ vo- 
ters interested in a livdy^|»r^ 
cussion of amendments and «Jth- 
■«r - vital - eleetion cjuesf ions are 
invited to attend a ForjAjn 
AssAnj 
nia 
Avenue, to; 



In compients anent the foreign 
situation, Mrs. C. K Bass, EAGLE 
editor-publisher, has maintained 
a score of "no fumbles," no loss- 
es," and "all touchdowns", in her 
weekly appearances on the ether 
waves |(KGFJ: 8:15 p. m.). 

Tabulation made in the Eagle 
editorial rooms' this week re- 
vealed that Mrs. Bass predictions 
and comments have rung true 
one hundred percent. Directly 
following the Four Power Pact, 
the world shook with rumors of 
a "New Peace". Editorials in the 
leading metropolitan' papers sta- 
ted that "no time sinpe 1914 has 
the world stood so fine a chance 
of continued peace". 

At this time, Urs. Bass (on the 
Thursday evening of, the confab) 
predicted that its- magnanimous 
provisors would effect no im- 
mediate or wide-range solation 
of Europe's involved poUtical en- 
tanglement. Within a week, pub- 
lic opinion and events swung to 
this belief. "Our editor" had beat- 
en observ .rs for Columbia and 
National Broadcasting systems by 
a full week. Statistics reveal that 
Mrs Bass comments from Los 
Angeles were more nearly correct 
than those of. several nationally 
know^n experts broadcasting from 

various' parts of Europe. 

Mrs. Bass' army of fans made 
themselves known in a striking 
fashion when she did not appear 
last Thursday, lue to technical 
difficulties. -Although, gome pro- 
tests were expected, KGFJ exec- 
utives and the EAGLE radio 
staff were amazed at the flood 
of telephone and mail demanding 
in no uncertain terms, Mrs. Bass' 
appearance. Smith and BuH ad- 
vertising, agents handling; "The 
Ne«»- Kfewspaper of the Air ",^ 
stiifep T(nrt--thi»-iR+ one it, the \j^mv « fa» 
f ^difr^jB^j^-Sglfc^ 


Proposed Bill Climaxitt EAGLE'S Compoign 
Agoinsf llifomous 'Wilfhii't Aportment Service' 
Here; Militont Astembl|ymon Brings Bill to Heod 

A proposed bill to dmend the California State 
Labor Code is the climax of an EAGLE campaign 
against the notorious "V^ilshire Apartment Service" 
which stirred a sensation io few months ago, Assem- 
blyman Augustus Hawkinjs revealed this week. 

The new amendments would' 


""■■HE 


MRS. FAUS-nNA JOHNSON, 
prominent civic leder, suffering 
from a broken leg, was removed 
from the General Hospital to St. 
Vincent's Thursday. Although 
condemned to the bed by doc- 
tor's orders, Mrs. Johnson con- 
tinues her militant battles on the 
political front from "Room 549." 

The progressive leader of the 
powerful Women's Breakfast 
club is well-known throughout 
the city and state for her work 
in behalf of the group. She is con- 
sidered one of the community's 
prime assets. 

The many hundreds of her 
friends join the EAGLE in wish- 
ing her "A HAPPY CONVALES- 
CENCE:" 


Presents Bishop 
With An 'All- 
Colored' Melon 

MUSKOGEE, Okla.. Nov. 3,— 
At the conclusion of last Tues- 
day's meeting here of the board 
of trustees of Flipper-Davis coll- 
ege, located near Tullahassee, Ok- 
la., a novel gift was presented to 
Bishop H. Y. Tookes who presid- 
ed at the .meeting by the Rev. 
A. C. Spahn, well known Okla- 
homan. The minister's ^present 
t othe Bi^op was a luscious 
watermelon, on- which was in- 
scribed: 

"This watermelon was grown 
b^ a: eoinmi man, on land own- 
ed by a colored man, picked by 
colored help, transported in a 
colored tmck, delivered by a col- 
ored taxi-driv(V. and presented 
by a colored AI%.? minister to our 
revered Bishop Henry Young 
Tooikes, a colored leader of Meth- 
odiflm in Arkansat and Oklabo- 
ma, and the- ffaiest bishop in the 
AME comiMitiOB." 


SLIM CHANCES FOR 
RAIN ELECTION DAY 

ChancesC of rainy weather in 
Northern California on the date 
of the general election, Novem- 
ber 8, are only one in five, and 
for Southern California one i^ 
ten, according to weather bureau 
records covering the p^t 67 
years. The records were check- 
ed by the U. S. Weather Bureau 
of Jian Francisco. 

i__ 


program itself, heard 
tly except Saturday and Sun- 
--^Pffay, is deemed among the front- 
* *'line of popular presentations loc- 
ally broadcast. The sports com- 
ments of J. Cullen Fentress and 
Miss Helen F. Chapelle's famed 
"style chats" are other weekly 
highlights. 


New sensational ideas are be- 
ing concocted by the special fea- 
tures department of the Negro 
Newspaper of the Air and John 
Q Public is advised by the wisees 
of the, air-lhnes to "get that 
EAGLE habit"! 


Now Dfl 
Scripture Sex: 

That "Thyjdrif shall be as a 
• fruitful vine by the sides of 
thine house: thy children like 
olive plants round about thy 
table," ao my Aunt gota 
hunch that Ht was upon this 
holy writ that the Simmons 
family was established! 

Yours untn some people's 
vines will rfo loiter be fruit- 
ful, £ugene Henry Huffman. 



establish domestic and other la-i 
bor contractors as private 9m-\ 
ployment agencies. A "slave rack-j 
et" had been evolved through i^ 
loophole in the present Labor 
Code which allowed domestic- 
contractors to hire laborers and 
sell their services at a profit of 
twenty-five percent per week. 
So skillful were these organiza-i 
tions camouflaged that they were 
not called upon even for the reg- 
ular employment agency license 

fee. 

When several domestic workers 
brought their plight to the SAGt 
LE,. "efforts instantly were madf 
to classify the nondescript or- 
ganizations which acted as "vul-!- 
tures .of the pay-envelope". No 
satisfaction was received froa) 
the division of Labor Law En4 
forcement, since the Labor Cod^ 
failed to recognize them. { 

However, the Wilahire Apartj 
ment Service, firtt threatenini 
}aw suits,disorganized and asser 

■ ]g.jtttr'SaB,Er«RCtf|_^ 

.l^e new measure definitel: 
classifying the labor contractor^, 
was brought to a head by milit- 
ant Assemblyman Agustus Hawl- 
kins. The proposal marks a nevf 
milestone of security for the Ne* 
gro domestic worker, it is said. 

The bill reads: 'Any person^ 
service, bureau, organization^ 
club or school, which by adver-i- 
tisement or otherwise offers, \t 
one of its main objects or purposi 
es, to procure employment for 
any person who will pay for it* 
services, or that collects dues^ 
tuition, or membership or regisf 
tration fees of any sort,, where 
the main object of the persoa 
paying the same is to secure emt 
ployment . . .comes under thi 
Labor code regulation for private 
employmenft ageneies." 


Merriam'j 
gear this 
promineat 
the GOP 


Big GOP Doings! 

One of the most outstanding| 
successes of the recent "out-'i 
"hMak" of political rallies, con-! 
falts, "get-togethers", etc., was 
the^jneeting held Sunday after- 
noon ^«t the Melroise Hotel, 120 
South l^rand Avenue, by the Re- 
publican County GCBtral com- 
mittee for \the 44th distritt 

Principal apeaker of the after- 
noon was the Hon. Vembn Day. 
Other speakers were Dr. Ralph 
Walker, pastor Of the Temple 
Baptist Church, wHo voiced the 
support of Baptists Xor incum- 
bent governor Frank \F. Mer-i 
riam; Mrs. . Olson, representing 
Dr. Walter Scott PrankUh; Mr 
Weir, Ernest Q. Norman; Jjqnes 
Musatti; and William D. Camp- 
bell, outstanding congressional^ 
candidate in the fourteenth dis- 
trict ; • 

The meeting I featured brilliant 
musical interludes and refresh- 
ments galore. 

Another rally will be held 
Sunday afternoon and promises 
much information and entertain- 
ment for smart voters. 


Merriam Is 
The Man! 

Governor Frank F. 
campaign hits high 
week as news of 
Democrats entering 
forces was made known. 

Merriam, whose reelection is 
virtually assured despite heavy 
Democratic majorities, is consid- 
ered one of the nation's leading 
executives. His administration 
record is being studied in sever- 
al states. The balanced budget, 
reduced taxation, etc., are points 
which no political enemy can at- 
tack. 

Negroes, particularly, are flock- 
ing from Democratic ranks to 
support the incumbent, reports 
state. It is said that colored vot- 
ers realize the economic* "disas- 
ter" which would follow the pro- 
posed hit-and;miss government 
of' other candidate. In any. sucb^ 
L many believe, N^pofC; 
V^tm worst; hence tiious- 
atods are shifting to the Merriam 
ranks. 

Leo Carrillo, star of the stage 
and screen artd a life long Demo- 
crat, today declared he will stand 
with the American Legion and 
the American _ Federation of La- 
bor in their fight to ix)ut radical 
dements from California by re- 
electing Gov. Frank F. Merrialn 
at Next Tuesday's election. 

Carrillo, a member of one of 
California's oldest families, re- 
iterated his reasons for support- 
ing Governor Merriam against 
the radical-endorsed Democratic 
candidate, in a letter to Harold 
English, Chairman of the Good 
Government Democrats of Calif- 
ornia. 

CarrUlo is a director of the 
Oempcratic organization, along 
with Irvin S. Cobb, Mrs. Eleanor 
Banning McFarland, Jefferson P- 
Chandler and other prominent 
Democrats. His letter to En^ish 
follows: 

"I think it is the duty biev- 
ery Califomian who has theru- 
ture of his state at heart to com- 
l>at the radical elements existing 
in our state^ politics. 
, "I am a Democrat, but I can- 
not agree with the candidate 
heading the Democratic party's 
gubernatorial campaign op many 
of the important issues for which 
he stands, and I am utterly sup- 
rised that certain candidates who 
vigorously denounced him during 
the primaries are now his sup- 
porters. 

"Opportunists are not for the 
good of this jUate and I am thor- 
oughly agaihk their 'isms' or any 
other un-American influences 
may endeavor to impose upon us. 

"I stand with the American 

gion and the American Federa- 
tidn of Labor in this fight against 
radical elements and I shall exert 
every \fffort to help keep Calif- 
ornia otit ef the Ham and Egs* 

Mine \ 



FRANK ^ MiatRIAl*. Jncumbient ftnd'lead6iig candidate for gover- 
nor. His spectacular campaign smashes to a firrBh this week with 
•wholesale walk-outs by Democrats into the GOP camp Leo Carillo, 
movie-star and life-long Donkeyite, is the latest recruit to the Gov- 
ernor's legions. A smashing victory is predicted for Merriam at 
the poUs Tuesday, 

NA^P to Discuss Problems 
of Negro Youth of Todoy 

What the Negro Youth of To-^by Mrs. Zelma Watson Duke will 
day is Thinking will be tne themo 
for the regular meetingjof the N. 
A. A. C. P. Representatpe young 
people and those older people 
who are interested in the welfare 
of the youth of today will present 
the program. 

The program ?vill be conduct- 
ed in the foi^ of* an informal in 


clas. 

"For tho^ reasons, I shall vote 
for the re-election of Governor 
Merriam." \ 


1 8-Year-Old Youth He«e; 
Esicoped f romiPeohoge n^rm 


J. B. BASS, late editor-in-chief of the California fegk^^Today markl 
the fourth anniversary of his death. But is he really deaSvi;^e mein- 

ory of a great leader remains. More. The memory of a kindfj^, gen- 

erous man. Thoughts of J. B. Basa> are ah in^iration — and perhaps, | Saturday evening, 

"Services were held Wednesday 
with interment in Woodlawn 


after all, this is the most important part of living. 

"NEGR6 NEWSPAPlfek OF THE Alft' 

8:15 P. M^KGFJ 
Ni^itty Neweaster — John Kintoch 

♦Thursday-^Editorial Comment: Editor-Publiiier C A. Bass 
♦Friday — Sepia Sportscast: J. Cullen Fentress 
♦Monday— Society— Helen F. ChappeU 
♦Tuesday — News 

♦Wednesday— News '^ .^ 

PreoMted by S. JL Saherar, Ante and Fnnitim Loans 


Pioneer Citizen 
Passes 


SANTA MONICA, Nov. 3— A 
pioneer GaUfpmian and resident 
of this Bay City for 41 years^ 
John Walter Moxley, barber died 
i;t his home, 15^. Euclid Avenue, 



Cemetery. . . 

Surviving Mr. Moxley are hli 
wife, Mrs. Etta V. Moxley, ^>rom- 
inent in club circles, a daughter, 
Honore Moxley Carey, a teacher 
at the LaFayette Junior High 
school in Los Angeles, and three 
sisters, Mrs. Alice Johnson and 
Mrs. Etta.. Vena, of Toledo. Ohio 
and- Mrs. Emma Hogan of Cleve- 
land, Ofaiflk J *;. .• 


An 18-year-old youth, fugitive 
from' a Louisiana peonage fa^, 
enrolled at Jefferson High schopl 
this week, the first school he has.^ 
ever attended. The youth whose 
name is being withheld in order 
to relieve him of embarrassment 
was given his chance for an ed- 
ucation by Hattie Noels, buxom 
comedian, member of Eddie Can- 
tor's radiocast program. \ 


terview arid Clarence Engliso 
will lead the interview. 

The World Youth Movement 
will be discussed by Wendell 
Green. The work of the State 
Youth Conference will be ex- 
plained by Buelah Terry;. Local 
,youth agencies will be discussed 
by Dorothy C. Guinn and What 
the younger Negro writers of to- 
day are thinking will be presen- 
ted by Miriiam Matthews. 

Each of these young persons 
is especially well prepared V^o 
discuss his particular pha« of 
the youth ^mov^ent. Wendell 
Green is theT)resident of the As- 
sociated Mens' Student organiza- 
tion of L. A. C. C. Mr. Qnen 
was present at the Nktional Y^th 
Coneference which was heM at 
Vassar College. Miss Beulah ft'er- 
ry is an acawnplished young wo- 
man who hai*<*iad an activelpart 
in the state youth conference. 
She was present at the recer.t 
state conference which was held 
in San Franbisco. m5 Dorothy 
C Guinn is the efficient secre- 
tary of the local Y. W. C. A. Miss 
Marian I Matthews is the Librarian 
in chaise of the Vernon Branch 
of the public library. 

Throu^ the courtesy of Cla'^- 
ence ISaae^two Hollywood stars 
will prpCDt clever numbers. 
. Miss Victoria Rice and Miss Idelle 
Johnson will play a violin and 
piano ensemble. The Avalon 
Christian Church choir, directed 

Double Trouble- for This 
Man! Hot Twins at 


sing. Mrs. Jesje Cole Grayson, 
accompanied by Mrs. Whittake^, 
■will serve as soiist for the after- 
noon.* 

Henry Gibson will review cur- 
rent topics. 

The program committee which 
has as its activv.- members. Mrs. 
Hazel Whitaker, Mrs. C. Forney,- 
Mrs. Anna M. Morrow, Mrs. Cv 
Terry, Mr. Clarence English, and 
Mr. Geo. Beavers invites all 
young people and all other peo- 
ple who are interested in ^« 
problems of the Negro Youth ot 
today to be present. 

IN CONCERT DEPUT 



^u^e^oesfi't 
Muse Totdoy^ 

Due to techileal dlflleiilttei 
"Clarenioe Mnse-A-taU^ U 
Ton" dMs not kntearttJs week. 
Readers of this Interestinf col- 
wnn wni meet Mr. Muse onee 
Htin Mzl/RMuwtay.- 


,i N 


^^^. 



Tuesday. November 8th, A« 
Second Baptist Choir will pres- 
ent ERNESTINE JONES WADE, 
soprano, in concert in the church 
auditorium, 24th and Griffith," 
promptly at 8:30 o'dotdr 

Altho wen known in local mus- 
ic circles, and having been « 
member of the Second , Bsptiw 
S^ioir, since childhood, serving 
%£ organist, pianist and then sing- 
er, this will t>e the yoimg sing- 
er's initial concert. She is a pu- 
T3il of Mme. Adeline ~ 


Mn<l Tw,,.. AU^^^Ji P" °^ Mme. Aoeime Dosseifa, 
,. ""■ ' T""" ^DfOaai I heao of the voice departmen^ at 
(ANr)— frank Savage, ae- ! Wilkin's Piano Academy, and her 

progress points to a successful 

fiiture. 


of being the fatlier «f U- 
Ite twins by a woman 
„-,^ money for their sap-' 
port, ins in court last week to 
■iiow oMii^ why be was onaMe 
to pay any^dng . Ho wsa rap- 
noeated by^Sy. R. T!>oaa- 
taJn ndio exiSaiiMd ttat 'Sav- 
afe. Mwly miMfd. also had 
a Mw set of twfta at hamt. 

Ho amd, mteSnaa ww^ 
to do the best be 
^Mnor, but eonsidor hfai' 
>MB(, uMi fwiM at _. 
tndns abmad." FiaaUy 
was petnadod to pay (be 
tiff lit iMTB mm\ 



B. 


p- 



Prior to, embarking -upon"* 
singing ' caiieer. this young wom- 
an won distinction as a d^d 
pianist in Wilkin's Piano Acad- 
emy. She was known widely as 
Baby Ernestine Jozres, and attrac- 
ted a latge following with her 
abili^ and style, which remamed 
loyal thru her transition to song. 

As a special feature on Tues- 
da3»'s program. Mr. Lester Hairs- 
ton will read several original 
Lucille Banton-Blayech- 
will accompenr the soloist 




ii 


PAdE 2..A 




EAGLE ^Ypu May Neyer knwv It HappenqB 




«tr. 


IT'S THE "KICK-OFF" FOR GOLDEN STATE MUTUAL IN CHICAGO 


BELOW: It's a -touchdown for Alex W. Stephens whn sold the first SSOOOlife policy on the annual payment plan. Stephens is shown in the reception room of the Chicago office 
with his client receiving congratulations from officials. " 

ABOVE '— The managerial 


Avenue in Pasa- 


XiingerNot" club 
.coilnprising sub-Aebs 
prominent South- 
will meet in Pw- 
adena this Satuirday afternoon .' . 
with member PauUyn Garner as 
hostess . . .busiijes of "grave" im- 
portance will undoubtedly pre- 
cede the funmjaking that is to' 
follow . . .Nancy Balch, Gloria 
Roberts, Gloria ! Russell, Florence 
are among 


forthcoming 
wedding of Mi|ss LaRita Clari- 
e^te to Richar<J Grant will be 
Pasadenans Mrsf Julia Robinson- 
iLockheart and Audley Cole, Jr.,- 

. . .in the weddipg entourage ... 
Mmes. Kenneth i Mack and Will- 1 
iam Long will serve as assistants 
during the wedc^ing reception . . . 
the ClariettC'Grant banns will be 
solemnizecJ on Sjinday, November 
sixth in the Peoples Independent 
Church of Christ. 

Members of the Pasadena Com- 
munity Sing AssJ)ciation Woman's 
Auxiliary feted Mrs. Joseph Mims 
1117 Lincoln Avenue, with a 
stork shower . 1. .Sunday after- 
noon last . . .calling to present 
gifts for the expected heir were 
Mmes. Pearl Fairfax, Marie GiU- 
em, Lillian Ford, BeUe Boston, 
Netta Paullyn (Jamer, Gertrude 
Wiggins. . .Mrs. Marie Gillem op- ' 
ened her homel which adjoins 
the Mims' housrf.for a tea, con- 
point wit hthe shower. 

FIRST AFRICAN METHODIST 
Comer N. Vernon Ave. and Ken- 
sington Place. 

Rev. J. M. Brown, pastor; Rev. 
Wm. Prince, assisitant pastor. Sun- 
day School, 9:30; Walter Worrill 
superintendent; , classes for ell 
ages; Rev. E. M. Scott, teacher of 
Adult Bible Class held in main 
auditorium. Morning public wor- 
ship; preaching by the presiding 
elder, Rev. F. Aj Harris; the oc- . 
casion being th^ first quarterly' 
meeting for the i new conference 
year. Special Music by the senior 
choir, Dr. J. H. McRiley, director; 
Vivian McRiley at the or4 
gan. The Lord's Supper will be 
administered. Allien Christian 
Endeavor. 6:30. \Hth a very rich 
program by the young people: 
Moulton Johnson, leader. Evening 
worship, 7:45. preaching again 
by the presiding elder. Quarterly 
conference business meeting wiil 
be held Monday evening, report.s 
from all departments for the 
quarter. 

Prayer and class service Wed- 
nesday evening. All are cordially 
invited to worship with us. 


and agency staff of the Illinois 
branch of the Golden State Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company 
are shown at their first annual 
rally dinnefr in Chicago held at 
Wabash Y. M. C. A. on October 
. J 5. The occasion marked the 
launching of the first "football" 
production contest in Illinois. 
Jn the picture, reading from 
left to right, are Gary B. Lewis. 
Alton A. Davis. LaVem Cheat- 
ham, Joseph Dogan, Chester W. 
Brewer, Robert 'Tuhner, Benja- 
min F. Jack, Jr.,- Victor Nick- 
erson, George A. Beavers, Jr , 
vice-president and director of 
agencies; Robert W. Smith, as- 
ustant director agencies and in 
charge of the Chicago office: 
Louis* M. Bennett. Roben B. 
Glover, Alex W. Stpphenx, E. 
T. Looper, Richard A. CroUey, 


LOS ANGELES AND 
PASADENA SOCIETY 

By GEORGE GARNER 



Members of the youthful "Late Four o'clock 
:lub . . . end several of the Sing Association juniors . 
. . got together for a rousing good time 'with an Hal- 
lowe'en party . . . held Saturday night lost in the Garn- 
er Foundation . . . with punch and apples and horns . 

notwithstanding the 


Jr . James W. Stamps, and Mel- 
vin HilL 


Friendship BoptistChurch 

Dayton Street and Delacey Avenue 
For: Spiritual and Intellectual Advancement 
SERVICES: 
SUNDAY, 

Teachers' Devotional: 9:00-9:15 

Sunday School : 9:00-10:45 

Morning Worship: 11:00 o'clock 

2 STIRRING SERMONS 

By the PASTOR 

W. D. CARTER 

Evening Worship: 7:30 P.M. 

"WHO ARE YOU?" 

Church nurses: Irene Berry and Madeline Burch 

core for your infants while you worship. 


veird shad- 
ows made by the decorations . . . 
and dancing on the gl = s.sv floor 
to swing recordings . . amusing 
and varied costumes . and a 
"clammy handshake" at ihe door 


for each new arrival . . .in be- 
tween the din and clarion of cow- 
bells and horn, the youngsters 
lined up for the "Lambeth Walk" 
. . .enjoying themselves were the 
Misses Doris Prince who came as 
a Spanish "toreadoress"; Aileen 
"Cooky" Cooke in her grass-skirt- 
ed hula costume; Lois Prince, 
Dorothy Perry. Jacqueline and 
Gloria Bunch, all as very "little" 
girls; PauUyn Garner as an Ap- 
ache: Gloria Mims as a gypsy; 
Carolyn Callier as a "danseuse"; 
Jeanne Morrow, Lucille Fairfax, 
Creola Anderson, Esther Young, 
Imogene Thompson . . .Chester 
Johnson, Aaron Fairfax. George 
rhomas, Robert Cunningham, 
William Ellis, Robert Farlice. 
Dudley Adkins, Joseph Mims, 
John Anderson, Arthur Callier, 
D«vid Scott, Rufus Blake . . . 
Chaperoning were: Mmes. Callier, 
'Erma~ Perry, Netta Paullyn Gar- 


ner . . .Don Butler, Ada Keys and 
Wendell Franklin assisted with 
decorations and music. 

Visiting in Pasadena is Mrs. 
Johnson Holloway of Chicago 
Mrs./ Holloway is stopping at 


The Reverend Karl Downs' it- 
inerary will include The Balti- 
more Youth Fotum, Baltimore 
Mao'Iand; Princeton, New Jersey 
and New York. 


DID YOU KNOW— John Casso-, 
one of the first Negroes brought 
to this country hy the Dutch in' 
i619 became an owner of slaves 
in Virginia, 



FOI 


O^^I^^S'tKE 


^ I 


til 


Propontioni 3 and 4 will work 
amuing improTcmenta, giv* 
yoW b«tt«r highwaya, and 
■ai«giuzd Uv«s and property, 
with poaitiyfy mm lm€rtiU9 

fa tWMSf 

Numb«r 3 (AaH-Gaa-Tax 
DiTOTakm Amendmant) 
protacta tha adaquata 
praaant lavwnuea for 
highway aaf aty and bat- 
tarmant. Numbar 4 
(Stat* mghway and Traf- 
Ue Safaty Conuniaaion 
InitiatiTa} providaa an 
•eenomical and aiiac- 
ttra full time administra- 
tkm td SUta Highway 
attain and traffic aafaty. 

MITSfllOUU CLUB 

•f JSOUTHIRN CAUrOKNIA 


i.K' - ,!-S^ 


vifc^. 



Proposition 10 

WILL RUIN 
OUR BEACHES 

Vote NO 


PROPOSITION No. H) authomes OIL 
WELLS IN OCEAN (fldeland drlllingl— thi$ 
meant oil smeared b«aches — polluted waters 
— destrucfion of the natural beauty e4 our 
shoreline. 

If this measure is not defeated Catifornia n« 
longer will be famous for its^b•a6hes. 


i^im CAN'T AFFORD TO FIGHT YOUR WAY TO WORK 

FARMERS 

^ aN'T AFFORD TO FIGHT YOUR WAY TO MARKETS 

PUBLIC 

^fiU CANT AFFORD TO FIGHT YOUR WAY l6 STORES 


k 


Proposition 10, a Vicious Measure 

should be defeated . , . VOTE NO/ 


Shoreline Planning Association 

OP CALIFORNIA 

etaAMlZIO IN IW lY CHAMHM Of COMHIHei Of 



M*ith«tf«« 
(tlMI Club) 


(CMt Uaiw4 


PROPOSITION NO. 24 h anofhar maaiura 
le datfrey our Baaehas. Vata NO aa 24 


Save your job, protect your 
constitutional rights- and insure 
your own and your family's wel- 
fare from violence in labor disputes. Vote YES on # 1 
and end labor leaders' warfare. Stop the killing of pay 
checks by mass picketing, racketeering, brute force. 

Employees have their rights. Employers have their rights. 
The public has its rights. All are specifically prdtcaed by 
Proposition #1. It does not destroy any union or the right 
to join any union. It does not interfere with the right to 
Strike or with peaceful picketing if disagreement* are over 
wages, hours, or physical conditions of employment. Prop- 
osition # 1 guarantees a fair and peaceful deal for every- 
body. Individual rights, freedom of speech and action art, 
upheld. i 

With Proposition :^l, there will be no mass control of 
sidewalks; no intimidation; no use of force to Sjioil crops 
in harvesting or on their way to market. It makels for just 
labor-peace, steady jobs, regular pay checks, better times 
for all. 

Don't wait until election day to work for Prjjposition 
#1. Explain its value to your friends. WORK. TALK and 
be sure to vote "YES" on #1 November 8th. ] 

VOTEYES 

*1 



eiNIMl SUCTION NOV. tTH 


PROTECT YOUR JOB AND YOUR |tlGHTS 

-. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIANS, INC » j 

CALIFORNIA t COMMITTEE FOR PEACE IN EMPUOYMENT RBLATIONS 




Coimn^.^^ 


i«y,Novemb«rV[938i 


in Expansion Proposal 


According to statements r*. 
ceived here, the Reverend J. ^. 
CXileman, minister of the newly 
organized Community Baptist 
Church, plans are under" way to 
purchase the building in which 
the church has held services since 
its beginnings less tl>*n a month 
ago. This plan is in accordance 
with the church's intention to 


On Simday morning at Scott | 
Methodist rEpiscopai Church, th«| 
Reverend Karl E. Downs spoka 
from the text found in DanielJ 
16:6, "Thy God Whom. Thou Ser- 
vest Continuously, ite Will De- 
liver ThesBi", was the subject of 
the sermon delivered botore a 
large and worshipful audience. 

The Epw«t-th Leag'je, under the 


carry on a unique program for | leadership of Miss Nella de Lon 

the community and yet not ov.er- • was well attended: and tiie dis- 
lap the present church M-ograms cussion was timely 


that have been in existeixe here- 
tofore. 

This idea includes remodelling 
of the present building to ac- 
comodate the church — serving the 
present need. 'Vacant lots north 
of, the building are being used 
for the playground. The build- 
ing is divided into auditorium, 
social hall and two offices. 

Though at present the adjoin- 
ing building is leased to a rest- 
aurant, the plan also includes the 
annexation of this properly to 
become the holding of the church 
and as soon as the property is 
vacated to. include both build- 
ings. 

It has been said that Reverend 
Coleman is not only endorsed by 
the National Baptist' Convention; 
but also by the Internatiomi 
Council of Religious Education— 
an organization composed of the 


City wide talent participated in 
the monthly musical , sponsored 
by the choir: and at "7:30 P. M. 1 
Levi Mills opened the program 
with several well renderei organ 
selections and readings. 

Thoroughly popular with young 
as well as the elder church-goers 
the monthly musical series will 
be a regular feature, at the 
church. 

Reverend Kafi E. Downs, pas- 
tor of thtf Scott M. E. Church here 
has been called East on a speak- 
ing tour. He will leave Sunday 
evening, November sixth. 

This engagement wiU mark 
Reverend Downs' fourth appear- 
ance before Eastern and Middle- 
western forums, chuiwhes and 
conferences. His first address 
was before a delegation of church 
leaders at the "United Methodist 


42 vari-denominational Protestant ' Council", at which lime he spoke 
churches of America. 

Reverend Coleman has begun 
his work ir Pasadena following 
a survey made by hgfi in both 
Los Angeles and Pasadena. His 
findings spurred him to begin the 
new church which he now pas- 
tors. 


at Chicago concerning the "Fu- 
ture of Faith -arid Service". 

Shortly before hi manage last 
June, Reverend Downs prea<^ 
in Foion: and an address 
Methodist Youth Council was 
livered at Boulder, Colorado ear-^ 
ly in September. 


COMMUNITY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

No. Fair Oaks Avenue at Hammond Street 
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 


The Church with A Program— 
A Minister with A Message" 


Reverend J. W. Coleman, Pastor 

Bible School :9:30 A.M. 

Preaching : 11 :00 A. M. and 8 :00 P. M. 



KEEP CAUrORNIA 
OUT OF THE 


• Twenty year^ peace in CaKforaia . . . 
then came Bridges and his CIQ. . . . fmir- 
teen years industrial strife . .'. onr mer- 
chant fleets sailed away- . . . Grace Line, 
Panama, United Fruit . . . business, big 
and little, is hurt . . . men out of work — 
menion relief . . . farmers' income badiv 
crippled . . . everyone suffers . 


NOW BUDGES WOmH EXTERI DS DOMAIN 
FROM WATERnONTS Tl STATE CAPITOL 


Jl CIO GdvemoT cannot bring back 
•or lost payrolls . . . nor 
attract BOW 


MERRIAM 


CL^VxA 


FRANKLIN 


^: 


"■^1-: "•■'t2HtiJ^feife#v^ 


i 


:i '-m 


DAWSON AHD MITCHELL 

r CONGRESSIONAL FIGHT 

SEEN AS HOT CONTEST 

Notional Attention Focused on Roce in First 

Congressionol District of Illinois; Fight Between 

, Incumbent, Administration-Backed, Alderman 

: CHICAGO, Nov. 3. (ANP)'— On the eve of the 
Nov. 8 elections, notionol ottention is being focused 
on the race in the First Congressional district of Illi- 
nois; the^ only district where the election of a Kegro 
SfcL to cOrjgress is assured. The battle this year is be- 
ff^ tween Arthur W. Mitchell, twice winner in the con- 
wj; gressional race and present incumbent, and Second 
Ward Aldermarr William A. Dawson. 


BLAME WAGE LAW POK 
LETTING OUT REDCAPS 

JACKSON, Miss., Nov. 3, (AW 
P) — Blame for the release Mon- 
day of 11 o{ the 21 local redcaps 
was placed on the ne«v federal 
minimum wage and hour law by 
the IllinoiB Central railroad. 


2? Congressman Mitchel\ Demg-^ 
;I " crat and strict New Dealer, has 
*^ ' th* backing of the Administrat- 
■; ion and feels certain all of the 
^ First Ward and pa-t of the Elev- 
t!- enth Ward, both of which are 
,-f white. 


Dawson the Republican candi- 
date, who has been fighting the 
economic battles of Chicago's col- 
ored citizens low rents, proper 
housing aftd en-.oioyment. expects 
to carry the Second ward which 
is ilic crux of the Tnl-aical fight. 
"ifie vote for Dawson oepends 
lo a great exte.-it, upon the 
tirength of the suppo-; of State 
Stn. William E. iling, a bitter 
ival within the party, but who 
announced publicly that he 
percent behmd Dawson in 
.le^ongressional H :e. 
Oscar DePriest, former con- 



Kefford, Edward, 67, died at 
his late residence, 2352 W, 23rd 
street Oct. 12. Cremated Oct. 27. 

Warrent,' Bennett, 67, who.?e 
late residence was 944 B i r c n 
street, died Oct. 25 at the Gen- 
eral Hospital. Interment Oct. 28 
in Evergreen with A. J. Roberts 
Co. in charge. 

Donohoo, Frank P., 79, died at 
the General Hospital Oct. 24. In- 
terment in Lincoln Cemetery 
Oct. 29 with Roberts Mortuary in 
charge. 

Jones, baby, whose, late resi- 
dence was 155712 E. 33rd street, 
died Oct. 23 at the General Hos- 
pital. Cremated Oct. 27. 

Rolfe, Arthur Lonj, 39. whose 
late residence was 705 E 43rd 
place, .died Oct. 25 §t Ids late 
residence, 705 E. 43rd place. Re- 
moval to Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Batista, Chief of 
Cuban Army, ^ 
to Visit U. S. 

HAVANA, Nov. 3. (ANP)— 
Col. Gulgencio Batista, head of 
the Cuban army, last week an- 
nounced that he would arrive in 
Washington Monday for a tive- 
day visit, during which .time he 
will see President Roosevelt, Sec- 
retary of State Cordell Hiill and 
Assistant Secretary of State 
Sumner Welles. While in 'Wash- 
ington, Bastista will be the 
guest of Gen. Malin Craig, Unit- 
ed States army chief of staff, who 
invited him to attend the Arm- 
istice day parade. 

Batista plans to discuss with 
Washington officials economic 
and political problems affecting 
Cuban-American relations. He 
proposes to seek reforms in the 


gressraan and a strong rival in Oct. 28 with Conner-Job ison 
the primary, is also said to have Co. in charge of arrangements, 
given his support in favor of I Gaines, baby, whose late resi- 
Dawson's campaign. I dence wa.-; 1163 Gorham. -W. L. 

' A., died Qct. 18 at the General 


MITCHELL CONFIDENt 


Hospital. Cremated. 


:i 1 Mitchell who has been much , looker. Louis. 73, d=ed Oct. 25 
;J In the public eye for the past | gt his late residence. 351 Patton 
: few months because of his fight | street. Interment in Evergreen 
, against ]im crowism on Southern , Cemetery Oct. 31 with A. J. Rob- 
railroads IS supported by many gi.^^ q^ jn charge 
. prominent citizens a.s well ssnat- Giles,' Joseph P.', 52, died at, 
jonal officials and he feels SPn- i.i^ igte residence, 11302 Parma-! 
: fident of a third victory m Ihis j jee, October 26th. Interment in 
- campaign. ...... . ! Evergreen Cemetery Oct 31 with 

. ^rt,^J f^'JI.^ili'"*.!.''"' ^, I So. Los Angeles Mortuary in 
a certain tenseness because of I charee 
the influence of relief clients and [ s^Ta, 
WP\ jobholders who may feel 
"obligated" to vote ^or the Deroo- 
•cratic nominee in order to hold 
their present status. 

Other Negro candidates on the 
Democratic slate are William i. 
Wallace who is running fo 


Swanson, Lillar, 58, wh.-^se 
late residence was 140 S. Savan- 
nah, died Oct. 25 .-t the General 
Hospital. Interment was Oct. 29 
in Evergreen cemetery with 


project for the revaluation of 
mortgages which includes a 10 
year extension of the maturity 
date and .a reduction of interest. 
Batista, who recently legalized 
the Communist and Fascist par- 
ties in Cuba, said he is neither 
an old-time conservative nor a 
radical, but instead is a socialist. 

KILLED.AS RESULT 0F~ 
SANDLOT FOOTBALL 

ST. LOUIS, Nov. 3. (ANP)— 
Lonnie Chapman, 20, died Satur- 
day night at Homer G. Phillips 
hospital of injuries suffered Oct. 
16 when he was playing sandlot 
football. It was reported that jn 
the game, he missed a tackle and 
fell on his • hoad, sufferin,"? a 
fractured skull and neck. 

Mineolar Thigpen, 36, ;1381 E. 

Vernon Ave. 
Charles Rimmer, 38, 2211 E. 113th 

St.: Adele Wade, 35, 22U E?st 

nsth St. 
Henry Watson, 24, 1638 E. 109th 

Wilhelmena Stubblefield, 20, 

786 E. 45th St. 
Charles H. McDaniel. 27, 1432 E. 

56th St.: Jessie J. Reed, 23, 

935 E. 52nd PI. 


Denuind Fuil Punishment 
for Smyrna, Ga. Mobsters 

MARIETTA, a»., Nov. 3, (ANP)f--Nctoirig lessitlMn f'&tn an<^ 
complete punishment, as prescribed bylaw," for ihOse giiilty pf ihel 
recent: raAal disorders ,centeringj.in Sflnywia will pleaise the white 
citizens of this commtmity, the Cobb ' County, Times, local white 
paper, stated .editoriallY last week. j . 

stopped, the - window glasses 
smashed and the door snatched- 
off. Did that hurt the Negroes? 


A &^nt page editorial headed 
"You Yellow Rats" blasted the 
mobbists, nbt for beating Negroes 
and burning Negro property, but 
for their attacks on white t our- 
ists, white property uihaHted by 
colored, and "the effect on' the 
outside world." 

.jSaid the Times: •^Phe! Intdli- 
gfrit people of Cobb county ( and 
wJu'd be surprised how mahn 
there are, Mr. Mob , . .you ignor- 
ant fool) are still wondering if 
y6u REALLY THOUGHT YOU 
WERE HURTING THE NEGRO- 
ES? Fool that you are, you prob- 
ably thought so, ] ■ 

"Let's see what you did." 
"There's the case of Claude 
T. Osborn, life long resident of 
SmyWia. A white man, mind you. 
.Mr. Osborn had 14 tenant hous- 
es. You, Mr. Mob, damaged 11 


reciprocity treaty now about to rbf ihem to the extent of let'o 
be renewed and will discuss his^^ $500 to be conservative. Did 


tliat hurt the Ne^oes? 

"There's the case of two aged 
women tourists whose car was 


By now, Aflr. Mobster, yon 
probabfy have your tongue io 
^oar cheek, an^ you leer audi 
sneer, 'Well, anyhow, we bnnied 
their .old .schoc^Jionse .Mi^nday 
Qifht. That hurt thras, I nekon.' 

"Tbat, statemeni )ust proves i 
what an anaittigafed idiot ;uidl 
moron you are, Mr. Mob. ., j 

"Whose scbooilioaae was it? Itj 
belonged to tiie i;ob» county' 

Board of Edtacafion! Tiil^ board,; 
in case you satdyoai oraiy com-l 
ppnions didn't know, is etetpooed 

of WHITE MEN. .i \ . . I-— 

"Whose loss was Hi 1^ tax- 
payers who built ir and who must 
rebuild it. And you are not a 
taxpayer. "/^ 

None of those arretted and hield 
in bonds of $2,500 for "malicious 
mischief" admit being guilt^. 
More than 30 have [been arrest- 
ed and warrants ha^r« been is? 
sued {or 90 persons: The ages of 


BISHOP PREPARES 
FOR HOMECOMING 


MARSHALL, Tex., Nov. 3— 
Again the furious Bishop College 
Tigers are on the stalk and this 
time they are on the scent of the 
Prairie View Panthers who are 
due around <ihis lair on Arm- 
istice Day. 

The Bishbpmen are, still i har- 
boring the hurt froti last sea- 
son when the Taylormen tore 
them apart 7-0. 


those jailed range for the 
part between 17 and 30. 
' The case grew out of the slay- 
ing of George W. Camp, 66, white 
farmer, and his daughter, Mrs. 
Christina Cahip Pauls, 26, a" 
edly by Willie Drew Russell 
construction worker. Russell,' 
rested and taken, to Atlanta for 
safekeeping, contends he was at- 
tacked by the elderly man during 
an argument over $5. 


most 


Mrs. 
alik- 

11, ¥- 


Funeral services for A. D. Car- 
ter, )1459 E. 21 street, one of the 
oldei* members 9f the S«»nd 
Baptist church, long ill, WiE be 
held from the church on^ Mou* 
day afternoon at 2 P, M. 


lOROUNE^ 


DO YOU W,ANT A LUCKY 

LODESTONE? 

ARE YOU HJCKVf l)o vuu CARRY A' 
CHARM or* a ]oulBfo:>^y Many iitt^utv 
OREAT l/UCK to the fart tb^j- <ar5v a 
loadstuh- or i-harni. Some atfriimt* POWER 
UJCK ai-i .snOL'KSS IN I.OVE to these 
rtones or MAONETrO OUiVHMS. 

Yoa .Tin wcare a Loadstone by aendinc 
It for 2. JK»n*T waif, mail today 
tAXD JIbVELTf, BOCHEIXE PARK, If J. 


-a-ft. 



ON YOUR 

fUJ^JTUjlE OR YOUR 


v^:^ 


No <;o-Signer9! Ho Endorscrsf^" 


: S» 


WE, DO NOT' NOTIFY YOUR FRIENDS, 
% EMPLOYERS OR RELATIVES. M^v 

S. A. SCHERER 

HOLLYWOOD ■ - . ■ i SANTA MONICA 

ll2th & Wilshire Blvd. 


.^ \ Santa Monica & Vine 

PASADI»lX ' - 

Colorado & El Moliho 

LONG~BEACH || 
American & Anahei* 

1901 FiGUEROA STREET 


HUNTINGTON PARK 
Florence & Pacific 

sXn DIEGO 
2nd & B Streeta-',: 

(Cor. WoshingttMi) 



O'K^iefe & Merritt 


Ti 



LOWEST PRICES 
OFFER ON 


Conner-Johnson Co. irt 'charge. 
, , Ricks, Mattie, 68, didd Oct. 27il>|APACir*/\P|; 

«;«,,*.. ^ ^A '^"T/"! ^°I' a' her late residooce. 2728 New i *■ ^ "^ V J' U W F C 

na^Hfl;. f^ ^r^^^.^ ^- ^"^^'^-' ; Je-^ey. Interment Oct. 31 in Kv- i 
Wr Tho iL^Kr".^ Commiss- 1 ergreen Cemetery with Smith! 
Lr AIo^^i'"^A"'^ candidates; g^^ WiUiamS Co in cr.arf». 
ff,%.^^\u^- ^^.^g«' "P fo-^i Batty. Jenerl I., 70, whcW; laie 
^^tf^Zi *4^^"'"'v'P^^ '^o"/- : residence was 61b Kohler street, ' 
I'^Ml^"-.^"'!'" ^ ^'"^1 ^'■; died Oct. 23 at the General Uos- 


re-election; Stanton DePriest for | 
county commissioner; and Jacob 


pital. A. J. Roberts in charge of 


'Tir.Jili """'""~*""=' . -iu J-i;^^ arrangements. 
Tipper, publisher of the Chicago ^ 

h^^h1'n''on°fh'' "^nl^'^^JZ '"^"'" INTENTION TO WED 

l5!^ HiJ^r," ^^%^°^'^'^, °\l^^ sail- . Fielding T. Rogers, 32, 815 East 

K» rlof fnrT" n ^'k ^'^ 28th St.; HeW L. West, 39, 
in the race for the lower house I jj^og v oyth St 

Monroe Perkins, 22, 991 E. 41st 

PL; Margie Kursh, 18, 1044 E. 

45th St. 

I Clarence Foots, 51, 1321 E. 45th 

St.; Mary E. Young, 45, 1321 E. 


THREE QUESTIONS FREE 

Find out WHAT YOIK (;i:M)iN<; M'\n 
.SHOWS KOR \aLR I'RKSKNT AND VV- 
'lURR I.IKE. It may BHI.Nr; YDU MiEAT 
I.LtX in pliowing jou' xvKat days .'■re jood 
or bad for yon, to iiitp«t iU'>n'-> , to make 
lovp, to jnidp your actions. Many promin- 
ent peoplft piidn their \[\-r.a ■ by the Ftars. 

Send .ior and birth date today to 
HOROSCOPE, ROCHELLE P.4RK. X.I. 




t 


t>t the Illinois legislature. 

Vital Statistics 

BIRTHS 

Jones, girl, Oct. 23 at the Gen- 
eral Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. 
Ether Jones, 1557 '12 E. 33rd St. 

Overr. Carl Ralston. Jr., Oct. 
21 at the Methodist Hospital to 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ralston Overr, 
Sr . 3707 S. Gramercy Street. 

Lewis, girl, Oct. 23. at the Os- 
teopathic Hospital to Mr. and 
Mrs. George Benjamin Lewis. 
1474 E. 92nd street. 

Jordan, boy. Oct. 24 at the 
General Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. 
Irving Jordan, 731 E. 24th St. 

Simmons, boy. Oct. 24 at the 
General Hospital to Mr. and 
Mrs. Buren Simmons, 1124 E. 
43rd Place. 
i Howard, Patricia Ellen, Oct 
24 at home to Mr. and Mrs. Gar- 
land Melvin Howard, 1124 E. 
43rd street. 


45th St. 
Josh Graham, 46, 1540 E. 20th i 

St.; Pearl LeGrand, 40, 1548 E. 

20th St. 
Rufus Brannon, 32, 1261 E. 53rJ ; 

St.: Melvina Watkins, 28, 1415 

E. 17th St. 
Bert Moore, 25, 1430 E. Adams 

St.; Mercedes Jackson, 29, 1430 

E. Adams St. 
John W. Ayers, 29, 1677 E. 110th 

St.;, Cleo Elam,* 29, 1802 East 

114th St 
Leon Avery, 20, 1635 E. 41st St.; 

Robbie M. Rone, 19, 5307 Lath- 
am St. 
Wesley W. Long, 34, 27 E. Adams 

Blvd.; Mary B. Sterling, 34, 

1357 E. 27th St. 
John D. Rogers, 21, 1428 E. 48th 

St.; Oralee Lecour, 20, 4372 

Compton Avenue. 



s Ranges 

TERMS WE'VE EVER BEEN ABLE TO 
EXTRAORDINARY GAS RANGES , 

MFAKIC CERTIFIED PERFORMANCE 
iviE/\nd COOKING PERFECTION 

t 

Every C.P. Range Meets The 22 Rigid Require- 
ments To Which a Gas RangeMust Conform be- 
fore It Can Be Offered As a C.P. Here Are a 
Few of The 22 Ways an O'Keefe And MerrittC.P. 
Gas Rangie Saves You Time' Fuel And Food. 

1. SIMMER BURNERS SAVE VITAMINS. 

2. NEW BURNERS CUT FUEL COST. f 

3. NEW BROILERS SAVE TIME^ { 

AND 19 OTHER IMPORTANT FEATURES. 

i 

You Gef As Much As, 




4(I0OEL SHOWN HERE S1S3.90 
WITH YOUR OuD sTOVE. 


TELEPHONE: RI -4789 

Let JUAN RAY 
FEATHER YOUR NEST) 

Eves. Till 9 

Authorized Electrolux Dealer 


Matthews. Alyce Carietta. Oct.' William P. Caldwell, 23. 5732 


22 at the Methodist Hospital to 
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Matthews, 762 

I E. 45th Street , 

'■ Sullivan, Constance Irene, Oct. 

, 24 at home to Mr. and Mrs. Le- 

, roy Sullivan, 1529 E. 12th St. 
Willis, Charles Augustus, Oct. 
25 at home to Mr. and Mrs. Aas- 
tin Willis, 18l"0 E. 114th St 

^ Withers, Paul Irving. Oct. 26 
at home to Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Lawrence Withers, 1540 E. 50th 

' St 

Madrid, boy, Oct. 26 at the 
General Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. 

^ Pedro Madrid, Santa Monica. 

DEATHS 

Kemp, Susie, 40, whose late 

residence was the Rancho Los 

^J Amigos in Hondo, died at the 

K General Hospital Oct. 20. Burial 

V in Calvary Cemetery Oct 25. 

Brown, Robert 55, died at his 

' late residence, 549 Ceres avenue, 

.^Oct. 23. Burial in Paradise Me- 

TTBorial Cemetery with A J. 

Roberts Co. in charge. 

Yoyng, James R., 31, whose 
- late residence was 706% E. 18th 
street, died at the. General Hos- 
pital Oct. 23. Interment in Lii^ 
coin Memorial Cemetery Oct 2T| 
, C»nner- Johnson Co. in charge.^ 


Fortuina St.; Virginia Slaugh- 
ter, 20, 1541 E. 48th PI. 
Allessandro A. Halle, 21, 261 N. 

Occidental Blvd.; Doreas Earl- 

es, 25, 2712 Council St. 
Dewey S. Brooks, 24, USS New 
Mexico; Marjorie Shields, 19, 761 

E. 41st St. 
Joseph D. Brown, 54, 964 E. 57th 

St.: Emma Williams, 36, 9219 

Pace ■ Ave. 
Andrew Potts, 50, 1010 East 50th 

St.: Myrtle D. Jackson, 50, 876 

E. 51st St. 
Lester R. Allen, 28, 3232 Central 

Ave.; Maybelle Howard, 22, 

2710 llevin Ave. 
i William J. Stratton, 31, 5711 

Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.; 

Sallie M. Wilcher, 31. 986 E. 

52nd St. 
Port A.| Gay, 22, 1621 V4 Tarleton 

St.; Mary L. Rawls, 23, 1633 E. 

48th St. 
Alvin J. Douglas, 25, 836 E. 24th 

St.: MUdred Scott, 26, 2010 N. 

LaBrea Terr. 
.Vivian L. Snowden. 40, 1374 E. 

48th PI.; Blanche Savage, 40, 

11205 S. Compton, W>tte. 
Walter Jones, 28, 747 E. 33rd St; 

Beatrice Brown, 30, 1534 West 

■35th St 
Alfred James, 39, 4305 Honduras; 



C. P. RANGES 
As Low As 


I $89.60 

^ With Your Old Stov. 


YOU CAN HAVE 

A NEW O'KEEFE ^ - ^7 A tfj ^ — ^A 

fir MERRITT C.P. $ 1 o7 wj $QCOU 

IGAS RANGE i ^ Month I^ OO. 

FOR AS LITTLE AS D ^ ^ 

■^ , For Your Old Stove. 

SEE THEM ON DISPLAY AT GOLD'S 



There Is No Substitute for PHILCO QualityVc 



CROWN LOAN OFFICE 

mLOANSm 

Ob elatUagf fan. Jewelry, dfauBonAi, aulMl fautnuMBti, 
tforUng fiiM, tnuiki, t«*U, etc. Tmi eaa (et what jtm waai 
at tha reliaUe CROWN LOAN OFFICI. 

120 E. Fifth Street MA-3882 

. j Esfblished Sine* 1 Ml - . . ' .' 


Borrow Locally m 

AND SAVE ON OUR 
EASY PLAN 

LOANS 

Fumiture, Trucks and Auto- 
mobiles, Promptly, Economi- 
cally—Without publicity, Red 
Tape or Co-Signers. At the 
following rates: 

You You 

Borrow Months Repay 


$ LOANS 9 

t&tJ ARC ALWAYS WZLCQMR AT «■ - ' 

;-:' CANADIAN LOAN OFFICE.' 

■ -::?>;• ■ * we Lo«b Th* Meat 08 EverrthiB* • " "f" / • 
ClaildBc aad Jewelry Oar Syaeialtr 2W Baat ftk Stntl 


$roo.oo 

150.00 
200.00 
300.00 
500.00 


12 
15 
18 
18 
18 


other Amounts io Proportion 
$50 and Up 

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Huntington Park 


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Sensational In Performance 

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IT'S A 
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If You Foil 7^ ^3 THE CAUFORNIA lAetf Ybu May Never Know ift HoppertiiJ 


Chicago Softer, $75,000 
Swecps^^inneiv Wan^ Quit 

CBICACtO^ Nov! 3, (AMP)-,Royal IL Spurlark, PuUznan porter 

between Chicago and San ' Francisco for 27 yiears, returned here 

Frldaj' morning richer by $75,000 than he had ever hoped to b^ 

'Hi« horse won that amouBt for lym by finishing second in the 

Cesacwjtch stakes at Newmarket, England. , ,.. 

Northwestern station wa? the 


seen* of a royal welcome when 
-aie winner got off the Overland 
Limited Friday morning. The en- 
tire family of the 59-year-old por- 
ter, lodge brothers and friends, 
as well as reporters and photo- 
graphers were present 

But his good fortune acd sud- 
den riches will not cause Spur- 
lark to quit his job. He will con- 
tinue giving his. service to Pull- 
man guests for another three 
1 years. At that time .he can retire 
■^jith a pension. That will meai 
^.^tead^nonthly income fotr the 
i«st of flu life. ! J 

INCOME TAX tfXn • ■. ^ 
Actually, Mi". Spurlaik wSl col- 
Nlj led for his personal use about 
f,'l 1^087.50 of the $75,000. The fed- 
eral government will take $3,000 
a^ normal income tax and $19,- 
VfrtO as. surtax. Of course- the cost 
' - his ticket, $2.50, will have to 
deducted, and he has' until 


March 15 "^ pay his taxes td 
Uftcle Sam. 

But the residue wiU mean con- 
siderable comfort to several peo- 
ple. Included in his family are 
Royal Spurlark, jr., 21, who s 
attending Loyola University Law 
School through earnings as a red 
cap ^nd with his father's help; 
Mr. and Mrs. James MacKam, 
eousines, and Mrs. Henrietta Tay- 
lor, the porter's 80 year^old aunt 

When he left. Chicago on his 
regular run, Mr. Spurlock knew 
he was "in the money," but he 
^ no idea how much. His ticket 
was coupled with Dubonnet, sec- 
ond' prize winner, in the drawing 
iLweek ^o Friday. He had offers 
ftom one source of $7,500 for his 
ticket. On visiting relatives at 
Belvidere, lU., his home, he told 
them he had also been offered 
$40,000 by a syndicate but turned 
it down. 


Suptryisor Pushes 
SIdusdit Project 

•Tall speed ahead" wm re- 
quested by Supervisor Gordon L. 
McOoriough last week to the con- 
struction company on ihe widei- 
ing of Slaufion Avenue between 
Compton and Central avenue to 
eliminate this hazu^ous quarter* 
tnUe bottleneck. 

Grading of the 20 foot strip to 
the south of the existing pave- 
ment to provide for a wider 
roa<j[-way is the firat step in this 
major project 


cDonough Moves to Curb 
Ciyil Service Discrimination 


iC. 


lEv«y precaution will be taken 
bir the county that no discrimi- 

-. wtion is permitted against Ne- 
lj(o Civil Service applicants, ac- 

, cjBrding to a statement released 

■■Monday by Supervisor Gordon 
E McDonough, following a re- 
^eaX conference with members of 
|he County Civil Service Com- 
Biission to which representative 
'Kegro citizens were called. 

'. A.ose: attending the meeting 
fwere Norman O. Houston, Dr. 
iVada SomerviUe, Mrs. C. A. Bass, 

.i editor-publisher of the California 
•Eagle, Mrs. Jessie Terry, Mrs. 
Betty Hill, Mrs. Prioleau, Miss 
King and Mrs. B. Mason. 

McDonough reviewed the prob- 
lems and difficulties with the 
t- ifeommittee before the commis- 
■ ? lion. The delegation informed 
members of the eommission of 
caaes brought to their attention 

i; In which applications qualified 
1 fcjr written examinations and 
;iwere disqualified by the oral m- 
1 terview. Upon recommendaticn 
I of McDonough, the Cojwnission 
;! Kicepted the suggestion that a 
diainterested Negro citizen b° 
present at the 'oral examination. 
^le meeting grew out of an 
editorial appearing in the Octob- 
er 13' issue of the Eagle recog- 
nized by Mr. McDor.o'jgh in a 
Mter imder date of Oct. 14. The 
better follows in part: 
"Dear Mrs. Bass: 
"I have today noted your 
editorial in the October 13th 
issue of the 'Eagle' coi.ceTning 
Jhe County Civil Service Com- 

"I have asked for a hearing 
before the Civil Service Com- 
jmssioners at their, next meet- 
ieg, which -wiU be held Wed- 
•fvjaesday morning at 10 o'clock. 
'•'^tober 19th, at which time I 
■|inll appreciate it \1 you will 
present 
"I have consistently fought 
discriminaiton agairfst qualifi- 
ed Negroes who are Civil Ser- 
vice Applicants and bavec -suc- 
ceeded, in havinfeibem pJicedi^ 
regardless of race or color fn 
several instances ..." 

GORDON %. Mcdonough 

Supervkisor, Seccmd District 


COLONEL JULIAN 
PLANS NEW FLIGHT 

NEW YORK, Nov. 3, (ANT»)— . 
Disembarking fro^ the lie de 
France Wednesday, Col. Hubert 
Fauntelroy Julian, widely known 
aviator, disclosed to his intimates 
that he -was quietly considering 
new plans for the most ambitious 
trans-Atlantic flight yet attempt- 
ed. The colonel said that he was 
perfecting arrangements for a 
round tjip non-stop, non-refuel- 
ing flight between England and 
America. ^ ' 

4 


% 


l^ornnp||Hold 
AnnmlfMeet 
in Georgio 


Body of Colorep^ 
Flood Hero Foilhd 

STONINGHAM, Conn., Niir. 3. 
(ANP) — Finis was writteifl last 
week to the heroic story of tacri- 
fice of Chester K. Walker, potter 
on the N. Y., N. H. and H, raU- 
road, when his body was fpund 
in a cove at the rear of the feitate 
of a wealthy citizen of this s^ion 
He had lost his life in a ^tile 
attempt to save the life of Mrs. 
Bertha Markell of Boston i:^hen 
the ill-fated Bostonian was de- 
railed in the recent hurricine. 

Mrs. Markell had been a pas- 
senger on the train, and v/.hen 
it was derailed, she attempted to 
walk along the tracks to irfety. 
When she was swept off balance 
by the wind and carried intoithe. 
harbor, Walker leaped into the 
harbor to save- her. The j'wild 
waves carried iim out of fceach 
of startled and helpless paalgcg- 
efs who saw the tragedy, '^^e 
body was shipped to New Ytork. 

SET MINIMUM WAGES 
FOR SUGAR WORKERS 

NEW ORLEANS, La., Nov. S..| 
(ANP) — Information reached 
New Orleans and LouisicUia to 
the effect that the agricultural 
department has estabUSied mini- 
mum -wages yhich Louisiana pro- 
ducers, receiving payments un- 
der the sugar act, must pay to 
laborers in the harvesting of 
sugar cane from Sept 1, 1938 to 
June 30, 1939. 

I Order Yonr Fniit Cake Faek| 

1 NOW —NOW — N0W| 

« All prepared, ready to bake, g 

2 We give full instructions andl 
precipe. Ingredients for- 314 Ib.l 
I Fruit Cake, $1.00. 7 lb. Fruit 
I Cake $2.00. 14 lb.' Fruit CakejJ 

* $4.00, Above prices include de-| 
^livery and mailed to any paxtS 

* of the U.SjA. free generousj 
g sample. 

{Jones Groin Milll 

I STALL A 12 

& Grand Central Market 
I 322 So. HILL STREKT 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
PHONE: Michigan 7473 


Pickens Hits 
State of 
R. Re Rooms 

WAYNESBORO, Va., Kov. 3. 
>(ANP)— In a letter sent last 
week to officials of several rail- 
road companies and to the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission at 
Wswhington, William Pickens, di- 
rector of branches of the NAACP, 
protested ,the deplorable condi- 
tions he found in Southern wait- 
ing; rooms allotted to Negroes in 
railroad stations. 

"This station (the one in 
Waynesboro) is one sample of 
the neglect and almost studied 
discomfort which Negro travelers 
receive from your railway em- 
ployees and local supervis-on. 
You know that members of all 
races pay the same fares, but 
there is hardly light enough to 
see to write in Ihe Negro wait- 
ing room and it would ruin the 
eyes to try to read. Only one 
small dirty bulb. This is Monday, 
early A. M., between 5 and 6:30, 
and I have just alighted from 
the C. and O., and am waiting 
for the N. and W. to Roanoke. If 
I could only read, perhaps Td 
not be writing you. This room 
is very dirty, and the seats are 
low-back and uncomfortable," 
Pickens wrote. 

"By contrast: the Vhite' wait- 
ing room has four large bright 
lights burning and there is only 
one person in it-and he is 
sprawled out on your bench 
sleep, and perhaps is not a pas- 
senger (as he has no bags) but 
only a loafer. 

Mr. Pickens continues: "I have 
read on your station walls here: 
'A Blueprint For Building Better 
Times: Give the raihtJads the 
square deal to which they are 
entitled,' etc. Why not turn that 
injunction around." 


ioy, 12, Gmn 1 
Life Sentence 

NEW ROADS, La., lS[ov. 3, (A 
NP)— A 12 year old boy, Walter 
Williams wis sentenced to life 
imprisonment in the state i)enit- 
entiary last week when he plead- 
ed guilty to a charge of shooting 
and killing Hubert Brouill^te, 9, 
white boy. WUliams was 11 years 
of age when the shooting occur- 
red. 

It was charged that he fired at 
BrouiUete and a playmate. May- 
eaujf, when they were playing 
with slingshots near his home. 
The Broulll^te boy. wounded in 
the abdomen, died in a New Orr 
leans hospital. His companion, 
wounded in the arm, r'^covefed. 


FORSYTH. Ga., Nov. 3. (AN 
P) — Negro farmers selected by 
governors of ten states were 
among those attending the an- 
nual meeting of th e National 
Federation of Colored Farmers 
held liere last week. 

Leon Harris, president of the 
federation, in his annual address 

said, "Poverty of the ' averageig 
Negro farmer is still something % 
that has an evil efffect upon the '-}^^!i:iXiS»:i:i%iijmi&&mmi;mm 
life of the community. In buying 
land he muat not be restricted to 
marginal and submarginal 
lands." . I 

Resblutions adopted asked that { 
congress remove the assignment 
clause from the farm program 
since reports indicate that cer- 
tain planters have forced share- 
croppers to asstgn their govern- 
ment payments; also that some 
form of pension be provided for 
fJegro extension agents. 


NEW YORKERS TO HOST 
NEGRO HISTORIANS 

NEW YORK, Nov. 3. (ANP)— 
Under the chairmanship of Har- 
court A. Tj-nes of New York 
City, supported by 'citizens in- 
terested in studying: the past and 
present status of the Negro, a 
conference of the race's histori- 
ans will be held hera November 
11-13. This assembly is the regu- 
lar annual meeting of the Asso- 
eiation for the Study of Negro 
Life and History now meeting in 
Its 23rd aniiiial session. The -(vork 
having been iounded by Carter 
G. Woodson in Chicago. 1915. 


UPHOfr 


OPPOSE ACTION OF 
TOBACCO INDUSTRY 

WILSON, N. C, Nov. 3. (AN 
P) — Citizens this week protest- 
ed the action of the Southern in- 
dustry, especially the tobacco 
sfemming, industry, in its treat- 
ment of Negroes. Approximately 
30,000 Negroes aU over Eastern 
Ndrth Carolina were dismissed 
lasi week because owners of 
stehjmirig companies , wUl, not 
agree to pay 25 cent* per hour 
for a 44 hour we^, as denand- 
ed by the Wage and Hour law. 

Your Dream Book 

WHAT DREAMS MEAN IN 
TOUR LIFE! ■ 

Multitudes Vlieve GREAT SUCCESS has 
come to th»m by their «bili»y to know 
Mhat the ME.^yiNO OF DRE.iMS ARE. It 
ran also TCME TO YOD. Be prepwed to 
READ YOUR DREAMS OORRECTT.T. 

S'='nd 50c today for large ijook telling 
you how to READ YOUR DREAMS. Mail 
today to 
.LAND NOVEL-TY, ROCHELLE P.tRK, 3*. J. 


THE CALIFORNLA EAGLE 

Publltln4 (Vtry Ihunoay by th* C«ll- 
ernla EasI* Publlihing Co., 4075 South 
C«ntnl AvtniM. Entcrtd h ScMnd Clu* 
Mtttw, N«*. 3, 1937, tt th* Pott Off!** 
■t La* All(*l*a, Cslllamla, untfw th* A«t 
•f Mink 3, 1879 

Thtttsday, November 3, 1938 

SUBSCRimON KATES 

Far \mx __, %tJ^ 

Z MMitha $i,j5 

t Moatta .75 

>»r C^m-. % 

DID TOU KKOTf— Marens Gar- 
bershlp or stockholding in the 
Universal Negro Improvement 
Association. 


• FASHIONABLE • 
Dressmaking 

Ladies Tailoring Alterations 
Leola B. Pierson, Wllaon 

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Perdm** an one of the nldeat mean* o( 
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eMHOUR, BOCB£LUE I'AaK, N. i. 


ELECTA'S FRUIT AND 

FLOWEB SHOW 

Sqo., Oct. 3«tb. 1445 West 

35th St., from 3 to 7 P. AL 

lowc_ iia sale. Silv offer- 
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STOWELL'S [ 

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S— 10— 25 and Up 

We appreciate the patronage of 
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Trained ad-takers glad- 
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^ ■ . ,.>,v. ^j. 


Mississippi's^ 
Junior Senator 
At \f Again 

JACKSON, Miss., Nov. 3. (AN 
P)— As termed by some of the 
publications of this state, "One 
Term" Bilbo, the only man who 
went to the senate on the pro- 
mise to our-huey Huey Long, is 
at it again. Residing here in the 
state's capital, and making plans 
to take an active part in the 
coming governor's election, the 
ex-baptist preacher, once gov- 
ernor, and present junior senator 
from the state of Mississippi, 
struck up his famous tune of 
"back to Africa with the Ne- 
groes". 

In defense of his support of the 
Wage and Hour bill, Mr. Bilbc 
made the following statement: 
"I think any industry that manu- 
factures products for '.nterstate 
commerce who can't or is not 
willing to pay labov who pro- 
duce* these goods 25 cents an 
hour ought to shut down. 

"And one great blessing to the 
South is the fact that it wiU 
boost the scale of labor to such 
a point that the laboring white 
roan can afford to take jobs and 
maintain our American standard 
of living. It will result in the 
white man taking the Negro's 
job and there will be nothing left 
to do but resettle the Negro in 
his native Africa. 


3 Community 

rtlOdPerCen 


■f-^:- 


>4if»Jfly, Noyeiwber 3, 1938 



otos 


Three Henma m the lExpositfon distrfet, captiined -by Mrs. Geo, 
§mart. Mips. Jrenet Green and Miss Jiilia Mathews, reported one 
hundred percent c[uotas to Mrs. Abraham Lehr, district chairman, on 
the operang (fay-of tl|e Community Chest annual campaign. 

With tftis encouraging report, Mrs. Lehr said, that she believed 
her distri<9 would be among the 
fint of the residential areas to 
coinplete ;fiel|d solicitations for 
the additional 20 percent increase 
in. funds needed to carry on the 
work of the eighty-eight we^are 
agencies operating under the 
Community Chest. 

"This is merely the start," Mrs. 
Lehr said, "and the three cap- 
tains. Miss Mathews, Mrs. Green 
and Mrs. Smart, are to be con- 
gratulated- for their splendid 
■work. We have also received re- 
ports from other, captains in the 
Exposition district that they are 
near their hundred percent quo- 
tas and -would complete division 
work within a few days." 

.At the innaugural Community 
Chest report meeting September 
26, in. the Biltmore Hotel Bowl, 
it was announced that volunteer 
workers. had obtained 110 sub- 
scription^ totaling $5,770, or 25 
percent of the Exposition district 
quota of, $22,200. 

With the fifteenth annual chest 
appeal underway. Chest leaders 
-will hold daily report luncheon 
meeting?, (pay for your own) in 
the Biltmore Bowl with the ex- 
ception of Saturday and Ijolidays, 

The nine residential districts in 
the Chest area raised a"total cf 


Dawson Speaks 
Tomorrow Night 

On November 4, Ernest Daw- 
son, well known business man of 
Los Angeles, a lecturer and 
teacher 9f the South-west Meth- 
odist Church, who has recently 
returned from a 69 day study 
tour to the Soviet Russia will 
discuss, "My Personal Observa- 
tions in the largest country of 
Europe and How Minority Races 
are Treated in The Soviet Uni- 
on." . 


Corpefs-Ru^s Qleoned 

In Our Plant or 6%--S^ Plo<* 
ReiMiring, Sewihg, Laying 
Binding, Fringing, Serging 

Upholstery Cleaned 

Call us for Free Estimates 

Keasonable Prices 

A fr F CARPET CO. 

PArkway 8326 

1323 W. Jefferson Blvd. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 


$52,539 with 2^034 subscriptions, 
or 25 percent of their quota in 
the current campaign according 
to a report made opening day by 
Mrs. Albert Crutcher, goieral 
chairman of women's activities 
and the residential district 

Lieut. Matthews 
is VFW Speaker 

Lieut B. Matthews, past coeq- 
mand^r of Captain K. L. Baker 
Camp No. 71, Spanish American 
War, was shaker at tha pro- 
gram unveiling the portrait of 
Lieut. Golonel James M. Beck, 
for Whom is namtHi the local 
James M. Beck Post No. 2651, 
VFW. The ceremon-/- was held 
at Grant Hall in the Patriotic 
HaU on Oct 19. 

Tribute was paid in the re- 
marks of the master of cere- 
monies, F. T. Brawley, to un- 
sung Negroes heroes of wars, 
Captain Floyd, a mariner, Col. 
John Robinson, aviator, and Post 
Commander Moody ' Staten, who 
was sent to Liberia with the rank 
of Majot of the U.;-S. Army, to 
take the post of military instruc- 
tor after the retirement of Lt 
Col. Charles Young. 


MUMBEff 
INDiCATOti 


to AajAkwlHto iMiMtIM witk' Pli^ Bmmm If to 

r WINNING DAILY "- 

••w frirod* crnTyficnl ToBCBOi b*v on* of the fix^L 
to pUj tfeil CHIT"' In roar eHrtrict. W« 

GUARANTEE 

yonr numey bmei if STRAIGHT'does ao( -win 
for yoa or your friends. Send only $1 00 and 
get yours by retura mail. If yon prefer, 

send name wtA addresa mad pay postman $L15, pins few cents postage. 

on deUveryt SUCCESS SALES, 30 Church St, Oept. G-71. New York. 


Ml 


%^ 


M- 


FOUND! THE SECRET TO 
TOUTHFUULOOKING HAIR 


• • • Dmbi LlfBl0S9, 
Gray-Streaked Hair 
Takea on Clawing 
Beauty with a Single 
Application of i^fieuae 


^T^HE middle-aged woman whose 

JLiaiz is soft, aUuriog, colorful, 

always sparkling with dancing 

hiKhiigius — how does she do it? 


What IS the secret to her yputfafiil- 
looking hair? 

Chances are sh« tises ■ hair colot* 
ing and chances are the hair color- 
ing she uses is Godefroy's Larieuse; 
Years ago this "secret" was gener- 
ally known only to professional 
hairdressers. Today it is shared by 
women ererywhere. 

Yin, too, can hare beautiful hair 
bf using Godefroy's Larieuse, the 
quick-acting, easy-to-use hair coU 
oriog in the red box. Whatever its 
condition — whether drab, lifeless, 
off-Color^or streaked with gray — 
Larieuse will make your hair one 
even, lustrous, natural, yoathful- 
•ppearing color. Choice of 18 
inadei, including jet-black, black 
and browzu: 

l i0 m* wli ff — ^ly btit sometim«|| 
kiflt •'man'slbtcrettan • wonijia. 



Don't risk it — ust Larieuse. Sati^ 
faction guaranteed or your dealer 
will refund your money. 


Larieuse Shampoo 

s I : produces a remarkably 
cleansing shampoo which 
leaves the hair soft and flufly. 

Larieuse Stain Ramovar 

; ; : removes hair dye stains 
from hands, forehead and scalp. 
WiU not affect «elor of hair. 


THE CROWN LAUNDRY AND 
CLEANING COMPANY'S 

"HELPS FOR THE HOMEMAKER" 
PHONE PRospect 6351 .., 


THE BEST WAT TO SAVE MONET ON 
TOUR LAUN0RT WORK 

FAMILY FINISHED WORK, by the pound. 

Send the whole famUy wash for these unbelie-vably low prices. 
Ten pounds for $1.25, extra pounds 10c each. Minimum bdl. 
10 lbs. Everything washed and ironed, ready for use. No ex- 
tra charges. No restrictions except bundle must be one-half 
flat pieces. Curtains not accepted in this bundle. 
Average weights of articles tn common use by families. 


2 Ladies' aprons wt. 1 lb 

5 Ladies' tea aprons; " " " 

20 Collars " " " 

5 Chemises " " " 

4 Combinations " " " 

6 Corset covers " " " 

4 Dresses, child's " " " 

2 Dresses, house " " " 

3 Dresses, night— J.^—" " " 
57 Handkerchiefs, ladies' " " " 

1 Skirt . " •• " 

13 Stockings, silk " " " 

3 Underdrawers, ladies " " " 

5 Undervests, ladies' " " " 

3 Blouses, boys' a—" " " 

28 Handkerchiefs, men's." "■" 

10 Hose, men's pairs " " " 

1 Jumper : . " " " 

2% Night Shirts " " " 


hi Overalls — wt. 1 Th 

% Coveralls . " " " 

2 Pajama, suits " " " 

Vi Bathrobes -„" " " 

2 Shirts, men's — " " " 

S.Undershirtsv " " " 

5 Underdrawers " " * 

3 Unionsuits - — ' " " 

1 Pants - " " " 

1 Bath mats " * " 

3 Slips " " " 

26 Wash rags _; " " " 

10 Napkins " " " 

% Sheets ^„_ " " " 

X Tablecloth .„ "^ " - 

2 Bath towels " " " 

6 Face towels " " " 

6 Kitchen towels " " " 

1 Spread wt a » 


You can have these lo-n^ prices right at your docw or at any 
Crown office. Just call them up, ana one of the Crown's courte- 
ous, dependable Routemen -will call and explain the service 
that fits your needs. 
"OUR SKILL AND CARE MAKE TOUR CLOTHES WEAR" 


ast 
^ed 


Tells You The Truth 
About* Your Troubles 

And How To Overcome Them 

Know What To Do 


tVtieu^ 


If yew daaUr 
doM Rot kov* 
If, Mnd 11.23 ^^^^^ 

eODirtOY MANUFAaUMNO COMANY • 3510 OLIVt ST. • ST. LOUIS, MO. 


HAIR COLORING* 





Spirifuol Psychic 
Marcus Ordoinied Medium 

He Can Help You 

If Too are in doubt, worry or trouble of any kind, if yonr 
heart is set on a certain end in friendship, love, marriage, 
divorce or business, or if yon are not satisfied, or another 
siBires that which rightfully belongs to yon, don't lose faith. 
His Spiritual advice and help re-unites the separated, fivta 
name&.and facts, helps you in whatever trouble you may be 
nn. Ha9 hroagtit g»od luck^ happiness, faealti^^and success to 
thousands whose hopes wei« crushed with trouble, and will 
do as much for yon. Do not be disconraged. Re|d L Cor. 12. 

Spiritual Psychic Readings, Donations 50c & $1 

Hoars 11 a. ml till 8 p. m. Smidays 3. to ? pjs. 

OCCULT SCIENCE CENTER C. S. A. 

Take "S" car, get off at 41$t Street 


4111 So. Avalon Blvd. 


CONNER - JOHNSON CO. 

THE PEOPLES MORTICIANS AND FUNERAL 


\ 


INC. 

DIRECTORS 


Conner- Johnson Con)pany has, over, a period of years, 
endeavored to give the people service beyond the ordi- 
nary for the prices^ bnd has distinguished themselves as 
a business organization. 


Doing at all tinnes the kindest thing in the kindest way. 
ft All services without confusion and misunderstondinas 


Don't fail to visit their 
equipped establishment. 


beautiful and completely 


1400 East 17di Street Los Angeles California Phone. PRospect 3195 



^ 


^■. 




. IWWIiHlliaiil 


wm 


'.ens recferotioh to 

on Proposition Ho. 2§i 


rvery important busi- 
[ization in Calif ornta 
m record as opposed 
Varrants-Every-Tnui-s- 
:, better known as th« 
ggs deal. This inchides 
ers, wiiolesalers, re- : 
inessmen,. business 
lb women, school teai- 
ic employes, hotel and 
groups, and the Tax 
isociation. Tt\e result 
age of this Act would 
business would prac- 
le to exist. Groceries 
« bOMgbt Rents could 
L T^e bare necessities 
lid _not be obtained 
rop<w€d issue of these 

the needy and those 
nsiohs would be ren- 
ically helpless as they , 
compelled to ? accept 
ts in place of the good 
'■are now receiving, 
een pointed: out that 
il Ho^ital would oe 
ccept patients who are 
jrrants on. the" preseut 

ion a few of the or- 
that have gone on re-. 
5t this proposed Con- 
Amendments are tha 

1 Teachers Organtza- 
« Angeles, Apartment 
>ciation of Las Angei- 
lia Federation of Bus- 
en, California Federa- 
neifs Clubs, California 
:ers Association, Cal- 
gue of Women Voter.;, 
Real Estate Associa- 
tomia 'Pharmaceiiticai 
,, California State Ho- 
ition. California Tea- 
ciation, Southern Sec 


Council, S o u I ri e r-n California 
Wholesale Grocery I3istribti't<' 
United Veterans of the Repi 
lie, Ventura County Farm Btj: 
Tax .Committee, Western Gn 
ers ■J^.tective Aisociatign,. 

W. IJ. Anderson, wrho "is clii 
man of a committee opposed |to 
tK& Amendment stated: 

'Withe the issue cleany. ndii- 
partisan, California ' never ys 
faced a more critical probler|," 
Anderson said. "The time l»s 
c&me when all good citisens, i^- 
gardless of political parties, mi|st 
join in putting an end to tjie 
misguided movement which h^s 
reached menacing jiroportions 
under the misleading title of the 
Retirement Life Payments Act, 
aid -which will appear on tfi» 
ballot in the November electioin 
as Proposition N6. 25. . 

"So long as the moveme^it ap- 
peared merely as a g^-rich- 
quick scheme it could be wisely 
ignored. But false promises haye 
blinded thousands of sincere but 
mislead 'senior- citizens'. Fpr 
their own protection, for the pro- 
tection of all, the scheme must 
be destroyed. 

"We must crush a proposal im- 
possible of operation. It would 
shatter business, industry, agri- 
culture and government. ChaOs 
ruin and poverty would result. 
"We cannot peer at it as a 
hoax. To many people are willing 
to believe it is a cureall. It 
would be bad enough if they 
alone were harmed. But the dan- 
ger is far graver. Then {Penalty 
for wild folly would be paid not 
only by the promoters' followefs 
but by every person ifi the state. 

"Republicans, Democrats, mera- 


AITE^F^ION! 

."^ -^JMiU ItOBT. MOSIER! 

' The Circulation Departmeot 
takes this means of sending out 
a call to Mr. Kob^ Sfosier to whom 
we gave some subscription ac- 
connts to collect, to please r^post: 
to the <rff ice at once. 

C; A, RASS, MfT.-Editor. « 


Mfniste^ of Lps Angele^r 


♦o 


NOTIS 

By MIRIAM MATTHCWS 


I .•!,•. 


PASKET CHAIRJtfJUtf 
^ MAKES APFEAI/ 

Mrs. Mary "Troy, chairman of 
the basket committee of the Wo- iios Apgeles 
man's Breakf^t Club, has a^'-- communities 
pealed this week to the 1500'Tnem- 1 . port to the Company's expansion 


bers and friends of the club to 
send donations for a record bas- 
ket contribution or bing- them to 
the next meeting at the 28th St. 
Branch Y. M. C. A. on November 
I3t li. . ^ . . 


Card of Thanks 

The family of the late Mrs. 
Eva Carson, 135a E. 49th street, 
wishes to offer grateful apprec- 
iation for courtesies extended- 
chiring the recpnt illness of our 
loved one and our bereavement. 

Appreciation is also herein ex- 


Answering the cKallienging and 
brilliant address of Wm. Nicker- 
son, Jr., President-Manager . of 
the Golden State Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, ministers of 
and surrounding 
communities pledged, their sup- 


fQttl 



::• liV- .' 


program at » luncheon honoring 
the churchmen Friday at tweivn 
ojclock in the 28lh Street Branch' 
YMCA. The luncheon, given in 
appreciation of the clergy's sup- 
port ofj the institution since its 
organization in 1925 and' to ac- 
quaint chutchmen with' the latest 
phases of jts ;gro\Yth, was. atten- 
ded by more than fifty ministers. 
! The Reverend Mr. W. D. Car- 
eer, pastor of tte Friendship Bap- 
tist Church of Pasadena, led the 
response with pyaisei for 6olde.T 
State Mutual's executives and a 
"Go on. Go Ion!' 


churchmen^aii^ ousiiiesjanen « as 
communityTieaders tm Whom the 
welfare of the people rests; 

"We ar9= a pedple belonging to 
a minoffty^'group on whicK to a 
very large extent, rests our own 
econonlic welfare," he cot^tinijcd 
arjd held - that" many churmes 
had found it^a*burden to keep 
their doors open when poor ec* 
onomif conditions existed among-i 
parishoners. He showed how. the I 
world of business depended oat 
the church for its growth andr 
how the church, in turn, depend- i 
ed on the financial in^hition i 
fOr maintaining its work.^ ! 

Jn tracing the history of Geld- 1 
,en State Mutual, Mr. Nickerson! 
said, "Golden "State Mutual has } , 
never brokeh a promise." Here |_ 


With the publication o^ '"The Story of San Micheie'^ l^ .". 
Munthe in 1930. ^e medical profession began a very rapid ri 
favor untU today, it outrj^ik? aU other branches of ' non-f-i 
wnti:ig.in the consistency of its popular appeiO. To be reme...,, 
ed amon^-lqp r^k favbrite^diirkig this eightryear pefiodTi 




Victor Heiser's *An American 
Doctor's Odyssey", Rosalie Mor^ 
ton's "A Woma niSurgeon" and 
Paul fieKrtiifs "Men Afcainjt 


ore^ed for floral pieces, the loan song, "Go on. Go ion!" in yvhich he 
of automobiles and the many was joitffed by the. entire asseni- 
mediums through which the es- 


_ bers of all parties must wotk 

)rnia"state"E&ipiojiees I together zealously. There Ls rto 
California State Re- i distinction between 'liberal' and 
' 'conservative' here. The issue is 
between common sense and peri- 
lous nonsense. 

"The campaign for an over- 
whelming 'NO' vote on Proposit- 
■«>i»'.5js ( y ■•i» * p~>|Pverv Calif- 
amian. TKe future of>,<*U state 
;he hope of security for old'*an(jy 
young, are .at stake. A 'NO', ..vote 1 


ission, California State 

fare Board, California 

Association, Los An- 

ing House Association, 

«, Pasadena M?r 
:iation. Southern C?i- 


teem in which Mrs. Carson wss 
held found expression. 
Signed 
WILLIAM R. CARSON, hus- 
band and family. ■ 

CARD~OF THANKS 

The family of the late John 
Wesley Harding wishes to express 
their thanks to those who have 
so kindly remembered them in 
their bereavement and hope that 
they will accept this acknow- 
ledgement of their appreciatici 
of their thought of them at this 
time. The great number of flow- 
ers and words of comfort from 
friends makes individual replies 
impossible. 

Signed 
Mrs. P.^J. HARDING 
MISS REBECCA HARDING 


he was-, interrupted by a round! 

of applause. *'From the begin- 

,ning it has been our aim to es-- 

f tablish' av$250,to capital 'struct 

blage. Appropriate remarks were t ture," he. continued further » to 


rtiade by the Reverend Messrs. 
George Miller, president > of the 
Los Angeles District Bapttst 
ministers; A. C: Capert, W. i3. 
Carter, L. B. Brown und w; H 
M. Di^erson. 

Invocation was pronounced on 
the distinguished gathering hy 
the Reverend Mr. F. A. Harris, 
presiding elder of the Los An- 
geles District A. M. E. churches 
and president of the Interdenon:- 
ational Minister' Alliance. A del- 
ectable four course luncheon fol- 
lowed; at the end of which A. 


sell $100,000 in Certificates cf 
Advancement as another stfep t .- 
ward that goal.. In conclusion, he 
expressed gi^atitude for the min- 
istry's .continued; support and toJd 
them that honesty of purpose 
coupled with the people's" toyalty 
had made it possible for the com- 
pany to noy employ over "two 
hundred persons and pay over 
$806,000 to policyholders since its 
inception; ; ■ * 

Several mmisters gave tangible 
evidence .of their endorsement of 
the cotnoanyfs latest program by 


;;n^te»'^^t!f.'f on ?5 Js their safeguard." ^_^ 


DID YOU KNOW— Edward <{. 

Walker and Charles L. Mitchell 

who were elected in 1866 to the 

Massachusetts Hous^ of Repres- „ ^ 

enUtives from Boston were the >" buUdmg this, the greatest fi- 
"-fiiStJJecroes in History of the nanciar corporation west of Chi 
nieeli^*,^ i^4i^nji>*>iMiilature of cago," Mr. Nickerson said, and 
#■7 s***^*. ^*-- Ofc-: . . 1 drew 


drew a striking, analogy betwce-'' 


J. Williams, Manager of the Cold- | purchasing Certificates of Advan- 
en State Mutual Los Angeles Dis- 
trict and sales director of Certi- 
ficates of Advancement in South- 
ern California, ' introduced the 
-speaker, Wm. Nickerson, Jr. 
SAYS COMPAf»Y BOKN 
IN CHURCH 

"This organization wsts bom in 
the church and from the begin- 
ning the ctergy has cooperated. 
The Church has had a large part 


cement ,which are sold at $10 
per Unit in j lots of five and pav 
4 percent interest .the first year 
and 5 perqient thereafter.. Inter- 
est is payable' semi-annually. 


DID YOlf KNOW — '^rederlfk 
Douglass was the first Negro Ic 
dine at the White Bouse as tb< 
guest of a President of the Cu- 
t>ed States (1X64). 
Dip iy— *:no~— Mrsi normal 
school for colored teachers' estab- 
lished in New Yoik Ijy John Pet- 
erson (1853). 


JDe^th". 

' Eixcellin 4all oteeri. iilE.'^ 
magic art of story teiliifg is '^ 
new contender for popular jfa- 
lyor, George Sava's "The Heat^ 
ing Knife," an anonymous auto- 
biography written li»y-a former 
Russian Prince who renounced 
his many titles af<er Russian 
Revolution. His ambition t6 be* "^ 
come a surgeon wai bom of i-r 
4>ecttliar circumstance. In 1919 
during^.the revohition when Jie : 
w:as'a boy prince officer of sev- 
enteen, be stumbled into a-iibs- 
pitat one day. with a wounded 
frieh^ on his> back. He stormed 
aiid raged, when he learned 
there was no doctor^ in the hoi- • 
pital to operate, oh his dying 
friend. Finally, in despair he 
seized a nurse and. forced her 
to direct his movements, per- - 
forming t^e operation himself 
with a rpd-hot ;Clasp knife. To- 
day, a$ the age of thirty-six, 
after a "heart-rending stri;gglei 
to get a medical education, hei 
enjtfys a distinguished practice 
in England and looks back on 
his early strugles as a just pay- 
ment for so" dear a possession. 

. The story of another doctor 
who traveled a long ar.d weary - 
road to success is told in "The 
Horse and Buggy Doctor," the 
autobiography of Arthur Hertz- 
ler.who has been known as an 
angel of mercy in , Kansas. For 
yeairs his s^iovel and lantern 
were as necessary to him as his 
medicine bag which was true 
of all country dpctors at that 
time. Traveling to ^stant f arips 
in the wiater, progi-ess was so 
slow that softietimtes when h? 


arrived, the patients pain vf^ 
over and forgotten and son* 
j'.timps so acutethat he was * 
ed to operate immediately 
the kitchen table. Today. w..._ 
his horse and buBf days behind 
JMm,'he ccntinuesnis practice 
his own hospinal in Ka 
where his patients can get 
best care it is possible to give 
Told with humor and kiiti " 
ness this story is filled i 
sound observations on medi 

-and human frailties. 
The lay reader will 


Traini 


SiM ^ 



SHOnfliANB 

' OMPTOMBTEK 

lypiri,- : " :--;.- 
;tiitfio'l3r..' uai; str-^ 
CEntury ZQ^i: 



ilTiO 


TAX'^ 



W 


(1 ) Lower Incojii** — Higher TigMt ^ 

(2) Lower Wa<|*s ~ Higlicf Ren^ P 

(3) Fewer Homes-— More l^ebts > 

(4) Fewer lede^rles^MeveVocairtLaii^ 

(5) Less Volae — Higher Prkei 

(6) Less Output -i^ Higher ^oifs 

(7) LessRelief — More WtJMilr 

(8) Fewer SciMois — More Crime 

r ' ' i VOTE NO! 


20 


TAXATION. lntffWr* C^ aji H ^e tia B il 
• .AmoBdii^t 


LSL 


' ^ Far IwhrmtHti^V/riH mrifCmH 

m mm mnmmmm sffl(u m 

7X7 ROWAM MIL01M». iOS ANettn 
\ f= MIehima «4<6 - 



—OF THIS WEEK! 


omLW : I ONTIL.rf.lll. 




1^1 


.Breaste 


r • «< of Many 
Savings o^^^Q^ JUST 




.**^ .^ 

^ 


lEN- 

u can buy 
»TH e SUIT 
h an EXTRA 
r of PAMTS 
i m Topcoat 
Ihoto special 
lo price* 
c 3 days. 

imna DOWN 

6 hTO PAYMENT 
the FtRST 30 dayi 




■BAliY 


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UNTrLirkM. 

F0« TOi« 
CONVERtENCE 


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d«pllee4* 
these v«h»« ^ 

Ntw eelars . . . NevJ({lalirics< >• Newl«lteil. 
Wrapcireend. Roglcui or lolmoc niedels 
et prle» ^"* *"v^* yoo jHANY doUorsf 



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If You W# To lUoi! ft In TK« Ebgltf^You May Never Know tf Hopp«n«a. 


30TH AKNIVERSARf^fSa 
OF ST. PHitlP'SW^ 
BEGIK THIS SUNDAY 

Episcopal liskop of Lot Ang«}es; ond Visiting 
Pfitst to Sp««k; Roy. Fothor Moore/ Yi^ior, An" 
nounces Main Service to B« at 11 Sua4ay Mom 

The Rev. Father H. RqndoJphr Moore, yicar of St. 
Philip's EfMscopol cRurch, 28th street end Stanford 
oVenue, hos onrtouriic'ed that the 36th dnnilversary of 
the founding of thot church will begin this $unday. 

The main service Vill be •held'^ 
at 11 a. rn., when the Rev. J. 
Henry Edwards of New HaveJl,- 
Conn., wll pre^h • the' sermon. 
Father Edwards received his edu- 
cation at IjOS Angeles High 
School, Western Reserve, a n -t 
Yale Universilies, and the Bishop 
i*ayne (Episcopal) Divinity 
SchooL H« is at present rt*cto: 
f S^ Luke's CJhOrch, New Hav- 

liay evening, November 6 
' o'clock Leon Edwards, as- 
hy St Phflip'a Choir, vm 
id in an organ recital, and 
<f eveninffi November 
^anniversary banquet 
at St' John's Pax- 
JirSTth St ' 
-sin shaker at the ban- 
: be t^e Bishop of Loy 
todies, the Bi Rev. W. ^er- 
rand Stevens, Pk. D.. D. D., LL. 
'<.. «itd. 3Dch magical talent as 
"ames Miller, Eiiiestine' Jones 
T'- Freita Shaw^*. Phylijs Kel- 
.^d Jceeph Jatees will apr 
-^. on pitHpram. ^ FE. J. HENRY EDWARDS of 

Tickets for the banquet may New Havfcn, Conneeticirt who 
e secured by 'idling Blchmond will speak Sunday at the scr- 
oll), or CEntur^#55&l. vices conunemonUing the 

fovipding of the St. Philips 

E^scopal Church 28tb Street 

and Stanford Avenue. Fr. Ed- 

. Vwards will sp«U: at the eleven 

Vcloek services. 






■^f .cU;^,- -il: 


Thu 


is Progressive D^YC^ 



face of 


SktmHMy, ^•%em)m^ IMS 
(AISTIAjr SCISJiCB COCRCHES 

These vords of Jobs: "Ete thxtx is 
' U)« «atU> is earthly, and (fMUeUf 
th* earth r be that cometh^trotn 
>«veB U ftboTe tB/' *n thei'0<>ld- 
j Ten 1o tile L«M«e-Senn<ui on 
\ daBi and Jt^en Mas" on 9undacr 
'ChuchoB ef Christ Sctentlst. 
pr the ' Blhie seiecUi^ to 
»nnpn inelude^v'thaae 
^raeajcrpm the oooic of Qocesla: 
nnlog God created the 
— — "Itiirt C"^ eartix. And ti!« eartli 
was withoi 
darkness 
~c«p>. And.ikASplrtt ^ Odd m< 

~oo th» tuwFvf th« vafers; /i . 
^u;d 0«d sald.'Let da inake nu&i la 
oar isMftf. aiter oar tlkenaaqp -} . , 
Bo God created isao in Qt> Wn 
ima^, ta tb* Ima^ of Ood ereated 
h* biffi; mate and female created 
JW them. . i- . And God saw ererj 
^thlnc thai M liad made. atkd. t>» 

Hold, ttimw^intj good Bat there 

went jp i iftjjt troii the earth, and 
watered th« wholo face ot tho 
■jcronnd."* 

The Liflssod-Sermdn presents also 
-this T«n« from "Scienes aad fiealtb 
Utth Key to the Scrtptores." by 
iUrr Baker Bady: Th«^ creations 
of -natter arte* from ^ mist or false 
«laitti. or .from mystification, and 
abC from the ftnmmeoit, or nnder- 
•rsading, which God erects between 
^ {n%:,^nd,falae." 


PR. H. RANDOLPH M&ORE, 
rector of St Philip's Episco- 
p^ charch, who will superin- 
tend the celehratioa of that 
ehnreh's thirteenth anniver- 
sary heginning Snnday. Nov. 


6, and continning for a week. 
Leon Edwards will be present- 
ed in an organ recital at 7:30 
Sunday evening assisted by 
the St. Philip's Episcopal 
charch. 


'An important progressive de- 
vielopmt^nt." ' 

Commenting on the establish- 
ment of the Community Develop- 
ment Fund of the Gold Furniture 
Company, one of our prominent 
rac^ clergymen made this' ob- 
servation, and he accurately ex- 
presses the. attitude of ^11 those 
interviewed. 

"The church and business mtist 
come to realize that their inter- 
ests are not mdependent, but in- 
terdefpendent," he further stated 
during the- interview. "If is a 
progressive step when an iiiflu- 
ential and respected firm like 
the Gold Furniture Company, re- 
turns a share of its income to 
the commimity it serves. It is an 
honor to our religious a^ d 
charitable organizations "that we 
were selected to distribute this 
generous fund. We can hopefUlly 
await, the day wh'» all busi- 
nesses^ realize that 'aey have the 
same obligation to the dbmm uni- 
ty." 

A few months ago during their 
20th Anniversary Celebration the 
Gold Furniture Company at 
Washington at Central announc- 
ed the e.stablishment ^)f i« Com- 
munity Development Fund. In 
the short time since its inception 
more than five hundred dollars 
have been paid out through the 


Reception -Qiyen 
for Usher Board 

Mrs. Hugh Bailehtine was hos- 
tess to : the usher board of Peo- 
ple's independent Church of 
Christ at a delightful reception 
last Suiiday afternoon in the par- 
lors of the Sojourner Truth Home 
on East Adams boulevard. 

The attractive rooms were 
beautifully decorated and an ex- 
cellent program of music, featur- 
ing favorite local talent, presen- 
ted by Mrs. A. C. Bilbrew, direc- 
tress of Independent's choir, add- 
ed to thft pleasure of the occasion. 

Mesdames Louise Hubert and 
Florence Ward assisted Mrs. Ball- 
entine in 'making the afternoon 
enjoyable for the more than 300 
guests. 

A spepial fund for promoting 
activities of the young people, to 
b . included in the budget for the 
fiscal iyear was voted by the an- 
nual convocation of People's In- 
dependent Church of Christ in 
session three days last week at 
the recommendation of -the min- 
ister, Rev. Clayton D. RusseLL 

With so many outside attradt- 
ions to draw the attention of 
youth* away from the church to 


-^ r — „.. B ^ day, Rev. Russell pointed out 't 

various approved Negro churches is necesary that the church take 


and charitable organizations. 


•- The Wounds of Jesus" has been 
announced as the Sunday mom- 
tag subject of the Rev, E. W. 
Il^estraw, pastor, Wesley Chap- 

^C ML E. Church, EigMh and San 
J^alian streets. In the vening Wes- 
My chapel wll join Hamilton 
It. E. for a union service at Ham- 
ilton. 


E. ChuT6h Sunday with the even- 
ing service being a joint one 
with Wesley Chapel. The choir 
of Wesley willl sing and Rev. 
E. W. R^estraw who is pastor of 
Wesley wiU deliver the sermon. 


T>r. J.' L. Caston wiU be the 
speaker for next week's meeting 
of the Baptist Ministers Union, 
r. Caston is pastor of the Trin- 
Baptist Church at West 36tn 
ITUnriandie streets. RevJ R. 
CJ Jones spoke at this week's 
meeting wiiich was held Tue^ay 
morning. 


*^ 


Tuskegee to Be Subject 
of Panel Discussion Here 


At the First A, M. E. Zion 

Chttrcfa, Pico and Paloma Sts., 

I^Rev. Walter R. LoyelL; 

-^laarterly meeting mil to^ 

" ■ with Dr. JaansI J" 

taker at both^ 

6:i& p.r^q|^^^^HBbser 
^erly .^I^^^IF^olmes 
le 11:00 B. 
services. The 
ference of the 
will "^e held at 
e. ««o»-,^^J^ondaj :iight. The 
5gSspi«i^^\.* "«■'*' officers will 
be the special feature with re- 
- ports from the various depart- 
ments supplementing them. 

'?'ii' Communion services wUl pre- 
^Ulat the Second Baptist church 
Sunday at both service* with 
baptism in the evening. Dr. T. 
L. Grifith, pastor, will fill the 
pulpit on both occasions and ad- 
minister the communion. 

"A Mistreated Christ" will be 
the subject of Rev. B. L. Strau- 
, tber's morning subject Sunday. 
At 7:30 p. m., the covenant and 
the Lord's Supper will mark tlie 
services. 

,:. ;. * 

^v'-Hamilton's Epworth League 
Srill meet at 6 p. m. and discuss 
• the topic: "Should Great Britain 
' and France have Fought to Save 
• the Czechs from the Hands n( 
I the German Dictator?" James 
L Brown will lead the discusion. 


Elder P. G. Rogers, pastor of 
^" the Seventh Day Adventist church 
r'»t 40th place and Wadsworth 
] ' Ajrenue will speak Sunday night 
-November 6, at eight o'clock and 
. Oft the Sabbath (Saturday) mom- 
.-tlng at eleven o'clock. Elder Rog- 
tl era, has just returned from the 
fan counci of the church at Bat- 
tle preek. Michigan and it is 
expected that his messages will 
be replete with much information. 

"What Are Christians Made 

Like?" will be the siibject of Rev. 

Chester A. Hemphill's message 

iiext Sunday, November 6, at the 

jming hour. At 7:45 p. m. Rev. 

A. Harrell of Texas will speak. 

C. Cornelius who has been 

^conducting inspirational song ser- 

will continue them Sunday. 

riday night Novmeber^j*, a 

n_of; evangelistic singing 

Sg quartets will be. pres- 


UNIVERSAL INSTlTUTIONiL 
CHURCH CENTER fk 

Sunday School. 9:30 a.;SJn.; 
morning service, 10:45. '^ 

All friends are invited to #>r- 
sJiip with us at our morning:ier- 
yice. 'A special program has bMn 
planned. 

Adult classes are held as fol- 
lows :' Tuesday and Thurfday 
6:30-9 Literary Revie* and Home 
Buijgeting with Rev. Isaacs as 
teacher; Monday, Wednesday, 
Thursday 9-12 Sewing Class with 
Mrs. Markham as teacher; 'ind 
daily from 9-li Miss Simon in- 
structs classes in canning, cdok 
ery, cake decorating, a 
tety. 

-Every student Wi 
as much as ona^ " 
vegetable is ^^^^^ 
the Cente^^^^Be has canned 
make he^^^^Pjar Of fruit or 
cationa^^^H^ed to come t-o 
s<4edu^^^^immediately and 
d^ai^^^^lection for the Edu- 
Program and Exihibit 
ed at the Center on Tues- 
„, November 15. 1938. Each 
-„dy will be privileged to take 
her work heme immediately ^fol- 
lowing the prograpi. 

For children there are classes 
in handicraft sewing, clay model- 
ing, story telling and games 
daily from 3-5 p. m. 

U. S. Griggs, president of the 
Northern • Settion of the Golden 
State Mutual Life Insurance 
Company; Dr. V. C Hamilton of 
Berkeley, and E. B. Gray, real 
estate broker, were the principal 
speakers at the Professional and 
Business Men's Association day 
on last Sunday at St Paul A. M. 
E. church, Berkeley. Rev. C. W. 
Smith, pastor. 

M. B. Whitten, real estate 
broker of Oakland for twenty 
years, was speaker at the Com- 
munity Forum of Taylor Me- 
morial Methodist. Church on 'last 
Sunday, Rev. H. T. S. Johnson, 
pastor. 

"West Oakland and Slum 
Clearance" was the subject, 
which greatly interested listeners 
and is of general interest to the 
•Negro population of Alameda 
County. 

Mrs. L. H. Williams, director 
of prison welfare of the Los An- 
geles W.C.T.U., who has worked 
around the county jail for nearly 
a quarter century Will speak at 
the W i 1 s h i r e Presbyterian 
church Sunday morning at 10 
o'clock for the Woman's Bible 
class. 


The 'world-famed seat of learn-^ 
ing, Tuskegee Institute, will be 
the feature of a panel discus- 
sion Friday night, NcA^ember 18, 
at Second Baptist church, A"?thur 
C. Cole, president of the Los An- 
geles Tuskegee Club, announced 
today. 

Among the speakers are num- 
bered Dr. W. R. Carter, recent 
NYA appointee and prominent 
clergyman; Floyd Covington, 
executive director of the Los An- 
geles Urban league; C. O. Eng- 
lish, Golden State Mutual Life 
Insurance official; Father H. Ran- 
dolph Moore, Dr. Pryce Cobbs, 
Lieut Wm. •Powell, Miss S. Pum- 
phrey,*A. R. Moseley, Mrs. Au- 
gusta Clover, Rev. Clayton Rus- 
sell, and Others. 

Vocal soloists include Mme 
Florence Cole Talbert-McCleave 
and George Gamer. R. N. San- 
ford will read some of the wor] 
of poet Paul Laurence Dj 
who wrote the famed 
Song^ '" 

N^GRO CI^^^BRs^ee 


H VITAL, 
S DEAN SMITH 

Speaking to the Negro Nation- 
al Congress meeting in Chicago, 
October 28-30, Dean H. M. Smith 
of the Chicago Baptist Institute 
declared, "The Negro church has 
always succeeded when it has 
been courageous and militant It 
has invariable failed when it 
has been cautious and timid. 

"Certain selfish and smister 
forces at work in our present so- 
cial order seek to have church 
people, in both the pulpit and 
the pfew, feel that the business cf 
religion in general and Christi- 
anity in, particular is to make 
people satisfied with their lot In 
life, no matter how desperate and 
difficult that lot may happen to 
be. As a matter of fact the Bible, 
Negro history, and the life of 
Jesus are all one in driving home 
the fact that Christianity is at its 
finest and best when it makes 
raen dissatisfied with Injustice 
and human suflfering. 

"The Negro church today needs 
men who itke Moses wUl lead 
their people out of the land of 
bondage-the Uncle Tc^os in Ne- 
gro life should stay out of. the 
pulpit and remain in "U n c 1 e 
Tom's Cabin'." 


L. A. Missionary 
Delegates Feted 
at Reception <^ 

The missionary society of the 
Second Baptist, church hosted a 
home coming reception compli- 
menting Mrs. S. A. Reed, presid- 
ent; land Mrs. Henrietta H. Chiles, 
state president of the Western 
Baptist Women's Convention, who, 
were delegates to the Nat, 
Baptist convention in St, 

Greetings were extei 
honoree from Mr. _^^r-i,oui' 
chairman of Deaj^^^ . ... 
Mrs. J. H. Hojipeed to the 
ionary SociaiB^„ ' •""''^' 
^roBXMia^^^r-^^ Board and 
^^^^^^les of the Miss- 
ly. The rest of the 
i^clrSfd a reading by 
■s. .newby; solo. Miss F. Crow; 
feadiHg Miss Vassie D. Reese; 
solo, Miss El vies James; remarics, 
Mrs. P. L Thomas, vice presid- 
ent; remarks on the convention, 
Mrs. Chiles, travelogue, -Mrs. S. 
A. Reed. At the close, of the pro- 
gram, the group assemibled in the 
dining room where Mrs. Rosa 
Talbert and Mrs. Daisy Carter 
received them and superintend- 
ed the serving of refreshments. 

On Sunday nigut the society 
presented a progra-n at the Sec- 
ond Baptist church evening ser- 
vices ai v-hich time Mrs. Reed 
made her report on the conven- 
tion. Other speakers of the ev- 
ening were Mmes. J. Williams, 
L. M. Erwin, Anna Scott Mari?h 
Thomas, and Pearl Jenkins. Mrs. 
George T. Lee served as mistress 
of qeremonies. Dr. T. L. Griffith 
pasfor, offered remarks immed- 
iately preceeding the close of 
services. 


I active steps to direct their ac 
I tivities in ways ths* will guar- 
antee their successful future. 

The assembly also voted iman- 
imously to support the proposed 
home for homeless boys, and in- 
structed the minister to contin- 
ue work with a commiittee for 
the final arrangements. 

The convocation was one of the 
most succesful In the history of 
the church, and was largely at- 
tended every night. 



PROF, 
fol^^ 

W. D. ISAAC, who is 

g in the footsteps of 
illastrous father as Secre-' 
tary of the NaUonal B.Y.P.U. 
Board. Prof. Isaac succeeded 
his father. Dr. Isaac, Sr.. at the 
latter's death in '31. and was 
again re-elected in ,St. Louis 
recently. A native of Waskom, 
Texas, Prof. Isaac was educat- 
ed at Bishop College, Arkan- 
sas Baptist College ,and Tus- 
kegee Institute. He is a master 
printer, and has managed the 
Clarion Printing Company, 409 
Gay street, Nashville, Tenn., 
since 1912. (Calvin Servlee) 


Story of Philippines Opons 
Children's Radio Program 

Saturday's (November 5, broad- 
cast of "The Monitor Children's 
Program" (KNX— 9:45 a. m.) op- 
ens with an entertaining story, 
"Jack and Mary in the Philip- 
pines." Following it "A Wonder- 


HARBOR PAIR HOST 
FRIENDS AT 
HOUSE - WARMING 

WILMINGTON. (Bji 
Lewis) — 
hostei^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Carr 

_ l)3ba«'''waaraainv 'or a 

number of friends in their 
new • home. A sumptuous dinner 
was served guests who, for the 
most part, came from harbor 
towns. 

Mrs. L. Lancaster and Mrs. B. 
Pilot of Los Angeles staged a 
dinner party at the home of Mr. 
J. HiU, lO' East N Street last 
week. Following dinner, guests 
motored to the beach to gather 
shells . . . Mrs. P. Wilson is re- 
covering from a protracted ill- 
ness in her home at 53 Benite 
Street . . . Mrs. Bush enjoyed her 
105th birthday on October 31 and 
will be honored with a party 
later this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. K. Benson 
moved to the: old Hathway Place 
on Hamilton Street and Mr. and 
Mrs. Hathway moved to their 
ranch at Palas Verdes. Mr. and 
Mrs. Luke who have returned 
from an extended vacation were 
tendered a motor party by 
friends on their return. 


ful Adventure for John," brings 
a tale of carrier pigeons and their 
flight from England to France, 
The final story, "Bushy Tail and 
His Nuts", tells of a red squirrel 
and his clever system of storing 
up food for the winter. 


NATIONAL BAPTISi 
SESSION CALLED 

The Extended sessiw? of the 
National Baptist Convention Inc., 
U. S. A. has' been called to meet 
with the churches of -Memphis, 
Tenn. Dec. 7-8, 1938. By agree- 
ment of the Memphis pastors, the 
sessions of the Convention will 
be held at the Metropolitan Bap- 
tist Church, comer of Walker and 
McDowell, Dr. S. A. Ow«i is pas- 
tor. The Women's auxiliary will 


Shout JHallelujah 
Sermon to Be 
Aired Tonight 

Parson Sabbath quotes the com- 
mandment, "You shall have nd 
other God before me' 'in deliv- 
ering tonight's unique "Shout 
Hallelujah" sermon, to be aired 
Over KFWB at 6:45. 

"Elijah Wins the Bet" is the 
title of Otis Barnard's whimsical 
quarter hour program which is 
generously interspersed with vo- 
cal numbers by the popular Fed-, 
eral Theatre Radio Division. 

"The all-Negro musical session 
brings this evening's listeners a 
thrilling account of Elijah's dem- 
onstration of God's power in test- 
ting the fabe god Baalam. 

Principals in the "Shout Hall- 
elujah" presentation are Charles 
Hawkins, Earl Smith, Artis Ward, 
Cephus Douglas and Lester Wil- 
kins and other favorites. 


Set All-Nations 
Musical Program 

An ell nations musical program 
will be presented by the Mexican 
and Shaw Chapel M. E. Churches 
1701 Santa Ana Boulevard, next 
Monday evening, November 7 at 
7:30 p. m. in the Mexican M. E. 
church. The program will present 
Helena Smith, radio singing star; 
Albert McNeal, Oner Barker, 
pianBts; Bessie Guy, Clarence 
Hargrove, Marriot Matthews of 
the current sensation, "Run, Lit- 
tle ChiUun" and renditions from 
Japanese, Ch'mese, Italian and 
Mexican artists. 

The Revs. F. O. QuUiUuilla and 
A.C Austin are pastors ,of the 
Mexican and Shaw Chapel 
churches respectively. No ad- 
mission will be charged f*r the 
concert, but a silver offering will 
be asked. - 


FIRST A. M. E. ZION CHURCH 

Pico Blvd. at Paloma Street Office Phone: PR-9727 

Rev. Walter R. Lovell, Pastor, 1217 Palonu St RI--99S9 

Rev. Roger Willis, Associate Pastor 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1938 

9:30 A. M.— CHURCH SCHOOL (All Departments) 
10:30-A. M.— HOLY COMMUNION 

1 1 :00 A. M. — Morning Worship, Sermon by Dr. James B. Holmes 
3;00 P. M. — Quarterly Meeting, Sermon by Rev. Emma Hamil- 
ton. ' 
5:30 P. M. — Christian Endeavor > 
6:45 P. M. — ^Eventide Worship, Sermon by Dr. James B. Holmes 
"THE CHURCH THAT SERVES WITH A SMILE" 


Ward C hope I 
A. M. E. Church 


REV. J. W. PRICE. Pastor 
1250 East 25th Street Phone .(ZEntury 23052 



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1938 


communion will be ad- 

d at the momipg ser- 

the Lincoln Memorial 

ttional CThurch witii the 

on being delivered by the 

~ E; E. Lightner. At 

he evening, there will be 

forrm on "Some Prac- 

ectives For the Church." 

-omrounion will be ad- 

at both the momin? 

at Hamilton M. ] 


FOUNTAIN PEN 
SHOP 

Room 314 Groase Bnilding 

124,W«st Sixth St. 

' Cdmer Spring Street 
PARKER & SHEAFFER 

SERVICE STA'nON 
Fountain Pen and PeneO 

Repairing 
Meil Orders Promptly Filled 

Phone TUcker 3652 

■ ONK-DAY SERVICE 


meet in the Second Congregation- 
al Church on Walker Avenue 
just across the street from Met- 
ropolitan. 


Outdoor Life 
Unit to Meet 

DUARTE— The Monrovia- 
Dtiarte Unit of the Outdoor Life 
and Health Association will hold 
Si meeting in the feethel AME 
church of Monrovia on Mondav. 
Members are urged to be pres- 
ent. 

Energy of the organization is 
concentrated this week on the 
carnival to be held from Nov 
ll-*4^on the grounds of the 
president's home, Mrs. M. J. 
Davis, 1940 Central avenue. 


5:00 A. M.— PRAYER MEETING I 

9;30 A. M.— SUNDAY SCHOOL ,1 

11:00 A. M.— MORNING WORSHIP |. 

6:00 P. M. — A. C. E. LEAGUES, Senior and Intermediates 
7:30 P. M.— EVENING SERVICES 
7:30 P. M.— WEDNESDAY NTTE Prayer and Class Meeting 


A CORDIAL WELCOME EXTENDED TO ACL 


We give comteoas aafl earefnl at- 
tentlM to all detaOs: efficient sa- 
Tiee with modem teeOitiea., i 

Our Motto: ' i 

. "Maximum Service At 
Minimum Cost 

South Los Angdeji 
,.^ _ Mirtuary %; 

112th fir WHmtn^ton Av«^u« v JE~477^ 




- 


'' Comer 108th and Comptoa Avwajiiw 
PROF. L G. ECGLESTON. Dnector of Mutk 
REV. ROBERT House. Pastir , 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1938 


5:00 A. M.— PRAYER SERVICE . : 
9:30 A. M.^-SUNDAY SCHOOL 
10:65 A. ?*«.— DEVO'nONALS and SERMOiM- 

Subject: "Spiritual Knowledge" 
6:00 P. M.— BIBLE CLASS 
6:30 P.M.— A. C. E. LEAGUE SERVICl 

"Topic: "Forces That Make far War" 
7:30 P. M.-iDEV0TIONAL§ .AND ; SERMOS"— Ite. White, 
■ '[ ■■ EvaniEelist ' J- ,'.;o ;^', '4 

' ' r I '• ' 111 i '« , 

TOU ABE COBDIALLT WELCOME t0 W0B9BIF WITH US 

■' .■ • ■ . .-( • .'■. - 

II , ' . 1 M l " I . ' 1; > . " I j" . I i 



BEV. KOBEET HOUSE 

AME Church 
Honors Rev., 
Mrs. House 

On Thursday evening, October 
27thi in the midst of friends and 
members assembled Grant Chapel 
A. ' M. E. Church of South Los 
Angeles honored their pastor and 
wife. Rev. and Mrs. Robert House. 
Every Board and Auxiliary lent 
their support to make this a 
grand affair. With Bro. Yates as 
general chairman of the recept- 
ion we were asured in advance of 
a very pleasant evening, -^fter 
rendition of the program, con- 
sisting of songs, a welcome ad- 
dress and instrumental solos. 
Rev. House was presented a Wahl 
Fountain Pen and- Mrs. House 
received a lace table cloth in ap- 
preciation for invaluable service 
rendered the Church and com- 
munity. The table was beautiful 
with white and pink color 
scheme, refresliments of ice- 
,tream and cake were setvi 


rsdo y, l^o^wmtio i' 3^1^8 

Girl l^s^>^®s of 
Oakfond YWCA 
Giye ^ek Sunday 

OAKLAWl>— the cn'tire mem- 
bershi^fHends and parents of 
Girl Reserves are invited to at- 
tend a tea ,to be given by the 
Girl Reserve Department at Lm- 
dent Street Branch YWCA, S2S 
Linden IStre# on Sunday at 3 

■p.. m. ':' i.\. 

Novella Curtis from Cordeil-j 
Wimv and Gloria Romine from 
iJasHidalgas senior high clubs, 
will give interesting highlights 
oh the ten day conference which 
they attended at Asilomar. 

Two of the four gjrls who went 
to Camp Hollow r Electra Kim- 
ble and Gwendolyn Smith, will 
tell their experiences during the 
two weeks' sUy. 

Members df the Girl Resen-e 
Committee who will assist the 
girls in hostessir^g are: Mrs. 
Frances Livingston, chr., Meg- 
dames Rosalie Smith, Teresa An- 
derson, Veola Gibson, Florence 
JackA}n, Jbsephine Lewis, Viola 
Romine, Elsie Rumford; Misses 
Muriel Anderson, Florence Bod- 
in, Theo. Bruce, Zelma Harding, 
Lillyan Hylton, Mary Labuzan! 
Jean Marin and Fannie Parki! 
and the «lub advisers, Misses 
Faracita Hall and Vivien.Te 
Swanigan. 


Card of Thanks 

.We take this method of extenii- 
ing thanxs ^ntf a« «ppnrtjrition 
to all individual and orgr.niza- 
tions who helped in any way to- 
wards the success of ou"f ■mem- 
bership drive. 

Some 325 membeT-ships wer» 
subscribed. - * ii^/f 

All persons holding unpaid cr 
part paid subscriptions are re- 
quested to make a report at once 
in order that the drive may offi- 
cially be closed. 

Hattie Baldwin, Pres 
Nettie B. Reese, Sunt. 


everyone oeparted for horn witj 
best wishes for a successful yea 


-> churcn 


'»nattb Vafim VUmn^ 


OtitfHk Av«BiM 
aiBdMOi Street 


L. Oriffith, D. 0. 


A CORDIAL WELCOME TO OUR SERVICES 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1938 

11:00 A. M. — "Attractions of The Upward Highway" 
6:15 P. M.— B. Y. P. U. 
7:45— REV. J. W. CLAY deUvers the sermon.. 
' BAPTISM. THE LORD'S SUPPER. 


Wwbg£2SS<^^«"Ji 


Eighth and San Julian Streets 
REV. E. W. RAREST RAW. Minister 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1938 

g:30 A. M.— CHURCH SCHOOL 
MINISTER'S MORNING SUBJECT: "The Wounds of Jesus" 

EVENING WORSHIP will be a Union Service between WES- 
LEY and HAMILTON M. E. CHURCH at Hamilton 




S. M. Burnt. B. D. 
Pastor 


Baa \8tb Strut ni 

S'aomi Av*nu4 


SUNDAY, NOVEM 



9:30 A. M.— CHURCH SCHOOL 
11:00 A. M.— HOLY COMMUNION 

COMMUNION MEDITATION ... Pastor 

6:00 P. M.— EPWORTH LEAGUE 

Topic: "Should France and Britain Have Fought to 
Save the Czechs From The (German Dictator?" 


led by Mr. Brown 

V:30 P. M.-JOINT COMMUNION SERVICE, WESLEY AND 
. HAMILTON r,ij^^ci. «jMu 

MUSIC .. — Wesley Choir 

SERMON Rev. E. W. Rakestraw 


PEOPLE'S INDEPENDENT 
CHURCH OF CHRIS-^ 

18TH AND PALOMA 

"THE CHURCH THAT SERVES" 

CLAVTSDN p. RUSSELL, Minister - 


SUNbAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1938 


HOLY COMMUNION AT BOTH SEBVICBii. 

RADIO BROADCAST FOR SICK AND SHUT-INS 
|*THE VISITOB", 19:15 a. m. \ " ' \- 

MORNING SERMON: 10:55 a. nCV . ' >; , \ 

"Weak Men, Strong Woifi^n 

MEMORIAL SERVICE: 7:30 p. m. i> i • 

For Members of the Churdi Deceased Durint; R«(t Year. 

NEXT SUNDAY EVENING Ber. AiuMUa d^aii* n^ 
clal Sermen «m "The NHnHis pwh Worst Bneiny »T|p* K . 


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■^B CoBver 
iBon's Po^ 

„ the clo 

xnoth 1938 Goh?,'^ 
^^'8 PoliUoall 
Eaomia, heldl 
,reek in O<;tobeir 
able leaderships^ 
and Executive I 
Betty Hill, tkerl 
other historic r 
the way of this I 
ed group's detel 
Originally andl 
ized to enlightra* 
Yuot' as to thel 
use of the balloi 
also concerns il 
munity and civil 
ifomia's" ciXizenJ 
quainted with tl 
many accoi&plistf 
terest of race w 
nine years of it 
Theme of the I 
■„ras, arrestinglyJ 
ed Doors of Opp<L 
Youth." Di&ussil 
by its sub-tQpicJ 
tion for Life Wo| 
tunity for Wort 
eminent", (c) 
(d) "In Negro I 
nished themes 
sesions. , 

"Preparation iJ 
es School SysterH 
of the Friday 
with Walter Brd 
the Dav-id Stai 
School as guesi 
Brown's address! 
presentation of tT 
the Negro youtW 
inclusion of praj 
standing vocat 
Mrs. Rollin Bro 
the 10th Distric 
jai informative i 
"le work .of he 
le History 
Xkc$cs 
read 
,Smit 
,iti 


eniighteninf 
ing. Sup>ervisor G 

IDonoujgh responde 
planation of rece 
county governmet 
. minate the vicioirs 
iticed discrimmatLD 
I Theme of the Fi 
' session was "Op! 
• the Negro in Inc 
! BuzelL ■ secretary 
I Labor Board of" in 
'plained the rr.sny 
'breaking down b; 
crimination in the 
organization. 

Appearing a.= a 
of tile opportunity 
Negro business w 
-Williams. 

Convention sessic 

day afternoon and 

tured various fom 

vroilc among Nej 

Scudder. head of 

Delinquency Depai 

sed his work and 

as a social correc:; 

ily Relief was disc 

ace Roberts; Mrs. 

well-knovsTi civic 

of hervecent visii 

Kappa Alpha Son 

ippi Health Projeci 

Temple gave a 

with the. free hea 

the Womar.'s Poiiu 

of" California spxir.; 

Tribute to the r 

late composer-ed; 

Weldon Johnson, v 

memorial -service 

ection of Mrs. Mi 

Delegates from F 

Beach, San Bema: 

Heists, assisted i! 

high point of whicl 

did voice of Mme. 

•McClece. rendenr^ 

"Since You Went 

Federal legislatu 

ed in two .v.el!-ej 

"Results of Perm a: 

rived from the Pr 

tration^by Mr?. 

leau; and Mrs. Hi 

of a Fresno farme 

the "Crop Contro 

■results — further • 

Mrs. Busby of. Bj 

Mrs. Betty H:i: 

dress: "Youth", re 

na Robinson, anc 

Mrs. Beatrice M 

prolonged and e 

plause from the 

Hill's sincere effoi 

ests of the race, a 

Executive secret a: 

Clab, makes her 

coajfl the orga.iui 

fort. Aiding mem' 

ecutive Council i 

Helen Moore. Hel 

el Prioleau, Eva ( 

shi Tatum. " Bla 

Louise Kenner, ar 

thews. 

Climax of 'the ( 

the formal banqu 

gymnasium of Lo 

Street Y. M. C. 

decorated for the 

Nptablcs present 

Phillip Bancroft, 

senatorial candid: 

iin, cai\didate foi 

Lieutenant-Qover 

nia; Supervisor < 

Donough, County 

* R. Quinn, I»rofe 

: i Stockton, Miss H 

■;■ «CH*ch of tbe CI 

. * ttTvCe, Riverside; 

.s;- -Easter of the Sta' 

•'■I tion Department; 

' t ■;i!red Roberts, foi 

^! .man. 

I • ^ The tonventior 

I ' as supporting thi 

j Bill, Revision of 

' Bill, and as bem 

;^ workable An) 

Each congression 

•was thoroughly 

to his stand on I 



Women of 

State Hpld 
Confob Here 

'38 Cdnvention of Wo- 
mon't Pditiccf Study 
Club^d*; Much Poof 


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-»*- 


Hr-: 


lus Conducts 
Services fdr L k. Citizens 


Mrs.-i}vaCarK)n of 1350 E. •O^made his home in California for 


street died at the General hospi 
tal October 25. Bom in Texas, 


she had lived here for the^ast Wedneisday of last weiek. 
20 years. Fihal services Were held ^ 
in the Angelus Pimeral Home 
.church chapel last Friday with 


Wi*„the_closing of the m«rf- S^Fix^t^A^St ?hSffc' 


moth 1938 Convention of the Wo 
nan'8 Politioal Study Club -of 
Jilifomia, held here the -last 
week in October, un^er the cap- 
able leadership of the organizer,- 
and Executive secretary, Mrs. 
Betty HiU, there is marked an- 
other historic milestone along 
the way of this politically-mind- 
ed group's determined progress. 
Originally and primarily organ- 
ized to enlight«i members of the 
race as td the most ' beneficial 
use of the ballot, the Study club 
also concerns itself with com- 
munity and civic problems. Cal- 
3ornia's citizenry are well ac- 
quainted with the organization's 
many accomplishments in the in>- 
terest of race welfare during the 
nine years of its existence. * 

Theme of tHe 1938 Convention 
was, arrestingly, "Opening Clos- 
ed Doors of Opportunity to Negro 
Youth." DiscussiMi of. the thane 
by its sub-topics: (a) "Prepara- 
tion for Life Work", (b) "OM>or- 
tunity for Work With the Gov- 
ernment", (c) "In Trades"; ind 
(d) "In Negro Business", jmr- 
nished themes for Convention 
sesions. 

"F^reparation in the Los Angel- 
es School System" was the theme 
of the Friday morning sesion; 
with Walter Brown, principal of 
the David Starr Jordan High 
School as guest speaker. Mr. 
Brown's address included a fine 
presentation of the advantages to 
the Negro youth's future by the 
inclusion of practical and under- 
standing vocational guidance. 
Mrs. Rollin Brown, president of 
the. 10th District P-T. A., gave 
tea informative talk dealing with 
the work of her organization. 

"The History of Civil Service 
and Its Tactics Against the Ne- 
f was read" in manuscript by 
Alice Smith. In view of the 
;ent conditions of prejudice 
St the raq^in the city, coim-J 
and Federal Civil 

iti;:; ^ 

jecit was 
h enlightening and challeng- 
ing. Supervisor Gordon L. Mc- 
Donough responded yiith an ex- 
planation of recent changes in 
county govemmet planned to eli- 
minate the vicious and long prac- 
ticed discrimination. 

Theme of the Friday aftemooi 
session was "Opportunities for 
the Negro in Industry". J. W. 
Bu-ell. secretary of the Central 
Labor Board of the A. F. L., ex- 
plained the many possibilities of 
breaking down barriers of dis- 
crimination in the units of that 
.organization. , 

Appearing as a representative 
of the opportunity for youth in 
Negro busuiess was Mrs. Zora 
Williams. 

Convention sessions during Fri- 
day afternoon and evening fea- 
tured various forms of remedial 
work among Negroes. Kenyon 
Scudder. head of the Juvenile 
Delmquency Department, discus- 
sed his work and its importance 
as a social corrective force; Fam- 
ily Relief was discussed by Hor- 
ace Roberts; Mrs. Mattie Nelson, 
well-known civic worker, told 
of her recent visit to the Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Sorority's Mississ- 
ippi Health Project; and Dr. Ruth 
Temple gave a report dealing 
with the free health clinic that 
the Woman's Political Study Club 
of California sponsors. 

Tribute to the memory of the 
late composer-educator, James 
Weldon Johnson, was paid with a 
memorial service under the dir- 
ection of Mrs. Minnie Wickliffe. 
Delegates from Pasadena, Long 
Beach, San Bernardino and Pico 
Heights, assisted ui the service — 
high point of which was the splen- 
did voice of Mme: Florence Cole 
McClece. rendering Johnson's 
•Since You Went Away". 

Federal legislation was review- 
ed in two well-executed papers; 
"Results of Permanent 'Value De- 
rived from the Present Adminis- 
tration" by Mrs. Ethel G. Prio- 
leau; and Mrs. Hutchinson's wife 
of a Fresno farmer, discussion of 
the "Crop Control Bill" and its 
results —further elaborated by 
Mrs. Busby of Bakersfield. 

Mrs. Betty Hill's Annual ad- 
dress: "Youth", read by Mrs. Ed- 
na Robinson, and discussed by 
Mrs. Beatrice Mason, received 
prolonged and enthusiastic ap- 
plause from the assembly. _ Mrs. 
Hill's sincere efforts in the inter- 
ests of the race, and as orgamzer 
Executive secretary of the Swrty 
Club, makes her a guiding bea- 
con in the organization's every ef- 
fort. Aiding members of Jhe a^- 
ecutive Council include Mmw. 
Helen Moore, Helen Riddle, Etb- 
el Prioleau. Eva C. Burton, Nao- 
shi Tatum. Blanche Vincent, 
Louise Kenner, afld Clanasa Mat- 

thews 

Climax of the Conventitm was 
the formal banquet held in tiie 
gymnasium of Loa, Angeles 28th 
Street Y. M. C. A.-beautifully 
decorated for the eye"^. . --„ 
Noubles present mchided Mrs. 
Bancroft, -wife of the 


lating. Burial was in Evergreen 
Cemetery. 

"The deceased is survived bv 
a husband, William R. Carson, 
and other relatives. 

Mrs, Bemice Boullt, succumb- 
ed at hta- home 1042 E. 45th St., 
October 25. She waa a native of 
St Monis, La., and hade made 
here home in Los Angeles for 11 
years. 

Bev. P. H. Prentice presided 
at the last rites held at Mt 
Zion Baptist church,o f which he 
is pastor, last Saturday. Inter- 
ment was in Lincoln Memorial 
Park directed by 'the Angelus. 
A husban and son survives.- 

Edward Holland, 1654 W. 35th 
atreet, who died at his home 
Wednesday of last week, was a 
native of Mohita,- Va., and had 
lived here for the past 16 years. 
He was employed by the city 
of Lios Angeles. 

The church chapel at Angelus 
Funeral home was the scene of 
the last rites, conducted by Rev^ 
J. L. Caston, pastor of Trinity 


tDOES YOUII^ 
CAR HEED 
REF^IftiNG? 


the past 30 years, passed away a'* 
his home, 1651 E. 112th street. 


The church chapel of Angelus 
Funeral Home was filled Monday 
morning of this week with 
friends of the family when Bev. 
L. M. Curtis conducted the rites 
for the deceased who had resid- 
ed in Los Angeles .for the past 
12 years. Interment was in Moim- 
tain 'View cemetery, Pasadena. 

Mrs. Ida E. Stanton of Mac- 
omb, Blinois, died in the General 
hospital Thursday of last week 
having made her home in this 
city for ofour years. 

The funeral, held in the rest- 
ful atmosphere • of the Angelus 
Funeral Home, waa presided ov- 
er by Rev. J. M. Cadell, with in- 
terment in Evergreen cemeterv. 
She leaves a husband, William 
Stanton, a daughter, Mrs. Margar- 
et. Reed and grandchildren, all 
of Los Angeles. 

Mrs. Melrose Stewart, one of 
the city's most popular matroii.'*. 
succumbed after a long illness 
at her home, 312 Pace avenue 
last Sunday morning. Born in 
San Antonio, Texas, Mrs. Stewart 
had been a resident of Los An- 
geles for 33 years. 

■ Last rites will be solemnized 
at the church chapel of the An- 
gelus this afternoon (Thursday) 
at 1:30. Rev. Clayton D. Ru^ell, 


^^V 


Baptist church, last Saturday af- { minister of People's Independent 


temoon. Interment was in Lincoln 
Memorial Park. His widow, Mrs. 
Katie Holland, and other rela- 
tives survive. 

James A. Beasley, a pullmon 
porter for 14 years, and who had 


Church of Christ, will preside, 
ytiih burial in Evergreen. 

Surviving are her husband, 
Ervin Stewart; mother, l&i?. Min- 
nie E. Burton, and daughter, Mel- 
rose. 


GUY A. .NEWELL & COM- 
PANY located at 316 West 17th 
Street are extending to their 
many colored friends an open in- 
vitation to drop in and see their 
"BEFORE AND AFTER CARS* 
— you will se6 mkny cars that 
you would probably think were 
completely beyond rwair — ^But, 
after their expert BODY & FEN- 
DER repair men have given the 
cars a thorough going over — one 
would not recognize the car as 
the one and same at all. 

Also the Guy A. Newell & 
Company are equipped with the 
nationally known BEE LINE eq- 
uipment — therefore they are eq- 
uipped to give the best service 
that can be had in the Automo- 
bile repair business. When your 
car needs repairing one always 
wants the very best that moiiey 
can buy — their prices are no 
higher than any place but their 
work is far superior. They are eq- 
uipped, to give you correct wheel 
alignment and frame straighten- 
ing, metal shaping and stream- 
lineing as applied to Trailers. 

If you are looking for the lat- 
est in refinishing and color crea- 
tions at competitive prices — let 
Mr. Newell .give you an estimate. 
You will receive prompt and 
courteous service; as the slogan — 
FIRST CLASS WORK FOR 
FIRST CLASS PEOPLE. 



SPREAD ADVERTISING MONEY 


It is very important to spend ^ 
money for advertising — but it is 
more important still to know 
where and how to spend it. We 
do not mean as to what medium 
to use. I mean spreading the ad- 
vertising money according to the 
markets. For advertising bud- 
geting find out exactly what 
the particular market that you 
want to develop wants and give 
them just what they want You 

are advj - - — 

newi 

er telling the Colored 
people what you have to offer — 
be certain that they want what 
you advertise. In other words 
advertise the things they are in- 
terested in. 


Since, from an accounting 
standpoint, there are only three 
measures that can be placed ag- 
ainst a doUar spent in sales ef- 
forts, vis: (1) the net profit on 
all sales produced, (2) the trend 
of sales set-up and (3)_ ration of 
sales to the spendable ^income in 
a given area. The district should 
be broken down into spheres of 
sales influence. The amoimt of 
advertising that shuold be used 
in that particular surea holding 
the most hope of profit That area 
should get the larger proportion 
of the advertising appropriation. 
You should be more "SELEC- 
TIVE" in placing your advertis- 
ing. 


Soy Business 
is Good ot 
Local Eostern 


Spurgeon Jones, Scdes manager 
Of Eastern at 45th and Central, 
made an annoucement of im- 
ive iib^Hittosked 


lin, candidate for the ottice of 
Lieutenant-Governor of Califor- 
nia- Supervisor Gordon L. Mc- 
SoioughTCofinty Assessor John 
R. Quinn. Professor and Mr^ 
Stockton, Miss Hansen and M.. 
Sfcru-u* of th6 Chamber, of Com- 
»!^e. Riverside; Superintendent 
E^er of the State Adult Educa- 
tion Department; and the Hon. 
■ ;■ Fred Roberts, formsr Assembly- 
man. . J. 
The Conveiition went on record 
I as supporting the Hamilton^ish 
.' Bill, Revision of the Wage 'Hour 
. .Bill, and as being in favor of a 
" .." -workable Anti-Lynchlng Bill. 
.'it Each congressional candidate 
t was thoroughly interrogated as 
•f-j ft* his stand on each of these u- 


The first thing to do in woijk- 
ing out a selective marketing 
plan is to obtain the actual sales 
for that particular, area. These 
sales figures should be brought 
back far enough to show defin- 
itely the trend in our midst. 
Check thpse thoroughly and ag- 
ainst the figiures set up a BUY- 
ING PO'WER INDEX. The fig- 
ures that you use will depend 
upon the nature of your business. 
I suggest that you go about it 
in this way: check the Negro 
population, income tax retur-ns, 
telephone subscribers, automo- 
bile owners, number of retail 
outlets and sales by retail out- 
lets if they are available from 
the cencus figures. This will give 
you something definite to work 
on. Remember such a buying 
power index, however, is only 
valuable to you if it checks ^ag- 
ainst actual sales conditions. A 
large amount of common sense 
must be mixed with all the fig- 
ures that you grt, or they are 
very likely to do more harm 
than good. It is also advisable 
to place alongside this buying 
power index an index finger, ob- 
tained from your own sales re- 
cords, to show the relative cost 
of selling in our area. This will 
avoid uie danger of not spending 
enough money for the kind of 
business that you want. With 
sales, bijiying power and the cost 
to advertise in this area, the next 
step is Ho work out a basis of 
compafiison. Group all your ar- 
eas together — such grouping is 
made with a cooperation of your 
salesmen and salesladies. Each 
sales person is asked for his or 
her opinion as to how much he 
or she thinks the sales with the 
colored are, and how they 'can 
be increased for the coming year. 
"When you have completed this 
operation, the amount of adver- 
tising money available is then 
divided first among the major 
groups ~ on the basis of known 
buying power and past sales his- 
tory; then according to sub- 
groups determine by the pot- 
ential sales increase. USE A SYS- 
TEM WHEN SPENDING MON- 
EY FOR ADVERTISING. Next 
weriE I shall tell you how to 
che<*k you appropriation. 


condition of traded in raor 

He said in part, "Everbody ag- 
rees, the radio industry in 1938 
made more real progress than 
any other industrial division. 
Push buttons to control the tonal 
quality, similar to organ perfor- 
mance, push buttons instead of 
dials which change stations, con- 
trol- of programs in one room 
while radio performs in another 
— without any connections; not to 
speak of tone quality and price. 
AH these are factors making the 
radio business this year's out- 
standing." 
TOO MANY TRADED IN 

"Because of this condition, our 
firm finds itself with a vast am- 
ount of traded in sets. Almost ev- 
ery sale of any radio adds one 
more used one to our stock. When 
considering we sold five car- 
loads of one brand alone, and 
that a setwastraded in on every- 
one — well, that's why we must 
do .■HJmething about it 

"Starting this week, at the 45th 
and Central Eastern we are go- 
ing to have a clearance sale of 
these reconditioned radios. Such 
famous makes as RCA, Aeronau- 
tics, Philco, Zenith, Fairbank.,, 
Morse and others, will be drasti- 
cally reduced to sell at once. 
And that is not all! Each and 
every one of these sets will be 
completely overhauled and re- 
conditioned before being offered 
to the public," he concluded. 


Philippine Islands 
Girl Reserve 
Secretary Y Guest 

Miss Evangelina Abellara," Girl 
Reserve Secretary of the Your.g 
Women's Christian Association of 
Manila, Philipine Islands will oe 
the guest of honor and speaker 
at the Home Coming Celebration 
of the 12tb Street Branch Y. W. 
C. A. now scheduled for Thurs- 
day, November 17th. This celebra- 
toin comes during World Fellow- 
ship W-eek when Young Women's 
Christian Associations throughout 
the world wiU give time to med- 
itation on the Christian Commun- 
ity in the Modern World. Dinner 
will be served Thursday all day; 
**ae family supper, when Mua 

k^y^^vUl speak at 6:30 P. M. 

blHMni^|^£e necessary, 

eservations 


_^^.^- 


3CJ8*' 



SIDEWALk 


(continued from page 

with pictures and special feature! 
the Galveston news wiU be an ac 
curate and forceful reflection of 
the town's progress and activity. 
The EAGLE advent in Texas 
marks the second out-of-state in- 
vasion by a Los Angeles business 
within the past few months. It is 
recalled that the Golden State 
Mutual Life Insurance Company- 
opened offices in Chciago, Illi- 
nois, earlier this year. 


Y. W. Secretaries Mee* ' 

Secretaries from all parts of 
Southern California met in the 
Twelfth Street Branch Y. W. & A. 
Saturday for- an all day confer- 
ence with Miss Thelma Hardon, 
office secretary and convener of 
the employment secretaries of the 
region in charge. 

Dr. J. Gustav "White, professor 
of applied sociology at 'Whittier 
College and director of the per- 
sontd counseling service of Los 
Angeles addressed the group in 
themorning and Miss Frances Kin- 
kaid of Long Beach lead the dis- 
cussion in the afternoon. 


JONES GRAIN MILL 

STALL A-12 GRAND CENTRAL MARKET 
322 So. Hill Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

* Tel. Michigan 7473 


•.^.%^ 


JA 


sues. 

Mrs. Mary King of Santa Bar- 
bara read the closing paper ,of 
the Convention: "One-ness . cf 
Purpose"; Miss DeBeal of River- 
side led the discvission following. 

. Members of the organization, 
representatives of eight C9unties 
of California, and guests attend- 
ing the educational sessions, vot- 
ed the Woman's Political Study 
Club 1938 Convention as un- 
precedented during the nine 
years of the organization's exis; 
ieaob, . ' i.- ..• . .-^ -■ V ; 

• . , ■ -;■■ ":• ■'3^ '■■^■■^ 'r-r/:- ■■•';>?^v 


kU->*^»fe 


FRIENDS, At this time of year, we take a great deal of 
pleasure in helping our THOUSANDS of friends prepare 
their tables for the HOLIDAY feasts ahead. Can't you just 
see that table full of good things to eat on THANKSGIVING 
AND CHRISTMAS DAY? 

You may have Turkey or you may have Chicken. There 
are hundreds of things you might have— But, ONE THING 
is SURE. YOU ARE going to have a FRUIT CAKE. What 
would THANKSGIVING or CHRISTMAS day be without - 
a FRUIT CAKE? ■ 

Realizing thstt this^is something everyone will need, 
we have created, an IDEA which will be your biggest TIME 
and MONEY saver this season. 

We have gone out into the Orchards and selected the 
best Fruits and Nuts possible for a FRUIT CAKE PACK 
FOR YOU. THIS PACK contains the exact ingredients for 
a real ENGLISH FRUIT CAKE, including nine kinds of 
fruits and nuts, flour, spices, etc.* all in correct proportions 
for YOUR IMMEDIATE MIXING. Enclosed in every pack- 
age is also a complete recipe with instructions for every 
step in the mixing and baking of the FRUIT CAKE. If you 
have never cooked anythingin all vour life you could still 
bake yourself the finest FRUIT CAKE TO BE HAD by just 
following the recipe. 

It's true that you. can buy your ^Vuit Cake already 
baked, but, you are not SURE what is in the cake and a 
. solid FRUIT LOAF CAKE such as this PACK makes would 
cost you much, much more money. You may get enough 
ingredients for 3% lbs. of FRUIT CAKE for $1.00, 7 lbs. of 
FRUIT CAKE for $2.00; 14 lbs. of FRUIT CAKE for $4.00.' 
These weights are net when baked and these prices include 
delivery. - 

ORDER YOUR FEUIT CaKje wOW! NOW! NOW! 

For your convenience we have baked some of these 
FRUIT CAKES from this recipe and have them at our store— 
you are WELCOME to a generdus sample just for the ask- 
ing. 

FOR a better idea of the tremendous success of this 
service we ask you to tune in on Radio Station KR.KJD., 
7:15 to 7:30 A. M. on Nov. 9, 10, 11, 12, 14rOr 15. Don't forget-^ 
if you want to know htfw the FRUIT CAKES will taste 
when baked call at the STORE for your generous sample. 

JONES GRAIN MILL, StQll A-12 
Grand Central Morkef, 322 So. Hill Street 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF., TELEPHONE Michigan 7473 
Send YooE Order In Now. Do Not DeUy. We Will Mail Any 
FIaeeInTheU<S.A. i ■■ 

Send One Of These FmH Cake Packs To Tom Friends 
And Relatives For The Holidays. .' i - 


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TUB criNG QUARTET OF BENTON'S ALL-LOS ANGELES FREE DELIVER^ $ER>9CE 
THE FL>V; Each One a Master of Motorcycle Technique 


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CORD 



A CLOSE OUT \ \ 

93 proof, 2 Years Old i / • »% ! . 

STRAIGHT *-/€% U|> , ■ 

Bourbon Whiskey ^-^ lU 
BENTON'S PRIDE \ 


Now |ou may enjoy BENTON'S new streomlined FREE DELIVERY, on outcome 
nine years' study ond research in Drug Store merchandising by telephone. All ord 
ore thmed ond clocked before leqying our delivery department, which is osnifonce tfij 
SERVICE will be givaa right owoy. 

i iollAD-'TiTi. A messenger will pick up your prtseWpHon ot your home 
Doctor's office and return compounded medicine to you, oil in o short space of Hmj 
;^ositiy«ly no extra ehorge for dtlivory. 



BENTON'S PRODUCTS Are Sold At AH GOOD DRUGGISTS Or AtJ 

BENTON DRUG 


'f. 


LQS ANGELES, U.S. A. 


■^\ 


i.;i i ^Li i .iT..,jjri' i ii 


'\A'^--}v'i^fa^ 




UIITII A 



DA/^C- 


k: 



I ''(^l-'U 


If you fon to reocl THE CALIFOKNIA CAOLE you may nn^ k'noNr It Hoppcnoi 



ER AND. SOME NEW5 

By HELEN F. CHAPPELL 
Swiety Ediisr 



f? 


!so, November 1. Two 

': ' - I read tnii and yown pr lough or get 

r your reaction, it's o iorh-packed 

^ ^ J Ooy bnd Thoriksgivirtg wouldn't 

,.%,:J# ,^i take that back 'cause these two 

-.sons to> o lot of octivlty . . . gives hostess- 

-^♦*fiporwhot hove you. 

1 Tuesday and music lovers have un- 

doy because we're all trooping up, 

Independent Church to hear Hall 

rotqge, Charles Holland, tenor, i^ a re- 

if ii fdiris. 

enjoyoble ;lost Thursday afternoon 

counter— I really mean "on the 

— and Jo Ik with Riirby Berkeley Goodwin, of 

ooct? ond sister bf Tom Berkeley, track 

. 3oc|dwtn's or»e of the. seven or ten Cpli- 

■ios who'll^ appeor in the anthology of^ Negro 

v"hich mo^es its oppeorance about the 21st of \ 

--'^h. ethers iWclude Anita Scott Coleman, 

ent ^lUoms of L.Arj Bessie Cobb of San 

d, I believe, Mr. Owens of Berkeley. If you 

"heofhers ... it'll be a pleasure 

- . >i the rjoraes on.. \ 

/EITTOTHEGftEEKS: • ' ' j' , 

To not let;3^he Martians that descencfedion New 

a rocket Si^dd>pnight via the Orsor)» Welles 

««|hotj?gtion end Hollowe'en antics or arjjlybody's 

jC brainJ§>*rld'keep ^h^m from contributing to the 

-■festsof the ^eosone-ifhat is seemingly the«Greeks' 

For Thursday might (tonight) fratei^ of Al- 

Ipho dre hieing out to Cafe dePoref a little 



MR; AIW MRS. THOMAS TlSDALE sre shewn with their wedding: party on the occst^on of the 
ceiebntion of their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary {ast Sunday in the home of her sister, Miss 
Vivian PhUlipe, 873 East; 51st Street. , "- 


Thomas Tisdnles Celebrdte 
Silver Wedding Anniversory 


>tv:- :■- - ' 

ipopulor ni^fVt 
.' oke" 
nen the 

r%a ihimitoble. 
o.i wifl ^emceei 
' stor 


^9, 


J'ng; 
But tri« 


' thot ore toking in the fete tO 

t/.eir scholarship benefit dance. 

mecca is on West Sievef^th and 

just across from WeStloke Pork. 

eptertoin they do entertain a la 

For yowr/&^njoyment, Heti>ie Jef- 

^dhdU^^a Mae McKinnefy (pret- 

Louise .Beavers, and th^ Three 

perfor^vMrices. Now I know you're 


Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Tisdala 
celebrated thir silver wedding an,- 
niver»arx:_ on Sunday, Octobsr 
30, 1938 in the home of Mrs. 
Tisdale's sister and co-hostess, 
Miss Vivian Phillips, 873 Ea.st 
51st street. 

Against the white and gold 
color scheme of the home, Ralph 
Porter, florist, created the setting 
fof the ceremony with two can- 
dlebra wit^ seven white candles 
each making a colonial gateway 
interwoven with maiden hair 
fern and sili^er leaf. Giant Kanila 
palms were in the background 
I with three huge white urns fitl- 
1 ed with white chrysanthemums 
and white- pom-poms studded 
with silver leaves. White satin 
stripped ribbon formed the ais!e 
for the bridal party's entry. The 
ceremony, a double ring pro- 
cedure, was' performed and cli- 
maxed in an anniversary, address 
stressing the re-affirmation of 
faith and devotion by the couple'^ 
pastor, the Rev. H. Mansfield 
Collins pf the First A, M. E. 
I church in elaborate ministerial 
I garb— a black silk robe set off 


ENTERTAIN FOR 
TRAVELER 

Miss Lillie Mae Collins, 1373 
East 23rd Street, entertained 
Miss Lucille Jefferson and a 
group of her friends op: the even- 
ing of Miss Jefferson's departure 
for an indefinite visit in San 
Francisco and Seattle. Guests 
included Mrs. Caroline Jefferso:i, 
Mrs. Rosa Green, Mrs. Florida 
C. Lockett, Miss Honey Jeffer- 
son, W. S. Page and Alfonso 
Lockett. 


w\ , 4.. .1 . 1 r ii I bv a white satin stoU on which 

jreeks are po<^ing their numbers for the i was interwoven three 
entertain visitors. From nine to 12 Sot- | ^^ ^^^^J^l:^^^^,.^. 

law. of the pastor, dressed in a 
gown of Alice blue crepe played 


Delta orid'AKA sorors ore hostesses 

, , , , «„ , m. x/ktr'A ly L 1. \ g"wn oi /\uce Diue crepe piayea 

tilrtakfost m the Zqth St.'YMCA. Kappa troters ; and san| "Ah, Sweet Mystery of 

e%ing hono«. at arV^nformal ddnce in the La Voda '^^^.^Z:'^^^^';, 

and the Alphas are .topping it 
\B Clossic from that wee hour 
J, it's due to one Qunbar Hunt's,. 


»l10 p- m. to 
ith cocktails at 

five 


m wr 



this 



_ommittjeeing jfor 
the CdiH^SC? games 


phine Blodge^t, 
;* Reggie-Wi 

ie Robinson, , 

. .3/ ^ • oaain: . 
rnday, if s *usic^.^^„ ■„ 

sic <5f the Pdtriotii 

resented by Au 

'^e and Hei 


round of Qiio\H — V*>^ ^^ 

in the of t«rnoon are j ^oC 

^*«yJes, Johrrnie \ * 
Sndolph, Bob 
r Hunt and Berr\\ 



white satin trimmed with 
ettes of silver lace swirlin, 
a train of white **ti^,^^_» 
intu fan-like fonnaijJ^^Hfricll 

Wed a colpiii«l-jW*2Si^B^*^«'^" 
lillies. « tHe "^a^j2|MP5uet of 
and orchids ^n^^^K^j^cmSii, 
dress of garjfl^pi^e g head- 
las and silver rib- 
was attended by Mr.s. 
Roan as matron of honor 
d in orange velvet with 
d<*ll evening hat and muff wil.'i 
gold crepe trim. Her flowers were 


PHYLLIS WHEATLEY 

CLUB ENTERTAINS 

IN YWCA CLU BROOMS 

The Phyllis Wheatley Club en- 
tertained a number of friends 
with a dinner and program in 
the clubrooms <jf the Y. W. C. A., 
on Friday, October 28. This meet- 
ing marked "^he opening of the 
Club's new year and the current 
membership driye. 

During the program, in which 
member* as wfiH as guests parti 
cipated, Miss Isabelle Marsha' 
purple j acquainted those prese nt 

the club's ideals and UMi^^frth 
portunity off eredJiB^iine op- 
C. A., for tl^iPP^the Y. W. 
womanhoo^^uuilding of fine 

Alert 
will Iji^Fiinded young women 
nterested in the weekly 
5m schedule which includes 
arts and craftS, physicai «d«; 
ucation, swimming, studies of Ne- 
gro culture, personal develap- 
Trips of, interest : anj* 



ment, etc 

numerous sdciaT activities are 
scheduled to continue throughout 
the coming year. 


The CYNDALIERS Club held 
election of officers last week with 
the following results: Misses 
Frutie^Mae Scott, president; Au- 
drey Johnson, vice-president; 
Evelyp King, secretary; Imogene 
Woodfe, corresponding secretary; 
Glorii Swanson, .treasurer; Car- 
men Davis, reporter, sgt-at-arms, 
Odessa Fobbs; Florence Greene, 
parliamentarian. Miss Helen Dun- 
doe replaces .Miss Vassie D. 
Reese as advisor. 

The^DAFFODIL Girls Club tb- 
port a -successful pre-Hallowe^fciT 
barn dance which featured Roy 
Clark'Sj, orchestra. Last week's 
meeting was held in the home of 
Mrs. J. Butler and added the 
name of Mrs. G. McCloud to the 
club roster. The ' next meetii 
will.*)e at the home o, 
Grundy. 

THE NEW E 

entertaij^ vjjPER BRIDGE club 

T^!ill'" ^h^Jr^^ a bridge lunch- 
Joh|s, lapTome of Mrs. Ivan J. 
Wedjjfii^ West 35th PL, on 
ay, October 26. Covers 
e laid for thirty-six guests. 

first Beauty 
Show On Tap 
For LA. 


Style Cha 


A f ao criticizes this scribe 
thusly: "Why do yOu name your' 
little (and I. flinched at vthc 
Jittie) comment on current modes 
"s^le chast" and spend most of' 
your tihie and outsi too, talking 
abput hair do's and; hand mas- 
sages . . ■ and ev*n the way 
folks walk? How about s o n e 
style news for a change?" 

I promised to Withhold my 
friiend's name, but tb answer ;iia 
question via print. , In the first 
place, this reader, like so many- 
persons, iyconfiasinig style with 
fashion. You go shopping for 
fashion wilit styljs in mind. 
Fashion costs you hard earned 
dollars; style mighty too, but it 
definitely belongs to you. • It's 
wliat you have to give to f^h- 
ioiji. Furthermore, i f a s, h i o n 
chi^nges with each i season and 
pita, itself to some outstanding 
event from which it^ selects a 
(iheme. 

To wit: There was the visit at 
King Albert and Queen to France 
'(vhich brought emphasized re- 
gstl lines to gowns and depth to 
crowns almost overnight. There 
was the comation Iftst year that 
introduced a new blue; more re- 


more green to shop windows in 
a Hveek than one s%v in a half 
dozen early prevuest Style is un- 
changeable, it is individual, and 
yet it's the basis for certain 
fashions being recommended for 
this type or that ty^pe, generally 
speaking. Type mai^ mean she's 
blond or dark, short or tall or 
any one of the' dozen categories 
into which we cotifine people. 
"She has style" or "I like her 
style" is a compliment any sen- 
.Mble woman will value more 
than "That's a beautiful fash- 
ion." . ■ 

There are plenty of persons 
who dress consistet^ly in the 
very height of fashion who con- 
form to type and possess not one 
iota of style. You iee them and 
get the notion th^t the battle 
royal of the century should be 
advertised: "In this comer, we 
have Mrs. John Ijoe, and this 
corner, her fashionable wardrobe 
that doesnct' suit her stylt. Style 
does not limit itself to any type 
nd more than charm does. That's 
why campaign for development 
of pereonahty is qluite in order 
under the. caption:! gtylj 

Doe' 

thaT 




\ mmay,Hti!fmbttr^93B 


Loc4l|Drug Corporotion 
Pei-fects Delivery Serrice 


Nine years^ago, W. J. Benton, 
founder of Benton Drug Co: Inc., 
began experimenting with the 
idea of rendering a speedy, ef- 
ficient delivery serv^ to. .ftis 
many customers. ' ■ 

This was d^idedly ah innova- 
tion in the Drug business; for al- 
though man3n drugists maintained 
a delivery service, it was more 
or less a matter of accomodation 
.and no efforf was made to spec- 
ialize in thii type of service. 

From the] very first day of 
Benton's Frete Delivery, the idea 
caught the |*ncy of the » public, 
uot-with-staijding the fact that 
a system had not been worked 
out and thai; there was much to 
be desired yi the way of speed 
and efficierf y. Physicians too, 
availed themselves of this new 
service whiih enabled them to 
have a prescription picked up 
at his office or at the patient's 
home, compounded and rushed to 
the patient'^ bedside. 

In a short time calls began 
coming in from all parts of th-j 


cently Corrigan's flight broughf *^'*y' ^^^ ^W* ^^^^ convinved Dr. 


whc, wished <bo render a bettar 
service, ikas blossomed into -a 
thriving business, giving em- 
ployment to nearly a score of 
pet^le and stepping into -thp 
front ranliLs of Negro owned bu^ 
inesses ^ the United States. , 


Benton that he had hit a worth 
while idea. After many months 
of pati.ent study and experiment- 
ing the present high speed, accu»-- 
ate, dependable Benton Delivery 
Service wai evolved, which noi 
consists ofi seven weU trained 
messengerB; on motorcyclM who 
cover all of Los Angel^ day rr 
nigl>t. t 

The popiilar phone number AU. 
7177, is well known ia nearly ev- 
ery household on the-eastside iij 1 
Los Angeles, for they realiz^ ' 
that by calling AD 7177 anythimj 
in Drugs, jLiquors or Fine 'Wines \ 
will be delivered right away, rain 
or shine, day or night 

And tliiis, tjie dream of a sin- 
cere Dru^gst and Business man 


Artis^t Completes 
MuKilForCSlurch 

Lehat Edwards whose «tudio is 
in the Calitemia Bank building 
at Vemou apd Central recently 
completed a beautiful, mural 
which now hangs in the pulpit of 
the Hamilton M. E. Church, I8th 
and NaomL The, mural, don? in- 
a pastel medium depicts a celes--.''^ 
tial scene dominated by fo-JT*.,, 
trown angels. The constructiort j^ 
of the angels \*angs is especially 
well done and shows careftA-' *- 
study and unerrjng painting abi)i--i5*: 
ity. The miiral .is well modeled ■'*' 
and hamjoniouay colored. , ^' 

Rev. S. M. Be^e, pastor oi 
Hamilton!, and the congregation . 
have expressed great pleasure in •* 
the'painting as well as a number' * 
of v^itors. [t 

Mia Edwards' sttidio is noM^ », 
busy taking hand painted Xm<is ' ~ 
cards, and doing portitait work. 


cially those in the i lower wage 
earning brackets; to see that nec- 
essary .health tests are taken by 
all members of the profession 
thus assuring the ppblic of sani- 
tary service. 

All licensed beauticians are 
urged by the organization to ap- 
ply for membership and attend 
the free demonstrations and lec- 
tures offered by the schools of ■ 
cosmetology. Cleola P. Finley is ' 
president of the league and Lilli- 
an G. Stephenson is general chair- 
man of the trade show. 


LARGE SIZES 

WOMEN'S 
Firie Shoes 

SIZES fi to 12 

Rushton s 

^ 744 Wcfrt 7th Street 

Bet. Flower and Hope Sts. 
LOS ANGELLES 


Casmetic 
House 

OPENING TO THE 
PUBLIC 

Newest Addition To The 
Central Ave. Buslaesses 

\ A COSMETIC AND NOVELTY 
HOUSE; 

44181 oS.CenfrrolAv*. 
\Sat., November 5th 

Wi Carry a Complete Line of 

Costtnetics including the Fines* 

Of Powders and Perfume*-'"' 

■ \ We Supply 


Jeauty 


I tors 

• ATt^, 


In 

to one 


lozen,^ 
'^to ten pooHidf,;;;;" 

Whoiesole ond lif^il 


1 


^g- 


orchids and gardenias. 

r- i - J J- 1 "^^ bride's sister. Miss Vivian 

a 'wedding !' Phillips, served as bridesma-d 

"aJI-star concert ^ ^"'^ "^"'^ ? "^^'^^ 8°^" "^'^^ 


>light;ff 
irks. 


train of spider web lace over iv- 
•ory satin. Her flowers were 3 
creation of orchids and silver oak 
leaves. Mrs.' Beatrice Thistle in 
ice blue brocaded satin wearing 
gardenias; Ernest Snow, nepii- 
ew of the t>ride; Judson GranJ, 
and the groom and his attend- 
ants, William Roan, best man. 'n 
conventional black completed the 
bridal party. 

The 150 guests were served at 
a table with a centerpiece of 
white chrysanthemums and whi'e 
pom-poms studded with silver 
leaf from five to seven in the 
evening. 

Miss Hattie McDaniels. dressed; 
in midnight blue lace with a cor- 
sage of gardenias sang during the 
reception accompanied by Rich- 
ard Bates at the piano. 

Assistiqg in receiving th° 
guests were Mrs. Kellar in black 
velvet gown and hat; Mrs. Maud 
Bird in blue print with matching 
accessories, Mrs. 'Wilma Chap- 
man, blue taffeta; Mrs. Fay Beal, 
black taffeta with corresponi- 

Might be a good way tor some of j Sfck''Ind'^^nk^°^sem'^b°rMr'.r 

Nell Venerable in brocaded vel- 
vet, and Mrs. A. McCarty in Al- 
ice blue crepe. 

The celebrants received numer- 
ous sifts and congrstulations. ' 


mber One of the Qut- 
idn . . , It's a wedding 
of Jessie Juanita Reed 
lei at four o'clock in the 
orid Towne . . , Rev. H. 
the ceremony, 
'eek hos nothing on the next 
qI topping the cultural sche- 
Jones-Wade, dramatic so- 
ted by the choir of the Sec- 
it church's auditorhjrrt Tues- 


jur of the fall vvill be held at 

mrsday, November 10. Dr. Alice 

^Ado L. Lewis will spedk informally 

fee . interior decoroting ond hints 

[ng will hold their attention ... It's 

Bes. 

5ts to spend on afternoon. Mrs. Irene 

'Ho it hasn't been my pleasure to see since 

|nd.at Griffith Park in September, is spon- 

delighttul group. The educational com- 

Jbe hostesses for this first hour of sipping 

Ideas. " ;, •:"' ■.■ " , 

A. Cdrfein of Vallejo, visited here lost 

^iolly, she's grand treosurer oft the Court 

Socially, she'sa pioneer of Vallejo and 

Jrown . . . Remember the George Carver- 
fed him two weeks ago at Eighth and 
fas returned to study at the New England 
in Boston. According to New Yqrk 
jrvo Uouls IS gaining weight. 

ni)kisi9 you wont ,-, , Leon Edwards 
:[taHSunday everting at 7:30 o'- 

s Episcopal church.. 

[riddy to slip in on the Itmcheon 

[loth given by the Golden State 

The Reverends ore quit^ 

■»versation' than salvotlon — 

Ittierbugs" just as well. Rev. 

^'os very dap>per in natty at- 

the prelates, Thurston Lom- 

Jmstrong, hi? pa?. Ndw, don't 

monatorily? 


Entertains Her 
Wedding f 

Attendants 

Miss Jessie Juanita Reed, brid^- 
elect, complimented the attend- 
ants for her coming wedding with 
dinner at six o'clock Saturday, 
October 29.^A pink and white 
color scheme was carried out *n<J 
fall flowers were distributed 
throughout the house. 

Miss Reed wore blue with bur- 
gundy for the smartly appointed 
affair. Guests included: ' Mrs. 
Henry S. Pierson. Jr.. (Mattie J. 
Carter), matron of honor. Misses 
Dorthea Micheau, Edwina Carter, 
Billie Porter, Euvalda Ballard, 
Mattie Jackson. Evelyn Gibao.i; 
flower girl. Little Esther Royal; 
receptiftn hostess, Mrs. Oscar 
Moore. | 

The popular young hostess whd; 
is a graduate nurse from L. A. 
General Hospital will, becom*? 
Mrs. Chartes Henry McDanifl 
Sunday at 4 p. m. in the First A. 
M. E Church, Rev. H. Mansfield 
Collins officiating. 


The-first «nnual colored beauty 
and trade show has been set for-1~ -I 
December*! and 42 th the fflks 
main flooivat 40M( South CefltraJ 
Avenue. TWe sho# is beine sponi- 
sored by the Ru-Fi-Les Chapter 
of the National Beauty Culturists 
League, Inc., recently organied 
here to raise the standards of the 
beauty business to the profession- 
al level. 

The show will formally open 
Sunday morning. December 11th 
with a breakfast at 8:30 o'clock 
followed by registratoin at 9:30 
A.^M. and official opening of the 
show at 10. The show will close 
with a formal dance Monday eve- ^ 
ning, December 12. i 

Officials of the local league cit- 
ed it as an organization to protect 
hcen^d operators and shop own- 
ers from the menace of bootleg 
<«hops; and to Stcure passage of 
state laws to protect its members; 
to cultivate interest in all legis- 
lation affecing not only theijr work 
but all classes of workers^ eSpe- 


TUSKEGEE NITE Second Bap- 
tist Church Friday^ Nov. -Ig. 


-■^ 




JAbie LJDUISE 
' Beauty and 
Casmetic Salon 

4620 So. Central Ave. 
i ADams9i57 


fec: 


■i- 




if. 


^ expert operators to serve vou 
* No Hair Too Short or" 
. Too Lone to Stvlf 

Try as tor Satin Top Dressing 


TVSKEGEE NITE Sebond Bap- 
tist Church Friday t' Nov. -18. 


FRANK ERNEST r»OST 
HOSTS BOY SCOUTS 

Frank Ernest Post n4 2134, V^ 

F. W. was host to the Boy Scout 
Troop No. 131, at brejikfast i't 
South Park Sunday at 8:30 A. M; 
18 scouts with their parents wersj" 
guests. Breakfast was prepared 
by Comrades Atkinson, E. Tale 
and Calvin Bland assisted by 
Comrades L. Hall, R. Henderson 
and Sister Ladd. After breakfa.st 
the boys engaged in, games. 

Scoutmaster Sanford briefly 
outlined to parents the training 
of the scoupts. 

C. W. Ladd is commander jmd 

G. M. Dean, quartermaster., 


GEO; J HALL & CO. 

fU>RlSTS 

We appreciate Vour Trade 
Flo\yers for all occasions 

Call Mutual 8181 
I For Service 

Fourth Slreel 


2I4J W. 


Los Angolet 


Fred C. Morney 

Optometrist 

GLASSES 
on GUiDIT 

4418 S. Cenfrd iivonu^ 


PRE- HOLIDAY 
SPECIALS 

Bot Oil. Steamed Scalp Treat- 
ment, Shampoo. Press and 
Ends Curled, all for Sl.M. 
Genuine Poro Rinse used or 
Croquiirnole or Marcel Wave 
in addition to the atntre for 

MISS E. r; ECHOLS 

'^ 1501 East 20th Street 
Phone: Richmond 9840 


MEN - WOMEN 

DISEASES 

I ACUTE and CHRONIC 

^ BLOpD— SKiN 
UROLOGY— GLANDS 

Shiears, Blood & Spinal Was- 

serman.<:. Darkfieid, Urinalysis. 

Written Reports. 


1 


No Consultation Charge 
Liberal Credit 

Private fUnit for Ladies. 

. M. hilELSON, M. D. 
• & STAFF 

3rd Floor, 416 W. 8th 

Bet. Hill & Olive 
m. to 8 p. m. Sun. 10 to 12 
TR-3469 


Thi -4tirof Seatlem Calllomlt 


• Many years ago the stockholders of the Edison 
Company w ere numbered in the hundreds. Just a 
handful compared tq the thousands of Soudiem 
Califomians who own and control the Edison 
Company hxlay. • Af the company gxv, each 
community contributW nrs- stockholders until 
today the owners of the company ate scattered 
throughout Edison territory, in towns and 
villages and on farms and ranches. • The great 
majority- of the 98,094 Edison stockholders an 
residents of California. It isn tompany owned 
and con broiled by the people it ser\ei. • Soutbem 
California Edison Company Ltd. 


\ 


\: 


ill! 


TUSKEGEE NITE Second Bak- 
tlst Church Friday,- Not. -I«. j 


NOW YOU TOO CAN HM^ THAT 


LIGHTER SKIN 


TtfAT MEN AOMIRE 
AND WOMCR INVV 

Wncsi «xln la ti 
dark roug 
blotch, e t 
spread on ge 
uine DR. FRED PALMERtS 
■SKIN WHITENER. It must make 
nature work faster to bring, out 
a lighter, brighter, cleaner new 
skin surface or your money bade. 
25c at drug stores. 


Dp. FRED Palmers 
SKIN WHITENER 


mmmiror i^ S-mpI, 

irrite to DR. FRED PALMER 

U^. Dept. m, AUimta, Ga. 


I SALE GOING FULL FX5RCE NOW!| 

Fail Coat Sile, 58.99 

Don't miss this sale! These coots 





nolly sold at high as $112.99! Over boO 
coots to choose from! Expensive boiicle, 
fleece, tweed ond Persian fabric coatk at 
a sensationally low pric«!i Fitted and lobse- 
bock styles. . Guaranteed Imings. Pl^nfy 
of teal blue, black, wine, navy, beige and 
colors. Sizes II to .20^ 38 to 44. Hurry! 


igi- ^ 


A- 
/V 

Thriftown Beauty Sdbn^ 

2607 CENTRAL AVENUE ' CE-.^5932 

In The Beautiful Thriftown Market 

^ ■ ^nA^i/ilc ^9<^P°°' Press, Morcel |l.2i 

eil-^P®^'<"* MANICURE niS 

Five Operators To Serve You \ a^ 



Y\. 


^ ■ ' Open DaQ 


Alice Todd Davis, Mgn 
^« A.M. to 1« pjw. Open Standars » A.M. I 


WM. 


ita Roy 


m\ 


A r 


513 $0^ BROADWAY 

ill 

hi::^}XmjfRANK A. 

ANNpUNCESTHE REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE 

.^ ,; • FROM SUITE 220 TO 303 
; .r ;^ 6L0DGETT BU LDtlSlG/ 
2$}0 SQUTH CENTI^L AVENUE 

OFFICE: AD--I2262 iRES.;C£.-26^5f 


Creok Seiitj SJuppe 

We carry tht lar«^ and most 
complete line of Creole »t Franch 
refined hair goods » the Weat. 


E. O.MORRIS, ^rep 

mil CUfNTSAL AVKKCK 

ANGKLES. CAUr. 

:,t. PkMM^mMVMt 7»sf 

\& 8«M t CM Sti|a||p ffr\BMUet 


JL. 




f 


BW IEE> BEAUTY SALON 


,t CROQUIGNi 
LIGHT^r 

■ Mme. Ella V. _ 
Prop.>> Scalp Spec! 


Bel 


AND 

ES, FAC: 
MANICUR 
T 119TH S 
"on 


ixing 
VING SHORT Nair 

«*. EYEBROW ARCHlNr^ 
FOR BRITTLE NA^*^ 
TET LA-4338 

\\ *^"P* »«'^tt'se Johnson 
Operatic 


you 
BOTI 
with t 
pair e 
• nd a 
attiio 

SAlt 

for 

NO Ml 

for th* 





•.J.,^, 


"^^^S^mi^Mim^^m:- 


S. P. JOHNfeoJN, cWef of fte Con- 
ner-Johnson Funeral Home. A 
prominent churchman of Second 
Baptist, Mr. JohnsoU is identified 
with many conunimity better- 
ment and charity campaigns. He 
is well known for generous sup- 
port of such movements. 


sJMm^ 



THi^W Plon$ 
Bieniikil 



J«XLIE V, CONNER, welli-known 
business and social figure, and ex- 
(jcutive of the IConner-Johnsoa 
Funeral Home. ^Ilrs. Conner is 
recuperating fron^ a recen^ seige 
pi illness. At onei time, her, con- 
dition was thoughk serious.;' 




ill •B<||fOi|';^:;.:Jff 
' '^ASi^vitLi, ■&£? . - 

NP)— Plate for the bieniilel -ef 
the National Association of Col? 
ored Wonnen, Inc., to be hel d m 
the city of Boston next mmtasTr 
were made this week when the 
administrative board inet with 
Mrs. Stflie W. Stewart of Bvwfr 
ville. ■ ^ i 

Plans' are t«j Iwve-this meeting 
^ Boston commemorate thefirst 
meeting of a national charactai 
ever held by colored wonlea in 
this country. This meeting held m 
1895 was called and fostered hf 
the sainted Josephine St. Pierre 
Rufflin of Boston, and was held 
to arouse the women of thif 
ceuntry to resent and to disprove 
a statement about Negro home 
life mad6 by John Jacks, a news- 
paperman of Missouri. At thi» 
meeting the women decided to 
begin raising the staiHlJvd of 
Negro home life to. refute tUe 
statement. 


*,.■■■• J*. - 
- •■i-r' 


" - p. 



Death Ridds The 



ays 


TRIPLE 
?AFE 




n rk- 


Slippery Payments 

j PLUS 

I SUCK TIRES 

EQUAL 

DISASTER! 

TAKE NO CHANCES 

Now that Foil js here again, it is more important ^hanWerto keep 
your car tire safe. Wet, slippery streets make it necessary f ho t-you 
pay particular attention to protection against skidcting. Kemember 
your brakes con stop your wheels»but only your tire$caii stop your 
cor. That is why drivers sxerywhere are replacing doniperoiisly worn 
tires with Firestone Triple-Safe Tires»tbe only tires that Will stop 
yQifjxar]25^4|ui«kenitefiiNSft^ new tires^ 1>oughf^iiow glre 36^ 
more mileage. <"- ^ 



OUR CONTRIBUTION TO YOUR 

SAFETY PRIVi 

IMAGINE! A COMPLETE BRAKE RELINE AT REGl^LAR PRICES 

PLUS 2 FREE ADJUSTMENTS 


(Picture No. 4). Mr. J. L. Hill, 
Vice-President of the Angelus 
Funeral Home and one of the out- 
standing business men of this 
City. Mr. Hill came to Los Ange- 
les from Atlanta, Georgia, where 
be was prcnninent in business and 
all social activities. He lias been 
one of the guiding forces in mak- 
ing the Angelus Funeral Home 
outstanding. 

Throijghout the page we see 
oUier men and women who have 
brought the world to recognize 
the man of color. Some are L. G. 
Robinson, whose life story is told 
in the book titled "A Man in our 
immunity", by Baxter S. 
mcrisggs, leader of our L. A. Y. M> 
•C^ A.; Mr. Paul Williams, whose 
skillful Arcbitectiu-e can- be found 
in remarkably frequent and vscry- 
ing works of beauty and practical 
■adaptabUHy in Beverly Hilla, 
Flintridge, and in fact all over 
California". Instances of these 
aciiievements are: Fraternity iad 
Sorority Houses for _U. C. L. A., 
the Y. M. C. A. of Hollywood, and 
tl^e 28th Street Branch, Theatres 
for the .West Coast Co. Mr. S. P, 
Johnson, ftrttident of the Conner- 
Jojhnson Funtejal Company, Vice- 
tPresMent of the Golden State Mu- 
'ltUHl|iife Insurance Company. No 
charity drife is. complete without 
him. No sJan far community bet- 
terment te' advanced that he is 
net tii«-e,"Jfe has helped in com- 
munity Cferiirtmas' projects which 
resulted ift giving away more than 
two hundred baskets to the poor, 
and the entertainment of more 
titan a thousand Bds at a theatre 

■ ■patty. ■:!■.':.•; ■•■^- 






Colnel Charleis: Austta, <l*ry' 
^ jepublican leader,, risen from the 
L'B&x-bed. is once again in the 
■Lftwnt line of the poUflcal melee, 
■rhe stalwart leader is well known 
r for courage, determinstion — auid 
GOP affilJ^tiPii.. . „-..: 


^l-V 


tt-fjr:-?. 





Ask any; housewife who is por- 
ticulor oboutthe quality of Poul- 
try she serves fo her fomily and 
friends — ; 

Where Do You Get 



i?wi 




JPfulliy 



liF you ore not aina^f loniili«r 
witK the fuperior Quality oi. 

^IM^nkiiis 

-^ 'it and enioy • nwDil.'tNi^^ 

"Quality Guaranteed 
,.^..^# r -..f -m^^- Vernon Ave.; C|fi-3U^, . 


HERE'S WHAT WE DO: 


1. Clean ond wash front 
wheel hearings 

2. Rtpadt with fibre great*. 

3. Free-vp bralie sycteM with 
IMnetratingoilii. 

4. Tighten "U" behf. 

5. Scientifically test and od 
iust hrahes. 


FREE BRAKE TEST AT 


GUARANTEED 

BRAKE J 



Keeps Your 
Brakes in Perfect 
Shape At All 
Times. 

Firestone Guar- 
anteed Broke 
Service Will 
Moke Driving 
Safe At No Extra 
Cost To You. 


SAVES 
LI V E S 


6000 SOUTH SAN PEDRO STREIT 
YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD AT THESE DEALERS 


GENERAL RADIO ELECTRIC CO. 
IOCS E. JEFFERSON. AD-SMI 


Central Avenue Tire and Wheel 
Exchonge 

2324 so. CENTRAL AD--12917 


CLAUDE HUDSON 

QBLMDRE SERVICE STATION 
41*1 SO.! CENTRAL 


inffSi-«» 


Kf-t;!".''; 


DAVID ^. HUNTLEY 

. SHELL SERVICE STATION 
859 E., JEFFERS(»f 


JONES' SUPEIt SERVICE 

4822 COMPTON \\ ^ AD-8#4« 

^ : -W 


JACK CLINGERMAN 

GILMORE SKRVICE 
49M SO. CENTRAL \ AD-SSSS 


14ELS0N NICHOU; li 

. . ., .. , ...,,*}»«ILL 8ESVICB gTATlON*'-.,-'!^^" l . 


^;-:::.^i,' 


RALPH'^ SERVICE 


lilM so. CENTRAL 


CE-29379 


FRANK R. BAKER & CO. 

SE51 SO. CEljfTRAL 

". I ir"i '^ i l I I I il l . 




"^.fT 



PAGE TeR^A 


IT Tcyu ran laKeaa i^b A««i*irwKwi^ cmulc tou /y»ay rsever isnow it nappenea 


t^nursdoy, Novembers, 19^9 


Son Diego Minister to Speak 
for Florida Bopfist Ass'n 


SAN- DIEGO. (By E. B. Wes- 
ley)— 'Upon invitation. Rev. J. 
Harold Brown, pastor of Trinity 
Baptist church, will I e the guest 
of' the •South Florida Baptist •».■<- 
sociatiori jn its Jubiles S-ssion at 
Tampa, Florida this rrcnth. On 
Thursday, November 7, Rev. 
Brown, will preach the jubilee 
senmop. Following ihat he will 
conduct a series of revival meet- 
ings in Arcadia, Florida where 
Rev. and Mrs. Bnv/i. were mar- 
ried and where he once nastored 
a Baptist church. 

- Mr. and Mrs. Wesl^ Prince 
and Mrs. Denny. Mrs. Prjnce's 

. mother, Los Angeles- were week 
nd guests of Mrs. R. Bakier and 
: her daughter, Miis Lucille Left- 
ridge, 3I4jii-Impirial avenue. Mr. 

. Prince is the son ;'f Hev. Prince i 

. \at Pasadena and one of the "Kinfe' 

. J C^ole Jesters' 


MT. ZION BAFnsT CHURCH 
C. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School, 9:30 a. m.; 
preaching. 11:00 a. m.; BYFU, 
6:3^ p. in.; preaching, 8:00 p. m. 
VmUAPS TEMPLE C,M.E. 
C H. Houston, Pastor 

Sunday School, 9:30 a. ia.; 
preaching, 11:00 a. m.; League, 6 
p. m.; 8:00 p. m. preaching. 
O. N. O. BROADCAST 

Station 0. N. O. has been ab- 
sent from the air for some months 
because of the lack of a sponsor 
and death of Mrs. Pearl Johnson 
Clark. Regular broadcasts were 
resumed at the WeKori study's 
on October 8. Prizes were award- 
ed to Mrs. Brown and the report- 
er. The regular broadcast on Oct. 
22 was from the Brown studios. 
^'^■^*^'*"" introduced a new 
who "are" heard ' entertainment in an intelligence 




C A L I F OK N I A CO M M U N IT 1 E S - 


It Your Town RoprcMnted^* 


Stfld Us the ^ew< 


PROGRAM OF NEGRO YOUTH 
BODY PUli BEFORE OFFICE -SEEKERS 

Employment Ciiril LibeitiiM^ Education Highlights 

■ ,'■"_-■ I, . - n '.■''' 


-daily over the NBC network, 

Reggie Denny, president' of the 
"Just A Mare" club .spent i few 
days in Pasadena last week, r.l- 
!uer S. M. Crouch, state overseer 
for the Church of God .n Christ, 
accompanied by Mrs. Kn-mh (ial- 
brath, Los Angeit--. were ^^assts 
of Elder and Mrs. James A! Jack- 
son last Monday . . Hev. and 
Jl^lrs. William Piirce of Pasadena 
were guests of Rev. and Mrs. 
Owens at Bethei A. M. iJ par- 
sonage last week end. 

Elder James A. Jaijkson. Mrs. 
Sapphronia Thompson and Mrs. 
lola Jenkins, missionary, went 
to El Centre Monday to atten-^ a 
special meeting of The Church 
pf <3od in Christ. They will visjt 
''No Man's Land" in Yuma. Ariz, 
where Elder Jackson has valu- 
able form lands. 

Mrs. L. H. Owens, teccrier in 
Imperial public schools, visited 
with her family, Rev. L. H. 
Owens and daueh^rs. Ruby and 
Clarice, over the week end at 
1847 Front street . . . Rev. H. B. 
Hawes, Dr. H. D. McPherson. 
Mrs. W. J. Bri'skell. Mrs. Austin 
Lee and soa. Virgil Lee. all of 
Los Angeles, came to San Diego 
last Thursday to attend the fu- 
neral of Quittie Ddvie, brother of 
Mrs. Alex McPherson. who 's 
prominently identified with 
church and civic work. 
FOUND GUILTY 
IN KNIFE MURDER 

Thomas M. Simmons, charged 
with the slaying of his wife, lola. 


test which proved entertaining 
and instructive. Prizes 'were 
awarded Mrs. 'Frances McDonald 
and C. C. Patterson. The Oct. 
29 broadcast was from ^he Mc- 
Donald studios. 
SOCIETY 

On Monday night, October i, 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Newton 
entertained a small group of 
friends iii their home, 2135 Ev- 
errett Avenue in celebration of 
theii fourth wedding anniver- 
sary. Mr. and Mrs. Newton re- 
ceived, a number of beautiful and 
useful ' gifts as well as cpngratu- 
latory messages. 
SICK LIST 

The Sunshine club reports the 
sick for the week as follows: 
General Hospital, Mmes. MoUie 
Davis and Nora Seals; Vauclain 
Home, Mmes. Mae Echols, Ruth 


OAKLAND. (By Lena Wysinij^ 
er) — The program of the Nortfi- 
em California Negro,Youth Leg- 
islative conference, as planned 
at a recent meeting of the Yoiiih 
Section of the National Negro 
Congress is being specifically 
put before leading political caii- 
didates, int^duced -with a let- 
ter which explains fully the in- 
tent of the issues set forth. 

Their attitude toward, the pro- 
gram outlined, and assurance as 
to whether rr not they will use 
the weight of office, if elected, 
further its achievement is' ask- 
ed. 

High points of the program fol- 
low: ' 

A — Employment: 1. To regui- 
late hours of domestie workers. 
2. To deny any union the right 
to collective bargaining which 
discriminates against Negroes. X 
Extension of the Emergency Edu- 
cation Program, the NVA and 
the WPA. 4. Toward the pre- 
vention of discrimination against 
Negroes in Civil Service: a. The 
setting up by the State Govern- 
ment of a commission to investi- 
gate cases of discrimination in 
civil service, b. Abolition of 
photography, c. Lowering per- 


McClellan, Bessie Andrew's, and «ntage of personal interview in 

civil service exammations. d. 


Sadie Hopkins; Eloise Hopkins 
Georgia Bell, Dan Gatlin, Benny 
Lucky, and Wilbur Smith; and 
at home. Mrs., Ida Jackson. 
FUNERAL RITES HELD 
FOR MRS. MARY S^^TH 

Funeral services for Mrs. Mary 
V. Smith .vho died October 23 
were held from the Church of 
God in Christ, 1705 i..ogan Ave. 
on Fridai". October 28 at two 
o'clock under the auspices of Mt. 
Olive Temple No. 6, SMT, Elder 
James A. Jackson officiating and 
Tate's Funeral Home conducting 
the services. Surviving the de- 
ceased are Viola Johnson, Hemy 
C. Johnson, Sylvester; SwUla 
Mattie Coffe of San Diego; Clar 


Upholding seniority; tllat js,' 
hiring of those with highest rat- 
ing regardless of race, color or 
creed, e. Fight to eliminate dis- 
crimination after appointment 
5. Against Proposition No. I. 

B. Civil Liberties: 1 To 
outlaw residential restrictive 
covenants or contracts against 
Negroes and other minority 
groups. 2. To strengthen our 
present civil codes making dis- 
crimination a misdemeanor. 

C — Education: 1. Revision of 
text books to give adequat* and 
fair treatment of Negro history. 
2. To abolish practice of dis- 
crimination in the practice teach- 


with a hatchet was found guilty 1 gnce Smith, Port au Spain. South I ing it all state teachers colleges. 


of second degree murder after a 
jiU7 deleberatioh of htirty-four 
hours. The defendant pleaded 
self-defense. A . motion for a 
new trial will be heard Friday 
morning by Superior Judge Gor- 
don Thompson, meanwhile the al- 
leged sla.ver is held in the coun- 
ty jali without baiL 
CHURCHES 

Bethel AME church. 1647 Front 
street Rev. L. H. Owe«s, minist- 
er. Sunday school was held at 
9:30 with Miss Nadine Redmond, 
auperintertdent in charge. R e v. 
William Prince, assistant pastor 
-of the First A. M. E. church. 
Pasadena, afld father-in-law -'f 
Rev. Owens, was guest preacher 
at the eleven o'clock services and 
spoke on "Prayer". Mrs. L. H. 
Owens sang "Hark The Voice of 
Jesus Crying". Mrs. Janie Simp- 
son and her sister. Miss Annie 
Brown rendered "He Will Un- 
derstand And Say 'Well Done'" 
The Brotherhood of the churcn 
sponsored a- pew rally and re- 
ported $61.50. Horace Shelton 
brought in the largest amount, 

?n.io. , ^, . 

At 3 p. m.. the Women s Civic 
League of which Mrs. J. E. Cra: 


America. Interment was in Mt. 

Hope cemetery. 

OBITUARY 

Funeral servxres.ror rt. Quittie 
Davie, brother of Alex McPher- 
son were held from thff AME 
Zion churchT Thursday, October 
27, at 2 p. m. with Rev. H. B. 
Hawes. qLassmate of the deceased 
officiating. The deceased came 

; here about three months ago 'T 

'• poor health from Washington, D. 
C. and grew steadily worse un'il 

1 hi^ death on October 23. Mr. 

1 Da-v'ie joined the Presbyterian 
church at an early age, received 

' his preparatory training at 
Brainard Institute, Chester, So. 

, Carolina, and attended Lincoln 
University college and seminary 
from which he was graduated in 

I the classes of 1908 and 1911 re- 
spectively. He served a number 

j of years as a P: Jsbyterian miij^^ 
ister and as dean of McCleWaud 

' Academy, Newman, G*, wheie 

[ he met and marped Miss Ruth 
Coakley of M»rtroe, N. G. Two 
children wfre born to the union. 
He is_sQrvived by his wife, Mrs. 
Ryti^, Davie; mother, Mrs. Annie 
avie; sister. Mrs. Alex Mc- 
Pherson; and two brothers, Isiah 


A large group, of organizations 
were represented with active de- 


legates, The Youtti Section of the 
itlational Negro Congress is a live 
wire in this section. . 
NON-PAR'nSAN CLUB 

A political, non-partisan club 
under the name of the East Bay 
Women's Welfare Club lias re- 
cently been organized. The sec- 
ond public meeting win be held 
Sunday at 3 p. in. at St. Paul 
AME church. Congressman John 
H. Tolan will be the speaker. 
Mrs. Fiances Albrier is presi- 
dent. Mi's. Ivah Gray is member- 
ship chatfman. The purpose of 
the club as stated is Security -• 
Jobs - Better Living Conditions. 

Miss Mary Dixon Nprris' of 
Oakland, member of the Women 
Defenders of America, was the 
principal speaker last Wednes- 
day evening in the auditorium of 
Lincoln School, Stockton. Miss 
Norris' sybject was, "The Afro- 
American, the Republican Par- 
ty, Communism and Revolution." 
Mrs. E. F. Atkinson^ state presi- 
dent of the organization, intr;©- 
duced the speaker. 

The Booker T. Washington 
Community Center held its An- 
n\ial Carnival on last Friday and 
Saturday, October 28-29. 
CHURCHES 

Rev. J. H. Wilson, Editor and 
Manager of the Western Chris- 
tian Recorder of Los Angeles, 
was pulpit guest at Bethel A, M. 
E. Church. Sunday, Octoberj 23. 

Rev. J. B. Isaacs of Los Aiige- 
les, filled the pulpit at the 11:00 
o'clock service on Sunday morn- 
ing, Oct 23, at First A. M, E. 
church, Oakland, Rev. D. G. Hill, 
Jr., pastor. The theme of Rev. 
Isaac's text was "Satisfaction and 
Contentment" 

The Twenty-seventh Annual 


Visitors Over 
Weel^end at 
Verd6 Listed 


VAL ■VERDE. (By Clara Tay- 
lor)— Outdoor and indoor sports 
are attracting capacity crowds to 
Val Verde at the club house and 
On adjoining grounds with Mr. 
Elliot in charge, "Visitors for the 
preceding week were listed as 
follows: 

At the Taylor R^nch were Mrs. 
McDaniel, Mr.s. Hale and Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shelton and 
family were entertained in grand 
style, by Mr. and Mrs. John Davis 
at their cabin. 

Mrs. Pearson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nelson and Mr. Alexander were 
guests.; of Mr. and Mrs. Ambr-.Ke 
at their bekutiful new cabin. 

Mrs. Seas spent a few days 
with Mrs. Sellers. , 

Miss Frances Owens of Seattle, 
Washington, niece of Mr. and 
Mrs. James Taylor, will sper.d 
an indefiniite stay at the Taylor 
Ranch. 

Mrs. E. k. Hillsman from San 
Bemardind is spending the week 
end visiting her daughter and 
family, the Mack Hunlfers. Other- 
guests of the Hunters were Mrs. 
Ernestine Garner and sph, Alli- 
son. ■ , • 

Mr. William Harding received 
news on Monday of the passing 
of his brother, John Anthony 
Harding, Jr. of Los Angeles. Sin- 
cere sympathy is extended to 



Gby. Merriom^n El Centro; 
eoks ot Dbugloss Hig 

SNTRO./ (By W. A.fX 


OUTSTANDING 

WILBERFORCE. C, Nov. 3— 
Jean Paul Hubbaxo, son of 
Rev. J. P; Hubbard ot OakUad, 
California, is an outstanding 
student at Wilberforce Uni- 
versity. He is a talented art- 
ist of notable ability and is a 
member of the WUberfwce 
Singers. 

Seoson's Initial 
Betrotlial Party 
Held in 'Frisco 


Mr. Harding. 
Bazaar of St. Augustine's EpiscO-^-- A house party was greatly en- 
pal Church, was held on Wed^^- ' joyed, over the week end, by the 
day and Thursday, Oct. 2f^»ni ^ guests of Mrs. M. Liddell. Tho.se 
27. The attendance was,l*lge, the 'who made up the group were 


booths attractive Palatable 
lunches and dinners were served. 
The Bazaar grrws'in interest 


Mrs. Geneva Wallace and two 
sons, Andrew and Lorenzo. Mrs. 
Ruby Stapler, Mrs. E. Whittaker, 


from frienr'' 
New Yorl ! 


as far distant 


Laud Appearance of Negro 
Choru$ in Concert at U. C. 


is president presented a psofram gj,^ Rufus Davie, four nieces and 
conducted by Mrs. IffJrade Hicks, ^^.^ nephews, 
business chairmaa/bf the League. 
The prograrnjRCTided a poem by 
Mrs. J. Gsfr: a talk by Mrs. 
Jeanettr' Daly; an address by 
MfiSfM. Nye, principal of Stock- 
' ton -■ School; solo, Mrs. A. E. 
Green; quartet "selsctions by 
Mmes. L. Freeman. G. Spencer, 
L, Denny and A. Denny, repre- 
senting the Church of God in 
Christ; a paoer. Mrs. Mary Hart. , Madelyn Cooke)— To begin the 
The ACE League met at 6 p. ! Autum.n social season, the well 
m. and evening v.orship at 7:30, 


Brigadetts of San 
Bernardino Usher 
in Social Season 

SAN BERNARDINO. (Bv 


BERKELEY. (By Ablyne Lock- 
hart) — A chorus concert, w'.'iich 
was an event of unusual- mter- 
est, under the skillful direction 
of Elmer Keeton, gave a major 
concert program of gtirituals in 
terspersed with cl issical h a r- 
monies, at t he.. ' Tnternational 
House, on the Un'^/ersity of Cali- 
fornia campus /^inday. The rapid 
rise of this F^sral Music Chorus 
to a place of dominance for this 
type of r'^ic has been one of 
the most ^Kked of events for the 
past twci years. 

ti.C<5liductor Keeton, who besides 
is superb use of the baton, is a 
proficient arranger of choral 
numbers, after having received 
bis academic and musical train- 
ing in Sedalia, Missouri and at 
Northwestern in Evanston, HI., 
has filled the positions as organ- 
ist for churcnes. theatres and 
broadcasting studios. 

Mt. Keeton said in explana- 
tion, "Our specialty is spirituals, 
which we present in a new vein. 
I write the tunes and dress them 
in a little different clothing using 
modern harmonies, and modem 
rhythms without destroying the 
sentiment. We organized in 1936, 
and we have presenTed 150 con- 
certs. We have received fan mail 
from all over the country in re- 
gard to our work." 


feach year. Ar".cles were on sale ! Mrs. Eugene Hardiman and Mar- 
as garet and Robert Kyle 

At the Fowler cabin, last week 
end, were Mrs. Fowler and 
daughter, Ruth, with their guests, 

j Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Pender, Jr. 

, and Loretta Ross. 

; Out-of-town guests at the club 

! house, recently were Mrs. Edwin 
Dave and Mrs. Stella M. Douglas 
of Colorado Springs, Colo., Mrs. 
Charlotte Andrews and dauyiiter, 
Mazie, of Denver, Colo., Mr. and 
Mrs. Clinton Brown of Souix 
City, J Iowa. Mrs. Ollie Porte of 
Berkeley. Calif, and Mr. Samuel 
Fortime of New York City. 

Mr. ' and Mrs. Lechus enter- 
tained about sixty couples at ihe 
Community Club house, Satur- 
day night. The guests enjoyed 
the traditional Hallowe'en mas- 
querade party. 

Church serv'ice was very love- 
ly this morning. Pastor Rev. J. 
H. Ford brought us some good 
news about the new c h u r c .h 
building i*'e plan to erect. We 
are putting on a buildint; rally, 
starting today. We have .S300 in 
the building fund now. We are 
asking the public to help us on 


BROTHERHOOD NOTES 

The Bt-otherhood of the Bethel 
AME chprch, met last Thursday 
in the home of Mr. Zollicoffer. 
The following officers were elect- 
ed for the ensuing year: Messrs. 
Jackson, president; first vice- 
president. Hatcher: second vice- 
president. Henderson; secretary, 
McDonald; assistant secretary, 
Fortier; treasurer. J p h n s o n; 
Chairman. Executive board. D. 
V. Allen. A rep?-t was ser\'ed by 
Mrs. Zollicoffer assisted by h e r 
twoi daughters-in-law and her 
son.i Thomas Price. The next 
meeting will be held in the home 
of C. Jackson, 2126 Everett Ave. 
The Brotherhood is open to all 
men of the church. 
CIVIC LEAGUE MEETS 

The recently crgafuz'>d Negro 
Civic League of v.-hich J. W. 
Cloud is president met n the 
club room at 2878 Imperial ave- 
nue on Monday night Ootober 
2* Two new members. Rev. J. 
h7 Brown and W. L. McDonald 
were added to the roll. Mr. Mfr 
Donald wa* appointed publicity 
chairman upon the resignation of 
Al Ramsey. The next meeting 
.wfll be held on the second Mon- 
day night in November. 
CALVARY EAPtlST CHURCH 
J.-L. BniBham, pastor 

Sunday school at 9:30 with 
Mrs. Louella in charge. Morning 
and evening sermons wre deliv- 
ered by the pastor Rsv. Brsp- 


The A Cappella group was 
highly commended for its puri- 
ty of tone and pitch, distinct 
enunciation, evenly balanced 
quality and sustained harmony, 
which is unparalleled by any 
local choir. 
Marcus Hall, the featured bari- 
tone soloist of the group, and 
protegee of Roland Hayes dis- 
played a similarity in style, in 
interpretation, fine diction and 
rela.xed vocal tones. Arnold , 
Barapco, assistant director led' 
the group in two numbers. Mr. i 
Keeton's _^ arrangement of t h e | 
quartett/~ from the opera Rigol- , 
leto, lilted the audience to aj 
fervid pitch of delight never be- 
fore demonstrated by an Interna- | 
tional House audience. i 

ONE OF BEST 

The Federal officers, headed j ^ „._ ^ ,_ .._.^ _ 

by the National Director of the ' this drive. Everybody wants to 
Federal Music project, have ac- see a new church in Val Verde, 
claimed the Oakland Project as -We need $300 more before we 
the best of its kind in the United I can plan to start building. All 
States. I donations mav be sent to Rev! J. 

The San Francisco critics pre- • h. Ford, pastor of the church, 
diet a. brilliant future for thislHLs address is 1157 E. 41st St., 
group. There is no doubt that i Los Angeles, Calif. 

this Negro aggregation w h i c h [ . ■ 

has made four transcontinental; agent heard the Negro Chorus 
appearances on the radio, will, last evening, twenty-nine musi- 


find a backer in any event the 
project closes. 

"The San Francisco News stat- 
e.d, "If an enterprising booking 


cians will be off the government 
pay-roll and under contract for 
a nation wide concert tour by the 
end of the week." 


SAN FRANCISCO. (By Anna 
Foster) — Marking the beginning 
of the Northern social season. 
San Francisco's first ^betrothal 
party was held last wrek. The 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Horatio Sandford, 1330 Baker St., 
banked with exquisite floral ar- 
rangement offered its famed hos- 
pitality to over 400 guests at a 
regally appointed tea. tradition- 
ally schemed in elegant silver 
and white. , 

A register at the stair landing 
tended by adoirable sub-debs 
Audrietta Watson and Mae Evy- 
lyn Ward announced the engage- 
ment ' of popular Miss Sybyl 
Sandford and Lavi-rence Lee 
Lewis, son of a prominent Ea£t 
Bay family. 

Miss Ruth Morgan of Sacra- 
mento, sophisticated in printed 
chiffon ushered guests into the i 
bowered softly lit drawing room | 
where the , receiving line began I 
with the beloved Mrs. Herbert \ 
Lofton, gowned superbly in black i 
velvet with sequins. Ever charm- 1 
ing Mabel Sandford, queenly in 
mid-nite velvet with pearls, pre- 
sented her only daughter, be- ' 
witching in upswept coiffure, 
white tucked French crepe and 
orchids. 

The handsome groom-elect, 
(certainl.y the bachelor of the 
season) in turn introduced, Mrs. 
Irma Lewis, of East Bay society 
The dining room, supervised by 
charming Gladys Baker, aunt cf 
Mr. Lewis, offered first petite 
Marie Starr in turquoise lace. 
Pouring were the vivacious Miss- 
es Doris Mitchell, life long friend 
of the prospective bside and 
dressed, like Mary Jane Brown 
of San Jose, in faille white taf- 
feta with many ruschings and 
tiny velvet bows, Jewel Manley, 
floral printed chiffon, Eleanor 
DeClaybrooke, taffeta with tiny 
bolero and Mary Townes, black 
taffeta and lace, farther hostesses 
were Miss Angelina Lopez and 
Mesdames Alicia Butler, Dorothy 
Watson, Gussie Lewis, Adelia 
Pollard, Catherine Flippin, and 
Lois Davis Crouch. Nuptial dates 
have been set for late Februarj-. 
Flash: A newly formed Danc- 
ing club namely the Treasure 


EL CENTRO. \* (By 
Payne) — Go vernon Frank F. Mer 
riam was the most distinguished 
of the visitors in \ the Imperial 
Valley during the past week. His 
main purpose to setoff the blast 
that started the work in the 
straightening out of \ curves in 
the highway between \the Valley 
and San Diego, among viis speak- 
ing engagements was one in the 
Douglass high school auditorium 
Monday afternoon. In addition to 
the students of citizens attending, 
a large number of ciiizerts from 
the City listened to thW inspiring 
talk given by the Govlemor, cit- 
ing the blessings of dtizenship 
that is the heritage of\Caiifor 
ndans. v 

Theodore Moss of San\ J «s e. 
Most Worshipful Grand Waster 
of the Grand Lodge of Masobs, 
California Jurisdiction, was \a 
visitor in the city during tlie 
week. While here he was the 
house guest of Mr. and Mrs, R\ 
J. Burleigh. He visited with\his\ 
fraternal brethren; made poHti- 
cal contacts in aU the Valley 
cities; and addressed the h i ^h 
school assembly Friday mornin 
Mrs. Vivian Osborne Mars 
State Supervisor NYA, Divisiorf 
of Negro Affairs visited El Cen- 
tro last Friday, checking with the 
City Superintendent's office and 
also with the office of the Prin- 
cipal of Douglass high school. 
She is making a candid survey 
of educational opportunities for 
race girls and boys. In the party 
motoring from San Diego were 
Miss Octavia Payne, teacher m 
the Adult Evening School of the 
city; W. J. Welton, SRA Super- 
visor; and 0. R. McClellan of the 
city school sj'stem, Los Angeles. 
The party of educational work- 
rrs were visitors in both the 
Douglass and Washington schools. 

Mrs. Maud Caver Marks of 
Long Beach is visiting friend.'- 
and acquaintances here and in 
Calexico. She was a former citi- 
zen of this section . . . Mrs. Ruth 
Coffey and son, Ciyde, of Los 


Wi'' A. Jacksun on Hamilton St 
Entertainment and amysemen^; 
we^ varied and all attending en<j 
i^ed the festivities. 
l»THp student body of DougL 
hi^ , and their young fri 
chose .Friday evening as the 
for their Hallowe^en party, gami 
and dancing kept everyone 
moving and enjoying the wel' 
balancec^ program planned bj 
the comitiittee. 

Salton Sea Lodge of Elks spon-j 
sored its Hallowe'en dance MonH 
day evening. Music was. fumish<j 
ed by the Southern Califomi 
of San Diego. The guests numJ 
bered persons from all the Val\ 
ley towns and several f r o n 
Yuma and Somerton, Arizona. 

MISCELLANY 

Coach James Stocks will lead hi 
football warriors into Brawleji 
territory Tuesday afternoon. Thd 
boys say they aVe out to win. I 
Misses Sarah Payne and Mar-I 
garet Prince represented thq 
high school Girr Reserves 
■County meeting \held at th< 
Barbara Wprth hotel last ThursI 
day evening. After the' meeting 
they were among the guests din^ 
ing at the Trocadero. 

Dr. H. Francis McClure. preJ 
,siding elder of the San Diegq 
toistrict Conference conducteq 
services at Johnson's Chapel las 
Sunday. This was his first meetJ 
ing with the new minister, Revi 
J.\H. Hawkins. The evening- serj 
vide was the occasion for 
cloliing-. of a Rally of the 
of the Year. A program of m.t 
addresses, and readings was re.- 
dereld. 

Rey. and Mrs. William Princd 
nf Pisadena and Mr, and Mri 
Wesley Prince of Los Angeles 
VL«ited\ relatives here SundaJ 
even in a arid were worEhipper| 
during '(he evening service. Th; 
visit wa| quite a surprise to th^ 
family. \ 

The Women's Home and Ft 
eign Mi^ionan.' Society , hatj 
charge on the Sunday services 


Angeles renewed old acquain- , Rev. Whittlfn the pastor preached 
tanqes here after an absence of; the mominb sermon. Miss OpheJ 
fifteen years. She was the house . lia Walker ",sang a solo. Visitoi^ 
guest of Mrs. Frances Burleigh ' at the services were: Mrs. Maiia 
. . .Elijah Cook of San Diego C. Marks 'of\ Long Beach: I 
spent part of his vacation here Hargo of O^land; Miss Maud 
visiting his uncle S. C. Cook and ' CJoodwin of ferawley; and Mr 
family . . . Miss Lenore Cooper | H. Herron o*^ talenico. 
spent the week-end in Los Ah- j Prof. L. J. Stewart delivered 
geles. visiting with her parents; the evening teddress "Youn 
HALLOWE'EN > ! versus Old .^ge". Mrs. Lucilia 

The Univer;S;ty Club membei s Culberson assist^ in the musi-| 
cast aside daily routine and pro- 1 cal program, 
fessional duties and frolicked] Mrs. Margaret P. Owens visit H 
with the ghosts, goblins a n d ' ed with h?r family in San Diegi 
what-not Saturday evening. The 1 pver the week end. She return^ 
annual fall festival took place in I ed with her relatives from Pasa-^ 
the residence of Prof, and Mr? i dena and Los Angefes. 


Marion Silveyand Francis 
Barnes Wed in Santa Mbnical 

SANTA MONICA. (By Willie j the theme of the lovely decora 
Louise Gilmore) — Attractive ^^lss tions. The evening was spent 
Marion Silvey and Francis Bar- bridge, pick up slicks, and ot 
nes were wedded on Sunday, I interesting entertainment" ■■ ' 
October 23 at the AME church. ' prizes ^ the w inners of ea 

"" '"" -'--'---' ' Tho» present were 1.;.T! 


before an altar profusely decked 
with white chrysauithemums, 
palms and candles. 

The bride wore the traditional 
white satin with semi-t rain, 
waist length circular veil and 
carried a large bouquet of lillies ] Afne'r 
of the valley, gardenias and or- 1 Moore 


known Brigadetts entertained 

'with a cocktail party Friday 

j night. Those seen at the affair 

were: Mr. and Mrs.M. Aves, Mr. 

and Mrs. Herman Philips, Mr. 

j and Mrs. S. Hillsman. Mr. and 

I Mrs. Jackson, Miss Rose Spears, 

' escorted by Dr. H. D. Ingrahm, 

' Mrs. Almeda Johr.son by Albert 

Johnson. Mrs. Rov.'ena Savage by 

Mr. Jones, OrviUe Diggs, Cecil 

Owens and L. C. Westly. 

Members of the club v/ere in- 
troduced by President Mrs. John- 
etta Jackson. 

The .Brigadetts have planned a 
dance for Nov. 19 in celebration 
of Settlenient Day which will be 
' from Nov. 17-20. 
i FORUM 

I The College Forum met Sun- 
i day night at the home of Miss 
i Vera Harris. Main purpose of the 
meeting was completion lof elec- 
! tion of officers, Helen CJollins i? 
1 treasurer, Carl Ingrahm; pro- 
I gram chairman and social chair- 
men are Vera Harris and Nate 
Mooreland. 

New studcn'is who wej^e pres- 
ent wese Anita Beverly, Ursula 
Evans. AKred Norman. Joe Car- 
ter, James Smith. Sponsors ap- 
pointed from San Bernardino 
are: Mrs. Leola James, Mrs. Flor- 
•ence Knight and Miss Rose 
Spears. ' 

The next meeting will, be Sun- 
day at the Second Baptist church 
in Redlands. 
I HEAR OF— 
Miss Rose Spears having din- 


JAY GOULD'S COAST NEWS 


AND GOSSIP 


ham and .tnusic throughout the . ner with a group of social work- 


rtsty by the Junior and Senior 
Choirs under t h « direction of 
Wiliiam Webb. R. W. Lipsromb. 
president conducted the BVPU 
rrieeting at four o'cloc^:. Mrs. 
Lawrence. Robinson was accepted 
by the churoh as a candidate for 
baptism. 
TKIMTrY B4PnST CHURCH 


ers at the Anderson hot^l 
Henrietta Banks recovering . . . 
The college bunch get-tb-gether 
over at Mrs. J. Jackson SUndav 
night . . . The fact that Nate 
Mooreland is a football star and 
first man with the Redlands Uni- 
versity Co-Eds . , . . Some fel- 

I lows who attend Long Beach Jr. 

I College breezed by to s*e yours 


Bay Meadows has half of the 
town parading to the races and 
the other half watching the pa- 
rade ... Ira Grant, chauffeur 
for Mr. Moody, over-night price 
maker, was asked please to take 
a rest by track officials until 
Moody could leave the press box, 
"come down and identify him" . . 
Clarence Fullbright press box 
mixologist and stand-in man at 
Santa Anita ^track is well liked 
by the news scribes and radio 
blabbers. .He, also bets long-shot 
winners for Carter Hayes and 
others. 

Vernon Brown of S a n Fran- 
cisco has moved in on the other 
boys and has taken pretty Peggy 
Armstrong over for himself. Nice 
work, Vernon . . . Clara Camp- 
bell, now in Nev/ York, was re- 
ported as saying. "I loved my 
husband, Joe, better than any- 
thing in the world at one time." 
I wonder if absence makes the 
heart grow fonder for someone 
else? . . . John Levey from New 
York after cashing .$1200 on' 
Sporting Green, fourth race. Bay 
Meadows, the cashier while pay- 
ing him off inquired v/ho he was. 
John said, "I've got several 
friends working in the mint and 
plenty of dough for proof . . . 
Walter Green of race track fame 
motored to Great Falls, Mont , 
viewed Portland and Seattle, to 
contact a business woman reput- 
ed to be wealthy. Walter used 
big money as bait, but his money 
was no click . . . Franklin Cole- 
man of Los Angeles, who has 
been itching to take a trip, is now 
in Oakland and can Be seen play- 


ing the high spots nightly . . . J. i motored away, counting their 


Blakely of 'Frisco, aftef his red 
headed sweetie sped away to Lc.-; 
Angeles, decorating the nite spots 
with her swell outfits, is w a y 
overdue back home, but Blakelv 
is quoted as saying, "who wants 
to be a red head's pet any^vay?" 
. . . Bob Franklin and Tim Stein 
motored from Los Aijgeles to 
'Frisco after digging deep down 
in their front pockefS, sightseeing 
and romancing a couple of love- 
lies on each side of the bridge. 
They, must have gotten the run- 
around as they motored back 
singing the blues. 
Carl Young has the spot lights 
turned on him again. This time 
his car turned over "three times, 
and he was pulled, from under 
the wrecked car by EggiC: Gary 
who is now at Bay Meadows. 
Carl was unhurt . . . Duke Moore 
of Seattle ha.<-. folded his tent- 
and moved to San Francisco. Can 
pretty ' red-headed Ethel ' Carter 
be the reason? . •. . Dorothy 
Reese, formerly a -N e w York 
show girl, married a boy in Al 
Watt's bank, now in San DiegO, 
are both good people. 


Nora Brantley andSister, Mrs. H. 
Banks . . . Seen at the dance 
Thursday night were Johnny 
Shackleford end Dunbar Hunt of ^ 
Los Angeles ... A number of ' nie 


TRISCO NEWS 

Helen Walker and her friend 
Myrtle Bishop don't seem to 'nod 
as they pass each other, but by 
meeting each other aroimd the 
night spots it may work up to a 
"heilo" again. 

Mrs. Emma Pankey, formerly 
of New York now Mrs. Milterafi 
Of San Francisco and Mrs. Rose 
Jacl^man make the cocktail 
lounges, look beautiful while sip- J V J^^^^'t^c 
pirig mixed drinks on higji stools sui^i-unxHtj 
. . . T. Holliday and his sv/ell 
Missus can be seen dining at the 
Town Club after dark . . . Natlj- 
an Robinson, Louis King, Jphi}- 
"■■* Bryant and Leon Adonis. 


money . . . Miss Elnora Calhoun 
and Mrs. O. H. Hambrick dining 
at the late spots looking sweet 
and smelling like a 5th Avenue 
Vanity Salon . . . Mrs. Dr Le- 
marr and Victoria Scholey play- 
ed the races from the lawn in 
front of the grandstands, but had 
a worried Jook on her face. For 
any further information write or 
wire Jay Gould, 1716 Webster. 
Street, San Francisco, Calif 


San Jose State's 
Grid Aces 
Draw Interest 

SAN JOSE. (By Phyllis Brad- 
ford) — Interest in San Jose and 
sun'ounding towns centers about 
San Jose State college where two 
colored youths are playing ot 
regular varsity piositions, and 
Bull Lewis, former star of tltat 
college is head backfield coach 
'for his altaia mater and is train- 
ing his younger brother. Bud 
Lewis, for next year's varsity. 

Lloyd Thon^as, great right end. 
is almost ready to quit the grid- 
iron for the hardwood basket- 
ball court where he is slated to 
be captain of the team this sea- 
son. Don Pressley, Varsity guard, 
is being groomed to take the 
amateur heavyweight crown 
,when boxing starts at the state 
college. He is considered one of 
the best in the Inter;collegiaie 
boxing league. 

OLD RESIDENT 


chids, caught with a knotted 
white satin streamer. She v,«is 
attended and given away by her 
father. < 

Miss Helen Brantley, maid of 
honor, and Miss Ruby Harris and 
Daisy Quinn. bridesmaids, were 
similarly garbed in turquoise and 
pink moire resp^tively, corres- 
ponding hats, and carrying white 
chrysanthemum bouquets. Alvin 
HoUingsworth was best man. La 
Vert Payne and Lloyd Courtney, 
ushers. Miss Doris Worthy was 
flower girl and Sid Whitley ac- 
companied by Miss Gwen Crad- 
dock on the rello, played the wed- 
ding march. John Moore, accom- 
panied at the piano by Miss Mel 


Gene Slvey. mother of the bhde-l 
elect; Misses Elnora Whitley.l 
Rose Garrett. Elizabeth Gai*rett,l 
Daisy L. Qu:nn. Lillie Mae Linly,! 
Gladys Cook: Mmes. Katherjnel 
Hazel Tippsns. Christinel 
Burdeue Linly, L«la| 


Island Dancing club gave their Duncan, sang "0« Promise Me 


second in a series of affairs at 
the Booker Washington Center 
on the past Friday evening with 
the charming Mesdames Walter 
Sandford, Ernest Trokey, Alice 
Butler and Laura Davis as hos- 
tesses of the evening. In keep- 
ing with the season the paviUion 
was beautifully decorated in 
Hallowe'en motifs and of course, 
the strains as played by Eddie 
Alley and his group of lads was 
unsurpassed. 

The present committee in 
charge is composed of: Mrs. Gus- 
sie Lewis, chairman, Amelia Far- 
bar, vice-chairman, financial sec. 
and Mrs. George Clarke. Among 
Oaklanders were the ever pofu- 
Isr Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Pol- 
lard 


J. Ratirtd Brown, Pastor i — -—o- -.-«. — ^j ~ -~~ ^ — - ^^, „..a^*^= . . . .n. ..w...^w --,-:- r— '—:-„. TT'Vu iJ^l 

Sunday school 930 a. m.; truly Saturday night . .i. of the Ean Bemardinians are going to ! Playboys tellig each other jvnat 
' .vxrA*^T> _--..- — .»-„j__..-, . ... , ,- .- . ., _ they could have done ... Ralph 

p m • evening servicps at 3:3U p; • mgni m neaianas . . . inai meirormat oemg given ny ine noy- Warren, Mrs. Mary 'Warren, Mr. 

lie The m.-^mbersbip of the "Rockets" are planning another • al Twelve of tliat city . . . Visit- 
one of their famous weiner bakes ing in Lcs An^^elss nnd Pasadena 
. . . .• Helen Brantley of S a h fa this woek end were ^iss Rose 
Monica visiting her motner, -Mrs. ) Spears and your corrfesponds^t 


church Has . grown to one hun- 
(ked'ijwrsons since .its brganiza- 
tion five months a^^ • r ^\^:- 






■U^'. i^ 


■m^r 


Hatley, Mr. Foley, Mr. Davi^, 
Mrs. V. Dji'(^r, 'Miss Miller and 
Mrs. Emma Huff all played the 
eight races at Bay Meadows anfl 


Mrs. Mary Horton, an old resi- 
dent of San Jose, died Thursday, 
dct. 20 at the San Jose Coimty 
Hospital. Funeral services were 
held at Hacking and Williams 
Mortuary andi attended by rela- 
tives as far away as Texas and 
Tennessee. 

Mrs. Alice Morris is recover- 
ing from severe injuries sustain- 
ed in a fall in Oakland some 
weeks ago. Jielen .Smith is com- 




KH^.> 


h- 

pletely recovered from an, ap- 
pendicitis operation. 
RELIGIOUS NEWS 

The Rev. Montgomery of Den- 
ver, Colorado, is a recent appoin- 
tee to the pastorate of the local 
Baptist church. "The Rev. Carson 
was appointed to another Con- 
ference year at San Jose in the 
Conference held recently. 

A junior choir is being or- 
ganized for the AME church, un- 
der the direction of Mildred Rog- 
ers, newcomer to San Jose from 
Vallejo. 

A reorganization of the A. M. 
E. Zion Sunday school met with 
the following results: Erselle 
Crosley,- superintendent, Phyllis 
Bradford, secretary, Manuela 
Spears, treasurer, Albertine Re- 
cord, Mrs. Carson and Mr. Jones, 
teachers of- the primary, junior 
and senior classes, respectively. 
SOCIETY 

Evelyn Bailey, young debutante, 
was married on Oct. 20 in San 
Mateo to Frank Huff. Services 
were held at the Baptist church 
and enacted before a large gath- 
ering!. 

Doirothy Morris, in company 
with her mother and father, 
spent the week end in Hollisterm 
visiting her, cousins, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jennings. Juanita Ribbs. enter- 
tained Bull Lewis and Billy Bos- 
well ! of Oakland at dinner on 


r:^M^'^^ 


The ceremony was performed by 
the Rev. A. K. Quinn. 

As Miss Silvey, the bride was 
the recipient of many pre-nup- 
tial courtesies, among them a 
linen shower with Mesdames 
Gertrude Morton and Georgia 
McQueen as hostesses at the lat- 

; ter's home. 

i In honor of Miss Silvey, Miss 
Helene G. Brantley was hostess 
at a lingerie shower at the home 
of Mrs. Silas E. Tippens (Hazel 
Linly). The wedding motif was 


Sunday at her home. 

Carmen Horton. former San Jose 
resident, now living in Santa 
Monica, came home on a surprise 
visit a recent week end. She ar- 
rived in company - v/iUi Honey 
Smith of Monterey, Charlie Har- 
ris, John Davis. Jimmy Green, 
all of Los Angeles. 

The Boys' Eisquire club of San 
Mateo gave their FaU Dance on 
Saturday everyng, Oct. 22, at the 
Oakland Masonic Hall. Those at- 
tending from San Jose were: Mil- 
dred Rogers. Clarence Frazier, 
Ruby Washington. George Ad- 
ams. Myrtle 'Washington, Bill 
Moulden, BerrV Crossley, Bill 
Jones, Felix Ribbs and Earl 
Jacobs. 


Brown, Wathea Jones, AHeanl 
Lewis, Gladys Milan. '^ [ 

Mrs. Allie S. Cook very graci\| 
ously played hostess to .a ver 
smart dinner party on Fric 
evening, Oct. 21st honoring Missl 
Silvey and Mr. Bafnes and theirl 
wedding party which includedl 
Misses Helene Brantley, Daisy| 
Le Land Quinn and Ruby Harris 
of Pasadena Mr. Lloyd Courtney, 
LeVert M. Payne and Mr. and 
Mrs. .^Ivin HoUingsworth. 

The Hi-Tri Girls had theirl 
weekly meeting ar.d installation | 
of officers on Wednesday ev-en- 
ing at the home of Miss Gladys| 
Brantley, pres.: Novellote *T 
Christman. vice-pres.; Christeenl 
Pegues-Moore, sec'y; Lela Simmsl 
Brown, cor. st-cy^ Daisy Le| 
Land Quinn, treas. 

The latter part of the evening! 
was spent in socializing. Othexf 
members present were: , 

Misses Phyllis Quinn, -Elnora | 
Whitley, Thelma Fletcher, Guni- 
vere and Cornelig Craddock, Me- | 
linda and Ida Duncan. 


Thanksgiving 
Turkey Dinner Dan^e 

at NEALS RANCH 

(San D|ego) 
Beginning ThanJ^giving Ev^, 
midnight. Ia4tmg\ throughout 
Thanksgiving pay^Tickets 75t 


NOTICEL 

On or About 
NOVE-'«BER 1ST, the 

SAN I FOAM 
BARBER SHOP 

will mr^'e into its new 
, location 

845 N. Fair Oaks Ave. 

PASADENA, Calif. 


\ 


PASADENA 

HOMESITES. CBOfCE LOTS 
a»d ACREAGE 

OLLIE A. ROBINSON 

LieenMd Real featat* Broker 
31 W. CUremoat • ST. t^St 


EVA C. BURTON 

Sale s wuir an 
PhoM: STerllnr 8S41 


HOTf 1^ SIMMON^ 

Formerly Tlie RuUbmb tA Home Wbea Away From Hmm" 
Quiet and conveii^t\to Shopping, District San Diego is just tlu ^ 
I^-3ce for your vacation. S^vimnung, risbing, the Races and ' 
many other attractions. Conrteetis Senrlce. FRaakUa 1841. 

MR. ft MM. fRANK M. BIMMON8. Pr^s. 
5« /to STREET \ , \ \ S AN 9IEGO. >CUM. 



I- 


BOLD -TYPE 

READERS' OPINIONS 


^ 


T- so 


Spend $5,670 
a Week for ^ j 
Beer in Texas 

GALVESTON— Beer drinkers 
in the Galveston Negro commun- 
ity spend an avier^ge of $5,670 
per week for different brands of 
canned beers. 

This rather starthng fact was 
discovered this week with release 
to the Press of buying powers 
statistics of Negroes in eleven of • 
Texas' cities, by the office of the 
"Guide News and National Ad- ' 
vertising Inc." here in Galveston, i 

Eleven cities were chosen for I 
the survey, Dallas. Fort Worth, 
San Antonio. Houstfm, Austin, i 
Beaumont. Port Arthur, Waco, [ 
Wichita Falls. Corpus Christi and 
Galveston. 

In the population tofal for 
those cities, 1.325.747. 304.186. are ' 
found to be Negroes, with Hous- I 
ton having 75.000. the largest I 
single number. Following are Dal- 
las. 65.000, Fort Worth. 51.376, 
San Antonio. 19.578, Galveston, [ 
17.000, Beaumont, 15.575. Waco, 
14.962. Austin. 14.330. Wichita 
Falls. 12,782. Port Arthur, 10,170 
and Corpus Chiiiti. 7.273. 

It IS estimated that the.-^e 304.- 
180 Negroes spend S883.558 per 
week li'.mg expenses. Theif' is^ 
believed to be an additi'inal 4o.- 
000 Negmcs in the State, li\ir.g 
in more spar.<ol\- populated towns 
and rural sections. 


^,: (Send in Yours Today) 

r walked in upon a buncf) of men in a little friendly ex- 
change of vapor over the word 'Negro' and much was interposed 
Over the varied definitions said to be in Mr, Webster's big book. 

t 
On* of the contestants turned to me with the exclamation 

"What do you say a Negro is?" 

"Well, said I to begin. "I have been in this classification all 
of my life. I have seen quite "f- 
a few of the other members. 
I do know that we have an as- 
sortment of citiztnry in a lim- 
ited scope. A few insurance 
companies, grocery stores, bar- 
bershop*, barbecue pits, school 
teachers, and many preachers; 
more churches than necessary 
to the Tjopulation, minature 
chamber* of commerce, bronze 
executives, municipal officers, 
and associations of many des- 
criptions, civic clubs and many 
said to be wise men or pro- 
phets! 

"I know that amidst the ab- 
ove named divers Sources we 
have many scabs, wags, and 
scalawags, bums, i m o o s t e rs, 
makeshifts, and d r e s s e d-ap 
sticks, moochers, suckers, and 
Orchestras and a heluvah as- 
sortment of brainless jazzers. 
that have neither sense or 
Cents.' 

"I know that among us we 
have Jacobs, Hams, and Cains, 
that we have to endure regim- 
entation of an enormity of stu- 
pid jackasses that have neither 
pride nor valor nor favor.' 

"Do not seize the idea that I 
am using many unnecessary 
words, for I h'ave the hardest 
b on hand that I have tack- 
led in many years — describing 
something that is the "T" in 
technical. 

"It Ls indeed a moot quest- 
ion and a stiff argument wheth- 
er or not the American Negro 
is the carbon copy of "bunk". 
He has had the lineage of true 
civilization around him, .-mce 
he came up from the ciadle 
and yet he complains about the 
status that the days of bond- 
age left him, in and he has all 
the elements of a normal hu- 
man being but three, Reading 
Writing, Thinking. His would 
be leaders are on the order of 
Ham; hi.^ heroes of Jacob; and 
his friends on the order of Cam: 
Where he is going nobody 
knows and what's more no- 
body seems to care 

'■He is without a friend, nei- 
ghbor, or Moses Too often he • 
looks about him and sees a de- 
vouriBg lion, antagnislic to htm 
and his state or being, which 
he knows full well ls a long 
wavx from the "feast of the 
Tabernacles " yet he accents m 
jtupidity all of the dire conse- 
quences, and he is too timid 
even to raise his own voice. 

"Some have liie view that he 
Is religious, yes and extremely 
«o. To the language of Cam' 
"Am I my brothers keeper?", 
he IS religiously indifferent. 
He is in fact most everything 
that IS antagonistic to christi- 
i anitv. 

There are just three things 
min all historv that are essential 
^to civilization; INDUSTRY. EC- ' 
^ ONOMICS. and COMMER- 
CIALISM. Now you that have 
been preachmg and teaching 
about race developement. may 
tell me where the American 
Negro ranks among the afore- 

"A man once said. who. by 
the wav. I thinK was on the or- 
der of a phUosiper. "The Negro 
must be mentally one-eyed. He 
doesn't seem able to .see but 
one thing at a time and ihat 
^ not very clearly. Following up 
this line of reasoning immed- 
iately after the 60s, with hi.' 
new' freedom and educational 
advantages, it was the prope' 
thiag to be a school teacher. 
preacher, later a doctor. And 
today he is still looking in that 
direction notwithstanding that 
this field is over crowded. 

"Negroes are not wise to the 
fact that Industry and Commer- 
cialism are required to com- 
plete hi.i status. He does not 
seek to meet the demand of his 
' people, he remains m the rear 

and Taxes it for granted that 
this L' for some other to do. or 

p that this is forbidden territory 
for him. Yet the field is wide 
open and there is a rich har- 
vest awaiting him if he will on- 
ly take time to gather it. > 

"Of all magazines and pr^ 
productions, very few are dir- 
ected to the .American Negro. 
All eyes now seem to be turn- 
ed tn""Theatrica] performance" 

; orthestr . record making, song 
composing. ■ 

I i' -The very first line of the 

m Psalm.s of Life" reads, "Lives 

■ ^ of great men oft remind us 
we .-hould make our lives sub- 

"After we mention Frederic* 
Douglas and Booker T, Wash- 
ington, we have to drop down 
i quite a few years to Jessie Ow- 
I ens andr Joe Louis, the latter 
two born in freedom and only 
in the order of athletics which 
is of very little service to the 
race as a whole. 

"Where then is our Moses''" 
C, R. SCOTT 
U. S. Railway Mail Clerk 
Houston-Galveston Divi-iion 


SWINGING JITTERBUGS 

GALVESTON — Radio loveri 
this week were urged to tune in 
Thursday morning from »:30 tf 
10:00 (jn Statiofi KLUF. The real* 
on is the music of the Island 
City's "Swinging Jitterbugs 
Three". Camilte Browning. Joe 
Hathaway and Roosevelt Thomas. 


TEXAS HEWS 


Edited by ISREAL SMITH 
423 25th Street 


H. L. LAW 

Galveston, Texas 


THINGS 





RJH KHOWJNS 

Byt^.L. Low 

You wil' find in these columns, the latest news obtaiitibl^ 
reliab'e and progressive. We patk no chip on our shoulder, show 
no pa.-tial.'ty to none, stand ready at all times to atfend right ,>nd 
destroy w-rdng At odds, we work exhaustively 'o Ii.rn..sn you with 
a medium of expression and infor;mation of your people. Regard- 
less of your station in life, some Where, some time, about some- 
thing, you will need our ser- * — - 
We stand rjadv at all 


'KANSAS CITY'S BEST' ATTEND POLICEMAN'S MEET IN DALLAS 


Four members of the Kansas 
City Police department who 
went to Dallas last week to at- 
tend the annual convention of 
the Texas and Oklahoma Peace 
Officers association. They are, 
left to right, John Botts, pat-, 
.rolman at the Municipal audi-- 
torium; Robert E. Lee, detec- 
tive; Leon Jordan, pLain- 
clotnesman: and Korest Stn- 
man; plain-clothesman. The 
Kansas City officers made the 
best showing at the convention 
according to reports reaching 
here from the Texas city. Det- 
ective Lee was elected vice- 
president of the a-ssociation. 


Offi 


HE GOT LOUIE 

Respohsible for the appearance 
of Louie .Armstrong, world fam- 
ous trumpet player, and his or- 
chestra, here in Galveston on 
Tuesday evening, is CH.\RLES 
SHiRO, mild mannered owner 
of the .Mecca tlub, 409-25th 
street. 

Shiro is one of the bay towns 
outstanding busmessmen, glv- 
iag employment to five persons 
in his club. 

He asked the Eagle's Texaa ed 
itors to thank the loyal pub- 
lie for patronage of the trum- 
pet king's appearance. 

E. SELLERS JR. EXCELS 

TYLER — Word comes of rapid 
progress being made at Texas 
Barber College by E. Sellers, Jr.. 
of Houston. Young Sellers prom- 
ises to become one of the best 
barbers in the State Ufxin his re- 
turn home He is very active in 
the \uunger social cmle. 


Docks, Wharfs 
Top Job Figures 

GALVESTON— Galveston's dry 
docks and wharfs are the central 
.-sources of Negro employment 
and thus control most of the buy- 
ing power. It was learned this 
week in the survey of the Negro 
in Commercial Labor, conducted 
by the Guide News. 

Galveston Dry Docks and Con- 
struction Company. the Com- 
pre.ss and Cotton Warehouses. 
Gaive.-;toh Wharf Company, and 
Sealy Hospital are the largest 
Single employers. 

Hawkins, Webb 
to Play in Houston 

HOUSTON— The distinction of 
biiiisjing to Houston two of the 
Nation's ^largest dance bands be- 
longs to Earl Carthown and Geor- 
gp Whiteside, successful amuse- 
ment projnoters with an estab- 
lishment it 101 West Dallas. 

In late' November and early 
December Erskine Hawkins and 
Chick Webb will furnish swing 
music for the city, and surround- 
ing towns' dance lovers, the two 
young impresarios promise. Con- 
Tacts close to .*.'^,000 allegedly 


Card of Thanks 

The family of the late Jam^i 
' Ryan, who met death in an 
automobile accident on a Hous- 
ton and Galveston Highway Sept- 
ember 19th, takes this method 
of extending sincere appreciat- 
ion to the staff of the John Sealy 
Hospital, in particular, Mrs. Min- 
nie Wiley. Mazie Davis, Lula Fel- 
der and Miss Clara Mathis. for 
services rendered during the re- 
cent bereavement. 
Signed 
Mrs. Lucy Ma« Rya»V widow 
111-M. (rear), 
Galveston 



3064 NEGRO KIDDIES IN 
GALVESTON SCHOOLS 

GALVESTON— The Galveston 
Public School System reports 
3064 colored children on iU rolls. 


FRATERNAL AND BUSINESS LEADER 

General Manager of one of Galveston'i Urgeat enterprises and p«7 
master of 25 men and women is JEFFERSON JONES, active club- 
man and fraternal leader. A charter member of the Oleander 
Lodge, No. 550 of th* Elks, Jones serves as executive recording 
Morstarr. 


Patrolmeri at 

icers' 
Meet in Dallas 

D.A,LLAS.— Negro police offic- 
ers from 10 cities in Texas. Ok- 
lahoma and Missouri attended 
the third annual convention of 
the Negro Peace Officerj associa- 
tion held at the Negro Ch.Tmber 
of Commerce building here Oct- 
ober 17. 18. and 19, 

The convention was hd\6 in 
conjunction with the Negro Stale 
Fair which drew 70.000 peri-ons 
to this city last week. 

The policemen took part in the 
?rand parade held Monday morn- 
,ng. October 17, and attended the 
football classic between Wiley 
college and Praine X'u-v. tii.it af- 
ternoon. The con^rention proptr 
opened Tuesday morning at the 
Chamber of Commerce. 314'^ 
Good street. 

Following opening remarks by 
the retiring president. James A. 
Ladd of Houston a welcome ad- 
dress was given A. Maceo Smth. 
secretary of the Dallas Chamier 
of Commerce. The response was 
made by Officer W. D. Fuller of 
Oklahoma City. 
I A round table discussion v*. as 
hold Tuesday afternoon with t^o 
a,« a Peace 0-h .J, ;rUuckO 
delegates discussing the "Negro 
as a Peace Officer." "Everyday 
Problems" and "Handling of Col- 
ored Youth." 

Leon Jordan, plainclothesman 
from Kan.sas City, described the 
police department of the Missouri 
city, and told of the progress 
Kansas City is making in its 
program of youth guidance. 

The Kansas City police depart- 
ment sponsors two Boy Scout 
troops, one white and one Negro, 
pnone means of guiding youth in- 
to' becoming good citizens. "A 
policeman must do more than 
make arrests," Jordan said "It 
;s more important to work out a 
program of social rehabilitation 
with an aim toward preventing 
crime." 

John Botts, Kansas City officer 
who is Scoutmaster of the Police 
Boy Scout Troop, told how the 
troop is sponsored. San Antonio 
and Tulsa officers invited Officer 
Botts to come to their city to 
help them start such a troop. 

Brown L. Brackens of San An- 
tonio was elected president of 
the association, succeeding Mr. 
Ladd. 

Other officers are Detective 
Robert K. Lee. Kansas City, vice 
president; W. D. Fuller, Okla- 
homa City, secretary: Harvey 
Hill, San Antonio, assistant sec- 
retary; J. H. Smitherman, Tulsa, 
treasurer; Forrest Stirman, Kan- 
sax City, chaplain; C. C. Mills, 
San Antonio, sergeant-at-arms. 

The 1939 meeting will be held> 
in Tulsa. The Kansas City police ' 
department has been invited to 
send not only delegates to the 
meeting but the entire Boy Scout 
troop to the Tulsa meeting. 

The four Kansas City officers 
came here in the latest edition in 
motor transportation. The car in 
which they traveled was one of 
the three radio equipped road 
machines maintained by the Kan- 
sas Ciiy police department thru ^ 
the interest and cooperation of 
Otto P. Higins, director of police, , 
and Lieut. Henry Johnson, ins- 
pector of police. It wa.<i the first 
time in the history of the depart- 
ment that Negro officers have 
been sent out of town in a police 
car to attend an educational meet- 
ing or on any mission other 
than to return a prisoner to the 
city. Director Higgins and Lieut. 
Johnson gave their wholehearted 
support to the venture as did Cap- 
tain John Sullivan, captain at 
the Flora Avenue Police ^tation 
out of which Officers Jo^an and 
Stirman work and wMch is the 
headquarter* for th»' Boy Scout 
troop. 



Brewery Under 
Fire in Houston 

HOUSTON— An instance of 
discrimination by the local Unit- 
ed Brewers' Union an allihale of 
the A. F. L-. has cnie to the at- 
tention of ihe ^'egrcr beer drink- 
ing public and is causing tnreaus 
of a wholesale rejection nf the 
products of the Harry Mitchell 
Barewing Company. 

The incident was th? outlawing 
of Connie Williams, foimer R;.ce 
sr'lesman fou the Con'pany. by 
the Union. Step."; are b":r.g taken 
to force the rehiring of WiUiams. 
who reportedly had an excellent 
record of service. 


HAS KIN IN L. A. * 

The Los Angeles relatives of 
babv PRINCELLA DOLORES 
WEBB are Mrs. Princella Jeff- 
erson,' for whom she is named 
and T.obert Lee Dykes, aunt 
and uncle, living at 1633 Palo- 
ma avenue. 
At home, Baby Webb is the ap- 


TO TALK ON NEGRO 
BUSINESS HOUSES 

HOUSTON— M Edward Key, 
representative of the Texarkana 
; Casket company, in Texarkana 
I and Cleburne, will include in his 
' trade lectures, talks on Nf^ro in- 
stitutions i.sking for greateFvec- 
ognition of the merits of rafSs 
owned and operated business, it 
IS claimed. 

pie of her Dad and Mother's 
eyes, .Mr. and Mrs. Dudlev 
Webb. ST., 114-16th street, Gal- 
veston. 


vices 

times to extend a helping hand 
A good newspaper is a val- 
uable asset to any community. 
furnishing you with facts that 
can only come through its 
cannals. It brings the everyday 
happenings of the world ro your 
door. You receive for a few 
pennies what it costs thousands 
of dollars to obtain. 

Newspapers are built on the 
principle, of community advan- 
cement, and a relationsiup of 
better uncjerstanding among 
races in the community. In the 
columns of each editorial news- 
papers are the opinions of mas- 
ter minds — Education at us 
best 

In our column. featunn.; 

.real people, we will endeavor 
to bring to light the world of 
the little fellov,, the one that 
saves the country, the one that 
makes it po.ssible for the law- 
yer, doctor, merchant, banker, 
to make a living 

HOW GALVESTON 

HAS CHANGED 

Let's turn back the paj^es of 
histor;-, and u-snder in ine 
spaces ot time. 27 yea is ago. 
today, in Galveston, Women 
lAore long dresses, cotton stock- 
ings, and high top shoes. «'enl 
to chTjrch (jn .SundoNs and rais- 
e dlarge healtii> families, m'- 
body smoked but Grandma, and 
her delight was a cub pipe. 
Boys uore shoit irousci.-- and 
girls long dresses, children 
were in bed a; .>~i.-.( n. .Sir.gir.g 
"Casey June>" hud ".Sailing th^. 
Jack" in the allfv. out of he^r- 
ing reach of i^e Old Folks, 
was their daiis pleasure Miri 
worked twelve and fifteen 
liours a da\' and macit C'l.w 
money, lived an> place li..il np 
was able to pay rent ana wa- 
considered a .good neighi.ioi. 
Beer sold for 20 ceni.s a gaiiui 
and most w 'ii--Ke.\ .^ a doliai 
quart. Saloons closed at nint- 
thirty week day.s and twelve on 
Saturdays, and received m>'i 
customers only. Beer was Ji\e 
cents a glass and all the wein- 
ers that you could eat were 
free. If you made a trip to 
Houston in -eight h.ouis > ovi 
were considered a .-peed king — 
82 and 33, the crack trains ot 
the Galveston Hon-ion ana 
Henderson .siitTt lin<-. w erf !:.e 
pride of the city. .A -'omobiles 
were noxcltifv; 

Time goes on. Wf ■ can'' ='"n 
that. Things have chi-..!eed. Tne 
hor.se and buggy d,i>^ ,.if t.oi> 
forever, We'ie living ;n a new 
age. We are not \hf -ame for 
we keep pace with tim*^. ioo,i 
facts in the faoe. stand solid 
when we arc" -igfit. and know 
that we are not here a.^ \i.-nor.>-. 
but as a race i.if people, out 
ha\-e been here 303 \ears. W" 
ha\-e multiplied in numbers, 
from 300.000 to 15,000 iiOn m 7.T 
\"«ars. spending S^.7,''v).iiuu OOo' 
a year. "This truly makes i;<: a 
part of this great nntim Wi 
are ser\ iced by 18U new.-paper.- 
and 135 magazines. ser\ing u.- 
as a "Ra«e of People, not as 
Ci iminals. '.America has . or.h 
I produced Four Ncj'i'o Gang- 
■sters in 303 yeai-s 'iind they 
were encouraged by whiles to 
' enter this barbarous fieId"^-of 


v: 


crime. Two were killed by Uie 
department of Justice and two 
were killed by jnembers of 
ward under pressure and at- 
tairied a reasonable amount of 
success, in the last 75 years, we 
will nevei attam the proper 
proportion until we learn ihopt 
about ourselves and the major, 
part we play in life arourrd lU. 
their own body, because they 
got cold feet and wanted to 
turn back. 

Only through the Negro presi 
shall we find our salvation. Al- 


though we have forged for- 



WANTS TO BE A STAR 

This attractive voung Galves- 
tonian. \ADI>E AUGtSTA 
POPE, is the s«m total of 13- 
years-old. In the*, seventh grade 
Miss Pope is a siK>rt fan and a 
lover of the stag* and screen, 
in fact, she thintit she'll be a 
movie star whensbe grows up. 

Book Club\ Seeks 
Curb Readifig 
of Dime Novels 

GALVE.'^TON-^It s afjm te dis- 
courage the wide spiead reading 
of dime 'io\-f-is and paper-back- 
f-r; "ihriile: " novelties, the' local 
"Book Lo\ers' CJar " launches 
lis Fall program on Tuesday ev- 
rn:n'.' h'. Sc"'i^l Library.. "Man, 
the Unknown "..is t'r.e title of the 
\ oil. me to bt- re- icwed 'oy Cos'- 
tello Jr-mes, one of the locsi Llt- 
e;;:i'y lieiits, 

Organ;>:ed in December. 1936, 
the "Book Lo\er? Cljb'' has ren- 
dered in\ aluable seivice to the 
community rn urging the pur- 
chase of better l.teraTjre. 

\l"mbers and officer.': are Lill- 
son s 

:ar Davis, presirient. E.ssie John- 
,-on .-ecr^'-Tv, Vema Homphrey, 
reporter M,ss Carrie Smith, cnap- 
lam. Miss .-Audrey Pendleton, 
trea.-urer Mmes Amanda Cae- 
sar Irene Combs. Margunte Col- 
lins, Ro^a Grand ison, Beatrice 
Henr>'. Carrie Jones. S A. Maxey. 
Roberts Wmfield. Mis,"^s Eunice 
N■''^h, SsT^-.n-.e Pif.m.an and Agnts 
Williams. 


:i^.^ IS YOUR SKIN 

CAUSING YOU TO SUFFER 

THIS DISCOMFORT? 


i, I ^.^ 


s«^SF^ 


Of ^s^taHA>>:«2i 


[Of 




0^ 


Of 


MONEY-BACK 

C6uarantc0 

GET RELIEF OR GET YOUR MONEY BACK 

Buy a box of Black and 'White 
Ointment; if it does not begin to 
bring you "relief from the discom- 
fort.'» of skin irritations" as de- 
.^cribed in this announcement, the 
retail price of the box will be re- 
funded at once. / ; 


'SaS'iw?!* 


.^^J^ 


o\s 


COt^fORj 


'^^n'S^irpKR'LV.^ 


NUN.O'^. 


SK\H 


\n\^t^^ 


Of 

\bHS 


.s<^ 


p^- 


^^vow o\^ 


Ol 


_were signed 
famed band 


involving . 
leadan. 


the two 


Are any of those skin irritationa printed above 
making you miserable and unhappy? If "yes" is 
your answer, read of the relief Black and White 
Ointment and Skin Soap help to bring: 

First you go to your dealer right now and get 
yourself this famous combination treatment. 

The mild super-fatted Black and White Skin Soap 
is used to cleanse the affected part of dirt and other 
material. Then apply Black and White Ointment 
according to plain directions within the package. 

Black and White Ointment helps to relieve the 
discomfort of itching, burning and soreness due to 
dry eczema (salt rheum, tetter) of external origin, 
or simple ringworm or minor parasitic skin irrita- 
tions. 

Black and White Ointment also acts as an anti- 
septic dressing foe such blemishes as superficial 


pimples, blackheads and acme of exter- 
nar origin. Be sure to de^iand Black 
and White Ointment and Skin Soap. 
Don't accept a substitute. \ 

The 50e size of Black and Wluie 
Ointment contains more tliarn t^iee as much as the 25c size. 
Large bar of Black and Whit^ Skin Soap. 2oc Trial sizes of 
both Black and White Ointment and Skin Soap are sold for 
10c at all five and ten cent storqp. Sold by dealers everj-«'her%. 

If you want a gentler-actitjg preparation, use Black 
and White Skin 'Whitener to help yourself toward a 
fairer, lighter, complexion. At dealers everywhere, 25c. 


B LAC Kajo WHITE 

OINTMENT and SKIN SOAP 


f^ 


.kk<-^ 


''^:i^%M 





E*i|-^T;^^^ 


...^j--.,-,^.. 


':<^r^i^.^:-\v y 


■i 1,-> 




\ I • - ' tr « . 


,-w^-. 


INCREASE 

YOUR 
SAVINGS 


T 


fi 


:"z-' . - : .-..-^v ^^^_.>^^' -■,> ■ 


C 


^C 

t 

1 

.0; 



»l;vSi-s»;jt 


.1 


Quality Foods Sold as Low as the Law allows 


DRIVE A FEW BLOCKS AND SAVE A FEW DOLLARS! 


"f, 


SAVE 

WITH 

SAFETY 


4222 So. Central Ave. lllllinilSpedals for Thursday. Friday. Satarilay and Simday- November B, 4, 5, 6!iiiiiiiiiii4J22 $0. Central Ave. 


EASTERN GRAIN-FFJ) PORK at SPECIAL PRICES 

CHOICE RIB \ TENDERLOIN ) SMALL LOIN 

CHOPS ROAST ! CHOPS 


23 


2|b. 


18 


2|b. 


27 


2|b. 


Sausage 
9 


2lb. 


PURE 
LARD 


Eastern Sliced 

BACON 


19 


ifb. 


Extra Special! 

Pretno Brand 
tendered 

Hams 

WHOLE OR HALF 

Fancy Young BeeS 

Sirloin STEAKS 


Vi 


lb 


EXTRA SPEUAL! 

Chitterlings 

16 - ^1~ 


Fancy Young Beef 


Wi fancy loung iseei ^ ^ 
^<>> T-Bone STEAKS 16 


2lb. 


Boned and Rolled 


isoned ana nouea 4^^ ITT TT 1 ^ 

Prime Rib Roast 19^'' Hog Heads 4 


Sliced PEACHES ^'"'"'^- 


No. 21, Cans 


PINK SALMON "^"^ "^^^"^ 


No. 1 Tan Can 



TUNA FLAKES T^fJ^L^ 


Tomato Sauce ^^^JZ.1 3for 


EGGS 


LARGE 
LOOS Doz. 
EXTRAS 


Lighthouse Cleanser 3 

t f n I ^UVOI' 17-<». Can ^ J^- I LIBBY'S 

5y I Cranberry Sauce IQ*^ I K R A U T 



No. 2 1 J 
Cans 


3 25' 


1 Gal. 


MACOMBER'S CmER 

4^C .., Gal. JQC Quart ^^C Pint ^QC 


1 Gal. 


MARTINELU'S CIDER 

JJC '.Gal. JJC Quart |^gC Pint 4fC 



BLUE ROSE 

RICE 


A 1 


SODAS 

OR 

GRAHAMS 


7 


lb 


CRAOCERS 

RED ROSE— L^ah Hard Wheat ^^_ 

FLOUR _ ^*-^^- "tfc 47' 

DOG FOOD ■"■^^ 6'"2S^ 


MISSION INN 

PUMPKIN 


No. 21/2 Cans 
Each 


ih. 


Pig Snouts... 

Pig Ears 

Fresh Melts.. 
Bacon Rind^> 



Hamburger . . 
Short Ribs... 
'ot Roast.... 


YEARLING 


Lamb Chops. 



FANC)C FRESH ¥1SH AND POULTRY SPECIALS! 

SLICED I NewY«rk I KINGFISH i Large Fresh 

SEA BASS Oysters MACKEREL Shrimp 


Fancy Yearling 

LAMB LEGS 


12 


Fancy Yearling Whole 

'I Lamb SHOULDERS 


S 


2Jb. 


CORN MEAL 

4 »^" 10^ 


BULK- 
YELLOW or WHITK 


WALDORF m 4 0%g* 

Toilet Tissue 3 ^^"^ IZ^ 


SCOTT 

TISSUE 


Jrolls21< 


CHARM— 650^heet tm g^g^ 

Toilet Tissue 3 ° "^ T^ 

OmO BLUE TIP # ^ J%^ 

MATCHES t)'^ 19^ 


PETER PAN No. 1 Tall tm #A Aa 

PinkSALMON5"Z8^ 

GOLD KRAfT ^M t* 

Peanut Butter '^ ZV 


BULK <9 ^ g^ 

Hominy Grits 3 "10^ 
QUAKER OATS |fic 

Quick or Reg. I^rge Pkg:., ea. ^»^^ 

CtnVSm^ Mb. 18 'ic 

^■'K Y Shortenini; .S-lb. .51c 
*^* *• * 6-lb. S1.02 

Wesson Oa SS. lU 


IBCE AMERICAN g ^ ^#t 

MATCHES '^^^ 15^ 


C. & H. 


Brown SUGAR ^: 6^^ 


POWDERED SUGAR 
PILLSBURY-S 


PkK- 
' Ih. pkg. 


PlLLJiBLKyS 40-oz. Pkg. ^ m^ 

Pancake FLOUR IS^ 

CALUMET Mb. Can M g^g* 

Baking Powder IV^ 
BORAX CHIPS 91 <; 

22-OI. Package.^ ... each MfJL' 

Boraxo ^"12^' 

Bisquick Flour tlS 2Siv 


Small 


each 14< 


Crisco 


Mb. Wit 
Shortening 3Ib. 51c 
6 lb. $1.05 


DEL MONTE 


CATSUP 


ll-oz. Bottles Each 


10 


Ic 


HILLS BROS. 


COFFEE 


BLUE CAN 


20 


lb 


IRIS— SWEET WRINKLED 

PEAS 

HOT 


No. 2 Cans 


CARIVTATION 
CANNED BORi)EN'S 
SEC^, PET 


X Tan f gC 

.^ Cans •■*# 


DEL .MO.NTE 8-oz. Cans g^ ^ ^^ 

Tomato Sauce 3 "10 

HILLS BROS.— RED CAN ^^ M 

COFFEE ^^^'^^ 26 


lb 


IRIS — TELEPHONE 

PEAS 
MICK 


No. 2 Cans 


BANNER 
CANNED or 

Golden State 


5s.l6« 


CRACKERS 
21« 


RITZ 
i-lb. Pkg 


PORK & BEANS 

VAL VITA 

No. 2i, Cans 


3 25" 


IRIS FANCY FOODS 


Dried Prunes 

Mrd.— i-iii. rki.. . 

KRAUT 

No. 21^ <'»n« T 

^KI.LOAV OK HHITK 

HOMINY 


lie 
lOic 

2-. 19c 


No. 2'-^ CHno 

^ior.in PACK 

TOMATOES'*, fMc 


Coffee 


In 1 lb. 27c 
Glass 2 lb. 52c 


Pftite^ Ml'., (ioldi-n Bantam, Sho^-pejt 

CORN IforKC 

No. '> Cans ^ gf f 

CATSUP 2'o 15c 

l4-<ii. Kolllr'.. ^ mt^ 

Tomato See. 

8-or. CuiiKt., 


3 ""10c 


CLOROX 

Quart 13*^ 

TOMATOES 

AETNA M ' i^t^^ 


No. 2i, Cans 


Delicatessen Dept> 

SALAD 


POTATO 


Macaroni Salad 


PRESERVES 


-flO* 

strawberry * #Ifc 


PEANUT 

BUTTER 


2^18^ 


MAYONNAISE luTk '^ Pt^ 17c 


DiU Pickles 


S for 10c 


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PIMENTO cum? A T\ 

CHEESE 91rI%lLi%JLf 


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LUNCH MEAT ZSft 


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FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DEPT. 


Large Watsonville 


BeUefleur APPLESlO^ 12 


POTATOES 
10-11 


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7 la 


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RED YAMS 

5 la 


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4 "10* 


Sweet 
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APPLES 

5-15 


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Wash. 
Delicious 


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BEANS ^"^ lU 


FANCY CALIF. 
NATURAL 

Dates 


12^ 


UQUOR SPECIALS 


90 PROOF— BLENDEDf 

GoldenWedding 

STRAfnHX nrtTTRnrfv ivineinrv ** 

c 


STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY 


Half Pint 

CLOSE OUT 


47' 


MAROS 90 PROOF . . . CALIFORNLA 
5-YEAR-OLD 

GRAPE RRANDY 


Full Pint 67c 

HALF PINT 


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60 PROOF OLD WARRIOR 

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FULL $f 15 

QUART : i 


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STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY ^^^ 

FULL Cl^C 

QUART 


92' 


5'/, YEARS OLD ... 90 PROOF 

B. D. C. 


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EPICURE 


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2 YEARS OLD— SCHEXLEY 

PA WILKENS 

STRAIGHT BOUIUtON WHISKEY 

FnU Quart $1.19 

FnU Pint 

HALF PENT 


63- 

.840 , 


Wc Arc forced to Collect Soles Tax on Taxable Items 


state Excjae Tax Included in Theae Prices 


■ah 


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?r:^^He AUTOBfiOGRAPnT 
V OF A^ STONE DOORSTEP 

By Sbroh E. Lindsay 


,TIie existence of a door step is#ed by their tales of by-gone ad- 
of kmger or shorter duration, ac- ventiire, I fell asleep. 'Hie next 
cBrding to the material it con- morTiing I awoke refreshed and 
^Sts of, and the usage it experi- ready for the fray. 
ences. Few of them have in easy Time has flown, the years have 
lot in life—generally speaking, come and gone like magic The 
they endtire great hardship»s. children have romped and played 

Being a stone door step I have in and out through the long day.s. 
-long been in service here, and Visitors have come: great per- 
have felt the weight of many a ' sonages. Lords and ladies in ele- 


.-k 


;'X" 


CQLIF 



% CUULEN FENTRESr 

GAB STUFF 

■HiMlli^MiH 


VOL. 59^NO. 30 


LOS. ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1938 


DARK LAUGHTER 


loot fall 

My earliest recollection of my 
. surroundings is of a beautiful 
sloping hill-side covered with a 
carpet of green grass. I was em- 
bedded in the soil near the top 
of the hUl, and my back was cov- 
ered with soft violet colored 


gant attire have tripped lightly 
over me. I have seen the family 
physician with his kindly face; 
the vicar in his sombre black 
coat Each have come to lift the 


Brass-Knocker and swing 
the great Oak Door. 


open 


_ . , . ., , , . , As the years went fleeting by j 

rock-moss. Little children played ' the children were rapidly near- 
arouTid me all day in the su.-v ■ • . ■- . . 

shine, and in the evening twir 
light, young lovers came to sit 
Upon me and dream their happy 


dreams. 

. One day, w n e n the summer 
had passed, and the autumn 
leaves were falling m bright col- 
ored showers, three strong men 
came with spades and shovels. 
They dug away the soil from 
my base, and hoisted me onto a 
cart drawn by two oxen. The 
children ran to ask what was to 
be done with me. The men re- 
plied that I was to be made into 
a door step for the new mansion, 
■which had been built on the other 
side of the river. 

I was hauled laboriously over 
the rough roads, across the 


ing their maturity. One day there 
' was an unusually large group of 
young people in the garden. I 
fell to wondering what was tak- 
ing place. Everyone seemed to 
to be so happy. 

"Danny and Sandra are cele- 
brating their 'eightc-enth anni- 
versary." said the Brass-Knock- 
er. 

"Yes. yes. ' said the Oak Door. 

How the years have flown! It 
seems only yesterday when they 
came here to live. I felt a little 
saddened, upon hearing that my 
children had grown up. 

-■Ml through the sunny afte.-- 
noon the young people played 
and sang, and flitted in and out 
over my back. At twilight. Dan- 
ny came to the door with a 




bridge, and up the hii! to th's ] beautiful young girl. 




assive stone house. The stone 
ason immediately set to wo-rc 
upon me, grinding and flatten- 
ing-, planing and polishing, and 
shaping me to fit into this spot. 

All night I sat here m tb-^ 
darkness feeling the bed of solt 
cement into which I had been 
placed hardenmg around me— ;o 
different from the soft rich soil 
of my native hill side. Why had 
I been chosen to be a door step.' 
Why could not they have taker. 
som.e other stone, and allowed 
be to remam in my happy estate' 
Ah. never again would I hear 
the sunny laughter of the win- 
some children who loved m.e so 
dearlv I experienced a sicken- 
ing sense of despai.' a< my beu 
grew harder and harder. 

The morning dawned ctsar. and 
the su.a rose spreading a soft 
glow of color over the earth. My 
spirits arose with the light: I be- 
gan to look about, became inter- 
ested m the ne-.v su.TOundinss. 
contemplating what the happen- 
ings of this day might be, I wr^ 
startled from my reverie by the 
sound of heavy foot steps. Look- 
ing up. I saw several workmen 
approaching, carrying a thick 
oaken door which they placed 
upon the ground veiy close to m.e 
I could see the beautifully caiv- 
ed designs upon its face. 

While I was gazing mtentl;. 
upon the beauty and grandeur 
of the door, one of the workmen 
stepp»ed upon my bacs and sa.d, 
**We must work fast, m.en, be- 
cause this door should have been 
.urg yesterday. The master ex- ' 
^p»cts the house to be ready for 
•ocupaBcy today." * 

The work was soon finished. , 
and the thick, ornate, oaken door 
•wung ponderously upon its 
heavy iron hinges. Then they ' 
fastened a brass knocker u p o .i 
the center of the door. 

"Now", said tne forem.an. "tne 
mansion is complete ' 

The Door, the Brass-knocker, 
and I have been the best of 
fnends all through the years. My 
being rather provincial, there 
■was much for me to leam from 
them. They had been to the city 
.—through the factories, and had 
heard many things of interest 
which they related for m.y edi- 
ficatiixi. Then. too. they occupied 
rather a strategic position, for 
they could see and hear much ci 
\^^at transpired within the hou.=e. I 
as well as that which occurred 
without. They kindly kept me in- 
formed as to what was hapoe.]- 
ing around me. But the Ivin 
Hinges have remained ngidiv 
aloof. Never have thev shown an-.- 
disposition to join in our con- 
verse. Occasionafly. they cried 
loudly, at which tim.es the house- 
man would come and give them 
a drink of oil from a small tin 
can: then they would lapse into 
their morose silence. Thus we 
lived here together, day m and 
day out. 

When the master came with his 
family that first morning, it was 
"the Brass-Knocker who saw them 
first, and exclaimed loudly, "Here 
they cornel" 

The Oak Door stod ajar witn . 
excitement. There at the gate 
-ft as the luxurious family car- 
r:ige. The footman openeid the 
_' iron gate, and up the gar- 
den path came the mother and 
lather,, the two children running ] 
ahead of them. 

This is. our stone", the little I 
girl cried, joyously dancing up., 
and down upon me. I 

Imagine my surprise and de- 


"Let's go out side and sit upon 
the stone step", he said. 

They came out and sat upon 
me. while he told her of his love 
in beautiful words such as I had 
heard young lovers use in the 
old days when I lived across ths 
river on the green sloping hill- 
side. Ah: the tender chords o{ 
memory which were touched bv 
this scene: thought traversed the 
past years: tears welled up to 
my surface. 

The young lovers went bacK 
into the house: the ponderous 
Oak Door closed softly: the old 
Brass-Knocker remained silent: 
the Iron Hinges looked down 
upon me in their cold forbidding 
v-ay I settled myself a little 
.more firm.ly into my cement bed 
and fell asleep. 


THE 
LAUNDRY- 
MAN 


HELLO FOLKS! Being a 
m.an past fifty: t.^^erefore 
entitled to draw down this 
proposed "Thirty Bucks Ev'ery 
ihursday" (I can't see why 
they didn't make it Saturdav 
night I it is only natural that' 
I should be keenly interested in 
the measure. So. night before 
last < took the booklet which 
came with m.y ballot and read 
Upon finishmg. I found that I 
the mieasure over carefully. 
had arrived at a definite con- 
clusion that the "Joker" was 
running wild in certain para- 
graphs of thi.5 measure, and 
that It must be defeated at all 
costs. I do not mean that old 
age pension legislation should 
be abandoned, because I be- 
lieve it to be a step in the right 
direction. But there is T. N. T. 
.smuggled securely a-way in this 
•Ham and Egg package they 
are holding out so temptingly 
to us oldsters. 

The T. N. T. I refer to Ls the 
paragraph that states "Within 
five days after the adoption of 
this amendment the Governor 
shall appoint either Roy G. 
Owens, 139 Oxford st*eet, L. 
A., or Will H. Kindig.S4125 S. 
Figueroa street or J. C. Elliot 
608 N. Olice Street. Anaheim. 
California, to serve as admin- 



by or Horrin gtonTsecond Sunday 

Artist Series 


is Announced 

The Gray Conservatory >f 
Music announces the second year 
of the Sunday Concerts Series. 
This season the following art- 
ists are offered Mme. Elizabeth 
Ford, dramatic reader: Mr. Finis 
Moore, tenor: Miss Rubby Lyij. 
pianist: ^r. Lawrence Lassiter. ' 
violinist: Mrs. Naomi Pharr, con- 
tralto and The Stokes HaUelu- ^ 
jah Quartet. 

Season tickets for the six 
events are only $1.50 and it 
would be impossible to find' an- 
other series of such fine perform- 
ers at this price in the city. A\] ! 
concepts are given on the second : 
Sundays of the month beginning 
November 13th a* 4:30 promptly, 
Gray Musart. 4068 Central Avi-. 
Single admission 35 cents 


Y^HEJJ NEWSPAf^RS flashed news of the winning of $190,00i 
in sweepstakes by a mian and woAian here last week, w« 
couldn't help but feel, as the comics say, "glad all over". 

We figured that because we have ho luck at such things, we 
shouldn't hfsitate to felicitate someone who hit a jackpot, Thii 
jackpot will do a lot of 'good, too. according to the papery. The 
participants plan to tie the well kno-wn knot. 

It seems that now, everything is just ducky — the $150,000 
smackers having cleared up a lot of routine matters which stood 
in the way before. , -T 

A bit of humor was attached ^ reaohins ns that Roby CIxy, tibe.^ 
to the good luck. It was huin- 
crous as we saw it, at least. 
On the arm of Theodore Ed- 
wards, half of the lucky duo, 
the next day was John L. Hill, 
the undertaker. 

We told the undertaker he 
was certainly a fast worker. 
The ^If of the duo to whom 
we refer was pleased apparent- 
ly, so we suppose everytrung 
was aU right. 


M 


"Birth certificate — you mean a 
didn't have to git a license fer him?" 


istrator until 1940. This para- 
graph XX heacJs section 4 of 
the .-^miendment. Then, in sec- 
tion 30 way over near the end 
of the ."^mendrjent it states 
tha tet hOifol qMSoarsrmttisida 
that the administrator can draw 
upon the State Treasurer im- 
mediately for funds, up to S70U, 
00 to set up the nece3:>ary 
machinery, printing, operating 
costs, advertising, etc, to place 
the amendment on| a working 
basis. 

N6w what I want to know Is, 
Who is Roy G, Owens, or Will 
H. Kmdig, or J. C. Elliott. , 
Where did they ever tend bar? 
What do we know about their 
qualifications or fitness for the ' 
unrestricted handling of STOO,- i 

00 of us voters' money? .-^nd to 
add insult to injury, the Act 
states that the maximum bond 
to be required of .3ry one. of 
these gentlemen is SIO.QOO. And 
said bond is to be paid for by 
the State. Now in all frankness 

1 ask you "Ain't that somethin? | 
And naind you, the Ace makes 

It rramiatory u-^on the Gover- < 
nor to elect Onf or these three 
rr.en. I don't Kr.ov; now that i 
impresses you, tut It looks like 
to me that :SOM^30'JY is lig- 
urtng to get a dam sight more 
than the "Ham and Ecs? they I 
ere offering us. I 

It seems to me that t' c post ' 


Jen>iie Bell 

Ofttimes I long for Jennie Bell 
My pal of long ago, 
'When we were huskv countrv 
kids ' 

Without^ a single -A-oe. 

I see the old academy. ; 

Where we all went to school: 
I hear the grim Prof Guest. 
As he laid down the rule. | 

I see the rugged prairie paths. 
The shaggy clay Inills red. 
I hear the tolling of the bell. 
We're trying to guess who's dead. 

Thanksgiving and our Christmas 

times 
Did never com.e too fast. 
Our mothers cooked for sev'ral 

days 
Tj make the goodies last. 

I see the trussel dangerous 
The stream beneath the bridge 
Where all our kindred were 

baptised 
Along the mountain ridge. 

Jennie Bell, oh Jennie Bell. 

license:' Well, he ain't no houn' dog, we ^^S^^erf f^^e'L turn- 

.-, ing gray I 

^J -" Will join vou after toil. 

— IVA O REED 


HERE AND THERE: Spotted 
Herbie Jeffries, singing cow- 
boy, and Spencer Williams, 
screen heavy, both of Holly- 
wood Productions, the all-Ne- 
gro Ynovie outfit . V Which re- 
minds us that MilLton Dollar's 
latest ""Gang Smashers', star- 
ring Nina Mae McFftnney and 
Ralph Cooper. :s repfcrted fin- 
ished ... 

Dave Keene. of Paramount 
Studios, tells us that "Oscar. 
the colored bootblack, has gone 
back to attending the feet of 
the famous. But his ivory grin 
IS broader and there's a jaunty 
set to his shoulders. For a lit- 
tle while Oscar was Sn actor 
He was called away from his 
jars and brushes to do a bit in 
Tom Sa-»-yer. Detective', with 
Donald O'Connor. Billv Cook. 
Porter Hall. Philip Wa.-ren and 
Janet Waldo. 

"Oscar has presided o\-¥r the 
shoeshine stand just inside the 
mam gate at Paramount for 
years. He's on speaking terms 
with more stars and executives 
than any other member of his 
calling in the world. Wallace 
Rei'-' set him up m business.'' 


singing star, starts her awn pea i^j : 
gram, beginning SatnrdaT ere*- ' ,! 
frtMB 6:.t« to 6:45, 

Heard weekly orer KEHE, . (, 
the prognun will be called ' 
"Sonthem Serenade", we arc ■ 
infonned. We have often wttn- 
dered wh.v some sponsor didn't ' - 
nab this versatile young lady. .' 
starred in "Porgy and Bes" 
and countless other stage hits. 
This may be the beginning of 
something worthwhile. We 
hope so, anyway. 


A Georgie Crouch -Jimmy' 
Garrison re-match is on tap, -we , 
hear .a duplication of their 
ding-dong thriller of last -week 
would mean SRO signs . . . We 
like to toy with the idea that 
Brrr-^ruin .of UCLA may yet 
gtt in the Rose Bowl come Jan. 
1 use mop down the Bears 
Saturday and if Bre'r Bruin 
keeps his slate clean for the 
rest rf the season, walloping 
the Trojans to boot, well . . . 
you get the idea." 


Good news 


is the report 



New 
Portables 

29.75 

.A,:! Make5 

All Models 

Standard Machines 

$19.75 & Up 

French Tvpewriter Co. 

1021 RO. MAIS STREET 

.Mich i Tan 9.'; .'7 Los .*ngele« 


of Adminis' rater in an. untried <•• ride the Blinds'" of any popula' 
I'"^an( lal vsnture of this kind 


sbould be delegated only to a 
.Man of proven experience in 
the .•\dministi -[ive and e;cecu- 
tne I'Cld of i;L; .is'.ess. For the 
.-pecial tra '■,'■14 required to 
successfully launch and carry 
on an enterprise of this type 
could have been gained in No 
Other Field, .-^nd I fel that We. 
The People should have the 
Right and the Prrrilege to- 
CHOOSE the Man to whom we 
delegate the power to dra-A 
STOO. 000 of our money from the 
State treasury. Taking all 
things under consideration. I 
believe that the passage of this 
amendment in its present form 
will only mean "GRAV^"' for 
a few. Failure for the project 
and a serious set-back for the, 
Cau.^e of Old Age Pensions all 
over the entire country.- So let 
Ub be wise, and vote NO on 
this "Ham and Eggs' proposit- 
ion. , 

These may seem strange 
words from a stauncn Demo- 
crat, such as I am, especially 
when the measure is apparently 
sponsored by my party. But 
experience has taught me that 
Political E.ypediency creates 
strange bed-fellows at times; 
and through force ,of circum- 
stances due to lack of fund.s 
ofr propoganda ourpose,?, nnp 
candidates are often forced to 


tram m order to get votes en- 
ough to win in the elections. 
The Republicans have the mon- 
ey, while we have mostly Our 
wits to ccmbat them. But in 
this election! believe and hope 
that we wiQ be ablt to 


give 


California ?. NEW DELAL. 


FIX YOUR ROOF NOW 

.Asphaltum Roof Coater 

Per Gal. 16c 

or 3 Gals,«»c or le Gals. S1.54 

Heavy .Asbestos Roof Coater 

per Gal. 33e 

99 lb. nyifing, per roll $1.63 

H. A. PAILK 
1216 W Washington Street 

PR-2«»9 


TfNGLEY MORTGAGE 
6% Real Estate Loons 7% 

"Reach For Your Phone — To Get Your Loon" 

Simply Dial MI.-6215 
Free Inspection — Prompt Action 

Good Loons In Any District Considered 
Old or New Homes — Age of BIdg no Objection 

ANSWER SAME DAY 

BUILDING LOANS- PURCHASE LOANS 

REFINANCE LOANS 

448 So. Hill MI-6215 




(NOTE: This colomo is edited by J. Callea Fentress and is sponsored by the Los Angeles branch of 
the Urbaa League. It is designed to bring to the at tention of the public the work of specialists in 
rarioos fields of endavor who so far hare escaped t he notice of Uie joa-conacloos. Contribntioas are 
solicited. Write in care of Loa Angeles Urban League, 2502 So. Central Avenue.) 

Sketch Subject: J6AN JOHNSON WILtIS— Tailoress. 

Br DOROTHI PRESTON 



At an age when most young people are still wondering what to do for a liv- 
li^tTwhTO'i^reaiize(r'that''th«» '"9/ Jcwn Johnson Willis has already established herself as a successful business 
we! my children whom I had I womon. She's only 21 now, and has been in business since she was 18! 

despaired, of ever seeing again. _ , ' 

The |oy of knowing I had beep 1 Such an extraordinary record 
placeti here because thev want->d ! ^* attributes to deciding when 
m? itos permeated all of my ex- 1 1"i*« young what she wanted t 


■pmcaces. I have endured tne | ^° —then directing all her,ener- 
best of summer, the pouring f ^*« toward that endv 

^ ^T^^n J ™v ^,Y,^ Th'!v<=*"^ that youthful decision, "My 
3^ has Med my bemg.-The/j^„^ .. j^ .. ^ •'_ 

^ro.,W „^v'".^m^1!■H T^'rr k^ke^- Naturally I had a child* 
£2^ -^^..fhnntn^^twmnJ^^^^al curiosity about her work. 
■*?!!?■ ^°"8^ "° f " 5°<:k-moss , Her method of answering my 
S^"2^ "^L V^Jli'^J'Z ! <l"e«ti<»« was to teach me hoZ 

«de«. So the vicissitudes of Ufa | S|„'-|^ ^Jj^Y ^^<=^«'- 


kind of sewing course the school , ing with her. Most of her own 
offered. That her abilities werk ! time is devoted to tailoring. Joan 
not limited solely to her chosen > Willis does not confine herself 
vocation is shown by the fact that - to making feminine "garments, 
she was chosen valedictorian of ' and can maki^^a• man's suit as ea:;- 


■re icade seetp less harsh by 
these reminders of the old sur- 
Toundincs. 

I will never forget the day on 
which the hotise-hold furnishings 
•rnred. Massive four-poster 
beds. hu(e wardrobes, marble 
topped cabinets, trunks, and box- 
«a. — every conc^vable thing was 
carried in over my back. 
^ At ru^ht fall, when all was 
K^..^ quiet wiihin the house. I relax- 
ed, so "utterty wearied that it 
■etiiied impossible to rest* TVas 
than the sympathy of my friends, 
Oe Oak Door, and the Brws- 


^^ 


girl in our neighborhood. Mother 
was a most particular craftsman, 
and she saw to it that my doll 
dbthes were not only finished 
perfectly but fitted as well," Joan 
Willis will tell you quite s^riou^- 
ly that once she dlscovCTed her 
skill at making clothes — doll 
clothes 'though they were — she 
decided then and there that was 
what she wanted to Jo. 

When she entered high scfaool 
Joan Wdiis decided to major Ja 
domestic icience, so that she 

sf^imaimiimmkt tak« •my. 


her class. 

From Clabume, Texas, her 
home-town, Joan Willis, after 
finishing high school in 1933, 
came to Los Angeles. Having de- 
cided that the care and upkeep of 


ily as a girlfs skirt. 

Work with the ., Business afitf 
Professional Qirls Club aX the 
Y. W. C. A. She credlte with hav- 
ing broadened her viesiKpoint and 
stimulated her ambiitibiis. She 


clothing are. as important as the ^^as the c|ub's secretary far 


making of it she enrolled m 
classes in spotting and pressing, 
as well as dressmaking and de- 
signing at Frank Wiggins Trade 
SchpoL She studied tliere for a 
year; and a half, at the same 
time earning money by dress- 
making at home. 

Just as definitely as she had 
determined what to do, J»an 
Wdiis resolved how. it should tie 
done. Characteristicaay. her de- 
cision to esUblish her own bus- 
iness was acted upon quickly. 

At her cleaning and favoring 
shop on SotiOi Central Avenue, 
4ie now te three pthen mqtk- 


three years and is now vice-pres- 
ident. She has never really step- 
ped studying Even now, she Hs 
a student at Trank Wigins Xrau 
SchooL No new process in the 
tailoring or cleaning industry wi'i 
be introduced without Joan Will- 
is knowing something about .iti 

"Clothes" ' says Joan Willis, 
"are a necessity. As tong as peo- 
ple muat wea|r them there 4rill be 
a . need for someone to 1 make 
them, keep them clean and in re- 
pair. If you have ability for sew- 
mg and designing then you dn't 
go far wrong by preparing your- 
self to lit into 'the dothiof id 
durtou' 


^\ 


i '.l:^ n^j^t^^-^, 



Prices o» ANGELUS FUNERAL 
HOME are graduated to meet the 
needs of any family. 

« 

Whether the means be ample, or tx-, 
tremely limited, here will be found 
perfectly appointed services at prices 
exactly in keeping with circum- 
stances. . 
♦ \ 

Whatever the expenditure, eirefy 
fomiiy moy be assured that at 
ANGELUS FUNERAL HOME there is 
but one standard of service — the 
finest it is possible to render. p 


ANGELUS 


FUNEBMf, BOMB 

I1O3O EAST JEFFERSON tLVDt 


PHONE -ADAMS 5189 


KFOX 

Siuday Manlnc 


f 


'&tJi^ 


thMmik 





2--B 



JT^-fivSwp-'' 




-(■■'■P^^4?t=?^''''.''-^:=^'- 


If You Fail To Read THE CALIFORNIA EAGtE You May Never Know' It Happcne'd 1 

- . -■ - , - .- -— I ■■ ^.Mi^ ■ iw - I I 111 ■■*■ n ■ I I. J — ^ « ■■ .- -. ■ ■■ , ■— ...... — . - -..-■ I I 


t^l^'lll^l.' T ^"^^ 


k1RE VIEWS 

^ I !fv- . ,j f,y John Kinlock^ 


Alpha Bowlint club hit t "bull 
ejre" with their affair Saturday 
at the Clab Alabam. This pro- 
gressive youni; orgranuation is 
r to be congratulated for an even- 
ing of swell fun. Selection of the 
• ""Covan Kid" for entertainment 
was truly laspired. 

"Gt course, you've got to con- 

'lider they're just kids!" This, 

J friends, is the statement all re- 

. view'ers merrtally review when 

i reviewing a Kiddies Revue 'pun;. 

g The performance of the "Covan 

Kids" Saturday eve ?: the Cluh 

AlabarA knocked any suchlike 

qualifications into the ash-can. 

ChiWren or no children — those 

J - are real performers. 

1 The ensemble numbers partic- 
, ularly reflected the training 
"i which has been jgiven them by 
. -i' 'i.iAT. and Mrs. Willie Covan. There 
'S is a precision and a snap to their 
'i Work lacking in rtiany other kid 
i» |hows. Notable ainonj their at- 
": ttibutes is a complete naturalness; 
^ an ease m presentation, 
t Among the memorable choru.-; i 
IZntuobers was a rhnmoa dar.Le in 
^_ which the minors turned out js 
^"<ompetent a piece of hip-ila gir.3 : 
1' as you'U see this seiton. 

The unii'jom exce'.rnce of tne 
wliole sho\» makes ne selection 
cf highlights a rather ei-^barrass- 
ing affiir. But, as with r.li shows ' 
there were stand-out:?. The un- 
doubted sensation of the ev?iiirg I 
was little Joe Anderson, a seas- 
oned show-topper. His rendition ' 
of "Shoe Shine Boy" is a nioru- 
raent to his talents — or sone- 
thing. At any rate, we'll w3?,,;r 
he'll have a long time living it 
down. Theisoulful rolling of eyts 
as he voiced the plaintive mel- 
ody unloosed a shower of coin 
that bounced all over, nearly sub- 
merged, the Alabam dance floor. 
Like Cantor's "If you Knew Ida" 
or JoLson's "Mammy", Joe 
-has got himself something in 
"Shoe Shine Boy". 

Little Donald Brown wliacked 
several bull's-eyes in his presen- 
tation of "Music Maestro Please". 
The kid, microscopic diagonally, 
baosLs a decided bulge about the 
jnidriff. He also boasts a person- 
ality usually described by press 
agents as' "million doyyar '. Come 
to think of it, his singing would- 
•3L. n't set Rome afire and his danc- 
g Ing is several notches below sen- 
aational. B.ut, oh nry, can he put 
~ over a song! Little Donald des- 
XZ «A'es a Master of Arts m Suzy 
rc: Q, by the way. 


J 


Sunday at 
Sill Robinson 



ThurtiJay, Noywl»»r 3^ 1938 


Arden and Ann Sheridan. They all 

appear in John M. Stahl's "Letter 

Of Introduction." 


Fist Fight in 'Gang Smashers' 
Likened to One in 'Spoilers' 


Alberta Hunter 
Returns to U. S. 

NEW YORK. Nov. 3, (ANP)— , 
Miss Alberta Hunter arrived in i Players stage a bitter give and 


At last a rough and tumble 
hand to hand battle equal to the 
famous one of the "Spoilers" 
twenty years ago, will be seen in 
Million Dollar Production's "Gang 
Smashers", which opens at the 
Million Dollar Theatre on Nov.. 
18. Discussion of that fight in 
the old silent film has ever since 
been stamped as the most realis- 
tic ever participated in by two 
screen actors, and ever so often 
it serves as a topic of an article 
by a theatrical writer. Wm. Far- 
num and Tom Santchi were the 
combatants io "The Spoilers", a 
Kolon Campbell lumber camp 
story made in an office set on 
the old Selig lot. The office W3.s 
wrecked and the two men bad'y 
hurt and bruised during the me- 
lee. 

Lawrence Criner as "Gat Dal- 
ton" murderous gang leader and 
Monte Hawley as "Lefty" are 
the battlers in "Gang Sma.shers" 
modern all-colored cast Class-A 
melodrama of big city racket- 
eers. From the time they land 
from a bandit car that crashed 
over the side of a hill in the fin- 
al climax of the story until it is 
over, the two former Lafayette 


New "^ork aboard the lie De 
France Wednesday and will re- 
main in this country indefinitely. 
She concluded an engagement at 
Fred Payne's Artists club in Par 
is just before sailing for America, 


take scrap that sets the nerves of 
the spectators on edge. Rolling, 
and l|imbling among the rocks 
and shrubbery, their fists thud- 
ding against the face and body 
with real blows, first one, then 



11 


her trip being hastened by news ■ the other is downed with stagger- 
ing punches. Both admitted later 
that they forgot to act, so the 
realism asked for by directors 
Leo G. Popkin, was certainly giv- 
en. It tok several days rest and 
medical treatment to repair the 
damage done the two "Killers' 
to each other. Incidentally they 
had refused the services of two 
wtiite professional stunt men who 
double for major studio stars in 
fight scenes, so supervisor Ail 
Brooks had to tell the doubles 
to remove their makeup and go 
home. One had been disguised ar 
Criner, the other as Hawley. 


that her mother's home had been 
visited by burglars three times 
recently. 

Mi^ Hunter described vividly 
her experiences during the recent 
war scare in France, pointing out 
that at least from the standpoint 
of gas masks that country was un- 
prepared for war. She said i: 
was impossible to secure a gas 
mask for love or money although 
It was reported that huge sums 
have been appropriated to the 
defense ministry for th&ir devel- 
opment. 

Robinson Heads 
Benefit Body 


SHIRLEY TEMPLE 

AT ROSEBUD 
Sun., Mon., Tuec. 

MRS. SHORES FETES 
BRIDE-TO-BE 

One of the sm.artest October 
affairs on the social calendar 
was the luncheon given last Sat- 
urday by Mrs. W. H. chores aii- 


Johnson Protege 
Well Received 

A spontaneous and resounding 
burst of applause that lasted 
fully five minutes after his final 
encore rendition and recalled him 
for two bows let Charles Holl- 
and, tenor, and protege of Hall 
Johnson, know just how thor- 
oughly he captivated Los Angels 
music lovers and patrons Tues- 
day evening in his initial recital 
in the People's Independent 
Church of Christ, 18th and Palo- 
ma Streets. 

Young Holland who was pres- 
end by Mr. Johnson who first 
discovered him four years "ago 
when he was ' a vocalist with 
Fletcher Henderson's band comes 
from New York and is identified 
with the famous Hall Johnson 
chorus. His program, arranged by 
Hall Johnson, himself, revealed a 
flexible tenor voice that lent its- 
elf to difficult compositions of 
Franz ("Im Herbst") and Brahni.? 
with as much ease as to Quil- 
ter's "It was a Lover and H's j 
Lass": that swept unwaveringly | 
from the pathos demanded by the 
Spirituals to the verve of Cole- 
ridge-Taylor's "Onaway! Awake, 
Beloved!" from Hiawatha and 
through Cadman's "The Moon 
Drops Low" with dramatic ver- 
satility, j 

Encores answered the applause ' 
at the end of each group, the fin- 
al number being a requested one, 
Hanley's immortal "Invictus". 
Mr. Holland was accompanied by 
Mrs. Robert V. Edwards, young 
pianist, who has already dis- 
tinguished herself in Los Angeles 
music circles. 

Mr. Holland's program follows: 
I — Lascia ch'io pianga (from Ri',- 
aldo), Handel; Se tu m'ami, Pe 
golesi: "I Attempt from Love's 
Sickness to Fly", Purcell: "It 
was a Lover and His Lass", Quil 


Sweepstakes Winners Ho&t 
Party to 'Run, Little Chilliin' 


First choice of entertainment^ 
by Mrs. Josie I,ewellyn and The- 
odore Edwards, after winning 
the Irish Sweepstakes grand 
prize was "Run, Little Chillun" 
the outstanding FTP hit at the 
Mayan theatre. 

The couple hosted a party of 
eight at the Sunday night per- 
formance of the sensational Ne- 
gro folk drama. Guests were: M-. 
and Mrs. Wheeler Johnson. Tani- 
azine James and Mr. and Mrs. 
Ruben Scott, and Mrs. Baron 
Lawson. 

Before seeing the show, the 
lucky couple visited the green 
room of the Mayan and were in- 
troduced to the players that have 
made "Rup, Little ChUlun" the 
town's taBc for 16 smashing 
weeks. 


end position. They were biade 
on passes from Washington! and 
Fenenbock. 

To the accompaniment \ of 
cheers from Bruin student rilpt- 
ers the squad of thirty-six plov- 
ers departed from Central St*- 
tion at eight p. m. last nighV- 
They are expected to arrive ih 
Pullman, the town which housek 
the Cougars, Friday morning ancJJ 
will leave for home shortly aftenj 
the game Saturday night. 1 


Telephone: CEntury 21445 

KULLMANN 

Iron fir Wlr*^ 

Works 

1260'- E. 57th Street 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Manufacturers of Bank, Store 

and Office Fixtures 

Interior and Exterior Stair 

Railings. Folding Gates 

Wire and Flat Iron Screens 

Fences, Etc. 

BURGLAR GUARDS 



Bruins Leave 
for Pullman 

Possibility that Woodrow 
Strode, Bruin right end, might 
be shifted to left end in the game 
this Saturday against Washing- 
ton State at Pallman. and this i 
get in on U. C. L. A.'s .scoring 
plays was seen after practice .=oss- 
ions Tuesday. 

Two of the Bruin Varsity's .=ix 
touchdowns, scored against the 
"goof" squad, were taken over 
by Strode, playing at the left 


BIGGER- BETTER 



^MMENa^WOMEN 

^ You're never out of work— you've alwaya 
*^ gt)t a big-paying job as\ a Lucky Heart 
Agent. Just Show Lucky Heart's big guar- 
anteed line of cosmetics, medicines, flavor- 
ings, curios to everyone. \\'atch them buy. 
Lots of men and women w^o come with us 
make up to $5 a day spi-e time — $45 a 
week full time. Vou can do the 'same. Work 
when vou feel like it We show you how — 
we guarantee your success. \It's easy — but ^ 
the main thing is to get started— today- 
right now; Write for your FREE SELLING j 
PLAN. BIG SAMPLE CASE FflEE of extra, 
cost and FREE SAMPLES We'll rush^ 
Everything by return mail — ge^ you started 
at once on this big money-msifting proposi- 
tion. Send name and address to Lucky 
Heart Co., Dept..„_ ...., Memphis, Tenn. 



the' betrothal' of her; **""• "— "^ Stood on de Ribber ob 


NEW YORK, Nov. 3— With Bill 
Robinson as honorary chairman 


3p 'Tm gonna lock my heart and 
Jfc throw away the keyl" held Phyl- 
5 is Grace, little Italian, songstress, 

~.z as she knocked the cash custom- s in charge, plans fof the midwint 

.^ ers flat in the aisles (of cour.se er benefit of the Negro Actors 

^ there are no aisles in the Club! Guild of America, Inc., were 

':5 Alabam, but still it makes a njce launched this week. The Benefit 

:S expression*. Grace proved her- i will take place December 11 at 

~ self an expert show-stealer as the 46th Street Theatre, scene of 

•5 »he wat-bled all about her deter- ' the current hit "Hellzapoppin". 

M mihation to avoid the grand pass- Working with Robinson as co- 

i' ipn. Maybe it was the glint in 

L . he* eye, but she added .something 

"tolhe stock wiggling of curls. 

. - ' ^ Others whose efforts met with 

a high approval included Norma 

^e Winston- "Don t Be That 

Way"; Eloise Witherspoon. "Small 

Fry": Margaret Brown, "Rock it 

For Me": and Bobbie Jean Chad- 

2 wick, "Saving Myself For You". 

f Then there was an item bv the 

; IKiestro himself — Willy Covan. 

■y The guy what hinted brother 

V Covan ain't what he used to be 


Other members of the cast sup 
porting the star, Nina Mae Mc- i 
Kinney are Reginald Fenderson, 
Edward Thompson, Mantan ; 
Moreland, 'Vernon McCalia and I 
others, , 1 


chairman of the benefit will be 
top-flight stars of all branches 
of the entertainment field, includ- 
ed among them: Bing Crosby, 
Paul Robeson, 'Vinton Freedley, 
Paul Whiteman, Ethel Waters, 


^ctor and^,ewis 
Jitterbirg Victors 


La Veg^e Ector and Simon 

Lewis^Von first prize by popu- 

ice in last Friday night'3 

g contest pt the Rose- 


nouncing 

daughter, Marjone. to Henry 

Feltenberg on December 17th, 

Huge boquets of fall flowers 
were chosen fo>- the living room., 
The luncheon Kable carried the 
bridal motif ui^der the soft glow 
of candle lighted tapers. Those 
bidden were: Misses Edith and 
Gwen Jones, Elizabetl\ and Helen 
Mills, Anna Rosa Bfoyles. Nan- 
cy Harris, Emily Mason, Eleanrr 
Ram.sey. Mmes. Chancey Curi^/, 
Edward Atkinson. Louis Shores, 
John Edward Atkin.son, E. A. 
Feltenberg, Fannie Robinson. Jes- 
sie Hurst. Robert Beverly, J. C. 

I Wright, L. V. Wells, Miss Ivrf 
Washington and Mrs. Mae Mitch 
ell. 

I The afternoon was spent 1 t 

I games. Many pre-nuptial affaii-.t 
are being planned to honor MisJ 

, Shores. 


Jordan", arranged by Burleigh; 
"Jesus. Lay Yo Hand in de Win- 
der." H. John.son: 'Talk about n 
Chile dat do Love Jesus," Daw- 
.son; and "Hpnor! Honor'". H. 
Johnson: III — "Im Herbst", Franz: 
"Am Sonntag Morgen". Brahms: 
"Faeden", Erich Wolff; "Zuei^- 
nung." R. Strauss. IV— Onawa.v ! 
Awake. Beloved!" (from Hiaw.i- 
tha and "Thou Art". Coleridgo- 
I'aylor; "Blue are her Eyes", 
Watts: and "The Moon Drops 
Low". Cadman. 

Approximately four hundred 
persons attended the recital and 
approved with applause Ha 
Johnson's comment at the inter- 
mission: "The time has lonR 
since passed that art has any 
complexion." — H. F. C. 


lar c 
Jitte 


isiv 
cj^ic 
'#ug 


Tyrone Power. Noble Sissle and ^ ^^'T^'Tr''- ^-^""'^ P"" '^*"' 

ij(fc Madeline 


Jimmy Lunceford. 


Prince and Bill 


Proceeds from the benefifeJKitff '^^^""y ^J)° P«>ved themselves 
be applied to contuyiati^iSof the I '^*^^ Jitterbug dancers, 
welfare aryt~''cultural work 


among a^tftfs, musicians and per- 
formed in general whicfi the 
Giuitf has carried on since its in- 


should climb back under lhat-'«P?T'^eptioni ten months ago. 
s^one. . The High-*aj(Mft-^ot Tap i 
stfll reigns. ..^T I 

If you hayft"Deen very obser- j 
,.J?^^'-^^n~'wiU have percieved 
that your reviewer liked the 
show. If you have good sense, i 
you will make a special effort to 
catch the Covan Kids at the next 
exhibition. 


Copra Lauds 
Alfred Grant 


prize was copped by 
William* and Jimmy 


Third 

Olivine 

Wright. 

This contest was the second in 
a series which is being shov/n 
every Friday night. All winners 
of 1st and 2nd prize will com- 
pete for one grand prize and the 
Eastside Jitterbug championship 
which will be held soon on the 
stage of the Rosebud theatre. 


MOX 

Wrecking Co. 

33 RD fir MAPLE 

ALL KINDS OF 
NEW & USED 

Building Material 
At Cheap Prices 


■ 


^ 




ft 


Fomed Stars 
to Fete Handy 
on Birthday I 

• NEW YORK, Nov. 3. (ANPj— A 
galaxy of mu?icj»l stars will gath- ] 
er at Carnegie hall on Nov. 21 
to help celebrate the 65th birth- 
day of William C. Handy, dean 
of jazi composers, who has to hi? 
credit such timeless tunes as. 
•The St. Louis Blues", "Birth of 
the Blues". 

The program of the William C. 
Handy Birthday concert, under 
the personal direction of Mr. 
Handy, will include^ suoh top- 
flight stars as Cab Caffoway, Fa4s 
Waller, Teddy Wilson and Lionel 
Hampton of the Benny Goodman 
band, and a number of groups, 
including William Lawrence and 
his Negro Art Singers, Andrew 
Dorsey's Negro chorus of 100 
voices, and Minto Cato and hr-r 
quartet. 

At Mr. Handy's wish, the pro- 
ceeds of the concert will be turn- 
ed over to the Spanish Children's 
Milk fund. 


Hollywood's ace director, Frank 
Capi-a. of Columbia Studios, ac- 
claimed the performance of Al- 
fred Grant, who appears in a 
starring role in "Run. Little 
Chillun." FTP Negro folk dram.\ 
at the Mayan, "one of the best 
of any young male actors on the 
stage today," according to a re- 
port made this week by Clar- . 

ence Muse, director of "Run, Lit- ' the AKA sorority play, 
tie Chillun". 

Capra was among a host o 
Hollywood celebrities attending 
the show this week, which in- 
cluded Charles Chaplin. Irene 
Dunn. Ralph Grave.s. Webber and 
Fields, John McCormick, Edward 


Arnold and Amos 'N Andy. 

Young Grant made his sta:<e 
debut as a leading character in 

'Smai t 
Women." which showed at the 
Lincoln Theatre several yesrs 
ago. 


Health Service 

Free Consultation 

DR. URBACH'S 

D. C. CLINIC and SCHOOL 

Internal BalhS--_75c and $1.00 
Electrical Treatments 150 & $1 
Phones DR--9466; MA-4893 
604 South Rampart Boulevard 
Branch 346 S. Spring St. 


WE PAY 
THE MOST 

FOR 

WATCHES 

JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS 

GOLD TEETH 

STERLING SILVER 

NATIONAL 
Gold Refiners 

4TH FLOOR 
Loew's State BIdg. 

Seventh and Broadway 

AND 

600 S. Spring 

GROUND FLOOR 



I KEEP THIS DATE | 

I Tuesday, November 8th. 8:30 p. m. 

■* The Choir of Second Baptist Church will Present 

I ERNESTINE JONES - WADE 

-* Soprano -:- in Concert 

Jester Hairston, Reader Lucille BlarchctUi, Accompanist 






in the Church Auaitorium 
24th Street at Griffith 

ADMISSION: 25c 


>-r»s***S(**3«'S<jKjxrjr#S'^S'*-«-^«'^s.^?^.*^?-# .»-? j5jr*-?.v.j**s-#*?<**ai 


ALL - STAR MUSICALE 

Benefit of Tuberculosis Rest Home 
AT 

Patriotic Auditorium - 1816 South FIgueroa 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6 at 3 :30 P. M. 

—.ARTISTS- 
FLORENCE COLE-T.-VLBERT - Soprano 
VICTORIA RICE, Violinist - FLORENCE CADREZ. Pianist 
JAMES MILLER, Tenor - HALL JOHNSON CHOIR 
Sponsored by the Outdoor Life and Health Association 
Auxiliary No. 1 
Dr. Leonard B. .Stovall. President 
Mrs. Carolyn>l\ Rivers, President of .^ux. No. 1 
AD.MISSION: Reserve^ Seats - 'ISc Gen. Adm - 50c 


FOR SALE SACRIFICE I ' 

ATTENTION 

6 rm. Westside lot 50x135 
$3«<W, $60« da. 

2 houses 5 and 3 rooms 
$1850, SSMdii. 

3 houses West of Central 
good shap8 -.-$3000, $600 dn. 

8 rnis. double, just like new 
$5000, $500 dn, 

2 vacant lots en W. 36th 
Street. CHEAP. 

H. A. HOWARD 

REAL ESTATE 

3208 S. Central Aveaue I 

AD-9719 6544 


For The Discriminating— 

DUNBAR 

COCKTAIL 

LOUNGE 


An Informal Atmosphere Enhanced by Superb 

Cocktails — Finest Liquors — Deluxe Dinners. 

Your Cordial Host— HARRY SPATES 

4227 So. Central ADams 4201 


Savoy Theatre 

SUN., MON., TUBS. 


'The Dead End Kids" 

IN 

'LITTLE TOUGH GUY' 

ALSO 

HAROLD LLOYD 

IN 

"PROFESSOR 
BEWARE" 


$30 A WEEK 

-IN THE MARCH OF TIME. 


CARTOON, NEWS, COMEDY 


THE.^TRE 


CASINO 


1605 E. Vernon 


AD-13751 


FRI., SAT. NOV. 4, 5 

RICHARD DIX 

"BLfND ALIBI" 

BARTON MAC LANE, 
GLENDA FARRELL 

"PRISON BREAK" 
$50 FREE SAT. NITE 

Sun., Mon., Tues., Nov. 6, 7, 8 
THE "DEAD END" KIDS in 

"LITTLE TOUGH GUY" 

JOE PENNER in 

"I'M FRO M THE CITY" 

Wed., Thurs., Nov. 9, 10 

ANNA M.AE WONG 

MARGARET LINDSAY 

"When Were You Born" 

GRIFFITH JONES in 

"WIFE OF GEN. LING" 

ALSO 
Comedy, Cartoon, Novelty 

$50 FREE WED. NITE 


OFFICE OPENS 

WEEKDAYS 6i20 

Sat.-Sun. Ii20 


BILL 


4319 SOUTH 
CENTR.AL AVE. 

Tel. AD-7367 


Robinson 


4 DAYS Sforts Sundo^^ Nov. 6th- 


DAYS 



mmmi 




ADOLPHE MENJOD 

ANDREA LEEDS 

EDGAR BERGEN iDd 

"EBARLIE McCARTHY- 

CEORCE MURPHY _x , -nv*^ >i. 

fchJOffliSOKinSHEIlHUII ™»S - - ~tV^>\ 

Uhtsa.im^ama Ricrt.\RD cromwell 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, November 1 0, 1 1 , 1 
"FATHER DEVINE'S HARLEM HEAVEN" 
In The Latest March Of Time 


•RACKET BUSTERS" 
With Humphrey Bogsui 

Continuous Matinee Friday 
Armistice Day from 1:20 P. M. 


"10th AVE. KIDS" 
With Bruce Cabot 


500 GIANT KENO 

Tues., Thurs., Sat. 


► ' 


• Psycho^A, 
Astro ^ 


J. C. Amwine, Astra Psycho. 
Counselor and advisor. If you 
are worried over business trou- 
bles, love affairs or worries of 
other kinds. Unsuccessful, dis- 
couraged, despondent and feel 
everything is against you.— 
Write J. C. Arawlae, Box 362, 
BrealuuB, Texas. 


f 


FIRE 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION 

SOON TO BE ISSUED 
BY 

Rev. Clayton D. Russell 

Send your riQme now to the California Eagle 
or People's Independent Giurch of Christ, if 
you want to b among the first subscribers, or 
Telephone PR--84 14. 

The Flames of "FIRE" will glow en Racial, 
Rcligieus, Community, Notionol and intir- 
notional Affairs. 


•laaRVB 


VISIT 

Charlie s Cafe 

For The 

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Best Chinese Food on The Avenue 

Americon Dishes on Order 

Specializing in Fresh Shrimps Served any Style 
Soft Drinks ■ ' 

Open n A. M— 1 A. M. 
ADoms 9084 


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l*. 


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Los Angeles, Calif. 

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TELEPHONE TU-8908 


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ADULTS 2 
Children 10c 


PR5759 


Sandav, Monday, Tuesday. Show starts Sun. ijt 1 P. M. Not. 6, 

2 BIG HITS 



'^ ., fn Vclvvn Fl.nrnre — 

DOUGLAS RICE 

Claire Dodd ■ Sheppff ri i 
\mtcV. • lours Catbern ■ Hm ' 
leton - DouKl^s Oumtnllr 


PLAY KENO— Wednesday, Thursday, Sofiirdoy 


^^*#*!^544Au; 




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■^■^■^ ilr^lVIVIiJ TESTIMONY IN COURT IN CRIMMINAL OR MARITAL CASES 

World Wide Service — So why remain in doubt. Let him help you. Family or business troubles. Let Ua 
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-'3dS'se»i ■ 



m-j'Sr-*:;^ 





Holiai\(j,yenerson, Bell 
Star in Weekend Gomes 


DOWN IN 
FRONli* 




^ i^ 




By ALMENA J)AVIS 

(Y»ur Mondiv ll»rnlni -flinrtwbaok) 

A little Of the teaim spirit, 
.exhibited last Saturday after- 
noon, a~bit. earlier in the season 
and UCLA could have been a 
Conlerenc- championship foot- 1 umbia, 

ball tejani. At least, so says I, aft- j crowd of 35,000. In Evianston, U 
er witnessing the Bruins' 6-0 : linois' Oyche Staduim, Nprth- 
tommybawking of t h e Stanford , western toppled Minnesota, reign- 
iodians on the Coliseum Happy | ing power of the Western Confer- 
Hunting Ground. I ence, 6-3. 

The Great American Press ap- Holland, pointing for a second 


' The end sweeps of Brud Holl- 
and, Cornell Univeilsity's AU- 
Amterican end, and the off-tackle 
ripping of Bernard Jefferson, 
Northwestem^s powerful back, 
were responsible for the victor- 
ies of their respective teams over 
major opponents last Saturday 
At the same time Horace Bell 
aided Minnesota in somewhat 
stemming the ferocity of their op- 
ponents. 

On New York City's Baker 

Field, Cornell overpowered Col* 

23-7, before a record 



parently lies at the bottom of 
the Bruins' fitful showing pre- 
vious to Saturday. For, soured by 


honor team selection, was every- 
where, snaring passes on the of- 
fensive, intercepting them on *he 


the inconsistency of the Stars, of : defensive, tackling and blocking. 


Westwood, the Press, in the past 
two weeks,' has subsided notice- 
ably from singing paens of 
praise of individuals. Thus Kenny 
Washington, Chuck Fenenbock 
and Hal HiBShon, not yieing with 
each other in collecting press 
clippings, the remainder of the 
team got in on the ball game. 

Heretofore, it - was a familiar 
sight to see the greater part of 
the Bruin team, once a play v/as 
put in motion, squattifag on its 
respective haunches, watching 
Kenny, whom the daily papers 
had vowed "could .win the game 
by virtue of his own brilliance'' 
running interference for h i m- 
self, doing his own blocking, mak- 
ing his own holes, as the lingo 
goes. Maybe the boys wanted to 
see how it looked, and it took 
them two snubs from Conference 
brothers to gander that it didn't 
look so hot. 

One had to be a careful ob- 
sei^^'er to see that the above-men- 
tioned lads, especially Kenhy 
plus Woodrow Strode, were just 
as brilliant against Stanford, as 
in preceding games. The differ- 
ence lay in that they were not 
as spectacular. 


On his specialty, the end-arouno 
I he carried the ball eleven itmes, 
' averaging 2.5 yards on each try. 

LONE TOUCHDOWN 

Jefferson, at right half for 
Northwestern, running behind 
excellent interference, was re- 
sponsible for the lone touchdown 
of the tigerishly-fought Minneso- 
ta-Wildcat game. The score did 
not come until the last quarter. 
The" ball had been carried in , 
crashipg plays to the' Gopher 8 
yard line whei Jefferson, 185 
pounds of T. N. T., ripped thru 
left tackle, running with the 
speed that made him a great prep ; 
basketball and track star and j 
blasted over the goal line with 
three tacklers hanging on him. 

In addition he held down the 
punting duties, dueling for sup- 
remacy in that capacity with Hor- 1 
ace Bell, Akron, Ohio guard, res- 
poiisible f o"- the greater portion 
of Minnesota's place kicks for the 
past two seasons. Minnesota's sole 
score came "n a field goal kicked 
by the educated toe of Bell, only 
Niegro in the Gopher line-up. 

195 pounds of sterling defense, 
it was Bell's play at the left 



50,000 CK«er JoeliRo|>ih$on 
• " ' Rose ioWl Win 


in 

Pasadena's famous Rose Bov/1^ 
held its greatest football throng 
iir all Junior College! gridiron 
history last Friday night, October 
28th, when an estimated 50,000 
fans wildly cheered the sensation- 
al playing of an unobtrusive 
youth— Jackie Robinson — Pasar 
dena Junior College's astonishing 
back. Robinson made an historic^ 
al showing before a ci^owd that 
set a new high in national junior 
collegiate attendance records, 
gathered to witness l!he PJC- 
Compton JC fight toward the 
Southern California junior college 
championship. 

Compton J. C.'s heoric Tartars 
were definitely no match for the 
Pasadena eleven— Jackie Robin- 
son being directly responsible 
for all of Pasadena's points;— 
making fourteen himself and 
passing to Red Robinsori to make 
the remaining six poinljs. 

Robinson started his (team off 
on their 20-7 win by taking 



Tommy MilM, L A.^ Youth, n 
F%oiy OS Xovi^ Ties Aiobdm] 


NJEW; -ORLEANS, La. Nov.. .aifc-JfStaters who thes spc^ted 15 


In a spectacular gazne» th 
'Bama State Hornets of Mon 
gomery. Ala. held the powerCui'^ 
Xavier University Gold Rush of' 


it* 


Griojs on Woy 
fdrTHts 


guard 


Washington, considering t h e «"?,'" position that prevented 
opposition, looked better than he Jf«erson breaking loose on one 


did against the Idaho eleven 


I of his power drives earlier in the 


. when he outshined the sun. He 
gained 104 yards on 23 plays, I 
four to five times more than! 
anyone else on the field. His ball ' 
carrying and tackling was as in- 
spired as ever, but he shared 
the "by-line" (as we say in the ' 
newspaper game » with B u s | 
Sutherland, fullback, and with ' 
the Bruin forward line, sparked 
by Center John Ryland. 

Strode played three fourths of 
the game, during which he did 
not once handle the ball, and 
was in on the actual play that 

^brought down the ball carrier 
but twice. Nevertheless, he was 
easUy the outstanding defensive 
player on the field. 


game. 


\ 


HonkPlonsto 
Resume Go- 
o-Mo. Policy 


B-U-L-L-E-T-IN 
NEW YORK, Nov. 3,— The 
first title defense of Hustlin' 
Hank Armstrong, winner of 
three world championships and 
present holder of two was post- 
poned here Tuesday evening. 
On the eve of the welterweii^ht 
defease against Ceferino Gar- 
cia. 

The second serious injury 
suffered by Armstrong during: 
his fight career was given as 
the reason for the delay. In 
trainmg sessions early I'ues- 
day aitemoen, tbe cbampion 
slipped twice u1ien padding 
on the. floor was moved out of 
position, and severly injured 
his back. 

KTforts are being made to 
set the Gareia-Armstrong go 
for Nov. 25th. 


I don't suppose it matters but | 
I have a quarrel with the coach- ] 
ing department of UCLA in the 
matter of concentrating Strode 
on defense. 

While . sitting in the Jeff Hi 
bleachers last Friday afternoon, 
I overheard a fan likening Joe 
Black, present end-wonder. of the 
Democrats, to Strode in his prep 
hey-day. Anyorft, who has fol- 
lowed prep football within the 
past four years recalls Strode's 
scintillating performances on 
those end-around plays. 

The big boy has always played 
at end. He is, of course, a "natur- 
al" for that position. As Maxwell 
Stilas, who got it from another 
writer, said: "He haunts his end 
like a departed spirit", taking 
out fotir men on one play, jf 
9eed b?. 

-But wh|t the brain men at 
Westwood seem to have forgot- 
ten is that he can snag passes 
and run. 

On Washington's 27-yard run 
Saturday, which came about be- 
cause, when he faded back to 
pass, he failed to see in the clear 
either of the men to whom he 
had been instructed to "shoot 
the licker", Strode was as clear 
M a baby's breath, so close to 
the Stanford pay-dirt, he could 
have reached out and flicked the 
lime. That has been the case all 
season, with the exception of the 
Iowa game when the passers 
seemed unable to judge, distances 
accurately. ^ 

The answer, of course, is that 
Strode is a decoy. Get it, can you, 
I can't — the mental picture of 
Mr. Strode frisking his lean hips 
about as he coyly entices lumber- 
ing 2^gar and Clark off to green- 
er meadows where the conges- 
tion is considerabfy lessened. 

All the opposition is wise to \ Continuing their march toward 
the play. They seem to know as i championship of the City Play- 


NEW YORK, Nov. 3. (ANP)— 
Dissatisfied because of the fre-, 
quency with which Armstrong 
was hit by sparring partners dur- 
ing early training sessions for de- 
fense of hifi welterweight crown 
against Ceferino Garcia, Man- 
ager* Eddie Meade announced he 
was returning to the fight-a- 
month policy under which little 
Homicide Henry became cham- 
pion in three classes. 

"This fighting every two or 
three months is no good for 
Henry," Meade said. "It's no 
good for me, either. He's getting 
hit too often by those sparring 
partners to suit me. Before Arm- 
strong won those three titles and 
could fight once a week, he didn't 
have to worry about sparring 
partners because he didn't have 
to train. Besides, when you have 
to wait three months for a fight, 
you've got most of the money 
spent before you get it." 

Delta Tau Sigma 
Falls Before Ross 
Snyder Bulldogs 


Fritz Pollaro 
BRILLIANT GRiDDER 

Dispite the" victory of 17-13, 
North Dakota State over the Un- 
iversity of North Dakota last 
Saturday Fritz Pollard, punting- 
passing left half back on the lat- 
ter team, played a brilliant game 
according to reports from the 
Midwest. 

Pollard, a senior, called the 
signals, turned in record punts 
and averaged from eight to nine 
yards on twelve plays in which 
he carried the ball from scrim- 
mage. In addition he did a fine 
job of blocking when called upon. 

Fritz, son of the famed Fritz 
Pollard of Brown University, has 
a record of Hfft-ee punts returned 
for touchdowns this season, one 
of them chalked up Saturday. 

Fans will remember him as a 
member of the '36 Olympic team, 
winner of third place in the hi^l^ 
hurlles at Berlin. Latest new? 
from the North Dakota school 
confirms his election to the Blue 
Key. honorary men's service fra- 
ternity. , 

North Dakota's second colored 
star, senior linesman Horacii 
Johnson, hfriling from Sheridan, 
Wyoming, played a bang-up gams 
for N. D. Last year Johnson was 
awarded the Grand Forks' Her- 
ald Trophy for being the out- 
standing athlete in the North Car- 
olina Intercollegiate Conference, 
having starred in football, playej 
on the varsity basketball tean;, 
and was an individual high win- 
ner in the North Dakota Inter- 
collegiate track and field meet, 
winning first places in the 100 
and 200 yard dashes and the 
broad jump. 


day the Snyders had taken the 
measure of the Los Capistranos 
eleven 20-0. 

The San Pedro Longshoremen 
will be the Snyders' next victims. 
The game will be played at the 
Manchester playground at 2:00 
p. m. 

Under sponsorship of the De- 
partment of Playground and Re- 
creation and under the auspices 
of the Municipal Football asso- 
ciation, the league started Oct. 
23 and the last game will be 
played December 18th. 

Buck Manson, former Wilber- 
force and Southern Loop All- 
American, is coach of the Snyd- 
en. 


Compton captain Berry's kickoff 
on his own 11 yard line and rlic- 
ing up to the 44; the quarter 
ending with an incomplete pass. 
A short gain found Robinson fein- 
ting to pass and making his way 
around his own right end for a 
first down on the Compton 27 
yard line. Jack succeeded in 
bringing the score to a tie. 

An intercepted pass by Jack 
put the ball on Compton's 29 
after running it back 51 yards. 
Robinson netted ten yards on the 
first play to toss a flai pass to 

Red Robinson two plays later 

hence fourteen yards and the 
second tally. 

It was late in the half that Rob- 
inson turned on pandismonium 
with a brilliant 45 yard! end run 
for a touchdown. SUrtinIg for the 
sideline to find himself' hemmed 
in, Jackie raced to the field's 
center and across the gdal; while 


wave after wave of 


s^.ept the crowded stands 


Of interest to sports 


cheering 


fans ev- 


H, U. Truslee 
Board Soves 
Grid Teom 

WASHINGTON,! Nov.' S. (AN 
P) — Howard univiersity's trustee 
board, -meeting here last week, 
^erruled- the board of athletic 
eentrol which banned football 
as a competitive sport ifter this 
year, due to the continued poor' tackle 
showing pf the^ schoolfs grid' 
teams. 

,The trustees acted in accord 
with student : groups, faculty 
members and alumni \|vho pro- 
tested the athletic boaiid's deci- 
sion^ Dr. Mordecai Johnson, presi- 
.dent, was approached on the mat- 
ter and attended the g4me with 
West Virginia which Howard 
won, 6 to 0, to see for himself the 
team's status. i 

A special committee has been 
appointed by Dr. Johnson to in- 
quire iiTto the athletic Situation, 
with a view toward improving 
the setup and putting athletics 
on a more stable basis. tWo years 
aeo the team struck oiver lack 
of equipment, absence of a 
training table and the inadequate 
coaching staff. v. 


DO TOU WANT TO KNOW— 

About your LIFE, [LOVE, 
LUCK? Happiness and Success 
is your birthright! Gelt "Sol- 
oman's Circle" and consult 
when in doubt. Answeris every 
question. 25c complete. P. O. 
Box 6167. Los Angeles. Calif. 


well as the passer that the ball 
is not going in the direction of 
the right end. All I can .say is 
that Strode is a pretty valuable 
piece of timber to carve into a 
wooden duck! 


ground League, the Ross Snyder 
Bulldogs, playground football 
team, handed a 19-7 defeat to the 
Delta Tau Sigma team", last Sun- 
day afternoon at the Snyder 
playground. The previous Sun- 


H 


GUY A. NEWELL & COMPANY 

Body and fender Kelwiring, Wheel Alignment and Frame 

Sttraightening, Refinishing and New Color Creations — All at a 

CompcQtiTe Range of Prices. Come to us for an Estimate. 

AUTO BODY REPADUNGr AND POINTING 
PRospect M17. 31« West 17tb. lios AagilM, Calif. 

WE DO FHIST CLASS WORK FOR FIRST CLA*"* PEOPLE 




f « ■ 


i BRUCE'S 

Diuretic Medicine ri 

llK)R WEAK KIDNEYS AND BLADDtR 

:'i.: fiTOPS--ORTTIN« TIP NIGHTS, BURNING fWNB 
^ AND BACKACHE < 


BRUCE'S DRUG 

• ■ • 

4400 South Central Areiiu^ 

.fBONE: CEiB^urT 2M5* FREE DELIVERS "*, 


JOHN W. KING 
Toilor and Haberdasher 

who has served the public with tailor - made 
clothes at 18th and Central for 20 years has 
moved to 2027 CENTRAL AVENUE in his own 
building. Ttttphon* PR-49S8. 

Here he is gtying a satisfied public the best 
Values and lowest prices, this he is able to do be- 
cause of the reduced overhead. 

He carries a complete line of haberdoshiry. 
His cleaning and pressing service is tinsurpasEed 
for a superior type of work properly and promptly 
done. 


HONotULU, Nov. 3, (Special 
to the "Eagle")— To play at full- 
back on '^hne first string Varsity 
Nolle Smith, the Island's newest 
football sensation, a .gangling 19- i 
year old colored boy, was among t 
23 players for the University of 
Hawaii, who left for the Mainland , 
last Friday where they will take 
o two Western collegiate teams 

Hawaii U's RainBows are schled- 
uled to arrive in Los Angeles on 
November 6 and ; will leave soon 
after for Denver, Cdlorado, where 
they meet the University of Den- 
ver on November 12. After that 
encounter, the . Hawaiians will 
move on Fresno, California -where 
they will take on Fresno State 
college's Bulldogs November !>?. 
..Smith, a soptaraore student 
fresh out of Roosevelt High 
school, is #eu known to the 
Mainland: through his father, 
Nolle Smith, Sr., Honolulu gov- 
ernment employee and member 
of the famed Lions Club, who 
makes frequent trips to the Main- 
land West Coast Cities. 

The 3H)jinggter's reputation as a 
football player, however, did not 
become known until October 7 
when almost singlehandedly be 
spatrked his team to ah 18-6 vic- 
tory over the Kamehameha Alu- 
mni in the inaugural game of 
the season. 

ENTERED IN 3RD QUARTER 

Smith did not enter the game 
until the mid third quarter, sub- 
stituting for a Varsity regular. 
With four niinutes remaining 'o 
play in the third frame and the 
home team trailing 8-6 he com- 
menced to set himself up as 'he 
fastest lad in 1.hese parts. 

Incidentally major league 
^unes are played in cleats and 
not in barefeet, as it is reported 
here, it has been rumored on the 
Only games, cMnparable to those 
played in the playground leagues 
of the Mainland are played in 
barefeet. 

To get back to Mi^Jler Snii.h, 
irrespective of yardage gamed 
snagging passes and throwing 
them, the youth chalked up some 
fifty-two yards on end and off- 
runs. He carried the ball 
over the marker for two touch- 
downs and when the whistle blev» 
ending the game, was threatening 
seriously on the opposition 2- 
yard njarker. 



We have a large stock of used 

Gos Steam Rodiotors 

(replaced by Warmolatprs) 

These Radiators have been ren- 

vated like new and are 

offered HALF PRICE 

at 
Visit show room or ask for 
■ estimator 

Wilioms Radiator Co. 

1M5-1833 Gordonra St. RE. 5125 


Deti-oit Stars 
Pla^ Whit< 
kings SuiK 

With Winter League basi 
fans anxious to ."iee how 
Newton's .Detroit Stars stack yp 
against players of the majcir a: 
minor leagues, bats will be tro! 
ed with <5asey Campbell's Wh 
Kings Suhday at White So 
Park. The game will be a double 
header with the opener at l\30 
p. m. A cohort of crack hurl 
of the Negro National Lea 
including Derricks,' Davis a n 
Young, will be on the firing lim 
against Lindell, Gonzales and 
Schafer. 

In the line-up of the Detroiters 
are Macon. Bill Lane, Fiennoy, 
Dunn, Miller, Basset, J. Davis, 
and O. Lane and the White Kings 
roster Allington, Powers. Mesner. 
Herman McDoiilald, Berkowitz, 
Rehi, McMullen, Lindell and 
Gibbs. 

GIANTS WIN CLOSE 
THRILLER 

The much discussed "Littls 
Civil War" last Sunday between 
the league leading Roy?I Gian*s 
and Detroit was a thriller from 
start to finish with the Giantf: 
copping the first 8-5, and the 
seccKid called in the fifth on ac- 
count of darkness, 3-2. 

The c-ocky (jiants had a real 
scare in the first game w h e ii 
the Detroiiers. grabbing two runs 
in the first stanza, held them 
down 3-1 until the foui'th wh'?n 
a_Jbpme run by "Mule" Suttles 
and a tally by Williams tied the 
score 3-3. After Williams tied the 
the deadlock with another run in 
the fifth the Giant.s gradually 
pulled up to the 8 mark 'while 
Bill Lane and Jake Dunn mace 
the only other 2 for Detroit m 
the 8th. , 

SANDWICHES SUNDAY 1 

As a sptecial treat from the 
Citizens Cooperative committee 
free sandwiches and beer wiU 
be served to anyone who presents 
an I. D. card al the 40 cents gala 
paying only 25 cents for their 
entrance. This offer holds good 
from 10:00 A. M. until 1:00. those 
partaking of this courtesy also 
staying for the games. 


knot the score for kM^ 

PRAIRIE VIEW, Tex, Nov 

— Prairie Vie^ ete«trifi»3 5,0 

ix3jiS'ana""to"a"i2-'i2 "tie'Tas'tltrabid home coming fans here t 
"aturday at New Orleans. Dis- ?ay with a deadly aerirfatta 

laying a surprising oSensive, wat toppled a passmg A^kans 
coupled with several *breaks, as ^*^^" ^'"^• 
a result of fumbles and poor 
punts in the first quarter, the 
visitcws were able to stave off the 
repeated line thrusts of Xavier 
in the first quarter. After a 
scoreless first period, the ^Rush's* 
ceiater, Daniel Turner, blocked a 
'Bama State punt and the ball 
was downed on the Alabama 4- 
' yard stripe. On two fties at the 
I center of the line, Dallas £>anielf 
Xavier's big fullback, (ilunged 
over the center of the line for the 
initial score of the game and the 
'Rush went into the lead. A try 
at conversion by Lilbum< "Joe 
Louis" Williiams went wide and 
the score .at the .half peripd was 
6-0 in Xavier's fiyor. ! 
Nearly 3#00 fans were given 

a treat at the half period when 

"Dnke" EUingtoe addressed 

the crowd. 
the 'Bama Staters returned 
with a determination to ,even 
matters up in the final hall. After 
a sustained drive of 50 yards, 
halfback Kirkle of the Hornets 
ran 20-yards around rigbt en-< 
to score. Wilkins' attelhpt at 
conversion was wide and the 
score was 6-6 at the end of the 
quarter) 

The final period brougl t the 
fans to their feet as play after 
play on the part of both teams 
proved their desperation to take 

the game. The Gold Rusk took 

to the airi Perry, Ttash quart- 
erback, la^raled to Tommy 

Mills, Los Angeles, Calif, fresh- 
man back of the 'Rnsh^ iHw 

then forward passed to Ernest 

Dennard, Xavier end, in the 

Hornet's end rone to complet*' 

the forty-seven yard heave for 

a toochdown. With the game 
almost in the bag for the Xavi- 
erites, the 'Bama State team Un- 
leashed its own passing attack. 
Playing a splendid game 
roughout. Wilkins. Hornet 
ckfield ace heaved a 45-yard 
p^ to right end Dunn of the 




lUMt 

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ADams 9M0 1. 

Yov don't have to go la, i 
deep — our prices on fine liquoi 
are a life saver: ^ 

ALL STANDARD BRAND 
OF WHISKEY BT THE CASl 
PHONE Por FREE DELIVER 


TOGETHf R AT LAST ! 

STARS vs 
WHITE KINGS 

ite Sox Park, Sunday, Nov. 6 

OUBLE HEADER^ STARTS 1 :00 P. M. 


♦, 


idn 40c — 85c 


\ 


Phone CE-n833 


Don! pay on^'Extra Penny 

6h£cldtm\W^ 


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RUG PADS OR THROW RUGS 

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Axjilitid's FurniturjB V^rehouse 

RmI- 1331 Wm» FlorMC^i Nmrr Normondi* 


OlfEN TILL S F. M. 


I CLOSED SUNDAYS 


Says You CAM 

ifford dtntal attention 

RIGHT NOW 



./, 


prtnif 


Compariaon will pr*v« 
rlfht now my prices are' 
lower tlukn st soy time dur- 
ing the past decade, and I 

particularly call your at- \ 
tention to the Great Valuea 
I am offering on both per- 
m a n e n t and removable 
bridge work. Regardless 
of whatever Branch of 
I>enti8tr5' you may desire, 
come to Dr. Cowen with 
the assurance of being able 
to Save wltH Safetr. 



Investigate my Liberal and Con- 
venient Easy Paymont Plan ana 
you will no longer feei you'cannot 
afford IMMEIDIATE dental at- 
tention. Among my patients are 
many of the community^ small- 
est wage-earners. If >-ou could 
taJk with them they woald t»fl 
you that Dr. Cowen's consistenl' 
Low Price* and Liberal C^edll 
enabled them t« ha^-e IMMEDI- 
ATE dental attentloa withcnit 
ftlianclal difflcnit}'. Come in and 
talk over your dental problems 
with me without obligation. 


You will appreci- 
ate how EASY k 
is to arrange for 
CREDIT in nay of- 
fice, because there 
i* no finance cona- 
pany to deal %«ritli. 



^!^ 


<^^^ 


^mm 


They coat 

iio naore 

than jroa 

would pay 

for ordinary 

rubber 

plates 


Now tba lamous DuPont lsb*i:..^:i?s mikc 
It possible (cr you to dbttln dental pUtei 
with a closer reseoibian^ th»Q ever before 
to Nature's own rui&s. Tou must see the 
lampief of tills tiew and' dlftereiit I>uPont 
material to appreciate Its exceptional 
Besut7, Its anusual StrtBstb. and. abort 
all, lU Icsther-like weliht that is so et- 
•estlal for the comfort tA plate-wearers. 
At' last roQ can obtain dental plates that 
art ao "Katurally Beautiful" TOU will ae- 
tmlly b« proud to wear tbe^ 


or ngt ijQuihii 



J*urcbmae t h e s • 
riDtf dftnta! pistes 
on Tn. . Cbwca's 
Xj i b e r R 1 S-l»-lft 
Brs7 Pa rmeji I 
PUn. No interest 
«r toy cxtrft 
ohRrse. Not OKc 
paui7 for dovB 


AIM Located ta 
Hcdlywood 

1648 N. WtloOK *« ! 

Glendale _ ^1 

103 N. %m<* •"*>( 
12 So. EwHd AiMt 

Santa Monica 

3d 4 Sts. Moniss 
Bl*d. 

Lone Beadfe' 

107 W. B 


San Diec*V>L 

722 Broadway- • 



I 


DR. CPWEN 

\f CREDIT DENTISTS 

SiD6S0UTH\HILLST. 

;~ Entranot on HMI ^trast Onlr 
OvW tke 6»'l Drug HtW- Xnd floor' ; 
.Tel.,llCtllsl i^lSl 

\ Down Town Office 

0FEN SUNDAYS 

It ajB. t» 1 pin., . 



— , "- -r- 


4h Central Avenue. CaterM as Smwm) CUmb MftUer, 
ir 17, 1913, at the Post Offi«* at tm Aag claa, CnML, •mUt 
ot Marek IS, IS?*. SabscrivMrn HSN yar yaar; Se yev w»r- 



HE WEST 5 GREATEST WEEKLY 

' VOL.59— NO. 30 w«***^w* **..«. ^^y*w THURS., NOV. BJ938 

EDITORIAL PAGE I i 

IWtPAMR IS AN tMTITUTlOU KVEUHPEO BY ANft TOI THt ^^KS OF THIS OOMMUNirY TO ^MIEIIT THC NEWS ST THt DAY. WSTIB MTTER RAM HCUTIOW. LCAB PUSLIC OmHioN AND TO CONTENO FOR THE OOMTITtiTtOllAU m«MT» AT aIl TIMES AND IW ALL WJSLIC INftTtT^TIOI^ ANO PLAcIt nM ML 

■ . ' '- . T V ' ' ,-. •/■'. "Behold, hoppy is th« man whom God correcttl-h ; therefore desp ise hot thou the chostening of the Almighty." JOB 5:17, ~~^ ^~^ 


P9tOm AAAMs 9162 

L JMm* S^itM* 

*. WflkMiS, TiMSMIi L. 
S. M, B«M^ I. L. 
Gontoa, DiiiMt^n. 


A. 


intf N|XT CONGRESSMAN 

"No hews is not good news!" 
. This statement is o proticol one 
for people who send represehtotives 
to notional legislative bodies. It is 
to be remennbered that individuals 
ftronsported, via the ballot, to a resi- 
dence in Washington, D. C. receive 
their salaries directly from the col* 
lective purse of those whom suppos- 
edly they represent. Then, too, it is 
afwoys a good thing for a voter to ex- 
pect o certain amount of represen- 
tation from such men on general 
principles. In fact, several persons 
hove hinted that legislators work 
consistently in behalf of the best in- 
terests of their constituency. This 
idea of "consistent" endeavor in this 
direction is progressive to the point 
>of communism, we realize; but au- 
thorities advocate at least on occas- 
ional spurt of conscientious activity 
on the port of the people's represen- 
tatives. - 

We, of the Fourteenth District, 
hove been 'very lenient. Congress- 
man Ford has seldom indicated 
through legislative effort the false- 
ness of rumor that he has been as- 
leep for the post decade or so. Some 
persons have hinted that Mr. Ford's 
pccosionol presence in Congress is 
due to on, aggravated case of insom- 
jhio,, Most persons ore agreed, if on- 
ly from humane considerations, that 
Congressman Ford's lethargic condi- 
tion colls for his immediate repioce- 
^Irieht. • 

At such a crossroads, the voters of 
I the Fourteenth District are fortunate 
to -possess such an alternative as 
William D. Campbell. This young 
lowyer, experienced for years in the 
€apitol and a war hero, has shown no 
signs of sleeping-sickness. He is well- 
known for policy of interracial foir- 
pfay. Ke is a former Federal prose- 
. cutor. He is recognized as one of the 
city's most brilliant attorneys. He 
is notorious for honesty and KEEPS 
HIS PROMISES. In fact, he is THE 
NEXT CONGRESSMAN FROM THE 
FOURTEENTH DISTRICT! 


KEEP TO THE RIGHTI 


A SLIfnIT ERROR 

•LIBSBIA UNCIVILIZED? IT DEPENDS 
UPON THE VIEWPOINT 

(From ttie Los Ancelw Daily New*) 
"In view of the European quarrel over the 
treaty created republic of Czechoslovaki* there 
is a rtorybook character to the founding and 
history of Liberia, another republic carved out 
with pens. 

"Th»» Negro state on the African coaat 
reaches no American newspaper* with stories ol 
cabinet downfalls, revolution* or labor argu- 
menU. Whatever new* is of a peaceful kind. 
•n»« United State* navy department ha* ju»t 
tnijounced that the first .voyage, of the newly 
commissionted cruiser Boi*e will mdude an in- 
formal courte*y call at Monrovia, the seaport 
capital of luiberia. The occasion of the vi«it ia 
to. celebrat* dedication of the site f6r a new 
AmKican legation building. 

"A liiilanthropic organization, the Phelpa- 
Stokes fund, for many years has contributed to 
the advancement of Liberia. It own* the sur- 
viving portiona of the hunting from which the 
first flag of -the republic o^ Liberia was made. 
As a special gesture of goodwill the trustees of 
the fund prepared this material iii a form suit- 
able for donation to the Liberian government. 
JThe historic relic was cairfied to Monrovia on 
i the Boise for presentation. 

Liberi* was founded in 1822, when a set- 
nt was made at Monrovia by Negro Ireed- 
I'iMB-from the United SUtes'with the assistance 
ti Araertcan colonization societies. It was de- 
clared a repubUc July 26, 1847. with a cOTstitu- 
tiop modeled on that of the United SUtes. 

"In the period preceding the CiVil war 
many Negroes left thia country under auspices 
of the American Colonization society to join the 
" colonists on the west coast of Africa. Henry 
Clay, toget^r with Madison, Monroe and others, 
became an -active supporter of the movement. 
Which, it was hoped, would lessen the slavery 
problem. There are now 20,000 American Na- 
groae in Liberia. 

"The first treaty between the United States 
and the Negro republic was signed in 1862 after 
the outbreak of the Civil war, and was ratified 
«Dd proclaimed .^an 1863. This treaty was re- 
cently replaced by the signing last August 8 of 
a new treaty of friendship, commerce and navi- 
gation. 

"The visit of the Boise to Monrovia com- 
rades, therefore, with the 75th anniversary of the 
Initiation ot treaty relations between the two 
jovemmenla. Beeaase of this, and considering 
.the subsUntial progress made by Liberia in the 
last few years under President Edwin Barclay, 
the occasion is a landmark in the history of re- 
lations between the two countries. 

"It is a small news item, not of brOad his- 
toric inajortanoe. y«t at a time of international 




■ti 


BUYER'S GUIDE by Clarence Peacock 

While some advancement has been made 
in the political and social life ot the Negroes m 
Harlem, their economic stari;s lias chatigc.l but 
little within the last ten yearsL In October 1928, 
the "Advertising and Selling* magazine publish; 
ed an article by H. A. Haring cailed "Selling to 
Harlem". The following excerpts fron; this ar- 
ticle will give a clear picture of the conditions 
that exist in this community and in other cities 
where there is a large concentration! of colored 
people. 

Indigestion and vanity, laxatives and silk 
stockings are the outstanding traits of Harlem. 
They point to the secret of Harlem's merchan- 
dising, for within the district are hundreds of 
small merchants growing rich by catering to 
these traits, perfectly willing for Harlemites to 
go to 125th street for their shoes and hats, sutits 
and cloaks, stoves and furniture. 

Dtnig stores, delicatessen shops, pork shops 
and groceries are manned by whites. The Negro 
is not a merchant. To him remains, in Harlem, 
only the manicure, barber, shoe shine and laun- 
dry places and of course the restaurants, tf 
there is in all Harlem a Colored clerk in a drug 
store he has escaped notice, and though often 
inquired about, was reported as not existing. 

Four times, too was I told, "If you want to 
get rich, come up here and open a delicatessen 
store The chain store groceries can't make a go 
here, but a delicatessen — that's a different story! 

Throughout Harlem (excepting 125 street) 
there is not a single department store or dry 
goods store worthy of name. On a Sunday after- 
noon, at a haberdashery window next door to a 
moving picture house, 31 Negroes were found 
crowding to the window. Without, apparently, 
being observed it was possible to get near 
enough to discover the cause of their gesticula- 
tions. The 22 men, aided by hte 9 girls were 
discussing ties. 

After the movie doors had opened and the 
crowd was gone it was rather surprising to ob- 
serve that not a tie in the window was priced 
for less than $2.00. On the following evening 
I chutted with the owner of the store, and dis- 
covered that he had hold four dozen ties that 
day at |1.50 and over. "I used to work on lower 
Broadway", he said, "where we thought we had 
the cream of the world. Never again! Here I'm 
paying $60 rent and doing mere businMs hi 
socks and ties than Wanamakcr does. 

At another pilace, where womens' hoieerjr 
and imderweer filled the windows, the pro- 
prietor, who has been seven years at one locat- 
ion, enlightened me by stating "Half ef the 
time the women dress in hand-mc-downi given 
them where they work. But when they dress 
up it's done to a finish. When a woman has five 
dollars, she can't get by my window any more 
than her man can get by the next door." It 
was found that th^ window next door was filled 
with aoft-shelled <irabs. 

The writer might add, that today ten years 
later, fundamentally these same coaditions ex- 
ist. The conditions are a challenge to all think- 
ing Colored Americans. Will we at the end ot 
ihi next ten years be in the sami rut or will 
we take advantage of the existing opportunities 
to solve our own economic problems. A planned 
program for mass action, both fo^ publicizing 
discrimination and for extending employment 
opportunities, a further union with organized 
labor and ap extended program of vocational 
guidance for Negro youth will do much to cor- 
rect some of these economic injustices. 


'■<^\- 


ft. 


strife a weary world may read of the fariwa^r 

re^dblic of Liberia and her international rela- 
tions with some longing for the idyllic state pfi 
peace which it suggests. « 

"In the fields of science, literature and art 
Negroes have shown notable talents. In Liberia 
they have evdienced a capacity for govcminent.j 
l^ot all of the country is progressive or pleasant,^ 
and, outside of Monrovia, mueh of it is 'unciviri 

' lized^ — according So geography books. But i) 
Liberian native lexicographer, regarding somff 
aspects of European and American life, may di|4 : 
fer with Noah Webster on what it1L*«!^t brl'- 

-that term."- . -;^,,; :X0, ^^r. .- K0%^,%4g- 

'^' Likeria k not all ttiat Is ecaertbed in thlfp 
«dH«rial fron the Tneaday morning Daily Navai,| 
^wd OTea BMre Hiaa this— gcograjriilcally an(| 
p<diUcally— Liberia is about ae heipleaa fi^ 4| 


ri-w:./^>" 


with n» anat eateriag a li|^ 


A: 


COMING ELECTION "PERSONAL" 

In the state elections whidh will 
confront the voter Tuesday, he will 
find his selections offectingr his own 
personal welfare to a greater extent 
than in any election California has 
ever kn6wn. ^ ^^^ ;__ ... „^. ;■ . - 

Today, we are ai the parting df 
the ways., Today, we face national 
unrest and economic problems, prob- 
lems of readjustment and recovery, 
greater than those even of the deep 
depression years. We find now that 
long-rdnge, careful planning is need- 
ed. It is ohe thing to deal with on 
immediate notional disaster and an- 
other to evolve a program by which 
the catastrophe will never again 
come about. The moment for hasty 
experimentation has passed. Instant 
relief for the suffering no longer is- 
the greatest issue. Now, we must 
hove seasoned law-makers, trained, 
competent, and able to think clearly. 

Hence, the re-election of Governor 
Frank F. Merriom is of vital impor- 
tance, to us all. Never before was a 
man iof his pro'^'ed ability so sorely 
need^ in Sacramento. The excel- 
lent progress which the state has 
made under him cannot be dissipat- 
ed in a splurge of tricl-and-error gov- 
ernment. There is no superficial is- 
sue of party. All Californions — 
Democrats, Republicans, Progres- 
sives — mu^t get together and retain 
"a good governor". 

The personality smile and kindred 
political devices cannot perfo-m the 
task of a state chief^odministrator. 
We need on executive — not an ora- 
tor. 

It would be long-winded to recite 
the accomplishments of Governor 
Merriom's term. He entered his ex- 
alted position OS a part of a "Stop 
Sinclair!" movement. He has reveal- 
ed himself a fine |,tatesman — not a 
politician. 

For the solvation of California; 
for sanity in government; for a 
sound, progressive administration; 
for fair-ploy and consideration; for 
YOUR OWN benefit— MERRIAM IS 
THE MAN! 


LABOR RACKETEER ON WAY OUT 

Climax to the EAGLE'S campaign 
against the notorious "Wilshire 
Apartment Service" came the an- 
nouncement by Assemblyman Au- 
gustus Hawkins this week that a pro- 
posed bill has been written to in- 
clude "third-party" labor contrac- 
tors among ^'private employment 
agencies". 

Simply, this means that unscrupu- 
lous labor racketeers who hove hired 
Negro domestic help en masse and 
sold it at a usurious profit of 25 per 
cent per week will be stopped cold. A 
"slave racket" hod developed among 
our local "house girls" that was slpw- 
■ ly eating away one-fourth their buy- 
ing fxjwer. ; 

The cose of one stich chiseling or- 
ganization — the Wilshire Apart- 
ment Service — was brought to the 
EAGLE by confused workers. A cam- 
paign was put underway which re- 
sulted in the complete disorganiza- 
tion' <yf this firm, the asserted flijght 
of Its owners to Son Francisco, and 
very possibly a aeyr state Idw. | 

This is- the type of service "the 
Californid Eagl0 offers our commgnir 
ty. The facts I bear out this stc|te- 
ment, so we feel no conceit in mdk- 
ing it. ; 

But,* tri fuifice, the splendid work 
of .Assemblyman Augustus Hawkins 
must be hailed. This young legisla- 
tor shoWs hinrtself wiliing and able to 
wage dn qggressive bottle for 1 -ha 
welfare of Inis pfople. 



THE World ti^is week 

By ROBERT PATTERSON 



GACilOUS 


DB. GEORGE PARRI8H. LOS 
ANGELES CITT HEALTH 
OFnCES, SAYS: ,| 

"If you despise that wrtiich is 
ugly you \do not know that 
\which is beautiful 

"The successful control of 

immunicable disease, showing 

- ~ \\ improvement from year to 

Unattached to any politicalU y^ar is not a matter of luck. 

icamp, it has just completed a statewide sampling \\ 1^ aTrai^' £d iX^I 

\a5ti«; specialist at the head of 
\\th* public health department . 
\ supported by trained assistants, 
all firm in the .belief that hy- 
giene and preventive measures 
ojap, and will with the Support 
oI\the public, rid mankind of 
dif^ase.' When in need of ad- 
vido call upon the^City Health 
Dep^utment, ML 5211. 

"Ih 1912 approximately 125 

perspns in every 100,000 died of 

. tubefickilosis. Last year in Los 

\ Angeles City only 45.5 per 

\ cent persons in every 100,000 

'\died. Based on our present 

bopulatji)n-j-one thousand one 

hundred lives were saved in 

ttfberculosis cases alone last 

year in o\ir city. 

*'In 112 'pneumonia claimed 
132 out if "every 100,000 per- 
sons, apt,.T)ximately only 80 
out of each lOaoOO died last 
year; a savitig of 725 lives laat 
year that in 132 would have 
been the victims 'of pneumonia. 

"California is a sort of na- 
tional health resort. For many 
years the aged and ailing have 
been coming here in droves. 
Los Angeles is a human dump- 
ing group for aged and indi- 
gent, and yet its (death rate has 
slightly deoreased. The 50 
cents per capita you spend an- 
nually for health pays you tre- 
mendous dividends in health 
and happiness. 

"He who attempts to make 
nature deviUe trork her nor- 
mal physiologic processes may 
accomplish his immediate ob- 
ject, but it is very apt to be at 
an exorb-iant price. 

"With a learned physician 
and an obedient patient, sick- 
ness soon disappears. 

"Common things most com- 
monly occur. 

•'A perfectly healthy man 
does not know he has such a 
thing as digestion. 

"He who cures a disease may 
be the osl skinful, but he 
that prevents it is the safest 
physician. 

"Dyspepsia is the remorse of 
a guilt\" stomach"'. 

LETTERS TO EDITOR 
nCHTING OUR OMTN 

Dear Editor: 

1 read a letter in your last 
paper. Why are we fight'mg 
our own teachers? I wish you 
and those other people would 
do something about some of 
the wrong thirt-gs that are be- 
ing done to our children by the 
other teacher.<^ 

My niece w a .» to graduate 
from Jefferson last June. The 
school said she had taken the 
wrong things and didn't have , 
enough of the right credits to 
graduate. 

This has happened to some 
other colored children too. 

Why. can't we have a colored 
counsellor who will be interest- 
ed in our children. One of my 
nephew's teachers is so old he 
isn't aMe to do anything with 
the boys in his room. This boy 
wants to go to college but he 
has found out that the coun- 
sellor let him take the wrong 
subjects. Now he will not be 
able to enter college. He wants 
to quit school. 

We can't say much to the 
school people because we do 
want our cfiildren to graduate. 
I hope you will do something 
so that the younger children win 
not have these same things hap- 
pen to them. We will appreci- 
ate anything you can do. 

— A Disappointed Parent. 


CALIFORNIA VOTES 

j I There are poUs and polts, but the public opi\>- 
ion survey whic|i came within one per cent of pn 
dieting the outcome of the Los Angeles recall elecA 
tion of September 16 has, at any rote, won a righ\\ 
to consideration, 

pling y 
of voters' choices after testing olT income groups 
with both major parties. Its findings furnish a rea- 
son for the fact that betting odds in California's 
fast-paced governorship race hove now reached 10 
to 6 in Olson's favor.- The non-partisan public opin 
ion survey found ?2 per cent of the voters standing 
with Merriom, 8 per cent for Hoight, 18 per cent 
undecided, and 42 per cent pbdging ballots to Ol- 
son. Additiorjio I Democratic supp>ort swinging to 
Dr. Walter Scdtt Franklin continued to increase his 
substantial ledd over his rival for the office of lieu- 
tenant govern(br. 

With a v^ry superior air, countries in Europe 
like to chide us about our kidnapings. But the shoe 
is now on the other foot. Dispatches from Vienna 
report that the Nazis are holding Baron Louis de 
Rothschild for a $3,000,0CX) ransom. If the sum 
is not forthcoming within a month's time, their vic- 
tim will be thrown into a concentration camp tp 
undergo, as best he con, a living death. America's 
kidnapers thought they were in the big-time cir- 
cuit-when they sought to extort $50,000 to $100,- 
000 from their victims' families. But the tough 
lads now doing time in Alcatraz and Leavenworth 
were only sand lot show-offs compared with the un- 
abashed demands of the Nazi captors. And these 
latter hove a much better chance of succeeding, 
too. The police are on their side! 

Old Man Winter has already unloaded a bliz- 
zard in the Mid-West, and his chill breath on the 
eastern slope of the Continental Divide foretells 
the soon-coming day when he'll plummet down the 
western slop>e, scattering storms in the Sierras and 
Siskiyous, and sweeping across the Ridge Route 
southward to the crests of the Son Bernardino 
mountains. That's the day when road crews and 
fleets of totary plows will swing into action, smash 
through 1 5-f t. snowdrifts, sand ice-coated pave- 
ments, and cut swift openings for the through- 
schedule traffic of passenger and freight carriers, 
and recreation-bound passenger cars. Highway 
travelers won't be alone in hoping a milder winter 
than the last one visits California this year. The 


f LAT-BB0K6 rmOAY 
WITH A rU>V FLOV! 





oovKTUY or La.1 

State Highway Dept. wonts one, too, for it's bod 
wejither, not heavy traffic, that breaks and crocks 
up rojads. Erjgineers hove already solved the weight 
problein, for any road able to carry possaiger traffic 
at hihh spe^d con readily withstand all the truck 
traffic traversing it. I t's the weother, natural ene- 
my or highways, that still causes engineers to grow 
gray I when Jock Frost and Old Man Winter sweep 
dtewtrttto stage their white carnival. 
! i VVhen citizens gather for m^rry-moking 
hlericeforth, life will be easier — in Son Jose. Under 
Oilnew f?olicy, the WPA recreation project there 
yvill Supply, on order, people guarantee^ to liven up 
pbrfies,' organize gomjes, and keep the boll of con- 
fversation rolling. As long as citizens ore paying 
fo|t AJVPA, they nrwy bs well get their <fivi^nds in 
piieq^Mre. /f»d if the WPA pofty-savei"? ofe really - 
successful, \r will be this first time a tcixpqyef has 


ever , la^uhed. when he sow where his 


JTKJI 


ney . was 


The Editor 
Madame: ' 

Judging from tiir article 
written by your sports editor 
which .appeared in your paper 
of October 27. one of my re- 
marks dicing the course of the 
Olympic Fight broadcast on 
Tuesday. October 25. was mia- 
construed as a reflection on the 
sportsmanship of the Negro 
people. 

I hasten to assure you that 
nothing could have been farth- 
"^r from my mind. ' 

I try to approach every 
■sporting event with an open? 
mind and an impartial attitude 
and,' obviously. I would ivo t 
under any condition wilfqlly 
wish to cause offense or mis- 
understanding among any 
group of sport fans, regardless 
of their affiliation or sympa- 
thies. 

Working under the pressure 
Of time and under some condi- 
tions, , one sometimes .phrases 
thinp in\a statement; that is 
not alwayi an exact picture of 
the thoughts in his mind. I 
bear the Jifegro people of Los 
. Ang[eles or anywhere else bo 
malice. I espouse the cause ot 
Negro fighters along with the 
rest, and I shall continue to io 
so. I ask your readers and my 
listeners to b« the judge. I ad- 
mit the possibility of ambiguity 
in some of my hastily con- 
strue ted, Extemporaneous 
phrases--but race prejud^c'r j- 
never! , ■ i „ \ ■ U ' 

Sincerejy youtt^ _LJ,li \1 ( 
REID KIL^ATplfcaK V 
-^ Sportcaster - 

SUtionKKIF 


%" 


W :^\i-^ 


/ 


LEGAL NOTICES 

CKRTIFICATE FOK TRANSAC- 
nON OF BUSINESS UNDER 
FICnOUS NAME 

THE UNDERSIGNED do«» here- 
by certify that he U conduct- 
ing a Contracting business at 
8443 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, 
California, under the fictitious 
firm name of California Home Im- 
provement Company and that 
s«id firm is composed of the fol- 
lowing persons, whose names in 
full and places of residence are 
as follows; to-wit: PHILLIP 
SCHWARTZ, 756 So. Normandie. 
WITNESS my hand this 18 day 
of October, 1938. 

PHILLIP SCHWARTZ 

FILED Oct. 18, 1938. 

L. E. LAMPTON, County Clerk 
By F. E. Morgan, Deputy. 
State of California 1 

}ss. 
County of Los Angeles j 

ON THIS 18 day of October, A. 
D. 1938, before me, L. E. LAMP- 
TON, County Clerk and Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the 
Coimty of Los Angeles, personal- 
ly appeared 

PHnJ.TP SCHWARTZ 
known to me to be the person 
whose name s subscribed to the 
within instrument, and acknow- 
ledged to me that he executed 
the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I 
have hereunto set my hand the 
day and year in this certificate 
first above written. 

L. E LAMPTON, 

County Clerk, 
By F. E. Morgan, Deputy 
(Oct. 20. 1938 (^te 1st Publish) 


FOR RENT 


FOR RfcNT— Fur. rooms In quiet 

Christian home; working people 

only. 1510 E. 23rd St. . r-3-2 


WANTED TO RENT — 4 room un- 
furnished house by family of 
three adults, no pets, quiet and re- 
spectable. Will be more or less 
permanent tenants. Rent must be 
reasonable. Write Box No. 10, care 
Calif. Eagle. 

FOR RENT — Fur. front room, 

single man, $2.75 per week, also 

room for 1 or 2 girls from 2 to 14 

years. AD-13229. r-3-1 


FOR RENT— 3 room apt. well fur- 

nished, employed adults only,' 

convenient to S., G. it K. cars., 

655 East 37th St. r-'S-l 


FOR RENT— Neatly fur. room for 

man or couple, convenient to 

"S" car. CE. 24979. r-3-1 


CERTIFICATE OF TRANSC- 
FICTITIOUS NAME 

THE UNDERSIGNED do here- 
by certify that she is conducting 
a Cosmetic Manufacturing busi- 
ness at ^02 S. Central Ave., Los 
Angeles, Calif., under the fictiti- 
ous firm name of Ladv Ebonee 
Beautifying Toiletries and that 
said firm is composed of the fol- 
lowing persons, whose names in 
full End places of residence are 
as follows, to-wit: 

Hazel Williams, 693 E. 43rd PI., 
Los Angeles. 

WITNESS my hand this 19th 
day of October. 1938, 

HAZEL WILLIAMS 

FILED Oct. 19, 1938. 

L. E. LAMPTON, County Clerk 
By L. J. Miller, Deputy 
State of California 1 

\ss. 
County of Los Angeles J 

OK THIS 19 "day of October A. 
D. 1938, before me, L. E. LAMP- 
TON, County Clerk and Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the State 
of Califomia, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles, person- 
ally appeared HAZEL WIL- 
LIAMS known to me to be the 
person whose name is subscrib- 
ed to the within instrument, and 
i acknowledged to me that she 
executed the same. 

IN WITNEY WHEREOF, I 
\iave hereunto set my hand the 
ay and year in this certificate 
first above written. 

L.E. LAMPTON, County Clerk, 
By L. J. Miller, Deputy. 

(Oct 27, 1938 date 1st pub.) 

NOTICE OF HEARING OF PE- 
TinON FOR PROBATE OF 

wnx. 

No. 1SM22 

In the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for 
the County of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate « 
ANNA BERG. Deceased. » 

Notice is hereby given that the 
petitwn of Margaret B. Haney 
for the Probate of WiU of Anna. 
Berg, Deceased, and for the is- 
suance of Letters Testamentan^ 
thereon to the said Margaret B. 
Haney will be heard at 10 o dcKjk 
A M., on November 14th, 1938. 
at the'Court Room of Department 
24 of the Superior Court of the 
State of. California, in and for 
the County of Los Angeles. 
L. E. LAliffTON, 

County Clerk, 

Dated October 20, 1938. 

By Wm. Samuels, Deputy. 

DAVID W. WILLIAMS, 2510 
So Central Ave.. ADams S737, 
Attorney for Petitioner. 

Oct. 27th date of 1st pub. 


FOR RENT— Large lovely fur. 

room. See to appreciate, near S. 

& H, carlines. Man preferred. Call 

Mrs. Reed. CE 29588. r-3-1 

FOR RENT — Room, clean and 
comfortable, private home, 
phone and kitchen privilege, near 
S., U., & G. carlines. 945 E. 22nd 
street. r-3-1 

FOR RENT — Nicely fur. room in 

nice, quiet home, conv. to car, 

good home for right party. Phone 

evenings, AD. 6596, r-3-1 


FOR RENT — Fur. rooms, gas 
heat, $3,00 per week, 975 1* E, 
Vernon Ave. AD. 11587. 
r-3-2 

FOR RENT^Nicely fur. modem 
bungalow, large rooms, 2 wall 
beds, near all, conv. Adults only, 
no pets, reliable people. 1001 E. 
55th street, inquire 5212 S. Cen- 
tral Ave. r-3-2 

FOR RENT — Single apmt. com- 
plete, nicely furnished, $22.50 
per^ month, hot water incl. 3310 
Hooper Ave. r-3-1 

FOR RENT — Fur. room in good 
location. CE. 20769. r-3-1 


CARE FOR CHILD— Young wo- 
man with nice home wishes to 
care or child by the day. 1148 E. 
2 5th Street. r-3-1 

FOR RENT — Large front room 
overlooking Central Avenue, 
Conv. for R. R. men or working 
girls. $2.50 each per week use of 
kitchen. Call evenings, 1075 East 
33rd St., apt. A. r-3-1 

FOR RENT— Comfortable room 

with heat near S. & V. cars, with 

or without garage for gentleman. 

AD. 7993. r-3-2 


FOR RENT — Unfur. 5-rm. flat in 
Hollywood, mod., frigidaire, 
$30.00 mo. Adults only. No pets, 
1273 N. Commonwealth Avenue. 
OLympia 0158. r-3-1 


r ft 


FOR RENT— Neatly fur. room for 
single man or woman, employ- 
ed. AD. 6320. r-3-1 


FOR RENT: Fur. room in pri- 
vate home to man steadily 
employed 458 E. 42nd Place. CE. 
28840. (r|20{2) 


FUR. R(X)MS for rent couple 

or single betv#3en two car 

lines. Ph.: RI. 9739. 

FOR RENT — Rooms for gentle- 
man. .$3.00 per week. 1305 E. 
12th St., TUcker 6456. rj20|4 


^ 


RUGS fr CARPETS 

1000 used Rugs 6x9, 8x10, 9x12, 
$5 00 up. New and used broadloom 
all shades. 9x12. 9x15. 9x18. 12x15, 
12x18, 12x21. 
Wilton Rags aU sbes 
Used Carpets «27-inc*i 35 centa 

yard and up. 
THiyr Broadloom type rug 9x12. 

$8.75. > ■ ... 

Furniture Modem and up to date. 

Dining Room Suites, Living Room 

Suites, Bedroom Suites, Springs 

& Mattresses. ,^. « _ „ 

Opta Eyenlam till 9 F. M. 

Singer's 1487 Sunset Blvd. 

Fbone MU. 45M 
Open Sundays tni 5 F. M. 


FOR RENT — Room in private 

home' or westside for gentle- 

mafi or couple in service. RO~ 

3058. r-27-1 

FOR RENT — In private home, 
neat, clean, large, airy fur. 
room T)#th privileges like home. 
RI~1304 or RI-8855. 

10-27ind 

FOR RENT — Room for couple in 
private home. Call after 5 P. 
M. 904 E. 43rd Place. AD-0700. 

r-27-1 

FOR RENT — Oozy housekeeping 
room. Most convenient to Wil- 
shire, Hollywood and Beverly 
Hills district. Close to "P" car- 
line. Rates reasonable, refined, 
employed gentleman preferred. 
Telephone RE~9790. r-6-ind 


ft UF 


STOVES 


CIcanMI ft Reconditioned 

Expert Repairing 

RELIABLE STOVE WORKS 

MS last Fl«r«nee Ave. 

TW-4242 


HAVE YOU ULCERS 

STOMACH TROUBLE 
OF ANY KIND? 

We positively Correct the 
cause, many Completely Cured 

For appointment 

Phone GR. 5401 

1301 North Man^eld Ave. 

BoUywpod, Calif. 

DR. H. L. LYOM (fa. C.) 

DR. MARY LYON (D. C.) 

So. of Hollywood High School 

R«ni«mb«r 

Keep your Spine Straight— It's 
the Backbone of Your Health 

Make T^nr Appointment 

NOW! „ NOW!! NOW!! 


MAJESTIC 
Venation Blinds 


With 

WUte Cedar Slaia, FUiey 

ValflBCM, Cadminm Flataa 

Hardwu* 

Many Other Features 

See Ut Before Buying 

SIM WEST FLORENCE 

FHONE: TW-21tS 


MISCELLANY 


CHILD CARE 

So. Los Angeles Frivate Scho«ri. 
Boys and Girls, 2 to 7 yeai^ 
Room and board, or by tlie day. 
Nnrsery, Kindergarten, Prim- 
ary. Also Piano, Vi<riln, and 
Spaalsli Guitar, are tanght. 

OPEN THE YEAR 'ROXWD 
MRS. OLLIE L KING, Director 

Cor. E. llSth and Gripe Sts. 
KI-MM 


CASH— For used furniture, cloth- 
ing, rags, Ic and 2c per lb. CE— 
29778. 4975 S. Central Ave. 

' r-13-4 


MEN ATTei<rnoN ! 

SUITS AND OVERCOATS made 

to yonr measure. Latest styles 
and materials guaranteed. $22.50. 
Special prices to orchestra men or 
when ordered in groups. Ladies' 
Suits $21.50. PENROSE CHAD- 
WICK, UlS E. 23rd Street 


I WILL PAINT your kitchen, bed- 
room and bath; then will free 
hand paint flowers, birds and 
swans free; 26 years of knowing 
how. Paperhanging that sticks. Es- 
timates free. Bill— TW-4440. 


WANT TO BUY smaU house or 
will trade 1937, Chev. Master 
Sedan, like new, Radio-Trunk ,as 
part down payment. 936 E. 91st 
Street. LA-2297. r-3, 1 


WANTtD — Working woman to 
share a duplex house with lady. 
$10.00 a month. CE. 29480. 

r-3-1 


WILL J. B. BROWN or DOLL 
BROWN kindly communicate 
with Jack Polk, formerly. of Sem- 
inole, Okla., now at 1129 E. 41st 
Street, city. 


FOR SALE 
HOME anA INCOME 

BARGAINS 

M750, $175 down, $12.45 per mo., 
8 rms., 4 bedrooms, front can 
be used , for stMe, ,on business 
corner, 25x125, bon'dspaid. 
.house, 2 bedrooms, large lot 
55x145. Good loea. near 43rd 
Street. 

$2850, terms, or will take ear or 
lot as part payment, lovely 
6-rm. mod. staceo like new; 3 
bedrooo;a, large dining roojin 
and kitchen, nice living room, 
garage, concrete driveway, 
ideal loea. 2 biks everytiiing. 

$3,e«0, $300 down. $2135 per mo., 
1 5-rm. and 3 3-rni houses 
like new, all on big eor. lot, 
100x137, fine rental loea. 

$3,750, $375 down, $2S.70 per mo., 
2, 5-rm. houses, and 3, 2 rm. 
booses on lot 50x132, 27th St 
west of Central Ave. 
INSURANCE AND LOANS 
ON REAL ESTATE 
H. O. L. C. Properties 
POWERS REALTY CO. 

936 E. 91st St LA--2297 

Please phone for appointment 


Central Av«. District 
Rfdty Boord 

We have come a long way 
in our search for the secret of 
building good will for Real Es- 
tate. I hope it is less of a sec- 
ret than it was before. The one 
thought above all other, that I 
should like to leave with you 
this afternoon, is a very cheer-r 
ing one. It embodies the kernel 
of evierythnig I have said. In 
thie day generations' service 
' pays, the more you do for your 
customers, the more you will 
do for yourself, fr of necessi- 
ty, if you render service you 
will put your business on a 
scientific and a truly profes- 
sional basis, you will render 
more s«^ice and you will have 
more g6od will. And gooa"will 
is the asset of your business, 
that brings the greatest total 
profit and the highest price in 
case of a sale. 

These are the ambitions and 
requirements of the following 
members of the Central Ave. 
I>istrict Realty Board. 

Members as follows: 
Walter L. Gordoon, President, 

406S Central, ADams 3193. 
Geo. W. City, Vice-President, 

816 E. 40tb PI., ADams 13702. 
Elijah Cooper, Treasurer, 2504 

Central Ave. ADams 9025. 
Seth B. Ray, Secretary, 2302 

Griffith Ave. PRospect 5861. 
Mr. L. Watson, Director of Pub- 
licity, 4824 Central Avenue, 

CEntory 22894. 
Mrs. Mattie Elizabeth Watson, 

4901 Hooper Ave. AD-12082. 


FOR SALE 


MB. JOHNSON 

(Licensed) 
REAL ESTATE BROKER ' 

HousM, Lots, Acraag* 
ISU B. 53rd St AOams 7t71 
Branch: 4S2 S. Main St Rnt S7 


LET'S DISCUSS 
THESE- 


5-room house, good 
cond.; cor. lot; $3250. 

6-room house, E. 46th 
St., $2300; $300 cosh; 
good business corner; 3 
Stores, ot a sacrifice. 

4^fomily flat; good 
rantol locotion. At a 
price you will oppreci- 
ote. 


Own a Home in Pasadeno, Colif. 

V CAROLYNE E. GREEN, Broker 

CONSCIENTIOUS AND RELIABLE 
251 SO. PA8ADEDNA AVE. S Y 24610 


S. B. W. May R^l Estate 

SELECT FROM THIS LIST 

6 rm. home, hardwood fls.. frame dwelling. $2600. $350 dn. 

6 rm. on comer, good investment, buy today. Only $2700; 
fl rms., nice stucco in industrial^ section, will double your 

money on re-sale. Only $3250. 

5 rms. on E. 33rd near San Pedro, must sell. Make offer. 

7 rms. on McKinley Ave., good location for a family, close 
to car line and school. Only $3000, easy terms. 

6 rm. home, hardwood floors, west o^ Central Ave. on East 
42nd Street Only $500 down. 

7 rms. hardwood floors in 3-rms. on paved street, $1,000 dn. 

8 rms. on Jefferson Blvd., a home and business property. 
Only $600 down. *■ *^ j 

2 houses on lot, 5-rms. each on Trinity St., $1000 down. 

2 houses on a lot on E. 49th Street, in A-1 condifion. Only 
$700 down. 

3 units, 3 and 4-rms. each on E. 50th Street. Only $3200. 

5 units on E,.49th Street, income $85 per month. Only $1000 
^down. ' 

4 unit court furnished, only $1000, incom? only $105.00. 
On Westside, nice 7-rm. home, hardwood ■ floors! Beautiful 

lawn and shrubbery. $3S00, $750 down. Bank foreclosure. 6 rms.. 
West 2»th JStreet, $3000, $000 down. 

7, rms., 4 bed rms., on W. 27th Street, comer, ony $3000, 
fSOO down. 

jB rm*.. West 35th St, hardwood floors, only $3300. $500 dn. 
Foreclosure Properties and Other Bargains 

On Central Avenue, one story frame building, 4 stores, and 
office room, on second floor, income $125 per month. $10,000. 

Cmtral Avenue comer court, a fine inves<ment income 
$180.00 on low r«nt. Price $11,000. 

Many other income property flats, apts., courts, and 
doublet. 

We Have All Hone OwBers*^Loaa FereelMarw 

S; Bo Wo Moy Company 

1054 E. Vernon Ave., CE-24788 Nototy Public 


a BIG RUG SALE! { 

^ ROCK BOTTOM PRICES l^ 

^BMT PATTEH5S, AIX SIZES 

•zlS Broadlaon type . .% t.ts 
SxlS Wool Ftn Tip. . .SI«.*} 
9x\t V«h(«t .... 117.95 
txll Hwlwt jUarinMtt.llMt 

YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD 

SEE OUR NEW 

4. 5 ft < RM. ocmrs 
Stor Furniture Co. ^ 

JUUBN'g. E.«T LOS AX0BLX8 C 

OTEB tSi.OOO STOCK 4C 

nUCBD Di PLAIN nOCKSB V^ 

Opwi T A. M.— » p. y. Dtiiy -^ 

3MS WUITTIER BLVD. ir 


lotdwell H. Jones & Co. 

lARGAINS IN^ REAL liSTATE 

A food five-room plastered house for $1800.00; big lot, 
lide drive, garage; near SSth sad Compton. $400 down; bal. easy. 

1^ Six-room bunnlow, hardwood floors; W. Slst street near 
Saint Andrews. 4«00.00 will handle. 

I ' One 4-flat building, two five-, and two four-room flats; 
bear 29th and Maple Ave. $500.00 down. Total price $4900.00. 

Two houses on one lot, 50x150; six rooms, hardwood floors 
front 4iroon|s liardwood floors rear. $1000.00 dovni; price, 
|i«00.00. , -.. '! -, \\:-yj .», ■■.■■.• • 

I One 7-room house; two-story, 4 bedrooms, for USOO.OO; 
$1,000 will handle. 

I OOR MO TTO! 

. The TSUTH about EVERYTHING, whether we sell yon or not. 

Office: 1059 E. Jefferson St. Phone AD-1 2061 


Coll, City Bros. 

816 EAST 40TH PLACE 

ADams 13702 


f FOR SALE V 

$15,000 stucco bungalow court 
7-3 rm. uhits furnished, near 
Pico and Normandie. Unrestrict- 
ed. - ■ :; 

2950.00, $5010 down, Q-rtD. Bung, 
near 29tb and St. Andrews. Mr. 
Best PA. 0679. (r|20|todf.) 


1 


FOR SALE 


ALCOHOUG TREATMENT — 
secret, inexpensive three-day 
money-back . guarantee — no loss 
of time— no hospital. DOCTOR'S 
CONSULTATION ■ FREE. Visit 
ou^ office. Carter's Formula, 542 
S. fidw. Rm. 907. TU~2025. 


^Stakes, Panels, Pickups 
READY TO GO 

Wise Buyers Buy At 
Dwyer's, 3790 So. Vermont .-ve. 

r-22-4 


PERSONAL— I will sell my equity 
in an all-modern home on E!ast 
52nd Place near Avalon. Good in- 
come property, fine location. Ca31 
AD^ms 9362, refer to Owner. 


FOR SALE— 4 door Sedan. Only 
9800 Miles, ^dio. Trunk, pri- 
vate party, $650.00 E. 91st Street. 


FOR SALE— Owner will sell or 
exchange income property on E. 
Washington, 2 houses, five and 
three rooms. Write Box 25, care 
Calif. Eagle. 


FREE 

BRAKES INSPECTED 
Ignition & Carbnretod Adjusted 

Gnaraateed Value 

Grind Valves, Clean Csrbon 

Check Ignition, Tune Motor, 

Adjust Carburetor 

Standard < 

4 Cylinder .„.-._.*; $3.00 

6 Cylinder ...: 4.50 

8 CyUnder .... 6.75 

Motor Overhaul 

Stops Piston Slap and Oil 

Pumping j 

INCLUDES 

Grind Valves, InstaU New 

Rnigs, New Gaskets'and Adjust 

Rod Bearings and Labor 

4 Cyimder Car $ 9.50 

6 Cylinder Car . 14.06 

8 Cylinder Car.. 1950 

90-Day Written Guarantee 

Time Parments Arranged 

Cars Called For and Delivered 

Broke Specials 

Includes Labor it Materials 
(.45 cent adjustments, all cars) 
Ford, Plymouth 9t Chev...$4.50 

5 CyUnder Cars .$6.95 

Large Cars ......._ $8.56 

lliese are lo4r prices for 

standard Lining 

Overhaul Clutch, Transmission 

or differential on any standard 

car, labor $5.95 

Reboring and Rebuilding 

Complete in our own shop 
Body & Fender Work; Tops & 

Upholstering. Low Prices. 
Quality Material & Workman- 
ship. 90-day written guarantee. 

LIBERTY SALES & 
AUTO WORKS 

103-1*5 EaM 17th Street 
14 Years in JMa Neighborhood 


SMAP 
BARGAINS 


I BTooaes, one T Rosltas, allluwl- 
ivood floors, ana two S Reens, 
excellent incme; bir lot, garage. 
A saeritiee! $SH jwlU hanyfie. 
Moatlily terms t* salt bnyer. 
Hurry! Get yonr security fee « 
Merry, Merry Xnuis. 


■f. 


Beat this, if yon cto— 7 Keom 
Duplex, 4 room house in the 
rear, $30P down. N^ly re-dec- 
orated, omnthly pnymoits $35^ 
M until paid out ! 


Owner's sacrifieo— ^Beautiful 6 
Room stucco, ultnt modern. 2 
Bedrooms, all tile koA shower. 
Price $3850, small' down pay- 
ment, near Sootk Paik. 

MA DO ox 

REALTY COMPANY 

NOTARY FUBUC 

Approved Safes Broker 

H. O. L. C. 

1375 East Vemon Avenue 

ADams 11862 


REA^^ EStAt€ VALUES 1 



ReolEstofeiJ^or Sole-Real Estalv 


SUM: $$N dn. < im. H^mtt, Baet Mtk SttMC 

|S,Mtt t riiL I!4 Sty. kaWe. 1560 East ttad Strael. :, 

SS4M: f m. hMme. K. SSCh St Hiwd. Fteees, toe rtik * Bdl^ 


FOB SALE 

Two houses located on a large 
lot 56x150 on Gorman Avenue. 
$1850.00, $150X)0 down. 

Five room stueoo, located on 
East 110th street, lot size 25-125, 
garage, $2000,00. $200.00 and $20.00 
per month. 

Three room house aa E. Impe- 
rial Highway, $600.N, $100.00 dn. 

Tiiree room house oo Parmalee, 
$600.00, $1*0.00 down. 

Ttiree room and store room oa 
Mona, $600M, $100.00 down. 

See us for cheap bargains in 
Lots. 

KNOX tt KNOX, Realty Brokers, 

10324 Wilmington Avenue 

Phone: LA: 0878. 


FOR SALE CHEAP— 1932 16 
Cylinder Cadillac Sedan, six 
wire wheels, fully equipped. Price 
$165. See, 1001 S. FigueroaSt. 


ATLAS ROOF CO. 

ROOFING AND PAINTING 
CONTRACTORS 

No Charge For Inspections 

or Estimates 

Phone PR-ei91 

1045 West Jefferson. Blvd. 

Los Angeles 


Eastern Star Drill Team 

Wishes To Announce The Date 

of Exhibition Has Been 
Clumged From Sunday, Nov. 

13th, to Thursday, Dec. 8th. 


B 


RICE 

ETTER 

UILT 


HOMES 

SINCE 1908 


$24.00 MONTHLY BUYS A 5-ROOM STUCCO HOME 



One of these Stucco Homes octually built at 1 949 
E. 11 5th St. See it, then see us for F. H. A. Terms. 
5 Rooms built to the rigid F. H. A. requirements. 
5 more to stort soon. These homes ore complete 
in every detail on lot 40x165. .•? 

V, BLOCK FROM CARLINE & BUSINESS CENTER 

J. N. BRICE'"5,^J:r"— !g.ii 


Licens ed Real Estate Broker 
Licensed Contractor 


O. C. NASH 
Salesman 


t8,IIO: t sty. hevse, 8 
OB Triaity SI 


to aa4 S raw flows., float l i iatfa i 


\ 


$2400: 6 rm. house. Let 80x150 between Main and Wan 
OB Bast 4»th Street 


Vj- 


UJSM'.t 


staeee, 2 baths, let 60x17*. West Adaam BItC 


$5,000: 2 sforrbeuse , < ITntts furnished. L« 5<xU0, eioae t* 
Adams Blvd. * Saa redro Sts. Income $110 per 

$MH: « m. house, 11S9 B. 22sd St $4M dn. AU fmi 


$250 des 


Bardweed Oeors. Tile Sink * B«Ob 


2504 So. Central Avenue 
Ottlee Fhene: ADams 00X5 


Las Angles, CO^ 
Resldene* Phone: RI~07ffT 


Eliieh Cooper 

Member of Central Avenue District Realty Board 


:^i- ! 


For Sole 



Bonk Foreclosure! 

10% DOWN ^ 

'MaBagemcnis, Rwitals U CoUecttons Made. Personal 

given to all my Bu slmes problems. Loans made on . 
lear Properties. Ustfaigs Wanted, Reat and Sale 

6 R. ^ 5127 Towns Ave. Hardwood FL $3800. RestricUon 
broken. - . 

2-4-R. M. modem, 1548 E. 49th St, front drive, $5250. Bank 
will make you a loan on the balance. 

6 R. H; west of Cent on Wash. BL All clear. 3-R-$37S0. 
10% down. \ 

6 R. west, of C^A. was Cor. Lot 45x280. $6000, down \<i% 
Clear. 

Ranch, 5-R. Stucco house, modem, Ton tana. Calif., 2 acres, 

all in good cond., many fine fruit trees. Price $2650, a beauty. 

10 R. M. H. west of Cent on 25. 2-4-R, in rear.-iront drive.! 

10 R, M. H. E. AD. west Cent 50x150. Price $3500! G<x>d buy. 

7 R. M. H. west of Cent. Cor. lot 50x150. Price $2700. 

8 rm. H. west of Cent 20 St, a one Cond. Lovely, $3500. 
Vacant lot west of Cent $1000. Down smalL 50x150. 
Vacant lot west of Cent Cor. 200x150. Price $19,004. Down 

10%. 

8 unit stucco court modem, tile showers, aU rented. Cncome. 
$224 month. Price $12,000. Down $1250. Just think. 

6 units, courts, west of Cent, 5 stores, $16,600. Down $8000. 
Stucco Duplex west Western, 2-4 stores, one 5-R-niodem 
to the Minute. Price $8000. Down $1500. 

9 lovely stores west of Cent $13,500. Down 10%. AU rented. 
4 R. H. New, 36. MaMple front drive. $2200. down $350. 

Good buy. 

4 flats west Cent on E. AD. 5-R-E-100xl50, $8250, $1000 . 
down. 

I am member of The Central Ave. Dist Realty Board. The 

Man Who Does. PB~58«1 (Re*.) AD--U760. 2302 Griffith Ave. 

Licensed Br^wr, Hotels and Leases. SETH B. RAY. 


t- 



Bondild 

insuronco 

Broker - Notary 

Publiq 
Standard 
Auto o^d 
Properfy 
InsuVanjeei 


Frre, 


{Real Estate \ 

l|lonM/ &lfMt 

: Homes- 

Business Income 

Small Homes - 

Smoll Forms • 

Ronclies 


Soles- 

Leases. - 

Rentals- i 

Ej^chonges • 

Investments 

&j Properly 

M^nogement 

$4800; $1500 downs cIom in 
$2900; $ 290 down,- cIom In 

We are eager Ito give a square deal in order to get a square deal 

Comk D. L. D. Funche^s, Jr«^ 

I truem ijal Batate Broker * Approved Saljs Btokeg ier 
.' Bona Owners Loaa Corp. y 

FOR YOUR^CONVENIENCE, PHONE OR WRITE: 

B£6.— CE. 20837 • BU8.-AD. 77071 

10$3-<5 E. 50TH ST. LOS ANG|ELE8. CALIF. 


iS-rooi^/ 
5-roMir 

! eager Ito i 


'■fi 


FOR SALE 


If you are thinking ot buying a home or income property, 
it will be to your advantage to come in and look over ear Ust 
l>efore you decide. 

4-room house near Vernon Avenue, full price 
$1950.CX> with $T75.00 down and balance easy 
.... Large lot. 

Modern duplex East 43rd street west of Cen- 
tral .... Good rental property, priced with terms. 

Bank foreclosure — -6 room house West Jeffer-. 
son District .... $3000.00. $500.00 down poy- 
ment and balance like rent. 

7 roorjn stucco west of Central, south of Vern- 
on, pHced at $3500. $500.00 down payment, will 
handle this wonderful buy. 

We have many other good buys to show you . . . See ■■ 
fw Are nisnrance, rental collections and loans on real estate. 


We Speciolize in Fire Insuronce 
—And Moke Loons 

Walter L. Gordon Zo. 

4065 Central Are. ADoms 3193 

«l W C«aim A' 


-TV 


OR SALE 

SPECIAL BARGAINS 
ri sni rpk less 

TWO HOUSES ON LOT; S AMD\S ROOMS- WESTSIOI. 
$8180.00. $800.00 DOT^. \ 

SIX ROOM BukoAL^W: ^I^Bll^nSE: HARDWOOD \ 
FLOORS; I8000JK). SM^WLL DOWN PAYMENT. : .\ 

FIVX AMD sec ROOM HOUSES ON ONE LOT; WIST\ 
or CXNTOAL AVENUE. |27SO.OO^ $500.00 DOWN. 

nVE ROOMS, SAST OF CENTRAL AVENUE. $l»S0Jtt. 

$175.00 DOWN. 

^FOUR Xnnr FLAT; WEST OF CENTRAL AVENUE. $4^0.. 
00. $760.00 DOWN. , - . ^ 

WILLIAM H. GAMBLE 


I 


lUf B. WASHINGTON BLVQ. 




' i' 


'?i^^^u^^°5^^v^^;P^^fP3^T,Jt.''';^^ 


6-8 


If ^Ybti Fall To Reaa THE CALIFORNIA EAGLE You AAoy Kl^r Kr«)#Jrf: Hapi^!f*3 


y^'^i 


Thunilay, Nev«in^r 3, 191^ 


Jcmera Reviews N. A. A. C. P. 


After 25' years the National As-f- 
'atlon for the Advancement of 
Colored People has been able to 
shape itself and serve all of the 
inmsiial cycles of governmental 
changes. The period . immediately 
after its creation was clearly a 
time of correcting thousands of 
stirface and c' vious evils, but af- 
ter the whole system of American 
econmics began to shift, the or- 
ganization attempted to shift to 
meet the conditions by specialized 
preparation. 

So, in 1935, a group of specially 
appointed technicians psycholo 

fists and economists prepared a 
Littire)plan and program for the 
N, A. A. C. P. The average citize.i 
here or in any city could, prior to ■ 
this time, point to many evils here 
and there in the walks of life, but 
now under this new understand- 
ing of conditions, they have di- 
vided the work into seven divi- 
sions: 
1. 
2. 
3. 


Economic Activities 
Structural Re-organization 
Proposal of Legal and Politi- 
cal Activities 

4. Spingarn Medal Award 

5. Educational Activities 

6. Finances " . 

7. Publicity, Research Investiga- 

tion and The Crisis 
Heretofore, the organization of 
the Association in the economic 
field has been conducted as an in- 
cidental phase of the civil liber- 
ties program. It is not the idea to 
become so enthused in economics 
that the Association will forget its 
sacre^ duty to protect the civil 
rights and its original objectives. 
They must continue to fight race 
discrimination, lynching and all 


the other million and one things^ 
that find their way into American 
life with the purpose of defeating 
the Negro. 

The Los Angeles Branch of the 
N. A. A. C. P. has a definite 
schedule to more adequately meet 
the needs of the workers and cit- 
izens in its jurisdiction. On this 
Page in Picture No. 1 you wiU 
find the BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
in session: Atty. Thos. L. Griffith, 
Jr., Walter L. Gordon, Dr. Albert 
Baumann, C. E. McKinney, Bax- 
ter S. Scruggs, Atty. Charles H. 
Matthews, Mrs. A. Hill, L. G. Rob- 
inson. Fred M. Roberts. Rev. S. 
M. %ane, Arthur C. Cole, Dr. H. 
C. Httdson, Miss Naomi Goodloe, 
Mrs. C. A. Bass, Mrs, Zella M, 
Taylor, and Mrs, Elizabeth Ed- 
.wards. 

■at which time they passed upon 
appointing specialized committees 
to be a in a position to answer all 
types of reasonable questions that 
come to the attention of the 
Branch, and to try to serve these 
conditions that have heretofore 
been beyond its facilities. 

In picture No. 2 you will see 
Walter L. Gordon, Chairman of 
the COMMITTEE ON €URVEY 
OF J.-MLS AND PRISONS, dis- 
cussing with Clarence Muie, his 


program. Mr. Gordon wilPhave 
Mrs. L. H. Williams and Mr. P. C. 
Parks as his assistants. 

Picture No. 3, Committee on 
EMERGENCY RELIEF with 
Mrs. A. Hill, chairman, discussing 
with Mrs, Elizabeth Edwards and 
Miss Naomi Goodloe, the possi- 
bilities of taking care of the Xmas 


side, plans of which will be re- i Relief of many citizens of the East- 


leased soon. This is an excellent 
innovation to the work of the As- 
sociation, as it has not had facil- 
ities for spreading Xmas Cheer. 

Picture No, 4, Committee on 
SLUM CLEARANCE AND 
HOUSING is Chairmaned by Fred 
M, Roberts who is talking on the 
telephone to the Housing Authori- 
ty about the slum conditions, par- 
ticularly in the Nevins District, 
Mrs. C. A. Bass and Dr. Albert 
Baumann are in accord' with Mr. 
Roberts, which activity is entirely 
new in the work cf the local 
branch. 

Picture No 5, Committee for 
COMMUNITY BETTERMENT, 
Mrs. C. A. Bass, Chairman, discus- 
sing the fine points of improving 
the appearance of homes, training 
children not to destroy property, 
and the proper care of pets. An 
important work at present is se- 
curing an extension of the "U" 
car line from Slauson Avenue to 
Watts. Serving with her on that 
committee is Walter L. Gordon, 
L. G. Robinson. Clayton D. Rus- 
sell, and S. B, W. May. 

Picture No. 6. BUREAU OF 
STATE ACTIVITIES AND COM- 
PLAINTS, has for its Chairman, 
Dr. H. C. Hudson, Champion of 
Negro rights for many years and 
now the State Conference presi- 
dent. Here he is giving instruc- 
tions to C. E. McKinney to go up 
in the San Juaqum Valley to in- 
I vestigate conditions among the 
, workers as there are many coin- 
\ plaints, coming into the Associa- 
tion from that district. Also Ar- 
i thur C. Cole is waiting to go to 
Imperial Valley to make definite 


survey of working conditions 
there to be acted upon irnmedi- 
ately with results. 

Picture No, 7, Committee on 
YOUTH PROBLEMS. The Presi- 
dent, Thomas L. Griffith, Jr., is 
investigating Stanley Watkins as 
to his experiences in serving as a 
Y. M, C, A. attendant. State- 
ments are being recorded by Zel- 
la M. Taylor, Branch Secretary, 
and Baxter S, Scruggs is aiding 
in working out a definite pro- 
gram that can be properly super- 
vised and enforced in the N, A, 
A. C. P. in the interest of the Col- 
ored Youth. 

Picture No. 8, Clarence Muse 
discussing the plans of the drive 
with Baxter S. Scruggs, executive 
secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

The organization will announce 
shortly its annual drive which 
they intend to secure for • the 
greatest number of members in 
the history of the Association, 
taxing the members $1.00 and 
trying to give more for the dollar 
than ever before. The liberal at- 
titude has increased and it is>our 
duty to get every man. woman 
and child from all walks of life 
interested in this, the only mili- 
tant organization that is in a po- 
sition to put teeth in its program 
and make it stick. They have 
watched the rise and fall of many 
over-night ideas, but this one is 
set up to reach out and serve the 
citizens with intelligent defense, 
intelligent supervision and intelli- 
gent legal advise in the many 
problems that arise daily in the 
great city of Los Angeles and its 
environs. 


Attyi Thomas L. Griffith, Jr., 
who IS president is also the legal 
adviser. His past record irom a 
legal angle has been superb, but 
with these many other new de- 
partments, the Association will be 
able to do greater work, 

Clarence Muse, the distinguish- 
ed artist of the stage and tne di- 
rector of "Run Li'l Chillun" will 
head the N, A. A. C. P. Drive for 
members this yejir. The drive will 
be announced soon and a very 
unique way of securing members 
will be .inaugurated. It is his de- 
sire that everybody who has ever 
had a membership to become a 
worker and answer the call when 
the frist get-to-gether is slated. 

The N. A. A. C. P. has been giv- 
ing service for 25 y,pars, and with 
its new and broader program, will 
stand as a champion of Negro 
rights with as much dignity^and 
security as the Sphinx of old. ' 


<^ 


IT'S EASY 
TO SELL IT 

JF YOU TELL \T 
I -V THE E A C, J. E 


PHONE . . 

ADAMS 9362 

OR CALL AT . . . 

4075 SO. CENTRAL AVE. 


NAACF Pushes 

Prosecution Of 

White Attacker 

i 

CHASE CITY, Va., Nov. 3,— 
Prosecution of a white man, col- 
lector for the Universal Life In- 
surance Company, of Richmond, 
Va., charged with raping a 17- 
year-old colored school girl here 
is being pushed by the local 
branch of the National Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Col- 
ored People. 

The man is alleged to have in- 
duced the girl to ride with him 
to the home of her uncle wheie 
he was to collect insurance, but 
instead drove to a wooded sec:- 
ion near the town and attacked 
her despite her efforts to figiit 
him off. Arrested by police offi- 
cials he is out on $1,000 bail. 

DID y6u know— In 1729, Per- 
ier, governor of Louisiana said 
with reference to a group of Ne- 
£:roes who had lought against 
Indians: "Fifteen Negroes in 
whose hands v.'e had put wea- 
pons, performed prodigies of vaJ 
or. If the DlacR did not cost so 
much, and if their labors were 
not necessary to the colony, it 
would be better to turn them into 
soldiers, and to dismiss those we 
have, who are so bad and cow- 
ardly that they seem to have 
been manufacutred purposely for 
this colony. 





No. 1— GROUP IN ACTION 


No. 2— BUSINESS ACUMEN PLUS .\RTISTIC INSIGHT 


Used and Reconditioned 

RADIOS 

PHILCO 

RCA -VICTOR 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 

and other famous makes 

95 

to $12.95 

PAY 50c WEEKLY 

Just 1 of a kind - so hurry! 

RCA Victor T-tube table model S 7.9.5 

RCA Victor 7-tube mantel model _ 6.95 

Philco 4-tube table model 5.95 

Phiico 5-tube table model . _ . 4,95 

Philco 6-tube console mode! 10,95 

Philco 4-tube mantel model 4.95 

Philco console model radio 10.95 

Philco 5-tube console model 11.95 

Philco 7-tube mantel model.. 4.95 

Philco 4-tube mantel modeL 12.95 

Jackson Bell 5-tube tompact model 4.95 

Philco 4-tube compact model 7.95 

Philco 4-tube mantel model t',._- 5.00 

Philco 4-tube mantel model :': 5.95 

-■Mission Bell mantel model radio. !._j_ 4.95 

.Midwest table model radio _ ,^_ 12. 95 

-Alajestic 7-tube console model- ._ __, 9.95 

Jackson Bell 6-tubp mantel model__ > 5.95 

Grunow 6-tube console radio .. 10,95 

General Electric Console model .. 9.95 



. 


r 



No. 3— LADIES TO THE RESCUE 



No, 4— BETTER-BEAUTIFUL HOMES 


No, 5— MORE PARKS FOR OUR CHILDREN 



uLf.fS.;: 


No. 6— STATEWIDE SERVIGB 


No, 7— AN OUNCE OF PREPAREDNESS 




No. 8-tIOJN the N. a. a. C. PJ 


■ • \ ' 




'♦J v- 1.1 


■U:: 




■m-i 








WOV llrl918 








FOR RESULTS US£ 

EAGLE CLASSIFIED 

ADS— AD. 9362 


CALIF 




VOL. 59— NO. 31 


LOS ANGELES, CALIF., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1938 


PRICE FIVE CENTS 


IIVO 

BICKERING 


MEN QUARREL, ONE FOUND DEAD 


DEMOCRATIC VICTORY 
Ok COAST CONCEDED; 
NEW DEAL SLIPS IN EAST 

Assemmyman Augustus Hawkins is Overwhelm- 
ing Victor in 62nd District; William D. Camp- 
bell is CaugKt Under Democrotic Landslidi 

As election returns received final tabulation Ipte 
last night, a\ Democratic victory in the State of Cpll- 
fornia was dpnceded, but a renewal of Republi|^an 
popularity in the .nation, as a whole, was noted. 

The West Coast, last of the^- 


A 


ENDS IN 
DEATH FOR ONE MAN, 
ARREST FOR OTHER 

22-Year Old Car Washer Found Dead by Brother 
of George Farley, Eviction Case Principal; Police, 
Staked Out, Nab Suspect; Claims Self-Defense 

The continual bickering between Prince Davis, 
22-year old car-washer of 120 E. Fifth street, and Joe 
Due, 934 Hemlock street, ended Sunday in death for 
one and arrest on suspicion of murder of the other. 
'■ '? Due was found dead in his bed 

on 


the 


at the above address Sunday af- 
ternoon by Ben Farley, brother 
I of George Farley, convicted mur- 
1 derer of two eviction officers last 
I Spring, now serving time in San 
I Quentin prison. 

i Davis was arrested Monday 

, night at 1425 E. 14th street by 

j Newton street police who had 

been staked out at that address 

on a tip that the youth would be 

coming there. 


CLAIMED SELF DEFENSE 

He admitted hitting Due a blow 
On the head with a mop handle, 
at the climax of an argument, but 
said that Due jabbed him first 
with an ice pick. 

Officers were fold that Dae 
wallted abont for a day and a 
night with his skull fractured. 
The fighting occurred Friday 
night on a lawn at 943 Hemlock. 
Due walked to his home, went to 
bed, went about his activities Sat- 
urday and Saturday night. When 
he failed to get up Sunday morn- 
ing or lattenioon, Farley wpth 

whom the youth roomed, went in 
and found him dead of the frac- 
tured skull. 

EVANGELIST KINSEY 
RETURNS TO L. A. 

Mrs. Susie Kinsey, Evangelist, 
formerly connected with the Peo- 
ple's Independent Church of 
Christ, returned to the city last 
week, after two years spent 
studying at Wilberforce Univer- 
sity in Wilberforce, Ohio. 

Mrs. Kinsey was one of the 
most brilliant students of the Un- 
iversity School of Religion. 


Wm. Nickerson 
Plans State Tour 

William Nickerson, Jr., Presi- 
dent-Manager of the. Golden 
State Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, is planning a tour of 
the state, it was learned this 
week. He recently visited in 
Pasadena and San Die^o and was 
received with such enthusiasm 
that he plans spending some time 
in every district where an office 
of the Company is located. 

An itinerary is being arranged 
to give policy-holders the bene- 
fit of hearing the story of the 
Company's progress r r o m the 
man who initiated its founding. 
Mr. Nickerson is well known as 
a Weaker of ability. 

Hawkins Thanks 
District Voters 

This election has been a great 
victory for the people and I am 
very proud of the position taken 
by our District on the side of 
Progress. 

On behalf of our local Camp^ 
aign Committee I wish to thank 
the many loyal workers and the 
voters without whose suppoirt 
and faith this victory .would not 
have been. We have from you 
clear orders to ".go ahead" and we 
shall not fail you. 

Signed 
AUGUSTUS F. HAWKINS 
Assemblyman, 62nd District 


GOVERNOR OF CALIFORNIA--CULBERT L.OLSON 


South Africa Recognizes 
Conquest of Ethiopia 

PRETORIA, Union of South 
Africa, Nov 10, (ANP)— The Un- 
ion of South Africa last week 
approved Prime Minister Neville 
Chamberlin's decision to estab. 
lish the British-Italian agree- 
ment. It also decided to recog- 
nize Italy's conquest of Ethiopia. 


sidewalk 

by c. a. h. 

NOT the Kite— but the Tail." 
This is a very old phrase — 
e well-used by this and preced- 

ng generations. However, it well 

its the activities of certain groups 

lection night. 
The state of California has chos- 

in to "go democratic" for the first 

ime in 44 years. This is a clean- 

ut indication of the will of the 

■Mjfcle; and, as always in a De- 

■fcpacy, is to receive the respect 

IN deference of all. But this vic- 

ory for a certain political faction 

loes not mean that those who 

pposed it are either discredited 

T legitimate targets for misuse 

md misrepresentation. The mobs 
hich decorated windows of Cen- 
al Avenue business establish- 

nents known to house Republi- 
cans were a disgrace to the com- 

nunity. Iij these motley throngs, 

t was strange that most conspicu- 

jus were those who constantly 

irusade in the name of "liberty", 

"freedom of thought", "freedom of 

ipeech", etc. Yet these individuals 

degraded themselves to the ex- 

ent of destroying property simp- 

y because its owners happened 

to diff«- with them in the exer- 
ise of this same "freedom of 

speech" and "freedom of thought". 
On the windows of the Cali- 

'omia Eagle printing plant the 

jjrmbol of Nazism was scrawled 

Wednesday morning. The general 

Intent was one of malicious ridi- 
cule because a Republican canidi- 

date had been defeated. It is a 

singular thing that the ardent sup- 
porters of justice in "Tom Moon- 

ey Case", "The Scottsboro Case", 

"The Czechoslovakian Affair", 

and "The Spanish Civil War" can- 
not achieve this .justice in their 

own thinking. 

A fellow American, supporting 

an independent political opinion, 

was branded Nazi because that 

opinion clashed with those es- 
poused by the mobsters. * 

How little these people realize 

the frue force and significance of 

the word they overuse to such an 

eirtent. TI» word "liberty". Evi- 

firtly, this freedom is important 

m Tuesday evening's Central Ave- 
nue destructionists only as it af- 
fects themselves. The glory of lib- 
erty was shown when they de- 
feated, say, the muchmaligned 
Proposition No. 1. But when this 
victory was celebrated through a 
demarkation of property, the 
hoodlums revealed an absolute ig- 
norance of the vital planks of De- 
mocracy. To them, only their side 
was worthy of tolerance or sym- 
pathy. The other fellow, although 
his sentiments were sincere and 
honest, did not merit a respect 
•ven for his property rights. 

It would be a good thing if those 
wRo struggle in the conflict to re- 
form humanity would first clear 
the cobwebs of bigotry from their 
own minds. 

Scanning the national scene, we 
I)erceive that America's age-old 
law of the pendulum is once agam ..■•i»i ..» 

>u/^esS&Tt?e'tation Appomtcd To Managerial Post 

indicate that u. -egrity of thought 
has not been abolished by the 
American electorate. 

Unlimited, unchallenged power 
in the hands of any individual or 
party functioning in a democracy 
« a grave threat to Its existence. 
Significant, resounding GOP suc- 
cesses are a symbol to the admm- 
Istration that it had better nund 
, Its legislative Fs and Q's. 

The 1-ss of California, of course, 

I a blow to Republicans. However^ 

the most amazing strength of 

Dewey in his New York cam 

(eontiaaed oa Edtfortal »«(•) 



segments of the Cbuntry to ac- 
cept the New^ Deal domination, 
voted almost wholl* Democratic 
in the State final election Tues- 
day. But the East, in Which Pres- 
ident Roosevelt's New Deal rea- 
ched its peak a year a«o, admin- 
istered a sharp rebufl to those 
forces. Fifteen states were be- 
lieved captured by the Grand 
Old Party. 

In California, leads ol Demo- 
cratic candidates for Governor 
Culbert Olson, for United\ States 
Senator Sheridan Downey and 
for Lieutenant-Governor 1, Ellis 
Patterson, at press time\ last 
night had crossed the 100,000 
mark and election was virtually 
assured. \ 

HAWKINS m AGAIN \ 

In Los Angeles and on -the 
Eastside the re-el«etion of the 
incumbent Asemblyman Augus- 
tus F. Hawkins to the State Leg- 
islature from the 62nd Districi 
was a certainty almost at the 
outset. Entering his trird term 
at Sacramento where he suc- 
ceeded Frederick M. Roberts, Re- 
publican and the first Calif orffla 
Negro legislator, Hawkins «v-as 
opposed only by Sidney P. Dones, 
local realtor, running on the Pro- 
gressive ticket. Both are Negroes. 

Snowed under by the New 
Deal landslide was the Eepabli- 
can candidate for Congress from 
the 14th District, WUliam D. 
Campbell, bowing to the incum- 
bent Democrat, Thomas Ford. 
This was Campbell's third at- 
tempt to make the Wasbiagton 
trip tai vs many consecutive el- 
ections and each time he has met 
a similar fate. 

Most persistent runner-up to the 
victorious Demos was Walter 
Scott Franklin, retired Santa 


Barbara doctor and f*mer. 
Franklin, introduced to th4 Los 
Angeles community by thelfeditor 
of the Eagle, Mrs. Charldtta A- 
Bass, clung fast to the coit tails 
of Patterson throughout Yester- 
day's vote tabulations and Sot un- 
til three fourths of the piecincts 
were, accounted for did thafpenao- 
cratic political aspirant iPatter- 
son pull away to a comfortable 
lead. •• 
PENSION PLAN BLOW 

The death of the Ham a ad Eggs 
Pension Plan was a bio* to the 
state's oldsters, who h^d been 
warmiiag themselves on political 
hai-angiiers' bloated promises of 
$30.00 ivery week, for the past 
three months. j 

However, the proposal of the . 
plan, ludicrous in itself as it was, 
was hailed as a definitei step in 
the right direction, iridicating 
that something must be none for 
the country's aged and inpover- 
ished. 

California Eagle sponsored can- 
didates for minor state! off.ces 
fared a bit better than Governor 
Frank Merriam, incumbait can- 
didate on the Republica i ticket. 
Elected by wide majorit es were 
Secretary of State Frank Jordan, 
Controller Harry B. RUe^ , Attor- 
ney General Earl Wan en and 
Richard Bonelli to the loard of 
Ekjualization, 4th District, 


Now De 
Scripture Sez 

, That "The price of wD^om is 

above rubies," "So," my Aunt 
decided, "that explaiii the 
great epidemic of morohs!" 

Yours until wine will no 
longer be a mocker of al]( strong 
drink. Eugene Henry Htiffman, 


(Photo, courtesy of Daily News) 


9,000,000 DENIED LEARNING 



New Light is Thrown on 
Jim Crow School System 


NEW YORK, Nov. 10— In the^ 
United States approximately 9,- 
000,000 Negroes in 19 states and 
the District of Columbia are de- 
nied the opportunity of sharing 
equally with whites in the dis- 
tribution of federal, state, county, 
and municipal funds for educa- 
tion, according to a pamphlet is- 
sued this week by the National 
Association for the Advancement 
of Colored People. ' 

The twenty-four page pamph- 
let entitled/ "Racial Inequalities 
in Education," summarises the 
Association's work during the 
past four years in the field of 
education, which was made pos- 
sible by grants from the Ameri- 
can Fimd for Public Service. 

The booklet is a revealing 
document, maintaining as it does, 
the thesis that the segregated 
school system tn the United 
States, aside from the fact that it 
is wasting the maney of Ameri- 
can taxpayers to the tune of mil- 
lionS of dollars, operates as the 
greatest single force against de- 
mo<a-acy in the United States to- 
daj*. 

Disfranchisement in education- 
al opporttmity is the lot of four- 


fifths of the total Negro popula- 
tion in the country, which is lo- 
cated in the South, where they 
comprise one-fourth of the total 
population, according to the 
pamphlet. It shows how Alabama, 
Arkansas, Florida, -G e or gi a, 
Maryland, Mississippi, North 
Carohna, South Carolina, Okla- 
homa, and Texas, taken as a 
whole, spend an average of 252.5 
p>er cent more money on the edu- 
cation of white children than on 
Negro children. In: some south - 
em counties, according to the sur- 
vey, the difference runs as high 
as 1,500 per cent. 

The pamphlet shows how the 
southern and border states divert 
federal funds from Negro land- 
grant colleges, force Negro tax- 
payers to pay for white schools 
while denying Negroes the right 
to attend state universities, rob 
Negro teachers of thousands of 
dollars every year by paying 
them salaries far under the level 
of white teachers, and deny Ne- 
gros an equitable share faf PWA 
and FERA funds for building 
schoote and transporting pupils 
to classes. 


Mrs. Bethune is 
Highest Paid 
Negro in NYA 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10, (AN 
P)— Although the NYA and WPA 
both New Deal Agencies have 211 
officials drawing salaries in ex- 
cess of $5,000 y.parly, not one 
goes to colored executives in the 
two set-ups. Mrs. Mary McLeod 
Bethune of the NYA is the high- 
est piid Negro with a reported 
salary of $5,000. 

Of those making more than 
$5,000, 108 receive over $6,000, 
26 are paid in- excess of $7,000, 
16 get 8,000 or more, six diraw 
over $9,000 and one WPA Ad- 
ministrator Harry Hopkins is 
paid $12,000. 


Irene Freeman Appointed Manager 
For Lincoln Memorial Park 

Mrs. Irene Givens Freeman who has been bookkeeper ior foui 
years at the beautiful Lincoln Memorial Park Cemetery at Central 
and 167th Street, was appointed manager of the unresWctec ; burial 
tract last week. 

Mrs. Freeman comes from a pioneer Los Angeles family and 
is the sister-in-law of the famed architect, Paul R. WUliai is. She 
received her education after high school in the Woodbu ry and 
Ku'rtz Business colleges and attended the University of S)uthem 
California. 

Before becoming identified with the v Lincoln Park foupdation 
at its inception ir^ February. 1934, Mrs. Freeman was emplJyed as 
bookkeeper by thfe Unity Finance Company for eight yeafs; and 
in the same capacity by the Pyramid chain stores four yea 
appointment irecords the first Negro manager for the Parh 
now employs aU coflDred help both in the office and on the g 

In the social an^ club world, Mrs. Freeman is known as 
Y. M. C. A. worker where she is advdser for the Business 
f essionai Girls, and as la member of Pi Chapter of Delta Sig 
Sorority. She resides at 921 East Thirty-second Street. 

Mrs. Freeman's ajppointment has been cited by leading Order- 
takers as a very progressive and commendable step by the Linpola 
Park administration. 



CLARENCE MUS? 


A-TALKIN' to YOU-- 


MRS. IRENE GIVENS FREEMAN, progressive and efficient 
young business woman, who was appointed manager of the Lincoln 
Memorial Park Cemetery last Week which she has served as book- 
keeper for four years. (See Story). < 


"NECHtO NEWSPAPER OF THE AIK" 
8:15 P. Mv— KGFJ 
' ; Nightly Newcaster — John Kinioch 

♦Thursday— Editorial Comment: Editor-Publisher C. A. Bass 
♦Friday— Sepia Sportscast: J. Cullen Fentress 
♦Monday— Society— Helen F. Chappell 1 ;-; • 

♦Tuesday — News ■ « '• '- 

♦Wednesday — ^News . ..i| , ..•. . .. < 

; Preaenttd by S. A. Scberer, Anf« and FanttiiTe Loam 


Negro Youth Topic of 
NAACP Meet Sundoy 


ASK TO SEND 
COTTON TO STRICKEN 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Nov. 10, 
(CNA) — A resolution urging the 
United States Government to 
send surplus cotton to Spain and 
China was passed by the Alaba- 
ma Fanners Union State conven- 
tion just ended in Jasper. 


What the Negro Youth of to 
day is thinking as reflected in: 

The National Youth Movement, 
The State Youth Conference, 
The Local Youth Agencies, The 
Writings of Younger Negro Au- 
thors, will be discussed by Wen- 
dell Green, Beulah Terry, Doro- 
thy C Quinn, and Miriam Mat- 
thews at the regxxlar meeting, of 
the local brancft of the NAACP 
Sunday, Nov. 13, at 8:30 o'clock, 
at Hamilton M. E. Church. 

The discti^sion will be presee- 


ted in the form of an informal 
interview and Clarehce 'English 
will serv| as leader. Each speaker 
will endeavor to give all of the 
most important ideas suggested 
by his particular part of the sub- 
ject. It is hoped that these parts 
of the Youth Movement will be 
clarified for those who attend the 
meetiiig. 

The-music for the afternoon 
will be especially good. Jessie 
Coles Grayson is the soloist and 
Hazel G..Whitaker wijl accoinp- 


SEEKS ''HEAVEN" 
LANDS IN JAIL 

NEW YOITK, Nov. 10, (CNA) 
— Buddy Jones, 36, wanted to 
eat his Sunday chicken dinner 
at Father Divine's Heaven at 
Lenox avenue and 123rd "street 
Refused admittance because he 
had been drinking, Jones turned 
in a false firt alarm. Arrested 
he was sentenced to 10 days in 
jaiL 

any her. Zelma Watson Duke wiii 
lead the Avalon Christian church 
clioir. A violin and piano ensem- 
ble will be played by Idelle 
Johnson and Victoria Rice. Of 
unusual interest will be the num- 
bers presented by two Holly- 
wood stars through the courtesy 
pf Clarence Muse. The public is 
cordially invited. 




■There has been a great urge recent- 
among our group, especially the 
nger folks to write plays. That's good 
a very healthy thing for our pro- 
gress in the theatrical and literary w^orld. 
MaiW young authors have sent me their 
"BR4.IN CHILDREN" but I find on the 
wholk that most of these ambitious writ- 
ers h|ve failed to study their business. 
Writing is a very definite business with 
. rules Aiat must be followed and codes. 
\a young writer should learn them all 
jDef ore starting in the field as a c o m- 
CLABENCE muse jnercial (author. One rule I noticed the 
other day that is indeed a good ope, especially for dialogue and 
that is, "Have Something "so Say, ^ay it in as few words as pos» 
sible, And Then Stop Talkirk." I mi^t pass this along for what it 
is worth. But the important thing that strikes my mind is that we 
need writers and there is a ifood malritet for good sincere writers. 
We need new subjects, with kimple execution and above all with 
universal appeal. Again the fWm and formula is important with 
screen plays and I might say tkere are a number of schools giving 
couAes in this work that woul^ be of gr^t help to these young 
aspirants. I hope this little chat t^ young writers will not discourage 
them. It is given in the SPmiT OF HELP.— The kind of help that 
will make the world accept great Negro storifes. Miss Ruby Berkeley 
Goodwin, one of our outstanding feature wriU/rs and I believe or.e 
who bids fair to be an outstanding screoi play author, contends 
that aU oilr creators need is trainii^g and enthusiasm plus oppor* 
tunity, best si^i>lieS by our people writing FAN MAIL, consistent* 
ly. Fay Jackson, the siicteen cylinder press agent and news com- 
mentator has screamed FAN MAIL ih headlines until her fingws 
have torailitis, and I am again asking you to write studios, new*. " 
papers and anybody in the PRODUC:iNG end, so that these younj 
writers can be heard. But writers, keep writing and studying, lor 
when the day comes, it may be btf ore you are ready,and that WouU, 
be sad. With pen in hand, 'I now set these words that shall rinfc 
out a message to the world.' That's the slogan as I see it, and pleaafiV 
write better plays, is my answer to some three hundred I hav*^ 
received. Keep away from obvious propaganda and race prejudice. 
It is not good theatre fare. Entertainment with soul and sincerity, 
wiU carry a message. (Copyrighted by Clarence ^use— lOSft) 







Thursdoy. Kev«mber 10, 1938 


^^.^^■^ ''^:^'^r%i-M:.^ 



If You l^if Totea THI C^^ CAfill You AAay l^tNvr Mivftf }fMopf»eriSi 





CHECKING YOUR 
ADVERTISING MONEY 


By s. A. acorr 

As an aid to all aals roanafcn 
who hare not had a great d«al of 
experience in kyin* out adver- 
tising programs, and . in deter- 
mining the amount required to 
carry the advertiaing program 
through I am going to ask a few 
questions to avoid inadequate and 
unwise advertising budgeting: 
.-(1.) WHAT DO TOC HKAN 
WHEN TOU SrXAK OF 
ADVEBtlSINQ 

Does it cover only advertising 
*i magazinea and metropolitan 
'newspapers, d i r e c t-mail, bill- 
boards, street car and the other 
commonly accepted avenues for 
.^publicity? No doubt it includes 
^. exhibitiona at converetiona, busi- 
. ness ahowa. Fairs, etc. iThere are 
many avenues for publicity — but 


DID YOU 
KNOW? 


'■I. 


-.V; 


That the Majestic Venetian 
Blind Ca, at 3126 West Florence 
Ave., are now. featuring the fol- 
lowing Venetian Bltods at only 
39 cents per square foot. 
1. white clear slats. 
2.. supreme interwoven cords. 

3. Fancy Valances. 

4. Lignum Vitae Pulleys. 

5. LOTentzen Cadmium Plated 
wrught Steel Hardware and the 
Majestic Venetian Blind, Co. 
Mfr's. Blinds, they are not agents 
for some other company. Every- 
thing is mfgr., at ne address 
above and only the finest Vene- 
tian Blinds are made — they do 


the mort important part; my ^^^ ^^ , ^^^ ^ ^j y,^^ 

friend, IS overlookmg the medium tv,:_ J- * 

that will get you in direct con- 


tact with the people that have 
the money to spend. In advertis- 
ing in class publications you are 
going after ^he business direct. 

The average tales manager will 
tell me loat he advertises in the 
Metropolitan papers and that will 
reach all the people That is not 
true in this case at all — The Cal- 
ifornia Eagle carries all the News 
That Is of Vital Interest To All 
the Colored People, It Keeps 
Them In Touch With Worldly 
Topics "f^at Effect the Colored 
People — News That They can not 
Get Out o' Any Metropolitan 
Paper Because the Other Papers 
Are Not At All Ifrterested in our 
Problems or Our Welfare. 

2.0 What should advertising 
as defined, be expected to do? 

A list of some of the principle 
conditions to be faced by the 
business during the period under 
consideration should be named. 
For example: 

Probable increase and decrease 
In selling resistance experienced- 
by all your sales staff. 

The introduction of any new 
line of servi<;e or product to the 
which must be advertised to the 
colored people. 

Stimulus that needs to be giv- 
en to the sale of certaLa products 
or service. 

The necessity for offsetting the 
influence of increased ad /ertii- 
ing on the part of competitors. 

After thought has been given 
to the listing of conditions which 
will probably have to be met, the 
next thing is to formulate cer- 
tain definite tasks for the adver- 
. tiding to accomplish. It it best to 
keep the tasks modest in scope, 
rather than to expect advertising 
to work revolutionary changes 
within a few months. 

13.) How can advertising best 
do the tasks .set, and meet the 
conditions likely to be confront- 
ed? 

Will magazine advertising 
reach the colored people? 

Will direct mail reach the 
Colored people? . 

.Should billboards be given 
" a trial to reach the colored peo- 
ple? 

Should street car advertising 
be tried to reach the colored peo- 
ple? 

Should all theses media be 
fUsed, or only one, or two, or 
three? - 

This is one of the most impor- 
tant questions to be answered in 
determining an advertising ap- 
propriation to reach the colored 
people. Probably no firm ever 
answers it in a manner satisfac- 
tory even to itself. Experience, 
the experience of others, coupled 
with sound judgement must be 
relied upon to define the course 
cf action that should be follow- 
ed. I shall give more next week 
on: Checking your advertising 
money. 


blinds. 

Three years ago the Majestic 
Venetian Blind Co., was in its 
infancy — however, today Mr. 
Gardner who is the sole owner 
has enlarged his business to such 
an extent that he now owns the 
entire Comer the plant is located 
on. Do you knaw what enabled 
Mr. Gardner to enlarge his busi- 
ness and so rapidly too? This is 
the reason. — By giving the pub- 
lic, dependable merchandise that 
no other company can equal in 
price or quality. If you are ex- 
periencing the same trouble most 
people are as a result of inferior 
quality of material and very 
poor workmanship, why not let 
the Majestic? Venetian Blind Co., 
give you an honest estimate on 
your Venetian blinds. A phone 
call will bring one of their rep- 
resentatives with samples of 
blinds and plenty of suggestions. 

Why not avail yourself of this 
opportunity without oblication 
on your part — if you do you will 
want to join the steadily grow- 
ing army of boosters. 

Mr. Gardner has many friends. 
and customers among the colored 
people and openly solicits yoiir 
patronage. (Adv.) 


Students in 

Strike as 
Insult Protest 

OYSTER BAY., L. I, Nov. 10. 
fANPf— Three hundred students 
of the village high school at Oy- 
ster Bay last week sUged a strike 
to determine the identity of the 
unnamed taxpayer who was re- 
ported to have said that the school 
was "too good" for Negroes, It- 
alians and Poles attending it. 

The statement, causing trouble 
was published in the Oct. 30, is_ 
sue of the Oyster Bay Enterprise- 
Pilot, a weekly newspaper, in a 
report of a taxpayers' 'meeting. 
Dr. Myron, to whom the remark 
is alleged to have been made, is 
reported to have said at the meet- 
ing that he did not agree with 
anyone who said the high school 
"was too good for Negroes, Wops 
and Poles." 

The strike was called last Mon- 
day morning, and students refus. 
ed to attend classes until a com- 
mittee chosen from their ranks 
had been selected to investigate 
the source of the alleged sUte- 
ment. 


Benton's is|' 
Handy in 
BadWeather 

Winter is coming and with it, 
the inconvenience of shopping in 
rainy weather and pentertating 
cold. Persons within reach of 
telephone^ however, are not sub- 
ject to such discomfort If their 
needs come within the limits of 
the many services offered by Ben- 
ton's, a cidl to AD. 717'/ at any 
hour of the day or night will 
l^ing a courteous messenger to 
their doorsteps right away. 

Pioneers in Los Angeles deliv- 
ery service, Benton's has since 
last winter added to its fleet of 
motorcycle and delivery trucks 
until it is one of the largest and 
speedest in the city. 

Another added feature is a 
special prescription pick-up ser- 
vcie. You will find it very con- 
venient to call Benton's to pick 
up your prescription at your 
home or Doctor's office and re- 
turn the compound medicine to 
you all in a very short space of 
time. 

No matter what the emergency 
or occasion, if the service of a 
drug ' store are needed, Benton's 
can do it. Place the name BEN- 
TON'S and the phone number, 
ADams 7177 on a pad beside your 
telephone. 

It is your personal servant! 

Vital Statistics 

BIRTHS 

Smith, Daisy E«a, Oct. 28 at 
the General Hospital to Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Smith, 1777 Imperial 
avenue. 

Warren. Alice Faye, Oct. 29, 
at the General Hospital to Mr. 
and Mrs. E. Warren, 1713 E, 21st 
street 

Web, Clarence Roosevelt, Oct. 
29, at the General Hospital to Mr. 
and Mrs. James Webb, 1261* E. 
Vernon Avenue. 


Final Rites for OoklandMilt 
Conducted Here By Aiigeitias 


DEATHS 

■ Bobo, Carrie, A. 55, whose late 
residence was 1541 E. 43rd street 
died Oct 29 at the General Hos- 
pital Buriel Nov. 5 at Paradise 
Memorial Cemetery with A. J. 
Roberts Co. in charge. 

McCardell, Roland. 27. whose 
late residence was 1351 E. 42nd 
street died at his home Oct. 22. 
Buriel was Nov. 4 in Paradise 
Cemetery with the People's 
Mortuary in charge. 

Melenda, Lucille, L., 35, whose 
late residence was 42 Alesandro 
place, Pasadena, died at the Gen- 
eral Hospital. Buriel was in Mt. 
View Cemetery Nov. 3 with J. 
Woods Funeral Parlor jn charge. 

Jackson, Charles E., 44 di e d 
at his late residence, 3723* Met- 
tler street Oct 31. Burial was 
Nov. 4, in the Soldier's Cemetery 
with Conner-Johnson Co. in 
charge. 

Woods, Emma Gene, 9 months, 
whose late -residence was 417? 
Hooper avenue died Nov. 1, Bur- 
iel was in Evergreen Cemetery 
Nov. 5, with Conner-Johnson Co 
in charge. 

Adams, Carter, D., 72, died at 
his late residence, 1459 E. 21sti 
street Nov. 1. Buriel was Nov. 7J 
in Evergreen Cemetery with Con-j 
ner-Johnson Co. in charge. 

Turner, Anna B. 53, whose late 
reiidence was 1368 E. 20th street 
died Nov. 1 at the General Hos 
pital. Buriel was Nov. 5 in Ever- 
green Cemetery with Conner 
Johftson Co. in charge. 


Having passed awa^ at his 
home in, Oakland Oct./ 30, the 
funeral of Henry Floyd was held 
in the church chapel of Angelus 
Funeral Home Monday afternoon. 
Rev. B. F. Floyd officiated and 
burial was in Evergreen. 

Bom ih Louisiana, the deceas- 
ed had made his hcrnie in Califor- 
nia for the past lis years. An aunt 
Mrs. Mary Reed of Oakland and 
other relatives survive. 
LAMBERT 

Hundreds of friends and des- 
cendants of early settlers of Los 
Angeles filled Second •^•^ptist 
church, 24th and Griffith, last 
Tuesday afternoon to pay final 
tribute to Mrs. Mary A. Lambert 
pioneer resident,, of 2152 E. 20th 
street. 

The aged matron was one of 
the oldest members of Second 
Baptist and for many years was 
one of the most faithful workers 
in the church. "The pastor, Rev. 
T. L. Griffith, directed the ob- 
sequies. Under direction of the 
Angelus Funeral Home inter- 
ment was in Evergreen cemetery. 
Mrs. Lambert succumbed at 
her home November 3. She came 
to Los Angeles from Providence, 
R. I., 38 years ago. Her husband. 
Rev. R. H. Lambert, survives. 
MCCRARY 

Final services for Mrs. Grace 
McCrary of Indio were held from 
the church chapel of Angelus 
Funeral Home Wednesday morn- 
ing with Rev. S. M. Beane in 
charge of the rites. 

She succumbed at Riverside 
county hospital November 4, fol- 
lowing a brief illness. Her nat- 
ive home was Martin, Tenn., and 
she had lived in this state for 8 
years. Her husband, Samuel Mc- 
Crary and other relatives sur- 
vive. Interment was in I^er- 
green. 
SMITH 

The funeral services of Shed 
Smith, 1760 E. 113th street will 
be held in the church chapel of 
Angelus Funeral Home this af- 
ternoon (Thursday)" at 2 o'clock. 
Rev. L M. Curtis will survive, 
with burial in Lincoln Memorial 
cemetery. ' 

Mr. Smith passed away at his 
home November 3. He was bom 
in Gonzales, Texas and had made 
his Rome in Los Angeles for the 
past 15 years. 


AN EXCELLENT HAIil 
STRAIGHTENER 

GUARANTEED to straighten 
the most STUBBORN Hair 
quickly and surely. Pleasing and 
attractive — an excellent tonic-— 
giving the Hair a deep luster. 
Costs but a few cents. Write for 
FREE OFFER. 

JOHNS-PACK CO. 

856 Wilson Avenue, 

Chicago, Illinois. 

JOHNS-PACK CO. 


Congratulstiong to a popular 
and successful gentleman are in 
order, Arthur F. Adams, above, 
of the general sales department 
of the Gold Fumitur» Company 
and i^dvisor and cOCiisellor on all 
matters pertainin.'.' to home furn- 
ishings and dec rations, is cele- 
brating his fifteenth year 
commendable s» -vice to the East' 
side community. 


The Doy I Got 
My Rabbit's Foot' 


A. F. Adams i'l Won $100] GOLD\MEDAt 

Enters 15th 
Year at Gold's 


write* T. T. of Pa. "The PIUTEK you 
•ent mn with ay RMBtTS' FOOT b«s 
hrlpcd nw wonikilullr. I wm« wuir crip- 
pled. Xow I •TO ifltiiiir well «catn, " says 
Mn. L. C. o( Ohio. "I now h»ve Btc«dy 
work," writes Fred C. of Canadk ' 


tiadrNmOil 


Fine for Weak Acid 
neys ^nd BJadder 


Letter* like tbfue coming trdm «ratefiil 

men and women all over the country make 

Bie very happ; It may lie coincideoce, or 

it may be the pbyachological effect, Iwt 

„»i whatever it is these people believe I liave 

[ helped them— ami I would like to help 

, YOU. too! 

I Heallli, Ko Job, Unlucky in Kumbera, 


Irritation. 


STOP GETTING UP 
NIGHTS 


'The Electric Fairy" is 
Kiddie Airing Feature 

Featured in "The Monitor 
Children's Program'* Saturday 
morning at 10 o'clock over KNX 
is a little girl who wishes that 
she might live in a story book, 
but who discovers that she has 
been living in a fairy tale all the 
time and never knew it. "The 
Elecrtic Fairy" appeared origin- 
ally on The Children's Page of 
The Christian Science Monitor, 
an internationally daily news- 
paper published in Boston, Mass. 

Included in> the program are 
two other entertaining stories, 
"Robert the - Bruce Races" and 
"Little Dog Finds Three Friends". 

NAT'L COUNCIL Of' 
WOMEN TO HOLD MEET 

NEW YORK, Nov. 10, (ANP) 
— 'The National Negro Council of 
States, Inc., will assemble for 
Negro Women of the United 
their annual meeting on Nov. 23 
and 26 at the YWA here. The 
election of the nominationp- 
council will hold its biennial el- 
ection of the nominating com. 
mittee at this time, and will 
make plans for its future pro- 
l^ram. Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune 
IS founder and president, and 
Mrs. Clara Burrill Bruce, exec- 
utive secretary. 


; nealth, ■ No Job, Unlucky ni Numbers, 

Adams had already earned an oames, Race«, swcei>«take». etc, in i.ovo, 
enviable record in the bu.siness Loi.oiy, won-kd, or au)ahintr eiae— -you 
world when he decided to enter, ^'^.^^^^c^' ^^b'^-s ri^ »^ tTe- 
the home furnishing field because 
it fascinated him. During his] 
long association with the uold ' 
Furniture Company, the firm 
has risen to the position, of one of 
the largest and most complete 
hotne furnishing and appliance 
stc^re in Southern Californiat 

Despite the strenuous require- 
ments of his position, Adam.s 
finds time to devote to his many 
interests ih the religious, fratern- 
al and social world. 


One 35-cent box of these fa 
ous capsules will put hiealthy acl 
tivity into your kidneys and bladl 
der — flush out harmfxU wasti 
poisons and acid and pr<*ve tl 
you that at least you have 
«PKCi-\L PR.aER for Vou and Youi 1 grand diuretic and stimulwt thsl 

Loved Ones which 1 enclose in everj- or.lei 'will swiftlyj caUSC these trOUDU| 


Thousaha of people aweir that the mys. 
tprious IXCKT POWBR of a real B\R- 
BIT'S FOOT briiiKS Good Fo'turie and I'ro- 
tcctiou from Harm. Almost every liiir.g 
soul on Mrth lus F.klTH in Ihp Trnnu-n. 
dons, .Mi^ily. iN>>er.Kailing TOWTJK or 
i'RAVKR If vou haven't tred the rom- 

liin.itioii of these two flRK.^T POWKHH 
(luut 'tclwy! IVopl.- say thi-y may Change 
Your I.uck overnight ! 


DID YOU KNOW— The bllick 
belt was originally a fertile strip 
of black soil. The Black Belt of 
today is that part of a city where 
most of the colored population 
reside. 


Land -Grant 
Presidents to 
Meet in 'Chi' 

INSTITUTE, W. Va., Nov. 10, 


CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION 
TO ENTER GAINES CASE 

ST. LOUIS, Mo., Nov. 10, (AN 
P) — Charging that equal protec- 
tion of laws guaranteed by the 
14th amendment to the U. S. 
Constitution had been denied, the 
American Civil Liberties Union 
will file a brief in behalf of 
Lloyd Gaines, St. Louis, Mo., Ne- 
gro student in his appeal to the ! 
U. S. Supreme Court for an order i 
compelling the University of Mis. I 
souri Law School to admit him. I 
The high court, early this month j 
agreed to review the case. 


4 'Cons' Killed in 
Georgia Jail Fire 

GLENN VILLE; Ga., Nov. 10, (A 
NP) — Four prisoners, Henry Ar- 
thur, Lloyd Mundine, Vodie 
Hamilton and Allen Carter, lost 
their lives when fire damaged 
the city jail. Firemen extinguish, 
ed the blaze and saved the build- 
ing, but the prisoners were dead, 
apparently from suffocation. 

The blaze had gained headway 
before Patrolmen Dewey Toofle 
and E. H. Bacon discovered it. 
They said they opened the doors 
immediately, but received no re- 
sponse from the prisoners. A. 
coroner's jury was unable to de- 
termine the cause of the fire. 

DID YOU KNOW— The se^^ 
settler in Alabama was a Negro. 
He visited the country with De 
Sota— liked the climate and the 
country — stayed and lived with 
the Indians (1540). 


LAY OFF NEGRO 
WPA WORKERS 

OPELUS, La., Nov. 10, (ANP) 
— Approximately 35 colored men 
have laid off the WPA rolls. 
These men must either go to the 
cane farms or be cut out of work 
for two months. No white WPA 
workers were laid off. 


Young people would do well to ! '" 
study the Adams creed. Adams j _ 
says, "You cannot be a failure 
doing work you enjoy. Consider 
carefully before you enter any 
field. WTien you have made your 
decision, your enjoyment of your 
work will bar any thought of 
failure. If you like your work, 
you'll succeed, if you don't, you 
won't." 


to cease. ' 

But be sure and get GOL" 
MEDAL Haarlem Oil Capsule 
safe and harmless — the origin-J 
and genuine — right from Haa^ 
lem in Holland. Millions hav 
kidney and bladder trouble an 
never suspect it — some synjp 
toms besides visits to bathroo»| 
Ko pieaae hurrv! Clip thia m»«ag» and at night are backache,' moi 
mail with e.'Sc (coin) to help cov, r mr or- pain^g puffy eyes and scanty pal 

periN,-!* I want to help ^'<u a.* f.'*t a'* I [ ^ 'P" '^ ' ,r. . .. ■ 

can Your Sincere Friend. t.ADY Hoi'E, | sage that ofttimes smarts 

Post Road, Ni^roton, Conn J burnS. 


DID YOU KNOW— Moses receiv- 
ed what education he had in the 
schools of the black people of 
Egypt. 


INTE^r^ONS TO WED 

Alfred J.'Marvray, 22. 1654 W 
36th St.; Anna L. Manuel, 21, 
1664 W. 36th St. 

Leroy Russell, 31, 944 E. 50th St.; 
Ethel Slaughter, 23, 4120'^ S. 
Central Ave. 

James W. Haulsey. 28, 836 36th 
St, Oakland; Mae A. Williams, 
24. 736 E. 52nd PI. 

Amos Howard. 18. 9710 Pace 
Ave.; Lillian V. McDonald, 19, 
1659 E. Imperial Highway. 

Ky Richard, 63, 1381 E. 49th St.; 
Emma Rooks, 58, 1831 E. 112th 
I St., Watts. 
, [ George Ary, 42, 1305 E. 21st St.; 

EMPLOYMENT POLICIES ^f^^f ^'^""p^' ^^' ^^^^ ^- ^''' 

HEARING BEGUN Richard jerry Grant, 23, 283 N. 


St.: Katie M. Johnson, 19, 

1401'*! E. 15th St. 
Charles Woods, 26. 1656 E. 33rd 

St.; Katherine Daugherty, 19, 

2309 Compton Ave. 
Henry Symonette, 36, USS Ari- 
zona U. S. Navy; Mildred L. 

Hatcher, 30, 828 E. 31st St. 
Isaac N. Whitten, 48, 146 S. 3rd 
St., El Centre: Estella McCall, 44, 

1186 E. 42nd PI. 


Better Business 
Training 

GREGG TOUCH 

SHORTHAND TYPING 

COMPTOMETER 

"Picturctypmg", The New 

Short-Cut Method of Learning 

Touch Typing in 12 Lessons. 

Studio 4365 WaU Street 

CEntnry 2«527 


Los Angsles' Finest 
Ciassifi«d Scrvic* 

*■ 

Bttying, selliug, renting 
whatever your n^ed or 
activity, let this great 
newspaper serve y o u. 
Trained ad-takers glad- 
ly assist yoH in icriting 
your ad; provide any 
information you tcish; 
do everything possible 
to insure the best re- 
sults at theieast cost to 
you. 


Phone: ADams 9342 

or call at 
The EAGLE office 
• 4075 S. Central 


BROOKLYN, Nov. 10, (ANP)— 
When the long awaited hearing 
on the employment policies of 
the Brooklyn Utility corporation 
in regard to Nco-ro workers, be- 
gan last week. Borough President 


(ANP)— The presidents of Negro i Raymond V. Ingersoll, in an ad- 
Land 'Grant Colleges will meet! dress to the State Temporary 


in their 18th annual convention 
oiy November 14, 15, and 16, at 
International House, University 
of Chicago. The theme of the 
meeting will be "Enlarging the 
Service and Support of Negro 
Land Grant Colleges." The en- 
tire program relates the land- 
grant colleges to current needs 
of Negroes in the South. 

At the banquet, to be held Nov. 
15 the principal speakers will be 
Dr. Fred D. Patterson, president 
of Tuskegee institute; Dr. Mary 
McLeod Bethune of the National 
Youth Administration; and a rep- 
resentative of the president's ad. 
visory committee on education. 

Other noted persons expected i 
to attend are Dr. George A. ' 
Works, University of Chicago; 
Harry L. Brown, assistant secre- 
tary «( the United States depart- 
mentt^of agricultui;e; Dr. John 
W. Studebaker, U. S. commission- 
er of education: J. E. Stamps, 
Social Security board and Joseph 
H- B.- Evans, Farm Security ad. 
. ministration. 

John W. Oavis is president Of 
the conference group and R. B. 
Atwood of Kentucky is the secre- 
tary. 

DID YOU KNOW— Solomon o.-- 
dered Hiram of Tyre to secure 
the services of black men to do 
the skilled hewing and designing 
of the timber work on the temple. 
Solomon declaring that these 
"black men" were the only men 
possessed with sufficient skill to 
^ ^tahe 'charge and complete the 
artistic timber work. 


ttm 


commission, said that he wats op. 
posed to any measure that up- 
holds discrimination against col- 
ored people or any other group. 


TUSKEGEE NITK Seeoad Bap- 
tist Church Friday, Ner. -18. 


PRE- HOLIDAY 
SPECIALS 

Hot Oil, Steamed Scalp Treat- 
ment, Shampoo, Prem and 
Ends Curled, all for $1.M. 
Genuine Poro Rinse used »r 
Croquignole or Marcel Wave 
in addition to the above for 
S1.25. 

MISS E. R. ECHOLS 

IMl East 2«tk Street 
Phone: Rletamond 984« 


Vernon Ave., Pasadena; Susan 

L. Clairette, 23, 1340 E. 15th 

St. 
Mariano Bautista, 35, 1415 Al- 

varado Terr.; Ida Mae Jones, 

24, 756 S. Carondolet. 
James Moore, 29, 138Ui E. 50th 


HOROSCOPE 

THREE QUESTIONS FREE 

Fihil out ttll^T YOl R (;i llil.M; iSTxn. 
.SIIOW.S FOR YOl R PRKSK.NT .WD VV- 
TI:RE I.IKK. It nia.v BRI.M; YOU MiEAT 
Mix in «.lin\viti^ you wf.iiL (l«,vs .ire good 
or bail (or ynxi, to inv^'tt ni.>n''.v, to ntfltte 
lovfi, to urui'le .voui: artionn. Manv promin- 
ent propj*^ ipiitle their lives hr thf ntJiTK. 
Scnil ,'i(lc and iiirlh d«te tod«y to 
HOROSCOPE, ROCHEI.LE P.\KK, S.J. 


STOWELL'S 
B«n Franklin Store 

1775 EAST 103RD STREET 
5-10-25 and Up 

We appreciate the patronage of 
All the Colored People 


Corpets-Rugs Cleoned 

In Our Plant or on Your Floor 
Repairing, Sewing, Laying 

Binding, Fringing, Serging 

Upholstery -Cleaned 

Call us for Free Estinutes 

Reasonable Prices 

A fir F CARPET CO. 

• PArkway 8326 
1323 W. Jefferson Blvd. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 


MATCHLESS 



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free of flames, fiunes, pilot light... the approved 
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Before you repair or replace your present water 
heater get tbe btcts about this truly modem method 
of beating water. You'll find the operating cost 
is remarkably low— your Bureau provides a special 
record-low water heating rate. You'll find too, 
that tbe approved tUttnc offers matchless cleanli- 
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about easy £HFA Terms and the fmb iniuNG 
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^^ WATER HEATER 

OPtRATID IT LOW-COST SOUIOIR BAM POWIR 


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Know Whot To Do 


FOR 8ALB SACRinCE 

ATTENTION 

( n>. W«fltri4e lot 5«xl35 

•— — — — — ^ — — — — — — ^•WPf 9vvV SS« 

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good shape ...$30M, MM da. 
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X vaaaBt Iota on W. Mtk 

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REAL ESTATI 

3208 S. Central Avena* 

AD -9719 8944 



Spirituol Psychic 
Marcus Ordained Medium 

He Con Help You 

If T»a are in donbt, worry or trouble of any kind, if yonr 
heart ia set oo a certain end in friendship, love, marriage, 
dlTOree or business, or if you are not satisfied, or anothar 
shares that which rightfully belongs to you, doo't lose ^adth. 
His Spiritual advice and help re-anites the separated, gives 
■aoMS and facta, helps you in whatever trouble you may be 
In. Has brdhglit good luck, happiness, health and succeas to 
tlwnands whose hopes were crushed with trouble, and wUl 
io aa mneh for yon. Do not be discouraged. Read L Cor. It. 

Spiritual Psychic Readings, Donations SOc & $1 
Hanrs 11 a. m. till t p. ai. Sun^ys S to 7 fjs. 

OCCULT SCrENCE CENTER C. S. A*.; 

41U So. Avalon Blvd. Take "S" ear. get off at 4Ut Street 


THE CROWN LAUNDRY AND 
CLEANING COMPANY'S 

"HELPS FOR THE HOMEMAKER" 

PHONE PRospeet S351 


THE BEST WAT TO SAVE MONEY ON 
TOUR LAUNDRY WORK 

FAMILY FINISHED WORK, by the pound. 
Send the whole family wash for these unbelievably lew prices. 
Ten pounds for $1.25, extra pounds 10c each. Minimum bdl. 
10 lbs. Everything yi^ashed and ironed, ready for use. No ex- 
tra charges. No restrictions except bundle must be one-half 
flat pieces. Curtains not accepted in this bundle. 
Average weights of articles in eiHumon use by families. 


^SSSi 



2 Ladies' aprons wt. 1 lb 

5 Ladies' tea aprons " " " 

20 Collars " " " 

5 Chemises " " " 

4 Combinations — . " ** " 

6 Corset covers " " " 

4 Dresses, child's 

2 Dresses, house..* "' " " 

3 Dresses, night..l ' 

57 Handkerchiefs, ladies' " " " 

1 Skirt " " " 

13 Stockings, silk " " " 

3 Underdrawers, ladies " " " 

5 Undervests, ladies'.,." " *' 
3 Blouses, boys' " " " 

28 Handkerchiefs, men's." " " 

10 Hose, men's pairs " " " 

1 Jumper 

2% Night Shirts " " *• 


_wt. 1 tb . 

n u u 


H Overalls 

Vt Coveralls -_, 

2 Pajama, suits " " " 

% Bathrobes " " " 

2 Shirts, men's " " " 

5 Undershirts - — " " " 

5 Underdrawers " " " 

3 Unionsuits * " ** 

1 Pants " " " 

1 Bath mats " " " 

3 Slips ," " " 

25 Wash rags " " " 

10 Napkins — " " " 

% Sheets " " " 

1 Tablecloth _" " " 

2 Bath towels " " " 

6 Face towels : _.." " " 

6 Kitchen towels ..." " * 

1 Spread wt. 3 tb 


Y«u cai\ have t^sc low prices right at your door or at any 
Crown office. Just call them up, and one of the Crown's courte- 
ous, dependable Routemen will call and explain the service 
that fits your needs. 
"OCR SKILL AND CARE MAKE YOUR CLOTHES 



r 


s 



YOUR 
EALTH! 


m'w^ 


DON'T EXPOSE fOURSELF 
TO THE COLD WI%ER RAINS1 

BENTON'S 

CALL ADams 7177 

A TRAINED MESSENGER WILL 
DELIVER YOUR ORDER 

RIGHT AWAY 


I 


! A COMPLETE STOCK 

I 

All The Well -Known Liquors j 

WHISKIES 
CORDIALS 
BRANDIES 
GIN 

and FINE OLD WINES 

j AT COMPETITIVE PRICES 

[ DELIVERED! 


STOP THAT COUGH ! 

ASK FOR THE 

GUA41ANTEED RELIEF 

BENTON'S 
Cough & Cold Special 

AT ALL GOOD DRUGGISTS 
OR AT BENTON^S 

DELIVERED! 



Benton's Ntisal Drops: 


Aid in thp Relief of Colds. Nasal Congestions, 
Coughs and Hoarseness. In Handy Dropper 
Bottl* .. 


Benfon's Benolgesic : 

A Penetratini; Liquid for External Use, Valu- 
able for Sprains, Stiff Joints, Neuritis, Rheu- 
matism, Lumbago, and Athlete's Peet 


35c 
50c 


!»■ 


Bol 


Benton's Cold Tablets: 

A Preparation for Colds. Relieves also the 
feverish Condition and Headaches, usually 
Associated with Colds. Has mild Laxative 
Properties. 


tge 



Box 


Benton's Poin Tablets: 

A Valuable Relief for Pains Such as TooTS^ 
ar.he,. Headache, Neuralgia, etc. Is Especially 
Effective in Relieving Menstrual Paiiu 



Box 


I 

4 


BENTON'S DURG he. 

AD. 7177 


Central Ave. 
At48thSti. 



X- 


?s 


y-i.F - > f 


TKurt'ifoy, NovemlMr 10, 1938 


..^ •"i";- 


^^■v' M- 


Tf You PqII to Rea3 THE CAtlFOfeNtA 


%. 


oii May 


r l^now ft 


HoppeneH 


-rm, 



?fW' 


k. 


PastTkrM-ii 


Mnited States Eyes Nayal 
Bose in Trinidad, B. W. I. 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10. (ANP)^Fearful that Great Britain 
^may give Hitler a free hand in Liberia and entrench Germany on 
the northwest African coast thus placing the Nazis in a position to 
dominate South America, offi-^- 
aais of the U. S. department of 
state are busiy .discussing ac- 
quisition of a naval base in the 
British West Indies, preferably 
Trinidad, it was learned this 


.week. 

It is no secret that government 
= -officials are worried ever the pos- 
■sible fate of Liberia, an unoffi- 
I' cial American protectorate. But 
tihe worry is not a philanthropic 
one over the safety of the last 
independent African nation. 

The United States does not 
want Germany, long known to 
have designs on Liberis^; to get 
the African republic for sever- 
al practical reasons. An inde- 
. pendent Liberia would provide 
an aerial base for American 
|. aviation in the South Atlantic. It 
•Iso constitutes virtually the only 
source of rubber available to the 
-U. S. which is not controlled by 
l" British or Dutch interests. And, 
of course, a Nazi controlled Li- 
beria would place Germany too 
close to South America thus en- 
iangering the Monroe doctrine 


Current Civil 
Service 
Exams Posted 

The employment department of 
the Urban League has posted 
bulletins in its office announcing 
the following civil service ex- 
aminations. Persons, qualified, 
should file for these examinations 
at once. Additional information 
can be secured at the office of 
the League, 2592 S. Central ave. 
U.'S. Department 

Junior Engineman (steam-elec- 
tric), salary $1,560 a year. Age: 

20 to 55. Closing date. Nov. 14. 
Assistant Engineman, (steam- 

riectric), salary $2,100 a year. 

Age: 25 to 55. Closing date Nov. 

14. 

State Department 

Junior Bridge Engineer, en_ 
trance salary, $170 a month. Ayt, 

21 to 40. Closing date: Nov. 26. 
Dean of Boy's, School for the 

It- is a°n established fact that I fi'"^' *°P^'^ ^o "^^^ ""l^i' ^alanr 


sailer countries are influenced 
hy^ the closest powerful nation. 
^Se United States has always 
Ween the nearest large power to 
Latin America. Germany estab- 
lished in Liberia might be a near- 
er power. Already it has exerted 
some influence, particularly upon 
President Vargas of Brazil. If 
the Nazis dominate northwest 
Africa, it might exert enough 
power to wean Latin America 
iway from North American in- 
-Quence into Fascism, with the 
United States itself as the event- 
tial goaL- 

What happens to Liberia, in 
the face of these conditions, is of 
ieriou« importance to American 
diplomacy. Although this coun- 
try definitely does not want Ger- 
many in that part of Africa, her 
iiplomats are viewing matters 
realistically. 

This realisan shows that Great 
Sritain and France, who ar« able 
lo thwart Hitler's ambitions, are 
ki DO mood to do so as long as 
Veville Chamberlain retains his 
»ower. Germany wanted Austria 
iBd Czchoslovakia, and ^t them. 


$200 a month. Age: 27 to 50 
Closing date: Nov. 19. 

Exhibit Craftsman, (open to 
men and women), entrance sal- 
ary $150 a month. Age: 21 to 50. 
Closing date: Nov. 12. 
County Department 

Bacteriologist Grade II, en- 
trance salary, $150 a month. Age: 
at least 21. Closing date: Nov. 10. 
City School District 

Librarian, Library service and 
Teacher of Adult Classes in Li- 
brary Science, age: at least 24 
years. Closing date: Nov. 15. Sal- 
ary: $2.33 per clock hour. 

Teacher of Agriculture Soil- 
Less Fanning entrance salary, 
$2.33 per clock hour. Age: at 
least 24. Closing date: Nov. 15. 

Teacher of applied Psychology, 
entrance salary, $2.33 per clock 
hour. Age: at least 24. Closing 
date Nov. 15. 

Teacher of Parent Education, 
entrance salary: $2.33 per clock 
hour. Age: at least 24. Closing 
date: Nov. 15. 

Teacher_Leadership. entrance 
salary, $2.33 per clock hour. 

Teacher of Consumer Educa- 
tion, entrance salary S2.33 per 


Protest PIqnned 
Colored Airport 

FAIRFAX, Va., Nov. 10, (AN 
P) — ^Fairfax county last week ad_ 
ded its protest agains the build- 
mg of a colored airport near 
Seminary, to those of Arlington 
and Alexandria which had al- 
ready been filed with the state 
corporation commission. The com- 
mission is to consider the Ne_ 
groes, application for the propos- 
ed airport in the near future. The 
airport, if built, would be loca- 
ted partly in Arlington and Fair- 
fax counties and Alexandria City. 

The action of supervisors was 
taken after it was shown that 
the airfield would be located near 
three public schools and the theo. 
logical seminary. It would be lo- 
cated at the foot of Seminary 
hiU, and supervisors declared 
they belive the flying from the 
hiU would create a hazard for the 
schools and residents of the dis- 
' trict. 


Training Center 
for Youth Goal 
of Urban League 

Endeavoring to serve as ^ train- 
ing center for young people who 
have completed secretarial and 
general office courses the Urban 
League announced today that 
it has found that many such 
young persons welcome the op- 
portunity provided for actual of- 
fice practice and the acquisition 
of qualifying experience. Per- 
sons who are interested in re- 
gistering for training work are 
requested to contact Executive 
Director, Floyd Covington at the 
office, 2502 S. Central Avenue. 

Record registrations for the 
training courses in panitorial ser- 
vice and PBX operation were te-. 
ceived last week. 45 persons at- 
tended the janitorial service 
class, under the direction of Ed- 
gar Hampton, at the League's of- 
fice last Thursday. Approximate- 
ly 150 attended the iirst meet- 
ing of the PBX operator's class 
held last Friday at the 28th St. 
YMCA. 


Community Chest Support 
on Up-Grade, Reports Show 

The barometer ef public support to the Community Chest was 

pushed up several more notches today by the enthusiastic stream 

of volunteer workers in the Exposition district following a report 

of Mrs. Abraham Lehr, chairman, that 297 pledges totaling $6,993, 

or 31 percent of quota, had been turned in. 

Erroneous rumors regarding card be exhibited. No persons 


the alleged payment of Commun- 
ity Chest volunteer workers were 
definitely spiked today by Mrs. 
Abraham Lehr, who stated n« 
volunteer worker received a 
single cent for his part in the 
current Chest appeal 

"In order to clarify the situa- 
tion," Mrs Lehr said "all persons 
who solicit for charitable pur- 
poses are required by law to pre- 
sent information cards which set 
forth the purposes for which tht 
solicitiations are being made; 
whether the workers are volun- 
teers or paid, and if paid, what 
commission is paid; also the per_ 
centage of funds sought which 
go to the fund raising expense 
and other important data." 
BLOCKS RACKETEERING 

"This law definitely blocks any 
attempt at charity "racketeering". 
All Chest volunteers are provided 
with these cards and all persons 
asked for subscriptions to the 
Chest fund should ask that tht 


seeking pledges for the Chest is 
paid for his or her work." 

The chairman csdled attention 
to the notation on Chest cards 
that only 4% percent of funds 
raised will go to year-round ad- 
ministration and campaign costs 
This fact is attributed to the vol- 
unteer workers -who generously 
contributed their time and money 
to aid the needy and unfortun- 
ate in the Los Angeles chest area. 

Exposition volunteers are bend, 
ing every effort to obtain the 
necessary 20 percent increase of 

subscriptions to carry on the 

work of the 88 health and welfare 1^ 
agencies during the coming year. ^ 

DID YOU KNOW— In November M 

1910, The Crisis, the c^ficial or- 
o-an of the National Association 
for the Advancement of Colored 
People was fit^t published. In 

1911, the Association published 
its first pamphlet against lynch., 
ing and held .its first large meet^' 
ing of protest. 


DEMOS USE RHYTHM 
TO GARNER VOTES 

HICAGO, Nov. 10, (ANP)— In 
Philadelphia recently, Democrata 
hired Chick Webb and Ella Fitz. 
gerald to swing votes to the Dem- 
ocratic side, in Pied Piper style, 
with their hot rhythms and tor- 
rid tunes. In Chicago, however, at 
the giant mass meeting and elec- 
tion rally held last Friday night 
the method took more enthus. 
iastic turn, and 50 Negro dancers 


OUTDOOR LIFE OPENS 
SALVAGE HEADQTRS. 

The Salvage Headquarters for 
the Outdoor Life and Health As- 
sociation will be established at 
3220 S. Central Ave. The pro- 
ceeds sent in to the association 
will served a means to carry on 


Dunh^i^ presented a pageant- 
dancft inter{)reting the Negro 
spjrit through slave days and its 


rise to racial freedom. The pres 
Kentation was called "The March 
under the direction of Katherirfe ' of Democracy." 


pro YOU KNOW-i- Haam 
Revela, the first Negro to ser 
as United States Senator 
the first man of the race to 
pear in either house of Congr^ 
completed an unexpired te va. 
from Feb. 25, 1870 to March 
1871. Senator of Mississippi 


.^^L. 


the work of the association, 
general plea is made by the ch^ir* 
man, Mrs. Hattie Baldwin for a!)l 
types Of salvage rags, bott.es. 
Call Ce. 26786 or Ad. 9790 iifld 
leave your name and address. 


P!:^ 


Gold's-^>leqdquarters For Warmth & Comfort 

BLANKET AND HEATER SPECIALS 



Beautiful, Double Blank- 

efs. Part Wool, 

Plaids, and Solid 

%X $269 

SAFE, ECONOlnCAL,, 
GOOD LOOKING 

HEATERS 


= ' PAY ONLY 25c A WEEK 



$225 
No Money Needed At G<^ld's 


AS 
LOW 

AS 


Gold's 

Pre-Holiday 

SALE 

SAVE25%TO40» 


SuUeiu 



POR 


Sermany also wants the African clock hour. Age: at least 24 
wlonies she possessed befolr^ Closing date: Nov. 15 


1914, or their equivalent. 

Chamberlain is not disposed to 


least 24. Closing date: Nov. 15. 


Teacher of Custodian Engineer- 
„„, „..,^„„..„ ,„ '"S 'Vocational Arts), entrance 
Jive up any British possessions | f^'^P'o^^^I,^, ^. "nonth. Age: at 
icquired in the World War, but 
le is willing for Germany to have 
and in Africa: Since Liberia has 
jeen coveted. Hitler may be 
fiven a free hand there in return 
\OT a promise to Britain and 
" ance not to bother their pos- 
ions. In that way Hitler 
Id be satisfied, and neither 
tain nor France would have 
O surrender possessions. 


■ !or 


Hold Final Rites 
for Louis Hooker, 
L. A. Pioneer 


and remained in that capacity un- 
til shortly before his death when 
he was retired on a pension. He 
was 73 years Old at the time of 
death. 

Hooker was prominently iden- 
tified in fraternal circles as a 
member of the Masons, the 
Knights of Tabor and the For- 
resters. He was a member of the 
Mt. Zion Baptist church from 
which funeral services were held 
on Monday, Oct. 31. 

Interment was in Evergreen 
Cemetery, under the auspices of 
the Masonic Lodge with the 
Knights and Daughters of Tabor 
acting as honorary pall bearers. 


The death October 25 of Louis 
Hooker, who lived with his fami- 
ly at 351 Patton street for more I 
than 20 years removed from the ! 

rwrPFA^FPABU lOAuc r"'T"'*^ °r^ °^ ^^^ "Vs^ 

inCKEAdC rAKM LUANd long time residents. Hooker with •■ 
4M0NG NEGROES ^'^ ^^^' '^s. Nora V. Hooker, 

moved to Los Angeles from We- 
WASHINGTON, Nov. 10. (AN natchee, Washington in 1912. 
P) — Negro appHcatJon for tenant Soon after coming here, he se- 
purchase loans, loans made to cured employment in the En- 
tenants, sharecroppers or farm gineering Department of the city 

laborers to enable them to start ■ i 

on the road to ovmership, have „,^ vrkxr ur^vx . » »,^^„ ' 
increased 12.5 percent this year "® ^^^ ^^^^ A LUCKY 
over those of 1937. As of Sept. LODESTON P? 
27, applications were received for 1^ fc »# I \0 1^ k • 

1938.39 loans from 64,267 white V*?^ ^oi- i.i:cky< Do >•..„ ( arkv .\ 

^r^A tA^A^ Ma.n-« »<>»«»-> *~_ IH.tRM or i loidsto.'K- • Many atlrihuti' 

and 24,544 Negro tennant farm- cre.kt litk -^ the f.ct th- .am , 
ers m 14 Southern States. I^egro inadst,,,,, or .iiarm. sr,in» »ttrih.it.- poWek. 
applicants represented 37.5 of the ^-^^^ """^ ^''fL'Kss i.n i.ovk to these 
to number as against last year's '"^'^ "' m.agnktic oh.^rms. 
figure. 5,089, or 25 percent of the .,^Z. r'lw^l.lt.'-rr.'r,./'- ""''*"' ' 

total. LAND NOVELTf, ROOHKf.r.E P.VRK, N J. 




$100 


I 


SPECIAL OFFER 

With Every Dining Room Suite 
Sold Before Thanksgiving 
We Will Include A 

COMPLETE 
DINNER 

SET 

For Only 

Plan To Entertain Your 

Thanksgiving Guests In Your 

Newly Furnished Dining 

Room. Special Prices From 


$3950 TO $29950 

WIDE ASSORTMENTS OF MODERN. DUNCAN, 
PNYFE, CHIPPENDALE AND HEPPELWHITE. 
AUTHENTIC DESIGNS PERFECTLY EXECUTED 



NO 

MONEY 

NEEDED 

at GOLD'S 


P^ '^ 





Cash Today 

ON YOUR 

FURNITURE OR YOUR 
AUTOMOBILE 

[i No Co-Signers! No Endorsers! 

'^ WE DO NOT NOTIFY YOUR FRIENDS, 
EMPLOYERS OR RELATIVES. 

S. A« SCHERER 


HOLLYWOOD 
Santa Monica & Vine 

PASADENA 
Colorado & El Molina 


SANTA MONICA 
12th & Wilshire Blvd. 

HUNTINGTON PARK 
Florence & Pacific 


LONG BEACH SAN DIEGO 

American it, Anaheim 2nd & B Streets 

1901 FIGUEROA STREET (Cor. Washington) 


Juan Ray 

jSoeat Salesman 


TELEPHONE: RI -4789 

Let JUAN RAY 
(FEATHER YOUR NEST) 

Eves. Till 9 

Authorized Eleetrolux Dealer 

5 

ROOMS 

FURNITURE 

WEST PICO 
FURNITURE 

(SOM W. PICO) 

AT LA BREA 

opiN fvis. a SUN. 

WY. 3151 


CROWN LOAN OFFICE 

# LOANS # 

Oa elotbiiic, fun, jeweiry, dfammada, mnaieal iastimMata, 
■porttaf roods, tnuiks, tods, ete. Ton can {«< what yoa want 
at tiM relkbl* CROWN LOAN OmCK. 

120 E. Fifth Street MA--3882 


EsUbliahed Since 1922 


t 


$ LOANS $ 

fOU ABB ALWAYS WKLCOMI AT TBE 

CANADIAN LOAN OFFICE 

WX Loan Ih* Moot on EverirthiaC 
'iaa< Jowolry Omt SpodoHr Mt ■aal Ctn tiweot 


SALESMEN 
WANTED! 


HIGH TYPE MAN 
WANTED TO SELL 
NATIONALLY AD- 
VERTISED WATCH- 
ES, JEWELRY, RADI- 
OS, SILVERWARE, 
ETC., ON SMALL 
WEEKLY PAY- 
MENTS. 

EXCELLENT EARN- 
INGS. 

XMAS SEASON NOW 
IN FULL SWING. 

MUST HAVE VERY 
GOOD LOCAL REF- 
ERENCES. 

MR. BENSON 

Hudson's Diamond 

Company 
717 So. Broodwoy 


Search 

your attic 

for your old 

Victrola 

IT MAY BE WORTH $250. CASH 

During RCA Victor's 40th Anniver- 
sary Celebration, if your Victrola is 
the oldest listed for any one of 20 years 
. . . 1906-1925 . .".you wiU v/in $250.00. 
That's 20 chances to win. Get full de- 
tails today. There's nothing to buy. 
No strings of any sort. Come in 
for your entry blank. 


„ 40 TRADE-IN 


40th >Wver«^ 
Offer Saves You 

YOURS FOR 
ONLY 

22c 

A DAY 


Two instrumentt in one 

Tunmg for 6 station, anS 
an automatic recoM I ^^ 


Lwnt Prict 

in History for 

an RCA Victor 

AutoMatic 

Victroli 


^ety. Come an today if, 
th« opportunity ofa^Si^/ 


Your Best Thanksgiving Dinner 

PREPARED WITH THE LEAST EFFORT 
AND AT LESS COST 
ON A NEW C.P. 

O'Keefe & Merritf 
Gas Range 

And For a Limited Time— From $22.40 To 



$ 


35"° Allowance 



MODEL SHOWN HERE $153 OC 
WITH YOUR OLD STOVE 


FOR YOUR OLD STOVE 
ON A NEW C.P. 

O'Keefe & Merritf 

These Ranges Carry The 
Seal of 


Certified Performance, ll 


You Get All The 22 
Features Required For 
C.P. Approval. No Gas 
Range Ever Built Carries 
A Higher Seal of Ap- 
proval Than These 
O'KEEFE & MERRITT 
C.P. Ranges. 

You Can Hove a New 
O'KEEFE & MERRITT 
C.P. Range For A i 


O'Keefe & Merritt 

C.P. RANGES 
As Low As $89.60 


WITH YOUR OLD STOVE 


See Them On 

Display At 

GOLD'S 


Little As 

$ 1 87 

X A Month 


GoldFurnitureCo. 


1207 Eosf Washington Neor Central 

IIUlllUUiUlUMIIP 


PRospect 4388 


% 


.^ 



\ 


h 




'. '■ ^iy' i llfV ''' ! -U?|. .\:^^"1" ' 


If 1IW fall to ma THt CAttraKNIA IA«J y«M may nmr »«» tt 


RAILRQAD CLATTER 

By CHARLES L. UPTON 


^•- w-"-- 


-i. 


Thur»doy, November 10, 193t 


Golden Stote MufUdl Official Back f rdm 
Windy City with Enthusiastic Outlook 


of the United Statei Govenuneat afsiast Anna 
Laurft Bamett, widow of the late Jackson Barnett, is a very in- 
terestiof one from several stand points. ^Int, it brings back the 
days when the white man took the land away from the Indians, 
then after keepinc the beat of It for themselves and. killing off 
most of the tribes, they nuke a fiand t^o'C uul r>ve the few 
tribes that remained free land frants, ^paasinc laws to keep other 
white men and women from stealing Jtt over again. Long comes 
Mrs. Baroett whose ancestors might-^ve been among the early 
pioneers who helped grah the Indian's land when there were no 
laws, with a more modem scheme. She allegedly kidnaps old 
Jackson and all his millions, .marries him and lives as his wife for 
tiiirteen Hwg years. She most have had a mighty good time 
■pendlng^money for so long a period without any restraint. Just 
give m0 access to a fortune as large as that for thirteen years 
and I would either be sitting on the moon with my feet hanging 
down or trying to push over the tomx) stone that set on my 
grave. Hie U. St. Government must have taken these things into 
eonsideratiea when they tear gassed the swanky Wilshire resi- 
dence and carried poor Anna out teti first. Again, the swinging of 
that hatchet bj Laura must have brought faint recollections of the 
historical pioneer days when the Red Skins did the same with 
their tommy-hawks. If Mrs. Bamett has failed to salt down some 
of that money as she claims, her best bet now would be to marry 
a W.' P. A. worker whose mind is definitely made up on the $30 
every Thursday plan. 
C. L. Dellums, Brotherhood 
Vice-Pres. Here 'for Series 
of Meetings 

With the arirval of C. L. Del- 
luras. International Vice-Presi. 
dent of the Brotherhood of Sleep- 
ing Car Porters, for a series of 
special meetings, members of the 
organization are in for a very 
busy two weeks at their head- 
quarters. Delegates were sched- 
uled to make their reports again 
on the convention held recently 
ia Chicago in order that all 
mem.bers of the oro-anization 
would have the opportunity of 
hearing them. A national of- 
ficer's view point of the conven- 
tion should prove of great educa- 
tional %alue to all who attend. 
The first of these meetings was 
h^d last (Thursday) night, an- 
other on Friday night. This! the Terminal discharged 43 red 
week's meetiflg began Monday, at ! caps m the expectation that the 
11 a. m. and every day thereafter ! set would fix the jnen's wages at 
at 11 a. m. ending with the last ' 25 cents an hour. They were re- 
meeting on'' Friday at 11 a. m. hired, however, after an agree- 
All porters ^and their wives are ; ment whereby tips, previously 
earnestly requested to attend at i their only compen5ation. were to 
least one of the remaining meet- | ^ supplemented if they fell be 


Back at his desk this week aft- 
er a month's soioum in Chicago, 
George A. Beavers, Jr., 'Vice- 
President and Director of Agen- 
cies of the Golden State Mutual 
L,i f e Insurance Company, 
brought new enthusiasm to the 
Company's constant expansion 
program. 'Mr. Beavers visited the 
recently established Chicago of- 
fice of the Company in official 
capacity and is very optimistic 
about the outlook. 

■While in Chicago,- the executive 
addressed over 10,000 persons in 
various church congregations 
who, with other businesses, wel- 
comed the Company to Illinois. 
Especially noted was the interest 
shown in the new Funeral Bene- 
fit policy which met with the im- 
mediate approval of independent 
funeral directors. 

Before returning to the Home 
Office here, Mr. Beavers visited 


Rivalry Keen as Golden 
State Mutual Sales Mount 


A keen and fri«idly rivalry is 
being evidenced between North- 
em and Southern forces of the 
Golden State Mutual Life In- 
surance Company in the sale of 
C e r t i f i c ates of Advancement 
which the state authorized issu- 
ance of a month ago. 

A, J. Williams, Manager of the 
Los Angeles District, heiads the 
Southern drive while U. S. 
Griggs, Northern California Man- 
ager, is directing sales in the 
north. With each striving for the 
greater amount of propoitionate 
subscriptions, inquiries and re- 
sponses are being received in the 
Home Office from all parts of the 
in East St. Louis, considered a ! state, it was announced by the 


future field for the Company, 
and was pleased with the indus- 
trial center. The pace and strain 
demanded by activity during the 
trip necessitated several days 
rest following his return last 
Wednesday. 


Secretary-Treasurer, Norman O. 
Houston, this week. 

The contributing factor to the 
unusual interest being shown by 
policy-holders in securing Certi- 
ficates of Advancement is the 
message received by thein in the 


48 Red Caps 
Fired as Tips' 
Ruling Result 

ST. LOUIS, Nov. 10, (AN?)— 
Forty-eight of the Union Sta- 
tion's 105 red caps were dismiss- 
ed last week because their em- 
ployer, the Terminal Railroad as- 
sociation feared an adverse rul- 
ing under the wage-hour act on 
whether tips may be considered 
as a part of wages, and this would 
require back payment of salaries. 

Just before the new federal 


Newer Apartments Install 
Electric Water Heaters 

Low electric rates, made pos- ] — — 

sible by low-cost Boulder Dam 
power, are enabling an ever-in- 
creasing number of Los Ange- 
les builders to install- modem 
electric water heaters in new 
apartment houses, that tenants 
may enjoy the many advantages 
of heating water with electricity. 

At a cost far less than most 
families realize, electric heaters 
supply abundant, clean hot water 
24 hours a day. Since electricity 
is the onlv flameless source of 


ings and hear the important news. 
James A. Beasley Passes 

James A. Beasley, former Red 
Cap and Pullman porter, sue. 
cum bed; to a lengthy illness on 
October 26th and was laid in his 
final resting place in Mountain 
■View Cemetery Monday. Services 
were held in Angelus Chapel with 
the Rev. L. M. Curtis officiating. 


back, pay' 
Beasley was bom May 1st. 18M ' - The red caps' union charges 
and left a large family well pro- /inat the dismissals last week 
vided for. He was a member of ' were discriminatory against its 
the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car members. The agreement under 
Porters of the Los Angeles Divi- which the discharged men re- 
•ion, which organization had I turned to work -vas that each 
Aarge of the funeral. Pall Bear- I should make a daily report of 
1^ were as follows: F. Hammond, i tips received. The Interstate 


law went into effect October 24, ! heat, light and power, the electric 

water heater insures- freedom 
from worry about pilot light, 
flames or fumes. It is not neces- 
sarj' to use any other electric ap- 
pliances to take advantage of the 
special low water heater rate of- 
fered by your Bureau of Power 
and Light. This special rate is 
only seven-tenths of a cent per 
kilovvatt-hour--the lowest, rati of 
its kind in the United States. 

Electric dealers this month are 
featuring the newest model . of 
electric water heaters. T e.se 
can be purcha.^^ed on easy EI, FA 
Terms for as Utile a.s five dotjars 
down and SI, 08 per month, pay- 
able with water or electrir 11. 

The Bureau offers a Fre' ;-- 
ing Plan which is worth ii..ft-sti- 
gating. Further information may 
be had by telephoning the near- 
est office nf your Bureau of Pow- 
er and Light. 


low the $11 a week minimum 
wage. 

J. A. Mathewson, general mana^ 
ger of the Terminal said the se- 
cond dismissal followed because 
there was no assurance that the 
courts might not eventually hold 
that tips are not wages and or- 
der payment of "an awfull ot of 


Little Theatre 
Proves Success 

YOUNGSTOWN, Nov. 10. (By 
S. S. Booker, Jr., for ANP)— The 
Little Theatre Guild here or- 
ganized by Graham Lynch to sti- 
mulate interest . in play produc. 
tion has one of the finest records 
of any amateur group of flayers 
anywhere. Last season, the Lit- 
tle Theatre Guild presented two 
succesful plays and grossed 
enough proceeds to completely 
equip the organization with 
necessary material. This year, the 
combine of players, actually the 
tops in play producing units lo- 
cally has arranged a theatrical 
season and will present a num. 
ber of three act ventures soon. 

All publicity is handled by 
those in the organization who 
have journalistic talent. St-ge 
arranging is taken care of by 
those certain gifted persons. In 
all, ' the group is com. posed of 
young people who are interested 
in the* certain channels of play 
production and those joung peo- 
ple see to it that the Little Thea- 
ter Guild's offerings are the best 
under conditions. 


letters from the Company, whiph 
show the Company's progress 
since 1925 and the part the mem- 
bers have played in building this 
outstanding institution. The fact 
that it is now possible to secure 
4 percent interest the first year 
and not less than 5 percent there- 
after in the Company they help- 
ed to create and develop, has had 
a great appeal to those who feel 
and believe that within the race 
we can largely solve the eco- 
nomic problems by developing 
strong institutions capable of fur- 
nishing employment and other 
services to the people. 


LeRoy Russell Takes 
Cleveland Bride Here 

LeRoy Russell and Miss Ethel 
Slaughter of Cleveland, Ohio 
were married Wednesday even- 
ing, November 2, in the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Taylor short- 
ly after Miss Russell's arrival in 
Los Angeles. The ceremony was 
witnessed by the groom's sister 
and a few close friends. Rev. L. 
B. Bentley officiated and the pair 
were attended by Mrs. Levenia 
Foley and Arthur McMillan. 

Immediately following the wed- 
ding, Mr. and Mrs. Taylor enter- 
tained with dinner. Sunday 
morning. Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
were ho-ils to the newlyweds and 
a few friends at breakfast. 


Storf Hew Copra 
Production , 

Ever since Director Frank Cap- 
ra, who brought Eddie Anderson 
and Lillian Ysirbo to new heights 
in "You Can't Take it With You" 
left Hollywood for a combined 
business and pleasure trip to 
New York and Washington, D. C. 
several weeks ago, there has 
been considerable speculation in 
and out .of "the film industry as 
to the nature and title of his next 
production for Columbia. 

It was variously reported that 
several well known screen per- 
sonalities were under considera- 
tion for Cjipra's production. Also, 
the titles-of the feature veered 
from "Mr. Deeds Goes to Wash- 
ington" to "The Gentleman from 
Montana." 


Negro Applies to 
Boston Hockey 

BOSTON, Nov. 10, (ANP) — 
The Boston Bruins of the Nation- 
al Hockey League received form-' 
al application last week from a 
23 year old Negro ice hockey 
star of Medford, Mass., and the 
name Charles Booker, a brilliant 
forward, has been officially plac- 
ed on file for future reference for 
next year's Bruin cub aspirants. 

Not -satisfied -with this trail 
blazer of progress,' Booker has 
won a try-out and is undergoing 
practice sessions with the high 
ranking white Boston Olympic 
dub. 


Colleges Out of Da<i^^ 

Says Magazine Writer 


.% 


ilegion. Elks 
to Hofd Fete 
on^rmistice 


> t 


NEW YORK, Nov. 10, (ANP) 
—Negro colleges are behind the 
times and the whole scheme of 
Negro education needs to be re- 
vised along cooperative and coll- 
ective lines in contrast to the 
individualistic pattern of the past 
and present. 

"niis is the contention of Ran- 
dolph Edmonds, head of the de- 
partment of drama at Dillard un- _ ., , - ..._ . - ■_ t«- 
iversity. writing in the November .^""'l**! **'^tS* ^VJ'^^^ 
Crisis magazine. , ^on and the Elks of the Golden 

n„^,'„;„_ .,,, ,. ,. . West are ready to stage the 

Declarm£ that the world is 1 crowning of the Armistice Day 
n5^^1?n^-P'**^^ ^T ' ,^*"*[" 1 celebrruons Friday, it was an- 
?= f^^^^.Z ^' »"<J,»»ew«il«ig the I nounced ioday, m the Armistice 
fact that Negro coUeges are still cav Dance and Jitterbug contest 
trammg our youth for md.vidual- \ to be held at the Elks' Auditor- 


DID YOU KNOW— David Wal- 
ker 
son 

through the press 
peal" was published in Boston 
in 1829, which was circulated in 
the South. 


a free Negro, the first per- i ^^ '^.'f"'. '"^* 
of color to attack slavery i^'i'". _ ^^'^VY.^ '" Cleveland, 
Walker's Ap- 


Grad Home After 
Eastern Visit 

Mrs. Armenteil Ford, graduate 
in the February class of Manual 
Arts High, returned from a vLsit 

St. 

Louis, and Shreveport this week. 
She is the sister of the late Clark 
Ford and lives with her mother 
at 1164 East 24th street. 


istic efforts, Professor Edmonds 
states: 

"The solema obligatioa of edv- 
cators to analyze the chan^g 
social order, adopt new methods 
ud sabjeet matter as needed, 
and guide students in the maze 
of living in a complex world. 

"We must recognize the need 
for a new type of training to 
correct the glaring defects of 
th2 current system. Above all 
we must cease arranging the dry 
bones of a decendeat individual- 
ism and prepare students for a 
gtoup world of mass production, 
trade unions, collective bargain- 
ing, and political and economic 
centralization. That is the su- 
preme challenge of our timej" 


mm. 

George Brown's popular danc* 
orchestra has been engaged to 
furnish the Swing music, Curtis 
Carpentier. Commander of the 
92nd (Buffalo) Division Post 532 
American Legion as Master of 
Ceremonies-will direct the fun- 
fest of dancing and entertain- 
ment, it was stated. 

Andrew (Ham) Mayfield and 
Chester Lewis are co-chairmen of 
the joint committee in charge of 
the dance. 


PRE-THANKSGIVING DANCE 


O^^IO I 
dRTC 


BATTERSBEE, NOTED 
MUSICIAN, PASSES 

HAMILTON. Bermuda. No^i 
(ANP — Funeral services 
held her last week for SergT^ 
Stadford Battersbee, noted raasi? 
cian.w ho died at the King Ed_ 
Given by BENJ. J. BOWIE i ward Memorial hospital after a 
AUXILIARY No. 228. and GLEE \ short iUness. Mr Battersbee, ■a.-h* j 
CLUB of the AMERICAN LE- started his car> r as the organist 
GION. Saturday. Nov. 19, 1938. at in the WarwiA Methodist Sun- 
No. 5115 Central Avenue, Ameri- \ day School was the first colored 
can Legion Clubhouse. Good Mu- ' orchestra leader to be perman- 
sic by Fannie Benjamins Orches- entlv engaged at local hotels, 
tra. Admission 25 Cents. starting at the St. George 


K. Constantine, J. Bell, Sr, Jas. 
Sibley. C. H. Washington and 
Byrl (^ry. The Brotherhood re- 
solution was read by W. B. Hoi. 
Izncl, Spcretary-Treasurer of the 
organization. 
C. C. Bruce RaOreo 

C. C. Bruce received hts final 
retirement papers from the 
Board of Pensions last week and 
forthwith bid a fond and regret- 
ful adieu to Pullman cars forever. 
Bruce is one of the old veterans 
of this district and enjoyed a 
.good record with the PuUman 
Company. Geo. Corbin another 
veteran of the rails went out on 
Bruce's run. 

* 
Pnllmaa Co. Makes Drastic 
Cat ia Peraoailftl, Many 
Poretrs Turloaghed 

With winter fast approaching, 
the F*ullman Company of the Los 
Angeles District wielded the 
dreaded ax last week and execut- 
ea a large curtailment in the lo- 
cal office, sending Robinson, 
former F^^lln-«n Platform Agent 
to EI P*aso and placing the en, 
tire responsibility of the Santa 
Fe and The Southern Pacific sta- 
tions on the shoulders of 'V. 'V. 
Ross. Several other minor clerks 
in the office were also dispensed 
with and a large number of port- 
ers as far back as '36 were fur- 
loughed. With this news flash- 
ing through, it begins to look like 
a hard winter ahead for the ex. 
tra men. 

Auxiliary's Oyster Supper 
Grand Success 

The first social event of the 
^winter season given by the Wo- 
men's Auxiliary to the Brother- 
hood of Sleeping Car Porters was 
a grand success and the supper 
went over in a great big way. 
The Brotherhood Headquarters 
was packed to capacity all even- 
ing and those who attended were 
loud in their praise of the splen- 
did affair. Music 'and dancing 
were enjoyed till after mid.nite 
and it begins to ^ok like the or- 
p^nization has at last revived the 
ipark of life so long needed. Mrs. 
^ If cWhorters. Mrs. J. W. Richard- 
■ ton, Mrs. Baptise Bee and aU 
those who worked so hard in as- 
aisting the International vice- 
president, Mrs. B. J. Murray, 
the local president. Mrs. Hos 
kins, deserves the highest words 
•f praise for their cooperation. 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Johnson 
TWke in Oyster Supper 

Just to prove that he is not 
', "j.baing held in chains of eternal 
bondage since he joined hands in 
holy wedlock. Otto Johnson and 
the madame dined at the auxili- 
.ary's oyster supper. What per- 
-fect bUss. 


FELLOWSHIP LEAGUE 
FEATURES "BOYS' DAY" 

The Los Angeles Fellowship 
League will be devoted to High 
Sdiool Boys' Day Sunday at its 
regular monthly breakfast-meet- 
fag m the 2&th street. YMCA. Irv- 
ing Hague, vice-principal of the 
Jefferson High School, will be 
guest speaker. Mrs. Luvenia 
Sooes Will be in charge of music 
and brealrfMt i» iwved at I a.'m. 


Comiperce commission has ruled 
that the red caps are employees 
of the Terminal, and raikoad at- 
torneys have advised the associa- 
tion to be guided by the wage, 
hour law in dealing with them. 

Training School j 
to Open Here ! 

Noreen S. Forney who for two 
years has been teaching typing 
and Gregg shorthand at 200 East 
'Vernon is now in a commrecial 
training studio at 4365 Wall St. 
weeks summer session for Gregg 
teachers at Gregg College in Chi- 
cago this summer learning the < 
latest methods of presenting 
commercial subjects. She is , 
especially equipped to t e a c h i 
touch typing, comptometer, and 
picture typing, a new method of 
teaming touch typing, enabling 
the student to type with ease, ac- | 
curacy and confidence in twelve 1 
one hour lessons. 

Mi^ Forney is the only Negro 
teacher in the city in picture typ- 
ing having completed the teach- 
er's training course under the 
author at the Los Angeles Busi- 
ness and Preparatory School. 


'THE LOST ATLANTIS" 
$1,000,000 SPECTACLE 

For 23 centuries scientists, ad- 
venturers and inummerable au- 
thors have tried to solve the mys- 
tery of the ancient legend first 
brought to light in the writings 
of Plato, that back in the dim 
ages a continent, known as Atlan- 
tis, on which lived people of a 
high covilization. was engulfed 
and sunk in the Atlantic. 

Now. "The Lost .Mlantis" is 
being produced as a huge spec- 
tacle of drama, horror and fan- 
tasy by Trem Carr and Fred 
Jackman for Columbia Pictures. 

International interest the con- 
tinent sunk by a cataclysm 12.- 
00 years ago has created learned 
societies throughout the world 
devoted to its historical study; 
and more than 2,000 books in 
many languages have been pub- 
lished on the subject. 


Senior Insurance Documents 
Examiner, salary $230 a month. 
Age: 25 to 50. Closing date: Nov. 
26. 
CITY OF LOS ANGELtS 

Junior Clerk-Typist. salarv 
$85.00 to $125 00 per month. Age: 
Minimum 17 years. Closing date: 
Nov. 14. ^ 


FIND NEW-BORN BAB7 
DEAD IN BUCKET 

The body of a new bom baLy 
girl was found crammed into a 
bucket on the front lawn at 916 
E. 25th Street, last Friday morn- 
ing by Carl Friendburg. resident 
of the house at that address. 

Coroner said the irvfant died 
from strangulation. Efforts are 
being made by police to find the 
mother. 


I was called to the Preacher's ! 

Bench, are you not sorry? I 

To preach the true word of God. 
My text that I shall preach will ; 

be the high throne of God. Are j 

you glad? 
I will give you a few words of the 

Throne. 
When God spoke and said, "Let us 

make man". 
One writer said if you make man, 

he will sin. < 

I am giving you a short notice. ' 
The doors of Eighth and Towne 

church shall fly open at eight 

o'clock p. m. second Sunday , 

night. ! 

-Next year of June, 1938, I shall 

preach with a low voice. 
It will be by the gift of God. I 


NOW YOU TOO CAM HAVE THAT 


LIGHTER SKIN 


THAT MEN ADMIRE 
AND WOMEN ENVY 

Wncn STCiri is too 
dark rough, 
blotch, e t <., 
spread on gen- 
uine DR. FRED PALMER'S 
SKIN WHITENER. It must make 
nature work faster to bring out 
a lighter, brighter, cleaner new 
skin surface or your money back. 
25c at drug stores. 


Dr. FRED Palmer's 
SKIN WHITENER 


FREE SAMPLE For Free Sample, 
write to DR. FRED PALMER'S 
LABS. Dept. 302, AtlanU, Ga. 


TUSKEGEE MTE Second Bap- 
tist Church Friday, '*Nov. -18. 


SADIE LOUISE 

Beauty and 
Cosmetic Salon 

4620 So. Cenfrol Ave. 
ADoms 9157 


« expert operators to serve yo« 

No Hair Too Short ct 

Too lx>ng to Style 

Try us for Satin Top Dressing 




Frank Ernest Post 
Hos Installation 

At the meeting of the Frank 
Ernest Post No. 2134 last Friday 
night 5th District Commander 
Joseph C Lamb installed Com- 
rade Chaplain Emmitte L. Gaines 
on the Department Retired Men's 
I Comm. Comrade John ^.W. T. 
Freeman was installed Deputy 
Chief of Staff. Comrade Freeman 
also holds the important office of 
I Chairman of Junior Activities. 
I Commander Wallace M. Fore 
I of Unknown Soldiers Post No 
1 875 presented a Citation to Frank 
I Ernest Post No. 2134 for the ex- 
ceUent work accomplished by the 
Post and its members in the Hos- 
pital and Faculty at West Los 
Angeles. 

Armistice Day Parade starts 
promptly at 10 a. m. from Pico 
at Broadway. The officers and 
members of Frank Ernest Post 
No. 2134, V. F. W. of the U. S., 
will assist in the Dedicatory Ser- 
vices of the Evergreen Baptist 
Church, Naomi at 40th Place 
Sunday at 3 p. m.. Rev. Johns' 
pastor. The public is invited to 
attend. 


• Psycho ,i. 
Astro ^ 


J. C. Amwine, Astra Psycho, 
Counselor and advisor. If you 
are worried over business trou- 
bles, love affairs or worries of 
other kinds. Unsuccessful, dis- 
couraged, despondent and feel 
everything is against you. — 
Write J. C. Amwine, Box 362, 
Brenham, Texas. 



TINGLEY MORTGAGE 
CO. FLASHES 

Reach For Your Phone — To Get Your Loan 

Phone MI-6215 

Appraisal Same Day 

Prompt Action — Free Inspection 

6%-L0ANS-6'/2% 

Will Make Any Good Loan in Any Good District 

Low Net Cost — Flexible Terms 
448 Soufh Hil Street MI-6215 


Cosmetic 
House 

OPENING TO THE 
PUBLIC 

Newest Addition To The 
Central Ave. Businesses 

A COS1VH5TIC AND NOVELTY 
- HOUSE 

44181.. S. Central Ave. 
Sot., November 5th 

We Carry a Complete Line of 

Cosmetics including the Finest 

.of Powders and Perfumes; 

We Supply 
Beauty Operators 

In Small Lots from One Article 

to one dozen, from one pound 

to ten pounds. 

WhoUsale and Retail 


■7- 


The man next door can tell you 

• 32.6" of the 9S.094 Edison Companv stock- 
holders are men. It's possible that \our next door 
neighbor is an Edison stockholder— it's almost 
certain that many of them live in your common- 
it}'. • The 52,657 men who own Edison stock 
reprc'-ent almost even concei\-able business and 
occupation. Some are Edison emplo\-ees. Otherj 
arc farmers, mechanics, grocers, clcrkv doctors, 
lawyers, teachers, and executives. • It is because 
the Edison Companv is owned and controlled by 
the people it senes that it can look for^xard to 
an even greater part in Southern California life 
in years to come. • Southern California Edison 
Compan\ Ltd. 


t 


Late - Popular 

Phonograph Records 

lOc Each 12 for $1.00 

5634 Melrose Ave. 

Open 11 a. m. til 8 p. m. 


Telephone: CEntury 21445 

^ KTJLLMANN 
„^<>N tc WIRE WORKS 

12M4 E. Wth St. LoB Anrelea 

interior and . Exterior Stair 
^ay»2«s. Folding Gates, Wire 
and rut Iron Screens, Fences, 
"•"^ Burglar Guards 


Thoughtfulness - - - 

WHEN and WHERE 

It is Most Needed. 


When Service and Honesty Count Most! 


Sudden bereavement Is a tremendous stroin. 
Seemingly unimportant resfjonsibiiities become 
clouded. Decisions must be made quickly. 

For trustworthy dependability, for expert as- 
sistance in completing plans and arrangements, 
we offer every possible advantage and protection. 

21 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

has prepared us to off er the finest type of helpful 
service available anywhere. 

Motorcycle Service With All Funerals WitluNit Extra Cost 

CONNER-JOHNSON CO., INC. 

UNDERTAKERS ond FUlilERAL DIRECTORS 

PRospect3195 i 1400 East 17th Sh 




Buy A Home Now ! 

IN THE 

New Modern 

Pay Less Than Rent!! 

• New Homes In This Improved Modern 
TractAreAvailableon Very Easy Terms. 

• All Improvements Are In — Water, Gas, 
Lights, Street Work. 

• Fully Approved By The Federal Housing 
Administration. 

• Drive Out Today And Select Your New 
Home. 


^' 


The 


Blodget]^ Tract 

IMPERIAL AT WADSWORTH 

Office: 2512 Central Ave. Phone Adonis 8614 

WITHIN Cirr LIMITS 


a 



i 








.?• ,-?-*^: vt: '■■■?- 


,-«-*; 




if Y<Hi ^ir tb Reaa TrtE CALiroRHtA EAGtr j^ul Mot f^ever ^ I^^ 


4- 



J. L. HILL, prominent mortician of tlie beautiful Ang^elus Funeral Home. 


HAMILTON M. E. CHURCH, at 18th and Naomi of which Rev. S. M. Beane civic leader is pastor. 


f 



NORMAN O. HOUSTON, insurance executive of the Golden State Mutual, is one of the socUl and 
political leaders of the community. ' 



i ?,; "iff f ^^^^- ^^^. ^^^"^^^"^ "«J secretary-treasurer of the People's Funeral Home, 
of the best known local business men. ' 


one 


(PVvonc'lJoim ^ 


-r. f - 


X 


ADams 9362 


, .1 


iu?^S^^.r.i,iJE;5!», 



By 


TODAY 

Charles Edwords 


On our page today we see men 
in white, two leading Negro doc- 
tors who have, given their life 
to the cause of suffering human- 
ity. Dr. Leonard Stovall and Dr. 
Cladus Ballard. Dr. Stovall bom 
in Atlanta, Ga., came to Los An- 
geles September 1896, graduated 
from the Hollywood High school 
in 1906, completed his course at 
Medical College in 1912. He en- 
tered the World War during the 
year,' 1917, enlisting in the Med- 
ical corps of the United S'-^'o^ 
Army. Being the first Negro doc- 
tor to be apponited to me siaxi 
of the Los Angeles County Gen- 
eral Hospital, Dr. Stovall has be- 
come an outstanding specialist 
in the cure of Tuberculosis. He 
heis devoted his life to the con- 
struction of a demonstration Rest 
Home in Duarte, California. One 
unit of the institution being com- 
pleted last month. Shown in the 
picture with Dr. Stovall is his 
friend, Dr .Claudius Ballard who 
served as Lieutenant of the Med- 
ical Corps, of the U. S. Army in 
the World War from 1917 to 1919. 
Received the Croix de Guerre 
for rescuing wounded soldiers 
under heavy fire, and is a grad- 
uate of the Ubiversity of Calif- 


^ornia Medical College, ^class of^ 
1913. He is now associated with 
Dr. Stovall in the siovement of 
the Outdoor Life and Health As- 
sociation and the 28th Street 
Health Center, located 903 East 
28th Street. ; 

yours truly succeeded in gain- 
ing an interview with Bing Cros- 
by, who heaitfl the song that was 
written by Mrs. A^ C. Bilbrsw. 
famed choir; directoress, titled 
The Rivfer, iThe Moonlight, and 
You." He stiated that it should 
be a hit. It'j going to be in the 
feature pictiire "Dancing Feet" 
going intft production soon, on 
the Paramount lot. The Willie 
Covan Danciijg Stars, the latest 
Los Angeles* chorus of 25 beau- 
tiful dancing: girls. Bill Robinson, 
and Willie Covan are scheduled 
for the picture. 

Jules Wolf, manager of ■ the 
Lincoln Theatre, the avenues fin- 
est show place says he will con- 
sider and class the new Million 
Dollar film as a secojnd run fea- 
ture, after the scheduled brilliant 
opening at the down town theatre. 
He says that the Grand Central 
Market is closed after six o'clock. 
Now let's not get angry boys, 
your best entertainment" not the 
after all "Moving Pictures are 
Producers, directors, Publicity 
men and theatre managers. 




t- 


ERNESTINE JO.NES WADE 

Wade Concert 
Acclaimed 
Great Success 


'j^i^". ii' 


"Magnificient success" was the 
verdict of local music lovers 
when Mrs. Ernestine Jones Wade, 
dramatic soprano, jam-packed 
tlie Second Baptist Church with 
her initial concert Wednesday 
night. 

At the conclusion of the music- 
fest, Mrs. Wade was showered 
with floral — an_! verbal — tributes. 
A brilliant concert career is pre- 
dicted for the lovely young ar- 
tist. 

A repertoire which included 
that memorable aria from Ma- 
dam Butterfly "Un Bel Di. Ved- 
remo" by Puccini and "Peter, 
Go Ring Dehi Bells' as arranged 
by J. Rosamond Johnson charm- 
ed listeners. 

Having performed at local 
churches and "affairs" since 
childhood, the excellent quaiity 
of Mrs. Wade's voice was well- 
known to many. However, the ar- 
tistry revealed in the concert 
was a revelation. 

Particularly applauded was 
the young singer's final rendi- 
tion — "I am Fate!" by Hamblen. 
Garbed in a flowing black cape 
and caressed by dark purple and 
blue lighting, Mrs. Wade's im- 
pression was visible as well aa 
audible. 

Jester Hairston, nationally 
known poet and reader, aided 
the program with several highly 
amusing original works. 

Mr. Hairston is well-known in 
the East and prominent critics 
have applauded his verse. 

Expert selection and brevity 
were highlights of the evening's 
entertainment. Many commented 
upon the variety of music offered 
and- the dispatch and grace with 
which it was rendered. Lighting 
effects were handled efficientl' 
and the general "management' 
commendable. 

"Father Abraham" arranged 
by J. Rosamond Johnson was ex- 
tremely wejl-received by the 
large audience; while the Mad- 
am Butterfly aria inspired ova- 
tion. 

Mme. Lucille Blayechettai was 
a competent i accompanist and 
came in for laurels personally. 
Her perfbrmarwe at the Knabe 
was subtle — perfect. 

"Evenin' by de Moonlight" 
recovmting the conversation of a 
ninety year old exslave as he 
sits upon his pirch in Dixie-land 
was an outstanding reading by 
Mr. Haii;ston. It was hig single 
serious rendition and stood out 
w«U bjr iaoBt^«8t Hi* h^uioui 


"■1 


Where Was Martin"?, anent the 
"hanted house", and brilliant 
"Cycle of a po' Man's Life," 
which reveals the comments of a 
mother at her child's first year, 
twelfth year, when he is a man, 
and at his death, struck vital 
chords of audience response. 

'All things counted, checked, 
and re-checked, Tuesday's even- 
ing concert was a definite per- 
sonfil triumph for Mrs. Wade 
and a boon to the music lovers 
of the community. 

Mrs. Wade's complete reper- 
toire included, in addition to 
those mentioned, "Butterfly", by 
Wood; "Wild Geese", by Rogers; 
"Vale", by Russell; "Steal Away", 
by J. Rosamond Johnson; "La 
Serenat,a" Tosti; "Little Blue 
Pigeon", Wm. T. Wilkins. Mr. 
Hairston's renditions included 
"When a Black Man Sings", not 
previously mentioned. 



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PAUL R. WILLIAMS, only Anreleno mentioned in the recent LIFE account of prominetii Afw>- 
Amerioans, is recognized one of the nation's finest architects. Builder of several Hollywood homM. 


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WILLIAM NICKERSON, JR., foander'of the Golden State Mntoal, is one of die country's forcnKMt 
Negro executives. Is also known for ibis power as an orator. 



MBS WILIUA A. TOWNSKND 


OR. LEONARD STOVALL, founder of the Reft Home at Diiarte, and promineflt Neir* pk^jde- 
ian, on the staff of Los Angeles County GeoMal Hospi^. Dr. Stovall is sliowa with Ur^i 
Jiu CUttdiiu Ballard. 1 1 






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SPECIAL PROGRAMS SUTEb FOR 1 
SUNbAY SERVICES AtCHURCHES 

Progroms of interest hold lorge promise of record audiences at church ser- 
vices tNs Sundoy, of particular interest to young people and business men. At 
Second Baptist and Zion Hili Baptist youth programs will characterize the day 

while at Avalon Christian 
Church, the Golden State Mutual 
Life Insurance compan]^ wQi be 
guests at the morning worship. 

At Zian HiU's 11:00 a. m. ser- 
vices, the I junior pastor, R*r. 
Thurston tiomax will preach 
from the subject, "Our F 1 a g". 
Music wUl be rendered by the 
YouBg People's choir under the 
Erection ' of Miss Charlie Mae 
Crawford with Mrs. Addrena 
Anderson at the piano. 

At eight o'clock, the sermon 
will be preached by Rev. Hu- 
bert Rozier, son of the late R. H. 
ftorier, founder and pastor of 
Pleasant Hill Baptist church. 
This will l)e the first appearance 
of the young minister before a 
major Eastside congregation. 
MK. NICKERSON 


AVALON SPEAKEK 

WilliSim Nickerson. Jr., presi- 
dent of the Golden State Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, will ite 
presented in a brief address fol- 
lowing a special insurance ser- 
mon by the Rev. Baxter C. Duke 
at Avalon Christian Church Sun- 
day morning. Rev. Duke's sermon 
subject has been announced as 
'Tor Our Sake". The service ?01 
be highlighted with several musi- 
cal renditions by Golden State 
aggregations including its popu- 
lar quartet. This presentation 
marks the first of a series of.vis- 
■itions by the insurance company 
to aty church services. 



TO SPEAK AT AVALON 

WM. NICKERSON, JR., prerf- 
dent of the Golden State Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company, 
who will be a guest speaker at 
the Avalon Christian Church, 
43rd and Avalon, Sunday morn- 
ing. 


Rev. T. T. Addison, GoodwUl 
Missionary Baptist Church, -will 
preach from the subject. "Thy 
Kingdom Come" at the morning 
services Sundav 


Confirmation services will be 
held at St. Martin's Church on 
Sunday afternoon, November 13. 
The Rev. Father Wilkins will con- 
duct vesper ser\ice.'; and present 
the confirmation classes to the 
Rt. Rev. Robert B. Gooden, Bish- 
op who will officiate. 


Thursday evening ( tonight i, 
November 10, the Temple of Di- 
vine Truth at 909 East 33rd street 
will, present the Gospel Trumpet 
Singers m a program sponsored 
by Rev. W. M. Easlick. Mrs. Sus- 
ie A. Jackson, pastor of the Tem- 
ple announces Sunday services 
as follows: .11:00 a. m. worship 
service; 3.00 p. m. lecture on 
"Wisdom of the Masters" S. L. 
Tillett: 7:30 p. m. healing service; 
8:00 worship service. All services 
are open to the public. 



DIRECTOR 

MISS CHARLIE MAE CRAW- 
FORD, director of the Young 
People's choir of Zion Hill 
Baptist Church, who will lead 
the aggregation Sunday morn- 
ing at a special youth service. 


Quarterly meeting services will 
be held at Ward Chapel A. M. E. 
Church; Sunday. November 13, 
it was announced by the pastor. 
Rev. J. W. Price. Tuesday after- 
noon. Elderly and shut-ms will 
be guest of Ward Chapel Thanks- 
giving Sunday when a free lunch 
■will bf served after the morning 
worship. 


The Kind of Person Satan WUl 
Use" has been announced aa the 
aubjact for the Sunday morning 
lubject of Rev. Chester A. Hemp, 
hill, pastor. True Light Baptist 
Church, 1008 East Jefferson Blvd. 
At 7:45 p. m.. Rev, H. C. Cor- 
nelius, local preacher of St. Paul, 
will preach. 


Tha congregation o{ Lincoln 
Memorial Congregation al 
Church, Vernon and Hooper ave- 
nue will hear its pastor. Rev. E 
E. Lightner, on "Anchored or 
Drifting" Sunday morning. "At 
the evening service, he will 
speak on: 'Things that Make For 
Peace". 



Rev. S. M. Beane, pastor. Ham, 
flton M. Z. Church will deliver 
his morning sermon Sunday from 
the subject, "That Was Certain". 
,At S p. m. the Epworth League 
will convene and at 7:30 former 
citiaens of Louisiana will have 
charge of a fellowship service, 
Assemhlyman Hawkins will de- 
liver the principal address and 
the pastor win discuss the re- 
quested subject, "Seeking A Bet. 
ter Home" in a brief sermonette. 


JUNIOR PASTOR 

REV, THURSTON L O M A X, 
junior pastor of Zion Hill Bap- 
tist Church, who will preach at 
the Sunday morning youth ser- 
vice. 


CHJUSTUir SCIENCE OHURCHK^l 

"Mortals and ImmortalB" fs the 
subject of the Lesson-Sermoo <te 
Sunday in all Churches of Christ. 
Scientist The Qolden Text Ib from 
Paul's second'letter to the Corinthi- 
ans: "If any man be in Christ, he 
is a new creature: old things are 
passed away; behold, all tbinss are 
become new." 

A Scriptural selection presents 
these words of John: "Beloved, now 
are wa the sons of Ood, aa^ it 6otb 
not yet appear what we shall be: 
but we know that, when he shall 
appear, we shall be like him; for 
we shall sea him aa ha is." Theae 
passages from First Peter are also 
included : "For all flesh Is as grass. 
and all the glory ot man as the 
flower ot grass. The grass wither- 
eth, and the Qower thereof falletb 
away: But the word of the Lord en- 
duretb for ever." 

One ot the passages, from the 
Christian Science textbook, "Sci- 
ence and Health with Key to the 
Scriptures," by Mary Baker EMdy 
states: "Mortals are not like im 
mortals, created m Qod's ows 
Image; but infinite Spirit being all 
mortal consciousness will at last 
field to the scientific fact and dis- 
appear, and the real sense of being, 
perfect and forever intaet. will ap- 
pear." 

Mrs. L.M.Hughes 
Arrives in 
South Africa 

CAPE TOWN, Nov. 10— (AN 
P) — Mrs. Lucy M, Hughes, Presi- 
dMit of the Women's Home and 
Foreign Missionary Society of 
the A, M. E. church has reach- 
ed South Africa and was heartily 
welcomed by Bishop R. R. Wright 
and the ministers and missionary 
workers of Cape Town. There 
were many receptions and a huge i 
missionary meetmg of the women 
at Bethel Church. 

In addressing the missionarv 
mass-meeting, Mrs. Hughes told 
the history of her society which 
has now 25,000 women organized 
in America. "We have organized 
ourselves to support South Afri- 
ca", she said, and we are proud 
of the work we have done. We at 
one. time spent as much as $5000 
per quarter to this work here 
For the past ten years we have 
done that well. But we have sent 
nearly $10,000 to Bishop Wright 
during the two years he has been 
here, and out of that he has not 
only paid the teachers at Wilber- 
force Institute in the Transvall, 
but helped to build that splendid 
12 room schol building up there. 
Last year we sent you here from 
America Professor A. J, White, 
a Harvard graduate, and his wife 
a Wilberforce Graduate. This 
year we sent you Prof. J. R. 
Coan, of Yale university We have 
not done all that we want to do. 
We propose to do more. We shall 
stand firmly behind Bishop 
Wright's building program, that 
the splendid work he is doing 
many continue to go forv/ard. 

After ten days stay in Cape 
Town, Mrs. Hughes left for a 
two months visit to Rhodesia, 
Transvaal, Swaziland, and Bas- 
utoland. She wiU also attend Bish- 
op Wright's conferences. Intro- 
ducing her he said, "For twelve' 
years South Africans have been 
I looking for Mother Hughes to 
I visit them, and have been sorely 
i disappointed because she failed 
to do so. When I was assigned 
here I extracted a promise from 
■ her to come to South Africa'and 
. in neafly every letter I have 
written her I have reminded her 
that she should come. And now 
how happy wa are that she is 
here. Her visit i» an epoch mak. 
ing event in AME history." 



- ■■ ' I ''>*'' li'l^K^^i-^ fe^i- »3-^- jL£Hr DORMITORY 


Thursdoy,\l 


L. G. Robinsli^it Sets Reicdria of 
31 Years tit County 


Thirty-one years of service in* .pect among the : men for their 
Los Angeles County Governmeni . . -. . _ . 


i PROGRESSIVE 

REV. ARTHUR E. RANKIN 
Progressive pastor of McDow- 
ell Memorial Community 
church, 21st and Columbia ) "lent 


is the record of L. G. Robi|ison 
now Superintendent of Jainitor 
and Elevator Service of the Los 
Angeles County Janitors Depart- 
ment. . ! , 

The pleasure has been his to 
see this unusual department of 
^[government expand from 13 jani- 
tors to 123 janitors, 34 eleyator 
operators, 3 starters, 6 mai^s, 3 
messengers, 1 truck driver, I sup- 
ply clerk, 1 stenographic secre- 
tary, 1 assistant chief janitoi; and 
1 assistant superintendent 'of 
Janit.* and Elevator Servicei 
This force isC augmented in the 
summer vacation months by some 
25 or 30 emergency emplo^^fc 

The payroll for this depart- 
ment runs frpm $21,000 to *24,- 
000 per month. ; 

In this unique County Depart- 


can be found repreisent- 


Ave., Philadelphia, Pa., who 
served a successful charge in 
Kansas City before being call, 
ed to the Quaker City where he 
succeeded a nationally known 
pastor, the late Matthew An- 
derson. The Rev. Rankin has 
moved up from this charge to 
his present post, which is one 
ot the most ambitious com- 
munity projects in the city. 
The program embraces religi- 
ous, educational, social and re- 
creational activities, and the 
church edifice is commodious, 
and a marvel in architectural 
design and construction. Rev. 
Rankin, a very highly trained 
man, is expected to succeed in 
his new post. (Calvin Service) 


] atives of most social groups in 
Los Angeles; young, old, religi- 
ous, sports, political or education- 
al. Once a month speakers, local 
and national, come to speak be- 
fore the group, among these have 
been such men as Baxter Scruggs 
of the YMCA, Rev. Claytbn 
Powell, Hon. Oscar DePriest, A. 
Phillip Randolph, Channing To- 
bias, Robert DeFrantz, Nolle 
Smith of the Hawaiian Islands, 
Clarence Johnson and others. Mr. 


race, work and tfaeir department 
Unlike many .routine jobs this 
work furnishes a variety of 
diities and affords as well an op- 
portunity for tl^e employees to 
study for other jobs in the gov- 
ernment service and to take 
Civil Service tests for these posi- 
tions. A sympathietic bond exists 
between the departments of 
County Government. The Jani- 
tors Department feels that it lias 
its place and does not underesti- 
mate the value ot- importance of 
its duties, keeping the bujldings 
Mean and sanitary, runnihg the 
elevators, delivering interdepart- 
mental mail and performing oth- 
er incidental services. 

This Department is a distinct 
County unit with its individual 
set-up in the County Budget, ord- 
ering its own supplies, making 
payrolls for its employees and 
being generally responsible for its 
own yearly spending program. 

Mr. L. G, Robinson is also 
President of the Angelus Funer- 
al Home of Los Angeles, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Management 
of the J8th Street Branch of the 
NAACP and Assistant Pastpr of 
Scott's M. E, Church, Pasadena. 

Capt. Wm. Reynolds, fh c As- 
sistant Superintendent of Janitor 
and Elevator Service is a veteran 
of the Spanish Americari War 


Y DORMITORY MEN TG^infm,^ 
PUT ON TALENT NIGHT I " J " 

The domitory men of the 28th 
Street YUCA are attempting to 
establish a Ulent night ever>' 
TL,esday night. Each man will 
bring to the group some number. 

There is also being organized 
under the direction of Mr. Vin- 
cent M. Townsel a domitory glee 
club, which will render numbers 
on the program. This is a splen- 
did activity started . by these 
J dung men and efforts will be 
made by them to present a pro- 
gram to which the public will 
be invited. 



f 10, 1938 


'If 


Young Women's 
Club of Phillip's 


owship 
Wec(t t^.'"j.-#;. 
Be \6bserved 

The YMCA week f ^°^ 
Fellowship will be <*fervea 
from NoveiBber 13 to 19. Tr - ob- 
servance sounds a call "to u*"** 
with Association workers through 
out the wofld in a fellowship of 
thought and prayer". 

Special subjects for group 
study and meditation are an- 
nounced for each day of the 
week. Three main events are to 
be featured by the local *V 
Branch. XDn Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 16, at 6:30 P. M., the Board 
of Managers' meeting will ha vj 
1 Rev, J. L. Castor as speaker, aa* 
the same d*1« 


■ ^i. I . B _^ ! at 8:00 P, M, on 

in Night rrOgram ithe imer Hi-Y Club Meeting WiU 

v„»v nf^iohtprs an nTffaniya- be held. The speaker is to be an-, '. 

Eves Daughters, an ."Lg^.P.'^".- Lounced later. On Thursday. Nov- I 

CME church, WiU be in l«nber 17 promptly »* 7:30 P. M- 

a special "Fireside Meditation 
Group" will meet in the Main I| 
Lobby under the leadership of 
Father H. Randolph Moore. In- 
vited to attend tliis meeting ar« i| 
j dormitory men, "V" members, 


tion of younj women of Phillip's 
Temple 

charge of t h e evening program 
Sunday, November 13, when offi- 
cers will be installed and t h e 
club addressed by Miss Helen F. 
Chappell, society and women's j 
editor of the California Eagle 


The club is five years old and ] ^^Jends and any others interest- 
has on its roster some of the most «1 '" this informal fellowshij 
progressive women of the city, j P"°4P' ' 

Officers are Mmes. Bertha 
Wright, president; Dorothy An- 
derson, vice-president: Vergie 
Williams, secretary; Willie M, 
Baldwin, terasurer; and Miss Ni- 
cola Holland, business manager. 


DID YOU KNOW— If the pro- 
_ _ _ _ ._ phecy of Daniel is true Christ 

value of these monthly talks to I of "Friendship Baptist Church of i when he left this earth had wooly , given a contract 


_ , . , . * iu • .u I 3nd a prominent laymen in the 

Robinson has great faith m the g^pji^j^church, being a member 


NEGRO GIVEN SCHOOL 
WIRING CONTRACT 

E. ST. LOUIS, m., ov, 10. (A 
NP)— For the first time in Um 
history of East St. Louis, a Ne, 
gro, Charles McCarns, has beei 


for elect: 


help build up a high sense <xf re- Pasadena. 


hair. 



Institutional Church Center 
to Sponsor Adult Program 


On Tuesday evening, November 
15, the Institutional Church Cen- 
ter will present an adult educa- 
tion program and exhibit. Among 
the institutions represented on 
the program are the Emergency 
board of Education, Golden State 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
William Nickerson, Jr,, president; 


Congregation Church choir^ Rev 
Lightner, pastor and Mrs, C. D. 
Frederick, director, Phillip's Tem- 
ple, Rev. L. C. Cleaves, pastor; 
Wesley Chapel chorus. Mrs. Rake- 
straw, representative; Second 
Baptist church octette, Mrs. An- 
na Griffith Morrow, director, Miss 
Edyth Kathryn Owens will be 
at the piano. 



wiring in the public schools. 


We give eoorteovs and earefo] at- 
tention to all details; efficient 
rice with modem faeilitiec 

\Our Motto: 

"Maximum Service at 
Minimum Cost 


% 


Women's Progressire Club of 

Wesley M. E. to Present Feature 

Two interesting and worth 


South Los Angeles 
Mortuary , 

1 12tli & Wilmington Avenue JE-4T78 


"Bread and God" will be the 
tubject of Rev. E, W. Rakestraws 


Interest in Newly Appointed 
Tuskegee Body to Build 

DmmaI lu4/viiri*ciPi"6»"Typeof Life 

I QnCi rTlUUIliai Bishop W, Bertrand Stevens, 
Increasing interest in the com- I Rabbi Edgar F. Magnin, Msgr. 
ine Los Angeles Tuskegee Club i Thomas J. O'Dewey and Doctors 
panel discussion was evidenced i Frank B. Fagerburg, James W. 
this week according to Arthur I Fifield, Robert Freeman and Wil- 

' sie Martin have been appointed 
by the Board of Supervisors at 
the "County Committee for 
Church and Community Cooper. 
ation." 
The Committee is' planning a 


C. Cole, member of the City Po- 
lice Department, who is presi- 


Sunday morning at Wesley Chap- dent of the club. 

el M. E. Church dissertation At Featuring Tuskegee Institute, 

8:30 p. m., the Ushers' Union wofld-famed education center. 

will hold its rhonthlv service at Cole said the discussion will be , - - 

WMlr^ ChapeT « the Ku«t o I conducted by Dr. W, R. Carter, ! number of sugegst.ons regardmg 

•V V '-""P*'!, ~ ^"f guest 01 rnx/infftnn C O FnpHsh the responsibility of various 

ita usher board. In the eveninc, Ir'oya Covington, u. u. tngiisn, t- j ^„.„„„i»,, 


- - - evening, , , ,_ », i-. 

Rev. Rakestraw will speak on his 1 Father H. Randolph Moore, Dr. 
recent trip East and South. Pry<» Cobbs, Lieut, Wm. PoweU, 

_ I Miss S. Pumphrey, A. R, Mose- 

The pastor of the Seventh Day '^y- Mrs, Augusta Glover and 
Adventist Chur>;h at 40th Place R^^- Clayton Russell 


and Wadsworth Ave., wUl speak 
Sunday night, November 13 at 
tha 8 o'clock service. He will 
present a picture sermon on the 
"Past— the Present and the Fu- 
ture of the (5ospel Church. The 
•ntire sermon will be based on I 
the vision of the "Woman in the i 
Sim" of Revelation 12, and will 
be iUustxated by the use of un- 
usual screen pictures, A picture 
of the grave of Sojourner Truth 
photographed by the pastor at 
Battle Creek three weeks ago 
will also b* thrown on the 
screen. Sabbath (Saturday) the 
pastor will preach at 11 a. m. on 
"I« -righteousness earned.-or is 
It a gift without effort on the 
part of man?** The Sabbath 
school preceeds this service con- 
vening at 9,25 a. m. 

FHQTOGS CLAiSS TO ~ 
START AT 28TH ST. Y 

A call is made to all men inter- 
ested in joining a photographers 
club at the 28th Street- Branch 
YMCA. Efforts are being made 
to secure an outsanding authority 
in this field to lead this group. 
The aim of this group will be to 
participate in hobby shows and 
photographers exhibits both local 


Special numbers wiU be rend- 
ered by Mme. Florence Cole Tal- 
bert-McCleave, George Garner, 
R. N. Sanford and outstanding 
choirs of the city. 

The local Tuskegee club will 
present the panel discussion in, 
Second Baptist church, 24th and 
Griffith avenue, Friday evening, 
Nov, 18. at 8 o'clock. 


Second Baptist 

Young Folk 

in Homecoming 

Young people of Second Bap-' 
tist Church, 24th and Griffith 
will observe their annual home-i 
coming Sunday, November 13, iti 
was announced early this week. 
The services will be characteriz- 
ed by a special young people's 
sermon Sunday morning by the 
pastor, Dr, T. L, Griffith and an 
evening program featuring Cris- 
pus Wright and Miss Elizabeth 
Hampton as speakers on "Youth's 
Return to Faith." 

The observation inarks the an- 
nual rally for the Sunday school 
»nd B, Y. P, U. Congress of the 
We«:t°m Baotist State Conven- 
j ':on. The congress will be held, in 
1 Santa Barbara immediately fol- 



cross sections of the community 
for building a finer type of life, 
taking different topics for each 
month. 

As the November topic deals 
with the Responsibility of the 
Schools ■ and especially teachers, 
for the character of youth, var- 
ious school officials were inter- 
viewed with the result that a 
number of true interesting ex- 
periences among students was 
brought to light. One teacher in 
the county is the adult leader of 
two voluntary school groups, 
teaches a class in his church, 
and is adviser to a fourth group. 
Every summer finds him colin- 
selor at one or more camps for 
boys. 


GETS HIGH ^Y" POST 

MRS. GEORGE W. LAWRENCE 
Chicago, who was elected as the 
first colored woman member o( 
the .National Young' Women's \ 
Christian Association's Committ* I 
ee on Review of Program and 
Budget and who attended her 
first meeting in New York City | 
last week. 

Mrs. Lawrence wife of the for- 
mer president of the National , 
Bar Association, has had wide ex- 
perience in the Chicago YWCA i 
and is a member of the city wide 
board in Chicago. 

Native of Nashville, Tenn.,and 
wife of D. A. M. Townsend, sec- 
retary of the Sunday School Pub- 
iishmg Board of the National 
Baptist Convention, Mrs. Towns- 
end is leader of the Woman's 
Auxiliary Convention of Tennes- 
see. She is an all around church 
worker, director of music depart- 
ment of historic Sprue Street 
Baptist Church, music editor of 
the Beginner's Quarterly, and 
Director of Children's Work of 

the Sunday iicnool Kublishing 

Board and a songwriter and hym- 
nologist, all of which capacities 
were strengthened by her visits 
in Palestine and seeing the Pass- 
ion Play at Oberamergau. She is 
also chairman of the Women's 
Convention Choir Leaders, Nat- 
ional Baptist Convention, U.S.A. 

Nat'lYw LeJds~ 
Lynch Campaign 

NEW YORK, Nov, 10, (ANP) 
— Continuing its campaign in sup- 
port of a federaf anti-lyiiching 
law, the national public affairs 
committee of the-Y. W, C. A., at 
a meeting held at national head- 
quarters, 600 Lexington, Avenue, 
recently, passed a resolution 
which urged all the j organiza- 
tion's branches throirghout the 
country to work actively to get 
their senators to vote for limit- 
ation of debate, should a filibus- 
ter develop when the bilj is re- 
introduced during the coming 
session of Congres, 


while events to take place next 
week will be the culmination of 
the Children's Popularity Con- 
test at Wesley M. E, Church, 8th 
and San Julian, nexP Wednesday. 
November 16, 8:15 p. m. 

The club will also present five 
pupils fro:n the advanced piano 
class of Lucille E. Blayechettai. 

A unique feature will be » 
Beethoven Sonata played by 
three pianists. 

The beautiful voice of the 
popular young soprano soloist, 
Ernestine Jones-Wade, who sang 
last week to an appreciative and 
enthusiastic audience will be. 
heard. 

Admission adults 25 cents, chil- 
dren 10 cents. 


DID YOU KNOW— Mrs. Howard 
Harper was appointed by the 
governor of West Virginia to ■ 
succeed her husband who died 
on Dec. 21, 1927, aa a member of ' 
the legislature of that State. Thi.s 
was the first time a Negro woman i 
was a member of any legislature 
in this country. 


E A 'P a bungalow 
^% Jl beantifully 

P«y nothing down. P«y $4.79 monthly. 

Automatic rojuHtion. Salilfiction 
OUirinl»^_ Qai Colt in Loi Angtles 

QuarvUoxl Lax than $I8 a raar. 
No baaamant or flue 'equired. 

WILLIAMS RADIATOR CO. 
1865-1873 W. Cordova Street 
RE -5725 


DID YOU KNOW— Negroes in 

the United States in 1936 own ' 

s' n,e 20,00(1,000 acrej of land or^SKOOO square miles 


^ttatih ^uptxBt (£\^mt\^ 


Mth Street 


L. Otttmk. 9. m. 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13 1938 


HOMECOMING DAY FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

11:00 A, M— PASTOR'S SUBJECT: 'How Young People, May 
Lose or Win the Present-Day Conflicts in Making 
a Living and in Making a Life" 
7:45 P.M.— .ADDRESSES by Mr. Ciispus Wright and Mis? Eliza- 
beth Hampton, 
Brief Sermon: Subject — "Today and Tomorrov. " 

Sundav School - 9:30 A. M. B. Y P. U. - 6:15 P M. 


FIRST A. M. E. ZION CHURCH 

Pico Blvd. at Paloma Street Office Phone: PR -9727 

ReT. Walter K. Levell, Pastor, lU? Paloma St RI--99S9 

Rev. Roger Willis. Associate Pastor 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1938 

9:30 A. M— CHURCH SCHOOL (AH Departments) 
11:00 A. M.— SERMON by Pastor, Subject: "I was in Prison" 
3:00 P. M: — Quarterly Meeting, Sermon by Rev, Emma Hamil- 
ton. 
5:30 P. M— Christian Endeavor 
6:45 P, M.— EVENING SERMON by Pastor 

"THE CHURCH THAT SERVES WITH A SMILE" 


Officer in Baptist 
Church Posses 

• Mrs. Armanda West, deaconess 
of Mt. Zion Baptist church, and 
mother of Mrs, Pearl Butler, pas- 
sed away after a brief illness at 
her residence, 1452 E. 46th St. 
Services were held Wednesday 2 
p. m. Mt. Zion Baptist church. 
Rev. F, H. Prentice, oflficiating. 
Interment in Lincoln Memorial 
Cemetery. Conner-Johnsoa Co., 
Morticians in charge. 


Card of Thanks 

The family of the late Edward 
Holland wishes to thank Rev. J. 
L. Caston for his splendid ser- 
vice and the city employees .and 
the many friends for their com- 
forting words, donations of cards 
and beautiful flowers, also Ange- 
lus Funeral Home for their 
.splendid service. 
Signed: 

Mrs. Kate Holland, wife " 
Mrs. Agnes Green, mother- 
in-law 
Mrs, Anna Jones, sister-in- 
law 


ijamUtott m E (Slfurrli 


5. M. Btsm, B. D. 


-|^ 


Bstt 19H SkMt m 


SUMdAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1938 


9:30 A, M,— CHURCH SCHOOL 

11:00 A, M.— SERMON _ Pastor 

Subject: "That was Certain" 

3:30 P, M.— NAACP MEET 

' 6:00 P. M— EPWORTH LEAGUE 

7:30 P. M.— LOUISIANA FELLOWSHIP SERVICE 

Address Hon. Augustus Hawkins 

Short Sermon: "Seeking a Better Home". ..Pastor 


MUSIC .. 
SERMON 


Wesley Choir 

.-Rev, E. W, Rakestraw 


ilrtlroMst 


Wfalf8SSS«J|«"i» 


Eighth and San /uit*n Strteti 
REV. E W RAKESTRAW Mtmder 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13 1938 


9:30 A, M— CHURCH SCHOOL 

MINISTERS MORNING SUBJECT: -Bread and God' 

3:30 P. M— UNION USHER BOARD Mtetrng at Wesley 

7:30 P, M.— MINISTER'S SUBJECT: 'Some Facts Gleaned 
From My Trip South and • ast" 


MlWord Chapel 
lllfJA. M. E. Church 

REV. /. W. PRICE. Pastor 
1250 Eait 25th Street Phone CEntury 23052 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1938 

5:00 A, M.— PRA-i^R MEETING 
9:00 A. M.— SUNDAY SCHOOL 
11:00 A. M.— MORNING WORSHIP 

6:30 P, M.— ALLEN CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR LEAGUE 
7:30 P, M,— EVENING SERVICES 
7:30 P, M,— EVENING WORSHIP ^ 

A 

CORDIAL WELCOME EXTENDED TO ALL 


>' 


DID YOU KNOW— At Valley 
Forge, ; Washington was induced 
by Gen. Varmam to enlist a bat. 
talion of Negroea to fill hia de- 
pleted ranka 


I 


i 


FOUNTAIN PEN 
SHOP 

Room 314 Groiise Bailding 
124 West SixfhSf. 

Comer Spring Street 
PARKER & SHEAFFER 

SERVICE STATION 
Fountain Pen and Peneil 

Bepairing 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

Phone TUcker 3652 ; 
ONE-DAlf SERVirE 1 


':^^>^;' 


... I. 




-j^^ drant (El;ipfl 


A* JR* tt^ 



Comar 108th and Compton Avenue 

PROF. L G. EGGLESTUS. DntUor of Mutic 

REV. ROBERT HOUSE. Pastor 

SUNDAY, NOyEMBEk 13, 1938^ 


5:00 A. M.— PRAYER SERVICE i 

10:55 A. M.— DEVOTION ALS and SERMON- | 

Subject: "The Christian Home" 
8:00 P. M.—BffiLE CLASS I 

8:30 P. M.— A. C. E. LEAGUE SERVICE 

Topic: "How Young People Can Help Build a 
War-less World" 
7:30 P, M.— DEVOTIONALS and "Young People's Program 


YOU ARE CORDIALLY WELCOME TO WORSHIP WITH US 


PEOPLE'S INDEPENDENT 
CHURCH OF CHRIST 

1«TH AND PALOMA » 

" THE CHURCH THAT SERVES " 

CLA'YTON D. RUSSELL, Miniitw 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13. 1938 

10:15-10:45 a, m.. Broadcast for Sick and Shut-in*. "The Viai- 
tor", KFOX 

10:55 a. m., SERMON: 

"Harig Out Your Sign" 

7:30 p. m.: SPECIAL ADDRESS: 

The Negro His Own Worst Enemy 


Rev. kusaell Speajts at all Serv 


icea 


COMING: UNION ITHANKSGIVING SERVICE, 
THANKSGIVING DAT 
New Hbiie Baptist and Indqwodent at Indepoidem 


"WE SPECIALIZE tN HELPFtlLNESS" ^ * 


m^^^^^^M': 




T^t'^ 



FOR RENT 


LEGAL NOTICES T 

CIBIIFICATE FOE TRANSAC- 1 ^^ ^.r^^^ ^ : 

HON OF BUSINKSS UNDEE ' f^« RENT— Nice, modern room. 
FICnoUS NAME 

THE UNDERSIGNED does here 


MISCELLANY 


by certify that he^ is conduct- 
JBf a Contracting business at 
M43 Beverty Blvd., Los Angeles, 
CaQfomia, under the fictitioas 
firm name of California Home Im- 
provement Conipany and that 
said firm is composed of the fol- 
lowing persons, whose names in 
full amd places of residence are ! 
as foUows. to-w i t: PHILLIP 
SCHWARTZ, 756 So. Normandie. i 
WITNESS my hand this 18 day 
of October, 1938. j 

PHILLIP SCHWARTZ 

FILED Oct. 18, 1938. 

L. E. LAMPTON. County CTerk i 
By F E. Morgan, Deputy, i 
State of California 1 


lovely location, for employed 
man or lady. Call CE~20683, after 
6 P. M. _ r-10-1 

■■ — ^ — ■ 

FOR RENT— Nicely fur. apts. 

first class, people only. 975 S. 
Mariposa. FL 9546. r-lO-md. 


FOR RENT— Attr.. light, air>-. un- 
furnished, apmt. in west Jeff, 
district, available soon, to adults 
only; conv. to Bev. Hills, H')lly 
wood. J & V cars. Call Richmond 
8849, if no answer, ring EXposi- 
tion 5843. r-lO-ind 

FOR RENT— Weil furn. rm. in 
very nice home to single man^ 
woman or couple. Must be employ- 
ed. Hskeeping. priv. & phone. 
KI-8874. r-lQ. 1 


CHILD CARE 

So. Lm Aagelex Friratc ScImoL 
Boys mad Giito, S to 7 yean. 
KooBi aad^ board, or by the day. 
Noncry, Kia der gartea, Prim- 
ary. Also Piano, Violiii. and 
Spanish Guitar, aire, taoght. 

OPEN THE YEAR 'ROUND 
MRS. OLLIE L KING, Director, 
Cor. E. USth and Grape Sts. ' 
KI~4M4 


County of Los Angeles 

ON THIS 18 day of October'. A. 
D. 1938, before me. L. E LAMP- ! 
TON County Clerk and Clerk of , j-QR RENT— Neatlv fur. room m 
the Superior Court of the State t rhr,«tian homp ' for couple or 


FOR RENT— Unfur. 3rm. apt.. 

newly decorated. 209 N. Benton 

Way. Call EX. 7079. r-10-2 




of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles, personal- 
ly aopeared 

"PHILLIP SCHWARTZ 
known to me to be the person 
whose name is subscribed to the 
within instrument, and acknow- 
ledged to me that he executed 
the same. 

IN WITNESS WHERjpF. I 
have hereunto set my hand the 
day and year in this certificate 
it above written. 
L. E. LAMPTON. 

County Clerk. 
By T. E. Morgan. Deputy 
(Oct. 10, 1938 date 1st Publish) 


Christian home 
nice working men. 4061 Trinity St. 
near H carlme. r-10-1 

FOR RENT— Completely fum. 3- 

room apt., all outside rms. 711 

E. Vernon. Apt. 715. .A.Dams 8921. 

: r-10-1 
*_ 

FOR RENTi— Neaty furn. room. 

use of tel*»plXone and garage. 647 

E. 37th St. .AD. .3984. r-IO-1 

FOR RENT — Room clean and com- 
fortable private home, phone i 
kitchen privilege, near S, U & B 
carlmes. 945 E. 22nd St. r-IO-1 


i MEN ATTKNTION ! 

SUITS AND OVERCOATS made | 
to your measure. Latest styles { 
and materials guaranteed. $22.50. 
Special prices to orchestrsi men or ! 
when ordered in groups. Ladies' t 
Suits $21.50. PENKOSE CHAD- 
WICK. 1213 E. 23rd Street. I 

I WILL PAINT your kitchen, bed- i 
room and bath; then will free I 
hand paint flowers, birds and { 
swans free; 26 years of knowing \ 
how. Paperhanging that sticks. Es- 
timates free. BiU— TW-4440. 



CERTIFICATE OF TRANSG- 

Ficrrnocs n.ame 

THE LT^TDERSIGNED do here- 
by certify that she is conducting 
a Cosmetic Manufacturing busi- 
ness at 5002 S. Central Ave.. Los 
Angeles. Calif.. un>ier the fictiti- 
otis firm name of Ladv Ebonee 
Beautifymg ToUernes and that 
said firm is compo.sSd of the fol- 
lowing persons, whose rames m 
full 2nd places of residence are 
as fsllows. to-wit: 

Hazel Williams. d93 E. 43rd PI., 
Los .\ngeles. 

WITNESS my hand this 19th 
day of October. 1938. 

• HAZEL 'WTLLLA-MS 
. FILED Oct 19, 1938 

L. E. LAMPTON. County Clerk 
By L. J Miller, Peputy 
State of California 1 

'- m. 
County of Los .\ngeles 

ON THIS 19 day of October A. 
D. 1938. before me. L. E. LAMP- 
TON. Counry- Clerk and Clerk of 
the Superior Coun of the State 
of California, in and for t h e 
County of Los .Angeles, person- 
ally appeared HAZEL WIL- 
LLA.MS known to me to be the 
person wnose name is iubjc.ib- 
ed to the within instrument, and 
acknowledged to me that she 
executed the same 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I 

ve hereunto set mv hand the 
'}••■ and year :n this crtificate 
6rst above writren 

L.E. L.\MPTON. Couhty Oerk, 
By L. J. Miller. Deputy. 

fOct. 27. 1938 date 1st pub.> 

PK- 
OF 


FOR RENT— Unfur. 4-rm. cottage 
near Hollywood. Phone OL— 

2314. . r-10-2 

1. . 

FOR RENT— Neat light airy room, 
reas. to couple. 10 mm. from 
town. 5 min. from Ambassador, 
walking distance o! U. S. C, conv. 
to U. S. C. near Bev. Hills. Ring 
RI--8849. if no ar.swer call Ex- 
position 5843. r-lO-ind 

FOR RENT— Gas station, 2 pumps, 
equipped. J. M. BEST. PA-0679. 

FOR RENT— Unfur. 4 room, mod. 

house, side. rear. 1439 West 36th 

Place. Inquire 1485 West 36th PL, 

or 705 E. 43rd Place. CE-29891. 

r-10-1 


FOR RENT— Fur. rooms in quiet 

Christian home, working people 

onlv. 1510 E. 23rd St. r-3-2 


FOR 

RENT- 

-Fur 

. rooms. 

gas 

hea 

. S3. 00 

per 

weeK, 

975 

4 E. 

Vernon .Ave. 

.\D. 

:!587. 








r-3-2 


FOR RENT— Nicely fur» modem 
bungalow, large rooms. 2 wall 
beds, near all conv. .Aduits only. 
no pets, reliable people. 1001 E. 
55th street, inquire 5212 S. Cen- 
tral Ave. r-3-2 


NOTICE OF HEAHrVG OF 
TmON FOR PROBATE 
WILL 

No. 1SM2S 

In the Superior Court of the 
State of California m and foe 
the Countv of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the EsUte «< 
ANNA BERG. Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given that the 
petition of Margaret B Haney 
for the Probate of Will of Anna 
' Berg. Deceased, and for the is- 
suance of Letters Testamentar.- 
thereon to the said Margaret B. 
HaneT will be heard at 10 o'clock 
A. M'.. on November 14th. 19.3«. 
at the Court Room of Department 
54 of the SuDerior Court of the 
Slike of California, in and for 
the CouitT if Lo5 .Amgeles. 
L.' E. LAMPTON. 

County Clerk. 
Dated October 20. 193fl. 

Bt Wm Samuels. Deputy 
DAVTD W WILLIAMS. 2510 
So Central .Ave.. .ADams 3737. 
Attorney for Petitioner. 

Oct. 27th date of 1st pub. 

^NEWTON STREET GARAGE ' 
NOTICE OF S.\LE FOR 

LIEN CLAIMANT ' 

Notice IS hereby given that pur- 
jsuant to section 427—428 of the 
Vehicle Code, of the State of Cal- 
ifornia, the undersigned. Ivory 
Yarber. of the Newton Street Ga- 
rage, will sell at public auction at 
i 361 Newton Street. City of Los 
I \ngeles. at the hour of 9:30 A. M.. 
^ on the 25th day of November, 
1938, the following described prop- 
ertv. to-wit 

One 1936 Buick business coupe, 
license No 4C4643. Engine No. 
43139512, Serial No. 29728.50. be- 
longing to -AHna Batie. as legal 
- owmer. who resides at 1340 East 
42nd Street. Los .Araeies 

Said sale will bt had to enforce 
a lien claim.ed by the under- 
signed for labor and material per- 
formed upon said vehicle in the 
amount of $251 DO together with 
storage, cost of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale to date. I 
Dated November 8tb. 1938. 

Signed: Newton Street Garage, 
Lien Claimant. 

By IVORY YARBER, 
Nov, lOth, date of first publication. 

RUGS 6r CARPETS 

1000 used Rugs 8x9. 8x10, 9x12. 
S5 00 up. New and used broadloom 
all shades. 9x12. 9x15. 9x18, 12x15, 
12x18, 12x21. 
WUton Rugs all sixes 
Used Carpets 27-ineh 85 cents 
yard and up. »_,« 

■ --New Broadloom tyi>e rug 9x12, 
$8.75. - . ^ . 

Fumitui^ Modem and up to date. 
Dining Room Suites. Living Room 
Suites, Bedroom Suites, Springs 
& Mattresses. 

Open ETenings till 9 P. M. 

Singer's 1487 Suns :3lv(l. 

Phone MU. 45r» 
Open Suadaya OliT.M. 


FOR RE.NT— Comfortable room 
With heat near S. Si V, cars, '.vith 
or without garage tor gentleman. 
AD. 7993. r-3-2 ' 

FOR RENT— Neatlv fur. room for [ 

smsle man or woman, employ- 
ed. AD. 6320. r-3-1 ' 

1 FOR ' RB^^'T- Rooms for gentle- 
' man. S3. 00 per week. 1305 E 
!2th St., TUcker 6456. r 20 4 

FOR RE.NT- In pru-a'le home, 
neat, clean, large, airy fur. 
room with orivileges like home. 
RI-1304 or 'RI-8855. 

10-27ind 


PERSONAL— I will sell my equity 
in an ail-modern home on East 
52nd Place near Avalon. Good in- 
come propertv. fme location. Call 
.ADams 9362. refer to Owner. 


Stakes. Panels. Pickjjps 

READY TO GO 

Wise Buyer', Buy At 

Dwv-er s, 3790 So. Vermont . .ve. 

r-22-4 


$4-9S 


tc VP 


STOVES 


Cleaned ft Reconditioned ^_ 

Expert Repairing 

RELL\BLE STOVE WORKS 

246 East Florence .\Te. 

TW -4242 


HAVE YOU ULCERS 

or 

STOMACH TROUBLE 

OF ANY KIND? 

We positively Correct the 
cause, many Completely Cured 

For appointment 

Phone GR. 5401 

1301 fimrtb Mansfield Ave. 

Hollywood. Calif. 

DR. H. L. LYON (D C.) 

DR. .MARY LYON (D. C.) 

So. of Hollywood High School 

Remember 

Keep your Spine Straight— It's 
the Backbone of Your Health 

Make Your Appointment 

now: now:! now:: 


ALCOHOLIC TREATMENT — 
secret, inexpensive three-day 
money-back guarantee — no loss 
of tirne— no hospital. DOCTOR'S 
CONSULTATION FREE. Visit 
our office. Carter's Fonnulaj 542 
S. Bdw. Rm. 907. TU-2025. 

W.ANTED — Mid. age man to care 
for ranch 7 mUes out from Vic- 
torviUe in desert: only care for 
place, room and food furnished. 
CaU after 4:30 P. M., 991 E. 33rd 
St. CE-24221. r-10-1 

WILL BOARD AND LODGE 
small boy. 5 to 7 years old. reas- 
onably, to be a companion to a 
bov 6 years old. Call RI-6036. 

r-10-1 


Central Ave. District 
Reolty Boord 

We have come a long way 
in our search for the secret of 
building good will for Real Es- 
Jate. I hope it is less of a sec- 
ret than i;t was before. The cne 
thought above all other, that I 
should like to leave with ypu 
this afternoon, is a very cheer- 
ing one. It embodies the kernel 
of everythnig I have said. In 
thie day generations service 
pays, the more you do for your 
customers, the more ycu will 
do for yourself, fr of necessi- 
ty, if you render service you 
win put your business on a 
scienUfic and a trtily profes- 
sional basis, you will render 
more sei^ice and yoii will have 
more good wUL And good will 
is the asset of your business, 
that brings the greatest total 
profit and the highest price in 
case of a sale. 

These are the ambitions and 
requirements of the following 
members of the Central Ave. 
District Realty Board. 

Members as follows: 
Walter L. Gordooa, President, 

4«C5 Central, ADams 3193. 
Geo. W. City, Vice-President, 

816 E. 4«h PI.. ADams 137«2. 
Elijah Cooper, Treasurer, 25M 

Central Ave. ADams 94KS5. 
Seth B. Ray, Secretary, 23«2 

Griffith Ave. PRospect 586L 
Mr. L. Watson, Director of Pub- 
licity, 4824 Central Avenue, 

CEntnry 32894. 
Mrs. Mattie Elisabeth Watson, 

49«1 Hooner Ave. AD-12CS2. 


FOR SALE 


rem SAis'' 

llSiOOO stucco bungalow coort 
7-3 rm. units furnished, near 
Pico and Monnandie. Unrestrict- 
ed. 

2950.00, $500 down, 8-rm. Bung, 
near 29th :^nd St Andrews. Mr. 
Best PA. 0«79. (r!20!indf.) 


FOR SAL&-$15,000. Stucco Bun- 
galow Court, 7— 3-nn Units fur- 
nished, near Pico and Normandie. 
Unrestricted. Mr. Best. PA-0679. 
$2950.00, $500 down, 6 rms. Bun- 
galow near 29th and St. An- 
drews. Mr. BEST. PA-0679. 


I 


SWAP OR SELI^-'29 Ford coupe, 
converted ; into light truck, for 
good used piano, or will sell for 
$30.00 cash., 10527 Gorman. KI- 
8874. : r-10-1 

FOR SALE-^-$400.00 down, 6 rm.^ 
house, total price $2350.00. Big^ 
lot, near 38th and Avalon Blvd. 
Phone AD. 12061. r-10-1 

FOR SALE— 8 piece walnut din- 
ing room suite, good condition. 
AD-8708. r-10-1 


FOR SALE CHEAP— 1932 16 
Cylinder CadUlac Sedan, six 
wire wheels, fully equipped. Price 
$165. See, 1901 S. Figueroa St. 


FOR SALE 

HOME^nd INCOME 

BARGAINS 

$1975. $204 down. 6-rm. home hi 
Central .\ve. Gardens. 3 bed- 
rooms, or will trade for a home 
north of Slaoaon. west of Hooper 
.\venue. 

S3250. $225 down, 4-rm. home. 2 
bedrooms, en 51st Street. 

$3850. terms, or will take ear. 
lot, or small home as part pay- 
ment, lovely S-rm. mod. stucco, 
like new, 3 bedrooms, large din- 
in;; room and kitchen, nice living 
room, garage, concrete driveway, 
ideal loca. 2 biks. everything. 

S3.00«. $30« down. $21.35 per 
month. One 5-rm. house and three 
3-rm. houses like new. all on big 
cor. lot 100^137. fine rental loca. 

Gas station, equipped, store 
Bldg.. with 2 !itores: 4-rm. house. 
2 bedrooms on cor. lot 83x125. all 
for only $4750. Eiy terms. 

ESSIRA.NCE AND L0.4.N8 

ON REAL EST.ATE 

H. O. L. C. Properties 

POWERS REALTY CO. 

93« E. 91st St LA-2297 

Please phone for appomtment 


M. 


R. JOHNSON 

(Licensed) 
RIAL ESTATE BROKSB 

Houses, Lots, Acreoge 


15«t r SSrd St AD 
BraMh: 432 8. Main St 


7ri 

S7 


LET'S DISCUSS 
THESE- 


5-room house, good 
cond.; cor. lot; $3250. 

6-room house, E. 46th 
St., $2300; $300 cosh; 
good business corner; 3 
stores, ot a sacrifice. 

4-family flat; good 
rental location. At a 
price you will appreci- 
ate. 


Call, City Bros. 

816 EAST 40TH PLACE 


AD 


13702 


FREE 

BRAKSS INSPECTED 
Igaitioa St Carboretod Adjusted 

Gaaraateed value 

Grind Valves, Clean Carbon 

Check Ignition, Tune Motor, 

Adjust Carburetor 

Standard 

4 Cylinder ._ S3.«« 

• Cyifaider 4je 

t CyUoder „ _ 6.75 

Motor Overhaul 

Stops Piston Slap and Oil 

Pumping 

INCLUDES 

Grind Valves, InsUlI New 

Rnigs. New Gaskets and .4djust 

Rod Bearings and Labor 

4 Cylinder Car S 9M 

6 Cylinder Car 14.00 

I Cylinder Gar 19.56 

90-Day Written Guarantee 

"Hme Payments Arranged 

Cars Called For and Delivered 

Broke Specials 

Includes Labor & Materials 
(.45 cent adjustments. aU cars) 
Ford, Plymouth & Chev.-.$4J« 

C CylfaKler Gars S«J5 

Lai^eCars-- StM 

These are low prices for 

Standard Lining 

Overhaul Clutch. Transmission 

or differential on any standard 

car. labor S5.95 

Reboring.aad Rebuilding 

Complete. in our own shop 
Body & Fender Work: Tops & 

Upholstering. Low Prices. 
Quality Material It Workman- 
ship. SiO-day written guarantee. 

LIBERTY SALES & 
AUTO WORKS 

I«3-lt5 East I7th Street 
14 Tears in This Neighborhood 



FOR SALE 


SNAP 

BARGAINS 

I 

1. On lovely SSrd Street near 
"U" car line, 6 rooos, larft 
lot. Sacrifice. 5>25«.M down. 
$25.00 per month. Ready to 
move in. 

X X 

2. Near Avalon, a newly deco- 
rated 7 room Bongalow, 
double garage. Ebrdwood 
floors. Tile sink. Lot StxlSO 
ft. Only S5M.N down. 

X X 

3. West of Central. 2 houses, 
5 rooms and « rooms. Lot SOx 
135 ft Only $375.M down. 

X X 

4. Near McKlnley, 3 units. Like 
new. Income S90.0e per mo.. 
All rented. S85«.M wiU han- 
dle. A special' BARGAIN. 
Terms to suit buyer. 

MADDOX 

REALTY COMPANY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Approved Sales Broker 

H. O. L C. 

1375 East Vernon Avenue 

ADams 118S2 


FO RSALR 


Reol Estofe-For Sole-Real Estcite 

$2,5Se: %SH da. C m, konae. East 2Mi Street 
S3,Se«: > rm. 1^ Sty. hoose. 15M East 22Bd Street 


S34W: « rm. hdoae. El 55tb St Hdwd. Floon. tSe atak * 

down. Good 


\\' 


$3JSe: 2 sty. house. 5 rms. up and 5 
on Trinity Street $75* down. 


FOR SALE 

Two houses located on a Ufge 
lot 50x150 on Gorman Avenue. 
$185«JH), S130.00 down. 

Five room stucco, located on 
East lieth street, lot sise 25-125. 
garage. $2000.»«. $2««.0« and $20.90 
per month. 

Three room house on E. Impe- 
rial Highway. $6««.0«, SIOO.OO dn. 

Three room house on Parmalee, 
$600.00, SIOO.OO down. 

Three room and store room on 
Mona. $«00.00. SIOO.OO down. 

See us for cheap bargains in 
Lots. 

KNOX & KNOX. Realty Brokers, 

10324 Wilmington Avenue 

Phone: LA: 0878. 


$ZJtH: < rm^hoose. Lot SOxISS between Main and Wall 
OB East 4»tti Street ^ 

SS,5M: 8 room stucco, 2 baths, lot Stxl7«. Weot Ada^^' 

S5,SM: 2 storyboose ,,« Units furnished. Lot SexlSI, _ 
Adams Blvd. ft San Pedro Sts. Income SllO per a*. 

S2.5M: C rm. house. 1155 E. 22nd St $400 dn. AU im 


locidaa 


$2,400: 4 room house. Hardwood floors. Tile Sink * 
$250 down. 


250)4 So. Central Avenue 
Office Phone: ADams 9025 


Los Angeles, CUif. 
ReaJdenee Phone: MX-* I7ST 


lijah Cooper 

Ember of Central Avenue District Realty Board 


-J- 


ATLAS ROOF CO. 

ROOFING AND PAINTING 
' CONTRACTORS 

No Charge For Inspections 

or Estimates 

Phone PR-0191 

1045 West Jefferson Blvd. 

Los Angeles 


Heahh Service 

Free Consultation 

DR. URBACH'S 

D. C. CLINIC and SCHOOL 

Internal Baths. ._75c and Sl.OO 
Hlectrical Treatments 75c ic $1 
Phones DR-9466: .MA-48SS 

604 South Rampart Boulevard 
Branch 346 S. Spring St \ 


Own a Home in Pasadena, Calif. 

CAROLYNE E. GREEN, Broker 

CONSCIENTIOUS AND RELIABLE 
251 SO. P.4SADEDNA AVE. s T 24«1« 


S. B. W. May Reol Estote 

SELECT FROM THIS LIST 

8 rm. home, hardwood fls., frame dwelling. $2600. $350 dr. 

9 rm.. on comer, good investment, buy today. Only $2700. 
8 rms., nice stucco in industrial section, will double vour 

money on re-sale. Only S32S0. 

S rms. on E. 33rd near San Pedro, must sell. Make offer. 

7 rms. on McKinley Ave., good location for a family, close 
to car line and school. Only $3000, easy terms. 

8 rm. hom.e, hardwood floors, west of Central Ave, or E:ast 
42nd Street. Only $506 down. 

7 rms. hardwood floors in 3-mM. on paved street $1,000 dn. 

8 rms. on Jefferson Blvd., a home and business property. 
Only $600 down. 

3 houses on lot. S-rms. each on Trinity St, $1000 down. 

2 houses on a lot on E. 49th Street, in A-1 condition. Only 
$700 down. 

3 units, 3 and 4-rms. each on X. 50th Street. Only $3200. 

5 urJts on E. 45th Street, income $85 per month. Only $1000 
down 

4 unit court furnished, only $1000, income only $105.00. 
On Westside. nice 7-rm. home, hardwood floors. Beautiful 

lawn and shrubbery. $3500. $750 down. Bank foreclosure. 6 rms.. 
West 29th Street. $3000, $600 down. 

7 rms., 4 bed rms., on W. 27th Street, comer, ony $3000. 
$500 down. 

8 nns.. West 35th St.. hardwood floors, only $3300. $500 dn. 

Foreclosure Properties and Other Bargains 
On Central Avenue, one story frame building, 4 stores, and 
office room, on second floor, income $125 per month, $10,000. 
Central Avenue corner court, a fins investment, income 
$159.00 on low rent Price $11,000. 

Many other income property flats, apts., courts, and 
doubles. 

We Have Atl Home Owners Loan Forcelosares 

S. B. W. May Company 

1054 E. Vernon Ave., CE~24788 Notary Public 


B 


RICE 

ETTER 

UILT 


HOMES 

SINCE 1908 


$24.H MONTHLY BUYS A 5-ROOM STUCCO HO-ME 



One of these Stucco Homes actually built at 1949 
E. 1 1 5th St. See it, then see us for F. H. A. Terms. 
5 Rooms built to the rigid F. H. A. requirements. 
5 more to start soon. These homes Gfe complete 
in every detail on lot 40x165. 

H BLOCK FROM CARLINE & BUSINESS CE.NTER 


J.N.BRICE'«^5>',H':.r'"- 


Licensed Real Estate Broker 
Licensed Contractor 


JE~4520 
JE-9432 
KI-1394 

C. iNASH 

Salesman 


LISTINGS WANTED 

\ SETH B. RAY 

23Q2 Griffith Avenue PR -S861 

PROPERTIES FOR SALE 

Properties ^or Sole. Bonk Foreclosures^ lO''' do^n 

Property .Managements. Hentals and Collections 
Hotels and Lease Loans .Made on Properties 
\ THE .MAN WWHO DOES 

, 10 room hoisf- -a t;t ..:' Cerftral on 25th Street. Two 4-ropm 
Bung, m Reat. &ood Income. Price S4750. ! 

Six room hdlise m gooa tondition. west of Avalon. Lot aOx 
150. 3-car gaiagel 3 bed room.s. Price $2250. j 

8 room houseiw.est of Central m Fair condition. Price $2750. 

Duple.x wesl\\of Western Stucco 2-4-R-;-5-R-Cor. Lot pOx 
150, Modern, tile %id showers. $8000. Down $1500. I 

5 room house^orntr Lot eas\ of Central S2100. Down $150. 

6 room housed west of Central. Lot 50x150. Price $2200. 
Down .S200. \ \ ' 

Business piooeriv. Centra! .•^■.•vnue. 2 s'.ory bnck building. 
8000 sq. ft. Cia^s C. Baud Price i35^0. 


hou> 


.acsnt. 


westiidfi. Hd. 


F. Price $3850. IC/t / 


\ 


6 room 
down. 

6 room .Kuuse west of .^\alon oVi 52nd. 2-3-R-in Real Si 
3 garages. Luveiy home and income. Price 59000 | 

4 room house Aesi ai Oeniral. Cas^ S1200 Small liOt. i 

6 room l^ouse East of Centra: S2250\Do\» n 5250. Lot 50x)50. 

ti room nou.se east of Central, l-3-I-4^;n rear. Incom.e $6^.06 
monti^.. P-;ce •.>320o Do^vr. s400- \ J 

9 Unit jtuccoo. Fl. Modern. P-ic* Sir^OOO 2 bed, RS Ejach 
.Apart. West oi Ctnirai. Down '.5' • . \ i 

4 .Apart stucco, 2-4-R-M-.Apart. Rear ^''^crn Prop. Price 
al3.50U. Down 15'-<r. \ | 

Lovely ranch near Foniar.a California. \2 acre 6-R-stdcco 
house. 5 years old. lovely Trees. Price .}2T5>). 5 stores 6 imit 
courts. West of CeniraL Price S:6,oOO. Dc v\t. ir-.OQC- 

I am a member of the Central .Avenue Distal Reaity B«ard. 
The .Vlan Who Does. 2302 Griirith -Ave. PR--5861. Res. AD-127n. 


SETH B. RAY, Broker 


"A'^A'A AAA ^AickifiK 

^ BIG RUfi «ALEf "^ 


BIG RUG SALE! . 

. ROCK BOTTOM PRICE.S "1^ 

"TJbe.ST PATTKa-N'S .\LL .SIZES -41 

^»ilS Wool f>c« T«». . .«11.9 
■^»iM VtI%M $17. » 

"^ YOUR CREO; 




>ITIS GOOD 

SEE Our NEW 
4. 5 & 6 RM. OrTFITS 

Star Furniture Co. 

•mUtES'S, E.4ST LOS ASGELES 

ovKR «5n.noo STOCK 

FRICKD IN* rt.\TS FIGfRES 

Op*" ~ .4. y. — a P. ^f. DailT 

3««t WHlraER BLVD 




Caldwell H. Jones & Co. 

BARGAINS IN REAL ESTATE 


A good five-room plastered house for $1800,00: big lot, 
side drive, garage; near SSth and Compton. $400 down; bal. easy. 

Six-room bungalow, hardwood floor*; W, 31st street near 
Saiiit Andrews. $800.00 will handle. 

One 4-flat building, two five-, and two four-room flats; 
near 29th and Maple Ave. $500.00 down. Total price $4500.00. 

Two houses on one lot 50x150;^ six rooms, hardwood floors 
front, 4 rooms hardwood floors rear. $1000.00 down; price, 
$4600.00. . 

One 7-room bouse, two-^storjr, 4 bedrtxmis, tar $2500.00; 
S1.000 will handle. 

OUR MOTTO: 

Tbe ntum akeot EVERYTHING, wbeflicr we idl jtm ar net 

Office : 1059 E. Jefferson St. Pkone AD~1 2061 



Bonded 

Insuronco 

Broker • Notory 

PubKc - 

Standard Fire, 

Auto and 

Property 

Insurancet 


Real Estate 

Home, Sweet 

Homes - 

Business Income 

Smoll Homes - 

Small Farms - 

Ranches 


, r,-*--. 





Soles ■ 

Leases • 

Rentals - 

ExchaQges - 

inveshnenta 

& Property 

Management 

1 13-ro«m, $48CX); $1500 down; clot* in 
1 5-rown, $2900; $ 290 down; close in 

We are eager to give a square deal in order, to get a square deal 

Conjir. D. L D. Funchess, Jr. 

f ffP—iii y<al BMaUe Broker Jk ApprOTCd Sales Broker f«r 
AodM Owsers LiOu Corp. 

FOK "ioUR .CONVENIENCE. PHONE OR WRTTB: 
RE0.— CE. MS37 • BUS.— AD. 77t7 

ita-<s R sent 9t. los angcles, calv. 


± 


f OR SALE 

If Vou are thinking of buying a home or income plfoperty, 
it will ke to voor advantage to come in and look over J»ur li* 
\befoTe ytoa decide. I 

4-roqm house near Vernon Avenue, f\Ji\ price 
$1950.00 with SI 75.00 down and balarxe eosy 
.... Lai^ge lot. i 

ModeiVn duplex East 43rd street west/of Cen- 
tral .... Good rental property, priced witp terms. 

Bank foreclosure — 6 room house Wejft Jeffer- 
son DistriV .... S3000 GO S500 00 ddwn poy- 
ment and.balance like rent. 1 

7 room a^tucco west of Centrol, south/ of Vern- 
on, priced cit S3500. S500.00 down pay^en+, will 
handle thisVonderful buy. \ 


We have ml 
for fire nisura 


y other ?ood buys to show t»«j . . . See ■• 
rental collections and loans on feal estate. 


We Specialize in Fire Insiirance 
— Wnd Make Loan^ 

Walter L. GordoA Co* 

4065 tentral Ave. ADanfjr3193 


IFOR SALE! 

SPECIAL BARGAjINS 

WE SELL FOR LfSS 

TWO HOUSES ON LOT; 5 AND 3 ROOMi!; WESlMUl, 

$3150.00. $300.00 DOWN. 

SIX ROOM BUNGALOW; WESTSIDE: HARDWOO) 
FLOORS $3000.00. SMALL DOWN PAYMENT. 

FIVE AND SIX ROOM HOUSES ON Om LOT; WIST 
OF CENTRAL AVENLTE. S2750.00. $500.00 DOW|J. 

FIVE ROOMS. EAST OF CENTRAL AVS^WZ. SlMO.at. 

TOVTR UNIT FLAT; WEST OF CENTRAL AVENUE. $479*^ 
00. $750.00 DOT^i. 

WILLIAM H. 6AM1LE 


IIU E- WASHINGTON BLVD 




CHATTER ANa. SOME NEWS 


■ 


By HELEN F. CHAPPELL 

"; V S«ieiet7 Editor 


If You Fort To Reaa THE CALIFORNIA EAGIE You f^ Ne^nXnow It Hapfpened 


Lo Rhetta Cloireffe Becomes 
Bride bf Richard J. Grant 


You're rushing to the polls to ctecide whether ojr 
not I can eqt horn and eggs every Thursday . . . som^ 
decades hence . . . dhem! . . . Personally, I don't see 
why somebody doesn'f start the boll rolling for o low 
giving youth something, too . . . like the family car 
OfKe in o while to go to some of the nice affairs and 
to do some of the things on,e has to do to keep up with 
the Joneses. 

i Tuesdoy night, after hailing, in record time, one 

of those ontfr-doted conveyances you coil street cor^ 
and clanging down to Independent, all the incident^ 
of Qn ordinary day were forgotten in listening to 
Charles hlolland ip his initial concert . , . The cost of 
"Run, Little Chillun" turned out practically en masse 
. . . along with all the other music lovers. The ap- 
plause said plenty to young Holland and other thart 
the wish to hear him again and again we haven't much 
to add ... Did you see how he took the steps in two's 
in both ascending and leaving the platform? ] 

Two very popular couples are basking in the sun- 
shine of congratulatory messsages this w^k. It's a 
boy for Mr. and Mrs. Lee Purnell, formerly of the Bay 
qrea and now of Los Angeles . . : Mrs. Purnell is the 
former Madeline Gillespie. It's a girl for the Ivan C. 
Connadys at 12061/2 West 36th Street . . . Baby Can- 
nady will be christened Brenda Jean. She was bornj 
at the Methodist Hospital Wednesday, November 2. 
FOR YOUR INFORMATION: 

Mercedes Gilbert, star of the Langston Hughes' 
Broadway sensation of 1 935 — "Mulatto" — is winning 
new glory- this season ... as o novelist! "Aunt Sarah's 
Wooden God", story based on the mulatto son of a 
southern woman, is the talk of the Big Town . . .Xotq 
Neale Hurston comes forth with another one of those 
folklore contributions in "Tell My Horse". Title comes 
from the Haitian expression for absolute frankness. 
Miss Hurston is known for several popular books — 
"Jonah's Gourd Vine", "MuleS and Men", and 'Their 
Eyes Were Watching God". 

Josephine Baker, in private life Mrs. Jean Lion, 
wife of a French merchant, is "infanticipoting" . . . 
Maurice Chevalier — remember him? — announced 
the news in- Paris . . . Willa Gene and Emmett Ashford 
celebrated their first wedding anniversary Monday 
with dinner at home . . . Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Beavers are back in town after q month in the East 
•k . . She visited relatives and friends in Kansas while 
he went to Chicago for an official look at the young- 
est Golden State Mutual branch office where Robert 
"Bob" Smith is holding the fort. Praters of Phi Beta 
^Sigma entertained for Mr. Beavers during his stay 
th Chi . . . while the Middle West saw to Mrs. Beavers 
:having o wonderful time. 

Your hair up and best bib and tucker will be in 
order for Saturday night if you hove one of those 
swanky white on block invitations issued by the Roy- 
Xll Twelve for their fourth annual formal . . . The Y. 
W. C. A. has postponed its homecoming day to De- 
cember 1 . . . The Breakfast Club meets Sunday a. m. 
-ot the YM . . . Mrs. Faustina Johnson is cheerfully 
convalescing in St. Vincent's Hospital . . . Theodosia 
Hampton Washington is well enough to receive visi- 
tors at home, probably be bock at work soon. 
NOTES . . . OPINIONATED: 
' ~ ■'' The James Weldon Johnson Club's annua 
CLOSED — since there were no press invites — dinner 
donee is Saturday night from eight to 12 on the Los 
Angeles City College campus. Haven't heord much 
about the Alphas' scholarship fund dance out at Cafe i 
de Paree last Thursday. So sorry to hove missed it, \ 
but even ladies of the press don't go to evening af- 
fairs unescorted. Try two "comps" next time, fraters 
» . . you should've learned that if you were two seasons 
making the "cream" organizations. Cream sours, 
too, you soy? 

Since everybody was betting on California Sat^ 
urday ... I'd like to see UCLA take the day Thanks- 
giving. Wouldn't you? Frank Collier, senior at Ber- 
keley, was among the Bay guests last week-end. 
Learned from Frank that Carlton Goodtet, known to 
Q number of youngerset Angelenos, is teaching at 
West Virginia State now. Nice break . . . nice boy. 

Congratulations to Charles Henry McDoniel and 
Alfred Grant, who each took unto himself a wife Sun- 


Pretty La Rheeta C 1 a r i e tt e, ley. At her throat, she wote , a 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas gold pendant set with diamondls 

C. Clariette, became the bride of v»|iiqh hVs been the Clairette 

Richard J. Grant of Pasadena family for more than a century. 

Sunday altemooH at four o'clock She was given in marriage by 

in the People's Independent her father. 

Church of Christ with the Rev. Mrs. Olga Taylor was matron 

Clayton D. Russell reading the of honor in a Gtbfion girl styH- 

simple ring ceremony. ed gown of blue satin and a bou- 

Wearing a gown of brocaded quet of orchid chrysanthemums 

velvet with a generous train and with which she wore matching 

• .. , *!. 1 «« *Lo^i« ♦..!«» gloves; Miss Dorothy Woodfox, 

waist length veil of fragile tuUe. ^^ ^, j^^^^ was gowned in 

the bride carried a bouquet of similar fashion; she also, carried 

gardenias and lillies of the vail- Orchid chrysan«(iiB««». Other 


WEDI^ING 


Mr. an^ Ifrr. Ridxl^' 

ard X Grant (Lftt 
Rheeta ClarietteJH, 
par^ 



Tkumloy. Noveifib«r 10, 1938 


Shef f ie - Watsdti 
Rites Read in St. 
Potricic's Rectory 

Climaxing a romance that be- 
gan in school days, Miss Louise 
Mae Sheffie, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Raymond J. Sheffie, became 
the bride of Henry C. Watson, 
last Monday evening in an im- 
pressive ring ceremony , in St. 
Patrick's rectory with Rev. Fr. 
Parei, C. S., officiating. 

The bride wore an ivory white 
brocaded satin gown (worn by 
her mother) fashioned on Victor- 
ian lines wit^ silk embroidered 
lace that was handed down thri 
many generations of her maternal 
family. With it she wore elbow 
length gloves and a pearl i neck- 
lace with rf^head piece of gar- 
denias instead of the traditional 
halo and veil. Her bouquet was 
of bovardia and gardenias under 
which she clutched a gold cru- 
cifix, a gift of the groom. 

The bride was attended by Miss 
Jewel Thomas who wore princess 
styled blue taffetta while the 
groom was attended by Ses Mc- 
Coy. 

"The bride's mother wore green 
chiffon with a corsage of Cecil 
Bruner rosebuds and the groom's 
mother wore navy blue with a 
corsage of roses. 

A reception immediately fol- 
lowing the ceremony was held 
in the home of the bride's parents 
in East 45th street and attended 
by one hundred guests. A num- 
ber of lovely gifts were display- 
ed at the reception. 

Mrs. Sheffie was assisted in re- 
ceiving guests by her aunt, Mrs. 
Bobby MUler and close friend, 
Mrs. Billie Harper. 

The pair will be at home tem- 
porarily at 786 East 45th street. 


Mrs. &nmO Jenn i ngs 
Leaves for Pueblo „,^ _ 

\ Mrs. Emma Jennings, 716 *• 
bth Street, left Wednesday, Nov- 
ember 9, for a visit with reia- 
tives and friends m Pueblo, Col- 
orado. Mrs. Jennings is active 
in^lub and church circles and, 
is called the mother of the Five 
and Over Charity Club in which 
sbeAbas worked constantly. 


COLLEGIATE VISITORS 
FETED AT INFORMAL 
BUFFET SUPPER 

Mrs. J. H. Graham and Miss 
Pauline Slater served informally 


AME Auxiliory 
Entertoins Cost 

A mVjority of the artists wbo 
appeared on the "Big Broadcast^ 
program at the First A. M. t. 
Church, \8th and Towne Avenue, 
in SepteWber, responded to the 
invitatiori of the Collins Utility 
Club, at the parsonage, on Hallo- 
we'en. Ti^is affair, which had 
been planned for a previous date 
was delayed due to the end of 
the church year and change of 
officers, was given for the art- 
ists by this auxiliary to show 
their appreciation_for the splen- 
did cooperation and participation 
of Uiese artists on ohe of the 
most memorable concerts of the 
year. 

The evening was spept by play- 
ing a series o| interesting games, 
the participartts being penalized 
and as a result of the]"penalizer" 
all were delightfully jentertained 
by a rendition Of "Trejes" by Jul- 
es Snfith; "Palp Hands Along 
the Shalimar"" by Rpbert wm- 
iams; and "Mammie's] Little Oni^ 
Black Rose" by WilHam Gilles-^ 
pie. In response tp this number 
Mrs. Gillespie took la bow for 
their little son. Jininie' Miller, 
instead of singing fodnd his pen- 
alty to be counting! buttons as 
did Bertha Powell jwho could- 
n't sing because of la cold. Mr. 
Douglas, recently of { Radio City, 
; and connected with [ radio work 
here, sang two numbers. 
All were accomparied by FloT- 


pianist. Th« 


ence Cadrez. popular 

evening terminated \s'ith the ser- 
repast This 
given under 


ving of a delicious 
on last. Saturday evening at six ^ ^^^s the first affair 
„vi^„i, ,„;«h o„ =f»*r thA <Tpme 1 the new president. Willie Ma« 

Cowans, who is wfll-known in 

club circles. 



T bridal attendants were Misses^ 
, Gwendolyn \^alentine, Carrie 
Parks, Julia Lockhart, Hera For- 
sythe and June Baker. They were 
attired in dubonnet dresses- and 
hats ■ of Gibson girl style with 
matching hats and carried du- 
bonnet and bronze chrysanthe- 
mums. Little Nora Lyons was 
flower girl and John Poppet, ring 
bearer. 

The groom attired in tails 
and gamble striped trousers, was I 
attended by his brother, Alfred 
Grant. Ushers were Larry Rob- | 
inson, Joe Cunringham, Audley 
Cole, Preston Clipper, and Alex i 
Thompson. He is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell Grant, pioneer 
Pasadenans, and is, in business \ 
with his father. 

Immediately preceeding the 
nuptial ceremony, Miss Eddivies 
Flenoury sang "Because" ' with 
Miss Evelyn Braxton at the orV 
gan and Miss Emma Smock ren^ 
dered a violin solo. / 

A reception honoring the pair 
followed the wedding and -Was 
held in the briday home. Re op- 
tion Hostesses were Misses Mar- 
go CoUin.s, Josephine Long, Es- 
ther Abry, Lonnie Mae Watson, 
Gladys Broadway. The bride's 
mother wore royal blue lace and 
a corsage of gardenias. The 
groom's mother was attired in 
lace of a lighter blue and wore 
gardenias. 

Floral creations and decora- 
tions of white chrysanthemums 
and candles were by Mamie 
Re«ves, floral artist while all 
•gowns were designed by the 
bride. 


MRS. GEORGE H. DANIELS, 

prominent member of the St. 
Paul Baptist church, and resi- 
dent or 1513 E. 21st Street, 
who will return home this 
month after an extended trip 
in the South, East and North. 
During the trip, she partici- 
pated in the 74th birthday an- 
niversary of her mother. 


o'clock with an after the game 
buffet supper, honoring their 
house guest. Miss Gertrude Ow- 
ens of Vallejo, Calif., a graduate 
! student at U. C. at Berkeley; 
and Jimmie Cowan of Wichita. 
Kansas, a graduate of the U. of 
Kansas. Many other visitors here 
to attend the game shared cour- 
tesies with the honorees. 

The Misses Anna Rosa Broy- 
les and Inez Hamilton popular 
coeds at U. C. L. A. and U. S. C. 
respectively assisted in receiving 
the more than fifty collegiate 
footabll fans. Others assisting, 
were Mesdames Frank Harris, 
and George Whisenant along with 
Mrs. Aurora Hoskins and Jim- 
mie O'Neal, nephew of the host- 
esses who furnished the delight- 
ul en.semble music. 


92nd Buffalo Division 
A. E. F. Post No. 532 
American Legion ' 


tito, was also the widow o' Ur- 
iah the Hititites are descendants 
of Heth and Heth was the second 
son of Canaan. 


REV. AND MRS. R. B. 

PORTER 

RECEPTION HONOREES 

Rev. and Mrs.- R. B. Porter 
were honored with a reception 
in the social hall of the Progres- 
.sive Baptist Church Tliursday ev- 
ening. November 3. honoring 
their return from an eight week 
vacation and Mrs. Porter's birth- 
day. Cleola Finley was mistress 
of ceremony for the program. 

At the guest table were Dr. 1. 
C. Coleman, Oakland: Reverend.'^ 
A. Moten, R. M. Marshall, T. J. 
Jones, L. D. Caddell, Rev. and 
Mrs. D. C. Austin, Dr. and Mrs. 
E. I. Robinson and a number of 
others. 

Dr. and Mrs. Porter visited cit- 
ies in Texas, Illinois, Wisconsin. 
Ohio, Kansas, and Utah. A num- 
ber of lovely gifts were received 
^by Mrs. porter. The social hall 
Vas decorated with fall flowers. 



Sponsoring 

ARMISTICE 

DANCE 

FRIDAY NITE- NOV. n 
Elks' Auditorium 

Music By GEORGE BROWN 

and His^Ebony Collegians v 


CASH PRIZES 

JITTERBUG CONTEST 

AT MIDNIGHT 


FROM 9 P.M. tit 2 »*t- 

Admission . ^ . 40c 


♦• 


.MR. AND MRS. CHARLES HENRY MCDANIEL (JESSIE JUAN- 
ITA REED) caught by the cameraman as they left the alter Sun- 
day afternoon following their marriage in historic Eighth and 
Towne. (See Story) 


Reed-McPaniels Nuptials 
Brilliant Church Scene 

In a beautiful candle-lit setting of all white chrysanthemums 
at the end of ribbon flanked aisles. Miss Juanita Reed, graduate 
nurse of Los Angeles General Hospital and daughter of Mrs. Thelma 
Reed Johnson, was married Sunday afternoon at four o'clock in the 
First A. M. E. Church, 8th and Towne Avenue, to Charles Henry 
McDaniel. Rev. H. Mansfield Col- ^ 
lins read the ceremony. 

Miss Reed chose a gown of 
white bridal velvet in princess 
style boasting a lengthy train 
and a front bedecked with tiny 


ADama 9272 " For Appointment 

MARGURITE, The Hair Stylist 

CREATOR OF BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLES 

AND 

DISTINCTIVE BEAUTY SERVICE 

MARGURITE CARRERE, Prop. 

Catherine Pierson, Dorothy Woodson, Esther Primus, Operators 

Try Our Guaranteed Excelsior Hair Grower Especially 

Prepared to stop harsh and brittle hair from 

breaking and falling. 


1 


1 


5011 CENTRAL AVENUE 


LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


velvet buttons from neck to hem 

line. Stj£ carried a Testament 

' showered with white orchids and 

1 was attended by Mrs. Mattie J. 

J . r rLj ■ X. 1 -I •j.riji' Pierson as matron of honor in 

day at four. For Henry it was Jessie Juontto Reed at j Alice blue velvet with matching 
Eighth and Towne; for Alfred, La Rhetta Clairett oti ^^^t. Mrs. Pierson carried yellow 

I Independent. ! other bridal attendants were 

1^-:. Achievement of the week is promotion of Irene ' ^S* C.cS"^ ^^Wc^e^ 

Freeman to the managerial post of the Lincoln Me- ''^^^y ^^''e Misses Dorth^a Mich- 

. \ n \ r i. /^Lj jLi-i i ^"' Mattie Jackson, Edwina Car- 

morial Park Cemetery . . . Orchids and best wishes j ter, Biuie Porter, Euvaida Ball- 
ard, and Mrs. Evelyn Gibson, 


f**-^ 


Little Esther Royal was flower 
girl and Lewis Carmicheal, ring 
bearer. 

The groom waa attended by 
his brother, Ulysses McDaniel. 
Ushers were Henry Pierson, 
Lloyd Chaney, Alfred Hathaway, 


for success . . . She's one of the Delta sorors. By the 
by. fh« Delta Jabberwock is November 26. Accord- 
tng to Mrs. Vassle Brown, the date's the biggest of 

th« month. 

Prizejfor conceit goes to Charles Edwards now ,, 

ioriciting funds for the N. A. A. C. E.-Nationol As- ^^f aoS^h'JS mS 

ioclation for the Advancement of Charles Edwards . . a nd Robert Moore. ^ ^^^ 

I the number of ineligible girls he's fleeing balances 


Preceeding the ceremony, Har- 
old Keith sang "For You Alone" 
and Mrs. Marguerite Chapman 
entered in front of the bridal 
party singing "Because". She car- 
ried a huge bouquet of red ros- 
es. ' ; 

The bride's mother wore sap- 
phire blue velvet dress and hat. 
The groom's sisters, Mrs. N. P. 
•Modwell and Mrs. P. Lenton 
wore Alice blue satin and black 
aijd white satin creations respeifc- 
tively. 

The beautiful home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Tamper, 2103 West 29 
Street was the scene of the re- 
ception complimentary to thfe 
newlywedfl following the wed- 
ding. 

Mrs. WiUie Moore, hostess at 
the reception, wore peach velvet 
Mrs. Minnie Tucker, hostess in 
charge of the wedding, wore 
black velvet. Also smartly gown- 
ed were Mrs. V. Hughes and Mrs. 
A Sapp, aunts of the bride. 


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Straightening, Refinishing and New Color Creations — All at a 

Competitive Range of Prices. Come to us for an Estimate. 

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WE DO FIRST CLASS WORK FOR FIRST OLA'S PEOPLE 



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prise, because his mother Hitt 


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Prop, ic Scalp Specialiit \ Operator . 


A conceited man |is one who doesn't believe thot^ the number of very desirable ladies fleeing him! 


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31^ 


K 

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s 

5 


TH.4NKSGIVIN<i is celebrated in ^most 
American homes ^odav the same as il ttie 
lays of the Puritans, with a TURKEY PIN- 
NER. \ 

\ 
Should your dinner be a failure 
-if the embarrassmentf— so be doubly 
'n doing your buyingi^ especially your 
KEY — which is the main feature, and Is 
of a problem in buytng.\ 

Suggestions on how t* buy the 
TURKEYS— First go to\a reliable Pi 
!Vlarket, and ask for a No.\l Prime TUR 
Remember there are Four\grades, infei 
the one quoted. So we ur^e yon to go 
very reliable Poultry Market, where yon 
d^«nd on getting the best Quality. Reni< 
ber it is utterly impossible \\ t^ top Qi 
at the chei^r prices. \ 

For quMity, r eliab ility, a^ service, 
repatation of JENKINS POUliTRT ~~ 
■^ET is al)OT« reprotcta. \ 



Jenkins' Poultry 


"Quality Gtio ran teed Y 
1387 E.Vembn Aye. CE- " 

FREe\ DELIVERY 


35 


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VjJr^ 


\ 


1 Uf . k 






PA 




STANFORD WILLIAMSOI 
^Associate Editor 


ADEN A SECTION 

^ GEORGE GAlNlIt ^X; NORMAN H. DUNCAN 
■i • - ■ «j..^^-; f 1*]:,^^; ' :~'-C ;:, jUMciolt Editor ^ ''' 


Editor 


— ♦ 


^ 


^1 . 


■'j : K^'ii- 


LOS ANGELES ^ND 
PASADENA SOdlETY 

By GEORGE GARNER 


In their great house in fashionable Westend Los 
Angeles . . . prominent educator, Mjiss Pauline Slater 
end her sister, Mrs. Jennie R. Graham, entertoined 

splendidly . . .oh Saturday even-' 
ing last . . .with a buffet supper 
to follow the Southern Califomia- 
U. C. game . . .and honoring Miss 
Certrude Owens, prominent 
young Berklej'ite: and their 
houseguest. i^ames Cowan Jr., of 
Kansas Cityi Kansas . . .more 
than fifty guests attended the 
handsome party . . .to follow sup- 
per there was informal dancing 
in the beautiful draswingroom . . 
Miss Slater, prominent in civic, 
society and sorority circles; and 
Mrs. Graham, entertaifif frequen- 
tly for members of the South- 
land's social and university sets . . 

• Miss Owens has returned to Ber- 

. kley. Mr. Cowan will remain on 
indefinitely in Southern Califor- 


Greot Horvest 
Hel<l of Fri 



lub Qlendtt j 


Sunday morning, November 6,' 
found Pasadena's Friendship Bap- 
tist Chtirch arowded to over- 
flowing wi^ worshipperi come 
to participate in the annual Har- 
vest Homecoming. 

The Reverend W. D. Carter, 
pastor, preached a soul-stirring 
sermonette that, had it lasted a 
full hour coifld not have awak- 
ened within the hearts of those 


ecoming 
ijp Boptist 


Rev. Brown Has 
W^lliChosen 
Text for Sunday 


fOirtddior 

^asKlle BrMliont Succ^ 


Forces for Gonfob 


The sfilendid audience thatfbert appeared three times on the 


Gub 


"Acceptable Offering and Per- 
sonal R^ponsibility" will be the 
sermon topic where from the 

^..^ „.,„„, „.>. Reverend J. M. Brown, pastor of 

present, a beher thought to carry I the First A. M, E. Church, Ver- 
throughout their daily life. Fol- non avenue and Kensmgton Place 
lowing the reception of members I Pa^dena will speak to his con- 
and the period of fellowship. Rev- i greg«tion this Sunday moring. 
erend Carter admonished the con- I There will be openmg worsjHp 
I gregation toward their civic and i music by the senior choir. Dr. 


heard the! All star Musicale last 
Sunday tftemoon at Patriotic 
auditoriuxii was enthusiastic in 
their praise of the sriists. 

Auiliary No. 1 of the Outdoor 
Life and Ijealth Association spon- 
sored the proipam, presenting 
such artists as Florence Cole- 
Talbert, $6pran6 of international 
fame; Victoria Rice^ violinist 
James Miller, tenor, and the great 
Hall Johnson choir! 

The cho|r opened the program 
with four favorite spirituals: 

"Mob" bone; Travelin""; "In 
Bright Mansions Above"; "City 
Called Hefrven' and "Gimme YC 
Han"' under the masterly direc- 
tion of Hajll Johnson those lusty 
voices poured out harmonies that 
carried bur soiils to the vei-y 
gats of heaven. The male chorus 
proved very popular in their 
renditions i of "Go Down Moses 


several en- 


program and gave 
feorecTTie "Salome' 
French ope»a "Herodide" and 
the 'Suicide" from the Italian op- 
era 'Xa Gioconda" were gems 
that elicited s^Kintaneous ap- 
I^ause. *TTie Russian Nightingate" 
and "Ava Maria" were also fav- 
orites, "My Cloud's Silver Linin"* 
one of her recent compositions 
from the poem by Elsie Long 
(who was in the audience and 
presentfcd the singer with a beau- 
tiful bouquet) was a very touch- 
ing number which deserves pubr 
lication. It was the consensus 
of ojiinion that Madame Talbert's 
voice has taken a mellow sweet- 
Hess since her last appearance 
in Los Angeles. Florence Cadrez | 
and Bemice Lawson gave sym- \ 
pathetic accompanimenst. 

Dr. Leonard Stovall, the presi- 
dent and foxmder of the Rest 


According to i stat^snent inade 
here this week by Rev. J. W. 
Coleman, pastor of the Commun- 


,;, *~»- »h. i Ity Baptist Church, Pasadena, 
au- from the I ^ officials of the (Boyd) Nat- 
ional Baptist Conventioti. Ui S. 
A., have conferred with him con- 
cerning the coming convention to 
be held at Los Angdca, Septam- 


AV-ATbt |»4 f r aui wiQ conast ^ 
^amsic la^yared by directress L. L, 
Dinkins. "There will also be vocal 
^d instrumental music by SiKst 
ssloists. Mmes. Pearl Booker amid 
Elizabeth Smith are organist and 
assistant organist, re sp ec tivel y 
for the church. 

The publi^ is cordially reques- 
ted to attend this outstanding 
onisical progc^im. 


ber 1»39. 

Reverend 
committed the 


Coleman I b 
intention 


lias 

1 


not 

his 


church; but he -has agreed to ae> 
cept the leadercbip for the Pasa- 
dnia district Ui arranging for 
the coming coiiVention. 
^ ^ Reverend Coltman is known ., 

tokens for the club's Christmas in the Baptist dpnvention tram ' ! 

baskets. \ coast to coast. \ . ' ^ 

' ^\ -L. u^ 


■t 


■+■ 


and "Nobody Knows." The solo i Home, who was introduced to the 


Mr. and Mrs. Walter Perry of 
100 Yale StTeety^asadena . . . 
have issued invitations for the 
wedding reception of their daugh- 
ter, the former Josephine Sar- 
ah Williams . . .for Sunday after- 
noon on the twentieth . . to be 
held in the Parry's charming 
Spanish home . . .Mrs. Arthur J. 
McXeely^ .Mrs. Kenneth W. Mack 
and Miss Viviane Snow will be 
among the assistants who will 
receive the many guests expected 
. . .Now NJr?. William Clinton 
.Long. Jr_ Josephine and her hu.*- 
band have taken an Eastside Los 
Angeles apartment where th'^y 
■will be at home to their friends 
following the reception. 

Among the many smart pre- 
nuptia! parties . . .given to honor 
the nc'.vly-wed. Mrs. Richard 
J. Grant . . .-.vas that cleverly ex- 
ecuted spi.nster" party . . giv^i 
to honor t^e former La Rheeta 
Clanette . .and for which the 
entire femini..e contingent of last 
Sunday's bridal party were pres- 
ent . . M:ss .Tune Baker. who 
lives with her parents, the 
Bruces. m an imposing Spanish 
■Casablanca out along ""^v.-enty- 
four .hundred" way. Wesiend. 
hostessed th» affair . . her for- 
mal party, preceded by cocktails 
and hors d"'ouevres, was climax- 
ed at di.nner . . .covers were laid 
for Mmes. Julia Robmsor.-Lock- 
heart, E5ther Mack. Joseohi.ne 
Long. Olga Taylor. Hera Fore- 
>»vthe. the Misses Margo C-Iiins. 
iDorothy 'WcKxif''x. G'.vendoiyn 
"valer.'.i.ne. Came Parks. Eve'.yre 
Braxton. .<:e\-eral of the guests 
. . . and" the hostess . . .joined es- 
corts to go on ff^r the .^Ipha Phi 
Alpha dancing pany . . .later. 

In the aproaching dusk of a 
Tall South.ern California high 
rincm. within the .sanctuary of the 
People's Independent Church of 
, Chnst. the forrr.er Susan La- 
Rheeta Clariette. only daughter 
of Mr and Mr?. Th.omas Clar- 
iette, Los .Angeles: became the 
bnde of Richard J. Grant, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Grant of 
Pasadena. The banns were solem- 
nized on Sunday. November sixth ■ 

th* Reverend Clayton RusselJ 

officiating. 

Tail lighted tapers glimmered 
against the ecclesiastic red."; and 
blues of stained-glass windows: 
and with them were clusters^ xjf 
white flowers "to mark the aisle 
leading aUer^vard. Heron were 

■ banked splendid white chrysan- 

■ themum. gladioli and lilies, in- 
: tersoersed witli the Rreen of ferr. 

: a w.hite ben suspended above 

• the prie dieu. Organ music, and 

the clear, poignant 5trams of a 
' violin hung above "he perfect 

■ beauty of the whole to make 
'■ forever remembered the dignified 
: simplicity of the ceremony. 

; PROCESSION SOUTHLAXDIA 


Glimpsed at the CTariette-Grant 
recent wedding . . Mrs. J. Ruftis ; 
Portwig: most of the- members 
of the large Grant clan from Pas- 
adena . .Miss Ouida White. Mrs. 
Netta PsuUvn Garner. Mrs. Nel- 
lie Taoor and daughters. Bertha ^ 
and Etorpthy:. Mrs: Dais>- Barrett. 
Mr' James Woods. Cecelia Mc- 
Neeiv. Marge Ellis. Josephine 
Blod'gett. -Bootsie" Colli-ns. Flor- 
ence Gagnet: Frances Carroll, 
joining Melvm Nickerson later . 

Eleanor Dee Johnson with Ar- 
thur Topsil . . .Eddivies Flennoy. 
inimitable rendering a solo . . . 
la»er. in the Bamboo Room . . . 
to join the newly weds at supper 
were- Hera and Marion Fore- 
sythe. Olga and Clarence Taylor, 
the Bill Longs Jr . Mrs. Kenneth 
Mack. Stan Williamson, Doro- 
thy Woodfox. Julia Lockheart, 
Gwen Valentine, Audley Cole, 
Larry Robinson. Arthur and Cec- 
elia McNeely . . .coming on later 
.Chuck ^urris, June Baker. 
itia*ee Collins . . .having ounch ; 
after punch . . .«enny Mack, aw- : 
ay from work to join his wife . . 
At a far Uble: Preston Clipper 
and Margaret Moore. Al White 
Joe and Mvrtle Cunningham . • . 
Conklin Brown . . the newly wed 
Bill and Lonnie Mae Watson . . . 
Paul Harris, dancing with an at- 
• tractive Long Beach resident, and 
going on with her later to attend 
■ a party out HoUywood way . . . 
Miss Ruby Harris, m the crash 
' ot people outside the church . . 
Wendell Franklin. Tom Hopkins, 
Godfrey White. Byrd BeUis, Jean 
HoUoway, Chuck Cunningham. 
Betty Cole, Ball* Wid« . . and 
ao &UB> 


The VANi- COURTLAND Club, 
Inc., held their regular meeting 
at the residence of Van Cole last 
Monday evening, the highlight of 
the meeting was their forthcom- 
ing Tnrke>- RafTle to be held 
Nov. 20 at the residence of Van 
Zimmerman. 996 E. 42nd PI. 
Next meeting Nov. 14 at the resi- 
dence of Van Cooper. 

The WOMEN'S COUNCIL of 
the California Cooperative Im- 
provement Association met the 
parent body last Tuesday, Nov. 
1. in the YMCA. The group was 
entertained by the children's 
band and scheduled its next 
meeting for the home of Mrs. 
Janet Chisholm, 2512 Griffith 
.\venue on November 10. Mrs. 
Billie M.cFarland is general chair, 
man and Mrs. Elizaljeth Cypion 
social chairman. 

The THRIFTY HOUSEWIVES 
club was hostess at the October 
6 meeting by Mrs. Myrtle Taylor; 
Club chairman presented o u t- 
lines of the year's work and re- 
marks were m.ade by Mrs. Prayer, 
a visitor. Mrs. Myrtle Williams 
of 684 East 46th St. was the hos- 
tess for the October 20 meeting. 
Mrs. Chambers was accepted as 
a new member. Visitors included 
Mmes. Albert Arnold. Alfred 
Hassau. Gerald Lee Bell and A. 
E. Allen. 

The G .A. Y MODERNETTES 
club was entertained by Laurine 
Gosey, secretary, at a supper 
pany at the Dunbar Hotel on 
last Saturday evening. Covers 
were laid for eighteen. Tables 
decorations were of fall flowers 
and tall yellow candles and fav_ 
ors in keeping with the Hallo- 
we'en motif. Each member was 
presented with a yellow rose— 
ihe club rose. 

The L.A.D1ES SOCI.A.L .ARTS 
and Sewing club of the Compton 
Playground met Tuesday night. 
X number of ladies made copies 
of a new quilt party of red and 
white brought to t.he club by 
Mrs. Hubbard. The club is open 
to all ladies. M-'"s. Nancy Keyes 
IS president and Mrs. Esther Hen. 
derio.n secretarv. 

The .J.\.ME.S WELDON JOHN- 
SON club will hold Its third an- 
nual dinner dance Saturday even- 
ing. November 12 in Newman 
Hal! on the L05 .Angeles City Col. 
lege campus. This event has al- 
ways been the initial fall social 
venture of the club which is the 
only Negro cultural unit on the 
campus. The dance, a semi-form- 
al one. is open to club members 
and their guests, only, and wUJ 
be held from eight to twelve 
o'clock., 

THE p-raAMID CLL'B of the 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority met 
Sunday. (fictJber 30. at the home 
nf Miss Earline Edwards. 1602 W. 
36th street. Results of election 
of officers follows: Velma Marsh 
of L'. C. L. A.. President: Earline 
Ed'wards of Chapman. Vice-pres- 
ident: Levenia Tw>-ne of Chap- 
man. Secretary: Vema Wilson of 
P. J. C. Treasurer; Desmonia 
Harris of U. C. L A. Publicit>- 
Manager. 

The next meeting of the P>-ra- 
m.id Club will be at the home of 
Miss Vashti .Anderson. Sunday. 
November 13. 1938. at 2:00 P. M 
THE .ARKANSAS STATE club 
met on November 4, in the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Murray 
on Newton Street. A large num- 
ber of members and guest were 
in attendance and plans for the 
annual Christmas party were 
completed with a committee be- 
ing appointed to serve the occasr 
ion. "The club was hosted by 
group eleven made up of Mr. 
and Mrs. McMurray. Mmes. El- 
la Beard and Nannie Freeman. 

Special guests were: Mr. and 
Mrs. N. M. Malone, Mrs. Ailer 
and sister, all of Los Angeles; 
\Irs. Pearl WalL<i of Chicago, 
Mrs. Irma Brown, who recently 
; moved to Los Angeles from El- 
lorado. Arkansas where she was 
a teacher in the city schools; Mrs. 
Lula Taylor of St. Louis who is 
visiting her brother. Arthur 
Long, a member of the faculty 


national loyalty in the face of 
anti-A'merican practices now pre- 
valent throughout the nation. 

Members of the Crown City 
American Legion Post No. 5^ 
held their impressive annual Ar- 
mistice Day program in conjunc- 
tion with the morning service — 
Barney Durham acting as master 
of ceremonies. Charlotte Will- 
iams, dramatic reader and Mor- 
ris Buchanan. Boy Scout trooper, 
made telling appearances on the 
Legion program. 

Mrs. Pearl BookM", soprano so- 
loist with the Friendship Choir, 
rendered a beautiful solo with 
the choir's assistance. During the 
Communion service there was ad- 
ditoinal singing rendered by the 
choir — a tenor soloist adding his 
well trained voice to the en- 
semble. 

Following the service, the en- 
tire congregation gathered in the 
church social hall, for the Har- 
vest Homecoming feast. Heavily 
laden baskets of food, brought 
by the members and friends, were 
opened and partaken in a gen- 
uine spirit of good feeling and 
fellowship. Friendship Baptist's 
annual Harvest Homecoming has 
become an event in the church 
life of Pasadena. 


H 
ian McRiley 


organist. 

the Strickland's 
Sacred Orchestra will furnish 30 
minutes of gospel music. Mrs. 


Member^JIff 
>rcnesti 


parts were fine. 

James Miller, the operatic ten- 
or, sang the air "E Lucevar. le 
Stelle" from La Tosca by the It- 
alian Puccfaii, and "Joy" by Cad- 
man *romi the poem; by Elsie 


Helen Adams Moore will appear 1 Long. Mr. Miller- gave, a wonder- 
as guest soloist. f ul renjiition of these number's 
The church's varied program | and his diction and interpretat- 
inoludes Sunday school at 9:30, ' ion left nothing to be desiied. 
Walter Worrill. superintendent: By request^ he sang a second num- 


Adult Bible Class. Rev. E. M. 
Scott, teacher: Allen Christian 
Endeavor, Moulton Johnson, lead- 
er: Evening worship at 7:45 for 
which the sermon this Sunday 
wUl be 'Even Me." 

Ladies of the Misionary wiU 
serve ■ Thanksgiving Dinner 
on Thursday from twelve noon. 
All are welcome. 


''Romance" frOm "Fra Diav- 
in Enjglish to the delight of 


, of the evening school at Jeffer- 
son High SchooL The program 
I consisted of instrumental select- 
ions by Mmes. Taylor. Brown and 
John Pitts, club pianist. Former 
Arkansas residents are invited to 
become member of the organi- 
zation. Mrs. Attealia James is 
president and Mrs. Maggie Belle 
I Buckner. financial secretary. 
THE JOLIETTE CLUB'S sec- 
ond October meeting was high- 
lighted with the presentation of 
the new business girls secretary 
of the Y. W C. A., Mrs. Crum'- 
. ley. Mrs, Crumley who is a nat- 
ive of the Island of St. Thomas 
gave a historical talk on the 'Vir- 
gin Islands. 

Officers of the club are: Presi- 
dent. Helen Gwyn Irving: vice- 
president. Esme Gumbs. secre- 
tar>-. Dorothy Sims: assistant 
secretary. Ruth Chambers, club 
reportre. Dorothy Patrick; and 
assistant reporter. Jessie Jenkins. 
Other members include Helen 
Milligan, Zelma Lipscomb. Lorean 
Higins. Shirlia Gray. Louise 
Steams. Grace Fisher. Mabel Mc- 
Coy. Lelia Mae Jones. Ora Mae 
Kennedy, and Alberta Chambers 
Barkley. 

LA FIESTA CLL^ of Grant 
Chapel A. M. E. Church met at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. T. Taft 
last week with Mrs. Cora John- 
son entertaining and bringing to 
the club four new members — 
Rev. J. \. Green. Mr. and Mrs. 
Isaac Woods and B. Woods. The 
"Back Home Boys" will be pres- 
ented by the club in the church 
on November 15 at the eight p. 
m. services. Mrs. Viola Berford 
is president and Pearlie Craig, 
reporter. 

The TWENTIETH CENTURY 
Young Women's Social Club m.et 
at the home of Miss E>emulda 
HoUoman last week and welcom- 
ed Mrs. Mildred Holland back to 
Its fold after a visit with ner 


Summing Up 
Of Chest 
Campaign 

Mrs. Abraham Lehr. chairman 
of the Exposition district Com- 
munity Chest campaign, today 
summed up the progress of the 
chest in her district as follows:' 

Goal S22.0OO. Subscriptions to 
date, 577. Amount of money to I 
date. S9.378. Percentage, 43 per- 
cent of goal. 

With th state election over. 
Mrs. Lehr reported volunteer 
workers speeded up field sub- 
scription canvassing so that at 
least sixty percent of the district 
will be obtained before the end 
of this week. 

Every effort is being made to 
increase chest subscriptions this 
year by at least twenty percent 
so that the benefits of the 88 
welfare and health agencies may 
be extended to thousands of 
needy in the 488 square miles of 
Chest territory throughout the 
coming year. 

With approximately one-half 
of the campaign appeal still to 
be completed and more than, one- 
third of the quota already ob- 
tained. Exposition Chest leaders 
literally ""waded-in" to secure 
approximately sixty percent of 
; quota before the end of this 
week. 


ber 

olo' 
aU. 

Victoria Bice, the bril'jant vio- 
linist, played the conce-to in A 
Minor by Vivaldi in three move- 
ments in aft artistic manner. Lat- 
er in the program she executed 
Percy Grainger's Irish reel "Molly 
on the Shore" arranged by Krieti- 
ler showing rare techpic in her 
pizzicato work, and arrangjsment 
of "Nobody Knows" by Clarence 
White (our famous violinist" 
with much feeling. 

Florence Cble Talbert, the gif- 
ted soprano charmed her hear- 
ers, as usuial, with her oeautiful 
and expressive tones. Majestic 
in bearing and attractive ti a 
black velvet gown with red ac- 
cessories, she was truly the 
"Queen of Song'. Nfadame Tal- 


audience by Rev. Clayton D. 
Russell expressed thanks to the 
audience and appreciation to the 
artists who graciously contribut- 
ed their services to this worthy 
cause. 

Mrs. Carolyn Rivers, president 
and the members of the Auxil- 
iary who were tireless in their i 
efforts to make the musicale a 1 
financial success, were also pres- 
ented to the audience. 

The young ladies who served as 
usherettes were charming in their ' 
pretty gowns. 

Women's 
Breakfast Club 

The Women's Breakfast Club 
will hold its Pre-Thanksgiving 
breakfast at the 28fh Street 
Branch Y. M. C. A. Sunday morn- 
ing. November 13. at 8:45. 

The Christmas basket chairman 
Mrs. Mary Troy and the toy 
chairman. Mrs. Malenia Allen, are 
asking aU ladies to bring small 


HON TO MME HMI LOWEUTMI 
KEEP IT TIAT NAT 

Too, too, on luTC \<rrtiy hair — bair Jbat |HUpl* ' 
will sotice, idmire — by nsSng Godefroy'a 
Larieuse.Dnh,lif«lej»,gray-itreikedk»irt«ke» 
oa new color and lustre when' Lahense is »» 
plied. Color warned comet qoiddy, rren^ 
Laricusc won't rub off or wuh ooc and if 
doeso't color the scalp. Lerres ttw hair fott, 
tatf — -eady for hot irons or permAoent w^»c» 
Choice M 18 colors. Get a bottle of Larieoaa 
tmUj. Bealcr will refund joat money if yo«'M 
^^ ooc « atis6 <d . 

HAII COLORING ^ 



^j 


H yaw daelar 

doM not hov* 

it, sand $1.25 

diraet l« . . . 

•OOm^r MAMUf ACTWWM COMWANT 


3510 OUVI XT. • ST. LOWS, MO. 


t 


H4/tDY Ntmie Uui4^ 


5« 

AMD 

IO<i 


For Sale, bargains 

4-rm. frame, hardwood floors, tile, new roof, modem. See 
3738 So. Wiltoa PL $300 down. . 

5 rms. frame, cor. lot. 1271 E. 46th St. Only $1P5 down. 

5 rm. frame, 1542 E. 23rd St.. in good shape. S300 down. 

5 rm. frame, in good shap«. rear Avalon Blvd . lot 50x162. 
$300 down. 

Business corner, on Avalon :31vd.. with 4 rm. houE'e. $275 
down. Business lot 3 stores. Cential .\ve . busy spot. S550 down. 

8 rm. double, west 28th and S\. Andrews. $475 down. 

Beautiful 5 rm. stucco, modem. Gramercy and 36tn. $500 
down. Beautiful 4 rm. stu?co. dtplex Gramercy and 36th. 
$1000 down. 

Call me. if you want a hif h class stucco court, income 
$250 mo. Price $'l2.(K>0. $4000 d<>wn. 

Bernard C. Hefndon, Broker 

ADA.MS 13$09 i S69 H.^ST 41ST STREET 



MENanoWOMEnI 

ra'ra .never out of work— you've alwmya VjTfr 


big-paying lob as a Lucky Heart 
Lu 


You' 
P»t a 

Agent Just show Lucky Heart's big guar- 
anteed line of coametics. medicines, flavor- 
ingi, curios to everyone. VVatch them buy. 
Lota of men and women who come with us 
niake up to $S a day spare, time- {45 a 
waek full time. You can do the same. Work 
when you feel like it We show vou how— 
we guarantee your success. It's easy — but ,.@ 
the main thing is to get atmrtod — today — 
ri^t now: Write for -vour FREE STitT J .rvrv, 
PLA>r. BIG SA^fPLE CASE FREE of extra.| 
coat and FREE SAMPLES. Well rush 
everything by return mail— get you started 
]*t once on this big money-making oroposi- 
tion. Send nam* and address to Lucky $^3 
Dept , Memphis, Tenn.^^ 


Heart Co, 



^ 


JOHK W. KING 
Tailor and h|aberdasher 

who hos served the public with tailor - mad« 


clothes ot 18th and Ceihtral for 20 


has 


^u veers 
moved to 2027 CENTR>yL AVENUE in >ii$ own 
building. Ttl«plionc PR--4958. 


Here he is giving a & 
valiMS and bw^st prices 
cquse of the \reciuced ove 

H« carries a ^omplet 
His cleoning and pressin 

for a superior type of worii propseriy and promptly 
done. I 


itisfied public the b«ft 
f-his he IS able to do be- 
^ecci. 

tne of hoberdoshery. 
service is unsurpassed 


mother in New York. The recent 
cocktail dansante was reported a 
succes due to cooperation of a 
number of club friends and plan;- 

were made for a format dance to 

b« given m December. 




AD.7I77 


"A Beauty Show For You" 


First Annual Colo 


ed 


Friendship Baptist Church 

Doyton Street and Delacey Avenue 
For: Spiritual and Intellectual Advancement 
SERVICES: 
SUNDAY, 

Teachers' Devotional: 9:00-9:15 > 
Sunday School : 9:00-10:45 

Morning Worship: 1 1 :00 o'clock 

2 STIRRING SERM0>4S 
» By the PASTOR 

W. D. CARTER 

' Evening Worship: 7:30P.M. 

%H0 ARE YOU?" 

Church nurses: Irene Berry and AAodeline Burch 
care for your infants while you worship. 


Get money •-- Lovf 


SUCCESS 


Hf«. No CM* b«(Md h*«a. 
ia( I Writt at tadMr. ' 

M. WILLIAMS, iMnMl 
Jertty CHy, N. J. 


MAJESTIC 
Venetion Blinds 

Witt 

White Cedar State, Faasy 

Valences, CaJwhmt Ptat— 

■ariwu* 

Many Other Featurta 

See Us Before Buying 

312C WKST FLOKENCK 

PHONE: TW-21M 


COMMUNITY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

No. Foir Oolu Avenue at Hammond Street 
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 




Thcr Church with A Program-- 
A Minifter with A Message' 


.'/ 


' ; ftrrmwid J. W. Coleman, Postor 

l; Bible School: 9:30 A.M. 

Preoching : 11 :00 A. M. and 8:00 P. M. 


Beauty and Trade $how i 

Deciember 11 and 12,1938 1 

Elks Auditorium 

Come Out ond See Whot Our Beouticians Are Doing i 

HAIR STYLING CONTESTS | 

ALL LICENSED HAIRDRESSERS ARE ELICilBLE | 

DemonstraHons By Famous Artists | 

(THfO ASRTS — BUKYTON SKILES^RENO & OTHERS | 

:-l (ALL-OF THE L A. COIFFURE GUILD) • | 

4^ DISPLAY OF BEAUTY AIDS AND COSMETICS | 

Two Days and Nights Packed Full of Interesting an^ Education- | 

al Features. 

For Booths, Program Spoces and Tickets Call ADofij^ $739 

Heodquorters: 4016^2 South Centro 




#,i! 



GE^ERfL 




.P«9« T«n 


~A 


If You Fan t« fiieaci THE CALIFORNIA EAGLE You May f^^9€r ttfmMf T^<iRMa 


Mrs tojLif e. Order for 
San Diego WiiFe 




. VN DIEGO. (By E. B. Wes-<^ 
. ) — Thopias M. Simmons, 44, 
cgro, convicted by a j^ry of 
laying his wife, Isola, July 13, 
*U sentencted to San 
iuentin by Judge G. Thomp- 
son to serve a term of five years 
to life. The district attorney 
argued fcfr the death penalty, not 
provided by the second degree 
murder verdict returned by the 
jury. 

Sinunons' counsel, before sen- 
:ence was passed, moved for a 
new trial, but it was denied. 
Simmons was arrested after he 
'hscked his wife with a hatchet 
during an argument in bed. 
Pleading not guilty and not guil- 
ty by reason of insanity, he in- 
sisted he only struck his wife 
when she slashed his throat with 
a Jmife. He made no comment 
whoi sentenced, answering rou- 
tine questions stoically. After be- 
iH, convcited, Simmons was 
foond sane by the same . jury. — 
S., D. Union. 


,^;,.#'*CALIFORN,l 

[•• Your Town Reprosented? 


' s "%»•■ 


i=«% 


^ 


Mrs. E. B. Johnson; mother of 
Mrs. Mayola Johnson Curl, vocal- 
ist, and the late Pearl Johnson 
Clark, pianist, returned home 
Saturday from a month's visit 
with f^nds in Los Angeles, Pas«- 
dena and Santa Monica. }Ats. 
Johnsoi> was accompanied by her 
Los Angeles friend, Mrs. T. J. 
Morrison, who came down to wit- 
ness the baptism of little De- 
Vpnne Curl, granddaughter of 
Mrs. Johnson, at Calvary Bap- 
tist church Sunday morning. 
November 8. 

The Women's Civic League 
held its regular monthly meet- 
ing Sunday afternoon at three 
o'clock at the Open Door House 
of Prayer. Discussion of proposi- 
tions on this week's election bal- 
lot was heard and the ladies 
quartet of the Church of God in 
Christ— Mmes. Freeman, Denny. 
Spencer and Denny— rendered 
several selections. 
State Coancil of Pentecostal 
Aaaemblies Meets 

Beginning Thursday, November 
3, the California State Council of 
.the Pentecostal Assemblies of the 
World held a' four day session at 
the Apostolic Church, comer of 
Hensley and L. with about 75 
out-of-town guests in attendance 
and district elder. John Cald- 
well, as chairman. Among those 
appearing as guest speakers was 
Bishop F. L. Douglass of Los An- 
geles and slate mother, Mrs. A. 
B, Sturgis, president of the Mis- 
sionary Auxiliary. Young peo- 
ple's meeting was conducted by 
jVIra Harriet Freeman Sunday 
afternoon. Evangelistic services 
were conducted each evening and 
the closing sermon was delivered 
by Elder R. S. Raines of Pasadena 
who will be host to the council 
in March, 1939. 
SOCIETY 

The home of Mrs. J. E. Craft, 
2873^ Imperial avenue was the 
scene of a delightful tea Thurs- 
day afternoon. November 3, given 
by the Women's Democratic club 


the pulpit and again brought the 
message. At the close of the ser- 
vice Holy Communion was ad- 
ministered. 
Trinity Baptist Ciinrch 

Trinity Baptist church experi- 
enced a full day last Sunday. 
Sunday School at 9:30 a. m. con- 
ducted by the Superintendent, 
Mr. R. H. Parker and a full staff 
of officers. Sermon at 11 a. m. by 
the pastor, Rev. Brown. Ordin- 
ance of Baptism at 3 p, m. B"5fP 
U|fat 4 p. m. Preaching and ad- 
mmistering of Lord's supper at 
5:30. There were six accessions 
to the chbrch. 

Rev, J. Harold Brown left on 
Monday, Nov. 8 for points in 
Southern Georgia and Florida, 
upon an invitation to preach the 
50th anniversary jubilee ser- 
mon of the So. Florida Baptist 
Association in. Tampa, Fla. A co- 
incidence is that Rev. Brown 
was converted and baptised in 
this church. 

Just before leaving Rev. Brown 
received a telegram asking him 
to preach at 11 a. m. on Nov. 13 
to the students and faculty of the 
Florida SUte CoUege at Talla- 
hasse. At this college one son of 
the Browns, J. Harold, is Dean of 
Music. 

The plan is ^hat-Rev. Brown 
will be away about a month. Ade- 
quate arrangements have been 
made to carry on the services. 
Several of the ministers of the 
Alliance have volunteered their 
services. 
AME Brotherhood Notes 

A very fine meeting of the 
Brotherhood was held last Thurs- 
day night at the home of t h e 
president, C. Jackson. The 
Brotherhood sponsored a Hal- 
lowe'en party in the basement of 
the Church las tMonday night at 
which, a substantial amount was 
raised for the current expenses 
of the church. - 

Prior to the Hallowe'en party, 
the following persons were elect- 
ed and appointed for the cuiTent 
year; Trustees: Dr. F. C. Cal- 
vert, James P. Tate, Geo. W. 
Thompson. Casey Jackson, Rob- 
ert E. Lee, Mrs. Irene Shepherd, 
William Morgan and John Hen- 
derson; Senior Stewards; Lee 
Brown. J. A. Llopis, Ed. ZoUi- 
coffer, V. Carlton, D. V. Allen, 
Bradbury, Mrs. Rosa Baker, Walt- [ 
er L. McDonald, John Henderson 
and L. W. Laird; Junior Stew- ] 
ards; H. Campbell, R. C. Cooper, i 
Jamison, G. T. Brown. 'Junior. 
Clarence King and H. P. HoUo- 
mon; Stewardesses; B- Shannon, 
Bettie Jackson, Minriie Lewis 
and MUdred Garrett, Deaconess, 
Elizabeth Kincaid. Evangelists, 
Catherine Jackson and Elizabeth 
Kincaid. Class Leaders, A. E. 
Morgan, Lee Brown, P. L. John- 
son, Gertrude Vorce, *Nancy 
Johnson. Rosa Baker, Clara 
Thompson and John Henderspn. 
Reading Clerks: Clarence King 
and H. P. HoUomon. 

The Pew RUy sponsored by the 
Brotherhood last Sunday mom- 




(^- 


COMMUNltlES 


of which Mrs. J. E. Craft is presi- ' '"8 and aftemoor was a success 
dent Decorations of red. white from every angle 


The next meeting will be with 
A. N. Hicks. 

Walter L. McDonald, reporter. 
The Sick 

The Sunshine Club reports the 
sick for the week: 

At General Hospital: Mrs Mol- 
lie Davis, Mrs. Pansy Beil. Mr. 
Albert Billips, Mr. William 
White; At Vauclain Home: Mrs. 
Mae Echols, Mrs. Ruth McClellan, 


Mrs. Sadie' oJhnson. Mrs. Bessie | Church began evangelic services 

Monday evenuig. There will be 


and blue with white chrysanthe- 
mums in abundance made the 
event a very colorful one. These 1 
same colors were carried out in 
the refreshments. Approximately ' 
one hundred guests attended. 

Mrs. Minzie Wallace was hos- 
tess at a Hallowe'en party at the 
residence bf Mr. and Mrs. Jarr.es 
Harvey for the children of t h e 
neighborhood. 33 youngsters were 
entertained. 

The Women's Civic League 
sponsored a peasant party Satur- 
day evening, November 5. The 
fete foUpwed a dinner which was 
served all day. 

Darby Branner. 3158 Webster 
avenue was host to the Best Yet 
Club Saturday evening, Novem- 
ber 5. Edward G. RoUins is 
president. 

Station O. N. O. Club held itb 
regular meeting Saturday even- 
ing, November 5, in the McDon- 
ald residence on J Street. Ray- 
mond Welton was leading man ! -^ Gilmore)— The annual el- 
for the .pseudo-broadcast and , ^^.^^ of 'officers and mapping 


Citizens of P 
Centro Plan 
Ciyic Leogue 

EL CENTRO. (By WA. Payne) 
—The citizens of this town met in 
a mass meeting last Wednesday 
night and began plans for the or- 
ganization of an effective Civic 
League. The League has as its 
objectives securing and main- 
tenance of civil liberties and 
justice. Much interest has been 
taken in the move. The next 
meeting will be held November 
13. 

Prof, A. E. Prince, Principal of 
Washington School, has purchas- 
ed property on Fourth Street, the 
main highway leading through 
to the border. He is planning to 
make extensive improvements. 

The P.-T. A. of local schools 
held an enthusiastic meeting last 
Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. Sarah 
Maples, president. Curriculum 
building, past and present trends 
were discussed by Mrs. Ruth P. 
McGregor and Miss Fairlyn 
Lewis. Superintendent Guy A. 
Weakley summarized the ad- 
dresses in a splendid review. 
James Robinson's room received 
the prize for largest representa- 
tion of parents. 

Rev. C. A. Hodge of Tucson, 
Ariz, was a visitor in the city 
last week. Prof. A. E. Washing- 
ton who recently conducted his 
pageant, The Pearly Gates, for the 
citizens of Tucson was a return 
passenger with Rev. Hodge. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Francis Mc- 
Clure and Mesdames Cleveland 
and McDonald of San Diego were 
visitors in El Centro last Sun- 
day. They were worshippers at 
Johnson's Chapel, AME Church. 
Representatives from the sever- 
al Baptist churches in Imperial 
assembled in the New Bethel 
Baptist Church, Brawley and list- 
ened to inspirational addresses 
and sermons from leading mem- 
bers of the denomination, during 
the afternoon and evening last 
Friday. Accompanying Rev. C. H. 
Hampton, President of the West- 
ern Baptist State Convention, 
were Rev. W. P. Carter, execu- 
tive secretary; Dr. H. B. Thomas, 
Santa Barbara, President Emeri- 
tus of the Convention; Dr. T. L. 
Griffith, Pastor. Second Baptist 
Church, Los Angeles; Dr. W. R. 
Carter, Transportation Commit- 
tee Chairman; Dr. J. L. Caston, 
Educational Commission Chair- 
man; Rev. I. N. Whitten, Mission- 
ary Commission Chairman; Dr. 
W. D. 'Carter, Regional Vice- 
President, National Baptist Con- 
vention; Rev. L. M. Curtis, Mod- 
erator Tri-County Baptist Asso- 
ciation. The series of meetings 
closed with a sermon preached 
by Dr. W. D. Carter Friday even- 
ing- 

Plans are completed for the 
November quarterly meeting of 
the Southwest Baptist Associa- 
tion. Rev. I. N. Whitten is Mod- 
erator of the Association: Rev. 
David Campbell is Executive 
Secretary. Sessions will be held 
Saturday and Sunday. Rev. A. L. 
Merritt is pastor of the church 
entertaining the Association. 

Rev. J. H. Hawkins, pastor 
Johnson's Chapel, A. M. E. 



RACEfRACI^ 
& GOSSIP I 

By JAY GOULD 


JDoughfer of Vol 
Verde Couple 
Rests of Cobin 


^ 


Thui«doy;Hov»ml»er i4J?I? 



FORUM SPEAKER 

Drew Pearson, who helped au- 
thor the "Washington Merry- 
wUl speak under Los Angeles 
Modem Fomm auspices tne 
night of Nov. 21 at the Phil- 
haimonic Auditorium. 
Feanon, nicknamed ^'The Wal- 
ter' Winchell of the Nation's 
Politics," wUl speak on "Wash- 
ington Merry-Go-Eouad np to 
8 o'clock tonight." 


Society on Porode 

for Grods 

of Son to Borboro 

SANTA BARBARA, -(By Phy- 
llis A. Hoxie)— Saturday, Nov- 
ember 15 was homecoming day 
for Santa Barbara State College. 
In honor of the visitors an even- 
ing social was given by Misses 
Earlene and Margaret Hopkins. 
Both proving very charming host- 
esses, made the evening enjoy- 
able for all. Among those present 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Pickens of 
Pasadena, Mr. Prestly, formerly 
of Wilberiarce, Lloyd Thomas 
of San Jose, Larry Pickens, De 
Melvyn Dennis, Latinee Gulla- 
tte, Willie Peters, and Misses Lu- 
cinda Smith, Altheda Marshall, 
Jean Stapler, Jean Williams, Hel- 
en Ford and Thelma Spencer. 


SAN FRANCISCO— Bay Mea 
dows runs the flag down Satur- 
day after its 25 day winter meet 
and then Tanforan steps in aijd 
runs the flag \xp for its winter 
meet, : 

Tffs column is 24 years old 
and is for sport and entertain- 
ment. Hope no one gets hinkty 
or ritzy when their name appeais, 
if so we apologize. I 

Al Ramsey, San Diego, who 
oaid a big slice, of coin for tljie 
Yesmar and Pardee hotels, has 
reached the top hotel spot . .] . 
Society George Dean, who was 
placed on the payrolls in the Bay 
Meadows clubhouse by Frank 
Boutee, has a chance to see the 
swell dandies and their ladies he 
has read so much about . . . j . 
Clarence Fullbright, commentator 
of Catalina and press box mixolp- 
gist, of Santa Anita sent 30 tele- 
grams to friends reading, "Sea- 
biscuit is a sure thing" ... 

Clocker Carter Hays was heard 
to say that if War Admiral, Lie- 
garoti and Seabiscuit were in : a 
three cornered match race, he 
would lay 10 to 1 War Admiral 
would be last and no place else. 
. . . Lovie Joe Roberson bought 
50 tickets for the Armstrong- 
Garcia fight November 2 ; b u t 
when the fight was postponed he 
cashed them in . . . Casper Hol- 
stein, Bob Bledsoe, Roscoe Bajr- 
nett and Travie Woods are ring- 
siders at aU. big affairs . . . Eu- 
gene Sorral, when in New York 
stepping out of Ed Small's nite 
spot with his lunpteen carats Of 
diamonds, the cabbies all put on 
their dimmers until he passes . . 
John Leavy who moved in San 
'Francisco frorri the East was 
betting on the E(ay Meadows 
races like his salary was twice 
the size of Dizzy Dean's . . . . 
Mae Moore is back home in Los 
Angeles after too long a s t a^,y 
sightseeing and looking on from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific 


VAL VERDE. (By Clara Tay- 
lor)— Mrs. Smith, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose, is spend- 
ing a three weeks rest period at 
the Ambrose cabin, at the end of 
Val Verde road. 

Marked improvement is being 
made on the home of Mr, and 
Mrs. Bean in South Val Verde. 

Recent out of town visitors 
were Mrs. B. DeFeaster from Chi- 
cago, IlL; Mrs. Edith Barefield, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Mrs. Beatrice 
Smith, of Kamploops, British, 
Columbia. 

. Mr. Lee Lewis, park employee 
i^ on a two week's vacation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cottrell of New 
Hall, entertained with a dinnes 
party, Sunday at the club house 
cafe. 

The church was blessed to have 
the name of Mrs. M. Williams ad- 
ded to its list of members, Sun- 
day A. M. The rally, to continue 
through November, asking the 
public for help to build the lit- 
tle church, contiues active. Quar- 
terly conference is slated for 
Nov. 27th. Everybody welcome. 


Federal 
Official 

OAKLAND. (B> Lena M. Wy 
singer)-^eorge Edmund Haynes, 
Ph. D., of New York, Executive 
Secretary, Department of \Race 
Relations, Federal Cotincfl of 
Churches in America, is among 
the delegates attending the\ln- 
ternatibnal (3ood Will Coni 
November 6-11, at the P^^ce 
Hotel, San Francisco. ( 

He addressed the iConL 
yesterday morning at jts fli 
open session on Race anii Wojrli 


lUncilofChiirchfs 


s in 


ofl 


Dies 


Peace, stating: • \ i 

"World peace cannot be achi^v 
ed by military and navalX rig^it. VhangM j^lront 
World'peace cannot be acWev^ T?Slu **^'xJL 
so long as the white peopleXcoij- \ ^^^ .colored 


BOY'S CENTER ORGANIZED . . ^ 

Through the efforts of Eddie Artie Groves, Sam Montgomery, 
Shands and Fred Tolliver, two Johnny Jones, Calvin Jones and 
industrious, efficient young men, ! P'eas Scagga of Los Angeles, but 
steps are being taken toward 1 "^^ in Frisco can be seen in 
the development of a boys' cen-j f^^ 0"t of the high spots night- 
ter. Backed |>y the Father Alfred 


ly. 


Andrews, Mrs. Bemice Beasley, 
Miss Georgia Bell, Miss Eloise 
Hopkins, Mr. Benny Lucky, Mr, 
Theodore Steele, Mr. Dan Gatlin, 
Mr. Wilbur Smith; At home: Mrs. 
Minnie Coleman. 


NAACP of Santo 
Monico to 
Elect Officers 

SANTA MONICA, (By Willie 


preaching by the pastor every 
evening during the two weeks' 
meeting. A cordial invitation is 
extended to all to attend . . . O. 
T. McWilliams. teacher and ath- 
letic director in the CCC Camp 
near San Diego was a visitor 
her last week end. He is assist- 
ing in an outstanding program 
there. . . Maurice Wiley, Comp- 
ton Junior College, visited his 


of the Santa Barbara Mission, the 
organization is well under way. 
St. Mary's Center, as it is call- 
ed, is frequented by many young 
men and boys who are eager to 
help buUd the center which wiH 
afford recreation heretofore not 
offered them. 
STUDENT-TEACHER AT 
GRAM.MAR SCHOOL 

To Harry Clayton Stewart o^ 
Santa Barbara State College, goes 
the honor of being the only Ne- 
gro student teacher in the Lin- 
coln Grammar School here. Har- 
ry the son of Mr, and Mrs. John 
D. Stewart Sr., prominent fig- 
ures among Santa Barbara soc- 
iety, graduated from Santa Bar- 
bara High school with high 
standing in his class. He w a s 
awarded a scholarship, thus mak- 
ing his present position possible. 

His sister, Velma Stewart, also 
a student at the same college is 
the only Negro counsellor there. 


Suggest 2-Woy 
Approoch to 
Race Relations 


BREA, Calif., Nov. 10, (ANP) 

—Ruby Berkeley Goodwin, lec- 

, , turer and writer, was presented 

parents here over the week end j Sunday evening at the Brea 


Members of the Second 
Baptist church and friends of its 
pastor were given a grand sur- 
prise when it was announced 


^ Mrs. Dorothy Glover, leadmg ^^ ^^^ program will get that the Rev. I. N. Whitten and 
i*Ay ^^r'^iJJ^'^flVfZ underway at 3 p.. m. Sunday ' - - " - 


Mrs. Daisy Welton and assistant 
prograiii director, Mrs. C a s s i e j 
Patterson. Prizes were awarded 
Mrs. Lucille Brown and young 
Charles Patterson. The next 
meeting is scheduled for Novem- 
ber 19 in the Manning home. 

Th»; Boys' Band, directed by Al ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ __^^ ^ 

Parks, is attracting considerable j sfrgeT- last" Saturday afternoon 
attention and have been booked , ^ ^ farewell party in honor of 


in 
the regular monthly meeting of 
the branch of the National As- 
sociation for the Advancement of 
Colored People. Tlje A. M. E. 
church will be the scene. 
SOCIETY 

Mrs. Bessie Washington was 
hostess at her home, 1423 Uth 


for two or three public appear- ; ^^^ Dorothy Johnson, who is, at 
ances. I present, en route to her home in 

CHUKCHES _ I New York, after several months' 

The church building fund is : ^^j-q^^j^ -^^ ^^-^ gj^y 
absorbing the attention of Bethel i Those present to bid the hon- 
AE- parishoners under the lead- I ^^^^ ^^jg^ included Misses Viv- 
ership of Rev. L. H._ Owens, min- | ^^^^^ Wilder, Flo Kennedy, Viv- 

ienne Lawrence, Aileen Cele.stan, 
t Martha Lou, Tyrese and Vi War- 
I ren, and (iorinne and Roberta 
Rhodes. 

The Sub-Debs club, a recently 
organized group, held its intro- 
duction party Friday, Oct. 21. 
1 Members are ClotUde Fortune, 
Eddie Lee Alexander, Marlene 
Davis, Esther Cook, Mary Jane 


ister. Sunday school services are 
at 9:30 a. m.; worship at 11: A. C. j 
E. League, 6 p. m.. and evening ] 
worship ait 7:30 p. m. 
Calvozy Baptist Church 

Sunday School at 9:30, Mrs. 
Louella Roberts, superintendent. 
Morning worship at 11 a. .m At 
this time a beautiful baptismal 
service was held. Candidates for 
Baptism were: Mae MulhoUand, 
DeVonne Curl, Lois and Alva 
Clark, Mrs. Louice Robinson. 


Mrs. EsteUa McCall would be 
united in marriage in the near 
future ... A number of the lads 
and lassies of East El Centro 
took part in the Pet Parade 
sponsored by the business men 
of the city. Several received priz- 
es. The Junior Police looked nat- 
ty in their uniforms. George 
Cleveland, Vengel Mason, Bur- 
ton Hilton, and Earl McCoy, 
Captain represent our group in 
this organization . . . Louis Neal 
who recently underwent an op- 
eration at the El Centro City hos- 
pital has been removed to his race relations was suggested by 
J home and is rapidly improving. the speaker in which both races 

4 participate, rather than the old 
method of the Negro always be- 
ing the recipient. 


Christian Church, as the third 
speaker in a series of Sunday 
evening educational studies. Mrs. 
Goodwin followed Judge Kenneth 
Morrison who spoke on the pre- 
ceeding Sunday on the "Causes 
and Cures of Juvenile Delin- 
quency". The final speaker in the 
series to follow Mrs. Goodfwin 
will be Prof. L. O. Culp, head of 
the department of commerce at 
Fullertoh Junior College and 
president of the California Busi_ 
ness College Association. 

"Speaking for My People" was 
the topic for Mrs. CJoodwin's lec- 
ture in which she pointed out the 
indifference of the average white 
citizen to the problems lacing the 
Negro. A practical approach to 


'FRISCO FLASHES 

Prettly lone Darsey, the Artie 
icicle was seen full of smiles 
chumming with Fred Pough in 
the dimly lit Town Club who 
was breathing slightly close to 
her cheeks . . . William and 
Joseph Hubbard, Mrs. Allie Mae 
Johnson of L. A., sister of Mrs. 
Oscar B. Foster motored with 
Mr. James Glass of Alburquet- 
que. New Mexico to spend a few 
days, with the Fosters . . , Mrs. 
Irene DeCuir and Ruby Phillips 
of Los Angeles can be seen out 
with Estelle Butler of S. F. ro- 
mancing and hitting the high 
spots on both sides of the bridge 
... Joe Valentin, taking his mail 
at San Francisco just returned 
from Denver where he visited 
his kin. Joe returned and just 
stayed 2 days before leaving 
again for Denver. I don't kno*^ 
anything is seriously wrong or 
not . . . Ralph Warren and his 
charming wife, Mary Warrent of 
Berkeley have not been to the 
race track since he cashed in on 
several winners a few days ago. 

Daisy Boone, night spot en- 
tertainer at Nat Earle's. Oak- 
land, just returned from Reno 
getting a decree. She would like 
for her next to be John Levy of 
New York or Charlie Alexander. 
. . . Samuel Williams opened 
at the Fess Club, Thursday with 
a red hot show. Sam is the pet 
entertainer of 'Frisco. . . Gladys 
Pittman, Helen Parks, Florence 
Wysinger and Ethel Carter, Eli- 
zabeth MulUt can be seen dinr 
ing at the popular tables at the 
night spots. . . . Walter Scott, 
Frank Scott, Grover Woods and 
Lewis King can be seen romanc- 
ing the girls on both sides of the 
bridge . . . Mrs. Johnson, Miss 
Clara Hall. Norman J. Williams 
can be seen dining in and out 
of the nite spots , . . 

For an y further information 
write or wire J6y Gould, 1716 
Webster Street, San Francisco. 


Fire in Riverside 
Demolishes 
Goroge ond Cor 

RIVERSIDE, (By Francis M. 
Williams) — Fire of an unknown 
origin destroyed the garage of 
A. Stratton, citizen of Riverside, 
completely demolishing his au- 
tomobile. 
CHURCH NEAK FREE 

Allen Chapel A. M. E. church, 
the Rev. A, L. Washington, pastor 
is beginning to see the light after 
much ^ort on the part of C. A. 
Daughterty and his committee 
with the coojjeration of the mem- 
bership, to pay off an eight-year- 
old indebtedness. 

Activities of the church for 
the month include: the organiza- 
tion of a Mother MoUey Mays 
club, in honor of the life of 
Mother Mays, who died here re- 
cently. Mrs. Pearl Jackson is 
president; Trustees of the church 
are sponsoring a Baby Contest 
on Nov. 27 at 3 p. m.: Rev. Harris, 
presiding elder, will hold his 
first quarter on Nov. 20. 

Park Avenue Missionary Bap- 
tist church, the Rev. L. D. Moss, 


tinue to depend upon this lAight 
to control the darker races\ so 
long as they are dominated \ by 
the myth of superiority", w'fS 
the "declaration made by Qr. 
George Edmund Haynes, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Department 
ef Race Relations, Federal Coun.^. 
cil of Churches, speaking before* 
the members of the International 
Goodwill Congress in San Fran- 
cisco today. 

"Peace is a product of justice 
and equality which cannot issue 
from such false ideals", Dr. 
Haynes continued. "So long as 
the dominant groups deny the 
beisic rights to the weaker racial 
minorities so long will there be 
wars, and rumors of wars." 

Dr. Haynes pointed out that 
today racial conflict based on. 
ethnic and cultural difference is 
widespread and more intense in 
emotion than the world has ever 
known. "South Africa is seeth- 
ing with conflict between black 
and brown natives and white 
Europeans", he said. "In north- 
east Africa Italians are holding I 


lust 


Ethiopian lands against guerilla 
Warfare while their Grand Coun- 
cil prohibits marriage between 
Italians and persons belonging to 
Semitic and other 'non-Axyan'- 
stdck. In India, British ad In- 


diaii leaders are a3^nos^de^ 
ed. The. Japanese onslauffvt 
China are^ an application jr 
western pojwer politics unde 
myth of divine origin and de 
of the Japanese race. We«tl 
dian Negroek have recenUy 
ed against their white overt 
In Europe. Germans and P 
are baiting J^s. In the "" 
States the dispossessed Ini Han 
stiU broods ab«;ut his lost ." ™* 
and disrupted culture, and tne 
K Negro- white interracial stru [gla 
\ - - ' ■ but contu uet 

ecade." 
Wees of 
/iroericfts^ of InculB and 
hdwever, are slow^ awa 
to their plight and to the Weofcgy 
bui^t up to enforce their Btatr" 
he xy^arned. "There is^ rising I 
of c^lor. The forces of\,peace 
find Ways and means^to rei 
the myth of racialisntt from jtha 
minds and hearts of the peoblee 
of the world and. to teach them 
\that prestige grows from go 
•will; that safety of ecomMiic, 
family and national status lief in 
just and friendly relations j be- 
tween rapes and group* *pf j all 
kisds." 

Dr. Haynes was guest 
on Sunday at First AME ch^ 
Oaldand, Rev. Daniel G. Hil" 
pastor. 

The speaker portrayed thej 
groes'' position in the- present |c 
economic and Race conflict j 
gave a panacea for world peac 
contrasting wa^ and peace of| th* 
Biblical period and the pr^jiei^ 
day situation. i \ 

A large audience greeted] th«' 
eminent race man. 
1 Richard T. Smith, Exe 




Secretary of the North 
YMCA, introduced the 

Di. Haynes also addre 
congregation at the Ch 
Church of Oakland on Sunday at 
11 a. m. 



t 


Sdnta Barbora State College 
Sophs to Bolster Grid Hopjes 

SANTA BARBARA. Nov. 10,* \ 

—With another defeat chalked up nnualflCC Hi ToDS 
on the Sanu Barbara State Col- »^W«gi«a» " ■ ■ VK* 
lege Gaucho's loss-heavy season Rrn%i#lAV 6^0 


record, the only definitely bright 
spot on the horizon is the gener- 
ally conceded fact that next year, 
sparked by two colored sopho- 
mores. Los Angeles boys, the 
Santa Barbarans will be the club 
to beat. The, y,ouths are Larry 
Pickens and l^elvin Dennis, for- 
mer Manual Arts High school 
players. 

pastor reported a "wonderful ser- Las, Saturday the San Jose 
vice Sunday with .a tithing ] gpartans. "highest scoring teem 
"'^"'^,?l^)Pn ^""^ ^" offering of , ^^ ^^e nation", boosted their ocin: 
over 5100.00 to^gi g, j^e expense or the Gau- 

MISCELLANY chos by a score of 20-0. Coach 

Mother Gordon, for some weeks Dud DeGrott'5,..^ large and lough 
visiting relatives here had the | squad with Lloyd Thomas and 


pl^sure of a trip to Palm Sprmgs 
with her step-daughter, Mrs. M. 
C. Baker and Mrs. I. Norr. Mr. 
and Mrs. A. L. Willismns and 
family visited some old acquain- 
tances in the persons of Mrs. 
Stanley and daughter on last 
Sunday in Los Angeles. 

The receipts to go to the wid- 
ows, orphans and feeble veterans 
Anthony Cunningham Post, No. 
2003 will serve a barbecue din- 
ner in Lincol Park on Nov. 11. 

Mrs. Ann Kimball and Mrs. Ze- 
ola Jones are on the sick list. 


Don Presley, colored players, act- 
ive in the line-up, easily domina- 
ted the fight keeping the game- 
but-outclassed Green and White 
Dack on their heels mainly thru | 
the use of passes jwitfe Thomas ' 
on the receiving end. 

The Gaucho's record now stands 
at one win and six losses. Far 
from disheartened. Coach Spud | 
Harder sejs the improvement td I 
date in hi.^ team as a definite in-\l 
dication that the Green Wave ' 
wiU finish out the season on top. 


EL CENTRO. Nov! 10. (By W. 
A. Payne 1 — Douglass High School 
football warriors turned ' in a 
masterly brand of football last 
Thursday in their game with 
Brawley. The game was nip and 
tuck until the third perio4. FoV» 
lowing a brOliant 40 yard driven 
Roland Maples, D-Hi fullback, 
broke thru for the only s<jore Ck( 
the game. Douglass winning 6-0. 
In spite of his assumed modesty. 
Coach James Stocks w h p is a 
tennis champion in his owri right- 
wore a smile that wouldn't coral 
off. This is the team's fir* yea*..-,- 
at the game and their progress ii^^ 
a surprise to the followers jof thO 
game. After a day's rest the 
boys went back at hardi work 
preparing for the Calipatrii 
game. | 


Beware Cougi|s 

from common coljis 

That Hang On 

No matter bow many medicines 

3rou have tried for your cothmon 

Another item which kesp>s away icough, chest cold, or branchlaJ irrl' 


Present Gront 
Still's Work 

., LA HABRA, Calif, Nov, 1, (A 
NP) — Before a select group of- 75 
musicians and music lovers the 
music of .William Grant Still, 
was presented Friday evening 
in the drawing room of the home 
of A. Milton Boucher. Boucher, 


Dumas and Phyllis Quinn. 

At a parting gesture, honoring j noted voice teacher and musician 

u 1 o I ^''- ^""^ ^^^- Walter Walker, who rounded out an evening of music 

Many friends from Bethel Bap- g^e motoring to New York, Mes- composed largely of the work of 
tist Church visited this service to dames Lynch and F. K. Leath . modernists composers by singing 
witness the Baptism of DeVonne ^g^g co-hostesses at a lovely ; two spirituals arranged by Still 
.Curl, who until recently was an breakfast at the home of the lat- and published in book form by 
active member, in that church, ter last Tuesday. Chrysanthenj- . the Handy Brothers Music Pub- 

ums. decorated the well appoin- lishing Company. "Lord Ah Want 


The parents are long time mem- 
bers of Calvary and it is her de- 
sire to be with them. 

BYPU at 4 p. m. Evening ser- 
vice at 5:30 p. m. Rev. Branham 
delivering the message. 
';;hiirch of God in ChrM 

Sunday school opened at 9:30. 
Mrs. Grace Spencer and Mr. Lee 
Pierson in charge. Morning ser- 
vices at 11 a. m. Elder Jackson 
delivered the message. 


ted tables. Those present includ- 
ing the hostesses and honorees 
were: Rev. F. K, Leath, Mr. and 
Mrs.- WiU Linly, jr., and Mr. 
Lynch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Trotter also feted 
Mr. and Mrs. Walker with a v^- 
it to Los Angeles' Chinatown 
where they enjoyed a delightful 
dinner. 


to Be a Christian," and "Listen 
To De Lam's" were the selections. 


YP'WW at 6 p. m. Miss Myrtle DID YQU KNOW— A slave ship 
Pressley and Miss Katra E. Tuck- captain always counted on los- 
„ «,nductme. Program a.t 7:15 mg on the voyage one-fourth of 


er conductmg. Program 


t S^l', rfir^n of Uie Sunshine his cargo of slave<= fSick and dead ed, police said. He got m the car 
l':J5°^ l-Sr^lacl^ ^uPied ' thrown' overboard). . -J»nd then asked to teU h« bos. 


Band. Ekter Jackion occupied 


BOOTBLACK KILLS SELF 
AFTER QUESTIONING 

SANTA ANA, Nov. 10, (ANP) 
— tlyde E. Wright, 37, bootblack 
killed himself last week when 
police picked him up for quest- 
ioning regarding a white girl 
drinking beer with him. He was- 
n't to be arrest«i, just question, 
ed, police said. He got in the car 


Housing Project 
in Ooklond 
Probed by N2ACP 

Oakland, Nov. 10-|-An investi. 
gation to ascertain whether or 
not Negro labor wcHild be edn- 
ployed in the errection of the 
buildings on the sites of the slum 
clearance districts, has been 
made by Attorney W. A. Gordon, 
president of the Alameda Cotin- 
ty Branch, National Associatipn 
for Advancement of Colored Peb- 
ple; H. L. Richardson, director of 
NAACP, and Byron R u m f o r d, 
chairman of program of Local 
Branch NAACP. 

Information elicited sewns to 
.show that Union labor will jse 
given preference in all the work. 


Gordon stated. 

The nams, ages, addresses, ap- 
titude of those who are qualified 
in the building trades, namely 
carpenters, brick layers, plast- 
erers, lathers, e 1 e c tr i c i a n si 
plumbers and other qualifica- 
tions, are solicited by the com- 
mittee. Will this information 
kindly be sent to the office of 
Richardson at 1557. Seventh Sti 
Oakland, where it will be' great- 
ly appreciated. 


2 Women Get 
Kress Jobs 
in Son Pedro 

SAN PEDRO, (By Edward Cu- 
ney) — Results of the fight con- 
ducted in Los Angeles by the 
California Eagle for employment 
of Negroes in Kress Stores, was 
seen in the recent employment 
of two race women, Mrs. Ella 
Louise Brooks and Walter Shan- 
non in the San Pedro Kress at 
7th and Pacific avenue. 

Civic groups are urging the 
citizens to show their apprecia- 
tion bv patronizing the store. 
MISCELLANY 

The local Crispus Attucks Civ- 
ic club held a bridge and whist 
tournament last Friday evening. 
Among those seen at the affair 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Gatlin, Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert Luke, Mr. and 
Mrs. Rafe Tave, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Albert Faulk, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dee Clark, of Wilmington; Henry 
C. Tave, John H. James, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Clark, Mrs. Stewart, 
and Miss Bernice Warren. 

Services at William Chapel A 
M. E. church, the Rev. J. L 
Glover, pastor, included an even- 
ing evangelical service v/ith Sis- 
ter Jennings preaching. Members 
and friends of the church sur- 
prised their pastor with a gift 
box, containing all kinds of food, 
fruit, etc. The church is hailing 
the successful convalescence of 
Mrs. Glover, wife of the pastor.c 


the grey hairs is the fact that 
Harder wiii lose only one man 
from his regulars at thi end of 
the season, and most of his first 
stringers have two year.^ left. 

Season's play so far has devel- 
oped some excellent talent which 
needs a little more experience to 
become "Star-Stuff". 

Some flashy ball packing by 
Santa Barbara's big end, PicV.ens. 
last week at Tempe, Arizona im- 
pressed the coaching staff with 


tation, you may get relief no^W with 
Creomiilslon. Serious trouble! may 
he brewing and you cannot Afford 
to take a chance with any relnedy 
less potent than Creomulsion, 'vfhich 
goes right to the seat of the troubla 
and aids nature to soothe and heal 
the inflamed mucous membtenea 
and to loosen and expel srm- 
laden phlegm. j 

Even tf other remedies have f aOed, 
don't be discotu^ed, try C>ec^ul- 
sion. Your druggist is authorize to 
refund your money tf you as9 not 
thoroughly satisfied with the hpne- 
fits obtained. Creomulsion is 1 one 
word, ask for it plainly, see that the 
name on the bottle is CTreomulfion. 


the idea that Pickens should ect ' and youH get the genuine product 
a chance at a backfield post. As' "--nd the lebef vou want (Artvh 


a result. Pickens got into the 
Spartan game at right half, ai.d 
showed up well even though the 
Gauchos lost. 


that he would be gone for awhile. 
Wright went back into the shop, 
secured a pistol and shot hdmseiU. 
He died the next day in the 
county hospital after two blood 
transfusions failed to sava his 
Uife. 


W^ 


i 


^■^^^'Kfp'-'r-: r^M'M 


fe.^vi^ 


•> \-' ■ (P-^-^^*i'j;V''*'- ■■■■■'' ' 


^-mm 


ViJ^'r 


DID YOU KNOW— Pedro Alonsb 
Nino, a Negro, was a pilot of one 
of the famous three vessels of 
Coliimbus. 


IT'S EASY 

TO SELL IT 

IF YOU TELL IT 

INTHE EAGLE 


PHONE , . 

ADAMS 9362 

OR CALL AT , . . 

4075 SO, CENTRAL AVE. 


iS 


GEO. J. HALL & CO. 

FLORISTS 

We appreciate Your Trade 
Flowers for all occasions 

Call Mutual 8181 
For Service 

214 W. Fourth Street 
Los Angeles 


Fred E. Morn^y 

Optometrist 

GLASSES 
on CREDIT 

4418 S. Centrol Av«J^« 


' FASHIONABLE * 

Dressmoking 

Ladies Tailoring Alterations 

Leola B. Pierson, Wilson 
RI-3752 722 E. 25th St 


Glomour Perfume 

Is Just What The Name Says 
Do You Want To Attract Others? 

Perfumes are one of the nicest means of 
ATTRAOTINO OIHERS. Hlatoiy i« full o» 
tbe power of incenae and perfumes, bring. 
Incr GOOD LCCS, LOVE and UREAT 
WEALTH by fascjnatioc the aencea of otfa- 
era. It ia maffnetlc and compels attention, 
and mar bring von. JUST THE ROMANCB 
70U have longed for. 

Two sizes, $1 and »!, fT WILL AT- 
TRACT OTHERS. PotH doUy. Order today 
froiD 


NOTICE! 

On or About 
NOVEMBER 1ST. the 

SAN I FOAM 
BARBER SHOP 

will move into its new 
location 

845 N. Fair Oaks Are. 
PASADENA. Calif. 


P A S A D E N 

ROMKSITES, CHOKK 
and ACKKACS 

OLLIE A. ROBINSOi 

Lieensed Seal titet^ 

^A C. BURTON 

Sal( 



Thanksgiving 
Turkey Dinner Dance 

at NEAL*S RANCH \ 

(San Diego) | 

Begiiining Thanksgiving Evt 
midnight, .lasting ^i;^g^^ 
Thanksgiving Day. Tickete 73t 


HOTEL SIMMONS 

romerty Ihe RobiHaoa «A H<»e\whm a... — _ - 

Quiet and convenient to ShoppingDiawT^rSZ!!^ J^ 
pUee for your vacation. S^rimSifflrUhi^ ^Tj^i?* «^ 



.i.-.-'Tj' >ij^if^v-- 



: !■'.' J - "J" - 


Ikmrf^r. ^fovMibw 10, 1^ 


m^M 


'>-* 




::^\- '^ 


CAIJFORNU 


lAfiilJE Vfxi 



,T 


AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 10, ( 
P) — George L. Allen, gradoai 
student recently riwmiiiot^ 
the University of Texas after 
ing allowed to register and at-^ 
tend classes, last week announ- 
ced that he would file suit against 
the school because he beUeves 
ttiat his dismissal was based on 
ground of color. 

Allen, who was the first Ne- 
gro student to be admitted to 
the university in the history of 
the school, was dismissed aftH- he 
inquired about his official status 
in the school and was informed 
by Dean T. H. Shelby that he was 
not Enrolled for the conrses in 
psychology and salesmanship. 

Allen made this inquury after 
an conference with Prof. C P. 
Brewster, director of the courses 
who suggested that he leave th6 
school. The suit, which will test 
the Texas law providing equal 
opportunities for colored grad_ 
uate students to study in the state 
is expected to aid niatefially in 
the move for the establishment 
of a University for .Negroes in 
Texas. "l_ 

Well Known 
Texas 
Motron Dies 

S.\N .-VNTONIO, fTex>, Nov. 
10 — Mrs. Adelphia E. Scott, 
youngest daughter of Washing- 
ton and Ellen White, deceased 
pioneers of Gonzales, Texas, and 
widow of the late Samuel T. i 
Scott, son of Bishop I. B. Scott j 
died here in San Antonio iast \ 
Saturday. \ 

The "Eagle" went to Houston lact week, stepped by the Gulf Mrs. Scott weU known in Tex-.; 

Brewing Co. and was received warmly. We drank beer out of nice | as^ sociaL civic and^religiousjcir- 

clean gla«ss and sat at Ubles. We must admit that the GRAND ' " '^ ^^ - - 

PRIZE is good beer, and it might interest you to know that the 

Gulf Brewing Co. works 1200^ 


oinst 






■^ 




v^r. 




u 


PETROLEUM COMPANY MESSENGER 

UCNNK AUSTIN, life-Ieng resideiit of Galvestmi, and messenger 
'•r tlie Mexleaa Petroleum Company. Austin has held this respon- 
sible pa riUu M for the laat 23 yens. He reportedly eontn^ stock 
aad hea«s tateUag. acrenU thMsaad doOus witii this compaoy. 


THINGS WORTH KNOWING 

By H. L. Low 


Negroes, 

salaries. 


paying them all good 


We also were "entertained' 
the Galveston & Houston Brew 
ing Co., here in Galveston. 
Things were much different. We 
were flatly refused a glass of 
beer under the above stated 
conditions, but if the Chief En- 
gineer sees fit to hand you a 
beer voucher, please remember 
that you must stand on the out. 
side of the little beer house and 
receive what ever you are able 
to get through the 2x4 window. 
If your memory isn't good. 1 
should advise you to stay away, 
until you are able to convince 
the chief that you are eligibUe. 
You might receive a voucher aft- 
er telling your age, for whom 
■• ou work, and how long you 


about it 

A few days ago our Negro 
school heads presented them- 
at I selves before the altar of Edu_ 
cation to ask for what the race 
needed, for his elevation for a 
sounder piTnciple to good citi- 
zenship. Our timid school heads 
couldn't find space for argument 
to justify a course other than 
in the domestic field. Yet 
there are available courses of- 
fering bookkeepmg, typing. 
electrical engineering, and what 
not. 


Can whites be sure that the 
reputed mental inferiority of the 
Negro is real? The fact that 
country Negroes are more un- 
couth than City Negroes raises 
doubts. When- we discover that 


cles. is survived bjf. many rela- | 
tives among them a sister, Mrs. f 
J. D. Artis, two nieces, Mrs. J. } 
H. Harrison an<J Mrs. H. C. 
Grant. Ralph W. Porter, all of i 
Los Angeles. ! 

Other relatives are: her child- ' 
ren, Eloise Scott Weston and : 
Samuel T. Scott Jr., vice prin- 1 
Cipal of San Antgnio High school ' 
department; sisters, Mrs. M. J. 
Moore of San .\ntonio and Mrs. 
F. L. Artis of Gonzales, one bro- 
ther. Noah White of Beaumont 
laeces and nephews, Mrs. Lola 
B. Taylor of San Anittnio and 
Rudolph H. Fortier. ' 

Mrs. Scott was prominently id- 
entified with the civic life of 
San Antonio as a member of the I 
Rising Star Chapter, No. 176. O. j 
E. S. and a devoted member of 
the Second Ba^Jtist church. 


SPEAKS AT INTERRACIAL MEETING 

JUDGE ARMOND W. SCOTT, Jodgo o( tke M i ini e lp al Caort of 
Oie District of Coinmbia, shown above in a neeat photo^a^ in 
his robCB U office. He was the priaeipBl speaker at an iatcmcial 
■Metiag last week at Jobn Hopkias Uairenity, Ba ltimT e, Md. 
The BMeting was sponsored by the Womears In t e iuii ti inl Lea- 
gue for Peyxe and Freedom. 


TENN. TO END LASHINGS 

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Nov. 10, 
(CNA) — Bowing to the demands 
of progressives to himianize the 
treatment jrf convicts, Tennessee 
will_ abandon prison stripes and 
lashings as disciplinary measures. 

Commissioner George Cate said 
however, discipline cells will be 

Addressing- a: capacity audience | Negro has played m this country I j^^^^j IJS*^^^ ^^Z\ 
., T -„-^>-__ ti_ii T_i u„_ 1 1 tu-. «iw,.,x h.. ™^. hivYiiaht tn I ™^es 01 solid concrete without 

wmdows. having little ventilation 


Judge Scott Urges Constont 
Warfare Against Jim Crow 

BALTIMORE. Md.. Nov. 10 — % program at Johns Hopkms. 


the intelligence quotient of rural 
have worked for this or t h at*! Negroes who have just come to 
concern. We saw or could find', town, is far below standard*, but 
only three Negroes in the entii* I from close check we find that aft- 


plant one porter and two trudc 
washers. However, we learned i 
that there was one more Negro 
belonging to this little family, • 
making a total of four in alL The ■ 
latter is the colored beer sales- ' 
man and he was on his route • 
trying to convince the Negroes \ 
as to the merits of Galveston i 
Houston Products: i 

Miss Anon* Srmth, director of ; 
the facility of Central High , 
School, a position which she has 
successfully held for several 
years, for some unknown reason I 
took time out from her official I 
duties last week to express per- 
sonal criticism of dance promoter 
Charles Shiro, and band leader ' 
Louie Armstrong, whose band 
played a dance at City Audi- 
torium Nov. 1. We don't know 
why Miss Smith found room for 
this criticism when there are so 
many Ungodly places within 
stone throwing distance of Cen- 
tral School, an institution dedi. 
cated by the Ux-pa>-ing citizens 
of Galveston. 54 years ago to 
elevate pur children to a .superior 
moral citizenship. If the authori- 
tie« will only look around tney 
will see less than forty feet n' :th 
of the school. The Red Rose, a 
licensed befer parlor which I 
know sells beer to children. And 
these children are students of 
Central School. On 26 avenue L, 
250 feet north of Central School, 
we have another l)eer house and 
on 27th and Avenue L, we have 
a drug store that sells har'd 
liquors. I wonder if Miss Smith 
knows about this. She is in this 
neighborhood every school day, 
but some times it's just hard for 
us to see in some directions. 


The owner of the City Hall 
Caah Grocery Store and Beer 

Tavern, located at 25th, H has 
remodeled his store, and employ- 
ed a white bartender, displaying 
signs "for White Only" although 
Negro trade made it possible for 
this man to realize this state of 
financial independence. Now I 
hope that you can see why 4t 
pays to patronize your race. 


er two, three or more yea-^^ in 
the city he improves in intelLi, 
gence, and surpasses the levels of 
whites of the same social class, 
thus we must decline to admit 
that mental superiority depends 
on the color of a person skir.. 
■There is no: the sUghtest scienti- 
fic proof tla*. "race' determines 
mentality, but there is over- 
whelming evidence that mental- 
ity IS u5luenced by traditional 
culture. 

Where are we going? I ask€d 
a little girl in the seventh grade 
if there were any colored angels 
in heaven. Her mind wondered 
in space ,a while then she told 
me that she didn't know, but 
would ask her mother. Farther 
along in the conversation I asked 
her who were somiC of the great- 
est Negroes of whom she knew. 
She told me Chick Webb and 
Louie Armstrong, the band lead- I 
ers. Her hobbies were football | 
and dancing, yet in this child , 
IS the riiaking of a fine woman , 
and a good citizen, if properly 
trained. 

I asked a little white chOd in 
the fifth grade, what did he in- | 
tend to be when he grew to be j 
a man. .Automatically his reply | 
was, "I am going to be a lawyer ; 
because niy daddy said that I - 
should be so." An4 nine out of 
ten chances, he wilTwind up be- 
ing a lawyer because this one 
point has been instilled in him 
from his early youth. I wonder 
if that day will ever arrive when 
I we will exercise this reasoning 
I with our children. 
, We need better schools and we 
1 need better teachers. 

1 DID YOU KNOW— The three 
I most important events in the his- 
tory of American slavery aU oc- 
cured on the same date. 

AprB 14, 1775 — First movement 
tc free American sl.-ves began in 
Philadelphia as Quakers organ; 
ized the first anti-slavery society 
^ith Benjamin Franklin as pres- 
ident. 

April 14. 1861— The American 
ficg was hauled down from Fort 
Sumter in Ci-arlestou, S. C. har- 
bor ae the War between the States 



in the Levering Hall, Johns Hop 
kins University Thursday night 
Honorable Armond W. Scott. 
judge of the Municipal Court of 
the District (^.Columbia, urged 
constant warfare against injtis. 
tices, discrimination and lower 
state. 

"This kind of a struggle is the 
only kind of war needed in a gov- 
ernment of, for. and by the peo- 
ple", said the speaker. 

Judge Scott was the principal 
speaker at a meeting of the Wo- 
men's Industrial League for 
Peace and Freedom. The audi- 
ence was a mixed one and in. 
eluded many of the leading judg- 
es of the state as well as promin- 
ent business, political and social 
leaders. It was the first tim.e a 
Negro has appeared on such a 


caUEENSBORO, N. C. Nov. 10, 
(CNA)— Charles Smith, Colum- 
bus County youtii, has been in 
North Carolina's Central Prison 
for two years under a sentence 
of deatti, later commuted to life 
imprisotiment for a crime which 
he 4aA not commit 

Sentenced for first degree bur- 
glary and criminal assault in 
1936, Smith lived for nine months 
in the shadow of the lethal gas 
chamber, while white tories 
throughout the state howled for 
the death of the "Negro rapist." 

Mrs. Sarah Lyles Britt the 
white w(>man who accused him of 
attacking her and whose positive 
indification of Smith as her as- 
sailant convicted him, this week 
told Paroles Commissioner Edwin 
GiU, "Charles Smith is innocent". 

Mrs. Britt haltingly dedared 
that she had never known posit- 
ively whettier Smith was the 
roan who entered her home and 
attacked her. "I admit I made a 
mistake," she confessed. ''Short- 
ly after the alarm went out 
Smith was brought' back in bad 
shape and bloddy. I didn't have 
any idea he was the man, but 
Arthur Carter, who arrested him, 
told me to say Smith was and 
stick to it, I haven't had any 
rest since." 

Smith's sent ence was commut- 
ed to life imprisonment April 3, 
1937 by Governor Hoey. 



■*** 





^ OUR REAJKItS' OPi 

^..^..^ SEND DiT roims 

CAN I GKT MT HONST BAGK*- 

Dear Mr. Law: T 

I have belonged to a white in- 
aorance company for ten years. 
I was elapsecha few days ago and 
a friend of mine told me that I 
cotild get some of my money 
bade, but the agent -say that I 
canX Please advise ine wUdfa te 

Mrs. Anny May Wlkon 
Ans. "fea, you maly collect 10 
per cent of the money that you 
have paid into the policy. I 
think that these figures are right 
but i£ you will take your old 
policy" to W. K. Hebert 2827 M^*, 
he will advise you as to what i 
steps to take in collection ,or you 
may contact John Clouser, Mrs. 
Mamie Thurston, 912— 33rd St, 
or Mr. AUen Scarlett 2617-K, 
rear up stairs. I am sure they 
will be in position to he^ you. 
And after this buy colored in- 
surance, I do know this, that 
white insurance companies is- 
sue three classes of p^icy, a. b. 
c.: — ^to white which pays the 
largest claims for the smallest 
premium. The Mexican runs sec_ 
«id and the Negro third. Itis I 
means that you pay twice as ! 
much as the white person and 
get half the amount in case of 
sickness or death and your buy- 
ing in white concerns is limited I 
only to certain classes of insur- ' 
ance. I 



SAIESMAN 


Dear Mr. Law. 

Here are my cwigratulations to 
Arthur Ray Humphrey for his 
nice poem on the Negro Race. It 
has found a space in my scrap- 
book. Com* on shoot the works, 
Arthur, we want to hear from 
you some more with this class 
of stuff. I save all things worth 
wbHe. That was a portion of your 
work that we all should keep. 

Sincerely, « 

HENRY LAMBERT, 

508 26th Street 


from the time he was brought to 
America to- the present. •'.\3 the 

Judge Scott traced the part the 
Negro himself, has advanced 
economically and culturally, he 
has become judicial arbiter with- 
in groups: of citizens dwelling 
within certain bounds, where 
clashes between the people are 
so common. As he has become 
culturally and economically 
equal to the national standards, 
he has been called to act for 
larger interests and causes more 
far-reaching." 

Judge Scott is in his fourth 
year as a member of the judiciary 
and has ^ade an enviable re. 
cord on tjie bench. During the 
month of October he is presiding 
over the Small Claims and Con- 
ciliation Branch of the Court, 


and no tvatural light 
The commissioner 


said blue 


Dear Mr. Law: 

I read your column last week 
in the Eagle and I think that it 
is forceful and up to the minute. 
If we had a few more writers 
like you, I think that we would 
see things as they are. 

Ifeel a< you do about colored 
women being in advertisemer.c 
that is placed in Negro business 
establishments. We do have 
beautiful 


EARL ST. lULIAN. 
at Melver's lewelry Store, mam .:: 
of the Citjfs Icodi^ cntfk .". 
Jewelers at! 2117 Av«HM D. — ; 
Yon can depend oa juilse H 
you get iaioA wtt HUm. ,.■ 
TEXAN SEEKS JDf-CBOW 
PARTITION^ ON BUSES 
—AUSTIN, T)e.. Nov. 10. <CNA)l 
—Stringent "^im Crow" laws for 
buses are not enough for Repres-. 
entative Harrell of Smit hville. 
The honorable rept-elect wants 
partitions to Separate- the Negro - 
from the whiite section. T 

He claims that the problem^ 
of keeping th i two races in their. 
respective is 'particularly aeote^ 
in counties hi ving a large Negro 
population, si ice the latter, in a 
crowded bus. will sometimes oc- 
cupy seats s<^ aside for whit* 
persons. 


1 just as any other race is. If we 


substituted for stripes. 


would try dotng something and 
stop talking apout what is need- 
ed, I know ^at we would get 
more considerations from busi. 
ness houses tqat we suiq>OTt. 

I know thati I enjoy looking at 
my colored i^romen. I jtist like- 
to look at liiefcn. 

Very trulv j yours. 
JEFFERSpN JONIS 


Galveston Junior C* of C. 
is Smooth-working Body 

By H. L. LAW ^some of the things that he said 

I attended a Junior Chamber j were true but the majority was 
of Commerce meeting recently in i plain hooie. 
Galveston. These youth's per- | We all kno-g^that Scott hasn't 
formed their duties with clock ' been out of Texas in 20 years 
like precision. That only masters i and I know that he doesn't know 
would be expected to duplicate. | what the fiegro is doing in and 
Each man was weU aware of the ! for America. It's men like Scott 
terms of his responsibilities., 

JoYm A. Forman, and Elisha Q. i 
Wright, minds behind the organi- i 
zation. said that the accuracy and i 
well timing are results of montiis 1 


Doesn't Her Hair 

LOOK PRETTY? 


GALVESTONIAN 

-MISS L. H. WRIGHT, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron 
Wright, 1316— 21st Street Gal- 
veston, and sister of ;>Irs. Fran. 
CIS Bryant, 40 E. 41st Street, 
Los Angles, 

UPRISING IN HAITI ■ 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti, Nov. 
10, 'CNA) — A huge demonstra- I 
tion 1 nthis city of workers de- j 
manding "work and bread" was 
ans^red with repressive meas- 
ures by the government,' includ- 
ing the arrest of seven Senators 
who expressed sympathy for the, 
demonstrators. 

Two newspapers were also sup- 
pressed by the government for 
publishing reports of the demon- 
stration and its demands for jobs 
and bread. 
Following the repressive acts 
I o f . t h 6 government several 
\ clasTies were reported between 
i civilians and the American-train- 
i ed Haitian gendarmerie. 

i ever slavery began. 
j .A.pril 14, ;365 — Abraham Lin- 
I coin, 56, enancipatoi of the slav- 
; es was fatilly shot in the back 
I of thtf head in Ford's theatre, 
I Wa^hingtcm at 10:30 p. m. 


of hard labor. "We did not go 
into this field of business direc- 
tion blindfolded.. We are well 
aware of the hardships that we 
mtist encounter in aU of our pro- 
jects. We know that the sharp 
tongues of the public will mark 
us as being too young and giddy 
to attempt an organization of 
this nature, but we are well 
pleased with our results so faf ." 
Forman, say that each man is a 
high school graduate with an 80 
per cent grade average through- 
out the four years, possessing a 
collective intelligent knowledge 
in general. The executive staff is 
composed of men with not less 
than three! years of college work 
in an accredited college with ma- 
jors in social industrial business 
and commercial science. Each 
man affUiated with this organiza. 
tion is sane, sober and of good 
family and most noteworthy, 
each man holds a health certifi- 
cate. 

Officers of the Junior Chamber 

of Commerce are: Elisha WrigTit, 

Executive Financial Secretary; 1 

John Foreman, Executive Chair- 

[ man; Eugene Curney, President; [ 

In reply to Mr. Scott's letter in , 
issue of the third (Nov. 3) about 
the word Negro and all of his 
ballyhoo about t h e progress oi! 
the Negro, Race, I think that Mr. 
Scott is a little off-balance in 
his statement I will admit that 


that start a lots of humbug. He 
finds fault! with everything and 
everybody but himself. Instead of 
helping the race, men like him 
tear it down, if people are weak 
enough to listen to his silly state- 

• ments. 

J Try to write something decent 

I the next time, Scott. 

j W. E FAIRFIELD, 

Te«as:City. Texas 

J Formed resident of Galveston 

DAILY NEWSP.'VPERS MUST 
FALL IN LLNE WITH W-H LAW 

1 WASHINGTON, Nov. 10, (CN 
A> — WagCi Hour Admiajstrator 
Elmer F. ■ Andrews ruled this 

. week daily newspapers are sub- 

I ject to terms of the Wage-Hour 

', Law. 


PLACE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 
FOR THE EAGLE WITH CUB 
TEXAS CORRESPONDENT 


Will we ever see the light? la 
every city in America most ot 
its Negro population must live 
in defined quartets. Only a few 
of us have wealth and fame, but 
those of us who are above two 
meals a day are too timid or sel- 
fish to attempt a program of 
race progress. Dtnow seevral men 
that could and woutld be of value 
to our community if thc^ were 
not too timid or for th« nMfat 
part-.stupid, to offer their ser- 
vices for race advancement. 

The foundation of a rice de- 
pends upon Education and Sound 
' Leadershipk- Our educational 
standards in the South are far 
below normal levels, and there 
ii a va7 little that, our so-called 
or wo(4d-bt leaden are .doiof 


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IT'S JUST AS EASY 
FOR YOU TO IM. 
PROVE THE AP- 
PEARANCE OF 
YOUR HAIR 



r 


FIR£! 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION 

i SOON TO BE ISSUED 

J BY , : • '^ ■ 

Rey. Clayton D. Rjussell 

; • i /— I : -i ' 

S«jnd your name now/to the Gi|ifomia Ea^le 
or People's Independent Church; of Christ, if 
you Wont to b amoh^ the first siubscribers, or 
Telephone PR-84]^ ' ' 

Tfc« F!oines of /'FIRE" will 9I0W on Rociol, 


ReKjj^iottS, Commantty, 
*«tt«iwl Affal 


Nati«n« 



liit«r- 


DRESS yoor hair this easy 
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25c. Trial size; Amber, 10c 
Sold by dealers^ everywhere. 


Uu Black and White Skin Se^ aa a ahawpoo in connection 
wiA Mogre, Black and White Hair DraMtag and Black and 
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MOGRO 


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Helps you to )ongef<-Iooking ^ 
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Keeps down "jumpy" hair. 
Trial size, 10c Large 


Give Tcbr Hair 
Lustre4 Sheen 

Use fanuM^ Black anl 
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Pint 20C 
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CHUJ PEPltRS Ptot ISC 

Pcanitt Bntter . Zii>.l9e 
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Macaroni Salad Pb.t ioc 
BaicedP orke Beans m 


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lADTS CHOICE 


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or 
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Each 


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CRANBERRY SAU(% it^c^IO^ 

OCEAN SPRAY— 17.0Z. Cans L.-each lOi/iC <^^r 

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MASON 


Sweet Potatoes'^' 


TARGET J^ ; #AJ^M 

C0RNBEEF^Z'°'Z9' 

LtBSY*S— i«'Og. Ciau, ca. 17c 


FOLGER'S 


COFFEE % 


2 lbs. SOc 
Lb... 26c 


LADY'S CHOICE ZZ^tz. Jar , 

nM^Vl 1?C SWEET NIPS 
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HARLOW— Plain or Toasted 14b. 

Marshmaliows V£Z 


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Sliced PEACHES O^ 

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,*t- 





WEIX, FOLKS, the elections 
are over. The big Circus 
tent ix folded up and stowed 
safely away until next time. 
Also the performers, acrobats, 
(of which we had several top- 
notchers in Califotnia) sleight- 
of-hand magicians, trapezists, 
and Bally-Hoo artists, at whose 
head we unhesitatingly place 
William Randolph Hearst; all 
of them are now talcing Rest- 
Cures and drinking soothing 
syrup to ally their inflamed 
throats. 

America has long been class- 
ed as a peaceful nation, and for 
the first time, I am beginning 
to se« How Come? It must be 
because we expend so much ep- 
ergy in periodital Wars of 
Words, ' that we have no 
strength left for the other 
/kind. If the people of Mars ev- 
mer did make an attempt to in- 
~ vade this country, I don't be- 
lieve they would dare come any 
closer than within radio wave 
tistance. Because the frantic 
appeals continuously broad- 
casted by our frenzied Radio 
Announcers, entreating them to 
buy everything imaginable, 
from chewing gum to china- 
ware; would undoubtedly 
throw them into a panic. They 
would zoom back to their 
Home-planet ina hurry, thank- 
ful (for the first time maybe) 
for its quiet restful atmosphere. 
Among the favorite bombs 
used by the newspaper frater- 
nity, the following three words, 
"Hurl". "I>robe". and "Loom", 
seem the most popular. Seems 
to me that each of these words 
have been used in headlines at 
least one-half a million times 
in the past year. They have 
been hurled at everything and 
everybody, from the President, 
down. Maybe some scientific 
genius will invent some sub- 
stitutes for these overworked 
verbs some day. I hop>€ so. 
SCHOOLS FOR VOTERS 

You know it has finally 
dawned upon me the reason 
why Democratic government 
has lost out so rapidly in EUiro- 
pean countries in the last few 
years. It must be because the 
Democratic . State or better its 
problems, develop faster than 
he thinking apparatus of its 
inhabitants. I believe this is un- 
eniably true in regard to the 
United States. Take the Twen- 
ty-five Amendm-nts to the 
voters of California on last 
Tuesday. I venture to say that ' 
fuUy fifty per cent of those 
who did vote, had not studied 
and carefully weighed the vari- 
ous propositions submitted to 
them: and that a large ma- 
jority voted yea or nay, on iJbie 
strength of somebody else's 
opinion. As to the remaining 
fifty per cent, I do not believe 
that over one-third of them 
could have made heads or tails 
of the various propositions 
even if they had taken the time 
to wade through them. For 
most of them contain issues 
that only well-informed minds 
could capably pass upon. 

So, the inherent weakness in 
Democratic Government may 
be the fact that we, the un-in- 
formed people, are compelled 
through ignorance, and inade- 
quate political training, to fol- 
low blindly the lead of some 
highpowered spell-binder; who 
for mercenary reasons of h i s 
own induces us to support this 
or that proposition. And the 
only remedy that I can see is 
Schools For Voters set up and 
supported-4)y the State. We'll 
have to have them sooner or 
later-or maybe something 
division. 

This bout shouldn't take 


John Henry Lewis and Joe Louid have b<«n .matched' forT the.' 
world's heavyweight diampionship. The fact that they aire^both 
Negroes'is iocidental-only a «nall part of the big'' picture. It really - 
is what it pretends to be, a contest lM>eled for "the world's heavy- 
weight boxing title" between two recognized representatives of that 

-^ mudi of a buitcr-up. Shapii^g 
up as a natural, Madison 
Square Garden shouldn't have 
seet» enough for the fight fars, 
come next January 27. 

We heard John Henry Lewis 
in a coast-to-coast broadcast 
early this week: If speaking 
with conviction means any- 
thing, John Henry is as good as 
in.. 

He says he can take Joe and 
has been wanting the chance 
for .the last three years to 
prove it. He says, too, that-' he 
has- good reason for the afore- 
mentioned wish because Joe is 
primarily a slugger and he, a 
boxer. On top of that, Lewis, 
who is the world's lightheavy- 
weight champion, says he has 
films of all Joe's fights and has 
studied them closely. 

Having expressed the belief 
that he can take the Brown 
Bomber, Lewis' was asked by 
his interviewer what was he 
going to do after he won the 
championship. To this, John 
Henry said he would defend it 
three or four times and then 
go to college to study business 
methods. 

From his remarks, one might 
well say fhat Johii Henry, stu- 
dious chap that he is, really 
means business—maybe, bad 
business fo» Joe! 

A top-notch glove-thrower 
for the past eight years, longer 
than Joe, by the way, Lewis is 
recognized as one of the finest 
boxers of the current crop. But 
at this remote date, v/e pick Joe 
to pin John Henry's ears back. 
Louis, besides being a slugger, 
is also a boxer of some repute 
and sometime during those fif- 
teen titular rounds ihe is apt 
to explode a left-hand or right- 
hand knockout bomb on his 
similar-named opponent. 



tbiTTie ivien , fyiajor\riim, ro 

Be SJibwn at!V«rhoii LiUrary 


evefybody ! ! 


^! 


PREDICTIONS: On the grid 
front, we are picking, on a 
hunch, the Washington Hus- 
kies over the University of 
California Trojans, the Uni- * 
versity of California at Los 
Angeles to win four in a row, 
downing the Wisconsin Badgers 
here at the C(riiseum. 

Next Tuesday night, Georgia 
Crouch takes on Jimmy Gar- 
rison in a rematch at the Olym- 
pic auditorium. Referee Lieut. 
Jack Kennedry drew the ire of 
press the last time the pair 
met a few weeks ago, when he 
was looking apparently the 
wrong way, giving the decision 
to Garrison. We are picking 
Crouch to leave no room for 
doubt come Tuesday. 

The p)Ostponement of the 
scheduled welterweight title 
match will do. Henry . "the 
Hank" Armstrong, defending 
champion, most of the good, we 
believe. And now, bolo punch 
or no, Armstrong should take 
Ceferino Garcia by a knockout 
That's November 25. 

The SpKDrts Fiesta, beginning 
next December 31, with the 
Santa Anita opening, through 
H U.ghtweight title match Jan- 
uary 15, showing Champion 
Henry Anhsfrong should be a 
Henry Armstrong should be a 
wow. It has everything, and 
here's hoping success for pro- 
moters and the fiesta itself. 



DID YCU KNOW— Thomas Jeff- 
erson spoke of slavery: I tremble 
for my country when I reflect 
that God is just; that his justice 
can not sleep forever. 


(NOTE: Thi$ column is edited by 3. Cullen Fentress and is spciisored by the Los Angeled branch of the 
Urban League. It is designed to bring to the attention of the public the work of specialists in -variods 
fields of endeavor who heretofore have escaped the notice of a jdb-conscipas citizenry. > Contribations 
are solicited. Write in care of Los Angeles Urban League, 2502 So. Gentn) Avenue J 

Sketch Subjects: ROY L. and MINNIE LOGGINS, Caterirs. 

By J. CULLEN FENTRESS 1 

Here's one man who honestly believes that he caniplease 
He is portly, affable, and middle-aged Roy L. Loggihs, whose foods in the 
. past few years have become the talk of Hollywood and Los Angjeles. 

. The story of Roy L. and Min- 
nie Loggins. out-Algers a Hora- 
tio Alger story. It begins back 
in 1931 when they had a party 
for a motion picture director. 
The food was good and so was 
the service. The word began 
to go around.. And then — 

Bryan Foy studios offered the 
Logginses their first opportuni- 
ty to develop their specialty — 
the location lunch. They serv- 
ed a Foy company on location 
at Wrigley Field during filming 
of scenes for a baseball comedy. 

The Logginses superlative 
foods soon had the celluloid 
makers' tongues wagging in 
earnest, and in 1935 their real 
work began. Republic studios 
offered them a chance to make 
good ther^ and now, among 
other studios, the Logginses ca- 
ter to Columbia Pictures Corp- 
oration. This business rela- 
tionship, their most lucrative, is 
in its second consecutive year. 

At times, they have taken 
care of three and four studios 
at once, this stage has been 
reached from as humble a be- 
ginning as one can imagine. 
From tbe days of rented dish- 
es, an improvised heater, an old, 
second-hand^ truck, etc., Roy 
and Minnie ' have grown into 
Loggins Food Products, with 
two late model closed trucks, a 
Pierce- Arrow, latest portable 
steam tables (designed by Mrs. 
.Loggins) for trucks and all oth- 
er equipment necessary for busy 
caterers in Los Angeles and 
Hollywood. Is a highly com- 
petitive field, their success has 
been all the more remarkable. 

Mr. and Mrs. Loggin-, came to 
California in 1916 from Dallas, 
Texas. -For 2ft years, he was in. 
the real' estate business. While 
dealing in , property, houses, 
etc., Loggins says his wife tri- 
ed to interest- him in catering, 
but he couldn't see-it. Follow- 
ing the crash in 1929, however, 
Loggins says, quite humorous- 
ly, that he began to , see her 
I>oint. 

The couple employs from 12 
to 20 people and just recently 
joined the Catering Employes 
Union, Local 582, an American 
Federation of Labor affiliate. 

The Logginses live at 1369 W. 
37th street here and have two 
boys, Roy jr., 17 years of age, 
and Arthur J., who is 12. As a 
result of years of hard work, 
they, are property owners, and 
now are rebuilding their cafe, 
located at 36th St and Noi'man- 
die avenue.. 

Believe in a thing, sacrifice, 
and stick to it, is the Loggins' 
formula for success. Their en- 
terprise, begun at scratch, and 


THE HOUSE THAT 

BLODGETT BUILT 

The home, shown above, of «> the added advantage of an oc- 


Bill Robinson, peer of tap dan- 
cers, was built by the Blodgett 
Building and Loan Co., after 
the architectural design of 
Paul R. Williams. 

Although not located in the 
Blodgett Tract, Robinison's home 
is exemplary of the show plac- 
es being built, on a more mod- 
erately-priced scale, in the 
community, sponsored by Blod- 
gett, at Imperial and Wads- 
worth avenue, 

Guiding genius of the Blod- 
gett Co. is Wesley Clark Blotf- 
gett, known by contemporar- 
ies for tils business acumen 
and shrewdness as "Sharkey". 
Blodgett has underway the er- 
ection of several "blue ribbon" 
bungalows. Latest of these to 
be completed is the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Oliver, 
846 East, lltitta Street. Five 
rooms of complete nroderr=*v. 
with surrounding space for 
lawns and gardening on the 
1000 square feet lot, is the Ol- 
iver's new residence. 

Medium price of the homes 
now under construction is S3000 
Blodgett said. Fully approved by 
the Federal Housing Adminis- 
traition, they are available on 
easy terms. "The tract has all 
improvements, lights, street 
work, gas and water and has 

now worth thousands, is a liv- 
ing monument to the Loggins 
business acumen. 


ean breeze. It is within the 
city limits. 

For further particulars, in- 
terested persons may consult 
"Sharkey" or his co-workers 
at the Blodgett Building, 2512 
Central avenoe, Adams 8614. 


.C 


*-^^' 



INTER-CLUB CAGE 
CALL ISSUED BY "Y" • 

First call for teams to enter 
the Inter-Club Basketbay Tour- 
nament was sounded this week 
-by-the 28th -StteetYMGft, spon- 
soring the event. Teams, wishing 
to play, are asked to come out 
Monday night at 8 p. m. 

DID YOU KNOW— Free Negroes 
in Maryland had a right to vote 
down to 1783. A law was passed 


THE BACK DOOR, "a novel by 

Julius R. Made, 310 pp. New 
. York: Longmans Green «nd 

Co., $2.50. 

By LOD LAYNE 

Insight sympathy, and imder- 
standing of the problems of the 
South have produced a remark- 
able volume in Julian R. Meade's 
"The Back Door," a novel just 
released by Longmans, Green 
and Company. 

In treating . the love story of 
Mary Lou Payton and J u n i e 
Gronn,.the author has deeply etch- 
ed a lasting picture of every day 
conditions facing the Negro be- 
low the Mjison-Dixon line. 

Back-door folk are depicted as 
those in domestic service for the 
whites, or as unskilled "hands" 
in tobacco factories. Their prob- 
lems are struglges engendered 
by suppression, repression, and 
oppression. Obtaining even the 
bare necessities of existence be- 
comes a task of gigantic propor- 
tion. 

The author has reproduced this 
picture with that forcefulness of 
style delivered only through the 
con-viction of simple prose. 

Junie, who works as a handy- 
man in a tobacco 'factory, and i 
Mary Lou. whose "love is no I 
one-time thing." are' looking for- 
ward to an early marriage. Prac- 1 
tically forced into doing so, Mary 
Lou quits her five dollar a week 
job as cook for the hateful Mrs. I 
Pugh, whose name adequately \ 
describes her. The loss of Mary ! new theatre 
Lou's meager weekly earnings is 
the first of a series of setbacks 
preventing the couple's saving 
of enough money for, the wed- 
ding, i 

Local police "raid" a harmless 
party the lovers attend,' and 
Junie's scant savings disappear 
in the payment of his fine. Even 
after the happy event does take 
place (through the benevolence 
of the son of Mary Lou's new 
employer, ominous clouds of dis- 
aster overshadow their lives. 
Working a round tobacco endang- 
ers Junie's health, and Mary 
Lou is constantly menaced by 
the unwanted attentions of a 
handsome but designing young 
white man. 

The novel is a literary sonata 
in the conventional three rnoye- 
ments.^ The only adverse criti- 
cism of the author's otherwise\su- 
perb treatment of his subject 
matter is that the adagio mo 
ment tends to drag. Meade's s: 


iliree Cdirry on 
Lectures 
iJoliiisdn df niTUi 

.^-NEW YORK, Not; i«, (Al«») 
^•The series of lectm** on tpe 
contributions of the Neff-o to the 
culture and economy ojF Aineri- 
can IHe, which have been con- 
ducted \ at New York -ipiiversity 
for the past th^pe yeirsjiy James 
Weldon Johnson up to tis death 
last June are being continued 
by three visiting lectt^rs this 
year, it was revealed '.^lfere this 
week., ■^'^■^.\ 

The men, who wift deliver 
three lecturers, each, iuod their 
topics are: J. Bipsamondilohnson, 
well-knOwn conmoser and broth- 
er of the late po«, on Negro mus- 
ic with probably additional lec- 
tures on the Negi*p's ■contrib^tion 
to the theatre; Sterling Brpwn, 
professor of literature at. How- 
ard U, 01^ the NeCTtj's contribu- 
tion to literature; \ and Waliter- 
■White, executive secretary of tbe 
National Association Vor the Ald- 
vancement of Colore<i People, on 
the Negro as a polii-Ucal factor, 
the Negro in court and\in history 
■White will give particu! 
eration to the prejudii 
ment of the Negro in 
textbooks, f 


%*f^4r*f^t vAll the boyA Pnd glrla in the 
-' iBKtside distrirt are phvited to 
attend a gala s^wing[of Louisa 
M- Alcott's ' m^orabOe classic, 
"Little Men", a Vnajot all-talk, 
ing motion pictiirV from Wam« 
Brothers Studio, ffeat^ring Dick- 
ie^ Moore, Cora Su^ (foD^s and 
Ral{4i Morgan, on ^Ftiday, Nov. 
18 at 3:30 p. m. and 7190 p. ni. at 
the Vernon Branch Lprary, 4504 
South Central Avenue it was an- 
nounced this week uy Miriam 
Matthews, head librs rian of the 
Vernon branch. 

The Show is being made poBfr 
ifale through Charlis Edwards, 
President of the Charles Edwards 
Productions, Inc. and photogra- ■'■> 
pher for the CALIFOkNIA EAG..«-: 
LE. Interested alwayi in promot- 4> 
ipg diild's welfare, the South ;/, 
Central Co-Ordinatihg Council, jf 
headed by Mrs. Baxter Duke, has i^, 
joined in sponsoring! this etiter- -S 
tainment by making .It pos^ble ;^ 
to secure the film, j ^. \ a'' 

This will mark the cTOfe of ihe-j: 
National Book Week! cefebration, '" 
November 14 to 19, al the Vernon .u'i 
Branch Library, accoiding' to Hel- '.) 
en Reynolds, the children's lib- >■ 
rarian. In order to '^rry out the i^ 
purpose of Book 'Wfcek to en_ 'jf- 
courage more and b^Jer reading 5r 


consid- t ^°r y°u"g people, 

treat-J seeking admission %i 

merican ' must present library 

has had books drawn 


la] 


on it son 
time during the week.. No new, 


cards wUl be issued 
1 and boys and girls 


Central avenue. \ 

Manila Smith; who graduated 
from U. C. L. A. last June with 


ch c h i 1 d _ 
the show % 
card which 

>ni^htk 


Library Bbok 
Club to M^et 

Sponsored by the '^s An 
chapters of the Alpha Kappa 
pha Sorority, the next\meeting\of 
the Vernon Library Book c 1 1 
will be hted during the Natioi 
Book Week on Wednesday even 
ing, November 16 at 8 o\clock in 
the library club room, \t504 S. ya Master's degree in 


on Friday 
the sev- 


enth to the ninth grades are ask- ' •! 
ed to attend the second perfor- ^ ' 
4 mance. 

Remembehr the date — J'riday, 
No\ember 18th ai 3;3| p. m. 9nd 
7:00 p. m. at the VerAon Branch. - 
Library, 4504 South Central Ave. ; 


'A 


cere sympathy is 
evident in such 
ironical phrases as 


recurrently 
delightfully 
"the fine 


ct as chairman for i 

resenting here Soron 
adden. Josephine Bl 
Sfce Prioleau Bowdan 
of \ Anne LindberghS 
thA Wind", Julian Me 
Back Door", -Dorothy lliompsop's 
'Refugees ". George" Sa ra's "The 
Healing Knife",- Arthtr Hertz- 


tWt had no seats 

for Negroes." \\ may not be t^o ^ ^ _ 

far-fetched to see in the character j learsV'The Horse arid BtggyDoc- 
of Warner Carey a self -Tjortrait ' tor" a\id "New York t anorama* 
of the author. 1 by the Federal Writen ' Project - 


tin will 
evening, 
Adelaide 
crctt and 

reviews . 
Listen to 
e's 'The 


FOUND! THE SECRET TO YOUTHFUL 
LOOKING HAIR... 


^ 


avte- 
si^ 


Life is so diifefcDt for )the woman wbo kaows 
this "»«cr«"— the e«sy iysy to ia»lte, »od k^p, 
b»ir youthful lookias. Wliiieyer its conditiooV— 
whether drab, lifeless, off-oplor, or streaked wii(i 
»"r— tMntle applicition of Godefro} 's Larieos^ 
Hair Colorins will make yomr Imt one even, lus-\ 
trons, natural, routhful-appcann^ color. No w^ui- 
inc. No disappointments^ Choice of 1 8 colors. 
Results most satisfy yon V dealer -will refund 
rour moocr. Don't -wait— »^ a bottle of Lanenic 

■-'Bi - ''■■ 


GODEFBOV*! 

If your dealer 
does net hov* 
ir, send $1.25 
direct to . . . 


in Virginia that they were not 
allowed to vote. 




HAIR COLORINI 

\J 0ODiFR«T MANUMCTUeiNG COMMNT • 3510 OLIVI ST. • $T. LOUlk,MO.* 
\^^^*'^* » 11,...^ i - i -i-L-L- - - i .nj-L i -Lr i - - - ■ - I ( i . '-L i u i . 


k 


3 Tie for Lead 
on Lincoln 
'U" Honor Roll 

Lincoln University, Jefferson 
City. Mo., Nov. 10, — A sophomore 
a juriior and a senior each made 
an average of 3.000 points for 
the second semester of tiie 1937- 
38 term at Lincoln University to 
make a blanket finish in the 
scholarship standings for that per- 
iod. The senior, Mallilieu Wool- 
folk, of St. Louis, is nov/ attend- 
ing graduate school at the Univ- 
ersity of Minnestoa. The junior, 
now in her last year of college, 
Miss Gertrude Whitley, of Kan- 
sas City, Mo., is a history major. 
The . Sophomore, Miss Ethel 
!Rhodes, is from St. Louis. 

Mrs. Jesnita Hughes, of Lee 
Angeles, California, who led the 
scHooI in scholarship during the 
first semester last year, stood at 
the top of the freshman listing 
with 2400 points. 

llie Greek letter organizations 
on the campus were led in schol- 
astic averages by the Alpha Kap- 
pa Alpha sorority with 2.165 
points. 


FIX YOUR ROOF NOW 

A^haltam Roof CMter 

PerGaLl«e 

«r 5 Gals. 79e vt It Gals. $1.59 

Heavy Asbestos Roof Coatef 

per GaL 3Se 

' M Ife. roofing, per zoU....|1.65 

' H. A, FAULK 

1216 W. Washington Street 

PK~2Sf9 




Prices at ANGELUS FUNERAL 
HOME are graduated to meet the 
needs of any fomily. 

Whether the means be ample, or ex- 
tremely limited, here will be found 
perfectly appointed services at prices 
exactly in keeping with circum- 


stances. 


Whatever the expt nditurci 1 every 
fomily may be ossured thiat at 
ANGELUS FUNERAL HOME there is 
but one stondard of servic4— the 
finest it is possible to render. 



''^^"-'■* the hell do you mean comi^' in jn' punchih' my fittle Silvester in 
eye. What if he wuz beatm' nie— -ain't I his?' 


NGEL 


EAST J I Ff E RJ5 O l|l\ B L\^D 



■T--^ 


Ai0« 2~B 



^ If Ypir Nr 14 ^'^ JJ^^CAIII^ORNIA f AGU You 



Know ft ^HoDDenei! 


Tfc"-»'l«T. N«t«mb«f 10,J51 


E E.:y I E W 

4Sf A>'^ Kinloch y 


^^jM^-^ :Mtr^:^^u, :pr[y,i^^ 





!fi' 


: Bjr JOHN KINLOCa 

The Bill Robinson comes 
throuSh. today with one of the 
most important and interesting 
pieces of entertainment current. 
iy circulating. 

It is the new edition of "Time 
Marches On." This particular e<U- 
tion further discloses the inside 
goings on of one Father Divine. 
The Messiah of thousaiKis of 
whites and Negroes is shown in 
his mansion, his kingdom, his 
.feasls. Rolls Royce, and assorted 
heavens. 

Chief emphasis is placed upon 
the new Krum Elbow estate, ad- 
jacent to the President's Hyde 
Park habitat Spencer Chatter, 
eccentric millionaire who deeded 
the property to Father, states his 
reason thereof and takes a right 
healthy swing at the administra- 
tion. 

Divine's vocabulary is display, 
ed rather to disadvantage. Sever- 
al meaningless strings of lengthy 
verbage pass the Messiah's lips 
Whidi would hj^ve been many 
times more effective if they were 
squelched along about the coUar- 
line. 

There was one extremely un- 
fwrtunate shot which revealed 
*'God" bouncing unglamoruosly 
uporr his nether portions. This 
tragic event occurred as Father 
emerged from a doorway in the 
Hudson River Kingdom. 

However, the economic philo. 
■ophy of the Divinites-t heir 
hiO'd work and vision is reveal- 
ed also. The various agrarian pur. 
■uits at Krum Elbow are seen and 
many Diving business establish- 
ments featured. 

.^Jso presented at the Bill Rob- 
liuon is "Letter of Introduction", 
■tarring the inimitable Charlie 
McCarthy. Incidentally, it is one 
of the season's better offerings. 


ON THE AIR 

By SALLYE BELL 

For Associated N^ro R-ess 
Hello, folks. In case you didn't 
know it, this is American Educa^ 
tion week, and part of its pro- 
gram includes a IS.minute nation 
wide radio broadcast Over NfiC's 
blue network on the major prob- 
lems affecting the education of 
Negroes. Carrington L. Davis, 
principafl of Dunbar Junior- 
Senior high school in Baltimore 
makes an address with music fur. 
nished by the Douglass High 
School chorus. The theme stres- 
ses the professional improve- 
ment of Negro teachers and the 
provision of better educational 
opportunities for Negro children 
I hope you hear it. i 

For you Western Coasters, the 
"Southern Serenade" presents 
Ruby Elzy, star in "Porgy and 
Bess", and currently appearing 
as Ella Jones in "Run Little 
ChUlun", in a program of tradi 
tional Negro songs and Literature 
with an organ accompaniment 
lormmg a beautiful background 
over station KEHE every Satur- 
day at 6 p. m. Those of you who 
are always searching for some- 
thing distinctive will appreciate 
this offering, and I hope you wiU 
show your appreciation tangibly 
by jottmg down a few lines and 
dispatching same to KEHE offi 
cials. 

History was made in New York 
last Sunday when the services 
Of the Refuge church, Bishop R 
C. Lawson, pastor, were telecast 
over sUtion WBNX. This mark- 
ed the first time in America that 
a rfnmister and his services were 
telecast, and Bishop Lawson, 
kno^ as the "Cry Loud, Cheer 
*'•- Weary Traveler" preacher, 



m;iC.llandy 

Hollywood film stars. Twenty world-famed dance" 
bands, a beauty and talent contest to pick "Miss Mo- 
tion Pictures" and celebration of the 61st birthday of 


Fisk U. 
Teacher 


Music 
Briiigs 


RADIO COMEDIANS 

J4CK BENNT and EOblE ANDEBSON, known u "tbochtaUt", 
u they appear In tbeir side s^ittinf ndlo program every San- 
day night over a ooast-to-co«st NBC networic Thrir "Jello" pro- 
gram is rated as one of the two beat prognuns currently on the 
air. (Axsoeiated Negro Preoe Pboto^ 


WiUiam C. Handy, "da«dy of 

Amreican blues," will feature the 
first annual jamboree of the 
American Federation of Musici- 
ans' local chapter on November 
21. 

Orchestras already lined up 
for the affair, to be staged at the 
Palomar, include those of Rudy 
Vallee, Ted Fio Rito, Robert 
Airobruster, Gene Krupa, Phil 
Harris, Ray Noble, Harry Owetis, 
Louis Prima, Shep Fields, Carol 
Lofner, Ben Pollack, Vido Mus- 
so, Biriy Mozet, Hal Grayson, 
Lary Kent and Matty Malneck. 

The Beauty and talent contest 
to be staged in conjimctibn with 
the jamboree will see 100 girls, 
finalists from a nation-wide en- 
try list, competing for the title of 
Miss Motion Pictures. Any yoimg 
woman between 18 and 25 mky 
entpr the contest, according to 
Dr. Leonard B. Stallcup, chair- 


man of the event Winning girl 
will receive a film contract with 
Paramount studios. 

The board, of judges for the 
contest is to be composed of lead- 
ing film directc;-s and stars. The 
Screen Actors guild has given 
its full endorsement to the event. 
Dr. StaUcup anpounced that con- 
test entrants may register at 1052 
West Sixth street 

The score of bands will play 
from 7 p. m. to 2 a. m., accord- 
ing to Dr. StaUcup. Each band, 
as it finishes its routine, is to 
play the famous "St Louis Bliies" 
in honor of the birthday of its 
composer. Handy, who will be 
listening in from New York to 
Hollywood's tribute to him as 
the "father of American blues". 
A similar celrt>ration at New 
York's Carnegie Hall will also 
honor Handy on the same even- 
ing. 


SUNDAY AT BILL ROBINSON 


the 


I 


>• 


•• . < 


Pfcture: "Men With Wings" 
Players: Fred McMurray, Ray 

Milland, Louise Campbell 
Place: Paramount 

There have been several 
strange things which emerged 
from Hollywood during the 
course of the past few months 
under the head' 'Epic" and 
"Saga" some have been down- 
right baloney; others fairly weU- 
done tripe. "Men With Wings" is 
the first real epic this year. 

The film faithfully recounts 
the history of modem aviation. 
In place of the extreme sensa- 
tionalism which stamps most 
aviation films, this one is sim- 
ple, honest and straightforward. 
Decline of the happy-go-lucky 
*bom" flyers is shown and the 

Ljnse of the technical expert re- 
vealed. I^red McMurray func- 
tions more than adequately as the 
lovable dare-devil and Ray Mil- 
land even better as his serious 
peL 

Surprize of the picture is Ut- 
ile Lotiiae Campbell, diminutive 
etar, who scores heavily as the 
•Tady of their loves". Donald 
O'Conner, who caused a near 
•enMtion in the Bing Crosby film 
*'Sing You Sinners", appears 
briefly as MacMurray, a young- 
ster. Virginia Weidler contributes 
» nicely balanced interpretation 
of young Louise CampbelL 

Director William Wellman re- 
mains faithful to his statement 
that he would "not make another 
black-and-white picture" made 
after tbte tremendous success of 
the technicolor, "A Star Is Bom". 
The brutal force Wellman 
achieves in his climactic passages 
is due, conversely, to the re- 
straint with which he hand' 
them. There are never over p' 
ed dramatics. Scenes which oi. 
directors play for all they - 
worth are dealt with tersely iy 
.^Wellman-with double the effect. 
The recent Carole Lombard- 
IVederic March "Nothing Sacred" 

. proved that this young gentle- 

y man can produce a brUliant. 
However, his more serious films 

, are his most iny)ortant contribu- 
tions. "A Star Is Bom" which 
retrieved Janet Gaynor from 
the cinematic ash-yard, and now 
"Men With Wings" attest to his 
great ability as a director of real 
drama. 

Mme. Ford in 
Dramatic Recital 

Madan* Elizabeth Ford, 
dramatic reader, opens the sec- 
ond Sunday Concert Series, next 
Sunday at 4:30 p. m.. Gray Mus- 
art 4068 Central Ave. 

Madame Ford is an artist of 
rare attainments, admirably 
schooled in her profession and is 
wellknown in San Francisco 
where she conducted her own 
school of Dramatic Expression. 
She wiD be rememljered for her 
excellent performance as assist- 
ing artist on last year's concert 
series. 

She offers a well balanced pro- 
gram in which humor, pathos and 
dramatic intensity are combined. 

Paidine Wilkerson, soprano; 
June Stevenson, pianist; and 
Phyllis Kelson, accompanist are 
assistant performers. . Admission 
is 35 c ents. 

SUCCESS OF "BLONDIE" 
STARtS NEW SERIES 

"Blondie" made her movie de- 
but in Hollywood last week. 

She captured the hearts of sev- 
eral thousand people at a loc- 
al theatre, and endeared herself 
to a large group of newspaper 
correroondents representing pub- 
lications throughout the world. 

As a result, "Blondie" will re- 
main in the movies for a long 
time, and Columbia Studios are 
already planning the second of 
the seriiss baaed on Chic Young's 
popular comic strip feature. 


was chosen for this initial experi- 
ment because of the widespread 
interest In his work in Hariem 
and because he has been on the 
air for over a year. 

The set over which, the services 
were televised was invented by 
Edwai-d Spear, a young colored 
man from Georgia, who has made 
one of the greatest contribution! 
to radio this year. 

Bishop Lawson, considered 
unique m his field because he 
preaches an every day religion, 
is bLshop over 200 churches, one 
Of which is, an Italian church in 
Staten island: the others are 
scattered from the British West 

J^ Jf ^^^°Y^^ ^« C"^al Zone 
to the Northeastern states. 

Gettin' in th' groove," we 
note that Cab Calloway' has 
written another edition of his 

2nn ;*?P^^' T'^'"^ l^ts about 
200 of the Harlemese expressions 

rnrb^J"^"^, -^^ '"^"y 35 were 
included m his original dicUon- 

^•.,y^*" y°^ »re a "hep cat" 
f°"" have to wait for the dL- 
tnbution of this new glossary to 
define such terms as "frompy" ^ 
"pounders", "cubby " "f a7, Vf •' 

lnH''".l^t"£:."Wu4sanlyaU'' 
and "jeff". Prof. Calloway has 

^ i^J not definitely HaFlemese 
^i^"*r "^tho many authentic 
Jive terms have been adopted 
♦Zk *.^^« fans, such as "jit 

n1»n"* • ^^ ^'-^^^^ Profesior 
plans to conduct a "jive univer 

S* C^^ ^^B broadcasts from 
the Cotton club, teaching H a r- 
J*™^«. to his radio fans, using 
the dcitionary as a text-bo ok. 

Pastor Sabbath to 
Oeliver Stirring 
Sermon Tonight 

Quoting from the Psalm, "De 
fool sayed in his heart, 'Dere 
ain;t no God," Parson Sabbath 
delivers a stirring sermon in to- 
night's "Shout HaUelujah" pro- 
gram. 

"De Asbestos Kids" is the tit- 
le of this aU Negro "Green Pas- 
tures of radio" presentation 
which relates, in Parson Sab- 
bath s inimitable style, the story 
Of the Hebrew children who 


Presenting Eddie Anderson: 
'Rocheste? to Benny, You 

HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 10, (ANP)— Eddie Anderson owes his pres- 
ent position as Jack Benny's "air valet" to his inability to leave the 
dinner table. The bewildering Rochester, who exasperates his boss 
with his laziness and larceny each Sunday night over the NBC-Red 
network, might have been a jockey rather than a radio and screen 
comedian with a string of his^ 


were thrown into the fiery fur- 
nace for refusing to worship Neb- 
uchadnezzar's golden image. 

The Parson wans that, just as 
the ChHdren of Isreal strayed 
after the golden calf, many today 
are pursuing "the golden eagle". 
..CK ^f°,/*y°'"it«s heard on the 
Shout HaUelujah" program are 
Lester Wilkins, Eari Smith, Ear] 
Hall, Artis Ward, Cephus Doug- 
las and Charles Hawkins. 

GOODMAN ARRANGER~ 
IS HONORED 

, /^MILTON. Bermuda. Nov. 10, 
(ANP)— Last Monday a reception 
promoted by several local musi 
cians, was given at the Albert 
Guest house in honor of Edgar 
Sampson, the composer and ar- 
ranger for Benny Goodman's or- 
chestra. Sampson wrote Stomp- 
mg at the Savoy. 


own thoroughbreds if he'd prac- 
ticed a little more restraint at 
mealtimes as a boy. 

Because Eddie decided he pre- 
ferred second helpings to spurs 
and saddle, he deserted the pad- 
docks for the footlights at the 
age of 13. Bom in Oakland, Cilif, 
Eddie ferried across the bay with 
a dime he'd found and won an 
amateur contest in a San Fran. 
Cisco vaudeville house. 

During the next few months, 
Eddie would have had no trouble 
meJsing his weight had he decid- 
ed to return to the race track. 
He spent most of his time on an 
enforced diet But finally, having 
established himself as a comed- 
ian with a versatile hoofing act 
to boot, he began to get better 
bookings. 

It was during his vaudeville 
days in the East that Eddie first 
met Jack Benny. They just shook 
hands— nothing more. But Jack 
remembered Eddie's name as well 
as his act, a fact which was to 
pave the way to Anderson's ev- 
entual selection as "Rochester". 
"NOAH" IN THE PASTURES 

Like many another vaudevill. 
ian, Eddie drifted back home to 
California and -into pictures when 
the f our-a-day circuits folded. Af- 
ter a series of minor roles, Eddie 
first attracted attention as 'Noah' 
in "Green Pastures", and was 
hailed by critics everywhere for 
his whimsical characterization. 

A year later Jack Benny de. 
cided he needed a "valet". When 
he issued his audition caU, Jack 
made sure that Eddie, whose 
work he remembered, was invit- 
ed to try out The following Sun- 
day, "Rochester" was bom. To- 
he's one of the most popular sup. 
porting characters in the Benny 
gang. » * 

A bom complement to tbe Ben- 
ny type of cemedian, Rochester 
never Has to rebearse a Uae 
twice. He is one actor on whom 
Jack can depend for super-fire 
laughs, and is never caught off 
balance by any of the boss's "ad 
lib" cracks. Possessed of a re- 
markable memory, Eddie osually 
knows his lines by heart at 
broadcast time, and seldom refers 
to his script. 

After his radio debut Anderson 
was more and more in demand 
for picture parts. He's appeared 
in an even dozen since the first 
of the year, but will be best re- 
membered for his scene-steal- 
ing performance in "Jezebel" and 
as Donald in "You Can't Take It 
With You". 

Always true to hla first lore- 
horses— the first thiBf Eddie did 
when prosperity came his way 
was to bny three theronghbreds, 
and help to train tliem liimaelf. 


One little brown mare is ezpee. 
ted to do great things during the 
Santa Anita season this year. 

spare time taking pni 

Unmarried, "Rochester" lives 
with his mother and sister in 
Hollywood where he spends hii 
spare time taking them for 
cruizes in his trim little yacht — 
that is, when he's not eating some 
of his mother's good home cook- 
ing. 


King Sings to 
Large Audience 

INDIANAPOLIS. Ind.. Nov. 10. 
fBy Arthur W. Womack for AN 
P) — ^When Luther King, tenor, 
appeared here last week in re- 
cital at Greater Phillips C. M. E. 
temple he sang before one of the 
largest audiences ever assembled 
for such an occasion. 

Mr. King, "a Califomian, who 
is considered by critics as one of 
the finest singers on the concert 
stage, rendered an unforgettable 
version of "The Crucifixion" un- 
accompanied by his pianist, Jean 
Houston who had arranged the 
number. These two youno- people, 
both of exceptional ability, were 
praised for a fine musical pro- 
gram. 



Egon Petri Here 

NASHVILLE, i Tenn., Nov. 10. 
(ANP)— When Egon Petri, noted 
European musician, arrived in 
Nashville last week, he was 

•greeted by William Alien, form. 

er pupil who was instrumental in j ^ 
pjersuading him to make an Am- - 
erican concert tour. Allen, in- 
strqctor in the music deparbnent 
of Fisk university, studied under 
him in London and in Poland, 
where Petri conducts a summer 
class for 12 atpecially selected 
students. 

The Fisk concert was given in ' 
Fisk Memorial chapel, and in. { 
eluded works of Liszt, Bach, | 
Schumann, Rachmaninoff a n d | 
Chopin. Other concerts are to be 
given at West Virginia state col- , 
lege, Augustana college, State 
Teachers college of North Dako- 
ta and Howard university. ^ 

The Howard concert is schedul. 
ed for TuMday, Nov. 15 follow- 
ing which the pianist will go to 
New York for an NBC broad- 
cast. He then sails on "niursday. 
Nov. 18, for England where hf 
will play an engagement at Ox- 
ford university from which be 
recently received an honorary 
degree of doctor of music. 


^MuficiProgram 

\ The Sunday «Aool and th«B 
Y. P. U., of Friendship BaptW 
Siurch, Pasadena are preaeuUUI 
sotoe of this city's most able ta* 
ent in a musical broadcast pror 
gram to be held Sunday «vo^\| 
November IS at 7:30 — *-" ^ 


&doek. 


•t U "ftlly. widely-kBDWi 
theatre owner and optniae. 


BR.Cl.K-BI- 1 



mr 


James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in "The Shopworn Angel" 

'Run, Little Chillun' Run 
Continues Until Christmas 


Shuffle Along 
Premieres ot 
Tally's Tonite 

"Shuffle Along 1939" will have 
its world stage premiere at the 
Criterion theatre, Los Angeles, 
Thursday night November 16, it 
is announced by Alfred Butts, 
producer. The production stars 
Miller and Memtan, Hattie Noel, 
and 60 fast stepping, torrid sing- 
ing sepia artists. Francis A. Man- 
gan, internationally known for 
his stage hits, is director of the 
musical stage revue. 

The out-of-towners attending 
the Wednesday and Saturday 
afternoon performances see the 
splendid stage show and may re- 
turn to their respective cities at 
an early hour, it is pointed out 


A 
OELICIOUS 
COUDRNC 

REFRESHMG 

AND 
STIMULATM&J 


5 


{ 


•MSiSf 



^'^'^\%" 


FUL. 


WORTH A Ul.Wl 


As '^un. Little Chillun", cur- 
rent Federal Mayan Theatre hit, 
entered its 17th successful week 
last night, announcement was 
made to the cast that the folk 
drama by Hall Johnson will con- 
tinue until December 25. 

Down in the actors' waiting 
room of the Mayan Theatre, cele- 
brities from all walks of life 
gather nightly to greet the play- 
ers before the curtain rises at 
8:30 p. m. 

There one hears stories of old 
troupers that make up many of 
the interesting, legends of the 


Visit ("Ted's") WestsideCafe 


DID YOU KNOW— The first Ne. 
gro to be elpcted member of Phi 
BMa itappa fraternity was Ed- 
i^ard A. Bouchel, 1874, Yile Uni- 
iversity. 


VISIT ' 

Charlies Cafe 

For The 

Best Chinese Food on The Arenue 

Americon Dishes en Ord«r 

Speciolizing in Fresh Shrimps Served any Style 
:. Soft Drinks 

Optfn 11 A. M.— 1 A. M; 
ADams 9084 


4169 Ctntrtl AiliNiiit 


We Cater To forties 


ly 

z 

Q. 
%/% 

o 

I- 

< 


111 
iD 

Z 
< 
X 

u 


o 


3567 SO. WESTERN AVE. 

PHONE: PA. 9221 

DINE , 

BEER 

• WINE 

Good Old Southern Barbecue 

PRiTAKED BJ 

HENRY COMJ'TON 
All Kinds of Sondwiches Made to Toke Out 

Bar Service -:- Tables for Ladies 


Theo. Garrett 

Formerly Chef Cook 

STEVENS CAFE 

Oakland, Calif. 


Henry Compton 

Ten Year< with 

SUNSET GOLF CLUB 

Lea Anfeles, Calif. 


PROPRIETORS 


For The> Discriminating— 

DUNBAR 
rf COdKTAlj. S 
I LOUNGE 


HATTIE McDANIELS 
IN NEW PICTURE 

HOLLYWOOD, Nov, 10, (AN 
P), — Hattie McDaniels, has re- 
cently completed work in the 
new Joan Crawford opus, "Shin, 
ing Hour" at Metro-Goldwyn 
Mayer Studios. 


theatre from "flesh artists" who 
have thrilled vast audiences all 
over the land—in hamlets and 
metropolis alike. 


OFFICE OPENS 

WEEKDAYS 8:^ 

Sat-Son. 1:20 


BILL 


4319 SOUTH 

CENTRAL A1X 

TeL AD-7SI7 


I 


Savoy Theatre 


SUN.. MON., TUBS. 

JAMES CAGNEY and 
PAT O'BRIEN 

IN 

'Boy Meets Girl' 

ALSO 
PETER LCMtRE 

IN ' 

Takes a Chance 
Mr. Motto 


CARTOON, NEWS. COMEDY 


Robinson 


3 Doys— Starts Sunday, Nov. 1 3th 

FREE TURKEYS - Monday, Nov. 14 


MrMJJ:I>MJ:U 


An Informal Atmosphere Enhqnc^ by Superb 

Cocktails — Finest Liquors— DeLuxe Dinners. 

Your Cordiol Hoi»--l1ARflY SPATES 

4227 So. Centrql t :|i * ' 12^ At>Qm$4201 



New 


THEATRE 


CASINO 


1605 E. Vernon 


AD-13751 


FRI., SAT. NOV. 11, 12 

Madge Evaaa— Piesteo Foster 

"Army Girl" 

BUCK JONES la 

"Law of Th* Texant" 

$50 FREE SAT . NITE 

SUN.— TUBS. NOV. 13—18 
JamiM Cagney— Pat O'Brien 

'Boy Mctets Girl' 

ALSO 

"HIGGINS FAMILY" 

wild BBI Hlckofc ft Cartoon 

WED., THURS. NOV. 16-17 
Baby KMler, JTames E3Iiaaa 

"MOTHER CAREY'S 
CHICKENS" 

RAMON NAVASBO in 

"Desparote Advantura" 
Andy Clyde Comedy dc Cartom 

$50 FREE WED. NITE 



Margaret Sullavan 


4 Days — Starts Wednesday, Nov. 16tli 


'ALEXANDER'S RAGTIME BAND' 

with Tyrone Power - Alice Faye - Don Ameche 

COMPANION FEATURE^— 

'TOUNG FUGITIVES" with Rolwrt Wilcn 


\ 


-C 


$500 Giant Keno Tue., Thurs., Sat. 


'94CCENTRAL i^itaSS PR5759 


SUN.. MON.. ' 


XDUtTS 
C hildren 

start! Sua. at l\ 

IIT FEATURI 


-NOV. 1S.14.U 


W ;:, R N E R 


.BAXTER 

U GtVE , 
MnUON 


IIUl 


ARLtENWKELAN 


PLAY l«NOhW«^w»y, Tl.««|.y\~iii^ 


NICK HARRIS!i!S^^3^;H^«?^0A 


TESTBHONT IN 
Worii WMe Servlee— So wby tonaln fai donbi Let 
▼erifrior di^nve your aaqAuens. StrieOy eonfiden 
iee. nee emwnlatlon. AIw vfff^ ciffHta uid Snadays NI( 



CBIMMINALCHt 
nuaUjr or bnrin^ tnii 

Detecttw, 4U W. tth^ 


-•err- 


\ 


H. 


Thmnaaf, N«¥ttniber 10 1938 


DOWN IN 
FRONT 


'.ewi$-Lpuis i^ight to 
Lewis First Tosle of Dough 

MKW YOBK. Nov. 10 (ANP>-^Jgfat Hecvyweicht dumpkm 

jfaa Hazy Lewis, kept oat of the big money b»>o»e ht lefnM^ 

3 sign with the czar of boxing, Mike Jacobs, capitulated last week. 

Et irB meet that other Louis, the one named Joe, for tne world's 

heavyweight crown in Madtaon SQiaie Gezdan on Jaaoary 27. 

» Tlie match, annotmcement of 
artiieh came as a sorprise to fistic 
eirdaa^ win pit together boxers 
for the fiat aU-eolored heavy- 
weight fi^it on American soiL 

It win set at rest dtarges heard 
in bome quartos that the Brown 
Bomber had drawn tKe color line 
and it wiH establish definitely 
whether or not sudi a match wHl 
draw dollar money. 

It will also give John Henry 
Lewis a chance to make heavy 
sugar, not only on Jan. 27, but 
povibly for the next five years, 
for Ja(»fas will sign him to a five 
year exclusive contract should he 
defeat Joe. The Ughtheavy champ 
although holding the crown for 
three years, has made money in 
only one fight, that against Len 
Harvey in London when he col- 
lected $20,00a 

COLLSCTKn <3,5(K) 
ON GAINKS 

Previously Lewis had been of- 
fered a contract by Jacobs, but 
Manager Gus Greeiilee turned it 
down, stating he .was opposed to 
Uncle Mike's stranglehold on box. 
ing. As a result, Jqjin Henry 
cbuld get no bouts ttiat would 
draw wisll, fcff Jacobs had corner- 
ed practically every fighter of im- 
pcrtance. The powerful promoter 
also suceeded in having the New 
York Boxing commission declare 
John Henry's title vacant Lewis 
best chance in considerable time 
to line his coffers came when he 
was engaged to fight Two-Ton 
Tony Galento last summer in 
Philadelphia — only to have Tony 
floored by pneumonia a few days 
before the match. Tor defending 
his crown recently against Al 
Gainer, week before last, he col_ 
lected about $3,500. 

Aotording to Joe, the oppon- 
ent doesn't matter, just so long 
as he fights. He will draw 40 
percent (rf the gate, which pres- 
ent estimates put at $100,000 and 
Lewis will take away 17^ per- 
cent 

Only other fight for the heavy, 
weight crown between Negroes 
was in Paris in 1913 between Jack 
Johns«Mi and Ben J : hnson. 

While moat exp: s are eoHfl- 
deat Joe will di^iose of his lesa 
heavy namf ke in the same ef- 
fideat maimer he has eonqaered 
ottaoa, a good boat is predicted. 
Levis is eoaentially a poneher 
who base* well; Lewis is the 
cleverest boxer ia heavier class- 
es today and has a capable 
pnaefa. Jaek Jotataoa went on 
leeord a few years ago with the 
statowrat that John was a better 
maa thaa Joe, althongk the see. 
ood Sdmieiiag fight may have 
eaaaed him to dnajge his mind. 

Louis may be anywhere up to 
20 poimds heavier than^ John Hen- 
ry, since the latter fights best at 
around 182. Lewis has never been 
knocked out in 100 fights. 

Contracts will be signed Nov. 
25. 


tf You Foil T& Reo d THi CALIFOltWU EAO^ You May Never Kncru U Hoppened 


By 

aOBTS HINDU 

Last year about this time, toe 
.>fotion's Press seixed upon the 
feats on Oie gridiron of one half- 
back with Syracuse University, 
Syracuse, New York. As the youth 
answered to the queer-soundmg 
name of Witanetfa Sidat-Singh, 
coupled with a fair skin and rath- 
er straight hair, he was "diacov- 
ered" to be a Hindu- 

Sin^'s physical appearance 
'wouldn't have fboled any of his 
own race for a moment, although 
ru admit they were stumped by 
the name. Finally, an enterpris- 
ing New York Amsterdam News 
reporter broke the word that 
■Singh was about as much Hindu 
aa flat-foot fioogie. 

£astem reports place Sin^ 
nearly on par with Kenny Waaiu 
ington as far as passing a foot- 

/ball is concerned. The following 
iaformatiain on the "Harlem His- 
da"^ am giving to you jxist as 
it was proferred me by the ath- 
letic news department of Singh's 
alma mater. 

- 'Sindat-Sini^ was bom 20 
, years ago in Washington, D. C, 
as the son of Elias and Pauline 
Miner Webb, Negroes. His father 
di«l when he was five and just 
starting Public School Na 5 in 
the nation's capital. Two years 
later, his mother was married to 
Samuel Sidat-Singh, an East In_ 
dian Out of Medical college two 
years and just starting practice 
in Washington. The family, witii 
Wihneth given the name of his 
step father, legally, moved to 

■ New York City and he «irolled 
in Dewitt Clinton High school 

"Wn played football, basket- 
ball and other sports, but became 
so good in basketball, Harold Re- 
gan, his coach, forbid him to 
play footbaU. Jle liked football 
though, and played in sandlot 
competition being recognized as 
a fine halfback on the 135th St 
YMCA eleven. 

"Arriving at Syracnso three 
years ago, Wil did not feel good 
enough to report for frosh foot- 
ball He was the keyman on the 
frosh basketban team and has 
been a star with the varsity bas- 
ketball team for the past two 
seasons. 

"Roy Simmon*. Asst. FootbaU 
Coach, spotted Sidat_Singh piay- 
^Ing halfloack on an intramnral 
^team two years ago and asked to 
him at varsity football prac- 
tice. Sidat-Singh reported to 
sprmg^' football practice and don- 
ned a uniform for the finrt time 
■s a member of a weU-organized 
football squad. Coach Ossie Solem 
liked Wil's clever basketball feint 
that he uses so well to shake off 
tacklers and his ability to handle 
the football as well as he docj 
the basketbaU. In the Cornell i 
game last year he was givra i 
his first chance and made a won- 
derful debut into Intercollegiate \ 
competition. Wil only scored one 
touchdown last year (mtercept. ' 
Ing a pass in the last period of 
Penn SUte game for the winning 
touchdown), but he was instru- 
mental in brining about many 
other scores. His clever running 
form and deadly accurate passes 
havo made him the moat feared 
gjneoai offenstva player (or to 
MO a term tacked on him by the 
fcawifi HI men around theae 
parts — As gangrtars are listed in 
Ibt Public &iemy No. 1 Class 
wa SidatJ«iBgh is the footbaU 
- No. 1 of Syracuse's oppon- 


Mommoth /Sports Fiesta' 



UMUiifc 


r|-fi%-^ft'^-;^^; 


G>lored Sloiri hce Mi 
Diamond Aces ot Wri 


An totds kad to Wrigley neU ed *^eain"Steiaer 

nMt SuaOtj, reason befe« »- membeti of the 

other wmter season ba s e ball ^ — > i^mmm fai • 

between the crw* Nat- r~~? '^"^'"-" • 


iWy 

a pkk* 


bin last 

, — en me crscx rra»- sanday. The Latins sfaigaad three 

umal Mexico team, champitms of -lee'^dMrs fiwn tbofaomid in 


Mexico, and a picked team of 
Coloied- All Stats, tnm Major 
Colored Leagues. 


be 0|>ener wbidi 
1-4 score. 
The Coast _ 
lUs Mexican team has the for onty a few scat 


wfaole town 


\ 


A galaxy ot major 9(fft emts^ 
has been lined up for the first 
anmial "SPORTS nESTA" to be 
ctKiducted in Southern California 
December 31 to Jan. IS. Carietsn 
the newly act Nov. 29 ^te for r. Burfce. president of the Sports- 
man's As^tdatioo, anooonced to. 

day. ^ 

Magnitude of the "HESTA" is 
expected to attract thou- 
anda of additional vitftan to 
Southern California. 
I baugurated by the gala open- 
ing a! Uie Santa Anita racing sea- 
son Dec 31 the 'TIESTA'' will 
zoom with unalMitcd variety thru 
a 16 day calendar of "big league" 
sport events. 

The 

Dec 31 — Saata Anita opea- 
iag, Jaa. 2 — ^Toamameat of Ros- 
ea Footkan lisiiii, Jan. 4— Saa- 
ta Anita "SPOBTS FIESTA" 
Handkap, Jan. S— East-West 
Hoekey Blateb, Jaa. (, 7, S, t. 
— Fenrteenth Annoal Lea An- 
geles Open CMf Tonnameat, 
Jaa 10 — Henry Armstrong, 
worid's cluuni^on U^htweigU 
boxing title boot, Jan. 15— 
World's Professional Football 


'for tlie^JIexicaa 
tales, one of the ft 

)cfaen to beat Urn 
was chaaed firom 

Set for Dec 31 to Jon. 15^^^^*^ 

RED BURMAN TO FIGHT Lo« Dial^manager 
^OSCOE TOLES wed All-Stars, who 


rrbe following is the official 
raeord to date for Sidat-Singh in 
Om foDowinc games (Clarkson, 
lUrylacod, Caroell, Michigan 
State) WU has completed IS 
passes oat of 38 attempts for a 
total yardage gain of 301 yards. 
Be t»M gained a first down each 
attempt or averaged ten yards a 
try . . . and an average of 24- 


Poige's Onlv 
Superior to 
Pitch Sunday 

Backed up by his newly ar- 
rived teammates who hiuried 
here with him froza the East, 
Bill Jefferson, crack pitcher of 
the Negro National League, will 
display his wares for coast fans 
for the first time Sunday in a 
Winter League game at White 
Sox Paric AU over the east in 
the drcoit of ttie Negro National 
League ia wliidi he plays all 
summer, Jefferson is classed ss 
equal to Satdid Paige. 

It was Jefferson, who flrst cob- 
Tiaced baaebaH fans througboot 
the country tiiat Paige was not 
invincible by beating him, a 
tri<* few of the wWte major lea- 
gue pitdieis have been able to 
do. Three other new playen, 
sent here to strengthen the Giant 
ehib, are Kimbro, Mos5 tad 
Walker. 

SANOIEGO ALL 
COAST LEAGUESS 

Facing the (Giants will be Jie 


KENNY Wii»iu.«u.^«^-«~ -ttux u^j/taa d^gtaan liawaiian* 

Bruins Heeded for Bowl 
or Date with U.of Honolulu 

If there was anybody whom the victory of U. S. C. over Calif- 
ornia pleased more than-^&e Trojans themselves, it was El Bruin out 
at Westwood Guldi. But the varying degrees of jtiiulasoe being 
e x p r e ss ed out on the Udan training field these days, grows not out 
of any spirit of altruism. Rather the Trojans by their noble feat last 
Saturday, set the stage for a cli-^ 
matic ending to the Udan season 
as well as their own. 

The secret of the Westwooder's 
happiness is' this. With California 
defeated by U. S. C. either the 
Bruins may vanquish all pend- 
ing opposition, including S. C. 
and playing in the Rose BowL Or 
shoijld U. S. C spike their hopes 
and cop the coveted New Year's 
date for themselves the Bruins, 
take a jaimt . to Hawaii for a 
Christmas present, meeting the 
University of Honolulu on, or ab- 
out, December 24! 

TTiafs inside information, fans, 
but you can take it from me. It's 
as authentic as anything ever is 
these days. 

Full of quiet determination, 
the Bruins, 34 strong arrived 
home last Mcmday nighj after a 
five day trip, during which they 


and Wasliington passed to Har- 
ris and the SO, from wiiich he ag- 
ain sicirted right end for a tally. 
Brain passes to the tall 
wingman. Strode, attained great- 
er success Saturday than in any 
of tlie Udans, previous games 
Due probebly to previous practiee 
sessions in frhidi the plt^ers fir- 
ed passes at the star. Strode nab- 
bed three for considerable yard- 
age. —A. D. 


Bulldogs Tie 
San Pedro 
in League Tilt 

5000 grid fans gathered at Man- 


J -.. _. -_^ .•„ „„ f«,-4«„ 1 Chester Playground, saw the Ross 

scored their first wm on foreign , ^^^^^^ Bulldogs first and only 

colored football eleven in the 


yards a completion . . -.for a total*, g^j] Diego Farleys, inclodlng 


o< ttfm tondidowoa through the 
air ^ . ' H^»* has averaged a little 
diort of five yards a play frorr. 
. the line of scrimmage-that is 
running phqra." 

Jeff Grid Ace 
Reels Off 
Longest Run 

Fast-stepping Joe Black, the 
Jefferson ^«h Sdiool q>ark ping 
tomed in prepdom's longest run 
for a touchodwn tiiis season, dis- 
pite the defeat of his team last 
tMday aftsmooa by the Wadiing- 
tf^. Generals, If-l? 

^Rla«*. an end player and one ; 9th inning after many substitn- 
0* the best hi the dty at that I tions both skies tiiey had passed 
noaition, ran 84 yards to score ttie Detroiters to the tune of 5. 
Il^ina BD. taking the bell traa The second gam e was not started 

on account of daikjiess. 


Herman PHlete and Howard 
Craighead, pitchers from the 
Padres; BiU Starr and Harold 
Doerr, catchesa; Spence Harris, 
lb; Pete Coseorart. 2b; Jos. Cos- 
corart, cf ; Ernie Holmes of Tulsa, 
3b; Tfed Durant, manager of the 
Hollywood Padres, if; and Eill 
Ckey, left fields, who was just 
signied by the Brooidyn Dodgers 
with a bonus of $4,000. 

WHRC KINGS or 8E-SAW 
GAME FBOM DETROIT Sft-lS 

Regardless of the foot-ball like 
score. White Kings, 21 Detroit 
Stars, IS, Sunday's game was 
exciting. Starting off with homers, 
the White Kings soon had the 
Stars in a hole from which they 
pulled to get 2 ahead. But by tiie 


soil, over the Wasliington SUte 
Cougars, 21-0, in the little town 
of Pullman. The determination 
enshrouding the Bruins is to turn 
back Wisconsin, whom they meet 
in the Coliseum Saturday, U. S. 
C. and Oregon State, in consec- 
utive order, thus making the first 
U. C. L. A. team ever to play in 
the Rose BowL And should U, S. 
C rend these plans asunder, the 
determination continues, to l«ul 
enough moral sui^ort to the Tro- 
jans to get them into the Rose 
B<^I and nab the Hawaiian trip 
for them selves 
UMHCXT 

Tbt two Bruins, with whom I 
am most conoemad. Kenny Wash- 
ington aod Woodrow Strode, 
dropped off the San Joa<tuin 
Spedal with nary a scratdi and 
only one complaint, that of the 
terrific cold up North. They said 
the weather was overcast like a 
pendBig snowstorm and the ben- 
ches were slide wiQi ice. 

Not tkat cMber ef Oe two had 
mndi time to ptrti* the beaefa. 
Strode played sliaist a fan three 
qaartets and WaAlactaa aeaily 
thai $atk of Oem stSCTed. with 
Washington's playtag so sfeetac- 
abBly briOiaat as to eoafle Us 
aaaw witk AP-American 


Washingtoo's two toudidowns 
to whifdi he galloped on 40 and 
50 yard runs placed him on par 
with Vie Bottexi in scoring av- 
eraces. Bottart. until Saturday 
was leading the Conference;. 

One of the touchdowns, the first 
in the game, came about a^en 
Strode blocked a pant with his 
cheat in the second period on the 
Cougar 39-7anl line. From a 
sprtad formation, the Brain spec- 
iality, Washhuton loped, in his 
jitterbug fashion, 40 yards to 
seoca. In fbe same period, the 
Brains took Ow ball on their 34 


City Playground League hold the 
heavier, hi^ily touted San Pedro 
Long^oremen; to a 8-6 tie last 
Sunday afternoon. 

Sunday's game was the ttdid 
of the league season. The Ban- 
dogs have a record of two wins 
and one tie. 

Right end R. Bobby carried the 
bell over the goel Ime from tiie 
Lcmgdioremen's five yard line 
for fb* Bulldog's seot% coming 
in the first quarter. 

"nw game opened wtfli the Bull- 
dogs idcldng off to tlie Long- 
shoremen, K. Woodruff return- 
ing the ball 22 yards. A punt 
on the fourth down was blodced 
by Bush Manson, coach, mana- 
ger and riglit goard, par excell- 
ence, and reco ve red on the 25- 
yard line. From then on the peas- 
mg combixuktion of Bobby, Har- 
ms, Scales and McKlnney alter- 
nated in passing ttie ball down 
to the five yard line from wiiich 
point, Bobby carried it over. The 
conversion try failed. 

The Long Shoremen's right 
halfbadc, Woodrtiff and FuHbadc 
Jones went to work behind a 
200 pound line to tie the score. 

Sunday fbt Bulldogs win meet 
the Manchester A. C at the Man- 
chester playgrormds, 8800 S. 
Hoover street The game win be 
caUed at 2 p. m. 


On Nov. 1 wnue going through 
final Iiml>aing up excrdaes for 
the Garcia bout, aehednled for 
file next night, Honudda Henry 
slipped aaa ML .Examination 
showad a back injury, which is 
expected to heal before tlie end 
of th!3 week. Bat before this ac. 
cident, some of tb» wise boys 
who saw A r m str o ng hi training 
went aroond shaking their heads. 
PO<» CONRION 

There is a definite impression 
in some eirdas that the champion 
is in no condition to take on audi 
a powerful puncher as the Fili- 
pino. In his last fight, the One 
in which he lifted Lou AmbMa' 
lightweight crown, the little 
battler sustained a severely cut 
lip, and the first hard pundi 
he takes may rip the wound open. 
These observers declare that the 
desire of Manager Eddie Meade 
and Promoter Mike Jacobs for 
cash has caused them to rush 
Henry back to the ring when he 
should still be convalescing. They 
also doubt tliat the back injury 
will be completely cared by Nov. 
25. 

There are also rumors here 
to the effect that Oarda ia destin- 
ed to emerge from the boot with 
tha welterweight crown. This 
talk has it that Armstrong may 
be an innocent victim of inside 
manipulations, and that the haste 
witit which he has been thrown 
into a match with Gerda, despite 
his physical disabilities is a meth- 
od of insuring victory tor the 
hard punching Filipino. 

Lincoln Tigers in I 
Footboll Finale 

Lincoln Uhlversity, Jeffenon 
City. Mo.. Nov. lO. (Special)— 
Tlie 1938 footbaU seascm will 
come to a dose for the Lincoln i 
University (Mo) squad, Satur- 
day, November 19 in Jefferson 
City. The opening team is ttiis 
engagement will be Tennessee 
Stete College of 
NashvilW, Tenn. 
When the 
Tomessee and 
Missouri teams 
Tnet in Nashville 
last year, they 
ought doggedly 
to a 0-0 tie, 
Tennessee 
tlireatened t fl 
score on several 
occasions bat a 
line repulsed ev- 
ery effort TSiis year will find 
the two squads about equally 
matched. Tjneoln will go into 
the encounter sli^tly handicap- 
pad throogh dw loss of a first- 
string tacue, Leooazd S be e d. who 
was eaUed home last wedc Leo- 
nard's brotlier Maorie^ is just 
fn»n a Hospital in St Looia auf- 
faring trom a ligameBt taar re- 
ceived in the west VirgfaiiB ^nne. 
John Huglies; first-string guard, 
iajnred ra tlM tiiird gnae ot ttie 
season, the one with Philander 
Smith CoOefe, is back in the 
line-up now and is one of the 
reasons why no heavy scoring 
has been made against the Misa- 
oori team ao far ttda seaaon. 


last Sunday's game, 
NEW YORK Nov. 10 TANP)— ers he had figured 
Clarence "Red" Btmnaa. pro- beat Oie Medcaa 
tege of Jack Dempse:', and Boscoe Polytechnic high ' i 
tScb, knockout conq u ero r of will send Cher T 
Jimmy Adamick who was him- i the best Colored 
self defeated bv Willie Reddish, ' country against the 
win meet in a iQ roai.J boot at^ er house gang". The! tarfn biS 
Olyrr'jic Stadi-im, Detroit, on , games start in the Wrikley neU, 
ifov. 11 ' 42nd and Avalon,\at 9^0 P. M. 



MENS 'NSU^ 


CLOr 


Interspeiaed tliroughout the 
cavalcade of major events will 
be other sports attractions. Ne- 
gotiations are being conductea for 
a professional tennis tournament 
and an intersectional intercolleg- 
iate oasketball series. There may 
be an East- West high school fOot_ 
bell title game. 

The Rose Bowl footbaD game,' 
Santa Anita, and the Los Angelei 
Open Golf tournament are ev- 
ents of esublisbed repute in 
Southern California, but the U|^t- 
weigfat title fight wiU be the 
first local appearance of Arm- 
strong, Oxt great fighter arlw 
captured three world's boxing 
diampionship m one year. 

Louis, made his first visit to Hot 
Springs last week. 






mmA 

Sayi George: Why get Ilqver at 


JACK BLACKBURN 
VISITS HOT SPRINGS 

HOT SPRINGS, Ark., Nov. 10, 
(ANP)--Jack Blackbure, trataer 
of Heavjrwtiffat ^ Champion eJe 


the best fsrlea 

MEDICINAL SPIRITS 
VmiSKEY 

$3.25 

Full Qt. 

Phaae for Free Deiirery 

2729 S. Central 

A0~91 10 


'm0r 


PAY CASH mmL 

SHOP OUT OF THE 
HIGH RENT BISTRICT 

CmillTRVIBIKI 
make \^ 

SUITS 3' 

iQPCOim 

«MlHTVnHlwB 

Pamts 

Mm Uhst nuJeU 
eutd patients 


icvBN»i$**sas 


30O2^'« 

1 utiCOKOlTKMAllY 

'fcsrsi'S'SfiBi 


Guarantee 
azicse 


UE», 


^5a^. 


INSURED ^CLOTHES 


300 Sa SPRING ^.'^Cat.tfZri 


\ ofn EvenMGs mi a sat. 


I >o> 


niit*jaanGoiAnr\ 


MENS INSURED 


! 



Dont pay opr^Xxtra Penny 

llENTISTRV 


Dh.Qnirt»t 

Says You CAM 

iffetJ dmUl attoiSm 

RKSHT Noy y 


FILLINGS 

CftOWftS 

INLAYS 

BRIDGEWORK 

PLATEWORK 

X-RAY 


NEW 
LOW 
PRICES 


lavtlssf BV Ubeni aee Ose- 


I #11] preve tihat 
tlgM eew m7 prieee are 
leir u than at aa^ ttme Avt- 
las the paut decade, snd I 
partinOarly can yoor at- 
^eatioa to the Great Vaion 
I am eCfering on both per- 
ai a B e ■ t and ramovabli 
ftrldr* work. !teg&r(fleaii 
a( whatever branch o( 
Dentistry you may desire. 

to Dr. Oo' 
the asvoraBce of being able 
o 


rw wfB ae lea««r fad ysi| I 
aflerd nmxnTATK iae t al a*- 


aauBjr of the oonunTmitT*^ 

wt wage-eantera. D ^# 

talk witk thein they 

yee Ikat Or. Csw«b% 

V0m Fricaa aaa Llbet ^, ■w.w» ~ 

eoabled tkea to have Clflffintt. 

nnaocial dtfflcnltT. Cona^to and 
talk ever .*t>«r detttal tJMt i « iBii 
wva- -^ witboot obncaaia. 


atas^ttng up, taking 
pant formation m the Bret nve 
Bmmtea of the initial quartar. 
Ma-r Tafoya, attempting a line 
buck, failai to convert. 

•niat put the Democrats oiit 
Id fnot and although they hung 
op another toachdown and a aaf- 
ely, ov ei co n fidence coet ftem the 
ban fame by fonr points. 

WaaUn^oBTa ctrength 1^ in 
• pH^Tai^ck th^^^ not 
m aptctacnla r as P»lfeaflP% a 
Jot more cuusblem. 

Conch Swede tmin^ Jordan 
adtnol BoUdMi h^ to 
'onbeaten -e-ord nrday afiar- 
in ta'^'ng Wilson ffi^ at 
WSsoo, 28-0. 


Berkowitz also hit a heme ran, 
and IGSer, Lfaulell and Macon 
I lodced out three baggen. Wade 
Donn. and Garia bK two-be'^^erL 
The White Klnci need Johnaon, 
Llndell and Schafer op tbe 
moond, while the Star* itsed 
Thomas Flenooy, Young and Ma- 


Harris 

Scott 

Austin 

Warroi 

Janes 

McGoran 

aobby 

Scale s 

Polndexter 

McKfauey 

CW»cy 



8PL 

I- 

Thomas 

L. E. 

Metzger 

I*T. 

Raaaerino 

L.G. 

. Bodin 

C 

raDc 

B. O. 

J. Bodin 

R-T. S. 

Thomas 

R. B. L. 

Dhrena 

Q. 

Van Ankets 

L. H. 

Conaty 

B. H. 

WoodruS 

F. 

Jonea 


SATCHEL PAGrS MASTER 

(SPEEDBALL JEFFERSON) 

White Sox Park Winter League 

ROYAL GIANTS ^». 
I SAN DIEGO 

Sunday, Nov 13th, 1 :30 P. M. 

SmSATIONAL DOUBLE-HEADER 
ADMISSION 40e— 85c Phom CE: 1 1833 


in ^1* iSastem Lea«ae, stopped 
Bdl h; 31-0. fM- the first vie- 
tOTv ?B ten TeaiB. 

PcV+~.».nic Hi* adMMl »- 
rr^'^-^ ,* ♦»„ Twttcar of rtse 'wep 
TM -^h - >rorafHat»^ atfir^lcis- 
^erp'* Itp '"inlinglnii l^aik h» a 


BASE BALLi 


COLORED NATIONAL LEAGUE ALL STARS 

LOU DIALS. Mgr. CHESTEB WILUAMS, Civtaih 

COIDORA-- VERACRUZ — MEXICO 

tKZKXyS PlMnSIONAL IStt UAOVB ALL^REABS 

WRIGLEY FIELD 

iUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13—12:30 P. M. 
46e S?-« 55e «!?«'««75€ __ 15fe 



BRUCE'S 

' Diuretic Medicine 

KNtjWEAK KIDNEYS AND BLADDER 
OP Nnam, BUBMiNO dbirb 


BRUCE'S DRUG STORE 
1400 South Gentrol Avenue 


mWIB: 


IBBBOnJTBBT 


I^.L-:.i-l- 


\ 



» poartble (or roa to abtaia dental «lat« 
wStb a tfoMi raarablaiiee tbaa vnr taiwa 
vm'% 3wm ciah« Tea mast mm Om 
of xiiM BUM and dtdamt DnPoat 

■aMila] «c _ _ " ■ 

lu -numJ atmvth. aad. mo**' 
aa. tt« fcatheruc* inlaM Mat |i m «»■ 
••Btlal for t&« eoBlcrt •( (ista-aoann. 
At :a« iva or ohtaaa d it i l piaaa tkat 
an •• -VatorUbr ■MaciM'^Faa aO aa- 


AlaoLo^ 

»ant*»**»*i 
SeaDiaC* 


\ DR.COWE>^ 

CnEDITDDnBTa 

506 SOUTH HILL STi 

Oal Dnc mm * * a i narj 



1U. VDIari IIU 


OPEN SUNPAYS 


Or.Joch 


H 


n 




. -ri r .. \ 


THI WBrSGRIATlST WEEKLY *^^^- u i^|v,-. - 




■tt GMtnl At««m. Eiltend as S«mM CIub Matter, VOL. 59^-NL>. 31 
n, l»IS.-«t tke r«BC-(Mnee at Lm Aagdca, CaUf^ oadMr 
*• Act «( Hank IS, 1S79. Si^MtMpOM S.H p« jtu; 5e »er >«py. 
tM« New«M>Eii » AM.mariTvfrioii octtutno by aho nm rm ntb^ op this coMMumrY to present the Hem or the day. foster SEtieR race reUtions, lead puilic OPiHJOfi ano t6 



■S' , "'• 


, .-«,'• 


Lalifornia 

if editorial Ml 



-;.».; f.v, ,: 


■?iy^ 


L/Tv^'^ 


Put me in remsmbrance: i«l' us plead togethcHr: deckire tfiou. Hi : at thoiii moyest !»• justified." — ISAIAH XLlH:26. 


' 3 



e-td:! 






f' 


THURS., NQV: 1^, 1938;^ 

■I I. ■■ .-■ .i \ . -i,. ■■■. '«y.- . \'.-' ^.^f.' i J i i-fi ■ < 

CONT^D FOP THECONSTnunoiiAL RMlVn AT ALLTM^ AMD IN ALL 




PHONi ADA MS y3 0^ 

PUtLI&IMTI1iniMS4IIO^nACSM roN AU 


SiriH 



. t 


HOW AIOUT IT, MR. MAYOR? 

The suggestion presented last 
we^k in the Eagle that Newton 
Street Police station operqte with a 
FULL representation of Negroes in 
oil fines has stirred great interest 
and conriment in the community. 
^ -^ i . ' But the idea was put forward with 
no designs upion interest or comrrtent 
alone. "We crave action !" The newly 
appointed Police Commission could 
well prove its fairness and interracial 
vision if it made possible on orgoni- 
zotion at Newton Street employing 
Negroes in all branches. In the great 
downtown* ff ices, colored applicants 
' are ignored. There you will find no 
Negro officer, clerk, 'phone operator, 
or police official of any kind. There- 
fore it is an economic necessity that 
adequate representation be forth- 
coming from the local station. 

So, Mr. Mayor and brethren of the 
Commission, how about it? 


20 YEARS LATER . . . 

Twenty years ago the world rang 
with the news that the World War 
was over. Over? The world war had 
just begun. Today there ore more air 
machines, more artillery, " more in- 
fantry, more supplies to offer the God 
of War than ever before in the his- 
tory of man. 

"When you stop to think of it "it 
is a very oold phrase usualy employed 
to prefix a very old thought. Howev- 
er — let us stop and think. Think: 
Seven 'thousand years of civilization 
arvd nations have not yet learned the 
waste, horror, and futility of War. It 
is almost ludicrous to see men speak 
in terms of gunsfcnd troops instead of 
right and justice. We teach chil- 
dren the ways of arbitration. A thous- 
and times a day little ones take their 
arguments, fully as vital to them as 
the great problems of Europeans are 
to us, into "court" for Mother or Dad 
to decide. And when they fight, it is 
soon forgotten. But these roe chil- 
dren. Elders are for too wise to talk 
their problems through; think them 
through. Far too mature to fight — 
and forget. 


NAZIS AND GANGSTERS 

It appears that the German gov- 
ernment is highly dissatisfied with 
American civilization. Recently, 
Nazi newspapers hove reiterated the 
unquestionable fact thot the U. S. 
population is composed mostly of in- 
dividuals combining the talents of Al 
Capone, "Legs" Diamond, and the 
late, lamented John Dillinger, 

It seems also that our chief nation- 
al pastime is, briefly, "Spitting their 
gum against the walls of their 
houses". 

This accusation from brother Hit- 
fer is rvDt to be scoffed. If American 
gangsterism is disgraceful and out- 
rageous, certainly he is an authority 
to tell us about it Here is a young 
man who has turned what once was 
termed "criminal ethics" into the 
most potent political force in the 
world. 

Even so, however, we feel that 
some d|efense of this country should 
be forthcoming. It is all quite true 
that a certain proportfon of our pop- 
ulation derives its income from vari- 
ous uriderworld pursuits. Then, too, 
there ore portions gf the notion in 
V^ich on occasional burning or 
lynching of a fellow citizen is impera- 
tive for the well-being of the comi 
mun j.ty. 

We do not wove the fidg with on^ 
pious notion that we of America ore 
so gl'-powerfully good that the oc- 
currences under Hitler cfre too, too 
shocking. We will not keep up the 
ridiculous comedy begun by certain 
United States writers who deem the 
slightest hint that off is not well h|prf 
tr^ixttrWege^ It 1s onJy thot mony^ 
foctsi pertaining to Qsrmon/s own 
jpackyard are not very nice nor, in- 


deed, at all unlike the very gangt 
ster ism" which Hitler's mouthpieces , 
deride in this country. , . s- :;;. ::fyi#' 

The Jewish press and metrdpoli- , 
ton papers in general hove gone over 
the injustice to that group. 1 1 would 
be trite to repeat the mony instancejs : 
of Nazi abuse and injustice •toward 
them. All the world is acquainted 
with the flight of one Albert Ein- 
stein, the greatest intellect of our 
age, from the confines of German 
domino^on. Of course, this gentle- 
man, suffering the common misfor- 
tune with Christ — being a Jew— was 
entirely too low-bfow for association 
with such lordly creatures as the 
high Aryan regime now in power. 
The mere presence of the man was 
discomforting. Somehow his genius 
hinted that the mentality of the 
world was NOT manufactured, trans- 
ported, and distributed to Nazis ex- 
clusively. Any men becoming a 
symbol of such an obvious untruth, 
of course, should suffer immediate 
deportation. 

Perhaps Hitler does not core to re- 
member it just now, but there was a 
time when the Italians were termed 
by him, "swarthy, stunted, unintelli- 
gent people". Now that Mussolini 
has sef n the light, all this has chang- 
ed. No longer are the Italians the 
worst of humans. They ore only one 
or two notches below Germans them- 
selves in collective mentality, today. 

Now, we do not claim that the 
United States government has not 
pulled some very funny stuff in the 
past one hundred and fifty years, 
but we do believe that Old Glory has 
never turned coat with such dispatch 
or finesse. An American double- 
cross, and there have been many, is a 
ponderous thing — giving full warn- 
ing to the proposed victims. At least, 
this illustrates that our nation of 
"gangsters" harbors SOME consci- 
ence. 

But, perhaps, we waste our breath. 
The Nazi press is a very stubborn 
thing. Almost a year ago Hitleri^on 
publications reported that the Am- 
erican city of Los Angeles had slid 
into the sea. The story still goes. 




ENGLAND STILL "GIVING AWAY" 
WHAT SHE'NEVER POSSESSED 

By William Pickens For ANP 

The most marvelous ochievement 
of Hitler has not been the winning 
over of Mussolini, for Mussolini 
found himself in the some situation 
with Hitler with reference to England 
and France; nor was it the winning 
over of Japan, for the Japanese found 
themselves literally pushed into the 
"totalitarian" block by the hostility 
of white nations to their attack on 
China. But Hitler's masterpiece is 
the hypnotising of Neville Chamber- 
lain, Prime Minister of Britain. 

Not satisfied with delivering to 
Hitler Czechoslovakia, and all the 
rest of central and southeastern Eu- 
rope, and with reducing France -to a 
vassal, Mr. Chamberlain is now plan- 
ning to give Mussolini free title to 
Ethiopia, — a coun'-ry of block people 
whose freedom anredates that of any 
European nation, and who hod not 
been conquered even by the Romans. 
And incidentally the Mussolini-Hit- 
ler group will get Spain, if Chamber- 
lain con deliver it. 

Everybody else in the world, except 
Chamberlain, knows that Mussolini's 
"withdrawal" from Spain is a dom- 
shom. Let us see: He withdrew only} 
SOME of ^he troops which he sent tor 
Spain 18 months ago! That is, he! 
withdrew the wounded, tired, home- 
sick, worn-out legionnaires. It is 
quite a commentary on the numberj 
he has in Spain today, when we re-l 
fleet that he could still withdrqw 10,^' 
000 men who have been there "more 
than 18 months", — without touch- 
ing those who hove been sent In 
great hordes during that last 18 
rripnths. 



THE WORLD THIS WEEK 

By ROBERT PATTERSON 


DEATH FROM THE SKY . 

The threat of death-dealing war in the air, of 
poison gas, and sinister rays, hongs like o shadowy 
cloud over all people today. This fear was not pres- 
ent forty years ago when H. G. Wells spun out his 
fantasy about an invasion of Martian monsters 
equipped with a death ray. Then his story of de- 
struction from the sky had the elements of horrh- 
less romancing. And as for airplanes, some of their 
most enthusiastic supporters, including Wells him- 
self, thought it would be another generation before 
such machines would be practicable — for war br 
peace But the wizardry of science has moved, 
quickly since 1900, and terror from the skies is no 
longer a myth. If radio audiences were recently 
panic-stricken by f ictionized reports of on appall- , 
ing disaster descending upon them from the heav- 
ens it was because the people of Paris, London, Ma- 
drid, Nanking, Shanghai, and Hankow have also 
learned since 1914, to look heavenward, not for 
mercy, but for the rain of death. If we must hove 
disaster preparedness, doubtless the Army could 
supply the civilian population with training less ob- 
jectionably than the radio has done. 
HISTORY RACES TODAY 

Judging from Japan's recent replies to Ameri- 
can protests, the Open Door in China is due to take 
its place with the Versailles Treaty, European war- 
debts, and other pieces of history's obsolete bric-a- 
brac. The Nine-power pact, recognizing equal 
rights among all nations in China, though only a 
few years old, hod its birth in on era when the writ- 
ten pledge of a nation meqnt what it said — not the , 
opposite. To all intents and purposes that poet 
might hove been written in reverse English. That 
would at least account for the backward march of 
honor and integrity among nations. ■* 

CRAZY? GOOD! YOU CAN DRIVE 

Just because a court has declared you men- 
tally incompetent is no proof you ore not legally 
qualified to drive an automobile! If someone 
should assert this to you, don't start backing away 
from him. It's the truth. He con prove his claim 
with last week's ruling by State's Attorney General 
U. S. Webb, affirming the right of a mentally in- 
competent person to hold o driver's license. Yet 
the importance of highway arteries to California's 
business, trade, and recreation — and to the lives of 
the millions who use them! — suggest that they ore 
entitled to all the order, sanity, and sofety, we can 
provide. At least, that has been tradit'orial state 
policy, with public safety campaigns^ a statesman- 
like highway carriers' act to protect intro-state 
commerce from the ravages of Cut-throdt competi- 
tion, and continuous program to re-align, re- 
route, and re-build dangerous and obsolescent^ 
roads. These three are essential, orderly policies, 
but as for opening highways' to known irresponsi- 
blesy even Sandy himself might oping, "I- hoe" me 
doots!", 
RECESSION IN RELIEF .. ^ . 

WPA rolls fall wheh business rjses, and the 
growing indusfrior revival finds its counterpart in 
lessening nurnbers of WPA job-holders. Acting Ad- 
ministrator Williams reported last v^'eek that in 
September - 228,000 persons — thre^-fourths of 
themj voluntarily — [left ith^ir relief jobs, most of 
them ito enter pHvote employment. A few months 
ago ;^elief rolls hod soared to a; record high. Their 
cuirejrit declihe is the ki^d bf a fall tl-iat morks an 
upturn! America can tbk«l a recession — plenty of 
'ern! — ^in relief roll figures.! 


/':A, 


^GACIOUS 
^YINGSI 


7 


City 


Dr. George Parrish, 
Health Officer says: 
1 "Unto us are committed im- 
^rtantk he^th trusts, which w* 
hold, not merely in out own 

• behalf, but for the benefit of 
others. If we dischare the ob- 
ligations of our trusteeship, we 
shall enjoy present strength, 

usefulness, and length of days; 
but if we fail in their perfor- 
mance, then inefficiency, incap- 
acity and sickness will follow, 
the. sequel of which are pain 
and death. Let us then prove 
worthy of this generous com, 

I mission that we may enjoy the 
delicious fruitage of honest 
sweetest o[ all pleasures, 4he 

toil and faithful obedience. 

• • • • 

'Too many persons appear 
to thiijk that the chief end of 
Ufe is gratification rather than 

useful endeavor. 

• • • • 

"Health and disease are phy- 
sical conditions upon which 
pleasure and pain, success and 
failure, depend. Every indiv- 
idual gain increases public gain. 

• • • • 

"The eye is the organ through 
which we perceive, by the ag- 
ency of light, aU. the varied 
dimensions, relations, positions 
and visible qualities of exter- 
nal objects. It receives out_ 
ward impressions and in man, 
reflects all the thoughts, ideas 
and passions, which in their ag- 
gregate, form the sum total of 
individual experiences. The 
greatest care should be accor<^ 
ed the eyes,- only outstanding 
specialists consulted when any- 
thing is wrong. 

• m •. m 

"Pain of mind is more than 

pain of body. 
•i, • • • • 

"There is no short road to 
success. One cannot cut across 
lots; there is but one road to 
success and that is the road 
paved with patience, by hard 
work and honesty. Nothing is 
to be had for the asking in the 
business world; everything 
must be acquired, nor can the 
majority of things, particular- 
ly those most valuable to us, 
be bought. They must be exper. 
ienced and a great deal of pain 
and hardships go with the ex- 
periences. Success is ^orth all 
it costs, however much that may 

be. 

• • • • 

"Whatever else you may for- 
get along life's highway, re- 
member that there are obliga- 
tions which bind your thoughts 
and affections to those from 
whom you sprang. Succ<ess will 
never come to a son who either 
forgets his parents or looks 
askance at them. Closely kniit. 
ted into every success is the 
only Commandment of all the 
ten to which is attached a 
promise — "Honor thy father : 
and thy mother that thy days 
may be long upon this land." 

"The oak grows stronger by 
the winds that touch its bran- 
ches and so with life the closer 
w e live to high ideals the 
stronger grows our character." 


YER'S GUIDE by Cloreiice f«ococ|L 

A humber^of readers of tbis ^ooka^ .wb*-' -^ 
are interested fn going into business fOr\ them^.^ 
e inqiiiides conoeminc ti^ Tf^^' 
cgroes lA the retail aajtomobttii; _, 

to point \>ut th^-tbi»f«MMfl*^ --, 
store in the automD^Te fitiup^^ 


lelves, have 
portunities for 1 
lield. 

I I would 
yleaii;^ sales 
is higher than 




-rv; 


'8- ■ 




any other type of Ne«ro ret^ 

business- Motorl vehicle dealers have an av^« 

_,a^e sale of $16,J|dO a year. Household appliand* 

Stores come second with al;i average yearly 

sale pf $12,333. Lumber and buildiKC. materia^ 

dealei^ are thirdlwith an average of $1(333. 

I Tbe depressi^ has had litue efiitpi aa the' 
number of stores operated by Colored peopU 
in the retail automotive group. \ln 1929 there 
»|ere 880 stores jand in 1935 thifre Were 779 
stores run by Negroes. These 77^ storiei have 
total. sales amoun^g to $1,328,000 <a year, they 
employ more thi^n 344 people aa^ pay over 
$191,000 a year inl salaries. ' 

In these United States there are over 30,- 
041,Q0O owners of pleasure cars, these^ cars con- 
some daily about 60,000,000 gallons of gasoline 
There are over 87;621 cars owned by Colored 
people in the sUtes along the Atlanttc Coast 
from Maine to South Carolina. North Carolina 
leads the other stat^ in the number of cars ow»- 
ed by Negroes with 25,304 cars. South Carolina 
has 19,642, Pennsylvania has 18,897, New York 
as 18,164 and Virgihia has 15,518. 

Colored people spend pver $132,0db,000 an. 
nually for gasoline ind oil, but very Kttle of ^his 
amount is returned to Colored circles. There 
are about 783 fflling stations operated by Ne- 
groes in the entire country. The total annual 
sales of these stores is approximately $2,946,- 
000 and the total payroll for their 433 employ- 
ees is over $217,00(0 a year. 

For those people that contemplate going in- 
to business in this fieW, I ^v•ould lilse to bring 
to their attention some of the mistakes made by 
a majority of Negro employers at the beginning 
of their careers. These mistakes were pointed 
out in an editorial in the July issue of the Op_ 
portunity magazine. 

Among the mistakes may be listed these 
things: 

1. They try to sell their goods and ser\-ices 
to Negroes on a basis of color instead of merit. 
Instead of trying to improve their products and 
services, they spend too much time capitalizing 
on color. 

2. Too often Negro employers fail to make 
intelligent studies of their businesses to learn 
how they really should be operated. Because of 
this, serious mistakes in operation are made. 

3. They are short sighted and selfish when 
it come to paying fair wages and providing job 
security. 

4. Negro employers make a fatal mistake 
when they fail to realize that buyers of foods 
and services invariably go to the place where 
they can get the best products for their money. 

5. They also charge as much as other busi- 
ness men for their wares, yet they often want 
their employees to work for less. 

To increase your employment opportunities 
and the opportunities for the race partronize 
our Colored News papers and buy their adver- 
tise products. 




♦- 


LETTERS 

THANKS 

Dear Editor: 

Regardless of the outcome of 
today^s voting on State Propos- 
ition One, I should like to ex- 
press to publishers and editors 
bf Southern California our ap- 
preciation of their kindness, 
courtesy and co-operation dur- 
ing the campaign just complet- 
ed in the handling of both ad- 
vertising which we placed and 
of editorial matter submitted 
which was adjudged newswor- 
thy. May I add, also, my per- 
sonal thanks? 

Faithfully yours. 
Cruse Carriel, secretary 
Public Information Committee 


GREAT WOMEN 

Dear Editor: 

Congratulations to Mrs. C. 
A. Bass, manager of the Cali- 
fornia Eagle, upon that politi- 
cal speech made by her over 
the Radio Nov. 3, 8 p. m., de- 
livered with such logic and phi- 
losophy that puts her in the 
first rank of the great women 
of the Nation and ■ i^rhaps in 
the lead. 

I am exceedingly proud of 
my women and while she 
spoke, the rivers of my pride 
ran out of its banks and rich- 
ly irrigated the barren soil. 

I am therefore beseeching 
God to give us more great wo- 
men to help build and solidify 
our racial structure within this 
nation, and in the world. 

REV. R. A. GARRISON, D.D. 
Missionary of the Western 
Diocese embracing Califor- 
nia and Washington ~ 

Dear Editor: 

I canndt let this campaign 
pass into history without ex- 
pressing td yOu my apprecia- 
tion of your cooperation and ef- 
fort on behalf of the Republi- 
can party. This has been the 
most enjoyable campaipi with 
>ivhich I have ever been connec- 
ted and this is due to ^e fact 
that we had a niinimum of dis- 
cord and,, a maximum of har- 
mony. With very little money, 
the Republican Party has put 
on a very satisfactory campaign 
and your work has contributed 
to this result 

■ With best wishes for your 
continued success, I am 
Sincerely yours. 
Chairman, Los Angeles County 
Reeublicaa Ci^trsl C.^Dmitt<^ 


SIDEWALK 

(continued on Editorial page) 
paign, which rolled up the most 
tremendous vote ever given a Re- 
publican in that state, is a wel- 
come sign that the GOP will not 
be without candidate in 1940. A 
complete upset was the striking 
defeat of Governor Murphy of 
Michigan. The man that estab- 
lished the sit-down- as something 
to be recognized and tolerated was 
swamped. The implication is clear. 
Labor must draw the line some- 
where. 

The defeat of Proposition No. 1, 
picket regulation measure, in Cal- 
ifornia was brought about chiefly 
through hysteria and misconcep- 
tion of many voters, although 
there were several "ragged edges" 
in the proposal that merited seri- 
ous opposition. However, the bit- 


TMOBILE SCHOOLS 
PROMISED REPAIRS 

MOBILE, ALA., Nov. 8.— (By E. 
Goode for ANP). A proposad 
$247,000 building and repair pro- 
gram, affecting about 50 Mobile 
County schools, among them 10 
Negro schools, was announced Fri- 
day during a meeting otthe school 
commissioner. 

The Negro schools and the 
amount they are to receive are aa 
follows: Pricha, $19,950; Toulmin- 
ville, $5,983; Dunbar High, $13,t 
911; Council, $483, Williamson, $1,- 
033 i Owens, $325;- Grand Bay. 
$710; Theodore, $492, WhisUer 
$466, Mount Vernon, $503. The 


UTfluT^'^tl^ffily'^V^li-P-^*™ '^ *- -- ^-^^^^' 


table. 

* 

A film sponsored by the great 
Los Angeles Community Chest 
WOULD HAVE BEEN distributed 
through the High Schools and 
elementary schools of our city 
which contained an extremely ob- 
jectionable slur had it hot been 
for ttie intervention of a 16-year- 
old boy. 

The alert young man is John 
Asfengo, editor-in-chief of the 
Polytechnic Optimist; the best 
High School weekly newspaper in 
the nation. At a special preview 
showmg of the picture, a little 
Negro boy was shown flat on his 
back in a hospitaL The narrator 
stated at this point "Little Sambo 
here could still do a swell job on 
a watermeon!" 

When the f im ended, young As- 
tengo immediatey contacted Vier- 
ling Kersey, schools head, through 
whom the narration was altered. 
Astengo is a brilliant and gifted 
young man. $ut there the several 
brilliant and gifted young men 
who would not have stirred them- 
seves to the fine action which he ' 
took. John H. Francis Polytechnic 
High School should be proud of 
such an excellent product^ ' , 


room additions, repairs, sanitary 
improvements, painting, plaster- 
ing and other individual projects. 
A number of the schools will be' 
given oil burners and other new 
equipmient. 

An amount exceeding $10,006 
was also appropriated for repair 
work Bnd additions at the Mobile 
County Training School at Pla- 
teau. However, the amount will be 
•evised, it was announced, as the 
greater part of the school was de- 
stroyed by fire about six weeks 
ago. A petition signed by nearly 
1400 persons, asking that the 
school be rebuilt at'Pritchsrd. was 
received by the board. The board 
decided, however, that no action 
would be taksB on selection of a 
site until the superintendent and 
assistant superintendent of schooh 
make a survey and state their rec- 
ommendations. .^ " • 


^ 


TBM CAUtrOSNlA BAffl^K 

' PuMMMd wwy iiwna^r ty «w Cai^ 
Mala C«l« PuUlthint C*, 40n aMith 
CMtral AftniM. EiiUn4 u t w uM Olaif 
Mattar, N*v. X 1*97. «l Um Mtl\M)(f 
•I Lm AnitiM, C«Hiwal«i uii4tr'lkt IM 
tt IMrdt 3. ItT* \ 


Thusday, M o» — il »e» !•, 


t :MMtki'. 


lOBSClimON BATfi 



3«,M« FACE lOBLBSS WINIck 
IN TEXAS y^^ 

SAN ANTONIO, Tml^ NoJs^ 
(By Elaiane ElUs for CNA)— Be- 
cause local gov^Tunental • age'h- 
dfes have failed to sponsor addi- 
tional projects to WPA workers, 
Biore than 33,t)00 Negroes and 
white persons in this state ai« fats 
ing-winter without prospect of 
ea^Moyin49lt.'Of'this nuBtfoer, 17,- 
485^^\&nners for whom special 


-P I 


tlig funds al^ available for their 
— W\ pioyment. 


em- 



FOR RJESuii'"'"" 





lACSLEXLASSfffED 
At>S^»AD. 9362 


VOL. 59— NO. 32 


' v I '.tU 




.^;f.-u 


flGLE 


%l EXT WEEK r 

The Thanpgiving Editwn ef -the CALfFOR- ' 
NIMeAGLB^wOI go td press TUESDAY instead 
of Wednesday All copy must in the office n» 
later than Monday. P. M. ■ ' , " ;. V; 

Watch the "EAGLE" for Thanksghnng pwrtkg^. '} 
tug Bargains. 


7r'I 


^1 A ' 


Robert M. Iryin Meets 

Instant Deoth En Route 

; Home From Reno, Nev. 

Alont In Automobite After Leaving Employer 
In Reno; Closed Eyes For Moment; Body Still 
at Bakersfieid, California 

BAKERSFIELD, Nov. 17,-(Special to the Eagle) 
A pioneer settler of Los Angeles, Robert 'M. Irvin, late 
of Redlands, was killed instantly in an automobile accident 
occuring last Sunday night on the Highway between 
Reno, Nevada and Redbluff, California. 



LOS ANGELES, CkLIF,, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 19|8 


PRICE fIVE CENTS 



on the 
sidewalk 

hi •■ *■ i- 

\A/e do not hesitate to say 
' ' that we were convinced 
that Governor Frank Merriam 
should retain his office. It is 
unsportsmanlike, but true that 
our thougKs on the matter 
have not changed. 


Followed by the most scat- 
tered, suspicious, and separated 
constituency in the state's his- 
tory, we cannot picture Olson's 
administration a successful one. 
If he forgets the elaborate 
promises made to this old-age 
the other left-wing bloc 
■•tttes down tw"the^ job tSf' 

tecutive, there will be civil 
'war in the Democratic ranks. 
On the other hand, if Olson at- 
tempts to deal out patronage to 
the myriad men and organiza- 
tions which aided his election, 
the statie treasury will take a 
thorough thrashing. 

Somehow, we have visions of 
Governor Merriam's balanced 
budget fljring off handle once 
again in what some Republicans 
like to can "a mad orgy of 
ipending". 

liowever, this is a democracy. 
Every new county, state, and 
national administration de- 
serves the support of all citi- 
zans. -' It is a -ftndamental duty. 
Citizens must support . . , 

Even if citizens feel grave 
dbubtr,.in the dark, shadowy 
corners of their souls — and 
pocketbooka, 

TURNINGjrROM politics, we 
note that this week Negro 
achievement^ is celebrated thru- 
out the natioti. 

There has .always been a fine 
line of diaprimination in my 
mind conceriiing the various 
achievement and progress cele- 
brations that are found today. 
So often these events inspire 
only a biased, pompous recital 
of the outstanding triumphs en- 
joyed by a group, church, or na- 
tion over an allotted period. 
To mjr mind, this is not a 
healthy practice. 

Achievement Week, if i is to 
mean anything, should bring 
forth an honest estimation of 
the race's progress in the past 
fseveral years. An attempt at a 
"air judgment should be made, 
_hd all things considered with 
an eye to future, greater effort. 
On this basis, a progress cele- 
bration is a valuable stimulant 
to racial advancement. 

The American political sys- 
tem, fundamentally, represents 
such an idea. Ever so often, 
the elected officials of the na- 
tion must account for their ac- 
tivities, stand upon the sum to- 
tal, and pray the other party 
doesn't have a landslide. 
, It is often amusing to observe 
la what lengths- candidates 
■ must proceed to discover com- 
mendable movements in which 
they have been involved. Some, 
unable to corral any memory of 
a worthy legislative move, have 
' resorted to vocal and other mu- 
sical renditions in reelection 
• I camoaigns. Unfortunately, Tex- 
( as is the onl^ state moved to a 
I great extent by the soulfu' 
moan of "Yippeeee, I'm a Lon^ 
Cowhand}" 
But, really, this notion of ac 
■ counting to the public is a sound 
j one. It fcforms the ctiizen and 
j , prepares an institution for in- 
' creased, more comprehenaivf- 
service. . , ^ , , , 

With such an idea, todajr^ lev 
us argue the cas< of The Calv 
fomia Easle, largest Negro 
newspaper of the Far Western 


' Irvin was alone in the automo- 
bile at the time it overturned. 
As far as highway officials could 
ascertain, he closed his eyes mom- 
entarily while driving, his car 
struck a soft bit in the road, 
swerved and overturned, killing 
him instantly. 

The deceased was a pioneer 
resident of Los Angeles, although 
his work as a chauffeur for a 
wealthy family kept him in Red- 
lands and Reno for the past few 
years. He was on his way from 
the Reno home of his employer at 
the time of the tragedy. 

At press time last night, fun- 
eral arrangements had not been 
completed although it was known 
that the Robert Mortuary of Los 
Angeles would have charge. The 
body is in Bakersfieid where 
members of the family have gone 
to bring it to Los Aageles. 

Included among those surviv- 
ing are brothers, Clarence, Elzie 
and Jessie Irwin and a sister, 
Mrs. TioTa^ Ligner. 

Now De 
Scripture Sez: 

That "The tongue of the 
wise useth knowledge aright; 
but the mouth of fools poureth 
out foolishness," So my Aunt 
was always saying, "Now I 
wouldn't just come right out 
and call Sister Lucy Jones a 
fool, but when her mouth gets 
to blabbin' and a-runnin' on, I 
declare, I can't make sense out 
o' three words she says." 

"Yours until cows will no 
longer chew their cud. 

Eugene Henry Huffman 


Howard (/. Assailed 



CAST VOTES 

Mr. and Mn. Edward "Mike" 
Sneed go to the polls ta cast 
their votes under the watchful 
eye of the precinct judge, IMCrs. 

Drunken Man 
Slashes Citizen 

Leon Heflin, 4219 Hooper avenue 
cabinet maker and his son, Leon 
Jr.. sustained severe injuries ab- 
out the face and body when they 
were att,:.cked with a knife in the 
hands of a drunk-crazed man, 
John Smith, last Monday night. 


Lottie AndeiBOD. Sneed, Demo- 
cratic committeeman from the 
third ward, was elected county 
commissioner and became the 
first Negro voted into that of- 


fice as a Democrat. He polled 
771,348 votes to finish seventh 
on the list of IC successful can- 
didates. (ANP Photo) 


■* 


"NEGRO NEWSPAPER OF THE AIR" 

8:15 P. M.— KGFJ 

Nightly Newcaster — John Kinloob 

♦Thursday— Editorial Comment: Editor-hublisher C A. Bass 
♦Friday— Sepia Sportscast: J. Cullen Fentress 
♦Monday— Society— Helen F. Chappell 
♦Tuesday — News 
♦Wednesday — News 

Presented by S. A. Scherer, Auto and Furniture Loans 


''? 


On Willowbrook Charges S?""°"'" '"".°'"*i 

V Wants something Done 


By unanimous vote, on the motion of Supervisor John Anson 
Ford, the County Board of Supervisors last Tuesday vted through 
its County Council to take immediate action on investigation of the 
alleged fraud and disfranchisement of Negro and White taxpayers 
of Willowbrook in a school bond election on the Sept. 30th ballot. 

A petition was presented to^ — 

the Council charging that a bond i j ■ ■' k i 

election for $200,000 was put ov- kil/\Mi^L| |«# KAA£k¥ 
er quietly by the Compton High llTlWlUniy iTlCCf 
School district officials and they ' 
were not legally notified of the 
election. The bonds were report- 
ed carried by 194 to 40. Willow- 
brook has a population of about 
9,000 — one third of whom are Ne- 
groes. 

A portion of the petition »ftad: 

"That wilful pervirsion Of elec- 
tion laws, deceit, wilful violation 
of the rights o fthose who must 
pay for the bonds in an already 
over-taxed district, was done. 
And a few people who had chil- 
dren allegedly were coerced to 
vote on this day by private mess- 
age to them from school officials 
while the majority of the elec- 
torate did not know about the el- 
ection until the Iwnds were put 
over." 


It was claimed also that b» 
■ause the bonds were voteo 
town l^t May, persons involved 
iecided not to send out sample 
lallots for the September elect- 
on for fear the bonds might no( 
•arry. 

Among thos«? signing the pet- 
lion were Hobart SmiOi,iMunici- 
)al employee, Mrs. Esther Browf' 
md Elizabeth Keeler, Harlem 
■lub • proprietors in Watts, Mrs. 
Minnie B. Foster, Manhattan club 
Jwner, R. Neal, contractor, Mrs. 
Mattie Thomas, George Davis and 
rohn Wilson. 

Hilton A. Phillips .writer, ap- 
peared before the County offic- 
als as spokesman for the petit- 
ioners. 


Of NAACP 
Successful 

The regular monthly meeting 
of the NAACP which was ,held 
last Sunday at the Hamilton M. 
E. Church was' a, highly success- 
ful one. A large and enthusiastic 
audience enjoyed the well plan- 
ned and interesting program. 

"What the l^egro Youth of To- 
day is Thinking" was the toptt- 
of the day. Wendell Green, pres- 
ident of the Associated Men Stu- 
dents of Los Angeles City College 
gave an account of the World 
Youth Movement Conference 
which was held at Vassar College 
Beulah Terry presented notes of 
the meeting of the State Model ' 
Youth Legislature which was | 
held in* San Francisco. The work I 
of the local youth agencies vtras j 
ably presented by Dorothy C. i 
Guinn, secretary of the lo^al j 
branch of the YWCA and Miriam I 
Matthewrs, librarian in charge of j 

the Vernon Branch of the I^ibjic I 

Library gave an interpretation lOf \ may, 


Veterans' Home 
Napa County, California 
November 10, 1938 
Mrs. C. A. Bass, Editor 
California Eagle 
Los Angeles, California 
Dear Mrs. Bass: 

It is with regret that I write 
you this letter. I am so asham- 
ed of the manner in which my 
people are being treated here, 
but on the other hand, I am 
glad liecause it is my duty and 
privilege to state this condition 
as it is. 

There are about 2000 men 
here in quarters and hospital 
and as fa^ as colored men come 
here for admittance to the home 
or release ttom the hospital, 
they are turned out because 
there is no room for them in 
quarters. 

Of all the buildings here, our 
group occupies just two small 
squad rooms, 18 beds and men 
in all, in the Wilson Barracks. 
And the worse part of it is that 
no attempt is being made to 
provide for any more. 

Several have been turned 
away today after making the 
trip from Los Angeles, and if 
yon can find room in your pap- 
er, please advise anyone whc 
proposes to ; come here and 
"break in" tdi stay away. 

On the other hand, please do 
S4nnetiung tqat our men may 
have use of this place. 

Have no fear for my safety. 
Let then ehip^ fall where -they 


„c«ct~t-. >-- -— ^^ i.istifv ****•' *••* November 23rd is- 
states, and if possible, justuy^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ California Eagle for 
-its existence. . the best in food bargains at your 

The. eetrly tnumohs onrlser ^^ mariwts. 
(eonfinued on Editorial V»tfi> j "•«" "**'W*^ i ^,. ;.: 


ome of the writing of some iof 
the younger Negro authors. 

The star of the musical part 
of the program was Clarence 
Muse, noted screen actor apd 
singer. Muse was forced to rfes- 
pond to a number of ^ encores. Id- 
elle Johnson,; Victoria Rice, Jes- 
sie Coles Grayson and the Avaljon 
Christian church choir, directed 
by Zelma Watson Duke, w^re 
also well received. 


.1 


Read the CaHfomiR iiiagle lor 

j the latest in news event., thnm^b- oHspital to het 


Tmstins ttaat simie «ood may 
come of ttiis, and with appre- 
ciation for yOur goodness, I re- 


JAMES C; TRUFTT 
Formerly No. 30, hAJFU. 

Mrs. Faustiha Johnson 

Convalescing in Home, 

Mrs. Faustina Johnson, chair- 
man of the Women's Breakfast 
Club and civic leader, has been 
moyerf from ithe St. Vincent's 


her home where she 




; :;. I uor tl^r« and bojotlegs it, uude- 


Say Communism 
Being Taught 
At' Howard U. 

Charges That President 
Jolinson Advocated Revo- 
lution Aired at Hearing 

WASHINGTON N,o v. 
17- (CNA)- Charges that 
Communism is being taught 
at Howard University and 

that Dr. Mordecai Johnson 

h^s advocated publicly doctrines 
of the party, were made this 
week at a hearing of President 
Roosevelt's Dies Committee, the 
explicit charges hurled by form- 
er Judge James A. Cobb of the 
Columbia Municipal Court. 

Reading from a newspaper 
clipping, Cobb declared that on 
June 10, ,1933 Dr. Johnson made 
an address in Chicago in the 
.course of which he urged seniors 
to adopt new plans. These new 
plans, the judge opined were 
Communistic. 

He introduced a letter in tiie 
hearing which he said was a 
memorandum prepared by Law- 
rence A. Oxley »f the Depart- 
ment of Labor. In the letter. Ox^ i 
ley a&sertedly referred to a con- 
ference held at the University on 
May 18, 19. and 20, 193-5 under 
the Joint Committee of National 
Recovery and the Social Science 
Division of Howard University 
and declared that the conference 
was "decidedly Communistic in 
character." 

Secretary of the Interior Ickes, 
who spoke recently at the Region- 
al Conference of the National Ne- 
gro Congress, was also attacked 
by Judge Cobb at the Committee 
hearing. 

The jurist said he mentioned 
Dr. Johnson's "Communistic 
leanings" to Ickes, but that the 
Interior Secretary refused to do 
anything about it. 

Youth Who Escaped from 
Peonage Farm Tells Story 

Several weeks ago the California Ea^le carried a story about a 
youth who had escaped from a peonage farm and made his way 
to Los Angeles where he was* attending school for the first time 
in his life. 

Last Monday morning, the young man presented himself in the 

Eagle office, volunteering addit-^ k— ^ 

ional information on the unbe- terred by the law. 
lievable story of his life, previous Robert was never paid for his 
to coming to California three •*'>*"'• 'Most money I ever had in 
months ago. ' my We was $2.45, earned it wait- 

ing dishes in Oklahoma City af- 
ter I escaped", he said, smiling 
sdiyly at his listeners' amazement. 
The workers are lured to these 
peonage farms with promises of 
$25.00 per month and room and 
board. Once gotten behind thai 
wire fence, they are never free 
until death, or as in Robert's 
case, which is rare, escape. 

Husband and wife are separ- 
ated Families ate not allowed 
to live together. The meagre foot 
and sketchy clothing is procur 
ed at a commisary.on the plan- 
tation to which the workers arc 
ever and eternally in debt. 
PROUD OF CLEAN CLOTHING 
when interviewed at the Eagle 
office, Robert was wearing a blue 
overcoat which he continually 
{continued on page 4-A) 

Confesses Crime 
to Policeman 

James Aristide, 24-year-old lab- 
orer, is an obliging burglar. When 
he broke into an electric shop on 
Olympic blvd., last Friday night 
and cut his forehead m the . act 
of removing a generator from the 
showcase, he went directly to 
the Georgia Street Receiving Hos- 
pital . for treatment. 

Held there by suspicious doc 
tors until the arrival of the pol 
ice, he submitted amiably to ar 
r«t, went along with the New 
ton street police officer while hf 
inspected the scene of the bur- 
glary and wrtien the two arrived 
at the Station where AristidP 
was to be questioned, calmly ir> 
fprmed the officers' that he was 
the one who had brolcen into tlie 
Electric shop. 



Respectors of the Emancipation 
Proclamation would be surpris- 
ed to learn to what extent it is 
regarded as a scrap of paper in 
some parts of the South. And that 
is putting it mildly! 

Robert Lee Perkins almost nev- 
er heard of the Emancipation 
Proclamation and if he did, he 
failed to see what connection it 
had with him. For until one rainy 
night several mc«itbs ago, he had 
lived in slavery for as long as 
he could remember. "He doesn't 
know his age, but he estimates it 
to be somewhere around nineteen 
or twenty. 

It is 75 years since freedom, 
'jut there are people living in re- 
note areas of the South who 

light walk past their motheris, 

ithers, sSters, brothers, even 

ons and daughters, and not 

now them. • '\., 

Robert is one jo.! those. Some- 
vhere he has a mother and fath- 
er, Jim and Rosie Perkins, (the 
white folks told Him their names) 
and a brother ana sister, whose 
names he does not know. But 
for all he can remember he has 
never seen, any of them. 
1000 ACE3 PLANTATION ' 

His life was spent on a plant- 
ation, "almost a thousand acres", 
he said in his soft, flat voice, in 
Bulltidge, La„^;within a wire 
fence about 15 feet high and 
peaked with barbed wire. Day in 
and day out, with 60 other Ne- 
groes, he worked for a white 
man, whom he colled "Marster", 
planting, hoeing, and harvesting 
corn, peas, and rice. So far from 
nowhere is the place that ■ the 
plantation owner even stills liq- 


L A. Pioneer, 95, Dies in 
Home of <jrandchildren 

Mrs. Ellen Cook, 95. familiarly^stant attendance until besieged 


known as "Mother Cook", who 
was a pioneer settler of Los An- 
geles died at the home of her 
grandchildren. Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
cus S. Brown, with whom she 
lived on Friday, November 11. 

The deceased came to Los An- 
geles with her husband. James 
Brown Cook fronn Texas in 
December 1893. During the forty- 
five years here, she has witnessed 


by a stroke on July 19. 

Last January, Mother Cook 
celebrated her ninety-fifth birth- 
day and more than seventy-five 
persons were present to congrat- 
ulate her. Surviving her are sev- 
en grand children and two 
daughters-iri-law. 

Funeral ser\-ices will be held 
Thursday. No\'emher 17. at one 
o'clock from the New Hope Bap- 


the death of her husband and' tist Church with Conner-JohnSbn 
four children. James, Major. 
Dempsey, and Lucy. 

Mother Cook was prominent in 
city church life joining the Sec- 
ond Baptist Church under the 
pastorate of the late Rev. C. H. 
Anderson, and later helping to 
organize the New Hope Baptist 
Church where she was a senior 
deaconess at the time of her 
death and where sne -was m con- 


Morticians in charge ana the Bev. 
J. ,D. Gordon officiating. Inter- 
ment will be in Rosedale Ceme- 
tery. 

.NEWS REPORTED ILL 

John Kinloch. Eagle News re- 
porter, due to illnass, was forced 
to omit Wednesday night's news 
broadcast from his nightly rou- 
tine. 


CLARENCE MUSE 


A-TALKIN' TO YOU-- 


What is the World coming to, is the question asked by milliona 
oif sane people throughout the world. Two great nations of Europa 
have decided that the way to get world recognition is to persecute 
and destroy minority groups. Today the Jew holds the headline 
position, tomorrow the second feature will be the Catholics and as 
a Grand Added attraction will be the Negro throughout the worid. 
I don't mean to say that the Negro has been left out for more than 
a Thousand Years, but he has lost Top Billings for a while. To argue 
that is not us. Just Jews, is foolish — to argue that if it's Catholics 
and you happen to be a Baptist or Methodist that it Don't Concern 
you, is as safe as laying in a nice soft bed with a Diamond Back 
Rattlesnake. The world is still big Plough 
for aU humans to live in peaoeibilly. Bi^ 
enough for everybody to be able to be atde 
to say good morning when the sun rises 
and good night when the same sun sinks 
in the Golden West. To talk about these 
conditions and do nothing about it, is in- 
deed suicide. It's time that we, meaning 
everybody. Black or White, big or anall 
should join up with organizations that have 
for their program tolerance. The NAACP 
should have the greatest membership in 

. — -..-« its History— the Anti-Nazi League «>«o«il4 / 

tLARENCE MUSE ;'. 

have just as many Negroes as members as the National Associatieb '■ 
'.ov the Advancement of Colored People has white mambers. The 
Catholics are tolerant and should have our support We must wake 
jpi to the fact that the Negro is an international asset, that he i« _ 
coi^cemed at all times with world affairs and that he is above aU 
a champion for equal rights not only for Colored People, but lot 
leV, Ethiopian, Catholic ' or any Hijman Beipg walking the hot of - 
the earth. "Peace and good will to lall men", is a lov^y phnse aad 
.vill be sung around the world in aj few days. But Empty words, ia 
hei Jew! "lust perish because of his religior^ Or ecoriomic superiority. 
Hy^JOcriBy if the African must be murdered and persecuted by the 
Italians. Hard to figure out; most oif the Italians are Catholics, yef 
the^ fought the Coptic Religion and drove Haiilie Selassie ffom hia 
home— the Germans cried to the World at the end of the 'War.fbr 
a rijght to live— Now the Fuehrer murders Jews with statvationi * ^ 
(Copywrited hy Clarence Muse. l1^.) 



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GOLDEN STATE MUTUAL 
AT WESLEY CHAPEL 

SUNDAY MORNING 


thm Los Angeles <iistrict stafl*- 
mt tke Golden State Mutual Life ■ f 
inaurance Compahy will make 
Hm second in its series of visits 
to Hty churches Sunday morning 
m guests oi Wesley Chapel M. E. 
Cbarcb of which Rev. Mr. E. W. 
lUkestraw ie pastor. 

Tractical Thanksgiving" has 
bMR announced as Rev. R a k e- 
stntW's sermon subject which will 
he ftUowed with a brief address 
_Mi'tiw insurance company's pro- 
grew by the president-manager, 
W«. Nidcerson, Jr. Music will 
im rendered by the €k>lden State 
^(^rtette made up of George 
J^mts, Clucse Reid, John L. 
Thompfion end Cecil Davis. The 
Wesley Choir of fifty voices will, 
also, sing. 

The visits are in charge of A. 
J. 'Williams, manager of the Los 
Angles District office. 


^nm^mmm 


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DIRECTOR 

A. J. WILLIAMS, nuuiag:er of 
the Los Aiureles District of the 
Golden SUte Mntnal Life In- 
serance Company, wh» is di- 
reettsg a series ot visits to city 
diofdMe by tbe local staff. 
(Set story). 


ILL IN HOME 

GEORGE A. BEAVERS, JR. 

vice-president and director of 
agencies ot the Golden State 
Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany is ill in his home. His 
physician advises complete rest. 
Mr. Beavers recently returned 
from an official visit to the 
Chicago <rftice. 

Frank Gagnet 
Succumbs 

Frank Gagnet, of 1418 W. 37th 
Street passed away Tuesday, Nov. 
15, aft the Veterans Hospital, Saw- 
telle. Bom in Pensacola, Fla. 44- 
years ago, came to L. A. 26 years 
ago. Was elevator operator for L. 
A. County, 14 years. 

Rosary will be held Thursday, 
November 17 at 7:30 P. M. from 
Chapel of the Angelus Funeral 
Home. Funeral services Friday 9 
A. M. from the Holy Name 
Catholic Church, W. Jefferson 
and Cimmaron. Burial Soldiers 
Home Cemetery ,Sawtelle, Calif. 

A wife, Mrs. Eva Gagnet, a 
daughter, Florence, and mother 
and father, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Gagnet survive. 


Survey Gives Da to 
on Houston's t^Mr 
Hegrb Business 

WASHINGTON, D. C- N oV. IT, 
(ANP)— Houston, IStKIBEty in 
size of Negro population rank- 
ed, according to William L. Aus- 
tin^ Director of the Census bur- 
eau, 10th among the cities of 
the United States in the number 
of retail stores operated by Ne- 
groes in 1935. 252 retail stores 
were operated by 261 active pro- 
prietors and firm members. How- 
ever, 7 fewer stores were opera- 
ted in 1935 than were operated in 
1929 when Negro proprietors op- 
erated 259 retail stores. One hun- 
dred thirty-three of the stores 
reported in 1935 were in the eat- 
ing and drinking places classifi* 
cation. Stores of this classifica- 
tion represented bZS per cent of 
the stores operated by Houston's 
Negro retail store proprietors.' 

Total s.les amounted to $565,- 
000. This was 57.9 per cent ^$778- 
588) below total sales reported 
by Negro operated retail stores 
in Houston in* 1929. Of reported 
sales in 1935, the sum of $&7,000 
50.8 per cent of total sales was 
accredited to 133 eating and 
drinking places which represent- 
ed 52.8 per cent of the retail 
stores operated by Negro pro- 
prietors. Twenty-nine enterpris- 
es in the automotive group' real- 
ized 21.6 per cent of total sales 
or $122,000. 

Operating expenses of $169,000 
represented 29.9 per cent of to- 
tal sales. $127,000, 75.1 per cent 
of total operating expenses, was 
incurred by eating and drinking 
places. Total pay roll of $69,589 
amounted to 41.2 per cent of total 
operating expenses and 12.3 *per 
cent of total sales. 


Ant&Lyn^Hing Bill Peamad 
'^r^ iEl6efioii fO^iii 


4-^ \':, ' >':'^'' '' . 


> Netli 


Tktiimloy, Nei^mWy 17> 1»^ 


Urban league Gardens' Church 
Registration Schedules All- 
Notion Wedding 

I An AU Nations wedding with 
brides of eleven different coun- 
tries uniting in marriage to one 

! groom, will be held at the First 
Baptist Church of Central avenue 
Gardens on the evening- of Nov. 

i25. 

I Phillips Temple C. M. E. church 


Poultry Market 
Under New 
Management 


NE^ YORK, Nov. n-fPassage of a federal anti-lynching bill in 
the Hoiise and a hopeful Qutlook for its passage in th« Sena'U,iar4 
seen as j distinct possibilities during the coming session of Congress, 
accordii^g to public statement today by officials of the National ;As- 
sociatiob for the Advancement of Colored People 

Accoiiding to the fepwrt 21t 
Congre^men were seen ais cast- 
ing votfes for the' bill. 

The tjnalysis was made bn the 
basis of the election returns, re- 
sults of an anti-lynching ques- , 
tionnaine sent out by the associa- 1 
tion prior to the election, and the 
voting records of re-elected Rep- 
resentatives and Senators during 
the lastl session of Congresp. 

Accoiiding to the report 218 
elected |Congressmen can be con- 
sidered !in the ranks of those who 
will vote for the bill. Of this 
number! 47 signed a pre-election 
pledge to sign a petition which 
would bring the bill to the floor 
of the House for a vote; 116 sign- 
ed the 'Gavagan petition during 
the last session of Congress; 50 
voted for the bill in the last ses- 
sion, and 5 signed the Gfivagan 
petition! in the last session but 
were absent when the vote was 
taken. 

3S SENATORS FOR CLOTURE 
"The past records of senators in 
the last Congress, plus the pledges 
o fsome few newly-elected sen- 
ators indicate that at the present 
date 38 can be. counted upon to 
vote tot cloture, to shut off de- 
bate if a filibuster should de- 
velop against the anti-lynching 
bill. 

In addition, Scott W. Lucas of 
Illinois ^nd C. W. Tobey, of New 
Hampshire, newly elected sen- 
ators, had such good records as 
members of the lower house that 
it is felt they can be counted up- 
on to vote for cloture. 

This figure is not large enough 
to guarantee that clotur* will 
be invoked, but it is more than 
half the necessary total of two- 
thirds of the senate. 

Senator-elect Robert A. Taft, 
Republican of Ohio, pledged in 
writing before the election ■ that 
he would vote for cloture if 
elected and if such a move be- 
came necessary to pass the bill. 

Other riewly~or re-elected 


James Smith, is now sole own- 
er and manager of the Poultry 
Market at 2725 So. Central Ave., 
formerly known as Kidd and 
Smith's Market. 

"I have been in the Poultry ^^^^^^^ ^^ ,^^ 
busmess since 19^ and have.'„,„, ;»,„i„jij r^TilT.." ."vi. .. 


Final Rites f pr 
Joseph Due \ 
or Angelus 

Funeral services for Jojseph 
Due, found dead in his bed at 
934 Hemlock street, Nov. 6, Vtre 
held in the church chapel of i An- 
gelus Funeral Home last Moiday 
morning, with Rev. Baxter Puke 
pastor of Avalon Christian chiircn 
presiding. Interment was in Saw- 
telle Soldier's Cemetery. 

The deceased was a World War 
veterah, bom in Gre«i Calstle, 
Indiana, and had lived here for 
the past eight years. A daughter. 
Mrs. Alice G. GraVes, of Seattle, 
Washington, and other relatives 
survive. 
COOK i 

With the Angelus Funeral 
Home in charge, arrangemients 
for the last rites for Euall Alex- 
ander Cook, Jr., 21, who diejd at 
the General Hospital Arnuatice 
Day, .were made by his father, 
Euall A. Cook, Sr,, of 3309 Stan- 
ford avenue this week. 

The youth was bom in Mem- 
phis, Tenn.,' and had lived in 
California for the past 11 years. 
LA BEAU M% 

Final services for Bertha Mae 
La Beau, 18 year old dough tw of 
Mr. and Mrs. Burl La Beau, i31« 
E. 43rd sti-eet, were held at Ham- 
ilton M. E; church, 18th and Nad- 
mi, Wednesday afternoon. Rev. 
S. M. Beane, pastor, officiatinf. 
Burial was in evergreen, direc- 
ted by the Angelus Funeral home. 

The young girl died at the G«i- 
eral Hospital November 12. iShe. 
was bom in New Iberia, La„ 
and had lived in Los Angieles 
for 15 years. 


Closes Soon 

R^^tration for two classes re- 
c«jtly inaugurated under the Los 
Angeles Urban League's "In Ser- 
vice Training for Public Service 
Project" will close next week, it 
was announced here today. 

Final date for registration for 
fb* class in Building Mainten- 
Tkis class, which is designed to 
adce was set for next Tuesday, 
meet the needs of persons want- 
j/of to qualify for civil service 
poaitions in the Building Mainten- 
ance field, is part of the exten- 
sion system of Frank Wiggins 
Trade school. After Nov. 22 no 
iurther applications for entrance * 
ioto this class can be made, so ' 
persons interested should plan to ' 
Twister before that time at the ■ 
Affice of the Urban League, 2502 ' 
S. Cetttral avenue. j 

With an enrollment of 25 mem- [ 
ben the Secretary and Office 
Management Guild under the dir- 
ection of the Urban League was 
sat up last Thursday. This group 
ii composed of persons wishing 
t» secure sufficient training to 
enable them to qualify for posit- 
ions in the field of secretarial and 
office management work, includ- 
ing PBX operation. Final date 
tot registration in this group is 
set for tomorrow at which time 
all members and those wishing 
to become members must be pres- 
ent at the meeting at the 28th St. 
■YMCA. Further information can 
be secured by calling at the Lea- 
.gue office. 


43rd and Wadsworth, is aiding 
<ih9 Soutii. Los Angeles church 
stage the affair, under tjie d^ec- 
tion of Mrs. Obelia Teal, ntediber 
of the C. M. E. church. Rev. 
George Cofield is the pastor of 
the Gardens' church, Mrs. Julia 
Roach, chairman of the church 
group sponsoring the wedding. 


GEORGIAN TELLS OF 
POOR FACILITIES FOR 
NEGRO EDUCATION 

j AMERICUS, Ga., Nov. 17, (AN 

1 p>_Two hundred principals of 
Georgia schools met here last 

I week to discuss a proposed pro- 
gram for de\'elopment of schools 

j throughout the state. 

I During his talk State Supervis- 
or of Negro Education, R. L. 


made an extensive study of poul- 
try." said Mr. Smith when inter- 
viewed by an Eagle representa- 
tive this week. 

Mr. Smith raises his own poul- 
try and assures customers when 
they buy from him, they are get- 
ting the best corn fed fowls mor.- 
ey can buy. He also statfci, "If 
you haven't tried some of J«mes 
Smith's poultry^ you have not 
tried the best." 
I The atmosphere of the market 
is not only one of congeniality 
: and friendliness, but one of ideal 
cleanliness. Here one will rind a 
complete line of high grade holi- 
I day poultry at low prices. 
} Smith's market is as near as 
I your telephone. Just phone your 
! order to CE. 26468 for immediate 
delivery. 

LOCAL TUSKEGEE CLUB 
CORRECTS 
PROGRAM ERROR 

I Los Angeles, California 

November 14, 1938 
i Mr. George Garner, 
] 470 Blake Street, 

Pasadena, California 

Dear Mr. Garner; 
' As per telephone conversation, 
j I apologize for using your name 
; on the Tuskegee program to be 

given at the Second.^ Baptist 


cloture included Gillette, of Iowa 
Wagnv of New "york; Mead of 
New York; Bone of Washington, 
all Dc-nocrats; and Barbour of 
New Jersey, Repjiblican. 

DEATH TAKES VETERAN 
KANSAS CITY 
LAWYER; HAD STROKE 

KANSAS CITY, Kan., Nov. 17, 
TANP)-4This city, lost one of its 
best known civic leaders and law- 
yers with the death of I. F. 
Bradley on Wednesday at Doug- 
las hospital. One of the oldest 
lawyer;? ,of this community, he 
had practiced his profession here 
for 47 years and was active until 
two yeaiB ago when he suffered 
a stroke of paralysis. 

The veteran barrister had made 
his home with his son, I. F. Brad- 
ley jr. A daughter. Miss Ruth 
Bradley, Kansas City, also sur- 
vives. 

International 
Workers at Forum 



L. A. Youth 
to Hold 
Heolth Meet 

For next Sunday at the Temple 
Health Institute a very fine pro- 
gram has been arranged by a 
group of youth under the able 
leadership of Mr. Claybome Rob- 
inson who is assisting Mr. T. Gol- 
fer program chairman of the 
Auxiliary committee'of the Com- 
munity Health Association. 

You are cordiaUy invited to at- 
tend this meeting and join the 
Royal Sons and Daughters of 
the Community Health Associa- 
tion. They have and help others 
to have a complete periodic 
Health Examination every 6 
months and necessary treatments' 
to help get well and prevent un- 
necessary diseases. It is easy to 
help save millions of dollars if 
in your community you find syp- 
hilis—Treat Syphilis— Teach Syp- 
hilis. Sweden in 15 short yearc 
made Syphilis a rare disease. We 
can eradicate Syphilis in one gen- 
eration— Sur. Gen. U. S. Health 
On Sunday afternoon lodge ' S. Do you care? Will you come 
515 of the International Workers a"d bring others? 


Cousines disclosed that there ! £hurch^Noyembej^ 18. Ijegrejto 
were four counties in the state 
without Negro schools, and that 
there were only 74 Negro high 
schools throughout Georgia. One 
county high school superinten- 
dent, he said, had closed his high 
school department "because Ne- 
groes did not need it." He also 
stressed the need of higher edu- 
cation among Negroes." 


Golden State Mutual Has 
Continuous Dividend Mark 


An uninterrupted record f o r | 
payment of dividends on out- i 
standing Unit Certificates for 
thirteen years was revealed this 1 
week in a press conference with , 
Norman - O. Houston, Secretary- i 
Treasurer, the Golden State 
Mutual Life Insurance Company. I 

The record is said to be one of | 
the contributing factors to the, 
mounting sales of Certificates of 
Advancement which the Com- | 
pamy received authority to issue 
amounting to $100,000. Statistical | 
daU showed that on $23,750, the 
amount of the original Units out- 
sterfding, $24,087 interest has 
been paid to- holders of the 
securities in dividend returns. 

The accomplishment is especi- 
ally remarkable since the com- 
pany was able to pay interest the 
first year following its organiza- 
tion and throughout the years of 
depression. This fact, also, con- 
tributed largely to the state's 
granting authority to sell the 
present Certificates. Certificates 
of Advancement are sold at $10 
per unit with a minimum of five 
tmits; interest is 4 per cent the 
firtt year and no less than 5 
per cent thereafter and is pay- 
temi-annually. 


state that through a misunder- 
standing between the Publicity 
Committee and myself, there was 
a recurrence of the same. 

Again asking your apologies, 
and to inform you that we shall 
make a public retraction to rec- 
tify, same, and assuring you thai 
this was a mistake of the head 
and not the heart 
Sincerely, 

A. C. COLE, 

President Tuskegee Club 


will be in charge of the program 
at th^Los Angeles Forum, 1209 ^i 
S. Central Ave., commencing at 
4:30 p. m. The main item on the 
program will be a symposium on 
"Peace and Democracy." There 
will be several musical numbers 
and a representative from the 
Mayor's Office will speak. John 
H. Owens, vice-president ot the 
Southern California District of 
lodges, will be in charge of the 
program. 


Mrs. Bautte Called by 
Sister's Death to Chicago 

Mrs. Irene Boutte of 975 Kast 
Fiftieth Street left Los Angeles, 
November 4, to attend the fun- 


Next meeting: Sunday, Novem- 

j ber 20, 3:00 p. m. Sharp. 

Place: Temple Health Institute, 

j 4916-4920 Central Avenue. 

; Occasion: 3rd Sunday Conanun- 

j Ity Health Day. 

1 Motion pictures, Health Talks, 
Free Blood tests. Free tall cans 
of milk to children accompanied 
by parents. Free examination for 
all eligible persons who register 
before 2:00 p. m. Sunt'ay. 

eral of her sister, Mrs. Elvira 
Walton who succumbed after a 
stroke in Chicago. Mrs. Boutte 
will be away six weeks and plans 
to visit relatives in New Orleans 
and New Iberia, La.; and Hous- 
ton, Texas before returning. 


HEAD-ON COLLISION 
INJURES TWO 

With a head on crash at the 
corner of Jefferson and Central, 
.George Abrams, his knee injur- 
ed, and Oscar Dawson, white, 
broke up traffic at Jefferson and 
Central Monday night. 

The accident occurred when the 
two cars met in a head-on crash. 
Dawson resides at 409 South 
Figueroa, while Abrams lives at 
1203 W. 33rd street. 

Immediately aftet the crash, 
the two men, though hurt, at- 
tempted to stage a brawL Police 
officers, instantly on hand, broke 
this up, however. 




CALIFORNIA EAGLE 

•vary Ihuntr ky th« Call- 

PublliliiiiS C*.. 4075 aMitt 

"Ann- btwM M S«wi4 Clnt 

mm. X V3H. «t uw PMt offiM 

Ai^llw, CalMaml*. aitdar Um Act 
S^.IST* 


', Noveniber 17, 1938 

BVMCtXnwkf BATES 

Ymr ..- -$^•• 

* ," $1.85 

_^ ,^_. -.75 

" I 


Card of Thanks 

Rev. and Mrs. H. R. Gibson of 
San Diego wish to extend their 
heartfelt thanks to the many 
friends who so npbly assisted 
them in securing sufficient means 
for the burial of Mrs. Carrie 
Mays Bobo, sister of Mrs. H. R. 
Gibson, who passed in Los Ange- 
les, last week, and whose funeral 
was held from Ward Chapel of 
which the deceased was a mem- 
ber. Rev. J. W. Price, pastor offi- 
ciating. 

(Signed): 

Rev. and Mrs. H. R. Gibson 



HOLDUP MEN TAKE 
$58.40 FROM 
GROCERY PROPRIETOR 

Coming in on the heels cf a 
small boy who had jtist maide a 
I ten cent purchase, three armed 
I Negro robbers held up Harry Jue, 
, store proprietor at 4810 Hooper 
j avenue last Saturday night and 
rifled the cash register of its con- 
' tttitc, (58.42. 


IT WON'T TAKE WEEKS! 
IT WON'T TAKE MONTHS! 

Just Apply Black and White Bleaching 
Cream For a Few Nights, and That — 

Older, Duller, Darker Outer 
Skin Starts to Flake Rfght Off 

YOUR skin -will soon be fairer, smoother, softer — 
dull, darker outer skin will be 1 "flaked off" 

I 

Mi^he&.you use famous Black and Wlsjite Bleaching 
Cream. Start to use it tonight. 

This fine cream is a bleach and skin beautif ier and 
its "flaking-off" action begins promptly. Also acts 
as an antiseptic dress^. for acne pimples and 
"clogged-pore'* bumps (blackheads) due to external 
causes, as well as for the relief of itching discomfort 
of minor parasitic skin In^tatioiUb ■ ; 

Get busy now — ^help yourself toward a** changed" 
complexion that seems fairer and lighter in appear- 
ance because superficial skin is "peeled off" to re- 
veal true skin of lighter tone. Demand Black and 
White Bleaching Credm. Large opal jar, 50c. Medi- 
vm size, 30c. Trial, 10c. Sold by dealers everywhere. 



V 


AlwajTA use Blade api White Skin Soap to> 
CadMir with Black and Whfte Bleaching 
-Ckafupp; Large bv, tSc Trial cake, lOc 


BLACK':'«WHITE 

BLEACHING CREAM 


HELP YOURSELF TOWARD A 
I FAIRER, UGHTER COMPIHION 

i Buy a jar of Black and WliHe 

I fileaching Cream; if it does not giye 

yea entiw satisfaction when uaed 

for purposes indicated, the retail 

luiM of the jar will be nfonded. 


vl>psi^i^kj|v 


Now yen mb pity imi re-pliy your hvorHc «knie 
this eompaet rtdio-phoaotripb t UiuiUy t iplcadid radio 
Kk* tWi iloBt mi|ht Miily eo»t ^ou retrh $27.74' It't a 
S-tub« taparliataredyBc with dual purpoie tubca and aa 
•laetro.dyiiafflic ipaakar. But is addiuoa here ycwi're !•<• 
ting ta tlactrK pkeneirtph that playt aither W w 12-iinfc 
raeorda. And liBally y»ur« <«ttint * Bluebird recordt M 
yaar awa ahooaiol at ao extra charict Only S30.83 ar 
$27.74 with aid radio. No mail ar phoaa ordart, plaaic. 

Only tt.1l monthlit \ 


PLUS YOURXADK) 

i. 



l-honograpli 

plus 6 Records 



EA5TE 


>^fi 


m- 


CENTR^L >^T 45TH- 


CHiCAGOANS VIEW « - 
^ WRECKAGE AFTER. 
HECTIC ELECTtOK 

Dcniocrafs Sweep County Offices. Reelect Mit^ 
cheM^ Cdngress; Republicans Toint with Pride' 
to AMennon Wm. Dawson's Spirited Campaign 


Ta Fublish ^ 
Insurance 'Mag' ^ 

- CLEVEIAKD. NOV. 17, (ANP) 
—Coming as Something entirely, 
new in the fijeld of Negro per- 
iodicals will be the "Insurance; 
Counsellor", i national maga- 
zine devoted to the business 3f 
insurance as conducted by Ne- 
groes, which ifaall be circulated 
an or about Nov. 20. Its primary 


Supreifie C6ii rf Heoi^ {Points 
hiMisisourJ Low Schb<^li Cos^ 

wAsanNG'tOS, Nov. 17, (ANP)— With. Chief j Justice Hu^ies 
and the seven associate justices listening attentively ant} asking sear- 
ching ijuestionsi the United States supreme court ^ejcsday beard 
arguments by both sides in the famous test case of lAqvd L. Gaiites 
of &. Louis, dfitied admissioh to rthe University qf M^souri law 


tablish a law course if it is Te- 1 his ^ppropria^ea 53.auo.ww "^ ll«»^ft»«^» AvnCflll 
quested to do so by only one ap- 1 Ltaoidn, which has rectived tne.j *ir ■•vwv^t «-*■ »»%»^m 
plicairt. Justice Boberts protes- { entire amount with the excei»lioB't |Jgj«|r jg Aflfi 200 


SHELBYVHJJ; Ind.. Nof. 17, 
CANP>— A flaoE hackle estimated 
to be more than 200 years old 


u 


tie records rfioWJ he declar- 
ed "tbat.Misseiirt nnitfersity 
kdmitted FiUl^iBps, CtJiBese, Hia- 


'das, Mexicans — j ia 
race save its ewa 


j ted that the word "mandatory" ol a grant ci tJSOO.ihW which was 

could not be. applicable because I held uneoiianiuucnai fay Jiw 

of the existence of an alternative Missiuri Supw^? court-V- • .' 

systemr0< oirt-of-state scholar- WSlliams sii-* that LiacWn al- „ ,_ 

ships. ■ ' rrady has 'be, classrooms and J and said to have been brought 

Tke ^def Jastice paired wky, buildings fo-- i low course^ azid > to this oauntry from Africa by a 

if acttiBg up a Jaw course w«« , that! four blocks away, there 1 siave has been discovered hwe ia 

■Hde .OMBVolsDfj «■ Liacola oa- ! would be ooen to Negro .<^dt:nt3 j possession o f Louis Griffith. 

imaUj hy the Hiswaii SaftCBK i the legal library of the Missouri white. 

Mart, that tribnaal "did aat or- supreme court "one of the best Griffith said he was given the 

der fatthwfth flat Liacola aaiv 
; enity establish 9. )mw sehooir He 


cHiif.iis. j 


pressed a fattter 


My cUent applied «3 admisslMi \ 'Jf*?. SlL.^^^ 


to 
oaivnsitjr 


tafattwa 


to tbat the of 4he United States 
Supreme court" , 

F<ir the . mstroctioa of oae or 


stadent?;. he^ calcnlated, the 


school ^because of his race. 

/-Lift^A«-'<-v k.1 t-7 I a. a'iu^^-*. /- D^ J^^*i tnr aa OT aboat itav. zu. Mts yiuuaif Although no decision is tat- 

CHrCAGO, Nov. r7. (By Albert G. Bamett TO"" objective will be to furnish field ipected for some time, the entire 

ANP) ^This week after one of the most exciting ; men with inspiration encourage- j south is keenly awaiting the 

/-vi^^r/ inib weci*., uiici VBic: wt i.ic .in« ^ J* ,„ent and ^racUcal sales aids and court's opinion. On it binges the 

ele<*ionS held here since 1 932, and mode noteworthy | ^^ inform 1 the general public of 1 future poUcy of; I6 southern and ..., ..„..„. -„.~^ ™ , j^ nmamiml iiniHIaB ta * t 

byG.O.P.effortstobreokthestrangle-hofdof l0CoV:g^-any^^s«gees the compan- | border^^ w^e a^^on to »u^a«. the tnge ^^ea^he he- ^^ ^^^^^ P««- , f Ulj«^ ^d^ t^t g^ 

Democrotic t^oders, victprs and vanquished took : '"xS^agazineV a^y «- , groes. ; wrong class, the;w^r«ctioa.-| J^- ^^^-^.^^^l^K 7^*^^^ •» .'»^ 

- , , J. I ^j ■ ^^^*:,^ ♦Ka:r rtxcntif- ■ ceived the personal enooraement 1 Charles H. Houston of Wash- The university's counsel con- I „i_ universitv had an available •TBt exaerieace with universM 

Stock of the wreckage and. mven toned their respeC- ^^ ^ ^ aipy^t and C. L. Townes ; ington and Sidi>ey R. Redmond ! tended that Misstauri is the pio^ ta^^ of^^llWO of Wh^ expenowe wiui_ . _ 

president and secretarj^ of the 1 of St. Louis aiigued for Gaines «i«rr aud probabljy tjie only state f |i3g^QQ0 ,,f^^ allotted to salaries 
National Negro' Insurance assoc- j without interruption from the ■ where a public university f or Ne- ' jqj. teachers and instru3or« 

*v, ' T^<»,ro„^ ' !i^o* justices. J^^L. Williams j groes has been sCt up^on an _eq- -chief Justice Hughes continued i fit *MiBg evea nt,tM,to a «•!- 
the Insurance , of St. Louis anid William Hogs 1 ual plane with tha^ for whites, by asking, whether "this sum had ' legtimiget already prepared." 


in t*e country, compaiable even | hackle 25 years ago by an 85 year 


tive tosses end gains. 
Most notable of the ♦ictori«* 


office wttch swept 


was that which s^-ept back into who profited by ^he '^Jf^^Jll I '*^^ ^i^or 

■ of Democratic votes was Edward j me eaiior 


old Negro who told him his great 
grandmother imported the hackle 
when brought to Ihe U S. as a 
slave. The relic consists of about 
90 spikes protruding point vT 
throuch a small wooden board, 
bound with haad wrou^t iron.- 

The hackles were used years ago 

ics is limited." smiled Chief Jos- to tear flax and hemp before 
tiecj "bat my impresskm is that being woven mto crude cloth. ; 
theije is nsaally some diffienltyl 2^ 


d 


«*«~. R«,r»«.„t,t,v« Arth,.^ w M. Sneed. popular Democratic \ Counsellor, Mrs Jean Mtu^eu ett of Kansas City, white attor- Gaines is a gi^duate of that „ot been budgeted to the end of . When the university's attorneys 
^AeU^Ttoe S diSirt! ^ SinmfttSnairSfX Third Ward ; Strode, is a graduate o*^ Western ; neys, spoke foj- the unive^ty school. Lincoln JTniversity; ^ He |the year," and whetlier Lincoln, I declared one of the non-debata§e 


.»<>v.^^ w -.^ *"-. -„«.^., _„ „K_ vomi, out as countv commiss- Keserve universiij, « ^^^^-u^'- ••• . ana were suo]ectea to 
^t^l^'^V^^J^ »'S^ I^S^rTbe tbe^Syiis race I the Cleveland PU^Uc schools for | questions by the court. 


Strode, is a graduate of Western ' neys, spoke for the university school, Lincoln University; He _ 

Reserve university, a teadier in j and were subjected to searching should ^ave appilied there for a hike'mofet universities 


be inscribedr ;'TTie only Negro -J*""^ ^ '^vT t^^^T ThX~nth«^ [ five vears and has been employ- 
representative ' in the halls <a^io_aBur._^ti^^hono^.^Thej^^ ^^^^^^ JJ^ 


-marking 


Congress," 
third terns. 
KepabUcaas gf 


Mitchell's fornwr coimty commissiongr was 


the district 


Oscar DePriest elected about 20 ! umnost reporter, and advert.. mp 
years on the Republican ticket ! representative by several ^ew^« 
Rrst Republican political trum- • papers. ^ 


hewever, ae J^^bnt »yCT flie ^ ^ bloV a blast for the 1939 , ^U,-. 

showmg m^ittr «beir candidate, ^ayorality election sounded off 2 NAMED ON OHIO 
;t!f*S2*a^!f V^JlTZtt *is week wh«^ it was reported j STATE DEBATING TEAM 

COLUMBUS. O.. Nov. 17, (AN 


the Seeoai* Ward, a Wortd War ^^^ former Mayor William Hale 
veteran, leader m City baU eooa- Thompson long a friend of Ne- 
groes, bad announced that short- 


eil circles and widely known for 
hb oratory. They point to Mit- 
clieirs victory by the narrow 
margain of 2.5M votes as iadieat- 
iag tliat nearly TIM9 eoiored 
voters of the district had again 
'^Fea the ligtit" and returned 

iJK Repabticaa ranks. 

^ Concerning the red-hot cam- 
paign and last Tuesday's hectic 
climax. Alderman Dawson said: 
"We are not at all down-heart- 
ed over the outcome of last Tues- 
day's election in the First Con- 
gressional district. Rather are we 
heartened and optimistic about 
the futu/e of the Republican pat- 
ty, not only in Chicago. but 
throughout the nation. Consider- 
ing the odd- against us. I think 
we made a remarkable showing. 
Out of a total of about 56.000. Utive in the Halls of Congress. 


ly he will declare himself a can- 
didate for the GOP nomination 
for Mayor in next February's 
Primary. 

Philo. Loses 
Chance for 
Negro Solon 

PHILADELPHIA. Nov. 17. (A 
NPJ — By a scant margin of 5.911 
votes this city's electorate last 
Tuesday failed to send to Wash- 
ington a fellow-Congressman to 
stand beside .\rthur W. Mitchell 
of Illinois, sole Negro represen- 


P)_William A. Colwell and Geo- 
rge A. Moore, Ijoth senior stud- amendment 
ents. have been named members 
of the debating team of Ohio 
. State University, it T*-as learned 
last week. 


ities in :. Missouri, when tliey 
compelled to leave their 
'. state to rind such equality of 

.. -^jiaie^ to be "the constkntional professioDal iraining in other 

laW course which could have 1 nave chronic deficits , right of a state to segregate the ; states?" 

14TH AMENDMENT VIOLATED been Wganked for $10,000, -but LINCOLN DEFICITS j whiie and black races In edu- J The reply was that Negroes, 

Houston told! the bench that in the meantime! the state would j The attorney replied tnat the catiinal institutions," J us t ice I through the system of oat-of- 

the law departm«it of the Univ- l^ave paid SlSe a year tuition at | nioney had ai fact been allocated Stoge' interposed: [state scholarships, have an ad- 

ersity of Missouri is the lone public universities of any of^four and that Lincoln has a deficit of ; rfhat is the law in some states. 1 vantage o^ about $150 a year ot- 

"' ^ - f„^ 412,000 to $15,000 ivery two But 1 there is also a national point i tr white studente. 

years. He ddded that there has of view.' which is opposed to rac- "Do you mean to suggest Y*** 
been ibut .» single instance in I ial fliscrimination." ' , I tferrupted Justice Black. V* 

which I the iegi3lj.ture refused to QUESHONS "EQUALmT ; h*ls from Alabama, "that a 

m?ke such supplementary appro- 1 Hbw can you say," demanded j cimiary pajTnent would be 
piiations as Lincoln requested. ti»e chief justice, "that Negroes quale compensation for loss 
•Since J921, he declared. Missouri havfe equal educational ooportutir ' dvy rights?" 


state-supported institution of tbat adjacent states,' Illinois, Iowa, 
kind. Since Gaines is a citizen Kansas, and Nebraska, whirh do 
and a taxpayer, his rejection as '^'^^ bar Negroes. 
a student is a denial of his rights NOT MANDATOiBY 
to e<^al protection under the Williams argued |hat the' Miss- 
law, as guaranteend by the 14th ; ouri supreme court has made it 

mandatory uponj Lincolij to es- 


^■'1 



IPII^Iillllili 


votes, the final count showed me 
about 2.500 votes short of beat- 
ing Congressman Mitchell as the 
First District representative. 

WHITE WARDS BALANCE 
OF POWER 

"I cenamly wish to thank all 
of my loyal supporters and 
friends who worked so hard and 
zealously for my election. They, 
as well as I. know that the heav>' 
vote in the 1st and 11th, white 
Democratic wards, was what beat 
us. But w._ are aure that the Ne- 
gro citizenry of Chicago and the 
nation are aroused as never be- 
fore. The political pendulum has 
again started swinging toward 
Repub'.scanism I look for still 
further gains locally in the 1939 
mayoral'y camoaisn and in 1940. 
when the next pres-'fent of the 
United States will be elected." 
Another rreai political upset of 
^the election was the defeat ti 
MH«paMic»t State Senator William 
»•[ King, hy Democratie Second 
Mtf ard Organization President Wm. 
A. Wallace. Wallace won by a 
scant 8M votes, the early returns 
bavin^tedieated Kinit as the win- 
ner. Wallace, a Mnnieipal Conrt 
deputy ^lerfc.-faas long been ac- 
tive in Deaidfentic eireies, and 
win be the first Democratic Ne- 
gro State Senator "in the history 
•f Illisois. 

-\mong the other Repubf^can 
candidates who lost were: O. 
Stanton DePnest. son of the for- 
mer consressman. who ran for 
county commissioner: Jacob R. 
Tipper, pabMsJ\» of the Chicaeo 


Philadelphia's Republican candi- 
date for the second district. Mag- 
istrate Edward Henry, disting- 
uished citizen and jurist was de- 
feated by the Democratic incum- 
bent, James P. McGranery. 

The GjpP electorate later found 
consolation, however, when it 
was learned that E. Washington 


Rhodes, editor of the PhUadel- 
phia Tribune, had been elected a 
member of the State Legislature 
from the 6th district (7th ward). 
Rhodes a former assistant U. S. 
attorney, nosed out the present 
colored Democratic- incumbent 
Samuel D. Hohnes, by S2 ballots. 

Local Democratic history was 
made when J*Irs. Crystal Bird 
Fauset. candfflate for the Legis- 
lature in West Philadelphia won 
a decisive victory and therby 
earned the distinction of being 
the first colored women Repres- 
entative in the history of the 
State. Mrs. Fauset polled 39,726 
votes, winning by a majority of 
5.789 ballots over her nearest 
GOP rival. 

Other Democratic winners for 
the State Legislature were Dr. 
Edwin F. Thompson, reelected: 
Hobson R. Reynolds and William 
A. Allrr.ond. 


file Motion for New Trial of 
BoY/ M, Given Life Term 

NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 17. (By^der with motive". The judge and 
Leon, Lewis for ANP)— Attys, J. i sheriff of New Roads attempted 
D. McNeal and Robert M. Haynie, to escape bitter criticism in the 
retained by the Southern Youth boys conviction by laying res- 
congress and the International ponsibility to the state for not 
Labor Defense, filed motion for having provided an institution 
a new trial in New Roads, La., for juveniles of the Negro race 
this week in the case of 12-year who might be found guilty of 
old Walter Williams, a Negro major crimes. 


Hurry" 

Just A Few Days Remain For You 
To Get $2240 To $3500 Allowance 

FOR YOUR OLD STOVE ON A NEW C.P. 

O'KEEFE AND MERRITT 

GAS RANGE 

Don't Delay Another Day. 
Get Yours Today. You Can 

Have A New 

O'Keefe & Merritt 

C.P. Gas Range 

FOR AS LITTLE AS 

$1 87 


It was found that the state leg- 
islature under the late Governor 
Huey Long had authorized the 
construction of such an institut- 
ion, but had not provided a 
source of funds. 


youth whp was sentenced to serve 
life imprisonment in- the state 
penitentiary. Sentence was im- 
posed by Judge Iris Dupont af- 
ter the kid pleaded guilty to the 
murder of a 9 year old white 
boy. 

The attorneys ,, filed the new 
trial litotion after- setruring per- 
mission- fron) the boy's parents 

and having-the attorneys who re- MCCORY, Ark., Nov. 17, (ANP) 

presented the boy in trial with- — "Aunt Molly** Adams, 130, an 

draw from the case. In the event exslave, died here Monday night. 


Ex-S!ave,130, 
Dies in Arkonsas 


the lower court grants the mot- 
ion, efforts will be made to have 
the boy convicted of manslaught- 
er, thereby making him subject 
to reform school imprisonment. 
If the lower court does not grant 


She was the oldest person in ^ 
Woodruff county and had served = 
in many homes here. Bom near ^ 
Columbus. Miss., in 1836, she : ^ 
grew up on the plantation of Tom ^^ 
Cannon. Her first husband died \^ 




;■! 


LAST CHANCE 

Witli Every Dining Room Set Pnrcliaaed \ ^ QQ 
Before Thanlt^giviag Ton Get a Lovely I 


Dinner Set For Only_ 


Save 25% To 40% 

On Dining Room Suite* During our Pre> 
HoMoy Sole. Beautiful Sets Priced from 

$39.50 TO $298.50 


1 


A Month 


World, candidate for SaniUry 

district trustee and Albert B. ! a new trial, an appeal will be 'soon after the Civil War, ^nd in 
George, former municipal court made to 11.3 state supreme court, the 80's she came with -ISer se- 
judge and again candidate for I Technical state statutes will be cond husband, Joseph Adams, to 
that poeition. Republican win- applied to determine if the Woodruff county where she had 
ners included Ernest A. Greene, youngster is subject to "mur- , lived since. 
Charlea H. Jenkins, A. Andrew 
Torrence and William A. War- 
field, all as state representatives. ' 
Among fbe outstanding winnerf-t 

DO YOU WANT A LUCKY 

LODESTONE.' 

AR* yOO LBCKYf D» y^ CARar A , 
CHAKJt or a ls£.ilstaiic ? Utm mnbMt 
GKKAT LCCE ui th« firt fhiy nrry ■ , 
loadM-WF or rbarm. Scar .ttriNitr POWMt, ! 

urcR «ii StTcvrss fn i.ovb t. titwt.' 

Too van iwL'Jie % Load-^tone hv sradny [ 
%\ for ;. 1>>U4 w»ir: Jnail to«^av. I 

LAND WOVELTT, IWrtlEf.l E PXRK. 5 J. 


O'Keefe & MerriH 

C. P. Ronges 
As Low as $89.60 

WITH YOUR OLD STOVE 


MODEL SHOWN HERE $94.80 

WITH YOUR OLD STC" 
(Liijlit Eitra) 


Here Are a Few of The 22 
Ways an O'Keefe & Merritt 
C.P. Range Saves Yon Time, 
Fitel and Food: 

1. Sinuner Burners Save Vita- 
mins. 

Z. New Burners Cat Fuel Cost 

3. New BroUers Save Time. 

And 19 Otlier 
Important Features. 


Remember: As Much 
$3 COO TrodeAllo. 
^^•^ For Your Old 


Save on Blonkets & Heaters 
Keep Worm 

BLANKETS 



PLAIDS AI«> 
SOLID COLORS 


Beantiful 
Doable 
Blankets 
Part Wool 


$069 1 


2 


Pay Only 2!^c a Week. 

HEATERS 

Safe — Economical 
Losing 

$025 



Cash Today 

ON YOUR 

FURNITURE OR YOUR 
AUTOMOBILE 

No Co-Signers! No Endorsers! 

WE DO NOT NOTIFY YOUR FRIENDS, 
EMPLOYERS OR RELATIVES. 

S. A. SCHERER 



There is No Substitute for PHILCO QualityV 


Only The Inventors and De- 
signers Of The Marvelous 


» 

Phiico Mystery Control 

COULD HAVE ENGINEERED THIS VALUE THAT 
YOU WOULD EXPECT TO COST $125.00 

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HOLLYWOOD 
ianta Monica Sc Vine 

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Colorado 8t El Molino 

LONG BEACH 
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SANTA MONICA 
12th & Wilshire Blvd. 

HUNTINGTON PARK 
Florence Sc Pacific 

SAN DIEGO 
2nd & B Streets 

(Cot. Woskingfon) 


TELEPHONE: RI -47S9 

Let JUAN RAY 
(FEATHER YOUR NEST) 

Eves. Till 9 

AotlMriKsd Electrohix Dealer 



CROWN LOAN OFFICE 

#LOANS# 

On clotlunc, fan. Jewelry, illam— *t, HsaiMl i^atraaMslB, 
svwtikg ! «■*». tmks, tMb, ete. Yra cu gat frfeati jmi waal 
at the reiiaUe CSOWN LOAN (WFICK. -| | 

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DARK LAUGHTER 


by or Horringloii 



• "FIGHT? NO OFFICER, THERE WUZN'T NO FIGHT. WE JEST ASK- 
ED MR. BOOTSIE AN' STEWMEAT TO LEAVE ON ACCOUNTOF THEY ISN'T 
IN OUR SOCIAL SET." 

T years, she was a prominent mem- 
ber of the People's Independent 
Church of Christ. Household of 
Ruth, Daughter Elks, and Com- 
panions of the Forest. Services 
were held yesterday from the 
Church. Rev. Clayton D. Russell 
oflficiating. Interment in Ever- 
green Cemetery. Conner-Johnson 
Co. in charge. 

Funeral services will be held 
today for Mrs. Ellen Cook, who 
died last Friday, from -New Hope 
Baptist Church, at 1 p. m. Mrs. 
Cook, was 95 years of age and 
had been a resident of Los An- 
geles for 45 years. Among the 
surviving relatives are: Mrs. Ger- 
trude Brown, 717 E. 32nd St., 
with whom she lived. Mrs. 
Thomas, and James Cook, all 
grandchildren. Interment will be 
in Rosedale Cemetery. Conner- 
Johnson Co. in charge. 


E6*" ,. f 


Vital Statistics 

INTENTIONS TO WED 

Reville Drake, 27, 1163 E. 43rd 
St.; Vivian L. GunneU, 17, 631 

E. 38th St. 
Daniel E. Fowler, 26, 755 B. 32nd 

St.; Addine N. Bank«, 21, 4121 
Hooper Ave. 

Joseph M. Perry, 56, 1130 E. Ad- 
ams Blvd.: Delithia Henry. 48, 
1108 E. Adams Blvd. 

Rex Quail. 58. 1973 Holly Dr., 
Hollywood; Lola Mae Ellis, 27, 
343? McKinley St. 

Chesley D. Cunningham, 46, 803 
E. 28th St.: Rgsalie E. Deason, 
28, 1515 E. 49th St. 

Giodfrey White. 20. 485 W. Wash- 
ington St.. Pasadena: Frances 
McReynolds. 18. 896 Manzanita 
Ave.. Pasadena. 

O. D. Thompson, 28, 651 E. 45fh 
St.: Mattie Purdie, 25, 643 E. 
45th St.: Jason F. Lewis. 25, 
4277 S. ^Central Ave.; Vivian 
Johnson. 26, 10402 Grape St. 

James R. Woods. 24, 1636 E. S2nd 
St.; Lillie M. Wright, 21. 1146 
E 25th St. 

Lenious S. Davis, 43. 874 E. 50th 
St.: Blanche Walker, 40, 1039 
E. 52nd PL 

.Samuel Moore, 31, 10416 S. Comp- 
ton St., Watts; Juanita Dyer, 
20, 1686% E. 40th PI. 

Walter L. Jenkins. 22. 4355 Hoop- 
er Ave.; Lucille Baldwin. 18. 
648 E. 45th St. 

Fred Robinson. 22. 946 E. 54th 
St.; Bette J. Smith, 19, 660 
Brooks A\'V.. Venice. 

BIRTHS 

Rubin, Hendrix. Nov. 8 at 
home to Mr. and Mrs. Rubin 
Hendrix. 5206 Holmes .Avenue. 

Smith, Sandra Lucille, Nov. 5 
at home to Mr. and Mrs. Gustave 
5inith,*'724 E. 29th Street. 
. Brown, girl, Nov. 4 at General 
Boapital, to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey 
Brown, 9234 Pace Avenue. 

Franklin, girl. Nov, 4 at Gener- 
al Hotpital to Mr. and Mrs. pran 
Franklin, 634 E. 35th Streeti 

Cununings, Frank Ed\*rard, 
Nov. 8 at, home to Mr, and Mrs 

F. E. Cummings, 11117 Alabama 
Hale, girl, Nov. 4 at home to 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hale, Jr., ^ 1837 
E. 105th Street. 

^HiU, Georgia Taylor, Oct. 28 at 
white Memorial Hospital to Mr 
and Mrs. William Archer Hill 
IMl W. 35th street. 

Alexander. Earnest. Oct. 24 at 
Bon Air Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. 
Earnest Alexander, , Sr., 14318 
Success Avenue. 

Henderson, Eleanor Bern ice 
NOV. 3 at home to Mr. and Mrs 
Lambert Richard Henderson 741 
Clanton street." 

Tampkins, boy, Nov. 3 at Gen- 
eral Hospital to Mr. and Mrs 
Leonard Tampkins, 2401 E 109tli 
atreet. 

DEATHS 

HUton. Elizabeth. 11. 1225 E 
51ft street. Nov. 5 at General 
Hoapttal. Burial Nov. 10 ia Ever- 
green Cemetery with A. J. Rob- 
trta Sons and Co. in charge. 

Johnson, Sarah. 96. Nov 7 at 
late residence, 1011 E- 116th St 
Burial Nov. 10 at Rosedale Ceme- 
tery* with A. J. Robert? Co in 
charge. » 

Wwards, Charles Wright 68 
ajTH E. 1st street, Nov. 2 at Gen- 
eral HospitaL Burial arrange- 
ments Incomplete at this publica- 

tiOB. 

Henry, Ishmeal. 37, 2135 Clin- 
ton avenue, Oct. 29th at General 
Hospital.) Cremated Nov. 7 at the 
County Crematory. 

XA8T BitKS HELD FOR THE ' 
POLbOWtSC PERSONS BY 
OOl^ER- JOHNSON CO. INC. 

Funeral services for the late 
Lillian Johnson were held Thurs- 
day from thp Sev'enth Day Ad- 
ttiet Church, Elder Pj G.^Rod- 


-^Evergreen Cemetery with Con- 
ner-Johnson Co. morticians in 
charge. 

Funeral services were held, 
Monday for Ed. Davis from the 
Conner-Johnson Co. parlors. Mr. 
Davis, was a protninent Elk, con- 
nected with the Lodge in Bakers- 
field. Rev. Wm. Walker officiat- 
ed with interment in Paradise 
Memorial Cemetery. 

Conner-Johnson Co. parlors 
held the funeral services of, 
Joseph Jenks, Tuesday. Mr. 
Jenks died after a lingering ill- 
ness at his late residence, 927 E. 
33rd street. Interment was in 
Evergreen Cemetery. Rev. J. D. 
Gordon officiated. 

Mrs. Lucy HqUand, parsed 
away after a long ijlness at her 
residence, 1423 E. l8th St., Satur- 
day. Beside being a resident of 
Los Angeles for more than 23 


Turkeys To Be 
Given At Dance 

Five turkeys will be given aw- 
ay to as many lucky pers>n"3 at- 
tending the Thanksgiving Dance 
at the Elks' Auditorium, 4016 S. 
Central avenue, on Thursday 
night, Nov. 24. 

Dancing will continue from 
nine until to the music of Geor- 
ge Brown and His Ebony Colleg- 
ians. Admiss'on will be 40 cents. 
By E. A. SCOTT 


I 


Winter Pears Are Fkf 
For Qukk Breakfaau 




NOW YOU TOO CAN HM/E THAT 


LIGHTER SKIN 


THAT -MEN ADMIRE 
AND WOMEN ENVY 

WTien SKln is too 
dark rough, 
blotch, etc., 
spread on g e n- 
uine DR. FRED PALMER'S 
SKIN WHITENER. It must make 
nature work faster to bring out 
a lighter, brighter, cleaner new 
fkin surface or your money back. 
25c at drug stores. 


Dr. FRED Palmers 
SKIN WHITENER 


FREE SANPU For Free Sample, 
write to DR. FRED PALMCR'g 
LABS. Dept. 302, AUanta, Ga. 



g«^ affriating latflnnent in 


By BETTY BARCLAY 

No coazinK sonny to Mt whao 
tha dUh it new and yu»iny!. Try i 
peeled, sliced Bote or Asjou %*rl«tr 
pear*, cor^red with oranga jniee, 
and you'll know what I ' aaaan! 
S«rTe them In a sherbet Elass, or 
small cereal dish and spoon. 

If th« pears are pennlttad to 
BUnd untU they are ripe and juicy, 
they sre alecant sirred freah 
I peeled, first), eataa with a apooa. 

Psara with Caraal 
Or simply serrs the sliced pears 
with cream — no sugar needed. 

Another suggestion Is to add 
sliced fresh pears to a cereal - 
either a crisp, dry cereal, or mbtei 
Into a cooked hot cereal — a fe'. 
chopped Butmeatt may be added - 
Borrewlth^ sugar and cream. Th'. 
Is poaiti^ely i* luxe. 

Baked Paai* 
For breakfast fruit of aa dlnaar 
dessert, baked pears are excellent 
For aooBonir. bay big pears, and 
bake a panful, keeping in cool place 
and ut>ing as needed: they will last 
up to 10 days. Baked pears can 
be raried by bastinc with dlfferaat 
klnda of srrup, such as mapla, 
lemen-flarored, and marshmallow 
(16 marshmallows and 1% eupa 
water.) A faTortta way la aa fol- 
lows: 

Bakad Psara wHH Ralalna 

Pare and core nicely-shaped fresh 
pears; fill the centers with brown 
sugar, ralsias and ' nuta which do 
not need to be well mixed, bat put. 
la by pinches. Sprinkle orer alt 
sugar and cinnamon. Corar tha 
bottom of the baklar PU with 
water and put in the peai^. Keep 
rover on for 45 minutes. Bake ntttll 

•ini'er — about one hour at 250 
'iefTiees. Excellent serred with 
whlpps* 


Lueky Heart Aaren t 

Twice AS MUCH KCMhr. A«HSkB 

that used to nudM nO to t» a week 

caa make up to MMa a week Mm 

TT ON! Be a Loekj 
DOUBLB TOUl 


up 
>K ] 

Heart Agent. 


thne. rROK NOW ON! Be a Loeky 

gent. DOUBLB TOUR 

MONBT. Wrtte now for sa.ta worth 


Willifig Workers Entertain 

Visiting Rector witfi Dinned 

The Rev: 5V. Prince Edwards ♦- . ~-~—:^.. 


Of New Haven, Conneticut who 
yisited in the city during the an- 
niversary celebratioQ of St. Phi- 
lip's Episcopal, church was honor- 
ed with diner last Sunday even- 
mg in the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
M. Andrews in Zamora street by 
the W^hig Worker* Guild of St. 
Philips. 

.• Ared and white florkl motif 
1vaa carried out and supplement- 
ed by a centerpiece of fruit and 
autumn leaves. A sumptuous tiir- 
key diner was served,;; j|o about 
twerity-flve guests including Fr. 
and Mrs, H. Randolph Moore of 
St. Philips and ^e, husbands and 
friends of guild members. 

Officers of the organization in- 
clude Mmes. Viola Pollack, presi- 
dent; Bell Alston, vice-president; 
Curry, recording* secretary; King, 
corresponding secretary; Juanits 
Henderson, treasurer. Other 
members are Mmes. Lotti^ Irwin, 
Baugh, Gertrude Wharton, A. b! 
Ashford, Madge Andrews, Misses 
Jeanette Howard and Madge An- 
drews. . . ' 


Style Chd 




^TK«r»doy, NoY«mb«r tJj 


1958 


Liquor Party 
Culminates 
in Shooting 

Another "friendly . d inking" 
party enaed in a tragedy here 
with the near-fatal shooting Sun-» 
day night of Clarence B«»g3by, 
1145 E. 23th street, reportedly by 
Morris Watson. 25. 

Witness Peggy Wynn told pol- 
ice that Bagsby, Watson and her- 
self in company with Pinas Holl- 
oway and several other people 
were all at Bagsby's home Ear- 
lier in the evening, Miss Wynn 
claimed, she hdd seen Holloway 
with the gun which she said he 
gave to Watson. 

Suddenly without preface of 
any kind. Watson is said to have 
shot Bagsby while the injured 
man was making ceffee in the 
kitchen. Miss Wynn was the on- 
ly other occupant of the house 
in the kitchen at that time. 

Turning on her, Watson is said 
to have told her "I ought to shoot 
you too," and ordered her to get 
in the hedroom. As she turned to 
go, several bullets whizzed past 
her head and A-ere buried in 
the wood above The door. 

Then Watson, accompanied by 
Holloway ran out of the house 
and is still at large. 
, Bagsby's condition i.* consider- 
ed serious at the General Hospit- 

31. > 


WE'RE DISPENSING WlTlH 
.THE USUAL TKEND OF ojir 
style chat this week and takihg 
a peek at winter fashions which 
really reach their zenith between 
the Thanksgiving and Yidetide 
season. For a one word descrip- 
tion of the current modes the 
best one is "up". Despite the 
Hair Dressers decree that hair 
will be down in 1939 no one 
seemr to be rushing the season. 
In fact, .ladies are just beginning 

' to discover variations of the new 

I hair-:do that will suit their par- 
ticitlar profiles and neckline. 
And uft too, goes the neckline 
relieved by clips, petal-like pat- 
terns, or^ tiny bows in the day- 
time frocks. Shoulders are «p 
With the leg-o-mutton sleeved 
puffed at the top emphasizing the 
dependability of the modem lady 

I. . .and, of course, skirts are def- 
initely up. Candidly speaking, 
nothing marks your dress as last 
years style as quickly as length. 
. . .just below the knee is the 
vogue. Shoes are built up for 
glove-like fittings in suede, kid, 
and alligator leather . . . Color 
has fallen in line and tones are 
more exotic than ever, grape ; 

red, bright cocoa brown, sun- ' 
^ shine yellow, and 4 blue akin 
1 to wood violets. 

With the short skirt has come 
the short jacket. Popular in • 
plaids or plain trimmed worn 
loose or nipped in at the waist. . . 
assortments for every style and 
type are very much in evidence 
. . .and at very modest prices. 

Newest in combination of col- 
ors are rich brown with gray. 
A gray crstume suit made up of 
dress and boxy loose fitting 
jacket has a double stand-up col- 
lar, and deep cuff of beaver. A 
gray pillbox hat features a brown 


ESCAIPED YOUTH TEtXS 
STORY TO EAGLE EDITOR 

I (continiied from pace 1-A) 
fingered as he talked. One could 
see be was proud of im clean, 
whole clothing, although it ob- 
viously was not new. ; 

After the interview, when he 
aaked and received permission to 
polish the automobile of the ed- 
itor of the paper, Mrs. C. A. Bass 
he removed his c5at and handing 
it to her implored her to keep it 
safe for him. 

rw HAPpy ! 

"You're cheerful, aren't you?" 
Mrs. Bass asked, during the course 
cf the interview. 

"I'm happy", he corrected her 
quickly. "I'm free. I can go any- 
where I want. I'm going to school 
to learn to be like other people." 

"Why you know", his face was 
shining and his 'voice was full of 
pride, "I'm learning to write and 
spell. I spefled stop and go in the 
class the other day. 

Robert isn't out of the woods 
i yet. Frankly stated,, he hais a 
: place to sleep, but he has to 
' forage for food himself. He does- 
n't ask for charity, but no odd 
job is too lowly for .him to take 
on — until he gets his education 
fitting him to be somebody "like 
other fol^s". 

veil and brown suede bag and 
gloves are carried with brown 
shoes completing the outfit. The 
combination is especially becom- 
ing to clear complexions height- 
ened with bright . make-up that 
is deftly and lightly applied. 

Finishing touches are found in 
gilt-leaved earrings to cover ex- 
posed ears, antique looking brace- ; 
lets, dangled over the wrist. .For ' 
evening wrist corsages and twin 
bracelets are holding their own. 
. . .and you'll be a step ahead of 
your friends if you slip into one 
of the curio shops and buy an or- 
iental silvpr ring hung with clus- 
ters of tiny bells . . .that flaunt 
themselves with every movemen 
of your hand. 




i. 


^^M -^X 


A. HARTLEY JONES noted CaBfomia aeemnrtaBt, wb* 
opened a Finance Company for Eastside Patrons. Mr. Jones Is 'Wpfl 
known as past Exalted Roler of the Local Branch of Elks and fOT 
his display of financial wizardry througljout in varieos 
enterprises of Southern Califomla. 



t 


Telephone: CEntury 21445 
KUlLMANN 
IRON & WIRE WORKS 
12601/2 E. 57th St. Los Angel** 

Interior and Exterior Stair 
Railings, Folding Gates, Wire 
and Flat Iron Screens, Fences, 
Etc Burglar Guards 


AN EXCELLENT HAIR 
STRAIGHTENER 

GUARANTEED to straighten 
the most STUBBORN Hair 
quickly and surely. Pleasing and 
attractive — an excellent tonic — 
giving the Hair a deep luster. 
Costs but a few cents. Write for 
FREE OFFER. 

JOHNS-PACK CO. 


PRE-THANKSGIVING DANCE 

Given by BENJ. J. BOWIE 
AUXILIARY No. 228, and GLEE 
CLUB of the AMERICAN LE- 
GION. Saturday. Nov. 19, 1938. at 
No. 5115 Central Avenue, Ameri- 
can Legion Clubhouse. Good Mu- 
sic by Fannie Benjamin's Orches- 
tra. Admission 25 Cents. 


Late • Popular 
Phonogroph Records 

lOciEach 12 for $1.00 

5634 Melrose Ave. 

Open 11 a. jai. 'til 8 p. m. 


RING AROUND COHAGE CHEESE 


Los Angeles' Finest 
Classified Serric* 


Buying, selling, renting 
whatever your need or 
aciivity, let this great 
newspaper serve y o n. 
Trained ad-takers glad- 
ly assist you in zvriting 
your ad; provide any 
information you zvisli; 
do everything possible 
to insure the best re- 
sults at the least cost to 
you. 



■BP^' "^^K 

P^^L. 

k.. 

1 




MMi 'Vt.^ 


9« ^ 

I'^v.i 

^i^^ 


|;- 

l-li^ 

•^ ' * -4*.^ '■ ^^ -*>, 

- >u If 

It/-. . 







Jellied Vegetable Ring Wiih Cottage Cheese. Here is the list of all 
needed items for this delicious recipe: 


Phone: ADams 9362 

or call at 

Hie EAGLE office 

M7S S. Central 


of g^jftmnteed 

n«Torinxs. curio* aaa BIO 
CASS TREE of Mil 
Heart Qw D«(it 


}& 





' 1 pkg. lime gelatin 
1 cup boiling water 
1 cup cold water 
1 cup shredded cabbage 
Vi cup shredded raw carrots 


Vi green pepper, chopped 
I teaspoon chopped onion 
1 tablesnoon lemon juica 
V] teaspoon salt 
C^ive cottage eheeae 
Watercress 
Dissolve the gelatin in the boiling water; add the cold water. Cool, and 
add the shredded and chopped vegetables, with lemon juice and salt. 
Pour into a 6^/2-ineh ring mold; chill until firm. Unmold, fill th« center 
with chive cottage cheese, and garnish the plate wltii watercress. 



V 


RWHTAWAY 
SERVICE 


-^ .= 


if* Chinese Herbs 

F*r iUttta Mi Mrtita INs 

Ehjirk nrUrt. LoB^ Co»t. Ho«»» 
=«I1« on r«<iueat. .Vw-*« In att««d. 

<rr» for wom^n patienls. 

Dr. Ipp,:5Z5~ti« t. Mala 

Heura: 11 «. m.-» p. m. VA. «0»7 


Thoughtfulness - - - 

WHEN and WHERE 

It is Most Needed. 


f 


d non 


When Service and nonesfy Count Most! 

Sudldeh .bereavement is a tremendous strain. 
! -K. Seemingly: uninifjor'tarit responsibilities become 
clouded, Decisions must be made quickly. 

For trustworthy dependability, for expert os- 
sistonce in completing plans and arrangements, 
we offer e^^ry possible advantage and protection. 

* .21 TfARS EXPERIENCE 

1 has prepared us to of^er the finest type of helpful 

service qyd«lot>lepnywhere. " . 

Motoreyele Servlv WiUi All Fonerala WitlHMit Extra CoM 

CONKER ^JOHNSON CO., INC. 

I UNDERTAKERS and FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

I - 1400 kast 17th St. 



PRosj>cct3lOT 



Buy A Home Now ! 

^* IN THE 

New Modern 

BLODBEH TfillCT 

j 

Pay Less Than Rent !! 

• New Homes InThit Improved Moderii 
Tract Are Available Oil Very Eosy Terms] 

• All ImprovementsAre In— Water, Gos. 
Lights, Street Work. 

• Fully Approved By The Federo I Housing 
Administration, vj i 

• Drive Out Today And Select Your New 
Home. \ 

The Blodgeti^ Tra 

IMPERIAL AT W4 

Office: 251i Centrol Ave.p >iroft^\ Adiiins 8614 



V WITHIN City 


-■-;? Aj^ ! --^ 



f Local Tuskegee Club to Present Part^ 


>t.-v 


Tomorrow 

3^;i"sifcODd Baptist Church, 24th <f 


at Second idptist 


' : arid Gkiffith avenue, toirtorrow 
(Friday) evening, 8 o'clock, the 

, LoK Angeles Tuskegee Club will 

■ present "Tuskegee Institute", a 

_p«mel discussion. 

The purpjise of this unique 
program is tc*describe to the pub- 
lic the-impor lint place this world 
famed educational center has 
carved for itself in all branches 
of higher learning and to promote 



Junior Hi Girl Reserveis to 
Griffith Park for Festival 

The City Wide Junior High Girl^ 
Reserve planning committee an- 
nounces an international song 
festival to be held in Griffith 
Park this week end, November 
18 and 19. The fest is hope to 
strengthen acquaintance with 
Girl Reserves around the world. 

Interest in the program lias 
been heightened by Miss Evan- 
glena Allyera, Girl Reserve sec- 
retary from the Phillipines, who 
is visiting the Los Angeles asso- 
ciation. 

Girls from the following junior 
high clubs will attend: Foshay, 
Lafayette, Jordan, McKinley. 
These groups will participate as 
well as share the benefit of the 
program. 

IThe Girl Resepe committee, 
the advisers and the mothers 
council are maknig plans for a 
fuller program. In the develop- 
ment of the "Worldly Wise" pro- 
gram the title for book week, 
"New Books . . . New World", is 
being used by one of the senior 
high schools. Another club is 
using "New Names ... New 
World" for a special program. 


▼th< 


A. C. COLE 
resident Local Tuskegee Club 


the Washington Memorial Fund, 
a Tuskegee, Club projecj4 

Panel participants ^nclude Dr. 
Wm. R. Carter, outstanding min- 
ister and recent NYA appointee; 
C. O. English, Golden State Mu- 
tual Insurance official; Dr. P. 
Pryce Cobbs, local practicing 
physityan; Joseph Ellis, member 
Mrs, Charlatta A. Bass, 
EAGLE editor-publisher, is 
scheduled to offer remarks at 
close of program. 
of the George Carver Club and 
UCLA' student; A. R. Moseley. 
teacher at Jefferson Evening 
High school. 

Floyd Covington, executive di- 
rector. Los Angeles Urban lea- 
gue; Father H. Randolph Moore, 
vicar St. Philips Episcopal 
church; Lieut Wm. Powell, 
teacher , of aeronautics, Jefferson 
Evening High: Miss "^ Pumphey, 


The French typewriter Co. now 
located at 1021 South Main St., 
has a most complete li ne of 
STANDARD TYPEWRITERS 
slightly used and reconditioned 
as good as new? Now here is the 
GOOD NEWS — these typewriters 
can be purchased for as LOW AS 
,$27.50 and on a BUDGET PLAN 
TOO. 

The French typewriter Com- 
pany have been in business since 
1925 — their first location was 755 
South Main Street on the 3rd 
floor, however, with their busi- 
I ness gradually increasing — they 
were compelled to move to much 
1 larger quarters and you will now 
I find them at the present location, 
! 1021 South Main Street. The 
Store is very easy to reach as it 
is right at the triangle where 
_ Main Street, and Broadway come 

reglsteV%d'nurserinTM"rs!''Au-|^°S^*^^^- ^° ^" ^"^ ^"o*^ ^.h^''' 


DID YOU 
KNOW? 


gusta Glover, who is active in 
P.-T. A. work here. 

Features of the discussion, 
made known today by A. C. Cole, 
president of the local club and 
well known member of the L. A. 
P. D.'s traffic division, will be 
"Life of Booker T. Washington", 
"The Health Center"'. "The Hos- 
pital and Clinic", 'Tuskegee In- 
stitute As A College", "Military 
Training and Why the Need of 
Aviation", "Extension W o r k", 
"Dr. George W. Carver As A Sci- 
ntist ", "Tuskegee Graduates in 

OS Angeles and Elsewhere", and 
The Influence of Tuskegee In- 
stitute in Establishing Better 
Race Relations". 

Completing the attractive pro- 
gram, Mrs. A. R. Mosely. program 
chairman, stated that Mme. Flor- 
ence Cole Talbert, Clmton Rose- 
mond, both of whom are nation- 
ally known artists, and Ruther- 
ford Sanford, will appear in 
special numbers. 

SAY YOU SAW IT 
IN THE 'EAGLE' 

We are trying terribly h^rd to 
make the California Eagle a Big- 
ger and Better Paper, We are 
asking the cooperation of all who 
are interested in helping us to 
do so. 

When purchasing from the ad- 
vertisers in the California Eagle 
. . . Say you saw it in the CAL- 
IFORNIA EAGLE! 


wonderful stock of typewriters 
will also find a staff of four alert 
and courteous salesmen at your 
service and two outside mechan- 
ics to service your machines. The 
French TypewTiter Co.. have for 
many years kept the Los Angel- 
es Examiner's entire stok of 
machines in good condition, and 
many, many other of the larger 
firms in L. A. 

Before purchasing a typewrit- 
er or any machine, may we sug- 
gest that you visit the French 
Typewriter Co.. — You will not be 
Sony. - 

Issue Invite 
To Reception 

You and Your friends are cor- 
dially invited to attend a recep- 
tion in honor of the president of 
the Federation of Colored Wom- 
en's clubs, Mrs. Ada Brownlee, 
sponsored by the Harriett Tub- 
man club of Pasadena, Sunday 
afternoon, Nov. 27, at the home of 
the president, Mrs. V. Corry, 787 
N. Garfield Avenue, 4 to 7 p. m. 
AU club members are especially 
invited. State officers and presi- 
dents of clubs, president Emerit- 
us, Mrs. E. A. Warner honored 
guests. 

The Harriett Tubman club will 
serve breakfast Sunday,- Nov. 27, 
from 7 to 9 a. m. at the Chicago 
club house. Waffles and Country 
Sausage. 


§/aur 



RED'S 

Courteous Delivery Service 

PHONE: PA-9500 

3565 SO. WESTERN AVENUE 



The Choicest Selected Poultry^ in Lps Angeles 

At Competitive Prices 


CHICKENS 
DUCKS 
G££SE 
RABBITS 


FAST FREE 
DELIVERY 


'smYt'SsRANCH poultrs 

2725 CENTRAL AVENUE CE-.26468 




HEALTH 
HAPPIKESS 

By Dr. George Parrish 

It is said that a lobster, when 
left high and dry on the rocks 
by the retreating tide, has not 
intelligence afld energy ert- 
ough to work his way back to 
the ocean but waits for the sea 
to come and get him. If the 
sea does not come, he remains 
where he is and dies. The world 
is full of human lobsters, men 
stranded on the rocks of life, 
who, instead of using their own 
energies, are waiting for some 
wave of good luck to come al- 
ong and set them afloat. 

AU great heroes and heroines 
of history have been fighting 
men and women. Some fought 
wtih their heads, some fought 
with their hands, and some 
with both. 

It is divine nature in us that 
finds pleasure in toil, joy in a 
gooa scrap, and happiness in 
tasks well done. It is the anim- 
al nature of man that causes ' 
him to shun difficulties and to 
take the avenue of least resis- 
tance. It is up to us to take 
our chances. We can be lobsters 
if we wish and remain supinely 
on the rocks; or with a little 
rierve and energy and a little 
hustle we can be real men. 

In the werld of sti-ance, lit- 
erature and business, the most 
valuable asset is the man of 
fifty, but we should have more 
of them and we would if we 
took care of ourselves. Every 
man of 50 should insist on eight 
hours of sleep in a well ven- 
tilated room and no two per- 
sons should sleep in a jingle 
bed; on arising take a. couple 
of minutes of deep breathing; 
eat breakfast slowly. Have the 
office well ventilated. At noon 
walk fifteen mmutes and then 
a salad and a bowl of milk 
toast. Return to the office and 
lie down for one-half hour. 
Take a well balanced dinner. 
Milk is preferrable to coffee 
or "booze". Have a yearly phy- 
sical examination. Make it a 
rule to walk at least three miles 
each day at a time that suits 
you best. 

Don't believe the many faka 
ads you read. Hippocrates said, 
"An important, irfiase of medi- 
cine is the ability to appraise 
the literature correctly." 

"So if life be short at best, 
If we wonder what and why. 
Here's a toast to pledge with zest 
Friendship ever — you and I; 

If the day be gray and sad, 
Let us fight on and go through 
And at evening just be glad. 
You for me and I for you." 





DON'T FORGITj 

■' ■ THE i ^ ■-;! j-- . ' 

MARBLE INN 

"THE HOME OF ARISTOCRATIC FfOODS" 

THANKSGIVING I 
WE FEATURE , | 

A Real Turkey Dinner 

With All The Trimmings 

j 

1820 Imperial 1:1 igh way 

Just East of Compton Blvd.! 



REMEMBER? 

Last Thanksgiving GIBBS broke all Records on 
Centrol Avenue, serving Turkey Dinners.. He in- 
tends to do Still Better This Year. 

12 Choice Entrees Served With Ail 

TURKEY DINNERS j ^ 

Gibbs' Jockey Club Cofe 

Central Avenue At 43rd Street 


A 

REAL 

TURKEY 

DINNER 

29^ 


With AII'Trimimings 
IT* I 4314 South 

jvarls ^"^'o' 


LEWIS' 

P.D.Q 
BARBECUE 

We Specialize In - 

. HOME MADE' 

SWEET POTATO PIES 

HOT LINK SAUSAGE 

CREOLE GUMBO 

MEXICAN CHILI 

BEER & SOFT DRINKS 

FREE DELIVERY 

J. 0. Lewis, Prop. 

4210 SO. CENTRAL 



62c 


ALSO 

Chicken, Duck, Rabbit, 

Rare Steaks, Chops, or 

Baby Liver Dinners 


DUXBAR GRILL 

4227 SOUTH CENTRAL AVENUE 


IN THE DUNBAR HOTEL 


EAT THANKSGIVING DINNER 

AT MURRAY'S DUDE RANCH 

Full Course Turkey Dinner 75 Cents. Enjoy That Refershinr 
Mountain Air. Healthful and Restful. For Reservations Write 
Box 257, VictorvUle. MR. LELA O, MURRAY. 


J 

E 


THANKSGIVING is celebrated in most 
American homes today the same as in the 
days of the Puritan*, with a TURKEY DIN- 
NER. 

Should your dinner be a failure think 
of the embarrassment — so be doubly cautious 
in doing your buying, 'especially your TUR- 
KEY — which is the main feature, and is more 
of a problem in buying. ., 



*>Hrl, 


HOW TO BUY THE BEST TURKEYS— 
First go to a Reliable Poultry Market, 
and aak for a No. 1 Prime TURKEY. 
Remember there are Four grades, inferior to 
the one quoted. So we urge you to go to a 
very reliable Poultry Market, where you can 
depend on getting the best quality. Remem- 
ber it is utterly impossible to get top Quality 
at the cheapest price. 

For qnaUty, reliability, and service, the 
reputation of JENKINS POULTRY MAR- 
KET is above reim>ach. 





Jenkins^ Poultry, 

"Qua li ty GuQ ranteed" 
1 387 E. Vernon Ave. CE-2235 1 

FREE DELIVERY 


Sales tax will 
b* added to 
retail prices 
on all taxable 
Itema. 


DUHDIflll DEL MONTE 
~W"l"IMn i ORLIBBV No. 2"/ 
Golden pumpkin for holiday ,1. ' 
plee. (Mlsaton Inn Pumpkin, "" 
No. 21/2 can, 8ei) 


OYSTERS 


210 .. OCc 

can. ^ J 

1? 


Your 


TROPICAL 
BRAND 32. „. 

Jar 


MINCEMEAT 

Molat type minckmeat. (None 
Such Concentrated Mince* 
meat, 2 boxes fqr 21c.) 

i FINE 
eUALITY 
Wlllapeint brand, Csye 
oysters. (ISi/i-ot, size can 
priced at 19c.) ■■ 

PEACHES^VlRlkT' 

Sliced or halved iCallfomI 
clings. (Whole spiced 
peatihes. No. 2'/2iean, 1Sc.) 

APPLE CIDER 

Marttnelll brand, pure appfe 
elder, the traditional bever- 
age for the holidays. 


^uart 
bottle 


Btll's S«aMi|iii9 

For poultry. Package- 


Golden Datds 

Dromedary. 16-ciunce bo: 

Scffdicsf Raisins 

Gun-Maid Nectab-a. 1S-er. box 

Snowdrift : 

Shortening, l-lbj 11c c*" 

Airway Coff^ 4 ibs. 

Mellow, mIM \ .* f"" 

Edwards CejFfo* 

Vacuum packed^ l-lb. can— 

Nob HUl Ceftto h ib*. 

FInett quality j., , * '•'"| 
Black Tea i 

Canterbury^ '/a-^b. *■»" 

Grap* Juieti 

Welch's Concorii. Qt. betti* 


9c 

15c 

Sc 

'c?n 50C 


2Se 
22c 
3SC 

2tc 
37c 


CRANBERRY 
SAUCE 

Stokely or Ocean Spray 

2'™ 21c 


WALNUTS 

Diamond. Lge, budded 


22< 


FLOUR 

Kitchen Craft "home, 
type" blend 


NO BOTTLE DEPOSIT 

WIrea Yes lay 

LUCERNE 
MILK 



Packed In the 
new, lightweight 
"one-trip" con- 
tainer. It eaves 
apace In the re- 
frigerator, tee. 


Per 
Qurt 


8 


Price effective 

In Lea Angeles 

metropglltan 

area only. 


BEEF 

ROAST 


per 
lb. 


PRIME RIB 

Hacy fMit, <M frMB first livt ril^ at Saftway bcaf. 

i-z t^n Hiiir 

PaHy HMl»rlM|, wHk aM ittaM hmm 


por 

lb. 

r. Whola or half. 



Lata H«w* type. 


Eatmor brand,! Hiby-rad 
Fin* for sauoej 

Firm, eeldin-i'4M fruK. fMdtuin size fliigere. 
largie bunehea.! " 


lb. 


3 


lbs. 
for 


29- 
33' 

21' 

tr 


Ji''i!!-~5^i«jkv».?J«!*i»i^ Prtew « 


In ?«ftw«y.«m[it«l <lep«rt!m»nta rt 


«*fc 


S;iiiiaBpr»!;j5>^ii.bi:i 


-v'J..--* i' •■■ ^-'.-t*- -< - 43-*' r---.. ^- . "■■^; v^^r ■■'/'■I ■] - . ■: . . 


etiv* through Saturday, Nov. II, 
ka within 3S mllaa at Lea Angelaa. 


MENU 

Soup: Chicken Noodle 
ROAST YOUNG 

TOM TURKEY 

With Oyster Dressing 

VEGETABLES: 

Green P«as Mashed PoUtooes 

BREAD: Hot RoUs 

DESERT: Plum Pudding:, 

Pumpkin or Mince Pie 

BEVERAGE: Coffee 

RELISH: 

Olives, Celery, Cranberry Sauce 


{tHELYN COSTELLA 

THE QUAUTY CAFE 

;. ilust tnldrged Tp Accomodate j 
\ \ - - Fast Growing Business 

A REAL HOME COOKED 

TURKEY DINNER 

^ .^"WithAll The Extras f' 

JtOAST TURKEY— ROAST DUCK 

FRIED CHICKEI^— FttlED FISH— FRIED OYSTERS 
! CHOICE OF VEGETABLES 

CHITTERLrNGS 

— • ^THERE QUALITT IS PARAMOUNT _ 

4216 So. Central Avenue Los Angeles, Calif. 


Visit ( 


4^ 


s") Westside Cafe 


I/) 
O 

< 


z 
< 

z 
u 

< 
o 


3567 SO. WESTERN AVE. 

PHONE: PAA9221 

DIN 

BEER 
• WINE 

Good Old Southern Barbecue 

PREPAKED BY 

HENaV COMPTON 
All Kinds of Sandwiches Mode fo Take Out 

Bar Service -:- Tables for Ladies 


The0. Gorreff- 

Formerly Chef Cook 

STEVENS CAFE 

Oakland, Calif. 


Henry Compton' 

Ten Years with 

SUNSET GOLF CLUB 

L»s Anpeles, Calif. 


PROPRIETORS 



IRKEYS 


SELECTED PLACE 

No. 1 QUALITY YOUR ORDER 

FTtESH DRESSED NOW 

ty, Full Grown Birds That Have Been CarefnUy Selected 
FR^H, LARGE SIRLOIN 

Outers dz. 25c Steaks lb. 23c 


FORI 


PORK 


Rodst lb. nVj'cSousqge lb. 20c 
CHICKENS AT^'„ lb:28^ 

PIChllC HAMS llSffils IbTzSc 


Easte^ HAMS 


SHANKLESS 

WHOLE 
or HALF 


lb. 27c 


TASTY FOOriS FOR HEARTY THANKSGIVING APPET1TF«;_ 
AND SPfeCLM-LY PRICES TO SAVE YOU .MOnI?!^ 


Mince 25« Pumpkin .1 fjc 


MEAT 3 Ibs. 

PEAS 


No. Z'/J can 


Red Bag 17^ 

COFFEE lb. 1 


I he I ^°"^y 

<M^ PEACHES 

\ I Sliced, Lar|:e 


nc 


Pineapple 17^'^ 

27 o«. Can 


SUN MAID 
Raisins 

ZPkfs. 


15^ 


Ofires 

CAN 


10= 


OLEO 

Sflver Nat 


12 


He 


FLOUR 1 a lbs. 39c 


SPERRY 


EGGS doz. 

35: 

Larf e U. S. Extna 


^TTE OB YELLOW \ 19 tb, SOLIDS P^^ 

Corn M eol 25c BU.TJER 33^ 

__i__^ ThanksKiviiig and Later 

t^t HOLIDAY FRUITS & VEGETABLES :_i 


Fancy BoFbank ft Roaset 
Pot atoes 10 IBs. 15c 
Meit Size Swe«t 

Yellow Y«mii 5 IBs. lOc 


Larre Ariaona 

Grtpefruft 


Fancy Pippin 
APPLES 


5 t6s. TOc 


43^ 


8 for 10c 

= GREATER 


Sweet Winter NeUi 

PEARS 3 tts. lOe 

Fancy Swaet Spanish 

ONIONS 4 IBs. 10c 


VALON MARKET 

AvolonBlvd. Plenty of Fr«e Parking 







P«9« Six-A ^ 


suy 




If You Foil To Rm3 TUf tCAUraRMU EA6U YoalMoy lffe*er Knw Tt Happenta 


iiiufiaiy, Nwmfar 17, 1W«. 


SUPERINTENDENT OF SO. ©i^lFi Wi 
CHURCHES SPEAKS HERE SUNI^nr 

DR E D GAYLORD IS SUNDAY MORNING SPEAKER AT LINCOLN : '= i 
MEMORIAL; PASTOR OF ARMENIAN CHURCH SCHEDULED FQR EVENING 
Dr. E. 6. Gaylord, superintendent o^ the Southern California Congrega- 
tional Conference, will speak at the Linc6ln Mernorial Congregational church 
'Sunday morning, according to an announcement by the pastor, Rev. E. E. Light- 
ner. 

A visiting speaker will also fill* > 
the Congregational pulpit Sunday 
•v^ning when Dr. Kapriel Bed- 
resian, pastor of the Armenian 
Gethsemane Congregational 
Churcii wtll speak. 


Uiti^n Turkey Day I Boptist Youhg Pciople'l^ 

^^e..,TAn^ CpitgiSss III Soiita " ^ 


Bishop Greets 

Arkansos 

Methodists 

MONTICELLO, Ark., Nov. 17, 

(By Albert G. Bamett for ANP) 

— Methodist church leaders from 

all parts of the State journeyed 

it was announced this week. The here this week to attend the ses 


Beginning this Sunday morn-, 
iag, November 20, and continuing 
for the next three weeks a church 
appreciation group will be con- 
ducted by the pastor of Second 
Baptist Church, Dr. T. L. Griffith 


services are being held to stim- 
ulate interest in the various de- 
partments of the church. 


It will J>e Texas night at the 
^Hamilton M. E. Church, 18th and 
Naomi, Sunday at 7:30 o'clock. 
All former Texans are invited. 
Epworth League will convene at 
six p. m. la the morning the pas- 
tor. Rev. S. M. Beans, will preach 
from the subject, "All is Mine". 


The Greater Progressive Bap- 
tist Association will convene with 
the Greater Metropolitan Baptist 
Church. 20th and Hooper Avenue 
beginning Tuesday, November 29 
and will continue through Nov- 
ember 29. Rev. G. H. Washington 
is host pastor and Rev. W. L. ! special 


Strauther will preside over the 
meeting. 


sions of the annual South Ar- 
kansas conference which opened 
on Wednesday at Pilgrim Rest 
church with Rt. Rev. Henry 
Tookea, bishop of the 12th dis- 
trict, presiding. 

Assisting the prelate was his 
secretary. Rev. V. M. Townsend, 
I presiding elder MonticeUo dis- 
. titct and president AME Connec- 
tional council; Dr. John H. Clay- 
I born, editor Southern Christian 
I Recorder and a prominently-men- 
I tioned candidate for the bishop- 
j ric; Rev. D. C. V. Lambert, pa's- 
' tor of Pilgrim Rest, and many 
, others. 

I At the evening public meeting 
I reception- for the bishop and vis- 
iting ministers and delegates, a 
program of music and 


The Seventh Day Adventist 
Church at 40th Place and Wads- 
worth Ave., offers another stir- 
ring evening sermon Sunday, 
Nov. 20, at 8 P. M. when the pas- 
tor presents "The Blunder of Ju- 
das" and illustrates this unusual 
sermon by using seveftl score of 
the finest Screen pictures avail- 
able. Sabbath (Saturday) the 
SabBath school begins at 9:25 A. 
M., and at 11 A. M. the pastor 
will present the sermon held over 
from Itst week, "Working for 
righteousness or getting it free — 
which?" 


Joint Thanksgiving services of 


speakirfg was presented with 
many city officials and business 
leaders of MonticeUo delivering 
addresses of welcome. Prof. E. C. 
Deas, noted author of AME church 
hymns and spirituals attended 
all sessions. 

During his address which mark- 
ed opening of the conference. 
Bishop Tookes, pleading for • 
more practical Christianity, de- 
clared: "Throughout our annual 
Oklahoma-Arkansas conferences 
I have attempted to impress on 
my people the need for a practic- 
al Christianity — that which cares 
for a man's bodily as well as 
spiritual well-being. In keeping 
with this idea, we are concentra- 
ting on a great six-point pro- 
gram; child welfare and youth 


UKION THANKSGIVING 
SERVICE AT WESLEY 

Union Thanksgiving services 
will be held at Wesley Chapel 
M. E. Church on Thanksgiving 
Day at eleven o'clock. Churches 
participating are Wesley, Hamil- 
ton M. E., and Phillips Temple 
C. M. E. Church. The combined 
choirs of the three churches will 
render the music under the dir- 
ection of Mrs; Blayeachetti, qhor- 
ister of Wesley while Rev. L. C. 
Cleaves, pastor of Phillips Temple 
wUl preach. 


^•ryice of Trinity 

i The Union Thanksgiving ser- 
vice, spbnsored by the Bethel A. 
M. E. Church, the Presbyterian 
Church tnd the Trinity Baptist 
Church, will be held with the 
Trinity Baptist Church, West 36th 
and Normandie streeU promptly 
at 11:00 a. m., Thursday, Nov. 24. 
ITie services will be arranged to 
close at 12:30 p. m. so that those 
who may attend will have ample 
time for their afternoon plana; 
Tfiis Uijion seirvice is one of three 
similiar services held anriually to 
promote church fellowship 
among the westside church goers. 
^The service this year is expect- 
ed to be of a high order with each 
of the pastors and their official 
stgfli.^aring some part of the 
worship. Music will be furnished 
by the combined choirs of the 
three churches and Rev. White, 
the new minister of Bethel 
Church, will bring the meange. 


The lourth annual YWirilg Pieople's Cbngreas of tfee W«rtern 
Baptist State Convention, R^r C. H. Hampton, president, w|U be 
^eld during the Thanksgiving holidays with the Sscond Bapttat 


Church of Santa Barbara, tiSrJ H.)- « ■ ■ 

ThoiAas, pastor. The date^ of RqYS H 01116 


B. 


Grant Chapel A. M. E. and Shaw | training, religious education, eco- 

(^apel M. E. churches will be 

conducted at six o'clock Thanlcs- 

glving morning in the former 

diurch auditorium. Music will be 

furnished by the combined choirs 

of the two churches and Rev. 

Robert House, pastor of Gran; 

Chapel will speak. Rev. A. C. 

Austin is pastor of Shaw Chspel. 


The Golden State Mutual Life 
Insurance Company will be 
guests of Wesley Chapel M. E. 
church services Sunday morning 
at eleven o'clock. The pastor, 
Rev. E. W. Rakestraw will preach 
and will be followed with a talk 
by William Nickerson, Jr., the 
Company's president-manager. 

At the evening service. Rev. 
Rakestraw will preach from the 
subject, "Preparedness." 


nomic progress, interracial good- 
• will, aid for the needy and jobs 
i for the unemployed. Tnt church 

and those forces which make 
I for the economic betterment of 
I my people must go forward, hand 
, in hand. 

1 The conference closed with a 
; special program on Sunday with 
I an overflow crowd in attendance. 

Bishop Tookes' next conference 

opens Wednesday at El Dorado, 

Ark. 


S. S., B. Y. P. U. 
Congress Meets 
in Son to Borboro 

By MARIE SHEFFIELD 

The Sunday school and BYPU 
Congress, Auxiliary to the West- 
em Baptist State Convention, Dr. 
H. C. Hampton, president, will 
meet in its fourth annual session 
in Santa Barbara, Calif, at- the 
Second Baptist Church, Dr. H. B. 
Thomas, pastor, Nov. 25, 28 ^- 
clusive. 

Theme: Who is sufficient for 
these days? 

The group conferences are to 
be lead by Dr. J. L. Caston, Dr. 
W. R .Carter, Rev. Louis Foster, 
Rev. Frank James, Mrs. Blanch 
Carter, Miss Octavia Payne; key- 
note address. Rev. W. P. Carter; 
address for fellowship dinner, Mr. 
Billie Dickerson, student of the 
Berkeley School of Divinity. Ad- 
dress Friday evening by Dr. J. L. 
Caston, consecration sermon by 


Rev. H. R. Smith, pastor of 
New Hope. Baptist church Oak- 
land is now conducting services 
each night at the Morning Star 
Baptist church, 41st Place and 
Ascot Avenue, it was announced 
by the Paator, Rev. W. L. Strau- 
ther. 


Sunday at three in the after- 
noon. Rev. Smith will discuss the 
subject: "The iFuture Outlook of 
the Race." He will, also, preach 
at both morning and evening ser- 
vices Thanksgiving day. Worship 
begins at 7:30 each evening with 
preaching at 8:C0. 

Ward Chapel A. M. E. church. 
1250 East 25th street, will hold 
special "Thanksgiving service 
Sunday at the eleven o'clock wor- 
ship hour. Elderly and shut-in 
persons are Invited to be special 
guests and will be served free 
lunch following which provisions 
will be made for their return to 
their several homes. 


CHBlSTIAJi SCIENCE CHUBCHES ; 

"Yea, in- the waj of tfiy Judg- j 
meots. O Lord, tutre we waited (or j 
ttiM; the daslr* of our soul is to 
th; name, and to the remembrance . 
of tbee." These words trom Isaiah ' 
are the Golden Text In the Lesson- I 
Sermon oo "Sotil and Bodr" on 
Sunday In all Churches of Christ, j 
Scltntlst. : 

Among the Bible selections are '■ 
these verses from the Psalms: "1 
will bleiB the LORD at all times: 
bis praise iball cantlDually b« tn 
my mouth. Uy soul shall make ber 
boast In the LORD: the bumble 
shall bear thereof, and be glad. U 
magnify the LURO wltb me, and let 
us exalt bis name together." These 
word* of Paul's from the Acta are 
also Included: "Ood that made the 
world and all things therein, seeing 
that be is Lord of heaven and eartb 
dwelleth not In temples mad* witb 
hands; Neither is worshipped wltti 
men's bands, as though be oeeden 
any thing. seelDg b« glTeth to all 
life, and breath, and all things; . . . 
For in bim, we live, and move, and 
nave our being." I 

A passage from the Christian Scl- i 
ence textbook, "Science and Health 
with Key to the Scnpturet," by 

, Mary Baker Eddy, states: "Soul Is 
the substance. Life, and intelligence 
of man. which Is indiTldualized. but 

I not in matter. Soul can never re- 
flect anything Inferior to Spirit. 
Man is the expression of Sout" 



Harry Ford, 
Adventist . 
Head, Dead 

CHICAGO, Nov. 17, (ANP)— 
Dr. Harry E. Ford, widely-known 
leader of the Seventh Day Ad- 
ventist church, a recognized au^ 
thority on x-ray treatment and 
superintendent of the Rivei%lds 
sanitarium, Nashville, died here 
Wednesday at Hinsdale sanitar- 
ium where he had formerly serv- 
ed as assistant business manager. 

The illness which caused his 
death was of short duration and 
came at a time when he was suc- 
cessfully developing the Naahville 
health resort from an almost un- 
known institution into one of the 
foremost sanitariums operated by 
Negroes. 

For more than 17 years.the not- 
ed medical expert was the x-iay 
and laboratory technician of the 
Hinsdale SaniUrium during which 
time he installed the first tech- 
nical equipment there and serv- 
ed as roentgenologist until be was 
called to the superintendency of 
Riverside Sanitarium in Nash- 
ville. 

Dr. Ford was born in Vmcen- 
nes Ind., and in 1916 was married 
to Miss Ida Parker of Logans- 
port, Ind. Called to the army 
during the World War, he serv- 
ed as sergeant in the medical 
corps at Des Moines and had the 
distinction of installing the first 
x-ray and laboratory equipment 
at this military camp. He receiv- 
ed his secondary and college ed- 
ucation at Beechwood Acadomy 
and Purdue university. He was 
also a member of the American 
Roentgenological society. 


MRS. MARIE SHEFFIELD 

President S. S. and B. Y. P. U. 
Congress 

Dr. W. D. Carter. 

The closipg sermon, Sunday 11 
a. m., Dr. H. p. Hampton. 

Trains will be leaving Los An- 
geles Friday, November 26th over 
the Southern Pacific, 5th Street 
and Central Avenue, 8:00 a. m. 
Fares, two dollars and ten cents, 
f$2.10), round trip. Please see 
that your delegates give their 
money to one person for the pur- 
chase of their tickets. For any 
information call the following 
oersons: Mrs. Marie Sheffield, CE. 
23451, president of Sunday 
School Convention; Prof. W. A. 
t'ayne, president of BYPU, El 
Centro or Dr. W. R. Carter, 
chairman of transportation com* 
mission, ADams 6453; Dr. J. L. 
Caston, chairman of education 


Vivian Osbome-Marsh, newly 
appointed State Supervisor of 
Kegro Affairs for the National 
Youth Administration, will ad- 
, dress mass meeting at Friendship 
Baptist Church, 80 West Dayton 
Street, on Sunday afternoon, 
November 20 at 3 p. m. 

Mrs. Adah Brownlee, chairman 
of the arrangements committee, 
expects an enthusiastic audience 
to welcome Mrs. Marsh who will 
present plans for increasing par- 
ticipation of Negro youth in the 
NYA program locally and 
throughoat the state. I 

Assisting Mrs. Browillee in ar- ! 
rangements for the meeting are: 
E>r. Wm. R. Carter, Dr. Edna 
Griffin, Revs. A. Wilkins. Karl 
Downs, J. M. Brown, W. E. Car- 
ter, Mesdames Mae Reece John- 
son, Eva Burton, Elizabeth Arm- 
strong, Georgia Kelles, Miss Rosa 
Spears. Messrs. George Gamer, 
Carl Echols. 


riRESIDE MEDITATION 

OROUPAT 

YMCA TONIGHT 

'A fireside meditation group • 
wiU meet at the Eastside branch 
TTMCA tonight (Thursday) at 
7:30 o'clock. This event wlil be 
featured In the main lobby fa) 
front of the large and cozy firr.- 
plaee. 

The group will be an infomnal 
one, usdar the leaderahip of Fath- 
er H. Randolph Moore, of St 
Philip's Epiaeepal Oiurelt This 
{;r«(jde meditation group ii 
planned as a part of the YMCA 
17«ck or World Fellowship be- 
^« B i t i v r aa lly observed itom 


CONNECTICUT RECTOR 

RECIPIENT 

OF SOCIAL COURTESIES 

The Rev. Fr. J. Henry Edwards, 
rector of St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church, New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, who delivered the initial ad- 
dress on the St. Philip's Episco- 
pal Church thirtieth anniversary 
celebration, received a nuijiber 
of social courtesies whUe here. 

Among affairs honoring him 
were dinners hosted by Messra. 
and Mmes. Joseph Prather, Mar- 
vin Jackson, and J. Rufus Port- 
wig; breakfast by Mrs. Estelle Al- 
len; lunch by Fr. and Mrs. Wil- 
kins of Pasadena; and a week 
end at Murray's Dude ranch a 
the guest of Mrs. Leila Murray 

Fr. Edwards returned to Conr 
eeticut last Tuesday. 

DR. CHAS. JOHNSON 
ON CHURCH BODY 

NASHVILLE, Nov. 17, (ANP 
—Dr. Charles S. Johnson, heac 
of the department of socia 
science at Fisk university, has re 
cently been appointed a roembtr 
of the Board of Home Missions 
of the Congregational and Christ- 
ian churches and chairman of the , 
American Missionary Association' 
division, it was learned here this 
week. 

28TH ST. 'Y' PLANS 
ANNUAL DINNER 

TTie 28th Street Branch YMCA 
this week announced plans for an 
armual dinner to be held Thurs- 
day rv—'ing, Dec. 15. the event 
will fr- -. a noted newspaper 
publish;. _.; the principal speak- 
*r. 



Rev. Russell 
Attacks 
False Leaders 

"Negroes should revolt against 
any religious leaders, including 
myself, who do not take a defin- 
ite stand against all conditio .is 
that are destructive to the values 
of life", declared Rev. Clayton D. 
Russell, minister of People's In- 
dependent Church of Christ, last 
Sunday morning, in one of his 
most dynamic sermons, to a peek- 
ed auditorium. 

Continuing his attack upon fel- 
low members of the cloth, the 
young clergyman said revolt 
should also be directed ag'dnst 
"pulpit cowards" who are indif- 
ferent to the needs of their re- 
spective communities. 

Political-minded preachers 
came in for their share of right- 
eous criticism as Rev. Russell 
lashed out: "We should openly 
/«ebel against those of us who 
[stand in the pulpit before ycu 
^nd are unable to hit unaeemly 
Conditions because they are 
cramped and bottled up by the 
pay-off route, which is true m 
many cities throughout the na- 
tion, including Los Angeles!" 

"We should demand", he added, 
"that the church concentrate 
more on the development of >'he 
values of life, for religion is a 
very definite faith, ar.d the 
values of life are eternal." 


the Congress, as announced i by 
the Exectitive Secretary, Rev.; W. 
P. Carter, will cover three inspir- 
ing days ,November 25, 26 jand 
27th. The theme of the Congress 
will be "Who is Sufficient for 
these Days" and will be present- 
ed hy numerous features. Thil 
meeting fcas grown rapidly dur- 
ing the past three years, having 
caught the interest of young Bap- 
tieta, imtil it is the largest gath- 
ering of Negro youth on^ha 
Pacific Coast. ^-^ 

The program sis provided' by 
the Christian Education Commis- 
sion of the Convention has three 
emphases, inspiration, s 1 1^ d y 
courses and fellowship. Under in- 
spiration there will be the devo- 
tionals by Rev. L. M. Curtis; the 
keynote address by Rev. Wi P. 
Carter; the congress address i by 
til. J. L. Caston; the consecra- 
tion address by Dr. W. D. Carter; 
the coronation sermon by Revj C. 
H. Hampton; the communion ier- 
vice by Rev. H. B. Thomas and 
his deacons; lay speakers w h o 
will be Prof. W. A. Payne and 
William Dickerson, a student at 
Berkeley Divinity School. 

Stjidy courses this year and 
thefcf instructors are: "Youth' in 
the World Today", Dr. W. R. Car- 
ter; "The Community and the 
Christian Ideal", Rev. Frijnk 
James; "Personal Religious Liv- 
ing", Rev. Lewis Foster, Jr.; 
"Preparation for Marriage and 
Home-making", Mrs. Blanche 
Carter; and "The United Chris- 
tian Adult Movement", Dr. J. L. 
Caston. 

Features in Fellowship will be: 
The fellowship bagquet; 8tuii|ts, 
yells and music; a mammoth 
street parade and outdoor cele- 
bration in the city park; the con- 
gress pageant; a one hundred 
voice chorus; the congress photo 
and other social evehts. Mrs. 
Mane Sheffield will alternate 
with Prof. Payne as presiding of- 
ficer and will have direct charge 
of the banquet. Rev. G. A. Mil- 
ler and Mrs. Serretha Granbertry 
will direct the chorus. 

The transportation commission 
of the convention has arranged 
to carry a "Congress Special" 
train over the Southern Pacific 
leaving Los Angeles at 3 a. m. 
Friday morning November 2oth 
and the round trip will be $2.10. 
Entertainment wjiile in Santa 
Barbara will be furnished by the 
entertaining church for $2.00 and 
will include meals and lodging. 
Each Sunday School and BYPU 
representing will pay a registra- 
tion fee of $3.00 which will en- 
title its delegates to tickets to all 
sessions and tiie social affiairs as 
well. Dr. J. L. Caston is chair- 
man of the Educational Commis- 
sion and Prof. W. A. Payne is 
secretary. 


Planned 
By Church 

According to an announcement 
made by Rev. Clayton D. Rus- 
sell, minister of People's Inde- 
pendent Church of Christ, ne- 
gotiations began last week for 
the purchase of a commodious 
and well-appointed building on 
the Eastside for the home for 
homeless colored boya which has 
been sponsored by Independent 
church for more than a year. 

The home will operate in con- 
nection with both local and state 
juvenile authorities. Commission- 
er Sutton of the Los Angeles 
County juvenile department has 
expressed his willingness to co- 
operate in every way with the 
project, because, as he stated in 
a recent interview: "We find an 
increasing need for such a home 
for those Negro boys who drift 
to our city because of circum- 
stsmces, for the n-.ost part, over 
which they have no direct con- 
trol. Rev. Russell and his congre- 
gation are to be highly commend- 
ed for this most important step 
in community work." 

Commenting on the home. Rev. 
Russell said: 

*T want it distinctly under- 
stood that this home does not be- 
long to People's Independent 
Church, but to the community. 
We are only sponsoring it, be- 
cause someone had to start It. 
Therefore, we are asking tWe un- 
selfish support and contributions 
from all churches, clubs and or- 
ganizations in the city and coun- 
ty, and from every individuK 
who feels that our unfortunate 
youths should be given a f a i r 
chance to become worthy citi- 
zens." 


Slote Concert } 
of IndepbJideiit 

The Senior ChioirUl People's 
Independent Church of Christ, 
directed by Mrs. A. ;C. Bilbrew, 
will open its winiter eeason with 
Ita regular' fourth Suhday after- 
noon concert in the main audi- 
torium of the church, November 
27, promptly at 4 o'clock. 

Mrs. Bilbrew will \ introduce 
two new "discoveries", in local 
music circles—Ollie McDonald, 
tenor, student of Columbus 
School of Expression, Chicago, 
111.; and Edward White, gifted 
young violinist. 1 

In addition, Margaret Robinson 
Chapman, one of Los 'Angeles' 
most favorite soloista, 'wIU be 
heard; and Professor W.lT. Wil- 
kins, head of Wilkins Pii»o Aca- 
demy, will present a nui^b^r by 
his. artist pupils. 

The choir will be hekrd \ in 
special selection, including t^e 
one sung last summer' in aom 

tition with a We^ choir,\whe 
the Eistefodd' Society presented 
the two orgatiizationa at Be^(Hit 
high schooL Featured oven the 
air every Sunday momins'With 
"The Visitor", sponsored by* An- 


Jiblicoi Pageant 
t Zion Hiir ' 

Vsale Of Sweets" will »>•*** 
at the Zion Hill BapUst chtttCh, 
1319 K. 22nd S^eet. B^. OW« . 
Harria,, paator.i on »«J«™^' 
NovrSber l*tti ktartin* «t 10 a. 

Homemade c^kea, piea. 
doughnuta, cookiea ind J«Iie« ' 
be bought lor « amall turn. / 
time Saturday l^tween IJ »jnr\ 
and 6 p. m. in the church aocUl' 
halL Members %»d friend* are 
invited to select tlie familr* »»■. 
orite deaaeA for \ Sunday. Ati- 
spicea of BYPU. V . 


Colorful Affair 

Mrs. A. C. Bilbrew, thi re- 
nowned directress of the Peo- 
ples Independent Church will 
present a Biblical Pageant, en- 
titled "The Day of Reckoning", a 
cast of 50 people, at Zion Hill 
Baptist church, Thursday even- 
ing, November 17th.' at 8:30 
o'clock, under the auspices of the 
20th Century Dramatic Club. 

The public is cordially invited. 


HV A X *bon(raIow 
•" *^ * beantifoliy 

rty nothlna down. Piy »4.79 monthlr. 

Aulom»lic regulitlon. Sttltfietlon 
auirintMd Qa, Co«t In U. Angtlu, 

QuirantMd Lm than tu a yaar. 
No baMcncnt or flu* tt^uU*i. 

WILLIAMS RADIATOR CO. 

1865-1873 W. Cordova Street 
BE--5725 


FIRST A. M. E. ZION CHURCH 

Pico Blvd. at Paloma Street Office Phone: PR-9727 

Rev. Walter R. Lovell, Paator, 1217 Paloma St. RI-99M 

Rev. Roger Willis, Associate Pastor 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1938 


9:30 A. M.— CHURCH SCHOOL (All Departments) 
11:00 A. M.— SERMON by Pastor, Suhiefit: "1 was in Prison" 
5:30 P. M.— Christian Endeavor \ 

6:45 P. M.— EVENING SERMON by Pistor 


"THE CHURCH THAT SERVES WITH A SMILE" 


trict. 





There 

will be a 

parade 

and 

open 

air meeting 

in the 

City 

Park 

m 

the afternoon of the 26th. 


PROF. W. A. PAYNE 
President of B. ¥. P. U. 

^mmission, PA. 4072. 
We want 200 yoimg people 
om Los Angeles, for this trip. 
7e are asking your cooperation 
n helping them to go In the 
'.ame of the king. Special f eatiures 
his year, will be a chorus of 50 
voices, under the direction of 
Mrs. Sereatha Gi'anberry, pseai- 
lent of the Sunday School con- 
venti9n of the Los Angeles Dis- 




MAJESTIC 
Venetian Blinds 


WUte Cedar Slaia, Faney 

Valencee, Cadaiiam Platen 

Bardwar* 

Many Other Features 

See Us Before Buyine 

3128 WEST FLORENCE 

PBONE: TW-nSS 




A Tbee Days' Cough 
b Your Danger Signal 

Mo matter how many meoUdnea 
you have tried for your common 
xxnfa, chest cold, or bronchial Irrl- 
taoon, you may get relief now wltb 
Crecmulilon. Serioua trouble m^ 
be brewing and you csnnot afford 
to take a chance with any remedr 
laai potent than Creomnlaun, which 
goes rlidit to the seat of the trouUa 
and ^oinature to soothe and beal 
the [nf[m3tMA mucous membranes 
and to loosen and expel germ- 
Isden i>hlegm. 

Even If o&er remedlesJiaTe f aOed, 
dont be dlscotuaged, tzfr Oreomul- 
3lon. Tour druggist is autbdrlasd to 
i-efund your money if you are not 
thoroomy satisfied wlQx the bene- 
flta obUlned. Orewntiislnn Is one 
wnd, ask for it plataljr, see that (be 
name oo the bottle Is Oreomulsion, 
and ToaU get the genutne praducc 
and the relief' you want. (Adv,) 


FOUNTAtN PEN 
SHOP 

Aoom S14 Gtoase BoHdiag 

124 Wait Sixth St. 

Comer Spring Street 
PARKER £ 8HEAJTER 

SERVICB STA-nON 
Fmintain Pen and Pencil 

Bepaiting 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

Phone TUcker 3652 

ONE-DAY SEBVICIi 


f amtltott •• E QIl|«rtlj 


5. M. Btofu. B. D. 
Pdstor 


EaM \M Strut mti 

h'aami Avtnut 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1938 


9:30 A. M.— CHURCH SCHOOL 

11:00 A. M.— SERMON \ Pastor 

Subject: "AU is Mine" 

3:30 P. M.— NAACP MEET j 

6:00 P. M.— EPWORTH LEAGUE 

7:30 R M.— TEXAS ST ATE NIGHT PROGRAM 
Special Program — Special Features 

MUSIC ,| Wesley Choir 

SERMON i Rev. E. W. Rakestraw 


'^ A. III. t (5i|«rrlf 

Comer 108th and Compton Avenue 

PROF. L. G. EGGLES^OS, Director of Music 

REV. ROBERT HOUSE, Pastor 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1938 


5:00 A. M.— PRAYER SERVICE 
10:55 A. M.— DEVO-nONALS and SERMON-k. 

Subject: "Sub-Spititual Values" 
6:00 P. M.— BIBLE CLASS 
6:30 P. M.— A. C. E. LEAGUE SERVICE 

Topic: "Gracious liivSg" 
7:30 P. M.— INSPIRATIONAL! SONG SERVICE by the Choir 
and SERMON. 
ThaaksgiTing Service Early Morning— 4:M. 


YOU ABE C0KDIAZ4.T WBLCpME TO WORSHIP WHB US 


Cord ofThoiikSA 

The family of the Ute, Mother 
Armanda West, who passed fawn 
labor to reward, Nov. Sm, wuh 
to express their deep spprecU» 
tion for the many kind deeda, 
flowers, telegranos, and yt pr*»- 
sions of sympathy, coming from 
numerous friends, and neighbors. 
"God bless you all". 
Signed: 
Mrs. Pearl Butler, datightar 
Mrs. Annabelle Oakey. aiec« 

elus Funeral Home, the laef* 

kgregation \bu become t adl» 

rorite for Sunday MtUtmn-iM. 





^ aad eanMcir 

detillr,^neiMt «r^ 


Tiee vrith m^en tadUttca. 

OOr Motto: 

'MoximBm Sonrico of 
'Minimum Cost 


>^ 


South Los Angalet 
Mortlpaiy 

1 12th fir Wilmington Av«niM \ JE~4778 


itaaii Sapttit (B^initli 


CMffldi AvsMs 
aadMthStnet 


BEGINNING OF CHURCH APPRECIATION CAMFAIOX 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1938 

11:00 A. M.— "What Kind of a Church Would My Churdi Be 
If Every Member Treated It— Just Like Me?" 

7:45 P. M. — "Appreciation for Spiritual and Temporal Bleas- 

ingi— How to Show If 
Sunday School - 9:30 A. M. B. Y. P. U. - 6:1S P. 1^ 


Mnlt^ 


gKS (^knvtH 


Eighth and San /ulian Strtttt 
REV. E. W. RAKESTRAW. Minister 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1938 


9 30 A. M.— Church School 6:00 P. M- 
11:00 A. M.— Morning Worship 7:30 P. M.- 


-Epworth League 
-Evening Worship 


Golden State Mutnal Life Insurance Company meat at 
the moraini; worship. "^^ 

minister's MORNING SUBJECT: "Practical Thanksgiving- 
MINISTER-S EVENING MESSAGE: "Preparedness" ^^"^ 

Thursday, Nov. 24, at 11 a. m.. Union Thanksriving Serriee 
between Hamilton, PhUUps Temple and Wesley ChnrdM*. 
Thanksgiving sermon by Dr. L. C. Cleaves. Music by oOBbin> 
ed chou^ 


IflWord Chopfl 
!lA. M. E. Church 

REV. J. W. PRICE. Pastor 
1250 East 25th Street Phone CEntury 23052 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1938 


8:00 A. M.— PRAYER MEETING 
9:00 A. M.— SUNDAY SCHOOL ^ 

11:00 A. M.— MORNING WORSHIP 

6:30 P. M.-ALLEN CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR LEAGUJ 
7:30 P. M.— EVENING SERVICES 
7:30 P. M.— EVENING WORSHIP 

Brotheriiood WUI Hare a Special Sertioe Nov. 27th 
A CORDIAL WELCOME EXTENDED TO ALL 


PJOPLE'S INDEPENDENT 
CHURCH OF CHRIST 

18TH AND PALOMA 

" THE CHURCH THAT SERVES " 

CLAYTON D. RUSSELL, Minister 


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 195« 

S^^KK?rJoSto 10-4r '''"*-'"^ featuring -THE VISI. 
MORNING SERMON: \ 

"WHICH WAY RELIGION FOR 
THE NEGR0" 

(Continued from last Suiiday) 

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION with UNITED 

CHURCH OF CHRISTTlwotH 

Music by Independent's Cho^r. 3 n m 

EVENING SERVICE: Anniy.Si^ sSr,^« 

Continued With Spociol Guost SpIKr^? So p. 


m. 


Commg: Union Thonksglving SorriM With Now 
Hoopo Baptitt Church, thanktgJvS MoVniBr 
1 1 K)0 ot Ind^pontCnt T T "•' 

Senior Choir Concert, Fourth Sundoy, 4 p. m 


i 


"WE SPECIAUZE IN 


fe 


*ii 


X? 


Ir 



• nureoay, Novemb«r 17, V938 


l '| . i . - y | . S>'t"- || j '■'^f-'j^C 


'- If Tou roil 10 Keod the California ; eaqle tou /v\oy iNever i^now it nopoenee 


^•••1 



^i--^g^y€^:.i,%yh :■■ i''''r--\>iy'!if^ '•■■■: ■■ffMV 7'k^.-'-'\ iJi^^k. - •■^' 4- -^^ ■• -Z f 



:J ■'■ 


Reviei¥ 




Taleiit 


*' 


Negro lawyers are among the 
best poepared and most progress- 
ive in this city it was observed 
this week by several civic leaders 
who are interested in influenc- 
ing more persons to engage the 
services of Eastside attorneys 
when in need of legal advice. 

Aside from being graduates of 
leading law schools, most of them 
have enviable^ records in hand- 
ling litigation. A few who have 
recently entered ths field are 
forging ahead rapidly. Commun- 
ity activity for group betterment 
hold! the interest of most of these 
lawyers. 

Several of the outstanding per- 
sonalities ' in the law, profession 
are employed in outstanding cap- 
acities. Among them are District 
Atty. Charles Matthews in tlie 
District Attorney's ofifce; the 
first person to hold the post now 
filled by Atty. Matthews was 
the late Atty. Leon Whittaker. 
Atty. Hugh Mac Beth is in the 
consular service as Liberian con- 
sul Atty. Bert McDonald is t 
city deputy prosecutor. Loren 
Miller, Curtis C. Taylar, Clarence 
Jones, Ivan Johnson, 3rd, Afue 
McDowell, and Edwin Jefferson. 
Among those showing marked ab- 
ility after a year's practice are 
Attys' David W. Williams, and 
Walter L. Gordon. Marshall Den- 
ton who recently passed the bar 
will begin practice soon. 





ATTY. THOMAS L. GRIFFITH, 
president of the N. A. A. C. P. 


ATTT. HUGH MACBETH, Liberian consul x6d outstanding civ- 
ic leader, who will speak at the Town Hall Forum of Scott M. E. 
Church Sunday night, November 20, at 7:45 p. m., from the sub- 
ject, "If I Were a White Man". The other side of the question, 
"If I Were a Ne^'ro" will be presented by McClellan Reed, note4 
orator, traveler and writer. 


AITY. CURTIS C. TAYLOR, 
outstanding criminal lawyer. 




ATTY. WALTER GORDON, 
making rapid strides in the law 
profession. 


ATTY. -BERT .MCDONALD, , 

city deputy prosecutor. 


ATTY. CHARLES MATTHEWS, only Negro Deputy District At- 
torney in the District Attorney's office of Los Angeles. 


,j. Thieves Steal Minister's 
"^ Coat Right Out of Church 

An epidemic of overcoat-stealing hit the Eastside of Los Angel- 
es this week with the piliferers of topcoats even entering churches 

in search of loot. ^ , , ■, , j__» 

The ^ev Clayton D. Russell, pastor of the People's Independent 
Church of Christ at mh and Palo ma streets, was one vicUm. He 
reported to Newton Street police ♦♦- —— -; ZZ 

- -— Registration For 
NAACP Posts 
Now In Order 




PHOTOGS' GI^OUP TO | 
GET EASTMAN AID | 

When the Photographer's group 
of the 28th StreetJranch YMCA [ 
is organized it will be done un- } 
der the guidance of the Eastman | 
Kodak Company. This group will 
be open to all those iristerested in 
photography; and will have as 
its projects to enter all contests I 
held in and around Southern Cal- 
ifornia, hoping to participate in 
the national contests. > 

All interested in joining this 
group, please call the 28th Street 
Branch YMCA, Adams 7193. 

The California Eagle an- 
nounces a new Cash Prize con- 
test to begin next week \and 
to continue each week for the 
remainder of the year. 


CURTIS LOUISE HORNE, Chief Dletetian of the U. S. Veterans 
Hospital at Tuskegee, Alabama, was a visitor to Lot Angeles over 
the week-end. Mrs. Home attraded the National Dietetical Con- 
vention at Milwaukee in October and visited her sister for a 
period of tlxree weelu in Oakland, where many brilliant social 
events were given in her honor. Mrs. Home, a graduate of the 
University <Sf Chicago and of Pratt Institute of Bftwklyn, N. T., 
heftds a stalif of 91 persons, including assistant Dietitians, chefs, 
cooks and mess attendants. She expressed herself as thrilled with 
the many beauty spots of Southern California, having been es- 
corted by L^ J. Hicks, local citizen. 


Blodgi 


ett Model 
Home Hears 
Completion 

That the model home in the 
Blodgett Tract at Imperial and 
I Wadsworth streets, being erected 
under the pej-sonal -supervision 
of Wesley Clark Blodgett, ace 
constructor of the Blodgett Build- 
ing and Loan Co., Is fast nearing 
completion, wbs announced this 
week. I 

Blodgett stated that only a few 
more days of work were requir- 
ed to open thie home, which is 
a sample of up-to-date construc- 
tion in its beauty of design and. 
convenience on a small scale, for 
mspection. j 

In fact, Blodgett said, the pub- 
lic is urged to visit Blodgett 
Tract at any time and get ac- 
quamted with; the attrjctions It 


18-Yr. Old Robber 
Caught in Act 

An 13-year-old iransient giving 
his name as John Robinson and 
his occupation as shoe-shiev, vas 
his occupation as shoe-shiner, was 
Monday in the act of burglarizing 
the Betsuin Produce co. 

When officers apprehended him 
after a call by the owner of the 
business, Robinson was making 
away with a typewriter, check 
writer and calculator, valued at 
$228.50. He told police that he 
I needed money badly. 


AilV. DAVID W. WILLIAMS, 
youngest of L. A. practicing 
lawyers. 


k 


the theft of his overcoat, hat and 
scarf and the'tdp coat of S. A. 
OUver, official, of the church, on 
last Sunday night. 

The Rev. Russell said he* left 
his coat with Oliver's in the rear 
annex of the church, while he 
presided at evening services. 
During the hour of 7:30 to 8:30, 
someone entered and made off 
with his clothing. 

Russell assessed hl^^op piece 
at $45.00, his scarf at? $1.00 ahd 
his hat at $2.50. Oliver evaluated 
his at $25.00. 

LOiSAX A VICTIM 

Lucius Lomax, Jr., proprietor 
o; a cockteil lounge in the Dun- 
bar Hotel also reported the theft 
of his overcoat, from his park- 
ed automobile last Saturdsy even- 
ing. He placed value of $60.00 on 
the article. 

And on Sunday night thieves 
snatched the top piece of Oscar 
Jackson, 1371 W. 30th street, 
fro mthe v^ibule of the McCoy 
Memorial Baptist church at 802 
E. 46th street. Also stolen at the 
tune time was a coat belongmg 


The annual election of officers 
and members of the Executive 
committee of the local branch of 
the National Association for the 
Advance ment of Colored People 
will be held on Sunday, Decem- 
ber 11th at 3:30 at the Hamilton 
M. E, Church. 

All persons desiring to become 
candidate for the election will 
be expected to submit their 
names to the committee on nom- 
inations which is composed of 
tlie following persons: Mrs. C. 
O. English, Chairman, QoMen 
State Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, Building; Dr. Charles A. 
Jackson, 1105 East Vernon; Mr. 
J. E. Rector, 4108 Central Aven- 
ue; Mrs. Lorenzo Bowdoin, 732 
West 32nd Street and Mrs, Viola 
McLemore. 


LIQUOR STORE 
DELIVERY 
BOY IS ROBBED 

Merchandise and cash totaling 
$10.00 were taken from Walter 
Green, delivery boy for the House 
of Morgan Liquor Store, by en 
aiTned Negro bandit, accompan- 
ied by a white man. 

Green told Newton street pol- 
ice that a call came in at about 
8 p. m. Tuesday night for deliv- 
ery of whiskey, ciga»ettes and 
gum to 1196 E. 32nd street. The 
jrouth was cautioned to bring 
change for a ten dollar bill 

When Qreen arrived at the 
corner of Naomi and 32nd, he 
said he saw that there was no 
such address. Just as he turned 
to go, the two men appeared from 
the side of the house at 1182 E. 
32nd and held him up. 



HP J| f o -OOP. 

"tr, 9c A DAY :z::'"" 

0..tab. ' rt-fju^h Apf I 

WILLIAMS RADIATOR CO 


FOR SALE AT A 
SACRIFICE 

Lot 88x122, comer West 36th 
Street and St Andrews. No 
reasonable offer refused. Uncle 
Sam will loan you the money 
to build. Inquire — 

A. A. GITTENS 

1448 WEST JEFFERSON 
PA -1516 


ATTY. LOSEN MILLER, pro- 
gressive yonng attorney. 


The First Annuol Beauty 
And Trade Show 

i To Be Held At The 
ELK;S' AUDITORIUM—DEC. H & 12 

' IS ON YOU ! 

The Hair Siting Contest is a Means to Show Your Ablltty! 

I ENTER NOWf 

THIS ME^NS INCREASE IN YOUR BUSINESS 

^A«^^ri^*??^f.HI OUTSTANDING EVENT OF THE 
FOR INFORMATkON t— CALL AD--9739 


to Arthur 
::own.* 


Peters address un- 


Cosmetic ond 
Noyeify Houu 

441IM so: CINTRAt AVE. 

CEntury tai6j^ 

Pvblk iBTlted tolook oOr atoek 
over. Try our PB£8SI1«0 OIL 
It viMkm PBB88ING lAST. 

gvwtiielBMr « SATUrr FIN- 
H and JUSm CURLS MORE 
PERMANENT. 




K*t' 


,.--.' ■"-■ ^.-■' 


[ ^ ' ■^^-'^■^Xz; 



Rupture Piles 

(Hernia) (Hemorrhoids) 

Varicose Veins ' 

Latest Approved Office 

Injection Methods 

NO TIME LOST FROM WORK 

Adultf • Children 

linfontt 

— No Chuke Conmltaticm— 

libinU Credit 

M. M. N ELSON. M. D. 
fir STAFF 

3rd Floor,l416 W. Stfc Street 

Bet Mill and Olive 

TRilily 3459 

Hrs. 9 a.m. t{ff 8 p.m. Sun 10-12 


ri-ip^tMm iMk:;^^'^^ 


$1 Oe HOVEMBER ONLY M (||j 
1 Physicol Exomiwotion 1 

i 
Including check-up and report of the following: Heart and 
Lna^ Dige^ve Traet, G«iito-iarlBMr, Blood Pressiae, Nerv- 

2'Jfo52S*5;iJy!S!i^^'*»'"to Deflclenclea, Blood VASCULAR 
SYSTEM, INRcnONS, THROAT, AND SKIN. '^"'^^^'^ 


Examinajtlon is most emnplete and we wiU advise yt^ 

Cenltrol Heolth Center 

OpenEvei V a-; Open Eve's 

Dr. Fronk J. Bush, D. ^ 3224 So. Centrol Aye. 


■.-■:.is4. fifes* 


^,%'jgfH.: 


imr 


.f" 7-;. ;■'; ;•' ■■■_-'_. V 1 v- 1 ■■.I. ' '^ ■■;■. .- k>. .; 


"To those not familiar with 
our racial life, the extent and 
scope of this section of the 
Country's press, edited and 
printed by colored people for, 
colored people, hiay be sur- 
prising; for it forms the largoat 
purely "class" group of public- 
ations being produced by any 
one racial minority in America. 
The Jewish group of some 70 
papers is next' . . .Claude A. 
Barnett, Director The Associa- 
ted Negro Press. 

Nothing to bny— Nothiag to 
sell — No subscriptions to selle- 
it. Jnst read the EAGLE and 
follow the simole rules ef the 
Contest. Wath the West's Beet 
Weekly for the opening of the 
Contest NEXT WEEK. . . 


FOUND! THE SECRET TO 
YOUTHFUt-LOOKING HAIR 


• • • Drab, Li'fefess, 
Gray*S<r«af(ed Hair 
Takaa on Qlowing 
Baauiy witfi a Singla 

Appltcailon pf Larlauaa 

\ 

THE middl«-«ge4 woaiao whose 
hair is soft, alluring, colorfid, 
tlways sparkling with danciox 
hichli^hts — bow <k>es she do it/ 
What IS tht stent tO her routltful- 
looking hair? \ 

(3ia<ices are she uses a hair coioi* 
iag and chances are tkc hair colot- 
iag she uses is Godefrcjr's Larioue. 
Year* ago tiiia "sccrMf' was gener- 
alljr known ooly to brofessional 
hairdressers. Today itis shared bf 
women ererywherc. | 

War, too, can hara beautiful hair 
bf using GodeCroy's l4neuse, the 
quick-acting, easr-to-ustn hair col- 
oring in tlie nd oox. Wfaterer its 
con<Stion — whether drab, lifeless, 
off-color, or strealce4 with gray — 
Larieuse will make youii bur one 
eran, lustrous, natural, youthful- 
appearing color. Choice of IS 
shades, including jet^ blade, black 
and iMOwn. 

Kemember — nffl7. hai^ sometifflet 
kills a man's interest iln a woman. 


GOOEffBOn 



Don't risk it — use Laritmtt. Satis- 
faction guaranteed or yoor dealer 
will refund your money. 


Larieuse Shampoo 

; : i produces a remafkabty 
cleansing shaaipoo which 
ieares the hair soft aad fluffy. 

Larieuse Stain Ramovar 

. . . removes hair dye stains 
from hands, foreltead and scSlp. 
WiU not affea color of hair. 


Jl,::-.'' -~^**!BR5 hair COUOHINO. .,. 

•ODiniOY MAMUrACTUKm|B COMPANY • 3J10 OUVI ST. • ST. LOWS, MO. 


YOU WILL ENJOY 

THANKSGIVING DAY 
AT VAL VERDE 

The Delightful, Bracing, Mountain Air Will Give Yon a Keen 
Appetite Foor The Val Verde Grown 

Turkey Dinner Served By Mrs. Alice Gafford 
At The Club House Cofe 


MENU 


Celery and Olives Fruit Salad 

Rice Mashed Potatoes Fresh Vegetables 

Prime Roost Turkey 

Dressing and Giblet Gravy 

Cranberry Sauce 
Hot Southern Biscuits 
Pumpkin Pie A'la mode Ice Creom 

Tea ' Coffee 

I Sixty Cents 


DR .OAY 

I Dentist 

ILOS ANGEUS' FIRST 

CREDIT DENTIST 

1062 EAST VERNON AVENUE 

We\ ORIGINATE — -OTHERS FOLLOW 
BE K^OT DECEIVED— COMPARE VALUES 

\ • '-" 

Work Dane Right Here, No Unnecessary Delay. 

My Ti^fmendous Practice Is. The Result Of Cdre- 

fiil Roinstaking Work,-Qt Unbelievable 

' \ LOW PRICES 


1062 E.\v^non Avenue CEntury 21 396 

8 Yrs, in some location 

DRi GAY, DENTIST 

ORIGINAL CREDIT DENTIST 

>Me Lead-~pthers follow 





F«|ft tlgfTt-A 


If You TdllTb R^a THE 


CHATTER AND , SOME NEWS 


By HELEN F. CHAPPIM.L 


■•"K» 


SoeietT Editor 


'^€ 



CALIFORNIA 


s 

Infarmol 


EAiSLE 


You May Rev^^ Know Tf Happeine3 


'.■m 


Do you know a better time to g6t ocquointed 
with people than when they're eating? . ,\ The talk 
mode at meal-time surpasses all other tests in. reveal- 
ing just where interests ore and to ivhot idegree. 
Perch^ ot one of the drugstore lunc!h counters last 
, Saturday noon, conversing with Dr. W. R, Carter of 
the NYA Advisory Committee, something of a 
thumbnail sketch of youth movements up and down 
the coast was gleaned. Quite inadvertentyq, Dr. 
Carter interprets every occujxstional trend and every 
movement in terms of what it will mean to intelligent 
young men and women. So he remains a young man 
concerned with who will take his place upon Kis re- 
tirement and what provisions will be made by govern- 
mental' and private ogencifes to keep the very life 
blood of race and nation warm — its youth. 

A note in the morning mail from a'friend of Oli- 
vette Connie DeGruy, lady of sweet patience, whose 
ill health kept her from school this foil, tells me that 
she is rallying in the fashion of a true trooper and will 
becorrie the bride of Henry McClenney next summer. 
It is something of a Robert Browning-Elizqbeth Bar- 
rett romance it seems! Known to her friends as Olli- 
vet+e Connie Reese, the young woman is the daughter 
of the late 01 lie Reese of vaudeville fame and grand- 
daughter of Mrs. Anna E. Reese . . .« We're joining 
everyone else in hoping that she's completely recov- 
ered soon . . .Aren't we? 
DOING THEMSELVES PROUD: 

Lester and Pal Zimmerman of East 42nd Place 
are receiving congratulations on o bob^ boy born Sun- 
day . . . Pal is "tops" with the entertainment world as 
a singer. The way Lester "boomed" around to tell 
friends about their good fortune left no doubt of his 
chest expansion. 

Marriage, like murder, has a way of "outing" 
and Houston Pillow hos confessed his marriage to Miss 
Lonnie Jones in Santa Ana on October 31. SCOOP: 
"Spot" and Eoline (Jackson) Thornton are among 
those popular young couples stocking up for Sir Stork. 
Both figure prominently in the social and sport worlds 
— Eoline is a tennis player, and "Spot" as a basket- 
eer — Junior will probably star in both or either . . . 
Ktih? • 

You'll be interested in knowing that news from 
abroad has it that Josephine Baker, dancer who's 
made more front page copy than Sally Rand, is the 
J mother of a son born three weeks ago . . . She's Mme. 
Jean Lion in private life, wife of a wealthy French 
merchant. 

See by the New York papers where Richard 
Wright, author of "Uncle Tom's Children", was 
awarded second prize in the 0. Henry award apprais- 
als^ for the best short story of 1938 . . , Aren't you 
glad of the way these sturdy sons of Ham keep/org- 
ing ahead? 

Tuesday evening (a week ago) Ernestine Jones 
Wade added personality to versatility abounding in 
her concert repertoire and captivated one of the larg- 
est crowds I've ever seen at an initial recital. Basket 
after basket of flowers was received by the young 
singer whose fans ore likewise her friends. And Ern- 
estine's ability doesn't end with music . . . the beau- 
tiful deep pink taffeta gown with bouffant sleeves 
and swirling skirt was designed and mode by her.' 
Successive bonds of American Beauty rose and orchid ' 
trimmed the bottom of the full skirt and were dupli- 
cated in the sash at her slender waist ... on ostrich 
plume atop on upswept coiffure, a corsage of orchid 
and silver oak leaves with rosebuds rendered the lady 
beautiful. Lighting effects by V. M. Morrow creat- 
\ ed the atmosphere for each number, A blue velvet 
' cope — also designed by the singer — was donned for 
the final number, "I Am Fate" by Hamblin. 
CURTAIN: 

"Shuffle Along of 1939" is playing at the Cri- 
terion on Grand Avenue. Aside from Willie Covon 
" and another, fellow's dancing (think his name's Bo 
Jenkins), there's very little to recommend it. Of 
cpurse. Ruby Elzy's singing between the acts is su- 
perb . . . but with that orchestra! . . . she's to be con- 
gratulated for consenting to appear. The jokes ore 
; stole and chorus routines were somewhat stiffly exe- 
cuted . . . With some more new comedy blood like 
Hattie Noels and o director who recognizes that an 
audience knows "dated" acts, the show could be a 
contribution to the season. But you ought to go and 
see it . . . for light entertainment and slapstick come- 

If, 

dv with drags between, the show hps what it takes . . . 
potentially. Chock-full of talent poorly presented. 


LA HERMANA SOCIAL CLUB 
met at the home of Miss Billie 
Pearl Saulisburry, 431 East 43rd 
Place on Sunday, November 6. 
The meeting, the tost of the 
'33-'39 fiscal year, was for the 
election of officers. The next 
meeting wiU be in the home of 
Miss La Verne Hawkins, 1380 £. 
2f6t street. 

^^ST FOR FUN CLUB was 
hosted by Mrs. Mamie Waugh 
Thursday with a bridge lunch- 
eon. Prizes were won by Mrs. 
Margaret Moore aiid Mrs. Clara 
Scruggs. 

THE MR. AND MRS. CLUB 
together with Mr. and Mrs. Leon 
Marsh of Berkeley and Co. R. 
Green of Berkeley were honored 
with a formal bridge dinner Sat- 
urday evening in their home on 
West Twenty-eighth Street Covr 
ers were laid for twenty four 
persons. . 

THE NEW INDUSTRIAL club 
of the Y. W. C." A. is planning a 
number of interesting meetings 
this fall. Mrs. Sara Wooford is 
ffresident; Eleanor Brooks, vice- 
president, Adelle La France, sec- 
retary, Solomessy Jessy, social 
chairman. Miss Brooks will bring 
to the club each week challenging 
current events dealing with La- 
bor Problems. Programs will be 
in charge of the following: Nov- 
ember 17, Grace Johnson; Dec- 
ember 8, Willie Clayton; Dec- 
ember 15, Elmira Guinn; Decem- 
ber 22 Ellen Dixon and Solom- 
essy Jessy. 

THE DAHLIA GlRLST CLUB 
met with Miss Thelma Waltz for 
its weekly business discussion. 
Three changes of bridge v/ere 
Isabelle Fairchilds and May Den- 
played and prizes won by Mmes. 
ton. Mrs. Gene Wright was Tuest 
for the evening. Mrs. Mary Bry- 
ant will be the next hostess. 

The FREDERICK DOUGLAS 
Unit of the Republican Study 
Clubs held its monthly meeting 
Wednesday, evening in the So- 
journer Truth Home. The busi- 
ness session was presided over by 
Mrs. Echo Stanton Robinson, 
president. 

The VAN COURTLAND Club, 
Inc. met at the residence of Van 
Cy Cooper last Monday night, fin- 
al plans were completed for their 
Turkey RaflFle-Cocktail dance, to 
be held Sunday, November 20th 
at the residence of Van Lester 
Zimmerman, 996 E. 42nd PI, Next 
meeting will be held at the resi- 
dence of Van J. Cullen Fentress, 
4117'2 Naomi avenue, Monday, 
November 21. All members are 
urged to be present, business of 
importance. 

The ROYAL FEW Social Club 
held its business meeting at the 
home of Mrs. Ella Cotton, 1600 E. 
49th street with Mrs. Anna Wash- 
ington, president, in the chair. 

MRS. ALMA WHITE 

SURPRISED 

ON NATAL DAY 

Mrs. Alma White was surpris- 
ed by a group of friends Thurs- 
day evening honoring her birth- 
day at her home in. West 35th 
Place and received a number of 
beautiful gifts. 

Guests were Mmes. Clara 
Scruggs, Margaret Moore, Mattie 
Battise, Claudebelle Parker, Em- 
ma Holt, Emily Portwig, Eliza- 
beth Hill, Nellie Holmes, Virginia 
Cameron,. Zella Boyer, Lue May- > 
er, Thelma Long, Nella Blodgett, i 
Delia Williams, Ethel Newsome, i 
Edna MacBeth. Corona Baumann, 
Nellie Jones. Mamie Waugh, G. \ 
Matthews and Alice Harvey. 


Mr. and Mrs. Mack Senor hosit-^ 
•d a number of friends in their 
beautiful new home at 882 East 
57th str^ on. last Sunday even- 
ing. ■''''■ \ \_ 

The home was decorated ^jn 
seasonal flowers, autumn leaves, 
pumpkins; yellow and white 
chrysanthemums dominated the 
floral aramgements and a center- 
piece fif yepow was enhanced by 
silver candelabra bearing tapers 
in kefeping with the motif . j 
'Cocktails and a six course tuj- 
key dinner delighted the i^llow- 
ing guests: Messrs and Mesdamejs 
Charl^ McAllister, Arthur J. 
HarrttLL. Warren; Misses Ada 
BertilRi, Mary B. Ring, Renda 
Howard, Louise McBride, Chris- 
tine Thome, Clementine Clarhi; 
J. C. Johnson, J. Watson am 
Leenard Howard. 


Hosts to 
Houseworming 


fV-.' --rV- 


'"" !i .. i l i . 


t 


Deltas Plan 
Scholarship 
Jabberwock 

Members of the Delta Sigma 
Theta Soroity are completing 
final plans for their scholarship 
jabberwock to be held on Novem- 
ber 26, beginning at nine p. m. 
in the Elks ballroom. 

A number of fraternal and so- 
cial organizations will present 
skits during the evening and 
music for dancing between skit^ 
will be furnished by one of the 
city's most popular orchestras. 

Funds obtained from the jab- 
berwock are for the Delta 
scholarship fund created to as- 
sist college young women in pay- 
ing tuition. Reservations may be' 
made through any Delta. Infor- 
mation is available by calling 
Honore Moxley Cary at ADams 
7985; Vassie Robinson Brown, 
C£. 21721: or Myra Estelle Mor- 
ris, RI. 3428. 


Thanksgiving 

Breakfasf- 

Set for Sunday 

On Sunday, November 27, tbe 
members of the Assistance Lea- 
gue of the Outdoor Life and 
Health Association will be hos- 
tess to the public at their second 
annual Thanksgiving Breakfast, 
given in the banquet hall of the 
28th Street YMCA. 

An excellent program, in keep- 
ing with the occasion, is being 
prepared by the program chair- 
man, Mrs. Delia Williams, while 
Mrs. Mamie Waugh is again plan- 
ning the menu. 

Advanced reservations may be 
made by calling: Mrs. Fanny 
Williams, RE. 5526; Mrs. Set h 
Lee, PA 5588; Miss Francis Hen- 
derson, CE. 28739. 


Two -Year -Icy j 
is Nafol I 

Party Honoree j 

A party honoring the secon^ 
birthday of Thaddeus Mitchell; 
Jr., was recently sta^d ih iai 
home by his mother, Mrs. Juliil 
Mitchell. I 

i- Ah Armistice Day motif was 
carried out in decorations and 
favors. Guesst were Melvyn anq 
Marvelyn Sydney, Diane D^ 
Blanc, Bebe Jean Greshum, Ja- 
nice and ElmBst Shelby, Jr., Joel 
Andrews, Odis Conway, Jr., Reg- 
inald Dixon, Steve Locket, inj 
Harry Lewis, Sherman Williams, 
and Ivan Taylor. ! 

Adults at the paryt include^ 
Mmes. Linnie Petty, Eolin^ 
Thornton, Opal Bloice. Marth^ 
Smith, Evelyn Locket, Alma An* 
drews, Alice Conway, Gladys 
Dixos, Laura De Blanc, Clar» 
Taylor, Dorothy Lewis, Eleanor^ 
Sydny, Ruby Shelby, and Mr4 
Scott, grandmother of the honf 
oree. 


92ND&93RD DIVISION 

OFFICERS ASS'N 

HAS ELECTION 'PARTY- 

Among the many cetebrations 
held Armistice Day was an even- 
ing party given at the Camille 
Party Den, 848 E. Adams Blvd., 
by the] 92nd and 93rd Division 
Ptticen' Association. C a n c i ii g 
ahd gaines were topped" by sup- 
per and the election of officers. 
Election results are as foUor.'s:— 
Commander, Leslie King; Execu- 
tive, Maj. Moodj^Staton; Finan- 
ce, Lieut. Thos. Green; Laison, 
Lieut j. W, White; Judge Ad- 


PBOUD PARENTS 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Zimmer- 
man, of East 42nd Place, are the 
pioud parents of a baby boy, 
Lester, Jr., bom Sunday, Nov. 13 
at General Hospital. Mother, and 
son are doing fine. -p , 

^ ' — I '"' , " h 

vocate, Lieut. iSeorge Rahdol; 
Chaplain, Lieut Leonard ^tovall 
and Officer (rf the Day, Lieut 
Percival Everett Lieut Dennis G. 
Matthews was again appointed 
Adjutant i Commander for the 
past year, Lieut Norman O. 
Houston, was placed on the Ex- 
ecutive Board. 


ThurMlay, >4l«v«niWr T 7» 1^38 


VACAHONraTS ft VISITORS 

Mrs, Beatrice Smith of ^^ 
loops, British Columbia who n«a 
been visitinjg her sister, va^ 
Christine Allen^ A. K. A. *w«r 
of West 27th Place, returned to 
here home Tuesday evening, sue 
was honoree at a bon voyage 
breakfast hosted by Mrs. Marie 
Robinson of Monrovia Mcmday. 


Miss Evelyn Braarton, POP^* 
senior at the University of Ked- 
lands came down last week-end 
to be in the Clariette-Grant wed- 
ding. 


FUNERAL SERVICES 

Funeral services were held 
Wednesday afternon from the 


LARGE SIZES 

WOMEN'S 

Fine Shoes 

SIZES 6 to 12 
WIDTHS AAAAA Ut E 

Rushton's 

744 West 7 th Street 

Bet. Flower & Hope Sts. 

LOS ANGELES 


Christ for Mrs. Lucille Holland 
who died at her home, 1423 East 
18th street on November 12. 
People's Independent Church ot 


GUY A. NEWELL & COMPANY 

Body and Fender Repairfaig, Wheel Alignment and Frame 

Straightenini;, Refiuishing and New Color Creations — All at a 

Competitive Range of Prices. Come to us for an Estimate. 

AUTO BODI REPAIRING AND PAINTING 

PRospect 8617. 316 West 17th. Los Angeles, Calif. 

WE DO FIRST CLASS WORK FOR FIRST CLA«B PEOPLE 


Creole Beaity Skt ppe 

We carry the largest and most 
complete line of Creole 8e Franch 
refined hair goods in the West 

E. 0. MORRIS, Prop. 

2221 CENTRAL AVENUE 

LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 
Phone PBoapeet 7931 
Send 3 C«at Staoiy for B«oUct 



BEE BEE'S BEAUTY SALON 

Specializing In 
GROWING AND WAVING SHORT HAIR 

CROQUIGNOLES, FACIALS. EYEBROW ARCHING 
LIGHT-RAY MANICURES FOR BRITTLE NAILS 
1476 EAST llOTH STREET LA-4338 
Mme. Ella V. Belfon Georgia Devonrse Johnson 
Prop. & Scalp Specialist . Operator 


• 

[ ADams 9272 


For Appointment 


tent I 


I 

M 
I 

J' 


■. ,V.i>: 


MARGURITE, The Hair Stylist 

CREATOR OF BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLES 

AND 

DISTINCTIVE BEAUTY SERVICE 

' MARGURITE CARRERE, Prop. 

Catherine Pleraoa, Dorothy Woodson, Esther Primqs, Operators 

Try Our Guaranteed Excelsior Hair Grower Especially 

Prepared to stop harsh and brittle hair from 

breaking and falling. 

Mil CENTRAL AVENUE LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


TINGLEY MORTGAGE 
CO. FLASHES 

Reach For Your Phone— To Get Your Loan 

Phone MI-621 5 

Appraisal Sam* Day 

Prompt Action — ^Free Inspection i 

6% "LOANS -61/2% : 

Will Make Any Good Loan In Any Good District 
' Low Net Cost — Fhxible Terms 

448 South Hil Street ! Mi-6215 


^k 


■J:.'',---'X'i-i/'^-- 


:>fi' 




Trio's Anniversary ! 

Observed with Party i 

An anniversary party honoring 
the "Sweet Notes of Harmony'', ^ 
vocal trio, was held at the hoifife 
of Miss Catherine May on Friday 
evening, oNvember 11. The triO 
made up of Misses Catherine Majf, 
Mary Louise Morrison, and Imoi- 
gene Morrison celebrated theif 
first anniversary and entertained 
guests with song and dancing, i 



X_^ 


DO YOU SUFFER WP THI 
TORMENTING DISCOMFpRT 6l^ 

SKI>i 

IRRITATIONS 

(OF EXTERNAL ORIGIN) 


We Pay 
The Most 

For 

WATCHES 

JEWELRY 

. DIAMONDS 

GOLD TEETH 

STERLING SILVER 

DON'T FAIL 

TO SEE ur 

BEFORE 

YOUSELL 

DEAL 

DIRECT 

National 

Gold Refiners 

4th FLOOR 
Loew's State BIdg. 

Seventh and Broadway 

AND 

600 S. Spring 

GROUND FLOOR 


Get Relief or Get 

YOUR MONEY BACK 

Buy a box of Black and White 
Ointment; if it does not begin to 
bring you "relief from the discom- 
forts of skin irritations" as de- 
scribed in this announcement, the 
retail price of the box will, be re- 
funded at once. 



SOLD IN THB 

UNITED STATES 

and 

37 FOREIGN 
COUNHUES 


ONLY those who have suffered fifcm t|ie 
discomfort of itching, bumiilg: aid 
soreness due to diy eczema of exterral 
origin, or due to simple ring^ivorm or minor 
parasitic skin imtations — cairtruly appre- 
ciate what RELIEF really means! Many, 
many people can point to Black and White 
Ointment and Skin Soap and say, "I bought 
them both on a friend's advice, and they cer- 
tainly have done much to HELP me". 

If any of the skin irritations mentioned 
above are making you miserable and unhap- 
py, then read of the relief Black and White 
Ointment and Skin Soap help^to bring: 

First you go to your dealer right now 
stnd get yourself this famous^ combination 
treatment. ^ 

The mild super-fatted Black and White 
Skin Soap is used to cleanse the affected 
part of dirt and other material. Then apply 


it If yon want a gentler-actinff preparatiMl. 
u»e BUck and White Skin Whitener to 
help yourself toward a fairer, lighter com* 
plexion. Sold by dealers everywhere, 25c 


to 


Black and White Ointment according 
plain directions within the package. 

Black and VsMie Ointment helps to relieve 
the discomfort of itching, burning and sore- 
ness due to dry eczema (salt rheimi, tetter)' 
of external origin, or simple ringworm oij 
minor parasitic gkin irritations. 

Black and White Ointment also acts as 
an antiseptic dressing for such blemishes 
as superficial pimples, blackheads and acne 
of external origin. Be sure to demand 
Black and \\Tiite Ointment and Skin Soajk 
Don't accept a substitute. 

The 50c size of Black and \yhite Ointment 
contains more than twice as much' as the 25c< 
size. Large bar of Black and White SMn 
Soap, 25c. Trial sizes of both Black and 
White Ointnfent and Skin Soap are sold 
for 10c at all five and teO. cent stores. 


B LAC KH WHITE 

OINTMENT and SKIN SOAP 


FOR YOUR HEALTH'S SAKE- 

BENTON'S 


Call 
ADams 7177 


WILL SEND YOUR 
ORDER BY MESSENGER 


RIGHT AWAY FREE SERVICE 

• • A COMPLETE STOCK OF HOLIDAY LIQUORS • • 

i ALL THE WELL KNOWN 

Whiskies : Cordials : Brandies : Gin : Fine Old Wines 

I AT COMPETITIVE PRICES 

DELIVERED! 


Benton's Nosal Dropi: 


Aid in the Relief of 
Colds, Nasal Congres- 
tions, Coa^Iis and 
Hoarseness, in Han- 
dy Dropper BootUe 


Ei^li 


Bentoon's Benalgesic; 

A Penetrating Liquid for Bx- 

temal Use, Valuable 

for Sprains, Stiff 

Joints, Neuritis, 

RbeaiMtism, Lum- 

bas» and Atblete's 

Feet BotlUe 


50c 


aW" STOP -p!E 
THAT COUGH 

ASK FOR THE 
GUARANTEED RELIEF' 

BENTON'S COUGH 
and COLD SPECIAL 

AT ALL GOOD DRUGGISTS 
I OR AT BENTON'S 


DELIVERED 25«& 50c 


Benton's Coldi Tablets; 

Ke- 


A Preparation for Colds. 
lieves also tlie Fev- 
erish Condition and 
Headaclies, usually 
Associated with' 
Colds. Has mild 
Laxative Properties. ^ px 

Benton's Poin Tablets: 

A Valuable Relief for Palaa 
Such as Toothache, ^^ 

Headache, Neural- 
gia, etc. Is Especial- 
tf Effective in Be- 
lieving Menstrual 
Pains. 


25c 


25c 



EVERY BEMTON UBORATORY PRODUCT IS GUARANTEED— TRV ITHE^ 




DPUGS \ 




^& 


CENTRAL Avenue at 48th^t. 


1-.^ 


* 


-l 




ni*.!; 



T-TT- 


^»^ 


P 


-9W 


-J 


:?f^^ 


■<*^ 


STANFORD WItLIAMSOH 

Associate Editor 


PASADENA SECTfON 


:•#• -i- 


•irf 


George GARNiii 

Editor 


l>WRMAN H. DUNCAN 
Associott Editor 




^,. 


'-•V ! 


Turner - Armstratig Case 

as Sensation 


:',«. 


RumMinw of the impending 
Raymond Turner vs. Mrs. Eliza- 
■ beth Armstrong court strife, long 
heard, and heard to roll more 
ominously last Monday afternoon 
in the Pasadena courtrooms of. 
Judge Collier, gave mU evidence 
fthe maze of intrigue, subter- 
fuge and dishonesty soon to be 
exposed. 

For more than thirty years the 
catering business of the late Ber- 
tha L. Turner has flourished as 
an example of hfghest-type Ne- 
gro enterprise— Manned now, by 
Mrs. Turner's son, Raymond, to 
whom the bps!ness was bequeath- 
ed, tlj* firm continues to enjoy 
the patronage of Southern Calfi- 
omia'a wealthiest and most aris- 
tocratic families. 

Ederts afoot point te the fact 
this clientele is being sought by 
the firm's former secretary-man- 
ager, Mrs. Elizabeth Armstrong 
who, since separation from the 
Turner business has had possess- 
ion of the confidential client files 
belonging to the firm. The files, 
« black bound volume, might 
^'•■eU. be described as the case's 
JW "piece-de-resistance": for thCTe 
is no doubt that it is the hub 
around which a series of strat- 
ling revelations will soon revolve. 


Priqir to the death of the be- 
loved founder of the Tufner Cat- 
ering Company, successful ef- 
forts were made to incorporate 
the business, with the well-known 
Attorney Willis O. Tyler as cor- 
poration counseL Today, with 
the Turner Catering Companv 
once- more in Turner hands, n<f 
corporation exists. Attorney Ty- 
ler came forward Monday as Mrs. 
Armstrong's counsellor for the 
defense. 

Raymond Turner, James L. 
Turner, widower; and Jack Mc- 
Graw, secretary to the company, 
sat in court Monday to hear their 
lawyer, the brilliant Roland Max- 
well, go through case preliminar- 
ies. Momentary interruption came 
when Mrs. Armstrong and her 
several employes arose to leave 
for woj-k at the Orthopaedic Hos- 
pitaL 

First step in the litigation pro- 
ceedings came in the form of a 
restraining order — issued by the 
court; ajid making it commanda- 
tory that Mrs. Armstrong solicit 
no further business from Turner 
clients. Meanwhile, eyes through- 
out the nation will be focused up- 
on Pasadena's Hall of Justice as 
the date nears for one of South- 
erii California's most sensational 
trials. 


Pasadena Business Groups 
Hold 1st Annual Breakfast 


Members of tlie Pasadena Bus- 
iness and Professional Associa- 
tion and the Negro Busine/ss and 
Professional Womens Club held 
their first annual breakfast in 
the social hall of the Scott M. 
E. Church, Mary Street, Pasa- 
dena. 


by Mr. and Mrs. Walker. Capt. 
Hollingsworth and volunteers, 
MmeV Laffon Ford, Rosabelle 
Purdue, Ollie Ann Robinson, and 

I Romona Penn, headed the effic- 

I ient catering staf. 

1 Officers of the Business and 


Ma$s l^eeting at 
Community v 
Baptist Church 

Reverend J. W. Coleman, pas- 
tor to the Community Baptist 
Church, Fair Oaks Avenue ahd 
Hammonfi Street, Pasadena, states 
that a mass meetiag will be held 
at the church this Sunday after- 
noon, Nov«|iriber'20, . 

Purpose of the meeting will be 
to rally th^ forces of the Boyd 
National Baptist' Convention — 
-convening in Southern California 
September 1939. 

Revered R. B. Porter, presi- 
dent of tllie California Baptist 
Convention, has been invited to 
address the meeting. Other pas- 
tors and churches, • among them 
the Lincoln Avenue Baptist 
church have been invited to al- 
so participate. All church offic- 
ers of Community Baptist will 
be installed at this time. 

Membership of the church is 
steadily increasing with a large 
attendance in the church school 

Fine for Kidney 

and Blodde-^ 

Weakness 






\^^:-^ 


>.^ 


Wives' 


<i 


i3^f^^ Ntttier^^^ ill Most 
^iKC^^siHi l^eor; Ctelebrat^ 


Herman Smith, first vice-p(resi- 
dent; Earl Grand, second Vice- 
president; James Penn and Cecil 
Davis, are secretary and assis- 
tant-secretary respectively; James 


More than seventy persons I Professional Association include, 
gathered Sunday morning, at 8-00 ' ^J^- Brandon Bowlin, president; 
o'clock to attend the joint session ' "^""='" ^"^'^^ *^~* ,^«-— .. 
of the two recently organized 
busines groups. 

William Easter, superintendent 
of Adult Education, Los Angeles 
appeared as guest speaker for the 
event His address stressed the im- 
portance of education of our Ne- 
gro yeuth in such a manner that 
they might take their place as 
Negro citizens, rather than un- 
- wanted, over-educated liabilities. 

Mrs. Clara Brown, member of 
the Womens Club group, assisted 


Stop Getting Up Nights 
Look and Feel Younger 

Keep your kidneys free from 
waste matter, poisons and acid, 
and put healthy activity nito kid- 
neys and bladder and you'll live 
a healthier, happier and longer 
Ufe. . 

One most efficient and harm- 
less way to do this is to get from 
your druggist a 35-cent box of 
Gold Medal Haarlem Oil Cap- 
sules and take them as directed — 
the swift results will surprise 
you. 

Besides getting up nights, some 
symptoms of kidney trouble are 
backache, moist palms, leg 
cramps, and puffy eyes. If you 


Mrs. 'Conine Carter, wife of 
Rev. W. D. Carter who is pastor 
of the Friendship TsapiTst church 
in Pasadena, was re"-elected presi- 
dent of the Interdenombiational 
Ministers' .Wives Council at its 
November 7 meeting in the home 
of Mrs. Maude Watkin% 1054 
Weigand Street 

Other officers include Mmes.' 
Margaret Rai^estraw, first vice- 
presid«it; Elmira, second vice- 
president, Annie E. Sheldon, re- 
cording secretary; Dorothy White, 
assistant secretary; Jean Shaw, 
financial secretary; Mamie A. 
Rhea, corresponding secretary;. 
Jean W. Holmes, treasurer; Cor- 
nelia R. Pius, evangel; Maud 
Watkins, assistant evangel; Flor- 
ence A. L. Gordon, parliroentar- 
ian; Blanche Carter, reporter; 
Marguerite Cleaves, pianist; Mar- 
ian Downs, assistant pianist; Ed- 
na H. Porter, director. 

The present membership of the 
council numbers 75. 

Claims Close 
Election is 
Big Chance 

NEW YORK, Nov. 17— The 
close margins in* the November 
8 election offers the Negro an op- 
portunity for effective work for 
the race, said Walter White, N.A. 
A.C.P. secretary, today. The 
complete statement: 

'The results of last Tuesday's 
election are of enormous signifi- 
cance to the Negro. A minority 
group has its best opportunity to 
flght effectively for what it wants 
when the margin of victory be- 
tween political parties is narrow 


Celebrating their most success- 
ful year in [business, their 40th 
—Dr. FTIED Palmer's Laborator- 
ies will give [FREE SAMPLES of 
Dr. Fred Palmer's Skin Witener 
to readers of the California Eagle. 

Famous th^roughouti the nation 
for 40 years; Dr, Fred Palmer's 
laboratories were first founded 
in Atlanta, ^eorgia, in 1898 by 
Dr. Fred Palmer. He was known 
from coast-tp-coast and border- 
to-border for his great work in 
overcoming the beauty handicaps 
of an vgly cpmplexion. 

His 4rea,test achiev|pment 
which brought joy to the 'hearts 
of thousands jof men and 'women 
everywhere, ^as the discovery of 
his famous iDr. Fred Palmer's 
Skin Whitentr. Folks who were 
handicapped \}y a too dark-toned 
surface skin, made ugly by sur- 
face pimples, jblackheads and oth- 
er outer sJlm blemishes—started 


IMP* 

mMWf 

usint Dr. Fr»d Palmer's Skin 
Whitener. 

Today, thanks to Dr, FBED 
Palmer's Discovery, many hand- 
some men and gorgeo\fi women 
who have beautifulr attractive, 
LIGHTER SKIN will teU you 
they use Dr. Fred Palmer'f Skin 
Whitener regularly. > 

Carrying on in the true tradi- 
tion of Dr. Fred Palmer's gen-' 
erosity, Dr. Fred Palmer's La- 
boratories, to celelM^te t?)e close 
of their 40th and most successful 
year, offer to each and every 
reader of the California Eagle a 
generous FREE SAMPLE, of Dr. 
Fred Palmer's Skin WJiitener. 
Just write, "I am a reader of 
The California Eagle. Please send 
me a FREE SAMPLE of Dr. Fred 
Palmer's Skin Whitener." Ad- 
dress DR. FRED PALMER'S 
LABORATORIES, Dept SW-3, 
ATLANTA, GA. 


Civil Sei 
Exoms 
Posted H^re 

■ llie Smplojrment D^tpartrntat 
of the Urton League of Los An- 
geles has posted bulletins in its 
office announcing the following 
civil aervice examination*. Per- 
sons who are qualified should 
fllft for these examinations at 
once. Additional information can 
be secured at the office of the 
Urban League located at 2502^8. 
Central avenue. , . I ' 

CooBty of Los Angrtea '1 

Museum Helper, salary $4.40 
and $4.50 per day. Age: At least 
21 yeans of age. Sex: Mak. Last 
day to file: Nov. 21. 

Library Typist-Clerk, salary 
$70 a month. Age: At least 18 
years of age. Last day to Qle: 
November 25 



Cottcige Cheese Gains in 
Menu - Planning Import 


On Monday^ 
day and Friday 
Lobby of the Eastside ' 
be open ior the adult members of 
the 28th Street Branch YMCA, 
to play ping pong it was amunw** 
ed today. 

At least 23 and not ovtr 30 yMrt 
of age at date of examinatkm. 
Sex: Male. Last day to file: Kotb 

30. ^ • ^. 

Elevator Maintenance Man, sat* 
ary $8,80 pr day. Age: At least 
25 years. Last day to file, NOK. 
18. 

Intern, the Los Angeles Coantf 
Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif., sa£* 
ary full maintenance and |10 
per month. Last day to file, Nov. 
29. 
Los Angeles City SdiM4 Diat.^ 

Custodian (female and nuleV, 


■ i 


Salary $106 for first year. Afe: 
Student Deputy Probation Of- 21 years minimum. Last day \» 
ficef, salary $75 , a month. Age: ' file, Nov. 18. 


Woods, leading mortician, is trea- } Haarlem in Holland. Give your 


want real results, be sure to ge» We are not able to make our- 
GOLD MEDAI^-the original and " " - ■ ^• 

genuine— a grand kidney stimu- 
lant and diuretic — rig^t from 


surer. 

Officers of the Women's Club 
group include Mmes. Alice S, 
Bugg, president; Georgia Kelles, 
vice-president. Nana Fuller, trea- 
surer; Sharnette Floyd, financial 
secretary; and Veronica Mack, 
corresponding secretary. 


kidneys a good cleaning once in 
a while. 


MOROLINE^I 

SHOW-WHUt PETROLEUM JELLY^^ 


423 25th Street 


TEXAS NEWS 

Wited by ISREAL SMITH - H. L. LAW 



Galveston, Texot 



and Knoxville College there prior 
to coming to Dallas in 1934 to be- 
come manager of Crawford Un- 
dertaking Company, the posit- 
ion he now holds. He is 30 years 
of age, married, trustie of St 
John Baptist rfiurch, and a mem- 
ber of Phi Beta Sigma Frater- 
nity, 

"Hie election of Bron<.a Mayor is 
an annual feature of colored cit- 
izens of Dallas and is sponsored 
by the Negro Chamber of Com- 
merce. 


selves heard as effectively when 
any one party has an overwhelm- 
ing majority. 

"The November 8 electioas 
- indicate anmistakably that ft 
hard fight will be made by both 
parties to capture the country 
In the 1940 presidential elec- 
tion. The Negro must concern 
himself not so mnch with par- 
ties and labels as with men 
and issues. We mustlceep fi.rm- 
ly in mind the things we want: 
)I Employment without discri- 
mination and without wage dif- 
fermtials based on color. 2) 
The ballot for all qualified Ne- 
gfocs in the Sooth. 3) A feder- 
al anti-lynching bill with teeth 
in it. 4) Abolition of discrimi- 
nation in the civil service. 5) 
More and better schools and 
equal salaries for teachers in 
the sejiarate school systems. 

"We can make progress on each 
of these objectives if we will use 
our^political strength wisely dur- 


The very name of "Cottage < 
Cheese" has a homey, friendly 
sound! It stands for simple fami- 
liar goodness— a cheese delight 
which, though it may invade 
palaces, is equally at home in the 
simplest of dwellings. Cottage 
cheese is renqwned for its econ- 
omy—for its goodness, for the 
charm which it can lend to the 
simplest repasts! 

Yet simple 'as this creamy 
curd cheese is, it has its more 
elaborate mSments. We're so ac- 
customed to serving it for itself 
alone, that we somtimes forget it 
has a myriad subtle menu uses. 
In dozens of ways, cottage cheese 
can transform miracles with 
everyday dishes, can inspire a 
salad to new heights of goodness, 
can make a hasty snack into a 
party dish fit for kings! 

Because of the fact that cot- 
tage cheese combines economy 
with such unusual versatility, it 
should find ever-increasing im- 
portance in rnenu-p 1 a n n i n g 
through the season. 


SOLICITS COPPERS- 
POPPED IN JAIL 

Corrine Harden, 28, 4117 Dor- 
sey, is in the women's division of 
the City Bastile because she can't 
distinguish between a policeman 
and civilian. 

When she solicited Newton 
Street officer L. M. Baugh Ust 
Monday morning about 3 a. m., 
setting a price of $2.00 on herself, 
she didn't know that she was 
walking right into the arms of 
the law. 


Many delicious and unusual 
salad or supper dishes takeJheyL 
inspiration and their unusual 
flavor from cottage cheese. For 
instance, a jellied vegetable ring, 
with cottage cheese, is a dish 
which might well take the blue 
ribbon in any contest. 



SPECIALS 


ALL THE TRIMMINGS 
FOR A COMPLETE 
FEAST. A LARGE SE- 
LECnON or HOLIDAT 
FOODS. 


ing the coming years. But if we 
are to profit we must exhibit 
greater political maturity and 
sagacity. We must not be selfish. 
While attacking local problems, 
we must not ifinit our vision to 
local issues. We must beware of 
purely racial hysteria, remem- 
bering that the world is not suf- 
fering because of prejudice and 
race hatred. We must not be 
bought off with a few jobs scat- 
tered here and there." 


WILEY FORWARDS 

Barry "^uUdog" Yanthis utA 
Lewis Hart, a stonthearted pair 
«f WHey forwards in a strong 
line that has yielded but one 
tDaehdown all season-aiuL tliat 
folhnrtaig a 15 yard penalty 
that giving the opposition the 
ball on the Cats' one yard 
stripe. This stellar pair will 
sing their swan son; to e*Uege 
football after the Texas Col- 
lege-WUey tilt in Tyler Thanks- 
giving nl^t in the season's 
finale for the Wiley ^even. 

Prairie View and 
Longston Win 
Texas Thrillers 


DALLAS, Tex.. Nov. 17— Perfect 
weather contributed its part in 
making a pair of week end home- 
coming grid games over at Mar- 
shall gala sporting and social at- 
tractions. 

Jimmy Stevens' Bishop Col- 
lege Tigers were hosts to Sam 
Taylor's Prairie View Panthers at 
Fair Park stadium Armistice day, 
and Fred Long's Wiley Wildcats 
entertained Zipp Gayles' Lang- 
ston Lions the following after- | 
Qoon at the municipal stadium. 

tn a- 'wild and wooly scoring 
fiesta, the Prairie View Panthers 
pounded out a 31-19 victory over 
the Bishop Tigers in a ' razzle 
dsEzle skirmish that kept 2,000 
iipectators sitting on the edges 
of their seats and yelling voci- 
ferously throughout. 

Bill Gayles' phenomonal punt- 
ing and his adroit place kicking 
ability that accounted for Lang- 
ston's initial 3 points with a 41 
yard field goal m the first period 
were the main factors that en- 
abled Langston to shade the 
lighting Wiley Wildcats by a 3-0. 
score, thereby easing the Cats out 
of the championship picture of 
the Southwestern conference and 
definitely establishing the Lang 
ston Lions as the tearti to beat ir 
the flag chase hy any who would 
dilute their righu to the covet- 
ed titia^ 


OTHER TEXAS SCORES 

Paced by Buddy Allen's fln« 
passing, the Arkansas State Lions 
knocked over the Texas College 
Stears by a 13-0. score Saturday 
at Pine Bluff. 

Paul Quinn was imable to stop 
Jarvis' sensational "Runt" Smith 
Friday at Waco and the Bull- 
dogs chalked up their fourth suc- 
cessive victory of the season w^ith 
a 23 to 6 victory. 

Brioe Taylor's Sam Houston 
Dragons noeed oat Philander 
Smith College by a 7 to 6 seore 
hi the tatter's Homeeoming Satur- 
day at Little Rock. | 

The Morris Brown Wolverines 
scored tjwo safeties against Xavier 
Saturday at Atlanta and turned 
back the Gold Rush by 4 to 
score. 


PHILADELPHIA CAGE 
TEAMS BEGIN PRACTISE 

PHILADELPHIA, (Pa.). Nov, 
17,— Otto Briggs' Philadelphia 
Girls, national colored basket- 
ball champions, and his Tribune 
Big Five (boys) have started 
practising for a hard season. 

The girls, captained by Miss 
Ora Washington, former tennis 
champion, traveled over 6,000 
mUes last year, filling their 
schedule. Tba boys met some of 
th« leading teams in New York, 
New Jersey, and PeniMylvania 
and were undefeated. 


ELK RULER ON DUTY 

FOLLOWING ILLNESS 

J. M. Stewart, exalted raler of 
the Golden West Lodge No. 86, 
L B. P. O. E. of W. who has been 
ill for two weeks is out again anS 
able to re-asume his duties. 


BRONZE MAYOR 

DALLAS, NOV. 17, (ANP) — 
Climaxing a bitter four-week i 
campaign during which a pri- 1 
mary and run-off election were 
conducted, A. A^ Braswell led the 
field of four candidates and em- 
erged victorious as Bronze Mayor 
Elect of Dallas. Braswell is a 
native of Knoxville, Tennessee, 
having attended publir '^"'-nois 


H 


New 
Portables 

As Low As 

29.75 

Afi Makes 
AU Models 

Standard Machines 

$19.75 & Up 

French Typewriter Co. 

IMl SO. MAIN STREIT 
Mldiigan $827 Lea Angeles 


For The Discriminating^— 

DUNBAR 

COCKTAIL 

LOUNGE 


WE SPECIALIZE 

IN 

** IMPORTED OLIVE OIL, 

CHEESE, CAN GOODS, 

ITALIAN SPAGHETTI. 

HOT LINK SAUSAGE 

& PORK SAUSAGE. 

ALSO 

A COMPLETE LINE OF 

DOMES'nC 

GROCERIES. 

BEER & WINE 


IT'S HERE!! 


CALL AD-4696 

Free Delivery 

BRIA PROS. 
Grocery Co. 

3407 SO. SAN PEDRO 

JOHNNY BRIA, Mgr. 


STOWELL'S 
Ben Franklin Store ; 

1775 EAST 103RD STREET 
5-10-25 and Up 

We appreciate the patronage of 
All the Colored People 


An Informal AtnTosphere Enhanced By Superb 
Cocktails — Finest Liquors — DeLu)?e Dinners. 

Your Cordial Host— HARRY SPATES 
4227 So. Central ADams4201 


■] 


FIRE! 

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION 

SOON TO BE ISSUED 

BY -:'v ;■ ,• 

Rev. Clayton D. Russell 

Send your name, now to tihe'Canfbmrcr Eagle 
or People's Independent Church 6f Christ, If 
you wont to b among the first subscribers, or 
Telephone PR-84 14. ^ i: h 

The Flames of "FIRE" will glow ofk ^eiol. 
Religious, Community/ NolionoL wi Inter- 
iMfioiMl AffoircT-: ' 



Friendship Bopfist Church 

Doyton Street and Deiacey Avenue 
For: Spiritual and Intellectual Advancement 
SERVICES: 
SUNDAY, * 

Teachers' Devotional: 9:00-9:15 

Sunday School: 9:00-10:45 

Morning Worship: 1 1 :00 o'clock 

2 STIRRING SERMONS 

By the PASTOR 

W. D. CARTER 

. Evening Worship: 7:30 P.M. 

^'WHO ARE YOUr 

Church nurses: Irene Berry and Madeline Burch 

care for your infants while you worship. 


Better Business 
Training 

GREGG TOUCH 

SHORTHAND TYPING 

COMPTOMETER 

"Picturetyping", The New 

Short-Cut Method of Learning 

Touch Typing in 12 Lessons. 

Studio 4365 Wall Street 

CBntnry 26527 


Carpets-Rugs Cleaned 

In Our Plant or on Your Floor 
Repairing, Sewing, Laying 
Binding, Fringing, Serging 

Uphfrfstery Cleaned 

Call us for Free Estimates 

R««MTiable Prices 

A fir F CARPET CO. 

PArkway 8326 

1323 W. Jefferson Blvd. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 


11 


COMMUNITY 
BAPTIST CHURCKl 

No. Fair Oaks Avenue at Hammond StrAat 
PASADENA/ CALIFORNIA ^ 


The Chufch with A Progrom— 
A Minisi^ with A Mesioge' 


r. 


-■-.•4-- 




' L Reverend J. W. Coleman, Pastor 

Bible School :9:30 A.M. | 

-lireQching; H :00 A.M. and 8 :00[P;M: 


PRE- HOLIDAY 
SPECIALS 

Hot Oil, Steamed Scalp Treat- 
ment, Shampoo. Press and . 
Ends Curled, all for Sl.OO. 
Genuine Poro Rinse used or 
Croquignole or Marcel Wave 
in addition to the alMve for 
SIJZS. 

MISS E. B. ECHOLS 

1501 East ZOtli Street 
fbone: Richmond 9S40 


FOR SALE SACRinCE 

ATTENTION 

S rm. Westoide lot SSzlSS 
$30M, $6M dn. 

C h pu ae a 5 and 3 romns 
$185«, SSMdn. 

I homes West of Central 
food shape $3009. $«M da. 

1 rma. doable, jost like new 
S50M, $60« dn. 

2 vacant lots on W; 36th 
Street CHEAP. 

H. A. HOWARD 

REAL ESTATE 
MSt 8. Ccatnl Av 


it-^- 


IN THE EAGLE WANT AD SECTION 
WHERE EVERYONE WHO HAS SOME- 
THING HE DOESNT WANT, SELLS IT 
AND EVERYONE WHO WANTS 
SOME THING THEY HAVENT GOT 
BUYS IT. 

•IT'S JUST THAT WAY WITH 
HOMES. THERE ARE DOZENS FOR 
RENT AND FOR SALE EACH WEEK 
IN THE EAGLE WANT ADS. USE THIS 
SECTION, EVERY ONE DOES! 
TO PLACE AN AD 

PHONE AD-9362 


IT PAYS 

TO USE 

EAGLE 

WANT ADS. 



Tells You The Truth 
About Your Troubles 

And How To Ovorcome Them 

Know What To Do 



Spiritual Psychic 
Marcus Ordained Medium 

He Con Help You 

If Tea arc in doubt, worry or trouble of any kmd, if yo«r 
heart is aet mi a certain end in friendship, love, mankg^ 
divoree or bnsiness, or if yon are not satisfied, or anottier 
ibares that which rightfully belongs to yon, dont looe faith. 
His Spiritual advice and help re-unites the separated, glTes 
nadies and facts, helps you in whatever trouble yon mxf bo 
in. Bas bronght good luck, happiness, health aad soeeea to 
thoeniidt whose hopes were crushed with troable. aad «■ 
do a> mndi for yon. Do not be diseonraged. Read L Cor. IS. 

Spiritual Psychic Readings, Donations 50c ^ $1 

Heus 11 a. in. till 8 p. m. Sundays J to 7 p.aL 

OCCULT SCIENCE CENTER C. S. A. 

oar, get •« at ilst ttrool 


«1U to. Avaloa Blvd. 


Tak« -8" 


BRUCE'S 

Diuretic Medicine 

FOR WEAK KIDNEYS AND BLADDEIf 

NOPB— GETTING fTP NIGHTS, BURNING UBINK 
AND BACKACHE 

BRUCE'S DRUG STORE 
4400 South Central Avenue 


PHONE: Century 2S95C 


FREE DEUTBRT 


THE CROWN LAUNDRY AND 
CLEANING COMPANY'S 

"HELPS FOR THE HOMEMAKER" 


PHONE ntoopoct 6351 


THE BEST WAT TO SAVE MOVET ON 
YOUR LAUNDRT WORK 

FAMILY FINISHED WORK, by the pound. 
Send the whole family wash for these unbelievably low prices. 
Ten poutids for $1.25, extra pounds 10c each. Minimum bdL 
10 lbs. Everything washed and ironed, ready for \ise. Ko ex- 
tra charges. No restrictions except bundle must be (we-half 
flat pieces. Curtains not accepted in this bundle. 
Average weifhts of articles in c<muftOB ose by families. 
2 Ladies*! aprons -wt. 1 l* H Overalls wt. 1 tt 


5 Ladies* tea aprons. 
20 Collars*, " " " 

5 Chemisilis — * " " 

4 Combinltions " " " 

6 Cor»t dt>ve»s " - • 

4 Drespes, child's _-" " " 

2 DresaeSv house ~.-'' " " 

3 Dresses, *ight l." " - 

57 Handkei^efs. ladies' - - " 

1 Skirt .dZ^ ._" " " 

13 Stochmgs, »4k " " * 

3 UndeSrawiM, Udies " • « 

5 Under^t»,\ ladies' — " 
I BlouBeS,\ boy»^. 

28 Handk^i^ch^ mena." 
10 Hooe, mw'i pairs. 
1 Jumper^ 
a% Night r 


« « 



^ Coveralls 

2 Pajama, suits 

*k Bathrobes 

2 Shirts, men's 

5 Undershirts 

5 Underdrawers _^ 

3 Unionsuits 
1 Pants 
1 Bath mats .. 
3 Slips 

25 Wash rags .. 

10 Napldns .: 

tk Sheets 

1 Tablecloth 


2 Bath towels 

6 Face towels -- 

6 Kitchen towels 
1 Spread 


.wtSlh 


low prices right at yoor door or at tmf 

us^call then up, and one of the Crown's ceurto- 
utemen will call and explain the aervko 

CAIK HAD TOnt CLOTHU WKAr* 


ff You Foil Tc ^eod THE 


CALIFdRNU 


EAGLE You Mpy Nev^r' KnoWf Ti HoppeneiJ 


"orTCIiilb Holds 
Reunion in Son Diego Cof e 


Thunioyr November 17, 1938 


t- 


■^•^ fAN, DIEGO. (By Mrs! E. B.t 
Wesley)— Former members of 
the Polyhedron club entertained 
a few frjends at a dinner dance 
Saturday; night, November 12, at 
the Creole Palace. The PcUyhe- 
drons were organized up 1925 and 
have been ]cnbwii as one of the 
leading charity organizations of 
4bd Diego. Former officers and 
•(embers present were; Mmes. 
Mattie Summerville, . president; 
Josephine Wilson, secretary; Fern 
Martin, chairman of the enter- 
taiPinent committee; and Ethel 
OkVer, hostess; Ruby Raphael, 
Edna Raiftwater, and 3usie Oiby. 
Just-A-Mere Club met last 
treek with the president, Reggie 
Duncan, 2059 Julian Avenue. 
Plans were completed for the 
bazaar to be given at the Com- 
munity Center on November 17, 
18 and 19. Preparations for 
Christmas festivities were also 
discussed. 

The Best Yet Club met with 
Miss Ora Dimry. Saturday night 
on Valle St. The club usually 
■ends dinners to needy persons 
»n Thanksgiving Day and is head- 
ed, by E. G. Rollins. 
; The Do Good Club celebrated 
"^jte' ifirst anniversary ^recently 
with a turkey dinner given by 
Mr. and Mrs. William Freeman 
in the home of Mr. and Mrs. An- 
drew Thai, 3095 Webster Avenue. 
Quests of honor were: Messrs. 
uid Mmes. Wilfiam Tucker, El 
3aJon: L. Neal. National City; 
Fred Elliot, James Parks, A. Wal- 
lace Otay. E. Pearson; Messrs. 
:;harles Wagner. William Tucker, 
uid J. Mitchell. 



CALIFORNIA (COMM UNIT tESi- 

i$ Your Town Represented? i"v , '' ,; Send Us the News 


El Cenfro Community 

<^ip-;;^:^eaguei f sj Orgdnixed 

EtCENTRO. (By W.A. Payne) ♦delivered the Monday mominf 


REV. H. R. GIPSON, BapUst 
evangelist, Who has held a 
number of pastorates in South- 
em California cities. He, re- 
sides in San Diego. 


Little Beverly Jean Campbell, 
daughter o^ Mr. and Mrs. Colton 
Campbell «:elebrated her fourth 
birthday with a party on Novem- 
ber 10 from five until seven. The 
table wa.s m pink and white 
motif and cei>tered with a large 
cake inscribe<J '"Happy Birthday, 
Beverly Jean." 

Mrs. Emma Carrington came 
from Los Angeles Saturday even- 
ing to. be With her sister-in-law. 
Mrs. Othella Pollard who is ill 
in the General hospital. 

Mrs. Lulu Claridy spent .sever- 
al days in Los Angeles last week 
as the guest of her daughter. Mrs. 
Celia Blackburn, and family. 

HI-Y CLUB 
OHGANIZED 

A group of 11 of the oulstand- 
jrg Negro youths of San Diego 
High School have organized 
themselves into a San Diego 


Hign School Chapter of the na-" '"°'""i"« ^'"shiP services at 11 
tional Hi-Y Club. *■ *'"• The combined junior and 


The first 3 meetings were held 
at the home of Henry Manley, 
the Hi-Y Leader. At the first 
ro'^etirvg the boys were acquaint- 
ed vith the Hi-Y. its aims, func- 
tions and the possibilities and ad- 
vantages that It offers to its 
ipsmbers. The boys were quite 
enthusiastic and immediately be- 
gan to look into the future and 
di-icussed various club programs. 

Tf'e second meeting was given 
over to the election of officers. 
The results of the election are as 
follows: Walter Quinn, Jr.. presi- 
dent: G'endon Armstrong, vice- 
president; John Ritchey, treas.; 
Robert Raphael, sec'y. The new 
jn-esident suggested that at the 
next meeting the felloes be pre. 
pared to submit names for the 
club, a club purpcic or motto, 
and suggestions for club colors. 

After much discussion at the 
foUowing .neeting the name of 
Campus Hi-Y was crosen. The 
boys wpre unanimous in accept- 
ing. "To provide an incentive for 
hitrher citizenship and scholar- 
ship", as their club purpose. Club 
colors of blue and orange were 
chose... 

The lack of transpQrtation 
proved a disappointment to the 
bajs when they were unable to 
get to Los Angeles on November 
12 to take part in Hollywood Hi- 
Y Day and attend the UCLA- 
Wisconsin football game. Any 
person who is willing to aid the 
club by furnishing transportation 
or loaning the use of his car so 


the boys will be able to take ad- ,^0^ j^^^y young men and wo- 


vantage of the opportunities of 
fered by the Hi-V in the future, 
is urged to notify Henry Man- 
ley. Hi-Y Leader, at 2872 Frank-- 
lin avenue. 
CHURCHES 

Mount Zion Baptist Church 
C. Johnson, pastor 

Sundav School. 9:30 a. m.; 
Preaching, 11 a. m.; BYPU, 6:30 
p. m.; E\'ening service, 8 p. m. 
Philllpa Temple CME 
C. H. Houston, pastor 

9:30 a. m., Sunday School: 11 
a. m., Preaching; 6:30 p m.. Lea- 
gue; 8 p. tn., Preaching. 
Trhiity Baptist Church 
t. Harold Brown, pastor 

Sunday School at 9:30 a. m.: 
Preaching at 11 a. m.; BYPU at 4 
p. m.; Preaching at 5:30 p. m. 
Calvary Baptist Church 
i. I,. Branham, pastor 

ITie Sunday School opened at 
«:30 with Mrs. Louella Roberts, 
8upt in charge. An interesting 
and instructive review of the les- 
aon was led by thfe Supt. 

Sermons for both morning and 
evening services were delivered 
by the pastor, Rev. Branham. 
Miuic was rendered by both the 
junior and the senior choirs un- 
der the direction of Mr. William 
%obb. 

BYPU at 4 p. m. Mr. R. W. 
Lipscomb, president in charge. 

Evening services at 5:30 p. m. 
. The pastor and members wel- 
■ eomed Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Gar- 
lison who united with the church. 
•There were several visitors pre- 
WBt at both nioming and even- 
ing services. 
Ctamh of Gad ia Christ 
JaoMs A Jasksoa, ysstor 

Monday sctMX^ opened at 9:30 
«. m. Mr. Lee Pierson the super- 
intendent was in charge. 

At the morning services Elder 

' Hckson occupied the pulpit and 

dcliul{«4 « loul ftviriag owis«ge, 


J 


YPWW^ at 6 u; m. under me di- 

. rection of Miss Ratra E. Tucker 
I and Miss Myrtle Pressley. Even- 
' ing services at 8 p. m. Elder Jack- 
, son again delivered the message. 
A. M. E. BROTHERHOOD 
NOTES 

The meeting of the Brother- 
hood was held last Thursday 
night with A. N. Hicks as. host. 
' The greatest enthusiasm was 
evinced by those present for the 
very energetic program of the 
year, the pastor, along with the 
members was very much pleased 
with the excellent success of the 
pew ralfy and the Hallowe'en 
: party. Each meeting seems to be 
gaining in bot+i. interest and at- 
tendance. The attendance is 25 
per cet greater than it was three 
months ago and the brothers are 
in a lively rivalry as to who will 
entertain the next meeting. 

A public installation of the 

new officers of the Brotherhood 

and those of the several other 

auxiliaries of the church will be 

held at the church on Sunday 

[ evening. November 27. A good 

I program will be presented by the 

executive committee of which D. 

V. Allen is chairman. The next 

' meeting will be in the parsonage 

with ihe pastor. 

BetTel A. M. E. Cnurch Sun- 
day School convenes at nine with 


senior choirs sang last Sunday 
and the pastor. Rev. L. H. Owens, 
preached from the subject, "The 
Mark of God". 

The Harvest Home festixal was 
initiated at the morning service 
and the class leaders council 
sponsored the festival dinner 
Monday evening. 
THE SICK LIST 

The Sunshine Club reports the 
sick for the week at General Hos- 
pital a^ Mmes. M. Davis, Pansy 
Bell, Martha Reeder, Othella Pol- 
lard: and William Wh: e: at Vaj 
Clain Home: Mrs. Mae Echols. 
Mrs. Bernice Beasley, Eloise Hop- 
kins. Georgia Bell, Bessie An- 
drews Benny Lucky, Dan Gat- 
lin, Theo. Steele, and Wilbur 
Smith. 
DEATHS 

Mrs. Ruth McClellan and Mrs. 
Sadie Joiinson died last week. 
The former's funeral was held 
I'rom Logan C'lapel A"ME Zion 
church Monday afternoon with 
Rev. L. W. McCoy officiating and 
the Tate Funeral Home in charge. 
Mrs. Johnson s remains were 
shipped East for burial. She was 
the niece of Mrs. Cleo Crews. 

Santa Barbara 
Baptist Church 
Plans S.S.Confdb 

SANTA BARBARA. (By Phyl- 
lis Hoxiel-rThe Baptist churcb 
here is now making ready for the 
Baptist Sunday School Conven- 


Wfii. NiclUrftPii. 
toSpeokto " 
San Pedro Club 

SAN Pedro. (By Edward Cu- 
ney)— WiL,.^ -^-'-erson. Jr., 
president of the t>«r*aen awate In- 
surance Co., will be the guest 
speaker at the Sunday morning 
breakfast of the Crispus Attucks 
Civic club. Others on the pro- 
gram will include Lavanda Gat- 
lin, recent graduate of Compton 
Junior College, a speaker, and 
Mrs. Rochelle Linwed, Misses 
Cleopatra Taylor and Roberta 
Stewart, musicians. 

Lamar Stubblefield heads the 
committee in charge, assisted by 
James Darling, Ernest S t a r k s, 
William Hathaway and F. H. Cu- 
ney. 
CHURCH NEWS 

A suggestion to the pistors of 
the various churches of San Pe- 
dro that union church services 
be held 'once a month, or inter- 
changeable visits, was greeted 
favorably here. Rev. Taylor of 
the Mt. Sinai Baptist church 
made the suggestion and .Rev. 
Massengale, pastor of Mace- 
donia Baptist church, seconded 
the motion. 

The Evangelist, the Rev. Mrs. 
Ralston is in the city, conduct- 
ing servites at Williams Chapel 
A. M. E. church. Rev. Harris, 
presiding elder of this district, 
will be here on Tuesday, making 
the first visit to this church since 
conference. The pastor," Rev. J. 
L. Glover, has asked all clubs 
and members to cooperate. 


San Bernardino's 
Socialites Attend 
Formal in L. A. 

SAN BERNARDINO. j(By 
Madelj-n Cook» — It seems that 
all of San Bernardino V young so- 
cialites were in Los Angeles 
Saturday night, attending the 
formal dance given by the Roy- 
al Twelve club of Santa Mpnica 
at the Angel City's Masonic Hall. 

Saw--Beissie Collins very strik- 
ing in black, escorted by Orville 
Diggs, Helen Collins and Reggie 
Harris made a cute couple. No- 
ticed Cecil Owens, prexy of the 
"Rockets" linked with the new- 
comer. Lois Fuqua . Also saw 
Vera Harris and Lamar Stone, 
Mr. and Mrs. Jackson a.id Mr, 
and Mrs. E. Strickland, George 
Williams and L. and Westley 
After the dance, the crowd en- 
joyed an early breakfast at the 
Dunbar GrilL 
I HEAR OF 

The lovely dinner dance given 
Thursday night by the Hi-Hatters. 
Riverside girls . . . .Visiting the 
"Friendly City" for the week- 
end were Mr. and Mrs. 'lun'er of 
Val Verde . . . Mrs. Leola Jones 
entertained at dinner for her 
brother, Julian Brantley, who is 
visiting here . . . That Mr,". f>am- 
mie Strickland gave a party for 
her little daughter, Silva Janice 
. . . Coats stolen in Los Angeles 
from the automobile of Reginald 
Harris . . . Excitement about the 
dance to be given by the Briga- 
fiette Saturday ni°ht for pioneer 
celebration ... 01 tlje classical 
jamboree Monday night . . . Be- 
ing at the home of Mr. and Mrs 
Vernon Felix of Riverside for an 
informal get-to-gether Sunday 
with Misses Muriel Jackson, Lo- 
wella Martin, Miss Hubert Ward, 
Walter Miller, all of Los Angeles, 
also Mr. and Mrs. James Ware, 
Howard Williamson, Elizabeth 
Goodwin, L. C. Westley and 
Madelyn Cooke. 


RACE TRACK 
& GOSSIP 

ly JAY GOULD 


Week of Prayer aiicT World 
Fellowship Held if Ookldnd 


SAN FRANCISCO — Tairforan 
steps in and Bay Meadows steps 
out. Tom Shaffer, formerly of 
New York, now living in San 
Francisco, amazes all his filends 
and the whole town by taking in 
all the Eastern big events . 
Delphine Jackson, Mr. McThomp- 
son and his missus stCMea off the 
Streamline at 6 p. m., Triday for 
the Tanforan Races. They were 
entertained by Purcy Boses. 

Pop Yellow in the Alabam 
Night Spot until the wee hour;?. 
When Kid Lee asked Pop did his 
ladies drink. Pop was heard to 
say "Yes, they get high as a tic- 
ket to New York." . . . After a 
gent danced several times with 
the same lady in a party from 
'Frisco in the Creole Palace late 
spot, San Diego, an entertainer 
was heard to say "It couldn't be 
his wife as he has danced every 
set with her," . . . 

A party was given by Ruth and 
Ariabelle Stubblefield in Oak- 
land recently. The guests present 
were: Roy Gardner, John Levy, 
Nat Earle, Charles Hamilton, B. 
Mill and Frank .Miller. They 
danced until the wee hours of 
the morning, , . . Merceita Le- 
near, Mrs. T. Allen and Mrs. Su- 
sanne Taylor can be seen on both 
sides of thft bridge taking in all 
the swanky night spots . . . Mr. 
and Mrs. Bennie Gibson are pay- 
ing slight visits to Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Bijrr. Since Mrs. Burr has 
been ill at her beautiful Nob Hill 
Apt. . . . Clara McNeil, who spent 
.'B500 having her sister's eyes op- 
erated on at the Green Eye Hos- 
pital, looked very bleary eyed 
after spending 49 hours at her 
sister's bedside . . . Lovie Joe 
Roberson of New York was al- 
ways used in all sporting upsets 
as the man on the inside. When 
Tunney licked Dempsey, the by- 
word was Lovie Joe mopped up. 

Did you know that San Fran- 
cesco pays the highest salaries in 
the world. Did you know that 
you can pick fresh vegetables 
from the garden, fruit off the 
vines ?nd trees and see the beau- 
tiful sun rise from January to 
January. . . . Did you know that 
the people of San Francisco are 
different from people of other 
I cities, if they are the same they 
don't act it . . . Did feu know- 
that Jimmy Nelson just '-eturned 
to the Dunbar hotel after having 
his wife ex-rayed at the Mayo 
Hospital. 

For any further information 
write or wire Jay Gould, 1716 
Webster Street, San Francisco. 
Calif. 


men from all jjarts of the Uited 
States are expected. The conven- 
tion will begin Nov. 23 and will 
extend through Nov. 27. Plans 
are being made to make this a 
great success. 
ARMISTICE DAT 

An informal gathering was held 
Monday, Armistice Day at "Eve- 
leyn's Cafe". Many of the S. S. 
Colorado crew were amon„ those 
present. Spotted among 4 h e 
young socialites were Misses 
Dorothy Washington, Altheda 
Marshall and Felicia Johes. Faye 
Seymore, George Moore, Wiiliam 
Voderil. Jerome Smith and J. W. 
Butler. 

Su.'-.Uoy was devoted to men 
and their mis.siorarv v/ork at the 
■Methodist church. At the even- 
ing services. Dr. Oliver Han 
Bronson spoke on. "What Scandi- 
navia can teach us". Harry Stew- 
art rendered several numbers on 
the xylophone, "^'^ny important 
guest were nr- 
AFTERNOON TEA 

Sunday, an ai .loon' tea was 
sponsored by The Chrbtian En- 
deavor ot the St. Paul A. M. E. 
Church. A most en ^ - < ■ ^ pro. 
gram was presented and tne -*»- 
ly elected officers were -ir re- 
duced. The president is Miss Lu- 
cinda Smith, vice-president, Fu- 
sie Simms, secretary, Estella 
Minter. treasurer, Larry Pickens. 


Glomour Perfume 

b Jnst Wbat The Name Says 
Do Ton Want To Attract Others? 

Perfomrs ir^ atit* of rhe .>M«t mnnt of 
•ApraACnSO 01Ri-1B)<. HWoiy i> full 01 
•»« TOWff of inC'.-lM tni pirfuutw, hring 
ing pOOD lUca, I.O?E iinU GREAT 
we.\F,TH bjr -ftidwithig Ite tmtM of ofh- 
ti». It i« mi(ni«tie iml ramprlf •Itfntion, 
«Bd iwiy brine voii JIJST THE J»0¥,\\Cf: 
Ton }uivt lonfcril for, * 

Trro nitrf. $1 aM »4. IT 'WIT.I. KT 
TSAlT OTHKRS. n»n't ..iMv. tT.|.r %M\tr 
from 

, aUMOUR, KOCB&LU CAKK, V. /. 


San Jose A. M. E. 

Zion Church 

in Bible Day Fete 

SAN JOSE. (By Phylis Brad- 
ford) — A. M. E. Zion church cele- 
brated Bible Day, Sunday, Nov. 
13. Rev. Carson, San Jose's bril- 
liant young minister, giving an 
inspiring message on the Bible 
and its good. Several signifiranl 
passages were read to a very ap- 
preciative audience. * 

Armistice Day was celebrated 
in San Jose in various ways. Be- 
ginning with a parade, a football 
game between San Jose State 
and Redlands followed with San 
Jose winning. The final score be- 
ing 21-6. Don Pre?ley and L'oyd 
Thom.as turned in a very good 
game. 

Lamarr Jacques entertained at 
his North Spring Street home, 
with an "after the game^ buffet 
supper. Nate Moreland, player on 
the RFedlands team, was one of 
th^ guests of honor. 

Motoring t() San Jose to attend 
the game from San Francisco 
and Oakland were: Mesdame.- 
Cora Noel, George Clarke; Mis- 
ses Faith Thomas, Hilda Harris; 
Messrs. Jack Clarke, Roy Ed- 
wards.- I 
' Seen at the American Legion I 
ball, given in honor of. both th-«' ; 
San Jose State and Redlands j 
football teams on Armistics Day: I 

Misses Faith Thomas, Mildred t 
Rogers, Jayne Cooper, Phyllis 
Bradford. Dell Ree Washington, 
Ruby Washington; Messrs. Don 
Presley, Bill Maulden, Lloyd 
Thomas, Ray Edwards, Harold 
Jones, Nate Moreland, "Bull" 
Lewis, Billy BoswelL 

Faith Thomas of San Francisco, 
spent the week end as house 
guest of Jayne Cooper. 

Motoring to San Francisco 
Saturday njjht. Nov. 12, to at- 
tend a "Sc?vi»»»'~'^ vP'ty^- r»ven' 
b" Jnhr-n- :p '•■'•■•■.; r*- 


membw of S. F.'s younger let, >?'**' ^"y* 


Builds Radio 
Set at Cost 
of $3,500 

PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 17, (By 
Bernice Dutrieville Shell on for 
ANP' — Between tooth jerking 
and ^umb-probing. Dr. Waddie 
Belton has for the past four or 
five years been working upon a 
radio receiving set which to date 
has cost him in the neighboihood 
of $3,500. It's a beauty. Nightly 
chats with his niother in South 
Carolina constitute one of thf 
highlights of his inventor-den 
tist daily rputine. 

Dial board looks like the c'ash 
board of an expensive automo- 
bile — magnified many times, oi 
course — and contains what Vance 
Chavis, of Greensboro, N. C, an 
other radio enthusiast cails "si 
many gadgets." It has rose^m 
ber dial knobs, a key to switc) 
stations on and off, a meter ft 
registering the nuances of tl 
voice while broadcasting— and 
number of other little devici 
for receiving and transmittii 
messages to various points, i 
'eluding Sweden, London, Ep 
land, as well as the remote a: 
intermediate points in Penns.' 
vania and along the Atlantic s; 
:^ard from Canada to Florida. 

And the responses he receiv 
from his broadcasts! Everythii 
from mere form cards ackno\ 
ledging hearing the messages 
visits from and invitations for r 
turn visits to homes of New Yo,. 
Stock Exchange members ar 

were: Misses Jayne Cooper. Mar 
Jane Brown, Mary Isabel Adams; 
Messrs. Lloyd Thomas, Don Pres- 
ley, Earl Gladman, Felix Ribbs, 
Doug. Kjnard. Geo. Adams, Bill 
Jones, "Bull" Lewis. Lamarr 
Jacques, 

Mr. Henry Ribbs, a plumoer in 
San Jase that is being commend- 
ed for forging ahead in his busi- 
ness, has recently opened an of- 
fice and display room in East 
San Jose. Pictures of his plumb- 
ing shop were on display in the 
rCsding theatres of San Jose. 

Mr. Walker, one of San Jose's 
Oldest residents, gave a year's 
subscription for the Calljornia 
Eagle, to P. Bradford to send in, 
I wish to take time now to extend 
my thanks to him, and sincerely 
hope that he will get satisfaction 
and enjoyment from it. 

Mr. Jim Harton is still confin- 
ed to his bed after a rather' seri- 
01 -. illness. 

Mr. Overton is seriously ill. He 
has been suffering in the past 
with hemorrages. Then every one 
thought Iv w a R dome splendid 
when Iir had another one the 


OAKLAND, (By Lena M. Wy 
1 singer) — The Annual Candle 
Lighting Service for the recog- 
nition of Linderi Branch YWCA 
and observance of a week of 
Prayer and World Fellowship 
was held at Taylor Memorial A. 
M. E Church last Sunday. 

The services were opened with 
Organ Voluntary by Lloyd Har- 
rpll. . 

Call to worship by Mrs. T 
Henderson, was followed b- 
National Negro Anthem ar el- 
come to members by fh esi- 
dent of .the Board of Mar nent 
Mrs. Bertha Allen, for jd by 
a solo, by Mrs. Zilica . , lUiams. 
• Miss Henrietta Bell, recently 
appointed Business and Indust- 
rial secretary of Linden Brafich. 
was the speaker upon the sub- 
ject, "The Christian Cpmmunity 
in the Modem World." 

'The desire of those starting 
the organization was to include 
in the membership on an equal 
basis, within the fellowship those 
groups most widely differing 
from the common form of white 
Nordic adults, groups such as 
(the foreign bom, the Negro, the 
Industrial Worker, and the young- 
er girl. . 

"Miss Ruth Woodsman. Gener- 
al Secretary of the World's Y. W. 
C. A., with headquarters in Gen j 
eva, Switzerland, has said, ^We | 
recognize that our very existence j 
as a World Christian Movement j 
is an evidence of unity in Christ, 
transcending all barriers of race 
and nation. This lays upon us an 
inescapable responsibility to 
work for the creation of an inter- 
national order which may more 
nearly examplify the fundament- 
al basis of the World Christian 
Community, the Fatherhood of 
God and the Brotherhood of Man. 
Our belief i.s the supremacy of 
God-sovereign above all human 
claims of sovereignty — is challen- 
ged by the anarchy among the 
nations." 

CIVILIZATION FACES 


can you t .e those tragedies on 
an ignorai nation, or is it a at- 
tempt and a successful one on 
the pa' 01 an unscrupulous nat- 
ion tr .ke and hold power. 
Sn- ^ar we now have is, "Who 
«r .?•• 

^■x. /en the United States with 

r glorious past — her revered 
. aditions is insecure." , 
ECONOIVUC SYSTEM = 
INSECURE 

"How pathetic is our economic 
system! There have been through- 
out the last ten years about 10,- 
000,000 of unemployed. Workers 
and business men too are pan- 
icky.' 

"According to Dr. Paul Dood, 
'Opportunities for initiative and 
Ownership are ropidly decreasing. 
Only ten percent of the gainfully 
employed are independent." 
CALIFORNIA FOURTH RANK 

"Over fifty percent of the popu- 
lation of California live in fam- 
ilies having less than $1,200 per 
year, yet California is the 4th 


— Last Sunday afternoon the El 
Centro Community League came 
into being. A large gathering of 
determined citizens met in the 
Douglass high school auditorium. 
After general discussion, a per- 
manent organization was formed. 
DuBois McGee, chairman of a 
committee, previously selected 
to present a constitution, read the 
document which was adopted aft- 
er a few minor chanegs. 


address for the Ministers' Alli- 
ance. Mrs. Frances M. Burleigh 
sahg two numbers; she was ac- 
companiad by ^frs. Irene S. 
Prinw. The broadcast was ovw 
KXO and this service is on* of 
the feat«ur« of the week. 

A large congregation worsh^J- 
ped with the Secprid Baptiat 
church Sunday morning and 
evening. Rev. Whitten preached 
! two excellent sermons. There 


"The following persons are the ware two additions to the church 


officers for the remainder of this 
year and the year 1939: R. J. Bur- 
leigh, President; DuBois McGee 
vice-president; Richard Bayloe. 
Secretary; Robert Merrill, Treas.; 
W. A. Payne, Parliamentarian. 


membership. Mr. and Mrs. Jor»es 
formerly members of Trinity 
Baptist Church, Los Angeles. The 
congregation joined the host of 
worshippers in the service held 
in Brawley Sunday afternoon. 


the first quarterly meeting of Uit 
Southwest Baptist ' Association. 
Rev. Whitten preached the (Coro- 
nation sermon. Mr. Japies Robin- 
son sang a solo during the morn- 
ing worship. He was accompanied 
by Miss Lenore Cooper. 

Rev. E. rf. Smith, presiding eld- 
er of the California CME Con- 
ference was visitor here during 
the past week, conducting ser- 
vices in the Edwerds Chap>el C. 
M. E. Church and holding busi- 
ness sessions of the organization 
While here h% '*ras the guest of 


The E^cutive Committee is com- This meeting marked the close of 

posed of the officers and Messrs. " " " ' 

Ellison Lucas, H. D. Gentry, C 

C. Hall, A. E. Washington, Rev, 

G, E, Davis, H, E. Raymond, C 

J. Burton. 
East El Centro took an active 

part in the CJeneral election of 

last Tuesday. Variotjs civic, frat- 
ernal, and religious. organizations 

had made a careful study of the 

several issues and records of can- 
didates and the vote totalled 60 

per cent of the registration. 
El Centro had two election 

boards all Negro nr>embers. In 

hiah^t .s,^ 1 ■ -I precinct 15 Miss Ouida Dixon- the pastor. Rev. G. W. Davis. 

highest among annual incomes m | Mesdames Elizabeth McGee, 01^ The Southwest Baptist Associa- 

lie Allen, Ellis Lucas; and Messrs tion held its first quarterly meet- 
John Fair and S. W. Butler were ing in Brawley last Saturday and 

members of the election board. Sunday. The Moderator. Rev. I. 

In precinct 16 the board membent 'N. Whitten. presented as a theme 

were Mesdames Vera Terry and "Facing Our Task". The sessions 

Martha Hicks; Messrs Ben Long. 

E. H. Cross, Harry Steams and 

Lewis Foster. Race citizens of 

Calipatria presided in one of the 

precincts. No. 3. The members 

vere: Mesdames Evelyn Quincy 

Katie Hawkins. Ida Elv; and 

Messrs Joseph Wedlaw. Leonard 

Haynes and Vance Tate. 
Mrs. Jessie Craig has taken out 

permit for rebuilding her resi- 

detice at 153 Orange Avenue. Her 

residence was destroyed by fire 

last June. 

Phyllis WheaUey Temple 

I sohttion to the political, social, 
economic and ethical problems last Thursday 

t-e constantly n. A. Dedman. city editor of 


the United Stsftes. 
"Communism and Fascism face 

us all — the worker wants to go 

communistic in order to obtain 

a greater economic security- the 

rich want to go fascist in order 

to hold on to what thty already 

have but neither of these will 

work because the means to an 

end is too costly. 
I "Prejudices are rampant, they 
I face uj on every hand," said the 
j speaker, "certainly we as Negroes 
I do not need to beccMne acqnain- 
: ted with the problems of minority 
!i groups. 

I! "What part can a Christian 
ji Movement play in this modem 
i! world of education and science? 
f Can it through its memt>ersliips 

' ^H„",r"!"!!!.??'' r"*'*!".* °«"6ht^r Eikr°enlertai;;i" their 

members and friends at dinner 


we 


with which 
Aced?" 

Miss Lulu C. Chapman is Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of the branch. 


""■'wkJ^Vh , j' Dougfoss High Footbollers 

When Ethiopia wa.s invaded 1. g. . .^, 'L """""'era 
by Italy we all felt that the fall ^'Oy I" Win Column; 
of the empire was due to the poor Defeat CalipotWa Hioh 
leadership of a i)ackward peo- el CENTRO— The Douglas 


pie — but Japan invaded Manchu- 
ria then Northern and Central 
China, now the same thing has 
happened to Czechoslovakia — 
CJermany has possession of t h r 
Sudeten land and other territory. 


Southern white families. 

The small control room is right 
behind his office where the trans- | 
mitter is set up. The entire trans- 
mission set occupies a room on 
the top floor of his home. Dr. 
Belton holds a Class A operator's 
license, the highest grade obtain- 
able in amateur radio, and i.s 8 
memb°r of the Amateur Radio 
Relay League. 


Thanksgiving 
Turkey Dinner Dance 

at NEAL'S RANCH 

(.San Diego) 
Beginning Than.nsgiving Eve. 
midnight, lasting throughout 
Thanksgiviug Day, Tickets 75c. 


High football aggregation con- 
tinued to make the winning 
column last Thursday when it 
defeated the Calipatri? High 
team. 33 to 7. The game w;.. 
one continued session of thrilh. 
Maples got away for an 80 
yard run and Cook returned a 
punt 60 yards. Once in the open 
these two boys are hard to over 
take. Alaples scored three 
touchdowns and plunged thni 
Cahpatria's for three extra 
points. Cook scored two touch- 
downs. 

Tw\ more games are to be 
playetJ this season, one with 
Holtville and the closing game 
wilh Imperial. This is Dour, 
lass Highs first year at regu- 
lar football. The boys play to- 
gether as a unit, are responsive 
to the instructions of the coacJi 
»nd yet think and act ad-- 
vantageously in crises. There 
are several boys coming up 
from Washington School who 
will fit into the organizaUon 
and continue the fine start made 
by the present formation 



install automlatic gas heat 

Modem equipment keeps roomi 
uniformly warm - requires no attention 

Make every hour indoors an hour of cainfoH this 
winter! Your home will |be assured of healthful 
wamith "from the floor up" with automatic gas heat. 
And the cost will not be griat. 

Just note these special reasons for providing your 
family with adequate gas Keating equipment at once: 
l.Your household will beiui^the cold months with 
greater comfort and conk^enience plus the health- 
protecting adv.i'.. i(re« off proper wamith. No need 
to be Continually cdjustitig appliances to keep heat 
uniform. You Will have correct circulation of air; no 
dampness on walls. | 

i.Easyterraseliminateanyi^eedfordelay.lnstalUuto- 
matic equipment now an^ pay for It by the month. 

(OUTH K R'N i C>LI roatK IA OAI C O II P A H Y 


the San Diego Informer, is a 
visitor in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Shaw of 
^.os Ange'e.s. Mr. Shaw's father. 
"VTr. and Mrs. Lowe, brother-in- 
law and .-lister of Mr. Shaw wcrf 
visitors here over the week end 
2nd were guests of Prbf. and 
Mrs. A. E. Prince. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jessie Robinson 
nf Los Angeles visited friends 
here las! Sunday. Mrs. Robinson 
'orn-erlv tausht in the Washing- 
;nn .'^qIiooI. The- ivere ?ccnn-.riani- 
Pd by Mr. and Mr.<:. Robert Lan- 
dry of Los An.eeles: and Mis< 
Howard of Fort Worth. T p x a .« 
They were dinner guests of Prof 
and Mrs. A. K Prince. 

Miss Ruth Payne, San n ; e e o 
State College, spent the ■» -ifion 
with hfr parents here. Shr> was 
accompanied on her return trip 
to ,San Diego by hpr sisters. 

Mrs. Clarence Moore has re- 
turned to El Centro and will 
make her permanent residence in 
this city. Mrs. Moore is a grad- 
uate from the Douglass Junior 
College. , 

Mrs. Lucille* Culberson and 
Miss Gladys Gier spent the holi- 
days with relatives and friends in 
Los Angeles. 

Mrs. James Stocks and son 
Stanley of Pasadena spent the 
week end holiday with husband 
and father. 

Rev. I. N. Whitten. pastor of 
the Second Baptist Church and 
Mrs. Estella McCall of Los An- 
geles were quietly married at the 
residence of the Rev. and Mrs. 
MiUer, Los Angeles last Wednes- 
day. The ceremony was perform- 
ed by Rev. Miller in the presence 
of a few friends of both parties 
The happily married couple left 
Friday for El Centro where Rev 
Whitten IS pastoring the Second 
Baptist churA. A cordial recep- 
: tion was given tho^ at both the 
session of the Southwest Baptist 
Association and the morning wor- 
D '' °U^^ Second Baptist church. 
Rev. Whitten is well known in 
the West for his splendid ser- 
vice as Missionary of the West- 
ern Baptist Convention and as 
chairman of the Missionarv Com- 
mission. He has successfully pas- 
iored a number of churches in 
'he convention. Mrs. Whitten i^ 
active in church and community 
work is a talented musicia,r. and 
will bring into this sectlbn the 
personality and help that are 
greatly needed. A large coterie 
of friends congratulate the new- 
'yweds and wish them a happy 
inarried life. ^ 

Tn?^''- f ^/ Hawkins, pastor of 
Johnson's Chapel, A. M. E. church 


of the A.ssociation and the auxi- 
liaries planned tbtir programs 
around this theme. Throughout 
the meeting there was a frank 
discussion of the needs of the or- 
ganization. Plans were made to 
extend the missionary activities 
of the Association. As a begin- 
ning it was decided to make de- 
finite contributions to the work 
in Indio. 

Rev. David Campbell of Blythe 
conducted a series of devotional 
services which were inspiring. 
The Association sermon w as 
preached by Rev. J. L. Branham, 
pastor of the Calvary Baptist 
Church. San Diego. This church 
was received into the Associa- 
tion during the .session. 

The president of the State Con- 
vention, Rev. C. H Hampton, was 
presented and delivered an ad- 
dress taki!'g as hi subject. "Thf 
Relation o.' the "ChiT'-'- and ii 
.■\uxiliar:es,"" 

The Xev.- Bet!, el Ecpusl ciiurcl-. 
Rev. Matthew Merrit. pastor, en- 
tertained the messengers to thf 
meeting in faultless style. Then 
cordiality served much' to create 
the risht atmosrherp nf Chris- 
tian feJIowfhir, 

2 Named to dt 
Council in 
Norl-hern Indiana 

GARY. Ind.. Nov. 17, (ANPt — 
Gary and East Chicaso. Ind,. wil 
have Negro aldermen, results o' 
'ast TuesdaVs election shows. 

Wilbur J. Hardeway. former- 
ly alderman for two vears but 
who lost in 1934 to William An- 
derson. Democrat was elected 
from the Fifth district on the Re- 
pubhcan ticket, beating out Ben- 
jamin Cre&swell, local undertak- 
' er and Democrat. 

In East Chicago the victor was 
Janes Dent. Jr..faL=o a Republi- 
can. He ,s a steel mil! worker a 
graduate of Washington h'gh 
school and a bae|i§lor. Young 
Dent is the first N%ro ever el- 
ected to the council in East Chi- 
cago. 


Fred I. Marr^y 

Optometrist 

GLASSES 
on CREDIT 

4418 S. Central Avenue 

pasa^TnT 

HOMESFTES, CHOICE LOTS 
aad ACKEAOe 

OLLIE A. ROBINSON 

Licensed KeaJ kstate Broker 
Jl W. Claremoat - ST. Mtf 



EVA C. BURTON 

Sal ecw mean 
STerliiig |M1 



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a Cosmetic Manufacturing busi- 
ness at 5002 S. Central Ave., Los 
Angeles, Calif., under the fictiti- 
ous firm name of Lady Ebonee 
Beautifying Toiletries and that 
said firm is composed of the fol- 
lowing persons, whose names in 
full and places of residence are 
•s follows, to- wit: 

Hazel Williams, 693 E. 43rd PL, 
Los Angeles. '' 

WITNESS my hand this l»th 
day of October, 1938. 

HAZEL WILLIAMS 

FILED Oct. 19, 1938, 

L. E. LAMPTON, County Clerk 
By L. J. Miller, Deputy 
State of California 1 

l-ss. 
County of Los Angeles J 

ON THIS 19 day of October A. 
D. 1938, before me, L. E. LAMP- 
TON, County Clerk and Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles, person- 
ally appeared HAZEL WIL- 
LIAMS known to me to be the 
person whose name is subscrib- 
«d to the within instrument, and 
acknowledged to me that she 
txecuted the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I 
%ave hereunto set my hand the 
lay and year in this certificate 
trst above written. 

L.E. LAMPTON. County Clerk, i 
By L. J. Miller, Deputy. 

(Oct 27, 1938 date 1st pub.) 


FOR RENT 


fOR RENT: Fums room in prl- 
.vate home, to man steadily em- 
ployed. 458 E. 42ndPL CE.'28840. 

' •■ r|17|2 


MISCELLANY 


FOR RENT: Roomi, . clean and 
comfortable; private home; 
phone and kitchen privileges; 
near S, U, and B carlines. 945 E. 
22nrfSt. . r[17 


FOR RENT: Neatly fum. rooms, 
-single and' double, near 4 car- 
lines; working people preferred; 
no pets. AD. 8425. T\n\l 

FOR RENT: Neatly fum. room; 
912 E. 46th St.; no county cli- 
ents. ■ "^ r|1711 


CHUDtAlll 

So. lUitAbg&ea ttbnti^ liOmtAi 
Boys and Girls, 2 to 7 yean. 
Room and boards (^ by the day. 
Nursery, KiadMrgartoi, Prim- 
ary. Also Piano, Violin, and 
Spanish Guitar, are taught 

dPBN THE YEAR 'ROUND 
MRSj OLLIE L KING, Director 

Cor. B. 115th and Grape Sts. 
]p~4084 


Will care, for small child, rm. 
and board or by day. Best, of 
care. Reasonably.— Ro.-7490. 


FOR RENT: Neatly furn. room, 
quiet home, $3.50 per week; 
huosekeeping privileges. 4309 Li- 
ma St. rll7|l 


FOR RENT: Lovely, fum. room; 
gas heat; near S and H carlines. 
Man preferred. Call CE. 29588. 

rinjl 


FOR RENT: 5-room stucco, classy 
furniture, landscaped garden, 
swell patio, garage. Rent or lease, 
$40.00. On 108th St.. phone AD. 
12061. 


FOR RENT: Fum. Apt., $25 and 

$28 per mo. 1066 E. 47th St. 

Eva Lee. Mgr. rlTind. 


MEN ATIENTION ! 
SUITS AND OVERCOATS made 

to your measure. Latest styles 
and materials guaranteed. $22.50. 
Special prices to orchestra men or 
when ordered" in groups. Ladies' 
Suits $21.50. PENROSE CHAD- 
WICK, 1218 E. 23rd Street 

I WILL PAINT your kitchen, bed- 
room.and bath; then will free 
hand paint flowers, birds and 
swans free; 26 years of knowing 
how. Paperhanging that sticks. Es- 
timates free. Bill — TW-4440. 


WANTED: High - cla.<;.'; colored 
salesman; neat appearing. Com. 
tip to $60.00 pe- week. ADan-s 
9362. E. A- Scott. 

MONROVIA Cmr LOTS 

For sale or exchange at sacri- 
flce. Kennard. 210 So. Ever- 
green. L. A. r 17'ind. 

TRAVELING 

Wni take one person to any 
part of Texas. Share with ex- 
pense; leaving in December. Call 
RL 9556. 


FOR RENT: Would like to share 
good, comfortable home with 
persons employed desiring quiet 
home. AD. 6596. Call eves. 

rinu 

FOR RENT: Nicely fum. rm. in 
pfivate home. Call RI. 8128. 

r;17;2 


FOR RENT: Neatly fum. rm. on 
East 48th St. near S. carline, 
for single man or woman, em- 
ployed; garage if desired. AJDams 
6320, r'nind. 

FOR RENT: Neatly fum. room 
with all con v.; garage if desir- 
ed. Single person preferred. 
Good location. AD. 3984. r 17 1 


HOUSES FOR SALE 

5-rm. hse.. mod., hdwd. firs., fine 
eond.; near transportation; $250 
dn., bal. like rent; also a 6-rm. 
hse. and a 7-rm. hse. on terms to 
suit you. 1709 E. Firestone Blvd., 
exclusive agents. 


W. H. JOYCE 

(Licensed) 

Real Estate Broker 

Dandy lot for sale, westside. Two 
fine houses for sale. 1636 We«t 
38tti St Phone PA-0992. 

I Will Paint Your Kitchen 

bedroom and bath; then will free 
liand paint flowers, birdt and 
•wans free: 26 years of knowing 
how. Paperhnaginr that sticks. Es- 
timate* free. BILL.— TWinoaks 
4440. 


FOR RENT— Comfortable room 

with heat near S. & V. cars, with 

or without garage for gentleman. 

AD. 7993. r-3-2 

FOR RENT— Gas station, 2 pumps, i 

equipped. J. M. BEST, PA-0679. 

— ■ ^^ i 

FOR RENT— Nicely fur. modem 
bungalow, large rooms, 2 wall 
beds, near all conv. Adults only, 
no pets, reliable people. 1001 E. 
55th street, ^nquirt 5212 S. Cen- 
tral Ave. r-3-2 

FOR RENT— Neat light airy room, 
reas. to couple. 10 min. from 
town, 5 min. from Ambassador, 
walking distance of U. S. C, conv. 
to U. S. C. near Bev. Hills. Ring ' 
RI-8849. if no answer call EX- ; 
position 5843. r-lO-ind 


$200 Good Running Cars 

Bi.M down, terms to suit Ezy 
weeklT payments. 

BERNARD MOTOR CO. 
1516 S. Main Street 


A GIVEAWAY 

FOR SALE OR TRADE 
Vacant lot in Monrovia, 50x150, 
paved street, desirable colored 
district conv. to railrostd and Red 
ears, juJrt off Main Higrhway, suit- 
able for orange grove, business, or 
residence. Price Reas. Terms ar- 
ranged. W. H. Giles, 11213 Za- 
mora Ave. 

REV. SELMATPSYCHic^MEDI- 
UM. Asks no questions but will 
tell yon what you want to know, 
riving names, dates and facts on 
DQsiness matters, love, health and 
famUy affairs. If in trouble, un- 
happy, discoouraged with life, you ^^^ .„„,„..„„,^ „ 
nee. her help. Will tell you tte { ^^^^^ machine 


FOR RENT— Nicely fur. apts. 
first class people only. 975 S. 

Mariposa. FT. 9546. r-lO-ind. 

• —J 

FOR RENT— Attr., light, airy, un- 
furnished apmt. in west Jeff, 
district, available soon, to adults 
only: conv. to Bev. Hills, H'llly 
wood, J & V cars. Call Richmond 
8849, if no J^nswer, ring Exposi- 
tion 5843. r-lO-ind 

FOR RENT— Unfur. 4-rm.. cottage 

near Hollywood. Phone OL— 

2314. r-10-2 


ALCOHOLIC TREATMENT — 
secret, inexpensive three-day 
money-back guarantee — no loss 
of time — no hospital. DOCTOR'S 
CONSULTATION FREE. Visit 
our office. Carter's Formula, 542 
S. Bdw. Rm. 907. TU~2025. 

WANTED— "Mid. age man to care 
for ranch 7 miles out from Vic- 
torville in desert; only care for 
place, room and food furnished. 
Call after 4:30 P. M., 991 E. 33rd 
St. CE-24221. r-10-1 

WILL BOARD AND 'LODGE 
small boy, 5 to 7 years old, reas- 
onably, to be a companion to a 
boy 6 years old.*Call RI-6036. 
- r-10-1 

FOR SALE 

HOME and INCOME 

BARGAINS 

$1975, $2041 down, 6-rm. home In 
Central Ave. Gardens, 3 bed- 
rooms, or will trade for a home 
north of Slanson, west of Hooper 
Avenue. 

$225«,.S225 dovra, 4-rm. home, 2 
bedrooms, on 51st Street. 

$2950, only S295 down, lovely . 
5-rm. mod. stucco home like 
new, breakfast room, real fire- 
place, big: lot 50x135, paved St, 
boonds paid, ideal iocatoin. 

$2800, S280 down. $19.95 per 
monht, large 4-rm. home, like 
new; 2 bedrooms, oak floors 
and small building suitable for 
beauty shop, barber shop or 
store, nice cor. lot Good loca- 
tion. 

INSURANCE AND LOANS 

ON REAL ESTATE 

H. 0. L. C. Properties 

POWERS REALTY CO. 

938 E. 9l9t St. LA-2297 

Please phone for appointment 


Cthtrjoii Avt. District 
R^lty Bqord 

We have come ;» long, way 
In -our search foi* the secret of 
building good yill for Real Es- 
tates I hope; It IS lesff of 8. s«i(8', 
ret than it! Was before. The oiie 
thought above all other, that I 
should Hke to leave wiUi.y0u 
'this afternoon, is a Very cheer- 
ing one. Itj embodies the kernel 
of everytbnig I have said. In 
thie day | generations service 
pays, the ipore you do for your 
customers, the more you will 
do for youfself, fr of necessi- 
ty, if you render service you 
will put your business oh a 
scientific and a truly profes- 
sional basis, you will render 
more service and you will have 
more good will. And good will 
is the asset of your business, 
that brings the greatest total 
profit and the highest price in' 
case of a s^le. 

These are the ambitions and 
requirements of the following 
members of the Central Ave. 
District Realty Board. 

Members as follows: 
Walter L. Gordon, President, 

4065 Central, ADams 3193. 
Geo. W. City, Vice-President 

816 E. 4eth PIm ADams 13702. 
Elijah Cooper, Treasurer, 2504 

Central Ave. ADams 9025. 
Seth B. Ray, Secretary, 2302 

Griffith Ave. PRospect 5861. 
William Mells Watson, Direc- 
tor of Pi^blicity, 4824 Central 

Avenue, CEntury 22894. 
Mrs. Mattie Elizabeth Watson, 

4901 Hoopee Ave. AD-12082. 


M. B. JOHNSON 

(Licensed) 
RIAL ■STATE BROKKB 

Housts, Lots, Acr«ag« 

ISSt ■. 53rd St ADaaa 7171 
BrsMh: 4S2 S. Maia Si Ra. » 


LET'S DISCUSS 
THESE" 


5-room house, good 
cond.; cor. lot; $3250. 

6-'room house, E. 46th 
St., $2300; $300 cash; 
good business corner; 3 
stores, at a sacrifice. 

4-family flat; good 
rental location. At o 
price you will appreci- 
ate. 


Call, City Bros. 

816 EAST 40TH PLACE 


ADams 13702 


truth, good or bad. 4321 Avalon 
Blvd. S car by the door. Satisfac- 
tion Guaranteed ^ 

TRADE 
p 

Chairs, one- 

vou do not 

ALTER H. 


TO THE LADIES! 

I Have your winter wardrobe re- 
I plenished and repaired right at 
\ home. I am an experienced dress- 
maker and alteration expert with 
I ye^rs of experience in the exclu- 
i sive shops of Wilshire Blvd., Hol- 
lywood and Michigan avenue, 
Chicago. 

My rates for sewing by the day 

are resasonable and I have my own 

Write Box 10, 


Own a Home in Pasadena, Calif. 


251 


CAROLYNE E. 

CONSCIENTIOUS 
SO. PASADEDNA AVE. 


GREEN, Broker 

AND RELIABLE 


S T 24616 


care California Eagle. 



FOR SALE 
barbe: 

Modem, np-to-dat 

half interest. See 

have the cash. 

GILES, 1117 S. Central Avenue. 

Reaidenee, 11213 Zamora Ave. 

PRE-THANKSOrVJNG BREAK- 
FAST, sponsored by Morning 
View CharitT Club, Sunday, Nov. 
20th, at the home of Mrs. Williams, 
1031 E. 49th St. from 7 A. M. un- 
til' Public invited. V. S. Booker, 
rnm. J. H. Treadw*y, Sec. Price 
35c . ; 


$4.9S 

& UP 


STOVES 


Cleaned & Reconditioned 

Expert Repairing 

RELIABLE STOVE WORKS 

246 East Florence Ave. 

TW-4242 


K 


SALESPEOPLE 

NOTHING TO SELL! 

HERE IS THE 
JOB YOU HAVE 
BEEN LOOKING 
FOR. NO SALES 
\ EXPERIENCE 
^> NECESSARY. 


HAVE YOU ULCERS 

or 

STOMACH TROUBLE 

OF ANY KIND? 

We 

cause 


positively Correct the 
many Completely Cured 


EARN UP TO $40 
PER WEEK. 

SEE I ' 

Mr. Benson 
HUDSON'S 

7t7 So. Brodrfwoy 


For appointment 

Phone GR. 54*1 

1301 North Mansfield At*. 

Hollywood, Calif. 

DR. H. L. LYON (D. C.) 

DR. MARY LYON (D. C.) 

So. of Hollywood High School 

Remember 

Keep your Spine Straight — ^It'i 
the Backbone of Your Health 

Make Tonr Appointment 

NOW! NOWU NOW!! 


jfor^aUI 


— 1: 


FOR ^ALE 


FOB SALE 

$15,000 stucco bimgalow courtj 
:7-an9. ;«rJ|»:..fi»risiBirtd,.;.tt.«.«r^ 
Pico and tnomindtt. 'dnmtdct- 
ed. i Jt 

2950.00. i$5p0 down, ^'-rm. BitiajL 
near 29th rand St. Andrews, ft^i 
Best PA. 13679. .(rl20|indt) :« 


J 


FOR SALE— $15,000. Stucco Bun- 
galow Cjourt, 7"S-rm Units fur- 
nished, near Pico and Nonnandibv 
UnrestrictHL Mr. vBeSt.'EA-rOWS:, 
$2950.00; $500 dowftf « iiMB.-Bah- 
gaXovf near 29th and St. . An- 
drews. Mti BEST. PA-0679. 


FORSALl): 3-rm. house, Jot 32 x 
135. Pride $800.00; $150 down; 
bal. $12i00iper month. See owner, 
1822 E.i 106th St. r|i7|l 


SALE cjr TRADE* Model A Ford, 
$30 at tfrms. See me whether 
you have tash or not; peppy car 
and good transportation. Walter 
H. Giles, 11213 Zamora St. 


^OR SALE: Underwood typewrit- 
ers, gocKJ condition, suitable for 
office, $6.00, See 11213 Zamora 

Ave. ll|17il 


FOR SAL4: $300.00 down, 6-rm. 
cottage liear 37th and Avalon; 
big lot, .side drive, garage. Total 
price, $2500.00, including redeco- 
ration inside and out. C. H. Jones 
Co., 1059 El' Jefferson St., ADams 
12061. I 


( - 

I. On lovely SSrd Street near 
"V^ -car liite, # rooms, large 
lot. Sacrifice. $25«.«0 down. 
$25.00 per mmith. Wmif to 
move in. 


.\v 


QUICK SALE 

3--4 rms. W. of Central, income 

$75.00 per mo. $4200.00, $500 

down. 
4 rms. lot 50x138 on W. 36th St. 

$2000.00. $500.00 dn. Balance 

lilce rmt, 
6 rms. interior Stucco W. 29th 

St., Jus^ liiie new. $45««.M. 

$1000 d6wn. 
10 rms. Dtfplex W. side stucco, 

income $65.00 per mo. $4500.- 

00, $100ll.00 dn. Snap. 

H. A. HOWARD 
Real Estate 

3208 CENTRAL AVENUE 
ADams 9719 ADams 6544 


2. Near Avalon, a aeWly dM»r 
rated 7 room Bungalpw, 
double garage. Hardwood 
floors. Tile sink. Lot 50x150 
ft. Only $500.00 down. ^ 

X X 

3. West of Central, t houses, 
5 rooms and i rooms. Lot SOx 
135 ft Only $375.00 down. 

X ' X 

4. Near McKinley, 5 nnits. Like 
new. Income $90.00 ter mo. 
All rented. $850.00 will han- 
dle. A special BARGAIN; 
Terms to suit boyer. 

MAD DO X 

REALTY COMPANY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Approved Sales Broker 
H. O. L. C 

1375 East Vernon Avenae 
ADams 11862 


IRIAI. fSTATE VALUES 


rm 



ATLAS ROOF CO. 

ROOFING AND pklNTING 
CONTRACTORS 

No Charge For Inspections 

or Estimates 

Phone PR-0191 

1045 West Jefferson Blvd. 

Los Angles 


iteol Estote-For Sole-Real Estate 

■r^,SH: IM^ in, • nk.hoMe. Eaat 2«th Street ' 4 

|l.lpii: ri4> iy* sty. hmm. 15M Eaat 22nd, Street f 

\fi,1M: I rm. house. E. SStti St Bdwd. Floon. tile sink ft-katlk 

I^JN: 3 aty. house, 8 rms. ap and 5 ms dowa. Good iMatiea 
> M Trialt7 Street t^ti down. 

f2,SM: 6 rm. hoase. Lot 50x150 between Main and Wall fllieela 
on But 4901 Street 

ICSM: 8 romn stnoco, 2 baths, lot <«xl7«. West Adams BlvC 

%S,*H: 2 staryhonse , S Units furnished. Lot SOxlSO, eloa* i* 
Adams Blvd. & San Pedro Sts. Income $111 per mo. 

|2,5««: 6 rm. house, 1155 E. 2Snd St $400 dn. AU improvements.' 


RUGS fir CARPETS 

1000 used Rugs 6x9, 8x10, 9x12, 
$5.00 up. New afld used broadloom 
all shades. 9x12.9x15.^x18, 12x15, 
12x18,- 12x21. 
Wilton Rugs all sizes 
Used Carpets 27-incti 35 cents 

yard and up. 
I^ew Broadloom tvpe rug 9x12, 

$8.75. 
Furniture Modern and up to date. 
Dining Room Suites. Living Room 
Suites, Bedroom Suites, Springs 
& Mattresses. 

Open Evenings till 9 P. M. 

Singer's 1487 Sunset Blvd. 

Phone MU. 4522 
Open SOndays till 5 P. M 

PERSONAL— I will sell my equity 
in an all-modern home on East 
52nd Place hear Avalon. Good in- 
come property, fine location. Call 
ADams 93621, refer to Owner. 


I was called to tlie Pneacbe's 

Bench, are you sorry? I 

To preach the true word of God. 
My text that I shall preach will 

be the high throne of God. Are 

yon glad? 
I will give you a few words of ttie 

Throne. 
When God spoke and said, "Let us 

make man". I 

One writer said if you make man, ', 

he will 'Sin. ' 

I am giving you just a shortnotice. i 
The doors of Eighth andT"owne j 

church shall fly open at eight j 

o'clock p. m. second Sunday { 

night. 
Next year of June, 1939, I dull 

preach with a low voice. 
It will be by the gift of God. 


FIX YOUR ROOF NOW 

Asphaltum Roof Coater 

Per GaL 16c 

or 5 Gals. 79c or 10 Gals. $1.50 

Heavy Asbestos Roof Coater 

per Gal. 3^c 

90 lb. roofing, per roll ;-$1.65 

H. A. PAULK 

1216 W. Washington Stre«t 

PR -2809 


S. B. W. May Real Estate 

SELECT FROM THIS LIST 

6 rm. home, hardwood fls., frame dwelling. $2600. $350 dn. 
6 rm. on corner, good investment, buy today. Only $2700. 

6 rms., nice stucco in industrial section, will double your 
money on re-gale. Only $3250. 

.5 rms. on E. 33rd near San Pedro, must sell. Make offer. 

7 rmS. on McKinley Ave., good location for a family, close 
to car line and school. Only $3000, easy terms. , 

6 rm. home, hardwood floors, west of Central Ave. on East 
42ndiStreet. Only $500 down. 

7 rms. hardwood floors in 3-rms. on paved street, $1,000 dn. 

6 rms. on Jefferson Blvd., a home and business property. 
Only $600 down. »^ 

2 houses on lot, 5-rms. each on Trinity St., $1000 down. 

2 houses on a lot on E. 49th Street, in A*l condition. Only 
$700 down. , .^ 

3 units, 3 and 4-rms. each on E. 50th Street. Only $3200. 

5 units on B. 45th Street, income $85 per month. Only $1000 
down. 

4 unit court furnished, only $1000, Income only $105.00, 
On Westside, nice 7-rm. home, hardwood floors. Beautiful 

lawn and shrubbery. $3500, $750 down. Bank foreclosure. 6 rms.. 
West 29th Street, $3000, $600 down. 

7 rms., 4 bed rms., on W. 27th Street, comer, ony $3000, 
$500 down. 

5 rms., West 35th St., hardwood floors, only $3300. $500 dn. 

Foreclosure Properties and Other Bargipu 
On Central Avenue, one story frame building/ 4 stores, and 
office room, on second floor, income $125 per nyonth. $10,000. 
Central Avenue comer court, a fine investment, income 
$159.00 on low rent. Price $11,000. / 

Many other income property flats, apt^., courts, and 
(Joubles. 

We Have All Home Owners Loan Foreclosatw 

S. Be We May Company 

1054 E. Vernon Ave., CE-.24788 / Notary Public 


B 


RICE 

ETTER 

UILT 


HOMES 

SINCE 1908 


S24.00 MONTHLY BUYS A 5-ROOM STUCCO HOME 



One of these Stucco Homes actually built at 1949 
E. 11 5th St. See it, thenseeusfor F. H. A. Terms. 
5 Roonnis built to the rigid F. H. A. requirements. 
5 morejto start soon. These homes are complete 
in every detail on lot 40x165. 

H BIJOCK FROM CARLINE & BUSINESS CENTER 


J.N.BRlCE'"5,lJr""— li 


Licensed Real Estate Broker 
Licensed ; Contractor 


< JE-4520 
•9432 
-1394 

C. NASH 
Salesman 


Viatl Fact Tip. 

Velvet 

8«<mtew Axrainii 


BIG RUG SALE! i 

. ROCK BOrrOM PRICES "f- 

^CbEST PATtERSS. ALL SIZES '4C 

. .» ».»5^ 

iiUr. $19.96^ 

TOUR CREDIT IS GOOD 1^ 
SEE OUR NEW 
4, 5 ft « BM. OUTFITS 

Star Furniture C«. 

Jcxres's. E.<ST r.os axgelks 

OVER $60,000 STOCK 
P^CEO DJ PLAIN riQCKIS 
Open 7 A. V.— 9 r. M. Uillr 

S60« WHmPIER BLVD. 




Caldwell He Jonj^s & Co. 

BARGAINS IN REAL ESTAtE 

' A god*4 five-room plastered hoi^e for ^1800.00; big lot, 
side drive, giwage; near 55th and Oompton. $400 idown; bal. easy. 

Six-room bungalow, hardwood floors; W. 31st street near 
Saint Andrews. $800.00 will handle. 

<5ne 4-flat building, two five-', and two four-room flats; 
near 29th and Maple Ave. $500.0J1 down. Total price $4500.00. 

Two houses on oife lot, 50x150; six rooms, hardwood flocfrs 
front, 4 rooms hardwood floors rear. $1000.00 down; pru(B, 
$4«00.00. 


One 7-room house, two-story, 4 bedrooms, for $2500.i 
Sl.OOO will handle. 

, , ,■- OURMOTTO: ,i,,,..iKi-.,.,,- ./ . - ,-' ; 

The TRUTH about EVERYTHING, whether 1M seU rm or not. 
Office : 1 059 E. Jefferson St. Phone AD- 1 2061 



Boiided 

Insurance 

Broker ^ Notary 

Public ■ 

Stondard Fire, 

Autd and 

Property 

Insurances 


Real Estate 

Home, Sweet 

Homes - 

Business Income 

Small Homes - 

Small Forms - 

Ranches 


Soles- 

Leases • 

Rentals • 

Exchanges • 

Investments 

& Property 

Monogemcnt 

down; close 
down; close 

We are ea^er to give a square deal in order to get a square deal 

Comr. D« L. D. Funchess, Jr. 

r irrnecij' Real Estate Broker & Approved Sales Broker for 
Home Owners Loan Corp. 

FOR YOLTl CONVENIENCE, PHONE OR WHITE: 
RES.— CE. 2«23.7 - BUS.— AD. 7707 
1063-65 E. bOTH ST.;i 


1 3-rc|om, 
5-ro6m, 


$4800; 
$2900; 


$1500 
$ 290 


m 
in 


tm 


•-^l:-^>^ ^ • =%^- ; ''■^*:'^^^.^^ 


i.Utt' V. 




■'■ M:. 


.i-'-Sffl?;.!; 


v-'"^ i^*- 


^^yi-; 




i 




LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 




f.i'-' 


U.S 


»;: V .-to; 


,i.q4r-.: 


$3,400: 4 room house. Hardwood floors. Tile 
$250 down. 


Sink * 


t504 So. Central Avenift 
Offiee Phone: ADams M2S 


Los Angeles, CaOt. 
Residence Phone: RI— #791 


EEJah CeopM 

Member of Central Avenue District Realty Board 


150 


150, 


• LISTINGS WANTED 

SETH B. RAY 

2302 Griffith Avenue PR -5861 

PROPERTIES FOR SALE 

Properties For Sale. Bank Foreclosures. IC^^ down 

Property .Managements, Rentals and Collections 

Hbtels and Lease Loans >lade on Properties 

THE MAN WHTIO DOES 

10 room house west of Central on 25th Stree*.. Two 4-room 
Bung, in Rear. Good Income. Price $4750. 

Six room house ia good condition, west cf Avalon. Lot 50x 
3-car garage. 3 bed rooms. Price S2250. 

8 room house west of Cennal in Fair condition. Price $2750. 
Duplex west of Western Stucco 2-4-R-l-5-R-Cor. Lot 50x 
Modern, tile and showers. $8000. Down $1500. 

5 room house corner Lot east of Central. $2100. Down $250. 

6 room house west of Central. Lot 50x150. Price $2200. 
Down S200. 

Business propertv. Central .Avenue. 2 story- brick building. 
8000 sq. ft. Class C. Build. Price $35,000. 

6 room house vacant, westside. Hd. F. Price S3850. 10 "ff 
down. t 

6 room house west of Avalon on 52nd. 2-3-R-in Rear t* 
3 garages. Lovely home and income. Price S9000. 

4 room house west of Centi-al. Cash SI 200. Small Lot. 

6 room house East of Central. $2250. Down $250. Lot 50x150. 

6 room house east of Central. 1-3-1-4-in rear. Income S6S.00 
month. Price t$3200. Down S400. ' 

9 Unit stuccoo. Fl. Modem. Price SI", 000. 2 bed. RS. Each 
Apart. West of Central. Down 15'*. 

4 Apart stucco, 2-4-R-M-Apart. Rear Modern Prop. Price 
$13,500. Down 15'r.. 

Lovely ranch near Fohtana California. 2 acre 6-R-stucco 
house. 5 years old, lovelv Trees. Price $2750. 5 stores 6 unit 
courts. West of Central. Price $16,600. Down $8,000. 

I am a member of the Central Avenue District Realtr Roard. 
The Man Who Does. 2302 Griffith Ave. PR- 5861. Res. Ab--12760, 

SETH B. RAY, Broker 


FOR SALE 


If yon are thinking of buying a home or income property, 
It will be to your advantage to come ift and look over our list 
before yon decide. 

4-room house near Vernon Avenue, full price 
$1950.00 with $175.00 down and balance eosy 
.... Large lot. 

Modern duplex East 43rd street west of Cen- 
tral .... Good rental property, priced with terms. 

Bank foreclosure — 6 room house West Jeffer- 
son District .... $3000.00. $300.00 down pay- 
ment and balance like rent. 

7 room stucco west of Central, south of Vern- 
on, priced at $3500. $500.00 down payment, will 
handle this wonderful buy. 

We have many other good buys to show yoa . . . See ns 
for fire nisurance, rental collections and loans on real estate. ■ 


We Specialize in Fire Insuronce 
—And Make Loans 


Walter L. Gordon Co. 

4065 Central Ave. ADams 3193 

(MMiber •< the Ceatnl Atwm OMrtoi BiaHy 


FOR SALE 

SPECIAL BARGAINS 

WE SELL FOR LESS 


WESTSIDIt 


TWO HOUSES ON LOT: 5 AND 3 ROOMS; 
$3150.00. 5300.00 DOWN. 

SIX ROOM BUNGALOW: WESTSIDE: HARDWOOD 
FLOORS; $3000.00. SMALL DOWN PAYMENT. 

FIVE AND SIX ROOM HOUSES ON ONE LOT; WEST 
OF CENTRAL AVENUE. $2750.00. $500.00 DOWN. 

^JVE ROOMS, EAST OF CENTRAL AVENUE. $1950^. 
$175.00 DOWN. 

FOUR UNIT FLAT; WEST OF CENTRAL AVENUE. $4750.- * 
OD. $750.00 DOWN. 

WILLIAM H. GAMBLE 

IIM E. WASHINGTON BLVD. 1. PRospett 3«U 


^ 


P i ' 



■-H"-. 


s^i'^-i^ 


ex- 




INCREASE 

YOUR 
SAVINGS 


Quality Foods Sold as Low as the Law allows 


DRIVE A FEW BLOCKS AND SAVE A FEW DOLLARS! 


WITH 
SAFETY 


4222 So. Central Ait ^^miiiiiiSpedais tor Tii«tidg|^fj^f fy^jayy m Sjii^^ a^iiiim«4222 So. C cntrafl Ave 



I* 
lb 




Eastern Grain-Fed Pork 

Leg Roast 3 lib 
Pork Chops M7 

Tenderloin Roast 191b 

SAUSAGE 1 . 10 

Spare Ribs : . 19 
Pork Legs } I W 

Loin Pork Chops 29a 
Rib Pork Chops 23 


lb 

A 


lb 



» 


Fancy 

Boiling BeeS t S 
Hambiu^er • 4 9» 

Short Rilfts Y 10» 
Rump Roast .IS* 

Chuck Roast . 12*» 
Oven Roast . . IS^ 

Roneless Roast . 11^ 
Ground Round... ISk 

Soup Bones • . 2^ 



Hog Heads 

Ears— Snouts 
Melts-Mauls 
Racon Rinds 


WIENERS 
CONEYS 
Slieed 
LIVER 


lb 


Fancy TeaHing 


Lamb Legs mjL 


Fresh Fish and Poultry 


Fresh Sliced 


Fancy Yearling Whole ^^ 

Lamb Shoulders 9 

OTcetf 

Bacon 


SEA BASS 12^ 


FRYING 

CHICKENS 


27 


i 
ft 


MACKEREL 
KINGFISH 


6 




BACON 

Squares 

DeficatessenDept 


LARGE 

SHRIMPS 


21 


lb 


NEW YORK 

OYSTERS 

re 

90Z. 


IT 


POTATO CHIPS. 


..Xb. 19c 


PICKLED FIGS FEET— - -5 for 15c 

DOMESTIC SWISS CHEESE .. Lb. 19c 

Oid-Faatiioned BOnee Meat -2 lbg.^7c 

CHOC OLATE DBOPS. ■- 3 Ifag. 25c 

2 lbs. 18c 


APPLE BUTTEB- 


PEAJrtJT BUTTER , 2 Hw- "c 

Fancy New York Saner Kraat 2 Ibs^ 9c 

TTLLABiOOK CHEESE — - Lb. 19c 

Cudahy'a Agaorted Luncfa Meats Lb. 19c 
Cndahy'a Meailowr Prove CJieese Lb. 18'/iC 


COOKIES.. 
Flft BABS.. 


..3 doz. 20c 


.2 Ib«. 19# 


mglMra POUND CAKE -Ea 12c 

BOSTON BAKED POBK ft BBIANS Lb. ge 


PlONEEft UVEB SAUSAGE 
BOLOGNA, MINCED HAM.. 
K08HEB STYLE SALAMI 


m 


SBiOKED UVER SAUSAGE.. 


.XJb. Zle 


ORANGE MABBIALADE. 


..2 lbs. ISc 


MAYONNAISE 


JUL 24c 


JUMBO BIPE OLIVES.. 


<>t28c 


MACABONl SALAD 


..Pt 5c 


HtUD CHEESE. 


Xb. IS'/tc 


KTPP«B ED SALMON 

rwnaxn anchovies.. 


..Lb. 31e. 


Xb. 2Te 


tABGE SALT MACKEBEL.. 


.J^. 15c 


DO-NUTS 


.Doc 15c 


STEAMING HOT TAMALES— 

SnMU1.......4l for 8Bc LTge.....'-8 for 28c 

DUX f^CKLES - „8 for 5c 


MonreO'g Eaatem Boiled Ham.. 


..Lb. 38c 


WMENTO CHEESE iBPBEAD-. Xb- 15e 


COTTAGE 


-Lb. 6e 


PDOC BEANS 5r 14<' 


MMlloselUce^'^il' 


FANCY « i MM it 

Navy BEANS 3 '^11'' 


SWANSDOWN ^^it» 

CAKE FLOUR "^ZO" 

2-19« 


LIBBY^ 4«IEVE 

PEAS 


No. 2 

C&D8 


CIDER \Cc 

GALLON CANS Ea. Jjf 

90c 


5« 


GOLD MEDAL 

>io. ] 

No 5 8k. 22c sack 


FlOUl* ^^' ^^ ^^ *^ 24>/2-lb. 


ALBEB'S 

CORN FLAKES^" 
Red Salmon '"■ Lr 


18< 


GOLD KRATT 

Peannt Rntter 2 


lb. 
Jar 


21c 


BANNER 

MILK 


LADY'S CHOICE 

VINEGAR 


Qnarl 


GOOD TASTE 

PEAS 


No. t 
Cans 


JwJJl 


80 Count Napkins Cc 

EACH ^ 


VAL VITA 


TOMATO SAUCE 


Ea. 


LARGE, LOOSE ^ Mg 

Extra EGGS - 99 


Mince Meat 


NONE 
SUCH Ea. 


lOc 


Mince Meat 


CALIF. 
2-lb. Jar 


19« 


BEN-HUB ^0 

2-oz.— Es. • 


Sage or Savory 

ElMolinoOKves'Ell'' 
Stuged Olives ""F 19" 
PET MILK 


TaU 
Can 


DOZ. 


FRESH— EXTBA LARGE 

EGGS Premo 

COUNTRY BOY large _„ do. 42c 
Fresh as the Morning Dew "^l' 43c 


Iris Pujmpkin 


No. 2 1 


Can 
Each 


/i 


IRIS PEAS 


TELEPHONE 

No. 2 Can 


CAL- 
UMET 

lb. can 


Baking Powder 
Spry Shortening .^ 18 ji 


LADY'S CHOICE 

Crape Jelly 


2-18< 


LIBBY^ TOMATO 

SAUCE 


N.. SV4 J '"25^ 


C>nv 


»6-o.. 2'V29^ 


TARGET 


Com Beef 


12-oz. 
cans 


2 29^ 


Quaker Ooats Igc 

QUICK OR REGULAR. Lge. Pltg. *^ 


Scot TISSUE 


EACH. 


7c 


Waldorf TISSUE ic 

EACH ■• 


Pancake FLOUR 


PILLSBURY'S 
40-oz. Pkg. . 


15 


White King Products 

WUte King Gran, ^^ii* 28^ 

White Kiiif f\^,irj 5 a. 15^ 

SCOTCH 

White King 3:?i\;" 3 ^_ lU 


GKANtLATKD 
l.fe. PkK. — Each 


23^ 


FREE-1 pkg. Jellatin 

With Each Can 
REN HUR COFFEE 


REI> '••V#">^ 

(iisKS. lb. m fr ('■ 


"i^'* 'VJkM' Bi.i k can 

n. lb. XwTlb. t-K-; i ll>. 4Br 


Peter Pan — No. 1 TaU tm ^g%t* 

Pink Salmon 3 ° Z8^ 

LONG BEACH— Uglit Meat^ 4%^m 

Tana FlakeSc^ i'lS' 


ROBISON SHOE PEG 
CORN "can^ 


4 '"' 29^ 


FLOUR 


RED 
ROSE 

UTAH 

Hard Wheat '^IT 
CRACKERS 

A-l— SODA or GRAHAM 

CALRAY SUPER 
^j^j^I-Sac Cfaocotate Coated 
VmWilCa Graham— >b. pkg. 

BISQUICK i^e 

SMALL— Each 14c Each 


Purex Bleach Qt. | Ale 

HALF GAL. 19c— GALLON 35c * W 
MINOT 17-oz. can ^ g^ 

Cranberry Sauce llr 

OCEAN SPRAY 17-os. Can M |%1.|» 

Cranberry Sauce lU^ 


KENNEL KING tm ^ BB^ 

DOG FOOD 3'^n^ 


DEL MONTE 

CATSUP 


14-oz. 
Each 


DEL MONTE Eariy Garden 
PEAS N«>-2Can- 


WHTTE EAGLE 

CHIPS 


Peet's Gran. 

LARGE FKG Each 

ROYAL HONEY 

5-POUND P.AIL _ _... 


FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DEPT. 



POTATOES 


Large Choice 
BURBANK 


lO"*^ 


SWEET 
JUICYl 


ORANGES 

1^9 


PERSIMMONS 


FANCY 
EIPE -. 


POft!«)RtC& 
RED.- --!__:- 



BEDYAHS 


UQUOR SPEQALS 


90 PROOF— ALENDED 
HUNTER'S BALTIMORE 

RYE WmSiCEY 

HALF PINT 41c 

FUIX PINT 


••••••••• 


MAROS 90 PROOF . . . CALIFORNIA 
S^YEAROLD 

GRAPE BRANDY 

FnU Pint 67c 

HALF PINT ••••<««.•. 


60 PROOF OLD WARRIOR 

ROCK & RYE 

rvih \ $115 

QUART L_^::.:....:..-i;.-— - A 


5>/2 YEARS out ... 90 PROOF 

I B. D.C. 

STRAIGHT BOjUBBON WHISKEY 

Foil Pint ;.5..... .89c 

fi A'LF , WW]T ••'•«'• • 


KINGSHn club . . .86 FBOOF 


RAif^ 


•,• .•.•I* ••.••» •• • • • 


W9MOutmM0ibU 


SHstefi^ae 


!ffl 


1-YEAR4>LD ... 80 PROOF 


HARPER'S FERRY 

STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY 

FULL 


STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY ^.^^ 

FULL 07^ 


HIBAM WALKER'S 

EPICURE 

SCOTCH WHI8KET 
OncrHaff Pint 


2 YEARS OU>-€(CHENLEY 

whjcens 

STRAIGHT JOUBtoN WHISKEY 

FnU Quart ..... .^.19 

Fvll Pint ........•*... 

HAIf FINT : , .i, , . , »to 





Portland, Oregon— Yooi^sters of the Negro 
Federal School of Mosic, part of the WFA rec- 
reation program. Beit Tomer, pictured above, 
is leader of the boys and girls who play in the 
thirty-two piece band and the drum corps made 
up of sixteen youths. These musical enthusiasts 
meet regularly for instructions and practice. 
They give performances at schools and in parks. 

The instruction, practice and public appear- 
ance of these youthful mosidans in Portland are 
a part of a total of 500,000 hours spent a week 
by thousands of persons taking part in choral, 
band and other musical training programs m 
WPA recreation cotten throoghojU the country. 
(WPA Photos.) 


CQLIF 





(NOTE: Tfiis eoliiina is cjtUieil kjr J. CaUea F« 

Vrbaa LeagM. It fa designed t* tatar fatlw 

fieUs af ewdWTwr wb* httctofOre have eseMed tHe uaOce af k jrt tn—ri«M citBeny, 

uc aaUdtod. Wri^ te eare at Los Ai^paes UirtaB l^cacw, 2502 So. Ceatnl ATenne.) 

Sketch/^ 


fa sponsored bj: the Los ABgdcs hnnch (rf ttt« 
•r the pvhlie the work of spfrfalfatB ai jrariOBO 


£t: MATTIE MttiCIA H^VNDLEY, H«<mI Teacher o» Nursery. 

j .'• By tttXlAW lOHlS aa^ IHHUJTTO CKAFTOH 

Mattie Pdtriciq Hundley, bead teocher at the Federal Vernon Avenue Ntir 
Sery School, credits her deep interest in children as the factor motivating her 
choice of a profession. Such on interest is basic equipment for the very special-; 
ized work of educating children of pre- school ag€i. Miss Hundley emphasizes.- 
That she combines patience, tact, ar>d a quality of friendly authoritativeness— j 
all important requisites for the nursery school .teacher — is obvious when one- 


watches her at work 

At the Federal Vernon Ave- 
nue Nursery School which Miss 
Hundley supervises thirty chil- 
jdren are in daily attendance. 
Ages range from 2 to 5 years. 
Naturally, these children are un- 
used to group cissociation and .ac- 
tivity. It is responsibility of the 
/nursery school to aid parents in 
^training children to adapt their 
individual personalities to group 
activities. 

•Viewed broadly".. Miss Hund- 
ley {Mints out, "the nursery 
school teacher has a grave so- 
cial responsibility. She has the 
first contact with the child, and 
thus the first opportunity to be- 
gin molding rfiildren of the 
future generation. AH teachers, 
of course, share the responsibili- 


*paratively recent In Los Ange- ^Dr. Elizabeth N. Woods, bead of. 


OGLE 


VOL. 59— NO. 32 


LOS ANGELES, CALIF., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1938 


les there are now 12 nursery- 
schools established under the 
auspices ct WPA, the Board of 
Education and individual sp<m- 
sors. Responsibility for the Ver- 
non Avenue Nurse ry School is 
shared by the WPA which piys 
the salaries cf the instructors and 
provides the food, the Board of 
Education which furnishes equ^- 
ment. and Mrs. Lehr, HollyTwood 
philanthrophiat, who pays the 
rent on the building in wbicfa the 
school is housed. 

i/bss Hundley attended WUber- 
force University where her first 
training in pre-school education 
was secured. After finishing there 
she taught English and History 
i to 7th and 8th grade classes in 
; schools in Oklahoma. After com- 
I ing to Los Angela in 1934 she 


J. CULLEN FENTRESS' 

GAB STUFF 


^ 


SPREADING YOUR 
ADVERTISING MONEY 


By E. A. SCOTT 



^ 


^^yREN we ran across the followmg excerpt we were reminded 

'^ of the present world scene. The nimble and probing brain 
(rf medico A. J. Booker culled it for the American Legion Day 
program last September 18 of the Los Angeles Fellowship league. 
^ It reads: 

"No man ever ruled other men for their own good; no man 
Avas ever rightly the masters of 
fhe mmds or bodies df his 
"^ rothers: no man ever ruled 
other men for anything except 
for their undoing and for bis 
own brutalization. The pos- 
session of power over others is 
inherently destructive both to 
the possessor of the power and 
to those over whom it is ex- 
erciBed. And the great man of 
the future is he who wUl re- 
fuse to be great at all in the 
historic sense; he wiU seek to 
create power in the people, and 
not gain power over them: he 
is the man who wiU literally 
lose himself, who will alto- 
gether diffuse himself, in the 
life of humanity. All that any 
man can do for a people, all 
that any man can do for an- 
other man, is to set the man 
or the people free. Give men 
opportunity and opportunity 
wiB give you men." 
TUSKEGEE NIGHT 

The name of Boolcer T. 
Washington, probably the most 
famous of his race, will echo 
and re-echo Friday night at 
Second Baptist church when 
the Tuskegee Club of Los An- 
geles presents what it calls a' 
panel djseuanon, topic: Tu^ce- 
gee. 

Prominent Angelenos are 
sdieduled to take the rostrum 
and speak of the varied ser- 
vices performed by the school 
in that part of the country re- 
cently termed the Nation's 
Number 1 Problem. 

Education of the "hand, 
bead and heart" which, as we 
remember, was first advanced 
by the Tuskegee founder, seems 
to be needed more now than 
ever before. What with depres- 
sions, recessions and too-crowd- 
ed parofessions-'the rule in re- 
cent years rather than th e ex - 
ception the wisdom of BTWs 
words lake on an addM mean- 
ing. 

And if the Tuskegee club 
seeks to perpetuate the teach- 
ings of this man it suffers not 
for fertile soiL 


I La ngsf on Hughes 
and Bontemps 
;fo Speak in L. A. 


What is the relative importance 
of each type of puBlicity and how 
much money should be spent on 

It:* 

In every advertising de;iart- 
merlt there are certain fixed ex- 
penses, such as salaries, supplies, 
telephone and telegrams, postage 
and correspondence, traveling ex- 
penses aqd so on. These expenses 
should be estimated for the 
period, based o past experience. 

in addition t6 these fixed expen- j ^-^is lecture which is expected 
tes there are certain other ex- i t^ ^^^^.^^ recent travels of these 
penses whchi are practically iini, two writers in Spain and Haiti 
avoidable; there are certain sales j_5 geing sponsored by 25 interes- 


Marjorie Shores 
Feted wrth 
Lingerie Shower 

The Mmes. ] Ana Diggs, L. V. 
Wells and Fitances Fairs Curry 
entertained friends at their beau- 
tiful home, 238 E. Ave. 38, hon- 
oring' bride-elect. Marjorie Shor- 
es, with a lingerie shower lunch- 
eon. Beautiful flowers of fall 
colors decorated the home, while 
the limcheon table carried a col- 
or motif of pink, white and silver. 
A huge white -bell with stream- 
ers leading td each place hung 
over the bride-elect. After lunch- 
eon all gathet'ed "in the drawing- 
room to partake of the demi- 
tasse, to watch the unwrapping 
of the beautiful gifts. 

Those bidden were: Misses 
Edyth and Owen Jones. Emily 
Mason. Nancy; Harris. Anna Rosa 
' Broyles, Ruby Jefferson, Eleanor 
Ramsey. MeSdames D e w a r d 
Strong, Marvon Jacksoa Clifford 
Gantt. E. A.| F^ltenberg, J. C 
Wright. W. iH. Shores, Jessie 
Hurst. Lov* Jr. Shores, John Ed 


ty of helping children to become , secured additional training in pre- 


sociaUy responsible and socially 
useful adults. But the impres- 
sionable a^e of the pre-school 
chi]d increases the obligation of 
the nursery school teacher to 
start him out on the correct 
path." 

The increase in the develop- 
ment of nursery schools is one of 
the most important phases of the 
whole trend of progressvie edu- 


school education at the Univer- 
sity of Southern California. 

Before appointment to the posi- 
tion as head teacher at the Ver- 
non Nursery School Miss Hund- 
ley served there for two years %s 
assistant to the head teacher. She 
has been in full charge of the 
school since September, this year. 
Two assistant teachers and eight 
workers supplied by the N. Y. A. 


the Child Guidance ^Division of 
the L. A. City Schools, has com-; 
plimented Miss Hundley's elfi-- 
ciency and ability. 

For persons who are thinkini' 
of entering the educational pro- 
fession Miss Hundley would re- 
commend that those whose par-| 
ticular interest is young chil- 
dren should think seriously ofj 
specializing in pre-school age 
work. This f idd is relatively new^ : 
and therefore uncrowded. It of-^ 
fers extensive op^rtunities. Miss 
Hundley feels that in few other 
phases of educational work are 
there more opportunities for real 
social service. Moreover, the re- 
sponse of both the parents and 
the children to the work done 
through the nursery school of- 
fers the educator satisiactioas 
which few other branches of edu- 
cational work can equaL 


cation. This development is com- ' constitute the staff of the school 


HOROSCOPE 

THBEE QUESTIONS FREE 

Find out WH\T YO["S 'U /1>!.M; >!HM 
SHOWfi FUR YOra P«E>EVT A.VD Ft^-. 
TURK UfZ. It nMv BRIM; T<>U '^JJEAT 
LLl'K in shirriii^ yoo iroit a».v« jre goa4 
or ^m4 lor vci, tr inTi.*t iB'jn<?<-. (■ maltm . 
lore, to ifvi<i^ roar actiniM. Many pr<i^nk. ' 
ent prople (ni>l« thrir bvrt br the nara, 

S.^«i .idr and birth dat*? today to 
HOnOSCOPE, ROCHELLE PARK, KJ. . 


L 


Chest* Luncheon 
at Bfttmore 

The C«»nmunity Chest pay-for- 
your-own Itmcheon at the Bilt- 
more Bowl last Monday, was one j 
of the most interesting and most i 
colorful of the Chest functions \ 
this season. It was set aside as : 
■•group work— character buUding 
<fay" and every community in the 
Chest area was represented. 

There was a splendid turn-out 
of colored workers. At one table 
Mrs. Josephine Brown, wso is 
working on the special prospects 
committee in refideutial district 
4t sat with Mrs. Albert E. Chiroi. 
Kn. X. R. Baldwin, Mrs. Edgar 
Reeves and Miss Adah F. Rus^ 
all of whom are colonels in this 
district. 

Noticed at another table were 
Mrs. Isidore Brown and Misses 
Dorothy Guinn and Nettie Beese, 
Mid Hn. C D. Frederick, repres- 
enting the Twelfth Street Branch 
y. W. C- A. and all majon in the 
CBest campaign. 


HOWEVER, much we m a y 
criticise the various forms 
of government now operating 
in Europe, there is one phase 
of governmental procedure up- 
on which Nazis. Fascists, and 
we Democrats uniformly agree: 
namely, whenever a new ruler 
is ushered into ■ office, whether 
Dictator or elected Represent- 
ative, the rule seems to be that 
the event nnist be celebrated 
by the granting of political 
amnesty or pardon to some 
outstairfing—or weU-advertised 
— political or civil prisoner. 
My specific reference is to the 
case of Tom Moorey, the most 
highly advertised jail occupant 
in this land of the Free. 

If . as is claimed by his sup- 
porters, Mooney is innocent, 
then surely no European Dic- 
tator has ever wielded much 
mere power than the n e w s- 
jwper (the Los Angeles Times 
according to statements made 
by Mooney adherents) which 
put him in jail and kept him 
there all these years. That i$ a 
glaring display of autocratic 
power in a country where Lib- 
erty and Justice are supposed 
to be the birth-right of all citi- 
zens alike, whether rich or 
poor. 

Now. with the advent of the 
New Deal in California, gov- 
ernor-elect dson is seriously 
considering a pardon for 
Mooney. If the forth-coming in- 
vestigation establishes his in- 
nocence, and pardons him. the 
years of unjust imprisonment 
he has undergone will be an 
everlasting blot upon Califor- 
nia justice, and will cause 
thinking people to wonder how 
it could have happened. 

JEWS IN THE NEWS 

If the Jews ARE God's Chos- 
en People as some Bible stu- 
dents stoutly affirm, I think I'd 
rather not be CHOSE. Their 
plight .at ttiis stage of world 
history is certainly a pitiful 
one. Like the "Son Of Man", 
they seem to have no place to 
lay their hewEs. As another 
minority group existing under 
conditions not nearly so favor- 
Jible as those «ijoyed by the 
Jews hitherto, their terrible 
predicament should arouse oar 
deepest sympathy. It should al- 
!» cause the thinking minds of 
sroup to indulge in mucli sober 
. tbou^t. 

It is easy mough to dismiss 
it with the thought "It Can't 
Happen Here". But the old 
sajring that "History repeats it- 
self*' proves uncannily true in 
many instances. The ekperi- 
ences of European goveminents 
during the twenty years since 
the signing of the artnistice. set 
forth ttie indisputable fact that 


helps and working tools that 
must be kept up. There are cer- 
tain other Items which judg- 

i ment plainly indicates are ab- 
solutely essential— items w^ h i c h 
the selling organization really ex- 
pects and needs. 

I By adding the estimated cost 

' of these expenditures to the fix- 

, ed charges already determined. 

; you will have the sum which 
must be appropriated if there is 
to be an advertising department 
which "functions in a measure at 

i least and gives some evidence of 
its existence, 1 am certain that 

I it will if you have been and will 

■ follow my advice in this matter. 
! How much money should be 
! appropriated for meeting condi- 

■ tions with the colored population 
; and accomplishing the task set? 

As I told you in a previous arti- 
cle—there are two principle ways 
of determiping your advertising 
appropriation with the colored 
newspaper. 

ia> Taking a percentage of 
the sales quota, or of sales vol- 
ume. This may be for the first 
year, the current year, or the 
year to come. It can be figured 
either ' as a percentage of the 
gross sales or as a fixed sum per 
unit of the product or service 
you are ma^|jeting. 

(b) Appropriating a fixed 
sum. Some firms appropriated a 
fixed sum for the entire yea^— 
others for only half year, or even- 
a- quarter. As each of jOiese pe- 
riods draws to a close, appropria- 
tions are made for the succeeding 
half year or the quarter, or what 
the case may be. 

This plan is not to be re<^m- 
mended as a general rule, how- 
ever, because advertising pro- 
grams figured in this way— in my 
opinion— lack continuity. AD- 
VERTISING tAJCES PLAN- 
NING AND FOLLOWING THRU. 
A FAR BETTER WAY TO GET 
THE COLORED BUSINESS IS 
TO LAY A PLAN FOR THREE 
j YEARS AND BASE IT ON AN- 
I TICIPATED SALES. In that way 
i>you will enjoy thousands of dol- 
i lars in business ftOra the colored 
trade. 

Busine« is getting a great deal 
better— Prepare for the largest 
holiday trade in years. All de- 
partment stores see the largest 
holiday trade ahead— that I attri- 
bute to the improvement of busi- 
ness the increased spending pow- 
er by the colored consumw, due 


Langston Hughes and Arna Bon 

temps, two noted Negro authors 

who will arrive in Los Angeles 

soon. 1 have accepted an invitation 

to spteak at the Vernon Branch 

Library on the evening of Dec- ^ ^^rd Atkmsdn. Robert Beverly, 

ember 7. it was announced today. ^^^^ Turner Brooks. Tresvant 

Wynn. Edward Atkinson. Fannie 
Robinson. Maje Shores Mitchell, 
Frak Johnson,; Carrie Parsons, 
Bessie Brown, : Edward Hamilton. 
Georgie Tymony. 


"Anythmg Is Possible** wbere 
and when the old established 
order of. government >. breaks 
down, and fanatical, power- 
seeking Opportunists are en- 
abled through artful propo- 
ganda to seize the reins of gov- 
emuaent ^eref ort, more than 
any other group in this coun- 
try perfaj^pa, we should stew 
otir course steadfastly to the 
Right, and throw our combin- 
ed weight 'agaiwg* an LeCtiats 
movements. 


ted individuals for the enjoyment 
of the book-reading public. Fur- 
ther details wiU be published lat- 
er. 

For those who need to be re- 
minded, Hugjies i* the author of 
"The Weary Blues," "Fine Cloth- 
es to the Jew," "Not Without 
Laughter," "The Ways of White 
Folks," and others while Bon- 
temps a former Angeleno, has 
written "Black Thunder," "God 
Sends Sunday," "Can't Get a 
Possum," "The Sad Faced Boy" 
and a new volume which wiU be 
published soon on "Tom-Tom 
Treasures." 

Much public interest is being 
aroused in good reading dur- 
ing, this twentieth annual cele- 
bration of National Book Week 
and we trust it will last all 
through, the year. One editor 
recently remarked that news- 
papers have given widespread 
publicity to the appalling num- 
ber of undemourisheO children 
and their alarming death rate 
but have given out statistics 
concerning mental undemour-^ 
ishmoat among chUdren and 
adults, nor the mental death 
rate wbidi is also alarmingly 
high. *^' 

If you are interested in keep- 
ing the cobwebs out of your 
mental attic, visit your near- 
est public library and ask for 
the book list, "New Books- 
New Worlds" which may be se- 
cured for the small sam of two 
cents. Here you will be intro- 
duced to the "World of Peo- 
ple." "The World o* Ideas." 
"The World of TraveFand Ad- 
venture," The Wbrid of Science 
and Practical Living," "The 
^°r,'*^.,2' ^^ **"S'C and Thea- 
:. Tr^^ ^°'"W °' Hobbies 
and Vocations," "The World of 
Fiction" and the "Contempor- 
ary World." «="ii~r 

Among the new books includ- 
ed m this list are "The Be«fis- 
covery of Mai;.", by Link} "Des- 

iS^^.^I?™*"-" by Byers; "Re- 
»Kca, by puMaurier; "The 
Commg Struggle for Latin Am- 
erica, by Beals; "The Fun of 
Photo^phy," by Scacheri; "All 
"^,^ He»ven and Too," by" 
Field; '^ith Malice Tbward 
Some.'' by Halsey; "Red^r 
Over China," by Snow: «Wm- 
jam and Dorqifay," by AatAon; 



Dr. Von H<^rn Writes 
Book on Miotfieitioties 

NASHVILLE, Nov. 17, (ANP) 
— ^A Preface to Mathematics by 
Dr. Clarence E. Vann Horn of 
Fisk university has just come 
from the pres^ of Chapman and 
Grimes, Inc., of Boston. Concern- 
ing it the Journal of Education 
said, "It U designed to *enrich 
the backgrounds of the mathe- 
matician with : much philosophy 
and lore whichi finds no place in 
the more formal texts on the sep- 
arate branches of the scioice. 
The book should prove a valu- 
able contribution to great teach- 
ing." 


"Farewell to ^wrt" by Galil- 
eo; "The Long Valley." by 
Steinbeck: "Listen, the Wind!" 
by Lindbergh; "Dry Guillo- 
tine," by Belbbnoit: "The Best 
Plays of -193l7-3«," edited by 
Mantle; "Green Worlds," by 
Hindus and mjany others. 

Borrow these books from the 
Vernon Branch Library, 4564 
South Central; Avenue and the 
Hele Hunt Jadkson Branch Li- 
brary, 2330 N»omi Avenue 


to the continuea recovery in em- 
Pl«»yment of the colored people 

I^!.^V™*^' together with 
iarger government spending for 

^^1^« **j:f ^*'- STRONG 

IS REPOinm The index sale* 
^^^^- ^^"^MS have risen 
st^dily since September and win 
wminue t9 do :«D the balance eT 
Not/^:jS?^ your money>l 
th?^l",fS^**^ your ales waM* 
the colored people. ^^ 

Next week I shall give too 
jnore on Spending jxmlov^ 
ing money. 


MEN! [WOMEN! 
Tfco M^no^e of Chronic 

URINARY 

AND PROSTATE DISEASES 
I believ e are frequently due to 
imiiroper treatment. I use the 
latjKt methods! in treatment to 
MEN and WOMEN. URINARY. 

^w. mdIjet, blood 

PROSTATE mSORDERS and 

non-surgical treatment to Hem- 
orrhoids. , No itime lost from 
work, no hoispitaL BLO<M> 
WASSER]lfAN»S URINALTS- 
IS, X-RATS aid LABORATO- 
?J'?*'0*'S4 Pregnancy and 
Stwihty Tests.; Most modemly 
quipped offi<^ entire «th 
floor, for treatment of this 
specialty. Please do not daas 
our medical treatoaent with or- 
dinary advertisers. We try to 
give each patient unexc^ed 
treatment. Feesi reasonable and ' 
credit extended. NO CHARGE 
FOR CONSOLTAnON. 
S li f ' W *# — $3J» 



' ntoM tt-uss 



C^ 


II too frcquonfly • mojor 


portion of ovoiloble money is expended 
upon too lovish a funeral service. ANGELUS 
always counsels against extravagance in 
poying- final tribute at time of sorrow — 
particularly where there is on obvious need 
for economy. Burdensome expenditures ore 
not necfstory since o complete and im« 
pressive ANGELUS service is availoble at 
prices in keoping with the most modest 


i . 


income. 


Sund 


TUNE IN 

THE VISITOR" 

KFOX 

r Morning 10:15 to 10:4S 
1250 on your diaL 


-n 


■M- 


Stop in todoy for a free copy of our beautiful bkie 
and gold booklet. "" r 

- . . . ■ ■- . ^\ ''' \ ^\.j ' 

aNGELua 

ULOJiJ-- ADJLKLS A1M3 




*, 'it 


If Ybtii Foil 'Tb ReoH THE qALIfdRNIA f^E You Mciy l^iBver Know It Hoppenea 


TKimtfoy, No^i;^ 1^ ttiif 



Pictui*' 
PUc* 

Pliyara ..^ Pi«d Atttin, Oin(«r 
Rogen 

The Aft«ire-Rog«n combina- 
tion is out at vital importaoce to 
emplojreea of tke RKO film cor- 
pormtion in jebflnl tnd Mvertl 
bankers of wall Street in p«r- 
ticulxr. 

It aeemt that the greataet fin- 
sndal star-duet in motioc pic- 
tare history hit a bump about 
« year and a half ago. The fickle 
jniblic turned away from a glit- 
tering Astaire-Rogers musical and 
cash ctutomers became a rarity 
at showings of the same. Obviotu- 
ly, sentething had to be done. 

Well, naturally enough, the 
pair was split Astaire was given 
more light dancing comedy— with 
another partner. Rogers was al- 
lowed to prove henelf a bril- 
liant comedienne and a fine 
dramatic actress. Ginger far out- 
distanced the great dancer in her 
solo run. However, grosses from 
her films nowhere cliallenged the 
immense mounds of do-re-mi 
which the dancing duet piled 
during their hectic moment at the 
top. So, with true banking in- 
stinct, they were rematched. 
"Carefree", now at the Bill Rob- 
inson, is the restOt 

Unfortunately, this picture an- 
swers no questions. As a sly, so- 
lihisticated piece of entertain- 
ment, ( it is undoubtedly good. As 
a barometer of the Astaire-Rog- 
ers money malcing powers, it is 
a flop. It attracts crowds in one 
city and the people stay away in 
droves at other places. The 
scheduled life of Irene and Ver- 
non Castle will be the true test. 

However, let us point out sev- 
eral things concerning "C a r e- 
free" which are definitely unre- 
lated to the world of hi^-fin- 
ance. It is fast-stepping, brittle 
comedy. In spots, it is ultra hu- 
morous. LueUa Gear is intro-.. 
duced to the film world. The 
plot is excellent light-comedy ma- 
terial. Off ,the record, this is a 
goo'l picture. 



ROLAND HAYES scoRESf Shuffle Alonif, 

IN INITIAL RECITAL W: 

NEW YORK, Nov. 17, {ANP>— 
Roland Hayes, leading tenor, gave 
his first New York recital of the 
season before an enthusiastic aud- 


;;-"-i 


Janet Oaynor and Fianchot Tone 
in "Three Loves Has Nancy" 


ience at Town Hall Tuesday 
night. His program included old 
composers like Brahms and the 
Italians as well as such contem- 
poraries as Theodore Chanler 
and William Grant Still. He was 
accompanied by Reginald Board- 
man. 


JEFFREY LYNN TESTS 
FOR 'GONE WITH WIND' 

HOLLYWOOD— Jeffrey- Lynn, 
Warner Bros, player who came 
to film prominence in "Four- 
Daughters", will take time off the 
"Yes, My Darling Daughter" set 
this week to test for the role of 
Ashley Wilkes in "Gone With The 
Wind" at the Selznick studio. 


Picture "The Great Waltz" 

Place Loew's State 

Players Louise Rainer, Fer- 

nand Gravet 

This is the initial Hollywood 
effort of famed French director 
Julien Duvivier. Passages of the 
film are visually magnificent, but 
the whole lacks dramatic power. 

SSmply, there is no plot. No 
rise to a climax; only stilted mid- 
Victorean prattle. A faithful wife 
and a glamorous "other woman". 
Noble sacrifice of the wife. Noble 



Bight— Pan] Bobeeon and Hattie McDaniels in a scene from 
Boat". The latter dlspUys a subtle wit. (See Story) 


Matinees Popiiloi^ 

Matinees of "Shuffle Along 
1939" at the Criterion theatre 
are proving popular with shop- 
pers on Wednesday and- Satur- 
day It is stated by producer Al- 
fred Butts. The sepia stage show 
features Miller and Mantan, fam- 
ous comedy team, Ruby EJzy's 
soulful songs, dances of Bo Jen- 
kins, Hattie Noel's comedy and 
songs, and vocalizations of Her- 
bert Jeffries. Baron Morehead 
and his orchestra delight the pa- 
trons with their sweet, swing, 
and torrid orchestrations. Prin- 
cess Hadiza Conjeckee Nokicomb 
Najior of Uganda startles the 
audiences with her native tribal 
dance, said to be the first time 
to be presented before foreigners. 

Out of town audiences are 
beating paths to the ' Criterion 
theatre in Los Angeles to witness 
one" of the finest stage shows to 
ever visit Southern California — 
"Shuffle Along 1939". The sepia 
stage revue features 60 colored 
artists headed by the world f am- 
yous comedy team of Miller and 
Mantan, ,the soulful songs of Ru- 
dances o) Bo Jenkins, songs and 
by Elzy, (of "Porgy and Bess") 
comedy of Hattie Noel, (former- 
ly of Eddie Cantor's radio show 
and winner, of $150,000 Irish 
sweepstakes). Marcus Slayter, 
Princess Nadlza Conjeckee Nok- 
ocmb Najior (a real African Prin- 
cess from Uganda ,S. A.), Sam- 
my Warren, the Four Toppers, 
Herb Jefferies, Patsy Hunter, 
Neva Peoples, Teddy and Lee, 
the Three aSepia Songbirds, and 
other "techni-COLORED" artists. 

Reserved tickets for "Shuffle 
Along 193" are on sale at the 
Criterion theatre box office, Sev- 
enth and Grand, Los Angeles, all 
Southern California Music Store 
branches and all Mitchell Ticket 
Curtain rises nightly at 8:30 with 
Agencies of Southern California. 
"Pop" matinees at 2:50 on Satur- 
day and Wednesday. 


ll^P^itnesses Willing to 
^^ik. Says Cupte Garrott 

The inscrutable auence of the 


/ l a.-t t ' 



Who Sold Song Hit for $50 Soys 
Be More Careful in' Future 


CHICAGO, Nov. 17, (ANP)— ♦ 
Local musical and theatrical cir- 
cles continued to buzz this week 
after hearing the strange story 
of Zilner T. Randolph, colored 


._ . ,, ^. , . WPA worker, who declared that 

sacrifice of the other woman. Let 1 j^e had written the song hit, "Old 
us be frmnk. As a story, a "gnp- | ^^^ j^ose," and in 1934 had sold 


ping" drama, the "Great Waltz" 
stinks. 

Now that this is off our minds, 
what have we? Answer: some of 
the finest music ever recorded 


it to Louis Armstrong to avoid 
eviction from his home. 

Randolph, who at one time 
played the comet in Armstrong's 


and several tender, nostalgic epi- ^and. said, ' W ^wif e and I taUc- 


sodes. The ride through Vienna 
Woods which brinp forth the 
immortal songs is brilliant. Jo- 
hann Strauss and his glamorous 
sweetheart canter through these 
beautiful woods one lovely 
morning. Shepherds guard their 
sheep on hazy, far-of hUls. A i 
coach flies by with a blast of | 

-horns. A snatch of melody from i 
this oubturst is taken up uncon- 
sciously by a distant herder. ; 
Then, birds augment the song, j 
Strauss listens and soon the 
world has "Tales of the Vienna ; 
Woods". 

It is played that night for the 
first time by an orchestra in a ! 
way-side inn. Strauss and his 1 
opera-star waltz. They go round 
and round; the camera racing be- 
hind trees and foliage to follow 
their movements. Faster. The 
dancers almost fly, and the sway- 
ing melody rises higher. Director 

, Duvivier has revealed his talent, 
for that song lives. 
As an autobiography of a song, 

- then. "The Great Waltz" IS great. 
There are scenes that will remain 
fir your memory many a year. 
They are scenes of tender rus- 
tiana and dancing feet. The plot, 
*fe repeat— s{inks. 


Oriental, the "No savvy" of the 
Latin is not a general character* 
istic of colored citizens, who 
have been spectators to a crime. 
This fact was learned by the reJ 
search department of Million 
Dollar Productions when prepar- 
ing to start filming "Gang Smash- 
ers which opens soon. 
, It \tma the repult of interviews 
with police department heads and 
students of criminology in many 
cities w}iile ^curing data on the 
battle of law agadnst crime that 
would make the technicalities of 
the finished film absolutely cor- 
rect. ■ 

Said Capt. Homer Garrott, vet- 
eran Captain of Detectives at 
Newton station in Los Angeles, 
"Whether it is volubility aroused 
by the moment's excitement or a 
sincere desire to aid the law in 
apprehending the suspect, I am 
not able to say, but when my 
men arrive on the scene of a 
crime, they find colored bitizens 


are tfaoM of some other nationali- 
ties. Frequently information 
learned in this manner saves 
houn in unearthing clues or hit- 
ting a malefactors traiL 

However, those interviewed be- 
come more reticent when ques- 
tioned by a white officer or de- 
tective tlian by a member of 
their own race. Seemingly when 
testifying to colored oflficers they 
have less fear of becoming in- 
volved themselves. This is one 
of the reasons Negro officers' ef- 
ficiency hand-in-hand with their 
white fellow-sleuths is greatly 
recognized throughout the coun- 
try." 

"Gang Smashers" tells of t h e 
manhunt for ruthless murderous 
racketeers and how a beautiful 
entertainer, "Laura" played by 
Nina Mae McKinney figured in 
it. Supporting this internationally 
famous screen star are: Lawrence 
Criner, Monte Hawley, Mantan 
Moreland, Reginald Fenderson, 
Edward Thompson, Neva Peoples, 
John Criner, 


INorthDakbia 
Star Most 
Valuable 


BIGGER HI. Ml R 


, Arthur Ray and 
present more willing to talk, thatt^ Vernon McCalla, and others. 

Georgie Crouch Leaves No 
Room for Argument jii Bout 

By J. CULLEN FENTRESS 

Georgie "Cobra" Crouch left no room for argument last Tues- 
day night at the Olympic auditorium as he decisively decisioned 
Jimmy Garrison of Kansas City in 10 heats. Referee Abe Roth 
awarded Garrison two rounds. 

Starting slowly, as usual, the^ 
Cobra and Garrison fought on 
even terms for the first five- 
rounds. Crouch, always cool, 
cut down his tough opponent eas- 


ed it over, and we decided to sell 
it. So for $50 I let a song go that 
I had been afraid to trust to the 
mails to get copyrighted. I car- 
ried it all the Way to Washington 
myself. Louis Armstrong later 
heard it and wrote to^ me about I 
it I had an idea, it was good, 
but I sold it to save my home. | 
Randolph, wh^ is the father 1 
of five children, now has two new j 
numbers "as good if not better, I 
than Old Man Mose." One is 
"Knock-kneed Sal" he wrote for [ 
Eddie Duchin and the other i 
"Liza Down on the Levee," was 
introduced by Ethel Waters last 
year on the Ben Bernie program. 
Asked about these songs, Ran- 
dolph said quickly, "You can bet 
I won't sell them for $50." 


Madame Ford 
Pleases at 
Gray Musart 

A select appreciative audience 
enthusiastically received Madame 
Elizabeth Ford last Sunday at 
the forst of the concerts presen- 
ted by the Gray Conservatory of 
Music. 

Her program was well chosen 


BICYCLE WON 
FREE TURKEYS! 

With increasing amount of 
money and of spins in which to 
win Keno at the Bill Robinson 
theatre, the Jack Pot was won 
last Thursday. The lucky win- 
ners were Robert Frederic, 1700 
E. 22nd, Mrs. Mae Nickol, 1001 
Santa Barbara, and Henry Burns 
of 1211 E. 43rd PL who divider 
the $220 Jack Pot, giving each 
approximately $75.00. 

A new Jack Pot has been start 
ed besides the original one of 
$500 on 5 spins for Keno. 
BICYCLE WON 

Culminating a contest held at 
the Bill Robinson theatre for kid- 
dies on the Satuday matinee, a 
bicycle was awarded to Clarence 
Stewart of 858% E. 36th Place, 
winner of the contest. 

Endeavoring to make it a 
cheerful Tbanksgivint: the Bill 
Robinson theatre wtll give 
away 6 turkeys this Monday, 
November 21st and 6 more on 
Wednesday, November 23rd. 

and allowed her ample opportun- 
ity to display her art both ii^ the 
serious and In the lighter vein. 
Her character portrayals were 
the outstanding features of her 
work and proved her to be a 
keen student of human nature. 

Paujine Wilkerson, soprano, 
disclosed a beautiful voice and 
much talent in her vocal selec- 
tion while June Stevenson, pian- 
ist, played her selection with ,a 
warm tone and delicate phrasing. 

Phyllis Kelson, ably accom- 
panied Miss Wilkerson in her 
songs and completed the trio of 
assistants on this program. 


more sports minded adults at- 
tending each year. Last year's 
attendance reached well over 
60,000. 

Proceeds derived from this car- 
nival go to purchase mUk, lunch- 
es and clothing for the under- 
privileged children attending Los 
Angeles City schools. 

. The following teams will def- 
initely be in the carnival: — 

For the "South" — Fremont, 
Los Angeles, Fairfax, Eagle 
Rock, Jacob Riis and the win- 
ner of the North Hollywood-San 
FeJnando game this week. 

For the "South": — Fremonth, 
Jordan, Roosveelt, Torrance, the 


ily from then on. 

Forced to slug in the previous 
match several weeks ago -which 
was "won" by Garrison, Crouch 
was content to oy^hcx Garrison, 


NEXT WEEK 

HaystaiA Sloan vs. Irish Mic- 
key McAvoy, heavyweights, 10 
rounds. Lefty Louie Flyer vs. 
Al George, lightweights, 10 rds. 


but out-slugged him also the few 
times it was necessary. 

A bout with Pedro Montanez 
next month was promised the 
winner this week. 

A crowd of some seven or eight 
thousand watched Crouch turn 
the tables. • 


YEAR'S LARGEST CAST 
BEGINS WORK 

HOLLYW(X>D. (Special) Nov. 
17— The year's Ingest cast be- 
gins work this week (of Nov. 141 
when "Juarez", starring Paul 
Muni and Bette Davis, goes be- 
fore the cameras at Warner Bros. 

The production, scheduled to 
be the studio's most important 
production of the 1938-39 season, 
gives Muni the title role and Miss 
Davis the role of Carlotta, mad 
Empress and bride of Maximilian, 
Emperor of Mexico. 


GRAND FORKS, N. D., Nov. 
17, (ANP)r-Friday, amid the ap- 
plause of i'ne student body of the 
University of North Dakota, Hor- 
ace W. Johnson, their only three 
lett«r athlete, \fu awarded a 
silver plaque for being the out- 
standing athlete, of the North 
Dakota conference for the year 
1937-38. 

Johnson, who is a senior and 
a native of Cheyime, Wyo., at- 
tended high school in Phebnix, 
Ariz., where he carried off all 
laurels in track, football and bas- 
ketbaU. 

In football, Johnson, along with 
Fritz Pollard, Jr., shares honors 
at the university, beside being 
a regular on the basketball team. 
In track, he holds the conference 
records in both the 100 yard dash 
and the broad jump. 

Due to a injury to his right 
knee received at the beginning 
of the football season, Johnson 
has been forced to the side lines. 
However, he intends to make his 
debut in a few weeks when the 
university inaugurates its bas- 
ketball season for 1938. 

Mayor Glenda Farrell Will 
Taka Office This Week 

HOLLYWOOD— Brass bands 
and the full panoply of political 
office will accompany the instal- 
lation of Glenda J'arrell, the 
screen's blondie interpreter of 
'Torchy Blane", as Mayor of 
North Hollywood when she re- 
turns from the East this week. 

Mayor Farrell also will be 
guest of honor at a dinner to be 
tendered by civic celebrities. 


y^^/> CRITERION 


winner of the Manual Arts-Jeff- 
erson game and the winner of the 
Gardena-Banning-Narbonne game 
this week end. 


HATTIE McDANIELS 
LIKES LANGDON 
AS OLIVER HARDY 

When Oliver Hardy, starring 
with Harry Lafigdon in "It's 
Spring Again", at the Hal Roach 
Studios, was introduced to Hattie 
McDaniels, the jovial character 
actress appearing as a Southern 
mammy in the picture. Miss Mc- 
Daniels expressed great delight 
at appearing in the new romantic 
comedy. 

"Yo' sho are a great actor, Mr. 
Hardy", she declared. "I've seen 
all yo' pictures and enjoyed them. 
I think yo're just immense." 
' Hardy's smiljnc greeting 
changed to bewilderment and 
the 318-pound star is still wond- 
ering whether Miss McDaniels 
was complimenting him or kid- i 
ding him. I 

JtOCKET SHIPS (MORE I 
MEN FROM MARS?) > 
TO BE HEARD TODAY' 

Destruction by a meteor threat- 
ens Profesaor Barbicane's rocket 
ship in today's thunderous epi- 
sode of "From The Earth To The 
Moon", slated for KMTR listeners 
from 4:45 to 5:00 P. M. 

"From "the Earth To The 
Moon", exciting scientific serial, 
is a dramatization of Jules 
Verne's famous novel and fea- 
tures Federal Theatre Radio Di- 
vision favorites. The quartet 
keuT presentation is the second of 
the popular "Adventure Ahead" 
progxanos inaugurated with "A 
•Jo»»mey To The Center Of The 
Sutb" sQae weelu ago. 


Kentucky and Tennessee 
Tied in Grid Standings 


WILPERFORCE, Nov. 17— As^ 
the colored loop Mid-western 
Conference race goes into the 
final stretch this wefek Teimessee 
State and Kentucky State are in 
a tie for first place and this may 
be the way the Conference race 
may end as these two powerful 
teams do not meet on the grid- 
iron this year. Kentucky is vir- 
tually in so far as the Conference 
championship as only a weak 
Louisville Municipal College 
3leven stands as a barrier. Ten- 
nessee State which is undefeated, 
untied and unscored on, may 
run into a stumbling block in 
West Virginia or Lincoln. How- 
ever, the Tennessee Tigers have 
plenty of veterans, one of the 
best backs of the year in Um- 
phrey and virtually an airtight 
defense so they have a great 


chance to get through West Vir- 
ginia State, Lincoln and Lane 
and lay a claim not only to the 
Conference title but to the mythi- 
cal national championship. West 
Virginia and Wilberforce will no 
doubt battle it out for second 
place with Lincoln and LK>uis- 
ville destined for the cellar. 
Official Mld-Westera Conference 
Staadiar, laclndes Nor. 5 games 


Team -W L 

Kentucky 3 

Tennessee 1 

West V. 2 1 

WUberforce 1 2 

Lincoln - 1 3 

Louisville 2 

November 19 games — Tennes- 
see at Lincoln; Louisville at Ken- 
tucky; Nov. 24 games, West Vir- 
ginia at Wilberforce; Tennessee 
at Lane. 


Pet 
1.000 
1.000 
.666 
.333 
.250 

.ooa 



• Psycho,! 
Astro ^ 


J. C. Amwine, Astra Psycho, 
Counselor and advisor. If you 
are worried over business trou- 
bles, love affairs or worries of 
other kinds. Unsuccessful, dis- 
couraged, despondent and feel 
everything is against you. — 

Write J. C. Amwine, Box 3«2, 
Brenham, Texas. 



*/'.>z< TR-9956 


UMITCD ENGAGEMENT PWOA TO 
NEW TOMC OPEHttW 





Miller * MtnUn. Bikf tfn 

neatn mmmuun mn vma 
Nightly 8:30. Mat. Sat. 



Savoy Theatre 


SUN. and TUES. 

LIVE TURKEYS 
GIVEN AWAY 

SUN., MON., TUES. 

JOE E. BROWN 

IN', 

'THE GLADIATOR" 

ALSO 

GEO. BRENT 

IN 
"RACKET BUSTERS" 


CARTOON, NEWS, COMEDY 


P-TA. Football and Band Carnival 
Scheduled Wednesday at Coliseum 

The Sixth Annual Tenth District Parent-Teacher Football and 
Band Carnival will be held in the Coliseum next Wednesday, com- 
mendng at 1:45 P. M. 


B«li«v« it or net...//V only 


BLAZER 


• Brushed mohair 

- *f 

• Crew nedc 

• Fish tail 

• Reinforced elbows 

$195 


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Twelve representative teams, 
the cream of the prep football 
leagues, will clash. The teams 
are divided into two sectioni, 
"North" and "South", with six 
teams in each. Six 20 minute 
periods will be played, with no 
time out, assuring spectators of 


Competition has been unusual- 
ly keen in the preliminary con- 
tests as the honor of playing in 
thii great carnival is coveted by 
every high school team in the | 
city. Formerly considered an en- j 
tertainment for school children, > 
the carnival has become a major 


StoleL 


MEN'S WEAR and HATS 


faat and cootinuout play. _ ' city q>orti evtnf, witt^ inore and 


SIO aeVIN *B««BW«T 
WIlSMMi AT LsSRIA 

743 fowm aaoMWAY 

m PINI AVt., ION* SIACH 


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SOS so. MAIN SirtilT 
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t 


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NEW 


THEATRIC 


CASINO 


1605 E. Vemoa 


AD-13751 


1605 E. Vernon. AD--13751 

Friday, Saturday, Nov. 18, 19 

JOE E. BROWN 

The Gladiator' 

Paul Muni— -Bette Davis in 

"BORDERTOWN*' 

Last Chapter: 
"Blake of ScoUand Yard" 

$50 FREE SAT. NITE 

Son., Mon. Only. Nov. 20, 21 
HUMPHREY BOGART 

Racket Busters 

TOMMY RYAN in 

"lOrti AVE. KID" 

Last Chap., 'Wild Bill Hickok" 

5 Turkeys Free 

\ . MONDAY NIG HT 

Tnes., Wed, Nov. 22, 23 

Richard Dlx— Chester Mords 

"SKY GIANT" 

GEORGE OVRIEN in 

\ "PAINTED DESERT" 

]Mao Comedy, Cartoon, Novelty 

$50 FREE WED. NITE 

MdaSTER NOW FOR 
TREASURE CHEST 


1 OFFICE OPENS i 
WEEKDAYS 6:20 I 
I Sat.-Sun. 1:20 


BILL 


4319 SOUTH 

CENTRAL A>'E. 

TeL AD -7367 


Robinson 


4 DAYS— STARTS "SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH 


Freel2TurMys|^:3'°^ ''°^ ''•* 


Nov. 23 rd 



$500 Tue., Thurs., Sot 


Thurs., Fri., Sot. 


Nov. 24, 25, 26 


Continuous Matinee, Thanksgiving, Nov. 24th 


SONJA HENIE 

IN 


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Blockheads " 
My Lucky Star" laurel&^hardy 


POSEBUQ 


'94ilCENTRA: 


AaSiTS' 


Children lOe 


PR5/.S9 


Son., Mon, Tnes. (Show Starts Sunday at 1 P. M. Nov. 20, 21, 22) 

2 HIT FEATURES! 


R\(,ri>IK BAM) 

POWER FAYEAMECHE 


// 


RICHARD 

DIX 
Blind Alibi" 


PLAY KENO->Wednesday, Thursdoy, Saturday 


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«T.^ „ ■■^^■\l\ll^ TESTIMONY IN CaCRT W CRMRIINAL OR MARITAL CASKS 

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.If Ydu Foil To RWdJTHE CAUrORNI^ iAQLE Yi>u Ma y t^ever Know It Hoppene'^ 


'mr^ 


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DOWN IN 
FRONT 


Bj ALAfENA DAVIS 

The indefatigable icene stealer, 
Kenny Washington, after mufline 
his lines and getting all balled 
up in the "business" during the 
first three scenes of the Tragedy 
playad in the Coliseum last Sat- 
urday afternoon, managed ♦o ero- 
erege still the matinee idol of 
thousands of followers of the Pig- 
skin Parade as the curtain rang 
down on the Wisconsin-U. C. L. 
A. spectacle. 

When the lights went out on 
the "meller-drammer", staged on 
the close-crtepped Stadium turf, 
90,000 fans applauded the great- 
ness of Kenny Washington, the 
jitterbug general of the Bruin 
"fumbleball team" where five 
minutes previous they had not 
been so sure of it. 

Just seconds remained of . the 
game when the buUet headed 
youngster cinced a curtain call 
for himself and his ball club, 
by snatching a pass and streak- 
ing 32 yards to place the ball on 
the 3 yard line from which sub- 
sequently it was taken over for 
the sole Bruin score of the day. 

The game ended 14-7 favor of 
the Badgers, but the score was 
j'ncidental to the curtain-ringing 

K performance of Miiter Washing- 
ton. For with all the dexterity 
of a seasoned thespian, he turned 
the crowd's approval from the 
capably performing Wisconsin- 
ans to himself and hie rather 
ragged mates. And when a few 
minutes later, the grandstands 
poured onto the streets, on all 
sides could be heard laudations 
of Washington and the Bruins. . 
. .when it was Wisconsin that 
won the ball game! 

It was truly a wonderful ex- 
hibition that General Washington 
put on. Trucking on down the 
side-lines, en route to the gqal 
p>08ts, with the raaU tucked sec- 
urely under his arm, he was 
struck from the left, poked from 
the right, punched from the back. 
Nothing daunted, he struggled on 
and when finally downed by 
practically the whole Wisconsin 
team, periously near the pay-off 
line, the crowd was with him to 
a man. 

— But what's this? Our hero \s 
hurt. Battered and bruised he 
was pried from under the burly 
Badgers that were grinding him 
into the dirt. Tottering he rose 
to his feet, staggered and fell 
again. 

Up from the stands that had three 
seconds before been singing "On ■ 
Wisconsin" arose a cry. 

"He's hurt, the poor brave dar- 
ling", shrieked a blonde behind 
(we. 

And he was. The General was 
writhing on the grass, clutching 
his tummy, groveling his proud- 
ly helmeted head in the dust. On- 
to the field trotted the Bruin 
doctor'' and water boy. Grasping 
their leading man by the should- 
er, they attempted to assist him 
from the field. 

But, NO, said our hero. To hell 
with the Charley Horse. Let me 
at 'ent. 

Again the stands were with 
him to a man. It was the concen- 
sus of opinion that the show must 
go on. 

Persistently, however, the doc 
and the water boy tugged at the 
200 pound frame of our hero and 
success attended their efforts. 
For, placing themselves on either 
■ side of the General, they rever- 
ently ejected him from the field, 
and shaken with anger, he tossed 
his helmet to the dust and strode 
to the showers. 


But wait. Here the most inspir- 
ing bit was glayed. As our hero 
limped to theusidelines, the crowd 
and the blondje paid him tribute. 

"He wanted' to stay in and give 
his all", she, the blond wailed. 

And to their feet the Badgers 
were leaping on the field, form- 
ing a gauntlet of congratula- 
tory expressions, pumping our 
hero's hand, slapping his back, 
shoving him on the next . . .Good 
old American sportsmanship. . . . 
• • * 

The Sunday morning gander at 
the Los Angeles Times brought a 
lot of .sleeping dogs to the sur- 
face as those of us who attended 
the aforementioned game scratch- 
ed our heads in puzzlement over 
a story therein. 

Penned by the estimable Rob 
Ray of the Times sport staff, 
there were a few lines in which 
it was stated that Coach Harry 
Stuhldreher of the Wisconsin 
Badgers picked Kenny Washing- 
ton, Johnny R>iand and Bob 
Cregg as the Bruins who impress- 
ed him most 

"That Washington Is a sweet 
football player", announced the 
Badger mentor, "and I liked the 
playing of Ryland and that end, 
Cress". (That is a direct quote 
from the Times story.) 

Bruin fans had no quarrel with 
the selection of Washington or 
Ryland, but they wondered if in 
the naming of Cress there wasn't 
a case of mistaken Identity. 

Unless Stuhldreher is color 
blind, he could not possibly have 
meant Cress, who is the blond 
substitute for Woodfow Stwdt, 
brown, Bruin behemoth, and pre- 
season pubUcity to the windward 
hardly holds a candle to him. 

Strode turned in the bert In- 
dividual line performance that I 
have witnessed in the Coliseum 
this season. . 

He gave the impression of ex- 
tending himself far more thm m 
• previous games. To ray mmd he 
hai no equal lii defensive work, 
but the type of game he plays 
bids fair to condemn him to com- 
"paative obscurity and obscunty 


"Jefferson 
Ends Big 
'10' Coreer 

ANN ARBOR, Mich.. Nov. 17, 
(ANP)-,Although Northwestern 
and Michigan battled 60 minutes 
to a scorleaa tie before 66,700 
' spectators here Saturday, this 
stalemate did not detract from 
the, work of Bernard Jefferson 
who, in his concluding Big Ten 
game turned in one of the finest 
performances of his career. 

Jef, who played all but a few 
minutes, waa sensational on de- 
fenae and was Northwestern's on- 
ly consistent groud gainer. He 
came up from the secondary to 
stop many Wolverine running 
plays and either batted down or 
intercepted Michigan aerials. He 
did ell of Northwestern's kicking 
and toised several completed 
passes. 

It was this same Jefferson who 
gave the huge crowd its great- 
est thrill of the game in the third 
period. Catching a pass from a 
teammate on his own 46, the 
dusky star showed an amazing 
exliibition of broken field run- 
ning and change of pace, dashing 
past would-be tacklers until he 
reached the Wolverine H where 
he was hauled to the earth. Nor- 
thwestern could not take advan- 
tage of this opportimity, howev- 
er. 

Jim Smifli, sophomore end, did 
not enter the game uatil the last 
few seconds of the final quarter 
after Mlehigan sacked In the reg- 
ular Wildcat flankman and a 
halfbaek dashed 44 yards. Here 
Smith was inKrted and on the 
second play he broke through to 
si^ a Wolverine passer for an 
18 yard loss. 

Jefferson concludes his varsity 
career Saturday as Northwestern 
plays Notre Dame at Dyche sta- 
dium, Evanston, IlL 
■ — - — / 

Bell in Finale Agoinit 
Wisconsin Soturday 

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., Nov. 
17, (ANP)— Horace Bell, place- 
kicking guard for the Minnesota 
football team, will write finis to 
his three years as a varsity reg- 
ular when the Gophers battle 
Wisconsin Saturday in the final 
game of the Big Ten season. 

Bell played most of the game 
Saturday when Minnesota lost to 
Notre Dame, 19-07 He had one 
chance at a field goal, but was 
too far away to make it good. 

Holland Praised for Port 
in Cornell 14-7 Victory 

ITHACA, N. Y., Nov. 17 (ANP) 
— Jerome "Brud" Holland, brill- 
iant All-American end of 1937 
who is nearing the close of his 
varsity career, was singled out 
by spectators and critics alike for 
high praise as Cornell toppled 
Dartmtmth from the- ranks of the 
undefeated, 14 to 7, before 30,486 
here Saturday. 

Holland's end was well nigh 
invulnerable on defense and the 
star broke through time after 
time to spill Dartmouth's power- 
i ful backs. He broke up several 
passing plays by rushing the 
passer and either threw him for 
a loss or hurried his delivery. 
Although Brud did not score, he 
aided Cornell's offense by several 
long end-around gains from 
scrimmage. 

never got any votes from the boys 
that pick All-Coast and All-Am- 
erican teams. 

I am not carrying a torch for 
the big boy by any means, but I 
was far from alone in my praise 
of his playing Saturday. One 
play in particular, Kenny Wash- 
ington's nullified touchdown im- 
pressed me most. 

As Washington scooped up the 
fusible and started off. Strode 
was on his heels. Blocking out 
all oposition, in particular" Quar- 
terback Gavre with whom he 
seemed to be playing "king of 
the mountain" all afternoon, he 
followed Washington down the 
field to the touchdown line, keep- 
ing the ball carrier abSblutely 
clear of all opposition. If the rest 
of the Bruins displayed that kind 
of blocking, the Rose Bowl and 
all else would be a cinch for the 
Westwood team. 



t-r-r 


Joe PirrcMif "s m 
Plo^^oyfif Grants Sundoy 


>j 


pp§j"«)?s;iJ'*f 



Smith Shines 
dsHoWqii 
in Grid Loss 


v^ 


the Eagle)— In their initial 


JEFF GRIDDlRS KEEP 

i POLY AT BOTTOM 

! OF SOUTHERN LEAGUl 

Polytechnic High school re- 
mained at the bottom of tVs 
Southern League pile after de- 
feat on its own turi by Jefferson, 
last Thursday. The two schools' 


Creating exeitament in 'Winter ^' 
League circles comes \h* news^ 
that Joe Pirrone, Father of Win- 
ter baaeban, has been induced to 
enter his new revamped dub of 
majors and minors into the pen-' 
nant race. This marks the first 
appearance at White Sox Park in 
any but an exhibition game fox 
two years, of the AIl-StArs, the 
only club that has ever beaten 

St "SSi v^^'^A^-^f", * ^^^' ;iiS;^^rdi.pite ti; 

past twdye years teamtji-e trimming at the hand* 


Sldyton,Gorfitld 
Hl^ock, Start ' 
OS Team Loses 

A little-publicized fullback 
from Garfield High School waa ^^ 
the ' outstanding athlete on th*— ..>| 
Roeeevalt High school turf last- 


U. OF HAWAII THREAT t 

One football game made a hero 
out of the young man pirouet- 
.ting about in the above photo. 
He is NOLLE S. SMITH, Jr., 
fullback on the University of 
Hawaii football team. (For full 
particulars see story on this 
page). * 

The Hawaii ball elnb Is some- 
thing of a little league of nat- 
ions, composed as it is of Chi- 
nese, Japanese, Korean, Haw- 
aiian, Canadian, German, Russ- 
ian, Spani^, Scotch and Negro 

ancestry. 

Smith is the only Negro on the 
squad. A few years back his 
uncle was the Idol of the Is- 
lands, noted for his sensational 


Sidat Singh Ploys Agoinst 
Duke; No Trouble 

SYRACUSE, N. Y., Nov. 17, (A 
NP)— Wilmeth Sidat-Singh, call- 
ed one of the greatest passers .in 
the history of football, was kept 
bottled up by the Duke univer- 
sity Blue Devils here Saturday 
afternoon in a game which the 
visitors won before 26,000 by a 
■score of 21-0 to keep its undefea- 
ted and unscored on record clear. 
Although this was the first time 
Duke had played against a color- 
ed star, there were no evidences 
of bad sportsmanship on the part 
of the Southerners. 

football playing and general all 
around ability. 


ver Turner are 
reserve lineup. 


included in the 


Kid Brother of Al Duval Aids L. A. 

Husky Henry Duval, kid brother of Al, Loyola's stellar guard 
of a coupla' years back, turned, in the finest performance of his 
football career on last Thursday tfternoon as he aided Los Angeles 
High school snare the Western 
Loop title. The Romans adminis- 
tered a 25-0 thrashing to Fairfax 
High school before 12,000 fans in 
Gilmore Stadium. 

A prep school Woody Strode 
at right end, Duval was directly 
responsible for one touchdown, 
made when he snagged a 32- 
yard pass in the end zone. Also 
the last of the Romans' quartet 
of scores came about through the 
good offices of the tall, tapering 
youth. 

An efficient blocker and tack- 
ier, Duval is unerring in his ball 
catching. On the pitching end is 
a smaller, whiter edition of Ken- 
ny Washington, Al Cole, star 
Roman halfback. Between the 
two, they have managed to give 
Western Loopers a fit. 

On the play preceeding the 
last touchdown, Duval won the 
plaudits of the stands. As Cole 
rared back on his own 45 yeard 
line and fired the pigskin 35 
yards, Duval ran forward facing 
his own goal line. He caught the 
hall near his shoe strings, wheel- 
ed and carried it 5 yards to the 
Fairfax 15 before he was tackled. 

A shot putter of some note, Du- 
val is the only colored youth on 
the Roman first string. Bingo 
•Robinson, Neil Collins and Wea- 


son, thi University of Hawaii 
football team found the chilly, 
gusty November Rocky Moun- 
tain weather a far cry from 
sunny Hawaii and dropped the 
duke to the Denver Uni- 
versity Pioneers here last Satur- 
day afternoon; score 20-12. 

An intercepted pass and a 
blocked punt led to quick Den- 
ver scores which converted a 
12-7 deficit into victory. The 
Hawaiians were defeated at their 
speciality, the forward pass, but 
gave tlte Denver line a fit with 
the dipsy doodly running attack 
of its backfielders, led by the 
colored fullback ace, Nolle R. 
Smith. 

Smith, an 18 year old sophJ- 
more at America's most western 
university, accounted for one of 
the Rainbow's touchdowns, en a 
line-buck through Denver U's 
line, and most of the Islanders' 
yardage. His forward, triple, and 
lateral pass play was little short 
of phenomenal Given a few 
more with the youth's spirit and 
accuracy, Hawaii might be a 
threat to any of the big confer- 
ence teams. 
ONLY A SUBSTfTUTB 

Saturday's game was Smith's 
second as a member of the Rain- 
bow varsity. I*rior to the Univer- 
sity's game several weeks ago 
with an Island team, he was on- 
ly a substitute right half-back. 
But because of his brilliant per- 
formance he was shifted to the 
fullback position and given a reg- 
ular berth. 

STUDYING BUSINESS 

Great things are expected of 
Smith before he leaves the Island 
U where he is studying business 
and his record has been described 
by University officials as "a bit 
above average". 

His activities are not confined 
solely to football because he is 
a fleet man oft the cinder track, 
and is a valued member of the 
track team. He is prominent in 
school activities as a member of 
the Oriental Library Society and 
the JUniversity of Hawaii orches- 
tra. His activity was more diverse 
at Roosevelt High school in Hon- 
olulu where he participated in 
many athletic events, including 
baseball, basketball, football and 


mainland appearance of the sea- 1 annual grudge match started off 
-- - - — "at even-steven to the first half 

when the Democrats pulled away 
and chalked up two touchdowns. 
Nolan McCoy, left end and 
Quarterback George Harris were 
scorers for the Eastside school. 
Joe Black, stellar Demo player 
at left end, made one conversion 
score 13-0. 

JORDAN EAST LEAGUE 
VICTORS * 

Jordan High school in Watts 
hung up an Eastern League vic- 
tory, the first in several seasons 
as they whipped Bell 14-8 on 
Davis' field.FuUback Duke Brat- 
cher and Gil Round were the 
Bulldog scorers. 

'Y' Basketball 
Teams Tip Off 

Last Monday morning. East- 
side branch YMCA basketball 
got off with a ';;.-. :- • :-.:n 
four teams picked from the reg- 
ular basketball class, were mat- 
ched in a first of the winter lea- 
gue series. 

The Alphabets played the 
numhbers in the first game 
which the A's won 2i-10. "Drip- 
py" Williams was leader of the 
Alphabets". Leonard McClain was 
high point man for the winners, 
fohn Brewer was the leader of 
the losers. 

In the second game, the Ro- 
mans defeated the Centuries in a 
! nip-and-tuck game, 25-24. Her- 
I man Hill led the Romans while 
j Johnnie Shackleford led the los- 
, ers. High point man was Boswell 
; at twelve points with Hill and 
I Herbert Jones tied six points 
I each for the winners. 
I The series will resume tonight 
j (Thursday) when the Alphabets 
I play the Romans and the Cen- 
turies play the Numbers. 
\ Officials for the game were L 
i H. McClelland, Jr. official scorer. 
1 and Allen George, timer. 


■i.^ 


track. At Roosevelt he also took 
a hand in dramatics, and was a 
member of the orchestra. 

Not "bulky and beefy" like 
most football players, the Negro 
weighs but 160 pounds and is 
5' 11" in height. 

His father. Nolle R. Smith, sr.. 
is an expert in the Governmental 
Research Bureau of Honolulu. 


Playing both in the summer 
and winter seasons through var^ 
oos parts of California, the Pir- 
rone team has had an unbroken 
string of wins over some of the 
best semi-pro and pro outfits. 
These victories have been due 
largely to the stellar pitching of i 
Joe's crack hurler, Dave Odens, | 
who has a record of 17 strike- 
outs in each game and has won ! 
all of his last fifteen contests. He ! 
is backed up by a number of ap> 
pie swatters and fast fielders 
most of whom w*U be new to 
White Sox Park fans. Among 
them will be Carl Sawyer, the 
old favorite first baseman who 
will as usual entei;^in with 
comedy between the two games 
of the big doubleheader. 

NEW PLAYERS , 

IN UNE-VP ' 

The Giants are headed by Ace 
Jefferson, only superior to Satch- 
ell Paige in the Negro National 
League, the newest addition to 
the Giants are Kimbro, Walker, 
Wilson, Flennoy,\and 'Submarine' 
Moss, tricky pitcher of the Wash- 
ington Elites. In the rest of the 
powerhouse gang are Hughes, 
Snow, Suttles, West, Somers, 
Walker and Mackey. 
GIANTS BEAT SAN 
DIEGO PARLEYS 8-3 

By dint of a series of double 
plays that pulled them out of 
dangerous places, the Royal 
Giants took the first game of last 
Sunday's doubleheader 6-3. The 
night-cap, called in the fifth on 
account of darkness, went to the 
Farleys, 3-1. The last double play 
Walker to Hughes to Weitt hap- 
pened in the 8th inning with the 
bases loaded and possibilities of 
San Diego tieing the score. An- 
other double play came in the 
second in the same manner and 
still another in the fourth Walker 
to Huhes to Wesgt. Home runs 
were hit by Pete Cascarart, MosSj 
West and Hughes. 


FISK TRIUMPHS OVER 
TALLADEGA, 25-6 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. Nov. 17, 
(ANP)— The Fisk BuUdogs de- 
feated their long time rivals, the 
Talladega Tornadoes, today at the 
Fisk Homecoming Game. Playing 
before 2,000 fans, the Gold and 
Blue Gridders scored 25-6. 


of the home. team. 

Bill Slayton is the. name, and i' 
but a sopnomore, he turned out ' !■ ' 
to be one of the icrappieat prep \\^ 
ball players in t^ie ci^. \ '' 

An accurate passier and hard ' . 
blocker, Slayton's cohtributioa ,■- 
checked the sweep of the Rough- [ _ 
riders. In addition he fired the ., 
pass that connectW for the Bull- \ , 
dogs' only touchdown. Slsyten i« I, ' 
the only colored youth on the '. 
Garfield squad. • jV 

Active wn the other side of th» 
fence was right halfback, Leroy 
Carter of Roosevelt. ' 


(OlienfliQeonift] 



—gone to . . . 

OLMiM 

George says you can't beat the 
Honse of Morgan for low prices 
and »peedy delivery 1 

Let's Join George 

Real 

Champagne 

$1.50 Fifth Gal. 
2729 S. CENTRAL 


BIG NAMES OF BASEBALL ! 

AT OFFICIAL WINTER LEAGUE 

White Sox Park \]^^^^^'^ 

ROYAL GIANTS y^ 

(Negro Nat'l League) 

Pirrone All-Stors 

(Major and Minor Leagues) 
Big Double Header Starting 1 :30 F. M. 
Screen Stors — Celebrities— Entertainment 
Admission 40c— 85e Tel. : AD-U 833 

BASE BALL 

COLORED NATIONAL LEAGUE ALL STARS 

LOU DIALS, Mgr. CHESTER WILLIAMS, Captain 
^-j_VS . 

CORDORA — VERACRUZ — MEXICO 

MEXICO'S PB0FES8I0NAL 1938 LEAGUE ALL STARS 

WRIGLEY FIELD 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20th, 12:30 P. M. 

General 40^ Grand 55e BeeervedYC* 

Admiaaiott ^^ Stand Seats Children 



Dont pay oj»i^£xtra Penny 


FILLINGS 

CROWNS 

INLAYS 

BK«DGEWORK 

PLATEWORK 

X-RAY 



OompArison will prove that 
rlcfat now my price* ax* 
lower thAD at uty time dor- 
Ini; the past decade, asd I 

particularly call your at- 
tention to the Great Values 
I am offering on both per- 
■B a n • n t and removable 
bridge work. Regardless 
tit whatever branch of 
Dentistry you may desire, 
come to Dr. Cowen with 
the assurance of being able 
to S«ve with Safrtr. 


Sifk.CowtH, 

Says You CAN 

afford dtntal attentton 

RIGHT NOW 


Investigate my Liberal and Con- 
venient Ea^y Payment Plan and 
you win no longer feci you cannot 
afford IMMEDIATE dental at- 
tention. Among my patients are 
many of the commtinity's small- 
est wage-earners.- If you could 
talk with them they would teU 
yon that Dr. Cowen's consistent 
Low Prices and Liberal Credit 
enabled them to have IMMZTDI- 
ATE dental atteatlon wtthoat 
financial difficulty. Come in and 
talk over your dental problems 
wiih me without obligation. 

You will appreci- 
ate how EASY U 
is to arrange for 
CREDIT in my of- 
fice, because there 
is no finaacc com- 
pany to deal with. 



'atik.i 



Now thi ttmaus DuTeat Itbaratcrlri aulM 
U powlble lor 7«u to obt»in dec'.^ plat«t 
vlth s doicr ru^mbiuict Uka «vcr Mfon 
t« Nature's avn sums. 7ou muit tee tBc 
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i"' ?^'!'- CentraJ Avenue. Entered as Sec«ml Class Matter, VOL. 59 — NO. 32, 
XaremMr 17, IMS, at the Post Otioe at Los Aafeies. Calif- Badar i I 

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NOV. 17, 


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1938 : 


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;;^^ IWOHE ADAMS 95«2 

-Vivi^u^;.;.; ,-V.O«irt#ta A. Baas : . . i. ; ^ditor-PsMMNT 


tGMAM. Oiftetats. 


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THERE'S TROUBLE AT HOMEf 

,, Heocflines inform us that the good 
-.President/ Franklin-Delano Roosfc- 
A^lt, fs highly upset'over the treot- 
rnent occorded Jew?, In Germany. 
There Is jnuch diplomatic furore, re-- 
calling of ambassadors, orKi the like. 
Obviously, Mr. Roosevelt is horrified 
by the terrible edicts of Dictator Hit- 
ler in regard to oppressed Jewish 
minorities. 

Now, there are none who will dis- 
agree with the President jn that Ar- 
yan persecution of Jews is a first- 
rate exhibition of latter-day barbar- 
ism. World-wide recognitiQn.of the 
fact makes naive any heated repeti- 
tion of it. This scandalin human re- 
lationship is broadcast to the world 
at large. No one is prepared to DO 
anything about it, but all are willing 
to help the cause by a choice verbal 
blast. 

Of course, choice verbal blasts are 
all right as choice verbal blasts go. 
But, alsd, overrunnings at the mouth 
have caused most of our wars. Tf a 
secret ballot were- token, the people 
of the United States would defeat 
any proposal that this nation go to 
war with Germany in or^er to repri- 
mand her un-Christian attitude to 
minority groups. It naturally follows 
that a nation unwilling to go to war 
should not indulge in the war-like 
pastime of choice verbal blasts. De- 
nunciationsSmay be intended *^or the 
sake of justice — but ore liable to end 
up for the sake of munitions manu- 
facturers. 

A fire once. started in the cellar of 
a man's house, i t burned slowly and 
Steadily, eating out the home's foun- 
dation. The man was vaguely con- 
scious of the fire's presence, but for- 
sook it for a great warehouse confla- 
gration on the other side of town. 
When he returned from this great 
blaze, he found only burnt remains 
of his home. 

. Like this unfortunate, most people 
OK-e led aside easily when a "great 
conflagration" is taking place on the 
Other side of town- — or the world. 
Jewish oppression in Germany is not 
the world s greatest injustice, but its 
most publicized. It is fashionable 
and easy to denounce this thing. It 
gains a reputation of courage and 
liberalism without an immediate 
prospect of 'backing up the squawk'. 
Mr. -Roosevelt has joined the shocked 
brigade who "view with alarm" the 
great German disaster. But domes- 
tic cellar-fires are ignored, and these 
ore the most dangerous. May we re- 
mind the President that he is paid 
seventy-five thousand dollars per an- 
num to safeguard the moral, physi- 
cal,' and economic welfare of Ameri- 
ca, the UNITED STATES— which 
terminates definitely and decisively 
at the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. 

If Mr. Roosevelt finds it difficult 
to discover instances of domestic ir- 
regularities in the matter of "inter- 
racial justice and fair-ploy", we pre- 
sent cose in point. 

This week there is a young man in 
Los Angeles, about 20 years of age, 
who is very happy because he has 
learned to spell ''go" and "stop".. 
This young man is a fugitive from a 
Louisiana peonage form. Until a few 
months ago he lived like on animal 
on one of the countless backwoods 
"slaves ranches" of the great Ameri- 
can state of Louisiana. He tells of a 
huge human chicken coop in whjch 
all workers were caged at night. He 
Inas never seen his mother or father. 
, When the workers at this farm grow 
old cv feeble, he relates, they are 
elinrnnated — via the whipping post. 
If ony attempt to escape is mode, 
they ore followed by bloodhound 
packs. The story of the young man'? 
.flight would. make an excellent nav- 
el; Could there be anything more 
horrH>le in Germany? Think of it! 
Such a thing in A^ierica * Yet. it goes 
olcnost utiremorkecj. No (tews value 


,. . U X . .. ,. .r . —- — , >^ 0T.0IU1. W«Hn AT AU TIME, A)W, », ALL pTIbuk. minWTHm, A- .^C 

And ^r hope of you is steodfwt, knowing, that as ye ore partok era of the tuf fertfigs, so shall ye bf olso of the consolation." '•'*— ^■-"■— - -^ ^ 


'—CO RINTHIANS 1 :7. 


they will tell you. PersecLJtlOni In 
Germany— horrible ! Disgustiibg! Ac- 
tual slavery In America — ^irosgic, 
every day Stuff. Mr. Roosevelt, this 
is no pipe dream; Mr, Roosevelt, 
please come homef How moniy miore 
slave farms exist irt America? What 
untold numbers-of murders ore to be 
avenged? One half the outspoken 
condemnation — the courageous de- 
nunciation' of Germany might free 
thousands, perhaps millions, of Ahi- 
ericans, if it were directed toward do- 
mestic outrages. TALK about Ger- 
man oppression ! Why not ACTION 
against American MURDER? 


COMMUNITY CHEST 
COMMUNITY'S BEST 

Why give to the Community 
Chest? Isn't the government doing 
enough welfare work? Where are 
the billions for relief that the Presi- 
dent asks each year? 1 

Answer: The need for private giv- 
ing in Los Angeles has increased one 
hundred per cent in the last 1 years. 

The population has increased 
nearly fifty per cent but Communi- 
ty Chest giving has remained stable. 
Think what that 'means' Children 
neglected, medical care denied thou- 
sands, the last helping hand "snatch- 
ed away from countless families. 
There is no more worthy cause than 
the Community Chest because Com- 
munity Chest is everybody's cause. 
Hove you a favorite welfare agency? 
With few exceptions, it is Chest sup- 
ported. The Chest idea is a simple 
and sound one. Instead of eighty- 
eight agencies suspending ^j. active 
welfare work to make heated pleas 
for funds, the Chest takes core of the 
entire money-raising campaign, al- 
lowing the agencies to function as 
social service organizations alone 
and cutting administrative expense 
to the bone. These are the lost days 
of the Chest campaign. If there is 
not greater support, the organiza- 
tion will be forced to curtail rather 
than extend its services. No citi- 
zen should appreciate the serious- 
ness of this condition more than the 
Negro. 

So. give. Give, GIVE! 


A NEW NEWTON STREET? 

The campaign to broaden employ- 
ment opportunities for Negroes at 
.the Newton Street Police Station is 
gathering remarkable impetus. 

The absence of colored employes 
in administrative positions in .the 
central offices of the department 
has brought about d demand for 
FULL recognition at Newton Street. 
With no eye toward segregation, 
practical observers hove stated that 
Newton Street should become a 
training ground for Negro police 
workers in all capacities. The per- 
centage of colored employment at 
the station today is negligible. 

Phone girl, policewoman, stenog- 
rapher, special officer — these ore 
some of the positions.-which ore de- 
sired for Negroes — not merely on a 
racial basis, but because it is believ- 
ed there ore scores of Afro-Ameri- 
cans fully qualified. 

In the instances wherein Negro 
officers hove been given positions of 
responsibility at this station, they 
have proved themselves more than 
worthv. ArJ-ing Captain Komar C 
Gorrott IS one of the cftys oDiesr po- 
lice administrators. Negroes ris- 
ceive NO representation in the cen- 
tral police offices, why not FULL 
representation at Newton Street? !_ 


STILL FIGHTING FOR DEMOCRACY^ 


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Ai$L 



THE WORLD THIS WEEK 

By ROBERT PATTERSON 


MAKE WAY FOR THE KING 

Couriesy-polishing and "your higtmess" coaching seem due 
for a lenai.s.sance as democratic America prepares to entertain the 
King and Queen of England. The royal tour, officially scheduled 
for next June, is Item One on Prime Minister Chamberlain's pro- 
gram to re-inflate the British Empire's punctured pVestige. Per- 
haps the premier hopes to substitute toasting the British lion's 
king, for the current popular pastime of twisting the British lion's 
tail. With the Duke of Kent consigned to Australia, the Duke of 
Gloucester on tour, and the Duke of Windsor waiting the call of ^ 
''hurry home, all's forgiven", the King and Queen are merely do- 
ing their bit to lemind the world that, whatever may be said of 
the ailing British Empire, the sun still never sets on the Brit- 
ish royal family. 
WHAT'S IN A POCKET? 

There's a young fellow back in Seymour, Indiana, who has 
tlie makings of a real explorer. Barred from delving into the un- 
explored jungles of Africa, and came up with the first official 
report on the "Flora and Fauna of the Interior of Boys' Pockets." 
Hi.'; top discovery was a .specimen. Bill Leslie, who shelled out 
rwenty-five separate items. Rarity honors went to one. Bill Rumph 
who uneaithed an old .^hoe-sole in his right hip pocket. Most com- 
mon discoveries were marbles, knives, bugs, and string. Now all 
some valiant explorer has to do is make a scientific study of what 
a woman keeps in