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Dciitilriclgb, Sammy Davis Jr. to Aia ^IMbi 

'. ] . • fi' ' ■ - ' 11 III.- ■ L •;,•<■ 




BRANHAM WINS FIRST 



Theater Greats 
Eager tb Hdp 
lie's' Night 



-IVi 


By "CHAZZ" CRAWKJRD > 

Movie Queen Dorothy Dand- 
tidge has expressed the desire 
Ao be Femcee (Mistress of Cer- 
emonicsV on. newsman Abife 
Robinson's big night coming up 
iiext Thursday at the Lincoln 
^theater, and stellar showman 
Sammy Davis. Jr!. feels sure he 
can he on hand to stand the 
«rowd on its collective ^ar. 

And it's times like these that 
make a scribe such as I proud 
of his profession knowing that 
,,the greats and near greats are 
always ijeady arid williTig to do 
a fellow "trouper." such as the 
illustricAts Abie, a. good turn. 
■ The sbowbusiness notables 
trade in "greasepaint" and the 
newshawks trade in printers 
Ink, but that just naturally 
makes them next of kin, so to\ 
speak. . , 

• MomT Mor* 

Theire are many another not- 
able who has felt that "the 
show must go on" and who has 
made the commitment to help 
tAbie'^ Night as -a fitting and 
propei^ tribute. Among the Hol- 
lywood stars, there's both 
Tony Curtis and his luscious 
uife. Janet Leigh, who will at- 
tempt to arrange their busy 
aoheriules to make this "scoop"' 
show and there is mingly gray 
Jeff Chandler who has prom- 
ised to keep the' date open. , 

Froni the nitery field, there 
WilP appear Lawrence Stone, 
the little man with the "big"- 
Voice, the inimitable Sherman^ 
"Scat Man" Crothers: Valda,' 
the interpretive, dancer with 
the revolving hips; a new all- 
giri- quartet billed as tiie "Se-- 
, pia DoHs" (who wirfi*»e intro- 
duced on the showi; 

The. magnificent Machito.the 
Afro-Cuban bandsmari, and the 
entire Creole Mambo Revue 
(currently at cJub Oasist; Ben- 
ny Carter t^ie "amazing Man 
of Music," and as a last-min- 
ute surprise your , •^jddling 
friend-. Spade Coqley is ready 
for action for Abie. '. ^ 

• FromMha Stage ' ! 
■Representing the stage front 
will be James Edwards iand 
Camille Cannady, the stars, of 
the' current Ebony showcase 
play, "Detective Story.' along 
with their congenial host co- 
median, Nick Stewajt. 

And many many more. Duc- 
ats are now on sale at the Ea- 
gle office, 1050 E. 43rd place, 
ADams 4-0165. Tickets, are $1 
each, tax included. The stage 
show will be prerefled by a 
(Continued on Page 3) ■ 






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43rd Place. L.A. 


Vol. LyXIV-*No 


Let Angelei, Calr(brni« 


Ti. 1954 


Find 

From Railing 



Mississippi Votes 
To Close Schools 

JACKSON, Miss.— Voters in Mississippi Tuesday 
overwhelmingly voted to abolish publiQ education rath- 
er than comply with the Supreme Court. mandate or- 
i dering integration of Negro and white pupils in the 
State's schools. The amendment was approved by -an 
approximately two-to-one majority. 

The \oting ''followed a cam- 


S.fSTi-t- B.IBY—onnln unufd^havr n ftnrd Jlnir paffhio h\ 
lo,irly Lnurita Alcxandfr. sinner xiilh Snakr, If'liilf'f onhcs' 
trn. I'hol'i TCYi.v snnbped by hnilr ianirrnrnati. I! any .1 dams'. 


Syndicdte ^Brands 

Birth oi d Nation' 
Protest 'Premature' 

♦ NEW YORK— While "Variety," leading publication 
in the entertainment industry, editorially deplores the 
re-filming of th« hated "Birth of a Nation," the syndi- 
cate that is plEuining to produce the .S8,000,000 produc- 
tion has termed the NAACP's protest "premature." 

- ' "It 


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DoraClainis 
Sentinel Done 
Wrong By Her 

All Mrs. Dora Moore wants 
for being "fired" as general 
manager of the Lbs Angeles 
Sentinel is the small sum of 
$49.(X)0! 

Reciting her woes in a suit 
directed against Leon H.Wash- 
ington Jr. and his wife^ Ruth, 
the 'termer general manager j 
complains that she was fired 
three years before a seven-year i 
contract expired. The way she 
figures it. she is entitled to ' 
$34,000 for salary she didn't 
collect and another S15.0<V1, be- 
cause her former employers i 
said naughly thing.s about herj 
and hurt her reputation. 
; The complaint recites that : 

Mrs. Washington signed a ff'ii.Vpih Street Elementarv School, 
tract in 1930 giving Mrs. Moore t,,..,._j 
complete control of all Senti- 
nel "editorial and business" 
policies and giving her abso- 
lute right to "hire and fire." 
The contract, which was pre- 
par«d in Attorney Jerry Gies- 
.ler's office, gave Mrs. Moore 
sweeping control -^wer every 
detailof the Sentinel's opera- 
tions and the right to "fuH,^e- 
niuner^tion ! for seven years." 
lier salary was set at $125 per 
week and was later raised to 
^00. she said. , " 

Washington, represented by 
Attorney Loren Miller, pointed 
out that he did not sign the 
contract and said that he will 
"contest the action with the ut- 
most vigor." 


Can of Beer 
Turns Man 
Info Tornado 

Robert E. Lee, 31, of 3030 'j 
9th a\enuc. who claims he 
"just had one can of beer," had 
both' himself i^nd University 
Trafic Divisioft'-T-eeling in the 
weo, small hours of Monday 
morning. 

Officers were answering an 
ambulance call when word 
came over the radio that a 
•drunk driver was weaving and 
speeding north on 8th avenue. 
While ^hey were searching U) 
for the ambulance, and (2) for 
the drunk, there came a third 
call that seemed to tie things 
up neatly. • 

The ambulance the officers 
had been looking for had lo- 
cated a drunk at Sutro and ,39th 
streets. There the officers 
found Earl Long and Lyn Ray 
of the Georgia Street Receiving 
Hospital Unit holdfng Lee. 

Lee had driven his car across 
,39th .«l.rpet le^aring into a W)' 
me'al fpncp surrounding tiie 


seems fairly e\ident. 
Variety asserts.' "that no pic- 
ture can possibly dare, at this 
late date, to glorify the thor- 
oughly di.«creditPd Kit Kliix , 
Klan which wa.> — let it not be ' 
forgotten — also against Jews 
and Catholics. Too \%ide a ses- 
ment of the population would \ 
be offended. Sheer economic i . . ., 

self-interest dictates that the White. coi 
new shooting script must bear "" planned program 


paign IhSt 'reached a neAv low 
— even fo^ Mississippi — in h\- 
pocrisy and double-talk, larded 
with race hate and sodden with 
contempt for the 4.'i percent of 
the State's population who are 
-Negroes, , ; i 

Governor Out Front 

The governor, of 'the' State. 
Hugh White, led the park.. In 
a statewide plea for, support of 
the constitmional amendment 
empowering the legislature to 
turn public schools into private 
schools. Gov, White declared: 
"Passage of the amendment is 
necessary, not aS a vehicle for 
abolishing public schools, but 
to provide a constitutional ba- 
sis for the State to continue 
education .should ^n all power- 
ful P'ederal autocracy cram in- 
tegral ion ^own our throats;" 

The_ governor declared fur-' 
ther that the "amendment is 
violently opposed' by the Na- 
tional .Association for the Ad- 
vancement , of Colored People 
and other radical Negro organ- 
ization.*." 

Then he asked: "Who.se lead- 
ership will we follow? Will we 
follow the leadership of our 
chosen officials' who have 
shown a belief *in "our funda- 
meiTTal philosophies of govern- 
ment, or will we throw our sup- 
port lo thoke Irving to destroy 
our way of life?" 

\bI«-Talk 
inued: 


j little or no resemblance to, 
: Griffith's. Nor can it be over- , 
I looked that America's l.'i.OOO.OCK) i 
I Negroes today are a respected j 
and courted fivehillion dollar | 
market. And big filmgoers. On , 
i top of all the economic factors. ] 
i there is. of course, the factor I 
; of morally and social respon- 
jsibility." 

N«w Script 
I In Hollywood, Phil L, Ryan, 
I a member of the syndicate 
[which purchased rights to the 
1 story, indicated that an entire 
new script would he written 
arid declared that the NAACP 
I protest was "premature" inas- 
much as the .Mofv had not yet 


\ate sihool 
there is no 


.system, 
dea in 


mind that public schools will 
be abolished. The propt ed 
amendment is a safety valve 
for future use in case the need 
arises." 


The expressed purpose ,of then 
amendment, however, is to em-'f 
power the Legislature to abol- , 
ish the public school .system asj 
a means of assuring continued ] 
segregation. The legislalors/>rf { 
given authority to dose down : 
state- wide public schools by a ! 
two-thirds majority in each j 
house. Local districts are em- ! 
powered to sell public school ' 
property ,and set up private 
schools by a simple majority in 
the two houses. 

Opposition Voiced 
• Tuesday's voting in no way 
represents the voice of Miss, 
sippi's Negroes. Altftough 
nearly half of the peopl/ in the 
State are colored <43 percent* 
only Tt percent of the voters are 
Negroes. \ • 

The T)pposition that was reg- 
istered, therefore, came almost 
entirely from whites. The Tu- 
pelo "Daily Journal" was one 
of the State's papers which 
carnpaigned against the amend- 
ment. In an editorial Dec. IT, 
the paper stated that the back- 
ers of the amendment, "having 
discovered th^ unpopularity of 
their private school plan . '. . 
have now done -a complete 
about-face and are now going 
about the State telling people 
that their real purpose in au- 
thorizing the abolition of pub- 
lic schools is to preserve pub- 
lic schools." 

It says further: "We have 
There is^porsonally never been confused 
for a pri- over how we will vote on Dec. 
"21. We will vole against the 
amendment. And we have not 
the slightest doubt in our own 
mind that at this tirtie in 
changing history, this is the 
best course that can be taken 
for the children of Mississippi." 



10- 

Outside l.A. . . 1 2c 

Phone 
Want Adg t 

AD.44)Ul 



Porch 


Body Swings 
From Rope 
Around Neck 


The grotesque sigh1 of a 
swinging body, hahgiiig by 


l.the neck, greeted an 


early 


JriLIJE '-.Vv 

added the title 4. 
unhU Mnlrl .ftyellk 
U. S. for j4 


luisthfiil IniirUs ikii 

I 


MAYS 

XI '.H leil- 
ti the 

mt . of 

e^k. 



"beeause 
anyone's 


MAN'S MILLION DOLLAR 
DREAM COMES TRUE ' 

Dr. Laurence C. Jones, of giney Woods, Miss.. Ls a 
man who dreartjs dreams — and who makes his dreams 
come true. 

Just recently he had a miUion-ddllar dream — jfind 
in the course of the past week he has already seerf al- 
most half of that dream come 


and attached to the top r&iling 

of the porch" at 1617 P^loma 

street, a vacant hou.se 6w led by 

the New Hope Baptist cli urch. 
Officer J. R. Hobson lound 

the body of Carl T. Johnson. 55. 

1427 Griffith avenue, swinging, 

in the breeze. The poHci" arrr*^" ^^^ . ' 

■buiance unit was rushed to^lie i aHegatio; 
'scene, but Johnson was dead 
, when they arrived. 

No Foul Play 
According to police th^ilewas 

no apparent e\:idence oi! foul 

play and -"there were no visible 

injuries or marks on the fiody. 
The dead man had 33 cents 

and a wallet in his pocket. His 

papers and gold watch were 

still intact. The police records 

stated: "Death bv own himds." !■ 
Mrs. Vera Lee" Hall, of 142' 

Griffith, a friend of the dead 

man. told police that Jchnson 

had -warned her two weeks ago 

that he was in dange! and 

feared for his life, but gave no 


indication as to who- might 
want to harm him. Mrs Hall 
also .stjited that Johnso:i. the 
day before the tragedy , had 
j;i\en her the key to his roorh, 
told hrr whore his per.son U pa 
pers were kept, and confifled to 
her that if he wasn't home any 
night by .the time she came 
back from work at-12:3f a.nT.. 
'•-he would know somethii g had 
happened to him. 

She claimed that latfjr- she 
heard him stop at the of ice of 
the apartment manager. \ ernon 
Webb, and' engaged him in a 
laughing conversation. This 
was about 3 p.m. last Saturday 
Later that evening. jWebb 
said. Johnson telephoned his 
wife and asked to talk io Mr. 
(Continued on Page 3) 


Judgf Agrees 
That peductii 
Charie Is Faufl 


Rev.Jfhn L. Branhi 
em.battlel but f i g h t i 
minister |of St. Paul Bi 
tist chuith, \ion .the ti 

st ,tnis week ] in 
ises to be a Ditr 
ested, setisatiol 
a-filled legal 

Superior! Judge Philbrick Mc- 
Coy agnef i oni Monday vrith 
the pastoi s attorney. Paulj It. 
, Hutchin.soi i, that the lirat ot|th« 
sed.ucti, )n and abductiiQii 
jcfiarge.s ,b ought against liini.' 
jwas.,faiilt5. He granted : Atty.^ 
•George A.] Cannady, '.repteseht- 
I ingMack"! Shepherd, two jw^eieks 
to file a-n intended compiaiat. 
' - fiilanira: i Hailad to Ccjuir^ ' !. 
At the s ime time. Rev; |3ntn<' -| 


COUl't V 

what pr( 

terly coi 

and dra: 

41e.- 


A 


IN 


ham, wh( just didn't jsiiiow, 
when he \ as scheduled tjo ag*.. 
pear it .^ty. Cannady^ -j^^c 
last Th'urilay for a deposition, , 
has now »eeh served with .* . 
subpoena Ito appear on iMon«'^-. 
day, Dec.CT, before Judgje j Ar- 
nold Pfaefer. At- that tiipe h« 
will be reluired to show icaiise 
whv he .^ould not" makp the 
morning church-goer ISun-*! deppsUTonl that Cannadjf jhas 

day. , j 'requestea.l • 1 ,1 -" 

The terrified woman, who did j -T"he sjihfeoena. was issued by _^ 

not identify' her.self. mahaged *he clerk |f the Superior Cotirt^ 

to get to a phone and notify Tollowing|next Monday's ^Iwari . 

police. Then she disapr pared, i ''"? it is txpected that }udse ~ 
The bodv was hangi-nf i f rom ' Pr^^'er will set a d^te fo^-Rev. 

a rope, tied around the j neck ^ranhamfo appear for jques- 

Failure to ct^mpiy 


tioning. 

wo^d'mike hirft liable j to « 
charge of I contempt of ccjutt. . 
StatiAc of Limitcrtieu 
Judge McCoy, after listenihs 
to HutchJnson's demuirrir, ' 
agreed th|t there was douMai 
issateility of certain 
iri the first count in. 
the S20{a|IO damage sttijt . - 
charging me pastor wth«ed»lc* - 
ing younaand attractive Rosa-,^ 
retha Shepherd. The chars* 
claims thit the illicit relitionS 
with the lirl who was thMi Ijis 
secretary flate back to July -l," ■ 
Miss iShepherd fi^t 
ing at the church at 
17. 

s attorney claimed 

charge - should -tie 

t under the sUtute , 

of Ijmitadons; which provides 

that suit \fi such cases must be 

thin a year from the - 

alleged act. 
idn't[Shew 

has I claimed, how- 
he love relations be- , 
daughter and th*' 
ntinued over a- pe- 
r years, through July 
ent year. 
Judge JlcCoy upheld the sep*^ 
(Cont nued on Page 2) 


; 1950, whel 
[ began wo| 
1 the age 
I Branha-^ 
|.that thi^ 
I thrown of 


brought 
date of tl- 


Shephe; 
ever, that 
tween hi 
Ininis'ter 
riod of fo 
of the cu 


for the new 


He -had run through signals at 
Vernon and .Normandie and 
Vernon and Western and had 
boWled through boulevard 
stops at Arlington, Sutro and 
39th street.' There. he ran into a 
dead-end and crashed to an 
abrupt, stop. 

When arrested Lee stated: "I 
left home a few minutes ago 
and was going to a gas station 
to get the battery charged on 
my Plymouth. I don't know 
where I- am right now. In a 
police car I guess. I've only had 
one can of beer tonight. I think 
someone put something in it. I 
get real drunk anyone can. I 
did not know the ambulance 
(Continued on Page 3i 


hern rewritten 
production. 

At NAACP headquarters in 
.New York the opinion was ex- 
pressed that nothing would re- 
main of the film except its title 
if the anti-Negro theme and 
the glorification of the KKK 
were deleted. In a telegram to 
Wilkirus. Ted Thai, head of the I 
.syndicate. _ propo.sed a confer- 
ence between Ryai^ and an 
NAACP representative. 

Consternatiett 

In a lengthy story in its Dec. 
8 edition. Variety reviews the 
NAACP's long fight against the 
film and quotes Roy Wilkins' 
wire protesting the proposal to 
remake the picture, which in 
the original production "slan- 
dered the entire Negro Ameri- 
can population through its 
naked incitement to racial 
hatred and violence." 


• true, with the money .'till pout- 

ling in. hags full of it every 

' day. hags full of letters c-on- 

laining dollar hills, or five-dol- 

; lar bills, and even tens. 

'Thli to^ Your LUe" 

j Hr. Jones is the principal and 

i founder of a little .school in the 

I deepest, darkest .section of the 

I deep, dark south. At least it 

started out as a little .school 

almost half a centurj' ago. , 

Last Wednesday he appeared 
over the NBC-TV network on 
the Ralph Edwards "This Is. 
Your . Life" show, beamed 
throughout the'J country. Ed- 
wards made an appeal for a 
million people to place a dolr 
lar bifl in an envelope and mail 
it in— to establish a trust fund 
for the Piney Woods school .so 
that it can continue to func- 
tion even when Dr. Jones even- 
tually relinquishes his post. 

Six bags of mail were de^ios- 
ited the first day. averaging 


S3300 per bag. On the second 
day. the Ralph Edwards' dff ice 
received 21 bags, BySaluday. 
fiO bags had- arrived. And still 
the envelopes kept rollin; in; 
Bank Helps , 

Alt Negro radio stations Tn 
Jack.son. Mi.ss.. promise* to 
plug for contributions e\^ y l.'» 
minutes, and to report th? re- 
sults to Ralph Edwards. The 
president of the Deposit CrUar- 
antee and Trust Co. in Ja<|kson 
said that their bank wjould 
take over handlins the jmail 
going dtrecUy to ^ney V oods 
because the post office th« re is 
too small to handle the 
stepped-up volume of bust less. 
The trust . company's bo ided 
employees \vill coun the 
money and deposiH^t as it iours 
in. • ". " I 

Meanwhile, it was learned 
that a large contribution is be- 
ing sent to the Piney \N|oods 
iContinued on Page 31 


Ai^KiD roR. A ^llUJ()^' 

— Dr. I.iiiireiur J). Jones, 
hfird - hitting fifi»eif<nf tind* 
founder of Pi'iev II oods, 
Mi.*si,_fihofiI, asliedl for a mil- 
lion \dolltirs to \ I 'in tin tie his 
life's u or k in n Vl^hi^ is your 
Life" fronrnm pee. 1'' — find 
lit ptess time titlf nhendy «.>•• 
iured of close to.hnlf liif oofil. 
i |. I [C,Mfl>wj Photo) ' 


Two Arrested 
Charged Wit 
Raping Woni 

Mrs. Mary Alice Baptisjte, 19, 
of 1637 E. 115th street, com- 
plained* to 77tn St, polio! that 


her \vay 
morning 


F9atur9d 
In fhm Eogle 

Special ^features this week 
Inside the Eagle Include: 

Chazz Crawford 9 

Editorial L..-. 4 

SpoJts 6 

Church Activities 5 

Social „> . i-j~- ■■■.. 7 

People and Places - 9 

Dorothea Eosterlp........ 8 

Bill Smallwood ;■ ..; — -— "i 

What's Cookihgi ....].._ 8 

Bridge Pointers J...... 8 

Bowling Nekvs .j... — ; 12 

Morris Saysj 1 : 6 


she was on 

last Sunday 

l.,30 a.m. when she deci(|ed lo 

visit a friend, Mrs. Al.ice lAdair, 

1471 E. I1.5th street 

Mrs. Baptisip -iaiH—s^e en 
tered her friend's house and 
a.sked Cleophus Adair' if his 
wife was home. Mrs. Adair was 

1 out. As Mr.s. Baptiste stailted to j beautiful 

j leave 
Adair 


home 
about 


Gun SoMcf 
Ed !idnders| ^ 
at nuriol 

Ha\es tdward Sanders wa» 
laid to rfst Monday as moic 
than 300 [ triends and relatives 
from all ^falks of life paid their 
last respi cts to "Big Ed" at 
funeral si rvices held at Grant • 
Chapel Methodist Episcopal 
Church, 1 5th and Central Ave- . 
nue. •• . 

Edward son of Mr. and .Mrs. 
Hayes Sa iders, died in Boston 
from ihlu ies received in a ^x- . 
ing mate i,. j ; 

Sanders was given a milijtary 
burial as le was serving irithe ■ 
United St tes Navy at the time i; 
of his un imely death. A short 
eulogy b> retired naval bracer. 
Chief Jon p. a volley of shots 
by the hi nor guard, the pres- 
entation 3f the flag, to his . 
widow, ^t s. Mary Sanders, and 
Big Ed ras laid to rest in ; 
peace. . ; '. 

The p^ncipal eulogy ;W«S 
delivered by Rev. H. 


a friend visiting the ^ w. Murjfi. pastor of Gratat 

home. Johnny Brfidford jchapel. slpervisor Kenneth 

Williams, 1573 W. 49th'>treet, | jj^hn, Mfnager Nuno Cam «£ 

Boston, a&d Art Saxell, . a foT' 


tried to detain her. 

According to Mrs. Ba|ptiste, 
Williams grabbed her l arm, 
pulled her into the bedroom, 
threw her across the? bed and 
attacked ' her. Wheiji she 
screamed, Williams choke}d her, 
she clairned. 

Ad?iir, in the adjo.iningjroom, 
refused to cotjie to her aid when 
she cried for help. Both 'Adair 
and Williams were bookjed on 
a charge of rag^. 


mer coaci, also eulogiTedj the 
dead athllte. Bid Ed, as Ihc'^i^ ' 
affectionstly known to .nwni* 
hers of blxing circles, was'i|»t 
only theifirst member . oil Ms 
race, Ijut f/as also the first paan 
in the United SUtes ever.tcf 'vM|f 
the Olymf ic Heavyweight Boe- 
ing' Chaiimionship. 

Intermwit followed at, Wood- 
lawn Cfmete^ry in^ 
Monica. 




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2-Th« CalifQrnia Edslt 
Thwrs., Dec 23, 19S4 

"t '■ ■ • «r, 

l¥oman Sues' 
for Injuries; 
bi Bus Crash 

^^Tbm Los Angeles Transit 
lines was defendant tijris week 
£ a. new S25.000 lawsuit 
Wougiit by Mrs. Verbcp Holmes 
•S 2652 La Salle street, result- 
ing from her injury on one of 
it5 Ijuses. recently. . j 

In her complaint filed by At-' 
tnrney Vince Monroe Townsend.? 
Jr., Mrs. Holmes alleged that 
!ihe was a pas.«enger on one of| 
lt.<; buses on Dec. I when it 
collided with an automobile at 
Washington and Hill. She al 
leges injnrifs to her head. neck., 
bark., right side, shoulder and 
both* hand.*:.., ' 

• . ( i 

CALIfORNIA: 


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Dr Xpng 



Take 


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aR.IDVATt.S—Tnnis T.J.'rtt i> sh.nu ,iho 

Mr>. .1 rin >'. I'lirrifr liith lirr liiplonu; I'r'iin thi Itrfl i/rniluiil 
nil) cias.f nf'thf Trar.ts T. Loft Sdior,! >,/ Real F.statf. Ir'un 
Irft. 'I'horiias Brou;n : Larry' H ilsoii. hiif of the 'tinurs and 
husinrss hiitnaucr nf ihr Stipirinr /-..iiroi; -(^'iriiptirn : Lntt. 


o! : Ally. (Inlvin Pnrtcr, fih'iit ' 
ilfir: anil liirnrr. II ilsbn, tihn ti'nt firin,i/>n{ sPrakcr, is 
ally itti lewi't from his.^foft at iffr L .i>.' h.mbassy in Sri, 
I)r/hi,JndiJi. nherehc is eHlturnl affairs ojfufr. 


r 


10S0 E. 43rd PI. 

Los Ans«lcs 11, Calif. 

AOams 4-0161 




LOREN MILtE^ r 
Editor and Publisher ' 


Vol. uaiv 

Thvraday 


Dm. 


No. 40 
23, 1954 


. .1 


PHIUADELPHI.V — Thurgood 
Mar.sh.ilt, director-cntinscl nf 
the ■N.t.-XCT Legal Defense and 
Educatlontil Fund, will receive 
the Phlilairielphia Cotillion So- 
xiery's ;rf>p 'award, the Emerald 
Cross (>f Malta, on Dec. 30 at 
the 6tMi Christmas Cotillion to 
be heltl at .Convention Hall. 

■ Marjfliall. who i.s al.so .special 
counsel' for the N.\.\CP,,is being 
honorfji^ for; having "devoted 
his life tg uneeasing activity in 
the camse of Human Rights." 

3MAMtL« Cl^i I . Hig/illght of the annual 
.WODIIIS *>^' {Christmas cotillion is the spec- 
'A|.|-- ' B Macie-rfanta.sy "The Blue Venus" 
"n*y !■■ jlin which more than a thousand 
jQj'wctors and dangers will partici- 
... . .. ' „, • ,„.^„ ipate. Presented in honor of the 

*d(uilieatioB Decre* Number 123228 f , . .■_,■,. 

Dau Of Adjudication July 1, 1921. lauard winner, the lavish pro- 

Pubi.stied tv^ry Thurgday 6/ The ' ci"<U"ri "has been called "the 
California Emila Publiihina Co., world's largest ballet." 

-J^O,. fcaat 43r«J Place. Entered aw : 

Sefrsiidc Clasa Matter November 3,- 
1937. sft the Post office at Los Anw 
tgelaa. California, under, the Act of' 
March 3. 1879. 

REPRESKNTEO NATIONALUY BY 

ASSOCIATED- PUBLISHERS. •MC. 

6513 Hollywood Blvd. 

Rum BIdg.. San Franc>sco. Cakf.- 

■ 1'/. ri Y. 


F P. WAl\LER. JR Adv. Mgr. 

GRACE E. \SlMONS. Executive Elditor 

EDWARD ".ABIE" ROBIMSON 

■ ,i.. .. , _ ...CircutaVOh Mgf. 

^CALME RUS«_ .Office Mgr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. G. ALLEN , _ ...1512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, ifalif.. Ph.: EX. 5-1591 


Autumn Subscriptions 

Montiis^ 
Only JL 

PER COPY .; ".... 


Marshall Given \ Cbu n ter- Boycott [Theater Party 

To Combat South's Set for Watts 
Economic Thugciery Youngsters 

YORI^- 
.srd inpf 


Honor Award 


I 


N'EW YORI^ — The pconomic boyrott that has 
bepn unlea.srd infirfissis.sippi in a pressure d;ive.against 
infeciation of.public- .schools will l)p an.s\vcr,ed by a 
countei'-bpycott by ^Ii.ssi.s.slpi)i■.s NcKroes a.s soon as 
the mechanics of the opeiation can be SPt*in motion. 

Mi.«sippi's financial iristiiu- 
tions. condurting activities that 
have been branded' ?s '■eco- 
nomic' thiigKery,^' 'are engaged 
in .a svstematic drive -to fore- 


t1 W*st 46th street. N. Y. 


Memjhers of the Tilth Street 
School si.xlh grade 
Ellen Foster are 
make a lour of 
and MiPrchants Bank of Watts 
on Wedne.sdav. Januarv 3. 


close mortgages, deny credit 

and refuse employment to all 

per.sons who challenge existing 
race restrictions in the .state. 

> Hard Hit 

Small businessmen, farmers, 
home owners and \\orkers are 


spoken out against the ef- 
forts of the dlehards to iorce 
a_ continuation of .separate 
school.s. de.siiiie the Supreme 
Court <lecisioTi of !a.«;t ^lay IT. 

Dr. T. R. M. Howard of Mound 
Ba.M.u. pre.sident of the Re- 
;;iiinal I'ouniil of .Negro Lead- 
ership, appealed to the N.\AC'P 
111 assist in countering the eco- 
!;omii- pressure being e.xerted 
against thern. 

To Provide Help 


class of Mr.s. being hit by the .shutiin- off ,.-,,i|,\ ,„^ , meeting of ih 
srhediilert to of ihe regular channels "f .. ^^,■nID , ^ » i^- 
the Farmers credit. Panicularlv singlcrl .,„t. -^A^c pl B..arrl. ..f Directors. 


for retaliation ha\e been lead- 
ers of the N.\.\C'P who have 


«-. a 



1 



I 
f 
I 

I 


I 


SEASON'S 

Meetings 

■■• I ~^:'' !■ !■- ■""•■■ ^^' ^ 

UNITED AUTOMOBILE, AIRCRAFT AND 
IMPLEMENT WORKERS OF AMERICA, 

UAW-CIO 

- .. ...f ■■•' *-" '■■■■-'■■ ■•■ 
C. V: CHALLORAN, Regional Director 

Noali N. Tauscher, Asst. Regl Director 


g: 


I 


The doors nf the Larfco The- 
atre, 1R2T E. lO-'Jrd street, will 
be thrown open fiee of charge 
to the children of Watts and 
Willowbrook. '' noon tomoriow. 
Frida.\. be<ember 24 as the 
guejts of George McLain.-spon- 
.sor of the ihi.rd annual kiddie 
theatre Chri.stmas party in this 
>rea. ^ , 

It is pxpcted that .some 1.'50 
children will be on hand for a 
great film and .<tage show, and 
Christmas prizes. 

Each child attending >iill re- 
ceive. a bag of raiiHy. 

This year. .McLaiii announced 
a li\e Sania Claus will be on 
hand to officiate as the Master 
of Ceremonies awarding the 
giant grand prizes • among 
which is a 19.5.5 streamlined hi- 
c>cle'. the cro\vning of the 
King and Queen of the festival, 
aiid the drawing of the maii\ 
prizes that will be awarded to 
the holders of the lucky num- 
ber, tickets. ■ 

MiLain. pension leader of the 
California Institute of Social 
Welfare at 10,"JI S. Grand ave- 
nue, ih ciimmcnting on the an- 
nual affair sai«t, "the kiddie 
p'artj "in this area has become 
a tradition with us. We [pel 
that the oiitstreictvwl handof 
friendship, to tl^ose pore bul- 
feied by life itwtrt. oihrrs." is a 
oilier agencies and mu.si in our \\a\- of "life if \\e«re 
in devising a finan- even to attempt to practice. the 
Golrlen Rule of 'Do unto Others 
as Vou Would Have Them Do 
unto You." " 


Leaving Los Angeles early last Wednesday morning. Dr. N. 
Curtiss King., noted California surgeon, canter speciali.st and 
founder of Rose - Net ta Hospital, arrived in New YJork this week 
for- brief conferences with medical authorities before enplaning 
lor Belgium to begiii an African medical .safari, 

iHis research cx^dition is be- ^ 
lieved to be one | of the most 
extensive tours iti the interest 
of medicine atteinjHcd tn* an 
individual ' Arneri<:ai|i Negro 
ph.vsician. 

A director on the board of 
the American Cancer Society, 
I>r. 'King met with that group 
in New York and also with Dr. 
Townsend of the fvational Med- 
ical Association. j 

F'mperor Haile Selassie -will 
welcome t he dor^t or to Addis 
Ababa where he will be the 
guest of Dr. Charles Diggs, 
Minister of Health in Ethiopia 
and a former Calitomian, on 
a tour of hospjitats and research' 
centers. "j' J 'j " ' 

, The East AJfri can Association 
of Surgeons, in Nairobi; capital 
of. Kenya, have scheduled a,^ 

visit for Dr. King to-King Ed-T ■ , , - i # 

ward Vll HGspit4l land Ortho- ,K'ng '^^■'» inspect hospitals for 
paedic Clinic. i \ j natives and Eurojjeans in -=*—- 

In Tanganyika, he will ob- and join in field research 
.serve the hospital work of the into the jungle of ' Eliz4'>*^h 
Catholic White Fathers and \ii\f 
native medics iindet direction [ . ' 
of fiishop Seidlej a recent ! As the guest of President 

visitor to Los Angole«. . , Tubman. Monrovia, Liberia, the 

Hichlifehting the trip wilt, be idbcTor winds up his three-rhonth 
Dr. King's attendance a,t the p^-ppfjjfjon over the Conl|inent 
annual Meetjng of Physicians o^, Africa. From there h(i. will 
and Surgeons in Ka.mpaia. rpttirn to Belgium ijbr a 
where he is expected to read seminar at the Institute ol tro- 
an important paper on Cancer pical Medicine and begin | a 80- 
Treatment in America. jday pleasure tour of Spain, 

' Through tiie Belgian Congo. 'England, France, Getmany, 
Zululand. and .Swaziland. Dr. Jlrelatid. Italy and Switzerland. 



DR. CIMTISS KING 


cities 
units 


First 

(Conti 
end "^ou 
that deali 
q£ Miss S] 
Atty. a 
3, 1955, 
document] 
■ Last r 
photogra 

when Rei 
uled to 
office to 
fore Noo 
which Shi 
are necesj 
proceed 
hour bef< 
however, 
nounced 
advice of- 
not be pi 


Winil 
ourt Tttsi' 

ed from Page 1) 

It in the complaliiifc4 

g with the abductilini' 

epherd. ( , | r- • 

nady has until Jaii. 

file an amendlled 


iday , newsmen j 
ers were on hiji 
Branhaiti wasschi^--^ 
ppear at Cannady^ 
nswer questions lie- 
and Pratt, notSiri^s»> 

ipherifs Attorneys feel: 
ry to enable them! to* 
th the case. A halt 

e Brj^nham was diie^ 
annady's office ajn-' 
at the minister; "wn 

his attorneys'* 
sent. ' 


tCliRISTMAS 
.» GkEEtlNGS 


^1 



Clarence 
Woods 


12031 ^. J«f(crten Bikd. j 


RE. 2-6177 


I 


I 


committee was appointed to de- 
velop -H plan lit action for as- 
sistinj: the victinfs of feprisal.s 
by white bankers, businessmen, 
retail meiT-hants. school boards 
and Others, wlio warn to de- 
capitate the movement .against 
.seigregatiori. ' - j-:. >t " : 

Ri>y Wilkins. N.\A('P admln- 
isiraior. has assure<| Dr. llow- 
ani that, while charter limita- 
tions p)revetil iliR;-t«.<.s(X"iation 
from niaking dir^f'l loans or 
otherwise- entering into the 
ba'nkins hiLsiness. the .\.\.\t'P is 
exploring the possibility of join- 
ing' with 
iiulivulua 

cial formula through- legular 
banking I'hannels' w;hich will 
j)rovlde the urgently 'needed re- 
lief. ... 

The artion of the whites has 
been branded "ef-onomic thug- 
gery'' hv- the influential Mont- 
ginnerv . .\U.. "Advert i.ser." 



ROSE NE*TTA HO SPIT 

' Exfcnd to All Their I^afients,j 

■ , ' Patrons and Friends ./ 

a f'ery Merry C/jr^stpifJS 

and Happy XcK 


AND 


3s\ CIRTISS KING, M.D. 
.Mfdical Dirfctor 


Yem' ! 

■m'2 South Hoc* er Ave. 
■ AD. 4-8110 



PATRONIZE THESE 
ADVERTISERS 


*- ■ 


MERRY 



rlstmas 


n y I h e t r u e % 

ntenning f)f Christ- ft 

mas lift your heart ^ 

U'l/A courage, and iff- 

bring you and yours 2- 

reheued spiritual -9 

\strenqth for the %_ 


STAffI 


h I .:3 


ISHES 


IV.- 1 


Otir liishes for yotiv happiness duriiigtl is 

Hoitday* Scnson i . .are as msttng and 

true as the tviinkUng stars above 

';i---r.'i- ■^- I -■ / ■ 

']■■%'■ --'" jroin ■" ; - . ■ . 

MORRISpN, STAFF 

^nd Members of tl^e Union 

UNITED PACKING HOUSE 
WORKERS OF AMERICA,G.liO: 


new year. 


I 

I 



I Dr. & Mrs. GRADY ORANGE | 
I 8671/2 JEast Vernon i I 


!* 


«APPY 
NEW YEAR 


from the 


• ;\- 


% 


I 


9 ■ T , 

Greater Los Angeles CIO Council 

•-. Robert R. Clark, President 

■-":';. ... - ■ I' 

X |L J. Franklin, Vice President 
. -f Albert T. (Blackle) Lunceford, Sec.-Treas. T 





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MILLION DOLLAR MAS— Dr. Laurence C. Jones, t; A« 
last Wednesday ni^ht over SBC's "This Is Your Life" nsketi 
mmiliion people to send him a dollar each for his Pmey .11 oods. 
Miss., school, is shown eihove surrounded by Los Anqelrs 
friends tind former qrnduates. Seated from left, Mrs. Helen 
Kirku'ood f alley : Prof. Jones holdtnt/ Mrs. I alley's daugh- 
ter; Mrs.: Lsther B. Belion. hostess : Dr. H . O. Smith, former 


president of the li'illou-hrook School District Board of Trus- 
tees. Standing. T. A. Kirkwood. Ilouard Hall. Robert E. 
Bel ton, host; T. J. Pruitl. Mrs. If'illiam H. Atkinson. Dr. 
Atkinson, D. A. fiirkti-ood, T. A.'s tutn. Belton uas formerly 
financial agent for the sthool. and ti friend »f rts- founder for 
the past J5 yrars.yAdams PhotoJ -. . L^ [. \ '[ • 


Mississippi Teacher's Million Dollar 
Dream Comes True, Due to TV Show 


(Contined fromPage li 
College by the Hollywood Press 
Photographers Ass'n. 

Stop Him en Street 

Dr. Jones, who is still in Hol- 
lywood at the Knickerbocker 
Hotel, reports that people rec- 
ognize him as he walks along 
the street, atop him, and press 
money into his hand for the 
school. Even hard-bitten pro- 
duction personnel and Ralph 
Edwards stal^ members 
reached in their pockets. 

The. story that has touched 
the- hearts of so many televi- 
sion viewers is the story of a 
lifetime of devotion to an ideal. 
Dr. Jones., not long after the 
turn of the century, became^b- 
sessed with the depressing fact 


that , Negro children in the | 
Piney Woods area — as in so i 
many other sections- of the 
South — had no opportunity to 
obtain even the simple rudi- 
ments of an education. 
A Sack of Potatoes 

After gisaduating from the 
University of Iowa. Dr. Jones 
set up shop in Piney Woods, 
using a pine tree log for a 
desk, and gathering around him 
two or three unlettered young- 
sters who wanted to learn. 

Some of his former students j 
who appeared on the show told 
how Dr. -Jones would arrange: 
for them to go lo his college. ; 
despite their laik of funds, j 
They would come to s<-hool with 
a sack of potatoes or a few} 


• ; 



WHAT'S 
DOING 


e 

• 

• — ' '. - I • 

■•.■"■■..■ e 

%:• ••••••••••••eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

: Outdoor telephone booths get new look 

Hone's t^e land of tele- 
phone booth you'll see 
lis using in many out- 
door installations from 
now oil. And we think 
you'll like it a Jot. In- 
. stead of wood, it has 
« silvery-white alumi- 
num frame? with -big 
(lass panels that will 
five you better light- 
ing. You'll also find it 
roomier and better 
ventilated than the 
wooden models: These 
handsome new booths 
cost leas f o take rare of, 
too .'. .and last longer. 
They h*lp us bring you 
mar* and better •tele- 
phone' service at low a, 

eeet. l^l^^e Telephone works to make jroor tolcphon* 
a Uggar Talue every day.jk .,. . '>».< 

Save time -check doubtful 
numbers before you call 

Lots of times— especially when 
' people are in a hurry to talk 
to someone — it's a temptation 
to call a telephone number 
. they're not quite sure of. But 
studies we've made show that 
a caller often winds up getting 
the wrong party in cases like 
this. For memory can play 
strange tricks with telephone 
, numbers. And, of course, this 
means inconvenience and 
wasted time. That's why we 
suggest you Ipok up numbers 
in your directory whenever 
yoy'r^ln doubt' about them You'll complete your calls faster and 
yave yourself a good deal of trouble m the long run. 



cents and .he would take them 
on as boarding students. In the 
early days, they would work 
one day and go to school the 
ne.\t. erecting bitilding.*! on the 
campus as they learned. 

Dr. Jones, who often speaks 
to ser\ice groups throughout 
the country, was brought to 
Hollywood through the cooper- 
ation of the Hollywood Rotary 
group to address their Tuesday 
luncheon. Leroy Nelson, pres- 
ident of the group, invited him 
to see 'This Is Your Life" and 
Ralph Edwards picked the ed- 
ucator out of the audience as 
the surprise principal subject. 

Johnny Burton, a rising young 
professional singer, sang vari- 
ous traditional melodies during 
the telecast as a means of il- 
hi.«itrating phases of Dr. Jones' 
life. 

Pay Tribute 

Among those on hand to pay 
tribute to Dr. Jonps were: E. V. 
<;raff. .Newark. Ohio, who was 
his high school principal: I.. M. 
K Morrissey, Davenport. La., a 
former classmate; Estella Otis 
Young. Meridian. Miss., a for- 
mer st-udent; Georce W. Du- 
lany Jr., who donated the first 
girl's dormitory to Piney 
Woods: W. H. Mahaffery. Jack- 
son. Miss., 'a member of the 
school board: William Yanry. 
Baton Rouge, La., one of the 
school's first students. 

Betty Mae Jack. Supt. of Ne- 
gro schools in Scott County. 
Miss.; Dr. Ellen Chandler and 
Georgia L. Meyers, teachers at 
Piney Woods; Mrs. Lora Rath- 
von. Boston. Mass.; R. F. Mc- 
Ghee. Ya/oo Cit.v. Miss.: and 
Rev. William C. Di.xon. Baptist 
minister of Fresno, who was 
j one of the first students at 
Pinev Woods. 


XniJas Time 

Busy Time 

For Thugs 

Christmas season is the time 
for good will and peace on 
earth, but not according to the 
police reports at Newtoii sta- 
tion. At Newton it's just an- 
other week of sluggings and 
petly thievery. 

Frank Emerson, 2822 Ellen- 
dale, complained to pwlice Dec. 
18. five days after being taken 
i|>Jnconscious to general Hos- 
pital, that three men saw him 
paying a bill in a cafe at 56th 
and Compton. When he started 
to get in his car, he said, two 
men grabbed him and then all 
three of the thugs beat him. 
Then they kicked him in the 
face and body. When he be- 
came conscious he was mising 

Isaiah C. Thornton, 883 E. 
47th street, also. had reason to 
believ^e that people v^ere not 
all full of good cheer during 
the yuletide season, when he 
reporred that two men ap- 
proached him on the street last 
.Saturday night and one gave 
him a kidney punch. Then, ac- 
c-ofding to Thornton, the other 
man took his wallet from his 
pants' pocket. 

To add insult to injury, one 
of the hoodlums ^pulled 
Thornton's tie tight around 
his neck until he passed out. 
They, made off with $40. 

Lawrence Chisholm. 1 1019 .'^. 
Broadway, tried to be a good 
"joe" when a woman asked him 
for a , ride last Monday eve- 
ning, and ended up $300 short 
for Christmas. 

ChLsolm .said a ■. woman 
asked him lor a ride at 25th 
and Main streets. He com- 
plied. W'hen she entered the 
car ^e propositioned him and 
he told her he was letting her 
out at the next block. Chisholm 
told police that when the lady 
committee members and teams |E0' o"^ <>' »he car she started 
will meet at the new Urban I "^""'"R »"** he became suspici- 
League headquarters. 3839 S.\^^^ *"'' reached for his wallet. 


Urban League 
Members Drive 
Opens Monday 

Monday is the kick-off date 
for the biggest menr\bership 
drive in the history of the Los 
Angeles Urban League. The 



ns ui'nnlfrs fo 
Sficcial 
Leat/uc : 
pre side n 


hys are the four dub presidents 'iete<ted. ■ 
Lillie M'ontgoi tery,- president of the 
fct'ii^ties Comiiutlce of the XAACP: Mrs. Ethel Pickett, net president of tne Dolt 
Mrsv. Emily Johnson, president of- the Tuclye ^ig Sisters; and J hs. Harriette Johnson, 
t of tne [Turnabouts. 


Western avenue, to complete 
plans for an intensive four- 
week drive at the beginning of 
the >ear for 5.000 new -riiem- 
ber.si- 

Serving us chairman for the 
third >ear is Lorenzo V. Spen- 
cer. Urban League Board mem- 
ber, -and Mrs. Ella K. Mays. 
prPiiideut of the Woodlawn 
Branch YV,XA. 

Mrs. Rosemary Hampton, 
young ro-publisher of Church 


He still had 
pocket, but 
missing. 


the wallet in his 
the money was 


and • Community, heads the 
church group. With her as co- 
ihairman is Rev. Maurice Daw- 
kins, pastor of People's Inde- 
pendent Church of Christ. South 
Los Angeles is tinder the lead- 
ership of Leon Thompson; man- 
ager of the Palm Lane Hous-. 
ing [Project. I . - . " 


NAAC^ Regipnql 
FEPC Cai^paigd ^ 

SAN FRANCISCO— More than 
30 civic, churctt, fraternal and 
community iorg^nlzational rep- 
resentatives meeting here re- 
cently, unanimously chose. C. 
LawTence |Delli|rns to lead a 
state-wide' campaign for a Fair 
Employment Practices Law. 

The wide cross-section of or- 
ganizations formed themselves 
into the Califoirriia Cdmmittee 
for Fair Elnployment Practices. 
Dellums. international vice- 
president of the Brotherhood of 
Sleeping Car P'orters. AFL. is 
also chailrman of the W^est 
Coast Region, National Assopi- 
tfie Advfinceraenf of 


Awards Givln Local vmk 


Awards to. four outitandfng [ among! the notables .^ho at- 
Los Angeles organizations for I tended, and Miss! GertrOdeGip- 


iheir work in community bet 
terment were made Dec 9 at 
the .second Civic Awaji-ds Din- 
ner at the Rheingold I^in. ' 


The groups singled 




son. Rl] jingold plublic relations 
advisor was hostess^ 


out for 1 


iation for 
Colored Peojile, 


the honor were the SpeciaT Ac- 
tivities Com'mittee of the 
NAACP. the Twelve Big Sisters, 
the Doll League Charities and 
the Turnabouts. 
■ Wesley Brazier, executive di- 
rector of the. Los Angeles Urban 
League, was the guest; speaker. 
Jo.seph Martinez, assistant to 
the president of the Rheingold 
Brew-jng Coiripany, which 
makes the monthly [Awards, 
presented to each wiiining or- 
ganization an engraved trophy 
and a check for $100. Dr. E. I. 
Robinson, local phjsidian 'and 
president of the Los Angeles 
jchapter of the NAAtP, was 


Jusi bnel^ink l 

(tc ntined from fage 1{ "~ . 
was c asirig mje. jChe l^hts : 
must hive gone i out by them- 
selves. [ did not jlurn them out. 
My bra ces must nave .gone out,-; 
That's ! ivhy I did not stop for - 
all the ie red lights^" 

Lee, lecause of his-inability 
to star i arid walk when tak» 
ing tl e sobrieity test, was , 
booked on drunk driving, 

1 -f ! ' ■• 

Twel e Exploiters from the 
Los All jieles Area CounciV Boy 
Scouts )f America, will attend 
the Eij lith World Jamjboree at 
Niagari -on -the -Lake. Ontario, 
Canada 


- t 



Man Hangs Self 

• Contined from Page 1) 
Gra\-. the handyman at the 
apartment. 

According In Gray. Johnson 
said: 'They're killing me." Gray 
said he asked him wher» he 
was. and Johnson attempted to 
give a phone number, but Im- 
mediately- hung up. 

Mrs. Cassie John!»on. 3fi24 
Mettler street, the wife of the 
<ead man. informed inve«tigat- 
Tng officer. F. R. Banks, by 
phone that she and Johnson 
had been separated over two 
years, but that he had "pecul- 
iar^' wavs. 


'Abie's Night 

• Confined Itom Page 1) 
i preview movie, starting at 8:30 
I pm. 
! Come one. come all. It;s 

Abies big night. -He's had a 
^ rough time of it. and he's still 
■ no out of the woods. Let's give 

a good guy a great big hand. 



next summer 


ri 


Maf % 


jyf^r 11955 see a continuous adSance in the -J 



eff4rt tosecure human rights <mdspcial progress f 

1--J||I:p 1 ' 


all people in the sjDifitof brothBrKood^ah 



i_- f. 


|! INTERNATIONAI^ LADIE 

mm WORKERS" UNION, a:f: of U 


i equality. 


'V-^llI 


GOLDEN STATE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

Los Angeles, Westside— Nolan Payton.i CLU, Manager 

Los Angeles, South' Los Angeles— Johnnie Cochran, Manager 
Los Angeles, Central Division-M. A; Ray, Ass't Supt. Agencies 
Long Beach— Garland Jamison, Manager 

Pasadena— Marston O. Washington, Manager 


r 
I 
I 


Merry Christmas 





i The more than 1500 Telephone eraployoes serving. 
\yp\w community wish to extend a very sincere 

Seasons Greetings, and the best for a Happy and 

Prospierous New Year. 



I 
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and a 


I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


HAPPY NEW YEAR I I 

To Our Many Customers ' ! | 
Patrons, Friends and their Families | 


I 


I 


PIERCE'S SUPER MKT. 

1714 East 55th St ;b| 





,i 


Hk 


,,!•-. >.. 


•:• V 


X 


0EIP SENSE Of tkOTHERUOOD 

L A. Clook Joint Boird 

Isidpr Stenzor, Mcinager 

! U^ ■ 

Harry Kandell, Chairman 


i-M 


^ L A. Dress Jjpint Boprd 

Fannie Borax, Manager 
Bertha Kopsell, Cihairman 


• J 


y^t 4-^ A, Sportswbar Joift Boora 

John Ulene, Manager 


Cailie WilHams, Chair 


\ I • '" ■''■■■■ I'. ■■ " " ■ ' 

if Samuel Otto|Yice nes. 


ady 


- i- 


and Pacific Coast 


-.* 


Uji 


•. j. . • ■ ■ 

[.— ■'l:. 

• "'- •■ 

t;;l ..f : 

- - • 




Director 



Mr. 


■31 


^ ::J^ 


]Vi\ 


:il* 


1 \. 


.- ■ ] 



-- ii 




4— The Colifornki Eagl* 


Thurs., Dec. 23, 1954 


California Sagle 


Loren Mi/fer, I6\\6r and Publisher 

Th* lagl* stands for cmnplat* intsgration mi N*gro«s info mvmty 
phos* of AirivricMi IH* through th* damecratic prec«ss«s. , 

W9favhr: 

1. npc en IomI, stcrt* and national lavals. { 

. ?• Dacant housing for all Amoricans. 

3. Roprosontatien In Gevornmant. 

4. Adequoto eld ago ponsiens end social security. 
> 5. Colioctivo bargaining rights for all workman. 

e. Dovolopmont and. oncouragomont of Nogro business. 

We oppose: I' 

1. Jim Crow, in all forms. 
r 2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy.. 

! k' -! ^uWtohed Ivory Therfdoy ; 

fOSO East 43rd Place, Los Angeles 11 ^ . At). 4-0161 


One Man^s Opi nion 


Bt LEON STEWARD 


THOUGHTS ABOUT CHRISTMAS 

Savior of mankind wa.s He 
Tree and windows j;a\iy trim 
Sincp it will His birthday be, 
Let us all remember Him. ■■ 

Myrrh and franliin<-ensp and gold 
Wi.se men took to Bethlehem. 
MatN. Joseph, stable cold. J 

Let. U.I all remember them* '. 


.■•(*) 


Merry Christmas! 


Merj'v Cftristrrias! 


-7 


lit-tle better place in which to live 
than it was this time last year, f 

Now that we've said that we're 
hard put to .specify the grounds for 
ouv optimism. , . 

The threat of the A-Bomb arid it.s 
twice moio terrible brother, the H- 
'Bomb, still broods over the globe to 
mock at the promise of Peace on 
Earth. 

The British in Kenya, the Malans 
in South Africa, and the Talmadges 
and the ^ B.vrnes in our own South 
are doinj: their utmost to destroy 
that goodwill toward men that was 
a part of r the Christma.s promise 
of more than 1900 y-ears ago. 

There are too many people who.se 
lives are lived in grinding poverty; 
there are too many nations in which 
the dignity-of the individuatl is de- 
nied in the name of race -or in the 
name .of religion or in the name of 
politics. - 

We're a long way from that kind 
pf a world \\hich the traditional.. 
Wise iMen foresaw , when they fol- 
lowed the Star of Bethlehern. 
.However, during the last year the 
fighting in Indo-China has died down 
and -there have been no new out- 
"hreaks of njfien warfare. Fewer men 
j will kill fewer other' men this Decem- 
i her 2'-) than- was the case on Decem- 
: ber 25. 1033. 
- There are signs of awakening in 


AfricaAvhere aiew voices — too few — 
have been raised against the British 
butchery in Kenya and the Apart- 
heid Of South Africa. (_ 

Our own Supreme Court has taJcerj. 
a giant stride toward wiping out the 
,infamous Separate But Equal doc- 
trine which was devised to set man 
against his fellow man on the basis 
of race and color. 

There have been land leforms and 
other kinds of r e A d j us 1 m e n 1 s 
throughout the world which promise 
a better life to some of those who 
have heretofore accepted poverty as 
their lot and discrimination as their 
due. 

Add up all the little things and 
the sum total of all the addition is 
that we are struggling painfull.v 
and slowly — too slowly and toopain- 
fully-^toward the promise of the 
first Christmas. 

Man today stands at 
in his long history. He 
and the implements at 
how to make life abundant and good 
for e\cry human bein.g everywhere. 
We can only hope tjiat men col- 
lectively, and each of ix.s individu- 
ally, will u.se this Christmas season 
as a time to reiiew the, hope for 
Peace On Earth and Goodwill To- 
ward Men and that out of that hope 
will come the couracp' and the 
strength to press toward these goals. 

Merry Christmas! i • . 


a crisis time 

has the tooLs 

nd the. know- 


There Is Discrimination 


Tlite recent State Legislative Com- 
mittee that Investigated the extent 
of Communist influence in the medi- 
cal profession permitted itself to be- 
come' a so.unding board for those 
who keep Jhoir heads in the sand 
and ipretenfi that the Negro's dis- 
content witii racial discrimination 
is Communist-inspired. 

The Committee apparently ac- 
cepted at face value the testimony 
iof sortie physicians that there is no 
discumiination in hospitals arid that 
theAcharges of such discrimination 
wei'C inspired by Communi-sts. That 
is nonsense. 

There is still plenty of discrimina- 
tion in local hospitals both-in respect 
•of staff appointments and in regard 
to patient.s. There are hospitals in 
Los Angeles where the Negro doctor 
is excluded because of^race and up 
until about; 1947 that practice was 
the rule. 

There is hardly a hospital in the 
city, with the exception of public 
facilities, which does not practice 
a subtie or open segregation of 
patients. In that field, too. there 
have been significant advices in 
the past few years. There^s plenty, 
of liopm for improvement. ^ 

Islegroes didn't need Communists 
to tell them about that raciial dis- 
crimination and segregation. They 
knew it from harsh and bitter expe- 
rience before the Reds set up shop. 
Negroes didn't need Communists to 
tell them that both discriminatidn 
and segregation are humiliating and 
^frustrating experiences. 
,' Negroes didn't need Communists 
io ■ tell them that they ought to 
protest, and seek to era-dicate, both 
di.scrimination and segregation. 
They were at it long before the 


Communists ever hove on the Amer- 
ican scene. Negroes, led by the. 
NAACP, destroyed race restrictive 
covenants, the white primary, school 
segregation, .liiai Crow dining cars 
and a half do/cn other varieties of 
plain and fancy .Jim Crow. They did 
it without the help oi- inspiration of 
Comnumlsts. .And \\o'\e sure that 
Negroes will clip the wYngs^-of Jim 
Ci'ow in hospitals. 

Opponents ol" Communism who 
identify the fight against discrimina- 
tion iand segregation with Commu- 
nism do us all a disservice. They 
play into the hands of Communists 
. who want Negroes to believe that 
they, the Commimists. are opponenTs- 
of discrimination. The.v spread the 
vicious untruth that every Negro^_ 
who seeks to realize 4)w--tdFSTof 
equality is a tool of the Reds and 
that every person who raises, his 
voice against racism is in league 
with Moscow. J 

The plain truth' of the matter is 
that tho.se Americans, white and 
Negro, who seeek to wipe out racial 
inequalities are living up to the 
highest ideals of Americanism. Ours 
is a nation founded on the tnaism 
that all men stand equal before the 
law. Whoever helps realize that goal 
within the framework of our demo- 
cratic system deserves the thanks of 
his fellow men. 

Whoever seizes on the Negro's 
protest against discrimination to 
promote his own ends and to under- 
mine the democratic systern — as the 
Communists do — should i)e exposed 
for the fakir that he is. But no po.s- 
sible good is served by pretending 
that racial discriminatron doesn't 
exist. It does. Negroes will continue 
to fight against it. 


Death of Daily News 


\ The death of 


the ; Daily News 


lliaves the new.spapers of Los An- 
. gjeles in the hands of the conservative 
Chandler and Hcjarst families. It 
leaves the city \\\ih its predominant 
Democratic registration without an 
ii>rga'h of Democratic party opinion. 
Both the H e a r s t s and the 
Chandlers have shown flashes of 
liberalism in their treatment of news 
about .Negroes. Neither has ever 
taken the forthright stand that 
marked the pailyNewsi at its best. 
We know that the Times and the 
Examiner can be counted on to 
. oppose federal civil rights legisla- 
tive proposals. The Herald-Express 
has aiwrays been, a little more skit- 
tish, "mi the subject but has certainly 
never carried any torch' for <^ivil 
rights. The Mirror hasi been, aind 
will probably continue to be, the best 
of the lot but we doubt that it >vill 


ever mount jt crusade for a state 
fair employmeiit act or that it will 
screw up courage enough to battle 
the real estate lobby on the ticklish 
housing issue. ' f\ 

In our view, the DaiW)News was 
the victim of its own imiecision. It 
never realized the full promise of its 
own liberal position and many times 
retreated when boldness was called 
for. The riet result was that it never 
generated the kind of enthusiasm 
that would have attracted and kept 
readers. It was too liberal for the 
conservatives and never liberal 
enough for the liberals. 

The fate that overtook the Daily 
News has overtaken dozens of other 
once-great newspapers in America. 
The dissident, crusading newspaper 
is being crowded out by t1ie more 
conservative and less controversial 
organ. Liberals have fewer and fewer, 
voices. 




On the Christma.<! we await. ' 
Bow the heiad and bend the knee. 
Hi.^ the birth we celebrate. f 
Let Him not forgotten be. 

Join the children at their play, : 
Fill the glasses to the brim. 
But ttiroughout the Christmas.JDay 
Let us alL femeniber Him. "^^ 


'\ 


So wrote a bii.sv executive 


■\. 


to hi.i many (Employees. Read tht 
^ poem over several I iirtes. What do you think of it? 

Here ia a simple litrlepo^m which, we like and' want you 
to read. 

ifvjietblehem weitp here torlay, 
Or thi."« were very long ac<>. 
There wouldn't be » winter ti^ne 
Kor arry cold or s^now. 
i 

I'd run out throuph the garden pate 
And down along the pasture walk; 
And off beside the rattle barns 
r.d hear a kind of gentle talk. 

Id move the heavy iron rK»lrt| ^ 
And pull away the wooden pin; ' 
■I'd push the -door a little bit 
And» tiptoe very iibftly in. ' t 

The pigeons and the yellow hens 
And all the cows would !«land a\\a\ ; 
Their eyes would open w ide to see 
-A lady in the maneer ha.\-. 
If thia were very long ago 
And Bethlehem were here today. 

And mother held rtiy hand and smiled- 
'I mean the lady would — and sho 
Would lake the wooly blanket.s off 
Her linle Iwy so | could see. 

His ^hut-up tyes jtvould be. asloep. 
And he' would look like our John, 
And he would be all crnmpied, too, 
And have a pinkish color on. 

Id waiih his breath go in and out. 
. Hi.« little clofhes would all be while. 

I'd slip my finger in hL« hi<nd 
• To feel how he could hold It light. 

I .' ■ ;, 1 

• And she would SmUe and aay "Take care," . 
The mother. Mary, would 'Take care" 
And 1 would ki«s his litUe hand 
And touch his h?ir. 

While Mafy put the blankets bark 
The gentle talk would soon begin. . .■ . 

And when I'd .tiptoe softly out ■- . • 
-I'd meet the wise men going m. 
We shall close this piece, with a cQuplet we contrived In 
our yjouth. 

"Was what you gave them of thyself a part 
Or was it just exchange of stuff you bought?" 
Hero's wjsliing you a Merry I'hri.-^inia!^ and a iiafc one. .^nd 
nia\ \oii/ Npw Year be the best ever. Y ■• .■ ^ 


Piire and !§iiiiple 


^^ JL. F. V aimer Jr,^ 


Here is a dewriplioiiof Christ- » fomrhon purpose, an odd 
mas in a hospital^^jw— word-~.5l»rt of quiet .settle^ jvor the 

painted in •This-Month."^ Amer- hostrti*!. 

lean HosfnfSih- Association, De- "Perhaps from the student 

S^]9.53. I think it's beau- """e.s" quarters comes the muf- 

. » 1 A T ..4U.. .ui^i, .-., "'''' *"*' "t a girl spending her 

fiful and I rather think >ou ^^^^. ,.^^, chri.stmas away from 

will. too. home. And in the wards a pa- 

"How do you describe Xhc lient stjrs fitfully and wonders 

Ciiristmas sea.-o-i in a hospital? what it would have beeti like 

How do >ou put on paper ihe to ha\e just one visitor, and 

emotiotial experifnce. Ihe liM'e perhaps he dreams of other 

plea.santries, 'he human traqe- days when there was someone 

dy. and i-hc profound sense of who cared, 
cdhipassion that only a hospital 
can know during 4he holiday 


Hcii>py Tim* 

".\nd perhaps even the. pa- 
tient who had a happ.\- lime 
will awaken in. the morninj; 
with the trace of tears on the 


sea."«onT How do you put loneli- 
ness into words? 

"Truly the holiday .season is 
the epitome of the concept un- 
derlying medic*! and hospital P'Ufwca.se. , • ^ 
rare — the great humanitarian 'To tho.>ie who are patients, 
spirit, the selfle.>isne.ss. the and to those who ai-e q,n ,du,ty. 
lenderne.ss of thought and ac- the hospital i.>j "home*, when the 
tion. the annual renewal of holidays tome. To some the 
mans belief in goodne.ss and hospital is a hva.vs home. Others 
brotherhood and in doing unto <an think of places they'd 
others . . . rather be at such a .personal 
"A Sad Plac«" iime of the ye.Ttr, 

"The ho.'-pital is a 'sad place "But ihosi* who work in lios- 
"at Christmastime, and if has its piials (an take' .M)lace in .the 
.ioys as%ivell. Most of itie pa- knowledge that they are living 
tients who were able to leave the C^rristmas .spirit, not Ju.st at 
have gone to their homes. Only Christmastime but all the time, 
those who are .seriou.sly ill or and this is the noblest goaj tha^ 
disabled rerhain— and those to man can a.spire to." 

whom home is iusi a dream, a 1 ?— * — 

memory, or a hope. 

"In pediatrics there is bright' 
ne.s.s and cheer, and the young' 
sters are proving that Christ- 
mas reallj^ is for children, no 
malter..jwhat.. And someone 
variitmy shows up^in a 
suit in ca.se any doubt remains. 

".\nd maternity is a ha-ppy 
pla(«, too. for what could be 
rhore delightful and more hope- 
ful for the future than a baby, 
born, like another infmiit twen- 
ty centuries ago, at Chilctmas 
Eve? X 

Sms All Thiagt 



inta 


iOOK SHELF 

THE RAMAYANA by Au- 
brey Menen 

This is an original and fre.sh 
retelling of a 2500 year otd 
Hindu classic. 

Aubrey Menen recounts the 
adventures of Prince Rama ii 
modern pro.se and from an occ - 
"The hospital sees all these dental viewpaint— with eyi- 
things and feels all these emo- opening results. Replacing th» 
tions. Brahmin moralizing with si r 

"And after the visitors are tales of his own, Menen ha > 
gone and the carolers have de- illuminated the parallels be ■ 
parted and the hospital is left tween ancient India and ou" 
once again to the patients arid world. 

to the nur.ses and maids and This reworking of the In^ 
porters and maintenance men dian epic is a shrewd mixturf 
and tiechnicians and docfor.s, of humor and heroics, told in 
who have given up so much of the wickedly satirical style of 
themselves to work u one in |>Ienen at his best 

•J 


i . - 

* ■ ■ ■ ■ 


|.», ■:;/ 


k-.-i 





Byf LMfar B. Grongar 


leapce and Brea 


This was gong to be a Christ- 
,mas column, iull of gopd cheer 
and stuff— exuding the spirit of 
St. Nick. Then I made the-mis- 
take of asking a friend a simfile 
Jiltle question, and my! friewd's 
reply knocked all the cheer ou 
of me until loo |aie for me to 
meet Ihe cohnitr's dfadline. 

Lwas remaiking on the'opin 
Ion of .Atiornck- (leneral Biovvn- 
ell delivered lu Labor Secretary 
James ' Mii(h«^ll.. ti> the effect 
that, the President's Govern- 
ment 


V 


Committee has 


Contract 
legal .jurisdii'- 
tion over tie 
railroad indu:;- 
tr.v. I asked my 
friend. "Isn't it 
loo had th;it. 
Charlie Hous- 
ton died befoie 
this bfgan to 
happen?' 

My friends 
reply w a B. Latter Granger 
"Who was Charlie Houston?'' I 
.jumped two feet into the air 
and came down snarling. I 
thought immjediatel.v of a re- 
mark which Charlie himself 
made five years ago when he 
attended oUi] Iriian League 
<-iinfereme oitl 'in Denver. Re- 



ferring !o lh»' 
"inorialiiv 


ieniaikal>ly llii^h 
rjate anion" "big- 
shot " repulatiuiis of .Negro leail-- 
ers. ' he drawled wiili his wry 
grin: "Kid. bejiiig a r.ut^ hero is 
piclty ie\penr>i vf business. First. 
.\ou'\e| gtJi to iliase a press 
a.gem ito 1 build \<)ii up while 
.\ou're ali\e iind going places. 
Then you've jfcot to pav.him to 
slay on the job after you're 
dead.'" 

Roughly ai \ear afterward. 


their organizations werei con^ 
tent to forget the railway Iwork- 
ers. Charlie wouldn't let them 
torget. He hounded and tjugged 
at them. He made the cause of 
'& couple of hundred thousand 

en. a crusade for i|iistice. 
There's the record or part of it 
at least. 

Now for the suggestion. While 
all the kudos is being spread 
arou'm;t:=\v+yle the public's in- 
terest in legbl actiwn f o ■ civil 
rights j.s fresl,i\ — wouldn't this be 
the time to c'r^ie a Chafles H 
Houston memori 

Wouldn't his lXs[l coiifreres 
be willing to endowS»>j?liair of 
cixil rights at Howard L ill ver- 
sity in Charlie's honor? Aren't 
there scholarships to Howard 
or Harvard or Michigan Law 
Schools that could be gi\en 'in 
his. honor? This Christmas 
there willMTe plenty of frater- 
nity and sorority getting-to- 
get her. 

It would be a wonderful hon- 
or for .some college frater, 
group, if it stere >vise anq 
erous enough to' vot.e a 
sand-dollar»ann|Ual scholiirship 
irl memory of the dean of civil 
rights legal action. MayJjje 
lie was right. Maybe' a 
agent doe's need to toe kdpf on 
the job after, a good man[ dies 
Bui if this is so.-can'f we 
ourseUes the pre.ss ag(?nt^— for 

l.AC? ' ■ 


t«en- 


ernal 

gen- 

thou- 


Char- 
press 


Letter '^To 
The Editor 


>ear 
lUslon 


de^d. 


and .iudging from 
pling of the niemories 
younger folk whifh I've carried 
on after my friend's- shocking 
que.stion, the publit-'s "forget- 
tery" is alreadly working at high 
speed. So thisj column is lor the 
record — and ail.so to offer a sug- 
gestion, but first.. the record. 

Who was Charles Houston? 
He was only tife rock on which 
has been bitilit all Ap brilliant 
legal work Joeing done today in 
th'e fie^d of ciyil rights. He was 
spe'cial coyns^l for the NAACP 

Tor fiNe.yearsi building the" de- 
partment wh^-h Thurgood Mar- 
.chall sio abj.v' heads today. 

He did the groundwork on the 
Suprerne Covirt cases invohing 
re.strictive hou.sing,.. covenants, 
discrirnination ■;in university 
training -and Jinj Crow andijob 
denial; in theirailway industry. 
Charlek Hoirslon hand-trained. 
w;et-nursed ^nd encouraged 
dozens of ptjomising younger 
Negro and wjiite law.\ers who 
are now-reco^-ding victories in 
Ihe field of ciVil righls. He' was 
dean ^f HoW'ard L'nixersity's 
Law School aind developed its 
co4.ir.se in Civil Righls Law 
whiclr'is the strongest .of its 
kipd in tly* -jHiuntry. And stijl 

,.my friend, who is. reasonably 
well-informeji oii- current af- 
fairs, copfd a$k, "Who ■ Was 

^'harlie Houston?" 

^3iliat isn't Jhe wholi? record, 
of cayrse. His work for Negro 
raitw-iiy -workers Vas worth a 
whole ^Ijapter inXitsclf. ' Ira 
Reid. IhenSresearch director of 
the NationaK^ Urban League, 
made a study which, revealed 
the gross discrimination in the 
railway industr.v and the ar- 
rogantly brutal policies ofsthe 
independent railway luiions. 
Bill Townsend of the rM ca'p 
tinion and Phil Randolph of the 
Pullman porters union .organ- 
ized Negro railway workets iii- 
to protesting, .lighting gr6ups. 
Then Charles Houston, big, 
earnest, wi.se and since're, came 
in as legal counsel without any 
thotight of pay. He traveled up 
and down the country in their 
behalf at his own expense. 
When niany of our Itifkt and 


Dear Sir: 

Your coverage of the " 
er Woods;' birt+iday 
where our missionary 
^vere— feiUirefl in the 



I. loth - 

tribute 

nks 

seiKices 


was excellent. ^.^ 

We arl grea^fuP^K 
kind mention of our orgafn 
tion and -would like to 
this-'opportunity to expresk 
lippreciation and,* thankjs 
you. 

JACQUELIN' W'OOiDS 
CELIA MONCADA 


the 

1Z3 

take 

our 

to. 


The Cornmunity Che.st i"am- 
pi\ign Cabinet takes plejisure 
in presenting you with pur 1954 
Corhmunity Service Award 'lor 
the outstanding support yo j are 
giving the current CommV'^'^y 
Chest "appeal.. 

Telling the Coinrfiunito- Chest^ 
story in your nejw'spaper with 
pictures and cqp.v has been ' 
greatly appreciated and has 
given the volunteers in, your 
area, the needed lift to. jfarry 
the campaign forward. 

To this ^formal exp.ressidn pf 
appreciation from our ca )inet 
I wish to ,add m.v personal 
"thank you'' for your -friendly 
interest and leadership in your* 
community. 

J. E. Fishburn, Jr. 
. Chairman 1954'-.55 Com- 
munity Chest Cami[aign 

bear Sir: ' '^ 

How disgiistlng It • l.sJ to 
see members ' of the n ledi- Jewish students In Om 


cal ■ prof e.ssiori becomiijg: con- 
formist, afraid to have ideas of 
their .own, furthermore project 
ing themselves as the saviors- 
of the medical professi^^ in 
search for "Commimists!" 

Havft- they thought to look 
for. fascists and racists in the 
profes.sion, who yet iit this day 
and time are still aidvocjting 
racial discrimination agiinst 
Negroes and Jews? Hkve they 
conducted- any- light lor the 
rights ot all persons to be ad- 
mitted into ho.spitals when in 
need of medical -attertt on? 
What have' they done aj)but the 
L. A. smog danger? I nave not 
heard one peep out of tiiese 
.so-called "distinguished . (;eri 
tlemen" against the hiost Mat- 
ant discriminatory, policy of' 
quota ayatem for Htpo {and 




Recent Ij two teena^ girts, 
w hqj*ad 1 pen d^inkingltpgithef- 
in^.5th s ireet bar, got; iintlj an 
arguniejn over a maii Irjepd. 
One teen iger pulled a ibiife 
and cut he other. The, pjolice 
were tali ?d. Both girls vkvere 
arrested, "barges were asiault-' 
with "a leadly weapofi ! and 
flrunk an< disorderly. | 

Shocfcinl. you say? Th|e te 
agers goirlg to the dog&.' i J 

That sfatement I'm flvinf 
lots of "Balk Talk. -The teenagers 
today, collectively spealcing,' 
are a gr4't bunch od kids. If 
ajiyone '"|.*" he censorledj it's, 
the par^nis. Parents, so ! unlike. 
The old fishioned paretitsj ar«: 
too busy Ito be companions to' 
their gro\^ing olfspring.Ul|oth-- 
ers. from lecessity, bore|do|n kit 
greed, spi nd hours away 'prom 
the home ; leaving the jVqung- 
sters to s lift ^^or themselvef^ 
th'us 5th i street- or some] 4ther 
"hell hole" . - - :.| 

Broken homes, un. happy,. 
home^'f-r ipty homes, these ar» 
but jripv of the contriil>4tinc 
factors fiVi t send young '^ifls to 
5lh street bars, or worse] { ^ 

The- ni< rcenar.v barki^^jpte in 
these div 'St. who serve Ihe."* 
youngsters, are equa|Iy[ as 
guilty asl the delinquent | par- ' 
ents. FortlnaTely there iit-^ tavr 
that covcfc these "spoilers" -of 
youth— if hey are caught! I 

Two y( ung girls, beflnrt 

they're ol I enough or Seninbla 

.enough ti » vote, are on tha 

police rejords as drurtk and 

disorderljl -on ?>th streei 

' ■ - • • • 

■ f~ . ,_ 

Sora Spot 

gave a eita'ttt^ te 
two "sergfaftts=Mn..^the Sheriff's 
Departmeit last weelT __ 

toriouswark with the juvetiiles- 
iri the WJtts-Willowbrook iirea. 

A fellol,' scribe gave Mi^m- 

little Back Talk: "Ge^ftirlkcti 

straight nd. Gwen Dus^eau 

and Curti Howard are not! ser- 

geariis; ji si sporting th* tag." 

A rose By any name jfeinells' 
just as si veet— not so In thia 
case. Why tjie handle if inik ihk 
status? X J ^ 

Well, r 'e always wanted to 
xhpet the ! heriff 'anvwavj 

A not* to tha aim 'ajpatain 
. —Dear lupervisor — we leel 
that you ire 'not aware of tha 
fact that; Will Rogers Fark is" 
getting ri IJ of over a third of 
its play d rf ctors. . | 

Some lire bein^ moved M 
other area s, so we've been told. 
WattSf asl you know,' needs alV 
the help it can get or kaep !■ 
that one playground mtitiill 
pot of en< rgetic children. 

Of courle you may not Imew 
of the em doyment Mtnatien at 
Will Roge s. Or da you? l!«»-Ha^ 


plea.se. 


schools ' o: 

When 
grade th 
done by 
L. A. Co 
tion in 
witch hu 
tion of t _ 
democratj; 


the nation, 
en of adcnea iMa 
tselves. as is %aiflS 
»se repiaaentiHf tii«' 
ty Medical Aaapeia- 
McCarthyitt-lonii 
this is iut imUai' 
rapid decay '^ «at 
„ w*y <*f li*»- lit ftjur* 
ther reflelts ^ complet* aUfi'- 
nation onlth^ part- of tii* L. Ai, 
Medical Association to ra^on4 
to the -nee Is of the ptopT^.lOof 
tors have a real resp<m^bili«y 
}n th«ra^ iger of smof Ito ttt 
peopleX-bi t the Medical Aaso. 
-latioir^ p: aces its major am* 
hasi^ o 1 tlie "Communist 
tangfS:."^ , 

Is this t> divert' the atteitjoa 
•>f the pei iple from tha iiaaltii 
darfgers i i smog? 
H. Wi 


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Bibfe Survey 
Shepherd's Ps||ni Favored 


The 23rd Psalm is Los 
feles' fiavorite Bible text. 

This conclusion was reached 
by more than 30 Seventh-day 
Adventist Churches in the Los 
Angeles area this week as they 
concluded a city -wide survey 
to determine the city's favorite ! 
Bible passages. jT j 

According TO church officials; 
ulno directed the three-weeH | 
.«urvey. the favorhe text, often 
called the "Shepherd's Psalm." ; 
was ihe favdrite of approxi- f 
mately 22 per cent of the per- 
sons surveyed by the churdh. , 

Hiyidreds Of Seventh - Day • 
Adventist Church members 
throughout the city participated ' 
in the survey which was ispoii- :' 
by the church as part of , 
its ob^rvance of World Bible j 
Sabbath, sponsored by tljefi 
American Bible Society. j 1 1 


Other f^<^>ite texts disclosed 
by the survey included John 
3:16 as second choice. John 
H:l-3. and the 91st Psalm. 
Some three per cent of the per- 
sons surveyed indicated that 
they had found hope and com- 
fort in their reading of the en- 
tire book of Psalms. 



|Bibl# Meditations I | 

"Peace I leave with you: irtyj 
[peace I give unto you; not as 
I the world givpth. give I unto 
vou."— John 14:27. 


Two ^hoirs 
Fete Messialv 

"The Messiah." by G. F. Han- 
del, was presented by Bowen 
Senior Choir and visiting choir 
of Bethel .\ME^ last Sunday. 
Dec. 19. at Bowen Memorial 
Methodi<:t Church at 36th and 
Trinity Sts: The soloists were: 
Jean Keele. soprano; Jean Jack- 
son Johnson, contralto; Frank 
James, tenor; and Oscar Plant. 
baritone. 

The guest director of the 
choir was Louise Bratton. The 
director was Nell Plant with | 
Dr. Henry Booker and Ray 
Spight the accompanists. Re\. 
Jo'hn'C. Bain Is the pastor. j 


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SEASON'S GREETINGS 




;. 8 .it 


4 : 

'i 


w 


mV: 



4s uf pay homage to 
the birth of the Christ 
child, ue humbly give 
thanks to the bless- 
ings bestoued upon us 
by His coming dnJ the 
inspiration of His mes- 
sage of peace and good 
uilL ' •' ' 


Tfiuri., D«c. 33, 195^' Th« CaWomi 


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1!Pi 


Death Takes 2 
Church Leaders 

Funeral services for Mr;:. 
Eleanor Hithe Rush will be 
held at the Lincoln Memorial 
Congregational Church, 441.J 
South Hooper avenue. R« v. 
Lloyd Galloway,' pastor pres cl- 
ing services will be at 11 a.m. 
on Friday, Dec. 24th. Body m 
in State at the Paskell and 
Grigsby Mortuary, 9920 South 
Central Ave. 

Mrs. Rush leaves, to mourn 
her passing her husband. Rev. 
Charles Rush, former pastor 
of Lincoln Memorial Congre;ja- 
liona I Church, Chicago. III. The 
daughter of Joseph Hithe of 
New Orleans. La. and three 
siters .\nna Bifredoii lIol)>oii. 
Ilattie Hithe a^od Hazel Wil- 
liams. 

Overshadowing the Christ- 
mas ."^unday rriornin? siprvices 
at the church Of Christian Fel- 
lowship last -Sunday was the 
news of the passing of Dr. Al- 
bert W. Palmer; who served the 
churrh a.s associate pastor for 
nearly two years. Dr. Palmpr 
was buried last .Saturday from 
the " Altadena Community 
Church. 


Hamilton in 


On 'Angelas llour' 


Find 


I 
I 

I 

I Ward AME Choit 
In Xmas Nusicale 


The services 
Sundav will be 


at Felbwship 
in the form" of 


I'lllLLlPS TEMPLE Hf>yiS ISUERS- 4SMI ERS.l RY—Thr 24th icl.hrr.unn-r.f the 
Sf!i',r I >hir Rr,i:r,{ lounii tinmhrrs prf,uii.\ ti tiirtn{; tkeneli. un:<'irm< riiitnuinrturfii h\ I/fnri 
O Brut'it. From thf left: Janus Par, hi^fjitr,I.ora-Ar)ttiitronii,_ ALa£x^ ''''fn'iifnt^ JamCs t.iliot, 
Albtrti! Mhiti'jft'nnd U Brxiint mniir.i/ fuTai adjustnUnt ttf the tie o-t ^i^r J.rf. 


Phillips Temple CME 
24th Anniversaixo^ Ushers 



DR. D. OVEfeSTREET GRAY 

; 1 11 1 Edit V«rnon Avenu* 


I 

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The Ward A..M.E. Church at 
West 2.1th St. and Magnolia 
.\ve. will hold special services Board. Sunday, 
during the Christmas "Season 3:30 p. m. 
beginninj: Dec. 24 at 8:30 p. m. 

Kvmns of Chri.stmas will be the anniversary prografh was 

under Mrs. .\nnie B. Seldon. The wel- 
come address was given b> 


a memorial. In addition to the 
pastor. Rev. Harold M. Kingsley 
Mmes. E. E. Lightner and 
Anna Everett ;Farr! will pay 
tributes. His njany friends in 
the church and| the interracial 
field are expected. ' ' 


with the culmination of Ithe 
past yeflr's deeds and de. its 
and the things yet to come <md 
to be fulfilled m the <i>min:; 
year. The Children's, Youth iind 
Senior Choirs, directed by Xf nia 
Reece. Svlvanus Lott. and A. C. 


i4-r ■.tji-'* 


18th & Paioma Rl. 7-63«5 


Rev. Mauric* 


PhimpsiT^rnple C-MfTCTumTr^TnTe Kayi Tabernacle CME 
of 917 £>^rd St. had its an- Church. 

niversary of the Senior Usher The afternooit message vvas 

Dec. 5. at delivered by Dr.''Norris S. Ciirrj', 

the host pastor 'X)f the anniver- 

TlTe rnwlrecc-<»f:-f^r<»Tr<n>>4ea of s arv. ! 

Mrs. Et^iel H^ds. the presi- 


sung. The .senior Choir 
the (direction of .\nnie Lois 
Schooler will sing special ar- 
rangements. 

The message will be given 
by the pastor. Dr. Fred E.. 
Stephens. Sunday morning. 


,:,:^f..^' 


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SEASON'S GREETINGS from 

REDS OUTLE'r 
STORK, ■ 


CEXTRAL STORE 

OprH A.yi. to 9 P..\f. 


' Lverydny. indudtng Sundfixs 
43r? S. Central A^^. 

ADnr,:< 3-4S4S i 


HOLLYWOOD 
STORE 

Open <? A.M. to Mtdnight 
Ini ludmti Sunday 
bhlb Hollvvvood Blvd. f.. 
HO.'2-027^ 


1704 E: 103rd Sl 
WAIT.S — LO. «^-S"l 


Mavme Curry with the musii- 
rendered by the Celestial Choir. 

.K .«oio was sung hv Mrs. Wil- 
letta Trac'v. .^fter an invitation: 
a! Solo b.v Mrs, Virgie M. 
Lenoir, the new usher uniforms 
were d«iliiated. " ,t 

The uniforms worn by the 12.i 
ushers we're all made bv Henri 


dent of the lijiorif Csher Board. 
made a few remarks after the 
unveiling of the usher badges. 
The theme s<ing of the pro- 
gram was •Je.-us Keep Me Near" 
ithe Cross." • i i 


OBITUARIES 


A SfRANGiLY 

OlfUD MAN 

SPIRITUAL PSYCHIC 

ADVISOR 

HELP and ADVICE en ail 
affairi of lifie; solvet every 
human problcni pertaining to 
LOV.E. nnarfiage. separation 
and butineu. Successful in 
Heloing thousands find con- 
tentment, happiness and peace 
of mtnd, wfiyinot ypu? 
One Visit W-i|l Convince Vou 
Take Vellow fP car to n,r 
pau BiMd.. thfn 'Santa Menu 
Blue bus to door. 

1626 PrcO BLVD. 
SANTA I MONICA 
I lx/jft.S677 

Hours: 11 a.m.'ta • p.i 
OPEN JSUNDAYS 


8:30 P<M.: Gospel Choir in Posoant "I 


"A Community Church- 


ProgrcfRi 
Sunddy 


MfSSAJK CWCII ANBM' 

PRC UEM CLINIC 

Evory Friday, « ^.M. 

1130 E**f54tli Straot 

Rov. Sail f kaundori, Pad^f 

Rav. Sol »a JohiMMi, ftbfr. 


D»cfors' 
PharmQcy 

PrMcripl one Excluaivoly. 

Call F« r anil Dolivor. 

4bl2 i. Confral Avo. 

A >. •1923« 


II «0 a.m.- 
7:M a.m.- 



Thc closing message oh thejBMbrew, respectively,. will ren- 

Angclus Hour, over which Ham- |djpr appropriate musical selec- 

iltpn Church has been bro id- tiiqns for th| yule-tide season. 

casting a series of messes es, 

ceritered around the corfiing 
'and the birth of Christ, will be 

given by the pa.<Wor. Rev. ^ohn 

N. Doggett. Jr.. entitled: "Now 

Is The Time!'' This will bri 

to, an end Hamilton's .secrnd 

appearance on The .Angejus 

Hour, during the past year. 
Hamilton has been honored 

to acc-ept this invitation and 

wishes to thank the .Ange us 

Funeral Home, for making it 

possible. -] 

The Rev. Victoria Jack.sjrn 
I .Assistant Minister at Hamflt >ii. 
'who has prayed the "beautilul. 

deep and moving prayers.' at 

the beginning of each bro; d 

cast., each Sunday morninj 

will again give the opening 

prayer for this last broadcasi. 
The .'Senior Choir, directed by 

A. C. Bilhrew. also the An- 
nouncer, will give their inter 

preiation of: "I'll Nev*r Ti rn 

Back No .More" iDeliT". aii<l 

Stanford Ka.s.sett. who was pre 

sented to Los -.Angeles. I ist 

month here at Hamilton, ii^ a 

brilliant recital, will sing 

Climbing Jacob's Ladder.'; cOm.- 

posed h\ Los .•\ngeles ow n P'of. 

Wilkin's-". 

Rev. Doggett. preaching ton 

"The Forward Look!'' Will deal 




■f 


BOWEI MEMORIAL 
METH( DIST CHURCH 

Eut 3S1 I ami TilallT ui 
Joha <. 



: Libeity Divine 

I' '- leniple.., 

S432 9>. Central Avo. 
'Sunday SclfBol .... .9:40 a.n^. 
Morning Swvico .. .1 1:00 a.m. 
Evening Solvico .... 7:30.p.rn. 

Pro'achin^ J tKM p.m. 

. Tua«day:|Rov. A. V. lyr^ 
(Evangolift-'rephot •! KaniaB 
-City) 1 
Friday— RegliUr Sorvico 

(Rav. Hoi drieks. Minister i 
Bithop H L Morgan, FounMr 
Mrs. Besi io . Roberteen, Sev't. 


Poople't lndep< indent Ichurch «f CKrist 


■/ 


KALI I lun. 10:30 A JUL i 


A. Dawkins, Mihistor 




Doc. 26th: 10:30 A.M.-Channol 5-"ln Sod Wo Trusf 


Non-Racial— Nen4 )nominafi*iMr V> :'.'l'l!.<! 


ing of 



Kingdom Church 

Gives 100 Boskets t»<>'.An;:.lii>s >-un<>r«l H«m» in-chi 

— V |A\* I'. Iff! It"-.. >;Si'rVi.>-s from 


The Pastor of the VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH, Rev- 
erend A. A. PETERS, wishes a Merry Christmas and a very 
prosF)erous New Year to the Parishioners and Community. 

VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH invites everyone to its 
Christmas mprning services at 6:00 a. m. | [ 

VlCtORYMPTISTCHURCH^^^^^^^ Z^^ 


. . , t.K.-;i,lK N.XTHAMKL J.VCK.SON'. 

O'Brvant of 1142 ^. Western jz:* K. i-inth p;fi<e. died 'l>r 9 »t 
X\p' the oiilstandlWg iinifaim t"'"""v'**:' '■'♦'* -P"'"'- ., ""'r^''' 

. , , r , from Irw .^ngfus i hapr. Nt.-i <^.. P«'. . 

and wardrobe manufacturer of ;■« r rr. - s- raTifjv_s(jaiiir.i,.^mr.h. 

>i^- ■*' ; ■ , _ >"n «'fP Priest off\r,^-M\. 'AnK^IU* 

The guest ushers wete. Iron! tunpral iHorrn- in .-!-arg.' of bur;»' 

— ■ — : ' I.KVt^lSH.W^ . Ihi3 K. .Santa- Bar- 

. b.ira. Dlrd IH-." l"i »t ■ the <',er\iT»\ 

Jtoipiiai! rji>t rites De.v 15 from 

tile -XnX'lu* Chapel. Surviving re!»- 

twe Slrf. LoviiTa Sha«. Vvife. Inier- 

pien' a*, the I.inoln ' Cemetery wiih 

I'iiis KunerHl l((>nll* incharge. 

'itnarrnn 

'*'• m^ _^_ m.M • — V |LV\e. l'.<frt !»>■.. > ; j^ervi. i-s from the 

'*■■■*■* ■»»^»a ■■■■■5J B.-rin» Wii,:.. w ;f«,Jrnerment »t the 

Bishop \V. E. Holman of rrar'"''~'' Mfmor 5l -T'ark remeier; 
,1. .. . If ■ ■ 1 /-.!_ t. , L'onner-. Johnson iifniiated. 

Washington Memorial Churrh . r javik? .a johnson. i2i.'i r. 33rd 

and Dr. A. Wendell Ross, pas- ;ilreel. Services v»erp held rrom the 

# tT- '^ J T* .*^ * ^i_ "!_' . I\or\" ("hapel Sur\ivinK relative, 

tor of Kingdom Baptrst Church. ; Mr,' M.itr Johnson, wire: Int«ir- 

2.<'0S Temple avenue, will have """''■' »'i '^e tvfrtreen Cemetery. 

tonner-.Ir>''!n*"''\ <>ff.i';ated. -h 

morn- irvin iBoy'ivf-j-iti w. i.ii.t street( 

D-ed Dej- 111 !.«<• rites from thf 
1 -Ang^-iusi Chapel Der. IS. Sur\ iv ing 
relatire Mrs .Mlie Busb^ The Rf\. 
,'oilins o|ffir:»tinK the burial in L.n- 
loln Cenrpter^ 

MR.<J. KUC-y. P.'.fVrS. 3601. Wil- 
!o\' '-"bf Beach. .'*erv ic*« . from the 
Sfiond Baptist. Chiirrh of I.on(r 
B*^arh. Surx'iviny reJati\e .\nrtre-.v 
Riiffin. .Inierment at the Sunny«irte 
^.. ■ . •. «- i_ t, -11 I'emeierv' inl Lore Bearh. with the 

thnstmas. Bushop Homan will conher-John^on funeral Homa of- 


I 
I 
I 


joint services Christmas 

in<r at 10 a.m. to noon~at-the 

Kingdom rhiirch. 

The choir of Wa.shington Me- 
rriorial will render the musical, 
.selections for the program. The 
theme of the — Chrisima?^ pro- 
gram will be. '.4 More Blessed 


Oliver TtTF~mes.<a se 
Baptist Churrh will give away 
more than IW baskets, accord- 
ing to the Rev. Ross. 


Kingdom 'ft^ftinEj 

:^^A'-t)^:r |Kly Thompson' 


W .TiVt »lreet. Died Der. 9 »t home 
: Sur\ itm* relative .^Mm. Ida Belie 
1 Kmer> . frieiid. Anselus Funeral 

iharee of sPT\lfp^' 


in 



Taay5«.j:is\«ii:«iWiSKiisi''iiBaiwr 


i%MiZX'Zi. 


'.MJmitb— 


^'.:. 




To All Our 

Friends and 

Customers 

We Extend Our 
Most Cordial 

I SEASON'S GREETINGS 

fromfh* ! il 


I 
I 

3 


I 



CONNER-JOHNSON CO., INC- 

MM ust siYiOT^nH sreiir i rtdwiertn 

•KEEPING THE FAITH" 


S Management and All Employees | 
^ of the Store I | | 

i 


S.I' .'■."'■ .K-%,M Sa ^M. M.^ » ^-e • — • ^— ■ — ■ g 

I 2 -(.FFP/Vfi TW» i^lira — Ul«r» U « mrtftnloiuH C»a* •r ethlct whieh «nirfM «(t onr dnUrtu wltlfn*. 1 
If Ji^ffu - lo.y^Znor i'%''t.Zl.urte,t*,,orU forumr4 .1 .U ..«.« t« «« >ur *«, .t.fi. ., 
it (o rej^eei ana eonfultnet. W£ UEf TUh tAlHt. 




■-■>- •-x'^ 


ANY FASliLY CAN 


A new fjuoerjl service policy, reccrn- 
mended by ANGELUS FUNERAL HOME, 
pays all cxperises regardless of ho.v littie 
has been paid in. Lo^-+)a.iMeii S *(;e made 
to •dmiffed lif»-+nsure'. Phc.e or s;op_ia — 
for free,i»^<Jrrriatiof\ today. No obligation. 


cf 


At time 0^ 

sarcifice ih< 
the ia'KC 
Fupe-al P 
ever/ .dftfai 

fcif coi-iplet' 



AFFOBD 


need, it is not 
pf a"^iner 


beauty 
econonjiy; Angel 
e-Arrangfemeot 
to be arranged 


s 


PI J 


njfcessary" to 

funeral for 

sensible 

n allows 
advance- 
Come in 


ANGEIUS 


1030 EAST JEFFERSON BOULEVARD 
711 CAST ANAHEIM BOULEVARD 


>^^ 


PHONE 


ADan^t Sltij 
pH'ONE: long B#kCH ^00449 


I 






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:?v-- j;; - 

l\ 

r ;< :, ■ 


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:.-ri- 


HEAR J. RAYMOND HENDERSON. PASTOR SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH. 24TH ST. AT GRI 

[ ) I 11:00 A.M. SERVICES: "JOY TO THE WORLD" BY DR. J. RAYMOND HENDERSON 

7.30 ^.M. MUSICAL BY WOMEN'S CHOIR | ARJE YOU A NEWCOMER TO LOS ANGELES? VISIT SECOND BAPTIST BEFORE JOININci ANOTHER 


S 


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6— The Californio Eogl« Thurs.; Dec. 23^ 1954 


would be larklrrs to spring 
Lowe on a beautiful run in the 
Hoover franic was the last 
word. After brusing both he 
was a gentleman and helped 


We wish to take the first. The block C'has. McNeal of 
few lines of the column to "t' Apachps put on the two 

, -wish-ourT^aders (il we iiave 
one) A MERRY— eHRISTTVlAS 
' ANP HA^PY NF:W year. 
^, New Champs 

'. As most of you know we have i both to their feet 
a new C.I.V. Champ in the I d|j y^u Know 

neighljorhood. Centennial High Eamell Durden boosted his 
..School. Your reporter predicted j^j. ^^^^. i^rfprship to 108 
- It after watching the Apaches i -^ "* ' %. r^ v 

' in their first Bay League game ! Pomts with the two T.D.s he 
'•with Torrance 14 weeks ago, and ! scored in the L. A. Manual 
was laughed out of the romp. He has scored 18 times 
stadium. But I have the l^st r^Qj. Manual this year, 
-laugh, now. On fundamentalls ^^^ ^.^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^.^ 

this IS one of the best prep i -- 

teams we've seen in this area aPP'y to the championship 
in some time. To play lor ! game in the C.I.F. If the 
' Coach\ Wade you must bl^k | Hoover- Apache game had ended 
and.tackli; as you should, and[g.g. although Hoover was in 
Jiow\ you jean see the results. :j,.jj,^j ^,^ j^^ downs, vou would 


VIDEO 'GROANER' 


- The 


les will move to the 


ha\e had 


Co-Champs. ■ Thi.« 
accounted for the 


CoastTTeague next year, and j^^,j.^ j^^^.g 

will again be tough. So look p^^^ thrown by Hangartner to 


for it 


■i 



IVMJ. 
JOKNSONIII 


Phares in the closing second.s. 
which set the stage for Lowe's 
■T.D. pass. They were going all 
out for the win. 

We Hope Santa Claut Brings: 

1. A big fat pillow for C. R. 
Pvoherts. on the Trojan bench 
nc.Nt season. 

2. .Another set of McNEAL 
Twins for Coach Wade next 
\ear. 

.3. Another- S. C. Rooter's ( ap 
for Attorney Ray Lundy. be- 
cause his present one has HAD . 
, IT. ■ ; 

4. The kids want a new sta- [ 
lion wagon for good Coach 
John Randolph to transport,- 
ne.xt year's Jordan J.V. base- | 
ball team to and fro. 
"5. L.-.\.' , High's' Romans ar* 
Hitching Post to -hold those 
Man\ial pony backs.% " .• ' 

6, The Policy- Determining 
Comrnittee a-x-hange of heart on 
the \\^shington-Frcmont • deal. 

T..'Abie Robinson good luck 
with his hurt flipper, so he can 
.■ioon retuj'n to his love, the 
EAGLE. I 

MERRY XMA.S I 



Centennial Captures CIF 
Chompionship in Fast Finish 

■t al. chism { ;'!' ' 

Coach Aaron C. Wade and his will-to-win Centennial 
Apaches, proved trt a crowd of 14.243 spectators Saturday afteF-Jjast.jninitte desperati(jn drive 
noon in the Coliseum that a hall game is jicvcr over until tne ^^ ius.^ been halted] on the 
la.st pitch, whether it be ba.seball or football. The Apaches 
downed the fighting Cinderella team froln Glendale Hoover 

High school 12-6 on the good'*^ ! — — 

right arm of Tailback Paul I ^"r » receiver, rushed by the 
Lowe, who hit his wing back entire Hoover line., Lowe was 


While it' isn't considered 
cricket to carry a jug to a 
high school football game, I 
couldn't help but f ?ei that 
somebody must have laced my 
half-time coffee, as I ijaped in^ 
credulously, at the red . jer.'ieyed 
athletes rolling glecTuHy .all 
over the field, and at ;i sky be- 
ing assailed by flying red hel"- 
mets. ' 

This tipuldn't possibly be the 
same Centennial team whose 


effort -to shake the 
spoiler ;. And then 
sometl ing that would | 
the CO rkles of a Nevjadia 
player i heart. • | 

Wall ting .with one| pf I th 
Hoovei tacklers on thcL^O stripi 
he unc srked a long.|)<ss wiiclu 
fell rl; ht into the m|oretlian« 
.williiij arms of Bob SAlleji in 
the em i zone. 'And the Apa rhe 5 
had w apped, up a gaiine ai|tt ^ 
CIF championship. , 
d; 


Carl Allen in the end zone with 
the winning touchdown. 

The game had officialy ended 
but a penalty on the previous 
play gave the Apaches one 
more play -which was enough 
for "Pitchin" Paul of the Bay 
League Champs to fire the 
strike, which gave the C.I.F. a 
new Champion. 


forced to retreat back to the 
43rd yd. line and was chased 
to the north side line. He 
turned and headed 'back toward 


I hive been,, feadlng 
Prep Si oreboard^ll seaison, 
sS^yarrtbine'as'ihe final gun j had ji|!t about concliided 
sounded, lendin;j the tame at 
6-6 with Centennial behind on 
downs 

Then the events'starlled push- 
ing their way back ..into my 
memory. The roar tfiat had 
gone up from the wesjt side of 


the south, ipicked up a block by [the stands as the plendale 

Russell and Williams, spotted 

Allen and; Sampson all alone 

in the end izone and let fly. The 

pork fell into the waiting arms 

of Lefty Allen who juggled it 


Hoover defenders rrtkde the 
game-ending tackle. And the 
hu$h that followed, as all 14,- 
243 fans in the Coliseum saw 
tl^little red splotch oh the 21- 
ya^d line. Glendale Hoover 
Off side. 


'CUAMPIOS' II II.BVR SS'YDl^R. uhnhn dricr.icH all 

lornrrs in his ' tr/rvision ///.u/o.' fi|i7/ f>rt lor/ti ■ for lanirrfi 
rinirrs nrx-t Ih fdnrsday rvftin/f tii finotlirr fjtort touard 
tiorld r.fiO(initi'>n Tn~^ubjinjiiif ttnd ofonnino' ■ • • _ • 


•\ 


TR^HmONS 


/• 


)'/ 


954- '95^, 


f 


lifiT4l 



w 
I 

T 


RflMSEY 



G«org« .Ramioy 


Manual Wins 
All-City Crown 

Playing jthe second game of 
the big borgan bill in the 
Coliseum Saturday afternoon 
Manual ■ Arts' Durden-paced 
Toilers shut out Los Angeles 
High Western, le^giie Champs, 
tory, and aided ' by " a pushing' 21-0 to win , the City Football 


penalty, the ball was placed 
on the "Centermial one yard 


Championship 
The Centenoial Hoover gam* 


left Mariual aS-ocky road, but 
it dirfn''t seem to bothef 
oVidiroh Mjanson, Bates and Co. 
as Coath iJim BlevVett's boys 
took a d v_a n t a g e of-»L. A- S 


SANTA ANITA" HACE~^fSACK , Doiir forget during the Santa 
Twenty-six valuable and Anital meeting the colurnn will 

highly "prized gold , troprtie.s j carry j all horses that are fit 

hale'arrived at Santa Anita toiand rjeady and other important 

be prescrrted in public ceremo- newsjconcerning racing. ,. • 

nies to the luckj^owners of thej, 

winners of the 'Stakes on the" 

prograrh for the 18th racing 

season which opens Dec. 28. 
These trophies of special de- ; 

sign and creation are extra ! 

awards for the sla_kes besides ; 

the million dollars set . up in ' 

added money. There are large 

SI 



Jes!^ M o n g i a. batting one 


I line with an autoftiatic first 

I down. , 

I. Hei*e that fine Apache defen- 
sive line proved why it is best 
in- the league. Holding Hoover 

to all the necessary downs be- j miscues aqd score^^L^'Mll.' 
fore sub Fred Bonderud fmally j One ofljihe featuV** of the 

, pushed it over to tie the score ^game was the Allen tw3ridiron 

.at 6-6. M<;Neal blocked the con- jpass good jfor 52 yards and a 

.version and the count re- 'T.D. for the Toilers' ^second 
mained al tied up. |. score. Earriel Durden. the lead- 

in the late stages of the final ' '"g scored of the ■ city also 
period Hoover slopped what «'ored in the first period with 
looked like a Centennial score,* 23 yard |iash through tackle, 
and took over with theif backs 

jto the wall. With but 45 sec- 
onds showing' on the big ,c-lock 
in the east end. Hangartner 

I passed to Phares who was hit 

! hard and fumbled on the 2? 

I yr. line. Centennial recovered; 

'.Lowe threw to Allen on the 12 

{and. the gun ostensibly? ended 

I the game, but a penalty was 

'called. 


but held on for the T.D. and 

Centennial started the game!,he c.LF.l Championship. The 
With a break when the kick off j kick was missed and the game 
was picked up by the alert,! was ^^.^j, leaving the crowd in 
Horace Monroe on> the 15 yd. I a Irenzy ^nd Coach Wade in , „ 

line, where Hoover let it roll i tears, to climax the story book | was snapped from ccijter. and 
dead. Lowe then hit pay dirt, t finish, 
and Centennial was off and run- 1 
ning 6-0 in the first minute of 
the game. Pollards' kick was 
wide. 

HOOVER TALLIES 

In the third quarter Hoo.ver 
on the pitching arm of their 
great quarter back. John Han- 
gartner put on an aerial show 
that was something to see. 
Hangartner. who set a new 
C.l.V. record of 140 comple- 
tions for t^e season, hit Bell. 
Foushee. aind Phares with four 
successive, passes, which moved 
ithe ball deep into Apache terri 


BOXING CHAMP 

Pvt. Floyd Martin, 18, sdjn df 
Mrs. A litoor Martin, 2132 I asa 
Ja\A so it was that th^Apaches [ dena a .'e.. Pasadena, is a i|en- 
;Were given one last extrain- i ber of the 1st Divisionfs 
ii\ng shot at victory. The ball p^gj^^ ^^ boxing team in 
was snapped from ccr ter. and | „„„^„„ I 

reached Paul Lowe. esUtefl by : ""^ny his season. | 

a couple of Hoover [linemen.! Privj te . Martm, a rifiemai 
Lowe zigzagged all «t>ver the i with 1 1^ regiments CampAnf 
field, moving all the \1(a\ back A. ha.«| been in Europe sintje 
from the 22 to mid-fiejd. in an July 


Centemial was pa^j^in 
Chism a salary. No 
could le as good. or provic 


much color as Chism said 
was, a id this is not unu| 
wrong. I have seen the Apa 
in Act an, and I'm here tc 
you th it they're the best 
in the tate. Aw, why be cHeesy 
— the -lest team in the coutitrj. 


16tT 

Gei- 


'*\^^n^ 


gold cups, each costing 51- ; _^ 1 «v,ir ,.„,, „.iii"°'.»,^/.t ' Lowe tocfk the pass for ceiiter 

"a-- t 41. /„,,- «i no nrifi I thousand this year, will snoot i . ... . j * Ti ,_ , ^ i ■ 

96().55 for the four SIOO.IKJW , ^. . . , , ._i .\ , 1 Joe Wade, .and fell back to look 

classics— the Santa Anita Ma- '" """ 

turitv on Jan. 2, the Santa 


N 


px 


GRAND OFENINO... 

'^'' i Another opening day, renewing all the 

'^%- a thrills flnd color of Thoroughbred horse rac- 

f ing, is at hand at beautiful Santa Anita Park. 

,1; f Since its inaugural meeting 20 years ago, 

^/" ' Santa Anita has given the Southern Califor- 

- .'?^=' I nia public the very finest presentation of the 

■ ^--^^ ! "Sporf'iof Kings". The exciting 50-day winter 

> • - meeting of 1954-55, marked by a number 

%. ■ of thrilling grass-course races, will prove no 

■% ' exception. Obn'f miss the excitement of 

'%■- ' — ] — another Santa Anita racing season, opening 

. ^j"*' '[\. Tuesday, Dec. 28. '--.=,=.i,_^^ - 

1954*1955 Winter Meeting-^ 
at Sar^a ^nita^ark 

Racing Every Tuesday through Saturday 
DECEMBER 28 to MARCH 5 

OPENING DAY AHRACTION- 
$20,000 PALOS VERDES HANDICAP 

(S-year-olds and up — Six furlongs) 
Ab* FMtar* Cnw Caitn* !•*• 

GATES OPEN 1 1 A:M. -[^ FIRST POST T P.M. 

S3.00 Clubhflu** 
.60 FwtertI T«x 


Anita Derby on Feb. 19, the 
Santa Anita Handicap on Feb. 
26 and the San Juan Capistrano . 
Handicap on March 5; 
CALIENTE IN OLD JMEXICO 


for hip'sixth straight victory of j 
1954 when he faces classy Gil j 
Velardo in the ten-round fea- 1 


Men, At Last It's Here! 


a|t 

Monday night. 
Mopgia. hard punching fealh- 


plenty of action. , ^^.^^ 

LITTLE JOE — Off had but \^^^^^ 
finished third. Go back. 


YOU MAY 
EARN OVER 

(WEEKLY 



$1.S0 Gr»rxhf»n«l 

.30 F*d«rll TtX- 

.15 City T»x ' 

»t.95 Tof«l i- " 


.25 City Tm 
$3.85 Te*«l 


J Once Againi 

Four $IOO,dOO Stakes 

■ jon. 29— Santa Anita Maturity i 
Feb. 19— Santa Xnito Derby 
Feb. 26— Santa Anita Handicap 
! j iyUir. 5— San Juan Capistrano 'Cap 

I (On Comino Real Turf Course) 

^06 i^GEIiEd TdPF CLUB INa^^ 

SANTA ANITA PAtlC i ARCADIA. CAUF. 


IYmi 1-7401 


DOuglas 7-2171 


\r 


*;■ 


Take RUMTOREX and enjov life. 

ture att the Eastside Arena next [Ri.MTORf;x taips up whpre nsture ! 

' lr«\c< off. .\ PHY.SIGI.\N S FOR- | 

MLL.\. .\Ion^i-b»(k >!U»rantoe If not '• 
roi)ipl«>i(>l\ salisfifd aftpr three bot- 

tlf^ Onh $■ f/i for a full two weeks' I 

'rfii^NT'^orAVTR' "rah'for " frotn Denver. Colorado, start- ! 'iupply. i- O. D. or send rherk or 

DAW.N BREAKER — lao lor i . . , ;,.,,„ ..„...,.» .,.;„ moncv order now. THE Rt^MTOREX ; 

. -, -.,.:„„ led the >ear with an upset win , compa.ny. 23<» F.an iL5th street. I 

Oscar Torres at South j New York 29, .v. y. | 

Then came- a sidashing 

victory over Baby Face Gutier- 

TAKE REGARDS-^Ready for j rez. His 3rd triuniph was .scored 

: a winning effort. | in , Mexico City over -highly- 

i VEROLA |>'ewcomer from j regarded Emilio De La Rosa. 

'Ellsworth stable. | His next two wins were scored 

I LONGNECKER— Six furlongs |^at th^ Hollywood Legion Stad- j ^^pL,^||p|«i„ IM D«pt. loi 

I or over home free. ; ium over Franiiie Campws and | K^JaaTT^^I Miitosi. mass. 

I HEEL'S O'FI'VE — Shopping for Vic Pon< e respectively. 

' spot. Smart stable. 

I LITTLE TICK— Rounding to 

I good form again. 

j LE BRAC — Improving with 

; each race. 

THANKS AGAIN — Plenty of 
] class has this one. 
I SPEAR PLAY — My longshot 
special. 

ROYAL ROUNDER — Loves 
plenty of distance. 


-Homa of }Nor\d's 

BIGGISJ. 

DAILY DOUBLi 

$12,724.80 

BEAUTIFUL 

CALIENTE 

fn Old Mexico 

PRESENTS EVERY SUNDAY 
KAfN OR SHINt 

in THKILLING AND I A 
iU EXCITING RACES ■ » 

MAIN EVENT 

'THE SAN RAFAEL* 

SIX FURLONGS 
SECONDARY 

"THE BERKELEY" 

MILE AND 70 YARDS 

PARLAYS AND 

COMBINATIONS 

DAILY-DOUBLE 

AND QUINELA 

BOOKS AND MUTUELS 

Post Time 12:40 

JOHN S. ALESSIO 

IxMHtiv* BiratMr 




■m^ 


f* sJrldfiJiixf 


W?L. 


^Er\qht]\ 

f:Brthlrhr 

9 ni//ht tlifir nf 

if.ni/iy the spirit nf Christ- 

I runs shirii in your heart to- 

Ifday and forrxrr, ■ 

\ HOLLYWOOD 
\ STARS 

f_ BASEBALL CLUB 


Don't Forge 
Your Loved Dies 




j 


'm 


...'20 
»COAT 


With anj^Hlt frieil $20 If 

■•rt trl$20 tff tin (irici if 
My Swit Md Tip Cut. Or, if 
yiM likt twi suits li thi Vic- 
tir's kHi ) stick. yM May ^ay 
III at ki: reiular prici mi 
taki $20 aft tht prici if ijiur 
siciad s iV 


V^^ 




Dress 

Up 

for 

Christmas 

everyone 

else 

wiil 


EVEP fTHIPM 'ran MENL 
WOI EN AND eOYS .Z 
iuli liai fin raijN. laM 
*i1ei»f. jtwthy, Imini 

Mi KCtlMriu. 

CHMS1 m STORE NOURSr 
Oiithi ■nritftie.ataitfrt 


'■':U.- 



Victor Clothing Co. ) 
214 south broadway 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES, CflLiFQRNtQ ^ 

UNITED SIATFS OF AM, Ri( a '\ 

B. uL'.'i.l C'orh- - ♦o' M. n VV • -. . . ^ N 




s- 


i 


Jd-be T 

drd I 
varm I 
card I 
\- 

the [' 
tripe. 1 
.•hirh il 
than* \ 
pn in 1 
irhes 
knct S . 


the 
i. and j 
that j: 
Alj 
team f 
le a5 I 
Id. I 1 
IsuaK \- 
Vches i 

tell 
team, 
teesy* 
Intry. 


In of' 
hasa- 

pem- 
Il6th 
iGer. 


V" 


if., ■ 


J" V 




I 


«- 



■•>■ I ■■,•■. 

■ • i !: . 

\^'' ' ^ ^ ' ■■■■ 



Doll Leagiiers Hold Ahfuar Christma^ P 









^P 


CLUBS 


Thuris., Dec. 23, 1954 


DollLeagu^ Fetes 

Hundreds M Tots 

The Doll League. Iiir.. held its annual Chris. mas charity p irty last SattiiNf. 
day morninjfe;-in the huge auditorium of the Caryer Junior Higl school. :. 



SHIOfli 


The Calif >rnia Epgle^T J 


FUS AyD MORE FL'S'r—Some nf the y^jungytm tjladdtned h\ thf D,9ii 
Leagues annunl Chr'titrnns 'pnrt^ Inst Saturday are fhotin uith^thrir ric'i^ 


tnr.'ure.i. fiqcther vAtli. (ko'ii Ufl. Ann- Odom, fhn'irninn ',t thf.Leagur. Irene 
II riiiht .' president . iind Citfdys Clark .refiorter. (.Idnms phr,t'i.j 



Gab Reception Honors 
Former Juanita Terry 

Jsumerousi friends and associates nf ' rfne of Los Anodes' 
longtime residents, Mr. and Mfs^ W. H. Tcrr\ . greeted". ne*i\]- 
weds Mr. and iMr.«. Quentin Barbee inee Juanita TerryT .at 
Iferrys home,' 11.52 E. Adams Blvd.. last Sunday afternooh 

The recepfion was occasioned by a holitiay visit to Los 
Angeles by the Barbees from Washington. D.C.. where 
couple reside, i Barbee is a federal employee in the Veterkn's 
Administratioti's Loan Division, and a former tiewspaper man. 
His bride and former Angeleno, Juanita. is a «;ecretary for 
Senator. Humpjhrey of Minnesota. T'hey were married last Jlay 
in the .District of Columbia. 

Also in tl|e receiving line, in addition' to ttee guests 
honor and theif parent-hosts, were other members of the Telrry 
family. Sliss Beulah Terry, sister, of the honoree and per 
brother Frank] with his wife. Anita. 

Refreshments were served to as many pre-world Wai II 
Los Angeles residents a.s one will find at any single gather: 
these c^ays. plus many of the more recent friends known 
the pioneer eastside family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Barbee will return to the Capitol 'City i.e.xt 
Sunday morning. , See photo on page 8 


>erettes Set 
XmasEve Party 

As the Cooperettes Social and Charity Club offi- 
cers planned their annual Christmas party for Christ- 
mas Eve night, they looked, back over a year filled 

with work, honors and service, to the community. 
While making arrangeinenl 


for their own party, to which 
they have invited all former 
members and friends, they 
were also busily engaged iri 
preparing Christmas Cheer 
boxes- for needy families. \ 
Their yea r-l o n jj activity 
started on Jan. 24. 1954. when 
Mrs. Gertrude Gipson Penland 
inst lied club officers at the 
■V^'atkir.s Hotel. 

First Affair^ ' | 

^ A charity matinee dame 
""was the first affair on the 
club's- 1954 calendar. Due t6 
the pubtic'.s overvvhelmins re;- 
sponse to the Feb. 21 affair at 
the Elks Auditorium, the club 
'distributed a tremendou? 
arnount of canned juices td) 
patients at Long Beach Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

Many fri*»ds. relatives and. 
repiesentariNPS from ttfe popu- 
lar clubs of Los Angeles .ioin- ■ 
ed the Cooperettes kt their 
annual semi-formil Saturday 


HPA Plays 
Santa For^ ' 
Local Kids 

The Hortie Protective Asso- 
ciation pTayed Santa Claus to 
more th»n a hundred neigh- 
borhood kiddies on SundayJ 
December 19, at the Bass- 
Kinloch Cultural Center, 1055. 
Ea.st 41st Street. i ■ 

There were candies", nuts.- 
oranges, apples, rookies and 
other eondies in brightly rol- 
ored-<"hristmas stockings dis- . 
~~tributed by a real live Santa, 
xvho took the little tots on his 
knee and hstened to their 
stories of what they wanted . 
"Santa to bring me for Christ- 
mas." ! s' I 

The Cultural cientef was 
artistically decorated by Rosa 
and Artie Jones. A huge 12- 
foot Christmas tree surround- 
ed by miniature Christinas 
trees, set in the middle of a 
flower bed, and bearing many 
brightly colored ■ lights, was 
the feature of the decorative 
scheme, while strings of 
bright lights and balloons . 
criss-crossed the patio over- 
head. > 

MrsT Paul'etta Fears, secre-" 
'tary of the HPA, planned the 
party, assisted by many vol- • 
unteers. Wendell Newton do- 
nated his record-player with 
amplifier for the music and 


evening. May 29, in the Elks 
Ballroom. This, the club's out- 
standing affair, in which a 
gay Parisian atmosphere pre- 
vailed, was carried out in art- 
full accord with the unique 
. decorative the.me. "Paris au 
Printemps'' i Paris in Spring* 
designed by the hostesses who 
di.splayed glamour, charm, 
and cordial hospitality and 
who wete garbed in the latest 
pastel shades of o r i^ in a 1 
Paris-styled gowns. 

Cotton Fiesta 

The summer season was 
highlighted with their presen- 
tation of the "Fiesta de Algo- 
don'' (Cotton Fiesta i Sunday. 
Aug. ^. This affair had an 
atmosphere of "Down Mexico 
Way.' 

Once again the Angel Cih'i 
spotlight was dominated b.> 
the winsome group of socie- 
ty's popular ladies when the/ 
won second place honors fo.- 
the 2hd -consecutive year at 
'the Las Dames . .Annual Ba' 
Masque. Sundav. Jfov. 14. 

Mrs. Liliah Durden. parlia- 
mentarian, represented • the 
Cooperettes. displaying a cha- 
peau with the theme "Mptora- 
ma '55. ' i Their captivating 
floral arrangement was origi- 
nated' by'ihe club and desig- 
ned by Joe Collin.i. designer ».t 
the Casa Blanca Florist pf Los 
Angeles. 



of 


gn 
to 


HobartGubs 
Have Fun At 
Scout Pa rt>^ 

A Pack Night and Christinas 
party was .enjoyed by Cub 
Scout Pack at Ardmore Play- 
ground ^londay night. Helping 
w:ith the preparations vyere 
rnany new den mothers — ^Irs. ' 
Liichi Takeda. Mrs. Minoru 
}[asuyama. Mrs. Kiyoshi Yano, 
Mrs. Robert Downs.Mrs. Kib- 
ert Peevy, and Mrs. May /.be. ; 
I The Hobart Blvd. PTA spon- 
sored pack has Mrs. Lcroy Lee 
as head den mother. Mrs. Hen- 
ify Masaoka and Mrs. Fred 
Manning have been den mdth- 
ers for some time. 

Plans are now being formu- 
lated for a newspape^r and fag 
drive early in the new vealr. 


ApproxiiT ately 400 younf*- 
sters rolli( ked through tkft. 
swift- movii g -hours, clambo'-. 
ing all ov r the genial «iia . 
joily, red-r ibed, white-j^^JWt* : 
?red' Sarita thf girls, .wid^* 
jyed and happy, huggiitf, 
-iosely th4 Handsome dolls., 
presented; o theni. thie boys'. 
fascinated- )y their- mtriguing 

toys. . . . ^ -^ . 'l^^.. 

The gay young faces ciune 
from ever section oT^-^ie- 

:-ommunit>- • \ -.:'•*■ 

■'■ .-^Bil y alkwr, Santa ■.■-'J|,t;; 

Bill Wai ker was S«ri-t:« 
Claus. hi^- jovial persoijaiity-^ 
and^_undei standing love -(jfr 
chilciren^ si thing through hp*. 
Old Saint : ick disguise, - . 

"the exclt jment of the party.' 
was greatly heightened by the 
delightful lerformance-of tbH 
Covan Kidi ies Review, whi^h 
demonstrat \A natural .talent 
combined \ ith fine,training.J,, 
The Doll Leaguers were ex-:. 
tremely fateful to WlUlir 
Covan for fis fine cooperatien ' 
Mimi Glendale,.>fjC 
geles Nut House, 
d candles f^ the 
f sweets • lovirif 


;t^- 


and to Mr 
the Los 
who dona 
hundreds 
youngsters 
The Doll 
been cons 
iTiost hard 
standing g 
munity. w 
unselfishly 
money and 
cheer and 
give assis^ince 
need. 


10 


eaguers have Ions 

ered one of- the 

.vorking and . out- 

oups in the coin- 

jiear after year. 

give of their time, 

energy to sprea:d 

happiness and to 

in times of 


SocU'l Club 


^ 



THEY LIKE THE EAGLE —TheO.opereitrs are one of 

the rii/itiv Ji-ts Antjrlrt qrr,ups lih'uh "like the E.nQle." The 
iluh toted 'iinnnimou'fi thnt rill its mrnihers sh^iiitd take ouf 
bhf year's iuh.uriptioti to the paper. Shoun above udmtring 


o/ir of the recent issues are. from left. Helen Stfiiart, Lilinh 
Durden. Christine Glasio. Orlean ll'tishington. Ann Crtiio. 
Marjone Parker and Joste Steuart. (Adams photo) 


nong. 

> 


. 'J. 

1 


r . 

■ t '- 

l'.< .i 



The Acquettes 
In Pre-Xmas Meet 

jThe Acquettes .Social »nd 
Charity Club had its pre- 
Christnias meefing ' at the 
beautifully decorated home of 
Alma Hammond, Ttoe Mc- 
'Kinley Ave. 

' Christmas gifts were ex- 
changed by the 15 members. 

A lovely basket containing 
$40 in groceries and a turkey 
was given to a family with 
eight children. The members, 
after heading the plight of the 
family, got together a box of 
clothes for the youngsters. 

Mrs. Alma Waller, the pres- 
ident, invited the members to 
her hoihe for Christmas. 

The new year will find the 
Acqiiettes "at the "Platter 
Party" of the Sigma Gama 
Rho Sorority at 2025 S. Ray- 
mond. "Bass" Harris, of radio 
fame, will be a guest at the 
party, with Donria TrSe mis- 
tress of cerenibnles. 


I 


"'j;aji. 


s7.W;W"«!»if;i?'ii"i>N«i«iiiira*-''>! 


•'Tfr- 


"HWSBSfi 


Bill Small wood 

ON THE DELIGHTFUL SIDE : 



Striking silver-threads- 
hrough-the-hlack tressed Ber- 
nice Barksdale took the Iron 
Horse out to Chi Monday for 
the Yuletide. Carolyn Bryant 
planed in Friday from her 
New York relaxation. Had sd 
much fun she's a-pinin' to 
turn around and go right back 
if she only c6uldl Xmas Day 
birthday: Mrs. Leroy Weekes. 

Johnetta Starks put aside 
her pins, needles and scissors, 
packed a few bags and with 
her mother took off Wednes- 
day via her '55 Capri for 
Beaumont. Texas, whence 
they'll attend : a family hup-, 
tial. Last Saturday Was nine- 
yeatold Lady George Forde's 
birthday so she had her circle 
of friends in, of course. 
Small* Fry 

Sunday, folowing the en 
'm'a s s e attendance " at the 


i.i . m< t':l:ai.i'i:,;..„;,in,''illl. i ;, j 

Players' Ring Theater of small 
fry Jack and Jill members 
• Group 3, they're known asi, 
the home of the Dr. W. Clyde 
Aliens was the scene of a sit- 
down supper party for the 
younguns. Local Jack and 
Jill line-up deserve a brava 
bow for certainly .they go 
places and do things instead 
of vaguely talking about it. 

Busiest, holidayers Iqcall) 
surely: The socially active' 
Quentin Barbei&s (Juanita 
Terry) here from DeeCte. And 
it's nice having them both! 
The Elliot Carpenters station- 
wagoned if back from a Fre8-_ 
no-weekend. Rhetta Jean Piick- 
erspn birthdayed on. the 12th. 
Daisy Covan checked in 
Queen of Angels. 

Janet and Llo/d Reese have 
two months to go now before 
that -stork date. Heleit Whit'' 


Ti 


, :\-, 


ii -•■iill 


1. -Hj., -..li..-.; -ii 'i. 


i 

I 

I 

t.'> 


man's sister (shes Salem Tutt 
Whitney's widow i leaves on 
the 2Tth for home via Chi. 
She's been out here two 
months. Helen's .son, Reggie 
and his wife, incidentally, are 
remaining on, out here. Eve- 
lyn Coleman holidaying with 
her daughter in the east. The 
latter is in schbol back there. 

You did know. I'm sure. Dr. 
Lawrence Jones. Piney Woods 
(-Miss.) School head, was in 
town? Bob King and a friend 
galloping toward their plane 
the otttfr a.m., eastbound for 
the Omega conclave whoop- 
de«do. In 'New York they have 
reservations 4-aiting at the 
Warwick, Waiting, too, on 
Bob is a crew-cut babe, ready 
in silverblue roink. -En route 
back here. Bob and traveling 
buddy will. ck> some Martini- 
' f ancj'ing around-. ChUr ! < 


I. 


LesFemmes 
Officers For 
'55 Named 

Les Petite Femmes held their 
last meeting of the year Sun- 
day with a brunch at the 
popular Tow n Tavern. 

Evelyn Thierry Williams 
was re-elected . as president. 
Members decided that, her 
cabinet had done such a 
wonderful job that they re- 
tained all of the other offi- 
cers including Mamie Taylor, 
vice-president; Beryl Wilson, 
secretary; Lela Hurst, corres- 
ponding sicretary; Cecelia 
Carr, treasurer; Katheryn 
Bowie, publicity; CljlraQuinn. 
sunshine chairman. Mem- 
l>ers are Bernice Avery. Mel- 
va Combs. Ruth Dennis. Clara 
T.Iarcee Benson, Ruby Jones, 
Marjorie Fraser, Edna M. Ray. 
and Goldie Moore. 

The first 'meeting of the 

new year will be held with 

•Mrs.-£cina Marie- Ray -Jan.^ 10. 




Businessman 

In Houston 

For Xmas 

Mr. Joseph Jones, 2012 
Union avenue, successful busi- 
ness man will fly to Houston. 
Texas to spend Christmas with 
his mother and four sist(?rs. 
Mr. Jones will l,eave Los An- 
geles on Friday Dec. 24 on 
-American Air Lines. He v.-ill 
visit his 'immediate family, 
>nd will also be a guest of 
.Ir. and Mrs. Sellars. of '85 
Irant St., Beauniont. Texas. 

On Christmas day he vill 
be a :guest of a party of about 
500 given in his behalf, and 
on Sunday. Mr Jones Will lat- 
tend church with his mother 
and four sisters. 

He will be the guest Suntlay 
afternoon of old home friends 
who will then later drive him 
to the airport to board Am«ri- 
ran Air Lines back to. ]his 
home in Los Angeles. 


An expec :ed- sad (jhristmia 
will now b ( a happy one fof 
14 needy ] infants arid twi 
needy fami ies. thanks to th^ 
Les Bienfa: santes Social 'am} 
Charity Cli; b. " i \j 

Pretty pihk arid blue lajtrl 
rttes are b ?ing given tOk-tM* 
babies. \v to are virtuWB^ 
without cJ >thing. Boxes ]t!|f 
food and a lothing are 'beiiw 
given to tl e families who*^ j 
cupboards ind closets- weire I 
bare, ^v ' ' 

"Each ye ,r through the «y j 
forts of clut activities we hale J 
been able 1 1 provide over.liyjS j 
hundred d«lars worth of in;- i 
fc nt garmfflits," Mrs. LiUilui | 
Gray, presilent of Les Keii* 
faisantes. slid, adding that-Ill^ 
most instartces the infants are' 
of unwed qiothers or broken 
homes. 

"Member! are looking fo^'- 
ward to thair annual "Stork" 
dance Jan. £2. at which tloB^ 
friends of E^s Bienfiasahtfes 
will again! contribute bahjy 
garments lor this project»" 
Mrs. Grav foncluded 


■T 


'■i 


Les Amoreux 
Club To Aid 
Wilson Homd 


Members of the wellknovn 
National Les\ Amoreux "ide 
Musique Club w'ill assist Mrs. 
Alberta L. Joyce in honoring 
the Daisy Wilson Foundation 
Home for the Aged at ■ the 
beautiful and centrally locat- 
ed home. 2283 S. Hobart' 
Blvd.. on New Year's Day. i 

A special musical prograrh 

will be presented as well las 

delicious refreshments. Thire 

is no adinissi(Mi, 


Utopial iCIub 
Fetes Jf nnings 


■tifc: 


The Utoiian Social dUb 
dispensed ivith 'its^ reguUlr 
•meeting, siitiirday and fai*' 
stead, celebflated the birthttjiy 
of its recdrding secretary-^ 
popular goK-playing, . tzoplqr* 
winning Le|oy Jenninss,^Sr. ■ 
The affav was an claftdo* 
St at the homeof 
Jennings at 1408 
Street. ITie Jc<3e* 
more thanjvA 
Leroy and, !his 
are :celebialJb4c 
lymoon ofzldnr 




rate breakfi 
Mr. and Mri 
E. Eighteen 
bration w; 
birthday fi 
wife . Maryi 
their h o n 
months. 

Birthilay 
wedding gi 
the couple 
Utopian 
- and other 


;ifts and'1)el|«^ 
ts were piMcntm 
kv membefs «Mfe« 
!b their, 
iters. . 


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8-Th« California Eagls Thurs.^ D«Cr 23/ 1 



^^^) DOT'S 

j r bj DO ROT HEk FOSTER 



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BAUAKA 



MOUNTS 

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'E.iSrERX ST.^RS f\St.a.L—\rn offi.rrs instnllrd Sumhv 
ters if the Enslrrn Star, fhnrtrrrd under the (itldfn P^ppy ( 
y are, f'nm Irfl, If orlhy .\Iot,ro>fs: tiith roses, (-.nrfne Pmther, 
• Mary :1nn llenry, Amndene Civtee, Jod\- Smith, Ruth Thown. 

Eastern Star 
Daughters In 
Installation 

Th* subordinat* chapters 
of the Los . Angeles area 
Dauerhters of the Eastern Star 
held their annual public in- 
stallation of officers last Sunt 
day at the John C. Jones Ma- 
sonic Temple. 

The chapters are chartered 
under the Golden Poppy- 
Grand Chapter, working: iin-, 
rier the most worshipful 
Hiram of Tyre (»rand Lodge 
AF and AM California juris- 
diction. 

The impressive ceremonies 
were conducted by the pa.st 
matrons under the direction 
of Corinth Brown, (irand In- 
structor. X ew^ ^ytfjtT fon.'i -fie'cted 
were preseTiTed with beautiful 
bouquets of American Beauty 
roses. Past ■ matron honors 
were bestowed upon Alice 
Kuykendal. Estella Dadson. 
Lanell Hicks. Pearly Davidson 
and Beulah McElroy. 

Among the dignitaries pre- 
sent were, the mother and 
father of the _ jurisdiction. 
Maude Brown and William F. 
Payne Sr.; the Supreme Ma- 
tron of Heroines of Jericho of 
the U.S.A.. Bernice Payne; and 
GraVid Worthy Matron and 
Grand Worthy Patron of Gold- 
en Poppy Grand Chapter, Fan- 
nie Mae Wil.son and Frank S. 
Patterson. Officers officiating 
were Frank S. Patterson, 
Grand Worthy Patron, presid- 
ing; Fannie Mae Wil.son, 
Grand Worthy Matron, mis-' 
tress of ceremonies; Franklin 
and Helen Boyd, marshall.s. 
Flowers were provided by Wil- 
lie Brown. 


hy the I'>iiui3h- 
I'lind (ihiiftrr, 
l.u(:lu-: Sii:ith. 
. i.i 1 1 ^ 'iiinij. 


Jr.isir hhnr, and Johnnie M. I luilish: ll'o 
Jr.mii Uark, Cinrimt Ruhardi'in, Erank S. 


lh\ Pr.lrnns. I'r/inHin l homfison,- 
Piiltirs'in and L. Jones. • 

(Photo hy Adetms) 


Sparkling lights and glo.Ai- 
wreaths shine at NVjndows jmd 
doors as the .social woV^d 
makes preparation for the 
gala holiday weekend. 

Atty. and Mrs. Carl Earles 
(Norma) invited friends in for 
coiktails and to .see the film 
that was taken at the The- 
opolis Smiths cocktail party 
on the night rtf the Kappa" 
hall. Myrtle Robinson walked 
off with a "Nosker" for her 
part in the film and hubby. 
Jesse, just silently beamed. 
Atty.s. Earles and Neusom 
win leave via airline on Mon- 
day evening for the Omega 
convention in Georgia. 

At SammT Davis' Homt 

Thursday evening found 
\our scribe high up. in the 
Holl\-\vood Hills on Sunset 
Pla/a Drive to Help Sammy 
Da\is. Jr.. and his dad cele- 
brate their birthdays. Sanhmy's 
was on Wednesday- and bi.s 
dad's on Simday. chatted with 
.such mo\ie greats as Mickey 
Rooney and his wife. Janice, 
Jeff Chandler. Betty Abbott. 
Tony Curtis. Gloria DeHaven 
and Sammy Sr."S charming 
wife. Pee Wee. 

Holly, red berries and the 


•in- 


<n- 


-% * 


. To help create the spirit of 
festivity inany serves ■"spirits" 
to those who drop in for a bit 
of holiday cheer. Among those 
drinks- favored throughout the 
nation are Hot Buttered Rurn, 
Tom and Jerry ^, and Egg Nog. 

Tom and Jerry 

For 6, servings, beat to a 
stiff froth 6 egg whites and 
beat in 6 tablespoons pow- 
dered sugar. In janother boWl 
beat 6 egg yolks |nd fold thern 
into the white jnix. Heat 1 
quart njilk to the boiling point. 
Into eachtf-up-ptft 1 jigger of 
rum and 'a jigger of brandy. 
On top of this place 2 or 3 
tablespoons of egg mix. Fill 
the cup with hot milk and 
sprinkle with nutmeg. Serve 
with a spoon. May be stirred 
briskly and sipped or eaten 
by spoonfulls. 

E99 Nog 

For 5 quarts, beat until 
light 12 ^gz yolks. Add 1 
pound powdered sugar. Add 
very slowly, beating constant- 
1\. 1 quart brandy, rum or 
whisky, 2 quarts cream, 1 
quart milk. Now beat the egg 
whites and add '2 teaspoon 
salt. Fold this into the yolk 
mixture. Serve with a gener- 
ous sprinkle of nutmeg. This 
is elegant served from a 
punch bowl. 

Hot Buttered 
.This is made rn the indiv- 


I iroill a. 


ual cups and served steaming 
hot. For it. place a tablespoon 
of butter, 1 teaspoon powdered 
sugar and U cup of rum in a 
cup. Add '4 cup boiling water 
and sprinkle generously with 
nutmeg. 



warm glow of Christmas cj 
dies greeted A.K.A- membk« 
as they entered the Golden 
State for their annual din:)er 
dance^on Friday evening, 
"rors and their 4^ubbies 
joving the*delicious ham d 
ner and yuletide -festivit es 
were: Dora and Brice Taylor, 
'i«llicc and Maceo Long, Marian 
and Ed Maddox. Carl and 
Norma Earles, Helen and 
Theopolis Smith. Chloe ajnd 
Allen Woodard. and happibst 
of all was Melba Wilson who 
recently reconciled with ]ier 
hubby, William. They left on 
Monday for a short stay in 
Phoenix and will be back in 
L; A. for Christmas. 

Bachelor Farewell 

Forsaking bachelorhood on 
Sundav afternoon, At»y. Vm- 
gene Hall had his last fling 
at a stag party gWen for 1 im 
by Atty. Curtis Taylor and|he 
boys. 

Dorothy Carey will eni er 
tain her bridge club on; Mm 
day evening. 

Holidcers having their kn- 
iiuai Christmas dinner ps'rty 
on Thursday evening at [the 
home of Laura Tiohnson. 

Singer ' Lawrence Stoiie'.^ 
mother -left for Texas jind 
ChrLstmas \«-ith th'e folks. 

The Leslie* Shaws (Anhe) ' 
off to Ccflumbus, Ohio* "and 
hoping for Ti white Chri-Stiias^ 
with their family. Orbah 
Burns also heading for fco"- 


ly 


iumbus 
Hpf fam 

euth 
nie'. will 
tion »with 
mentft 
Leonaiyl 

J( 
Dr. an ! 
all smile 

dar :e' 


1 )aded with' gifts for 


S] lencer 

5 


bit 


nei f 


lans 
telling 
be a 
family iri 

South 
Council 
mas part; 
on Dec, 
ty Park. 


and son, Len> 

pend a short vaca- 

her family in Sacra-. 

will be back to 

tor Christmas.. 

New Toner 

. Mrs. Ellis. Toney 

^t the Phi Delph- 

on Friday and, 

that there will 

addition to their 

1955. 

(ntury Coordinating 

11 sponsor a Christ- 

for trtp youngster! 

at Athens Coun- 


fr !nds 


Ce 

v»i 


2lrd 


Sammy 
Chazz 
be on 
son's Ni 
Theater 
clubs a 
interest e<i 
please 

'For cen 
time,.tVijB 
have tu 
Even if 
>vithout \ 
there ar* 
of love 
fellow m 
these are 
sures. M^ 
es toeacfi 
Merry Ch 
tliy, 


.'1. 


Crj wfbrd 
ha nd 

^ht 

01 1 

ni 


J J>ie'ajfi»h* 

Davis, Jr., ^ssUred 

■ ird that He will' 

for Abie -Robin • 

at the Linaoln 

the 30th. All social 

friends of Abl^ 

in participating, , 

^ the 'Eagle officp. 

uries^ at Christma.f» 

lou^hts of •families 

to thejr -blessing."?; 

sorne • families J|r« 

!mp<)ril possessions, 

th^ spiTitual' ories 

oflfam|iIy, love of.their 

and ilove of good— 

the richest of trta* 

sinteiiest best wislh-. . 

of you tor a ve|ry 

■istmaii anid' * heal/> 

..&»>,->. .'Vaar V*ft*; .' :' 


itht 
rij id 


« n 


•^ • / 


pros] «rous 'New Year. 



I 1 


IS 

ts, 
$et, 
iol- 
fe- 
iilly 


IIEDDISa RECJPTIOS—Thr iormer J uanitei Terry and. 
her liushand. (Jiientin Rnrhee. iir>r honored Sund/iy in a io;ely 
U'eddinif rtteplion. Shotin ahofe tii f the niii. hinds, ioqether 
with Jiridr's f>iirrrils, brother, sister nnd sister-in-liiw. Emm 


.left, hntk rou-' (Jiientin. Beirhi 
'Afrs. If. If, Terry' is senled. 
\Hre .Mrs. Reirbef. Mrs. Erank 
(See story on fneie 7} 



I 



"J//7T the olndsnme spirit of the 
hi)lidnys he ni/h you through 
out the entire yeor.'' 


:* in Gfnermss 


F. 


SEASON'S GREEIINGS CI 


Dresses ^— Coats — \S port sic car 
4360 CENTRAL AD. 3-0004 


-from- 


BARBARA & ROCHEILE MOUNTS 


- I' 
f I 


full 
just 


r. ff. If. Terry. Ernnk Terry, 
ront. uii/e a'rouped nround her 
Terry find .Miss Beilleih Terry. 


Not vulnerable, a gam* 
worth about 400 , p o i : 
whereas a three-^fick 
floiibled. is worth 5(K). It 
lows theri tlL»r the' .^?t'is 
ferable to the^ame, especl 
In duplicate, 

N 

S— in 9 X X 3( X 

! H— Q 
D— X 

C— Q J X X x 
' W 
S— K J x,x S— X 
H— K 10 X X X H— A U 9 
D — ^x D^xx,ixxx 

C— A X x C— IC \(, 

S 
S— A Q 
H— J .5 4 
^ b— A K Q J 10 
' ■} C— 10 X X 
VV N "E S 

.- IS: P INT P 

2H' P P 3lD 

■ P ; P. Dbl jP 

■'• p-"-i • p ■ r 

Justified 

South has a good hand 
a ^pa.ss over one no-lr'um 
ju.'ilified as he was hoj^i 
Ihkt t^hey would go on 
three. - In this particular 
stance he was quite wro 

West opened the biddin 
a bare 13 points and two 
dable suits, although Ije 
them baclRvards. But it 
because of this error that 
whole hand took place. 


Lon.\ xvhal Seinttt is pullinn 
u'P'li) your home. . . . n peii k 
hf happy wishes from us, 
fir you!\ j. - v I 


1 1' 
1 » 

- , I f 

JEFFERSON JEWELERS S I 

II. 



We Sp«cl«lii« in Wa^ch and Clock Reprring 
All Work Guaranteed 

UNldfj SHOP - .-. iJ- 
JIMIRSON ILVO. lO SANGiLES II, CALIF. 





SMARl 

4364 


lid have bi«l two 
|r one, and the hand 
[Id have been played 
leaTtR, or posaibly 
but "riot • likely 
tonds dotfbled. But, 
best place for it, 
[East and West are 


ind 

is 

ng 

to 

in- 

on 
bid- 
bid 

[is 
^he 

as 


East 'w( 
hearts ovi 
likefy wo 
at four 
only - thn 
three- dia: 
this is t: 
as far as; 
concernei 


West lei a low spade, a poor 
lead as East's pass of two_^ 
hearts saM that she had mOre. 
support fhere. Sduth took 
this 'trici and led trumpa 
twice. Flom the dummy-, he 
could telBthat East had only, 
one spad( . His shock on tlie 
second tn mp lead was almost 
too much The situatiorrwas 
hopeless. )f. course, unless t 
opppnentj could be tricked. 

South 1( d a club which Ei^tN 
took. Ea 5t led the ici 
hearts, a id a small 
W^est got in and led bick » 
smiall spi de_. On t"his 1 trick 
East thr( iv- away ther last 
clulb. 

I? she lad- ruffed, the bid 
would ha I'e been set three 
tricks, wi h a profit of 500 
points. As it was,- South 
turned ft e dia'iViond tricks 
and two s lades for doS^ntwo. 

Classes are held at ; the 
Omega H iuse eacl^ Monday 
at iT:30 ii the evening/; All 
bridge pi vers are^ invited to 
. attend. ' j 


-r;- 



flW</ 0' 

hope that 
"~ bring o 
., well b\ 
you a 


S HO 

CENTRA 


ti'y 


nd 


If siticere i -5 

he h-oliJays \ A 

joy amii 'Ji 

nng'for .f 

yours. "ii^ 

PPE ^ 


I 


I- 


I 


. I Q''<^etlhgs 


From 


IS 

11 

II 




11 
If 



if 
1 1 
II 


Our sincere a\id simple uisli 
for yoti ■ . i i^my you luivc 
. a very Merr^' Christmas! 


- I 


CAPT. and MRS. ROSGOE JONES 

30- 


IRENE and PHIL A.' JONES 

jP- Our tttsk for your happiness thtf Holid/iy Sehson. is 

V- 9 as lasting and tiue as iht start aBoteJ— 'jf: %• 

i^ ■ ^ '^i- ■ ^ ■■■'-■L' " " fi •-> ' r •: ■' I •■ i -' 1 1 

I CAPT. and MRS. ABBOTT R. JONES || i' .■' ! ( ■ •■ I : • | ' ' %^ 

|yaLdMR^.vANbH^^^^ || DR. BOOKER T. TUCKER | 



■ i 
1^' 



MARTIN'S 

1661 E. ibSRD ST. 


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* T«rf liBdignittAd young 
matron was found lying in »n 
«Ue>-, parUally dressed ^nd 
VM-y enbriated. by local Badge 
Carriers. "I was attacked," she 
cried. "Is. that so?" Blue Boys 
replied. Results: a booking at 
City jail for drunk and disor- 
«ierly conduct. She must have 
had a dream! c 

"»• mea«T. Mo runnM" Wal- 
ler, Eagle advertising wjiiz; has 
three beautiful chickess who 
Would just love to hanghis ad- 
vertising heck oh a matrimb- 
nial rope. His reply. "After Ive 
won the National Sweepstakes, 
Well— maybe." 

Th» Littl* Bi9 Shot— at the 
AVint^ League Ball, who waff 
afraid to bat an eye of recogni- 
tion at his "back-street" friend 
in front of his socially promi- 
Tient parts'. Out of sight at the 
bar, he was all kisses and 
friendliness. Wonder if the in- 


Iferest of a very important 
I "snow" in the snobbed one. had 
lanj-thing to do with the Big 
i Shot's nervousness. / 

I KtT. J. L. Biem&ain'i — radio 
! broadcast of Dec. 12 oa which 
[he stated, "Cora would be sing- 
ing in St. Paul until the Lord 
I calls her home and I hope those 
jf^w -words find you well and 
I happy." may have lost him his 
i one staunch scribe supporter. 
: Ole scribe thought he was just 
;a nvisunderstood humble man! 
;Now just looks blank at the 
mention of his name. 

.Lady Will Carr — A pretty lo- 
cal gal who's knocking "em 
dead at the ••Sundown" Club in 
Bell. The fact she's on the 88 in 
a Bell club speaks for itself. 
We'd like to glimpse this doll 
on the "Strip." she's deserving. 
'ErlliM Hightewer — the cute 
little doll in Newton Records is 
being transferred to University 
~ (Continued on Page 10 • 


Crowd Pleaser 
Modern Teaser 
At Club Tiffany 

Lee Konitz. one of the finest 

i modern saxophonists «f the 

day. is appearing nightly at 

i Jack Tucker's popular Tiffany 

Club. Normandy and Eighth. 

I Tucker is holding th.e Konitz 

'quartet through the holidays 

after the strong first week 

showing of the modern jazz 

unit, whose fans have been 

flocking to dig this music every 

night. 

The Tiffany is .still* offering 
\ Sunday afternoon jazz concerts 

with Konitz and his quartet 
, starting at 3 p.m. Reservations 

for New Year's Eve are being 
I accepted in person or by phone. 



^^SES 



SOUNDTRACK 

-^ wHh 


E3S373B' 


r 


TOU CANT HARDLT GET THAT NO MORE f 

. JOYCE BHYANt. chantuese as delectable dish comparaMe 
to a chocolate sundae without straws. Mowing 'em down at me 
palm-studded Cocoanut Grove promises in her skin-tight gowins 
and ear-arresting pipes. The lady is one of the very few "relg- 
uljtr" people in her illustrious profession. No highbrow antics 

from mellow miss.' She's as*' — — J — 

friendly as a letter from home I store is that scribling 


SYMPHONIC CHORUS 

The Los Angeles Symphonic 
Chorus, topflight adult con-' 
certizihg unit of the city's Bu- 
reau of Music, will sing a spe- 
cial Christmas Eve broadcast 
over the coast-to-coast facilities 
of the NBC network. 


and a w-hole lot more unassum- 
ing. Needless to remark, we'd 
sure as shooting like to see 
more of her contemporaries in 
the same salary bracket stay as 
sweet as they were when they ;pjay^->, 
were hustling bookings and \ 
trying to make ends meet. We I 
were Miss Bryant's guest last j 
night at the Gip^e. and the 
doll was graciousness personi- I 
fied. Sa\s she could hardly 
believe her car^ when asked to 
pose" for current Ebony in the 
5 Most Beautiful Wimmin ar- 
ticle. The beaut mustuve been 
kidding. She's Helen of Troy 
in bronze. 


IS That scrit)lmg gent's 
sidekick BETTT EDWARDS. J.. 
QuMtion Mark: Why did fak- 
tastic JO rREMICE suddenly 


The doll in the 
ment at Markey's 


toy depart- 
Department 


quit Bdwj's "HeuM of Flowws' 
' . Seems Josephi^ie-! 

was stopping the show cold 

and the other leads were 
j squawking loudly. The pUy 
I that deals with a 'call houie 
' Madam " also stars Pcotlit Mda 
'Bail«T Bellson and youthful 
I DiahooB Carroll. New Yoik 
i papers, pleasecopv! 1 

I LIONEL HAMPTON'S "CEN- 
ITRAL AVENUE BREAKDOWN" 

record is making a comebatK 
I by way of the platter pusher's 

turntables but the Avenoo 
(Continued on Page lOi 


^is" 


I, 



GOURMET GUIDE 

[Recommendations for Family Dining* 



Nacliito Stays 
At Club Oasis 
Another Seven 

The exciting, danccable music 
of Machito and his 14-piece 
band is drawing raves and 
more raves from enthusiastic 
throngs nightly at the West 
Coast's most beautiful jazz 
mecca. the completely redecor- 
ated Club -Oasis. Western at 
3Sth. For this, his first West 
Coast appearance. Machito is 
providing • his ow n inimitable 
combination of brilliant jazz 
and thrilling .A fro -Cuban 
rhythms. 

Reservations are being ac- 
cepted now for the . fabulous 
New Yca.'s Eve Oasis offering. 
Aland Di.xon. one of the na- 
tion's smartest young musical 
revue producers, will bring in 
the Oasis Creole Mambo Revue, 
crammed full of gorgeous girls, 
singing, dancers, comedy and 
music for both listening- and 
dancing., plus favors and the 
happiest feeling in town. Two 
bars for fast service and a fast 
paced show, pki.s dancing, make 
the Club Oasis the best bet for 
New Year's Eve frolicking. I 


!■ 3 


k 


-\ 


=.-| 


: \ 



WhwMvar Ywi'r* Hungry 
lf« Tim* t* Eat •» . . . 

DYNAMITE'S 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
4701 Central, AD. 2-5918. 

OPEN EVERY DAY: 10 A.M. 2f 2 A.M 

^^■■^— . Featuring ^^— — — — ^^^ 


H-GOOD DRINKS - FINE FOOD 

GUMBO FILE EVERY FRIDAY 


Pmrsonally Cookwf by 'Dynamlf 



Piano Artistry by 

EDDIE "88" DUDLEY 
at thm Watt's finmrt 

PIANO lAR 


^•«<^ 


«««*«**• 


W« Cattr te Club* 


DYNAMITE'S 

Seuthwett Carner 47th and Central 


MACHITO! 

and his full band 

The "DIZZY 
GILLESRIE" 

MAJ 


OF THE 


IMBO 


DANCING! 

N«wly D«corat«d 
New Bar 

CLUB 
OASIS 

WESTERN AT 38TH 
RE. 4.5s 10 


Festive Yule Greetings 


« M> T AVA T *VAVAVAVA T AVAVAVA g * T AV*VAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAV*V*V MVgV3 



IT'S "THE MOST" AT lERT and lAl S 

CLUI I i 

MILOMO 

• DELIGHTFUL ATMOSPHERE 

• SERVING BEST FOOD AND DRINKS - 

ExMllant' Enlartainmant by Lauit Rivara at tha Organ 

Open Doily 10 a.m. te 2 a.m. 

MILOMO 

2829 S. WESTERN 
RE. 9S85 





WAWAWAWAWtMAWkWAWtWAWAWkWk'WAWkWAWAWkWAWAWAWkWAWli^^WltWkWKWil 



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,* FtiM Drinks • Holiday Dinners 

Whmrt Ivsry Ovvst Is. • Cmlmbrity 

9 CHlicKEN SHACK 

and 
VIC S COCKTAIL LOUNGE. 

UOSVs E. VERNON ^ cou.ns. „.,h^, AD. 3-9239 




- ■ k 



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J. Hodge Proudly Presents: 

HUGH BELL _^ 
TEDD^t^DWARct^ 
FRANCES 6 ADDISON 
MARGO GIBSON 
J. HODGE'S ORCH. 
GLORIA JEAN, Singer 

THE NEWLY REMOOELEO, ^ 

CELEBRITY CLUB , j i 

A*k About Club Rmtalt 


I u t\*i t\*i k\hs\it aW «W*ti/ hWthkWt^tw ^'itA'fi k^tii *\t/ ».v s^tt^i t^iki:^ 


1909 Imperial 

.Phoiw LO. «-9457 


JOHNNY'S 

WAX 

w 
o 

R 
K 
S 




CHOICE DINNERS FOR THE ENTIRE FAMIIYI 
i COCKTAILS OF DISTINCTION . • ' 

GOURMET RECOMMENDS FAMOUS 

RUBAIYAT ROOM 


af 


li^^ 


HOTEL WATKINS 

2022 W. Adams Blvd. 

Rf. 2-8111 

William "lill" Wafkint - Host of Coaft 


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^ 


^}j-rokH y^ur Cl^ntire t^taff ... 


MERRY 

CHRISTMAS 

[ J j EboiE ATKINSON'S 

TOWN TAVERN 


'\ 


36TH PLACE k WESTERN 




BY JOHNNY MORRIS. 

BillT Eckstino's new waxing 
of all tbo thing* you aro is 

another example of B singing a 
standard as it should haye been 
sung long before. 

HAIG 'N' HAIG 
The king of the baryaxe was 
back home' recently. Right back 
where, it all started^the Jazz 
center of the nation — Tho Haig. 
CeriY Mulligan's .unique style 
\va<: born when John Bennett 
decided to get rid of the piano 
at The Haig. "Man.'* said Ger, 
pulling his belt a little tishter. 
"Who needs a box?" Gerry wa^ 
sounding better than ever. John 
ErdleY doesn't \\^\e rhettie 
Baker's big pretty tone, but he 
blows «5o much cleaner. 

The Haig is the answer to a 
jazz hound's dream. John Ben. 
nett has- never wavered from 
his progressive policy which be- 
gan in 1931. This is the only 
club in the countr>' that has 
i dared to o^er a steady diet of 
I jazz for i. prolonged period. 
I Pacific Jau Recording Cempa-' 
nY isn't the only thing that 
boasts its beginning at the 
Haig. Notables who have cut 
their ''aye-teeth'' there include: 
Errol Garner, Red Norvo, Ger, 
Chettie. et a I. Dave Bnibeck 
made his first West Coast ap- 
pearance th'ere. Right now. 
John's featuring the Frank Ros- 
solino mob. starring Charlie 
Mariano, the alto man \\\\o 
made Kenton fans forget Ken-- 
its. For real jazz. \ou can't beat 
The Haig. Hats off to J. B. 

I JOHHNY'S JAMS 

.Chris Connors sings CCapi- 
toll'. Main course on this menu 
i^e All About Ronnie ... Bird 
and Diz iClefi. .Ml of 'em. . . . 
The Genius, of Art Totum No. 2. 
Really takes ynuOver The Rain- 
bow. . . . PinkY ^y Sarah 
Vaughn. \\\ nbligato. this one's 
for BabY- ... BillY Eckstine 
sings Tendefrly (MGM). Noth- 
ing like One For M^ BdbY* 

Things Te^^me 
; A waxing by JerrY Fielding of. 
: Gypsy in My Soul. . . . \n LP 
'by Spud Murphy called 12 
' Tones For 4 Saxophones. .. . . 



//o/*/>"fr as onr of the, 
dicalfd ('tlumnlit's ann 
fortnnntef y.rre outstan 
erf moit tHely to soar t'p 
in ''Carmen J'inr<. ' cur 
honor. Dorothy Dnndn 
offer her.serviees for \i(f, 
Lincoln Theatre. 


uill be 
n nev: film stars 
uat selection of 
ing J urine/ the i 
top stardom. 7 
rently in release, 
iffe..uas one p* t) 
'ie's Big Siyht, 


selected hy-f Hfdia 

of: 1955 in the syit' 

ftlayers whose per- 

r^rrfnt year and U'Ao 

■star's perfohmanci 

ion her the coveted- 

first great start i« 

fcember 30th, at the 


Starts Sat. Xmas 


Payl 


Judy 
Garland 


It 


Jam^s 
Masan 



IS BORN 

Exclusive LJli 
I Showing 

PASSES 

Matinee 75c Gen'l 4^l|<i 
Evenings, Salt., Su 
Holidays, 
$1.00 General Admiisi 


P DOWNTOWN , 
QJuwwtmt 
i^ ^ \\ S'rp-*: . V. "^J'i 

PARK FRH INT srjTfM lOT N'lt'; i iU! 


For »• Mostesf ^ . . 

HOIIDAY FUN 

Aftend — h 
B. KINGS' 

llear Him Sine 
'nroi Upset Me Baby" 

(QST XMAS 



Moil. 


40 


eik: 


Nite/Dec. 27 
t AUD. t 


^:- 


6 S. Central 


NIMITLY 


LIE KONITZ 


QUARTETTE 

BOMrMH^r 4W4*e winn| 

""m::.v,v; TIFFANY clui 


NO COVIR 

NO ADMISSION 


.(Car 


JAZZ SCSSiONt 

Sii*d<r fr«*" I p. I 
FKU rAIKm6 
DU. 2i20t 


'BETTY MARTINA STUDIO Of DANCE ' 


SOUTH LOS ANGELES 

Modern — Afro — America — Clatsj 
Private Leksent — Screened 
■■Hat— Tap— ahrMiHt—tia—liitarprati «•-!■■»!• 
Jiva— Acr*b«tk-|liidivi4iral ar laiamt 

THE [EXCLUSIVE SCHO< 
103S7 Croesus Street, L. A. '2 


, HOLLYWOOD 

— Oriental 
:iasse> I 

■Tampla-Nativa-. 

TaadiiHS 1 1 

LOrein «^65« 


CHARLES f^RYME 


(Malibu Beach's 
Favorite Pianist) 


at LACARIBE^COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

HOLDAY DINNERS A SPECIALTY - FUN - DRINKS -IfROLIC AT ALL TIMES 

Ci ARK HOTEl\ | ] PRospoct 53S7 ; I r j L ^ WASHINGTON & CEN TRAL 

• •••••*•••••••••••••••••••••• 


\ 


\ 


eason s 



In the devoted spirit o( 
the three kings, let each 
oK us bring to Christ- 
rtMS the supreme gilt oF 
love and good will to- 
ward all. 


CRISPUS 
A. WRIGHT 


GENE NORMAN PRESENTS 

XMAS RHYTHM & BLUES CONCERT 

3 4fOUR SHOW FEATURING 

THE GLOVEItt - BI6 JAf McHEELY 

THE ROilNS - THE PUfTERS 
THE JEWELS - TKE CHEERS - THElMEDALLIONS 

SHRINE AtDlTWllM 

MONDAY XIG^T, DEC. rTTH 
Ticket* from $1.|50 at So. Calif. 
All Mutuail Agencies — 


I • 


To Our Many'T-riends and Cuswpmtrs 




-:\ 


MERRY MSTHAS 
andaHAPFrNEWYEAR 

SAY- WAY 

1994 W. lEFFERSON ^ 
" RE. 4 1891 { 

Mr. and Mrs. I . M. dMOthani S 


KING ORK IN POST-XMAS 


/if' 


•■3 1 

;kit {■.-■ 


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• •••*'¥-¥-¥'-¥'-¥'^ 


DANCE 


^ ^ ^ 



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-¥- -^ • • 

27 


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lO-Tlw fllfarnia iggto Thurt., D«c. a S, 1934 

Gene Norman Presents 
Rhyihrit 'N Bhies Show 
Monday Nite at Shrine 


si The Shrine Auditorium again 
II is the site of the Annuaf Christ 



^^reetinai 



I 


f 

I- 


MOtl. Jf 

lABnrn in the hush of a Hnly f, 
^i^ight, our Saribur stil/ijf^ 
.M.lives in the hearts of all^-' 
&those uho love peace and 


mas Show presented by Gene 
Norman, this year on Monday 
night, December 27th at 8:30 
p.m. Because of the growing 
interest in Rhythm and Blues 
music, jovial Gene Norman is 
making the Show this year a 
gigantic cavalcade of the top 
recording artists in the country. 

Featured will be The Clovers. 
The Robins, The Jewels, The 
Platters, The Medallions, The 
Cheers in their first Los An- 
geles appearance, the band of 
Big Jay McNeeley, and many 
more. 

Tickets may be purchased at 
Southern Calif. Mu.«ic Co. 737 
S. Hil St., and all Mutual 
Agencies. 


I 


their felloiv men. 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank 
^. Terry 


I 

I 
I 


N 
O 
W 


50 


LINCOLN till Robinson 

Canlral t, 33rd Cantral A 43rd 


AD. 5351 

Starts _£wrMl«y 

"SHIELD FOR 

MURDER" 

"JESSE JAMES' 

WOMEN" 


AD. 1-9341 

St«rtf Swnilay 

"TRACK OF 

CAT' 

"CROSSED 

SWORDS" 


Golden State 
Expands, Needs 
New Salesmen 

'•Golden State Mutual needs 
top-flight insurance salesmen." 
Norman O. Houston, the com- 
pany's president, stated this 
week. 

'The American people." he 
said, "are buying more insur- 
ance protection than ever be- 
fore. Always adjusting to meet 
existing needs, GSM is increas- 
ing the number of service of- 
ficies as well as insurance serv- 
ices. Our company offers excel- 
lent opportunity in the sales 
field." 

Texas Senriccs Increos* 

Indication of GSM expansion 
is the Company's operations 
in Texas. The area, under the 
super\ision of John h. Payton. 
a.'ssislant superintendent of 
agencies, will get new support 
with the ariditiori of a Beau- 
mont general agency, managed 
hy Clarence Ssm.s. former GSM 
repre.senl alive in SaiUa Monica. 

One of the new recruits to 
the (;SM insurance sales field 
in Texas is Ernie Banks. Chica- 
go Cubs' short stop, who plans 
to transfer to' the (JSM Chiiago 
office with the commencement 
of spring baseball training. 

Plans for opening a new of- 
fice in Chicago are also under J 
wav. 




I , 



JOllS CILPIS AS D AS 1 1.1 LAS DA. luo featured 
darners tilth the famous London Frsli; al Ralli t . will danir 
in the nrti' and e.xiitint/ SAPOLI hallit uhert the-iomfiany 
ofifiis itt limited entfapement at Shrmr A udiloriuni on Dceem- 
•her _'.•>. Si.xtren different Imllets uill he presented duriiii/ run. 


People & Places 



(Continued from Page 9i 
Records this week. If anyone 
can ma.ke ii there, she'll be the 
one. Great gal. 

Xarl *^h* Ctaat Meuthpicc*" 
Broody moves to new offices as 
soon as his clients stop pushing 
him back into his old offices. 
His batting average is still big 
league. 

Malbrou9h'«, at Exposition 
and Western, for all your last 
minute Xmas shopping. This, 
great husband anrt wife team 
give the same million dollar 
smile if you spend a dime- or 
buy one of their very stylish 
suits. Drop by and prove it. 

>«arl Bailey collap.sed on the 
set of "Hou.se of Flowers" and 
Juanita Hall of "Bloody Mary" 
.'^outh Pacific fame went on 
with three hours notice. The 
melody of love. 


'Valda, wlih the interpretive 
hips is going out great guns 
for .^bie Robinson Night at the 
Lincoln. Dec. ."JO. F:verybody that 
is anvbody will be there. 

BOSALIE ORSBEN SCOTT 
(Continued on Page 11^ 


Joseph Szigeti 
To Give Concert 

Inausiiraling his ."iOih anni- 
\ersar> on the United Stales 
conicri slage!" Joseph .Szigeti. 
one of the greatest violinists of 
all time, will give his only, Los 
.■\ngrles r<'crtal of the .sea.son 

; on Saturday evening. January 
i<. -in the Philharmonic audito- 

' rium. as the opening etent in 
the B'nai B'rilh .Messenger 
Foundation project for the ben- 
efit of the new Mount Sinai 
Hospital. 



I. A 


SOUND TRACK 

(Continued from Page 9> 
still deader than last week's 
tabloids! ... 

iX's LAWRENCE STONE'S 
first tiay on earth day. Send 
him a message to 1136 W. 37th 
St. "rte little guy with the 
"king-size" voice will appreci- 
ate hearing from you! . . . 

ABIE ROBINSON NIGHT is 

snowballing with .\rthur Lee 
Simpkins. Lee Kenitz, I,anet 
Leigh and Tony Curtis who 
will more than likely join the 
list of entertainers' for his big 
deal! ... A tip of the battered 
ber^t to SAMMY DAVIS and his 
spc^k. And thanks. Junior, 'for 
the 'invite to your pawtee. . . i 
Let's salute torso - twisting 
Valda with the 39 inch hips 
goes to N'Yawk soon to wow 

[the city slickers with her 
gyrations! 

Chades Limited, the haber- 
d^asher. giving away Xmas* 
gobblers with ever>' pur<hase 
of a set of fine vines from his 

I cloth palace on Broadway. . . . 
General White and Edith Qwens 
are shopping for a parson, and 
it couldn't happen to a cooler 
couple. . . . RUBY BERKELY 
GOODWIN and company will 
displav a "Prelude to Christ- 
mas" drama at the Torrance 
theater (226.5 E. 22nd i at Gram- 
ercy about two nites before St. 
Nick's annual visit. Phone for 
re.servalions! 

NADINE COLE sorely mis.sed 
from the hostess gig at club 
INTIME. real's indispensable 
as a loft arm! . . . LADY WILL 
CARR entertaining the peasants 
at the SUNDOWN club in iBell. 
California. And go.sh, isn't 
that the samp nite spot thai 
didn't want the suntan tenth 
r>f a nation to darken their 
doors a while back. Now the\' 
are doing their level best to at- 
tract people. Meaning your 

I green can make the scene if 
you're atall interested. 

; GIGGLE JUICING TRIO at 
Town Tarem: Chester Parks, 

i Doris "China Doll" Spencer and 

Iphotog HARRY ADAMS.. That 

I \icious. vicious Vodka. 2's 
Company. "Kut 3's a shroud!... 
Is it just because we're a 
kolyumnist that some of the 
Xmas Cards we've received are 
on su(h an "offbeat " kick??? 
. . . But the Lathan*^ (Mabel 
Scott) was the merriest .so far! 
. . . M AH ALIA JACKSON'S ra- 
dio broa<lrast Saturday is a 
tonic for tired ner\es. She's a 
gospellbinder! Hey. Walter 
Windshield, that's a coinword! 
Maybe it wasn't the first lime 
the> iiave danced in the church. 
(Continued on Page 11) 



1 


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::j: 


I 
I 
I 


MERRY X 


^ 


I HAPPY 


.---.If;. 


fTo ell eF our friends everywhere jge our best, wishes. -£([ 
for e reel eld-F«shibned Yulctide, toast-warm ^^ithft* 
love «ifd friendship , . . ttir-brisht with the sparkle.^ 
fof children's eyes. jfe: 

'■ f-A -. I 5 

WALTER JOSEPH MILLIR, Manager Z: 

REGAL HOTEL and ANNEX | 


• IS I. SIXTH ST. 


MA. 5-7671 


f 

t |i 
t 

% 

' « r 


. fr6m our . . . 

STAFF OFFKERS ond DHtEaORS 


ROSSMORE HOTEL 

<ST. ; .; ii \ ' 

HASTON I. WOOMIN, Manafer 


905 I. SIXTH ST. ,1 MA. 5-70^0 


r-i 



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S-1 


of«eitin«.pre-p««§«n<tw«>rry-i*«* ^g^^ 

y«ur funds »• Mts pr«i»*rt«<«. » W>n« term r>als lik» ^ 

.J ^^ for the y«««gs«ers e«i> plawed awl »*^ '<* «*'^«^*'y- 
•p Start 9Mr MCoMit ncm,9mmt every P^da> 

L« .s Mp jrwi ""i^ **• "^^"^ 






IX. '. 


OPfN YOUt ACCOUNT TODAY 

BROADWAY FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN 
ASS'N OF LOS ANGELES j 

CUtRfNT MTMEST RATE 3M% PfR ANNUM 

AD. 3-7246 

lOpmn Account for Only $1) 
OfnCE HOURS ' 


I 

I 


4329 SOUTH 
BROADWAY 



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The 


AND 

NEW, 


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from 


Lunc ys 




YEAR 


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4 £_ 


'■9t. 


MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR GI^ND OPENlMG 


BY WRITING 

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, 1050 E. 4drd PLAC 

LOS ANGELES 11, CALIFORNIA 


, 




"May the joy of Christ vifis 

shine brightly in your heart . »-. 

and the jSevo Year bring another 

365 happy days of blessing 
to you and yours 


Monday tbreush Thursday *:0« A.M. to 4 P.M.-Friday 1 1 A.M. te 7 P.M. 


RICHARD R. WRIGHT, III, MaiM«er 


Member of Federal leaq Sank System 



MR. FAT BURGER 


- J 


! 2601 Central Avenue 
|3021-23S. Western Ave. 
I 2743 W. Pico Blvd. 


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^ Js the Wise Men fol- 
|r: loued the Star to the 
" scene of our Saviour s 
birth, may all of us be 
guided by the lights of 
His spirit through aU 
the days of our years. 
Let u s gat h e r i n 




% i -5: Church on Christnias 
# l/^ to sing His praises in 
joyous carols and to 
bow our heads hum- 
bly in a prayer of 
f thanks for the eternal 
- glory of His message. 
. .' i I M 


- ^- 


5 4^\laUonal J^roadcastiiig \^^ 

WESTERN DIVISION 

AND .jj"|| -y. 

KRCA Television Chunhet 





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BORROW 



OR MORE 


|0n Your I 

REAll 
ESTATE 


■\ r 



CkiMiffied 


SEKVICES 


RINTALS 


Three room unfurnished apart- 
ment near Ocidental and 
Temple streets. Adults, refer- 
ences required. NO PETS. DU. 
3-7218. 


LANDLORDS NOTE 

SA\^ VACANCY TDIE 

FREE RENTAL SER>1C£ 

YOU SAVE MONEY 
, XOU SA\-E TIME 
h USE OUR FAST. 
FRIENDLY SERVICE 
BUDGET RENTAL 
n-4 PL. 8-J593 


400K! 

A » r I inSil 
«0j(iint turf r*!)- 
ItTKtian kn««- 
h«w mad« Mi- 

On imall mnnth' 
Ir F H. A. tr 
■Idr. T« 

Cill RU. 

Sn. no 


Mltti-PlrMM ■■ 

IIUM#US ROOM 

At lart« It 1 b^drsAiiM. 
InrrujM krtek fir*v<art. 
riti«« hurth. itidini 
tiait tf*«rt. kM >«i e«il - 
ififf. rtc. VMutifMlly 
dMt«n«4 far rtar yartf 
livinv ar additiaa. 



Beau ti f u 1 furnished stud4o 
room, westside, reasonable, 
rates, utilities pd.. transporta- 
tion, and shopping. Couples 
fit singles. RE. 3-8803. 




|]5 Pcr$1000a Mo. 
Until Paid 

BALANCE 
"AKES bEED 

fo Many of These 
Prop|rties 

Open Monday 
ight Till 8:00 P.M. 


*.► 



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73 W. ThlrW St., Pom«««-3 ImJ- 
H^m-$45 Dw., U \i M«. 

164 I. lOSth St.— Frama^anil adi. 
let. $3S0 Dn., Ba l. M«. 

04 E. nith PI.-$350 Dn., laL 


RENTALS 
ALL-FUkNISHiD 

$40.$4S-Sin«lM («) 
yi $5S-D«wbl«« (3) 

M* chiMran or patt— 

Cl**a t* shappinfl, 

trantfMrtatian. 

1141-1 asi 1. «4tli Sfnal 
TW. J71» 


^$$$$$$$$ 

Arm You In Dabt? 
Lmt ' 

DEBT ADVISORY 
SERVICE 

Halp You Tedayl 

W* Ara Cradil and Dabt 
' "Spacialitti" 

—Our Easy Plan— 

a y»u ow* Y»« Pay at law i 


S 450000 
SI, 000.00 
$2,000.00 
$3 000.00 


$ f .04 p»r waak 

SI 5.00 p»r waak 

S23.eO par waak 

SII.OO p9r waak 


Wa Pay All Yaur Dabt< t»r Yaa. 

(Out mf Slatt Milh A/sa PaU) 

NO 5ICUIITY, NO CO-SIONI*S, 

NO REAL ItTATI 

Nalliini but tha hanatt datira ta 
pay yaur rfabtt— fraa infarmaliaa 
a« all preblemi. 

■rinf All tilU Tai- 

DEBT ADVISORY 
SERVICE 

610 S. Broadway, Rm. 705 
let Angalet VAndika 6981 

Daily • to 6 P.M.-Sat. S-2 P.M. 

EDWARD BECKER, Pratidant 

$$$$$$ $ 


l( 


Sound track 

I Continued from Page lOt 
but we caught "Opera Night'' 
at Independent last Sundaiy 
evening and Archie Savage's 
hoofer*!. Jay Loft-Lrn, Wendell 
FianklTn. Albert McNeiL Jerrr 
Gcnrett, etc.. kept the party 
going as did so many others 
who weren't franii enough to- 
give their names. . . . PEGGY 
LEE AND THE MILLS BROS. 
warbling "It Must Be So" ii5 
something to WTite home about. 

Arthur Lee Simpkins is bring- 
ing his melodic genius back to 
Cresc-endo this week. . . . Wax 
whirling QASS HARRIS DE- 
SERVES a salute for hiS^ sahite 
to ABIE ROBINSON on his 
KFI airer S a t u r d a y. He's 
on between eight and ni^e. and 
if you haven't given him your 
full attention so far. you're a 
goof. Don't goof again. And 
don't say we never pulled your 
coat! . . . SAMMY CH'^FIN and 
FRANCES NEALY may go back 
home together! 

A happy \uletide — You-all. 

LEGAL NOTICES 


J 


Thurs ., D«c. 23, 1 954 1 1w Calif Ofniq itifll#-l 1 

PEOPLE AND PLACES 


(Continued from Page 10 1 
. . . Captivating Consumer Con- 
sultant of the Carnation Evap- 
orated Milk Company; joined 
Waller in celebrating three 
years of tenacious effort to sue- 
ce.ssfully add hep fine product 
to the Eagle's ever Increasing 
family of advertisers. 

FRANKLYN A. AJAYE . . . 


llJoined Frankfort Distillers Com- 
pany as a special representa- 
tive in charge of trade rela- 
tions and marketing for , the 
greater Las Angeles area. The 
good California Eagle; who 
ha« known Ajaye for over a 
decade is happy to welcome an- 
other 'brainy' addition to its 
midst. 


MERRY 
CHRISTMAS 


Fiirniehed. room in quiet place, 
privileges, close to transporta- 
tion ajid shopping. Man or 
woman. 136 W. 49th Street. 


HAYES, 
MOTEL 

Tfi« ^op/«'s C/iOfC* 

960 E. Jtfferson 

AD. 3-9295 


,_17-17^-1» $. Central - Newly 
dec tfviccet-SIZSO Dn. iai. 


i5» I. lilth St.-$3»? Dn., Bal. 


I50S Grape St.-$299 Dewn, Bel. 


151 E..I0Sth S»reet-$3*« Dewn, 
lal. Me. ^- . li . j .. 

171 I. Mth Sfreef-Sfueee-$«»» 
Dn., Bel. Me. 

tOSOO Clevis Street-Stuece-$7S0 
Dn., Bal. Me. 

|431 Pire St. - Newly Deceraled 
lij Stw«ce-$3 50 Dn., B el. Me. 

1|393 E. 15lh St.-18 Rm. Hetel- 
^ $2500 Dn., Bal. Me . 

|037 Nerd St.-$299 On., Bal. Ma. 

ni4 Beach S t.-$350 Dn., B#l. Me. 

106 E. I13lh St.-$250 Dn., Bal. 


^712 I. Mnd iStreet-Unif»-$350 
i Down, B at. Mo. 

II2IB E. 82nd Sfreet-$tu«ee-$4W 
Dn., Bal. Me. 


|»7 E. 52nd Place-SBM Dewn, 

t Bal. Me. 

111 13 Cempten Ave. - |2M Pn., 

'f Bal. Me.' 

622 I. 40th PI.-$3»» Dn., Bel. 
Me. 


SS6 I. 100th St.-$4f 9 Dewn, 

Bal; Me. - . - - 

^55 i. 85th St.-$499 Dewn, Bal. 

• % '**■ . 

'9136 I. 112th^t«-New S reem 
J •lBCce^|499 WC i*!- Me. 

Itomorrows honey 

^' SPECIAL 

vMONEY-MONEY 

ON THE HOUSE YOU NOW OWN 


Four room modern furnished 
apartment. Chicken O.K. 
$50.00. Apply 2503. E. 108th 
St. Close to everything, t.f. 

i Single apartment is new build- 
, ing. stove and refrigerator, 
bed. inner communication 
system, all tile bath, garbage 
disposal. See it at 1474 West 
Jeferson Blvd. S60.00 a mon. 
Call RE. 4-7438. 

NEW MAYLORD 
APARTMENTS 

Weekly Maid Service end 

All Utilities Furnished 

Apertmcirts newly furnished, 

painted end carpeted 

f[urnished, 
Singks - Doubles 
Bachelors 
$15.00 Up 

WEEKLY OR MONTHLY 
RATES NOW AVAILABLE 
1250 So. Western Avenue 

RE. 8117 

RENTAurwiurriir 


GILES AUTO SERVICE 
REPAIR 

All WORK GUARANTEED 
2012 W. Jefferaen RE. 9260 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
NO. 355278 

In the Superior c"ourt of the Slatp 
of ("alifornia. -in and for the Couniy 
lit I.n< .Angeles. In the Msller of tht- 
ISl.iif ofHudi-nn D>''- Di'iea-ed. 

Nciiii.e is hert'hy niven to irediiors 
h.i^ ins rl.iinis a.^dinvi the >aid rfet»-d- 
rm !•• Iile -.mi . I.ums in ilie t>ff ii f 
iir 111 |jrf--r.t Ih«m I<> thi> undoi- 
r>r the . iiTk fir ih>' :>riir.-«aid <-iiurl 
-Un'd :.! th.' ..((•i>' i.r .\^ll^r. .Maddnv 
.-ind Sneats .Miorne»>. '24 .<oulh 
Spring Street, in file I'iiy ot Los .\n- 
);elp-i 111 in the arnrosaid Coiinl> 
«hirh latlc^ nff.ir U the piare «T 
hu<ine<:4 of the under«iKne<J in all 
mailer* l)»*riain;n£ In said esiaie. 
Siirh claims with the nef»»>*ar> 
lourhers nui~t he liled or pre>.enied 
KM »(ore-aid within mv month* after 
the first (luhii. .mon of this notice. 

Dated r>.>.omhcr ». 1954. 
.\MAND..\ RYE 
Adrrnistratrix of tha Estate 
of -aid deiodent 
MtLLER. MADOOX A SHEATS 

Attornyt at law. 

524 South Spring Stract 

Lot Angelot 13, California 

MA. 5-26M 
Publish in California >:»K!e Orf. 18. 
Zi. .V>. 19r)4 and Jan. 6. IH."'- 






EXCELSIOR REA 

' ' ^ S 10957 SI 
PL. 6-2764 


n 



To al ' of our 

yood fr'ends — we 

extend a sincere 

•uisl for' a 

me moral le holiday, 

TV INVtSTMEiT COJ 

A^alon Blvc. ^ 

Frank L. Greene 


r i 


May your Yuletide glow brishtly with that 
good old fashioned^hristmas cheer that makes 

« every heart lighteV, eviry friendship warnfier, 
^ every hour richer in happiness and contentment. 

Dr. Howard H. Allen 



«// 


h(t 


MACK AND MACk 

1071 W. Jefferson 



'k ... 


-\i f>u T-fcct Christmis Day to yott 


ul and merry 
are the Yulf 


rifiny, many ]o\ 
i.« jhcad . . . thrsi 


fe send to y )U. 

AUTO SERVICE 

;. 2-379& 




■r*' 


hcartielt nishe 


.*> 


Jihtifi lias this (ihris 
■\ mid fill tht- (ihrii tmnseti 

' 1 ; !.' .. !i htreaiter, 

'\W"''i ■ ■ .■ , 

DqJilin Y. Koyima, O.D. 3 

; OPTOMETRiST-Of OCIAN 


21 04 W. Jeffersdn Blvd., L. A< 

'' . « (Naarl\Ar|ingten) 


for yftur 
mas Day 


■| 


'i\ 


8, Calif. 


4524 S. 


Ll 


Pedro PI, 


Johnny's Trim Shop 
Auto Tops 

Seat Covers 

3500 W. l%Htr%on Blvd. 
REpublic 4-5884 


M ADA'S 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 
All Lines of Beauty 


Cultii 


re 


205i E. Vernon 

Bus. Phone: AD. 4-2317 
Res. Phone: AD. 4-3392 


NOTICE TO CREblTOR$ , 

No. 3S888« I 

In the Superior I'ourt of the State | 
of (."aliforrria. in an<1 for the County ; 
of Lo< Anseles. In the Matter of the . 
1 EMate of Martha Hamilton, deceased. 
.Not ire it hereby piven to creditors 
having claims ag.'iin.'.t the said deced- 
ent to file said claims in the offiie ■ 
I of the clerk of ihe aforesaid ••our.t or j 
to present them to the undcrslcned i 
'at the office of Thomas C.N'eusom. | 
.\llornc> 1111 Kast Vornon Avenue ; 
in the ("ity of Los .Xji'selcs. in Ihe j 
aforesaid Countx. which latter office 
is tlie~place of hu.ine«s of ine under- . 
signed in all matters (i.-rtaininK to ' 
..aid estate. Such claims with the ' 
neces.ar.v ^oiichcr-s miisl he fi^ed or | 
presentcH as aforesajj. within six > 
months riftrr the first" publication ol 
tills not I.e. 
Da'.ed. l>.-.,.ml>-r 1"? IP.M. 

LENA O. C.KNTP.Y. 
[ EN-'cutriV of the »iU_lrf__ 

said de. ■dent. 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
Attorney-at-t-aw 
Hit East Vernon Avenua 
Lot Angelei, California 
AD. 2.6149 
iPubl.sh Per. 16 2.1 30. 19R4: 
Jan 6. IS.'wSi 


' Sf^ 


s< 


TV SERVICE 

TV dafinitaly rapai^d in heme 
— ne fix, no charge. Heme TV. 
HO. 9-2131 - WE. $-7526 


G^l 


WARD'S REALTY GO. 

2707 W. JEFFERSON BLVp. ' RE. 0873 


r# 



MERRY (iHRI^TMAS 


Phono Won't Rejod? 

Hav« James W. Rebimoa 
REPAIR IT at 

2T20 S. CENTRAL 
RI. 8-7027 



2rH- A DAY ^ 
3IETER PLAX 

TELEVISIONS I 

WASHERS 

STOVES 

PIANOS 

REFRIGERATORS j - 

HARRIS METER PLAN 
Phone RE. 2-5944 


6489 

NOTICE OF HEARING OF 

PETITION FOR PROBATt ^ 

OF LOST WILL 
No. 359C37 
In the Supcri'ir Court of .the Slate 
of California, in and for the Counij 
of I.o« Anttfle» 

In the Mair. r of the E.-iaie of 
E.MVTA K. <K)I'.1»<)N. Deceased. 

.Notice IS l'preb> given that the 
petition of Thomas C,. N e ir sbm for 
the Probata of the LaM Will of the 
aliove-namert dei-egsod and for the 
issuance of Letters' Testament rv 
thereon to the petitioner vsill he 
heard at Sl'i o'clock AM. .on .lap- 
viarc 12 XB"-*. at the .-nuf-t-, rooc of 
IVpartmcitl ."v of the Superior lourt 
of tiie" State of California, m and for 
the Countv of I^is .xngeles. 

HAROLD J- OSTLV. 
Countv Clerk and Clerk nt the 
Superior Coijrt of the State of 
California, in and for the 
C'ounlv of Los .Ans'le* 

B.v H L .M. LKA.N Deputy. 
Dnied De<-cmher 16. 1954. 
CARL A. EARLES ,T 

1111 Ea»t Vernon Avenue 
Lo» Angele* '". California 
Attorney tor Petitioner 

iPuhii-h in c->i,f...rnia Vjtsie- ' 
Dec S^ V V.i-A: .Ian 6 1?S.t1 


Seas 


- „*f 



season . . . ts as W 

tuinklin 

■ 
■ 


Tnk 



tngs 



4 ■ 


I* ; 


Happy Nev r Year 


Our icish for youft Jiapp'inrss flu s holiday 


sting and trie as 
stars above. 

■.IV 


For Your Porfocf Holiday Pfopsi iro 


a: Pi^LMER REED 

1111 EAST VERNON AVI 


CENTALS WANTED 

, landlenb. List Ye<ir Hemat, 
, Apartmenit and Rentalt with 
I DREW INVESTMENTS 
Hundreda ef peeple waiting to 
meve in teday. 

3«ta SO. WESTERN 

(Acraii {ram Sacaritir laak) 

RE. 1««346 LO. 7-2770 


IN ONE DAY IMPIOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 


Pdvancad en your lean if wa 
. K. it. Cenaolidata all your bill* 
•n* loan. Sorrow $1,000 or 
«^fnera— pay back SI 5 a monlb per 
^$1,000 til paid. 

|lOO CENTS ON THE $1.00 for your 

.Vist Trust Daed if aatiafactory io | 

. ilvt, credited to tha purchase of any 

' properties we have listed. Terrific 

rlOO contc on the dollar. If you 

bava a TD for $100 to $10,00 wo 

iriil golf you a deal 


-MOTOR 

OVERHAUL 
$49 to $6? 

* Motors Exchanged 

* Cenvaniant Location 

* Ample Financing 

A - D MOTORS 

7600 S. Broadway; PL. 3-2172 
LEffAL NOTICES 


ATTENTION LADIES! We have 
good job.s part and full time, 
day workers. For fiirilipr in- 

'Ifarmation call Ihe Ladies 
{Employrhent Aid .\.ssn. Agen- 
cy. 3226 S. Central A\e., AD. 
2-9505— AD. 1-3244. 


a V e 

clionie- 


(98.000 CASH" 

Iwith $9S,000 in cethi te buy^ii 

■|ni<te in.fhit dietrict. Thb ie V*w 

"'-hance te sell eut for eU caafc if 

w have an eiiuity ir ewn a 

„oiue. We have cliente wMh 

I9>,000 in all caah te eiiy >*« 


•MAS 


y 


, NOTft wi HAvi cumrt ^ 

|ae X0WT Inl IttaMi ieaMy-Ilt or 
f ai Trast Baaes-4teatira«t, ar oay 
itity. yaa t year frilaadt bov* ia 
I latata. M if* aa Ittbfa. oil CASK. 

Va ea fe-Se mm CaaiaiUaiMi arilb-^ 
I Baal Ittata erakars. 

I fH ffapartiai SabiatI ta Pribr Solo. 


GOOD JOB$^^Ks«¥=qt 
Physlot^fiirapistt 

ourors ^ 

Pr«ctkal Nurso ■'^'^' 

n. 3,6509 


t * "alifnr'>i3 HhkI*' > 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 357S16 

In :ho Siip-rl«ir ('<mrt of the Stale 

of rH!if*^»rniM in rind. f<ir ihf Countv 

of ],..•; .\nj.Mfx In lh^jMnl?»-r of the 

i-SiMTf <■>! Car^-t'^ I!. M«frr4>. dfrt'.t^^d 

Nifli-'f i« tirn'l»; ;:i\*'n til rlfflitor^ 

h«\inK « i;itni> ;uHir.-t tiif* s«id d**t*'ri- 
rnl to rit** .said ilatnis in Ihe offii-p 
of ih»* cltrrk. of ihp afores.-iid tniirt or 
lo t""*'<i''pt th»*f»i lo ihp iinder>iKnfd 
at Th#* offiif nf Thon»a.'i <;. .Neu-^otn. 

Attorne\. Till fi»Tt^-^waa 

in thr ritv of I,o« AnfielPT: — itv- i^ie- 
jiforf^^aid i^ouni> , u hifh latter office 
i« the pliK e of bu.«inr«fi of th^ iinder- 
•iigncd in all matters prrt«ininK '" 
; >«id p.<ta^f ^. gurh rlai,ms with the 



TIES 


CO. 

4374 S. MAIN 
AD. 61 01 


W'^1 


- ' KELP WANTED 
In the domestic field 
NO DOWN PAYMENT 
U you will live on the place. 
Cook k general. Sal- $t25-$223 
month. ^^j^^s^ 

Mothers HelpM— $125. : 
No coolcing. no xeler, TTtrdowrr-"^ 
,»ipayinent. 
:Cple«. Sal. $2.V)-S-J2.T month. 
Other positions open for men. 
Chef 2nd cooks. di.';hwa.<hers. 
Iporters. jaintors. car washers. 
122 years in same location. 
1714 W. Jeferson 
RJE. 3-3930. RE^l-4529. RE. 3i930 


WE NEED 
HELP: 

Address Our Advertising Cards. 
Oeed Handwriting. Atlas, Box 
)SS-N. Melrose, Mass. 


prr«>ntp<t »« ^rnrf^i iin within »lv 
monihs Kfterthe f irSrTKibncation of 
ihi« noliic. "■" ^=1- — ^.=^ 
Dated: I><Tmber,13. 19S4. . 

rHARr.KS^I. ffVBBARP 
Artmmls'riitor of tha £stata 
of .<iaidTl«>r<^pnl. 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
Attern*y-at-Law 
11 11 East Vernon Avcnua 
L ot An galei. California 
CHuftllSIl I'Wi-r-W- 21. 30. 1954 
Jan. 6. 19r>.'it 


sAtr- 



H11 
ZONE EXCEPTION 
No. 1873-(2) 
\ PlBI.ir IfF.ARI.Ni-, in the mat- 
ter nf a rfqitf>i for ;in p\(-eptiitn to 
ilie R-I Sin!:l<;'-K;imii.v Krsidrntv 
/.mie in ordrr to .<>Nt.jbli&h. n|i*-ratt- 
inil mjlnlam a rhiinh pl.int an<l ofl- 
^ir?ft parking un t>ropfil> lixfiiril 
(»n thp <(iiitlu\»*xT oorntT oT Cjliii.i 
• ml Hn-ci r.ins A\e^ in the W illim 
liiiiiik Knuiprne DKtrii-t Ijis An- 
l;»*i.-> (''Hini.\. \kilf i*«» liflil l>.>(nri* 
ilii> Zoning Board, in Tln" R>'<ional 
I'l.innrna '('omiiii*i>ion- hearing riKini 
Lii> Angele> ("ount> Kntineerinc 
TmldinK lii> \\ e...! Sorond .•street 
I.OS An)j«"'e- on Thursdav Januar\ 
".. It.'j.^ al 10 iX) AM. at whii-h timp 
prnponpl.< .ind opponets ot proposed 
Use will be hrard. 

-MU.TO.V BRKIVn<-.F:i,. 
P.rnlor. of rianmn:. 

'iiii: ni:r.inNAi. n.A.NNiNr; 

(■|>MMI.<;.SIO.\. 
<Vun'\ of 1.0.S .Xnneffs 
(Fuhh'h in California Eacle. 
on Tburtday, Dec. 23, ISMj 


&457 

NOTICE OF HEARING OF 

PETITION FOR PROBATE 

OF WILL 

No. 359987 

In tho Superior t'ouri of th» Stale 

of ralifornia. in arid for th* County 

ot Los Angeles 

In the Matter of the Kstate of 
tKIMKMCO I.AIRITtK Pereasfd. 
I Notice is hereb> (;i(en lh*t the 
'petition of K .\ Uinstan.lov. Puhlir 
.\<1mini«trator, for the Prohate of the 
Will of the .Thove-nanied derea.sed 
nnd for the i<*.uant*e .of Letters M 
.\dministration - with - the - Will - 
.\nnr\ed the're'tn to i:. .\. \\'inslAn- 
le> . Puhli- .Vdministrator. «lll be 
he.-ird at o I'> o rioi k .\.M ..on Jan- 
uary 12. 19."^, at the i-mirt room of 
Oepartment ."> of the Superior i'ourt 
• r the .Slate »if ("alifornia. in and -for 
the Countv of I.^s .\npe|es 

HAROLD J OSTI.y. 
Countv Clerk and Clerk of the 
Superior Court of the State of 
California. in and for the 
Countv of Los .Xngele*., 

Bv H. L. .M< LKAN Deputy. 
Dated' Derember 16. 1954. 
HAROLD W. KENNEDY, 
County Counsel 
11C0 Hall of Record! 
Lo* Angeic* I2„ California 
MU. 9211 
Attorney Adoiinittr.ator 

iPubHsIi'in Califbrn.a l-JiEle 
Der. 23. .TO. 19.>4; Jan. S 19S.1) 


uiff our rue from thekiddies, 
lic litsh each of yoTi a 
Christ niiis as Jierry as a | 
Stotkinyful of Joys.' i • '; 


Edward A. Hardwick 



I 


HERMAN A. 

1570 E. 10.^ rd St.' ' 


ENGLISH 


LO. 6-5184 


sea; 


Realty Company 


MAIN OrFICE: 

"Drat uith Compii 
270S W. JEFFERSON BlVD 


REpuMk 4-115 ' 
>/|c Confidence, Al\ : 
LOS ANCEltS 



GHRISTMAS 


'INGS 


■ I 


DE GRUY REALTY . ' 

4305 S. WESTERN AVE. AX. Ml 21 



■^-n 


6435 T 

CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 
UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME . j 
The iinder-i!;nert do hereby i>r- ] 
•if> thai llie.v ;ire mnilurlinK a 
lanilorkHl ami m.iiruenani c .»er\ ii e» 
hvi«ine»s as «N)-Pa'rin<Ts at TiTT Ntirtli 
;iand>e. Compton: ('aliforni.i. und< r 
the fii'iiiiou.s firm jianie of WIIITK 
HOI.'.SK JANITOR -Sf-:R\1CK and i 
in,Ti said firtTi is romtiosed of the | 
f*>]io\vinK persi.ns. whose names- and 
Iil.iie« of residence are as follows, 
lo-wii: 

3SK J HOWARD. TiC North 
Grandee Conipton California 

JA.MKS F:R'Nh:ST HOWARD. I.Vi 
Fj<5t 99th Street, Los Angeles. Cali- 
fornia. 

Witness our hands this 9th day 
nf No\ ember. i9.M 

JF_SSK J HOWARD 
JAMKS KRNE.ST HOWARD 
Stale of California. 
County o^ Los AnEelet. ts. 

On this 9th rtav of November. 
AD. 1934. before me. a Notary Pub- 
lie in and for the said Couniy and 
istale. residinc iherin. duly com- ; 
missioned and swo^n personall} i 
ippeared JESSK J. HOWARD and | 
lA.MES ERN^:ST HOWARD, known 
to me to be the persons whose names 
are subscribed to the within instru- | . 
m^nt. and acknowledged to me that 
Ihev executed the same. 

iS' WITNFSS WHKREOF. I have ■ 

hereunto set my hand and affixed J' 

ni\ official seal the da.\ and .vear in | 

tiii.s certificate fir.it abuve written. 

t.SK.M.i II ^ROLD j SI.NCL.-V1R |' 

Notary Public in and for , ! 

s;iid ('ounfv and .Sate. , 

HA^Ot-D J. SINCLAIR 

Attorney at Ljiw 

S42 South Broadway 

Let Angeles 13, California 

MAditon 6-C551 

(Publish, In California K.igle 
Dc<-. 2.T .111. Jan. 6. U> 


I SEASON'S GREETINGS 

I 



Even as the Sinr guided 
the three ui)C men to 
Christ in Bethtehem, so 
may ue find spiritual 
guidance in the a^e- old 
messupe of Christmas, 
alonf uith reneued cour- 
tife to uork steadfastly 
for a liorld. of peace and 
mutual nndentdnding. 



A. V. WOFFORD 


ays 
18, CALIF. 


If^e want \ ou to hai'e 

somcthina hat cannot 

be placed i rneath the 

tree — '/ ir best 
uishcs of he season. 


CHRIST! 


SPECiAL FOR . RENT 

Three rooms each, now apart- 
manta — strictly modern including 
garbage ditpesals. 

RING CITY IROTHHS 
AD. 1-370a Res. RI. 34SS 


GILES' AUTO 

Repairs & Services 

■ '2012 W. Jefferson Blvd.. 
REpublic 9260 


fOR 


May a qiz 

Measure of fjheer 
Keynote ^Your h'uletide 


mm 


1 


r .■*■'■ •' 


Licensed Real isf ate Broker 

Western ilar Re|iHy 

1953 wijefforson 
Office: RE. 4-2539 Res.: RE. D-2025 


r 


m 


} ;>■ 


' '.» 


l2rTh> Ctiltforniq Eagle Thurs./Oec* 23, 1954 


■ -i 

4' 


i ■ 




» 


I '-; _•■ 

. i .- ' 

• - 

: '■ -.- 1 /' t ■ • ■ 

E! - ^ 


I 



' ' "/ 

1. -[- 

1 '" ■ 

rrrn 

T 

1 .' 
ITT 


1 . 

i- 

T%Ti 


To Our Many Friends and Customers 

MERRY 


1 f 



\ 


1-. 


■: AND : ■ . .. 

Happy New Year 


F:ROM 



1207 EAST WASHINGTON BLVD AT CEWTRAL AVE, 


"Grand Central BarB Cue" 

in a slugfest slaughtered the 
wood to cut score the Pickup- 
pers" three games , to none. 
Saturday night in the Sunset 
Bowling League at the Studio. 
Bill Hampton pounded the 
timber to again top the league 
with a 609 series. Eddie Irving 
piled the stuff up shooting a 
577 series. Don Taylor of the 
"Pickuppers" however shot his 


wad to dazzle the spectatbrs i in racking the wood back. 

uncorkiiig a sizzling 604 series. Merry Xmas and here is hoping 

"LeeV Hi Hats" belted the | ^^at dear ole Santa will tumble 
pins to^ down B. B. two games, some of the spending green stuff 
le. "' " " '" ^ *' 



to one*. Milton Pope rocked the 

maple bowling a 578 series. 

AMn Griffin blowing his top 

with a 5o5 series. 

'Neal's Liquor.s' .powered the ! 

logs to 'blank "Qarretts" three 
i games to none. The Lawrence j 
i Brat hers pacing the team — ^ 

Larry plowing it over and | 
I slacking it up with a 596 series \ 

and f'loyd staggering close be- | 
jhihd. Jimmy Hill of "Garretls" 

bowling good in flinging a 569 
i series. 

The "Timber Ticklers'* set 


around vour tree. 


' By IDA F. DOOX.EY 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Law 

rence celebrated their 
wedding anniversary Sunday 
evening. 


J\f, 


Dec. 19. from 3 to 



'AtPT'X 


g^ti«5TA^Si 


I 


CJieck Eaglcj Xmas A ds Now! 


t 


Here toriifs Santa xiilk 
a hig hat) of Yulrtide 
joys and -our iii\hrs for 
a very mrrry holiday to 
you and yours. 

T I VOL I 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 

1054 E. 43rd Plan 

AD. 9334 - AD. 4-9706 

Marguarila Merrill 
Reti* Armstrong 


CHRISTMAS 
, GREETINGS 

|- I Jrishing Each 
B ^'f You n Very 

1 1 HOLIDAY 
1 1 SEASON 


I 
I 



Sing out the old fa mi liar, 
carols.' They express *lhe 
spirit of all the good liishes 
lie carry in our hearts 'for 
you! 


onicct <^ vews 

p. m., at their home at 1803 

22nd St.. Santa 
„-,, ' Throughout the evening many 

friends came to congratulate 
the t>opuIar couple 

Preceedin<^ the ceremonies, 
Isaac Edwards sang 
This House." while Fev. W. P 
Carter, pastor of;Cal''ary Bap- 
tist Church, brought 
cation, after which 


&C \^< 


the invo- 
iss. Es- 


-t 


Coleman'.,( 

Call." t 



.i- 


c%ivitieg 

Hher 

Love 

Th^couple cut the very beau- 
tiful ! 'edding cake "after ■which 
the gi ests enjoyed a very love- 
ly re last. The wadding cakfe 
was i masterpiece of art and 
delica e beauty with beautiful 
white rosebuds detailed b^ sil- 
ver le ives. Many gifts of silver' 
and 1 nen wflere received. 


ARLINGTON and WESTSIDE 


PHARMACIES 
J»ff«rsen & Arlingtbn 2074 W. Jeffvrsen 
RE. 4^283 RE. 2-3288 



^ I 


Jolly as the siion- wan a'nd t)tc 
tiL'inklinti tree ... 
I Joyous as the evening carols 
suntf so merrily ... 

Is our uisli for you. on this 
(Ihristnias Day. 


BILL'S TACOS 

4367 S. CENTRAL ;., 




jibrt 


'M 



ELBOW BEND 

53rd & Avalon 




Take this greeting to mean ur 
hope y«ur-Chrislmns ulll he , , , 
"simply out of this u'orld." 




May the Holiday Season 

hring julitllment -to- all 

your liishes . •. . Our 

uishf Your .Merry' 

Christmas. 

•f •• ' ■ • 


%' L/rlalbroitqh s 

I 


'5' 

FASHIONABLE 
WOMEN S APPAREL 


3769 So. Western Ave. 
Los Angeles 18, Calif. 

iZi. REpublic 3-4739 
Res. REpublic 3-0428 


Travis T. LoH, Sound Investments 

THE TRAVIS T. lOTT CO. . |j , 

BROKERS TO "BETTER REAL ESTATE" ' 

2635 SO. WESTERN (N*ar Adcuni) REpublic 2>6 138 


H'euant to add ,«ur preetingsto^ those- of 
y. otkersuho httie uished you a Season 
primming uith pleasure. 

THOSE 

COTTON BOYS 

THRIFTY I 
SERVICE STATION 

BILL QUARTERMAN'S 

AUTO SERVICE 

ALBERT CURRY'S BODY WORKS 

Corner of Western Cr 36th PI. 




Your Credit Is As 
Good As Cash! 

You tii/e/ ffit SAME LOW PRICES . . . fht 
Some Big Savings en Dental Work of Dr. 
Cewen's ... no matter' hew much credit 
you need.' Dr. Cowen's Helpful, Convenient Credit 
Terms are yours for the asking, and you can spread 
the small weekly or monthly payments ever any 
reasonable length of time. There's no red tape . . . 
no bank or finance company to deal with . . .NOT 
ONE PENNY Interest or Extra Charge for Credit. 
Easy terms are promptly arranged with sincere con- 
sideration for any financial problems you may have. 
Pay AFTER your Dental Work is completed! 

1 TO 3 DAY SERVICE 

. . . difficult OKI (xcf pftd. Thii prompt dtntti ttrvie* it 
p«rticul<rlY convinitnt for eutof-tewn rtsidthtt whe 
want to s«v* th« tim« end •xptni* of extra tripi. 


I Christinas GreetiBgsfroin 


I.'. 


• ■[ ■■—..■•■ -I ■ ^ -^ ' \ 

■^ - I • . ' j ■ .f I teoders In the Community 



Dental Science lias overcome many disadvantages of 
. eid-fa»hioned false teeth by developing the new 
» Transparent Material Plates, -set with Trubyte Bio- 
' f orm Teeth. AsIc Your Dentist about these modern 

dentures. You can get them RI&HT NOW at Dr. 

CpweJj'f 0.ffite*-p p^y tater, on Easy Credit Terms. 

q\i\CK PLATE KEfAlkS , 


E AS LONG AS 

15 

MONTHS 

i TOPAY! i|iv 



I 
I 


I 


HENRI O'BRYANT. owner of 
th.« Honn O'Bryant Manufactur- 
ing Co.. 1142 N. Weitern Avt., 
Is organizing chairman of tht 
Lot Angelet Buimni Men and 
Women'! Auociation. He l« a 
Deacon at Mt. Sinai Baptist 
Church, Official Robe Manufac- 
turer of the California State 
Baptist Convention, and was the 
subject of a recent feature «tory 
iri Ebpny Magazine. He operate! 
a tithing business, and is en- 
couraging other ^business men 
to give one-tenth 'of their net 
earning* to the church. - 


MORRIS O. HAMPTON, owner 
of Church and Community Pub- 
lishing Co.. 1S34 W. Jefferson 
Blvd.. Is organizing co-chairman 
of the Los Angeles Business 
Men and Wom'en's Association. 
He IS Publisher-Editor of 
" C h u r c'h and Community' 
Magazine, a member of Trinity 
Baptist Church, public relations 
director of Far Western Juris- 
diction of Alpha Phi Alpha Fra- 
ternity, member of Alpha Delta 
Sigma National Professional Ad- 
vertising Fraternity, and a re- 
cent advertising graduate of the 
University of Southern Califor- 
nia. 


ETHEL W. HOLBERT, co- 
owner and. manager of Holbert 
Letter Service, 3828 South 
Western Ave., is temporary sec- 
retary, of the Los Angeles Busi- 
ness Men and Women's Associa- 
tion. She Is an active member 
of Lewis Metropolitan C. M.y E. 
Church, and serves ^tfrTx (the 
church's editorial board. >frs. 
Holbert is also a m^iber of 
the board of directors of Bill 
Wklker Productions. . 


V 




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^ •Shllis blessings' to 

If ■ '^ 

If 


i 


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DR. J. F. EVANS, proi 
physician, heads the com 
to plan the permanent' oifganl- 
zttion for the Los Angeles [Busi- 
ness Men and Women-s AMocia- 
tlon. Or. Evans recently served 
»% chairman of the membership 
dl-lve of the Los Angeles branch 
of .the NAACP. He is State! Vice 
President of the National Medi- 
cal Association, a Sunday School 
teacher at 'Second Baptist 
Church, and'a member of Kappa 
Alpha .Psi Fraternity, 


Pacific T< wn Cluk 


tiai'yie 


/ f^est Vi--'OJ*fro/ , rCeal ^l^stale 


t,[*J ertuite V^r 


HUNTINeTON PARK 


'HOUYWOOD 

■>t ■!< nn. mi Wlk»m 

■ SkNTA MONICA 

n»tma 0mmmmitmBI<t4.mtig4 

UST tOS ANGIUS 

CtlNDAtE 

MP M. Jr.a4 ■!.<. tmr. S-w«r 

PASABSNA 

IS M.. f Mild. «w. C.». f J. 

lONO IIACH 
VINTUeA 

4t1 f. aUia »rM« 

POMONA 


■ivnsmi 


Your friendly Credit Dentist 

5ffh and BROADWAY 

Second Floor, Metropolitan BIdg. - Over Newberry's 

Entrance: 315 West 5th Street 
LI^^IE AAIlA..^I 11A1 Prices G/od/y 


PHONE Mutual 1191 


Quott'd in Advancf 


r. 


92 


li, operate* a 
Ines* at 909 Ea«t 

He is a member of .^ 

of Divine Guidance, S 

!s Urban League, ^V 

lerican Legion, Con- Jf; 

alty Board, «nd th* ^ 


lit! 
bill 
flu 


kill 

Oij 

pr 

Joll 

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ATTY. EVERETTE M. PORTEK 
has served as legal adviser for 
the Los Angcle* Businet* Men 
and V/omen's Association dur- 
ing its organiation period. He 
is Attorney for -the California 
State Baptist Convention, Attor- 
ney for the Providence Baptist 
Association, Attorney for Mt. 
Siriai Baptist Church, and com- 
mander of the Intcrnfetiertal 
PMt,.Am«rican Legion, No. >42. 


THOMAS C. JACKSON of Jack- 
son Pest Control Co., 4124 N. 
Mission Road, is a member of 
the National Pest control Asso- 
ciation. Pest Control Operator* 
of California, Los Angeles Pest 
Control Operators Asaociation, 
American Association of Eco- 
nomic Entomologists, Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity. Urban 
League, NAACP, Lincoln 
Height* Chamber of Commerce, 
and a member of H e I m a n 
Methodist Church. 


BEATRICE/ LEAGUE I* a real 
estate broker at 2131 So. Orang* 
Drive. She is a member of Sec- 
ond Baptist Ctiurch, and *ings 
in the choir. Mrs. League has 
been in the real estate business 
for (even years. Before going 
into real estate, she was on* 
of Golden State Mutual Lif* 
Insurance Company's leading 
lady agents for five year*. Sh* 
, ttiidiM muafc •• a hobby.,. . , 


., la 
oWncr. 


Ht 


ABRAHAM T. KELSEY, J 

S term it* operator artd < 
f K*l**y'* Ttrmltc Control 
$842 So. Nbr.mandte Av*, ' 
also a member of T. A. H 
Maaenic Ledg* No. 69. 
Hall Affiliation, atudiad 
South w«*tern Univ*r*lty, 
ber Of NAACP, and a malnbcr 
of the- Firat iPrimitiv* Baptiat 
Chtirch. ' ■ ^ 


Co., 
la 
larri* 
Princ* 
at 
em- 


FRANK e 

at 4209, Si 
H* i* aUo 
H. WiUod 
M, Princ* 
(olidatad 
a m*mb*r 
byt*rian 
b**n in th 
for *ix ye 
tral 

yea r*. Hs 
and carrii 
iniuranc* 


in sura ice 


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AI-LEN laa rMiter 

ith W^attrn Avcnut. 

1 member of Jam** 

Masonic Lodgo No. 

Hall Atfiliatien^ Cmi- 

I eaHy Beard, and ia 

' W«*tmin*ter:^a»- 

Mr. Allah tiaa 

r*al ectata buainaac 

r*, and in th* gan- 

butinaa* for' fiva 

I also a life agant, 

a cemplata li|ia of 




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C lurcti. 


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dt 'AbieV Benefit Thit 


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>*M 


ORMER JXGELEXO'Jl 

'oosman, here from Germany 

here ke starred in film, 

'Toxi," v.'ill he •« hand for 

dhle's' nifht,. • 


DASCER PAT SIDES »/ 
the Club Oasis Creole Mambo 
refuf will lend her talents and 
trod the boards tonipM for the 
Abie Robinson revue. 


iriLL SISG— Johnny Bur- 
inn, XBC-Ti' vocalist, will 
ting in his rare lyric Baritone, 
aicompanied by lie Royal at 
piano, OK Abie's Nit/ht. 


CAMERA-VIEU'ED totrethfr are movie qiian Dorothy 
Dandridqe and master shoumdn Sammy Datis, u:ho are both, 
schedulid to appear tonight at the Lincoln Theater for the 'A bie 
Robinson benefit. The stellar trtisis uill be person to person 
tonight uhen they unite'- for t great cause. 


LAJFREXCE STOSE. the 
little man filth the "king- 
site" voice will shout tonight 
CH the Eagle's great show for 
scribe Abie Robinson. 


JOE HOUSTON, li ild ma^ 
of the tenor sax. and hii 
rhythmic quintet uill blou' ufii 
a storm for Abie Robinson', 
big night at Lincoln. 


AT EASE 
Aladi Comfn 
prettily in 
ti'ill warble fo 


Tempestuous 
who ti'orblet 
is iMe Deadly." 
Abie tonights 


\t 



FIRE CHIEF BACKS D 
TRANSFERS 



"3 ANOEUS Z,TaLU 



r 


1060 C 43rd Pfae*.' t_A. 


Ceirt^mieiit htbikatiMi for 74 Y««n 


Vol. LXXIV— No. 41 


Los Angeles, CaliFdrnia 


Thurs., Dec. 30, 1954 


Outside L JV. . . 1 2c 


Phone 
Want Ad's to 

AD. 4-0161 


Race Segiregati 

II' 
In City Departi 

The hard and fast jimjcrow pattern 


len' 


jimjcrow pattern lliat Was stub-- 
bomly existed in the Los Angeles Fire Delartment was 
scuttled this \\-eek when two fire-fighters|from Central 
Avenue stations 14 and 30 were ti'ansfer|ed to an all- 
white station, No. 78, in Studio City. 


Two Die In Murder-Suicide 


Wholding the bag 


-John E. Jenkins, tne of the otiiters 

' . |l«/ Jenkins Poultry market, 1387 E. Vernon prenue, is shoti~n 

r ; ^''holding the bag" and gazing into the empty till after early 

%mortnng bandits made their get-auay with close to $12jJ00 

; ^M»nday. — (Adams photo:) 

how World Gives 
arm Response to 

leip M^s Benefit 

|l ■] ■■ ' By CHAZZ CRAWFORD '' •' ^f^H • 
Although Abie Robinson's night will not be tele- 
sed from the Lincoln theater stage tonight, Thurs- 
y, the affair is shaping up as a "spectacular." 

raft of taT#nt will b« on 

Bandits Loot 
Poultry Shop 
Of $12,000 


k.lx 


H 


be on 
ind to excite art expected 
aSrerflow audience. The lineup 
ii^cludes such big names as 

riny Carter, the atnazing man 
music; Lawrence Stone, the 
little man with the big voice; 
Isjues-rhythm ihbuter Fluffy 
inter; 

And Mflf* oad Met* 

.,.roul)edour Arthur Lee Simp- 
kans. Aland Dixon and his en- 
t&e Creole Mambo revue from 
GJlub Oasis; Lee Konitz and his 
Pfjogressive all-star group: 
Johnnv Lee (Galhoun otAmos 
':i Andy); 

i^ffie Smith. '< Roy Glenn, the 
Sipia Dolls, Sammy Davis, 
Dorothy Dandridge. interpre- 
tijre dancer Valda; Jeep Smith's 
.orchestra, singer Johnny Bur- 
;t<|i. the Mills Brothers; 

yloe Houston and his swing- 

Ii|g quintet; Martha Davis and 

• snouse Calvin Ponder; Juanita 

C^ise. Madi Comfort; James 

-Inwards; and many, many 

[^rt^Tt. ■ i I- ■ - " : -I ■ jl- 

[ jSammy Davis, although lin- 


Two bandits, who hid in the 
store all night, held up Jenkins 
Poultry Market, 1387 E. Vernon 
Ave., for $12,000 at 7:45 a.m. 
Monday. ' 

Ishmael Evans, owner of the 
market, told police that as he 
was taking his Christmas holi- 
day receipts' out of the floor 
safe a man, about 35, with 
large eyes walked up behind 
him, jammed a .38 caliber re- 
volver in -his side an(J ordered 
him to "get against the wall or 
I'll blow your head off^" 

Then he told his confederate 

to "get the loot" which Evans 

had just removed from the safe 

and placed on the desk. The 

.second thug .«cooped up the 

money' and both men left by 

j the rear door without even 

1 wishing Evans a "Happy New 

iYear." 

|«Ii|r doctors orders to rest, has] Evans stated that they went 

dlnsented to beiJprpsent for the | east on Vtrnon aventie and 


By EDDIE LEE KING « 

A 34-year-old man shot 
himself to death Monday 
or early Tuesday after 
blowing off the head of his 
common-law wife with a 
.22-caliber blue steel re- 
volver. 

The two bodies were found 
lying in a pool of blood on the 
bathroom floor at 1121 ^: E. 
71st street, by Miss Bettie 
Shields, 21, niece of the slain 
man, when she returited home 
after spending two nights with, 
a girl friend. 

LoTtr't QuaxTtl 

Dead were John Forrest Wil- 
liams and Juanita Ligon, 24, of 
4161'i Wall street. Williams 
apparently had shot Miss Ligon 
through the head arid then 
turned the gun on himself. 

Sheriff's deputies reported 
that they had been called to 
the 71st street address early 
Monday morning on, a com- 
plaint of a disturbamcp caused 
by a lover's. quarrel. The offi- 
cers warned Williams and Miss 
Ligon to be quiet:^ This was at 
3:08 a.m. The murder-suicide 
was committed between that 
time and the time Mi.ss Shields 
arrived home at 7 a.m. Tues- 
day. 

Me biquwit 

Miss Shields said that her 
uncle and Miss Ligon had 
lived as man and wife up to 
about three weeks ago. 

Henry Chico Williams. 31. 120 
Paseo Los Avisos, brother of the 
dead man. said that his broth- 
er had given him the murder 
weapon several months ago. 
(Continued on Page 2) 


•^nt. This is^quite a tribute 
tfl5 the newsman inasmuch as 
r^vls has turned down all ben- 
' *j| ts and public appearances 
piBCjr to "^Abie's night" since he 
Ij (Continued on Page 2) 


that they were on foot. The 
money in ones, five, tens and 
twenties which totaled $12,000, 
was wrapped in pink butcher 
paper and placed in brown 
paper sacks. 


.5! 


•J 


|lavy to Ploy Sugttr Bowl 
Before Jim Crow Crowd 

I NEW ORXXANS— N«w Teox's Day in this me- 
lir^lwUs tof the South will be marred by <» ugly dii- 
:^l07 of Jim Crow proctieet when the U. S. Nary 
"^codMny's eleven, which ii supposed to represent 
itdl Americans, will meet Miksissippi Uniyersity's 
^iteom in the famed Sugar Bowl game. 
^j When the opposing aggregotes march out onto 
^« iiold. th*y will be playing before a segregated 
audience. Ticket sellers are limiting the choice 
«eats for "whites only." Negroes will be herded 
iMhlad tlie goal posts and "up top.^! | 4. 
% - ' ,i 1 


f 


Court Orders 
Rev. Branham 
To Give Replies 

Rev. John L. Branham. who 
jha.s ronsi.stently dodged rcfwrt- 
jers and who failed to show up 
i two weeks ago when he was 
i scheduled to make a deposition 
{in the $200,000 damage .«uit 
filed against him. was ordered 
! Monday to appear at Atty. 
George E. Cannady's office 
Tuesday, Jan. 11 at 2:30 p.m. 
Judge William J. Palmer gave 
a direct order to Rev. Bran- 
ham's attorney, Paul R. Hutch- 
inson, to appear on that date 
and at the time set and answer 
the questions asked by Atty. 
Cannady, counsel for Mack 
Shepherd who brought the dafn- 
age suit charging that kis 
daughter. Rosaretha, had been 
seduced and abducted. 
XeprMMitad Bt Ceunaei 
Rev. Branham did not appear 
in court, but his failure to pre- 
sent himself next week would 
make him liable to a charge of 
contempt of court. 
Atty. Cannady has sought the 
(Continued on Fa^e 2) 



The historic transfers, firit in 
the history of the city, which 
climaxed a heated battle of a 
year and a halt, were made 
suddenly, quietly and without 
betiefit of publicity. Notice of 
the new assignments was re- 
ceived at Station 30 on Monday 
and Station 14 on Tuesday, but 
up to press time no official an 
nouncement had been made to 
newspapers; 

Two Men Tra'asfM^sd 

Tlie two firemen selected to 
blaze the trail were John Rhet- 
U and George Winchester. Both 
men have been with the de- 
partment for more than a de- 
cade and have given ample 
and repeated proof through the 
years of their fitness and abil- 
ity as fire-fighters. 

Rhetta. 44, of 1331.-AVr-36th 
street, who has been a fire- 
man for 17 years, has the 
honor of being the first Negro 
to report for duty in a white 
station. He repprted for work 
Wednesday morning at 8 a.m., 
preceding Winchester by just 
24 hours. 

While both men will work 
from the game station, they 
will be serving on alterna,tp 
shifts. i I 

Quiet Shift ' i J 

Rhetta received news of the 
transfer on Monday, with the 
effective date scheduled for two 
davs later. Winchester, 37. of 
2625 Wellington Road, who has 
been with the department for 
13 years, received his notifica- 
* (Continued on Page 2) 


MEST'S 0:ff'Y l^aughte 
Sydnetta Don& Smith i 
mourned by all who knew het% 

Native Kiughter 
Sydnetta Smith, 
Leader, Dies I 


HAPPY \Eir YEilRTO'ALL—Ilaston Lewis H oodlen Jr.. nine month old "drxueigh.'. 
•smiles n "Ilnppx .\W Ye^r to' All." /irl9.^5 knocl^s on the door, lie is tfic son nf Mr.' and 
.Mr.i. Hnston l^.. If oodlen Sr., 2842 Potnmai menue. ' (.tdams photo.) j 

School Case, Fire Dep'f^l | 
Fight, Branham Scfinclai 
Top Year's NeW^ Events I 

Eagle readers were almost unanimous in picking the May 17 decision of the United States 
Supreme Court outlawing racial segregation in the public schools as the top story of 1954. 

They were a little less cerUin about the leading local story of the year but most of them 
settled on the long and sometimes bitter struggle against racial discrimination in the Los An- 
geles Fire Department * • * i -: \ 


And almost everyt)ody agreed 
that the leading scandal yarn 
of the year centered iround the 
Rev. J. L. Branham and the 
famous records which allegedly 
chronicled his love (7) affair 
with 20-year-old Rosaretha 
Shepherd, his one-time secre- 
tary. 

In ks history.-making and 


■:- & 


1/" 


ll i 


unanimous school decision, the 
nation's highest tribunal agreed 
with NAACP attorrteys that the 
Equal Protection clause of the 
Fourteenth Amendment forbids 
school segregation. The opin- 
ion, written by Chief Justice 
Earl Warren, swept aside the 
SO-yeai-old Separate But Equal 


doctrine first announced in 
189«. 

"In approaching this prob- 
lem," Warren Mwote. "we can- 
not, turn the clock back to 1868 
when the Fourteenth Amend- 
ment was adopted or even to 
1896 when Plessy vs. Ferguson 
was decided. ... We must coh- 
(Continued on Page 2) 


"I 


Brady to Ask 
Dismissal of 
Fraud Suit 

L. J. Brady. Westside*.real es 
tate broker and member of the 
Consolidated Realty Bodrd who 
was charged ^ith four'counts of 
grand theft early this month, is 
expected to ask that the charges 
againsthlm be dismissed when 
he comes up for arraignment 
Thursday. 

The hearing was originally ' 
scheduled ferxMonday but was 
set over until later in the week. 

Atty. Theodore Schaffer, who 
is representing Brady, advised 
that he will seek the di.smissal 
of the suit on the grounds that 
evidence brought out in the pre- 
liminarj' hearing is in.sufficient 
to constitute a cau.se of action. 

In: the event that the motion 
Is denied, Prady is expected to 
plead not guilty and to deny 
that the acts of which he is 
accused involved any intention 
to defrs^ud. He will, in all like- 
lihood, ask for a jury trial. 

Brady, one of the best known 
real estate dealers in the city, 
is accused of four counts of 
misuse of funds, involving a 
total of approximately $6,500. 
The charges .were pressed by 
Dr. and^ Mrs. Jarone W. John- 
son', Lynson J. Miller and. two 
cpiuits by -John A. Amos. 

All three complainants testi- 
fied at the preliminary hewing 
that they had turned •over 
money' to Brady in anticipation 
of purchasing property^ , -and 
that when the transacticms were 
not completed they were un- 
'able to obtain a refund of the 
money advanced. 


one of its 
fMonday. Dec. 
liter B. Smith,, 
of friends- as. 
surrenderd ' 


Smit 


>nes 


The West lo| 
own daughters 
27, when Mrs. 
known to her he 
Sydnetta. quiet) 
her hold on life.i 

Sydnetta 
was the first- 
Mr. Sydney P. 
Bessie Dones. 
early years wit| 
|her pioneer grar) 

phelia William 

oung brother, 

eceased. She w 

he local schooU 

unior High and 

•enior High Sch 
graduated from 
lege with an A.I 
t'or several y( 
ployed as a librlrian with the 
^s Angeles Pubic Library. 
! In 1937 she malried Walter B. 
Smith, well-knov«i realtor. She 

)vas the mother |of three chil- 
Iren — ^Walter Priston, Sydney 
Jlruce. and Gaill .\nn. She ir 
urvived by herfhusband. her. 
Children, her n4o t h e r, Mrs. 
Bessie Dones. hir aunt, Mrs, 
Jayne W. Hplmef, and aevenil 
(j)ther relativ|e.s. 
I A wcH- loved 
hostess, whose h^ 
Hobart Blvd., wa 
place for manyiof the city's' 
socially prominei^, Mrs. Smith 
livill be rememV 
fnany social andlphilanthroplc 
"(Continued o| Page 2) 


nee Dones. ; 
of the late 
and Mrs. 
le lived Yms . 
her parents, 
[mother, Mrs.- 
IS, and lier 
jPreston, now 
[s educated in 
Fohn Adams- 
ef f erson' 
>1. and was 
lapman Col- 
iii Sociology.' 
she was em- 


iind gracious 
ie at 2045 S. 
a gathering 


-r 


f •atufMf 


Special teat 
inside the Eaglj 
Chazz Crawford j 
Editorial 
Sports 


Chuidt Activitit 
Social 


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Peoplf and Plac< 5 
Dorothea Foster , 
Bill Smallwood 
What's Cooking 
Bridge Pointers 
Bowling News .; 
Morris Says 



this wtA 
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a^Th» Califo rnia Eqgl f Thurs., D»c. 30. 1954 

, _ , ^^ jtlight On 
Schools, Fire Dept. 

(Continued from Psge 1) | for a survey in other cities. - 
sider public education in the i When Chief Alderson did re- 
light of its full development | Port at the end of six weeks, 
and its present place in Araeri- 1 ^^^ simply proposed to retain 
can life throughout the nation." ' *^^ o'<^ system on the claim 
However, the Court did not ! J^'^V '^ i^'?, 1°'" *^^ ,*'?,^* Jj"" 
lay down rules for de-segrega- !f'^^^^. °^ *" ^'^^ people." The 
tion in the schdol sy.stem of the ^ Commission rejected his report 
17 states and the District of j ^"^ again ordered him to find 
Columbia where it is permit- f. "'o^kable plan for integra- 
ted or required. That question l'"":. Me^nwh. e. the "Fact 
was reserved for argument on i '';"'^'"^..CT'"'"?* ,'?'''.. "^""li 
Dec. 6 but was delaved because \ ?^^^^^, »^ investigation and 
there were only eikht ju.stices'" October solemnly reported 
pn the Court due to the death ;!Il!^^il! V°^A"!!ll!_P''" "^'^^ 
Of Justice Robert Jackson 



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Fire Department 

The fight against racial se- 
ETegation in the Los Angeles 

. Fire Department was a year- 
long effort that began with a 
^positive announcement by May- 
or "Norrjs Poulson' on Jan. 7 
that the Board of Fire Com- 
missioners had agreed with him 

* that it would make changes in 


the best in the nation. 

As tempers rose to the boiling 
point; the mayor replaced two 
of the Commissioners with ne\y 
appointees dnd pointedly sug- 
gested to the Commission that 
if Chief Alderson refused to 
comply with its directives K 
find another cinief. 

Finally, in November, the 
chief announced that he would 


.< _ * * -^u- .. ■ i comply with the directive for 

the Department within six . . *^-'.. - . ,, , „ 

■_. „*i, .. J I xr »» <->T> integration and would make 

months," and a.sking NAACPi '; „, „„ ..,i,v,;„ in a^,o 

_i.4. ._ » J 1 11 ». some changes withm 30 davs. 

attorneys to delav legal action xr •. i -.u- 

t tu t *■ ^u . I No changes were made within 

to that time. The campaign ... • j . , .u j - ,. 

^ ^ that period but as the vear drew 


to a close the Eagle learned 
that two Negro firemen, one 
from Station 30 and the other 
from Station 14. hart been- re- 


against segregation had been 
opened in the summer of 1953 

I with a petitipn asking for the 

j end of the prac-tice of assign- 

, ing ^■eg^o fire fighters to Sta- i j . o. •• -o •,. c, 

1-tions 14 and 30 both located hf^SIit^ ^o Stat|on <8 in Stu- 

i 'on Central avenue. 

NAACP attorneys, including 
■ Herbert Simmons. Elbert Hud- 
son. Thomas G. Neusom. Ed- 
ward C. Ma<ldox arid Loren Mil- 
ler, responded to- the mayor's 



Ike Asked to Halt 
Mississippi Terro^ 

' NEW YORK— President Eisenhqwer was asked this 
week to take action against the "undisguised e^onoipiic 
intimidation" and a "conspiracy to put the squeeze On 
Negr© businessmen, farmers and homeowners in Mis- 
sissippi by white bankers, merchan ts and len(^ing 
agents. 




•J; 

.- r 

1 :- H 

■i 


■ 

^^^1 ^ 


FUX FOR ALL — Thr grand Chrhtmas party at the Largo theater last Friday, ^o'tven !^00 
V/atts youngsters by George McLnln, standing left ne.yt to Snnta, chose Ruben Calind^ k'mg 
and Llahir (Jnrreathcrs queen, inset right. .Alfred Dm is. grand prize u inner, is sboUn iitting 
nn the hike he won. Committer in chartje. insit '.eft, ineluded Mrs. Matilda Llam, Fay^hUen, 
Btulah Proctor, .Innit Topps. Eufinia Clark, Julia Moody and Ben I'rery. 


dio City. 

Bianham Scandal- 

The Rev. Branham furnished i 
scandal-lovers with the year's i 
finest tid-bit when some mem- i 
I . . bers of his church demanded 1 

Announcement with a deci.sion , his resignation ;at a November I 
to take the depositions of Fire meeting in which open refer- 
Chief John H. Alderson and j ences were made to records 
members of the Commission in that had been whispered about 
order, as they put it. to "put : for six months, 
the chief and the commission- i Copies of the records blos- 


Ruben, 6. and Elainei 7, 
Chosen 'King' and 'Queeii- 

More than 1.t<K) ciieering youngsters packed the Largo Tlic% > 
atre in Watts December 24 as gue.sts of pension leader George, 
McLain at the third annual theatre Christmas" kiddie party, in I 
the area. * ■ 

The "King" and "Queen"- ot\y Klwtt^rtmt^** 

the Christmas festival theatre j ■ »»0 rireilien 


ers on record under oath as to 
practices, in .the. Department." 
The depositions, taken in 
March. ' produced a certain 
amount of fireworks with Chief 
Alderson and most members of 
the Commission defending ra- 
cial practices- in the Depart- 
ment .Only Chairman .Leon- 
ard Yeamans was willing to 
admit without equivocation 
that assignments were made 
on a racial basis. 

Asked for Plan 
• I Changes promised by the 
mayor failed to materialize in 
the six months' period but in 
July the Commission did order 
Chief Alderson to bring in a 
plan for integration within six 
weeks. Meanwhile, the chief 
Encouraged ', formation of a 
"Fact Finding Committee", of 
firemen which solicited funds 

Farm Jobs in 
Marked Decline 

: WASHINGTON— As the end of 
the harvesting season approach- 
ed last month,; the number of 
larm workers declined by two 
'million, compared with the em- 
ployment level during October, 
Ihe U.S. Departrrvent of Agricul- 
ure reports. 

Sharpest decline took place in 
the South where the cotton har- 
vest was" practically completed. 
"^hiS region rep)orte a decrease 
tat 1.42,5.000 workers. Altogether. 
7.937.00 persons were at work on 
farms in November, compared 
* jo 9,973.000 a month Earlier. 
'"I Colored workers rnake up a 
j ^izeable part of the farm labor 
I Jforce in. this: region. 

Big Drop Shown 
In Labor Force 

Sea.sonal factors were reflected 
in a drop in employment and a 
rise iri unemployment in Cali- 
fornia during November, accord- 
ing to the departments of In- 
dustrial Relations and Employ- 
ment. 

Employment decreased to 4,- 
980.000 in November from -5,063.- 
OOO in October. At the same 
time unemployment rose to 
178.000 from 161.000. During this 
period the labor force decreased 
by 66,000, largely in agriculture. 


somed like wild flowers all ; 
over the city and revealed a 
voice, said to be the minister's, 
making fervent lov^ to "Rosie." 
The woman's voice was readi- 
ly identified by rrrPTRbers of St. 
Paul's as that of Mi.ss Shepherd ; 
who had served asltve pastor's 
secretary for four years and 
who had suddenly gone to 
Gary, Ind.„la,st summer io take 
a job with a man described as 
one of Rev. Branham's frieruls. 
Mack Shepherd, the girl's fa- 
ther, promptly filed a huge . 
damage suit in which he sued ' 
the minister for seduction and 
abduction of his daughter. As 
the year drew to a close, law- 
yers were playing a cat and 
mouse ganie with demurrers, 
depositions and other legal 
writs filling the^air. 

The attempt to un.seat the 
Rev. Branham and deprive him 
of his lucrative po.st as pastor 
of St. Paul's flopped when, 
members gave him an uneasy 
but overwhelming vote of con- 
fidence. The mfnister stead- | 
fastly denied all wrong doing. ; 
even in the face of a letter from ; 
Miss Shepherd in which .she 
pleaded that everybody "makes 
mistakes." 

Other Votes 
Another top news event of 
the year which drew some votes 
as entitled to first place was 
the successful effort to halt 
school segregation in Pasadena, 
a practice that had grown up 
through gerrymandering of dis- 
trict boundary lines and t-he 
transfer of white students to 
adjoining schools. 

Another news item favored 
by some readers was the elec- 
tion of Attorney Thomas Neu- 
som. as president of the local 
branch of the NAACP after a 
vigorous and hectic campaign 
in which supporters of Dr. H. 
Claude Hudson charged Neu- 
som witA being soft toward 
Communism. 


party, elected by "unanimous 
proclamation" as well as by ! 
virtue of their holding the 
lucky ^ckets, wei'e Ruben Ga- 
ll ndo. age 6, 10408 Hickory 
street, and Elaine Carreathers, 
age 7, 10432 Antwerp street. . 

Prize Winners 

The grand prize winner of a 
streamlined 1955 bike was Al- 
fred Davis, age 10, 9819 Van 
Buren .street. Othe/ prize win- 
ners were Jerome Lenoir, Max- 
inc Stepps, Linda Marie Jack- 
son. Carrie Fletcher, and Cleo 
Marie Thomas. 

A "real ' Santa Claus was pre- 
sent to hand over the prizes 


Transferred to 
'White' Station 

(Continued from Page 1) 

I tion on Tuesday.He was sched- 
uled to report at the Studio 
City station. Coldwater Canyon 
avenue and ^^htura blvd., 
Thilfr.sday morning.-' -V. 

The quietly effected shift of 
the two men ciima.ite-s a bit- 
terly contested struggle in 
which Fire Chief John H. Aider- 
son, an outspoken- advocat 
segregat 
tempted 
a polif 


first_ meeting _with the kids;in j ordered by the Fire^Commis 


rire i.niei jonn H. Aiaer- ,f^„p ^,3, , big flash. 
1 outspoken, advocat. of ^^^ ^ ^^. ., 
ition. repeatedly V-^ poiice claimed thev at 
d to prevent-adoption.^-,^ j..^ gullett a s6bri. 
y-of integiaticin. ^, \\^^^^ ^.^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^ 


the lobbv of the theatre to give 


sion on Oct. 28 t^ proceed' at 


The request for White House 
intervention was contained in 
a telegram to the President 
from Dr. Channing H. Tobias, 
chairman of the Board of Di- 
rectors of the NAACP. Dr. To- 
bias" telegram also aflkBd for 
a conference with, the t^esi- 
dent "for the presentation of, 
factual evidence and a full dis- 
cussion of this new threat to 
the well-being of our country." 

LMdwi Victtmiivd 

"Negro leadership in Mis- 
sissippi," Ihe NA.\CP message 
charged, "is being subjected to 
undisguised economic intimi- 
dation admittedlj' designed to 
curb civil rights and particu- 
larly to discourage registration 
and voting and to force aban- 
donment of efforts to secure 
peaceful compliance with the 
May 7 ruling of the United 
States. Supreme Court outlaw- 
ing racial segregation in pub- 
lic schools." 

The movement to use eco- 
nomic pressure to suppress de- 
mands by Negroes for an end 
to segregation was initiated by 
citizens councils first organ- 
ized in Mississippi. Recently, 
efforts have been made to ex- 
tend the movement into Ala- 
bama and other southern states. 
Primarily the movement has 
been aimed at NAACP state 
and local leaders. Others, how- 
ever, who assert their citizen- 
ship rights have also been vic- 
timized. 

The text of the NAACP tele- 
gram to the White House fol- 
lows: 

Conspiracy Charged 

"Because of a serious 'situa- 
tion in Mississippi, the NAACP 
would appreciate a conference 
with you at your early conven- 
ience to indicate what remedial 
action can and should be taken. 
"Negro leadership in Mis- 
sissippi is being subjected to 
undisguised economic intimi- 
bara and the ne.xt thing I knew dation admittedly designed to 
there was a big flash. I didn't ! fi'rh civil rights and particu- 

! larly to discourage registration 

tempted ] ""d voting and to force aban- 

obriety test, j donment of efforts to secure 

do so be- i peaceful compliance with the 

cause of his drunken cojidition. ' May 17 ruling of the U. S. Su- 

Thev did administer a test preme Court outlawing racial 


Druhk Driver 
MresTwo j 
In Collisioh V 

Howard -Eugene Bullett.'?4, of 
4057 &.\Main street, was arrest- 
ed on a'^runk driving charge 
arid booked on a felony count 
Christmas evening following an 
aatoiTTDfiile collisiqp in which 
two people werie injured. 

When he \^as arrested. BuUett 
told police: "I'v^ had a couple 
of beers. I tnet .some friends 
about an hour before the acci- 
dent and we were all drinking. 
I was driving down Santa Bar 


gro who advocates dssegrtea- 
tion to find and hold ^ jobl get 
credit, or renew a mortgagp.' 

"We believe these cconitmic 
purges warrant the atterttion 
of the federal governinentj We 
urge you to direct the aplpro- 
priate Federal agencies j to 
make such investigation as [may 
be needed ^nd to m|ake their 
facilities readily avajilabli to 
Negro citizens now being : per- 
secuted because they suppprt 
the Constitution of the United 
States. We are vitally fcon- 
cerned with tfie moral ' issue 
confronting our coun)try. 
Aik PubUc StotijiiMOt 

"We believe that |a public 
statement from you followed by 
corrective action Woiild be a 
proper exercise of t^e moral 
suasion inherent in ithe high 
office of tlie presidancy of a 
free people. I i ] 

"There dhn be nq freedom 
where privately [organized 
groups brazenly seel^ ta con- 
trol the hopes, "attitudjes, speech 
and action of American citi- 
zens through what tie Mont- 
gomery Advertiser a )tly calls 
'economic thuggery.' For the 
law abiding victims tf this ter- 
ror we pray swift an 1 authori- 
tative relief. 

"In this grave car ;umstance 
we respectfully seek- and urge 
a conference with you for pres- 
entation of factual evidence 
and a full discussicn of this 
new threat to the \'ell being 
of our country." 



I 






:IV = 


CHEERY — Saunira it •kg 

of t, e cheeriat of the 70,000 
polit patients given aid by 
Mar h of Dimes funds in 
195i. The 1955] March of 
Din, •! is slated for-Jart. J-J7, 


Shfw World to 
Aid Abie's Nisht 

ntinued frorh Page 1) 
is eye in an auto acd> 


I 


ea|ch\oungster personally a bag^^^.^ ^^.,,j ^ ^^^^ ^^ a.ssign men 'afioul t^^o^ hours later, however, segregation in public schools, 
of candy. *o posts without regard- to race gpfi reportedly'found him drunk | "Reports from members of 

A stage and film show, round- -j or cplor. Alder.son continued to ^ j,f that time. jour staff in the state indicate 

ed out the afternoons program. , stall and defiant\j- declared he MaylaTld Phillip Muse of banks and other private credit 

Local dignitaries uho coop- | would consult with private at- camp Pendleton, Oceanside, institutions are conspiring to 
crated with .McLaih ; were: , torneys to determine whether I wais seriously injured, sustain-, put the squeeze on Negro farm- 


Supervisor Kenneth 


Doyle. As.semblyman 
Kilpatrick and Captain Reddins 
of the Police Department. 

Ri'di ng he rd on the small fry 
was the j9t of the comitilttee 
headed fc(> M.rs. Matilda Elam. 
assisted by Fay Allen. Beulah 
Proctor, Annie M. Topps, Euge- 
nia. Clark and ,Iulia Moody. 

Ben Peery was the arrange- 
ments chairman, a voluntary 
iob he has competently hani: 
died for the past three years. 


or ijot the Commission had au- 


County . _ .^,. .„ 

Jlahn, Congressman Clyde j thqrity to i.ssue the order. 

Vernon 


You can lead a hone to water but 
you can't make him drink and you 
cSn send a tool to school but you 
can't maVe him think. 


Arthur Loggins 
Cited in Suit for 
Child Support 

Arthur John Loggins, a.ssoci- 


^ NAACP Fil«d Petition 

Action of the Fire Corriniis- 
sion followed firm corrTmit- 
ments by Mayor Norris Poulson 
that discrimination and segre- 
gation in the, Fire Department 
would not be felerated. 

First mov^ fn the attack on 
"the jim-crow set-up occurred a 
year ago last summer when the 
NAACP filed a petition, asking 
the Department to end race se- 
gregation. 

In the course of the heated 


ing" a flap-like laceration above 'ers, businessmen and home- 
his eve as well as other injur- ' owners who are active in the 
ies. ALso injured was Lawrence , NAACP by foreclosing their 
H. Lockhart, 1630 W. 37th ' inortgages, demanding full and 
street, but he refused nodical i prompt payment of indebted- 


treatment. Bullett received only 
a small cut on the upper lip. 


Department of 
NAACP to Aid 


School Change 

NEW YORK— The creation of of Sunflower County, are 
a new department of the 
NAACP Legal Defcn.se and Edu- 
cational Fund to protect Negro ! sole purpose of maintaining se 


ness, and refusing credit. 
Bash and Vicioui 
"These and other acts of in- 
timidation have bPPn initiated 
by so-called citizens councils 
recently organized in many of 
the state's counties.. These 
councils, according to State 
Representative Wilma Sledge 

com- 
posed of reliable white male 
citizens . . . organized for the 


controversy, ad^ates of seg 

regation attempted to bring j teachers, principal's and school ' gregation of the races.' They 
pressure by submitting petitions .superintendents involved in the seek this goal through the 'ap- 
to the commi-ssioners.by send- transition from segregated to ' plication of economic pressure 
ing a committee on a "survey" i non-segregated schools, was I to troublemakers.' 
of other fire stations throughout announcpfj ^ere this week by ' "The Montgomery (Ala.1 
the country to "prove" that in- Xhurgood Marshall, director- 1 Advertiser characterizes the 
I Arthur John Loggins, a.ssoci- j ,pj,ra,ion doesn't work, and by .-ounsel of Legal Defense. Councils' methods as 'rash, in- 

ated with the Roy Loggins Cat- :p3j.,ji„g ,j,p ^pen hearings of pr John W 

ering Co., was asked to show ; ^^e commission with their sup- tionallv 


Sydnetta Smith 

(Continued from Page 1 1 
activities.. She was a member of. 
and an officer in. a number of 
organizations, notably, 24th 
Street Parent Teachers' Associa- 
tion D^n Mother in the Cub 
Scouts. Delta Sigma Theta Na- 
tional Sorority, Jack and Jill. 
Inc., Les Moderns. The Links, 
Inc., Ball and Chain, and Bib 
and Tucker. 


cause Wednesday for failure to 
siipport his three-year-old child. 
The action was brought by 
his former wife, Mrs. Lorna 
I Elizabeth Loggins. 319'i W. 45th 
street, who claimed that Log- 
gins was $492 in arrears on 
payments which were set by 
the court at $60 per month. 


former president of West Vir- 
ginia State College, will head 


porters. 

On the other hand, the mayor 
and the commissioners made it the, new department, 
clear that unles.5 Alderson was 
prepared to carry oiit the pol- 
icy laid ddwn by the depart- 
ment he would be forced to re- 
sign. The situation has been 
calm on the surface since the 


Davis, interna- decent and vicious.' This lead- 
known educator and ing Southern dally quotes a 


She claims further that young j Oct. 28 order by the commls- 
Loggins is financially able to ! sioners. 
make t-he payments, and asks 
that in. addition to the money 
due he also be called upon to 
pay attorneys' fees and court 
costs. 


t 
I ■ 

1v - ' 
i 1 




HAPPY NEW YEAR 


■•;» 


. I 


henri o'bryant uniform co. 

III44 North Western Ave. ; 
Los Angeles, Calif; 


It is ail right to look on the 
bright side except when mak- 
ing an Investment. Thaf is the 
time to look on all sides. 


Murder-Suicide 

(Continued from Page 1) 
but had asked him to return It 
about a month ago. 

The bodies were turnisd over 
to Pierce Brothers Mortuary, 
6003 Compton blvd. There will 
be no coroner's inquest. 


AdvcrtlMmcnt 


Advertisement 


Science Shrinks Piles 
New Way Without Surgery 

Pindf Haalina Substcinc* That De«i teth— 

R«li«v«» Pain— Shrinks Hamarrhoids . 

Ntw York. N.Y. (Sp*cial) — 1 among these sufferers were a 
For the first time science has very wide variety of hemorrhoid 


found a new healing sub.stance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids and to stop 
bleeding — without surgerj-. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
another, "very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and verified 
by doctors' observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And. while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction or retrac- 
tion (shrinking) took place. 

And most amazin£ of all — 
I this improvement was main- 


conditions, some of 10 to 20 
years' standing. 

All this, without the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a -new healing substance (Bio- 
DyneW.) — the discovery oC a 
world-famous reseatch instu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured tis- 
sue on all parts of the body. 

Now this new healing sub- 
stance Is offered in ointment 
form for hemorrhoids under the 


council spokesman as- saying: 
'We intend to make it difficult, 
if not impossible, for any Ne- 


Rev. Branhiim 
Must Answ<»r 

(Continued from I age 1) 
deposition from the pastor of 
fashionable St. Pai 1 Baptist 
church to enable hin to. pre- 
pare his case properly. Bran- 
ham had previously been sched- 
uled to make his deposition at 
Canandy's office DC?. 16, but 
at the last mirtute 'on advice 
of attorney" di(i not appear. 

Meanwhile. Cann»dy has 
been given until Mo iday, Jan- 
uarj' 3*10 file an amended com- 
plaint in the controversial suit 
that has been the number one 
sensation iii the (ommunity 
since last silmmer vh^n sala- 
cious records, with a h^avy ac- 
cent on sex and love, were boot- 
legged around the community 
under cover of night, and play- 
ed to secret and sele:t:audicn- 
ces. ' , ; . 

Branham Acn sed 

The male voice on the rec- 
ord was alleged to be that of 
ReV. Branham. One oi the wom- 
en w-ith whom he ' conversed 
was called "Rosie.]' At the 
height of the controversy. Miss 
Shepherd left the city and 
turned up in Garj-, Ind. Bran- 
ham's attorney has advised that 
Miss Shepherd, like Branham, 
denies all allegations. 

After the records and the 
charges <against the pastor be- 
came public knowledge, the 
girl's father filed suit accusing 
the minister of holding illicit 
relations with his daughter over 
a four-year period, ar d then ab- 
ducting her. 


lost Bis eyg in 
dent.^ 

Daizling Dot DandHdge is 
sche( uled to opei^ in Chicago 
at a litery New Year's Eve, but 
is bi sily attempting to rear- 
rangi her booking to make the 
Eagli 'affair. Spade Cooley is 
also ! scheduled to appear as is 
Hum, d Helen Humes.' 

Thi show kicks off promptly 
tonig It at 8 from "the Lincbln 
theat ?r stage and wilTbe'era- 
ceed; by Joe Adams, CharlH 
Tran; mell, Bass Harris, (^enr 
Norn an, and Chazz Crawford. 
Tick* ts w ill be on sale at the 
box jffice for one dollar ptr 
pers^^;^ -[ ~ 

Sorr ! people get tired today thinli* 
ing aiaut wtiat they are' going to d* 
tomorlow. 


T" 


CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 


1050 E. 43rd PI. 

Ibs Aflfdcs 11. C«Ur. 
ADams 4^141 


LOREN MILLER 
Editor and Pubfithtr 


Vol. LXXiV 
Thur day 


X 


Ne. 41 
30, 19S4 


F. P.jWALLER, JR. J Adv.'Mgr. 

GRAdE E. SIMONS. Executive Editor 
EDwYRO "ABIE" ROBINSON 

Circulation Mgr. 

CALfJE RUSS L: Office Mgr. 

BA ■ AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. G. <kLl_EN_ _... 1512 1«th St. 

Santa Monica, Calif., Ph.: EX. 5-1M1 


Aijtumn Subscriptions 

Months') 
Only 


8MonOis$4 
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PER 


:OPY 1«e 


Adjui 
Date 


Calif 
1050 


ieation Decree Number 12S8S 
of Adjudication July 1, 1KI. 


Put lithed every Thursday by TIM 
ilifi rnia Eagle Publishing Co., 
50 ' bast 43rd Placev,' Entered aa 
Secor i ClaM Matter November S, 
1937, at the Post office at Les An* 
geles California, under the Act of 
Marc 3, 1879. 

REPI ESENTED NATIONALLY »Y 

ASSOCIATED PUBLISHERS. INC* 

' S513 Hollywood Blvd. 

Run BIdg., San Francisco, Calif. 

«1 Wi St 4eth Street, N. Y. 10, N. Y. 



Yot/ll havt tb4 monty for your ceUtgt iduauiont 
Your Christnus presmt is OoUm$kge Mtatu^ 

injuratui with payor htmfif: the company g \.yi\ -\ . 

. will hep it in force if the appUemt payor ditl 

% .'i ■ 'I -' 

9^uuUlgetthcmcruy.lfD»i4o4t | 

not livt to pay the policy prmiims, 


CoUUn Statt Mutual u/ill 


IIP 


take up where be Itavet of. 

Love and Merry Cbristmail 

Mother tnd Did 


I tained in cases where doctors' I name Prepamfion H.* The price 
j observations were contiuned | is only 98c a tube including an 
I over a period of many months! : applicator. The nam^ to ask for 
I In fact, results were so is Preparation H — at all drug 
I thorough that sufferers were stores. And remember — if not 
I able to make .such astonishing entirely satisfied — yoiu money 
statements as "Piles have ceas- \ will be refunded promptly. 
,ed to be a problemr And i r Trade Mark.) 


. 11 


H 


COLDBV STATS MOtVAL 

urs ursoiuiTCt compavt 
•HBtTM at uuriMU, luiMK. *M mn 

IdWOitM 


t 


M* 



H' 


MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEV YEAR! 


GOlDfeN STATE MUTUAL LIFE . INSURANCI COMPANY 
lot Aage'es Cewiity Offices 
Ut Angeles Wettsido-Notae Peytea.'ClU, Maaagar 

las Aageles. tawth Las Angeloi-Jehnale Cackraa, Maaoger 

las Aagelas Central Oivistaa-M. Z. Ray, Asi't S«^ af Agoasio* 
laag ■eocli-Barland' Jainlsan, Manager 
>—<>■■ ■Mfsfw 0, Washhigtaii, CU 



— from the — 

^Association 


can. 


H'e iL'isU to thank every o e for our success, gtti fw 

their codperation end pat onage. 

This Association is an or ranitation »f service. 


H'e serve you, and by 
grow and succeed. 



ing iMin. This s*rvic« 
or -f^boift fh« 19th off 

LIBERTY ! 


ur using our services *f* 


-- 

Th« ••mini January hrm ar* fl*lii|| t* oHor 
»• you m spocioi imprj tvomont «nd roihodol- 


wili bo oyoiiariUo on 

4anu«wy, |f95« 

I 

AVINGS & 


LOAN ASS aciAinoN 



.11 


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I 


AO QUljBBLl'SG — Ao one — but no one^could quibbU otrr the selection of beautiful Straie- 
kerry bltndrMiss Naney U'oodruff. 21, as uinntr of the $50,000 Miss Rhcingold auard for 
1^55. She re'reites $20,000 in cash, $30,000 in modelin/r fees, a year's uardrobe. and tours »( 
the L. S. and Puerto Rico. She is thoiLM being congratulated by Gertrude Gtpfon •/ Rheingold't 
puhlie relations staffs ^ * ■ 


Ithipk. 




Father - In - Law Is Shot 
After Christmas Row 

■ ! - I - 

The father of four young children was arrested early Sun- 
day morning for the shooting to death of the children's grand- 
father. Henry WiMiams, 28. 1214 E. 60th street, told Sheriffs 
Firestone deputies that he returned home late Christmas night 
and that when he knocked on the door. Phillip Robinson, 50, 
1170 E. 25th ^treet. the father 3>^ 
of his common-law wife. Wil- 


,' • . -I 


Mar. 

I Editor 

Mar. 

War. 

nvc . 

llthSt. 
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lie Doris Robinson, opened the 
door. 

Williams inquired as to the 
whereabouts oC Miss Robinson 
and says he was told by Rob- 
inson that you "did not want 
to know where your old lady 
was or you would have been 
there with her." An argument 
ensued, during •which Robinson 
-threatened Williams with a 
knife. Williams says he ran 
to the northeast bedroom of the 
house and got his gun from the 
closet, 

the gun he 


There will be no coroner's in- 
quest. The district attorney's 
office filed murder charges 
against Williams. 


Ly by 

tN&« 

Sarif. - i 

N. y. ^ 


'1 


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u'e 


i . ; 


Re'turning! with 
opened fire on Rhhinson. hit- 
ting hihi with the serond shot 
in the upper chest. The victim 
fell on the bed and lay there. 
Williams railed fhe Sheriff's year, 
office .''■ Upoti the .arrival of dep- \ Ballot* 
uties Robinson was rushed to 
Tweedy Hospital \fhere he was 
dead on arrival. 3 

The, suspect was placed un- 
der arrest and taken to Fire- 
stone Park Station. A .32-cali- 
ber revolver, the gun used, was 
found on the arm of an over- 
stuffed chair with two shots 
fired from it j 

Miss Robinson Had been tak- 
en by her father to the hospital 
for a pregnancy. Her' other 
four children, Linda Jean. .2. 
Teresa 
months. Melvin. 4. and .\lvin 


Walter White to 
Give Address at 
NAACP Meet 

NEW YORK— Walter White, 
executive secretary of the 
NAACP. is scheduled to make 
his ' first public appearance 
since his hospitalization in 
October at the Association's 
4.5th annual meeting here on 
Jan. 3. '4 

White and other staff mem- 
bers will report to the member- 
ship on the activities of the 


the election of 
mem'bers to the Board of Di- 
rectors will be opened and 
counted and ^he successful 
candidates announced. There 
are 19 candidates for 16 vacan- 
cies. ■ 


Watts Doctor 
Delays Plea In 
Abortion Case 

Dr. Edmund George Peters, of 
Watts, arrested late in Novem- 
ber when police believed they 
had cracked open a county- 
wide abortion ring, asked for 
additional time to enter his plea 
when he appeared for arraign- 
ment Monday. 

He was given an additional 
week, and will again appear 
January 4. 

Dr. Peters, who has been in 
and out of the hospital for the 
past six months, was arrested 
together with a Pasadena 
woman. Mrs. Bessie Sutter. 50. 
who was believed to be the 
kingpin in the illicit operations 
i racket. 

Dr. Peters. S.'i. who lives at 
S723 Pieyka avenue, is expected 

: tjo plead not guilty. He was 
charseri with conspiitary to vin- 

; late the State's abortion .statute 
and with a second count of 

I performing an abortion. 


Conscience 


I-.' 


Murder Suspect , 
Gives Himself Up 

At about 11 o'clock Sunday night, the day after 
Christmas, a 29-year-old man'=^alked calmly into the 
Firestone Sheriffs station, approached the counter, and 
said quietly: "I believe you are looking for me," He 
gave his name as Jack Raby. 

Detectives immediately » — ' 

checked their files and booked 


the man for murder. 

AU-PoiBts SmicIi 

Raby was the object of -an 
all-points search after the body 
of Mrs. Farella Johnson Brack- 
ins. 26-year-old mother of four 
small children, was found Oct. 
17 in a pool of blood, a butcher 
knife thrust up to the hilt in 
her chest 

Raby. of 2102 Hoopet avenue, 
red Ijaired and freckled, was 
known to have visited Mrs. 
Brackins frequently and was 
believed to have been with her 
the previous evening.. Despite 
police efforts, however, he van- 
ished and no trace was found 
of him. 

The man who appeared at 
Rirestone Sunday had dyed his 
hair black.- He told police he 
had been li^mg in Las Vegas, 
and working near the Ellos Air 
base there. He informed Sgt. 
C. W. McGowan that he had 
been visiting his father on the 
fatefu4 Sur}day in October, 
came to Mrs. Brackins* home 
and found her dead. Knowing 
that he was on probation on a 


Lucius Lomax 
Candidate for 
City Council 

Lucius W. Lomax. Jr., who 
came within 2500 votes of elec- 
tion to the State Legislature 
from the 63rd district last No- 
vember, will seek election to 
the City Council from the 10th 
district in the City Elections 
next spring. 

Lomax, publisher of the Los 
.Angeles Tribune, will oppose 
Charles Navarro, who was first 
elected in 1951. and who in 1953 
won in the primary election 
over a field of four rival can- 
didates.- including two Negroes. 
Dr. John A. Somerville and 
Claybourne Mitchell. 

Lomax has been in business 
grand theft auto charge, he left | in the 10th district for nine 
the baby playing in the living years, a n d- has lived in the 
room and ran out of the house, j Westside community 18 years. 

He was beaten in the 63rd dis- 


Chotnged Story - 

Later' however. Raby 'changed 
his story. He admittecl he had 
an argument with the young 
woman 'over money matters. 
While they were arguing, he 
said. Mrs. Brackins ranintottie 
kitchen and grabbed the butch- 
er knife. He said he struck her 
and knocked her down and fell 
on top of . her. The knife 
pierced her flesh and was driv- 
en in deep. 

Raby was arraigned in Mu- 
nicipal Court Wednesday on a 
j charge of murder. 

j The body of the young wom- 
'an. who lived at 1121>i E. T7th 
: street, was discovered by her 

parents. Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 

Johnson. 147^2 W. 59th place. 
I The Johnsons had stjopped by 
;to make an unscheduted visit. 

and found their daughter, i 
.bathed in blood, .sprawled out 

on the floor of her bedroom. . . ' 
Her ISmonthold baby *Vas ^ 

playitig on- the living" room U 

floor. 


trict race last November by five- 
term incumbent Delbert Mor- 
ris, a Republican. Morris' vote 
was 22.657;- Lomax's 20.143. 

Native' of Brenham. Tex.. Lo- 
max was reared in Chicago and 
holds a degree in Business Ad- 
ministration from the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. He has published 
the Tribune since 1941. 



T" 


'mm-n 


Soldier in Germany 

PFC Jefferson D. Pugh, son of 
Mt'. and Mrs. C. L. Pugh, 10203 
Wilmington averiue, Los Ange- 
les, is a member of the 2d Arm- 
ored Division's Combat -Com- 
mand A boxing team in Ger- 
.\nn Williams. 10 ' many this season. 

The 21-year-oid .soldier, who 


COLLEGE FUND CHOIR 

NEW YORK— The United Ne- 
gro College Fund choir series 
heard weekly over the ABC ra- 
dio network will enter its ^xth 
year of continuous broadqkst- 
ing in January, 1955. ' 


H« wlio starts to rid* a hobby- 
hors* should be provided with an 
emef-gency brake. 


■ i 

GOOD RESOLUTION 

Resolutions for the coming 
Npw Year should include a per- 
sonal promise to he ever on the 
alert to prevent fires — fires that 
start from crfreless habits when 
smoking. cooking. heating;, 
burning rubbish, and dry clean- 
ing clothes in the home, fires 
that inevitably result in unne- 
cessary expense for property re- 
pair, and far too oftien fatal or 
near fatal burns. 



CArr. soscoE jones 

Capl. Jones 
Reports for 
Chicago Duly 

Capt Roscoe Jones of Pasa- 
dena, former adjutant officer of 
the 6th Chemical Warfare Com- 
pany, USA, departed for Chicago 
Tuesday to report for duty with 
the Army Procurement District 
headquarters. 

For the ' past three years. 
Capt. Jones has been stationed 
at Camp Hall in Bushey, Eng- 
land, five miles from London. 

He returned to this country 
with his wife. Mrs. Norma Jones, 
aboard the liner S..S. America in 
time to enjoy Christmas with 
their parents and relatives in 
Los Angeles and Pasadena. 

The captain's wife is the 
former Norma Roberts. Pacific 
Telephone Co. staff member. 
Capt. Jones' parents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Phil A. Jones of 92 W. 
Pepper street, Pasadena. Jones 
is a nationally known news- 
paper and magazine distributor 
and cosmetics manufacturer: 

While stationed in Europe. 
Capt. Jones attended an Army 
accounting .school in Garmish. 
Germany. He also had traveled 
in Spain, France and Belgium. 

A veteran of World W'ar II. 
he was recalled into the service 
in 1950. He has a brother, Capt. 
Abbott Jones, who has also been 
serving overseas and who is 
now enroute back to the United 
Statts. 

Capt. Jones attended local 

schools and graduated from 

Pasadena Junior College and 

; Southwestern University whbre 

; he obtained a Bachelor of Laws 

degree. 



Thurs., Dm. 30, 1954 The Colt ernia logle-S 

— . — _H 

Miracle Needed to 
-Birth of Nation- P( 

NEW YORK— If thi sponsors of 
version, of "The Birth of a Nation" cai 
based upon Thomas DJixon's novel, 
which will be "palatable to American 
they will have performtid a "miracle 
NAACP administrator, 'wrote this w 
who, with Phil L. Ryanl, heads the W|st Coast syndi- 
cate which has bought jthe film rightsfto the story. 


In response to an earlier tele 
gram protesting the remaUng 
of the notorious anti-N«gro 
film, Thai. had indicated thita 
new script would be written 
and suggested a conference 
with the NAACP West Oiast 
representative. While agre<ing 
to a conference, Wilkins in- 
fcH-med Thai that "our discus- 
sion with you would not be 
upon the basis of modification, 
but on dropping the project al- 
together." ; 

It is difficult, the NAACP, 
executi%e said, "to see how the 
picture, could be made without 
incorporating its princi]ial 
theme which is the inheient 
inferiority of the Negro a^d his 
unfitness to be regarded as a 
man. The original novel »nd 
the script made from it have 
no story to tell except this one. 
The Klan is glorified as the 
answer to the Negroes' attempt 
to assume the status of a man 
and a citizen with the rights, 
privileges and dignity of oth- 
er men. The Negro is dei ict- 
ed as an ignorant, depraved 
animal. The Klan is held up 
as the proper weapon v.ith 
which to control, if not exterm- 
inate, this animal." 


e proposed new 
produce a film 

The Clansman" 

egroes in 1955" I 
Roy Wilkins, 

k to Ted Thai 


*- 


'-" limii 
IS KORh.l —Marine Pit. 
Rich/trd If.. Harris, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Hill of 
201 S. Pynchonst St., San 
Pieqo, IS serxing . with the' 
Military Police Company of 
the Jst Marine Division ik 
Korea. 


construction 
Increase 

"Construction in Los .\ngeles 
County during 1954 continued 
its record -.setting pace with 
figures for the first 11 months 
showing a 102 per cent gain 
ov^r the tnta". recorded for the 
corresponding period in 1933." 
.said Quentin W. Best, chairman 
of the Lns Angeles Chamber of 
Commerce Con.struction Indus- 
tries Committee. 


Travel Expert 
Visits Relatives 
In California 

William D. Garcia, head ttf a 
national travel agency of Vlil 
waukee. Wis., Mrs. Garcia and 
their son, Joey, arrived here last 
week from San Francisco to en 
joy the Christmas and Ifew 
Years with local realtives. Wrtile 
here the Ga'rcias are the h( use 
guests of James L. "Buddie" ihd 
Marge Garcia, of 2952 S. ^or- 
mandie avenue. 

The visiting _Mr. Garcia \% a 
native of Oklahoma. 

James "Buddie" Garcia. Is a 
senior law clerk in the law. of- 
fices of Attys. Gordon. Scha fer. 
Lang and Hall. He is a bro her 
of the visitor. Following the 
visit here, the Milwaukee visit 
ors will journey on to San 
Diego. They are combining bus 


I Some pertont arc to easily fooled 

that the wolf- only waitet hit time 

I putting en theep't clothing. 


in ess with 
trip west, 


vacationms on 


MARC^ OF DIMES 

On January 3, the aniiual 
.March of Dimes will start its 


drive for polio-fighting funds. 


Christ nias 
paged up 
threatening 
children in 

Mrs. Me 


Meanest Mai^ I 
Threatens Tots] 
OnXniasDay 

Bt 3NNA FREE 

Wendell ] : v e r e 1 1 e Hooker, 
11927 Wads|vorth avenue, was 
rated the m|anest man in Watts 
ay when he ram« 
d down the street 
to beat- up all the 
he neighborhood. ' 
;ie Wods, 11931 % 
Wadsworth |iv-iue, told police 
that Hocker was shouting pro- 
fani^es an I threatening the 
youngsters 1 vho ran scurrying 
out of his Mj ly. When the offic- 
ers arrived.^ they saw Hocker 
standing on the sidewalk. 

Some of he frightened resi- 
dents said i\ ley thought he had 
a gun.. 

Officer K^ nneth Shipp beck-, 
oned to Ho tker to come over, 
but the maif replied belligerent- 
ly, "You cor le over here, if you 
want me." 

Shipp sal that when he got 
within 10 feet of the man, 
Hocker pull >d a butcher knife 
from his b< It and threw it tt 
him. but n issed. Hocker then 
began fight ng. but was finally 
subdued kh 1 placed under ar- 
rest. 

Mrs. Myn le Jones, next door 
neighbor, si id Hocker had been 
threatening! to beat up the 
children wh > lived in the area, 
and had thi "atened her daugh- 
ter, Rene, aj e 5. She said he had 
also warne her to keep her- 
child in the louse if she wanted 
her to be sa e. 

Hocker v as, booked on a 
charg^ of aa sault with a deadly^ 
weapon. 


In 


the 


Ov«irs«as Arn^y 

Bakersfield, 


PFC Henri Grant: 
is serving in Germany, where he 
is a truck driver in Head- 
quarters Bj( ttery of VII Corps' 
867th Field i Artillery Battalion. 

Overseas ' since November of 
last year, .h > entered the Anhy 
in February 1953 and completed 
basic trainii g at Camp Roberts, 
Calif. Gran is a former em? 
ployee o*f th » Naval Air Station 
in San Dief 3. His mother. Mr^. 
Alvie Granq lives at 1010 Vir- 
ginia ave. 


■-.■J- 


.■3. were sleeping at .the time entered the Army in February 

of the shooting. They wpre 19.53 and arrived overseas the 

taken by Mrs. Mildred Rohin- following July, is a driver in 

son. 34. 4 170 E. 2.5th street. Miss Company D of the 12th Armored 

Robinson's .stepmother., Infantry Battalion. 




r. 


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Take Advantage of Ibis 

-SAVlblG GRACE- 






# Get extra rvam 

l>y placing funds with us 
by January llth. 
Receive 6 full months' 
eaimuigs next June 30th. 
Open or a<W to 
\imx account now! 


; Of BN YOUR ACCOUNT TODAY. 

BroMiway Federal Saviags t Laaa 
AsaaeiafiiM af Las Aagalas 

; CUtRINT INTttilT RAH 3HH MR ANNUM 

4329 So. ^^^ AD. 3-7246 

. Only $1) 



Mmi. Hif Mgli : Thur«. * «i.m. t« 4 p.m.; frMay, 11 mjm. 
t« 7 p.m. Closed OM Saturday. 

MIMHI OF FIOIRAL HOMI LOAN BANK SYSTIM 

RICHARD R. WRIGHT. Ill . . . Manager 









QV-W 

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onaco^^Sh.**^' 








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207 EAST WASHINGTON BLVD AT CENTRaL AVE 


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4-^th« Cdlifornio Eagle 


Thurs., D*c. 30, 1954 


■'I- 


California Sagle 


4.! 


ieren Miller, Editor and Publisher 

Tli4 lofll* »t«HiA f«r cempl«t« int«eration ef Na^reM iiit* •v«nf 
HhoM of Aiiioricmi Hf* throuah Hm dwnocrqfk proc«MM« 

Wmfavon U il''' ; ■! "^ ■ 

1 1. nPC on local, stoto chi# notional lovaJt. 
Decant housing for oil Amaricans. 
RofU'Ofontation In Govornmont. 
Adoquoto old ago ponsions and social socurlty.' 
Colloctiv* bargaining rights for all werknian. 
Dovolopmant and oncourogomant of Nagro buslnass. 

W* oppose: 1;! 

. I.Jim Crow in all forms.! ' ' I . *' - 

: |3. 1 Communists «md all othar anamias of damocracy. 

^MIsfMd fvory Thwrsdoy i i 

1050 East 43rd Ploco, Los Angolos 11 AO. 4^161 


Happy New Year! 


t 


One of the 'best pieces of New 
Year's news is the decision of the 
National Council, of Churches to im- 
press the more than 35 million mem- 
bers of affiliated churches that ra- 
cial prejudice is a "sin — contrary to 
the Will and Desigrf of God." 

The Biblical text selected to im- 
press that teaching is the urging of 
the Psalmist to "Behold how .good 
and pleasant it is for brothers to 
dwell together in unity." 

We don't suppose for a moment 
tjhat all of the 35 million communi- 
cants of the churches will accept and 
. act on the mandate of their leaders. 
i • Some — all too miny — will reject 
'or jspum the lesson taught from the 
pulpit, <:^ 

Another goodly number^ will, ac- 
'cept the lesson in a passivg^manner 
. and forget or neglect to ^o anything 
. to make the text a living reality. 

Others, perhaps a minority, will 
search their hearts- and" resolve to 
forego the luxury of discriminating 
. against other men because of race 
and color. Many of them will carry 
that resolution into practice. Be- 
cause, of what they do and how they 
act, America will inch a little closer 
towards its- democratic goal. 

One of the strengths of the Amer- 
ican democracy is the manner in 
which voLuntary organizations keep 
eternally at the business of prod- 


ding the rest of us into accepting 
and living up to ideals that are often 
more honored in the breach than the' 
observance. 

The church has been a mighty 
force in American life. Ever since 
the founding of the Republic, for- 
ward-looking churchmen have 
thrown their weight against prac- 
tices that denied rights and privi- 
leges to those unable to speak for 
or protect themselves. 

Opposition to slavery was rooted 
in churches. Christian leaders in- 
veighed against child labor, against 
the sweat shop, against denial of 
rights and'opportunities to the poor 
and poverty stricken. -Many times, 
their protests against wrongs went 
urtheeded for generations. But some- 
how in the long i-un their views tri- 
umphed, the reforms they proposed 
were wrung out of legislatures and 
courts. . - '■ 

Racial pre^'udice is contrary to the 
(Christian concept of the Fauier- 
hood of God and the Brotherhood 
of Man. It denies the dignity of the 
individual, the cornerstone of Chris- ' 
tian dogma and teaching. 

If 1955 brings nothing else in the 
area of race relations except a con- 
certed drive by churches against ra- 
cial prejudice we can look forward 
to a lessening of racial discrimina- 
tion. : 


1 


Time For Action 


One of the crimes denounced by 
federal legislation passed just after 
the Civil War — and never repealed — 
is that of conspiring to deny a citi- 
zen his civil rights. 

A gigantic conspiracy of that 
kihtf is going on In Mississippi where 
thousands of whites have banded to- 
gether to subvert the Supreme Court 
decision outlawing segregated 
schools. 

Negro workmen are being intimi- 
dated and kept from patronizing Ne- 
gro, business and professional men 
who have refused to bow to the de- 
mand of Mississippi's governor that 
they turn their backs on the Court's- 
decision and accept Jim Grow 
schools. . ^ 

Other Negro workmen are being 
denied employment if they stick up 
for their rights and are being told 
that the price of getting jobs is that 
of kowtowing to Jim Crow. 

Under those circumstances the 
NAACP is on solid ground whin it 


appeals to President Eisenhower to 
throw the weight of the government 
behind prosecution of those who are 
seeking to flout and undermine the 
Supreme Court and to deny Negro 
parents the civil right of having 
their children educated at unsegre- 
gated schools. 

The' Administration has made 
much of the fact that the School de- 
cision was delivered by Chief Justice 
Warren, the first Eisenhower ap- 
pointee. However, that decision will 
become a dead letter unless the gov- 
ernment moves quickly to halt those 
who are using economic and politi- 
cal reprisals again.st those who want 
to enjoy the fruits of the decision. 

Here is an area in which the ad- 
ministration can act and in which it 
should act. Its willingness to act 
will measure the good faith of its 
oft proclaimed determination to mete 
out even handed justice to all Amer- 
icans. , ' , •. • 


Can't Clean It Up 


The proposal to remake the film, 
"Birth of a Nation," deserves vigor- 
ous and concerted opposition. 

The claim of those who are toying 
with the idea of filming the picture 
that* it can be made "acceptable" to 
Negroes is nonsense. The book from 
which the original film stemmed, 
and from which this film would 
have to stem, is ""The Leopard's 
Spots," by Thomas Dixon. 

The theme of the book, its primary 
design, was the glorification of the 
Ku Klux Klan. 

It has become fashionable these 
days to pretend that the original 
Klan was a much better organization 
than its. latter day counterpart and 
to prate that it did good work in rid- 
ding the South of corruption that 
arose out of Reconstruction govern- 
ment. The plain harsh truth is that 
the Klan was founded on the prin- 
ciple of White Supremacy and that 
its real purpose was to drive Ne- 
groes out of southern governments. 

A CongressionaJ Committee of 


that day investigated the Klan and 
all its works and issued some 19 vol- 
umes of testimony. 

Those volumes are filled with 
stories of violence practiced again.st 
Negroes and those who sided with 
them. They present an unrelieved 
story of murder, and worse. 

As a result of what the Klan did, 
Negroes were disfranchised in the 
South. They were denied their civil 
rights and liberties. They were re- 
duced to a status little better than 
the slavery which they had just es- 
caped. The Klan was evil through 
and through and no amount of white- 
wash by apologetic historians can 
conceal its shame. 

Any glorification of the old Klan 
can only result in stimulating the re- 
cent attempts to revive an organiza- 
tion that peddles hate and bigotry 
and in encouraging the hucksters of 
racism. 

One of the greatest calamities that 
could befall the nation would be a 
re-filming of "Birth of a Nation." 


■f; 


Waste Of Time 


The recent White House confer- 
ence on housing for members of mi- 
nority groups was an awful dud. , 

Its failure is concealed for the mo- 
■ ment by the fact that a committee 
was named to "study" the proposals 
made at the conference. 

There is nothing to "study" in the 
area of government action. 

Everybody at all familiar with the 
facts knpws that until FHA acts to 
ban discrimination by> builders and 
sMMividers who construct housing 
with FHA insured loans, Negroes 
will continue to be excluded from 
the new housing market. 


'.I t 



The tall talk of building "housing 
for minority groups" is a booby trap. 
Such a program is discriminatory on 
its facf. At best its success would 
only serve to extend and strengthen 
residential segregation. And the 
continuance of residential segrega- 
tion means the continuance of se- 
gregated public facilities. , i 

America needs housing for Amer- 
icans, open to Americans. The prob- 
lems of Negro home seekers can be 
solved only within the framework of 
that concept. Until that idea is ac- 
cepted, conferences are a mere waste 
of time. 


One Manx's Opinion 


By LEON STEWABO 



Did you know that Harper 
and Reynolds, wholesale hard- 
ware, sporting goods and 
plumbing supplies company, 
had employed a Negro sales- 
man? Well, this is the work 
history of Walker Williams 
who became the first siich 
salesman in the city. 

In 1940 our 
hero substi- 
tuted for an- 
other man 
who was 
wxjrking with 
Harper and 
Reynolds as 
a janitor. 
When he re- 
turned to 
the company 
there were Lson Steward 
other plans for him. It ap- 
pears that in October. 1946, 
they hired him, as a packer for 
iour months. A packer prepares 
merchandise for deliveo' and 
ta^s it for its destination. 
After the four months Walker 
Williams became a stock clerk, 
checking incoming merchandise 
against the invoices to see that 
everything ordered was -in the 
shipment, and |)utting the mer- 
chandise in its proper place. 
After a year our hero became 
the head stock clerk. 

Th« Stetm Morse 

After Walker Williams had 
been employed in various de- 
partments lor aboift six years, 
the city bought the building in 
which he worked for the new 
. Health Service Building which 
graces the'^Civi* Center these 
days. The ■i^ompany bought*a 
new site on Malt Ave. and re-, 
arranged its working plan. 
Thus Walter WUli^ms became 



one of the section heads of the 
company. The store had seven 
sections. Two section heads 
were Negroes and five were 
white. 

New Status 

Two years after the big 
change Williams was casually 
discussing the Negro market 
with Bob Cline, the superin 
tendent, who 
was impres- 
sed by the 
facts which 
he learned 
during the 
c o n ve rsa- 
tion. We can 
imagine that 
there were, 
disc ussions 
between such I 
higher-ups as W. Williams 
Sidney Exley, the president, 
Edward Norberg, veep, and 
Ralph Judd. the sales manager, 
who finally called in our hero 
and revealed the opinion of the 
officials that he would be the 
first to make history in this 
very fine city for this demo- 
cratically-run store, of which 
we are all very proud. 
First WMk 

Well, Walker Williams re- 
ports that he has found some 
responses already- mark these 
men and stores well: Glass- 
man Hardware. Model Paint 
and Hardware Co.. Ponds 
Hardware and Paint Co., Nat 
Diamond furniture Co., and 
two on West Jefferson, Davis 
Hardware Co. and Metier 
Variety Store. Here's hoping 
that this young man will be 
successful and that this fine 
wholesale store will profit, 
greatly because of his sales. • 



Battleaxe and Biead 


By Lmstmr B. Orangmr 



It was the kind of letter s^ch 
as no ^ne should have to WTite 
at Christmasfimp. She- wrote: 
"l would like to .«epk your help 
or advice in re<.eiving some 
aid for Christmas. My hus 
band was recently sent to the 
hospital. It will be a very >sad 
Christmas for my youngsters, 
one nf them 
12 and the 
other two 
years old. I 
am unable to 
seek employ- 
ment, for I 
-have no one 
to care for 
them in my 
absence. lam 
appealing to 
you as a Lsster Graa^sr 
friend and neighbor. Would 
you kindly help me. to secure 
a Christmas basket, soifie cloth- 
ing and a few toys fbc^hem. 
Ma.\ God blP,ss you for the^lp 
you extend to me." ; 

There were several ways of 
handling the appeal, for it nev- 
er occurred to me not to handle 
it. One was to refer it to the 
Department of Welfare which, 
though big and sprawling and 
burdened with a certain amount 
of red tape, is still able and 
ready to act upon such in- 
stances of need. But somehow 
I couldn't do this in this case, 
not at Christmas season, which 
is the season for beitig "a friefid 
and neighbor." 

Didn't Hasitato 

Another way was to make the 
visit myself, and take person- 
al action in response to the ap- 
peal. But the way my desk 
looked, there wasn't a chance of 
any such visit and authentica- 
tion of .the situation as com- 
mon sense dictates, even in ap- 
peals that tug at the heart- 
strings. And besides, over- 
seas, national, local and per- 
sonal appeals had already 
emptied my own Christmas 
basket, with income tax day 
just around the corner. 

The other way was to find 
other friends and neighbors — 
friends who still - retained the 
neighbfjrly impul.se in a city ofc 
eight million crowded, hurry- 
ing, harassed people. To find 
such friends would have been 
a tough one if it had not. been 
for one thing — there was, thp 
Utility Club; there was the 
club's president, Mrs. Louise 
Morris! And in the chib there 
was friendship and neighborli- 
ness and staunch civic respon- 
sibility that had been demon- 
strated again and again 
through a long succession of 
years. 

So I picked up the phone 
and called Mrs. Morris. She 
never hesitated. "We dont do 
the Christmas basket kind of 
thing anymore," she said, "but 
I know the club members would 
want to move on this one. Peo- 
ple mustn't be left worried and 
alone at Christmas." 

■ I Good Nslghben 

I hung up the phone and 
thanked God for the Utility 
Club. Not only because of what 
it is, but also because of what 


it repre.sents— in New York or 
Los Angele.s. in Chicago or 
Thiladelphia or a hundred oth- 
er hig cities throughout the 
«xiiintry where people are tossed 
loRPthor witliout having a 
chance to be neighbors; wherie, 
without such groups as Man- 
hattan's Utility Cliib, friend- 
ship could become a withered, 
twisted thing, because friend- 
ship grows out of neighborli- 
ness. 

I'm not a- historian of civic 
activities, so I don't know how 
long the Utility Club has been 
in existence.- I do know that 
during all the years that I have 
been working in the world's 
most impersonal metropolis the 
Utility /Club has constantly re- 
minded me that even though 
you to.ss people around, scram- 
ble them up, send them a thou- 
sand miles rro.ss country into 
new and- unfamiliar surround- 
ings — even though all this hap- 
pens to people, they are still 
able to re-adjust themselves 
and get along, provided they 
can only find some' neight>ors. 
Act Together 

And neighbors aren't the 
people who live next door; they 
are the people who care about 
what Hlippens to you person- 
ally. And care, not because 
they are especially fond of 
you, hut because they feel re- 
sponsible for you. And that's 
the Utility Club, with its mem- 
bership of fine-spirited, warm- 
hearted women who take time 
from their professional, busi- 
ness and hou.sehold duties to 
pool their neighborly impulses 
into one big, good-neighbor or« 
ganization. 

Through their club, they can 
support community causes to 
an extent beyond any one 
member's resources. Through 
club parties and appeals, they 
rtin call on the general commu- 
nity to help them in providing 
such support. Through their 
officers and committees, the 
club members can weed out the 
unimportant from the impor- 
tant, the phony from the. hon- 
est, and the first- and second- 
priority from the third- and 
fourth priority cases of need. 
And they can -also find a lead- 
er like Mrs. Morris who, when 
I told her that I didn't know 
whether the wTiter was white 
or colored, responded, "What's 
the difference? It's still ChrUt- 
maa. Isn't it?" 


H 


[y 


i. 


See by a magazine that one 
out of every five Americans 
make New Years' Resolutions. 
And, it seem.s, most of the folks 
who make 'em never keep 'em. 
There's an art to keeping a re- 
solution, -so the writer says, and 
one of the most- important 
things to' do is to make them 
specific, instead of gener^. 

For example. Instead of re? 
solving to stop drinking, the 
resolution should read some- 
thing like this: "For the N5W 
Year, 1 do hereby resolve never 
• to drink more than! a fifth «• 
day." 

Mt Ri^Wss 

kThat^way. you've got a fight - 
g.- chance of keeping the 
pledge. So, with this in mind. 
I dOvhereby make my own New 
Years Resolutions and IJm go- 
ing to be specific, too. 

1. I resolve to cut down on 
my smoking. From now on. I'll 
only smoke a pack and a half 
of cigarettes, only 6 <igars and 
6 pipesfull of tobacco each day. 

2. I resolve to get my column 
in to my editor earlier each 
week. Instead of having it ar- 
rive just as the paper is coins 
to bed. I'll have it in her hands 
while it's undressing for the 
sack. 

Ob Ctaristraas, Tee 

3. I resolve to go to church 
more. Instead of going only on 
Easter Sunday, I'll go on Christ- 
mas, too. 

4. I resolve to get less sleep 
during the coming year. I'll set 
the alarm at 9:30 a.m. from now. 
on. 

5. From now on, I'll not in- 


dulge my.self with .sv\jeets. No 
more pie and cake. I'll limit my- 
self to candy, banana splits and 
apple sauce. 

Must Wait 

6. No more looking 
a pretty girl when 
walking wit.h my wife, trhis wiil_ 
have to wait until I'm' alone. - 

7. I will not drop ashes oin 
the floor any more. I'll! at leas^ 
aim at the ash tray.' i"' 

8. I will not teachj my-26- 
monthold son any mqre rou^ 
tricks. From now on ^11 limit 
it to4hings.no more.! danger- 
ous than hangiitg from the 
chandeliers by his toes. . 

9. That horrible hablfl have 
of pulling the covers at night 
haS got to go! I'll begii a cam- 
paign for twin beds. 

10. The end of TV-itis is at 
hand. For. the new year. I'll 
limit myself to watch ng only 
seven of my favorite' shows 
every nijrht. . - 

To Show I'm Big 

11. To show how really big 
I am. I will stop I eing 'so 
chinchy with the Itousf money. 
From now nn. the wife gets an 
extra dollar every wee t to use 
any way she wants to. 

12. And in keeping vith the 
holiday atmosphere, I lo here- 
by solemnly resolve th it I will 
treat everybody I knaw and 
meet as though he or ; he were 
the greatest person oli earth 
And why not? He or she IS the 
greatest person on earth to some 
one. 

Happy New Year EVERYONE, 
Give those resolutions the old 
college try. 


For lifi 
ing 'to, 
be mad 
practiCM 
physical 
Habits. 
Not 
health 
clo.sely 



Civil Rights Low 
For Nevada Urged- \ 

RENO. Nev. — Members of the 
Reno Branch of the NAACP at 
their eighth annual banqufC 
were told to lead a state-Widt 
campaign for the enactment at 
a civil rights statute. 

In giving the principle ad- 
dress at the banquet, Tacea 
Hall Pittman, regional field 
secretary of the Association, 
stated that "unless the Reno 
NAACP took the leadership in 
fighting for a state civil rights 
statute the campaign would 
"drag" and Nevada would con- 
tinue to be a "vacuum of civil 
rights." 


ALWAYS IN VOGUE by 

Edna Chase 

The world of high fashion, 
from Seventh Avenue to the 
Rue de la Paix, is vividly re- 
created in the reminiscences of 
Edna Woolman Chase. 

This is the T»tory of "Vogue," 
that sleek authority on fash- 
ion and society. It is also the 
autobiography of Mrs. Chase, 
from her first ten dollar a week 
job to the position of editor. 
which she has held for a great 
many years. 

During the pa.st half century 
she has witnessed all the va- 
garies of the fashion world,, 
helped create a magazine with 
an international reputation, 
and met an assortment of fam- 
ous personalities from Dior and 
Schiaparelli to Bea Lillie, Ce- 
cil Beaton and Dorothy Parker. 

Entertaining anecdotes about 
the glittering world of high 
style and high socjety abound. 

This is gay. informative light 
reading for the holiday season. 
• * • 

WHAT EVERY WOMAN 
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT 
FINANCE by Mabel Raef 
Putnam 

Here is a clear, simply writ- 
ten survey of finance, from 
theory to practical application. 
J Mrs. Putnam discusses invest- 
'ment programs for women, 
kinds and purposes of life in- 
J surance, securities, bonds, 
"^ stocks, when and how to in- 
vest, and what to look for in 
a bank. 

The operation of the stock 
market is explained, and the 
author discusses business cy- 
cles. This book offers a sound 
savings and investment pro- 
gram, that will be useful to 
women of all' income groups. 
TBUTH IS ONE Ijy Henry 
J. Forman and Roland 
Gammon 

In this book the drama of 
man and his religions is un- 
folded in a new and fascin- 
ating way. Many photographs 


i\ 


i 


■■ \ 


4' 


f iid an" interesting text depict 
the priests and worsnippers, 
the churches, shrines, emples, 
and holy places, the jiostures 
of prayer, the pomp and pario- 
ply of worship, and the sacred 
festivals of the world's organ- 
ized faiths. 

The religious experiences de- 
scribed and pictured cov?r elev- 
en great religions of modern 
times, emphasizing the highest 
spiritual factors common to all- 
The book would make a won- 
derfulgift and an excellent ad- 
dition to anyone's persoial lib- 
rary. 

* * ■ • 

NO TIME FOR SER- 
GEANTS by Mac H^man 

The way it was, this Geor- 
gia boy, this Will Stojckdale, 
well he didn't see the sense 
always in what these army 
.sergeants told him to do and 
it semed like he was always 
fouling everything up. 

You get. the picturfe, tUs Will 
and his buddy, little Be|i. *vere 
never figgering on doirwg any- 
thing bad or causing trojuble or 
any of that stuff, but it seemed 
like their ways just weren't 
the ways of the Army. 

One thing just seemed to 
lead to another, lik^. but 
shucks your laughs will keep 
right on coming, and these 
days if you can pick up a 
book that will give you r othing 
but laughs, well, is there any- 
thing* wrong with that? 

* ■* * 

THt LONG SHIPS by 

Frans Bengtsson 1 ^ 

The age of vikings i^ the 
last part of the tenth . century 
is illumined for the rttbdern 
reader by this Jong and excit- 
ing historical novel by a Swe- 
dish writer. 

Red Orm is the hero of many 
adventures by land an|d sea, 
being captured by Spanish 
Moors and forced into ivfoham- 
medanism. later to esca])e and 
embrace Christianity. T^ie ups 

i 


1 people realize- thft 
and contentment are 
elated. But -the truth 
of the Jiatter is. however, that 
it is di ficult to be happy un* 
les.s hei Ithy [and if persistent- 
ly distu bed ,over something or 
cither, hi wner; or later physical • 
well-being Will be adversely 
affected ' . 

Happi less, contentment, or 
peace < f miind. or ■ whatever 
else it nay j be called, is a 
things t lat grows, or efnanates. 
from wi hin ^he individual. It 
is eloqilent jof a capacity to 
meet tHe stresses of life and 
aiso of in ability to rise above 
the an noyances, petty and 
otherwii e, that seem to occur 
without end lin day-to-day ex- 
istence. ! 

Nor c )es" this imply accept* 
ance of the irresponsible men* 
tality v hich refuses to recog* 
nize the existence of these con- 
ditions ' .hen they do exist. "So 
what'" -Why bother about it?" 
are att tudes that reveal a, 
most un dmirable state of mind 
and a li ck of .sound principles. 
It is re lly ju.st another form 
of emot onal I immaturity since 
it show a reluctance to fac« 
the fact as they exist 

The n ature or well-adjusted 
person 1 ees the problem from . 
all angles, does what he can 
about it, adju-sts to it. and lives 
with it vithout permitting hit 
inner p« ace, and subsequently 
his heal h, to b^ impaired. And 
difficult though, it may be, 
surely it is worth the effort To 
acquit h maeU creditably in th« 
business or^^nng is indutitab* 
ly one : the greatest satisfac- 
tions thi individual can know.' 

Work, good health -habits, 
and inti Uigently used leisure 
tiirie are all essential to a sat- 
isfactory way of life. For the 
rest, as I very good ma.n once 
said, "Di the best you can and 
leave th rest to'God.f 


and dou|ns 

played 

the nort|tern 

days, 

once exttemely 

full of 


The St 
ing 

agJB- an 
know m 


of his destiny are ■ 

c^ainst the backdrop of 

Europe of those 

existence was at 

precarious and 

tion and excitement. 

ry presents a reward- 
experience of an ., 
a locale jfew of us 
about. 


reac ing 


\ ch 


THE • EMPTATION OF 
ROGEH HERIOTT by Ed- 
ward N ?whpuse . 

Someti nes the responsibili- 
ties of p arenthood get a man 
down, a id the temptation to 
shirk th ;m is overwhelming. 
But Rog. r Heriott had a fine 
integrity that was pact of his 
New Enf land jieritage and he 
managed to struggle on. and do 
his duty Written in an ur- 
bane, Ne V Yorker manner, this 
novel is an entertaining story 
about de ent and likeable peo- 
ple. 

LOOK BETTER. FEEL 
BETT ZR. bf Bets K. 

Menst ndieck. 

The ci ;ator of the famoMS 
Mensendi *ck System, iong used 
in? Euroj s and the entertain- 
ment w jrld, describes her 
"function il movements," non- 


stren»ou! 
sculpture 


exereices for 
and beajth. 


body 


't'i: 


Haiil-in-Hand 

O. GILBERT. M.D. 
luntr Health Oifioar ^ 

Repre|enting ' the • mileston* ■ 
that itidoes, the faeginning of 
the Ne\^ Year is a good time for 
the individual to- take stoclp Ot - 
his wa^of liite. Centuries ago, 
it was s lid tiiat manVfjielies 
within limse^lf ^nd, t'o^»->ser- 
tain extjtnt at least "this ts true. 

or existence, accords 
he" point of viewi can 

more enjoyable by thf . 

of reasonably good 

and mental he^Itti- -. 


t 


f • 


■^- 


\<. 


o 


^7- 


1-1- 


I I- 
i 


'-t '}^ 


V 


m 


'■ if ?* 



f 1 

i 1 

- 1 ■ 

■ - H . !/. 

' ."*| 

^Iv^' 


1^ 




"i ;3 


w f. 


.1 


Bton* ; 

keiot i 

tk of J. 

i«go. ' 
lies i 
cer- I 

|tru«. ,' 


u«.4 


can 
I- the 
(good 

Ithat' 
are 
(truth 

[that 
un- 

[tent- 

ig of 

(sicat 

sely 

or 
tev-er J 




. 


C6siiioi»olifan 
Fetes Xmqs 

Christmas service was con- 
ducted Sunday morning at the 
Cosmopolitan. Christian Church 
at the corner of 33rd and 
and Hooper avenue. Following 
a tradition ol twenty^live j-ears 
duration. Pastor artd 'Jt|jb]B. 
Mitchell had a cojnmuni'^^ 
Christmas tree and dinner.- ^^ 

Many merchants of the city 
contributed generously to make 
this occasion a memorable one. 
Hundreds of dollars worth of 
merchandise was arranged un- 
iler a Christmas tree. a;i*;4i 
the close of the service, th^ 
gifts' , were distributed to " ^ 
and young alike. Every one 
'left with arms loaded with 
^fts of all kinds. Pastor and 
^rs. Mitchell were hosts to 
about forty guests at a turkey 
dinner; in their home cpi 
Jlooper Avenue, following the 
worship service. 

Recently,-, several additions 
have been made to the church 
family: Mrs. Barbara Lowery, 
stenographer of Chicago, who 
has come to reside in Los An- 
geles, joined Mith the church. 
Also, Mr. Willie Morgan and 
Mr. Chas. Mitchell of Chicago, 
Rev.^ Mitchells brother. 

The Union Christian Youth 
Fellowship will conduct its an- 
nual meeting at the church 
ne.xt Sunday ni^t. Mrs. Logan 
is president. ■ ' 

The "guest soloists for ■( Sun- 
day, December 26 were Mrs. 
Geraldine Jones, lyric soprano 
and Mrs. Lillian Thompson, di-a- 
matic soprano. 



: 

'i » 

■-'■ i 

1 "i : 


' .i ^ 

f 



mw 


LET, former ''pns^tnr' of the' 
Delaiinrr Avf. S.D.rl. church 
in Santa Monica and the Los 
An<ieles Bcrcan S.D..1 . church, 
and- now prrsidini/ over Oak- 
wood College at Huntsvitle, 
"•vlla.. is visiting Southern Cnli' 
fornia during the yuletide 


Unless a man honestly tries 
to improve himself and his 
work each day, he does not 
know What real happiness is. 


^t 



MiSSAGE CIRCLE AND 

PROBLEM CLINIC 

Every FrMay, S P.M. 

1129 East S4th SirMt 

Rev. Sally baundert, Paster 

Rev. Sellta Johnson, Msgr. 




«OWE^ MEMORIAL 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Xwt Mtt MUl TMaitT Sta. 
Jaka C ■■*■, Mtelstit 

t;ao a.m.— Church S«h««U 
ntt» a-ra.— WaraMB. 
7:M ■.m.'— Aaad Ncwa Haur. 


is: CALIFORSIA — Dr. 
Carl Dent, formerly a physi- 
cian and surgeon of Santit 
Monica, and now chief of staff 
of the Riverside Sanatariuin at 
y.ashzille. Tenn'.. is visiting in 
the Bay area during the holi- 
da 1 .1. 


J^OUBLE BIRTHDAY 
-^n^- DINNER 

Tivin birthday dinners were 
had last Sunday honoring Mr. 
and Mrs: Dennis Simms of 1921 
I9th street. Among the 76 
guests present were seven sets 
of twihs. Others present were 
Mrs. Luvender Gray of San 
Franci-sco and Mrs! Onega Da- 
is apd ifirnily from San Pedro, 
relativfe* oV the honorees. - 

«^ -^ "GRATITUDE 

' '^e Junior Boys' Chorus of 
the . First Baptist Church of 
Venice has e.xpressed its thank.s 
to its many friends for dona- 
tions that made their Christ- 
mas dinner a success. A pro- 
gram was rendered before din- 
ner. Those participating were 
Linda Allen, granddaughter of 
Mr. E. G. Allen, who sang "Si- 
lent Night," Eugene Crawford, 

, who gave a violin solo, Mrs. 

! Vivian Credille and Mr. E. G. 
Allen," guest speakers. 

Others who participated were 
Miss Ruth Holly, piano solo; 
Mrs. Robert ^ursey. assistant: 
Mrs. Rene Crawford, instructor; 
Rev. J. D. Brown, pastor. 

MISSIONARY DINNER 

The Mi.ssionary Society of the 

j Calvary- Baptist Church spon- 

; sored it.s annual Christmas 

j party last Thursday evening in 
the Social Hall of the church, 
with ^pv. Wilford P. Carter of- 
fering pracp. 

Turkey, ham and all the 
trimmings were enjoyed. A 

I short program followed. Each 

I missionan.' unit acted as Santa 

I Claus. dist|ibuting gifts from 
the tree which had been secret- 
ly purchased by members and 
secret pals. 

R. C Owens, of the College ', 
of Idaho, spent Christmas on j The Winter Term of the Chris- 
the West Coast in the Bayitian Education Department of 
Area with his family. Owens :^^^ p^^^ College of Religion 
was recently selected as "Lit- 

All American- which dis.- ^^'" begin Mondaj 



^ mi 


Th« :aliferiii« 
Jhw$,D9c90, If 54 


Yicjory Baptist 
Horiors Pastell 
OnBii 


.■&'i! 



Dr. A Atlas Peters, the pastor 
and foinder of. Victory BW^ 
Church! at 48th and McKaSei^', 
was la /ishly feted at a birth-.., 
day< pi rt^ at his Buckinghatn- 
Ro^d'Ii )me. ^' 

With over two hun^fted 
friends and parishion«^^^4ie' 
Rey. P (ters and wife,' ^^Swye. 
brbadcs st over r % d 1 o^»ta^pn^ 
KWKW in a special prog^api 
leaturii g birthday greetings . 
from h s many friends. 

The 1 lembers of Victory pre- ' 
sented )r. Peters with a 9 loot 
-4ake mat was designed by 
Cookie :he Florist at 4016'i &.^. .. 
Central avenue. ' /> . x*S-^5 


Amor z the many gtiests ^fie 


joined 
tion at 


the v6i( es of children couI,d be 
heard i bove the music of the 
Hatnmc id organ singing Christ- 
mas Ca -ols. 


DR. A. A. PETERS — Hosted hundreds of friends and pai^ish- 
ionns uith his lovely uife Dec. 16 at his birthday cele^ra- 


\ 


tion. The Rev. Peters is shown tvith uife, son. Arthur Jr., and 
sortre of the children of the lictory nursery school and church. 


Reed College I 
Opens New Tenn 
Monday, Jan. 3rd 


National Council of Churches 
Denounces! Racial Prejudice 


tie 


NEW YORK, N.y., Dec. 17— j day from the pulpits of many 

The National Council of , of the 147,000 local churches 

Churches in a strongly Worded embraced by Council com- 

... message addressed ito the munions, cites the recent 

Januarv 3, j 35.500,000 members of jits 30 .Supreme Court decision ending 

and the Second Semester of the 


High school seniors who plan 
to enter a Los AngeKs junior 
college in January of rext year 
should submit applications for 
admission immediately, accord- 
ing to Miss Edith M. Clark, as- 
sistant superintendent in charge 
of junior colleges. 


Venice News 

By Mrs. Louise Fort* 


Liberty Divine 
Temple 

' S432 So. Central Ava. 

Sunday' School 9:40 a.m. 

Morning Sorvict . . . TI.OO a.m. 

Evening Sorvico . . . J.7:30 p.m. 

f reaching 8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday: Rav. A. V. Byrd, 
(Evangclitt-Prophat of Kansas 
City) ^ . 

Friday— Regular Sorvie* 
(Rov. ' H«ndrrckt,'.Minitlar 
ftishop H. L Morgan, Founder 
Mrs. Bossio Robertson, Sec't. 


The brotherhood board of the 
First Baptist Church of Venice. 

j 7th and Westmiaster, is pre- 

I gentihg a program Sunday. 
Jan. 2. at 3 p.m. Val C. Chafk 
will supply the music; Nathan- 
iel Davis of Los Angeles will 
be their guest soloist. J. B. Wil- 
liams, will sing a solo. The 
Junior Bojs' chorus. First Bap- 
tist Church of Venice, the 

! Western Tra\elers. the Travel- 
ing Si.x and others will appear 
on the program. 

! Pastor J. D. Brown will de- 
liver the message. 
The board consists of men 


tinguishes him as an end plav- .«>"'^' 

er in the past football seasom. ' Ministerial Department will be- 
Owens leaves early next week gj^ Tuesdav. Ja'nuao' 25. En- 
for the college where he i.>ma- rollment for these departments 
joring in business administra- will be open from January 3 
tion. He is a Junior. j through February. 8. Persons 

Gospel Choir wishing to enroll may call at 

The Gospeli choir under the ' the office. 9309 S. San Pedro 

street, between the hours of 9:30 
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. each day 
and evenings from 6 to 7 p.m. 

The following courses will be 
(Offered in the Christian Educa- 
tion Department: 'The New 
Testament, Its Contents and 
Values." "Missionary Sources." 
I '"Christian Stewardship" and 
■ 'Teaching Psychology." T h e | 
.courses in Mis-sionarj- Training ; 
I will be taught by Dr' Reed who 
'is i-onsidered an expert in the' 


constituent communionsj. has segregation in the p u b 1 i c 
denounced "any and all forms" schools as marking "the, prom- 


direction of Mrs. Ethel Sykes 
and its president. Mrs. Ada 
Hayes, observed its 14th Christ- 
masParty in the Social Hall of 
the Church. This affair is giv- 
en each year during the holi- 
day season. Special commit- 
tees, ably assisted by the 
members, made this a grand 
affair. Special guests includ- 
ed the pastor, his wife and 
other leading personalities. 
MissiotaOTT SoeittT 


of racial prejudice as a-'sin - 
contrar>' to the will and idesign 
^ of God." 

' The 500 word text coupled 
! with a 16 point outline of sug- 
1 gested steps to be tal^en by 
' local churches and individuals 
I in combating prejudice and dis- 
; criminatorj' practices, Was re- 
I leased recently for use in con- 
: nection with the 33rd annual 
obser\ance of Race Relations 
Sunday, February 13. 

"As a child of God, a man 
is a member of one family, the 
human family," the message 
aserts. "Whatever increases the 
sense of kinship one ■with an- 
other brings man closer to his 
Father; whatever destroys this 


ise of a fuller life for all 
people in the nation. The bar- 
riers erected by prejudice are 
being breached in many areas 
of life. This is cause for re- 
joicing." 

The Scriptural text for the 
message is from Psalm 133: 
"Behold how good and pleas- 
and it is when brothers dwell 
in unity," but, says, the mes- 
sage, "many churches have yet' 
to discover this unity." 


Ca 

40 


,-:■¥ 


the birthday celebra-' 
he lovely Peter's home, 


Muse tes In Program 

The I armony Baptist Church, 
4132 S. San Pedro street will 
feature a "Spiritual Musical." 
with th • famous "Los Angeles 
Musette ;," Sunday at 7:45 p.m. 

In til ! morning service. Dr. 
C. Allei Hemphill, pastor,, will 
deliver he messaged 

Dr. H jmphill stated he would 
like to have all of his friends 
visit ttt "friendly, church 
ar6und he corner." 


Doctors' 
^hormocy 

Pres riptiens Exclusively. 


Let fieouty Gd to Your Htrt ond Heed— 



TO TO 

contributt r 
pleasure 
These G 
hrit^ sin 
IJ'appihc. 
the comi 


GEORGE and STELLA RA 

BARBER AND BEAUTtf 

1067 E. JeHeison Blvd. 


Fo'r and Dofiver. 
\ S. Contral {Ave. 

AD. '\n%% 


whose friendliness 

so much 19 the 

f our business. 

re tings of the Season 

ere good wishes for 

and , Prosperity in 


Si 


r, 9 year. 


WILLIAMS 

SALON 


RES 


SHOP. AD, i-iiei 
lOENCE: AD. 4-i8M 


The Mi.'s.sionarj" Swiety of the field of Ml«sionar>- Training, i f^ij^g'^i "oneness, drives man 
Calvary Baptist Church cele- Cla.sses meet Monday^ nights. | »^,ay inmi his Father." 


who are interested in coming i brated its annual Chri.stmas Tuesday nights and Thursday 


Isted 

from 

I can 

live* 

hia 

Intly 

^nd 

be^ 

Ta 

th«i 

tab«i 

fac-- 

low; 

3it5, 

sure 
Isat- 

the 
J)nce 
land 


I are 

of 

Hose 

at 

md 

It. 

ird. 

an" 

us. 


A STRANGELY 
GIFTED MAN ( 

SPIRITUAL PSYCHIC 
ADVISOR 

HELP^ and ADVICE on ill 
affairs of life: toWet evtry 
hitman problem pertaining to 
LOVE, marriage, separation 
and business. Successful in 
helping thousands find con- 
tentment, happiness and peace 
of mind, why not you? 
One Visit Will Convince Voit 
Take Yellow P car to Rim- 
pau 6lvd., then Santa Monica 
Blue bus to door. 

1626 PICO BLVD. 

SANTA MONICA 

EX. 6-5677 

Hours: 11 a.m. to S p.m. 
OPEN SUNDAYS 


out on Monday nights to study 
and discuss the Bible for one 
hour from 8-9 p.m. Their pur- 
pose is to prepare themselves 
for their church obligations 
and to improve the church's fi- 
nancial position. Brother James 
W. Smith is the president of the 
board. I 

The chairman of the organ 
fund of the First Baptist Church 
of Venice was thrilled over the 
reports coming in from each 
contest taking part in rais- 
ing money to purchase an or- 
gan. 

• • • 

! Mrs. Delia Powell, the presi- 
dent of the Seven Star Club No. 
1, entertained the club at its 
annual meeting Dec. 28 at 8 
p.m. In her home at 541 San 
Juan. Venice. 


party recently. The president. 
Mrs. Maudie E. Lawrence, with 
a special committee and mem- 
bers, made this one of the out- 
standing affairs on the church 
calendar. 
CalTorr Conierstene Laying 
The pastor of the Calvary 
Baptist Church. Dr. Welford P 
Carter, with his officers, mem 


nights from 7:00 to 9:25. Day 
Classes meet from 10 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. on Wednesdays and 
Fridays. 

The school offers a scholar- 
ship to two persons between the 
I ages of 18-25 who wish to take 
up Foreign Mission work. The 
school will assist them in com- 
- ' pleting Missionary Courses and 


The message, which will be 
read on Race Relations Sun- 


OBITUARIES 

Xer Wicks. 898 E. 54th street. 
Services from Missionary Bap- 
tist Church, Wilmington with 
the Rev. A. L. Haggerty in 
charge. Interment was at the 
Lincoln Memorial Parle, Dec. 20. 


bers and friend.s, laid the cor- advanced school of Missionar>' 

nerstone for their newly erect- Training and also offers help in jsurviving relative, none. Friend 

ed educational unit in a ver>- ^ taking missionar>- courses in the | ;„ charge of arrangements Mrs. 

impressive ceremony Sunday [local Church. Persons applying Tin. Green. Conner-Johnsofi of- 

aftemoon. From a ver\' signif- 'for such scholarship and help fixated. 

icant pa.sage of the Scriptures. ! must bring references from) «„ O-jji. ii«,«heur«h' 

a verv timelv message was de- j their local church pastor; also * 'ifiosJ^ F iTrd «t^t Services i 

livered about the meaning and transcript from some school i~f ^ f;„Ii 7^. t!!;,„ ri!,V,«i 

purpose of stones and their sig- .showing their academic train- jf^^-f^™ ♦"•/J°'y^^^ 

nificance in the erection of ; ing which must be a High'^"^*™"^ ** ^^e Lmcoln Me; 

buildings and why copper box- 'School diploma or its equiya 


es are used to contain impor- I lent. The school offers help to 




• t - People's Independent Church of Christ 

lith A Palema Rl. 7-6365 KALI Sun. 10:30 A.M. 

Rev. Maurice A. Dowkins, Minister 
Dec. 2^th: 10:30 A.M.-Channel 5-"ln God We Trusf 
i:30 P.M.: Gjospel Choir in Pageant "King of Peace" 
''.-■liiii. 


,aiiSiil!ilMi:S:iil»ii: 


! 


» 1 




t-- 


' 


A Commurity Church— Non.Racial—Non-Donoininationar a ii .i ^- bership. 


tant documents and placed un- ministers who find themselves 
der stones. At the close of the j unable to pay the required tui- 
message. Pastor Carter sealed ; tion. Applications must be in on 
the box and led the procession |or before January 18. | 

to the btiilding, followed by ! —:■ ' 

the " stone carriers. Deacons ' 
Goree. Garrett. White. Jones j 
and Walls, trustees headed by 
1 1 J. Allen Reese, and the mem 


:i!i!i!ia:ft!;!HTi;iMisiiiL:;iKai!irM:iiiii!ii!ii!iiiM 



morial Park Cemetery, with the 
Rev. A. Toussant In charge of 
services. Sur\iving r e 1 a t i v e j 
Griffin Rosenbourgh. husband. 
Conner-Johnson officiated the 
funeral. 

Albert Ingram. 1807 E. 123rd 
street. Services from the Ivory 
Chapel, Dec. 21. with the Rev. 
B. W. Wade reading the eulogy. 
Interment at Evergreen Ceme- 
tery. Surviving relative, Mrs. 
Ruth Ingram, wife, Conner- 
Johnsen officiated the burial. 
Henderson G. Maaning. 1430 
"Society of the Sacred Seven." ' £. 18th street. Services from the 
left Chicago this week en route : jvorj' Chapel; Dec. 22. Services 
to Memphis. Tennessee a,nd from the Ivory Chapel, Dec. 22 
other points South. Dr. Ran-|vi-ith the Elder Frank R. Bow- 
dolph. a former 


Rev. R. Randolph 
In Holiday Trip 

CHICAGO, 111.— Rev. Richard 

V. Randolph, of Los Angeles, i 

founder and president of thei 



Dr. Ran- 

Chicagoan. \ dan in charge of funeral. Sur- 


; viving relative, Lee Arthur 


visited relatives and friends 

here during his holiday trip ■ Manriing. son. Interment at 

and went to Memphis to visit the Lincoln Memorial Cemetery- 


I relatives there. 

The Society which the clergy- 
man heads was incorporated in 
1930 and formerly had its 
headquarters In San Diego, 
California. 


Conner-Johnson 
services. 


officiated the 


A 


CONNER-JOHNSON CO., INC. 

1400 East SiVINTfiNTH STRIH PtOSPKT 31fl 

f I I'iKEEPING THE FAITH 

KMBPtNG TBE WAITB —Ititrt u a prot*—io«al C«*« uf BUM wAleA Mitu * 
U.U »• point of Aonof wuh ut to pniout but jtfrU /erwmri tt M ttmitLJa 
- ■ ■ ,WB REEf TUB PAITU. 


PU. 

I* 


(« ru^«c( dav eon/idenee., WB BEEf THB fAtTU. 


r»» 


niiu all oar tfealfaift vie* pf- 

- OM ear hul $kUU aaM 


■?H'jii;':!i,1 


;:,iil:ii.r 


Take care of the tomorrows 
and the yesterdays will take 
care of themselves. 


Your frimnd In 
7i'ih« of Sorrow 


f\f/h»n aorrow itrik«», with fha patt- 
ing of semoona dear, rely upon 
PEOPLE'S to cempleto all necessary 
•rrangtmentt. Our axpericnced staff 
is. above ail. tasteful and liiscreet 
at all timM. 


PEOPLE'Sr 
FUNERAL HOME 
4250 CMitral AD. 71 tl 



ANY FAMILY CAN AFFORD 


A new funeral service policy^ recom- 
mended ,by ANGELUS FUNERAL HO/WE, 
pays all expentet regardless of fiow little 
hat been paid in. Low payments are made 
to admitted life, insurer. Phone or stop in 
for froo information, today. No obligation. 


At tine of need, it Is 
sarcifi :e the beauty of a 
the SI ike of econorny. 
Funeri) Pre-Arrangeme 
every detail to be arrani 
quicklv, efficiently, piei 
for cofiiplete information 


not necessary to'. 

finer funeral for 
I kngelus' sensible 
r t Plan allows 

led in advance— 
antly. Come in 


HEAR J. RAYMOND HENDERSON. PASTOR SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH. 24TH ST. AT QRIFFFrfH AVE. 



r// 


7:30 P.M.: HOLY COMMUNION 


11:00 A.M. SERVICES: NEW YEAR'S SERMON — "A FORWARD LOOK 

ARE YOU A NEWCOMER TO LOS ANGELES? VISIT SECOND BAPTIST BEFORE JOINING ANOTHER CHURi 


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r ' With old King Football for the 1954 season about shot, the 
^Pieps have hung up their togs, some for the last time as high 
school players. At this time of the season the coaches and se- 
lection boards pick the All-City and A11-C.I.F. teams, which rep- 
Tesent the cream of the crop in the Southern California school 
system. If some of you missed it, here's a repeat. 


ALL.CITT 

EriWillard. Penn, M.A. . 

E. George Pupich, S.F^ j , 

•p. Ted Bates, M.A. 

T.*Rod Humenuik. L.A. ^ 

G. Clint Whitfield, LJV. 

G. Ronald Strajither, Jordan : 

C Ralph Huffman, S.F. 

B. Carl Ketchii S.F. ! 

B.^.Earnel Durlen, M.A. \ 

Bw-Jim Maxfield, L.A. 

•.'Edmund Paculba, Banning 

k'John Lofstedt, N. Hollywood 

.s^Congiats, iellows, from Prep 
Scoreboard, and c 9 n t i n'u e d 
stardom. 

BEEF DCPr. 
I couldn't see the placing of 
Jim Maxfield of L.A. over CirinO 
of San Fernando in. the quarter- 
back spot on the All -City team. 
Maxfield, strictly a passer in 
my book, couldn't carry Cirino's 
shoes. But maybe that's why 

^'m tr>ing to write, and not pick 

, teams. 

j My big beef, though, is how 

,^e Southern California Board 
of,.Football could place a man 

"YiHt Paul Lowe of Centennial on 
ffii third team. Here's a player 
who sparked his team to the 
C.I.F. Championship, gained 
over 1300 yards running, passed 
for over 8 T.D's., played both 
offense and defense in every 
game. What else could he do? 
Coach the team? 

LAST BEEF FOR 'S4 
. Attended the last rites for Ed 
Sanders, who was laid away 
very beautifully. I saw report- 
ers and photographers from all 
the daily's, i^but not one from 
4ny of our papers. What's 
wrong, fellows, not enough 
scandal involved? Here was a 
man who acconvplished some- 

■thing never done before by an 

'American. If that's not news, I 
give up. Sometimes I wqiider 
are we really ready or just 
kidding ourselves. 
WOT TOO DISTAMT FtJTURE 
Southland Prep football fans 
will get a look-see at the fabu- 


AU.-CLF. 

£. Lee Sampson, Centennial 
E. Art Powell, S.D. 
T. Charles McMurty, Whittier 
T. Ralph Martin, Riverside 
G. James Brackins, Redlanda 
G. Charles McNeal, Centennial 
C. John Geyer, St. Anthony 
B. John Hangartner, Glendale 
B. Lee Grosscup, Santa Monica 
. B. John Adams, S.D. Hoover 
B. Mickey Gouyd, Anaheim 
B.-Rex Johnston, Compton 

lous Dick Bass of Vallejo High 
School this summer in the 
North-South Shrine game. He is 
being hailed as the greatest 
thing in high school since Glenn 
Davis. Bass has already receiv- 
ed several Major League base- 
ball feelers, but we understand 
he has his eyes set on U.C.L.A. 
or California to finish his edu- 
cation. . . . Atta boy, Dick; 

The coming TRACK season 
should be a (to quote my son) 
"Wig" also, with California, 
U.C.L.A., and» Fresno State get- 
ting some of last year's top 
Prep athletes. California picked 
up Leamon King of Delano, one 
of the. state's best sprinters; 
Monty Upsftaw. Piedmont, who 
broke a 21-year-old broad jump 
record held by Jesse Owens with 
a leap of 25'4U". also high and 
low hurdler and Don Bowden, 
San Jose half miler who rano 
1.52:9 for a new state record in 
'54. 

U.C.L.A. grabbed Rafer John- 
son, state high hurdles champ 
of Kingsburg. Johnson also 
runs lows, jumps and runs a 
fine relay lap. He is currently 
playing basketball on the Bruin 
Frosh. Fresno State also made 
a kill in James Jackson of Ala- 
meda. 100, 200. and relay. Jack- 
son almost won the state meet 
by himself last year. West 
Coast Relays, here we come! 

Abie said there would be days 
like this. 

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOyi 



6~Tlw California logl« Thurs., D«c 30^ 1954 



TV PR06RAM-1955 ROSE MRADE 

On New Year's D17, tbe National Broadcasting 0>mpany will present to 
ifae tdeviskn audience oout-tixoast the 66di annual Tounument of Roses 
Parade fron Pasadena, California. This year's pcrade, with its theme of 
"Familiar Sayings in Ftofwen". presenis ail the splendor and breath-taking 
beauty of milliont of flowers whidt have made the Rose Parade world famous. 

Tear out this page and keep it handy for New Year's Day. This Line-of- 
Maicfa will make your viewing of this rainbow spectacle much more enjoyable. 
fmUe htpns 12:13 p.m. EST; 11:13 «jw. CST; 10:13 MST; 9:13 mJf. PST. 



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Marris Say? 

^y Johnny Moi«s'_J_ 


By JOHNNY MOBRIS 

After reading all the good 
wishes in the other columns 
last week, my tenders (both of 
them ) probably think I'm a dog 
for not saying "M E R R Y 
CHRISTMAS." Well, my only ex- 
planation is that I §ort of fig- 
ured they'd "fee tired of hearing 
it, and I'm not apologizing. 
LEST WE FORGET 

I've been kind of silent on the 
subject of the Rose Bovv! for-the 
past few weeks. But Idon't let 
that fool you. I haven't lost my 
nerve. I still pick Ohioj State by 
18 points. And I'm at odds with 
the choice of Alan AJneche as 
recipient of the Heisijnan Tro- 
phy. If anybody can give me a 
decent argument as t(j) why he 
should have been ch((>sen over 
Hopalong Cassady, th* address 
is 1050 E.' 43rd Place.' Who 
knows- You might con|vince me. 
WHA-A-ATI 

From the leg of my favorite 
carrier pigeon comes |the news 


th&t N|w York Yankees' ioc^ic 
Howari Elston (Ol* boy f«om 
my Iwme) outshone Willi* 
Mays In a baseball game in 
Puerto fRico on Xmas day, blast- 
ing af game- winning liomer 
agsrtnsl Mays' team. Wow! | Of 
course lyou remember He ward. 
The h^ who received a wQrse 
g at Yankee hands tfean. 
federate States. He was 
as an outfielder, but 
crack the playground 
en, Woodling, Bauer, 
et al. So he was switch- 
ed to jhe catcher's spot lwher« 
he wolld get more chances to 
play. 1 hat If if Yogi Berri aud- 
denly )econnfesi' a victim of the 
plague Having no place to 
play, li ; wife sent back to fcavort 
with tl e little boys, still Stengel 
proper y. Which prompts the 
suspici m that he was bought as 
a prot ction measure aft^r ith« 
Yankei scouts had sized him up. 
Attab(*, Case. If you can'|t beat 
'em; join 'eni. 


trimm 
the Ci 
bough 
could 
of N 
Mantl 


Siniiine All htts- 


By 'Sito«i«$s Jo«' 

The-S^ear 1954 will be long least 
remembered by Cosifnopolitan 
Club golfers. It wil|l be re- 
me,mbered first as a year of 
brilliant victories on the fair 


RACING 



I 

T 


RflMSEir 



Gaorg* RamtAy 


SKATING AT THE SKATIUM 

ly JOHHNY 


SANTA ANITA HOB8ES TO 
WATCH 

CAN CAN BABY— This one is 
fit and ready. 

SWATCHETTE — Very fast. 
Will score first out 

ON THE MOVE— Worked a 
half In 463-5. 

PON McCOY-^Broke watches 
in works. 

': JMBROS— Ready ofr his best. 
' -MIGHTY KING— This one can 
iekUy fly. 

: FLIGHT KAHL— A goodie to 
start ojf with. 

EL COYOTE— Watch out for 
this one. 

GOLDEN ABBEY— Fit as they 
make them. 

SWEET NELL— Never better 
thtan now. 

. POONA II — ^An Imported one 
to watch. 


KING JOE — TTiis is my spe- 
cial. 
CAUENTE IN OLD MEXICO 

VELMA'S REGARDS— Plenty 
of early speed was short. 

QRCUS LADY— Much the best 
when beaten. 

TOP BULL— 5ix furlongs his 
dish. Tab. 

ARA KHAI^From the Ells- 
worth stable. Can fly. 

LOTS OF MONEY— Get yours 
on this one. 

ZAROSA— Broke In a tangle, 
finished fist. 

ABIE'S ABBEY — Newcomer 
that can run. 

ST. MITCH— Closed a big gap 
to finish third. 

SANDY POMP— Tab for early 
action. 

WAR WILLOW— About ready 
for the charmed circle. 

Watch this column for live 
horses and also sleepers. 



o t«v« regularly 


■»y, 

any jrfaot 
any amount 
J BY-MAIL 


^ 



rn regularly 


CrMiorout divi- 
d«MU ovary mx 
BOBtha— attiM 
cunont rate of 
•%1M 


OfBN YOUR ACCOUNT TODAY ' 

BrbSiwaiy Ftitral Savhgt I Loai 
toocialioi tf Ltt AigtlM 

CIKMNT MTmST lAH SHH Ml ANNUM 

4329 So. J^^ AD. 3-7246 




UM 


mm. Hn^nfc Ifcjrs. » n^a to ♦ jift.i^PrM .y, 11 .,«. 
«• T^BjM. Ctoaoa on Mnrmmy. 


jMNUBI W PIMIAl NOIMt LOAN BANK STtTIM 
■^ RICHARD R. WRI«HT, WI Manafor 



The Watts DAPS enjoyed an 
afternoon of skating at the 
Skatiu'm, and the co-ordinators. 
Officers R. SAVILL, S. RAINES, 
J. MILLIGAN, had an eye full 
as they watched HERMAN 
HILL, DAVID PAYNE. O-nS 
SKINNER, JAMES CARTER. 
MICHEL SPIGHT, ROBERT 
JOHNSON. WALDO MATTH- 
JOHNSON WALDO 
MATTHEWS. JAME FAIR. 
ST.\NLEY AVERY, LAMAR 
BOWER, and BENJAMIN BAR- 
KER roll around the rink like 
old timers. The girls took a 
different view of the matter as 
they glided over the. floor. 
Those present were: 

THELMA ANDERSON, LOR- 
RAINE BLACKBURN, GWEN- 
DOLYN CHANDLER, MAVIS 
JENKINS, INEL LACY. RENDA- 
LYN HUGHES. CHEI^ ESTEAN 
JACKSON, ANNETTE SMART. 
ELAINE HARDY, MARSHA 
COBB, MYRTIS JONES. CLAUD- 
ETTE FREEMAN, CAROLYN 
LANDRY, PATRICIA GRANDY, 
ROSLYN SMOOT, EVELYN 
MOORE, and ANITA MOORE 
. . . OOOOPS. sorry I overlooked 
vou three fellas: JAMES LIN- 
COLN. THOMAS JORDAN, and 
JAMES CASEY, you were pres- 
ent too!!! 

SCOTTY and MELVIN are 
working out a "routine" . . . 
together?. . . . just two "fel- 
lows" , . . RACE HORSE KATHY 
had her leg bruised somewhat 


-Horn* of World'B 

BIGGEST 

DAILY DOUBLE 

$12,724a80 

BEAUTIFUL 

CALICNTE 

In Old Mexico 

PRISiNTS IVERY SUNDAY 
RAIN OK SHINi 


10 


III THRILUNG AND 
lU EXaTDTG RACES 

FIATURID IVINT 


'THE NEW YEAR' 

Mill AND 1-1 *th 
I CO-FIATURI 

THE QUICKAWAY' 

i I TWp FURLONGS 

i. PARLAYS AND 
COMBINATIONS 
: DAILY-DOUU.I 
AND QUINILA 
■OOKS AND MUTUILS 

PoslTima I2:4{D 

JOHN S. ALISSIO 



when an auto rear "bumper" 
and a telephone pole trapped 
her between them a few days 
ago . . . Better watch those 
shorts and poles girls . . . ERMA 
JEAN aimost went out of her 
mind a few days ago . '. . she 
couldn't find a certain, fdlnr, 
and didn't know where to look. 
Be careful, pretty, dont lose 
your head ... Be it known 
that a Screw Driver and a Mar- 
tini can make the head spin 
the same as a wheel . . . Two 
very good friends of mine were 
locked out of their home a 
couple of nites ago . . . jou 
shouldn't stay out so late ^rls 
. . . naughty, naughty . _ . BET- 
TY CANTON WINE, better 
known as ^'CANTONJUICE" by 
her club membership, had a 
spinning good time at the rink 
last Sat. . .. . JEAN G. is more 
the "Movie Star" t>pe for she 
was posing for pictures all af- 
ternoon . . . Honorable mention 
in this column goes to the fol- 
lowing persons: JOYCE RABB 
. . . DEBRA RADLEY . . . VTVA 
JEAN EUNICE . - - VERNITA, 
and BERNADETTE BANKSTON 
. . . PHILLIS? . . ..DON NA C . 
. . . SHARON. BRENDA, BETTY, 
and the OLIVER sisters — 
THELMA and VERA.' 

The ever-lovable, delightful, 
and delectable LINDA and 
LOIS JOHNSON graced our 
floor with their presence Fri- 
day night after being away for 
so long ... it was nice to see 
you girls. The new floor man 
at the Skatium is none other 
than MELVIN JACKAON. 

It seems as though JOHNNY 
G. tried to end his life the other 
night by running into an auto 
in a 1954 Cadillac on the free- 
way . . . watch that stuff boy 
. . . I wondec where DOROTHY 
"El Serrito" MILLER has been 
keeping herself lately? . . . 
long time no see . . . miss you! 
. . . The charming ANITA 
LOUISE was invited to have 
a cold drink a few nights ago 
and accepted . . . but she had, 
a light lunch instead . . . 
o-ooo-w! . . . The lovelv TINA 
THOMPSON returned from 
S. F. a few days ago looking 
lovelier than ever as she 
slipped across the ^oor , . . 
JIMMY ALLEN ~and the gor- 
geous SHIRLEY DOWNEY gave 
us the pleasure of their pres- 
ence last Thursday , nite . . . 
very nice too . . . There's a 
feud going on between S. C. 
and M. J. at the rink ... I 
wonder why. 

I wonder why free admission 
is permitted a certain group 
which is supposed to be a skat- 
ing club ... is this same group 
also a social club? . . . MARIE 
R. returned to -the Skatiiim af- 
ter an absence of more than 
(Continued on Page 11) 

Men, Af Last It's Here! 

Take RlJMlXMtEX and enjoy IU«. 
RUMTOREX takes un wher^ naturt 
leave* off A PHYSICIAN'S -FOR- 
MULA. Money-back auarantee tf not 
completely satisfied after three bot- 
tles. Only 95 00 (or a full two weeks' 
supply. C. O. D. or sen* check or 
monev order now. THE RUMTORKX 
COMPANY. 289 Bast lUth StrMt. 
Naw York .at, ^N. Y. 


— whh — 



LEWIS RUSS 

Last Saturday being Xmas, 
bowlers were probably playing 
Santa Claus, eating turkey, or 
having a li'l taste here and 
there and so since no games 
were scheduled, let's scan the 
sheets and see what's happened 
thus far in the Sunset Bowling 

League this year. Billie Hamp- 
ton, the pocket ball cutie from 
Chi. has been belting the timber 
and racking up 600 series con- 
sistently. He is topping the 
league with 190 a.verage and is 
"THE Ixjwler of color" to invade 
these parts. Kenneth Morris, 
Harold Johnson and Alfred Ah- 
Sam also have plowed down the 
wood and piled up the stuff in 
carying 180 : averages. Eddie 
Irving has been blowing his top 
in booming along and seems to 
be the best improved bowler in 
an overall average. Bldgar Ben- 
son has speeded up his soft ball 
to step up in class. Jimmy Hill 
giggling and tumbling the pins 
having a good season. Floyd 
Lawrence, Milton Pope, Ed Mc- 
Fall, Ed Moseley, Earl Jackson, 
Chuck Downs and Alvin Griffin 
shooting their wads to stay up 
there with the top tossers: 
Chuck Ballance, a rookie with 
a good ball and a little more 
seasoning could be a potential 
in all games played. 

In team play Lee's Hi Hats 
holds an edge and is the team 
to beat. Let's take a peak at the 
standings: 

Lee's Hi Hats 
, Grand Central 

Neal's Liquor 

Brown's Motors 

Timber Ticklers 

Garrett's Motel 

B ft B 

Dedricks 

Lewis Brothers 

Plckuppers 

In racking up the wood back, 
"May the new year bring lots of 
happiness, but like everything 
else worth while while It will 
have to be earned." 


Whan a friend asks yau for yaur 
candid opinion, ha iMually wanta it 
eandiod. , 



WEFKLY 


Tank Younger 
Enoch Xhevy' 
New Addition 

Los Angeles Rams star full- 
back Tank Younger has put 
aside his football cleats for the 
winter and started work as a 
new car salesman for Enoch 
ChevTolet, 8730 Long Beach 
Blvd., South Gate, according to 
General Manager George Cash- 
man. 

Tank's boss on the gridiron 
was Rams quarterback Norm 
Van Brocklin. pro football's 
inost valuable player in 1954. 
It's a small world for the lanky 
backfield star because Norm 
Van Brocklin is now Tank's 
boss on the showroom floor at 
Enoch, too. 

And joining Tank and Norm 
from the Rams playing squad 
at Enoch Chevrolet is scrappy 
lineman Art Hauser. who made 
the team in his rookie year. 

Tank Younger is available at 
Enoch daily to meet his many 
friends, according to Mr. Cash- 
man. 


KNIFE SALES TO 
JUVENILES 

An attack on potential flare- 
ups bf . gang warfare among 
juvenile groups was made by 
the Board of Supervisors this 
week in-the form of instructions 
t<v County legal authorities to 
draft an ordinance prohibiting 
or restricting the sales of dead- 
ly knives to juveniles. 


ways. 

Starting in May Iwith the 
Desert Mashie Club'ii curtain 
raiser at Phoenix. Al McDaniel 
won the first of his three vuc 
tories, after having survived 
the first cut in the Li.A> Open, 
Al missed playing the j final day 
by just a single stroke- Follow- 
ing the May tourney, [the West 
Coast witnessed, a continuous 
parade of Cosmopolitan golfers 
into the winner's circle thruout 
the season. 

Major victories were achieved 
in various events other than 
W.S.G.A. sponsorfed tourna- 
ments by Cosmos. Robt. Rocky- 
more, won the medalist honors 
in the Naval Shipyard Journey, 
held here annually to determine 
who shall make up the four 
man team which competes in 
the West Coast chaibpionship 
affair. | 

Rocky's team did not win the 
title, but he was again the low 
medalist in the 72 hjole event 
held in Seattle. Jesse Brown 
was the B flight winiier in the 
Culver City open. Lorimer Mat- 
thews broke the tape In the re- 
cent Santa Anita Opon, in the 
from 8 to 10 handicap group. 
Fred Cumbess finished third -^n 
the from 6 to 8 group in thj^ 
same tourney. f . , 

McDaniel carried tjhe great 
Bruce McCormick to | the 18th 
hole in the semifinal | round of 
the Pasadena city (Champion- 
ship before losing one down 
after muffing a twp footer. 
Fred Cumbes was the major 
domo in the near championship 
flight in this major tourna- 
ment. When it is all summed 
up. this has been thp Cosmo- 
politan Club's most jsucessful 
year, competition wisie. 

Pres. J. Cullen Fentress ap- 
parently has come up with a 
winning combination as far as 
his committees are concerned. 
He has surrounded himself with 
working chairmen bi commit- 
tees, who have in turii selected 
committeemen who are in there 
slugging at all times. Not the 


1-* 


these committees lis' tho 
budgei|and finance spearlieaded 
by Alonzo Peml)erton and 
Frank|Adam9» club treasjurjer. 

The! have guided the organi- 
zationlto its greatest linanMal 
heighti. The club is solvent and ; 
is well on its way to grater 
accomilishment's. 
. The iTournament Comihitt^a, 
headeJ by Herman Parlfor, ia 
functiffliing smoothly. 

Toolmuch cani\ot be skid in 
praised for the way Parkor has 
ironed: out the tournainant 
angle. jTh# affairs are raoro 
enjoya jle than ever an 3 ara 
condu( ted more efficiently. , | 

Harlld Batiste, and his cOm- 
mitteei have just abotit licked 
the Handicap disgruntled prbb- 
lem, Ift' working at handicap- 
ping, s Harold puts it,; "^y not 
tryinglto guess at a man's golf- 
ing Jbility." The system 
adopt^ by the club is th^sarae 
which lis used by the UJS.G.A. 
This. Ido, is a step nearir our 
ultimate goal; full fledged 
memb|rship in the U5.G.k.. 

The 1 1954 officers wene un-- 
animoasly re-elected, except the 
secretary W. P. Crajrtonj who 
asked 1 to be relieved of his 
duties.! Howard Alexander was 
his r^lacement. The officers 
were |istalled Dec. 23 at the 
Pacif id Town Club. Steye Gavin, 
Pres^lnt of the Los Angeles 
JrVoffchainber of Conunerce, 
presided over the installation 
cerenidnies. and in hisj address 
he asaired the gathering that 
a b i 1 lit y and character alone 
would I determine who should 
compMe in the nationally fa- 
mous L. A. Open. Eveiy beige 
golf Inthusiast in tike area 
should support Gavin land his 
organsation 100 per Icent as 
they srtainly are in our fif- 
ing comer. 

The I Public Relations and 
Public ty committee ot the Cos- 
mopol tan Club realizes that 
had it not been for the; courtesy 
and tl » coperati(Hi extended by 
the p -ess, both we«fkly' and 
daily, that it could never have 
accom ilished what it has. To 
the pr ss and to th^ sports com- 
menta! ors on the air, we wish fo - 
expres > our deepest aiid heart 
felt gi atitude. 


Pigskiiiers onlParade 


TALLAHASSEE — SeK^en Flor- 
ida A. and M. University grid- 
ders were named to the three 
1954 All -Southern Interd&llegi- 
ate conference football teams 
selected by the Atlanta (Ga.) 
Daily World which >jvere an- 
nounced recently. I 

The "all stars" wete nomi- 
nated by a panel of pljiskin ex- 
perts made up of top ; coaches, 
sports publicity directors, ath- 
letic directors and th? Atlanta 
Daily World staff headed by 
sports editor Marion E.j Jackson. 

Three of the Rattlers — tackle 
Wild Bill McClung of Philadel- 
phia, guard Arnold Siillivan of 
Tampa, and left halfi Willie 
(Galloping Gal) Galjmore of 


St. Ai^ustine— were named to 
the fi&t team. Galimbre was 
oiie OB two players who drew 
first taim selection for kh« sec- 
ond c|nsecutive year. I Xavier 
Univetiity's Eriiest Campbell, a 
guard,! was the second | gridder 
so hoilored. 

Gua^d Art McCoy of, Phentx 
City, JLla., and fullback Sail 
C&itor of Miami were: named to 
second team andTi^arterbadc 
Elvin I [Dizzy) Dean of Miami 
and *nter Bill Boynton of 
Ocala were third team selec- 
tions. I 1 . 

Plac ment of players on all 
three t sams were based on the 
player^' ability to pliy boOi 
offensit^e and defensive balL 



HA|>PY NEW YEAIi i 

TO ALL OUR CUSTOMIi^ AND PRIiND$ 

FROM 'MAMMA' ADAMt AND STAFF " f 

UaadlCAFE 49Pl.tCNlfal 

UXmX WHITE llOfi. NIXT TO tHVia STATIONI 


BREAKFASTS 

Include* Hot Biscuits «. 


DINNEBS 


Imliidas S 
Oardan Frash 

Vagatabhs 
Hot Com Sticks 
DatMit and Drink 



OPEN SUNDAYS 
U and I CAFE 49 PI. I CMiral 



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Loc(2: lAKA s Leave 
iFbr National Meet 

K . /: . :. . :.-■ . [. . ■ . . ' ' 

Members of the Los Angeles delegation from Alpha Gamma Om^a chapter of Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Sorority left this weekend via American Airlines to attend the Boule at Nash- 
ville, from December 26 to 30. Delegates included Lucille L. Bryant, national financial di- 
rector; Jessie McDaniel, basileus of the local graduate chapter; Mary P. King, nominee for the 
Far Western regional director; Gwendolyn Dusuau and Euvalda Morris. Cleopatra Johnson 


has 

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Wilfandels 
Fete Guests 
At Breakfast 

The spacious and beautiful- 
ly, decorated rooms of The 
Wilfandel Club House were 
the setting for one of the out- 
standing events of the Holi- 
day Season, last December 
19th. 

Wilfand^l's annual Christ- 
mas' breakfast took place at 
9:30 a.m. amid the oh's and 
ah's of the guests and club 
members who were viewing 
the new floor coverings tor 
the first time. 

The more than one hundred 
gathered we're joyful in greet- 
ings and , salutations of old 
friends and new. 

Mrs. Freita Shaw Johnson, 
the club's program chairman, 
brought a real treat to the 
breakfastets In the presenta- 
, tion of The Mitchell Boys Choir 
;led by their director and or- 
ganizer, Robert MitchelL 

Labor Group 
Of NAACP's 
Annual Party 

The Labor Committee of the? 
Los Angeles Branch of |he NA- 
ACP will welcome members 
and friends of the organiza-/ 
tion for the fifth time to its 
New Year's Day party, Jan. 1. 
from 6-11 pjn. 

This year the party will be 
held at the Omega House, 2069 
So. Oxford blvd. 

Chairman L. B. Thompson. 
In charge of the party, and 
Labor Committee Co-Chair- 
men, William F. Anderson and 
Woodrow Redo, promise re- 
freshments knd music a-plen- 
ty. ' 

DELTA PLEDGES 
PLANNING JAN. 
FASHION SHOW 

The Pyramid Pledge club of 
Delta Sigma Theta sorority 
will present a "Around the 
Clock" fashion show, plus in- 
tertainmeni and dancing Sun- 
day, Jan. 30. 

The place chosen for this 
unique affair is the California 
Club and the fashion show 
chairman is Callie Cobb. She 
and her committee are work- 
ing very hard to make this 
•how of fashions- and enter- 
tainment a huge success. 

The Pyramids have invited 
representatives to model from 
all the Grvto^ organizations, 
and as many from the popular 
social clubs as possible. 


and Audrey Jones left the 
city earlier to attend the meet- 
ing- , 

The sMsions will be held at 
historic Fisk University and 
Meharry Medical College, 
Arnetta G. Wallace of Knox- 
ville is the Supreme Basileus 
of the ' organization. The so- 
rority's scholarship program 
foreign fellowships, under- 
graduate "activities. Housing 
prog r a m, national building 
and chapter houses, health, 
research and local community 
programs will be discussed. 

Members of the delegation 
from the Far Western Region 
are looking forward to enter- 
taining the national organiza- 
tion in the Bay area next 
August and Los Angeles will 
be the scene of the Regional 
Conference in May. 


Polio Group 
Given Many'^'§^!^ 
Donations 


Pyramid Club 
Holds Party 

The Pyramid Pledge Oub 
of Delta Sigma Theta sorority 
entertained their big sisters 
at a very successful Christmas 
party Sunday, 

The beautiful home of Karol 
Miller, was the .^setting' for 
the Christmas party which 
began at 5 p.m., with the 
singing of Christmas carols. 

Afterwards the Big Sisters *' 
were surprised by a visit from 
old Santa (Laura Clifford). • 
Santa brought them enter- 
tainment from the Pyramid 
Showcase, starring such stars 
as Sheila Martin. Karol 
Miller. Virgie Brown, Lor- 
raine Campbell, Zetta Wright, 
Roberts, Johnetta 
Branche, Deborah Miles, Jeane 
Foreman, Pat Taylor, Joyce 
Torean, Dorothy Muldrew, 
Mayna Carter and others. 



CHRI&TM^IS SPIRIT—Ffst'hvittef ntrr thr urdrr c( thr trrnlng when thr 
Zeniths Snria/ and (Iharily Cliih held ils nnnunl ('.hriflrum hvf ' pmviy' nt the 
home of Jiifiti Bnilry, 27 1} Ilnbnrt Blvd., nne i>f their 20 members, jimonf 
«! filers present were t erseiia . Hmikins, president; Argreilia t.arlrs, lire-presi- 



Thurs., Dec. 30, 1954 


The California EOglji— 7 


The Polio Sunshine Associa- 
:tion, of which Mrs. Mary G. 
Rubin is founder and director, 
received a number of gifts at 
a -Christmas party Sunday, 
sponsored by the Frank Ernes 
Post, No. 2134, of the Vet- 
erans Foreign Wars. 

Charles E. Smalley, who 
played Santa, was chairman 
of the party committee. Work- 
ing with him were Dr.- Maur- 
ice B. Hickman, commander 
of the post, and Kyles Kinson. 

The party was held at the 
Victory Baptist Church. 

Among the donations re- 
ceived were $25 from the Dia- 
mond Goal Social and Chajrity 
Club, $30 from the Gay Artis- 
tic Social and Charity Club; 
$10 from Mrs. Susie M. Rhine"- 
hart, president of the Ladies 
Benefit Charity Club; $15 
from the Victory Airs Choral 
group; $50 from the Friendly 
Twelve; $18 from the Beverly 
Hills Social and Charity Club; 
and $67.50 from the Barco Gar- 
ment Co. 

Gifts were also received 
from the Zenith Club, the Top 
Hatters and the Mt. Sinai 
Grand Lodge. 


Boston Matron to 
Spend Holidays Here 

Mrs. John D. Holland of 
Boston, Mass. arrived last 
week to spend the holidays 
with her brother and wife, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. E. Harper of 1736 
W. 35th Place. Mr. Holland 
wil arrive by TWA in a few 
days to spend the remainder 
of the visit with her in Los 
Angeles. Many social events 
have been planned. 


Senters Host 
Xmas Party 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Sen- 
ters of 1939 Victoria recently 
were hosts at a lavish pre- 
Christma.t party for a group 
of their friends. 

The lovely Senters' home 
was resplendent wth holiday 
decorations topped by a min- 
iature Santa Claus and rein- 
deer riding across the mantle 
to bring good cheer to their 
guests. 

Couples ir\ attendance were 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Whittenberg. 
Peoples Pallitte, William Bell, 
Johnson, Roger Mason, Rue- 
ben Richardson, Roscoe Wash- 
ington, Gamett.Greene, W. E. 
Holman, Ray Lathan, J. T. 
Wilson. 

Miss Nancy Holman, Miss 
Wini Orr. Mesdames Irene 
Coleman, John Garcia, Mildred 
Reid, B a g a h e i m, Lazora 
Rowell, Anna Lee Turner, 
Dickson, Cassie Harris. Bea 
De Vaughn, Leslie Armstead, 
and Dr. A. T. King. 



Christma 
Party Fe 
HiXshand^ 



Sigma Chapter of Alpha 
Kappa Sprority gave its Christ- 
mas Party last Friday at the 
beautiful home of Mrs. 
Roberta Hall, when Sorors en- 
tertained 4i«sbands, iriends 
and fiances. Miss Marjj Dan- 
iels, a visitor from GHicago, 
greeted her guests in a beau- 
tiful black velvet afte- five 
ensemble with pink accessor- 
ies. 

Among those present were 
Leatrice Dodd, George Jurns, 
Norma Pitts, Million McGil- 
bry, Phyllis and William 
3blden, Clothilde and Earl 
Sprulin, Roberta Hall, Nathan- 
iel Washington, Mary Fiances 
Freeman, Georgia Ridgway 
md Graduate advisor AJudrey 
Jones. 


Thmnpsom 
Eniertainh 

With Party 

On Ch istmas Day amohg.a' 
settfiig iof holly, beautiful 
trees, a very lyijoyable eve- 
ning wa i spent with a large 
group oi friends of L. B. and 
Maxlne Irhompson of Second 
f.'V- s^- avenue. ' . ( • . : ' .'■ 
The* 1 ving 'room and "barj 
were ov< rflowing with groups 

of fun 1^ ving, holiday spirited 
people, j The thirsts of the 
group wire satisfied with pink 
champalne arid other spirits. 
The dining romn was set up 
buffet 4yle and a d^cious 


Bern Pi Si 



repast vias. served. 

MusicJ carols and . daitdng 
foUowedl arvd among the li^- 
py throlg were: Billic Mi 
Jetty Aii dersbn, Mr, valid ISSHL- 

fJohn S ory, J«r. a^d.'Iirs. 
Claude; : Obkeir, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. A. Jl "rescott, Mr. arid Mrs. 
Joe Sam ersi,.Mr. and Mis.' M. 
Walkeri Mr. and Mrs. Junes 
White, B [r. and Mrs. Tomipy 
Fountain Mr and Mrs. S.:N. 
Quinin, j Ir. and Mrs. Robert 
Johnson, Mr. and Mra. C. V. 

ffhbmpsc li Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Jc finson^ Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank JC ine, the Classic Lit- 
erary Cli b, Hera Evans, Mar- 
gie Hun t, Dr. and Mrs. .- Pi) 

•Greggs. 1 tel Coffee and Maud- 
estine Tl ornton. 



OFF FOR BOULE— Members of the Los Anfjetrs deleget- 
tion of the Alpha Gamma Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa 
Alpha sorority uere photographed at the residenre of Jessie 
McDaniel just before planing to their Boule at Nashville, 


Dee. 26 to JO. From left. Lurillr L. Bryant, Mary P. King. 
Basileus Jessie McDaniel, Euvalda Morris, and Gfjendolyn 
Dusuau. \l 1 . L- - -^AdamsFotovision. 

■ --11 v. .I-,! vj .-■ 


CLASSIC LITERARY GLUB ENTERTAINS S/g;w«i?/io5 

Hold Meet 


Among the pleasant holiday activities was the annual Christmas breakfast of the Clas- 
sic Literary and Social club on Sunday morning at the lovely home of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd 
White on Arlington. Members and their guests were entertained in the spacious living room 
and cozy den which was decorated in the Yuletlde spirit including a large white Christmas 
tree. ' -. ■ — 


Deltas Turn Monthly j 
Meet Into Xmas Party 

Delta sorors walked straight info Christmas Saturday at 
Wilfandel on the occasion of their December meeting. Each 
of 'them was given a gay-corsage made up of Christmas green- 
ery, bells and the like. . . . , 

A miniature tree bedecked i n tensel graced the mantel ot 

the 


f .- 


■ft 


the, clubroom. while in 
dining room the table was 
loaded with eggnog, chicken 
sandwiches and all the trim- 
mings. Sor<?rs who created this 
atmosphere of warmth and< 
color were hostesses Claudia 
Sharon, chairman; Alise 
Waters, Adelaide Dunne, OUie 
Thornton, Inez Jenkins, Mary 
Caldwell and Maidie Haws. 

Bids for the annual white 
Christmas dancc^ are in the 
mail as all plarts were com- 
pleted at the Decernber meet- 
ing. The Zenda ballroom will 
provide the setting for the 
ball on Dec.';28 and Jeep Smith 
will play. The dance commif- 
chaired, by Ruth, C. Robin - 


.son and Judy McElroy, are 
promising that the decorations 
will be unusual and exciting. 

Emily Woody was made 
happy by the sale of Freedom 
Seals among the sorors, as 
money collected was well over 
the $100 mark. Mrs. Woody, 
who chaired the NAACP drive, 
was assisted by Mary Glenn 
and Mjotle Porter. 

Maurine Perkinson was the 
recipient of funds for Xmas 
Cheer to be used for th§ aged. 

President Geraldine Woods, 
who had just been blessed 
with a fine baby boy, was 
present to preside over the 
meeting. Also present and in- 
Detroit. .. 


■■H?*'; 


After a very testy break- 
fast, the guests were given 
presents from the_^ tree by 
Santa Claus who in every day 
life is L. B. Thomspon. A 
serious note was added to the 
festivities when Mrs. Lucille 
Hamilton. Vice-President of 
the club, made a very timely 
talk and presented Mr. 
Thompson with a is.OO mem- 
bership in the NAACP for 
herself. She was followed by 
Dan Buchanon, a recent 
bridegroom, who also pre- 
sented $5.00 for the NAACP. 

Minnesota Couple 
Visiting^Friends 

> Minnesota visitors spending 
tiie winter in California are 
Mr. and Mrs. Olin Wells, who 
recently arrived from Minnea- 
polis. They have taken up 
residence at the Pamflyn 
apartment building on South 
Hobart. Their son. Howard, 
and his wife along with a host 
of friends have many plans 
to keep them well-entertained 
during their sojourn in Los 
Angeles. 


Thompson accepted these do- 
nations for the local branch. 
Members presentwcre: Mrs. 
Viola Lewis, president ; 
Marian Buchanon, Biljie 
Clarke, Chloe Downey, Jewell 
Greer, Lucille Hamilton, 
P" 1 o r e n r e Hogrette, Clyde 
Howell, Auveme Martin, Cor- 
nelia Martin Charlie Snowdein. 


Fairymae Sanders, M a x i n e 
Thompson. Ann Walker, Ira 
White and Maurine -Wallace. 
Gi^sts included: Thomas 
Lewis, Joe Sanders, J. Greer. 
Walker. Wallace. J. L. Rogers.. 
Mr. and Mrs. S. N. Quinn, Mr. 
Dan Buchanon. Mi^. and Mt.s. 
L. Dials and Mr and Mrs; Ed- 
Wells of Minn. . I . 
'■ ,«i' . 


Townsends Celebrate 
Wedding Anniversary 


\ 


Atty. and Mrs. Vince Monroe 
Townsend, Jr., the former Lil- 
yan E. Mansfield of Columbus, 
Ohio, formally observed their 
17th wedding anniversary on 
Christmas Day at their home, 
3662 S. Arlington avenue. 

The couple re- reid their 
marital vows, made a mutual 
pled^ of rededication and ex- 
changed Christmas and anni- 
versary gifts among them- 
selves and their family and 
friends. The quiet affair was 
climaxed by a family dinner, 
followed by visits from friends 
and well-wishers. 

Among those attending Uic 

■\ 


family dinner were Mr. 
Bowling Mansfield, the 
brother of Mrs. Townsend, and 
his wife Elizabeth, together 
with their daughter, Judith 
Mansfield and her Schoolmate, 
Beverly Walker; Mrs. Bessie A. 
Johnson, life-long friend of. 
the Townsends; Miss Willa 
Marie Stafford, friend^ and for- 
mer schoolmate of Mihs. Tovyn- 
.send; Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Osbourne. the -iormer Sylvia 
Mansfield, daughter' of Mr. 
and Mrs. Bowling Mansfield, 
and their young son. Gary Os- 
bournt. ' 


• A festive spirit prevailed in 
the beautiful home of Mrs. 
Emily Johnson when ^Sigma 
Sigma C h a p t e,r of Sigma 
Gamma Rho Sorority held its 
holiday meeting. The basileus 
-belphene Sevcrin. presided, 
Plans for the ejisoing year 
were discussed. - j' j 

After the busines meeting.' 
secret pals were revealed and 
lovely gifts were received^ by 
each member. ,The liostess' 
table was laid with sterling 
silver in holiday motif and 
a deliciouis turkey and ham 
dinner was served in buffet 
style topped with eg gnogg. 


Pledges of the Beta jPi Sigjma Sororitt were initiated' last 
week at the home of Mis. 'Maggie Rawli . 2443 St. Andrews^ 
place! Dressied in the traditional "white,' they were con<ihict- 
ed through the "Candle-Light" service inj an impressive cere- 
mon/T>y Helen Gaines, nresident;. Deans Louise Glover, Erlene 
Howard. Essie Robertson and, ; —■^. — : — 
Lucille Ailstock, treasurer. ' 

Members gave them a, 
hearty welcorrie into thfe so- . 
rority, and they received pins, 
cards and year books. lAs a 
surprise the p r e s i d e njt in-,, 
formed the newly-made pprors 
of a visit to the M d • 1 i n , 
Rouge. Pictures were taken of 
the group there, and seajson's 
greetings were exchangep by 
all. , J 

Present were Opal Clifton, 
Julianne Blackman, Ola I Mae 
Early, Emily Jackson. IVifii- 
fred Lindo, , Connie McKii ney. 


Pioneer Celehrai 

lOOtWBiftMay 


\ Morfe than*tw6 hundred and 
fifty guests paid honor tc the 


Beatrice letoyer. I>na Wash- 
ington, < iteka Moore, Ellen 
Savage, I velyn Tennell, Ethd 
Faye B< 11, CynthiA' White, 
Mary Mc ^eal, Anna t. Tum«, 
C a t n e it e Tucker, Marion 
.ucille Ailstock, Mae 
den, Helen GaJnes, 
n, Rosetta Hijgh- 
hye Hollins, Erlene 
aggie Rawls, Essi^ 
Vashti Alexarider, 
Caldwell, Gertrude 
uise Glover, MamJfe 
S t u b b s, : Almja 
d Susie Flynn. , 


Youngie, 
Alice G^ 
Una G 
tower, Fi 
- Howard 
Roberts© 
Georgia 
Fowler, 
Lee, Joj 
Hogue. 


lere 


1. 


"There's 
"Count 
Carol Jc 
Mm. 


aim in Gilead" anjl 
ur Blessings." Mrs. 
nson accompanied 


100th birthday of Mrs. Eu jene 
A. Johnson. The fete was 
hosted by her daughter, VTrs. 
Evelyn Harris, fronri four p.m. 
until seven p.m. at the Wil- 
fandel Club last week, i ^ / • j n 
Mrs. Johnson is the [only ChrtSttiaS Party 


Spfority Inducts ' 
New M embers '^ \-. 

"Neophytes of Sigma Chapter 
of Alpha Kappa Alpha so- 
rority includiiig Shirley Stark, 
Floydia Mathis, and Ernestine 
Kountz were initiated" Thurs: 
day evening and became 
Sorors of' Alpha Kappa Alpha. 

TJjey were honored at a ' 
dinner Sunday. Sorors in at- 
tendance were. Wilma John- 
son, Dorothy Barber, Norma 
Pitts, Phyllis Golden, and 
Basileus Leatrice Dodd. 


Zetas J Intertain 
Husba ids JVith 


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t.- 


is 

living classmate Of Booktlr T. 
Washington and stiU attends 
meetings of her I four ^livic 
clubs and Westminister ^'res- 
byterian Church, j i 

The clubs' presidents lave 
brief testimonials; Her brth- 
day was asknowledged by 
greetings from Presid snt 
Eisen^iower, Governor G aod- 
•win Knight, Mayor Poii Ison 
and hundreds of friends ail 
over the country. | 

Ivan Harold Browning, an 
old friend, sang three num- 
bers in tribute to Mrs. John- 
son, "Mother O' Miic" 


Member > of Gamma Signta 
Phi Beta Isorority Jeteji their 
husbanps and sweethearts 
Saturday with a unique Christ- 
mas parti at tne home of 
Mrs, Sehicia Baggs Weems, 
basileus, S30 Carlin Street 

A special program includ<|d 
holiday gsnes and a dance by 
Calla Stewart. The menu co|\- 
sisted of ' punch and various , 
goodies. ( [ u e s t s were pre- 
sented wit 1 favors and at the 


'■fi< 


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conclusion 


of ^the program,. 


Yuletide g fts wert cxchanfM 
by memb^ -s. 


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8-Tho California Eagl« 


Thurso., D«€. 30/ 19^4 




mounts' 


. ..MODhL DL \rOM> FRJIti: — L&k/v 

LNW ^ ork model S\kta' Juines denion- 

straUs ti'«y to ac^mre up-lo-iJu->nih^ 

dn^ Her secret U'fapon is neu- ty/>e flexible, 

hftir-bru^h, with strong nylon bristles^ 



Bars DASHES 


*/ DOROTHEA FOSTER 


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Fabulous Yule decorations^, 
were in the Tspotlighi "as 'th**'" 
Bocial world went round and 

' jdund with its many festive 

.'affairs: At the Town Club, 
Vogue Art Club members en- 
tertained their friends on, 

. iChristmas Eve. Christmas 
morning found little Frankie 
Pearl Williams entertaining , 
about 20 of her young friends 
with Santa Claus, gifts and 
goodies. She is tlje eight year . 
old (.daughter of'* Sandy and 
Aida, Williams. . c 

;. The ; Lesli^ Scotts held' their 
traditional Christmas morn- 
ing breakfast. . . . Also Mr. 

• and Mrs. Tommy Fountain of 
.■2nd Avenue had about 75 for 

breakfast on Christmas morn- . 

. ing- 

Gifts and More GiJU 

' Topic of conversation was 
' gifts: Nejttie and John Lowe 
gifted themseh'es with a new 
Buick;: diitto for the Al Rad- 
fords, with a new Olds 98; 
Virginia Johnson all cuddled 

- up in her silver- blue mink; 
Helen Wright receiving the 
oohs a'nd_ ahs over the gor- 
geous cream colored satin 
sheath dress, covered with 
seed pearls arid beads. 

Helen Broyle Smith with a 
cute wallet-watch combination 
and Polly jGreene happy over . 

• the fabulous watch-bracelet 
that she received. I could go 
on and on listing the many 
beautiful gifts received by An- 
glenos but off again to the 
social, swirl. 

' I 4^^?^ Supper 
One of the nicest bridge- 
"^supper parties was given by 

■ Dorothy Carey when she en- 
. tertained the Saturday nite 

■ Bridge Club at the beautiful 
home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Dingee. on S. 
Arlingto-n. Midst holiday 
chitter chatter, the guests en- 
joyed d'eiicious food and» 

I bridge. Gyests included: 

- Dprothy Ho Ward. Clotild 
Woodard, Mary Lou Tolbert, 
Norma Earls. Rozelle Fer- 
■nandez . and Helen Broyles 

Smith. 

Mrl and Mrs. Chucjj; Rithard- 
son have forsaken New York 
for sunny Caliofrnia for the 
winter. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Dyson ^till raving over the 
bull fights down in Mexico. 
The lovely home of Mr. and 
Mrs Norton Manson was a 
very gay sight when all the 
family gathered for Chi^tst- 
itias dinner. 

4 The John Storys and the 
Claude Bookers, of San An- 
toine ar^ being wined and 
dined extensively since their 
arrival for \he holidays. They 
have beeS entertained by the 
Q V T h o m s p s o n s. L. B. 
■Tfiompsdn and on Tuesday 
nite, Bertha and Henry Pres- 
cott invited a few friends in 


■J 


to • meet and have egg nog 
with the famous couples. 
• Pridlla Scott left Tuesday 
for a week's stay in San Diego 
as house guest of the ErneSt 
Robesons. 

CocktoU Buffet ' - 

Over 75 people enjoyed the 
holiday cocktail-buffet given 
by Hilda Caine. Agnes Peters 
and. Edith Lavalle on Sunday 
evening at the West 31st home ' 
of the Caines. Miss Florence 
Batiste of New Jerse.v>is home 
to spend the holidays \N;ith her 
mom and dad. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sterling complimented their 
houseguests front Milwaukee 
with a lavish cocktail party 
on Christmas nite. Mayme Sue 
Graves and Mrs. Turner en- 
tertained friends oh TJiursday 
evening at .the home of Mrs. 
Turner. 

Mrs. Mable Conner and her 
twin boys. Floyd and Lloyd, 
left ctt\ Saturday for a vaca- 
tion in Hawaii. The Thomas 
Jeffersons entertained, many 
of their friends with egg nog- 
buffet on Christmas- eve. Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Eldridge had 
their annual cocktail party on 
^nday evening at their beau- 
tiful, S, Ardmore home. 

The Tuttwilders gave a 
lavish dinner party on Christ- 
mas with their beautiful din- 
ing room table set for 12 and 
decorations of winter flowers 
and Christmas holly all over. 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Hopkins 
of Santa Barbara entertained 
their two daughters and their 
husbands. Mr. and Mrs. Wilber 
Tate and Mr. and Mrs. Chester 
Thomas along with Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Rufus Portwig and 
Dr. and Mrs. H. J. McMilan. 
Stag Party 
"Dr. C. W. Hill hosted a stag 
for Dr. B. B. Martin of 
Memphis. Tenn. Dr. and Mrs. 
George Hancjis in town from 
Bakersfield to attend the 
Medical dance at the Elks to- 
night. They are guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Rufus Portwig. 
Zenobia and Ted Foreman in- 
viting friends to scb the New 
Year in at their beautiful 'Vic- 
toria Ave. home. 
- Mr. -and Mrs. Edward Davis 
will serve Tom and (Jerrys to 
usher in the New '?ear with 
their friends. 

Friends shocked to hear of 
the passing of Sydnetta Dones 
Smith. Also the well loved 
Mrs. Louise C o s t o n who 
passed away on Monday af- 
ternoon. 

Peggy Foster in town from 
Cal for a vacation with her 
folks, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Foster. 

Billye Miller complimenting 
Irene Paterson of Chicago 
with a party t'onight. Lucille 
Perkins of Houston telling 
friends how much she is en- 
joying her California vaca- 
tion. Norma Earles an.xiously 
awaiting the return of her 
favorite attorney. 


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This week everyone seenis 
to be in the mood" to make 
»nacks for friends who drop in 
to bring the greetings of thi^ 
season. Here is « recipe for 
fudge that I have found to bf 
easily made and excellent eat- ' 
Ing. It is made with. Pet Milk 
and fiakers Dot-CHocolate. It is 
a lirge quantity recipe'. How- 
ever you will not regret using 
the full amount- 

1)0 not become alarmed if 
during the cooking of the milk 
and -sugar you see brown 
flecks appearing because tljis 
Is a natural process. Keep the, 
fire low antl boil, stirring con- 
stantly for the first three nr.in 
utes. 

Checolota Fiidg* 

Combine 1 large can Pet 
'milk with 44 cups sugar in , 
a large kettle or sauce pan. 
Stir over low heat until it 
boils -briskly and' cook for 6 
minutes after it=/Starts to boil. 
Have ready chopped 3 pack- 
ages Bakers Dot chocolate and 
2 cups walnut-meats. Add 'a 
cube Jjutter.'l eight-ounce jar 
niarshmallo<v creme, the cho- 
colate and stir tilLwell blend- 
ed. .\dd-nuts and 1 teaspoon 
vanilla extract. Pour into a 
buttered pan or platter and 
set, aside to cool. Mark into . 
squares! 'May be put into the 
refrigerator to harden. . 

If you are looking for an 
.easy sauce to' serve over that 
fruit cake or plunfi pudding 
"jou received as a gift, try this 
one. It can be flavored with 
rum. sherry, lemon or vanilla 
extract with equally good re- 
sults. Over a steamjng hot 
fig pudding it will bring calls 
for seconds. ^ ,' 

Pudding Sauc* \ 

Beat the yolks of two eggs/ 

till light, add gradually \ cgp 

powdered sugar. Fold into this 

1 cup whipped cream and 
when ready to serve over 
pudding fold in the whites of 

2 eggs beaten till stiff with a 
pinch of salt. Add your own 
choice in flavorings and sprin- 
kle with nutmeg if desired. It - 
will come out fluffy and jich 
and turn a plain piece of 
cake, gingerbread or pudding 
into the easiest party desert 
you ever tasted. 

If you have a pet recipe 
why not share it with yoiir 
neighbor? If you will send 
them to me we will print as, 
many as space will allow. Wr 
will also welcome comrpents 
or questions about "What's 
cooking." 

HAPPY NEW YEAR. 


J\'STAl.LAT10X ,1\'D TROPHY PRESENTATION B.1KQUET «/ ] presided; J. Cullen Fentress, president Cosmo. (Mub; Lillian Fentress, pret. 

Cosmopolitan Golf Club', held tit Paeific ^iu^H Club t)ec. 23rd. Foreground, | Cosmo. Udies Auxiliary ; Archie Hairston.vice-prek Seated on right with'glasset 

reading left to right: T heron Kirk, finartrial sec'y: Lionel Kelly, corresponding < is Don Wilker, Pres. Emeritus. K'ifo is recovering ffm serious illness, (bee ttorjf 

' Sfc'yi Frank Adams, irens^: Sltre Caxin, pres., of Chamber of Commerce, who s on Sports Page. Photo by Irving S^nith.) 

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Janet Collins, her^ incogni- 
to tliree weeks,- leaves mn^ 
jnent«trily for Trinidad. Leroi 
Antoine adopted a baby boy. 
gave him his name. Mabel 
irid Ed 'Kurd's son! Edmund, 
home from school for the holi- 
days, will be off 'to Europe 
thill summer wrilh- Paullyn 
Glass* travel group. ' Betty 
Vaiighn- dye in from DeeCee. 
Dr. a rid Mrs. Buck West .sta- 
tioh-wagoned down from Las 
Vegas for the holiday week- 
end. 

Gladys Lott mixed endlesss 
Martinis Xmasi night for her 
crowd, Eula Hender.sgn • and 
her mother Xmas dinner-serv- 
ed friends.- Eiila expects her 
sister out from New York for 
a brief, visit. Dr. B. B. Martin 
here from Memphis, Watkins 
Hotel registered. Johnetta 
Srfarks and her mother at the 
last moment had- to cancel 
that ahhounced dash to Beau- 
mont, Texas. The latter be- 
came Ul. LaVon Wallace's 
mate, Garl. went East to share 
Xmas W4th his ailing Dad. 

'- Poriies pxiA Portitk [ 

Barbara Weaver holidayed 
(from Fiski with her grand- 
f)arents iri Chi and decided 
next year she'll enroll at Univ. 
of Chi instead. Her sister Inez 
is inbving to New York, inci- 
dentally. Jerry Mcintosh was 
a Xmas night stag host to his 
gang. Lucille Roach. Leonard 


and mate [had a Dec. 25th 
hoiiseful, too. .One of the nic- 
est parties ..was the Girl 
Friends assembly at Wilfan- 
del. Their party becumes an- 
nually, merrier, more brilliant 
and their huge champagne 
bowl never runs dry, . 

Mil Blount got an invita- 
tion to Paris. It was tufked 
casuall.v in a Xmas cardi Oliv- 
ette Miller and Freddy Gordon 
to try it again? Dartmouth 
student Billy Durosscau delays 
his return east in prder to be 
present on the 2n(^ when his 
mother. Dr. Kathleen Jones- 
King, becomes Mr^. A. Ward 
Golburh. j 

January Birthdays 

Elois Davis- rourided up a ■ 
festive crowd Sunpay night 
and her spacious place jumped 
awhile, so help usi Seems to 
me we even got inj a mambo 
or two. Donna Pred birthdays 
on the 1st. Dr. T<im Griffin 
dittos on the 19tri. Wesleen 
Foster on the 23rd:iher moth- 
er. Elsie Foster, h^s hers on 
the 27tli. Betty aiiid Mickey 
Jones have an annijx'ersary on 
the 21st. The Cullen|Fentresses 
have theirs on the -leth. 

Beautiful Charlotte Wesley 
Holman will house^guest with 
the Paul Williamse? when she 
arrives for her jWilfandel- 
sponsored recital. I She'll be 
sure to wow the naiives. mark 



/-i^l 


my words! The junior Celes- 
.tus Kings to build an impres- 
sive recreation room onto 
their house. Xmas Day at their 
house was pure production, ga- 
la style. Their son finishes his 
West wood schooling next 
month. He enters a prep school 
in the fall. 

Xmas Jackpot 

Stafford Lott. new car shop- 
ping. The Hank Coopers (he's 
the contractor) are holidaying 
in their ole hometown of Balti- 
more. La Dandridge's Holly- 
wood apartment was holiday- 
gayer. Edna McCormick's Eng- 
lish sheep dog hit some kind 
of Xmas jackpot. He got a 
two inches-wide red satin 
collar studded with rhine- 
stones! Tony Hill balling in 
Chi. His new apartment here 
has black monkey-skin riigs, 
no less. 

Esterline Powell. New Year's 
Eve party hostess. Leroy 
Moore drove his ne\\^ Coupe 
de 'Ville to Las Vegas to' spend 
Xmas with his wife. Louise 
Beavers. He dashes back for 
the New Year's weekend, as 
well. Billie and Curtis Miller 
having guests in tonight 
(Thursday I to meet Irene Pat- 
terson of Chi who will be Mrs. 
Walter Williams soon. 

Saddest holiday incident: 
Sydnette Dones Smith's sud- 
den passing. ; 


PICTURE friiME 
Guild advises 
get togrther,\ns 


'- — Any time 

ai'tateurs. And esp, 

In the eihove info 


S picture tinte,\ the Camera 
dally nhen four generatiohx 
tiial snapshot. ' j ' . j 


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AKA IVY LEAF PLEDGES 
INSTALL NEW OFFICERS 


Sometimes' 
which seem to 


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Watts YWCA 
Sets Calendar 

The Watts -Willowbrook 
Y.W.C.A. Area Committee 
held its regular meeting De- 
cember 2, at the William 
Nicker.son -Jr. Gardens, Recrea- 
tion Building. Those present 
were: Mrs. Rose King. Chair- 
rhah; Mrs. Arelia Ragland^ 
Program Planning; Mrs. Daily, 
new member; Mrs. C. B. Moten, 
Public Affairs Chairman; Miss 
LaVera Collins, secretary; Mrs. 
Bessie Wilson, telephone 
chairman; Mrs. Flora Jame.«(; 
Mrs. A. Jackson, and M^s. H. 
Sloan. 

The Area Committee Js very 
happy tt) report that more 
people in the community are 
becoming "Y" conscious and 
that more people are wanting 
to help with the "Y" program 
through committees or leader- 
ship of Y-Teen Clubs. 

Young woiTien^v^:^o live in 
the Jordan High.'jGompcrs Jr.. 
High. Willowbrook Jr. High, 
Centennial High, and Enter- 
prise Jr. High Districts, that 
are interested in working with 
a teen-age girls' group, can 
contact Miss^Lynne Mclhtyre 
at LO. 9-8711 for informafion 
or write to the Y.W.C.A. Office, 
11208 South Wilmington Ave- 
nue. Los Angeles 59, Califor- 
nia. 


A regular meeting, -instal- 
lation of ^all officers and a 
"Big-^and Little Sister" party 
were all a part of the da.v 
"recently for members of the 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 
Ivy Leaf Pledge Club. 

Plans fqr a Yuletide party 
were discussed by the Ivies 
before they closed the meet- 
ing. Phyllis Golden, dean of 
pledges, performed the instal- 
lation ceremonies which fol- 
lowed. :•'■''-' 

Installed officers were Pres- 
ident Narvia Pruden. Vice 
President Ernestine Kountz. 
Recbrding Secretary Sylvia 
Johnson, Corresponding Sec- 


retary Rhae Tate, Treasurer 
Vina Harditig. Parliamentar- 
ian Beverlee Bruce, Chaplain 
Diane Watson and Historian- 
Reporter Elodie Bowers. Lois 
Carringjon chairmaned the 
installation committee. 

The "Big and Little Sister" 
party was held. * as was the 
meeting and in.stallation. at 
the home of U-y Marlent 
Floyd. 

. Pink, candles, green ribbons 
and crepe paper were used to 
decorate the spacious dining 
room by "the decorations chair- 
man. Elizabeth Brembury. 

Members of the refreshrnent 


committee w«re Hazefl Ger- 
man. Armogene Moore, Jurrie 
Emerson. Betty Harvey, Rosa 
Ferris, Bemice Wright and 
Miss Floyd served in dainty 
ruffled heart-shaped aproni^. 
Miss Floyd was cdmmittee 
chairman. " - 

Beverlee Bruce, entertain- 
ment chairman, put on a 
mock TV show (AKA IVY TV) 
with the aid of her committee 
members, Vina Harding. Shir- 
ley Trish, Josephine Pierre, 
Narvia Pruden. Thu r,m a 
Panky, Coylia Brown. Bar- 
bara White and Elodie 
Bowers. 


method of play, 
really • have a 
method beneath 
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e only one 
bin Which 
^econd, ^afer 
the suflace; 
example. 
H S 
A Q 
K X 


The death rate from pulmon- 
ary tuberculosis is less than 
one-fifteenth of what it was 
.50 years ago. yet approximately 
20,000 people die of the disease 
every year in the United States. 



WW 

P IH . 1* 
P 4D 
^ P P. 
Spades were led 
playing his- 4be 
In^ a small one 

the play hinges 
the club honors 
■o South preparjes 
a double finessi*. 
leads out trump^. 
ponent has two. 
the jack of club^ 
the queen and 
worries are over- 


Zetns to Mch 
In Louisvilii 


Members of Zi 
Sorority from 4S 
the District of i 
expected to c o 
Louisville, Ky., 
30th for the 
30th Annual Bottle 
the g«oup as 
is Dr. Nancy 
Professor of 
u>n Institute 


and 


HEADS EDUCATORS— Dr. C. 'V. Troup, right, president of Fort Valley (Georgia) State 
College, was elected head of the Association of (Colleges and Secondary Schools at the organiza- 
tion's 21st annual comention last ueek in Lyuisville. Seen commending the new electee are. left. 
Paul L. Guthrie, retiring president, and Dr. L. S. Cotart, center, who has been secretary-treas- 
urer of the association for twenty-one years. 


• 

1 

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Theme of the 4 
will be "Youth 
lenge of Integration 
Phi Beta Sorority 
elaborate plans 
aspects of the su 
shops, business 
public meetings, 
will particularly 
on a major 
the group as 
of the workshop 
ing Juvenile De 


)^lMs< 


s 

3D 
5D 


twice. East 
and return- 
Apparently 

on whether 

are divided, 

to make 

•First he 

Each op- 

Ithen he leads 

West plays 

all Souths- 

[fe plays the 


■^~i ce from dummy and loses 
« rlly one more trick, tj|ie. tdnk 
'( f clubs. . i 1 j,.''. - I- [ 

Alternate Play 

It is true that three out of 
i )ur -times this Is the /best 
I ibth9d of play. But we have 
i n additiorial clue Wcause of 
last's Tovercall. He has shown 
le ace of spades, and prob- 
|bly.has the jack.;hut his only 
ther honor' strength lies in 
ie club suit, whifere he certain- 
has the king and likely the 
ueen. If he has both.' the 
J bove line of play will lose. 

3QUth therefore leads . •' 
I n^H diamoi^d to the jack. All 
i jllow-. The ace and king of 
1 earts are led:^taith discard- 

. i ig a small club. JP third heart 
i -led and ruffed by South. 
I ^ leads another diamond and ' 
t ikes it with dummy's king. 
' his removes the opponents' 
t ximps; South leads the last 

, 1 eart from dimnmy and ruffs 
i . The sittiation is ^now like 
1 lis: . 

D C 
X A 

N. X a 


H 


ta Phi Beta 

states and 

!|9lumbia are 

V e r I e on 

Eecember 27- 

holqing- of their 

Heading 

Grind BasileuS' 

Woolridge, 

£ngli|5h at Hamp- 


day meeting 

" the Chal- 

and Zeta 

has made 

to cover all 

in work- 

^essions and 

Emphasis 

be centered 

natioiiaU project of 

indicated by one 

tklefc, "Fight- 

ijhqtiency." 


X J '' 

.10 

S." . 8 i ^-i 

■ X ■ \~ ':\ I ■ '. 

Leeds Clubs 

South leads his jack -of 
o ubs. if West plays low and 
E ast takes ^the trick he is 
« ink. If he leads back any 
t ling but a club, he gives- 
5 JUth a ruff and discard. H 
h > leads a club. South gets a 
f ee finesse. This Is an air-- 
t ght method of play to pro; 
t( ct against East -hiving both 
h mors in the club suit. : 
j On this hand we don't show 
'• t le East and West hands be- 
giuse it isn't necessary. De- 
c arer sees only his handvand: 
d immy during the play and 
r lust make up his mind with- 
<|it any additional help other 
tfcan the previous bids., But 
fir the curious. East held*five 
^ades headed by the ace- 
3|ck, three hearts to the queen, 
tfree clubs to the king, and' 
two diamonds. 

j Classes are held each-Mpn- 
d ly evening at the Omega 
t ousc. The Ume is 7:30 p.n». 
a id all beginrJng players are 
ii vited to come put and learn 
t » improve thei'- pi»jne. 





fr 


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U"^ 


'f^ 


3^. 


fres, 
Slasset 


imrra 
itions . 


loses i 
lie king' 


out ,of ■ 
|e Mst I 
fe have- 
luse of 
! shown' 
prob-- 
Jiis on'y 
(lies in, 
ertain- ' 
lely the 
\h. the! 
lose. ■ ,' 
lads a i 
pck. All ■ 
King of 
Jliscard- 
|d heart 

South. ' 
Ind and . 
king. ■ 
onents' 
he last: 
ruffs 
Iw like 


lick of 
|)w and 
he - is.i 
Ik an>,- ! 

gives: 

lard. Ki 
]gets a;: 

ai:'-; 
I to prot! 
lie both 


Mon-i- h 
J Omega - 

Vers are 
kdteam 


■iV*'f"'? 




f: , 



HEW TEAR!— Ajid here is 
hoping that 1955 brings hap- 
piness and" lots more babies! 
You see if thefe are lots more 
babies, Harry Aaams. Eagies 
photographer will be kept busy 
taking pictures for the social 
pages. It is the custom to get 
married before holding a 
shower which accounts toi the 
fact ihat he will be on hand for 
your wedding, baby shower, 
and divorce! So. let us prav 
that 1955 will be the Eagle's 
banner year and we all can 
enjoy a rich and wholesome 
life in this happ/ and wonder- 
ful smog city of ours!'; * 

" \ New, Tear Wishes 

BEV. DAWKINS^We are 

looking to this interesting and 
inspiring young minister for 
outstanding leadership to cap- 
ture the heart of the commu- 
nity! 

EMMETT ASHFOHD— To be- 
come the first Major League 
umpire! 

WILLIAM PARKER— To up- 
grade the brown boys in the 
department and increase effi- 
ciency instead of trying to 
pro\-eTo the citizens that the 
department doesn't yield to dis- 
criminatory tricks! 


ATTT. THOMAS NEUSOM— 

To double the JJAACP member- 
ship wih eager young people 
interested in progress! 

SAMMT DAVIS JR.— to come 
up with an outstanding TV 
show with a Negro as tts spon- 
sor! 

NEW FACES— Since Di)tty 
Dandridge and crew did that 
terrific job in Carmen Jones, 
Hollywood should take its cue 
and offer much better roles in 
1955! 

SPREADING JOT— We need 
to do lots more than '54! We 
hope Flash Music store or 
lovin' John Dolphine dig this. 
Occupational Therapy in -the 
General Hospital certainly can 
use a few records to ease the 
pains of patients learning to 
walk, and the use of other 
limbs. Music plays an im- 
portant part in restoring the 
disabled! So forward a few- 
please. 

BETTT HOWARD— To host 
the city's most lavish pawtee 
before 1956! 

WESTSIDERS— To keep the 

Town Tavern. Milmo. Rubayiat. 

Oasis and Cosmo jumping 

nightly. Same for Dynamite 

(Continued on Page 10 > 


N' 


L- 


— Km^ontforti^gi* jfilmfarc — 



Thurii., pec. 30, 1954 Th* Calift rnia Eagl*-^ 


Biii'iiiiMi-iwifiiii 1,11. iiwHW: 


ii«iiiiiii^^ {^ 



NDT^lACKj 


re wtor* 


POPILJR XIGIIT CLL'B in Los Angrhs betamf the 
locale for a Miiiry Spillane nioj ir u hfn prodiner-tHrettor 
Robert Aldr'uh filmed scenes for United Artists' "Kiss Me 
Deadly" at Leroy's Pigalle, 4135 South Figittroa St. Madi 


Comfort (center), uho plays the role of the club's sultry 
icrtainer, introduces Earl Grant , the club's rcguliir pifini>l 
vocalist, to Producer Robert Aldrich. Madi utll 'decorate 
stage of the Lincoln Theatre tonight for 'Abie'. 


en- 
and 
the 



Wt Tim* to Eat at . . . 

DYNAMITE'S 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
4701 Central, AD. 2-5918 

OPEN EVERY DAY: 10 A.M. 24 2 A.M. 



-LQOOD DRINKS -r FINE FOOD 

GUMBO FILE EVERY FRIDAY 


Personoffy Cooked by 'Oynomitm' 



Piano Artistry by 

EDDIE "88" DUDLEY 

at thm West's Hn9tt 

PIANO BAR 


W* Cater t* Clubs 


DYNAMITE'S 

Southwest Corner 47th and Central 


NEW YEAR'S 

EVE \ 

' " '.-il 
Club Oasis 

WESTERN AT 38TH 

RE. 4-S5iq 

I- _ 

AUND DIXON'S 
! CREOLE 

MAMBO REVUE 

>at Sides - Harris Sister 

Anna Weidon 

Louis Pefemont 

DICK TAYLOR RAND 


Festive Yule Greetings 


ETZTi 


IT'S "THE MOST" AT RERT and RAL S 
CLUR 


MILOMO 



• DELIGHTFUL ATMOSPHERE 

• SERVING BEST FOOD AND DRINKS 

ExcalUnt Entertainment by Louis Rivara at tha Organ 

Opeii Doily 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. 

MILOMO 

2829 S. WESTERN 
IJ RE. 958S , 




COSSIPPINGI i 

EARTHA Kirrs latest heart 
throb is a gentleman of color. 
He's CLARENCE XOBIKSON 
yvho will produce the shows at 
Las Vegas' interracial Moi(Mn 
Rouge showplace. She's the 
snub nosed sexy throated song- 
stress They are rumoring 

that PEARL. BAILEY'S collapse 
during the run of the "House Of 
Flowers" play in Philly indicate 
she's in a family way! . . . "^e 
General Hospital is buzzmg 
that one of their top medics hjas 
his heart in a sling 'cause h^'s 
sintply fractured over the 
charms of singer JOYCIe 
BRYANTI ... The Manchestjer 
Club was raided last week by 
ofay gendarmes who broke iip 
an after pawtee for thj enter- 
tainers and other hired hejp. 
Photographer DICK STONE wks 
taken along to the bastille onfa 
drunk charge. Memo: the lens- 
man doesn't drink anything 
stronger than cool clear wat^r. 
Despite protests from the other 
guests the "heat" insisted that 
Stone was inebriated. Theyire 
saying that the real gripe wjas 
laid to the presence of Dick's 
wife who is of another hue! .f. . 
Both FRANCES NEALY atid 
SAMMY CHAFIN called to dejiy 
i the item in last week's column 
that they will consider "playiiig 
' house" agai \. Claim thpy're jiist 
j palsy walsy and have no hajrd 
I feelings despite the recent sfJit 
' up. . . . Incidentally. Frances lis 
appearing at Club Californiin 
with an Afro-Cuban 


^fA>A¥A9A¥A¥A¥AWA»A¥AWAW/<WAWAW«WAWAWAW«WAW«WlflKiWi¥gfCT 



1105^2 E. VERNON 


Fine Drinks • Holiday Dinners 

Whmrm ffvery Gwesf 1$ m Celebrity | I 

f CHICKEN SHACK 

and 
Vie S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

JOHN COLLINS, Preprialer 





AD. 3-9239 


^tytVt /(V»y{Vt/tVf /fit /ft /{Vt /f-t fj\1>t\'> 'IV'v'lVt/lVt 'f_« '|Vf 'tv? '!>t 'jVf /IV* /fVt 'JV» II {i 


J, Hodge Proudly PresentK 
+ HUGH BELL 
+ TEDDY EDWARDS 
+ FRANCIS GADDISON 
+ MARGO GIBSON 
1+ J. HODGE'S ORCH. . 
- GLORIA JEAN, Singor 

THE NEWLY REMODELED I 

CELEBRITY CLUB 

Ask About Club Rantal* 



1909 lmp«rial 

Phena LO. *-«4S7 


^^i/*J/a\l<'tWs^/t^*w*^l/*^^<'*^^/'•>i/'*tf/sA'>>^li^l<^^V/•t^»/tJ/^wtwi'^^/^aw*i; 


DOT McGEE and BARRY BAINES Invite You f o 

. •• • * . " i- i ■ ■ i 

Spend Your Holiday 
Where It'i Bright (V Gay 

TIPTOP 

• Good Food 

• Fine Drinks : 

• Open Every Day & Nite 

N.W. COR. 47III i& GEMTfiAL 



P%i«%&' 


at EDDIE ATKINSON'S 



36th Place & Western 


sy^ 




ffHOICi DINNERS POR THE ENTIRE PAMKT 

COCKTAILS OF DISTINCTION 

•OURMET RECOMMENDS FAMOUS 

RUBAIYAT ROOM 

^ of 

HOTEL WATKINS 

2022 W. Adams llvd. 
RE. 24111 

William titt" Watkint - Host ef Cecal 


*rffcs? 


Pat Patterson's 


§1 COSlf o 


fmatvring— 

GERALD "M" WIGGINS 

"CHICO' HAMILTON en Druim 

GEORGE BLEDSOE en Ban 

Special Sunday Aftarneen Matinee 

with EDDIE REAL COMBO 

Oaf/clovs Moalt by Mourlca 


PAT PATTERSON'S 

COSMO 


19S2 |Wf. ADAMS 
feL 2^244 


BY JOHNNY MORRIS 

TIfE GAL THAT COT AWAT 
Is one of Frankia Sinotra'i best 
efforts. Harold Arlen never 
wrote better in his life. Capitol 
tossed in MeUen Riddle . fbr 
Rood measure, and I mean 
good. 

A-B 
Ther» isn't 6 goul who ^ends 
this paper and dopsnT knpw 
about the Abie Robinson bene- 
fit. But there may be a few 
things you good people don't 
know. When I first met Abie. I 
had already been warned that 
he was uncouth, uncultured, 
and completely without regard 
for the feelings of others or 
respect for their rights. But he 
impressed me differently, to me 
he was a man of intelligence, 
sensitivity, and consideration. 
A man with a dream, possessing 
a sincerity so genuine that it 
I frightens shallow peopl^ into 
I hiding behind the only ishie^d' 
they know — maliciousr|esx. I 
have nothing against Uhese 
j citizens of a dernocratip^hation 
lexpre.'s.sing their opiniibn?." arid' 
, I hoi>e they are not averseUo my 
expressing? min^ And ift my 
opinion. Abie belongs jfo an 
aristocracy which ean't he 
bought into with money ;«r so- 
cial status. There are only two 
.membership cards. an<j you 
] niust have both of thejn— j-talent 
and Tirtue. Abie has them. It is 
• most regrettable that his critfcs 
I do not. I am a trapped rnan. I 
'have to admire him. I Me In 
! him the man I might! have 
!been. 

' While it's not conclusive, a bit 
! of proof that 1 am right lies in 
! the fact that so many ipepple 
who are RE.\L notables have 
I been more than glad to offer 
their tajents for Abie. Sammy 
I Dovia said he wouldn't miss it. 
Derethy Dandridge asked to 
emcee it. Lee Keniti aske;d if he 
could come early, so tl^at he 
could play for an hour before 
the rest of the performers come 
j on. There isn't a performer 
who isn't anxious to hejp. Jeff 
Chandler wants to coine in 
from his location in Airizona. 
I against his agent's frantic pro- 
tests. Tony Curtis. Janet j Leigh, 
land I could go on and on. Who 
I said something about fifty 
j million Frenchmen.' 

JOHNNY'S JAMS i 
SWUfG EASY by Franl^ie Sin- 
atra (Capitol). Lilting and 
j lovely. . . . SOMETHING! COOL 
by June Christy. Just cah't get 
over this one. . . . OVER THE 
'rainbow by Buddy Defranco. 
I The low notes are th^ high 
I spots. . . . SMILE by Ncjt Cole. 
I Song and singer were made for 
I each other. . . , MAKIN' WHOO- 
PEE by Gerry Mulligan. Best he 
ever did. See you next y^ar.J.M. 


^ ly4i 


jora 


\:ammmmmii»!immm»mMmm\mm\m ii!iK!!iiii:Hi'iiiHii!Jiimmiitii;iiii 

She has put a ;ide her tap dance 
shoes! . . . W( 're honestly soriy 
these} young -narrieds eouldh't 
make^ a go of t. . . . ' 

SHHHHHRHH IHHHHHBHI I 
KE'SiON THi; BE ATI 

PECIGT and PRED WASRXNO. 
TOR'i; prize Cmas gift waa a 
seven pound baby boy! ... 
JOE HOUSTOl r. the wild man of 
the tinor sa> is wheeling' one 
of thdse high :y chromed fifty- 
five "shorts'' . . . Prediction: 
The hottest fe id in showbiz will , 
come off whil ; the new year is 
still a baby. : : will involve the 
healthy HjIrRIS SISTERS ( a 
trio of songbiiys) and the newly 
formei] sexy ^PIA DOLLS. The 
charmers wil| give each other 
the digger rlutine after they 
learn they're both bidding tar ■ 
the same song material. . . . The 
suicidi! angle' jver the deathof 
JOHH]«T ACEJ the blues shout- 
er in Houston ast week is being 
strongly denit 1. It was, accord- 
ing to sourc< s, an accidental '- 
shootiig mislnp that occurred 
while the rei ording star was , 
toying arourid with a supposed- 
ly J"inloaded ' pistol in his 
drejisiiig room . . . Because of 
thp many lau jhs afforded TIM 
MQOEE as he Kingfish en 
Amos and Ai dy teevee, there 
will (!ome tc you beginning" 
January four "The Adventufes 
Of, The KingJ sh" starring the 
aforenientione 1 gent as the big 
cheese of "Th < Mystic Knights 
Of Th(! Sea" a d although some ' 
of yoi (inclui ing the NAACP) 
(Continue* on Page 10) 



N.B.C. FEATURE — Mkrion Jm 


•jjy mctlmmei 

'\ featured star on "The 

Telephone Hour" , . i in het first 'outing' sini ' being 'inked.' 

Trmrvelous in the 
,f.m. PST. 


Metropolitan Opera star, u%ll he the 


A voice that is considered one of the 
country ti-ill be aired by KFl, January 


son. 


most 
3rd, at 


Wo fid Famous Coittrdlto 
On ^BG TkephonM Hour 
January 3rd At 9c00pm 


CHARLES PRYME ^^"^ at LACARIBE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

HOLDAY DINNERS A SPECIALTY - FUN - DRINKS - FROLIC AT ALL TIMES 

CLARK 410TEL PRospect 5357 WASHINGTON & CENTRAL 


i. 

-' 



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N 
O 
W 


50 


UNCOLN HN RebfaKM 

Central A 23rd , Central A 43rd 
AO. S251- I AD. 1-9341 


Sr«rr> Sonrfay 
"CRY 

ViNOEANCE" 
'BUCK 
KNieHT" 


Startt Saiirfay 

"BLACK 

WIDOW 

"CANNIBAL 

ATMCK" 



In her first radio appearai 
since joining the MetrOpoli 
Opera, the celebrated central 
Marian Anderson, will be tl 

featifred,' star on "The Telepho: 
Hour" Mionday, January 3 (N: 
Radio a! Coast, 9 p.m. PST; 
p.m. CST). Selections! fro 
opera, the concert repertbire a 
spirituals will comprise her pi 
gram. 

Higjily Acclaimed 

Miss Anderson has chos( 
the poignant aria. "Pleure 
Pleurez, Mes Yeux" from tj 
third act of Massenet's "1* C\< 
Her coiicerto number fwilt 
Handel's "Da nkeSieDir, Hen 
Completing her portion of tl 
program. Miss Anderson w] 
offer the spirituals, "Trampin| 
arranged by Boatner. and "Rii 
On. King Jfesus" arranged 
Burleigh. Doniald Voorhees wj 
conduct the Bell Symphoi 
Orchestra in Waldteufel's 
lores Waltz." the "Pastoral! 
from Bizet's incidental music 
••1,'Arlessienne." and "La Da 
seuse " from Arensky's "Silhi 
et^es." 

Noted for its selection of oi 
standing performers, the Te! 
phone Hour iwelcomes one 


many 
ical 


Andenon, 


return 
riusie 


Bsits to the el«9»> 
rogram bgr MiH 


SocondpgWoofc 

Judy I Janws' 
, Giirlandi Mason 

"A STAR 


IS 


Iff 


Ifxcfuj fvo LJk, 


PASSI ES 


She wing 


lee 7jc Geh'l Adm. 
Evenings, I ats., Sundaysjf 
Ha idays,.^ 
) Gen rai Admistimti 


PDOXVNTOWN , 
(VuimotmC 

PARK fRtt ANT ■ <V.\tf. IG' N<I:. i'..?' 


YEARfS EVE IS ALA 

NO COVER NO APA WSSION 


mUY" 


LEE HO 

MVOU HATS OUABTETTEI 

^*f:f£JL2:> TIFFANY cLuB 


mn 


SUM Mrs 


lETTY MARTINik STUDIO OP DilNCE 


Aiiterica — 


SOUTH LOS ANGELES 

Medera — Afre — 

Private Lessen) 
■alM-Tap-abytbn-TM^I 
Jiv«-Acr«b«tit-r "' 

THE EXClUSIVi 
i03S7 Creestis Street, I. A. 


ImiI er 


HOUYWOOD 

C lassie — >rieRlsl . 
Screened Clase • 


jAzx snsieNS 

t P.M. 


2-szet 


<wMm Tai ihiiie 

scijiooi 

lOraiR 9-SU4 


\ 


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VI 




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THE IXIMITJBLE fifteen year ICest Const radio favorite. 
Bass Harris from dear cImh net station KFI, heard Saturday 
mornings betiiixt eight and nine, will be one of the live stellar 
emcees tonight at Lincoln Theater for Abie Robinson's Site. 
Bays, along nith Joe Adams, (jharles Trammell. (lene \or- 
man and Chazx Crntiford. ail [ String on the many, nmny start 
who will participate.. Harris enjoys the distinction of the man 
who opens and closes doors at Bass' House of Music, Poetry 
''and Tranquility. 


SCATMAS CARRL'THERS. an evfr-willing- entertainer, 
t;v;> iimonn the first trnnpcrs to -'oil his pipes' and 'dust his 
pads' for Abie's Big Xight, Thursday night, December .Wth, 
III the Lincoln Theatre. 2.hd and Central .Ivenue. Ample 
parking is arailah/e in the neighborhood and the star-studded 
stage rage uill 'jump off as the. artists get straight about 
8:00 p.m. 


• * w **••*•*•**••••***• • 


i 


CH.I R.M /\(t Camille Cannady. eurrently starring in \ick 
and Edna Steward's Ebony Showcate stage production, 
" Detecttre Story ," will pause between perfohnancrs to giie 
her all for her good friend and former fourth estate csio- 
einte. Edward ".Ibie" Robinson, 


TERSA TILE— Benny Carier, the 
will be among such tnusiciins as i< 


"blow" on behalf 
night" this "early 


* * • • • • • • * • * • * * • * * * 


jmaztng man of, music, 

^>ike Jones, Lee Keniti, 

Jeep Smith, A lam' Dixon a,id a gal\xay of others who will 

of Ettnard "Jbi^" 

bright." i 


CREOLE REVUE OPENS NEW YEAR'S EYE AT 


10— The California Eagle Thurs., Dec. 30, 1954 


SOUNDTRACK 


Moulin Rouge 
. Hotel Finesl 

(L^ltazz CZrrawfofJ {iBeuigErected 


lailliK!itliliii4«;i:iiiiiit,i:iii:ti!t.i:i;;|i;i»,..i;. 


L.iiiu ii..;i liicitlti-.i (;, 


(Continued" frbm Page 9)' ithe other twilight about a long 
v^ill scream bloody murder, it^i"]^nce call from her good 

' buddy Sarah. She hadn t hoard 
from the singer in several 


uill mean more work for the 
sepia 8it players. 

Except for those "pork chop 
in the sky" guest bits on TV, 
there's no action for Mr. B. or 
Miss Kitt. Or Dandridge or King 
Cole. Or the Brothers Mill and 
Calloway. Or Sammy Davis and 
Lena Home! Or BiHy Daniels 
and Pearlie Mae Bailey. Bela- 
lonte and Ethel Waters. Man, 
they don't even have t^ose sus-" 
taining guest spots. So altho TV 
isn't an infant anymore, we 
figure it's grown up to be a 


months and nearly flipped 
whfen her phone rang at three 
ayem Xmas morn and the voice 
on other end whispered. "Let 
me introduce myself. This is 
Sass Vaughan." 

The ZENITH club's Christmas 
Eve pawtee was smooth sailing. 
And We stood under the mistle- 
toe with publisher L I B B Y 
CLARK and her pretty sis. JERI 
JACKSON MARTHA DAVIS 

tand spouse CALVIN PONDER 

are standing cafe sassiety on its 


crazy mixed up juvenile delin^afg ^, 

quMit. ... I plush ear at' the Near 'N' Far 

AND FtJTHERMORE , . ". ; club at Santa Monica and Fair- 
BABS GONZALES' 'Be Bop fax! . . . SAMMT DAVIS showed 
Santa Claus is aj; cool and re- [the pilot film from hi.<: sched- 
freshing as that deep well uled "Three For The Show" TV 
water the brewing companies i film at his ca-razy pawtee last 
talk abotJt. . . . CONNIE WASH- week. Sorrj- to report that the 
INGTON'S open house on production may never reach the 
Christmas day should have! general public unless ABC can 
swept the country . . . GEORGE j clear up the scuttlebutt. . . . 
SHEARING, the blind pfanist., BVA'i affair at vSt^rlite Roof or 
has been offered eyes eighteen j Room was an elbow rub with 
times. He hais aJways refused the right elbows biit we missed 
the offers on the condition that | the presence of Alyce "Buddy- 
he woi^ld lose more happiness Buddy" Keye.s who was con- 
than he could possibly gain by j spicuous b>- her ab.sence. 


getting another glimpse at the 
outside world. . . . ROZELLE 
GATLE, the piano vocalist fel- 
low who has been btedded for 
many weeks, will resume work 
tonight at a club in El Monte. 


Copy Boyeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee! Lay 
this on the typesetter — 30. 


LA."^ VKGAS. Nev,— Originally 
designed for a lOO' room struc- 
ture, the Moulin Roiige Hbteli 
now under construction , in Las 
Vegas, has doubled its si^e to 
200 guest rooms prior, to Its 
opening the first of 1955.' . 

Inter- Racial 
In addition to the guest 
rooms, one hundred garden- 
type bungalows for the hotel's 
staff are being built. Preopen- 
ing interest on part of the pub- 
lic is responsible for the expan- 
sion. 1 

As a guarantee of adequate 
I housing for the large staff 
! necessary to- rnan the hotel, the 
l2-bedroom apartrnents, com- 
!plete» with living room aod 
kitchen, are being' constructed 
on the resort's 6acre site. 
I Vegas' Finest 

The largest- sign in Las Vegas 

, and the longest script sign in 

the world will identify Moulin 

Rouge. 21 feet wide and S.t feet 

long, the sign will grace the 

modern designed edifice's 

' upon completion. 

' A great plyon is being erected 

to extend above the hotel's roof- 

iline. On top of" the pylon will 

i rf.st a neon reproduction of the 

|famed"^ffel Tower over 45 feet 

high. - 1 


-- \JHov'mg T^er/ormerL JAIand DiXOIl'S 

Creole Mambo 
Choice Revue 


fi^nt 



$50,0001 Redecorating- 
Makes Oasis Ni 
Coasts MoSi 


The man vyho uses his head 
and- arms it entitled to bigger 
wages than the man who 
His charming wife, Lois, told us merely uses his arms. 


• I I 


V- 


1 


Happy New Year 



Let's ring !n a year Filled 
with contentment and 
peace . . . good health 
and good cheer. Our 
sincere best wishes to 
you all for a joyful '55. 


DOCTORS' PHARMACY 


4012 S. Central Ave. 


Orchid Club 
Entertains 

The Orchid Club Inc.. one Of 
Los Angeles' oldest and most 
prominent philanthropic or- 
ganizations, entertained .some 
300 guests Sunday at a cham- 
pagne party in the Blue Room 
of the Park Manor. In tradi- 
tional style the theme was set 
for the yuletide mood. 

In retrospect of yesteryears. 
. the Orchid Club Inc 
. founded and orgapiit^d by 
Miss Laura Slayton. The club 
iS best known for its annual 
charity ball and for its ah- 
rrual Chri.stmas party for un- 
derpriv4ledged children. 

The Club was introduced by 
the personable J. B. Patterson, 
master of ceremonies for the 
evening. The program was fur- 
ther augmented by the golden 
voice of Ray Hicks, young stu- 
dent of Jordon High School. 

Members of the organization 
are: Elizabeth Johnson, presi- 
dent: Winona Martin, vice- 
president; La Verne Mayfield, 
sec; Fay Wilson, treasurer; 
Juanita Smyles, bus. rtigr.; 
Ramelle Bagnerise, reporter; 


PUlCHRfTUDISOUS PAT SYDES "mores" into tht 
neti' Qluh Oasis with Alan Dixon's Creol* Mambo Revue 
opening S'etv Year's Eve. Tonight, Deeember 30th, Pat will 
"perform" for Abie Robinson. Last minute additions to the 

dance brigade are Sampson and Delilah direct from Sew York. 

" 

PEOPLE AND PLAGES 


Opening New Year's Eve \*ith 
the promise of gala festivities it 
the fabulous $.50.000, newly dec- 
orated New Club Oasis follow- 
ing a demand performance on 
Abie's Show at the Lincoln 
Theatre tonight is Aland Dixon's 
sparkling new Creole Mambo 
Revue, a sensational new show 
featuring g o r g e o u-s girls, 
oomedy. vocalovlies, da^ncations, 
music, and plenty of tinie for 
dancing between shows. 

One of the funniest comedi- 
anij in the nation, Dixon is also 
producing the new Oasis Revue 
which will feature Johnny Bur- 
ton, 'singsationar t e le vision 
star. Tantalizing dancer Pat 
Sides as well, as the vocalizing 
of lu.scious Anna Weldon and 
the thrilling primitive beat of 
bongo drummer Louis Polemont. 
along with the dance music of 
Dick Taylor's Band, ma 

■■ new Oasis Creole MamJj^ Revue 
a must on everyone's enter- 
tainment list, a suie bet of a 

i wonderful New /Year's Eve 
frolic. 

The Creole Mambo Revue will 
continue for ^ limited engage- 
ment following the holidays at 
the plush Oasis. 


A S50.000 complcile redecorja 
tion just completed 'or the ho 
days giving a breathtakinf^ 
beautiful interior makes 
New Club Oasis at \l'estern an 
."^Sth the most fabulous nig 
club of the entire M'est 
AUOut Effort 

Plush deep-piled carpetiig 
tbroughout, soft lights, ~ new 
comfortable cushioned chairs, 
paintings, new bars and exqui 
site color schemes, all under the 
supervision of fairted Beve:ly 
Hills interior decorator arid de 
signer Brett Carletoii, make the 
$50,000 decoration job on the 
Coast's entertainmt nt 


something 


far-sighljed 
at 


West 
mecca 

owners Bill Robin.s<j)n and J 
Poskel may weU b«i proud o|f, 
Definitely Diflerep.t 
Along with the newly decbr 
ated nightery. however, goes 
new low polic.v in prices 
drinks, plus an entertainmejnt 
policy of offering well-rounded 


. past 
i. Shearing 
v 
he 

d 

ht 


musica 


revues anri dancir 


fhing with an a 


1 new scn- 
N'ew Year's 


y6Jr lucky break store 


CENTRAL STORE 
-Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 
Everyday, includinf Sundayjs 
' • 4355 S. Central Ave, 
ADams 3-4848 


HOLLYWOOD STORE 
Open 9 A.M. to Midnight 
Including Sunday 

vwood Blvd. 
'2-0275 
i 


jnciuaing 

6675 Hollvi 

\^ H0.'2 


RED'S OUTLET STORE 

1704 E. 103rd St. 
VV.\TTS — LO. 9-8751 


(Continued from Page lOt 
Jackson's, John Collins' Chicken 
Shack, LaCaribe and Elihu Mc- 
Gee's Tip Top!' 

REV. I. L. BRANHAM— to 

keep in the headlines. 

JAY LOFT LYNN— To make 
Independent Church the mecca 
of outstanding Concerts! 

BLANCHE DREW .. To be 

kno^n as one of our better 
busrness women! 

HENRI O'BRTANT — Chair- 
man of L.A. Businessmen and 
Women's Association to really 
make strides with this group 
as a gateway to bigger and 
better busine.ss opportunities in 
our community! 

COOPERETTES— Will without 
a doubt be one of the most in- 
formed social groups in the 
coming year because they all 
have taken to our Eagle! 

CHANGES IN '5S— Links Inc. 
to take a broader view and 
wider aims in getting the aver- 
age person interested In its ef- 
forts! 

HUCKSTERS— To change from 
the "me first attitude" to more 
working together to coin the 
loot In the Negro Market, with 
the Eagle's help! 

VOTERS — To study our poor 
political plight and really set 
about doing something about 
It! 

ROSAUE ORSBEN SCOTT— 

Attractive and terrific Con- 
sumer Consultant of the Car- 
nation Evaporated Milk Com' 


pany is over due for a promo- 
tion and we the consumers 
should point this out to the 
company heads by letters! 

CREAHNG JOBS— B u y i n g 
and supporting community- 
business we hope will be.much 
in evidence in '55 and those 
failing to fall in line will feel 
the drop in business! 

HERE'S HOPIN&-that the 
local medical men "don't miss 
the boat when the National 
convention meets here this 
summer! 


OUR 
SCHOOLS 


TEA PLANNED 

To honor .\9 girls and their 
mothers, an A9 tea and fash- 
ion show will be held at 3:30 
p.m. Wednesday afternoon, 
Jan. 12, at Edison Junior High 
School, 6500 S. Hooper avenue. 

Parents are cordially invit- 
ed to attend in order to see 
girls from the A9 class model 
clothes suitable for gradua- 
tion. Dresses and suits mod- 
eled will be supplied by cour- 
tesy of a local store in the 
Huntington Park di-strict. 


sat ion a 1 show this 

Eve. and following 

.Viand Di.xon's Credle Mambo 

Revue. | 

' Among the eh 

world's greats who 


peared at the Club Oasis in t 


Corenson-Kaufman 
1500 Youngsters 
Tenth Annual 


till 


Santa Claus and a 
dor gladdened the hearts 
1500 deserving youn 
soiith eastside commiunity 
two of its most 
■business arid profesfe 
^ons. Dr. Seymour 
head of the Kaufmin 
Center, 55th and Contrail 
Richard 'Dick' 
Realty Equities Corripany 
S. Main St.. opened tpe doors 


his splei 

of ov ?r 

gisters of the 

when 

enterprising 

ional per- 

Kaufma 

Medic il 

ar d 


rSUBSCRIBE NOW!-n 


CALIFORNIA 


EAGLE 

3 MONTHS B7 MAIL $1 
EVERT THUBSDAT JL ^ 


raoNi 


AD 40161 


WrHw 1050 L 4)rd PU LA. 1 1, Cal. 


HAPP 


i^-i 


Threushout this 
-"plenty brim ov^r 
good ch«cr and 
bumper crop oF 
all, a H«^py N 


SHIG'S 


2105 


\:m 


iiip'- 


>p. 





-. 


- 


y 

1 

'1 


. 1 . 



t - 1 

* 






' ' 






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1 





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' 



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■ 

( J 






.-. 

• 

j t ' , J . ' 



». 1 

-x 

] r. 



.-p.-..- 


. ^ '. 









~^ . . ■ 

' 


*te 


ertainmeiit 
have a 



Fcbulotis 


King 

Sarah 

ton, 

Pradc 

Arms 

Bosti 

artistfe, 


Robinson on, his ''ri^ht 

■ . . j 

• • •• ..'Aj '.• 

ASK 


ghtery 


n 


re Billy Eckstine, Geort*'^ 
Stan Kenton. Nat 
Cole, ' Duke Ellington, 
Vaughan,' Lionel Hamp- 
lla Fitzgerald, Perez 
Dinah Washington, Louiij 
rong. Count Basie. Earl' 
and scores of other top 


;t.. 


thereafter. ! l»ond 



ta 




-s. 


le I 


Nancy Wtudntt tnm 

Caltfsmla h »k« 1«SS win 

tl4 1 «rt< annwa) MIh IkaliitaM 

Naner wHI ba ISO.OOO iMmt- 

ining »h« atacHan anrf.wifl ba Itw 

I hatofrapkad fM in AmmtmMl 

infl y»«r. . 


Honor 
^ /o 

During 


Xm%s Show 


>f 

43' '4 
)f 




m 


Kauffian Center and presented 
each :hild with toys, ice creltm 
and (findy. 

WorthwhUe Effort I 
FoJ owing a tradition which, 
was )egun over a decade ago' 
by tl e late Abe Coreiison, his 
son 1 as continued to carry on 
the s; lirit of Christm^as, heartily 
welco Tving an ever-increasinj 
numb er 4 of young boys - and 
girls pach Yuletide Season. 


Y NEW YEAR 



ew 


sTad N 
with a 
good 

wor|d-wi 
Year! 


■1 


4w Yea 
a bund 
fortune 
ie 


peace 


may. yeui! liern of 
I nee oF good health, 
vlay 1955 harvest a 

and prosperity. To 


SHOE 


W. JE 
RE 


FERSOI4 
7194 


SERVICE 


BLVD. 


-M. ■■ 


! jll.» 


UAL ISTATI LOANS 


BORROW 


1^ 


■/I 


m 


-I - 



r -V 


.1 .' 


iuite, 

initx. 

Will 

ight 

"A- 


s 


u 


OR MORE 

On Your 

REAL 
ESTATE 

PAY BACK 

$15 Per $1000 a Mo. 
I Until Paid 

299 DN. 

BALANCE 
TAKES DEED 

To Many of These 
!i\ Properties 

[ Open Monday 
. Night Till 8:00 P.M. 


1173 W. Third Sl., P«mon»-3 b«d-' 
j^ r»«m— $45 Pn., B »l. Mo. 

1564 E. lOttb St.— Fram* and adU 
l«t. $350 Pn., M . Mo. 

• 1704 I. nith PI.-$350 P«., U\. 


Ckissiffied 
Ads 


MNTAIS 


FURN. ROOM FOR RENT—Old 
age pensioners or relief cases. 
Men or women. 4 nice vacan- 
cies. 1101 E. Adams. AD. 

1-7551. 


FurnislMd Room Fox Root 

Furnished room for working 
couple, no children. All pri- 
vileges. $8.00 per week. 
JE 6908 after 7 p.m. 


3 RM. HOUSE. Furn. 4 Unlum- 
ished. Refrigerator. All com- 
pany you wish. Near all tran- 

' sportatlon. 644 Gladyce. 
VA0829 


FURNISHED HOUSE FOR RENT 

Attractive, newly decorated 3 
room furnished rear house 
with Frigidaire. Located in 
the West Temple district- 
Near No. 11 Temple bus. Call 
NO 2-3374 


Furnished Apartmoat 

Small furnished apt. with 
private entrance for bachelor 
or working persons, respect- 
able and reliable persons. 
Conveniently located. 125 W. 
4Tth PI. Cail AD 4-7777; 


Furnished Apaztaunt For Rent 

Three room apartment for 
couple, no children. Conven- 
ietnly located on eastside. 
Call AD 3-6569. 

Furaishod Room For Rent 

Large, beautifully furnished 
room with kitchen, complete,- 
ly private. Westside. All pri- 
vileges, low rent. RE 2-46P0. 


10617-171-19 $. Contral - Nowly 
doc. slwccos-$12S0 Pn., B«l. 


-. 

|Geerc< 
Nat 

lington^ 
|,Ha(mp- 
Pere* 
1. Louisi 
Earl 
>er top 


\i 


■ -:tt 


4 


psenti 
crea 


which 
ie ago* 
9n. hiaj 

ry onf 

heartily 

teasing 

rs and 

on. i 


R 


o( 

* 
To 


1559 t. inth St.-$399 Pn., Bal. 

Mo. - • 

lOSOt Crapo St.-$299 Pown, U\. 
Mo. 

1451 E. lOStb Stroot-$399 Pown, 

. tal. Mo. I 

1»>1 E. ♦4*li Str«ot-$»Meeo-$«99 
Pn., U\. Mo.^^ 

10500 Clevis $tr«ot-Slucco-$750 
Dn., Bal. Mo. 

1431 FifU St. -Nowly Docorattd 
>«<co-$35 Pn., Sol. Mo. 

1393 E. 15th St.-18 Rm. Hetol- 
$2500 Pn., Bair Mo . 

2037 Ht4 St .-$299 Pn., U\, Mo. 

9114 Boach 5 t.-$350 On., B«l. Mo. 

1106 E. 113th St.-$250 Pn., Bal. 
Mo. 

1712 E. 92nd Stroot-Units-$350 
Pawn, Bal. Me. 

121S E. t2nd Stroot-$tuceo-$499 

Pn., Bat. Mo. ? 
697 E. 52nd Plaeo-$899-Pown, 

Bal. Me. . 

2113 Compton Avo.- $299 Pn., 

Bal. Mo. 

1622 E. 40th PI.-$399 On., Bal. 
Me. 

1556 E. 100th St— $499 Pewn, 

Bal. Mo. 

755 E. »Sth St— $499 Oown, Bal. 

Me. V 

1136 E. 112th St. -Now 5 room 

stucco-$499 Pn., Bal. Mo. 

TOMORROW'S HONEY 
SPECIAL 

MONEY-MONEY 

ON THE HOUSE YOU NOW OWN 

IN ONE DAY 

Advanced on your loan if wo 
O. K. it. Consolidate all your bilto 
in. one loan. Beriow $1,000 or 
more— pay back $15 • mofith per 
$1,000 til paid. 

100 CENTS ON THE $1.00 for your 
1st Trust Peed if satisfactory to 
us, credited to the purchase of any 
preportios wo have listed. Terrific 
—too cents on the dollar. If you 
hivo a TP for $100 to $10,00 wo 
will get you a deal. 


Furnished Kitchenette Apt. 

Two room furnished kitchen- 
ette apartment. Private en- 
trance. One rhild r.k. util. pd. 
Reasonable. RE 4-7306. 


^^r. 


EMPLOYMENT OPPOftTUNITiES 

ATTENTION LADIES! We have 
good jobSi part and full time, 
day workers. For further in- 
formation call the Ladies 
Employment Aid Assn. Agen- 
cy, 3226 S. Central Ave., AD. 
2-9505— AD. 1-3244. 



1- - 
LE«AL NOTICES 


OOOD JPIS WITH PAY 

* Physio Tharof itis 

* M«iss«ur«r« 

* Practical liiurM 

PL ^-6509 


HELP WANTED 

In the domestic field 

NO DOWN PAYMENT 

If you will live on the place. 
Cook A general. Sal, $125-$225 
month. 

Mother's Helper— $125. 
No cooking, no refer, no down- 
payment. 

Cples. SaL $250-5425 month. 
Other ^sitions open for men. 
Chef 2nd cooks, dishwashers, 
porters, jaintors, qar washers. 
22 years in same locatioiu 

1714 W. Jeferson 
RE. 3-3930, RE. 1-4529, RE. 3930 


; WE NEED " 

HELP: 

Address Our Advertisina Cards. 
Good Handwriting. Atlas, Box 
IBB-N. Melrose. Mass. 


(California Eaele) 
NO. MM 

IN THE SUPERIOR COUlTr OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LOS 
ANGELES. 

Fannie Downs. Plantitt, vs. Wil- 
liam Downs. Defendant. 
NO. D477585 

Action brouglit in the Superior 
court ot the County of Los Anseles. 
snd Complaint filed in . the Office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court 
of said County. 

SUMMONS 

The People of the SUte of Cali- 
fornia send greetings te: WiUiam 
Downs. Defendant. 

You are directed to ap|(ear In an 
action brouKhi against you bv the 
above named plaintiff In the Sti- 
perior Court of the. State of Cali- 
fornia, la and for the County of Los 
Anjieles. and to answer the Com- 
plaint therein within ten days after 
the service on vou of this Summons. 
if served within the County of Los 
Angeles, or within thirty davs If 
served elsewhere and you are" noti- 
fied that unless you appear and* 'an- 
swer as above required, the plain- 
tiff will take Judgment for any 
money or damages demanded in the 
Complaint, as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any 
other relief demanded in the Com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court of the County of 
Los Angeles. State of California, 
this 8lh dav of November. 19.>J. 

HAftOLD J. OSTLY. County 
Clerk and Clerk of the Su- 

I perior Court of the State of 

J California, in and for the 

Countv of Ijos Angeles. 
(SEAL SUPERIOR COURT , • 

LOS ANGELES COU.STYi > 

Bv J. We«tHerv»ax. Deputy. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

Attorney for Plaintiff 

M2 So. Broadway St. 

Los Angeles 13, MA. 60S51 
Publish California Eagle Dec. 30. 
1954. Jan. 6. 13. 20, 27; Feb. 3. 10. 
17. 1955. 


Thurs., D«c. 30, 1954 Thii California Eagl«-11 


SERVICiS 


Unfumisbed Apt. For Root 

Two bedroom upstairs apart- 
ment — $60; 1710 South Cen- 
tral Ave. AD 4-5362 after 4 
p.m. Available to see. Side 
-entrance, living rooin, kitch- 
enette. \ 


.FEMALE HELF WANTED. . 

Elderly woman for room and 
board with small salar>' in 
exchange for keeping chil- 
dren. Nice comfortable home. 
EX 9-5757 


LANDLORDS NOTE 

SAVE VACANCY TIME 

FEEE. RENTAL SERVICE 

TOU SAVE MONEY 

YOU SA\*E TI3IE 

USE OLTl FAST. 

tniENDLY SERVICE 

BUDGET RENTAL 

PL. 8-2593 


S98.000 CASH " '«, 


V a 
clients 

with $98,000 in cash te buy real 
•state in this district. This it your 
chance te aell out for all cash if 
yeu have an equity or own a 
house. Wo have clients with 
$91,000 in all cash to buy you 
out. 


NOTI: Wff tUVI ClKNTt 
WHO HAVI All CASH 
,V*r T««r Real Istet* foHy-Ilt ar 
Sad Trust Vaarfs— Ceatrect. or eay 
equity, yea er year triumdt be«a la 
KmI latata. H ifs •■ Isteta. all CASH- 


RENTALS j 
NOW AVAILABLE 
\ ALL'FURNISHED 

$40.$4«-Sin«les («) 

$S5-0oubles (3) 

No childrert or pets-^ 

Close to shopiiing, 

transportation. 

U41>12S1 1. Mtb StrM* 
TW. S7ie 


$$$$$$$$$< 

Arm You In Dmbt? 

Lmt 

DEBT ADVISORY 

SERVICE 

Help Yow Todayl 

Wo Are Credit and Debt 
"Specialists" 

—Our Easy Pian— 

W yaw ewa Yen Pay as law as 


s 4so.ee 
Si,ooo.ee 
S2,eeo.oo 

$3,000.00 


S 9.00 »«r w**ll 
SIS.OO p«r wMk 
$21.00 ^r WMk 
$31.00 wr weak 


Wa Pay All Ya«r OaMs far Vae. 

(0»t •« Stmim mil AIn Pmi4) 

NO SICUaiTY, NO CO.SIONIBS, 

NO aiAl UTATI 

Nathiao bat Mm Imims* dasira «• 
pay year dabts-fraa iafaraiatiaa 
aa all prablaais. 

■riae All Bills Ta- 

DEBT ADVISORY 
SERVICE 

«ie S. Broadway, Rm. 705 
Los Angeles VAndiko 6981 

Daily 8 to « P.M.-Sat. 8-2 P.M. 

EDWARD lECKIR, President 

$$$$$$$ 

SERVICES 

Union Oil Company '76' of- 
fers finest service in Adelen- 
to, California. 


GILES AUTO SERVICE 
REPAIR 

AIL WORK GUARANTEED 
2012 W. Jofforson RE. 9260 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
NO. 3SSZ7S 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the Count> 
of Ix>5 Angeles. In the Matter of the 
Estate of -Hudson Dje. Deceased.,- 

Notii-e Ls hereby civen to creditors 
ha\inK claims against the said deced- 
ent to file said claims in the office 
or to prest-nt them to the under- 
of the clerk of the laforesaijl court 
siicnedat the office of Ml(j.er. Maddox 
and ■ ShPBts. Attorncvs. 5'M South 
Spring Street, in the Tity ol Los An- 
•.;(>lrs 13 In the afore<iaid County, 
which latter office is the place of 
business of the undersigned in all 
niAtlers pertairini; to said estate. 
Such claims with the necessai.. 
vouchi.rs must be filed or presented 
as afort aid within six months after 
the first publication of this notice. 

Dated December 8. 1954. 
AMANDA RYE 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of said drt-cdent. 
MILLER. MADDOX A SHEATS 

Attornys at law. 

524 South Spring Street 

Los Angeles 13, California 

MA. $.2668 
Publish in California Kagle. Dec. 16., 
23, 30. 1954 and Jan. 6. 1955. 


< California Eagle i 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
I - No. 358886 

' In the Superior Court of the State 
ol CaJiiornia. in and for Uie County 
' of 1.04 .\nk-elps. In the Matter of the 
t Estate of .\tartha Hamilton, deceased. 
'^ Notice is hereby given to creditors 
' havinR claims aK»insi the said deced- 
ent to file said claims in the office 
of the clerk of the aforesaid court or 
t» present thcni to the undersigned 
at the office of Thomas G. .Neusom. 
I .Attorney, lljl East Vernon Avenue. 
i in the City of Los Angeles, in the 
I aforesa'.d Count\ . which latter office 
I is- the place of business of the under- 
j signed in all matters pertaining to 
I said estate. Such claims with 4he 
necessary vouchers must be filed or 
presented as aforesaid within six 
months after ttie first publication of 
this noiticc 
Dated: Dei-'mber 13. 1954. 

LENA O. GE,NTRY. 
Executrix of the will of 
said decedent. 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
Attorney. al-Law 
1111 East Vernon Avenue 
Lot Angeles, California 
AD. 2-6149 » 

(Publish Dec. IS. 23 30. 1954; 
Jan. 6, 195.^) 



On The IJook Shelf 


BICYCLE FOR JAP.4X— Manny Borun, fhr-prcslderrt of 
Thrifty Druif Stores, and Boy Scout Tommy Hill prepare to 
srnd a Sffiuinn Trntelfr bicycle to S[out Eddie Sfernrr in 
Tokyo, Japan, as his prize in Thrifty't recent chain-tlide 
contest. 


THE VIEW FROM POM< 
PEY'S HEAD, by ; Ilam- 
ilton Basso. 

With all the novels jon the 
South, the literary picttjire that 
has developed of that roman- 
tic and beautiful section of the 
country has in the mairi been a 
distorted one. 

Now, ironic, perceptive, 
aware. Hamilton Basso, one of 
the South's sons, by a truly 
creative effort has pdrtrayed 
some of its social traditions, 
contrasting them with the so- 
ciety and mores of Neiv York 
and its publishing world. Back- 
ing his story with suspense in 
the account of an editor post- 
humously accused of er^ibezzle 
mcnt. Basso merges pejrsonali 
ties and exciting plot into 
novel as readable as it is h^il 
liantly anal>-tical, 
* • • 

THE MAN IN THE THICK 
LEAD SUIT, by Daniel 
Lang. i J 

Our technblogy has taken us 
beyond our imagination, be- 
yond our ability to comprehend 
the consequences. LaS Vegas 
looks on the explosions at 
Yucca Flats as a side show. 
Prosepctors think onlyi of the 
wealth to be gained frim ura- 
nium. But scientists have come 
to believe that they wiil never 
have all ,the an.swers. j 

Thus Van BraC^p tells us that 
"every scientist is a religious 
man." and one of tl^e chief 
atomic physicists at Oajk Ridge 
joined the Epitcopal liiini.stry. 
This fascinating book gives a 
vivid account of what the fan- 
tastic development of' atomic 
enei-gy means in terms of the 
hope's and fears of t^e men 
who have brought it about. 





a mem< rable and 'tkeuCktfuJl 
Qoyel o; our time. -'*• 

-^' • • • -'••-' 

THE WOMAN WITHIN. |irf 
EUeii Glasgow. 

The i&ner life of one of this" 
country! greatest wornan writ- 
ers is r|vealed in this posthu- 
mous autobiography. Ellen 
Glosgo^ writes with candor of 
her spictual struggles as an 
artist and as a woman. Beneath 
the qnm exterior of her life 
in NcwiYork and Virginia^ she 
was belet with problems— her 
growth 4s a literary artist, the 
death « those closest to her, 
and hel attempt to find hap; 
piness |espite increasing deafi 


ness. 

his 
sensiti 
will se: 
h«r 

Shelter! 
and "I: 
Ls certa 
erary 
year. 


s Brain Injured in , 
Crash; Wins Large Award 

CHICAGO — A six-year-old girl won almost a quar- 
ter million dollar jury verdict here last week against 
the Chicago Transit Authority. 

The law firm of Director and '-^ — ■ 

Liebenson was credited with i The Robinson family, includ- ' and read it: Most of jis knew 


THE HUGE SEASON, by 
Wright Morris, j 

If you have missed this, one 
of the fine books of |the fall 
sea.son, by all means igo Back 


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6499 
NOTICE OF HEARINO Or 
PETITION .-FOR PROBATE 

In thr Superior CrXCKtU the State 
of California, in and for the County 
of Los Angeles. 

I In the .Mattf-r of the E.<tate of 
I E3I.M.^ K GOKDO.V, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given that the 
■petition of Thomas (i. Neusom for 
, the Probate of the.Lo:>t Will of the 
above-named dereased and for the 
Nsuanre of Letters Testamentry 
thereon to the petitioner will be 
heard at 9 15 o'clock A.M.. on Jan- 
ii»r>- 12. 1953. at the court rooc of 
Department 5. of the Superior Court 
of the State of California. In «nd lor 
the County of Los Aneeles. 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. 
County Clerk and Clerk of the 
Superior Court of the State of 
California. in and for th« 
Countv of Lo> Anceles 
Bv H L McLean. Deputy. 
Dated December 16. 19M. 
CARL A. EARLES I 

1111 East Vernon Avenue | 

Los Angeles lt. California 
Attorney for Petitioner 

(Publish in Cxlifomia Eagle 
Dee. 23. X: 1954; Jan. «. 1955) 


obtaining the largest personal [ *"2 Doris Jean. fTer tnother, a 

injury award, $225,000, in the I ^"^'^ *"^ V''° ^.'^'^"^' 1'^'^'" 
. . ' , ,,,. . J .. . • onP '■oom of a sixroom apart- 
history of Illinois and the larg- \ j^ent. ^ ■ ' . 

est amount ever levied against I .^ 

the transportation company. 

Beneficiary in the suit is 
Doris Robinson, 2935 S. Cottage 
Grove avenue, who was seri- 
ously injured when struck by 
a bus in front of her home in 
April of last year. 

Doctors state that Doris Jean. 


Thrde Churches 
Ujiited For 
.Benefit Services 

I "The Son of God Missionary 


or had thrUst on us the world 
it vividly depicts, the ^orld of 
the dazzling, rebellious; roman- 
tic and idralistic 'twerities and 
the people who found, in 
Wordsworth's words. "Bliss was 
it. in that dawn to be 4live, But 
to be young was very heaven»' 
but who survived on into other 
decades and other valtjies. 

You will find it a book in- 
tense and believable, j evoking 
; pictures of golden colliege days 


ntimate memoir of a 
highly skilled artisv 
d the reader back tr 
ks,{ novels like "Th 
Life," "Vein of Iron 
This Our Life."" Th 
ly one of the best li 
utobiographies of 11? 


ATOM » IN THE FAli^''' 
by I Burq Farmi. 

A bio rraphy of the late En 
rico Fei ni, Nobel prize winner 
whose ] ioneer work in nuclear 
psysics nade the atob bomb a 
reality. : . 

Writtln by his wife shortly 
before lis sudden death, thi.<^ 
interest&ig and stimulatinr 
book gft'cs us an insight into 
the liv* of those isolated sci- 
entists Ivho worked, in secrecy 
in NewjYork. Chicago, and Las* 
as well as an 4ff«^- 
md human accouhi of 
lilies and the special 
issumed by their 
A portion of the book 

In the "New Yorjcer." 

• • • r . ■ ■ 

^AN WHO NEVER 
fGED. by.John S«l- 


Aiamosj 

tionate 

their f: 

problei 

wiv^. 

appfarc 

THE 
. CH 
by. 

Perh 
is the 
whose 


daughter of Rosetta Robinson, ■ ^^Ptist Church," 6127 S. Hodver j in a setting not far fjrom Los 
a welfare recipient, may never is hosting 'The Angel of Mercy ; Angeles. Robert Louisj Steyen- 


attain mental capacity above | Missionary SocietV and "World 

"'^•-f^^/M", * '^'"," °f, **^« IWide Evangelicarsociety in a 
accident. She is paralysed on' *" *^ ' 

her left side, has lost the use 
of her left hand and has per- 
manent scars on her arms and 
legs. The child is under the 


New Yearns benefit program, 
Sunday at 3:30 p.m. 

Missionaries L. White and B. 
L. Williams are the founders 


care of a leading neurologist, i of the "Son of God Missionary 
Attomev Liebeson, who han- Church." 


died the case, said some $60.- 
000 of the grant will have to 
"be spent for special schools for 
Doris Jean to provide occupa- 
tion«l thaapy "in the hope 
that she can develop normally 
and not become a burden to 
her family or the taxpayers." 

LEGAL NOTICES 


'SKATIUM' 


TV SERVICE 

TV definitely repaired in hem* 
— n« fix, n* charge. Hem* TV. 
HO. 9-2131 - WE. S-7526 


Phono Won't Roject? 

Have James W. RobinsM 
* REPAIR IT at I 

2120 S. CENTRAL 
Rl. 8-7027 


W« •• 19.S» •■ CaamlssiMt wH 


I:- r ' 

1 
■■ j. 


REALTY 
EQUITIES 


■fi . ^■ 

4374 S. MAIN 
.^i ADv6101 


RENTALS WANTED 

Landlord*, Litt Your Hemes, 
Apartmenfs and Rentals with 

DREW INVESTMENTS 
Hundreds of peoph waMiif I* 
move in today. 

3888"SO. WESTERN 

(AcrMS^Iraa iaority aaak) 

RE. 1-6366 LO. 7-2770 


25e A DAY — 
METER PLAN 

TELEVISIONS 

WASHERS 

STOVES ■ . I 

PIANOS ' 

REFRIGERATORS 

HARMS METER PLAN 
Phen* RE. 2-S944 


6457 

NOTICE OF HEARING OF 

PETITION FOR" PROBATE 

OF WILL 

No. 359987 

. In tlip Superior Court of the St»t» 

of (Talifornid. in and for the County 

ol Los .Angolp-. 

In th» Mnttrr of Xhr K.^tat*- of 
DO.Mf:.MCO LAIRITO. LMKMjtd. 

Nollic is hereby iciven thm the 
petition of K A \Vin.<tanlpy. Publir 
Administrator, for Iht Probate of the 
Will of the »bo\<-named derrasrd 
and f<ir the' is.<.uan<e of Letters of 
.Vdminlstratlon - with - the - Will - 
.\nnc\ed. thereon to E. A. Winntan- 
ley. Public Administrator, will be 
heard at 9 IS o clock A.M.. on Jan- 
uary 12. I9.t5. at the court room of 
Department 5. of the Superior Court 
of the State of California, in and for 
the Coufity of Los Anfceles 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. 
County Clerk and Clerk of tha 
Superior Court of the State of 
California. 
Countv of Lo« Anreles. 

By H. L .McLEAN Deputy. 
Dated iJecembrr 16. 1954. 
HAROLD W. KENNEDY. 
County Counsel 
1100 Hall of Record* 
Lot Angeles 12, California 
MU. 9211 
Attorney Administrator 

rPubllsh In California Eagle 
Dee. 23. 30. 1954: Jan. «. 1955) 
V • 

! MISC. FOR SALE 

I 

Broadcasting Unit For Sal* 

Praniically new broadcasting 
I I unit with loud .speaker. - 
1 AX a -234.5 


and for the 






!' .-1 


Women Wanted 

Malce extra money. Address, 
Mail postcards spare time 
every week. Write Bex Four- 
tcen^ Belmont, Mass. 


MOTOR- 
OVERHAUL 
$49 to $69 

* Meters Exchanfled 

* Cenvenient Location 

* Ample Finandnf 

A - D MOTORS 

7600 S. troadway; PL. S-3172 

LOANS 

Heui* Rafinancing 
M. E. WEtB CO. 

PR. «937 
Ask for J. CL Corey 


REPAIR SHOP 
FOR SALE 

Radio TV tvbet test *qui|»> 
meni, phonograph lecordt 
and used radios. 
^ 2 1 20 South Central Avenue 


I (Continued from Pag^ 6i 

two weeks ... she was in rare 
! form too 

; BIRTHDAY blanks at the 

] Skatium are available for our 

I patrons to will out so that all 

the Skatium personnel may re- | 

member them ort their day of j 

admittance into this world ... 

A very important fellow this 

JOHNNY G.. while talking 

over one telephone he was 

stgned proposes to sen slcoholic bev- I holding the receiver- on the 
erajtes at these premls«t. a*»crlbed \ •'"•"'"« ""= jci.«iver on ine 


son qnce wrote an essay extoll- 
ing those who lived fu^ly up to 
the moment of death ind 0ied 
"trailing clouds of glbr>:."j or. 
as a child of the twenties would 
say, using a bull rir^g term, 
achieved their moment | of 
truth. Morris contrasts these 
with the ones who survived, in 


Vic Vet says 


VA tfVANTS -|0 miP^OO KEEP 
rOM BENEFIT OAIM 5TIUI6lfT 
BUTITNEEPS rOOR HEL^TOp. 

WHEN you wem about it, be 
SURE TodvEYouaic* OB 

CLAIMS NUMBEe. 


s the loneliest of men 
orchestral co|iductor. 
osition keeps him aloof 
from tl e very musicians who 
interpr* : music as he indicates. 

This lovel grves a picture of 
a man j vhose temperament and. 
musical! feeling made him a 
success as a leader, whiljb he 
was for :ed to learn for hiipself 
how u ifulfilled these iamc 
qualitie ; left him as a human - 
being. ; : 

An u iderstanding and fym^i 
patheti< portrait, this als^ af-' 
fords tl e reader an intereitinr 
glimpsa into the complexiitiei^ .■ 
of conouctor and symtihjony* 
board Klationships that |^ov-,. 
ern gr«t American sympljiony 
orchefet 


k 


NOTICE OF INTENTION Ta EN- 
GAGE IN THE SALE OF ALCO- 
HOLIC BCVeRAGES. 

Dec. 13. 1954 

To Whom It May Concern: 
Notice it herebv given that 30 day* 

after the above date, the under- 


•5 follows 

11313 Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles 

(IM 

Pursuant to such Intention, the un- 
derfisned is applying to the State 
■Jz ■ - ■ 


, Other one ... he . had a party 
on that one too . . . CHUCK 
WINSTON has returned to the 
Skatium as a floor man . . . 


Board of Equalization for Issuance, 

of an alcoholic beverage licenie <qr ] things are under control on the 


floor once again . . . The Skati- 
I urn plans a terrific Xmas party 


licenses) tor these premises as fol- 
lows: 

On Sale Beer Only. 

Anyone desiring to protest the Is- ' this vear 
suance of such license may file a|. •'. ,^. ^, „ 

verified protest »-lth the Sute Boafd I >s commg skating on that De- 
of Kqualization at Sacramento. Call- | cember 23rd . . . That's 30. gids, 
fomla. stating grounds tor denial *s ' o uv,. e, , 

provided bv law. 

ELtJAH PHILLIPS AND 
EARL WHITE 

Publish California Eagle Dec .V 


I California EacIe) 
NOTICE TO CREDITOBS 
No. 157516 
In the Superior Court of the Stale 
of California. In and for the County 
of Los Angeles. In the Matter of the 
Estate of Carsie H. Morris, deceased. 
Notice is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against the said deced- 
ent to file said claims in the office 
of the clerk of the aforesaid court or 
to present them to the undersigned 
at the office of Thomas G. Neusom, 
Attorney. 1111 East Vernon Avenue. 
in the "Citv of Los Angeles, in the \ 
aforesaid County, which latter office 
Is the place of business of the under- 
signed In all matters pertaining to 
said estate. Such claims with the 
neces.sar;' vouchers must be filed or 
presented as aforesaid within six 
months after the first publication of 
this notice. 
Dated; December 13. 1954. 

CHARLES L. HL'BBARD. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
THOMAS C. NEUSOM 
Attorney-at-Law 
IIUEast Vernon Avenu* 
Lai Angaias, California 
(Publish Dec. 16. 23. 30. 1954; 
Jan. 6. 19551 


RIAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


^^lioUsFl'OH SALE 
$50.00 dwn. New four room, 
two bedroom with garage. 
Balance easy. 15503 Compton. 
NE 6-5115 


I 


INCOME FOR SALE 

Two Units. $1S00 down. 
7 rm., 3 bedroom plus 1 
bedroom unit, on Socend 
Avonu*. PR. S937. 



6435 

CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 

UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME 

The undersigned do hereby cer- 
tify that they are conducting a 
iahitorial and maintenance service > 
business as Co-Partners at 707 North ! 
■.Irandce. Compton.- California under 
the fictitious firm name of WHITK ; 
HOUSE JANITOR SERVICK and 
that said firm is composed ot the 
foUowine persons whose names and 
niaces of residence are as follous. 
to-wit : 

JE.^SE J HOWARD 707 North 
Grandee, Compton, California 

JAMES ERNE.ST HOWARD, !.■« 
l-'jist 99th Street. Los Angeles. Cali- 
fornia. 

Witness our hands this 9th day 
of November. 1954. 

JESSE J. HOWARD 
JAMES ERNEST HOWARD 
State of California. 
County of Los Angelei. ss. 

On this 9th day of Novamber, 
A.D.. 1954. before me. a Notary Put>- 
lic in and for the said County and 
State, residing therln. duly com- 
missioned and twom. personally 
ippeared JESSE J. HOWARD and 
JAMES ERNEST HOWARD, known 
to me to t>e the persons whose names 
are aubtcrlbed to the within Inctru- 
ment. and acknowledged to me that 
they executed the same. 

Jii WITNESS WHEREOF. I have 
hereunto set my hand and affixed 
my official seal the dav and year in 
this certificate first above written. 
(SEAL* HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

Notarj' Public in and for 
said County and Sate. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAlk 

Attorney at Law 

542 South Broadway 

Lea Angtflca 13, Califarnia 

MAdiaon (4551 
(Publish in California Eagl* 
Dec 33. ao. Jan. 6. 13) 


V' 



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« 

3 ■> 


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j 







^ 

1 



' 


V 


; ' 


1 

. ■ ■ i. ;- 


f 


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f '. 

*^ 







tt-Th» Calildrniq ia^l* Thun., D«c.^30, 1954 


\\ 


Walter White Protests 
Federal Aid for Ghettos 

I- ^?^ YORK— Warning that a proposal of the Na- 
tional Association of Home Builders to erect houses for 
N^fTo occupancy only "if suitable sites" can be found 

15?*a"^^^^®^®^°P"^®"* °^ ""Ore ghettos, Walter White, 
NAACP executive secretary, has urged U. S. Attorney 
General Herbert R. Brownell to take steps "to halt gov- 
ernment participation in the practice of extending ra- 
cial segregat ion in housing." 

^ ; "■ — « The Home Builders advanced 

this program at a Washington 
conference on minority group 
housing problems called by the 
government's Housing and 
Home Finance Agency, Decem- 
ber 9-10. . Members of the 
Builders Association agreed to 
aim for a goal of 10 per cent of 
all housing they developed for 
minority occupancy, provided 
"suitable sites" could be found. 
3!he NAACP was represented at 
the conference by Clarence 
Mitchell, director of the Asso- 
ciation's Washington Bureau, 
and Madison S. Jones, field 
secretary. 

The NAACP ^^representatives 
submitted proi^sals restricting 
government aid to housing, 
slum clearance and redevelop- 
ment programs only on the ba- 
sis'of occupancy and use with- 
out racial considerations of any 
kind. While these proposals 
were supported by the major- 
ity of representatives, at the 
conference, they were strongly 
opposed by some of the busi- 
ness fnterests. 

In his letter to the Attorney 
General, White recalled that 
the NAACP submitted a mem- 
orandum to the Department of 
Justice in July on "why the 
U. S. Government should with- 
hold housing^ assistance in any 
form unless there is a guaran- 
tee that such housing will be 
open to all person* without re- 
gard to race." 


New York 

to Ban 
Rocial Togs 

NEW YORK— The New York 
State Comniission Against. Dis- 
CTimination has again been 
Jirged to take effective steps 
to halt the practice of the State 
Motor Vehicle Bureau of asking 
for racial. designations on offi- 
cial applications. 

The request wai made by 
Herbert Hill, labor relations 
assistant of the NAACP,- at a 
feeeting SCAD held last week 
with representatives of various 
organizations. Hill had made 
a similar request last year, but 
the bureau has continued the 
practice claiming that it serves 
a valid purpose <rf identifica- 

,' ^In te^portie to this conten- 
'j tion. Hill told the commission 
V that "a far more pressing- rea- 

s3h for removing 'the racial 
' ' daaignation is the fact that 

Negro citizens are forced to pay 

; higher insurance rates and 

v| * that this practice inflicts an 

|;*rndignity upon hundreds of 

If; thousands of New- York citi- 

'-*% »ns." 


'^^i 





yp 


Gr««tm<}s to the giod N«w 
Y«or oimI grMtifigs to oK 
eor fri«fids ofid if«igthbof si 
To ovofyofio, wo wisK fvtl 
moosuro of po<K«, joy ond 
presporityl Moy •1955- \ 
bring tho Hoppy fuMtmont 
of aN yovr doorost wuhoi. 

'- froM our . . . 

DIRECTORS & STAFF OFFICERS 

WAnSSAYINGS& 
LQAN ASSOCIATION 



Better Service 
Pledge Made 
At Hotel Meet 

Culminating a drive to or- 
ganize hotels and motels cater- 
ing to minorities, the Nation- 
wide Hotel Association held its 
seventh regional meeting last 
week at the Clark Hotel. 

Purpose of the Nationwide 
Hotel Association is to raise the 
standards of its members and 
give better service to travelers. 

Dykes A. Brookins, national 
president, stressed the, need for 
better accommodations and 
sited the urgency for upgrad- 
ing standards in order to meet 
competition. N H A members 
sign a pledge of service before 
they are acepted and must be 
inspected at regular intervals. 

Samuel W. Whiteman, assist- 
ant regional salesmanager, R. 
Mars, the Contract Co., New 
York City, was the guest 
speaker. He gave many 
valuable pointers on the newest 
trends in hotel-motel furnish- 
ings and the advantages of 
buying through contract ar in- 
stitutional firms. 

Andrew F. Jackson. Founder 
of NHA, and its public rela- 
tions counsel, traced the his- 
tory of the organization and 
gave the highlights of the 1955 
regional program. | There are 
seven (7) regions in the as- 
sociation. 

Regional seven officers are:- 
Horace P. Clark Sr.. President; 
William jWatkins, Hotel Wat- 
kins, First Vice President and 
Treasurer; Arthur W. S»ewell, 
Cosmopolitan Hotel, Second 
Vice President. Leonard Christ- 
mas. Digby Hotel, Secretary. 
Clark is also on the Board of 
Governors. 

Others atending were: Paul 
Wilson, Hayes Motel; Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence Muse, Muse-A- 
While, Perris; Jack Lauder- 
dale, La Dale Motel; Wade 
Newton, Newton Hotel; Law- 
rence F. LaMar, Dunbar Hotel; 
Vernon D. Webb, Vernon Hotel; 
A. Turlay Van Couverling, 
Memphis Hotel; A DeVoe. De- 
Voe Travel Agency; L. Davis, 
Royal Hotel. 


EBONY'S 'DETECnVE' 
RATES NEW RAVES 

i By JAN EDWARDS 

How d'ya like the nerve of that suave, scene-snatch- 
ing, scanner of scuttlebutt Chazz Crawford!! Just when 
we were timed to rhapsodize in a rave review on "De- 
tective Story," Chazz Clishmaclaver Sound Track Craw- 
ford muzzles right into our high-toned Drama Depart- 
ment, plagiarizes the thoughts we might have thought, 
calls lis "assassins!" and comes up with a terrific re- 
view' praising Nick and Edna Stewart's latest hit, now 
playing Thursday through Sunday at the Ebony Show- 


Cif y Admits 
Housing Bios 

GRAND RAPIDS. Mich.— Seg- 
regation of Negro and white 
tenants in low rent housing 
projects was admitted last 
week by the Benton Harbor 
Housing Commission. 

The admission wajs made in 
a reply to a suit filed by 
NAACP attorneyi in the Fed- 
erad spistrict Court on behalf 
of five Negro families seeking 
admisison to one of the city's 
all-white projects. 

The Benton Harbor Commis- 
sion said its segregation policy 
is the result of "custom and 
usage." It admits requiring ap- 
plicants for apartments to state 
their race on the application 
blank and admits maintaining 
separate projects for Negro and 
white families. 


A principle is much like a 
prejudice except that you can 
defend it with logic instead of 
a brick. 


case. 

Ho Myatarr 

No mystery, though, why 
Chazz "felt the urge" to shout 
it from the house-tops. Every- 
thing needed to create success 
(including Crawford) has been 
provided in the production of 
"Detective Story." A play that 
has pathos, tragedy, bright 
brisk comedy, and a highly ac- 
ceptable" philosophy. This play 
put into the hands of scholarly 
Leslie Abbott, who directs a 
talented group of players per- 
forming against ingenious 
stage sets and clever lighting 
by Paul Rodgers, has certainly 
resulted in what Chazz labels 
a "Lulu." 

The pervading atmospl^ere of 
realism and naturalness in the 
Ebony's production is a pleas- 
ant contrast to the hysterical 
histronics we have been sub- 
jected to in other versions of 
"The Story." Not only the nor- 
mal tone of voice and natural 
business of the performers, but 
clever staging, even to the 
faint sound of passing street 
cars, put us right into their 
stream of consciousness. Fact 
is. the audience might have 
been watching the drama right 
in the poljce station, waiting 
there to be booked themselves 
— for parking tickets, of course. 
Fin* Poatomini* 
First to appear when the 
lights go up is Vilmore Schex- 
nayder doing a very efficient 
characterization of Detective 
Dakis rattling off routine ques- 
tions while booking a shoplift- 
er. The dizzy little dame is 
played by Marmetta France, 
who stays on stage almost to 
the bitter end. She fidgets and 
worries. Sees all and hears all, 
and does it so expressively we 
think Marmetta is just about 
the finest pantomimist around. 
As to performance, every 
member of the cast ia a win- 
ner, but sometimes we didn't 
altogpther agree with the ac- 
tor's interpretation of his char- 
actor, as in the case of James 
Edwards (so handsome and at- 
tractive). We thought Jipi over- 
did his projection of restraint; 
often, too. talking so softly we 
couldn't hear the lines. Our 
idea of Detective McLeod is 
that he was a paronia-rbrutal. 
unreasonable and uncontrolled. 
Jim gives him a tense, sober 
quality. We would have liked 
McLeod more ruthless, loud- 
mouthed and pathetically hate- 
ful. 

PewarfuL CeaTiacing 
Nothing restrained about Ca- 
mille Cannady who plays Mc- 
Leod's wife, a very intelligent 
lady whose past catches up 
with her and causes quite a di- 
lemna. Camille uses her voice 
like an organ; capitalizes on 
every little detail to make her 
role powerful and convincing 
and. so convincing was she. we 
could even read her thoughts 
offstage! 

Bernard Hamilton, Jake Mc- 
Kinney and M Benton are fun- 
nymen of "The Stor>-." Ham- 
ilton slithers around the sta- 


tion as Charlie, four-time loser 
and criminal cut -up. The guy 
must be a stunt man on the 
side, he tumbles so gracefully 
and takes blows like foam 
rubber. Bernard proves him- 
self to be the most amusing 
and entertaining stinker we 
ever met. Charlie's partner, 
Lewis, played by Allen Belton, 
is downright silly, a Lou Cos- 
tello type of silly, the kind 
everybody loves. Jake McKin- 
ney was given wonderful lines 
in his part of news reporter, so 
the dialogue and Joe's antics 
are a fatal combination. His 
"check and balance" talk ic a 
wow. 

Sensational 

As Chazz pointed out' the 
"walk-ons" are sensational. And 
they kept walking on. A new 
one every few minutes. Zara 
Cully Brown started the parade 
and had us howling. She was 
.so doggone serious and persu- 
asive in her anxiety about spies 
and atomic vibrations we were 
afraid the laughter inight of- 
fend her. 

Chazz described Louise Cum- 
mings' portrayal of the beaute- 
ous Miss Hatch as "undulat- 
ing." Very definitely, this 
player has to be seen, to ap- 
preciate the Crawford genius. 
Hattie Northcross ended the pa- 
rade as an indignant citizen. 
Her hilarious bit was wild eyed 
and wonderful, a shocking conr 
trast to the tragedy which im- 
mediately follows. 

Al Freeman gives a beauti- 
fully s>'mpathetic portrayal of 
the youngster who makes one 
mistake. Florence Smith, as 
his girl friend. Susan, is sweet 
enough to make any "mixed- 
up kid" go straight. Ted De 
Lange has one of the most 
beautiful speaking voices; res- 
onant, and way. way down 
deep. Emperor Clemmii does 
the villain part up just right, 
smooth and sinister, but never 
ludicrous. 

Sylvester Bell. Gilmore Gul- 
chard. Leon Brawley. Charles 
Carpenter, Lane Floyd, and. Mr. 
Theatre himself. Nappy Whit- 
ing, all had straight parts and 
all do an excellent job. "De- 
tive Story" is too chuck full of 
talent and entertainment to do 
it justice in a dozen reviews. 
Huh, Chazz? 


Seek Centers 
For Children of 
Migrant Labor 

NEW YORK — Dean Paul H. 
Appleby, who will serve as di- 
rector of the budget in the new 
administration of Governor- 
elect W. Averell Harriman of 
New York, has been urged to 
include in the state'ji new budg- 
et an item of SIO.CXX) for a child 
day care center and school pro- 
gram for the children of ml- 
•grant farm workers in the state. 

The reque-st was made by 
Herbert Hill, labor relations as- 
si.stant on the staff of the NAA- 
CP. 


■'4 


V:^) f 



Far «nythiiif Frem a 
miner «d)uii;mcnt i* a 
major repair on 'ytfur 
telavitieni'er radio ... 
call Avejnua TV an. 
Radio at ADams 4-0970. 
Yeii can b« sura of ex- 
pert workmanship and 
prompt service at s«ns- i 

ibic priced. ' ' ; |^ ■' J".." 

AYJENUE TV & RADIO 

4^57 CENTRAL AVENUE 

(Utw—n 4ftfc M0c« anrf SOf fc %*r—t) 

Phone: AD. 4-0970 

.- .•-■.!. I- ■ • I 

I JAMU HUMPHtrr Pr*pri«t«r 


I USE THIS CONVENIENT FORM TO PLACE 

CLASSIFIED ADS 


Write your ad JUST AS YOU WANT IT TO ■! PUIUSHfO THURSDAY, includinf yaur ADDRUS m 
TILEPHONI NUMBER, or bath m part of the ad. 


CUSSIFKATION DiSIRIO 
Suck •• Itaal Istala Por Sala," 'Pumiahad Raam Par Rant,* 'Apt. 
'Mis«. Por Sal*,- oU.-PUas« PRINT CLEARLY M mora than mm word 


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bi each aquara balow. 


15 

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Additional 

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- RIpublic 3-5S00 — Iquals 3 Words 


CAUPORNIA IA6LI 1 
1050 I. 43rd PL 


Classiflod Ad Dopt. 
Los AngolM 11, Collf. 


Gantlamani 

I am •nclosing $ chack, meiwy order or eoina in paymant af my daaaifiad. 

Pfaata intart it in -tha naxt iMua of your CALIFORNIA EA6LL \ 


Print Nam* 


Addra$a phona 

Your CALIFORNIA EAGLE li puUishad avary THURSDAY. Ads must reach your CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE offiea by 1:00 p.m. \Vadnasday foi iriMriion in tha following day Cla**ifiad offica* opan 
AAonday through Friday 3:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 pjn. 


^:— • 



BROirX SKIS. BRIGHT LEAF—C^hgressnian-elect 
Charles J. Digtis.^cft, Michigan's first Segro Congressional 
representative, and Old Gold salesman IValtcr Broum examine 
the colorful "Brown Skin and Bright Leaf" exhibit which 
depicts the past and present role of the Negro in the tobacco 
industry, prepared by the P. Lorilliard Company. 


Jim Crow Hit In Bakersfiejd 


BAKERSFIELD — In a com- 
munication signed by James 
Benjamin, Esq. and directed to 
the City Council of the City of 
Bakersfield the question of ra- 
cial segregation in the Bakers- 
field Fire Department was 
raised. 

Benjamin quoted an opinion 
rendered by Attorney General 
Edmund G. Brown concerning 
racial segregation in city .Fire 
Departments. 


In commenting upop this ac- 
tiea of tha Bakarafialjd NAACP^ 

Franklin H. Willianis, regional 
secretary -counsel stated,. "It's 
time that all California cities 
brought themselves and their 
practices in line with the Con- 
stitution of this state. §everal 
communities still practice se- 
gregation in the assignment, 
promotion and transf(>r of pub- 
lic employees." 


Elderly Maor 
Hit by Trucks 
Cri shed toDeath 

Per y Jackson. 68, 113 W. 2nd 
streeq who ,refu«ed to stop 
workfig on his construction job 
in sSte of his advalnced age, 
met ^eath under the wheels of 
a coifetruction company truck, 
Tuesijay at 12:30 p.m. 

Jackson, who had worked for 

the .Giriffith Company for many 

was paving an alley on 

nd Cimarron, when truck 

W. E. Langford backed 

he alley, looking out <rf 

ndow on his Jeft. Jackson, 

as to the right, stepped 

he paf^ of the moving 

e and was crushed to 


br Smith to 
[urn to Films 

r Smith, former famed 
ring comic of the screen 
oted for his flare for lav- 

ardrobes which earned 
im the sobriquet "Cut* 

is planning a return to 

Smith was a former Par* 

it Studio contractee. 

his retirement from > 
has been interested in I 

roperty investments. Ha i 
^ly operated the Hi-Hat 

t Val Verde. Smith, who 
leen studying the charac- : 

the late stage comic and 
n plate, Broadway Jones,. 

to re-activate that rola 
h motion pictureiand tel« 
n film ventures.! 


(OWEIi 




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Chief Accused Of 'Spile' y rq 

DOCTOR ARRESTE 
W0MAi^>3IEl DURING ABOR 



r-fc- 


Men 'Punished' 
For Opposition 
To Segregation 

You can lead a horse to 
water but you can't make 
him like what he has to 
. drink! 

Similarly, you can com- 
pel a reluctant public of- 
ficial — a fire chief, for ex- 
ample — to bow to an order 

from his superiors to halt 

"facial segregation. But you 
can't make him like it! 
Last week, Fire Chief John 
^ H. A 1 d e r s o n took a whole 
bushel of bows for his order 
transferring two firemen from 
alhNegro Central Avenue sta- 
tions, ta a former "white sta- 
tion" in Studio City, after two 
Shears of fussing and feuding 
with Mayor Norris Poulson. the 
Board of Fire Commissioners, 
" the NAACP, and public opinion. 
Spite List 
This week, the Eagle learned 
that the Studio City fire sta- 
tion is entirely manned with 
new persiannel — the two Negro 
transfers,' plus white firemen 
who - w^re selected from * 
"Spite List" compiled by the 
ehief from those who had indi- 
cated their opposition to his 
racial segregation policies. 

Always a cagey man with 
words, the chief told the Fire 
- Commissioners last Thursday 
that "We made a specific, ef- 
fort to transfer the men so the 
colored lads are Surrounded by 
a friendly atmosphere." He 
didn't tell' the Commission 
r^«taout the naanner ijtL-iKhi<;)i . be 
■ T- had chosen the men in order to 
induct- ilfbc "friencfty atmos- 
phere.'* \ 

The "colored lads" are John 
I^fttta. 44 year old grandfather 
of 1331 W, 36th street who has 
' been with the department for 
! 17 years, and George Winches- 
ter. 36, a fire fighter with 13 
, years experience. 

Skeptical Souls 
Changing of the entire per- 
sonnel of a fire station is un- 
precedentedi according to old- 
timers. 'Nobody would venture 
a guessj as to Chief Alderson's 
motives! in selecting the 
white pfersonnel for the station. 
There were skeptical souls who 
tool? a dim view of his motives 
and chuckled that he made the 
. moves to spite the fireman who 
opposed! him. The charitably in- 
. clined took the chief at his 
word and said that "maybe" he 
made the transfers in order to 
. make sure that there would be 
'no incidents of any kind. 

The white transferees came 

;' primarily from a list of those 

who refused to kick in with 

:■ two bucks a piece to finartte a 

(CoJitinued on Page 2) 



1«eO E. 43rd Place, L,A. 


mmmmmtm 
CentiiHMiis Pubncatien for 74 Years 


Vol. LXXIV_No. 42 


Los Angeles, Californij 


Thurs., Jan. h, 1955 


Nab 5 for Thefts 

■./'. .;■ ^. ■ ■ .\y . i 'i I'll ^i ■■ 

In Education Depf 


-1^ 


i'. 


15;" 


CouH Urged to 
Drop One Count 
In Abortion Case 

Dr. E4mund George Peters, 
•ef Watts, was scheduled to ap- 
pear for arraignment in court 
Wednesday afternoon to plead 
in the felony charges accusing 
him of two counts involving the 
uncovering of a far-flung^ abor- 
tion ring in Los Angeles. 

Through his attorney, Wil- 
liam Mayhew, Dr. Peters has 
asked that one count charging 
him with conspiracy to commit 
abortioi^ be dropped. Argument 
on the motion was to be heard 
Wednesday. ." . 

On the other count, accusing 
him of perfbrhninj; an illegal 
operation. Dfc Peters will plead 
not guilty, according to his at- 
torney. 

rw. Peter.*, who lives at 872.1 
Plevka Avenue, was arrested 
jointly with Mrs. Bessu;. Sutter, 
of Pasadena, who wa.s believed 
to be the kingpin in the local 
abortion racket. 


■ fn fAe JFog/e 

a^>ecial features this week 
fauide the Eaerle indude: 

10 
. 4 
. 6 
5 
. 7 

People and Places . 9 

Dorothea Foster '. 8 

Bill Smallwbod 1 7 

What's Cooking 9 

Bridge Pointers ......r......'. 8 

Bowling Ne#s _ 6 

Morris Says I '. 6 


Chazz Crawford 

Editorial 

Sports 


Church Activities 
Social : 


r 



STOPPFD THE SHOW— J! hen tall, handsome r broad- 
shouldered Jeff Chandler and lovable, mereurial and dynamic 
Sammy Davis, Jr., stepped on the stage at the Lincoln theater 
on Abie's Xit/ht, the teen-agers in the balcony and the not-so- 
tf.cn-aqers upstairs and do-un uent uild. When Chandler 
literally carried Sammy off the Stage, the place became 
delirious. CJdams Photo.) I i 

Million Dollars in 
Talent Aids 'Abie' 

By "CHAZZ" CRAWFORD • 

I took in a show the other night. It was a really 
.sock show according to the paying customers. I didn't 
happen to be among that crowd. I was allowed to come 
in free, but I was compelled to remain backstage. How- 
ever, I did get a sideivise glance at the performers ^hile 
they were on. And I was greatly impressed. 

First of all I took into con-* ~~ 

sideration that none of these 


gifted people were being paid 
for their charms. If they had 
been, this newspaper as spon- 
sor would have had an astron- 
omical talent fee on its ink- 
stained hands. 

For Abie 

It all happened for a popu- 
lar and highly regarded guy 
known as Abie Robinson, who 
is of that benign group or 
breed known as pen-pushers. 
This Robinson fellow usually 
toils for the California Eagle 
newspaper, but for several 
weeks now has been laid up 
with- a lame hand as a result 
of . an unfortunate auto acci- 
dent. 

Inasmuch as turnabout is fair 
play, it wasn't too surprising to 
see such a galaxy of folks do- 
nating their time and talents 
to beiieflt the scribbling gent 
during his convalescence. For 
through the magic of his pen, 
he has pushed a lot of them 
toward their goal as showstop- 
pers and world beaters. His 
rfforts were not in vain, for a 
solid bunch of these world beat- 
ers gave him a fair tum last 
Thursday night. 

Abie will learn here and now 
how he shared the lirnelight 
with literally dozens of enter-' 
taining well-wishers who never 
allowed that light to flicker o^ 
dim during three hours of 
whoopte-drr in his behalf. And 
^Continued en Page ii 


Mystery Shrouds 
Killing of Man 

Homicide detecti%es are in the 
blind on the murder that was 
committed just before mid- 
night New Years Eve. 

Gus Thomas. 40. 241 E. 2nd 
St.. was dead on arrival at 
Georgia Street Receiving Hos- 
pital with his throat cut from 
ear to ear. 

A dragnet wa.s put arotmd 
the area and several persons 
were arrested and later re- 
lea.sed. 


Losses From 
Stealing Set 
At $20,000 

1 Five eastside members 
of the Board of Education 
staff were picked up Tues- 
day between noon and 
, midnight and charged with 
thefts of articles that have 
disappeared from the de- 
piartment during the past 
three years. " 

' -. Estimates are that from $18,- 
000 to S20.000 vyorth of mate- 
rial, intluding typewriters and 
chairs, have mysteriously van- 

I ished during that period. SoRie 
of the items were «rpon«><riy 

,^ found at the home of Leon Mc- 

I Guire, 24, and Charles £. Wat- 
kins. 26, both of 649 E. 83rd 
street. 

MeirijuoBo Fetuid 
The raids also are said to 
have uncovered a size4ble wad 
of marijuana, f nd to Have sur- 
prised two cff the suspects, 
Watkins and Miss Mary Gran- 
ville, 25, in bed at her home, 
1533 E. 48th place. ' 

Others arrested were Johnny 
Norton. 21, of 1237 E. 53rd street, 
a stock clerk, and Johnny 
Smyles. 35, of 1333 E. 92nd 
street, who has been a stock 
clerk in the department for the 
ga.M 12 years. 

The haul was made follow- 
ing a tip to police and came as 
.something of a surprise to the 
Board of Education. Police 
first rapped on the door of Miss 
Granville's home and demand- 
ed that they "Open up in the 
name of the law." 

Norton, unfortunately for him, 
walked up to the house just a 
fevv minutes after the police 
arrived. He was taken inside 
for questioning, and he. Miss 
Granville and Watkins were all 
arrested. 

The three, according to the 
police, implicated the other 
two who were picked up later. 

The marijuana — about a 
pound of it — was found in a 
drawer at the home of Watkins 
and McGuire. McGuire. a floor 
waxer, reportedly told police it 
belonged to Watkins. But some 
more of the weed was alsa dis- 
covered in a drawer in Mc- 
Guire's dresser. 

Their apartment, police 
claimed, was generously 
stocked with Board of Educa- 
tion supplies. They listed the 
loot as: nine typewriters, one 
I.B.M. electric typewriter, two 
movie projectors, a microphone, 
a food mixer, three record 
players, public address appar- 
atus, two cardboard boxes of 
new silverware, two movie 
screens and 12 folding chairs 
with the telltale Board of Edu- 
cation name stamped on their 
back.s. 



Uri-: SSUFFKD OUT— Lovely .Mrs. Ceraldine Ray died 
on .Vfir Year's Day^as a result of an illegal operation. Dr. 
A". F. Spencer is ^argcd uith her death: accused of murder. 


Lorenzo Bo wdoin 
Leaves 'Angelus' 

After an assodation of just under 30 yeai's, Loren- 
zo Bowdoin and the Angelns Funeral fiome. which he 
helped found, parted company as of January 1. 

* Bowdoin told the Eagle that 


Killing Ends 
Quarrel Over 
'Olher Men' ; 


Henrv Green Harrell, 39 vear 
old cleaner, of 628 E. 55th St.. 
was shot and killed by his girl 
friend and employee last Fri- 
day during an argument while 
they were locked in a warm 
embrace. 

Barbara Jean Watson, 25; 353 
E. 117th St., was jailed Wter 
witnesses told police that she 
shot Harrell while they were 
in bed at his home. 

Two Nights of Lot* 

Miss Watson said that she 
worked for Harrell at Henry's 
Cleaners, 119th and Avalon and 
was his girl friend. She said 
she spent two nights each week 
with him. 

They were going to a, dance 
Friday night she said, and Har- 
rel had pressed a dress for her. 
On the way tp Harrell's house 
she and Harrell engaged in an 
argument which had started 
earlier in the day when he ac- 
cused her of going out with 
some of the male customers. 

According to Miss Watson, 
Harrell hit her several times 
during the drive home in the 
ribbs and stomach ^nd an argu- 
ment ensued. j 

Killed latixm 

The arguing continued after 
the pair got home and when 
Johnny McCoy of the 55th street 
address entered the front door 
Miss Watson told Harrell not to 
talk so loud as she did not want 
the visitor to know they were 
fighting. 

Harrell got out of bed. she 
said, went to the claset and re- 
turned with the gun. Once hack 
in bed he said." "I'm going to 
(Continued on Page 2) 


Fremont Students Irked crt 
Being Banned to Side Lines 


Students at Fremogt High 
School were singing the blues 
this week as they began to 
feel the full impact of the re- 
cent Athletic Policy Determin- 
ing Committee's ruling barring 
them and students of Washing- 
ton High School from inter-city 
meets until after the close of 
next year's football season. 

The up - coming basketball 
play-offs, in which neither 
school will be permitted to 
play, point up the hardships 
being felt by the athletes from 
what is admitted by practically 
everyoneJnvolved In the city's 


sports set-up as a really "atiff ' 
penalty. 

Tough VtaaRy 
The two schools will also be 
deprived of the possibility of 


participating in the scheduled' a couple of over-excited idayers 


track meet to be* staged here 
May 20. 

Students and some parents 
are grumbling over the deci- 
sion, which son^ of them feel 
is unfair and more drastic than 
penalties meted out to schtiols 
in other sections of the cHy. 

Not so, declares the Boards of 
Education Athletic Policy Com- 
mittee head William Lopez..Ua<. 

i 


,-*-«*4«e: 


admits It is a tough penalty," 
but insists "thereNvas no trther 
way out." He explains that 
what was Involved was not just 
an ordinary fight between 


he, had not anticipated the ac- 
tion but that he had been told 
about the planned, separation 
on Dec. 15. "It was unexpect- 
ed." he said. "I never dreamed 
this would happen." 

Founded in 1925 

Bow doin. together with Dr. E. 
I. Robinson, started the' widely 
known funeral parlor on Aug- 
ust 13, 1925. Shortly thereaf- 
ter they associated themselves 
with John LaMar Hill, Sr., who 
subsequently became a partner 
in the fast growing firm. Bow- 
doin was secretary-treasurer 
until a year and i half ago. 

Upon the death of the elder 
Hill, his holdings in the com- 
pany passed to his son. young, 
progressive and far-seeing J. 
LaMar Hill Jr. Subsequently, 
Dr. Robinson withdrew from 
the partnership and turned over 
his stock to Hill, giving Ijiim 
two-thirds control. ! 

^eminent 

Bowdoin is well known and 
highly respected in the com- 
munity. He has long served as 
the treasurer of the NAACP, to 
which post he was\re-elected 
la.st month, is a member of the 
Board of Directors of \ the ^Sth 
Street YMCA, and ^s chair-, 
man of the Board for four 
years. He is also active in Wes-. 
ley Methodist church, and has 
repeatedly devoted much of his 
efforts to'furthering the March 
of Dimes campaigns. 


A wejy«>s^nt)wn wai 
for murci^f^m the Sob 
Angeles beauto^.^^ v^S?^ 

Dr. Kindl*^VEdv««r*^pe 
of 399t^^SkArV!^.. was 
rest^^iate }^fw Year's Da 
charged with' an attempted 
abortion which caused tpe 
death of Mrs. Geraldine Gladlys 

Ray of 243 E. 45th St. He wks 
jailed by Homicide Lieuts. G. !h. 
Bates and ^anny Galindo. 

Actor <i|spected Father 

The 39 year-old doctor, w^o 
has offices at 11419 S. Avalbn 
Blvd.. works for the County I in 
the Bureau of Public Assist-, 
ance, Adams and Grand, alwg 
with Mrs. Ray and Milton Wo^d, 
the Suspected father of the vin- 
born child. 

Mrs. Ray. who was the girl 
friend of Wood, who doubles as 
a movie actor, of 3715 Montclair,' 
had field suit for divbrce frjm 
her husband, Wallace. 

According to Bates and Cia- 
Undo, Lottie Jordon of 1335 E. 
42nd, St., Wood and other wit- 
nesses, Mrs. Ray \.as taken to 
Dr. Spencer's office at 3 a m. 
Saturday where the doctor at- 
tempted to perform the abor- 
tion. Something went wr< ng 
and she became sick. i 

Dead On Arrival ; -^ 

When Mrs. Ray got progress- 
ively worse. Dr. Spencer ordered 
her to a hospital. Mrs. Jordan, 
his assistant, and Wood took 
her to University Hospital 
where she was pronotinced diead 
on arrKal. ' I 

Wood and Mrs. Jordaa W«re 
questioned at length by Gailn- 
dovand Bates, but were liter 
jtgleased. Wood admitted t|hat 
he is the father of the unborn 
child. He is married and pas 
three children. 

knew Nothing 

Dr. Spencer claims he ki'ew 
nothing of the pretty Mrs. R^y's 
pregnancy and that he did 
encourage the abortion 
tempt. Wood says he knew 
doctor from work and that 


Murder Gharded 
Followi^ 


of 

49th 


had been set as the fee. Wood 
also .said he paid none of the 
money, and that the attracfive 
mother-to-be paid if. 

Mrs. Ray was a member 
St, Paul Baptist Church 
and Main, of which Rev, Johh L. 
Branham is pastor. She was also 
a member of the Order of E |st 
em Star and of the Busiress 
a,nd Professional Women's Sor 
oVity, She had been employed 
for six years with theBurpait 
of Public Assistance, and 
a graduate of Poly High. 
College and UCLA as a soc|iol 
bgv major. 

She leaves her father, mAth 

er. Mr. and Mrs. Claude Nel M>n, 

and brother. ClaUde, Jr. Com lor 

Johnson Mortuary wall hai|dle 

(Continued on Page 2) 


not 
,at- 
the 
$75 


Filibuster Riile 


NEW Y)RK— Members ef. 
the United ;tates Senate have 
been urged 1 ) "join in the eff<Ht 
to adopt nev Senate rules when ' 
the 84th Co igress convenes on. 
January 5." 

The reque A was made 6n be* 
half of the ^'AA(|:P and 50 na- 
tional reli| ious, labor, civic; 
fraternal" arm veterans organi- 
zations affiaated with it in the 
Leadership Conference ^;^vil : 
Rights. i ~" '■ 1 . ..- 

Over theisignatures of HSoy 
Wilkins, nJaCP administrator 
and chairman of the^ executive 
committee Isf the"^nferetice; 
and , Arnold Aronsdn, confer- 
ence sekrrelary, letters were 
sent to me^ ibeES-oi the Senate^ 
calling att| nflon to "the ini^ 
portance « breaking the veto 
power of ti e filibuster" and to 
"the futilit r of attempting to 
change thef Senate rules at any 
an at the opennie 
because of Ose 
re rule requiring 
consent' to main 
in the rule. 

the letter - asserts, 

the majority of the Senate <rf 

each new 5 Congress hai the 

1 right to ado^ ~ 

ceedings unfettered 

of the Senate of 

ng Congress." 


vas 
<Mty 


of opposing teams. Far more 
serious, he continued, is the 
pattern of race conflict ^at 
seemed evident, an ugly mani- 
festation with which he, him- 
self, and his committee have 
had considerable experience 
dating back to the taughdays 
of 1925 when effigies were 
burned In battles between Fre- 
jKOan a a u ad an-Fage aj. 


Subpoenas Fly; 
Lawyers Spar 
In Branham Suit 

The battle of the subpoenas 
was in full .swing this week in 
th(P celebrated Branham $200,000 
damage suit. \ 

Hardly had thX murt com- 
pleted its order Vroclaiming 
that Rev. Branham rnJ»st appear 
in Atty. George Cannady's officej 
Jan. 11, when Mack Shephen 
who has filed the suit agamst 
St. Paul's pastor, was served 
with a summons to appear in 
the law offices ^of Rev. Bran- 
ham's attorney, Paul R. Hutch- 
inson, Jan. 10 for a deposition. 

Meanwhile, Atty. Cannady 
complied with the court ruling 
that he file an amended com- 
plaint on behalf of his client, 
containing minor technical 
changes. 

In view of the moves and 
counter-moves by opposing at- 
torneys, it is now considered 
that the case, charging the min- 
ister with seducing and abduct- 
ing Shepherd's daughter, Rosa- 
retha, may be many months in 
piepaiation. 


Fire Guts P. O 
Storage Building 

Traffic rolled to a stop ^:on- 
day evening during the eveiiing 
rush hoUr as flames fanned out 
from the Los Angeles Post Of- 
fice storage building locate I at 
934 Ni Alameda street 

The fire raced through the 
building, destroying between 
5.000 and 10,000 ' empty mail 
sacks arid causing serious dam- 
age to the interior of the two 
story, sheet-metal warehoujc. 

Fortunately, however, no one 
was in the building at th.' t me. 
nor was there any mail in *he 
burned bags. 

The fire " was apparently 
csiused by a faulty gas better. 
Also partially destroyed weie -30 
special t\T>e bicycles used 



g mail in commun ities 
Los Angele.s. and a 


r of nwiil sorting 
in the building. 


time other f 
ot ttie Gmi 

present eld 

unanimous j 

any chang^ 

However, \ 


constitutior 
rules of pr 
by the rul^ 
any prec 


for 


case& 


Geoilie Wins 
oundiii 
Posa|leno Suit 

The first! round in the now 
hotly contelted suit by Nathan* 
iel Gaorge,! former star athlete 
at Whitti4 College and one 
time NqVA 100 yard-daah 
chainpion, I against Pasadena. 
was won Ijf George last Friday 
morning, Irhen objections' ^to 
the complaint were overruira 
and the ciw was ordered to dar 
fend the a tion. [ "--I', 

Young E»vid.C. George waa 
killed last; March 14, vrhen an 
automobile in which he was 
riding an( which was being 
driven by i Brandon A. BowUtt, 
Jr., son of Dr. Brandon A. T. 
Bowlin, Si , collided vrtXh an 
automobile driven by iCageti* 
F. Peron. , t>asadena pidlcc io(- 
ficer. ^ ." 

In June, MtOTney CurtirTigr* 
lor filed a claim for $50,000900 
against th • City of Paaadeaa, 
but no actfcn was taken and in 
August hetfiled'a dantfge.saif 
in the salne amount, against 
the City. 'Bhrough its attorneys 
the city dlmurred to the com- 
plaint on ihe grounds that im- 
proper ser ice had been made 
on the clai n and charging that 
it should lave be«i filed wtfl» 
the City ( ontroUer, instead « 
the. City C erk. • r* 

Howevei Attorney Tayt 
pointed oi t that the City i- . 
written CO nmunication h«r 
knowledg* 3 tiie claim' aiK 
referred It to the aty Br 
Directors, inhere it was r 
fore them irtd then tur 
to the cit attorney. ■ 


Navy Wins Poubl 
Defies Sugar Bowl 


ibvwed 


Th« U. S. Navy 

of on New Teor'i DoT' 

field where they scored 

After harinq been 
liberal presi lor accept _ 
"For White OtOf" Nojtd 
out the ducats to soilois 

Then Naval guardi 
on the Middies' side el 
Annapolis' stand again^ 
• Nothing happened 
xim in ooe doTt Old b^th 



'f 


U ! 


m 


.J, 


thestu 
ond not ju: 
a 21-0 apse 
blasted by ' 
!^ng Sugar B' 
Aoodev 
without 
were pla' 
the fie" 
the f 
ond f 





'rl 


) . 




PAGE 


2-TfM Cdifernia laglf 


I 1 Thurs., Jan. 6/ 1935 



;KAACP LABOR COMMITTLt— I he Labor and Industry Cmmmitt.e of the \AACP 
Utld it!) 5th annual Xnv Year's Party Saturday at ihr (imcoa Hoiisr. Among those pment 
were il/r. and Mr.t. A. Palmer, .Mr. and Mrs. Jamrs .\tarks. .Mr, and Afrs. R. Hlnik, Mr. and' 

"Mrs. Jf'oodrotv Redo, B. Barber, .Mrs. L. Kennedy, Mrs. Lfnrnie (inter and .Moneto If est. 

; ■. .. «, 


New Chairman 

For Child Health 
Project in Watts 

According to Morris M. Ew- 
ins. president of tKe Watts 
Community Health Council, the 
community -wide child health 
program initiated in 1953 will 

continue Thifbugh 1955 under a 
new chairman, Mrs. Eva Brad- 
ford-Rock, director of the Comp- 
ton Avenue Child Care Center. 
The overall purpose of the 
program, which wa.^ tempor- 
arily suspended during the 
1954 sufimer vacation month.";, 
is to (S)mbat the .«hoci<ingly 
high Infant death rate existing 
in the tV'atts district. 

Community volunteers solici- 
ted by the committee will con- 
duct a door.-to-door survey of 
pre-designated neighborhoods 
in search of expectant mothers 
and young children not receiv- 
ing essential medical care. Pro- 
fessional guidance for the sur- 
vey will come from local pri- 
vate doctors and the Watts dis- 
trict of the Los Angeles City 
Health I>epartment. 


AUTOS IN NEW HIGH 

Automotive production for 
November and December hit 
new air-time highs for those 
two months, according to the 
January issue of the Pacific Fi- 
nance Corporation Automotive i 
Digest. , 


Freemont 
Irked by Ban 






a . 


- - • -1 

,1 1 

J .. 

' 


(Continued from Page 1) 
mont and Jefferson, and con- 
tinuing through the race out- 
breaks during the r u g g t d 
tlurties. 

I 20 Saeeods of Mar 
• Th« suspensions of Fremont 
and of Washington, located at 
lOSth and.Normandie. date back 
to last Nov. 19, when the_ foot- 
ball teams of fhe two schools 
met at Washington. /Twenty 
seconds before the end of play 
a couple of white, boys from 
Washington jumped some of 
the Fremont players. Students 
watching surged forward onto 
the field, but were successfully 
herded hack. 

The fracas didn't end there. 
however. It boiled up and over 
in thfr girls' washrooms when 
some of the Fremont youngsters 
attacked some of the girls from 
Washington, inflicting serious 
injuries. 

Lopez said he was one of 
those who investigated the in- 
cident and probed possible ways 
of dealing, with the situation 
before it is permitted to degen- 
erate into a first-class race 
brawl. 

"It's unfortunate to punish 
the innocent with the guilty," 
Lopez stated, but added that 
since the antagonism which ex- 
ists between the two schools 
can break out at any moment, 
the only way to deal with it is 
to , prohibit their respective 
te»ms from engaging in compe- 
tition together. 

The two schools are permitted 
to engage in games with other 
schools but not with each other. 
This automatically bars them 
from inter - city meets, and 
might well prevent some ath- 
letes from gaining much covet- 
ed college scholarships. 



CIO Pledges 
Its Support to 

Urban League 

The Greater Los Angeles CIO 
Council has: announced its 
whole-hearted sijpport of the 
annual membership drive of the 
Urban Leajrue, and the appoint- 
ment of Ed Shedlock, General 
Executive Board member of the 
Utility Workers Union, as- co- 
chairman of liie Urban League's 
Labor Division. 

Each affiliated CIO local is 
being asked to name a team 
captain in the month-long 
membership drive whirh began 
Januan,- 1. Goal of the drive is 
5.000 new members for the 
Urban League, a national .social 
welfare organization concerned 
With minority groups. 

"We of the CIO have for all 
of our existence fought discri- 
mination wherever it has oc- 
curred." Albert T. Lunceford, 
secretary-treasurer of the Coun- 
cil, said. "We believe that dis- 
crimination in jemployment be- 
cause of race, creed, color or 
national origin , is an evil which 
ran and mu.<;t- be eradicated. 
The Urban League is doing 
good work in the field of elimi- 
nating disrrim^ation. and we 
are happy to jqin in its efforts 
to obtain more members .so that 
the fight asainsjt discrimination 
can be carried: forward more 
effectively." 


Demo Club 
Will Install 
New Officers 

Goldie Kennedy, wofitien's 
leader of the Democratic Party, 
will speak to the Democratic 
Luncheon Club Thursday, Jan. 
«| at the Rosslyii Hpjel. 

Mrs. Kennedy is vice chair- 
man of the Democratic State 
Committee and crfkirman of the 
State Womens Divi^on. Her 
subject will be "The Adventur- 
ous Spirit in Politics." 

The program will also include 
the installation of the new club 
officers for 1955, The incoming 
chairman i.? Alden F. Houck. 
attorney and former director of 
enforcement for the Office of 
Price Stabilization. The three 
vice presidents are also promin- 
ent attorneys: William Dixon, 
John Sobieski, and Rudy Pacht., 
Dixon was the former head of 
the anti-trust division for the 
Federal government. 

Harold Starr is the new sec- 
retaW and J. Holmes Ford was 
again cho.sen as treasurer. 

Glenn M. Anderson, outgoing 
chairman, will present the In- 
coming officers. 



1' 



Old Grads Will 
Receive Honors 

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — 
Graduates pf ]9i04 — 50 years 
ago — will be honpred by Lin- 
coln University as a part of the 
Founders' Day obser\ance in 
the S9th year of the University 
on January 16. 

Following a practice inaugu- 
rated several years ago. gradu- 
ates of .50 years are presented 
citations by the Curators of this 
institution of higher learning 
in Missouri. To date 4,3 such 
citations have been granted. 


ASWAL PARTY — Others attending the annual party of the Labor and Industry Com- 
mittee of the y A.1CP. shonn above, are: (J. II til, ('. Jeffers. Willie Jackson. Luther .Merri- 
urather, Ifoodrofi' Redo. Sam Coniy. C Hayes. If illlam F. Anderson. L. B. Thompson, C. 
Louis, L. Max. II. L. Davis. Lily Montgomery , (iernld Harvey . James Marks and ^oe Adams, 


Locol NAACPj School Case Top Event of 


Meets Jan. 1 6 


The first regular monthly 
meeting for 1955 of the Los 
Angeles Branch NAACP Will be 


1954. Says Walter While 


PALOMAR 

Recent developments m sci- 
entific work at the Paloniar 
Observatory will be revealed in 
an illustrated lecture Friday. 
January 7 at 8 p.m. in the East 
Lps Angeles Junior College 
theater-auditoriurri. 


NEW YORK — Easily the most significant event on 
the civil rights front in 1954 was the United States Su- 
preme Court decision of May 17 banning segregation 
held Sunday, January 16, at ; jn public education, Walter White, executive secretary 
Phillips Temple. 971 E. 43rri of the NAACP. said in "his year-end report of the As- 
sociation's activities. f * 

The NAACP executive rated i The party cannot be rebuilt on 
the ruling as one of eight ! 'he shifting sands of .sacrifice 


Street at 3:30 p.m. .\11 memberis 
are urged to attend as the 
newly elected officers will be 
installed at this meeting. 

Thomas G. Neusom. president, 
announced this week that the 
t membership drive will begin 
I this year around February 1. 
! Anyone wishing to volunteer 
I his. or her. service in this drive 
; mav call the NAACP , Off ice, 
AD" 1-5189. 


Ptidieul* ia a kaen wtapon. Laugl^ 
> at yeur treublea and thay wiU a«en 
b* aahamad of thamaalvas. 


It is far better to have it and 
not need it than to need it and 
not have it. 



SICIWr BOY NOW 
GROWS HUSKY 

Whea yeuaftten art slcinay, aod colds hang oa, 
h'l oftea due ta a lack of enough natural .KkT> 
Vitamiof . That's the time to try Scott's Emuliion 
to help them build a husky body, sound bona*, 
strong taethl It's hke "health iaiuranra" 
in that it's full of natural .KkD Xitamia*, 
energy building oil, added minerals. 

SCOTT'S IMUISION 

NATURAL HIGH ENERGY IONIC 





Man Loses Vigor! 
Wife Asked tor Divorcel 

Ut Mr. Ranay Tall His Own Story: 
t "I had tuHararf with my prostata gland, K 
caucad ma narvaua, slaaplaat, lag pain, kldnay 
and bladder traubia, and ae bittar to go toward 
eppetita tax, complala loti of vigor, il was 
— _ .. . . nocossary my wifo ask for divorca. I had triad 
>r« f. Y, L»w all kinds of romodios without result until I was 
pmmendod to Or. f. Y. Low (Chinoso Harb Sp»- 
pi). In coupio months timo I am eomplotaly wall. 
^1 am wall and tho future is more brighter and 
' tr than over. If any one suffers at I did, 
|ush to Dr. Lew. I am sure you will raceive 
result." 

i) i. A. Ronay, Radlands, Calif. 

'HY BE SICK.J 

Ifarka* owd evr Ixihniv* We Bmik Ma*h*4 
Jir . . . Itmmntk TrawMe Imttmmtly 


ium Niiveus conditioiu 
succisaruuT tiiatib 



^•Arthritis 
Asthma 
gladder 
^onstipauaa 
tbetes 
nale 
buble 


D.iC 


look for 

Dragon on 

Door 

Open IS «.Bi. 

Ia C p.m. 

nati; ■ <>i>«a 

Saturday 1* ta 

S ■ rioxed 

Suada; 

Istablished Since 1920 
<•■>• laaellea >S Taari . 

850 S. MAIN ST. 


* Heart Diteasa 

* High Blood 
Pressure 

* Kidney 
, Trouble ' 

* Rheumatism 


epochal events in the more 
than 300 year history of the 
Negro in the New World. The 
decision, he said, "puts the law 
of the land unequivocally on 
the side of the guarantee.* of 
human rights which are writ- 
ten into every document which 
has made the United Stattsthe 
greatest democracy in hi.story. 
... It marked Americas turn- 
ing of the corner from partial 
liberty to full freedom for all 
its citizens." 

Unqualified ?iaii« 
The Supreme Co^rt. White de- 
clared, deserves "unqualified 
praise for its unanimous and 
unequivocal deci.sion on this 
basic moral Issue. So, too, do i 
we owe a debt of gratitude to 
President Eisenhower for his 
firm «tand against racial se- 
gregation in Washington and 
the Armed Services. 

However, the NAACP secre- 
tary pointed out. "that praise 
extends to very few in his par- 
ty. We hope that both he and 
the Republican party will rec- 
ognize the need for a federal 
fair employment practices law 
with enforcement powers, for 
the inclusion in all appropria- 
tion bills of amendments to pro- 
hibit expenditure of any tefi- 
fral funds for segregation or 
rii.scrimination." and for other 
civil rights legislation. 
D#moB Weeing South 
/Vlso. White said, "we call 
upon the national Democratic 
party to cease its present at- 
tempt to woo reactionary ele- 
ments in the South by soft- 
pedaling the civil rights issue. 

AIIYouMeMi 
fcr Child's Cough 

Wben colds, measles or. fla leaw 
your cbikl with a croupy cough get 
Creomulsion quick because chronic 
bronchitis may develop. Creomulsioa 
soothes raw throat and chest mem- 
branes, loosens and helps expel germy 
phlegm, mildly relaxes systemic ten* 
sion and aids nature fight tbe. cause 
of irritation. Get milder, tastier' 
Creomulsion for Children in the pink 
and blue package at your drutcouater. 

CREOMUCSION 

FOR CHILDREN 


Jealous Quarrel 
Ends in Killing 

(Continued from Page It 
kill you because I love you so 
much." 

"We started- to fight and-tus- 
sle over the gun."^ Miss Watson 
sa^. "The next thing I knew 
tne gun weat off and Henry 
rolled over on hisiside and then 
over on his back^ 

"I jumped out of bed and 
ran to the front 'door and told 
Johnny to call aii ambulance. 
Then I went hack into the bed-, 
room and looked; at the blood 
running from the hole in his 
left chest." 

- Through tears Miss Watson 
told how she held his head and 
then realizing Hatrell was dead, 
ran out . the back door and 
asked McCoy to bring her 
clothes. She dressed in the back 
yard. ' | 

McCoy stated hhat at the 
time of the shot he was in the 
bath room and thought it was 
a firecracker. Whjen Miss Wat- 


In 190S. at the age of 21, the 
Southside's Charles H. Bruens 
went to work for th^ Southern 
Pacific railroad as a third cook 
and soon became a waiter. 

This week — 46 years and at 
least 10 million meals later — ^ 
he announced his retirement 
following continuoMS service 
with the railroad. 

Bruens worked on most of 
the dining and Idunge cars on 
most of the Southern Pacific 
trains. Just prior to retirement 
he was running on the Coast 
Daylight, but his longest per- 
iods of service were On the Lark 
between Los Angeles and San 
Franci.sco and on various trains 
to New Orleans. | 

"Lots of adventure in a job 
like that." he remarked, "but 
I guess nothing too unusual 
ever happened to me. Just did 
my job. You know — a lot of 
good days, a few bad ones." 

Bruens has made his home 
for 30 vears at 1132 E. 56th St. 


HAPPY— Happy ti be back 
from a tour of duty uith the 
1st Marine Aircraft If'ing in, 
thf Far F.ast is .Marine Pfc. 
James If. Sii-indtll, 3J55 
Beverly Drive. Beve'ly Hills. 


Fire Dept. Chief 
'Punishes' Men 
On 'Spite' list 

(Continued from I 'age 1) 
"study" of integratioi in other 
departments. The sti dy, which 
was spurned by th< Commis- 
sion, proved (strangely enough) 
that, segregation was just about 
the best thing .that ever hap- 
pened to any depart nent any- 
where. 

Net So XIoT n 
Anyhow, Eagle s euths re- 
ported that if the ciief made 


the transfers out of 
little scheme won't 


much. Although sone of the 


firemen mu-sl travel 


tances to their work, ill of them 


made it plain that 


willing to practice the demo 


cracy they preach. 


spite, his 
imounf to 


long dis- 


they are 


Complete 


harmony reigns at the station 
and the men believe it will set- 
an example that 'dll prove 
that the integration] the chief 
feared will work 

In his report to thle Commis 
sion last Thursday. Cpief .\lder 
son added that" "I 
gradual integration 
cording to Webster^, <hat means 
step by step." Just he w gradual, 
gradual is. nobody cnows. But 
the NAACP this veek an 
nounced that it expects to see 
Integration arrived jjt a couple 
of days before the 
at least. It intimated 


millenium, 
that it will 


keep its eye glued o i the chief 
and will prod him 
and then, if necessa 


of basic moral principles. In ' son told him to ?all an ambu- 
the crucial election year of jance, hut not the police, he 


1956, we may be sure that Ne- 
gro voters in the pivotal states 
will be swayed by the records 
of the two parties on such vital 
issues as civil rights and job 
security." 

In addition to the A.«.socia- 
tion's successful cjJurt action in 
securing the anti-segregation 
ruling. White cited other high- 
lights in the KaaCP 1954 pro- 
gram. 

These Included the steady 
trend toward the final elimina- 
tion of segregation in the 
Armed Services Including 
schools on military posts; im- 
provement of conditions for mi- 
grant farm laborers in New 
York and Pennsylvania; Presi- 
dent Eisenhower's endorsement 


went next door and called, 
after looking at Harrells body. 

When the policip arrived Miss 
Watson was seated in the front 
room on a piano bench. She ad- 
mitted the shoo'ing and was 
arrested. 

The Coroner's inquest is set 

for Friday at 9 a.m. 

I 

of "the ideal of (^quality among 
all men. • at the As.soclation's 
Freedom Fulfillment Confer- 
ence in Washington; the dlmu- 
nition of segregation ^^^ dis- 
crimination in the District of 
Columbia; and t!he response to 
the NAACP's appeal for a mil- 
lion dollars anrtually to carry 
on the Fight for! Freedom. 


AOVItTISIMINT 


ADVEItlSIMINT 


Announce New Way to Relieve 

Pain sf Arthritis aid Rheumatism 

Without Pills! 


d— p— tp ii d a up fl«w of frMh, richbloodl iiito 
•aw awf f a ct — Ity lialpa drhw away pain- 
cmnmng eon g — d en and 

Wev Tark. N. T. (8p«cial>-> 
Scieaoa has sow dereleped an 
edoriaaa, graaaelan eraam that 
acta ia a aav way to brii« a new 
kind of relief from pains e€ arthri- 
tis, rbeaiaatisM, and maeeular 
aehea aad paina. This ncv ereaat 
reli«t«i tiMae paiaa 'wittoat tbe 
need of takiar piUa aad other ia- 
tanpal ttedieiBea that wmj oaly 
thaarrtMa. 
^•Btlr rnbhad iate paiafal 
this eraaat penetratea so 
deep aad eoaipletalf that it acta- 
ally TsaiahSi, Qaieklf a eoanf oci- 
ing f odiac «i nansth dorolepe 
aad the whole paiafal areatakea 
en a pieasine gleir. Thia is atrik- 
iWc eridMiee of tlM power of this 
cream to peaetrate qnieUjr and 
■tioHilate the cifcalaiioa of the' 
blood. Thia view inuotratea how 
it spe adi ap tbe flow of f reah, ri«h 
bleed iate the aeae areaa and ae- 
toaHy hatpe drive away the paia- 


•pikt 

qeal 


146 Britiah and Trtcneh Aoubm t 
are ao Mtiafied with this saw help 
for patiants infferiiif from ar- 
thritia and rheoautian ttet they 
have prepared written reports of 
Boeeess based on hundreda of 
f MS. Farther, ooe of the Icadiac 
arthritia and rheoaiatiam diai- 
eians ia the United States has 
ne>w eeBfinaed tbe findiina of 
tiwaedoeters. '> 

'Now for tbe fiiat tiaie this la- 
Biarkahle cream can be obtaiaed 
a ilhuat a preacriptioa at drac 
stofaa throuchovi • America— vn- 
der the name InfraSUB*. The 
prioe ot InfraRlTB is only 964 
for a large tube. InfraRUB is; 
backed by the amioing guarantee 
that saiferers from the paifu of 
arthritis, rheamatisnv lambage, 
neuritia, nenralgia or rnaede in* 
jariea or sprains! will get hoora 
and heers of eemfprting relief er 
lEheir awney will |m reftaided ia 
falL ' 


i . 


'\ ■ 


'I' I' "'I'GOLP'S RED 

CLEAR 

SAVE % 

NO MONEY- DOWN 


Rm^oMFfrw(? 


FlMr SimplM 
RtU Ei4t 

Aaaartaal Sizes 
m»d Colort 


Hare Is aaly a 
partial lisHn« ef 
m^y giant 
• valuaa. 


(Air 

lUn >•«, PtICI 

I 12x12' Jamet Lcei Horizon 

green $259.95 $U«.9S 

1 12x<?-6" Bigelow Chor»le 

brown 1 79.95 99.9S 

1 12x9'4' Mohswk Pelledium 

green 129.95 ♦».♦$ 

1 12x12'3" Alexander Smith, 

Pinehill blue frieze 159.95 W.** 

8 Rolls Alexander Srhlth ^ 

cotton broadloom ' 4.95 2.49 yd. 

3 Rolls Jamet Lees Predecetser, 

disc, pattern, rose only 12.95 S.9S yd. 

3 Rolls Alexander Smfth wool 

frieze, green only 9.95 6.95 yd. 


intend a 
and ac- 


SkKefauver 

Ti Speak at 
FIR Dinner 

S in. Estes Kefauvejr, Tennes- 
see Democrat and "» leading 
can lidate for thejpaijty's Presi- 
den ial nomination in 1956, will 
spe ik in Los Angel(?s Jan. 29 
at dinner marking the birth- • 
daj anniversary, of the late 
Pre ident Franklin Rioosevelt 

p oceeds from the dinner will 
go ;o the March of Dimes, the ' 
lat< President's favorite aHar- 
ityj The dinner wilj, be at V' 
p.nl in the Rodger Young Audi- 
tori jm restaurant, 936 W. Wash- 
ing on Blvd. 

1 ie dinner Is sponsored by 
the Democrats for Demoefacy, 
a tion-profit organization of 
Ne|r Deal and Fair Deal Demo- 
crat s headed by Albert T. Otis, 
Loi^ Angeles businessman. . 

S !n. Kefauver. one of the top ." 
cor enders for the 1952 nominr 
ati( n, already is receiving 
str* ng siipport for a second bid 
in 956. He is one of the leaders 
in he fight against the Dixon 
Ya: es contract and will be in- 
flu' ntial in the new Democra- 
tic Congress. j[| r I . 

I Ivited sponsors artd bemo- 
crj^ Ic leaders for the dinner in- 
clw Ie Mrs.. Elizabeth SbydCT, 
Cal ifornia State Democratic 
Co^ imittee chairman; Paul Ziff- 
rer . Democratic National Cbm- 
mi teeman for California^ John 
B. \ Elliott, vetera;n Dejriocrat, 
am Dr. Hugh Tiner, Pepperdina 
col ege head. 

^ Mil Rogers. Jr,.will be toast- 
m^ iter. Co-chalrthan will b« 
Jol n M. Ennis, Los Angeles at- 
tor; ley, and Tom Carrell, San 
Fej [lando auto dealer. 

DJ>ctor Charged 
lith Murder 

|( Continued from Page J> 

body and services will be 

iducted by Rev. E. Anderson 

1 Memorial Baptist. Church. 

McKinley, at the special 

iest of Mrs. Ray. 

will be no coroner's 

jest. Lts. Galindo and 

es reported that the District ■ 

jrney's office has already 

criminal charges against 

»ncer. 


\ 


doesn't do much good ta 
grisp an opportunity unless 
yol know w^t to do with it. 




24 9x12 Rugi 


.Reg. $24.95 $14.95 


10 Assorted sizes, used rugs as low as $7.95 


5 


wrought iron dinette s«la^4?.95 
Duncan Phyfe yeluxe ■ ,« 
inette set in reJ motlier of 
fceari, . 36"x48" v|th 12" ■ f 
extension leaf .1. .. .L... 119, 


-MU 

PtICI 

|29.tS 


'c. deluxe oversi 
jet with 36"x4e 
12" leaf. Consis 
Tiatched table artl 


si e dinette 
" size and 
t^of rhis- 
chalrs... 


FBP^Oa/*fs 



OPIN STOCK 
fhcit •! Drawer! 
:h«st en Chsst 
Dr»t*i>r ana MIrrai 
l>««bl« Dranar, 
Full ami Twin Siia' 

Raaular S24.95. 
Iwcki Caunty 4-|»i< 
Raawler $399.tS, 


(he 


American 4-Pc. ! 

formica top , 
Kling- 4-Pc. solid 
United 5-Pc. HcH^wood 
Drexel 5-Pc, whi 

turquoise finish 
Kent Koffee 5-Pc. 
5-Pc. Modern HeaJiboard 


P|k Oversize 

Pc' 


Chairs. 
Deluxe 
SETS, 36x 


1 ible and 6 
R« %. $19.95 valoe 
0< eraizo DINiTTE 
t with XT' leaf 


MAI l,l 


Ml 


1... 


rry set 

Headboa 
formica top 


Cordovan mahogfny set. 
Set. . . . 


50 

Stdy. Simmeik. Superior Skclritc 
... NOW PRICES 


Assert*^ twin and ful 
iMrttrasfcs— mlMnatcbcif 


• lat 
START AT Ol 


eeeeoeeeaaeaeaeeei 


95 79.95 


109.95 49.95 


569,95 
559,95 


ri»{iiSH siaaooM sums 

-t $»».♦$ $1».fS 

J 5».»5 

_ ae.es 

ai^t -"■" •* 

law .anly 

• talM niaiila «•!. 

■aw ealy ,l41M.fl 

-' sail 

PRICI 


2«.«S 

24.*5 
34.9S 

_.:._ 12.fl' 


.. i ■•a- 

\ Black lacquer ijrith white 

.$399.95 $279.95 

.$4^9.95 $349.95 

^et $299.95 $199.95 


r( 

VV th" 


.$479.9-5 $349.95 

.$479.95 $299.95 
:$ 99.95 $ 79.95 


sixc box sprinfs mnI 

sets. Such names M 

V«liMS«o$13«.f5 


39.?5 


• Open /Men., Tues., ftU, S«r. Wit Till 9 
, W9d. A Thurs, Till «~Closed Sunday $ 



1207 East Washington Blvd. at C mtral Aye* 


\-- ■ ,' 


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"^mgrn^m^mmmmmmm 


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leading* 
f's Pre5i- 
1956, will 

Jan. (29 
Ihe birth- 

sevelt.'* 

Inneri wjll 

limes, tlie 

lite ch^i- 

be ati7 

g Audi- 

, Wasix- 

I ^f 
Isored 1>y" 

^mocraqy. 

ation pt 

Dertrb- 

T. Ot}s, 

™an: * 

■ the tpp 

nomin- 

iving 

and bid 

lead^s 

lie DiX(t»n 

ni be in- 

bemociisi- 


Demp*- 

iher ih- 

Sxjyder, 

Imocra^c 

taul Zif«- 

|ial Corti- 

JoH|i 

loerat, 

aperdine 


toas|- 

Iwiii y« 

scles at 
ell, S^k 


lecli 

will be 

Anderson 

Church, 

special' 

boronerfs 
(o- and 
District 
already 
agaihst 

I ■ 

I ,. 

■> 
unlesi 

ith it. ! r 



Wife Greases 

Hubbyi Freed 

Estella Dimas. 27 year old 

housewife^ is free this week be- 
cause her attorney, Earl C. 

Broady, blocked the testimony 

of police officers who wanted to 
tell what she told them about 
throwing hot grease on her hus- 
band last Nov. 20. 

Her husband, it seems, was 
sleeping peacefully eno.ugh 
when he awoke at about .5 a.m. 
"feeling that I was on fire." He 
said that when he got up his 
wife was running out of the 
front door. . 

Police officers took the stand 
all prepared to testify that Mrs. 
Dimas told them that she had 
thrown the hot grease on hubby 
because she was peeved with 
him. However the. judge held 
with Broady that such testi- 
mony was inadmi-ssiblc .without 
prior . proof that the grease- 
throwing was something more 
than an accident and ordered 
her relea.sed. - 


Thurs., km* 6, 19^ The California Eagl< 

LA. Postal Clerks 
Seek Wage Raise 

Los Angeles' 3,000 p o s t a iTsalary Ini rease with a 


F-. 


clerks, finished with their big 

job of handling a record break- 
ing volume of close to 300,000, -|compensat| for the lost sjalar> 
000 Christmas greetings, gifts 
and letters for Angelenos last 
month, this week turned their 
attention to their next big pro- 
ject^ — a pay raise for them- 
selves. 

Launching of the pay rai^e 
drive was announced by John 


iW. MacKay. president of Local i dustry. Si rveys taken through- 


, NAy,NIB,1L HOLL.-l\D UOLID.4Y — Surprised In^t Sundny ^■i/k m. 

'": ^\-s drlifi\<)Uf dinner srricd by his sisters, Rthrtia Hainillon tiitd Mnrt/nret Dm is, 

Ufis "Haiiip' liollfind. Jorix-year resident of 147 Sorth H ,fsll<ikr Axencf and 

■ -I owr of fhe Tenip.le District's most popular parents . . ; father of fire sons. In o 

daiitrhtets, and the -dotine/ admirer of thirteen vrandehtldren and three t/rcnt- 

■f/rarrdchildren. Fotoxicued tilth their ffiniiiies Ji ere Richard and Dehires Dans, 

Ritfiis and Betfv Davis. Romeo and Fieta Davis. Joseph and I tola (Jrosbv. 

CienrQe. ajid Carrie HuHtind. hiioene and Reheeea Hamilton, Mrs. Jean Broun 

: snd fiimily , fva Sma//e\, Mnruitrel Davis and L. J. .4%'ery, (Uifjord Holland. 

• ■■' . Euffrne and Rebecca llttnnllon, Mrs. Jean Rroxvn and family, t.ra Smaltry, 

I • Margaret Dm is and L.\J. Avery. Cliff or4 Holliind, mcinher of the famous 

j|- Delta Rhxthm Bnys. currently appearing in Honolulu, ffatiaii, tabled season'/ 

I •[ ■ frtetinps to his father, Hamp, wishing him many happy returns of the day, 

■ I . ' • ' ' {Adams' Pic.) 


Union Actions 
Topic Of Debate 

"Are Labor Unions Abusing 
Their Power?" will be the topic 
for a debate presented by the 
Community Forum of Los An- 
geles at 8:1.T p.m. on Sunday, 
at 3206 San Marino Street. How- 
ard Jarvis of the Los Angeles 
County Republican Party will 
speak for the affirmative and 
Leonard Levy of the Amalga- 
mated Clothing Workers will 
argue fo^ the negative. , 

There is nothing new under 
the sun. Even our mistakes 
have been made before. 


64. AFL National Federation of 
Post Office Clerk.s, at the Local's 
office on 201 Augusta Street, 
jwhere the postal organization 
operatjes a 600 car parking lot 
for workers at the post office. 

Raise Vetoed 
Despite the admission by the 
Administratiornthat a salary in- 
crease was needed, a pay raise 
for postal and government 
workers was vetoed last August 
by President Eisenhower. 
Among the reasons given for 
the pocket veto was the Con- 
gress' refusal to boost postage 
rates and thus provide the 
funds needed for the pay in- 
crease. . . 

The AFL Government Em- 
ployees Council, composed of 
Federal ' En>ployee Organiza- 


$40e 
minimum together with a retro- 
active felture which Would, 


benefits dye to the President'js 
veto. 

Filit Since 1951 
MacKay j pointed out that the 
proposed (ay boost will be the 
first since 1951 for postal work- 
ers who ar ' now several pjiy in- 
creases bqiind workers ip in- 


out the 1 ation indicate] the 
Local 64 s Jokesman^said, that 
60 per cent of all postal wcrkers 
must. find i second job or their 
wives and mothers must leave 
the home to work in order to 
maintain ^ decent standard of 
living for ] ostal families. 

MacKay called the gok^ern- 
ment salar : policy "penny wise^ 
and pound foolish.'' He pointed' 
out that ' while billions are . 
spent on f( rei« i aid, the strict^ 
est economy- is practiced on pay 
for postal ind federal wq -kers. 
This poilcj has backfired with 
ajnet loss i a the taxpayer, Mac- 
claimld. He said the low 
has upped turnover 


Kky 

pay policj' 

and made 


it increasingly 


cult to recjuit high type 
ers for the 


diffi- 
U'orl^'. 
bostal career s«rvice. 
In additidi^ it has unfairly re- 
living standaids of 
many 


tions including the nation's 

\ postal clerks and letter carriers, duced the 

! have endorsed a pay increase \ postal workers and. m 
proposal by Senators Olin D. I instances., t ndangered the 
Johnson <S.P.l, and Mathew life of posti 1 familie.s. 

^'eely (W.Va.l which will be 

lsu|amitted to the incoming Con- 
gress. The Johnson-Neely pro 


There is 
world and 


posal calls for a 10 per., cent is to get 


happiness in 
the way to ^^ 
)U8y. 


fO 


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1.95 


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2*.9i' 
J4.«S 


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349.951 
199-95 


349,95 i 
299.95 
79.95 




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Ask Ike to 
Name Negro 
To Bank Post 

• NEW YORK— Pre.sident.Ei.sen ■ 
bower has' hefn asked* by the, 
Amerirah Savings and Loan 
League to norninate Dr. Booker 
T. McGraw of Washington, an 
ecojSomist and hnusinc official, 
to the Federal Home Loan-Bank 
■Rnard vacanry created tlimugh 
the resignation of William K. 
Drver.*. The appoinfmenf. sub- 
ject to Senate confirrniation. is 
for foUr years and carries a 
aalary of Sl^.OOO. 

Dr.- McGriaw is at present 
deputy assistant to the Admini- 
strator of the HdWsihg and 
Home Finance Agency, a post 
he has *reld sipce 1946. He has 
been identified . wi.th . govern- 
ment housing activity for 13 
.years, more recentlv on the ra- 
Vial relations, staff "of Dr. Frank 
Home and now'' /With Joseph 
Ray. 


A .«lelib»r»t» truth .niay carry more 
malice tt»»n »n innocent lie. 


CIP Denounces Defunct 
'News' for Slap at Labor 

The Greatpr Lbs Angele.s CIO Council Exerutivp 
Board this week made a financial rontribiifion to thi" 
welfare fund for Daily New.s employee.s, and railed by 
re.saJution on all It.s affiliated organizatinns to "con- 
tribute as generously as possible to the fund." it was 
announced by Albert T. (Blackie) Lunceford, secre- 
1;ary-trea^urer of the Council. 

the Coun- '■ 


At! the same time 
HI issued a strongly worded 
denunciation f>f the artiofi of 
Daily News publisher Clinton 
D. McKinnon for ceasing pub- 
lication off the Daily News "with 
le.ss than 12 hours notice, throw- 
ing some 330 members of the 
ClO's Los Angeles Newspaper 
Cuild out of work." 

Speaking for the Council, 
Lunceford branded any impli- 
cations that unioh demands 
cau.sed the paper's collapse as 
"outright lies." "Quite the c'on- 

i trary is true." he said. "AP'L i 
and CIO unions had contribut- ■ 
ed nearl\ half a million riol- 

, lars to the support of the Daily 
.News 5n direct and inclireft 

I fa.shion. In addition. Daily 


ii 



248,414.99 

IN EARNINQS 
PAID OUR 
SAVERS 
IN 1954 

EVHtY SIX MONTHS OUT 

savers receive a gener- 
ous return on their sav- 
ings. Worthwhile in- 
come earned safely— 
without worry or both- 
m. These extra dollars can be yours too with 
oujr next payment of promts on July 1st. ACT 
ncyw— open your account today for a full six 
montte* ean>ings at mid-year. 

' ! .^ t^SH YOUR ACCOUNT TODAY ' 

Irtiiiway Federal Savings I Loaa 
Association off Los Aageies 

eimillNT INTilUST RAn 3Vi% MR ANNUM 


4329 So. 
Broadway 



AD. 3-7246 

(OpMi Account fer 
bnly $1) 


tii r ei n h tfiurt. 9 a.m. te 4 p.m>; Pridciy, 11 •Jn. 
.t« 7 p.m. CloMd en Saturday. 

,}' •'. , ■ I 

, lyHMUl OF KDIRAL HOME LOAN lANK SYSTIM 

felCHARD R. WRIGHT, lli , t ..Manager 


News pmplnypps not onl.\ esvp 
McKinnon, almost a ypar's grace 
to meet obligations of hack pa\ 
due them, but also eased their 
demands in contract negotia- 
tions and compromised in fa- 
vor of the paper far beyond 
anything they might have been 
reasonably expected to do. 

"Nevertheless." Lunce- 
ford stated, "in the face of this 
i massivp. long-term support 
from labor, at the very moment 
McKinnon was negotiating in 
apparent good faith with the 
unions, he was. secrrtly consu- 
mating a deal with a compel- 
i ing newspaper interest. 
I "Hundreds of dpipnt honor- 
jablp working people are out of, 
i work and in critical eronomic 
lieoparrty because of this man's 
i callous actions, with over $1.- 
i nOO.non owed them in spveranre. 
[ vacation, and termination pay' 
; and scant hope of collecting «o 
; much as one eent," LuTieeford 
; said. 
i - 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

1050 E. 43rd PI. 
Los Angdcs 11, Calif. 
. ADoms 4-0161 


LOREN MILLER 
Editor arid' Publish.r 


<, 


Vol. LXXIV 
Thursday 


No. 42 
Jan. «, 1955 


IF. P. WALLER. JR... Adv. Mgr. 

GRACE E. SIMONS. Executive Editor 
EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

_ __ Circulation Mgf . 

! CALME RUSS Office Mgr 

1 BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

■ E. G. ALLEN .._1512 T6th St. 

I Santa Monica, Calif., Ph.: EX. 5-1591 


Autumn Subscriptions 

3 Months ^^ 
Only X 


PER COPY 


10? 



Adjudication Deere* Numb^ 123228 
Date of Adjudication July 1, 1923 

Published every Thursday by The 
California Eagle Publishing Co., 
1050 bast 43rd Place. Entered as 
Second ClaM Matter November 3. 
1937, at the Post offic at Los An 
geles, California, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BV 

ASSOCIATED PUBLISHERS, INC. 

6513 Hollywood Blvd. 

Russ Bldg.; San Francisco, Calif. 
i 31 West 46th Street, N. Y. If/, N. > 

I Men, At Last It's Here! 

Take RUMT0R5X and enjoy life 
RUMTORKX takes up where nature 
leaves off A PHYSICIANS FOR 
i .MUL.A. Money-back icuarantce if not 
I ronipletrly satisfied after three bot 
tle.s. Only $.5 00 for a fuliawo weeks 
suppl>. C. O. D. or send check or 
money order now. THt RUMTOREX 
roMPA.NY. 233 East 115th Street. 
New York 29. N. Y. 


-1 

..v.- 

,! i 

I 

I 

I 

i . 

I I 




' • -,1 


I - •> 


I ! I 


■*} 


home 


the 
nd H 


The Secret .; . that isn't Seer 


Again ... in 1954 . . . Budweiser outsold every other beer on 



I . i 


■ I. 


Earth..! mak^ this announcement in a spirit of deep gratitude 


I I- 


'^ I,'-'-' 

. 

•.■I- ' 
, -1 


1 .■ ■ 

■- -: y 


.,1- ".. 


to our friends everywherei 

I ' >- . I I -.1 I . ■ 

What is the secret oif Budweiser's continuing popularity? 


There's really-^ijo secret at all. Let me simply tell you 

■r .1 - V ■ ■' > ■■■ . 1 . /-^ ■■ ' 

that Anheuser-Busch is proud to 'be first in sales... on/y becatis 


we ire known to be 


ility. 


-• » 


■I ^ . 



In Budweiser we proudly offer you the finest beer that 


i"', 


superior Ingredients and a century of brewing leadership 


can produce. 


[ •; 


t. 


Someone aptly summed it all up this way: "Budweiser 
outsells every other beer on Earth . . . because it's Budweiser.'* 



•-?'■ 


.1 ■ I- 


/"■ 


'^;. 


: ,vt- 



lANHEUSER-BUSCH, INCI; 

ST. lOUIS • NEWAtK • lOS ANailiS 


brewers of 







a 



-I ■ 


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! 



MUTILATED PAGE 


\ 


' I 



4--The Colifornfa Eagle 


Thurs., Jan. 6, 1955 






California Sagle 


2. 
3. 

4. 
S. 

6. 


Loren Miller, Editor and Publisher 

Th* iagi* stancb for cempl«t(» intvgrotion of Negro«s Into •vary 
9hfu« of American lif* through tho domocrotic ffrocouo*. 

We fav4>r: / 

1. FIPC en local, stoto and national lovolt. 
Docont homing for all Amorieans. 
Roprosontotion In Govornmont. 
Ado^ucrtO old f ago pensions and social socurity. 
Colloctivo bargaining rights for all workmon. -^ 

Oovolopmont and oncourogomont of Nogro businoss. 

yye oppose; 

. 1. Jim Crow in all forms. ' . ' • 

■".i % Communists and all othor onomios of, domocracy. 

PubMsfcod Cvory Tlivrsdoy , t 
1050 lost 43rd Place, Lo&Angolos 11 AD. 4^161 





1- 


r ' Transfer ^of two Negro firemen 
. from Central Avenue stations to an- 
other station in Studio City marks 
the first break in the segregation 
y^^ pattern "that'has obtained in the fire 

department for more than a quarter 
of a century. 

Of cours^, one swallow doesn't 
make a spring arid two transfers are 
far from the ideal situation in which 

...all assignments are made on the 
basis of merit and without respect 
to race or cotor but we hope that the 
new move is a step in nhe direction 

:. of complete integration. 

: '' Chief John H. Alderson told the 
Board of Fire Commissioners last 
November that he was going to give 
the integration order "serious con- 
sideration." We expressed' doubts at 
that time that he would ever aban- 
don the segregation policy which he 

: defended so strenupusly and which 

; he repeatedly described as. one for 
the "best interests -of all the people." 
We must admit that we were a lit- 
tle bit. wrong, as evidenced by the 
trasfers last week, and we hgpe that 
we we're altogether wrong and that 


Forward Step 


the chief will prove it by dropping 
all color barriers. 

The people of this city — and that 
includes those who opposed integra- 
tion as well as those who cham- 
pioned it — owe a debt of gratitude to 
the NAACP for its deterniined bid 
to end segregation. The very fire- 
men who pi'Otested so vigorously 
will learn in time that neither race 
nor color is a proper standard of 
judgment for the abilities of firemen. 
They will come to understand that 
the prejudice that compelled dis- 
crimination against Negro firemen 
is a luxury that Americans cannot 
afford in our present-day world. 

Mayor Norris Poulson is also de- 
serving of a pat on the back for his 
unswerving opposition to the segre- 
gatory pi-actices of the Fire Depart- 
ment and for his determination to 
see that it was rooted out of Los 
Angeles. 

Our city can hold its head a little 
higher because it has had the cour-. 
age to abandon a practice that had 
nothing to recommend it and only 
brought us discredit and ridicule 
among thinking people. " ' I . 


Board of Educa Hon 


.W> 9^r9^ that change i.«; overdue 
in the membership of th'e Board of 
Education. Too many members of 
that body have their eyes too firmly 
glued to the past. A few more years 
of their administration and a once 
fine school systeni will deteriorate 
into a second-rate system. 

We are glad to learn that Mrs. 
Georgianna. Hardy has decided to 
:seek one of the four vacancies that 
jwiil be filled in the forthcoming elec- 
"tion. In fact, we doubt that her se- 
lection could be improved upon. 

Mrs. Hardy's long interest in civic 
^problems and the problems of edu- 
cation ai'e too well known to require 
commefit here. Her long concern 
"with civic problems has given her 


an excellent prasp of the issue.'s fhat 
will concern the Board for the<-next 
few years. ^^ 

And in addition to all that. Mrs. 
Hardy has the zeal and the ability 
to translate her beliefs into action. 
We're sure that eveiy problem that 
comes before the Board will be thor- 
oughly explored when she sits as a 
member. 

Mrs. Hardy has done so ' many 
things for so many people that we're 
certain that she will have little trou- 
ble rousing up a determined band of 
supporters. She'll need them because 
the special interests that control the 
present Board won't give up without 
a struggle. Mrs. Hardy will repre- 
sent the people and it's up to the 
people to elect her. 


-5' 


i ^ ■ , ' . • I ■ . ■ 

^hat Backward Look 


■J 
t 


f: 


Mississippi has joined South Car- 
olina and Georgia with a constitu- 
tional amendment that permits -the 
abandonment of public schools.! 

The -law will never be used^ Its 
proponents say, imless there is a se- 
rious attempt to banish segregation 
in the state's school system. We've 
got a hunch it will never be u.sed in 
the face of the fact that we're equal- 
ly 5ure that Mississippi is going to 
have to abandon segregation in its 
public schools. 

i It is significant that South Caro- 
lina's Jimmy Byrnes, who dreamed 
up the scheme of abandoning public 
schools in the event of Supreme 
Court condemnation of Jim Crow 
schools, has been very silent since 
the decision of last May. 

The public school system is deep- 
ly imbedded in the laws and customs 
of this country.i People take it for 
:ranted that the states are more or 

'ss required to furnish free public 
ication. They are certain, as who 


jsn't, that our modern' society re- 
quires free public education. 

The people who vote for abandon- 
ment of public schools do so in re- 
sponse to the hysteria induced by 
race baiters and without thinking 
the matter through. 

But what would the poor citizens 
of Mis.sissipi, or Georgia or South 
Carolina (^nd most of them are 
poor) really do if they woke up some 
morning and found their schools 
clo.sed? How would they educate 
their children? How would their 
children fare without education of 
the kind afforded by the public 
schools? 

Mississippians or South Carolin- 
ans, or Georgians may fancy that 
they love Jim Crow better than they 
do their children but we're con- 
vinced that if they're faced with the 
reality of abolition of public schools 
they will soon reverse themselves. 
And in that reversal some of the race 
baiters will find themselves* repudi- 
ated. 


A New Councilman 


^laid two years ago that the 
district needed a new coun- 
LWe still think so and we 
some candidate can un- 
t>s Navarro who is a mis- 
, office. 

lament, Mr. Navarro is 

the opposition of Lu- 

^«n* goodness knows 

^i aspirants. - Frank- 

|iv whether Mr. Lo- 

^^didate or not. In 

.t he would be 

clown' with other 

Ltalk the situa- 

;ct the appro- 

lefit if the 

it is divid- 

ttle pieces 

4efault. A 

^vs helps 

to get 


the votes of many unthinking voters 
simply because he's already in of- 
fice. 

We al.so think that the Tenth Dis- 
trict is the logical area to elect a 
Negro to the City Council and that 
a Negro should be eletced. Ours is 
one of the few large cities in the na- 
tion which does not have Negro rep- 
resentation in its governing body. A 
part of the fault lies in the fact that 
the City Council has been gerry- 
mandering districts for years just to 
keep Negroes out. 

The large increase in Negro pop- 
ulation in the Tenth offers it the op- 
portunity to break down the color 
barrier in the Council. It can't do 
that unless all anti-Navarro forces 
agree on one candidate and unless 
some of the prospective .candidates 
forego their personal ambitions. 


One Man^s Opinion 


Sy LEON STSWABO 


Here is a young man ^o 
prefered business to any job 
for [Which he qualified. William 
Rus.sell, of "Russell's Men and 
Women's Apparel', is the sub- 
ject of this story. Mr. Russell's 
apparel shop is at, 2220 West 
Jefferson Blvd. - 

Young Mr. Russell was born 
In Oklahoma City where he 
pla>od football and baseball 
while attend- 
i n g high 
school but al- 
so studi,ed 
theory, hjar- 
mony and fear 
training. 
Joins Amty 
^^^^^ William 

[ ^K^V^HH^ came to Los 
^ Angeles a t 

age 16 at 
Loon Steward which time it 
was 1941, Having learned weld- 
ing in high school he applied 
for opportunities to weld at 
various places but was turned 
down in each case becau^se- of 
his age. It was 1942 before he 
found a job with the Frank 
Rciber Co. sanding discs. Dur- 
ing this employment his mother 
and father came out west to 
Los Angeles and the young fel- 
low found a house and set them 
up in it., 

In 1944 the lad secured a job 
with the Los Angeles Medical 



Depl. but he was sent to 
St. Louis to join the Engineers. 
After a short experience he was 
discharged due to a bad leg, 
a relic from his football days. 
This was in October, 1944. 

Opons a Busiooss 
Mn March 1946 he married 
Mr.s. Luella Mitchell w)iom. he 
met while in the army. 

Upon his return to civilian 
life he secured a job at MGM 
studios in Culver City as a 
janitor. From there he went to 
the shipyards, but was dis- 
charged when the war was 
terminated. He then secured a 
job as a Board of Education 
gardener which he gave up in 
October to seek business as a 
career. 

Walking down West Jeffer- 
son one day the young man 
found a man about to go out of 
business. He contacted the 
lessor and took over the store. 
The 28year-old Mr. Russell 
went to the shops and bought 
$2,000 worth of women's and 
men's shirts, suits, dresses and 
what have you and tastily set 
about to display his wares in 
the shop and in the window.*;. 
When we passed there during 
the Christmas week Mr. Russ- 
ell's store was filled Aip with ' 
customers. Congratulations. Mr. 
Russell, here's wishing you. the 
best of success. 


CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION 
LISTS MAJOR EVENTS 

The American Civil Liberties Union this Week 
pointed to the United States Supreme Court decision 
ending segregation in public education as the major 
civil liberties gain in the past year. 

The Union released its 34th — ; 

annual report. "America's Keed: which affords at least some sup- 
port for freedom of inquiry and 
communication in public and 


A Jiew Birth of Freedom." 
which listed as other import- 
ant fivil liberties successe.s the pr'^ate schools and colleges 
Senate's Watkins' Committee ^"f' universities." 



(onflomnation of Senator .Mc- 
Carthy for abu.'^e of witnesses, 
and also the counterattack by 


Teen-Age Violence 

The report frankly acknowl- 
edged that the country's grfiw- 


Pducafional groups "against '"K '**"" about juvenile delin. 
the assorted orthodoxies which Qi'^nO' ""fl teen age gang vio- 


seek to dictate educational con 
tent and method and/ person 
nd." L..".t ••,... 

The.se three developniitot^lhc 


lenre and the methods pro- 
posed to dfal with them may. 
produce .serious civil liberties 
effects. 

"Our natural shock and out- 


I28page report noted. pr-iriTiiTH •'"KP ^' teenage gang vandal- 
more advances for civirilSer- '^m and murder too frequently 
ties in the la.st .six months than 'raps us into urging the police 
in any corresponding period for ^^^ 'he courts toward whole- 
several years. Nevertheless, the sale arre.sts and indiscriminate 
report emphasized that trouble toughness, or into sanctioning 
spots remained which made de- . <he censorship of books and 
fenders of civil liberties "ba- motion pictures and television 
sically anxious." These include programs. 

"organized discrimination." at- •'Those of us who believe In 

tacks on free 'speech and due civil liberties as well as civic, 

process of law arising from in- decency have our work cut out 

creasing concern with juvenile ^or "s. We shall need to take 

delinquency, and the govern- every opportunity to join in pre- 


mcnt's employee security pro 
gram. 
The Supreme Court's antise 


ventive and constructive mea- 
sures which will reduce juven- 
ile delinquency without dam- 


gregation decision will require «King due process and free- 

of ■'^P<'''<'"- B"' ^^*' shaU also on 


immense 


, amount 

thought and work, courage and ^^"-^' ^^^^'''I'l"! ^^.y,*] . '." .^^Pjl"/? 
forbearance. . . . the the spe- 


cific application of the Court's 
great pronouncement." the re- 
port said, adding, "there will he 
much nullification of various 


even our best fellow-citizen^, 
when their preoccupation (with 
the risk of juvenile crime makes 
them forg.et that life is always 
a choice of risks, that abandon- 


kinds for .some years, not only ri!"!.u"L'!!'r.„^'i?.''*!flJ'.I!.'l.^r. 
in .the Deep South by elsewhere. 

j Ctocit Relets* 

"But this historic decision \n 


speech inevitably produces far 
more harm than good." 
Conspicuous Dcfoots 

, , . .. , The past vear was marked 

already provmg to be far more . , „ „,,.^w„" „ # .. ,.„; , 

. , , . ... bv a number of conspicuous 

than a legal capstone; It is an j'f„,,^.. ,„, i>.j:..;j..„i i;w-..., 
, , , . , , ,^1 ,. defeats for individual liherlv 

incalculably valuable psycho- ■ ,.„ „,.„„■/ „,,;„„„i .,«,,,," 
, ■ , , . ..... *^ , in the name of national secur- 

logical release of additional en- 
ergy, channeled through all 
sorts of; official and unofficial 
experiments toward ending an- 
ti-Negro discrimination — in em- 
ployment and housing and oth- 
er areas, as wpll as education... 

"We know — and the world 
know? 


ity. the report asserts. "Robert 
Oppenheimer had»his clearance 
withdrawn by the Atomic En- 
ergy Commission, and .lohn 
Paton Davies was dismissed by 
the State Department — for al- 
leged deficiencies in 'character' 
and 'judgment' whose docu- 
that we can. by keeping mentation (so far as it has 


everla.stingly at it. put an end been puhliclv di.sclosed i leaves 

to organized discrimination be- manv of the" most experienced 

fore the end of the century." and ' intelligent and patriotic 

In hailing the Watkins' Com- men in the country profoundly 
mittee report which .served as skeptical as to whether justice 
the basis for the Senate's con- was done, 
demnation of Sen. McCarthy. "Republican campaigners rang 
the ACLU report stated that the the changes on a hodge-podge 
country will pay for a long of .security-risk statistics pub- 
time for the damage caused by lished by the Civil Service Com- 
Sen. McCarth.v. at home and mission. And liberal Democra- 
abroad. "which the Senate and tic Senators, to fend off the 
the White House, the party ma- charge of 'twenty years of trea- 
chinesiand the people as, a son.' took the lead in passing 
whole, too lortg allowed or even the Communist Control Acj. the 
encouraged. But it is signifi- latest legislative violation of 
cant that, wherever the issue the vital principle that nobody 
of Senator McCarthy was should be barred from legal acts 
squarely joined in the Congres- simply because he can be pun- 
sional elections just held, the ished if he commits illegal 
candidate opposed to him was acts." 
victorious. Fairness in legisla- 84th Congrass 
five inquiry lias taken on * A forecast that the 84th Cont 
new lease on. life." , gre.ss. which convenes on Janu- 
Counter-Attack ar>- 5, wili rut consider much 

The counter-attack against civil liberties legislation is 
assaults on education has be- made in the ACLU report, 
gun to be noticeably effective. "Whatever degree of coopera- 
the report said, even though tion in foreign policy may be 
"some institutions are still stu- achieved by the Republic exe- 
pid and cowardly enough to cutive and the Democratic leg- 
cancel their participation in de- islative leaders, they are al- 
bates on the diplomatic recog- most certain to be engaged in a 
nition of Communist China, and dog-fight over domestic mat- 
many teachers still keep quiet ters — looking toward the 1956 
about anything controversial elections, 
for fear of losing their jobs. But it Is probable that nel- 

"But It was the' foundations ther party will caluculate that 
which won In the fiasco of it can gain much credit for it- 
Cong. Reece's committee inVes- self, or heap much discredit on 
tigation of them. And you can its opponent, by proposing en- 
hardly pick lup a mass-circu- actment or repeal of laws par- 
lation magazine '{ these days ticuiariy affecting civil liberties, 
without finding ^-.an article This will ^e good for civil liber- 


Happy New Year to the many 
liitellijfent readers of Back 
Talk. 

I'd definitely intended to give 
out with sweet talk for the in- 
coming year, but the stench 
that's been coming across my 
desk (which I attributed to the 
stock yards— wrong again) from 
the Sheriffs department, calls 
for not only Back Talk, but an- 
swers from somebody. 

Eostside Dummies 
, Of course certain people with 
political aspirations may not 
think we of the eastside of 
town are very intelligent think- 
ers (election time's the excep- 
tion' but we are sensible 
enough to. recognize dirty hall 
playing when we see il.. 
Th* Executioner Strikes 

Gwen Dusuau. ox^eof the nic-- 
est people if.s heeprrTX~-^lx;4s - 
ure to meet, was dubbed ser- 
geant during the recent election 
in the Sheriff's department, for 
obvious reasons. This phony 
rating Dusuau has carried since 
last July. She has done a ser- 
geant's work with a deputy's 
pay. She was lauded on radio 
and TV as Sergeant Dusuau 
and was a.«sured that she 
would fie next in line for the 
real promotion, according to. 
confidential information. 

.Sergeant Dusuau worked 
hard and conscientiously in the 
Watts-Willowhrook area to hu- 
manely combat juvenile delin- 
quency. The job she courage- 
ously undertook, was a marvel- 
ous e.xample of justice in our 

ties in'that there will be fewer 
threats to freedom of speech 
and association incident to new 
bills aimed at plugging loop- 
holes in national security. But 
it will be bad for civil liberties 
in that, for example, there will 
be no federal civil rights legis- 
lation." 

The big difference between 
the last Congress and the in- 
coming Congress will be in the 
field *of investigations, the re- 
port states. The emphasis on 
probes into loyalty and secur- 
ity will decline, wiih the chief 
subjects of .inquiry to be "econ-' 
omic and other domestic poli- 
cies practiced by the Republi- 
can administration. 

"It is probably too much to 
expect that the House Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activ- 
ities will be eliminated, or that 
all Senate and House investi- 
gations in the loyalty and se- 
curity area will be unified; but 
it may be hoped that the Sen- 
ate Committee on Government 
Operations will stay out of that 
area." 

The report declared that 
whatever decision the Supreme 
Court' reaches in the Emspak 
case, which challenges the pow- 
er of congressional committee 
to ask questions concerning po- 
litical beliefs and associations, 
"it seems likely that Congress- 
men and Senators will them- 
selves define their scope more 
strictly." , , 


Everybody else's got 'em so 
I migtit as well, too. Cut this 
out and file it away in your 
Great Documents of History be- 
cau.se here are my "Ten Best 
for 19.54." 

1. Without a doubt, the best 
new-s story and the best news 
came on May 17. The Supreme 
Court's decision outlawing Jim 
Crow schools " out-rated any- 
thing- el.se race-wise la.st year 
and will take its place as one 
of the great moments of his- 
tory, j i|., [■ j. ■ ■ 

' Best Movie' 

2. For the best moyie of the 
year, from the brother's view- 
point, we'll pick "Carmen 
Jones." It really got rave no- 
tices and that Dottle Dandrldge 
— wow I 

3. Palmer's vote for the best 
dressed woman of the year 
goes to a gal you've never 
heard of so I really won't? even 
bother to mention her name. 
On second thought. I will. Cla- 
ra Marcey runs rings around 
all the-.movie stars, models and 
Socialites who regulai"ly make 
the lists. She^s ^a t.vpewriter 
pounder in Chi town. 

4. y\\ best moment viewing 
television came. I think, when 
Sophie. Tucker, a personality' 
and singf^r I have never parti- 
cularly liked, tugged at my 
heart strings on — was it Toast 
of the Town- I really don't re- 
member which show It was. 
Anxhow. she was great as she 

law enforcement department 
but when the heads started 
"rolling" come Jan. 1, Miss Du- 
suau was the first to getdthe 
axe after seven years of de- 
partmental .service. 

She was transferred out of 
Field Service where her iob 
was to work with and for the 
children of'our community, to 
the jail on Terminal Island. 
This "Siberia" is a good 60 
mfles of travel daily. This 
would have been in order, but 
for three very good reasons. 
First, there's a position open in 
the main office of the depart- 
ment, here in town, for which 
Miss Dusuau is well qualified. 
Secondly. Miss Dusuau, who 
has teacher's credentials, col- 
lege credits and intelligence in 
handling our teenagers, and 
seven years seniority with the 
Sheriff's fiepartment. should 
deserve more consideration 
than she is. apparently getting. 
Mayl)e seven years of service 
doesn't mean too mtjch on the 
.Sheriff's or Under-Sheriff's rate 
sheet: . i . 

Maybe I ■ should wbit until 
election time to Talk Back. 

When I think of how we 
called voters in every section 
of our city to explain in sim- 
ple language Proposition "C." 
I've got to give out with Back 
Talk when I find plays that, in 
my opinion, are not according 
to Hoyle. j 

This Dusuau transfer to "Si- 
beria" and "sergeant" masquer- 
ade is strictly for ]the birds. 
It's fowl. j j 

Orchids for Newleii DiTiiioa 

To Captain Messlow. Sgt. 
Shermen and Newton- officers 
the Back Talk orchids and 
thanks for their wonderful, co- 
operation and protection on bur 
"Abie" Robinson Night at the' 
Lincoln last Thursday. They 
really came through on short 
notice. Tjiapks again. 


pleade 1 with the world to "open 
your • heart and open your 
mind.' 

Abie's Night 
. -S. T he best gesture of the 
year came when the folks de- 
cided to give Abie a "night." 
I'll be it was the end. 

6. The best <iews reportinf 
came 1 rom a gal. That Kilgallen 
covere 1 Shepherd like she cov- - 
ers th' >se guests on What's My ' 
Line? I hear tell that Hem- 
ming^ ay has labelled her one 
of th( great ' reporters of all 
time. iVell, like I said . . . she's 
quite I gal. 

7. Tl le best in automotive de- 
sign came from Ford. That 
Thunc erblrd is positively won,- 
derful; But that price ... "% 

8. Tie best song to come out 
of Tir Pan Alley— Count Your 
Biessi] igs. ' '' " ;■ 

9. T le best best— M. Monifot. 

Best Teom 
10- T^e best team of the year 
was lotf the Giants nor the 
Ohio . State footballers. Two 
guyf; I nd two gals at 1050 East 
43rd 'lace. Los Angeles, con- 
stitute the best demonstration 
of tea n spirit I have ever seen. 
Graci(. Cal. Abie and Waller— 
a qua-tet of the finest. 

You d have to work with 
thesp Fourth Estaters to know 
what 'm talking about. Togeth* 
er the i sweat, toil and produce. 
And t leir product is really the 
year's proudest -"best." 

As coworker. I salute Gr»' 
cie. Cal, Abie, Wilier, Chazz, 
Bill a id all the rest. To Attor- ■ 
ney a id Mrs- Leten Miller, my 
sinc*r r thanks Wtf letting rae 
cMmb aboard. To everyone of 
yo'u a the Eagle's Nest and to 
everyi ne' of you readers, my 
New ' 'ear greetings. 

Kee J the ble bircj flying high 
in '55 



the 


01 

BtOK SHELF 

SKY tOCKETING INTO 

t:[e unknown, by 

Charles Coombs 

Pro fusely illustrated by many 
photographs, this exciting ac- 
count of rockets and jet planes 
and he future of man's ex- 
plora ion of outer space is an 
excel ent one for all the family, 
partii ularl5i younger readers. 

Th( amazing strides sin^ the 
war n our conquest of space, 
what! must be done, before we 
can )egin to ihink of inter* 
plam tary. travel or that trip to 
the nj oon that Is so often talked 
abouj , and what the future may 
hold ; for this fascinating new 
front er that is opening up be- 
fore our modern explorers, 
mak< up a book that will hoik 
your interest to the end. 

THE [ skARCHERS. by AlOB 
Li May 

T\«> men search for » white 
chilOT^ captured by the iOeroK 
Comi nche Indians in the Iron- 
tier ( ays of Texas. A<ter many 
hard hips and stirring advci^ ° 
tures they find her. now givwit . 
to «|)manhood->«nd tncounter 
fresll complications. 

A well-written yam that witt 
plea|e Western fans fay its «► 
citini plot andgenerar l««d«n 
by i|s fine chancterizatioBi. 


.■5? ■ 


■ 

■ 

V 

1 

i: 

• 1 

^ 

s.^ \ 




i - :' 


;^ 



\_-By :i 


News 


5^ 


£.^ (; L E R I. r R E S E .V TA- 
'TlJ'b — J\trs. Louisf Forte, 
-ff J mice, is representing the 
fJklifornia Eagle "^in her tity. 
Jler columri appears in each 
'issue of the paper. 


— sanTa- 

/MONICA 
' ■ NEWS 

By Ida B.Dooley 


Mrs. Louise Forte -^^ 

JollT TwtWe Club 

The Jolly Twelve Club closed 
the year with the election of 
officers for 1955. 

Mrs. Jessie Porter, founder of 
the club, was re-elected presi- 
dent. Others elected were: 

Mrs. Viola Roberts, vice presi- 
dent; Mrs. Clara McCleary, 
sec'y; Mrs. Beulah Robers, as- 
sistant sec'y; Mrs. .\nn Tart, 
treasurier; Mrs. Esther Thomp- 
son, sergeant-at-arnis; Mrs. Lil- 
lie West, reporter. 

The Jolly Twelve Club Y'as 
organized for the purpose of 
entertaining elderly mothers of 

the community. ' 

• « « 

HelidoT Visiter 

Miss Ida Chatman was home 
visiting her parents during the^j 
holiday. She is a former mem- 
ber of the Church of God in 
Christ in Santa Monica. She 
also served as pianist and di- 
rectress at the First Baptist 
Church of Venice and at several 
other churches. She is now 
teaching. 



:i-< 


MUTILATED 



Ut^C 



Thurs., Jan. 6, 195S Tha C|i lifernlq lagl«-S 

Rev. Chambers Will Mall 
Nephew In Paslellcite 


The Philomathean Charity 
Literary and ArtiClub, Inc., held" 
it.s annual Chri^ias party re- 


i 


|j 


li 


Junior Beyt 

The Junior Boys of First Bap- 
tist Church of Venice are ren- 
dering their first program of 
cently at the Postal Employees jhe year. Sunday, Jan. 9. 11 p.m. 
Hall. A lovely turkey and ham ' at the Christ Community Church 
dinner was served, gifts were i 8518 South San Pedro Street. 

' of which the Rev. J. D. Graham 


"open I 
your 


If the 

IS de- 
ight." 

orting 
kajlen 
cov- 
j'R My ' 
JHem- 
Ir one 
\f all 
she's 

\re de- 
That 
won- 

le out 
Your 

lonroc. 

|e year 

M the 
Two 
East 
con* 
Itration 
\i seen, 
laller— 

with 

know 

fogeth* 

rodup*. 

Illy the 

fcp Gra* 

I Chazz, 

Attor- 

ler, my! 

Ing met 


': i" 


exchanged, and secret pals re- 
vealed. Highlighting the affair 
was the installation of officers 
by Mrs. Allie S. Cook. 
, New -officers are: Mrs. Rose 
' Wesson, president; first vice- 
president. Mrs. Mildred Harris: 
secopd vice-president, Mrs. 
Bessie Osborne; recording sec- 
retary, Mrs. Grace McAlster; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
Virginia Terrell; financial secre- 
tsiry, Mrs. Isadore Williams; 
treasurer, Mrs. Vada Kin?, busi- 
ness manager, Lillie Hughley; 
Mrs. Erlen Inlowe. chaplain; 
and supervisor of jurlior girls, 
Mrs. Mattie Collins. , • 1 

^ I ' Gospel Choir 

The Gospel Choir of the Cal- 
vary Baptist Church entertained 

r. members and their guests with 
an elaborate ham dinner in the 

' church social hall last Thursday 
evening. The secretary, Mrs. Al- 
berta First, give words of wel- 
come. Mrs. Ada Hayes, presi- 
dent, also made interesting re- 
marks. She was followed by Mr. 
M. Latimer and others. 

- Tables wer* Beautifully dec- 
-orate<i and six lovely hostesses 
in evening attire attended. Mrs, 
Blanche Carter, .the wife of the 
pastor, greeted, the choir and 
guests on behalf of the pastor 

who could not be present. 

• • * 

Christmas in Arkansas 

I Mr. John Scott of Los Angeles, 
I together with Morris Palmore, 
I spent the Christmas holiday! in 
i Arkansas. Scott visited his 
p father while Morris was the 
' houseguest of his grandfather. 


is pastor. 

TraTCling Six 

The Traveling Six of Venice 
will be featured in a program 
at First Baptist Church of Ven- 
ice, 7th and Westminister Ave.. 
Sunday. Jan. 9 at 3 p.m. The 
"Soul Seeker" of Santa Monica 
will be their guest. The Travel- 
ing Six were organized a few 
months ago by Mrs. Vivian 

Batch, of 609 San Juan. 

* * • 

Mr. Sorter Dies 

Mr. Fred W. Sarter. of 516 
San Juan, died Monday. Dec. 
27. He is the nephew of Mrs. 
Mable Tant. His funeral was 
held Monday at 2 p.m. at the 
First Baptist Church of Venice. 


lone . o\ 


i -. 


Doctors' 
Pharmacy 

Prascriptions Exclusively. 

Call For and Oalivar. 

4012 S. Central Ava. 

AD. -1M36 


E. Lazarus Clubs 
Celebrate 300 Yrs 
Of Settlement 

The Emma Lazarus Jewish 
Women's Clubs of Los Angeles 
are celebrating 300 years of 
Jewish settlement in the United 
States by presenting a drama- 
tization at the Wil.shire Ebell 
theater. 4401 W. 8th Street. 
Saturdav. Jan. 8 at 8 p.m. 

"To ^vell Together" is an 
original script \%Titten by Wil- 
liam Wolff and includes drama, 
songs and dances. Proceeds of 
the program will go to the 
Mount Sinai Hospi^tal and 
Clinic. 

They traveled in Scott's new 

1954 streamlined Chevrolet. . 
• • • 

Mrs. Cbdtmaa Entertains 

Mrs. Laura Chatman enter- 
; tained her family wfth a lovely 
Christmas dinnef. Five genera- 
tions were present and enjoyed 
the lovely affair. 


On Sunday, Jan. 9 at; 3 p.m. 
installation service will be held 
for Rev. Marvin T: Robinson, 
newly elected pastor I of the 
Friendship Baptist Church. 

The Special service will be 
1 presented^in the rhain sanctuarj- 1 
' of the church, 80 ^^yest Dayton ' 
Street, Pasadena. Officiating as I 
master of ceremonies will be ^ 
Rev. Lloyd N. Calmore. who for I 
a number of years has 'worked I: 
with Rev. W. D. Carter, who I 
will officially retire as pastor ! 
after more than 28 years of I 
service. - . '} I 

Rev. Robinson, Uho dame to I 
Pasadfna as Asociate Pjastor of 
the Friendship Baptist [church | 
in November, Avill assume the! 
full pastorate on April 3. 

Rev. T. M. Chambers, pastor 
of the Zion Hill Baptist Church, 
uncle of the pastor elect, will 
deliver the Installation feermon. 
Others slated to appear are Van 
Williams. Lora Jones, Dr. A. R. 
Traylor, Rev. Rex. Jones,' Dr, p. 
Smith. Rev. , R, F. Hockenhull, 
Rev. S. M. Malone. Augusta 
Horn, Roy Turner, Dol|lv Mae 
Mills, and Rev. I. H. Hiiint. 

WTiile 'Residing In Rockford, 
Illinois, Rev. Robinson pastored 
the Providence Baptist Church 
for nine years, and served as 


State C( invention. A graduate 
of Bishoj College, last' year he 
attended the Baptist World 
Alliance and traveled through 
Europe ind the Holy Land. 

Rev. R jbinson is the father of 
three children. Eunice, Marvin 
T. Jr. an i Wilhelmina. His wife 
is the fo mer Erma Jean Robin- 
son of C akland. 


Bible Courses 
Designed for 
Tlie Alcoholic 

The V orld's first Bible cor- 
respondj nee course for alco- 
holics h IS been released in<X.bs 
Angeles Iby the Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist Church. * 

The cfursejis designed to re- 
habilitaie alcoholics through 
spiritual therapy and restore 
them t(M normal life, according 
to Dr. Dlnald W. Hewitt, authpr 
of the c urse. T^iis Seventh-d*y 
Adventi t physician has de- 
votf d 1 ! years to study and 
treatme it of alcoholics. Meth- 
ods he has developed in suc- 
cessful reatment of alcoholics 
have "be en incorporated In. the 


vice president' of the 1 Baptist i<^°IJ?^P«^:^t"^,^?"'-!«: 


McCOr SPRh^lDS CHEER— Shoun preparing baskets for 
delivery to si( k, shut-ins and needy are some of the memkert 
.of the committee of the McCoy Memorial Baptist church. 
From left, Velma T. Lassiter: Pastor E. A. Anderson: Rosa 


McCoy Baptist 
Brings Joy to 
Many Homes 

Striving this year to .bring 
glad tidings to a larger number 
of sicK. shut-ins and needy than 
has ever been possible before, 
the McCoy Memorial Baptist' 
church, 802 E. 46th Street, in • 
cooperation with the Missionary 
Department was able to say 
"Merry Christmas'' with 35 
food -laden baskets. 

Members of the committee, 
which dillipently collected thje 
food, packaged it and delivered 
it enjoyed the giving as much 
as those who received it appre- 
ciated the gifts. 

Committee members includ- 
•ed: Pauline Aaron. Beatrice Al- 
len, Luvcnia Carter. Ida Cham- 
bers. Adelle Crowell. Roberta 
Ford. William Giles. Mims 
Hackett, Maggie Hamilton. 
Mary Harrison. Carrie Jackson. 
Irene Jackson. Beatrice John- 
.son. Lessie B. Kemp. Fannie 
Lou Royal. Hattie Tevis. Ruth 
Washington. Nellie Webb. 
Velma Lassiter. P^stor.E. A. An- 
derson. Rose Fer'fell. Elouise-- 
Moore. Billie T. Ferrell. Salli^' 
Mitchell and Franklin Wil- 
liams. 


Ferrtll: Elouise Mttre, Stnitr Mission, first vice president; 
Suite T, Ftrrtll, coordinator and board . chairman; datlie 
Mitcktll. and franklin Williams. 

^r«tovta«rc« *y A«ami> 


Bisliop Kyle Elected Postor 
Of Newly Organized Church 


The first service of the newly 
organized "True Holiness 
Church of God in Christ" will 
be conducted at a temporary 
place of worship, 3115 5th 
Avenue, Sunday at 3 p.m. 

Bishop C. F. Kyle, who Is well 
known to Los , Angeles audi- 
ences, has b'een elected as pas- 
tor of the new church. 

The Bishop is a member of 
the Interdenominational Minis- 
ters Alliance of Los Angeles. At 
author, lecturer and Bible 
teacher, he has travelled ex- 
tensively throughout the U.S. 
and Canada. 

According to some religious 
learners. Bi.<hop Kyle has been 
hailed as a teaching evangelist, 
and referred to as "The Walk- 
ing Bible" becau.«e of his clear 
explanations of the Bibl 

Bishop Kyle will speak in th* 
subject. '"How are members of 
the Body of Chri.st healef to 
day?" this Sunday. 

A New Y*ears teaching i^vival 
will start Jan. 9 and wi|l con- 
tinue indefinitely unoer the [di- 
rection of the Bishop. I 

The denomination with which 
the new local church i^afilli- 
aled has as its presidmg lOf- 
ficer in the city. Bishop S. 'M. 
I Crouch.jMrs. L. O. Hale is State 
sii]j»rvisbr df Women's Work, 


and Bishop C. % Mison Of 
Memphis is the founder and 
Senior Bishop. 

The new congregation is wor- 
shipping temporarily and con- 
ducting all services at the St. 
Matthew Temple AjMC Church 
of which Dr. Jeaaei L. Glover 
is the pastor. 


I and toi 
rs, my| 

high 


TOI 
by 


many! 
ig ac-| 


Liberty Divine 
Temple 

5432 S«. Central Ave. 

Sunday School 9:40 t.m. 

Morning Service ...11:00a.m. 

Evening Service .,..7:30 p.m. 

Preaching : • 8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday: Rev. A. V. Byrd, 
(Evangelist-Prophet of Kansas 
City) 

Friday— l(*«ular Service 
(Rev. Hendricks, Minister 
Bishop H. L. Morgan, Founder 
Mrs. Bessie Robertson, Sec't. 


BOWEN MEMORIAL 
i METHODIST CHURCH 

kast 31th oad Trlaltr tt*. 
— ^elta £, Bala, Mlolatfi 

• iie.a.m.— Chureti takaaU 
114e a.m.— W^ihla. 
7iM p.m.— mea FItwi Haur. 



MESSAGE CIRCLE AND 

PROBLEM CLINIC 

Every Friday, » P.M. 

1120 East 54th Street 

Rev. S^ly launders, Pastpr 

Rev. Selita Johnson, Ms|^. 


Trianguiar Church of Truth 
|Observes^3rd Anniversary 

[. Sunday, Jan. ,9 mark^/he be- , o'clock 4iy a- thought provoking 
ginning of the 23/fl Annivcrsarx' -Truth For^Tn. • » i ' 

ob.servance..,of" 'the triangle Th^ third Sunday night the 
Church of Truth, located at 52rd^.Senio'r Choir, under the direc- 
and Wa<f.swi0rth and !<■<! foMnVition of ^rs. R. R. Greene vvill 
1 derpa.stor. Rev. Pearl C.,Ai^ood. 'present it's anniversary musi- 
, Mother Wood announces* that i cal prograrn. Many outstandip' 
Rev. Clarence H.,Cobbs, nation- ;>kLgers and groups will be pr*s 


I allv 


of the 



known^vtninister 
First Church ot Deliverance. 
Chicago, will preach at the 
opening services next Sunday 
morning. 

A musical program will be 
presented at three o'clock in 
the afternoon followed at si.x 


BilitiiiJiiiiKIUillliiiiiMilSiiil 


:iiUllllIlijilliUiliiiillliiiillliliiiil)tii£Xlii.Jil/J:£M 


ia 


plane 

"s e 
is an|- 
family,! 
|ders. I ■ 
ice th^_ 

spa'ce.l 

jre ^e| 

inter-l 

I trip'trtj 

talked* 
re ma}^ 
Jg news 

up be-' 

iorers, 

fl holil 

^ 

*. 

' Alan 

-white 
fierce; 
fron»l 
many 
j adven» 
grown 
ounter 

^at will 
; its ex- 
eaderai 
ions. 





Pi 





Mqmmoth Song 
FestatZion Hill 

opportunity Baptist Church, 
1112 E. 23rd Street, will present i 
Kebert Anderson the "golden j 
voice of the East" in a mam- 
moth gospel song fest, at the | 
Zion Hill Baptist Church, 51st 1 
and McKinley Avenue, Sunday, i 
Jan. 16, at 3 p.m. | 

Featured with Anderson will j 
be a 500 voice choir directed b\- ) 
Thurston Frazier, the Sally Mar- 
tin Singers, the Victory Airs. 
the Musettes, and other gospel 
singers. 

The program Is being pre- 
sented to. help Rev. E. D. Small- 
wood, the pastor of Opportunity, 
in a building drive. 


Independent! 

Rev. Dawkins, his choir and 
congregation will meet at 
A.M.E. Church at 8th and 
Towne, Sunday at 3:30, to Hold 
special services at the invi- 
tationof Rev. Alvia ^haw. Rev. 
Dawkins will deliver the mess- 
^ge. The pubic is invited to 
attend.. 


Dr. H<witt thinks a religious 
I approacl i to the alcoholic's^rob. 
lem is me of the mosteffec- 
tive'anil that most alcoholics 
are" ''immature spiritually." 
I 'Accef tance of God's healing 
i power i! the only sure way out 
for the alcoholic. Such people 
need an elementary knowledge 
of God n order to; understand 
how sp ritual forces .can -be 
utilized in breaking alcoholic 
addictioi," states Dr. Hewitt. 


P eople's Independenl Church. 

Itth & Palema Rl. 7-6365 Ki II Sibn. 10:30 A.M. 

REV. MAURICE A. DAWKINS! MINISTER 

JAN. 9th-1 1:00 A.M. "BEYOND THE MICROSCOPE" 
7:30 P.M. "POWER OF POSITIVf THINKING" 

A Community Church - Non-Racial 4 Non-DenominatieiiM 


The ba«t talk it siifnc* and the 
baat writing it e*n* with an trastr. 


1 BEST WISHES In '55 

K- ' From 

LAYMEN'S LE>s CUE 

■■■ -. ■ :.|i.-of ; , "*: 
EIGHTHandTCWNE 


92nd STREET 

(Cbriatl«a) 

CHURCH OF CHRIST 


UNDENOMINATIONAL COHORiaATIOM - All All WUCOMI 
1478 I. 92ncl St. jj Offlco 7-351I 


Sunday School 9:45 - Morning Worahip lliOO AJA. 

Chrittiai) Endaavef^O P.M. - Ivaninf Wenkip T.-IO^.M. 

Our Day^Numr^ Opmn Ooffy to tlio Fvfclfr^ 
' Hours: 6:30 A«M. to 6:30 FJM. . 

■ . ^ ■ ■ . ■ . " J--' ^ 

Cornelius W. Arnold, Ministof - 10. 7.St34 

Sunday. School 9:4S A.M. - Morninf Woraliip 11:M AJM. 
' ^ , Evenrone Walcome 


/ 


■a/: 


GONNER-JOHNSONf C 


1400 Iast seventeenth streh 


>itcisPEa 


"KEEPING THE FAITI^ 

"KMBPING TBE FAITB-'Tliert t$ a profestionat Code of Bthtes ivliieh natdti all our italingi wun 
pU. It it a point of lionor with as to put oar best tff oris ■ forward at all timet to lu* our best ikillt 
to respect any confidence. WB KEEP TUB tAlTH. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiBiiPii::; " !'E: ' :i?iiBiii!ij[!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiir;«i^ f i' ■:' •' i::;i: ; ii(i i x:i:' :;wrii';!iiii"H":' '::^i'!i:?' i-'i ■ ■ i':";n ■" i"' ;«(pii!Pilii«iMii»'!i 



V 


ANY FAMILY C.A.N AFKORD 


A new funeral service policy, recom- 
mended byr ANGELUS FUNERAL HOME, 
pays all expenses regardless of how little 
has keen paid in. Low payments are made 
to adrnitted life insurer. Phone or stop in 
for free infermatien, today. No obligation. 


At lime of need, it 

sarci 

the sake of economy, 

Funeral Pre-Arrangc! 

ever/ detail to be ar 

quickly, efficiently, 

for <om'plete informatic 


not necessary to 

Fice the beauty ofSa finer funeral for 

Angelus' sensible, 

irft .Plan .allows 

[nged In advance— 

iassntly. Come in 


V \ 




ANGELUS 



1030 EAST JEFFERSON BOULEVARD 
71 1 EAST ANAHEIM BOULEVARD 


|HONE ADe*& 5181 . 
PHONE: LONG BEACH 70044^ 


^■ 


■< 


HEAR^^JIAYMONP HEN DEJ^SONi PASTOR SECOND BAPTIST CHURCHi 24TH ST. AT 


1^^ 11 A,M. "PORTRAIT OF A MAN IIS! FLIGHT''— DR, HENDERSON 

ARE YOU A Nl^cbMER TO LOS AhiGELES? VISIT US BEFORE JOINING ANOTHER CHURCH . ^ 


1- 


GRIFFr 


FREE PARKING- 


■ 1 \ 


y 

S. 


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PAGE 


■J 


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■i" ■ 


'^The California Eagle Thurs., Jan. 6, 1955 



Waiting for school te^cori' 
vene, and. prep Basketball to 
continue leaves the old boy a 
little stuck lor prep news. I 
was thumbing through some 
of my, old programs from sports 
events in 1954. and came to the 
conclusion our race lads were 
tops in aljr-^ields thrpughout 
the State. Ma^be a run down 
on a few'^of their achievements 
will give you the same impres- 
sion. .1 .'•.[» !-j. - 

FOOTBALL:-! -t" "- l ' jl!-" 
ALL-MARINE LEAGITE 
E. Reed, Jordon 
G. Strauther,' Jordon 
Wright, Jordon . _ 
Perry, Jordon . 1 , 

. ALL-CITT 
DUrd,en. Manual Arts . 
Strauther, Jordoft. 
Bates, Manual Arts j 

Pfnn, Manual Arts i 

ALL-CLF. ' ' 

sampson. Centennial 
G. McNeal. Centennial . . 

".ALL-SOUTHERN LEAGUE 
•IJ. Penn. Manual Arts 
T. Bates. Manual .\rts . "" 

B.Durden. Manual Arts • 
B. Gridiorn, Manual Arts 
B, Webley, Fremont 

B. Bradley. rJefferson 
**Bates. pi"? yer of the year in 
the Southern I^eague 

^ ALL-BAr LEAGUE ^ 

C. Wade. Centennial ■ ; 
T. Poston. Santa Monica. ' 
(5. McNeal, Centennial 

•E. Houghley; Santa Monica 
B.Lowe. Centennial 
' Dick, Bass of Vallejo was just 
about toj^ in all depts. up 
north. He's, one of the mo.st 

.sought after prep footballers in 
the couritry. . , v * 

, ...The thrill*6f the year for me 
was the wax' ] coaches Aaron 
XJ^d'e. John Q. Adams, and Bob 
Reynolds of Cientennial led their 
fighting Apache team to the 
Bay League crown, and then 
to the Southern Section C. I. F. 
CHapipionship: Unless there is 
a, reversal of form from pre- 
vious years Coach Wade will 
serve as head coacK iI^ the 
Nort>i -South game.,^ 
TRACK:— ST ATEnCHAMPS 

' 100-220 yd. dash 

". Jackson, Alameda. ^.6—21.2 

' ' King, Delano 2nd to Jackson 


~Hom9of Wdfld's 

bIggest 
daily double 

. $12,724^ 

BEAUTIFUL 

CALIENTE 

In Old Mexico 

PRESENTS EVERY SUNDAY 
RAIt^OR SHINE 


in both, races by an eyelash 
(and I do mean lash) 

H. 'Hurdles : - 

Johnson. Kingsburg. 14.3 
STATE RELAY CHAMPS ' 

Alameda High — Jackson, 
Thompson, Davis, ajid Harper 
CITY CHAMPS 

H. Jump — Jackson, Venice,. 
6'3"- 

"^*CDad Jump— Stafford, Jeffer- 
son, 23'6" 

Shot Put — ^Everage, Jordon, 
60'10%" 

H. Hurdles— Hall, Manual 
14.7 ■ 

100 yd. dash— Jackson, Man- 
ual 10 
L. Hurdles— Hall. Manual, 19.6 ' 

440— Bowden, Poly, 49.4 

220-^ackson, .Manual, fil.« 
100-220' Class B 

Ken Dennis of Frernont. Broke 
recor<ls in both races 
BASEBALL: 

Elis Burton of Jordori — ALL 
CITY S.S. Also signed by the 
Holh-wood organization tL 

How about 'all our boys? 
Makes you feel kihda good 
huh? 

While on the subject of Base- 
ball we're glad to see LA. pick 
up Buster Clarkson for the '55 
season. Clarkson was one of the 
Texas Leagues top hitters and 
should help the locals. After 
watching Richards around the 
bag they could also use another 
fir."!! baseman. 

, We have a local lad right 
here in our own back yard who 
ijiighN help L.A. with their prob- 
lem. His name is. Charles Neal. 
a f iyst baseman. Take a, look 
at his record; Bats, left; Throws, 
Left; and age' 23. 

1952— Bisbee. Douglas. Ariz. 
Hit 319. Played on All Star team, i 

1953 ^- Wenatchee Washing- \ 
ton. Hit 332. Sold to Amarillo ' 
Texas. Hit 310^6. • ' 

1954 — Salenri, Oregon. Hit over . 

300: ^ , ; 

Neal can klso play outfield. 
We think he's worth a look at. 
and would make Clarkson a 
good room-mate. HOW about 
SWEENEY? A free agent too. 



FHRILI 


AND 


Thrifty Drugs 
To GiveAway^ 

New CheVrolelS Robinson Wins 

In Detroit Ring 


I ■ I 
■ J ■ • ♦ 

v.^ . !- I '^. 


SANTA ^NITA 

BULL .RAMPAN'C— Now ready 
for the best. -^■^ 

TEE MAN — Came from far 
back. Tab. ' 

EL COYOTE— Made up plen- 
ty of ground when third. 

POLO— Don't let this one get 
away. 

ERGO — Same goes for this 
one. 

KARIM— Fit as they come. 

GREAT CAPTAIN— Loves the 
grass oour»e. 

EL DRAG— One of thle best at 
'the track. 

MARDIGAN — Loye^ a dis- 
tance of ground.- Fit. 

THE PIE |KING — This one 
can ,'flv. 

ISABU— Mv very spelcial bet. 

ARCTIC WIND— Will be out 
loose. Tab. 


Gaorg* Vamscy 


CALlflJTE IN OLD MEXICO 

CorioN CROP— A nice maid- 
en twolvpar-old. . 

FLY fcuEST— Plenty of tearly 
speed. If it and ready: 

VAIll BOOTS — Just m:ssed, 

raced wide. 
LON( ;NECKER — I n j;mart. 

hands ! or a kUling. 

INT^jRITY — This onr has 
iplentvi9f clas.s. 

LILLj' BULLY — Get yours 
next 01 t. 

, GAM •:lyON — Mile or' over 
home 1 ee. I . 

YAN] ;EE DREAM — This is 
mv Ca iente special. 

FIRS' ' POST— Wokfe up and 
narrow v missed. 

ALIB ' MAN— Closed power- 
fullv li| last. 

This [column gave you- six. 
winner] last week. Watch it; 
for livl horses/\ 


SKATING AT THE^KATIUIV^ 


.BY JOHNNY PEAIING 


OrroShSTS of ikr Bruins this Sfttson utll find them- 
sflvfs urll gunrdfd by this /no of ctttie start. Morris Tmft. in 
ike foreground, fiho uns voted the oulstandint pl^yer in tkf 
rcfcnt Holiday Basketball Festival tt Madison Square Garden, 
is rated a sure bet to break Johnny .\toore's seorinf rttord 
before- he qrnduates next year. The Bruins foufkt their uty 


into third plarr in tkr festival, mnd probably t^ould hate done 
mueh better had they been u*ed /li sueh stiff rompelition «> 
only the far t.a>t enn. offer. From not;' tin. ih/y'll he out to 
tmrh the rest nf the PCC uhat they're Irnrncd nh',ut the 
fame from the h,oys in the land uhere nerybtidy flays it. 


' >* ; 


'^m 




aS'' 


:.*ii[i^ 




1^^^ 


Two brand new 1955 Cheyro- 
lets.ynow on display at Rodeo 
Road and La Brea in Los An- 
geles, will be given away dur- 
ing the^ coming weeks , to 
Thrifty Drug Store shoppers, it 
was Announced this week b>' 
officials* of the pioneer Cali- 
fornia drug chain. 

The Serier 210 four-door se- 
dans will be serviced and de- 
livered to lucky TJirifty win- 
ners by Fletcher Jones Chevro- 
[gt, Los Angeles. Entries from 
of Thji||^Drug Stores' more 

In raa^^Hkprnia 
eligiJ^^HHhe free 
il 


Debut Wed. Nif^t 

Sugar, Ray Robinson, appear- 
ing as sleek and swift a:s ever. 
ended a SO-monlh "retirement" 
last night and started his cal- 
culated . comeback to regain 
the world's middleweight cham- 
pionship. 

The former champion, inac- 
tive since June, 1952. met Joe 
Rindone of Boston in a non- 
televised lOrounder in Olympic 
Stadium. 

Robis.son. 34. hopes it was the 
eading to a June 
with .Middleweight 



orris 


IS K^aui 


JOHNNY MORRIS 



<^^^''' 

^ibj^mcteasr*' 
6CrWih»itnK 



'iai 


f^iwiT' ttn«!efw»y'i«|ir*ui5hoplf 


^tS^-^S 


m 


- Hofb 




V«tWnM:^Tfh^^^fkB, 

flint OBtU. 
,^k1i. ram -itfr^ iSfji 
were' there, Wf ,» 

tntu of fwco 

.-•r? tali* I 




ttrtur 

iti»t.tet JMT 

.VLitim. ■:-. 
"My p^^M^ 


5S-< 


(4) 



WiUCovor 

ThrLo<|.v|Bj 

li«IC«nK*d ebttftfe^^^i^ KMPC 
iiHO canjr 'lii^>ftdd|; frogreM 
irt«>(ifig •{ lt:30 it^jj^^hd con- 

TeltowtfarogrjB^Ben' will 
st^tt^irtlKdl^ Bt^lPf and on 
Sttinid«yrfi«iiijMN>l^[i|:30, 3:30 


|! -U« il. 'J?rT!!"""r'~:r'~""*~* 




fftllM 


^ ^*fc>;>SV'-^--"V- .:.'' 



The Troja.ni should consider 
themselves lucky. Th* Buck- 
eyes didn't beat them »ny worse 
than the oddsmakers said they 
would. So they li%«d ut> to ex- 
pectations. But probably .the 
luckiest team of all was Ohio 
State. The Bucks were 'lucky 
to get the chance. to beat SC. 
Fortunate that they could 
squeeze past Michigan. An^ 
there are still a lot of people 
o think that Michigan was 

e b^ team in the Big Ten. 

Of course nobod>' has to think 
bout which was the best team 
n the PCC. So that the Rose 
1 game was -something of 
an anticlimax, following on the 
heels of the two most important 
games of the year — one in 
which UCLA proved her superi- 
ority over SC. and one In which 
Ohio State and Michigan bat- 
tled away for sixty minutes and 
proved exactly nothing. You 
ran see. then, that in the eyes 
of many grid fans neither Rose 
Bowl participant was repre.vnt. 
ative of the best in its particu- 
lar conference; 

M«a*T H«««r 

The game, on the other hand, 
.was a huge success at the gate. 
But It was the spectacle of the 
Tournament of Roses i includ- 
ing the parade) which attract- 
ed the crowd, not the possible 
outcome nf the game, since this 
was never in doubt. 

If the powers-that-be in the 
two ronferences have>any fat 
on their skulls whatsoever, 
they'll get together nou-. while 
the scene Is clea*, and take the 
ridiculous rule off the hooks 
that prevented the two teams 
who are still arguing over 
which Is the top team in the 
nation, from settling the mat- 
ter once and for alL 
Star Goaw 

JE PREDIT: That tKe ix^xt 
Rose Bowl attraction (will be 


UCLA versus Michigan, with 
the Bruins riding the low end 
of the wagon iHope they don't 
hold this against me when I 
try to, transfer next semester i. 
. . . That C. R. Roberts will get 
all the bench-riding practice he 
deser\es for going to USC. . . . 
That Vfr Kelley won't send us 
Rose Bowl tickets in the end 
zone, as did the athletic direc- 
tor at Southern Cal. . . . That 
Jarkiellohinson will quit before 

he's Ihrown^uv-Qtbasehall 

That Tom Alston iStH- become 
the Cardinals' regular first 
sacker. . . . That the Giants 
won't do It again. . . . And thai 
The Man will have another 
batting title to take home next 
falL 


"TEWn COliS MW" 

Om truly tiae-tcstad way ta hdp bnfld up 

youapten— hdp 'cm fight of ceUs 'a coughs 

whcB they're lew ia naiwtl AU> Vitaatins— 

Scott's Emulsioa! It's a "(oM Biiae" of these 

Viul EIcaMBts, caeigy buildiag oil, tad added 

minerals that help build real resistance 

aad itamiaa. 148XXX).000 bottles U5rd! 

Get it toioj-<o bufld 'am up I 

scoirs iMuisitoii 

NATURAL HIGH ENERGY TONIC 


r-i I" 



Billy Peacock 
Unpopular Pick 
In Legion Fight 

Holl>-wood Legion Stadium 
ring fans are sure to give Keeny 
Teran a big ovation Saturday | 
night when he boxes Billy . 
( Sweatpea • Peacock, f o r m e r | 
North American bantamwelgKt , 
champ. I 

Ever>one is pulling for Teran 
to make a successuil comeback. 
Although Keeny will be the 
popular favorite, the stronger ■ 
Peacock figures to he the of- 1 
ficial choice in (he odds. I 

It will be Keeny's first show- 1 
ing at the filmland arena in { 
almost three years. The la.^t | 
time he appeared there, on 
March 7, 1952. he; derisioned 
Johnny Ortega in 10 rounds. 


NCAA Gridiron 
Rules CItanging 
By Next Season 

It won't be any tpIui^ to the 
Iwoplatoon game by fSr. hut il 
will make life' a littic easier for 
the roaches, especially those 
with thin-manned squads. 

The new football sub rule 
would allow any pla.vrr who 
start.* a quarter to reenter once 
during the same quarter. The 
present rule does not permit a 
player to ^return in the same 
quarter in which he is with- 
drawn, exrept for the final four 
minutes of thc^ second and 
fourth quarters. 

The "su<ker" shift recommen- 
datinn was directed at linemen. 
A note would be added to the 
present rule saying "onv a 
lineman has taken hjs place on 
the line of scrimmage and 
ateumed or simulated a three 
or fourspoint stance, thereafter 
there, ran be no movement be- 
fore the start of play." . 


The Xmas and New Yeai^ 1 to .see 
party held at the rink last week ab.ient 
was "a huge success. Prijzes were 
given and fun galor v^s had The 
by all who attended. FRANI&E 

FROM AFAR to bec4ne 

The Skatium was the host to future, 
the very beautiful SANDRA THA 
TURNER of New York City, ac- 
companied by the every lojvely 
CYNTHIA COOK . . J oooww, / 
some fellas have all !the fun. 
don't fhev DENNY TRENIER? 
CLOSE QUARTERS ■ 

H. CANTONWINES "Kitty" 
was played as .a "squeeze box" 
Xmas night. Better watch those 
other drivers Howard. 

HAPPYi BIRTHDAY 

There are I two b i r t h d a y 
parties celebrated here not long 
ago bv PAMELA WILSON and 
.STt:RLING DU BOW. Guest of 
PAM were: LYNNE CAROL, 
SHARON, and RENEE. . . . Dur 
Bow's .guests were of great 
numt>ers. but he wouldn't re- 
veal his age to me ... hum, I 
wonder why? 

Fortune teller pleas^ tell me 

SEEKER 

where CHU-CHU. JfiAN , B.. 

LOUISE W., SHIRLEY D.. and 

IX)RIS H. are ' keepiitg thciti- 


you after' such a long 
my dear. 

FUTURE STAR 

very cute little tike.i 
JONES is destine<^| 
a ••PRO" m the nearj 

Keep up the god work, 

"S 30 ^ . 


BOWLING 


— wifh — 


:a 


« -^> 


LEWIS RUSS 


.t 


selves???? 

Joe LaTella is having quite a 
time daily as he driveis to and 
from Bell flower . . . nice ride 
huh Joe?? G. and G. are to- 
gether again . . . congratula- 
tions my friends . . . now st^y 
that way. 

FORCED PLAt 

DONNA C. received as a 
"Xi^as present a trip to Motor 
City, and loved it so rriuch that 
she hasn't returned yet ^. . is 
it that good??? Miss J. tuggW 
on Mr. B. so much a few nights 
ago that Mrs. B. became very 
angry ... ah temper, temper. 
TIED IN A KNOiT 

VI(,TOR M. and MARLENE 
are so thick that /lothing can 
part them . . . ERMA J. R.and \'°^^ 
JOHN.NY G'.are the same way. 

BARBARA A. made a sur- 
prise visit to Los Angeles last 
.Monday and .joined het- friends 
for an evening of skating. Good 


tet 


o\% 


Influence is something one 
thinks he has until he tries to 
use it. 


The one who boasts 
do anything he tries 
tries anything. 


he can 
seldom 


Bailey Here Foff| 
NAACP Field Work 

Lester P. Baile.v, a regional 
field secretary for the NAACP. 
has been active in several com- 
munities throughout Southern 
California on assignment from 
the Regional Office for the past 
seven weeks. 

Bailey, working out of the 
Santa Monica Branch.- attend- 
ed the Executive Committee 
meeting of the NAACP South- 
ern Area Conference in San Di- 
ego on Sunday. In addition, 
he completed a siirvey of 
school discrimination in El 
Centro and aided in the insti- 
tution of an employment sur- 
vev in Pasadena. 


no games were sche^- 
the Sun.set* Bowling 
during the holidays, 
a little into the sport 
wling. The balls weigh 
plve""to sixteen pounds, 
s from 3.2 to 3.8, the 
ones "used for pratcice 
lieavier ones for tour- 
play; the pins "are set 
pon an alley from 1-10 
ngular shape, 
leys, according to r; 
re 42 board^ wide an 

long. • Players m 

traight ball.s, backup, 

curve, the latter two 

e most effective. 

le idea is to blast the 1 

ckets for a strike: numyr 

are also obtained cross- 

r to the Brooklyn, the 

ana slicing the timber 

welve strikes constitute 

t game, about as tare as 

itter. in baseball or a 

one in golf. 

is a sport like various 
ports. There are good 
d bad ones and temper- 
1 players. . A bowler 
blow his top anytime, 
bouncelhis ball, kick the" racks 
and c il it quits; but they 
aiway.<| come back for more. It's 
all in lie game. 

In ricklrig this stuff back, 
the w^d-tumbling. timber filt- 
ers wi I tee into action come 
Satiirdi y. 
Th« j .eague StttM^n?: 

^^ W L 

Lee's Hi Hats 34 14 

Grand, Central Bar-B-Q..31 17 
Neal's 1 liquors ......^: ....... 30 18 

Erown'l Motor Shop...„ 2.'5 23 

Ticklers }:... 25 23 

Inc :..:. 24 24 


a perfi 

a np 

holei 

This 

other 

day.s a 

ament 

might 


Bl 


Tim be 

Garret 

B. & 

Dedricl 

Lewis 

Pickup 


trothers 
>ers . . 


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 

Registration for new students 
who wish to enroll at Los Ar>- 
geles Junior College of Business, 
1601 South Olive Street, were 
<)pncluded recently with a capa- 
city group eixpected for the last 
six-week session of the fall 
semester. 1 


Everyone is capable of origi- 
nating the ideas he has the 
capacity to comprehend. 




n olid I CAFE 
49A.&(%ntiiiI 


BREAKFASTS! 

Includes Hot Hiscuits ...... 


(tlnU WHITi ILDG. NEXT TO 


IIRVICE STATION) 


DINNEBS 


up 


Includes 3 
Gardin Fresli , 

V*g«tablM 
Het Com Sticks 
D«SMrt and Drink 



OPEN SUNDAYS 
UandlCAFE 49Pl.ft(iMlral 


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S/LIKR H l.DDIXCt—Onr nf thr 'lutslandirig affmrsin Sanin Monhat unng the ^'uletitnt' 
rrfitnn t; n.r thr fith^irdAirt/r ntinivrrfnry of \1 r. and .Mrs. hrnrst A . Lati'i rncc. shotftt above 
uilh their lavish rnkf commemorating a guarter^entury of marriage. (A dots' Again,) . 

Ernest A, Lawrences 
Celebrate Anniversary ; 

Among the outstanding affairs in Santa Monica during: the Yule seaspil ^CT* 
the open house given by Mr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Lawrence celebrsiting their T^.en- 


,^l 


ty-fifth wedding anniversary. 

The house :was beautiuilly 
decorated with the dining- 
room table the (-enter of 
atiractibiT. The table was. 
covered with a lovely silver 
metallic cloth witli a center- 
piece of while chr\santiio- 
mums and silver leaves. Tlie-. 
three-tiered 03 ke ' was ' surl 
rounded by s i 1 v e r candle- 
labras holding -long while 
tapers whose light ga\e a soft, 
bright glow til, the entire 
table. 

I>«dicatieit 
. The dedicatory service con- 
sisted of the Lord's Prayer 


given by Mr. Issac Edwards 
of Los Angeles. A solo was 
rendered by Iris Ambrose, of 
Los Ar\geles, while Dr. W'et- 
•ford- Carter.* pastor, offered 
prayer. Later in the evening 
Mrs. Esther Coleman sang as- 
sisted by Mesdames Hazel 
T i p p i n s. Dorothy Edwards 
and Beatrice Lanch at the 
piano. Mrs. Ida Dooley acted 
as Mistress of Ceremonies. , 
Special guiests who attended 
were Mrs. Blanche N. Carter, 
wife of the pastor of Calvary. 
Baptist Church,' and Mrs. D. 


M. Mills, Spresident of the 
Woman's Auxiliary ol th* 
W.B.S; !,. 

21 b Cumts 
Among' tie gnests wh0-at> 
tcHded welf Ruth Campbell, 
Rosa Hawlins,. Letha Hunl, 
Mabel Jackson, Willie . Ken- 
nedy, Li.)a| Mitchell. Weltha 
Bolton. ElliMae Ware, Ozeiia 
Clements, |ew«ll Davit, 1jot» 
raine Bank|, Baretta Daniel^ 
Anna Jack|ni . Kiniiy Walla* 
Clara Willilms, sister of Mrs.. 
Lawrcn^,' feric Morrow and 
(Cq^tinaed on Page 9) 


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tlELPJSa ff'J'HIRS — H'l/idny ihiir.fnr people less fortunaie uaf elisf>nis%i %iitk m lavish^ 
fanri hy the II omen's Auxiliary of the M^diial, Dental and Pkar^iticfutieal , Association '«f^', 
\outhern (California. Preparino hnskets are, from left, Mrs. Geneva IValleu r, Mrs. Jmmet 
Xiuards, Mrs. Lots Carr and Mrs. Irene To wUsi (ddatiu' Pie^ 


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k'aiTC?d. Mrs. E V a n g e 1 i ; 

VVoodfolk announced xi 

(veek. "'"^ 

Many of the committel 

lave ' completed prelimlnaJ 

irrangements and are bu* 

perfecting details for the b| 
' week. 

Among the convmittees th^ 

ha,v« been working overtir 
■ a* the Citation Committe 
.chaired by- Mrs. Lucille Pullie 
.and 'the ScTiolaiafiip. CoinmFj 
.^e, .of^which '^ 


l« addn^^WTeNv feafu^ thi.< 
year, the Youth Forurrv. of 
r which James Wilson is chair- 
^~ man. Plan.<! are also being 
- completed for the annual era- 
, torical contest which this year 
A will be interracial.. 

Mr.i. Vassie D. \V r i g h t, 

• founder and president of Our 

' Authors Study Club, sponsors 

•\of Historj- Week, has asked 

...that suggestions of nominees 

X^' for either group be t^Mnd tn 

her. " 


4Li^ 


WJmi 

lOiis Mnran, Dave /start, 
\hofl: Ttnn (Blrnnrkard) 
Y~Elmrr MrGain. Hourll- 
Wtnry, Sra/y Inpmm and 
fPrirr) Kttilrrlitt. ■ 
(Adnms Photo.) 


I^. 




y 


8-Th« California 


thurs., Jan. 6, 1955 


Parties, bij and little ones, 
all with plenty of fun bid a 
gay farewell to 1954 and Wei' 
corned the new year in with a 
bans- 

Zenobia and Ted Foreman 
had a buffet cocktail party 
at their Victoria home with 
oodles of food, nog and other 
spirits to put their guests in a 
happv, dancing mood for the 
Alpha dance, which they all 
attended later on. 

Exchanged idle chatter with 
vDorothy and Edgar Carey. 
Lela Wrothwell. Virgil and 
Srothy Benton. Mr. and Mrs. 
H*nry Hunter. Mr. and Mrs. 
Morris Finn, John Rancher. 
Louise Singleton. Addie 
Brooks, Vema Decard and 
Mr. and Mrs. Justine H. 
Allen. Alphas held sway down 
at the Case Hotel and Jeep 
Smith's band and Lawrence 
Stone were terrific. 

Alpha WlTM 

First official duty of charm- 
ing -Alice Robinson, as prexy 
of the Alpha Wii-es, is to stage 
a gigantic night in Monte 
Carlo at. the Alpha House on 
Monday. This looks like a big 
year for the wives of Alpha 
men. Incidentally. Alpha man. 
Morris Hampton and his Rose- 
mary are expecting a tax de- 
duction in April. This will be 
the second for tliis very 
progressive couple. 

Spud and Evelyn Cummings 
were hosts at a bang-up New 
Years eve party. The party 
continued with candlelight 
coffee at^ Jimmy and Ann 
Wileys on New Years morn- 
ing and cocktails and dinner 
at Jim and Betty Sootts. 
which was truly a fitting, 
climax to the long holiday 
week. 

Ruth and R.iley Chaney. 
along with their sis. Edna 
Dawson, entertained o\ er 
a hundred guests in their 
S^ Kenwood home. Mattie 
Chaney, another sister, recent- 
ly /orsook Chicago for sunny 
California. .^ 

Bill and Pojly Greene opened 
the doors of their beautiful S. 
Standford h o"m e to compli- 
ment Mr. and MrsV E. J. 
Robeson, their son. Bobby, 
and Mrs.' Robeson's dad with 
a delicious luncheon. The 
Robesons spent Christmas 
^w>e4t. in Los Angeles and re- 


amed to San DieSo bn Tu«^ 
|ay. 

School Morma 

Rosie Williams and Carrie 

>'ade, both Atlanta school 

larms. having a wonderful 
lacation in the Ang« City, 
lertha Prescott complimented 

le two lovely ladies, with « 
Ipanish luncheon <>n Wednes- 

ly. Pearl Bratton Smith 
ihoned her family on New 
Bears telling them that At. 
V'as r^ cjirpet for her was 

eal plushy. 
Tea Cup Club had iu 

>cktail party at the Berkeley 
Siuare home of Dr. Ruth 
1 emple on New Year's night 
» r. Buddy Temple, brother of 
|u-. Temple, along with hit 

V ife and her mother are en- 
j tying a Southland vacation. 

^ Dr. and Mrs. Fitzroy Young 
c \ Berkeley are fhe house* 
^u e s t s of Dr. and Mn. 

randon Bowlin of Pasadeiia. 

h e Bowlins complimented 

jie Youngs, and a groupi of. 

frican students from USC 
iith a lavish supper party on 
> ew Year's eve. 

Anchorettes had a gay time 

b fing little girls at their party 

a Marianne Bowmans. They 

a sp exchanged happy boxes. 

"'^ yrtle Davenport looking 

V !ry cute at the party and 
t Uing the girls how much sh« 
li led San Jose. 

Fabulouai 

Lt. King's iMmpus room 

V as the scene for another 
f; bulous party o« New Yeara 
a which the Mr. and.M^ 
C ub acted" as host. • /» 

^ , Mrs. Marie Moore of the 
\ rgin Islands vacationing in 
"t e Southland. — ^ 

Dr. and Mrs. George Handis 
Ii ft f or J Bakersf ield on Sun- 
d ly taking with them me- 
n ories of the wonderful hos- 
F tality of Mr. and Mrs. Rv(fus 
F jrtwig. Chief Petty Officer 
a id Mrs. Will Powell of San, 
t lego.. whose houseguests they 
\' ere for a few days, the lovely 
F obesons of San-J^iego^ 
cSnner party by the E. J. 
clcWail^ party bJ|^,the Cleve- 

• l|nd Browns of S^n Diego, 
tie breakfast given for theiA- 
b- Mr. and Mrs. Flosco Lan- 
n ng. also ■ Elizabeth Smith 
a id Zephe'r -Ramsey and .th«' 
d nner party by Dr. and -Mrs. 
R ibin Bennett. 







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irytiHf, xoroHty jnurnalift. Sfatrd. from left: Juiiy 
,ro-rhfiirm»n^ Danellyn Mahry: trraldtne 11 oods. 


liiffet Party 
■etes Guests 
rf rom Texas 

jiThe beautiful West 2dth 
Place home of Mr. and Mrs. 
I-i 'J'rescott was the scene of 
a| buffet .egg-nog party Tues- ' 
dly evening - to Introduce a 
f«iw friends to Mr. and-Mnt 
C| C. Booker. Sr. and Mr. and 
^ rs. John Story, all of Saa 
A itonio. Texas. - . 

In the spotlight', midit coloiv 
fvl hoJiday decorations in tha 
P -escotj dining room, was th« 
bi autiful cut - glass ' egg.- nog' 
biwl, which came in for 
plsnty of attention. 

AfRong those present were: 
Mrs. Arie Walke.r, Mr. and 
M rs. George Williamson. Mr. 
and Mi^s. Gurnie L. Moore^ 
\i-s. Alfred Crockett, ' Mrs. . 
J< seph Estorage, Mr. and Mrs» 
R >y Norman, Mrs. Edith Lee. 
\1 r. John Brooks. Mr. and Mrs. 
S muel Vincent. Mrs. Kinni* 
F sher, Mr. C. H. Drish. Mrs. 
ioise Ambrose, Miss Novella 
|rry. .Mr. Walter Elgin, Mrs. 

Iimazirie Jy James. Mrs. Tom 
Fuller.^ Mrs. Goldie Boyd 

kd Mrs. Tly^a Carter. . 


OUR 
SCHOOLS 


"Keeping American Tradi- 
tijtn," was ^e topic chosen by 
M-s. Ralph- i6.^Lewis. Jr. past 
-Pi esident of thfc 10th Dist. ancj 
n<w State Parliamentarian,. 
. w len slie gave the Christmas 
^ mjssage at the Deceniber 
TnfeeUng of Ffeinont Council, 
m ?e^ng of Fremont CounciL 
Mi«. Geo. Thompson, presi- 
d(nt>f Fremont Council, pre- 
si led at the business mectinf^ 
aid T^ceK'ed reports from the 
C( mm'ujiW Chest chairman. 

Mts^. Teacher 


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IS, Ida Lee Harris. 

ierson, Mimi and 

fiders, Alice and 

Adelaide Dunn, 

llisby, P a u 1 y n 

Loinax, Leola 

iBriggs; Joan 

Ba Bell, Emize 

In' Pipkin, Pearl 

[Howard Allen, 

In, Mary Glenn, 

rr tind dynamic- 

ottering away, 

the dance in 

lexhausted but 

(srs and Mes- 

iBrowh; \N*al 


Bush, Timothy Brown,' Joseph 
Walker with Ruth Robinson 
on hii, arm, Cecil Doty and 
Wendell Stott, Hilbert Thoma* 
tnd Ann* f»tlmer and Tom 
Duckett, Jr. , i' 

The dance committe was 
chaired by Ruth Robinson and 
Judy McElroy. Committee 
: members were: Helen Lomax, 
Charlesetta Sterling, Thelma 
Mitchell, Alise Waters, Mattye 
Page, Charlene Smith. Pearl 
Monroe, Mary Alice Walton, 
Helen Pipkin and Danellyn 
Mabry. 






Given PoUd^>^ 
Scholarship k 

^\^ \\u, Joyce Mflnnis Lim 6t 

ijurel' MIsIl, is enrolled it 
th » yniversity ^rf Southern 

; California in coiirsM which 
will enable her tp beb(H^ a, 
pliysTcal therapy teacher) . 

'^ ijrs. Lim is^one of 26 Kegn 

. students awarded ;^olarships 

■ an i fellowships "by the N*. 

'' tic nai f'oundatlon' for 'infantile 

Pafralysisior^the 1954-55 school 

.y^r. ' ->.- 

. These scholarships, in fields 
of|studyvjelated to polio care, 
are granted each year from 
Mlrch of Dirn*sj[und«*to iHi- 
sii^the ava^labmty of akUled 
cai e When polio stri^" 


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■ (Continued from Paepl^- 

there was a sin rere and 

dierfu] audience thcTe ti 

k take place. 

• t— Xealts Opens 

.Lee Konitz and his m 
' sounds company opened t 

Tustrious «how after a bm 
;troduction by radio's Ba-ss 
. ris. And from ifhere on 

was smooth sailing- for a g« 

. number of actors who 

I formed as if there wa<? no 

morrow. Je^p Smith and rr 


^^flf^TW^fif^ftJwT^i^ri its sat. IfijfU thuttrv^ tM "Cl 

/ 


Qrrm 

■^ att ^Aflrerard imit fejituf#4 e| 
ltiseMsi>hM(«^pn 4 c<»i;>)e 61 iJ»- 

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tJi^lsgSiSac* .Stone tjeJted f 










|ir Later HorJon damcrs appear tnikesidi 

.It the extreme riff ht we find Latircnce 

tf" voice, flanked hy luscious dancer Pa 

initther sonqhird. See story on these pi 

\ri</ hailed as the greatest of iff kind stagey 


kurs.,Nlan. 6, 1955 . Th* 'California Eagle— 9 

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Diagnosed 

' ;A large- part of the trouble 1n(^ 
' niarriage, often . leading to di 
vorce.' ' grows out of pf>r^onaht> 
'diffirtiJties and the mo».t diffi i 
cut to deal with, among the 
cornnion faults, is the 
jective syndrome." according to 
Dr. Roswell H. lohnson director 
of counseling at the American ^ 
Institute of Faniily Belations i 
"this term describes a ^ ombi ,»' 

,■ nation of thxee traits. One is 
"subjective" or the tendency to 
take everything personaJly an 

.be. swayed by prejudices. Th 
• second is ''critical," a - naggin 
and fault -finding tendericy, an 
the third is lack of sympathy. 
.■J ,='. '-BMsy Mate" 

' 1 . "Wjien this combination 

■ «ss6«i ated . w i th hig 
aggressiveness.* Dr. Johns 
says, "one finds the bossy, hoj^^ 
tempered* unreasonable vnai 
With low aggressiveness t 

; picture is pne'of a jea^ou'^ ,sii 

• . picjoUs. nagging, resentful pa 
ner.who' though not aggressi 
is likely to be ,e'x;remel> stu 

ji.'borJi-l. ■' 

i ■ A81 of the«e trait.* can be 1 
proved by • couii.seling, «so 
tirrfce* in a surprisingly surce 
'iul way, but the subjective s; 
drome ii always a threat 

. ,. marriage .and . is equally da 
aging in other human f4 
tionships such as business 
todnsfry." • 

■■!■■. Airtlrbr of Test 
t>r. Johnson is author of 
Johnson. Temperament An 
sis, a test widely used in 
eges and also to evaluate 
pective employees in the 
ness world. At the Amer 
Institute of Family Relat 
■5287 Sunset Boulevard, of v. 
■pr. Paul Popenoe fs the ger 
director, he offers n semin 
the use af ihis test, beg 
Jan! .10. 

The Institute also 
seminar for the g'enerall p 
beginning Jan. 13. . in v 

■ toight experts from the staff; 
describe ways of improMnffi' 
personality. Such titles as 


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neSs and the inferioritv _ 

plax,- "Overcoming your ^^?Lf4t^f^'1»«^f«Cit Sfeow^^ m the 
and anxieties," and *'Mc^fco|^in<v8l"^l,|stetjf'ift^*(i-tfce rw- [ *i^««w^ - 
avoid matrim6nial monor|«e^4taiJ4^ fi^t -^ffea*-" ifk-i^'j^tfH « i. - The couple «rw9!* «w»r hro 
indicate the scope of the !feS^5>fg««Ka#.jHa50«rtt oJ^ste^^^oA hwwJretf ;!?»«^^«>d. TWei<i<«d 
Inert SYndrome ,/ " V'i^.p^Arfcrf^tg m tfte Vth£*i«> miny^^W 

Dr, Johnson has jnore tlte|*(i.^jj^ J>n :!«,*"{?*»*" ■Rtt*'^ and- Sf^"* f 
counselors workirtg undf ^fg9!^^^«^]|g_^^ tjjjf *»0«f h*wt 
at thej*ifititute. He lic'feiB^^^'ij^^l^^ll* &i9-^l«**ty ; 
another common" fliffi(u^,'.^p^^^i^^te^5fe4¥6f j(^*-e wittu 
■marriage as the 'ineri «^^^^§^^^BC'aWft»«f?«' l^^ 
drome." As measured (£ j^^.j^*lJ'#OBJ-sftt ^tocee an* 

Johnson Temperafnent At J^P^|3^"4^Jjfajwf J,fe«an W^f* Jt 

this represents a person W^^^i^ns^^i^t^V^^ o*- 3i|e*apS' ; 

low in activity, cordiality j^f:5^g^.^i5^!t^a'go^«*«sr,aod; 


Anniversary 



aggressiveness. "Such a 
a. dead weight who ha 
dragged around, flgu 
speaking, by her busba 
remarks. "If it is the 
who is so affected, he laj:^^ 
bitlon Snd energy. Fr 
we send such clients 
physicians for a physicj 
up. Tlie inert syndrome i 
common and. serious, br 
what -ihore easily han 
an expert counselor, th 

-'subjective syndrome." ^ .^ja^- 
During its quarter c^^^.^^ 
tiiry. Of activity, the Ip.s "' "" 
• f ports that it ha-s b 

I, Strengthen more, tha 
•maniages by individi 

fiteXing, in addition to i 
wide jBducational prog 






I'l- 


JiAr 



lived va Ssjla'SR^Ii^^ tJ» 

p*ls( ele\^$^ 3D^a^'4Bf,^ave 

^m*d^ m^atS' Jrtei^^ff«9y'«te. 

.ventionv- " ;- ~ ' 


tfi«*r -e^gbt 
at their 


- -^ i " 

«ig Iter «^hth^j^^init^p(«^ 
dent o« t^ Cg1rlygl!:-^K|^^ 
s^«nY Ssea#i^^^i^apiei^ 

so«:kliote-^l^^^^«Ui)[ 
c}flwne«air..4nff *„ic6i«B»*r^^ 
the &aT^Biwi^^^tiigt»». 

Mr, t>tim^$^4^i^«f <*r 

' — 'j'V";'"-- 

Th«-ca*ifi?r di^;^ fate ^iKnRi]^ 




LZZ CRAWFORD— Vop 

lOod and TV wheels are 

, the Eagles slender 

las the fii'st sepia pro- 

\ince his terrific job at 

(•oln the other eve'. 

ytK GRIFFIN— N o t e d 

is recovering from a 
toniach operation! 

MAROLOUGH— C h i c 

pwy wifie of the town's 

Im^le tashion expert. 

Id with a sirlart Eng- 

convertiblf bv her 

ICCLAIN— The attrac- 

Iry Club reSiident was 

r n n 


learn her only 
n Alaska was rushetH ?"PPOsei 
pital on Xmas day 

ter released to her 

A. home'. 

AYS— The New York 
was greeted at the 
t by Isamal Evans 
arlier releived of 
by two banditsi 

R— The Brownskin 
things to happen, 
[upset ■ the society 
e heart-throbs of 

er ex-hubby, by 
founds with him 

idays. Eyebrows 

window shades^ I 

HILL^Hustling 
andling all of 
publicity while 
der is on the 


"Say *n ere."" "irerriando Hide-- 
away," , nd "Steam Heafl ' '. 

LENA HORlf Er-is dup jf or a ' 
run at " he Chez Paree for thf ' 
first of |er night club series! 

LOUia JORDAN — CoQductOr 
of the^^bttest' little band in'the 
land, set a new box office rec- 
ord in dakland last week whenT-- 
12,500 fjins jammed the audi-' , 
toriurn!' 

' M A H A L I A JAGKSON— Tf^ 

ge! Jcii g o s pe l voice .-ciit her 
first rec] rds with Columbia last 
week wi h- pianist Mildred Fall! 
Gertrude Penlait^ rumOr has 
it, will lake over publicity idt 
the Oasis cobie Jan. JO*^ Jules ii^ * 
supposefely ^put, but hasn't 
heard tie finkle~yet. ' 

Nick Stewart announced from 
the stage of the Lincoln stage, 
.Abie's Sight,, that he will do- 
nate t.hl proceeds for one night 
of ^'E)p|ective Story " to Abie, 
The announcement brought^ A 
mist to many cold eyes and left 
a certs in grasping ' conniving 
bystan( er with his greedy e};es 
poppinj . 

Bettr Leu and Rebecca Singer . 

vilsiting from Niles. Michigafi, 


r-V -- 



EN— The beau- 
ice ivlKned with $5,000 
owns to launch her 
reer! 

HORN — Ex-disc- 
iwn in New Orleans 
visit from the stork. 

C G E E — The other 

of sportsman Elihu 

from San Frantnsco 

e spread cheer over 

ys: 

Y OWENS— Ex writer. 

instructor, ex-gas sta- 

ator, has dropped the 

dded H to his name 
edan interracial 

service at a West 39th 
dress! 

Y JOHNSON— P o r 1 1 y 

er at the plush Town 

ill be off to Las Vegas 

us news first hand 

e big '."iS hotel boom 

for the gambling town! 

BOWL BLUES— A much 

social lovely paid S35 

a glimpse of Bobby 

but declined the offer 

the powerful running 

|r fear that she couldn't 

her emotions. i 

lED LOOK— Those new 

pearing around .. the 

a well known docjor 

ver money matter.s. Girl 

s threating to tell all to 


CIRC0IT — After 18 

ith the Ink Spots high 
ill Kenny will start out 
ngle! ^ 

A KITT— The hottest 

show bjz. i^ authoring 

utobiography and the 

led ay publication has 

her a fat offer ior it. It 

be finished by spring! 

NEL HAMPTON — Mr. 

g Home." because one of 

rst Americans to win, an 

films by the French 

.\cademy for recordings 

while in Paris! 

U I S ARMSTRONG — His 

hits town for a 17 night 

et Strip Stand, starting 

eek! "j 

ECKSTINE— Who sub- 

r Sammy Davis at Italian 

e. is signed fOrFdates in 

ritish Isles this smraer! 

ROLL GARNER f- Pianist 

ordinary has cut 1 21 selec- 

on Mercury in the Latin 

IMMY DAVIS— George Ab- 
famed Broadway play- 
t, is interested in writing 
part in his new show 
"Damnyahkee;" a base- 
yarn for the fantastically 
t little showman! Richard 
and Jerry Ross will 
le the score. They wr 


were t le two beatrtifes wHS 
graced fehe dance floor of the 
Slgman 5 - Platter Party ^mm 
Year's night Those two dolls, 
would 1 lake most of L.A.'s so- f 
called p etties look like the last 
rose of Summer. Beauty and 
persona ity to boot 

Pretty Mrs. "Dor McGee flew 
to Miss ssippi for a little vaca- 
tion. Tit les have surely changed 
down s( nth of the Iron Curtain. 
Rememl er the time we could 
only wa k fast in that area, and " 
run aft( r dark. Cheers to brav'e. 
Mrs. M( Gee. 

Jeff C landler. SamonY Dories. 
Jr.i and the wonderful show 
people iho nwde Abie Robin - 
soa,'s n sht at the Lincoln a 
million iollar talent night, rat^ 
thanks. Bie.ss you f U. Sorry our 
boy co>u: cin't be there to see how 
everydm loves him. 

A Jiol > to the little BobedT 
who did a take off on our Abie 
last Thi rsday night. "DoH you 
strictly Ivalk alone in your lop- 
sided opinion, but thanks for 
the onaime act anyway. At 
least ycAi dance on beat> Apply 
that to |,'Our loose lips ^— and 
you'ie i; 

Cbcttxj "Sound Track" Craw-, 
ford did a great job of produc- 
ing the best of the best, for thfe 
best — lis friend' Abie. Take a 
l)ow Ch; zz. 


5^- 



Mitnesotans 
Entertain 

Hundreds of happy guests 
danceJ the evening away 
Thurs&y night as members of . 
the Mainesota Club served as 
"charmaig hosts" and hostesses.* 

The gala occasion was their 
fifth tnnual holiday semi- 
formalj dance at the Forum 
Starlitt Roof on West Pico. 
Boulev|rd. ~y 

Guea[.s were .seated around 
tables loverlooking the , dance 
floor J\atching the dancers 
glide -%) the smooth music of 
, Georgd Combo and his orch- 
estra, fifroductio'ns after mid- 
night if officers for '55' were: - 
Margaiet Wells, president; 
Oliver H. Muldrew^ Jr., vice- 
preside it; Mary Beaufore; re- 
co]^ding secretary'; Wilso» 
Johnso; 1, correspond ing-jsecre- 
taryr -and Ramon Session^ 
! treasur ?r. The club has a 
closed < nembership of twenty- 
five m< mbers. 

A ra ( n g the out-of-town 
guests '. spotted in the -crowd 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Qlin 
Wells, , Mr. and Mrs. Cecil 
Schoffisld, Mrs. Lottie Hyde 
and M-. and Mrs. R. Adams 
from Diluth, Minn. 


L.*r»« 


PV.NO QUARTET 

The E( s Angeles Piano Quar- 
tet will present a chamber 
music c< ncert Sunday, Jahuary 
16, at 4; p.m. in the East Los 
Angeleadjunior College theater- 
auditor! im. 


1. tm-m'^mii^ 


S..-.( 



iij 'y xi iTwfifii aaap 


NOT I, by 
. deserves. Poor, 

:■ - Stol^ thcwj 
-of a better one 
describe the 
Xonitz. Lee fel 
Kobinson benef 
.have his quart 
trio by a faulty, 
early so he co' 
but he had to 
inane cartoon 
ed over the sci 
the curtain wei 
fident (and rij 
er stepped int 
the kieig light 
ably the first t 


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I 


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BASS'vHOUSE <SUJ 




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J.{UM*IA 


Is I US M.ICKLiy 


lljijiitrt^ .ivtiiitc l.xtrndi d Da\^ St 
'Vim tor of Hif Kxirfitionnl C.hildr&n 
the. first piYs'iiinlity nf tlir \i<ir In br 
H'liifc of Aliisir oTrr Khl f/ii Srw 
O.o'iloik. The show Ufis hioh/'u/hte 
dnuqhlfr Rixie Cnirvford.^P^'n'Jrr^to 
iimde her dehii-t eis a siriole at the $ 
Mris's. ih^ise xiho slept throutfh t 
M ufie rnissfd n real Sen: Year's ir 


', head teaeher o/ the 

ool and the F.xfeutixe 

Opportunity School, was 

quest of the Bill Harris 

car's ntornint; from 8 to 

■4^ h\- a rerqrdinff" of her 

ry^^ain." iiho recently 

h'ltv Time Club in Boston, 

h'r.^iU Harris' Houst of 

nt.y 




iar <2r^ r^cD 


if car- 


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' V e>: 



Civic 

ipnts 
Mitor- 
[utual 


forn 

By JOHNNY MOhRIS 

WhenpCer a picture recei\«f>s an overabundance 6f advance 
rave notices. I, find ihat it must impteis me in spile of the bally-' 
hoo. It would have a much easier .tinie finding its way into my 
incon'spquentiai favor had the pre,ss acent.< not worked so hard 

happ!' that it hapt>ened to her. 
.\h(\ q hope wonderful things 


Occasionally a movie will 

throw all the sugared dirt into , ^ . happening to h*r. 

mv-^ eyes that the critics (paidf „ ^^.^^ familiar with James, 

and unpaidi can^scoop up. and ^^.^ modus operandi. I' 

still make nue like itt The lat- ' k . • 


/I 

110! 




iitrutJLlJir 


•-''^~"^'° 


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%'^!S^^SS^^:^:!^&gS^&:::^^S!S:Smi^SiS!f^S;^^^l^S.'6eii^::Ss!?m 


/ .: 


A 


/■ 


Dor^cGEnmd b 

Spend Every Day ' 
Where It's Bright Gr Gay ^ 

\ AT THE I 

TIP TOP 

# Good Food \^ 

# Fine Drinks 

# Open Every Day & Nite 

N.W. COR. 47th & CENTRAL 


lYBi 


\Sln\ 


Yoi 



m. 

%' 


' t 


Eddie Atkinson's 





^ 


' yourlamiiy's iiealth (ttitk ^^ 


CHOICI DINNERS FOR THI ENTIRE FAMILY 
. I COCKTAILS OF DISTINCTION 

I OOURMET RECOMMENDS FAMOUS 

RUBAIYAT ROOM 

of 

HOTEL WATKINS 

3022 W. Adams Blvd. 
RE. 2-8111 Ay 

iam "lill" Watkins - Host Jf C 



WINiam 


Coast 


^ 36th PL & Western 
^ fe fe 1^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 


36th PL & Western 




Pat Patterson's 


II c as MO 


— — F»0tur/ng— 

GERALD "SI" WIGGINS 

"CHICO" HAMILTON en Drums 

GEORGE RLEDSOE en Bats 

Special Sunday Afterneen Matinee 

with EDDIE SEAL COMBO .' 

Oaficieus iMccrfs by Maurlem 


r^ PAT PAnrasoN's " l 

COSMO , 

1952 W. ADAMS . |' 

k^ 

RE. 2-5244 ^^ 


nise 

com- 

fctacle 

! famed 

M the 

^^^^ Jaiiu- 

Hke'^S^^^^eill per. 
fo?B^9||7 a rep?fl^^^Vant;in$; 
fror^B«ar''s "Don^TOvanni". 
(the 60-minule version, with 
dialog in English and arias in 
Italian^ to "The Blue Danube" 
by Strauss, with other favorites 
on the program InHwding "The 
Dying Swan." "The Nutcracker 
Suite" and "Fledermaus." 

There wlJl be one evening 
performance only, on Monday. 
Januan,' 10. with matinees on 
all three days. 

These amazing marionettes, 
long celebrated in Europe, have 
been one of the outstanding-at- 
rtactions in the Musical Festi- 
vals of Salzburg, Austria, since 
1937. They were designed by 
sculptor Ariton A'icher, and 
show a grace and flexibility in 
motion unknown in other pup- 
pets. They sing, dance, panto- 
mime' beautifully, with a r*<al- 
ism that soon loses the observer 
in a tniniature world of charm 
and elegance. Many of them 
are over three feet tall, and 
there are puppets representing 
almost every animal in the 
kingdom, besides the human 
figures. 

Last year, when they pre: 
sented "Snow White and the 
Seven Dwarfs" and "The Wiz- 
ard of Oz" in Pasadena, they 
played to sellout houses on 
every occasion, and still left 
'many disappointed hundreds 
behind when tbey moved on. 

This is their third world 
tour, and they will play in most, 
of ' the major American cities 
before returning to Europer 

Tickets are now on sale at 
the Playhouse box office' for 
their three-day appear nee. ' 


est 'to do this was "A STAR IS 
5QRN." Not the story, as such, 
nor the music, for both were 
quite lll-wr4tten, with the ex- 
<-eEtix)n of "THE MAN -THAT 
GOT AWAY." This flicker was 
a personal trjumph for two peo- 
ple; who botH\needed and de- 
served the chartipesto showcase 
their enormous taleiUs. 

Jiidy Garland did as superb 
job of making people i'emem- 
ber her as something other than 
Andy Hardy's girl friend. .'>he 
did a good job. a convincing 
job. atid there's nothing else to 
say about her except that I'm 


tContinuedj on Page 11) 


LeCARIB 

/'Pearl of tkrfiaribAn": 
Cocktails in Haitiajt" — <.Frehcf Atrnosphere 


Horace C!l«rl(, Sr. and Jr., Prepr.- 

HOTEL CLARK | 

Corner of ■^yashingtoll Blvd. & Central Ave,^ 
Phone PRospcct 5357. Free Paricing in Rear 


Blue Room-r-Cocktails and Grill 

. , "Whert pld friends meet" 

Magnoiia Room 

' "For dining' in a quiet atmosphere" ■ ' 



-! r. 


\ 


Ui. .1... 


j 


•ftv 


s 1 

CAc 

o ■ 

>ll 

W 1 

Jw 

LINCOLN 

Ml ReWiMOii 

Central « 23fd 

Central ft 43rd 

AD. 5251 

AD. 1-9341 

.Start* Saturday. 

itmrit Svnrfay 

"SHANGHAI 

"JECKYLl 

STORY" 

ft HYDE" 

"THE 

WOMAN'S 

SHE-WOLF" 

FACE" 


New Club Oasis 
Pleases Public i 
With Mambo-ing 

Beginning with the New Year, 
everything is new at the Club 
Oasis, Western at 38(h PI., . 
famed We.st Coast entertain- 
ment bistro. The Everything 
includes the fabulous "new 
decorations, plush carpets, bars, 
lighting and coloring, as well 
as the sensational new Creole 
Mamba Revue, produced and 
emceed by funnyman Aland 
Dixon, along with a new policy 
to be continued of no admis- 
sion or coyer charge, and new 
low, low prices for drinks. 
Burton Bl^ws 

Starring in Dixon's fast-paced 
musical revue is Johnny Bur- 
ton, whose rich, mellow bari- 
tone received nationwide ao- 
claim when he sang spirituals 
on a recent Ralph Edwards' 
"This Is Your Life" television 
show. Burton's Oasis offerings 
include a variety, running from 
"pop" lo i;tandard. Luscious 
and curvacious dancer Pat 
Sides and a show shock full of 
beauty and talent, along with 
dancing on the spacious new 
daoce floor, make the Oasis a 
sure-fire entertainment bet.. 



' ^'A 


(.- 


f'om<i 


NO COVER NO 


■NISHTLY' 


UE KO 

Mvois HATS OUARTETTE 

HORNS. NOIStMMItS tOWHuSrAWAUm 
■■■ (at Narmaarflvi TIrFAN.Y 


•BETTY MARTINA STUDIOfOF DANCi 


SOUTH LOS.ANOEIES 

Modern — Afro — Ain*ric« — C 
_, Privat* iMsont — ScrMiii 
Ballat-Tap-Rliytlini-Taa-liitarvaHva 
JIva-AcrabatU-larfivMaal ar li 


THE EXCLUSIVE SClidOL 
10357 CrOMut StrMt, L. A. 2 |. 


HOUYWOQD 
Ic — Crfoiital 
ClattM 
ia-Taw»la .Mrtlv» 
iMhta Taathiiw 


LOnbiMMf 


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1 1 

,.:.! '. 

^ 

'=■• .■•.-!.,■ 

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tIAL ISTATt lOANl 


:- VJ 


BORROW 


l-T ..1- 



i 


~ X 


Classifisd 

- Ads ':' 


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\ . 


I 


.hf 


ESTATE 


PAYi BACK 

i$15Peril000aMo. 
^ Untiil Paid ^ 

'299 DN. 

BALANCE 
TAKES DEED 

To Many of These 
Properties . 

Open Monday 
Night Till 8:00 P.M. 


1173,W. Third St., Pomon«-3 b»d- 
r«em-$45 Dn., U \. Mo. 

1564 E. 108th St.-^Fram* and adj. 
lot. $350 Ph., »a l. Mo. 

1704 E. Illth PI.-$350 Dn., Bal. 

Mo. ' ; 

10617.17i-l» S. Central -Nowly 
doe. stucco* -$1250 On., Bal. 

Mo. ____ 

1559 E. Ulth St.-$399 Dn., Bal. 
Mo. . _____ ^ 

10508 Grapt St.-$299 Down, lal. 

.Me. 1 .. '\^^ '■^■:. 

1451 B. lUiTh Stroot-$3»9 Oiowi^ 
Bal. Mo. ^ ^ 

1371 E. 94th Stroot-Stueco-$«99 
Dn., Bal. Mo.^ 

10500 Clovla Stroot-Stucce-$750 
Dn., Bal. Mo. 

2431 Pirn St. — Nawly Docoratod 
Stucco— $3 50 Dn., Bal. Mo. 

1393 E. fsth St.-18 Rm. Holol- 
$2500 Dn., Bal. M o. 

2037 Nord ^.-$299 Dn., Bal. M^. 

9814 Boach S t.-$3 50 Dn., Bal. Mo. 

1106 E. '113th St.^$250 Dn., Bal. 

Mo. ^^ 

.1712 El 92nd,Strtot-Unit«-$350 
. Down, Bal. Mo. 
1218 E. 82nd Stroot-Stueeo— $499 
Dn., Bal. Mo.' 

697 I. 52nd F>lace-$899 Down, 

- Bal. Me. 

2113' Comp»on~Avo. - $299 Dn., 

Bal. Mo. -! ■• .- 

1622 E. 40th Pl.-$399 Dn., Bal. 
' Mo. . -^ 


RENTAiS 


FURN. ROOM FOR RENT-^ld 
age pensioners or relief cases. 
Men or women. 4 nice vacan- 
cies, llpl j:. Adams. AD. 

1-7531. ^ 
^> 


Furnlshtd Room For Rent 

Furnished room for working 
coupler no children. All pri- 
vileges. i$8.00 per weelt. 
JE 6908 after 7 p.m. I 


3 RM. HOUSE. Furn. k Unfurn. 
ished. Refrigerator. All com- 

. pany you wish. Near all tran- 
sportation. 644 Gladyc^. 
VA 0829 


FURKISHED HOUSE f6r RENT 

Attractive, newlvx^ecorated 3 
room furnished rear hpuse 
with Frigid^ii-e. 'Located in 
the West ^empJe district — 
i Near No: n^emple bus. Call 
NO 2-3374 


Furnished Apartment 

Small furnished apt. with 
private entrance fM- bachelor 
or working persoiis, respect- 
able arid reliable persons. 
Conveniently located. 125 W. 
47th PI. Cair AD 4-7777. 


Furnished Apartment For Bent 

Three room apartment tor 
couple, no children. Conven- 
ietnly located on veastside. 
Call AD 3-6569. 

Furnished Room For Rent 

Large. beautifullv> furnished 
room with kitchen, coriiplete- 
Jy private. Westside. AH pri- 
vileges, low rent. RE 2-4680. 


^^Furnishcd'^Kitchenette Apt 

Vw'o room furnished kitchen^ 
ette apartment. Private e,: 
tr,ance. One child o.k. utjl. pd. 
Reasonable. RE 4-7306. 


Y 


Uniurnished Apt. For RoBf 

Two bedroom upstairs apart- 
ment— S60. 1710 South Cen- 
tral Ave. AD 4-5362^aft^r 4 
p.^. Available to see. Side 
entrance, living room, kitch- 
enette. 


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

ATTENTION LADIES! We, have 

good^jobs, part and full time, 
day workers. For further in- 
formation call the Ladies 
Employment Aid Assn. Agen- 
cy, 3226 S. Central. Ave., AB. 
2-S505-'AD. 1-3244. 


I, LEGAL NOTICES 


GOOD JOBS WITH PAY 

* Physio Therapists 

* Masseurers 

* Practical Nurs* 

PI. 2-6509 


'I 


HELP WANTED 

In the domestic field 
NO DOWN PAYMENT 
If you will live on the place. 
Cook & general. Sal. S125-S225 
month. 

Mother's Helper— $125; 
No cooking, no refer, no down: 
payment. 
. Cples. Sal. $250-S42o month. 
Other positions open for men. 
Chef 2nd cooks, dishwashers, 
porters, jaintors. car washers. 
22 years in same location. 

1714 W. Jefersoti 
RE. 3-3930, KE. 1-4529., RE. 3930 


WE NEED 
HELP: 

Addrast Our Advertising Cards. 
Good Handwriting. Atlas, Bex 
188-N. Melrose, Mass. 


(California Eagfi) 

NO. M64 ' 

ilN THE SUPERIOR, COUBT 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA . IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LOS 

ANGELES. 

Fanni.e Downs. Pljiritiff. Vi. Wil- 
Jiam Downs. ' Defend&nt. 

■ NO. D477S85 -■ ^ 

Action .brought in the Superior 
Court of^tHe County of Los Ahgties. 
and - Complaint filed, In- the Office 
of the Cl<>ric of the Superior Court 
of said County. ' 

SUMMONS ' 

The People Of the State of Ca,ll- 
fornla send ereetingsi to: Williun 

Downs*. Defendant. . 

y-ou are directed to appear in an 
^riion brought against you by the 
sboxp n^ined plaintiff in ' the Su- 
perior C6urt of the State of Cati- 
fornl.). in' and for the County of Los 
ABjetlcs. and l^j.-'Answer the Com- 
plaint therein -ivithin ten days after 
the itpr\ ifc on vou of this Summons. 
if served; within the County of L»s 
.Xngclfs,^ or within thirty days if 
-served ejsrwhere and you. are noti- 
fied that unless > ou appear and an- 
swer a.s above required, the plain- 
tiff \\M take Judgtricnt for , any 
money or damages demanded in the 
fomplalnt. as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any 
other relief demanded In the Com- 
pl.iint 

(H\rn under my hand and seal of 
the 'Superior Court of th* County of 
\^n< .-Xngeles. State of California, 
this SIh ila\ of November. 19.>4. 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. County 
I'lerk and Clerk of the Su- 
Vi-rior Court of ihc State of 
. California, in and for the 
Countv of Los Angeles. 
(SKAL SUPERIOR COURT 
LOS ANCELES COU.NTYl 

Bv .1. Weatherwax. Deputv. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

Attorne/, for. Plaintiff 

542 So. Broadway. St. 

Los Angeles 13, MA. MSS1 
Publish California JCagle Dec. 30. 
1954. Jan. 6. 13, 20, 27: Teb. 3. 10. 
IT. 19S5. 


SER^CES 


..FEMALE HELt WANTED^y' 

Elderly woman for room iaijiO 
board ' with small salajy^in 
exchange' for keeping chil- 
dren. Nice comfortable home. 
EX 9-5757. 


" lAJfDLOBDS NOTfr 
SAVE VACANCY TDI? 
FREE RENTAL SERVICE 
yoi' SAVE MONEY ^ 
YOU SAVE TLAIE r 
: eSElOLR^FAS*, ; 
FRIENDLY iSERVICEL^ 
BUDGET RENTAL <-.^ 


I Hentals i 

NOW AVAILABLE 

$40-$48-Singlot («) 
$55-Doublot (3) 
NO childron or pots— 
Closo to shopping, -, 
. transportation. 

1241.12S1 i. «4th StTMt 
TW. 4710 


K $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 4 

Are. You In Debt? 

Let 
/ pCBT ADVISORY 
SERVICE 

Holp You Totfay! 

Wf Ar* Cradil and Dobt 

^^ "Specialists" 

—Our Ea»y Plan— ' 

IF yau aw* Vou Pay ■( law •> 

S^ijfSe.OO S9.0O p«r w**k 

StS.QO per weak 
S23.00 par weak 


$1,000.00 
S2,000.00 
$3,000.00 


';431.00 per waak-' 

Wa Pay All Taur Rcbli Far Yaw.' 

/ rOwt of itaf tills Al<« Paid) 

NO JKURITY, NO^CO-SICNUS, 

*iO tIAL ISTATI 

Nathinfl but tha bvitatt dotuBaL.?* 
debts— Fraf infornifinan 


pay 

an 


rou 
prablams.. 

■rinp All lills Ta- 

DEBT ADVISORY 




/• 


SERVICE 


I California Eaglet 
NOTICE TO CREOITCRt 

- . No. 357516 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of Californui. in and for the County 
of Los Angeles. In the Matter of the 
Kvt.nte of Or.<ie H. Morri.s, deeeased. 
.Noii.e IS hereh> given to eredilors 
ha\ iPK flaimN R;;Hinsi the said deced- 
ent to fill- said i'laim.<! ip the offiee 
of the ilerk of the aforesaid lourt or 
to (iresent them in the undersiitred 
at tlie offii-e of Thomas. <;. Neusom. 
.Mtorni'x. nil I-^ast Vernon Avenue, 
in- the t'itv iif I.o< AnKele.*. in the 
iiforesaid ('"ountv. which Ijlter offiee 
is the plaie of business of the under- 
^itned in aiy matters pertaining to 
>airt^ -estate. Surli claims with the 
n*N-,.s^Hr,> !louvh*-rs must he filed or 
lifcMnlcrt' as aforesaid within »i\ 
months afier the fir'st. publication of 
ihis, Motij-q. 
Dated: Der-ember 1.1. 1954.. : 

.<-HAI{Lh:S L. HUBBARD. 
Administrator of the Estate 
ofi-aid decedetU. 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
Attorney-iit-Law 
-till East Vernon Avenua -■ 
Lot Angeles, California 
ffublish Dec. 16; 23.; 30. 19M; 
Jin 6.. 1955\ ' , 

EURN. ROOMS FOR RCNT 


<.KOAt WOTtCK <„ , - ' 

NOTlCt TO JtrtlTAM 
^ Na S60Baa 

•.In the'-.Suparlo*, C«»ii*t of tka Btata 
of-CalUornU. in and for tka County 

Of LOS Ani«iei. In the Matter et the 

E.st»te of Martha HAmiUen. deceased. 
Notice' IS hereby (ivcn to cradttors 
havins claiips AaaiBat tbe sAlO deced- 
ent to file said dAlms ta tha offiee 
of the clerk of the afortadid court or 
to present them 'to the undersicned 
at the office of Thomas G. Neusom. 
Attorney. 1111 East Vernon Avenue, 
in the Citv of Loa Anceles. in the 
aforesaid County, wliltdi Utter offiee 
is the place of huilneu et the tiadei^ 
sijfcned in all matters pertaining to 
said estate. Such clainu with the 
necessary vouchers must be filed or 
presented a* gforetald within six 
Moiyfhs After the first publieatien of 
this notice. 
Di^ed^ December 13. iSM. 

LENA O. GENTRY. 

Exeortrtx of the *iU of 
said decedent. 

TiriOMAS C. NEUSOM 
-Mterney-at-L.aw . , 

1T|1 Eaat Varnen Avanuo 
Lea Angeles, Callfarnia - 
AO\2-614l 
(Pliblish Dec. K. 33. 30, 
an. 6. 1955) 


.Ml 


ilM: 


UNFtlHN. APT. FOB RENT 

92nd. street and Compton ave- 
nue. ■ Childfen accented. LO. 

'i«E.2523. . " ' ■ -^ 

. .' — —5 = -v.- .: — 


iThrec room unfumfshed apart- 
j mctU^ nr. ^ Occidental ^vid. 
. and Temple streefT . Adu 
References required. Nis pets 

' DU. 3-7218. ^ . . , 1 



<10 S. Broadway, Rm. 70S. 
ik% Angolos VAndiko 6981 

Daify 8 to 6 P.M.-Sat. Ir2 P.M." 

' EDWAR0 BECKER, Prosident 

$_J^ ;$ : $ $ $ $ 

SEBV/C^S 

Union. Oil Cotrtpany 'Tfi'- of- 
fers finest .service in Adelen- 
to. California, '., -^ 


FURNISHED Alt. FQ|I XEMT 

Four rooTh modern furnisheiJ' 
-apt. Children O.K. $50 morith 

Call LO. 9-1728 after 1 p.m 

Southeast district." 


DUES AUTO SERVICE 


REpar 


All JUybRK GUARANTEED 
2012 W. Jofforson ^E. 9260 


1556 f. 100th St.-:44?» Down, 

Bal. Mo. ' 

755 E. 85th St.-$499 Down,, Bal. 

Me. 

ir*| I. tl2th St.— Now 5 room 
; itucco— $499 Dn., Bah Mo. 


TOMORROW'S MONEY 
I SPECIAL^ 

MONEY-MONEY 

ON tHE HOUSE YOU NOW OWN 


IN ONE DAY 

Advancod on your loan if wa 
- Q. K. if. Consolidate all your bills 
in ono loan. Borrow $1,000 or 
more— pay back $15 a month por 
SI, 000 til paid. 

100 CENTS ON WE $1.00 for your 
1st Trust 0««d if satisfactory to 
us, credited to the purchase of any 
'properties we have listed. Terrific 
-100 cents on the dollar. If you 
ha<^c a TD tor $100 to $10,00 we 
-will get you a deal. , 

$98,000 CflSH "/c«:n^ 

with $98,000 in cash to buy reiJ. 
estate in this district. This iiTyour 
chance to sell out for all cash if 
you have -an equity or own a 
house. We have clients with 
$98,000 in Oil ^ash ,>o buy you 
out. 


I NOTI: WI HAVI CLIfNTt 

! WHO HAVi All CASH 

Par Taur Baal Itlcita l^uity-Ist ar 

2iid Trast Oaads-Cantract, or any 

oouity, yee or yeot friends hove In 

Raol btata. M It's oe I sfte. all CASH. 

Wa •• so-so •■ CamaaisslM wHk oil 

laol IsMto •roliors. 
AH Propartlaa Sefcjact to Prior Solo. 

HEBITY 
EQUITIES 

4374 S^ MAIN 
A0.6101v 


k" ■ 


i! i 


HAYES 
JkOTEL 

Tlhe PnopWs Choici 

1960 E. Jefferson 
\ ADw 3-9295 

NEW MAYLORD 
I APARTMENTS 


Vj/eekry Mdid Service and 

All Uiiliiiet Furnished 

Apartments newly furnished, 

'painted and carpeted 

Furnished 

Singles - Doubles 

Bachelors 

j $15.00 Up 
Weekly or monthly 

'tii^nvV RATES NOW AVAILABLE 
1250 So. Western Avenue 


RE. 8117 


RENTALS WANTED 


RATALS WANTED 

landlords, List Your Homes, 

Apartments and Rentals with 

DREW INVESTMENTS 

Hundreds of poepio waiting to 

move in today. 

3888 SO. WESTERN 
(Across from Sacarlty •■nk) 

RE. 1-6366 LO. 7-2770 


Johnny's Trim Shop 
Auto Tops • 

Seat Covers 

35Q0 W. Jefferson Blvd. 
REpubiic 4-5884 


Thrpp room apartmenf for rent 
<fur.(. 138 'i W'est-49th street. 
Single man or wonian. No 
children. $45 mo. 

Modern furnished . four room 
apt. for quiet couple. $70 a 
mo. AD. 2-6418. 

Three room apt. in rear, on 
fa.stside. Call AX. 4-2579. No 
children. $12 \vk. 

Modern 4 roonrfront. Child O.K. 
Quiet couple wanted. $70 mo. 
AD. 2-6418. N<>w furnishings. 


M ADA'S 

BEAUTY SHQPPE 

All Lines of Beauly 
■ " Cii^htre . ■ 

205i E. Vernon 

Bus. Phone: AD. 4-^317 
Res. Phone: AD. 4-3392 


ROOM FOR RENT 

Beautiful large room for nice 
young lady. 'Uicinlty Adams A 
4th ave. CalUaft.eij 6 p.m. or 
•Sat. &Sun. RE. 7057. 

HOUSEKEEPER WANTED 

Aid Jjousepeeker. Near trans- 
portation. Two adults. Private 
room .and bath. $100 mo. Call 
WE. 1 -4039. 


TV service: 

TV definiiily repit^ed in' home; 
—no fix, no charge. Homo TV.' 
HO. 9-2131 - WE. 5-7524 


FOR RENT OR LEASE 

Modern rountry home on acre 
8': miles south of Riverside. 
Suitable for poultry, raising. 
Phone Perris 163202. Write P. 
O. Box 485. Perris. Calif. 

BUSINESS OPPOPvTUNITIES! — 

Dr. George Washington Car- 
ver produrts. Wholesale and 
retail. Dealers. Agents. 4409 
South .\valoni 

MISC. FOR SALE 


Phono Won't Reject? 

Have Jc(mcs W. Robinson 
REPAIR IT at 

2120 S. CENTRAL 

Rl. 8-7027 


FOR SALE FUR JACKET 

: Silver fox jacket. Evens. AX. 
I 2-4783. 

Broadcasting Unit For Sole 

Practically new broadcasting 
unit with loud speaker, 
AX 4-2345 




25c A DAY — 
3IETEil Pf^N 

TELEVISIONS 
WASHERS \ 
STOVES A 
PIANOS 
REFRIGERAtORr 

HARRIS MiTiR PLAN 
Phone R^. 2-3944 


Dr. Gray 

Quick dental plates re- 
poirad while you wait 
—low prices— now tlen- 
tal plates our specialty 
-^pay later on approved 
credit extractions, fill- 
ings, etc. 

Al>^ 4-1397 


#409 

NOTICE OF HEARINO OF 
. PETITION FOn PHOBATK 
OF LOST WiCL 
Na. tSMSr 
In the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the Count}' 
of Los Anaeles.. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
EMMA E. GORDON. Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby elven that tha 
petition of Thomas G. Neusom tfpr 
the Probate of the Lost. Will of ffie 
above-named deceased tod for the 
ixsuanrc o( Letters Testamentry 
thereon to the petitioner will ba 
heard at 9:19 o'clock A.M.. oh Jan- 
uar>- 12. 1955. At the court reoe of 
Department 5. of the Suparier Court 
of the State of Califomia. fin and lor 
tha County Of I.01 Anaalei. 

HAROLF J. cStly. 
County Clerk tad Clerk of the 
SuD^rior Court of the Stat« of 
Califomia. in and for tha 
County of Lea Angelas. 

By H. L. McLEAN. Deputy. 
Dated December 16, 1954. 
CARL A. CARLES- 
1111 East Varnan Avanua 
Laa Angelaa 11, California 
Attarnay fop Pctitiencr 

<Puhli«h in California Tarie. 
Per. 23. .VI. 1954: Jan. «. 19S5) 

$457 

NOTICE OF HKAItlNC OF 

PETITION FOR PROBATE 

OF WILL 

Na. SStlS7 

In the .Superior C<>urt of the Stata 

nt California, in and tor the County 

of Los Angples. 

In ih» Matter of tha Estate of 
DOMENICO LAURITO. Deceased, 

.Notice- U herebjs; given that the 
petition or E. -A. Winstanley. Public 
.\dmlni<itTator. for the Probate of thi» 
Will of the above-named deceased 
and for the issuance of Letters of 
.Administration - with - the - Will - 
Annexed, thereon to R. A. Wtnstan> 
ley. Public ' Admintstrator,. will be 
heard at 9 IS o'cloclt A.M.. on Jan- 
uarx' 13. 1965. at the court room of 
Department 5. of the Superior Court 
of thf State of California. In and t&t 
the County of Loa Anceler. 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. 
i Counlf Clerk and Clerk of the 
Superior Court of thai State of 
Califorhit. in end for ;thi 
Countv of Los Anite.let. 

Bv >I. L. McLEAN. Dcptity. 
Dated Dec-ember IS. 1«54, <:- . 
HAROLD W. KENNEDY, , 
' County Ceunaal . 

11C0 Hall of Raoerdt 'Si- 
Los >ngalaa 12, Califaroia 

MU. 1211 

rnay 'Administrator 
' ' lish in .Califomia Catle. 
30. 1954: Jan. «. »SS) 


JOHNNY'S 
WAX 


w 
O 

R 

X 



Thursv Jan. 6, 1955 The C< lifornia Ea(f«— Ti: 


" ■V'kVI 

■-, 


. -■•' 

y{ >." 

'■ P^l 



H 

'W 

-- ;-^3^a^?. 

^. ' 


.'^ , 

.,4*-- 


i THE 

* AGAU] 


.^C^*^ 


)MANSHAD 

;eforit! 

ICHCSTMRMtPMUet ' *" 
BMLCeaO 10 POUePKT BI6WT *^ 
ANPMe HALF MCU» WOTE. 

TWO wiWM ««• LAweynmi ' 
CH»P 9/ 1UE ANCIENT «3MM< '^ 
CHASIOTAUKEVANPEaftp.^ v.. 
eUlLPEet TWO THOIOAMM 
VEACC A«C> SINCE TUE Ran". 

flwuBgaof wEceeuiLTON ■■ 

EN6LIM K»M TMCUA9' 
0KI6INAUV Bern LAIOOlir 
Of THE ROMMNft 


6435 

CERTIFICATE OF BUSII^JUS 
UNOCR-FICTITIOUS NAMf 

TKe undersigned do hereby > ear- 
tify that the>' are cenductiiif a 
Janitorial and maintenance service 
business as Co-Partners at 707 North 
nrandee. Compton. Califomia. under , 
the fictitious firm name Of WHITE ' 
HOUSE JANITOR SERVICE a/id ; 
thdt said firm is -composed of the | 
fnlloulng pi^r'sons. whose names and 
places . of reaidenca or* as fellows, 
lo-wit : 

JE-SSE J. HOWARD. 707 North 
Grandee. Compton. Caltfomia. 

JAMES ERNEST HOWARD.- 18S 
Eaat 99th Street, Lot Angelas.^ Cali- 
fornia. 

witness our hands Utt* Sth day 
at November. 1954. 

JESSE J. HOWARD. 
JAMES ER.N'EST HOWARD 
State of California.. - 
County of Los Angeles, a*. •■ 

On this 9th dav of November, 
A.D.. 1954, before-me, a NOtar>- Pub- 
lic in and for the said County and 
State, rtildlnc therin, duly com- 
missioned and tworn, perfooally 
appeared JESSE J. HOWARD and 
JAMES ERNEST HOWARD, knonn 
to me to be the persons whose names 
are subscribed to the within Instru- 
ment, and AcknowledgM.to me that 
the\' executed the tame. 

IN WITNESS WHERfiOr. I have 
hereuMo set mv hand and affixed 
my official seal the day and year ia 
this rertUicate first above written. 
(SEAL) HAROLD J. SINCLAIR. 

Notary Public in and for 
said County and Sate. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

Attorney at Law 

542 South Broadway 

Lot Angeles 13, Califar.nia 

MAdiaen e-CS;! 
(Publish in CalifOriila Eagle- 
Dec. 23. 30. Jan. S. 13) 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
NO. SS6Z7S. 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California. In and tor the Coiinty 
of Los Angeles. In the Matter of the 
listRtf of Hudson Dy». Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given to creditors 
having rlaims agaln.st the said deced- 
ent to file said claims in the office 
nr to present them to the tuider- 
of the rlerk of the aforesaid c6urt 
signed at the office of Miller. Maddox 
find Sheats. Attornevs. 524 South 
Sprmg Street, In the City of Los An- 
geles 13.> in the aforesaid County, 
uhirh latter office Is .the place of 
business of the undersigmM In all 
matters pertaining to said estate. 
Such claims, witfl the necessarj- 
\ouchers must be filed or presented 
as aforesaid within six months after 
the first publication of thU notice. 

Doted December 8. 1964. 
A.MANDA RYE 
Adminiatratrix of tJie nute 
of tald decedent. 
MILLER. MADDOX A. SHKATS 

Atternya at law. 

524 South Spring Straet 

Lot Angalaa IS, Califarnie 

MA. $-2ess 
Publish in California Eagle. Dee. IS, 
23. 30. 1954 and Jan. «. 1956. 


Women Wanted 

M' ke extra rhbney. Address, 
Mail -pestcerds spore time 
every week. Write Box Four- 
teen, Kelment, Min. 


MpTOR— 

OVERHAUL 
$49 to $69 

* Motors Excheyiged 

* Convenient Location 

* Ample Financmg 

A - D MOTORS 

7600 S. Iroadway; PL\ 3-2172 


REPAIR SHOP 
FOR SALE 

Radio TV tubes tost o«|uip- 
ment, phonograph rocDrdt 
and used radiot. 
2120 South Central Avonut 


REAL ESTATE f O R $AIE 

HOUSE FOB SAU 
$50.00 dwn. New four room, 
two bedroom with garage. 
Bialance easy. 13503 Compton. 
NE 6-5115 


LOANS I . 
House Refinancing 
M. E. WEBB CO. 
PR. 8937^ 
Ask for J. D. 


I' 

L. 



CAPE FOR SALE 

taautiful Cof-!, fully aqul^Md. 
■uill-in Irick Sarbacva Pit. Wast- 
lake ditfrlct. Alta ftfrnlthad offita 
far intern* tax buiinats. 

ADams 3-6972 
ADam$ 3-2063 


■fOR SALE- 


IT JOHNNY MORRIS 

(Continued from. Page 10) 
learned that th^ were So en- 
thralled by his masterful per- 
formance they simply felt that 
loud applause would be a form 
of sacrilege. 

Alte-Sio 

Maybe you'd like to know 
where thi« Konitz Karacter 
came from and what he's been 
doing. Well, . Lee knocked 
around a Chicago campus for a 
year anil a half, until he got 
stole, and then went to New 
York. Lee feels that his biggest 
break came when he left Clauds 
ThorshUl in 1948. I didn't ask 
him. but I'll bet he was the 
catalyst that moved Claude to 
do the first thing he ever did 
de cent ly in the jazz vein -^ 
AMTHHOPOLOGT. Lee studied, 
with LoQnit Tristane, and you* 
know when Lennie teaches ypu, 
you don't have too rrvuch more 
to learn. But Lee is still striving. 
He feels that he will never reach 
his.;peak. because he'is going to 
blow as long as he can, ajnd the 
longer he blows the better he'll 
get 

Saxsatieaallsf 

And yet he i« so -in love with 
his work that he acts as if he 
were thanking you for a chance 
to' display ^his talents. In a man . 
M great, you can't help but 
know that this is the ultimate 
in humility (Arthur GodlimT. 
please note>. for you are trS^*. 
ing hijB- silently for allowing 
you to listen. Xtnton once said 
of him, "My orchestra is only a 
frame., and the picture is Lee 
Koaits." .^nd yet he gives me a 
photo, and on it is written. 
"JohBBT . . . Thank YOUl"- 

JohBiiT't Joms 
- M6M and CAPITOL are to be 

congratulated as the firs 
recording companies, tohelp^ 
spread the .woi?d-"Df .liazz. Got 
tough item- from MGM c 
WDrTER, : SEQUENCE, ^ and if 
vou ever heard SUMMER SE- 
QUENCE t>y Woe«T< I don't have 
to tell you! that Bolph Bunu had 
a hand ih it. He didn't wr^te 
this one, however. Loeaar4^ 
Foothor did. But Ralph did the 
orchestrations, and it's one of 
the best jobs he's don#» in all 
his thirty-thi»e years. Each of 
the eight sides features a par- 
ticular artist, and you mighti 
know some of them. Ever hear 
of Oscar Pottiferd? Or Billy 
Bouert Or Xoi Winding? . . . 
Ran into. a record shopVnd dug 
a tough ie. Jackio Cloason's 
MIMORIES, MARTINIS AND 
K B L O D I B S. It's on CopitoL 
Haven't got it yet. but its 
probably in the'mail. Tell you 

more tbdut It later. 

« 

Rouse of Wax 

Been hearing, complaints that 
the records I'm mentioiiing 
can't be found. Got new* for 
you. Look in the right place, 
Artd the em ly shop I've found in 
L.A. that his a complete selecv 
tlon of the nicest things is Irwin 
and' EdllBQ MesloT's shop at 
3605 South Normandie. They've 
even got sides by Cal TJador 
and Milos. That's where I dug 
the Gleason' album. They're 
moving in a couple of weeks 
but I'll post you on the hew 
address. 


IT'S 


ssT»55i 


*#»«■*' 


S"; HOW MANY? 
TwMtrruum. aatANPiweLicnmoe 

JOHN QUINfV AOMW IWCt THE ACTUM. NUM8I 
Oi: PEOeLt WHO«9nEOR3KTMe>MlNMIM» ' 
CAHPtetHK. WAO KNOM({A0kM« RECEIVCP 

lecszi V9TE«^ NOT kumoBn Mikjosrry 
THE ELCCnOU «n»TMEMKEFEK8EP1DTHE 
HOUfiK OFMCmtaENXKriVEA) 


m 



Tmt ICTHC tWJKPTMHeOLO 

■OMNo user wcmhwid 

NO MkTTEK 

u 1 amnmoi nwj 

ARC a FINE INvetTMCMT 

acoKiTV.' smcT euvMO 

BONOO TOOW/ 


a-tiiiiJiiiii'riin'SraiiBi&iiiiiiiiiaitliiiiiiiitsiiiiiiitiiiiiiiisiJisffi 

SOUNDTRACK 


Hiiftifi'!' ••iisiiiiiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiimiaiiiiiaiaiL.iii: ^ 
- ■ ' ' -; -fc- 


■with- 



azx 



jwaii!!:rBmn::ttiii!ii;ite^^ i!iuiuiikiii!iiiViiii:iiiiiii;i!«tniw 


(Continued froni Pag* 10) 
a salute to the little guy with 
the beeg beeg sounjd. 

While you werp on Steney, 
SamniV rushed over to 'us and 
wanted to know why we 'had 
him following a showstopper. 
We retorted, "because you're 
the only one who; can' follow 
him" ... of course Sammy was 
teasing us Stoney Boy, but he 
confided later that he thinks 
you're a candidate -for the very 
\ery bigtime . .'. and you know 
what???. We respect that guy's 
opinion . . . Reason Mabel Scott 
couldn't make the Robiiison 
hov: she was appearing at 
iim Jenkin's spot in the ba\i 


-- 


j;..S.rf J^i 


--■" f .1 


^'^rw 


jord 


"Mdre n xt trip. Tm late bui 
rm stra ght . . . Copy Boyeese- ' 
let's hu 5tle this oveiCla^ «iat 

linotype ' .■".:■- '' "'■ 



OWBIZ'^ 


VA 


^AR IS RE-BOI^N" 
Johnny Morrrs" 

(Confihued from Page 10) 
need .oily say that in ' 
STAR IJ BORN.":>Iason is M 
son. A^ "usual, li«^^ enhane- 


m^ 


X- 


his Tolclby underplay'ing it^i^ 
the waf. r^ the first dect 
role hels be^n given since fr' 
.... .^..,^.1. ., .^yy, 1.. ...c u«.v, became! Hollywood property.^ ., 
ea where she' fracfuxed th'f'^^keptAision the edge of otit seaj 

\s;aitin J for the explosion:' Ar 
when i did come, it came j 
a softii sar — more like spontai 
eous ci: rnjjustion. In— his^a^ 
great s ene. his sobs weri» Ic 


,r, 


saved 


The number of those 
from cancer could be doubled 
by early detection and prompt 
ade<)uate treatment,- the Amer- 
ican Cancer Society says. 


e juice set. 

Nick- Stewart will jturri over 
^the proceeds from a hite^iSthis 
Ebony Showplace to newshawk 
Abio . . . -Horaco Miller in town 
from Chi.: '.:. . L'Tanya the 
falcon plate on the sick list 
and n«> mA|iy\fHends pulling 
for the great gal's speedy re- 
covery . . . Wire fr.orri luscious 
Sylvia Mooa the dancing dar- 
ling (in S.F.) to say everything 
is keen and peachy and. SRO! 
. . . Pretty Ann Prtte slipped in 
the bath tub and hurt her nog- 
gin. But she's as soune^ks ever 
no,w and still dazzling the play- 
bores. 

Singer Johnny Green slipped 
quietly back into town ajnd his 
best chums are frankly con- 
cerned because Urey can't hear 
a peep out "of him since the fel- 
low has returned from his mid- 
west tour . . . Guy has nothing 
to hide. Just pooled! . . ,. 
Johnny ^Morris impressed with 
.iazz great Leo Konits's noifrha- 
iance. Say's he's, the taarlon 
Braado of the mUsic world . . 
Sigma Gamma Rho plotter 
party teed off like a flying 
saucer New Year's nite and 
Eagle Church Ed. Donna Pree 
was f emcee for the affair! - 

Pianist-organist Bob Mosely 
'invited a mob over just last 
nite to celebrate his first day 
on earth dav. Carry on, lad! 
. : . Wonani, the "Black Orchid" 
of showbusine&s starting off on 
a Canadian . tour and swings 
back intothe Cocoanut Grove! 
. . . Short, sweet, and snappy. 


in the sobs and sni 
around, me. 

Judy ar^d Jiininy» .make 
I'm w^tf you all the waj-. 


^750 DOWN 

INCOME 
4 UNITS, PtAMI 

$13,500 "*' 


PRICI 


•OOD WISTSIM 
LOCATION 

'650 DOWN 

3-MDROOM NAME 
$•950 Pull Price 


PL 1-5680 



INCOME FOR SALE 

Twe Units. $1500 down. 
7 rm., 3 b«dre«m plus 1 
iMdroom unit, mi SacMid 
Av«mM. PR. tf37. 


PEN HOUSE 

VACANT - 3653 7TH AYENU|: 
1-5 P,M„ Sunday, Jan, 9, ^9SS J 




3 Be dr oom Ifucco, lerao. room*. Newly Jowratod \nt\imj/nA out. 
Tile, herdwood, floor furneeo, broakfatt n«ok. Side drive, fareflo/ 
Will ho eold to the hifhoft offer. Doo't miu tlii|l 

12TH AVENUE^ NEAR "J" CAR 


S BodrooM and Don Modem Stucco, 
•howor over tub. Side drive, doubl 
B«m 194B. S2000 down. Pwll price $1 


loH of tile, hord^iMMBd, 
e flareso. Ploor lumaco. 
11,IS0. Flexible. / 


/ 


^• 


VACANT 


'J' 

In Woi 


$1S00 D»wn. 3 lodMom ShMco. Ucalod In Wott Adam ail 

LavfO lot, 40x155, with mem to build in front. 1-«ar «araj 

SolCr will cany wwn pap«n at 5i% IntoiMl^Only $75 



t, 1 J>/di 


I INCOMi- 

'I - • 

"J" car line. 2 on a let. 3 bedroom front, 1 hodreom roar. 
Need* M'"' iniide, but solid built. Both rented. Income $115 
|Mr month. Owner very anxiouf. $1500 down. Offer on full 
#rioo. ■-..■'■/ 





; 




...'. 

■ 

- 

- 


' 


kolna Company at , 
Jndopondent 

Bishop Company, r. 
"In the Church" drgar 
presented "Boy Iii:^'^ 
jit People's Independer 
Sunday evening. Th 
ny is directed^- PhyHi 
ley, church edi»r of th 
1 "f he erifhusiaMic, aud' 
Js inviteJhtluijcompan'; 
\n in the spring to prci 
The Beloved Coiifr 
le stirring drama bi 
iton.' ' . • * 


TUARIE^ 


'i^. 


Mrs.' «arY. Ary, 457 £.491'' 
Street. :, Services hel4 Dec- 2' 
from til ? Ivory- ChapeL Rev.-... 
N.*D6g ;ett spoke the eulog:,. 
Interme it at Lincoln Meniori? 

Park C« metery. Surviving rela 
tive, Al lert Ary, husband. Con 
iner — ol nson in charge of s«^^'■ 
ices. . . 

Mrs. i lellio Guy Olivor, 1330' 
Towne Avenue. Services wer^ 
held fr )m the ^vory Chape). 
Dec. 27j with th/ Rev. E. Wll- 
hite spi aking t«e euloTgy. Surr 
viving II !lative,Xarrie G. Hafrir 
daught*. Interment at 'Ever- 
green, with *€onner- Johnson- in ' 
charge it services. j ' 

Mrs. irhuia Melsen, 159 S 
105th si-eet. Services were hel{' 
from thi Ivory Chapel, with thr 
Rev. m Mansfield Colllnv 
spWkin* the Eulogy,' Dec, 29 
Surviviiig relative. Vera King. 
daughtJr. Interment at the 
Evergr»n Cemetery with Jihf 
Conner-lohnson in chargfrwof 
service/ 

Mrs. pcrtrude Horptr, B7C 

/befinaci Avenue. "S e r v i i 
from tl» Ivory Chapel. Dei 
with th| Rev. Ellis readin^^^^e 
eulogy .Jlnterment at the E^.*!!' 
green (4metery, with -the Qori- 
ner-Johiison]iri charge of dttv- 
ice^. Sfrviving relative, Mrs.. 
Ruth E|irden, God-daughtor. . 
/ Mrs. I aanie Ford. 179 E. 36th 
Street, iervfces w^ere held from 
the Gre|iter Cornerstone Bajpti^t 
Church,|Dec. 29th,' with the Rer. 
D. C. Mistin speaking the' «d. 
logy. Siviving relative, Walter 
Tprrf, hf sband. Interment at tjje 
fLincolnl Memorial Cemetcr:^. 
Cotiner-fohnson in ch^j^e «t 

M^. iFaimte Lm BriBUtfr 

Cooi^r^485 E. 41st Place. Serv- 
ices h^ffl from the Ivory Chap^, 
with/ tie Rev. J. N. Do^e'R 
speakipE the eulogy, Dec» 29. 
Survivifflg relative, Ben Cooper, 
husbani. Interment at I the 
E V e r fir e e n Cemetery '^ith 
dhnson in ehar^ «f 


Conner 

l^vic^ 



/' 


II. ^ 


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12— Th* California Eagle Tiiurs., Jan. 6, 1955 


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The Department 
printing or typing name 
visiting nearest renewal 
cross it out and print orl, , 
Do not detach stub. Present 


Vchicliit urgw motoriftf to a petd r«Mwt 
address on lines of stub at right of new form, 


of auto registrations for '55 by 


If address is incorrectly printed under nan5eST3trsisow»^M!owMarrow, 


Then fill in stub with name and correct address. 

renewal oiBee before midnight Feb. 4, to avoid legal 


legal 

penalties. Do not fold, st^le, pin or tear the card. On paying fees, BMlorist receives one '55 tab for rtar pint. 
The stub will be stamped ana detached for display in the vehicle^ 


First AME Ushers Present 
City College's A'Capella U 

. Tfie iWted Los Angeles City t choir sang in the world famed 


College 60 voice A 'Capella 
Choir will perform a concert, of 
Sacred Choral Masterpieces at 
fthe Fifst AME Church on Janu- 
I ary 16 at 5:00 p.m. Musical 
• ambassadors of the nation's 
largest junior college, the sing- 
- 'ers are directed by Ralph J. 
Peterson. Soloists for Handel's 
"Messiah" will be: Rose Marie 
Welch, Soprano; Larry Fonseca. 
Tenor; Eleanor Cassanta, Con- 
tralto; and Ray Roberts. Bass; 
Other soloists on the program 
are Valeria Sasine. Miquel Elac. 
and Roberta Sherry. Don Lee 
White, organist. 

For' several years the City 
.College Choir *has won national 
acclaim through preformance 
b&fore the annual conventions 
.; of the Music-Educators National 
Confeiience. Their concerts have 
taken them on tour throughout 
Southern 'California. Nevada, 
and as far North as Salt Lake 
City. Utah. In 1950, the college 


Hollywood Bowl and in 1934 
thev represented England in the 
United Nation's Folk Ballad 
Jubilee at Philharmonic Audi- 
torium. Their appearances have 
not been limited to the concert 
stage, however. The singers 
have entered many homes by 
means of radio and television. 
The most recent television ap- 
pearance of. the City College 
Choir was on the program, 
"City at Night." 

The A Capella Choir is a 20 
year old tradition at the Music 
Department of L.A.C.C. Organ- 
ized in 1931 by its present di- 
rector. t>ie original w'as one of 
the earliest that pioneered the 
revival of choral singing in the 
west.' Each year the group is 
reorganized through auditions 
required of former members as 
weir as jlew candidates. The 
City College Choir has always 
maintained a top standard and 
a foremost place ia the choral 
music scene. 


\ 


Churches to Aid Parolees 
In Attempt at Rehobilitation 


^ The road back to a normal 

life is a difficult one for the 

. parolee. He has paid for the 

■ bffenses he has committed. He 

—r* 4 , -. ■ 


Local Artist 
To Exhibit 
In Germany 

Beulah Ectbn Woodard. well- 
known Los Angeles sculptregs, 
has been honored with an ih- 
\itation to put on a one-man 
show ir) Gerhiany in the early- 
fall. Older residents of the city 
will recall the widespread at- 
tention which her first one-man 
show received at the'Los An- 
^ geles County Museum; in 1935. 
■ 'Noted particularly, for her ac- 

■ curate portrayal of primitive 
African types, Mrs. Woodard 
has e.xhibited at the California 
Pacific International Expo.si- 
tjon, at out.standing galleries 
throughout the state as well as 

.in New York and Chicago. 
- Examples of Mrs. Woodard's 

TOrt\are-tso be found in the col- 
lections of the Los Angeles 
County Museum, and many 
other museums. ; 

Organizer of the Los Angeles 
Negro Art Association (1937). 
director of the Eleven A.ssociat- 
«*d Art Gallery (lO.oO-.'il), Mrs. 
W^podard has won many hon- 
ors including the purchase 
award and blue ribbon first 
prize in sculpture in the 1953 
All-City Art Festival for her 
wood -carving of Korean heads^ 
titled, "Travail.'^ 


may Ije determined to begin a 
better life. But generally he is 
without family or friends, re- 
jected by society and singled 
but by discriminatory laws. The 
odds are against him. 

This week the nation's Prot- 
estant ch urch es announced 
«« Milans for a cooperative .move- 
>' ment to reduce these odds — a 
movement to help men and wo- 
men released or paroled from 
prison on their "roa/d back" to 
lives a.? useful and accepted 
members of society. 

Through the National Coun- 
cil of Churches, a special com- 
mittee of church representa- 
tive!! and experts in prison and 
parole problems has been called 
together to develop plans for a 
church program nation-wide in 
its scope. 

Dual aim of the new project, 
according to Chairman Mr. Rob- 
»rt Hannum. a Congregation?' 
minister's son -who has been 
helping ex-prrsoners for the 
past 25 years, is first, the de- 
velopment of undPrsta 
among church people 
offenders and the' 
that confront them; a 
the mapping out of 
ways in which church groups 
and individuals can &i'<* the 
kind of lielp that is needed. 

"Like most citizens," Mr. Han- 
nuni commented, "church 
people are apt to think of the 
ex-pri.soner as someone alien 
and apart, if they think of him 
at all. But if the average 
churchgoer could understand 
the problem and the reasons for 
i^, he would want to help." 


Car Licenses 
For J55 Due 
For Renewal 


The Department of Motor 
Vehicles rcrhinds motorists that 
the annua) renewal of vehicle 
registrations is due for 19.55 on 
or before Friday, February 4. 
The fastest .servic* may be ob- 
tained by submitting fees with 
the prepared statenient mailed 
to owners from Sacramento in 
December. 

Persons who do not receive a 
mailed reminder are neverthe- 
less responsible for renewal of 
their registrations, and are ad-- 
vised to submit their fees with 
the 1954 white registration slip. 

The new prepared statements 
issued by the Department for 
the ♦first" time this-'ye|ar to 5.- 
000.000 auto owners, ifter two 
years of testing with l.OOO.OOO 
truck and trailer registrations, 
contain data tle.scribing the 
vehicle and identifying the 
owner. A stub at the/ right end 
of the card mvist be filled in 
with the owner's name and ad- 
dres, legibly pririten or typed, 
before presenting at a 


No m^wa in 
NY} Delegation 
On Education 

NEW YD R K — Governor 
Thomas E. Dewey was asked by 
the NAACP this week to revise 
the make-up of a state delega- 
tion to the White House Con- 
ference on Education so as to 
include at least one Negro. 

A telegfam sent.to Governor 
Dewey by NAACP Executive^ 
Secretary Walter White a'serted 
that "inclusion of at least one 
qualified Negro ' in the New 
York., delegation would have 
been of inestimable value" and 
urged that "some means of cor- 
rection be devised." 

"In view of the fact that Con- 
gress in authorizing the Con- 
feftnce directed the group . to 
'consider and report to the 
President on significant and 
pressing problems in the field 
of education,' " the message 
pointed out, "and in further 
view of the fact that the most 
pressing problem in education 
today is implementation of the 
U. S. Supreme Court's May 17 
decision outlawing racial segre- 
gation in tax supported educa- 
tion, ' New York State's delega- 
tion should be a bi-racial one. 

"The New York State commit- 
tee\which will participate in the 
Whhe House Conference on 
E^ducation, to be held in the 
autumn of 1955, is composed of 
21 members. 



Gov. Knight Proclaiins 
George W. Carver Day 


■ 1 


■ « , •■■ 



-+ 


Vatch Heatei^l 

Local fire record! indicate 
portable heaters as frequent 
cau.ses of fire. In most cases 
such fires result not from any. 
defect in heaters themselves, 
but rather from thoughtlessness 
in placing them near combust- 
ible materials. 

Any heating devices placed 
near furniture or where cur- 
tains might be > blown across 
them may cause' a^ disastrous 
fire at any time. 


March of Dimei Ttaini 
^olio Fightcri ' 

Since 1938 M*rch of Dimes 
Motor grants totaling $22,700,000 have 


Vehicle offic-e. The cards .should*; '*"'"«*'' ^^* profe.ssional train- 


not be folded or. stapled, as 
they are used for machine tab- 
ulations. 



Rev. 

Oit Angelus 

Radio Hour 

T^ie Rpv. W. L. Robinson. Pas- 
tbfA of the. Faithful Central 
Bapiist Church, located at 1020 
Paloma St. extentls a cordial 
invitation -to the listening pub- 
lic to join them in the radio 
service for the si^ k and shut 
ins on' the "Angelus Funeral 
Home Hour" eachSunday morn- 
ing from 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 
a.m. over station K.F.O.X. 1280 
on the dial, during the month 
of January. ■ ,\ 

These broadcasts will preceed 
the regular) Sunday hnoftiing 
Church worship in ttie auditor- 
ium with the comhined choirs 
and the Ma.le Chorus rendering 
the music and Pastor Robinson 
delivering the me.ssages. 



mg of research workers, doc- 
tors, nurses, physical therapists, 
occupational therapists, and 
other skilled workers on the 
team needed to fight polio. 


Gov. Goodwin J. Knight this 
week proclaimed Jan. 5 Dr. 
George Washington Carver Day 
in California, in honor of the 
scientist, humanitarian a*n d 
educator who devoted four dec- 
ades to aiding the growth ^f 
Tuskegee Institute. . 

In his proclamation, Go' 
Knight said: 

"Few in the history of than 
kindjiaveiisen from such oh- 
igms to the heights of 
ational acclaim and re- 

Norman Houston 
Appointed On 
Credit Group 

Norman O. Houston, presi- 
dent of Golden State Ins. Co., is 
one of 14 Negroes representing 
private financing- institutions 
and builders of residential prop- 
erties who have been designated 
as' members of Regional Com- 
mittees of the new Voluntary 
Home Mortgage Credit Pro- 
gram established under the 
Housing Act of 1954. Herman 
Plummer of Portland was also 
appointed. • 

The program seeks to make 
private funds available for 
mortgage loans Insured by the 
Federal Housing Administra- 
tion or guaranteed by the Vet- 
erans Administration., A.ssist- 
ance under the program is 
available to members of 
minority groups who are un- 
able to obtain home loans under 
the same terms and conditions 
as are available to others in 
the same locality. .Such assist- 
ance is also available to non- 
members of minority groups in 
small communities or remote 
areas which are designated by 
the Regional Committees. 

The program Is directed by a 
national committee headed by 
the-l;Iousing arid Home Firtan.ce 
Administrator. It operates 
^rough 16 Regional 'Commit- 
tees. These committees do /lot 
make loans. They serve as a 
clearing house, endeavoring ^ to 
brit>{^ .together eligible b&r- 
rowers* an^ willing, pr iVa t e 
lenders. . • 


The American Cancer Society 
says that only a little more than 
half of the public knows even 
one of the seven cancer danger 
signals,' acording to a sur\'ey. 


SUBSCRIBE NOW! 


mtk. 


CAUPOtNIA 


EAGLE 


3 


MONTHS IT MBIL 
JEVEIT THUISDAT 

'^ AD 40161 


1 


WrifM 10S0 L 43rd PU LA. 11, Col. « 



For anything From- « 
minor adjuitment to * 

■ major repair on your 
televtsion or radio . . . 
■ call Ayenuc IV an. 
Radio at ADarns 4-0970. 
' 1^ You can be sure of ex- 
H pert workmanship and 
^.j^! prompt service .*t tent' 
H i^e pricc^l 

jK^VENUE TV &4Ua]^IQ 

4957 CENTRAL AVENUE 

rB«fWMit 49th Pfac* em^JOtli Stfwl) 

Pfvbhei AD. 4-0970 

JAMU Humphrey Pr«pri«ter « 

f 


I 
1 


I 
I 
I 


USE 


THIS 


CONVENIENT FORM TO PLACE 


CLASSIFIED ADS 

Writ* your ad JUST>AS YOU WANT IT TO U nilUiHiD THURSDAY, Hwludini yovr ADORBS w 
TELEPHONE NUMBER, or both as part of iIm ad. .. ^ .^ 


Such as "Raal 
"Misc. For Sala 

ClASSIPICATiON DBSIRIO 
^ ittato Par Salo,^ 'Pumisbad Room Par Rant,* "Apt. Wanted," "Parsonab,- 
," ate— Plaaso PRINT CliARlY iw mora than ono word in each square below. 

15 

Words 
or Loss 

PiratWofd 'I'n.,, ' , 

^ •; rj 

3. 

4. 

1. 

4. 

7. 

■. 

9. 

s|oo 

••• - .^1 . 

i 

11. 

■ ■ 1 
1 

"• V ■ •. ::- 

1 

13. . ' 

14. 

IS. $1.00 

Ev«ry 

Additionah 

Word 

5e 

1«. -$1.03 

17. ' $1.10 

11. $1.1S 

19. $1.20 

20. $1.25 

* 

M. $1.30 

Pay Amount 
in last 

M. r; »$1.S5 

29. $1.40 

2*. : . .$1.4S 

J ^ • 

squaro yo« 
fill In. 

2S. $ija 

24. $1.S5 

27. $1.40 


Now to figurm addnga and trntaphonm numbmrtt ' 

2022 W. Adams Blvd. - Equals 4 Words 
REpublic 3.5S00 — Equals 3 Words ' 


.!• . 


CALIFORNIA EAGLE 
10S0 E. 43rd PU 


Classif iod Ad Dopt. 
Los Angolos 11, Calif. 


Gentlemen: v 

I am enclosing '$. check, money ^order or coins in payment of my classified. 

Please insert it In the next iiMM| of your CAUf ORNIA EAGLE. ■ , 

.]■'-» 

Print Name 


I . • . • • . • • . ■ 


Address Phone 

_y Your CALIFORNIA EAGLE is published every THURSDAY. Ads must reach your CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE office by 1:00 p.m. Wednesday for insertion in the following day Classified offices open 
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 


Omegas 16 

Meet Here 

i ■ 

In August 


i, 


spect as did Dr. George Wash- 
ington Carver. Born a slave, 
this man, armed only with his 
own great genius, attained be- 
fore his death on January 5. 
194,5. world-wide eminence as 
a scientist, humanitarian and 
educator. 

"Fowr decades of his h"fe were 
devoted 1o aidirfjg the growth 
and ..nrogress of Tuskegee In- 
stitut^Nt>f Alabama. The im- 
portant <-ontributions of Dr. 
Carver helped make this school 
one of the fine.st educational 
facilities in the world today. 
Hi.s work in the fields of. chem- 
istry and agricultural .science 
was instrumentat in providing 
a better, more abundant life for 
thousands of people, not only 
in his own country an(^ time.^ 
but throughout the World and* 
for generations to com'e. 

"It has become traditional. to 
honor this outs|andiijg Ameri- 
can with special ob.servances 
each year upon the anniversary, 
of his death. In accordance with 
this cu.sfom and with deepest 
respect for the memory of this 
great rnan. I. Goodwin J. Knight. 
Governor of California, hereby 
proclaim January 5, 19.55. -a.s Dr. 
George Washington Carver Day 
in our State. I urge all Cali- 
fornians to give consideration 
to the inspiration which is to 
be found in Dr. Carver's life 

and works, for ihe\ exemplify i tion made the observation that 
deal.s of the May ITth decisibti of the 
' United .Slates Supreme Court 


ATLANTA, Ga.— Oniega Pi 
Phi Fraternity closed ■ its 41st 
Grand Conclave here Thursday 
by ca*)ling for "full intlegration 
of education in all areas" and 
by cihosing Los Angeles as its 
meeting place in August, 1955. 

In' a clearly defined resolu- 
tion, delegates to the conclave 
voted that the fraternity should 
go on record in supporting the 
position of the National Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of 
Colored People, asking .for de- 
segregation in. cducati(^n. 

In addition to taking a stand 
against .Segregation in Amer- 
ican- life, the fraternity called 
on all of its members "every- 
where to lend " f uU sitpport to 
the proposed program."! 

Deemphasizing much of its 
social prograiri, the fiTaternity 
went on record almosit at the 
beginning of the conclave here 
Wednesday by striking at "some 
of the vital issues" in American 
life as they affect Negroes and 
olher--^ninority groups. 

The status of the Negro in 
Arnerica and some of| the im- 
plications back of social change 
were aired -Wednesday in a 
work.shop presented ; by the 
fraternity. j 

The panel dealing-wilth educa- 


Ben luda osas 
tod; to Draw 
Racial Lines 


NEW 
word 


hotels and U. S. 

agents to bqr American 

from certain hotels on 

"vacation pa.ra- 


YORkV 
ranium 


A secret cod* 
" is used by. 


Bermud 

travel 

Negroes 

the so-called 

dise. 

This' harge was made In 

Confider lial magazitie (oti J^ale 
Jan. 4th and backed t^p by a 
hitherto unpublished document 
showing how the Bermuda big- 
otry plot works. 

■ The di cument is a letter sent 
by the I ?rmuda Tourist Bureau 
to A m j r i c a n travel agents. 
Marked I^Confidential Informa- 
tion to irravel Agents" the 
letter st ites: "Some hotels are 
restricte i. We suggest therefore 
the use of the -following code 
w'oi-ds, p arti<;ularly in cables, to 
denote r icial origin. j . 

"Gentile — 01.eander"; ? { : 

"Jewis h — Hibiscus"; 

"Negri — Geranium"; ''.'"' 

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- '-.-.in 





UCLA LURARX 

LOS ANaELBS 


teafflefs Strike iLos Aug 


CO«P 
AVE 

CALIF 




BALKS 


DIRTY RECORD 



f-Pbeys 


^icy 


Vol. LXXIV— No. 43 


Les Angeles, California 


Tkurs., Jan. 13, 1955 


to Death 


LEAFLETS HIT L.A. — Vile leaflets, parts of which [are shown above, are being mailed to 
residents of Los Angeles. » ^.-——-'ZIZ^^^--- \ \ 

Local Hate PedHer Mails 
'Ape- Leaf leH^City Schools 


< 


i'-i- 


i'"^^- 


Vi A 




Ugly, filthy and vile anti- 
Negro propaganda is currently 
being mailed to residents of Los 
Angeles. ", 

This past week the lying and 
insulting leaflets were sent by 
post to members o^ the Board 
of Education 'and other leaders 
of the city schools. Investiga- 
tion reveals that copies of thie 
revolting race-hate material has 
been sent during the past sev- 
eral weeks to individuals in 
outlying communities. 
^'E^otM Ape, Negio 

Object of the campaign is ob- 
viously to sfir up the most 
primitive type of race antagon- 
ism, to pit white against black 
and to arouse the lynch spirit, 
apparently as a move against 
. the Supreme Court decision 
holding Jiin Crow schools un- 
constitutional. 

-r^vOne side of the leaflet shows 
an ape, the other sid^ a 
Negro, the attempt being to 
Show that the Negro Is only 
slightly removed from the ani- 
mal kingdom. The fact that 
there isn't an iota of truth In 
any (tf the allegations contained 
in this scurrilous document does 
not lessen the Incalculable 
harm that it can do. (See pic- 
ture above.) 

Purveyws aC this guttar-typ* 


Jeff High Athlete 
Stabbed 

Schoolmate, 1i 
Held Following 
Midnight Fight 

Jefferson High School 
track and football star, Ro- 
bert Bias, 1609 E. 41st 
place, died in General Hos- 
pital Sunday evening, vic- 
tim of a stab wound inflict- 
ed by a 14-year-old school- 
mate. 

The two youths had been to 
a mixed teen-age party Satur- 
day night at 1539 E. Santa Bar* 
bara avenue. 

fvltod KaU» 



together wlfh two other boy«, 
were walking down HoopM 
avenue, when they began argu- 
ing. As they came abreast of 
Jefferson Higtu-theyoUnger boy 

lied a knife and thrust it 
deep into young Bias' stomach. 

The tall, good-looking and 
popular youth crumpled over on 
the grass of the school yard, 
bleeding profusely. 

His attacker fled the scene, 
as did the other two lads who 
had witnessed the knifing. One 
of them, however, paused In his 
flight long enough, to telephone 
the police. 

Bias, who was 15 and a stu- 
dent in the B-11^ class, was 
picked up by poUce isa rushed 
to the hospital. His condition 
was serious, and he was suf- 
fering-from loss of blood. 

He did. however, tell police 
(Continued on Page 2)- : 



The "dirty" records that have l^pt fashionable St 
Paul Baptist church in a turmoil fol months and thkt 
formed the basis of a $200,000 suitlagainst its pastor 
were silenced again Tue§,day wh^n- ^v. Branham maie 
a court-ordered deposition at Atty. G|orge E. Cannady's 
office. 1l 

The Eagle learned that the 
Rev. Branham._iLfter categori- 
cally denying that he ha(^ com- 
mitted any indiscre.tion^ with 
Miss Rosaretha Shepheri^, said 
that he couldn't ' remjember 
whether ^jr jisd. he had ever 
heard the sensational re(^ords. 
Attorney Objects J 

Atty. CannHtly immediately 
offered to play them fojr the 
mir.'"*"r. But at this moment 
Atty.'-Paul'lf. Hutchljison 
jumped to his feet with a 
forthright ohj^tion to the in- 
troduction ofN^he recordisj. 

Branham, who up Ijq this 
point had been suave si^daf- 
■ even pleasant |to re- 
immediately 


to church' imem- 
the records fii|st be- 
knowledgje, Rev. 
stoutly denien. that 
>n the discs was hi*. 
lad OB Tim^ 
Branham was . schedi^led to 
appea^at Atty. Cannady's of- 
fice at^:30 p.m.. Tuesdiy. He 
ad been' ordered, by th|e court 
t^ppear and failure t^ do so 
would have inade him liable 
to cotatempt of court a|nd Im 
prisonraent. 

At pfwnptly 2:36\ plm. the 
kBiinlster, Ilanked hy His two at 
^korneys, Hotchinsbn and James 
rioumeyN«wun« Jauptllyup 
«C ^Cantiadri oHic^ 

id camttmita, <h|r pastor 
^ift^^ a frfen<ly liianner. 



NOTiTALKING — 

Branhtmt' appeared for m 'dif-'l 
positioA Tuesday as schedufe^j 
but diqn't have auythmfl^t^ 
say ah^t the^ famtnu rtcuhft' \ 

— — • ■ ;. .1' ':'.r 


of "literature" can find an 
audience, amongst the; illiterate, 
prejudiced and ignorant whites. 
It is also calculated to anger 
Negroes and goad them into re- 
taliations. 

Peddled LeeallT ' 

These leafiest are put out by 
the National Citizens Protective 
Association^ which gives its sost 
office box/number as 156,^ St 
Louis 3, Mo. They are being dis- 
tributed locally by W. R. Beatty, 
Citizens United Incorporated, 
6217 Converse Avenue, Los An- 
geles 1. ; j 

Brazenly the authors an- 
nounce that the leaflets can~Be 
purchased for 10c per copy or 
$1, for 15 copies. 

Prominently shown on both 
the drawing of the ape and. of 
the Negro are a bottle marked 
with a skull'and cross-bones. 
The bottle is variously labeled 
"a warning," and "animal 
smell." In the lower left hand 
comer of both pictures is a 
circle containing spots, with the 
label ''syphilis carrier." 
Rareltiag lasulta 

Samples ol the gratuitous in- 
iults found in the writing be- 
low the pictures are as follows: 

"The Negro carries stench 
glands as. does the dog and in 
hit n«|tuial itatc these may 


serve as a means of identifica- 
tion in place of a name. This 
stench (from extra sweat 
glands) is partly under control 
and is put out when the Negjre 
is excited." 

"Unless the Negro race with 
its deadly sickle celled blood is 
separated from the white race 
it will completely destroy 
America." 

Cannlbcd 

"The Negro has no morals. He 
is not immoral but non-moral. 
Without the white man to con- 
trol him the Negro reverts to 
savagery and practices torture, 
cruelty and witchcraft. The 
Negro is a natural cannibal and 
on his native doorpost may be 
found choice cuts of human 
flesh." 

"The Negro is much closer to 
the ape than any other race 
physically and consequently 
mentally for form must deter- 
mine mental and moral quali- 
ties and like must produce like. 
Every race is different physi- 
cally and thereby mentally. 
With the Negro, the body — 
hence mind — is the lowest of 
aU." 

Tiaged Bocm 

"The black skir> <rf the Negro 
has nothing to do .with climate. 
(Continued oii Page 2) 


Five to Seek 
Council Posts 
In Primaries 

Five Negroes, three In the 
Eighth and two in the Tenth 
District, may seek poets in City 
Council in the spring primary 
— -elections. No Negroes filed for 
the Board of Education posi- 
tions. 

Eighth District candidates 
may be Lucius Lomax. pub- 
lisher of the Los Angeles 
Tribune, George "Hiomas, execu- 
tive of the Los Angeles County 
Conference- on Community Re- 
lations and Earl Griffin, pub- 
licist. ' . 

Filing declarations of candi- 
dacy in the Eighth District were 
Perry Parks, postal employee, 
ahd James Jones, a business 
man. • _ 

Mcrr Mot QuflOIfT 

All five have filed their dec 
larations, but none <A them has 
formally .qualified. In many in^ 
stances, declarants never com 
plete formalities and hence do 
not appear on the primary 
ballot. 

The Tenth District is now rep- 
resent^ by Charles Navarro, 
who won the election two years 
ttgo in a hotly contested battle 
with Dr. John A. Somerville. 
Thomas has never sought pub- 
lic office but Lomax ran against 
Delbert Morris and was nar- 
rowly defeated in last fall's 
assembly contest. Both Lomax 
and Thomas are Democrats. 

The Eighth District is repre- 
sented by Gordon Hahn. The 
Rev.^. W. Rakestraw was his 
opponent in ttie last municipal 
elMtion. Parks has been active 
th copmninity affairs for a 
nun>ber of years. Jones has tried 
his^ luck in various elections but 
has never won nomination. 


COVETED LICENSE— It took grit and courage and^ 
perseverence — but this week Miss Eddie Mae Armstrong won 
the coveted license, certifying that she has successfully passed 
the rigid California Bar, , Examinations. Congratulations, 

Portia. , l.j :!' 

NEW PORTIA READY 
TO HANG OUT SHINGLE 

It took perseverance, giit, courage, confidence and 
a lot of good, hard work, but last week Miss Eddie Mae 
Armstrong got something she^ values more than a mil- 
lion dollars. ■*^""^~i — Z ;7li; H — z 

received a little extra push 



Miss Armstrong was one of 
the southland's 257 candidates 
who successfully passed the 
rigid California State Bar ex- 
amination, and who last week 
received her officifl license, 

authorizing her to pfactice lawu—-" •» •»• — 

in all courts in the State of 'Pb*" .the lonf grind of working 


California and in the U. S. 
Federal courts. 

Started Early 
Miss Armstrong's ambition to 
be an attorney dates back to 
when she was a youngster. It 
was strengthened when she was 
a student at Manuel Arts, and 


when she delivered the valedic- 
torian address to her graduat- 
ing class. 

Later she studied at the Uni- 
versity of California at Berke- 
,ley, and after graduating, be- 


by day "and studying law by 
night at the South Western 
University School of Law. 

Everyone told her 'she 

couldn't make it It was too 

much. She'd never pass. „ But 

she finished law school, and 

(Continued on Page 2) 


:taeh< 

tsa^ day off ajid-wahtk to see 
hlr^Best-fSlThe isn't gjging to 
let a littie obstacle like 
wanting to see 
way. 

. Last-SSfurday, officeijs got a 
hurried call to ,317 
street. On arrival they \v^re 
by J. D. Weathers 
officers his 

been drinking. He alsb stated 
that*Vance had enteied 
home of Henrietta Morgaiu 
through the windi 
the kitchen beating her. 

Officers entered the 
They heard loud voices ind saw 
the girl and Vance battling it 
out Vance ^a(ras twisting 


Boy Scratches Foot, 
Dies From Tetanus 

Foiirtieim-year-old Erpest Copeland was plajdng In 
his backyard, 9559 Defiance street, Watts, Dec. 20, 
when he scratched his foot on itn old iron bed spring 


didn't seem to be very 
serious but thle lad's mother, 
Mrs. Gertrude Copeland, never- 
theless bathed the injury and 
bandaged it 
The next day the small 


In fh» Eaglm 

Special teatuxcs this wfcek 
Insida the Eagle indudt: 
Chaxs Crawford 10 


Editorial 

'iports _.. 


Church Activltiea 
Social 


People and Places . 
Dorothea Foster .„ 
Bill Smallwood ... 
What's Cooking 
Bridge Pointers . 
Bowling News 
M(HTi8 Says . 


wound seem to be infected and 
was causing considerable pain. 

Dtod Dec M 

Four days later, Mrs. Cope- 
land took Ernest to the General 
Ho^ital. On Dec. 26, less than 
a week after what had at first 
appeared a minor scratch, Ern- 
est was dead. 

The coroner retorted that the 
death was probably due to 
tetanus. ' 

Sgt Bodcy Vann and tMe 
boy's grieving mother, Mrs. 
Copeland, warned other moth- 
ers to take any scratches or 
cuts from rusty nails or ragged 
Iron seriously. They implored 
them to rush their diildren to 
the liearest doctor, even If the 
■crato^ appeared unimportant 

TetMus is one of the most 
painfuTvoif deaths. And the 
tragedy is that in most 
It can b« 


1^-1-. 


.m 


■it 


*'^4^- 


M9M« 



unflwiltin 
[ibnOea^ 

Br pDBlZ LEE KING 
Chiroii -actor Kinckle Edward 
jeficer, 39,'goes to court today, 
Thursda; j^fim a preliminary 
^^0ine >n the diarge he mur- 
dered ft rs—- Geraldine . dadjrs 
Bayrlitr i. Ray died as a result . 
of an ali>rtlon New Yeats pKf.\ 
'"STntendew ^tj tih«|" 
tounty Sainr u e s d ay, [ I>r- ' 
pencer told the Eagle: '^' feA 
=cbnf idem that the truth will 
come ou 'knd S-iftdll be dejared 
of this fiideous crlme^ Only a 
done Budi 


\^. 76th 


the 


house. 


and language-amr ^^ 


girl's, arm, 

kitchen utensils were flying in 

all. directions 

Both Vance and Miss Morgan 
were taken to.77th street police 


deadly weapon. 

Vance-4old arresting bffieers, 
"All I wanted to do was talk to 
her. When she wouldn't let me 
In the house, I went in Uirough 
the window. I've been drinking 
and I really don't know] exacUy 
what happened." 



Atty. 
togethe 
Hardwic 


r 


on 


Mill 
brought; 
f ice at 
said 


pearanc 
she w 
monia 
hosplta: 

Dr. S] 


Oidnt Know 

erman A. English Who, 

with Atty. Edward E. 

tlng| On 

said his client told liim 

oods, 3715 Mont^adr. 

'— . Ray into his est- 

S. Avalon blvc^ He 

reaction and ap- 
claimed he thought 
suffering from |»ett- 
id ordered her to tiit ' 


were 


incer told the Eag!4 
Ray. and Wood* 

d friends, and ^lat 
Woods api^rently thought tha 
doctor 1 rould be able to &dp 
the beaii jful young woman wlio 
didn't wint the baby she was 


i ~ 


station, which was convmiently "^""^ ^"^ ""^.S^ ""vTr 
Just around the eSnJr. Bbthf«o«"« tf bear. ^«rbeds, t^ la 
were booked on assault with a 


married and has tliree children, 
is allegi d to be the fatlier fi ' 
the unwelcome child. 

'Tf t liad done this thiiig I -. 
would have^cleaned up after ray 
asslstanj, Lottie Jordon. anid- 
Woods fook Jerry to ttw haa- 
pital. Bit I didn't even Taurtt: 
<Co|tinued on Page 2) 


Marian Aider 


fakes 


History in Met DAut 

NEW YORK— An Jmpossible chlldJyod dream aarae 

for Marian Anderson ^iday. She ma* h|sr debut with th* 
Metropolitan Opera. I i | • 

It was far more than Just a debut The American eoatfaHo 
ir to " ■ " ' """ 


is the first Negro sing 
at the 71-year-old house, 


become a 
For*^ 


her it was th* culmination of 
a brilliant Intemationall career 
as a concert performer, i and for 
other Negro singers it Was the 
opening of a new an^ major 
doer to oppoAunity. 
Api^onsa 
Miss Anderson appeared in 
one scene— 4he seeondj of the 
first act She sang the! role of 
the sorceress, Ulrica^ in a re 
vlval of Verdi's "Masked 
Ball." Alttiough this was a 
fieductloB with an aB-itar 


--U.. 



mber of the 



ded by Zinka 
ard 'Tucker, LMBVd. 
Roberta Peters, iri^ 
ma and Honnftn ~ ~ 
liicted by 
it was 10m 
larance that i 
ention and aj 
itement In tlia 

ad an apcoing.: 

e houae^iad wOA e|^ 

tiik, opanldK ted. 

d omerad tlAsti §£ 


■r 



2-Tha Califernia Eagle 
jThurs., Jan. 13, 1955 



Walter White In 
3-Month Leave 

ITEW TORS — Walter 
Wfeito, •3ncuUT« Mcretorr of 
Uw MAACP, has beeo grant- 
ad • three meaths' leave of 
ab ee n ce to regain bis health. 
Dr. Chaaaiag H. Tobias, 
choinBan of the NAACP 
Bead of Directors, an- 
Bouneed this week. 

Upon recommendatien of 
White's phTsidan, the Beard 
voted to grant the leare so 
ttuit after the rest he may' 
retiuB to work with full 
ttrength to meet the unusual 
preMures and obligations of 
Us office. 

White's physician de- 
scribed his cardiac condition 
OS '^mest satisfactory." How- 
ever, it was added, another 
three mentlrii would be re- 
fer him to fully reeu- 
peroie. 

In White's .absence. Qoy 
W 1 1 k i n s, administrator. 
serres as head of the NAACP 
staff. 


r 


'i-' 


Kinsey to 
^peakon- 
Yes, Sex- 

Dr. Alfred Kinsey, professor of 
Boology at Indiana University 
Uid noted researcher, will ad- 
dress the professional staff of 
the City- of Hope Medical Center 
on Friday, Jan. 14, at 8 p.m. 

His talk will be on "The 
Physiolftgy of Sexual» Response 
and its Clinical Implications." 

Open to ^11 members of the 
medical professioiSTlh the Los 
Angeles metropolitfm area, and 
their guests, the 4neetlng will 
take place in the auditorium on 
the City of Hope grounds. 
, "nie City of Hope Medical 
Center |s; located at 1500 E. 
Dnarte^Road in Duarte. 


Negro Firemen 
Pledge Aid to 
Uri)an League 

Report that Negro firemen 
had pledgpd 100 per cent sup- 
port to the Urban League mem- 
bership drive brought cheers at 
the kick-off meeting last Mon- 
day at the organization's new 
headquarters. 

The report was made by Mrs. 
Permelia Jordan, chairman of 
Division D — one of the five 
established to handle solicita- 
tions during the membership 
drive in January. 

The Urban League has 
worked with the Fire Depart- 
ment since 1949 in their efforts 
to integrate the various fire 
stations. 

The kick-off meeting was 
spearheaded by George A. 
Beavers, Jr., Lorenzo V. Spencer, 
Ella K. Mays and Wesley R. 
Brazier, with the Lilly Aguilar 
dancers as a special feature of 
the meeting. 

Division B — South Los Ange- 
les — headed by Leon Thompson 
had the largest representation 
at the meeting, and historically, 
poses the greatest competition. 
Chairmen of the other divi- 
sions are: Division A, Reverend 
Maurice D a w k i n s and Mrs. 
Rosemary Hampton: Division C, 
Edward T. Shedlock and Sig- 
mund Arywitz; Division E. 
I Hazel Washington.- 

The Urban League Member- 
ship Drive, headed by Lorenzo 
V. Spencer, real estate broker, 
iand Ella K. Mays. YWCA Board 
chairman, will be held during 
the month of January and has a 
goal of 5000 new members. 



Dr. HudsMi Re-Bected 
NAACP Directors Board 

NEW YORK— Dr. H. Claude Hudson, of Los Ange- 
les, was again elected to the Board of Directors of the 
NAACP at its 45th annual meeting here last week, along 
with Judge Wm.- H. Hastie of^ ^ackel, Natche?. Miss., for- 


CAKDIDATE — Eighth 
Councilmanic District pott is 
being sought . by Perry C. 
Parks, Jr., whose rampgign 
gets formally under uay next 
Tuesday night at a meeting 
at the Crystal Tea Room, 


Longstioremen 
Claim Negroes 
Face Job Loss 

SAN FRANCISCO— A commit- 
tee broadly representative of 
the Bay Area Negro community 
was formed here this week for 
the announced purpose of pro- 
tecting the job rights of Negro 
and other minority workers 
aboard Pacific Maritime Asso- 
ciation ships. 

According to the International 
Longshoremen's Union, the jobs 


of the e workers, who form the 
Spencer. Urban League Board I majority of all working marine 


1 


■'4\ 


l^. 


-f .i- 


<^ 


'Thui'good Marshall 
Slated^ Spiok In 
Pasadena, Oakland 

SAN FRANCISCO — Thurgood 
Marshall, NAACP special coun- 
sel,, will speak at public^ meet- 
ings in Pasadena and Oakland 
-jOn May 20 and 22, respectively. 

The meetings are being spon- 
sored by. the West , Coast Re- 
gional Committee under the 
leadership of C. Lawrence Del- 
lyms, chairman of the commit- 
tee and vice-president of the 
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car 
Porters. ' j 

" 1 i3^#; 

AR You Need 
^ Child s Cough 

Wbea colds, measles or flu leave 
-yvor ctaU with a cioupy cough get 
OeomulskNi quick because chronic 
bnoehitis may develop. Creomulsion 
seodMs raw throat and chest mem- 
braiies, loosens and helps expel germy 
pUegra. miklly relaxes systemic ten- 
sion and aids nature fight the caiuse 
of ii^tatioB. Get -milder, tastier 
Craaamlsiaii for Children in the pink 
aadMnep^kageatyourdrugoounter. 

CREOMUCSION 

FOB CHIUWEN 

I Ctmtttf, Omt Col*. Aorta ■rwcMtl* 


member, has headed the drive 
for the past two years. 

Two bronze trophies and five 
incentive prizes, donated 8^' 
ilenry Brandler. Board member; 
Walt Barak, furniture dealer, 
and an anonymous Urban Lea- 
gue supporter, will be awarded 
to divisions, teams and indi- 
viduals making the best report. 
■ Report meetihgs will be held 
each Monday during 'January, 8 
p.m.,^ League offices, 3839 S. 
Western Avenue. 


Branham Shies 
From Records 

"^ (Continued from Page 1) 
"It's a very pleasant day,- a 
very pleasant day." Other than 
that he wasn't saying anj'thing 
to the press. 

The day before, Branham 
had a meeting and a near in- 
cident involving Mack Shep- 
herd, father of the young girl 
Branham is chWrged with se. 
ducing and ivo<)ucting, . and 
who brought the suit against 
the popular minister. 

.Shepherd had been ordered 
to appear at the office of Bran- 
ham's attorneys to answer cer- 
tain questions as to how he 
learned of the facts attested to 
in the charges he had filed. 

When Shepherd arrived, he 
was noticeably surprised to 
find out that Branham was also 
there. As he sat down he was 
heard to remark to himself 
something that sounded suspic- 
iosly like "I ought to kill him." 
He refrained, however, from any 
open attack upon the man he 
accuses of bringing disgrace 
upon his family. 





cooks and stewards, are threat 
ened by an impending National 
Labor Relations Board election 
which could force them to join 
AFL unions, which the long- 
shoremen claim haver a 40-year 
history of discrimination 
against minority workers. 

Formation of the committee 
stemmed from a community 
conference called by the ILWU 
Stewards' Pepattment Organiz- 
ing Committee. 

The community •' committee 
will, within the next few days, 
consider legal steps tiiat may be 
taken to protect the job rights 
of more than 2000 cooks and 
stewards who are members of 
minority groups. 

It is expected to call to the 
attention of the President of the 
United States the tragic poten- 
tial of a situation that could de- 
prive the Bay Area Negro 
community alone of some $5,- 
000.000 in annual wajges.- 

Temporary chairman of the 
committee is William Chester, 
ILWU Northern California Re- 
gional Director. 

Other committee m embers 
are: Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett, 
physician and publisher of the 
Sun -Reporter; the Rev. F. D. 
Haynes, pastor of the Third 
Baptist Church of San Fran- 
cisco; Rich%rd. Bancroft. San 
Francisco attorney and execu- 
tive i)oard member of the local 
chapter of the National Associa*. 
tion for the Advancement of 
Colored People; Jo'seph Ken- 
nedy. San Francisco attorney; 
Charles T. Augustus of the Paci- 
fic Public Relations Company; 
the Rev. Hamiltop T. Boswell, 
pastor of the Jones Methodist 
Church; Dr. W. E. Garner, phy- 
sician: the Rev. Henry G. Green, 
pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist 
Church, and the Mesdames Ruth 
March and Qstenia D. Fleming 
of the National Council of 
Negro Women. 

Also present at the conference 
were: Woodrow Bostick (Booker 
T. Washington Center) Revels 
Cayton (ILWU). J. Kendall" 
(ILWU-SDOC), W. D. Edwards 
(ILWU-SDOC), K. C. Thomas, 
George Towas, Berkeley ob- 
server, Mrs. Lucille Morrison 


the United States Circuit Court 
of Appeals; Walter Reuther, 
CIO president; Arthur B. 
Spingam, New York lawyer and 
president of the association 
since 1940; and «Dr. Channing 
H. Tobias, religious leader and 
chairman of the Association's 
Board of Directors. 

Newly elected memt>ers in- 
clude the Right Reverend 
Stephen Gill Spottswood of 
Washington, D. C, bishop of 
the African Methodist Epis- 
copal Zion Church; Dr. George 
K. Hunton, New York City, exe- 
cutive secretary of the Catholic 


roer president. National Dental 
Association, 

Others re-elected to the 48- 
memlier board were Dr. Joseph 
Beq:y, Tuskegee, Ala.;' Judge 
Hubert T. Delany, New York 
City Domestic Relations Court; 
Prof. S. Ralph Harlow; Rev. 
James H in ton; Mrs. Daisy 
Lampkin; Carl Murphy; A. 
Maceo Smith and Dr. U. S. 
Wiggins. 

There were 19 candidates for 
the 16 offices vacant. NAACP 
branches throuhgout the coun- 
try made their selections during 
November and December. The 
sealed ballots were op>ened and 


Interracial Council; and Dr. A. 'counted at the convention. 


Halt U. S. Aid to Jim Crow 
Scliools. White Demands 


NEW YORK — In his first public appearance since 
his hospitalization last October, Walter White, execu- 
tive secretary of the National Association for the Ad- 
vancement Of Colored People, predicted a withholding 
of federal- educational funds from states defying the 
Supreme Court ruling of May 17, 1954 banning racial 
segregation in public education. 
Citing a report of the Depart- 



ment of Health, Education and 
Welfare, White told the associ- 
ation's annual meeting that the 
17 States. requiring segregation 
In schools received $220,000,000 

of federal aid for various edu- 
cational purposes in 19S2-53. 
The NAACP. he asserted, will 
be on the alert- to prevent the 
allocation of federal funds for 
education "to any state which 
violates the law as interpreted 
by the Supreme Court." 

Not only do these states face 
the possibility of being denied 
federal Junds for the perpetua- 
tion 'of segregated/education. 
White warned, bui they may 
also encounter'' diniculty dis- 
posing of their school l>onds. 
The banking commissioner of 
Ohio, he pointed oiit, has re- 
cently rejected Georgia's school 
revenue certificates as an "in- 
eligible Investment" for Ohio 
banks. 


lension i«/ith 

Braii4iur 


saysCLAMNCC WILSON 

Captain 

Harlam GlobofraHars 

**We might look relaxed, but 
there's plenty of tension when- 
■ver the Trotters ploy. I find 
chawing B««ch-Nut Gum holps 
m« relax, ploy my b«tf. Hoips 
yeu at work, too. Yoi^^ it I" 


Hate PhcimpleH 
Hits Los^Angeles 

(Continued from 'Page 1) 
It is caused by aiiimal coloring 
matter between the true and the 
scarf skins. It is proven the 
world over that black and yel- 
low' skins are tigns of mental 
and spiritual inferiority' and 
that no tinged imc* can create a* 
dvUizatlon." 

"The Negro's hair . . . Is not 
a true human hair but re- 
sembles the wool of the lower 
animals and it <^n be felted. 
The Negro's eyeball is tinged 
with yellow t& is .the ape's." 

ActioB Demandod 

The pictures of the ape and 
the Negro are practically iden- 
tical, except that the Negro 
appears somewhat darker than 
the ape. Both are tagged with 
the same pseudo - scientific 
labels in an endeavor to con- 
vince the stupid and ignorant. 
The tags include "animal wool," 
"small brain." "weak lower 
limbs," "ape groove .in skull," 
"black ape color." etc., etc. 

Copies, of the California Eagle 
containing a reproduction of 
this crude attempt to foment 
race riots are being mailed to 
the Federal Post Office, the 
F.B.I, and the NAACP. both 
locally and nationally. 

Local residents who have re- 
ceived copies of the leaflets are 
up In arms and demand that 
action be taken at mice against 
all those connected with putting 
out this leaflet or in dlstrtbut- 
ipglt 

MoTamant Gzewi 

The National Citizens Protec- 
tive Association, which admits 
parentage of the scurrilous 
document, is one of those or- 
ganizations which has mush- 
roomed into prominence since 
the Supreme Court decision of 
May 17, holding that segregated 
schools are unconstitutional. 
There are, similar, and presum- 
ably connected organizations in 
Detroit, and in various cities> in 
the south. 

It was a similar outfit which 
fomented the lypch atmosphere 
in White Sulphur Springs. W, 
Va., Baltimore and Washington, 
D.C., at the time of the opening 
ot schools last fall. 

So far as is known, the gov- 
emment has taken no action to 
date against the St. Louis or- 
ganization, or'^any of the other 
organizations located elsewhere. 


Sclidoimate 
Kills Youth 

(Confined from Page 1) 
officers H. T. Weldon and J. E. 
Guterding what had happened. 
The youngster knew that his 
condition was critical. He was 
too weak to write out a report, 
but he gave the name of his 
attacker, adding that he didn't 
know why the lad had knifed 
■him. 

Fellow students at Jefferson 
were incredulous when they 
heard what had happened. 
Young Bias had been excep- 
tionally popular, and it was 
hard for them to realize that 
their quiet, good-looking frieod. 
w^as dead. ' 

Students in his class tqak up 
a eollection in his behalf Tiaes- 
day, the money to be handed 
in tiie form of a check to the 
lad's mother, in addition, the 
school's A'Capella choir will 
sing at young Robert's funeral, 
scheduled for today. Thursday, 
at 1 :30 p.m., from the Morning 
Star Baptist church. 41st and 
Compton streets. , j 

Youth Arretted ^ I 

Ptolice. meanwhile, went to 
the 1100 block on E. Santa Bar- 
bara and arrested the youth 
-<Vho^d plunged the knife Into 
Bias'-^dy. He told pfficers: ^ 

"it all started New Yeare 
when I grabbed a girl's arm to 
keep her from hitting Tracy (a 
teen age friend^ with a pop 
bottle. Bias grabbed me then. 
Tonight he called me- and 
wanted to pick a fight. I told 
him I didn't want tb fight. He 
kept talking and I stjabbed him. 
I thought the others were clos- 
in on me. I didn't jtnow what 
was going to happen. -This- is 
fhe knife I did it "with." 

He turned over tl]e knife to 
the police. He wa^ taken to 
Juvenile Hall, with arraign- 
ment set for Jan. li. The lad's 
parents are long-time residents 
of Los Angeles, but; are sepa- 
rated. The youth liv^d with his 
mother. 


MOTOR LICENSES 

Branch offices of the Depart- 
ment of Motor Vehicles will be 
open Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 
12 noon during the annual ve- 
hicle registration renewal per- 
iod which ends on Friday, 
Feb. 4. 



LQUIS 


North Ainertccnr^ 
Hires Teacher^^ 


ur; 


Through the negoti^ti?!^ of 
Frederick A. CaTterTTndustrial 
Field Secretary 61 the Los An- 
geles Urban League, Louis C. eletti 
Marshall of Philad^phia, h^ts- at th 
been appointed^,^«s a mathe- 
matician for North American 
Aviation, at a beginning salary 
of $5500 per year. 

Marshall is a graduate of 
Howard University and the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, hold- 
ing the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science (cum laude) and Mas- 
ter of Science respectively. He 
has completed the residence re- 
quirements for the degree Doc- 
tor of Philosophy in mathema- 
tics. 


Silver Dollars 
Stick to Fingers 
Of Bank Janitor 

Julius Tommie Stringfellow, 
1667 E. 110th street, who works 
as a janitor for the Bank of 
America's Westwood Village 
branch, 1099 Westwood Blvd., 
seemed to- be impressed v*5Jth a 
siiyer dollar. A little too Im- 
pressedf police said. 

FBI agents got to question- 
ing around when the bank re- 
ported, last week that $2200 in 
silver had disappeared from the 
Vault Tuesday. Agents searched/ 
Stringfellow's ho.me, and m 
portedly came up with $1345 of 
the missing iron men. 

Stringfellow, 57."was 
at City Jail for robbery. 



Newest Portia; 
Obtains License 

(Continued from Page 1) 
then, mentally ready and eag«r 
to take the state law exams, 
*he b'fecame ill, and the doctor 
forbade her from \ undergoing 
the strenuous grilling for--at 
least a year. That was a hard 
year, but she kept pn studyingT 
for her ambition w^s firm, and 
her determination ■, undaunted. 
Great D«y 

It was a great day for her 
when she vyas sworn in by 
Chief Justice Phil S. Gibson of 
the Supreme CoWtof California 
and Judge Leon^ankwich of 
the Federal Courts: 

The new attorney is at pres- 
ent a legal representative for 
the Los Angeles County Bureau 
of Public Assistance in the 
Failure-to-Provide Division of 
the City Attorney's office. 

Miss Armstrong resides with 
her mother, Mrs. Mary Arm- 
strong, at 3900 H S. LaSalle 
Avenue. 


Spingarn 


again 


Heads NAACP 

MEW TOBK— f or tha ISMi 


consoeutiTa yat 
Spiagam was 
presSdont of tba 


Arthur B. 
ra-«l«etod 
MAACP at 


the assedottonfs ^ISth asBual 
maating h«n this waa k . First 
•loeted in IMO. tha v**^ 
New York lawjM sueeood^ 
his late brother J Dr. h f- , 
Spinagm. and pas serrofl 
eoBtinueuslT sin^ 

Dr. OianniBgH. ToWW 
was re-elected e*ainnan ox 
the Beard 


CPWili 


Meet Sunday 

The first ijeguljar monthly 
meeting for 1955 of the Los An- 
geles Branch NA^CP wdU be 


held Sunday, 1 JanHiary 16^ 

Phillips Templte. 971 E. 43rd St. 

at 3:30 p.m. All liiembers are 

ged to atterid as the newly 

<fted officers! will be installed 

this meeting. Tl^e President- 


elect, Thomas 
nounced this 
membership djrive 
February 27, 


G. Keusom, an- 

we^ that the 

will begin 


Dr. Sppi^cer 
Denies Guilt 

. (Continued jtron^ Page 1)^ 
what was wrong with her." 

Miss J9rdon was at her home, 
1335 E. 42nd sjtreet when Dr. 
Spencer called her knd told her 
to go with Woods afid Mrs. Ray 
to University ^ospital. 

The coroner'si auiopsy report 
showed tfhat «ji alwrtion wM 
performed. | i 

Doctor Related 

By a curious tiwist of- fate. Dr. 
Spencer was releas^ trom Lin- 
coln Heights Jill i Wednesday 
morning, and went home. He 
took a liesurely ijatli, then tele- 
phoned his attorlney. Atty. 
English, surprised that his client 
was out of- jail, but realizing 
th^^ he was scheduled for ar- 
raignment later that ^temoon, 
Notified poljce. ,\ 

. At that point. p<!»llce, some- 
what red in the lace, began 
searching their Jjftcords and 
found that someone" had slipped 
up t^d released the 'wrong 
SpenciBr. It couldn't happen, but 

■It did."- ^ I "I -; ^. ■ * 

^. Milton "Woods, when interro- 
gated, had told police that Dr. 
Spencer had agreed to operate 
for $75' in advance, and that 
that was why lie took Mrs, -Ray 
to hi? office. . • 

The doctor, who lives at 3991 
Denker avenue, said: "Woods 
must have been confused and 
been trying to get bimself out 
t>f It when the police questioned 
him. I can't see any other 
reason for his stat«nents." 


LOTS OF CARS 

JJnited States factories pro- 
duced one hundred and eighty 
million motor vehicles during 
the past fiftyjiyears, reports the? 
National Automobile Club. 


Meir, Af Last ltVHei:er 

Take RUMTOREX and enjoy life. 
RUMTOREX takes up where nature 
leaves off. A PHYSIClAtr^ POR- 
MtJLA. Money-back suafantee If not 
completely satisfied after three bot- 
tles. Only $5 00 for a full two weeks' 
supply. C. O. D. or send check or 
money order now. THE RUMTOREX 
COMf'ANY. 239 East USth Street 
New York 29. N. Y. 



iVeOv< 
'Anderswr 


(CoiitlDiMd fr«n*age » 
aliove*; the country and awi*^ 
pe sons! in the op*ra h«ur| 
ha 1 traveled from as fit 
as California to be present at. 
th* debut ^^ 

JMether Present 
Jo previous Metropolitan 
Op sra I performance had so 
m« tiy Negroes in the audience 
asi this show. Reporters 
fro n thit Negro press In the Far 
W<Bt, the Midwest and Ea4 
we e injthe theater, as well as 
Bu< h colleagues of Miss Ander^ 
SOI as ftoland Hayes, Leontyna 
Pri;e, ^illiam Warfield and 
LafTende Winters. Away on 
was Bol>ert McFerrin, barl- 

., trie second Negro to be 

led hiy the Metropolitan, who 
make his debut in the 

■a '.^Ida" toward the end 
of he riionth. 

1 1 the center box sat Mrs. 
An la Aiiderson, the contralto's 
fra 1 mother, who could share 
an( ther ItriuBiphant moment in 
hei daughter's career. A widow, 
sh< worked as a laundress in 
Ph: adelphla three dacades ago 
an< more and" had bfilijey^d that 
Ma ian some day wouw make 
sor ething of her voice. 

1 le contralto's sisters Alyae 
Anfersoh and Mrs. Ethel De- 
Pritet, and her nephew, Jim De- 
Pri st, were in the box with her 
hu! band, Orpheus H. Fisher, 
an( herimanager, S. Hurok. 


CyvKIFORNIA 
tAGlfe 

1050 E. 43rd fl 
Ansdcs 11. CaHI. > 
ADoms 4.0141 


^OREN MILLER 
Editor and Publishac 



No. 43 
Jan. 13. IfSS 


6 


WACLER, jr.- LA«iv. Mgr. 

E.| SIMONS, Exacutiv* Edtter 
I" ABIE" ROBII^ON 


..circulation Mar. 
-Off ie*. Mgr. 


REPRESE.NTArTWE 


)S12 1«b at 
Calif., Ph. I EX. i-1BI1 


Ai itumn Subscriptieht 


MoBtlicil^ 


.■j 


Oalrf 


PER fc0PY 


lOe 


Adjul 
Oat* 

■ Pui 

Califi 

10S0 

Seco 

19S7. 

wr- 

REP 


icatlen Deerea Numbar 123821 
of AdJudleaUMi July 1, iaa. 

Ilahad averyrfThuraday 'by Tlw 
Irnia Eagle' . Publisl^lng Ccv 
[East 43rd Place. Entered as 
Ciaaa Matter Ndvembar 1 1^ 
at th* Pbat off lea at Laa A** 
CillfariUa, under tha Act ! af 
, 3, lS». . i 

ESENTEO NATIONALLY |V 
JATED PUBLISHERS. I INCU 
6S13 Hellyweed Blvd. I 


Rail BIdg., San Franciaca, Calif. 


II 


4«tll 


san rranciaca, wain., 
Straet, N. Y.iTSri*r|V. 


Ben 

.by ovotding 


look oMcr. worn sot. jittieiT for t 
aya each mentliT Why let mijli ajy- 
i your "time" is here? Thoaaaadi «f 
_ I ririi and women take a littk Cardoi 
ca«li pay to help build new cacrfy aad 
sec. They look, act. alcep bettar^ tal 
id lew misery each aBontt. Some leaa* 
go tlfoush periods vithoM pain afte • 
whilej Stay tovdy all- month ^ ask («a^ : 
-*"*-•* for Cardni. (Say:;"een(-«ew«#i*). 


CARD U I 


CNSMse srlun 


^■H"H"HHN-i"i"«" 


When builnasa and pleasure are 
combined busineas generally gata th* 
worst end of th* deal. 



LIBERTY SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOGIATIO|l j| 

2512 SOUtH CENTRAL ADams 1^118 ' J 


Incorperafed 1921 

CondenMcl Statement of Condition 
, December 31, 1954 


ASSITS 

Real Estate Leans $6,536,1 ^0.73 

U. S. Bonds and Stock in 

Federal Home Loan Bank. 165,000.00 
Cash on hand and in Banks. 683,003.60 
Advances for Taxes and 

Insurance ., 11,235.35 

Interest Earned lijuf 

Uncollected 1 3,352.49 

Loans Secured by Shares • 

and Certificates 29,581.74 

Contracts for Sale of Real 

Estate 8,81 8.76 

Association Premises, 

Less Depreciation 15,450.78 

Furniture, Fixtures and Equip- 
ment, Less Depreciation. . . 10,354.16 
Real Estate Owned, Less 

Depreciation 25,534.46 


* 
l5 




LIABII TIIS 


Certificate Accounts . 

Share Accounts .... . 

Escrows ind Aecei^its 
Payable .^*. . 

Loan* in Process 

Advances from Federal 
• Loan Bank .... 

Reserves for Uncollect^ 
Interest and Unearne i 
Premiums A. 

Earned Reserves and | 
Undivided Profits 

Surplus 

Guarantee Stock .. 


. r. $6,240,639.51 
236,269.08 


e • • 


Horrw 



''MHO EUE WANTS Ta BE 
BM-fTRONG-HEALIHY T 


## 


"Mawwaats bc le be bi| *> itroac, to dM pvm 
B« Seottl tvtry day." Yes, Scott's EmoUoa lielp* 
1 devdop t itunly body, strong bones, 
itaeth. It also builds resistance to colds, 
Itbqr lack enough Wamios AtOI It^ a 
'^M mine" erf nattml Mtamtai, caergy 
^bnilding oil ind tddcd miaeraU. 
, 14S/X»,000 bottte OMd-lt mmit be de- 
'pandabielGatScatt^teday-andnmiil*. 

SCOTT'f IMMU ION 

NATURAL HIGH ENERGY TONIC 



:'V ■ 


$7,498,492.07 


OFFICERS 

LOUIS M. BIODGETT President 

JACKSSON L. TAYLOR Vice-President 

ELA S. MAHHEWS Secretary 

JOSEPHINE B. SMITH..... Assistant Secretary 

YVONNE JOHNSON Assistant Secretgry 


4,932.31 
25,193.66 

300,000.00 

• 

18,060.96 

612,1 22t.60 
33,274.05 
28,000.00 


♦7,498,492.07 
J 
nkECTORS . 

iouis|a. rloogett 
jackson l. taylor 

JOSEPHINE B. SMITH 

CHARLES i BLOOGfTT, JR. 

CHARLES! H. MAHHEWS 


RATM or INTinST S'A PtR CfNT NX AMNVI 


Federal Savings and Lean Insurance Corporation 
^ . Federal Home Loan Bank System 

CaliforniB Savings and Loan League 
United StSates Savings and Lean league 

All Savings Insured itp to $] 


»,doo 


by Federal Savlngi and Loan insuranc* Corporation > * 

(An InttrwmentalHy of the Vnkfi Statag eavammaii^ 


i 

ao 

rs 
rar 
Ol 
as 
er- 
^ne 
Jijd 
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be 
lio 
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nd 


[rs. 
o'« 
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in 
»w. 
In 
go 
lat 
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ler 
er. 


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13 
55 


tor 


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- 




Ministers to Plead 
For Kenya Peace 

^ Today in Kenya, a British colony on the east coast 
-Of Africa, nearly a t)ioniond people are being killed 
•very month. The story behind the killings and the 
**Mau Man" movement in Yenya is little known. That 
story is told in a small book. "The People of Kenya 
Speak for Themselves," by Mbiyu Koinange, president 
of Kenya Teachers College. 

This week the plight of these ^ 
people and the story told in 


V 


this book became th« concern 
of residents of Lbs Angeles. On 
Tuesday night, a committee of 
the Interdenominaional Minis- 
terial Alliance urged the organ- 
ization to call upon aU of its 
members to set aside a day in 
the near future to tell their 
congregations the story that is 
too little known in the world 
at I|rge. 

DemonstratleB Planned 

The alliance Is expected to 
act on the proposal' at its next 
meeting. Suggested date for 
the demonstration of brother- 
hood is the weekend of Jan. 
29-30. 

In addition, the Rev. A. A. 
Peters, of Victory Baptist 
church.'plans to bring.the mat- 
ter before the Baptists Minis- 
terial Alliance at its next meet- 
ing, Jan. 19. to recommend sim- 
ilar action. 

The plan for the united dem- 
onstration originated in De- 
troit, when six ministers sent 
out a plea to fellow clergy. 

Off Press Jan. IS 

In his booklet, which will be 
off the press Jan. 15, Mr. Koi- 
nange. whose, father and broth- 
ers are in concentration camps 
In Africa, describes in vi\id de- 
tail how advanced his people 
are. how they are trj'ing to get 
an education, to work and to 
build their organizations and 
trade like people all over the 
ci\ilized world. 

Now. says the author, a few 
thousand settlers have closed 
down African schools, churches, 
cooperatives and organizations, 
put the Africans into concen- 
tration camps, driven the young 
people into the hills, and are 
trying to liquidate the millions 
of Africans who live in Kenya. 

• J " Terrified ' 
"All the talk about Mau 
Mau." Mr. Koinartge writes, 
''boils down to this. From the 
moment the African people in 
Kenya began to make their 
case known to the people of 
Britain and tlje world, the Eu- 


Two Children 
Die When Gas 
Floods Auto 

A 5-yearold boy died at Gen- 
eral Hospital here this week, 
the second child victim of 
carbon monoxide poisoning 
which struck a earful of people 
in the early morning hours on 
the desert near Barstow. 

Victims of the tragedy are 
William Thornton. 5. and his 
sister, Dlanette, 24. children of 
Alfred and Odessa Thornton, 
both 28, 6f 1679 E. 117th St.. 
Willowbrook. 

The Thorntons, their four 
other children and a family 
friend, Ray B. Jones, 29, all 
were overcome when the ex- 
haust system of their car 
flooded the machine with mono- 
xide fumes. The accident oc- 
curred as they drove across the 
desert area on the way here 
from Memphis. Tenn.. last Sun- 
day, the jlighway Patrol re- 
ported. 

The long night of desert 
tragedy was described by 
Sgt. H. K. Owen of the High- 
way Patrol J and Constable 
Penny Pendergast of Barstow. 

The Thornton family and 
Jones, driving in a latejnodel 
sedan, were halted by a flat 
tire near the village of Cham- 
bless, near the town of Amboy. 
officers said. 

There they found the only 
service station closed and drove 
on toward Ludlow on the flat 
tire. The vibration apparently 
jarred the exhaust system apart 
and filled the car with flumes. 

As a result, when Jones drove 
the car into Lee Yim's gasoline 
station at Ludlow, he collapsed 
from the effects of monoxide. 

Station attendants called a 

two truck, officers said, and Bill 

Williams, operator of the truck. 

ropcj^n settlers became ^terrified. [ recognized Jones as a mono- 



Murder Charge 
As Aged Vet Dies 

A 65year-old Army veteran who was beaten severly by a 
young man with a piece of metal pipe Christmas night as the 
aftermath of a party celebration died last Saturday in the Long 
Beach Veterans' Hospital. 

- S. W. Theus. 32. 1207 E. 78th street, was arrested Christmas 
nigirt and charged with assault ?• 


They recognized that the Brit 


xide-poison Victim. He dragged 


Jsh people as a whole, whether 1= the ocupants of the car into 

Conservative. Labor or Liberal. 

had absolutely nothing to gain 

by a scandal protecting the 

privileges ot a few thousand 

settlers." - 

Mr. Koinange. who is at pres- 
ent in. England where he has 
been unable to obtain any sat- 
isfaction for his people, has 
dedicated his book to the 52- 
year-old Kenya woman, Njeri. 
who, although she can neither 
read nor write, raised $10,000 


fresh air and found that 
Dlanette was dead on the floor 
in the rear of car. • i 

Members of the party were | 
treated at Barstow Hospital by 
Dr. Glen S. Griffith and the 
body of Dlanette was taken to a ' 
mortuarj". Dr. Griffith advised 
the family to stop at San 
Bernardino Hospital and seek , 
treatment there for William, of- j 
fleers said. 

Biit apparently the party de- 


from the poor people of her cided to continue to Los An- 


country to build the first worn 
an's dormitory in East Africa. 

Njeri, who "presided over 
meetirigs like a statue." is now 
in prison, and ill. Dr. Koinange 
WTites. 

It is the author's hope that 
through-his booklet he will aid 
in bringing about a cease-fire 
in Kenya and an opportunity to 
let the world know the true 
grievances of his people. 


geles and brought the boy to 
General Hospital here, instead. 

"If the group had driven an- • 
other 10 miles in that car every- ' 
one would have died from the I 
fumes," Sg*. Owen said. "It is 
a miracle any of them were 
saved." j 

The Thornton children who [ 
survived the accident are Jerry. 
3; Alfred Jr.. 6; Edward, 7, and 
Richard. 7 months. 


Air Force Drops Charges Against 
NAACP Official in Loyalty Case 

ASBURY PARK. N.J. — The i Griffin's suspension that the as- 
president of the local NAACP j sociation rejects the theory of 
branch here, suspended from his I "guilt by association," used by 
post as a civilian employee of | the Air Force, 
the U.S. Air Force last June for 


LEADER — Sjeri, trho can 
neither read or xirtte, is the 
leader of 10.000 African 
uomen. She is one of the 
many rounded up in Kenya, 
and is now in prison and ill. 
Book on Kenya u:as dedicattd 
to her. 


Postal Clerk 
Hits Jackpot 
On TV Show 


Jackie Cozart. 29. a clerk in 

the Long Beach Post Office, this 

week identified Alvin Cullum 

I York as the mystery personality 

' in the grand finals of Larry Fin- 

I ley's "Holiday in Paris" contest 

and won a two-week vacation 

in the French capital, a S4000 

! mink coat for his wife. Doris, 

; and a host of other prizes. 

Staged on KNXT's "Strictly 
Informal" telecast. Cozart cor- 
rectly identified the World War 
I hero from a segment of his 
' photograph and a series of 
audio clues provided by host 
Finley. Other contestants ar- 
ranged in a bank on the stage 
were the 12n weekly winners of 
the contest staged during Khe 
preceding months. ' 

Cozart. who lives at 836 E. 
.Anaheim. Long Beach, identi- 
fied -John Dillinger to win the 
eighth week of one .of Southern 
California's biggest televi.'sion 
audience- participation contests, 
making him eligible to compete 
in the grand finals. 

No one clue tipped the iden- 
tity Of the mystery personality, 
according to the winner. York 
became one of the most famous 
war heroes in American histoni' 
when, single-handed^ he- cap- 
tured 132 Germans during ac- 
tion in the .\rgonne Forest. 

Cozarfs wife. Doris, is 2.5. 
Their daughter. Sandra, is six 
years old. The Cozarts are ex- 
pecting a second child in March. 

The complete list of "winner- 
take-all" prizes copped by the 
Cozarts includes a round. trip to 
New York for two via Sky 
Coach, a week-end at the Savoy 
Plaza, two weeks in Paris as 
guests of Lanvin Perfumes with 
transportation provided by KLM 
Airlines, a Maurice Ball" S4000 
mink coat, a $500 diamond ring 
from Slavicks and many other 
prizes. 

Cozart was born in E. St. 
Louis. Illinois, and went to 
school in that citv. He entered 


with a. deadly weapon, but the 
death of James Loyd. 65, 9805 
Grandee, changed the charge to 
murder. 

Loyd for the past two weeks 
had been undergoing treat-, 
ment for a cerettral concussion. 
rau.<ed by a head injury re- 
ceived when he was struck on 
the left side of his head with 
a 36 inch piece of chrome metal 
tubing by Theus. 

Quarrel At Party 

Loyd and Theu.s had been to 
a party at 1681 E. 99th street, 
with Mark Johnson. 10810 Wil- 
lowbrook. Grover Parker. 10714 
Willowbrook. and Mattie Bur- 
sey. 1681 E. 99th street. 

A quarrel began betw:een 
Loyd and Theus who had been 
drinking. Both men had been 
forced to leave the house sev- 
eral times because of quarrel- 
ing. 


returned later and was taken 
into custody by Officers E. W. 
Barsley. E. C. Riley and Sgt. R. 
F. Floyd. 

At the time of his atrest. 
Theus admitted to officers that 
he had struck the elderly man, 
but claimed the elderly veteran 
had tried to cut him with a 
knife. 

Officers were unable to find 
a knife at the scene of the 
beating. Later a knife was 
found in the pocket of Theus, 
who told officei's the knife be- 
longed to Loyd. 

Loyd was taken to Georgia 
Street Ho.spital by his landlord. 
Joe Lucien. 9803 Grandee, 
where he was treated and sent 
home. 

The next day. Dec. 26. his 
condition grew worse and Gen- 
eral Hospital was contacted. Dr. 
A. W. Lingberg of. the General 
Staff arrived and examined 



The C oKfornia EagI«-3 
Thurs. Jan. 13, 19S5 

Le lloy Beavm 



■/'V-.'fc'-i 


Gol( en State 


■ •» ■ I 


.. t " 


ISSPEC'I IO\ TOVR^-CiimcrnTiened in nn inspciti',n 
tour of n,-xv .Mount Sinai Hoipital. in uhich < '/uipmcrit 'if 
already hrinij mstalUS. arc triple fif/ht champion Henry .Irtn- 
Stronq and Max E. Mark, executive director of ihe medical 
center under construction at S720 Beverly Blvd. 


Theus later returned with an i Loyd and had him immedi- 
object and threatened Loyd. ately - transported to the. Long 
Lovd finally left, according to Beach Veterans Hospital where 
witnesses, and walked toward | he was treated for a possible 
his hou.se. As he was entering cerebral concussion, 
his yard. Theus drove up in his Theus. who had a prelimin- 
car and got out. The elderly ' a rj- hearing Jan. 4 in Division 
man started running but Theus 4 was held to answer to a 
caught him and knocked him charge of a.s.sault. The charge 
to the ground with the metal was later changed to murder, 
pipe. Theus told officers "The old 

At this time Mattie Bursey man was trjing to cut me with a 
arrived at the scene and saw knife. He opened the door of 
Theus .standing over Loyd say- my car on one side; I jumped 


Credit War Opens 
In Mississippi as j ; 
Negroes Fight Back 


LeRoy |\. Beavers, Jr. v^as ap- 
pointed listrict manager of 
Golden ! tate Mutual's Central 
division, one of the largest in 
the firm ; group of branch of- 
fices. Thi appointment' was ef- 
fective J inuary 1. The new 
manager vill take active charge 
on Januj ry 14 following a pe- 
riod of ir ensive training at the 
company 5 home office, j 4 

■ In anri )uncing peavers pro- 
motion to the management posi- 
tion. A. ] f. Williams, Superin- 
tendent ( f Agencies, stated: 

"We aift happy that we have 
competeri and enthusiastic 
manjpowlr within our own 
ranks wlen such an opening 
•occurs, ^fc•. Beavers is an ex- 
ampl£__of the young, capable, 
well-train Fd^-men with us who 
are makl ag a career of insur- 
ance sail smanship. * 

iNeeds More 
Insuralice selling is a pro- 


fession." 
nued. "w 
men of 1 


Mr. Wjlliams conti- 
ich ca'lls for young 
s caliber. We need 


ing. "I'll kill you." 

Leores Scene 
Theus then left the scene and 


out the other side and picked 
up a piece of tail pipe and hit 
him on the. head with it." 


J NEW YORK— A plan to rescue Mississippi's , Ne- 
groes frcfm the ruin they face as the result of a plot 
hatched <by white businessmen of the State was set in 
motion this week. — — -: 

j White bank.s and business in- | Dr. Walker gave assurance 
terests, using the economic boy- ,hat "any funds put'in the Tri- 
cott to aid their fight to retain ctot« d,"!!, e ^/ u . ^ 
segregated schools, h a v e i ^'^^^ ^^"^ "^ -Memphis to aid 


.4" 


community projects. "Thfe." he 
commented, "doesn't fit into 
foreigners' opinions of Ameri- 
can materialism." .'; 


Discriminafion in South I 
Shocks For East Diplomat 

. • NEW YORK — A young Indonesian diplomat who 
has made a five-month tour^of the United States takes 
a dim view of the treatment of Negroes in the South. ', 

Surjono Sastrowardojo. 34- ' 
year-old brother of Indonesia's ; 
foreign Minister and a mem- j 
ber of his country's delegation j 
to the United Nations. ex-.| 

• pressed his viems this week at 
the Institute of International I 
Education, sponsor of his trip, j 

Regarding race relations in ! 

the southern part of the couti- j 

tr>'. Surjono said he was "par- I 

ticularly shocked to find the | 

situation worse than I had ex- I 

pected." i 

One of the sights that espe- 
cially impressed him was that 
I they parr>' the segregatiein | 
i policy "right down to the water 
I fountains." 

I The young diplomat also 
I didn't think too much of hand- | 

shaking politicians. "Americans > 

are not aware of the issues at ; 

• hand." he remarked, adding: i 


banded together to foreolo.se 
moricages. deny normal credit 
exten.sions and refuse credit to 
NAACP members and other 
Negroes who won't buckle un- 
der to their demands. 

Counter Move 

To counter this move, the 
N.AACP. together with the Tri- 
City Bank of Memphis, are ar- 
ranging. to.step into the picture 
aQd provide the sorely needed 
credit facilities. -' . 

The plan, approved by the as- 
sociation's Board of ' Directors. 


"Negro \ictims of economic re- 
prisals in Mississippi "will be 
made available for loans to 
them.'' He further piomised to 
"give .special attention to appli- 
cations from Negro homeown- 
ers, farmers, business and pro- 


j more whc :will come to us on a 
' career ba is." _ ' , ; 

i Beafvers has been with the< 
' company, or eight years. begin"=>^ 
j ning as . . part-time agent in 
1 1946. ■'He : eceived his first pro- 
motion to 'staff manager of the 
'Central d strict in 1950. In the 
! 1952 age icy year, his ! staff 
placed s( ?ond in competition 
for the G: M' President's Trophy 
given for all-round excellence 
in the fie d of insurance sales- 
manship.- 

In addit on to his years of ex: 
perience i i the insurance field, 
fessionai:men whoha"ve'"^'een i^'jf,^"^^'';, manager has c^-,; 

denied credit becau.se of their P'^^^^ ^^' ^'^^^'u^"""^ ^"1 X 

I insurance sa|esmanship offered 'v: 

i by .the Lif » .Underwriters Train- .j 

' ing Counc 1. For his- undergrad- ■" 

uate work he attended the Uni- 


views. ' 

Notional Boycott Hinted 

Under the plan the N.-\ACP 
will seek to get organization?, 


fraternal orders, insurance c^m- • """^^^f^ ?.%\'^?^^^ ^* ^^**- 
„o.,;.„o v,.,o.i„.,.^„„ -_j:_.a:-^ley.,^rld UCLA, ^majoring 


panie.s, businesses and ■ indi- 
viduals to m,ake sizeable de 


Firm Fined for 
Short-Changing 
Its Employees 

Three Los Angeles garment 
makers were fined a total of 
S2'25 Jan. 6 for violations of the 
Fair Labor Standards Act (Fed- 
eral wage and hour law). They 
are Philip Weiner. his bro»hei, 
Israel Weiner. and Samuel Slav- 
insky, also known as Sam Ste- 
vens, doing business as P M 
Casuals, at 743 Santee St. 

The three men had pleaded 
We'^1 have our first general guilty to criminal charges of 


provides for the .strengthening . posits in. the baijk. 
of the j-esourcea .of the .Negro- ^ In addition to efforts to en,- 
owned Tri-Stat% Bank through large the.resources„flf the Tri- 
suhstantially Lncreasiiig its de-.j State Bank, the NAACP is in- 
posits. thereby 'making availa- j v^stigating the national con- 
ble.more money for commercial i nections of the various Missi.s.- 
Iqans to the Mississippi victims, i sippi business enterprises which 
Expressing the hope that the | are pArtjcipating in- thife con- 


m 
economics He is at presepf 
studying. It theUniv^ity of 
Southern California. Ife Jsa yet-.' 
eran of World War IL ;se'r\^g 
'withk the-..? rmv Air Force. 


plan would expand the assets ' ^piracy, to deny credit to Negro 
of the bank by at least 5250.000. 
the*"NAACP made an initial de- 
posit of S20.000 of its reserve 


TRA JLER EXHIBIT 

Los Artg !les will host its s^-" 
ond anhu, 1 Trailer Life., Stibw 
in the Gi; ?at Westerri Exhibit ." "l' 
civil rights advocates. Some of ! Building ] ebruary 3-6. ,} 
these Mississippi in.stitutions | A previ( w for the- traxfe Vfjll 
are known to be subsidiaries or [take plac ; January 31-Febru 


I funds in the Tri State Bank. In [ affiliates of national corpora- j ary 3 prioato th6 general shbVv 


election .soon in Indonesia, with 
very little handshaking." 

One thing did impress Sur- 
.^ono favorably, however. That 
was the large number of un- 
paid volunteers who work on 

the .Marine Corps in 1944. going 
over.seas to Japan as a corporal 
in the 10th .-Xmmunition Com- 
pany. He returned to Ft. Wayne. 
Ind.. where he met Doris and 
married her in 1947. The couple 
came to California in 1953. 


failing to pay time and one half 
overtime to employees working 
more than 40 hours in any work 
week, and failing to keep accu- 
rate payroll records. 


Some of us want to make hay 
when it rains because we arc 
too busy enjoying ourselves 
while the sun shines. 


a letter to Dr. John E. Walker 
president, transmitting the de- 
posit. Roy Wilkins. NAACP ad- 
mihi.strator. said that the 
NA.-\CP e.xpects the loans to be 
made on "a strictly business 
basis with applicants meeting 
the usual requirements of the 
bank in such matters." 

YOUR CHANCES 

Statistically, your chances' of 
having an accident serious 
enough to cause a 'disablifig in- 
jury are about one in 15. ac- 
cording to the National Auto- 
mobile Club. 


tions. 


mg. 



tr- 


SICKLY B or NOW 
GROWS HUSKY 


\\'hen youngsters are ski: 
it's often due to a lack 


N'itaniins. That's the time to tr>' Scott's Emulsion 
to help them build a hui ky body, sound-bones,^ 



strone teeth ! It's 
. in that it's full ot 


energ%" building ( il, added minerals. 


SCOTT'S 


Free speech 
vantage to the 
nothing to say. 


is of no 
man who 


a<^- 
has 


alleged association with Com- 
munists, has been fully exon- 
erated by the Air Force and will 
be restored to his position. 

Theodore Griffin, the accused 
president of the Asbury Park 
NAACP branch, received a letter 
from Beatty R. Julien. executive 
secretary of the Security Review 
Board this week, which stated: 
*TTie , final determination in 
your case is that based on all 
available information your re 


Kenneth Hahn 
Named Head of 
Coliseum Group 

Supervisor Kenneth Hahn this 
week was named president of 
the Coliseum Commission for a 
one-year term. Larry Noritian 
wais named vice-president, i 
position held by Supervisor 


tention in employment in the t Hahn during the past several 
position from which you were I months, and W. H. (Bill) Nicho- 
suspended is clearly consistent | las. general manager of the 
with the interest of the national Coliseum, was named secretary. 
secXirfty-i*' The commission, consisting of 

The letter noted that "it has three members each from the 
6een directed that you be re- 1 county, the City of Los Angeles, 
stored to your position and that and the Sixth Agricultural Dis 
you be paid for the period of 


your suspension. ' Griffin said. 
XAACP Administrator Roy 


trict of the State, is responsible 
for the management, operation 
and control of the Coliseum and 


Wilkins asserted shortly after its buildings and grounds. 


F 


SUBSCRIBE NOW!- 


X CAIIFORNIA 


S 


& 


1"'i 




EAGLE 

3 MONTHS BT Mfill $4 
EVERT THUBSDfiT X 

'""•« AD 40161 


oi 


Writm 1050 E. 43rd PI., LA. 11, Col. 


mm 


iilllHPSIliibHPW-^''^' *"-'*' '*'''' ~l=lfP'«iW'*!WW,'^'^'''»'lffllWIM'' 


USE THIS CONVENIENT FORM TO PLACE 

CLASSIFIED ADS 


Wrif* your ad JUST AS YOU WANT IT TO BE PUBLISHED THURSDAY, Including your ADDRESS mr 
TELEPHONE NUMBER, er both as part of tha ad. 

CLASSIFICATION DESKED 
Such aa Itaal Ectala For Sala," 'Furnithad Room Per Rant," 'Apt. Wantad," "Paraanalt,* 
"MItc. For Sala,' atc.-Plaata PRINT CLEARLY no mora Hian ana word In aach aquara balow. 


15 

' Wards 
or Lass 

First Word 

2. 

3. 

*• ■ r *• 

S. 

.. I,i;i- l 

.«. 


7. 

8. 

9. 

HOO 

10., • . J .. 

f . 

' -AH- 1' ■ 

11. - 

.7 ■ *i ; 

1 

13, 

14. 

15. 

$1.00 

Every 

Additional 

Word 

5c 

14. 

i .!'>.♦'•" 

17. 

4^ '!*'•"» 

IB. 

$1.15 

'»• 

$1.20 

20. 

$1.25 

n. 

$1.30 

Pay Amount 
in laat 

22. 

$1.35 

23. 

^fl- , $1.40 

24. 

$1.45 

aquaro you 
fill in. 

25. 

$1.50 

1 

2«. 

$1.55 

27. 

$1.M 


How to f fgur* addnst and tmhphcnm numbmnt 

2022 W. Adorns Blvd. - Equols 4 Words 
REpublic 3-5500 — Equals 3 Words. \ 


CALIFORNIA EAGLE 
1050 E. 43rd PI. 


Clossifiod Ad Dopt. 
Los Angolos 11, Calif. 


Gentleman: 

I am anelosing $ chock, money order or coins in payment of my clauified. 

Please insert it in the next issue of your CALIFORNIA EAGLE. 

11 : I Print - Nanw . . 


Address ; Phor>e 1 

Your CALIFORNIA^ EAGLE Is published every THURSDAY. Adt mutt reach your CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE office by 1:00 p.m. Wednesday for insertion in the following day Clauified offices open 
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6<30 p.m. Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 


J?i.P?7v 



^^fsmmmim 


ny. and cold; hang on. 
f enough nqtural .A&D 


like "'health insurance 
natural .\&D Vitamins,, 


EMULSION 


NATURAt «/( H ENERGY TONIC 


BROADWAY FEDERAL ^ 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASS'N 


OF LOS ANOfLlES 

4329 SOUTH BROADWAY -^ I | 

J 6th SEMI-ANNUAL 
STATEMENT OF CONDITION, DECEMBER 31, 



ADains 3-7246 


1954 


V--: 


ASSETS 


■i' 


•••■■■•■oaeaoo 


First Liens on 

Real Estate 

Loans on Savings 

Accounts 

Real Estate Sold 

on Contract 
Real Estate Owned 
investments and 

Securities 280,0p0.0p 

Cash on Hand and 

in Banks ■•..••••...••«• 
Odice Building 

(Less depreciation 
Furniture, Fixtures 

and Equipment 13,912.47 

Deferred Charges and 

Other Assets 3,404.30 

TOTAL ASSETS ....^...$9,1 64,546.76 


.$8,289,819.73 

. 64,794.45 

7,432.16 
16,369.44 


405,988.87 
82,825.34 


LiABn^mi 

avings Accounts |$8,376,566v77 


f^ 


Advances From Fede/al 
Home Loan Bank., 


Loans in Process......... 

Other Liabilities ........ 

■ ■ 

PeFerTed^redits .... 

Specific Reserves ....... 

General Reserves ....... 

General Loss Reserve. 
Surplus 


TOTAL LIABILITIES..., 


•n 


OFFICERS AND DIkiCTORS 


H. CLAUDE HUDSON President 

PAUL R. WILLIAMS........Vice-President 

ALBERT MADDOX Vice-President 

ZELLA M. TAYLOR.}... .....Secretary 

J. PHYROMN TAYtOR.„.....Treasurer 


RICHARD R. WRIGHT, 'I I......Manaser 

THOMAS L. GRIFFITH, UR Director 

EDWARD G. ATKINSOM Director 


50,000.00 
213,678.72 

37.200:2» 
4,049.11 

24.742.72 
260,600.00 
134,312.15 

63,397.00 


i9,1 64,546.76 


H-. W. SAND&RS..7:, 
J. ALLEN REESE...., 


Current Inforest RafeSVk Percent Per Annum 


.Director 
.Director 


.XtBMTiv 



j j — MEMRR OF— 

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK SYSTEM 

FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN INSURANCE CORPORATIC< 

UNITED STATES SAVINGS AND LOAN LEAGUE 

CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN LEAGUE 

AMERICAN SAVINGS AND LOAN LEAGUE 



3 SBfWfttf\ ]JfBJrR;if>< 


( k\ii k\y iff I »w»w ii\»/»* »^^/ »\v »\v » iV» .»/»\v » A »\'/ ffi k\i, k . 


v.. 


XN 


I ' 


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.■,-*-■ 




>•■ . 


% 



4— The California Eo^le 


b- 


Thurs./ Jan. 13/ 1955 


1 


['• 4 


California Sagle 


3. 
3. 

4. 
5. 

6. 


^ 


loren M[ll9r, Editor and Publisher 

Th* I«ml* stands for cemplatci int«9ratien of Nogreas into myry 
ptMs* of Amoricon lifo through tho domocrcrtic precossos. . , 

IVafovor: J 

1* nPC on local, stofo and national lovoU. | j'. 

Docont housing for all Amoricans. if j 

4leprasentation In Govommont. I 
Adequato old ago pensions and social socurMy. 
Colloctlvo bargaining rights for all workman. 
Dovolopmant'and encoura'gement of Negro business. 

We oppose: ' j - 

1. Jim Crow In all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of dem^ocracy. 

I' .^ i - Publlahmd ivry Thursday ^ 

1050 East 43rd Place, Los Angeles 11 


AD. 4-0161 


The Met and Marian 


For the first time in seventy-sev- 
en years, a Negro sang a part in 
New York's famed Metropolitan 
Opera when Marian Anderson ap- 
peared there last week. 

The Jaudience stormed its approval 
of her appearance by loud applause 
when she appeared and by thunder- 
ous ovations when she had finished. 
And why not? Marian Anderson is 
the ■ greatest of American singers. 
Hers, according to competent critics, 
Is a voice that oecurs only once in 
generations. 

Literally thousands and hundreds 
' of thousands of people all over the 
world have been enchanted by her 
singing. We can be proud, as Amer- 
icans, that the Metropolitan Opera 
has finally accorded her an honor 
that she should have had many 
years ago. 

We can be ashamed, too, as Amer- 
icajis, that Miss Anderson's color has 
barred her from the Met for so long. 
If Ainerica is entitled to the praise 
that is accorded to the repentant 
sinner who recants his evil ways it 
is alM subject to all of the criticism . 
that belongs to one who has persist- 
ed in wrong doing long after he 
understood the quality of his act. 


Marian Anderson did finally sing 
at the Met but what about the other 
Negro singers who deserved that 
honor and to whom it was denied 
solely because of race and color? 

The Americans who applauded 
Miss Anderson when she sang are 
to be congratulated for their good 
fortune in hearing her but what 
about those other Americans who 
lived in those seventy-seven long 
years when they were denied the pri- 
vilege of hearing a great artist sole- 
ly because of color? 

That gets us to the point that ra- 
cial prejudice is a two-edged sword. 
In the Mef's case it hurt the Negro 
artist who could not be heard and 
it also hurt the music lover who 
could not hear the artist because of 
blind prejudice. Both were losers. 
Everybody will agree with that now. 
• And while Americans are ponder- 
ing . Miss Anderson's case and re- 
joicing that she finally got a chance 
to te heard we hope they'll look 
around and ponder the cases of 
other Negroes in many Other phases 
. of our lives who are still being de- 
nied opportunities because of race 
and also take a sober second -look 
at what America is losing because 
it is denying those opportunities. 



Is The Price Too High? 


Word is going ardimd that the 
Democrats hope to win in 1956 by 
playing footsie with the Southerners 
who rode off with Ike in 1952. Big- 
wig Bourbons are soft pedaling civil 
rights issues. The loyalty oath that 
raised so much ruckus at the 1952 
convention won't be exacted this 
year. 

The politicos hope that these mea- 
sures will convince the Dixicrats 
that all has been forgiven and that 
they should return to the party of 
theirj fathers. As an extra induce- 
ment much is being made of the Su- 
preme Court's school decision with 
a great deal of finger pointing at the 
fact that the opinion was written by 


Chief Justice Earl Warren, the Eisen- 
hower appointee. 

As is the case with most political 
fenaglings, there seems to be some 
r^yme and reason to the current 
course being pursued by Democratic 
leaders. The other side of the coin 
is that Negro voters are casting a 
critical eye at the whole business. 
Many of them aren't going to stand 
for much more of this monkey busi- 
ness. A goodly number of these rest- 
less voters live in key northern and 
western states. Their voteS may be 
decisive. 

What will it gain the Democrats 
if they win the Solid South and lose 
the industrial North? 


There's More To Say 


Presi'dent Eisenhower had noth- 
ing to say about civil rights in his 
State of the Union message last 
week. 

Apologists for the Adniinistration 
are saying that the lack of direct 
comment reflects the belief that 
nothing is to be gained from at- 
tempts to get legislation through 
Congress and that the president will 
continue to strike at discrimination 
through executive devices where 
possible. The rest, these spokesmen 
say, must be left to the states and 
to the courts. 

We seem to recall that at the 
height of the 1952 campaign Mr. Ei- 
senhower said in a widely quoted 
speech that he would call a confer- 
ence of state governors to deal with 

the problem of discrimination in 
employment. He hasn't called such 
a conference and we are willing to 
hazard the guess that he won't do 
so. Mr. Eisenhower has learned by 
this time that sweet reasonableness 
won't get far with such characters as 


Byrnes of South Carolina and other 
Dixiecrats who carried the torch for 
him in the last election campaign. 

We hope that despite the pl*esi- 
dent's silence some senators and 
congressmen will insist on introdtrc- 
ing civil rights legislation in the cur- 
rent session of Congress. We are 
frank to admit that the chances of 
passage aren't too bright but the 
very introduction of, and debate on, 
such legislation serves a purpose. 

There is a need for civil rights le- 
gislation despite the advances that 
have been made in the courts and 
through administrative devices. The 
character of our government is such 
that some problems can be met only 
through legislation. For example, we 
can't see how discrimination in em- 
ployment can be rooted out without 
congressional action. 

We think that the president made 
a mistake in keeping silent on fed- 
eral protection of fundamental 
rights, a matter which seems to us 
to be of prime importance to all 
Americans, ij \ ■ \ • ■ I 


Taxes For i^ittle Man 


xiie little man is about to get an- 
vwler swift 1«ick in the seat of his 
pants— in the general region of his 

pockef book. 

Governor Goodwin Knight has pro- 
posed a series of taxes on beer, ci- 
garets and other low priced con- 
sumer luxuries. 

While he was campaigning for 
governor, Mr. Knight seemed to say 
that he' would not propose tax in- 
creases. He made the welkin ring 
ynth promises of economy that, he 
said, would keep the cost of state 
government down to such a level 
that increases wouldn't be neces- 

saiy. 
The people who guard the mter- 

ests of the better-to-do among us 

made much of the govemoi-'s tax 

promises and told the rest of us that 

he looked just like the governor we 

ought to have. . ^ *i- ♦ 

Of course, there's the fact that 

some of the upper boys don't count 


Jr-> 


as tax increases any levies that fall 
primarily on the lower and middle 
income groupsJ^e millionaire and 
the laborerwho both smoke cigarets 
will, of course, pay the same amount 
in taxes. But if the state levies a 
three cejit tax on every package of 
cigarets the cost will be about ten 
dollars per year on the package-a- 
day man. The ten dollars won't hurt 
the business tycoon very much; the 
ten bucks will make quite a dent in 
the little man's budget. 

That's the trouble with consumer 
taxes. They look fair and they look 
painless but when it's all said and 
done the burden falls on those least 
able to pay. We're sure that Califor- 
nia needs the money th^t will/be 
supplied by the gc^ernor's'jjr^posed 
consiuner taxes but we think that 
in the long run the public interest 
will be better served if the money 
is extracted from the upper income, 
rather than from the lower income 
residents,, of the state. 


THURGOOD MARSHALL 
REVIEWS FIGHT FOR 
, FREEDOM DURING 1954 

NEW YORK— Thurgood Marshall, special counsel 
of the NAACP, gave a comprehensive review of the 
fight for freedom in his report on the NAACP Legal 
Defense work to the 45th annual meeting of the asso- 
ciation held in New York last week. 

"At the close of last year's — 

report, we reaffirmed as the ^^"^ *' intelligent leadership 
ultimate objective of our work *" *^* community, 
the total elimination of racial' To Aid ImplamMitertlon 
discrimination and its viruses. "In moving to implement the 
segregation and ekclusion, in decision of the Supreme Court 
the enjoyment of all public In- ^^ employed three educational 
stitutions, facilities and serv- specialists. Vernon McDaniel, 
ices. Loftus Carson and Dr. Margaret 

"We also set out there some Butcher who, after training in 
dozen or so specific goils as this office and at Fisk Univer- 
the immediate objectives of our sity, have been placed in the 
1954 program of litigation, edu- f^eW in Arkansas, North Caro- 
cation and research on facets Una and West Virginia, 
of racial discrimination in six- "We have also set up a Com- 
fields ^ education, employ- mlttee of Social Scientists under 
ment, health, housing, recrea- the leadership of Dr. Alfred 
tion and transportation. McClung Lee. assisted by Dr. 

"Summarizing the past year's Kenneth Clark. These experts 
achievements, we report signifi- ^''" "se their training and ex- 
cant progress toward our long- perience to give to communl- 
range objective and the attain- *'es working on desegregation 
ment of many, if not "most, of ^he necessary expert advice to 
the specific goals set for our either prevent the occurence of 


1954 activities. 


Dual Prpblem 


school strikes like those in 
White Sulphur Springs and Mil- 


"There can be little doubt '°'"'*' ^^'- °^ *" control them 

that the unanimous decision of °^^^ ^^^^ s*art. 

the United States Supreme Finally, In this field we have 

Court on MaV ITth declaring established a special depart- 

segregation in public education "*"* ^^^ ^^^ ^°^^ purpose of 

to be unconstitutional will be Protecting Negro teachers, prin- 

recognized as one of the great- <^'Pals and administrative p^er- 

est forward steps toward the sonnel from being made the 

eradication of race and caste victims of the desegregation 

from American life. On the other Program. This department is 

hand, in 1954 once again we headed by Dr. John W. Davis, 

were reminded that we con- ^""nP' president of West Vir- 

tinue to face the dual problem ^'"'^ S***^ College, to Jje as- 

of consolidating our gains and listed by Daniel E. .Byrd and 

at the same time planning for El wood Chisolm, all of whom 

. the future. will work full time on this one 

"Once again we find that the ProJe^t- 


harri core of un-Amesican op- 
position to the forward trend of 
democracy will not accept de- 


Othar VletoriM 

"Outstanding victories w^e 
also earned in other cases 


feat. We find that while the brought in the field ^^f-Ji'u bile 
opposition is steadily growing education, and in housing. 

recreation and transportation. 
"Three undergraduate col- 
more leges in Louisiana and a Texas 
Junior College were forced' to 
accept Negro students for the* 


smaller in numbers it is be 
coming more consolidated 
more determined and 
ruthless. 

Graot Pregrasa 


"Public and private reaction ^'rst time in 1954 as a result of 
to the Supreme Court's May suits prosecuted by our at- 
17th decision should not have"* tomeys-We were also success- 
shocked anyone. When public tul in "cases challenging Jim 
schools opened In September of Crow publlb housing projects 
1954, we found localities in in San Francisco, Camden and 
eight states, including states as Elizabeth, N. J., and Detroit and 
far south as Arkansas, opened Hamtramck, Mich. 
thWr Vhool doors to Negroes "Decisions in still other cases 
for the first time. Baltimore, prosecuted by our attorneys re- 
Md. desegregated its public quired a private amusement 
schools as did Washington, park in Cincinnati and public 
D. C. St. Louis and Kansas City, recreational facilities in At- 
Mo. moved toward complete lanta, Houston, Louisville, 
desegregation. Twenty-five Nashville, and the Oklahoma 
counties in West Virginia state parks system to cease ex- 
desegregated. No one could for eluding Negro citizens, 
a moment deny that great pro- Transportation 
gress has been made since May. "And. In the omnibus trans- 

"Of course, we have read portation suit hrnught before 

about the unfortunate situation the Interstate Commerce Com- 


In White Sulphur Springs. W. 
Va.. Milford, Del. and in iso- 


mission. the I.C.C. trial exam- 
iner recentlv recommended that 


lated areas in Baltimore and the Commission issue an order 

Washington. Expert scientists decreeing the disconUnuance of 

on our volunteer committee racial segregation on railwav 

have Investigated all of these coaches and railroad waiting 

instances and find that they rooms. 

were purely local matters and "There have been legal vic- 

did not in any way detract tories in areas not covered in 

from our major proposition that the speclfl<« goals outlined In 

public schools can be desegre- last vear's report. For example, 

gated without delay providing (Continued on Page 12) 


Pure and Simple 


sBy £,. F. Palmer Jr.s 


WHEN WILL WE EVER 
LEARN THAT . . 

A beautiful girl can make 
herself look like she should 
have 'Stayed at home just by 
chewing gum in public? There 
Is an art to chewing gum and 
the gals I've been watching 
lately definitely are not chew- 
artists. 

Liquor and gasoline, really 
don't mix? I've been appalled 
by the rash of stories lately 
of accidents, many fatal, in- 
volving drivers who had been 
drinking. Like the makers of 
Seagram say. 'Tonight. When 
Jt's 'One for the Road'^ — be sure 
It's coffee." ' 

•No Substitute 

There is no substitute for 
courtesy in business? Went In- 
to a drug store the other day 
and the young lady who 
waited on me was so pleasant 
and so courteous. I was glow- 
ing when I went out And I'm 
going back. too. 

This business of race rela- 
tions is a two-way street? 
Members of minority groups 
just have to be on their toes 
in everything they do. Let's 
face up to it: sometimes we 
are so orne^. our own families 
would just as soon disown us. 

It's not money that is the 
root of all evil, ifs the love of 
money? There Isnt anything 
at all wrong with money. But 
it's our insatiable appetite for 
the green stuff that leads to 
all the trouble. 

Daffy and Dorllag 

No matter how hard we try, 
we can't fit a square peg into 
a round hole? So, parents just 
ought to stop trying to make 
careers for their children. 


Youngsters these days are 
pretty wise and they know 
what they want to do. And 
they'll do it better, too. 

Women will be women? 
Those of us who wear trousers 
and neckties just might as well 
Stop tr>ing to understand the . 
members of that wonderful sex. 
They're daffy and darling, nut- 
ty and nifty, and without them. 
I just don't know what I'd do. • 

Boys will be boys? So. the 
youngster made a road map 
on the floor with the tooth 
paste. And he wrote his name 
on^the wallpaper. You're wast- 
4nB> your time, and his; too. 
wying tm put an gnd to his 
boy's play. Let 'im rip". 
Bless 'em 

Men will be men? Bless 'em. 
They're going to drop ashes on 
the rug. leave their towels on 
the bathroom floor and sleep 
in their shorts. A man's home 
is his castle. Let him live in it. 

You can't believe everything 
you see In the papers? The 
other day I read that a certain 
store was selling TV sets for 
$25. Brand new, 21-inch televi- 
sion sets. That's what the paper 
said. But when I got to the store, 
they were fresh out. Hmmm. 

There's no business like show 
business? Look at TV. The 
movies. Radio. Las Vegas. Ever 
see anything like that Bop 
drama on General Electrlc's 
half-hour the other night? 
Nope, there's no biz like show 
biz. Where else can you make 
yourself a couple hundred 
bucks a minute? 

Filling a column can be as 
painful as filling a- tooth? So 
excuse me please while I get 
the aspirin. 


■' . '' . ' I ' ' '• 


Battleaxe^ 
& Bread 

Bf Ittmr B. Orangar 

My Ijest New Year's present 
came In two parts and cost a 
total of fourteen cents. It con- 
sisted of two post cards ipailed 
from Miami, arriving Just after 
the New Year opened and carry- 
ing identical messages. One 
read: ^'Brought your column on 
Charliis Houston to the Alpha 
Phi Alpha convention and 
found plenty of support for It 
Alpha voted to establish a 
Charles Houston fellowship at 
Howard University. Cheers for 
us." The /)ther was In similar 
vein. 

I repeat "Cheers'." Cheeri 
for the oldest Negro college fra- 
ternity and for the spirit in 
which its • delegates acted to 
keep green 
and honored 
the memory 
of one of the 
true Negro 
greats of our 
day and time. 
I make one 
additional 
suggestion to 
Alpha — that 
the fraternity 
Lester Gnmgor designate a n 
anniversary when, with the ap- 
proval of Howard's officers, a 
civil rights observance be held 
at the college in memory of 
Charles Houston and the other 
pioneers, now dead, who gave 
so much of themselves in order 
"to give us the chance to fight 
for what we have today — and 
will have more of tomorrow. 
Will Run Congress 
Less encouraging was the 
news, which the .Sunday New 
York Times brought to^4ts 
readers in its magazine issui6.of 
January second. An article by 
William S. White, written from 
Washington, discussed "The Ten 
Who Will Run Congress." Those 
ten as listed are a reminder 
that the Eighty-fourth Congress 
will be controlled, in bioth the 
Senate and the House, by the 
Southern Democratic bloc. 

Speaker of the. House is Sam 
Rayburrt of Texas. Chairman of 
the House Rules Commitee is 
Howard Smith of Virginia. Ma- 
jority .Leader of the Senate is 
another Texan. Lyndon John- 
son, who has his eyes on the 
White House. 

President pro tempore of the 
S e n a t e is Georgia's Walter 
George, and the Armed Services 
Committee will b»e under the 
rule of Georgia's Senator 
Richard Russell, cousin of Adlai 
Stevenson and head of the 
Southern bloc. What chance has 
any civil rights reform measiire ■ 




One Jllan^s ilpiniion 

■t LEONlBTEWA] O 


MEET ATTY CARL A. 


EARL£S . 



Here is a young lawyer who, Atty. Series reveals that his 

of successfully running that after officer training, was sent ho.m4 tdwn is Marshall, T«ca«, 

gauntlet? *« Camp Beal near Sacramento, ^j^^^^. l^jj^ ^^y^^ ^^ ^j^^. 

Smooth No wonder, following army de- ■ . „ v . ... 

More encouraging, and of in- tours that took him to various f^e^. H< was a member, of the 
direct importance to ci\'il rights places in Europe, he found his famous Wiley College Debating 
in this county, is the smooth as- ^gy ^ack to PPHMIi^M ^lub. a good place to start a 
sumption of responsibility by p-Ufnmia in ^M^^HIPI ^*^ cou-se. , • . 
Nelson Rockefeller as adminis- '-«'"°»^"'a m ■^^^^^mm Our t ero was trained at Ft 
tratiVe assistant to President 1** '• ^e came *^^^Q^W Sill. Okla. to become an officer. 
Eisenhower on foreign policy, back to study :^^H|HB ^e the! i served in England, 
His appointment is one of Ike's a pre-legal i^|H^H| France. Belgium, Holland, Lux- 
smarter moves, and is good course at ^^^BgKSB^: emburg and Germany, 
news for all of us who have U.S.C. for two jfl^^^R Civic Minded -I. 
been wishing for a clearing up years and to B^H|^H: ^.tty. Series is on the NAACP 
of some of the murkiest as{>ects enroll at ^wHH^K board, is 
of our foreign policy. South West- ^KIB^^B president of 

It's good news, not simply em. from BH9ii«B the On ega 

because Nelson Rockefeller, is wh ich he Leon Steward Psi Phi l rater- 

smaft and hard-working, like- graduated in 1951. Forthwith he nity, a nem- 

able in personality and liberal took and passed the bar exam- ber of the 

in social outlook, but also be- ination of California and hung Wiley Cillege 

cause he has been "thinking "P his shingle at 1111 E. Ver- Club, the 

big" for years in fields where non without missing a beat. Langsto i Law 

our top diplomats have too A Lad from Texas Club, of 

often seemed shortsighted and One reason why Atty. Carl A. which le Is 

supercilious if not blind and Earles lost no time after re- secretar|% and *«T- searies 

bigoted. turning from war Is because, is a^trus tee of Hamilton Metho* 

"Co^ Neighbor' Architect "PO" graduating from Wiley dist Chi rch. 

Nelson Rockefeller was the College, he had y- married a Los Angeles has considerable 

original architect of our "good schoolmate. Miss Norma Moore, need o ! young professional 

neighbor" policy for Latin Now the attorney says tjiat 75 men' wh > see their opportunity 

America. Back in the mid- percent of his practice is in the to serve their community, their 

thirties, he toured Latin Amer- ^l^il field — domestic relations church. J nd those agencies that 

ican with a group of business and personal injury cases, bid wel for the advancement 

leaders and prepared a report while his lady fair teaches at of their race. We salute .Atty. 

for P r e s i d e n t Roosevelt that Hooper Avenue School. Earles fcjr being just such a ope, 
criticized our former policies 
and activities in the southern 
continent and made suggestions 
for setting up a governmental 
agency to improve international 
relations in this hemisphere. 

A few years later, in 1940, 
when F.D.R. ci^ated the office 
of Coordinator of Inter-Amer- 
ican Affairs, he appointed Mr. 

Rockefeller as. its chief. Later .___ _-,,-_«.- .»,<««* «%« c. j-w i .x , < ^ 

he named the same man as As- MY SEVERAL WORLDS, Since si ch visits usualy meant 

sistant Secretary of State for by Pearl Buck humkn ( rama. the l)ook abounds 

Latin American iAf fairs. Pearl Buck, the Nobel Prize In Interesting anecdotes. 

Hoalthy Influence winner, looks back over the The charming illustrations 

When he resigned that office, years and tells of her life, rich lend* a i lavor of their own. 

he kept his interest in Latin with memories of varied / . • • • 

America and cai-ried on some Peoples and far places. GOLDI N MOMENTS OF 

programs on a private basis Her story spans th? time RELIGIPUS fNSPIRA- 

that were the lore-runner of from the Boxer RebelUfh until -^ j^ 
President Trupah's Point Four today; her life has ranged from 
program. Theft hje set up, after India and Cliina to a quiet 
World War II,j tfie Interna- Pennsylvania farm. Always it 

tional Basic Ecohomy Coriora- is the people whom she has need is thi| collection of more 

tion, a private organizationFthat rtiet. from the most exalted to than elg; ity short stories, poeras, 

aimed to carry American capital the most humble. Who ^ engage ^nyvct, and essajrs taken f rona 

and technical knowledge into her ssropatliles.. ^ i • .. the pag(s of the Chris tiin 

under-developed lands to lift tThis is a very personal book, „ ,,»» -Iw" 

their production and living that grows out of knowledge Herald Magazme. Throug;h 

standards. and experience and insight, and every s« lection runs the thread 

The first full iwareness that is written with a warm and of faith, as expressed by many 

the American public began to abiding .love of human beings, oelebrat id writers and spiritual 

have alxiut the [importance to • * * leaders of todays 

this ^csuun try of ejconomic candi- HOCKSHOP, byJ|ViUienn R. The ollection covers a.w^de 

tions in'^'u^er-developed areas and Florence K. Simpson range, f i om the meaning of be- 

of the worlds-came when Mr Five generations of William ing a O ristian to how a farnily 

Rockefeller begsb-^o hammer Simpsons provide the back- can woi ship together, from! a 

on this theme inl hisreports to ground for this Series of, anec- story o \ how to meet ' life's 

the people of this country. dotes about the joys and sorrows losses ' t ) an essay on how^ a 

A man with t^s experiettee of running a pawn shop busi- business mati loela at God. 
and instinctive appreciation of ness, beginning with a single Represented are such note- 
the problem^ of people in establishment in New York add wothy i lames as Dr. Norman 
Africa. Asia and iLatin America developing into a niunber of Vincent Peale, Lloyd C. Doug- 
is bound to brii^g a new^ajid shops in different locations. las, Tljimas Sugrue, Faitii 
h e a 1 1 h y^ influence into thfe- Rich and poor, respectable BaldwU , Margaret Lee Run- 
^K^te House— to the gain of and disreputable, all came to beck, \ ess Streeter Aldridge. 
racial conditions jthroughout the this best known and respected Frankli i D. Roosevelt and J. 
world, including here. of alt^American hockshops. Edgar Hoover. 





TION, from the Cliris- 
tian Herald j 

. For ev ery mood and for ev^ry' 






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iNSdlT IrW^APtlST 


Western 
"^ Begins at 


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The Second Quarterly Session 
of the Los Angeles District As- 
sociation of the Western Baptist 
State Convention of California 
will convene at the Second Bap- 
tist Church. Dr. J. RayiHond 
Henderson is host-pastor.. The 
Rev. Dr. Arthur A Peters, Pas- 
tor of the Victory Baptist is the 
District Moderator. The Theme 
of this Session is "Christ the 
Answer to the World's Needs." 

The meeting will begin on 
Monday evening, Jan. 17, at 
7 pjn., with a "Symposium of 
Musk" under the direction of 
Mn. Katherine S. Lindsay, Dis- 
trict Diieeter of Music. An en- 
tertaining, as well as, informa- 
tive, program will be presented 
at; this time, including special 
dasses from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
Tuesday evening, January 18, 
at 8. p.m., the great Second 
Quarterly "Musical Extra- 
vaganza—The Parade of Choirs" 
wiU be presented, featuring out- 
standing choirs and artists af- 
filiated with the Association. 
Choirs from Hon Hill, Trinity, 
Mt Zion, T^ctory, St. Paul, and 
Second Baptist Churches, will 
be among the many famed mu- 
sical organizations featured. ^ 

Wednesday morning, Jan. 19l« 
at 11 a.m., the Pastor's Confer- 
ttict of the Association will be 
In session. The Rev. S. O. J- 
E^rans, Pastor of Macedonia 
Baptist Church Is President of 
the Conference. A special mes- 
sage will be delivered. 

Wednesday evening, January 

19, 1955 at 7:30 p.m., the Lay- 
men's Department, Mr. Billie 
T. Ferrell. President, will pre- 
sent a Spencer Service, which 
will also be designated "Usher's 
Night" for "the members of the 
Union Usher Board of Califor- 
nia, Southern District, of which 
Mrs. Grace M. Boyd is Presi- 
dent Dr. A. A Peters; the Dis- 
trict Moderatap> will bring the 
Message of the Hour. Several 
outstanding musical aggrega- 
gatfons will provide music for 
this service— the Anderson 
Singers of St. Paul Baptist 
Church, the Vocal-Aires En- 
semble, Mr. Clifton E. Mosely, 
Director, and others. 

Thursday morning, January 

20. at 7:30 a.m., the Women's 
Department, Mrs. Arlillian 
Walker, President, will sponsor 
a President's Breakfast at the 


Victory Bap^ Chur<*^48th A 
McKinley. The Women's De- 
partment invites all Pastors and 
Delegates to attend this special 

breakfast. The Women's De- 
partment Session will begin at 
9:00 a.m. at the Second Baptist 
Church. 24th A Griffith. "A 
Thousand Women On the March 
For Christ" is the goal of the 
morning session. Several promi- 
nent clergymen and Christian 
leaders will be included on the 
program for the morning meet. 
The afternoon session will con- 
vene at 2:00 p.m. A spectacular 
twilight service featuring 
"King Solomon's Festival" will 
be presented at 5:30 p.m. under 
the direction of Mrs. Dubose, 
chairman of music conunittee. 
Thursday evening, January 20. 
1955 at 7:00 p.m. the Yoimg 
People's department will be in 
session, Miss Callie Miles, presi- 
dent and Mrs. Eugenia J. Laray, 
director. The Rev. W. L. Robin- 
son, pastor of Faithful Central 
Baptist church will be bringing 
the sermon at 8 p.m. 

The Sunday School and B.T.U. 
Department will be in session 
Friday morning, Jan. 21, at 
9:30 a.m., Mrs. Mary D. Agnew, 
president. Conference groups 
will be in session at 10:00 a.m. 
At 11:30 a.m., the Department 
of Christian Education will be 
in session, Dr. Horace N. Mays, 
State Director, In charge. Rev. 
Whalen S. Jones, pastor of Mes- 
siah Baptist Church, will de- 
liver the message. At 2:00 p.m. 
Friday afternoon, the Doctrinal 
Message will be delivered by 
the Rev. Elliott Brown, pastor. 
Evangelistic Baptist Church. Dr. 
J. Lyle Caston, president. West- 
ern Baptist State Convention, 
will address the Association 
during the State President's 
Hour. The Association Business 
Session will follow. 

Jan. 21, at 7 p.m. a Special 
Youth Service will be held, with 
a brief movie at that hour. Mr. 
Willie C. Brown 'Will be chair- 
man. At 8:15 p,m., the Rev.E. 
A. Anderson, pastor, McCoy 
Memorial Baptist Church, will 
bring the final message.. 



HOST PASTOR— The Rev. 
J, Raymond Henderson is host 
to the Western Baptist State 
Convention. 


BEAUTIFUL SECOND BAPTIST— The site of the West- 
ern Baptist State Convention.^ 


REV. A. A. PETERS— The 
moderator of the Western 
State Conviention that it eon- 
veiling at the Second Baptist 
Church. . 




It 

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BOWEN HEHORUL 
METHODIST OWKH 

lot 3$tt aad Tklattr 8«L 
JtohB CBota. MlBlatac 

»a» •.■■.— Ckurcli aalie*!. 
tlM «.■••.— Warahlp. 
7M D.m.— <koad Niwt Heur. 



MESSACr 

J- PROBLc 


'IRCLE AND 

A CLINIC 

fvary Fridjy, 8 P.M. 

' T120 East 54th StrMt 

«•». Sally iauiMl«r«, Partor 

Rav. Sclita Johnson, Msgr. 


^ 


Doctors' 
Pharmacy 

PrMcripHww Exclusiveiy. 

Call Per and Dalivar. 

4012 S. Central Ave. 

AD. -19236 


Liberty Divine 
'^ Temple 

5432 So. Central Ave. 

Sunday Sdwel ..;.. 9:40 a.m. 

Merigng Service .. .11:00 a.m. 

iv«nin« Service 7:30 p.m. 

Preaching .... 8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday: Rev. A. V. Byrd, 
(Evangelist-Prophet ef Kansas 
CHy) 

Priday— Regular Service 
(Rev. Hendricks, Minister 
Bishop H. L Morgan, Founder 
Mrs. Bessie Robertson, Sec't. 


Roosevelt to | 
Name Ten for 
Air Academy 

Congressman James Roosevelt 
announced this week that im- 
mediately upon taking office he 
is prepared to submit as many 
as ten names of qualified young 
men living in the 26th District 
who are eligible to take exami- 
nations for admission to the 
first class of the new Air Force 
Academy, the so-called "West 
Point of the Air." 

Examinations for applicants 
from this area of the state will 
be given during the first wee}? 
of Februar>' and again during 
the first week of March, prob- 
ably at March Air Base in 
Riverside. 


Berkeley Installs 
NAACP Offficers 

BERKELEY — In a ceremony 
in the Williard School , in Ber- 
keley, Tarea Hall Pittman. field 
secretary of the NAACP, in- 
stalled tie newly elected of- 
ficers of the Berkeley chapter. 

The newly elected officers 
are: Mrs. Frankie Jones, presi- 
dent; Dr. Wendell Cotton, first 
vioe-presldent; Edward Grlce. 
second vice-president; Dr. Joel 
Lewis, third vice-president; Dr. 
Fred Stripp, fourth vice-presi- 
dent; Cecil Thomas, fifth vice- 
president; Mrs. Dorothy 
Knowles; recording secretary; 
Mrs. Bei Brown, corresponding 
secretary, and Mrs. Pearl Blan- 
din, treasurer. 


Calvary Hill 
In SongfesI 

A musicale of gospel singing 
is being featured at the Calvary 
Hill Baptist Church, 6802 S. San 
Pedro street, Sunday, Jan. 16, 
at 3 p.m. 

Rev. E. H. Windom, the pas- 
tor, announced the program will 
be featuring the Thompson's 
Gospel singers under the direc- 
tion of T. T. Thompson, the 
organizer of the group. 

One of the many outstanding 
artists who will appear on the 
program will be Madsune Car- 
rie Brown, according f to Rev. 
Windom. of internationatjame 
as a gospel singer, and^rs. L. 
Pobie, an artist of lo<?ai renown. 

Rev. Windom Is asking every- 
one who is a lover of gospel 
singing to attend this program. 


OBITUARIES 

James Anderson Brown, 2726 
Nevins. Died Jan. 1 at Rancho 
Los-.Amigos. Last rites from An- 
gelus Chapel Jan. 8. Surviving 
relative. Rosa Brown, wife. In- 
terment in the Evergreen Ce^ie- 
tery with A n g e 1 u s Funeral 
Home officiating. 

Ceraelia Davis, 1128 S.-Beren- 
do. Died Jan. 2. Final rites from 
the Angelus Chapel Jan. 7 with 
the Rev. P. Prentice sj)eaking 
the eulogy. Surviving relative. 
John Davis, husband. Angelus 
in charge of burial. 

Henry Green Harrell, 628 E. 
55th street. Died Dec. 31. Sur- 
viving relative Beryl Coleman 
Harrell, wife. Final rifes Janu- 
ary 10 from Angelus Chapel. 

Sallie Miles, 615 W. 65th 
street. Died January 2. Last rites 
were held Jan. 6. from the 
phurch of God in Christ. Sur- 
viving relative. Rhodessa Webb. 
sister. Angelus Funeral Home 
in charge of services. 

Walter Thomas. 4960 S. Wads- 
worth. "Died Jan. 4. Last rites 
Jan. 8 from 2nd Baptist Church 
with the Rev. J. ^. Henderson 
reading the eulogy. Surviving 
relative. Dixie E. "Thomas, wife. 
Angelas officiated at the burial. 

Hany Givens, 5120 H S. Cen- 
tral. Died Jan. 4. Last rites Jan. 
10 from the Angelus Chapel. 
Surviving relative. Roland 
Givens, brother. Angelus offi. 
ciated at the burial. 

ToTlox. Infant. 4234 S. Ken- 
wood. Died Jatt 2 at General 
Hospital. Survstving relatives, 
Margaret and John Taylor, 
parents. Services from the An- 
gelus Chapel Jan. 7. 


Negro History Week 
Set Febniary 13-20 

The anntial observance of National Negro History Week 
V011 be held February 13-20, with the theme: "Negro History A 
Contribution to America's Inter-Cultural Life." 

Our Authors Study Club, the Los Angeles branch of the 
Association for the Study of Negro Life and History will sponsor 

the annual celebration in* 

Southern California. 


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CONNER-JOHNSON QQ., INC. 


1400 UST SmHTHMTH STRin nOSNCT 3115 

"KEEPING THE FAFTH" 

-rmwmme nrs PAtTB *— IJter* u « protetttonat Cod* of Ethtei wliieh qn14— mil amr 4talttia* ip<ta p*e. 
^ttUa moSt of honor wttb m» to pat oar bttt tfforu forward ot aU timtt to uto oar but ikilU aiU 
}!rrtMPtet mTeonttdeneo. W* KEEP TUB tAlTU. i _ 


The Planning committee is 
made ' up_ of representative 
members of churches, fra- 
ternal organizations, social, 
civic and educational groups 
and all co^pperatlrtg to pre- 
sent the best Negro History 
Week observances. , 

R. R. Wright. Ill,'' Manager 
of the Broadway F«]eral Sav- 
ings and Loan Association is 
the general chairman of the 
Week and Miss Pauline Slater 
an outstanding educator in 
Los Angeles is co-chairman. 
Miss Evangeline Woodfolk. a 
social ser\-ice worker is sec- 
retary of the planning com- 
mittee. Mrs. Vassie D. Wright, 
a real estate broker is founder^ 
of the Study Club and ilS7 
president. . 

The achievements of; the 
Negro will be brought to the 
attention of all of the people 
in Los Angeles during the 
week with eminent speakers 
of national importance fea- 
tured. Among speakers are 
Dr. Benjamin Quarles and 
Mrs. Vivian Mason. "Special 
music will be presented and 
a hundred voice chorus will 
sing on church night and for 
other events. 

The Negro in the Hall of 
Fame will be dramatized. Art 
work of outstanding artists 
will be presented on a guided 
tour and an outstanding musi- 
cal program will be presented 
featuring the compositions of 
Negro composers. 

The Young People will pre- 
sent a stimulating Forum, en- 
tertainment, banquet and ora- 
torical contest. 

The Business and Profes- 
sional people of the city will 
present a demonstration of 
modern business and profes- 
sional practices, interspersed 
with music. 

Miss Negro History for the 
year of 1955 will be crowned. 
Citations for top flight 
achievements will be made to 
ten individuals In the com- 
munity. I 


t '»vf Mf M» ';*» wf /j\f /j^f '{Vf i^}% /.'« 


CHURCH 
Bulletin 


Donna Pr—l 


Cathonc Dean Speaks 

The Very Rev. Francis J. Con- 
nell of the Redemptorlst 
Fathers. Dean of the School of 
Sacred- Theology at the Catholic 
University of America in Wash- 
ington, D.C., will speak on *The 
Unity Octave" on KNX-CBS 
Radios "Church of the Air." 
Sunday. Jan. 16, 7:30 to 8 a.m. 


Youth Meet Set 
For February 

NEW YORK— The site trf the 
second annual NAACP National 
Youth Legislative Conference 
has been changed from Howard 
University to American Univer- 
sity in the nation's capital, it 
was announced this week by 
Herbert L. Wright, the associa- 
tion's youth secretary. 

Wright said the conference, 
scheduled for Feb. 3 to 6, will 
be concerned with arousing the 
Interest of young people in the 
role they can play in the sdiocl 
desegregation program. ■ • 

Some 1.500 high school and 
college students are expected to 
attend the conference. 


Back to God Program 

JiL mass meeting^ initiating a 
"B^ck To God" movenieht will 
be held this Sunday. Jan. 16 at 
4:30 p.m. in the Savoy Theatre 
building, 54th and Central Ave. 
Dr. Julius D. Pettigrew. foun- 
der of United Church of Christ 
is manager of the "Back to 
God " movement 


Mormon Choir Sings 

California's leading choral 
conductors, organists and choir 
singers — some 750 strong — ^will 
gather at Forest Lawn Memorial 
Park's raam/noth Hill of the 
Crucifixion in Glendale. fln 
Monday. January 17 to present 
a two-hour program climaxing 
the annual musical convention. 

Highlighting the list of musi- 
cal entertainment will be the 
famed ISO-voice Mormon Choir 
of Southern California. 


A. L Simpkins 
In the ''Sacred 
Hour" Sunday 

Sunday at S p.m. will mark 
the 5th annual presentation of 
"Sacred Hour with the Stars" at 
Peoples Independent Church of 
Christ 

Jay Loft-Lynn, impressario. 
promises an enteruinment 
filled afternoon. 

Among the many artists ap- 
pearing will be Arthur Ltee 
Simpkins, tenor, Forman Brown, 
composer, Dorothy Neumann, 
Earl Grant. Ted Rambo and 
Preston Patterson. 

The Peoples Independent 
Church of Christ is pastored by 
the Rev. Maurice A. 6awkins. 



Bopfist 
Installafion at 
Mount Sliidi 

Newly elected officers of the 
Baptist Ministers yn|ion of 
Southern California will jbe in- 
stalled at a banquet it-Mt 
Sinai Baptist Church, 26lo La- 
Salle St, on Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. 
Wives of the members \Hll be 
honored guest* along with civic 
dignltarijHB. \ I 

Hollywood robe manufActurer 
Henri O'Bryant will be host at 
the banquet 

The 200 memberk orgjaniza- 
tlon held the election deeting 
at Faithful BapOst Church, 40th 
and Paloma St^the Rev.lw. L. 
Robinson pastor.' J 

Named as officers for 1S|55 are 
the Rev. H. B. Charles, re-elected 
president for the third consecu- 
tive year; Rev. E. A. Anderson. 
McCoy Memorial Churchj, first 
vice-president; Rev. N. J. Kirk- 
patrick. New Hope Churchy Long 
Beach, second vice-president; 
Rev. John A. Davis. Community 
Church, Monrovia, secretary; 
Rev. D. C. Austin, Come^rstone 
Church, treasurer. Mrs. 
Moten is president of the 
auxiliary. 



Edna 
wives 


Hill Fetes 
Robeirt Anderson^ 
In Gbspel Sing { 

The Obporttmity Baptis't 
Church, located at 1112 E, 23rd. 
street Bn). Eugene D. Small- 
wood, pastor, presents "Robert 
Andersoni'that golden voice of 
the East In a Mammoth Gospal- - 
Music FMSt at the Zipn Hfl! 
Baptist cfiurch, located at 51st" \ 
and McK|nley Ave., Rev. T. Mi 
Chambers! pastor, Sunday afterl* 
noon, Jarj.'ie at 3:00 p.m. 

Featuring with Robert Anderl- 
son, a 10 voice choir, directed 
by Thurs Dn Fraizer, the Sally 
Martin fingers, the Victory 
Musettes, and many • 


•t\ 


Airs, the 
others 


CHEST X-RAYS 

Les Angeles city health de- 
partment's mobile unit took 
100,088 x-rays during 19S4, an 
increase of 30.000 over 1953, 
according to Dr. George -M. 
Uhl, dty health officer. 


Charles Morris at 
Zion Hill Sunday 

Announcement was made to- 
day by Dr. Timothy M. Cham- 
bers, pastor of the Zion Hill 
Bapist church. East 51st stneet 
at McKinley avenue, that Dr. 
Charles Satchell Morris. II. na- 
tionally known minister, educa- 
tor, orator and social worker 
will be the guest preacher at 
the regular 10:30 a.m. worship 
service next Sunday morning. 


P«opl«'s lncl«f^nd 

Rav 

Jan. 16-11 
5:00 P.M.-S«cr«d Heur 

A Community Chur^i— Non-Racial— Nei 


MauriM 
R 


\tStRANOtVr 

OimO MAN 

SPiltlTUAL PSYCHIC 

ADVISOR 

and ADVICE en aH 
.of lifa; aolvta avary 
problem parUinlng ta 
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tiness. Suoenaful In 
thousand* find aon-, 
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, why not youT 
lit Y/»\ Convlnea Veo 
ellow P car to Rlm- 
then Santa Moniea 
I to door. 

16^ PICO BLVD. 
ITA MONKA 

fX. 6-5677 

11 a.m. to • p.iH. 
>PEN SUNDAYS ^ 


human 
LOV 
and 

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One 
Take 
pau 
Blue bl 


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lent Churil 

A. Dawkins, 
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A.M.-"Beyond the 
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off Christ 

itter 
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7:30 P.M.-Voq»on 

ineminatienal 


BEST WISHES 

tram 


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A.M.E. Lajmen of Southern 

CALIFORNIA .CONFEtENCEN^. 

D^Armund* Wcpll imr B«n{ami| W. Ingraham 
Bishop 


Women's Day 

• Woman's Day will be ob- 
served by the Christian Wom- 
en's Fellowship of "Fhe Avalon 
Christian Church 43 and A'valon 
on Sunday, Jan. 16, at 11 .a.ra. 
St 

The theme for Womans Day 
is "Partners on the Way." 

Mrs. Jessie Harper. Secre^ry, 
will serve as Mistress of Cere- 
monies. 


Carver Tribute 
In Hall of Fame 

A dramatic incident in the life 
of the famed scientist George 
Washington Carver will be re- 
created on CBS Radio's "Hall- 
mark Hall of Fame" SuadoT' 
Jan. 18. Edward Arnold, the 
program's host will pay tribute 
to botanist Carver for his hu- 
man and his scientific contribu- 
tions to world well-being, in a 
drama entitled "The Courage of 
Carver." Bill Froug produces 
and directs "Hallmark Hall of 
Fame." Script is by ITionnls 
Calhoun. 


Your FrJoncf In 
rimo of Sorrow 


'when aerrew ctrlkes, with the past- 
ing of someone dear, rely upon 
PEOPLE'S to complete all nocossary 
arrangements. Our experienced staff 
isj above ail, tasteful and discreet 
•t all times. 


PEOPLE'S 

FUNERAL HOME 

4250 Contra! AD. 7181 



ANY FAMILY 

A new furteral servica policy, recom- 
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pay* all expenses regardless of how little 
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HEAR J. RAYMOND HENDERSON, PASTOR SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH, 24TH SL AT Gf tlFFFITH AYEa 

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ARE YOU A NEWCOMER TO LOS Af<GELE5? VISIT US BEFORE JOINING ANOTHER CHURCH FREE PARKINO - PUBffl 



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WELCOME 



- ". ■ 


vs. Salas 


^-^Tiwt Cdljfornlo Eagl* Thurs., Jan. 13, 19S5 




PREP 


|v- 


SCOREBOARD 


By Al Chism 


Well, we're back in business 
mtter two weeks of holidays. 
1 Prep basketball is back in full 
•• swing, with action both in the 

■ dty and C.I.F. We caught a 

'couple of games in the 10th an- 
•^Bual Compton High School 

llasketball Tournament. Mt. 

-Garmel High was the winner, 
ijlbeating Huntingtoil Beach 


79-49. 

LOYOLA 
spot 


ijttird 


HIGH copped the 
with a win over 


i'i 


^'' 




! game went into two overtime 
I ^'periods. Bob Gregory, the Loyola 
flash, who had been the butt of 
hecklers all night .broke up the 
gune with a jump shot, to wind 
itp the heroi 

I CENTEJTlilAL HIGH made it 
'to the second round, losing to 
DOWNEY 59-57 after leading 
all the way. The Cents are still 
giving their rooters nervous 
breakdowns with their story 
" book finishes. With but five sec- 
onds left in the game Porter 
missed a shot, and Downey 
, scored to eliminate them. The 
Apaches have a new coach, 
"Link" Richmond, a - former 
-Arizona cage and football star. 
•H« should have one of the top 
flvea in the Bay League. 

I f; -While on the subject of Cen- 
. tennial we'll give the Boosters' 
Club a little plug. Their Annual 
Football Awards Banquet, hon- 
oting Centennial High. Bay and 
C.I.F. champs, sponsore,d by 
Centennial Boosters Club, will 
bt held at Will Rogers Play- 
ground, Jan. 27. jDonation $1.50. 

i > The Boosters are/ hoping to 
secure Coach Red Sanders of 
U.C.L.A. as guest speaker. Yours 
truly will serve as master of 
ceremonies.- The Apaches . gave j 
us lots of thrills last season, so 
come on i^ut apd show 'them 

. our apprefiatiori.' Public invited. 

rtrruBE STAR-^ 

> We got a look at., future Mt. 
'Carmelstar in the person of Al 
Claiborne, 6'7'^ center. A Soph., 
Al is under the wing of Spot 
Thornton, a former Jeff.. L.A.J.C. 
arid Fresno- State star. Pick up 
all you can from your tutor, 
Alvin, as he was only fine of the 
best in the state a few years 
back. (O.K.. I'm sorry, a gang of i 
years back.) 

~COACH JOHN RANDOLPH'S 
Jordan basketball team is also 
enjojdng a good season thus far. 
They practically sewed up the 
Marine League vrith their win 
over Westchester 49-39 Friday. 
Bobbie Odum was high man 
with 16 points. I've seen the 
Bulldog varsity in action, and 
pick them to be right in the 
thick of the city tournament. 
Tfiey could even win it. 

JEFFERSON HIGH, led l^ 
McGill and Guidry, took . over 
the lead in the Southern 
League with a 65-45 win over 
ROOSEVELT. Shinzato, the 


Roughriders' leading scorer, was 
held to ten points, his lowest of 
the season. 

POLY retained their lead in 
the Eastern League downing 
Huntington Park 75-42. Silas 
Williams, the league's top scor- 
er, hit 23 to run his season's 
total to 125 points. His running 
mate. Green, had 14. 

FREMONT HIGH, with one of 
the best teams in the -city, kept 
on their winning ways. Stafford, 
the Pathfinder ace. scored 30 
points, topping Garfield 71-38. 
Too bad they have to take such 
a bitter dose. 
HOPE HOT THE LAST— 

Jordan's football team won 
the Marine League this year, 
which marked the first time in 
the history of the school this 
has happened, but let's hope not 
the last. The merchants on 
103rd St. in South LJi. showed 
their interest in the boys by 
furnishing footballs with names 
and a raised blue "J" for each 
man. 




Fight Tonight 
For Top Honor 

The 'New Olympic' Audito- 
rium, completely modernized 
and renovated, swings open its 
doors tonight with a state light- 
weight championship fight as 
the featured attraction. 

Southern California boxing 
fans will have the opportunity g.j.^. anttA PARK^ 
of seeing two of the most sen- _*>/*" * * ^f ^ V; *^***!\— 
sational 'swingers' In the busi- ^ight^n prominent i-year^ds. 
ness when Don Jordan, ac- he«ded Iby A. J. Crevdlm's Deter 
claimed the greatest fighter of ^'ne. the money-wiining king 
•54. defends his state "ght- '«' ^4 »iave been kipt eligible 
weight crown against the for-j'or the $100,000- adged Santa 
mer world's champion. Lauro | Anita Maturity on Jah.2SL Final 
gjjjj^g eligibility payment df $200 was 

Public Favorite • ?«'<* J»st Januaiy :, and the 

Edward "Able" Robinson, in- total pool for the rich 4-year-old 
capacitated Sports scribe said special at 1^ niles now 
that "Jordan stands out like a amounts to $145;360. Saturday's 
•teetotaler' at a distillers con- ^«»i"«s: San Fernaido Stakes 
ventlon" and is picking him as and El Encino Handicap, 
the '54 king of swat. Lauro _.„.„. .»r,^. „, ^ 

Salas, on the other hand, has SANTA ANITA -j Skooting, 
engaged in seven slugfests on , "Ut for this one 


• T 


LETTER FROM HOME— Tom Alston, flashy first baseman of the St. Louis Cardinals, 
greets Johnny Morris, the Eagle's acting sports editor from St. Louis, at a luncheon sponsored 
by the Anheuser-Busch brruery at the U'atkins Hotel. Tom will spend the rest of tl{e month 
touring the Los Angeles playgrounds, giving pointers to aspiring young ball players.' Johnny, 
uho lived two blocks from Tom, is a nephew of the great Luke Easter, so they had a lot to 
talk about. 



4»^Vlorris 4^<: 


aw^ 


fbyf 


JOHNNY MORRIS 



Evan a man of the graat open 
tpacaa Is cireumaerlbed by the limi- 
' tationa of hi* own breadth of out- 
look. 


} 


■i^.: 


'\- 


■f:^- 


.4- 




ROLLER SKATING 
SIATIUM 

POST-XMAS 

ROLLER SKATE 

CLEARANCE SALE 

■•glniiins Jan. 15th 

A $iS.OO skats ccualgivan 
•way abselotaiy FREE with 
•vary pair off skatas pur- 


SPECIAL Vi PRICE 

iKATING SESSIONS 

■vary Serf. mom. from 
9t30- J 2i00. IdMi f or tho 

kfddioi and also paronts. 

50c includlnf shoo skotos. 


SKCIAl «AT1$ PO» OtOUPS 
PHONE RM INFORMATION 

THE ^KATIUM 


it 


aS17W.Wosli.Wvd. 
1* 


M. 3^210 


Fan Moll 

On our editorial page appears 
a letter which t received from 
a Mr. Richard E. Sneed. In it he 
reveals that, he Wliev^UCLA 
will take next tej^s Jlose Bowl 
game and caullonS^e not to 
be a pessimist. I'm not, Mr. 
Sneed, but you said it yourself 
—use is the only FCC team to 
Itold a win against the Big Ten. 

Farther, he doesn't seem to 
i]i$Meve that C. R. Roberts will 
put in as much bench time as I 
predicted. Hey, Dick. Remember 
Addison Hawthorne? 

At least Mr. Sneed and I 
agree on one point. We share an 
intense^ disrespect for Dodger 
fans who didn't know Brooklyn 
was in the league until 1946, 
and probably still wouldn't 
know which train to catch to get 
to Flatbush. And our opinions 
probably won't be altered .by 
the excuses Jackie Robinson 
makes for his vulgar behavior 
in the forthcoming issue of 
Look Magazine^ (Let's read this. 
Mr. Sneed. It <H11 probably give 
us both a big chuckle, if it does 
not ruin our digestion). I am 
from St. Louis and a staunch 
Cardinal fan. I probably will be 
one as long as the Redbirds are 
in the league. 

The letter, .also states that 
"We have more than UCLA In 
the Pacific Coast Conference." 
You <fan't tell it from the 1954 
football record. 


Mr. Sneed goes on to tell me 
of his educational background. 
He .ends his letter by stating 
that he' is going to send his 
daughter to USC. I have a friend 
who sent his daughter to Rust 
College in Mississippi, and 
maybe by 1965, USC, as well as 
Mississippi, will be able to see 
Negroes as peopter^^ 

QUESTION OF TKZ WEEK: 
Why didn't Mr. Sne«d go to 

use? 


Sinking all Putts 

iy 'Shodass Joe' Jace 


10 
2 


-Home of WorW» 

BIGGEST 

bAILY DOUBU 

$12,724.80 

BEAUTIFUL 

CALIENTE 

In Old Mexico 

PRESENTS EVERY SUNDAY 
RAIN OR SHINE 

WTHBILUNG AND 
EXCITING RACES 

2 BIG FEATURES 
THIS SUNDAY 

MAIN EVENT 

"THE AUMEDA" 

SIX FURLONGS 
SECONDARY 

"THE MULCIBER" 

SIX FURLONGS 

PARUYS AND 

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OAlLY-DOUBLi 

AND QWNiU 

BOOKS AND MUTUELS 

FUTURE BOOK ON THE 
SANTA ANITA HANDICAP 

Pott TiiiM 12:40 

JOHN S. ALISSIO 

Mr 


If the prelude is indicative of 
things to come, when" fledge- 
ling year develops into a full 
grown golfing season, the Cos- 
mopolitan golf club is in for 
an ultra-superlative year. The 
old guard is headed by the 
magnificent Al McDaniel the 
bread and butter boy of the 
unit, with the new champions. 
Al "Clown" Christman and Ha- 
rold Batiste, hitting the pellet as 
they are at the moment, the en- 
tire west coast is in for a thor- 
ough going over golfwise. 

Mc Daniel, after numerous at- 
tempts, made. the last day in 
the L.A. Open, and made it 
good. His 227 for 54 holes put 
him in front of such prominent 
amateur golfers as Ronnie 
Hughes, Pat Chartrand, Jim Fer- 
rie, and Bruce Cudd who won 
the 1954 L.A. Open amateur 
crown. His 79 in the final round 
put him among the first 15 in 
the Simon pure ranks. 

Crafty Al Christman. playing 
it safe f 11 the way. stroked his 
way to a five and three victory 
over slugging Archfe Hairston 
in the finalround of the Presi- 
dent's Cup Play. Christman, 
whose game has Improved im- 
mensely in the last year, found 
the going fairly easy after turn- 
ing the corner only one up on 
Hairston, who had putter 
trouble on the back side. This 
victory gives Christman the 
Club championship for 1955. The 
Cosmos salute Al. and to a 
worthy champion, lots of luck 
in your future efforts. 

Handicap chairman. Harold 
Batiste, recovered from a two 
down deficit at the turn, to go 
on and defeat Ed. Carey two up 
to win the Vice-President's 
trophy. Batiste's consistently 
long tee shots finally took their 
toll on Carey as his game dis- 
integrated on the final six holes. 
Salud to you, lower bracket 
champion. The trophy could not 
be in better hands. Keep it pol- 
ished well Mildred. 


Angel's Brass 
Missing Local 
Baseball Boat 

Last week the Lot An- 
geles Angels hod a lun- 
cheon at the Bi It more 
Hotel, during which their 
new president was intro- 
duced to the downtown 
press, ond enlY to the 
downtown press. There 
wosn't a Negro reporter or 
sportswriter in sight 

This makes us look 
rather silly after all the 
suport we have indiscrimi- 
nately lavished upon the 
Angels. And. looking at the 
record, maybe • we were 
rather silly. While the ^ An- 
gels have hired Negro 
players, they are still try- 
ing to sell their team to us 
without hiring any tan 
brothers where it counts — 
in the Public Relations De- 
partment. In this respect, 
the Hollywood Stars are 
way ahead of them. They 
have a Negro Public 'Rela- 
tions man, and Brown Cali- 
fornia is well represented 
on their boosters' club. 
During . regular baseball 
seson, Mr. Washington, 
one of our colleagues, 
travelled with the Stars to 
San Diego and Seattle. 

I suppose that the false 
security which the Angels 
posess is a geographic one. 
But we have news for the 
newly-installed Mr. John 
Holland and ^ his Los An- 
geles Angels. What with 
the freeways, we won't find 
it too hard to make 
way to Hollywood. 


BOWLING 


JUwJfh— 



LEWIS RUSS 

The Sunset Bowling League 
banged back into action Satur- 
day night plowing down the 
pins at the Studio Bowl. 

Tony Moore tore up the tim- 
bers, shooting one of his best in 
topping the league with a 630 
high series. His team, "Brown 
Motors." rolled the "Neal's 
Liquors' two games to one. 
Alfred AhSam of Neal's alio 
was in high gear in tripping the 
sticks for a 583 series. 

Lee's Hi Hats pounded the 
wood and racked up the stuff to 
blank the "Timber Ticklers" 
three games to none. Edward 
McFall blew his top in bowling 
a 236 high game and a 622 
series. L. V. Miller shot his wad 
with a 590 series. Harold John- 
son was doing hfs part in 
tumbling the logs for a 599 
series. Lewis Brothers upset 
"Brand Central Bar-B-Cue" two 
games to one. Wilbur Church 
and Al Singletary bowling 
rather consistently. 

The "Pickuppers" took "Ded- 
ricks" two games to one. Don 
Taylor gloating over a 590 
series. "Garretts" downed "B & 
B" two games to one. Earl Jack- 
son shooting a 542 and Hal Kin- 
man a 545 series. 

In racking the wood back, be 
a good sport at all times. "Keep 
our I your temper for nobody wants 
lit." 


' his comeback ttail, leaving four 
victims down for the count, in-, 
eluding Mickey Zielke in six; 
Sonny Straus in three; Alex 
Firabres in two and Gil Velardo 
In nine. 

Likeable Louie Magana, jovial 
jack of all trades and coopera- 
tive Olympic staffer, announced 
that the auditorium is undergo- 
ing a completely new 'face 
lifting.' "From the bright, new 
neon sign overlooking the main 
entrance clear down to the 
smaller, more compact and 
visible ring, the $150,000 re- 
modeling job makes 18th and 
Grand the finest sports-a- 
torium on the Pacific Coast." 
OlTinpie InnoTotiea 

The Olj-mpic started a new^ 
policy opening with tonight's 
'action.' The Jordan-Salas 
twelve-rounder will NOT be 
televised, however the entire 
balance of the card, including a 
ten-rounder between Dave Gal- 
lardo versus Ramon Carrillo 
and three preliminary bouts 
will be telecast. 


AHhea Tops 



For 8th Year 

Althea Gibson is ranked -as 
the No. 1 woman player ^for the } 
eighth consecutive year 'by the 
American Tennis Association, 
whose 1954 rankings were re- 
leased this week; Earthna Jac- 
quet of Los Angeles is given the 
top spot in the Men's Singles 
supplanting George Stewart 
who had been the No. 1 mei^s 
player for five of the past sy^n 
years. Stewart did not defend 
his title this year. 

Young Blood 

Donald Archer', an 18-year 
youngster from Nassau,-, Baha^ 
mas. is the leader in the Junior 
Singles as William Wynn from 
Wilmington, North Carolina, the 
1953 title holder, had passed the 
age limit for the event. The 
first New Englander to gain 
the top position in the Girls' 
Singles is Blanche Bailey, a 16- 
year old girl who hails from 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. Dr. Syl- 
vesterB. Smith, President of the 
American Tennis Association, 
when announcing these rank- 
ings stated. "I am happy to 
note the growth and progress of 
our organization as the rank- 
ings show we have players from 
the Atlantic to the Patific." 


Harmony Bell — Coijoes from a 
smart stable. 

Poverty Bar — Sev^n furlongs 
or over tab 

Regardira — ^Very f^st^ fit and 
ready for best 

Model Ace — Ma(n Chance 
Farm flyer. 

Noir— Ready for thfe best now. 
Halrack — Can run Ion the turf 
course. 

The Pie King — Go back to this 
one on fast track. I 

Team Work — Shopping for a 
spot. 'I 

Blessed Gal — Didrit like off 
track. ' 

Our Merhf^Now rpady for 
best efforts. 

* * • 

CALIENTE IN OLD MEXICO 
— Mr. Rusty — Ready lor winning 
efforts. 

PoUymain — Very 4hjirp now, 
tab. 

Sir Patch — From wife to wire. 
Get yours. i 

Autumn Child -- Newcomer. 
Smart hands. j - 

Didjano — Unseat >d rider in 
last^Tab. , • 

Russian Fox — ^This tme at a 
price. • 

Two Sky — Six furl mgs home 
free. '- 

Dramamine— ^My roal ^pfecial. 


lie Tarius — Don't s^y 1 
tell you. 

rts Stars 
light Miami 
If Tourney 

To I amafeur and professional 
golfc 's from all parts of the 
nati( n are expected to take part 
in r ay Mitchell's second an- 
nual Winter Golf Tournament, 
to i i held at the beautifid 
Miar li. Fla. Springs Golf Coiirse, 
Feb.' 21-24. This course is the 
homi of the fabulous Miami 
$10,o|o Open. 

A Ihighlighit of the tourna- 
menf will be the baseball play- 
ers' ffiandicap tournament, in 
whicp Jackie Robinson, Hank 
Thorapson, Don Newcombe, 
Monw Irvin. Joe Louis and Nat 
Kinglcole will play. Other con- 
testslwill be Scotch Foursomes, 
withlmen and women playing 
as *irtners. driving^ contests 
for men and women and besi^' 
dressfd golfer competition. 

^ Doiens of trophies will be 
awamed winners in each event, 
incltming a special -.trophy f6r 
Charie Sifford as Outstanding 
Golf* of 1954. 



Held 
was . 
3,500 


La! t year's tburhameht was 
in Jacksonville. Fla: jand 
attended ^y more 1|haii 
entrants and spectatcHS. 


must meacure «ne by th* 
den Vt e if you want him to 
to yoi ■ expectation*. , 



YOU MAY 
EARN OVER 

WEEKLY 


AMmt a MaH 

ftfct* mt Hmm , 


-AtLAS- 



NV- 


Man LoMe» Vigor! 
J¥iie Asked tor Divoreel 

Ut Mri RoMv Tell HU Own Story: 

1 had (ufferad with my prMtate gland, it 
caAMd:m« nerveiM, slMplns, leg pain, kidney 
and bladder trouble, and to bitter to go toward 
o p posito MX, cemploto Iom of vigor, it wa« 
_ ,-„ J ~ w c owt y my wifo wk for divorco. I had triad 
Br. r. J. Mw all Undt of ramodiot Without rotuH until I was 
rocommondod to Or. P. Y. Uw (Chinoto Horb Spo- 
cialict). in couple mentha time I am cemplotoly woll. 
Now I am woll and the future is more brightor and 
itrongor than over. If any eno •uffart.ias I did, 
ploato rualr to Dr. Uw. I am turo you will locolvo 
the samo rosuh." 

(Signed) J. A. loiioy, Rodlandi, Calif. 

WHY BE SICK.. 

Um 'XktaM* H«r*t- OBd mm Imthnhn tto aotif MMkod 
roa QUKK uuu . . arMMdb timm. toMMiy 


MINTai AND NIIVOW CONDITIONS 


NAVI 


wccistruuT niuno 


VA.2646 


HOIIywDDd 
••7H1 


* Arthritis 

* Asthma 
*BUttiler 

* OoBctlpatloii 
*Dtab«£M 
*Ftmal« 

Tronbla 


* Htart DUcaM 

* High Blood 
Pretaura 

* Kl<lni , 
1 Troubl 


bl« 
* RhctmiatltiB 


batii • dpM 

Satnrmo U ' 

p • riejed 

Dr. F. Yo Lew Dx. y»^\ Mu^ c,ino 

HERtALliT 850 S. MAInTt. 


♦.•.WS.A»ii%.- 




Councilman Gordon R. Hahn 
has arranged a special treat for 
the young enthusiasts of major 
league baseball. 

On Saturday. January 15. at 
10.00 a.m., Tom Alston, the first 
base star of the Cardinals will 
be at Manchester Playground. 
8800 South Hoover, in person, 
and the film "Let's Train With 
the Cardinals" will also be 
shown, added Councilman 
Hahn. 


•Dftspswe* 



SURPRISE BIRTHDAY PARTY— Mrs. Kate R. Evans 
ttfos swept off her feet Sunday when her son. Dr. J. F. 
Evans, casually took her to the Pacific Town Club where he 
had previously arranged a surprise party for her birthday. 
Shown seated, grouped around, a huge floral centerpiece, from 
left: Metiamet Segunda Mae Smith, Thelma Phillips, Gladys 


Badineau, Honoree Kate R. Evans, Miss Zenobia Gillehm, 
Margaret Martin, Laura "Rosebud" Fowler and Dr. Kath- 
erine White of San Diego. Standing: Thomas Phillips, Dr. 
J. D. Fowler, TkonSas Martin, Prof. Avery Smith, Jr.. Dr. 
Ray P. Bettis of San Diego and Dr. Evans. 


! . 




■el- 

I Upi 


I, 


■i . 


Mrs. Kate Evans Feted in ^ 

Party 


'A^^ L-.tr- 



rise 





^■\ 


Wonder whafs mround the 
aextiiend? 

■ Mis. Kate S. Evans is one (A 
' fhose unusual women who en- 
1 joy life, with its sorrows as 
^ well as its joys, and welcome 
^.eadi passing day, not worry- 
•j tag about the advancing years 
1^- but recognizing each-^tomi 
- xow as a refreshing challi 
■ . At her surprise birthd 
party Sunday, given 
son. Dr. J. F. Evans, and cele- 
brated at the Pacific Town 
Club, Mrs. Evans expressed her 
Refreshing philosophy in the 
■following verse: 
". *^ome celebrate 'em! 
Some forgrt 'em! " 
•I But we all nave 'em. 

Mileposts along the road of 
, I of life, telling us how far 
I I we have travelled." 
, "After all," she added, "it's 
\ Bo disgrace to have travelled, 
\ and the journey can be con- 
tinually interesting and re- 
warding if we help to make it 
that way. So here's to the 
years, both yours and mine. 
Vfoaiet what's around the 
next bend?" 

At 3 p.m. Mrs. E^rans and her 
son arrived at t&e Pacific 
Town Club from chutA. There 
Mrs. Evans was given the sur- 
prise of her life when ^e was 
greeted by a small group of 
friends, and saw the table 
spread for a lavish dinner 
"party. 

Prof. Avery Smith. Jr., was^ 
master of ceremonies. In addi- 
tion to the good wishes and 
the I breath - taking surprise, 
Mrsi Evans received many 


handsome gifts and was 
showered with a large number 
of birthday cards. ^ 

Among those who attended 
the surprise dinner were Dr. 
.Katherine White and Dr. Ray 
P. Bettis, both of San Diego. 

Local socialites who were 


present were Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Phillips, Dr. and Mrs. '^" 
J. D. Fowler. Mr. and Mrs. ?• 

Thomas Martin, Mrs. Segunda 

Mae Smith. Mrs. Gladys Babi- 
neau, and Miss Zenobia Gil- 
lohm. 


s, tomor- — ' — 

i^T Organize Local Chapter 
Of Nati Phi Delta Kappa 



People are still remi- 
niscing about the Christ- 
mas party given by Mrs. 
Willie Williams on Mon- 
day evening to welcome 
home her husband. Earl, 
from China. j. 

Beautifully gowned in 
ai black cocktail dress and 
wearing ^the gorgeous 40- 
diamond platinum watch 
(gift from hubby), Mrs. 
Williams ushered her 
guests Into the gaily dec- 
orated den, where the 
Christmas tree and Mrs. 
Williams' gifts all were 
, waiting for him. 

Traditional eggnog.hol- 
1 iday bird with all the trim- 
mings were enjoyed by: 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ran- 
som, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. 


Rivers, Mr. and Mrs. Levi 
Jackson, Mrs. Josephine 
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Tom 
Morten. 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Carter, Mr. and Mrs. Eus- 
tace Smith, Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Johnson, Sidney 
Staton, Mrs. Mim Harris, 
Mr. and Mrs. Horace 
White, Lewis J. Jones, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfonso Rad- 
ford, I. Wallace, Miss Avie 
D. Thompsoji^Mr. John 
Gaynes, Arueij Fernan- 
dez, Mrs. Beatrice Thom- 
as, Mrs. Jean Keele, Mr. 
and Mrs. Heybum Pryce, 
Mr. L. D. Benton, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. D. McNeil, Mr. 
and Mrs. Spencer Mail- 
lard, Mr. and Mrs. Thom- 
as Johnson and Mr. Rufus 
Norman. 


Recently chartered, the Beta 
Theta chapter of the national 
Phi Delta Kappa sorority for 
school teachers was organized 
here Dec. 29 and 30. 

Fourteen sorors joined the 
new chapter. The fifteenth 


I •< 


Xfeffersoni 
PTA Holds 
Xtnas Party 

Thomas Jefferson PTA held 

• Its annual Christmas party on 

the afternoon of Dec. 30 at the 

beautiful home of Mrs. Bertha 

Haynes, 1557 E. 46th street. 

Gay conversatiwi, merry 
"Singing, gift giving and an 
abundant luncheon w«re on 
the order of the day. 

The regular January meet- 
ing will take place at the 
sdiool Jan. 18 at 2 p.m. in the 
cafeteria. A panel, led by out- 
standing conwnunity leaders 
will discuss the topic: "Growth 
Through Community Partici- 
pation." 

Tea will be served at 4 o'- 
clock by the Hospitality, Com- 
mittee. 

All meetings are open to 
members and to the public 


member, Winnie Palmer, is 
the founder and contact repre- 
sentative for the far Western 
region. The election of officers 
was held as well as the instal- 
lation and initiation. 

The first chapter of the na- 
tional group was organized in 
1923 at Newark, N.J. There 
were twenty-two chapters in 
twenty-six states before the 
new "chapter was chartered 
here. The theme of the sorority 
is, "To foster a spirit of sister- 
hood among teachers and to 
promote the highest ideals of 
the teaching. profession." 

Contributions toward an- 
nual, scholarship >|9nds and a 
library project for the Uberia 
State building occupied vne of 
the new group's major work- 
shops last Wednesday. A re- 
ception held at the Wilfandel 
concluded the two day session, 
presided over by Rosetta 
Elliott, 3rd Anti-Basileus and 
Regional Director of Chicago 
public schools. 

Visiting soror was Ashley 
Cain, from San Francisco. To 
be eligible to join the new 
chapter applicants must be 
actively engaged as school 
teachers. 


Twin Girls 
Win $500 in 
Baby Derby 

CmCAGO — "Twin Negro girls 
are among- 23 sets of timely 
newborn arrivals on New Year's 
Day to win $500 in gifts in the 
Sevienth Annual Toni Twin Baby 
Derby, sponsored by the Toni 
Company, leading cosmetic 
manufacturers. 

Daughters of Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Saunders, Valerie Lynn 
and Vanessa Lee are the only 
derby winners bom in the "State 
of Delaware. They reside at 460 
Anderson Drive in Wilmington. 

Though the Saunders had 
known for several weeks that a 

double blessing was on its way, — 

the twins still surprised their f)^-,.^^,-^- /?I*»/vt*/#k 
parents by arriving two months rUCOllTHl KjTUUy 
prematurely. First to arrive at 

Wilmington GenCTal Hospital 'Pl/rtl'^it^tt IPH 
was Valerie who was bom at riUJinin^ 1 fiU 
11:56 p.m. Vanessa followed at The Myron Leflore Defense 
12:01 a.m. They weighed 3 lbs.. Committee is sponsoring a 
5% ounces, and 4 lbs., 1 ounce,' reception and tea at the home 
respectively. of Mrs. Jessee Mitchell. 13297 

The lucky twins will receive a Paxtom street, in Pacoima, 
HedStrom twin baby carriage; a 
year's supply of Gerber's baby 
food, an assortment of toys from 
the Ideal Toy Corporation, 
Trundle-Bundle infants' wear 
and a special selection of Love 
dresses, Lu 1 1 a b y e cribs, and 
Kantwet posturized innerspring 
mattresses. • , f 

Waiting at home to welcome' 
the little newcomers are a 
brother, Gregory, seven, and sis- 
ters, Brenda, five, and Sheila, 
four. 

Mr. Saunders is a tmck driver 
employed with the Baylln Com- 
pany in Wilmington. 


CnhsEN—Miss Ruth Reese. 
Bennett College junior, of 
Darlington, S. C. u-as select- 
ed by Mademoiselle, the mag- 
azine for smart young tvomen, 
as a member of its College 
Board. The board, chosen an- 
nually, is composed of out- . 
standing young uomen under- 
graduates from the nation's 
leading colleges and univer- 
sities. 


Open House Honors 
Minnesota Visitors ' 

A house party hosted by Mr./and Mrs. George Roach, hon- 
oring the hostess' slster-in-law^d brother, Mr. and Mrs. Web- 
ster E. Stovall of Minneapolis, was~held Sunday afternoon at 

the Roach home on West 29th street. 

■ ' Other ifecipients of South- 


r^ 


Sunday from 3 to 6:30 p.m.. 
Principal speaker will be Dr. 
H. Claude Hudson. The pub- 
lic is invited. 


VENICE 

News 

Bv Mrs. Louise Forte 


The Brotherhood Board of 
First Baptist Church of Venice 
this week thanked those 
whose cooperation made their 
program a great success. Ar- 
thur L. Reese gave the com- 
plete history of the church. He . 
is one of the founders. 

Mrs. Clara Murrey, of 649 
Santa Clara Ave., died New 
Year's Day. The funeral was 
conducted Jan. 8 by Rev. W. M. 
Jones. 

Raymond Roberts, of 629 
Westminster Ave., and Dol- 
pheus Ware, of 648 Sunset 
Ave., were injured last week 
in a car collision. They are re- 
ported to be improving. 

The Senior Choir of the First 
Baptist Church will hold spe- 
cial service fdr their Organ 
Fund Jan. 16 at 3:30 p.m. 


Athenians 
Plan Revue 

Athenians are busy with last 
minute preparations for their 
Blue Book Variety Revue in 
honor of Mrs. Montana Mc- 
Nealy, club advisor. 

She is one of several con- 
testants hoping to wear a 
crown given by the Ways and 
Means Committee of the 
Woodlawn Branch Y.W.C.A. on 
Jan. 21. This'is an annual pro- 
ject, with Mrs. A. C. Bilbew as 
this year's chairman. 

This variety revue will con- 
sist of many charming models 
wearing the latest fashions 
and entertainment from prom- 
inent artists. The Athenians 
will present their version of 
Night Train as the finale. > 

The affair will be held at 
the Phyllis Wheatley home. 
2125 S. Harvard. Sunday, from 
3 p.m. to 7 p.m. 


land hospitality w^n, Mrs. 
Mae Collins, Mrs. Adele 
Howell. Mrs. Lottie Hyde, Mr. 
and Mrs. Olin Well of Min- 
neapolis and Mr. and Mrs. 
Adams from Duluth, Minne- 
sota who are spending the 
winter with friends in Pasa- 
dena. 

The buffet table was a 
vision of splendor covered 
with an elegant lace cloth, 
silver service and beautiful 
floral centerpiece. 

The capacity filled home 
presented a gala appearance 
as former residents of Min- 
nesota and friends met the 
visitors, reviving their past as- 
sociations and memories of 
the days when the majority of 
them were neighbors in Min- 
neapolis. Many were members 
of the same churches and at- 
tended various social functions 
together. 

The Stovalls will be seeing 
a lot of the beautiful sights 
and scenes Southern Califon 
nia has to offer during the re- 
maining two weeks of their 
vacation. 


Pueblo Del Rio Residents 
Plan Group Dev^elopment 


■I ! 




I 


Doing things in a big way is 
ttie recently oi*ganized Pueblo 
Del Rio Citizens Committee. 
"Approximately 30 civic mind- 
ed residents of the Pueblo Del 
Rio Housing l!>evelopment 
meet together weitkly to dis- 
cuss and plan action on prob- 
lems and conditions in <wder 
to make the development a 
better place in which to live," 
■; Mrs. May Hicks, chairman of 
' the committee, declared this 
week. I 

"In less than a month," she 
continued, "we have enough 
residents signed up for two 
First Aid Oasses and are 
working toward re-establish- 
ment of a Child Health Clinic 
for which volui^teeis have 
been recruited." i l . ; 
ExtwaiT* VUnJ'r 

Mrs. Hicks further declared 
that the committee is cur- 
rently concerned with getting 
better traffic control (installa- 




tlon of additional signals and 
signs in the area) and educa- 
tion for pest control in many 
of the apartments.; 

"Our committee is also con- 
sidering programs for: 

(1) A Cooperative Nursery 
School for non -working 
mothers; 

(2) Increased Recreational 
Facilities for Children; 

(3) Better Nutrition for Low 
Income Families and 

(4) Parent- Education Classes" 
she stated. 

"Instrumental in getting the 
committee organized was Mr. 
U. Soe Nyun, from Burma," 
Mrs. Hiclu continued. "He is a 
graduate student of the Uni- 
versity of Southern California 
working with us and the staff 
of the Southeast Health Dis- 
trict for field training and ex- 
perience," Mrs. Hicks con- 
cluded. 



YWCA Queen Will 
Be Crowned Friday 

Mrs. Ella K. Mays. Chairman Committee on Administra- 
tion, has invited members of the Woodlawn Branch of the YWCA 
as well as all friends to Join them at the Branch on Friday (Jan. 
21) at 7:30 p.m. Mrs. A. C Harris Bllbrew, Chairman of the Ways 
and Means Committee will announce the winner of the YWCA 

Queen contest between the 

following contestants: Mes- 
dames Montana McNealy, Bes- 
sie La Valle, and Martha Mil- 
ler. 

The YWCA celebrates its 
Centennial in 1955 and in 
keeping with the many activi- 
ties to be held In the dty, 
Mrs. Gertrude- Hides, Centen- 
nial Coordinator for the 
YWCA- Woodlawn branch in- 
vites members and friends to 
attend a luncheon being held 
at the Branch on Thursday, 
(Jan. 20) at 1:00 p.m. 

Mrs. Beatrice "Cassell, Chair- 
man and Mrs. Effie Enox Co- 
chairman of the Branch Mem- 
bership Committee announce 
the Kick-off for the Branch 
Membership Drive. 

The second series in Figure 
Control will begin at the 
Branch on Thursday at 7:30 
p.m. Classes will be instructed 
by Mrs. Gladys Calgrose, 
Physical Education Teacher at 
Pepperdine College. 

Dr. Pauline O. Roberts, 
Chairman Teenage Committee 
announces the Y -Teens are , 
busy going from one worth- 
while project to another: pic- 
nics, crafts, singing, dance 
classes, swimming, drama 
groups, public affairs confer- - 
ence, vespers, visits to the hos- 
piUls, and parties. 


I 


-.1- 


J. 


STUDENTS INITIATED— Two students. Mrs. Tkeora L. Justin and Robert B. Burke 
at Florida A and M University, were initiated recently into Kappa Iota Chapter of Alpha 
Kappa Mtt National Honor Society. They are shown here with Dr. Charity M. Mauc. 
State Department of Education, NaskvUle, Tenn., who delivered the addrtu mt the tapping 
ceremony. 






No man can get anywhere 
with both feet unless he uses 
his head. 


The wisdom of some people 
consists largely of knowing 
what ether people ought to do. 



BETROTHAL AN 

for the June wedding ofAtiss Esther Willi 
' school teacher, and Mr. Charles Willk 
director, were announced at a pre-New 
their Jtonor by. the popular young girl's 
GuilMte. 

GUILLOtTE-T 
BETROTHAL 

Mrs. Irabell Guillotte, of 8234 ^elle' avenue, Los,. 
Angeles, announces the engagemeni of her daughter, 
Esther Willene Guillotte to Mr. Icharles William^ . 
Turner. 1 ' '*' 

Miss Guillotte and Mr. Turner ^ere charming as^ 
host and hostess to a lovely pre-aew Year's Party 
given in their honor. The house was beajutifuUy deco- 
rated with colorful trimmings reprlsenling the Yule 
season. Shlne^ colored silver ballslfall ng out of a 
horn-shaped basket made a lovely c «teipiece for the 
buffet table. "^ ' ^ 


inscriled pn a red rib-' 
snow man's 


The couples' names 
bon, tinkling with bells, tied arouiid a 
neck, revealing the nionth of the wfddii^g. 

Suleoess Wishes 

Those attending |the affair, wishing the popular 
young couple success and happin«s, were: Misses 
Wendell Downer, Gweindolyn Hale, Mariane (ChickieJ 
Williams, Deborah and Hariett Miles|Del<fres, Victorii 
and Gloria Henderson!. 

I Mrs. Rosa Mcgee, Mrs. Deloris Ilig^ns, Mr. anfl 
Mrs. William Wilson, Mr. and MrsJ Ricitiari Morris, 
Mr. G. J. RashaUe, Lloyd Scaife, Do^ Mason, Samued 
Schulti, Charles Hanflon and Mrs. Mfldrefl Allen, atmt 
of the hostesses, also attended 


in 


Miss. Guillotte is j teaching in tMe 
system and is a menkber of the D^ta 
sorority. 

Mr. Turner, who won a scholarship 
the McDowel Studio jof Music, attended 
College and is the director of the rfdio 
Tabernacle of Faith Baptist Church. 

The popular couple plan to wed ^ Juiie. 


Tulare school 
SJigma Theta 


anti-ba^iU 
Baker, 
L. Gaines, 1 
Ida B. 
Susie Mile 
tress, ant 
Madry, pi 
M. FrazierJ 
of Truste 


Zeta Boule Calk 
Best In History 

Mrs. Lillian J. Fentress, editor-in-cHii 
national magazine, and Mrs. Mildred C. 
Director, report that the Zeta Phi Beta 
most successful In the history of Zeta, wit: 
in attendance. The meeting was held in 

Others from the West Coast — '- r 

were: Myrtle City, first anti- 
basileus of Ganuna Sigma 
Zeta Chapter and Ada Rod- 
gers, basileus of Beta Eta Zeta 
Chapter; Naomi Williams, as- 
sociate regional director, Ber- 
keley, and Mary T. Williams 
of Oakland. 

The theme of the four day 
sessions was "Youth and the 
Challenge of Integration." The 
specific problem of Juvenile 
delinquency was especially 
emphasized, as a national pro- 
ject of the Sorority. 

Dr. Nancy B. Woolridge, 
grand basileus, and professor 
of English at Hampton Insti- 
tute, presided. Two unusual 
highlights of the Boule were 
national officers appearing on 
television broa^asts depict- 
ing the progress of Zeta 
throughout the nation, and 
the presentation of five young 
Zeta Artists at a musical pub- 
lic program. 

Dr. Deborah C. Partridge an 
inytructor at Queen CoUeige, 
Flushing, N. Y., was elected 
Grand Basileus, to succeed 
Dr. Woolridge, who had cc^ 
pleted a six year term. 'Dr. 
Woolridge was elected Chair 
man of the Executive Boird 
Other national of(ic«s elecpd 
are: Velma C Bundi. Qrst 


music from 
L. A. State 
choir of the 


of the scntirity'k 
le. Pacific Regional ' 
lie was one of tiie 
over 400 members 
^uisvllle. 


Marion C 
)nd anti-basileus; 

lird anti-basileus; 

ig, Grainmateus; 

Tan lias; Mrs. Fen- 

ikritis; LuciUe R. 
'lactjsr, and Anna 
chairman of Board 


Fetes 

Membei 
Qub held 
at the be; 
ing Club I 

A gay ti: 
the 200 gjii 

Hyacin 
Bailey, 
Bracken, 
Cunninghai 
tary; Theli 
ingsecre 
business 
Means, tr» 
sergeant-a' 


\nth Club 
^fiends 


of the Hyadnth 
eir annual party- 
i Alpha Bowl- 
w4ek. 

wjas had by all 
ts liivited. 
embers are: Irina 
iijlent; Renee 
president; Betty 
fihancial secre- 
H^iynes, reonrd- 
Bcfatrice Hanell. 
as^r; Lucille 
J; Ann Harwjv 
Frances 
Maiy Arm- 


itiful 


>resl 


arm^; 
King, repdbter; 
strong, Bon lie ijhbmpeon, A>< 
berta Dawa n, Beulah Atwatat; 
Eddyman ifitdi{el and AUee 
Arthur. 




.t '• 




c| 


^ft^NE VyALKER, R^^ 


w''iwmii'TO"i;Anvti' I >iiii jinirii'n (I 111 Vimm'tmvwf ti'flv iim 


> 



4. 


1 
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, ^.. 


TOUNG AT HEART , 

i i I ; By Johnny Morris --i ' ' I'" 

Another picture guilty of a weak plot (there must 
be a sale on them), YOUNG AT HEART more than 
makes up for it with good, tight dialogue, great music, 
and the fine dramatic talents of Frank Sinatra and Doris 
Day, who could make their livings acting if they never 
sang another note,-- and- Ethel Barrymorfe, who never 
sang in the first place. 

Natural 
' Frankie's oversized, artery-lined forehead, soulful 
eyes and congenital sensitivity, made him a natural for 
the part of the paranoic musician who succeeded in 
making things pretty tough for himself. His build 
helped to convince the audience that he had seen some 
lean days. 

Dori? Day is superb as the scintillating beauty who 
marries the bitter piano player, and finally makes him 
dig himself out of his own hole. > ^ ' 

Ethel Barrymore convincingly played the role of 
the type aunt who is as hard on the outside as an oy- 
fter, and twice as soft on the inside. 

I'd send my friends to see this — even my best 
friend. ! , 


STARRING 




Club Oasis Creole Revue 
Jammed With Best Talent 


Rhythm 'N Bliies 
Package Quaitd 
All Set to Blow 


jnilAL lUDY GARLASD teams uiOi James Mason in 
the nutstanmng role of her career. "A 'otar Is Born" nUl 
undouhttdiv he hitjh on the list of nominat nns for the greatest 


picture* of the year, currently screening 
Paramount ' Dountou-n Theatre. 


I 1. - *■ 

■ ■ ' '*]■■• 


■ -*'- f 



exclusively at the 


The new Club Oasis offering. 
Creole Mambo Revue, is jam- 
med with a wide variety of 
spectacular talent, making it 
the most fast-paced musical re- 
vue of any nightery of the west. 

Aland Dixon, a personable 
master of ceremonies and 
comic, has produced this new 
show, complete with beautiful 
girls, sensational singing, 
breathtaking, da.ncing and 
offering an all-around enter- 
tainment package 'emphasized 
by the newly redecorated plush 


western avenue 
low price policy 


bistro's new 
of no admis- 
sion or cover char.ge. lower 
; prices on drinks. 

j Action Packed 

i Featured in the show is spec- 

, telcular Anna Weidon, a lus- 

cidus canary from Detroit. 

whose vocalizing runs the 

■gamut from mellow contralto to 


Life.' 


GQURMET GUIDE 

^Recommendations for Family Dining* 



n 


:\:. 


^■i 


■li 



Whenever You're Hungry 
Ift Time to Eat at . . . 

DYNAMirrS 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
4701 Osntral, AD. 2-5918 

OPEN EVERY DAY: 10 A.M. 24 2 A.M. 

— ^— — ^— ^^^^— f«oturliig — ^— ^^^^^^-^— 


+GOOD PRINKS + FINE FOOD 

GUMBO FILE EVERY FRIDAY 

Pmrsonally Cooked by 'Dynamitm' 



Piano Artistry by 

Lorenzo Flennoy 

at thm Wmtf's Finmtt 

PIANO BAR 


We Cater te Clubs 


DYNAMITE'S 

Southwest Corner 47th and Central 


ALAND DIXON'S 

CREOLE 
MAMBO REVUE 

* ANNA WELDON 

* JOHNNY BURTON 

* PAT SIDES 

* FRANCES NEALY 

* HARRIET YOUNG 

* RALPH WEAVER 

DICK TAYLOR BAND 

CLUB OASIS 

Western at 38th 
RE. 4-5510 

No Cover, No Min., No Adm. 


t|AVAVAVA VAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVA'^AVAVAVAVAVAVAVi 

" r irS THE MOST AT 


AV*V*VA ' 


I 


GILBERT KENNER'S 

MliOMO 



a completely surprising hari- 
I tone. Also on the singing side is 
John Burton, whose recent ap- 
pearance on the coMt-tocoast 
Ty show. "Thi.s is Yoiju- 

set the natiorv raving. ,_ 

Pat S^des. Frances Neaiyli^d 
I Harriet Young offer puichitrude 
wi<h pulsating, rhythm, while 
' tapster Ralph Weaver is one of 
the best solo hoofers seen here- 
abouts. 

Dick Taylor's band, playing 

for the "three shows nightly as 

well a<; the dancing, -i.s -one 

of the finest musicaj aggrega- 

rtibns of the west. They recorded 

104 tunes within the last year. 

averaging two sides a,, week. 

■ which speaks well for their 

I musicianship. Altogether, the 

I Cliib Oasis is currently the best 

1 bet for entertainment seekers. 


Jimmy Nelson's 5-4 Ballroom 
at 54th and Broadway is pre- 
senting a small package out of 
wh*^ some hiighty ."big things 
are going to pop this week-end. 
Topping the list will be T-Bone 
Walker, the Texas hoy who has 
probably had a greater influ- 
ence on the blues than any 
other singer, and is still the 
"Pres" of the blues kick. From 
the days of singing to a coin- 
tossing audience at the. Littlie 
Harlem. Bone has ri.sen until he 
is new one of the nations top 
Dane^rs fpaid -performers. Although he is i 
the most imitated personality in 
the rhythm" and blues field, yoy 
haven't heard anyone thajt 
sounds like The Bone until yolu 
have heard The Bone. j 

The package will alsoleaturie 
the hottest vocal group on the 
We.st Coast at present ■. — .The 
Robing; Riding in on the tide 6t 
rave notices from all over thp 
cbuntrv-^ 'this group will thrill 
the. audience with its recorded 
and unrecorded hits-. 


Whenlyou get tired of hear - 
n^ aboitjune Christy, let me 
know. I never do. Her 
iSEMEM lER APAIL still kills 
tne mor ■ ttian anything el: 
she's- ddrie, 


CONE- BONE 
i*to the (ociific liaziotf. 


Wynn and his grea.t band will- 
he whaling with their very 
danceable music. ] 

And wait a minjjte. VV'e'rie not 
through yet. Floyd Dixon is go- 
I ing Jo be on hand, and don't j 
think that he might disappoint 
vnu. He has promised, that he 

liAt54NextWeek^°-^'""^°^™ 


'Wild' Bill Davis 

I ... ... .... . 



DELIGHTFUL ATMOSPHERE 
SERVING BEST FOO^AND DRINKS ^ 

Excellent Entertainment by IKE ROYAL at the "B8" 

Open Daily 10 a.ml te 2 a.m. 


g 


I For Sand Session 


All in all, you can'l%ielp but 
I have a good time, because there 
is one thing that the 5-4 Ball- 
room always promises and- de- 
I livers — an enjoyable evening. 



MILOMO 


282^ S WESTERN K 

i RE. 9585 g 



Fine Drinks • HolMay Dinners 

Whmrm Ivmry Oumst It a Celebrity,. 

/7 9 CHICKEN SHACK 

V/ . » and 

<^ylC S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 





1105'/2 E. VERNON 


JOHN COLLINS, Proprietor 


AD. 3-9239 



^•^» tf^iiyy >M>t^i /ivtyjvt fiyfjwtf^Pf-Viv w '^• '^^ ¥• Y;« v» ¥ • ^f.» 3 '^ 


J. Hodge Proudly Presents: 

HUGH BELL 
TEDDY EDWARDS 
FRANCES GADDISON 
MARGO GIBSON 
J. HODGE'S ORCH. 
GLORIA JEAN, Singer 


."Wild Bill" Davis, the man 
who introduced the organ' to 
jazz and demonstrated that the 
traditionally solemn instrument 
really could rock, will make his 
first West Coast appearance lin 
almost a year next week-eiid 
when his group plays at the 5-4 
Ballroom for three nights, be- 
ginning next Friday. Jan. 21. ' 

Bill's Epic and Okay recorid- 

ings. released by Columbia, aire 

enjoying nation-wide popularity 

j and since the advent of his tne- 

mendous fame and following 

the, Hammi)nd Organ Company 

I re.ptirts more instruments have 

1 been ^old than at any other 

timje since the earlj' days when 

featured 


RecuDerating 


THE NEWLY REMODELED 

CELEBRITY CLUB 

Atk About Club Rental* 


1909 Imperial 

Pheite LO. 6-9457 


socially - 

. "Wild 
Atlantic 
to hear 


•wMi«^^j^«wsi<'iWj^•'««w•WM^«%.^v•^«('*^v•^v*^?^•^^ 


'/ 


.■ : 



a "^ump ■ organ was. 

in front parlors of the 

select. 1. 

Throughout the eas 

Billh is known as 'Mr. 

City." for throngs flock 

him throughout the long sum 
i met months at one of ihe most 
! heaiutiful spots in the country 
; In his last appearanc? before 

returning east last year. Bill and 

his group broke all rec<j>rds at a 

dance in Las Vegas. 


i Fell' . .,. 

„ fices th< other day to get The* 

_ ,- ... ._. ,. ijatest pcop-from-the-group. and 

To round out the evenirti, ^^i^t dy: lamic Dorothy. Vfool; 

watd an i the better looking SjO" 
! per cent of th? Bud Shank mair- 
iital cor ibine. ■ Couldn't", h-ave 
j been trailed rnore hospitably if-, 
1 1 had Nen tea -ing in. their re-/ 
I spective parlors. , )s_^ - 1 

I gath 3ted more facts than • 
Joe 'FrJd ly, and got myself in- 
troduced to a tQugh LP '^y the,. 
Bob Bro< kmeyer- quartet. ' The 
way out ex-G«tz, ex-Mulligon. |. 
ex-, e.x-. valve man shared the ' 
writing- lonors on six of the 
eight sit es with Red Mitchell 
and Die] : Rodgers. It was re- 
freshingTto tind a musician 
among ajll the technicians. Bob 
doesn't Acrifice^soul for execu- 
tion. And yet.' strangely, hife 
lip and iinger work doesn't suf- 
fer jtoo 'much for it. j 
I GOOD TREK j' 
,d siionk's off to Australia 
soon w' th Tronkie Sinatra. 
AttabQ>-. Down L'Jider's where 
the brea 1 is. Ask B and Hat 

TlilNGS TO COME' | 

. Ger, w 10 cut the first LP that 
Pocjozz 'ver made, has done 
their firs , 12-incher. It's called 
GERRY KfULLIGAN IN CON- 
CERT. . . Chettie's cut one in 
conceH. • oo. . . . Shank's doing 
some St' iff with strings. . • - 
The Johi ny Mand«I orchestra 
willfeati re Cy Touff on a forthj- 


i 


station KOWL) 
Mayor of Melqdy 
Meets WDIA's 


D.J. 


KOWL'S disc jockey. Joel 
Adams, was visited receiitly by 
Nat Williams. Mempiiis Dee 
Jay. of the all Negrfi.| 50.000 
watt radio station WDIA, and 
the outstanding Memphil: High 
School athlete. Andrew iEarth- 
man. Mr. Earthman was ijn Cali- 
fornia as the winner flf ia con- 
test sponsored by Coiktjnental 
Trailways for the outptknding 
Memghis High School althlete of 
19.54. In addition to the award of 
a trip. Mr. Earthman was given 
a tour of Southern California 
highlights and was a featured 
guest at the Rose Bowl game.' 
j . Variety Shaw , 

Diliring their interview on the 
Joe Adams show, Nat Williams 
and Joe Adams discussed the 
current record situation, with 
particular attention given to the 
airing of records containing 
highly insinuating and offen- 
i sive lyric content. Williarrvs 
agreed with Joe Adams and 
KOWL that there are enough 
good rhythm and blues records 
to choose from without resort- 
ing to playing those that are 
beyond the bounds of good 
taste. The station has refused to 
air the.se recordings ' arid does 
I not accept sponsors who will 
not endorse this .starfd. 

Joe Adams and KOWL have 
received countless letters of 
commendation from both young 
and old for their convictions 
and high programming stand- 
ards. / 



I'll jiist 


« 


coniiiig f apjack 
ins will do one 
friends. . . . The 
Twardzik (WHO?> 


with' seven 
Richard 
Trio— we? 1. 


ave to wait. 


jAcrCMAZfN THMrilir 

LINCOLN 

23rd * Central AO. 3211 

ttartt iafurHay 
"BIG SLEEP" 

ATOGA TRUNK" 


"SAjt 
III 


Bilr Robinson 

43rd PL. I CENTRAL AD. 1-9341 

Stnrft Svn&ay 

rUMBLEWEED" 
T/|rZAN ESCAPES" 


LOyLLY L'Ttiny-a Griffin, 
icnnderful nifc of Lart 
"(yiuncilmnn" Grtjjtn, is re- 
lUpcratinr/ from rc'itnt sur- 
<icry. L'Tanya, int'irnatintially 
famous fashion designer, upon 
rccofi ring uill continue creat- 
ing fashions for some of the 
best kno^n stars of stage, 
screen, rndio, and lideo. 


BRATTO:V'S 

ACCOUNTING SERVICE 
3011 S. Western RE. 3-9866 

BRANCH OF^IClE 

DUNBAR HOTEL 

4235 Central Ave. lAD. 3-4201 


Conic In ( u;l Mtrt Lou and Fruftk 



•o ^11 "if's the End, 
Friend" 

FIIJE FOOD 
• G( OD DRINKS 

Friend^ Surroundings 

Elbow Bend 


523 

rUnrfar 


LeCARIBE 


' "Pearl of the Caribedn" \ 
Cocktcili in Haitian — French Atmosphere 


Horace Cl<rk, Sr. and Jr., Props. 

HOTEL CLARK 

Corner of Washington Blvd. ii Central Ave. 
Phone PRospect 5357. Free Parlring in Rear 


Blue Room — Cocktails and Grill 

"Where old friends me\t" 

Magnolia Room 

"For dininp in a quiet atmosphere" 


ONE IN SEVEN 

One out of every seven work- 
ers in the United States is em- 
ployed in highway transporta- 
tion industries, according to 
the National Automobile Club. 


— — BinY MARTINA STUDIO OR DANCE ' 

SOUTH LOS ANGELES 

Modern — Afro — America — Claui< 
' Private Lessons — Screened 

Bell»t—Tap-ahytkni—T»»—lnt*rpratlv*— Latin 
«, : Jlva— Acrobatic— Individwol or laMiabl 

* i THE EXCLUSIVE SCHOOL, 

j(^357 Croesus Street, L. A. 2 


Avalon Blvd. . 

N«w Monoeomonrj 


HOLLYWOOD 
— Oriental 
Classes 

romplo-Mativo— 
Taechiiit 

lOrain 9-5656 


One way to avoid being over- 
worked is to attend strictly to | 
your own business. 


■ i 




^•>'' m ' r" 'f?t^.m 


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m 


' ^ 




^1 

■1 


I 

Nl 

■:.... ^ ■: - .-1 .:-•■;-.•• 

r 


J i 

4 

, 




• 

" 


, ( 




i 

« 


10-Tha California Eagle Thurs., Jan. 13, 1955 


•C 



S E H I E S — the good 
brothers w the ooimcil should 
welctome this bit of news. Sup- 
ervisor Kenneth Hahn and the 
president |of the Coliseum com- 
mission just approved a 22,000 
■eat, $6,000,000 indoor sports 
arena for Exposition Park. We 
• advised the council to check to 
■ be assured of the new site! 

! SVGARi RAT ROBINSON — 
Slender, saber jet boxer of old. 
ciirrently On a comeback, will 
need more; than his usual excess 
baggage erf baroer, doctor, valet 
and trainer. West coast rumors 
are that he's badly in need of 
a press agent to regain lost 
prestige! ; 

GOLF BtUES — singer Billy 
Eckstine and footballer Kenny 
Washington withdrew from the 
PGA open amateur golf tourney 
opening day because of the 
mud, rain and poor score! 

' FLORA IaMES — is the owner 
of the bell clear voice over the 

. telephone In the offices of the 
Plaster Room In the General 

Jospital, and her looks are 

Equally refreshing! 


BERNICE I8H0M 


is the 



Dance Center 
Will 
Sat, Jan. 23 

An international theme will 
be feature4 In the second Cab- 
aret Night j)y-Dance Center, 462 
N. Westemi Ave., on Saturday, 
Jan. 23, at! 8:30- p.m. The pro- 
gram will represent the cultures 
of various nationalities through 
wng and d^nce. i 

Contributing to folk-song part 
of the program are Ruth Her- 
shey, Chris jRuiz and Doris Han- 
■ kerson, whjo also serves as 
emcee. Ruii will sing his re- 
nowned ballad, "Juan Gon- 
zalez." similar in character to 
the Americain "John Henry." 

The Danpe Center Faculty 
Group will perform an African' 
Welcome Dance accompanied 
" on the drums by an African 
drummer, ajjewish dance inter- 
preting a, folk song from the 
"old country," and a Russian 
medley. 

General social dancing will 
be offered before and after the 
show, with popular folk danc- 
ing for any enthusiasts in the 
audience. r 

Members of the Dance. Center 
Faculty Group are Anne and 
Paul Barlin. Shirley Walker. 
Elsa Stubbs, Sylvia Beck and 
Mary Lou Johnson. 
' "At Hie first C^^aret Night 
aoany i>eople had to be turned 
away because they hadn't made 
reservattpns or called too late. 


Vic Vet jayj 


if A POSr-ta39£»< VtUBAMS 
TBAiNING EMnUEMEKT, UHOEB 
THE IcrOBEA 61 BiLL RUNS OOT 

WHEN HE ts HAiL^-WAV 

THBOU6M HIS SEI-IESTEB AT 
SCHOOL, HE CAN FkNISHTHAT 
SEMCSIEKUNCEKtHEGi StU. j' 


smooth ebony satin skin, county 
clerk doll that takes the boys' 
bteath away when she strolls 
up and down the corridor, tak- 
ing ah abundance of time. She 
is k cool number and our guess 
is that she is fully aware of it! 
BOB BOYD — fleet-footed L.A. 
Rams , footballer is getting fat 
offers to cavort in the Canadian 
loop next season and he isn't 
filing 'em in the waste basket! 

ATTY. EARL BRODY— dapper 

and top criminal lawyer in '54 
moved iijto his plush new of- 
fices at Vernon and Broadway. 
The area is fast becoming the 
center of big eastside business 
such as: Bdwy. Federal and 
Loan, Vernon Medical, Henri- 
etta Beauty School to name a 
few! 

ELL AK. MAYS — personable 
arid hard working prexy of the 
WoodlawTi YWCA is heading 
this year's Urban League ment- 
bership drive. We certainly 
hope she signs up persons hold- 
ing jobs for which the league 
was responsible and a very good 
place to start is NBC. 

THE PLATTERS — four guys 
and a doll are creating a mild 
sensation on the west coast with 
their unique song styling. They 
caused quite a row with two 
numbers on the Spade Cooley 
TV' show last Sat. eve! 

GERTRUDE PENLAND -^ who 

is doing a terrific job with 
Rheingold, installed the officers 
of the very popular Cooperettes 




BIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!II1I1IIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIII«IIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIWIIIIIIIIIWI!^ 

I soundtrack! 

I ^wHh 


IMIIIIillliiQ 


s 


^.^Itazz K^^rawtord 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiitniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiBmiiiiii^ 

UBBT CLARK will enlarge her FEM magazine beginning 

next issue . . . GLADYS BENTLEY on Pete Kelley's Blues TV 
show starring Jack "Dragnet" Webb. Her jazz piano will be 
heard behind the scenes and Meredith Howard will be a featured 
performer .. . Folks claim they "couldn't move" out at the Savoy 
Ballroom last' weekend while 


Louie Jordan and company were 
holding forth . . . Sorry to have 
missed the spectacular press 
pawtee HERMAN HILL tossed 
for the Tympany rive! . . . 
CRISWELL predicted a woman 
president for us in 1960. Buxom 
.Mae West is the blonde pro- 
phet's candidate. Mae's fond of 
Louise Beavers. Maybe she'll 
give her a seat in the Se;iate. 
. . . Sunday night's "Displaced 
Person" play oh TV for General 
Electric gave your heart strings 
a rough yank. Film starred 
Jimmie Edwards, Bernie Hamil- 
ton. Roy Glenn and a wonderful 
seven yr. old Negro - German 
lad (wot's his name, some- 
body?^ ... the same nite NOR. 
MAN BUDD, who directed "No 
Exit " at Ebony Showcose gave 
a good account of himself in 
"Death And The Sky Above" on 
Robert Montgomery Presents. 

The Jerry Cumbers (she's LiD 
will celebrate their tenth anni- 
versary on . January twenty- 
first. Recent splituation news is 
cold hash now . . . Johnny and 
Evelyn Green have a new num- 
ber. It's a sweetheart of a place 
on Sugar Hill . . . Eddy Dudley 
tickling the ivories at a Palm 
Springs bistro . . . Effie Smith, 
the bluesie thrush at the Brass 
Rail on Bdwy . . . Valda. the 
hip contortionist in NY . . . 

Sepia newshawks and hens 
salty 'cause "Pops" Armstrong 
and company opened at Cre- 
scendo on the Strip without the 
fanfare of a press pawtee of a 

in the smart Hotel Watkins the, how-de-do to dusky hued Jour 

other eve and the group plans nalists 


day on the teevee pro-am. 
Guy and his wifie won thous- 
ands of dollars in prizes, too. 
He is a postal employee in the 
Long Beach P.O. . . . SOUND- 
TRACKS a short dash this trip. 
May run the mile next edition. 
Copy Boyeeeeeeeeeel This" is 30! 



VCrCBAMS ADMINISTRA'nON oS« 


big things for '55! 

EDDIE MAE ARMSTRONG— is 

.the newest among our lady law- 
yers and we certainly hope the 
young lady matches the "bril- 
liant strides of Att>'. Martha 
Malone Williams Jefferson, 
who's just about tops in the 
women's field! 

VERA FRANCIS — the much 
ballyhooed model, actress is 
slated for a bit part in a thing 
titled Devil Coodnes* by Colum- 
bia Studios. She's been gracing 
Berlach -Barlow company's cal- 
endars, mostly cheek and chest! 
chest! 

TRAFFIC JAM — in front of 
Giro's famed Sunset Strip bistro, 
is being caused by the Will 
Mastin Trio starring Sammy 
Davis, Jr., nightly! 

PROGRESS — Raymond Wall- 
ace, a New Yorker who donated 
$15,000 of his Irish Sweepstakes 
to several civic groups which 
included the NAACP and the 
Urban League, should inspire 
the locals to give a little more 
support to our community 
groups! 

JEFF CHANDLER — the noted 
film idol will receive $22,500 
when he appears at the Riviera 
in Las Vegas! 

RED FOXX — wit-splitting 
comic, is long overdue for his 
big break. The funnyman is 
loaded with talent and our 
many TV shows certainly can 
use the Foxx! 

POKERCHIPS — medical 
wives are buzzing about a 
brother who lives high on the 
hog and was able to drop $1,500 
in an all night New Year's 
game, but couldn't square his 
gas bill for $5.60! 

TENTH DISTRICT — a certain 
westside real estate dealer has 
benn approached to enter the 
City Council race. He has been 
promised a new car and a posi- 
tion! His chance of winning 
wasn't discussed! 

JAY LOFT LYNN— is makihg 
elaborate plans for his fifth 
annual Night of Stars at the In- 
dependent Church Jan. 16! '• 


A battery of writers preparing 
song material for Dorothy Dan- 
dridge in her soon* due Las 
Vegas bow at the Last Frontier 
nltery . . . 

Genial George Jay has re- 
sumed his wax whirling com- 
mentary chores out at Larry 
Finley's strictly informal rest- 
aurant. Everything is real 
"jawge" now . . . Jackie Cozart is 
the beige lad who won Finley's 
Trip To Paris contest la.st Sun- 


Bob Scobey is 
Starting Friday 
At The Tiffany 

Bob Scbbey's Frisco Band, fea- 
turing famed vocalist-banjoist 
Clancy Hayes, brilliant musical 
group who developed "San 
Francisco style" jazz and is 
largely responsible for the Great 
Jazz Revival of the past few 
years, will make their first local 
nightery appearance at Jack 
Tucker's Tiffany Club, Eighth 
near Normandy, beginning to- 
morrow night. 

Long associated with the 
famed Yerba Buena Jazz Band, 
and star of his own Tuesday 
television show In San Fran- 
cisco, for which he'll "com- 
mute" during this engagement, 
Scobey's trumpet stj'ling is best 
displayed in his large reper- 
toire of rags, stomps, blues and 
the great jazz classics which 
form the basis of the San Fran- 
cisco st>'le. Clancy Hayes is one 
of the top vocalists in the field. 
The Scobey Septette, with 
their jazz with a modern beat 
emphasizes simplicity and 

thythm, performed with great 
rhythmic looseness and drive, 
resulting in a singularly re- 
laxed approach. Their Good 
Time Jazz albums with such 
all-time great tunes "as "Wol- 
verine Blues." "Some of These 
Days." "Peoria" and "Chicago." 
are collector's Items. 

During the Tiffany engage- 
ment. Scobey and his band will 
appear nightly except Tuesdays. 


CAUFOtNIA EAGLE . . . 


SKATING AT THE SKATIUM 


■ BY JOHNNY DEARING 


HEAR EVANGELIST 
RUTH TONES 

of Cleveland, Ohio | | 

KIGHTLY AT 
JSed 


> 


V 


lanxf 


intHnitif 




■ 7728 SOUTH BROADWAY 

'll.l.V 'Ml I- ■■■■:. , ■ 

WE ARl! NOW LOCATED I NOUR NEW- 
LY BUILT CHUR^S«/CHAPEL, WHICH 
WILL BE OUR HOME FOR DIVINE SER- 
VICES AND RELIGIOUS TRAINING 

I YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND 
I OUR SUNDAY SERVICES 

11:00 A.M.,* 7:30 P.M. • Sun. School 9:30-10:30 A.M. 
REJV. W^ T. WARD, Pastor I j ' 


The very lovely lassie that's 
been serving our customers at 
the snack bar is BILLY SMITH 
of Chicago — and she's the most 
too!!!! Another delightful and 
beautiful visitor, from the 
Windy City was "shapely" Bar- 
bara* Jean Porter, who Is the 
house guest of her aunt, Mrs. 
Ruth Morrison. Wolf calls went 
up all over the rink as she 
rolled by . . . even I had an 
eye for this cutie. 

SPEED-DEMONS 

There are a few fellows and 
girls who come to the rink and 
they think that this is a "Der- 
by Trac'k" by the way they sail 
around the floor ... to them 
I would like to say: "Please, 
fellows and girls, slow down or 
the management will be forced 
to "BAR" you for a while. Now 
we like you here and we don't 
want that to happen, do we? 

UNDER THE WEATHER 
We. the personnel of the 
Skatium. wish a speedy recov- 
ery to the following people: 

. . JEAN B. . . . 

. . EDITH J. . . . 

. . SHARON W., 

of Pasadena, who 

lovely 


R- 


CHL'CK 
MARIE R. . 
WENDELL , 
and BILLIE 
just gave birth to a 
Seven-pound baby girl. 
QUITTING TIME 

JOSEPH LaTELLA Is leaving 
the Skatium this week for an 
undisclosed period of time . . . 
good luck in your new venture 
my friends. JOHNNY GROSS 
gave up his post as the presi- 
dent of the Mohawks and RoH- 
ettes Skating Club and several 
of the members also parted with 
these skaters ... I wonder why! 
RETURN TO EARTH 

PAULETTE J. glides around 
the floor as if she's on a cloud 
. . . better wake up pretty girl. 
GWEN R. "and those beautiful 
XmSs present skates are getting 
better acquainted by degrees 
don't you know Gwen, every- 
thing is better when it has 
been used awhile . . . ELMER 
W. is walking around wtlh a 
long-long face because his love^ 
GLORIA J., is In K.C. for the 
holidays '. . . hurry home "RED." 
LOST SOULS RETURN 

It was good to see the faces 
of DORIS H., PAULINE "POL- 
LY" P. . . . (so sorry that I did 
not mention you in the column 
last week.) MARY L.. KITTY C. 
JOAN L. . . . (now here's a real 
OW woman) ... and KAY. 
The holidays had them so beat 
that there was no time for fun 
. . . remember all work and no 
play, etc., etc. 

BIG BUSINESS 

Mr. SAM "Marryin' Sam" 
GOBER, LEON SOMON, F. SI- 
MON and Mr. VIC MATHIEU 
... all of these "gentlemen" 


are purchasing their, own skates 

. . . big deals too. Say fellas. 

let me have ten "G-s" will you? 

THREE-POINT LANDING 

Con-"Spread Eagle" way. and 
lovely PAUL "slo'n easy" ETTE 
made a verv nice landing 
Thursday night. JOHNNY G. 
tried to tap MARY S. and pan- 
caked . . . CHUCK W. was ene- 
mv resistance that caused the 
crash landing . . . JOHNNY 
DUKE and CHUCK REED land- 
ed squarely on their eyeless 
and noseless faces a few nltes 
ago . . . better watch that stuff 
fellas. 

CLEAN-UP TIME 

BILL K. . . . CHUCK W. . . . 
and JOHNNY G. had a cleaning 
good time a few nltes ago with 
mop and all . . . VIC M. was 
In trouble because of a remark 
he made to MARLENE D. and 
he couldn't "clean up in time." 
. . . Bo-o-o-o-m! 

RUMORS 
I heard whispers that Chu- 
Chu was going to China to see 
her father soon . , . and that 
J. Grose is 'going to Alaska. 
What I'm wondering is will 
ChuChu go to China via Alas- 
ka or vice -versa . . . don't get 
me wrong ... I would just like 
to know . . . Mr. V. M. has rent- 
ed an apartment for himself 
and that Mrs. M. D. cooked a 
very nice steak dinner for him 
and brought it over to his shack 
. . . how great can you be? 
GRACE T. is planning a trip in 
Februarv to New Orleans for 
the festival . . . (T. or F.) I only 
heard these rumors and you 
may take them fbr what they're 
worth. 

SURPRISE VISITORS 
; The Friday night gang was 
surprised by the appearance of 
BOB B.. OLLIE J.. ERMA JEAN 
R.. URSULA H., ROSA L. M., 
CALVIN "The better class" 
CLARK, CHARLES, the K. C. 
Kiddies, MILDRED V. and 
GEORGIA E., also my very good 
friend RUTH B. .. . Nuff said. 
THATS 30 . . . jld. 


. J . a man wakes up in the morning 
• after sleeping under an advertised 

blanket on on advertised mattress 

i 

ar^d pulls off advertised pajamas, 

\akes a batl^ in^an advertised tub, 

j 

sNaves v/ith an advertised razor, 
wishes with an advertised soap, 
d^ns advertised clothes, sits down to 

1 ' 

a breakfast of advertised cereal, 
drjinks a cup of advertised coffee, 

I 

piits on an advertised hat, rides to the 
office in an advertised car . .>. . 

Then he refuses 
to advertise, say- 


ing that adver- 


tising 


pay ? ?'■ 


u^. 


llsv 


lU 


M/SS INFQRMAT/ON Z 


MY mCKAAC 
CAHC. BUT X' 
COULDn-T. 

se.tAHt- 
mvtsistje 

HAIR NETS 

mrr* 



WHEN 

we 


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wviSiicel 


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-FOR LATB5T HAIR STYLES' 



BILLIE'S BEAUTY 

PROBLEM TYPE^ HAIR A SPECIALTY 
4723 AVALON I M ll AD. 3-9425 


If DEnNItELY DOES 
PAY tb ADVERTISE 


IN YOUR 


PHQNE 


I. I 

All|qins 

k-olei 


FOR AN 

ADVERTISING 

SALESMAN. 


not u DEBDUHi^^VIBY 




Wednesday at 1 P.HL | 


1 /. 


• ' 

1 
1 

i" 
* 






CALI^OKMIA 


CONTINUOUS ryUiCATION POK M YiARS | 

PIIOYEN SUPERIORITY 

i 

Imitated by Many . • • • Duplicated by None . • the 
highly recognized and most rapidly advancing mi dium 
iit circulation throughout the West . ^ . :\. is th^ ONE 
weekly neWspaper wher^ advertising is BEST. 



. Where Results Ar« B«it dad Cost Far Um •CALIFORNIA EAGL|« 



■ 


^^ '.^ 


., (•' - ■.-■■ 


/■ 

1 i, ■■ 

j 

i 



■J " 


"S^^^JE- < 




J .1 


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li 

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I 


rURN. ROOM FOR RENT— Old 
age penslbners or relief cases. 

Men <» women. 4 nice vacan- 
cies. 1101 E. Adams. AD. 
1-7551. > 


(mptOYxtewT C|iK>KTuwinEs 


ATIENTION LADIES! We have 


Sood Jobs,. part and full time, 
day workers. For further In- 
formation ciili the Ladies 

Employment Aid Assn. Agen- 
cy. 3226 S. Central Ave., AD. 
2-9505— AEi. 1-3244. 


rnmlilMd Seen Fer Rest 

Furnished room for working 
couple, no children. All prl- 
vUeges. $8.00 per week. 
;E 6908 after 7 pjn. 

S RM. HOUSE. Furn. & Unfurn- 
ished. Refrigerator. All com- 
pany you wish. Near all tran- 
sportation. 644 Gladyce. 
VA0829- 

rURNISHED SOUSE FOR RENT 

Attractive, newly decorated 3 
room furnished rear house 
with Frigidaire. Located in 
the West Temple district- 
Near No. 11 Temple bus. Call 
NO 2-3374 

Fumlshed ApartnwBt 

Small furnished apt. with 

private entrance for bachelor 
j or working persons, respect- 
I able and reliable persons. 

Conveniently located. 125 W. 

4Tth PI. CaU AD 4-7777. i 


GOOD JOBS WITH PAY 

* Physio therapists 

* Mosseurers 

* Proctkal NprM 

PL. i-6509 


LEGAL NOTICES 


LEGAL NOTICES 


(California Eagit) 

NO.. M<4 
IN THE' SUPERIOR COURT Or 
THE STATE OF CAUIFORNLA IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF UOS 
ANGELES. 

Fannie Downs, Plantlff. vi. Wll- 

Uam Downs. Defendant. 
NO. D4'^758S 
Action brouKht in tlie Superior 
Court of the County of Los Angeles. 

and Complaint filed In the Office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court 
of said Countv.N 

« SUMMONS 

The People of the State of Cali- 
fornia . send Kreetlngt to; WQllam 
Downs. Defendant. 

You are directed to appear In an 
action brought against you by the 
•K-„- _ .. nlalntlff In the _Su- 


above named 


Fnniished Aportnaeat For Rebt 

Three room apartment for 
couple, no children. Conven- 
iently located on eastslde. 
CaU AD 3-6569. i 


Fmnlalied Room Fer Rent 

Large, beautifully furnished 
room with kitchen, complete- 
ly private. Westside. All pri- 
vileges, low rent. RE 2-4680. 


FuiBlshed Xltebenette Apt 

Two room ifurnished kitchen- 
ette apartinent. Private en- 
trance. One child o.k. util. pd. 
Reasonable. Rjf 4-7306. 


Dafnmlsbed Apt. Fer Reat 

Two bedroom upstairs apart-, 
•ment— $60. 1710 South Cen- 
tral Ave. AID 4-5362 after 4 
p.m, AvaiHable to see. Side 
entrance, living roomt kitch- 
enette. - ij 


^JTEMALE HELP WAMTEDt... 

Elderly woman for room and 
board with small salary in 
exchange for keeping chil- 
dren. Nice comfortable home. 
EX 9-5757 


JjASmAiSDS NOTE 

SAVE VACANCT TIME 

.FREE BENTAI. SERVICE 

YOU SAVE MONJBY , 

^bU SAVE TIME ■[■ |i 

USE OUR FAST. 

FRIENDLT SERVICE 

BUDGET RENTAL i 

PL. 8-2593 


1 RENTALS 

n6w available 
au-furnishbd 

$4p^8-Sinsles (6) 
$55-Deubl«s (3) 

N» Idtildren ' er ' p«ls-| . Al 

, Clese to shepiiing, : | 

tianspertstien. ! . li 

n4Uiaf1 1. Mfk MtmI 
fW. J710 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

Thm People's ClieJee 
960 E. Jefferson 
\ AD. 34^95 I 

NEWMAYLORD 
APARTMENTS 

:Weekl|y Maid Service and 

All Utilities Furnished 

Apertniients newly Furnished, 

painted and carpeted 

. Furnished 
Singles - Doubles 
BacFielors 
$15.00 Up 

WEEKLY OR MONTHLY 

RATES NOW AVAILABLE 

1250 Sb. Westeirn Avcnu* 

i ?E.81il7 


RENTALS WANTED 


RENTALS WANTED 

Undlerd*, ' list Yewr Hemes, 
Apartment^ and Rentals with 

DRiW INVISTMENTS 

Hundreds ef people waiting to 
pieve in today. 

^ .3888 SO. WESTERN 

(AtrMS trmm SMirHy taali) 

RE. 1.6346 LO. 7-2770 


Women Wanted 

Make extra money. Address, 
Mail postcards spare time 
•very week. Write Bex Feur- 
teert, Bclment, Mass. 




HELP WANTED 

In the domestic field 
NO DOWN PAYMENT 

If you will live on the place. 
Cook & general. Sal. $125-$225 
month. 

Mother's Helper— $125. 
No cdoking, no refer, no down- 
payment. 

Cplesj Sal. $250-$425 month. 
Otheri positions open for men. 
Chef j2nd cooks, dishwashers, 
porters, jaintors, car washers. 
22 years in same location. 

1714 W. Jeferson 
RE. 3-3930, RE. 1-4529. RE. 3930 


I WE NEED 
HELP: 

AddfMs Our Advartisina Card*. 
Good Handwriting. Atlas. Bex 
18S-N. Malreta, Mass. 


SERVICES 


$$$$$$$$$$ 

^» You In D»bf? 

Ut 

DEBT ADVISORY 

SERVICE 

Help Yeu Tedayl 

We Are Credit and Debt 
I '^pecialists- 

— Our Easy Plan— 

IT ym owa Ta» Pay a* law ai 

$ 4M.0e $ 9.00 par waak 

il,0e|e.00 $15.00 par waak 

$2,000.00 $23.00 par waak 

$3,000.00 $31.00 par waak 

Wa ray All Yaur Oabti far Yaa. 

(Owt •# Srata WHf M— PmU) 

NO tICUIITY, NO C»4IONnS, 

NO RtAL ISTATI 

Nathhis bat Iha hanatt diatira ta 
pay raur dabti— Traa lafanaatlaa 
aa all prahiaaii. v 

{Mas All Mil* Ta- 

DEBT ADVISORY 
SERVICE 

«10 S. Breadway, Rm. 705 
Les Angalas VAndika 6981 

Daily 8 to 6 P.M^Sat. 8-2 P.M. 

EDWARD BECKER, Prasidant 

$$$$$$$ 

SERVICES 

Union Oil Company '76' of- 
fers finest service in Adelen> 
to, California. 


p«rlor Court of the Stata of Cali- 
fornia, In and for the County of Los 


Aneeles. and to answer 


ity < 

the 


Com- 


B taint therein within ten days after 
16 service on you of this Summons. 
If served within the County of Los 
Angeles, or within thirty days if 
served elsewhere and you are noti- 
fied that unless you appear and an- 
swer as above required, the plain- 
tiff will take JudKment for any 
money or damages demanded in the 
Complaint, as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any 
other relief demanded in the Com- 
plaint. 

Glvein under my hand and s«il <rt 
the Superior Court of the Countv of 
Los Ani;eles. State of California, 
this 8th day of November. 1954. 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. County 
Clerk and Qerk of the Su- 
perior Court of the Stata of 
California. In and for the 
County of Los Angeles. 
(SEAL SUPERIOR COURT 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY) 

By J. Weather«ax. Deputv. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 
Attorney for Plaintiff 
542 So. Broadway St. 
Lot Angeles 13. MA. 60561 
Publish California Eagle Dee 30. 
1954. Jan. 6. 13. 20. 27: J>b. 1 10. 
17. 1955. 


NO. 7392 
California Eag'a 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA Hi 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LOS 
ANGELES. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
Wllla Mae Brackin Deceased. 
No. 358993 

NOTICE ^F HEARING OF PETI- 
TION TO BORROW MONEY AND 
TO EXECUTE A DEED OF TRUST. 

Not ire Is hereby given that John 
L. Brackin. Jr.. Administrator of 
the said estJite. has filed herein his 
verified petition pravlng for an or- 
der authorizing the Petitioner to 
Borrow Money an<l to execute a Dei-d 
of Trust upon real estate herein- 
after described: and that Januarv 
31. 1955. at 9:15 A.M.. In the Su- 
perior Court of the State- of Cali- 
fornia, in and Tor the Countv of 
Los .\ngeles. Department 5 thereof, 
has been appointed as the time and 
place for hearing of said petition, 
when and where any persons Inter- 
ested in the said estate jnay appear 
and object to the .granting of said 
petitlhn. ^ 

Reference Is hereby made to the 
said petition for further particulars. 

Said real estate Is situated In the 
County of Los Angeles. State of Cali- 
fornia, and is described as follows. 
to-wit: 

Lot 53 In Block •'B' of tha Ei- 
twistle Tract in the City of and 
County of Los Angeles. State of 
California, as per map recorded In 
Book 7. Page 1 of Maps. In the of- 
fice of the County Recorder of Los 
Angeles County. 

Dated Januarv 6. 1955. 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. 
Countv Clerk and Clerk of 
said Superior Court. 

By H. L. McLean. Deputy. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

542 South Broadway 

Lot Angelea 13. California 

Attorney for Petitioner 

MA. 6-0551 

Publish in California Easle, Jan. 
13. 2f, 27. 19S5. 

puRrTRooJiirFoirRiw 


> m 

CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 

UNDER FICTITIOUS NAKSE 
Tbe undersig:ne4 do thereby car- 
tify that they are conducUns a 
janitorial and maintenance servlca 

business as Co-Partneri at 707 North 

Grandee. Compton. California, unde r 
the fictitious firm name of WHITE 
HOUSE JANITOR. SERVICE and 
that said firm is composed of the 
following persons, whose names and 
places of residence are as follows, 
to-wlt: 

JESSE J. HOWARD. 707 North 
Grandee, Compton. California. 

JAMES ERNEST HOWARD. 155 
East .99th Street. Los Anseles, CkU- 
tornla. 

Witness our hands thU 9th day 
of November. 19S4. ' 

JESSE J. HOWARD. 
JAMES ERNEST HOWARD 
State of California. 
County of L.os Angeles, is. 

On this 9th day of November. 
A.D.. 1954. before me. a Notary Pub- 
lic in and for the said County and 
State, residing therln. duly 'com- 
missioned and sworn, personally 
appeared JESSE J. HOWARD and 
JAMES ERNEST HOWARD, known 
to me to be the persons vvhose names 
are subscribed to the within instru- 
ment, and acknowledged to me that 
they executed the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I have 
hereunto set my hand and affixed 
my official seal the day and vear In 
this certificate first at>ove written. 
(SEALt HAROLD J SINCLAIR. 

Notary Public in and for 
said County and Sate. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

Attorney at Law 

542 South Broadway 

Let Angelet 13, Callfsmia 

MAditon 6-0551 
(Publish In California Easia 
Dee. 33. 30. Jan. 6. 13) 


UNFUHN. APT. FOB RENT 

92nd. street and Compton ave- 
nue. Children accepted. LO. 
7-2523. • 


6ILES AUTO SERVICE 
RB>AIR 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
3012 W. Jaffarsen Rl- 9260 


Johnny's Trim Shop 
I Auto Tops 

Seat Covers 

3500 W. Jaffarsen Blvd. 
REpublie 4-58t4 


M ADA'S 

I BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Jilt Lines of Beauty 

Culture 

20Si E. Vernon 

Bus. Phone: AD. 4-2317 
Rm. Phone: AD. 4-3392 


Three room unfurnished apart- 
ment, nr. Occidental Blvd. 
and Temple street Adults. 
References required. No pets. 
DU. 3-7218. 


FURNISHED APT. FOR RENT 

Four room modem furnished 
apt. Children O.K. $50 month. 
Call LO. 9-1728 after 1 p.m. 
Southeast district. 

Three room apartment for rent 
(fur.). 138% West 49th street. 
Single man or woman. No 
children. $45 mo. 


Modern furnished four room 
apt. for quiet couple. $70 a 
mo. AD. 2-6418. 


NO. 7158 

CALIFORNIA EAGLE 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

NO. 359618 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California. In and for the County 
of Los AnEeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
George Dunmore. Deceased. Notice 
is hereby jiven by the undersigned. 
E A Wlnstanlev. Public Adminis- 
trator, as Administrator of the Es-- 
tate of George Dunmore. Deceased, 
to the Creditors of. and til persons 
having claims against, the said de- 
cedent, to present them with the 
necessary vouchers, within six 
months after the first publication of 
this notice, to the said Administra- 
tor at his office at 808 North Spring 
St., Los Angeles IZ California, which 
said office the undersigned selects 
as a plage of business In all matters 
connected with said estate, or to file 
them, with the necessar\- vouchers, 
within six months after the first 

Fubllcatlon of this noUce. In the of- 
Ice of the Cleric of" the Superior 
Court of the Sute of California In 
and for the County of Los Angeles. 
Dated Dec. 3^. 19S4. 

E. A. WINSTANLEY. 
Public Administrator, as ad- 
ministrator of the cstata of 
said decedent. 
Publish in California Eagle Jan. 15- 
30-27. Feb. 3. 1955. 

NOTICE TO cneoiTOR* 


NO. 358M3 

In the Superior Court of the Stata 
of California. In and for the County 
of Los Ancples. 

In the .Matter of the Estata ef 
Wllla Mae Brackin. Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against the said de- 
cedent to file said claims in the of- 
fice of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned at the office of Harold J. 
Sinclair. Attorney. 542 South Broad- 
way. Iff the City of L<5s Angeles 13. 
in the aforesaid County, which latter 
office Is the place of business of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate Such claims with 
ihe necessar>- vouchers must be filed 
or presented as aforesaid within six 
months after the first publicatlan ol 
this notice. ' 

Dated December 30. 1954 

JOHN L. BRACKIN. JR. 
Administrator of the Estata 
of said decedent. 
HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

Attorney-at-Law 

Los Angeles 13, California 

MA. 6-0551 
Publish in Callfomia Eagle, Jan. 
13. 20. 27: Feb. 3. 1955 


OBirUMS 

loby E. Stoptai, 1351 E. 42nd 
pliM. Services held Dec. 1 

from the ivory Chapel of Con- 
ner-Johnson. Surviving rel«. 

tive. Edward B. Stapler, hus- 
band. Rev. Maurice A. Daw- 
kins was in charge of services. 
JamM Monroe Washiagteo. 
5402 Coley street. Fort Worth, 
Tex. Died at the Los Angeles 

General Hospital on Nov. 30. 
Surviving relative, Joe Jack- 
son. Remains shipped to Tex- 
as for burial by the Angelus 
Funeral Home. 

Jomea rmany, 3855 Arlington 
avenoe. Services held in the 
Ivory Chapel. Surviving rela- 
tive. Charles Penny, son. Con- 
ner-Johnson officiated the serv- 
ices. 

Rev. Thomas Uadler. 4613 S. 
McKinley. Died Nov. 30 at the 
Gener.al HospiUl. Surviving 
relative. Cecile Llndley, wife. 
Minister in charge of services 
was Rev. J. S. Townsend. An- 
gelus Funeral Home officiated. 

GMige Fisher. 1498 W. 35th 
place. Services held from the 
Mt. Zion Church Dec. 4. Sur- 
viving relative. Mary Fisher, 
wife. Fred Fisher, brother. 

Iwotj HolL 131 E. 45th street. 
Died Nov. 30. Surviving rela- 
tive. David Hall, husband. In- 
terment In the Evergreen Cem- 
etery with Angelus Funeral 
Home officiating. 

rcrtrick O. Reyaolds. 988 E. 
Vernon avenue. Died Dec. 1. 
Services from the Ivory Chapel 
with Dr. A. A. Peters officiat- 
ing. Surviving relatives. Mrs. 
Reynolds, mother; 7 brothers 
and 3 sisters. Interment at the 
Rosedale Cemetery. 

Jennes Hewazd Scott 1146^ 
S. Serrano. Services DlecV 6. 
from- the Angelas Funeral 
Home. Surviving relative. Prls- 
cilla Edith Scott, wife. Inter- 
ment at the Rosedale Cemetery. 

Araey Hanm. 1454 E. 23rd 
street. Services from the Ivory 
Chapel of Conner-Johnson. Sur- 
viving relative. Marie Oliver, 
niece. Intenffent at Evergreen 
Cemetery with Rev. Maurice A. 
Dawkins speaking the eulogy. 


( . I 


Thura./ Jan. 13, 1959 Tht Calif 9rn « fa^la-li 



SPEARHBAblKC NEW "OPERATION AID- are erar S.OM employeaa at Flrestoie Ti 
■early 200 of whom are shown hcra formiitg tJia lettara AJ.D; aiaBr of thoae ehoira 
menu with 100% parUcipation while for tha company as a whole employees have » no 
participaUoB. In recant campaigir, employees pledged reeerd-breakiBg fl 06.660 ^ piyrol 


Al McDaniel Top Amateur Liglitweight 


Three room apt. in rear, on 
eastside. Call AX. 4-2579. No 
children. $12 wk. 


Modem 4 room front. Child O.K. 
Quiet couple wanted. $70 mo. 
AD. 2-6418. New furnishings. 


TV SERVICE 

TV dafinitaly rapairod in homo 
—no fix, no charge. Home TV. 
HO. 9-2131 - WE. 5-7526 


ROOM FOR RENT 

Beautiful large room for nice 
young lady. Vicinity Adams & 
4th ave. Call after 6 p.m. or 
Sat. & Sun. RE. 7037. 


Phono Won't Reject? 

Have James W. RebinsM 
REPAIR IT at 

2120 S. CENTRAL 
Rl. 8-7027 


35e A DAY * 
METER PLAN 

niEVISIONS 
WASHERS 
STOVES i 
PIANOS . 
REFRIGERATORS 

HARMS Af f Tf R PLAN 
Phone RE. 2-5944 


-MOTOR 

OVERHAUL 
$49 to $69 

* Melert Exchanged 

* Convonianl Location 

* Ample Financing 

A - D MOTORS 

7600 S. Ireadway; PL 3-2172 


LOANS 

Ham* Refinancing 

M. E. WEBB CO. 

PR. 8937 

Ask for J. D. Caroy 


4- 


ROnSEKEEPER WANTED 

Aid housepeeker. Near trans- 
portation. Two adults. Private 
room and bath. $100 mo. Call 
WE. 1-4039. 


FOR RENT OR LEASE 

Modem country home on acre 
8H miles south of Riverside. 
Suitable for poultry raising. 
Phone Ferris 163202. Write P. 
O. Box 485, Perrls, Calif. 

BusiNESs^oppoimijNmK^ 


Dr. George Washington Car- 
ver products. Wholesale and 
retail. Dealers. Agents. 4409 
South Avalon. 

MISC. FOR SALE 


FOR SALE FUR JACKET 
Silver fox jacket. Evens. AX. 
2-4783. 


Breodcasting Unit Fer Solo 

Prjlctlcally new broadcasting 
unit with loud speaker. 
AX 4-^45 


REPAIR SHOP 
FOR SALE 

Radio TV tubes test equip- 
ment, , phonograph records 
and used radio*. 
2120 South Central Avenue 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


HOUSE FOR SALE 

$50.00 dwn. New four room, 
two bedroom with garage. 
Balance easy. 15503 Compton. 
NE 6-5115 


OAK FOR SALi 


•MirtHKl Cafa, «<illr 
ft«llt-ia Brick Barbawa PH. W«(t- 
laka district. Aha leralslMd oNica 
tar iacanra tax bmlaau. 


Pit. vSmT 


ADoms 3-6972 
ADams 3-20^ 


75C9 
SUMMONS 
No. 630314 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California In and tor tha County 
of Los Angeles. 

Action brou^t in tha Superior 
Court of the Count.v of Los Angeles, 
and QUIET TITLfe Complaint filed 
m the Office of the Clerk of the 
Superior Court of said County. 

MOUNT OLIVE MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH OF LOS AN- 
GELES. CALIFORNIA. A CALIFOR- 
NIA CORPORATION. Plaintiff, vs. 
LILUE WHITE. Defendant. 
The People of the State of California 
Send Greetings to 

LILLIE WHITE. Defendant. 

Re that certain real property lo- 
cated In the City of and Countv of 
Los Angeles. State of California, 
described as follows 

Lot 1. Block 4 of the George Dal- 
ton Sr. Tract, as per map recorded 
In Bonk 25. Page 16 ot .Miscellaneous 
Records, in the office of the County 
Recorder of said County. 

You are directed to appear In an 
action brought against you bv the 
above named plaintiff in the Super- 
ior Court of the State of Callfomia. 
In and for the Countv of Los An- 
geles, and to answer the Quiet Title. 
Complaint therein within ten davt 
after the service on you of this 
Summons, if seized within the 
County of Los Angeles, or within 
thirty days If served elsewhere, and 
you are notified that unless you 
apcear and answer as above re- 
quired, the plaintiff will uke judg- 
ment for any money or damaget de- 
manded In the Quiet Title Complain, 
as arisltig upon contract, or will 
apply to the Court for any other 
relief demanded In the Quiet Title 
Complaint 

Given under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court of the Countv of 
Los Angeles. State of ' California, 
this 24th day of June. 1954. 
(SEAL SUPfeRIOR COURT 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY) 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. 

Countv Clerk and Clerk of the 

Superior Court of the State of 

Callfomia. In and for tha County 

of Los Angeles 

By K. .MEACHEM. Daputjr. 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 

Attorney for Plaintiff 

1111 East Vernon Avenue 

Los Angeles 11, California 

ADamt 2-6149 
(Publish In California Eagia Jan. 13. 
20. 27. Feb. 3. 10. 17. 24. March 3. 
1955) 


NO. 35934S 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California. In and for the County 
of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estata of 
Margaret Turner, also known as 
Margaret Thompson. Deceased. * 

Notice Is hereby given to creditors 
having' claims against the said de- 
cedent to fUe said claims in the of- 
fice of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to theun- 
rtetslgned at the office of Edward S. 
Hardwick. Attorney at Law. 1570 
East 1034 Street, in the City of Los 
Angeles. In the aforesaid County, 
which latter office Is the place of 
business of the undersigned in all 
matters pertaining to said estate. 
Such claims with the • necessary 
vouchers must be filed or presented 
as aforesaid within six months after 
the first publication of this notice. 

Dated Januarj- 10. 1955. 

ETTA L. PERKINS. 
Administratrix ot the EsUte 
of said decedent. 
EDWARD S. HARDWICK 

Attorney-at-Law 

1570 East 3rd Street 

Los Angeles 2. California 

LO. 6-S184 

Publish In California Eagle. Jan. 
13. 20. 27; Feb. 3., 1955. 


'fOR SALI 


^750 DOWN 

I ' INCOMI . 
4 UNITS, FRAMI 

$13.S00 "" 


PRiCI 


GOOD WISTSIDI 
LOCATION 


50 DOWN 


3.BIDROOM FRAMI 

$8950 Full Pric* 
Itoor ■roadway 



PL. 1-5680 


Anytiim 


INCOME FOR SALE 

Jw Units. $1500 down. 
7 rm., 3 badreem plus 1 

D# QPOOItl UHiv* Oil 9#C0IMI 

Avanu*. PR. 8937. 


NO. 7480 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

NO. S5M75 

In the Superior Court of the SUte 

of C:all(ornla. In and for the County 

of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Slm- 
mle Munn. also knowTi as Semmlne 
Munn. Deceased 

Notice Is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against the said de- 
cedent to file said claims In the of- 
fice of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned at the office of her At- 
tornevs. Miller. Maddox A Sheets. 
524 South Spring Street, in the City 
of Los Angeles 13. In the aforesaid 
County, which latter office Is the 
place of buslnness of the under- 
signed In all matters pertaining to 
said estate. Such claims with the 
necessarv vouchers must be filed or 
presented as aforesaid within six 
months after the first publication of 
this notice. 
Dated January 10. 19SS. 
DORA WJSV!. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
MILLER, MADDOX A SHEATS 
Attorneys-at- Law 
524 South Spring Street 
Los Angeles IS. California 
MA. S-2M8 
Publish i>v California Eagle, J^n. 



REFINANCE 
YOURi 
.HOjISE 

At ReducAd Pym'ts 
Call f I 

PRospecl 8937 

Ask fer Mr. Car«y 


13. 20. 27: Feb. 3. 1955. 


\ 


BRATTON'S 

ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

son S. Waatam U. 3-9866 

BiANCH oarici 

DUNBAR HOTEL 

4225 Canlral Ava. AD. 3-4201 


WESTERN 

STAR 
REALTY 

1953 W. J«fff«rsen 
Rl. 4-2538 I 
RE. 3-20251 

V*) Acr«. Near S«ars- 
Pico with S«mi. stucco 
A 5-nn. fram* heuso. 
$12,750, torms. 



^ 


OPEN HOUSE 

VACANT -3653 7TH AVENUE 
!'-5 P.M., Sunday, Jan, 9, 1955 

2 ia d raom Sluccs, laraa raem*. Nawly daceratad Inslda and out. 
tila, hardwood, floor fumaca, braakfast neek. Sld« driva, garaga. 
Will bs sold to ths highsat effsr. Don't miu thisi 

12TH AVENUE NEAR "J" CAR 

3 Bsdreem and Dan Medam Stucco. Lota ef tila, hardwood, 
ahowor ovor tub. SIdo drIva, deubia garaga. Floor fumaca. 
■uilt 1940. $2000 down. Pull priaa |1 1,950. Ploxiblo. 


1:: 


VACANT 


V. 


$1500 Dwvn. 2 
larpo lot, 40x155, 
Ssllor will csrry vwa 


Stucco, locatod in Woat Adama apoa. 
to build In front. I^ar garaga. 
% iRtsrsM. Only |7S0O full 


stS^I 


INCOME 

Nosr "J" car lino. 1 sn s lot. S bodroon front, 1 bodroom .^.. 
r da paint inaido, but aolid built. Both rontod. Inaoino $115 
par month. Ownor vory amdoHS. $150^ down. Offor on full 

p*»- i-l- r .1 ji ■ ■ - 


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Br A. "Sbooloss Joo" Jace 

One canijiot consider himself 
a top-fllglit| golfer long, in ama: 
teur clrcleis. before a persistent 
fear arises: "Wonder jwhen 1*11 
have to meet that .McDaniel 
guy. and how does one go about 
licking him?" 

Al McDaniel has proven, con- 
sistently, that he definitely be- 
longs to the House of Lords, as 
far as amateur golf Is con- 
cerned, but never has he caused 
the interest and concern among 
his Cosmopolitan Club brothers, 
and the golf gentry in general, 
as he did In the recent Los An- 
geles Open. His proficiency 
carried hiijK to an .even par 
round of Ti, following his open- 
ing day round of 82 In the 
deluge that greeted the Simon 
Pure hopefuls at Rancho Muni- 
cipal Golf Course. Emerging 
seventh among the qualifiers, 
Al Improved his position, mov], 
ing upto fifth place after playi 
ing the opening daj/f at Ingjlei 
wood C.C.. with its slick amd 
treacherous greens, in 74 bloiWs 
the very first time he had eyet 
set foot on ^ the course, a fea(t 
that many, of the pros f ailedf tii 
accomplish. i 

This lustrous shotmaker. Jril 
fused with a Jjulet mode^tjf 
which even his adversaries idJ 
rrtire confided tq the Intjerj 
viewer that "Had I played ih^ 
course a couple of times, I may 
have made a better showing, as 
I realize now that I should hav^ 
played several holes differently 
and will at the Inext opportune 
ity". It was no alibi, but merely 
a matter-of-fact- statement. 

McDaniel Infomts us that hS 


a A Robber Co., 
rtoreaant deMrt* 
n4ar-record f5.I% , 
dcdaetioa& 


Colfer 


has been playing golf for about 
15 years J nd that he never 
caddied, but his brother Fred, 
who taught hiir the game, was 
a caddy at 3ne irae. He started 
at Brooksid^ Pa k and it was a^ 
this course tha he carded h* 
best rouhd. a s x under par 66. 
He has wo :i, a : some time or 
other, everj "Wi st Coast Negro 
tourney frcm Seattle to San 
Diego, andi has qualified in 
three of tlje fiur L.A. Opens 
that he has en tered.i This, tiie 
29th L.A. Cipen was his jjiost 
succesful Mfort, tho,'' as he fin- 
ished deadlocke 1 for 14th place, 
ahead of si^ch ;olfers as Bruce 
Cudd, the 1954 \ inner. Bill Nun- 
nally, and Joe I loach the Negro 
national ai|na^ei^ champion. 


and 21 o 

performiers. 

philosopher 


er itellar amateur 

AI i I somewhat dl a 

toe . He was asked 


si. 


what shot hie cofisidered his best 
short. He rep 
"The one that 
to tlhe hole' 

He very 
Lorimer Matth 
fot him, credit 
which he may 
never once 
anq had I 
coujple of 
have been 
sayis Al. 

SO:— Los 


and to Cosrios 
have, right he 
backyard, tie f 
tear golfer in 
can be done al 
represent this 
eifi^nusiasts 
tionkl to b|e hi 
195S? 



TABOliOFLOVE 


ed laconically. 
:ets mc closest 

lerously gives 
;s, who caddied 
or any success 
:ve had. "Matty 
clu|)bed me wrong 
led- to him in a 
nces I would 
h better off,"" 


Angeles in general. 


jiarticulariy, yoii. 
in your own 
jiest Negro ama., 
pe nation. What 
out having him 
: bed of golfing 
|thfe Negro na- 
td in Detroit .in 


"^mm 


^.Ji 




%^j^^. 


,«#fj^t§|>k 


ScienUsta have tried for Liny yean ^ ddvelop a vaeeiae 
against niraivtic polio. Since l>ig alone. S^«M$M of m^th^ 
Dimes fu4ds have been spent on research to defe^ PoUo. The 1954 
j" a^rf **''*^ •*•* $p.500,W0. Joii| tbeJMarch of Dimes,, 


FkOM BRACES TO 


'meahmcT 


^*i'f^«? 






JUm MARCH 8F DIMS 



Tha pletura at laft waa taken fourj years ago In Orleaj a 
whan Larry McKahala, than 12, waa cheaen M^rch |f 
Boy fer that yaar. HIa arms were; In airplane apllnts aa 
an attack of polio. The picture at right ahewa Larryii 
thanka to eara and treatment patd fer by the Martfi 
can take part In juat about every, activity any Other 
Your auppert ef the March ef Dimaa will mean nev« 
theuaanda of polio vietlma like Ljarry who need Ion 
treatment before they can reaum^ a normal life as 

T^DORSE 1955 MARCH OF 



County, N.Y,, 
Dimea Poster ': 
the reault of *! 
aa he la today. I, 
of DImea. Mo"- 
i6-year«ld oan.t- 
htfpa for many 
and expenalvo 
.arry haa dona. 


Left to rifht: Dr. MMIiiewl Walker, Nathvilie, 
dent of the N4tional Medli^! Association; Mis. 
Brown. Pittsbwrgb, Pa., prjesident of the Girl 
Dolole Jr.. New Orlcaas, Ls^ prfsidcat of the 
Pablishers AswciatloB, wfe you to rospood 
March of Dimos. Jan. S-lf ' 

■ ! . .1 



-TeB9H prciK 
:\^iihelmin l^r« 
'i, sad C.C. 
Newapai 

Uberiily to " 


"SS 


'>, 




:*4:*5* California iagto Thura., Jan. 1 3, 1 95S 




Mcn'shall Reviews 
fS4 Freedom Fight 


(Continued from Page 4) 
tlM Supreme Court reversed the 
*«onvlctlon of a destitute Negro 
Mntenced to death for the c^me 
*< rfcpe in Birmingham, Ala., 
*»d a lower federal court ruled 
'tliat certain discriminatory vot- 
ing registration procedures uti- 
•Itoed by Bullock County. Ala. 
rtWdals were unconstitutional. 

Brwks in Color Una 
. •'All gains made in 1954 were 
liot produced as a result of liti; 
|(atlon. For, as a result of our 
jpommunity education program 
knd the dissemination of tech- 
iilcal information to local law- 
yers and community organiza- 
tions, additional iireaks in the 
color line were made. In Ches- 
ter, Willow Grove and York, Pa. 
%ni in several communities in 
t>elaware, West Virginia ■ and 
Maryland, desegregation in 
public schools became a reality. 

"Furthermore, public recrea- 
tfen facilities were desegre- 
gated in a half dozen or more 
^exas communities and private 
and parochial elementary, sec- 
ondary and collegiate institu- 
tions accepted Negro students, 
even In states such as Okla- 
homa and Tennessee which 
make it a criminal offense for 
private schools to operate on a 
n<» -segregated basis. 

Maw DcTelopmaats 

•Although these achieve- 
Bltnts give some insight into 
our 1954 activities, they alone 
cannot set the tempo or the tone 
for the entire year's work. There 
bave been exciting new de- 
velopprients in many fields. 

'In public housing, for in- 
stance, not only was the volume 
of litigation increased, but new 
aspects of the housing problem 
were attacked. The right of a 
ftieral agency to contribute 
mqney toward the erection of 
public housing projects de- 
signed for white tenants solely 
was questioned in a suit 
brought in Savannah; the re- 
^sal of a private building con- 
tractor to sell homes.to Negroes 
when the construction of such 
housing is insured by the fed- 
eral housing authority was con- 
tested in the Shreveport case; 
and the right of Negro on-the- 
Site-tpnants (displaced by a 
Birmingham slum clearance 
and redevelopment project) to 
■nsegregated relocation in fed- 
erally-aided public housing was 
raised In still another case. 
' 'iMoreover. research and plan- 
nhig for a suit attacking racial 
dlsCTlmina'tion in the procure- 
ment of housing in a total-com- 
munlty-development project, 
such, as Levittown, were com- 


pleted, and this suit is to be 
filed early in 1955. 

Public Bacracrtiea 

"In the field of public recrea- 
tion, we sought to expand the 
thrust of the Supreme Court's 
decision in the School Segrega- 
tion Cases. We prepared and 
have now pending, four suits 
which raise this issue. Two of 
these cases involve bathing fa- 
cilities in Maryland state parks 
and the others concern muni- 
cipal golf coursecs in Atlanta 
and Charlotte. i 

New developments were pro- 
duced by litigation and field 
activities directed against dis- 
crimination in public schools. 

"Legal techniques and the- 
ories were tested. A case was 
brought before the New Jersey 
Division against Discrimination 
to find out whether a school 
board, prohibited from operat- 
ing segregated schools, is re- 
quired to maintain maximum 
integration. Two cases, one in 
Delaware and the other in 
Ohio, were brought to deter- 
mine whether a local school 
board can order re-segregation 
after it desegregated its schools 
and actually enrolled Negro 
pupils on a non-discriminatory 
basis. 

Staff attorneys also partici- 
pated in a Tennessee case 
which protected the job rights 
of a Negro school teacher dis- 
charged because his superiors 
foresaw that he would soon be 
teaching white pupils. 

Exeaptloiial ActiTltT 

"Our lawyers participated in 
over one hundred judicial and 
administrative proceedings; ten 
briefs were prepared in cases 
brought to the Supreme Court 
of the United States; ten briefs 
were submitted to state su- 
preme courts and federal courts 
of appeals; and the number of 
pleadings, motions and memor- 
anda of law prepared and filed 
far exceeded the lOQ-plus pro- 
ceedings in which we were in- 
volved. 

"The deciswh of the Supreme 
Court on May 17th, the en- 
couraging march toward com- 
plete desegregation is so strong, 
as to give those of us who have 
been working in this field re- 
newed conviction that victory 
is in sight." 



SilYING GOODBYE— Pfc. Andrtw R. Gordon of Rich- 
mond, says fnrexvell to an old friend. "Reckless," a Korean rac- 
ing Pion'jf, and mascot of the 5th Marine Regiment. Reckless, 
made honorary "sergeant" for his accomplishments in ammo- 
carrying during the last days of the Korean war, is returning 
to Camp Pendleton. Pfc. Gordon stays with the anti-tank 
company in Korea% i 


On The Book Shelf 


BLESSED IS THE LAND, 
by Louis Zara 

An interesting and little 
known footnote to American 
history, forms the subject of 
this fine and absorbing novel. 
A %mall band of Dutch Jews 
were driven from Brazil by the 
Portuguese conquerors in 1784 
and finally ended up in New 
Amsterdam where, after patient 
efforts to establish themselves 
in the face of prejudice and re- 
strictions, they finally won a 
freedom and status undreamed 
of by the Jews of the old world. 

Louis 2Jara describes in detail 
the harrowing voyage and the 
long, struggle before success 
crowTied the efforts of the little 
group. The research that went 
into the novel is particularly 

impressive. 

« • • 

GOOD MORNING. MISS 
DOVE, by Frances Gray 
Patton 

Librarians are often asked 


for another book like "Goodbye, 
Mr. Chips." 

Everyone who loved that 
warmly human tale of a de- 
voted teacher will take equally 
to their hearts this account of 
the redoubtable Miss Dove, a 
teacher whose Influence left a 
lasting impression on two gener- 
ations of pupils. The fine char- 
acter of this dedicated woman, 
her sense of justice and of 
clearly defined right and wrong, 
is reflected in the lives of all 
fortunate enough to be in her 
classroom. 

Already on the way to becom- 
ing a national best seller, this 
story is a heaVwarming tribute 
to the finest sort of teacher, to 
whom society owes so much. 


CIO Regains 
Possession of 
Disputed BIdg. 

The Greater Los Angeles CIO 
Council enters 1955 in full legal 
possession of the auditorium 
and building at 5851 S. Avalon 
Blvd. for the first time in six 
years, Albert T. (Blackie) 
Lunceford, secretary -treasurer, 
announced this week. 

Lunceford revealed that the 
long struggle of the CIO to re- 
cover its Los Angeles head- 
quarters building from unions 
severed from the CIO had been 
concluded through an out-of- 
court settlement. 

Under terms of an agreement 
signed recently, the CIO has 
paid the unions that were con- 
trolling the building $16,705 in 
cash, and $8,795 to retire build- 
ing bonds held by them. The 
Building Corporation will be 
administered by a Board of Di- 
rectors representing the Greater 
Los Angeles CIO Council and 
affiliated unions. Present ten- 
ants of the building are prepar- 
ing to move out, and under the 
agreement must be out within 
ten months unless agreeable to 
the new Board of Directors. 


View New Hotel 

Building plans for the 
Moulin Rouge Hotel are near- 
ing completion in Las Vegas, 
Lou Rubin, one of the owners, 
stated this week as he showed 
plans for the $3,000,000 ultra- 
swank interracial resort to 
visiting celebrities. 

Among the visitors were: 
Mrs. James West, wife of the 
hotel's resident physician; artist 
James Stanford, acress Madi 
Comfort, actress Louise Beavers 
and Jimmy Gay. personnel di- 
rector for the hotel, which is 
scheduled to open in mid-March. 


day, Feb. 7, at the Legion Hall, 
51154 South Central Avenue, 
where the Benj. J. Bowie Post 
meets the first and third Mon- 
day nights in each month. 


^ \^ 


Conceron 

Increose. New 
Studies Show 

Startling new statistics on the 
incidence of cancer were made 
public tills week by Eugene J. 
Jovgenson, M.I)., chairman of 
tfie Cancer Committee of the 
Los Angeles County^edical As- 
sociation and Board member of 
tht American Cancer Society's 
Los Angeles County branch. 

Citing figures released by Ian 
Macdonald, M.D., president of 
the Califomi^a €)ivision of the 
American Cancer Society, Joef- 
genson pointed out that cancer 
strikes one person in every four, 
instead of o?ie in five as had 
'been reported in previous years. 
,. i^ Aetucd Increase 

The new ratio is based on 
Studies by the statistical re- 
seardi section of the American 
Cancer Society in New York, and 
.reflects increased efficiency in 
the reporting of cancer .cases 
since 1949, as well as an actual 
increase in the incidence of can- 
cer. The figures have been 
,»«riewed by the Cancer Com- 
mission of the California Medi- 
cal Association. 

"Whereas formerly cancer 
was estimated to strike a fifth 
of 985,460 persons, of our county 
population, the disease now 
might be expected to attack an 
additional 246,365 people, bring- 
ing the total to 1,231,825," Joer- 
genson said. 

^ ' LiTes Con B« Sored 
;j^ "TTre new ratio also means 
that caneer might be expected 
t9 strike in two-thirds (rf the 
families in Los Angeles County 
during the preswit generation, 
whereas in the past it was ex- 
pected to strike in only one 
family of every two," he added. 

On the hopeful side, Joergen- 
son pointed out that a fourth, 
or 307,956, pt those in the county 
v^o may eventually have can- 
c«r can expect to survive the 
disease. He said that an addi- 
tional 307.956 lives could be 
saved if every cancer case were 
detected eairly and treated 
properly. 

"The new cancer figures," he 
added, "will spur local volun- 
teers of the American Cancer 
iSoeiety in their efforts to ac- 
quaint the public with the fact 
that cancer can be cured if 
caught in time. They will try to 
place in every home a list of 
cancer's early warning signs, 
the Seven Danger Signals of the 
idtMase." 

I Growing awareness of cancer 
en the part of the public 
coupled with medical advances- 
moui a greater hope for the 
esaeer sufferer than ever before, 
said. 


Post Starts 
Member Drive 

ITie Benjamin J. Bowie Post 
No.' 228, Ame4can Legion, De- 
partment of California, set In 
motion their "Home Stretch 
Membership Drive" this week, 
having as their goal the attain- 
ment of 500 members by or be- 
fore Saturday, Feb. 5. This was 
the announcement made this 
week by the Commander of the 
Post, -Atto/ney Vince Monroe 
Townsend, jr. 

From now until Feb. 7 all 
qualified veterans, new and old, 
past members and non -mem- 
bers, will be admitted into 
membership, <)r can have their 
old membersliips renewed for 
the total sun* of $6.50. 
All applicaGons and remit- 
tances receivJd during this dis- 
pensation peCod will be acted 
upon by thej Post at its first 
regular February meeting Mon- 




For anything from 
minor adjustment to a 
major repair on your 
television or radio . . . 
call Avenue TV an^ 
Radio at ADams 4-0970. 
You can be sure of ex- 
pert workmanship an^ 
prompt service at scns^ 
ibic prices. 


W 


PR UM O TED— Marine Cpl. 
Louis Carter of Hanford. 
Calif., has just been promoted 
to his present rank while serv- 
ing with the 3rd Marine Divi- 
sion in Gifu, Japan. 


Motor vehicle accidents In 
the United States killed 38,000 
persons in 1952 while cancer 
kills 220.000 persons. 


I 

I 


AVENUE jTY & RADIO 

4957 CENtRAL AVENUE 

rlOWMil «Mli Mac* ami Mtk Slnm)> 

Phone: AD. 4-0970 

JAMIS HUMHfRiY Prepriafer 



'299 DOWN, BAL: MO. TAKES DEED ?, ^^r PROPERTIES 
BORROW 1000 OR MORE 


OF THESE 

' ' ON YOUR REAL ESTATE INI 
Pay Back $15 per $1000 Per Mo. Until Paid 


OPEN MONDAY NIGHT UNTIL 8 P.M. 


1106 E. llSth St — $250 Dn^ BaL Mo. 

1173 W. Third St.. Pomona - S Bdrm. — $450 Dn.. Bal. Mo. 

1712 E. 92nd Street — Unite — $350 Down, Bal. Mo. 

1564 E. 108th St — Frame and Adj. lAt — $350 Dn.. Bal. Mo. 

1218 E. 82nd Street — Stucco - 8499 Dn., Bal. Mo. 

1460 E. 107th St — 8250 Down, Bal. Mo. 

1106 E. 124th St — %S8» Down. Bal. Mo. 

1061717Vrl9 S. Central • Newly Dec Stuccos - $750 Dn. Bal Mo 

1627 E. 88Ui St — $399 Down. BaL Mo. 

1856 E. 49th St — $399 Down. Bal. Mo. 

1622 E. 40th PL — 499 Down. Bal. Mo. 

1559 E. 111th Street — 299 Down. Bal. Mo. 

2515 E. 115th PL — $199 Down. Bal. Mo. 


11920 Bandera St — $490 Dn., Ba|. Mo. 

1371 E. 94th Street — Stucoo — $450 Down, Bal. Mo. 

1556 E. 100th St — $499 Down. Bal. Mo. 

2048 Pirn St — $399 Down, Bal. Mo. 

414 E. 105th St — $450 Dn.. BiU. Mo. 

1393 E. 15th St — 18 Rm. Hotel — $2500 Dn., Bal. Mo. 

1264 E. 125th St — 750 Dn.. Bal. Mo. 

3037 Alsace — $699 Down. BaL Mo. 

2136 E. 112th St — New 5 Rm. Stucco — $499 Dn.. BaL Mo. 

^814 Beach St — $350 Dn.. Bal. Mo. 

9721 Beach St — $450 Down. Bal. Mo. 

5259 Wadsworth — $450 Dn., Bal. Mo. 

525-251/, E. S6th St — 2 Hoiuei — $799 Dn., Bal. Mo. 

6330 Estrella — $S99 Dn., BaL Mo. 

10624 liOn DUIon — $99 Dn.. BaL Mo. 

14004K2 Valencia St — $1399 Dn., BaL Mo. 

11521 Grape St — $299 Down, Bal. Mo. 

1648 E. 129th St — Stucoo — $799 Down, Bal. Mo. 

TOMORROW'S MONEY TODAY 

ADVANCE ON THE HOUSE YOU NOW OWN IN ONE DAY 

Advanced on your 1st Trust Deed loan If we OX.. It. Consolidate 
all your bUla in one loan. Borrow $1,000 or ore— pay back $15 
a month per 81000 'tU pidd. 

WE HAVE CLIENTS WITH ALL CASH 1 ! ! 

For Your Real Estate Equities— 1st or 2nd Trust Deeds— Con- 
tracts, or any Equity, you or your friends have in Real Estate. 
If It's an Estate, a suit or separation or Anything: pertaining to 
Real Estate. Here is your chance to sell for CASH. 


f . 


l; i I ! 100 CENTS ON THE $1.00 

FOR YOUR Ist TRUST DEED IF SATISFACTORY TO US, CREDITED TO THE PURCHASE OF ANY PROPERTIES WE HAVE 
LISTED, TEBBIFIC — 100 CE NTS ON THE DOLLAR IF YOU HAVE A T J). FOE $!•• - S10.000 WE WILL GET YOU A DEAL 

$98,000 CASH-$98,0b0 CASH 

HAVE CLKNTO WITH «ra.000 IN CASH TO BUY REAL ESTATE IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO SELL OUT 
FOB CASH IF YOU HAVE AN EQUITY OR OWN A HOUSE, WE HAVE CLIENTS MTTH SM,000 IN CASHffO BUY YOU OUT. 


AD« 2-6101 


Wi GO 50-50 ON COMMISSIONS 
WITH AU R. I. MOKMS 


REALTY EQUITIES (0. 

4374 S. MAIN ST. 


Aba 2-5528 


ALL PROKRTIES AKI SUUia 

TO^ARIOt SAUS 1-1S-5i 


i 


|- 



Qpen ^olf Courses, 
Atlantans Demand 

ATLANTA — The Court of Appeals was urged last 

week to reverse an arbitrary lower court ruling which 

permits the maintenanee pf racial segregation on golf 

courses owned and operated by the City of Atlanta, Gaj. 
The Court was asked to Issue f; 


a clear-eut ruling barring all 
racial restrictions so that piegro 
players could enjoy: the| park 
facilities on the ssune ba^is as 
other citizens. 1 

The request was rakde in ah 
appeal filed by the InAACP on 
behalf of 150 Negro ^olf players 
In Atlanta. j 

The appeal asked that the 
Court set aside an eskrlier court 
ruling which, while I admitting 
that Negro golfers are denied 
their constitutional right in be-, 
ing barred from the city's seven 
golf courses and issuing an 
order restraining the city from 
refusing to let the players use 
the park facilities, postponed 
the injunction in order that the 
city might have time to estab- 
lish a Jim Crow regulation for 
use of the municipal golf 
courses by Negroes. 

In the appeal, defense law- 
yers argued that while the state 
of Georgia is under' no obliga- 
tion to provide golf facilities for 
public use "once It does ao, It 
mus' provide such facilities 
without discrimination based 
upon race and color. 

"We take the position that the 
state has no power under the 


Fourteenth Amendinent to regti- 
late or condition the use (^f 


(dlf 


on: 

.4 


tha 


put^c fedlf fadUt^s 
baids ad race aad ecdoc.' 

lawye^ argue. 

It is i lelr view fb&t thf 150 
Negro p ay^ers vrho have <vgan< 
Ized ihtc a group are entitled to 
use thej golf courses now and 
withoutlbelng subjec^ted t^ any 
kind of facial segregation. 

This fase first came before 
the U.s| District Court in 1951 
when Billy Wilson sought per- 
mission Ito use the Bobby Jones 
golf coivse and was refused be- 
cause oqhis racer * 


Science Sjiru 
NewWay\Vithoi 

Finds H«aling Substanc* The 
R«|{«v*s Pain-Shrinks H« 


Now Terk. N. Y. (Spmdol)— 

For the first time science has 
found a new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids and to re- 
lieve pain — without surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid case aft^r 
another, "very sriking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by doctors' observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction or re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 

And most amazing of all-i- 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where doctors' 
observations were continued 
over a period of many months* 

In fact, results were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able to 
make such astonishing state- 
ments as "Piles have ceased to 
be a problem!" And among these 


:s Piles | 
it Surgery 

DoosBoth- I 
lerrheids 

were a very wide 

of hemorrhoid condi- 

fme of 10 to 20 years' 

[is, without the use of 
anesthetics or astrin- 
any kind. The secret is 
ealing substance (Bio- 
the ; discovery of a 
lous research Institu- 
■ady,j Bio-Dyne is i>in 
for healing injured' 
all parts of the boidy. 
his new healing sub- 
is offered in • ointment 
hemoirrhoids under the 
name Pfeporoiion H*. The price 
is only »8c,a tube including an 
applicaftr. The name to ask for 
is Prepiration H — at all drug 
stores. |And remember — ^it not 
entirely! satisfied — ^your money 
will be refunded promptly. 

.• Reg. U. S. Pat Off. 


suffere: 
variety 
tions, SI 
standin 

All t 
narcotic 
gents o: 
a new 
Dyne*) 
world-f 
tion. A 
wide u 
tissue o] 

Now 
stance 
form f oi 




\^ ■ 



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l' i t «*• 



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Po|t Offic e Stai-ti Megi^Ape ^ea fl«t Pij«be 

WOMAN KILLED BY GIRL 7 11 

- . ^O-,^*' '^"^ 


I 




^■ 


^1 


a 


w\ 


\ — Rated the Best — 



CtiOSEN 'TOPS'— ^For her inimitable performance in Car- 
men Jones, Dorothy Dandridge has received three top awards 
lor best actress inl954. See story p. 2. 


MiTf 




Agdii 


■A- 


Court Case Tests 


To biscriiiiiniate 

. PHILADELPHIA — The long-awaited discrimina- 
tion suit against Levitt & Sons, Inc., the worid's largest 
builders of private homes^ reached the Federal District 

-♦Court Jan. 13. 

The legal, action against tlie 
builders and developeri of Le- 
vittown. Pa., and Levittown, 
Long Island, was brought in a 
complaint filed with the U.S. 
District Court of Eastern Penn- 
sylvania by attorneys tot NAA- 
CP Legal Defense in behalf of 
six Negro veterans who were 
denied the right to buy homes 
in the new Bucks County, Pa., 
conuntmity developed by Lev- 
itt 

GomBBMot Aided 

They seek an injunction re^ 
straining the firm of Levitt A 
Sons, Inc., ftom discriminating 
against Negroes in the sales of 
homes in the Pennsylvania 
community as long as it uses 
the creklit, guarantee, insurance, 
approval and assistance of the 
Federal Government 

Levitt throughout the years, 
has consistently refused to sell 
to Negro families in any of his 
projects. He has resisted pres-. 
sure from every source and 
once indicated that he would 
never allow a Negro to buy a 
home in the newly developed 
Bucks County community. 
' Three of the Negro veterans 
in whose behalf the suit is 
brought tried to purchase homes 
in the Levitt's Buck County de- 
velopment as early as 1951 
when he opened his first model 
home and the others as late as 
June of 1954. 

IMOO Heoas 

When the Levitt's Buck Coun- 
ty community is completed, it 
wiU consist of 16,000 small 
homes which will be sold to in- 
dividual purchasers. The mort- 
gages on these homes are 
either Insured by the FHA or 
guaranteed by the Veterans Ad- 
ministration. 

The suit against Leyitt also 
seeks an injunction restraining 
Levitt from refusing- to sell to 
Negroes on the ground that 
Levittown, Pa., is, in reality, a 
town and Levitf s policy of t>ar> 
ring a person because of race 
or color. is a violation of the 
Fourteenth Amendment and 
the statutes of the Common* 
wealth ai Pomsylvanla. 

In the complaint, the attor- 
neys Stat* furtiter that since 
Levitt has a moB<9oly on all 
new construction in Levittown, 
he is saving th« public in the 
same manner as a public util- 
ity and should not be allowed 
to contlBue his anti-Negro jioli- 
cy and pcaetlees. 

gsuond Salt 

- Filed «t the same time and 
with the eaapilaint sgaiast Le- 
vitt is ma&Out suit whkh- asks 
(Oantlinifld on Past 4). 


LeigolMove 
lin Stalls 
Bronham Suit 

The battle of the lawyers was 

again in full swing this week 

In the celebrated Branham case 

' as Atty. Paul R. Hutchinson, 

counsel for St Paul's pastor, 

; <mce more filed a demurrer to 

i the cp^plaint charging the 

I minister with seducing and ab- 

': ducting the fornior secretary of 

: the church. 

Hearing on this new protest 

against the manner in which 

■ thencharges were presented will 

/be held either Friday of this 

week or next Monday. 

In substance the burden of 
Hutchinson's demurrer was to 
the effect that .the original 
: complaint failied to state suf • 
: ficient cause of action. 
[' At issue in the legal tussle 
1 Is the question of the statute 
: of limitations. Suits charging 
I seduction must be filed within 
' one year from the time of the 
i act 

Atty. George E. Cannady, 
i representing Mack Shepherd, 
! father of the girl, has charged 
that the alleged love affair 
: dates back to 1950, and con- 
tinued up until July of this 
i year- 


Child Given 
$3600 for 
Auto injuries 

^^K^niam Sole. Jr., an eight- 
year-old schoolboy, won a suit 
to collect, damages for injuries 
he sustained last Oct 24 when 
he^ was hit by an automobile 
ifriven by Guy Monroe Wilcox 
ait the intersection of 78th and 
Hoopa avenue. 

The suit filed jointly by 
Xttys. Ivan J. Johnson HI, Wel- 
ford Wilson and Eugene Mc- 
Closky, was brought in the 
name of Rev. William Role, Sr., 
lather of the Injured boy. 
' The case was heard before a 
Jury for four days starting on 
Nov. 8, 1954, in Superior Judge 
Arthur 'Cram's court On Jan- 
uary 13 Judge Crum approved 
thc^ amount at' damages and 
awarded the plaintiff $3600. 
■Qie child lives with tis parents 
at mi Fanndec aveBoau 


U.S. Post Office 
Seeks Source 
Of If ate Racket 

The Post Office this week 
was investigating the hate-in- 
spiring ■ Negro-A p e leaflets 
which have been sent during 
the pist few weeks to residents 
of Los Angeles and nearby 
towns. 

Postmaster Otto K. Olesen 
turned over a copy of the Jan. 
13 issue of the California Eagle, 
which prominently displayed a 
photostat of parts of the leaflet 
to a postal inspector to probe 
into the matter in an endeavor 
to trace the evil intentioned 
material to its source. 

NAACF Protests 

Likewise, on Tuesday Atty. 
Thomas G. Neusom, president 
of the local branch of the NAA- 
CP, wrote the postmaster de- 
manding that action be taken 
to prevent the "dissemination 
of this scurrilous litsrature" 
through the mail. 

Information received follow- 
ing the Eagle's expose of this 
new attempt to sow antagonism 
between Negro and white shows 
that the leaflet has already 
been sent to a fairly large num- 
ber of people. CoiHes, in addi- 
tion to those turned over to the 
Eagle, were made available to 
the NAACP. A large number of 
those so far received had been 
sent to individuals in the pub- 
lic school system. ^V 

Marked copies of the Eagle 
were sent by messenger to the 
postmaster who when they ar- 
rived was in conference with 
a postal inspector here on of- 
ficial business from San Fran- 
cisco. The newspaper was im- 
mediately turned over to him, 
and the Eagle has been in- 
formed that the> investigation 
is proceeding. 

Eqocrtss MegM. Aps 

The leaflet shows two pic- 
tures, almost identical in ap- 
pearance, one baaring the cap- 
tion -Ape," the Cither "Negra" 
Fnudo-scicntiflclsbals on botk 
jlftSbXBM ai» also jvactieally- 
idcntlcal. and arc obviously de- 
sigi^ to create tiie impression 
that the Negro is but little re- 
moved from the animal. 

Written matter below each 
drawing is filled with revolt- 
ing,, derogatory remarks all 'lur- 
rying out the base theme that 
the Negro is a disease -carrylngr 
s u b-h u m a n. feeble-minded 
creature. 

The National Citizens Pro- 
tective Association, Box 156, St 
Loi^s 3, Mo., is the address 
printed at the bottom of the 
leaflet Copies were received 
together with copies of alleged 
excerpts from a speech by 
A))raham Lincoln in which the 
Civil War president is quoted 
as sajring that, the Negro is in- 
ferior to the white man. This 
latt« gem is "submitted and 
distributed by the Citizens 
United Incorporated, 6217 Con- 
verse Avenue, Los Angeles 1." 


Outsid«LA...12c 

Phome 
Wamt Ads to 

AD. 44)161 




^S'vte Discount 


B. 4lrd Mm*. UA. 


VoT. LXXIV— No. 44 


Los Angslsf, California 


Thurs., Jsn. 20r 1951 


'Mirrar' D^nie^ Policy 
Of Not Hiring N egroes 

Paper Declares 
Report of Bias 
Due to Mix-up 


Mm HH By 
3 Cars Dies 

- John W. Burton, 44, of 238 6/8 
E. 53rd St, was killed Tuesday 
night when he was struck by 
three can, one driven by a hit- 
and-run motorist as he at- 
tempted to cross Jefferson blvd. 
at LaSalle street 

Burton first was struck by 
a car driven by Robert Schnair, 
27, of 5633 Bowcraft street He 
apparently was not seriously in- 
jured although knocked to the 
pavement. He got up and ateg- 
gered into the middle of the 
street when the second car hit 
him, knocked him to the pave- 
ment and sped away. 

The second car threw him In 
the path of another vehicle 
driven by William J. Cooper, 31, 
of 2717 Arlington avenue. 



TO SING HERE— Marian Anderson, fresh from her wo- 
mentous victory at the Metropolitan Opera House in New 
York, is expected to achieve another resounding success here 
in Los Angeles Feb. 14 when she appears in concert at the 
Philharmonic Auditorium under the auspices of ' the Com- 
munity Civic Music Association, 


Youthful Killer of 
Jeff Hi Athlete'to 
Plead 'Self Defense' 

Fourteen-year-old John Draper, Jr., of 1151 E. San- 
ta Barbara avenue, who last week stabbed to death 
Jefferson High School football and track star, Robert 
Bias, will plead self-defense when his case comes up for 
a hearing in Juvenile Court January 31, according to 
his attorney, Earle C. Broady. 
The Probation Department it 


was learned, does not consider 
young Draper "incorrigible," 
and is not asking .that he be 
treated as an adult criminal 
who would be subject to the 
death penalty. 

Funeral Sad 

Atty. Broady steted ttiat he 
will ask that the youth be 
spared the ordeal of being sent 
to a penal institution, but will 
not request that he be returned 
to the neighborhood in which 
Jie has lived up to now. 

Meanwhile, the funeral for 
15-year-old Robert Bias was one 
of the saddest witnessed here 
for a long time. About 500 of 
the young athelte's schoolmates 
and teenagers frcnn Carver Jun- 
ior High, where he also had 


many friends, attended the 
rites which were conducted 
Thursday afternoon at the 
Morning Star Baptist church, 
41st and Compton streets, just 
across from Jefferson High. 

Moot Wssp 

Jefferson's A Cappella choir 
sang during the services, v^ile 
a wave cf weeping swept over 
the youthful mourners. Girls 
sobbed and tears ran down the 
faces of the boys as they ex- 
perienced what was for many 
of th«n their first acquaintance 
with death. 

A report that whisky had 
been served to the teen-agers 
who were at the party attend- 
ed by both young Robert and 
John before the killing is be- 
ing investigated. 


Representatives ofthe 
•Mirror" — sUrting at the top 
with Editor and Publisher VhrgU 

i n k i e y— stoutly denied Wed- 
nesday that the paper excludes 
Negroes from its editorial staff 
as a matter ofpolicy, but final- 
it did develop that someone, 
an obscure and unnamed "of- 
fice boy" did make some; in- 
quiries and some statements. 

A little earlier that someone 
from the "Mirror"— presumably 
the obscure office boy— was re- 
ported quoting Vir^ Pinkley 
or his lieutenants as having 
established a poUcy that the 

•Mirror* is not going to hire a 
Negro until the Times' hires a 
Negro— and Nobody knows 
wh«n that will be." 

tt saems agreed fliat someone 
ad t ds p h o^ to tf» Da ily Naws 
y»»«ijiijiM«« CuuuultteCt located 
tba -Lfoa Aageles Press Club 
the BmtMSsy Hotel. That 
someone spoke to a member of 
the conmiittee and asked for 
the names of copy boys from 
the defunct "News" who might 
be available for the "Mirror." 

The representatives of the 
"News" recommended Eddie 
Lee King, well known to 
"Eagle" readers, who for the 
past two and one-half years 
worked at the "Daily News" as 
copy boy, now and again being 
stepped up to reportw when a 
vacancy occurred. 

During the conversation it 
was mentioned that Eddie Lee 
King is a Negro. It was then 
that ,the statement about the 
"Mirror's" hiring policy was re- 
portedly made. 

Bold to Bsacb 

Pinkley, when queried — and 
it's not easy to get to query 
Pinkley — emphatically and 
forcefully denied that he knew 
anything about it denied that 
the paper followed any . such 
policy,- or that there was any 
truth whatsoever in the allega- 
tion. He seemed angry that such 
an attitude could be ascribed to 
him and made it very clear that 
he judges people "by their 
ability and not by their color." 

Paul Bell, of the Personnel 
Department was just as em- 
phatic "There is no foundation 
in fact" for such a atatnn^t he 
said, adding that "I am 98 per- 
cent confident no such inquiry 
was made." He already has a 
long list of applicants for the 
job. However, presumably be- 
cause of the two p«vent doubt, 
he promised to investigate. 

A short time later, Asst Man- 
aging Editor Ault telephoned 
and adtdsed that there ap- 
parently "has been something 
of a mix-up. Some office boy," 
(Continued on Page 3) 


Parents Attempt to End Tension 
At Fremont, Washington Smoois 


Fremont High School stu- 
dents, still smarting Under the 
tough penalty barring 'them 
from inter-city athletic compe- 
tition, this week enlisted the 
aid of their parents and com- 
munity organizations in an ef- 
fort -to ease race tension and to 
attempt to get the sports ban 
lifted. 

At a pieeting Friday night at 
Roosevelt Park, about 50 par- 
ents, Negro and whitc^ ex- 
dianged views, aired grievances 
and sought remedies. Unfor- 
tunately, although the organ- 
isers had attempted to get par- 
ents from both Fremont and 
Washington, only one repta- 
aentative of the latter fcbool 
was present. 

Of tht Stattfa of- 


fice, Juvenile authorities, tl^e 
NAXCP. the Urban League, the 
County Committee cm Human 
Relations and the County Con- 
ference on Community Bela- 
tions were present, .as was also 
George Dirckx, principal at 
Fremont 


Hie nieetlng was an out- 
growth of the free-for-all that 
broke out last Nov. 19 during 
the last few seconds ^ the Fre- 
mont-Washington football 
game, and continued in the 
school building after the game 
ended. HaM antagnnlsm was 
apparently at the bdctom of the 
tl^ts. and an ugly situation 
threatened. In order to prevent 
aiQT ttathu ontbtcaks the Ath- 
tetk PoUcj DetaRBlBliif Com* 


mittee of the Board of Educa- 
tion forbade all competition 
between the two schools imtil 
after next year's football sea- 
soiu This automatically 
baimed athletes of both schools 
from inter -dty competitimi. 

In back of the friction at the 
schools Is the changing pattern 
of the neighborhoods, with Ne- 
groes moving out iinto the 
Washington Sdiool area, and 
their presence being resisted 
and resented by the vhiites who 
havC' been living there. 


One of the ^Ufficutttas In tha 
situation brao^t oat at tha 
meeting Is ttat a number of 
the N^Vco patents who Jtvc in 


transftted their diildren back 
to Ftemoat, in order to protect 
their diildren f^om expected in- 
sults and possible bodily harm. 

Atty. Thdmas G. Neusom, 
president at the NAACP, was 
one of. those addressing the 
group. He suggested that fur- 
ther efforts be made to interest 
parents at yrashington in the 
problem and to attempt to ob- 
tain ttieir cooperation In solv- 
ing it 

He furttier proposed that the 
group ^attempt to obtain- the 
ba fMifg of the oommunUy and 
Joint action by both Frem<mt 
and WaihingtiMi in an endeavor 
to «4^paal to the Departmnt of 
Edoeatlmt to Ilgbten the stiff 
penalty laid oi tiia attUctei of 
tha two f1^ lfffl ^f , 




NO WITHDRAWAL -- 
George L, Thomas, one of six 
ctndidates in the storpf 10th 
eouncilmanic district, is in the 
race to stay— and unn. Sm- 
mors that he or Lucius Lopuue 
Jr. might withdraw are v/ith' 
out foundation, 

Thomas, 
Gird for Battle 
In Stormy lOth 

An all-out, hard-slugging 
battle was brewing this 
week for city councilman 
from the 10th eouncilmanic 
district, as Lucius W- Lo- 
max/ Jr. and George L. 
Thomas hoth stoutly de- 
clared they are in the race 
to win. and have no intent 
to withdraw. 

Rumors have been circulat- 
ing widely that efforts were be- 
ing made to get one or the other 
to drop out of the race so as 
to make possible election of a 
Negro to the post now held by 
Charles Navarro. 

Six In Baoe 

Others who have declared 
their intention to run for the 
office arft Eart J. Griffin, pub- 
licist; Sam D. Whitworth, re- 
puted to have strong financial 
backing; and Milton R. Mac- 
kaig Jr. , 

Griffin, who on Tuesday had 
not yet picked up his nondnat- 
ing petitions from the QXy 
Elections Division, was out d 
town and was not expected 
back until Friday, his office 
reported. 

But Thomas and Lomax were 
busily campaigning both for 
signatures on their petitions, on 
which they need 500 valid 
names, and for voter support 
Against the Field 

Thomas told the Eagle: Tm 
in it to stay. I'm running 
against the whole field." | He 
added that he had given 'long 
consideration to making a bid 
for the City Council seat, | that 
he has made many conjunit- 
ments to run. and that he has 
no Intention of baddng 
now. 

Lomax, who rolled tip a 
able vote in his campaignl last 
November for Assembls^man 
from the 63rd district remariced 
briefly: ^1 have no intenti^ of 
(Continued on Page 3) 


out 
siae- 


f«ofvrW 
In fhm f ogfb 

Spsdal flMtnres thife wMc 
tnaida the Eagle in^uda: 

Chaa Prawfnrrf [ j, y 

Editorial 
Sports 


Ghorch Aettvitiaa 
Sodal 


aV 


_ !■ ■ „ i ^ » |>> ^>,«- 



People and Places 
Dorottiea Foster 
BillSmallwDod 
Whaf 8 Cooking 
Bridge Pointers 
Bowling News 
MoRlsSays 
Slioir Bwtness 


fOfOver 
liiiril Woman 

Annlbell Bowden, 41, of 
4427 If Avalon Blvd., died 
FridaM night from a knif* 
thrustlin the heart inflict- 
ed by Jier friend, Mrs. |^- 
el Dalis, 822 E. 45th St. 
But tliere are, conflicting 
stories as to the cause ot 
the qiluTel that led to th« 
killin_ 

police arrived shortly 
|p.m. at the 45tti street 
they foimd Miss Bow- 
I the floor in a pool of 
|The coudi just behind 
Is also covered with 
land the walls were 
There wa^ mooe 
tha dining room. Miss 
was dead, a single 
hole ill her chest A yellow- 
handled fish knife was on tha 
floor i^ar her body. 

[reports that the stab- 
bing rjsuited from a "lover's 
quarrel' between the two 
womeni were discounted by 
Newton Street Det Broady, who 
investilated the case. 

id that he hail ques- 
Mrs.<. Davis for r^any 
llowing her arrest on 
e of murder and that. 
ive appeared to be jeal- 
ousy aroused by Miss Bow* ' 
den's, anorous advances to hif 
'husbain. Roar Davis. 
MissiBowden, who worked at 
Sanitarium, 1131. 
ado street, and a friend 
with her; Bernlce 
visiting Mrs. Davis, 
three reportedly had . 
nks. . .' >.•.-. ' 

joined them, and, ae* 
to Broady, Miss Bow- 
itly he^A payinc" 
nate attention to hina.. 
while, he wmt to his' 
foUowed igr his wtfa 
ded him for mak- 
tc» anothtf, woman, 
her inesenoe. Ha do- 
nied fia <Aara«p1nft^iS»-ar^ 
gumeiK became hnted, decid- 
ed to leava and wait out tbm 
back 

Mrs.|Dayis then, returned to 
her 'tw > friends. ."Ihey asked 
her to drive them home , In- 
stead i he said she would call 
a cab., rhey advanced towards 
her,- st i said. She remembers 
having a knife in her hand, 
but sh doesnt recall how tiie 
stabbii z occurred. 

Earli t, reports, obtained from 
other I ffidal sources, indicat- 
ed tha the cause of the Jeal- 
ousy h 'tween the two -women 
was rb airy for the affection of 
Miss £ >wden's roonmutte. Miss 
Hall, V io was a witness to the 
killing. 

Acco) ling to these reports. 
Miss B iwden's last words just 
before Ishe collapsed on the 
coudi .^^ere: "Bonice, I Idva 
you ana I'm dyin^ fcv you:'* 

ClmciNomed 
By M^Girthy 
Reoains Job 

WAS DNdTON— Secretory of 
Defensi W 1 1 s o n Wednesday 
ordered theJArmy to rdnstate 
Mrs. A] nie l{«e Moss, suspended 
employ e whose case figured in 
the CO itroversy between the 
Army t tid Sen. McCarthy. 

The t9-yelr<}ld Winnan was 
twice si spended by the Army as 
a possi le aejcnirity rislc, the sec- 
cond t^e li^t Aug. 4; 

been doing doleal 

's order was in a letter 
to AnA^ Sefxetary Stewns in 
whldi be directed Mrs. Moss' 
restoration jto duty and said 
that she wouild be reassigped to 
a nonsciisitive position 'Srtthout 
access Ito classified informa- 
tion" la the finance and ac- 
counts loffide of the Army's 
Chief eg Finjance. 

^oal4 Clesa Cosa 
said in his letter that 

JMo^ accepts her new 
It ittie case should ba 


if Mrs. 

assignn 
dosed."j 

record 

dusioni 

versiva 

States." 


said his study of the 
loes |not support a con* 
$he is actually su|^ 
the United 


brdiMloyal toi 


December 
To tfie NAACP 
Total$25ANM) 

rORK— Americans am* 

mate tlisn 935g000 t» 

n's largert eisll rlghtt 

Ion duilnf tb/e montq 

it was i^aelc 

il mnrti 'Ot-'; 


■/-^ 


» ovaiinf tlM lait 
lbs exact 


[ •. 


|! - 
n - < 


S-TIm Califfemia logl* 
thurs., Jan. 20, 195S 

■ ■ 

CIQ Sponsors 
FEPCLaw 
For CalHomia 

The California CIO Council 
win help to sponsor legislation 
at the current session of the 
California State Legislature 
. .crieating a Fair Employment 
Practices Commission, John 
Despol, legislative representa- 
tive for the (»-ganlzation an- 
nounced tills, weelc. 

"Fair Employment Practices 
laws, as sponsored by the CIO, 
were endorsed by the Demo- 
crats at their national conven- 
tion in 1952 and urged by 
President Eisenhower for adop- 
tion in the various states. Thus 
passat^ of sitch legislation by 
the California state legislature 
would carry out campaign 
pledges of both major political 
IMirties," Despol stated. 

"The proposed California act 
is modeled after the New Yoric 
law which has been in success- 
ful operati(m since 1943 and 
wlilch has been adopted in 
eight other states and 22 cities, 
covering a total population of 
almost 60 million people. More 
than 5,000 complaints have been 
handled in Fair Employment 
Practices^ states, and all but 
five cases were settled by con- 
fer«ice without even the neces- 
sity of a formal commission 
hearing. Emphasis of the pro- 
IMwed act is on education and 
on preventing discriminatory 
practices," the CIO spokesman 
explained. 

"It is time we demonstrate to 
the entire world that our Con- 
stitution's guarantees of life, 
liberty and the pursuit of hap- 
piness are not meaningless 
phrases to a large number of 
American citizens because of 
the color of their skin, their re- 
jligion or their national origin^" 
Despol concluded. 



PLAN BANQUET — Consolidated Realty Board committee members this week were husil, 
planning their sixth annual Installation Banquet io be held at the D^eauville cluh in Sant 
Monica. Comrrtittee members seated, from left, are: Mrs. Ikalina Saioy, Mrs. Flora Dun- 
can Radix, Chairman fVillis E. Carson, Cluese Reid and Mrs. Geraldine Nicholas. Stand' 
ing: Joseph Beacham, Mrs, Ruby Braxton, Af'rs. Emily J. Johnson, Milton Berry man and 
Cecil Parts. ' 


VACATION TRIKS 

Eightyvthree per cent* of 
Aitoericans make their vacation 
trips by automobile, according 
to the National Automobile 
Club. 


ConsoHddf ed Realty Plans 
Annual Installation Banquet 

Final plans were shaping up this week for the Cbn-* 
sblldated Realty Board's sixth annual Installation Ban- 
quet, to lie-4ieid in the near future at the Deauville 
aub,'l525 Ocean Front, Santa Monica, 
committee. 


The committee, chaired by 
Willis E. Carson, promises that 
the forthcoming event will be 
the best and biggest banquet 
Jn the board's history. 

Lorenzo V. Spencer will be 
installed as president along 
with the rest of the newly elect- 
ed officers by Hon. Judge Ed- 
ward Jefferson of -the Superior 
Court. 

Miller Barbour, western field 
director of the National Urban 
League, will be principal 


speaker, and will talk on "Bet- 
ter Housing for Better Living." 
Clarence Johnson, ratfiai re- 
lations officer oif the Public 
Housing Administration, will be 
master of ceremonies. Guest 
artist will be Martha Davis and 
her combination. From 10 p.m. 
to 2 a.m. there will be dancing 
to the music of Sammy Frank- 
lin and his band. 


ABVinUUHMT 


ABVIKTISIMINT 


Afihoonce New Way to Relieve 
Bain of Arthritis ud Rheamatism 

I ; I Without KUs! ,. 


op flow ol fndb, lidi blood into 
actoally hdp* dtiwm away pai»- 


caueinff 


ion and preeeure. 


1^ Terk, N. % (S»Mial)- 
8«i«aee has now developed an 
ifcrlMi, creawliMi cream that 
acta in a aew mj to brine a new 
kind of rdief from pains of arthri- 
tia, rheanatism, and aniaealar 
iMhcs uid pains. This new eraaM 
lefierw these paias'witlMMrt the 
seed of taking pills andotfaer i»- 
tanal medieittes that nay only 
afeet tite system. 

Geatly robbed into pidafel 
wee, ^is cream penetrales so 
deep and eompMely that it aet»- 
«ly Tuidiea. Qoiekly a 
Mg f eeiins of wannth 
and. the wlMde painfnl araa 
eb a phasing gkw. Tlua is ats&- 
Si« erkfanee <tf tlM power o< tUi 
cieam to penetrate -qeieidy sad 
■tiamlate the dneletfaei «< the 

m^» 1 


146Biitish sad Freadi doetors 
are so aeitiafted vHh this new help 
for patients sitf ering from ar- 
thritis and riwsmatiam that they 
have piepezed written reports of 
saee e e s baaed on hvndreds of 
eases. Further, one of the teadiBg 
artlnitis and rlieamatiem ehni- 
tba Uaited States hM 
ttte findings ct 


it speeds ap the Sow cffNeiwrisii 
bod into the sore araae and ae- 


Uaed 

teaHy ha^ drive away «Im pai»- 
coDgeetiaB and 


New f «r the first tim* tUs le- 
cream can be obtatned 
1 preeer^tMa at drag 
HtfoogniMit Amensa^m" 
M name InfraBUB*. The 
of InfraRUB is^ooir 964 
fer a large tabe. laf raBlTB is 
basked by the amaalng gaanolee 
that sufferers f ron the palaa of 


faO. 


or sprafais will get bears 
trfeaarforttagieliafar 
moaey will be refonded hi 



"MOMMY SAYS IT'S A 
REAL BODY BUILDER" 

To hdp bidkl up yeuacstins, to give them s hesky 
body, M«nd teeth— try Scott's EmuldoB, ai naiiy 
DoctoB recoaimend. This noutiihing food tonic 
k like '%eaUli insurance", in that h't foU of 

tnattiral AtD Vitamins, eneigy buOdiag 
oib and added mincraht 148,000,000 

' bottles sold-it must be dependable I , 

SCOTT'S IMULSION 

NATURAL HIGH ENERQV TONfC 




JIf OIK JLose« Vigorl 
Wiie Ashed tor mvoreel 

let Mr. Raney Ted His Own Story: 

1 had siiffeied with my prostate ftend, H 
censed me aerveea, aleeBless, leg peki, kMney 
end bladder trewMe, end se bitter te «e leward 
opposite sax, ^mplete loss ef vigor, H wss 

. necessary my wife ask fer diverce. I hsd fried 

Or. r. r. law all kinds ef remedies wMieot raault wntil I waa 
lecammsnded la Dr. P. Y. Lew (Chinese Herb Spe- 
delist). In cewple menlhs tkna I em camplefely well. 
New I sm well and Iha fetina is more brighter and 
strenger than ever. If any one suffeis ss I did, 
plaais rash to Dr. Lew. I sm sure you will rsceive 
Mm seme resuH.' 


(Signed) J. A. Reney^ Redlends, Calif. 

WHY BE SICK.. 


tnifp ... 

WWbeef Ooa»eHae. 


■«lnl«r* n» BaOt MMkorf 



May Co. Unit 
Accused of Bias 
In Store Strike 

PITTSBURGH, Pa. — The 
NAACP this weelc called upon 
the local Fahr Employment 
Practices Comminion to h^It^ 
the displacement of veteran 
Negro worlcers by white strilie- 
brealcers at Kaufman's Depart- 
ment §tore, the Pittsburgh unit 
of the May Company. 

The Negro employees worited 
as elevator dispatchers, assist- 
ants and operatorsL A few of 
them had been on the job for 
40 years. Many others had 
worked at Kaufman's for long 
periods. As members of the lo- 
cal of the AFL Building Service 
Employees Union they were in- 
volved in a labor dispute with 
the company. All other issues 
in the strilce have been settled 
l9ut the company refuses to take 
back the Negro workers or to 
re-employ the Negro waiters in 
the store's restaurant. 

The union has refused to ne- 
gotiate away the Jobs of its 
Negro members. 

The NAAC P rep resentative re- 
minded the FEPC officials that 
"the one and only remaining 
issue in the labor dispute is a 
matter of racial discrimina- 
tion," and urged them to take 
immediate action on behalf of 
the displaced employees. 


CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

lOfO I. 43r4 PL 

Us Aiwd«f 11. C«Bf. 

ADom 44161 


LORgN MILLCR 
■ditor anS PublMier 


Vol LXXIV 
nwkby 


No. 44 
Jca. 20. IfSS 


r.P. WALLCn. JR.. 


-Adv. Ma 


ahACc e. aiMONS,Exaeutiv« editor 

COWARD -ABIE" ROBINSON 

•.Circulation Mgr. 
.Office Mar. 


CALMC RUSS- 


BAV AREA REPRESeNTATIVE 

E. & ALLEN 161t 1»th St. 

Santa Monica, Calif., Pli.i KX. S-ISSI 


MINTAl ANB NnVOW CONBITIOia ... . 

MAVi HiN saccnirBUT nuTu _ .|| .; 

if a 4AJfi * Antarltis • Heart Disease r!!^!Ll^m 

YAs 2»W l^^Se • - *^^^^ °^r'" 

MO R y m oed * Female Trouble imi, .'omb 

. . ,fb7tf| Troabls . * RhemnatisAi Satai*urn~ih 


mMAUST 


Established Sfaica 1920 
850 S. MAIN ST. 


Autumn Subscriptlonf 

Only 1 

PER COPY lOe 

Adjudication Decree Number ^a*U^ 
Data af Adjudication July 1, 1KI. 

Publlahed every Thuraday by TNa 
California bQle f^iblMiirtg Co., 
iOU liaat 43rd Riaca. Entered aa 
Second Ctaae Matter Navembcr S, 
1S37, at the Root office at Loe An- 
■ataa, Califamla, under tlie Aet ef 

RBPRCikNTED NATIONALLY BY 

ASaOCIATCO RUBLISHERi. INC 

SS1S Hollywood Blvd. 

Ruee BIdg., San Franclece, Calif. 

t1 WOat 4eBi atroot. N. V. to, N. V. 


Men, At Last It's Here! 

TUceRUMTOMaC and aajoy Ufa. 
AUICTOIIEX takee up where nature 
{esToe m. kVKTSiClktrn TOItr 
MULA. Moaey^ek aoaraatee It not 
eampletdy iatMled after three bot- 
tles. Oaly IB 00 tbr a foil two woeks* 
aupply. C O. D. or aend cheek or 
money order now. THE RTTMTOIteX 
CDMFANT, — ~ - 


Michigan City 
Passes FEPC 

HAMTRAM,CK, Mich. — This 
Detroit suburb last month be- 
came the 34th city in the coun- 
try to pass a fair employment 
practices ordinance. 

The campaign for a local 
FEPC was sparlced by Dodge 
Local 3 of the UAW-Ob. Busi- 
ness groups and other civic or- 
ganizations were enrolled in the 
campaign which resulted in 
unanimous approval of the 
measure by the city council. 
The passage of this ordinance 
ma lies Hamtramcic the 4th 
Michigan city to outlaw dis- 
criminatory practices in em- 
ployment. Prior action had been 
talcen by Pontiac, River Rouge 
and Ecorse. In all these com- 
munities the drive was inaugu- 
rated and backed by labor 
groups. 

The Hamtramck law c^ls for 
a five-man commission to be 
designated by the mayor of the 
city. All complaints will l>e 
heard by this commission which 
will refer the more flagrant 
violations to the city attorney 
for prosecution. Included in the 
new ordinance is a provision 
for maximum penalties of a 
$100 fbie or 90 days in jail. 

Fraternal and religious or- 
ganizations are exempted from 


I— SANTA— 1 
MONICA 

NE^\''S 

By Ida B. Dooley 


MAAC? MEETDfC 

The Bay area branch of the 
NAACP wUl hold its regular 
monthly meeting at the Ma- 
sonic Hail, 1720 Broadway, 
Thursday evening, Jan. 20, at 8 
p.m. All members and friends 
are cordially invited to attend. 
Important business will be 
stressed and standing commit- 
tee chaitrmen will present^^eir 
memben. Refreshments will 'l>e 
served, photographs talcen and 
everyone is welcome. Mrs. S. 
Younge is president, Mrs. Ruth 
Brown, secretary. 

• • * 

COUHCn. WOMEN 

The Council of Church Wom- 
en of Southern California and 
Nevada will hold its 2l8t an- 
nual meeting Friday, Jan. 21, 
at the First Congregational 
Church, corner of 3rd and Ce- 
dar in Long Beach, from 9:15 

to 3 p.m. 

• • • 

CBUBCH SEBVICES 

The Calvary Baptist Church 
will join other Bay area church- 
es for worship at Christian 
Church of Cluist, 5th and San- 
ta Monica blvd., in special ser- 
vices Sunday evening, Jan. 23. 
The new executive secretary of 
the Bay Area Council of Chur- 
ches will be honored. 

• • • 

SHILOB BAPTIST 
Rev. Vincent Gabriel, former- 
ly of Toledo, Ohio, and assist- 
ant pastor of Shiloh Baptist, 
will speaic at Calvary Baptist, 
20th and Broadway, Sunday 
morning at 11:00 a.m. services. 
Rev. Gabriel's sermon will l)e: 
"Seeing Life from God's View- 
point" 

• • • . 

McGOWAN BETUBMS 

Mr. Grady McGowan, promin- 
ent citizen of Santa Monica, 
was callaid home recently to. at- 
tend the luneraf of his father 
in Camden, Arlc. After tlie pass- 
ing of liis father, Rev. J. B. 
Martin, it was arranged for his 
mother, Mrs. Mary Martin, to 
fly to Santa Monica. Mrs. Mar- 
tin was happily married for 
sixty years and was the mother 
of eight adopted children. Al- 
though Mrs. Martin is £!2 years 
old she unhesitatingly made 
the eight-hour plane trip here 
from Camden. She is malting 
her home with the Grady Mc- 
Gowan family at 1843 7th Street 
in Santa Monica. 



ECONOMIC RESOURCES 

California has a greater di- 
versity of natural economic re- 
sources than most European 
countries, reports the National 
Automobile Club. 


this statute as are domestics 
and firms employing less than 
six worlcers. 


-FOR lATfSr HAM STflMS' 


BILLIE'S BEAUTY SHOP 

PROBLEM TYPE HAIR A SPECIALTY 


4723 AVALON 


AD. 3-9425 



— aa sutofflstk Gas wuer heater 
tod so autofflstic Gu clothes 
dtjer. Put them togedier— along 
with your sntomstic washer— 
and fouVe got s New Fieedom 
Gas laundry — one that will make 
ereiy wadiday a carefree day-^ 
a hony. 

An antomttic Gas water better 
delivets hot water 3 tonet hsttt. 
It pibvides die £ut tecQvety rate 
needed to keep up widi TOUT auto* 
mtticwttbq.Xctyoiirdpakrbe^ 


yon select the tight size water 
heater for your ftmily'i oecdi 

When It comes to ckxhes dtjr* 
ing, nothing equals Gat. It dries 
cloches fiuter than any other aufo* 
mttic fuel And til your laundry 
it softer, fluffier, sweeter'imelling 
tiian ever before. 

So, make yours a New Freedom 
Gas Laundry. See the new auto* 
made Gas clothes diyen and auto> 
matic Gu water beaten at dealers' 
or your Gas Gxnpany o£Bce now. 
They cost lest to operate. 


giubV. 


•OUTMnm OAUrORItlA AAS COMPAItV 



Parents Boir 
Jim CroW Sc 

SSrtS^dtool hM. or. wfuslna to .ei 4 them to q n«flT 

cooftruetad Mgragate^ *^~. 

school t 



IN, KOREA— Marine Cpl. 
Tommie L. Nellon, son of . 
Mrs, Ruby J, Taylor of 26 
Florence ave., Fresno, is a 
water purification man with 
an air control squadron of the 
1st Marine Aircraft Wing in 
Korea. A former student of 
Edison High School, he, en- 
tered the service irt January, 
1953. 
_j^. 

Dandridge Gets 
Three Awards 
ForXarmen' 

Although 20th Century- Fox's 
"Carmen Jones" is only now be- 
ing given its full national re- 
lease, Dorothy Dandridge is the 
recipient of three top awaKi; 
for her title role performance in 
the musical film. 

Members of the San Fran- 
clsco-Oaltland Critics Circle 
voted the star the best actress 
of 1954. at their annual dinner, 
according to notification re- 
ceived In Hollywood by the 
studio. 

James Mason shared hdnors 
with Miss Dandridge in the 
California critics' selections by 
being named the best actor of 
the year for his performance in 
Walt Disney's "20,000 Leagues 
Under the Se&." 

Film Daily, leading motion 
picture trade paper, informed^ 
the actress by telegram that 
she was named as one of 
"Filmdom's Famous Fives for 
1954" in its annual poll tal&n 
of leading movie reviewers and 
television-radio commentators. 
Other stars who po^«L top posi- 
tions with Miss Danondge are 
Robert Francis, Grace Kelly, 
£^ra Marie Saint and JacI^ Lem- 
mon. 

The Hollywqpd Foreign Cor- 


Last summer the 
board started chnstructloa of,* 
school building ton a site vhich 
would assure, attendance by 
Negro chUdren only. Despfte 
NAACP protests at a meeting 
of the school board, authorities 
proceeded with building the 
new school on the alte whidi 
the NAACP leaders had con- 
demned as unfit for a schooL 

When the new segregated 
school was opened on January 
10, Negro parents accmnpisnied 
their children to the •chool 
they originally attended. Al- 
though mere waa no violence, 
the sheriffs office waa notified. 
The children were not ajdmlt- 
ted tocthe old achooL 

The parents demanded a con- 
ference with Richard Maitwell, 
chairman of toe school board. 
Despite the fact that only Ne- 
gro children were assigned to 
the new school. Maxwell insist- 
ed there was no segregation. 

On advice of the local NAACP, 
parents are continuing to send 
their chUdren to the oldj Inte- 
grated school. , 


respondents Association, which 
annually awards Golden iGlol>e 
emblems to stars, also domi- 
nated her as the best actress 
appearing in a musical film In 
1954. 


Beach; Women 

Settle Ilaim for 

Tfaffii^ Damages 

Mrs. En ima Pearl White and 
Mrs. Ollie B". Mc Cornell both «( , 
Long Bea di> this ^ffeek lettled 
their dair t for damages against 
the drive r of an automobile 
whldi stuck them down in 
Wihningtt n on Dec; 12.^The tu 
was drivei i by Eablo Bochemlcip. 

Represe ited In ootirt by tlie 
law firm \ f Miller, Maddok and 
Sheets, tH > two women received 
this week a substantial settle- 
ment^ for their In]tiries frotai 
Fanners I isurance compcBy. 
• 1 

Op«n 
NAACI 

JA< 
will formi 
pi state 
afternoon, 

The off] 
quarters 
which 


issisiippf 
State Office 

, Miss.— The NAACP 
ly open its Mlsslasi* 
fice here on Sunday 
January 23. 

will be state head* 
r the NAACP out of 

_ J (dgar W. Evers, re- 

efiatly s] pointed , field secre> 
tai$', will worlt 


4^ 


It i« a 
■omathing 
about tiia 


human 
notr 
Jity. 


faill 


>r nothing 
« Ml 




A 


f 


i* 


'■^;i r. 


■i^: 


TuiM In Mondays at 7:30 p.m. Wad. at 7x30 p.m., PrI. 
"Adventures of Kit Carson" KRCAr Ciianiiol 4, i^dte 


I 


BtOO p.m. I 
fiihmr I 


]^JStSi\SSm£SmmSSS!SL 


■11 


■.^«?5!icK, 


u 



''■T: 


\ - -1 .' 


n^ax, Thomas Ready 
For Stiff Battle i n 10th 

New Officers 
Installed by 
Local NAACP 


fc: 


! 




I 1 


1 


1 
'I 


>« 1 


:',! 


f 


1 

t 


l-i' ^ 


, 




(Continued from Page 1) ^ 
withdrawing. The only thing I 
that would stop me would be if I 
I failed to qualify." j 

Tn-Camptdgn Coffe* j 

But he's not taking much of i 
a chance on that "if." Saturday 
morning from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ! 
he is holding a pre-campaign 
coffee and "Nominating Peti- 
tion-Signing ceremony" at the 
Wllfandel club, 3425 W. Adams 
blvd., at which he hopes to 
complete the signing of the 
petitions. 

The petitions must be filed 
- by next Saturday, Jan. 29. to- 
gether with a filing fee of $144. ' 
.Both Navarro and Whitworth ■ 
have already turned in their 
petitions. | 

Thomas, best known locally i 
for his work as executive direc- ; 
tor of the County Conference on ; 
Community Relations, which is 
composed of 60 member organi- | 
zations, is busy releasing in. ■ 
formation to the press outlining 
his platform, and has already 
been pledged some labor and 
church support. i j 

RacsiTed Awoxdx ' 

During 1953 Thomas received 
the Urban League Award for 
*T)istinction in Promoting Bet- 
ter Race Relations." In 1954 the 
Los Angeles Tribune awarded 
him its scroll for "Outstanding 
contribution to the development 
of the community and to the 
extension of the democratic 
ideal," and the National Japa- 
nese-American Citizens League 
gave him its highest award for 
"meritorius service and out- 
standing contribi^tion to the 
welfare of persons of Japanese 
ancestry in the United States." 
He is running on a platform 
pledging an all-out fight for a 
city FEPC. a municipal com- 
mission on human relations, 
the provision of adequate park 
arid recreational facilities in the 
10th district, and effective iii- 
tegration of minority employees 
into the Fire Dept. and all other 
municipal agencies. 


'Mirror' Denies 
Bias in Hiring 

(Continued from Page 1) 
he went on, "did^call the Press 
Club to get a list of some 
eligible names fi^m the Daily 
News for our already standing 

' Kst." There are 32 names on 
the list now, he explained. 

"I am not clear as to what 
was said in this conversation," 
Ault continued, but' insisted 
there was "no policy authoriza- 
tion of any sort." 

"We have been for some time 
Interviewing several Negro 
newspaper men for possible edi- 

■ torial jobs. It started back be- 
fore the combination of the 
•Daily News' and the 'Mirror.' 
We talked to three or four or 



ytir PRESlDEST—.-itty. Thomas G. \'cu^',rn \.,is 
■ installed as president of the }\AACP at Philbps Temple 
meeting Sunday. 

TRAVELLED LOCAL GIRL 
MAKES SURPRISE VISIT 

A delightful 10 day visit, after a period of 18 months 
came as a surprise early this month to the family and 
friends of Jane Miller, daughter of -Mrs. Ida Miller. 

During her absence Jane 
toured the European rontinent 
with a group of university stu- 
dents who studied and conduct- 
ed wo'rk projects in France. Hol- 
land, and Geritiany. On her re- 
turn to the U.S. she worked as 
a supervisor at the Women's 
State Reformatory in New Jer- 
sey. Since May. 1954.. Jane has 
been employed by the Secretar- 
iat of the United Nations in New 
York City. 

During her vi.Mt here. Jane 
was entertained by family and 
friends among whom were Atty. 
and Mrs. Loren Miller, who had 
also invited representatives of 
the U.N. and charitable organi- 
zations. Also entertaining her 
with dinners were Mrs. Bulah 
.\rnaud. Miss Connie White, 
Miss Alice Meyers, and mem- 
bers of the Y'WCA Coop at UC- 
LA where she attended school. 
She also addressed a class in 
Political Science at that insti- 
tution. 


Drew Pearson 

ToS^akAfi 

Sinai 



^en. Wayne Morse. Hank 
Greenspun, and Drew Pearson 
will be presented in the first 
annual lecture series of Sinai 
Temple Brotherhood; Jack 
Bloom, Brotherhood president, 
announced this week. . 

Pearson, nationally syndicat- 
ed newspaper columnist, w-ill 
speak at 8:30 p.m. Sunday. Feb. 
13, in the temple. Fourth St. and 
New Hampshire Ave. 

Greenspun, publisher of the 
Las Vegas Sun. who made head- 
lines, by winning an anti-trust 
suit charging conspiracy to 
withhold advertising from his 


five Negro newspapermen who f ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^v jousts with 
might have the qualifications.' | ^^^ j^^ McCarthv. will talk at 
He explained that since the; g.g^ s^^jja^. j^^rch 20. 


Imerger every effort was being 
. |made to hire as many as pos- 
sible of the former Daily News 
employees. 



D. CRAMPS 

give you that 

monthly look? 

■Nr M M-Mi w/mn, "mnm" mm k jmr tml 
- Da«a your mirror *how mn oldcr-lookinr. 
Wora^nit,' nerroiu fact during jrour "bad 
4aysT" Why let men sc* that too arc 
■offcriBK from monthly erampa? Try a little 
Cardai each day aa thousands of women do. 
Let it help boild atrensth and resistance so 
yon haTe i— and less misery each month. 
Snm* to through periods without feeling 
any diseomforta at all. Also helps relax 
Itttanr iMrraa— sleep better. Look, feel, act 
yoanger, nior* normal all modth. Ask for 
Cardtd. (Say: "eard-you-eym" ) , 

MONTHLTCUMPS 
CNMU OF Lira 


CARDUI 


The appearance of Sen. 
Wayne Morse of Oregon, inde- 
pendent whose vote permitted 
the Democrats to organize the 
Senate, will climax the series 
at 8:30 p.'ta. Sunday, April IT. 

"Our brotherhood feels," said 
Bloom, "that in this series we 
are presenting three of Amer- 
ica's leading independent I. 
voices. And their information j 
and points of view, we think, 
will be of value to our com- 
munity." 

Proceeds will go for the new 
structure that Sinai Temple, 
oldest Conservative Jewish con- 
gregation in Los Angeles, with 
a membership from all over the 
Los Angeles area, will build at 
Sun.set and Sepulveda blvds. 

Wiliiam Friedland is chair- 
man of the series. 


ELECTRONICS 

An intensive training course 
in "Basic Electronics." designed 
to qualify students for jobs in 
the fields of electronics, radar, 
television, radio, and guided 
missiles, will be given during 
the spring semester at East Los 
Angeles Junior College, start- 
ing Feb. 1. 


Installation ceremonies were 
heJd last Sunday at Phillips 
Temple for seven officers and 
18 board members elected to 
shape the destiny of the 
NAACP's Los Angeles • branch 
during 1955. 

The newly-elected team was 
installed by C. L. Dellums, 
president of the Regional Ad- 
visor>' committee. 

Neusom, PrMidaot 

Heading the group is Atty. 
Thomas G. .\eusom, president, 
who last term ser\ed as vice- 
president. He succeeds Dr. E. I. 
Robinson, who served as local 
branch president for five con- 
secutive terms. 

Officers installed in addition 
to President Neusom are: 

Fleming Ennix. Rev. P. D. 
Lehman. C. E. McKinney. and 
L. B. Thompson, vice-presi- 
dents; Zella M. Taylor, secre- 
tar>. and Lorenzo Bowdoin. 
treasurer. 

Board members elected are: 

Dr. E. I. Robinson. Gilbert 
I L i n d s e y. Lillie Montgomery, 
I Atty. Rayfield Lundy. Rev. J. 

R. Henderson, E s t e 1 1 e Van 
I Meter, Clarence S, Smith, Atty. 

Herbert Simmons, Jr.. W. F. 
I Anderson. 

j Sadie E. Brewer, A. C. .Bil- 
fbrew. Rev. T. M. Chambers. 
i Rev. Maurice Dawkins, Bernard 

C. Dillingham. Rev. S. O. J. 

Evans. Rev. F. D. Ferrell. 

Dorothea Foster, and E. J. 

Franklin. 

ApproTS Reseli^on 

First action of the board was 
to approve a sharply-worded 
anti-communist resolution intro- 
duced by the presidentelect. It 
reads: 

"Be it resolved that we. the 
members of the board of direc- 
tors of the Los Angeles Branch. 
National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People, 
do hereby serve notice on all 
persons seeking to jdin or be- 
come affiliated with the Los 
Angeles branch; 

"That the 42nd annual 
NAACP Convention in 1951 
stated as a , fact that persons 
who belonged to, or organiza- 
tions fronting for the Com- 
munist Party, could not sup- 
port the p r i n c ip 1 e s of the 
XAACP, and that therefore, the 
Constitution of the NAACP was 
amended, restricting member- 
ship to those who support the 
principles and programs of the 
XAACP; 

"In accordance therewith, we 
do heneby reject the assistance, 
coopenation or membership of 
any person, organization or 
group, who is now or has been 
without having resigned or dis- 
avowed such postiion. connected 
with or held membership in any 
organization declared to be sub- 
versive by the Attorney General 
of the United States, since such 


Abortion Death 
Case Doctor 
Freed on Bail 

Dr. Kinckle Edward Spencer, 
westside chiropractor accused 
of murder in the abortion death 
of Mrs. Geraldine Gladys Ray, 
was out on $1500 bail this week, 
following a hearing last Thurs- 
day. 

Arraignment in the case has 
been set for Jan. 27. Dr. Spen- 
cer's attorney, Herman A. Eng- 
lish, advised that at that time 
his client will plead not guilty. 
Dr. Spencer maintains that the 
beautiful young woman was 
ill when she, accompanied by 
Milton Woods; came to his of- 
fice at 11419 S. Avalon blvd. on 
New Year's Day. 

Mrs. Ray, who was well 
known and popular, was dead 
later that afternoon on arrival 
at the hospital. 

The low bail of S1500 is un- 
usual in a murder case. 

No evidence was produced at 
the hearing which directly 
linked Dr. Spencer to the 
abortion. 


Clerit Reliired; 
Was Fired Over 
'Darkie' Protest 

WASHINGTON — An Army 
clerk who was fired from her 
job at Fort Meade. M**.. when 
she objected to being called a 
"darkle" was reinstated to her 
position this week. 

Mrs. Rosie B. Adam^' difficul- 
ties began in August, 1^4, 
when she complained about be- 
ing by-passed on a promotion. 
A few days later, she observed 
on the desk of her immediate 
superior, an Army officer, a let- 
ter in which he referred to her 
as a "darkie." 

Unable to substantiate her 
charge without proof, she took 
the page of the letter. She 
presented it to post authorities 
and asked that it be cori^dered 
in evaluating her charge isf dis- 
crimination. Instead, her /com- 
plaint was ignored aifihshe was 
separated from the service on 
the charge of taking personal 
property (the letter) of another 
employee. 

A complaint of dtsctimina- 
tion. filed on her behalf by the 
NAACP, was disallowed by Fort 
Meade personnel. On appeal to 
the Department of Army, how- 
ever, it was ruled that the dis- 
missal of Mrs. Adams was un- 
warranted and she wa^rdered 
restored to duty. This decision 
was approved by the Secretary 
of the Army. 

persons could not constitution- 
ally be members. Further, that 
we as officers of this Branch, 
will discharge our duty in a 
diligent and alert manner, be- 
ing constantly on guard to re- 
sist the effort of any organiza- 
tion on the Attorney General's 
list, or person who is a member 
of such organization from tak- 
ing part in or infiltrating in 
any degree in the local branch." 


I '> 



Fer •sythinj from « 
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major repair on your 
television or radio . . ■ 
call Avenue TV an. 
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You can be sore of ex- 
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P 


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(B^twmmn 49th Maf and 50th Strmmt) 

Phone: AD. 4-0970 

JAMIS HUMPHRfY Vropriotor 



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.r 


The Ciilifomio Eogle— 3 
Thurs., Jan. 20, 1955 


Negroes Hit Back 
iVs Economic Battle 
Splits Mississijppi 

NEW YORK— The explosive economic battle be- 
tween Negroes and whites in Mississippi became more j activitie^ will address the 

heated this week as Negroes began to hit back against Ethical Culture Society of -Los 
4, ... , j.i_ , , . ,. Angeles" Vednesday on the sub- 

the credit squeeze imposed upon them by whitp fman- ject: "Se -regation. integration. 
cial institutions in the state. or What "' ^ 

A total of $40,000 has already 'v -— — — — . Miller was one of the at 

been deposited in the Tri-State Pfople m the state can. save [ t^^^^^^ ^.j,^ presented to the 

their farms, homes -and busi- | TTnit«^ « f <= cu •.« uie 


Loreii Miller 
Will kpeqk To 
Church Group 

Loren Wilier, local attorney, 
editor ol the California Eagle, 
and pan icipant in many civic 


y 


Bank of Memphis to finance 
Negroes deprived of credit by 
white banks. Negroes in Missis- 
sippi itself are standing solidly 
against attempts to relegate 
them to second-class citizen- 
ship. 

540,000 Deposited 

At the same time, Atty. Gen. 
J. P. Coleman has sent com- 
missions as special assistant 
attorneys-general to the State's 
1.100 white law>ers to assist in 
handling anticipated law suits. 

Administrator Roy Wilkins 
announced that the NAACP de- 
posited $20,000 of its reserve 
funds in the Memphis bank, 
and that the Detroit Metropoli- 
tan Mutual Assurance Ccjm- 
pany and Edward Kivie Kap 


nesses. 


United States Supreme Court 

...,.,_ «. . . ^ , ^ , I '^^'^ "^^M on restrictive cove- 

"The NAACP feels sure Ithat j nants. 
in a few weeks between $300,- 


000 and SI .000.000 can be made 


The m :eting will be held at 

available through the Memphis 1 1*]^.^^"^'; "/"T ^'"^' ^ ^outh , 

bank for loans. Deposits are in- f i^'""" ' Boulevard at 8 p^m.. 

sured up to SlO.OOOand loans i^"? ^'" ^^.''P^."/" ^^^ P""?^' 

u,iii ho A.=Ho ^n , .tHMK. !,„=!. ! Refreshnfents will be served by 


will be made on a strictly busi 
ness basis to those who satisfy 
the bank's requirements. 

Prompt actign is needed since 
farmers are now seeking funds 
to finance their 1955 crops. 


members of the Ethical Culture 
Women's Auxiliary after the 
meeting. 


MATTIWILDA DOBBS 


GREENSBORO, N. C - Matti- 1 Angeles Funior College are ad- 
wilda Dobbs, the coloratura [vised to make applications for 
' "'""' ehtrancelat once in the re^istra- 


rUNIOI COLLEGE OPENS 

Studer :s . wishing to begin 
stiidies'1 lis spring at East Los 


soprano who has made musical, 
headlines in Europe and New 



^> 



lah of Boston. Mass., had each j York the past two seasons, 
deposited $10,000. Checks should i heads the list of presentations 
be made payable to the Tri- j of the winter lyceum ser^gs at 
State Bank of Memphis, 386 i the A&T College. 
Heal avenue. ! ' : 

The NAACP has appealed to 
all Negro insurance companies, 
banks, fraternal societies, and 
interested individuals to make 
substantial deposits in savings 
accounts so that the Tri-State 
Bank will have^ the money to 
handle applications for . loans 
from"' Mississippians. A mini- 
mum of $500,000 is being 
sought. 

Denied Credit 

Mississippi homeowners, 
businessmen and farmers are 
being denied credit by white 
banks in an effort to force them 
to accept segregated schools 
and to cease trying to register 
and vote. They are being turned 
down if they belong to the 
NAACP or sympathize with its 
program. 

Sma,ll: businessmen are being 
aske(j . for cash on delivery of 
goods. Banks are refusing to 
re-finaitce farm mortgages or 
to advance money needed to 
start a new crop. "Negro profes- 
sional men are on a C.O.D. 
basis for supplies and some are 
having their insurance can- 
celled. Big white plantation 
owners are forbidding their Ne- 
gro tenants to go to Negro doc- 
tors and dentists. 

"This is a challenge to Negro 
individuals and institutions 
that have millions of dollars 
lying in banks all over the na- 
tion," Wilkins said. "If they 
will send only part of their 
funds to the Tri-State Bank the 
vicious and unfair Mississippi 
squeeze will be licked and our 


tion offi •£. announced Walter 
Hertzog, dean of admissions. 
The new semester opens Mon- 
day, Jan lary 31. j V 


Goodbye 


SCOTT 

NATURAL 


Mr. Cold" 

f.. 


"Moms making me si rong 'n healthy. by giving 
me Scott's ever>' day . . . says it's like gold from 
the sea to put energ ' in me.'.' Children grow 
stron? on Scott's Em ilsion, because it's full of 
natural .\&D Vitamin , energy building oil plus 

, added minera s. It helps build real stam- 
ina and resist nee to colds, if youngstetji 

* don't get eno| gh.of these Vitamins! 


S EMULSION 

HGH ENERGY TONIC 


mm 


SUBSCRIBE KOW! 


I 

m 


CALIFORNIA 


EAG 

' 'i 

3 MONTHS BY 
EVEBY THURS 



.*■— -^^i* ■ > !■< 






.1 'f 


^"-:4 



4-Th« Cpliffornia Eaal 


ss*- 


Thurs., Jon. 20, 1955 


California Saglc 


ioren Miller, Editor and Publishmr 

Th* ii^l* ttoiMls for cwnplat* int«9rati«n ot M>gr — int* avsry 
phot* of Amorkcm liff* Hirough ffh* dMnscratic 

1V« favor; 

1. FEPC en local, ttoto and irationol lovolt. 
3. Oocoirt howting for aril AmoricMM. 

3. Roprosontotion in Govommont. 

4. Adoqwoto old ago ponsiom and fociol socurfty. | 

5. Collocthro bargaining rights for all worfcmon. 

*. Oovolopmont and oncowrogomont of Nogro buslnos*. 

IVe Oppose: < 

1. Jim Crew in all forms. '. ' i ■ 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. ' 

'\ ' PttMJslietf ffvery Thorsdoy i 

lOSOEost 43rd Place, Los Angeles 11 AO. 441*1 


Too Many Candidates 


If the prospective candidates for 
city council in the Tenth District are 
serious in their claim that their pri- 
mary concern is the defeat of the in- 
cumbent, Charles Navarro, they had 
better get together and find some 
way to preset a united front. 

omas, Lucius Lomax 
en who have taken out 
f candidacy, have at- 
brms and any one of 
ake a far better city 
Mr. Navarro who 


George 
and Earl Gri 
declarations 
tractive pla 
them would 
official than 


neither understands nor cai*es much 
about the problems of the people of 
his district. ; | i 

Doubtless, Mr. Loinax, Mr. Grif- 
fen and Mr, Thomas each has strorig 
supporters and we don't doubt that 
any of them can advance strong rea- 
sons why he should be the candidate. 
We zdso know that all will appeal to 
the same group of voters and that 
if this group is split the chances are 
that Mr. Navarro will walk off with 
the election. 

Noi)ody can deny that each of 
their has a perfect right to run if he 
desir !S. Nobody can compel any of 


them to withdraw. Nobody can make 
the decision as to which of them 
should stay in the race or whether 
all of them shall stick to his original 
decision, except the candidates them- 
selves. 

We doubt very seriously that there 
is any solution of the problem ex- 
cept by an agreement, freely arrived 
at, between the candidates them- 
selves. There is no machinery, such 
as the Democrats used before the 
June primary elections, for screen- 
ing out candidates and for giving the 
official nod to one of them. There is 
no group presently constituted to 
perform that task and it is too late 
to form such a group. 

As far as we are concerned at the 
Eagle, any one of the three is ac- 
ceptable to us and we'll take the 
candidates' collective judgment as to 
which of them should stay in the 
race. We hope that two of them can 
and will withdraw and leave us, and 
other perplexed citizens, free to 
throw our whole hearted support be- 
hind the one that is most likely to 
get the Tenth District the new coun- 
cilman it deserves. 


The Senate Retreats 


Northerji Democratic senators de- 
cided to evade a fight over senate 
rules by dropping plans to offer an 
amendment to limit debate. The real 
resistance to limiting debate comes 
from southerners who know that 
such limitation would result in the 
passage of civil rights legislation. 

Northerners know that, too, and 
their capitulation on the debate 
limit rule is an acknowledgment by 
them that they do not intend to put 
up a ^serious fight for fair employ- 
ment legislation or for any other 
civil rights measures. 

• This senaitorial knuckling under to 
the soirtherners is a part of high 
Democratic. strategy which seeks to 
win back the Dixiecrats who played 
footsie with the Republicans in 1952. 
Curiously enough, the leader in 
the fight to abandon all efforts for a 
limit on senatorial debate was Sena- 
tor Hubert Humphreys of Minnesota 

' who had won a reputation as a red 


hot liberal by his apparently unre- 
lenting opposition to the southern 
wing of his party. It was he, accord- 
ing to reports, who convinced Sena- 
tor Lehman and other northern 
Democrats that their southern sena- 
torial colleagues are reasonable men 
who can be prevailed upon to do the 
right thing.' 

Whatever they are in other cir- 
cumstances, southerners are dis- 
tinctly not reasonable on the subject 
of civil rights. They are bitter end 
and wild eye^ fanatics and nobody 
knows that 'better than Senator 
Humphreys. 

The Minnesota senator is begin- 
ning to act like a man who has been 
bitten by a political bug. There are 
stories that he is eyeing the pre.si- 
dential or, at least, vice presidential 
nominations of his party. Like many 
another politico, he hopes that his 
ambitions can be realized by sacri- 
ficing principal to expediency. We 
doubt it. 1 I 


I 


Better haie Than Never 


'A way back in the dim, distant 
ages of World War II, President 
Roosevelt's FEPC tried vainly to per- 
suade Washington Capitol Transit 
Company to drop its age old rules 
against employment of Negroes as 
street car motormeh and conductors. 
The company flatly refused in the 
face of capitulation by street railway 
. companies all over the land, includ- 
^ing our own Los Angeles lines. 

Capitol Transit pursued its Jim 
Crow ways in the nation's capital 
untU last week when it made a sud- 
den about face and announced that 
it had dropped all coldr barriers. 
That is good news, not only because 
of the action itself but because it is 
desirable that every vestige of dis- 
crimiriation be wiped out in the capi- 
tal of the world's greatest demo- 

^racyl 

The company has been under pres- 

|sUre from President Eisenhower's 
Contract Compliance Committee and 
its capitulation will help bolster the 


administration claims that it has se- 
ciu-ed reforms in those areas in 
which the federal government can 
exert direct influence. 

The truth of the matter is that 
the administration has acted fairly 
effectively in this and similar cir- 
cumstances. Integration in the 
armed services has been hastened 
since Mr. Eisenhower came to office. 
Segregation has been wiped out in 
schools on military installations 
and discontinued in nayal shipyards. 
It was government pressure and per- 
suasion that hastened the end of 
discrimination and segregation in 
Washington theaters and similar 
places of public accomodation. 

We hope that the logic of events 
win persuade the administration 
that its whole duty won't be done 
until the federal government extends 
the sphere of its activities into areas 
which it now seems to regard as 
matters of purely local and state 
concern. 


V 


Negro History Week 


Negro History Week is just around 
the corner and it deserves unani- 
mous support. We've remarked be- 
fore that it -is unfortunate that a 
-group, such as Negroes, needs to 
mark out a special week to call at- 
tention to its own contributions to 
the welfare of our country. Unfor- 
tunately, that is still the case. 

° The long continued existence of 
slavery with its tngistence on the 
inferiority of the Negro and with its 
denial of the dignity of the individ- 
ual set a pattern of thinking aUd 
Wilting about Negroes that infected 


historians as well as the individual 
citizen. Negro contributions were 
forgotten, denied or thrust into the 
background. And after slavery there 
came the segpregation system with 
its imputation of second class citi- 
zenship for Negroes to further 
shackle and blind historians. 

The net result is that the average 
historical work glosses over the Ne- 
gro's contribution to American life. 
The purpose of Negro History Week 
is to remove that gloss and to tell 
Americans the part Negroes have 
played In making our nation great 
and strong. 







, , 

)i ' • « 

I 



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1 " 

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1 

1" 

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.- - ■ " 






Battleaxe & Bread 




By ioster 0. Grangmr 


Contralto Marian Anderson 
• madtf history two weeks ago 
with her smashing; triumph at 
New York's Metropolitan Opera 
. House. To judge irom press and 
eye-witness reports, the elderly 
building shook with audience 
enthusiasm, many of the audi- 
ence wept and everyone pre- 
sent was caught up in a tremen- 
dous wave of emotionalism. 
Like thousands of other devoted 
admirers of the great artist, I 
had to enjoy her success at 
second-h^nd, through noting 
its effect upon those fortunate 
enough to he present. 

But I was more than a little 
irritated a few evenings l>ack 
when, at a social occasion, a 
dear soul chattered to me, 
•Wasn't it a wonderful thing 
for Miss Anderson to be given 
her chance at this stage of her, 
career? 1 was so-o-o proud of 
our Met:" 

Cars Mat A Cbonc* 

I struck back with, "Wasn't 
It wonderful of Miss Anderson' 
to grace the Met with her pre- 
sence? I don't know, that the 
Metropolitan did anything for 
Marian Anderson, exc<?pt provide 
her with another success on top 
of thousands. But she not only, 
gave the Met a successful 
evening; she gave the organiza- 
tion a chance to become re- 
spectable." 

Maybe I wsis a little ungraci- 
ous but. I repeat, 1 was irri- 
tated by thej lady'.s bland as- 
sumption thai Marian Anderson 
had been hajnging around for 
25 years, waiting for the Metro- 
politan's brass to recognize her 
ssuperb artistry and show 
enough cours(ge to sign up the 
greatest conti^altq voice in the 
world. 

Who Helped Whom? 

Twenty- five years ago. Met 
success woul<} have been a tre- 
mendous bodst for the velvet - 
voiced singer; . today the Met 
has simply hitched onto Miss 
.\nderson's World-wide reputa- 
tion and capitalized upon it. 

I'm not denying that this was 
a good thing j for all Americans 
to experience, but let's have no 
misunderstanding about who is 
doing something for whom. It 
was Marian the Great who per- 
formed a great service for 
American opera, and the sen- 
sitive ones among her audience 
were there toj thank and honor 
her for it. 1 

As a matter of fact, one of the 
top officers in organization for 
concert service recently re- 
marked that financially and 


artistically it had been a good 
thing for Marian that Metro- 
politan had not snapped her up 
when she was younger and 
could be had. She would have 
made less money, less progress 
as an artist and less fame as 
a concert star, if she had lieen 
swallowed Into the vast maw 
of the opera company. It would 
have taken twice as long for 
her to emerge from organiza- 
tional anonymity into indivi- 
dual stardom. 

Com* to Thsir Ssnsss [ 

I remember twenty years ago 
when the late Dr. Louis Wright, 
Harlem's distinguished surgeon, 
was tendered a testimonial 
dinner for becoming the second 
member of his race — and the 
first In a number of years — to 
be given membership in the 
American College of Surgeonsf. 

In his responding remarks. 
Louis said, "Let's get this 
straight. I ought not to be 
honored for having something 
I ought to have had years ago. 
Any qualified surgeon is ex- 
pected to qualify for member- 
ship in the College. What we 
really ought to do is have a 
testimonial for the governors 
of the College for having come 
to their senses at last." 

So with La Anderson. Lefs 
not cheapen her success at the 
Met by congratulating her. on 
having made it. Lefs congratu- 
late Rudolph Bing for having 
had the courage once more to 
break with ignorant and short- 
sighted tradition. Let's honor 
Marian Anderson for having the 
greatness of spirit to respond 
to the Bing offer With gracious- 
ness and magnanimity. 

Lefs appreciate the way in 
which opera-goers and many 
who had never tjefore heard a 
full-length opera turned out for 
the occasion, and made it a 
memorable evening for Miss 
Anderson and her mother. All 
of this is in the spirit of pre- 
sent-day America, which is re- 
evaluating old customs and 
analyzing them In the light of 
modern history. It's all good — 
for Americans and for the world 
— but It wasn't "wonderful" for 
the Met to have arranged for 
the evening. It was Just long- 
deferred good sense in opera- 
tion. 

"There he goes again," some- 
body will say about this 
column, "always belittling!" 
But I don't think it's belittling 
at all, merely to set the record 
straight. It would be selling 
"our Anderson" too cheaply to 
do otherwise. 


On^ Man's Opinion 


■T LEON 8TEWABD 



Did you know that Atty. Ivan 
J. Johnson HI was the son of 
Ivan J. John.son II and his wife, 
Ethel? Well, that is the way he 
gave it to us| 

Little Ivan was born In 
Auroa, III., but moved to 
Topeka, Kansas, when he was 
a year old. 
Ivan went 
through high 
school there 
and had en- 
tered Wash- 
burn College' 
When his par- 
ents decided 
to move 
again. This 
time they 
Lson ^tywokd moved to Los 
Angeles. It was 1921 when they 
arrived. The same year young 
Johnson ente|red . U.S.C. in the 
college of Lil)eral Arts. 
Out tor Troek 
They looked at his Jong lithe 
legs and thought Ivan might 
be a track potential. They gave 
him some track shoes and 
asked him to try out. He did 
not make it for a sprinter but 
by the trial and error method 
they finally decided that young 
Johnson was a quarter miler, 
and he really ' made good In 
those man -killing races. And 
they gave him a letter. 

After a year In the Liberal 
Arts department he changed to 
law. When he 
showed up at 
Hastings Col* 
lege for fur. 
ther 1 a iv 
Study, that 
school put 
Ivan on theit 
track team as 
their own 
quarter 
miler. His 
long legs Ivan Jehasea 
took the Southwestern quarter 
and you could not have touched 
him with a pretty apple. 
Took Beonl l»«f on Gmdaoting 
In March 1927 he took the 
examination of the State Board 
of Examiners and in June he 
graduated. What is more'. It was 
on the 29th of that same month 
that the lovely Miss Dorothy 
Vena and he were married. 
What a June! 

Atty. Ivan J. Johnson HI 
moved In with Atty. Clarence 


A. Jones on Second and Spring 
.streets until he was called to 
the U. S. Attorney's oflee for 
five years of service, following 
an appointment by Sen. Samuel 
Shortrldge. The Women's Politi- 
cal Study Club sponsored him. 
When Roosevelt was elected our 
hero moved to the Golden State 
Mutual Insurance Co.'s offices 
asihat company's attorney. For 
19 years he and Loren Miller 
shared a secretary and a suite 
of offices at 1105 E. Vernon, 
where Mr. Johnson remains to 
this day. 

Atty: Ivan J. Johnson lU is a 
civil lawyer. For exercise these 
days, he settles for golf. His 
faithful quartette is composed 
of Norman Houstom, Edgar 
Johnson, Dr. William Bailey and 
himself. Now that Is ju.st up 
his alley. 


LEHERS TO 
THE EDITOR 



A Southern Minister wants to 
know: 

The writer has been waiting 
to hear some comment aitout' 
the beautiful parade held, in 
Pasadena, on New Year's Pay 
r e a 1 1 i V e to the conspicuous 
al>sence of minority groups and 
especially was this true of 
colored Americans. 

In a state where integration 
isn't supposed to l>e a problem, 
it was quite noticeable that 
every high school represented, 
failed to have a colored mem- 
ber of the band. Since we are 
musical by nature, it struck me 
most peculiar ttiat some of our 
boys and girls were not march- 
ing to the glory of "God's 
country." ■•' 

Where were our civic minded 
leaders Who are supposed to 
protect our Interests and spare 
us this type of embarrassment? 

Our percentage in this parade 
kept the Writer (who stayed up 
all night) from enjoying and 
feeling a part of this outstand- 
ing event, which should have 
been representative of every 
segment of California. 

Could it be that there is a 
very subtle pattern of segrega- 


/' 


;r 


I .J ■■ 


Vj 





HO IS This PALE LltTLt CI^EATUiE ^KC 

DEf ILI5 Ml) NAME. IWHOBUILTTHBE GREAT 
MONUMENTS THfcTmvfKt ANTlQJnt/.lWHO 


WAS GREAT BEFORE MIG-KTU EGUpTV^SB/EM 
KN0WNjTiHI5 VAIN LlTfit MlTt X_ONy Tltl^ * 





Pure and Simple 

i^^^^sBy L, F. Palmer Jr.* 


Raci 
Yin 
Gri 


Gospel "music has found its is to L. A., or something like. 

place in American culture. that. And he can hardly write 

Only yesterday, GospeKmusic* a column these days without 

was pretty much a type of singing the praises of Mahalia, 

shout and emote singing which, who soared. to national atten- LONI 

aS far as I could tell, was the tion via a CBS radio show Just becoming 

domain of several Negro de- recently. est andj 

nominations from Baptists to To me this is very Interest- lem. 

independMit groups called, with ing. It shows that folks are the Long 

tongue in clieek, "Holy Roll- same anyway you look at it. they w^ 

ers " They've got the same emotions, i)eople 

l' know back in mv home the same spiritual needs and increasii 

town, Newport News, Va., as a the same methods of expressing about 

kid, one of my greatest thrills them.i have b: 
was to sneak off to Daddy 


Grace's churcH, sit far in the 
back and Watch the worship- 
pers roll In the sawdust. It was 
gospel music and fire and 
brimstone sermons which set 
the emotions in motion. 

'Could be that white folks 
'felt the spirit" the same way 
and gave out with their own 
gospel music but I have al- 
ways had the feeling that this. 
like the spirituals, belonged to 
Negroes. 

OTwnight Sensation' 

Well, all of a sudden, in Chi- 


Prejudice 
Grows in 
It Brltainl 

)N— Sir James Crow is 
Great Britain's new- 
lost perplexing prob- 

iroud of the fact that 
■e "the most lil)eral 
I earth," Britons are 
;ly worried these days 
>unting Incidents that., 
ight the words "color 
the headlines for the 


ery critical Indeed of 

treatment of Its com^ 

large Negro popula- 

British now find that 


To brove this point, as if by bar" lnt| 
design, I tuned in the other first 
night looking for Jackie Glea- Once 
son. Instead, I caught the end America! 
of the Dorsey brothers' show. paratlvej 
Cry ■«*T I tlon, the 

I couldn't believe my eyes a sudd^ Influx of their own 
and ekrs and I became frozen to Negro a lonlals, immigrating in 
my seat when I saw who I larger, md larger numbers 
thought was Frankie Laine glv- from .t; le West Jndles, has 
ing out with a racy veiislon of brought many aggravating 
"Walk and Talk with the Lord." problem ;. Britain today has a 

When I finally recovered Negro i apulatlon estimated at 
from my shock, ,1 called my 80,000 o it of a total popula- 
wife to witness this phlenome- tion of 5 ),000,000. Many govem- 
non and she advised me that ment au horitles are convinced 


the gentleman who was so very that thl4 Is close to the satura 
cago, at least, Mahalia Jackson caught up In this gospel-type tion pol 
has become an overnight sen- song was none other than tlght-ki 
sation. Top Disc Jockey Howard johnny Ray, the Cry Baby. 
^iille^ on his CBS show the And, brother, he was crying But 


for the hard-pressed, 
British economy. 
Competition 

end is not in sight. 


other night had this to say in — except, this time he Was cry- An averige of 12,000 more Ne» 


introducing Mahalia: 

j"It Isn't often that one enter- 
tsiner stands in awe of another. 
But that's just how I feel as I 
present to you our next guest 
— Mahalia Jackson." 


ing to the good Lord. And the groes aij arriving every year— » 

audience ate it up. mostly f 'om Jamaica. Many of 

Music of Hope I these m wcomers have fotind 

I don't know. Maybe It's the jobs, bu indications are that 

atomic age or something. But few can be absorl)ed easily in 

when white folks start going the hea' lly industrialized sec- 

And the deference he paid for gospel music the. way Ne- tions od London, Birmingham 

her before a massi\e network groes ^ave for years and years, and ShefField. Since these three 

well, all I can say Is maybe cities ai{ the biggest employ- 
there Is some hope for this nient c In t e r s. the problems 
One of Mahalja's greatest, crazy old world of ours. created If or the goverranent 
fans in Chicago is the Sun- 'CaUse it's Just like Mahalia planners! are enomous. 
Times cojumnist. Irving Kupni- says about her songs, "It's mu- Comp^ltlon for jobs— always 
ret better known as Kup. Kup sic of h<^e." 
is to Chicago what Paul Coates And it Is, top. 


audlenc^'was amazing. 
Ptais* for Mahalia 


one of |the chief inciters of 
racial hcjjtllity as we In Amer- 
lea havej found through experi- 

LEVITTOWN SUED . '^^"\T,^' S''^^ Tt 

I (Continued from Page 1) wife and other 'Hegtoi* who Britaln'st cities. This has also re- 

the court to restrain the agents have been refused apartments suited li Incidents over hous- 

of FHA mortgage insured hous- i" FHA mortgage insured de- ing and, relationships between 

ing developments in Philadel- veiopments. The Pearsons were white wcfnen and Negroes 

phia from discriminating refused an apartment In the Ol- A nea 

against Negroes "^^ Gardens project at Chew ample, 

ThU action was brought by and Wlster Streets by the rent- when wj 

Legal Defense attorneys in be- ^"g agents, 

half of J. Ralph Pearson, his In the complaint, the attor- 
neys ask that all mortgage in- 


Negroes s 
As a resi 
are t>egli{ 
tomers. 
homes y 


tibn In this particular, of which f"'*^,^°""*"« fTl^Pf"*"** '" 

we are unaware' the City of Philadelphia be re- ,^^„ 

we are unaware. strained from baning a person Palnted fogans of a vicious, in 

because of race or color, suiting fature. Verbal Insults 


riot broke out, for ex- 
a London suburb 
te men objected to 
alklng to white girls. 
t, pubs in many areas 
ing to bar Negro cus- 
ront doors of Negro 
e been spattered with 


Much credit, on 
hand, is due the Salvation 
Army, the Catholic High School 
Band and the Los Angeles 
Police Band who were very 
democratic in their displays. • 

Don't fool yourselves about 
Dixie. We do not tolerate such 
action there. When there Is an 


FHA Nomsd 


are ope: 
Ing has 

Named in the suit with the degree 
agents of the Olney Gardens washed 
are Norman P. Mason, commis- 
sioner of the FHA and William 
A. Kelly, director of the Phila- 


passed. And the feel« 
leightened to such « 
at recently a white, 
ign mysteriously ap. 
a wall of a London 
adlng "Keep Britain 


, , . . J. ^ delphla Insuring Office of the 

event of this magnitude down p^^, 
there, we get our proper share 


of recognition. We do not ac- 


The action against Levitt fol- places b: 

., ^. . , „ lowed two years Of negotiations their o' 

^S.rLrtrTlL^ZJZ^ With FHA Officials and Housing have m 

either. Our bands and meinbers ^^^ jj ^ J_ e„i,„ 

of our group are distributed jj^j^,^ ^^ Washingtonin «n at- 

systemaucally all through the ^^^p^ ^^ ^^^ |.jj^ ^^ ^^^^^. 

demonstration. ^^ _, „ lish a non-discrimination re- 

ThisisaNewDay.Theresa „^^g^g„^. ,„ pjj^ ^^^^j^p. 

rising tide of liberty. We must ^^^^^ ^^ this kind. 


peared 

building, 

White 

West Ildlahs are being gong- 
ed and .§ victimized in many 
rent profiteers, often' 
countrymen who 
ed to Britain much 


L C Labor Reports 


protect the advancement which 
we have made, and also keep 
demanding that which i^ denied 
which guarantees the dignity 
of the individual. 
Any 


Named In the suit with Le- 
vitt are the commissioner of 
the FHA; the director of the struction 
Philadelphia Insuring Office of •'*■ 


open to iNegro occupancy in 
FHA mcftgage insured sales- 
housing developments and FHA 
rental nvelopments, wMeh 
comprlse|90% of all new con- 
In the Philadelphia 


_ „# f\r.,^^^ FHA; Harvey V. Higley, Admin- 
connoisseur of flowers i^trator of Veterans Attalrs, and 


Attorn< 
l>oth c< 


""i.!lLy•?!!:.,'^^^"^f/l1"i' Charles E. Engard. Director of ^ha 1. di 


completed until all of the colors, 
varieties and hues are ade- 
quately displayed. 

Edward Sneed Foust, 

Minister 
Walker Temple A.M.E, 
•Church 


the Loan Guarantee Section of 
the Philadelphia Regional Of- 
fice of the VA. 

First Action ia Easit 


The two cases represeftt the NAACP 


first court action in the East to Plnsky pf >hUadeIphi«. 


Defense, 

Motiey, 

counsel, 

member 

Co\ntnitte 


for the Negroes in 
are Thurgood Mar- 
tor -counsel of Legal 
rs. Constance Baker 

gal Defense associate 
alter A. Gay, Jr^ 

f the Legal Redress 
of the Philadelphia 

anch, and David £. 


of 


cull 


ly 

me] 
the 

sml 


dH 


■'^r. 


J |UILLJ„iJ.. 


■J 


1 '■ ^- ,;-(^' ' 

iMrico Soid ^rfile Ground 

for Christian Churcli Work 

Europeans and Asians of 8h«^lv dl^Jnof?£ ^ mlUlon Africans, 
JUtical backgrounds. LfSy SlS^tSi ^c'i^*^'^ "if 
■lans of communication and create ten^^^Sfu''*"".^'?*'': 
eeold flare at "any ♦t«.- .-*ril^ tension, which uncheclted 

hostilltia. 


time Into 
open hosniities. Atmoepheri- 
cilly and politically it is one 
of toe hot ^pots of the world. 
JLBst week in New York a 
fathering of top church and Af- 
rica mission leaders heard 
ajbout one way people in one 
pkrt of the continent are coop- 
eWting in meeting their prob- 
l(ilftis. Their answer, described 
asi "one of the most promising 
developments for peace on the 
continent today," is a series of 
small study groups' bringing 
together widely divergent points 
of view in open discussion in 
the best tradition of the old- 
fdshioned New England town 
meeting. [^ • 

JKnown as the Capricorn Af- 
rican Movement it has in a 
. comparatively short span of 
tipae since its founding In 
Southern Rhodesia four years 
ago spread to four other terri- 
tories and enrolled thousands 
of persons of all backgrounds. 
The report on the movement 
was given by Dr. George W. 
Carpenter, who returned re- 
cently from a-three months' Af- 
rican tour, at the annual meet- 
ing last Thursday of the Africa 
Committee of the Division of 
Foreign Missions of the Na- 
tional Council of Churches. 
~i*These people are convinced," 
l>r. Carpenter told the Conunit- 
tee, "that their human differ- 
ences are not ineradicable ra- 
cial traits, but the result of 
tfieir cultural heritage. There- 
^fpre they believe they can be 
changed thh>ugh education and 
cultural advance." 
I He described the aim of the 
Biovanent as threefold: first, 
study of citizenship in small 
discussion groups; second, prep- 
aration with the assistance of 
experts in the field of a "broad- 
ly acceptable citizenship docu- 
ment"; and third, promotion of 
the document as the basis for 
an action program to secure 
basic legislation which would 
embody these principles in law. 
I Chief architect of the move- 
Bient which, it was reported, 
has gained the enthusiastic 
Cupport of many of the major 
^ganizations ihcluding the 
. lurches, is Mr. David Sterling, 
k retired British colonel now 
living in Salisbury, Southern 
^odesia. From here the move- 
ment has spread to Kenya, 
lehere it is particularly strong, 
: Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland 
ind Tanganyika. 


,J^* R^- Dr- Virgil A. Sly, of 
todlanapolis, Ind.. secretary of 
the United Christian Mission- 
ary Society, was re-elected com- 
mittee chairman for a three- 
year term. 



1 

\ 



rx? 


Thurs., Jan. 20, 1953 



The California Eagl«— 5 


Disciples in 
Fellowship^ 
Meet Sunday 

The Disciples of Christ held 
their monthly fellowship meet 
at the 92nd Street Church of 
Christ, Sunday with a sermon 
brought by Rev. C B. Torrance, 
whose text was "I "Am Not 
Ashamed of the Gospel" 

Ministers present were Rev. 
C W. Arnold, Rev. C. B. Tor- 
rance, Dr. Carroll Baxter Duke, 
Rev. H. E, Fowler and Rev. 
Spencer. 

Other pulpit guests were the 
Revs. A. W. Jacobs, Rev. W. M. 
Wilson, Rev. Arthur A. Patter- 
son, Rev. O. C Jacobs and the 
Rev. F. L. Chambers, Assistant 
Pastor of the Cosmopolitan' 
Christian Chtirch. 


■0¥fEN MEMORUL 
\ METHODIST CHURCH 
PmIIMi oDd Triafty 

\im a.Ri.<-«lHirtli asMsfc 
tiH ■.UK— •ootf N«w« Hawr. 


••■ ! 


■ MISSAOE CWCU AND 

■ raOBLEM CLINIC 
T Ivwy Friday, • PJ^ 

'1120 last 54Hi StrMf 
Itov. Sally tewnMis, Paster 
Salito Jahnaon, N^r. 


i 



. Doctors' 
Pharmacy 

P i ea ulpll ana Exclusively. 

Call For mmI DoUvar. 

4012 S.^Mitral Ave. 

Ab. -(19236 


Liberty Divine 
Teifipie 

5432 So. Centrkl Ave. 

Swidsy School ..... 9:40 a.m. 

NIomlnfi Service .. .11K)0a.in. 

Evening Service . . . .7:30 p.m. 

Freaching 8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday: Kav. A. V. Byrct, 

, (EvangelisNFrophet of Kansas 
City) 

Friday— Regular Service 
(Rev. Hendricks, Minister 
Bisltop H. L Morgan, founder 
Mrs. Bessie Robertson, Sec^. 


Phillips Temple 
Will Dedicate 
New Building 

During the week of Jan. 30 
through Feb. 5 Phillips Temple 
C. M. E. Church will launch its 
official opening of the newly 
fconstructed unit, the Educa- 
tional Building. 

The Educational Building v^as 
built by the members and 
friends of Phillips Temple C 
M E. church to serve the youth 
in local communities. 

Sunday, Jan. 30, 3 p.m., there 
will be a dedication service, 
conducted by Bishop Felix L. 
Lewis of the 5th Episcopal Dis- 
trict. 

Special services will be held 
each evening at 7:30 pjn.with 
open house each day at noon. 

Sacred Heart 
Evening Class 



MorticiansWoHship 
At Hamilf oh Sun. 

The Morticians Association of Soiittiem Califo nia and Ari- 
zona will worship^at Hamilton M. E. Church duii ig the morn- 
ing service, starting at 10:45 a.m. The morticiani are conven- 
ing here In Los Angeles for their semi-annual mi eting. Busi- 
ness sessions will be held at the Cosmopolitan H|tel. 
Hamilton's pastor. Rev. John^ 


N. Doggett, Jr., will deliver the 
sermon entitied: "Recognizing 
Jesus." 

"Jesus is with us in many 
forms. He may be a crisis you 
might encounter, or in the form 
of sickness, or even In a bless- 
ing, such as luck in your work 
and daily endeavors. Thus 
when you see where there is a 
need, meet it, where there's a 


TO BAPTIST MEETING— Rev. Charles Hampton, of 
San Diego, third from left, vice president of the National 
Baptist Convention Inc., left Sunday for Hot Springs. Ark,, 
to attend executive board meetings of the convention in prepa- 
ration for Sunday School Congress "nd National Convention 


activities this year, A delegation of Baptist laymen, business' 
men and professional leaders escorted him to the train. He is 
shown ttnth, from left, Henri O'Bryant, choir robe manufac- 
turer; Celestus King III, businessman, and Atty. Everette. 
Porter. 


Every effort has been put 
forth at Immaculate Heart Col- 
lege to make the late afternoon, 
evening, and Saturday morning 
classes for adults of interest to 
everyone — ^men and women, 
young and old, graduate and 
undergraduate, whether degree- 
minded or not. The aim of the 
program Is to provide the op- 
portunity for Intellectual en- 
richment for all who seek such 
an experience. 

The course offerings include 
Art History lectures by Dr. 
Alois Schardt; Mental Hygiene, 
Abnormal Psychology, Individ- 
ual Testing, and a special read- 
ing laboratory course by Sister 
Aloyse. The well-known Doctor 
Polllch of the Los Angeles 
City School system will offer 
valuable aid to school adminis- 
trators in school organization, 
administration, and supervision. 
Other education courses will 
consider currlcultmi, methods, 
audio-visual education, testing, 
|guldance and counselling. 


Bei-Vue CKurcli Will 
Burn Mortgage Feb. 2 

The Bel-Vue church will liquidate its mortgage on the building constructed in 1949. and will celebrate the occasion with 
an impressive mortgage-burning ceremony on S,tinday, Feb. 6, at 4 p.m. This ceremony will Ije coypled with a service of re- 
dedication of the building and members of the congregation. ^_^^ 

The Bel-Vue church started as a mission in September, 1949, under the board of AmericSn Missions of the United Presby- 
terian church. The missionary was St Paul Epps. who came to this work from Henderson, N. C. 
A program of Christian edu-f ' * • — 


cation in the Sunday School 
was immediately initiated. 
This Sunday School grew rap- 
idly from nine enroliees to a 
present enrollment of 355. After 
a year of cultivation in the 
community which the new 
church was to serve, enough 
Interest was developed to or- 
ganize the mission into a con- 
gregation. The organization 
was effected with 22 charter 
members on Aug. 10, 1947. This 
faithful band of members 
worked and conducted all of its 
services in a garage • meeting 
place for more than two years. 
Subsequently their zealous 
endeavors were rewarded with 
excellent results in growth and 


membership and resources 
which led to the construction 
of a new church edifice. The 
new building was dedicated on 
Feb. 6, 1949. 

This . church, located in the 
southeast district of Los Ange- 
les, now has three choirs, three 
Cub Scout dens, one Brownie 
troop, two Girl Scout troops, one 
Boy Scout- troop and a well-or- 
ganized youth fellowship group. 
Other auxiliaries of the church 
are: Junior and Senior Usher 
Boards, the Missionary Society, 
the Matron Guild, the Altar 
Guild, and the Parent-Teacher 
association of the Sunday 
School. There Is also a day 


nursery school connected with 
the church with trained persons 
to care for the llttie ones. 

The pastor, St Paul Epps, Is 
an active member of the Los 
Angeles Presbytery. He served 
the Presbytery as moderator in 
1952 and served for three years 
as director of the summer high 
school conference. At the pres- 
ent time he Is a member of the 
committee Of Christian Educa- 
tion of the Presbytery. He is 
an active member of the Watts 
Health Council and has recent- 
ly been elected vice-president 
of the organization. He is also 
a member of the Urban League, 
NAACP and the Ministers' Al- 
liance. 


Union Names New 
Officers for the Year 1955 


Mourn Death of 
NAACP Leader 

NEW YORK — The late Rev. 
George H. Sims was "one of the 
stalwarts in support of unqual- 
ified freedom for American Ne- 
groes through the medium of 
the NAACP from Its founding," 
Walter White, NAACP execu- 
tive secretary, said In a mes- 
sage of condolence this week to 
the clergyman's son, the Rev. 
George H. Sims, Jr. 


The Christian Ministers' 
Union of the Disciples of Christ, 
held th^ir second January 
meeting at the 92nd St Church 
of Christ Thursday. 

Officers for 1955. elected 
unanimously, were President, 
Rev. Carroll Baxter Duke; 
pastor of the Avalon Christian 
Church; vicepresident Rev, C. 
B. Torrance, pastor of the 28th 
Street Christian Church; secre- 
tary and treasurer. Rev. F. L. 
Chambers, assistant pastor of 
the Cosraopoliten Christian 
Church; chaplain. W. M. Wil- 
son, associate minister of the 
92nd Street Church of Christ 

Also in attendance at the 
meeting were Rev. H. E. Fowler, 



CONNER'JOHNSGN CO., INC. 

1M0 ust snwmwTH imn . riosna nn 

"KEEPING THE FAITH' 


*t\ 


trwwnnan rir> rATTB '— Ttarv to a pnttutamml e«rf« of Stkiet vkteJk mildii all oar i*tltnt$ mtth p—- 

» rUP*el WW eOn/tdnt t. ._JE^Z^..__..__iMM,M,M»MMM,,»m,,„»i„..mi«f»»ii..ii.ui,.r» -ii , i » i...ii „ -. , i.i..i.n»...im.i».i—mmii. 


iMiwiiiiiwiiWBiiwii H i m i wmi w 


pastor of the Western Ave. 
Christian Church; Rev. C. W. 
Arnold, pastor of the 92nd 
Street Church of Christ; Rev. 
A. W. Jacobs, pastor of the 28th 
Street Christian Church, and 
first president of the minister's 
union, and Elder Leon Payton, 
pastor in charge of the 90th 
Street Christian Church. 

Installation was held at the 
Avalon Christian Church. 


Graduation Set 

The Reed College of Religion 
will hold Its Mid-Term Com- 
mencement exercises In the 
South Los Angeles Baptist 
Church. 92nd street and Avalon 
blvd.. Tuesday night (Jan. 25), 
1955. The Rev. William H. John- 
son will deliver the Commence- 
ment Address. 

Ministerial Diplomas, Certifi- 
cates of Advancements. Pro- 
gress and Credit will be award- 
ed the students who have suc- 
cessfully completed the re- 
quired Courses of Study. 


The Bel-Vue church will cel- 
ebrate Its signal achievement 
with a week of services begin- 
ning Sunday, Jan. 30 and end- 
ing Feb. 6. 


Henri O'Bryant 
Seeks ^25,DII0 
Robe Order 

Choir robe manufacturer 
Henri O'Bryant planed to Hot 
Springs. Ark., on Tuesday where 
he will confer with the National 
Baptist Convention Inc. execu- 
tive board concerning an esti- 
mated $25,000 robe contract. 

O'Bryant's firm is seeking to 
furnish special robes for the 
featured 1000 voice chorus at 
the Baptist's national conven- 
tion and for youth choirs ap- 
pearing at the annual Sunday 
School Congress In AUantic 
City next June. 

The meeting In Nashville. 
Tenn., next September will 
mark the 75th anniversary of 
the National Baptist Conven- 
tion, Inc. O'Bryant said he is 
submitting a unique robe motif 
for that occasion. 

O'Bryant plans to spend sev- 
eral days on business in Chica- 
go, his former home, before re- 
turning to Los Angeles. 


92ND STREET 

(Christian) 

CHURCH OF CHRIST 

UNDINOMInAtiONAI CON6REGATION-AU AM WIICOME 
1478 I. 92nd St. | Offic* 7.2S25 

Sunday School 9:45-Morning Worship 1 1KW AJM. 

Christian Endeavor 6:30 P.M.-Ev«ning Worship 7:30 P-M. 

Our Day Nurfry Opmt Daffy to thm Pubffc 
< I Houn: 6:30 A.M. to 6:30 PM. - . 

Comolius W. Arnold, MinUtor-LO. 7-2834 ' 

Sunday School 9:45 AJA.-Memin9 Wenhip T1:00 AM. 
Everyone WelcenM 


Your f rl«i|d In 
of Sorrow 


'when sorrow strikes, with the pass- 
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pays all expenses regardless of how little 
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for free Information, today. No obligation. 


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At time of need. It is not 
sarcifice the beauty of a finer fu 
the sales of economy.. Angelus' 
Funeral Pre-Arrangement Plan 
every detail to be arranged in 
quickly, efficiently, pleasantly, 
for complete Informotifin. 


sry to 

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advance— 

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ANGELUS 


% 


challenge, accept It, where 
there's an opportu lity for serv- 
ice, answer it aim you'll find 
Jesus and It will 1* a blessing," 
the Rev. Doggett aid. The Sen- 
ior Choir, directed by A. C. Bil- 
brev^, will furnisl the music. 
The Hamiltonian I Circle meets 
at the home of Mi 3. E. Kemper, 
223 W. 70th St., pHine TW. 2854. 
Melonee A. Smitrais chairman. 
At 7 p.m. the ahool of Mis- 
sions, sponsored py the Com- 
mission on Miskijtns, presents 
Charles SchermerHom, who will 
tell of the "Comjnunity Prob- 
lems of Our Children." Scher- 1 
merliom was an Administrator 
of the child-feeding program In 
Greece, for the Uaited Nations, 
and remained Injthat capacity 
with the UN for five years. He 
is now superintendent of the 
Plaza Communitj| Center, well 
known in the "citir for Its out- 
standing work ill the commu- 
nity. 



\\\ 


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718 EAST ANAHEIM BOULEVARD 


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HEAR J. RAYMOND HENDERSON, PASTOR SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH, 24TH ST. AT GRI 


I 11 A.M. "THE CHALLENGE OF THE CITT' — DR. HENDERSON 

ARI VOli A NiWCOMIR TO LOS ANGELES? VISIT US BEFORE JOINING ANOTHER CHURCH ^ 


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6-TIm Califernia lagl« Thurs., Jan. 20, 1955 



orns 


is ii^dfu. 


'S 


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JOHNNY MORRIS 



f\ 


Don't ret that smile on the picture above fool you. 
;This is the time of the month when I lay all my gripes 
end to end. So look around, all you shoe-shoppers, and 
see if you can find one that fits you^ And I hope I 
!|>inch a lot of toes. 

Number one on my Spit Parade is Olympic Audi- 
*-torium. Watching a poorly officiated fight end in a rot- 
ten decision is bad enough. But when I have to watch 
it while seated on a plank in the rear of the auditorium 
Xyfith ringside ticket stubs in my pocket), I think! that 
more has been Injured than the portion of my anatomy 
which was exposed to the board. 

's ■ The usher proffered some inane excuse which had 
as its major premise the fact that a thousand seats 
were missing. My seats were there. I showed them to 
him. And although he said he couldn't move the peo- 
ple witfiout further confusing the situation, an assertion 
which I finally accepted, I later noticed from my pine 
perch ihat he was moving other people from seats to 
accOmibodate the rightful possessors. Still another 
personal observation which I made was that all the 
downtown scribes were seated at ringside as peF ar- 
rangement. I wondered when I walked in why I didn't 
see more brown faces. Now that I know, there will be 
one mcire among the missing, unless the stigma of par- 
tiality lis unequivocally removed. 

I'm not blaming the boys downtown. It's not their 
fault iff they get the honey while the bees sting us. It's 
probably our fault, as I've said before, for accepting the 
humilis.ting incivilities to which we have been subjected 
for so long. Whether my tan "Brothers bf the Pen" 
have tlie guts or not, I intend to make my position 
dear. [Here are my open letters to the people con- 
cerned: 

BABE McCOT. owner of Olympic Auditorium: Un- 
til 700 can contact me personally. Babe, and assure me 
that tiie cavalier treobnent accorded me was. on your 
part, a matter of being uninformed, I am afraid that I 
eamwt find it within my wounded dignity, among other 
tilings, to again grace your auditorium. If it wasn't 
your fault, an apology is not needed; if it was. one won't 
b« acceptedi My only eye is to the future. I shan't 
•Tea move towards 18th and Grand unless I am rea- 
«oiiably surcM^ that there will be no |itatic. 

DAN REEVES, president of the Los Angeles Ranjs: 
Maybe your^room wasn't big enough when you cleaned 
boose, so you'd better get yourself a good vacuum 
cleaner with ALL the attachments and go back through 
your front office. Z knew that there are a lot of un- 
desirable conditions which you would not hesitate to 
cenect if only they were brought to your attention, and 
I should like to make you cognizant of one now. To 
wit, I do not enjoy the accmnmodations afforded the 
Negro Press. Contrary to advance reports, it not only 
girts pretty co^ in California, but it even rains occa- 
iioaally. X should like to sit in the nice warm press 
BOX. Not that I feel that it would be an honor or a 
aovelty to mingle with the paler set. I simply find be- 
ing constantly exposed to the elements a bit uncom- 
fftrtflfrK And I don't exactly relish being regarded 
qniBieany. «u if I were the village half-wit whenever I 
attempt to get on an elevator marked "PRESS." 
[.- I dMdl await with confidence, Mr. Reeves, a reply 
from yon, and not one of your self-important hirelings, 
iegoidiag this matter. 

THE LOS ANGELES ANGELS: BasebaU season is 
practically upon us, so your cpse is almost hopeless. 
Bdlry and X are already looking forward to seeing the 
Hollywood Stars in action. 

FORREST TOOGOOD, USC basketbaU coach: You 
mode the statement that you were proud of your boys 
after last weekend's games against UCLA. If this is 
tme, yea probably, thank heavens, stand alone. I'll 
bet even *^our boys" aren't too proud bf themselves. 
Pediaps you just didn't hear your two stars yelling the 
racial sobriquet which i always bears a poignantly de- 
grading connotation wlienever a member of the feared 
**Brown Brigade" got the baU. If you didn't then you 
either left your hearing aid at home or the bedlam that 
signed drowned it out before it reached yon, because 
even the parking lot attendant compMniA. 

If yon think Tm through beefing, jnSt turn to 
SHOW BUSINESS ^n the tfaeotricol page, 


4 


TANK NEW 'ENOCH' PUYMAKER 


Popular Tank young;er, star 
fullback on the Los, Angeles 
Bams pro football team, tells 


ROLLER SKATING 
SKATIUH 


POST-XMAS 

ROLLER SKATE 

aEARANCE sinLE 

Beginning Jan. 15th 

A $5.00 skate case gWrnit 
owoyabselvtelyniH wftli 
every pair of skates pur- 



I 'If 


SPKIAl Vi PRKI 

SKATING SISSIONSi 

Ivery S<rt. mom. from 
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kiddies oNd also parents. 
50c inciudins shoe skates. 


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PHONI FOR INFORMATION 


THE SKATIUM 


3S17 W. Wash. Ilvd. 


us that Sunday's AU-Star Pro 
Bowl game at the Coliseum was 
as thrilling an exhibition of 
top-notch football as he's ever 
seen. ;,. 


'Tanker" caUed 
teaqi's victory a 


the West 
"clear-cat 
showing of superior passing, 
puntiQg and offensive spirit 
when it was needed the most" 


-Home et World's 
\ BIOGESr 
DAILY DOUBU 
$12,724.80 

BEAUTIFUL 
CALIENTE 

In Old Mexico 

PRiSINTS IVRY SUNDAY 
RMN OR SHINf 

mTHBnUNO AND lA 
KXC|TING RACES ■« 

\ - . 

2 BIO FEATCBXS 4 
THIS SUNDAY * 

UTILIZES AMIRICAN 

TOTAUZATOR 

PARLAYS AND 

COMBINATIONS 

OAILY-DOUBLI 

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BOOKS AND MUTUILS 

FUTURI BOOK ON THI 
SANTA ANITA HANDICAP 


Pott Time 12:40 


;JOHNS. AUSSIO 


■Ci-' 


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OftL'WieL 

Tops in the country so Far in 
basketball season — outstand- 
ing for their 'performance and 
sportsmanship — the players 
shown have been chosen by 
the sports staff of the Califor- 
nia eagle as the most likely 
All-America candidates. 



BOB COX, Center 
Loyola Univ. of Los Angeles 



Bob Cox, to the left, is 
the stalwart, play- making 
center of tovola, the num- 
ber two smaller college 
team on t>ie coast, having 
lost only to San Francisco 
University. The amazing Si- 
hugo (Si) Green center, led 
the Duauesne Dukes to an 
upset Holiday Festival vic- 
tory ever defending NCAA 
champion LaSalle. Bill Rus- 
sell, over at the right, 6',9" 
center, who is as loose as 
the 'Goose' is the highest 
scorer in the conference 
leading San Francisco State 
team, which defeated UCLA. 



-^v: 
"•-^,- 



After watching elgh^ games 
of basketball in the Oty High 
School Tournament Saturday 
at Venice High, andl sitting 
from 10 a.m. until 10 t.n. the 
old man finds it prettj^ ruff to 
sit down and peck oiit these 
few lines this week. Til know 
better next Saturday for the 
second round. So if youl see me 
with a pillow andjunch, you'll 
know where I'm headed. 

'The games ran Just about 
true to expectation, \^dth all 
the Pre-Tournament flavorltes 
winning the first round except 
Polytechnic, the Eastemj dhamp. 


BOWLING 


— with — 



LEWIS RUSS 


SIHUGO 'SI' GREEN, Forward 
Duquesne University 


BILL RUSSELL, Center 
University of San Francisco 


Mays to 'Cover' Baseball Book 


Willie Mays, brilliant out- 
fielder of the New York Giants, 
has been selected as "cover 
boy" for the 1955 "edition of 
Dell's "Baseball Annual." 
which goes on sale at news- 
stands throughout the nation 
this week. 

A national survey of the Dell 
Publishing Company circula- 
tion field force preceded the 


cover selection. The field men 
reported that Mays' popularity 
extended beyond/ the Polo 
Grounds, beyond the area of 
the National League, to the 
entire country. Accordingly, 
the smiling Willie— in a full 
color portrait made at the Polo 
Grounds by Photographer Da- 
vid Preston — was emblazoned 
on the front cover of "Base- 
ball Annual's" fourth edition. 



MAHOGANY MAGICIANS— fieece \G90se' Tatum, Wal- 
ter 'Tiny Dukes and 'Bad' Bill Garre^ are a trio of Abe 
Saperstein's fabulous Harlem Globetrotters scheduled for a 
three, day stvish fit Shrine Auditorium \Feb. 3rd and Pan 
Pacific Feb. 5th and 6th. 1 


RACING 



T 


RflMSEir 



G*org« RamMy 


Santa Anita will feature 
three big races this week: Be- 
ginning Wednesday with the 
$20,000 San Vicente Stakes, for 
3-year-oIds at seven furlongs; 
Saturday, Jan. 22, the week-end 
highlight events will be the 
$20,000 Santa Maria Handicap 
for fillies and mares 3-year-olds 
and up at a mile and one quar- 
ter, and the $25,000 San Marcos 
Handicap on the turf for 4ryear- 
olds and up at a mile and orie- 
quarter. 

Horses to watch at Santa 
Anita and Caliente in Mexico: 

At Santa Anita 

IRISH EMERALD-lThis baby 
can fly. 

HUMBLE HEART— Don't let 
this one get away. 

NOWYUGO— Tab this one for 
my special. 

ISABU— Will bring home the 
bacon at big odds. 

HEAIHER HAWK — Comes 
from a very smart stable. Tab. 

CUNNAMULLA — Didn't run 
her race last out. Watch. 

NOVARULLAH — Loves the 
turf course. Sharp now. Home 
free next out. Get yours. 

CORRESPONDENT — Fit and 
sharp as they come. 

BEDARNED— Waiting for the 
right spot. Tab. 

COUNTESS FLEET — This is 
my real goodie. 

This column gave you last 
week: Money Order, $5.90; Our 
Merhf. $34.20; Fighting Jane, 
$6.10, and Porterhouse, $4.00. 
Keep this column for future ref- 
erence. 




+ Finest 
Food 


Superb 
Cocktails 


+ PartieSr>P 
Welcomed 


i^Vew y^rieans *^eafood grotto 

2820 W. Jefferson at Ninlli ' RE. 4-0901 


At Colieote 

TOSO — Maiden 2-year-old, 
ready for the charmed circle. 

TAKE THE LEAD— Look out 
for this orte. j 

DONT QUOTE ME— Fit as a 
fiddle. 

V. JOY— Will bring joy next 
time out » 

SPRING BREEZE — From a 
smart stable. Tab. 

WAR REPORTER — My big 
special. 


Sporty 
Bulletin 

Sugar Bay Robiuon. the 
night dub fottened ex-cham- 
pion, was misused for ten 
rounds Wednesday night by 
Ralph "Tiger" Jones. Jones took 
awrything Ray could give and 
gerve back twice as much. 

This mokes the Eagle sports 
staff look good. Roy's discqp- 
pointment was predicted on 
this page weeks ago. 


table 


lywood, the big wheel 
alley League. 
Fernando killed Poly 
th the Tigers holdbitf 
aious SUas WilUai^ 
the Eaitem league's top somr^ 
to 10 ] oints and blanked his 
runnin; mate. Green. 

I> tn SCARE EAST 
Watc ing Hollywood in ttw 
pre-gac e warm-ups brought 
oh's ai d ah's from the cxmrd 
as the sheiks, with a team of 
six fool ;rs, were dumping lay- 
ups ov r the rim of the has* 
ket, bu : it didn't impress En 
ten, G avett, Werhas, Maran- 
dim ar i Co., as the little Pe- 
dro Pif tes saw to it that tit* 
lads fr m the land of Make* 
(Continued on Page 11) 


Theever unpredic 
'Timber Ticklers" of tlie Sim- 
set Bowling League bonibarded 
the wood Saturday night to 
dazzle the kibitizers and blank 
"Band B" three games 
at the studio bowl. The team 
bowling like ole pros oit of a 
hot shot league pounded the 
pins for a 3173 series bMt ever 
recorded in this league 
Timbler Topper 

L. V. Miller practically an 
unknown walloped the tiinbers 
and mowed the stuff down to 
gloat over 214,221 aiid 243 
games for a 678 series another 
top for the books. His team- 
mate F. Simpson also was 
shooting his wad in coming up 
with a 605 and Vem Metoyer 
was crowing over a 598 series 
nothing to sneeze at. 

Over on another pair of alleys 
Billie Hampton, the pocket ball 
cutie, had found the range and 
was sweeping the lanes with 
strikes and stacldng the logs 
up for a 656 well bowled series. 
James Mackey was blowing his 
top in tumbling the sticks for a 
598 series. Their teafh "Grand 
Central Barbecue" trounced 
"Dedricks" thrpe gtbnes to none. 
'Seribe* Sizzles 

Close by it was heard that 
Rip Van Wrinkle had awakened 
as "Neal's Liquors" was blast- 
ing the maple and pouring it oh 
to upset "Lee's Hi Hats" three 
games to none. Yours truly 
sparked the attack with a 561 
and the Lawrence brothers 
scrambled the splints and 
plowed em under Floyd for a 
559 and Larry a 544 series. 

The "Lewis Brothers" rolled 
over "Brown Motors" two 
games to one. Albert Singletaiy 
and Wilbur. Lewis charging 
their team. 

"Garretts" sowned the "Pick- 
uppers" two games to one. 
Frank Garrett and Jim Hill 
supporting the punch. 
Solid Sportsmen 

In racking the wood back, 
howlers who deserve mention- 
ing for their good celan sports- 
manship^ Junie Green, Chuck 
Ballancef, Johnny Gardner and 
Albert Singletary. 


Meet Tank Yonoger 




LOS ANGELES RAMS' ACE FULLBACK 

SELLING CHEVROLETS 

■■'''• AT ■ 

EliOC 

tl|lEVROLET 

•7M LONO MACH ILVD., SOUTH GATI 
SnVICI MPT. ONN 34 htS. LOraln 7-2121 

^ DAILY 


1 

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* — I 




[LEY POWELL, bat- s 
ffht hand and oZ/Ti 
ans Friedrich, Get' . 
•yweight great, in a 
c-main eventer at 
mpic Auditorium Fri- 
day, J tnuary 21. Powell, 


exS. 1. 
will no 

Other 

ever, 
13. 


49 er football great,- 
be seen, over television, 
co-featurf 'will, how- 
» viewed over KCOP 




SMTV 


.jfiiid Mfffra 
ric* ecoJpakfll 
4 ifovMMilt' 



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to mf office I 

iibjr Metro be 

to drive flqrowao 

k wo«id ooec ac lee 

per week dM a 

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Thurs., Jan. 20, 195S The Call brn|a Eciel*-^ 


CLUBS 


FASHIONj 




DR4Md DEVOTEES — League of Allied Arts, fotoviewed on opening night 
of "Detective Story" legitimate stage offering at Nick and Edna Stewart's 
Ebony Showcase Theatre. The League has contributed greatly in time and 


effort toward establishing this worthwhile community undertaking, thus making 
the Ebony Showcase Theatre one of the leading playhoustt in S.outhem Calif. 


lied Arts 
Lm^uelMyi 
Yearns Plan 

The League of Allied Arts 
held its January meeting last 
Sunday morning at the home 
of Mrs. Coropa Bauman. Fol-, 
lovring coffee chat, Nora Holt 
Kay, noted music critic and 
world traveler, spok* on in- 
teresting asiiects of opera in 
Jkmedca. 

'S'Mrs. Gogol, ctirrenGy pie-- 
paring !a book-length tieatj- 
ment of Mau-Mau life Ih 
Africa, gave a short talk on 
Africa. League members gave 
a donation to aid the cause. 
Fisk University faculty mem- 
ber Arna Bontemps, noted 
author-lecturer, will be pre- 
sented in the spring by the 
Allied Arts. 

The group also discussed 
probability of bringing the 
Howard University Repertory 
Kayers to the coast during the 
simimer. TTiis group gained 
fame with its State Depart 
ment sponsored tour of Scan- 
dinavia. I > 


Gompers I^T/ 
Open House 
To Fete A-7's 

The Gompers Junior High 

j School PTA board held its reg- 

Z§^ '^ ular meeting in the teachers' 

cafeteria at the school Jan. 12. 

The group planned to wel- 
come the entering A-7s with 
an open house tour of the 
t school Jan. 22. 

Mr. M. Zabriskie, principal, 
told of a trip plaimed for the 
graduating class to Harbor 
' Junior College Jan. 27. All 
board members were invited 
ta accompany them. 

The PTA is also planning to 
honor the A -9s and their par- 
ents with a tea at the regular 
association meeting. 

Various committees made 
their reports and Mrs. Enid 
Lancaster discussed plans for 
Founders' Day and for the 
group's Honorary Life Mem- 
bership. jiLli . 


^ 


•***s. 


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DEBUTANTE INTRODUCED — Pictured above with Fisker Morris of New York; Mr. Neat Bradford, father; 
lovely Anne Louise Bradford is her Godmother, Mrs. Thomas Anne Louise Bardford^ and Mrs, Cornelia Bradford, mother. 


THOMAS-ROBINSON NUPTIALS— Catherine Thomas, daughter > 
L. Thomas of Paducah, Ky., was married to John Wyndell Robinson, 
Robinson. **> ' 


V. Jini Mrti- 
tn of Dr. Baiie 


Important Social Ei^erits 
Make 1954 


Chm'lite Club 
Plans Events 

MoL Lillian Allen enter- 
tained the Charlite Social and 
Charity dub at its first meet- 
ing of 1955. Mrs. Mattie 
Brooks, outgoing president, 
turned the gavel over to the 
new president, Mrs. Vivian 
Bettis, who outlined plans for 
social and charity events for 
the year. 

Installation of officers will 
■be held at WiUandel Club 
house March 6. New officers > 
are Mrs. Bettis; Hermaine 
Washington, vice president; 
Kebecca Alexander, secretary; 
Lillian Allen, treasurer; Max- 
ine Taylor, chaiplain and Lil- 
lian Tyus, reporter. Mrs. Jean 
.Monroe Is a new member, 
i One of the club's prime 
[events for the year will be its 
' East^ Dansante at the Calif- 
omia'Club. Tickets are now on 


V 


'Charity 12' 
Gives Funds 
To Needy 

Mrs. Selma Simon was the 
hostess to the "Charity 
Twelve" club Sunday, Jan. 16, 
at 2925 10th avenue. 

Committees reported on the 
very successful affair given 
recently at the Town Tavern, 
and the members expressed 
their sincere appreciation to 
Mr. Eddie Atkinson for his 
cooperiation. 

Plans were Initiated on a 
program to prepare a basket 
for a needy family during the 
coming months. Money was 
also aUoted to a needy fami- 
ly, and other funds were set 
aside for use by the Boys 
Home. 

The next meeting at the 
club is scheduled at the home 
of Ametta Rogers. 

Women s Council 
Plans Luncheon 

The National Coimcfl of 
Negro Women will spoYisbr a 
luncheon for Negro History 
Week on Feb. 19 at the Nika- 
bob restaurant. Mrs. Vivian 
Mason of Washington will be 
the'speaker. Reservation^'may 
be. made through Mrs. Alice 
Muon^and Dr. Vada Somer- 
ville. 


The year 1954 abounded in important 
social affairs, outstanding for their 
beauty, imagination and significance. 

Among the many hundreds that were 
held during the 12 months just past, it 
would be difficult indeed to select any 
one wedding, any particular anniver- 
sary celebration or any single club 
gathering as the most noteworthy of all. 

The Eagle, therefore, this year has 
chosen only a few representative func- 
tions to highlight in its yearly review 
with the hope of demonstrating the 
highly varied and entertaining fare en- 
joyed by the community throughout the 
past year. 

Pictures on this page and the next 
give but a brief glimpse into the ever- 
changing, ever-intriguing, ever-delight- 
ful social life of the community. 

There are pictured here the signifi- 
cant affair given by the League- of Al- 
lied Arts at the opening night of "De- 



tective Stoi*y" at Ebonjj Showcase The- 
ater; one of the many I beautiful wed- 
dings that occurred duiing the yestr; a 
debutante's party; a p« arl anniversary 
marking the conclusioi^ of 30 years of 
life together of two of the city's most 
loved citizens; i \ 

The preoedent-settinj first annual 
Urban league ball; pict ires of a repre- 
sentative men's club aild a representa- 
tive women's- club; and i view taken at 
one of the many delight ul local parties^ 

The "Eagle" has beei happy to wel- 
come to its social pagesi during the past 
year these groups and ^ le niany others 
whose pictures we hav« enjoyed print- 
ing, r • 

We look forward to 1 laving you all 
with us again in 1955, ; not once, but 
many times, so that thi !)ugh the medi-« 
um of the newspaper y< u can relive in 
retrospect the gay anf hsippy* hours 
mirrored here. 



PEARL ANNIFERSARY^-CeleknUuif their tUrtittkinm. ^ 
vertary with an elaboratt party art seated: Mr. nd Mru \ 


Bertr^ Tmcker, sitrromnded hy the lovely hostesses wkn' 
gmcUmsly attended the guests. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker art 


amoMf tit hast known and test loved coup, !s m\ tkt lacal 
community. 


/ 


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Afi#D£ CONTRIBUTION— Pictured above are officers 
of the popular Zenith Charity and Social Club which received 
tome of the most outstanding an-ards last year for its philan- 


thropic work. This club donated over eleven hundt'ed- dollars 
to the Exceptional Children's Opportunity School located in 
South Los Angeles. 


^ * 



20 YEARS JGO—Gaylords Social. Jthletic and Charity 

■ Club was organized by an outstanding group of young men 

following high school graduation. During the double decade 

of their existence Gaylords hate established themselves in 


communities throughout the city as important factors of civic 
life. Gaylords subscribe unanimously to membership in the 
NAACP, Urban League, and the country's oldest Negro 
newspaper. 


t 


I 


M 


X 




-i- L 


Ho|ilie Steed 
Bridge Player 
Of the Year 

Hbllib E. Steed was named 
bridge player of the year, 1954, 
by the kibitizers of the Amer- 
ican Bridge Aasn. this week. 

'StMd ^tn» high point winner 
at the American Bridge Asso- 
ciation national tournament 
held last August in Oakland. 
The West now boasts of hav- 
iag four life Masters: HoUie 
Steed, J. D. Dunn, May Denton, 
and Beatrice Reeves. 

The Angel City clubs set 
Feb. 27 as the date for their 
NAACP regional. All bridge 

. players are asked to hold this 
date open. 

The next regional of the 
"Goldeh West Bridge Assn. Inc. 
is an open team of four, Feb. 
12-13. Ann Daniels, Lewis. 
Woods, Raymond Henson and 
Ellis L. Veil ai-e the defending 
champions. May Denton and 

. Gertrude Settles won the De- 
oonber series of plays. 



DOrS DASHES 


bj DOROTHEA FOSTER 




^tL.A.J.d 
EUcts Nurse as 
Athletic Head 

I Zellen Franklin, 1285 E. San- 
ta Barbara, has been elected 
student director of Women's 
Athletics at East Los Angel^ 
Junior College, college ofll- 
dais announced this week. 

Miat Franklin, a pre-nurs- 
ing student In her third semes- 
ter at East L.AJ.C., is a grad- 
uate of St James high, attd 
plans her future training kt 
the General Hospital 


Deltas Slate 
February Ball 

Bachetor of the Year Con* 
test wUl highlight the Sweet- 
heart Ball to be given by the 
Pi and Upsilon Chapters of 
Delta Sigma Theta sorority on 
Feb. 11> «t the Cosmopolitan 
Betel, at 360 So. Westlake, 
ttam. 10 pJn.' to 2 ajn. Many 
pdaaa and surprises will be ih 
stdM for the college s^ Jac- 
qudime' Snead is the diait- 
min of this -annual event 
Tickets for the dance can be 
obtained: from all Sorority 
iBHBjbSQii and the Fyramids. 


Last week was a lull in the social wtiirl due to 
people resting from their holiday activities but they 
seem to be back in stride . , . with . . . 

Dr. Geraldine Woods entertaining the Friday 
Nighters on Friday in her beautiful Victoria home . . . 
and ... 

Mrs. Helen CSorrott being a very charming hostess 
to the Nanette Club with luncheon at the Wilfandel 
House. Her hubby, JimmY. and Herb Duckett, did an 
excellent job of bartending and Ike Royal supplying 
the soothing music, made this affair one of the great- 
est .. . 

Mrs. Josephine Boss complimented the Lullaby 
Guild on Friday morning , . . 

Tables were set for 32 beautifully gowned women 
on Sattirday afternoon when Iva WashlBgton enter- 
tained her Saturday Aftemodn Bridge Club in her 
South Kingsley prive home . . . 

Mrs. Evelyn King opened her spacious Sixth Ave- 
nue home to some 20 friends of long standihg who 
joined her in a natal day celebration for her handsome 
husband, RusielL Mr. and Mrs. Edward Baugh of San- 
ta Monica made it a 3-way birthday affair . . . 

Who said June, July and August were vacation 
months ... at the rate Angelenos are taking off, I 
should say January comes in for its share as . . . 

E>r. and Mrs. Thomas Kylo left on Saturday for a 
three-month round-the-world tour ... we shall be see- 
ing some interesting film upon their return . . . 

Dr. and Mrs. RoMn Bonnott and their son, Dmiald. 
left for a vacation in Mexico and South America. Dr. 
Bennett will open a fabulous office upon his return 
to Pasadena ... 

Hera Evans off for New York and will take in the 
Mardi .Gras in New Orleans before returning to L.A. 

OBI* Matson'i mom was in town from San Fran- 
cisco for a few days as house guest of Dr. and Mrs. 
Perry BeaL .~. . 

If you see an attractive young matron with Hve 
beautiful children riding in a 1955 Mercury station wa- 
gon . . . then that is Mrs. Leroy Weekes and she and 
the children are enjoying their belated Xmas gift from 
their favorite Doctor ... 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Atkinson. Sr. will compli- 
ment Loron Miller with a birthday dinner party on 
Thursday (tonight) evening. Z.oren's birthday is on the 
20th and Eddie's on the 21st . . . Happy birthday to 
two nice people. . . 

Birthday congratulations will flow Into the homes of 
. . . EUeabeth Armstrong Smith, Jan. 16th; Zepher 
Ranuey. Pearl Roberts and Dr. Leroy Weekes on the 
17th; MUdred Crawford Wade on the 18th; GwendolyB 
Gordon, Evelyn Kyle. Dr. Thomas Griffin and Dee 
Kelly on the 19th; Mrs. Eva Shanks on the 20th; Mrs. 
Fannie Mathews on the 21st; Dr. L T. Smith and Paul- 
ine Slater on the 22nd; Jesse CoUina, Jr. on the 23rd; 
and Dr. Y. Stovall on the 24th ... 

The Pacific Town Club bidding friends to theif 
(Continued on Page 12) , 


Woodlawn Y 
Week Events 

Queen ContMt 
Oh Friday night Jan. 21. at 
7:30 pjn. at the YWCA Wood- 
lawn branch, Mrs. A. C. Harris 
Bilbrew, Ways and Means 
chairman, will announce the 
winner of the Woodlawn 
Queen Contest All are Invited 
to attend. 


Mr 


Baport MMtln9 

Irs. Beatrice Cassell, chair- 
man, and Mrs. Effie Enox, co. 
chairman of the branch Mem< 
berahip Committee, announce 
their membership report meet* 
ing at the branch on Tuesday, 
Jan. 25 at 7:30 p.m. All friends 
and workers are asked to 
make their reports. ^ 

j BirthdoT Done* 
All young adults and older 
adults are invited to the Hol- 
lywood Palladium Fri. eve- 
ning, Feb. 4, to dance to Harry 
James' orchestra and see the 
Y's own star-studded Centen- 
nial floor show. 


Starlight Demce 

On Feb. 21 all teenaage 
members of the YWCA and 
friends will be entertained at 
the Hollywood . Palladium to 
the Aiusic of Les Brown. 
\ 


Omega Wives 
Install Officers 

The Q'Ettes, wives of mem- 
bers of Omega PsI Phi, held 
installation of officers at the 
Omega House last week when 
Attorney Carl Earles Installed 
new officers. Officers are: 
Sarah Payton, president; Ada- 
line Jordan, vice president; 
i^orma Earles, recording sec- 
retacy; Lillian Hodges, corres- 
.jtonding secretary; Ethel 
Maner, financial secretary: 
Esther Wiley, treasurer; Emlce 
Mazlque, business manager; 
Mary McCoo, sergeant-at- 
arma; Theresa Penn, parlia- 
mentarian, Clothllde Woodard, 
chaplain and. Evelyn Griffin, 
reporter. 


Les\ Beau Dames 
Plan Busy Year 

Les Beau Dames Social and 
Charity Club met last week 
to review 1954 activities and 
lay plans for 1955. Among 
1954 activities were contribu- 
tions to Slauson playgipund. 
food and clothing to needy 
families, and aponacring of a 
Girl Scout troop. 



It Is Interesting to note that 
when ordering food in a res- 
taurant a man will usually 
order soup as a first course. 
Unfortunately few women, 
due to the rush of present day 
living, take time to prepare a 
tasty soup. The vegetable 
broth is a good way to gain 
the benefits of the valuable 
mineral salts of vegetables 
which are usually thrown 
away when vegetables are 
cooked and adding season- 
ings and butter or meat 
essence Is a simple way of 
making the soup course with- 
out added work or lengthy 
preparation. 

Meal fox a BoiBT Dor 

Thoroughly washed celery 
tops, carrot parings, parsley, 
lettuce and blta of onion 
bailed in water, pressed to re- 
move flavors and drained may 
be added to the stock jar and 
utilized for soup or essence 
for sauces. This is true of the 
• outside leaves of cabbage, 
"tough parts of asparagus, pea 
pods, tomato parings and beet 
tops. / 

Any meat may be used for 
soup stock and the addition 
of a marrow bone adds flavor. 
Stewing beef or shortribs are 
excellent because they cook 
quickly and are easy to serve. 
The addition of diced, vege- 
tables, fine noodles, rice, bar- 
ley, lentils or split peas will 
make a meal in a dish aoup 
for a rainy day. 

The prepared soup concen- 
trates also offer variety for 
this department of the menu. 
A bit of whipped cream with 
a dash of paprika or a 
sprinkle of chopped parsley or 
chives can make a bowl of 
canned aoup emerge In party 
dress. A bit of sherry or a 
pinch of herb or grating of 
cheese will also add that 
chefs touch to the meal. 
Mow Dims for Laftovars 

Oh yes, you were going to 
have that leftover chicken for 
dinner tonl^t Let's fix It In 
a new dress today. Make a 
batter of three well beaten 
eggs, m cup milk and 1 cup 
flour with % teaspon salt Mix 
into a smooth batter and bake 
In large thin pancakes on a 
well greased griddle. Keep the 
pancakes warm until all arc 
baked. 

Now place a large spoonful 
or two of creamed chicken In- 
to the center of each paneake 
and roll up. Place in a but- 
tered baking pan. Pour over 
them the remainder of the 
chicken mixture and sprinkle 
with % cup grated American 
cheese. Brown in a hot oven, 
375 degrees for 10 minutes. 
Win make 7 or 8 rolls serving 
three or four. 


BIRTHDAY PARTY— Elizabeth and Elihu "Dot" McGet 
most sumptuous surprise birthday party of the year ivken m^re 
toasted "Dot's" natal day at Jack "Tucker's Tiffany Club. Leaaini 
athletic and civic Personages from alt over the countrf enjoyed 
"pawty." 

■^iKJSlMiraillinffliBlilllWKIIffiMilW^ 


I >ere 


respottsiUe for the 

than 150 invited guests 

sportsmen, entertmnert, 

Sfixabeth's $2500 surprise 


\ 


Bill Smallwood 

ON THE DELIgIiTFUI- SIDM 


.4nwiumiiiiiiiiii!niHiiHiiBiiBiiiiro^^ 


The Newell Easons host the 
LltUe aub this Friday eve- 
ning. Dolores Barkley and 
Chrystelle Wells co-hostess 
this Saturday's baby shower 
for Janet Reese. It's a matter 
of a handful of weeks now 
(maybe less) for Janet and 
Lloyd's big event 
■■ Margery Stewart, despite 
that tragic fire in her apart- 
ment building, goes right on 
counting her blessings. Pacific 
Town Club, formal, this Satur- 
day at ^e Cosmopolitan 
Hotel. Mrs. Cora Rollins was 


seventy-six years young last 
Sunday. 

Due from New York for a 
visit: The Dumas Redmonds. 
Sarah G.rlffin was hosteu 
Monday night for the Girl 
Friends. Eyeing the calendar, 
seems -to me Adele and Ernie 
Weaver's daughter, Inez, Was 
. due to leave last Monday for 
her new home in New York 
aty. - - I 

Bo9fs# Boggoga oim Csotaa... 

Captain ' Abbott Jones and 
his wife arrived from Ger^ 
many,' bags, baggage and 


to 
ini 
Joiies. 
oni 


Three Clubs 
Win Honors 

The Top Hatters, The Cheer- 
ful Twelve, The Council on 
Human Rights and Les Dames, 
local philanthropic organisa- 
tions, have been i.'hnounced 
as the winners of the Rheln- 
gold Brewing Company's third 
monthly civic awards." 

A trophy, together with a 
$100 contribution to the char- 
ity of each dub's choo^ng. 
will be presented to the indi- 
vidual organizations on Thurs- 
day evening, January 27 at 
the Rhelngold Inn, when the 
brewery will host a dinner in 
honor of these clubs which 
have worked for community 
betterment- 



■ trip 


Circle Dance 
Hoedown ^ 


Here Is a hand which was 


played In a recent tournament 
It was played against us and 
was one that hurt, but we 
must give the opponents 
credit for a hand well bid and 
well played. 

S. ASxxx 

H. AJIO 

D. KJ 
. I C. Axx 

S. 9xx S. J 

H. XX W. £. H. Kxxx 
D. Qxxx D. lOx 

C J1096 C KQxxx 

S. 

8 W N E 

IC P IS P 

3S P 4H P 

.4NT P 5D P 

P P P 


The Circle Square Daneert 
plan their fourt^ annual tree 
spaghetti hoedown Jan. 2S at 
the Will Rogers Memorial 
Pack, 103rd and Sueceis a^ 
■tarting at 8 p.m. 

Classes arc Held every Mm- 
day, Thursday and Friday 
nights. Monday night daaaes, 
held at Will Rogers park, are 
for beginners and advanced 
beginners or those wanting a 
'Otrush-up" course. An Inter- 
mediate class lis held Thuia- 
daya at South Park, end an> 
other intermediate dasi ii 
held Friday night at Compton 
Playground. All daaaes' atatt 
at 8 pJD. 


'^o«th FteT*d 
' North and South werC play- 
ing one club as forcing for one 
round, which explains how 
South ended up playing the 
hand instead of North. East 
opened the Ja'ck of dubs, 
which South took with the 
ace. Three rounds of trumps 
were led, ending in the South 
hand. A low heart was led 
and dummy's Jack was taken 
by East* s king. 
. East led the king of dubs 
which was ruffed by South's 
last tnmip. South led to the 
ace of hearta, then overtook 
the ten with the queen. The 
nine of hearts was led and 
dummy'a last dub was dis- 


carded. The ace of diamonds 
wtis played and all the cards 
in dummy's hand jpvere good. 

Shokr SMm 

Notice that all of North's 
points total only eighteen, 
Willie South's total only 
thirteen. This adds to thirty- 
one, whch is pretty shaky for 
slam. But in this case the 
cards were there, , and were 
certainly bid and played to 
the fullest 

We have been stressing Just 
pohit count bidding and the 
use of no other conventions or 
artifidal bids than ithe Black- 
wood Slam convention, which 
was used here. J i 

It is our contenuM ttiat It 
' is not necessary to use e lot 
of false bids in order to win, 
but each player shii>uld know 
them in o^der to diefend him- 
self against those who do use 
them. And recently each 
player who writes la book on 
bridge introduces hlB own lya- 
tem. I*rom time to tUne we 
will have occasion to meiktlon 
these different systems as 
they come up in the way our 
hands were bid ot^ played. 

The dub force indicates 
from, sixteen to twttty-ona or 
two pointe and is forcing, for 
one round only. It is nottb be 
confused with a fordng two 
bid, which is forcing b^Ame. 
It has several advantages and 
disadvantages, but its fti^f n 
feature is its aimpUidty ' 


crajtes. They wilT homestead 
heqe. The number of chaim« ' 

eager young German-bom • 
brlAes is increasing here. They ■; 
mate a stimulating addition' 
the ranks 'of the interest- ; 

young-marrleds. Captain ^ 
of course, you know »* , ■ 

of Irene and Phil JoneC : 
soi)b. 

:dna Winfrey Ottey and 
huiband headed this way 
soon from New Yorit aty for^ 
a f oast visit Chicago dentist 
I Dr. Slgler and wife ended' 
ther local visit headed for 
hone. Robert V. and Jimmy 
Lu< as have been taping -u^ 
plajis for a leisurely motor 
through the midwest and 
alolig the Atlantic seaboard' 
con e fall. It wUl be Robbief 
firs: thne to meet Jimmyt 
f anlily in Ofaia , 

Mevliig Ught Aloog ? 
edicaL Dental and Phar* 
utlcal Auxiliary board 
Tuesday evening at Mit. 
Beal's. AKA ticket aala 
their much aatldpated 
wilda Dobbs reftital, 
ng right along. Mailbagt '. 
nted, undaunted p«reii> \ 
Atty. Jack Terry lounged 
aloigside Miami's Lord Cal« 
vert Hotel pooL And, Choliy 
Moere. to our aatonishmen^ ' 
ua from Boston, n - 
roup to Philadelphia for addl* 
itioiial brightening up. TheyW^^ 
local bachelors who pOfT 
up fthouaanda of miles awejr' 
here, but constantly. -^ 
lenever someone mentloDi ' 
mentions Jack Terry I alwayt ^'' 
thiiic next of tooth-yanking „ 
Cat| Robinson. And mem'rlts^ 
of 8 leh early hi-Jinks as massl 
a w n g i n' and whoopln' at 4 
dar xs With ftetty and Jim-^^ 
SCO t Bemlce Eblon Smtthi' 
Jewtl and Johnny Randolplb'^ 
Stv • Lodeett.^ Riddle Soott^l^ 
Bet IT Hudson Nichols, the 
Moi rises. Yes, and Caiolyli^ 
Bry mt ^ 

Ta Boaqnet BoTallr ^'^ 
C tnsoUdated Realty 
wll banquiet royally this Sal*! j| 
utdiy .(22nd) at the Clu*r 
Dea iviUe. Martha Davis aM'^ 
spoi oe wlU be sure to kM»t 
thei 1 entertained, yup. Loc*f i 
fMe Ida of Walter White soiij**^^ 
ho« have an idea he iot9A 
vW out our way during liK^ | 
cun ent three months test? 

B andie Staddcland, tlXtati--, 
Thijd glance: Cab Callowi^^ 

busy too this 
Ga^ bash, that iate-Moi 
nlg|t session at Lee 

valley houM for 
Satdbmo who left on tM ;. 
plane. Folks balli4 


'-^•^V^-f- 


FOlllTyNES; LOUIS RIVERA AT 54' ON WEEKEND 



I- . 


- EARL CRIFFFIN-Silk 
tongued salesman, always man- 
■p^^toi.come up one: jump 
ahead of his rivals as he seeks 
; a public office. The Budweiser 
i compani' certainly should be 
interested In this move, as well 
I as rival companies. If Griffin is 
successful in his bid to capture 
a seat in the City Council race, 
it may open new roads whereby 
Negroes can seek public office- 
rat any rate, it's a new approach 
; In these parts, and will be in- 
teresting to watch! 

FBEeI tOADERS— Those cer- 
tain brown .brothers of Chief 
William Parker's set are giving 
glamour to the claim that our 
officers' behavior is of the worst 
sort. We have some of the na- 
tion's finest' operating out df 
Newton, University and 77th 
:Street stations and the good 
citizens want to keep it that 
way. The word has gotten 
around how a certain "Santa" 


SWmGINC A T THE TIFFANY - 



was overworked, and it doesn't 
make for good listening: 

HEV. A. ATLAS PETERS— 
Busy Victory Baptist church 
head, taking time out to visit 
the sick jnember. Mother Callie 
Fortner and others confined in 
the GeneralHospital! 

L O B B Y 1 S T— Several small 
businessmen from the Watts. 
Compton area are seeking ways 
and means to hire someone to 
state their case before the as- 
sembly in Sacramento to snuff 
out dangerous bills slated for 
that area! 

ATTY. THOMAS NEUSOME— 

Newly elected president of the 
NAACP is sounding the alarm 
for Feb. 27. as the date for the 
big membership drive. There 
are 2,000 hospital workers. 1500 
nurses, 4,000 city workers that | 
should be elerted to this drive! 
JAMES EDWARDS— The noted 
actor doesn't know it, but he 

(Continued on Page 10) ' 



Thurs., Jan. 20, 1955 . The| Calif ornfa Eagle->-9 

Siiiiiiiiiiiiia^^ 


-with- 



'C 


Aord 


aZZ K.^^tQLW\ 

Bil!ililiiiiliiiiiiiiiliiiiiilltiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuii;iiiiiiiuiii;iii:iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiii!8iiiiiii^ 

RCA LEADS THE WAY 


BOB SCO BEY and his Snn Francisco Dixieland Band cur- 
rently appearing at Jack Tucker's Tiffany. Bob. on trumpet, 
is featuring Clancy Hayes, the banjo player, on vocals. The 
Frisco group seldom leaves their home base, partly because of 


I 

( : 


their regular TV shoti;. The jazz spot at 
mandie uhich has come to he associated uith 
sounds, exhibits its versatility, as it opens its 
and students, of jazz. L '- 


Eighth and Nor- 
the neuer, cooler 
doors to oldsters 


GOURMET GUIDE 

i • 

lecommencfations for family Dmlm 



a' 


-••r 


<ag\»^^g%<»#^gv<» ^^cx<M^cx»^^c%<M^t 


-f GOOD DRINKS + FINE FOOD 

GUMBO FILE EVERY FRIDAY 




Pmrspnally Cooked by 'Dynamltm' 



Piano Artistry by 

Lorenzo Flennoy 

af the MTast'f Pinmtt 

PIANO BAR 


Wher* Sportsmen and 
ther women friends 
meet to eat . . . 



DYNAMITE'S 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
4701 Central, AD. 2-5918 

OPEN EVERY J)AY: 10 A.M. 24 2 A.M. 


ALAND DIXON'S 

Creole Mambo 
REVUE 

* ANNA WELDON 

* JOHNNY BURTON 

* PAT SIDES 

* FRANCES NEALY 

* HARRIET YOUNG 

DICK TAYLOR BAND 

* RALPH WEAVER ^ 

CLUB OASIS 

Western at 38th 
RE. 4-5510 

No Cover, No Min., No Adm. 


4VAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVATAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAV*VAVAV* 'fc 


IT'S THE MOST WHEN 
f GILBERT KENNER'S Your Host at 



MILOMO 

• DELIGHTFUL ATMOSPHERE 

• SERVING BEST FOOD AND 
DRINKS 

lxc«ll«iit lnt*rtfllnm«iit by 
IKi lOTAl ■! th« "Bl" 

Open Daily 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. ^ 

MILOMO 


2829 S. WESTERN 

(Narthwatt. Carmr •< 29th SI.) 

RE. 9385 





1105!/2 


Fine Drinks • Holiday Dinners 

}Nhmr» fvery Ouast It a Calebrity 

9 CHICKEN SHACK 

and 
yiC S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

JOHN COLLINS, Proprietor 





AD. 3-9239 


Come In and Meet iou ond frank 


[%/* f 'NE FOOD 
\JlL • GOOD DRINKS 

• CHOICE PLACE 

'It's the End, friend" 

ELBOW BEND 

5231 AVALON BLVD. If 


•/" .I 


DOT McGEExtnd BARRY BMNES Invite You f o 

Spend Every Day 
Where It's Bright Cr Gay 

I AT THE 


^jk^i 


TIP TOP 

* 

• GloocI f cod 
pM^e Drinks 

• Open Every Day & Nite 

N.W. COR. 47III & CENTRAL 


r'.^'-i. 


Eddie Atkinson's 



iSXh PI. & Weston 


36th PI. & Western m 



Cuaid your fmli^'i flealth witti 


vuMymmMii iieaim wini 

BEnERIOOD 


CHOICE DINNERS FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY T 
COCKTAILS OF DISTINCTION 
GOURMH RECOMMENDS FAMOUS 

RUBAIYAT ROOM 




of 


HOTEL W^ATKINS 

2022 W. Adams Blvd. 
RE. 2*8111 

William "Bill" Watkins - Host ef Coast 


5-4 Ballioom 
Features Top 
Musical Acts 

On hand to make your week- 
end one of the jumpjpest, the 
Four Tunes swarm into the 5-4 
Ballroom. This is a crew that 
everybody, regardless of age, 
knows. 

Back in the early forties, 
everybody started bugging over 
them as they sang I WANT TO 
BE LOVED, IS IT TOO LATE, 
and. I UNDERSTAND, all writ- 
ten by Pat Best, the baritone 
and guitarist for the group. A 
few years later, they popped 
up on the Victor label with 
COOL WATER and THERE 
GOES MY HEART. Immediate- 
ly they skyrocketed back to the 
top of the heap. Then, after a 
little while, they slid back into 
obscurity. 

Late in 1952, The Tunes mar- 
keted a platter on which they 
gave the old standard, MARIE, 
the most novel treatment it 
has ever received. It could have 
been just another spurt of suc- 
cess, but this time the Four 
Tunes were determined not to 
hit the skids. So when MARIE 
finally began to ease its way 
off the hit parade, they re- 
placed it with a tune from the 
pen of Pat Best, using the ti- 
tle of one of his earlier hits. I 
UNDERSTAND^ It stayed on 
the hit parade for weeks, and 
then they cut SUGAR LUMP, 
which swept the country. And 
before ^he pressure had time 
to subside, they did GREATEST 
FEELING, which has taken the 
East by storm, and is slated 
to be a hit nationwide. 

So you see, there's hardly 
anyone at any age who doesn't 
fondly recall a 'Four Tune hit. 

Rounding out the evening's 
entertainment, Louis Rivera, 
his combo and Hammond or- 
gan, will be demonstrating why 
his first recording. TANGER- 
INE backed by FAT STOCK- 
INGS, is doing so well sales- 
wise. 

You can't go wrong at Jinimy 
Nelson's^ 5-4 Ballroom, this 
Weekend or any weekend. It's 
the most. 


By "CHAZZ" CRAWFORD 

Mike Lyman's downtown grill 
was the site of RCA Victor's, 
lunch for sepia newshawks 
Tuesday. The company has re- 
solved to place a goodly amount 
of ad copy in the hands of the 
Negro press this y^ear. They, 
like several other national cor- 
porations, have seen the dawn 
and become rudely awakened 
by the "unmistakable impact" 
of the Negro Press and the mar- 
ket it serves. , i 

Vital Factor ! I 

Joe V. Baker, the company's 
Negro public relationist, had 
arrived in town for the; brunch 
and other business and the 'tub 
thumper' summed the situation 
up in fine fashion. He explained 
whereas advertising that ap- 
pears solely in the Metropolitan 
papers doesn't always "get 
home" to the Negro consumer, 
when this same copy is listed 
in the sepia tabloids, it's almost 
like a personal invitation. 

Fact of the matter is, ai good- 
ly amount of the copy in the 
dailies isn't even intended for 
the "sun tanned tenth" of our 



i LbCARIBI y 

\\\ ^ ''Pearl <>f the Carrbean" ;^ ' | Corner of Washington Blvd. i Central Ave. 
'Cocktails in Haitian — French Atmosphere ] Phone PRospect 5357. Free Parking in Rear 


Horace Clark, Sr. and Jr., Props. 

HOTEL CLARK 


Blue Room — Cocktails and Grill 

"Where fid friends meet" 

Magnolia Room i' ^ 

"Far dining in a quiet atmosphere" 



QUESTION OF WEEK— What 

well known 'sky pilot' shared 
the same 'quarters' with a 
member of his flock on a recent 
cross country convention? 
Rumor has it that even 25 year 
Pullman veterans were shocked 
bv the happenings. 
'deep .EMOTION— What well 
knewn ^estside 'sassiety' ma- 
tron is soon to become the 
'motljer' of her daughter's boy- 
friend's 'love offering'? 


New Club Oasis 
Great Hit Witti 
Dine Dance Mob 

The word has spread like 
wild fire that for the best 
in e h t e r.t a i n m e n t, a well 
rounded show, loaded with top 
talent, the place to go is the 
Club Oasis. Aland Dixon, pro- 
ducer of the show has gone all' 
out in an effort to make this 
present show one of his great- 
est, a showman in his. own 
right. Aland has added a bit of 
comedy to his dancing talent 
and has scored with the nite- 
lifers. .. 

Playing the show to perfec- 
tion, and for your dancing 
pleasure is the swingsational 
band of Dick Taylor. High- 
lights of the show include the 
exciting new voice of Anna 
Weldon, the dancing of pretty 
and curvacious Pat Sides with 
the specialty, dancing acts of 
Weaver, and to the rest of the 
Frances N e e 1 e y and Ralph 
show add the names of vocalist 
Johnnxiurton and dancer llar- 
riet Young. Put them altogether 
and you have one of the hottest 
package shows anywhere in 
town. , . 


natloi . But they can't be spe- 
cific, rhey have to generalize. 
And < f times you have .to be a 
shrew 1 rascal to know jjist who 
or wiiom will welcome your 
busim ss. Surely you must know 
that tiose resort ads aren't at- 
tempt ng to lure yo\xT fine 
browr frames to their play- 
groun Is. 

Gov ring our beat, we've 
learn( 1 that only a handfull of 
the r ghtclubs that advertise 
exclus ve]y in the "ofay" pub- 
licaticlis are at all interested in 
your fatronage. And you will 
find Ae going pretty discour- 


aging 


way. < hances strongly are that 


you w 

numb< 


try to 
bring 
baby. 


We 


if you venture out their 


11 he treated like a back 
r after being ushered to 


a boo h in the rear of their 
joint. Jut if you see a bistro's 
"pitch in this newspaper or a 
simila one you can be sure 
they'r* making the old college 


et your business. They'll 
you right down front. 
All you have to do is 
have t le price. 

In elligent Undertaking 

hink the Radio Corpora- 
tion of America and its distribu- 
tors hi ve made a wise decision 
to ad> ertise with us. And it's 
far ir ire than a "goodwill" 
gestur . It's highly significant 
of the trend. We wish them all 
the St :cess in the world and 
admin their buoyant spirit in 
climbi g aboard the bandwag. 
on. Th y're helping to keep the 
fhow ( n the road. And affable 
Joe B, ker along with Frank 
Terry (the west coast's sepia 
drum )eater) are largely, re- 
sponsil le in bringing about the 
current move. 


JlCK CHAZfN THEATUS 


INCOLN 


23rri jgc«rtrdl' AD. 9211 

Sfur*i Satttr^ay 

HB IS MY lOVE" 
l"CAmE QUEEr^" 

Bill Robinson 


43rd 


A CiNTIAL AO. 1-9341 
Starti SmulBy 
KIND OF WOMAN" 
1|ML IN me SADDLE" 


Maynard Ferguson 
Readying Crew to 
Blow for Big Show 

The Pyramid pledge club of 
Delta Sigma Theta sorority pre- 
sents it.s "Fashion Around the 
Clock," The fashion show plus 
entertainment will be given at 
the enchanting Californian 
Club, 1759 West Santa Barbara 
Ave., 4:00 until 8:00 p.m., Jan- 
uary 30. 

The music will be provided by 
the- every popular Maynard 
Ferguson and his combo. 


'INAL WEEK 

Jufly Garland 

and 
Jaines Mason 


«i 


in 


ffr 


DSTAR 
IS BORN 


FKi DOWNTOWN , 
la/tofrwunC 
6tl &H1II Streets- Ml. 7321 

ARK.f n ANY SYSnW LOT.NITES.i Sir 


CARSON THEATRE 


-NOyM PLAYINt 


Firtt Nalgliberheod Shevflng 

3 RING CIRdUS 

Sforrlng Oacm Martin and Jcrty Lawti 

I Pius GOLDEN MISTIiESS 

5409 SOUTH WESTERN 


AX. 3r8508 




/^ 


UnndieAFE 

49PLacintnil 

(LiniE WHITE BLDG. NEXT TO SiRVICE STATION) 


BREAKFASTS 

Includes Hot Biscuits 


DINNERS 

C 


up 


InchidM 3 
Oardcn Frash 

Vacatabia* - 
Hot Com Slick* 
Dasaart and Drink 


up 



OPEN SUNDAYS 

U and I CAFE 49 PI. & Central 



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ufrLllOBERT LEE'S WITS END OKNS JANUARY 28 


•/ • * • i 

Parn 

■ : . 1 ^ i , I 



Dobbs at 


Great Artists 
To Concertize 
Next 2 Months 

Three great American musi- 
cal attractions are headed for 
^.appearances in Philharmonic 
'Auditorium in February and in 
March. i 

First of these will be <he 
renowned De Paur's Infantry 
Chorus, under the direction of 
itx founder and musical con- 
ductor, Leonard be Paur, on 
Tuesday evening, February 1. 

V*racrtil« VecalUts 

Not only dofes the fainous Ne- 
gro Chorus excell in Spirituals, 
but also sings such hit World 
War II songs, especially ar- 
ranged for them, as "Roger 
Young". "Song of the French 
Partisan", and folksongs of 
Latin 'America. 

This Chorus is the first im- 
portant musical aggregation to 
spring frojn World War IL It 
,waS organized in 1942 'by men 
of the 372nd Infantry Regiment 
stationed at Fort Dix. | 

Second outstanding event ' of 
these three niajor musical reici- 
talfi \vill be the return of Ma- 
rian Anderson to Philharmonic 
Auditorium on Monday eve- 
ning, February 14. 

Contralto of Century 

Probablj^^he most famous 
contralto of all time. Marian 
Anderson recently madean out- 
standing hit in her first appear- 
ance with the Metropolitan 
Opera Corrtpany. 


— \^hora C^ofMOo — ' 


mm m^^'^^- 




i 


— Uoca lovely \ — 



hir 


HNNY'S 
AX 


MATnWILDA 

^ 

Mattlwllda bobbs, coloratura 
soprano, fresh from personal 
triumphs in La Scala, Mil^o, 
London and Glyndebourne, nbw 
iMi' her first Coast to Coast tour, 
will thrill concert audiences in 
Bhilharmonic Auditorium on 
/Tuesday evening, March 1. 
/ Zntsmational Fororit* 
J- This exceptional singer has 
/^'«ung before British and Swed- 
ish Royalty and has brought 
enthusiastic raves from music 
wise audiences in New York's 
Tovim Hall with the Little Or- 
chestra Society. 
Her Los Angeles debut will 
^ be under the joint sponsorship 
of the Community Civic Music 
. Association and the Alpha 
Gamma Omega Chapter of the 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. 


Kitt Direct HH 
As She Is 'Shot' 
ior Wire Mag 

Eartha Kitt's double - page 
color portrait In the current Ea- 
quire was taken by the photog- 
rapher without her knowing it. 
, According to Eartha, the 
photographer came up to her 
apartment and told her to pose 
on her bed and look straight 
into the camera. 

After a few seconds she said, 
"Well, aren't you going to take 
the picture?" 

"I have," he said— and left. 

"And you know?" Eartha 
adds smilingly, "It came out 
just great." 


SANTJ MONI^A\S—Mr. and Mrs. Joseph If. Spiddin/j. ounrrs bf a Iradinf Mor- 
tuary at 19th and Colorado, are most popular and highly respected, proprietor^. Prou^ 
parents, members of St. Anne's Catholic Church, nnd active in ^11 northwhile community 
underTdkinffs, the Spaldings exemplify perfect cooperation. ^^ 


10— The California Eagle 


Thurs., Jan. 20/1955 


•CHIEF" JSD -I/AW. .M.n^ROi 

examples of a harmonious twosome. Mai 

If omen's Apparel. Exposition andM'esi\ 

IS fast becoming known among faslidioi 

center of "snlid threads:' Joe and Ann art} 

do all they can to make you one of the \mW attractively, yet 

inexpemivety. attired "creatures" in the Sb^thland. 


'',11 arc excellent 

mgh's Fashionable 

(Abie's Corner) 

femininity as the 

\flluays on hand to 


mmni»'m\Mvsv}t «? i imrimtirt' .»wprui«'r»iww'«"i« *«"* ' 



Opportunity wilt meat you tiatf- 
way but wltl net- atareh through tho 
directory for your addrvto. 


BRATh'ON'S 

ACCOUNTINO SERVICE 
1011 S. Wutom RE. S**SM 

MANCH OrVKI 

DUNBAR HOni 
4225 CMtral Av». AD. 3-4201 


REUiF AT LAST 
PorYowCOU«H 

Va 


eold left yoa witti a 
1 that Jbas hong on for days and 
4^ itt quick. It ■ danterom to de- 
lay. Chieaic bronchitis nuy develop. 
Oct a knabottle of Crcomulsioa aad 
B as d& e cte d. 


. CraomnUoa loodMa 
.icv throat and chest mambraaa. 


iMBthc bnmchia(^yMaai to helpkxMca 
and «qwl germy ^lepn, afldly re> 
laKS tyttemic teasioa and Bids aatura 
fight the cause of irritatioa. ITta 
Creoaulnoa and get wonderful lebef 
'it iMt Oreamalsdon h g na nin teed to 
please yon or drugyst refunds money. 


, , THE JONES GIRL 

- \ ! By JOHNNY MORRIS 

A young lady, publisher of a small magazine which 
by its title and content is geared toward feminine in- 
terests, has raised a new point in the Dandrid^e-was- 
good-Dandridge-was-bad argument concerning the film 
"CARMEN JONES." While I would be no more a gen- 
tlenian than she was a lady to quote her here (what's 
more, it wouldn't be printed), I should like to relate, in 
essence, her yiews." 

Miss X /recalls that Dandridge refused a role in 
which she would have been required to wear a bandana 
on her head, but accepted one in which she was re- 
quired to shake her hips and reveal a goodly portion 
of her body. Miss X concluded by assuming the position 
that La Dandridge had lowered the dignity of the Ne- 
gro woman. 

I'd like to remind Miss X that only one person can 
lower your dignity — you. And neither Dandridge nor 
the character she portrayed exemplifies the typical 
Negro woman. Dandridge is not an actress by the most 
liberal standards. I have already decried her histrionic 
infirmity until I'm hoarse. But I find Miss X's viewpoint 
deriving its nourishment from a personal fear. 

I Any student of Freshman Psychology is familiar 
with the antipathy-through-identification complex. It 
consists of developing an intense dislike for anything 
which makes the lesser qualities that we possess evi- 
dent. This is the kind of perverse reasoning indulged in 
by Negroes who won't watch AMOS 'N' ANDY, by 
Italians who won't watch LIFE GF LUIGI, by Jews who 
won't watch THE GOLDBERGS. Of course, all Negroes, 
or Italians, or Jews, don't resent the respective shows 
mentioned. Only those who possess the characteristics 
portrayed. Thus, AMOS 'N* ANDY, who are handker- 
chief-heads, are resented by other handkerchief-heads. 
Luigi, who is a semi-illiterate, is resented by other senif- 
illiterates. The Goldbergs, who are thick-skulled Jews, 
are resented by other thick-skulled Jews. Carmen Jones, 
who is a tramp, is resented by Miss X. Of course, one 
doesn't have to hear Miss X expound upon the pros 
and cons of CARMEN JONES to be tempted to question 
her morality. Who was it that said: 

"Search thine own heart; what paineth thee 
In others in thyself may be." 

PUZZLE OF THE WEEK: One night, Chazz Craw- 
ford and yours truly ran into Gene Norman, who feigned 
heartbreak because he was receiving a dearth of tan 
trade. Strange that Gene wants something and doesn't 
ask for it. I haven't seen any "Crescendo" ads in the 
Negro newspapers. Sure, we know we're welcome. But 
I'll bypass a house with an "Open House" sign on it to 
visit a person who says, "YOU are invited." 

Our good publisher, Loren Miller, is celebrating 
his thirty-ninth again today. Happy birthday, Cuz. 


x 


BETTY MARTINA STUDIO OF PANCl 

SOUTH LOS ANOELIS HOLLYWOOD 

Modern — Afro — America — Clawic — Oriental 

Private Leseen* — Screened ClaMee 

■ellot-T«»-aiiytlHn-T— -lafrprotlva-totlit-Tompla Mt l iro- 

Jivo-Acrebatlo-lndivWaal or imanibU Toachiat 

THE EXCLUSIVE SCHOOL 
10357 Croeeue Straet, L A. 2 LOrain 9-5656 


SAVANNAH 
CHURCHILL 
HEADSIHOW 

Little Robert Lee, prom- 
inent Pacific Coast cock- 
tail bar owner, recently 
purcha.sed an ideal location 
in the heart of the West 
Washington district, the 
Cocktail Corner, directly 
across the street from Mc- 
Kaig DeSoto Dealer, to be 
known as Little Robert 
Lee's Wits End. 
Entertainment a Spccicdty 

Having headed some of 
the largest and most 
"plush lush parlors," Lit- 
tle Robert Lee has an ex- 
cellent knowledge of ex- 
actly what particular pa- 
t r o n s most appreciate. 
Fine food, reasonably 
priced drinks, congenial 
atmosphere, soothing en- 
tertainment . and pleasant 
associates are Lee's form- 
ula for guaranteed pleas- 
antness. Complete remod- 
eling is being done and 
will be completed in time 
for the grand opening, 
January 28. Lee's Wits 
End is open, however, and 
the best drinks on Wash- 
ington Blvd. are being dis- 
pensed by Ernest Skinner. 
Savannah Churchill Openg 

"Sexsational" Savannah 
Churchill, international fa- 
vorite of the music-loving 
set, opens Friday evening, 
January 28, along with the 
Teddy Edwards Trio as the 
first attraction at Little 
Robert Lee's Wits End. No 
other location affords so 
much for so little. Here 
you have location conven- 
ience, informality, hospi- 
tality and economy. 


The anceatort wo brag about aro 
thoM who have been dead the long- 


''Pops Tops 


99 





S I NGS^ TIONA L . | . , 
Savannah Churchill "moves" 
into Li}4^e Robert Lee's Witt 
End. 2339, West Washington, 
at Gramehey Place, directly 
across street from McKttig 
DeSoto Dealers, as the ini- 
tial attraction Friday. Janu- 
ary 28, accompanied by Teddy 
Edwards Trio. 


LOUIS ARMSTRONG, his 
trumpet and orchestra, cur- 
rently "blowing" on Sunset's 
rip strip at Gene Norman's 
Club Crescendo. "Pops" will 
appear in another "moom-pic- 
ture" following kit final 
weekend at the bistro. 


^Continued frOm Page 9) 
and the entire Gl E. cast >*as a 
bit hit with thkibojts in trac- 
tions on ward 3750 ^e other 
Sun. eve! \ 

WESTWOOD HO-JrTwo beauti- 
ful blueeyes are battling for 
the charms of a popular basket 
ball player. While the batOi 
rages a cream colored shapely 
wnskin commandsall his at- 
tention! * — 

SELMA SIMON — Vocational 
nurse student took tli^e out to 
host members of her 'dub, the 
Charity Twelve, to lVi| |irst 
meeting of the year! ^ 

MART ALICE J O H N S O ff — 
Wifie of Atty. Morris Johnson's, 
new house guest Is her lovely 
mother from the Lone Star 
state! - \[^]j 

JOHNNT MOHKIS-^New 
comer to L.A. and the Eagle 
staff is a writer of extraordinary 
talent. His first novel Was 
turned down because the mar- 
ket was flooded. He received 
such an encouraging letter 
from the New York publish^, 
he has started working on what 
we hope Is a best seller! 

CLUB CHATTER— Eddie 
Spieght and Bill Lane should 
buzz AD 4-0161 and speak with 
Waller about putting the 
Hllllcrest on the lips of the 
peasants! 

PAT SIDES — the pint-sized 
lovely, dancing doll is current- 
ly stopping the show with her 
pulsating rhythm. This may be 
'^he little dancer's big year! 

CHICO HAMILTON— The in- 
ternationally known drummer 
is being featured with Gerald 
Wiggins and George Bledsoe at 
the Cosmo and Eddie Beal sere- 
nading sun; the matinee crowd! 

EDDIE ATKINSON — Houses 
the fashionable set in his 


pple an<rPlaces 


Elk Daughters 

J. B. Bass Lodge No. 1004 and 
Sunset Temple No. 1198 of the 
Improved Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks of the World, will 
hold join installation of their 
respective brotherhood and sis- 
terhood leaders In the lodge 
hall, 102nd and Beach streets, 
Wednesday evening, Jan. 26. 


you will find ex-fighter pilot 
Marsen Thompson behind the 
bars! 

BUBAnrAT BOOM— With its 
soft lights and smooth cocktails 
is the attraction for the visitors 
and genial Winston Vonwertz 
Is on hand to greet thou! 
batOrl- MAC NEWMAN — Mild-man 
nered dispenser of the bottled 
bourbon at the Milomo and Ike 
Royal on the 88s are the com- 
bination making Bert Kenner's 
Western Avenuoo bistro ^ick 
with a groovy beat! |\. ■ 

CLUB -OASIS — Is the new 
home of happy feet if you are 
moved by the new dance craze, 
niambo. On hand with the 
Latin beat Is Dick Taylor's 
crew! 

LORENZO FLENNOT — The 
tall wl^rd of the ivories ^s as 
much of a fixture on Central 
Avenoo is its famed old build- 
ings. His piano artistry is being 
heard nightly at Dynamite 
Jackson's, the note ring ^ff leal! 

^ TIP TbP— The gay blades ar* 
living it up at the 47th Street 
retreat to the delight of "dt>t" 
McGee, where they'are saying 
one drink goes a long ways! 

IVXE'S CHICKEN SHACK — 
Just a few feet off busy Cen- 
trat is attracting the noon day 
carriage trade in a delightful 
atmosphere! 

HOTEL CLARK — Wliere 
French and Southern atmos- 
phere prevail. In the Le Caribe 
you can sip cocktails in the 
Caribean manner, ana~~«-~few 
■teps away^ in the Magnolia 
Room you can refresh \in a 
warm southern atmosphere 

DONlrX^PBEE— Eagle church 
editor, who ./doubles on the 
crime beat, has the other 
staffers Wondering- what got to 


popular Town Tavern, where you, chick, crime or chiitth? 



JOHNNY MORRIS 

THeI SAND AND THE SEA, 
by Na Col*. Look for it, and 
find it whatever you do. Cc^i- : 

tel ag< in produces the world's ; 
best lacking — ^the orchestra, 
and cH )rus of Nelson Riddle. 
>ESn.VA UNHTG — ~ 
A fel ow scrlbejias repeated 
ly wai led me to_g«t on the 
gravy rain and feature a little 
rhythre 'n^ bluesTTIe^' 
had ne believing that such 
faith a ; I had in jazz mus<t rfe- 
cessari y proceed from a brain 
which >ras smalleiutltfui * 
at fullj aatttrlty Tlieh one rtlght, 
as I M ; pecking out^driveUbr 
my fe low morons; T heard 
loraeth hg that was as foreign 
;o L.A. radio stations as a tee- 
totaler is tothe-©5^^r^Arxti! 
jocKey- wasTpIaying-two-ttecerrtr 
:records back to back. And then 
I thoui h the guy-^mii) 
either ^wned-thelifation or was 
for some guy he didn't 



like. H Jcept-ptaying jam after 
JstftrT: imped on the phone and 
found put who he was. His 
name i i Walt DeSUTO. 

We W terviewed each other onr— 
his shi w last week, and his 
mannei is commensurate with 
his goo I taste. He and his love- 
ly wife toes, made me the re- . 
cipient of some real down-to- 
earth g juthern California hos- 
pitalitji He played one of my 
favoritf Christy records just for 
me (If you've been reading me 
for an; length of time, you 
know tiat it was MIDNIGHT 
SXXN.) ; *Ve had a ball, and I 
came i way feeling that I had 
foimd 1 le one person who was 
doing i lore for jazz than any- , 
one on the West Coast. Sound 
fantast :? Dig KFVD Scrtuzdor 
night f om 10:00 'til l:Od. 
THE RUG 

Whil| sitting in the Coj^tol 
offices, chatting with Merrilyn 
Honunt nd. I looked around and 
saw om of mj' dream'muslcians 
stroll i I. It was Pete Rugolo. 
in my c )inion the world's great- - 
est an mger (Trade Mags be 
censore 1). The Rug was just 
visiting tho. He's with Colum-' 
bia no' ^ Found out how this 
boy ge 4us came to be. He's 
studied with OozTitts Milbcnid. 
as well as managing to earn a 
BA froi 1 San Francisco State 
College' and a Masters from 
Mills. 

AltlJo igh born in Italy, P«t« 
is as Ai lerican as the hot dog, 
only tw ce as likeable, because 
you do ,'t have to enjoy him 
at badl; played ball games. Of 
course 1 e spent five years with 
Kenton. Then he did back- 
ground aor B, Nat, Peggy, and 
everyboly. Now, as was said. 
hfe^s Willi Columbia (Wpnder if 
he'll bd able to keep Mitch's 
hands plit of his pockets?), and 
has cuH two LPs entitled IN- 
TRODUdlNG PETE BUGOLO 
and ABVENTVRES IN RHY- 
THM. Let us hope that The Rug 
will not become so concerned 
with thl public taste as to go 
oo corranercial, as didTiis ex- 
boss, Stfnley. 

ALTS WAXES 

rd in this particular 

if the Wax Worx may 

by tuning in ^THE 

NE this coming~^t- 

Jxt from lOiQOtUliC 




'i'\ 


Any 
portion 
be "hea 
JAZZ S 
urdoy 
on: 


CommunltY CMc Mvsic Asf'n of Lea Angeles PresMtti 

THREE GREAT AMERICAN MUSICAL AnRACTiONS 

AtuuCA't MiariST vocat iMumuu 

PAUR INFANTRY CHORUS 

PriM(-«j.so-a.so-i .se-1 .as 


TUES. 
PER. 


EVE. 

1. 


D« 


ij 


MON. 


14 
EVE. 


■"■" NICHTtY ■" 
EXCEPT TUESDAYS 


SCOBEY 


SEPTET 

FEATURMfi 

CLANCY RATES 


I2«a w. s<k St. 


TIFFANY CLUB 


DU. 2S2M 


TUIS. iVE. 
MAR. I 


MARIAN ANDERSON 

^ic*t-$3.so.i.oo-2.se-a j«-i .so 

MAHWILDA DOBBS 

LmUMi and Ol y Jabaaf 


Philharmonic Auditorium 


TICKETS NOW 

rmLHAaMONic *uo. iox emct 

AIM ■» Cam. aiaata to. fMiat OMi 


MAIL ORDERS AtCEPTED 
P (fadaaa Mtmmpu^ imvlmpu) 

Tala^kMM Mlchlsaa tSOO 
i«a. 717 Sa. NHISt. « NM. AaaMlai 


• JAZZ FANS STAY IN THE KNOW WHEN THEY (^tO^Hjl-VA^S SHO 


9 



WALT DE SILVA'S 


own 


'3 


azz 


dun 


EVERY SATURDAY NIOHt^O P.M. tb 1 A.M.1 I 




Featured Qh Waif $. Saturday Shov 
WILD APPLI HONEY by Woody Hainan 
) LUSH LIFE by Not "King" Cole 
) SWEHHEART of SIGMUND FREUD 
by Shorty^ Rogors I 

(ALL RKORDS HIARD ON SHOW 
AYAItAILE AT HOSEUETS MUSIC TOWN) 
^MffMrsoii m NOIIMHMm 
READ WAX WORX 


• JAZZ FANS STAY IN THE KNOW WHEN THEY D|0 DE 



> 



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• 

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::k:- 



IP 


issHiMi 
Ads 


^fTMS 


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fggft RENTAL SEBVICB 

jWJ sAve MONinr 

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RENTALS 
HOW AVAILABLE 
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1S41.12S1 L Mth SHMl 
TW. 371 , 


. Ar« row f n D«br? 

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OUT ADVISORY 
SiRVICI 

H»l|» y— Todayl 
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"SpodallMa- 


-Ow iosy Mmi-i 


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"O SKWITT,.NO COaMNniL 

MO uAi mAn 


liOAl NOTIC8 


■Hal AR BMb T«- 

DEBT ADVISORY 
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Ua Angoloa VAndiko 6981 
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NO. 7460 
NOTICE TO CMEOITORS 

NO. S5«78 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of CaUfomia, in and lor the County 
of Los Angeles. 

In the Blatter of the Estate of Slm- 
mle Munn. also known u Senunlnt 
Mtinn, Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against the said de^ 
cedent to file said clalnu In the of- 
fice of the cleiii of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned at the office of her At- 
torneys. Miller. Maddox & SheaU, 
a24 South Spring Street, in the City 
of Los Angeles 13, In the aforesaid 
County, which Utter office Is the 
place of buslnness of the under- 
signed In all matters pertaining to 
said esUte. Such claims with the 
necessary vouchers- must be tiled or 
presented as aforesaid within sU 
montlu after the first publication of 
this notice. 

Dated January 10. 1865. 
DORA MUiJn, 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
MILLER, MADDOX A SHKATt 

Attarn«ys-at-Law 

9C4 South Oprlno Street 

Los Angeles 13, California 

Publish in California Eagle. Jan. 
13. ao. 27; Feb. 3. 1S55. 


IfOAl NOTICES 


8EBVICES 

Union Oil Company •76' of - 
feis finest service in Adelen- 
to, California. 



MOTEL 

rfce People's Choice 

9601. Jefferson 

AD. 3-9295 

NEW MAYLORD 
APARTMENTS 

Wctkly Maid Service and 

AIT Utilities Furnished 

Apartments newly (urnlthcd, 

painted and carpeted 

Furnished 
Singles - Doubles 
^ Bachelors. 
■ $15.00 Up 

WEEKLY OR MONTHLY 
RATES NOW AVAILABLE 
12S0 So. Western Avenue 

RE. 8117 

^DTTALS WAMTED 


* MADA'S 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 

All Lines of Beauty 

Culture 

205} E. Vemoii 

Bus. Phone: AD. 4-2317 
Rm. Phoii*: AD. 4-3392 


NO. 3S9346 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California. In and for the County 
of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
Margaret Turner, also known as 
Margaret Thompson. Deceased, 

Notice Is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against; the said de- 
cedent to file said claims in the of- 
fice of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned at the office of Edward S. 
Hardwick, Attorney at Law. 1570 
East 1034 Street. In the City of Los 
Angeles, in the aforesaid County, 
which latter office Is the place of 
business of the undersigned in all 
matters D^rtalnlng to said esUte. 
Such claims with the necessary 
vouchers must be filed or presented 
as aforesaid within six months after 
the first publication of thia notice. 
Dated January- 10, 1955. 

ETTA L. PERKINS. 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
EDWARD a. HARDWICK 
Attorney-at-Law ' 

1370 East 3rd Street : 

Los Angeles 2, California I 

LO. 6-5184 *■ 


NO. 71M 

CALIFORNIA EAQLE 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

NO. S6W1* 

In the Superior Court of the State 

of California. In and for the County 

of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
George Dunmore.- Deceased. Notice 
Is liereby given by the undersigned. 
E. A. Winstanley. Public Admlnls- 
tratork as Administrator of the Es- 
tate of George- Dunmore, Deceased, 
to the Creditors of. and all persons 
having claims against, the aald de- 
cedent, to present them, with the 
necessary vouchers, within six 
months after the first publlcatton of 
this notice, to the said Administra- 
tor at his office at 808 North Spring 
St.. Lios Angeles 12, California, which 
said office the undersigned selects 
as. a place of business In all matters 
connected with said estate, or to file 
them, with the necessary vouchers, 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice, in the of- 
fice of the Clerk of the Superior 
Court of the State of California in 
and for the County of Los Aasdea. 
Dated Dec. 30, 1954. t 

E. A. WINSTANLEY, 
Public Administrator, •■ ad- 
ministrator of th« estate of 
said decedent. 
Publish In California Eagle Jan. 13- 
JO-27, Feb. 3, 1955. 


UOAL NOnCK 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

7S09 
SUMMONS 
No. 630314 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California In and for the County 
of Ix>s Angeles. 

Action brought In the Superior 
Court of the County of Los Angeies. 
and QUIET TITLE Complaint filed 
In the Office of the Oerk of the 
Superior Court of said County. 

MOUNT OLIVE MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHL'RCH OF LOS AN- 
GELES. CALIFORNIA, A CAUFX3R- 
NIA CORPORATION. Plaintift vs. 
LILUE WHITE, Defendant 


NO. 

California Eagia 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA SU 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LOS 
ANGELES. 

In the Matter of the EsUte of 
Wilia Mae Brackin, Deceased. 
No. 3Sa9«S 

NOTICE OF HEARING OF PETI- 
TION TO BORROW MONEY AND 
TO EXECUTE A DEED OF TRUST. 

Notice is hereby given that John 
L. Brackin. Jr., Administrator of 
the said esUtc. has filed herein hU 
verified petition praying for an or- 
der authorizing the Petitioner to 
Borrow Money and to execute a Deed 
of Trust upon Teal esUte herein- 
after described: and tlut January 
31. 19S5. at 9:15 A.M., In the Su- 
perior Court of the State of Cali- 
'fomla. In and for the County of 
Los Angeles. Department 5 thereof, 
has been appointed as the time and 
place for hearing of cald petition, 
when and where any persons inter- 
ested In the said estate may appear 
and object to the granting of aald 


FOR RENT 


ATABTMEIfT FOB BENT 

Five rooms furnished. One 
chUd. AD. 4-3074. Eastslde. 
UtlllUes paid. $75 mo. 


Thun., Jon. 20, 19^5 The Califoi nia Eoslv-ll 


niRN. ROOMS FOR RENT 


UNFUBNISHEO APABTMEUT 

Three room unfurnished 
apartment, reasonable. Near 
good transportation. 316 W. 
48th street. CaU RE. 4-3642 
<»- AD. 2-9e06. 


peUtlon. 

[by made to the 
tltlon for further partlcrilars. 


Reference is hereb' 

real esUte Is situated in the 


said 


Publish in California Eagle. 
13. 20. 27: Feb. 3. 1955. 


Jan. 


TV SERVICE 

TV defiiiilely repalrMi in heme 
-no fix, no charge. Heme TV. 
HO. f-2131 - WE. 5-752* 


RENTALS WANTED 

landlerds, U«t Your Hmms, 
ApartniMits and Rmrtals wMi 

tittlW INVESTMENTS 

Hmdivdt of p«epl« waWnf H 
■•va in today. 

3S88 SO. WESTERN 

(Acraas fraai Sw i lly taah) 

tt. 1-6346 LO. 7-2770 


Phoflo Won't Reject? 

HaiT« Jamts W. RebluM 
UPAIR IT at 

2120 5. CENTRAL 
Rl. 8-7027 


— MOTOR- 
k>VERHAUL 
$49 to $69 

* Motors Exchangod 

* Cenvaniant Location 

* Amiiio Financing 

A-D MOTORS 

7600 S. Broadway; FL. 3-2172 


DeGRUY 

REALTY 

4305 S. Western 
AX. 1-1121 

• • #_|- • 

INCOME BUYS 


SIOOO 

S2450 
|S7500 


DN.— 5 unit ttuccb. 
Oood rontal location. 

0N.-10 unH stocco 
court. Wcftttido. 

DN. - 17 vnit apt. 
bidg. Oood incoma. 


The-People of the Slate of California 
Greet ingi 
LILLIE WHITE. Defendant. 


Send Greetings to: 


Re that certain real property lo- 
cated In the City of and Countv of 
Los Angeles, State of CalUomla. 
described as follows: 

Lot 1. Block 4 of the George Dal- 
ton Sr. Tract, as per map recorded 
In Book 25. Page K of Miscellaneous 
Records, in the office of the County 
Recorder of said County. 

You are directed to appear in an 
action broueht against you bv the 
above naftied plaintiff In the Super- 
ior Court of the State of California, 
In and for the County of Los An- 
geles, and to answer the Quiet Title, 
Complaint therein jtlthin ten da>-s 
after the service on you of this 
Summons, if ter\-ed within the 
County of Los Angeles, or within 
thirty days if ser\'ed elsewhere, and 
you are notified that unless yoa 
appear and answer as at>ove re- 
quired, the plaintiff will take Judg- 
ment for anv money or damages de- 
manded In the Quiet Title Complain, 
as arising upon contract, or will 
apply to the Court for any other 
rtllef demanded in the Quiet Title 
Complaint. 

Given under my hand and teal of 
the Superior Court of the County ot 
Los Angeies. State of CaUfomia. 
this 24th day of June. 1954. 
•<SEAL SUPERIOR COURT 
ilOS, ANGELES COUNTY) 

HAROLD J. OSTLY, 
County Clerk and Clerk of the 
Superior Court of the State of 
California. In and for the County 
of Los Angeles. 

By k1 M each em. Deputy. 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
Attorney for Plaintiff 
1111 East Vernon Avenue 
Los Angeles 11, California 
ADams 2-«149 
(Publish In California Eagle Jan. 13, 


County of Lot Angeles, State, of Calt- 
fomla, and It described at followt. 
to-wlt: 

Lot S3 In Block "B" of the En- 
twistle Tract ta the City of and 
County of Lot Angelet, SUte of 
California, as per map recorded In 
Book 7, Page 1 of Maps, In the of- 
fice of the County Recorder ot Lot 
Angeles County. 
D«ted January 6, 1955. 

HAROLD J. OSTLY. 
County Clerk and Qark of 
said Superior Court, 
By H. L. McLean, Deputy. 
HAftOLO J. SINCLAIR 
S42 South Broadwa 
Vngels 
ney fi 
MA, 64651 


ZrrCHElfETTE 
ArAaTMEMT FOR BEMT 

Apai^ment kitchenette* also 
sleeping rooms, privileges. 
Call after 5:30 p.m. RE. 3- 
1960. Private liome. 


HOUSE FOB BEMT 

Two bedroom house, living 
room, kitchen and batli. 134 
W. 49th Street AD. 1-1295. IN- 
QUIRE within. No children. 


FOR RENT— Room. For quiet 
working couple or single 
person. Quiet home. Minter, 
1707 South Hobart. RE. 4- 
4306. 


FOR RENT— Three (3) room 
apartment near Occidental 
Blvd. and Temple streets. 
Adults. References required. 
No pets. DU. 3-7218. 


FOR RENT— Duplex bedroom, 
living, kitchen, bath, service 
porch. Newly decorated. $50 
per month. 166m R 40th 
PI. AD. 2-0992. 


y 

Los Anselcs 13, California 
Attorney for Patltlonar 


Publish in California Eagle. Jan. 
13. 20. 27, 1955. 


APABTMEirr FOB BEIIT 

One bedroom, living room, 
kitchen and bath. 819Mi E. 
Vernon Avenue. Apply 4413 
South Main. Inquire within. 

FURNISHED BOOMS 

$25 k $30 dollars per month. 
4115 South Central. AD. 2- 
9192. Mgr, Fuller. 


NO. S58M3 

In the Superior Court of the SUte 
of California, in and for the CouDtr 
of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
Wllla Mae Brackin, Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against the said de- 
cedent to file said claims in the of- 
fice of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned at the office of Harold J. 
Sinclair, Attorney, 542 South Broad- 
way. In the City of Los Angeles 13, 
In the aforesaid County, which latter 


SMALL furnished apartment, 
three rooms, for one quiet per- 
Near everything. $10 weekly. 
433 N. Bonnie Brae. DU. 2- 
5493 mornings. 


FOR RENT — One bedroom 
apartment comfortabiey fur- 
nished. Reasonable. Work- 
ing single couple, single or 
couple share with couple. 
Private entrance. Call after 
4 p.m. or anytime Saturday, 
Sunday. RE. 0573. 


FOR RENT — Room furnished 
with kitchen service. 140 
West Gage avenue. PL. 1 
2248. 


Prep Srd re Beaid 

(Continued from Tkgt 6) 
Believe will |/atch jthe rest of 
the Tourney Krom /the stands; 
(Also with p ilom/s). 
TOUBNAMEN r^^SIT-CRAT— 

Had a chat nth BILL LOP-EZ, 
Supervisor 6f Athletka for the 
City Schooli and he informed 
us the suite t ack meet wUl be 
here this y< ir. Maybe we'll 
fare a little li ;tter than we did 
in Berkley in '54. . , . Saw / 
Coach Woodd i of UtXA, lookj ' 
ing over the ; ?reps In some at 
the early gan es. . . . The Veh-i 
Ice High gyii is a beautlfuj 
piece of hard vood. We under- 
stand the ne w Jeff gym will 
be on the sa ne order. Maybe 
we'll get a toi irnament on th; 


side of town, 


in the near fu 


office Is the place of business of the 
undersigned In all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchers must be filed 
or presented as aforesaid within six 
months after the first publication of 
this notice. 
Dated December 30. 1954. 

JOHN L. BRACKIN, JR. 

Administrator o( the Estate 

of said decedent. 

HAROLD J. 8INCI.AIR 

Atternay-at-Law 

Lot Angelac 13, California 

MA. 64551 
Publish In California Eagle. Jao. 
13. 20, 27: Feb. 3. 1955 , 


LOS 


LOANS 

Hous* Rafincmchig 

M. I. WIBB CO. 

PR. ^37 

Ask for J. O. CcH'ay 


Women Wanted 

Make extra money. Address, 
Mail postcards spare time 
every week. Write Box Four- 
ifien, Belmont, Mass. i v 


ITIXNTION LADIES! We have 
food Jobs, part and full time, 
day workers. For further in> 
ioanatlon call the Ladles 
Emplo^nent Aid Assn. Agen- 
Cf, 3226 S. Central Aye., AD. 
2-9605— AD. 1-3244. 


OOOD JOBS WITH PAY 

* Physio TharapUts 1 1 

* IhrcKtical Nurs* jj 

PL. 3-6509 '' 


REPAIR ^HOP 
FOR SAI£ 

Radle TV tubes fest equip- 


e, phonograph 
waod I 


TOcorde 
and waod radiea. ' 
21 to South Central Avenue 


HELP' WANTED 

In the domestic field 

NO DOWN PAYMENT 
If you will live on the place. 
Cook & generaL SaL fl2S-$225 
month. 

Mother's Relpep-4125. 
No cooking, no refer, no down- 
payment 

Cples. SaL |250-$425 month. 
Other positions open for men. 
Chef 2nd cooks, dishwashers, 
Pctters, Jaintors, car washers. 
22 years in same locatl^i. 

I, 1714 W. Jefferson > 
U^ S-3930, RE. 1-4529, BE. 3M0 


WE NEED 
HELPt 

AMtm* Our Advertisinf Cards. 
Bead HandwriHn^AtlM, 


Box 


SKVKES 


Johnny's Trim Shop 
Auto Tops 

Soot Covors 

«S0O W. Joffeisaa ShA 
Mpvblic 44tS4 


m AUTO savia 

RffAIR 

AU WOBR OUABANIHD 
^'i* Wo MfrafMii ^ 


REFINANCE 
YOUR 


At Roducod Pym'ts 


Call 

it 8937 

Aek for Mr. Coroy 


PRosiiecl 


INCOME FOR SALE 

Two Units. $1500 down. 
7 rm., 3 bodroom plus 1 
bedroom unit, on Socond 
Avonuo. PR. 8937. 


ao, 27, Feb. 


3, lO. 17, 
1955) 


LEGAL NOTICE 

There will be a public auction 
sale Febntary 1. 1955. at 3 p.m. at 
909 Biist 33rd Street. 1940 Plymouth 

six. coupe, engine No. p91516^ '54 
License No. SftSSOS— '54. Tab No. 
4493953. The lien of the undersigned 
(or repairs, storage and other ex- 
penses. 

E. M. MCKERSON 
Publish Ih California Eagle l-iO-SS 


-FOR SALE- 


750 


DOWN 


INCOME 
4 UNITS, FRAME 

niu 


$13,500 


raicE 


BRATTON'S 

ACCOUNTINO SnVICE 

Mil S. Weelora Ri. 3-98M 

BSANCN orrwi 

DUNRAR HOTIL 

423S Coirtral Ave. AO. 3-4201 


RIAL UTATf FOR SAU 


CAR FOR SAU 

jdi So i ^a w m. WMt. 

eMrkt. AIM l »r a l i ll»a offlca 


ADam» 3-6972 
ADoms 3-2063 


GOOD WISTSIPI 
LOCATION 


'650 


DOWN 


3-REDROOM FRAME 

$8950 FuU Price 
Near ■roadway 


PL 1-5680 


Anytime 


NO. Tsao 

CALIFORNIA EAOLE 

NOTICE TO CAEDITORS 

NO. 359987 

In the Superior Court of the State 
of California. In and tor the County 
of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate ol Do- 
menlco Laurlto. Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given bjr the un- 
dersigned. E. A. winstanley. Pub- 
lic Administrator, as Administrator 
with the will annexed of the Elstate 
of Domenlco Laurlto, Deceased, to 
the Creditors of. and all perwn hav- 
ing claims against, the said deced- 
ent, to present them, with the nec- 
essary vouchers, within sl:t months 
after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said Administrator at 
his office at 808 North Spring St.,. 
Los Angeles 12. California, which 
said office the undersigned (elects 
as a place of business in all matters 
connected with said estate, or to file 
them, with the necessary voudiers, 
within six months after the first ptib- 
Jlcatlon of this notice. In the office 
^f the Clerk of the Superior Court of 
the State of California In and for the 
county of Los Angelres. 

Dated Jan. 17. 1953. 

E. A. WINSTANLEY, 
Public AdmlnUtrator, as ad- 
nexed of the estate of said 
mlnlstrator with the will ao- 
decedent. 
PublUh In California Eagle, Jan. 30, 
27: Feb. 3. 10, 19S5. 


ItaratlHcloe. ISfM Malnl Avo. 
Otu to HoolMi oloM Calvar CHy 
i y y^a fcadraai, a ii amlf 

p. p. HUGHES, Rooltor 
2452.A Uncein, Venice 
EX. 6.«272 


30 Units 

Furnished No«r 

Gonoral Hospital 

Gross $19,000 Year. 

Prico $95,000 

Low Rent 

HO. 2-1133 

TEX. 03111 


(California Eagle) 
NO. (664 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY 'OF 
ANQELES. . , 

Fannie Downs. Plantift vs. Wil- 
liam Downs, Defendant. 
NO. D477585 

Action broueht In the Superior 
Court of the County of Los Angeles, 
and Complaint filed In the Office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court 
of said County. 

^ ^ SUMMONS 

The People of the SUte of Cali- 
fornia send greetings to: William 
Downs. Defendant. 

You are directed to appear In an 
action brought against you by the 
above named plaintiff In the Su- 
perior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia. In and for the County of Los 
Anceles. and to answer the Com- 
plaint therein within ten days after 
the service oh you of this Stimmons, 
if served within the County of Los 
Angeles, or within thirty days If 
ser\ed elsewhere and vou are notl- 
fi«d that unless you appear and an- 
swer as above required, the plain- 
tiff will take Judgment for any 
money or damages demanded In the 
Complaint, as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for *ny 
other relief demanded In the Com- 
plaint. 

^Glven under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court of the County of 
Los Angeles. SUte of CalMomla. 
this 8lh day of November; 1954. 

HAROLD J. OSTLY, County 
Clerk and Qerk of the Su- 
perior Court of the SUte- of 
Caiifomla. In and for the 
,r.^.. £9.HEit °' Los Angeies. 
(SEAL SUPERIOR COURT 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY) 
By J. Weatherwax, Deputy. 

HAROLD J. SINCLAIR 

Attorney for Plaintiff 

B42 So. Broadway St. 

Los Angeles 13, MA. 60S61 
Publish California Eagle Dec 30, 
1954. Jan. 6, 13. 30, 27; Feb. 3, 10, 
17. 1955. 


UKPUBN. APT. FOR RENT 
THREE-ROOM unfurnished apt, 
near Occidental Blvd. and 
Temple SL; adults; references 
required; no pets,, DU 3-7218. 


BARBER SHOP FOR RENT 

TWO-CHAIR barbershop; good 
business location; will sacri- 
fice; low rent Also apts. $40 
month. 61st and Broadway. 


NINE-RM. furnished house for 
sale. 3794 S. Westero. Call 
owner, DU 8-461L 


APARTMENT — F o u i room 
modem furnished apart- 
ment Children O.K. $50 a 
month. One blk. west of 
Alameda on 108th. street 
Phone LO. 9-1728. 


FOR RENT— Bachelor apart- 
ment Privileges. Newly fur- 
nished. Close to shopping 
and transportation. Reason- 
able, yt pd. RE. 3-1612. 


FOR RENT— Room for couple 
or single woman, All privi- 
lege*. 805 W. 54th. Call after 
5 p.m. AD. 4-7760. 


UNFURNISHED APARTMENTS 
FOR RENT— 4046 South Trini- 
ty. Large three (3) room front 
redecorated • upstairs apart* 
ments. Separate entrances. 
Nr. transportation. One child 
O.K, $60.00. Also have 2-bed- 
room apts. AD. 4-5210. 


DOUBLE FOR RENT— Unfum. 
$85. double, 2 bdrm. Large, 
fenced yard, garage. Chil- 
dren O.K. Near everything. 
WEbster 3-3716. 


FOR RENT — Kitchenette apt 
One room kitchenette fur- 
nished, utilities pd. low 
rent (irivate entrance. Near 
stores & transportation. LU. 
1-7445. 


FOR RENT— Room. Furnished 
and unfurnished. For a 
single man or couple. No 
children. 1409 W. 37th Dr. 
RE. 2-5739. Mrs. Jackson, 


FOR RENT— Fur. Apt. Two 
large rooms with kitchen 

. privileges. Couple or two 
men. 140 West Gage Ave. 
PL. 1-2248. $50 per month. 


SHARE HOME — Family to 
share home with woman t 
child. Tots 0.K, Lb. 4023. 
Call evenings or Sunday. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES! — 


Dr. George Washington Car- 
ver products. Wholesale and 
retalL Dealers. Agents. 4409 
South Aralon. 


SALE OR LEASE 

Beairtiful'cafe, fully Equipped. 
Built-in brick barbecue pit 
Westside. Also offitos for 
Income tax business. \AD. 3- 
6972 or AD. 3-2063. \ 


ture. ... Wonder if the 
points score! 1 by JORDAN 
wasn't somiB lind of record for 
tournament nay? Every matt 
on the squad scored four ai 
more points, if you're looking 
for a good loig shot the BulR 
dogs look like it I 

OPEN LETTE I TO 
JOHNNY M<Si RIS:— 

Dear Johni y: We enjoy( 
your commer s on the le 
received from|Mr. R. E. Sm 
and as far ass the Trojans, Ti 
in your comeilas I'm also anti-j 
SC, but on the Robinson issue 
you hit my lore spot I read 
the fitst, installment of the Rot 
binson s^ry A the current is*- 
sue of Look, mnd«stiU enjoyed 
my steak (iamburgr steak[ 
that Is) withalut any effect ort 
my digestive isystem. But TU 
tell you whei\^ the juices did 
flow. One afta-ny>n after a vi-| 
sit to your Cardinal Ball park^ 
and was* infonnedx rd have, to 
eat my hot dag in^e bleach- 
ers, even th^gh th^ grand- 
stand was has empty,\ or may- 
be yoir-ean't| remember back 
those few yeals. But thinks to 
Jackie and hn Vulgar Behav- 
ior I can now kit in a bo^ next 
to Busch. All the man wants. 
Is to be treai *d like the Nxest 
of the bait p ayers, who beef 
with the Umi », come in wft 
spikes high, md even thro' 
bats. And I tlfnk even/the k 
dent Cardinal! fans will agre^ 
EBALL PLAY- 
t judge him as 




BUSINESS FOR SALEv 

Radio, repair and record sl^op 
for sale. Tools, meters, tu' 
records, etc, AD. 1-9591. 

MiscTroirsAir 


the man is a 
ER. So why 
just that. 

Yours for 
season. 


good Cardinal 


FOR SALE FUR JACKET 
Silver fox Jacket Evens. AX. 
2-4783. 


BroadcostiDg Unit For Sede 

Practically new broadcasting 
uiiit with loud speaker. 
AX 4-2345 

UAL tSTATE FOB SALi 


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO EN- 
GAGE IN THE SALE OF ALCO- 
HOLIC BEVERAGES 

TO WHOM IT MAY OoifcERk!*^ 
Notice is hereby given that 30 
days after the above date, the un- 
dersigned propose* to sell alcoholic 
beverages at these premises, de- 
scribed as follows: 

11236 So. Central Avuuc. Los An- 
geles (IN). 


FOR RENT— Store. Attractive. 
Good for any type of busi- 
ness, office or light manu- 
facturing. Low rent 3003 
South Central Avenue, Call 
owner, WE. 8-1053. 

Pursuant to such Intention, the 


undersigned is applying to the SUte 
Board of Equalizati 
of an alcoholic 


Board of Equalization for Issuance 

Ic beverage license (or 

for these premise as fol- 


llcenses) 
lows : 

On Sale Beer Only. 

Anyone desiring to protest the Is- 
suance of such llcense(s) may file a 
verified protest with the State Board 
of Equalization at Sacramento. Cali- 
fornia, suting grounds for denial as 
provided bv Jaw. 

BEtTY A.VN BRYANT 
Pubnsh in Ollfomla Eagle. 


CHOICE LOCA'nON — Fanners' 

Market Hollywood Baseball 
Park, Pan Pacific. Cute Eng- 
lish Bungalow. 2 and den, all. 
tile bath aiid stall shower, 
basement etc. 524 N. Laurel 
Ave. Phone STate 0-4287 to 
see. 


EDnOR^ 
sle Boich 
pie of ye<n 
Park lA St 
cold operated 
Browns Bosel 
from ttgngi 
Uces, Negro 
admitted free 


p Scoreboard 

Until Gia« 

iGsed tt a eea« 

'0/ SportSBons 

uis wos owned 

the St Louis 

Club. AsMe 

sealing peoc* 

men weio not 

on Lqdies* Dor. 

Both praetic^ however. 

ntinned 1 efore Jodde Be- 
bidson was 1 eaid of oast of/ 
Hooper Avenvp. 
X WONDER:- 

rtewonderihg if Braven Dy- 
er MtheTlaes would need 
sudi V blt<a^ ing towel If any- 
one other tKai two Negro ath- 
letes had beei picked for the 
Sullivan, awarf, and Athlete of 
the Ye&T'^ 


FOR SALE ~ New 2 bedroom 
duplex. By owner. Unrestricted 

- Low down paj'ment 1(X)9 
Brazil, Compton. Nev. 69121. 
L.B. 39-7006. . 


FOR SALE— Comer lot 180x180 
Ferris Road, near Lake Mat- 
thews. MAKE OFFER. SY. 2- 
6854. FtMdena 5. 


^m^tt^^t^^^^^^^t^^^ 


SEE laCES 


SERVICE?— Jeginners. piano 
class also private lessonSL. 
Call RE. 3-$935 for Informa- 
tion. 


AUTOMOBILES, 


FOR SALE— Automobile. Sac> 
rifice: 1941^ Cadillac. Good 
condition, ridio, heater, w/w 
tires. Tenis. 1412 South 
Union. DUi 3-6958. Private 
party. 


BAL MO. TAKES DEEB '<> 'TJ PROPERTIES 


muni AD HADE ON your real estate i hi 

IVUli Vil mUilC Pay lack $1S p«r $1000 P«r Mo. 
OPEN MONDAY^NioiS^Uifillfs^lM!; 


itil Paid 


UM EL llSOi St — nM Dn.. Rid. Mo. 


17U K. BSnd Stroet — Unite — $SM Down, Rid. Mo. 


WESTERN 
I STAR 
REALTY 

1953 W. J«ffMVon 
RL 4-2538 
RL 3-2025 

V*) Acn 

Pk* whh f-rm. stvcce 

Jk S^rai* ffr^RM hoiMA* 



1218 B. StBd Street — Stoeoo - $489 Dn., RaL Mo. 


IIM B. IMtk St. — $8W Down, BeL Mo. 


107 K tSth St — IS98 Down, BaL Mo. 


im E. 40th PL — 49§ Down, Bal. Mo. 


tSU B. U6th PL — $199 Down. Bid. Mo. 


imt 


St — $489Dn.,BaLMo. 


117S W. Third St. Pomono - S Bdnn. — $450 1 


Mo. 


1564 B. 108th St — FrMue and Adj. Lot — $S50 bn., BbL Mo. 


1400 E. 107th St — $200 Down, BaL ] 


10<17-17Vk>l$ B- Omtral • Newly Dec Stoeooa < 


I Dn. Bel Bio 


180$ E. 4»th St — $380 Down, BaL ] 


1508 B. llltti Street — 299 Down, BaL jUo. 


624 W. fiOth St — $800 Down. BaL : 


158$ E. 100th St — $400 Down. Bid. Mo. 


414 E. 106UI St — $450 Dn., BaL Mo. 


U$4 B. UStfa St '- 760 Dn., BaL Blo^ 


2188 B. llfHi St — New 8 


Staeeo — $488 Dn., BoL Bko. 


8721 


St — $460 Down, BaL Mo. 


SSS-ISl^ B. SSth St — t 


— $78$DlL,BaLMo. 


10824 Loa Dfflbb — $08 Dn., BaL Mo. 


11821 Ofve St — $288 Down, BaL Mo. 


TOMORROW'S MONEY TODAY 

ADVATTCB ON THB BODSB TOU NOW OWN IN ONE DAT 
Advaaeed on your 1st Ttnat Deedkwalf weOJLIt OanaoRdato 
aU your MOa m one kiaa. Borrow $1,000 or ore— pay back $15 
h monUi por $1010 tfl paid. 


ItTl B. 84th Strart — Staeeo — $450 Down,! 


204$ Pirn St — $S89 Down, BaL Md 


lS8SE.15aiSt — 18Bm.Hotcl — $2600Dn. BaLBIo. 


S087 Alsace — $699 Down, BaL MoJ 


8$M Beach St — $S50 Dn^ BaL M« 


8268 Wadaworth — $450 Dn., BaL Ml 


$880 EatreDa — $888 Dn., BaL Mo 


140048 YolencU St — $1800 Dn., : 


1048 B. 128th St ~ Stoeoo — $780 Down, ] 


.Mo. 


WE HAVE CLIENTS WITH ALL CASH 1 1 1 

tvt Toor Beat Estirta B««tttea— Ist or 2Bd Tmf Deed s ■ Con- 
or any Equity, yoa or yoar Mends have Ri Beal Estate. 
tt If a an RMote, a iolt or aepoiatioa w anythlni pertaining to 
Baal Batata. Here la yovduuiea to aaO for C 


100 CENTS CfH THE $1.00 

FOB TOCB 1st TBCST DEED IF SATKFACTOBT TO VS. GBBMTED TO na PTOCBASE OF ANT PBOPEBttES WE KAVE 
LISTED. TEBBDIC — 100 CENTS ON THE DOLLAB IFTOU HAVB A TJSTfOB $100 • $10,000 WE WILL GB»TOU A DEAL 

■ ■ ■ - ■ - ■ ■ »»— ^.J.—^.— l l ■ 11 _ ' ,. ' il l ! fil l 

$98,000 CASH ^ $98,0^)0 CASH [ jx.^ 

HAVE CLIBNTB WITH $88,008 IN CASH TO BUT BEAL B8TATB IN THIS DI8TBICT. THIS IS TOCB CRANCa TO SELL OCT 
FOB CASH IF TOC HAVE AN EQCITT OB OWN A HOCSB; WE HAVE CBIENTB WITH $88,000 IN CASH TO :