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Scalded Woman Dies, 
urse Held for Murder 



claims 
It Was 
Accident 

A 22-year-old nurse's 
aide was held for murder 
this week after one of her 
patients died following a 
bath in scalding water. 

Mrs. Annie Johanna Van 
Winkle, 84. a resident of the 
Lincoln Park Retreat, 2030 
Lincoln Park avenue, since 
1956, died at the home Mon- 
day morning from severe 
burns. 

She'* Sorry 

Frances Ferguson, 22, of 
9216 Belhaven street, was ar- 
rested and booked on a sus- 
picion-of-murder charge. 

Miss Ferguson, who came 
to Los Angeles from the South 
some 10 years ago, denied 
that she had intended to 
harm the elderly patient and 
claimed that she didn't real- 
ize the water was too hot She 
said it was an accident and 
she was sorry. 

Det. French, of the Highland 
Park Police Station, said that 
a second nurse's aide. Miss 
(Continued en. Page 2) 



79 Years 


AX. 5^1^ 


Vol. lJ<XIX-No. 46 


Thursday, January 28, 1960 


AX. 5-3135 

Out-of-Town 1 5c 


2 Gunmen Slain in 
Liquor Store Duel 

Two gunmen were killed and a third was wound- 
ed last Thursday when they were met by a police 
stake-out as they attempted to hold up a liquor store 
at 2900 W. Slauson avenue. 

^'1 James Wright, 18, of 4205 


Leon Harris, 
Writer, Dies of 
Heart AHack 

The active life of Leon R. 
Harris came to an end Friday 
evening, Jan. 22, when he was 
stricken with a heart attack 
in his home at 1124 W. 62nd 
street. 

Although a retired school 
teacher, and former columnist 
for the California Eagle, he 
was best known as an author. 
His book, "Run Zebra Run," 
came off the press last year 
and he was honored last Oc- 
tober with a surprise auto- 
graph party. 

CHhers of his works include 
"The Steelmakers," "Locomo- 
tive Puffs," and "I Am a Rail- 
road Man," which were in- 
spired while he was working 
in the Silvis Shops in Moline, 
111. ^ 

Educated at Tuskege* 

"The Modern Farmer" grew 
out of his association with 
the Federal Colored Farmer's 
Association of which he was 
a co-founder. 

Mr. Harris was bom In 
Cambridge, Ohio, Oct. 18, 
1886. He studied at Tuskegee 
Institute from 19011904 and 
then taught school for a num- 
ber of years. 

He wrote and published 
poems and blank verse whilfe 
he was editing the Richmond 
Blade. He was the founder of 
the James M. Townsend Com- 
munity Center, Richmond, 
Ind; was appointed a mem- 
ber of Pres. Hoover's Housing 
Conference in 1929; past presi- 
(Continued on Page 2) 



INJURED— Felda H^' right, 
night club owner of .Anchor- 
age, A las It a, teas injured 
when car in which she was 
ridinff with Leola H'hite, 
Mt. V erno n Junior High 
teacher/overturned. 

Teaclier, Night 
Club Owner 
Hurt in Crasli 

Mrs. Leola White, music 
teacher at Mt. Vernon Junior 
High School, and Mrs. Velda 
Wright, well-known night 
club owner of Anchorage, 
Alaska, were both seriously 
injured when the car in which 
they were driving early Fri- 
day morning overturned near 
Riverside. 

Mrs. Wright, former wife of 
San Francisco '49prs' foott>all 
Star Joe Perry, frijured several 
vertebrae and broke several 
ribs, but her spinal chord re- 
portedly was not damaged. 

Mrs. White was also serl- 
-ously hurt. She suffered in- 
juries to the vertebrae from 
the neck to the waist, and a 
broken shoulder. 

Both women were rushed to 
Riverside Community Hospi 
(Continued on Page 3) 


A-Test, God Don't 
Mix, Graham Told 

ACCRA., Ghana — Billy Graham learned here 
Sunday that you can't, preach Christianity while 
trjing to sidestep comment on France's intention to 
blast an atomic borhb in the Sahara desert 


Posters plastered all over* — — — — - 

from the north obscured the 


Accra proclaimed 

"Graham Mum on French 
Hell Test!" 

AttandoDca Drops 

Sunday night's attendance 
at Graham's evangelistic 
meeting in Accra stadium was 
cut to less than 5000, a sharp 
drop from that of the previous 
night- 

The threatened atomic tests 
weighed heavily on people's 
minds as dust and sand b<Ktie 

ia on til* UaimatUB wind. 


moon and the stars. 

That du»t and sand will be 
laden with radioactive par 
tides, Ghanians believe, if 
the French carry out their 
threat 

No Cenunont 

Graham told a news con- 
ference he would not comment 
on France's plan to fire atom 
ic weapons tests because of 
political connotations. 

TKe Evening News sjiid 

CContiaued on Page 3>, 


Zamora street, was shot and 
killed as he ran to a room in 
the rear of the store. 

Tried to Run 

Willie Livingston, 18, 2711 
(Drchard street, attempted to 
niake a run for it out the front 
door when officers shouted at 
him to stop, and said they 
were the "police." 

Officer Robert J. Helder, of 
the Metropolitan Wvision,. fif- 
ed o'ne round from a l2-gauge 
pump shotgun. Livingston fell 
on his face. He was dead. 

A coroner's jury found both 
killings justifiable. 

The third man in the hold 
up gang, Charles Scott, 22, also 
of 2711 Orchard street, tried 
to make a break along with 
Livingston, but as he heard 
the first shots he ran between 
display cases. 

'Don't Sheof 

Officer Dale fired at him 
and he fell to the floor yell- 
ing, "Don't shootl" He was 
taken to General Receiving 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Trainmen Yield, 
Drop Race Ban 

NEW YORK— The Brother- 
hood of Railway Trainmen, 
whose lily-white policy has 
long been a target of Negro 
workers, put its racff" restric- 
tion policy to a vote at its 
reqent convention in Cleve- 
land. 

Delegates voted overwhelm- 
ingly to eliminate the pro- 
vision from the constitution. 

Exclusion of Negroes from 
the trainmen's and firemen's 
unions was one of the issues 
that led to a hot exchange 
between A. Philip Randolph 
and AFL-CIO Pres. George 
Meany at the federation's re- 
cent San Francisco conven- 
tion. 


SHOT IN HOLD-UP— milie Uvingston. IS. was felled 
by a police bullet as he and two other .men were holding up 
■ fl liquor store at 2900 W. Slauson avenue last Thursday. 

Two Yolitlls Shot 
In Gong Warfare 

A 17-year-old Pacoima youth was given a 50-50 
chance to live this week after he was hit by a bullet 
fired from a passing car. Police believed the shooting 
was a flare-up of teen-age gang warfare. » 

Otis Andrew, 17, of 13061 


Ed Sullivan 
Gets Protest 
On Ga. Gov'r 

Tho scheduled appear- 
ance of Georgia governor 
Ernest Vandi^er as a paid 
performer on the Ed 
Sull^on Show bos brought 
sharp protest in Los An- 
geles. 

Vandiver, one of the 
noisiest segregationists of 
the South who is fighting 
court-orderwl integration in 
Atlonta. boasted in a re- 
cent intenriew that he can 
eoBtrol the "Nogros" in 
Georgia. 

Among these protesting 
this w«ek was tli* £. Pluri- 
bus Unum Club, which 
voted unanimously to send 
telegrams to CBS. Ed Sulli- 
van and his sponsors, East- 
man Kodak Co. and Ford 
Motor Co.. voicing opposi- 
tlon to Gov. Vandiver's 
forthcoming appearance. 


Paxton street,., Pacoima, was 
shot in the chest while he and 
a friend, A. Williams, 19, were 
driving down Payton street. 

Andrew was unconscious 
when he wa^ taken to Valley 
Receiving Hospital. Late Tues- 
day his condition was still 
critical. 

Williams was also shot, but 
his wound was less serious. 
The bullet hit him in the 
hand, and he was taken to 
General Hospital. 

There were no witnesses to 
the shooting which occurred 
about 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Wil- 
liams was unable to identify 
the attackers, but said he be- 
lieved they were members of 
a Compton gang. 


SnOirS HOUSING nOLLNC^^Putlisher Loren Miller, at Civil Rightf Commb- - 

sion hearing, points to montage of news stories in California Eagle showing repeated acts of 
violence as Los Angeles Negroes move from Ghetto. — (AdamfJ. 

Blaiiie U. S. Coyte 

For Housing Bias 

Although housing jproblems of Negroes and other minority groups had 
been slated as the fo^us of attention at the two-day hearing of the U. S. 
Commission on Civil Rights, a king-size hassle over police practices stole 
the headlines and nearly stole the show. 

The climax game Tuesday 
noon when angry Police 


Officers Transferred 

Officers F. Banks and O. C. 
Walton were transferred last 
week to Wilshire Detectives. 



Police Persecuted/ 
Chief Parker Says 

"I seem to be the only witness intelligent 
enough to understand these issues," Chief of Po- 
lice William Parker blurted out at one stage of the 
hearings of the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights. 

That statement epitomized *y^^ judge's critical attitudT^ 


the chief's unyielding attitude 
toward critics of police de- 
partrtient policies. 

•Unmitigoted Falsehood' 
He branded a statement by 
George Beavers that Negro 
police officers are confined to 
certain areas of the city as 
"an unmitigated falsehood" 
and seized another occEision 
to take a rap at Municipal 
Judge David W. Williams for 


gambling arrests. 

Police officers, the chief said 
in another explosion, are the 
ones Who are persecuted. "No- 
body is concerned with the 
rights' of policemen." he said, 
as he took a verbal swing at 
"elements" which have been 
"harassing me ever since I 
became chief." 

He didn't specify the "ele- 
( Continued on Page 4) 


LoMor Hill Wins 
Bios Suit at Lake 

La Mar Hill, prominent businessman and head 
of Angelus Funeral Home, can continue t» use pri- 
vately owned Lake Sherwood in Ventura county on 
the same terms as his neighboring lot owners. 
^ That was the essence of a 


TREAT FOR STUDENTS— A group pf CawtrJmior High students spent a grand day 
outdoors at Hidden Springs Camp, Saturday. From left: James Brov^n, student; Opal 
Jones, Avalon Center director;, Bob ScoUs^ camp' director ; Austin Dixon, Carver principal, * 

and tvelun Clvk, UuitiU*-iSti &t)dal ^se}ni—l,CurAu-iiovMrdJt .^ wl ., 


Member of 
Ink Spots 
Lost at Sea 

MIAMI— Essex Scott 38- 
year-old member erf the Ink 
Spots, popular singing group, 
was lost at sea here when he 
and two other men left Mi- 
ami last Wednesday for' a 
fishing trip on the' Florida 
keys. 

Coast Guard officials on 
Monday identified a sunken 
skiff as the one in which 
Scott and two other men left 
^lami. 

No trace was found of Scott, 
whose home is Los Angeles, 
or the other two uren, Cyrus 
M. JoUivette. Miami druggist, 
and James Strachan, also of 
Miami. * 

The boat was found a half 
mile south of Indian K^y and 
was half sutnnerged. Only the 
bow* of the 14-foot outboard 
powered skiff was above wa 
ter. The skiff appeared to have 
been anchored when it was 

swaxofied. 


decision handed down last 
week by Superior Judge E. 
Perry Churchill of Ventura in 
denying a request for an in- 
junction made by Mrs. Elsie 
Canterbury who charged that 
Hill had been trespassing on 
her property ever since he 
bought a lake front lot in 
1957. She owns the lake and a 
strip of surrounding land and 
based her suit on the fact 
that HiU has to pass over that 
strip to get to the lake where 
he maintains a dock for four 
boats. 

Hill, represented by Attys. 
Loren Miller and Elbert H. 
Hudson, presented lengthy 
testimony at the trial held 
last July to show that previ- 
ous owners of his lot had al- 
ways used the dock and had 
never been denied the right to 
pass over the strip or use the 
lake. He charged that Mrs. 
Canterbury tried to bar his 
use o^ the lake solely because 
of race.. 

HIstorT Belated . 

In a lerigthy 14 page opin- 
ion. Judge Churchill reviewed 
the history of Lake Sherwood 

(Continued on Page i). , 


Chief William H. PArker 
thrust his badge at George 
Thomas, head of the Commu- 
nity Relations Conference, and 
shouted: ''Here, yoa take this 
badge and run tiie depart* 
mentl" , 

No. I Probtoa 
However, the Commisrion* 
ers heard a parade «< wit« 
nes§es, including Atty. G«n« 
Stanley Mosk; Assemblyman 
Augustus F. Hawking John 
Buggs, executive of the Ooun* 
ty Commission on Human Be- 


For ottier stories Mi CMI 
Rights Commission h o uilug 
and xnontogs on hewlag 
Tioleaee set poge S. 


lations: Prof. Don Hagen, and 
Atty. Loren Miller describe 
housing as -the community's 
number one problem and 
urge that federal assistarKse 
be denied to discrimiivatory 
builders and lenders. 

Mosk pledged the full as- 
sistance of' his office 1io>iMard 
the removal of discrimination 
in all phases of state activity 
and agreed with Buggs' esCl- 
mate that the present Negro 
population of Lds Angeles 
county exceeds 423,000 and 
that they have been, restrict- 
ed to limited areas in the pity. . 

Miller charged that the 
state through former enforce* 
ment of racial restrictive cov* 
enants and the federal gov- 
ernment through FHA and VA ■ 
policies bear primary respon- 
sibility for the widespread 
residential segregation. 

Touches Off F i fwec ks 

Fireworks over police prac* 
tices were touched off Men- 
day when George A. Beavers, 
chairman of the board of 
Golden State Insurance com- - 
pany and head o( th^ dty 
(Continued on Page 2) 


In tfc« tagfm 

EdltorlaU , '. 


Cttnreh AetMtlM 
Sports ■ ■■ .«.— .^...— 


The Tee 

Bill, SmaUweed . 
OoretlMa Fostar 
FmpU . — ■ ,, . ., MM 


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' 2— The California Eagle 

Thursclay, January 28, 1960 


DISCUSS SALES— Dmid Holt. Uft. o/ Lot Angde!. rfgional rrpresentative for Atihru^. 
'■ tr-Busch Inc.. discusses " Budtveiser's" record sales for 1959 uith August A. Busch Jr.. 
/ fresidtnt. during a sdft convention in Tampa, Floridn. ^^j 

U.S. GoYennnent Blamed 
For Housing Segregation 

(Continued from Page 1) ,to "virtually all" of the city 
Public Housing Authority. ! schools but members of the 
charged that Chief Parker [ Commission's staff have filed 
"talks civil rights but doesn't! a report showing that they 
practice them." He had pre- 
viously described housing as 
the key problem in Los An- 
geles and urged that FHA 
and VA be required to with- 
draw assistance from build- 
ers who discriminate. 

Paul F. Lawrence, superin- 
tendent of Willowbrook School 
district, and Prof. Burton Hen- 
ry of L. A. State College, de- 



DIES SUDDENLY— Leon 
Harris, author of the recent 
novel. "Run, Zebra, Run.'." 
and former columnist for the 
California Eagle, xvcu buried 
ff^ednesday. He died of a 
heart attack, 

Leon Harris 
Dies Suddenly 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Ident of the Tri-Qty Branch 
of the NAACP; and past grand 
-master of his Masonic lodge. 

At the time of hi« death, 
Mr.'^Harris was compiling a 
"Date Book" for the Lo«s An- 
geles Tuskegee Institute 
Alumni Association. He was 
active In local civic and n- 
ligious groups. 

H. is « u r V i V e d by his 
wife. ^rs. Addie Graves Har- 
ris, R. N., Los Angeles County 
(^ncral Hospital; a daughter, 
Mrs. Henrietta H. Whiteside; 
a step-daughter. Miss Rose 
Carolyn Graves; and a brother, 
Earl Harris. 

Funeral services were held" 
Wednesday morning at 10 
o'clock at the First AME 
Church, 8th street and Towne 
avenue. Masonic Lodge Delta 
No. 21 officiated. Interment 
wa« In Evergreen Cemetery. 


are assigned to les.s than 20 
per cent of the schools and 
that most of them are teach- 
ing in Negro areas. 

Practices of real estate bro- 

I kers, builders and developers 

jand the manner in which 

] their policies exclude minori- 

i ties from new suburban hous- 

I ing were outlined by Prof. 

[Fred Case, UCLA; James Kirk, 

[Loyola University, and Frank 

Chuman, spokesman for the 

Japanese American Citizens 

League. 

E. J. Franklin, representing 
the AFL-CIO, issued a chal- 
lenge to builders to cooper- 
ate with labor in removing all 
racial barriers in housing. 

Specific instances of dis- 
crimination were described by 
Frank Barnes, Southern Area 


Percy Steele 
Named to State 
Welfare Board 

Gov. Edmund G. Brown on 
Monday announced tiie ap- 
pointment of Percy H. Steele 
Jr., executive director of the 
San Diego Urban League since 
]953, to a four-year term on 
the State Social Welfare 
Board. 

The Governor also appoint- 
ed Jerome N. Sampson of 
Beverly Hills and i^appointed 
Dr. Jacobu.s Ten Brack of 
Berkeley to .similar terms on 
the board. The appointments 
require Stat^ Senate confir- 
mation. 

WeU Qualified 

Steele, 39, a graduate of 
North Carolina State College 
and Atlanta Universijty of 
Social Work, has spent fill his 
adult life in social woi'k. 

He i.s regional* vice-presi- 
dent of the California Social 
Workers organization, chair- 
man of the Social Work Com- 
m'ission of the City of San 
Diego and a member of the 
Board of Public Welfare of 
the County of San Diego. j 

He and his wife Gussie andlgers' 
one child. Loretta Marie, 6, 'and 
live at 735 Duval street, San 
Diego. 

Sampson, a 1930 social work 
graduate of the University of fans the latest on Dodger do- 
Chicago, is a manufacturers' ings over radio station KDAY. 
representative " and al^^^-hasj Beginning Feb'. 1 on Mon- 
bcen active in social' work days through Fridays at 5:r5 
mo.st of his adult' life. p.m. the great Dodger second 

Dr. Ten Broek is a professor baseman and the club's stellar 
at the University of Calif- : southpaw will broadcast the 
ornia. He has been a member I lowdown on the champion 
of the Board of Social Welfare Dodgers and the rest of the 
since 19,50. 



TO BRO.mCAST FOR BROADirAY—A benvv nf Broadway Federal's tellers show 
derided apprnviil as Dndf/crs' scond hasemnn Charley Xeal and pitcher Sandy K<fufax StpH 
to brnndcnst Dodger doings 'nrr radio station KD.4Y for Broadivny. 


Neal, Koufax 
In Radio Pitch 
For Broadway 

The world champion Dod- 
infieldor Charley Neal 
pitcher Sandy Koufax 
will go to bat for Broadway 
Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 
this week to give baseball 



New Judge > 
QuHs Post With 

Business Men ; 

BmmM S. Jefferson hM iW 
signed his post as president ot 
the Western Avenue Businerif 
and Prcrfesslonal Association,} 
Inc. because of his appoint-) 
ment U » Municipal Court 
judge, the association atw 
nounced thi* week. 

Norman 1. Houston, vie!! 
precidtnt. Assumed the duUeg*^ 
as head ot the organitatioDt 
effecUve ian. 13. 

Mr*. VainO Spencer, attoN 
n»y, wHl he*d a lawyers' com- 
fflittM to asaUt the group In 
gathering facts in its current 
program to rout gambling and 
prostitution nests from the 
business area it represents. 

, Houston said some progt««t, 
is being made in this drive, 
but noted that it will take « 
sustained effort by the Asao< 
elation plus the close co- 
operation of other elements ot 
the community to completely 
rid the area of "rampant 
vice." 

Much of the success of thf 
organizStlon has been due to' 
the publicity given to the 
problem by the local com. 
munity press, Houston said. 

Judge Jrfferson is also pres. 
Cdent of Saf»ty Savings and 
Loan Association, while Hous- 
ton is secretary of Golden 
Wilson and Arthur Mabry gute Mutual Life Insurance 
presented the case for the | Company. Both businesses art- 
residents who oppose the pro- situated near the Western 
posed location of the dump I Avenue-Adams blvd. intersec- 


Delay Decision 
On Dump Site 

The Compton Planning Com- 
mission held off making a de- 
cision on the widely protested 
rubbish dump site on Central 
avenue at its meeting last 
Wednesday. 

It was learned that a deci- 
sion might bf given Feb. 10. 

At the commission's meet- 
ing last week, Attys. Welford 
Mabry 




LI 


■^' 'V^^ 




site. 


Ition. 


Youth Wins 
Essay Contest 


scribed discriminatory prac- 
tices of Boards of Education 
In Los Angeles county which 
prevent qualified Negro teach- 
ers from securing jobs while 
persons without state creden- 
tials are hired. 

Paints Rosy Picture 

However, Ellis JaA'is, city 
superintendent of schools, 
painted a rosy picture of Los 
."Angeles as a city with no dis- 
crimination against teachers ^ NAACP president, and Henry 
and students. He said thatj Hodge of the Committee on 
Negro teachers are assigned! Racial Equality. I 


ba.scball world. I 

In addition Nnal and Kou- ■ 
fax have made Broadway^ 
Federal their official .savings i 
headquarters and endorsed' 
Broadway's facilities, its serv-| 
Donald Owens, a junior at ice and its policy of paying; 

Centennial Senior High:^*^"" interest on savings. 

School, won first prize in the' Neal and his teammate will 

senior high school division ofM^Jl^-^- fans mformed on 

the Los Angeles Examiner's"'^ 


activities 


their 


Dodger 
17th annual Bill of Rights! twining ramp, give the inside 

dope on how the players arc 
rounding into shape for the 


CrriD -^ Dr. Harold D. 
If est. internationally known 

hi'i-chemist rind president of 
Mrhnrry Medunl College, 
Tins riled tiy the Los Angeles 
(jnimiy Board r,f SupcrriS'trs 
and the City Council on 
I' iicsdnx. I 

ORCHESTRA CLASS 

A new cla.'is in full concert 
orchestra will open Tuesday, 
Feb. 2, at Belmont-Metropoii- 
tan .Adult School, 1157 Berendo 
street. H. O. Backer, principal, 
said thi.s week. 


ART CLASSES 

Classes in Art will be open 
at Belmont-Metropolitan Adult 
School on Feb. 1, H. O. Backer, 
principal, announced. These 
classes will meet on Monday 
and Wednesday evenings, 
6-.30 to 9:30. 


NAACP Rally 

The Los Angeles branch ot 
the NAACP will hold lu 1960 
membership kick-off rally. 
Sunday at 3 p.m. at Second 
Baptist Church, 2412 Griffith 
Vavenue. 




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• FLOODS • PATIO LIGHTS AND FIXTURES • STARTERS 

^ FREE, FAST DELIVERY 

10824 South Bresdwsy, Los Angeles PL 6-1 411 


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coming season, and interview 
the top ballplayers of other 
teams as guest stars. 


essay contest. 

Over 3,500 entries were re- 
ceived. 

As winner of tlie first prize, 
senior division, young Owens 

will receive a S200 savings INCREASED RATES 

bond and will be feted, along Postmaster Otto K. Olesen 
with other prize winners, at a; reminded postal patrons that 
formal banquet in the Ambas-'new parcel post rates go into 
sador Hotel, Feb. 3. effect on Monday, Fob. 1. 


RALPHS $ELL$ FOR LE$$ RALPHS SELLS FOR LESS 


4 f 

'4 


DON'T MISS THIS GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY! 


Two Women 
Hurt in Crash 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Emma A. Marshall, 24, of 
1801 H Griffith avenue, was 
released after questioning. 
She was not booked. 
MsoTlng Set 

Hearing on the murder 
charge is set for Feb. 1 In Di- 
visdon 40. 

Bond was set at $25,000 
In arraignment proceedings 
Tuesday. 

Police said earlier that Miss 
Ferguson reportedly became 
angry at Mrs. Van Winkle on 
Saturday night and placed her 
In the hot water to "clean her 
up." The elderly woman suf- 
fered severe burns on her left 
foot, both legs, body and 
hand. 

The coroner's office said 
she must have been in wa- 
ter above 120 degrees for sev- 
eral minutes to suffer such 
severe burns. 

Officials of the hospital 
said that rules require that 
two nurses' aides must be 
present whenever a patient is 
given a bath. They said that 
both young wwnen have been 
liped. 

PoHce said Mias Marehall 
helped Miss Ferguson put 
Mrs. Van Winkle back in bed. 


CAIIFORNIA EAGLE 

QASSIFIED 



AX. 5^135 




Oroceri 


SPECIALS 


wi mavB THi ti»m 
TO iiMit euANnnn 


GLEN ARMS HOTEL-APTS., 1114 EAST 68th STREET 

i ■ " ® 

YOii CAN OWN THIS...... 

• SPLENDID BRICK BUILDING 

f . 

• 16 ROOMS AND 2 BIG APARTMENTS 

• FURNISHED AND CONSERVATIVE 

. i . ' ' 

^^ • POTENTIAL INCOME $650.00 A MONTH 

• PAYMENTS $200 INCLUDING INTEREST 

This property is in distress and needs oniy owner-manager to afford some- 
one 2 homes pius $300.00 per month net income for life. 

fiEHER GO LOOK THIS OVER IMMEDIATELY BECAUSE . . . 

$5000 CASH WILL HANDLE 

OR WILL EXCHANGfPOR SMALL CLEAR HOME OR OTHER PROPERTY 

For Ful/ Information — Call or WrH» for Owner > 

ATTY. SAM HOUSTON ALLEN, 6850 VAN NUTS BOULEVARD 
VAN NUYS, CALIFORNIA j TR. 3-1256 


Pric es Ef fective : 

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ROASTING 
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Hani 
ToB^ 

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Commissioners Told of Violence' 


Thursday, January 28, 1960 


The CalifornTa EagIe-3 


:^ 



Jim Crow on Rise 
In L A. Housing 

Negroes are confined to the central part of Los Angeles where much 
of the housing is old and falling into disrepair and thfe population density 
is higher in Negro areas than anywhere else in southern California. 

An almost solid Black Belt ^ — — ~-~ 


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Mean Tricks Played on Bishop 
In Exclusive 'White' 






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MOXTJGE Tt LLS STORY — A mnntnqt nf articles th/it nppinrcd in the 
Cn/if'Tiiui t.nolf denlinij uith vinUnce drmnnstrated the stnr\ of Jim Croiv 



housin(i as Publisher L')ren Miller spoke before CivH Rights Commission, 
Mfnday, 


Handling of Food ; 
To Be Discussed I 

Continuing pfforis to pro- i 
mote safe food handling prac- 
tices, the Southwest District 
Health Center. 3834 S. Western^ 
avenue, will hold a series of 
four weekly meetings for 
restaurant personnel begin-, 
ning Feb. 2. from 7 to 9 p.m , 
Dr. Pauline O. Roberts, di.s- 
trirt health officer, announced' 
this week. 


KPFK Signs 
Arthur Adams 

Arthur Adams this week 
was signed by radio station 
KPFK-FM as a newscaster. 

Adams has a daily 15-min- 
ute news program. 

Prior to the KPFK inking, 
Adams was a disk iockey with 
KNOB-FM in Long Beach and 
with KWBR in San Francisco. 

Adams is the brother of disk 
jockev actor Joe Adams. 


P. 


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Call AO. M97« 
SarvicM 

for Nit* fc Sun. 
Bill Guvten. ^op. 


jVirginia Calm 
|As \ Schools 
Are Integrated 

I RICHMOND, Va. — Two 
"white" high schools in Floyd 
("ounty, Va., accepted 13 Negro 
students Monday without a 
ripple of open opposition. 

There was no one in the vi- 
cinity of either of the schools 
to protest or even to observe, 
except a handful of newsmen. 
Court Order 

Floyd County has thre*" 
.schools for, white students of 
high school age, but none for 
Negroes. Heretofore, the Negro 
youngsters have t>een attend- 
ing Christian.sburg Institute in 
Montgomery County. 

Last -September Federal 
Judge Robb C. Thompson, a 
native of the area, ordered the 
two schools to accept the Ne- 
gro students. 

There were hints prior to 
the court order that the coun- 
ty would follow the action 
taken by Prince Edward 
County and close the schools. 
After the order was issued, 
the school board indicated its 
willingness to obey and qppo- 
sition sentiment dwindled*. 
100 in Verginla 

The admission of the 13i stu- 
dents in Floyd County brings 
to about 100 the number of 
Negro students in formerly 
all-white schools in Virginia. 

Negro .students now attend 
white schools in Alexandria, 
Norfolk and Charlottesville 
and in the counties of Arling- 
ton, Warren and Floyd. 


Dr. Rubenstein to Lecture on 
Negro in Novels February 5 

informative speaker, 


Stretches from City Hall on 
the north to the center of the 
city of Compton on the south 
and from the city limits of 
Vernon on the east to the 
boundary of Culver City on 
the west. 

Refuse to SVU 
Builders, developars and 
lending Institutions refuse to 
sell FHA and VA housing in 
new suburbs to non-white 
buyers, in violation of state 
law and court decisions. 

The Negro population of. 
Los Angeles county has risen! 
from some 63,000 in 1940 toj 
423,000 at the present tiimei 
and by 1975, there will be aj 
million and a quarter Negro | 
residents in the Los Artgelesi 
metropolitan area. | 

Those .sober facts were de- 
veloped by a parade of wit- 
nesses at the Monday andl 
Tuesday hearings of the U.S. 
Commission on Civil Rights.! 
Among those who contributed 
to the factual picture were| 
Assemblyman Augustus F. 
Hawkins, Atty. Loren Miller,! 
Prof. Don Hager of State Col-j 
lege, Prof. Fred Case of UCLA.^ 
Prof. James Kirk of Loyola; 
University, George Thomas of 
the Conference on Community 
Relations, and Joh,n Buggs ofj 
the County Human Relations 
Committee. | 

All agreed that the Federal 
government ought to take thCj 
lead in breaking the barriers: 
to Negro occupancy by re-! 
quiring .builders to covenant! 
with FHA and VA that they 
will not discriminate in hous- 
ing sales to Negroes. 

Government Sanction 

While other speakers were 
concentrating on jK>pulation 
figures. Miller traced the 
history of restriction on land 
sales and occupancy from 
early legislation against Chi- 
nese ownership to enforce- 
ment of racial restrictive cov- 
enants from 1915 to 1948, and 
finally pointed to FHA and 
VA practices as "governmen- 
tal sanction and support of 
residential segregation." 

Miller also charged |x>lice 
with laxity in arresting and 
prosecuting persons who try 
to prevent Negroes from oc- 
cupying new homes through 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Calif. Lawyer On 
Rights Commission 

Although Congress provided for six members, 
the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights had only five 
commissioners in the Los Angeles hearings. They 
were Robert Storey, deaji of the law school at 
Southern Methodist University; John Hannah, presi- 
dent of Michigan State Uni- •> 


versity; Doyle Carleton, for- 
mer governor of Florida; Rev. 
Theodore Hesburgh, president 
of Notre Dame University, 
and George M. Johnson, for- 
mer dean and now profes.sor 
of law at Howard University. 
Dean Storey presided. 

Not Replaced 

The president has not 
replaced John Battle, former 
governor of Virginia, who re 


Sen. Thomas Kuchel had a 
statement read into the rec- 
ord in which he praised the 
record of the commission. 


Govt. Contract 
Commitee Head 
Resigns Post 

W.\SHINGTON — i)r. Jacob 
signed after the Commission-' Seidenberg has resigned as 
made its report last fall. I executive director of the 

Affable and keen-witted. ^^^^'<^^"^s Committee on Gov- 
Dean Storey made a polite and f""^^"^ Contracts, effective 
efficient chairman who gave^^"' 31- He ha^ been the head 
little inkling of what his pri- °^ ^^^ committee since its es- 
vate views mav haxe been on [ablishment by Pres._Eisen- 
the controversial issues that^^^^^^ '" ^^^g^^t of 19d3. 
were presented at the hear- 1 I>r- Seidenberg is resigning 
ings but when he chose to dojfrom the committee to be- 
so he directed searching ques- come a private consultant in 
tions at witnesses. [the fields of race relations 

The occasion wa.s almost a *"^ industrial labor relations, 
homecoming for Prof. John- 
.son who was reared in San 
Bernardino and educated at 
the University of California 
at Berkeley. Alert and careful 
to develop a point he wanted 
in the record. Johnson was 
one of the most active ques- 
tioners at tile hearings. 
Keen Questioning 

Father Hesburgh is also a i on~ite*side 
man with a mind of his own 
and with a wide knowledge 
of the human relations prob- 
lems that lie beneath the sur- 
face. He, too wais quick to 
seize opportunities to develop 
particular issues he wanted 
in the record. 

Mayor Norris Poulson, Su- 
pervisor Frank Bonelli, .\tty. 
Gen. Stanley Mosk and Johii 
Moore, chairman of the may- 
or's new commisaon on civil 
rights, were among the wit- 
nesses but none except Mosk 
had looked beneath the sur- 
face of the issues. 


Hurt in Crash 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tal, where they are still con- 
fined. 

The accident occurred on 
Route 66 when one of the tires 
on their car blew out and 
caused th« auto to turn over 


The two fcfiends had been 
visiting Mraj. White's mother 
at White Hpuse Farm Camp 
near Perris. 

Mrs. Wright arrived in Los 
Angeles Jan. 8 to visit her 
mother, Mrs. Segre Madoline, 
2058 S. Hai^-ard bh'd. 


"The Negro in American 
Literature " will be the sub- 
ject of Dr. Annette T. Ruben- 
stein's first lecture in Los An- 
geles as part of her current 
national speaking tour. 

In observance of Negro His- 
tory Week, the People's World 
Forum will present the noted 
educator and scholar at Park 
Manor, 607 S. Western ave- 


is a 

former instructor in philoso- 
phy at New 'Vork University 
and author. She is presently 
completing a critical history 
of American literature, com- 
panion of an earlier book on 
English literature. 


Three out of four Calif or- 

nians eligible to drive have a 

nue, on Friday evening, Feb. i California driver's license, re- 

3. I ports the Automobile Club of 

Dr. Rubinstein, a lively and i Southern California. 


t,«^'i:^ *^ 








ELEGTraa 


Atom-Test, God 
Don't Mix Well 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Graham's "excuse that this is 
a political year in the United 
States is ludicrous." 

The Ghana Times, official 
organ of Prime Minister 
Kwame Nkrumah's Conven- 
tion People's Party, comment- 
ed: • 

"Not a few have been dis- 
appointed, actually stunned 
by Dr. Graham's attitude to 
the intention of Christian 
France to detonate an atom 
bomb in the Sahara, the evil 
effects of which will not spare 
any African Christians." 


"AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS" 

• Brake, Tune-Up Specialists • Free Pick-Up, Delivery 

HENRY LEZINE'S MOBIL SERVICE 
1921 S. CENTRAL AVE. Rl. 8-8044 ^""^^^f^ 



ANNOUNCING... 



the Appointment of Arthur A. Smith 
! as Associate Manager of 

UTTER-McKINLEY BROADWAY MORTUARY 

Active in the civic, religious and community life of Los 
Angeles, Arthur A. Smith is a member of many organiza- 
tions and has been in the funeral profession for many 
years. I 


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If hanging out wash has got you on ths 
ropes, it's time to get an electric dryer. 
Gentle, even electric heat gives you 
fluffier, sweeter-smelling clothes. It's 
kind \xi delicate fabrics, and since it is 
like the all-over warmth you get froni 
the sun, electric heat puts that sunshine 
freshness into your clothes. And >ou 
can use an electric dryer anytime . . . day 
or night. , .rain or shine. Best of aH, an 
electric dryer costs less to biiy and just 
penaies a load to operate ... ^ut $ 1 .00 

M T00RUSAN6ELES « 


a month for an average family at low 
Los Angeles Department of Water and 
Power rates. So forget that back-yard 
drudgery and see your electric appli- 
ance deal« today for a modem electric 
dryer. 


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DEPARTMENT OF WATER &rawa 


PLUG IN 
ANYWHERE! 


• 



Hug your electric dryer into any appii- 
ance outlet. There's no special inttal< 
lation needed with a flamelees electric 
dryer. For even faster drying, you may 
want heavy-duty 240 volt service. If 
so, ask your dealer about OWP's spe* 
cial $25 wiring allowance and Wire-On- 
Time Payments Plan. 


Prerent Decay 

Preventive dental ser\ ice 
for young children and ex- 
pectant mothers is one of the 
many services rendered by 
employees of the County 
Health Department 


- w.. .. ^^ -V*.;v'^ 




I 


X 





4-The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 28, 1960 


Loren Miller, Publisher 

Th« CaHfornia Eagle »tands for complete Integrertlon of 
Negroes into every phose of American life through the democratic 
processes. 

We favor: 

T*. FEPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. ^ 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Publ/shed Every Thursday for Over 79 Years 
ilOl West Vernon, Corner of Von Ness AXminster 5-3135 


\7lte <STmportanl ^\ewspap 


ey 


Human Rights Commission 


M a y o r Norris Poulson has 
finally got around to naming a 
municipal human rights commis- 
sion. Any device to accelarate 
the trend toward equality before 
the law is welcome and we hope 
that the commission will take its 
task seriously. 

The disturbing fact is that the 
commission's powers are limited 
by the fact that it has neither 
funds nor official sanction by 
ordinance. Apparently nobody 
knows what it is supposed to do 
or how it can accomplish its 
ends. 

Membership on the commis- 
sion is also disappointing. The 
mayor has loaded it down with 
big business executives who have 
shown little knowledge, of, or 
concern with, the problems with 


which it is supposed to deal?- We 
hope that Xorman O. Houston, 
Earl B. Grant and the Rev. 
Maurice Dawkins, the Is'egro ap- 
pointees, can put it on the right 
track. 

Los Angeles' human relations 
problems center around the ri^id 
pattern of residential- segregation 
which confines Negroes, Ori- 
entals and Mexicans to defined 
areas of the city and consequent 
segregation in schools, play- 
grounds and other public facili- 
ties. That segregation has the 
tacit approval and support of 
many of those who will sit on 
Mayor Poulson's commission. 

Human relations problems 
won't be solved by the simple 
multiplication of commissions, 
committees and boards of well 
intentioned people. 


Look Who's Talking 


Senator Lyndon B. Johnson of 
Texas turned up in New York 
last week with a plea to Demo- 
crats to reject considerations of 
"race, religion or region" in the 
selection of candidates. That's a 

pretty big m o u t h f u 1 1 for a 
Texan. 

Emphasis in the statement be- 
lonf;s on the word "r e g i o n." 
What Mr. Johnson is after is try- 
ing to overcome the post-Civil 
War tradition that no southerner 
can be nominated for the presi- 
dency. He wants to be president. 

The senator's conversion 
comes pretty late. He's built a 
career on playitig footsie with 
the Dixiecrats and he got where 
he is by traipsing along with the 
Texas version of White Suprem- 
acy politics. > 

Senator Johnson has never 
raised his voice against southern 
efforts to subvert the Supreme 


Court's civil rights decisions. He 
has kept a discreet silence in the 
face of Texas' laws and man- 
euvers to keep segregated 
schools. 

The senator did ease up a little 
in 19.i7 and support the milk and 
water version of civil rights legis- 
lation that year. In 1958 he even 
introduced his own civil rights 
bill which promised little and 
provided nothing by way of 
eliminating discrimination and 
segregation^^e turned right 
around .ajra undermined efforts 
to curb the senatorial filibuster, 
knowing full well that we can't 
get a decent civil rights law as 
long as southern senators can 
talk legislation to death. 

The short of the matter is that 
there is nothing to indicate that 
Senator Lyndon Johnson has had 
a change of heart. His words are 
fa'ir but his deeds drown out 
what he says. 


The Promise and the Record 


Arizona's Senator Barry Gold- 
water has^ set out to persuade 
all of us that the well being of 
the nation lies in its adoption of 
a conservative, philosophy. He 
said last week in the Los Angeles 
Times that conservatives are 
"dedicated to the preservation of 
the dignity of the individual and 
freedom for all men." 

That may be a good theoretical 
definition of the conservative 
position but it doesn't square 
with the practices of the con- 
servatives for whom Mr. Gold- 
water speaks. 

In few places in the world are 
vjnen treated with less dignity 
and given less freedom than Ne- 
groes in the southern section of 
the United States. Yet the con- 
ieivative Republicans led by Mr. 


Goldwater consistently refuse to 
support legislative measures to 
restore dignity and assure free- 
dom for southern Negroes. He 
has never cast a vote for civil 
rights. 

Conservative Republican sena- 
tors and representatives have 
consistently opposed fair employ- 
ment laws, legislation to protect 
the franchise and measures to 
strike down humiliating segrega- 
tion practices, laws and customs. 
Mr. Goldwater is a man of vast 
influence in his home state of 
Arizona but that state lacks an 
elementary law requiring service 
in places of public accommoda- 
tion. 

Mr. Goldwater's conservative 
record can't inspire much confi- 
dence among Negroes. 


Tuskegee Report 

For 1959 Dismal' 

' TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE — In its 46th annual 

report on race relations in the South, Tuskegee Insti- 
tute presents a=>^ dismal picture of progress for the 

year 1959. — — 

"Race relations in the South ■• f^m^%^a 

did not change appreciably J|||| WlOW 
during 1959," says the report. 

No Advance Qll IflCreOSe 

'Despite the urgency of , ^ .. « o» 
America's aspiration to pro- (Continu^ from Page 3) 
mote peace . . . there was — on vandalism. ' He presented a 
balance — little compelling graphic picture montage of 
evidence that America, itself, California Ea?le headlines 
was able, during 1959, to ad- and news stories of many of 
vance human understanding those incidents and .said there 
significantly within its own had been no arrests or prose- 
boundaries." cutions. 

The report, signed bv Luther "Failure to prosecute van- 
H. Faster, the institutes presi- dais." Miller charged, "is a 
dent, reports some gains as a species of governmental sup- 
result of court action as well Port of segregation." 
as some setbactcs, and some Spreads Segregation 
small progress in the opening Profs. Hager, Ca.se and Kirk 
of schools to ^:egro children who spoke on behalf of the 
on an integrated basis. Urban League stressed the 

The report does not men- ^^^ ^^^^ residential segrega- 
tion the lynching last April of ^"?" ,"-Pates segregation in 
Charles Mack Parker in Pop- ^^^^^ools and other public fa- 
larville, Mis.s. No reason is «lities and heightens racial 
given for the ommission. animosities. Hager was insis- 
tent on the point that segre- 
Adomant Opposition gation imposes a hea\'y cost 

"Efforts to remove barriers on the entire community, 

structured in segregation con- In a .statement carefully 

tinued despite adamant oppo- tracing the growth of the 

sitjon in some areas of the city's Negro population, Buggs 

Southern Region," says the re- voiced the opinion that tlie 

port. - intensity of racial segregation 

"In sum," it contmues, "the *« «" the increase and point- 
year showed further legal f** ^"^^ ^'^at the number of 
support and economically Negroes in cen.sus tracts m 
based rationalization for pub- ^^^ ff"<" o^. ^^^ ^^^ ^^ <^**"- 
lie dpscgregateion, limited ex- stantly gnwing, 
ten.Mon of desegregation prac The Negro population has 
tires, successful acUon by actually decerased in 31 of 54 
manv state and local govern- "^'*"%'" ^ Angeles county 
menu to avoi-d desegregation, f "^'^ ^^^O, he .said, and shows 
and a hes.tanrv by America's li^^Ie growth in many others, 
citizens to face' the moral im- "<* "^fd West Covnna as an 
plications of continued segre- ^^aniple and said that it has 
^ grown in population from 
^ " , , _, 4,499 in 1930 to 4^,704 in 1959, 

■The principle of desegrega- ^ut that the Negro popula- 
tion in public situations was ^^^^ y^^ increased from 119 
remfoTced," the report con- ^^ ^^^^ ^34 ^^^ ^^ domes- 
tinues. "A few instances of ^^ 
additional desegregation Ganged Up" 
were noted, both in schools Thre* witnesses— Da\^d Car- 
and in other public situations. ^^jp preston Morris and Rob- 
Delay Integration *rt Maxwell — all of whom are 

"With an occasional excep- enginws fold the Commission 

tion. Federal and state court '>^ ^heir experient«es in tpmg 

decisions, as well as the ad,- *« f'"^' homes near t h e i r 

ministrative and investigativt places of emp o>-ment in out- 

actions of Federal agencies, 1^-1"^ ^^^^^ Al] agreed that 

.supported the principle of de- "^"^^^ ""^^ I'^^'f^f ;"^^'tt"- 

segregation and sought its t'""-^ E^ng^ "P and tried to 

implementation." discourage their efforts^ 

„ ,, ,, . , . ,. Citv Councilman Edward 
. Most public officials m the R^^baj, speaking for Mexi- 
South. by their comments and can-Amencan.s. and Frank 
public actions, the report c h u m a n . of the Japanese- 
notes, delayed desegreganon Americans Citizens league. 
and di.scpuraged inter-group ^ ^^^^ ^^^^ di.=;cnmination 
discussion of community is- against other minority groups 
^"^^- is also widespread in the' 

Mass communication media, boosing field. They agreed 

vipwed as a whole, the report that FHA and VA policies 

continues, "reported and com- aided discriminator^' brokers. 

mentfd extensively on deseg- 

regation and tended to high- ■ ■ ■■ U'll 

light the arguments for seg- J* LCIfVICir rllll 

regation, either directly or by taf;„_ ■ _„ J C.Im. 

implication. WImS LGna SUIT 

Negative (Continued from Page 1) 

"A variety of constructive f "^ P°'"^ ,^"^ ^^\* ^"h^" 
community -services by Ne- 'f\'^:^''lj^^^ °" ^^^ '^'^'^ 
groes and their organizations ^'^^ '" ^^^ purchasers were 
remained largely unreported: \°]^ hat they > could use the 
and, as ^ consequence, the ^^^^ ^^^ 'boating, fishing and 
general public tended to form recreational purposes" And 
opinions of the citizenship ^^at the subdivider had prom- 
role of the Negro based upon i^ed to construct docks and 

the often sensational and 1*"*^'"^ ^P^^f^ /°^ ^hem. 

^ ;, . , . ^0 such docks or landing 

negative reports disseminated ^p^^^, ^.^^ p^,„ ^uilt by the 

by the mass media." subdividers but lot owners 

-Negroes, the report con- constructed tlieir own facili- 

tinucs, were confronted by ties and in 1935, Mrs. Canter- 

"outwardly imposed discrimi- ^^^ ^^^^ * written promise 

...... ^, to lot owners that their right 

nation in education, voting, ^_ _,, «. , , . „ .^, f, 

^' to sell their lots "with the 

employment and transporta- rig^t to use the lake" would 

tion which could not be over- not be q.uestioned. The dock^. 

come by individual effort; and used by Hill %vas constructed 

this situation tended to ne- '" 1948- the judge said. He 

gate the American democratic *'^'' P"'"*^ ""^ that no other 
„ person had ever been denied 
- the right to u.se a dock upon 

Cm m aw^^-^^ii a the purchase of a lot. 

A L I F O R N I A Wouldn't Cancel 

EB ^ I V Testimony at the trial 

M w L t showed that as soon as Mrs. 

Th. Imporient Newipoper' Canterbury learned of Hill's 

2101 W. Vernon Ave. ^rseiier'^rr^nl? ^hT h'^'I 

, . I o ^ IM "'^ seller to cancel the deal 

i »■" '»n9«'«» f ' r"'"« because; she did not want Ne- 

j AXminster 5-3135 groes to use the lake. The 

^^^ 44 seller refused. 

LOREN MILLER Hill tbok possession of the 

Pubhiher lot in early 1957 and has used 

»L J 1 >^ .... the lake! ever .«:ince that time. 

LV'^v^.v • M !5 However, Mrs. Canterbury re- 

Vol. LAXIX Ho. 46 fused to accept his fees on the 

GRACE SIMONS... Executive Editor claim that he had no right to 

F. p. WALLER, Jr Adv. Mgr. use the lake 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON USPineiaKC. , ,. . , 

_.CircuiaUD4i Mgr. Brushing aside technical 

^Siv ^ARErREPRESk°NW.vr a^fi:"'"""" «S tO Hill's right tO 

E. G. Allen ...1512 16th 6t, P^^s Over the strip of land in 

Santa Monica, Cai. Ph. EX. 5-1591 order to gain access to the 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE , .„ T,,rf„t r- V, ,, , ^ ;, ,• 1 l 

1907 zcth Street (Upstair.) lake. Judge Churchill re- 

Phone EXbrook 4-8082 marked tartly that the "evi- 

-^ dence clearly demonstrates 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! that Mrs. Canterbury at all 

□ $4.00 for I Year times recognized that lot 

D $1.50 lor 3 Months ''^"«" ^^^ * "^^t to use t?ie 

D $2.50 for 6 Months J*^« and to have access to it" 

Adjudication Decree Number 123228 vanr TiMvnnvm 

Date of Adjudication July 1, 192> r«nn. mrnuv£iU 

Published every Thursday by Th« Supervisor Kenneth Hahn 

California Eagle Publishing Co., rpnorted this week that mainr 

2101 West Vernon Avenue, at Van reporiea inis weeK mat major 

Ness, Los Angeles^, Calif. Entered improvements at RoOSevelt 

as Second Class Watter November Park in the Florence area He. 

3, 1937, at the Post Office at Loe ^^^*^ i '"^ r lorence area, oe- 

Angeles, California, under tha Act Signed to make the park and 

"'represented nationally playground ' more attractive 

BY interstate a^d useful, 'have now been 

"'^'if'^Fi^i^Tv^n^u?" completed and are ready for 

New York 17, Naw York USe by the pUDllC. 


'Southern California Scene 



w. 


A Look 
At Books 


Pity Poor Police, 
Declares Parker 


By JAN EDWARDS 
Sunris« ovei Alabama by Va- 
laida Potter. Comet Press 
Books, New York, 1959. 70 
pages. S2.S0. 


"Sunrise Over Alabama" is 
a short novel written in 
purely narrative stj'le. There 
is almost no attention given 
to characterization except lor 
a verv' uncomplicated analy- 
sis of the heroine. 

This is Miss Potters first at- 
tempt as a novelist. And, like 
many famous authors who 
have preceded her, her first 
novel is primarily autobio- 
graphical. 

She sets a terrific pace right 
from the first chapter. In fact, 
as one turns the last page it 
seems incredible that so mu<"h 
has happened. In retrospect, 
two thoughts occur to this re- 
viewer. 

First: Valaida Potter is de- 
cidedly gifted in creating a 
great am.ount of activity 
through dialogue. She ac- 
complishes this in very short 
reading space. This talent 
would make her wonderfully 
adept at radio or television 
script WTiting. 

Secondly: If the writer is 
going to stay with novels or 
• short stories, she will have to 
give much more attention to 
description and deliniation of 
characters. 

"Sunrise CH-er Alabama" is 
a sympathetic stor>' which 
outlines Valaidas life from 
the time she was five years 
old. It is full of youthful .ex- 
uberance; sometimes so 
youthful that the events 
seem a little unbelievable. A 
case in point is when her girl- 
friend Lydia's "inner feelings ' 
tell her that Valaida could 
use some money, so . . . "she 
sent her a check for ten thou- 
sand dollars.' 

If there really are people 
who make ten thousand dol- 
lar handouts we would like to 
know a great deal more 
about them. As we said be- 
fore. Miss Potter does not give 
us much Insight into the. mo- 
tivations or character make- 
up of thei individuals in her 
story. ' 

Another astonishing indi- 
vidual is Valaida's first hus- 
band. He is gentle, consider- 
ate, understanding . . . we 
turn the page, and he has de- 
serted her. When Valaida re- 
fuses to give him a divorce, he 
hits her so hard her hearing is 
impaired. One feels that a 
great deal has been left out. 
There have been no steps or 
signposts leading up to this 
important event. 

It will be interesting to 
watch Miss Potter's progress 
as an author. However, before 
attempting another novel she 
should take time out to write 
descriptive essays and short 
character analj^s. It is es- 
sential to her development as 
a successful novelist 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ments " hut it was plain that 
he was irritated by specifica- 
tions of police brutal-itv' made 
by the American Civnl Liber- 
ties Union and the >'AACP. 
Coses Cited 

Through Atty. Loren Miller, 
the XAACP presented a list of 
cases in which polirp brutal- 
it>- was charged. Miller said 
that thp Police Internal Af- 
fairs Bureau had heard 80 
cases of police hrutalit\" and 
21 charges of inva.'^ion of civil 
rights in 195S and had sus- 
tained charges in only two 
instances. 

However, he said, one-third 
of the rharge.=; against police 
on other ground.'^ had been 
upheld. He urged investiga- 
tions by an impartial agency. 

Beavers set off the row over 
polirp practices witli a 5tate- 
mpnt Mnnd.iy m which he 
charged the Polire Dept. with 
pursuing the following dis- 
criminatory policie.";: 

1. Following an unwritten 
but stringent rule against 
Negro and white policemen 
working together. 

2. Wasting manpower ra- 
ther than mixing the races. 

3. Refusing to assign Negro 
officers to crtain stations. 

South Paid Negroes 

Parker bustled in Tuesday 
wiih a rptinue of assi.^^tants 
and an armful of chart*;. 

The charts showed that Ne- 
groes, who constitute 12 H per 
rent of the city's population, 
were responsible for 48.4 per 
cent of the crimes for which 
cotpplaints were i.ssiied in ',58. 

Mexican - America ns, w>h o 
make up 10 per cent of the 
population, were responsible 
for 20.2 per cent of the crime 
complaints. 

Caucasians. 75 per cerrt of 
the population, were respon- 
sible for 28.8 per cent of the 
crime total. 

During the cour.se of ques- 
tioning, the chief .said that he 
had been told th'at some south- 
ern cities paid the fares of 
Negroes to got them to come 
to Los Angeles. He said he 
had hp«rd such a statement 
in a conference of mayors. 

After his testimony was 
concluded, Parker engaged in 
an almost shouting discus- 
sion with George TTiomas of 
the Community Relations Con- 
ference and at the height of 
the controversy>-shoved h i s 
badge toward Thomas. 
"Take My Badge I' 

"You. take it," he shouted, 
"and .«;pe if \-ou can run the 
department as ypu run your 
other affairs." 

Chief Parker's figures show- 
ed the emplojTnent of about 
4800 police officers of whom 
132 are Negroes. The highest 
ranking Negro officer is a 
lieutenant. When Commission- 
er George Johnson asked him 
why there were no higher 
ranking Negro officers the 
chief bristled back with the 
statement that they couldn't 
pass the examinations. 

"You're saying that no Ne- 
gro is intelligent eiioush to 


hold a higher rank?" John- 
son shot back. 

"I say that none of them 
has passed since I haye been 
chief." oame back the cliief s 
bristling reply. 

PeUe» Viokttietu 

Another witness Tuesday 
was Robert Vogel, president of 
the American Civil Liberties 
Union of Southern California. 

"Both in number and in- 
tensity' there are reeumng in- 
stances of police violation of 
the cnnl rights of Negroes 
and Mexican -Americans in 
Los Angeles," Vogel said. 

He also related se\-eral in- 
stances of alleged brutality 
and police invasion of civil 
rights. 


Two Gunmen 
Die in Hold-up 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Hospital with superficial head 
wounds. 

Scott had been armed with 
a small automatic. 

At first Scott dfnied having 
any part in the planned hold- 
up. He claimed he went to the 
liquor store by himself on a 
streetrar to buy some wine. 

After questioning, however, 
he admitted he had been rid- 
ing around with Livingston 
and Wright during the eve- 
ning and that they had enter- 
ed the store together. He 
wanted to know if his "two 
buddies ' were dead. 
Lo*t RU Job 

Scott said he was broke and 
needed money. He said he had 
been laid off his job at Muller 
Bros, just before Christmas. 

He also admitted that he 
used a little "stuff' now and 
then, but claimed he was only 
"chipping." He said he had 
not had a "fix" since the pre- 
vious day. 

According to Scott, he and 
his buddies were riding 
around when Wright said, 
"Let's go get some scratch." 
and handed him a "little 
black gun." 

He said he didn't know the 
liquor store on Slauson ave- 
nue was the one they were 
going to "hit" until they were 
inside and he saw a gun in 
Wright's hand. It was then, 
he said, that he pulled the 
"little black gun" out of his 
pocket. 

He said he had never been 
involved in a holdup before. 

Four counts of robbery and 
two of murder were lodged 
against him. 

When police went to Living- 
ston's home, they found Ed- 
ward Jackson, 20, erf 935 E. 
52nd street, waiting for Liv- 
ingston-. 

Officers said he fitted the' 
description of a man wanted 
in several robberies and ar- 
rested him on suspicion. 


Cot 

W« 

Wc 

Ml 


Fl< 


tor 
locat 


Writing lor PubUcotioa 

Classes in how to write far 
publication and how to sell 
the manuscripts written will 
open at Belmont -Metre^ltan 
Adult School, 1575 ^eit Sm^ 
oQd Street, on Febnaiy 8L 


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-SANTAn 

MONICA 

NEWS 


Rev. Harold Bynum, *«la- 
tant pastor to Eevf Welford P. 
Carter, preached the sermon 
last Sunday morning at Cat- 
Vary Baptist Church in the ab- 
sence of Rev. Carter who was 
attending the board meeting 
of the -National Baptist Con- 
vention in Hot Springs, Ark. 

The Cathedral Choir present- 
ed special music to comple- 
ment Rev. Bynum's sermon, "I 
Will Lift Up Mine Eye* Unto 
the Hills From Whence Com- 
eth My Help." • 



ur'cli 



Thursday, January 28, 1960 


Tht California Eagl«-~5 


TO CONDUCT HOSPITAL SURfEY—Officialt of Avalon Memorial Hospital art 
pictured with Miss Libby Clark, public relations expert who uill conduct a sunry amonq 
Sffro physiciant for joint ownership of the expanded hospital. The offer nf board member- 
ship and voting privileges is expected to serve ns incentive for investment by doctors. From 
left: (sealed) Miss Clark and Ted Buckhalter. co-nrdinntor. Standing: Richard F. Roth, 
administrator and Albert S. Greenberg. (Irving Smith) 


Nonnondie Women's Day 
Sunday School Movie Set 

The Missionary Society of the Normandie Avenue 

; Community Baptist Church will climax its Women's 

Week at Normandie Sunday, Jan. 31, with a special 

Women's Day Program at both the 11 a.m. and the 

■ " — *'3:30 p.m. services. 

Mt. Morlah's j >- ^ -^' ^>' '^ 
Chorus Sings in| 
Flower Festival | 

The Mount Moriah Baptist 
Church Inspirational Chorus I 


was 
chairman for the women of 
Normandie at a musical tea 
last Sunday and a midweelt 
prayer retreat. 

MeMloh Women Join ^he survey is designed 

Mrs. Margaret Jones, the interest Negro physicians 


Seek Doctors 
To Invest in 
Hospital Unit 

Libby Claris Associates, 
public relations firm, has been 
retained to conduct a survey 
for Avalon Memorial Hospital, 
Ted Buclihalter, official of the 
hospital, revealed on Monday. 

to 
in 
the area to become an offi- 
cial part of the hospital 
through investment and board 
memberships, Buckhalter said. 
Architect Roy E. Sea ley 


The Philomatheon Club will 
serve a brunch on Jan. 31 from 
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Proceeds will 
be given to the NAACP. 

• • • 

Mariarf Garrett and Billy R«y 
Johnson were united in holy 
wedlock by Rev. W. P. Carter 
at Calvary Baptist Church par- 
sonage. The couple will live 
at 1507 16th street. Both are 
students in Bay area schools. 

• * « 

Funeral services were con- 
ducted, for Gustavus Chester 
Turner, who died on Jan. 19, 
at New Bethel Baptist Chufch 
with Rev. L. M. McCraw per 
forming the service. Spalding 
Mortuary was in charge of 
the services with interment in 
Woodlawn Cemetery. 

He is survived by his son, 
Gus Jr.; three grandchildren; 
also his sisters, Mrs. Lee Sa- 
vanna Lee Walton, Mrs. Fred- 
erilia Shorts, Mrs. Georgia 
Hawkins, Emma Lorenzo, Troy 
Alonzo and Octave Turner, 
and his brother, Ed Turner Jr., 
in addition to several nieces 
and nephews. 


City College 
Choir to Sing 
At Hamilton 


Los Angeles Baptist Ministers! a 19 bed to a 50 bed facility, 
Union^ She 15 the mother of | ^ spot check of the area re- 
S.X children. The women o'vealed that while Negro physi- 
Messiah Baptist Church will'^,,^^ ,„h th^ir patiente are 


, wife of the Rev. Whalen S. 
presented a "Rainbow of • Jones, pastor of Messiah Bap- 
K lowers Festival" of t h e ' tist Church, will be the guest 
church laat Sunday. ! speaker at 3:30 p.m. 

The Inspirational chorus is, Mrs. Jones Is chairman of _^ 

directed by the renowned] the Activity Program for the! completed plans recently for 
Thurston Frasier. whose; Baptist Ministers' Wives of the expansion of the hospital from 
delicate direction makes each ' ' ' " ....... 

member sing as though he 
were saying, "Oh! that I had 
a thousand voices to praise mesj>i*n oapiisi. \..{iurLii wui .i.-^ -_j tv,/,!. 

my God with a thousand! accompany Mrs. Jones to Nor- l^.j^tually the mainstay of hos 

™*""'*- ; pitals in the area, none have 

Rev. NeLson B. Higgins. Jr..; financial interest in the hos- 

will preach at 11 a.m. on j pitals, or board membership, 

•Jesus and Women'. | g. B. Bratton. attorney and 

j To Mote Movie , Certified Public Accountant 

I Fifty children of the Sunday 'Whom the Clark agency re- 

School will participate in aitained prior 'to undertaking 

progress report movie which! the survey, has put a stamp 

I will be made at the church at of approval on the hospital's 

I 9:30 a.m. Jan. 31. The film expan.sion program and finan- 

will be shown March 13. 'cial status 

Mrs. Edna Collers will serve I 

as technician. Sylvester Thom- 
as is superintendent. A Living 
Memorial series of activities is 
planned for the church accord- 
ing to Rev. Higgins, pastor of 
church. 


tongues!" 

Among the ,<»tirring per- 
formances during the after- 
noon were the selection."! on 
the Organ by young Alexander 
Hamilton and the participa- 
tion by three choirs in the 
"Amen Chorus" which was 
directed by Mr«. A. C. Bilbrew. 

Rev. E. L. Pleasant is pas- 
tor of Mt. Morah, which is 
located at 470 W. 43rd street. 


VENICE NEWS 

Mr. and Mrs. Willie White 
are the proud parents of a 6- 
pound 9-ounce girl born on 
Monday, Jan. 18. Mrs. White 
is the sister of Mrs. Velma 
Cole, 1337 Sixth avenue, in 

Venice. 

* • • 

Phillips Chapel CME Church 
held union services last Sun- 
day, with Rev. Harry M. Da- 
vis, pastor of the First AME 
Church -by-the-Sea, delivering 

a stirring sermon. 1 

* « • 

Several members of PhlllipB 
Chapel attended a showing of 
the Council of Churches-spon- 
scored film, 'The Big Fish- 

ei?nan." 

* • • 

Mrs. Marlon Downs will be 
guest speaker for Missionary 
Day on Jan. 31 at Phillips 
Chapel CME Church. 


A Hamilton MethOdlat 
Church All Youth Festival will 
open at 8 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 
30, at the church, 6330 S. Fig- 
ueroa street. Rev. John N. 
Doggett, Jr. will preach at 9 
a.m. Oh "Your* for the Ask- 
ing." At 9:30 a.m. there will 
be a special chtirch school 
session. 

At 10:45 a.m. John Iboko, 
from Nigeria, Africa, will be 
the ^uest speaker. He will 
speak on "The Role of the 
Afro-American in the Devel- 
opment of Africa." Mr. Iboko 
will receive his doctorate de- 
gree In public administration 
at use this year. 

The Youth Choir, under the 
direction of N. Roy Van Good- 
ridge, will feature outstand- 
ing locrl and guest soloists. 

The outstanding Los An- 
geles City College a Capella 
Concert choir under the direc- 
tion of R. J. PetersOTi will be 
presented by the Calendar 
Clubs of Hamilton Methodist 
Church, 6330 S. Figueroa street, 
at the church Jan. 31 at 5:30 
p.m. ,i> 

The director has studied at 
Julliard School of Music in 
New York, and is considered 
to be one of the outstanding 
directors of a Cappella choirs. 
Several soloists will appear. 

Mrs. Olivia Thomas is the 
general chairman of the Cal- 
endar Clubs and Mrs. Zadie 
Breckenridge is the prompter. 
\ 



British Parliament Member to 
Speak at Holman This Sunday 

Fenper Brockway, member of the British Parli- 
ment, will speak at Holman Methodist Church, 3320 
W. Adams blvd., Monday, Feb. 1,- at 8 p.m. He will 
discuss "How Can We Solve the Dilemma of an 
Armed WorW that Gives Us No Security T' 
sponsors of the meeting in-'* ' ' ~" 


La Mar Hill 


La Mor Hill 
Is Funeral 
Board Head 

For the second time in six 
years, John LaMar Hill, presi- 
dent of A n g e 1 u s Funeral 
Home, has been elected presi- 
dent of the California State 
Board of Funeral Directors' 
and Embalmers. 

Hill, 36, is one of the young- 
est heads of a large mortuary 
in the state. He is also head 
of the fifth ranking mortuary 
out of the state's 750. He is 
going into his 7th year on the 
Board, to which he was ap- 
pointed as the first Negro by 
forhier Gov. Goodwin J. 
Knight 


elude the American Assoda 
tion for Afro-American Rela- 
tionf, Fellowship of Reconcil- 
iation, Friends Committee on 
Legislation, Humanist Council, 
Methodist Confepence Board 
Of Christian Social Relations, 
United World Federalists, 
Women's International League 
for Peace and Freedom and 
Workmen's Circle. 

Dr. L. L. White, minister of 
will welcome the speaker, and 
will give the welcoming and 
Georgiana Hardy will chair 
the meeting. 

Brockway will be interro- 
gated after his talk by news- 
men John Grover. Irving Fang 
and Lew Irwin. Brockway has 
written and spoken extensive- 
ly on disarmament, colonial 
freedom and world economic 
development. 

Tuesday, Feb. 2, he will 
speak in Pasadena at 8 p.m. 
at the Holliston Avenue Meth- 
odist Church, 1305 E. Colo- 
rado blvd., on "Africa and 
Asia Awake — Are We Asleep?" 


ALFRED O. ANDERSON 

Funeral services for Alfred 
Owen Anderson, 64, 1706 W. 
60th place, who died Friday 


The State Board directs the 'at a Santa Monica hospiUl, 


Vermont Square 
To Present Speaker 

Vermont Square Methodist 
Church will offer a special ly^g 
program for the first day of 
Negro History Week. On Jan. 7 
the African woman leader, 
Lucy Lameck, will speak un- 
der the auspices of Delta Sig- 
ma Theti* sorority. 
. . k 1 — 


PATRONIZE 

EAGLE 
ADVERTISERS 


.ARE YOU IN A RUT?' 


If You Want Paic* of Mind-Self Confidenc* 
ContMitmMit— Friends — Money 

C^L RI. 7-4734 


GIFTED SPIRITUAL READERS- 

• ADVISI ON ALL MAHIRSI I I 

• ALL QUESTIONS ANSWIRED 


1101 W. VERNON 


(Block W«*t of 
Vermont) 


AX 5-1644 


Great Books 
Group Formed, 
To Meet Feb. 3 

A new Great Books dis- 
cussion group will hold its 
first meeting Wednesday, Feb. 
3, from 8-10 p.m., at the 
Parish House of the Church of 
the Advent, 4976 W. Adams 
jblvd. The group is open to all 
adults who wish to read or re- 
read the great writings of the 
past and discuss them with i 
group of neighbors and 
friends. 

Mrs. Ross Ryan and Mrs. 
John Raber will act as lead- 
ers. 

'The group will meet every 
two weeks," stated Mrs. Ryan, 
"and will discuss a different 
work at each meeting." 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Church 

■AST JAtli AND TIINtTT STRim - RIV. JOHN C. IAIN, MINISTIR 

lUNDAT, JANUARY 24 

SiRMON TOeKt "CNRUTIANtTY MAKIS THf DIfriRINCI" 

Rev. Bain Preaching at 9 A.M.— II A.M. 
The public it cordially invited to attend. 


Herald-Dispatch 
To Give Awards 
On Anniversary 

The controversial Muslim 
leader Elijah Muhammad will 
receive the first of the awards 
to be given in celebration of 
its eighth anniversary by the 
Herald-Dispatch on Sunday, 
Feb. 7, at 3 p.m., at the Olym.- 
pic Auditorium. 

Awards will also be made 
to outstanding leaders in the 
community by Mr. and Mrs. 
S. Alexander, publishers of 
the paper whose offices are 
located at 1431 W. Jefferson 
blvd. 

Spokesmen for Muhammad 
announced that he would ar- 
range a conference with all 
the Christian leaders in the 
community to discuss the "Fu- 
ture of the Negro in America" 
and to attempt to unit* all 
Negroes into one common 
brotherhood. 

The keynote address of the 
meeting will be. made by Mr. 
Muhammad. 


New President for 
Christians and Jews 

Carrol M. Shanks, president | and 
of the Prudential Insurance 
Co. of America, has been 
elected Protestant national 
co-chairman of the National 
Conference of Christians and 
Jews, it was announced by 
Dr. Lewis W e b-^ t e r Jones, 
president of the organization. 


funeral home industry 
throughout the state, having 
jurisdiction, in addition, over 
3000 embalmers. It grants and 
denies licenses, determines 
maintains ethical prac- 


were held Wednesday, Jan. 27 
at 1:30 p.m. at the Utter-Mc 
Kinley Brbadway Chapel. In 
terment was in Lincoln Memo 
rial Park Cemetery, 


Tdents to be 
Returned at 
First AME 

The climax of th« 'Talent 
Rally" being conducted at 
First AME Church will be 
celebrated on Jan. 31. Each 
church member was given a 
dollar bill, and told to report 
on their goal of $100 on a 
given date. 

Many activities have been 
presented by members singly 
and In groups to raise the 
quotas. Talents will be return- 
ed following the 10:45 a.m. 
senHce. Food will be aerved 
all attending following the 
service. 

At 3:30 p.m., Rev. C. A. Hell- 
son, of Pleasant Hill Baptist 
Church, will be the guest 
speaker. His choir and con- 
gregation will join First AME 
in the worship service. Rev. 
H. H. Brookins, pastor of the 
church, used this method to 
raise the initial funds for the 
eventdal re-location of histo- 
ric Eighth and Towne. 


Bapt. Ministers' 
Officers to be 
installed Tues. 

Officers of the Los Angeles 


Mr. Anderson, a native of i Baptist Ministers Union will 


tices, and generally'"prornotes|Texas, had lived here 14 years, be installed at a luncheon to 
the public interest," Hill said He worked as a porter at Mike be held at Morning Star Bap- 
in commenting on his elec- 1 Lyman's. He is survived by tist Church, 1334 E. 41st street, 
tion. jhis wife, Corine Anderson, five Tuesday. Feb. 2, at 11 a.m. 

Hill succeeds C. Lewis Ed- i sons. Sammie, Billy G., Paul Rev. P. J. Ellis, serving a 
wards, of Edwards and Cum-jE., Willy and James L. Clif- second term as president, will 
mings Mortuary, of Pasadtna. iton; two daughters, Pearline host the ministers and their 
as president. iFord and Katherine Burke. I wives at the luncheon. 


THE 


Hera Id - D ispatch 


CELEBRATES ITS 


8m Jjirtltdaxf ^:Z/^t 


"nnivcrsarxf 


BY PRESENTING TO 


The Honorable 

ELIJAH MUHAMMAD 


TO PRESENT DRAMA 

Ross Snyder Playground 
will present a drama at their 
Valentine's Day party Feb. 
11, starting at 4 p.m. 


Tormenting Rectal Itch 
Stopped In Minutes 

Science Finds New Healing Substance That 
Promptly Stops Itching and Pain of Piles 



TIME Id th# test' o» 
eatitf^oUon 

PEOPLE'S FOT'TERAL home has bifou^ht sati8fa(w | 
tion to Los AngelM families for more than 20 yeara-ei i 
satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and honest* 

service, 4{l4l>^JUg'3 8{)fifiiMft<<>^^ 


PEOPtrS PUNCRAU HOME 


*»m&4un$m 4tMiMil<A?»NM 


AAiNTi s<7iai 


New York, N. Y. (SpecUl) - 

One of the most common afflic- 
tions is a condition known as 
"itching piles". It is most 
emberrassinK for the victim 
during' the day and eapecially 
aggrarating at night. 

No matter what you've used 
without results -l)«r«'s good 
news. For the fitst time, science 
lias found a new healing: sub- 
stance with the astonishing 
ability to promptly stop the 
burning itch and pain. It actu- 
ally shrinks hemorrhoids — 
without surgery. Medical sci- 
ence has proTed this substanc* 
produces a remarkably effec- 
tire rate ot healing. Ita germ- 
killing properties also help pre- 
vent infection. 

In one hemorrhoid Case after 
another "very striking improve- 


ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by doctors' observation!. 
This improvement was main- 
tained in eases where doctors' 
observations were continued 
over a period of months I Among 
these sufferers were a wide 
variety of hemorrhoid condi- 
tions, seme of 10 to 20 years' 
duration. 

The secret is this new healing 
substance (Bio-Dyne*) —dis- 
covery of a world-famous 
research institution. Thia sub- 
stance is now obtainablein oint- 
mentor suppotitoryf ormknown 
as Preparation H.* Ask for 
Preparation H suppositories 
(convenient to carry if awar 
from home) or Preparation R 
ointment with special applica- 
tor. Absolute satisffcetioa guar- 
anteed or money refandeo. 

•R««. U.S. Pit. oc 


McCOY MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH 

"Whmn friundthip !• Cotcft/n* Net a Cotchwerrf" 
•02 1. 4«tli Street, AD. 1-4271 Rev. I. A. Amiersee, Palter 

Church School, 9:30 e.m. Mornlni Wenhip, 10i4S ■.m. 

STU, 6:30 p.m. Ivoning WersMp, 7i3S p.ai. 

Tho Pub/jc if CorcHe/ly InvtteW Te Afteerf 

Join Rev. E. A. Andersen in 'Mements ef Meditation'' 

Every Sunday at 9 p.m. over KOFI Radio (1230 Keyc.) 

McCOY MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH 


75r 




■ 

i 



■»> 

■" • - ^ 


Nf %##- 




^ 


n> 


\7he <JXonoraiie ^liJaH <yrlHnammad 

an award for his 
Undisputedleadership 

OF THI ' ' \ 

NEGRO PEOPLE THROUGHOUT, AMERICA 

. Also "^ -^ 

OTHER COMMUNITY AWARDS . 


!."} 


SUNDAY/FEB. /-a P-M. 

OLYl^PIC AUDITORIUM 1 Sth & GRAND 

Hear Mr. Muhammad's 

Report on African -Asian Tour 






i 



Despite his sensational kayo-studded undefeated string 
of 28 straight wins (22 by knockout) Raymundo "Battling" 
Torres of Reynosa, Mexico, is rated no better than even 
money to lift the world junior welter title from Carlos Ortiz" 
brow In the Coli.«= um on Thursday night, Feb. 4. Ortiz won 
the title by stopping Kenny Lane last June. 

In the co-feature 15-roun,der, for the banty title. Cham- 
pion Jose Becerra of Guadalajara, Mexico, is a l(T-7 favorite 
to retain his crown. when he meets France's Alphonse Ha- 
liml in a retake. Becerra kayoed Haliml in eight rounds on 
July 8 in the Sports Arena. 

By stopping the Frenchman, Becerra became the first 
Mexican National to win the undisputed world banty title. 
Raul (Raton) Macias of Mexico held the NBA version of the 
title, which he lost to Halimi. 

Meanwhile, action at the Olympic boxoffice, and pther 
ticket outlets, is booming with all indications pointing to- 
wards a record gate long before fight time. 

"It's one of the most amazing ticket rushes I've ever 
seen," smiled Mike LeBell, Olympic boxoffice chief. "Why on 
Saturdays and Sunday^ there's never a let-up of cars, most 
of them bearing Mexico license plates, driving up to the 
boxoffice. Some of those fellows come from over 250 miles 
away, and they don't just buy a pair, but usually 20 or 30, 
and the best seats available." 

The Olympic boxoffice is open daily from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
On Saturdays and Sundays the window is open from 10 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. 

Additional ticket outlets include the Coliseum, Statler 
Hotel, Blltmore Hotel, Wilton Hotel in Long Beach and Geor- 
gino's Club House at Pico and Figueroa (open to 2 a.m.) 


r^ "fHE TEE 


## 


.WnH MAQOli HATHAWAY, 


Last year in November we 
printed a letter that Atty. Leo 
Branton wrote to Norman 
Johnson, director of Parks t^nd 
Recreation for Los Angeles 
County. 

This letter asked Johnson 
to accept an affidavit or to 
put some similar substitute 
into immediate force as a 
means of keeping some of the 
county golf clubs from segre- 
gating players. 

In a previous conference 
Johnson had promised to do 
everything in his power to 
get the county to use this af- 
fidavit after it had been 
drawn up by Branton. Here Is 
the wording of the affidavit: 

" _ hereby declares 

that he (she) is the 

ot the „ Golf Club, 

and makes this statement as 
an officer of said Club, and 
and one behalf of said Club. 
"Our organization has been 
made aware of the public pol- 
icy of non-discrimination of 
the County of Los Angeles in 
connection with the operation 
of all county golf courses and 
their facilities. In order to use 
such facilltiee, and to have 
certain times and facilities 
reserved for our special bene- 
fit, we hereby declare as fol- 
lows: 

"1. That the Constitution 
and By-Laws of our organiza- 
tion contain no clause or pro- 
vision prohibiting member- 
ship to, or reserving member- 
ship to, any gn"oup or jjersons 
on account or race, color or 
creed. 

"2. The declaratiOTs con- 
tained herein are under pain 
and penalty of i>erjury. 

"Signed _ " 

This is the letter Mr. John- 
son wrote after receiving this 
affidavit: 
"Dear Sir: 

"Having received your letter 
of November 25th, we are im- 
pressed with the fact that the 
question raised involved cer- 
tain legal decisions which are 
most properly the concern of 
the County Counsel's Office. 

"We are most happy to Indi- 
cate that as in the past our 
department is very anxious 
to cooperate with Mrs. Hath- 


away and you in dealing with 
the problem of insuring that 
the operations of our facili- 
ties are conducted in the most 
democratic manner possible. 

"As you know, the history 
of this problem has seen our 
Department working with you 
in eliminating somfe of the 
situations which certainly had 
to be dealt with. However, 
when the question of a legal 
affidavit comes under consid- 
eration, we cannot help feel- 
ing that the County's action 
in this regard would have to 
be governed by the advice of 
its legal counsel,' as vested 
with the County Counsel. 
Therefore, we ask your fore- 
bearence in this matter until 
this information can be re- 
viewed by County Counsel, 
after which a reply will be 
directed to you. 

"I want to thank you again 
for your interest and your as- 
sistance in helping us develop 
a proper operating policy in 
our various facilities. 

"Yours very truly, 
"N. S. Johnson" 


Gilliam 

Signs 

Contract 

Jim (Junior) Gilliam, Spec- 
ial ^ Representative for the 
Hiram Walker, Inc., when he 
is not leading off for the L.A. 
Dodgers, was the ninth Dodger 
to come to contract terms for 
the 1960 season, E. J. (Buzzle) 
Bavasi, Vice - President and 
General Manager announced 
last week. 

Gilliam, one of baseball's 
finest lead-off batters, was 
the Dodger regular third base- 
man t^iroughout most of the 
1959 season and had a tre- 
mendous on-base percentage 
in the Dodgers' World Champ- 
ionship season. He walked 96 
times, hit 131 singles, 18 
doubles, 4 triples and 3 
homers and, of course, reach- 
ed base now and then on 
misplays by the opposition. 

He was the toughest Dodger 
to fan, going down on strikes 
only twenty-five times. It was 
his seventh season in a row 
that he placed among the top 
ten in the league in this de- 
partment and he has shruck 
out only 222 times during his 
major league career. 

Once he gets on base. Junior 
makes the most of it. He has 
scored 705 runs in seven 
seasons with the Dodgers. He 
stole 23 bases last season and 
was the team leader in the 
thievery set for the sixth 
straight year. He now has 
stolen 132 bases and only one 
currently active Nla t i o n a 1 
Leaguer has stolen more over 
the same 7-year span — Willie 
Mays, of the San Franeisco 
Giants, with 168. 



FORMER HEAVYWEIGHT — Champion Joe Louis 
shows thf obstacle stroke to Las Vegas' lovely Audrey JVhit- 
more ivhile pausing in Miami at the Sir John Hotel cnroute 
east from Hai'o-na, Cuba iihcre he wns guest of the Castro 
government. Louis iiill participate in the annual North- 
South Golf Tournament in Miami, Feb. 14-IS. 


Hailem Globetzotten 
In Four Game Series 



BEAUTIFUL 


: CALIENTE * 

^ IN 010 MDMCO 

OfMM IVIRT SAT. t, MIN. 
^'*' IAIN M SHINI 4/^ 

^ .rtOROUOHMIID -«^ 



^11 


RACES EVEtY 
SAT. « SUN. 


11 


AND SATURDAY 
M- DAILY DOUBLE A QUINELA'*'^ 
BOOKS « MOTUEU ^ 

i* FABULOUS 5-tO BETTINO .i^ 
^ POST TIME 12 NOON ."^ 

SUN. POST TIME 13:30 HAH^ 

^ FANTASTIC RETURNS j/l 
¥*- Pm Yo«f Wa«w ^ 

Tw» 0*llara or Mm* |^ 
Ifr P*r«i«R ieek OpM Oslly 
^. On All Major Track* 

GREYHOUND RACING '^ 
^ WHi, RESUME FRIDAY, «k 

JAN. S FOR 3 NIOHTS 
^A WEEK-FRIDAY, SATUR-«» 
DAYL AND SUNDAY. 

^ rMST POST TUU 7>4S |i.m. ^ 

4«OT EVERY SATURDAY 
¥t- AND fUNOAY NIONTS "^ 

«^ * ^ 

_ JOHN S. ALISSIO ^ 


UCLA Cage Team* 
To Play in Denver 

Idle last weekend because 
of fall semester final exami- 
nations, John Wooden's UCLA 
basketball team resumes play 
with a pair of Intersectional 
games in the Rocky Mountain 
area, first meeting Denver's 
Pionaprs at Denver, Friday 
(Jan. 29) and then Air Force 
Academy's Falcons at nearby 
Colorado Springs the next 
night 

The Bruins' hopes for the 
12th straight winning season 
under (3oach Wooden were 
considerably enhanced with 
their impressive 63-62 victory 
over SC's favored Trojans last 
week. And so they'll go into 
the second half of their sea- 
son with an 8-7 record and 11 
games to go. 


NIGHT GAMES 

The National League has 
booked 312 night games for 
1960, the Dodgers will play 64 
at home. 


COACH OF THE TEAR 

In' Lexington, N. C, Charles 
England, coach of the Dunbar 
High School was named 
"Coach of the Year" for the 
entire Davidson County. 

In two years at Lexington, 
he has an overall record of 
17 wins, 3 losses and one tie. 



TO BE HONORED — 
Coach A. S. "Jake" Gaither 
of the Florida Al^M Univer- 
sity Rattlers, will be honored 
as the "Coach of the Decade" 
during the WO Per Cent 
Wrong Club banquet at the 
Waluhaje Hotel in Atlanta 
Friday night, Jan. 29. 


BggieCage Stai 
Is Honor Student 

Alvin Attles, co-captain and 
star playmaker with the A&T 
College Aggies basketball 
team, was listed on the college 
honor roll for the fall quarter, 

Attles turned in an average 
of 3.33 out of a possible 4.00 
and was near the top in "B" 
standing. 

He is joined in the select 
group of students by Paul 
Swann, star guarterback and 
Charles Debose, halfback and 
president of the Student Coun- 
cil. 

All are seniors. 


AL "SMITTY" SMITH 

Suggests That Yos BUY and TRY 


The Harlem Globetrotters, 
who open their four - game 
V i .s i t to our city Saturday 
night, at the Pan Pacific, are 
more than just a basketball 
team. They're an institution, 
known and loved everywhere 
because they bring laughter 
and entertainment. 

The 1960 team, 33rd edition 
of the Globetrotters, is cer- 
tainly no exception. Spindly- 
legged Meadowlark LemOn is 
the current Clown Prince, and 
he has an assistant Prince In 
Bob "Showboat" Hall. 

In this opening game, the 
Trotters will meet Baltimore 
Rockets, composed of former 
college stars and coached by 
the Little Giant, 5-7 "Red" 


Klotz, one of Villanova's all- 
time greats. 
There will be afternoon and 



Ray Butler 
Top Scorer 
In AAU Loop 

LaFonda's Ray Butler, a tall 
forward from Santa Ana JC, 
continues to lead the Major 
AAU basketball individual 
scoring race with a 25.5 mark 
for six games. 

In second place Is Willis 
Thomas with 23.3 in seven 
games; next comes Roy Irvin, 
23.0 in six games; Henry Ron- 
quilla, 19.0 in six games; and 
Bob Laemmle, 15.3 in four 
games. 

Thomas plays for Broadway 
Federal Savings, Irvin for 
Mirror Glaze, Ronquillo for 
Caballeros a/id Laemmle for 
Lockyers. 

Kirby's Shoes, who have 
paced the league since the 
opening whistle of the season, 
have been toppled. Pasadena's 
Mirror Glaze rules the roost, 
with Long Beach's entry, 
Cockyers Market, charging 
hard in the second slot. 

Johnny Moore, former UCLA 
ace and coach of the Broad- 
Federal Saving quintet, has 
whipped his team into a 
smooth unit. Paced by Willis 
Thomas, Maurice Washington, 
Bob Savage, Clayborne Jones 
and Don Land, the team can 
trip any aggregation on any 
given night 

'Major AAU League Standings 
Team WLPFPAPet. 

Pa«. Mirror Glaze 5 1 549 537 .833 

Lockyeri Mkti 3 1 350 328 .750 

Kirby'a Shoes 5 2 619 559 .714 

Broadway Federal S 2 595 60S .714 

La Fonda Rest. 4 4 «56 604 .500 

ILWU Dockers .... 6 344 479 .000 
Caballeros - 6 461 541 .000 



Elgin Baylor 
Here for Big 
Cage Benefit 

Professional basketball's 
drejun duel between Elgin 
Baylor and Wilt Chamberlain 
comes to Los Angeles this 
Monday night when the Min- 
neapolis Lakers meet the 
Philadelphia Warriors for the 
benefit of the Salesian Boys 
of East Los Angeles. 

Baylor and Chamberlain 
have collegiate and profes- 
sional careers which parallel 
each other. 

Both were All- American, 
Baylor at Seattle University 
and Chamberlain at Kansas 
and each skipped his final 
year of collegiate eligibility 
to turn pro. 

Baylor joined the Lakers 
last season and iminediately 
became a sensation. He was 
named the NBA Rookie of the 
Y^r after lifting Minneapolis 
back into contention in the 
Western Division. 

Chamberlain went to the 
Harlem 'Globetrotters for a 
season breaking the attend- 
ance record for the traveling 
cage clowns of the world. 
When he became eligible for 
the NBA this season, the War- 
riors bought up his contract 
and, like Baylor, Wilt is on 
his way to Rookie of the Year 
by bringing Philadelphia from 
the Eastern Division cellar to 
second place. 

Currently, they are scoring 
at an average of over 40 
f)oints per game with Cham- 
berlain leading the league 
and Baylor ranking third be- 
hind runner up Jack Twyman 
of the Cincinnati Royals. 


KAROL FAGEROS—The 
Golden Goddess famed for 
her golden panties as well as 
her skill in tennis is due here 
with the Harlem Globetrot- 
ters this week. 

night games at 2:30 and 8 
the following day, next Sun- 
day, also at the Pan. 

Special added attraction 
this year is Althea Gipson, 
who. shares with Helen Wills 
and Maureen Connolly the 
distinction of having won the 
Wimbleton and U.S. tennis 
titles two years in a row. 
Althea will play best 8 out of 
15-game set with lovely Karol 
Fageros, of golden panties 
fanie. 

Among the Trotter favorites 
who'll be seen this year — in 
addition to Meadowlark and 
Showboat-^are Clarence Wil 
son, team captain, and the 
best set-shot in pro basket- 
ball; "Tex" Harrison; Bobby 
Milton, and three dazzling 
newcomers: Joe Buckhalter, 
6:8, Joe Burtop, 6-8, and Ernie 
Wagner,' 6-2. 

Between the halves variety 
includes: Kimr Yokoi, Bale- 
rina of the Bicycle; Carmenas 
Duo, foremost European hand- 
balancers; The Parrys, re- 
bound bouncers; and Richard 
Bergmann vs "Cannonball" 
Fujii, table-tennis. 

Fourth and final locaV 
game: Sports Arena, Sunday 
afternoon, Feb. 7th. 


More Parking Area 

Good news is in the offing 
for every car owner wh» has 
tried to find a parking spwice 
for a Coliseum or Sports Arena 
event 

B. Jack Ansley, chairman of 
the Sixth District Agricultural 
Association Parking commit- 
tee, repKjrts that 1000 new 
spaces will be available along 
Santa Barbara Avenue in time 
for the baseball se<ason. 

Currently there are parking 
facilities for 4000 cars and 100 
busses in the 'association's lots 
surrounding the Coliseum. 


OLD MEXICO: Five selectors 
swept all six races to win $12,- 
320 each in sharing first-place 
money on the 5-10 public 
handicapping contest last 
Sunday at Callente Race 
Track. 

Four of the six were tnutuel 
favorites. 

Ninety-three ticket holders 
divided the consolation mon- 
ey, each paying $220.60 for 
five winners. 

The 5-10 pool grossed $91,- 
260. 

(HOUSES TO ffATCB) 
CAUENTE 

EMPLI'S HOST — Now dead fit. 
HONG KONG — Beaten a mxe. 

Go back. 
SUSPENSE — Getting good again. 
ECHO DRUMS — Much better 

than rated. 
MRS.MURPHY — Six furlong*,- 

home free. 
SAY NEIGH — Ready to pop. 
FRIENDLY ISIS — My special. 
DARING MAN — Came from far 

back. 
CONRAD — Now fit a* a fiddle. 
PERFEST LEE — Next out OK. 
ROSE PALE — Three star goodie. 

SANTA AMITA 

BALLAST GEM — Mile or ovr, 

OK. 
GRECIAN GLORY — Plenty of 

speed. 
NO DEVIL — dockers' goodie. 
ROLLER RED -7 Look out for this 


Paiks vs. Figueroa 

Joey Parks, Omaha light- 
weight, faces Ernesto Figueroa 
of Mexico City in tonight's 
(Thursday) 10- round main 
event at the Olympic Audi- 
torium. 


Teachers 
To Play 
Cage Game 

For the third successive 
year, teachers of the Willow, 
brook School District are 
donning basketball uniforms 
to do their bit for the bene- 
fit of the March of Dimes 
program to beat polio. ^ 

In past years the teachers 
have been successful .not 
only in beating their oppo- 
nents but also in raising a 
whopping number of dimes 
for a very worthy cause. 

The annual Basketball-for- 
Dimes game this year will 
pit the Willowbrook Teach- 
ers against the Faculty of 
the Ralph Bunche Jr. High 
School, Friday, Jan. 29, at 
the Southern Area Boys' Club, 
1339 E. 120th street, just off 
Central avenue. 

The big game starts at 8 
p.m. A preliminary will start 
at 7:30 with junior teams 
from the schools facing each 
other. 

Charlie Neal, star second 
baseman of the L.A. Dodgers, 
World Champions for 1959, 
will referee the game. 

Spiectators to the game are 
asked to contribute as many 
dimes for admission as pos- 
sible, as all go to the March 
of Dimes fund. 


MAYMONT — Tab, tote for early 

action. 
WARFARE — Fit as they coma. 

INITIATE — This one cai^ fly. 

NORTHER — Get yours on this 
one. 

TENSE INDIAN — A sleeper. 

PIE QUEEN — TV^ining \»ry 
good. 

" (Special Note: My picks for the 
San Vicente Handicap are War. 
fare, 'first; Tompion, second; and 
Noble Noor, third. Upsets could 
be New Policy or John Williams. 
For the Maturity I select Tomy 
Lee, first; Bagdad, second; and 
King O' Turf, third. Longshot 
upsets. Mr. Eiffel. King Ara, and 
American Comet.) 

Keep this column for future 
refetrence. It appears only in 
the California Eagle, out and 
on your new^ands every 
Wednesday. Ftor the best in 
the "Sport of Kings'* read the 
California Eagle. 



ELECTRONICS CLASS 

A new class in electronics 
and "iV servicing will open 
at Belmont- Metropolitan 
Adult School, 1575 W. Second 
street, on Feb. 2, H. O. Backer, 
principal, announced this 
week. *' 


TO DUEL—fVUt Chamher. 
lain comes t» town to duel 
Elgin Baylor when ike Lak- 
ers and the H'arriors hook 
up in a game of basketball at 
the L.A. Sports Arena Feb. 1. 

Charlie Neal Starred 

Dodger second - baseman 
Charlie Neal didn't play 
baseball in high school, but 
was an all - District football 
halfback and a basketball 
star as well at Longview, 
Texas. 


WEBB VS. OLSON 

Middlew eight Ellsworth 
(Spider) Webb moves up to 
the light hea\'j'weight class 
in San Francisco's Cow Pal- 
ace on Feb. 15, to fight Bobo 
Olson in a non -televised 10-_ 
rounder. 


SUPPOta SAUSIAN BOYS' lASTSIDt AREA BlNEflT • SUPPORT SAUSIAN BOYS' 



NBA PRO BASKETBALL 

F«ST LEAGUE GAME EVK PLAYED IN LA. 

MINNEAPOLIS 


LAKERS 


FMrturing ilgin Boyfor 
— V*rsus -y 

Philadelphia WARRIORS 

Featuring (Wilt (Th« Stilt) Chombwlain 
Also Solcsion High Mustang Band 

MONDAY - FEB. Isl - 8 P.M. 
L A. SPORTS ARENA 

SANTA BARBARA and FIGUEROA 

nckots ■» Mvtiral Agencies, >•. Col. Music C«„ 7)7 t». 
Mil St., SolasiM Htgb >clw*l, MO South Set* St., ■■4 
'ts Arena Sex OfHca. tor I rt e mwt lee eall AN. 1-7124 



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SUPPORT SALESIMi BOYS' EASTSIDE M£A BENiFIT • SUPPORT SAUSIAN BOYS 


In Glass and Cans at Your ' 
Favorit* Shopping C«nt«r 

H. W. PiNGREE COMPANY 



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SEEK HISTORY WEEK TITLE— One of these lovely 
Soung ladies will be crowned Miss Negro History Week at 
the annual celebration's closing reception, Sunday. Feb. 14 
at Will Rogers Auditorium. Seated from left: Evelyn C. 


Wheatley, Clarice Armstrong, Sarah E. Foules. Dona 
Stamps and Anita Washington; Buredene Lonry and Essie 
Robertson, co-chairmen: and Maxine Hard. Standing: 
Theresa Morning and Ethel Rene Parmer. 



COLUMBIA RECORDS JOINT PARTY— Shown at- 
tending colorful cocktail fett in the plush Beverly Hillt 
Hotel's Rodeo Room last Thursday evening art from left: 
Singer Johnny Mathis: Percy Faith, arranger and conduce 
tor : Jean Sampson, Columbia's newest singing star; George 
Hymer of Universal Attractions; Irving Townsend. Colum- 
bta'i new West Coast representative; Libby Clark, public 


relations consultant for Coca Cola Bottling Company; and 
Goddard Lieberscm, president Columbia Records. The affair 
served as a joint introduction of Townsend and Miss Samp-' 
son, whose records "Act Like a Lover" and "Lucky in 
Love'' were recently released. Incidentally Jean will be 
seen and heard rm l^awrenre Wclk's ABC-TV Show Satur- 
day, Jan. 30, at 9 p.m. (Smith) 



BEAUTICIANS' COMMITTEE— Members are going 
ever detail's for their Cosmeticians' Blue Book Directory 
which uill soon be released. Pictured are Betty Thomas and 
Gladys .Moore, seated. Standing from left: Blanche Black, 
Eva Mae James and Mary V. Batiste. Mrs. Batiste is a re- 


cent appointee to the State Board of Cosmetology as an 
examiner. She was a guest of the planning, committee. The 
Blue Book will serve as an aid to all beauticians in tht 
city and sfaie. 


Ollie Sansbury 
Gets Honor 

Mrs. Ollie Sansbury was 
crowned "Mrs. Willing Work- 
er for 1959." at the first. 1960 
meeting of the City of Hope, 
Willing Workers Group 188, 
held at the Pafm Grove ad- 
dress of Mrs. Freda Russell. 

In addition to the crown- 
ing, a token of appreciation 
was given to Evelva Vista 
Temple and Golden Sun 
Lodge of Santa Monica for 
their tremendous support of 
the group in their latest af- 
fairs. 

Plans wgfe.alsp discussed 
for the group's coming ' 
Spring Fashion Tea Bazaar. 


Columbia Records Party Orchid Club 

Elects Prexy 


Lovely Jean Sampson, 
sensational new singing find 
and Columbia recording art- 
ist, bowed formally to the 
press on Thursday at a color- 
ful cocktail-reception in the 
Beverly Hills Hotel.' 

The event also served as 
an occasion for the record- 
ing concern to introduce Irv- 
ing Tpwnsend, executive pro- 
ducer and new. West Coast 
representative for Columbia. 

Currently holding forth at 
the Civic Supper Club in San- 
ta Monica, the stylish per- 
former's -Columbia releases 


are "Act Like a Lover" and 
"Lucky in Love." 

Miss Sampson will guest- 
star on the Lawrence Welk 
Show, Saturday, Jan. 31, at 
6 p.m., Channel -7 ABC-TV. 

Jean, discovered a little 
more than a year ago by 
George Hymer, came west 
with the idea of making a 
career oyt of designing wom- 
en's shoes. Instead, her gold- 
en vocal cords skyrocketed 
her into the limelight as the 
freshest, brightest and most 
talented singing find o£ the 
space age. 


The Orchids, a social and 
charitable club, were first 
organized in 1932 and have 
been active all through the 
years. The ever popular 
Orchids met last Saturday 
night and held election of 
officers. Virginia Johnson, 
businesswoman and social- . 
ite, was unanimously elect- 
ed President; Ellen Street, 
Vice • President ; La Verne 
Mayfield, Secretary; Winona 
Martin, Treasurer; Elizabeth 
Johnson, Business Manager; 
and Fay W. Lewis, Reporter. 


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Thursday, January 28, 1 960 


The California Eagle— 7 


Plari Negro History Week 
Ceremony at City Hall 


A ceremony on the steps 
of City Hall will take place 
at 12 noon, Feb. 8, in ob- 
servanoe of Negro History 
week which is being cele- 
brated from Feb. 7 to Feb. 
14. The unique outdoor com- 
memoration will be held on 
the Spring street side of 
City Hall. 

Among those participat- 
ing in the affair will be 
City Hall employees, the 
American Legion, the Jef- 
ferson High School band 
and city officials. Also 
scheduled to apfjear are 
Atty. Herbert T. Greenwood, 
Grand Master of California 
Prince Hall Masons; Percy 
Simond, Grand Exalted Rul- 
er of California Elks; solo- 
ist Virginia Paris, and Bob 
DeCoy, of radio station 
KGFJ. DeCoy, writer and 
narrator of "This Is Pro- 
gress," will do an on-the- 
spot version of the popular 
Show in addition to a reci- 
tation of the Gettysburg ad- 
dress. 

On Tuesday, Feb. 9, Music 
Night at Ward AME Church 
will feature a variety of lo- 
cal talent. Those slated to 
appear are pianist Gloria 
Rol)erts, singer Dolores Pi- 
per, dramatic reader Helen 
C a 1 1 s, singer Katherine 
Parlms, contralto Ann Hunt- 
er, Baritone Howard Gamble 
and tenor Carl Gibson. 

Among other important 
events of the week-long cele- 
bration, a panel discussion 
in three separate categories 
will be held on Wednesday 
night, Feb. 10, at Golden 
State Mutual Auditorium. 
One discussion group, com- 
prised of Sgt. Carl Martin, 
Ulysses Montgomery- and 
Albert Hard\\ will discuss 
the "History of the Negro in 
the Armed Forces." 

Another, with Mrs. Opal 
Johnson, Mrs. Jessie Mae 
Beavers and William Pol- 
lard serving as panelists, 
will discuss "The Negro in 
Business and Labor." 

A third, comprised of Dr. 
H. Claude Hudson, Dr. Wil- 
liam R. Williams Jr. and 
Atty. Thomas Neusom. will 
discuss "The Effect of Inte- 
gration on Negro Business 
and Professional Groups." 
There also will be a musical 
selection by saxophonist Joe 
Lutcher. 

A major highlight of the 
week's activities is the Cen- 
tennial Luncheori, scheduled 
for Saturday, Feb. 13. in the 
Regency Room of the Shera- 
ton West Hotel. At that time 
awards will be given civic, 
church and fraternal lead- 
ers in the community' for 
their outstanding contribu- 
tions. A sti.ie show, featur- 
ing fashions of the ISth cen- 
tury to 1900, al«o will be pre- 
sented in addition to vocal 


selections by famed teno' 
Arthur Lee Simpkins 2md 
soprano Doris Hooks. 

The observance of this 
year's 11th annual Negro 


History Week in Los Angeles Mrs. Hazel C. Chambers Is' 
is being sponsored by Our chairman of the week's com- 
Authors Study Club, of memoration programs and 
which Mrs. Vassie D. Wright Llewellyn. Alazique is co- 
is president and founder, chairman- 



ORATORICAL CO\TESTANTS — Some of the city's most promising high school stu- 
dents will vie for top honors in the Negro History JVeek oratorical contest. Pictured front 
from left: Trera Bumham, Yvonne Lewis, Blanche Graham. Thrlma Harris and Cassan- 
dra Edmond. Back row from left: Benny Maxwell, Curtis Allen Jr., William Bailey, 
tpOHior of the group; and Gregory Washington. 

Bill Small^wood 




Club JUnique had its 
monthly get-togetlier Sat, 
this one at Maggii Neal's. 
Zeta Phi Beta's threie chap- 
ters assembled over Sat. 
luncheon things at | Raffles 
restaurant, congratulating 
themselves on their jfortieth 
Founder's Daj-. Rev. Ruth 
Bujol. tlieir principal speak- 
er, defined the ideal of 
"Building Finer Woman- 
hood." 

Sat, (30> will be birthday 
for Maurine Browning and 
the next tia\'. bright 'n ear- 
ly, starts Elois Davis' birth- 
day bell ringing. Bill LawTie, 
ex-Angeleno turned eastern- 
er, arrives in March for a 
ta.ste of Calif, life for three 
or four weeks: this uip he'll 
do his playing with help of 
a fire-engine red .station 
wagon. Broila Chavis, the 
bubbly baciielor career girl, 
had virus list membership, 
too: incidentally: her bro'th- 
er recently moved hisj family 
here from Balto. 

Mil Blount, set for 


»0*V9«>*V9«>*V90*Vj3<>»V^O*V9^?iJ 


part of 


the summer vacation in and 
around NYC: she'll spend 
some time with dear friends 
of old. Lefty and Lester 
Granger and Lucille and A. 
P. Randolph. Mary and Ed- 
die Strong add an anniver- 
sary next Wed. (3). Ida Mar- 
tin's share of virus almost 
skidded her into pneumonia 
but she's coming along 
splendidly n o w. Charity 
White expecting a Det-oit 
houseguest within the fort- 
night, Mayme Moore. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha, mis- 
ty-eyed over their golden 
■iri!\ersary Founder's Day 
1,1 is Sat., will assemble then 
for lunch at the Sheralon- 
West and reassemble next 
morning to worship at Hoi- 
man Methodist -ChuTh. Sun. 
week (Ti is Pegga Hawkins' 
choice to take-off for two 
weeks of Mexico City.- The 
Book Club met last Mon. 
over gumbo as only Ange- 
lique Bratton can concoct: 
both she and her husband, 
Bun, were laid up simultan- 


eously with mucho virus, 
earlier. 

Date Circled 

Leola Davis is hostess this 
evening (Thurs.) to the 
Wives of Bench and Bar. 
They've circled Valentine 
Eve on their calendar as the 
date for their luncheon at 
the Ambassador, honoring 
members of the two Medical 
Auxiliaries. Edith Fields 
Smith managed to quit her 
sick bed. New full-length 
mink coat wearer: LTanya 
Griffin. 

\\'i 1 lowbrook'is Carver 
School principal, Herbie How- 
ard, knocked out of circula- 
tion almost a week by a 
severe cold, has been able 
to make it, back to his du- 
ties. LaZora Rowell's folks, 
the George DLxons (Lillian), 
celebrate their golden anni- 
versary til is Sun.: interest- 
ing too about the Dixon 
family, of the six children 
four were born in Febr. 

Lola Beavers has a birth- 
( Continued on Page 8) 



FOR MARCH OF DIMES— Putting down thei\ pent 
and class books and donning basketball uniforms lf]itlotv 
brook School District faculty members will be featured in a 
basketball game for the benefit of the March of Dimes-on 
Friday, Jan. 29, Teacher players art^ from left: Huey 


Dredd, Carver School; Eugene Albright, Anderson School; 

■ Danny Reyes, ass't. principal, Mona Park School; Jetmet 

■ Fountain and Bill Ancinas, principal, Anderson School; 
Ernest Cash, Mona Park and in the center Vince Gomxt, 


music supervisor^' 


•H': 


ir^U,tL. 


••,^iii4.-:_^^Jti. 


..-A^.; .- .^*.- 


» _ , ■-. „..t I 





- JJ< <PW PI. || ' | I. I ll 


.11 1.1, _ J lip Ij 


Koyal Sliks at 



Jebtuaty 5th 


t-crr.ifz ti"* Ti;-.f;» 


hax keen *<i9!>?-;r" by tii« tti« ziwran* Ji«< <rf nart w?i« J«"P •"**'» I>^»« Mmtie 


ij-ifir^esBW *<^ rwm-e tjr3Brts raw i'ii tcr.f: !»r>'llj«t: Mow- 


CJjantv rwrsaa; Da.-v.*. 
Th« UnyjM T< iiir:khTZ- 


The Swr^I Ser\-ic« BosriS 


:r. a body. lo help tb* leag-je 
and teJse "he :.ajt <leoiict;ori. 

SiXTjf q{ the fjer. arists 
T-ai have agreed lo appear 
ij-e Jwe}?- Ge-oTg-.a Cajr, an- 


a-d r*!:!! Ard Id« Liiptno. 
rf The -Vr. Ad*m»" T\' 

h i« ' RTTKni < TtvyirtI i n I Con) l>f> ; 
Mr-.ar". C.irtiy; Rf»b<[«r« Chn\ 
of Tr-flckdown; Nanev Asoh, 


rurwntly app#«rinff *f J««- **l(*i^ ,^-i„- 

viU* Club: arxl mafiy ^•■JWf Wm«» •'.^wWf i 

famous names. *** *'**'*^J**!!lf •-^k-^ 

rrwident. atatM 'JUJ «*W* *'*tfif**.'S?' ^^ 

re*ervatlOM for Oi# f#» ^ '«' •* »'^»'' 




ADyiSTLRE JS EDI'CATIOS—Fr.r «,«, /r,^ AVr,,, ^n^ U/Ar-rVr 
tVftiLei 4nd tkf ftmi/uir ii^hli «/ iprtialiy tuilt k',1 rrtdi , i9 C^'r rr J yrn'.r H ch 
lluJfnli ftt s I'tok Ml the htaulj «/ nature u.hiie i^endinf a jull da) cl Htddrn 


^t'fjie: Ccrf. J hr ci^c- '.wr \- fdn'c:-',': ruc) ''•"^'^ the r//7.'"r.'''r u i.' t'tired 
^■•t the A'.c'.'.n C'^'t.'T^urtui (^'-!'r ci :' '■m'jrrd h\ mrnxi/rrf r,' ihr Phc cnx 
C'uh. It ucj der.gned cj c ' Mirr'^r I! 'j'tth'jp jo'' ttudcitr /•> i'y'jk at ih("i- 


f't^mrmi. IjKtrrmt rifii. £«f«^ Mamn. Srt 


c't er C'.d ':td e 'rrnns tf te'.' drt,.-,,-~.~. . ._-,__._ 

i^ith L}ndie) I -.(kcs, J^€.fn CrxUr suf wtrmirr. ,'Cirtm HvKmri, 


8— The CaMorrta Eac'e 


■jri'ii/. i»-ji'/ 53, "ffj 



Hidden Springs Workshop 

Dorothea foster I T h r 1 1 1 s 39 Carver. Students 


«« Bill SmallwcxxJ 


I 

No use countini? on your fingers — even three 
hand* wouldn't help: There are just more things to 
do every day than there are vitamins to get you 
there. 

But it fertainly was a refreshing paus* in a bujsy 
day to »top by KD and XERNONA CLAYTON' » 
home on Saturday and meet pensonable OTTO Mr- 
CLARRIN, informatjon officer for the Federal CiviJ 
Rlfht» CornmiMion in Washin^fton, DC. 
Quite a Session 

It wa* quite a j»eg)iion with discustions that ran 
the gamut from "Skodesians" to BOB DcCOY'b elo- 
quent rc-citaJ of "Face on the Barroom Floor.' DIk- 
cuuion panel included BOB, former Yale man; VIN- 
CENT TUBES, of Morehouse College and former 
editor of the Afro- American; and OTTO, former PR 
man with Howard University. Interested and amu»ed 
listenem to the college "whiz l<id«" were ETHEL 
DeCOY, TONI BATISTE and JAMES BREWSTER. 
Yer Quite a refreshing pause. 

DIANE and JOE WALKER (just back from a 
Hawaiian honeymoon) were the incentive for the 
lovely party t08»ed by ET) and MELISSA STEIGERT 
on Saturday in the beautiful home (designed and 
built by ¥2)) in South U)h Angeles. 

LANTZ and LUOLLE BALTHELZAR's meeting 
on Saturday night for the "Deuces" found the group 
still enjoying their gracious hospitality well into 
Sunday morning. MARIE and GEORGE COMFORT 
were guests. 

Then there was the Rinkeydinks Club meeting on 
Monday and the girls are htill talking about the 
delicious repast that ALICP] PAYNE served In her 
smart Victoria Park studio apartment. Members 
have Ktarted work on their next project, which will 
surprlfe everyone. 

When ELOIS DAVIS' vitamins run out then she 
runs out for a rest and she did just that last week 
for a lazy relaxful week down Santa Barbara way. 

It It always a gay time when the OG's get to- 
gether and on Saturday afternoon the nieetlng was 
even gayer In the beautiful surroundings of hostess 
OUIDA (Mrs. DAVID) WILLIAMS' Brentwood home. 
Honor Spots 

Mr. and MRS. GEORGE (LOLA) A. BEAVERS, 
JR., complimented Mr. and MRS. GEORGE JOHN- 
SON of Washington, D.C. on Saturday evening with 
a dinner party, Mr. JOHNSON Is a member of the 
Civil Rights Commission. 

On the same evening, OTTO McCLARRIN was 
In the honor spot at the home of DR. and MRS, LIN- 
COLN SHUMATE, on North Irving blvd. 

Check your calendar and then check your vita- 
mins: Pacific Town Club's annual fonnal is on Jan. 
30 at the Sheraton West Town House. 

The world-famous soprano voice of LEONTYNE 
PRICE will be heard In concert on Feb. 2 at the 
Philharmonic Auditorium, 

The Royal Elites Ball at the Beverly Hilton Hotel 
on Feb. h will be loaded with stars and all for the 
benefit of the Los Angeles Urban League. For re- 
servations (they're going fast), call AX 2-6511, Ur- 
ban League office. 

Petite MABLE ALBERGO, local ichoolmarm 
and prexy of Le« Beau Dames, putting the girls 
through same fast paces for their forthcoming 
benefit on Feb. 14 at Moulin Rouge. 

Pretty pink bids already In the mall announcing 
Alpha Kappa Alpha's "Fantasy In Pink" ball at the 
B«verly Hilton Hotel _on March 12. Hard-working 
badleus is VIVIAN STRANGE. 

Congrats to ROI HOPKINS on being named West 
coast representative for the Forward Times. Rol 
will report the happenings of Texas folk on the west 
coast. 

The untimely passing of BILL EATMON, popular 
Watoi* And POwar ^nlployee, on Jan. 23 at Queen of 
Angtli Hospital was h shock to the community. 
Sympsthy Is extended to his k>v»ly mom, Mrs. 
EATMON. 


By Edw. 'Abie* Robinson 

S'yr.'iC 30 yjr/.OT high s'j- 
der.is from Or.er gavf- a 
.'.*'*' rfifrar :..••:? lo Tr./? ;y^;yu'ar 
Njgwian /oik rot;?. ' flvf-ry- 
yz-yiy lyj-.f^ .Sa'u.'ijay N'.gn',' 
when they «;^r.l ai! day 
Satu^rday at Hi'iden i^i-hriz,^ 
c.arnp in the A.rgelr-s C.-<**t 
.T,oijnt-ain)«, a^f-nrJin? s r-re- 
ative workuhf/f; r-onferer.'-e. 

T7)e v/ o ,' k « h o p v, as 
|;!anr.ed by the A. alon (jrym- 
rnunity.Onier and ("por,*©'- 
ed by iho Phalanx <"!ab, a 
group of LJ;. Port Offi'e su- 
[jervivjrs, 

Woleemod to Camp 

Eu« drive,' G«»^ge Ga.T)er, 
along with Principal Austin 
Inxon, Clarjf* hmnaniir-z, 
girln' vi<-eprin' ipal; Harold 
.Smith, math teach<*r; Wil- 
liam Baik-y, attendanro 
tear-her; Came Eundy, phys- 
if-al ed tearher; and .39 ntu- 
d<»nii5 arrived at the camp at 
1 :?y<) am. and were m«*t by 
the Hidden .Springs »laff ar.d 
members of the Avalon Or.- 
ter 

Bob Soolew. director of th« 
f-amp, weiwmed the trtud- 
entu and learheri! to Hidden 
Springd and expressed hlm- 
M-If an b^'ing elated over the 
fart, that his '-amp had been 
hf'\(-f:li-f\ for the ronferen'-e. 
He added that in aJl of his 
yrarti aji ramp dirertor, 
though people often talked 
of nueh an endeavor, this 
wan the flwt time anyone 
had ever done anything 
about It. 

Following breakfast, camp 
munMllor* who knew all 
about nature and the outof. 
doors were a»»1gned to var- 
ious group* which then 
<»pent two houra In the 
mountaltui learning the aer- 
retJi of mother earth. Head- 
ing lh« groups were; Evelyn 
Moore, art wnnultant; Glo- 
ria Stevena, flth grade tearh- 
er In the Bellflower system; 
John Congur, Prl»e|)la 
Routhworth and Bill MlUeilr, 
camp ataffers, 

TrcnuUrt* Eicp«ritne« 

Eunice Cain, dance con- 
sulUnt, and her group tran- 
alaled the movement of wa- 
ter Into a dance which they 
performe<l expertly later at 
the general session, .Stu- 
dents of another grf»up 
caught tha e»«en<'e of their 
outdoor experiences In 
poems, while another group 
mad« sketches of the moun- 
tain sOenea, 

Betty Hartley coordinated 
the conference and acted as 
general hostess of the ses- 
sion, Uyndssy VIckers, Jo- 
lene Bristow and Joe Bfis- 
tow aaalsled her, thua en- 
abling the all-day confer- 
ence to be operated In s 
smooth snd efficient man- 
ner, 

Holen Tumw and Karen 
Hollander received warm 
praise from ths studenU for 
their three wonderful menlw. 

Visitors St the conference 
Included David Boublon, 
field deputy for Councilman 
£d Roybal, who scouted th« 




■'<'. 


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s*;d<?r' 


KVy-f- 


\''.X }-;;g'. Ar.other ob.v6.'\';r 


L/>s A.'. 

V 

>-s Cou-' 

.• =h'^:;ff s 

offif P. 

P 

jijiic 

R*r]at:0rs Cfr- 

pa .n-TiC 

:.' 




Tno 


workshop 

v^isior! 

'.V3«r/r 

'1 

■ p: v. 

T\^r. 

th'' rhar- 

T^,-f>d 

b'j 

s pu 

V.-A 

out a* 6 

■p rr. *.r, 

- y 

orri". 

Ai. e'.al'jg'ior. 

h^-^s.o- 


v.a<; 

r. e 

!d !a'rr 

&rr.rjr.'4 

* 

-e H 

iddc 

T Spr;rg? 

i 



* 



-rt'A Avalor. CertT s'aff 
."■nPTTjbe,'^. Main obi'M't of ■'.'' 
fo.-.fe.-^.rr-e was to provide 
ar. oppo'lijr.ify for <:'.ijder."_s 
To pxa.mine their own abii.- 
i.f-s ar.d prob«? the.,* i,'".djv;d- 
lisl po'f^ntialitie'^. 

Sununin^ tfp 
In sum.Tiing' up tr.'> -.^'ork- 
j^r.op, Bob ST>k-s said. vTr.is 
v.as an f-x.rx-ilfn* exjxr.-ience 
bf-'au.se ,' reaffrrr.s my con- 
\i'-1.;o.ns tiiat .r. the ou*.-o5- 


^ 



'SEvr.R TOO inisv~-yi<tn,ini„ (;i.or(;ii. ciRn 

inyi ihe'i never I'lO hiiiv "in hrl\i ihr IJrh/iii Lent/iir." (irnr- 
qin, whn it lurrrnlh ripprtitini/'iii Sukniid i.tliin Sininr/'f 
dnrniiftl lilnnd, ivill lir urti //ml limrdnl the tfri Iru iilnr 
fiirmftl ehnrily diiiiif iit ihr flill'iti Until, I ih. V 

Joe Adams To Emcee. Show 


Popiilflr diHC jrwkr'y Jo<» 
Adams, who f« lieHtd mIkIiI 
ly from fnldnlglii to 2 «.m. 
over r«dJo siHllon KIIKD, 
will acrvc MS mfiwlw of ceic 
monies for the elglilh HnniiHl 
Shrlners Hlarof Stars Hlvw, 
schedulort for Keh. la ul lli« 
Moulin fU^iiige. The affair, 
staged by Kgyptlan Tcmplfl 
No, B of Prince Hall Hhiin- 
ers, will honor Hammy Da- 
vis Jr., who will h« prtfiietit- 
ed the annual "Humatillai- 
Ian Award" for his oiilaiand- 
Ing cfintrlhutlons to char- 
ily. 

Adtttns, a familiar Uia An 
gala* rudlo periionulily, 
gained national prcxnineniH 
a few yeara back when \\» 
appesrad In a aUtniiig role 


111 Mic llrojulwiiy jiKKluclion 
;(if "jHiiiiilcd." A^ etncc(> of 
lllic sliif Hliiddcfl .Shrlncr.s 
hliow, Ills task u'lil l)C to 
wcnvr ti)t[r»lhcr » llv<-ly pro- 
(liiciloi) hiiilt iiroiiiifl Niich fn. 
iiious tiili'iil lis HliicM Council 
l»l(wtli Wiixhlnulon, TV «lMr 
Hicvc Allen, comcdlnii Diiti- 
ny Thomas nnd sinRcr Pck- 
gy Caslim. Mlihcr Dean Mnr- 
till or I'ritnk Mliinlra Is also 
cKju'clfid to join the pnrndc 
(if hliirs III llie hiiBC cluirlly 
Hffdlr, depending ii pn n 
which of Ihe two will not he 
scheduled to perform lli;it 
night at the !\fln(l» Molrl in 
Las VfgflB, 

TlcKerl sales for the nnniifll 
event have been brisk In the 
piuit we»k| 


d'^yrs T'eop'i'* are able to 
f.-d 'i-'m^-eives and discxrv- 
e." what tinpy can do." 

Y,\f^'.yr. Moore suc.med It 
•up ;n these wT)rd5. ■you 
r.h-.p in :.ou- cr/m.Tiunity the 
most p.'OTi;.=:ng group of 
>oung arti«"« T*-ho only need 
a *ad. a piece of chalk ar.d 
a r-han'-'"- 

B'^tty Hj:']'';,-. a resident 

!=*a.'f r"'"-n-.bc: of tine camp. 
S3 A. I -ha-.e r.e-vcr s^-en 
.<:jch a «pontaneo'js group 
f^ re-Aay "o perform and 
■participate." 

M.H!. D. Hawkins, mothe- 
of or.r^ of 'hp girl.?, said it 
■was onp of the most won- 
derful p.xperiences her 
daughter had ever had. 

A student. Melvin Walker, 
put .his fw-Iines into words. 
"If we could stay here two 
weeks you folks would reaJ- 
ly know what to do with 

Standing Orcrtion 

Harold 5mith. a math 
teacher, commenting on the 
ronfercncp said it was sti- 
mulating and exciting and 
he believed it would bring a 
change that will be greatly 
rioticed in the classrooms. 
.Similar r-omments were 
made by other memt»ers of 
the Caner' staff. 

Although member.? of the 
riialanx Club were unable 
to attend they received a 
.•j'snding ovation when Opal 
Jones, executive director of 
A\alon Center, made It 
known that their contribu- 
tion had made the confer- 
ence po.ssible. 

Others who also contri- 
buted to the conference were 
Win.sel Glenn, of the Coca- 
Cola Bottling Company; 
F.anklyn A. Ajaye, Frank 
^mith. L. C. Smith. Bill 
'Troy I Trcsclair and Bert 
Kenner, 


Tempelife Club 
Holds Meeting 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Grif- 
f II lis (o/y 50th street home 
w.iv the sotting for the regu- 
l.ir club meeting of the Tem- 
pcjite club la.sl Sunday eve- 
ning. Due to the illness of 
President James Villareal, 
the meeting was presided 
over by Opliclia Danforth,* 
\ icepresidont. 

Reports were hoard from 
M.illie Beard of the sjck 
committee and plans were 
initiated for a PreValentine 
jiarty, 

A visitor at the meeting 
was Mrs, Alberta Jamerson. 
After the business meeting 
members en.joyed a social 
hour with the hostess serv- 
ing H ham dinner with fruit 
punch. 

('fi/rnline Ball 

Alcorn A&M and Tougaloo 
(.«>. C.) College alumni clubs' 
preValentlne ball is be held 
Feb. 13 at Fox Hills Country 
Club. 


Cc-n'unued trorr. Page '' 
day Wed nert 3 Mcftessry 
No.TT.an Jr :s a ckl entha- 
siast tJiiS geasor.. hJ Fi er jch 
:r.stnuc;or is grvinf him 
those iessons too. Tory Hiil 
expects hi* b:T>ther. Henry. 
and" wife. Adelaide, with 
t.he;.- son. Tony, for a mid- 
summer Juiy' \i5it; tbey 
live ir. Boston. Mon. ili An- 
giebelie Nicholas' family 
wii: be birthday hugfing 
her. Emi.y Fortwig a: Pe.n- 
dleton Naval Hospital for 
series erf check-ups. 
t^niqae Gift 

Local chapter of the Na- 
tional Associatwn of Col- 
lege Women assembied last 
Sat. to lunch at Bit o Swed- 
en while hononng Evel>n 
Burweli as one of the ou:- 
.standing women of the com- 
munity. Dorothy Jones is k>- 
cal chapter head and Ade- 
laide Dunn is regional direc- 
tor as well as chapter found- 
er. By the way. her gift of 
a statue of Biessed Martin 
de Porres to St Cecelia* 
Catholic Chufrh (itj fonnal 
acceptance last Sun. was 
quite impressive' is untt|ue 
in that it is the only statue 
locally of the Negro to be 
mad^ in Germany. Evelyn 
has been invited to \'i»it 
Ghana next year. 

Flu bugs were able simul- 
taneously to side-track the 
two sons of Dr. and Mrs. 
Wayne Ho^^-ard laat week; 
they're up. out and rwingin' 
again if lightly. Cal Bailey 
soon to begin weekly com- 
muting to SF. He's taking 
on two classes of students 
who want to learn caricatur- 
ing from him, being the old 
master he Is. He will main- 
tain his studio here. too. 

Gert Wagner Tildon due 
in from Cleveland next 
Thurs. to get warm again, 
if bri^y. She's one <rf the 
few, the ever dwindling few. 


«*>9 L/vv «1^ *r£t tsA 4e- 
iMd^imes.^. W7i± aeyi* aad 
gay fc>cv««i«9are. 
Tajtor bMk firaa 
Spr.aci and Paia 
wbere she iamA ia tbe 
wtele naOsng UUMtM of 
t.*;«ni thar fis 


Biijhday Party 
Honors Owner of 
Lee Roys Lounge 

Lee Eo>' Mudrick. pfrna ti 
the Lee Bov's Cocktail Locfige 
at 47t»'. and S. Central are- 
rue. Was feted at his piatx 
of bus:r.ess or. his birtfcday 
la^ Monday tugfat. HeR tt 
the party was Bob Ashley. 
Serving as bartmdcn w «e 
Slim Mattiis and Crael>- 
Jennings. 

Guests attending wtrt : 
William Armrid. Eleanor 
Radford. Mar>- Hcdmes. Ver- 
die E»T\ey. Anita Morgan. 
Pearl O'Xeil Gieeru Dorothy 
Lewis. Mr. and Mrs. D. Gel- 
der. Mr. and Mn. Tbocnas 
Ames. Mr. and Mrs. Dare 
Van Gelder, &ina MiorelL 
Dow (Chill) Gravest Scottie 
Thomas. Lorenzo Kptoe. Inez 
Wlteeler. "Louif G. Iki>ward. 
L. T. Gregor>-. Jewel James. 
Vincent T. Vasquex. Lorrie 
Aragon. John Franklin. Ricky 
Ricarda Gayle H. Doomes. 
Martha Jo Preston. Gee Petty. 
Helen Maria Britten. Ruby 
Willianis. Dock Morgan, Dor- 
othy Bragg. Joe King. WU- 
liam Goodin. Betty King. Lm 
Simmons and Carrie Johns. 

PAMTAST ov ran 

AKA's Fantasy-ln-Pink so- 
cial is slated for the Beverly 
Hilton Hotel en FrMay, 
Mar. 11. 


•1 

I 

i 
I 


from DRAB ... to DAZZLING! 



with 


^hl^oyi 


Larieus* 
Haircolor 



U^fliw&tf/ 


Would you trade an hour for kalr 
like thit ptofetoobal Ssodd'rf 
One hour is all it iSkM for 
Godefror't LarieiMa Hsiicolor 
to btiat back yeuck to gt*r, duB 
Orfadtdhairi 

Evetrt&teg ««4 imd b la the 
faittous Nd Sitau 0« Codiber's 
lofif-bttiag LatkuM iMM# 


L Mil ttpOlM CM 
tMH ind R«vi4. 

t Apply to Mr •ilk 
(ppHattt. 

I. Lit <(V(Mi 1 1 1 


f 


On 
the Pd 
ors. a I 
sent 
from 
those 
Vaugti 
Carter! 

AtJcLS 

Mea7 
Dolly { 

.•^kine I 
the Hi 

Roulei 


Dal 
Wil 
At 


It 

coiioerl 
quinte 
Georg^ 
pany 
ton. 
them 
the SI 
night, I 

Ce 

The! 
tet ar 
made 
on the 
will 
appeal] 
here ir 

OnJ 
nounc^ 
pear 
night 
um. 

Tickl 
this ar 
Dakot 


*- . . — ku, te^ 


*kla*Ml> v^' 


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ismssiffs^-^rs^i 


\- "f 




*S-P! 


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of 

}ge 
Ve- 
ice 
pay 
6f 
sy. 
?re 
fly 


t\s. 


tiy 


PSHow,! 


Norway's first American Tour 

The FestiTtd Compcmy of Norway, appearing under the 
patronage of His Majesty King Olov V, comes on its first 
transAtlantic tour, bringing the cream of the nation's singers 
and dancers. At Santa Monica Civic Auditorium on Saturday, 
Feb. 26: and at Pasadena Civic Auditorium Sunday afternoon, 
Feb. 21, at 3 p.m. 

Anna Russell at Philharmonic 

Anna Russell, concert comedienne, comes again with the 
great gift of laughter at Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. Fri- 
day, March 11, at 8:30 p.m.: also at the Philharmonic Audi- 
torium Saturday, March 12, at 8:30 p.m. 

Varel and Bailey Climax Season 

Vorel and Bollly, Weekend in Paris, will bring Mary 
Brans season to a joyous and climactic conclusion. In the 
spirit of a Weekend in Paris, there will be included every] 
night a sparkling post-performance ball to which all ticket 
holders are invited as Dr. Bran's guests. 


■Phil Gordon Makes the- 


NEW YORK SCENE 


Well, for the most part this 
pa^t week has been cold in 
weather and warm in enter- 
tainment values. It has been 
a combination of Count Ba- 
sip Week and .Anniversary 
Week: Count Basie and the 
orchestra concluding a swing- 
ing week at the Apollo The- 
atre (where the outstanding 
newest arrangement is a 
Jimmy Mundy version of Old 
Man River, in grand concert 
style) and enjoying several 
Celebrity Nights at different 
nightspots. 

Baby Grand Entertainment 

The Club Baby Grand on 

125th Street celebrating Its 
1 tth Anniversia-iy by headlin- 
ing iLs review with Roy Ham- 
ilton. On Sundav nisrht at the 
Shalimor i b>- Randolph' the 
Ba.'iie apgrogation wr^ feted 
to a fuil house including Mr. 
Josh White. 

Apollo Cost Feted 

On Mof.day night it was 
the Palm Cafe doing the hon- 
ors, a goodly crowd was pre- 
.<ieiit to honor the entire cast 
from the Apollo show. .Among 
those attending were Sarah 
'Vaughan, Joe Medlin, Betty 
Carter, Tommy Robinson, of 
.Mlas Rp<Dr(l-. Emmett Davis, 
Mary Antonio, Red Prysock' 
Dolly Lyons 'vocalist uirh Er- 
^kine Hdvv kins' orchestra' 
I, IP Hot Shots, Teddy Reig 'of 
Rouletip R<'i.-ord'~ '. Claretta 


Dakota Staton 
With Shearing 
At the Shrine 

It will be the first time in^ 
* con.-ert for the famous jazz 
quintei of famed pianist 
CJeorgp .'~he,nrin<: to accom- 
p.iny 1.1/7. siri^e.- Dnkofa Sta- 
ton. Gciie Nor r,,iP. li;) ; 'iicp.eil 
them to ajipi'ar loueiher at 
tlie .-^hr.ne .Audit''" mm. Sat. 
night. Fehruarv' 6tfi at S. 

Capitol Moneymakers 

The r;eorj:e Shearing Quin- 
tet and Dakota' S'aton have 
made manv albums together 
on the Capitol label, but this 
will he a \er^' rare con<ert 
appearance for them together 
her^ in the Southland. 

fiene Norman will an- 
nounce other artists to ap- 
pear at this great musical 
night at the Shrine .Auditori- 
um. 

Tickets go on sale soon for 
this anticipated Shearing with 
Dakota Staton jazz show. 


Moore, Henry "Red" Allen, 
1 Teddy Powell ' New Jersey 
' promoter I, Stump and Stum- 
py, and Foch Allen with 
I Ralph Cooper hosting. 

Basie Bar Jumps I 

, On Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings after the last show, 
it was Count Basie's Bar on! 
7th Avenue which was head- ' 
quarters for the gala festi- 
vities with many stars and 
j celebrities on hand each 
! night. 

j For the 14th Annlversar>- 
! opening at the Baby Grand, 
Roy Hamilton pleased a ca- 1 
paclty audience with many! 
fine renditions of his hit rec- 1 
ords and album tunes. This' 
delighted group of personages' 
were .songwriter 'Looking 
Back, Its Just a Matter of^ 
Time. etc. I Clyde Otis, sing- 
ers Arthur Prysock and Clyde 
McPhatter and many others, j 
Taylor Trio at Prelude I 
I During the week. I al.so 
stopped b.\- the plush cocktail 
lounee "The Prelude" where' 
the Billy Taylor Trio consist- 
ing of Billy at the piano. Hen- 
ry Grimes on ba.ss and Ray 
Mosco on drum=, were keep- 
ing the dining and drinking 
customers patting their feet 
^and or reminiscing to lo\-cl\' 
standards and a variety of 
I Latin and .s\\-inging tunes. 
I Pink Angel Popular 

A .''hort stop at the Pink 
Angel found owner Ruth 
I Lampkin reloxing while 
rharmmg talker barmaid Al- 
thea Moore and singing bar- 
tender Sam Lows were doing 
the chores. 

Brooklyn's Favorite Go-Places 
Recently we made It to the 
Bron.x for the reopening of the 
I beautiful Blue Morrocco Club 
inn Boston Road, ai^ found 
I the decor most atmospheric 
.with the highlight being plas- 
tic ab.stract figurines in black- 
light paint, illuminated by 
ultra-violet. 

Florist with a Flair 
OUie, The Florist, of 128S 
.\msterdam avenue, has been 
^raciniisi\- pro\'idlng the gor- 
geous bouquets of flowers for 
all my generous and kind i 
ii'istesses since my return to 
the city. 'I 

Carry Moore to Star I 

I feel vpr%" honored in being I 
asked, and even more so since 
I understand that the other 
person who has been asked 
and who they hope will ar 

I cept the co-emcee spot, is 
none other than TV's own 
Garry Moore. More about this 
affair as details become avail- 
able. You've had it from New 

'York for another column, so 
back to your sla\'es and local 
bi.sTros until the next "Bye." 

I —Phil Gordon— 


Vocalist 
Price at 
The 'Phif 

Soprano Leontyne Price will< 
be presented in recital by 
American Artists, Inc., on 
Tuesday evening (Feb. 2) at 
8:30 in Philharmonic Audito- 
rium. Miss Price, who was ap- 
plauded by audiences in Hol- 
lywood Bowl last summer and 
by opera -goers during the 
1959 San Francisco Opera 
season, returns to Los Ange- 
les after garnering new lau- 
rels across the nation. Last 
fall she made her Chicago 
Lyric Opera debut as Liu in 
■Turandot" and was cheered 
for her interpretation of the 
title role in Massenet's 
'Thais" revived especially for 
her. 

Return Favorite 

With David Garvey at the 
piano, the famed soprano will 
be heard in an unusual pro- 
gram comprising three Handel 
airs, five Lleder by Franz 
Schubert, two arias from "Ad- 
riana Lecouvreur," infrequent- 
ly performed opera by Cilea, 
"Hermit Songs" by Samuel 
Barber which she sang in a 
world premiere with the com- 
poser at the piano in 1953, 
and Cantata Sacra by John 
Carter in a Los Angeles pre- 
miere. The Carter work is a 
liturgy emploNing a spiritual 
as the basis of each of its five 
movements. 


Cabaret Dance 
Is Club Affair 

The Melody Social a n d 
Charity Club will present a 
gala cabaret dance and floor 
show. Saturday night, Feb, 6, 
at Hoover Hall, 

.Mood music for dancing 
will be furnished by Frances 
Gray and her famous all- 
girl band. Prizes will be 
awarded*to the three best 
dancing couples. 

Tickets for the affair may 
be secured from members 
Pepe Fernandez, Mrs. .Mar- 
vin Johnson. Richard Poe 
and Bill Robertson, 



fVITH THLIR ROMASCh approaching the sizzle stage, 
Doris Day and Rofk Hudson toast each other in this scene 
from their nrn' ruinnntic comedy, "Pillow Tali." The 
Aniin production from U niversal-I nternational also stars 
Tony Randall and Thelnia Rittcr, and is in CincniaScope 
and color. Currently at MANCHESTER Theatre. 



( L r r PS — Don Jf ihon cn-starrtnQ utth his utft. Lois 
(Jorhct. arc drcncinq star-studded audiences at the Pasadena 
Playhrjusr ivherc they arc performino in the comedy melo- 
drnma. "The Crc/it Sebastians." A hove. Don prepares to 
hlmdl'ild his uite for their sensational " tnind-reading act. 
Brri A\lar, of the ori(/inal Broadnay cast, supports the Mil- 
.fO/M, .If tar plays the part nf General Zaiidek. 


|UCU Ballet 
Starts Feb. 5 
InRoyceHall 

The great Bolshoi Ballet re- 
turns to Los Angeles on film 
when it presents the "vivid 
dance sequences in Tchaiikov- 
sky's opera "Eugene Onegin," 
lO be shown in full color in 
Royce Hall Auditorium, UCLA, 
Friday through Monday 
nights and Sunday matinee, 
Feb. 5 to 8, sponsored by the 
University's Committee on 
Fine Arts Productions in co- 
operation with Mary Bran. 

USSR Production 

The Tchaikovsky opera is a 
USSR production. The scenes 
exactly portray the locales of 
the original Pushkin story, 
from tehe lovely countryside 
in summer and in winter, to- 
gether with contry homes and 
Czarist palaces. Leading act- 
ors of the USSR rhime the 
roles while the. vocal lines are 
sung by soloists of the Bolshoi 
Theater. 

The story' of Tchaikovsky's 
life and music is told in a 
companion color film in 
which piano virtuosos Van 
Cliburn and Svyatoslav Rich- 
ter and other artistsi play 
musical excerpts. 



Thursday, January 28, 1960 


The California Eagle— 9 


People & Places 


^Sweethearts 
Dance Slated 

Members of the pQpular 
Ladies of Distinction Social 
and Charity Club are busy 
making plans for their big 
"Sweethearts Dance" to be 
held Sunday. Feb. 14, at the 
Elks Ballroom, Music will be 
furnished by the Society 
Troubadours' 15-piece ag- 
gregation, Marie Adams and 
Mel Williams will be on 
hand to .sing the latest hits, 

Atty. Chuck Fielding is the 
club's sponsor. 


DIDJA KNOW— That Horace 
Clark Sr., owner of the Clark 
Hotel, was among the first 
Negros to hold a whiskey li- 
cense in California? 

BUZZING— The biggest buz 
this week is still atx)ut the 
swinging Rinkeydinks affair 
and how Dinah Washington 
teamed up with Ray Charles 
to give the classy bow-tie 
audience an earful I 
FRANK SMITH — Handsome 
sales representative for the 
National Distillers is also one 
of the city's most eligible 
bachelors. 

BARBARA COOK— Pretty wife 
of singer Sam Cook is chair- 
man of her club's coming af- 
fair and she wants your help 
to make it a swinging onel 
LAS VEGAS— That trio of 
beauties playing the gambling 
spa slot machine circuit in- 
cluded Hildegarde Bostic, Bar- 
bara Jacquet and Ruth Brown. 
All returned to the city with 
sore arms! 

DUKE WOODS— He openly 
boasted^ he never reads Negro 
newspapers but now that he's 
fronting he may have to drink 
those words! 

ATTT. JAMES AKERS— Ex- 
L. A. fireman and NAACP 
President is craving a nice 
career for himself in the field 
of law!' 

ATTY. HAROLD MACHEN— 
Probate specialist moved into 
Atty. Eugene Hall's plush 
Western Avenue office While 
Atty. Harold Sinclair and 
Atty. Cris Wright selected a 
9000 Wilshlre address! 
IKE LEWIS — Rubaiyat Room 
bartender introducing shapely 


Jody Cain of Ohio to south- 
landers via the cocktail cir- 
cuit the other eve! 
JOE ADAMS— He will serve 
as MC for the Shrlners Star 
of Stars Show at the Moulin 
Rouge in Feb. 

TOMMY TUCKER— He is tell- 
ing friends he is interested in 
becoming one of the 3-million 
followers of the late Daddy 
Grace movement a nd just 
how would this sound to the 
ear, "Elder Tucker?" 
TOWN TAVERN— Those two 
New Yorkish looking lawyers 
giving Johiy Tucker and Monk 
Hayward's Texas dishes a 
first class workout were At- 
torneys Loren Miller and Jack 
Tenner the other day. 
DOROTHY BRANNICK — Win- 
some clerk in Arnold's Liquor 
store is still on Cloud 9 after 
that crazee pawtee at Art 
Merlins Sunday night! 
GINGER SMOCK— She and the 
Aristrates were terrific when 
they opened in the lounge of 
the Flamingo Hotel in Las 
Vegas last Thursday! 
BETTY GRIFFIN— Carrot top- 
ped clerk in the City Attorney's 
office was the center of con- 
versation in the Rodeo Room 
of the exclusive Beverly Hills 
hotel the other eve! 

MARTY' S — His Broadway 
bistro will buzz like a hum- 
ming bee when he honors 

I the E a g 1 e 's Woman -of -the- 

JYear with a buffet next 

j month ! 

I NOW ACT — When Ernest 
Vandiver, go\'ernor of Georgia, 

! appears on 'E^d Sullivan's TV 

program you and every mem- 

( Continued on Page 10 • 


RnCHESTER^' 


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10— Tlie California Eagls 
Thursday, January 28, 1960 


MEMBERS OF^l'HE ORCHESTRA are hard at uork 

preparing for the foncert to be qivrn Frhrunry 2,S at East 
Los Angeles Junior College, (jomlui'lnr Lrrny Hurle, 
director nf the Hurle Sfhool of M unr on H est Adam!: 


hk'd., and studrnt of Juilhard School of Mu.uc, iiorki hard 
In art the f^rrfrction he always .desires and receives from 
the orchestra. Plan to support your community symphony 
orthestra and help to shnucase real talent. 


Realty Board 
Slates Banquet 

Dramatization of events 
involving the past presi- 
dents of Consolidated Realty 
Board, along with the instal- 
aJtion of officers for the cur- 
rent year, will be the high- 
lights of the evening, Fri- 
day, Feb. 5, at the Fox Hills 
Country Club, beginning at 
8 p.m. 

Atty. Bryce Wisner, for- 
mer secretarj- of C.R.B., will 
install the new officers and 
the board of governors. 

Featured speflker of the 
evening will be Supervi.sor 
Kenneth Hahn. Mr. Thomas 
O'Conner, of the Title Insur- 
ance Company, will serve as 
rpaster of ceremonies. 

The Banquet Committee 
consists of Willis E. Carson, 
chairman, and members: K. 
Murray, W. A. Moore. L. R. 
Evans. N. Gilchri.st, H. Till- 
rtfian, P. Yarbrough, R. Spi- 
vey, W. Smith and K. Bar- 
bour. 



GErriXG THE MESS.'fGF.—The Vibrations, consisting of Dene. Carl, Richard. Don 

and Jnmrs. from left, are five of the s'mginnrst and sv.inqingrst persons aUve. Currently 
mahmci it at the fnmr,us .Inzi-ille Club. .^510 Hollswood boulevard , at H estern avenue, 
the Tibintion^ are a nnlurni ' aas ; alnnn irith Don Apilado. balladeer, Kathy "i o >8 
Cooper, and the incomparable 'Sloppy' Danteh, uhnse clnrr comedy keeps you in ttttcheu 
Be there! ! ! ! 


'Slopp/ 
Daniels 
Scoring 

■Sloppy's' new wax work on 
Doo<to label is called "Home, 
Sweet Home." with a flip side 
by Kathy Cooper, and after 
spinning it just once your 
home will never be the same 
or nearly -complete until you 
play it again and again for 
evwy visitor or guest you 
seat. (Like, WOW::!' 

Those of you 'localites" 
who see Sloppy letting his 
feet beat the street, hardly 
recognize the neat athlete ex- 
cept by his feet; however, 
picking up on his act at trte 
JA2ZVILXX is 55till one big 
tiirill and guaranteed to send 
the 90ul of young and old. 
Night Qub Flxiurt 

rr«fih from a 6 year slay at 
one ol L.A.'s spots, Sloppy is 
bringing to fun lovers in Hol- 
lywood the most comical re- 
vue from Purdue to Olive 
View and Prairie View to Ma- 
libu. Make a date to come 
early and stay late and dig 
this character who is posi- 
tiviely great. Sloppy is making 
it six nights a week with 
Monda>' Night as Guest Stars 
and Celebntips Night, along 
with the regular floor show, 
while Wednesday Night \^ 
Talent Show Niglit. Don't be 



T.fLESTED TEESACER — iT-year-old guest pinmst 
Jin Robertson . son of Sevrnlh D'ly Adirntist Minister R. 
Hope Robertson, has hern a student of Madam Ethel 
Leam^kn for the past 10 \rnrs. Here he is uorkinn on 
Trhaitnvsty's Concerto Sumber One to be played February 
2S utth thr nrrhestrn. 

PEOPLE & PLACES 


a square 


ju.'it g'»t there" 


CHESTER LEWIS Soys: 
"Greasa With Ease - 
Whenever You Call" 

RE. 2-0197 



Iniey Old Fashioned 

BEEF & PORK 

BAR-B-QUE 

• HAM 

• RIBS 

• LINKS 

• CHICKEN 



D«livar«d to Your Door 

Anywhar* on tha WatHida 

Until 4 a.m. Evary MomingI 

-- Phon* or Vicit — 

BAR-B-QUE 
JUNCTION 

Wiihingten t Arlinfifen 

RE. 2-0197 

CHESTER LEWIS' PLACE 


(Continued from Pag? 9' 
her of your family should 
WTite letters to Ed and his 
sponsors, TItp Eastman Kodak 
Company and the Merrurj' Di- 
vision of The Ford >Totor Co. 

DR. ARTIS WHITE— Among 
the top west.side dentists an- 
nounced that Dr. Sol White 
will occupy a suite in his 
smart Crensha>v blvd. office. 
Dr. Sol Whites a leading ped- 
iatrician! 

WILLIAM BRANSCOMB— rre- 
dit manager for the Kirh>- 
Company of Central LA gave 
Vannv Thomp.=-on. company 
pr<~%ident. c-edit for their of- 
fice being rated one of na 
tion's tops in '.'iO! 
DR. J. W. HILL — President 
of M^harrj- Alumni Club, and 
members uill fete Dr. Har- 
old West, president of ATe 
harry Medical and 
College, with a banquet when 
he visits herp iri Feb.' 

CLIFF STERN — Wealthy 
friend of footballer Emelen 
Tunnell is toying with idea of 
s^'^'inging a cocktail bi7 with 
the Green R.iy Packer star as 
hi.s partner' 

C. P. A. HAPPENINGS — What 
well known luggler of figures 
IS mak'ng quite a record for 
himself by balancing some 
other kind of figures 'on hi.= 
kn^ei besides numbers??? 
PRETTY PROTEGE— A popu 
lar man-about-to\vn is mak 
ing 5v,-eet mur,ic with a mel- 
low brown and motel patrons 
are wondering whether their 
favonte theme song Is "After 
Hours," "All Night Long," ",3 
O'clock in the Morning" or 
"Jump for Joy'" 
"SLOPPY' DANIELS— Sporting 
that new Republican (Jook, 
dropping from 2W do^vn to a 
mere 180 pounds, he has fi 
nally 'gone Hollywood' and is 
ciirrently putting on a rave 
slave at Jaznille 
POLICY HOLDERS— Tall, tan 


and terrific City College stu- 
dent Brenda Funches is re- 
sponsible for the hea\-y traffic, 
conge.~tion at Adams snd^ 
Montclair \\tiere she is mak- \ 
ing it at Steve Rowlands In- i 
surance company. j 

CENTRAL DRUGS — When 
Vogue-looking willowy Len 
Johnson, chic Gail Kaufman' 
and leggy Cleo Parker breezed 
in for their Monday morning 
coffee they created a glow of 
three-dimensional beauty in 
the popular 25th and Central 

spot: 

ROI L. HOPKINS — He will 
pen a west coast column for 
Houston's Forward Times, a 
new and different pictorial 
newspa per ' 

SARAH VAUGHAN-l.Shp will 
pick up a check for .517.400 for 
two weeks' work when she j 
Ppj^ig] opens m London, England, ' 
next month I 


Phil Gordon 

Makes N. Y.'s 
Slick Flicks 

This week I finally had a 
chance to stop going primar- 
ily to bars and nightclubs 
and get to see a few movies, 
.so I sliall briefly appraise 
j-ou of some 'flicker' goodies 
which, if you have not been 
so fortunate you might add 
to your list for future refer- 
ence. 

Happy Anniveriary 

The first was Dovld Niyen 
and Mit 1 Gaynor in "Hap- 
py Anniversary'' which is hil 
arious and most worthwhile 
viewing. You have no doubt 
read reports of a 5uggesti\e 
line which the censors in- 
sisted be dubbed (n for Ni 
ven. but they left all the 
'choice' lines and suggestions 
in for jiour fun and_enjoy- 
ment, so don't miss this. 

Music Hall A BoU 
Next I atended the Radio 
City Music Hall which is 
still the best dollar for dollar 
movie theatre buy anywhere 
in the world, with the beau- 
ty and atmosphere of the 
theatre and its decor, plus 
the Music Hall Grand Organ 
opening the festivities, fol 
lowed by the Music Hall 
SvTnphony Orchestra under 
the direction Of Raymond 
Paige, e.xcellent variety arts, 
the Columbus Boychoir, the 
world famous Rockettes and 
their master precision danc- 
ing, and the fantastic a-tis- 
try of the Music Hall Corps 
de BaUet. 

Then for laugTis galore and 
a completely relaxed fun 
(Continued on Page 12 1 


Th* P« epic's World 
Fcrum, in observance of 
NEGRO HISTORY WEEK, 
presents DR. ANNETTE 
RUBINSTEIN, noted 
author and lecturer. Sub- 
ject: "THE NEGRO IN 
AMERICAN LITERA- 
TURE." Question and an- 
swer period. 
Friday, Feb. 5, 8 p.m., at 
607 S. Western Ave. 
Park Manor 


Srhrrlulf ^ our Sezt Affair at the , , . 

ZENDA BALLROOM 

LARGEST DOWNTOWN DANCE FLOOR 

0^,15 W, 7th ST. (OPPOSITE STATLER H0TEL1 

REASONABLE RENTS— CALL E. BOHLEN, HO. 4-6476. MA. 8-9584 

Available for Re"t«i<, Danc«», Weddmg Reception*, etc 


ISH'S SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 

-HEADQUARTERS FOR FUN LOVERS- 

2851 CRENSHAW at 29th St. 

FINEST DRINKS - CRISP CHICKENS 

CHARCOAL STEAKS 


• 

I* 

i 

■-^ 


**••*•**•***********••••••• 


li SB U BJ W fi m j Ui SI W U M, 


VICTOR i HURRY! SALE ENDS SOON! 


CLOTHIHG I 

COMPANY! 

[214 S. Broadwayi 

DOWNTOWN I 
LOS ANGELES | 



BIG SALE 


10% TO 50% OFF! 


OF MEN'S SUITS 


NO MONEY DOWN - $3 per week pays 
for $100 worth of Clothes, Shoes, 
Accessories for MEN and BOYS. 

GET YOUR CLOTHES AND LUGGAGE NOWl PAY 
LATER. FREE CREDIT - NO INTEREST, 



ALL $90 Suits NOW $75 
ALL $80 Suits NOW $65 
ALL $70 Suits NOW $55 


ALL $60 Suits NOW $45 
ALL $50 Suits NOW $35 
ALL $40 Suits NOW $25 


ALL $30 Suits NOW $15 


THE CONTINENTAl 


BUY NOW AND SAVE— Bronson Suits in all sizes to 54 in one-two-three and 
four button Models — All Wool and Silk Like Suits — Trousers now priced 
$9.95, $12.95, $14.95, $22.95 and $24.95 worth much more — Sport Coats 
now priced $29.95, $39.95 and $49.95 worth Much more. 



THi IVr LUMI 


UNLIMITED SELECTION OF NATIONALLY ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE ^ 

GOLD like and SILVER like Belts— Hats— Watches— Radios— Television Sets— Suede Jackets— Leather Jackets— Jackets 

of all kinds. Black Suits-Blue Suits— Grey Suits. ^ 

FREE ALTERATIONS - FREE CREDIT - NO INTEREST - FREE PARKING NEXT DOOR ^ 


AL "SHITTY" SMITH 

Suggests That You BUY and TRY 



Old Smuggler! 


Fashionable 
Scotch 




['••■Bciorjoo'W*] 


BLENDED •COTCH WHISKY • 86 PMOOF 

lm»Cfi»^ by W. A. Uyler t Co., N. /., N. Y.,\ 
Sole DIairibuiora for the U. S. A. 


••''•OHWIlB'N 



In Glass and Cans at Your 
Favorite Shopping Contor 

H. W. PIN6REE COMPANY 


I* 

if 
I 

Ik 

t 


as ybu PURCHASE YOUR NEW CLOTHES AND LUGGAGE. 

EVERYTHING you wear from HAT TO SHOES - Bfonson Suits and 

Sport Coats— Gruen Watches— Stefan Hats— Co-Mate Shirts— Freeman 
Shoes-everything for the boy-aa« 2 to 20 years. BUY NOW-PAY 
LATER-DRESS UP-ENJOY LIFE amfyou can in Bronten Clothes. 

WE CATER TO HIS MAJESTY, the WORKING MAN 

You h«v« until February 29, 1960 f'o tak* advantage of our 
ONE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR - Whte Soort Coats - V/h.te 
Tuxedo Jackets— Tuxedo Suits — Plenty of tho new Vest Shirts 
—Shirt and Vest to match— jackets cf all kind^, Suede and 
Leather — Caps — Polished cotton Trouser'; — Radios — Gold 
Watches— Silver end Gold Belts:- Work Clothes-Play Clothes 
—Dress Clothes— Sport Clothes — See ail the re-v models — 
Everything you wear from Hat to Shoes— You receive a g<U 
for each customer you send or bring In. 

Tell your friends about our ONE BIG SALE — no down pay- 
ment — free credit — as littio as $3 a week p?>s for $100 
worth of clothes, shoes and eccessojies — Dress up — Go 
places— En|ov life and you can m All Wool Bronson Clothes 
-Free Credit— No Interest, Park Free next door as you buy 
your new clothes— Car Coats-Ram Costs— Trench Coats— Top 
Coats— If it's new we have it — Names ynu know — Co-Ma'e 
Shirts— Bronson Suits— Grjjen Watches— Stetson Hats-Free- 
man Shoes— Wembley Ties— Wool Suits— Silk Suits— Sweaters 
—Bow Ties — Pa;am«s — Handkerchief — Cuff Lmks— Radios— 
Melton Jackets— Suede Jacke's— Leather Jackets— Suede Coati 
—Suede Sport Coats. May We See You Soon? '. 

CONTINENTAL SUITS AND SPORT COATS 

WE CATER TO YOU AND WE DO MEAN YOU. We speak your 
Language. SEE the LATEST CONTINENTAL SUITS, SPORT COATS and 
LATEST IVY LEAGUE AHIRE, NEW VEST SHIRtS, a shirt and vast 
to match. 

BUY 2 Suits and get a $30 Discount-THIS SALE ENDS February 29th. 
^Se hurry. Buy one suit and get $30 off the price of the 2nd suit or 
^ buy any suit and get $30 off the price of any top coat. Park Free 

next door as you purchase. 




This Is Itl 
Once a Y»ar 


avings 


Victor Clothing Co. 
214 south broadway 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

ClothPS ShuCi Actcssorifs 
.iaJ'O'. Wcirtis and Gifts for Mtn and Ba/S'(! 


AT VKTOk CLOTHINO 
CO. WE CATER TO YOU 


^ 


At Our One Big 
Sola of the Year 

Lee 


A UiitoB Craw t* Sarva Taa n»n.t 

HE CONTINEOTAL 

fs fho ifnu^S in 
SUITS for I960 



OMM DAILY »i30 A.M. f < PJM. S4T. T/1 * 

PHONE: MA. 4-0801 

teo "Svnsh/ne" fen-o-rew-Genere/ Mgr. 

Sunahinm' fon-A-Row, General Manager of Victor Clothing Co., ancf All Employs With Eath 
Customer tho Happiest end Most Prosperous of New Years During I960 

' Clip and Praient With Purchase Clip and Present With Purchase 


|pr»Hntado por | 

■ Par S3.00 s«manarios, paga uatad por S100.00 de marcancia , 
Ida la mejor calidad, Incluyendo calzado y ropa para Senores | 
ly Joyanea. . 

■ Preaenta acta tarjeta y reeibira un par d«- pantalonea grati>. I 
Ida valor de $10.00, con la compra de un trafe valido $28 a $89. 
I Heras: 9:30 a f 
I Sabadoa ebiarte haata laa 8 1 

I VICTOII CLOTHING CO. 

I 214 Sur Broadway, an al centre 

I d« Let Angalat, Calif., E. U. A. . I 


, PrMented by.. 


LEO S. FON-A-ROW, Manaoer 


I I 


VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 South Breadwey, Down Town Lot Anoelaa • 

California, U. S. A. | 

$3.00 a weak payi for $100.00 worth of bMutifkil 
clothea. ahoM and accaatoriea for Men and BeyVV' j 
Preaent this card and receive a $10.00 pair of treueors WHtt , 
with the purchate of any auit prioed tB is $•» | 

UA... ..««-.. Store Houn: t:» to •! 

l^«Adlaon 4-0801 Odmi .very Sat. nlpM til al 


^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Jf ^ Jf ^ Jf^ jf jf ^ ^ jf :^ 


If 
3f 
Jf 
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Jf 

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Jf 
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Jf 

Jf 

Jf 
Jf 

Jf 


as 

ler 


Ja 


s«**KW 


li 


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I 


I 




FJUT SERVICE 


• 

1 

* — 

V,OST • RENT • SELL • 

B U Y • 

HIRE* "TRADe 


1""1 ■ », ■" -" 





YIMIUHND 


THEMMNTAK! 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


Alicia Alonso 
Joins Artists 
In 15 Day Stay 

The Ballet RuMe de Monte 
Carld returns to Los Angeles 
lor A aerie* of 13 perfor- 
mances at the Philharmonic 
Auditorium, Feb. 5 through 
20. Additionally the renowned 
company will gtage one per- 
formance each at the Santa 
Monica Civic Aud. on Tues- 
day. Feb. 16 and at the Pasa- 
dena Civic Auditorium, Thurs- 
day, Feb. 18. 

The celebrated ballerina 
Alicia Alonso, partnered by 
Igor YOuskevitch, acclaimed 
by many as the outstanding 
male dancer In the world to- 
day, will Join Ballet ftusse de 
Monte Carlo as guest artists. 
Miaa MoTOk To Ptrfonn 

Led by Ballet Russe de 
Monte Carlo's glamorous 
Prima Ballerina, Nina Novak, 
a brilliant list of stars feature 
this aeries, including Mme. 
Krassovska who has rejoined 
the company after an absence 
of eight years, during which 
time she established herself 
as one of the greatest bal- 
lerinas in Europe. 


lEOAL NOTICIS 

" Callfoml* Eiagrlfl 

C8RTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 
,. FICTITIOUS FIRM NAME 

Thn undersiynM doeo hereby 
certify that I »m condurtlng a 
L,tig*d businem at 3902 South Den- 
ker Avenua, City of Los Angele.i 
6Z County of L<0!i AnKelec. State 
of Callfoi-nla. under the fictitious 
firm name of Bobn Tavern, 3902 
South C>enker Avenue, and that 
said firm 1« rorapoaed of th« fol- 
lowing persoos. who*e names and 
addresses are as' follows, lo-wif 
Robert L. .Iohn»on. :!9"2 South 
Denker Arenue. Business ; 13.3 
West 73rd Street, Home Resi- 
dence. 

^Vlmjw my hand this 22nd day 
of January. 196". 

ROBERT U JOHNSON 
133 W. 73rd St. 
LA. 3. Calif. 
Stal« of California, 
County of Lou An|:eie!>. ».» 

On Ihi.' 27th day of Januar>- 
A D. . 1960. before me. Loren 
Mll)«r. a Votary Puhlic in and 
for said County and .State. r#sid- 
InK therein duly commissioned and 
• worn, personally appeared before 
me. known to me to be the person 
whoae name Is pubscrihed to the 
within Instrument, and acltnowl- 
eds«d to m» that he executed the 
same. 

In witness whereof. I have here- 
unto sM my hand and affixed my 
official seal the day and year in 
this irertificate first above written. 
(SEIAL) 

LORBN MU-LKR 

Notaj*V PuWIc in and for 

Said County and State. 

My Commission expires 1962. 
(Publish California Earie 
Jan. 28. Feb. 4, II, \^. I960) 


PUBLICATION SERVICES 


AGENTS WANTED; To sell the 
book eveo'one Is talking about, 
ABC PICTURE BOOK OF EMI- 
NENT NEGROES PAST AND 
PRESENT. Fabulous commissions. 
WRITE A. B.C. PICTURE BOOK 
PUBLISHING CO., P.O. BOX 
l-«767. Clmmaron Station, LA. 18, 
Calif. 

Telephone PL. 2-1061. 5-7 p.m. 

SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION ' 


Instruction Offered 

An 8 w*tl( pr«paratof7 course 
for thM« taking CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMS for U. S. Post Offict 
CLERK-CARRIER. Compieto in- 
formitien and ippllcationt call 

RE. 4-8912 


FAMILY INSURANCE PLAN 


BEOWNERS— Violin or PianO 
one-half ('4) hour lessons 
$1,00 call AX 5-9159. 

ELECTRICAL SERVICES 


• INSURES BOTH .. . 

HUSBAND AND WIFE 

• NO EXTRA COST.. 

FOR CHILDRIN or 

CHILDREN BORN AFTER 

POLICY ACQUIRED. 

ALL QUESTIONS ANSWEREDII 

CALL EARL HADEN 
OR. 7-1486 

FLORIST 


ELECTRICIAN 

RELIABLE, SAFE, 

REASONABLE, 

DESIRES WORK. 

CALL MA. 9-0947 


SERVICES 


SELL Coleman's nationally 
advartlaed household prod- 
ucts and cosmetics. Salary 
guaranteed plus commission 
Call now. RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Coleman. 


ELECTRICIAN — Reliable, 
safe, reasonable. WANTS 
WORK. MA. 90947. 

DANCE INSTRUCTION 


NEWER & LARGER QUARTERS 

i CAROLYN SNOWDEN SCHOOL 
' OF DANCE 

I '2111 South La Bres Blvd. 
,WE. 6-1440 WE. 3-2263 

Beginners Class in Ballet, 
Acrobatics, Modern Tap 
Tots Enrolling Now Teens 


an Easter trailitliiii 


NOW OPEN 

in ths 

SO. LA. AREA 

To Serve You Better 

EDDIE'S 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Fiowsrs For Every Oceaiion" 

1131U So. Central 
_JJJ^0294_^ 

INSTRUCTION-MUSIC SCHOOL 


MONEY TO LOAN 


13780 
ZONE EXCEPTION 
CASE NO. B41}.(t) 
A PTBLJC HEARl.VG in thff 
matter of a request for an exr-ep- 
tlon 'O the Rl, 5.000 (Single Kani- 
D.v Residence. 5000 »q. ft. min. 
7/on« in order to e»t»blish. operatp. 
and maintain a church plant on 
Propertr located at 441 K. 132nd 
St. In the WlllowbrookBnterprise 
Zone<1 District. Lod AnReles Coun- 
i.v. will be held before the Zoninc 
Roard. in the Regional PlanninK 
("omml.ision hearing room. Room 
HKI. Loe Angeles Countv Englneer- 
InB Bulldlnn. 108 W. Second St . 
l>os .Xngeles On Thursday. Febru- 
ary 5. I960 at 10:00 a.m. at which 
time proponents and opponents of 
proposed use will be heard. 

Arthur J Baum, Chairman 
Milton BrelvoKel, Director of 
Planning 

THt: REXJIONAI^ PLA.N- 
.ViNG COMMISSION 
Countv of Los Aneeles 
Publish in Calif Ragle on Thurs.. 
Jan 21 * 28. 1960 

California Eagle 

12840 

NOTICE OF SALE OF 

REAL PROPERTY 

AT PUBLIC»AUCTION 

(Sale Ns. 81-A) 

Office of the Tax Collector of 
the Countv of Los Aneeles. State 
of California. 

WHETREAS. the Board of Super- 
visors of the County of Los Anee- 
les pursuant to the provisions of 
Dlvliion 1. Part 6. Chapter 7 of 
I he Revenue and Taxation Code of 
the State of California, adopted 
a resolution approvinK the sale of 
t>roperty hereinafter described: 
and 

WHEREAS, there Is filed In my 
office written authorization for 
said sale under the hand and seal 
of the ."?tale Controller, to sell 
said propertv; and 

\V>IE1REAS. the minimum hid 
for each r*rcel la Ten (JlO.OiJ) 
Dollars; 

THERJCFORE. public notice is 
hereby given that unless the said 
properly is redeemed as provided 
hv law. I. H. L. Byram. Tax Col- 
lector *f the County of Los An- 
Siles. will, commencing February 
1960. at the hour of ten oclocl4 
X M.. and contlnuln* from dav to 
day In the office of the Countv 
Tax Collector, 1S40 South Hill 
Street. In the City of Los Ange- 
les, offer for aale and sell at pub- 
lic auction to the hiKhest bidder. 
the following deecrlbed real pro- 
perty: 

Parcel No. S80. J O McDonald 
Tre.t .WV 110 ft. of Lot 38. 
A.'uiessed to Kred Saldana. Loca- 
I, on — Vicinity of Washington 
Blvd. * Tarleion St.. LOs Aniteles 
City 

Parcel No. 490 Suh Of Reyea 
Tract Lot on SB line of Ceres Aye 
com S 29 deg 45 min VV 150. 8U ft 
from raO!>t N cor oi Lot 1: th S 
29 deg 45 min W 1.2i) ft; th SE 
in a pt In BE line of ad lot 8W 
1.S2 ft from most E cor th*teof; 
th NE Uiereon 54 ft; th NW 
5T »r! ft to beg. Part of Lot 1. 
Assessed to Jack Busch Location 
—Vicinity of 8th St and Ceres 
Aie . Los Angeles City. 

The foregoing described real 
property Is located In the County 
of Log Angelee, State of Califor- 
nia 

For Information as to the 
amounts necessary to redeem. 
provided the right to redeem has 
not previou.'ly been terminated, 
apply to H L Byt«m. Cduhtv Tai 
Collector. 1840 South Hill Street. 
Los Angeles 15. California. 

If redemption of the propertv Is 
pot made according to law before 
th* first f^d is received-, the rlKht 
erf rederBptton-_«'ill cea-se. 

Prospective Awchasers may ob- 
tain detailed Information on this 
sale from the County Tax Cellec- 
tor 

Dated this a#th day of January. 

' ^ ~ '" tax collector 

- r.b. 4. 11, 


IF YOU NEED IT- 

We Have It to Loan 
on Most Anythingll. 

$$$$$ 

IF YOU HAVE IT- 

W* Nave Mo5f An/f/iinff 
Tfiaf toy} MIGHT Ne»dll 

$$$$$ 

"Our Out-of-Pawn Merchandise 
Is NEAR NEW and FOR SALE for 
a Fraction of the Original Price" 

$$$$$ 
SUITS & TOPCOATS $10 tip 

LUCKY'S 

LOAN COMPANY 

4265 So. Central Ave. 

CRIDFT • tANKAMIRICARD • 
INTIRNATIONAl CRIOIT CARDS 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

iWork at Long Beach Douglas? 
|Then ioin UAW Local 148. The 
I Union that fights for the right of 
iail workers regardless of race, 

color, sex or creed. Contact your 
I Steward and sign up today. We 

need you, you need usi 

Ed Spced\ Wianccki. 

4120 Lone Beach Blvd . I, B. 7 

GA. 7-8933 - ME. 4-l!>8.'5 

FEMALE HELP WANTED 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

VoicR, Piano, Violin, C«llo, 

CUrlnat, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PL. 2-1179 

PATRONIZE 

EAGLE 
ADVERTISERS 

FURNisHEolioUSEr 
FOR RENT or LEASE 


I Twenty good female workers. 

Apply Thursday or before 
'noon Friday, or after 9 A.M. 
i Monday. 2429 West Vernon 

Avenue. 

FINEST PAINTINQ 


COMPLITI 


H L. bTRAJC t 


PAINTING 

5 ROOMS-EXCLUSIVI 

195 

BATH Ml Cemploto 

KITCHEN ^23 Cemplet* 

FREE tSTIMATlS 


mm 


TILE - SHINGLE - FLAT 

REPAIRS . ' . ■ $5 

rui fsriMArfs 

NO. 3-4525 


BA RKER COLLEGE INSTRUCTION 

American 

Barber 

College 

Triplft'A Rating 

— 1248 Hour Course — 

- Approved for Vets - 

349 South Hill Street 

MA. 9-3303 


$7 FEE 

HOUSES & 

APIS. 
AD. 1-9308 

No Run Around 

We Call Our 
Vacancies 

Before You Pay! 

Westside - Eastside 

UNFURNISHEQ 

FURNISHED 

$8 Wk. to $90 Mo. 
4220 So.J^'e'rmont 

AD. 1-9308, Agent 


LAUREL CANYON HOME 
FOR SALE 


Unfurnished 
Beauty 

ON PRIVATE KNOLL 

in Laurel Canyon, designed 3 
bdrm. 2 baths plus fannily room, 
elegant view, iarg« le^el 
ground, school buses, interracial 
cdmmunity. Excellent financing. 
Owner. 

$39,500 
OL. 4^3266 

WESTSIDE ARTS. FOR RENT 


De Luxe Furnished Apartment 

RENTS FOR $81 

Easily Worth $1001 

• MODERN SINGLES 

• UTILITIES INCLUDED "' 

• CHOICE LOCATION 

• HEATED SWIMMING J^OOL 

PARK ADAMS APIS. 

3528 W. Adams Blvd. 
at 6th Ave. 

Republic 3-0642 


LEIMERT 
PARK'S 
FINEST 

ESPERANZA" 
APARTMENTS 

4201 SEVENTH 
AVENUE 

In Beautiful, Convenrent 

Leimert Park 

Near Everything 

FURNISHED AND 
UNFURNISHED 

DOUBLES GALORE 

Phone After 4;30 p.m. 
for Appointment 

AXmlnster 3-9066 

. ^__ 

FURNISHED SINGLES 
Nice for Couple— Child O.K. 
-Utilities Paid- 
Private Entrance and Bath 
Newly Decorated 
Xlnt. Transp. and Shopping 
Washer — Dryer 
Near Normandie 
$12.50 Weekly and up 
1225 WEST 39th PLACE 

RE. 2-1423 


RENT 


Wl,TH 


To Buy 

All AreQS 

2 PEDPOC^ 
FOR S82 50 M'.< 

3 BEDROOM 

FOR 587 50 h^O 

2 DM A LOT 
FOR 3V7 50 ^^0 

DEAL DIRECT 
WITH OWNER 

MR. LONG 

HU 2-58^1 


NOW RENTING. 

ROYAL 

PALM 

APIS. 

1518 South Wilton 

Place 
PRESTIGE ADDRESS 

Beautiful 4 story brick apart- 
ment" building in the best Los 
Angeles location. 

• Maid service 

• Home phone 

• Elevator service 

• Heated swimming poo! 

• Entire building Is carpeted 

• Each apartment redecorated 

UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 

See Mrs. Bierson In the premises 
PURNISHID A^ARTMINTS 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


CHOICE 

WESTSIDE 

LOCATIONS! ! ! 

HOW RENTING 

Los Angeles' Newest 

Most Luxurious 
1 Bedroom Apartments 

— Fully Furhished— 
■ — Partially Furnished — 

LONDON ARMS 
3800 West 27th St. 

Every apartment beautifully 
decorate^, hood/ fan and light 
over kitchen stove, tile show- 
ers, unit heat, fully equipped 
automatic laundry facilities,, 
large picture windows, gar- 
bage disposal, hot water, 
custom drapes, TV outlets, 
spacious closets, off-street 
parking, heated iwimming 
pools, beautifully landscaped. 
I - 

Investigate Now 

Choice 

Apartments 

Still Available 

From $84.50 

Open Daily 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sat. & SunT, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Enjoy the Sophistication of 

LONDON ARMS 

3800 West 27th St. 

REpublic 2-8144 


APARTMENTS FOR RENT 


NEW 
SOUTHWAY HOTEL 

A home away from home— 

trantienti welcome. 
Furnithed Aptt. and Rooms 

^ X X cd V per week 

5119 South Avalen Blvd. 
AD. 3-7033 


LARGE 

FURNISHED 

SINGLE 

BEST WEST ApAMS 
LOCATION 

NEAR CRENSHAW 

RE. 1-7629 
RE. 3-6019 

UTIL. PAID - $70 MONTH 


CLEAN— QUIET 

ADULTS ONLY 

Steam Heat - Carpeted 

Furnished - Refrigeration 

Washer ■ Utilities Paid 

Bachelors - Singles • Doubles 

$48 Up, $60 Up, $85 Up 

Weekly Rates Available 

ALEXANDRIA 
APARTMENTS 

1953 South Estrella 

(1 BIk. W. of Harbor Freev^ay) 
Between Adams 4 Wash. Blvd, 

Phone: Rl. 8-3078 


Thursday, January 28, 1960 


The California EagI*— li" 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


ai's No Dewnl — $62 mo. prin. 
and int. 2- bdrm. etuccos, 
hdwd. firs., tile, dbl. gar. 
Xlnt. loc. PL 4-2827. 


3 Bdrm. & Den, IH baths. Gd. 
cond. $14,900 F.P. $2000 dn. 
NO 5-4138. 


S195 Dn. r- 2-bdr. home. Lot 
50x150. "Fixer- upper." PL 
6-1478. 


Open Hse.— $1,000 dn. See 1110 
W. 49th St 6 rm., 2 and den. 
RE 4-2538. 


6249 Cimarron — 3 bdr. stuc. 1^ 
ba. Agent. PL 1-3943. Call 
p.m. 


$495 Dn.— 3 bd. & den. E. 49th 
St. Vacant. Move In! AD 
2-6241. 


INCOME PROPIRTY 


6-Rm., 2 bdr. k den. l%i baths. 
F.A. ht Beaut, cor. AX 2-0136 


3 Bdr. stucco mod. $2500 dn. 
$15,000 com'd. W.S. RE 
2-8729; RE 2-4850. 

Boigcdn — By owner. 2 bd. + 
den in nice area. Low dn. 
OL 6-6138. 

7 Room Spanish stucco. Lavish 
extras. Nr. Western ave. Try 
$2000 dn. l}i ba. AX 3-6267. 


2756-56 W. 15th St — By appt 
Attr. 8-rm. double; income 
or house for large family. 
Terms. HO. 5-2188. 

Submit Low Down — 10 room 
stucco studio duplex plus 4 
room home. 2 bdrm. each, 
1 1/4 baths each In fwnt 
units. Xlnt Southwest rentAl 
location on major trajupl 
line, walking distance t6 
shopping. Asking $25,000t 
Submit. Owner leaving afld 
wants quick deal. AX 2-0107 

Duplex plui 2-bdmi Hmb*" 

Garg. disposal, fenced yard, 
3 garages; good Income. Try 
$2,500 down. PL. 4-2827. 

3 Bdr. hae; 2 on lot. Also at* 
tract dbl. Lo dn. NO 1-4034, 

AdomS'WMtcm area. Immac 
3 units spacious 5 rm. apt. 
for owner L 2 l-bdr. for in- 
come. No loan cost $21,d50 
full price. L. A., High area- 
spacious 3 bdr. stucco, full 
dining rm. & brkft. nook. 
$5000 downl Pico-Dunamuir 
area. Attractive stucco dou- 
ble. Income $85 -+- owner. 
No loan cost $20^50 full 
price. Toyo Realty Co. AX 
5-4351. 


PLANTATION HOTEL 
$8.00 week and up, newly dec- 
orated rooms, hot and cold 
water in all rooms. Some 
with Tlvate showers. FREE 
PARKING. 1104 E. 40th PI, 
Corner Central Avenue. AD 
3-9328. 


"CASUAL CALIF. LIVING — 

Exciting new l-})drm. apts. 
with your own private out- 
door world. DU 4-0716 by 
appointment." 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 


HALL FOR RENT 

4200 Avelon BlvdI. 

MASONIC HALL 

Approximately 7000 Square 
Feet, Suitable for Many Uses. 
Also Available Ground Floor. 
Approximately 7000 Sq. Ft 

BY OWNER 

CHapman 5-1478 ' 

; BUSINESS PROPERTY >OR SALE 


Comer Lot — 3 bdr. & 1 bdr. 
with sleeping prch. Avail. 
Shown by appoint. $18,950. 
Terms. 1256 W. 62nd St. CUy. 
to brks. HO 4-8371. 


$495 Dn.— 2 bdr. frame, Ige lot, 
near Manchester. PL. 7-2268. 


$1000 Dn. — Open house. 1110 
W. 49th. 6 rm., 2 & den. RE 
4-2538. 


2 Br. Span. stuc. Nr. schools, 
transp. & shops. Just $12,950. 
Low dn. Must act now! West 
side. 2 on lot, W. side, 2 & 
1 br., 8 yrs. old. Dbl. gar. 
Steal at $12,500. Dai lohi 
Realty. RE 1-2495. 


Open Sun. 1-5 p.m. — 1805 S. 
Carmona Ave. Well-built 2- 
bdrm., 1-bath. $12,500. Only 
$2,500 down, balance easy. 
Tieman, Upton 0-1647. 


Sac. by Owner — 4-rm., 2-bdrm. 
house on 40xl30-ft to alley. 
R'3 .lot, at 144 W. Stth St. 
$4,250 net cash lull price. 
MA. 6-963L 


Quiet, 
Comfortable 

BRICK BUILDING 

FOR ADULTS 
ONLY! 

Furnished • Refrigerition 

Wisher & Dryer • UtII. Paid 

Bachelors— Single*— Doubl« 

$40 Up, $57 Up, $80 Up 
The Paulson Apts. 

1 979 S. ESTRELLA 

W. of Figueroa, N. of 23rd St. 

Manager Rfi. M909 

If No Answer; Rl. 7-3450 


6l apts. & 2 STORES 

CORNER 2 STORY BRICK BLDG. 

t, STUCCO DOUBLE, $15,000 DN. 

2700 W. VERNON AVE. 

AX. 4-7989 

WESTSIDE HOUSE FOR SALE 


BEDROOMS and Den. Span- 
ish stucco. Full dining 
room, fireplace. Corner 
house. 2 single garages. 
Carpeted. Hardwood floors. 
Tile features. 2 full baths. 
Unit heat. Garbage disposal- 
Pico- La Brea area. $20,500. 
$5,000 down. 



HAYES 
MOTEL 

The Paepf^'s Ch6fe» 

960 E. Jafferson 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WISTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


WESTSIDE SHOWPLACESIII 

Bachelors $12.50 Up 
Singles, $16 and Up 
Poubles, $20 and Up 

• Convenient — Clean 

• Newly beeorated 

• Modern Furniture 

• Elevator Service 

• Utilifles Paid 

• Best Tranipfirtation 

1501 w. ADAMS Blvd. 

(At Catalina) 


Modern, 

Comfortable 

Brick BMilding 

For Adulb Only! 

WELL FURNISHED 
WASHER AND DRYER 

UTILITIES PAID- 
SINGLES ANp DOUBLES 

Frederick Apts. 

1647 W. Ele\|enth Street 
One Block West |of Union Av«. 

$55 -$60- $70 
DU. 9-761 3 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


Open Sun. l-S-1514 E. 2lKt St. 
3-bdrm. $10,500. 5723 Man- 
hattan PI., 3-bdrm., $15,750. 
Takai Realty. RE. 1-3117. 

5-Room Corner Hpme, 50x120 
R-2 lot, vacant; very low dn. 
payment. Asking $12,950; 
submit. AX. 2-0107. 

1911 W 64th St. — Open Sun. 
Beautiful 2-bedroom stucco. 
$1,500 down. AX. 2-1412 or 
AX. 4-6262. 


3 Bdtm. — 2 baths, sep. din. rm. 
Close to everything. Only 
$22,500. 2 & den, split leveL 
1% ba., U. heat Attractiv* 
large rms. 2 story, 2 bedrm. 
k den, 2 baths. U. heat, Im- 
mac. Good financing. Phon« 
AX 2-9103 for appt. 

SISJMO Full Prioe — Thra« 
houses on R3 Idt Nice clean, 
near stores ft transp. Submit 
low down. AX 2-0107. 

SI 150 Down — 4 flat stiic. 2 
bdrm. ea. 10616 S. CentraL 
$22,500 F.P. RE 1-1107; &£ 
3-3563. 

2 on Lot— $1000 dn. 1 A 2 bd. 
Clean. 5912-14 Woodlawn. 
RE 2-8248. 

I . . . 

0t>9n Sat & Sub. — 1829 S. 
Orange Dr. 3 bd. S2500 dn. 
2926 Dalton. 9 rm. Make of- 
fer on 1755-59 Highland. 
Stuc. trplx. WE 1-8116; Ev. 
RE 1-1068. 

By Ownor— $12,000 dn. 8 deluxe 
stucco units, 1 year old; six 
1-bdrm., two 2-bdnn. Adams- 
La Brea area. $750 mo. in- 
come. WE. 6-2011. 

Low Dn. Pormeat— 8-rm. stuc. 

dble, $13,500; walk, distance 
to transp., shopping; w«st of 
La Brea tietween Washing- 
ton and Adams. Call to see. 
AX. 2-0107. fc 


Hvy. Spanish Stuc. — 7 rooms, 
3 bdrms. & breakfast. Man- 
chester & Western Avenue. 
$4,000 down. WE. 8-8000. 


WASH. & LA BREA — Immac. 
2-bdrm. stuc; full din. rm., 
brkfs^. nook, service poi\:h. 
Small down possible. Phone 
AX. 3-7949. 


$1,450 DH. — Open. 1443 W. 
91st St. 2-bdfm. stucco and 
rumpus, carpets, fireplace. 
Vacant Must sell. PL. 3-4366. 


LARGE l-RAME 9 bd. Nr. Ad- 
ams Blvd. R-3. U. ht Suit 
rm. hse., home for aged, etc. 
RE. 1-9491, RE. 4-2598. 


$3500 DOWN— 3 bd.. 2Vt ba., 2 
sty. Colonial. Crenshaw and 
Olymoic. Terms to suit 
Owner. WE. 8-2159. 


Submit Low Dn. — 10- rm. stuc. 
studio duplex plus 4-room 
home; 2-bdnn. ea., IH baa., 
each In front units ; exccL 
SW rental location, on m*J. 
transp. line. walk. distAnce 
to shop. Asking $35,000; tuhi 
mit owner leaving, wants 
quick deal deal. AX. 2*0107. 

$15,000 FuU Price— 3 Houses 
on 3-3 lot; nice, clean, near 
stores and transp. Submit lo 
down. AX. 2-0107. 

, , * - 

2907 4th Aye.— Open Sun. 1-5. 
2 houses on lot 2-bdrm. ea.; 
near 'J' carline. Offer $2,000 
down. Saito. RE. 1-2121. 

Open 'til Sow— 4537 W. 16 PL 
8 rms., 2-story frame; many 
possibilities. $1,500 down. 
RE. 3-9245 t» AX. 2-5530. 


4 UKIT to be completed In 30 
days. 2 2 BR. 2 IBR. Sched- 
uled $310 mo Inc. + Uv. 
qtrs. PL. 3-1271. 


Open Until Sold 

mo W. 49th 

Newly .redecorated 6-rm., 2- 
bdrm. & den, Ital. tile P.P., 
tiled bath, KW, & thermo- 
heat Close to shopping cen- 
ter,- bus line, schools and cen- 
trally located. Vacant F.P. 
$13,500, $1,500 dn. Ask for 
Wofford. 

^ RE. 4-2538 


$5000 DOWN— 5 bdr. k den. 2 
sty. stucco. 3 full ba. U. ht 
WE. 6-6277. 


$395 DOWN — 3 bdr. Orange 
Co. Bon Investment Co. LA. 
2-5075. 

incomTproperty^ 


2 ON CORNER LOT— 3 bdr. k 
1 bd. Both available. Shown 
by appointment. $18,950. 
Terms, 1256 W. 62nd St. Ctsy 
to bkrs. HO. 4-8371. 


WBSTSRN STAR REALTY — 

1953 West Jefferson Blvd. 
RE. 4-2538. $2500 dwn. home 
k income. North of Wash- 
ington on Harvard. Five (5) 
room two (2) bdrm. down- 
stairs and Six (6) room 
three (3) bdrm. upstairs. 
This won't last. Call RE. 
4-2539. ASK FOR WOFPORD 
—WE NEED LISTINGS. WE 
TRADE, BUY k SELL. 


$3500 Do. — By owner. 4 stucco 
units. 972-74H W. 42nd PI. 
FA 1-0118. 


2 Bd. ea. immac. mod. stuc. 
dbl., nr. W. Washington. 
$3,500 dn. RE 2-7175. 


11-room bouse — Suitable for 
rooming house or a home 
for the aged. Owner anxious 
to sell. 2 blks. from USC 
campus. R-4 zone. $1,500 dn. 
$17,500 full price. RE 1-7371. 


21 Rooms, 5 baths, home tlus 
3 apts. Fine for sest home or 
rooming house. CompL furn. 
Owner anx. 6-rm. stuc. dbL, 
hdwd. k tile, dble garage, 
fenced yaid. $13,500. Phone 
OR. 8-0174. 


W. or CRENSHAW, N*. 0£ 

Washington. $1500 dn. 8 rm. 
stuc. dW. 2 BR.— 1 BR. $16.- 
500 FP. RK. 1-2119. 


STEAL — Beaut new dlx. 7 
U. Corn. Wash, k Claudlna. 
Nr. La Brea. $10,000 down. 
Bldr. OR. 7-5832. 


4 UNITS k 3 trailer spaces. 
Sched. Inc. $2400. $11.000. 
$900 dn. ST. 5>5223. 


4 UNIT Stucco Court New bas. 
Hdwd. floors. U. heat, kir 
cond., insulated. Xlnt cond. 
in k out 56th * Vermont 
No loan charges. Priced low 
at $21,500. Make Offer on 
dowh' payment PL. 3-3875. 

OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 — 2114-16 
Longwood. 2 nice stuc. hses. 
on lo!. 3 k den 1 sty. nr. 
Wash." Big kit k lot $13.- 
950. $2000 dn. 2 BR. * 1 Br. 
houses. Nr. Seafs/Vermont 
Dbl. gar. $14,500. SaoOO dn. 
Rafu Realty Co. RE. 1-4155. 


ep«a HmuM— 3616 W. 73rd St 
2 and den. $900 dn. F.P. $11,- 
500. RE 1-2119. 


Low itta. — very clean 2 bdrm. 
Nr. Westn. F.P. $9950. Kashu, 
RE 4-1157. 


3 Br.— Tile kit., bath, w/w car 
ts, Ige. yd. $18,500. NO 


pets, 1 


Low t>own foyment — 8 room 
stfucco double. $13,500, walk- 
ing distance td transp. and 
shopping. WeM of La Brea. 
between Washington and 
Adams. Call AX 2-0l07. 

6 Units — $2000 dn. Inc. $330 
mo. (No loan charges). PL 
61478. 





WfMCMtyi. 




M-The California Eaglt 


Thursday, January 28, 1960 


lACLU Celebrates 

40 Yrs. of Activity 

NEW YORK — The American Civil Liberties 
Union observed its 40th birthday last Friday by 
releasing a special issue of its monthly publication, 

"Civil Liberties," which summarizes the ACLU's 
roost famous cases in the last four decades. 

The special issue Initiates'* r 


a year- long educational cam- 
paign designed to show how 
civil liberties directly affect 
the personal freedoms of all 
Americans. 

Founded 1920 
The ACLU was founded In 
JanuAry 1920 by a score (rf 
eminent Americans, Includlngr 
J^ne Addams, Helen Keller, 
Roger Baldwin, Arthur Gar- 
field Hays, Norman Thomas, 
llabbi Judah L. Magnes and 
Bev. John Haynes Holmes. 

Since then the union has 
grown into a nationwide or 
ganization of 48,000 members 
and 27 local atEUiates. Its 
work Is aided by a network 
of 800 cooperating . attorneys 
throughout the country. Bald- 
win led the ACLU until his 
retirement in 1950 when he 
became its international wwk 
advisor and was succeeded 
by Patridt Murphy Malta, ex- 
economics professor of Swiirtti- 
more College and vice-chair- 
man of the World War II Intw- 
Governmental Committee wi 
Refugees. 

Commenting on the union's 
growth, Malin said the organ- 
ization can look back at a 
number of constitutional bat- 
tles that stirred major con- 
troversy when thsy occurred 
but which are now hailed as 
respected landmarks tn the 
history of the United States. 
When the ACLU was form- 
ed, Malln said, the Palmer 
Raids (mass deportations of 
persons who held radical be- 
liefs) were opposed by too 
few Americans. 

"At stake," Malin said, "was 
th« weU-being of hundreds of 
people called aliens. But 
equally important to the tiny 
ACLU was the principle then 
as now: that all people pos- 
sess certain inalienable rights 
as set down in the Constitu 
tion and its Bill of Rights. 

"HoweMer banal such words 
may seem after so much repe- 
tition, the ACLU took them se- 
riously all these years, every 
day." 

Among the cases noted by 
Malin and described in the 
special issue of "Civil Liber- 
ties," are the Scopes' "mon- 
key" trial (of Clarence Dar- 
row, right- to- teach -evolution 
fame); the Children's Crusade, 
which petitioned President 
Harding to release imprison- 
ed WotM War I civil liberties 
victims; the Sacco-Vanzetti 
case; the Gaston ia, N.C.,- la- 
bor war (free speech for tex- 
tile workers seeking to organ- 
ize a union); free speech for 
iemployers in labor disputes 
(the Ford Motor Co. case); 

The Scottsboro bo^s; the 
Bonus Array evictions; "Ulys- 
ses" and "The Miracle" acen- 
soTship casfs; the evacuation 
of Japanese- Americans to de-. 
tentlon camps in World War 
II; McCarthyismr and black- 
listing In the mass communi- 
cations industry. 

In releasing the special 
Issue, Malin warned that 
d«^>ite the success scored in 
firmly pl«mtlng dvil liberties 
principles in Supreme Court 
decisions and public thinking, 
many issues are still unre- 
solved. 

Among these, he said, are de- 
segregation in public schools, 
Interracial marriage, govern- 
ment news and private group 
censorship. Illegal police de- 


tention and other abuses of 
citizens' rights, and a host of 
Issues affe<iting separation of 
church and state. 

"And there always will be 
front iei* problems not yet 
foreseen that will require the 
ACLU to exercise its 'watch- 
dog' role," Malin said. 


Anheuser-Busch Sets Sales Record 


TAMPA, Fl a. — August A. Busch Jr., president 
of Anheuser-Busch Inc., told his board of directors 

here this week that 1959 was the biggest year in 
the company's 108-year history. 

The board meeting took't. .,„ TT ; — i " -- ■ , — 

j..j__ *u. T .»i„- barrels of beer In 1959 than 


place during the annual sales 

convention of the brewery, at- 
tended by approximately 400 
of the company's regional and 

district sales officials. 

Busch said sales in excess of 
eight million barrels of beer 
established a new record not 
only for Anheuser-Busch, but 
for any single brewery in the 
world. 

Busch added that while com- 
plete industry figures had not 
yet been compiled, he esti- 
mated Anheuser-Busch sold 
more than two million more 


its closest competitor. This 
was the fifth year Anheuser- 
Busch produced and sold 
more than six million barrels 
of beer, another new record 
for the industry. 

Last year, Apheuser- Busch 
also was the industry's leader 
with 6,982,(XX) barrels sold. 
Sales in 1959 represent an in- 
crease of about 15 per cent 
over 1958. The company mark- 
ets Budwelser, M i c h e 1 o b, 
Busc?h, Bavarian and Regal 
beers. 


Bu$ch also told the board of 
directors that signs for 1960 
look^ very good for sales. 
He warned, ho^vever, that the 
problem of rising costs was 

Still one of the biggest the 
comiiany must face. 

"The CO St of practically 
everything in our business Is 
rising, and this means that 
every effort must be made by 
Anheuser-Busch to operate 
with the highest degree of ef- 
ficiency and economy," Busch 
said. 

Busch also said the com- 
pany plans to expand its op- 
erations in the future to keep 
up with the increased volume 
of business and the poten- 
tial in the brewing industry. 

Recently the company had 


announced it had taken an 

option on 50 acres of land in 

Houston. No immediate plans 
for Houston were disclosed. 

Busch also said the board 
of directors had voted to post- 
pone listing the company's 

stock on the New York Stock 
Exchange. 


Valentine Dance 

Rudy Brown's band will 
play at aValenthie Dance 
for the Wisteria Social Club 
on Feb. 13 at the North Star 
Auditorium, 1613 W. Adams 
blvd. 

The next regular' club 
meeting will be held in the 
home of Ollie Anderson, 916 
E. Century blvd., on Feb. 7. 


N.Y.'S "SLICK FUCKS" 


(Continued from Page 10) 
film it was Cory Grant and 

Tony Curtli in "Operotlop 
Pettieoat" And all this for 
only $1.75. Whwe can you 
top this? 

Cunrently there is' a new 
show with the feature film 

being "Iferwr So Few" star- 
ring Frank Sinatra and Glna 
LoUobrigtdo, and the reports 

say this is a swinger. I'll re- 
port as soon as I see. 

Brown Recks T»wn 

1 had a chat today with 
Ruth and she is looking real 
'tough' fellas, believe me. She 
sends her love to all the guys 
on the coast 

Everyone here has been 
asking me in particular 
abopt now L. A's own Willie 
B««, so greetings and salu- 


tations from all at sbow bus- 
iness in New York to Mr. 

Showbusiness, Willie Biyoat 
at KALI and Scm'i Bacoid 

Shop. Sure had a ball at a 
swinging birthday party in 
St Albans for Bugh^Baaks 
(now working on his Phd). 

Shriners At Armocy 

By the time you read this 
I will be preparing tot go to 

the strictly fonnal (no tux- 
edos) Shrineirs Ball at the 
369th Armory on Saturday as 
the guest of lovely model and 
mother, Elaine DanieL Should 
be fun. I'll report quite soon, 
so meanwhile continue to 
keep the action on the West 
Coast jumping, so I'll be able 
to keep sharp whenevw I re- 
turn. Until my next like 
later: PHIL GOROOn 



MANCHESTER AT- 
TRACTION— Glenn Ford 
and Debbie Reynolds co- 
star for the first time in 
MGMs "It Started With a 
Kiss," rollicking comedy of 
an Air Force sergeant sta- 
tioned in Spain, whose life is 
hilariously complicated when 
he vnns both a bride and a 
fabulous automobile of the 
future. 



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2101 W. VarMii Avaima, L. A. 


Continuous Publication for 79 Years 


AX. 5-3135 


Vol. LXXIX-No. 47 


Thursday, February 4, 1960 


AX. 5-3135 


Out-ef-Town. 


15c 


TOP STUDEXT AT FOSIIAY — Youn,f Patricia 
II oody, 14. A-^ rlnsii president at Foshny Junior High 
^1 hnol, shoxis tilth pride the Foshay Medal she was awarded 
i'lr leadership. (Story Paqe 2.) (Adams) 


$80,000 Said 
Taken from Daddy 
At Time of Death 

As the Federal Government slapped liens for 
nearly SG million against the estate of Sweet, Sweet 
Daddy Grace, his faithful followers in Los Angeles 
were agitated over a report that someone had 
snatched a bankroll of $80,000 from the bishop's 
person at the time of his death here in Los Angeles 

''''Jan, 12. 

Also causing wonderment 


Parker Claims Negro 
^Provoked^ Race Slurs 

No Apology 
Given, Denies 
Insult Intended 


Stab Man in Back 
In Housing Project, 
Flee Scene in Car 

A teen-age gang of boys, ranging in ages from 

13 to K years, were wanted for murder this week 

I following the death Monday of a 42-year-old man 

who was slabbed by one of them a week ago in a 

housing project at il4th street and Gorman avenue. 

A tragic aspect of the cas« 


is the fact that the slain man, 


-CfCtS ^LCiPPCU Louis Hardeman, of 2235 E. 



Police Chief William 
H. Parker managed to get| 
in apassing haymaker | 
at Civil Rights Commis-; 
jsioner George M. Johnson j 
i Tuesday while steadfastly 
ignoring repeated re- 
quests that he apologize 
to the Mexican-American 
community for slurring 
remarks made during last 
week's Civil Rights hear- 



A\(;ERLD PARKER — 

(Jii'il Ritjhts C.rjnimissioner 
(.icor/fe M. Johnson tins ar- 
cuscd by Police Chief Park' 
er in City Cauntti 'hcarin/j 
Tuesday of asking provoca- 
tive questions. 


HISTORY ITEF.K PROCLAIMED— Mayor Norris PoiHson, se-cond from right, reads 
his Segro History U eek proclamation to. from left, Llewellyn Mazique, co-chairman of 
the week's celebration E'eb. 7'14; Mrs. Hotel (\ Chambers,' general chairman^ and Mrs. 
I assie D. If right, president-founder of Our Authors Study Club, sponsor of the local f(S- 
ti-cities. (Smith)] 


fi I » J Also causing 

VlllVl«)ll M#IC€ was a report that in New Bed- 

^yilUUff I lUJJ ford. Mass., Daddy's H6me, a 

woman claiming to be his 

VM I ^ widow had hired a lawyer to 

MAOf I inOilC protect her interests and those 

i^lWVl VpWllJ I of her daughter. 

II, III I DeUvered Own Eulogy 

UlffAni uUAaI/ The eulogy- at the red, white 

riDlvl I n WWlV \^^'^ ^'"^ church ot the House 
• jof Prayer in New Bedford as 

A mass meeting at 3 p.m.. Daddy was buried there last 
Sunday, Feb. 7, at Second Tuesday, was delivered in 
Baptist Church. 24th and j Daddy's own voice amid sobs, 
Criffith .Ave., will officially i prayers and sineing The eul- 


Chief Parker's Performance 

Chief of Police William H. Parker put on the performance that has be- 


appearance before 1 1 
Council, the chiefi 


In an 

the City „„_ ^ 

maintained he had alreadyi 
explained his remarks in a 
letter to the Mexican consul- 
general and futhermore he 
insisted that he had been 
"misquoted." 

Unfortunate 

He did a4mit however, that 
his choice of words Ln ^ak- 
ling of the "wHd tribes" of 
iMoxico was "unfortunate," 

said that perhaps he should i ''fle^'ng ^° Chief of Police 

come his trade mark when he appeared before the Civil Rights Coramision last not have used the word "wild,"iW'"'a"^ "■ Parker talk about 

.r. . , , ... ,. ,. ■ , . ■ , -. anri that hp haHn't intpnHpfi I the disproportion between ^e- 

week. He tried to drown out criticism of police methods with facts and figures ^^"^../^JJy'^^^^^^.^Ji;'^ wrong, ' g^o ^"^ Mexican populations 

showing that Negroes and Mexicans commit a major share of Los Angeles'jbut that was" as far as'lieiand Negro 

crime and answered critics of police policy with half truths that conceal more would go in way of a retrac|and Mexicans i.,.^^ ■ 
,, ^. , r- I ., accused of .-f*^^^^ T 

than they reveal. ♦ " , [■ '°"- 

Chairman George A. Beavers of the Housing Authority and Golden State ',^g(j°"{j'j^p"'"jf£Q^^.mi3jg^ 1^^^ 

Insurance Company official made three specific charges. < 'ideas precisely, the chief 


THcUeft 


I was sitting there last week 


114th street, spent a good 
portion of his spare time 
working with teen-agers in an 
attempt to combat juvenile 
delinquency. 

Police Tuesday were comb- 
ing the neighborhood for 
members of the gang. Harde- 
man told police before he died 
that the youth who had at- 
tacked him lived in the hous- 
ing project and hangs «ut« at 
the gyTn in that area. 

He said he knew members 
of the gang by sight, but did 
not know their names. 

Someone in the neighbor- 
hood had reported seeing the 
boys drive off in a car after 
the knifing. 

The incident occurred on 
Sunday, Jan. 24, as Hardeman 
was locking up his car and 
going into his house. The 
young thugs were hurling 
bottles at each other. 

Hardeman spoke to them, 
warned them they might 
Weak some windows, wouldn't 
be able to pay for them and 
then would be in trouble. 

One of the gang spoke up. 
"Best thing you can do, old 
man." he said, 'is go inside." 

As he turned to go into the 
house, one of the gang jumped 
him from behind with a knife 
and stabbed him in the back. 
The knife penetrated the lung. 
An unknown person took 
him to St. Francis Hospital in 
Lynwood, from where he was 
transferred to General Hos- 
pital. He died Monday eve- 
ning about. S. pan. . 

HaM^mafif -was itrllr^ In- 
terested in Boy Scout work and 
also spent considerable time 
in the nearby playground and 

gym. 


open the 12fh annual week-; 
Ion;? ©b.-servance of .Negro his-i 
tory Week in Los Angeles. 
Guest speaker for the occa-l 
sion will be Dr. John W. Da- 
vis, president emeritus of 
West 'Virginia State College, 
who now is .special director 
of the Dept. of Teacher Infor- 
mation and Security of the 
NA.YCP's Legal Defense and 
Educational Fund. 

.Masor Norris Poulson. re- 
co^ni/ing tlie significance of 
the historic celebration, has 
is.surd a proclamation, call- 
ing upon "all citizens to fa- 
miliarize themselves with the^ 
important role played by Ne- ; 
gro citizens in the growth, | 
surccss and welfare of this! 
country'' during the week of 
Feb. 7- 14. The week of spe- 
cial emphasis on Negro con- 
tribution to American heritage j 
marks the 3Tth annual na-j 
tional observance by the As- j 
.sociaticHT for the Study of .Ne- 
gro Life and History, which 
was founded by , noted histor- 
ian Carter G. Wood.son. In 
Los .Angeles, Our Authors 
'Continued on Page 4i ' 


(Continued on Page 4> 



1. Mr. Beavers said that the Police Department follows an unwritten rule 
against Negro and white officers working together. Mr, Parker didn't deny 
that Negro and white officers don't work in pairs; he shouted that there was 
no '.'rule" against it but added in the next breath that he permits officers to 
choose their own partners and that he won't "force" men to work together 
against their will. 

2. Mr. Beavers asserted that the Police Department wastes manpower 
by its policy of assignments on the basis of race. Mr. Parker spurned examin- 
ation of the charge itself while he praised himself for his examination and pro- 
motional practices. 

3. Mr. Beavers said that police officers are not assigned to certain sta- 
tions. Mr. Parker was quick to assert that there is no policy barring Negro 
officers from any station but added that they are assigned to, and want to 
work close to their own homes. 

Critical assessment of the chiefs answers show that he has answered 
nothing. In the case of the first charge what he has said is that he permits his 

(Contihued on Page 4) 


(Continued on Page 4) 

Dr. P. Cobbs 
Funeral Today 



crime when 
it came to me 
that a friend 
of mine had 

I s e n t me a 

! clipping last 

'summer from 
an Knglish 

■magazine. 
This friend of 
mine is a fel- 
low who takes a dim View of 
Catholics and the Roman 
Catholic religion. He's about 
as handy about blaming 
Catholics for a\\ of the ills of 
this world as Eastland is 
about shunting blame for the 
the shoulders 


JfEEK'S KEYXOTEii.— 
Dr. John If. Davis, presi- 
dent emeritus of If est I ir- 
ginifi State College, mil he 
principal speaker at the .\ egro 
History II cck opening, mass 
meetinij Sund/n . Feb. 7, at 
Second Baptist (Church. 


Negro History Week 

Here is the week's program for Negro History 
Week which opens Sunday. 

Feb. 7, 3 p.m.: Mass Meeting, Second Baptist 
Chuch, 24th and Griffith. 

Feb. 8, 10:30 a.m.: Student Body Assembly, 
Jefferson High School. 

Feb. 8, 12 Noon: Ceremony on City Hall steps. 

Feb. 8, 8 p.m.: African Culture Night, Wesley 
Community Center, 52nd and Main. 

Feb. 9, 8 p.m.: Music Night, Ward AME Church, 
1177 W. 25th Street. 

Feb. 10, 8 p.m.: Panel — Progress of the Negro, 
Golden State Mutual auditorium. 

Feb. IL 8 p.m.: Youth Night (oratorical con- 
test). Manual Arts High, 4131 S. Vermont. 

Feb. 12,8 p.m.: Church Night, Zion Hill 
Baptist Church, 51st and McKinley Ave. 

Feb. 13, 1 p.m.: Centennial Luncheon, Shera- 
ton West Hotel, 2961 Wilshire Blvd. 

Feb. 14, 3 p.m.: Reception — Coronation of Miss 
Negro History Week, Will Rogers- Auditorium, 1335 
E. 103rd Street. 


Woman's Body 
Found in Alley 
Off 7th Avenue 

The body of a T3-year-old 
German woman, Amanda E. 
ROc'kTeilo'w, 2909 Tth avenue, 
was found early Friday morn- 
ing in the alley between Tth 
and Sth avenues just north of 
Jefferson blvd. 

Police said she had appar- 
ently been dragged to the 
spot where she was discovered 
about 6:30 a.m. by Leonard 
Peoples, 3913 3,5 Normandie 
avenue, and Dorothy Wil- 
liams, of the same address. 

The woman had two cuts 
on the back of her head. Her 
face was covered with blood 
and her eye had been 
blacked. Death was reported 
as due to asphyxiation from 
the aspiration of blood. 


Teen-age Parties 
Said Crihfie Cause 


' Memorial services for Dr. 

j Price Cobbs, 67, of 1407 Ni- 

Ideau street, are being held 
today, Thursday, at 10:30 a.m. 
in Lewis Metropolitan church, 'Soulh's ills on 
4900 S. Western avenue. ;of Negroes. 

! Dr. Cobbs, a native of Bar- 1 i dug up tlie clipping over 

! bersville, 'Va., died Monday' the week end ajid it quotes 
at Good Samaritan Hospital an English woman as saying 
from complications following i that although in England 
injuries which he received in^"the proportion of Roman 
an automobile accident at {catholics is no more than 10 
Washington and Union ave-jper cent . . . re<-ent inquiries 
nues on Jan. 13. 


Senate Okehs 
Poll Tax Bill 

WASHINGTON— The Senate 
Tuesday approved a con- 
stitutional amendment that 
would outlaw poll taxes as a 
requirement for voting in fed- 
eral elections. The vote was 
70 to 18, better than the heces- 
sary two- thirds majority. 

If passed by the House, also 
by a two-thirds majority, the 
measure must then be rati- 
fied by legislatures of three- 
i fourths of the states. 


He was a general practi- 
tioner, one of the few old-time 
family doctors still in Los An- 
geles who took up family 
counselling as an aid to se- 

n • V u - i 1 14 u A curing and maintaining the 

A campaign fo bring to a halt unchaperoned| ^^-^^^^^^ ^^ j^j^ patients. 

and unauthorized teen-age parties in rented houses i He was respected by young 

was initiated this week by Sgt. F'rank Knowles of | and old alike, and he taughl jcent of 

University Juvenile Division, who asked the coopera-.his children the principles of | Borstal 


show that the proportion in the 
bo\s' Borstal, institution of 
corrections was about 23 per 
cent, and in the Holloway 
prison about 26 per cent." She 
goes on to say that "ifl Scot- 
land in 1957 the 1.'5 pfr cent 
of Roman Catholus in the 
population provided 33 per 
those committed to 
40 


institutions, and 


tion of the Eagle in alerting the community to the' 
dangers involved. 

This practice is widespread, 
said Sgt. Knowles, who 
emphasized that it was not 
restricted to any one area but 
is city-wide in scope. 
Man ^tabbed 

He reported one instance 
that occurred last month 
where a house at 217 W. Santa 
Barbara avenue had t?een 
rented for $15 for a peirty fol- 
lowing which one man was 
stabbed and left in critical 
condition and another man 
was clubbed on the head. 

The youngsters charged 50c 
admission and opened the 
doors to all -comers. There was 
no adult present during the 
evening to supervise the danc 
ing or the otlier actions of the 
teen-agers. It was estimated 
that between 70 and 75 people 
paid admissions. 

John L. Lewis, 22, of 2918 '/i 
Pennsylvania avenue, was the 
man who was stabbed and 
who was not expected to live 
as the result of the wound. He 
did recover, however, and 
after two weeks in the hos- 
(Continued on Page 21 


(Continued on Page 12) 


(Continued on Page 4) 



Woman Tells 
Of Kidnaping to 
Prevent Trial 


A 22-year-old woman told 
police a harrowing tale this 
week of being kidnapped and 
driven to San Francisco under' 
I threat of death to prevent her 
j f rom testifying against a man 
accused of trafficking in 
women. 

Elizabeth R. (^nzales, of 
2640 S. Catalina street, said 
she gave the slip to her kid- 
nappers — three men and a 
woman — last Wednesday and 
notified San Francisco police, 
, who placed her on a plane 
\ for Los Angeles. 
j 4 Arrested 

She was met here at Bur- 
bank airport by officers and 
taken to University Police 
Station where she told her 
story. , 

Arrested following her story 
were John Murray, 28; Willie 
B. Royal. 32: Tommie Royal, 
,34: and Ma.xine Avant, 22. All 
gave their address as 132 W. 
38th street. 

Miss Gonzales claimed that 
she was walking dowm West- 
ern avenue at 2Sth street last 
Wednesday when the four 
suspects drove up along side 
her. 

Murray, she said, ordered 
her to get into the car. When 
she refused, he and Tommie 
Royal forced her into the rear 
seat. "You'll get into the car 
or else!" she claimed they 
told her. 

Noticed Gun 

She said she noticed a gun 
in the glove compartment. 

Shortly after they started 
driving her north, she said 
Murray warned her that if 
(Continued on^age 12) 


RECEIVES SCHOLJkSHIP— Outstanding student Robert A. lee. o/ Jefferson High 
School, zcas awarded a scholarship from the Rachel and Morris Kunin Scholarship Fund 
at the Jefferson award dinner Saturday. From left: Sam Hamerman, principal: Ralph 
Kunin. presenting award to Rt^bert Lee; and Mort Games, partner in the Kunin's turni- 
ture Co. (Stor^ Page 2.) 


In fli» Eogfc 


Edltoxtali 

Church ActiTlties 

Sports ..._ _ 

The Tee 

BiU Smedlwood 

Dorothea Foster 

PeopU „ 

Chan Crawtord 

Whatis Cooking 


. 4 
. 5 

.6 
. 6 
. 7 
. 8 
. 9 
.9 
.12 


"•*■ 


n >Mj.Ju,—fl>^ai 


•Hucksters Organize 



2— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 4, 1960 


Top Award Given 
Leader at |oshay 

Patricia Woody, 14, Los Angeles born, was 
awarded the Foshay Junior High School medal last 
Wednesday. 

She received the award for "leadership, citizen- 
ship, strength of character and scholarship." 

'" Despite her activities as 


TO PROMOTE LIQUOR JOBS— More jobs for Xf^mry in the liquor srllmr; field is 
the stated aim of the nctily organized Huckster!, composed of salesmen of liquor .litne.hecr, 
cigars and clgartts. Steinditig from left: Brad Garrett, Rudy U'alker, Pete Stanford, tnink 
Smith. LeRoy Day and John Grant. Kneeling, Steie Lockett. (.fd/ims) 



HUCKSTERS ORG.fSTZE— Officers of the neuly organized Hucksters Club are slumn 
seated, second roK\ during election meeting at the Playroom. Seated on floor, from left: 
Lou Shaffer, Harry Jones. Sam Tepp, Peter Stanford. Second roiv: LeRoy Day. sergeant 
at amis: Steve Lockett, secretary; Carl Haley, treasurer; Tom Palmer, president : and Boh 
JUiUiams. vice president. Standing: Claude Davis. Jack Eortson. John Grant. Brad Garrett, 
Bill Troy. Don Hamilton, St Jones, Al Locan, Trank Smith, .41 Sniith, Schuyler Selson, 
Rudy Walker and Ben Mallard. (Adams) 


Kunins Give 
Scholarship to 
Robert A. Lee 

Robert A. Lee, one of the 
leading science students an 
the Jefferson High School 
graduating class, was the re- 
cipient of the Rachel and Mor- 
ris Kunin Scholarship award 

at a pre-grad'.iation award 
dinner in the school cafeteria 
Saturday night. 

In addition to the scholar- 
ship, young Lee also receiv- 
ed a Bausch & Lomb award 
for outstanding merit in the 
field of science. 

Presentation of the schol- 
arship was made by Ralph 
Kunin, .son of the founder of 
Kunins Furniture Co., 4700 S. 
Central avenue, and Mort 
Gaines, a partner in the firm. 

The .scholarship was estab- 
lished in, honor of Morris Ku- 
rrin, now deceased, who start- 
ed the business in 1918, and 
his wife, Rachel Kunin. 

Presentation of this kind of 
an award is a welcome dem- 
onstration of appreciation by 
the Kunins of the support giv- 
en their business by the com- 
munity, as well as an indica- 
tion of their concern about 
the needs of the community, 
especially of its young, and 
talented students. 


A-9i class president and in 
the Girls Athletic Club, Patri- 
cia managed to chalk up the 
enviable record of 4 A's and 
2 B*s in her last semester at 
Foshay. 

Sliie is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Princes Woody and 
lives at 3601 4th avenue. 

Has Initiative 

In a letter accompanying 
the award, Hugh R. Folsey, 
principal, complimented 
young Miss Woody as an 
"outstanding class president," 
who is exceptional because of 
her "alertness," her "readinos.-- 
I to meet any situation," her 
I "initiative" and her ability to I 
make her "own good decisions j 
iwithout prior consultation 
• with the class sponsor." j 

I He also said that Patricia [ 
("accepts suggestions with a 
! mature attitude and carries! 
'out assignments promptly,"! 
has "energy, ability and char- | 
acter" and is a "top school 
leader." 

The attractive and capable 
teenager says, without hcsi- 
[tancy, that algebra is her fav- 
' orite subject and that .she 
i hopes to go to UCLA to be- 
come a phychologist. 
; Meanwhile, on Mondav of 
this week she spent her first 
day at Dorsey Senior High 
School. 

Sfie is also scheduled to re- 
ceive an American Legion 
award for her outstanding 
record at Foshay. 



USTOX AIDS X^ACP — The International Ladies Garment Workers' Union thii week 
donated $900 to the Southern California area of the XAACP. From left: ILGWU Man- 
ager Isidor Stenzor; ILGWU Vice President and Pacific Coast Director Samuel Otto gives 
cheek to Frank Barnes, XAACP area president ; right, John Ulfne, manager of the 
ILGll'U dress and sporlszirar division. 


CLERKS NEEDED 

The Los Angeles Post Office 
is urgently in need of men to 
fill Clerk and Letter Carrier 
positions. Postmaster Otto K. 
Olesen said Monday, adding 
there is a particular shortage 
of qualified men to fill Clerk 
vacancies. 


COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY 

Lawrence J. Richardson is 
conducting a class in COLOR 
PHOTOGRAPHY at Dorsey 
'Adult School, beginning 
■Thursday, February 4, 7-9:30 
[ p.m. Mr. Richardson won the 
! Faricy Art Award from North- 
western University and cur- 
Irently is* a photography lab- 
! ordtory tcchnican at tho Ed 
'Morgan Camera Center. 





Keep Parker 
File Secret, 
Govt. Urged 

NEW YORK. N. Y — The 1 
American Civil Liberties Un- ; 
ion asked Attorney General ; 
William P. Rogers not to bow ' 
to requests that he publicly] 
release the FBI's report of the 
recent Mack Charles Parker 
lynch case. 

"To do so would mean that 
the federal government is 
adopting the philosophy of 
the ends justifying the means, 
for public disclosure of the 
FBI file would be directly 
contrary to the constitutional 
principle that accusations 
against people are to be 
handled through the judicial 
process," the ACLU said in a 
letter released by its execu- 
tive director, Patrick Murphy 
Malin. 

The civil liberties group 
emphasized that the lynching 
was a "terrible crime express- 
ing the ultimate explosion of 
racial prejudice and deserves 
the condemnation of ever>' 
civilized person." However, 
the ACLU said, despite its bit- 
ter frustration that two grand 
juries have failed to return 
indictments, the principle of 


Teen-age House Parties Linked 
To Crime, Delinquency by Police 

(Continued from Page 1) , tor in causing juvenile de- 


pital was permitted to return 


linquency. 


home to recuperate. His 
brother, Cornell Lewis. 20, was 
hit over the head, but his in- 
juries were not serious. 

Worse Than 'Crashen' 

These house dances, said 
Sgt. Knowles,- are "all too 
common" in the University, 
77th and Hollenbeck districts. 

The parties, he went on, are 
generally "dreamed up' 
school. 

The youngsters don't have 


Three juveniles have been 
arrested and are coming up 
for a hearing on the cutting 
that^took place at the Santa 
Barbara party last Jan. 10. 
The woman who rented the 
house, Mrs. Devie Mae Davis, 
was warned but was not 
prosecuted. 

Sgt. Knowles pointed out 

at that permits for parties are 

available to any authorized 

adult who is sponsoring a 


•enough monev to pay for a S^°^P of teenagers. The per- 
regular hall and so thev re- "^''s may be obtamed through 
.sort to the practice of renting 'he Los Angeles City Police 
private houses. , Commission. 

The development, he said. 


is p'o t e n t i a 1 1 y even more 
dangerous than the better 
known "party crasher" evil. 
The "crashers" are generally 
known to at least some of 
those attending a party 
vvherca.s under this house- 
party development, the door 
is thrown open to anybody 
who happens b\'. 

Sgt. Knowles looks upon this 
development as a serious fac- 

non-disclosure of FBI file in- 
formation should be main- 
1 tained. 


Beil U'n/ift 10 Our Many 
h'rieniis and Cuslomrrt 



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HOMLS Sf\iR Dl MP SITE— Typical nf thr hom,. ,„ 
(.firrer Mfirinr that util hf ndierselx aijfitrd tf prnprjsed 
Con\pton dump site is approved are the nhrne. Tnp picture 


jhriiis the SI'^.OOO home of John (). Leiiis. Lmver ptctii 
shm.-s the SJO.OOO home of S. Johnson nnd the ^20.000 


\p picture home nf Felix H iltiarns, rirjht. 



f^mm 


Dl MP PROTf-ST GROUP— Members of a Protest Committee ar/ni'ist selection of thr 
proposed nif-(Jentrnl dump site in Cnmpton d'scuss estimated slump m properly prices nith 
repre'entntiT IS nf II atis Sminr/s trad I. nan nflicials. From left: Utis I alley, city riu/inecr: 
Dr. Bernard A. Stru kland : II orrell Collier nf II alts Saimr/s and Loan: Leslie M. Shall', 
lice pri \idcnt of II atts Savings and Loan : and John (). Liuis, real estate dealer and chair- 
m/tn nf the committee. 


Fear Huge Losses 
If Dump Site Wins 


New Lynching 
Feared in Ala. 

BIRMINGHAM. Ala. — An 
nnidontifird Npgro was be- 
lirvod to ha\p boon snatched 
: f rom the side of hi.s blonde 
companion in a 19."i7 Cadillac, 
beaten b.\ six white men and 
then lynched here Saturday 
niglil. 

Ser\icp slation attendant 
Charles Holman reported the 
, incident to police. He .said the 
white men followed tJie Ne- 
gro into the service station 
in two cars, dragged him from 
his seat, set upon Him with 
rubber hoses or sticks, then 
threw him in the back scat 
of one of their cars, and 
dro\c away. 

They reportedly took the 
blonde woman along with 
them. 

Police said they had had 
reports of "cases like this be- 
fore and never heard any- 
thing el.se from them." 

They added. "We'rp afraid 
we mi^ht have a lynching on 
our hands." 

They had no suspects in the 


I indicated that throughout 
jmosl of the year there is a 
I prevailing wind blowing from 
luest to east which would 
;make the dust, noise and ca.so. 

I odors almost unbearable fori 

residents there, Lewis said. j STUDENT GUEST SPEAKER 

i "Support has been gratify- 1 Miss Helen Hines. a senior 
ing," Lewis stated. "Mass at Centennial Senior High 
meetings have been held bv School, was selected bv a 


ANNOUNCING... 


P'inancial institution.s this week predicted there 
would be a serious slump in property values in the 
Carver Manor area if tine proposed dump site off 

Central avenue is approved by the Compton Plan- different churches in the areai panel of ten teachers to rep- 
ning Commission. '* "^ ' _ _ / and the Hub Citv Democratic [resent her school at a recent 

It was estimated that somc-af^nt ot Watts bavings ana ^lub is lending its support." 'soroptimist Club luncheon. 

Sl.-..nOO,000 in investments and Loan As.sociation, said this ^ 1 "21 "i 

mortgages would be jeopard- ^^e^k "lat his concern has 
i/ed if the former Atkinson made numerous loans m the 
Brick Co. yard is used for the area as have other financial 
dumping of rubbish. institutions in the Negro Com- 

The value of apuro.ximatelv munity. The Bank of America 
2(W homes, about % per cent also has extensive holdings 
of which are Negro owned, there, he said, 
would be adversely affected. i "Property values will cer- 
U was stated. 'tainly be affected," Shaw as- 

The thorney question is due^^r^ed. 
for review a.nd possible den- According to John O. Lewis, 
sion at a meeting of the president of the Enterprise 
("ompion Planning Commis- School District and chairman 
sion Wednesday, Feb. 10. at of the Citizens Dump Protest 
7;.3n p.m in the Compton City iCommittee, the Compton Dis- 
Coundl Chambers, 205 S. Wil-posaJ Company is seeking a 
lowbrook avenue. ^special zone change permit 

The homes in Carver Manor, from the Compton Planning 
a 12-year-old, 300-home tract. ^ Commission to operate the 
and the 139th street School, dump. 

are in the immediate vicinityj Boundaries of the dump site 
of the proposed site. The g^e Central avenue, east; Mc- 
school is directly adjacent to Kinley street, west: 134th 


the site 
L/Pslie M 


Shaw, vice presi- 


School Board 
To Meet Feb. 9 


street, north and 139th street, 
south. 

Air Pollution 

If the permit is granted. It 
will mark the first time a 
I dump site has been establish- 
ed in an R-1 area and within 
The Willowbrook School city limits, Lewis said. 
Districts reading program Besides the tremendous traf- 
w;ll be discus.sed at the first fie problem that will be cre- 
mepting of the di.stncfs Board ated, objections have been 
of Trustees in February. raLsed over the decay and fer- 

The meeting will be held atlmentation of the garbage to 
2 p.m , Feb. 9, in the Board be dumped along with rub 
RooVn. Ibish. The Weather Bureau has 



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The California Eagle— 3! 
Thursday, February 4, 1960 

House Opens 
Hearings On 
Rights BiH 

WASpflNGTON — Apparent- 
ly spurred into action by the 
political jitters of party lead- 
ers on both sides, tlie House 
Rules Committee this week 
began hearings on a watered 
down civil rights bill that has 
been gathering dust in com- 
mittee files since last August. 
A major factor in the decision 
to move ahead was the prog- 
ress of a petition to by-pass 
the committee. 

With both Democratic and 
Republican leaders jockeying 
for advantage, the air was 
filled with charges and coun- 
ter charges that began when 
an Indiana Democrat, Ray -J. 
Maden, moved that the bill be 
sent to the House floor with- 
out further hearings. His mo- 
tion died without a second. 

The Rules Committee Chair- 
man, Democrat Howard \V. 
Smith of Virginia, who has' 
made a career out of boltlin;;! 
up progressive legit^lation of 
all kinds, flabbergasted sup- 
porters by accusing Rc|).' 
Emanuel Celler, foremost arl- 
vocate of civil rights, witt 
having "dillied, dallied and 
delayed." He .said he will not' 
"dilly, dally or delay." 

The bill, now in tljc Rules 
Committee, was- whililcd 
down in the Judiciary Coin-' 
mittee and contains no provi- 
sions that would enable tlicl 
Department of Justice to act in 1 
cases involving denial of civil! 
rights or restrictions "on thei 
franchise. i 

Ajjjiaiently southerners fear 
lliat if tile measure is sent to 
llie House floor it will be 
amended and Smitli charged 
tliat ■■norlhern and western; 
politicians will add amend-| 
ments that will take us back; 
to the reconstruction dass and! 
impose carpet bag govern- j 
ment from Washington on the 
southern slates." 

More than 200 signers out of 
219 needed on tiie petition to 
take the Bill from the Rules 
Committee and put it on t.ie 
House floor have been secur- 
ed. California signers of the 
petition are: James Roosevelt. 
John F. .Shelley, Clyde Doyle, 
Harold T. Johnson. George A. 
Kasem, George P. Miller, John 
J. McF^all, Clem Miller, Jeffrey 
Cohelan, Harlan Hagcn, John 
(Continued on Page 4i 





TO II LLCOME Mf.HARRY PRESIDENT— A heavy schedule of aetnitres is being 
arranaed for Dr. Harold D. If'est, president of Meharry .Medical Collrr^e. uho is due here 
teh. " for n four dfi^' iisit. Some of the mcmhers of the enmittee nf Meharrv alttmni m 
fharr/r nf a reicptton.. dinner and other nffans are shoun aboze. Seated, frnm left: Dr. Clar- 
ence Lilthiohn. Mrs- Lnuicnin .Hraham. R.\., Dr. Caesar B. Piper and Dr. Julius it'. 
Hill. Standtna: Dr. Jnvics R. Il'hitmnre. Dr. Frederick .V. Spann and Dr. Hernandez G. 
LnBrnni he. (Smith) 


Robert McFerrin 
To Sing Here Sun. 

Robcit Mcf'errin. Metropolitan Opera baritone, 
well l<nown for the title role in Verdi's "Rigoletto," 
and as the voice of "Porgy." will be heard in concert 
here Sunday, Feb. 7, at the Neighborhood Commun- 
ity Church, 47th place and San Pedro street, at 

7 p.m. '• 

-McFerrin received his early I "Valentine 


musical training at Fisk Uni 
\'ersity and at Chicago Musi- 
cal College. 

In 19-lS he went to New 
York and was immcdiatel\ 
signed for a part in the Wil- 
liam (irant Still Opera "Trou 


from "Faust" by 
Gounod and the title role in 
"Rigoletto" by Verdi. He has 
al.so performed with the San 
Carlo Opera Company in 
Naples, Italy, the Finnish Op- 
era in Helsinki and has ap- 
peared with major symphon- 


bled Island" at the New* York k^s and in concerts all over 
City Center. He then appeared 'he United States, Canada, 


in the Broadway productions, 
"Lost in the Stars" and "Green 
Pastures." 


Europe and South America. 
{ Last year he was guest in- 
struc-tor at the Sibelius Aca- 


In lO.lS, McFerrin was one i demy in Helsinki. 


of the winners of the Metro- 
politan Opera "Auditions of 
the -Mr" and was awarded a 


and Bess, 

of Por"\'. 


scholarship to the Kathr.vn ^.g^.j^ qJ 
Turney Long School, a scliofil 
for members of the Metropol- 
itan for the specific purpose 
of preparing oijcralic role<. 
.After two seasons of stud>'. 
he was given a contract with 
tile .Metropolitan Opera Co. 

McFerrin made his debut in 
January, 1955 in the role of 
"Amonasro" from "Aida" by 
Verdi and subsequently sang 


McFerrin can currently be 
heard on the Columbia re- 
cording of the movie .sound- 
Gershwin's "Porgy 
' He sings the role 


lUrban League 
Plioto Contest 

NEW YORK— Harr>- Golden, 
author of the best-sellers, 
"Only in America" and "For 
Two Cents Plain," was named 
with four other distinguished [ 
I Americans to the Board of 
Judges of "America's Many . 
I Faces," a nationwide search 
for photographs dramatizing ■ 
.the multi-racial character of' 
I the United States. The an- ; 
'nouncement was made by Ed- ■ 
I ward Steichen. project chair- 
man and director of photogra- 
phy at the Museum of Mod- 
ern Art. 

Langston Hughes, noted 
American writer and poet; 
Margaret Mead, eminent an- 
thropologist; Gordon Parks, 
well-known Life photogra- 
pher; and Beaumont Newhall, 
director of the world-famous 
George Eastman House, will 
also serve. 


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For Ful/ Information — Call or Writo for Owner '' 

ATTY. SAM HOUSTON ALLEN, 6850 VAN NUYS BOULEVARD 
VAN NUYS, CALIFORNIA TR. 3-1256 


\^W: 



4— The California EagI* 


Thursday, February 4, 1960 >i»>^''' Sg^<>^T>C><»^g>»<&g>.»<'agN<ft»^g%<»<^gV« ^. 


I HIIII l«l ■■ ■ -! ■ I * 


Loren Miller, PubllBher 

Tk« Califarnia I«8l* stand* far eemplata intagrotion ef 
Um^r^mt inte avary phasa af Amarican Ufa through tha demoeratie 
pracassas. 

Wb favor: 

1. FIPC mn local, stata and national Isvels. 

2. Dacant housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Oavarnmant. 

4. Adequate eld age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all worlcmen. 

6. Davalepmant and encouragement of Negro business. 

■* 
We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Published Every Thursday tor Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Van Ness AXminsfer 5-3135 


iJlte K^ynpoytant i^Xewspap 


cr 


Chief Parkers Show 


rContinued from Page 1) 
men to exercise a discriminatory 
choice that is grounded in cus- 
tom and tradition and that he 
will do nothing to change those 
customs. His refusal to intervene 
gives the arrangement the status 
of an unwritten rule, which is 
precisely what Mr. Beavers 
charged. 

Personnel men are agreed that 
extending to the employe the 
privilege of dictating the terms 
of his own senice and making of 
assignments on the basis of race 
or nationality are wasteful prac- 
tices in terms of efficiency and 
Mr. Beavers second charge re- 
volves around those very prac- 
tices in the Police Department. 
The chief's answer that recruit- 
ment and promotional policies 
are fair does not meet the issue. 

If it is true, as Mr. Parker says, 
that police officers want to work 
and are permitted to work in the 
vicinity of their homes Mr. Bea- 
vers' third charge that Negroes 
are not assigned to certain sta- 
tions is borne out. The impact of 
residential segregation is such 
that Negro officers don't live in 
certain communities. Of course, 
the chief didn't invent residential 
segregation and he's not respon- 
sible for it but the fact remains 
that it operates to limit assign- 
ment of Negro officers. He ought 
to be frank enough to say so. 

Nor did Chief Parker fare any 
better in answering NAACP 
charges that there is a measure 
of police lawlessness. The Asso- 


ciation and the Civil Liberties 
Union presented specific cases 
and offered figures to show that 
in 1958 only two of SO charges 
of police brutalily and none of 21 
charges of civil rights violations 
had been sustained by police in- 
vestigation. Mr. Parker didn't 
deal with those figuj-cs. 

The very volume of complaints 
and the cavalier manner in Avhich 
they were disposed of by^the De- 
partment show that something is 
amiss in both police treatment of 
Negroes and in investigations of 
their complaints. The chief's fig- 
ures as to the volume of crime 
committed by Negroes and Mexi- 
cans offer no excuse either for 
unnecessary force or for viola- 
tion of the civil rights of prison- 
ers. 

The basic difficulty with Chief 
Parker's approach to the admit- 
tedly difficult and complex prob- 
lem of law enforcement is that 
he ■ will accept no suggestions 
and brook no criticism as to his 
policies: His self righteousness, 
his self esteem knows no bounds. 
He refuses to even entertain the 
idea that a man of the stature 
of George Beavers, to pick an 
example, is as concerned as he 
with the problem of crime and 
as competent as he is in the field 
of human relations. 

As Chief Parker becomes 
more and more of a martinet he 
becomes less and less able to 
function as chief of police of Los 
Angeles. 


Housing: No. 1 Problem 


Although the housing problem 
was overshadowed by undue em- 
phasis on police policies and 
practices, last week's hearings 
before the U.S. Commission on 
Civil Rights demonstrated that 
it IS the city's number one con- 
cern and left the uncomfortable 
feeling that far too little is being 
done to cope with it. 

Impressive figures cited by 
John Buggs, executive of the 
County Committee on Human 
Relations, show that there is an 
increasing concentration of Ne- 
groes in certain areas in the cen- 
ter of the city with almost no 
growth elsewhere. 

Although social workers are 
fond of saying that Negroes live 
; in an increasing number of cen- 
sus tracts, Mr. Buggs showed 
that these figures are misleading 
In that they reflect residence of 
Isolated individuals in some cases 
and of domestics in still others. 
Based on pest and current fig- 
ures, Mr. Buggs believes, and his 
case seems unanswerable, that 
the next decade will show almost 
golid Negro residence from Cul- 
ver City on the West to Alameda 
on the E^st and from downtown 
on the North to the city of Comp- 
ton on the South. 

In addition. Mr. Buggs points 
BUt that the new and fast grow- 
big iuburban eitlei ahow very 


small Negro populations with no 
growth of any consequence and 
e\en a decrease in some cases. 

Sociologists and anthropolo- 
gists from our ma,ior colleges 
and universities agreed at' the 
hearings that thi.s growth of resi- 
dential segregation is breeding 
segregated pul:)lic facilities of all 
kinds and that it retards normal 
social intercourse between vari- 
ous groups. Their prediction is 
for an increase of group hostility 
and misunderstanding. They 
were just as sure that residential 
segregation increases problems 
of police and fire protection be- 
cause of its tendency to promote 
overcrowding. 

Population experts chipped in 
with the prediction that there 
will be more than a million Ne- 
groes in the Los Angeles metro- 
politan area in 1975 — only 15 
years hence. 

Something has to be done. 
There is no simple cure. But gov- 
ernment, state and federal, must 
take the first step. That first 
step must be affirmative action 
to see to it that all exclusionary 
rules and devices practiced by 
builders, developers and lending 
institutions are forbidden and 
that the housing market is 
opened to all Americans without 
reference to race or color. 


Battleaxe & Bread 

By Lester B. Granger 



Naturally, I'm not going to 
tpll them, becau=^e as a rpg- 
istered R(»publioan of a dozen 
years standing, I am very 
frankly hoping for a GO. P. 
victory in thp forthcoming 
presidential elections. But 
somebody ought to tell the 
leaders and candidates of the 
Democratic Party that beating 
Vice Presi- 
dent Nixon 
o\-er the head 
with fancy 
epithet.*; and 
clp\'er sneers 
will not bring 
victory in 
Novem- 
ber. Fewer 
and fewer of 
the American 
v o t f r .1 a re Crongar 

willing to accept anti-Nixon- 
ism as an acceptable cam- 
paign i.v,ue. And outside of 
New York City and a few sim- 
ilar areas, most Negro voters 
(who could he the voting bal- 
ance of power, should they de. 
cide that they want to bet do 
not share in the frenetic "lib- 
eral" distaste for the man 
who is certain to be the Re- 
publican presidential candi- 
date. 

The decline in the I-hate- 
Dick school of opinion among 
colored voters started so grad- 
ually that 'it's hard to put a 
finger on a spot and fay. It 
started here. Diiring the first 
Elsenhower campaign, the av- 
erage Negro voter — boitig a 
Democrat — shared the aver- 
ace Democratic opinion that 
Richard Ni.xon was a dirty 
fighter, a man who smeared 
the good name of charming 
lafjies and an opportuni'^t uho 
uas the hired hand of "big- 
money interests" operating 
behind the scenes. Gradually 
the more perceptive came to 
notice that the morp fer\-ent 
Nixon -haters were apt to be 
tho.^e wlio could li\e comfort- 
ably with Russell of Georgia, 
Smith and Byrd of Virginia, 
the oil interests of Oklahoma 
and Texas and the supT>orters 
of the race-baiting \\'alter- 
McCarran alien-exclusion act. 
What About Harry? 

As political time marched 
on, the more thoughlfful con- 
tinued to reflect: Plow come 
thosp who hate Nixon for 
"reckless name-calling" just 
dote on "good old Harry Tru- 
man," who is a pa.st master 
of the scurrilou'^s remark and 
as reckless in his name-call- 
ing as any successful politi- 
cian of several generations? 
And at that point they quit 
listening to "Lricky-Dick" 
jokes and began to watch Nix- 
on the man, Uie politician and 
the Vice President. They be- 
gan grudgingly to like some 
of the tilings they saw and 
heard. They liked the time 
Mr. Nixon gave to his post as 
chairman of the President's 


Committee on Government 
Contract Employment, even 
while they remained unsatis- 
fied with the committee's out- 
put. Theyj liked the straigh- 
forward Way in which he 
spoke out! on civil rights is- 
sues witHiout counting his 
wo-ds befbrehand or looking 
over his shoulder afterward 
to nOf<> Southern reaction. 

But the strongly discernible 
shift in Negro attitudes to- 
ward Riciiard Nixon began 
three ^eafs ago. when the 
Vice President went to Accra 
for Ghanafs independence ce- 
remonies , and continued 
across AfrSca as the highest- 
ranking American official 
ever to vi.siif .some of the areas 
he touclied. I was one of tlie 
several hundred Americans 
(mostly Negroes) who were in 
Ghana and I remember their 
delight at the easy, friendly 
uay in which the Vice Presi- 
dent moxed among the Afri- 
can people, making friends as 
if hp had been there for 
months and showing plaittly 
that he liked the people as' 
much as they liked him. Onp 
friend of mine — a confirmed 
Democrat— blurted out, "You 
know, I iike that guy. He s 
regular! ' 

Nixon Heporl 

Nixons report to the Amer- 
ican people "'hen he came 
back spread this impression 
more widely among tlie Afro- 
American section of the popu- 
lation. He was the first poli- 
tician to include Africa .^outh 
of the Sahara in America's 
responsibility to underdevel- 
oped countries. Some of his 
commrnLs caused Anglophiles 
iriy this countr>- to" froth with 
rage. A State Department of- 
ficial who had for years been 
disj^usied with our representa- 
tion in Africa told me that 
Nixon's influence, exerted aft- 
er his return, had started a 
new dpal in our diplomatic 
repre.sentation and poiirie.s — a 
new deal which he confessed 
had the old-line careeristo m 
State nen.'ous and unhappy. 

This isn't any effort to 
"sell " Richard Nixon as a Pre- 
sidential candidate tills Fall, 
especially when the Demo- 
crats haven't e\en started 
their elimination heats as yet 
— much less picked their own 
candidate. It is to .'-ay, how- 
e\er, that Democratic leaders 
had better realizp that the I- 
hate-Nlxon scliool among Ne- 
gro voter.*; has -shrunk so 
much in the past four or fi\e 
years that it may have faded 
out completely b.v the time 
' November eighth comes along. 
So, if they have any i.ssues 
really important to Negroes — 
issues thajt will make sense 
to folks who are tired of blar- 
ney — Iheyjhad better be shin- 
ing them up. You can't tell; 
our folks tnight decide to use 
that balartce of po^er. 



((Continued from Page 1) 


per cent of those committed 
to prison." 

Just as Good 

I am willing to hazard the 
guess that the English wom- 
an's figuijes are about as 
trustworthy as Chief Parker's 
but I don't believe that her 
figures prove any more about 
the criminality of English 
and Scotch Catiiolirs, as Cath- 
olics, than the chief's figures 
prove about the criminality of 
Negroes, as Negroes, or Mexi- 
cans, as Mexicans. In fact, the 
English woman adds that her 
"figures cannot be taken at 
facoi value, since in Gr'eat 
Britain, a disproportionate 
number of Roman Catholics 
belong to the lower income 
groups." And if >ou press the 
chief hard enough he will ad- 
mit that a disproportionate 
number of Negroes and Mexi- 
cans belong to "the lower in- 
come groups." In the case of 
British Roman Catholics and 
in the case of American Ne- 
groes and Mexicans both Ibw- 
er income status and group 
prejudices operate to increase 
arrests and prosecutions as 
well as create social condi- 
tions that lead to crime. 

'What I'm after here is that 
Identification Of criminals by 
their race, religion or nation- 
ality proves less than nothing 
about the individuals involv- 
ed. My daughter-in-law, my 
grandson, and Chief Parker 
happen to be Roman Catholics 
but if each of them adopted 
British citizenship I don't be- 
lieve that the fact of religious 
identification would make 
them any more pron? to com- 
mit a crime than other Brit- 
ish subjects. 

Who Keeps Figures T 

What th* keeping of statis- 
ties on the basis of race, re- 
ligion or nationality does do 
Is distort the racial, religious 
or national identificatioii out- 
of perspective. It leads un* 


4t' 


thinking Englishmen to .jump 
to the conclusion that relig- 
ion is a factor in the making 
of criminals and it leads un- 
thinking Americans to jump 
to another conclusion that 
race or nationallt.v creates a 
predisposition to criminalit.v. 

Every time Chief Parker 
blasts his. figures he creates 
prejudice against Negroes and 
Mcxicams, no matter how pure 

is moti\es. 

I am sure that the Los An- 
gples Police Department does 
not keep crime statistics on 
the basis ! of the religion of 
those arrested and prosecuted 
and I an^ equally sure that 
Cliief Parker wouldn't tolerate 
such a practice. He would see 
without much argument that 
such figures would .serve no 
oilier purpose than to equate 
religion with crime and stir 
up religious hatreds and ani- 
mosities, t am sorr.v that his 
conscience' is not as quick and 
his vision: is not as clear in 
the case of crime statistics on 
the basis of race and nation- 
ality. He has blinded himself 
to lead this blind. 


League Seeks 
Awar^ Names 

The Lqs Angeles Urban 
League arSnounced this wtek 
that applications are now be- 
ing receiyed for the annual 
Urban Lepgue awards. The 
awards ar^ given In three cate- 
gories: Vocational achieve- 
ment, civic and race rela- 
tions, merit employment, and 
a special award is given for 
the motiort picture industry. 

Nominatjion blank* may be 
secured by calling the Los 
Angeles tJrban League, at 
AXminsteri 2-0511, or writing 
to 3839 St»uth Western Ave- 
nue, Los Angelec 62, CaliL 


Hearings en 
Civil Rights 

(Continued from Page 3) 

E. Moss, B. F. Sisk. Cliet Holli- 
field. D. S. Saund, Cecil R. 
King, Democrats; John F. 
Baldwin and Charles S. Gub- 
ser. Republicans. 

Attorney General 'William 
Rogers has already proposed 
an amendment that stirred 
bitter controversy. 

The Rogers proposal called 
for ■appointment of "United 
States voting referees by the 
Federal eourti." The Rogers 
proposal also would cover 
both state and Federal elec- 
tionp; the Civil Rights Com- 
mission had suggested the 
use of Federal registrars only 
in elections for Federal office. 
Here is how the Rogers pro- 
posal would work: 

The process would begin 
with a complaint by one or 
more citizens to the Justice 
Department of deprivation of 
voting rights. If the depart- 
ment found the complaint 
justified, it would sue unde-- 
the 19,57 act to require local 
officials to register the com- 
plainant. If the ^Department 
won the case, it would ask the 
Federal judge who had tried 
it to appoint voting referees. 
The referees would certify to 
the judge the names of any 
persons barred from voting 
and the judge would issue 
voting orders. The state pre- 
sumably^ could appeal the 
findings to the higher courts,, 
but the Justice Department 
hopes that courts would allow 
the voting orders to be effec- 
ti"e diking appeals. Any state 
Official who interfered with 
\'c4ing by a person found 
qualified .by the retere°s, 
would Be subject to commit- 
ment for contempt of court by 
a judge without a jury. This 
:s a crucial proviso because of 
Southern juries' reluctance *o 
convict in cases of racial dis- 
crimination. The referees 
would have the power to 
subpoena witnesses and docu- 
ments and administer oaths. 

The Rogers proposal is ex- 
pected to be the focus of civil 
rights debate from now on. 
Vice President. Richard Nixon 
is believed to have played an 
important' role in developing 
it. i 


History Week 
Starts Sunday 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Study Club, founded in 1945 
by Mrs. Vassie D. Wright, is 
chartered as a branch of that 
organization and has joined 
in the commemoration since 
19'19. 

The opening mass meet- 
ing's distinguished speaker. 
Dr. Da\-is, just recently re- 
turned from Africa, has an 
enriched background in his 
Outstanding role of Negro 
leadership. He wa.s born in 
Milledgeville, Ga., on Feb. 11. 
ISSS, He is a graduate of 
Morehouse College, Atlanta, 
Ga : has matriculated at such 
well-known schools as Wil- 
bcrforre Univ.. Morgan State 
College. Howard Univ., Vir- 
ginia State College, the Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Har- 
\'ard Unjv. In 1948 he was de- 
corated by the Republic of 
Haiti "for increasing the un- 
derstanding and goodwill ex- 
istmg between Haiti and the 
U.S." He was decorated with 
the Order of the Star of Af- 
rica by the Republic of Li- 
beria in 1955 "for making 
stronger tJie bonds of friend- 
ship and goodwill between 
the Republic of Liberia and 
the United States of America." 

Also appearing on the mass 
meeting program will be the 
Senior Choir of Rev. J. Ray- 
mond Henderson's Second 
Baptist Church, under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Anna G. Mor- 
row. AdditionaIl3-, there will 
be selections by a mammoth 
youth chorus, organized by 
Miss Hermine Johnigan and 
Miss Nicola Fowles. It will be 
directed by Mr. Louis John- 
son. 

Significantly, among the 
week's events. Music night on 
Tuesday. Feb, 9, at Ward 
AME Church, will feature the 
brilliant talent of the South- 
east S.ymphony Association, 
Inc., of which Mrs. Mabel 
Massengill Gunn is president. 
On Monday, Feb. 8, during 
ceremonies on the steps of 
City Hall, last year's Negro 
Histor>' Week chairman, Gil- 
bert W. Lindsay, will be in- 
trduced and invited to make 
official remarks in his capa- 
city as deputy to County Su- 
pervisor Kenneth Hahn. 


— Letters — 

Dear Abie Robinson: 
On behalf of the students 
and faculty of Carver Junior 
High I would like to thank 
you for your very generous 
part in making the trip to 
Hidden Springs the outstand- 
ing success that it was. Many 
parents and youngsters have 
told me what a fine thing it 
was. and I want you to know 
that your part was well done 
and appreciated. 

The trip is tlie talk of the 
campus and I am sure much 
lasting benefit wiU result. 
Please accept my warm per- 
sonal thanks and *pprecda- 


Beavers Asks Parker 
For Promotions Report 

George A. Beavers, chairman of the Los An- 
geles City Housing Authority, who aroused Police 
Chief William H. Porker's ire last wMk at the 
Civil Rights hearing, sought further information 
about police practices this wee)c 

In a letter to the chief. Beavers said: 

"We note that your denial of racial bias did 
not include an explonation as to why no Negro of- 
ficers are assigned to the following seven divisions: 
Central Detective Bureau, Homicide, Robbery. 
Forgery, Auto Theft, Burglary, Narcotics, Admin- 
istrative Vice and Internal Affairs." 

Beavers said he would apprecite< further ex- 
planation or informotion, and expressed the hope 
that certain discriminatory practices with regard 
to promotions thot were in existence as of July 
10, 1959 have now been eliminated. 


Parker Ignores Roybal's Request 
He Apologize for Racial Slurs 


(Continued from Page 1) 
found occasion to strike out 
at Commissioner Johnson. 

He didn't refer to him by 
name. He merel.v mentioned 
the "Negro commissioner" 
who, he said, kept asking him 
"provocative questions." John- 
son is the only Negro on the 
commission. * 

Aska Apology 

The demand that Parker 
apologize came from Counoil- 
man Edward R. Roybal, who 
voiced the indignation of the 
Mexican - American commun- 
ity after the council had heard 
a tape recording of remarks 
the chief made before the 
Civil Rights Commission. 

"The chief has taken an 
apologetic position," Roybal 
said. He then quoted the 
stenographic report of Parkers 
statements and added: 

"I think you did make a 
mistake. I can understand 
how that mistake was made, 
under pressure, and I hope you " 
can clarify this by a short 
statement of apology." 

The demand for an apology 
was greeted by applause by 
the spectators who filled the 
council chambers. The council 
president, however, called 
them to order and warned 
against further demonstra- 
tions. 

Wants Consideration. Too 

Parker complained that no 
one had been asked to apolo- 
gize to the Police Department 
or to him personally, and sai^ 
he thought he, too, was en- 
titled to consideration. 

He then said he had been 
misquoted in the newspaper 
and that he had said "were" 
and not "are " as reported. 


Roybal countered that Park- 
er's remarks that "some of 
these people were not too far 
removed from the wild tribes 
of Mexico" were just as er- 
roneous 30 years ago as thev 
are "offensive today to 500,000 
people^iving in this area," 

Just One S«nt«noo 

He again asked for an apol- 
og>'. "Just one sentence. " he 
urged, in which the chief could 
explain that he was speaking 
under pressure and that he 
apologized for any offense 
committed. 

At about this point. Coun- 
cilman John C. Holland took 
the chief off the liook. He ex- 
pressed great s\'mpathy for 
the chief, admitted he. him- 
self, on one occasion had let 
slip a racial slur, and thanked 
Parker for appearing befpre 
the council. 

Ramorka Quoted 

The stenographic report of 
Parker's remarks at the com- 
mission hearing as quoted by 
Roybal were as follows: 

"So we keep the record 
straight, the Latin population 
that came in here in great 
strength, were here'before us, 
have presented a great prob- 
lem because I worked over on 
the Eastside when men had 
to work in pairs . . . but that 
has evolved in assimilation . . . 
and its because of some of 
those people were not too far 
removed from the wild tribes 
of the district of the inner 
mountains of Mexico. I don't 
think you can throw the 
genes out of the question 
when you discuss behaviour 
patterns of people." 


$80,000 is Reported Missing 
From Sweet Daddy's Person 

(Continued from Page 1) 


tion. 


AUSTIN E. DIXON. 

Efincip*!, 

Carver Junior Hi|rh 

School' 


ogy, his followers said, had 
been tape-recorded ir»Los An- 
geles shortly before his death, 
of which he seemed to have 
a premonition. 

His body, clothed in a gold- 
trimmed, purple blazer, black 
trousers, white shirt and black 
tie. lay in a 520,000 gla.ss- 
topped casket. 

The funeral cortege, swelled 
by many hundreds of follow- 
ers who wailed in Icy weather 
outside the small church, 
mo\-ed slowly to a public 
vault in Oak Grove Cemeteo'- 
Last WiU 

Tlie latest will that has 
been found was dated ir>4?. 
In It, Daddy reportedly left 
the bulk of his estate to the 
House of Prayer for All Peo- 
ple, thougli no such corpora- 
tion existed when the will 
was drawn. The will also 
Stated he was unmarried. 

Value of the estate has been 
estimated as up to $25.000.. 
000: most of it received in the 
fortn of gifts from followers 
(estimated variously at 3.000.- 
OOO to 5.000.0001 in 350 
churches in 60 cities. Some 
$300,000 of the bishop's mon- 
ey was rep>ortedly found in 
New Bedford banks. 
Taxes Due 

The Internal Revenue 5er\-- 
ice claimed this week that 
hack taxes and ss.<^ssmen1s 
amounting to I'l.fX^.OOO for 
the years IPI.t through IP.'^e 
were owed by Charles Man- 
uel (Sweet Daddy > Grace The 
liens covered property in 13 
states and the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

California property was hot 
included. Liens were filed in 
Marjiand, Pennsylvania. Vir- 
ginia, Georgia. North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina, Connecti- 
cut. New York. Massachusetts. 
Ohio, New Jersey, Florida and 
Michigan. 

Misain? Money 

The report of the missing 
$80,000 came from New Bed- 
ford. Mass., where Atty. Roy 
F. Teixeria, of Boston, said he 
was investigating a claim 
that the money had disap- 
peared. He gave no further 
details. 

Atty. Teixeira w«s named 
bv Mrs. Jennie Lomba Grace. 
352 Smith street. New Bedford, 
as the law>er she has retain- 
ed en behalf of herself and 
her.daughter, Mrs, Irene Nor- 
iega. 475 Purchase street. New 
Bedford, in the matter of Dad- 
dy's estate. 

Had Two Chlldr*n 

Mrs. Grace claims she mar- 
ried Daddy Feb. 11, 1909, in 
Harwich, Mass., that they liv- 
ed together for three years 
and had two children. Irenft 
and a son, Norman, who was 
killed in an accident In 1947. 
She said she knows nothing 
about any divorce proceedings 


filed by Daddy Grace She 
said that when she knew 
"Charlie," as .«;he called th* 
founder of the several million 
member House of Prayer for 
All People, he worked as a 
second cook at a resort at 
Harwich Port and rode to and 
from work on a bicjxle. She 
said he wasn't much inter- 
ested in religion at that time, 
though he did accompany her 
to the South Har%vich Metho- 
dist Church and he did have 
a "beautiful voice." 

Six Service* 

Mrs. Grace said that after 
about three years "Charlie" 
and she quarreled over -his at- 
tentions to another woman 
and "he took his clothes and 
left." while she went to work 
to take care of the babies. 

Atty. Teixeria. who was 
named special administrator 
of the estate, said Daddy's 
latest will was dated 194S. 

Six funeral services wpte 
held for Sweet, Sweet Daddy 
following his dfath in Los 
Angeles. In addition to the 
local ceremony, other services 
were held in Charlotte. N.C^ 
Newport News. Va., Washing- 
ton, Philadelphia and New- 
ark, N, J. 

When the funeral cortege 
arrived in Newark, it was met 
at the airport interchange by 
a motorcycle e.scort from the 
police department, which con- 
ducted the mourners into the 
city. 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

Tho Importonf Newspaper' 

2101 W. Vernon Ave. 

Los Angeles B, Coltf. 

AXminster 5-3135 

LOREN MILLER 

Publieher 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXIX 


Feb. 4, 1960 
No. 47 


ORACE SIMONS... Executive Editor 

F. P. WALLER, Jr...- Adv. Mflr. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

_ Circulation Mfr, 

CALME RUSS .— Office Mor. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. a. Allen 1511 16th »t. 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph, 8X. &-1M1 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFlC« 

1907 KHh Strtat (Upttairt) 

Phone EXbrook 4-M82 


SUBSCRIBE NOW! 

8 $4.00 for 1 YMr 
$1.50 for 3 Mentha 
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Adjudication Decree Number I23ett 

Date ef Adjudication July 1. ItU 

Published every Thuraday by The 

California Eagle Publlahmg Ce., 

2101 Weet Wwnwi Avenue, at Ven 

Ness. Lea Angeles 8. Calif. Entered 

•a Mcond Ciau Matter N»vefnb«p 

S, 1S37, at the Post OfTIc* at LM 

Angelee, California, und«r the AM 

of March t, 1879. ^_ 

REPRESENTED NXTIONAia.V 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWSPAPERS 

H% Fifth Avenue 
Hmu York 17, Now York 


P\ 


B( 


of 

675 

in 

ices I 

6p.i 

ice 

SCOl) 

ent.'l 
" lA 
and! 
fer 

Willi 

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PRESBYTERIAN CLERGYMEN— Participating^ in the sntcmn yet henutiiul installa- 
tion ceremonies which made Rev. James £. Jones officially pastor of the yVestminster 
Preshuertan Church, were from left: Dr. Chester M. Buley. Rev. St. Paul Epps, Dr. Cecil 
Hnffman. Rev. IVtlltam Melhon. Dr. Raymond I. Lindquist dnd Rev. Otto Gruber. J'he 
installation ii.ns performed last Thursday night. 
— ^ 


Bel-Vue Boy 
Scouts to 
Lead Vespers 

The Explorer and Boy Scouts 
of BelVue Community Church, 
673 E. 118th street, will be 
in charge of the Vesper serv- 
ires at the church Feb. 7, at 
6 p.m. The theme of the serv- 
ice will be based on the 12th 
scout law, "A Scout is Rever- 
ent." 

Jimmy Mukes will preside 
and Robert Gardener will of- 
fer the opening prayer. There 
will be in.strumental numbers 
by Kenneth Stewart, Myson 
Mayfield. Reginald Andrews, 
Michael Jackson, Eric Everett 
and Arthur Browning. 

The program will also fea- 
ture musical selections by the 
combined scout chorus, and 
brief messages will be given 
by Ronald Bridgeforth, Her- 
man Smith, Dwayne Bryant 
and Kenneth Stewart. The Of- 
fertory prayer will ba made 
by Lawrence Smith. 
Exhibition 

In cooperation with other 
troops of the Los Angeles Area 
Council, the Boy Scouts of 
Troop 536. Bel-Vue Church 
will exhibit a display on 
camping. From Feb. 613 look 
for, "Lets Go Camping," in 
the windows of M&M Master 
Cleaners, 11250 S. Avalon 
blvd. 

Tioop Activity 

Led by Otto McNeal, advisor 
for Explorer Scouts at Bel-Vue 
Church, the boys and their 
guests enjoyed a snow trip 
to Mt. Waterman, Sat., Jan. 23. 

In the party were Frances 
Epps, Gwen Burnett, Edna 
Wright. Dwayne Bryant, Rich- 
ard Stevenson. Wilbur Miller 
(reporter I. Lawrence Smith 
and Jimmie Mukes. Rev. St. 
Paul Epps and sons. Branton 
and Shelton, were also in the 
party. 

Transportation was provid- 
ed by Wilbur Miller, 3r., Otto 
McNeal and Mrs. Susana 
Mukes. 


The Agenda club of First 
AME Church will hold a bake 
sale, at tht Fellowship Hall 
of the church, on Feb. 7. » 



Ward Plans Its 
Founder s Day 
Banquet Feb. 5 

Ward AME Church will 
have its annual Founder's 
Day banquet at the church, 
1177 W. 25th street at 8 p.m. 
on Friday, Feb. 5. The church 
will also celebrate the 200th 
anniversary of the birth of 
Richard Allen, which is being 
nationally celebrated by the 
AME Church. 

At 8 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 
7 Dr. C. Baker Peaile, presid- 
ing Elder of the St. Louis-Cape 
Girardeau District of the AME 
connection, will be the guest 
speaker. Dr. Pearle is coordin- 
ator of the prayer pilgrim- 
age which will be held in May 
at the Rose Bowl. 

At 10:45 a.m. Rev. L. Syl- 
vester Odom, pastor of Ward, 
will preach. His subject will 
be "The Price Is Right." 


KESTMINSTER'S NEW FAMILY— The pastor of 
It'eslniinster Presbyterian Church is Rev. James E. Jones 
who is pictured with his wife Mildred at the table follow- 
ing installation ceremonies last Thursday evening. 

Pastor Installed by 
Vote of Members 

By BARBARA MOUNTS 

The congregation rose to its feet and voted to 
accept and support as its pastor the Rev. James E. 
Jones following a thought-provoking charge to the 
congregation delivered by Rev. Chester M. Buley, 
during the solemly beautiful installation services last 
Thursday evening at West-'?' 


minster Presbyterian Church. 

The congregation pledged 
to love and pray for the 
minister and to help him to 
lead them to become wit- 
nesses for Christ in an infor- 
mal fellowship and closer 
association to work for spir- 
itual growth and demonstra- 
tion of the principles of 
Christianity. 

Rev. Dr. Raymond I. Lind- 
quist, pastor of the Hollywood 
Presbyterian Church, was the 
guest speaker. 

A minister was likened unto 
a lamplighter who went about 
lighting lamps in the dark- 
ness. A child seeing the pro- 
cess said that he was knock- 
ing holes in the darkness. 

Rev. Jones was described as 
the type of minister whose 
life and sermons caused men 
to step a little higher for 
having heard or known him. 

The reception which fol- 
lowed in the fellowship hall 
was arranged by the Women's 


Committee of the church. The 
tables were arranged to form 
a "W" and each section was 
laden with delectable foods. 
During the reception the fam- 
ily was introduced. Mrs. 
Mildred Jones and Roger 13, 


.KENNETH SPENCER CONCERT- 


MIAT A*IIRICAN lASS - ONIY LA. ATPIAKANCI 

SINOkNG 

MAHMS, SCHMnr, HANOIL, rOlK SONGS ANO SPIRITUALS 

FIIOAY. FEBRUAtY 5, 1 »«0, S P.M. 

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH OF lOS ANOEIES 
2936 Wast 8th Street 

Admission $1.50 


■GIFTED SPIRITUAL READERS- 

• ADVISE ON ALL MATTERSI i I 

• ALL QUESTIONS ANSWERED 


1101 W.VERNON 


(Block Wast of 
Vermont) 


AX 5-1644 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Charch 

lAST J6th AND TIINITT STRUTS - RIV. JOHN C. RAIN, MINISTIR 

SUNDAY, FiSRUARY 7 

HOIY COMMUFHON 

R*v. L I J«rdon Pr»<ichi»« ot »«fh ♦ mt>4 11 o.m. 

The public It cordiilly invited to attend. 


McCOY MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH 

"Wh«r« frt««dililp '• C«f«liJitt N«» • Cafffcwerd" 
102 I- 4«th Sfr««t, AD. 1-4271 R«». I. A. Andarson, Pa«tor 

Church S<ho«l, 9:30 a.m. 
■TU, 6:30 p.m. 

Tha Public Is Cordially litvHtd T* AFtand 

Join Rev. E. A. Anderson in 'Moments of Meditation" 

Every Sunday at 9 p.m. over KCFI Radio (1230 Keyc.) 

McCOY MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH 


Mernlne Warahip, 10i4S a.m. 
Ivaninfl Warship, 7i30 p.m. 


Utter McKinley 
Dedication, 
Open House Set 

The Utter-McKinley Mor- 
tuary announced last week 
the opening of its new 
Broadway establishment at 
4254 S. Broadway avenue, 
under the direction of' Rev. 
Arthur A. Srnith. Sunday, 
Feb. 7, will be dedication 
(Jay for the facilities with 
Open House activities to 
begin at 3 p.m. and dedi- 
cation ceremonies to begin 
at 3:30 p.m. 

Utter - McKinley, whose 
slogan is 'To serve every 
family as if it were our 
own; to treat every woman 
as if she were our mother 
or sister; and every man as 
if he were our father or 
brother" hsis become the 
first white mortuary to 
place a colored associate 
manager over its branches 
in L. A. and Pasadena. 

Another service which 
will be started in the com- 
munity on Sunday, will be 
a radio broadcast which 
will feature the voices of 
an inter - denominational 
choir, directed by James V. 
Hayes. Announcements of 
the programs scheduled at 
the various churches will 
be broadcast as the time 
allows. Rev. Smith said. 

The dedication service on 
Sunday afternoon will in- 
clude a dedication prayer 
by Rev. Marvin T. Johnson, 
pastor of Friendship Bap- 
tist Church of Pasadena. 
Rev. Walter J. Bryant of 
the Park Avenue Christian 
Church of New York and 
the Rev. Pearl C. Wood, of 
the Triangular Science of 
Mind Church, will as.sist 
with the ceremony. The 
benediction will be given 
by Rev. Cornelius Wesley 
Arnold, of the 92nd Street 
Christian Church. (Adv.) 


Communion 
At Hamilton 

Sunday, Feb. 7. will be 
Communion Sunday at Ham- 
ilton Methpdi'st Church, 6330 
S. Figueroa, and the pastor, 
Rev. John N. Doggett, Jr.'s 
sermon topic will be "Life- 
less Living," based on the 
18th chapter of John, 34th 
verse. 

The Gospel Choir will be 
feature<l at the morning serv- 
ice and the Cappella Choir 
will sing at the 10:45 a.m. 
service. 

The Gospel Choir's monthly 
musical will begin at 3:30 
p.m. and will feature the 
Prosperity Baptist Church In- 
spirational Choir, Calvary 
Methodist Church Choir, Geth- 
semanie Gospel Singers and 
other vocal and instrumental 
soloists. 


FREDERICK DOUGLAS 

The Frederick Douglass J^i- 
vic League, Atty. James L. 
Flournoy, president, will host 
the Lincoln-Douglass-Wash- 
ington celebration to be held 
on Sunday, Feb. 14, at 3 p.m. 

The mass meeting and re- 
ception will be held in the 
auditorium of the communi- 
ties service center, 3112 S. 
Western avenue. 

Judge Thurmond Clarke 
will address the assembly at 
4 p.m. 



ur'cK 



Thursday, Febrijiary 4, 1960 


The California Eagle— 5 


Brazier to be 
Speaker at 
Indepeiideiit 

Wesley R. Brazier, executive 
director of the L. A. Urban 
League, will be the guest 
speaker at the: Communion 
Breakfast of the Men's Feder- 
ation of the People's Inde- 
pendent Church, 1025 E. 18th 
street, Sunday, Feb. 7, at 9:30 
a.m. He will spieak on "The 
Unfinished Business of Equal 
Rights in Los Ahgeles." 
WESLEY R. BRAZIER 

Rev. Maurice A. Dawkins, 
minister of the; church, said 
that the men of the church 
will join in the National Write 
For Rights Campaign of the 
Council on Human Relations, 
and bombard ■ Congressmen 
with letters to lUrge signing 
of the petition to get the Civil 
Rights Bill out of Committee. 
Friends in other ^tates will be 
Written to urge them to write 
congressmen, thus starting a 
chain of letters from states 
other than California, Rev. 
Dawkins said. 

A series of films, lectures, 
and debates on Africa will be 
featured each Sunday at 5 
p.m. at Independent during 
February. Al Green will show 
films on his recent trip to 
Ghana and other African na 
tions this Sunday, Feb. 7. Pot 
Luck Supper for all will be 
served. 

■ Dr. J. D. Howell, former pas- 
tor of historic Eighth and 
Towne Church, will be the 
guest speaker at Independent 
on its Annual Men's Day, Feb. 
14 at the 11 a.m. service. Rev. 
Vincent Norris, minister of 
youth, will preach at the 8:30 
a.m. service on that day with 
Dickie Barrow as guest artist. 


rSANTA- 

MONICA 

NEWS 


Judy 11, James 15, and Lois 4. 

Among the distinguished 
guests were David ,0'Brian, 
Rev. C. E. Hoffman, Rev. Wil- 
liam M o 1 b o n. Rev. Otto 
Gruber, Rev. Raymond I. Lind- 
quest. Rev. Chester Buley, 
Rev. St. Paul Epps and others. 
The Sanctuary Choir, directed 
by Mrs. Ursula Murrel, sang 
with a solo by Rosemary 
Stewart. 

Rev. Jones, formerly of De- 
troit, was selected to lead the 
church following the retire- 
ment of Rev. Hampton Hawes. 

Mrs. Milton Thompson of 
St. Paul Presbyterian Church 
in Detroit came west for the 
installation service. 


Reynolds' Voice 
Thrills Crowd 

"Serve the Lord with glad- 
ness and come before His 
presence with a song," was 
the invitation given a capa- 
city audience by Charles Rey- 
nolds, baritone concert artist, 
who wove a love and appre- 
ciation of beautiful music in- 
to an afternoon of classics, 
gospels and spirituals. Which 
caused members of the audi- 
ence to shout with apprecia- 
tion of his great artistry. The 
concert was held at Price Cha- 
pel AME church last Sunday. 

"To Me It's So Wonderful," 
sung by Reynolds rocked the 
house. He was assisted in the 
number by the Walker Tem- 
ple Trio. When he sang 
"Somebody Bigger Than You 
and 1" with the Price Chapel 
Aires, Amens arose from every 
sector of the packed house. 

Among those present were 


Tht installation and ban- 
quet of the NAACP which 
was scheduled for Feb. 3 has 
been re-scheduled for March 
18. Franklin Williams will be 

the guest speaker. 

• • • 

The Daughters of the IBPOE 
of W. Evelusovista Temple No. 
1085 will serve barbecue on 
Feb. 30 at 1744 16th street 
from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
« • « 

James Fritz reports that 
Phillips Chapel CME Church 
Youth groups are attending 
the Youth Seminars at Phil- 
lips Temple, 971 E. 43rd strtet 

in Lo& Angeles on Feb. 6. 

• • • 

The National Youth theme 
is 'Thy Kingdom on Earth." 
CME Churches all over the 
country are observing Youth 

Week Feb. 1-7. 

• • • 

Mrs. M. Down Pierce was the 
speaker at Phillips Chapel 

last Sunday. 

• • • 

Rev. W. P. Carter and Cal- 
vary Baptist church members 
will travel to Monrovia on 
Feb. 14 to worship with Rev. 
G. G. Bailey and his congre- 
gation. 

• • * 

An Inter-Faith Tea will be 
held at the First Presbyterian 
church, 131 Arizona street, at 

1 p.m. on Feb. 19. 

• • • 

First AME Church-by-the- 
Sea will hold a service for 
veterans at Sawtelle Hospital 

on March 13 at 3 p.m. 

' • • * 

Rev. Harry W. Davis report- 
ed that Mrs. Ruby Walker 
Moore and Mrs. Elizabeth 
White were improving at Gen- 
eral Hospital. Zeke Grann is 

critically ill. 

• • • 

Venice News 

Funeral services for Odell 
Fields, 616 Sunset avenue, 
were held Feb. 2 at the First 
AME Church-by-the-Sea. He 
is survived by his wife Mar- 
garet, his father Lewis Fields 
and five sisters and three 
brothers. His aunt and uncle, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Foreman 
of Dallas, were in Santa Mon- 
ica for the funeral. 


Tormenting Rectal Itch 
Stopped In Minutes 

Science Finds New Healing Substance That 
Promptly Stops Itching and Pain of Piles 


New York, N. Y. (Special) - 

One of the most common afflic- 
tions is a condition known as 
"itching piles". It is ino«t 
embarrassing for the Tictim 
during the day and especially 
aggraTating at night. 

No matter what you've used 
without results — here's good 
news. For the first time, science 
has found a new healing sub- 
stance with the astonishing 
ability to promptly stop the 
burning itcn and pain. It actu- 
ally shrinks hemorrhoids — 
without surgery. Medical sci- 
ence has proved this substance 
produces a remarkably effec- 
tive rate of healing. Its germ- 
killing properties also help pre- 
vent infection. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
another "very striking improve- 


ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by doctors' obscrvationi. 
This improvement was main- 
tained in cases where doctors' 
observations were continued 
over a period of months I Among 
these sufferers were a wide 
variety of hemorrhoid condi- 
tions, some of 10 to 20 years' 
duration. 

The secret is this new healing 
substance (Bio-Dyne*) —dis- 
covery of a world-famous 
research institution. This sub- 
stance is nowobtainablein oint- 
mentor suppo (t tory/orm known 
as Prtparation H.* Ask for 
Preparation H suppositories 
(convenient to carry if away 
from home) or Preparation H 
ointment with special applica- 
tor. Absolute satisfaction guar- 
anteed or money refunded. 

•lUc. U.S. Tut. 09, 


Expect Capacity Crowd at Vt. 
Square to Hear African Leader 

Vermont Square Methodist Church, comer Bud- 
long and Vernon avenues, will present a program in 
celebration of the opening of Negro History Week. 
Miss Lucy Lameck, African woman leader from 
Tanganyika, will be the guest speaker and Miss 

Georgia Laster will be guest**^ 

soloist. A capacity audience is^tion effectiveness. Miss La- 


expected to hear these out 
standing artist| at 11 a.m. 

Miss Lameck has been a 
member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Tanganyika 
African National Union for 
five years. The Union now 


meek is traveling on a Delta 
Sigma Theta sponsored 
leadership training tour 'of 
America which will take two 

months. 

Rev. Howard R. Carey, pas- 
tor of Vermont Square, said 


forms an opposition to the i that this talk about Africa 
Legislative Council of Tan- should be of interest to every- 
ganyika and is expected to i one in the light of develop- 
form a government when the|ments in Tanganyika today. 


country attains its independ 
ence, informed sources report. 
In this country to study 


Leonard Johnson is chairman 
of the program committee. Re- 
freshments will be served fol- 


unions and women's organiza- lowing the service. 


Father Moore's 26 Years 
At St. hiilips to be Cited 

Feb. 7 will mark the 26th anniversary of Father 
A. Randolph Moore as Rector of St. Philip's Epis- 
copal Church, 801 E. 28th street. There will be a spe- 
cial service at 11 a.m. >'^ • 

Father Moore came to St. .^ i ^»a a 

Crusaders Club 
To Present Play 

Following its annual cus- 
tom of pi^senting an out- 
standing cultural event dur- 
ing Negro History Week, the 
or- 1 Crusaders Club of People's 
ganist- choirmaster, Ray [united Church in South ^Los 
Spight, a graduate of the USCj Angeles will, this year, spon- 
School of Music. He is vice sor a performance by the 
principal of the Mark Twain! Bishops Company of Sanu 
Public School. His debut will! Barbara in "Cry, the Beloved 


Philip's Mission in 1934 as a 
Vicar. This title ^^as changed 
to Rector in 1944 indicating 
that the church had become a 
Parish, a mark of achievement 
in Episcopal cireles. 

An added feature will be the 
introduction of the new 


Rev. Henry Armstrong and 
other evangelists and minis- 
ters. Ministers of music from 
several churches and critics 
from the metropolitan press 
were also present. 

Lodie Young was the piano 
accompanist who made the 
piano breathe with the artists. 
Lillie Mae Reason sang 
"Grace Is Enough." 

One member of the audi- 


include two new organ pre- 
ludes: "Aspiration" and "Im- 
provisation on the 8th Psalm 
Tone." 


sing. Rev. James Temple 
assistant to Father Moore. 


IS 


Countrj," a play adapted from 

the best selling novel of the 

same name by Alan Paton. 

o. T)ui- ■ n ■ u /-u • 111 It will be held in the Bel- 

^!- ^i?!^'P'..^_".''^i:^_°i':.^''.^l Vue Community Churxrh, East 

118th street and Stanford ave- 
nue, Sunday, Feb. 14 at 7:30 
p.m. 

The Bishop's Company, a 
unique repertory group, which 
is seeking to brinjg drama 
formeri back into the worship service 
Street!'*^ the church, is now on its 
sixth annual tour from coast 
to coast and Canada. The play 
deals with racial tensions in 


Guest Seeks 
Church Site 

Dr. 'Walter J. Bryant, 
pastor of the '28th 
Christian Church and now as- 
sociated with the Park Ave- 
nue Christian Church of New , 
York, is in the city looking | ^°"^" Africa 
for a location to open a branch 
of the church here. 

He is visiting with the Rev. 
C. W. Arnold, pastor of the 
92nd Street Christian Church, 
while enjoying the California 
sunshine. 


ence remarked that she was 
so enthralled with Reynolds' 
voice that she was shocked 
when she realized he was 
standing in the aisle beside 
her as he sang. He moves 
about the church as he sings 
the numbers. 


BLESSINGS 

JOHN STARR 


1 l« 3 Day Special Slvulnsi 
Avoilebl* 

START 1960 


RIGHTI 

You Are Never Helped . . . 
Unless YOU Try 

for Intormatloti Wrfte toi 
P.O. ftex 1922, Cleveland t, Okie 

SW. 1-9600 
JOHN STARR 

BLESSINGS 




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i 



In an effort to stimulate attendance, the Inter- 
frat Basketball Council decided to move this year's 
series back to the Loyola gym. It was at Loyola High 
School's gym where the series enjoyed ijs^ greatest 
attendance. Since moving over to Jefferson's beauti- 
ful and spacious gym there has been a sharp decline 
in attendance. Last year's series drew only 4200 for 
the seven games, a record low for the popular event. 

Officials in the Council seem to labor under the 
thought that most of the series followers reside on 
the westside and since that is the case they should 
make an effort to appeal to the greatest number be- 
cause rental fees of both quarters are just about the 
same. 

We have watched the series grow from a two 
fraternity team battle to its present four and de- 
velop into one of the most entertaining basketball 
extravganazas of any amateur group in the south- 
land. 

It may be true that a large percentage of the 
followers live on the westside and it is also true 
that it would be a little more convenient for a few. 
Moving the series back to Loyola might solve a little 
of the problem but not all of it. 

Lack of attendance in the past few years can be 
traced to the complacency of the Council and the 
take-it-for granted attitude has contributed more to 
the down grade of the series than any other single 
thing. 

In some twenty-five years of series basketball the 
Council has failed to come up with any worthwhile 
program for attracting new fans. They have used the 
same old stereotyped method of announcing the 
games by placing a few posters in a few business 
places that the college and sorority set seldom fre- 
quent. There is very little pre-series publicity given 
to the event and no program of interest during the 
series that might stimulate interest among the spec- 
tators. 

There is no reason whv the Alphas, Omegas, 
Kappas and Sigmas can't sell 200 season tickets each 
to the annual event. The fact is that only a few 
members of the Council put any sort of effort in try- 
• ing to increase ^he attendance. A few can't get the 
job done; it takes teamwork. 

It really isn't clear to me just how the Interfrat 
Council works but it's very clear to me that it hasn't 
been getting the job done. Perhaps it would be a 
good idea to drop some of- the members or bring in 
a person with promotional ideas. 

If the basketball series ever hopes to stay in busi- 
ness it had better start immediate steps to correct a 
bad situation because losing fans yearly is a bad 
situation and could spell disaster for the popular 
classic. 



-The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 4, 1960 


3 Florida A&M 
Players Ink 
Grid Contracts 

Three Florida A&M Univer- 
sity Rattlers have inked grid 
contracts to play professional 
football this fall according to 
an announcement by Jack 
Gaither, FAMU football coach. 

Vl^illiam Barber, a 204- 
pound Miami end, signed with 
the Calgary Stampeders of the 
Canadian League for $9,000 
and a $500 bonus. Center Wil- 
lie Taylor and fullback Jesse 
Heard agreed to terms with 
toach Sid Gilman of the new- 
ly formed Los Angeles Charg- 
ers of the American Football 
League. 

Barber snatched nine passes 
for 116 yards, two touch- 
downs and one two-pointer. 
Taylor was released by the 
Green Bay Packers of the Na- 
tional Football League early 
last fall after playing in two 
exhibition games. Heard is re- 
turning from a two-year hitch 
in the United States Army. 

This Drmgs the total num- 
ber of ex-Rattlers under pro- 
fessional football contracts to 
six. Halfback W^illie Galimore 
and tacskle Willie Lee are 
with the Chicago Bears. Tackle 
Willie McClung is with the 
Cleveland Browns. 


■j.'- j p iM i y gf 



N 


r^ ^THE TEE'' 


.W/TH MAGOIt HATHAWAY. 


President Eisenhower was 
In Palm Springs last week 
and TV had him. 

He was photographed play- 
ing one of his famous games 
of coif. 

It WW quite cmnslti^ Tand 
shocking to see him CHOP- 
PING away at THREE balls 
on the first tee. We could not 
tell If he was hitting balls out 
of bounds or "just waiting for 
an official ball to go straight" 
but whatever he was waiting 
for It took THREE balls to get 
It Now the rule is if a player 
strikes ONE ball out of 
bounds It costs him a penalty 
of one stroke. Three balls 
should have cost Mr. Presi- 
dent a three stroke penalty. 
Providing he parred the hole 
his score for the one hole un- 
der current rules (effective 
Jan. 1) would be seven. Under 
the rule prior to Jan. 1 his 
score for the first hole would 
have been 10. 

Speaking of President Ei- 
senhower brings to our atten- 
tion that a long over-due ar- 
ticle appeared in the March 
Issue of "SPORT' Magazine, 
written by Dick Schaap, and 


Huskie Cagen 
Resume Acfion 

The second round of the 
Metropolitan Conference bas- 
ketball race opens the week 
with East Los Angeles in 
fourth place, and has sched- 
uled three games. Coach Dave 
Taylor's Huskies travel to Val- 
ley Friday, Feb. 5, where they 
will try to repeat their Janu- 
ary 90-66 win. Fast improving 
Valley's Monarchs tre certain 
to be much rougher on their 
home floor. 

On Saturday in Belvedere 
Junior High gym the ELA 
team gets a shot at second 
place San Diego, winner over 
the Huskies 'by just three 
points at San Diego. 

An added feature will be the 
Metro Conference scoring race 
between ELA's Huey Thomas 
and S.D. ace. Art Williams. 
Thomas had 193 to Williams' 
189 as the first round ended. 
Clinging to third place is Hus- 
kie Henry Johnson with 149 
while fourth is held by Ed 
Johnson of San Diego with 
142. Needless to say it is the 
Huskies and San Diego 
Knjghts seem to have a mon- 
opoly on Metro high scorers. 

Next Tuesday, Feb. 9, ELA 
goes to Santa Monica for a 
4 p.ni. encounter with the Cor- 
sairs who are in the Metro 
cellar. 


it was about Negro profes- 
sional Charles Sifford. If you 
have not purchased this mag- 
azine then RUN to the nearest 
newsstand and get it. The title 
of the article is, 'The Golfer 
with the Big Handicap." ^It 
really should have been "big- 
gest") One of the most 
revealing p>oints that Schaap 
brought to light was that our 
own President Eisenhower is 
a member of the Augusta, Ga. 
National Club, which goes 
along with segregation. Here 
is a portion of Schaap's ar- 
ticle: 

"Outside the locker room at 
the Winged Foot Golf Club in 
Mamaroneck, N. Y., during 
the final round of the U. S. 
Open golf championship last 
June, a biting wind whipped 
up temperatures unquestion- 
ably northern. But inside, by 
the tables that adjoin the 
windows overlooking the 18th 
green, the drawls were un- 
mistakably southern. 

"•II Charlie Sifford has a 
real hot round,' a golf writer 
said, 'he can finish among 
the top 16. Now, that would 
be Interesting. That would 
mean that he would automa- 
tically qualify for the Masters 
Tournament next year.' 

" "yall crazy?' said a re- 
porter from Georgia. 'If Sif- 
ford makes the top 16 they'll 
change the rules so only the 
top 15 qualify. If he finishes 
11th, it'll become the top ten. 
And if he finishes second, then 
it'll only be the top one.' 

" That's no lie,' someone 
else said, 'they ain't going to 
have no Nigras playing at 
Augusta.' Had he shot a 69 
he would have placed among 
the 16 leaders — and the men 
who run the Master at Augus- 
ta would have had some soul- 
searching, and maybe rule- 
changing to do. But Sifford 
had not scored 69 and, for 
another year at least, a cru- 
cial test of the Negro's status 
in American golf had been 
averted. 

"'If Sifford had finished 
among the top 16 I think he 
would have been allowed to 
play in the Masters," a prom- 
inent golf writer said a few 
months ago. 'The Augusta 
people wouldn't have liked 
the idea, but they would have 
given in. After all. President 
Eisenhower is a member of 
the Augusta National Club. If 
they had changed the rules 
to keep a Negro out, he would 
have had to quit the club.' 

"Augusta would rather have 
a Negro player for one week 
and Eisenhower all the time 
than have neither of them 
none of the time." 



NOT PLAY ING— Charles 

Sifford, one of top profes- 
sional golfers, uon't be 
among the pros in the first 
annual 90 hole $100,000 
Palm Springs Desert Classic, 
being played on Bermuda 
Dunes, Indian frells. Tam- 
arisk and Thunder bird 
Courses, Reason being he was 
refused an invitation and not 
by the Indians who happen 
to own the land. 


L.A. SPORTS ARENA— Rob (Shouhoat) Ilnll of the 
Harlem Globetrotters will be seen tn the final ^ame of 
their current visit at the Los Angeles Sports Arena Sunday 
afternoon, Feb. 7. Althea Gibson and Karol Fngeros will 
he matched in the best S out of 15 game set in the "Basket- 
ball Follies" of^ 1960. 


OUTSTANDING 
DUELS SPARK 
INDOOR MEET 

Three outstanding duels are 
set for the First Annual Los 
Angeles Times Indoor Games 
at Memorial Sports Arena 
Feb. 13. 

One battle will be fought 
between Don Bragg, world in- 
door pole vault champion, 
and Bob Gutowski, holder of 
the world outdoor record of 
15-81/4. "Tarzan"-Bragg's rec- 
ord is 15-9'/2. 

Also fighting it out on the 
boards will be champion 
hurdlers Lee Calhoun, Olym- 
pic and national outdoor 120- 
yard champion, and Elias 
Gilbert , National AAU indoor 
door 60-yard hurdle champ. 
Calhoun and Gilbert will be 
pitted against each other in 
the 60-yard hurdle event 

Parry O'Brien, world champ- 
ion shot-putter, again will 
meet the young challenger 
Dallas Long, a sophomore at 
SC. O'Brien's best is 63-4 out- 
doors and 63-2 indoors — the 
latter made at the recent Los 
Angeles Invitational but set 
aside because the shot-put 
was four ounces underweight. 



BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO: Holders of 42 
tickets swept all six races at 
Caliente Race Track last Sun- 
day and won $1,568 for each 
ticket in the most widespread 
distribution of the 5-10 handi- 
capping contest money this 
year at Caliente Race Track. 

Consolation dividends were 
divided among 557 tickets, 
each paying $39.40 for five 
winning horses. 

The 5-10 pool grossed $97,- 
574. Winning numbers were 
6-1-9-8-6-2. Five of the six 
winning horses were mutuel 
wagering favorites. 

The crowd of 14,052 sent 
$419,494 through the mutuels 
not including $97,574 in the 
5-10 pool. 

SANTA ANITA: The $50,000- 
added Santa Margarita Han- 
dicap o onSaturday will be 
among the outstanding at- 
tractions that will draw the 
crowds that have produced a 
grand total of $10,690,242.24 
for charity since the Arcadia 
track was opeiied in 1934. 


Becana 10-7 Pick; 
ToneSt Ortiz Eveii 

Despite the fact Carlos Or- 
tiz is not only the world's 
junior welterweight champ- 


UCLA RETURNS 
TO L.A. ARENA 

After a month's absence 
from the Los Angeles Sports 
Arena during which they 
played three ^ames on the 
road and also took time off 
for final exams, John Wood- 
ens UCLA cagers return to 
their "home" court to battle 
New Mexico State's Aggies 
and Stanfords Indians this 
weekend Feb. 5-6). 

On Friday the Bruins take 
on the powerful Aggies, cur- 
rently undefeated in Border 
Conference play, with a 3-0 
record and a 13-3 season 
mark, in the 7 p.m. opener of 
a big doublehc'ader. Then at 
9 p.m. SC hosts Stanford in 
an important AAWU contest 

On Saturday it will be 
strictly all-conference war- 
fare with the Trojans and 
Washington's Huskies going 
at it in the opener and the 
Indians and UCLA following 
in their first meeting of the 
season. The Huskies come to 
town after playing California's 
league-leading Bears at 
Berkeley the previous night 

The UCLA basketball squad 
has won seven of 11 'home" 
games at the Los Angeles 
Sports Arena and so boasts 
an 8-7 seeison record to date 
with 11 more games to go. 
The Bruins are currently right 
in the thick of the young 
AAWU race with a 3-1 record 
and eight all-important 
league games still to be play- 
ed. 

It is interesting to note that 
eight of UCLA's games have 
been decided by one or two 
points, with the Bruins winn- 
ing six of the "closles" CSC, 
47-45 and 63-62; Santa Clara, 
75-73; Minnesota, 73-72; and 
Washington, 57-55 and 55-54) 
and losing only two of 'em 
(Kentucky, 66-68; and Purdue, 
74-75). 


COMPETITION 
KEEN IN AAU 
CAGE LEAGUE 

Five teams in the Major 
AAU Basketball League have 
a shot at the championship, 
which indicates how keen the 
competition has been in the 
loop's first eight gaines. 

At present Mirror Glaze 
and Kirby's Shoes are tied for 
the lead, with Lockyers Mark- 
ets third, Broadway Federal 
Savings, fourth, and LaFonda 
Restaurants in the fifth slot. 

Lockyers may have the in- 
side track as they have only 
played six games as compared 
to the others' eight 

Broadway Federal, a real 
hustling quintet, can defeat 
anybody on any given night 
as can LaFonda Restaurants 
and those two might prove 
the spoilers in the bunch. 

Kirby's, although suffering 
two narrow losses, remains a 
potent outfit. Guard Monte 
Gonzales had an appendix op- 
eration recently, but is ex- 
pected back to aid the shoe 
quint. 

The Meguiar's Mirror Glaze 
aggregation can still win the 
thing, especially with the sup- 
port of Bob Delpit, a recent 
transfer from Lockyers, and 
the improved shooting of Gary 
Simmons. Roy Irvin and' Jim 
Pugh are always tough. 


JOHN THOMAS 
GOAL IS 7-3 

Limber-leg John Thomas 
Boston University high jump- 
er who leaped 7-1 ',4 in the 
Millrose Games in Madison 
Square "Garden last week, 
higher than any man has 
cleared in the history of the 
event, }ias set his sights much 
higher. 

Because the International 
Amateur Athletic Federation 
still doesn't pass on indoor 
marks, Thomas' leap won't go 
down in the books. 

The remarkable Boston 
University athlete and his 
coach Ed Flanagan announced 
they will be campaigning for 
the amazdng height of 7 feet 
3 inches and both are confi- 
dent that this is within range. 


ion, but also top man on the 
/otem pole for an overdue 
crack at Joe Brown's lightie 
title, local gamboleers are 
still quoting his title melee 
with Battling Torres tonight 
(Thursday) in the Coliseum a 
"6-5 pick 'em affair." 

This price has held sway 
from the start, and Ortiz 
hasn't caused enough stir in 
his daily drills to widen the 
gap. 

The companion 15-rounder, 
which sends bantafri champ- 
ion Jose Becerra against chal- 
lenger Alphonse Halimi, still 
lists Becerra the 10-7 favorite. 

"Becerra stopped him be- 
fore, took the best punches 
Halimi could throw, didn't he? 
asked one big operator. 

The big puzzle to the odds- 
makers is whether Halimi will 
gamble on trying to outpunch 
the champion, or play it 
shrewd and go for the deci- 
sion. 

Torres undoubtedly has left 
a lasting impression on local 
gamblers who saw him blitz 
Frankie Nyff in one round 
and then tough Johnny Busso 
in two. However, Orti train- 
er, Sammy Cherin, laughs it 
off by saying: "We heard 
about Busso being kayoed, 
yet he didn't %top us from 
quickly accepting the fight 
with Torres, and putting the 
title up to boot." 

It's Ortiz' contention that 
Busso wasn't in the best of 
condition when he was here 
for the Torres sleeping party. 
At least the curly-haired 
Puerto Rican bolsters his con- 
fidence in making himself be- 
lieve it. 

Most experts see an Ortiz 
win if it goes the limit feel- 
ing that the younger and less 
experienced Torres must ex- 
plodp his big bombs early. 
They also point out that Ortiz 
can punch, too. as he showed 
against Len Matthews and 
Kenny Lane last year. 



(HORSES TO WATCH THAT 
ABE FIT AND READT) 

CALIENTE 
W7TH PAY. A nice maiden fit and 

ready, 
NO EXIT. Watch out for this one. 
GAMEKEEPE31. My sleeper. 
RED HOST. Next out ok. 
PAMPERED GIRL. Needed last 

race. 
IN FAST. Ready for the winning 

circle. 
TERESITA. Clocker's poodle. 
I.EFT HALF A longsiiot special. 
BORN MIGHTS'. Now real flu 
TARE. Get yours next out. 

SANTA ANITA 
BEEFEATER. Working fast tab 

tote. 
DRAGA Get yours on this on«' 
ISLE OF CYPRUS. A real goodie. 
TONY'S BOY. Thl.« one can fly. 
KING ARA. Mile or over ok. 
TOWSON GAL. In smart hands. 
ZEA'S JOY. Mv special. 
SWISS ROLL Pipntv s-p^ed 
NEGOTIATION. Slnp-look-listen 
VITAL FOP..CE. Tah tote next out. 

SPECIAL NOTE: My pick for the 
Santa Margarita Handicap. Silver 
Spoon, firsi ; Midwest Star, second; 
Indian Maid, third. L'psels, 1^ 
Plume, Sybil Brand. 

Keep this column for furth- 
er reference as it only appears 
in the California Eagle, out 
and on your newsstand every 
Wednesday. For the best in 
the Sport of Kings, it's the 
Eagle. 


Fremont's Joe Caldwell 
Voted Top Tourney Star 


S. Park Cage 
Loop Starts 

Two basketball teams open- 
ed league play last week. 
Games are scheduled against 
Ross Snyder, Manchester, 
Green Meadows and the In- 
dustrial League of South 
Gate. 

The Senior Hikers, winners 
of the South Park league for 
boys, will compete in the dis- 
trict play-offs, beginning Feb. 
12, at Van Ness Playground. 


yPEPPINg—Dwight Haw- 
kins, California ranking 
bantamweight boxer, is train- 
ing daily and will leave for 
England late this month 
where he is scheduled in four 
bouts that will net kirn 
$14,000. 


A&T Agies Win 
Two CIAA Games 

The A&T College Aggies, 
defending CIAA basketball 
champions, continue to roll in 
bowling over North Carolina 
College and St. Augustine's 
College by impressive scores. 

Playing before their largest 
home crowd in history at the 
Greensboro War Memorial 
Coliseum, the Aggies sub- 
merged the Eagles 88-67, on 
last Saturday night. 

The two wins gave the Ag- 
gies 10-1 record in the current 
conference campaign. 


Forward Joe Caldwell of 
Fremont was voted the most 
outstanding player of the All- 
City high school basketball 
tournament which the Path- 
finders won 81 to 63 over 
North Hollywood last week. 

Sharpshooting Caldwell led 
his team to its second consec- 


Globetrotters Play 
In San Bernardino 

Basketball's most famous 
team, the Harlem Globetrot- 
ters, and the tennis world's 
greatest woman player, Althea 
Gibson, invade San Bernar- 
dino Feb. 6; Yuma, Ariz., Feb. 
10; Tempe, Ariz., Feb. 11; Tuc- 
son. Feb. 12 and Tulsa, Okla, 
later this month. 

Fresh from drawing capa- 
city crowds at the Pan Pacific 
last week, it is the most sen- 
sational attraction on the 
winter sports scene. 

The traveling "sports pack- 
age" is due back in Los An- 
geles Feb. 8 for a game at 
the Los Angeles Sports Arena. 


Willowbrook 
Teachers Cop 
Three in Rbw 

The Willowbrook Teachers 
Basketball Team staged the 
finest game of the series to 
overcome a fighting, courag- 
eous Ralph Bunche Faculty 
Team 45 to 34 in the annual 
March of Dimes Basketball 
game held at the Southern 
Area Boys Club last Friday 
night. 

Trailing throughout most of 
the first half, WillowbitxJk 
managed to tie the game just 
before the half ended. The 
third quarter was a nip and 
tuck affair most of the way 
but the superior reserve 
strength of the victors proved 
too much for Bunche. 

Both teams demonstrated 
excellent team playing. Ever>' 
man on the court performed 
his job so well that it would 
be difficult as well as unfair 
to select any one as the star 
of the game. And this is as 
it should be, for these men 
were playing their hearts out 
to score a bigger victory over 
crippling diseases through the 
March of Dimes program. 


utive title by dropping in 24 
points, 16 of them in the sec- 
ond half of the championship 
game. 

Fremont became the first 
team in the 13-year history of 
the tournament to win two 
straight titles. 

Caldwell, in being voted top 
Ijlayer of the tourney, scored 
a total of 99 points in four 
games, breaking an old mark 
of 87 set by Cris Apple of 
Holl>-wood in 1958. It also ex- 
ceeded the five-game record 
of 92, which Don Eby of Wash- 
ington established in 1949. 

Caldwell is a senior and in- 
dicated that he would like to 
attend UCLA upon graduating 
from Fremont. 


Billy McGill 
Stars for Utah 

Billy (The Hill) McGill, 
former Jefferson High basket- 
ball sensation and now a reg- 
ular sophomore star on the 
University of Utah's highly- 
ranked cage squad, extended 
a warm welcome to the Loy- 
ola Lions when the visited 
Salt Lake City last week. 

In fact, the welcome left 
the visitors cold after McGill, 
playing only now-and-then, 
swished in 19 points as he led 
his team to an 88 to 81 victory- 
over the Lions. 

However high point honors 
went to Loyola's Ed Bento 
who got hot and dropped in 
28 points. 


Hollypork 
To Offer 
Rich Purse 

The $100,000 added Holly- 
wood Juvenile Championship, 
which last year in its inaugu- 
ral running became the rich- 
est race ever staged in the 
west for two-v^ar-olds, again 
will climax a most rewarding 
program for juveniles at the 
1960 Hollj-wood Park tho- 
roughbred race meeting 
which will open Wednesday, 
May 11. 

Vice-President and General 
Manager James D. Stewart an- 
nounced last week that the 
Hollj'wood Juvenile Cham- 
pionship would be continued 
as the top race of the 55-day 
season for two-year-olds. The 
six-furlong event, which last 
year grossed $163,850 to be- 
come the richest race in Hol- 
Ij-wood Park historj', will be 
staged on Saturday, July 23, 
and will be the first of Amer- 
ica's $100.000-plus races for 
the youngsters. 


CIAA GAGE TOURNEY 

Tht 15th annual CIAA Bask- 
etball tournament will be 
played in GreensJx)ro, N. C. 
in the War Memorial Colise- 
um Feb. 25-27. 


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orriRS ivuY sat. 4 sun. 

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4»*r EVERY SATURDAY ^ 
4» AND SUNDAY NIGHTS ^ 


JOHN S. ALESSIO ^ 




Thursday, February 4, 1960 


Th« California Eagle— 7 


E.\JOY[\G rOH,\ CLUB FORMAL — Obviously 
pUmrd over the surretx of the annua/ Pacific Toun Club's 
formal last Saturday night tn the Regency Room of the 


Sheraton-iyest Hotel are the stylishly gowned ladies above. 
From left: Mildred Jones, Wanda Miller, Leontyne King, 
Bernice Senter, Florence Vaughn and IdaWigley. (Adams) 


Pacific Town Club Holds 
Sparkling Winter Forma 


Old fnends usually enjoy 
"he same social events year 
n and year out. Such was 
the case with the elegant 
winter formal of the Pacific 
Town Club and it^ auxiliary 
last Saturday night in the 
fashionable Regency Room 


of the swank Sheraton -West 
Hotel on Wilshire. 

A quick survey of the 
dance floor showed a capac- 
ity crowd enjoying dancing 
to the music of Eddie DaMs. 
There was an unusual 
^unount of "Hi, Theres, " and 


the cheery wave of an arm, 
that denote an affair where 
you are most likely to see 
all your old friends. 

Wandering about the Re- 
gency Room we spotted a 
party of out-of-towners that 
included Rev. C. Cobbs of 



CLUB OFFICIALS — Pacific Toun Club officers and president of iff nuxtliar\- find muck 
to diirufs durtnij their annual formal Saturday night at the Sheraton-H'est Hotel. Seated 
from lefC^ Ethel Sheen, )}uest: Viola U hiteside, president of the ladies (ju.xiliary to the Pa- 
cific Tm^n Club. Standmij: Dr. JVilliam Bcales, out-going president ; and Arthur Houston, 
in-cominf-presldent. (Adams) 



\ 


DAXCE COMMITTEE — Members of the Pacific Toun Club dance committee get a 
special thrill as the\ greet many of the Southland's top personalities uho responded to their 
iluh's mutations. Putured ^ont from left: Ido li'igley and EdiLina Fearoncc. Back row, 
danre committee members are: Allan IVoodward, Dr. Cris Taylor^ George Whiteside and 
Leonard S enters, (Adams) 


Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Kussman of Pacoima; and 
Ann Lacoure of Chicago. 
Among local residents see- 
ing their old friends and en- 
gaging in spirited conversa- 
tion were *the stylish Leon- 
tjTie King, Addie Baker, 
Charity White. Bulah Hon- 
ore, Dr. and Mrs. Henry 
Jenkins, Dr. and Mrs. Wil- 
burn Williams, Dr. and Mrs. 
E. H. Ballard, Dr. and Mrs. 
Edward Beal, Dr. and Mrs. 
Emmett Wyndon, Dr. an4 
Mrs. Nat Fearonce, Dr. and 
Mrs. Herbert Fairs," Mrr and 
Mrs. Henri O'Bryant, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sybil Smoak, Mr. 
and Mrs. Homer Garrott, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Holbert, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Cline. 

Also John and Percia Hut- 
cherson, Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Griffin, Mr. and Mrs. William 
V. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nathaniel George, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lonnie Eberhardt, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Harris, Lam- 
bert Green and a friend; Mr. 
and Mrs. William T. Jones 
and Wanda Miller. 

Following the dance the 
49 membership group invited 
some 200 guests to breakfast 
at their clubhouse on West 
Adams and Montclair. The 
food was piping hot and the 
service was exceptionally, 
fast, cooked and served by 
the club's caterers. 

Festivities lasted into the 
early hours of Sunday morn- 
ing and the last of the 
breakfasters departed just as 
dawn was breaking. 

Bids to this \ear's affair 
were limited to 10 per mem- 
ber. Efforts of the hard- 
working dance carfimitlee 
headed by Allen C. Woodard 
III, chairman, and Leonard 
Senters. co-chairman, being 
assisted by George White- 
side and Dr. Chris Taylor, 
drew compliments on a job 
well done, particularly for 
the smooth and efficient 
manner in which both the 
dance and breakfast were 
handled. 



I.MPOSIXd GATHERING — Man^ out-of-town guests 
urrc attracted to the annual winter formal giicn by the Pa- 
cific Town Qlub last Saturday night. Group above includes 


from left: Medina Martin, Chicago; Mnxine Thompson; 
Rev. C. C. Cohhs of Chicago, and Helen Stanley. (Adams) 



FOUXDERS DAY LUSCHEOX— Alpha Kappa Alpha 
snrors view the record of the founding of their three Los 
Angeles chapters at a luncheon obserimq their ^2nd anni- 
versary. Sorors from left: y, orma Earles, committee chair- 


man: I ivian Strange. Basilcits of Alpha Gamma Omega; 
Joan Rhinchart , Basilcus of Sigma, and Helen Williams, 
liho served as narrator. (Adams) 


S'^ll Alpha Kappa Alpha Chapters Observe 
SmJUJ ^^2n6 Founders' Day at Regency Room 


Irma Hopkins expects the 
Nannettes in. Sat. Chicagoan 
Daisy Kennedy is visiting 
her brother and his wife. Dr. 
and Mrs. Albert Baumann. 
Home from a Chi weekend 
is Kate Garcia; she winged 
out to attend a two-day 
meet of the Iota Phi Lambda 
executive board at the Sher- 
man. Margery Green ocean- 
hopped home Sun. from her 
three weeks in Paris. NYC 
to LA: Perry Watkins, the 
scenic designer with B'way 
stage and TV credits to his 
name. He's here at play- 
wright Moss Hart's bidding. 

Dr. Geraldine Woods, Del- 
ta Sigma Theta national vice 
president, weekended in SF, 
guest-speaking for that 
city's alumnae chapter dur- 
ing their Founder's Day ob- 
servance. Clara Scruggs 
birthdays Mon. (8), Zepher- 
ine Brown has hers the same 
day. And next day is fourth 
anniversary for the hand- 
some Neville Kings (Barba- 
ra Weaver). It will be W 
"Nite in N'Orleans" at DMC 
headquarters this Sat, Por- 
tia Craig clutches our lapels 
to say. They've worked up 
a Spanish class, too. Detail- 
handler for it is Helen Gar- 
rott 

For the Agila 
Pitt-Los Club anticipates 
Its meeting this Frld. at 
Mary Clays (co-hostess will 
.be Dorothy Lee>; after the, 
meeting, there's to be a par- 
ty during which the gaily 
agile will be taught authen- 

(Continued on Page 8) 


Tlie three IjOS Angeles 
chapters of Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Sorority gathered Sat- 
urday, Jan. 30. for luncheon 
at the Sheraton West Hotel 
in the beautiful Regency 


Room in obserx^ance of the 
.sorority's 52nd Founders' 
Day anniversary. 

Committee Chairman Nor- 
ma Earles presided as mis- 
tress of ceremonies lor the 


program. The invocation was 
given by Soror Zenobia Jolly, 
chaplain of the graduate 
chapter. 

Soror Berenice Booker gave 
an inspiring rendition of 



GIVE CHECK TO HOME— In keeping with the spirit of "being my brother's keeper," 
members of the Ladies of Paradise Club are shown presenting the Exceptional Children's 
Home their check to help continue the home's program. From left: Claire IVilliams, presi- 
dent of the club; Ralph L. Davis, assistant director and vice-president of the home's board 
of Air ec tors, and La Verne Smlet, treasurer of tht Ladies of Paradise Club. (Adattu) 


"The Lord's Prayer." The Al- 
pha Gamma Omega chorus 
entertained with excerpts 
from Rogers and Hammer- 
stein's "Oklahoma." 

After a delicious luncheon, 
Soror Helen Williams served- 
as narrator for a "This Is 
Your Life" skit which gave 
the history and background 
of each of the three Los An- 
geles Chapters. Basili of the 
undergraduate chapters, 
Joan Reinhart of Sigma, and 
Annette May of Alpha Gam- 
ma, gave interesting high- 
lights of their respective 
chapter histories. Soror Glo- 
deen McCla'ne made -a sim- 
ilar presentation for Alpha 
Gamma Omega. 

Sorors in attendance who 
were founders of each of the 
three chapters were intro- 
duced. Follow-ing this. Soror 
Vivian Strange spoke on 
'This Is Your Future." em- 
phasizing the 'sorority's sec- 
ond half-century thefcie of 
service to the community. 
The beautuul rededication 
ceremony was led by Soror 
Is'eosha Tatum. 

On Sunday, Jan. 31, the 
sorority worshipped at Hol- 
man Methodist church, at 
which time Soror Lucille 
Bryant, Far Western regional 
director, spoke on the ideals 
an/i aims of the sorority na- 
tionally and locally. Tht 
chorus sang under the direc- 
tion of Soror Doris Norvel. 

Sorority members now 

(Continued on Page 8) 




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CLUBS 


8-The California Eagle 




FASHIONS 

Thursday, February 4, 1960 




FASHIONABLE GIRL FINALS— SmiUng happily after completing plans for the Fash- 
lonabU Girl Finals and dance contest are from left: Eddie Clark, program chairman: Elsie 
Balduin. model supervisor, and Johnny Young of the Von-Young Agency. Applications to 
enter the contest are being accepted at 1151 Y, S. Vermont avenue, Dunkirk 4-0419, The af- 
fair u' ill be he Id at the Elks Auditorium March 6. 


Malva Graham 
Will Teach at 

49th Street 

Malva Webb Graham Is 
among the January gradu- 
ates who are accepting hard- 
earned congratulations. 

Malva, a product of Los 
Angeles city schools,- receives 
her B. A. from the School of 
Education, USC, with a psy- 
chology major. 

She was advanced from 
Manual Arts High School as 
an A-11 .winning a scholar- 
ship to F i s k University 
under the Ford Foundation 
program at the age of 16. She 
took the first half of her 
freshman year at Fisk and 
her remaining years at USC, 
graduating at the age of 20. 

Mrs. Graham is a member 
of Delta Sigma Theta soror- 
ity. She has already been 
employed by the L. A. Board 
of Education and starts her 
teaching career at the 49th 
Street School. Feb. 1, as a 
kindergarten teacher. 

Malva is tbe daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Malvin Webb 
and the wife of Charles Mor- 
ris Graham. '' 


Things surely picked up over last weekend. No 
lull in the party whirl. There were several beauties. 

Lots of long time friends gathered over at 
CLARA PRINCE'S Luveme avenue home to help 
genial bachelor, HARRY BROWN, celebrate his 
birthday. Chit-chatted with CAROLYN WELLS, 
TOM STEWART. RUTH and GLADWIN BALL, BILL 
SMALLWOOD. attractive VIRGINIA. MORGAN (I 
remembered her as a buyer in an exclusive shop in 
Atlantic City but she is now living on the Coast), 
SUE WILLIAMS (now there is a gal with looks, 
brains and personality), BILL and CHRIS MOORE, 
ELLA REDMOND and others. 

Evening of Fun 

On the same evening the Pacific Town Club was 
hosting its annual formal at the Sheraton West 
Town House. 

Still more on the same evening was the fabulous 
party given by the Gay Maestros at the new Casa 
Manana on Manchester Blvd. The Maestros decor- 
ated the two ballrooms and with the aid of two 
dance bands and prettily gowned ladies, this was 
one of the nicest fun evenings. 

It vns a wonderful time that LEOLA REECE 
provided when she entertained her club^ Les Dames, 
Sunday evening. LEOLA's mom', MRS. MANN, pre- 
pared a most delectable dinner with the main dish 
a Southern delicassy made from a special and 
cherished recipe. Agreeing were members plus new 
member, LAURA SHACKELFORD, and guest, AN- 
ITA JONES. 

Another lovely evening was spent on Monday 
when CARL and IRMA WATSON tossed one of their 
"just for fun" parties in their cozy Hillcrest avenue 
home. 

In Grand Style 

MILLIE GRAHAM (glamorous grand-ma) was 
in the spotlight last Tuesday when several of her 
friends remembered that it was her birthday and 
helped her cejebrate in grand style. 

ZEE MADDOX celebrated her natal day (Feb. 3) 
at Puccini's in Beverly Hills. 

It wasn't WINIFRED CAREY's birthday but I 
must mention how good she looks behind the wheel 
of her 1960 Chrysler sedan. 

A. C. BILBREW was among the guests at the 
Eisenhower SlOO-a-plate dinner at the Pan-Pacific 
Auditorium. 

Looking ahead. . . . Vivacious GEORGIA CARR 
will be one of the many stars to appear at the Royal 
Elites Ball on Feb. 5 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel' All 
proceeds will go to the Los Angeles Urban League. 
Incidently, have you renewed your Urban League 
membership? Now is the time. 

Les Beau Dames all set for their benefit affair 
-on Feb. 14 at the Moulin Rouge. 

Feb. 15 is the big night for the Shriners' Star-of- 
Stars show at the Moulin Rouge. SAMMY DAVIS 
will receive the Humanitarian Award and DINAH 
WASHINGTON, DANNY THOMAS and many other 
top stars will entertain. 

_ Two dates that always remind me that spring 
IS just aroundthe-corner are the AKA's Fantasy-in- 
Pmk formal which wijl be held on March 12 in the 
international Room of the Beverly Hilton and HAR- 
|IIETTE JOHNSON'S March 20 presentation of her 
fabulous "under-cover" showings at the Moulin 
Rouge. 



via, Nancy Hand, Curtis Dor- 
sey, Charles Paige, John W. 
Randolph and Keyser Small- 
wood. 


Denver Club's Officers Seated 

Members of the Denver 

.Club installed newly elected 

[officers last Saturday eve- 

inlng at their annual dinner 

[banquet. 

'. Officers installed wpre; 

•Goldle Helm, president: Pearl 

'Dorsey, first vice-president; 
Rosalie Bickers, second vice- 
president: Eula Anthony, re- 
cording secretary: Beatrice 
Blakey. corresponding secre- 
tary; katherine Turner, treas- 
urer; Diette Gross, chaplain; 
Willa Smallwood, parllamen- 

;tarian, and Eunice K. Ran- 

•dolph, reporter. 

\ Guests attending the cere- 

-monies were Florence Harrl- 

-feon. Janettc Dee, Eddie Da- 


Wcstside Society 
To Hold Meeting 

Members of the Westside 
Benevolent Society are urged 
by Its president, Mrs. Leo 
Lott, to attend a regular 
meetins; Thursday, Feb. 11, 
at Bethel A.M.E. Church, 
36th street and Denker ave- 
nues 

The meeting will get un- 
der way at 7:30 pjn. 


Beaux Arts Plan 
20tK Annual Ball 

The National Urban 
League Guild will sponsor 
the 20th annual Beaux Arts 
Ball in the grand ballroom 
of the Hotel Roosevelt, 45th 
street and Madison avenue, 
New York City, Feb. 12, Mrs. 
Mollie Moon, chairman of 
the Guild, announced this 
week. 

"Gaslight Follies" will be 
the theme of this year's 
event, which is designed to, 
recreate the mood of 1910, 
the year the National Urban 
League was founded in New 
York City. The League is 
celebrating its 50th anniver- 
sary this year. 


46 Annual 
Omega Confab 

The 46th annual Grand 
Conclave of the Omega Psi 
Phi Fraternity held at the 
Hotel New Yorker, in New 
York City recently, drew the 
largest delegation in the 
history of the organization. 

Nearly 700 members regis- 
tered for the event and the 
attendance was swelled by 
several hundred others, in- 
cluding wives and visitors. 


Pjoncers Honored 
At Sojourner Tea 

Descendents of the first 
families gathered at Sojour- 
ner Truth Home on Sunday 
to participate in, the colorful 
Pioneer Day celebration 
hosted by Sojourner Truth 
Club, a 55-year-old organi- 
zation which maintains an 
eastside and westside home 
for working girls and young 
women. 

Nearly 300 persons at- 
tended the festivities, accord- 
ing to Dr. Vada Somerville, 
president of Sojourner. 


ROLLER SKATING 
Boys and girls can enjoy 
excellent roller skating at 
the sapcious roller rink every 
Wednesday from 3:30 p.m. 
until 5:30 p.m. at South Park 
Playground. 


VISIT MODERN DENTAL HOSPITAL— Members of the Los An- 
geles Dental Study Club are shown folloiving a tour of the Southern Califor- 
nia Dental Hospital at which time they also held their regular meeting. The 
hospital is dcsiffned to care for all types of dental patients and especially ap- 
peals to those who heretofore hate been forced to receive treatment in the 


Fraternit/ 
To Honor 

25 Year Men 

Dr. E. H. Ballard, western 
vice-president of Alpha Phi 
Alpha, Inc., announced this 
week that all members of 
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity 
who have been members for 
23 years or more will be pre- 
sented with an award certifi- 
cate on Feb. 6, at the Pacific 
Town Club. 

Byron Rumford, member 
of the State Legislature in 
Sacramento, will receive his 
award as Alpha "Man-of- 
the-Year" from the Western 
Region. 

Alpha men from Compton, 
Long Beach, Pasadena, River- 
side, San Bernardino and 
Santa Barbara will attend 
the meeting along with 
Roger Q. Mason and Cornell 
Jackson, presidents of Beta 
Psi and Alpha Delta. 


Ross Snyder Plans 
Community Night 

A patriotic community 
night celebration will be con- 
ducted Feb. 18 at Ross Sny- 
der Playground, 1501 E. 41st 
street. • - - 

The three-fold:' celehjjration 
will commemorate the' birth- 
days of Abraham Lincoln 
and George Washington, and 
will observe Negro History 
Week. 

Starting at 7:30 p.m., the 
program will feature songs 
by the Glee Club from Ascot 
Avenue Elementary School 
directed by John Herod, a 
patriotic pantomine and cre- 
ative dances performed by 
the students of Ross Snyder 
Playground drama and dance 
classes, and a verse choir 
presentation by local drama 
students. 



crowded facilities of a medical hospital. The visit to the hospital u evidence 
of the constant effort being put forth by the Dental Study Club to remain 
in step with the ever advancing concepts in the field of dentistry. Many of 
■the above group are on the staff of this unique hospitar located on Sunset 
near Vermont, (Adams) 

^ Bill Smallwood ^ 


FIRST DATE — H hen young Martin A. Nicholas, son of 
Atty. and Mrs. Leo Brnnton, escorted pretty Brenda Joyce 
Lenoir to the Belles and Beaux dance it was her first date. 
She is the daughter of Atty. and Mrs. Gerald Lenoir. The 
fiflh annual affair teas sponsored hy the Dads' Club of Sejnt-^ 
.Marx's Academy. It Has held at the Hollywood Palladium 
last Thursday, (Adams) 


Carol Anne Wise Wed: 
Donald "R. Robinson 


Elks Council 
Officers Seated 

The newly elected officers 
of the Elks Council No. 41 
were installed at their in- 
stallation banquet last week. 

Officers seated were Sam- 
my Warren, chief antler; C. 
Harriston, vice - a n 1 1 e r; L. 
Roberts, left antler; G. An- 
derson, inner guard; Harold 
Spennis, first scribe; Homer 
Baker, second scribe: and 
trustees W. A. Porter, George 
Perry, and B. Hicks. Rev. Ro- 
land Claud was also install- 
ed as chaplain. 

Gilbert Lindsay. Elks 
grand commissioner of pub- 
lic relations, was toa.st- 
master. Louis B. McKesson 
was the evening's principal 
speaker. 


Eastern Stars 
Plan Program 

When Queen of Sheba 
Chapter No. 7, O.E.S., cele- 
brates its 56th anniversary 
next Sunday, Jan. 17, at Ma- 
sonic Hall, 1050 E. 50th 
street, an evening of un- 
usual enjoyment awaits the 
public. The hours are 4 p.m. 
to 7 p.m. 

There will be radio stars 
and TV artists, followed by 
a musical review headed 
by Mrs. Lottie Gozier, well- 
known musician. 

There will also be models 
displaying the latest fash- 
ions. The commentator will 
be Mrs. Thelma Dyson, past 
matron. 


Rangers Activities 

Some 10,968 boys and girls 
participated In Woodcraft 
Rangers activities during 
1959, it was reported by John 
C. Flanders, executive direc- 
tor. 

Ranger activities In the 
South and Central areas are 
under the direction of Frank 
Donaldson, district executive. 
The area chairman Is E. E. 
Wigley, 5109 S. Wall street. 


The floral arrangements in 
the elegant Wilfandel Club 
House reception room pro- 
vided a beautiful setting 
when Miss Carol Anne Wise 
was wed last Sunday to 
Donald Richard Robinson, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Robinson of San Francisco. 

The daughter of the laie 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Wise, 
granddaughter of the late 
Mr. and Mrs. Duncan and 
the niece of Mrs. James 
(Helen) Garrott was given 


Arlington PTA 
Slates Meeting 

The regular meeting of the 
Arlington Heights PTA will 
be held Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 
1:30 p.m. in the school audi- 
torium, with Mrs. Carl Tot- 
ton, president, presiding. 

A feature of the program 
will be a Founders Day ob- 
servance using a birthday 
party theme by Mrs. Leslie 
Shaw, chairman. 

Highlighting the program 
will be an informative dis- 
cussion by Miss Jean Light- 
foot of the Community Rela- 
tions Conference of Southern 
California. 

All members and their 
neighbors are urged to at- 
tend this meeting. 

Two honorary life merrt- 
berships will be presented to 
worthy recipients by Mrs. 
Harry Nelson, chairman. The 
election of the nominatmg 
committee to select officers 
to serve in the next term 
will conclude the meeting. 


DMC Club Plans 

New Orleans Night 

Creole Gumbo will high- 
light "A Night in New Or- 
leans" this Saturday night at 
the DMC Club, along with a 
Dixieland Jazz band. 

Gumbo will be served 
from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. 
and dancing will get under 
way at 10 p.m. and last un- 
til .. . 


in marriage by her uncle, 
James H. Garrott. 

In the bridal entourage 
were Miss Nancy McCard, 
maid of honor. Mrs. Curlee 
Ross, matron of honor. 

Harold Wise was best man. 
Hostessess were: Mmes. Ivan 
Johnson, Edith Brooks, Her- 
man Harvey, J. Edward At- 
kinson, Irma Hopkins, Elois 
Davis, Otis Rene, Alva Gar- 
rott, Robert C. Garrott, War- 
ner Wright. Lorcn Miller, 
Ezra Bell, Clara Harris, Jef- 
ferson Fowler, Owen McCard, 
Kathryn Carr, Ruth Jones, 
Harold Smith, Samuel Stans- 
bury and Thelma Johnson. 

A student at City College, 
the bride is majoring in 
medical illustration. She is 
also a talented artist having 
won the American Legion 
Award for art in Junior High 
School and a scholarship to 
the Los Angeles Art Center. 

She previously traveled 
with the Kathryn Flowers 
Dance group in Wasbington 
State and spent six months 
with the New York Ballet 
Company, appearing in Lon- 
don and Leeds, in Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, and New- 
castle, Wales. 

The bridegroom is an elec- 
tronics engineer at the Naval 
Ordnance Test Station in 
Pasadena. He is also attend- 
ing University of Southern 
California, and will receive 
his Master of Science degree 
in June. He is a member of 
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity. 

r. Sullivan Elected 
President of Demos 

New officers elected to 
head the Wilton Democratic 
Club are as follows: Tom 
Sullivan, president; Percia 
Hutcherson, vice - president,. 
Lindsay Vickers, secretary; 
Opal Jones, recording secre- 
tary: and Lucy Adams, 
treasurer. 

URGENT NEED FOR BLOOD 

Mrs. Curtis Wilson, Wil- 
shire Council PTA Red Cross 
coordinator, announced this 
week that there is an urgent 
need for blood. 


(Contmued from Page "i 
tic Hawaiian dancing. iNow 
where IS my uke, darn it! » 
That was no ordinary hully- 
bully swingin' Harry Brown 
was happily domg at t h e 
Sat. birthday hooray givpn 
for him by Clare Prince. The 
house rocked with rhythm. 
And the martini pitchers, 
never did run dry. 

Annmarje Miller's broth- 
er, John Risher Jr., was 
elected via Morgan State 
Collegp I he's a senior i to 
the 1960 edition of "Who's 
Who in American Universi- 
ties and Colleges." Rev. and 
Mrs. C. W. Arnold fly via 
NYC to Europe in June. Aft- 
er attending an international 
church conference in Scot- 
land, their last .stop, they 
will return to the USA by 
boat at the end of July. Roy 
Smith, to be a playboy with 
a purpose this Sat.; it's his 
birthday. Art Thomas re- 
turns soon to Newcastle, 
Pa., to see about his ailing 
mother. He was there in 
Dec. 

It'i Hooded, Too 

Jim Scott and his cousin, 
Dorothea Foster, »^•ill be 
greeting their cousin. N'Yor- 
ker Mary Countee i she's a 
registered nurse i. when she 
de-planes Sat. Tliey hope 
she staj's around for a 
month and more. Uer late 
rfiusband. Sam. w-as a well 
known artist and taught at 
Fordham Univ. That's a 
hooded full-length mink 
Ernie Bendy gave his Lula. 
Both of them are increas- 
ingly interested in the Jew- 
ish faith and he's taking 
instructions. Dr. and Mrs. E. 
I. Robinson put an asterisk 
beside the date of Feb. 7: 
it's their fourth anniversary. 

Eva Wallace Gordon se- 
renely taking it easy at Ol- 
ive View as of the other 
day and happy as she keeps 
in touch with many solici- 
tous friends. Washington, 
D.C. dentist Dr. Bertell Fer- 
guson jet-rode in town last 
Sun. for a fortnight, visit- 
ing his relatives, the Webbs 
(Malva. Jerene, etc.* If all 
goes well, he plans to re- 
turn here later to practice. 
The Teacup Club meets Sat. 
at Mollie Reed's. 

Icy Living 

Maxine Thompson takes a 
birthday Tues. (9t. Breita 
C h a V i s checked out've 
Queen of Angels Mon. I've 
been asked whatever be- 
came of Nettie Washington 
Douglass. She's now Mrs. 
Norman Alli.'^n, lives in the 
nation's capital: as a hobby 
he's an accomplished inter- 
ior decorator and craftsman, 
and their home there is in- 
fluenced throughout with 
the California touch. Air 
Force Maj. Archie Williams 
(he's a Pasadenan) and his 
sparkling wife Vesta are in 
Riverside now after some 


iry living m Alaska, and 
are they happy! 

That sky blue car with 
young Henry Felfenberg Jr. 
at the wheel was a gift for 
him from his folks. Lee Ells- 
worth moved to Riverside. 
Dr. Cato Robinson, cigar 
passing. His blue ribbon Si- 
amese cats presented him 
uith another litter. His wife 
Toni sighs and says: "We 
should move out and let 
them have the house. We 
still have some from the 
first go-roundl" 

Adelaide Hardy finger- 
snapped away the virus 
with some desert sun. Be- 
fore Leontjne Prices Tues- 
day recital, to say fond hi 
to Galveston's Cris Akers, 
visiting a week with friends 
in La Brea Park Towers; 
over benedictlne. brandy 
and a samovar of most frag- 
rant coffee Oris said she 
and her affianced local real- 
tor reached their moment of 
truth. They ain't getting 
married, after alL 


Kadets Dinner 
Nets 301 Sales 

The Kadets of America, 
Avalon Community Center, 
gave a very successful 
chicken dinner, Saturday, 
Jan. 30. at which 301 din- 
ners were sold. Proceeds 
from the dinner are to be 
used for the pu.Tx:hase of 
Kadet uniforms. 

Kadet Cleveland Collins, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Nath- 
aniel Collins, won the first 
prize for selling 45 dinners 
and Clyde Cole, Jr.. won the 
second prize for selling 30 
dinners. 

He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clyde Cole. Sr. Eight 
mothers of the Kadets 
worked very faithfully 
along with the Kadet Advi- 
sor, Joe Bristow, to make 
the dinner a success. 


Chicago Visitor 

Daisy Kennedy of Chicago, 
the former wife of Dr. H. 
Kennedy of Memphis, is vis- 
iting her brother, Albert 
Baunman, 4415 Victoria 
Park drive. 


.Founder's Day 

fCoiitinued from Page 7> 
turn their attention to their 
benefit subscription 'Fan- 
tasy in Pink" affair at the 
Beverly Hilton, Friday, 
March 11. Proceeds from this 
affair are used to undergird 
the community service proj- 
ects of the sorority. Bids are 
moving well, and sorors urge 
those who wish to attend to 
resers'e their tables soon. 


.HAIR STYLIST WANTED- 


lnt«r«»ting Work in a Batutlful, (lAedarnistic, W««t$id« Shop. 
Mett lucrativa. Apply in Parson •» tiia 

GUMOUR INSURED BEAUTY SALON 


son W. ADAMS ILVD., AT LA MEA RL 3-8129 I ik« 



'\1 


I 

V- 

y 


1 


ii 


;r, 
lul 

}y. 

In- 
Ids 
Ibe 

lof 


go, 

lls- 
a 


Uyii 


Dinah Washington at Ara 




■Phil Gordon Makes the- 


NEW YORK SCENE 


Bel Esprits 

Offer Queen 

February 21 


I "Queen' 

currently 

' limelight 


Dinah Washington, 

in the national 

with her rendition 


Who are Sidney Poitier. Harry Belafonte. Juano 
Hernandez. Frank Silvera and Fred O'Neal? Actors? 
Hah I Yours truly is the find of the year as a thespi- 

an, after having learned the lead male role and re- of "Unforgettable" and "What 
hearsed for five days before the first professional a Difference a Day Makes" 

performance of "Present • - -- - - will be featured at the popu- 

Pleosure" at Central Syna-| Federation of Protestant Wei- lar Bel Esprib; annual Cita- 


9ogu» on 55th Street and Lex- 
ington Avenue. This half hour 
play was sponsoed by the 


cheduled for the 
room on Sunday, 



fare Agencies and the Child ^tjon Ball, 

Welfare League of America on Aragon Ba 

behalf of encouraging people peb. 21, from 5 until 10 p.m 

to care for foster children, and' Awards and Scrolls 

It was a real kick and a most j individuals and organiEa- 

gratifying experience to play,,;^,^^ whose contributions 

the father. Borney Reid, to the 

mother. Edna Penn, foster son, 

Stanley Green, Jr . and the 

agency case worker. Gavotte 

Green, under tiie most capable 


LUl E ISTIREST—Cnry 

ir'nnt r.iid Snphui I. 'inn 
shnrr thr t nh s . ni'mij u:tfi 
Frank Sinritrn. in Str:n,'i\- 
Kmrnrrt ni'vuiinintnl lilm, 
'The Pr-.Jr r.nd thr /Vw-r, '. 
currrnlly ^i rcciuiirj nt llw 
t.lrctrn I ifinn Cnrforalmn s 
^Ianihi\tt r nt B rnnduny 
Thciihc. C.n-icaturfd w.ll hf 
the ii'st run <!tisiii'. "Ma 
Biirkir'x Killer Br'ind . 

Make it' 


BnCHESTER^-7^ 


IT I u > aUM. ■MB anaB H I u 
Manchester & Broadway 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

New Bargain i^tc 

Admission . . %3J 

NOW PLAYING 

FIRST L.A. SHOWING! 

PS 


stage direction of Edgar Rey 
nolds. 

Most Worthy Cause 

There will be other perform- 
ances of this same pla.v each | 
month before non-profit or- 
ganizations, and we hope to' 
do some good for a worthy j 
cause while being paid for 
each performance. I was 
; pleasantly surprised at my 
own job on such short notiro. ' 
so the 'regulars' I mentioned , 
above had best protect lhcm-| 
selves or a now siar will ap- 
pear on the distant liori/on 
(only about 20 \(m:s a\>.ayi, 
and that star will be mo: 
Congressman Powell Honored 

On Moiida.v ni^ht at the 
Palm Gate there was a parly 
honorins: t'onc;rossman Adam 
Clayton PowgU, and comhinin^ 
i the celebration with a birtli- 
flay parly for one nf !iis aides. 
District Leader, Lillian Up- 
shur. .\ goodly turnout of 
friends and well wishers en 
joyed fine food and drinks 
while being politioally indoo- ; 
trinated by these factions op- 1 
posing the Carmen DeSapio 
regime. « \ 

"Sweets" in Paradise 

Then Tuesday brought Iho 
opening for a ucok only of 
Harry "Sweets" Edison and 
liis swinging genllemcn of 
music to Small's Paradise, 
featuring Sir Charles Thomp- 
son on piano. Gene Ramey, 
ha>s. Elvie Jones, drums, Jim- 
my Forrest, tonor and of 
course 'Sheets' on trumjict. 

'Show Business' Salute 

The audicnio \^ as a dcfm-j 
ite tribute to tlie musicianship 


been for the betterment of the 
community as a whole will be 
cited with awards and .scrolls. 

Music lo\crs the world over 
agree that Dinah ■Washing- 
ton is trul.v one of the great- 
est singers of all times, 
whether it is a blues song, k 
baljad, jazz or a plaintive love 
song. Dinah is, and always 
will he, "The Queen." 

Wilson Crew on View 

Accompanying Dinah will 
be (jerald Wilson and a 16 
piece orchestra. 

■ 



'S8' GREAT — The falmlous Eiiiil Gilch'. soloisl nith Mos- 
low Slate Symphony at the Shrine, Feb. 17. Flic 120 M us- 
eovite musicians nf Russia s leading orchestra arc part of 


the cultural exchange program between the 
and the United States. 


Soviet Union 


Mahalia 
Jackson 
To Sing 

Impresario Audrey P 
Franklyn announces that she 
has signed the world's most 
famous spiritual and gospel 
singer, Mahalia Jackson, for 
a rare concert appearance in 
the Southland. Miss Jack.son 
will appear at the beautiful 
Santa Monica Civic Audito- 
rium, Wednesday, March 2, at 
8:30 p.m. 

"Due to the fact that the 
Easter holy season will be 
upon us, I thought it would 
be a great musical tribute to 
present the great Mahalia at 
this season," said Miss Frank" 
lyn. 

An American Institution 

She possesses one of the 
world's most beautiful voices, 
and her interpretation of 



Thursday, Feburary 4, 1960 


The California Eagle— 9 


'Chazz' Soundtrack 

Just returned from viewing a preview of "The Crowning 
Experience" film produced by Moral Re-Armament. We were 
the guest of singer JEAN JACKSON who was a member of 
the dynamic choral group that dubbed most of the singing 
in the production numbers. You might say the film is a crown- 
ing achievement as it speaks '*' 

loudlv and clearly in behalf by SY DEVORE so maybe that 


People & Places 



DIDJA KNOW — That if 
loiily twenty-five of nur many 

social clubs would pledge ; several 
lone hundred dollars to Jeffer- 
ison High Schools scholarship 
I fund it would assure at least 
! one thousand sludcnls a Jun- 
[ ior College degree? 

iATTY. IVAN JOHNSON — 

When tlie asiule and respect- 
able barrisicr attempted to 
renew his drivers license the 
other dav he had a few em- 


/j>/\ /// // />///.V(;7y;.v 

. . . ' (Jill rn ot the Rlucs" 
T. ;'.'/; (ierrild U'lbon's Ork. 
lull he feiitarcd attraction on 
SuiuliiX. Fehru(ir\- 21. at the 
Brl Esprit annual (Citation 
Ball at the .-Irar/on Ballroom. 

All Faiths 
In Ben-Hur 


harassing moments. Seems 
like after wheeling around 
blocks with the ex- 
aminer in an expert manner, 
lie was told he was a good 
driver and to head back to 
the dept. Whereupon he 
whipped h^ olive-colored 
Buick around the corner and 
ran smack into another car. 

PAULINE WILLIAMS — She 

is one of So. Cal. Auto Clubs 
(Continued on Page 10) 


of building a better world 
through better understanding 
ourselves as well as our fel- 
low men. 

The film was inspired bv 
the career of DR. MARY Mc 
LEOD BETHUNE. "The decid- 
ing struggle," she once said, 
"is not between race and 
race, class and class, nation 
and nation. It is between the 
of God and 
Man's arrogant, rebellious 
will. Winsome MURIEL SMITH 
carried off starring honors. 
NOTES OF AN INNOCENT 
BAR-STANDER! 

FRANKLYN AJAYE, one of 

a n d now" slie our town's leading beverage 
the Santa Monica ^ buckslers. js responsible for 


spirituals has made this form 
of music take even greater | ^o'..^^'','?" J^^^^'f 
bounds in popularity. Her art- 
istry lias thrilled millions 
around, the uorld including 
appearani-es at Carnegie 
Hall, Madison Square Gai- 
fien. Opera House in San 
Francisco, 
comes to 


makes us sort of two-faced 
looking when shared a table 
and broke bread with the 
"tailor of the stars" at the 
Hilltoppers recent affair. 
Nope, our formal duds were 
purchased from BRIIXS West 
Tthi St. address. He has some 
nice thread, too! . . . SARAH 
"Sassy" VAUGHAN reported- 
ly breaking 'em up on the 
continent purchased a Rolls 
Royce for her folks in Jersey! 
. . . EMMETT HOZAY of the 
recording business claims to 
ha\e exclusivclv "the last 
\\ords of DADD-y GRACE" on 
tape. He was present when 
the religious leader delivered 
his last sermon. Then too. the 


('i\ ic 
only. 


for one 


PATRONIZE 

EAGLE 
ADVERTISERS 


<• \ihn Hirinrr r.f ,^x■^ lr^>■r>I^• V/^rrr^ chap Will opcratc 3 rccordmg 

performance ''be hiring of two lo\el\ -^f^gro • » 

;,,,r,w„K- I.- .-r^,,^.,.^^.- ,.,,,^,.,,1. ; booth on the site of the AME 

convention in March. So that 
out of lowners here 'for the 
14 day stand can mail their 
voice hack home. 


models as consumer consult 
ants for (Jlenmore distilleries 
. . . more on ibis next week! 
. . . "BABY PIE" WEAVER, 
dancer RALPH'S exi. says she 
has fresh marriage plans! . . . 
The clothes we wore weren't 


Piano vocalist RUDY REN- 
(Continued on Page 10) 



Cast of 80,000 

"Br-n Ituv" is a story of poo- 
plf^ nf all kinds: .Jews and 
Rninaii.'~. .Nrabs and Slaves, 
bel lovers and non- believers, 
groodv' and lusting, weak and 
, ,, strong, leaders and followers, 
and respect asan artrslof Mr. j^^^^^j ^^^^ c-orrupt. loving 

and hating, wise and impetu- 



Edison, because among others 
present were Jimmy Rushing, 
Bobs Gonzales, Kelly Martin 
(drummer svith Errol Garner'. 
alto man Earl Warren, tenor 
man Willis Jackson, Sir Rob 
ert Harvell, Dave Bailey 
I drummer with Gerry Mulli- 
gan), and a host of other fine 
musicians and entoilainors. 
Underpriviledged Benefit 
!• almost forgot the .-Xmster- 
dam News Camp Fund get- 
together this past week at 
Brankers on St. Nicholas Place, 
who:e the throng Included 
i-Continued on Page 10 1 


•.LURENETUTTU^. 
ALSO SCCOND HIT 


CARrGR»5r 

kSoPHialPREN 

^k ..STANLEY KBAMEE'S 
^^ MONUMENTAL FllMINC Ot 

TECHWCOtOB' • VKTAVWIOH' 
Bilnir^ din Mw*a^ AitM* 

ThMitr* 



ous. and portraits of all these 
prototvpes are painted 
tliroughout this stirring sf>ec- 
tacle. Tho friendship of a Ro- 
man bo.v who becomes a pow- 
erful warrior and his wealthy 
Jewish friend. Judah Ben-Hur. 
is soon turned to hate and 
destruction as a result of the 
warririr's quest for power. 

The desire for revenge 
which overpowers Ben Hur 
when he is made a galley 
slave and his sister and moth- 
er are imprisonel on a false 
charge b.v his lifelong friend 
the Roman Warrior (Stephen 
Boyd), remains within Ben 
Hur until vengeance is his, 
and then this is eventually 
changed by the influence of 
the Christ and His great heal- 
ing power. 


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BARTENDER TONY CASINO 

JACK FREEMAN NELLIE MINOR 

Maniger Hostess 


JIMMY MADDIN PROUDLY PRESENTS NITELY, 

TERRY GIBBS 

"MR. VIBES HIMSELF" 

PLUS TWO STELLAR ENTERTAINERS 



• AL McKIBBIN 

Former Bassist with Duke Ellington 


• MARY ANN MeCALL 

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ENJOY SWINGING BIG BAND SESSIONS EVERY TUESDAY NITE! 


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CONTINUOUS SAT . »UN. 1 PM. 
- 3 TERRIFIC MOVIES - 

STARTS FRIDAY 
'Hunchback of Notre D»me' 
"NOT OF THIS EARTH " 
HBIL ON DEVILS ISLAND" 


FRLMA B.lLLl Rl\ / — 

Snthaltc Krassovska liitl ap- 
pear u-ith popular Ballet Rus- 
iC de Monte Carlo nhen 
company plays Philharmonu 
.hiditorium lor I .■> ferlonn- 
anees stnrtim/ Feb. ?. ,1 pii- 
formance is al^o scheduled for 
the Santa Monica (hiie .lud. 
on Feb. 16. 


Lincoln Film 
To be Shown 

The influence of Abraham 
Lincoln throughout the world 
will be stressed in a new 
color film of his life scheduled 
to be shown at the Pasadena! 
Civic Auditorium on Lincoln's j 
birthday. Feb. 12 at 8 p.m. The : 
performance is to be a joint! 
benefit for the American 
Friends Service committee and 
Pacific Ackworth Friends 
school. 

Francis Raymond Line, who 
conceived and researched the 
1 picture as well as doing the 
! photography and editing, will 
[introduce it to the audience, 
I while narration has been pro- 
ivided by movie and television 
; actor Marvin Miller. 


MILOMOi 

29th & WESTERN RE. 5-9585i 


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HO. 2-8771 


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BOB ASHLEY - SLIM MATHIS • GRADY JENNINGS, Mixologists DICKIE BARROW, Chef 


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BERT 'Organist' KENDRICKS' TRIO 

Featuring TONY BAZLEY, Drums and WILLIAM GREEN, Reeds 

TENOR - FLUTE) 



ATTEND MARTT'S 

SUNDAY "YAWNING" SESSIONS 

and SUNDAY EVENING MATINEES 


(ALTO 


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QUINIHM^^ 

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JEDWIN PEARL PRESENTS. 


ROBERT 'Bumps' BLACKWELL Production of , . . 

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STARRING 'SISTER' BESSIE GRIFFIN AND THE GOSPEL PEAMS 

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STATON, SHEARING, TORME AT SHRINE 



Gene Norman 
Will Present 
Stars Friday 

Gene Norman has announc- 
ed that singing star Mel 
Torme will be in added at- 
traction on the Dakota Sta- 
ton, George Shearing concert 
at the Shrine Auditorium, 
Saturday night, Feb. 6. 
Welcome Addition 

Famous for his modern ap- 
proach to jazz vocalizing. 
Torme Is the special favorite 
of the other leading stars who 
consider him one of the im- 
portant original talents of our 
time. 

Good Seats Available 

Tickets for the Dakota Sta-;out in that area! 
ton - George Sheairng - MeliATTY. H. CLAY 
Torme Show at the Shrinp 


PEOPLE & PLACES 


(Continued from Page 9) 
attractive clerks, but Captain 
John Whitehead, on leave 
from the U. S. Air Force in 
France, caught up with her 
and married' her last Thurs- 
rl fl V ! 

BILL TROSLAIR — Natty 
'.aies rppiT.eentaiive for the 
Burgermeister Brewing Cor- 
poration credits his brand of 
success to the fact that the 
folks are willing to give it a 
trv! 

STAKEOUTS — Because of 
the increasing number of in-- 
dignities^and harassment? Ne- 
gro residents of Baldwin Hills 
are being subjected to, a 
group of prominent 
will ask for a 24hour stake- 


Suave and efficient law^'er 
down South L. A. way credits 
Glenn S. Holmes, the Private 
Eye, for that expert ir\,vestif a- 
tion that aided him when he 
won freedom for one of his 
clients facing a murder 
charge! 

DON-RE MARK-T — A 

quarter million dollars is be- 
ing spent to remodel the West 
Adams and Western super 
market which will hire 100 
employees of all races. It 
might change its name to the 
United Ra'^ps Super Market! 

HUSH-HUSH — Although no 
One is talking out loud about 


10— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 4. 1960 


New York Scene 

(Continued from Page 9) ibUngs I dropped by the Apollo 
lovely florist, Floree Brotni-iBar on I25th street and g»b- 
ban; Henry "Red" Allen; bed with the personality 
charming proprietress of the beauty barmaid, Gloria Camp- 
cozy "Midway Lounge" on b^ll, acrobatic dancer. Dee 
125th fttreet, Selbra HotM' Jo« J>— Jockson. manager Sol 
WeUs (who'll be. hosting atjobnton and comedians, 
his place this week); and lots j Stump and Stumpy. Had a 
of lads and lovelies doing i long talk with Apollo Theatre 
their bit for the underpriv- {owner. Bob Schlffmon, while 
ileged kids cause, under thejnoticing that Brook Benton 
conscientious guidance and and Ruth Brown are this 
"sincere efforts of Mr. and Mrs. 'wpek's attracjions. and ne»rt 
George Palmer. The Vin Strong week Alan Freed brings in a 
Trio provided the perfect mu-lbig show with Bo Dlddley, 
sical background and fore- 1 Bobby Day, Sara Taylor and a 
that dpntist's wifp being fired [ground for the evenings test- [galaxy of Rock n Roll per- 
residents! from her Dept. of Water ftivities as they do six nights 'formers. 


JACKE — 


her Dept. of Water 
Powpr job. the real rea.tion be 
hind it i.i because she let her 
(Continued on Page 12) 


per week at this popular spot. 
AjmUo, All The Go 

During my general ram- 


GOOD SPIRITS— Tht hit of every shnv.- uhrrner \nu mn\ qo is nhiws Italwn Sroiss 
Celony't famous Arribn H'me. Helpma ' sell-n-hmte' thr 14th nnniier<nrv of Rnrket Liqunr 
Store. 11204 South Crntr^l. u^rr- Jmefh 'KRKD' Adams, left, Mittie "Mus Arriha" 
Laurence and Paul " Arnbn Himself" \ichn!sn>j. 

Arriba Stars at 14tli Anniversary Rocket Party 

With Joe Adams, popular Bronzf California Contest and overall feeling of gaiety that 


KRKD "Ma\w oif Di«c Joc- 
k,eys," acting as host, the 
Rocket Liquor Stores, 11204 
S. Central Ave., celebrated 
their 14th Anniversary last 
Friday in an all day fun fest. 
The scores of guests and 
celebrities that attended were 
presented with Colorful leis by presentati\e 
Mittie Lawrence, outstanding sponsible for 


currentl>- "Mi.'« Arriba. 
A Swinging Session 

Thp Bohemian Di.'^tnbutors 
who handle tiip Italian Su-iss 
Colony product. "Arriba" in 
this area wcrp representpd h>' 
Paul Nichol.son. E.\pfuti\e ?u 
pen-isor and BUI Ho.ston. Kp- 
They wptp re- 
the festive tro- 


model, winner of th^ "Miss pical decor that added to tlie 


%>^M$ 

$ ^-4 : ^z^m\^ mMmammm 





^ ^^t^A. .- 


HBK^'Si^H 




'\ --.^.^^-• 




was the theme of the, day 
.Mso on hand, in colorfnl 
BonKo'' costume was Walter 
Brady, familiarly kno\\-n as 
"King Arnba." 

I' 14 Years of Service 

The Rocket Liquor Stores 
a group of four installations 
with their fourteenth year of 
catering to the public nn\^ 
behind them, was repre.sentcd ! 
by co-owners Dell Martinetti 
and Basil Wade and their in- , 
ter-rncial staff. 

I Plans are now afoot tn 
make MitTie Lawrence >^^| 
Italian Swi.ss Colon>' ' omK 
national level. If this coffes 

I about, it will mark a racial 
first for this po.sifion. In ad-, 
dition to her modeling duties.' 
Mittie is a .student at L. A. ! 
State college and the weath- ' 
er pirl over Radio Station 
KGFJ whose manager is Jim | 

[Randolph who was also on 1 

'hand to greet those attending. | 



BAD CHICK' — Lurrnf 
Tuttle plnssthe lend in thr 
true nnd aulhrnlir film ndnp- 
tniirin r,j thr fnmih that trr- 
rnrizrd n nutinn. I'hr mist 
nirnlid unman in crime' f his- 
tory stnr^ m "Mn Barker's 
'Killer Brnnd', n'/w shouinq 
ot first run thi litres and 
dri'i-e-ins thrriu ghout the city. 
I isit thr thrntre ttf yriur 
chnire at hast onrr each nrck 
hrcnusr mrjitnn futmrs arc 
better than ever and no pic- 
ture IS old until \r)u hmr 
seen it 


WAX IV ORKERS— Eddie and Betty Cole appear nightly 
at the Oakroom in If'hittter. Their latest record release for 
H-'arner's u "S'lohtlife jnr Day Dreamers." Music for the 
first three ocktatls. 


'Chazz' Soundtrack 


(Continued from Page 9) 
DEB'S bigtime pal DEBBIE 
REYNOLDS hired him to teach 
her to play piano in her new 
film. 'The Pleasure Of His 
Company" ... at least he's 
going to teach her to fake it! 
... we took JOHN MATHIS' 
o! marble shooting buddj' 
RAVENAL WILUAMS along 
to catch Johnny's Cocoanut 
Grove .show. Johnnv told us 
that SAMMY DAVIS had made 
reservations for himself and 
a party of ten the same night. 
"VVha$samatt<»r with Sammy." 
Johnny giggled. "Did it slip 
hl» mind that this was his 
opening nipht in 'Vegas?" . .. 

Sudden Thought: Just about 
the classiet doll at the HILL- 
TOPPERS affair was without 
« single doubt DINAH WASH- 
INGTON. And how about that 
Standing ovation for ETHEL 
WATERS? ... we thought it 
very proper and very fitting. 
The f al who broke into show- 
business as Sweet Mama 
StTlngbean has put on a lit- 
tle spread, but now she's "the 
mamma of 'em all" . . . 

Dinah told us the isn't too 
nuts about the record she 
made with BROOK BENTON, 
But we think it's a gasser! . . . 
We think EAHL GRANTS 
••HOUSE or BAMBOO" ghel 
l»c i« one of his swingingest. 
If he keeps on like tMs, NAT 
COLE will have to stgrt 
Bounding like him' And that's 
no stage joke ... 

Baritone CHARLES REY 
NOLD'S hu^p success last 
Sunday at Pr/ce Chapel, is an- 
other star in his crown of 
■ rhlevements . . . LODI 
CHERRY did a superb ioh ar- 
pert) job accompanying him! 
. . SingerZENA AYO battling 
; with herself over her success 
as a warbler in both the re- 
llg;1ous and pop field. On the 
•trength of her own rck 'n 
roll composition's "Dumb-bell ' 
MJ\d "Long Long CJone" she 
tppeared on the GARRY 
MOORE show, and things are 


ihegining to pop for her. But 

she s far more devoted to her 
■ religous work! . . . .'^orry to 

liave missed our gal TTAGGIK 
, HATHAWAY'S soirro sevpra 

nights ago. Understand it was 
[fine and mellow! . . . Bumped 
i into ALEX BOUTTE the other 

day. Hadn't seen the hand- 
! some chap in quite sometime, 
j Still maintains his looks and 

savoire fair. Says he married 
la luscious and wonderful girl 
I about 4 jears ago. Sure agrees 
[with him. And It makes us 
; envious! . . . Newest "must 

go" place in town is JIMMY 

MADDIN'S SUNDOWNERS 

club on the Strip near Wilcox 
TERRY GIBBS is there play 
'ing his groovy \'ibes and so i« 

MARY ANN McCALL 'shes 
I warbling of course) and then 
: there's that fantastic bass 

man AL McKIBBIN to round 

I (Continued on Page 12) 


FIRST J\m ON THf SCREEN ANY'JVHERE' 


"DON'T GET CAUGHT 


The Tm 
life story 
•fa 
notorioui 
aother 
.^smd btr 
strange 
ever- 
imwerini 
love 
for her 
criminel 
sons! 


EARLY READING rOR 

PRI-SCHOOL CHILDREN 

fun wfcll* laaritfnf ta«l larly 
•Ii4 •«ix r«adlnf far 2 ta t ytar 
•H% with •vr DI4a«t4e Aldt to 
■■'ly iMrflng. Mdc Ut $4.00 
^«*tr«44, or fnd 2Sc far ax- 
planatory circular to 

L A. Mufflar, Ixpart and ImMrt 
426'H) S«. iprlDt Sf.. La> Angalal 


Auditorium. Saturday night, 
Feb. 6, at 8:00 are available' 
at all Mutual Agencie.s and "1* 
S. C. Music Co.. 737 S. Hlli; 
street. f^^ 

>! 

i 

:^i 

I* 
Hit 

-¥■ 


• ***•*****•********••*•**•** 


^■tfpacjwsflwsai 


VIGTORj 

\ CLOTHING I 

IGOMPANYI 

f2l4 S. Broadwayi 

I DOWNTOWN I 
' LOS ANGELES | 
? i 


HURRY! SALE ENDS SOON! 


BIGSALE 


10% TO 50% OFF! 


OF MEN'S SUITS 


NO MONEY DOWN '$3 per week pays 
for $100 worth of Clothes, Shoes, 
Accessories for MEN and BOYS. 

GET YOUR CLOTHES AND LUGGAGE NOW! PAY 
LATER, FREE CREDIT - NO INTEREST, 


FREE 
TOPCOAT 


'I 


Former Duke Ellington trom- 
Ibonist, Qaude Jnes mow Cap- 
I (Continued on Page 121 


$30 VALUE 
WITH ANY 
SUIT PURCHASE 1 ^ 


ALL $90 Suits NOW $75 
ALL $80 Suits NOW $65 
ALL $70 Suits NOW $55 


ALL $60 Suits NOW $45 
ALL $50 Suits NOW $35 
ALL $40 Suits NOW $25 


ALL $30 Suits NOW $15 


DON'T BE MISLED BY IMITATORS! 

This IS the AUTHENTIC FULLLEtJGTH story of MA BARKER ' 



THE CONTINENTAL 


THE IVY lEASUI 




The Paeple't World 
Forum, in observance of 
NEGRO HISTORY WEEK, 
presents DR. ANNETTE 
RUBINSTEIN, noted 
author and lecturer. Sub- 
ject: "THE NEGRO IN 
AMERICAN LITERA- 
TURE." Question and an- 
swer period. 
Friday, Feb. 5, 8 p.m., af 
607 S. Western Ave. 
Park Manor 


Sefiedule Tour Sett Afftir uj the . . 

ZENDA BALLROOM 

L>ROEST DOWNTOWN DANCB FLOOW 

«M W, 7th »T. fO^POSITS STATLtR HOTSL) 

REASOMABLE IRENTft— CALL K. BOHLCN. HO. 4-6476. MA. a-M«4 

AviMibl* f^r Rintilt. QaneM, Weeding Recaption*, ate. 



BUY NOW AND SAVE-Bronson Suits in all sizes to 54 in one-two-three and 
four button Models — AH Wool and Silk Like Suits — Trousers now priced 
$9.95, $12.95, $14.95, $22.95 and $24.95 worth much more — Sport Coats 
now priced $29.95, $39.95 and $49.95 worth Much mor"e. 

UNLIMITED SELECTION OP NATIONALLY ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE 
GOLD like and SILVER like Belts-Hats— Watches— Radios-Television Sets— Suede Jackets— Leather Jackets— Jackets 

of all kinds. Black Suits— Blue Suits— Grey Suits. 

FREE ALTERATIONS - FREE CREDIT - NO INTEREST - FREE PARKING NEXT DOOR 
as you PURCHASE YOUR NEW CLOTHES AND LUGGAGE. 

EVERYTHING you wear from HAT TO SHOES- Bronson Suits and 
Sport Coats— Gruen Watches— Stetson Hats— Co-Mate Shirts— Freeman 
Shoes-everything for the boy-ages 2 to 20 years. BUY NOW— PAY 
LATER-DRESS UP-ENJOY LIFE and you can in Bronson Clothes. 

CATER TO HIS MAJESTY, the WORKINjG MAN 

You hiv« until February 29, 1960 to tike advtnUg* of our 
ONE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR - White Sport Coats - White 
Tuxedo Jackets- Tuxedo Suits— Plenty of the new Vest Shirts 
—Shirt «rid Vest to match- Jackets of all kinds. Suede and 
Leather — Caps — Polished cotton Trousers — Radios — Gold 
Watches-Silver end Gold Beits-Work Clothes-Play Clothes 
—Dress Clothes-Sport Clothes— See all the new models — 
Everything you wear from Hat to Shoes— You receive a gift 
for each customer you send or bring in. 

Tell your friends about our ONE BIG SALE — no down pay- 
ment — frea credit — as little as $3 a week pays for $100 
worth of clothes, shoes and accessories — Dress uD — Go 
places— Enioy life and you can in All Wool Bronson Clothes 
—Free Credit— No Interest. Park Free next door as you buy 
your new clothes— Car Coats— Ram Coats- Trench Coats— Top 
Coats— If it's new we have it — Names you know— Co-Mate 
• Shirts— Bronson Suits— Gruen Watches— Stetson Hats— Free- 
man Shoes— Wembley Ties— Wool Suits— Silk Suits— Sweaterj 
-Bow Ties — Pa;amas — Handkerchief — Cuff Links— Rao'>os— 
AAelton Jackets— Suede Jackets— Leather Jackets— Suede Coati 
—Suede Sport Coats. May VVe See You Soon? 

CONTINENTAL SUITS AND SPORT COATS 

WE CATER TO YOU AND WE DO MEAN YOU. We speak your 
Language. SEE the LATEST CONTINENTAL SUITS, SPORT COATS and 
LATEST IVY LEAGUE AHIRE, NEW VEST SHIRTS, • shirt and vest 
to match. 


BUY 2 Suits and get a $30 Diseount-THIS SALE ENDS February 29th. 
jSe hurry. Buy one suit and get $30 off the price of the 2nd suit cr 
'^ buy any suit and get $30 off the price of any top coat. Park Free 
next door as you purchase. 



Victor Clothing Co. 

214 south BROADWAY 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Clo'hri Shgr-s, Acfp^sorir- 
Rar^ic WoTcK'-, and Gifts for Mon nnd Pov^'" 


AT ViaOR CLOTHINO 
CO. WE CATiR TO YOU 


^ 


OMN DAILY »iIO AM. f t fM. SAT. tlL • 

PHONE: MA. 4-0801 

loo "SuntMnm" fen-a-rew— Oonora/ Mgr. 
Leo 'Sunshine' fen-A-Row, Oeneral Manager of V/eter Clothing Co., and All tntpleyees With iath 


A Unieii Craw t* tsrva Yea lattat 

HE CONTINENTAL 

's fhc HfnVS in 

SUITS for 1960 



Cusfomer the Happiett and Most Prosperous of New Years During 1960 

Clip and PrasenI With Purchasa 


Clip and Present With Purehata 


PrMentado por 

Pop $3.00 »«m»narios. paga uated por $100.00 de mercancia 
de la mejor calidad. Incluyen<ia calzado y ropa para Senores 
y joytnea. i 

Preaente e«t« tarjeta y raeibira un par de pantaionea gratia. I 
de valor de $10.00, eon li eompra de un trij* vailde $29 a $W. i 

Hopas; 9 :J0 a 6 I 
Sabadet ablerto hatta lai 81 


I i 


Pr»»anted by.. 


LEO S. FON-A-ROW, Managar 


VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 Sur Broadway, an al cantro 
da^ Lot Angelas, Calif., E. U. A. 


VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 South Broadway, Down Town Los Angoloa ' 

California, U. S. A. | 

$3.00 t waek pay* for SIM.OO worth of beautiful . 

' ' elMhe*. theea and aectsaoriea for Men and Boyt I 

I Praaant thia card and raeelva a $10.00 pair of treutar* FRCKi 

' with tha pirrehat* ef any suit priced $29 te $S9 I 

I I Store Houra: 9:S0 te <i 

J jMAdlasn 4-0801 Open ev»py Sat. nl0ht til SI 


3f 
3f 


'f^-f*-^-^4-¥--¥""¥--^^4*-¥'-¥'*4-f^* 


i 


** 


' i 


4 


FAST SERVICE 



v^OST • RENX • SELL. 


n 


VOUUHNDJI IN THE WANTAK! 


(! 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


California Eagls 
CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 

FICTITIOUS FIRM NAME 
The undersigned does hereby 
rprtify that 1 am fonducting a 
Legal business at, 3902 South Den- 
ker Avenue, Ciiy of Los Angelas 
62. County of Los Angeles, State 
of California, under ihe fictitious 
firm name of Bobs Tavern. 3902 
South Der^er Avenue, and that 
said firm is composed of the fol- 
lowing persons, whose names and 
addresses are as foUows. to-wit: 
Robert L. Johnson. ,19ij2 South 
Denker Avenue, Business; 133 
West 73rd Street, Home Resi- 
dence. 

Witn.ss my band this 22nd day 
of Januarv. ISgn. 

RDBLKT U .lOHNSOX 

L33 \V. 73rd St. 

LA. 3, Calif. 
State of California. 
County of Log Angeles. »*. 

On this 2r7th day of Januarv 
A D. I960. before me. Loren 
Miller, a .Votary Public In and 
for jsaid County and State, resid- 
Ins therein duly commissioned and 
sworn, personally appeared before 
nne. known to me to be the person 
whose name is subscribed to the 
within Instrument, and acknowl- 
edged to me that he executed the 
same. 

In witness whereof. I have here- 
unto set my hand and affixed my 
official seal the dav and vear in 
this certificate first above written. 
( brlAL) 

LOREIN MILLER 
Notary Public in and for 
Said County and Statt. 
My Cnmniission expires 1962. 
I Publish California Eagle 
Jan. 2?. Feb. 4. 11. 15. 1960) 


PUBLICATION SERVICES 


AGENTS WANTED: To sell the 
book everyone Is talking about, 
ABC PICTURE BOOK OF EMI- 
NENT NEGROES PAST AND 
PRKSENT. Fabulous commissions. 
WRITE A.B.C. PICTURE BOOK 
PUBLISHING CO. P.O. BOX 
1-8767. Clmmaron Station, L.A. 18, 
Calif. 

Telephone PL. 2-1061. 5-7 p.m. 

SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION 


■^ 

Instruction Offered 

An 8 ^aak prtparatory course 
for those taking CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMS for U. S. Post Office 
CLERK-CARRIER. Complete in- 
formation and applications call 

RE. 4-8912 


BEGINNERS— Violin or Piano 
one-half ('21 hour lessons 
$1.00 call AX 5-9159. 

ELECTRICAL SERVICES 


California Eagia 

12840 

NOTICE OF SALE OF 

REAL PROPERTY 

AT PUBLIC AUCTION 

(Sal« No. 81-A) 

Office of the Tax Collector of 

the County of Los Angeles, State 

of California. 

WHErREAS, the Board of Super- 
visors of the Countv of Los Ange- 
les pursuant to the pakvisions of 
Division 1. Part 6. Chapter 7 of 
the Revenue and Taxation Code of 
the State of ("alifornia. adopted 
a resolution approving the .^ale of 
property hereinafter described; 
and 

WHEKEA?. there Is filed in my 
office written authorization for 
said sale under the hand and seal 
of the .«5tate Controller, to sell 
said property; and 

WHEREAS, the minimum bid 
for each parcel is Ten ISIO.OO) 
L>oIlars; 

THEREFORE, public notice U 
hereby given that unless the said 
property is redeemed as provided 
by law. I. H. L. Byram. Tax Col- 
lector of the County of Los An- 
geles, will, conimencint: Februarv 
23. 19611. at the hour of ten o'clock 
A M., and continuing from dav to 
day In tht-, office of the Cojintv 
Tax Collector, 151u South Hill 
Street, in the City of Los An«re- 
les. offer for sale and sell at outi- 
lic auction to thg hichest bidder, 
the following described real pro- 
perly: 

Parcel .Vo. 360. J G. McDonald 
Tract. .VW lin ft. of Lot 26. 
Assessed to I-'red Saldana. Loca- 
tion — Vioinitv of WajhInEton 
Blvd. it Tarleton St.. Los Angeles 
City. 

Parcel No 4in Sub of Reyes 
Tract. Lot on SK line of Ceres Ave 
com S 29 dee 4.') min W 15m. 8" ft 
from most .\' cor of Lot 1: th S 
29 deg 4.1 mIn W 1.2<i ft; th SF, 
to a pt in SK line of sd lot SW 
152 fr from most F, cor thereof: 
th NE thereon 5t ft; th NW 
57 93 ft to beg. F'art of Lot 1. 
Assessed to Jack Bu.^cb Location 
->— Viclnitv of 8th St. and Ceres 
Ave . Los Angeles City. 

The foregoing described real 
property la located in the County 
of Los Angeles. State of Califor- 
nia. 

For Information as to the 
amounts necessary to redeem, 
provided the right to redeem ha.s 
not previously been terminated, 
apply to H L. Byram. Countv Tax 
Collector. 1840 South Hill Street. 
Los Angeles 15. California. 

If redemption of the prooertv Is 
rot made according to law before 
the first hid is re<elved. the right 
of redemption will cease. 

Prospective purchasers mav ob- 
tain detailed information on this 
sale from the County Tax Collec- 
tor. 

Dated this 28th day of January. 
196.J. 

H L BYRAM. Tax Collector 

(Published Jan. 28, Feb. 4. IL 
1960 > 


ELECTRICIAN 

RELIABLE, SAFE, 

REASONABLE, 

DESIRES WORK. 

CALL MA. 9-0947 


HELP WANTED 


MAR-FASH-SHO wants girls 
for courses in fashion, 
photo, T.V. modeling and 
personal grooming. Terms. 
3425 W. Adams Blvd. 
RE. 5-6447 — RE. 4-9420 


Hair Stylist Wanted 

Glamour Insured Beauty Sa- 
lon, 5011 West Adams Blvd., 
La Brea. Apply in person. 
RE 2-8129 


HOUSE FOR RENT 


RENT 


WkTH 


WESTSIDE APT. FOR RENT 


UNFURNISHED westside apt. 
2 large size bedrooms. 
2248'/i Ridgeley drive. Gk>od 
condition. Parking facilities. 
$68 a month. RE 4-9933 
nites. WE 4-7837 days. 


MAN, 27, British education, 
can type, accept trainee job 
. or ? AX 5-6374. 

FEMALE HELP WANTED 


SERVICES 


SELL Colaman't nationally 
advertised household prod- 
ucts and cosmetics. Salary 
guaranteed plus commission 
Call now. RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Coleman. 


ELECTRICIAN — Reliable, 
safe, reasonable. WANTS 
WORK. MA. 9-0947. 

DANCE INSTRUCTION 


NEWER & LARGER QUARTERS 

CAROLYN SNOWDEN SCHOOL 

OF DANCE 

2111 South La Brea Blvd. 

WE. 6-1440 WE. 3-2263 

Beginners Class in Ballet, 

Acrobatics, Modern Tap 

Tots Enrolling Now Teens 

MONEY 10 LOAN 


MONEY TO LOAN 

That Is Our Principal 

Business!!! WE LOAN 

MONEY ON MOST 

ANYTHING! ! I 

5 ? $ 5 5 
Because Some People Do Net Re- 
deem Their Pledges WE ALWAYS 
HAVE MANY CHOICE ITEMS FOR 
SALE AT A FMCTION OF THEIR 
VALUE - CLOTHING - JEWELRY ■ 
APPLIANCES • TOOLS • RIFLES • 
GUNS. 

$$$$$ 


Twenty good female workers. 
Apply Thursday or before 
noon Friday, or after 9 A.M. 
Monday. 2429 West Vernon 

Avenue. 

BARBER COLLEGE INSTRUCTION 

American 

Barber 

College 

Triple-A Rating 

— 1248 Hour Course — 

— Approved for Vets — 

349 South Hill Street 

MA. 9-3303 

ROOM FOR RENT 


WESTSIDE furnished room. 
Cooking privileges. Near 
transportation. RE. 2-9331. 

FAMILY INSURANCE PLAN 


$10°° 


the 


CALIFORNIA EAGLE 
15140 
NOTICE OF HEARING 
OF PETITION FOR 
PROBATE OF WILL 
In the .-Superior Court of 
^late of California, in and for the 
county of l^o« Angele.'i In the 
Matter of the Estate of PRK-S- 
Ti'N KVEJRKTT WKUJH. SK.. 
aka F>reston E. Welch, aka Pres- 
ton E. Welch. Sr.. l^eceajed. 

.Vntii:e l.s hereh.v siven that the 
pemion of Jtan Welch Cooper for 
the I'rohate of the Will of the 
ahovenampd dei-eased and tor the 
i'.^uanf-e of Letters of .Administra- 
tion with the will , aenexed there- 
on to the i>«titioner to which ref- 
prenre Is herebv made for further 
particulars, will he heard at 9:1.) 
rclo<-l< A..\f. on Feb. 26. 1960. at 
thp court room of Department 4, 
f>f fhfl. Puperjor Court of the State 
of California, in and for the Coun- 
tv nf lx>s Angele.^. City of L-os 
Angplea. 

HAROLD J. OHTLT. County 
Clerk and Clerk of the Su- 
perior ourt of th« State of 
California, In and for the 
("nuntv of Los An»«le» 
Hv H Pease Deputy 
Daltfl F>1.. 1. I960 
MILLER i. MADDOX 
2822 So. Western Ave. 
Lot Angeiss, Calif. 

I Publish In California 
V'-u i n. IS. isci I 


SUITS 
FROM 

CRfO/r, TOO/ / I 

BANKAMIRICARD and 

INTEKNATIONAL 

LUCKY'S LOAN CO. 

^ 4265 S. CENTRAL AVE. 

$ * $ * * 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 


Work at Leng Beach Douglas? 
Then join UAW Local 148. The 
Union that fights for the right of 
all workers regardless of race, 
color, sex or creed. Contact your 
Steward and sign up today. We 
need you, you need us! 

Ed Spcedv Wlanecki. 

4120 Long Beach Blvd.. L.B. 7 

GA. 7-8935 - ME. 4-1985 


SELL Coleman's nationally 
advertised household prod- 
ucts and cosmetics. Salary 
guaranteed plus commission 
Call now, RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Coleman. 

FINEST PAINTING 


• INSURES BOTH . . . 

HUSBAND AND WIFE 

• NO EXTRA COST.. 

FOR CHILDREN or 

CHILDREN BORN AFTER 

POLICY ACQUIRED. 

ALL QUESTIONS ANSWEREDII 

CALL EARL HADEN 
OR. 7-1486 

FLORIST 


loBuy 

ill AreQs 

2 BEDROOM 
FOR $82 50 MO 


3 BEDROOM 
FOR $87.50 MO 

2 ON A LOT 
FOR $97 50 MO 


DEAL DIRECT 
WITH OWNER 

MR. LONG 
HU 2-5861 


LAUREL CANYON HOME 
FOR SALE 


an Easter tradition 


NOW OPEN 

in tht 

SO. L.A. AREA 

To Serve You Better 

EDDIE'S 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Flowers For Every Occasion" 

1131 n So. Oentral 

INSTRUCTION-MUSIC SCHOOL 


Eagle 


NOTICE or INTENTION TO 

TO ENGAGE IN THE SALE OF 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

P«o*mber », 1956 

Trt Whom Tr May Conrern: 

.-:iiio'''t to issuance of the iiren.^e 
niipln-rl for, not ire l!< herehy civen 
thnr th** uoflerslKn^d propcscs to 

• ^ 1 dl'ohoiic hevertge.x at the 
prfmlxc described «Ji follows: 

39n2 S I>nk^r Ave. 

L-os Anteles 

T^ur^uant \n rt\ir\\ Intention, the 

in-J^r^urtiPfl is appiyinsr to the- De- 

jNarihiPni of Ali-ohollc BpveraKP 

Control for Issuance on orlRlnal 

ari'lw-ai loii nf gn aUoliolir bever- 

• i<' iircn«» for these prpmlses a« 

f ol o« " 

An\one <1»?lrlnt to protect thp 
ln'inn'P of thp slKli llrPnsp (S) 
mav 'il» a verifipil protppi with the 
Iippartmpnr of Al^ohollr Bpveraee 
f'otitrol lit Sarrampnto. Callforni*. 
st;lTinc rrotinds for rlpniai as pi^- 
> H»d h\- Un The prpinisp.^ are 
r-o' i^oCT- iirPTi.p'1 for the shIp df 
»!'-ohol|r- he\pran«a. The form Of 
^ prif iratiotn mav he obtained from 
an\ offii-p of the Penartment. 
XAMF; r^T APPI.TCANT 
ROBEHT I. .ir>HN.'=ON 


PATRONIZE 

EAGLE 
ADVERTISERS 


PAINTING 

5 ROOMS-EXCLUSIVE 
^lO^ COMPLETE 

BATH 511 Compittt 

KITCHEN 523 compuf. 

FREE KimAlli 



TILE - SHINGLE - FLAT 

REPAIRS . . $5 

FREE inmMK 

NO. 3-4525 

HAiFsTYUST^WANTED 


HAIR STYLIST 

WANTED 

GLAMOUR INSURED 

IIAUTY SALON 

5011 W. ADAMS BLVD. 


Mutt Apply .in Person 


RE. 2-8129 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Veica, Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

K. Ml 79 


FURNISHED HOUSES 
FOR RENT OF LEASE 


Unfurnished 
Beauty 

ON PRIVATE KNOLL 

in Laurel Canyon, designed 3 
bdrm. 2 baths plus family room 
elegant view, large level 
ground, school buses, interracial 
community. Excellent financing 
Owner. 

$39,500 - 
OL. 4-3266 ^ 

WESTSIDE APTS. FOR RENT 


WANTED — Part time ten- 
ants for nice apartment in 
double house. West of La 
Brea. Quiet Single person or 
couple only. Reasonable 
rent for right people. Call 
after 5:00 p.m., WE. 5-7340. 


NOW RENTING 

ROYAL 



De Luxe Furnished Apartment 

RENTS FOR $81' 

Easily Worth $100! 

• MODERN SINGLES 

• UTILITIES INCLUDED 

• CHOICE LOCATION 

• HEATED SWIMMING POOL 

PARK ADAA;\S APTS. 

3528 W. Ad^ms Blvd. 
at 6th Ave. 

REpublic 3-0642 


$7 FEE 

HOUSES & 

APTS. 
AD. 1-9308 

No Run Around 
We Call Our 

Vacancies 

Before You Pay! 

Westside - Eastside 

UNFURNISHED 

FURNISHED 

$8 Wk. to $90 Mo. 

4220 So. Vermont 

AD. 1-9308, Agent 


LEIMERT 

PARK'S 
FINEST 

ESPERANZA 
APARTMENTS 

4201 SEVENTH 
AVENUE 

in Beautiful, Convenient 

Leimert Park 

Near Everything 

FURNISHED AND 

UNFURNISHED 

DOUBLES GALORE 

Phone After 4:30 p.m. 
for Appointment 

AXminster 3-9066 


APTS. 

1518 Souih Wilton 

Between PiCo & Venice 

Place 
PRESTIGE ADDRESS 

Beautiful redecorated & nicely 
furnished SINGLE APTS. 

• Maid service 

• Home phone 

• Elevator service 

• Heated swimming pool 

• Entire building is carpeted 

• $70 and up. , Utilities Paid 

UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 

See Mrs. Bierman in the premises 

RE. 1-5287 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


WESTSIDE SHOWPLACESIII 

Bachelors $12.50 Up 
Singles, $16 and Up 
Doubles, $20 and Up 

• Convenient ■- Clean 

• Newly Decorated 

• Modern Furniture 

• Elevator Service 

• Utilities Paid 

• Best Trai^sportation 

1501 W. ADAMS BLVD. 
(At Catalina) 


APARTMENT FOR RENT 


PARTIALLY furnished, 3 room 
apt. $75.00. Ocean View. Sil- 
verlake District. NO 1-9546. 


NfW 
SOUTHWAY HOTEL 

A horn* away from heme— , 

trantiants \yalceme. 
Furnish*d Apts. and Roemt 

Si 1 CEO '"^ "P 

^ X A a^ V par weak 

5119 South Avalen Blvd. 
AD. 3-7033 


Thursday, February 4, 1960 


The California Eagle— 11 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


LARGE FRAME 8 bd. Nr. Ad- 
ams Blvd. R-3. U. ht. Suit, 
rm. hse., home for aged, etc. 
RE. 1-9491, RE. 4-2598. 


INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


$3500 DOWN— 3 bd.. 2U ba., 2 
sty. Colonial. Crenshaw and 
Olympic. Terms to suit. 
Owner. WE. 8-2159. 


CLEAN—QUIET 

ADULTS ONLY 

Steam Heat - Carpeted 

Furnished - Refrigeration 

Washer - Utilities Paid 

Bachelors - Singles • Doubles 

$48 Up, $60 Up, $85 Up 

Weekly Rates Available 

ALEXANDRIA 
APARTMENTS 

1953 South Estrella 

(1 BIk. W. of Harbor Freeway) 
Between Adams & Wash. Blvd. 

Phone: Rl. 8-3078 


PLANTATION HOTEL 

8.00 week and up, newly dec- 
orated rooms, hot and cold 
water in all rooms. Some 
with -^rivate showers. FREE 
PARKING. 1104 E. 40th PI. 
Corner Central Avenue. AD 
3-9328. 

BUSINESS PROPERTY FOR SALE 


6 APTS. & 2 STORES 

CORNER 2 STORY BRICK BLDG. 
& STUCCO DOUBLE, $15,000 DN. 
2700 W. VERNON AVE. 

AX. 4-7989 



LARGE 
FURNISHED - 
SINGLE 

BEST WEST ADAMS 
. LOCATION 

NEAR CRENSHAW 

RE. 1-7629 
RE. 3-6019 

UTIL. PAID - $70 MONTH 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


Quiet, 
Comfortable 

BRICK BUILDING 

FOR ADULTS 
ONLY! 

Furnished • Refrigeration 

Washer & Dryer • Util. Paid 

Bachelors— Singles— Doubles 

$40 Up, $57 Up, $80 Up 
The Paulson Apts. 

1979 S. ESTRELLA 

W. of Figueroa, N. of 23rd St. 

Manager Rl. 9*8909 

If No Answer, Rl. 7-3450 


WANTED — Part time ten- 
ants for nice apartment in 
double house. West of La 
Brea. Ideal for single per- 
son or couple ONLY. Rea- 
sonable rent for the right 
people. Call after 5:00 p.m. 
WEbster 5-7340 


FURNISHED SINGLES 
Nice for Couple— Child O.K. 
-Utilities Paid- 
Private Entrance and B«th 
Newly Decorated 
XInt. Trantp. and Shopping 

Washer — Dryer 

Near Normandie 
$12 50 Weekly and up 
1225 WEST 39th PLACE 


RE. 2-1423 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The P*opf«'s Chefee 

960 E. Jefferson 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT 


Open Until Sold 
1110 W. 49th 

Newly redecorated 6-rm., 2- 
bdrm. & den, Ital. tile F.P., 
tiled bath, H.W. & thermo- 
heat. Close to shopping cen- 
ter, bus line, schools and cen- 
trally located. Vacant. F.P. 
$13,500, $1,500 dn. Ask for 
Wofford. 

RE. 4-2538 


WESTERN STAR REALTY — 

1953 West Jefferson Blvd. 
RE. 4-2538. S2500 dwn. home 
& income. North of Wash- 
ington on Harvard. Five (5) 
room two (2) bdrm. down- 
stairs and six (6) room 
throe (3) bdrm. upstairs. 
This won't last. Call RE. 
4-2539. ASK FOR WOFFORD 
—WE NEED LISTINGS, WE 
TRADE. BUY & SELL. 


2 Bd. ea. immac. mod. stuc. 
dbl., nr. W. Washington. 
S3.500 dn. RE 2-7175. 

Adoms-Westem area. Immac. 
3 units spacious 5 rm. apt. 
for owner & 2 1-bdr. for in- 
come. No loan cost. $21,950 
full price. L.A. High area — 
spacious 3 bdr. stucco, full 
dining rm. & brkft. nook. 
$5000 down I Pico-Dunsmuir 
area. Attractive stucco dou- 
ble. Income S85 + owner. 
No loan cost. $20,950 full 
price. Toyo Realty Co. AX 
5-4351. 

$15,000 Full Price — Three 
houses on R3 lot. Nice clean, 
near stores & transp. Submit 
low down. AX 2-0107. 


SUBMIT $1500 DOWN 
and buy this nice stucco 10- 
room studio duplex, plus 4- 
room home in rear. Good S. W. 
location. Income $230 month- 
ly. AX. 2-0107. 

3 FRAME HOUSES 
$15,000. On 46x125 R-3 lot. 
Xlnt location. Owner wants 
quick sale. 

LOW DOWN PAYMENT 
Vacant. 2-bdrfTi. framp on 50x 
120 corner R-2 lot. Full price 
$12,950. Buy }ike rent. Open 
1-5. 5300 2nd Ave. AX. 2-0107. 

IMMAtULATE 
2-bdrm. stuccc]). $16,950. Com- 
pletely redec^irated, walking 
distance to ^ops. AX. 2-0107. 


$1150 Down — 4 flat stuc. 2 
bdrm. ea. 10616 S. Central. 
$22..500 F.P. RE 1-1107; RE 
3-3563. 


2 on Lot — $1000 dn. 1 & 2 bd. 
- Clean. 5912-14 Woodlawn. 
RE 2-8248. 


OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 — 1805 So. 

Carmona Ave. W^Llmiit^ 
bdrm., 1 ba. Only $2500 dn. 

$90 mo. See it. UPton 0-1647. 


$895 DN. 4 BDR., 2 ^A.-Onb'^ 
$85 per mo. Cov. patio, Ige. 
fenced yd. PL. 4-2827 'till 7. 


SACRIFICE BY OWNER. 4 rm., 

2 bdrm house on 40x130' to 
alley, R-3 lot at 144 W. 97th 
St. $4,250 net ca<^ii Full pr. 
MA. 6-9fi31 


Open Sat. & Sun. — 1S29 S. 
Orange Dr. 3 bd. $2500 dn. 
2926 Dalton. 9 rm. Make ©f- 
fer on 1755-59 Highland. 
Stuc. trplx. WE 1-8116; Ev. 
RE 1-1068. 

By Owner— $12,000 dn. 8 deluxe 
stucco units, 1 year old; six 
1-bdrm., two 2-bdrm. Adams- 
La Brea area. $750 mo. in- 
come. WE. 6-2011. 

Low Dn. Poyment—S rm. stuc. 

iiljie^-$i3,5O0;,walk. disUnce 


2756 W. ISth ST. By i.ppi. Attr. 
8 rm dble. Inc. or house for 
Ige. family. Terms. Pho.'-.r 
HO .5-2188 


WEST OF CRENSHAW. N. of 

Washington. $1500 dn. 9 rm. 
stucco dble. 2 bdr. — 1 bdr. 
$16,500 full price. RE. 1-2119 


to transp., shopping; west of 
La Brea between Washing- 
ton and Adams. Call to see. 
AX. 2-0107. 

Submit Low Dn. — 10-rm. stuc. 
studio duplex plus 4-room 
home; 2-bdrm. ea., IV2 bas., 
each in front units; excel. 
SW rental location, on maj. 
transp, line. walk, distance 
I0 shop. Asking $25,000; sub- 
mit, owner leaving, wants 
quick deal deal. AX. 2-0107. 

$15,000 FuU Price— 3 Houses 
on 3-3 lot; nice, clean, near 
stores and transp. Submit lo 
down. AX. 2-0107. 


$3500 DOWN — 3 bd., 2U ba. 
2 story Colonial. Crenshaw 
& Olympic. Terms to suit. 
Owner. Call WE. 8-2159. 


CALL US FOR 3, 4 <S 6 BDR. 

HOMES IN SOUTHWEST. 

AX. 2-9103 


$5000 DOWN — 5 bdr & den., 
2 sty. stucco. 3 full baths. 
Unit heat. WE. 6-6277. 


WESTERILJTAR REALTY — 

1953 West" Jefferson Blvd. 
RE. 4-2538. $2500 dwn. home 
& income. North of Wash- 
ington on Harvard. Five (5) 
room two (2) bdrm. down- 
stairs and six (6) room 
three (3) bdrm. upstairs. 
This won't last. Call RE. 
4-2539. ASK FOR WOFFORD 
—WE NEED LISTINGS, WE 
TRADE, BUY & SELL. 


Open Hse $1,000 dn. See 1110 

W. 49th,St. 6 rm., 2 and den. 
RE 4-2538. 


6-Rm., 2 bdr. & den, W baths. 
F.A. ht. Beaut, cor. AX 2-0136 


3 Bdr. stucco mod. $2500 dn. 
$15,000 com'd. W.S. RE 
2-8729; RE 2-4850. 


7 Room Spanish stucco. Lavish 
extras. Nr. Western ave. Try 
^000 dn. 1'^ ba. AX 3-6267. 


Modern. 

r II 

Comfortable 

Brick Building 

For Adults Only! 

WELL FURNISHED 
WASHER AND DRYER 

UTILITIES PAID 
SINGLES AND DOUBLES 

Frederick Apts. 

1647 W. Eltvtnth Street 
One Block West of Union Ave. 

$55-$60/$70 
DU. 9-761 3 


SIOOO Dn. — Open house. 1110 
W. 49th. 6 rm., 2 & den. RE 
4-2538. 


$395 DOWN — 3 bdr. Orange 
Co. Bon Investment Co. Call 
LA. 2-5075 


2 BDRM. & FAMILY RM. Ask'g 
$13,500. Good ,loc. on 7th 
Ave. AX. 5-413i, 


3 BDRM. STUCCO. Fireplace, 
Altadena. Redec. to suit buy- 
er. Lo dn. SY. 7-S439. 


6 RM. STUCCO DBLE. Hdwd. 
& tile. Dble. gar. Fenced yd. 
$13,500. OR. 8-0174. 


SIOOO DN. Clean 3 bdr. Garb, 
disp. Nr. Crenshaw-Venice. 
$78 iho. RE. 1-2336. 


2 & DEN. Immac. cond. Priced 
to sell. Toyo Rlty. AX. 5-4351 


NO DOWK — GI 5 rm., 2 bdr. 
stucco. Dbl. gar. Fenced yd. 
$69 month. Call PL. 7-2268. 


3 BD. PLUS RUMPUS RM. 1^ 

ba. Lge. kit. & patio. Sarto, 
RE. 1-2121 


ON QUEEN ANN PL — Lge 3 

bdr. stucco. $19,500. Submit 
down. Call AX. 5-4351. 

INCOME PROPERTY 


11-Toom hou«« — Suitable for 
rooming house or a home 
for the aged. Owner anxious 
to sell. 2 blks. from USC 
campus. R-4 zone. $1,500 dn. 
$17,500 full price. RE 1-7371 


2907 4th Ave.— Open Sun. 1-5. 
2 houses on lot, 2-bdrm. ea.; 
near 'J' carline. Offer $2,000 
down. Saito. RE. 1-2121. 

Open 'til Sold— 4537 W. 16 PI. 

8'rms.. 2-story frame; many 

possibilities. $1,500 down. 

RE. 3-9245 or AX. 2-5530. 
1 

4 UNIT to be completed in 30 
days. 2 2 BR. 2 1-BR. Sched- 
uled $310 mo inc. -r liv. 
qtrs. PL. 3-1271. 

W. OF CRENSHAW. N. of 

Washington. $1500 dn. 9 rm. 
stuc. dbl. 2 BR.— 1 BR. $16,- 
500 F.P. RE. 1-2119. 


STEAL — Beaut, new dlx. 7 
U. Corn. Wash. & Claudina. 
Nr. La Brea. $10,000 down. 
Bldr. OR. 7-5832. 


OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 — 2114-16 « 
Longwood. 2 nice stuc. hses. 
on lot. 3 & den 1 stj'. nr. 
Wash. Big kit. & lot. $13,- 
950. $2000 dn. 2 BR. & 1 Br. 
houses. Nr. Sears A''ermonL 
Dbl. gar. $14,500. $2000 dn. 
Rafu Realty Co. RE. 1-4155. 


TVV'O 5 rm. stucco on lot Dou- 
ble garage. Schools, buses, 
markets. Make offer. 507 
and 505 S. Williamson. L.A., 
23, Calif. East of Atlantic 
Blvd. Box 1000, 2101 W. Ver- 
non. 


6 UNITS — Partly furnished. 
$3000 Dn. Income $341 per 
mo. No loan chgs. Recently 
redecorated. Call PL 8-9971. 


$1000 DN. 3 bdr., 2 ba. $10,950. 

L. A. Hi area. 3 U. stucco. 

Many extras. 3 gar. Nr. new 

shopping center. $24,500. 
Dai Ichi Realty RE.1-3495 
STUCCO DBL. W. Side. $1250 

down. 2 bdr. stucco. Good 

area. $12,500. Terms. 
Dai Ichi Realt>' RE.1-3495 


2 Bk Span. stuc. Nr. schools, 
transp. & shops. Just $12,950. 
Low dn. Must act now! West 
side. 2 on lot, W. side, 2 & 
1 br., 8 yrs. old. Dbl. gar. 
Steal at $12,500. Dal Ichi 
Realty. RE 1-2495. 


5-Roem Corner Home, 50x120 
R-2 lot, vacant; very low dn. 
payment. Asking $12,950; 
submit. AX. 2-0107. 


1911 W 64th St. — Open Sun. 
Beautiful 2- bedroom stucco. 
$1,500 down. AX. 2-1412 or 
AX. 4-6262. 


Hvy. Spanish Stuc — 7 rooms, 
3 bdrms. & breakfast. Man- 
chester k Western Avenue. 
$4,000 down. WE. 8-SOOO. 


SSOOO DOWN— 5 bdr. & den. 2 
Sty. stucco. 3 full ba. U. ht. 
WE. 6-6277. 


WASH. & LA BREA — Immac. 
2-bdrm. stuc; full din. rm., 
brkfst. nook, service porch. 
Small down possible. Phone 
AX. 3-7949. 


21 Rooms, 5 baths, home plus 
3 apts. Fine for rest home or 
rooming house. Compl. furn. 
Owner anx. 6-rm. stuc. dbl., 
hdwd. b. tile, dble garage, 
fenced yard. $13,500. Phone 
OR. 8-0174. 


Low. Down Payment — 8 room 
stucco double, $13,500, walk- 
ing distance to transp. and 
shopping. West of La Brea, 
between Washington and 
Adams. Call AX 2-0107. 


Submit LAW Down — 10 room 
stucco studio duplex plus 4 
room home. 2' bdrm. each, 
l'/8 baths each in front 
units. Xlnt Southwest rental 
location on major transp. 
line, walking distance to 
shopping. Askmg $25,000. 
Submit. Owner leaving and 
wants quick deal. AX 2-0107 


3 Bdnn. — 2 baths, sep. dm. rm. 
Close to everything. Only 
$22,500. 2 & den, spirt level. 
W ba., U. heat. Attractive 
large rms. 2 story, 2 bedrm. 
& den, 2 baths. U. heat, im- 
mac. Good financing. Phone 
AX 2-9103 tor appt 


10 U. COURT. $600 mo. inc. 
$5000 dn. 5 U. 8225 S. Broad- 
way. Inc., $300 mo. $1000 
dn. 10 rm. dplx. 855 E. Im- 
perial Hy. $500 dn. PL. 3-2613. 


BY OWNER — 2 bdr., dining, 
den, cpts., drps. Bar-B-Q, Lo 
dn. W. L. A. WE. 9-2810. 


4 UNIT, to be completed in 30 
days. 2 2 bdr., 2 1 bdr. 
Scheduled $310 mo inc. plus 
living quarters. PL. 31271. 


4 UNIT. $29,500. Trade OK. 
See. 1139 So. Vermont. Call 
DU. 5-7011 


2 STUCCO UNITS. 2 bd. each. 
Vac. $3500 dn. 3434 Edge- 
hill Dr. RE. 2-9155 — Asia 


3 BDRM., Ic BAS. 44% G. L 

$74 mo. $13,250 F. P. Santa 
Ana. KI. 2-6580. 


2 HOUSES— R.3 LOT. Reduced 
to $22,500. Try $2500 down. 
OL. 6-0600 


16 APTS & 6 STORES. T. D. ^f 

trade accepted. RE. 2-8572. 


4 U. & 3 TRLR 8PCS. Sched- 
uled inc., $2400l $U,000, $900 
dn. CaU ST. 5-S223. 


f*-v>-i«L;. 




i3i--t,'?& 


12— The California ?ag1e 


Thursday, February 4, 1960 




BARBARA MOUNTS' 


'h 


What's Cooking 



, Most any family will enjoy 
thp^e lima beans for a hearty 
cold weather meal. This is a 
nire dish to prepare the day 
before and let the flavors 
blend. 

Lima Casuroltt 

1 cup California large 
dry limas 

I'i pounds pork sausage 
% cup chopped onion 

2 tablespoons flour 

1 4-ounre can mushrooms 

1 cup milk 

2 tablespoons lemon juice 
1 bay leaf 

1-4 teaspoon dry mustard 
^ teaspoon salt 
Dash nutmeg 
Dash pepper 
Brin? 1 quart water to boil 
and stir in rinsed limas. Sim- 
mer until beans are tender, 
about 1'^ hours. Add 1 tea- 
spoon sait last half hour. 
Drain, saving liquid. 

Turn limas into 1% quart 
casserole, or individual cas- 
seroles. Cut sausage into 6-8 
patties and brown well on 
both sides, at least 20 rnin- 
utes. Place patties on top of 
limas. 

Pour off all but % cup fat 
Cook onion in this fat until 
golden colored. Stir In flour 
and cook 1 minute. Measure 
liquid from limas and mush- 


Woman Tells 
Of Kidnaping 

(Continued from Page 1) 
she testified against his 
brother he would kill her. 

She was scheduled to tes- 
tify against Lonnie Murray, 
who is at present in jail on 
a morals charge. 

Miss Gonzales said they 
took her to a motel in San 
Francisco. 

Admit Rid* 

Tommle Royal told police, 
"O.K.. we took her to 'Frisco, 
but she came over to the 
house and asked us to take 
her." He denied that they had 
used force, and added, "I wish 
f had never come out to Cali- 
fornia and got mixed up in 
this mess." He came here 
from Georgia. 

His brother Willie told sub- 
stantially the same story and 
he also said all he wanted 
now was to go back to 
Georgia. 

Miss Avant likewise told of 
Miss Gonzales coming to their 
house and asking them to 
take her to San Francisco. 

Murray told a different 
story. He said he hadn't taken 
her anywhere and hadn't 
been to San Francisco. He ad- 
mitted he had "tried to talk 
her out of testifying against 
my brother," but denied he 
had threatened her. 


rooms to make 1 cup, adding 
water if needed. Add to fat 
and flour mixture, along with 
milk, lemon juice and sea- 
sonings. 

Cook, stirring, until slightly 
thickened. Add drained mush- 
rooms and pour over sausage 
and limas. Bake at 350° 30 
minutes. Makes 6 servings. 


Dr. Price Cobbs Being Buried 
At Lewis Metropolitan Church 


I'^Jgr^i^K^m 


(Continued from Page 1) 
self-respect and of doing a 
difficult job well. 

He was active in many com- 
munity betterment groups and 
took an interest in the work 
of the Elks, NAACP. Urban 
League, Los Amigos Club, the 
Charles R. Drew Medical Asso- 
ciation and his church, Lewis 
Metropolitan. He was a mem- 
ber of both the American and 
the National Medical Associa- 
tions and was listed in 
"Who's Who in Medicine." 

In addition to his wife, 
Rosa Cobbs, he is survived by 
two sons, a daughter and four 
grandchildren. One .son. Prince 
R. Cobbs, is a merchant sea- 


man. Another son, Dr. Price 
R. Cobbs, is a psychiatrist at 
Mendocino State Hospital. A 
daughter, Marcelyne Patter- 
son, teaches in one of the 
city's high schools. 

Interment is to be in Rose- 
dale Cemetery with Conner- 
Johnson Mortuary in charge 
of arrangements. 


WtNS HONOR 

HAMPTON, Va.— Mrs. Viola 
Palmer, assistant professor of 
biology at Hampton Institute, 
is the recipient of a Science 
Faculty Fellowship given by 
the National Science Founda 
tion to further her work to- 
ward a doctorate degree. 


People & Places 


(Continued from Page 10) 
superior know that she had a 
maid; 

BILLY REVIS — Dapper 
salesman is winning friends 
and influencing buyers as 
one of the top salesmen for 
the Rite-Buy Furniture Store! 
NELUE LUTCHER — Famed 
"Brown Frame Gal" is toying 
with the idea of hiring San- 
dra Gladstone, the noted In- 
glewood interior decorator, to 
design drapes for her swanky 
LaSalle street home! 
LILLIE R. EVANS — Shopping 
for a deal in good clean real 
estate? She operates strictly 
from the top and all business 
is dqne in her modern 68th 
and Vermont street office! 


SAM COOKE — When he ar- 
rived home from his recent 
tur and settled in his fashion- 
able Leimert Park apt. the 
first thing he did was to ser- 
enade his pretty wife Barbara 
with an unreleased song ti- 
tled "I Miss You So!" 
JEAN SAMPSON — Her debut 
Sat. night on Lawrence Welk's 
TV show won raves from the 
top Dodge executives, spon- 
-sors of the show, and old 
Welk himself. Five thousand 
post cards to the station and 
we might get more of her! 

WILUE BRYANT— He doesnt 
know it but a pretty brown- 
skin 6th Avenooer has those 
big. big eyes shining brightly 
after she heard his nightly 


*Chazz' Soundtrack 


(Continued from Page 10) 
things out! . . . Luscious 
MARSHA O'BRIEN still the 
sexiest employee at the Lake- 
side Country club! . . . 3or- 
tuve stuck on the reply an 
advice to the lovelorn column- 
ist gave a writer- in who com- 
plained his girl friend saw 
different guys everj'nite ex- 
cept the night she dated him. 
He wanted to know if he was 


program from Sam's Record 
Shop the other a.m.! 
LANGSTON HUGHES — His 
pictorial Negro History Book 
should be in every home and 
it should be purchased from 
:hc Hugh Gordon Bookstore 
at 4feth and Central! 


being taken for a ride? The 
columnist said he was not 
only being taken for a ride, 
but he might get hurt in the 
traffic! 

SADNESS IN THE NEWS 

The death of LENORA 
WINKLER JORDAN last week 
was the biggest jolt this scrib- 
bler has received in a long, 
long while. Lenora had been 
like a sister to this scribe as 
well as nice fellows like 
ARCHIE THURSTON. She 
came to California with the 
original "Green Pastures" 
show and her warmth and 
great sen.se of humor endeared 
us to all. With her passing, it 
leaves a great void in the 
lives of those who knew her 
well. 


X. Y. Scene 

(Continued from Page 10) 
tain's Assistant on the S.S. 
United States) was ashore for 
a few days: the St*T» Piilliam 
Trio is at Freddie's Cate in the 
bronx, while near there at 
Goodson's its Arthur Bowl* at 
the Hammond organ. Across 
the street the C Jason Trio is 
still giving forth with good 
week-end music sounds at the 
Blue Morrocco. 

Saturday night I attended 
the strictly formal Shriner's 
Potentates Ball at the 369th 
Armory, and ever>'one seemed 
to be there, if between four 
and five thousand people i» 
close to everyone. There were 
a galaxy of fez wearers, gor- 
geously gowned ladies and 
sharply full-dressed gentle- 
men, and the eolations were 
in grand abundance. 

Dick Vcmc* and the orches- 
tra provided the dance music 
and there was a warm feeling 
^f friendship and comradery 
throughout the evening, mak- 
ing up somewhat for the sore- 
ly lacking atmosphere of the 
bare Armory. A good time was 
had by all. 

Hope you are having fun 
there. I am here. See you next 
week. 

PHIL GORDON. 


Eii£3QL30iia;]|, 


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White Man Daanied^ Says Muslim Bosi^ 




KILLED 


^ 


>1 



CRASK 


v^- 


DEATH CRASH — J^«^ 
Belvin, blues singer, left, was 
killed and his wife, Jo Ann, 
top picture, was mortally in- 
jured'in an automobile crash 
Saturday, near Hope, Ark. 
She died Tuesday. 


Shooting 


a*ie(t 



Uortn Mllltr 




My Uncle George was a 
great hand for getting relig- 
ion. Ever\- time a traveling 
evangelist came to town, Uncle 
George was the first sinner 
» ^.^Mii^^ V 1 hit the 
sawdust trail 
and take a 
' front seat at 
J the mourner's 
"^ Si bench. You 
c a n s e e by 
what I have 
just said that 
Uncle George 
was a first 
rate backslid- 
er in between 
times. No sooner had the re- 
vival closed than he went 
back to his old ways and got 
r-^ady for his next year's con- 
version. 

i must admit that Uncle 
George was a first rate per- 
former at revival meetings. 
He whooped and hollered 
l-'uder than anybody else and 
described his sins of the past 
year in language that made 
some of the sisters blush. He 
was a great promiser, too. He 
would promise to love every- 
body for the rest of his life 
and as long as the revival 
was in progress there wasn't 
anything he wouldn't do. He 
took the lead • in the choir. 
.swept out the church and beat 
ti)e bushes for converts. 
Business Is Business 
Grandma always took a dim 
\iew of Uncle George's carry- 
inffs-o". She claimed he never 
got reli":ion at all and that he 
v?s ju'' putting on en act so 
he could get next to the best 
lookin:; sisters and drum up 
b u s i n r s •? for his barbecue 
stand which he kept open 
night 3nd day during re- 
vivalsv She said that a man 
v/ho got religion as loud as 
Uncle George did couldn't 
possibly backslide so many 
times. 
Whenever I aiked Uncle 
(Continued on Page 41 I 


Woman Held 

For 

Mate to Death 

Mrs. Edna May Parker, 41, 
of 833 E. 113.th.^treet, brough* 
Ii*^ ThiTea-Tnarrtage iw a 
tragic conclusion at daybreak 
Tuesday by shooting her 
estranged husband, Joseph 
Parker, of 11516% S. Central 
avenue, to death as he broke 
in the door of her apartment 

Mrs. Parker was immediate- 
ly arrested and held for 
murder. 

Summoned Police 

The police arrived moments 
after the fatal shot was fired. 
Mrs. Parker, herself, had sum- 
moned them while her hus- 
band was pounding on the 
door. 

Mrs. Parker told police that 
her husband had phoned her 
about 1 a.m. and told her to 
meet him at the gas station. 
She refused, she said, told him 
he had been drinking and 
hung up. 

She said she looked after 
the baby and then went into 
the kitchen, when she heard 
someone at the front door. 

It was "Joe," she said. He 
tried to open the door with his 
key, but she told him she had 
had the lock changed. She told 
arresting officers later that he 
|houted at her abusively and 
banged at the door. 

Door Flew Open 

She called police, told them 
she had obtained a restrain- 
ing order to prevent him from 
molesting her, and that he 
was trying to break the door 
down. 

When he continued to 
pound and shout, she again 
called the police. Finally the 
door flew open. 

"I fired one shot and he dis- 
appeared," Mrs. Parker said. 
'Then he appeared in the 
door again and I fired again. 
He fell to the fl6or." 

She told police that Parker 
(Continued on Page 2) 


Belvin, 
4 Others 
Succumb 

By CHAZZ CRAWFORD 

Jo Ann Belvin, Wife of 
singer Jesse Belvin, died 
Tuesday night from in- 
juries received in the ac- 
cident near Hope, Ark., 
Saturday that took the 
life of her famous hus- 
band, his road manager 
Charles Ford and two 
other people. 

Belvin, 27, Ford and the two 
occupants of the car with 
which his collided were killed 
instantly. 

The contemporary music 
world was stunned and deeply 
saddened over Belvin's tragic 
and untimely death as he was 
one of the most admired and 
beloved of all the members of 
his profession. His buoyant 
charm and sense of humor 
had endeared him to co- work- 
ers and fans alike. 

Most Loved 

Mrs. Belvin suffered a brain 
concussion and numerous 
broken bones, including a 
broken pelvis, three fractured 
ribs, a crushed wrist and a 
triple fracture In one leg. 

She was knocked uncon- 
scious and was still in a coma 
late Monday. Her father, Lee 
Johnson, left by plane as soon 
as he heard of the accident in 
order to be at her bedside. 

Belvin's attorney, Claude 
Worrell, also flew to Hope, 
Ark. He left here Sunday night 
to make a thorough investi- 
gation of the accident. 
Body Flown Hen 

A fourth occupant of the 
Belvin car. Kirk Davis, was 
reported in critical condition 
in the Memorial Hospital in 
Texarkana, Ark. 

The other two persons killed 
Mr. ^9.Ti^ Mrs. IfoW 5tf 
iiulce^, occupants of the 
other car Involved in the 
crash. 

Belvin's body was flown to 

Los Angeles Monday and was 

to lie in state at the Angelus 

Funeral Home untif the 

(Continued on Page 3) 



dROO A'tVV T7 




10 


2101 W. Varaea Avmm*, L A. 


Continuous PuUieatien for 79 Years 


AX. 5-3135 


Vol. LXXIX-No. 48 


Thursday, February 11, 1960 


^JH. 5-3135 


Out-ef-Towm. 


15c 



MO URN ED — Mrs. m^'Urjl 
P or twig, pro mine n t civic 
leader, died Sunday. 


Emily Portwi^, 
Civic Leader, 
Buried Wed. 


at 


Senate Opens 
Civil Riglits 
Debate Monday 

WASHINGTON — With par- 
ty leaders on both sides of 
the aisle jockeying for poli- 
tical advantage, the Senate 
prepared to open its election 
year debate on civil rights 
Monday with every possibil- 
ity that the voting sections of 
the 1957 Civil Rights Act will 
be strengthened but that lit- 
tle or nothing will be done 
in other fields. 

Heart of the proposal to pro- 
tect the franchise is an ad- 
ministration-backed provision 
for court-appointed referees 
to guarantee fairness in reg- 
istration and voting. Under 
the plan, a federal judge find- 
ing discrimination would 
name a voting referee to ex- 
amine Negro voters' qualifi- 
cations and certify them as 
eligible to vote. 

Referao PUm 

The referee would then 
check up to see that eligible 
Negroes were actually per- 
mitted to vote. Any violation 
would bring contempt of court 
charges against local officials 
with the threat of fine or im- 
prisonment after a court trial. 
(Continued on Page 4) 


"Stop praying to a d6ad 
Jesus and get up and lollow 
a live God whose messenger 

"Freedom, justice and equal- 
ity belong to the black man, 
but the white man will never 
give it to him until he sees 
the fire in his face." 

Women Frisked 

Women who oame to hear 
Muhammad were given a 
hearty welcome by white- 
(Continued on Page 3) 


A most holy requiem mass 
was recited by Father H. Ran- 
dolph Moore on Tuesday eve- 
ning for Mrs. Emily Brown 
Portwig, 65, wife of Rufu* 
Portwlg, real estate btoki^' . 
and. retired -ffajgr offiqe^ Tlk J? ^^^Z *<> ■*»«.' 

b^iov^ civimi soci^irieiST^?!}"^**-'-:: {'. • 

er died Sunday. 

Funeral services were held 
at St Philips Episcopal Church 
at 10 a.m. on Wednesday. 

The mass was recited at 
the Angeles Funeral Home. 
Resolutions were read by 
members of the Anchorettes, 
which Mrs. Portwig founded 
13 years ago, and by the L. 
A. Chapter of the Jack and 
Jills, which she also helped 
found as well as by the Med- 
ical, Dental and Pharmaceu- 
tical Association and the Med- 
ical Auxiliary of Los Angeles. 

Mrs. Portwig, who was a 
registered pharmacist and 
who lived at 1544 W. 35th st., 
died at Camp Pendleton Na- 
yal Hospital where she had 
gone for a physical, check-up 
and treatment for an intes 
tinal disorder. 

She is survived in addition 

to heik husband Rufus by a 

sister, Mrs. Josephine Brown; 

a nephew, Roscoe Conklin 

(Continued on Page 4) 


Muslims Piark 
Guns, Knives 
During Rally 

By BARBARA MOUNTS 

The white man, is 
headed for destruction. 
The devil Caucasian in 
America is doomed!" 

Messenger Elijah Mu- 
hammad was addressing 
some 3000 people who had 
gathered at the Olympic 
Auditorium Sunday after- 
Soon. 'sil^lwdj-jteen searched 
for^weapoIV5-i^w^,aI]FGhoL. Men 
filed' into tttile^ s«%i*J^I»omen 
into another. There, were 
r ^J^ut twice as many men as 
'wt)(fnen."» *->-,, 

"I have been conunissioned 
by (Jod to lead the black man 
toJlis^aijrjitMJiejtop of oiv- 
ilizatioHT' 'sald'Mutajimiad. 
Tenow Uve God' 

"We are a people in need of 
a great change. We have 
been robbed 6t our names, 
our lands, our history and our 
knowledge by the white man 
who teaches you to worship 
his dead C^od. 


Meany, Dixiecrdts 
Join to Rap Powell 

MIAMI BEACH.— George Meany, AFL-CIO presi- 
dent. Joined up with the Dixiecrats here Monday to 
protest the anticipated elevation of Congressman 
Adam Clayton Powell (Dem. N.Y.) to the chairman- 
ship of the House Labor Committee.' 
He would make a "terriblet* < 


featured 
In f h* iaglm 

Editorials .^^^ 4 

ChtiTch ActlTitlM 5 

Sport* - - 9 

The Te« 9 

BlU Small wood 7 

Dorothea Foster _. 8 

People — 9 

Chass Crawford 10 


chairman," Meany told a news 
conference following the open- 
ing meeting of the AFL-CIO 
executive council. 

"He ciuTied on a hate cam- 
^>aign and used his power to 
stir up racial hatred at the 
slightest provocation," Meany 
said. "It's terrible to think 
that we'll have a man like 
that as chiirman of the House 
Labor Committee." 

Powell has repeatedly pro- 
posed amendments to school 
appropriation bills that would 
bar funds from schools that 


are run on a segregated basis. 
In this he has had the full 
backing of the NAACP and 
other responsible Negro organ- 
izations. 

The expected promotion of 
Powell to the chairmanship 
has also been vigorously op- 
posed by Southerners. 

Powell is second-rankins 
liemocrat on the Labor Com- 
mittee. Rep. Barden (Dem., 
N.C.) has announced that he 
is retiring from Congress. Un- 
der the seniority rule.^Powell 
is nffict in line for the post 


Killing of Theft 
Suspect Held 
'Justifiable' 

The shooting to death of a 
robbery suspect, Jarnes Na- 
thaniel Harris, 21, ot'4226 S. 
Figueroa street, by police 
early last Saturday morning 
was ruled "justifiable homi- 
cide" this week. • 

A second suspect, Caesar 
Epherson, who said he IK^ed 
with a friend "on E. 23rd 
street," admitted to police 
after he was captured that he 
had been arrested before, in 
fact, quite a few times. 

Many Arrests 

He ticked off the various of- 
fenses of which he had been 
accused as rape, murder, rob- 
bery "and other things, too." 

Police, as they were cruis- 
ing by in a black-aftd-white 
radio car, spotted th^ pair 
shortly before 5 a.m. Saturday 
on the porch at 112 W. Vernon 
avenue. The two men seemed 
'to be looking into a box or 
suitcase. 

Officers R. R. Plante and W. 
D. Md«od backed up their 
car. 

Jumpad BaiUng, Boa . 

As they did so, the suspects 
jumped over the porch railing 
and ran. Harris jumped a six- 
foot metal fence, then dashed 
through a gate in the rear 
yard of 117 W. 45th street 

Officer Plante fired twice at 
the fleeing man. One of the 
shots hit its mark. Harris fell 
' (Continued on Page i) 


Santa Monica 
Cop Dismissed 
For Brutality 

A Santa Monica policeman, 
accused of beating up a Ne- 
gro during an arrest, has been 
fired from the force by Police 
Chief Otto Faulkner for "con- 
duct unbecoming an officer" 
and for "using more force 
than necessary to accomplish 
an arrest." 

George R. Pearson, 30, ex- 
deputy of the Los Angeles 
County Sheriff's Dept., has in- 
dicated he will fight the dis- 
missal. He asked for, and re- 
ceived, a specification of par- 
ticulars and has now request- 
ed a hearing before the Per- 
sonnel Board. Date of the 
hearing has not yet been set. 
The dismissal} was effected 
Feb. 2. j 

Partner TeUs of Beating 

Pearson's partner at the 
time of the arrest. Officer J. 
R. Hanseman, made a state- 
ment in wh4ch he reportedly 
corroborated the beating 
charge. 

Pearson was accused of 
beating 6-foot, 2-inch, 200- 
(Continued on Page ?) 


For Negroes Only 



TELLS WHITE MAN'S DOOM— Elijah Muhammad. Muslim leader, who is «Mf 

speaking terms with God, told an all-Negro audience at the Olympic, Sundaf, that ike 

"Devil white man is doomed to destruction." Two Muslim sisters, shown»seated, als9 

addressed the believers and the curiosity-seekers. No whites were admitted to the meeting, 

at which all who entered were searched for weapons. — (Adams). 
« 


Africans Shame 
Americans^ Says 
History Keynoter 

By MALCOLM WHITBY 

"America's greatest potential in the cold war 
and struggle to sell democracy to 980 million non- 
committed people is her minority of 17 million Ne- 
groes," declared Dr. John W. Davis, scholarly presi- 
dent emeritus of West Viriginia State College, in a 
keynote address on "Emerging •?> 


Muhammad's 
Views Similar 
To Dixiecrats' 

By CHACE C. SIMONS 



-.J j.***. .i..i-.c. 


..££":■.■ .v:- 




TO BE SWORN IN — 
Judge Bernard S. Jefferson, 
newly appointed by Gov. Ed- 
mund Brown, will' be sworn 
in at ceremonies on the 5th 
floor of the city court house 
at 12:30 p.m. today, T hurt- 
day. 


Africa" at the opening Negro 
History Week's annual 'ob- 
servance here Sunday. 

"But," emphasized tlie elo- 
quent globe traveling educa- 
tor, "we Negroes have some- 
thing to do to make this 
country acceptable every- 
where! America cannot buy 
respect and human dignity; 
w^ must practice what we 
preach! 

"America's Negro minority 
must knock upon the white 
man's head, open it and put 
some sense .into it. Too many 
in our State Department just 
haven't any sense," declared 
Dr. Davis. ' 

(Continuing, the Angel City 
Negro History Week keynoter 
said, "American Negroes have 
a strong tendency to lose 
identity with the face, a dan- 
gerous thing! But 'emerging 
Africa' is united like Jews and, 
is giving new dignity tb 
'blackness.' From Ghana, on 
one ocean, to Tanganyika on 
the east coast, Africa's .teem- 
ing millions shame American 
Negroes by sajring, 'Watch 
what we're doing, see where 
we go, watch how we do it,' 
as every native tribe sings a 
lion-titled song — 

"Down with Imperialism, . 

Dovvn with Colonialism, 

Down with Racial and 
Tribal Division. 

Freedom and Independence 
is our goal 

For all of our peoples 


and states 

Without Balkanization. 

'Tlie secret 'key' to 
great revolution taking place 
in Africa is the brilliant for- 
mal education of native lead: 
ers," Dr. Davis continued, add-- 
ing that "much of this train- 
ing was received right here 
(Continued on Page 2» 


S. p. Johnson's 
Last Rites Set 
For Saturday 

S. p. Johnson, Jr., 49, son of 
the late founder of the Ckwiner- 
Johnson Funeral home, died 
Sunday following a lingering 
illness. 

The former Jrfferson High 
School track s,^ar was an ac- 
tive participant in the Elks, 
the L.A. Consistory of the 
Masons, the NAACP and the 
Urban League. 

Memorial services will be 
held Saturday, Feb. 13, at 10:30 
a.m. at the C^ood Shepherd 
Baptist Church, 510 W. 53rd 
street, with Rev. Grant Harris, 
the Masons and the Elks tak- 
ing part in the service. 

In addition to his wife, 
Helen Johnson, Mr. Johnson is 
survived by a sister, Mrs. Nao- 
mi Sanisteban, and a nephew, 
Gerald Sanisteban, all <x Loe 
Angeles. 

Interment will be in Rose- 
da^e Cemetery. ~ 


•:*!A. 


.1 ...•v.f;;-i.„'';&'--iSi^i*:V; ^^Ss--£il'~:t,>l^ 



No halo of godliness shown 
about the head of Elijah Mu- 
hammad, self-styled prophet 
who talks to (k>d, as he told 
newsmen at the Clari< Hotel 
Saturday that "no intelligent 
person wants the races mon- 
^ grelized," and that he doesn't 
think that "white and black 
should ever mix blood." 

A slight, light-s!:inned man, 
Muhammad seemed more lifee 
a cagey politician than a man 
of God as he evaded questions 
and appeared anxious to 
.'^hroud himself and his move- 
ment in a cloak of mystery. - 
Wants Segregertlen 

He was quite positive, how- 
ever, when he said that God 
had spoken to him back in the 
depression days of 1931 to 
1934 when he was out of a 
job and had a wife and six 
children to support. 

On that point and in his 
insistence on his belief in seg- 
regation, he was specific. Jl 
don't believe you or any oth^ 
intelligent white man believes 
in intermarriage," he told a 
white reporter. "No intellfgent 
Negro wants intermarriage. 
No intelligent person wants 
the races mongrelized." 

No intermarriage. No inte- 
gration in schools or other 
facilities. Schools should be 
equal but separate, '^e 
should all stay in our own 
places — in ttie home, In the 
schools,in coUeges," said 
Muhammad. , 

Uln ZHxIwtato 

Remiitded that thte aoandcd 
mighty like the doctrine of 
the Sbuthern whites, he 
^Continued M fsf* J^^- 
- - ■ ■ -v *;, 

• • '^ J ■ ' '" 
■ 'Ji- ■ • 






A,* 


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2— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 11, 1960 



TO CONDUCT TOUR— Dr. James H. Kirk, chairman 
of the Department of Sociology, Loyola University, uill con- 
duct a tour of 30 people visiting Europe this summer. He is 
thou/n in front of the Basilica of St.Peter's in Rome during 
lut year's trip. Students can obtain sociology or education 
credit for the tour. 

Teacher Plans Conducted 
Tour of European Cities 

Dr. James H. Kirk, chairman of the Dept. of 
Sociology at Loyola University, is now readying an- 
other of his conducted summer tours to Europe, 
simtlar to the one undertaken in 1959. 

The tour this year will include visits in Moscow 

and leningrad, cities in Fin-'?^ 

^i.''^ the Netherlands andl^^ ^ ^^o will leave New 

Swltierland. aa well as Easti^ , , „. j . 

and West Berlin. Rome, vi- 1;^"^** ''""^ 24 and return from 

enna, Paris and London. 
30 on Tour 
Participants will be limited 


Willcins Asks 
For Signing 
Of Petition 

NEW YORK. Feb. 5.— Fifty- 
six non-southern members of 
the House of Representatives 
who in the past have signed 
discharge petitions but who 
had not as of Feb. 1 signed 
the petition to discharge the 
civil rights bill from the Rules 
Committee, have been urged 
to do so. 

In identical telegrams, dis- 
patched last week, Rpy Wil- 
kins, chairman of the Lead- 
ership Conference on Civil 
Rights and executive secre- 
tary of the NAACP, reminded 
the congressmen of their past 
actions and called upon them 
to sign the present petition. 

"An examination of your 
record," the telegram asserts, 
"indicates that on previous 
occasions you have signed 
one or more discharge peti- 
tions. Your signature on the 
present petition now will help 
guarantee early action under 
an open rule and will be evi- 
dence of your suport of civil 
rights." 

Although Committee hear- 
ings have been begun, civil 
rights advocates urge the 
"completion of the discharge 
petition at the earliest pos- 
sible moment ... in order 
to insure that these hearings 
will not result in further ^in- 
terminable delays or in the 
granting of a rule that will 
prevent consideration of 
amendments on voting rights 
and school desegregation." 

The telegram was sent to 
the following California House 
members: Hiestand, Holt, Hos- 
mer, Jackson, Lipscomb. 


Safety Offers 
Blue Stamps 

To make saving as attrac- 

?„« *L'^"'^'r»f- ^*^'*y^fri includes half the tuition fees 
Ings begms this week the 

Blue Chip Stamp program. 

Blue Chip stamps will be 

given for new accounts and 

additions to accounts, if cus- 


Europe Aug. 24. Cost of the 
trip is $1475. 

The tour, which is coeduca- 
tional, carries regular sociol- 
ogy and education credit 
which may be applied to un- 
dergraduate or graduate 
degrees. The cost of the tour 


tomers wish to have them 
rather than a Safety Savings 
gift 


for college credit, as well as 
airplane passage to Europe 
and* return, transportation in 
Europe, food and lodging. Each 
member of the group is al- 
lowed 44 pounds of baggage. 

The group spends from four 


Negro Labor to 
Form Committee 

NEW YORK, N. Y.— At the 
International Headquarters of 
the Brotherhood of Sleeping 
Car Porters in New York City, 
a local Negro American Labor 
Council was established last 
week. 

Temporary officers elected 
were A. Philip Randolph and 
Cleveland Robinson of Dis- 
trict 65, co-chairmen; Rich- 
ard Parrish of the Teachers' 
Union, treasurer, and an Ex- 
ecutive Board of fifteen Negro 
trade unionists. An Organiz- 
ing Committee was formed, 
the chairman of which is 
Thomas Fauntleroy of the In- 
ternational Longshoremen's 
Association. 



REV. KING COMING— Ret.. Jerry If. Ford, Rev. p. J. 
Ellis and Rev. E. A. Anderson, left to rifjhl, of the Baptist 
Ministers Union and the Interdenominational Ministers 
.llltance, uill present Rev. Martin Luther King here Feb. 
IS. He uill speak at Pasadena's Pilgrim Baptist Church, 
Zion Hill Baptist Church and Mt. Sinai Baptist Church. 

^—( Adams). 


Manager of Red Siceiton 
Sliow Sorry for Boo-Boo 

Cecil Barker, producer of the Red Skelton Show 
over CBS television, expressed "sincere concern" 
this week with regard to protests received by the 
Eagle concerning the Feb. 2 presentation of the 
show. '» 


Woman Dentist 
Opens Offices 

Dr.^Ruth Durley Carter, who 
in her career as a dentist has 
chalked up an impressive 
series of "firsts," has recently 
moved to Los Angeles fn»n St. 
Louis, and has opened offices 
in the Julian Ross Medical 
Center, 1828 S. WesternTive- 
nue. 

In 1950 Dr. Carter applied 
for membership in the St. 
Louis Dental Society, a com- 
ponent of the Missouri Slate 
Ass'n and the American Den- 
tal Assn. No Negroes had ever 
been admitted. Following a 
spirited debate carried out, in 
part, in newspai>ers, the so- 
ciety amended Its constitution 
to admit all qualified dentists. 
Thereupon Dr. Carter was ac- 
cepted as a member. 

She was also the first 
woman president of the Mound 
City Dental Society, and the 
first woman president of the 
Mid- Western States Dental 
Assn. In addition she was the 
first woman admitted to St. 
Louis University's Graduates 
School of Dentistry to study 
Orthodontics. 

Born in Tennessee, Dr. Car- 
ter received her dental train- 
ing at Meharry Medical Col- 
lege. 



OPENS OFFICE — Dr. 

Ruth Durley Carter, uho 
broke down race barriers of 
the St.-'Louis Dental Society, 
has recently opened dental of- 
fices in the Julian Ross 
Medical Ccnier. 1828 S. 
JVestrrn avenue. 


The scene protested involved rac*' is presented." She then 
the sending of a monkey into. said: 
Mau Mau land. \ Comedy Resented 

Apologizes i 'There has been no more 

"In recognizing our obliga-i horrifying and scandalous 
tion to the Negro race," wrote | and vicious example of this 
Barker to the Eagle, "we went! than appeared Tuesday night 
to great lengths to 'spell oufion the Red Skelton Show. Fa- 
the particular situation injbian, in mimicking certain 
question so that in. no way j Africans, gave viewers the 
could this be misconstrued asj impression they were mon- 
a Negro person . . '. j keys." 

"I quite honestly do not see' She said further that "we 
how this could "be miscon-jwho have African ancestry 
strued. . . . Quite obviously | resent this kind of comedy" 
in a few instances it was and; and said that CBS, in per- 
for this. I apologize." imitting this program to be 

One of those who protested^ televised, "has furthered ra- 
the show wa.^ Mabel V. Gray.'cial intolerance." 

past president of the South-! 

west Region of the National David A. Scott, Sr., of 14025 
Association of Colored; Alabama avenue, C o m p to n, 
Women's Clubs. She referred 1o' has been employed by the En- 
a "shocking disregard for fun- 1 terprise School District Board 
damental human decency with of Trustees as business^man- 
regard to the way in which ager. 


Woman Shoots 
Estranged Mate 

(Continued from Page 1) . 
had been threatening her and 
her mother for some time, 
that she was "deathly afraid 
of him, especially when he 
had been drinking," that on 
those occasions he became 
"very violent, "and that on one 
occasion he beat her up 
"pretty bad." 

"I had no intention of hurt- 
ing him nor did I want to 
kill him, but I was afraid," 
she said. 

I Officers reported that the 
! door frame had been broken. 

and the door appeared to have 

been forced open. 
Parker had been shot in the 

right chest. He was dead when 

police arrived. 


Santa Monica 
Cop Dismissed 

(Continued from Page 1) 
pound 0. D. Franks, 24, a 
plasterer of 333 Indiana ave- 
nue, who was arrested Jan. 
9 along with Joseph Wilfred 
Jarreau, 28, of 611 6th street, 
Venice, a custodian at Santa 
Monica's Rand Corp., and 
Johnny Lorenzo Williams, of 
1833 21st street, Santa Mon- 
ica, an expediter with a tool 
manufacturing firm. 

No Complcdati Piled 

The three were arrested on 
suspicion of burglary, but 
were released from jail when 
no complaints were filed 
against them. 

The case was brought to 
Chief Faulkner's attention by 
Jarreau and Williams, to- 
gether with their attorney. 

Pearson has been with the 
Santa Monica uniform patrol 
division for the past three 
years. Prior to coming to Los 
Angeles, he was on the police 
force in Akron. Ohio. 


Dr. J> Okms 
Is Keynoter 

(Continued ts^om Page 1) 
in some of the gr e at oniv ew U 
ties of Los Angeles!" 

Dr. DaVls said new extcif 
sive archeological investita- 
tions, now being conducted in 
Africa by European ecJentiata, 
have discovered ruins of cities 
representing highly advanced 
cultures unrecorded in today's 
histories and research 'records. 
Also, almost daily there are 
discoveries of inestimable 
quantities of highly atratefie 
mineral ore and chemicals 
that make Africa the world's 
richest nation in natural re- 
sources. 

Packed HeoM 

A packed throng at the Sec- 
ond Baptist Church, <rf which 
the Rev. J. Raymond Hender- 
son is pastor, heard the speak- 
er. On more than a dozen 
occasions, the audience inter- 
rupted the address with pro- 
longed applause. The audi- 
erice also gave Dr. Davis a 
standing ovation at the con- 
clusion 6! his informative and 
electrifying resume tA 
"Emerging Africa," which he 
personally observed during a 
visit concluded last week. 

The Los Angeles branch t^ 
the Association for the Study 
of Negro Life and History, 
founded by the late Dr. Carter 
G. Woodson, annually spon« 
sors a full seven days observ- 
ance of Negro History Week. 

Mrs. Vassie D. Wright is the 
president and founder of Our 
Authors Study Club, local 
sponsors of the week's ob- 
servance. Mrs. Hazel C. Cham< 
bers is chairman and Prin- 
cipal Llewellyn Mazique is 
co-chairmln. 


$1 Polio Shots 

The Southwest Health Coun. 
cil will sponsor a doIIar-a< 
shot poliomyelitis vaccination 
clinic Feb. 18 from 6 to 9 p.m., 
at the Southwest District 
Health Center, 3834 S. Western 
avenue, announced Mrs. Leslie 
L 1 m b e r g. chairman -oi the 
Health Council. 


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RALPHS $ELL$ FOR LE$$ RALPHS SELLS FOR LESS 


The Blue Chip Stamps are i to seven days in each of the 
sweeping the community with I major metropolitan 'areas on 
families cooperating to save I the itinerary. There are one or 
for a great variety of valuable, two days free in each place, 
gifts. Safety Savings seeks to j Information regarding pass- 
serve its c u s torn e r s'* and ports, visas, what to take, 
friends who participate in the i where to meet, etc., will be 
program. I sent to each person. 


LOTS OF TRAVELERS 

Passenger traffic at Los An- 
geles International Airport 
established a hew ^igh record 
for 1959 with 5,893,387 trav- 
elers using the airport. 


Fluorescent Tub* Service & Txchang« Co., Inc. 

— Distributor tor Lamps and Hxfur»t — 

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SAFETY 
SAVINGS 


FOR A BETTER FUTURE~Dr. Christopher L. Tay- 
lor, right, of 10209 S. Compinn nicv-nr, made tuo good 
investments for the future at Bro'i'liL ni; Irderal Savings H 
Loan Assn. First he gave nntionnl board member Dr. H. 
Claude Hudson a check to pay up his life mrmbership tn the 
NAACP. Secondly he opened Broaduay Federal savings 
accounts for his childrrn. 


AL "SMITTY" SMITH 

Saggestt That You BUY and TRY 



In Glass and Cons at Your 
Faverit* Shopping C«ntar 

H. W. PINGREE COMPANY 


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(Other gifts to be adiied) 

All en display at SaUty's oHices 


Sqfefy Servings. Gives You: 

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o federal agency 

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RE( ERSE R.H:/SM — E/ijah Muhmmnd. Irft. tnld his Olyipir nudicrirc Siindny that he 
»f>posff tntxtn/; nf thr rfii fs . " mnngrcliznttnn ' and nil hiring nf mtrriralinn. He is shown 
with Molcnlni X , \'cw Ynrk Under nf thr qrnup. and Miin>lrr Jnhn X (krioiln tn l.nqle 
readers ns fnrmrr cilumnnt Johnny Mnrris), 'if Islam Temple A". 27 at Xrirniandir air- 
rue and Jefferson hl\d.. ru/ht. — (Adams). 


All Whites Barred Helene Curtis 
At Muslim Meet 


(Continupd from Page li 
Tobfd sistprs. who "frisked" 
earh person with an experi 
enced hand, and expert ly 
s^-arched the depths of visi 
tors' handbags. An\T)ne who 
objerfed to the search was 
turned away. So also was 


Accused of 
Unfair Trade 


flag, whirh stripe" T\^•entJ■ 
million NeKiors should not j CHICAGO. — A $1 million 
be satisfied uiih anything 'a^vsuit against Helene Curti.s 
less than a cou^lr^• of their ''"'^^'■'"'"ips. Ine., Friday aecus- 
own. a state of their own. aj'"fi 'hf' firm of trying illegally 
land of their own. which theyil" "fopy" the now "HairStxate 
helped to build with blood ! Permanent " which a Negro 
and .sweat, skill and brawn. U'liPrni-'^' worked 18 years to 


anyone who happened to be Am I right? 


develop 

white. Not even pKslicemeni "You beg and beg for your | Summit Laboratories, of 
were permitted to enter, un | civil rights and appeal to theM'^'^'^napplis and Fort WayTie, 
le.ss they parked their guns, [white man's courts and the ' originator of the highly pub- 
A number of brown paper fbi and they do nothing for; ''t'ized "HairStrate Perman- 


bags. sealed and ticketed 
were .sitting on the shelf be 
hind the inspectors. We were 
told they contained knives, 
guns, nailfiles, alcohol and 
an odd assortment of other 
paraphernalia. The serried 
rows of bags were an impres- 
sive sight. The Muslims, it 
seems, put their faith in the 
Lord, but were taking no 
chances. 

The meeting was opened 
by Minister John X, of Islam 
Temple No. 27, located at 
Normandie avenue and Jeff- 
erson blvd. (Minister John, 
until a year or two ago. was 
known hereabouLs as Johnny 
Morris, and at one time wrote 
a column on iazz music for 
the California Eagle. > 

Teacher of Peoce' 

The audience was asked to 
stand, feet close together, 
head bowed, hands extended 


you. 

"Unite with 
being afraid!" 


me and stop 


Kept on Leoying 

A few more people got up 


lent" which it markets to 
beauticians throughout the 
nation and abroad, filed the 
suit for $1,218,000.00 in the 
U.S. District Court in Chicago. 
It charges Helene Curtis with 

■.^A i„f. -Th^,, \, t „ i^o, "unfair trade practices, copy-! 

and left. Thcv kept on leav- ■,.■,• ^ .'^•^1 

ing, one bv one. Lo by two, "^"^ infringements and un- 
quietlv, unobtrusively, as Mu-,^^"" 'competition, 
hammad continued to talk! ^°^^ vice-presidents, the 
for an hour, hvo hours. It was ^-hief chemist and general 


after six o'clock. 

"Spend the SI. =5.000.000.000 
you spend annually to build 
homes. busines.ses. factories, 
produce plants, farms and 
hospitals which will be for 
black people, hiring your own 
people and using yoqr skills 


manager of Summit Labor- 
atories, and the inventor and 
CO inventor of its products, 
are Negroes. 


Belvin, Wife 
Die in Crash 


to build cities and roads for 
your own people. . . i 

"■We have about 300,000 fol I 'Continued from Page 1) 
Mowers in America now and if burial services, set for 10 a.m. 
I there were a million of us uSatur.day. 

( could free the other 19 mil ■ Ironically enough, the well 
j lion and go to the government! loved songster w-as about 30 
palms up, as the Prayer 10,^^,.^^ j^jj ^^^^ ^^.^ ^^^^^ eightlor 40 miles from his birth- 

A 1 I 1 It It'll- e\r\ fr\n.^\rA I ^^ i . 

States and all the govern- ' place — Te.xarkana — when 

Malcolm X, Muslim leader! ment would say would be the accident occurred. He and 

from New York, introduced | -How long do we have to get ' his entourage were enroute to 

Dallas for an engagement 

Sprinkling of Hands 

By the time Muhammad 
asked who were willing to 


Muhammad as a "teacher of) out of them^ 
peace, the most talked about 
leader in America." 

Muhammad denied that he 
"preaches hate," opposition 
to the white man. to Christ 
ian churches and their minis- 


join the movement, close to 
half of the audience had al 

ters, or that he seeks to unite [ ready left. A sprinkling of 

Negroes iwhom he callsi hands were raised in response 

black mem to overthrow the:^o the plea. 

government of the United At th.e end of Muhammad's 

States. Then he continutKl; 
He Laughs at You 
'The white man has rob 

bed you of everything that 


after an appearance in Little 
Rock, Ark. 

Popularity Mounting 

Dick Pierce, president of the 


Western Division of RCA Vic- 
tor Recordings, has said he 
expected Jesse to be one of 
the top male vocalists on that 
i label before the end of this 
year. His latest long playing 


speech, he was presented with album. "Just Jesse Belvin, 
a plaque for his "outstanding was released only two weeks 
leadership of the black man, ago. 

in America" by the Herald' RCA di.sclosed that approxi- 
Is yours and your men are too Dispatch newspaper. The pres- | mafely S6.000 has been spent 

entalion was made by Mrs. on Bel\in's as yel unrcleased 
Elizabeth Alexander, edito--. : album with an 18 violin back- 
who said that "Muhammad is, ground. It is expected to be 
the first black man to deserve; his best. 


weak to protect your woitien. 
You bring him into \our 
homes and introduce him to 
your wives and your daugh- 
ters, saying, 'Ain't the\' pret 
ty?" And all the time he 
laughs at you and takes what 
is yours and uses it for him 
self under the guise that he 
knows what is good for you. 
Am I right'" 

There were stirrings in the 
audience. This was the first 
rime Muhammad had addres 
.sed a meeting in Los .\iigeles 
Some people 


such an honor.' 


Women Plan 
School Fight 


WASHINGTON — To fight 

segtogation in the nation's 

schools, a national "NOW for 

exchanged Equality" conference spon- 


glances with those nearest sored by sixteen major w-om- 
them; a few got up and left. 


Some of his biggesf hits 
have included "Guess Who," 
"Goodnight My Love." "Fun- 
n.\ " and his most recent suc- 
cess. "Something Happens," 
which was climbing on the 
charts at t!ie time of his death. 
Started to Climb 

Jc^.'-o had been interested 
and actively participating in 
music and singing as long as 
an>one can remember. His 
caieer started rolling when he 
■got a touring job as a mem- 


Muslim Leader 
Opposed to All 
Race Mixing 

(Continued from Page 1) 

dodged the issue by pointing 
to the difference in status be- 
tween the Negro (whom he 
calls the black man^ and the 
white. 

For the most part, Muham- 
mad avoided answering ques- 
tions. 

The inter\iew went in part 
as follows: 

Q. Is this the first time 
you've talked to white re- 
porters? (A news release from 
L. Masco Young Associates of 
Philadelphia, announcing the 
news conference, stated he 
would hold his "first inter- 
racial press conference" here.) 

A. You're here, aren't you? 

Q. Do you have any white 
members? 

A. We have anyone who be- 
lieves in our vie\ys. (Whites 
were excluded from the meet- 
ing at the Olympic Sunday.) 

Q. Do you advocate Negro 
supremacy? 

A. We don't advoc-ate Negro 
supremacy. We advocate 
righeousness. 

Q. Are you and the NAACF 
at odds'' 

Doesn't Know 

A. I don't know anylhing 
about being at odds. We're not 
absolutely enemies. 

Q, Do you and the NAACP 
have differences in general 
outlook? 

A. I don't know exactly 
what their outlook is. 

Q. Isn't there another black 
Islam group? 

A. I'm so busy with my own 
affairs that! don't know about 
that. 

Q. How many people are 
there in the group? 

A. I don't know how many 
there are. I do know that we 
liave followers from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific and from 
the gulf to the border. 

When asked about reports 
that he preaches a "hate 
white" philosophy, Muham- 
mad replied that "they have 
no right to say we actually 
hate white people generally 
when they ha\e nothing to 
back it up with." 

<^During his talk Sunda> 
at the Olympic Muhammad 
told how he was waiting 
during his press conference 
for an opportunity to tell off 
the white newspaper reporters. 

("On questions of integra- 
tion the white man sat there 
.saying nothihg but I had a 
hot tooth to put on him should 
he say anything. But I kept 
cool. I don't fight a man 
who's not scratching me.") 

Muhammad explained that 
his followers drop their 
"slave" names and use the 
symbol "X'^ for the time be- 
ing. "God will give them 
names," he said. ."He told me 
he would do this himself." 

Muhammad said he was 
born in Georgia and that his 
folks came to this country as 
slaves. He said he recently 
returned from a visit to Africa 
and the Near East, including 
a visit to Mecca. 



The California Eagle— 3 
Thursday, February 11, 1960 

Ra. School 
Law Rapped 

PET«i5ACOLA. Fla. — The 
Florida Pupil Assignment 
Law came under legal attack 
here Friday with the filing of 
a complaint in the federal 
district court by attorneys for 
tfie NAACP Legal Defense 
and Educational Fund, Inc. 

The complaint was filed on 
behalf of Negro children in 
Escambia County. Fla.. and 
against the Board of Public 
Instruction of the county and 
its school officials. It seeks a 
court order prohiibting the 
school authorities from oijer- 
ating and maintaining a 
dual system of public educa- 
tion. 

The focal point of the at- 
tack in the complaint is the 
Florida Pupil Assignment 
Law which permits school 
authorities to assign public 
school pupils on the basis of 
"sociological, p.sychological, 
ethical and cultural back- 
ground and social scientific 
factors ' 


^E^i^ TH ISr fur hill IIEI:K—-}l.,ziu<y during USCs Hill Hert took on a 
nnv tii.nl uhen studrnts from thr f'hi Gamma Drlln Jlot/sr toot it upon thrmsrhes to 
paint and otheriiisr tidy-up thr Avnlon (^immunity Center. — 'LSC photo). 


Six Named to County 
Human Relations Board 

Appointment of five outstanding civic leaders to new 
I one year terms on the Los Angeles County Commission on 
Human Relations, was announced this week. 

Appointees, named by Supervisor Kenneth Hahn. arc Dr. 
[■Vada J. Somerville, Joe G. Castillo, Frank F. Chuman. Louis 

Cole, and Henry W. Davis. Rev.ri- — 

Dan Towler, former Ram foot- [been active in the American 
ball star, was named byGl Forum. 
Supervisor Warren Dorn. I Chuman is a well-known 

Dr. Somerville is the [attorney and National Legal 
founder of tlie Los Angeles' Counsel for the Japanese 
branch of the National Coun- American Citizens League, 
cil of Negro Women. Castillo,! Cole is a member of the Los 
of 1837 W. 73rd street, is a 'Angeles County Republican 
well-known South Los An- 1 Central Committee and of Phi 
geles businessman and hasBeta Sigma fraternii>'. 


Jeff choir 

Thomas Jefferson High 
School's A Cappella Choir per- 
formed Wedne.sday night. Feb. 
10. for the press ^preview of 
the new Cinerama production, 
".Search for Paradise," at the 
Holl\-wood Warner's where 
Councilman Edward - Roybal 
preserried the City Council's 
resolution commending the 
choir for 30 years of service 
to the community. 


Br't Wi^hf.T to Our Mann 
hnrnfls and Customers 


Frisco Musicians 
Planning Merger 

The American Federation of 
Musicians announced Friday 
that three international offi- 
cers will arirve in San Fran- 
cisco on Siiturdaj-. February i 
13, for a scries of meetings 
leading to integration of Lo- 
cal 6 and Local 669 in that 
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ens organizations with a tola 
.Muhammad continued. He membership of 11.000,000 winder of the "Three Dots and a 
denounced the white mans! he held here February 17-19, ' D.ish ' group with Big Jim 
idea that Negroes should , it was announced this vv'eek? i^'c-Neeley's band. The group 


love everybody as false. God The conference will focus 
doesn't love everybody, he m.ajor attention on "the con- 
said, and God has stated He sequences of segregation and 
will not "forgive the white their effect on children of all 
man for what he has done and races." It is sponsored by 
will not rest until he is in; "NOW (National Organiza- 
smoke. ' jtions of Women i for Equal- 

Tb«re Was Applause ity," a newly-formed inter- 

There was applau.se as Mu-| racial coordinating council 
hammad said that the white! that aims at eliminating 
men in America have let the school segregation. 
black men build homes they' Speakers will include Mrs.' 
cant live in. factories they Eleanor Roosevelt, Justice 
cant work in, s<-hooIs they; Justine Wise Poller of the 
cannot attend and churches' .\ew York Domestic Relations 
in which they cannot wor c'Durt. Bishop James A. Pike. 
.,P' Jr. of California and Prof. 

tou say you are free and Kenneth Clark of Citv College, 
this IS your countrv 
which .star Ls yours " 


gained popularity with a rock 
I'n' roller called "All That 
Wine Is Gone." 
I He became a member' of 
".Mclvin and Jesse" and-gain- 
ed nationwide prominence 
With a song called "Dream 
Girl'' on Specialty label. 
' Jesse is survived by a sister, 
Gei.ildine Belvin; a brother, 
.Jack Belvin; his mother, Se- 
lena Belvin; and two sons, 
Jes.-e Jr. and Jonathan. 


Another Conference 

At his meeting at the Olym- 
pic Sunday, Muhammad criti- 
cized a "black reporter" at his 
press conference who, ''in the 
presence of white reporters 
asked questions and argued 
in defense of the white man 
and his way of life. A re- 
porter, mind you, saying that 
her paper would write noth- 
ing about us until we stop 
calling white men de\-ils." 

At the press conference we 
attended, one Negro woman 
reporter, Barbara Mounts of 
the California Eagle, did 
make a statement to the ef- 
fect that Muhammad's views 
on segregation didn't "make 
sense " to her, but she made 
no threat or commitments 
regarding the California Eagle. 

Perhaps Muhammad was 
referring to another press con 
ference. 


Jr.. of California 
Ken 
but noted Negro f^ocial psycholo- 


7//r>e fot f/>^M/0l4//A/r£/^ 
C//£C/C'l/P.L 


in the gist. 



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Flight Training 


4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 11, 1960 


Loren MillBr, Publisher 

The California EagI* stands for cempUt* intcgrcrtion of^ 
Negroes into every phase of American life through the democratic 
processes. 

We favor: 

1. FEPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Published Every Thursday for Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Van Ness AXmlnster 5-3135 


4J he ^^ynporiayti 4^\ewspap 


ey 


Lincoln and Slavery 


One hundred years ago Abra- 
ham Lincoln was scrambling 
around tr\inc; to get the Repub- 
lican presidential nomination. He 
had had a pretty rough time as a 
politician: he had lost a congres- 
sional post after one term and 
Stephen Douglas had defeated 
him for an Illinois seat in the 
United States Senate. 

Those defeats had made Lin- 
coln a pretty canny politician. He 
looked the other way while his 
friends and managers made all 
kinds of deals with shady Repub- 
lican politicians and he was 
pretty careful about what he said 
on the slavery issue. He said that 
he didnt want to interfere with 
slavery where it existed and that 
he wouldn't do so; he made 
other speeches that lined him up 
with those who preached the in- 
feriority of Negroes. After his 
election he would say that his 
sole purpose was to save the 
Union, with slavery if he could, 
without slavery if he had to. 

Historians can plow through 


those speeches and statements 
and make out any case they want 
to for Lincoln as either anti-slav- 
ery or indifferent about it. But 
Lincoln's real sentiment had 
been e.vpressed in his famous 
speech in which he said that this 
nation could not e.xist half, slave 
and half free and that perceptive 
statement was the tip-off as to 
where he really stood. He had 
too great a grasp of historical 
reality to believe that this coun- 
try was going to become a slave 
nation. 

When Lincoln said that the 
United States could not e.xist 
half slave and half free he was 
saying that the Union must be 
preserved and must become all 

free. He knew it. The South 
knew it. What remained was the 
means for achieving that goal. 
The measure of Lincoln's great- 
ness lies in the fact that lie did 
preserve the Union and that its 
Constitution was amended to 
forever forbid slavery. 


Mrs. Emily Ponwig 


The death of Mrs. Emily Port- 
wiK removes another of Los An- 
geles' fast \anishinK pioneers. 
She came here w hen Los Angeles 
had a mere handful of Negro 
residents and lived to see it grow 
to a boomins city with more 
than .')(}<». 000 Negro citizens. 

Mrs. Portwig was an active 
participant in the growth and de- 
velopment of her adopted city. 
She was one of Lbs Angeles' first 
pharmacists at a time when it 
had only a very small number of 
professional men and women and 
she took her civic and commu- 
nity activities seriously from the 
very beginning. That interest was 
sustained until the last and she 
served as a county grand juror 
only last year. 

It is difficult to sort out her 
contributions but one of the 
greatest of them was her interest 


in students and in the intellec- 
tual life of Los Angeles; Mrs. 
Portwig will be remembered by 
many as a woman who spent a 
great deal of time and energy in 
persuading youngsters to pursue 
an education and in encouraging 
them when the going got rough, 

Mrs. Portwig combined an in- 
terest in civic and community af- 
fairs with an intense personal 
interest in her friends. Somehow 
she managed to keep track of an 
amazing number of birthdays 
and anniversaries and those oc- 
casions invariably brought greet- 
ing cards and remembrances 
from her. 

Los Angeles is a better city for 
what Mrs. Portwig did during her 
residence here and it owes her a 
profound vote of thanks for her 
contributions, and her personal 
kindnesses. 


Housing Double Talk 


The Housing and Home Fi- 
nance Agency has taken another 
timid step in reference to dis- 
crimination in L'rban Renewal 
areas that does more to illumi- 
nate government sanction and 
support of such discrimination 
than it does to strike at the evil 
at which it is ostensibly aimed. 

Under a January directive, 
Housing Administrator Norman 
Mason provides that "Developers 
of urban renewal land projects 
are expected to conduct their op- 
erations in conformity with state 
and local law. A final determina- 
tion by a state or local tribunal 
that a developer has used such 
land in violation of the provi- 
sions of local law prohibiting 
discrimination may result in the 
refusal of the Urban Renewal 
Administration to concur in the 
disposition of any other project 
land to that developer." 
In plain words, Mr. Mason is 


saying that the federal Housing 
Agency won't determine for it- 
self whether or not the developer 
has practiced discrimination and 
won't require him to bind him- 
self not to discriminate. And he 
is also saying that where a state 
has no law forbidding discrimi- 
nation, developers may continue 
to discriminate to their hearts' 
content. 

That's a pretty shabby way for 
the Federal government to treat 
its citizens. In essence, Mr. 
Mason has confirmed govern- 
ment's long standing policy of 
refusing to use its own inherent 
power to halt discrimination, a 
power it could exert by the 
simple expedient of requiring 
FHA. VA and urban r en e w a 1 
builders to covenant with it that 
they will not discriminate in the 
sale of rental of any housing 
built under federal programs. 


Battleaxe & Bread 

By ImSimr B. Orongor 



The Newcomers 

Recently I have been dip- 
ping, whenever I hav* had a 
chance, into a book that 
should be a bestseller within 
tlie ranks of 
, Negro leader- 
ship. It is 
written by Dr. 
Oscar Hand- 
lin. a distin- 
guished histor- 
ian of Harvard 
Univpp&ity. The 
book's title is 
T H K N E W - 
COMERS, and 
Granger it was publish- 
»d a fe^v months ago by the 
Harvard University Pre.^. It 
costs four dollars at your fa- 
vorite bookstore — approxi- 
mately tlie price of a theater 
seat in Manhattan — and fo' 
most alert readers it should 
furnish not only food for deep 
thought but ai.so material for 
some fascinating arguments 
during what is left of the win- 
ter. 

Dr. Handlin's "newcomers" 
are compo.sed chiefly of Puer- 
to Rirans and colored Amer- 
icans from our soutliern states 
who come tn the New York 
area in search of "life, liberty 
and the pursuit of happiness." 
His attention is centered not 
only on what happens to these 
newcomers and their hopeful 
drcinTi but ,t1so on what hap- 
pens to the city of which 
they are beromin? an inter- 
esting part. His findings make 
pretty ominous reading even 
for the most optimistic. They 
can be used for a \'ariety of 
purposes. Tlie chronic waller 
will use therti as proof that 
"there ain't, no Justice' for a 
man witli a dark or darkish 
skin. The chronic Negro hater 
u'ill cite the Handlin figures 
in defense of his claim that 
Negro residence depresses ur- 
ban living standards. 

The thoughtful citizen who 
wants the best possible future 
for his city and all the peo- 
ple within it will'study Hand- 
lin's report for its warnings of 
dangerous trends in our pop- 
ulation growth, its detailed 
history of New York immigra- 
tion during the past two hun- 
dred jears and its sugges- 
tions as to corrective steps 
that can still be taken to- 
ward riddiiic Our Town of 
the frustration and disillu- 
sionment — the broken lives 
and growing crime rate — 
that ha\e accompanied 'he 
ri.^e in the nonvvhite popu- 
lation. 

Migrants Compared 

Especially interesting is 
the author's comparison of 
these new Newcomers with 
those of an earlier day. Here 
he is far more perceptive 
tha^ the majority of .social 
scientists who write of Negro 
residence in a modern metro- 
polis. He reminds his readers 
that the wa\es of Iri'ih, Poles, 
fJreeks. Italians and other 
Kuropean strains that arrived 
in the first quarter of this 
century similanly produced 


their problem.? of social dis- 
organization, dependency and 
crime. He points out, how- 
ever, that these problems 
were neither so deeply per- 
vasive nor .so prolonged as is 
true of colored newcomers. 
Here he is on sound ground, 
but the .statement needs in- 
terpretation. 

Beside the fact that color is 
a bigger handicap In the Uni- 
ted States than a foreign lan- 
guage or a differeii' cultural 
background, there is also th* 
fact of the timing of this re- 
cent wave of in migration. 
This is a period when family 
life as a whole has been dras- 
tically changed — when par- 
ental controls are weakened 
and effective substitutes ha\e 
not yet been applied. This is 
a time when there is an un- 
precedented amount of fool- 
ishness and filth a'^sidunusly 
peddled by television and the 
radio as well as by the mo\-- 
ies and newspapers that were 
our only communications me- 
dia forty five oi- fifty j'ears 
ago. This is a -period when 
narcotics addiction is on the 
rise among the population as 
a whole — when beatnikism 
and other exhibitions of de- 
cadence are glorified by a 
class of people who uould 
have laughed at them hfiy 
>pars ago. ■V\'hat uonder is 
there that unsophisticated 
newcomers fall prey to these 
influences and magnify their 
effect.'s^ Nor did southern- 
bred Negroes or island-bred 
Puerto Ricans iineni the 
\outh gang, the numbers 
racket, butcher shop g.vps or 
graft by police and housing 
inspectors. They are onl\' af- 
fe<Med by what they see and 
hear of successful corruption. 

Services Decline 

And this fact has not \-et 
been adequately covered by 
any of the so<ial .scientists 
writing on the subiect: .'^ince 
in-migrant Negroes replaced 
immigrant Irish, Italians and 
Poles as the folks lowest 
down in the economic scale, 
there has been a marked de- 
cline of public interest in 
such corrective and suppor- 
tive programs as settlement 
hou.ses, Americanization pro- 
grams and the like. 

The great big helping hand 
that the immigran' used to 
receive in many quarters of 
the city has suddetii>' become 
furiously busy with other 
matters. Nor is this simply 
a matter of racial prejudice: 
it is also a matter of lack of 
interest by Negro leadership 
pha.ses of life in Harlem and 
all the other little harlefns in 
tlie metropolis. 

But don't let me summarize 
the book for you. or discuss 
too many of tiie imints it 
raises. Buy it or boo'ow it, 
but read it for yourself. You 
will learn a great deal about 
New York that \<)u didn't 
know — and possibly \-ou will 
want to do some things about 
the future of New York, and 
voursclf. 


Loren Miller Says . . . 


(Continued from Page 1) 
George about what Grandma 
.said, he explained that he 
really didn't want to back- 
slide but that he had to asso- 
ciate with a lot of sinners all 
year long and that they en- 
ticed him into drinking and 
gambling in his backroom. 
He said that after a while he 
just naturally got himself all 
bogged down in sin and that 
there was nothing else to do 
but get religion all over again 
the first chance he got. 
Same Old Act 

The Republican and Demo- 
cratic parties sort of remind 
me of my Uncle George, if 
you can stretch a comparison 
that far. They get religion on 
civil rights every four years 
and they really make a lot 
of noise about it. During elec- 
tion times they can't do 
enough for the Negro voter. 
They'll promise anything and 
I doubt that any group of vot- 
ers is loved as much during 
campaign times as Negro vot- 
♦ ers in pivotal states. And in 
between times both parties 
backslide. 

Their explanation for back- 


sliding is about the same as 
Uncle George's. The north- 
ern Democrats explain that 
they have to associate with 
the southerners in their party 
and that .somehow or other 
these Dixiecrats get them all 
bogged down in political sin. 
The Republicans explain their 
backsliding by saying that 
they have to work with the 
Democrats in order to keep 
the country going and that 
they get enticed into all man- 
ner of evil through that asso- 
ciation. 

Grandma has gone to her 
Eterna.1 Reward and I don't 
know whether the politicos 
could make her believe that 
the Republican and Demo- 
cratic parlies ever get relig- 
ion on civil rights at all. She 
was quite a cynic and I have 
a hunch that her explanation 
would be that they ju.st put 
on a show every four \ears 
in order to get next to Negro 
voters and drum up business 
of their candidate.*. That ex- 
planation could be as sound 
as Grandma's estimate of 
Uncle George's doings. 


— Letters — 

To Barbara Mounts: 

We are highly appreciative 
of all of the good things that 
you have said about our 
church in your paper over the 
past weeks. 

We wish to work with the 
paper in every way we can. 
Accept our thanks a million 
times over. 

Rev. James E. Jones, 
Pastor, Westminster 
Presbyterian Church 


SCIENCE TRAINING 

KNOXVILLE— Knoxvnie Col. 
lege has received a $35,S90 
grant from the N a t i o n a 1 
Science Foundation in support 
of the College's second Sum- 
mer Science-Training Pro- 
gram. 

The eight week propam 
will begin June 5 and run 
through July 29. Joseph Martin 
Reyes, associate professor of 
chemistry at the College, is 
program director. 


omc££5 


lAWAY 



^X&.MT6.i -/!-?<». 


Rites Held for 
Emily Portwig 
Wed. Morning 

fContinued from Page 11 
Bro\\-n: and a niece, Mrs. 
Emily Josephine Jones. 

Active pallbearers were Drs. 

I^eroy Weekes, James Swan. 

. Herbert Shepn, Perry Heal and 

William Baley, and George 

Smith. 

Honorar>' pallbearers were 
Fred Griffin. Jerene Webb, 
Albert Trotter, Lonnie Coles 
and Drs. N. A. Fearonce, H. 
H. Towles, Dickerson Hawk- 
ins, Emmitt WjTidon, Howard 
Allen, J. O. Garland and Ro- 
bert I. Wood. 

Mrs. Portwig's name was 
symbolic of the high ideals, 
culture and progressiveness of 
the "new West." Few people 
have served more effectively 
and given as much time to so 
many diversified activities for 
human betterment. 

Emily Portwig came by her 
humanitarian traits naturalls-. 
Her mother, the late Harriet 
Gourdine Brown, was a direct 
d e sc e n d e n t of Tnusaint L' 
Ouverture and her father, the 
late William B. Brown III. was 
a major in the Georgia State 
militia. She was born in 
Georgia. 

K product of Los Angeles 
High School, Mrs. Portwig at- 
tended UCLA and Howard 
T'ni\orsity, and did graduate 
york in bacteriology at USC. 
She was a. member of the 
Board of Management of the 
Woodlawn Branch YWC.\. and 
ser\ed as chairman of Youth 
Community Activities of the 
West .36th Street PTA. She was 
Far Western zone dir£cor of 
the National Medical Auxil- 
iary and served for over in 
years as recording secretary 
for the Medical. Dental and 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

Mrs. Portwig carved a niche 
for herself in the hearts of 
many youthful Angelenos 
with whom she worked for 
over 25 years. She was advisor 
for the Girl Reserves "Y-Teens" 
at Los Angeles High School ^ 
for 12 years, and she spon- 
sored a group of suhdebs 
known as "the Achorcttes." 

Each year she took a group 
of girls to "Not a Care," her 
mountain cabin in Val Verde 
County Park for a week's va- 
cation fun. 

Mrs. Portwig had given 
more than .500 free hours to 
hospitals as a Red Cross 
nurse's aide. 

She was a member of the 
Intercultural Group of the Re- 
ligious Conference of UCLA, 
which sponsors Stephens 
House, a home for co eds. Rho 
Psi Phi Medical Sorority was 
another of her club affilia- 
tions. 

She was a charter member 
of the Lullabye Guild of the 
Children's Home Society, a 
member of the Auxiliary of 
ATDPA, served on the board of 
the Los Angeles County Con- 
ference on Community Rela- 
tions, served as financial 
secretary of the Expo.sition Co- 
ordinating Council, was on the 
board of the West 36th Street 
School PTA. was "Woman of 
the Year" in 1955 and was a 
member of the 1959 Los An- 
geles County Grand Juo'- 


Senaf e to Open Debate 
On Civil Rights Monday 


(Continued from Page 1) 
The plan would apply to state 
as well as federal elections. 

Other provisions with good 
chances of succe.ss include 
proposals for making it a fed- 
etral crime to resist school in- 
tegration by force and the 
setting up of a federal racial 
mediation ser\ice. The most 
controversial section of the 
19.57 bill — that of giving the 
attorney general power to file 
suits where denial of civil 
rights exists — is given little 
chance of success. 

Filibuster Seen 

Even the mild administra- 
tion-backed measure is sure 
to meet with bitter southern 
opposition. Prospects are that 


A Look 
At Books 


By JAN EDWARDS 

SELECTIVE SHOPPING 
GUIDE TO EtIROPE by 
Nancy and Temple Field- 
ing, William Sloone Associ- 
ates, Inc. New York, 1960. 
128 pages including a ler- 
en page index. SI. 95. 


After 13 years of research 
ro\ing through Europe, visit- 
ing 20.tO shops in 20 countries, 
the Fieldings (Nancy and 
Temple! have become well 
established as reliable friends 
to American tourisrs when it 
comes to steering them away 
from booby traps and guiding 
them safely toward the real 
bargain centers and ethical 
merchants. 

In this fourth, up-to-the- 
minute, 1960 edition (which 
can easily be stuck into >-our 
purse or pocket 1 a total of 
431 candidates for your pa- 
tronage have been selected. 
The name of a sales person 
in each shop who sjjeaks Eng- 
lish has been included and, 
best of all, a very comprehVn- 
sive chapter on customs, ship- 
ping, differences in sizes, ex- 
emptions and limits. 

W'c were disappointed tliat 
Istanbul. Turkey, was not in- 
cluded in the guide because 
we were eager to know where 
one buys those fascinating 
"puzzle rings" which friends 
have brought home. 

For the 20 countries that are 
covered there is a brief pre- 
amble which gives shopping 
hours and other pertinent in- 
formation. 

The book is written in a 
gay. breezy style but it has 
a very practical mission. 


Suspect Slain 

(Continued from Face 1) 
over on his back. He was 
dead. 

In his hand, police said, he 
carried a woman's purse. On 
the front porch at 112 W. 
Vernon, the officers found 
three more women's purses, a 
box of women's clothing and 
several boxes of women's 
shoes. 

Epherson claimed the goods 
belonged to Harris and that 
he knew nothing about them. 

He said that his mother 
lived at the 112 W. Vernon 
avenue address. 


a filibuster will be- mounted 
that may delay action for a 
couple of months. But even 
die hard Dixiecrats admit that 
they can do little more than 
delay and perhaps blunt some 
of the sharper sections of the 
bill. 

Southern pessimism is bas- 
ed on the fact that the Repub- 
licans are all-out to enact leg- 
islation that will give them 
campaign ammunition this 
fall and that Majority Lead- 
ers Lyndon B. Johnson of Tex- 
as will back the bills. John- 
son's newly-found liberalism 
stems from his presidential 
hopes and ambitions. Vice 
President Nixon will also be 
working boldly and in the 
open for civil rights legisla- 
tion in order to head off Dem- 
ocratic criticism. 

Northerners Active 

In addition, both northern 
Republicans and Democratic 
congressmen and senators 
must watch the votes in the 
pivotal northern and western 
states where Negro registra- 
tion is on the increase and 
is becoming more and more 
powerful. 

Senate Minority Leader 
Dirksen of Illinois has a pro- 
gram of his ow-n which h" 
will be pushing. His version 
contains the Jollowing pro- 
visions: » 

Make use oi force to ob- 
struct court decisions on 
school desegregation a fed- 
eral crime. 

Allow the FBI to cross state 
lines to apprehend an>xine 
suspyected of bombing schools, 
churches and similar build- 
ings. 

Authorize limited federal 
aid to communities in plan- 
ning orderly school desegre- 
gation. 

Aid schools for ehildren of 
servicemen in areas where 
.schools have been closed be- 
cau.se of segregation disputes. 

Make Group Permaaent 

Make the President's Com- 
mittee on. Equal Job Oppor- 
tunities a permanent body. 
The committee, now tempo- 
rar\-. is headed by Vice Presi- 
dent Nixon. 

Require better preser\'ation 
of local and state voting ree- 
cords in federal election. 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

The Important Newspaper" 

2101 W. Vernon Ava. 

Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

AXminst«r 5-3135 

<^^ 44 

UOREN MILLER 
Pubhthar 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXIX 


Feb. 11, I960 
No. 4S 


The Rev. Dan Towler, 
L. A. Ram fullback and now a 
minister in Pasadena, was ap- 
pointed to the County Com- 
mission on Human Relations 
by the L. A. Board of Super- 
visors. 


SINGERS AT FI8K 

NASHVILLE— Some of Hol- 
land's most distinguished 
singers will be heard Sunday, 
Feb. 14, at the Fisk Memorial 
Chapel when Fisk presents 
Felix de Nobel and the Neth- 
erlands Chamber Choir. 


GRACE SIMONS- Exaeutiv* Editor 

r. p. WALLER. Jr. Adv. Mflr. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

— _„Clroillatian Mgp. 

CAUME RUSS „ Oftiee Mar. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. C. Allen 1512 16th St. 

Santa Monlea. Cal. Ph. EX- S-15II 

•TA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICV 

1907 eoih Street (Upttaira) 

Phona EXt)r«ek 4-8012 


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Neat, Lot Angtlta t, Calif. Cntarwl 
at Second Ciata Matter November 
3, 1937, at the Pott Offlta ft Lm 
AnDalac, California, undar tna Aal 
of Maroh S. 187». 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY , 

BV INTERSTATB i 

UNITED NEWSPAP^Rt '' 

•46 Fifth AvaniM 
New York 17. New Yerk 


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Utter^McKinley Opens New Branch 


I^Ptut^cK 



Thursday, February 11, 1960 


BARBARA MOUNTS, CHURCH EDITOR 


The California Eagle— 5 



A TTLSD BUFFET DISS'ER — Ora Scott uas hostest to a sumptuous dinner for guests 
follouintf the opentng nf the nrw community mortuary, at her 1124 N. Hoover apart* 
ment. Shoun from left are: Miss Scott, Dr. H. M. IVard, Willye Johnson and Hev, 
Arthur Smith, Marivn JValls, Marie J ones and J . Johnson are shown at lop from left. 



AFTER PRAYER IS THE PEACEFUL COLOMAL CHAPEL— Rev. Marvin T. 
Robtnson had completed his dedication prayer of the new Colonial Chapel of the Broadway 
Utler-McKtnlev Mortuary u hrn cameraman Jack Dans snapped the picture of a few of 
those filling the 150 seat capaaty chapel. Am one; those shown are Ret. Lorenzo H'iley, 
Dr. S. Solomon. Dr. Mineria King, Lrrov Johnson, Fannie Benjamin, Edwina Clark, 
Creamy Brown, Pal Johnson and Viola H ilson. 



PREPARISG FOR OFERFLOH' CROffD— Hostesses 

rnjn in be)ore receiving more than 2000 visitors at the 4254 
S. Broadway branch of Utier-McKinh\ Mortuary, which 
held open house and a tnur nf the facilities last Sunday after- 
noon and evening. From left: Billye Bradley, Ora Scott 
and Mrs, Mane Jones. — fJart Davis). 


Tormenting Rectal Itch 
Stopped In Minutes 

Science Finds New HeaJiny Substance That 
Promptly Stop* Itchinf and Pain of Pilee 


^■ew York, N. Y. (Special) — 
Oije of the most common «llHc- 
tions i« * eondittoa known as 
•itching piles". It is most 
•mbtrrassinj for the rictim 
durinj the day and especially 
atrraTatini: at night. 

No matter what youVe used 
without resulte - here's food 
news. For the first time, science 
has found a new healing sub- 
•tane* with the astonishing 
ability to promptly stop the 
burning iten and pain. It aetu- 
.ally shrinks h^orrhoids — 
without surgery. Medical sci- 
ence has proTca this substancs 
produces a remarkably effec- 
liT« rata of healing. lU germ- 
killing properties also help pre- 
▼tnt iniection. 

In one hemorrhoid case aftar 
another "rery striking improve- 


ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by doctors' observations. 
This improvement was main- 
tained in easss where doctors' 
observations were continued 
over a period of months ! Among 
these sufferers ifere a wide 
variety of hemorrhoid condi- 
tions, some of 10 to 20 years' 
duration. 

The secret is this new healing 
substance (Bio-Dyne*) —dis- 
covery of a world-famous 
research institution. This sub- 
stance is now obtainable in oint- 
ment or ittppo»i tory /orm known 
ss Preparation H.* Ask for 
Preparation H suppositories 
(convenient to carry if away 
from home) or Preparation H 
ointment with special applica- 
tor. Absolut* satuf action guar- 
anteed or money refxinded. 

•H*». U.S. P»t. Oft 


GIFIED SPldirUAL READERS- 


• ADVISE ON AU MATHRSI I I 

• ALL QUUTiONS ANSWIRID 


1101 W.VERNON 


(Hock Wsst of 
Varment) 


AX 5-1644 


Parks Chapel in 
Oakland Raises 
$50,000 in 26 Mo. 

Parks Chapel AME Church, 
Oakland, California has rais- 
ed a total of over $5e;0(X) for 
trustee purposes exclusively 
in 26 months or almost $2,000 
per month. 

This amount does not in- 
clude any steward's purposes, 
such as annual conference 
budget, district conference or 
presiding elder obligations, 
pastor's salaries or other char- 
itable -disbursements usually 
made 6y the Board of Stew- 
ards, the announcement said. 

The $50,91 V99 was paid en- 
tirely on mortgages, contracts, 
notes and loans which totaled 
more than $95,000 in Novem- 
ber, 1957 on the arrival of Rev. 
and Mrs. T. L. Thomhill, as 
head of the church. 

The Committee on Publicity 
and Public Relations of the 
church, which sent the news 
of this achievement on the 
part of the faithful members 
an.d friends of Parks Chapel, 
stated this was an example 
of a group demonstrating how 
it could follow leadership and 
to support a real program. 

Members of the committee 
are: Edwin Baker, Edwin 
Scott, James Campbell, Miss 
Bennie Gillette, Mrs. Sarah 
Paul, Mrs. Jurdine Thomas, 
Mrs. Beatrice Hudson, Mrs. 
Leila Clark, Mrs. Vera Banks, 
Mrs. Ruth Larche and Mrs. 
Lovi^ Scott. 


funeral Home 
Open House 
Attracts M 

The long established firm 
of Utter-McIIialey opened for 
public inspection its newest 
neighborhood facility at an 
Oi)en House celebration last 
Sunday at the Utter-McKinley 
Broadway Mortuary, 4254 S. 
Broadway. 

Setting a precedent by em- 
ploying Rev. Arthur A. Smith 
as associate manager of the 
branch, it became the first 
firm to move back into the 
building where it began years 
ago and offer to the integrat- 
ed community a service of un- 
excelled quality at moderate 
cost. 

Interracial Staff 

This is a first in the com- 
munity in many ways. The 
appointment of Rev. Smith as 
associate manager of the 
branch with an" interracial 
staff to cater to an interracial 
community has not been done 
before. 

Rev. Marvin T. Robinson, 
pastor. Pilgrim Baptist Church 
of Pasadena, in the dedication 
prayer said that "Of one blood 
God made all the nations; we 
are all blood brothers and 
this institution Is here to 
serve all people." 

More than 2000 men and 
women from all parts of the 
city, including Pasadena, 
Santa Monica and San Diego, 
expressed pleasure at the ex- 
cellent service facilities avail- 
able at the newly refurbished 
mortuary. 

The Colonial Chapel with 
its ^Hammond organ attracted 
the spectators first. Keen in- 
terest was displayed by the 
crowds as they viewed the 
slumber rooms rf varying 
sizes and the large variety of 
Monoseal caskets in all colors 
of gleaming metals or lush 
fabric finishes bearing reason- 
able price tabs. For under a 
hundred dollars a complete 
funeral service may be ar- 
ranged with dignity. 

The owners of the mortuary 
had entered the hearts of the 
community with their gen- 
erosity in preenting to a de- 
serving family a cost free 
ser\'ice in a recent emergency. 

The open house was fol- 
lowed by a sumptuous buffet 
dinner served at the home of 
Miss Ora Scott, who watered 
the dinner beautifully in ad- 
dition to serving as a hostess 
at the Open House fes- 
tivities. 

A radio broadcast at 8:30 
p.m., Station KGFJ, featured 
the voices of baritone singer 
Charles Reynolds. Addie Wil- 
liams and Lotus Temple radio 
choir directed by Professor 
James Hayes, who serves as 
Utter . McKinley organist 
Others appearing were Mrs. 
j Maggie Jones, Arthur Green, 
I who serves as associate to 
iRev. Arthur Smith; Rev. Lor- 
jrenzp Wiley, Bobbie Mitchell 
and Earl Dittman. vice-presi- 
dent of Utter-McKlnley Mor- 
tuaries. 



HOSTESSES CHECK IN FOR DUTY — Charming 
Hostesses for the epen house nf the new U tter-McKinley 


Broadway Mortuary are from left: Billye Bradltf, Louist 
Lambert, H'illie Mae Willis and Willie Johnson. 

— (Jack Davis), 



ASSOCIATE MAS ACER CHECKS PROGRAM — 
^^f. Arthur A. Smith, left, associate manager of the new 
community project of the 4254 S- Broadway avenue Utter- 
McKi-nley Mortuary , checks the program for the dedication 
with the Rev. Marvin T. Robinson of Friendship Baptist 
Church in Pasadena, who participated in the ceremonies. 
, — (Jack Davis). 


Martin Luther King 
To b« Speaker 

The Temple Isaiah Forum 
Series will present Rev. Martin 
Luther King, Jr., as the. third 
speaker in its present series, 
on Tuesday evening, Feb. 23. 
beginning at 8:15 p.m. at 
10345 W. Pico blvd. 


Churchwomen 
To Seek Change 

The United Church Women 
are joining forces through 
"National Organizations of 
Women for Equality in Edu- 
cation" in setting up a con- 
ference to bring segregation 
in public schools to nationaj 
attention. It is scheduled for 
Feb. 17-19 in Washington. 
D.C. 

The conference is sponsored 
by national women's relig- 
ious, racial, civic, labor and 
service organizations whose 
members are "concerned 
about the breakdown of mor- 
al values, the increasing dis- 
regard for law and order and 
growing disrespect for educa- 
tion Itself" resulting from ra- 
cial discriminataon and segre- 
gation. 

Atty. Townsiend 

Atty. Vince .Mcnroe Town- 
send will speak on "Prospec- 
tion" on the Negro History 
Week program spwnsored by 
the Adult Citizens Council of 
Venice at 7 p.m. on Sunday, 
Feb. 14, at the New Bethel 
Baptist church, 3th and Brooks 
avenues, in Venice. 




Race Relations 
Sunday Slated 
At Hamilton 

Feb. 14 is Race Relations 
Sunday at Hamilton Metho- 
dist church, 6330 S. Fig- 
ueroa street. Rev. J. N. Dog- 
gett Jr.'s sermon topic is 
"Missing Something." The 
text is from 1 Samuel 30:6. 

The day will be climaxed 
with a special Brotherhood 
Vesper service at 7:30 p.m., 
sponsored by the Wesleyan 
Service Guild. The theme is 
"Methods for Improving Un- 
derstanding Between the 
Races." The program will con- 
sist of a panel made up of 
the Revs. W. Fay Butler, High- 
land Park church; Rafael A. 
Ortiz, Florence Avenue Meth- 
odist church: Earl W. Isbell, 
Alondra Pavk Methodist 
church, and others. The choirs 
from these churches will sing 
and the adult and youth 
groups and Wesleyan Service 
Guilds will participate in 
these services. Refreshments 
will be served. 



Members of the Ascot Ave- 
nue School sixth grade class 
of Miss Glodeen McClaine are 
scheduled to make a tour of! 
the A V a 1 o n and Vernon ' 
Branch of the Security- First 
National Bank on Wednesday, 
Feb. 17. 


Observance of the 12th An- 
nual Negro iHstory Week will 
close at the Saint Rest Bap- 
tist church, 709 W. Manches- 
ter ave. Sunday, Feb. 14, at 
3:30 p.m. 


ORG AS 1ST — Professor 
James Hayes has been re* 
tained as the regular organist 
for the Utter - McKinley 
Broadway Mortuary, 

Prayer Service 
Inaugurated 

An interracial group of min- 
istere and laymen headed by 
the Rev. C. F. Kyle, pastor of 
"By Way of the Cross Bap- 
tist Church," and Rev. Ross 
Owens, editor and publisher 
of the "Protestant Times," 
has started a prayer move- 
ment, made up of Interested 
ministers and church mem- 
bers representing all churches, 
regardless of race, creed or 
denominational affiliation. 

This group assembles for 
pra.ver at 7-8 a.m. at 3930 
Western avenue seven days a 
week. Results are said to be 
so marvellous that they have 
been urged to set aside Sat., 
Feb. 13. from 10 a.m., till 10 
p.m., for a city and county- 
wide prayer meeting to be 
held in the "Chapel of Inter- 
cession," at the S. Western 
a\enue address. 


HOSTESS GREETS ASSOCIATE — Sallye Kennett 
smiles in appreciation of information given her by Arthur 
Green, n.'sociafe member of the Utter-McKinley Broadway 
Mortuary staff, during the open house ceremonies last Sun- 
day aftrrnnnn. — (Jack Daiisj, 


-ARE YOU IN A RUT????. 


Do you want fe reverse yeur way of fife? Then Join Our 
23 Week Ceurse of POSITrVE THINKIN9. You Will Have 
Solf-Cenfidence, Peace ef Mind, Increase Yeur Incema, Over- 
come Fears, Inferiority Complex aecf Make Yeur Dreams Come 
True. Phono Nowllll 

Richmond 7-4734 


A. C. Bilbrew's Choir 
Slates Americana Ritual 

The Capella Choir of Hamilton Methodist 
Church, 6330 S.. Figueroa street, will present music 
and poetry representing Negro Americana on Sun- 
day, Feb. 21, at 6 p.m. 

Participating in the fete will be Carl Gibson, 

Naomi Pfarr, Rhoma Lewis* 
and Bob DeCoy, producer and 
narrator of radio station KGFJ, 
who will be heard in "This Is 
Progress," of which A. C. Bil- 
brew is director-producer. Rev. 
John N. Doggett Jr. is pastor 
of the church. 

A. C. Bilbrew is noted tor 
giving of her talents as an 
artisf, an author, reader and 
singer. She was recently 
guest artist at the Founder's 
Day luncheon of the Kappa 
Chapter of Gamma Phi Delta 
Sorority. The luncheon was 
served in the Town and Gown 
Club on the SC campus on 
Feb. 6. 

At a Realty Board func, 
tion recently, A. C. Bilbrew 
presented a dramatization en- 
titled "Roll Back the Curtain," 
which featured past presi- 
dents of the orgai;iization. 



± 


ARTIST — Planning pro- 
grams for community enter- 
tainment is one of the activ- 
ity of A. C. Bilbreu'. 


MOTHER WOOD SPIRITUAL READM8S 

NO CHARGE — DONATIONS OMLY 
5128 SO. MAIN ST. . AD. 1^772 


ANNOUNCING... 



the Appointment of Arthur A. Smith 
as Associate Alanager of 

UTTER-McKINlEY BROADWAY MORTUAIiY 

• 
Active in the civic, religious and community life of Los 
Angeles, Arthur A. Smith is a memk)er of many organiza- 
tions and has been in the funeral profession for many 
years. 


Utter m^Kinku 


BROADWAY MORTUARY 

4154 South Breedway AOams 1-9325 

One of Utter-McKinley's U Neighborhood Chepeli 

PINE FUNERALS - $95 to $4800 


i4 i«^. ...j^^-.^fe'r.'-. 


>. 






I^'^z- 


\ ■ 


?:-? 


♦—The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 11, 1960 



First AME Rally 
Brings In $15 100 

The initial effort of Rev. H. H. Brookins, minis- 
ter of Firet AME Church, Eighth and Towne avenues, 
to raise ftinds for the relocation of the church, paid 
off in large dividends when figures mounted to 
$15,100, as the original one dollar talents were re 
turned after- six weeks. ^ 


Hundreds of members re- 
ported. However there are 
many reports still to be pre- 
sented. Committee members 
predict that a total sum of 
$25,000 may be raised under 
the dynamic leadership of 
Rev. Brookins. 


Rev. Brookins has been th^ also to make First AME's 


pastor of First AME Church 
for three "and one-half months 
and according to Sarah Nel- 
son, reporter for the church, 
the membership has increased 
at a rapid pace, with morning 
attendance reaching capacity 
for the worship services. 
Faithful Memben 
Rev. Dr. C. Baker Pearle, of 
St. Louis, was giiest speaker 


for the rally service. His mes- 
sage on "Christ in Our Total 
Living," met with enthusias- 
tic applause. At the afternoon 
service E>r. C. A. Henson of 
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church 
was speaker. His choir, ushers 
and congregation attended 


service a memorable one, the 
reporter said. 

Faithful members braved 
the downpour of rain to at 
tend the church conference on 
Monday evening. Members 
pledged themselves as host 
church members to give the 
General Conference delegates 
in May the greatest entertain- 


Bishop Wright 
To Spook at 
Annivorsory 

VjAe 200th anniversary ser 
mon commemorating the birth 
of Richard Alleii, founder of 
the AME Church, will be del- 
ivered by the presicfing bishop 
of the 5th Episcopal District, 
Bishop R. R. Wright Jr. in old 
St George's Church in Phila- 
delphia, on Sunday Feb. 14. 
This is the same church which 
segregated Richard Allen at a 
communion service and caused 
him to pull out and found 
Mother Bethel AME Church at 
6th and Lombard street in the 
city of brotherly love. 


Bishop Wright, who li mt- 
c(«npaiiied by a delegation ot 
5th Episcopal district minis- 
t^s will then attend the 
Bishops Council meeting at 
Bethel AME Chu^h which will 
be presided over by Bishop 
George W. Baber. 


ment in the history of the 
church. 

Sarah Nelson reported last 
week that she had been a 
member of Eighth and Towne 
for 40 years. Her family 
migrated here from Acworth, 
Ga. It was under the leader- 
ship of Rev, A. Milton 
Ward that First AME Church 
(Continued on Page 12) 



BISHOP WRIGHT 


• •••••*•*•*•**•** ••**••**•**'<- 


TALEST RALLY PAYS BIG DIVIDESD—Mrmben 
of First AME Church, Eighth and Towng avenuf, are 
shoxiin checking in their money from the one dollar talent 
given them six lueeks ago. Appearing in the foreground are 
Dr. Bryce U. Taylor, W. Thomas Person and L. L. 


Stewart. Standing receiving talents behind the rail is Rev.- 
Dr. H. H. Brookins, uho is receiving talents from Judge 
Bernard 5. Jefferson and numerous other church steuards, 
stewardesses and memlftrs rallying around the altar. 



FOUNDER'S DAY BANQUET GUESTS — Members of the celebration party com- 
memorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Richard Allen, at the Founder's Day 
banquet at Ward AME Church, last Friday night, are pictured, front row from left: Dr. L. 
Sylvester Odom. pastor of Ward; Rev. T. L Scott, Rev. L. K. Quinn and Rev. Henry l(\ 
Murph. Back row, fr»m left. Rev. R. L. Phillips, associate pastor of Ward; Rev. D. /'. 
Kyle, Presiding Elder of L.A. District of the A.ME Church; Rev. C. M. Carter, Rev. L. 
V. Knighten and Rev. M. R. Dixon, (rf Oxnard, who was the speaker of the evening, 

(McLain.) 

Founder Skif 
Steds Show 
At Word 

A Founder's Day Skit put on 
*y members of Second AMB^ 
Church stole the show at the 
Ward AME Church Founder's 
Day banquet Friday evening. 

The guest speaker for the 
occasion was Rev. M. E. Dixon 
of Oxnard who said that the 
church must enlarge its vision 
to meet the challenge of each 
succeeding generation in order 
to keep abreast of the social 
and spiritual needs of the 
people. 

Rev. Larry Sylvester Odom, 
who was kept busily engaged 
in seating the capacity crowd, 
found that when he was ready 
to eat his dinner, all the de- 
licious food had been con- 
sumed. 



CITED FOR GIFT OF SHOES— Mike Gordon, left, 
is shown checking plaque which was presented him by Dr. 
James Madison and Dr. H. B. Charles. 

Baptist Ministers Union Gives 
Mil(e Gordon Merit Award 

Mount Sinai Baptist Church recently presented a 
plaque to an energetic young businessman for his 
presentation of 1000 pairs of shoes to the Baptist 
Ministers Union for distribution to needy families. 

Gordon operates the Mike's Shoe-0-Rama family^ 

style shoe stores which are*^ r-' 

located at strategic points injis a soft spoken, well man 


the city. He started his career 
In 1931 in a shoe repair store 
at La Cienega and Pico blvd., 
later opening the first Negro- 
owned and operated family 
type shoe store in Beverly 
Hills. For several years he re- 
paired all the shoes for Mag- 
nin's and Saks' and later 
opened his Shoe-O-Rama store 
at 2614-16 Crenshaw blvd. 

From this store he was ac- 
tive in community fashion 
shows often modeling the 
men's styles himself. He de- 
signs *ioes and bags to 
match for ladies and limits 
the number of each pair 
manufactured so that a 
woman does not see her fav- 
orite model on every foot she 
sights. 

His flair for contributing 
Shoes wherever needy persons 
are pointed out to him has 
grown to contributions of 
many hundred pairs each 
}^r. This is usually done 
without the "Look what I've 
^onp attitude displayed by so 
^any workers in the vine- 
yard," according to Rev. H. B. 
Charles, pastor of Mount 
Sinai. 

Mike, as he is affectionately 
called by -young and old alike. 


nered family man whose flair 
for chemistry has resulted in 
many patents for products 
which are now being sold in 
many stores. 

New Store 

Eecently he opened the 
budget store at 5324 S. Ver- 
mont avenue and now a new 
store has been adde«l to *he 
All American Market Square, 
at 13111 S. San Pedro street. 

He is a family man who 
credits his wife's cooperation 
as a factor in the success of 
his business. He is a hero to 
his son, Mike Jr., 16, and Vi- 
ola, who at 11 is tops in 
her classes at school and 
shows a talent for music. 

'The Mt. Sinai award is a 
source of satisfaction to me," 
Gordon said modestly. "I 
want to contact clubs and 
others who may have need of 
shoes this year." 

Do Unto Othsts 

In presenting the award to 
Gordon, Dr. James Madison 
and Dr. Charles said that 
the award was given in ap- 
preciation for the contribution 
Gordon makes each Christmas 
through the Ministers Union. 

"A business man who looks 
out for the welfare of others 
is an -asset to any commurity 


and one who practices the 
code of doing unto others as 
he would be done by as Gor- 
don tries to do are rare in- 
deed," Rev. Charles said. 

Shoe prices range from 
moderate to expensive with 
styles and sizes to fit the 
smallest to the largest foot. 
Gordon has designed a com- 
^ fortable shoe for all those who 
-4stand a great deal. His stores 
l^re manned by well trained 
^Jersonnel who fill orthopedic 
prescriptions accurately and 
rapidly. Othopedic foot sur-- 
geons such as Dr. P. R. Heard 
Roberson and Dr. Lois Evans 
recommend his services, Gor- 
don said. 


rSANTA- 

MONICA 

NEWS 


Calvary Baptist Church Mis- 
sionary Society will present a 
Negro History program on 
Sunday, Feb. 14, at 3 p.m. in 
the church center. In addi- 
tion to musical numbers on 
the program, there will be a 
panel discussion. The panel- 
ists are: Mrs. Allie Mae Allen, 
narrator; Mmes. Prise ilia 
Lacy, Pennye Powers,. Doris 
Scott, Dorothy Nelson, Una 
Singleton, Vivian Smith and 
Lucile White. Refreshments 
will be served. Mrs. Sadye B. 
Younge, pres. missionary so- 
ciety. Rev. W. P. Carter is 
pastor. 

• • • 

Mrs. Esther Coleman, presi- 
dent of - the Phylomathean 
club, announced it will cele- 
brate its anniversary with a 
valentine banquet Saturday, 
Feb. 13, at 1810 Broadway. 
Program Chairman, Mrs. 
Grace Woods, will present A. 
C. Bilbrew, noted writer, read- 
er and choir director, as the 
gOest speaker. 

• • • 

The next meeting of the 
membership committee of the 
NAACP will be held Monday, 
Feb. 15. at the home of E. G. 
Allen. 1512 16th street. A full 
report is expected. 

• • • 

Rev. N. B. Turley will preach 
at the morning service at 
Phillips Chapel CME church 

Sunday, Feb. 14. 

« • • 

Rev. N. C. Hashaway, min- 
ister of St. Vestal's CME 
church in Long Beach, is con- 
fined to the San Vicente Hos- 
pital due to illness. 

• * * r 

VENICE NEWS 

The revival at New Bethel 
Baptist church continues. The 
BTU of the church will spon- 
sor a weiner bake on Feb. 12 
at the center, 5th and Brooks 
avenue. Negro History Week 
celebration is scheduled at the 
church at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 14. 
Ttty. Vince Monroe Townsend 
will be guest speaker. 



BLESSINGS 

JOHN STARR 

1 ta 3 Dar Special ■■■sflnfi 
AvailabI* 

START 1960 RIGHTI 

You Ar« N*v*r H«lp«4 . • • 
UnUtt YOU Try 

for Informatitn Writs to: 
P.O. lax 1922, CUvaland 6, Ohl* 

SW. 1-9600 
JOHN STARR 

BLESSINGS 


— Westminster Presbyterian Church 

2230 W. JEFFERSON BOULEVARD 
Chruch School-9:30 a.m. Morning Worship-lliOO a.m. 
Westminster Sunday Evening Bible Hour— 7:00 P.M. 
MId-Week Fellowship— 7:30 p.m. 

Jam** Irfward ionai, Pa$tmr 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Church 

lAJT J«tli AND niNITY STRUTS - RIV. JOHN CtiklN, MINISTIR 

SUNDAY, riBRUARY 14 

HOIY COMMUNION 

Rev. XcrxM Walker Preaching, 9 AM-R«v. I. J. Jordan, 11 AM 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 


McCOY MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH 

"Whaf rriuHdMif It CotcMns No* • Cat<hw*rrf" 
•02 I. 4Mli StTMt, AO. 1-4271 ■•«. L A. AadwMa. Putw 

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»TW, tao p.ak IvaalBfl Wnktp. 7120' p.au 

rka frnhlh h CardWIy tovltarf To Afraatf 

Join Rev. f . A. Anderson In 'Memonts of Meditation* 

Every Sunday at 9 p.m. over KOFI Radio (1X90 Kcyc) 

McCOY MIMORIAL RAPTIST CHU|CH 


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of all kinds. Black Suits— Blue Suits— Grey Suits. 

FREE ALTERATIONS - FREE CREDIT - NO INTEREST - FREE PARKING NEXT DOOR 
as you PURCHASE YOUR NEW CLOTHES AND LUGGAGE. 

EVERYTHING you wear from HAT TO SHOES - Bronsor» Suits and 
Sport Coats— Gruen Watches— Stetson Hats— Co-Mate Shirts-Freeman 
Shoes— everything for the boy— ages 2 to 20 years. BUY NOW— PAY 
LATER— DRESS UP— B4JOY LIFE and yeu can in Bronson Clothos. 

WE CATER TO HIS MAJESTY, the WORKING MAN 

You havo until February 29, 1960 to tako advantag* of eur 
ONE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR - White Sport Coats - White 
Tuxedo Jackets— Tuxedo Suits-Plenty of the new Vest Shirts 
—Shirt and Vest to match— Jackets of all kinds. Suede and 
Leather — Caps — Polished cotton Trousers — Radios — Gold 
Watches— Silver and Gold Belts— Work Clothes— Play Clothes 
-Dress Clothes-Sport Clothes - See all the new models - 
Everything you wear from Hat to Shoes— You receive a gift 
for each customer you send or bring in. 

Tell your friends about our ONE BIO SAIB — no down pay- 
ment — freo credit- as little as $3 a week pays for $100 
worth of clothes, shoes and accessories— Dress up — Go 
places— Enjoy life and you can in All Wool Bronson Clothes 
—Free Credit— No Interest. Park Free next door as you buy 
your new clothes— Car Coats— Rain Coats— Trench Coats— Top 
Coats— If it's" new we have it — Names you know— Co-Mate 
Shirts-Bronson Suits— Gruen Watches— Stetson Hats-Free- 
man Shoes-Wembley Ties-Wool Suits— Silk Suits-Sweafert 
—Bow Ties — Pajamas — Handkerchief — Cuff Links— Radios— 
AAelJon Jackets— Suede Jackets— Leather Jackets— Suede Coats 
—Suede Sport Coats. May We See You Soon? 

CONTINENTAL SUITS AND SPORT COATS 

WE CATER TO YOU AND WE DO AAEAN YOU. Wo spoak your 
Language. SEE the LATEST CONTINENTAL SUITS, SPORT COATS and 
LATEST IVY LEAGUE AHIRE, NEW VEST SHIRTS, a shirt and voct 
to match. 

BUY 2 Suits and get a $30 Discount— THIS SALE ENDS February 29th. 
So hurry. Buy one suit and get $30 off the price of the 2nd suit or 
buy any suit and get $30 off the price of any top coat. Park Free 
next door as you purchase. , 





This Is Itl 
Once a Y»ar 


avings 


At Our One Big 
Sola of the Year 


Victor Clothing Co. 
214 south broadway 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES, C&LIFORNia 

Clothe-,. Sho'.s Acc.'S^.onr's 
Radro' Wouhr-. anJ G:ft'. 'or Mt n ond Boy.' ■ 


Of nv OAKY f x30 AJH. te C PM. SAT, TIL t 

PHONE: MA. 44)801 

lee "Stfnthine" Foii<r-rew— Oenerel HHgrm 


AT VICTOR ClOTHfNO 
CO. WE CATER TO YOU 


^ 


A UaiM Crmr te Serve Yee teMet 

HE CONTINENTAL 

is ffip H/iWS in 



l«e 'Sunshiiw' fon-A-kow, 6«n«ral Manager of Victor CfofMng Co., and All f mpley«M Wl$h Each 
Cuttommr tho HapplMt and Most Prosparows of Now Yoan During I960 


Clip and Present With PureliaM 


Oip and PretMrt WHh Purehaae 


IPraschtado Dor „..*...— -- - — — —•• 

Por M.0O lemanarloa, paga uated por S100.00 d« mercaneia 
Ida la major ealidad, Incleyende calzade y ropa para Sanorai 

lpre«ln"raata UrJeU y redbira un P«r d* panulonw oram.j 
Ida vilor da »10.00, con l« eompra do un traja valido 99 a las.i 
I HorM ! S:30 A 61 

t S«bados abitrto hasu la« £1 


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Presented by- 


LEO 8. FON-A-ROW, Mem 


VtCTOH CLOTHING CO. 

214 Sur Broa^ay, en el centre 
de loa Aii«^efc Calif., E. U. A. 


I 


VKTOK CLOTMNO CO. ] 

I 214 South ireadway, Dewn Town Los An gel e i * 

> Califemla, U. S. A. | 

I $3.00 a weak pay. for tXiaoo worth of beautiful ! 

clothee, ahoee and aeeeaaeriee for Men and Soya I 

iPreaent thia card and receive a $10.00 pair of trouaere PRKCt 
! with the purchase of any auit priced IB te $•• I 

I Store Henra: •:!•«• (i 

iMAdlson 4-0a01 Open every Satj night •Ul U 


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HUM Ay IT ARIA'S AJVARD — This ]^ear's top Shr'mers' miard utll go to Sammy Denis, 
Jr., for his many tuonderful contributions to k's lelloivmen. He ilill receive the auard at the 
Shriners' annual Star-of-Stars show Monday night. Shown are Kenny IVashington, Sammy 
Dmtts, Jr^, and IValler Goodloe. H'ashington and Goodloe head the talent committee. 


VIRGINIA KO — She was 
among the stars who high- 
lighted last year's show and 
is expected Monday night. 


'58 RECIPIENT — Danny Thomas, leftj shares enjoyment 
as he looks over "Shriner Award" given to comedian Bob 
Hope in 195S. The two famous stars are scheduled to appear 
this Monday night when Sammy Davis, Jr., ufill he saluted. 


DINAH WASHINGTON — She is among the famous 
stars slated to appear on the Star-of-Stars Shrine Show this 
Monday night at the Moulin Rouge, which is expected to 
attract a capacity crowd. 


Fashi 


ons 


In Orbit 
Show Set 

While the National Asso- 
ciation of Fashion and Ac- 
.cessory Designers was hold- 
ing its semi-annusft board 
meeting in New York City 
recently to complete plans 
for its 11th annual conven- 
tion in Detroit in June, the 
local chapter completed its 
own plans for the first' an- 
nual spfing fashion show to 
be held here March 27, in 
the beantifut Mayflower 
Ballroom in Inglewood. 

Johnetta Starkes is presi- 
dent of the NAFAD chapter 
here which has elected as 
its theme, "Fashion in Or- 
bit." featuring original cre- 
ations by members that will 
tell a fashionating story for 
the loveliest in lounge wear 
to the most exquisite in eve- 
ning wear. 

Invitations are being sent 
many of the Southland's 
most prominent newspaper 
women who will serve as 
panelists and who will also 
■ wear creations especially de- 
signed by one of the NAFAD 
members. 

Proceeds from this initial 
affair will go toward estab- 
lishing the chapter's first 
scholarship presentation. 

Among members of the 
club are Hilda Gaines. Inez 
Taylor, Sara Batchlor, Ro- 
berta Welch. Roberta Stev- 
ens, Janie Gordon, Anita Bo- 
gan, Florida Morgan and Ro- 
bert Stewart. 

Honor 
Visitors 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Beavers. Jr.. held a recep- 
tion in honor of Dr. and Mrs. 
George M. Johnson, of Wash, 
ington, D.C., during their 
stay in California for hear- 
ings sponsored by the US. 
Commission on Civil Rights, 
January 25-28. 

Mr. Beavers is chairman of 
the Board of the Golden 
State Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, and Dr. Johnson, 
appointed a Commissioner 
last Spring by President Ei- 
.•senhower. is a former dean 
of the Law School at How- 
ard University. 

Among the distinguished 
guests at the reception were: 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J. 
Johnson (Executive Vice 
President of the Golden State 
Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany!. Architect and Mrs. 
Paul R. Williams. Judge and 
Mrs. Bernard Jefferson, Atty. 
and Mrs. Ivan Johnson, Atty. 
and Mrs. B. B. Bratton. Dr. 
and Mrs. Lawrence Wilson, 
Atty Charles H. Matthews, 
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell B. 
Miles f prominent businefe- 
man), Mr. and Mrs. W. J. 
Fairchild (Real Estate Brok- 
er), and Mr. and Mrs. M. 
Earl Grant (prominent busi- 
nessman). 

Les Beau Dames 
Plan Affair Sunday 

Les Beau Dames will pre- 
sent their ninth annual 
"Welcome to the Club" cab- 
aret dance and floor show 
Sunday, Feb. 14, from 2 p.m. 
until 6 p.m. at the Moulin 
Rouge. 

With the th,eme being 
nveloome to the Club," the 
girls will put together cine 
of the season's swingingesrt 
shows. Jeep Smith and his 
band will provide the music, 
assisting members of the 
elub will be Harriet Terry, 
Singers Ronnie Smith, Rol 
Camerott end the Smith 
Siaten. 



LtS BE.IU D.JMES — Pretty Joyce Sonnier, props and scenery chairman for her club's 
cabaret dance and floor shojv affair this Sunday, applies make-up to Maxine Gauff during 
rehearsal. Looking on are Gloria Banes and Lucille Boswell. 





JUST REMINDING yOV— Suave Phil Rhoten (center), who will ad as master of 
ceremonies for Les Peau Dames' annual "Welcome to the Club" show this Stenday at 
the Moulin Rouge, is also reminding you not to forget it. Also pictured: LaRue Brawn, 

music chair matt It ft, and La Vauikn B. jVatkiflS, publicity chair mm. 


Moulin Rouge Sell-Out 
Certain for Shrine Show 


A sell-out of all reserva- 
tions for the local Shriners' 
annual Star of Stars Show 
at the Moulin Rouge appear- 
ed certain this week as the 
big star-studded night of 
Feb. 15 neared. So great 
was the demand for tickets 
in their final hours of prep- 
aration that the promenade, 
which normally extends out 
into the audience, haul to 
be removed to accommodate 
an additional 200 persons. 

The annual affair, now 
rated as the biggest show 
of shows among Negroes in 
Los Angeles, will mark the 
eighth successive charity 
benefit for Egyptian Temple 
No. 5 with Sammy Davis Jr. 
receiving the coveted 
"Humanitarian Award." 

Sammy, currently appear- 
ing in Las Vegas at the 
Sands while on location for 
the upcoming movie, 
"Ocean's 11," will be joined 
by a dozen or more of his 
fellow entertainers in what 
will amount to a "live" 
spectacular. Such million 
dollar talent as Frank Sin- 
atra, Dean Martin, Bob Hope, 
Danny Thomas, Dina1»- 
Washington, Peggy Castro, 


Annua 

Awards 

Affair 

Socialites and Hollywood 
celebrities were royally en- 
tertained Friday evening at 
the Beverly Hilton Grand 
Ballroom when the Royal 
Elites Social and Civic Club 
gave its first annual Van- 
guard Awards formal ball. 

Breaking away from their 
busy schedules to help make 
the affair a success were 
actor Roy Glenn Sr., Robert 
Gulp, singer Georgia Carr, 
actor Robert Ryan, drummef 
Chico Hamilton, Uttle Lester 
Smith Jr., actress Nancy 
Asch, Billy Watkins, Jack 
Krushen, the Vibrations, and 
"Bumps'' Blackwell and his 
Gospel Pearls. 

Emcee Tom Hawkins in- 
troduced the entertainers. 

An award was presented to 
director Billj*^ Wilder for "In- 
terracial Progress in Motion 
•Pictures." Accepting for 
W i 1 de r was actor Jack 
Krushen. The Royal Elite- 
UrlMin League "Starmaker" 
award went to "Bumps" 
Blackwell. A third award, 
for "Intra -Community Par- 
ticipation," was accepted by 
Howard Duff and Ida Lu- 
pine. "Career Boost Award" 
of 1960 was won by singer 
Georgia Carr. 

Because of illness Sanuny 
Davis Jr. was unable to at- 
tend and his "Vanguard 
Award" was accepted for 
him by actor Robert Ryan. 

Jeep Smith and his orches- 
tra provided the dance mus- 
ic for the capacity crowd. 

Dance Class 

Mrs. Oliver Poole, director 
at South Park, announced 
this week a new adult class 
in Latin-American Rhythftis 
featuMng the Cha-Cha-Cha, 
Mombo, Samiba and Rhum- 
ba. 

Classes are held every 
Thursday from 5 to 6 p.m. 
All local residents are urged 
to register and participate. 
Instruction is Jree. . 


the dancing Clark Brothers, 
and Betty and Eddie Cole 
will help pay tribute to 
Sammy on his night of high 
Shrine honor. 

Emceeing the affair will 
be disc jockey Joe Adams 
of radio station KRKD. 

Talent scouts Walter 
Goodloe and Kenny Wash- 


ingon, who have taken turns 
at traveling to Las Vegas 
and Palm Springs to receive 
in-person commitments from 
the array of guest stars, 
hinted that an air-lift 
arrangement may bring in 
Sammy and his friends from 
Las Vegas. If such is the 
plan, then Sammy, along 


with Sinatra, Dean Maitin 
and their friends, will arrive 
by private plane for the big 
affair. 

Last minute reservations 
are stiU being received, and 
can be made by phoning 
the Watkins Hotel, RE 2-8111 
or reseT\-ations chairman 
Lane Nicholson, AD 3-5316. 



• CLUBS 


Thursday, February 11, 1960 




FASHIONS 

The California Eagle— 7 



STARMAKER A If A RD—" Bumps" Blackwell. left, is shown as he received the Royal 
Elite-Urban League Starmaker award last Friday night. Looking on are Tom Hawkins, 
master of ceremonies, and Leonard E. Holliday, vice-president of the Royal Elites. 

(IVilliams) 


• rsow^ag^o^Ttgy." 


Bill Smallwood 


Auto accident aftermath 
put Maggi Neal in Univ. 
Hospital; her mother and 
sister rushed to her bedside. 
New Jersey's Dr. Colden 
Raines left Sun. sifter a local 
week; he visited Atty. Mor- 
gan Moten and his mother. 

Alpha Psi Zeta chapter of 
Zeta Phi Beta met Sat. at 
Ruth Browns; plans were 
completed for their Finer 
Womanhood Week. This 
year they will honor four 
Women of the Year rather 
than an individual electee. 
The Jessie McKinneys (Mil- 
dred) back from SF where 
they attended last rites for 
Julian Hicks' brother. 


Scanning the Skies 

Marian Gordon convalesc- 
' Ing at home after major sur- 
gery. L. B. Thompson's in- 
firm mother on the very cri- 
tical list The Edgar John- 
sons moving into their Parte 
View home. Emm^tt Ashford 
in town a week from months 
of the Dominican Bepublic; 


he resumes cosist umpiring 
within a month. Allied Arts 
meet Sun. at Venye Corpor- 
al's. They will vote on two 
new members. Valentine 
Day birthday for Clara 
Scruggs. 

Ole smoothie Freddy Gor- 
don moved back to town aft- 
er years of Chi. That was 
pretty Claudette Clay who 
expertly demonstrated a 
Hawaiian folk dance for 
guests and chums <rf her 
mother-in-law, Mary Clay, 
when the Pitt-Los Club met 
last Frid. night. The Irv Fos- 
ters' house guest, Mary 
Countee, expected in last 
weekend, delayed her flight 
west because of illness; they 
will scan the skies for her 
again this weekend. Detroit- 
er Dit Stevens swoops down, 
jet-roaringly. Sat. morning 
for a month, visiting her 
mother, Mrs. Lillian Nelson. 
Xfe Celenel Cuxrrl 

Sat. (13> is Stella Lane's 
birthday. The W. C Cunys 


' '^--■"~-»-'-«a^',i 




\ 


(Jessie Mae) understandab- 
ly full of proud smiles these 
days. Their handsome son, 
Steve, was made a colonel 
in the ROTC at LA High, be- 
ing the first Negro to achieve 
this honor. Wives of Bench 
and Bar step from their as- 
sorted shining cars, toss 
back their stoles and make 
chic entrances into the Am- 
bassador this Sat for lupdi. 
Sharing such fashionable 
drama will be the Charles 
Drew Medical Auxiliary, the 
Alva Garrott Dental Wives 
and the MDPA. 

The Women's Sunday 
Morning Breakfast Club has 
no trouble, year to year, get- 
ting husbands and sweet- 
hearts to attend the annual 
Valentine Day breakfast at 
the ClarK. This year's will of 
course be no excepti<m; 
sleepyey*d or not, they wtU 
be on hand, bright shiniqg 
and shaved. Incidentally, the 
(Continued on Page 8). - 

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LET'S CO LJT/\' — Members of the Cnntiriental Dnnce Club of La Parisienne Studio 
are elated as they qo mcr plans for their Latin affair on Friday, Alarch 4. at the Elks 
Auditorium. The affair ivill feature the music of Bobbie Montez and his Latin and A meri- 
can band. Pictured, sealed from left: Camel Du Ciilles, co-owner of the studio: .-f ndy .fllen, 
theatrical produrer: .Melxin Roulett, president of the Continental Club. Back roii\ stand- 
ing, from left: Peaches l^atkins, M adore Atlas, Lois Peak and Alice Corn. — (Davis). 


Links Plan 
National 
Meet Here 

The Links, Inc., with a 
total nation-wide member- 
ship of 1,600 prominent 
women, will assemble here 
July 1, 2, and 3 for their 




DOBOTHT ROWLAND 

annual convention, marking 
the first time that the 
national organization haa 
met on the West Coast. 

A delegation of some 500 
Links Is expected in the city 
for the confab and local 
chapter members are busy 
readying plans for the event. 

Dorothy Rowland, well 
known civic and social lead- 
er, has been named press 
and publicity chairman for 
the convention. Today, 
(Thursday), she has sche- 
duled a meeting with repre- 
sentatives of all community 
newspapers to di.sou.ss ways 
of obtaining the "best pos- 
sible coverage for the 
convention. 

The three- fold purpose of 
the organization is civic, 
social and educational, 
especially education fo" 
democracy. A variety of 
special events will highlight 
the forthcoming convention 
in addition to the regular 
business sessions. 


j Boys' Club 
Accepting 
Memberships 

Southern 'Area Boys' Club 
Is now taking gew member- 
ship applicatiohs from all 
boys, between 7-18 years of 
age, regardless of race, color 
or creed. 

Under trained, competent 
and adult leadership, every 
b<^ can take part in a well- 
planned, year-round pro- 
gram. A full schedule of 
constructive activities, gear- 
ed to the interests and cap- 
abilities of each member, 
gives him a firm foundation 
ir* social, physical, recrea- 
I fi onal, vocational and 
healthful training. 


A variety of events spread out over this vast 
town of ours. Whatever you seek in the way of en- 
tertainment you will find and most likely you will 
see all your friends enjoying the same events. 

Sunday evening a large group of friends respond- 
ed to the invitation of LOUISE and PEPPY PRINCE 
to dine and dance with them in their smart Leimert 
Park home on W, Santa Barbara. 

The libation bar, set up in the rumpus room over- 
looking the spacious swimming pool, came in for 
plenty of attention. There we exchanged talk with 
VIVIAN and VERNON STRANGE (naturally, VIVI- 
AN'S conversation was the forthcoming AKA Fan- 
tasy-in-Pink on March 12 at the Beverly Hilton), 
ditto for soror EUVALDA MORRIS. JAY BAILEY 
was there with petite LILLIAN KAZARIAN, CAS- 
SELL MORRIS reminded us of the Regular Fellows 
dance on Feb. 12 at the Zenda. COLLEY and EDNA 
CANNON were there, as" were OLES and THELMA 
HAYES. 

At the beautifully decorated table (works of 
DICKIE BARROW and staff) we chatted with CAR- 
NEY and LOUISE ANDERSON, MAXINE THOMP- 
SON, JACK and LEE TRAINER, RUBEN LEWIS, 
PAT and ODESSA MOORE. 

Still more enjoying the versatile piano and sing- 
ing artistry of ALYCE BROWN (popular Chicago 
supper club entertainer) were LOUISE BEAVERS 
and hubby LEROY, LEONTYNE and CELESTE 
KING.-A^TIE and ETHEL STOKES (she wore a 
beautifuL green chiffon), HARRIETTE JOHNSON 
(her show is all set for March 20 at the Moulin 
Rouge) and her hubby JACK (sorry JACK, I goof 
your last name every time), and many others. 

That was quite a surprise party that ALLEN 
WOODARD, 3rd, hosted for his wife CLOTILDE on 
Saturday evening. 

Coordinating Council held its annual dinner 
party at the Palladium on Thursday with JUSTICE 
DOUGLAS, JEFF CHANDLER and MORT SAHL as 
guests. 

GLENNA HAYES was hostess for the Lullaby 
Guild on Friday night. 

The attractive foursome dining on the strip the 
other afternoon were ELOIS DAVIS, Mrs. FITZROY 
YOUNG of Berkeley, MARIE CLAYBORNE and 
STACEY WILLIAMS, hostess for the group. 

Delta recently concluded an eventful week with 
MRS. LUCY LAMECK of Africa. 

Music lovers enjoyed the recital of ROBERT Mc- 
FERRIN at Neighborhood Community Church on 
Sunday afternoon. 

Gumbo session with Democratic Minority Con- 
ference on Saturday night with Chefs SPENCER, 
CROZIER and BERRIMAN doing the culinary hon- 
ors and receiving oodles of praise — it was that good. 

MRS. MASON (VIVIAN) DRIVER will host her 
10th annual Valentine Day Tea on Feb. 14 at her 
spacious Wilton avenue home. 

No "Jet" for RENA MARLOUGH; her '60 Thun- 
derbird will take her any place she wants to go. 

Send "get well" messages to MARGARET NEAL 
in University Hospital (recuperating from an auto 
accident) and OPAL JONES, bedded with "flu" bug. 

Los Angeles community saddened by the passing 
of beloved EMILY PORTWIG. This writer, among 
others. Is indebted to this wonderful person who 
through the years has helped us with our social jot- 
tings. She will be missed greatly. I know I will miss 
her. So will the Anchorettes (she was tlrff founder), 
Medical Dental and Pharmaceutical AssoGiatlon, 
Pacific Town Club, 10th Council PTA, Val Verde 
Improvement Ass'n, Jack and Jill and so many 
others. MRS. PORTWIG is gone, EMILY to her 
friends, but I doubt if there ever will be a meeting 
where her presence will not Jbe felt. 


Thursday, February 11, 1960 

Director 
To Address 
Women 

Donald Glover, executive 
director of" the California 
FEP Commission, will dis- 
cuss the function of the com- 
mission at the monthly pub- 
lic symposium ot the Wom- 
en's Sunday Morning, Break- 
fast Club on Sunday, Feb. 
14 at the Clark Hotel, Mrs. 
Gilbert W. Lindsay, presi- 
dent, announced this week. 

Guest soloist for the oc- 
casion will be Georgia Last- 
er, internationally known 
concert artist. Special em- 
phasis will be placed on Ne- 
gro History Week and Val- 
entine's Day, with special 
tribute being paid the old- 
est married couple present. 

A citation will also be pre- 
sented to the "Club of th*- 
Year." Regular .soloists Hazel 
Chapman and George Smith 
will be accomparried by Ber- 
nico Lawson. 

According to Mrs. Lindsay, 
the general public is invited 
to attend. 


Y'Teen Club 
Takes Pride 
In Serving 

The "Conquistadores" Y- 
Tcen Club, under Mid-City 
Branch of the YWCA, was 
organized September, 1958. 
The club members are: 
Cheryl Bizzell, Brenda Brew- 
er. Donna Brown, Gail Bry- 
ant, Gay Co.\, Johnella Ev- 
ans, Carol Fisher, D'Incz Jo- 
livette, Brenda Prudcn, Caro- 
lyn Robinson, Iris Saulney, 
Melonee Scott. 

Beginning in March they 
are preparing to take a 
charm course from Mrs. Cha- 
rity Washington, a well 
known expert on Teenage 
Charm and Development. 

Many experiences have 
been enjoyed by this group, 
both for fun and service. 
For service: (a) An Easter 
party for 26 exceptional chil- 
dren from "The Church Re- 
surrections," East Los Arige- 
les; which consisted of mak- 
ing games for the children, 
playing with them, and serv- 
ing refreshments, (b) A 
Christmas party for 33 Sen- 
ior Citizens of "Stovall Foun- 
dation," which consisted of 
buying and wrapping indivi- 
dual gifts;' presenting the 
"Nativity Play" and writing 
notes to some of the Senior 
Citizens after, Christmas. 

Mrs. Pearl. Bryant and 
Miss Mary Claiborne are ad- 
visors to the club and meet- 
ings are held in the homes 
of members. The members 
are made up of student.s 
from St. Mary Academy, and 
high schools: Dorsey, Los 
Angeles, and Manual Arts. 



TOASriSC SEIf PRESIDES T— Officers of the 20th 
Century Moderncltcs are shown saluting their new president 
at their installation party in Collins Restaurant last Sunday 
rveninq. From left: Laura Luckett, sergeant-al-arms; 
Cnuqucse It'arsteane, treasurer; Barbara McGinnii, out- 


goin\i preside^nl; Anita Murphy, president: Blanche Black, 
recording secretary; Marqie Hollintjsworth, secretary; Dor* 
lene Moore, business manager, and Gracine Griffin, mem- 
ber, — (Adams). 


Allen Woodard 
Surprises Wife 
On Birthday 

Much merriment and fun 
were enjoyed by all when 
Allen C. Woodard 3rd/ sur- 
pr sed his wife, Clothildc, 
with a party on her birthday, 
Saturday night. 

The ruse used was that ihe 
family was coming over to 
spend the evening, but tlie 
family grew and grew until 
over 30 guests were present, 
all showering Mrs. Woodard 
with delightful gifts in spite 
of being told "no gifts." Ca- 
tering service was supplied 
by "The Fawn." 

Present were Messrs. and 
Mmes. Charies Dunn. Wil- 
liam Johnson, Leon Taylor, 
Robert Blackburn, Lewis 
Chester, H. A. Howard, Ed- 
mund Kurd, George Lewis, 
Robert McFerrln, Lester Ni- 
cholas, Nolan Payton, Maceo 
Tolbert and Sterling Wag- 
oner, Father Moore, Dr. and 
Mrs. Dickerson Hawkins, 
Judge and Mrs. Edwin Jef- 
ferson, Mrs. Elois Davis and 
Mr." Edward Maddox. 


Benefit Program 
To Aid Bclvin Kin 

Filial plans have been 
completed for a benefit pro- 
gram entitled 'Jessie and Jiis 
Friends.' The affair will be 
held at the Elk's Auditorium 
February 2l8t, 1960. The pro- 
ceeds will be turned over to 
Jessie Belvin's mother. She 
resides at 737 E. 32nd Street 
The purpose is to help de- 
fray burial costs. 


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HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS — Followinf their 

record-breaking attendance at the L.A. Sports Arena last 
Sunday members of the Harlem Globetrotters are shown 
enjoying a banquet in their honor at the JVatkins Hotel. 
From left: Paul Gardner, Carl White, Dorothy Gardner, 

Kansas Ja/hawkers 
Hold Monthly Meet 


Tex Harrison, L. Wagner, Joe Buckheart, Winston Von 
ITertt, who hosted the affair; .-Alberta Von H^ertt, 
Meadowlark Lemon. Althea Gibson. Pinell Woods, R. 
Lewilen and M. L. Collins. — (Adams). 


«^ Bill Smallwood ^ 


The Kansas Jayhawkers of' 
California Club met at the 
home of Mrs. Lois Fuller, 
4319 W. 30th street, Saturday 
night, in their monthly meet- 
ing with 25 members pres- 
ent and four visitors. The 
visitors were Mrs. Gertrude 
Stovall of Humboldt Kan.; - 
Mrs. Harriett "Moore of Pasa- 
dena; Rev. T. M! Chambers, 
Jr., of Los Angeles; and Mrs. 
Potter of Pasadena. 

The following officers for 
1960 were installed in an 
impressiye service by Rev. 
Chambers: President, W. O. 
Bell; secretary, Clara Mae 
Bell: assistant secretary, Wil- 
ma Bolin; treasurer. Elder F. 
W. Holbert; chaplain, Olive 
Mitchcm; assistant chaplain, 
Lizzie VValker; critic, Leona 
B. Yates; social hostess. May 
Murray; secret pal chairman, 
Lula M. Miller; parliamen- 
tarian, Rubye Medlock; ways 
and means chairman, Mau- 
die Brown; sergeant-at-arms 
and recreation chairman, 
Edward B. Williams. 

Preparations are being 
made by the club for its 
third annual brunch to be 
given at the East Side Set- 
»!emont House, 1219 E. 
Adams blvd., Sunday, March 
13, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 
p.m. All former Kansas res- 
idents and friends and the 
public are invited. Also all 


former Kansans are cordial- 
ly invited to attend the 
monthly meetings, the first 
Saturday evening of each 
month at 8:30. For further 
information call the presi- 
dent, AX 3-1992. 


Plans Annua 
Social Events 


The Langston University 
Club took steps to imple- 
ment its social activity cal- 
ender for the year at its reg- 
ular meeting. 

Pres. Booker Clarkson pre- 
sented for consideration 
plans for the club's annual 
fund-raising event Proceeds 
are used to support civic en- 
deavors. Affairs scheduled 
include the annual club pic- 
nic, to be held at the Elysian 
Park lodge; and a spring 
formal 

The more than 30 mem- 
bers present enthusiastically 
accepted the items on the 
agenda and the proposals 
were turned over to appro- 
priate committees for reali- 
zation. 

After adjournment the 
club was favored by a de- 
lightful repast served by the 
refreshment committee at 
the lovely home of Esther 
Robinson, 3930 Welland ave. 


(Continued from Page 7) 
WSBC has plans for a re- 
markably unique program 
for the annual Negro News- 
paper Week bteakfast next 
month. 

Court Forrorite* 

Group 3 of Jack and Jill 
participated last Sat. in 
Queen Anne Playground's 
charity project X'alentine 
party. The Charles Drew Me- 
dical Auxiliary met last Sat 
Hostessing were Mmes. Jul- 
ius Hill, Dickerson Hawkins 
and Fred Spann; the home of 
the latter was (he coffee 
scene. Mildred Blount was 
speaker. 

Elols Davis' "circle of 
court favorites" gathered 
around on her birthday of 
course and lifted arms high 
to salute their birthday girl 
(she's Fresnoing with the 
DMC stalwarts this week- 
end). Over Dr. Loyce Evans' 
Sun. brunch things, Tina 
Quarles was beaming; her 
daughter Shirley Nanula, 
and husband Dick (they live 
in Altadena), expect their 
first child in May. And, too. 


some fond memories with 
Tina of early days when the 
Athenettes Club was so ac- 
tive around town. Ck)sh« 
time! 

Athletic Sehelorship 
Sun. is the Wesleyan Serv. 
ice Guild (Holman) Valen- 
tine lea and home and fash- 
ion display. Lula Evans and 
Juanita Crattic are cochalr« 
men. Arctoria Drye's S. Ar« " 
lington home will be the lo- 
cale. Kizer Smallwood check- 
ed out've UCLA Hospital 
Tues. Rosalyne LaCour, visit- 
ing her relatives in Pana- 
ma, wings her way back 
home within a few dav-a. 
Charity's mate, incidentally, 
is due in from Chi for event- 
ual surgery, locally. 

Portia Craig's ex-Marine 
son, John January, the first 
Negro to get an athletic 
scholarship to Compton JC 
as of last week. He'll be an 
exchange student at the 
Univ. of Mexico next Jan., 
too. 


•HAUl STYLIST WANTED- 


InterettinB Work in • Beautiful, Modernistic, Westside Sh«p. 
Most Luerativa. Apply in Person ah tho 

GLAMOUR INSURED BEAUTY SALON ' 

5011 W. ADAMS UVD., AT U BREA RI. 2-8129 


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-LOWERS THI 
NURSE'S WORK 



SimmoM" hospital bed— waist 

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•without stooping. Ke^ him 

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of a crank. Inneraprinf er 

Toamex" mattress included. 


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let An«lw DU. 4-5191 
Smrtk Sid* n. 2-1131 
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Collie J, Nickolson. gifted writer in charge of Grambling 
College News Service down Louisiana way. says that sports 
writers apparently followed the methods and itinerary of 
John Ringling North in selecting the top Negro college 
teams of the past decade. 

For them, naming th« best teams created a confused 
and uproarious situation, but ballots indicate to some de- 
gree that the writers made their selections on what they con- 
sidered proven capability in a team and an athlete. Popular 
choices of the scribes included Grambling. Florida A&M. 
Southern University, Tennessee A&I, Winston-Salem 
North Carolina College. 

The potent Tennessee A&I delegation that won its third 
N.AI.X championship and the 1958-,59 Grambling fi%p which 
went through the regular season without a blight ;n 28 games 
were selected as top basketball teams. They ranked one-two 
in the final press International rating last spring. 

Three wholly self-sufficient teams tied for top honors in 
football. The "Remington E.xperts" tabbed Prairie View i 1952'. 
Grambling il955i and Florida A&M il959i. all unbeaten, a.s 
the best of the past ten years after comparing squads from a 
variety of settings. Willie Galimore. an awesome Rattler 
before joining the Chicago Bears, was italicized as the top 
hack, while Willie Da\"is. a Gramblme alumnus who has 
completed his third season wirh the Clc\pland Browns, and 
the late Charlie Wright, a great end with FYainc View, were 
vo'ed the best linemen. 

A S 'Jake' Gaither. whose vigorous 'prr.ii'.ng .-I'ld ex- 
pert fxwching at Florida .\&M produced an urhc.^tablc rci-- 
ord of 81 triumphs, 10 defeats and four tics, wa^ ntrd as 
'coach of the decade ' 

Southern Univer^^itv « l^'^9 NAI.-\ champior.^ ::nt v^r 
downbeat in baseball. The writer^. Nicholson ;rvps nri m 
say. expressed a degree of compassion for Nor"h Carolina 
College and Winston Salem track ^ opponent'; h> ;ian-.;nz 
Ol.vmpic hurdle champion Lee Calhoun and Fiias Gilbert, 
world record holder in the 220 yard lows, as tiie he-;' of 
the cinder stars. Dick Burnett. Tennessee .-\&I .Ml -.Vm^: I'-ari. 
Bob Hopkins, the p.\ Grambling eager who scored more i-nl- 
Icge points than any other pla.ver in histor> — .3,T,i9 — re- 
ceived the aciolades in ba.=kerba!l, Currcntl.v thev- arc team- 
mates with the Svracuse Nationals of the National Basket - 
hall A.s.-iociation. 


Basketball 
League Champs 
tye PlpYoff 

Winnirig quintets in the 
and Dec. 1 to Feb. 1 boys basket- 
ball league play which was 
staged at municipal play-^ 
grounds throughout Los Ange- 
les are competing in district 
pla.voffs to determine entries, 
in city wide hoop finals .sched 
•.i!ed Feb, 25. March 1, March 
-3. I 

Citv wide champions with 
top squads from the Catholic 
Youth Organization and the 
•Jewish Community Centers 
-\s,=^'iation m Inter .\gency 


Final- 


■ t^d 


and 9. 


Marbles Champs 
Seek Chy Title 
At Queen Anne 



Outfielder 
Sandy Amorcs 
Inks Contract 


the 5-10 handicapping contest 

la.st Sunday at Caliente Race 

j Tract. ' i 

j Sixty-three tickets paid 

' S348.80 each in sharing con- 

' solation monev paid for five 

Two dozen Dodgers have horses, the gross pool was 

signed their 1960 contracts. S9T.668, winning numbers 

General Manager and Vice- were 5-5-7-8-6-1. A crowd of 

President E. J, iBuzzie. Ba- 14.323 sent S439..3S6 through 

vast announced. He then re- the mutels for the 12 races. 

vealed that Sandy Amoros. , not including the 5-10 pool 

outfielder, had forwarded his of S9T.668. 

papers from Matanzas. Cuba. SANTA ANIT.\ The races 

vvhere he is playing winter which highlight this weekend 

/*^"- are the S50.000 added San 

Sandy came back to the Antonio Handicap on Feb, 

Dodgers late last .reason, too 13 and the SoO.OOi") added 

late to he eligible for the California Breeders Champion 


BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN, In the breeders Stake my 
OLD MEXICO: Two selectors! selections are Warfare, New 
who hit all six winning horses Policy and T, V. Lark. Eagle 
pocketed S32.969.60 apiece in 
dividing first-place money in 


at last week's 
plav- ground 
in the 1 960 


r^ 'THE TEE 


## 


.WITH MAGGIi HATHAWAY. 


^^" 1 n tl e r s 
neighborhood 
eliminations 
marbles competition will 
battle for citv -wide crowns in 
finals of the contest which 
will be staged at Queen Anne 
Playground. 1240 West Boule- 
vard, beginning at 10:30 a.m. 
Saturday. Feb. 13. 

.\t local play centers last 
ueek. one ho.v was ^elected 
for each 15 entered in the mid- 
get division for lads 12 years 
'">f age and under and the 
junior division for those 13 to 
15 years of age. 


JOIS'S SPORTS ST.-iFF—Cenr {Btg Dudd\ ) Lifs.omh, 
riqht. IS cringrntulal:no Othf Mntson on hfino addrd to t nl ■ 
'tnff Bretiiitj Corporation 'ports stnff. Mntfon i^ul prr^cnt 
talks jraturiro a Ram hrahliahl iiirn hriorc ndult < n u . i'n :nl 
end veteran nrQnnlzations in this area, iiene Rr:tn, R,:'n 
drfertuir riri. heijan Inst ueek n similar prni,ri,ni tor I at- 
stnif . sponsor ot Rnrn qatr%cs on trii '< luon njid railio. 


Fremont, Jordan Cage 
flees Win Helms flwaid 


World Series, after having a 
fine season in Montreal. He 

■batted .301. had the top home 
run year of his career i26i. 
drove irf 79 runs, the best in 
that department since 19.53. 
and vvas selected on the In- 
ternational League All-Star 
team. In addition to colle<.-t- 
ing 156 hits, also his best 
since '.t3. Sandy led the In- 
ternational League in walks 
with S9. 

Aninros ha<^ been a member 
of the Dodger organization 
s;;-:ce 1952 vvhen he broke in 

with a .337 average at St. 

'Paul. 


Stakes on Lincoln's Birth 
da.v. My picks for the San 
.\ntonio are. Middle Brother' 
first: Mana.s.sa Mauler seix>nd; 
Kink O' Turf third. Up.set 
longshot is Promulgation.! 


Admiral and Flow Line hav« ; 

an outside chance. 

(Horses to watch tkat ore tttT; 

ond ready) !.-^! 

CAUENTE -^7! 

DOC PIERRE. WJtetl out Tor tHHt-- 

one. ^ - 

GOLDEN TORCH, My special. 
DON'T RUN FAST. Now ready- ." 

for the tjeit. 
MIRACULOUS. Getting g«od ago* 

tab tote. 
TINKLE. At a long price. 
SHESADOLL. Off batf m l»»» 

chance. 
ROSE PALE Give one more chance. 
PLENTY BABY. Loves the tractc. 
HASTY BOY 2ND. Ready for two 

miles. 

SANTA ANITA 

SOLID PINK Fit at they com«. , 
GRAY SHARK. LOOKout tor tni« ' 

one, 
HENRLIAN My lonoihot ipecul- 
FLAVS BOY. Nert out O. K. 
THE BISCUIT. Somethtna good to 

eat. 
RISE 'N SHINE. In %rr»ri hana». 
INDIAN MAID. Enough aaid en 

this one, 
PREDESTINADO, Wir* to wire. 
H4L PECK. Ju« t)eaten a no«« go 

Back. 
REGULAR ONE, Tab tote next 

out. 


Dodger Farm Hand 
Honored at Banquet 


214 Top Athletes Set , ^ 
For Indoor Games Sat.; 

Two hundred and fou.-.tcen pole vault. Other possibilitie*^-- 
champion athletes are poised are the two mile run, two- 
for a blast on indoor, records mile relay. 600 yard run and 
in the Los Angeles Times' 1,000 yard tnjn. 
First .Annual Indoo' Games! 
starting at 8 p.m. Saturday. i 
Feb. 13, at Memorial Sports 
.\rena. | 


War was declared last week grams 
and It was declared against Springs, 
the Professional Golf Associa- and the 
tion I PGA I. Sifford. Spiller. 
Rhodes, Barbin and other 
Negro pros have for years 
been discriminated against 
by this organization. 

It is an old. old .story abou' 
the Bmg Crosbv- yearlv- tourn 
ament segregating N egroes. 
Six or sevea, vears ago it was 


to the ma.vor of Palm 
. the chief of police 
tournament commit- 
tee. 

oJe said the onlv reply he 
rei-eived was from the Pii.A 
officials who said that it vvas 
not their fault but it was the 
sponsors who had denied the 
Negroes invitations. 

The sponsr>rs turned out to 
be the three Palm Snrings. 


Globetrotters Set 
Attendance Record 


Willie Davis, the Dodger 
farm hand who batted .36.5 

ifor Reno and was voted the 
California League's most val- 
uable pla.ver la«r season, was session 

'awarded the Win Clark me 


announced by the tournament golf course officials who had 

offic4als and Bing's "good made up the .Sliviixit) purse 

brother'" Bob Cn-KSby that they from the membership 

could do nothing about the of the three rhiK-;. 
situation. 


i Joe al.so sent telegrams to *^ h a p e 1 y "Golden 
nr the local T. V. stations but rhe drew 13,«;91 fans. 

In four appearences in 
Los .-\ngeles the Globetrotters 
packed in almost 35.000 fans. 


.\be Saperstein's amazing 
Harlem r;iobetrorters wound 
up a lO-day tour of the South - 
lend by breaking the L. A. 
Sport.s .\rena attendance rec 
ord la=^f Sunda.v afternoon. 

The all-star revue, featuring 
a three-hour show which in- 
eluded a tennis match be- 
roster twoon world champion .Althea 
r'.ih'^nn and Karo! Fageros. 

Godejis," 
Nov.- eom^s th<» Pa 
Springs tou-nament, Joe Louis only station that we heard 
felt that they would accept announce that Joe was "pop- 
Charlie Sifford in the Palm _ ping mad ' was channel .5. 
Springs Open, especially after' About five years ago this 
Sifford had won everythmg eolumnist spoke to the presi- 
dent of the Negro Golf .\.s,soc- 

iation 'Western States 1 who 

at the time was J. Ciillen 

Fentress, W'p could not get 

to first ba.^e with Fentress.' 

We asked him to suggest to, 

his organi zation that it, 

donate some money from itsj 

treasury to fight for golf 

integration. 

Now that every one who' 

\vas not interested five years' 

;igo has begun to see that we 

must fight for integration in 

golf and any place else where 

vve are being .segregated, we 

again will suggest a quick 

formula on how to defeat o 


Joe Caldwell. Fremont High_ Southern League first team 
School's outstanding seniorjwas Joe Caldwell's fine run- 
forward, was a unanimous se- ' ning mate, Melvin Chatman. 
lection of Helms Athletic, who finished the season as 
Foundation's All • Southern, the city's number three scorer 

California Board of Basketball! with 212 points. Chatman. , . , , ,, 

as ■•Player of the Year' in thei called the "quarterback' of '^'°'A^j„"°i'_"■\i!!^''I''.^ !f.^..! ^':l'.'^^'''^'^ ^""f,"^*^".''^.^'. '^'^ 


Don 'Tarzan' Bragg, u'iio 
has barely missed crossing the 
16 ft. bar during the past 
' three weeks, is set to make it 
Twelve relay ra.-es and this time. But he'U be crowd- 
nine other events featuring ed by world c+iampion of the 
top athletes from world ]u. S. Marine Corps, Bob Gu- 
champions . to high school towski, Aubrey Dooley o* Ok- 
champions will provide ample lahoma State, and James 
ground for a record shattenng, Graham, unattached of Still- 


Game Director Paul 


Southern League for 1960. j the Frei^ont team by hi 
Caldwell led coach Bill j coach. Bill Thayer, performed 
Thaver's Pathfinders to the j at guard, 
league championship, with a. j^^ee other top citv .scorers 
9-1 mark, winding up the lea-,,,.pre named to the fir.sf team, 
gue season as the city's num- Washington's senior center, 
her one scorer. C a 1 d w e IL -j-^^ Bridges, who scored 179 
scored 248 points in ten lea- ;po,f^ts during the league >;ea- 
gue games for a 24.8 average.; son, was named at center. 
Not only did Joe Ca IdwelL ^-hjip jpffprson's Richard Holt 
lead his team to the leaguei ,20,1 1 and Dorsey's Larry 
championship: he also had a Gower n8,Si were the guard 
major part in vvinning the pj,'i^s. 
Pathfinders' second straight 

L. A. City title^ ^ Kennedv, who led coach John 

Fremont defeated North Rg^^^jpj^.,, f,^,^ ,„ .^^^ .^j^^,^^ 
Hollvwood in the playoffi-, 
finais, 81-6.3. with Caldwell 


outstanding first year player will be the night the records 
in-Southern California, , will fall. 

More than 5(iO guests were Two world records that 
on hand at the 3.5th annual could easily fall during the 
dinner of the .\ssn. of Profes- games are the shot put and 
sional Baseball Players at 
Rodger '^'oung .Auditorium. 

Davis, who is still playing' 
winter ball in Venezuela, vvas 
represented by the scout who 
signed him. Kenny .Myers. 


water, Okla. 

Relay teams from eight un- 
iversities and Los Angeles 
a-rea .junior colleges and high 
schools will fill out the relay 
events for the games. 

Tickets are now on sale. 


Lakers Play Hawks 

Jordan High Schools Charles J^^ GafflOS IH kX^J^2^ 


» 4 

» « 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 


that was open to him. The 
minute Joe found out that 
even Sifford had been denied 
an invitation, he .sent tele- 


I THOMAS TIES MARK 

I John Thomas. Boston Cni- 
versity's sensational high 


^coring 24 poihts. He tallied 
99 points for the entire tour- 
ney to set a new four and 



iiimper who set a new indoor f'^'P game scoring record. Joe 
record recently, came back last ^'as named the city tourna- 
week In the Boston games to ment's outstanding player for 
tie his own mark of 7 feet, 1'^ his top performances. 
inches, 1 ALso named to the All- 


People & Places 


BEAUTIFUL 


CALIENTE 

IN 010 MEXICO 

OfflaS IVIIY $«T. * SUM. 
IAIN 0« SHINI 

.rtOROUGMMID 


\:'m^MCi 


•(^ 


^11 


RACES EVERY 
SAT. A SUN. 


11 


Ah 


AND SATURDAY 
M-OAIIY DOUBLE « QUINEIA "^^ 
BOOKS « MUTUELS ^^ 

^ FABULOUS S-10 BETTING ^g^ 
POST TIME 12 NOON 

SUN. POST TIME 12:30 PMH^ 

^ . FANTASTIC RETURNS .^ 
^ For Yotir Wag«r 

Two Dollar* or Mero tf^ 
^ Foroign Book Opoi 
^. On All Majo " 


PGA and any other organiza 
tions that segregate. This 
formula has won five suits for 
this columnist. 

The ingredienus only con 
<;st of one thing and that is: 
Vote .some money out of your 
f,-easury a",d hi-e a good 
lawver, or donate a lawver to 
the Negro golf clubs, 

.AH of this writing, taiki.ng, 
and calling is a waste of 
time. The mavor. sii.nervisors. 
citv. county and PGA have 
heard of this p.^Dblem for the 
past eight years and have 
f^one nothing. So why not 
try something differenf Let's 
face It. we never get freedom 
"donated" to us. we have 
always had to go to cou.n 
and fight for it. 


iTacL"*^ Bruin Gage Team 


GREYHOUND RACING ^ Q„|y ||a|f GamO Out 


4A- WILL RESUME FRIDAY, 

JAN. 8 FOR 3 NIGHTS 
.(^A WEEK-FRIDAY, SATUR-W 

DAYL AND SUNDAY. 
^ fltJT POJT TIMI 7:45 p m 4^ 

49»r EVERT SATURDAY 
V»- AND SUNDAY NIGHTS ^ 
w|. • -«► 

JOHN S. ALESSIO ^ 

fa«c«tiv* Oif ct»r 



The UCLA basketball team 
moved back into contention 
for the "Big Five" Conference 
cage crown with a sizzling 
hT ,5? wnn over Stanford lasr 
week. 

The Bruin v\in gave c-oach 
Johnny Wooden s quintet a 
4-1 rei'ord, onl.v a half a game 
behind leading California. 


DIDJA KNOW — That the 
Wilton Place Democratic Club, 
whieh rang doorbells in six 
precincts in the 10th district 
for Eddie .-\tkinson will hold 
its installation banquet at 
arney Castle Feb, 28. .And 
vou know that the best way 
to thank them for a job well 
done IS to pick up two tickets 
at S3..'j(T and attend. 
ANITA ECHOLS — E.x danc 
er after only six months as 
nperator of Roy Loggin's food 
wagon has built herself a lu- 
c.-ative business! 
BENNY CARTER — Top ar- 
ranger for two major studios 
will arrange the music for 
Jean Sampson when she 
wa.xes tunes for Columbia 
ne.\t month! 

PEAKES — .After viewing their 
ultra-ultra West Jefferson 
blvd. dress shop which can 
hold its own with any in this 
city, it's bu.gging us no end 
vv'ondering what e.xcuses our 
label-boasting females will 
give for not shopping there 
now! 

FATBOY COLLINS— He shuns 
publicity but you will find 
his name high 
SLipporting eve 
community betterment and 
that goes for the entire fam- 
ily, Wifie is PT.-\ president at 
Trinit.v Street School and his 
.voung son sold 40 of the 300 
dinner 
purciia 


.\ V a I o n Community Center 

Kadets' program! 

TONY WILLIAMS— Handsome 

lead singer with the Platters 

will leave the group ne.xt 

month and go it alone as a 

.solo singer! 

FLETCHER HENDERSON — champions 


gue title with a 7-1 record, 
was named top pla.ver in his 
league by members of the All 
Southern California Board of 
.Athletics, 

Kenned.v. who wa.s a first 
team forward on last .'reason's 
.\Iarine League team, was his 
coach's first recommendation 
and was described by his 
coach as an "excellent re- 
bounder and the best all- 
around player on the squad." 

John Gregerson. who was 
named the league's top per- 
former in 19.59. also made the 
first team at center. 

He was the team's top 
scorer and finished ninth 
among all city scorers. 

Besides Kennedv. the 


The Minneapolis Lakers 
who are considering moving 
their franchise will play two 
more regular .NBA games in 
the L X. Sports Arena Feb. 
21 and 22. against the St. 
Louis Hawks. 

rain, the Lakers and the War- 
riors drew 10.202 when they 
played their first NB.'\ game 
here Isist Monday. 

The St. Louis Hawks played 
an exhibition game here in 
September and drew 12,000 
fans. 



WHATS 
DOING 


• 


All-Stars to Play 
Pepperdine College 


Charlie Neal, former triple-A 
baseballer, is heading a Negro 
.-\11-Star tfam that will play, 
eague several exhibition games 
placed -Wirter against various college teams. 


Columbia Records is 
ing to reissuesome 


prepar- -^angrum and Charles Battey Today (Thursday i the All- 
of the on the first team at guard Stars will meet Pepperdine 


(great musician's works! 
CANNONBALL ADDERLEY — 
He ended his engagement at 

, .New '^'ork's Half Note, goes 
into San Francisco's Jazz 
Workshop for three weeks! 
LENA HORNE — Back in the 

, city after an absence of three 
years, the sweetest thing since # 
Strawberry Short Cake, opens 
at the Cocoa nut Grove toi.^ 
charm' em v^nth her beauty uj 
and voice for two weeks! Z 

ELBOW BENDERS — That gay ^j 
group sipping delightfully in,^ 
the Sportsman's Club Sunday ^ 

, eve included., Liz Good, Mar- -^ 

1 vella Finks, Roberta Ward X 
and Jonnv Carter! \KJ 

ZEE MADDOX — One of theli^j 
town's best party-givers will UJ 
be tossing one for Mary Con-'^ 

; tee, looted New Yorker who 
on the list for will Jet in Sat., at 2:40 p.m. • 
r y t h i n g for She is the widow of the late ^ 
Sammy Contee. well knowm 
artist' 

LARRY YOUNGBLOOD — 
Chicago sportsman and golf 
enthusiast in town to interest 


Battey and College at 2 p.m. at South 
much Pai'k Playground. 

In the All-Star line will b(» 
Lee -Mavs of .Milwaukee: Earlj 
ing the Jordan team click in Battey, White .Sox:- and 
1960. Charlie Neal of tiie L. .\\ 


positions. Both 
Mangrum were given 
credit bv their coach for mak 


SEE CHARLIE NEAL FOR YOUR BEST FORD DEAL 


CHARLIE NEAL'S 



tickets that will help Ray Botts. the sensational 


1 forms for the 


'Continued on Page 10» 


BASIE • COLE • ELLINGTON • GARNER • GRANT * SINATRA 


LIKE MUSIC? WANT A FREE STEREO? 

CALL BR. 2-7901 

ECI^STEIN * FITZGERALD • SHEARING • STATON • 


FREE RECORD 
NO OBLIGATION 


Old Smuggle 



ARLINGTON LIQUORS 


COMPUTI STOCIC Of 

• LIQUORS • BEER • WINES 

• ICE CUBES • DELICATESSEN 
• MAGAZINES AND NEWSPAPERS 

r Fr«« F>>« DvlivWY Call- 

RE. 4-2439 - RE. 4 9621 


2489 W. Washington Blvd. 

PHILLIP J. DORSEY, Propriefor 



BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY • 8« PROOF | 
Impo/iad by W. A. Taylor A Co., N: Y., N. Y. 
Sole Distributors for the U. S. A. 


tf^«9<ttAAOAAAtt 


inaawa^^^aaie— a— — aaiaiii— I— — * 


CHARLIE NEAL 

STELLAR SECOND BASEMAN OF WORLD CHAMPION 
LOS ANGELES DODGERS BASEBALL TEAM 

. CHARLIE Is Leaving for 

Spring Training Before tfie 

End of This Montfi — 
So He Is Offering a Special 

GOING AWAY DEAL 
to All His Friends and Fans 

-GOME IN AND SEE CHARLIE FOR- 

• Easiest Prices ^ Longest Terms 

• Highest Trade • Lowest Down t'mt 

HAMLIN W. NERNEY 

SOUTHWEST'S LEADING FORD DEALER 

52nd and VERMONT PL. 8-3161 



tn 


Safety it economr for 

telephone subscribers so 
safety has become a must 
with your Pacific Tele- 
phone Company. * 

Take a look at this 
telephone man for ex- 
ample; he's equipped to 
do a safe, fast and effi- 
cient job for you. His- 
gl asses are not to improve 
his eyesight, but are 
strictly for safety as is 
much of the other equip- 
ment he carries. Acci- 
dents cost money in lost 
time and production so 
we at Pacific Telephone 
are constantly trained in 
safe work practices. Safe 
jobs are good jobs and 
Pacific Telephone is hir- 
ing now in many job clas- 
sifactioits for men and 
women. 

For information about 
our nearest employment 
office, call or visit your 
local office at 3233 W. 
Vernon Avenue. 

H you w»r» to guess uhat is being held in this hand, vhat 
would you say it isf A neic kind of paper clipf A hairpin f 
Actttally, it's a thermistor, and I'm told it is one of the most 
sensitive temperature measuring 
devices known to science. Therm- 



— istors first sate the light of day 

— back in the 1930's at the Bell 
m Telephone Laboratories. Andthey 
^ are used by the millions in the 

telephone business as automatic 
volume regulators for your tele- 
phone service. Recently, thermis- 
tors have been carried in satellites 
and used by medical scientists to 
take temperatures inside human 
hearts. Proves that not all space-age idea 
xrhen you read about thermistors, you rea 



^ ferent ways telephone science works for all of us. 


If u- ones and, 
how many dif 



g Wh«n was Hi* last time you had 

a phone visit with an out-of-town 
m relative or friend? And how 
^ many times have you meant to 

write, but just never got around 
• to it I Well, nothing's easier 
^^ than picking up the phone right 
fTi now and catching up on all the 
^ news. I'll bet you'll both get a big kick out of a phone calL 
-^' i^^Hl^fek Some folks even set aside a 

JO ^S^^m^K certain night every week or so 

^^*"" just for a phone visit That 

way their call is expected and 
Z i ^^H^^^M^IP^ ^^y c^^n save on the ev&i 
> i ^^^' -/^^f^^^^ lower station-to-station rates 

after 6 p.m. Pacific TalopheiM 


^ SEE CHARLIE NEAL FOR YOUR BEST FORD DEAL 



i 


» m 1 I 


—t-M i . .--■ 


MILES DAVIS & MJO AT SHRINE 




.U./A7.\(,' IT— Hi': TOii' fulfiUrd. htf Inlher'f murder 
(rynard , and the harharinns drtrntrd. the Cnh/l/h nnd Lnridn 
rtdr iTUfi\ uith the r>ther villfiQns tn start n nnc lih to- 
Ofth'-r. (.hrin Alnn^n and StfXf Rrri ft ci-itiir irj fhr .-I'nrri- 
rnn-I nifrnr.ii'in/i^ pi, lure curr,-ritlv sfrrcnino nt thf t.l Cs 
Brn^dwjy find M'in,hrstrr Thrntt-r, Attmd Fnmilv Siaht 
r7>ry Ti/r-'d':\ u hrrr children are admitted free u-hen 
\l(rrimpnritfd h\- parent!. 


ISOUNDTRACR 


•with 


*Chazz' Crawford 



JAZZ STARS 
IN CONCERT 
FEBRUARY 27 

Thp Miles Davis QuintPt 
and the Modern Jazz Quartet, 
two of the leading exponents 
of modern American jazz con- 
repts, will be presented in one 
of tlie most important concerts 
of the year when they appear 
at the Shrine Auditorium on 
Saturday, Feb. 27. 

Miles Da\ns. whose tech- 
nique and brilliant imagina- 
tion are legendary, ranks un- 
challenged as the Number 
One jazz trumpet artist in 
every major music poll in the 
world. As a composer his 
works, such as "Budo" and 
"Milestones," have establish- 
ed him as a \vTiter of the 
higliest musical merit. Featur- 
ed with the Miles Davis Quin- 
tet will be John Coltrane, one 
of the leading tenor soxo- 
phone players in the country. 
Movie Maker 

The Modern Jazz Quartet, 
who join Miles Davis at the; 
Shrine, have probably been! 
more successful than any I 
other musical group in thei 
world in consummating the 
marriage of ja« and classical 
music. This can he well at- 
tested to by their recent mu- 
sical backing of the motion 
pirture "Odds Against Tomor- 
row." A performance that is 
ranked as a milesione in mo- 
tion picture scoring. The 
pianist-leader of MJQ, John 
(who Scored "Odd 


i(iffiQii:,i. '"jnraii"ii....»i ,,. .1,., .,..:. ,1 ■mil' I iraiiiffliir'«rfliii'iii!twi 

NOTES OF AN INNOCENT BAR-STANDER "^ 

Mrs. LENNIE HAYTON (LENA HORNE) of which there is 
no whicher breezed into touTi a vveek or .so ago to prepare for L/^wis 

her opening tomorrow night at the Cocoanut Grove, and also Against Tomorrow"t Is con- 
to tape the FRANK SINATRA TV special. We called the Hav- sidered to be one of th* most 
tons the other night to inquire as to Lena's well being. She articulate men m music and 

and MARIE BRYANT had, 

mad* the rounds the day be ' DUKE ELLINGTON. Dukes a 
for* and Lena had mentioned hypochondriac and Lena's 
fthe wasn't feeling too jazzy. I ails are psychosomatic. Lena 
But the next night. Lena : 's 'he .swingingest chick on 
was feeling no pain, and get- 'he night club circuir. but she 
ting dolled up for the Sinatra S«''-=^ "i^ jitters prior to an 
thing. Lennie took the phon^ opening. 

and said that everything was It's all part of the basic hu- 
smooth .mailing. It bears out mility that she possesses, that 
our belief that Lena s stage makes her a down-to-earth, 
genius is nurtured by the genuine doll \ to everyone she 
same fate that spawned encounters regardless of 
-- — their financial or cla.>;s struc- 


is complimented beautifully 
by Milton Jackson. Percy 
Heath and Connie Kay. who 
comprise this vital and excit- 
ing group. 

Single Performance 
A rare roncert of great mu- 
■^ical importance . . . the Miles 
Davis Quintet and the Modern 
Jazz Quartet ... at the Shrine 
Auditorium Saturday, Feb. 27. 


PLm 


nnCHESTER? 


LJJLjBrTfk-iM.w.MMi mSS 


Manchester & Broadway 
PHONE: PL. 3-1431 


New Bargain 
Admission . . 


65- 

NOWHERE! 

ITMUUNO 110 ONE WOMEN 
DREAM OF HIS EMBRACE! 


People 

(Continued from Page 9> 
Washington amateur, to '. 
him be his spon.^^or! 
JERI SPENCER — Wifie of 
Prince, member of tlie Four 
Step Brothers, is due in town 
next week! 

MUM — Thats the treatment 
the peasants are giving you 
when inquiring about that big 
time Riverside medic who is 



SOlltrH AND THE BARBARIIN; sflrr,n( 
SrtVE «[F.V£3 . CO »t»rr,nt CMEIO H.ON',0 
jna BmiCE CABOT • AN AMERICAS- 
INTESNAnoSAL PICTURE IN COIORSOOPF 


PLUS 2nd 
TOP HIT! 



ture. Lena's "a friend of 
yours" and incidentally that's 
the title of her latest RCA 
Victor album. 
HOLLYWOOD SOUND 
STAGES ARE 
BUZZING ABO^UT , . . 

The newlv formed NEGRO 
ARTISTS GUILD. The merger 
rame about ;is another des- 
perate mea.'^ure to bring about 
a fairer shake for .\egro guild 
mcmbcs who are b>pas>^d on 

manv biblical epics and other said to h;ne flipped his lidl 
films where whites are dark- JIMMY FULLER — The mil- 
rued up to portray rolps that lion dollar mon'i^y lender is 
\e;;roes could handle far being paged by a Lancaster 
more naturally. Negroes are property ownerl 
the spire of life. They are OPAL JONES — Avalon Com 
\arief\-. They work out nicely munity Center executive di- 
as Egyptians, Cubans, Indians. re<-tor will under20 surgery 
et retera. and Dr. William Williams has 

The height of ."lomethins or been elected' 
nother is the floating ruthor SPIDER — The dapper man- 
tliat one of the .Negro veteran about-town arranged that real 
performers played a role on a i-razee pawtee for friends in 
recent film with a white aCorBfrt Kcnner's Milomo Club 
n 'darkface' emplo>'ed as his Wed. e\c' 

stand-in. There is no telling PAT STREAT — The rains 
where we go from here, but if came .Monday night hut that 
this guild has it's wa\- tliere didn't stop friend.s from cele- 
will be a series of changes, brating her birthday 
With crusader MAGGIE LEON J. COLEMAN — Long- 
HATHAWAY presiding, WES- time resident and a top elec- 1 
LEY GOLE as vice . prpw , ■ trical maintenance man, en-' 
MAE JOHNSON, secy. JIMMY tcrs Mid Way Hospital recent- 
FIELDS, treasurer. EVELYN Iv to undergo surgerv! 
BURWELL on publicity and a JIM GILLIAM — The sterling 
roster of TiO Mhere should be Dodger, is doing the same 
morel this group is marching, type of job for Hiram Walker 

ART BUCHWALD reported as he does at any position for 
from Paris that the "Free and the World Champions. Com- 
Fasy" blues opera with 60 N>- munity businessmen find him, 
gro musieians and singers is mild - mannered, intelligent 
romping at the Alhambra and interesting to talk with! 
heater there. It seems the SATIN DOLL — Exotic dancer 
only while member of the re- iust returned from New York! 
(Continued on Page 12) attending her father's funerall [ 
— — i ' 





10-The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 11, 1960; 


Blues Queen 
Concertizes 
February 21 




Well, tomorrow will b* Lincoln's birthday, and here in 
New 'i'ork will mark the evening for one of the year's an- 
Bel-Esprit Social, Sports and "ual outstanding affairs, this year to take place at the Grand 


Charity Club will honor com- 
munity organizations and In- 
[dividuals with awards for 
! outstanding services in behalf 
!of the communit\' at their an- 
nual Citation Ball, Louis Rob- 
inson, president or the organi- 
zation, announced this week. 


Ballroom of the Itoosevelt Hotel. I am referring to the Notiaa- 
al Urban League Guild's 20th Annual Beaux Arts Ball, which 
this vear carries as its theme. 


"Gaslight Follies," honoring 
the National Urban League on 
it.s Golden Anniversary, and 
highlighting the. era of 1910. 
Sy Oliver and WUli* Smith 

'Blow 

There *\ill be dancing to 
two orchestras throughout the 
evening..Sy Oliver and the big 
band, and Willie "Th* Lioo" 

Smith and his' group for 
he entertained bv .song stvlisi:a"'hentic period music. I feel 
■Dinah Washington and Gerald ^'j'^ P'"''"^ ^"^^ honored in 
Wilson and his orche.-^tra. 


Worthwhile Event 

Event is scheduled for Sun- 
day, Feb. 21, at 5:00 p.. at the. 
Aragon Ballroom, on the 
ocean front in Santa Monica. 
Honorees and their guests will 


Tribute to Lat* Creots 

W'ithin the "Gaslight Follies 

Pageant' such fabulous fig- 

ues of the 1910 era as Diamond 

Jim Brady, Bert Williams, the 

(Continued on Page 12 1 


Southern Ar^a Boys Club. 
I Sports Edit9r Brad Pye. Rams' 
i football ace Ollie Matson, 

"i Women's Sunday .Morning 
I Breakfast Club and Shalimar 
jSocial Club will he the indi- 
ividuals and organization.^ re- 
[ceiving the citaions and 
; awards, Robinson said. 
I Singer of Any Year 

■ I An invitation is extended to of ".Mi.'vs 
the general public to attend, and the 


having b«'en chosen to be the 
Master of Ceremonies for the 

"Gaslight Follies Revue," the 

introduction of ]ho judges 

who will .select the Most 

Aufhentir Costume, and the 

.Most Beautiful Costume for 

>;i0O.oo prizes each, and the 

Mystery Prize for $50,00. 

Josephine Baker Returning 

Tliere will be the crowning 

Beau.x Arts of 1960," 

piece de resistance' 


MnM7 REY J All FESTIVAL STAR—Jimmy Ifith- 

eripnnn, u'hnse nihum, "The Sf>onn nt M 'intrrc\ , ' i' mnk- 
1117 nil rrrnrd shopt infh regi.'trrf flirt, nill tram mth surh 
vniur ninnts as Trddv Ediiards, Grnrqe Mnrrnic, Dalo 
i.nkrr VI n rnllirkvifj l^rehrnd Tlilh the h/i/rr thi<: Fnda\ , 
Saturday and Sundns nt the Zrhm Rnnm, S-'O.^ S'^ulh Cen- 
tral, and liith the "Spnnn" crooning its htuesy mess iou 
T^ould u ant to dm 


Special citation as 'Singer of will be my privilege of intro- 

the Year" will be awarded during that fabulous inlema- 

Miss Washington by Station tional entertainer, just re-| 

KGFJ. turned from Pans after ai 

.|~e\en >par's ab.sence. .Miss 

iVELDA WRIGHT — She is re Josephine Baker. Costumes or 

i covering from a serious auto evening attire are required, so: 

I accident in the Riverside Com- this promises to be a colorful j 

munity Hospital and can be and elaborate spectrum ofj 

ocated in Wing C! styles and characterizations. I 



r-- 


A D TES TUR US—Juano 

Hernandez uill be featured 
in the Adventures In Para' 
di^e hour TV show this 
Mo^nday night at 9:30 over 
channel 7. The setting is 
Haiti. 



* 

. 

\. 


f: 

1 

-y 

- 



r 


1 

i 

a 

I 


f 


ISH'S SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 


lawdatvawA •( Canfaiitaif Cfcicki 

-HEADQUARTERS FOR FUN LOVERS- 

2851 CRENSHAW at 29th St. 

FINEST DRINKS - CRISP CHICKENS 

CHARCOAL STEAKS 




BARRY S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

2636 CRENSHAW BLVD. 

FINE FOOD - SUPERB COCKTAILS 

GOOD FOOD BY CHEF PEARLINE HOPPS 

BARTENDER TONY CASINO 

JACK FREEMAN s. NELLIE MINOR 

Mintger ^ « Hottets 

-tNJOY THl f INI ST- ^■"^-'^ 

• COCKTAILS • FOOD] 

• ENTERTAINMENT 

• FUN & FROLIC 

-^'^•"-' MILOMO 

29th & WESTERN RE. 5-9585i 


ROBERT 'Bumps' BLACKWELL Production of . . 

''PORTRAIT IN BRONZE" 

5TARHING 'SISTER' BESSIE GRIFFIN AND THE GOSPEL PEARLS 

PLUS RAKHEL HADASS 


ISRAELI'S GREAT FOLK SINGER 


MON. NITE JAZZ SESSIONS-BUDDY COLLETTE QUINTET I SWINGSATIONAi GUEST ARTISTS 


THE 


8162 Melrote 


ASHGROVE 

No cover or minimum 


Re»ervitioni: OL. 3-7892 - OL 3-9233 
Admission $1.50 


jFORGET TAXES - GET UP OFF YOUR AXIS AND ENJOY| 

LEROY 'Sloppy' DANIELS 

-PRESENTINO- 

• Billy & Peggy * Cathy 'Yo-Yo' Cooper • Medallions 

VOODO DANCE TEAM DOING "DRUNK GIRL" "BEHIND THl DOOR" 

TALENT SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY - GUEST STARS WELCOME - DANCING 

3 BIG SHOWS NITELY • NO MINIMUM - NO COVER 

JAZZVILLE CLUB - 5510 Holywood Blvd. & Western - HO. 5-1806 

I Plenty of Fre* Parking on Western Ave. Just North of Hollywood Blvd. HO. 5-1t06l 


TOMMY TUCKER'S 

PLAYROOM 

DINERS CLUB & AMERICAN EXPRESS 
CARDS ACCEPTED 

COCKTAILS * FINE FOOD 



4907 W. Washington l^bV.., 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. WE. 6-3730 ^o***"^ ™"" 


JIMMY MADDIN PROUDLY PRESENTS NITELY, 

TERRY GIBBS 

"MR. VIBES HIMSELF" 

PLUS TWO STELLAR ENTERTAINERS 


• AL McKIBBIN 

Former Bassist with Duke Ellington 


• MARY ANN McCALL 

Everybody's Faverit* Vectolist 


Srhrrinlf Ynur S'rl \flnir iii Ih' . . 

ZENDA BALLROOM 

LARGEST DOWNTOWN DANCE FLOOR 

91fi W. 7th ST. (OPPOSITE STATLER HOTEL) 

REASONABLE RENTS — CALL E. BOHLEN. HO. \-fA7(i, MA. 9-9384 

Available for Rentals. Dances, Wedding fieceptions, etc. 


FAMILY NIGHT 
EVERY TUESDAY 


50c 


ADULTS ■•^rw CHILDREN 

UNDER 12 YEARS OF AGE 

FREE WHEN ACCOMPANIED 

BY PARENTS 


■ T M T J 

ADULTS ^ 

60c 



-OPEN- 

F»l -SAT 

SUN ONLY 


CHILDREN 

25c 


CONTINUOUS SAT . SUN. 1 P.M. 
_ 3 TERRIFIC MOVIES - 

STARTS FRIDAY 

"THE FEARMAKERS" 

"DIKING WOMAN AND THE 
SEA SERPENT" 

"ASTOUNDING SHE 
MONSTER" 


Be/ isprii Club Presents 

DINAH = WASHINGTON 


DANCE 



SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

FEBRUARY 21st-5 to 10 P.M. 

In t/ieir annual 

CITATION BALL 


DANCE MUSIC BY GERALD WILSON 
AND HIS 16-PIECE BAND 


DINAH WASHMarON 


ARAOON BALLROOM 

OCEAN PARK 

PURCMAII ADVANCI TlCftni AT All IIADINO RICO«0 SHOPS 


tNEXPtNSIVtlY SArisrriNo 


OUAKANTtiP WORKMANSHIP 


Alpha Service Invites You to . . 
;Put your best looks forward 
on all festive occasions 



• Dyeing * Weaving 
* Alterations * Repairing 


Careful Cleaning * Delivery on Request 


4Jtte 4^/^lplta i^i 


435 E. VERNON AVE. 


eyK^ice 

AD. 2-9363 


m t XFWi l V I LV U TI iff l Nfl 


WSBKMAMiH I F 


CHOICE DRINKS • DELICIOUS FOOD • DANCING 

Everyone's Making it to Jimmy Maddln't Fabylous 


SUHDOWN 


6507 SUNSET BLVD. at Wilcox 

FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE 


CLUB 

HO. 2-8771 


ENJOY CHOICE COCKTAILS - FINE FOOD - ENTERTAINMENT AT— ^ 

LE ROY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 47th & CENTRAL 

• • • featuring PERRY BLACKWELL'5 TRIO • • • 
PERRY LEE-Org«n KIRK WOODS-Drumt JACK McVEY-T«n»r Sax 

LE ROY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 47th AND d^NTRAL 

BOB ASHLEY • SLIM MATHIS • GRADY JENNINGS, Mixelegitts DICKIE BARROW, Ch«f 


Hotel Watkins & Rubaiyat Room 

fo see, hear and enj oy 

Entertainment Mon.-Thur.-Fri.-Sat.-Sun. 
QUiNIN WILLIAMS TRIO 


^^tt^t^^^t^^,^^ 


WE TAKE PRIM IN OUR EXCELLENT 
FOOD AND TOP MIXIOLOGIST5 


HOTEL watkins: 

2022 WEST AOAMS BOULIVARO, AT WESTERN 

BILL WATKINS, Prep. RE. 2-811 


For Your Delight . . . Every Night . . . 

BERT 'Organist' KENDRIGKS' TRIO 

Feoturing TONY BAZ LEY, Drum s and WILLIAM GREEN, Reeds 

ATTIND MAtTY'S ' 



SUNDAY "YAWNING" SESSIONS 

and SUNDAY iVININO MATINIIS 


(ALTO 


MARTY'S 68lh & BROADWAY 




Traol Your Family to the BEST ... EAT FOR LESS at 

COLUNS' RESTAURANT & 
COCKTAIL L0UN6E 

• PRIVATi DINING ROOM • OOTHAM ROOM • OOURM^ lOOM 

4771 W. ADAMS at PALM GROVE Ri. i.JOlo 



IVi ■'' 


T 


►.■^■■•i^*.^^. 


■v*"*^ 


mm. 






V 


V 


-*■' -• -.^> *■■' 


* V?* .i^'-^^T^ -' 


FAST SERVICE 



V,OST • R ENT 


SEL-L. 


BUY 


HIRE* TRADe 


YDUU HND IT IN THE MMNT ADS! 


OUND» SERVICE ' EMPL.OVMENT • PERSONAU 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


. C;" 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


LiGAL NOTICES 


California. Eagia 

CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 
FICTITIOUS FIRM NAME 

The underslfned does hereby 
eertify that 1 am ronductlnK a 
Legal business at 3902 South Den- 
Iter Avenue. City of Los Angeles 
62, County of Los Angeles, State 
of Calitoryla under the fictitious 
firm name of Bob's Tavern. 3902 
South Denker Avenue, and that 
said firm is composed of the fol- 
lowing persons, whose names and 
«daresse.< are as follows, lo-wlt; 
Robert L. Johnson. .1902 South 
Duiker Avenue. Business; 133 
■W>st 73rd Street. Home Resi- 
dence. 

Wimss my hand this 22nd day 
of January. 1960. 

ROBEUT L. lOtNSON 
133 W. 73rd St. 
LA 3, Calif. 
SUta Of California. 
County of Lo.s Angeles s*. 

On this 27th day of January, 
A U., 19«0. before me. Loren 
Miller, a N'otary Public In and 
for said County and State, resid- 
ing therein duly commissioned and 
sworn, personally appeared before 
me. known to me to be the person 
whose name is subscribed to the 
within Instrument, and acknowl- 
edged to me that he executed the 
Mint. 

<{ In wiine..'S whereof. I have liere- 
unto jet my hand and affixed my 
official .«eal the day and \ear in 
this certificate first above written. 
(SEAL) 

LORE.N VtlLLER 
.Votary Public Iti and for 
Said County and State. 
My Commission expires 1962. 
(Publish California Eagle 
Jan. 28, Feb 1. li. IS. 1960) 


C'lifornia Eagle 

12840 

NOTICE OF SALE OF 

REAL PROPERTY 
AT PUBLIC AUCTION 
(Saiy No. 81-A) 
Office ofvThe Tax Collector 


PUBLICATION SERVICES 


AGENTS WANTED; To sell the 
book everyone is talking about, 
ABC PlCrrURE BOOK OF EMI- 
NENT NEGROES PAST AND 
PRESENT. Fabulous commi.ssione. 
WRIT^ ABC. PICTURE BOOK 
PUBUSHING CO.. P.O. BOX 
1-8767. Clmmaron Station, L.A. 18, 
Calif 

Telephone PL. 2-1061, 5-7 p.m. 

SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION 


Instruction Offered 

An 8 w««lc praparatory ceuraa 
for IhoM taking CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMS for U. S. Pott Offiea 
CLERK-CARRIER. Com plat* in- 
formatlan *n4 application* call 

RE. 4-8912 


PIANO & VOICE 
COACHING 

* PIANO INSTRUCTION 

* VOICE COACHING 

Beginners and Advanced 

ELLA HILL TRIPLETT 

Taachar of Piano A Veica Coach 

STUDIOS 

2128 Delaware 

SANTA MONICA 

EX. 3-6963 

the County of Los Angeles, State ! _—/<.uwi-i>o in i- n' 

California. ! BEGINNERS — Violin or Piano 


ELECTRICAL SERVICES 


I DANCE INSTRUCTION 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


ELECTRICIAN — Reliable, 
safe, reasonable, WANTS 
WORK. MA. 90947. 


ELECTRICIAKS 

and 

CONTRACTORS 

Wiring — Repairing — Alteration* 

Call J. J. MASTER 

WEbster 1-1*53 

CRtstview 6-794S 

VErment 8-9124 

SERVICES 


SELL Coleman's nattonaUy 
odTertised hoiueheld prod- 
ucts and eeametiei. Salarr 
9uaionteed plus commission 
Coll now. RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Coleman. 

CAR FOR SALE 


'54 FLEETWOOD — Every- 
thing including air condi- 
tioning, exceptionally clean, 
private party. Call evenings 
EM. 1-8429. Selma Roldan, 
10971 Noble Avenue, San 
Fernemdo. 


NEWER & LARGER QUARTERS 

CAROLYN SNOWDEN SCHOOL 

OF DANCE 

2111 South La Brea Blvd. 

WE. 6-1440 WE, 3-2263 

Beginners Class in Ballet, 

Acrobatics, Modern Tap 

Tots Enrolling Now leans 

MONEYToWAfT 


MONEY TO LOAN 

That Is Our Principal 
Businesslll WE LOAN 
MONEY ON MOST 
ANYTHINGI I 1 
$$$$$ 
Sacausa Some People Do Not Re- 
deem Their Pledges WE ALWAYS 
HAVE MANY CHOICE ITEMS FOR 
SALE AT A FRACTION OF THEIR 
VALUE - CLOTHING • JEWEUY • 
APPLIANCES • X^OLS • RIFLES • 
GUNS. 

$$$$$ 


$10<>o 


NOW RENTING 

ROYAL 



of 


of Ca 

WHBRKA.S, the Board of Suoer- 
visors of the County of Los AnKe- 
les pursuant to tha provisions of 
Division 1. Part 6. Chaoter 7 of 
iy\e Revenue and Taxation Code of 
ihe State 'of Californis. adoDted 
a re.'soluuon approvinic Ihp .sale of 
property hereinafter described; 
and 

\VHERKA.'?. there l.i filed in my 
oHTce written authorization for 
said sale under Ihe hand and soal 
of the .»!iate Controller, to sell 
said property; and 

\\*HKKKAS. the minimum bid 
for each parcel is Ten (SlO.Oti) 
Dollar.' 

THKKEFORE. public notice is 
hereb.v given that unless the said 
property is redeemed as provided 
by law. T. H. L. By ram. Tax Col- 
lector of the County of Los .\n- 
Keles. will. oomnienciiiK February 
a. 1960. at the hour of ten o'clock 
A.M., and contlnulnir from day to 
day In the office of the County 
Tar Collector. ISlu South Hill 
Street, in the Ciiy of Los Anee- 
les, offer for ^ale and .«cll at oub- 
lic auction to the highest bidder, 
the foilowinK described real pro- 
perty: 

Parcel .No. 360, J. G. McDonald 
Tract. .N\V 110 ft. of Lot X. 
Assessed to Fred Saldana Loca- 
tion — Vicinity of WashlnKton 
Blvd. & Tarleton St.. Loa Aneelea 
City. 

Parcel No. 490. Sub of Reyes 
Tract. Loi on SIC line of Ceres Ave 
rota S '^9 deif 45 min W 150.80 ft 
from most .\ cor of Ix)t 1; th S 
29 dee 45 min W i.2ii ft; th 8E 
to a pt in SB line of sd lot SW 
152 ft from most E cor thereof; 
th NE thereon 0.54 ft: th NW 
5793 ft to beg. Part of Lot 1. 
Assessed to Jark Busch Location 
—Vicinity of 8th St. and Ceres 
Ave.. Los Angeles City. 

The forejtoin)? described real 
property Is located in the County 
of Loa Angeiea, State of Califor- 
nia. 

Tor information as to the 
'amounts necessary to redeem, 
provided the rifcht to redeem has 
not previously been terminated, 
apply to H. L. Byram. County Tax 
Collector. 1840 South Hill Street. 
Loa Anseles 15, California. 

If redemption of the property Ls 
not mad« accordlni; to law before 
the first "bid la received, the rlj;ht 
of redemption will cease. 

Prospective purchasers may ob- 
tain detailed infoimnatlon on this 
sale from the County Tax Collec- 
tor 

■ Mted thia 38ih day of Janu&ry, 
1960. 

H. L. BYRAir. Tax Collector 

fPublUhed Jan. 28, Feb. 4, IL 
1960.) 


one-half i'i) hour lessons 
$1,00 call AX 5-9159, 


LEARN TO TYPE AT HOME 

$5 Down-55 Month 
PRACTICE 

TYPEWRITERS 
$4950 

WILSHIRE TOWER 

143 So, Western Ave. 

DU. 3-5605 

SERVICES 


TREE SERVICES 


FINEST TREE 
SERVICES 


SUITS 
FROM 

CRtDIT, TOOl I I 

BANKAMtmCAKD and 

INTERNArfONAl 

LUCKY'S LOAN GO. 

4265 S. CENTRAL AVE. 

^ ^ ^ 5 ^ 
EAmOYMENrlipPORTlSn^^ 


Work at Long Beach Douglas? 

Then join UAW Local 148. The 

DAVIS TREE SERVICE-Topi them ] Union that fights for the right of 


APIS. 

1518 South Vilton 

Between Pico & Venice 

Pbce 
PRESTIGE ADDRESS 

Beautiful redecorated & nicely 
furnished SINGLE APTS. 

• Maid service 

• Home phone / 

• Elevator service 

• Heated swimming pool 

• Entire building is carpeted 

• $70 and up. Utilities Paid 

UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 

Soft Mrs. Bierman in the premises 

RE. 1-5287 


APARTMENT FOR RENT 


New 

SOUTHWAY HOTEL 

A heme away frem heme— 

Iransientt weleeme. 
Purnithed Apts. and Reemi 

^11«5U perwMk 

5119 South Avalen Blvd. 
AD. 3-7033 


all. Big or small 

PRUNING, 

tree men. 


TRIMMING, jail workers regardless of race, 
REMOVING, Expert! color, sex or creed. Contact your 
Specialists in palm] Steward and sign up today. We 


tree trimming, 
hauled away. 


All cuttings 


Call Day or Night 

REpublic 2-1303 


PAINTING t PAPERHANGINO 


INCOME TAX SERVICES 


FEDERAL RETURN 


250 


CR. 4-6061 


CAUFORNIA EAGLE 
15140 
NOTICE OF HEARIN3 
OF PETITION FOR 
PROBATE OF WILL 
In the ,Superior Court of the 
State of California, In and for the 
county of Los Angeles In the 
Matter of the Betate of PRES- 
TON EVERETT WEJUCH, SR., 
ak» Preston E. Welch, aka Pre»- 
ton E. Welch. Sr., Deceased 

.VoUce Is hereby given that the 
petition of Jean Welch Cooper for 
the Probate of the Will of the 
above-named deceased and for the 
is.-'uance of Letters of Administra- 
ilon with the will annexed there- 
on to the petitioner to which ref- 
erence Is hereby made for further 
partlculam. will l>« heard at 9:15 
o'clock A.M., on Feb. 2S. I960, at 
the court rooro of Department 4. 
of the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the Coun- 
I.V of Loa Angeles, City of Los 
Angelei. 

H-^ROLD J, 0.''TLT. County 
Clerk and Oerk of the Su- 
perior ourt of the Slate of 
Callfnrnia, in and for the 
County of Loi Aneeles 
By H. Peaae. Deputy < 

r>*ted Feb. 1. 1960 
MILLER ± MADDOX 
2822 So, Wcatern Ave. 
Lot Angela*, Calif. 

(Puhli.'h in California Eagle 
Feb. 4. 11. IS. 1960 ) 


ROOFING OF ALL KINDS 


WALTER SLATER 
ROOF CO. 

"Personalized Service" 
• TERMS 

• INSURED 
• LICENSED 

• Est. 1918 
1273 S. Cochran Ave., LA. 19 
WEbster 6-5284 


• PAINTER 

• PAPER HANGER 

• LOUVRE WINDOWS 
INSTALLED 

• MISCELLANEOUS 
REPAIRS 

CALL 

R. J. Mac DUFF 
AX, 2-6851 AX, 2-2604 


PLASTERING A REPAIRING 


PLASTERING and 
REPAIRING 

New ceilings— No job too large 
or too small. Guaranteed 
workmanship. Free estimates. 

Rl. 7-3438 


ROOFINa and 
REPAIRING 

Specializing in general roof- 
ing and repairing. We repair 
wood shingles — white roof 
coating and gutter installation. 

WEbster 8-6828 


15682 
CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 

Fictitious Firm Name 
THE LNDERSIG.NED do her* 
bv certify that they are conduct- 
ing a Appllcanca bu.slne.-.' at 4805'2 
W. Adama Blvd . City of Los An- 
geles 16. Couniv of Lo.< .Vngeies. 
Siate of California, under the lic- 
litious firm name of Ted's Home 
Appliance Service and that said 
firm Is compoeed of the following 
persons .whose names and ad- 
dresases are as follows, to-wil: 

Theodore Leonard Banks, Jr. 
3649 Rimpau, Los Angelei. Calif. 
DouKla.s R, Pell. 2849 S. Rimpau, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Business Address; 1301 Nananu, 
Los Angele.v Calif LT. 7-3Tn 

WITNESS mv hand this 3rd day 
of February. ld«0 

/s/Thcodore L. Banks, Jr, 
/»' Douglas R. Bell • 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

aa 

COUNTY OR I>OS ANGELE.S 

ON THIS 3rd day of February 
A n., 1980. before me Attorney 
I^ren Miller, a NoUry Public In 
and for said County and state, 
reaidln* therein duly coramlasloned 
and sworn, personally appeared 
before me Theodore Laonard 
Banks. Jr. and Douftas R. Bell, 
known to me to be the persons 
whoaa nam* ara aubseribed to tne 
wlthJn Inatrument, and acknojf- 
ledjed to me that they executed 

the same. __,,^«. t 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF.- I 
hava hareunto »«t my hand and 
affixad my official »«J V* «if 
and year In thla cerUflctta Urat 
above writtan. (SBAL) 

LOREN Mn . TJSR . 
Notary Public In and for Said 
County and ^tate 
Mv Commission Expire* 1981. 
rubitahed In the California Baffl* 
Newapwar jnab. U-18-». JUreh 3, 


EXPERT ROOFING 

New roofing or repairing done 
quickly and inexpensively. 
Free estimates. 

ALTMAN STA-ROCK 
ROOFiNty CO. 

Republic 4-4935 


SEWING AND KNIHING 


SEWING and 
KNiniNG 

We do all types of sewing 
and knitting expertly. AAo# 
reasonable rates. 

ADams 2-6679 


EXPERT PLUMBING 


DAVIDSON 
PLUMBING CO. 

S4NCE 1927 

24 Hr. Emergency 
Repair Plumbing 

Richmond 9-1048 

WEbster 1-1828 

PLeasant 3-7595 

Any PIcK*— Any Tim* 
INSTRUCTION-MUSIC SCHOOL 


need you, you need us! 

Ed Speed\' Wianecki. 

4120 LonK Beach Blvd., LB. T 

GA. 7-8935 - ME. 4-1985 


SELL CoUman's notionally 
c^Tertlsed household prod- 
ucts and cosmetics. Salary 
guaranteed plus commission 
Call now, RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Colemon. 

heTp^^antbdT 


MAR-FASH-SHO wants girls 

for cour.ses in fashion, 

photo, T*,V, modeling and 

personal grooming. Terms, 

.3425 W, Adams Blvd, 

RE, 5-6447 — RE. 4-9420 


Hair Stylist Wanted 

Glamour Insured Beauty Sa- 
lon. 5011 West Adams Blvd., 
La Brea, Apply in person. 
RE 2-8129 


FEMALE BEAUTT OPERATOR 
WANTED — Shampooing 
only. $12 per day, 5 days a 
week. 13518 Ventura Blvd., 
Sherman Oaks, ST. 4-9065. 

BMSETMiir&srwSTiHiCTWN 


'American 
Barber 
College 

Triple-A Rating 

— 1248 Hour Course — 

— Approved for Vets — 

349 South Hill Street 

MA. 9-3303 

FAMILY INSURANCE PLAN 


FURNISHED SINGLES 
Nice for Couple— Child O.K. 
-Utilities Paid- 
Private Entrance and Bath 
Newly Decorated 
Xlnt. Transp. and Shopping 
Washer — Dryer 
Near Normandie 
$12.50 Weelcly and up 
1225 WEST 39th PLACE 

RE. 2-1423 

WESTSIDE SHOWPLACESni 

Bachelors $12.50 Up 
Singles, $16 and Up 
Doubles; $20 and Up 

• Convenient — Clean 

• Newly Decorated 

• Modern Furniture 

• Elevator Service 

• Utilities Paid 

e Best Transporfaficn 

1501 W. ADAMS BLVD. 
(At Catallna) 


CLEAN— QUIET 

ADULTS ONLY 

Steam Heat - Carpeted 

Furnished - Refrigeration 

Washer - Utilities Paid 

Bachelors - Singles - Doubles 

$48 Up, $60 Up, $85 Up 

Weekly Rates Available 

ALEXANDRIA 
APARTMENTS 

1953^ South Estrella 

(1 BIk. W. of Harbor Freeway) 
Between Adams & Wash, Blvd. 

Phone: Rl. 8-3078 


Thursday, February 11, 1960 


The California Eagle-ll 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 P.M. 1805 
S, Carmona Ave, 2 bd, 1 ba. 
Hardwood floors. Nice tile 
Well bit. LOW dn, LOW mo, 
paymen/^lSee it! Make of. 
UP 0-1647 


DRIVE BY 1631 S. STANLEY 

2 bdrm., 1^« ba. redec. in- 
side and out. this one is 
priced right. 


S5,000 DOWN— 5 bdrms, & den 
2-sty. stucco. 3 full ba, unit 
ht, WE 6-62T7 


INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


OP. SUN.. 1-5, 211416 Lgwd. 

2 nice stuc. hses, dbl, gai. 

3 on lot. Sears nr, Vrmt 1-2 
bdr., nr, to shops, Ix> pr., 
SI. 000 dn, 3 & den nr. Wash. 
$1,500 dn. Poss, beaut, mi*. 
RAFU RE 1-4155 


OPEN SAT. & SUN. 1-5 P.M. 

3434 EklgehlU I>r, 2 stucc» 
units, 2 bd, ea. Vacant. 
MUST SELL, Only $3500 dn. 
Asia Realty Co. RE 2-9155 


FOR SALE. Van Nuys loc, 2 
& den. cor. Has everything. 
$21,750, DI 5-3734 


$5000 DN.— 2-sty, frame 5 bd. 
den, 2\i ba, Whit, DU 8-6426 


STUC. MANSIONS, 5 bd , den 

3 ba, Nr, Victoria and Ven. 
S38,500. RE 1-2372 


5 RM. 2 bdr. stucco nr, Man- 
chester. Try $1000 down, 
DA 3-5064, PL 5-0636 


$595 DN. ^- Payments like 
rent Lovely 2 bdrm. STUC. 

W-\v cpts. disp. extras. Near 
schools PL 7-41.53 


'corner lot. 3 bdr. with' 
i sleeping prch. Avail, Shown 

by appoint, $18,500. Terms. 

1256 W, 62nd St. Ctsy. to 

brokers HO 4-8371 


PLANTATION HOTEL 

$8,00 week and up, newly dec- 
orated rooms, hot and cold 
water in all rooms. Some 
with Tivate showers, FREE 
PARKING, 1104 -E, 40th PI. 
Corner Central Avenue. AD 
3-9328, 


FURNISHED kitchenette, $45 

mo. Furnished room S9.50 

wkly. Good transportation. 

DU, 9-8992 



UNFUR. APTS. FOR RENT 


OHE BEDROOM uhfur. apart 
ment, 1145 E, 70th St 
LO, 1-4263 


7 U. BEAU. New Dlx. Steal 
Corn, Wash, k Claudina. Nr. 
La Brea. Income over $7,200. 

FP $55,250. $10,000 dn, Bldr. 
OR 7-5832 

4 UNIT Pico Sierra BoniU 1 
bdrm, ea. Panel ht, ThMmo 
offer 1 5264 W, Pico WE 3- 

74* 

2 ON LOT. $1000 dn, 1 & 2 bd. 
Clean. 5912-14 Woodlawn 
Ave. RE 2-8248 

4 U. & 3 traUor spcs. sched. 
inc. $2400. $11,000, $900 dn. 
ST 5-5223 

H-1 VU. LOT, 56x100' Close in 
53,800. CL 5-7305 eves, 

3 & 2 STUC. DPLX, W. of La 

Bora, Nr. Pico, $26,500 
Kashu. RE 4-1157 


3 BEDROOM STUCCO $700 dn. 
—$10,950— $88 mo, Nr, W.98 
St. Modern AX 3-6267 


$750 DOWN— 3 bedrm. $94.50. 
Nr. 22nd & Normandie AX 
2-3607 


SI 00 STARTS the deal. Mod 2 
iKlr. stuc. disp. hrwd, PL 
1-0333 


OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 2 & den, 
immac. cond. Priced to sell. 
Tbyo Realty, AX 5-4351 


$1000 DN. Spacious 3 br., 1^4 
ba, Xtra clean. 1514 E. 21 St. 
Only $10,500 Takai Realty 
RE 1-3117 


R-1 LOT, 55x175, Bevly & Van 
Ness, lo. dn., attrac, terms 

MA 4-7071 

NICE CONVALESCENT HOME 

S W. Owner retiring PL 1- 
3943 eves. 

BY OWNER, 9 U. $7,500 yr. 
inc, $46,500, Submit down. 
DU 9-2962 eves. 


SEARS/Plco. Dplx. 3 & 2 bd. 
•65.K200 lot. $5950 dn. 3 gar. 
RE 1-2336 


8-U. 1 BDR. La Brea, jir. Ven. 
$52,500 — $12,500 down 
RE. 1-2437 


LARGE 

FURNISHED 

SINGLE 

' BEST WEST ADAAAS 
LOCATiOrJ 

NEAR CRENSHAW 

RE. 1-7629 
RE. 3-6019 

UTIL. PAID - $70 MONTH 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

VeiM, PUne, Violin, Colle, 

CUrlnaf, Saxephono, Tnimpot, 

Drums, SighHinginf. 

PL M17» 

BUSiNE«"o1pPORTUNiTY 


SERVICE STATION 
FOR LEASE 

Thriving garage and service sta- 
tion on corner of 120th and Cen- 
tral. Needs 'some Investment. 
Ideal fo renergetic owner who is 
willing to build a better busi- 
ness. 

AXministor 3-2830 

PURNi$H»1»OOMri^^ 


ELECTRICAL SERVICES 


ELECTRICIAN 

RELIABLE, SAFE, 

REASONABLE, 

DESIRES WORK. 

CALL MA. 9-0947 

^ATROSuzf 
EAGLE 


FURNISHED ROOMS 
FOR RENT 

NICE ROOMS-WMt of Central. 
Singles and doublet. Privileges. 
Private entrances. Near every- 
thing. Children permitted. 1007 
East 50th St. 

Cell Anytime 
Wlbstw 5-04S5 


• INSURES BOTH .. . 

HUSBAND AND WIFE 

• NO EXTRA COST.. 

FOR CHILDREN or 

CHILDREN BORN AFTER 

POLICY ACQUIRED. 

ALL QUESTIONS ANSWEREDII 

CALL EARL HAOEN 
OR. 7-1486 

westside^ptsTfor rent"'^ 


De Luxa Furnished Apartment 

RENTS FOR $81 

Easily Worth $.1001 

e MODERN SINGLES 

• UTILITIES INCLUDED 

• CHOICE LOCATION 

• HEATED SWIMMING POOL 

PARK ADAAAS APTS. 

3528 W, Adams Blvd, 

at 6th Ave, 

REpublic 3-0642 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

% 

Th» PeopWs Cfiofc* 

960 E. Jefferson 

AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


ROOM FOB MIfT— Bed linen 
and gas h*at, your company 
welcome. RE. 1-5515, 

K 
I 


Quiet, 
Comfortable 

BRICK BUILDING 

FOR ADULTS 
ONLY! 

Furnished * Rofa-igeration 

Washer & Dryer •• Util. Paid 

Bachelors— Singlet— Doubles 

$40 Up; $57 Up, $80 Up 
The Paulson Apts. 

1979S.KTRELIA 

W, of Figueroa, N, of 23rd St. 

AAtnager Rl. 9.t909 

If No Anawer, RL 74450 


^ BACHELOR 

APARTMENT 

ON WEST 20th ST. 

WE. 1-7260 

$60'MONTH 

UTILITIES PAID 


UNFURNISHED APTS. 
FOR RENT 

Large 1 bedroom apartments. 
Less than year old. SouttTeast 
section. Child permitted, 

^55 Par Month 

LU. 7-1870 

ACREAoTroiTsArr 


DESERT LAND 

IN ANTELOPE VALLEY. ROAD 
FRONTAGE ON PROPOSED FREE- 
WAY. ROAD NOW CUT FROM 
LANCASTER TO HIWAY (66), 
10 ACRES $3,000 
$35 DOWN; $35 AAONTH 
GENE WILSON AX. 5-3779 


R-l VIEW LOT 56x100'. 
in. All util, $3,800. 
CL 5-7305 eve. 

REArESTATE FOR SALE 


Close 
Own 


OPEN HOUSES 1-5. 920 S. 
Victoria, Wilshire/Crenstiaw 
area. 3 bdr., 2^ bath In 
beaut, neighborhood. Only 
$3500 dn, 6215 7TH Ave. 
Neat, newly decor. 2 bdr, «■ 
sun porch. Asking $13,500. 
AX 5-4131 


NO DN. GI 5 rm. 2 bdr. stucco 
Dbl. gar. Fenced. $69 mo 
PL 7-2268 


LOW DN. Very clean 2 bdrm 
Near Western, F, P, $9950. 
Kashu, RE 4-1157 


4 U. $23,500. Trade O.K. See 
1139 S. Vermont DU 5-7011 


PROPERTT MANAGEMENT. 

George S. Smith Co. HE 3- 
5914, RE 3-3816 


NOTHING DOWN. 12 apart- 
ments 370 W. 3rd Street, 
San Pedro. Needs Repairs, 

CH 5-1478 ^ 


CORNER 24 UNIT Stucco. All 
2 bdr. 1^3 yr. $1800 mo, inc 
$30,000 dn. Waiting list for 
occupancy Century & Fig- 
ueroa. PL 3-5171 


2 BDR. .& FAMILY RM. Asl<°g 
$13,500. Good loc. on 7th 
Ave. TX. 5-4131. 


$750' DN. 2 on lot. Hdwd. firs,, 
tile. Ige. lot cl. in, PL 4-2827 


PASADENA (nr, Los Robles & 
Mountain, Nice 3 bd., den 
R-3 coirner. 50x175. $12,000 
(adj, lot av§.il.) Mr, Grist 
VE 7-1564 


NEW 4 UNITS 2 bdrs, e^ch 
tile, gar., disp., etc. $42,500. 
Terms or trade. See 2704 So. 
Sycamore. Courtesy to brks. 
HO 4-8371 


12ROOM DUPLEX W. 22nd 
St. $2250 dn, AX 3-6267 


OP. SAT.* t SUN. 1-5. 5420 S. 
Wilton PL 3-bdr. frame. 
Clean. Spac. $1,500 dn'. $13,- 
500, HiH, Invest. Co, AX 
5-4321 


$495 DOWN — $8450 F. P. 2 
bdr, home -r inc. Nr. Slaus. 
PL 7-2268 


WESTERN STAR REALTY — 

1953 West Jefferson Blv^. 
■ RE. 4-2538. $2500 dwn. home 
& income. North of Wash- 
ington on Harvard. Five (5) 
room two (2) bdrm. down- 
stairs and six (6) room 
three (3) bdrm. upstairs. 
This won't last.* Call RE, 
4-2539. ASK FOR WOFFORD 
—WE NEED LISTINGS, WE 
TRADE, BUY * SELL. 


3 Rm. front Apt. 1 bedroom. 
Wall bed, refrigerator. Adults 
only. 

AD. 3-7624 


¥^ 


ARTMENTS FOR RENT 


Modern, 

Comfortable 

Brick Building 

For Adulh Only! 

WELL FURNISHED 
WAShfER AND DRYER 

UTILITIES PAID 
SINGLES AND DOUBLES 

-Frederick Apts. 

1647 W. Eleventh Street 
One Block West of Union Ave. 

$55 - $60 - $70 


DU. 9-761 3 


LANCASTER 
PROPERTY 

Lovely 4 bdrm. 2 bath stucco 
home. Loaded with extras, built- 
ins. Close to school and shop- 
ping. $18,000 full price. Write 
Box 1000, 2101 West Vernon 
Ave., Los Angeles 8, California. 


PALM SPRINGS 
SHOW PLACE 

Beautiful 3-BR.— two baths, swim- 
ming pool, in exclusive area of 
Palm Springs, only $32,500. Low 
down. Owner. 

EX. 6-5422 


SACRIFICE BY OWNER. 3 bdr. 
Den. 2M baths, dining rm. 
2100 sq. ft. All features pos. 
S acre lot, custom-built by 
owner. Valley's finest area. 
Good fin. Asking -$42,500 


LANCASTER BEAUTY 

LOVELY 4-BDRM. — 2 bath 
stucco home. Loaded with 
exras and built in features. 
Close to schools, shopping 
centers, chuches and every- 
thing of importance, $18,000 
full price. Write Box 1000, 
2101 West Vernon Ave., at 
Van Ness. Los Angeles 8, 
California. 


LEIMERT BARGAIN OF THE 
WEEK 

2 LARGE bedrooms and den. 
Reasonably priced for vt\- 
mediate sale by owner. Call 
AXminister 5-2641 week- 
days, l)etween 4:00 and 6:00 
p.m. AX 2-9056 weekends. 

WCOME^PROPERTY FOR SALE 


WEST OF CRENSHAW, N. of 

Washington, $1,500 dn. 9-rm 
stuc. dbl, 2 br.— Ibr. $16,500 
F. P. RE 1-2119 


6 DLX U. 4920 W. 20th St New 
dec, 2-2, 4-1 Bd. Tile sUll 
shwr. 6 gar. $8000 down. 
AD 2-7241, AX 5-7001 


6 DE LUXE UNITS. 6 one bdr. 
each. Modern thruouL Only 
$6,500 down, RE 1-8677 


LEMERT PK. Open daily 2-5 
Modern duplex, 2 bd. each 
$4900 dn. 4221 Creed Ave. 
PL 3-5171 

CALL US FOR 3, 4 & 6 bdr. 

Homes in sthwst, AX 2-9103 


16 APTS. k 6 stores. T.D. or 
trade accepted. RE 2-8572 


GI. NO DOWN. 2 bdr. stuc. 
hard tile, dbl. det. garage., 
good area. PL 4-2827, tU 7. 'I 


2756-58 W. 15th St By Appt 

Attr. 8-rm. dble. Income or 
house for Ige, family. Terms 
HO 5-2188 


OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 p.m. 1303 
Sycamore. 3 k den stucco 
$1250 dn, stuc. die. W^ide. 
Nice L.A. Hi area. 3 U. stuc 
Many extras. $24,500. — 4 U. 
stuc. 2 bd, ea, A buy at 
$29,950. Dai Ichl Realty Co. 
RE 1-2495 


BEAimFUL 3 br» den, 2 ba. 
1 level. -Large yard, patio 
fruit trees, modern kitch., 
dishwasher, disp., carpets, 
dps,, inter, shutters, recent 
redecorated. No city taxes. 
Assume large existing loan. 
Call owner. AX 2-1820 


VERMONT KNOLL 2bd stucco. 
Tile kitchen & bath, stall 
shwr., din. rm., $2950 dn. 
1211 W. 8l8t Do not disturb 
AX 5-3367 


SACRIFICE BY OWNER 4 im. 

2 bdrm. house oh 40x130' 
to aUey, R-3 lot at 144 W. 
97th SL $4,250 net cash. FP 
MA 6-9631 


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1 



""''Tl&JP'f*::-.'- 




*' :-/ 


•The California Eagle 


Thursday, FebMary 11, 1 960 


NEW YORK SCENE 


wIContinued from Page 10) 
Ziegfield Girls, .J. P^ Morgan, 
llkck Sennett "Keystone Cop," 
B«thing Beauties, Buffalo Bill 
Cody, a Police Gazette Girl, 
Jifck Johnson, Society Ladies, 
Cornelius Vanderbilt and a 
group of incensed Suffragettes, 
^U all appeal** while songs, 
nwsic and dance of that period 
ajfe demonstrated. 

It should be a real ball, and 
I'll give you the complete 
scoop in my next column 
Okay?? Swell. However, I 
must mention here that the 
fantastic pageant has been 
most capably produced and 
directed by NBC's and our 
own G«org« Noiford, in co 
operation w^th the Guild's 
chairman, Mrs. Molly Moon, 
Ruth Brown Honored 

Better bring you up to date 
on some of the other happen 
ings on the New York enter 
talnment scene in the past 
week. On Sunday night at the 
Shallmar, there was a Cele 
brity Night honoring lovely 
Ruth Brown and popular sing 
ing star Brook Benton who 
were headlining the sh8w at 
the Apollo Theoter. 


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Billy Daniels at the Copaeo- 

bana. an all-star show In the 
Village at the Club Savannah, 
Billy Taylor Trio held over at 
The Prelude. 

Harrf Belafonte still pack- 
ing 'em in at The Paloce 
Thflcrtre. 

Art Blokey (just returned 
from Europe) and his Jcbx 
Mesaengers at the Jazx GoUe- 
ry, and the return engagement 
of the young South African 
song stylist, Miriam Makeba, 
to the Village Vanguard. 
Wanna know anymore? Well, 
board a jet and I'll meet you. 
But for now, LATER. 

PHIL GORDON. 


*Chazz' Crawford Soimdtra«fc 


AME Talent ItciAy 


(Continued from Page 10) 
vue is Swede AKE PERSSONS. 

who blows trombone, and who 
is referred to as 'The Albino" 
. . . It seems that orchestra 
leader QUINCY JONES, singer 
JERRI GRAY and sax man 
PORTER GILBERT are at- 
tempting to teach Ake Eng- 
lish. 

"When you're learning Eng- 
lish," they tell him, "you have 
to have class." "Otherwise it's 
like fighting a lion in a tele- 
phone booth with a tooth- 
pick." They have told him 
that when you see an ugly 
chick, "you say she looks like 
a gorilla drinking vinegar." 


And that "throwing a brick" i joins the show as the star 
means "to make a pass at alwhen }t arrives in the states. 


cat or a babe." ; If you" don't 
want to be bothered, you duck 
the brick. But if you don't 
want to duck it, ypu wrap it 
up and take it home." A dumb 
person has "the brains of a 
young cockroach" and a 
happy person is "like a fox 
eating sauerkraut." Miss-Gray 
warned him to learn all this 
or more or "when you get to 
America, no one will be able 
to understand you." Incident- 
ally MAL WHITBY phoned us 
that trumpeter CLARK TERRY 
had quit Ellington's band jn 
Brussels to jftin the Paris 
show. SAMS^Y DAVIS JR. 


UNDERPLAYING IT 
ON AN UNDERWOOD 
PEARUE MAE BAILEY in 

town recruiting singers and 
dancers ■ for needed replace- 
ments in her revue that kicks 
off again in late March at the 
Las Vegas Flamingo . .'. Singer 
TOMMY YOUNGBLOOD has 
organized a seven piece band! 
. . . MARTY'S swinging Cock- 
tail lounge hosted a first day 
on earth day pawtee for the 
EAGLE'S ROY SMITH Tues- 
day night! . . . GOOGIE RENE 
*ent us a copy of his "ROMES- 
VILLE" album. A "Classic." 


. . . Actress JU4NITA MOOKE 

nominated for an award for 
"best supporting actress of 
'59" by foreign press , . . Top 

reed man WILtJAM GREEN 
of the BERT KENDRICKS 

combo rushed to Las Vegas to 
aid NAT COLE on arrange- 
ments. Also sat in a recording 
session here with NELSOn 
RIDDLE . . . Since that Price 
Chapel recital, h - • t o n e 
CHARLES REYNO' ^eing 

sought after by a tude 

of sponsors. He -has a . o been 
asked by REV. ARTHUR 
SMITH of UTTEH-McKINLEY 
to join their sacred program 
ming staff! 


(Continued from Page 6) 
was remodeled using the 
genius of Paul R. Williams as 
architect 

Williams, she said, designed 
the wing in the east and the 
wing in the west of the sanc- 
tuary. "I have witnessed and 
experienced a steady stream 
of spiritual as well as mate- 
rial growth fo^ this church, 
through its many great lead- 
ers. 

"Tradition has lived upper- 


most in the minds ci Its mem- 
bers,^' Mrs. Nelson said. 

Other m«inb«r» ot the 
church told the Eafle this 
week that they had never seen 
such a human dynamo as Rev. 
Brooklns and that -they feel 
confident the relocation plans 
wall go according to schedule 
and the CS^neral Conference 
delegations v^rlll be enriched 
for having come in contact 
with the forward looking pro- 
gram of the Mother Church. 


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5000 Attend Funeral of Singe"', Wife 


^ 



DOUBLE FU'SERAL—The douhU juncml at 1 p.m. Monday from Phillips 
Trniple CM E Church nf sinijcr Jesse Rclvin and his wife, Jo Ann Belvin, 
killed last ucrk in a traffic acridrnt near Hope, Ark., attracted one nf the largest 


crowds of mourners ever to witness final rites here in Los Angeles. It was esti- 
mated that some 5000 attended. It took between two to three hours for friends 
to file hy the twin coffins. Picture at left skftws pallbearers carrying out one 


nf the cnjjins. Picture at right shnws terviccs in the church. The body of Mrs. 
Bclvni is sh'iwn at the left, that nf Jesse Belvin at the right. Traffic was pikd 
up fnr hlijcks around the /hurch. (AHnnis) 


Lena Draws Blood in Race Row 




2101 W. VariMn Avaau*. L A. 


Continuous Publication for 79 Years 


AX. 5-3135 


Vol. LXXIX-No. 49 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 


10- 

AX. 5-3135 

Out-of-Town 15c 


— Death in Closet — 


Uses Belt to Hang Self 

Body Found as 


TASTALIZISG ILfNDS — Lena Homes tantalizing 
tan hands can hurl a mean ashtry as well as intrigue an 
audience. The ashtray incident \londa\ night brought the 
crowds swarming to the Cocoanut Grove, where she is 
presently pcrformtng, to see and hear her Tuesday night. 

Lena's Fan Rating 
Skyrockets as She 
Bops Race IHeckler 

By CHAZZ CRAWFORD 

Pulsating Lena Home squelched a heckler the 
hard way Monday night at the Luau restaurant, 421 
N. Rodeo drive, in Beverly Hills. 

When Harvey St. Vincent, of 11724 Sunset blvd., 
vice president of an engineering firm, hurled race 

"epithets at her after she in- 
formed him she could hear 


Student Killed By 
Cops^ Fifth Negro 
Victim in 3 Weeks 

The sorrowing parents took the body of th^ir 
l^year-old son back to Little .K.o<)it "tfeis Aveek slXkv 
be. had been literally blown to bits by police shot- 
guns in a West Los Angeles liquor store robbery. He 
was shot Wednesday and died Saturday. 
€' The Los Angeles City Col- 
lege student — Theotis Graves 


Civil Rights 
Bill Reaches 
Senate Floor 


Comptonites 
Win Battle of 
Dump Site 

Compton residents won a 
well earned victory last Wed- 
nesday when the city's Plan- 
ning Commission turned down 
a proposal to locate a rub- 
bish dump in a 40-acre site 
at 134th street and Central 
avenue. 

At a hearing packed with 
more than 300 residents of 
the area, the commission de 
nied a special permit to the 
Compton Disposal Company 
to use the former Atkinson 
Brick Yard for depositing ref- 
use. 

John Stone, speatc^g on 
behalf of the commission, 
said the decision had been 
arrived at largely as a result 
of the objections by home 
owners adjacent to the pro 
posed dump site and the fact 
that the 139th Street Elemen- 
tary School borders the site. 

A Citizens Dump Protest 
Committee, with John O. Lew- 
is, real estate agent, as chair- 
man, carried on an energetic 
campaign, informing the 
Planning Commission of the 
deterioration of property val- 
uees and the damage to resi- 
dents that would result from 
dust, noise, odors and traffic 
congestion if the permit were 
granted. 


him through the bamboo cur- 
tain that separated them, 
Miss Home "lost control" and 
bombarded him with every- 
thing her tantalizing tan 
hands could grasp. 

Connected 

This included a hurricane 
lamp on the table at which 
she was seated and a couple 
of conch ashtrays. 

She missed with the lamp, 
but connected with one of the 
trays and drew blood. 

St. Vincent was struck over 
the left eye, and it bled pro- 
fusely until he was given first 
aid. 

He had apparently become 
angered when a waiter told 
him he would serve him as 
soon as he finished waiting 
upon Miss Lena Home. 
Lena Incommunicado 

Lena was incommunicado 
to newsmen Tuesday evening 
when I went to the Ambassa- 
dor to see her and get her 
latest photo. 

But the Maitre D' at the 
Cocoanut Grove, where Miss 
Home is currently performirig, 
was not. 

'They call me and call 
me," he said as he kept an- 
swering the phone. "They say, 
'I'm So-and-So and I want a 
table tonight,' and I have to 
answer. 'I'm so sorry, Mr. So- 
and-So, but I don't have any 
tables left!' It's been going on 
like that for hours." 

Ralph Harris, who has been 
Miss Home's manager for 12 
(Continued on Page -4) 


WASHINGTON — With 
southern senators led by ftich- 
ard Russell of Georgia fight- 
ing a desperate rear guard 
battle, northern Democrats 
and Republicans — with a big 
assist from Senate Majority 
Leader Lyndon Johnson of 
Texas — moved slowly but 
surely toward passage of an 
election year civil rights law. 

Prospects are that the final 
legislation will contain little ""^Ist of what police said was 


— was the fifth Negro shot 
and killed by Los Angeles 
police officers within the past 
three weeks in what officers 
described as two armed rob- 
beries, a burglary and an 
escape attempt. 

Other killings 

Other police killings were 
those of James N. Harris, shot 
and killed Feb. 6: Ben Edward 
Pettit felled by police bullets 
on Feb. 8 and Willie Living- 
ston and James Wright who 
were gunned down on Jan. 23. 

Harris, 21, was described as 
a burglar who was trying to 



SEir DIRECTOR— Hen- 
ry A. 'T albert was installed 
Monday as new regmnal di- 
rector of the Urban League. 
(Story Page 2.) 


Director Wilder 
To Get Plaque 


A delegation of officers of 
the Negro Artists Guild, head- 
escape and police said Pettit jcj by Maggie Hathaway, 

president, is .<!cheduled to visit 

the 

Friday 


was shot when he ran from 
Wilshire Police Station after 
an arrest. Livingston, 19, and 
Wright, 18, were killed in the 


Woman Opens 
Door of Closet 

Mrs. Gladys Brown saw a 
terrifying sight when she 
opened the door of her closet 
in Piep-e's Boarding^ House iatf 
Old People, 1705 E. Century 
blvd., last Monday. 

There swinging from the 
clothcspole was the body of 
Wilfred Pierre, 69, a retired 
worker. 

A wide leather belt had 
been wrapped af-ound his 
neck, then looped over the 
pole. Police believed he had 
then slid forward on his 
knees from a suitcase. 

The elderly man left no 
suicide note. 

Raymond Chavez, who lives; 
at the boarding house, said' 
he visited Pierre about 9 p.m.! 


plain of a pain in his arm. 

Mrs. Le&nne Collins, of 1916 
E. 92nd street, with whom 
Pierre had lived until last 
Christmas, told polic-e that. he 

, ,_, . . ...ihad suffered a heart attack at 

set of The Apartment \^^^ ^^^^^ ,^5^ ^^ 24, and 

silver said he might have been de- 


more than provisions for court 
appointed referees to safe- 
guard Negro voting rights, 
ban the use of force to pre- 
vent desegregation of schools, 
and give the federal govern- 
ment additional powers in the 
case of school or church 
bombings. 

AU-Out Drive 

While parties obviously 
were going all-out to make 
voting capital on the civil 
rights issue, Lyndon Johnson 
got out in front Monday with 
a parliamentary maneuver by 
which he got the issue on the 
Senate floor by tacking it on 
to a minor school bill. His 
success brought anguished 
screams from the Deep South 
Democrats who waved the 
frayed Reconstruction banner 
in an effort to hold back the 
bill. 

Russell led the straggling 
southern Democrats Tuesday 
in a forlorn effort to force a 
week's delay on civil rights 
debate but lost by an over- 
whelming 61 to 28 vote. Four 
Republicans — Goldwater of 
Arizona, Young of North Da- 
kota, Williams of Delaware 
(Continued on Page 5) 


ftitund 
In tft« Eogfa 


Editorials 

Church AettTltiM 

Sports ~... 

Tho Too — . 


Bill StnOllwood . 
Dorothoo Fettor 

Pooplo .^ 

Shew ButiBMa . 


6 

8 

8 

9 

10 

12 

14 


liquor store robbery, 

Graves came to Los Angeles 
last summer to live with a 
sister and attend City College. 
He was a -star basketball play- 
er during his high school days 
and was being touted as a 
coming college star. He was 
described as a quiet lad who 
did quite well in his studies. 

Graves moved from his 
sister's home to occupy an 

. (Continued on Page 2) 


to present a 

plaque to Director Billy 
Wilder. 

The plaque is being given 
to Wilder by the guild in 
recognition of his having em- 
ployed so many of its mem- 
bers during the film's produc- 
tion. 

Starring Jack Lemmon, 
Shirley MacLaine and Fred 
MacMurray, 'The Apartment" 
is a Mirisch Company presen- 
tation for United Artists re- 
lease. 


spondent because he was not 
recovering as rapidly as he 
thought he should. 


NAACP Meet 

The regular monthly mem- 
bership meeting of the NAACP 
branch will be held Sunday, 
Feb. 21, at Pleasant Hill Bap- 
tist Church, of which Rev. C. 
A. Henson is pastor. The 
church is located at 261 N. 
Bonnie Brae street. 


French Bomb 
Blast Stirs 
African Ire 




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1- 


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is 




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tn- 


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It 


If RAPS BELT .IROUXD y EC K — If, If red Pierce, 

titirtd. uropt^cd It leather belt arOund his neck emd hanoed 
himself from the cinihes pole im a closet at his S. Lot 
.Du/clcs h'liiic. I R. S. Stnilh.) 

Arrest 41 Students 
At Five-ond-Dimes 


ROCK HILL, S. C— The sit-down strike started 
Feb. 1 by A & T students in Greensboro, N. C. to try 
the previous evening. Pierre,! to break five-and-dime Store lunch counter jim crow 
he reported, did not seem des-{ has spread rapidiv through North Carolina and has 
pondent, though he did com i^q^ errupted in this South Carolina town of Rock 


HUMANITARIAN AWARDSIiriners presente/ S*m- 
my Davis Jr. with their highest award M»nda^ 'night at 
the Moulin Rouge when they held their eighth annual , 
Star-of-Stars Benefit and Sammy brought along the Mav 
trick B/tothert just in cote of any trouble. Pictured from 


left:' Jim Garner, who plays Bart in the Maverick show: 
Arthur Lee Simpkins, concert singer; Gilbert W. Lind' 
say. Shrine potentate; Sammy Davis: Jf'iltiam Watkinsi 
nobei; and Jack Kclley, who plays the TV role of Bret. 
(See Social Page.) (Adams) 


Hill and in Virginia. 

Simultaneously, the wjiites 
are organizing to try to stem 
the tide before it becomes a 
vcrtible prairie fire. 

There have been several 
minor instances of violence 
here, and in Raleigh, N. C. 41 
Negroes have been arrested 
charged with trespassing. 

In Portsmouth. V'a., some 
250 Negro and white teenagers 
got into a number of fist-' ACCRA, Ghana — Prime 
fights at the Rose Department Minister Nkrumah issued a 
Store parking lot. Tuesday. I decree freezing all French as- 
One white student was taken; sets in this African nation as 
to a hospital with an arm in-; Ghana led continent-wide pro- 
jur>'. j tests against the explosion of 

Here in Rock Hill students an atomic bomb Saturday in 
from two Negro junior col- tJie Sahara desert 

(Continued on Page 3) | Tunis and Morocco foltowed 

— — — -closely with official condem- 

: nation of the explosion while 
leaders thoughout Africa de- 
scribed the French bomb test 
as a "crime." 

NkrUmah pointed out that 
the French plan additional 
blasts and said that Ghana 
must take "immediate steps 
to protect itself. 

"Therefore, as a first step, 
my Government has decided 
to freeze as from today the 
assets t>l all French firms In 
Ghana until such time as the 
effects on the population of 
Ghana of the present atomic 
explosion and the future ex- 
Ijeriments referred to by the 
French . Prime Minister be- 
come known," he assertod. 

"Tunisians are profoundly 
shocked and hurt that France 
exploded an atom bomb in our 
Sahara," a spokesman for that 
Government said. In a move 
reflecting the anger of Mor- 
occans over the French atcwn- 
ic test, the country's leading 
political party demanded im- 
mediate withdrawal of "Fren» 
ch occupation troops" and re- 
storation to Morooco <A her 
Saharan territories. 

The conservative Istiqlal 
(Independence) naity called 
on "all peoples and govern- 
ments of Africa" to hold a 
conference immediately. 


»:;. \^- - 


\.-ki»5s&- A^fei 


'''Si&?^'fe; ; .i : » 


\ 


.:irt(J^I£jtLu 


2-The California Eagle 
Thursday, February 18, 1960 


Talbert Heads 
iJrban League 
i^egional Office 

Bt BARBARA MOUNTS 

The National Urban League 
reactivated its regional office 
at 5514 Hollywood blvd. Mon- 
day under the direction of 
newly appointed Henry A. Tal- 
bert. 

The office has lacked a di- 
rector since the death some 
time ago of Miller Barbour, 
former regional director. 
Introduced Director 

Gifford Phillips, chairman 
of the West Coast Committee 
of the Urban League, an- 
nounced the appointment and 
introduced Talbert and Nelson 
C. Jackson, assistant to Lester 
Granger, at a press conference 
at the Statler-Hilton Hotel 
Monday morning. 

Talbert, a professional so- 
cial worker, has served as di- 
rector of group welfare for 
the Church Federation of Los 
Angeles and is president of 
the llOO-member Los Angeles 
chapter of the National Asso- 
ciation of Social Workers. He 
received his master's degree 
in social work from USC. 

Jackson, associate director 
of the national office, and 
Talbert have just completed 
a tour of the seven branch 
offices which, comprise the 
western region: Denver, Phoe- 
nix, Seattle. Portland, San 
Francisco, San Diego and, of 
course, Los Angeles. 

CeonUnates Activities 


"JWH"' U""Ji^i'U" 



II HAT. NO STEAK? — I'hree-ueek-old Uclphine Hrown, slioivn in the arms of iter 
mother, Mrs. Rose Brou-n, frowns as dental surgeon. Dr. Christopher L. Taylor, pre- 
pares tn extract n tooth. Assisting, attractively , is nurse Gloria Sutton. (Adams) 


Order Levittown 
To Sell to Negroes 

TRENTON, N.J.— The New Jersey Supreme Court 
The regional office functions ji^g^ Tuesday told Levittown that Negroes cannot be 


as an administrative and con 
sultative headquarters to as- 
sist local branches and coor- 
dinates surveys to ascertain 
housing, health, welfare and 
employment conditions. 

The regional office also will 
formulate plans for speeding 
cultural advancement and as- 
similation of new families in 
the area. A recent survey indi- 
cates more than 1000 newcom- 
ers a month are settling in 
the "port of entr>'" area — 
from the warehouse district 
downtown south to 103rd 
street, between Alameda and 
Avalon blvd. 

Over - Crowding 

The influx of these people 
causes over-crowding in hous- 
ing. It also pinpoints the need 
for increased job opportuni- 
ties, Talbert pointed out. 

In Los Angeles, said Tal- 
bert, the percentage of new 
houses available for non- 
white occupancy is one new 
house for each 134 persons, 
while in predominantly white 
areas it is 1>2 new homes for 
each person. 

According to Jackson, thej 
civil rights issue will be im- with his wife at .3616 Olympi- 
portant to both parties at the ad drive. He is the father of 
forthcoming conventions and I two sons, Henry Jr., 15, and 
elections. He also said thati Allan. 14. 

the Urban League surveys in-! Open house at the office 
dicate that there are marked I was held Monday afternoon 
gains in employment and vot- 1 and evening with board and 


barred from buying homes on racial grounds. 

The 6-0 decision, with Chief Justice Joseph Wein- 

traub not voting, upheld the ?^— — 

Appellate Division ruling that ^''thm the purview of the law 


builders of houses financed 
with federal funds cannot dis- 
criminate. 

May Appeol 

An attorney for Levitt & 
Sons, Inc., builders of the huge 
white-only tract, said the deci- 
sion probably will be appealed 
to the U.S. Supreme Court. 

The decision applies both to 
Levittown and to Green Fields 
Farms, Inc., in Gloucester 
County. Negroes claim they 
have been denied the right to 
buy homes in both develop- 
ments because of their race. 

Levitt has sold 3000 of the 
16,000 homes in the Levittown 
community located between 
Trenton and Camden. The 600 
homes in Green Fields have 
all been sold — to whites. 

The Supreme Court opinion 
written by Justice Albert E. 
Burling, held "that the public 
assistance rendered to the 


against discrimination and 
that the Division against Dis- 
crimination . . . has jurisdic- 
tion to hear and decide the 
charges . . . and that the sta- 
tute on which the situation is 
based is valid." 

The opinion said further 
that "Freedom with regard to 
property is not inviolable; it 
is subject to the reasonable 
exercise of the legislature's 
police power." 

The complaints against Le- 
vittown were tiled by Willie 
R. James and Franklin D. 
Todd of Burlington, while 
those against Green Fields 
were filed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Luther Gardner of Camden. 

Julius Wildstein, chairman 
of the Law and Social Action 
Commission of the American 
Jewish Congress, was head of 
a group of lawyers represent- 
ing the Negroes who sought to 


ing privileges for Negroes 
Vhile social integration is lag- 
ging far behind in such areas 
as service clubs and lodges 
and in churches. 
Talbert is married and lives 


staff members of the Los An- 
geles office and some 200 rep- 
resentatives of labor, manage- 
ment, city, county and govern- 
ment agencies and commun- 
ity members present. 


housing in question places it buy homes in Levittown. 

The court referred both 
cases to the Division against 
Discrimination of New Jersey. 
Levitt & Sons last year signed 
a stipulation agreeing to 
waive hearings before DAD 
and abide by the Supreme 
Court's decision. 


Little Rock 
Bombers 
Still Free 

LITTLE ROCK — Although 
the FBI has joined the inves- 
tigation of the bombing of the 
home of one of the five Negro 
students attending Central 
High School, no evidence has 
been reported that indicates 
a solution to the crime is near. 

Last Tuesday night a bomb 
was thrown at the home of 
Carlotta Walls while she and 
others were asleep in the 
house. 

Fortunately no one was in- 
jured, and damage to the tix- 
room house was rejx>rted as 
light. 

Although a number of per- 
sons have been interrogated, 
there have been no arrests. 

Student Killed 

(Coptinued from Page 1) , 
apartment with a fellow stu- 
dent. 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Fiza Graves, the young stu- 
dent was sent to Los Angeles 
by his parents because of 
college conditions in Ar- 
kansas. 


Warner Bros. 
Hires Tubbs 
As Publicist 

Widely traveled newsman, 
Vincent Tubbs, has been em- 
ployed by one of the film 
capital's largest studios as a 
publicist covering the entire 
USA, it was announced by 
Warner Bros, this week. 

Tubbs left Hollywood Fri- 
day to begin work in Phila- 
delphia on exploitation of 
'This Rebel Breed," a William 
Rowland production being re- 
leased by the Warner Bros, 
studios. He is scheduled to 
visit New York, Detroit, Pitts- 
burg and Chicago before the 
World Premiere of the film in 
Philadelphia March 4. 

A former war correspondent 
for the Afro-American News- 
papers, Tubbs covered both 
the Pacific and European 
phases of World War II and 
was later chosen by the Negro 
Newspaper Publishers Asso- 
ciation for a special White 
House mission to Africa. 

Tubbs then worked as man- 
aging editor of the ACfo- Amer- 
ican, associate editor of 
Ebony, and managing editor 
of Jet. 

He was a senior publicist 
on 'The Defiant Ones," and 
has been connected with the 
Columbia Pictures production, 
"All the Young Men," starring 
Sidney Poitier. 

This month, with Edward 
T. Clayton, former executive 
editor of Jet, Tubbs formed 
the Hollywood public relations 
firm of Tubbs, Clayton, Young 
and Morehead. Each member 
is a veteran newsman and 
accounts they are already 
servicing include Johnny 
Mathis, Sidney Poitier, Sammy 
Davis Jr., Damita Jo Gibson, 
Lionel Hampton, the Shriners. 
Dooto Records, United Artists 
and Warner Bros. Pictures. 



HAPPY FA AH LY— Mr. and Mrs. G. William McKinney. of 2641 Somerset drive. Pose 
with their two adopted children, Gregory, age Jjj '^ears, and the baby of the family, 
Alice Marie. 10 months. The little lady was adopted by the McKinneys just before Christ- 
mas from Children's Home Society of California. 


S. F. Jim Crows 
Chinese Diplomat 


Friends Honor 
Emily Portwig 

Friends of the recently de- 
ceased Mrs. Emily Brown 
Portwig, 1544 W. 35th street, 
joined together to present a 
sizable donation in her mem- 
ory to District 11 of the Amer- 
ican Cancer Society. 

Mrs. Leora R. Estwick, a 
life long friend of Mrs. Port- 
wig, presented the check in a 
brief ceremony held last Fri- 
day at District 11 Information 
Center, 4360 Leimert blvd. 


VICUNA 

The vicuna is the smallest 
of the camel family. It has 
never been domesticated. 


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I us that a man of his (Sun's) 
position would fit nicely into 
I the neighborhood," she said. 
But she encountered wliat 
she called "mass hysteria." 
!' "Values Would -Crop' 
SAN FRANCISCO— The consul general of Na- sun said his anonv-mous 
tionalist China was jim-crowed here this week when caller claimed to represent a 
he sought to purchase a home in the "white" suburb! committee of neighbors and 
of San Mateo. asked him to withdraw his 

Consul General Patrick P. C. Sun said that in o"er on the house, 
view of the opposition en- 
countered he is dropping 
plans to purchase a hom( 
there. An anonymous tele 
phone call, he said, made hirr 
realize he would be unwcl 
come. 

Won't Buy Home 

"I am sorry this happened,"! • preE STEREO • 
he commented, "but I will not ^ 
go where I am not wanted. 1 1 £ 
have a wife and children to j; 
think about." ' o 

Sun told reporters he had £, 
made a deposit on a S30,000 • 


1 "He spoke about real estate 

lome owned by Mr. and Mrs. j values dropping and he gen- 
.Villard Barnes, after being erally made me feel I was not 
^hown it recently by a San i wanted out there," said Sun. 
.Mateo real estate agent. | -j told him that if that was 
Mrs. Barnes said she began! their view, I would take back 
to tell her neighbors of the, my deposit. I'm not interested 
impending sale. "It seemed tojin the house any more." 


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Five-and-Dime Stores 
Close in Sit-Down Drive 


(Continued from Page 1) 
leges sought service at lunch 
counters in four stores Sat 
urday. The stores closed the 
counters. 

A group of "white citizens" 
thereupon sought to force the 
stores to re-o{)en the counters, 
on a segregated basis, and 
began distributing handbills 
urging customers not to pa- 
tronize the stores until further 
notice. 

In one of the drug stores, 
a Negro was knocked from 
the stool on which he was 
sitting by a white youth. A 
bottle of amonia was tossed 
into another drug store. 

In Raleigh, N. C. the 41 
were arrested at a shopping 
center, Cameron Village. Inc., 
when the owner protested 
their presence. The Negroes 
were on the sidewalk at the 
time, but the owner contended 
that the sidewalk was private 
property. 

All 41 were released on $50 
bonds. 

In North Carolina, student 
demonstrations have taken 
place in nine cities. Similar 
demonstrations have occurred 
in two cities in Virginia and 
one in Florida. 

In Greensboro, the F. W. 
Woolworth and the S. H. 
Kress five - and - dime stores 
closed their doors last Satur- 
day noon when students jam- 
med the stores. 

More than 400 A & T stu- 
dents , were on hand and 
almost a-s many whites. A 
struggle followed for posses- 
sion of seats at the counter. 
A telephone report said a 
bomb had been planted in 
one of the .stores. 

Two-Week Truce 

Following closing of the 
stores, students from A & T 
held a mass meeting and 
voted to allow management 
of the two chains two weeks 
in» which to work out a sat- 
isfactory plan to meet their 
demands. 

Students from three girls 
colleges — Bennett, all-white 
Greensboro College and Wo- 


man's College of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina in 
which several Negro students 
are enrolled — cooperated in 
the movement. Their student 
leaders also voted to accept 
the truce proposals. 

Both Kress and Woolworth 
.■stores in Greensboro opened 
for business Monday morn- 
ing, but their lunch counters 
had not reopened up to Tues- 
day afterooon, and no date 
for their opening was 
announced. 

The drive began late Mon- 
day afternoon, Feb. 1, against 


the Woolworth store. Four 
students, all freshmen, took 
seats and were refused ser- 
vice. On Tuesday a group of 
approximately 30 occupied 
seats from the noon lunch 
hour to closing time. 

The number built up daily 
until Friday when a counter 
campaign was started by 
white youths of high school 
age. Some pushing and shov- 
ing occurred and several white 
youths were arrested for dis- 
orderly conduct. The ■ drive 
then spilled over into the 
S. H. Kress Store. 



AMOSG U ORLD'S BEST DRtSSt.D— Named as one 

of the "iiorld'<: bat drencd n-oi^en." by the (Jontiiicrit(d 
St\le Club in Los Anqelcs. Mrs. Lionel Hampton is pic- 
tured licnrnitj one of her three mink coats. It is a Tour- 
maline Breath of Spring Mink in full length, one of 1 1 
major tur piaes in her fabulous wardrobe, lihieh includes 
oru/inals from the leading fashion houses of Paris, Rome 
and H onrikomi. (See story Page 10.) 


Successor's 
Face, Voice 
Like Daddy's 

WASHINGTON — Elder 
Walter McCollough, Washing- 
ton tailor shop owner who re- 
portedly bears a strong re- 
semblance to Daddy Grace, 
has been named to succeed 
the late Bishop Charles M. 
(Sweet Daddy) Grace as the 
spiritual head of the three 
million members of the United 
House of Prayer for All Peo- 
ples. 

McCollough was selected 
during a meeting here of 24 
elders of the church last week. 
Looks Like Daddy 

Unlike Sweet, Sweet Daddy, 
McCollough docs not paint his 
fingernails red, white and 
blue, but his facial features 
and his voice are said to be 
strikingly similar to the late 
bishop's. 

Two other top contenders 
for the post. Elder Henry Price 
of New York, and his brother, 
Elder Arthur Price of Norfolk, 
Va., bear little or no resem- 
blance to Grace. 

McCollough has been acting 
as presiding elder of the con- 
gregation since shortly after 
the death of Daddy Grace, in 
Los Angeles, on Jan. 12. 
Son in Los Angeles 

Meanwhile, a search has 
been launched by executors of 
the will of Daddy Grace to 
find a missing son to whom 
the bishop left $2000. 

The son, Marcellino Grace, 
now about 32 years old, is be- 
lieved to be living somewhere 
in Los Angeles. He was born 
of the bishop's marriage to 
his second wife, Angeline 
Montana Grace. That mar- 
riage ended in 1936 when 
Daddy obtained a divorce. 

Daddy Grace made no pro- 
vision in his will for cither of 
his two wives. His first wife 
was Mrs. Jennie Lomba 
Grace, whom he married in 
Now Bedford. Mass., in 1909. 
She has filed a legal action 
contending she and her 
daughter are legally entitled 
to two-thirds of Daddy's esti- 
mated 25-million-dollar estate. 



The California Eagle— 3 
Thursday, February 18, 1960 


JUDGE Slf'OR\ IN — Judge Bernard S. Jefferson is congratulated as he is sworn in 
as judge of the Municipal Court Feb. 11 at the city courthouse. From left: ,1tty. Loren 
Miller, publisher of the California Eagle; Judge David l( illiams; Judge Jefferstn and 
(icorge A. Beavers. Jr. Judge Jefferson uas sivorn in by Justice .Mildred L. Lillie of t^ 
District Court of Appeals. (Smith) 


% 


2 Brothers Face 
Murder Charge 

Two brothers face hearings Feb. 26 on a murder 
charge growing out of an alleged fight outside the 
42 Club, 4215 S. Central avenue. The charge was 
filed following the Feb. 10 death of Walter L. Lee, Jr. 

38, address unknown. i» 

Held to answer are Ray-f^"^^ numerous abrasions and 


lacerations. 

He died in General Hospital 
Feb. 10. 

Saw It All 

Following his death, an as- 
Lee was struck down bv ani-''^"'' with a deadly weapon 
auto Feb. 3 at 42nd and Con- charge against the two 

brothers was changed to one 
of murder. 


nold Alvin Morris, 24, and 
John Cullcn Morris, 30, both 
of whom listed their address 
as 5328 S. Avalon blvd. 

Struck by Auto 


tral, when he ran out from 
between two parked cars into 
fast moving traffic. 

Police said they were told 
that he was backing away 
and. trying to escape from the 
Morris brothers, who reported- 
ly were chasing him in an at- 
tempt to cut him. 

Lee was critically injured, 
with what was reported as 
a basal skull fracture, com- 
pound fractures of the legs 


Raynold Morris told police 
he didn't know what hap- 
pened. Then he said he lived 
in the Dunbar Hotel and that 
he "saw it all." He continued, 
'That guy that got hit by the 
car had just run out of the 
liquor store." 

His brother, John, said that 
he was down at 42nd street 
on the night of Feb. 3 and 


Libraries Told 
To Stay Open 
OnWeel(ends 

On motion of Supervisor 
Kenneth Hahn, the County 
Board of Supervisors this week 
instructed County Librarian 
John Henderson to rearrange 
county branch library sched- 
ules to insure that all 
branches are open to the pub- 
lic on Saturdays and Sundays. 

Hahn pointed out that some 
of the libraries are open dur- 
ing morning hours on week 
days when it is not (fenven- 
lent or practical for the public 
to use them and are closed 
on Saturdays and Sundays 
when the public does have 
the time. 


that he had a beer at the 
Dunbar Grill. "Nothing out of 
the ordinary' happened while 
I was there," he said. 


Powell to Lead 
Goodwill Tour 
To Visit Cuba 


NEY YORK — Congressman 
Adam Claj^on Powell an- 
nounced this week that he is 
inviting a special group of 
Americans to join him on a 
planned Goodwill Tour of 
Cuba. The first such venture 
of an officiaJ representative 
of the American government, 
the tour is aimed towards 
effecting a better understand- 
ing between the Cuban and 
American jseople. At the same 
time, it is Powell's desire to 
ease the growing tension 
between the American and 
Cuban governments. 

Friendly with the Castro re- 
volutionary government since 
it came into power in Jan- 
uary 1959. Powell has been 
outspoken in his belief that 
there isn't anything wrong 
between the two countries 
which a little understanding 
could not straighten out 

The Goodwill Tour has been 
set for the George Washing- 
ton birthday weekend and will 
be highlighted by the annual 
Cuban carnival season. 

For his tour. Congressman 
Powell has invited an inter- 
racial group from several 
large cities. 

Frisco NAACP 
Election Upheld 

NEW YORK — NAACP elec- 
tions in San Francisco and in 
Richmond have been upheld | 
by the national board of di- 
rectors of the association. 
Both elections had been con-| 
tested. 

Challenged elections ir 
Anchorage, Alaska; New Ro| 
chelle, N.Y.; Newark, NJ.f 
St. Louis, Mo.; and Sullivai| 
County, N.Y., were also uj 
held. 

Still under consideration 
an election dispute in Phil 
dephia. 


VfiROTHERHOOD WEEK 
FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 


y^«^. 


SPONSORED BY THE NATIONAL C(3NFER?^Ce OF 


CHRIS;iANS 4 JE 


JE\^S 


For the past 27 years, the National Conference of Christians and Jews has sponsored a nation-wide observ- 
ance of Brotherhood Week. The president of the United States is Honorary Chairman and millions of Americans 
participate. 

Brotherhood Week is only a part of the work of the National Conference which is a civic organization 
engaged in an educational program for better human relations 365 days of every year. It enlists Protestants, 
Catholics and Jews who— without compromise of conscience or their distinctive and important religious differences 
—work together to build better relationships among men of all religions, races and nationalities. 

The entire inter-racial staff of the oldest and most important metropolitan weekly newspaper, CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE, and its participating advertisers sincerely hope that during Brotherhood Week all people will begin to get 
to knew and better appreciate each other— and thus makke the true spirit of Brotherhood a year-'round practice. 


©KOTTMllSKl®®© WilK 



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Frances 'Glory' ;■ 


•4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 


Loren Miller, Publisher 

The California lagl* stands for cempUts integration of 
Negroes into every phase of Americein life through the democratic 
processes. 

We favor: 

1. FEPC en local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 4^ 

Published fvery Thursday for Ov^r 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Van Ness AXminster 5-3135 

4J Ite <jmpoytani i^Xewspapey 


Wrong-way Elijah 


The so-called Muslim move- 
ment has been pretty well con- 
fined to the east and midwest 
but Georgia born Elijah Muham- 
mad strayed into Los Angeles 
last week to preach the outworn 
doctrine of race hatred upon 
which his movement is based. 

Every Negro resents the dis- 
crimination and segregation that 
colors every phase of American 
life, and that sets bounds to his 
political aspirations, his employ- 
ment opportunities and his 
choice of a place to li\e. But 
even the most obtuse Negro 
knows that tremendous gains 
have been made in the past few 
years in the fight against segre- 
gation and discrimination. 

We're a long ways from the 
ideal of first class citizenship 
and we're going to have to spend 
a great deal more money and a 
lot of time and effort before we 
reach that ideal. There are times 
when the most hopeful among 
us give way to despair. 

Elijah Muhammad is tr>'ing to 
capitalize on that despair; he's 
trying to tell us that the only 
way Negroes can overcome pre- 
judice is to create a countervail- 
ing prejudice against all white 
people. That leads him to assail 
integration and to preach the 


doctrine of complete racial sep- 
aratism. There's no difference be- 
tween what he preaches and the 
South African doctrine of Apar- 
theid and the Mississippi brand 
of segregation. 

The Muslims have carried 
their theories so far that they're 
even trying to tell us that we 
ought to have "black stat'es" in 
the Union. He wants Negroes 
shoved off on racial reservations 
from which all whites will be 
barred. His views in this respect 
echo the Communist plans for a 
"Negro nation" of a few years 
ago. 

Elijah Muhammad's limited 
appeal to Negroes doesn't lie in 
their acceptance of his plans for 
a completely segregated way of 
life. Few of his followers exam- 
ine his theories closely enough to 
understand where he would lead 
them. What does attract are his 
strictures cni racial discrimina- 
tion and his angry denunciations 
of prejudice. 

The answer to the Muslim 
movemenl will not be found in 
prosecution of him or his follow- 
ers hut in wiping out customs, 
practices and laws that deny Ne- 
groes equality before the law 
and equality of opportunity in 
American life. 


Foot in His Mouth 


George Meany, president of 
the AEL-CIO, has fallen into the 
habit of putting his foot in his 
mouth every time he talks about 
Negroes and labor's relations 
with Negroes. 

Last fall, he asked A. Phillip 
Randolph "who the hell appoint- 
ed you spokesman for Negroes" 
and told the Pullman Porter pre- 
sident, in effect, that Randolph 
would do better to listen to la- 
bor's views on race relations 
than those of the NAACP. 

Last week, Mr. Meany let 
loose a blast in which he at- 
tacked the prospective promo- 
tion of A. Clayton Powell as 
Chairman of the House Labor 
Committee and rapped the New 
York congressman for his "racist 
views." 

Mr. Meany knows as well as 
anybody else that Hou.se chair- 
manships are assigned on a sen- 


iority basis and that Rep. Powell 
has the requisite seniority for 
the Labor Committee chairman- 
ship. We can't recall any attacks 
by Mr. Meany on southern Dem- 
ocrats who have a virtual mono- 
poly on both House and Senate 
committee chairmanships. Their 
racist views are hardly a secret 
even to a man like Mr. Meany 
who seems to have little grasp 
of what's going on in politics. 

The irony of the Meany attack 
on Powell is that a portion of it 
stems from Powell's insistence 
on anti-segregation riders on 
housing and educational legisla- 
tion. That insistence has led to 
the defeat of such legislation be- 
cause southerners are deter- 
mined to get federal benefits^and 
cling to Jim Crow at the same 
time. 

Mr. Meany seems to be doing 
his best to drive a wedge between 
Negroes and labor. 


Lyndon s Not Wanted 


Governor Brown said in his 
apology that he didn't under- 
stand why California Democrats 
booed the name of Senator Lyn- 
don Johnson when the Texan 
was mentioned as a presidential 
possibility. 

We've got news for the govern- 
or. The booing was an expression 
of the fact that California Demo- 
crats don't want the tall Texan 
in the presidential chair, and 
that they're not fooled hy his 
latter day espousal of milk and 
water civil rights legislation. 


The harsh truth is that Lyn- 
don Johnson has built a political 
career out of opposition to civil 
rights in his home state and that 
he has whooped it up for White 
Supremacy with the best of them. 
Now that he wants to be presi- 
dent he's trying to lull the vot- 
ers into forgetting where his 
heart lies on the civil rights is- 
sue. 

The boo may be an indelicate 
political weapon but it is a very 
handy device to let politicians 
know where the voters stand. 

They're against Lyndon, Pat 


Battleaxe & Bread 

^ By tester B. Granger 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. _ There 
were a number of reasons 
why I felt brisk and gay as 
I got off the Cincinnati Lim- 
ited in mid-morning and met 
Charles .Steele, executive sec- 
retary of the Louisville Urban 
League. One reason, of course, 
was that I came by train in- 
stead of plane. 

Twenty years and over a 
half - million 



Grangai 


miles of plane 
ravel ha\e 
not yet made 
me like it. 
The .seats are 
too confining, 
the weather- 
depend ent 
schedules are 
too uncertain 
and^thp air- 
lines are too 


prone to goof on tlie matter 
of re.-^erv-ation.s. Just the week 
before, a rPSPr\ation clerk 
.^old me a tir-kel to Pltt.i^biirgh 
for a New York flight that 
had been taken off, and then 
— to arid iniury to iniury — 
failed to rpcorri my name as 
a passpiiKPF which destroyed 
any chance of his error being 
di.<;povpred before too late, 
Rpsult. 1 sat up on an all- 
night tram ride back to Man- 
hattan. 

Chance to See 

So this trip, I took no chan^ 
ces and ga%e m>self a chance 
to see tlip countryside as it 
.should be .<;ppn — pa^smg 
tlirougli it instead of flying 
l."i.n(iO or 20.()00 feet above it. 
Sliding along between Cin- 
cinnati and I^ui.svillP. the 
train moved at a rate fast 
enough for mp to get where 
1 was going and slow enough 
to let mc see where I was — 
and that's the way travel 
should bo. 

I had a chance to look at 
the little farm houses tucked 
away under the side of a hill 
or squatting along the side 
of a creek. I watched dirt 
roads weave in and away 
from tJiP railroad tracks and 
I remcmbprcd how g(X)d it 
u.scd to bp to drive over dirt 
road, 'way, 'way back in 
the days when most roads 
wprp dirt and most drivers 
had time to u.so them. 

I had the feeling l'\e so 
often had before — sad sym- 
pathy for the young Manhat- 
tanitcs land Brookiynites and 
Bron.xitcs and all the other 
prisoners of megalopolis! who 
never in their live.s will en- 
joy walking barefooted down 
a country road, feeling cool 
earth squash up between their 
toe'-, smelling the good smells 
of. freshly-turned farm soil 
and all the other softly pun- 
gent odors that drift by and 
|)ause quieth — if they 
should be patient — to .see 
and hear the small things of 
the woods and fields scurry 

by. 

Arrived Smiling 

It was remembrances like 
these, after a good long sleep 
and a leisurely breakfast 
that 1 ate at a table instead 
of from my lap, that brought 
me off tlie train smiling. U 
was aLso anticipation of see- 
ing old friends and making 
new ones at that evening's 
annual meeting of the Urban 
League. 

For my love affair with 
Louisville goes back for more 
than 40 years — when I 
was a World War I officer 
candidate in the artillery 
school at Camp Taylor, close 
by. Louisville was a charm- 
ing, sleepy, hospitable semi- 
southern city in those days. 

I liked its pace, it-s neat 
frame and brick houses, the 
way in which "everj'body" 
went to church Sunday morn- 
ing and brought home com 
pany to after-ch urch Sunday 

Lena Home 
In Good Form 

(Continued from Page 1) 
years and who is also her ad- 
visor in times like these, 
wouldn't give us a rundown 
on ju.st wTiat St. 'Vincent said, 
except that he was "loud talk- 
ing" and that he said plenty 
to arouse Lena's "great dis- 
pleasure." 

Harris said Miss Home 
didn't want to repeat the 
hateful words lest crackpots, 
seeing them in print, pick 
them up and follow her tor- 
mentor's lead. 

The ashtray throwing ocxrur- 
red just after Miss Home's 
husband, Lennie Hayton, had 
left their table to make a 
phone call. 

As St. Vincent's words 
echoed across the room, and 
Lena's face lit up with anger, 
management became alarmed 
and called the police. No 
charges were made,' however, 
and there were no arrests. 

Miss Home's press relations 
advisor made it clear that 
Lena was not seated at the 
bar, as some papers had re- 
ported. 


dinner. And I fairly loved 
those dinners of roast chick- 
en and fluffy mashed pota- 
toes, with turnips and peas 
marching after and with 
slabs of deep dish pie drop- 
ped on top of the whole bus- 
iness. Ah, me' 

Crack in Jim Crow 

But principally I arrived at 
Louisville with pleasurable 
anticipaUon because of the 
chance to see what had hap- 
pened in town since my last 
visit four or five >ears ago. 
(Golly! Was it that long^) 
Then Louisville was making 
the big shift from the 19th to 
thp 20th cpntur>'. 

Louisville Municipal Col- 
lege (for colored! had been 
merged with Lx)uisville Uni- 
versity and thp dpan of the 
former harl been incorporated 
into the facufty of the latter. 
I It ua.s incorporated instead 
of integration, because tlie 
issue of what to do about the 
rest of thP Collpge's faculty 
had brpn duckpd. 1 

Public parks had been 
made truly public parks. No 
segregation. A tiny crack had 
been made in the Jim Crow 
walls of hotels. Colorpd I/iuis- 
villians had ad\'anced to po- 
sitions of staturp and influ- 
pncp in thp cit.v govprnmenf. 
LouisviUp was still gracious 
and attractive, but it wasn't 
sleep.\' any longer. 

To Measure Change 

And now I would have a 
chance, during 'he npxt cou- 
ple of days, to measurp the 
latest .strides takpn — school 
integration, npw political 
gains, increases in the total 
city as well as the Negro pop- 
ulation — and sample how 
the people now feel about 
tho>e strides. 

Had they been long, strong 
strides taken firmly, or little 
mincing. pussyfoot steps? 
This is one reason why 1 nev- 
er get tired of moving around 
the country on Urban League 
busines.s. Because there is no 
better way of knowing what's 
really happening in the ra- 
cial picture, and because tak- 
ing looks at different parts 
of America e\ery Uvo or three 
years often gives one a chance 
to measure the reach of 
change, and its significance 
even better than home folks. 
So I meant it. when I got 
to the end of the passenger 
ramp and saw Charlie Steele 
(all six-feet two of himi wait- 
ing for me and I grabbed his 
hand and said, "Us really 
good to see you. Charliel" 


A Look 
At Books 


THE SAMUEL GOLDWN MO- 
TION PICTURE PRODUC- 
TION OF PORCY AND 
BESS, produced by Ray Frei- 
man. Random House Pub- 
li8h«rs. New York, 19S9; 34 
poges. SI. 


By JAN EDWARDS 

The Random Hou.se publica- 
tion of Porgy and Bess is the 
kind of bookone should leave 
casually lying around, per- 
haps on a coffee table or any 
other p*lace where it will lure 
your guests into turning its 
pages and consequently en- 
abling them to enjoy the de- 
lightful color photographs 
which are masterpieces of the 
photographer's art. 

This hard-covered book is 
actually a very elaborate sou- 
\enir program, available in 
bookstores. It does not out- 
line the DuBo.se Heyward 
story of "Porgy" nor does it 
print any' of the famous 
Gershwin music or lyrics. It 
does, however, give an ab- 
sorbing account of the hi!}tory 
of the opera from its birth- 
place on "Cabbage Row" — 
which becomes Catfish Row in 
the story— right up to the 
Goldwyn motion picture pro- 
duction in Todd-AO process. 

A biography of thp compos- 
er and author is included. Al- 
.so short profiles of the stars, 
director and artisans who took 
part in the making of the 
motion picture. An entertain- 
ingly informative article by 
Deems Taylor adds interest to 
the book and titles of the be- 
loved Porgy and Bess songs 
are listed. 

Anyone looking for a gor- 
geous color portrait of Sidney 
Portier, Dorothy Dandridge or 
Pearl Bailey will find it in 
this book. 


Testimonial for 
Kenneth Hahn 

Sui>ervisor Kenneth Hahn, 
will be given a tribute by his 
friends and associates at a 
testimonial dinner scheduled 
for March 15. 

The dinner - dance in his 
honor, will be held in the 
International Ballroom of the 
Beverly ilUton Hotel. 



mmm 


^T7 2 >A.oUHT5 


Virginia Tries to Disbar Jgscha HeifctZ 


NAACP Defense Attorney 

EMPORIA. Va.— Thp fif.sf attempt to (ii.^bar an 
\AACP lawyer for partiripatine in civil rights cases 
met with (ielay hei-e P'ririny. A thrFO-juflge State Cir- 
cuit Coui't ordered Vircinia's attorney to file, within 
21 da.\s, an amended hiU of partinilars specifymc in 
detail the alleged act.'; and activities of Samuel W. 
Tucker which constitute impropei- or unprofessional 


conduct. 

Tucker, a member of the 
legal staff of the Virginia 
State Conference of N.\A''P 
Branches, was charged with 
unprofessional conduct for his 
role in connection with three 
cases dating back to 19.")fl. 

In one case he acted a.s dp 
fense counsel for Jodie Bn,iey, 
a Negro sharecropper indicted 
for the slaying of Luther P. 
Rockwell, a white landlord, in 
19.'jn. In another 1950 case, he 
a.ssisted the Commonwealth's 
attorney in the prosecution of 
a white man accused of rap- 
ing a 16-\ear-old Negro girl. 
And in the third; in 19.^2. he 
represented Tabb Watts, a 
Negro, involved in a fight w-ith 
a while man. 

The court's ruling ref)uiring 
filing of an amended hill of 
parli<ulars followed argument 
by Williain R. Ming of Chica- 
go, one of four NAACP defense 
lawyers. Others ucre Robert L. 
Carter of New York, NAACP 
general coun.sel: 01i\er Hill, 
Richmond; and Herbert Rcid, 
Washington, D.C. 

Ming argued that the 
charges were too vague to 
warrant consideration hy llie 
court. He asked that a motion 
to dismiss the charges be sus- 
tained. 

Questioned by Presiding 
Judge J. Garland Jeftcrson, 
Jr., the Chicago lawyer cited 
the complaint in the Bailey 
case. Nothing in the complaint 
or in the bill of particulars in- 
dicated that Tucker had en- 
gaged in any improix^r acts; 
on the contrar>. he said. 
Tucker had provided the ac- 
cused man with his constitu- 
tionally guaranteed defense. 

The trial room in the cen- 
tury-old Greensville County 
Courthouse w a s jampacked 
with NAACP officers, mem- 
bers and friends from all sec- 
tions of the State. The court- 
room Tias seats for only 108 
persons. An additional VM\ 
stood in the rear and lined up 
along the walls. Save for the 
judges, court attendants and 
"daily newspaper reporters and 
a half-do/en otlicrs everyone 
in the crowded courtroom was 
colored. 

The NAACP Board of Direc- 
tors at its meeting in New 
York City on January 'l, 
pa.ssed a resolution expressing 
full confidence in Mr. Tuckers 
"personal and professional in- 
tegrity," and pledging "the 
full resources of the Associa- 
tion to his support in his fight 
to vindicate his right.s to use 
his professional talents in the 
Interest of social justice." 


U.S. Aids 
Housing Bias, 
Miller Says 

NP:\V YORK— Two members 
of the Board of Directors of 
the NAACP and a member of 
the staff are among 17 con- 
tributors to the new quarier- 
Iv, The Journal of Intergroup 
Relations, published by the 
National A.ssociation of Inter- 
group Relations Officials. 

Board members .Mgernon D. 
Black of New York City and 
Loren Miller of Los Angeles, 
•and John A. Morsell, assistant 
to the Association's e.xecutive 
secretary, are authors of 
srholarly papers contributed 
to the winter issue, the first 
edition of the new publica- 
tion. 

Writing on "The Quest for 
("ommuniiy," Dr. Black holds 
tliat intergroup relations has 
now become a profession. The 
intergroup worker, he points 
out. has special problems, not 
the least of which is perform- 
ing in the "midst of extreme 
ideological conflict." 

Millers contribution is an 
article on "Government's Role 
in Housing Equality." Federal 
housing agencies, he charges, 
have been the chief arcliitects 
of today's "gaudy superstruc- 
of residential segregation." An 
attorney who argued one of 
the decisive restrictive cove- 
nant cases before the United 
States Supreme Court. Miller 
has pla.Nod a vital role in ef- 
forts to topple this "gaudy 
superstructure." 

In the article, he calls for 
a "complete reversal" of fed- 
eral housing policy in order to 
undermine the jim crow struc- 
ture of housing. Until recently, 
he asserts, governm.ent policy 
has been designed to assist 
the housing industry which 
has long been committed to 
racial segregation. 

The significance of "Legal 
Opposition to Desegregation" 
is recounted by Dr. Morsell 
in his article of that title. 


Foreign Born 
Committee Will 
Hold Confab 

The lOth annual conference 
for the Protection of Foreign 
Born, will take place on Sat- 
tjrday, April 2, at the Larch- 
mont Hall, 118 N. Larchmont. 

The conference will review 
10 years of activity, of the 
L.A. Committee, w-hich in- 
cludes the defense of 150 
non - citizens in deportation 
proceedings. 


Heart Sun. 
Plans Told 

Ten local wonien have been 
named Heart Sunday unit and 
district leaders for the 1960 
annual Heart Fund collection 
to he conducted in February. 
Appointments were announc- 
ed this week by Mrs. Curtis 
G. Carr, 2015 4th avenue, re- 
gional Heart Sunday chair- 
man. 

"Many of our Heart Asso- 
ciation volunteers assisted in 
previous Heart Fund and pro- 
gram activities," Mrs. Carr 
said. 

Mrs. Carr met this week 
with her local lead'ership re- 
sponsible for the success of 
tlie seventh annual residen- 
tial collection. Heart Sunday, 
this year a four-day weekend 
observance, will be completed 
on Feb. 2S in all communities 
of the Los Angeles County 
Heart Association. 


Violin Course 
Set for UCLA 

UCLA IS now accepting re 
gistration for class»'s in the 
field of music and theate» 
arts which will be conducted 
by some of the nation's great- 
est masters. 

Violinist Ja.scha Heifetz in 
his role as University of Cali- 
fornia Regents Professor of 
Music has completed a tour of 
six of the University's cam- 
puses in order to inter\-iew 
promising student candidates 
for the University Elxtension 
Master Violin class he wnll 
conduct at UCLA this spring. 

In late January and early 
February Mr. Heifetz was hold- 
ing personal auditions for 
those qualified and was select- 
ing eight students and 10 
auditors for his spring semes- 
ter class. A number of scholar- 
ships are available to out- 
standing candidates. 

Ron C. Carver, director of 
the Jerry Lewis Workshop at 
Paramount Studios and come- 
dy writer for U.P.A. Pictures. 
is conducting a course in Pro- 
fessional Comedy Writing, 
at University of California 
Extension in downtown Los 
Angeles. 

Featured are the fundamen- 
tals for actors, writers and di- 
rectors covering joke formu- 
las, characterization, situa- 
tion, construction, timing, 
censorship. Orientation for TV 
and all media is planned. The 
course will include 12 Mon- 
day evening sessions, 7-9:30. 

Dr. Feri Roth will give a se- 
ries of 12 weekly lectures on 
"Musjc of Today." Planned 
for Monday evenings in tlie 
Music Building at UCLA, the 
course begins with the impres- 
sionism of Debussy and ends 
with the jaz7. of Gershwin and 
the atonality of Schoenberg. 
No previous training is re- 
quired. 


PLANT FISH BY PLANE 

The California Department 
of Fish and Game used a 
twin-engine airplane to plant 
6.540,927 trout in 1959. 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

'Til. Important Newspaper' 

2101 W. Vernon Av«. 

Los Angolos 8, Calif. 

AXminster 5-3135 


LOREN MILLER 
Pubiittier 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXIX 


Feb. If, IfM 
No. 49 


leai 

sen| 
Feb 
Ishl 
\V. 


Ki 
T< 


GRACE SIMONS... Exacutiv* Editor 

F. P. WALLER. Jr...._ Adv. Mar. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

- —Circulation Mqr. 

CALME RUS8 Offica Mor. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

t. O. Allen 1512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, Cal, Ph. EX. 6-15*1 
STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 
1907 aoth Str««t (Upctalra) 
Phon^ EXbrook 


SUBSCRIBE NOWI 

D $4.00 for 1 Year 

B $1.50 for 3 Months 
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Adjudication Decree Number I^SZZt 

Date of Adjudication July 1. 1t23 

Pubiithed every Thursday by The 

California Eagle Publiahlng Co., 

2101 Weat Vernon Avenue, at Van 

Ness, Los Angeles 8, Calif. Entered 

•s Second Class Mstter November 

3. 1137, at the Post Office at Lot 

Angeles, Califernia, undw the Act 

af March 3. 1«7«. 

REPRESENTED NATIONAUtV 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWKPAPERt 

MS Fiftti AVIMIU* - 

Hem York 17. New V.rk y 



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-LV 


Louisiana NAACP 
Bacic in Business 

Federal Court Rules Association Need 
Not Reveal Membership List 

NEW ORLEANS— The NAACP is once more 
free to function in Louisiana without revealing its 
list of membership, according to a i-uling handed 
down last week by a three-judge federal court. 

The court denied the state'^*^ 

contentisn that the NAACP isl'ssued against the NAACP last 
in any wav similar to the|Oct. 9 barring organizational 
Ku Klux Klan. The 1 a w, activity. It had been sought 
under which action had been ^^ State Senator Willie 
brought again.it the associa 


tion Has one pa.«ised in 1924 
fn restrain the activities of the 
KKK. 

Full Steam Ahead 

In New York. NAACP Execu. 
ti\e Secretary Roy Wilkinsj 
hailed the ruling and called 
upon thp Loui.siana State Con- 
fprence of Branches to revive 


R a i n a c h, president of- the 
Louisiana White Citizens 
Councils, who at the time was 
a candidate for the office of 
governor of the state. 

The federal court ruling 
stated that requiring the 
NAACP to file membership 
lists would be in violation of 
the freedom of speech and 



all activity immediatelv and! ^■'^^^'^'''y ^'^^s*. of the First? 
take up where it left off last, '^'^^"^"'^"^ f"."^ 1*1^^"* P™' 
October. 

A temporary injunction was 

Mexican Art | 
To be Exhibited 


cess clause of the 14fh Amend 
ment to the Constitution. 
No Violence 

"Unlike the Ku Klux Klan," 
.^jaid the court, "the NAACP, 
however unpopular in Loui.si- 
ana, officially and unofficial- 
Twenty nine of M ex ico'sl '•^' i-''" not shown to be an or- 
leading "artists will be pre- ganization dedicated to un- 


<!ented. beginning Tuesday, 
Feh. 23. atTPie Westside Jew- 
ish Community Center. 5870 
W Olympic hlvd 


lawful intimidation and 
violence." 

The court said further that 
to require compliance by the 


MEHARRY HEAD CITED— Dr. Harold D. i^'eit, center, president of Meharry Med- 
ical ColUfje, is show-n accepting/ Board of Supervisors' scroll from Gilbert W. Lindsay, 
left, deputy to Supervisor Kenneth Hahn. at n banquet Tuesday. Others are Dr. James 
ll'hitmorp, maiter of ceremonies, second from left, and Dr. Julius Jf^. Hill, president of 
the Los Anpeles Alumni Association, riqht. (Smith) 


Democrats, GOP Jockey 
Over Civil Rights Issue 


The exhibition. "Mexican 'NAACP with the 1924 act and 
Art — Today and Tomorrow,", another act pa.ssed in 1958, 
includes 51 oil paintings. ■A'''- No. 260, "would require 

the impossible and is clearly 
unconstitutional." 

The NAACP, in its allega- 
tions, asserted that to make 
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Fed- 1 known its membership list 
eral Judge Robert L. Taylor i would subject its members "to 
last week ordered the Knox- economic reprisals, loss of em - 
viUe S«"hool Board to submit ployment, threats of physical 
a plan for desegregating the! violence and varied hostile! 
cit> > schools by April 8. I acts." i 


Knoxville Ordered 
To Integrate Schools 


'Continued from Page 1) 
and Butler of Mar>land — lined 
up with 24 Dixiecrats in the 
Russell maneuver 

Stronger Bill 

Meanwhile, proponents of 
stronger civil rights legisla- 
tion laid plans to amend the 
bill now on the floor. Leaders 
in the fight for stronger legis- 
lation took these steps: 

Senator Morsp (Democrat, 
Ore.1, introduced resolutions 
to discharge the judiciary and 
rules commitees from jurisdic- 
tion over all civil rights bills 
if they have not acted by Feb 
25. Morse is a strong civil 


[rights advocate but opposed 
Llohnson's method of bringing 
jup the issue. 

Sens. Douglas tDemocrat, 
Illinois), and Javits (Republi- 
can, New York), said they 
would introduce a sweeping 
new bill embracing most of 
the proposals sponsored by 
them and 1.'^ others last year, 
plus npw features to insure 
voting rights and crack down 
on "hate bombings" and 
lynch ings. 

Sen. Keating, of New York, 
introduced an anti-lynching 
bill which would give a jury 
power to impose the death 


Ten Commandments 
To be Shown 

A religious movie entitled 
"The Ten Commandments" 
will be shown on Friday eve- 
ning. Feb. 19. at By Way of 
the Cross Baptist Church, .'^9.30 
S. Western avpnue, at 7:30 
p.m. 

Rev. C. F. Kyle, pastor of 
the church, said this was a 
cost-free public showing. 


There are 6r)0,(X»0 vicims of 
rheumatic disease in Southern 
California alone. 


penalty. The measure, which 
Keating said bore administra- 
tion approval, was referred to 
thp .ludiciarv Committee. 


The California Eagle— 5 
Thursday, February 18, 1960 


Rkh Stakes 
Scheduled for 
Harness Meet 

Featured by tw6 $20,000 in- 
vitational events lor the top 
horses in the country, West- 
em Harness Racing Associa- 
tion will present the richest 
spring season in its 14-year 
history during the 22-day sea- 
son opening March 12 at San- 
ta Anita, it was revealed this 
week by Pres Jenuine, WHRA 
vice president and general 
manager. 

Jenuine announced a stakes 
slate of 22 races totalling 
$139,(X)0 and featuring the 
$20,000 California Trot and 
the $20,000 Californian Pace 
Both Californians have been 
upped $5,(y)0 from previous 
years and will be raced this 
year on an invitational bas- 
is. Such horses as 1959 $75,000 
American Trotting Classic 
champ Senator Frost, Charm- 
ing Barbara, Lumber along. 
Widower Creed, Adios Paul 
and Lumber Bill among 
others are expected to receive 
invitations. 



AID LEAGUE DRIVE— The Church Division of iht 
Los Angeles Uraban League last week won the trophy for 
reporting the largest number of new members during tht 
organization's current drive for 5000 members. Mrs. Othe- 
lia Boger, general campaign chairman, teft, presents tht 
trophy to Leon Mosby Jr., coordinator, and Mrs. Harnett 
H. Jordan, chairman, right. 


Clement Attlee 
To Speak Here 

"The Future of Democratic 
Government" has been an- 
nounced as the title of a ma 
jor address on foreign rela- 
tion by Lord Clement Attlee.' 
former British Prime Minister. 
at Los Angeles State College, 
March 2, at noon in the col- 
lege g\'mnasium. 


100.000 Goal Set 
By Local NAACP 

A membership rally to spur the drive for mem- 
bers to the Los Angeles branch of the NAACP is 
scheduled for Sunday, March 6, at 3 p.m., at the Sec- 
ond Baptist Church, 24th street and Griffith avenue. 
The Rev. J. Raymond Henderson is pastor of the 

church. >' 

The branch has set itself] "fissioned to write pep songi 

the whopping goal of 100,000^°'' ^^^ '^"^^■ 

members, and has undertaken 7^,^ '"^^^^u""' T^T^f^ 
. I of officers and board or direc- 

to obtain this number by tors are stressing the impwt- 


March 27, the membership 
committee stated this week. 


ance of an all out drive to in- 
crease vastly the organiza* 
The drive is dedicated to tion's membership. 


four "Home Front" heroes who 
have given generously of their 
time and talents to the asso- 
ciation in the past. They are 
Mrs. Zella M. Taylor. Mrs. 
Matilda Parker, Lorenzo Bow- 
doin and Dr. H. Claude Hud- 
son. 

Mrs. A. C. Bilbrew. composer 
and producer, has been com- 


The branch hopes to make 
a vital contribution to the 
fight for civil rights both in 
Los Angeles and throughout 
America, and to fight specific- 
ally to eradicate the abuses of 
police authority, to eliminate 
discrimination in housing and 
to increase the registration of 
the Negro voters. 


r.i<oriji;Kij(H)D week 


W5 


The '^ ipk 

Nation?,! ■*' -J^- ?i ► 

Confeience 5 x ^.^ ft 
of 
_ CH KlSTl AN S iind J E WS 


The National Conference of Christians and Jews was founded in 1928 by Charles Evans Hughes, Newton D. 
Baker, S. Parkes Cadman, Roger W. Straus and Carlton J. H. Hayes. In 1934 a Denver, Colorado, priest, Monsignor 
Hugh McMenamin, suggested the idea for Brotherhood Week. It was first observed as a single day in that year. 
The National Conference has sponsored the observance since its inception. NCCJ believes that Brotherhood is giv- 
ing to others the same dignity and rights one claims for himself. NCCJ believes that brotherhood can be made 
a normal and natural part of everyday living. NCCJ believes that cooperation on social and civic concerns among 
Protestants, Catholics and Jews will promote the "Brotherhood of Man under the Fatherhood of God." 

The California Eagle urges you to patronize ONLY those businesses whose policies are i/i accord with these 
basic beliefs. Remember that whatever you do constructively, in even the smallest way, will help bring about a 
better day. 



H> Fnrnr HrrMherhnnr1 All Year 

ANGCLUS MOTORS 
SERVICE, INC. 

WE HONOR 

INTERNATIONAL CHARGES 

CHRYSLER PROP. 

SPECIALISTS 

TJOO J. WtSTIRN »!_ 1-H71 

LOS ANGdIS 


ED'S MARKET 
AND LIQUORS 

G''9re'-,e» - Delicatejsen - SundnM 

FRESH FRUIT & VEGETABLES 

IN BUSINESS 24 YEARS 

11508 Wilmington Av«. 

LOgan 6-5704, Loi Angalas 59 


H'orJt for Brnlhtrhond .ill Year 

THEODOR OF 

CALIFORNIA 

229 South Lot Angeles St. 

Lo* Angelet 

MA. 4-9561 


'Our Bf^t HiTucf nn 
Brnfherhood Week ' 

"The Flame Room" Cafe 

512 W. ITH ST. MA. 2-8972 

LOS ANOIIIS 

"Wl WIICOHU rOUK TKADf" 


We Fndnrte nnd ^nln'f Rrnthfr- 

hnnfl for Vmi f an>l h rcprim 

Better Homes ■ Church 


Cor«rnercial 


Add itioni 


QUINNETT 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Gsn«ral Contractort 

Licensed - Insured - Bonded 
FREE ESTIMATES 
V. H. QUINNETT 

PL 7-1089 PL. 5-9676 

1707 W. 121it St., L. A. 47 


'Work n rr/i Brnlhtrliooii 
.ill Yrar' 

LEBANDON 
KNITTING MILLS 

JERSEYS - TEXTILES 

90S EAST EIGHTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES 14 


We Support Brotherhood 

MABRA JANITOR SERVICE 

LICENSED AND BONDED 

FLOOR WAXING AND 

POLISHING 

WINDOV/ WASHING 

OFFICE BLDGS. — SHOPS 

RESIDENTIAL 

mtl ISTIMATl 

"COMPLETE JANITOR SERVICE" . 


PL. 4-0564 


Moreland Electric 
Service 

Rfsirt<>nti,il and rommprrial 
All Work Cuaranteert 

10009 COMPTON AVE. 
WATTS, CALIF. 

LO. 4-3865 


CLICK BROTHERS 
LUMBER COMPANY 

ALL TYPES OF LUMBER 
Building Materi;)! — Hardware 

OPEN SUNDAYS TO 3;30 
NO DN. PYMT.— FHA TERMS 
13355 Telegraph Rd Whinief OX 3-3110 
5«00 S. (roadway. I. A. AD 4-3551 
914 N. Victsry Bl., Brb. VI 9-1683 


Southern California 
Upholsterers 

Frank D. Adams, Prop. 

Retail, Wholesale & Repair 

PL. 1-5036 - 6805 S. Hoover 

Los Angeles 


BBOTUh.Rtinoj) WEEK . . . 
(or PEACE and FBEEDOM 
Believe It' 

Line II' 

Support It! 

BEAUTY CAR WASH 

3505 RODEO ROAD 

AX. 2-4847 

LOS ANGELES 


VETERANS GUARD 
SERVICE, INC. 

Serving Industry 

Over 30 Years 

8020 South Vermont Ave. 

Lot Angelet PL. 2-3159 


SUPER 
AUTO SERVICE 

itryirtt th* IVatff Aracr 

?") Year? Aulomotiv* L'xperiPnre 

Featuring Autom^ft'C Traniminion 

Work 

ConipIeK' Auiomoii\e .S'T.ii'e 

Raaionable Price* • Guaranteed Work 

Ste'-'ing Lewii. (y^r\t9r 
UOOO Wilmington LOfain 9-4685 


Support Brotherhood 

Monolith Portland 
Cement Co. 

"Cement for Every Type 

of Construction" 

332i SAN PIRNANDO ROAD 

LOS ANGILES 65, CALir. 

CI. 7-8211 


GOULSON PLUMBING CO. 

Se'ving tK« SoutHweJt Area 25 yeart of Deoendable Se'vic* PaC'f'e Water 

Heater Corporation Gla^s Lined Water Heater* Unconditionally Guaranteed 

for 5 Years and 5 Years Pro-Rrated 


4121 SO. CENTRAL AVE, 


LOS ANGELES 


AD. 2-7087 


ATLAS PAINT AND 
WALLPAPER STORE 

Complete Line of Paints, 
Wallpaper and Linoleum 

GEORGE HECKEROTH 
11014 So, Main Street 

PLymouth 7-2266 


'U> Endorxf Sational 
Brotherhood M'prf* 

BOWIE PIES 


BEST PIES IN 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

4607 S. MAIN AD. 1-1138 
LOS ANGELES 


CENTRAL RENTALS 

Hospital Beds 

Wheel Chairs — Crutches 

Sickroom Supplies 

Rollaway Beds 

Vermont and Exposition 

Los Angeles RE. 1-6882 

1026 Exposition Blvd. 


FLEX- STR ANA/ 


^'0oy/ra£^^^ 



MADISON RICHFiaO 
SERVICE STATION 

LUBRICATION - WASHING 

POLISHING AND TUNE-UP 

HOURS: 7 A.M. TO 7 P.M. 

SUNDAY 8 TO 4 

6401 S. BROADWAY, UU 

PL. 1-«44t 


LOWENBRAU IMPORTED GERMAN BEER 

WISDOM IMPORT SALES GO. 

Los Angeles 35, Calif. 


SUNSET PET SHOP 

r.'^L-VL & rMSUAF^ AMMAI..'^ ny ALL K1NI>S 

KXPHRT ANI.MAL GU 1 DA.VCBI 

7568 SUNSET BLVD. HO. 9-8972 

LOS ANGELES 

"IVa Appreciate Your Patronage" 


•WE EAVOB BnOTHEBHOnn ALl^ YEAB' 

BOSWELL SHELL SERVICE STATION 
4762 $. CENTRAL AVE. AD. 1-0910 

"Where Teur Potronoje /• Appretioferf" 


Fluorescent Tube Service & Exchange Co., Inc. 

— Distributor for lamps and fixtures — 

• WEATHERPROOF • BLACKLIGHT • FUSES • BALLASTS 

• INCANDESCENT • FLUORESCENT • PHOTO • SLIMLINE 

• FLOODS • PATIO LIGHTS AND FIXTURES • STARTERS 

FREE, FAST DELIVERY 
10824 South Broadway, Los Angelet PL. 6-1481 


"We Endn-r^e \nttnnnt 
Brotherhood Week' 

RAM KNITTING MILLS 

Manutatturart e# 
leys' Swcoteri 

1355 SO. MAIN ST. 
lOS ANOEIIS Rl. 7-9612 


TifOMAS TV RADIO SERVICE 

FAST DEPENDABLE SERVICE 

FOR THE SOUTHWEST AREA 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

AUTO RADIO - HOME HI-FI - RECORD PLAYERS 

5319 SO. HOOVER ST. PL 2-0250 

Wl HONOK lANKAMfPICARDS 


H> Fnrnr Brotherhood All Year 

A. J. WILSON 

POWER MOWER CENTER 

KIS(. O LAWS MOWEBS 

Engine Repairing and Exchange — Sharpening 

Easy Starting Guaranteed 

New Power Motors and tdgmrs 

1137 West Century Mvd., PL. 4-6167 


GREAT WEST EGG INDUSTRIES 

PACKERS OF QUALITY FRESH BROKEN & FROZEN EGGS 
OELIYEBED DAILY 

Best-Tax, Whole Eggs, Egg Whitfs. Sugar Yelks, Sail Yelks, 

Plain Yolks, Dried Eggs, Shortening 

PACKED BY H. TEICHNER t SONS EGOS 

2183 EAST 11th 


f^diton 6-7538 


We are proud to endorse 
National Brotherhood Week 



im «MAt AlUUmC t MCMC TU COWaMV 


COAST ADDING 
MACHINE CO. 

NEW & USED ADDING MACHINES & 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

SALES - REPAIRS 

1844 Hyperion St., Los Angeles 27 
^ NO. 3-3163. 


BBOTUEBHonn WEEK . . . 
for PEACE and EHEEOOM 
Believe It' 

Live V! 

Support Itt 

CALIFORNIA 

STAMPING 

& MFG. CO. 

Aircraft Parts & Exhaust 

Systems — Missile Components 

Patterns & Dies 

909 East 59th Street 
Los Angeles 1 


ifVe Salute National Brotherhood If'eek 
Compliments of 

FIRESTONE 
DENTAL GROUP 

1300 E. FIRESTONE BLVD. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

John B. Barnes Dentistry for Children 

Kathryn L. White Dentistry for Children 

Ernest J. Foster Doctor of Dental Surgery 

Walter R. Tucker Doctor of Dental Surgery 

Booker T. Tucker Doctor of Dental Surgery 


'■M> Sniiite Sniional 
Brotherhood Week" 

* CITY 

PLYWOOD CO. 

For the Lowest Prices on 

PLYWOOD. DOORS. 

HARDWARE, MOLDINGS, 

WINDOWS, FRAMES 

* Plus % Off * 

for Cash Purchase 

OVER $ 40 - 5% 
OVER $ 100 - 8% 
OVER $ 250 - 10% 
OVER $ 850 - 13% 
OVER $1250 - 15% 

Write or CalJ for 
Free Cetologues 

CITY PLYWOOD CO. 

AD. 3-S193 

5S53 SO. MAIN ST. 

lOS ANOILIS 3, CALir. 



NEW RAINCOATS on phone we cut the cost of wet-weather re- 
lines do a better job of sealing out pair work. Economy like this helps 
harmful moisture. Now, by plastic- us give you the most for your tele- 
coating wires inside phone cables, phone dollar. 

We work to make your telephone dollar go further in California 

^ Pacific Telephone 


/ 


"t -*i.^*-4.._» ^ 


r 



ut^. 


MIMSIf-.RS UMTE FOR RALLY— Mrmhcn of the 

E/if'lift Miiiiffrrr L >U'>n ore shotin In4tnii tntf a recent 
trirrlttKi :^'hf'r pinris x^rrr I'linpleted In present Rev. M/irlm 
I.iither Kiiifi nil t eh. JS. I lie I nlerdenomuiatirmnl .M itm- 
trrinl .iliuime and the I nion nre j'linlly prewiting the 


speaker in a three ehureh rally. Rei\ P. 
Baptist Lnian: Rev. Jerry //'. Ford, 


national Jllmnee. Rei\ E. A. 
man for the rally. (Adams.) 


J. Ellis heads the 
the Interdenomi- 


Andcrson is general chair- 



-The California Eagle 


BARBARA MOUNTS, CHURCH EDITOR 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 


-SANTA- 
MONICA 
NEWS 




Ward Ushers 
To Celebrate 


The 50th anniversary of the 
NAACP will be celebrated by 
'the local branch on Feb. 25 
at 7:30 p.m. at Calvary Bap- 
tist Church, 1.502 20th street, 
Mrs. Alyce Gullattee is presi- 
dent. Rev. Welford P. Carter 
is pastor of the church. 
if * * 

The NAACP membership 
committee met at the home 
of E. G. Allen on Monday 
evening. Fourteen members 
wore present and reported 
200 members for the 90-day 
drive. The ne.xt meeting will 
be on Feb. 29 at the home of 
Ivory Hilliard. 637 Broadway 
in Venice. 



Martin Luther King 
To Speak at Three 
Churches Feb. 28 

Rev E A. Anderson, pastor of McCoy Baptist 
Church, announced this week that many groups in 
the city are cooperating with the Baptist Ministers 
Union and the Interdenominational Ministerial Alli- 
ance in presenting three Martin Luther King appear- 
ances here on Sunday, Feb. 28. 

The first appearance will be^ 
at 11 a.m. at Pilgrim Baptist 


Orpha Chapter No. 15 of 
the O. E. S. will sponsor an 
annual Barboquc dinner at 
1720 Broadway from 11 a.m.- 
6 p.m. on Feb. 20. Mrs. Johnie 
M. Watson is the reporter for 
the group. 


C'ROU SS (JL hhS — /?H'. Sclson R. Uiggni^. Jr., is shoxin irnnnint/ .Mrs. Odessa I'im- 
mnns as the Queen of the S 'irmandie .ivenue Baptist ('.hiireh II Oman's Day. Mrs. Ber- 
tha Euhanks n-atihes. I he tuo ndrrien raised f^O for the day. 


The 14th anniversary of 
Usher Board No. II, Ward'AME 
Church, 1177 W. 23th street, 
will bo celebrated Sundav. 
Feb. 21 at 3:30 p.m. Guest 
speaker for the occasion will 
be Miss Libby Clark, public 
relations consultant and presi- 
dent of Libby Clark Associ- 
ates f 

The sub.joct of Miss Clark's; 
address will be, "A Charge to J 
Keep." In keeping with its' • * » 

annual custom, the Usher A Nogro History Week pro- 
Board has invited other Usher gfam was sponsored last 
groups of the city to join the \^eek hy the Mis.'^ionary So- 
celebration. i cietj of Calvary Baptist 

Mrs. Thclma Morris is Church. Panelists included: 
chairman. ' Mme.s. Allie M. Allen, nar- 

Cecil Buckanan and Andrew' rator; Priscilla Lacy, Dorothy 
Brown will be guest soloists j Nelson, Pennye Powers. Do-is 
and Mrs. Lois Anna Schooler ! Scott, Vivian Smith. Una Sin 
guest organist. gleton and Lucille White. Mrs. 

Mrs. Addie Murray is presi- , Sadye Youngo is president of 


Church in Pasadena. Rev. Mar 
vin T. Robinson will give the 
entire worship service to Rev. 
King, the Prophet of God, Rev, 
Anderson said. 

At 3 p.m.. Dr. King 
speak at Zion Hill Baptist 
Church, 51st and McKinley 
avenue, with Rev. Timothy M. 
Chambers host pastor. 

Rev. H. B. Charles will open 
the doors of Mt. Sinai Baptist 
Church, LaSalle and W. 
Adams blvd. for the 7:30 p.m. 
rally. 


Houston Tells 
Meaning of 
Brotherhood 

Norman O. Houston, presi 
dent of Golden State Mutua 

Life Insurance Company, ■ Rpl'tical beliefs or other art- gpt the message Rev. King 
serving a-; co chairman of > i'icial designation. \vill bring to all in the Pasa- 

Brotherhood Week, said Tues "Brotherhood means that;dena and Los Angeles area. 
day that "Brotherhood Week we \alue each man by quali- [Questions on ways and means 
represents the rododication to fication rather 'han bN' any, of using Christian principles 
the principles of the onencs.s other standard. We in Amer-and energies toward making 
of man before the p\ os of ica will only gain true world ; America truly a land of the 
God. I leadership as our attitudes free will be discussed by Rev. 

"The period is designed," j toward others change to the King whose leadership of 
he said, "to re emphasize that' feeling for brotherhood, one Montgomery Negro-Americans 
equality of man is not judged ' man to the other." made international headlines. 


by his race, c-olor, religion, 
p/3litical beliefs or other art- 


Dr. King who recently moved 
from Montgomery, Ala. to At- 
lanta, Ga., where he plans to 
carry out his work covering a 
larger part of the South, is 
,, [president of the Southern 
^ 'Leadership Conference. 

The conference seeks fuller 
participation in the fight for 
freedom for the Negro in the 
South, with voter education 
and full citizenship patticipa- 
tion for all. , 

The ministers of the city in 
cooperation with the Baptist 
Ministers Union and the Inter- 
denominational Alliance have 
joined in a unified effort to 


dent of Usher Board No. II. 
Rev. L. S. Odom is -^minister. 


the Society. Laura Lee 
mistress of ceremonies. 


was. 


NormandieAve. 
Women's Queen 
Receives Crown 

Thirteen teams went about 
gathering in money for the 
annual Women's Day celebra- 
tion at the Normandie Avenue 
Baptist Church, 1385 W. 37th 
place. 

Rev. Nelson B. Higgins. Jr., 
pastor of the church, crowned 
Mrs. Odessa Timmons of the 
Timmons-Eubanks team as 
queen for the day. With Mrs. 
Bertha Eubanks. Mrs. Tim- 
mons raised $60. This was the 
largest amount of an\' team. 
The total for the day was 
$392.50. ; 


PhJlomatheons Celebrate, 
Take NAACP Life Membership 


Heart Specialist 
To be Speaker 
At Vermont Sq. 


Vermont Square Methodist 

Chuich will present its annual 

By MARIE HUGHES , banquet and observe a victory 

More than 200 members and friends assembled dinner program on Saturday, 

, ,, /-.,■_ r->i_i iu o i J ■ \.4. 4. ^ rob. zi, at b p.m. at the 

at the Club Philomatheon on Saturday night to at-^^^^^.^ ^^ ,|^^ ^^^„^^ ^^ ^.^^, 

tend a banquet commemorating the second anniver- vernon and Budlong avenues, 
sary of the modern ,S25,000 club house in Santa' The featured speaker will 
Monica. ' 

Each table was adorned 
with a \alentine setting. Each 

The dinner menu featured 

a half chidden with mush 


who were the husbands and 
friends of the members. 


place marked with a dec- 
orated menu and program 

effective! '''^oms, rice with but tore d 


SUMMER STUDIES 

NWSHVILLE, Tenn. — The 
National Science Foundation 
awarded Fisk Universitj* S14,- 

120 to support a program for The food was superb and per 
gifted secondary students dur- ' fectly served by 
ing the summer of 1960. coated sweetheart waiters 


souvenir was quite 

and most appropriate for this 

eventful affair. 

Food Superb 
The festive dinner was spot- 
lighted with a program of 
gala entertainment, preceding 
and during the supper hour. 


string beans, salad, olives. 


be Dr. Fletcher Pearl McBroom. 
who was rocontly heard before 
the Los Angeles County Heart 
Association in a report on a 
process which she developed 
in research on heart disease. 
Dr. -McBroom successfully 


pickles and hot rolls with transplanted a .segment of an 
jel'y. Special individual tor- artery from the heart of a 


rabbit with malfunction of thei . 
heart, into the eye of another^^'"^'^, 
rabbit. Here she was able to 
observe the reaction of cer- 
treatments and diets 


— Westminster Presbyterian Church 

2230 W. JEFFERSON BOULEVARD 

Chruch School— 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship— 1 1 :00 am 
VVesfminster Sunday Evening Bible Hour— 7;00 P.M. 
Mid-Week Fellowship— 7:30 p.m. 

Jomcs fdword JoMas, fattor 


MOTHER WOOD SPIRITUAL READINGS 

NO CHARGE — DONATIONS ONLY 
5128 SO. MAIN ST. . AD. 1-0772 


toni and coffee completed the 
meal. 

Grand Finale 

Much credit is due the pro- 
gram chairman, Mrs. Grace'l'^'" 
the " whu'e Woods, and her committee for, upon the heart artery. 

the fine entertainment. M.' \ 

Juanita Waters was mistre.ss' growth of man throughout the 
of ceremonies. Mrs. E. Cole- 'world. 

man introduced Miss A. C. ! A presentation of $100 to- 
Bilbrew, guest speaker, who ward a Philomatheon lifej 
in tribute to Negro History membership in the NAACP; 
Week, spoke on "Our Proud I 
Heritage." 

In the years of known his- 
tory. Negroes and their de- 
scendants have made count- 1 
less contributions to t h e ning to be long remembered 


On Feb. 21, Calvary Bap 
tist Church members wilT 
worship with the Sscond j 
Baptist Church in Monrovia.] 
Rev. G. G. Bailey is the pas- 
tor of the church. [ 

; I 

A Leap Year banquet will! 
be served at Cahary Baptist 
Church, on Feb. 26. , 

« w « I 

Gospel singer Mahalia Jack 
son will sing at the Santa 
.Monica Civic Auditorium on 
March 2 at 8:30 p.m. 

Marian Anderson will be 
pre.sented at Civic Auditorium , 
on March 17. I 

,^ * ii> 

George U. Leonard and his 
wife from Wilmington, N. C. 
are visiting their sons Ben- 
and Ulysess Leonard,] 
of 1837 16th street. Leonard,; 
a former longshoreman, is an 
expert fisherman. He plans a 
fishing excursion on the ocean' 
before returning south, he] 
said. ! 


James Fritz reports that 
Phillips Qhapel's Youth Group 
attended meeJ-gs at Phil 
.lips Temple CME Church at 
was made by Mrs. Isadora g^^ g ^^^ street in Los An 
Williams fo Mrs. Alyce Gul! j^g recently, 
lattee, president of the Santa . • • 

Monica branch. This was the: pj^^^ ^^g chureh-by-the 
grand finale toward an eve- g^^ p,g„g ^ liquidation ralb 

to overcome the mortgage ob 


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Richmond 7-4734- 


Tormenting Rectal Itch 
Stopped In Minutes 

Science Finds New Healinf Substance That 
Promptly Stops itching and Pain of Piles 


ligation.s of the church. 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Church 

lAST lilk AND TRINITY STRUTS - RIV. JOHN C. SAIN, MINISTIR 

SLNriAV, KKBRL'ARV 21 

Ths public it cordially invitad to atland. 


GIFTED SPIRITUAL READERS- - 

* ADVISE ON ALL MATTERS! I i 

* ALL QUESTIONS ANSWERED 

1101 W.VERNON ""■;:,:;;;•' ax 5-1644 


New York," N. Y. (Special) — 
One of the most common afflic- 
tions is s condition known as 
"itching: piles". It is most 
embarrassing for the victim 
during the day and especially 
aggrarating at night. 

No matter what you've used 
without results — here's good 
news. For the first time, science 
has found a new healing sub- 
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ability to promptly stop the 
burning itch and pain. It actu- 
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without surgery. Medical sci- 
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produces a remarkably effec- 
tive rate of healing. Its germ- 
killing properties also help pre- 
I vent infection. 

I In one hemorrhoid ease after 
; another "very striking improve- 


ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by doctors' observations. 
This improvement was main- 
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observations were continued 
over a period of months ! Among 
these sufferers were a wide 
variety of hemorrhoid condi- 
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The secret is this new healing 
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from home) or Preparation H 
ointment with apeeial applica- 
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'Ret. U.S. p»t. on. 


ISRAEL MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

REV. H. D. HIGDON, PASTOR 

SUNDAY SCHOOL, 9:15 A.M. 

MORNING WORSHIP, 11 A.M. 

B.T.U., « P.M. TO 7 P.M. 

4501 Compten Av, AD 3-6555 
Reiidenca AD. 1-1 986 


BLESSINGS 

JOHN STARR 

1 t« 1 Dor Spatial llauinit 
AvallobU 

START 1960 RIGHTI 

Yew Ar« Never Helped , . . 
Unleit YOU Try 

for /nformafloa Write ta: 
P.O. Sex 1*22, Cleveland «, Ohia 

SW. 1-9600 
JOHN STARR 

BLESSINGS 




FOR EVERY 
FUNERAL DETAIL 


For the simplest or most complex problems 
of sorrow. Angelus' complete service 
provides an Instant ansvsrr. From the 
first call, rhe entire responslbilit> 
for arrangements becomes ours. 


SAVE BY MAIL. 

Increase your income and security the convenient way! 

Every 90 Doys, on the basis of the colandor yeor. 
Safety Savings distributes •ornings en sovings. 
According to the type of account, Safety savers recaiva 
inleratt checks automatically each quarter, er 
Kovt the interest earned posted on their passbooks. 



UauiHtil Gifts ft 
M Mtw Aetountt 

• axquiMtc, nova! ilams-io'ava 
miportad ... oil m ifca S«faty 
Savings lovely gift trodition . . . 


Sptcffl/ for ffc« yoOTfrtfert: 

• colorfully inscribed OLIIE 
MATSON gloss for aoch occouM 
fro* $5. Sat of 8 glossa* l«f 
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pure 
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Mrs. 

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•■ ■. .' ■ ■■! '"MII-lNlf u( LHhl^[lrt^^S AND IfW? INL 

BROTHERHOOD WEEK 


4-k^ 


9 ,« "V*^ w 




CHURCH OF THE HOLY ANGELS 
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 

laahllth»d I9J5 

• IV. MSG«. GIRALO M. O-KEEFI 

Attistantsi Rav. Icland J. Beyar. R«v. Themai Sp«Mman 

HUNTINGTON NIVI AT HOtlT AVI. 

170 W HUNTINOTON PLACE, ARCADIA 


Valley Pastor, 
Rev. Dawkins, 
Trade Pulpits 


Rev. Maurice A. Dawkins. 
People's Independent Church, 
1025 E. 18th street, and Rev. 
Fred Doty of Woodland Hills, 
announced Monday that their 
Cathedral Choirs will ex- 
change choir lofts as the min- 
isters exchange pulpits this 
coming Sunday, Feb. 21. in 
observance of race relations 
Sunday. 

As a demonstration of inter- 
racial fellowship, both con- 
gregations will entertain the 
visitors at a fellowship dinner 
after the services. 

Rev. Doty will preach at the 
8:30 and 11 a.m. services at 
People's Independent. 

The Young Adults of the 
church will preside at a cof 
fee hour between services. 

At 5 p.m. at Independent 
Mr. and Mrs. Al Green will 
show the third in a series of 
films of their trips to Ghana, 
Guinea, Liberia, and other Af- 
rican nations. African students 
will join Mr. and Mrs. Green 
in an anaylsis of "Africa 'To- 
day." There will be a question 
period after the film followed 
by refreshments. 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 


The California Eagle— 7 


/ 


n> An Prnud to Endorte 
\alionil Broihrrhond Wfck 

GARDENA HOSPITAL 

1 145 W. REDONDO &EACH BLVD. 
GARDENA - DA. 3-7070 

From lot Angelas Phon» FA. 1-3550 


— ANNOUNCING THE PURCHASE OF THE CONNER STOCK*" 

Th« Conner stock owned by Charlies & Nellie V. Conner was 
purchased by Mrs. S. P. Johnson, Sr., wife of the LATE Mr. 
S. P. Johnson, Sr. 

The Conner stock has been held In trust since the death of 
Nellie V. Conner and was in trust to Mrs. Emily R. Rodgers, 
now residing in San Francisco, California. The purchase price 
was undisclosed. 

Mrs. S. P. Johnson is President of the Conner-Johnson Mor- 
luaries, located at 4700 So. Avalon Blvd. and 11129 So. Cen- 
tral Ave. Serving the entire community for over 47 years. 


Rev. Edmonds to 
Present Speaker 

Dr.' Anita Hays, teacher of 
religious science, will be the 
guest speaker at the New 
Community Church, 5849 S. 
Broadway, on Sunday, Feb. 21, 
Rev. Anita L. Edmonds said 
Tuesday. Dr. Hays will speak 
at the 11 a.m. and the eve- 
ning service on Sunday and 
Monday evening. | 

On March 13, Rev. Leon B., 
Carson of the First AME Zion I 
Church and his choir will par- 
ticipate in the musical pro-] 
gram arranged each Second j 
Sunday by Sister Kathcrine 
McCluney. 


Normondie Avenue to Hear 
Methodist Conf . President 

"Light in a Confused World," will be discussed by 
Mrs. Charles A. Trowbridge, president of the 
Women's Society of the Southern California-Arizona 
Conference of the Methodist Church. 

Mrs. Trowbridge will speak''^ 
at 11 a.m. at the Normandie 
Avenue Methodist Church, 3972 
S. Normandie avenue, next 
Sunday, Feb. 21. 

Rev. W. R. Johnson, pastor 
of the church, announced Mon- 
day that Miss Rhoda Jordan, 
a talented actress, will be 
chairman of the meeting. 

Reginald Fields will direct 
the Senior Choir and Mrs. 
Ernestine Johnson will direct 
the Children's Choir in an in- 
spirational musical segment 
of the worship service. 

The junior and senior ushers 


O'Bryant Tells 
Contributions 
Of Business 


AUTO 
UPHOLSTERY 

• LEATHER UPHOI^TERY 

• SEAT COVER.S 

• CONVKRTIBLE TOPS 

ALL WORK GUARANTIED 

CUSTOM TAILORED 
UPHOLSTERING 

AX. 4-9372 
NORMAN'S 

AUTO SEAT COVERS 
S749 SO. WESTERN, lOS ANOEUS 


Life 
and 


Golden State Mutual 
Insurance Company 
Broadway Federal Savings 
and Loan Association were 
called contemporary mile- 
will" "sei^-e' to sea"t The expected 'Stones of outstanding achieve- 
ment by Henri O'Bryant, choir 
robe manufacturer, at Saint 
Rest Baptist Church last Sun- 
day. 

Tracing the early history of 
the two Negro-owned business 
institutions, O'Bryant said 
that this progress made for 
greater self respect and pride 
among Negroes and was an 
inspiration for young people 
to build even bigger business- 
es in the future. 

Others Cited 

Other Negro businesses re- 
viewed in O'Bryant's speech 
were 3 e v e 1 1 e Enterprises, 
which services all Union Oil 
gas stations from Vancouver. 
Canada, to San Diego, Cali- 
fornia and as far east as Utah; 
Watts Savings and Loan 
Assn.; Liberty Savings and 
Loan Assn.; and Safety Sav- 
ing and Loan Assn. All of 
these business institutions arc 
examples of the great history 
being recorded in the 20th 
Century, he said. 

O'Bryant was introduced by 
the Rev. H. 'V. Jordan as a 
climax to Negro History Week 
celebrations at Saint Rest Bap- 
tist Church. 


capacity audience. 

Holiness Church 
To Install New 
Minister Sun. 

Rev. Henry L. Oliver, form- 
erly pastor of the Bethel 
Church of Christ Holiness at 
Adams and Hooper avenue, 
was elected pastor of the 
Washington Memorial Church 
of Christ Holiness, 4361 Mc- 
Kinley avenue. 

Rev. Oliver is a graduate of 
Biola College of Theology, and 
other schools which trained 
him for leadership and the 
ministry. 

Installation services will be 
conducted by Bishop Whit- 
field Massengale, at 3 p.m. on 
Sunday, Feb. 21, at the church. 
Bishop Massengale is bishop 
of the Western Diocese of the 
Evangelical Church of Christ 
Holiness. 


Alfred Quinn presented the 
First AME Fellowship House 
a Kelvinator refrigerator. 


A & J 

LIQUOR STORE 


fAST, tut DfLIVIRr 


L,iiiuor ■ 
6 A.M. 

203 


L)clicaics:;en - .'Sundries 
2 A.M. 7 Days A Week 

E VERNON, AT WALL 
lOS ANGEIES 

AD. 2-5320 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budipng at West Vernon 

Howard Ray Carey, Minister 

Sunday Scheel-9:30 A.M. Wenhip-lltOO AJM. 


OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE CHURCH 

SUNDAY AAASSES 6-8-9-10-12 and 7.20 P.M. 
1770 KEARNY REV. B. SUVA, S.J. SAN DIEGO 


•/ FAVOR BROTHERHOOD ALL YEAR ROLSD- 

HOWARD BROOKS 

WOOD REFINISHINO AND REPAW On All 

Fumitur* and Antiques — Olou — Satin 

•«^ X»i»»»n > FiniftiM* 

FREE ESTtMATES 

9522 SO. MAIN ST. r\- 4-5790 


MAXCINE 

HOWARD 

Bail Bonds 
24 Hour Service 

250 WEST 77TH STREET 

Opposite Police Station 

PLeasant 3-6644 

LOS ANGELES 



ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA 



ROMAN CATHOIK CHURCH - 

Establithnd 1910 


Rav. 

Jetaph P. Hill Rav. 

Mitchall J. C«ndan, 

Asal. 

1050 WEST 163rd STREET 

GARDENA 


"HEAITH A WfAlTH FOR I960" 

SAY-ON-DRUGS 

Open 9 A.M. fo 10 P.M. 
7 Days a Week 


"ICe Encourage National Brotherhood IVeek" 

Gillespie Furniture Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF QUALITY BEDROOM FURNITURE 

301 1 EAST PICO LOS ANGEIES 

ANgelus 8-4101 


\\ e BeUei'e in Brothtrhood 

J. G. PENNEY GG. 

Merchandise jnr the 

h.ntire Fmriily 

Gift Suggestions Galora 

3677 CRENSHAW 

CRENSHAW NEAR 

RODEO ROAD 


-V » 


'We Endortf Rrnlhfrhn'>d and F-'i"oiirnfjf ItK I'^f All Vedr'* 

CONNER-JOHNSON 
COMPANY, INC. 

Funeral Directors 

Two Locations Now Serving You 
4700 So. Avalon Blvd. ADams 4-9025 

1 1 129 So. Central Ave. 


'Venice News 

Phone 'Venicp news to 
EX 6-8331 

* « « 

Man.y persons visited the 

Chest XRay unit last week. 

« • • { 

Atty. Vince Monroe Town- , 
send spoke last Monday eve 
ning at New Bethel Baptist 
Church. The program was 
sponsored by the Adult Citi- i 
zen's Council. 

TOOTHACHE '^'rf/..;!.; 

I( you Wt Ctl to Iht i"«J«J''.-i* 
dintitt. tht b«st thini ORA-JEI? 

«inltlii> in ttcondt. 


Westminster Presbyterian 
Inaugurates Fomily Nights 

Westminster Presbyterian Church, 2230 W. Jef- 
ferson blvd., held its first in a new series of family 
night fellowships last Friday evening with the 
Women's Association of the church as the sponsors. 

Mrs. Ella Johnson is the presi- 


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BROTHERHOOD GREETINGS 

COONS CUSTOM COACH 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

THE FINEST IN TRAILERS AND TRUCK BODIES 
CHARLES L. COONS. Ou.ner ^ 
3933 MISSION BLVD., POMONA 
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dent. 

An "African Safari" movie 
shown of recent travels of "Al 
and S e n o 1 a" Green, well 
known educators, was one of 
the highlights of the evening. 
During the narration of the 
film Green emphasized the 
determinati(Hi of Africans for 
freedom. ' 

The keynote for the budding 
countries is education. The in- 
tensive building program by 
African people .setting a ter- 
rific pace with both day and 
night crews to speed up com- 
gletion of ultra modern build- 


XLNT FOOD 
COMPANY 

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"Heat 'n Serve" Fresh at the 

Delicatessen Section 

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ings for homes and industry, 
was shown as well as ex- 
am'ples of Nationalism in sev- 
eral countries was pointed out 
by Green. 

The Angelic choir composed 
of children sang beautifully 
during the program. 'Work- 
shops were planned and an 
exhibit of art objects and 
needlecraft was presented 
through the courte.sy of the 
West Adams Presbyterian 
Church and Mrs. Fannie Car- 
well. 

A pot luck supper preceded 
the program. Tables were dec- 
orated with tropical frouts 
and greens. 

Rev. James E. Jones, pastor 
of the fhurch, introduced dis- 
tinguished guests and an- 
nounced that the monthly 
famil.y night gatherings would 
be presented cultural work- 
shops of other nations. Sched- 
uled for the near future are 
views of life and culture in 
India, Japan, China and South 
America. 


lie Salute Rrnlherhood M'etk 

GOLDEN STATE MUTUAL 

LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

1999 WEST ADAMS SLVD. 

lOS ANGILES IS 

All Forms of L'fe. HospiU' and 

Sickness and Accident Contract* 

District CHfices 

Wastsid* District, 5133 W. Adams 

WE. 8-3543 

Cantrol District, 4261 S. Cantrol 

AD. 2-4126 

South Los Angelos DIsMct 

11025 S. Avalon - PL. 6-134S 

Murrol-Spoights AgoHcy 

2907 So. Westorn Ave. 


FIRST AFRICAN METHODIST 

Episcopal Qiurch 

Rev. H. H. Brookins 

801 TOWNE AVE. 

LOS ANGELES 


pnoTHFRHnnn wftk . . . 

for rKAC.F nnd FRFKDOM 
ndiere It! 

I.ii'f II' 

Support It! 

Jonson's Market 

QUALITY MEATS 

Payroll Checks Cashed 

Money Orders 

Utility Bills Paid 

Hours: 9:00-10:00 Every Day 

Including Sat., Sun. 9-8 
2432 E. Brooklyn, Corner of 
Mathews, 1 BIk. E. of Sole St. 


RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS 

RALEIGH, N. C— Plans arc 
set for the annual observance 
of Religious Emphasis Week 
at Shaw Universtity, Feb. 28.- 
March 3. The theme of the ob- 
servance is "'Victory Over Fear 
Through Dynamic Christian 
Faith." 


PHOTlll.RIIOOl) Wh.KK . . . 
fnr PKKt.K and FREKDOSl 
Belieue If 

i.ivt in 

Support It! 

GEORGE W. 
DUNING 

Composer 


"WE BELIEVE IN PRACTICING BROTHERHOOD" 

CALIFORNIA CHURCH 
FURNITURE COMPANY 

11900 center's!. 
HOLLYDALE 

DESIG.NERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

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THIRD OF A CENTURY 

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A successful Valentine Din- 
ner was held at Now Bethel 
Baptist Church, on Feb. 13. 


SCHAFER BROS. 

TRANISFER - PIANO MOVERS 

Agents tor Ixprtu and 

Atla$ Van LIntt 

825 E. WASHINGTON, L.A. 

Rl. 9-3104 


ST. AGNES CATHPUC CHURCH 

REV. HENRY G. ALKtR 
Conrps.*iion.s : .'^turda\s and Eve.s. of Kirst l-'rida.\ s 
■:;:30-6, 7::!n-9. Kves of Holy Day.-s, 4-6, 8-9 p m 

Vtrment Ava. and W. Adams Blvd. RE. 1-4922 


from GRAY to XjLORIOUS! 


California College of 
Morfuary Science 

M. D. HItGENFELD, President 
1920 Marengo, Los Angeles 


TIME Is the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
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satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and honest 
service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reasonable. 

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AOams a-7tSI 



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V 



1^ 

8— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 



In 1927. a group of Fresno civic leaders teamed up witli 
the Fresno State College athletic department to launch a new 
athletic venture which they hoped would replace the automo- 
bile races formerly held as a feature event of the city's annual 
Raisin Day celebration — a track and field relay carnival for 
which they adopted the ambitious title, West Coast Relays. 

While these officials had high hopes that their project 
would prove diverting and athletically successful, none of 
them dreamed that the program launched on that day in 1927 
would grow in scope and in calibre of performance until it 
would rank cis one of the great track and field events of the 
world. 

Ovenhodowecl Raisins 

Nor did they foresee that the West Coast Relays would 
grow in stature until they far overshadowed the Raisin Day 
celebration, so that Fresno would become known, not just as 
the world's raisin capital, but as the place "Where World's' 
Records Are Broken." 

In 33 runnings of the West Coast Relays, track and field 
fans who flock to the Fresno stadium from all parts of the 
world have seen 33 world, American, or national interscholas- 
tic records broken or tied, plus numerous other marks which 
broke listed world records, and no fewer than 27 national 
junior college record performances giving the West Coast Re- 
lays a slate of records which no other meet in the country 
can come close to. 

Lightning Fast Track 
■ In accounting for the unending stream of records which 
come from the West Coast Relays, a number of factors must 
be taken into account. One is the lightning-fast clay track at 
Ratcliffe Stadium, one of the fastest running strips in the 
world, as attested by the number of records which have been 
made in the sprints, hurdles, and sprint relays at the Fresno 
Carnival. 

Another is the high calibre of competition, with the relays 
annually attracting the cream of the Pacific Coast's track stars 
as well as many from all parts of the, country. Still another 
important factor is the skill of the relays' directors in plan- 
ning their program to give the greatest possible opportunity 
for top performances by all competitors. 

Some of the world records made at the West Coast Relays 
have been anticipated by the experts. Just as many others 
have come as a surprise. Some runnings of the meet have 
produced as many as three new world marks, and others have 
produced none at all. 

But every one of the 33 runnings of the West Coast Relays 
to date has left its own indelible stamp on track and field 
history, for thrilling competition, for colorful spectacle, and 
for the indefinable something which makes an event or an 
Individual a champion — the greatest of its kind. 


Ex Boxer Gets Baylor 

To Pace 
lakeis 


Plastic Nose 


r^ ''THE TEE 


## 


.WITH MAGGIE HATHAWAY. 


Willie Bean, former Pacific 
Coast heavyweight champion, 
was recovering at Hollywood- 
Leland Hospital last week 
from plastic surgery for a 
smashed nose he had almost 
miraculously avoided in his 
11 -year professional career. 

To add to the retired bat- 
tler's chagrin and hurt was 
the fact that the nose was 
smashed in a freak accident 
— by a swinging door in a 
coffee shop. 

Dr. Simon Schroeder, plastic 
surgeon who performed the 
operation, said the surgery 
was successful and predicted 
that "Bean will be in perfect 
shape to resume his work." 
Bean, 32, has been a plaster- 
er's assistant since quitting 
the ring in 1957. 

The incident that caused 
the damage which the ham- 
fists of many of the 
to 

inflict occurred in a Southside 
coffee shop. Bean was about 
to leave the beanery when a 
customer in a rush jolted the 
steel door into his face. 

Among the greats with 
whonn Bean tangled in his ex- 
citing career were Joe Louis, 
Young Jack Johnson, Turkey 
Thompson, Rusty Payne and 
Pat Kubiski. Bean held the 
Coast title from 1949 to 1955, 
losing and recovering it sev- 
eral times in that interval. 


mermg 

ring^s greats were unable 


Some of the biggest names 
in Negro golf are expected to 
tee off for the grand prizes 
and money in the seventh an- 
nual Miami North-South Win- 
ter Golf Tournament to be 
played over the Miami Sprjngs 
Golf Course, Feb. 15-18. 

According to Ray Milchell, 
nationally known golf pro 
who directs the tournament, 
Zeke Hartsfield, winner of the 
pro championship last year, 
will be back to defend his 
title. 

Big name professionals who 
ar« expected to press Harts- 
field for the championship are 
Charles Sifford, the money 
winning pro from this city, 
Teddy Rhodes of St. Louis, Bill 
Spiller, and Sam Woodson of 
Columbia, S.C. 

Also slated to return this 
year is the unbeatable ama- 
teur Joe Roach, winner of the 
amateur title for the past 
three years, who will be shoot- 
ing for an unprecedented 
fourth straight crown among 
the men. 

Ready to challenge Roach's 
right for the crown will be 
amateur golfers from 14 states. 
Top money in this city is on 
that sensational amateur Ray 
Botts who recently was voted 
into.the Sepulveda Men's Golf 
Club in the Valley. Ray rusn 
ed into this club in order to 
have a "Public Links" handi- 
cap. In the past when he won 
the Montebello tournament 
•orae of the pros tried to have 
his handicap disqualified be- 
cause his club was not a 
member of the PubLix Associ- 
ation. 

This association does not 
recognize the Negro clubs 
which forces our amateurs to 
Join the municipal Caucasian 
clubs. Incidentally Joe Roach 
is the "club champion" at 
Sepulveda and he and Billie 
Eckstein signed Ray's appli- 
cation blank making it pos- 


sible for him to acquire mem- 
bership. 

Among the women, Eliza- 
beth Rice of Washington, D.C., 
last year's winner, is expected 
to be challenged for her crown 
by Myrtle Patterson of New 
York. The New York swinger 
won the female title in 1954- 
55-58 and is expected to be 
tough to hold back this time 
around. 

In all, $1500 in prize money 
will be offered to the profes- 
sionals. The men amateurs 
will be shooting for 18 tro- 
phies in six flights. There is 
also a flight for senior men. 

Among the women there 
will be four flights and 12 tro- 
phies presented to the winners. 

Players who participated 
from Los Angeles last year in- 
cluded Winston Von Wertz 
and Freddy Miller. After the 
tournament Von Wertz and 
Miller hurried to Cuba to say 
hello to Castro and see if the 
golf courses there played any 
better than the one in Florida 
since they had been unable to 
capture one of the Florida 
prizes. 


Central, Fresno 
Cage Teams Win 
Division's Play 

Central Playground's hoop 
quintet last week downed a 
Fresno Playground squad to 
earn top slot in the 1960 East 
District Basketball league 
senior division play. 

In East District play-offs 
conducted at Lincoln Park 
Playground, the Fresno 
juniors beat Hazard Play- 
ground for the junior division 
crown. 

Winning Fresno and Cen- 
tral teams will represent the 
East District in Los Angeles 
City Recreation- and Park De- 
partment play-offs' later this 
month, according to Simeon 
Kemper, director of East Dis- 
trict league play. 

On Feb. 25 the East I)is- 
trict squads battle North 
District teams at Echo Play- 
ground, 1632 Bellvue avenue. 
Victors will travel to semi- 
final play March 1, and city- 
wide junior and senior 
division 'finals will be con- 
ducted March 3. 

The winning Fresno team 
was coached by Rudolph 
Reyes, recreation director at 
Fresno Playground. 


Maury Wills Becomes 26tl[ 
Dodger to Sign Contract 


With getaway day for the 
1960 Spring training season 
set for Saturday morning, 
E. J. (Buzzie) Bavasi, the 
Dodgers' vice-president an- 
nounced that Maury Wills, the 
club's World Series shortstop, 
had signed his contract. He 
was the 26th Dodger signed 
for '60 and only 14 remained 
to be completed. 

In the great "team" victory 
of the Dodgers of 19.59 Wills 
got in his best licks down the 
pennant stretch. A .206 hitter 
going into the final three 
weeks of the sea.son. Wills 
caught fire on Sept. 8 and, 
over his la.st 19 games, baited 
.389 and raised his season 
average to .260. It was little 
Maury, as much as any Dod- 
ger, who ignited the Dodgers' 
blaze. 

Along the way he had a 5- 
hit day against the Braves 
Sept. 15, a 4-hit day against 
the Phillies Sept. 10 and three 
3-hitt^rs. When the Dodgers 


Bakersfield 
Faces Huskies 
In 'Must' Game 

With a chance to leave their 
initials on the Metro Confer- 
ence basketball race the East 
Los Angeles College Huskies 
play at Long Beach Friday, 
Feb. 19, and are at home Sat- 
urday against Bakersfield. 


Southern California basket 
ball fans wifl get another look 
at major league activity when 
the St. Louis Hawks and^Min- 
neapolis Lakers collide in a 
pair of National Basketball 
Association games at the 
Sports Arena next Sunday, 
Feb. 21, and Monday evening, 
Feb. 22. 

Tipoff for both games will 
be at 8 p.m. The games are 
being sponsored by the Sale- 
sian Fathers for their charity 
program to curb juvenile de- 
linquency in East Los An- 
geles. 

The games are a follow-up j 
to the highly successful NBA 
game between Minneapolis 
and the Philadelphia Warriors 
earlier this month. That one 
drew nearly 11,(XX) in a driv- 
ing rain, prompting the NBR 
moguls to come back for an- 
other helping of Southland 
enthusiasm. 

The Hawks are way ahead 
of the Western Division chase ' Saturday"night's game is bill 
in the NBR. They boast some [ ed for Belvedere Junior High 
of the sport's greatest names Sat 8 p.m. 

—fellows like Bob Pettit,! The Huskie game is a 
Clyde Lovellette, Cliff Haganj"must win" for both Long 
and Slater Martin. j Beach and Bakersfield. The 

Long Beach Vikings are tied 
with San Diego for first place 
while Bakersfield is one game 
behind the leaders. 

East L. A.'s great individual 
scoring leader, Huey Thomas, 
picked up 35 at Santa Monica, 
and 27 against El Camino to 
run his Metro total to 314 for 
11 games. This gave him a 28- 
point lead over Art Williams 
of San Diego. Huey needs just 
33 more pwints in three games 
to break the record for indi- 
vidual scoring set by James 
Newman of Harbor in 1956. 
He should do it Saturday 
night. Henry Johnson, ELA's 
other high scorer, moved up 
to third in the conference by 
sinking 2S points against El 
Camino Thursday. This put 
him seven-up on San Diego's 
Ed Johnson. 


swept a thrte-game seriei 
against the Giants, moving 
past San Francisco into firs 



fl\ 




MAURY WILLS 

place,! Wills was voted the 
outstandmg player of the 
series. He made seven hits in 
13 times at bat in that wild 
set. 



Minneapolis' big gun, of 
course, is the fabulous Elgin 
Baylor. The 6-6 star was an 
All-Pro star in his rookie .sea- 
.son last year and is well on 
his way toward repeating. 

Baylor out - dueled Wilt 
Chamberlain in their recent 
meeting here, scoring 36 
points for high point laurels. 
He al.so is a great rebounder, 
feeder and court tactician. 

St. Louis and Minneapolis 
are bitter rivals, the Hawks 
still smarting over the Lakers 
upset victory over them in the 
Western Division playoffs last 
season. 


Prep Practice 
Meets Schedule 

The Los Angeles City high 
school track first practice 
meets will be held Friday, 
March 11, and Friday, March 
18. League meets will get un- 
way one week later. 

East Los Angeles Junior 
College stadium will be the 
site on Sat., May 21, for the 
city preliminaries a^d finals 
will be held one week later. 

Stanford University in Palo 
Alto will be the setting for 
the State meet 

Practice meets schedule: 
Jefferson at Jordan; Banning 
at Fremont; Jordan at Man- 
ual Arts and San Pedro at 
Westchester. 


Yo-Yo Finals Set 

Youthful top - and - string 
twirlers will face a tremen- 
dous test Saturday, Feb. 20, 
when district finals in 1960 
Y'o - Y'o Championships are 
staged at eight centrally lo- 
cated play centers. 


KFI-NBG Covers 
Winter Games 

Live and recorded radio cov- 
erage of the Eighth Olympic 
Winter Games in Squaw Val^ 
ley is being provided by KFI- 
NBC at 6:35 and 7:45 p.m. 


ARCHIE MOORE — De- 
spite the fact that the "SBA 
has stripped him of his title, 
the skillful boxing genius 
continues as champion in 
(California, Xeiv York and 
Massachusetts. 



BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO: Three select- 
ors tabbed five winners to 
win S21,514.40 each in the 5-10 
public handicapping contest 
at Caliente Race Track last 
Sunday. 

One was a Negro Irom Los 
Angeles. 

Consolation money was di- 
vided into 156 shares worth 
$137.80 each for four horses. 

The 5-10 pool grossed $95,- 
620. Blue Moment, at $6.20, 
winner of the San Bernardino 
Elks purse, was the only mu- 
tuel favorite to score in the 
5-10. 

Winning numbers were 10- 
12-11-11-11-4. i 

The crowd of 14,680 sentj 
$471,734 through the mutuelsj 
for the 12 races, not including! 
$95,620 in the 5-10 pool. 

This Sunday. Feb. 21, the 
14th annual running of the 
George Woolf Memorial Han- 
dicap will be the big attrac- 
tion at Caliente Race Track. 

Some of America's top jock- 
eys will ride in the handicap 
in tribute to the memory of 
the famous "Ice Man" of the 
turf. 

A beautiful 8x10 glossy 
print photograph featuring 
past winners of this handicap 
will be given free to each per- 
son attending. 

• • • 

SANTA ANITA: Santa Anita 
swings into the final weeks of; 
its 1959-1960 season. 

The current week will be 
highlighted by the $20,000' 
added Santa Susanna Stakes: 
on Wednesday, and the $50,- 
000 added San Felipe handi- 
cap on Saturday. 

"There will be racing at 
Santa Anita on Monday, 
Washington's birthday, Feb. 
22. 

The feature event on this 
day will be the $50,000 added 
mile-and-one-half Washing- 
ton's Birthday Handicap. ! 

HOR.'^ES TO WATCH THAT I 

ARE KIT AND RKADY: i 

CALIENTE I 

RISKY GEA.N" — Ready for the ' 
be.st. 

MLV PuOYAL — Lx>ok out for 
this one. I 

RE AKFIRMIU^) — .Mv sleeper. | 

RACK OX — Clorkere .special. 

.'JPBEDY' BE:.\UTY — Longshot j 
ITOodie. 

I.NTRBPIDO — ^Vas short last! 
out. 


SHINERS 
next out. 

REFRESHER — Now fit. 

TINKLE — Go back to this one. 

FORNEViaiBND — In snmrt 
hands. _ 

SANTA ANITA 
* NOBLE NOOR — A real good 

t! V. LARK — Vlll best the 

PRINCE BLEKSBD — My spe- 
cial 
CixW'N PRINCE — L<"es the 

BRIGHT TrNT — ^\ ell groomed. 
JCLIE KATE — My favorite 
VT.OWE8. DEiCK — Next out 

°i^re:nch romance - Tab 

tote. „ 

OUH .'SPECIAL — Gei yours on 
this one. , ,. . „ 

HASY tX>T."R — Lonpshot spe- 
cial. 

Keep this column for future ref- 
erence as it only appears In the 
California Eagle, out and on your 
newsstand every Wednesday, yor 
the best In the Sport of Kinps It s 
The Eaple. 


•Wf Prourllg Salvie 
Rrotherhoori Mrek" 



1» 


CALIENTE : 

IN OLD MEXICO 


OTFIRS IVIRT SAT. ft SUN. 
'M' RAIN OR SHINI H^ 

^ «HOROUGHBir» ^ 


mMffM;-Mf' 


TO PLAY—Ziggy Marcell. 
former great prep and pro 
basketball star, will be fea- 
tured on the same card with 
the Minneapolis Lakers when 
they play the St. Louis 
Hawks Monday, Feb. 22. 
Marcelt's team, the Vaga- 
bond's, will take on the El 
Toro Marines. 


M'e Believe in Brotherhood 
All Year 



Drop In and ••• Ltwi* Hamp- 
ton. Let mc help with yotir 
automobile problam*. 
Also See the New '60 Pontlac 

KEN CURK 
PONTIAC 

3740 CRENSHAW BLVD. 

LOS ANGELES 

Wa Ar* CJQMd All Day 

Sunday 


^11 


RACES EVERY 
SAT. t SUN. 


II* 


^ AND SATURDAY ^ 

M. DAILY DOUBLE « QUINEU '**^ 

BOOKS « MUTUEIS ^ 

y^ FABULOUS 5-10 BETTING .i* 
POST TIME 12 NOON 

SUN. POST TIME 12:30 PM-I* 

^ FANTASTIC RETURNS ^' 
^ For Ye«r W««ar 

Two Dollar* or Mora V^ 
^ P*r«i«n Book Opaw Daily 
^ On All Maier Tracks ^ 
^ GREYHOUND RACING 
a*. WaL RESUME FRIDAY, 4tk 

JAN. « FOR 3 NIGHTS 
aA.A WEEK-FRIDAY, SATUR-(» 
DAYL AND SUNDAY. 

^ riRST POST TIMI 7>4$ pj». 4^ 

49ar EVERY SATURDAY _^ 
«>■ AND SUNDAY NIGHTS "^ 


JOHNS. AUSSK) ^ 


Hot Rod Races 
On Tap Sunday 

Bob Hogle, Buena Park 
speedster, will be looking for 
two main event wins in Sun- 
day's CJA Hot Rod races, and 
Late Model Stock Car events. 
It will be two complete speed 
programs for fans at the Gar- 
dena Stadium. 

Hogle will drive both a Hot 
Rod and a Stock Car in the 
day's racing program. He will 
rate top competition in the 
Hot Rods from three time 
main event winner, Jack Aus- 
tin, Downey, and 1959 CJA 
Champ Ed Van Eyk, Gardena. 
Both Austin and Van Eyk will 
rate as Hogle's major threats. 


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STJR-OF-STJRS DIGNITARIES— In a serious vein 
the Egyptian Temple annual shoiv has grown to titn the 
respect of our leading cily and (ount\ officers because of 
the group's rntrrest m the uelfnre of the community and 
their unse.'fuh driotion to mankind. Pictured are. from 
left: Harold Marlou, under-^enjj ; Joe Adams, master 


of ceremonies; Xoble Roscoe C. Wctshington, show pro- 
motional chairman'; Danny Thomas, screen and TV star; 
Gilbert JV. Lindsay, potentate; Peter J. Pitchess, L.A. 
County sheriff, and Soble Kenny ll'ashington, talent com- 
mittee co-chairman. (Adams.) 



IS RECOGSITIOX—Xinfh Dutrirt City Councilman 
Ed Roybal, center, duplaxs ritr,t:on the City (,ouncU pre- 
tented to Egyptian Temple in recognition of their out- 


stqndiia ornantzntion nnd thf'-.r chiritv x^orh. Pictured 
from left: Kobe's Ru'us Sirnpk:is. Stnnlev If . Beverly, 
I rank G. Allen, Mr. Ro\bal end Curtis Miller, t^ A dams.) 



CLUBS 


T'^'jrsday, February 13, 1960 




FASHIONS 

The California Eagle— 9 



DIG THIS M'TTY BIT— Show people are a nonderful set. Sot only did they 
f'ei'e the captc-tv audience ii the Moulin Rouge: thev also had themselves a hall back' 
stage. Skip and Cliff Trenier are shoun hamming it up for honoree Sammy Davis Jr. 

(Adams.) 



f ABi'LUl'S Pf.RIOR.MERS—A couple of Clarks. a Cooke and n darltna Jo uhich 
ii'ld ut< to he a preli\ exfei'ize t'arkaae. They all aft''-ared on the Shrmers show Mon- 
dr\. Er'-.m left: Stere (Jark, dancer; singer Sam Cooke; vocalist Damita Jo and Jimmy 
C'.'^rk, dancer. (Adams.) 


Wilton Club 
To Insta 
Officers 

Publis'^'^r Lnrpn Mill'^ will 
be guest speaker Sunday 
*\oning, Feb. 2^, when the 
\\;lfr>n Plai-e Democratic 
Club holds it5 installation 

T -p S") "/> per plate affair 
u 1' be held at Blarney 
r^=.'!<». 623 South Western, at 
"-""O p n. 

Al=iO appearing on the pro- 
g-am will b« Jack Ansley, 
\ , n rh.ijTTian of County 
tVmo.Tatic Committee, who 
w 11 act as installing officer, 
aid (",ahe Lizer, chairman of 
f'np l^th Congressional Dist- 
rirr. who will be the master 
of icr'^moniP'^. 

Thp public i« urged to at- 
tc-Trl ap(i reservations can b« 
mad'' bv calling Lucy Adams, 
££. 3-3681. 



DISAH THRILLS — Talent Committee chairman Kenny 
If'ashignton, center, it shourt as he escorts Ruth Bowen, 
left, and Dtnah If ashington to the stage of the Moulin 
Rouge during the Star-of-Stars show Monday night. Mrt. 

i_w4m u M.UI l£/ukMti^'i hjfuiiMiirtu v*Mt, dim*) 


Eighth Annual Shrine Star-of-Stars 
Show Attracts Standing-Room Crowd 


A standing - room - only 
crowd filled all available 
space in the Moulin Rouge 
theater night club — largest 
of its type in the U.S. — to 
witness Egjplian Temple 
No. 5's Eighth Annual Star- 
of-Stars show which honored 
Sammy Davis Jr. for his 
innumerable benefit appear- 
ances in behalf of charities. 

The talented entertainer 
received the local Prince 
Hall Shriners' annual "Hu- 
manitarian Award," the 
organization's highest honor. 
Big Names 

The huge benefit affair 
attracted some of the big- 
gest names in tlie entertain- 
ment world who shared the 
spotlight with cit\' and 
county dignitaries. In recog- 
nition of the great charity 
work conducted by Eg\plian 
Temple, City Councilman 
Edward Roybal of the 5th 
District presented a cita- 
tion on behalf of the City 
Council to Eg\-ptian Temple 
No. 5 and its Potentate, 
Gilbert Lindsay. Also at- 
teriding in an official capa- 
city were Los Angeles 
County Sheriff Pete Pitchess 
and Under-sheriff Harold 
Marlowe. 

The fast paced entertain- 
ment extra\arganza got off 
to a np-roaring start with 
the Treniers group of stage 
and television fame going 
through their paces with a 
brilliance belonging only to 
veteran f)erformers>. 

Then followed a three- 
hour procession of million- 
dollar talent that included 
the fabulous dancing Clark 
Brothers; the pretty red-head 
of song, Damita Jo; bril- 
liant tenor .\ r t h u r Lee 
Simpkins: famed comic 
Danny Thomas; recording 
star Sam Cooke; blues queen 
Dinah Washington: the pop- 
ular Betty and Eddie Cole; 
and laugh star comedian 
Redd Foxx. 

HeadUne Spot 

In the headline spot was 
the honoree, Sammy Davis 
Jr. His citation was pre- 
sented to him by two 
famous TV personalities. 
Jack Kelly and James Gar- 
ner, who are more familiar- 
ly known for their roles in 


the Sunday e\enmg Maver- 
ick series. 

Sammy then proceeded to 
add his inimitable talents 
to the evening s bill of fare 
to the applause and delight 


of the audience. The re- 
sponse was so terrific that 
someone among the ma>s of 
spectators commented; "The 
onlv thing that can follow 
this' is World War IIll' 


Among the throng attend- 
ing were Lola and George 
Beavers. Dr. and Mrs. Ollie 
G'anthen. Mr. and Mrs. 
Winston Von Wertz. Mr. ar,d 
Mrs. William Watkins, Mr. 


and M.rs. Robert Williams, 
Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Pin- 
key. Glad\s Johnsoru Charles 
Gibson. Mr. and Mrs. Dermis 
G.-een of Chicago; Mr. and 
(Continued on Page 10) 



ASSUAL SHOW ATTRACTS—The annua! benefit 
Shrine show staged annually attracts most of the citv f 
top dignitaries and big names from the social, cnic and 


sports u'c.V. Seated ta'r'r'-.d' arr .Mmer. If endell Cotton, 
Frcnkhn Aia\e end Jim Gil.'tcm utth their illustrious 
husbands. .1 darns.) 



SHOIV COMMITTEE— Smiling over a job i.cll^ done 
backstage during the eighth annual Star-of-Stars benefit 
show are from left: Sohel Casey Howard, .Arabic Temple 


Ch', cijO : Sob'e F_rnuel Collm-s 
y. oble Frank G. Allen, genera 
Ed Clayton, deputy imperial 


Ed 


u ma 


.\I 


alone, a mo 


del; 


I show chairrnan : and ^ obel 
publicist. (Adams.) 


«^ Bill Small wood ^ 


The Victor Nickersons and 
family home from a week's 
f'-olic at Lake Arrowhead; 
Rhetta Jean's baby is due 
in April. Caribbean returnees 
Dr. and Mrs. John Coleman 
\isited the Waher Gordons 
(Berkeley) while island- 
hopping. 

Poppy Cannon U'hite will 
be a local \ isitor next 
month. Romaine and Jack 
Lyons' daughter China 
birthdayed last week .'=o TO 
of her chums came in for 
Sat. partying. Ex-Angeleno 
Lil Summers White (she's 
a Bay area dweller now) 
was in towm; she made it 
to Caliente last Sun., too. 
The Herbie Howards (Joyce) 
expect their third child in 
July. 

Author Dlscuss«« Book 

Helen Wright and Aurora 
H^skins ai-e new additions 
to "the Allied Arts as of last 
Sun. via their meeting at 
Venye Corporal's; local auth- 
or (literary prize-winner) 
Lorenz Graham discussed 
his book. "South Town." The 
club's annual coffee will 
get an Easter Sun. pouring, 
they've decided. The Ollie 
Matsons expect their third 
child by month's end. The 
Carl Finneys home from 
holidaying below the bor- 
der, his first long distance 
outing since his recent ill- 


UCLA's scholarly Hart- 
Nibbrig brothers, Nand and 
Harold, both scheduled to 
be bridegrooms come June. 
Ruby and Ernest Shelby 
joined the ranks of grand- 
parents via their son and 
his wife. Enroute home from 
his current flying trip to 
NYC Buck Jones visits his 
original hometown of Day- 
ton, O. Ralph Vaughn back 
from a business trip East. 

The Girl Friends met 
Mon. with Carney Stewart. 
Ivan Harold Browning rings 
up a birthday Sat. (20). 
Angelique Bratton hopefully 
exp>ecting niece Carmen De- 
Lavallade's husband, Geof- 
frey Holder, th'-ough here 
this week as he dashes 
home to NYC from SF. 
Cigan Unwra p ped 

Today (18) is Lela Walsh's 
birthday. Bemice Eblon 
Smith takes hers Sun. (21). 
Lucille Leonard checks in 
Kaiser Hosp. Mon. to await 
the birth of her second 
child; her husband, J, D. 
has the cigars and candy 
unwrapped and waiting. 
Maggi Need's doctor pro- 
mised her she could bid 
goodbye to that hospital 
bed any day now although 
she has to wear a back 
brace another week or so. 

Sun. is anniversary for 
iuanita and Loren Millesr; 
^ iCofitinued oo Face Vol ^ 



ROLLICKISG TRESIER Tlf'ISS— Their terrific act uas among the highlighu 
of the eighth annual Shriers show. The veteran showmen hate pretty and shapely Regins 
Cox on Cloud 9. Uthers'o Pictured from left: Don Hill, -Skip, Claude and Clif : Trrnier. 

- iAdamt.1 , 


\ 


\ 


\ 


k 




.S^.-7 .»i».^ rr ,.. rf- -^.^...^j 


-•*';-•">■ ■<ii«,'**Ww«, 



CLUBS 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 




FASHIONS 


The California Eagle— 10 



NEIV YORK VISITOR FETED— Shonn seated, right. Mary Countee nf New York 
City, enjoys coffee tit a party given in the fashionable Grarnercy place home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Sonny Maddox last Saturday night. Ahn seated is Dorothea Foster, a cousrn nf the 
visitor. Standing. Betty Scott, another cousin, right. Dr. James Kirk, and, pouring the 
coffee, Zenobia Maddox, hostess of the elaborate party, (Adams), 


Seek Former 
Students for 
Carver Event 

Talented ex-Carverites are 
being recruited by Mrs. E. W. 
Rakestraw for the PTA Foun- 
ders Day Program Feb. 23 in 
the Carver Junior Higrh 
School auditorium. 

This year's theme will be 
"Cooperation in Laying Firm 
Foundations." 

Noted local pediatrician, 
Dr. Henry Hines, was the 
guest speaker at the recent 
meeting, according to Mrs. 
Albert Knowles, Carver PTA 
president. 

Dr. Hines spoke to parents, 
faculty, and friends on the 
history and development of 
the school health program. 

Muriel Island, school 
nurse, spoke on the program 
at Carver, and Austin E. Dix- 
on, principal, discussed safe- 
ty within the school. 

A question period led by 
William Bailey, school regis- 
trar, followed. 

Eighth Annual 

(■Continued from Page 9> 

Mrs. JLmmie Harris, Freddie 
Felton, of Oakland. 

Jesse Pinson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Oles Hayes, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. R. Hawks, Mr. and Mrs. 
Eddie Williams, Geneva 
Wallace, J. C. Blackwell, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Cavalier, 
Mr-s. Harry (Ruth) Smith, 
from Chicago; Alfred and 
Cora King, Luther Powell, 
Jacqueline Jacquet, Peggy 
Robnett, Bill Hedderly. 

Rose Fernandez, Cliff 
White, Mr. and Mrs. O. Lat- 
timore, Mr. and Mrs. Elbert 
Hudson, Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
Bradley Jr., Betty Clark, 
Hlldegarde Bostic, Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis Carriere, Harvey 
(Spider) Biggin.s, Kay Stone, 
Marty Zugia, Libby Clark, 
Jeri Jackson, John Rancifer, 
Mary Countee of New York, 
Dit Stevens of Detroit and 
only 2,500 others. 

Drama Classes 

Ross Snyder children's 
dance and drama classes 
will highlight their Patrio- 
tic Observance Program 
today, Thursday, at 7:30 p.m. 



L.A. DENTAL STUDY CLUB— Because of the wonder- 
fill service the non-profit Stovall Home for the Aged is per- 
forming for our senior cititrns it easily caught the atten- 
lio'n of the Dental Study Cluh, Club members are shonn 
after presenting a sizeable check to the home. Pictured from 


left: Dr. Willis K. Duffy, chairman of the affair; Ruth 
Carter, Dr. Wendell Cotton, Dr. Hamilton Cloud, Dr. 
John Gary, Dr. Artis White, Dr. Lathan Sichols, Dr. 
Thomas Boger and Dr. Ernest Foster. Back row: Dr. 
Harry Thomas and a band member. (Adams) 



AID STOVALL HOME— .Members of the Los Angeles 
Dental Study Club organized uith the purpose nf serving 
the community in as many ways as possible are shown pre- 
senting representatives of the Stovall Home for the Aged a 
substantial check. Dr, Gerald L. Stovall, third from left. 



Dorothea Foster 


Links Cotillionettes 


One of those rare weekends of yours truly — 
but a real goodie that started on Thursday evening 
when the press were the honored guests for dinner 
and cocktails at the home of the Links' publicity 
chairman, DOROTHY ROWLAND. The Links have 
rolled up their sleeves for full speed ahead as the 
host city for the national Links' three-day conven- 
tion in July. Plans were unfolded and from all indi- 
cations, they are on the right track for a very suc- 
cessful convention. 

Friday evening we had to pass up the Regular 
Fellows dance at th« Zenda Ballroom with PEPPY 
PRINCE and his great band in order to prepare 1134 
Tremaine for the arrival of my coz, MARY COUN- 
TEE from New York. 

Honored Guest 

Saturday evening MARY was the honored 
guest at the home of ZENOBIA MADDOX where 
over 50 guests answered her cute pink bids to have 
dinner and cocktails and meet the New Yorker. 

Sorry I missed the Women's Sunday Morning 
Breakfast Club meeting at the Clark Hotel with 
DON GLOVER, Fair Employment Practice Commis- 
sioner, as guest speaker. 

Also, the lovely Valentine Day tea and fashion 
show at the home of MRS. MASON DRIVER Un- 
derstand it was real pretty and that a giant red 
heart was the center of attraction on her decora- 
tive table. 

Les Beau Dames had a real swinging affair at the 
Moulin Rouge with JEEP SMITH providing the 
dance music. 

Packed House 
Les B&au Femmes presented their Valentine 
Extravaganza at the Crescendo on the same after- 
noon. Business manager FRANCIS HAYNES re- 
ported they had a packed house. 

Another press' conference which included lus- 
cious finger food and cocktails was hosted by the 
National Association of Fashion and Accessories 
Designers at the home of HILDA CAINES. The girls 
: (Continued on Page 14) 


Thirty fashionably dressed 
young ladies who will be 
presented at the 1960 Links 
Cotillion in July were guests 
of honor, along with their 
mothers, at a brunch given 
by the local chapter of Links, 
Inc., Sunday, Feb. 14 at the 
home of Mrs. Gerald Barnum, 
cotillion chairman. 

A red - and - white color 
scheme in keeping with 
Valentine's day was carried 
out throughout the spacious, 
well-appointed home. An ar- 
tistic arrangement of red car- 
nations formed the center- 
piece of the exquisitely set 
dining room table. 

The honorees and their 
mothers who were present 
were: 

Irvelle Ashby, Mr.s. James 
Ball; Carolyn Melody Combs, 
Mrs. Horace Combs; Joan 
Cummings, Mrs. C. Edward 
Cummings; Marianna Cush- 
nie, Mrs. George Cushnie; 
Gueryn Dapremont, Mrs. 
Claude Dapremont; Diann 
Faulk, Mrs. Herman Faulk; 
Lyndall Faustina, Mrs. James 
Faustina. 

Laura Felder, Mrs. Walter 


Fclder; Vida Fortier, Mrs. 
Ferrol Fortier; Alberta Anne 
Foster, Mrs. Robert Foster; 
Linda Graham, Mrs. William 
Graham; Valerie Grant, Mrs. 
Brock Grant, Greta Griffith, 
Mrs. Thomas L. Griffith; 
Phyllis Harwell, Mrs. Laura 
Hanvell; Barbara Hunt, Mrs. 
J. Elmer Hunt, Jr. 

Kay Johnson, Mrs. Cage S. 
Johnson; Marcella Kingi, 
Mrs. Laurence D. Wilkins; 
Antoinette M. Lee. Mrs. 
Hazel Lee; Joyce Maddox, 



receives check from Dr. Thomas Boger, president of the 
group. From left: Dr. IV. K. Duffy, chairman of commit- 
ter; Ruth Carter. Dr. Stovall. Dr. Boner, Dr. H'endcll 
Cotton, Dr. Hamilton and Dr. Artis H'hite. 


Miss Patricia L Waters, 
Engagement Announced 


H 0.\L4S OF YEAR— Mrs. Opal C. Jones, executive di- 
rector of Avalotn Community Center, will be saluted Mon- 
day afternoon, Feb. 29. as the "California Eagle's Woman 
of the Year" as a tribute for her outstanding services to 
our community. The buffet banquet is being co-sponsored'by 
Marly Zuniga, owner of Marty's Lounge, and will be held 
in his smart banquet room which is closed to the public on 
Mondays, 


Mrs. Mamie J. Waters of 
Santa Monica has announc- 
ed the betrothal of her 
daughter. Miss Patricia La 
Verne Waters, to Alfred 
Frazicr Jr.. son of Mrs. Fan- 
nie Frazier and the late 
Alfred Frazier Sr. 

The bride ■ elect, also 

daughter of the late Charles 
D. Waters, attended Santa 
Monica schools, studied at 
Fisk University and later 
graduated from UCLA. She 
is a Alpha Kappa Alpha 
sorority member. 

She is employed as a 
social worker for the Los 
Angeles County Bureau of 
Public "Assistance. 

Miss Waters' fiance, an 
alumnus of Santa Monica 
High, served for two years 
in -the U.S. Army and is 


currently attending 
Monica City College. 


Santa 


Surprise ralcntinc 
Honors J. Villarcal 

The modest and attractive 
home of Mrs. Mattie Beard, 
232 E. 64th street, provided 
the setting for a delightful 
surprise Valentine reception 
for James R. Villareal, presi- 
dent of the Tempelite Club. 

The jovial president was 
the recipient of a gaily 
colored box of goodies pre- 
sented by Mrs. Beard, hostess 
of the affair. 

The club's secret pals ex- 
changed gifts and members 
enjoyed games and folk 
songs rendered by their 
guest, Rufus Lusk. 


Mrs. Albert Maddox; Sherie DpcjHpc in Madsra 

McDaniel, Mrs. Fred Mc f^fc^^'^tiS* ''^ 'Vidueid 

Daniel; Gervaise Moore, Mrs. 

Charles W. Moore; Melanie 

Moore, Mrs. Mildridge Moore; 

Judith Nelson, Mrs. Thomas 

Nelson. \ 

Janie Phillips, Mrs. James 
T. Phillips, Jr.; Paula Phil- 
lips, Mrs. Wilbert H. Phillips; 
Berryneice Powdrill, Mrs. 
Monte Powdrill; Sandra Ter- 
rell, Mrs. Romeo R. Terrell; 
Suzan Watson, Mrs. Norman 
Watson, Sr.; Susan Webb, 
Mrs. Malvin Webtr and Joan 
Whiteside, Mrs. George 
Whiteside, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Omri W. 
Bilbrew, pioneer residents of 
this area, have been resid- 
ing in Madera, Calif, since 
1957, but keep In touch with 
their friends and former 
associates by reading the 
California Eagle weekly, to 
which they have subscribed. 

They are the parents of 
three children, two daugh- 
ters who reside in this city 
and a son living in New 
York. For many years Mr. 
Bilbrew was employed at 
Silverwoods' downtown store. 




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l^eather jackets and leather coais. puede jackets and 
roats & jacket? — .«hirt pels . . . shirt ^ \e?\ to 
match. Leather \e5ip — cloth \e?ts — ."lack suit-=^ 
shoes, hats, handkerchiefs, tuxedos, white coats. 
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You are niorp than welcome in \our work clothes. 

FREE GIFTS FOR ALL NEW CUSTOMERS 

Parl< free next door as >ou sele<n your new rlothr.< 
for Ea.ster 1960. Black suits, blue suit*, grey suits 
in one-two and three button models. You get a gift 
for each customer you .send or bring in. Store hours 
9:."0 am. to 6 p m. Open Saturday nights until 8 
r m. — A union crew to ser\e you better. Get >our 
Easter ciothes now and save. 

LEO 'SUNSHINE' FON-A-ROW 

Manager of Victeir Clothing Company 

214 South Broadway in 

Downtown Lei Angolot, California 



e Watchea 

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their 






11— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 


Les Beau Dames in Colorfu 
Ninth Annual Cabaret Show 


II LLCUMh TO THE CLUB— Les Beau Dnmn url- 
cnntc quests to the ninth annual cabaret and floor shoiL' as 
they greet some 2500 tjuesls at the Moulin Roui/e Sunday 
afternoon. From left, pictured rn this number appropriately 



Dazzling costumes and 
some real swinging dance 
routines higlilighted the nin- 
th annual "Welcome to the 
Club" cabaret dance and 
floor show of the popular 
Les Beau Dames last Sun- 
day afternoon at the Mou- 
lin Rouge. 

A standing - room - only 
crowd watched the well su- 
pervised, beautifully cos- 
tumed show put on by -club 
members in a delightful two 
hour revue, although the 
performers had had no pre- 
vious dancing or acting ex- 
perience. The attractive 
young women worked for 
nearly four months on this 
show and judging from the 
standing ovation each act 
received their efforts were 
not in vain. 

The colorful costumes, de- 
signed by club member Thcl- 
ma Lee, were every bit as 
professional as any Holly- 
wood studio production. As- 
sisting Mrs. Lee were mem- 
bers La Vaughn Watkins, 
Vera Hoddrick, La Rue 
Brown and Juanita Wither- 
spoon. 

Choreography and show 
director Mabel Alberga did 
an exceptionally fine job 
from the opening number 
through the finale. Midway 
during the show the huge 
audience began to get p bit 
restless. Guest blues singer 
Jimmy Witherspoon, sens- 
ing the reaction with the in- 
stinct of the professional en- 
tertainer, mounted the stage 
and promptly brought the 
house down with two num- 
bers. The tempo of the show 
picked up and continued 
until its conclusion. Emcees 
has been named one of the who kept the acts rotating 

were Harriet Terry and Phil 
Rhoten. 

Members Joyce Sonnief, 
Vera Hoddrick, Ethel San- 
ford Smith, Charity Wylic 
and Bennye Wyatt all work- 
ed like little beavers back- 
stage during the show. 

Music for/ the dance rou- 
tines and the audience danc- 
ing was provided by Jeep 
Smith and his band which 
featured the Smith Sisters. 

Some of the many guests 
attending the affair were: 
Pat Howard and Robert Jenk- 
ins, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Hall, 
Mr. and Mrs. Willie Bell, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Earle, Mr. 
and Mrs. Calvin Edwards, 
of San Diego, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Martin, Mr. and Mrs. 


titled "S'/ueeze Me," are: La Rue Broiivi, Joyee Sonnier, 
Maxine Gauff , Juanita II itherspoon. Mabel Alberga, Char- » 
ity II ylic rtnd I era tloddruk. (Adams) 


Named Among 
World's Best 
Dressed Women 

Mrs. Lionel Hampton, wife 
of the famous band leader, 


TIKISG A BRhAK — Uniting for the Alelicson. J'opeka o Sanin fe t'l arrize in Kan- 
,,;, Cit' — rxirpt that this picture uas snapped on the slaiierif the .\foulin Roui/c Inst Suif 
An\ nhrrnrinn. Pnturrd from left- Dorothea MrMillrn , Mabel Poslrtte. L.oisila Daryrr, 
Senile Uvatt and Thclma Lee. Miss Lee designed the above lOslumes. (Adann) 

Couple Reveal Recent Wedding 


In a formal double ring 
wedding ceremony Saturday 
evening. Feb. 6, Ethel Out- 
law became the bride of Levi 
T. Lipscomb, Jr.. before a 
largf' number of friends. 

The rites were performed 
at SI. John's Episcopal 
Cliurch by the bride's uncle, 
the Rev. Ellsworth B. Jack- 
son, rector' of the Church of 
the Incarnation, Cleveland, 
Oh;o. The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. Rex- 
ford W. Outlaw of Wa.'Jhing- 
lon. DC. 

Present for their son's mar- 
riage were the grooms par- 
ents. Mr. and Mr.-;. Levi T. 
Lip'icoinb, Sr. of Baltimore, 
Md. 

Til'" bridr was attended by 
her maid of honor, -Miss Coy- 
lin B.-nwn, and bridesmaids, 
Mi.-s .\lthoa Sims and Mrs. 
Donald Holmes. Their blue 
formal length, nylon tissue 
dresses complemented the 
brides bouquet of white and 
blue carnations, and her cus- 
tom - designed. traditional 
white cathedral length gown 
of silk organza over taffeta. 

Gwendolyn Moseley, Melis- 
sa Hilton, iind Janet Moseley 
were flower girls and ring 
bearer, respectively. 

The groomsmen were Wil- 
ton Robinson who served as 
best man and Wilfred Kenny 
and Donald Boyd, ushers. 

.\ reception at the Wilfan- 
del Club followed immedi- 
ately after the ceremony. As- 
sisting the bride s mother as 


acl DeLago. C. W. O/.icr, Don- 
ald Morgan. William Wool- 
folk, Herman Evans, James 
Price, William Pruden. Ethel 
Wright, and Morris Finn. 

Additional hostesses were 
Misses Elodie Bowers, Lucille 
Robertson and Ann Kauf- 
man. 

The bride is the daughter 
of Mrs. Arthur F. Hilton of 
Los Angeles, who is a psychi- 


atric social jWork supervnsor 
with the California Depart- 
ment of Mental Hygiene. 

The former Miss Outlaw is 
a probation officer with the 
County of Los Angeles. The 
groom, formerly from Balti- 


"world's best-dressed wom- 
en ' by the Continental Style 
Club of this city following a 
poll among leading dress de- 
signers and fashion houses 
in Paris, Rome, and Hong 
Kong. 

It is believed to be the first 
time a Negro woman has 
been so honored in the 
fashion world with expressed 
agreement from among such 
leading authorities. 

Members of the Continent- 
al Style Club, which includes 
Mrs. Betty Clark, Mrs. Elois 
Davis, Mrs. Zenobia Maddox, 
Mrs. Martha Jefferson Louis, 
Mrs. Vivian Driver and Mrs. 
Benny Carter, plan each year 
to have a Negro woman 
named among the "world's 
best dressed." 

Among women in fashion . _ 

circles, Mrs. Hampton's ward- Aft PeStlVa 
robe has long been a subject 
of considerable discussion. 
Up to now, she has rarely 
commented upon it, consider- 
ing the subject to be in poor 
taste. But in answer to a 
questionnaire, submitted to 
her by the club, she did re- 
veal the following: 

Her wardrobe includes over 
lOf) cocktail and evening 
dresses, all especially de- 
signed for her. She has more 
than 200 pairs of shoes, all 
hand-made for her by Italian 
shoemaker Mr. Lori in Italy, 
many of which are matched 
in the same fabric as her 
gowns. Among her furs, 
there are 11 major pieces, in- 
cluding three full length 
mink coats and one full 
length Russian sable coat 
whose evaluation alone is 
$25,000. There are also three 
jackets, two of mink, the 


more, is a postal employe other of .sable; one Empress 


and is studying toward a de- 
gree in engineering. The 
young couple will reside in 
Los Angeles. 


chinchilla stole and two 

mink stoles, one white, the 

other black, and both three 
yards in length. 


Avalon Center 
Art Festival 
Slated Feb. 21 

Students from Jefferson 
and Carver Junior High 
School art classes will ex- 
hibit paintings and draw- 
ings at the first annual Fes 
tival of the Arts, Sunday, 
Feb, 21, from 3 p.m., until 
7 p.m. at the Avalon Com 
munity Center, 4272 Avalon 
blvd. 

The center is sponsoring 
the event. In addition to the 
.students some of the city's 
most outstanding artists will 
also appear. Among them 
will be Mildred Blount, mil- 
linery; Anita Bogan, com- 
mercial floral design; Eunice 
Cain, dance; Robert McFer- 
rin, music; Maidie Norman, 
drama and Charles White, 
art. 

Chicago Visitor 

Arriving in the city from 
Mexico City for a 10-day stay 
is Mrs. Callie M. Braxton, of 
Chicago. 



BUDDISG TROUPERS— Club member La Vaughn 
H'ntkms, second from left, tr pictured tilth d group of 
talented new faces uith bright careers ahead. They luere 

aliett ntlrrrlinnt i|< /,»r ""'■■ H.^-... afco.n Imtl Sv'irfry. 


from left: Curley Drnkins, Singer: Mrs. Watkins: Don 
.ll'yatl, singer; Gail Smith, vocalist; Phil Rhoten, M. C: 
Sandra Smith, vocalist; and Ray Camerbn, singer. (Adamt) 


Louis Thompson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Sylvester Atwood, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Bunocr, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Brown. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Cunning 
ham, Charles and Sheba 
Toney, James and Ophelia 
Plair, Milton and Roslyn 
Goddard. Melvin Rowlette, 
Eddie Cotton, Marie Holmes, 
Anthanette Finley, Desiree 
Miles, and Dewey Martin, 
Jozie Mack and Valerie Tay- 
lor from Pasadena. 

Also Roland Craig, Bar- 
bara McGinnis, Mr. and Mr.s. 
Rudy Jack.son, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bob S c r a n t o n , Dorothy 
Brown, Doris Grant, Gloria 


Gardner, lllie Curtis, Em- 
mette and Maug Tabor, 
Kathleen and Felix Pullium, 
Harriet and Kenneth Terry, 
Sugar Jones, Mary Carr, 
Marguerite S. Weinbc^-g. 

Herbert Boswell, Robert 
Sanders, Jessie and Leroy 
Beavers, Sy and Felix Wil 
liams, L. Hampton, Bernice 
Pigrce. Lorena Hammond, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Harper, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gwen Garland. Ro 
bert Hill. Donald Lewis, V. 
Morris, Odis Johnson, Callie 
Jor\^ and Pearl Turner. 

Following the Moulin Rou- 
ge affair, an after-the-thea- 


ter party was held in the 
home of club memt)er Vera 
Jo Hoddrick. where mem- 
bers and friends enjoyed 
cockta'ls and a buffet din- 
ner. Charles Jones served as 
bartender. In addition to the 
club members there were Mr. 
and Mrs. Bert Williams, Ned 
Kennedy, Jimmy Wither- 
spoon. Curley Ertnkins, Lois- 
it a Davyce, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Watkins, Mr. and Mrs. 
G. McMillian, Thelma and 
Benny Lee and La Rue 
Brown. Mrs. Mabel Alberga 
is president of Les Beau 
Dames. 



-iiM^ 


BLAl'TlTL'L \JGflTAL1RES — Lucille Bosti-ell, center, does a double take as she comes 
upon Ethel Sanford Smith, left, and La Vaughn H'atkiTis, right, backstage at the Aloulai 
Rouge Les Beau Dames shozv. Members were featured in "Around Midnight Nightmafe" 
number. (Adams) 



GUEST STAR — Among the guest entertainers highlighting the nrnth annual Les Beau 
Dames "iVelcome to the Club" affair last Sundey afternoon ueis Jimmy U itherspoon, 
center. Seated from left: Harriet Terry and Phil Rhoten, masters of ceremonies of the 

tprrffrri/tnr r/fifc put nn by club members. (Adams) 


\ 


1 


A 


.f^ 


i-i; 



DIJJA KNOW — That the car- 
bon copy of the Anglo-Saxon 
culture IS pn|o\f>fl h\' some of 
our top IPciiiprs^ W'r woulrl 
likr for thorn to know that the 
Anif ricari-born Nrgio culture 
IS uniquo and based on a rich 
and colorful hpriia^^n! 
PROUD PAPA— If you spo the 
hoss. LorPii Miller, thai is. 
flashmr; a broad grin it isn't 
because hp has just won a hi^; 
case. Loron Jr.. Pete to the 
vouns hloofis, just wound np 
No. 2 m his 60. man Lf)>()la 
Frpshnian law class. To[) man 
boat him out b\' .(12 of a pojnt 
How close I an \ou ^ei " 
JIM RANDOLPH — The disc 


— i^yylosi: 4^/0ci:ive — 



lHuirji-iu.».aum 


Manchester & Broadway 

COMING ONE SHOW ONLY 

SAT. MIDNITE 
Feb. 27 'SHOW! 

STARTS 11:30 P M. - All SEATS 90c 


50 SCART— WE DARI YOU I 
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YOU NEVER 


jockey who skyrocketed to bej 
among the city's top platter 
spinners is said to be out as 
KC'.FJ program director! 
RUTH SMITH — She didn't, 
change her name when she! 
moved to Chicago a little o\er 
a >ear ago but she added a! 
Harry Smith to it becausCj 
she's wedded' ' 

ROSE FERNANDEZ — Peppy 

little Questionetles Club mem- 1 
her and pholog Harry Adams 
are i-hums now and it looks 
like the club will pose again! 
BETTY FOXX — She strolled 
into Ralph's Crenshaw store 
Thursda\ morning and be- 
came fine of the store's dailv 1 
winners by picking her name 
from the box and suave Avor\ | 
Abbott, gonial manager, pre- 1 
spnied hpr with a coupon book 
and a culinary .set ! 

JIMMY WITHEHSPOON — He 

IS currently bringing down the 
house on wpekpnri.'? at the Ze- 
bra Lounge with his earthy 
blues. Crown Records has lUst 
released a SI 49 album feaiur-| 
mg some of the "Spoon's"] 
great hits that's selling, like 
<'ra/ee' ' 

KATY ANDREWS — Up and 
(Continued on Page lii ' 



CLl H t'A rURirt. — Dinnh H fnhiimlon. uhn has rap- 
tured the hrnris nf more rib(iu< hnidrrs thfin Dart Cupid 
ind nil his h'lus. rrturnrd h\ p'ipulnr demand to the famed 
CLUIS I'tR nn Sunset Strip. Dinah ui// interrupt her 
si^inam/j sihediile Innq ennue/h tn slur at the Bel Esprtt's 
Citatinn Rnll Sunday. Fehruai \ 21st, at the Aiagon Ball- 
rnnin in Simla Mnniin. 


— Uidco ^JtafM — 



Dl-ET — Former Henryweitjhl Champion Joe Louts paused 
in Miami lonq enough to duet uith his prnle/jee, Yionne 
Ghoston, sultry jazz organist noiv appearmq m the Sir 
John Hotel's Carousel Room. Louis diseoiered .Mi<s Ghos- 
ton and ftnanred her studies at Julltard in Xeu York. 


"THE PATSY '. a General EIretric Production, uill star 
Sammy Davis. Jr.. this Sunday. February 2Ut. an (Aannel 
So. 2 . Q .00 p.m. The above photo shous a scene from the 
telrplay tneludincj sinqer Sam Cooke, left: Francois Andre, 
center, and Sammy Dans. Jr. Roy Glmn, Hari Rhodes and 
Robjnr Johnson also are featured. 


HA.f SIEN THIS KINO OF SHOW 
100 IIMIS SCARIfU fOR R£Al • 


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Recommendations for Dining, Wining and the Best of Entertainment 


M 



"*AO*ONtTi? ^ 

"-TEEN AGE'^BBM^fSSI'^J 

«J^li|Si^ S..whot 
JHj^Fvfl^oppens when ^- \ 
f^i^pr HEN AOe{ 

r meets DRACUIA'S 
n^w DAUGHTERI 



ijood MijA< 

s from Vour Drrtuif ralir Ihinkinq 

Friends 

"n 



SWITZERLAND 

CAFE 




OPEN 
40S7 S 

BANQUET 

SUNDAYS 

. FIGUIROA. 

Next to New Sports Arena 
FOR FOR SMALL OR LARGE PARTIES 
FROM 4 P.M.— CLOSED MONDAY i TUESDAY 
lOS ANGILES AD. 2-2992 


ISH'S SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 

••nd*iv«ws ef Cenfsntad Cliftki 
-HEADQUARTERS FOR FUN lOVERS- 

2851 CRENSHAW at 29th St. 

FINEST DRINKS - CRISP CHICKENS 

CHARCOAL STEAKS 


BARRY S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

2636 CRENSHAW BLVD. 

FINE FOOD - SUPERB COCKTAILS 

GOOD FOOD BY CHEF PEARLINE HOPPS 

BARTENDER TONY CASINO 

JACK FREEMAN NELLIE MINOR 

M»n»ger Hoite»» 




TOP 4 
RECORDS 

SAM'S 
RECORD SHOP 

5162 W. Adams Blvd. 

1. "Behind the Door" 

Vernon Green 

2. "Peace of Mind" 

Willie Hoyden 

3. "Earth Angel" 

The Penguins 

4. "Best Party Fun" 

Redd Foxx 


_ 


EDWIN PEARL PRESENTS 

1959 SYLVANIA AWARD WINNER and 
VANGUARD RECORDING ARTIST . . . 

ODETTA 

BILLY FAIER - Banjo Virtuoso 

TWO WEEKS ONLY - Tuesday, Feltruory 23, Thru 

Morch 6th — Tickets Now on Sale oit 

Ashgrove, $2.00 

THE ASHGROVE CONCERT CABARH ^ 

8162 MELROSE, HOLLYWOOD 

Reservations: OL 3-2070 


SCREA.MSATIOSA L—^!oiie monsters alne, on stage 
nt Manchester Saturday. Feb. 27, one show only at id- 
nite! The world s scariest oxie onsters are coming to toun, 
in person. Only one perfnrrnrinee will he gn en and this a 
special midnile shotting startinr! at 11:^0 p.m. A ppearing 
both on stage and in the audience are such monsters as 
the h LY .' — the creature uilh a an s bod' and a fly s head; 
\oull see the TFESAGE F RA \ K EXSTEJS : also. 
RODAS, the fhnig on'ler iihich flie\ over the audience: 
the Dauahler ot Dracula: the Giant (^L.-IJI ; the 
HUXCHRACK OF XOTRL DA.MK' and any others 
ne- er seen m permn before' See lilicil happens u hen the 
liinnge J rankenslein nicels the Daughter nl Drniula! 
The'e r^eird rharni ters are part of a special double header 
stage p'o/jtir fealnrtng not ju<t one — but /?; o o/ the iioild c 
srnnrO <ho, k rhous. Dr, Macabre's "IRIGHTMARF 
OF .MOriE .MOSS'FI.RS" and an'.lher big stage show, 
the one and only - S POO KS A -POPPlX'—a eomplelely 
neri' idea m mystery enlerlainnienl. ' 


STEViN'5 DRIVE-IN 

4272 South Figueroa Street 
Los Angeles 

HOME OF THE BARBECUE 

Br^akfatt end Short Onleri Servd Alt Day 
FROM THI PIT TO YOUR DOOR 

AD. 2-9036 

fre9 De/»very ef Alt Timmt 
Your Host, Mos* St*v»nft 


HOLLYWOOD FLIPPED-SO LAS VEGAS PAID MORE DOUGH 

FOR THE SWINGINGEST SHOW ON ENTERTAINMENT ROW . . . Starring 

LEROY 'SLOPPY' DANIELS 

* Cothy ^Yo-Yo' Cooper * Lottie, 'Miss Body' * Chrlstlnm Chapman's Band 


MAKE RESERVATIONS BY TELEPHONING: DUdley 4-772S-LAS VEGAS, NIV. 


New EL MOROCCO CLUB, 1332 'E' St., Las Vecat, Ntv. 


\d rOl.OSS*'- 


»i*iL 


NOT MOVIES! 

EVERY SCENE ON STAGE! 

" ' SE£ 

' MONSTERS 

T0R1URE 

BEAUIirUl 

GIRLS' 


Srhfliilt )nur Sr^l.^tlntr nl llw . . 

ZENDA BALLROOM 

LARGEST DOWNTOWN DANCE FLOOR 

•36 W. 7th ST. (OPPOSITE STATLER H0TEL1 

REASONABLE RENTS— CALL E. BOHLEN, HO. 4-6476. MA 9-9384 

Available tor Rentalj Dances. Wedding Receptions, etc. 


"iNJOY THE FINEST- 

• COCKTAILS • FOODl 

• ENTERTAINMENT 

• FUN & FROLIC 

" --'^-— MILOMO 

29th & WESTERN RE. 5-9585i 


.MAKE A DATE TO GET STRAIGHT BEHINDt 


+ WILDCAT CHATMAN + MEDALLIONS 

"CADILLAC SPECIAL " "MAGIC MOUNTAIN" 

+ BILLY and PEGGY . . . African Cuban DancuiUoRt 

TALENT SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY - GUEST STARS WELCOME - DANCINO 

3 BIG SHOWS NITELY ■ NO MINIMUM ■ NO COVER 

JAZZVILLE CLUB - 5510 Holywood Blvd. & Western - HO. 5-1806 

■ Plenty of Free Parking en Western Ave. Just North ef Hollywood Blvd- ^. S-1106 ■ 


MOMSTCRS CAPTURE 
tiRLS PROM AUDIENCE! 


GHOULS! LIVING CORPSES 


GIRLS 


I IRINfi AN (SCORT TO PROTECT 
lYOUWHCNTHeUfiHTSCOOUT! 


PIUS SCREEN SHOW! 


Old Smuggler 


Fashionable 
Scotch 


TOMMY TUCKER'S 

PLAYROOM 

DINERS CLUB ft AMERICAN EXPRESS 
CARDS ACCEPTED 


COCKTAILS * FINE FOOD 



4907 W. Washington t.^.) 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. W|. 6-3730 ™«»*' "»««" 


JIMMY MADDIN PROUDLY PRESENTS NITELY, 

TERRY GIBBS 

"MR. VIBES HIMSELF" 

PLUS TWO STELLAR ENTERTAINERS 


• AL McKIBBIN 

Former Bassist with Duke Ellington 


• MARY ANN McCALL 

Everybody's Favorite Voctolist 


••••uceorsoottAi*/ 


BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKV • Se PROOF ' 

Importtd by W. A. Taylor t Co., N. Y., N. Y. 
So/a Diatributora for iha U. S. A. 


*<'l>»tH 


MnHM 


Ja"-"i^i"."/.V-"ii-iA"iVi"i"."i"i"AV."i".".VAV."."A 

■; BROTHERHOOD WEEK SPONSORED BY THE > 
*l NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CHRISTIANS AND Jj 
•I JEWS HAS BEEN OBSERVED SINCE 1934. IT ij 

;! IS A TIME OF RENEWAL AND RESOLUTION TO Ij 
;■ SUSTAIN BROTHERHOOD THROUGHOUT . ^ 

THE YEAR. "l 


IWEXPiN5IVHY SATISnriNO 


GUARANTEED WORKMANSHIP 


Alpha Service Invites You to . . 
;Put your best looks forward 
on all festive occasions 



* Dyeing * Weaving 
* Alterations * Repairing 


Careful Cleaning * Delivery on Request 


<Jlte ^^Iplta 4^i 


435 E. VERNON AVE. 

IHtyFENIIVIlV lATISrriNS 1 — 


AD. 2-9363 


CHOICE DRINKS • DELICIOUS FOOD • DANCING 

Everyone's Making it to Jimmy Maddin'$ fabulaut 


SUNDOWN CLUB 

HO. 2-8:1^71 


6507 SUNSET BLVD. at Wilcox 

FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE 


i 


JERRY LEWIS 


35V^A"A".%W"pVAV-"A'«VAHVV-%VdVdWi 


Hotel Watkins & Rubaiyat Room 

fo see, hear and en joy 

Entertainment Mon.-Tliur.-Fri.-Sat.-Sun. 
QUINIK WILLIAMS TRIO 

Wl TAKi PRIDE IN OUR tXCSUiNT 
fOOO AND TOP MIXIOLOGISTS 


ENJOY CHOICE COCKTAILS - FINE FOOD - ENTERTAINMENT AT"" 

LE ROY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 47th & CENTRAL 

• • • featuring PERRY BLACKWELL'S TRIO * • • 
PERRY LEE-OrB.n KIRK WOODS-Dromt JACK McV|Y-T»i.or Sax 

LE ROY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 47th AND CENTRAL 

BOB ASHLEY • SLIM MATHtS • GRADY JENNINGS, Mixologl$lt DICKII BARROW, Chof 


HOTEL WATKINS 


2022 WEST ADAMS BOULIVARD, AT WESTERN 
BILL WATKINS, Prop. RE. Ml I 



For Your Delight . . . Every Night . . . 

»-=^-c:^^ BERT 'Organisr KENDRICKS' TRIO 

FaQturing TONY BAZLEY, Drums and WILLIAM GREEN, RmcIs 

(ALTO - TENOR - mm) 


ATTINO MAKTY'I 

SUNDAY "YAWNING" SESSIONS 

aiid lUNDAY IVININO MATINIIS 


MARTY'S 68II1 & BROADWAY 




Treat Your Family to the REST . . . EAT FOR LESS ot 

COLLINS' RESTAURANT I 
COCKTAIL LOUNBE 

• Mr'AH DINING ROOM • GOTHAM ROOM • CC JRMIT tOOM 
4771 W. ADAMS at PALM GROVE U. MOM 

' ^ — ' " ■ I . ii 1 1 1 1-^^— <— — 1^ 

^^^.M^^M^i— ^^^^»» 111 I ■ » ■ HUM.. . . J. . . ... I , I t m ^mm^mmimtf^t^^ 


^ 


/ 


I 


'■ > I';.,) 


'vlii-'- 


■?- .' :.'.. I. 


r 


DINAH OPENS AT THE CLOISTER 


THIS LADY 

OF THE NIGHT HAS 

TAKEN HER LAST WALK! 



IM MOtt t>f*(OllC*l MUIDIIEI IN *U 

>Hi ANNaiS or CIIMi> Ml MMlHt 

'HI CII«T KO)l*N0 rAlO! 

THf fllf ON JACIf THl tlPUt 


JOSEPH B. LEVINE 

F«SINTS 



rirnnj Lif HrTIISOII • EOO'E l(«Hf • BHir McOWHl. • l*tll SOlOU- Scrunpjrh JIMMY S»NG5Tf» 

ffj* » n.gintl iiwyt, >[[[» iiiuuotIO 104 COUN C»>iS • P.iiduCfl Omcled a-id Pko'n^tiiihtil by ^^ 
«09(»T $ llli) ml UWrr lERUtH • ( Mid Cinlgry Film MjC ^on ■ I PIDIMOUIT P C'JPfS R!!!l5i 


"// (f (jPT honor to mlutf Brotherhood 
IVeek, let's all make it a daily habit. 

JOHNNY MATHIS 


Brotherhood IVeek — Feb. 21-28 
Brotherhood . . . 

FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 
BELIEVE IT! 

LIVE IT! 
SUPPORT IT! 

S'atiortal Conference of Christians and JeiLS 

NICK ADAMS 
(TV's "Rebel") 



Queen of Blues 
In Double Date 
For Music Fans 

Dinah Washington, - Amer- 
ica's foremost blues stylist, 
returns to the Cloister Wednes- 
day, Feb. 17, for a 14-day en- 
gagement. 

Dinah this summer hit the 
million mark in retail sales 
for the first time with her 
recording of "What a Differ- 
ence a Day Makes." 

An amazing sidelight in the 
career of this most prolific 
singer is that she has been 
acclaimed far and wide as a 
song stylist, but few people 
are aware of her talents as a 
thorough musician, composer 
and arranger. 

Most Versertlls Ar:UBt 

Dinah plays the organ, 
piano, vibes, bass fiddle and 
French horn. She has written 
several original compositions, 
among which was her recent- 
ly recorded "Corhe On Home." 
the flip side of "Difference." 

Dinah's career has taken 
her to such cities as New 
York, Boston, Chicago, New- 
port, R. I., Stockholm, London, 
Buffalo, San Francisco. St. 
Louis and Hollywood, playing 
the top clubs wherever she 
appears. 

Dinah has won much ac- 
claim and recently playpd to 
60.000 persons in Stockholm, 
breaking all records for one 
week. 

Bel Esprit Entertainer 

Sunday, Feb. 21, Dinah 
Washington will appear at 
the unique citation ball for 
the popular Bel Esprits at the 
Aragon Ballroom in Santa 
Monica. Gerald Wil.=;on and his 
Ifipiece orchestra will supply 
the dance music. 


Editor Re-appointed 

Junior Ray Mo.scowitz of 
IjOs Angeles has been re-ap- 
pomtPd to the post of execu- 
tivp editor of thp College 
Times, official newspaper of 
the A.ssociated Students of 
Los Anodes State College. 


KITE WEEK 

Kite Week will be obsen'ed 
at municipal playgrounds 
throughout Los Angeles March 
712. _ 

^^^mmmmmmm^ll HEArT ENJOY' 

COMING MARCH 2nd - DELIA REESE 

NOW APPEARING 

DINAH WASHINGTON 

^'^^ RAY HASTING 

Reservations — OL. 7-1510 

it's IN to siiinti at 

the cloister 

sunTet strip ol. 7-1 >W 



"Brotherhood JVrek has become a great Arner'ican event 
because the people and their organizations hate taken it 
to their hearts. Its observance gives expression to a basic 
ideal of the Judaeo-Christian tradition — that all men 
are brothers entitled by the gift of God to equality 
and justice," 

Anna Maria Alberghetti 


BROTHERHOOD WEEK . . . 

for PE.iCE nnd hREKDOM 

Belitve il! - Live ill - Support ill 

THE MISHKIN AGENCY 


Brotherhood Is Giving to Others 

The Rights and Respect 
We Want for Ourselves 

SAMMY DAVIS/JR. 


BROTHERHOOD WEEK — FEB. 21 • 28th 
"Brotherhood . . . 

FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 
BELIEVE IT! 

LIVE IT! 

SUPPORT IT! 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF 
CHRISTIANS AND JEWS 

HARRY 
VON ZELL 


"Brotherhood Week, Sponsored by the National 
Conference of Christians and Jews, Has Been Ob- 
erved Since 1934. It Is A Time of Renewal and 
Resolution to Sustain Brotherhood Throughout the 
Year." 

KAY> STARR 


*• 


"Brotherhood Week, sponsored by the Natjonal Confer- 
ence of Christians and Jews, has been observed since 
193. It is a time of renewal and resolution to sustain 
brotherhood throughout the year." 

KEENAN WYNN 




BROTHERHOOD IVEEK . . . 
for PEACE and FREEDOM 
Btiievt ill Live it! Support iti 

LEOMcCAREY 

20th Cenlury-Fox Studios 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 The California Eagle— 13 ._ 


Be/ f sprif Club Presents 

DINAH = WASHINGTON 


DANCE 


SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

FEBRUARY 21st-5 to 10 P.M. 

in their annual 

CITATION BALL 


DANCE MUSIC BY OERALO WILSON 
AND HIS 16-PIECE BAND 


ARAaON BALLROOM 


DINAH WTASHWeTON 

OCEAN PARK 

PURCHASI ADVAMCI TICKITS AT ALL LIADINO MCOCD MMM 


"The Purpose of Brotherhood Week, 

An Activity of the National Conference of 
Christians and Jeus Is a Rededication to tht 

Basic Ideals of Respect for 

Individuals and Peoples" 


TENNESSEE ERNIE FORD 


"THE PURPOSE OF BROTHERHOOD WEEK, 
AN ACTIVITY OF THE NATIONAL CONFER- 
ENCE OF CHRISTIANS AND JEWS, IS RE- 
DEDICATION TO THE BASIC IDEALS OF 
RESPECT FOR INDIVIDU.\LS AND PEOPLES." 

ANDRE PREYIN 


■•>- 


"BROTHERHOOD WEEK - FEB. 21 .- 28th 

BROTHERHOOD... 

FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 

BELIEVE IT! 

LIVE ITI 
SUPPORT ITI 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CHRISTIANS AND JIWS" 

MR. McGOO 
JIM BACKUS 


"Brotherhood Week, sponsored hy the National C»n- 
ference of Christians and Jews, has bttn observed since 
1934. It is a time for reneiual and resolution to sustain 
brotherhood throughout the year. 

WARD BOND 


"Brotherhood Is Giving to Others 

Im TIME RIGHTS AND RESPECT 
WE WANT FOR OURSELVES" 

^J JOHN PAYNE 


gA^V^^ V ■^■ ^ SV■^■^■ V d^S^dS^ 

^"Brotherhood Week, sponsored by the Na-' 
^tional Conference of Christians and J«ws,i 
2" has been observed since 1934. It is a time 
^of renewal and resolution to sustain brother- 1 
J hood throughout the year." 

^ DIMITRI TIOMKIN s 


I 


I 


.1 


' ^^ ^ '* ■ • *•— . ' * * ^ ' r * ' i il P i ii i h 


- -A-t ..•* ^.£fak* — sJ *«^''i 


f*' 



Back at the 





rove 


-14— The California Eagle Thursday, February 18, 1960 

National Urban League 
Guild's Annual Affair" 
Most Outstanding Event 


By PHIL GORDON 

Wril. tho 20lh Annual Boaux 
Arts Ball was fabulous with 
its (;;aslight Follies, and thp 
National Urban Loagup Guild 
ran wpII be proud of its tinne 
and pffon on thr Golden An- 
ni\prsar> of thr National Ur- 
ban Loaguo. Thp sppcial guest 
star, making her first publif 
appearance since her ref.rn 
after seven year's absence, 
was mercL sensational, in the 



tmiifivi,m.watttwmmmt\tM 
Manchester & Broadway 


Manchester & Broadway 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

New Bargain ^Cc 

NOW PLAYING 


• 


BING CROSBY 
GRACE KELLY 
WILLUM HOLDI 


hAraunfrscATONf 


THE 
COUNTRY GIRL 


A rAIAMOUKT K£-ltIL£ASE 


\\>>\\\ 


ALSO 

A-lMCMItMCIM ffffff/f 


Ss THE BRIDGES /K 


I I \\i «.i( \( I 


■ II I I >Mi< «■ II I.I ^ 

\r\|{( M ROOM ^ 


FAMILY NIGHT 
IVBRY TUESDAY 

ADULTS dOC CHILDREN 

UNDER 12 YEARS OF AGE 

FREE WHEN ACCOMPANIED 
BY PARENTS 


ADULT 


f.r 


form of now Paris' own, Jos- 
ephine Baker. 

I Also present was the gra- 
cious Philadelphia Lad.\' of In- 
I ternational concert singing 
ifame. Miss Marian Anderson 
[in all her majesty. The Gas- 
light Follies Revue went off 
■smoothly and to the complete 
satisfaction and pleasure of 
{the capacity house on hand at 
I the Main Ballroom of the 
Roosevelt Hotel. 

Glittering Aiiair 

There were games of chance, 
prizes and a fun-filled mid- 
way of barkers and touts 
gathering in the chips sold for 
these games, to benefit .the 
funds of the National Urban 
League. 

The costumes were many. 

some of the period 1910, others 

iof unique nature, many beau- 

tifull>' p.xposing, and some 

'quite elaborate. And those 

wlio uere not in costume were 

all cliarmingly formal. 

I Proficient Personnel 

I It was my privilege and 
pleasure to be master of cere 
monies, and in conjunction 
with the fine cooperation* and 
assistance of the producer-di- 
rector George Norford of NBC, 
Guild Chairman Molly Moon, 
Guild Treasurer Harold Jack 
man and all. the . remaining 
Guild Officers and members, 
plus Sy Oliver and his or- 
chestra, 'VVillip "The Lion" 
Smith and his Trio, lovely and 

I I a 1 e n t e d dancer-singer, Liz 
Williams and Jier partners, in. 
eluding the vocal offerings of 

: Ann Gable, old-timer's Noble 

Sissle and Eubie Blake, our 
; spritely dancing head waiters, 

Leon James and 'Al Minns 
I and the wonderful group of 
I judges, Carl Haverlin. presi- 
I dent, Broadcast Music Corp., 
1 Frederick Richmond, member 
Iof the Board. National Urban 

League, Robert W. Dowling, 
I president. City Investing Corp., 
' Walter H. Poll, president of 
1 Gold Medal Studos. handsome 
i Harold Jackson, representing 

the Guild, and last, but by 
(Continued on Page 16 1 


jFans Admire 
Tnily Great 
Folk Singer 

Making her first West Coast 
apisearance since her award- 
winning performance on the 
Belafon^e TV Spectacular, 
Odetta opens Feb. 23 for a 
limited two-week return en- 
gagement at The Ashgrove 
on Melrose in Hollywood. 
Sharing the bill is Billy Faier, 
a young folk singer and banjo 
virtuoso well known in th° 
East, who will be making his 
Los Angeles debut. 

Odetta, one of the most ex- 
citing singers to emerge in 
the past decade, is a musical 
descendant of Be.ssie Smith 
and Leadbelly although she 
emulates neither, nor anyone 
ielse. Certainly in her own 
j field of folk music there has 
been no voice in recent times 
with such varicolored rich- 
jness of sound or so emotion-! 
ally generated as Odetta 's. 

Odetta was born in Ala- 
ibama and grew up in Los .\n-' 
igeles from the age of si.x. She 
j first performed as a folksinger 
'at The Tin Angel in San 
! Francisco in 1953. Since that 
I time, she has appeared in 
concerts and nightclubs across 
the country and her fifth 
record album. Ballad for 
'Americans, has just been re-j 
leased. She has been chosen 
b\ GianCarlo Menotti to 
represent this country at the' 
J1960 Spoletto Festival in Rome 
this summer, an honor well' 
merited bv this noble artist. 



60c 




-OPIN- 

PRL-SAT.. 

SUN. ONIT 


I CHILDREN 
25c 


CONTINUOUS SAT., SUN. 1 ».M 

- 3 TERRIFIC MOVIES - 


STARTS FRIDAY 

RnURN OF DRACULA" 

"INVISIBLE INVADERS" 

"LOST MISSILE" 





•Phil Gordon Makes the 

IW YORK SCENE 


PAIM CAFE'S CELEBRITY NIGHT RIGHT 

The general scene for entertainment this past week was 
active but I had a rather busy schedule, so was unable to get 
around as much as usual. However, 1 did make it to the 
Palm Cote on Monday for the Celebrity Night for UomI 
HeoBptoo and Uord Price, which was a very happy evening 
replete with many well-known*' 

headed by my very ''««■•« 


slacked model Huth 

PeoTce. and popular bachelor, 
Dr. Ken Toppin. 

Ex-Coliforaions Popular 

San Francisco's loss, stal- 


persons, 

own good buddy, Sidney Poi- 
tier, that sensational South 
African singer, Miriam Make- 

ba. tenor man AI Sear*, alto ,%V7ct mcwipl Rnsetia 

man Ben Smith, singer-song- ; lion • artist - model, Rosetta 
wriJerTTtxi Turner, entertain. Howard, is being kept busy 
^r cileTHamner.bop-singer,:with Artist and Photographic 
BcdM Gofuolex, newspaper- assignments, 
man, Al McMillan, Jimmy M.C Regularly 

Booker, Carl Neefleld and ^nd after the Beaux Arts 
Major Robinson, and New 
York disc jockeys. Jack Walk- 


and 


Ball I was asked to be the 
Master of Ceremonies on Sun- 
day night at the Main Ball- 
room of the Waldorf Astoria 


•r. Jocko HenderK« 
Tommy SmalU. 

Carl's Comer Atmosphere 

On the way home I stopped | Hotel, for the Bon Bons formal, 
by Carl's Comer on 150th j and since that is tomorrow, 
street and Broadway, and | valentine's Day, I'll have to 
found it still to be one of the j report in my next column, 
most -atmospheric and well|i'm your very own, so I hope 
kept supper-bars in Newlyou are all'my VALENTINES. 
York, and tiow most capably Happy, happy: 
managed by that very good —PHIL GORDON 

looker, Loif Williams, | 

Jax at ShoUmor MAYOR RACE — If Supervisor 

The Jolly Jax Trio is still ;Hahn would back Ed Roybal 
doing the honors at the Shall- and plug for a new chief of 
mar, and Hibby Craig is the police he could count on Ne- 
most in swinging hostesses, groes and Senores to swamp 
while among the guests were the polls for him in the race 
the striking Mrs. Gerri Fowler for mayor" 


(.,ROn \l\C, ■iUlU I I \U \ r—Dimplid Dclorrs Darnel In.amc the fairest of the 
fair uhrn she uas iroi^ncii Bcnu Arts Queen of the }\ationat Lrhnn League Guild's 
20th Annual Rnll. in thr inwcd Grand Bnllroom of the Roosevelt Hotfl. h\ Mrs. Mul- 
tie Moon, ehnimian of Sew York's e;ent of the season. Internationally renonned Jo- 
sephine Raker, left, made n special trip iroin her home in Pans. France, to headline this 
rjutst(indini) charitable ai com plishtnent. Our very oti n Phil Gordon ti'O.r the suaze Master 
of Ceremonies tor "(ias Lidhl Follies." (Cenl Layne Foto.) 


.HAIR STYLIST WANTED- 


lnt«r»tting Work in • Beautiful, Modernistic, Westtide Shop. 
Most Lucrative. Apply in Person at the 

GUMOUR INSURED BEAUTY SAION 


50 11 W. ADAMS BLVD., AT LA BREA 


RE. 2.8129 


Sriiedtilf Your Sezt Affair at the . . . 

ZENDA BALLROOM 

LARGEST DOWNTOV^N DANCE FLOOR 

936 W. 7th ST. (OPPOSITE STATLER HOTEL) 

REASONABLE RENTS— CALL E. BOHLEN, HO. 4-6476, MA. t-»384 

Available for Rentals, Dances, Wedding Receptiofis, Etc. 


TREAF 

Dnnicls, i< 


ho 


LAS f'EGAS 
LeRoy 'Sloppy 
recrntiy iiimdom's fun lov- 
ers fit Ilollyiiood's famous 
JAZZI'lLLE Cl.VR. opens 
tin extended en<i<iqcntent at 

the SEU EL MOROCCO 
in Lost U ages, S rvada. 
'Sloppy' presents (Jathy ')o 
^'o' Coofer, Lotir, '.Miss 
Body' and (Christine Chap- 
man's Rand in the .smnping- 
est shoii for anybody s dough. 

Make it:::.' 


Gospel singer , Mahalin Jack- 
son, arrives here in Los An- 
geles — February 20th. She 
Tcill record /t; o netv Gospel 
alburns for Columbia uhile 
she IS here. 


Latin Dance Slated 

The "Let's Go Latin" dance 
of the Continental Dance 
Club of La Parisienne Studio 
is slated for Friday, March 
4, at the Elks Auditorium. 
I Bobbie Montez' Latin and 
I American band will provide 
i the music and door prizes 
Will highlight the affair. 


o 


u, »*SIE e COLE * ELLINGTON e qaKNER e GRANT e SINATRA EVERETT McCREE - It was 

J her birthday that caused that 


UKE MUSIC? WANT A FREE STEREO? 

CALL BR. 2-7901 h'^S^'on 


ECKSTEIN • FITZGERALD * SHEARING * STATON * 


Ijam packed free spending 
• I crowd at the Milomo last 
pwed., arranged by Kay Stone. 

VAUGHAN I Harvey iSpiden Biggins, and 

lOdee BarnesI 


Andrev p. Frankljn offers 

on 9V9n\ng of memerob/e song 
with the div'mm tofents of . . . 

Mahalia Jackson 

Wednesday Night, March 2nd, 8:30 p.m. 

THf tlAUTirUl SANTA MONICA CIVIC AUR., PICO AND MAIN 

Tiek»«— 13.75. «3,0fl. I: SB. 12 00. Iintt tl»nit« Civie Tlcll«t Ollii!«. t> C«l Muiic 
C«. 7J7 S. HIM. and III Muluil Aftnclti Clll M*. 3-1144 <»r y«ur ••trnt Mtney. 


Dorothea Foster 

(Continued from Page 10' 
related plans for a mo.st unusual fashion showing 
and yours trulv will share the stage with col- 
leagues MARILYNN HOLDER, JESSIE MAE BEAV- 
ERS and GERTRUDE PENLAND on March 27 at 
the Mayflower Ballroom. 

AUDREY SCOTT entertained Les Dames in her 
V'iew Park home on Sundav afternoon. Special 
guests were LURLENE PERRY, ANN CUNNING-! 
HAM and MARY COUNTEE. 

Food for Talk I 

Tougaloo and Alcorn College alumni entertain- 
ed guests at the Fo.x Hills Country Club. This group j 
brings together many old Mississippi friends and 
chief rooter for them is popular MARY GLADYS 
CLEAVES (Mrs. LANE C). 

Star-of-Stars show given by Egyptian Temple 
No. 5, at the Moulin Rouge will keep those lucky 
people who attended alking about it for a long time. 

The show included such stars as the MAVER- 
ICK BROTHERS (TV fame). DANNY THOMAS, 
DINAH WASHINGTON, TRENIER BROTHERS, 
SAMMY DAVIS (he received the Humanitarian 
award), DAMITA JO (she flew in from Las Vegas 
to appear), CLARK BROTHERS, BETTY and ED- 
DIE COLE, and the greatest voice of all times, AR- 
THUR LEE SIMPKINS (his ovation was tremendous 
and tears came to ARTHUR'S eyes when this cafe 
society audience continued to request an operatic 
number from him. 

Put the Icing On 

SAM COOK closed the show or in JOE ADAMS' 
words, "put the icing on it." JOE did a beautiful 
job of MC and kept the show running smoothly. 
I Continued on Page 16 1 


I People 

• Continued from Page 12) 
around since her car accident 
three months ago but still has 
a cast on her left arm: 

FORWARD MOVE — Four 
Links, Inc.. members took a 
gaint step in the right direc- 
tion in planning for their na- 
tional confab here in July the 
other eve, when they exchang- 
ed ideas, with fourth estaters 
in Dorothy Rowland's fashion- 
able Hobart blvd. home! 
JOHNETTA STARCS — >^ot 
only is she one of the town's 
leading fashion designers she 
can also handle a kitchen 
range and turn out some 
mighty tasty mustard greens, 
pig tails and cornbreadl 
PLAYING SET — Those two 
pawlee gals who moved in 
and out of a fashionable new 
westside apt. after one month 
because their guest lists got 
scrambled and their new 
quarters seemed likely to be- 
come overcrowded ! 
VALENTINE — Those fancy 
cards showing up in several 
mail boxes really shook up 
the receivers because they af-e 
not showing them to friends.' 

STEVE ROWLAND — Top 

flight insurance executive is 
grooming his pretty 15-year- , 
old daughter for the 1964 
'Olympic Game.<;: 


PROTEST MEETING AGAINST 

ANTI-SEMITISM AND NAZISM 

SUNDAY, FEB. 21, 2 P.M. 

PALM ROOM 

ALIXANDRIA HOTEL, 5tt) aiid STRINO STIItETS 

I^IAK OUT AOAINST ANTI-SiMITIC AND lACIST OUTRAMt 

Prominent C«m«nity, R*li(ieut and Trod* Ufiio« l^fkTt 

Admltsiofi fr9^ 

Sponsored by: CommittM to Protest Anti-Somitism A Nazism 


UP. 0-6776 or IX. 3-9«61 for tjckat ra<arvatian> 


A Delicious 
Natural 


!^ 


^ 




vi 


<> 


Call your M0Mfy Lyon. ;^ I Orange Jufce-Drlnk 





• • • for your FREE 
Lyon MoTinjr D«y Kit, 
•r drop in »t iny of ly 

the convenient Lyon 
oSieec. And remember, 
tlie Utt, tmdMit, T«1UU« 
Lyon Mrrieci omi Mve 

you monty when moviaK 
or storing yonr fTtrnishiDeSc 


VAN & STORACI CO. 

^^ REPMiie 1-3131 


BROUGHT TO YOU BY TWO FAMOUS SOUTHERN CAUl|ORNIA COflPANIES . . . 

Sunldst /Arden \ / 

• Costs less than any processed juice! A full quart for less than I penny tn ounce. 

• The only orange juice product with this positive guarantee ... 
Each 8 oz. serving contains the minimum daily requirement 
of natural Vitamin "C" for s growing child. 

• Each quart exactly the same! Just pour and enjoy. 

• No artificial color or flavor! 

\ 

T - r 'j orange juice product which gives your family all th«8« 
important benefits . . . plvs healthful refrethmtnt ! Serve with confidence 
because you know it's good ! At your store ... or at your door. 

Bottled under the authority of Sunkist Growers by 

Arden Farms Co. 

MMOUS rom phizk winmim9 oamr utooucn ran ovtm halt a emruitr 


•r-i 


k> nrano» 




or buy enough electricity to 

WASH AND DRY A LOAD OF aOTHES AND COOK A MEAL 
ON AN ELECTRfC RANGE AND RUN A VACUUM CLEANER 
FOR AN HOUR AND LIGHT A 50-WATT BULB FOR TWO 
HOURS AND PLAY THE TELEVISJON FOR Afi.HOUR AND 
MAKE TOAST FOR BREAKFAST ... ALL FOR \0t 

Yes, electricity in Los Angeles is "" ""' 

really low in cost Your dectrie 

bin may be higher tinn it used to 

be, but the main reason probaUy 

is that you are vising more cJecLi c 

ai^ances and more electricity. 

Electric rates in Los Axtgeits are 

% lower than the average of tfie 

15 other largest U.S. dties. Tfes, 

yoB can Ldve Better BeetrieaBy 

... and do it economically! WMmmi » «»» * 



S<»c» 1940, tk* ever-all cast of 
»»ii>f bet lacraawd H0%, bat 
•lectrie ratn in Lac Ancalas hne 
Kmb an averai* of enly 4%. 

■ nWLK 


I 


i 


I 


i 


I 


<9>9m»i!9tmm 


wmmmi 


■Mi 


FAST SERVICE 


Ruth 

^helo^, 

liar 

stal- 

set la 

busy 

j-aphic 


Arts 
the 
Sun- 
Ball- 
itona 

>rmal, 
jrrow, 
kve to 
blumn. 
hope 
INES. 

Irdon 

^rvisor 
loybal 
lief of 
In Ne 
|wamp 
race 


1-9384 


v^^' 


lEAL 

TWO 
AND 

I960 


I co»t of 
b%. but 
lln itjv* 
fly 4%. 


> 



IfDUU HND 



¥HE MMNTAK! 


OUND« SERVICE • EMPL-OVMENT • PERSOMAU 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


California Elagls 

CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 

FICTITIOUS FIRM NAME 

The underslpned doe<i hereby 
certify that 1 eini conducting a 
Lesal business at 3902 South Den- 
kcr Avenue, City of Los Angeles 
6J, <'ouniy of Lo?? AiiKele**. State 
of California, under the fictitlou* 
firm nain« of Bob's Tavern, 3902 
South Denker Avenue, and that 
Mid firm Is Bomposed of the fol- 
lowing persi^s, whose names and 
aridrr-,ses ifre as follows, to-wit: 
Robert L. .Johnson. :?902 South 
Denker Avenue. Bu.-finess; 133 
West 73rd Street, Home Resi- 
dence. 

Witnss my hand this 22nd day 
of January. M60. 

ROeSiT L. JOHNSON 

133 W. 73rd St. 

U.A. 3. Calif, 
.'^tate of California. 
County of Lo.-j Aneelei!, ?.= . 

On this 27th day of January. 
A D. , 1960. before nie, Loren 
Miller, a .N'otary Puhlio in and 
fnr .«aid County an-l .State, resid- 
insT therein dul.v conitnissloned and 
(iworn. personally appeared before 
ine. known to me to he the person 
who.<ift name is subscribed to the 
Tvithin Instrument, and acknowl- 
e<iced to me that he executed the 
PH me. 

Ill witness whereof. I have here- 
nnto set my hand and affixed my 
official .«ea1 the day and year in 1 
lhi-1 certificate first above written. 
(jEAL) 

LOREN MlT.r.KR 

Notary Public in and for i 

Said County and State. 
My Commission expires 1962. 
"tPuhllsh California Eagle 
Jan. 28, Feb. 4, 11. 18, 1960) 


SCHOOL OF INSTRUaiON 


LEARN TO TYPE AT HOME 

35 Down-45 Month 

PRACTICE 
TYPEWRITERS 


4950 


WILSHIRE TOWER 

143 So. Western Ave. 

DU. 3-5605 


INCOME TAX SERVICES 


FEDERAL RETURN 


$250 


CR. 4-6061 


PUBLICATION SERVICES 


MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 


Fishing Tackle, complete outfit 
and miscellaneous items. Less 
than half price. 6025 S. Ver- 
mont. 


SERVICES 


SELL Coleman's nationoUy 
advertisei) household ptod- 
ucts and cosmetics. Saletrr 
guaremteed plus commission 
Call now. RE. 3-2677. Paul 
I L. Coleman. 

! famiiy1«urance plan 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


[APARTMENTS FOR RENT 


Thursday, February 18, 1960 The California Eagle-lS 


PAINTING t PAPERHANGING 


• PAINTER 

• PAPER HANGER 

• LOUVRE WINDOWS 
INSTALLED 

• MISCELLANEOUS 
REPAIRS 

CALL 

R. J. Mac DUFF 
AX. 2-6851 AX. 2-2604 


PLASTERING & REPAIRING 


AiiENTS WANTED: To sell the 
hook e\er\nne is talking about, 
ARC PlCfrRE BOOK OF EMI- 
NKNT NE(;R0ES PAST AND 
PRESENT. Fabulous commissions. 
\\ RITK A K.C. PICTURE BOOK 
PUBLISHING CO.. P O. ROX 
1-S787, Cimmaron Station, LA. 18. 
Calif 

Telephone PL. 2-1061, 5-7 p.m. 


FINEST PAINTING 


PAINTING 


5 ROOMS-EXCLUSIVE 


*195 


COMPLETE 


BATH 
KITCHEN 


$11 
$23 c 


Compltte 


omplete 


INCOME TAX SERVICE 

Personal Income Tax Accountants 
We Come to Your Phone 

RE. 2-1576 


ROOFING OF ALL KINDS 


fRll ISTIMATtS 
• II 
TILE - SHINGLE - FLAT 

REPAIRS 



WAITER SLATER 
ROOF CO. 

"Personalized Service" 

• TERMS ' 

• INSURED 
• LICENSED 

• Est. 1918 
1273 S. Cochran Ave., L.A. 19 

WEbster 6-5284 


PLASTERING and 
REPAIRING 

New ceilings— No job too large 
or too small. Guaranteed 
workmanship. Free estimates. 

Rl. 7-3438 


EXPERT PLUMBING 


ROOFING and 
REPAIRING 


FREE ESTIMATES 


NO. 3-4525 


FINEST UPHOLSTERING 


^ Specializing in general roof- 
^5 ing and repairing. We repair 

white roof 


DAVIDSON 
PLUMBING CO. 

24 Hr. Emergency 
Repair Plumbing 

Richmond 9-1046 

ULbstcr 1-1628 

PLeasant 3-7395 

Any Place— Any Time 

MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


• INSURES BOTH .. . 

HUSBAND AND WIFE 

• NO EXTRA COST.. 

FOR CHILDREN or 

CHILDREN BORN AFTER 

POLICY ACQUIRED. 

ALL QUESTIONS ANSWEREDII 

CALL EARL HADEN 
OR. 7-1486 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 


Work at Long Beach Douglas? 
Then join UAW Local 148. The 
Union that fights for the right of 
all workers regardless of race, 
color, sex or creed. Contact your 
Steward and sign up today. We 
need you, you need us I 

Ed Speedv Wianccki. 

4130 Look Beach Blvd.. L.B. 7 

GA. 7-8935 - ME. 4-1985 


SELL Coleman's nationaUy 
odvertised ' household prod- 
ucts and cosmetics. Salary 
guaranteed plus commission 
Call now, RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Coleman. 

HELP WANTED 


MAR-FASH-SHO wants girls 
for courses in fashion, 
photo, T.V. modeling and 
personal groominjj- Terms, 
3425 W. Adams Blvd. 
RE, 5-6447 — RE. 4-9420 


Hair Stylist Wanted 
Glamour Insured Beauty Sa- 
lon. 5011 West Adams BLvd, 
La Brca, Apply in pers(5n. 
RE 2-8129 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PL. 2-1179 


wood shingles 
I coating and gutter installation. 

WEbster 8-6828 


Set the Stage foi 


New Furniture with our 


Custom 
Uphostery 



EXPERT ROOFING 

New roofing or repairing done 
quickly and inexpensively.! 
Free estimates, 

ALTMAN STA.ROCK 
ROOFING CO. 

REpublic 4-4935 


INSTRUCTION IN ORGAN 

OR PIANO - NOTE, 

EAR, CHORDS, 

HYMNS-LESSONS $1.00 

DU. 9-2653 
businkTopportunity 


SEWING AND KNIHING 


SEWING and 
KNITTING 

iWe do ail types of sewing 
Send your work to an Old, Es- ^^^ knitting expertly. Most 
tablished, Reliable upholsterer.! 
30 years of guaranteed work- reasonable rates, 
manship. 

• FREE ESTIMATES 

• REASONABLE PRICES 

• EASY PAYMENT PLAN 


SERVICE STATION 
I FOR LEASE 

Thriving, garage and service sta- 
tion on corner of 120fh and Cen- 
tral. Needs some investment. 

j Ideal fo renergetic owner who is 
willing to build a better busi- 

'ness. 

; AXminister 3-2830 

DANCE INSTRUCTION 


FEMALE BEAUTY OPERATOR 
WANTED — Shampooing 
only, $12 per day, 5 days a 
week, 13518 Ventura Blvd., 
Sherman Oaks. ST, 4-9065, 

FURNISHED ROOMS FOR RENT 


FURNISHED ROOMS 
FOR RENT 

NICE ROOMS-West of Central. 
Singles and doubles. Privileges. 
Private entrances. Near every- 
thing. Children permitted, 1007 
East 50th St. 

Call Anytime 

WEbster 5-0485 


NOW RENTING 


ROYAL 

PALM 

APIS. 


1518 South Wilton 

Between Pico & Venice 

Place 
PRESTIGE ADDRESS 

Beautiful redecorated & nicely 
furnished SINGLE APTS. 

• Maid iervlce 

• Home phone 

• Elevator service 

• Heated swimming pool 

• Entire building Is carpeted 

• $70 and up. Utilities Paid 

UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 

See Mrs. Bierman in the premises 

RE. 1-5287 


NBW 
SOUTHWAY HOTEL 

A heme away from home— 
transients welcome. 

Furnished Apts. and Rooms 

^ M> JL*9w per week 

5119 South Avalen Blvd. 
AD. 3-7033 

UNFURN. APT. FOR RENT 


LARGE 

FURNISHED 
SINGLE 

BEST WEST ADAMS 
LOCATION 

NEAR CRENSHAW 

RE. 1-7625 
RE. 3-6019 

UTIL. PAID - $70 MONTH 


ROOM FOR RENT— Bed linen 
and gas heat, your company 
welcome. RE. 1-5515. 


WESTSIOE APTS. FOR RENT 


ADams 2-5679 


LA SALLE 
UPHOLSTERING CO. 

2121 West Jefferson Blvd. 
REpublic 3-4614 

SCVTOOLS OF INSTRUCTION 


Instruction Offered 

An S week preparatory course 
for those taking CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMS for U. S. Post OHiee 
CLERK-CARRIER. Complete in- 
formation and application* call 

RE. 4-8912 


ELECTRICAL SERVICES 


ELECTRICIAN 

RELIABLE, SAFE, 

REASONABLE, 

DESIRES WORK, 

CALL MA. 9-0947 


NEWER i LARGER QUARTERS 

CAROLYN SNOWDEN SCHOOL 

OF DANCE 

2111 South La Brea Blvd. 

WE. 6-1440 WE. 3-2263 

Beginners Class in Ballet, 

Acrobatics, Modern Tap 

Tots Enrolling Now Teens 

MONEY TO LOAN 


ELECTRICIAN — Reliable, 
safe, reasonable, WANTS 
WORK. MA. 9-0947. 


PIANO & VOICE 
COACHING 

• PIANO INSTRUCTION 

• VOICE COACHING 
Beginners and Advanced 

ELLA HILL TRIPLETT 

Teacher of Piano & Voice Coach 

STUDIOS 

2128 Delaware 

SANTA MONICA 

EX. 3-5963 


ELECTRICIANS 
CONTRACTORS 

Wiring — Repairing — Alterations 

Call J. J. MASTER 

WEbster M653 

CRestview 6-7945 

VErinent 8-9124 


MONEY TO LOAN 

That Is Our Principal 

Businesslli WE LOAN 

MONEY ON MOST 

ANYTHING! I I 

^' $$$$$ 
Because Some People Do Not Re- 
deem Their Pledget WE ALWAYS 
HAVE MANY CHOICE ITEMS FOR 
SALE AT A FRACTION OF THEIR 
VALUE - CLOTHING - JEWELRY • 
APPLIANCES ' TOOLS - RIFLES • 
GUNS. 


$$$$$ 


SUITS 
FROM 


$1000 


TREE SERVICES 


BEGINNERS — Violin or Piano 
one-half Csl hour lessons 
$1.00 call AX 5-9159. 


FINEST TREE 
SERVICES 

! DAVIS TREE SIRVICE-Tops them 
all. Big or small. TRIMMING, 
1 PRUNING, REMOVING. Expert 
'tree men. Specialists in palm 
I tree trimming. All cuttings 
i hauled away. 

Call Day or Night 

REpublic 2-1303 


CREDIT. TOO/ I I 

BANKAMERICAU) and 

INTERNATIONAL 

LUGKY'S LOAN CO. 

426S S. CENTRAL AVE. 

* ^ ^ 5 * 

BARBER COLLEGE^iNSTRUCTION 


American 

Barber 

College 

Triple-A Rating 

— 1248 Hour Course — 

, — Approved for Veti — 

349 South Hill Street 

MA. 9-^303 


De Luxe Furnished Apartment 

RENTS FOR $81 

Easily Worth $100! 

• MODERN SINGLES 

• UTILITIES INCLUDED 

• CHOICE LOCATION 

• HEATED SWIMMING POOL 

PARK ADAMS APTS. 

3528 W, Adams Blvd. 
at 6th Ave. 

REpublic 3-0642 


Quiet, 
Comfortable 

BRICK BUILDING 

FOR ADULTS 
ONLY! 

Furnished • Refrigeration 

Washer & Dryer • Util. Paid 

Bachelors— Singles— Doubles 

$40 Up, $57 Up, $80 Up, 
The Paulson Apts. 

1979 S, ESTRELLA 

W, of Figueroa, N. of 23rd St. 

Manager Rl. 9-8909 

If No Answer, Rl. 7-3450 


FURNISHED SINGLES 
Nice for Couple— Child O.K. 
-Utilities Paid- 
Private Entrance and Bath 
Newly Decorated 
XInt. Transp. and Shopping 
Washer — Dryer 
Near Normandie 
$12,50 Weekly and up 
1225 WEST 39th PLACE 

__RE^423___ 

APARTMENT FOR RENT 


PLANTATION HOTEL 

$8,00 week and up, newly dec- 
orated rooms, hot and cold 
water in all rooms. Some 
with Tivate showers. FREE 
PARKING. 1104 E. 40th PI. 
Corner Central Avenue. AD 
3-9828. 


FURNISHED kitebenette, $45 

mo. Furnished room $9.50 

wkly. Good transportation. 

DU. 9-8992 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The People's Choice 

960 E. Jefferson 

AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


BACHELOR 

APARTMENT 

ON WEST 20th ST. 

WE. 1-7260 

$60 MONTH 

UTILITIES PAID 


UNFURNISHED APTS. 
FOR RENT 

Large 1 bedroom apartments. 
Less than year old. Southeast 
section. Child permitted. 


Per Month 

LU. 7-1870 


3 Room Front Apt., 1 bed- 
room. Wall bed, refrigerator 
Adults only. 

AD. 3-7624 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


DRIVE BT 1631 S. STANLEY 

2 bdrm., 1% ba. redec. in- 
side and out. this one is 
priced right. 


FOR SALE. Van Nuys loc. 2 
tc den. cor. Has everything. 
$21,750. DI 5-3734 


$5000 DN^2-sty. frame'5 bd, 
den, 2hi ba. Whit. DU 8-6426 


STUC MANSIONS. 5 bd., den 

3 ba. Nr. Victoria and Ven, 
$38,500. RE 1-2372 


5 RM. 2 bdr. stucco nr. Man- 
chester. Try SIOOO down, 
DA 3-5064, PL 5-0636 


$595 DN. — Payments like 
rent Lovely 2 bdrm. STUC. 

W-w cpts. disp. extras. Near 
schools PL 7-4153 


REAL ^TATE FOR SALE 


3 BEDRROOM & DEN. Lovely 
West of Vermont Redec. 
$1500 dn. EZ balance. AX. 
3-6267. 


$595 DN. LGE. 2 BEDROOM. 

Hrdwd. firs, fenced. Nr. 
Manchester. PL. 7-2268. 


THY $1300 DN. Nu 3 bdr. 2 ba. 
stuc. Bit. in oven k range, 
sliding glass drs. PL. 3-5258. 
CA. 1-8546. 


$1850 DN. HOME, $75 mo. in- 
come. 2 units. 1805 Harvard. 
RE 4-2538 

$750 DOWN— 3 bdrm. $9450. 
Nr. 22nd & Normandie. 
AX 2-3607 


CORNER LOT. 3 bdr. with 
sleeping prch. Avail. Shown 
by appoint. $18,500. Terms. 
1256 W. 62nd St. Ctsy. to 
brokers HO 4-8371 


$100 STARTS the deal. Mod. 2 
bdr. stuc, disp., hrwd. 
PL 1-0333 

INC0Mn«0«RTYIO^ 


3 BEDROOM STUCCO $700 dn. 
—$10,950— $88 mo. Nr. W.98 
St. Modern AX 3-6267 


HOUSES FOR RENT 


3 RM. HOUSE AND 

2 BDRM. APARTMENT 

1547 W. 48th ST. 

RE. 2-9590 


HOUSES FOR SALE 


FOR SALE 
$395 DOWN 

7 RM„ 3 BEDRM. STUCCO 
5 YEARS- OLD 

RE. 2-9590 


$500 DOWN 

3 BDRM. FRAME 

11 8th & SAN PEDRO 

RE. 2-9590 


$2,000 DOWN 

4 UNITS + 3 RMS. 

WESTSIDE - FRAME 

INCOME $315 MO. 

RE. 2-9590 


Modern, 

Comfortable 

Brick Building 

For Adults Only! 

WELL FURNISHED 
WASHER AND DRYER 

UTILITIES PAID 
SINGLES AND DOUBLES 

Frederick Apts. 

1647 W. Eleventh Street 
One Block West of Union Ave. 

$55 - $60 - $70 
DU. 9-761 3 


$2,500 DOWN 
5 UNITS STUCCO 

Income $329.50 

217 W. 47th ST. 
RE. 2-9590 


5 OLD HOUSES ON 
100'x138' LOT 
$1,000 DOWN 

■v 

RE. 2-9590 



MST^ 


ACREAGE FOR SALE 


^CLEAN— QUIET 

ADULTS ONLY 

Steam Heat - Carpeted 

Furnished - Refrigeration 

Washer - Utilities Paid 

Bachelors - Singles - Doubles 

$48 Up, $60 Up, $85 Up 

Weekly Rates Available 

ALEXANDRIA 
APARTMENTS 

1953 South Estrella 

(1 BIk. W, of Harbor Freeway) 
Between Adam* & Wash. Blvd. 

Phone: Rl. 8-3078 


WESTSIDE SHOWPLACESm 

Bachelors $12.50 Up 
Singles, $16 and Up 
Doubles, $20 and Up 

• Convenient — Clean 

• Newly Decorated 

• Modern Furniture 

• Elevator Servicfe 

• Utilities Paid 

• Best Transportation 

1501 W. ADAMS BLVD. 
I CAt Catalini) 


DESERT LAND 

IN ANTELOPE VALLEY, ROAD 
FRONTAGE ON PROPOSED FREE- 
WAY. ROAD NOW CUT FROM 
LANCASTER TO HIWAY (66). 
10 ACRES $3,000 
$35 DOWN; $35 MONTH 
GENE WILSON AX. 5-3779 

reaTestate for sale "^ 


WESTERN STAR REALTY — 

1953 West Jefferson Blvd. 
RE. 4-2538. $2500 dwn. home 
& income. North of Wash- 
ington on Harvard. Five (5) 
room two (2) bdrm. down- 
stairs and six (61 room 
three (3) bdrm. upstairs. 
Jhis won't last. Call RE. 
4-2539. ASK FOR WOFFORD 
—WE NEED LISTINGS, WE 
TRADE, BUY & SELL. 


$750 DOWN— 3 bedrm. $9450, 
Nr, 22nd & Normandie AX 
2-3607 


$100 STARTS the deol. Mod 2 
bdr. stuc. disp. hrwd. PL 
10333 


OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 2 & den, 
immac. cond. Priced to sell. 
Toyo Realty. AX 5-4351 


$1000 DN. Spacious 3 br„ lU 
ba. Xtra clean. 1514 E. 21 St. 
Only $10,500 Takal Realty 
RE 1-3117 


OPEN HOUSES 1-5. 920 S. 
Victoria. Wilshire/Crenshaw 
area. 3 bdr., 2'- bath In 
beaut, neighborhood. Only 
S3500 dn. 6215 7TH Ave. 
Neat, newly decor. 2 bdr. & 
sun porch. Asking $13,500. 
AX 5-4131 


27SSSS W. 15th St By Appt. 

Attr. 8-rm. dble. Income or 
house for Ige. family. Terms 
HO 5-2188 


OP. SUN.. 1-5. 2114-1'? Lrwd. 

2 nice stuc. hses. dbl. gar. 

3 on lot. Sears nr. Vrmt 1-2 
bdr., nr. to shops. Lo pr., 
$1,000 dn. 3 & den nr. Wash. 
$1,500 dn. Poss. beaut, rms. 
RAFU RE 1-4155 


4 UNIT Pico Sierra Bonita 1 
bdrm. ea. Panel ht Thermo 
offer! 5264 W. Pico WE 3- 

7471 


4 U.' & 3 troilor epcs. sched. 
inc. $2400. $11,000, $900 dn. 
ST 5-5223 


4 U. $29.50a Trade O.K. See 
1139 S. Vermont DU 5-7011 


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT. 

George S. Smith Co. RE 3- 
5914, RE 3-3816 


NO DN. GI 5 rm. 2 bdr, stucco! 
Dbl. gar. Fenced. $69 mo.j 
PL 7-2268 


LOW DN. Very clean 2 bdrm. 
Xear Western. F, P. $9950.' 
Kashu, RE 4-1157 


2 BDR. & FAMILY RM. Ask'g 
$13,500. Good loc. on 7th 
Ave. TX. 5-4131. 


PASADENA (nr. Los Robles & 
Mountain. Nice 3 bd„ den 
.R-3 corner. .50x175. $12,000 
(adj. lot avail.) Mr. Grist 
VE 7-1564 


CORNER 24 UNIT Stucco. All 

2 bdr, I'j yr. $1800 mo. inc. 
$30,000 dn. Waiting list for 
occupancy Century it Fig- 
ueroa. PL 3-5171 

S7S0 DN. 2 on lot, Hdwd. firs., 
tile. ige. lot cL in. PL 4-2827 

NL\y 4 UNITS 2 bdrs. each 
tile, gar., disp., etc. $42,500. 
Terms or trade. See 2704 So. 
Sycamore. Courtesy to brks. 
HO 4-8371 


I2.R00M DUPLEX W. 22nd 
St $2250 dn. AX 3-6267 


$495 DOWN — $8450 F. P. 2 
bdr. home + inc. Nr. Slaus. 
PL 7-2268 


OP. SAT. & SUN. 1-5. 5420 S. 
Wilton PI. 3-bdr. ^trame. 
Clean. Spac. $1,500 dn. $13,- 
500. H&H. Invest. Co, AX 

5-4321 


WEST OF CRENSHAW, N. of 

Washington. $1,500 dn. 9-rm 
stuc. dbl. 2 br.— Ibr. $16,500 
F. P. RE 1-2119 


SACRIFICE BY OWNER. 3 bdr. 
Den. 2'i baths, dining rm. 
2100 sq. ft. All features pos. 
'3 acre lot. custom-built by 
owner. Valley's finest area. 
Good fin. Asking $42,500 


6 DE LUXE UNITS, 6 onp bdr. 
each. Modern thruout. Only 
$6,500 down. RE 1-8677 

CALL US FOR 3, 4 & 6 bdr. 
Homes in sthwst. AX 2-9103 


16 APTS. & 6 stores. T.D. w 
traile accepted. RE 2-8572 


LANCASTER BEAUTY 

LOVELY 4-BDRM. — 2 bath 
stucco home. Loaded with 
e.xras and built in features. 
Close to schools, shopping 
centers, chuches and every- 
thing of importance. $18,000 
full price. Write Box 1000, 
2101 West Vernon Ave., at 
Van Ness. Los Angeles 8, 
California. ■ 


LEIMERT BARGAIN OF THE 
WEEK 

2 LARGE bedrooms and den. 
Reasonably priced for im- 
mediate sale by owner. Call 
AXminister 5-2641 week- 
days, between 4:00 and 6:00 
p.m. AX 2-9056 weekends. 


SIOOO DOWN — Buys this nice 
corner 2 bdrm. frame on R-2 
lot. Vacant. Immediate pos- 
session. Asking $12,950. Near 
53rd and 2nd ave. AX. 2- 
0107. 


3 BDR. & Fcimily room. All 
bit-ins, hdwd & tile. 2 ba. 
Less than 1 yr. old. PL, 
4-2827 or FA. 1-0383. 


$450 DN. VAC. 2 BDRM RANCH 

style, dbl. gar., cement block 
fenced yd. PL. 4-2827. 


GL NO DOWN. 2 bdr. stuc. 
hard tile, dbl. det. garage., 
good area. PL 4-2827, U\ 7. 

ADORABLE 4 UNIT — All 1 

Bdrm. — Owner's apt profes- 
sionally decorated — carpet- 
ed and draped — plus patio 
and $9000 end. Lanai room 
with B.B.Q., F.P., waterfall 
and tropical plants. — A real 
dream home plus good in- 
come. — Owner leaving city 
and will sell for very low 
down payment to responsi- 
ble buyer.— AX. 2-0107. 

HAVE HOME PLUE INCOME 

For a very small investment 
you can own this 10 room 
studio duplex 4 room home 
with an income of $230 
monthly. Xlnt. rental loca- 
tion. AX. 2-0107. 

CORNER LOT, 3 bedroom 4 1 
bdr. with sleeping porch. 
Avail, shown by appoint. 
$18,500. Terms. 1256 W. 62nd 
eat Csty. to brks. HO. 4-8371. 


LOOK I ALL THIS FOR $26400. 
Easy terms. Stores & apart- 
ments. Rent $415 month. Co- 
operate all brokers. Hanson. 
PL. 2-7179. PL. 9-9738. 


PALM SPRINGS 
SHOW PLACE 

Beautiful 3-BR.— two baths, swim- 
ming pool, in exclusive area of 
Palm Springs, only $32,500. Low 
down. Owner. 

EX. 6-5422 


BEAUTIFUL 3 br., den, 2 ba. 
1 level. Large yard, patio 
fruit trees, modern kitch., 
dishwasher, disp,, carpets, 
dps,, inter, shutters, recent, 
redecorated. No city taxes. 
Assume large existing loan. 
Call owner. AX 2-1820 


OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 P.M. ISCIS 

S. Carmona Ave. 2 bd. 1 ba. 
. Hardwood floors. Nic« tile 

Well bit LOW dn. LOW mo. 

payments I See it! Make of. 

UP 0-1647 


S5.000 DOWN— 5 bdrms. tk den 
2-sty. stucco. 3 full ba. unit 
ht. WE 6-6277 


THIS IS IT ! 

ONLY $500 DOWN - BALANCE LIKE RENT 



3 BEDROOM HOUSE 

• Hardwood Floors • Tile F««ture« 

• Clean and Specious • Ideal Family Hom* 

• Side Drive 4> Garage • San Pedro & Imperial 

• Large Front & Back Yards • Plenty of Room to Build 

• Choice 1 Owner Hous* B«ing Sacrificed for Ouick Sale 

SEE IT TODAY • lUY IT TOMORROW 


■BE. 2-9590 


y 




J 


16— TTie California Eagle Thursday, February 18, i960 


Bill Smallwood 


(Continued from Page 9) 
the former will soon be 
jetstreaking to Washington, 
D. C. to attend the Presi- 
dent's annual conference on 
Iwtional child guidance. . 

Horace Clark Jt. will serve 
(his first time) as principal 
at Nevins School during the 
coming summer session; he 
and his family are among 
those who have made it up 
into the snows this season, 
too. This Sat. night is Texas 
night at DMC headquarters 
and Elois Davis gets top 
billing as the Perle Mesta 
•of it all, Texas 'vittles to 
boot Tom Bradley is chair- 
xnaning this spectacular. 
With Flair 

The Al Carters (x-ray tech- 
nician Barbara Peppars) for- 
mally announced their 
manage. Cal Bailey bliss- 
fully in SF doing two oil 
portraits for Nob Hill 
habitues. 

Party - giver of party - giv- 
ers with flair. Ricci Day 
hosted one of his thoroughly 
stimulating Sun. night sup- 
pers for 20 at his distinctive 
apartment (one entire wall 
is covered with an oil paint- 
ing of Paris at night (Ricci 
lived there three years); 
the Andy Averettes (Ophe- 
lia) of Akron, Ohio, were 
basic cause for the supper 
party. Ricci's chums still 
elbow one another aside 
scrambling for bids •^o his 
annual beach party, too. 

Virginia Morgan filled her 
place Sat night with fun- 
loving cronies, such as the 
Ches Washingtons, Louis 
Jones, the Parker L/ees, the 
Archie BjlIIs, the Buddy 
Clays, Ann Robinson, DC-ite 
Aaron Mangum (here as a 
technical engineer with 
RCA) and Earl Foley s 
(E>sie), of Columbus, Ohio. 
Incidentally, Dorothy Lee 
entertained at Sun. supper 
for the Foleys. 

Australia oo Her Mind 

NTorker Elise Dixon flew 
back home this week after 
visiitlng our village green. 
She recently made a trip 
around the world after 
serving as social secretary 
to the wife of the ambassa- 
dor to Ceylon. Olivia Harro- 


way had a Sun. birthday so 
she did the next best thing, 
she had a swingin' party, 
what else? Irrepresible 
and ever gay, she had as 
much fun as her guests. 
Her vitality as yet knows 
no bounds. 

Ruth Mueller has Austra- 
lia on her '61 summer 
itinerary'. Zee Maddox's Sat. 
party welcoming N'Yorker 
Mary Countee was a tri- 
umph, of course. Their 
roomy house bulged at the 
seams with merrj-makers, 
not an unhappy soul in a 
carload. We had a time, 
'deed we did. 


Urban League 's Annual Affair 


(Continued from Page 14) 
no means least, the sexsa- 
tional Josephine Baker. 

Delores Daniel Ball Winner 

Miss Beaux Arts Ball of 1960 
was selected from among six 
gorgeous semi-finalists, and 
she was lovely Miss Dolores 
Daniel. However, even before 
the selection of Miss Beaux 
Arts of 1960, two charming 
show-stealers had won the 
hearts and love of everyone 
present as they were intro- 
duced as the two newest 
members of the Guild, and 
came to the stage as Ron 
Spearman sang beautifully, 
"Miss America." 

These young ladies were 


three and five years of age, 
Susan and Nina James, and 
were living dolls, and named 
Golden Girls of the Urban 
League's Golden Anniversary. 
The last part of the program 
consisted of the choosing of 
the most authentic and most 
beautiful costumes, for prizes 
of $100.00 each, and a $50.00 
prize for the most unique. 

The judges made their de- 
cision after much debate, and 
a gorgeous gal clad in little 
more than some beautiful 
feathers and displaying some 
sturdy limbs, was voted most 
beautiful costume, a couple 
most authentic as a Can-Can 
girl and her swallow-tailed 


escort, and the most unique 
was a man portraying Mount 
Rushmore. 

Season's Highlight 
Indeed, a good time was 
had by all, and everyone left 
with a good taste in his mouth 
after an evening of gaiety, 
frolic, frivolity and entertain- 
ment. No doubt this will be at 
the top of the list for the most 
oustanding affair of the sea- 
son here in New York. Sorry 
you had to miss it, but per- 
haps some of the photos I am 
having forwarded will permit 
you to get a few vicarious 
kicks, in absentia, from the 
pleasure-trip. Gaslight Follies 
at the Beaux Arts Ball. 



QUEEN GRACE KELLY 
and BING CROSBY share 
Uarring honors with William 
Hotden in Paramovnt's alJ- 
timf great dramatic hit, "The 
Country Girl," now playing 
at the Manchester Theatre. 


Dorothea Foster^ 

(Continued from Page 14) 

BETTY CLARK (wearing chinchilla cape) was 
at Potentate GILBERT LINDSAY'S table; the OLES 
HAYSES had their usual table for ten; DIT STEV- 
ENS Detroit socialite, arrived just in time for the 
show, as did Rinkeydink prexy RUTHE BOWEN. 
who jetted in for it. MAYME LEWIS was with a 
gay group. It was nice seeing DORIS CLARK, just 
in from Honolulu. 

"OLD SMUGGLER" kept our table in good spir- 
its thanks to our hosts Milford of Beverly Hills 
representative FRANKLIN AJAYE and his charm- 
ing wife, QUETTA, Hiram Walker's pride and ]oy 
JUNIOR (Mr. Dodgers) GILLIAM and his wife, ED- 
WINA Others in the party were WENDALL and 
LURLINE COTTON (he is the Wilshire ^Ivd: ortho- 
dontist), our coz MARY COUNTEE. who was thrill- 
ed over seeing so many stars at one time. 


ABCHIE M(X>RE — Talented 
boxer, actor and toastmaster, 
will make his televison debut 
on the 'TwiUght Zone" show. 
He'll start filming the CBS- 
TV show Feb. 23! 

riCMEAT MARKAM — The 

celebrated Apollo comic will 
hear why west coasters are 
raving over the singing voice 
of Jean Simpson when she 
opens at the New York The- 
ater Feb. 19! 


-4EGA1 NOTICE 


CALIFORNIA EAGLE 
15140 
NOTICE OF HEARING 
OF PETITION FOR 
PROBATE OF WILL 
No. 42S-604 
In the Superior Court of the 
State ot California. In and for the 
county of Los Angreles In the 
Matter of the Estate of PRBS- 
TO.N EVEIRETT WIiI>CH. SR.. 
aka Preston E. Welch, aka Pres- 
ton E. Welch. Sr.. Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given that the 
petition of Jean Welch Cooper for 
the Probate of the Will of the 
above-named deceased and for the 
lasaance of Letters of Administra- 
tion with the will annexed there- 
on to the petitioner to which ref- 
erence is hereby made for further 
particulars, will be heard at 9:15 
o'eloclt A,M., on Feb. 26, 1960, at 
the court room of Department 4. 
of the Superior Court of the State 
•f California, in and for the Coun- 
ty o£- Loa Angeles. City of Los 
Angeles. 

HAROLD J. OSTLT. County 
Clerk and Oerk of the Su- 
perior ourt of the State of 
California, In and for the 
County of Los Angeles 
By H. Pease, Deputy 
Dated Feb. 1, 1960 
MILLER & MADOOX 
2822 So. Western Ave. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

(Publish in California Eagle 
Feb, 4, 11, IS. 1960 > 


15682 
CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 

Fictitious Firm Name 
THE UNDEKSIGNED do here- 
by certify that they are conduct- 
ing a Appllcance business at 4805 S 
W. Adams Blvd . City of Los An- 

Seles 16, County of Los Angeles, 
tate of California, urvder the fic- 
titious firm name of Ted's Home 
Appliance Servlf-e and that said 
firm is compo,'«ed of the followiPK 
person.^ , whose name.-^ and ad- 
dressses are- nn follow.", to-wlt: 

Theodore Leonard Hflnks. Jr.. 
3S49 Rimpau. Los Anseles. Calif. 
Douglas R. Bell. 2649 S, Blmpau, 
Los Arreles. Calif 

Business Address-. Linj Nananu, 
Loa Angeles, Calif. LU. 7-3777 

WITNESS my hand this 3rd day 
0( Februar>'. I960 

/s/Theodore L. Banks, Jr, 
/s/Dou^las R. F.ell 
STATE OF CALIFOFLNIA 

COL'^TTT OK LOS AN'GBLBS 

ON THIS 3rd day of February 
A. D., 1960. before me Attorney 
Loren Miller, a .Votary Public in 
and for said County and State, 
residing therein duly commissioned 
and sworn, per.'onally appeared 
Before me Theodore Leonard 
Banks, Jr, and Douglas R Bell, 
known to me to be the persons 
whose nam* are subscribed to the 
within Inatrument. and acknow- 
ledged to me that they executed 

the same. 

IN WITNESS WTTBRBOF, I 
hav-e hereunto set my hand and 
affixed mv official seal the day 
and year In this certificate first 
^ve written. ^^^^^ 

LOREN MILLER. 

Notary Public In ana for Said 

County and State 

Mv Commission E.xplres 1961. 
Published In the California Eagle 
Newspaper Feb. 11-18-25. March 3, 
1960 


HAIR STYLIST 

WANTED 

GLAMOUR INSURED 

BEAUTY SALON 

5011 W. ADAMS BLVD. 


Must Apply in Person 


RE. 2-8129 


EVERY DAY'S A SPECIAL DAY AT /^y^/V'^^/^ 


EVERY DAY'S A SPECIAL DAY AT/JT^^/^^'"'^/ ' EVERY DAYS A SPECIAL DAY 


CELEBRATING THE ARtilVAL OF OUR NEWEST FAMILY MEMBER 

^ MffTH A GIANT 



WEICOME SALE 


IN EVERY 



AND BlUE CHIP STAMPS lOO! 


EVERY DAY'S A SPECIAL 


^//>v»»f QUALITY MEATS 


U.S.OJk. 6RADED 

"CHOICr OK 

"©OOO" 


STIAir SALE 


TABLE-READY, 

TRIMMED OF 

EXCESS FAT 

0« WASTE 


TENDER, JUICY 

T-BONE, CLUB, CUBE 
or SIRLOIN TIP ... . 


TAILS OFF 

PORTERHOUSE 

BONELESS TO BARBEQUE OR BROIL 

TOP SIRLOIN. 

FILLET $ig89|CHUCK 

STEAK I lb STEAK 


lb. 


LEFS SKINNED "EXTRA SMOKE FLAVOR' 


HAMS 

BUTT Jtrt I CiNTER 

CUTS H9tb 


FULL 

SHANK 

HALF 


SUCES 


89' 


WHOU ^J^ 


lb I HAMS 


lb 


LUER'S PURE PORK m S 1 00 

LINK SAUSAGE 5^1 

LUER'S QUALITY M ^t 

SLICED BACON \l 43* 


KOLD KIST 

nrozEN 


STEAKS 

2-oz. ncfts. 


10 -n 


00 


RATH'S 

ntOZEM 

KWF ■ PORK • VCAL 

CHOP-ETTES 

••or n(«. 


45: 


SLICED 
NORTHERN 

HALIBUT 
49k 


MRS. FRIDArS 
HtOZEN 

BREAbED 
SHRIMP 

1 V>.LB.. PKft. 
Ea. 


THRIFTIMART WILL BE 

OPEN ON MON., FEB. 22 

WAS HINGTON S BIRT HDAY 

SPECIAL STORE HOURS 

WILL BE POSTED IN 

EACH MARKET 


EVERY DAY'S A SPECIAL DAY ATyZ^^/^*^^7 


GOLD MEDAL 

FLOUR 


ALL GRINDS 

'CREAM IT WITH PREAM' 


5-L6. 

BAG 


CHUNK STYLE— S & F 

LIGHT MEAT TUHA 


NO. i $|00 


TINS 


1-LB. 
TIN 


IBEHY CROCKERS SUPREME 

AU 
FLAVORS 


CAKE MIXES 


$100 


y^^^f f INEST PROD 


WASHINGTON EXTRA FANCY 

WIMESAP APPLES _ 

FUERTE 

AVOCADOS Jl. 


Lb. 


Eo. 


COACHELLA VAUEY 

PINK GRAPEFRUIT 

SOLID GREEN HEADS 

CABBAGE =^-^ — 


Lb. 


Lb. 


IDELICATESSCN TREATS! 


OSCAR MAYER ALL MEAT 

WIENERS 


Pfcq. 


49 


DUBUQUE CANNED 

HAMS 


Tin 


r 


MARTIN'S NEW YORK 
ONE YEAR OLD 

CHEDDAR CHEESE 


LB. 


79 


JANE ANDERSON'S 
PLAIN, CREAM OR BEET 

HORSERADISH 

w 


JANE ANDERSON'S 
BEEF OR CHEESE 

ENCHILADAS 


JANE ANDERSON'S 

MARGARINE 

1.LB. 
CTNS. 


TISSUES 

WHITE Oft COLORS 

KLEENEX 

400 CT., 
PKGS. 

BELL 

PLAIN Oft NUTTY BITS 

PEANUT BUHER 

16-OZ. 
JAR 

GIANT PACKAGE 

IRIS 

DETERGENT 


^ QUAIL BRAND CB.EBRATION VALUES • 


TOMATOES 

8 -^ *1^" 


GREEN PEAS 


GOLDEN CREAM CORN 

8 No. 303 S*^00 
Ti« *1 


CUT GRKN BEANS 

gNo^3$|00 


TOMATO SAUCE 

16 - *1^^ 


APPLESAUCE 


^'^'bS^s"" ASPARAGUS 


No. 300 5^ 00 


TIm 


TOMATO JUKE 

6 ^ *!•• 


WHOLE 
UNPEELED 


APRICOTS 
^^i $400 

ThK ■ 


FRUIT COCKTAIL 

N^ Sft 

ThK ■ 


GRAPffRUIT JUICE 


CATSUP 


SUCED OR HALVES 
YEUOW CLING PEACHES 


P1LLSBURY 4c OFF DEAL 

PE CRUST STIX 


YOU PAY 


HORMB.'S 

CHiU CON CARNE 


51 -OZ. 
PKGS. 


$100 


PLAIN 

WITH 
BEANS 


nn 


Zff PAPa PRODUCTS 

WHITE or COLORS 

TISSUE iS 4d 

WAXED IOC 

PAPB _ -tf It 

IWBS H ?=: 


1 



THURS, FRL SAT, SUM., FB. 1«-1»-M-21 


l/ADPX FOR DAILY SPECIALS 
l\f\Dl/.A DIAL "RADIOACTIVE" 


wi Msuvi im mtm to uMn-ovANrnMs 


EVERY DAY'S A SPPCIAl DAY AT 


SAUS TAX MOID VO TAXAtU 


RED SOUR PITTED 

S&F CHERRIES 


CARNATION 

CANNED MILK 

7 ftr T 


XLNT HACWNOA FROZm 

MEXICAN 


2^M 


00 


e«2 


29 


%tiftlm^j0l^ 




ROYAL 

PUDDINGS 

3^19 


SWNSHINC KMSTY 

CRACKERS 


J 


no 
ac 


^1 

ui 

CI 
al 


cil 


Skef> 4S/4nJ*Savc oAt \jliriftimari Jer^er^Ja^ ^Specials • OAop ^nJC>ave ^t fjLriftimaH [^cx <£ver^</atf iSpeciaU 


4. 


i 


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I 


-CV*-* -w—^^f 


,*,-^^ 


■•^•■v,~-— 


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'■'rT 


L. A. Labor Council Breaks with NAACP 


FORii;; 


^v^^^ 4t' 


UilL 



STAKE 



DIVORCE 


— Too Torrid — 



DELE If. D — Loifly Barbnrn If dden danced her uny 
into L niirrsal's torthcommr/ "Private Lives of Adam and 
£tr," but the s-nip of the eensor s seissors cut her sequence 
riijht nut nt the picture. Too tnrrili uns the lerdnt. 



2101 W. Vaman Avanvcr^ A. 


Continuous Publication- for 79 Years 


AX. 5-3135 


Vol. LXXIX-No. 50 


Thursday, February 25, 1960 



AX. 5-3135 


Out-ef-Town ISe 


'Lover Boy' Hawkins 
Arrested for Forgery 


Labor Council 
Ends 
Of NAACP 


Support 


Chessman Should Not 
Says Poll of Community 

By BARBARA MOUNTS 


Freeway Tragedy 
Kills 1, Injures It 

Mrs. Plenry Laura Jones, 32, a young mother 
riding with her husband and two children, was 
thrown from their station wagon and killed on the 
Harbor Freeway about 2:30 Monday afternoon. 

The tragedy resulted from a head-on collision 

^with two other cars after the 

Jones' station wagon, driven 


Juanita Moore 
Wins Plaudits 
For Oscar Bid 

By Chazz Crawford 

Actress Juanita Moore has 
been nominated for the best 
supporting actress award for 
1959 for her stellar perfof- 
mance as Annie Johnson in 
the movie "Imitation of Life." 
The Academy of Motion Pic, 
ture Arts and Sciences bared 
the selections of Oscar con- 
tenders Monday. 

Miss Moore's nomination 
marks the second time in the 
history of the industry that a 
Negro actress has received 
this particular nomination. 
The late Hattie McDaniel was 
nominated more than a dec- 
ade ago for her role in 
"Mammy'' in "Gone with the 
Wind." She went on to cop the 
Oscar. 

Congratulations Galore 

Since the nomination story 
broke, Miss Moore has been 
kept tiusy responding to a 
multitude of congratulatory 
calls from friends. Local pals 
are especially proud when 
(Contmued on Page 3) 


Court Kills 
NAACP Fines 
At Little Rock 

WASHINGTON — The Su 
preme Court Tuesday, in a 
unanimous decision, struck 
down fines imposed on NAA- 
CP leaders in Little Rock 
and North Little Rock, Ark., 
for refusing to turn over to 
authorities lists of their mem- 
bers. 

The court held the fmes 
violated freedom of a.ssocia- 
tion. In a separate but oon- 
currmg opinion Justices Hugo 
L. black and William O. 
Douglas held the ordinances 
involved as applied to the 
N.AACP violate freedom of 
speech and assembly. 
Action Outlawed 

The court set aside fines 
impwsed on two N.^ACP offi- 
cials — Mrs. Daisy Bates, Ar- 
kansas N.\ACP president, and 
Mrs. Birdie Williams, head 
of, the North Little Rock 
branch — for failing to pro- 
duce their membership idIIs 
in accordance with the ordi- 
nances. 

In an opinion WTitten by 
Justice Potter Stewart, the 
court held that the women 
"cannot be punished for re- 
fu.sing to produce informa- 
tion which the municipalities 
(Continued on Page 12) 


by Mrs. Jones' husband, .lump- 
ed the divider near Eighth 
street, and ran into two out- 
bound cars. 

Thrown to Pavement 

Mrs. Jones, wife of Robert E. 
Jones, an electrician, died 
shortly after her body hit the 
pavement to which she and 
her infant -daughter. Geor- 
gette, were thrown by the im- 
pact. Georgette suffered a 
broken jaw, head injuries and 
bruises. She is at the Kaiser 
Foundation hospital. The 
Jones family resides at U66 
S. Raymond avenue, pfta- 
dena. 

Their other daughter, Pam- 
ela, aged 10. suffered shock. 
Eleven persons involved in 
the accident were injured but, 
according to preliminary re- 
ports, the other injuries were 
not serious. 

According to police, when 
Jones' car. northbound, skid- 
ded over the divider and into 
the southbourid traffic, the 
impact of the <;ollision turned 
the Jones' station wagon com- 
pletely around throwing Mrs. 
Jones and 16-monthold Geor- 
gette to the roadway. 

Moiulaughter Charge 

Jones was arrested and 
jailed on suspicion of man- 
slaughter. He was released on 
$1,500 bail. 

Eyewitnesses passing the 
scene shortly after the colli- 
sion said that Jones was hold- 
ing Georgette to his bosom 
walking up and down the di- 
vider and weeping. At his feet 
lay his dead wife. Passengers 
in the other two vehicles, less 
seriously injured, awaited the 
ambulance. One woman walk- 
ed about barefooted, another 
suffered from cuts on the face. 

Mrs. Jones was a native of 
Alabama, the daughter of Mrs. 
(Continued on Page 4) 


The local AFL-CIO 
Council, in a meeting that 
erupted. in a pier six brawl 
last Monday, reportedly 
declared war on the Los 
Angeles branch of the 
NAACP and called for the 
setting up of a rival or- 
ganization among Ne- 
groes. 

William "Bill" Pollard, vice 
president of the county labor 
organization and general 
chairman of the Dining Car 
Employes Local 582, and 'Vic- 
tor Nix. of the Building Service 
Employes Union, reportedly 
led the attack against the 
local NAACP. 

Same Old Bugaboo 

Motivation for the denuncia- 
tion was the oft-laid bugaboo 
that the branch is "Commun- 
ist dominated.''' 

Efforts to get confirmation 
of the reports proved unavail- 
ing. William Bassett, secre-^ 
tary-treasurer of the AFL-CIO 
Council, failed to respond to 
two telephone calls. 

Pollard, reached by tele- 
phone, explained that he could 
not comment on behalf of the 
council since he is not an ad- 
ministrative officer. He did 
Say, however, that the report 
about the setting up of an- 
other organization in the Ne- 
(Continued on Page 4) 


•I' 

Si.x out of nine people picked at random at vari- 
ous places in the Negro community approved the 
granting of a reprieve to Caryl Chessman and bfe- 
lieve that ho should not be put to death. 

" "' Two took the "eye for an 

eye" approach and expressed 
the 


'Brooksie' Dies 


that he should be 
One person wasn't 



Congo to t^e 
Independent 
On June 30 

BRUSSELS — Independence 
for the Belgian Congo on June 
30 was agreed to here Satur- 
day, after a month-long ses- 
sion when final text of the 
agreement was initialed. 

At the completion of the 
session, the Congolese dele- 
gates gave a ball at one of 
the city's best hotels. Belgian 
officials and journalists who 
covered the conference were 
invited. 

On April 15 an economic 
conference between Congolese 
leaders and Belgian officials 
will be held. 

The text of the agreement 
provides for independence, 
with Belgian technical and 
economic assistance for an in- 
definite period, if the Congo- 
lese approve. 



HAT IN RING— Herman Hill, public relations expert, 
right, formally announced his candidacy Monday night for 
assemblyman from the 55th district. He is shown uith Atty. 
Ererette M. Porter, former member of the (California Adult 
Authority, one of the sponsors of his candidacy. (Story P. 2) 


M O U R .V E D — Loui.'^e 
"Brooksie" Brooks, uell 
inoiin cluhTvnnmn , restaura- 
teur and humanitarian . died 
nt her Sih avenue home 
Monday night. 

Death Takes 
Louise Brooks 

Louise Brooks, one of the 
best-known and best-loved 
women of Los Angeles, who 
for many years operated the 
Dunbar Grill, died at her homo 
at 2827 8th ave. Monday eve- 
ning, following a brief illness, 
at the age of 78. 

"Brooksie." as she was 
known far and wide, was 
born in Michigan in 1882. She 
lived in Cleveland, Ohio, for 
a number of years, where she 
was famous for her gumbo, 
and was brought to Los An- 
geles by the Selznick brothers 
to make Creole gumbo here. 

She opened a restaurant at 
8711 Sunset blvd. and hired 
attractive colored girls as the 
first Negro waitresses to work 
on the Sun.sct Strip. The res- 
taurant was known as "Mam- 
my Louise's Creole Restaur- 
ant." Later she opened a res- 
taurant at the Dunbar Hotel 
on Central ave. and many 
were the free meals "Brooksie" 
served to struggling young 
men an"d women during the 
dep*ssion. , 

Her heart was ■wrapped up 
(Continued on Page 3) 


Jail 2 Negroes 
For Little Rock 
House Bombing 

LITTLE ROCK — Two Ne- 
groes — one a 17-year-old 
student — were arrested here 
Friday and accused . of hurl- 
ing the bomb that struck the 
home of Central High School 
student, Carlotta Walls, last 
Feb. 9. 

No motive was given for 
the action of the two men. 

The arrests were annuonced 
jointly by local police and 
the FBI. 

Arrested were Maceo An- 
tonio Binns Jr.. 31-year-oId 
handyman, and Herbert Odell 
Monts, 17, a student at Hor- 
ace Mann High School. 

They were charged with 
damaging property with ex- 
plosives, the same charge on 
which five white men were 
convicted in three bombings 
here last September. 

Convictions could mean 
one to five years imprison- 
ment and a fine of $100 to 
$500 or both. 


Jailed, 
$5000 
Boil Set 

Eugene Virgil Hawkins, 
26, of 621 W. 41st drive, 
who has been accused by 
a number of women as a 
"rough lover" and who 
has been in and out of the 
toils of the law too many 
times to remember, was 

back in jail Friday. 

This time he was accused 
of forgery, and was held on 
$5,000 bond. 

Driving Thunderbird 

Officers were alerted that 
there was a forgery warrant 
out for. Hawkins and they 
spotted him driving a 1960 
silver Thunderbird on West- 
ern ave. about 4:30 p.m. 

He was given permission to 
telephone his "girl friend," 
Miriam Kritzer. 3295 Hillock 
driVe, and advise her where 
he had parked tlie car. then 
he was taken to University 
Station where' he was inter- 
viewed and booked by Capt. 
Lambert. 

Checks Taken 

Hawkins had two checks in 

-!^:'^o'^ V?*^ ^"'^ °^J^^ ^°''^^^'i^''-'^ pos.^sMon. one for S5n 

signed by Mary H. Fay. and 
another for SS2.25, signed b\' 
Cherie de Castro and made 
out to Jo Abeledo. Both checks 
were booked as evidence. 

Hawkins said he "didii't 
have any bad checks out," 
and doesn't have a checking 
account. 

Questioned about a check 
signed in the name of Caroll 
McDonald of Oakhurst drive 
in Beverly Hills, Hawkins 
said: "I never was authorized 
to sign anyone's name on any 
account. I don't know a Caroll 
McDonald or anyone living 
on Oakhurst drive. I definite- 
ly did not sign a check with 
the name of Caroll McDonald 
on it any place." 

No Driver's License 

Police also questioned him 
about driving without a li- 
( Continued on Page 2i 


Dooto Records' 
Funds Estimated 
At Half Million 

Dootsie Williams, president of Dooto Records, 
whose fortunes zoomed when he brought out Jesse 
Belvin's "Earth Angel," is fighting it out in the 
courts with his wife of 10 years, Mrs. Josephine 

Williams. 

At stake. Williams says. Is 
property valued at roughly 
half a million dollars. 
Legal Twist 
Also involved is a curious 
legal twist concerning a prior 
marriage that perhaps wasn't 
a marriage after all. 

Despite that tangle, how- 
ever, Williams told the Eagle 
Tuesday that he hoped that 
he and Josephine could recon- 
cile their differences. 
^^ __^ . Williams filed for an annul- 

\t||^ I f H, ment of the lengthy marriage 

]||^ i * last January on the unusual 

grounds that Mrs. Williams 
had not been di\^rced from 
her second husband (Dootsie 
was her third'. 

On Fob. 8 .Mrs. Williams re- 
plied that jin annulment was 
nnii\- rn ijptij out of the question since, sl^e 



\iew 
executed, 
sure. 

Not Concerned 

In addition a number of 
people polled over the week- 
end either didn't know very 
much about the Chessman 
case or inclined to be disin- 
terested since a white man 
was involved. 

About one in five didn't 
know enough about the case 
to comment. About one in four 
seemed indifferent because of 
Chessman's race. A comment 
that recurred several times 
was; "If he were a Negro he'd 
be dead long before now." 

A number of people, even 
those who knew little about 
.i't'"' case, said .they were op- 
posed to capital punishment. 
Mdn-in-Street Queried 

The "man-in-the-street" was 
asked: 

"What do you think of the 
Chessman case? Do you think 
he should have been re- 
prieved? Should he be put to 


Dootsie U illiams. U' hose 
Dooto record of Jesse Bel- 
vin's "E.iirth An/jer-^struck 
the rainboii's pot of gold, 
'u as not ■u.nlhmg on clouds 
this u-eek. His marriage has 
hit the rocks 



period? Do you believe in' 
capital punishment?" 

The question was posed to 
men and women, elderly 
people and teenagers on Jef- 
ferson blvd. at Western, St. 
Andrews and Arlington; on 
San Pedro at 42nd street and 
4.3rd street; at Central and 
Vernon; at Western and 37th 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Mrs. M. Fisher 
Taken by Death 

Mrs. Margaret Fisher, of 
P-sadena, died Wednesday 
morning following a heart at- 
tack suffered about a week 
ago. 

Mrs. Fisher was the mother 
of Mrs. Earl (Flora) Grant, 
1280 N. Arroyo, Pasadena, wife 
of the president of Watts Sav- 
ings and Loan Assn. 


LEGAL T If 1ST — Mrs. 

.losephi'ie If illiams' lauyer 
has raised the intriguing 
question of u hen is a mar- 
riage not a niarriae/c in fight- 
in a Dootsie s annulment 
plea. 


Ellington Joins 



More Jailed in 
Five-and-Dime 
Sitdown Strike 


Thirty-four students were 
arrested in Richmond. 'Va. and 
11 others in Tallahassee. Fla! 
over the weekend as the stu- 
dent protest strike against 
lunch counter jim crow spread 
and deepened in six southern 
states. 

Significantly, a number of 
white students are also par- 
ticipating in the protest, even 
while other white teenagers 
are flaunting Confederate 
flags, sporting Confederate 
caps and other insignia and 
resorting to the usual provo- 
cations of the racists. 
Winston-Salem 

Another 22 youths — both 
white and Negro — weif ar- 
rested in Winston-Salem Tues 
day when they joined forces 
to stage a sit-down protest. 
White students from Wake 
Forest College joined Negro 
students. 

There were fist-fights and 
a near riot in Chattanooga — 
the first serious outbreak of 
rioting — when 2(X) Negro 
youths marclied down one Of 
the city's main streets in a 
protest against jim crow 
lunch counters. 

Police arrested six white 
youths who were pushing and 
(Continued on Page 4) 


REF. KING ARRIVES— Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., 
who is again being persecuted by the Alabama courts, ar- 
rived here Tuesday for a series of meetings and conferences 
that uill culminate in three meetings Sunday in Pasadena 
^and Los Angeles. —(See story on Church Page.) 


Nat 'King' Cole 
Can't Sing at 
Masonic Hall 

SAN FRANCISCO — Nat 
"King" Cole has been barred 
from appearing March 5 at 
the Masonic Auditorium on 
Nob Hill. 

"We just don't want the 
class of people Cole attracts," 
said Alvin A. Horwege, audi- 
torium manager. 

Cole is a 32nd degree Mason. 


her former busbar** 
had not been divorced from his 
previous wife. That means 
that she was never actually 
his wife; therefore her mar- 
riage to Williams was a valid 
marriage. 

Property Settlement 

Williams, through his attor- 
ney, Jerry Ralston, was plan- 
ning on answering Mrs. Wil- 
liams this week. 

Prior to the filing of the 
various charges. Williams 
states than an amicable pro- 
pertN' settlement had been 
made between' him and his 
wife. 

The S50.000 home at 11300 
S. Broadway went to Mrs. Wil- 

(Continued on Page 2) 
i) 

Irate Husband 
Shoots Self, 
Wounds Rival 

I Two men were shot wth 
bullets from the same gun 
last Wednesday as they 

I struggled with the weapon 

.during an altercation. 

I Cause of the shooting was 
Mrs. M. C. McCowan, who had 
left her husband to live with 
a younger man. Joseph Wil- 
son. 32. of 9719 S. Avalon 
blvd., a janitor. 

•m Kui Your 

McCowan. who lives at 9554 
Graham avenue, stormed into 
the Wilson home about 10 
p.m.. but Wilson refused to 
let him in. 

McCowan left, but returned 

an hour later, carrying a shot- 

igun. He entered unobserved 

; through an unlocked side 

door. 

"Joe," he said, "I'll kill 
you!" 

Wilson ran, with McCowan 
j after him. They fought for the 
weapon and McCowan appar- 
ently shot himself in the foot. 
Shot In Back 

Wilson broke away and 
started to run outside. 

McCowan thrust the gun 
through the screen and shot 
Wilson in the back. Then he 
i ran to his car that was parked 
on 98th street. A trail of blood 
led from the house to the 
street. 

Wilson was taken to Cei\- 
tral Receiving Hospital. 
treated for a gunshot wound 
in the lower back and then 
transferred to General Hos- 
pital^ in serious condition. 

A short time later a cruis- 
ing .squad car received a call, 
".■Ambulance, Shooting, at 12(X) 
S. Soto street." 

When the officers arrived 
they found McCowan lying 
beside the car. 

Admits Sbootiag 

They had received a de- 
scription of him over the 
radio as the man wanted for 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Feofirred 
In fh» fagi* 

Edltorlols 4 

Church Activities _... 5 

Sports _ 6 

The Tee _ 6 

BiU Smallwood _ 7 

Dorothea rectsr 8 

People 9 

Show BusinoM 12 

Chazs Crawford 9 


J 


! i 


r^»- .*?f«E«5^ 


\ 


2— The California Eagle 
Thursday, February 25, 1960 


Negro Voters 
League to Hold 
Conference 

CHICAGO — The Chicago 
League of Negro Voters an- 
nounced this week that a con- 
ference of Negro voters will 
be held in Chicago March 11- 
13 at the Washington Park 
YMCA, 5000 S. Indiana ave. 

The conference, according to 
a brochure sent out to reli- 
gious, fraternal, social and 
political groups, will be non- 
partisan. The brochure saya: 
"We urge recognized and un- 
recognized Negro leaders — 
Republicans, Democrats and 
Independents — to close 
ranks." 

Atty. Hcrljert W. Simmons. 
executive director of the Dem- 
ocratic Minority Conference 
of Los Angeles, has advised 
that he will attend the con 
ferenco. along with other 
members of his organization. 



GSM AWARDS — Xormnn O. Ilnustnn. pr'sidrnt of Cioldcn Sinir Slutual Life Insur- 
nnce Cn., flundirii/ ru/ht. <nn<jrntulatcs field rrprcsmtatlves for their "nutstnnding prr- 
fnririnnrr." From left; Gid A. Martin, Cliff ord I!' rstfield, .W ralcy Strnh, If yllic Elder , 
Johnny Lo<kr. and Roy 11 . Spencer, nil of whom received mivirdx. find Houston. 

— (Smith). 


GSM Gives 
Citations to 
Top Agents 

! "Golden State Mutual en- 

I joys honoring you for your out- 

I standing field performance," 

President Norman O. Houston 


Broadway Federal Ass'n. 
Assets $27,000,000 


Dootsie Wants 
Reconciliation 

(Continued from Page 1* 
liams. but 525,000 in cash, as » ^ ,. ,- ,■ 

his share, was turned over to t°^d a group of Southern Call- 
"Williams jfornia representatives at thej 

^ _, " , , , recent All-Year Awards pre-| 

Settlement vvas also made sp^tation held at the Nikabob 
of their other holdings Wil- , j^^^f^^^^^j | 

hams said. These include the' ^ ^„„ , '■ 

three corporations involving' Over 300 persons a ended' 
the manufacture and distribu. 'he .3"""al kickoff rally in- 
tion of records, Dooto Record '^'"^ing company personnel m 
Manufacturing, Inc.; D o o t o'So^thern California and Ari- 
Record Distributing Corp.; and zona and their wives and bus- 
Dootsie Williams, Inc. ''^"'^^• 

A«k« Support ' '^'ted for their production 

Also included is the proper- ^^^ords in 19.i9 were: Gid A. 
ty where the record business '-^'artin and Clifford Westfiold, 


Slated to Speak 
At study Club 


is located. 9512 Central ave- f^^'^Los Angeles office; \\es- j 

nue. as well as other real es-:^>-.St;^«- ^Je«'^;^'de ohce;^.^^^^^ approximately $20,- 

^^^^- :iv !^ke/n/Rov w"snence"^^ ^'hich has been ea - 

Williams, who is being ;">L,CK'^ef"d Ro>^^ to help improve the 

represented by Atty. Thomas,Cenra avenue ofhce- Jsta^dards of living in the 

Marcola of Beverly Hills,' "'ghUght of the rally wasi^^^^^^.^^. 
worked for Dooto Records as^""^""''^'^*'"^ ^^ C;SM s cur 


An increase in assets in the past two vcars from 
520,000,259 to approximately $27,000,000 has just 
been reported by officers of Broadway Federal Sav- 
ings & Loan As«'n, 4501 S. Broadway. 

Savings accounts totals also*' 
soared from 517,773,971 on Dec. 
31, 1957 to $22,566,513 on Dec. 
31, 195D. 

All-Time High 

The all-time high in assets 
represents an increase of 35''J> 
while savings accounts totals 
were up approximately 27^0 
within the 21-month period. 

During this time SI. 571,616 
in dividends were paid. 

Through its loan depart- 1 tory Class, sponsored bv Our 

ment, Broadway Federal has] Authors Study Club at the 

helped more than 4,000 people j Woodlawn Center YWCA. 
purchase homes with an aver- 426O Woodlawn Ave. 


Herman Hill 
In Assembly 
Race in 55th 


Formal announcement of 
the candidacy of Herman Hill 
for assemblyman in the 55th 
district was made Monday 
night at a dinner given by a 
sponsocing committco at Tul- 
sa Barbeque, 9436 S. Central 
avenue. 

Hill, a registered Democrat, 
is engaged in the public re- 
lations business. He is a grad- 
uate of the University of 
Southern California, served on 
the 1950 County Grand Jury, 
and was West Coast editor of 
the Pittsburgh Courier for 12 
years. He was also editor of 
the Star Review newspaper 
and assistant publicity direct- 
or of the Los Angeles Angels 
baseball chib in 1955. Hill is 
a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the Southcrtv Area 
Boys Club. 

The candidate is married 
and has three children attend- 
ing local schools. He resides 
at 904 E. llfith place, and has 
been a resident of Los An- 
geles since 1929. 

Members of the dinner spon- 


Airline Bias 
Condemned by 
N. Y. Workers 

NEW YORK— The New York 
City AFL-CIO Central Labor 
Council last night unanimous- 
ly passed a resolution calling 
upon "airlines to begin a fair 
hiring policy so that persons 
shall be hired on the basis of 
merit and not of color." 

The resolution was intro- 
duced by William Bowe of the 
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car 
Porters at the suggestion of 
the New York Chapter of 
CORE (Congress of Racial 
i Equality*. New York CORE 
has been working for three 
years to end the hiring bias 
of most major domestic air- 
' lines. 

The AFL-CIO resolution 
' pointed out that "this dis- 
i/rrimination means that 
! Negroes do not have the op. 
iportunity to secure high-pres- 
tige jobs in one of America's 
' largest and fastest - growing 
WASHINGTON— The Supreme Court on Tues- industries and . . . discrimi- 
day agreed to review a Richmond, V^a. case involving i nation wastes one of our most 
refusal to serve in a restaurant in southern terminals ' precious natural assets 



.UpS URBAX LEAGUE— John Kelly, ehmrman of the 
South Los A iigeles diiuion of the Urbnn League rnemher- 
ship drive, if given a trophy for the wecj;': best score hy 
Mrs. Joan Moore, assistant general chairman of the drive. 
Kelly reported 21^ memberships. 


High Court Will Review 
at Bus Restaurant 


I Dr. 
head 


Russell H. Caldwell, 


of the Department of club; John DoVoe.N^urniture 
American Civilization and In- 'store owner; and Att>-. Evcr- 
stitutions and Associate Pro ctte M. Porter, former member 
fe-ssor of History at USC. will' of the California Adult Auth- 
address the Thursday, March 'ority. 
3, meeting of the Negro His 


.soring committee included of interstate bUS lines 
Mrs. Jessie B. Hill, chairman 
of the 55th District Democra- 
tic County Central Committee; 
Herbert B. Atkinson, vice pres- 
ident of the Atkinson Trans-, , ■,..,•. 

portation Co.; Rov C. Brooks, i^^"'^^ service at a white res-^gnd general merchandise will 
president Southern Area Boys '^"^ant m Richmond early - - 


I The challenge to racial seg- 
regation was brought by 
Bruce Boynton, a student at 
Howard University, who was 


and violates American stand- 
ards of equal opportunity for 
all." 
New York CORE picketed 


Gene Hawkins 
Jail 


Police Auction 
Set for March 5 

A police auction of bicycles \^^ °P^"'"g ^^ ^T'^T tl 
.p^.jjj, lines new terminal Feb. 9 at 

be held on Saturdav. March ' I^lewild. American does not 

,5, at S a.m. at the"rear en-'^'^J'^^y ^ ^'"^.^^ ^^^ro in any 

Ordered to leave, he refused I France of the Los Angeles Pq. | m flig ht position. 

and was arrested. [ jjcp Building. 151 N. San Pe- » 

He was then fined SIO for ; jjro street I NEW CARILLON 

vioIatiHK a law thai makes it. jjjp propertN'. which will be' TALLAHASSEE, Fa. — The 

a crime to remain "on thei^ffp^p^j ^^^ ^-^\p ,q ,f^p highest carillon and chimes-'which are 

premi.ses of another" against ^jj^j^jp,. f^onsists of app^roxi- being installed at Florida 


this vear. 


His topic will be "The Age 
of Reform, 1820 to 1S,50." 


Mrs. 


a clerk-typist with a salary of '"^■"f ^'^'^ promotion campaign 
$450 a month until a short" ^" expense- free trip for 


Dorsey Student 
Leading Orator 

^ _^ __. , Miss Marvis Hughes, Dorsev 

agnts to spend three days ini'^^^ '^°''^ '^^n 10.000 savings ^ High School student, was 


10,000 Depositors 

In addition, Broadway today 


time ago. Williams said. i 

Mrs. Williams is asking rea-! 
sonable support plus a re-di- 
vision of the property. 

Dooto Records, which Doot- \ 

sie founded 13 years ago. hasi 

the reputation of being the;^^^^'^. P^o^^f,":"- 

top Negro record company in i ^l'^"''^^ '"^"f ^,.^"^. '^^J^ ^^^cated nolicv of sincere service 

iGSM representatives in Berke-p'^'^^ policy oi sincere ser\ice „ 

ley, Seattle, Houston and Chi-^" ^^^ community are among <^ 

cago, bringing together the '■^i^ reasons given by the offi- , % 

[personnel of each region for'^^^s for Broadway Federal's i 

i the occasion 


Again m 

'Continued from Page 11 
cense. He admitted that 
doesn't lia\e a license, but 
said he does ha\e a driver's 
permit that he got about a 
month ago. but that it was 
"at home." 

The charce against Haw- 
kins was writing a fictitious 
check. 

Special agent Ray Cum- 


;the wishes of the owner 
I The derision in this 
could ha\e an important 
bearing on the series of ar- 
j^^ rests currently taking place in 
connection' u'ith the student 
sitdown protests at lunch 
counteis in a number of 
southern cities. 


approxi- 
m.^tely 200 hicyc!e.=. radios. 'AtM University will be offi- 
•^^^^ automobile accessories, hand cially accepted during Found- 
and power tools, puns, cam ers' Week. March 11-13. 
eras, and counfljjss other The carillon and chimes 
items. Terms of the sale areVere made possible by dona- 
cash only': no perponal checks tions from alumni, friends, 
will be accepted. iand classes from 1953 to 1959. 


Mexico City, together with!'^^P°^'*°''S' ""-'^^ ^^^ receiving winner of the oratorical con 

their wives or husbands. The!^']''^';"^''™""^ sound return of I test conducted by Our Auth 

new travel program, based on!* '-''" *ntcrest on their savings.! ors Stud^■ Club during Negro mings of the D..\.'s office is 

a 15-month qualifying period,' •''lodern and superior facil- History 'VVeek. .handling the ca.se. 

replaces the company's cash '"^^ ^^^ ''^ customers, effi- 
cient and courteous practices 
by its employees and dedi-. 


IRRIGATED LANDS 

In 1950 a net area of almost 
seven million acres was under 
irrigation in California. sa\-s 
the State Department of Water 
Resources. 


Fluorescent Tube Service & Txchange Co., Inc. 

— Distributor for Lamps and fixtures — 

• WEATHERPROOF • BLACKLIGHT • fUSES • BALLASTS 

• INCANDESCENT • FLUORESCENT • PHOTO • SLIMLINE 

• FLOODS • PAHO LIGHTS AND FIXTURES • STARTERS 

FREE, FAST DELIVERY 
10824 South Broadway, Los Angelei PL. 6-1481 


• FREE STEREO • 4-5PEED PHONOGRAPH OF YOUR CHOICE • 


the nation 

Struck Gold 

Dootsie broke new ground 
for Negroes in the record busi- 
ness when he bet heavily on 
albums, instead of single 
discs, both in the comic and 
musical fields. 

He struck gold when he 
brought out Belvin's "Earth 
Angel," which reportedly has 
sold more than two million 
copies and is currently being 
revived. 

In the past year, Williams 
started to branch out and 
formed the Dooto Film Pro- 
ductions Co, to produce both 


FREE STEREOS 

No Obligation— Gift Record -4-Sp«ed Phonograph of Your Choice 

CALL BR. 2-7901 


RALPHS $ELL$ FOR LE$$ RALPHS $ELL$ FOR LE$$ 


Law for Loymon Class 

The "Law for the Layman" 
class is continuing at Dorsey 
Adult School, 3537 Farmdale 
avenue. This class started in 
November, 1959 and has con- 
tinued to grow in popularity. 

The subject matter is deter- 
mined by the needs of the 
class with a new topic to be 
discussed each night the class 
meets. 


rapid and consistent growth. • FREE STEREO • 4-SPEED PHONOGRAI^H OF y6uR CHOICfe 

CALIFORNIA EAGLE 'FASHIONATIONS' 

FEMININE FABRICS MAKE ELEGANT FASHIONS 


By: Evelyn Cunningham 


commercial and non-commer 

cial motion pictures. ; ^^ Dorsey or by calling AX 1- 

Original plans were to 15'^- 
house all the Etooto enterprises; 

In a single building to be subsequent court action 
built at a cost of $150,000. 


Domestic problems and the 


how- 
ever, have temporarily stalled 
progress on this expansion. 



Among the most feminine 
Registration^ '"^-T,.^! ™J^,^ and elegant of fabrics are vel- 
vets and velveteens. They are 
flattering to all women and 
tend to soften the face. This 
type of fabric can be dignified, 
sophisticated or sexy, depend- 
ing upon the cut of the garment 
and the mood of the wearer. 
For a long time there have 
been a lot of do's and don't's 
in connection with making a 
velvet or velveteen dress. It 
used to be a tricky fabric that 
demanded careful handling. 
It wrinkled easily, attracted 


I J - . .• I. I be made of any number of- cot- 

and experimentation have re- . ' , _, 

I. J • ..u f . J tons, satins or sneers. Ine 

suited in the finest and most . ' , , , , , i ■ 

I .- I I Tt. J suit would be good-looking in 

I practical velvets. They do not , .,, , * „,u.,:„ 

*^ ■ , , J ., , ,, faille, shantung, synthetic 

wrinkle and they are also able ' ,, ■ , • ,._ 

-.I J 1 L r • mixtures, needlepoint pique 

, to withstand long hours of sit- ,• ^ . 

• ...,- . or polished cotton, 
ting, without leaving that ter- v, , , ^ , . c- -r- 

•ui u- f ■ u . .u L 1 Veekly Fashion-SewingTip: 

ribJe shiny finish at the back. _. , ' , , . . . 

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is die major thing to be con- 
sidered by the home-sewer. 
Actually, this need not really 
be a problem. McCall's Pat- 
terns offer expert guidance in 
working with fabrics — with, 
and without nap. The yardage 
requirement is different. And 
the manner in which the pat- 
lint and produced an ugly mark ■ tern is laid out is different, 
if a drop of water fell on it. j But easy-to-follow directions 
Today, all varieties of the ; practically eliminate chances 
velvet family have undergone of error. 

wondrous changes. Research I The sheath dress (McCall's 

Pattern No. 5027) is made of 
a rich bottle green velveteen. 
It has a gently scooped neck 
and a choice of three set-in 
sleeves. This sleeve is made 
of two circles, each lined 
with a pale green sheer fabric. 
As an alternative, the sleeve 
may be long and gathered into 
a buttoned band or bracelet- 
length and narro'w. .A dramatic 
interpretation would be black 
velvet with white organza cir- 
cle sleeves. Included in the 
pattern is a small collar that 
may be used when long sleeyes 
aie preferred. 

The three-piece outfit (Mc- 
Call's Pattern No. 5134) in- 
cludes a dress, jacket and 
cummerbund. Black velvet is 
used for the slim dress and 
bolero-type jacket. The dress 
has a bateau neck at the front, 
V neck at the back and short, 
set-in sleeves. The skirt 
has soft folds at the front and 
a walking pleat in the back. 
Talon's marvelous Magic Zip 
for bodice neckline has a wo- 
ven sewing guide line in* the 
tape — so easy to follow for 
perfect application. The 
notched shawl collar is cut in 
one with the jacket fronts. 
The threc-jquarter length 
sleeves of the jacket are set 
in. The cummerbund in the 
pictured dress is made of a 
warm cocoa satin. 

Neither the dress nor the 
suit need be confined to velvet 
or velveteen. The dress might 


tion. If the fabric has a raised 
nap or pile, such as in vel- 
veteen, the nap should run up- 
ward in all the pieces. If the 
material has a flat nap, such 
as velvet, the nap should run 
downward in all the pieces. 



The sleeve's the thing ... for • 
fMhion-right aheMh. The slender, 
siiifile line is tccenled by grsce- 
fu!, widened sleeves. The "Essy 
to Sew" pattern mdces a dress pef 
feet for day or evening; for long, 
flared and lined or sheer sleeves; 
for linen, crepe or velvet or vel- 
veteen. Loi« aarU shape ike dress 
and a 20" zipper closes the center 
back line. There's a Talon zipper 
for every sewing need with simple 
A-B-C tutracUoas in eadi pack- 
age for easy and professional zip- 
per application. The elegant 
sheath here ... McCall's Pattern 
O027. Misses* sixes 10-18. 75i. 



A sleek sheath takes a cntawsy 
jacket with tuxedo lapels. And 
it looks smvl for town in rich- 
toned fabrics, chic for the the*, 
tre in deep-piled velvet. The 
dress has a batean ned^ine In 
front, dipping to a "V" in back. 
The sleeves are short and set-in, 
to be covered-op by its three- 
quarter sleeved jadteU A fold- 
softened sheath skirt Is given a 
walking pleat and a cinch of cam. 
merbund. The jacket sits lightly 
with its notched shawl collar and 
cropped silhosette showing off 
the wi^e contrast belt. Misses* 
sizes 10-18. McCall's Patten 
•SI34 65^. 


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Chuck 

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45 

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Roasting 
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4 lbs. and up 


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Oranges u w9 
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MINim MAID Frozen 

ORANGE JUICE 



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WhiH, Pink or Ysllew 

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wl 


led 
bi 


m 

W4 


tro- 
ths 

Tar 
of 

of 
kial 
►RE 
|ree 
Mas 
lir- 

tion 
lis- 

Ihat 

lop. 

Ves- 
car's 

lin? 
Imi- 
liost 

|nd- 
for 

tted 

lir- 

at 

I not 
iny 


iThp 

are 

rida 

iffi. 

ind- 

Imes 
jna- 
Inds, 
1969. 


ERS 


i$ 


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- "'■'""""* - ■■ m M itmum u— 

(lit l^\ I ^/// ■' — Cute' ai th(\ tnrne is S mntith-'ild 
!>i/f — hut It s h/irti tr, ftiul n home fnr her, hcmusr she's n 
><eqrn ,ind in addition, a (Jntholic. She's non ei resident nf a 
frnler hrnne suf<f>/ied hy the Unix Family Adoption Servi,e. 
U nrit rt hnh\. ,in\hndv' Call Dl'. 2-1 M4. 


Musicians' Locals 
To Merge April 1 

SAN FRANCISCO— The executive boards of the 
two San Francisco Musicians Union locals affiliated 
with the American Federation of Musicians, AFL- 
CIO, announced this week that the organizations 
will be merged effective April 1. 
A 


merger agreement was' 
reached last Wednesday by 
jomt action of the leadership 
of Local 6 I predominantly 
Caucasian! and Local 669 


450 members of Local 669 will 
become full members of Local 
6 on March 31. making the 
total membership of that lo<-al 
(predominantly Negroi of thciin excess of 6,000. Lo<al 669 
AFM, following friendly disUvill have representation both 
cuasions. Detailed terms of the|on the executive board and 


Woman Held 
For Murder 
Of Girl Friend 

Lessie Mae Hopson, 47, of 
1166'; E. Adams blvd., was 
held for murder Monday fol- 
lowing the death of her girl 
friend. Irene Wilson, 37, of 
1120 E. Adams blvd. Miss 
Wilson was stabbed in the 
chest. 

The two women were spend- 
ing the evening together at 
Mi.ss Hopson's home. They 
had been drinking for a while 
when they began to argue 
over a friend of Miss Wilson's, 
J. D. Shavers. 

Grabbed Knife 

Miss Hopson grabbed a 
knife and thrust it towards 
the other woman. 

Miss Wilson, cut and bleed- 
ing, walked to her own home, 
accompanied by Shavers. 

She lay down on the couch 
and fell asleep, never to 
awaken. 

When Shaver s went to 
rouse her about 9:30 a.m., she 
lay motionless. He touched 
her, and her body was cold. 
Don't Remember 

He called police, who went 
to Miss Hopson's home and 
placed her under arrest. She 
identified the knife with 
which she stabbed Miss Wil- 
son. 

"I must have stabbed her 
with a knife," she said, add- 
ing. "I don't remember too 
much." 



Thursday, February 25, 1960 


The California Eagle— 3 


Women Meef in Capitol. 
Urge Full Equolity Now 

WASHINGTON— The National Organizations of 
Women for Equality in Education ("NOW for- 
EQUALITY") ended a three-day conference here 
Friday with a c a 1 1 for "vigorous action" by all 
branches of government to end racial segregation in ' 

the nation's schools. 

L/Caders of 16 national wom- 
en's groups endorsed a sum- 
mary statement by Justice 
Justine Wise Poller of the 
New 'York Domestic Relations 
Court voicing "concern lest 
the great single issue facing 
our nation's schools — the is- 
sue of equality — fail to be re 


n 


Rev. King 
Will Fight 
Extradition 

ATLANTA — After his ar- 
flectcd by the forthcoming! rest here last Wednesday and 
White House Conference on 


Children 
delegates 


and Youth, 
urged the 


' The 

White 


release on S2000 bond, the 
Rev. Martin Luther King as- 


House conference to "face up|sened he would fight efforts 
to this key issue and seek a 
golden answer that will lift 
the hori/.on for all Amer- 
icans." 

350 Delegates 


to extradite him to Alabama. 
He described the arrest as 
".just another effort by the 
State of Alabama to harass 
me for my position in the 


// 7.\' SI IT .IG.II\ST C.IR COMI'JSY — The (,r,il,y jamUy. sh'jiiu uilh their 
(illorney, Dnvid J. Lee, lierc siuiesslul last Tirrh in n Miit eli/ir//inij the Ke/ly Js./ir (Jo. 
liilil jreiuiliilent pr/n liees. I' rout hit: .Itly. Lie. Mrs. Riilh Cientry, (,eor//r Ciintry and 
/■ iiqene (leiitry. 


More than 3.30 delegates to civil rights struggle." 
the conference, representing' Rev. King, Montgomery boy- 
11.000,000 women of various icott loader who at present is 
races and religion.s. voted to spearheading the drive for 
continue working together x o g ro registration in the 
through "NOW for Equality " I South, was arrested on an Al- 
to combat school segregation.! abama perjury warrant and 
During the conference, women j accused of failing to report 
leaders from all sections of i approximately $31,000 of in- 
the country mapped plans fort come for 1956 and 1958 on 


Kelly Kar Co. Deal 
Ruled Fraudulent 


agreement will not be an- 
nounced until the member- 
ship of the two locals is m- 
formed of its provisions. 
International Sanction 
Present at the final meet- 
ings in San Francisc-o when 
the agreement was reached 
were three international offi- 
cers of the AF.M, Vice Presi- 
dent William J. Harris: Secre 


the operating staff of Local 6. 


Junior Band 
Of Police Dept. 
Plans Concert 


.meetings by the officers of 
both locals, when it was 
learned they uould be in the 
West on AFM convention 
business. 


The Los .Angeles Police Jun- 
ior Band will present its Tth 
tary Stanley L. Ballard: and; Annual Concert on March 9. 
Treasurer George V. Clancy. ^^ 7:30 p.m. in the Pepperdine 

I_t;.„^'.^'l..'"l"^''-J"'° '^/College Auditorium, 1121 W. 
-„. >....-- ., _g^^ street. 

The band, directed by Ralph 

H. Kelly, a Los .\ngeles police 

officer, is composed of tecn- 

_. , J. , , age bo\s from all parts of 

Fmal discussions leading to ju :„." 

the merger were initiated, 

jointly b> -the officers of the! 

rwo locals in mid-19,'59. al- , 

though exploratory con\ersa- | y tO PiCtUre 

tions had begun informally at 

•an earlier date. After both Fricm KlonfAA'C 

boards agreed in their first ■' ''*■" I'^CgrUCS 

meeting together to the' A television program about 

merger principle, details were San Franciscans who are Ne- 

hammered out at a .series of g-oes will be aired on 

weekly joint meetings. KROXTV (Channel 4' on 

The merger of the two locals -Sunday, Feb. 28 at 12:.30 p. 
brings them into compliance m. 

with the policy of the Ameri-| Ttip ^how, produced bv the 
can Federation of Musicians Council for Civic Unitv' un 
calling for the elimination of der a grant from the Fund 
duplication of territorial juris- for the Republic, is part of 
dictions. g^ series explo-ing riiscrim- 

L'nder the agreement, the ination in San ^^ranci.sco. 


i'Brooksie' Dies 
iAt Age of 78 

(Continued from Page 1> 
in young people: she sur- : 
j rounded herself with youthful! 
j friends. As one of her friends! 
Isaid, "She was the most cour- | 
(igeous woman I have ever 
', known, she trod paths others 
I dared not try." i 

j When Louise Brooks was 75 ' 
\ears old. she organized the 
I first Negro Women's Demo- 
cratic club in Los Angeles. It j 
I was named "The .Mary Mr-| 
■Leod Bethune Democrticj 
I club." They now ha\e over' 
I 100 members. She ser\ed as i 
Mts president until her death.' 
She was also an active mem-, 
her of the board of the Demo- 
cratic Minority Conference: 
members called her the "Club 
Mother." 

In addition -to her political 
activitv- and work with youth; 
groups, she found time to col- 
lect funds for the March of 
Dimes and the Heart Fund. 

Miss Brooks is survived hy 
her sjster. Mis. Ross of Chi-; 
cago: two nephews and a 
niece. Alexander Ix)we of Los 
.-\ngeles, who is in charge of 
funeral arrangements: Rich- 
ard Moss nf Chicago. ;i'id 
Mrs. Dovie Browder of Cleve- 
land. 

Tlie funeral is to he lield 
Saturday at l:3f) p.m. Aiigelus 
Funeral Home is in charge of 
arrangements. 


A s(.tieme involving the use 
of tiust deeds on real prop- 
erty, chattel mortgages on 
furniture and purported leas- 
ing agreements in connection 
with automobile deals was 
ruled fraudulent and illegal 
by Superior Judge Burnett 
Wolfson last week. Found 
guilty of fraud was Kelly Kar 
Co. 

Juanita Moore 
Oscar Nominee 

(Continued trom Page li 
tliov recall that Juanita 
started as a chorus girl at 
the old Club .■Mabam and has 
remained in show business to 
become a top siature actress 
on stage and screen. 

Her most recent triumph 
was in London a few months 
ago when she essa.ved a top 
role m pla.vwrighl Lorraine 
Hansberrvs "Raisin in tlie 
.Sun." The London critics were 
lukevva '•in about tlie play it- 
self, but cheered Juanita's 
l)ei fonnaii'-e. 

The sepia ad res' first big 
hic.il-. in movies was in the 
film "L.vdia Bailcv." This was 
fri;i(iv\cd bv- a meatv pari in 
"Band of .Angels" and other 
films. Her career has been on 
the upgrade for several years. 
ar;d whetlier or not sire cops 
the Oscar tliis year, the nomi- 
nation makes her a full fledg- 
ed star in every sense of the 
word. ' 


! The action was brought by 
Kugene Gentry, 2902 W. 121 ii 
street, and his father. Cieorge 

'Gentry, tlirougii their attor- 
ney. David J. Lee. when the 
automobile dealer refused to 
release liens on the propcrtv 
of Oorge Gentry. 

i The Gentrvs testified that 
in April of 1957 they attempt- 
ed to purchase a 1956 Chcvro- 

I let from Kelly Kar Co. and 
vvound up with a deed of trust 

.on the elder (;entr\'s home. 

, two chaitel mortgages on 

I their furniture for $4,350. a 

I side loan for S55fl, a form pro- 
viding for o'l pavments of .S76 
j)cr month and an agreement 
uttder which they were pur- 
portedly leasing the car onl.v. 
The Cientr.vs further stated 
that Ihcv were promised Ihal 
all of the liens would he re- 

: leased as .soon as 51300 was 
paid in. They said that they 
kept the car for over a \ear 

,and paid $1700 towards its 

'purchase bin that the defend- 
ant ref-used to release the 
liens. 

Thir.iigh .\lly. Lee. the f.^n- 
ir>s argued that ihe entire 
scheme was fraudulent and 
illegal and an attempt to 
evade laws designed to protect 
automobile huvers. 

The court upheld Lee's con- 
tention and ordered the Kellv- 
Kar Co. to release all lien-^. to 
refund .S1700 and to pay plain- 
tiffs .S7.50 punitive and excmp- 
larv- damages for perpetrating 
a fraud. 


Roy Wilkins 
On TV Sunday 

NEW YORK — Roy Wil- 
kins, executive secretary of 
the NAACP, will appear on 
"Oi>en Hearing," a public 
affairs program to be tele- 
vised over the American 
Broadcasang Company net- 
work on Sunday, Feb. 28, 
at 3 p.m.. Eastern Standard 
Time. 

Wilkins ^ill present the 
association's views on the 
civil rights legislation now 
being debated in the Sen- 
ate. 


stale income tax returns. 

.A.n extradition hearing has 
been set for March 18. 

Tax evasion in Alabama is 
a misdemeanor and not a fcl- 


mobilizing church. parent- 
teacher and community bodies ! 
in behalf of school integra- 
tion. 

In her keynote address. Mrs. 
Eleanor Roosevelt emphasized 1 .,_,_• 

the international significance ■ °">- ^ho periur>- charge brings 
of the integration struggle in|"j'^ ^^^^ . 
America. "If our country is to : '^'^^^'''*^^^'°"- 
fulfill its real mission in the | 
world, we must bring about 
full equality for every ^Amor- 


within the felony 


ican in education, in housing. 


From New York. Roy Wil- 
kins. executive secretary of 
the NA.^CP, assured Rev. King 
of support. In a telegram he 


vours 


com- 


New Facilities 
For Compton 

i A building across the street 
I from the Compton Municipal 
["Court building will be leased 
by the County of Los Angeles 
in order to provide adequate 
■facilities for two agencies and 
at the same time enlarge its 
services to the area. 
j The building at 221 Palm 
street, will house the Comp- 
ton Branch Office facility of 
the district attorney's Failure 
to Provide section and the 
Compton .Municipal Court 
commissioners Hearing Room. 


in employment and of course ; stated: "Aid of NAAC^ in 
in voting, ' she declared. whatever way we can be of 

The Rt. Rev. James A. Pike. 
Protestant Episcopal Bishop 
of California, also warned that 
progress toward racial equal- 
ity in America will be "bar- i 
ren" unless it moves along 
"all fronts at once" — in hous- 
ing, education, job opportuni- i 
ties and the right to vote. i 

The "NOW for Equality" i 
group was formed last March 
following a call from Mrs. 
Thclma Richman of Philadel-] 
phia. president of the nation- 
al Women's Division of the 
.American Jewish Congress. tO' 
other national women's groups ' 
urging that ihey "join hands 
■ in the struggle against schoo 
segregation." ' 



BASIE • COLE • ELLINGTON • GARNER • GRANT • SINATRA 


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LIKE MUSIC? WANT A FREE STEREO? 

CALL BR* 2-7901 no obligation 

ECKSTEIN • FITZGERALD • SHEARING • STATON • VAUGHAN 





Three good 
reasons ' 
why she 
needs an 
ELECTRIC 
DRYER 


"Cream itself couldn't make coffee taste 
richer -yet Carnation has only 1/2 the fat 
calories," Miss Thrift emphasizes. Carna- 
tion in the red and white can is the world's 
favorite brand of evaporated milk. 


"Carnation is the milk that whips like cream -with far fewer fat calories," Miss Thrift explains to a 
etudoit. "1 prefer it to any other brand for recipes like Whipped Sundae Salad." (Recipe at right) 

Home Econc lies Director tells why.., 

'^Carnation is the milk I use like cream 
-with 1/2 the fat calories!'' 


Miss Pinlde Thrift is chairman of 
the home economics department at 
Southern University, Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. "In class we use Cfurna- 
■tion to make favorite dishes taste 
extra special-as if they'd been made 
with cream " Miss Thrift explains. 
"Wonderfully smooth cream sauce, 
for example. Meat loaf that stays 


moist through baking. And an easy, 
dehcious cheese sauce that needs 
no flour or butter because Carnation 
itself is so creamy-rich. It whips, 
too -higher than whipping cream!" 
A special method of evaporation 
gives today's Carnation the con- 
sistency of golden country cream 
-with 'Y2 the fat calories. 


©nation 


EVAPORATED 


I . 1 

I recipe: ' 

I WHIPPED SUNDAE SALAD 

I {Makes 6 seri^ings) 

I To Whip Carnation: chill 1 cup undiluted 

I Carnation Evaporated Milk in refrigerator 

I tray until soft crystals form around edge 

I of tray (15-20 minutes). Whip until stiff 

I (about 1 minute). Add 2 tablespoons 

I lemon juice. Whip until very stiff (1-2 

I minutes lofiger). Makes about 3 cups. 

j l^A cups canned pineapple chunks 
I 1 cup pineapple syrup 
I 1 package lemon gelatin 
I 1/2 cup chopped nuts 
I Ys cup mayonnaise 

1 cup chopped celery 
j 3 cups whipped Carnation (above) 

Drain pineapple. Heat syrup to boiling. 

j Pour over gelatin. Stir until gelatin dis- 

• solves. Chill until thick and syrupy. Add 

I nuts, mayonnaise and celery. Fold the 

I whipped Carnation and the gelatin mix- 

I ture together. Alternate layers of whipped 

I gelatin mixture and pineapple in tall 

I glasses. Chill, garnish and serve. 


"H 




Keeping your family in clean clothes is rea- 
son enough for owning an electric dryer . . . 
and when you have one, two, three or more 
children... you just shouldn't be without 
one. An electric dryer works for you night 
or day . . . rain or shine . . . providing gentle, 
even heat for fluffier, sweeter-smelling 
clothes. And since electric heat is the same 
kind of soft, all-over warmth you get from 
the sun, it gives clothes that sunshine fresh- 
ness you like . . . and is kind to delicate fab- 
rics. So count up all the reasons you have 
for needing an electric dryer, then hurry to 
your electric appliance dealer today. You'll 
find that electric dryers cost $30 to $50 less 
to buy ... just pennies a load to operate . . . 
about $1.00 a month for an average family 
at low Los Angeles Department of Water 
and Power rates. 


PLUG IN ANYWHERE! 

NO SPECIAL 
INSTALLATION NEEDED! 

Plug your electric dryer into 
any appliance outlet. There's 
no special wiring or installa- 
tion needed with a flaipeless 
electric dryer. For even faster 
drying, you may want heavy- 
duty 240 -volt service. If so, 
ask your dealer about DWP's 
special $25 wiring allowance 
and Wire-On-Time Payments 
Plan. 

■ YOUR lOS kNGElES ■ 


"W 


■EPHirrMENT Of NATBIt POWER 


/ 


jl 





4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, Febrwary 25, 1960 


loren Miller, Publisher 

The California Eagle stands for complete Integration of 
Negroes Into every phase of American life through the democratic 
processes. 

We iavor: 

1. FEPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Pub//shed Every Thursday tor Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Van Ness AXminster 5-3135 


J Ite ^^ynpoyiani <y\^ 


cws 


pap 


er 


The Right to Vote 


In three counties of Florida 
with 3,000 Negroes of votin? age 
— there are no Negro votersi 

In six counties of Georgia with 
3,000 Negroes of voting age — 
there are no Negro voters. 

In four parishes of Louisiana 
with an adult Negro population 
of 20,000 — there are no Negro 
voters! 

In two counties of Alabama 
with an adult Negro population 
of 15,000 — there are no Negro 
votersi 

In fourteen Mississippi coun- 
ties with 52,000 adult Negroes — 
there are no Negro voters! 

In Haywood County, Tennessee, 
no Negro has been pennitted to 
vote for 50 years despite the fact 
that Negroes own more land and 
pay more taxes than white per- 
sons in that county! 


In Gadsden County. Florida, 
only seven out of 11,000 adult 
Negroes were registered in 1958! 

In 46 of the 64 parishes of Loui- 
siana, the number of registered 
Negroes has actually declined 
since 19.56, in some cases by dra- 
matic proportions. In Red River, 
the number has dropped from 
1,360 to 16; in St. Landry from 
13,060 to 7,821; in Webster from 
1,776 to 83! 

In most of the 158 counties in 

eleven southern states having a 

'Population 50 per cent or more 

Negro, less than five per cent of 

the Negroes are registered! 

That's the cold record, dug up 
by the U.S. Civil Rights Com- 
mission. If it doesn't persuade 
Congress' that we need a civil 
rights bill with teeth in it we're 
persuaded that nothing can do 
the job. 


Too Quick on Draw 


It looks as if our Los Angeles 
police officers have been keeping 
their eyes glued too closely on 
TV detective yarns. No such 
show is complete without the de- 
tective or the police officer grab- 
bing his gun and shooting down 
the accused. 

Following that pattern, Los An- 
geles policemen have shot and 
killed five Negroes in the past 
month. 

Three of tho.se who were killed 
were engaged in robbery at- 
tempts and police justified the 
killing on the ground that the of- 
fenders were armed. 

One of the others who was 
slain was a burglar who was said 
to have been trying to flee the 
scene of his crime and the other 
man was described as having run 
out of Wilshire Police Station. 

Robbery is a nasty business 


and the hold-up man who arms 
himselif to invade a place of busi- 
ness runs a certain risk. And the 
law justifies police officers in 
taking extreme means to appre- 
hend a man fleeing a felony, such 
as burglary or escape from 
authority. 

However, we can't escape the 
uneasy feeling that police offi- 
cers are becoming mighty quick 
at setting themselves up as judge 
and jury and of meting out 
punishment that should be left to 
the courts. 

Robbery, burglary and escape 
from police officers are not capi- 
tal offenses punishable by death 
in California. The mark of good 
police work is the apprehension 
of criminals and the leaving of 
their fate to the courts. Quick 
trigger police officers aren't the 
answer to law breaking. 


Defender of LibeHyi 


f 


Guess who has just been hon- 
ored because he is "valorous in 
defense of his country and his 
protection of the rights and 
liberties of his countryman . . . 
determined that the citizens of 
this great land shall be free from 
the evils of coercion and the 
perils of deceit?" 

Why, nobody else but the 
senior senator from the Great 
State of Arkansas: John L. Mc- 
Qellanl 

Senator McClellan has demon- 
strated his valor in the defense of 
bis "country and his protection 


of the rights and liberties of his 
countrymen" time and again: by 
his determined opposition to 
civil rights legislation of all kinds 
and by his support of Gov. Orval 
Faubus when the governor called 
out the militia tc prevent Ne- 
groes from attending high school. 
The senator has shown how 
"determined" he is to see that 
the "citizens of this great land 
shall be free from the evils of 
coercion and the perils of de- 
ceit" by his outspoken support 
of coercive Jim Crow laws and 
by his assaults on the Supreme 
Court for its school decision. 


Back in Business 


A three judge federal court 
has held that the NAACP can 
continue to function in Louisiana 
despite a state law requiring 
registration of members and de- 
spite its failure to comply with 
that law. The Association is 
beck in business in that state. 

The federal judges weren't 
homswoggled by the fact that 
prior statutes requiring registra- 


tion of Klan members had been 
upheld. The judges saw, and 
said, that the Klan wasn't to be 
compared with the Association 
and that the registration law 
was an infringement of free 
speech as guaranteed by the 
Coristitution. 

A similar fate awaits other 
state statutes which have been 
aimed at the NAACP. 


Battleaxe & Bread 

By Lmttmr B. Grangmr 



SOMEWHERE IN INDIANA 
— On a train still an hour and 
a half away from Indianap- 
olis. I am thinking, not of to- 
morrow's forum meeting, but 
of the television panel dis- 
cussion in St. Louis earlier to- 
day and the three days pre- 
vious in Louisville. I am 
thinking how in some in- 
stances social problems seem 
to get wor.se for Negroes in 
cities just when their civil 
rights problems are easing up. 
I am thmkmg about the big 
difference that leadership 
makes — how good leadership 
can improve a seemingly 
hopeless situation while bad 
leadership can make a filthy 
mess out of ingredients that 
seem to promise succe.'vs. 

My mmd goes bark 1o Lou- 
isville and two personalities 
there who 
seem to me 
to tj-pify the 
he.st of the 
old and the 
new Louis- 
ville. One is a 
man serenely 
moving to- 
ward the ren. 
tury mark in 
age; the other 
is a woman Granger 

in the completely charming 
prime of her life. Both ha\-e 
helped to put the imprint of 
a civilized, tolerant urbanity 
upon their home cit>- which, 
without that imprint, would 
have been just another border 
city with Its pocketbook in the 
North and its heart stuck fast 
to an old, dying Southern 
way of life. 

Community Legend 

Dr. A. E. Meyzeek is of the 
best of old Louisville — a re- 
tired educator who became a 
community' legend 2,5 years 
ago hut who insisted on re- 
maining a legend-atwork. Re- 
garded a half-century ago as 
the nation's leading colored 
school principal, he head»d a 
junior high school and a nor- 
mal school long before the era 
of school Integration. 

His schools were famous 
for the quality of teachers and 
the achievements of . their 
students — and his influence 
on both. Retiring from the 
school system in the 1940's, he 
moved into other areas of .ac- 
tivity. He was supervisor of 
rent control for OPA during 
World War IT. He had been a 
founder of th" Louisville Ur- 
ban League in 1920 and its 
long-time president. 

He founded the colored 
branch of the "i'MCA where I 
bunked on weekends awav 
from Camp Taylor in World 
^^'a^ I; he sparked various 
business enterprises, was an 
often tart-tongued spokesman 
fnr his race at city hall, in 
downtown planning groups 
and in other areas unfamiliar 
to the average colored citizen 
.■?0 or 40 ypars ago. One fripnd 
describes him as "fnr twenty 
years a one-man system of 
interracial communication" 
before spokesmanship organ- 
173 1 ions and a solid Negro 
press took over the job. 

Now, at 96 years, he Is a 
clear m.lnded and gracious 
hrvst who has just begun to 
slow down physically and to 
grumble a little because he 
can't do for himself all the 
things he did 20 years ago. 
Quite a man is A. E. Meyzeek. 
and quite a city he Is still 
helping to build. 

A Uve Wire 

An entirely different per- 
sonality is Mrs. C. Milton 
Young, wife of one of Louis- 
ville's leading medical men. 
And the French would sa\', 
"vive la difference," for it 
would have been a shame if 
the city's leadership had lost 
the special quality of femin- 
inity provided by this gay, 
vivacious and intelligent lady 
who has been a prod to com- 
placency and a pioneer in 
c\\nc enterprise for the past 
two decades. 

She left the secure respec- 
tabilify of a librarian's post 
for the more challenging field 
of iournalism. When the Uni- 
versity of Louisville opened to 
colored students she was fir.st 
to apply for its law studies. 
She finds plenty of use for 
her lessons in law as parent, 
'head and driving force of 
■young Enterprises, which is 
Louisville's first apartment 
house-type of housing devel- 
opment with an eye to colored 
occupants — 52 families of 
them. 

She never meant to get this 
far into big business when she 
got the urge to build houses 
and recreate neighborhoods; 
she only meant to build some 
homes with profit to herself 
and to the families who would 
occupy them. But by the time 
she had travelled thousands 
of miles to Washington and 
New York, had gotten advice 
and information from many 
quarters and had found that 
Young Enterpdses was the 


only means of doing the job 

— by this time she was com- 
mitted to over $400,000, had 
interested a few white and 
colored friends in becoming 
investors and partners and 
had Uncle Sam dropping a 
heavy wad of cash into the 
project. 

Watched With Alann 
Some of her friends watched 
her with awe mingled with 
alarm, for Louisville — espec- 
ially colored Louisville — is a 
town tJiat places great social 
emphasis on private home 
ownership. 

But Hortense Young, as 
usual, pooh-poohed the cau- 
tious, "traditional" angle. She 
looked ahead to the increasing 
expansion and industrializa- 
tion of Louis\-ille and the 
growth in numbers of small 
families more interested in 
economic opportunity than so- 
cial status. She was used to 
taking a chance in order to 
get at thp bpttpr things ahead 

— and she and Young Enter- 
prises are on the way. 

Quite a woman is Hortense 
Young, socialite, entrepreneur 
and pioneer. And quite a city 
she. too, is helping to build. 
If the Meyzppks helped to 
bring I/iuisvjIle out of its 
past, the Hortense Youngs are 
helping to guide it into a 
good, sure future. 


Many Jailed 
In SItdowns 

'Continued from Page 1) 
shoving the Negro demon- 
strators as a crowd of .«ome 
500 whites gathered. 

One Negro and one white 
youth were injured seriously 
enough to require hospitali- 
zation. 

Polic .stopped all doun- 
town traffic for 30 minutes 
and called out reinforcements 
to coptrol the crowd. 

One Kress store closed 
down and several other stores 
shut their lunch counters. 
"Duke" Joins Protest 

First outbreak of the strike 
movement in Maryland oc- 
curred Mondav following a 
Duke Ellington concert at 
Johns Hopkins University in 
Baltimore. 

The "Duke" and a group of 
students, including about a 
dozen white youths, went to 
the Blue Jay restaurant near 
the Johns Hopkins University 
campus which had refused to 
serve Negroes during the af- 
ternoon. 

In Englewood, N. J. and in 
Harlem. Woolworth stores 
were picketed Saturday in 
protest against the store's pol- 
icy in the South. The S. H. 
Kress Co. store in Harlem was 
similarly picketed. 
S50 Bonds 

The M students arrested in 
Richmond. Va., were accused 
of trespassing when they re- 
fused to leavp Thalhimer's 
Dept. Store. Some were ar- 
rested at the fourth floor tea- 
rooms, others at the fir.st floor 
lunch counter. 

All 34 were released on $50 
bond each, with trial set for 
March 4. 

In Richmond, also. Wool- 
worth's and the G. C. Murphy 
stores were scenes of protest 
demonstrations. At both stores 
a group of about 30 white 
teenagers marched up and 
down the aisles, waving Con- 
federate flags, in a counter- 
demonstration. Both stores 
closed. ' 

In Tallahassee Saturday, 
police broke up a sit-down 
strike at the Woolworth store, 
arresting 11 students when 
they refused to leave the 
lunch-counter. .Ml pleaded in- 
nocent Monday to charges of 
disturbing the peace. 

They were released on.$!5Q0 
bond and trial was set for 
March 3. 

Other protests have occurred 
in South Carolina and North 
Carolina where the sit-down 
was initiated. 


Irate Husband 
Shoots Rival 

(Continued from Page 1) 
a shooting at 9719 S. Avalon, 
and they immediately placed 
him under arrest. 

He admitted the shooting. "I 
Just shot and killed my wife's 
boy friend." he said. "I didn't 
want to hurt anyone, but that 
guy, my wife started living 
with him a couple of weeks 
ago and they have been giv- 
ing me trouble every time I 
tried to see my kids. That's 
why I shot him. 

"I would have shot my wife, 
too, but she ran out of the 
room." 

McCowan was taken to the 
prison ward of General Hos- 
pital, where It was found he 
was suffering from a severe 
compound injury of the left 
foot 



^-^^-13 _ 


TV ANNOUNCEMENT— Audience Reaction is 
Technically Augmented. 


LA. Labor Won't 
Support NAACP 


A Look 
At Books 


(Continued from Page 11 
gro community as a rival to 
the NA.ACP is "not true." 
Then he again 'made it clear 
that he was not speaking in 
an official capacity. 

Warren Rejects Charge 

Edward Warren, president of 
the N.AACP branch, on Mon- 
day reiected the "Communist 
domination" charge. 

"If there are Communists in 
the organization," he told the 
Eagle, "they certainly do not 
dominate." He added: "We 
have not screened our mem- 
bers, nor ha\e we called in 
the FBI to screen thpm." 

The censure recommenda- 
tion was contained in the re- 
port of the executive com- 
mittee read to thp council. 

Pel Coffey, chairman of the 
Labor Committee of the 
NAACP, a position formerly 
held by Pollard, proposed that 
that portion of the report re- 
ferring to the NAACP be re- 
committed to the executive 
committee for further con- 
sideration. 

Quoted Wllkins 

That did it. Nix reportedly 
took the floor and centered his 
attack upon Coffey. He was 
followed by Pollard who re- 
portedly read from a commu- 
nication from Roy Wilkins to 
NAACP branches, warning 
against possible Communist 
infiltration. The message ap- 
parently was in the nature of 
a general directive and did 
not single out Los Angeles or 
any other specific branches. 

The executive committee 
recommendation t o boycott 
the local branch of the NAACP 
came following receipt of a 
routine letter from Coffey, as 
head of the branch's Labor 
Committee, asking for support 
In the NAACP membership 
drive. 

Instead of giving the sup- 
port which is traditional in 
the Los Angeles labor move- 
came following receipt of a 
ment, the executive board 
made its proposal to denounce 
the local branch of the associ- 
ation. 

Following a heated discuss- 
ion, the council voted to ap- 
prove the executive board rec- 
ommendation. 

The action of the local AFL- 
CIO in denouncing the NAACP 
followed by less than a week , 
the blast by George Meanj"; 
president of the AFL-CIO, in 
Florida, against Rep. Adam 
Clayton Powell's impending 
elevation to the chairmanship 
of the Labor Committee of the 

Freeway Death 

(Continued from Page 1> 
Laura Jordan O'Rourke, 11836 
Willowbrook avenue. She is 
survived by her husband, Rob- 
ert, her two daughters, two 
sisters and two brothers, Tina 
Louise and Madelyn Lee 
O'Rourke and William and 
Allen O'Rourke, all of Los An- 
geles. 

Tentative funeral arrange- 
ments by the Harrison -Ross 
Funeral Home indicate servic- 
es will be held at St Andrews 
Catholic Church in Pasadena 
soim«tim« Friday. 


House of Representatives. 

Meany told newsmen that 
Powell would make a "ter- 
rible chairman." and thereby 
raised up a hornet's nest of 
protest in Negro communities 
from the Atlantic to the Paci- 
fic. 


By JAN EDWARDS 
THE MISSION by Hugh B. 
Cave, Doubledoy and C«. Inc. 
Publishers, Garden City, N. T. 
1960. 31 pages. SI.50. 


Opposition to 
Death Sentence 

(Continued from Page li 
drive and at Virgil and Foun- 
tain. 
Some of the replies follow: 

Approve* Reprieve 
HERBERT L. BLOOM. 2230 
W. 31st street— 'Yes I think 
he should have been given a 
rppric\e. He should not have 
to face death again. I think he 
should have life imprison- 
ment. I believe capital punish- 
ment should be abolished — it 
has never been a deterrent 
against crime. If they want to 
keep the death penalty, they 
should condemn those who 
sell dope to kids." 

ROY FREEMAN. 1802 W. 
35th street — 'The governor 
was right in stopping the 
execution. If Chessman names 
the one who did it, he should 
be turned loose. He has suf- 
fered enough. The death pen- 
alrv should be abolished." 

MRS. JULIA LARTIGUE. 481 
E. 41st place, a visitor from 
Philadelphia — "Yes. he should 
have been saved. I do not be- 
lieve in capital punishment." 
Undecided 
MAC McMURRAY. 4168 S. 
LaSalle street — "Well. I'm un- 
decided whether it was right 
to stop it so late. I don't ex- 
actly believe in capita] punish- 
ment, but something must 
make people stop and think 
before thev commit crimes." 

W. H. MURRAY, 1647 E. 23rd 
street — "He shouldn't have 
been reprieved. He should 
have paid for his crime. Capi- 
tal punishment is the only 
way to stop such habitual 
criminals." 

CLAUDE McADAMS, 338 W. 
Santa Barbara avenue — 'The 
reprieve was just and timely. 
Twelve years in death row is 
punishment enough. He has 
fought for his life legally and 
unceasingly. I do not believe 
in the death sentence. After 
all. they don't know for sure 
if he did some of the things 
he is accused of. But if he had 
been a Negro In the South he 
would have been dead long 
ago." 

Give Him a Chonc* 
EVA NELSON, 1793 W. 35th 
place — "Give him a chance. 
God must have meant lor him 
to live. After all, he has been 
at the door of death for years." 
JEROME LEWIS. 1793 W. 
35th place — 'They don't know 
whether he is guilty or not 
Give him a chance. We have 
no right to kill him. Let God 
handle it." 

CHARLES COLEMAN, 615 
Sunset, Venice — "Every man 
should pay for his crimes. An 
eye for an eye. If he had been 
a Negro in the South he would 
have been strung up before he 
had a chance to get to death 
row ttw fint time." 


This is an enchanting little 
book wtiich tells a poignant 
stor>- of a little girl whose 
wonderful courage and spiri- 
tual l)eauty speaks wx)rdless 
sermons to ever>''one she meets 
on her long journey to Port- 
au-Prmce, ox-er 90 miles away 
from her own \illage In Haiti. 

"The Mission" is an ideal 
book to take to a sick friend 
o"- to give to that friend who 
"doesn't have time to read too 
much." It is 31 pages so it may 
be read in an hour or so, yet 
one feels at the end of this 
pleasant period that he has 
been on an exciting adven- 
ture, and has read something 
quite profound. 

The author. Hugh B. Cave, 
Is known for his contributions 
to national magazines both in 
this country and abroad. He 
writes like an artist who 
paints imaginative illustra- 
tjons for children's books — 
colorful and exciting and 
with the simplicity of an oM- 
time stor\- teller. 

The iarket painting by Pe- 
ter Stevens of the six year old 
heroine is as charming and 
appealing as the stor>'. 

FARMING IN CALIFORNIA 

California leads the nation 
In cash income from farming, 
according to the Water Facts 
Librar>'. In recent years farm- 
ing has represented 65 per 
cent of the State's total in- 
come. 


CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

Tfi* Important Newspapr' 

2101 W. V«rnon Av«. 

Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

AXminster 5-3135 

LOREN MILLER 
Publlther 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXIX 


Feb. 25, 1960 
No. 50 


GRACE SIMONS-. Executive Editor 

F. P. WALLER. Jr Adv. Mgr. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

CIrcuiition Mgr. 

CALME RUSS Office Mor. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. Q. All«n 1512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph. EX. 5-1591 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 

1907 aoth Street (Upstairs) 

Phone EXbrook 4-8082 


SUBSCRIBE NOW! 

Q $4.00 for 1 Year , 
G $1.50 for 3 Months 
Q $2.50 for 6 Months 


Adjudication Decr«« Number 12 
Oat* of Adjudication July 1. 1923 
Published every Thuradiy by Th« 
California Eaole Publishing Co., 
2101 West Vernon Avenue, at Van 
Ness. Los Angeles &, Calif. Cnt«r«d 
as Second Class Matter NovomMr 
3, 1937, at the Poat Office at Lea 
Anoelee, California, ond«r the Act 
•f March a. 187t. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWSPAPERS 

646 Fifth AVMIM 

Nmr York 17. Nsw Yarli 


I 


\\\\ 


ygh B. 

Inc. 
\. N. Y. 


little 
^ignant 
whose 
spin- 
jrdless 
meetj 
Port- 
away 
Haiti. 

idea! 
friPnd 
Id who 
fad too 
lit ma/ 
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>f this 
le hiS 
ladvpn. 

lething 
Cavo, 

)UtlOPS 

3oth n 
id H» 

who 
liistra- 
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and 
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l,bv F^- 

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I nation 

►rmine, 

Fa'^ts 

farm- 

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E'litor 
Mgp. 
ISON 

Ion Mgr. 
lice Mgr. 
TATIVE 
ll6th St. 

)FFIC'E 


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Inths 

Inths 

1. ,)9t3 

by The 

■ ng Co.. 

at Van 

Entered 

lOvemDer 

at Loe 

the Act 

>JALLY 
tRS 



Speak at 3 Rallies 


CKur-cIv^ 


AiyARD OF MERIT PRESENTED— Rev. John N. 
Doqgett, Jr., center right, is shoun presenting a plague to 
John Lamar Hill for his achievement in being elected to a 
secnnd term as President of the Calif ornta State Board of 


Alorticians and Embalmers. Also shown in foreground are 
Mrs. Hill, next to Hill, and Robert DeCoy, left center. 
The ceremony was a part of the Hamilton Methodist 
Capella Choir program. — (Adams), 


Parks Chapel 
Youth Activity 
Draws Crowd 

It was "standing room only' 
at Parks Chapel AME Church 
Pacoima, California as the 


Cherry Blossom Tea Slated 
By Wesley Women's Society 

The Women's Society of Peterson is secretary with 
youth of the church sponsored ■ ^^'^'^''^" Service of Wesley j Mary Hines and Hurshel Can- 


Methodist Church, 5139 S. j ada serving as co-chairmen. 
Main street, will present a Rev. E. W. Rakestraw is the 
"Cherry Blossom Tea" at the minister at Wesley. 

church community center from ! 

3 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 28. 

Clubs of the city have join- 
ed with the women of the 
society in the event which 
will feature outstanding table 
decorations and arrangements. 
They will also present fashion 


Noland, 


pro- i-'ij'c.iiu, Roberts Originals' 

their '"<'P''^scntative. Al Berger, Lor- 

their^"^o and Ruth Donally. Es- 

at a "^''d Ruffin will be the mas- 

I ter of ceremonies. 


Founder's Day services Sun- 
day Feb. 14. 

At 11 a.m.. supported by 
both the Junior and Youth 
Choirs, Parks Chapels young 
associate minister. Rev. Cyrus 
Taylor brought a challenging, 
thought provoking message — 
••Walk Softly." 

Again at 3 p.m. a capacity 
audience enjoyed an informa- 
tive program. "The Romance t\models in a show during the 
of African Methodism" was afternoon tea program, 
narrated by Miss Ira Woodfini Judges for the event will be 
and told by the youth of the ' Gregory of Hollywood, Carrie 
church. Following the 
gram the youth and 
sponsors were hosts to 
appreciative audience 
beautiful tea. 

Chilstian Service 

Rev. Ralph R. King said: 
"We are grateful to the self- 
sacrificing leaders and teach- 
ers who, through wise direc- 
tion and guidance, are help- 
ing to build a firm founda- 
tion for the future of African 
Methodism in the San Fer- 
nando Valley." 

Quoting from the welcome 
address by Miss Philippia 
Hunter, Parks Chapel "has no 
obscure traditions and is con- 
strained by no invisible local 
customs. We are free to work 
and to expand, dedicated only 
to the glory of God and serv- 
ice to mankind. To fulfill its 
mission in the community, 
the church has been thought- 
fully organized along lines 
that the church of Allen has 
found effective in winning 
souls for Christian service. Its 
membership has been chan- 
neled into various depart- 
ments and auxiliaries 


Baha'ls Slate 
Intercalary 
Days Festival 

The Los Angeles Baha'is 
will celebrate the Intercalary 
Days of the Baha'i World 
Faith beginning Feb. 28 
through March 1, at the Baha'i 
Prizes will be given for the Center, 331 S. ^■ew Hampshire 


rSANTA- 
MONICA 

NEWS 


, most outstanding table ar- 
rangements and the most cre- 
ative dress design. 
I Mrs. Otis Marble is presi- 
' dent of the group. Eleanor 


Doctor to be 
Speaker at 

Vermont Sq. 

Vermont Square Methodist 
Church will present Dr. F. 
Pearl McBroom as guest 
speaker at its banquet on Sat- 
urday evening at 6 p.m. 

Also scheduled to appear on 
the program is Joe Lutcher 
and his converted saxophone 
and Billy Opie, TV and radio 
recording artist. 

Leonard Johnson is chair- 
man and Rev. Howard Ray 
each, Carey is pastor of the church. 


offering a distinct and essen-. 


tial outlet for the talents of' People who save for 

rainy 

those who would enter the days never seem to 

have 

service of the Master." 'them. 



avenue. | 

Baha'u'lla'h. the founder of 
the Baha'i Faith, designated 
four Intercalary Days and or- 
dained that they sheuld take 
place preceding the month of 
Ala. which begins March 2. 

This is the time when 
Baha'is entertain friends and 
enjoy feasting, rejocing and 
f)erforming acts of charity, in 
preparation for the period of 
fasting which begins on 
March 2, continuing for the 
19 days which correspond to 
Baha'i months. 

Open house activities will 
prevail all day Saturday and 
Sunday with a fifrn being 
shown at 8 p.m. on Sunday. 
The pictures point out land- 
marks of religious significance 
in Israel. 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at V/esf Vernon 

Howard Ray Carey, Minister 

Sunday School-9:30 A.M. Wonhip-irOO A.M. 


— Westnninster Presbyterian Church 

2230 W. JEFFERSON BOULEVARD 
Chruch School— 9 30 a m. Morning Worship—! 1 00 a m. 
Wesfmjnsrer Sunday Evening Bible Hour— 7:00 P.M. 
Mid-Week Fellowship— 7:30 p.m. 

Jomai Idword Jonmt, Poitcr 


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True. Phone Nowllll 


Richmond 7-4734- 


Musical Slated 
At Graiit AME 

-At 7;30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 
28, the combined choirs of 
Grant AME Church, 105th and 
Central avenues, of which 
Rev. Henry W. Murph is min- 
ister, will present a musical 
program by 135 members of 
its Senior and Gospel Choirs, 

' directed by Don Lee White, 
Grant's minister of music. 

Awards will be presented to 
the following during the eve- 
ning; 

Madame Outley, former, 
choral director of Second Bap- 
tist Church; Rev. J. Raymond 

i Henderson, minister; Mrs. A. 

I C. Bilbrew, motion picture 

I actress, music director, com- 
poser and presently director 
of Hamilton Methodist Church 
Senior Choir. ^ 

The guest speaker will be 
Orville Mosley, instructor of 
music in the Adult School at 
Jordan High School. He will 
speak on "Negro Music and 
Church Musicians, Past and 
Present." 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Church 

■ AST l*th AND TRINITY tTRIITS - HIV. JOHN C. IAIN, MINISTU 

SUNDAY, FEBRUAilY 28 

The public i« cordially invited fe tttond. 


GIFTED SPIRITUAL READERS- 

• ADVISE ON ALL MAHIRSI I I 

• ALL QUESTIONS ANSWERED 


1101 W.VERNON 


(Block W**t of 
Varment) 


AX 5-1644 


Judge Thomas Griffith of 
the Los Angeles Municipal 
Court will be the guest speak- 
er for the "Leap Year Ban- 
quet," sponsored by the wo- 
men of Calvary Baptist 
Church. The program will 
feature men only and will 
exploit the Leap Year theme. 
The banquet starts at 7:30 
p.m. at 1503 20th street on 
Friday, Feb. 26. 

« • • 

Officers elected at the 
Area Conference of the NAACP 
were James McCann, presi- 
dent; Frank Barnes, first vice- 
president; David Hoggard, 
second vice president; Percy 
Anderson, third vice-president; 
Mrs. Scottie W. Williams, sec- 
retary; and Melvin Williams, 
treasurer. 

Delegates attending the 
conference were Alyce Gul- 
lattee, C. M. Garland, Evelyn 
Snyder, E. G. Allen, and James 

Martin. 

• • • 

Dinner will be served at 
the First AME Churchby-the- 
Sea, Fellowship House, on 
Saturday, Feb. 27, by the Sen- 
ior Usher Board. Rev. Harry 
M. Davis is pastor of the 

church. 

• • • 

Rev. W. P. Carter and the 
Calvary baptist Church con- 
gregation, made a trip to Mon- 
rovia last Sunday for a wor- 
ship service and dinner vnih 
the members of the Monrovia 
congregation of Rev. G. G. 

Bailey. ^ 

• • * 

Ben McNeal and his wife 
left for Reno to care for the 
children of his brother Ernest 
McNeal. Both parents are ser- 
iously ill. 

• • * 

Sonny Morris E 1 d r i d g e, 
706 4th avenue, Venice, died 
on Feb. 20 at Soledad, Calif. 
He was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Willie Eldridge and the 
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
tin Eldridge of Cuero, Texas, 
and Mrs. Lonnie Nickson of 
San Antonio. He was the nep- 
hew of Mrs. Leola Fields Per- 
nelia Ricks, Gertie Mayes, Wil- 
lie Satterfield, R. A. Hobson, 
Joe and L. V. Nickson. Afso 
of Mrs. Viola Prcwett and of 
Pinkie, Thomas, Celeph, and 
Martin Eldridge. 

Funeral services were to be 
held at 1 p.m. today (Thurs- 
day) at the CME Phillips 
Chapel Church, with Rev. H. 
Ward officiating. Spalding 
Mortuary was in charge. 

Interment was in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery. 


Thursday, February 25, 1960 


BARBARA MOUNTS, CHURCH EDITOR 


The California Eagle— 5 


LaMar Hill 
Given Award 

By C. MARIE HUGHES 

An enthusiastic audience 
filled the sanctuary of Hamil- 
ton Methodist Church last 
Sunday evening when the 
Capella Choir launched its 
first in a series of cultural 
programs of which Mrs. A. C. 
Bilbrew is producer- director. 

"This is Progress" was the 
theme of the program which 
featured Robert (KGFJ) De- 
Coy, writer and narrator of a 
five-minute program giving 
history making Negro contri- 
butions to progress in the 
world. The program is heard 
three times daily and twice on 
Sunday. As guest speaker, he 
pointed with pride to the Ne- 
groes and their descendents 
and the innumerable contri- 
butions they have made 
throughout the thousands of 
years of known history. 

Recalling some of the great 
historical events contributed 
here in America v/on the es- 
teem of the audience mani- 
fested by the great deluge of 
applause. 

The highlight of the eve- 
ning was the presentation of 
the award of merit to John 
LaMar Hill, president and 
manager of the Angelus Fun- 
eral Home, by Rev. John* N 
Doggett, Jr., pastor of Hamif. 
ton. 

Hill, prominent young busi- 
nessman, has recently been 
elected to the presidency of 
the California State Board of 
Funeral Directors and Em- 
balmers for the second time 
in six years. 

Dorothea Vincent, program 
chairman, was general chair- 
man assisted by Xenia Reese 
and A. C. Bilbrew. 



Intercalary Days 


BAHAl WORLD FAITH «|> 
CELEUHATES THE . . . '"• 

Feb. 26 to March i:: 

—Programt Daily at tha ^ 

BAHA'I 
CENTER 

1 331 S. N«w Hampihir* T 

N«fl. Hdqt. Wilmet, lllinola x ^"B"*** j^ 



SPEAKER— Dr. F. Pearl 
McBroom, heart specialist, 
will speak at the annual ban- 
quet at Vermont Square 
Methodist Church, Satur- 
day, Feb. 27, at 6 p.m. 

— (Adams). 


Minister's Unite to 
Present Colleague 

Rev. Martin Luther King, leader of the Mont- 
gomery Bus Boycott, will be presented by the united 
action of the Interdenominational Ministerial Al- 
liance and the Baptist Ministers Union at three rally 

meetings here Sunday. 


At 11 a.m. the dynamic 
speaker will be heard at 
Friendship Baptist Church, 80 
W. Dayton avenue in Pasa- 
dena, with Rev. Marvin T. 
Robinson host pastor. 

At 3 p.m. Rev. T. M. Cham- 
bers will introduce Rev. King 
to the congregation at Zion 
Hill Baptist Church, 52nd and 
McKinley avenue. 

At 7:30 p.m. Rev. H. B. Char- 
les will present Rev. King to 
the Mount Sinai congregation 
at 2610 LaSalle avenue at 
Adams blvd. 

Rev. Jerry W. Ford, master 


of ceremonies for the day, said 
that overflow audiences are 
expected for each appearance 
of Rev. King, who is president 
of the Southern Christian 
Leadership Conference. 

Regardless of denomination- 
al preferences and church af- 
filiation, the public's interest 
in the plans for future action 
in the struggle for individual 
dignity, which will be outlin- 
ed on Sunday, is expected to 
bring overflow audiences to 
all three meetings, according 
to the committee on arrange- 
ments. 


Slate Avalon 

Christian's 

Anniversary 

Avalon Christian Church, 
4272 Avalon blvd.. will cele- 
brate its 23rd anniversary 
with special services during 
the week of Feb. 29 to March 
6. Rev. Foster T. Craggett is 
pastor of the church. 

Several of the outstanding 
ministers and choirs of the 
city will be present during 
the week. These will include 
Rev. John Doggett and choir 
of Hamilton Methodist 
Church; Rev. Leon Carson and 
choir of First AME Zion 
Church; Rev. Isaiah Scipio 
and the choir of Lewis Metro- 
politan CME; Rev. Elliot Ma- 
son and choir of Trinity Bap- 
tist Church; and Rev. E. W. 
Henry and choir of E. 28th 
Street Christian Church. 

J. A. Pettaway, general 
chairman has arranged that 
charter members of the con- 
gregation will be honored at 
a coffee hour following the 
morning services on March 6. 


"If one must err. let it be 
on the side of gentleness." 

St. Francis DeSales 



Sacramento Inspirational 
Chorus to Sing at Victory 

The Sacramento Inspirational Chorus of 137 
voices will make its first appearance in Southern 
California at Victory Baptist Church, 4802 McKinley 
avenue, on Feb. 28 at 7:30 p.m. 

® The chorus, which is direct- 
ed by Herman Miller, is com- 
posed of youths 17 to 26 years 


Rev. White to 
Preach Sun. 
Glendale 


Judge Bernard Jefferson 

Men's Program 
Slated Sunday 
At Hamilton 

Sunday, Feb. 28, will be 
■ Men's Day at Hamilton Meth- 
odist Church. 6330 S. Figueroa 
street. The theme for the day 
will be "Jesus, the Author 
and Finisher of Our Faith." 

For the 8 a.m. service. Rev. 
J. J. Lewis will be the speak- 
er and at 10:45 a.m. service. 
Judge Bernard Jefferson will 
bo the speaker. 

The Men's Day chorus un- 
der the direction of N. Van 
Goodridge will furnish the 
music at both services. 


Rev. L. L. White, pastor of 
Holman Methodist Church, 
3320 W. Adams blvd., will ex- 
change pulpits with Rev. Ever 


of age. The group is spon- 
sored by William H. Thomp- 
son, a Sacramento business- 
man, on its tour and is being 
presented Sunday by the 
Youth Choir of Victor>' Bap- 
tist Church. Herman Claiborne 
is the director. Professor Larry 
Kaiser, pianist and Rev. A. A. 


ett Palmer, of the First Meth- ppf^rs is pastor of the Church, 
odist Church of Glendale, next' 
Sunday evening, Feb. 28. 


Rev. Palmer, whose church 
is located at 134 N. Kenwood 
avenue, in Glendale. will 
speak at 6:30 p.m. at Holman 
while Rev. White will speak 
in the Glendale church at 7:30 
p.m. Rev. White's sermon is 
entitled "It Pays to Advertise." 


Joseph T. Bush 
Last Rites Held 

Funeral services were held 
on Feb. 20 for Joseph T. Bush. 
1674 E. 115th street, who died 
Feb. 16. 

Mr. Bush had been a resi- 
dent of Los Angeles since 
1927. He was born 'in Louisi- 
ana in 1867. 

Three sons and three daugh- 
ters survive. They arc: Edgar, 
Oniel and Lawrence Bush; 
Mrs. Zenobia Foreman, Mrs. 
Daisy Turnham and Mrs. Ag- 
nes DuValle. There are eight 
grandchildren and two great 
grandchildren. 

Requiem Mass was cele- 
brated at Saint Leo's Catholic 
Church with interment in 
Holy Cross Cemetery. 


Birthday Party 
Slcitedfor Cobbs 

A Royal Bryon Musical Pro- 
duction will be presented at 
*rriangular Church of Relig- 
ious Science on Sunday, Feb. 
28. at 6 p.m., honoring Rev. 
Clarence H. Cobbs of Chicago, 
who will be celebrating his 
birthday at the church, 958 W. 
52nd street. 

The Dave Weston Singers of 
Santa Monica, Lillian Snyder, 
Ralph Goodpasture, Cora Mar- 
tin and Leslie Cobbs will ap- 
j pear on the party program. 


for 

more 

grow power 

insist 

on. 




— T-V- 

RADIO & PHONO 
REPAIRING 


c4llJHMsiScUHoJels 


R.asonabl. PricM 
GuarantsMi Workmanship 

AVEKUE TV & RADIO 

4957 So. Central 

AD. 4-0970 

JwTMt Humphrtv ( Call AD. I-1976 



Ao. mm 


for Nit* 1, Sun. 
Sill Guvten. Proe 


AME Lay Council 

AME Lay Council for 
Church Improrement will 
bold a Special MeeUp^-'at 
Antiocb Christian -Oiurch, 
6101 S. Figueroa street at 
4 p.in., Sunday, Feb. 28. 

J. B. Patterson ond ELton 
Llttlejohn will report on the 
Philadelphia ^lebration of 
the 200th anniversary of 
Richard AUen's birth. 


BLESSINGS 

JOHN STARR 

1 f« 3 Day Spaclal tlcMlas* 
AvallobU 

START 1960 RIGHTI 

You Ar« N«v*r H«lp*d . • • 
UnUu YOU Try 

for lirt»rmatl»ii WrHt to: 
P.O. lex 1922, CUvclonri t, Obl« 

SW. 1-9600 
JOHN STARR 

BLESSINGS 



TIME 18 the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfao- 
tion to Los Angeles families for more than 20 years- 
satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and honest 
service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reasonable. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 


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INTER - DENOMINATIONAL MINISTERIAL ALLIANCE AND THE BAPTIST MINISTERS UNION SPONSOR THREE RALUES FEATURING THE DYNAMIC AND INCOMPARABLE 

^ Reverend MARTIN LUTHER KING 

=^ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28tli at the Following Churches ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

1 1 :00 A.M.— FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST 3:30 P.M.— ZION HILL BAPTIST MOUNT 


SINAI BAPTIST 

80 WEST DAYTON AVE., PASADENA 52ND ST. AND McKINLEY AVENUE LA SALLE and WIST ADAMS BOULEVARD 

REV. MARTIN T. ROBINSON-Pattor REV. TIMOTHY M. CHAMBERS-Pattor REV. H. B. CHARLES-Paster 

fveryone Is CordlaUy Invifd: Regardless of Your Church Aftlllaflon, You Must Not Miss This Chaf/engfng Personality, Who Will Teff of Progress In Freeing tho Southern Negro From Bendoge _ 


Hi 



6— The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 25, 1960 



"The Negro In American 
Sport" is the subtitle of the 
current issue of Sport maga- 
zine, published in- New York 
by Ed Fitzgerald. 

The highlight of the articles 
Is a round-fable discussion 
participated in by the editor; 
Althea Gibson and Bill Davis, 
tennis champions; Jackie 
Robinson and Larry Doby, 
baseball stars; Buddy Young, 
pro football star; and Sam 
Lacy, sports WTiter of the 
Afro- American Newspapers. 

The discussion was pub- 
lished verbatim from the 
questions and answers given 
spontaneously by the partici- 
pants in a free give-and-take. 
"We wanted to ask some hard 
questions." the editor writes 
In a foreword, "and to get 
Bome hard answers." 

There was complete unani 
mity of the Negro sportsmen 
on a couple of matters that 
popped up in the conversa- 
tion: that although the Negro 
athlete has come a long way 
since the first ball player en- 
tered a big league team, he 
Still has a long way to go; 
and that young Negro ath- 
letes should strive for a col- 
lege education. 

There was some disagree- 
went on whether he should 
get the education first, before 
striving to become a pro, or 
vice versa. All agreed, how- 
ever, that it was, in Buddy 
Young's words, "always trying 


to reach upward," that counts 

Another important questioa 
that was kicked around was 
whether a Negro who had 
made a name for himself and 
become a national hero should 
take advantage of any open- 
ing to perform in a place 
which discriminates against 
other members of his race. 

It was the consensus that he 
should accept such an open- 
ing, for that in so doing, he 
may succeed in having other 
Negroes accepted. Althea Gib- 
son led the way in this phase 
of the discussion. 

"There was a time when I 
disagreed violently," declared 
Jackie Robinson, former 
Dodgers star and now vice- 
president of the Chock-Full- 
O'-Nuts chain of restaurants. 
"I wouldn't have considered 
going to a club where other 
Negroes were barred. 

"But I talked to people who 
weren't allowed Into places 
and they all said, 'Jackie, if 
you don't go, then how will 
we ever be able to go?' " 

Other articles in the special 
issue are: Ernie Banks Made 
It; When Wilt and Russell 
Meet; The Golfer with the Big 
Handicap; The Mixed Emo- 
tions of "The Big O"; You 
Could Almost Have a Negro 
All-star Game; Sports Half of 
No. 18: The Brown Bomber; 
and Jackie Robinson — Symbol 
of the Revolution. 


Major League Softball 
Team Drills at S. Park 


Broadway Federal Savings' 
star-studded Larks major 
league Softball team, man- 
aged by the famed Cy Phelps 
of the world champion Long 
Beach Nighthawks, is looking 
great in drills at South Park 
field. 

Already the classy interra- 
cial club, a member of the 
Western Softball Congress. 


Joe Louis 
To Get Top 
Club Award 

Joe Louis, the great "Brown 
Bomber" and the fightingest 
champion of them all, will be 
given a long overdue testi- 



11 


THE TEE 


## 


.WITH MAGGie HATHAWAY. 


By BILL SPILLER 

fBill Spiller, guest writer, 
this week brings candid facts 
about golf discrimination to 
Eagle readers,. Spiller was the 
first Negro pi'ofessional who 
was denied membership by 
the Professional Golfers Asso- 
ciation-) 


In 1948, a discrimination 
fight was started against the 
PGA at Richmond by Bill 
Spiller. Spiller, along with Ted 
Ehodes who qualified by fin- 
ishing among low 60 pros in 
the L. A. Open, played two 
practice rounds and was asked 



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W- FABULOUS 5-10 BEHINO j^ 
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SUN. POST TIME 12:30 PM^ 

FANTASTIC RETURNS j- 
¥i- .For Your Wagor "^ 

Two Dollar* or Moro |^ 
^ Foreign Book Opon Daily 

On All Major Track* 
■^ GREYHOUND RACING "•* 

'»■ 3 BIG NIGHTS * 

^A WEEK-FRIDAY, SATUR-tf> 
.^ DAY AND SUNDAY 
W ritST POSr TIMI 7i45 p.m 
49or EVERY SATURDAY 
^ AND SUNDAY NIGHTS 




JOHN S. ALESSiO 


4^ 


to leave because there is a 
clause in the PGA's Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws which states 
(Page 3, Article III) that "pro- 
fessional golfers of the Cauca- 
sian race over the age of 
eighteen (18) years residing in 
North or South America who 
can qualify under the terms 
and conditions hereinafter 
specified shall be eligible for 
membership." 

In a court in the county 
where Richmond is located, 
the PGA stated that they 
would not discriminate any 
more because of race or color. 

In 1952, at San Diego, Spiller 
qualified to play in the tour- 
nament there and again the 
PGA came forth and asserted 
that he did not come up to 
standards required to play in 
the PGA's sponsored tourna- 
ments. When asked what the 
standards were, the reply was, 
"He (Spiller) was not a PGA 
member nor an approved 
player." 

This approved player Mgu- 
ment should be clarified. To 
be approved, a pro must fill 
out a blank answering ques- 
tions about his playing rounds, 
score, etc.; then have the blank 
signed by two local PGA pros 
(members); get two or three 
letters of recommendation 
from influential people about 
his character, playing ability, 
etc. 

In 1952, the second conflict 
between the PGA and Bill 
Spiller also Included Joe Louis; 
former heavyweight boxing 
champion who at the time re- 
fused to come to Spiller's aid, 
possibly because of an amend- 
ment which permitted Negroes 
to qualify up to 10 In San 
Diego, at Phoenix up to six 
and similarly at Tucson. 

Since this incident, Negroes 
have been permitted to play 
in about 15 tournaments a 
year above the Mason-Dixon 
line. 

But for Bill who has pio- 
neered this movement and 
spent a lot of money and time, 
this led to obscurity and 
limited his playing in tourna- 
ments because he has a fam- 
ily — a wife and three children 

Spiller became hated and 
despised by both white and 
black because of his courage 
in speaking up for what he 
thinks is right 



has a constellation of stars on 
its roster, trying out for first 
string berths. 

These include Junior Bell, 
.second baseman, and Tommy 
Page, catcher, both of ttie 
runner-up champion Culver 
City team; Booker Turner, first 
baseman or outfielder; short- 
stop Don Watson, pitcher Dave 
Rodriguez, outfielder Howard 
Prosser and pitchers Ed Dewey 
and Elgin Gardenhire. Arncl 
Harper is field manager of 
the club. 

General Manager Phelps, 
who once led the famed Joe 
Louis' Brown Bombers team of 
Flint, Mich., predicts his club 
will be in tiptop condition for 
the pre -season Lakewood tour 
nament March 26 • April 1. 

Phelps is seeking the use of 
Wrigley Field for the Larks 
home games, which would be 
a real "natural" spot for this 
outstanding team. 

Meanwhile the club has 
been staging spirited work- 
outs on South Park's diamond 
on Sunday mornings and 
Wednesday evenings in pre- 
paration for the league's sea- 
son opening April 29- 


JOE LOUIS 

monial at the 1(X)% Wrong 
Club of Southern California's 
Third Annual Awards Dinner- 
Dance at the Beverly Hilton 
Hotel Friday night, April 1. 

This announcement was 
made by the \00'"r Wrongers' 
president, Atty. Leo Branton, 
Jr., this week. 

Branton said that Louis will 
be honored 'a«i "Fighter of the 
Century" and will receive the 
club's top award. 

At the same time, Atty. 
Branton announced that Gil- 
bert "Bert" Kenner has been 
appointed chairman of the 
banquet; Brad Pye, Jr., will 
again be in charge of the 
souvenir program; and A. S. 
"Doc" Young will serve as 
entertainment chairman. 

Tickets for this tremendous 
salute to Louis and the other 
outstanding athletes in South- 
ern California who will be 
honored by the club may be 
purchased on a first-come- 
first-serve beisis, according to 
Kenner. 


Annual Loyola 
Sports Hight 
At LA. Arena 

'The Annual Loyola Univer- 
sity Alumni Spwrts Night will 
be held Friday (Feb. 26) in 
conjunction with the Loyola- 
St. Mary's basketball game in 
the Sports Arena, according to 
an announcement by Mark 
Wood, chairman of the Sports 
Night Committee. 

Alumni and their wives and 
guests are cordially invited to 
attend the basketball game 
followed by the after-game 
reception with refreshments at 
the nearby Switzerland Res- 
taurant, 4057 Figueroa. 

Guests of honor for the eve- 
ning will be Rev. Alfred J. 
Klip, S. J., Dean of Men at 
Loyola and President of the 
West Coast Athletic Confer- 
ence, and Bill Donovan, 
Loyola basketball coach and 
former All-American basket- 
ball great. 

Chairman Mark Wood is 
joined by Hugh Boyle and 
Don Klosterman in making 
arrangements for the mid- 
basketball season Alumni get- 
together. 

(^ost of the entire evening, 
including the basketball, game 
and the reception is $2 per 
person or $3.50 per couple. 



PREP HONORED— Don Barksdale, former UCLA great 
bfuketball star and one of the Bay Area's leading due 
jnckrys, is shown awarding Gary Lewis a plaque as the 
outstanding high school football player of the month. Every 
nionlh Radio Station KDLi selects a high school athlete 
and honors him. Lewis is a B-average student and, natch, 
Barksdale would like to see him enroll at IVestwood. 

—(Willis) 



CfLlRLES SIFFORD — 
His score of 277 in the four- 
day f 20. 000 Tucson Open 
Golf Tourney last week was 
only six strokes auay from 
the leader. He tied with 
other pros to pocket $610. 


yCIifl Frosh Cagers 
Post 14-2 Record 

Coach Jerry Morman's UCLA 
frosh basketball team has won 
14 games while dropping only 
two this season. 

After winning 13 straight 
they were upset by Mt. San 
Antonio College 62 to 60. The 
Brubabe cagers have six more 
games to play before the 
season ends. 


SGBasketballersWin 

SC's baseball team scored 
its third straight win over 
Charley Neal's Negro Major 
All-Stars at Bovard Field 13 
to 4. 

Don Buford, ex-Trojan, w^- 
loped the game's only home 
run for the All-Stars. 


Joe Roach Cops 
Miami Amateur 
For 4th Time 

Joe Roach of Los Angeles 
fashioned a five over par with 
his 215stroke total to win his 

fourth straight %mateur golf 
crown in Ray Mitchell's 
annual "North-South," tourna- 
ment at Miami, last Friday. 

Myrtice Mclver of Dajlon, 
O., took the women's title on 
a 54-hole card of 271, one 
stroke under defending cham- 
pion Elizabeth Wright of New 
York City. 

Pete Brown of Jackson, 
Mi.ss., dethroned pro champion 
Cliff Harrington of Ft. Camp- 
bell, Ky., by a three stroke 
margin at 210. 

Ray Botts, another Los An- 
geles amateur golfer, shot 219, 
four strokes behind Roach. 


New Pro Team Sets 
Tryout Camp Date 

Trj'outs for the Los -Angeles 
Chargers professional football 
team will be held from April 
9 through 15 at Olive Street 
Park in Burbank. 

All applicants desiring to 
take part in the tryouts must 
send their applications to head 
coach Sid Gillman, Los An- 
geles Chargers, 9110 Sunset 
Blvd., Los Angeles 46, April 7. 

Players must furnish their 
own equipment, but pads will 
not be needed since there 
will not be any contact work. 


rry^^-^'^'H 



W 
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RflMSET 



0*erg« Rcmmiv 


■ BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO: Five selectors 
who named five winners won 
$15,127.80 each in sharing 
first-place money in the 510 
public handicapping at Cali- 
ente Race Track last Sunday. 

The consolation pool was 
split into 89 shares, paying 
$283.20 each for lour winning 
horses. 

"Hie 510 pool grossed $112,- 
613 on the day of the George 
Woolf Memorial, which drew 
a crowd <A 18,613. 

SANTA ANITA: The Silver 
Jubilee running of the world- 
famous Santa Anita Handicap 
will come up for decision this 
Saturday, Feb. 27, with $145,- 
000 guaranteed. The race will 
be run over the classic one 
Tnile and one-quarter distance. 

Special for the classic will 
be the taking of entries at 
10 a.m. Thursday and a half- 
hour earlier start on Saturday 
with the gates opening at 
10:30 a.m. and the first race 
at 12:30 p.m. 

The 1960 edition of the San- 
ta Anita Handicap shapes up 
as one of the greatest in its 
long history. Known as one of 
the most difficult races in the 
world, victory is coveted by 
owners, trainers and jockeys 
from the four comers of the 
earth as one of the premiere 
prizes of racing. 

This year's running will be 
contested by horses from Eur- 
ope, South America and both 
the eastern and western sec- 
tions of the United States. My 
picks for the Santa Anita are 
Bagdad, first; Silver SpKwn, 
second; and Fleet Nashrullah, 
third. Upsets are Amerigo, 


the California Eagle, out and 
on your newsstands everv' 
Wednesday. For the t>est in 
t«| *Sport of Kings," it's the 


Ardhie Moore 
To Defend His 
Boxing Crown 

Archie Moore, boxer turned 
actor, has agreed to accept an 
offer to defend his light- 
heaxyweight title against the 
No. 2 contender, Eric Schoepp- 
ner of Germany. 

Jack Kearns, manager of 
Moore, announced that he 
wired Jack Fugazy, general 
director of Feature Spons, 
Inc., that he would accept his 
offer of $200,(XX) to Moore to 
defend against the German. 

The National Boxing Assru 
lifted Moore's title Feb. 15 be- 
cause he had not defended 
against the No. 1 challenger, 
Harold Johnson, who Moore 
has whipped four times. 

Archie is still recognized as 
champion in New Y'ork and 
California. 


Cervantes Picked 
In Olympic Bont 


HORSES TO WATCH 
CALIENTE 

BOPEST — Next out OK. 

JOE'S DOLL — W»tc*i out for thi» 
one. 

HI GOVERNOR — Tab. Tote tor 
early action. 

EDGERMAN — In (mart hands. 

SHEHAB — My special. 

L'ELEGANT — Thit one can fly. 

THREE STAR CY — Longahot 
goodie. 

SMALL BUNDLE — From Ella- 
worth stable. 

JUST WAITING — Same for thii 
one. 

LEFT HALF — A real tieeper. 

SAirrA ANITA 

WITCH NIGHT — Fit and ready 

tor the beat. 
CIRCLE IT — stop, look and listen 
EASY STREET — dockers' special 
BOARD MEMBER — Six furlongs 

OK 
RHIN — Mile or over tab. Tote. 
BIPLANE ^ Better than rated. 
BAR PEST — My longshot special. 
FIELD DAY — At a big price. 

Keep this column for future 
reference. It appears only in 


Felix (Pel on) Cervantes, 
stablemate of World Bantam- 
weight Champion Jose Be- 
cerra, rules as a narrow 10-8 
choice to defeat San Fran- 
Nickel Boy and Promulgation, pjs^-g 51,]^ Thomas ii the to- 
night (Thursday I. ring fea- 
ture at the Olympic Audi- 
torium. 

Thomas will be risking his 
newly won California feather- 
weight crown against Cer- 
vantes. Billy, who lost a close 
decision to Pelon last Decem- 
ber, upset Danny Valdez, Jan- 
uary- 7 in a 12roirnder to cap- 
ture the title. 

Matchmaker George Pamas- 
sus hopes to bring in hard- 
hitting Paiarito Moreno from 
Mexico Citj' to meet the 
winner. 

Tomorrow night's KTL.\-TV 
main event finds Silvestre Vll- 
larreal the favorite over Gil 
Holguin in a lightweight 
skirmish. 


• BAAr • COLE • ELLINGTON • GARNER • GRANT • SINATRA • 


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362S S NORMANDIi AVE. OPEN SUNDAY 



SFSiCIALi* Make it an evening 
to remember. Sit and talk 
over tall glasses filled with 
the KING of Beers... Budweisen 
naturally! 



Where there's Life . . . there's Bud® 

ANHEaaCM-BUSCH. INC. » •T. LOUI8 » NEWAKK » LC» AN6ELE« » MIAMI » TAWf A 



$10 Trousers Free With Any 
SUIT or TOPCOAT Purchase!! 

Our Eatt.r Gift to You— A Good Looking Pair of 

$10 Trousers Absolut.ly Fro. With Any Suit or 

Topcoat Purchas. PricMi from $39 to $99 

No Cash Needed — Your Credit Is Good 

As Little as So a week pays for Jl'xi -worth of Clothes. 
Shoe,"! anri Arce.ssoriej" for Men and Bovs of all ages 
FREE CREDIT— No Interest— No Carrjiajt Char(re«— 
Free Alterations — Perfect Fit Guaranteed. See the 
new .*port Coats and Sport Trousers. Easter is 
Sunday. April 17th. E>i-eryone will Dress Up — so can 
you. Just say Charge It at the Victor Clothing Co. 

Continental & Ivy League H*c>dquarters 

New Continental Suits and Sport Coats — new Ivy 
League Suits and Sport Coat* — Trench Coat* — Rain 
Coats — Car Coats— Top Coat*. Buy any atilt and get 
$20 off the price of any topt»at or buy one suit and 
get $20 off the price of the 2nd Suit. Dresa up — go 
places — do things. Enjoy life in Bronson Clothes. 
Radios — Watches — Luggage. You nam« It, we have 
It. Trust Vs to Trust You. 40 years at the same 
address. 214 S. Boardway in Downtown Los Angeles. 

COMPLETE CLOTHIERS FOR MEN & BOYS 

Even.thing for the Boy aged 2'j to 30^— shiru', 
Hants, Jackets, suits, shoe* for Men and Bovs. 
suede coats — melton cloth coats and jackets — kid skin 
Leather jackets antf leather coaU. suede Jackeu and 
coats & jackets — shirt sets . . . shirt & Test to 
match. Leather ve.sts — cloth vests — slack tuita — 
shoes, hats, handkerchiefs, tux«<los. white coats. 
We cater to you and we do mean vou. We speak 
your language. Victor Clothing Co, Caterers to His 
Majesty, the Working Man, Come In as you are. 
You are more than welcome in your work clothes. 

FREE GIFTS FOR ALL NEW CUSTOMERS 

Park free next door as you select your new clothes 
for Easter 1960. Black suits, blue suits, grey suits 
in one-two and three button nxyjels. You get a gift 
for each customer you send or bring In. Store hours- 
9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Open Saturday nighu until 8 
p,m, — A union crew to ser\e you better. Get your 
Baster clothes now and save. 

LEO 'SUNSHINE' FON-A-ROW 

Manager of Victor Clothing Company 

214 South Broadway in 

Downtown Let Angolot, Canfomla 




GIFT 
HDDS. 

FOR 
LiDIESi 

* Watcho* 

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214 south broadway 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 

Ciothes, Shoes, Accessorios, 
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MA. 4-0801 


m 

PiRK 
FREE 
MT 
NOR 



JUSE DEBS HONORED AT COFEEE—The above young ladies ivrre 
honored at n Mother-Daughter coffee on L SC tampuf last week. The\ tall 
he presertted at the Assistance League's third annual debutante presentation. 
Seated from left: 'Sarah Bohana. Bonita Belcher, Marilyn Jacke. Sonya 
Ktese. Elayne Adams, Ethel Fuller, Pauletta Walker, Amelia Morcland, 


Delia Youna and Lonietia Fontaine. Standing: Juamla Reed, Romaine 
Boute. Era Rhodes, Carolyn Brou n, Millie Cook. Betty Leiiis, Jessie Cray, 
.Marian Blai kshear , Dnrlene Eylcs. Correta .\lcCee, Myrna Torrence and 
Claudette Higgtnbottom. — {.idains). 



In p-pparation for their 
third annual charity debu- 
tante presentation members 
of the Assistance League of 
the Stovall Foundation were 
hostesses last Saturday 
morning at a well appointed 
mother daughter coffee in 
the Town and Gown foyer 
on the campus of the Uni- 


versity of Southern Calif- 
ornia. 

More than 40 guests, in- 
cluding some of the seasons 
most talented debutantes 
who have already made 
significant contributions to 
their school, church and 
community life, were among 
those honored. 


Mrs. Annie Ruth Johnson, 
chairman of the coffee and 
Mrs. Yolande Stovall. co- 
chairman, greeted the guests 
Mrs. Venye Coporal. presi- 
dent, described the program 
of activities of the league 
for assisting the Stovall 
Foundation in maintaining 
the Stovall Home for Senior 


Citizens in East Los Angeles. 

Felicitations were also ex- 
tended by Mi.ss Pauline 
Slater and Mrs. Lillian Cot- 
ton, general co-chairman of 
the presentation, and Mrs. 
Lolita Richards, choreogra- 
pher director of the re- 
hearsals. 

Other committee members 



CEIB OFFICERS SEATED— Xetily elected officers of 
the Fans of Gaiety Club nere installed in impressive cere- 
monies last Saturday evening. Seated front from left: Velma 
.-llrcrez, proxy for^^nnie Lcne, vice president; Ruth Ifat- 
son. president: .Mildred .Miles, proxy for Lcssie Davis, 
! manual secretary, and Beatrice De Lay, treasurer. Stand- 


ing: Johnnie Black, custodian : Melvin Coleman, reporter; 

.Mar\; .inn Bayliss. business manager; Oetavia Bobo, scr- 
geant-at-arms; Freddie Brooks, installing olfteer; Bcatrief 
Mnman, recording secretary; trances I augh, <rhnplnin]; 
Jeanetle Coffery, historian and social chairman: and Mildr 
red Miles. — (Adams). 


Officers 
Seated 


present were Mmcs. Jose- 
phine Osborne, ElRae 
Griggs, Mildred Warren. 
Cleotha Provost. Barbara 
Mounts, Marion Downs 
Pierce, in charge of the 
music for tlie morning, and 
Mi.ss Ethel Bruington, 
publicity. 

Junior Leaguers who regis- 
tered the debutantes and 
presented them with dainty 
Valentine corsages whjfh 
they had made, were: Lera 
Kaalund, Alice Ray, Joy 
Jackson, Jcrole Dean Burks, 
Brenda*Sado, Janice Cald- 
well, Jacqueline Lyles, Yo- 
hantus Payne, D a v e 1 la 
Sykes, Betty Myles and 
Joyce Elliott. 

Debutantes 

Among the debutantes se- 
lected for June presentation 
are: Misses Janice Elaine 
Adams, Bonila Louise Bel- 
cher, Marion Irene Black- 
shear, Sarah Estel Bohana, 
Carolyn Ruth Brown, Delores 
Brown, Milicent Arlene Cook, 
Lonictta Antoinietta Fon- 
taine. 

Also Ethel Lee Fuller, 
Jessie Ann Gray, Claudette 
Higginbotton, Margaret Hud- 
ley, Barbara Jefferson, Mari- 
lyn Camille Jacke. Betty 
Leadra Lewis, Darlene Lyles, 
Correta Louise McGhee. He- 
len Monroe, Amelia More- 
land. Sonya Maria Reese, 
Juanita Ruth Reed, Eva 
Cardl Rhodes, Myrna Jean 
Torrence, Paulette Louise 
Walker, Lillian Teresa 
Webb, Marilyn Kaye West, 
and Theresa Mae Young. 

These young ladies fol- 
liJLwing thelTv presentation, 
will become inwribers of The 
(Continued?.' on Page 8j 


The beautiful and elegant 
residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmo DeLay provided the 
setting for the annual in- 
stallation of the Fans of 
Gaiety Club officers last 
Saturday evening. 

Freddie Brooks, a. well 
known Shriner and a past 
master of B. T. Taibolfs 
Masonic Lodge, served as 
installation officer. 

Following the ceremonies, 
the club presented the out- 
going president, Mrs. Maty 
Ann Bayliss. with a lovely 
silver covered vegetable dish 
in appreciation of her won- 
derful leadership during the 
past two years. Mrs. Bayliss 
m turn presented each mem- 
ber with a gift as a token 
of remembrance. 

Club members airranged a 
lovely dinner for visitors 
;uid their guests including: 
Mmos. Freddie Brooks, Mil- 
dred Miles. Cella Rushing 
ctnd Messrs. James Bobo, 
Alex Coffery. 

Jack Coleman, Elmo De 
L.iy. Wiiiston Jackson. John 
Marshall. Felton Moham 
and Eddie Watson. 

The hostess, Beatrice De 
Lay, pro-ed to be a lucky 
one by winning the club 
prize given at each of the 
clubs regular meetings^ 




CLUBS 


Thursday, February 25, 1960 




FASHIONS 


Th« Caiifbrtiia Eagfe— 7 


Assistance League of Stovall Home 
Selects Debutantes for Annua 



JUXE DEBUTAXTLS — Among the young ladies uho uill be presented at the third 
annual .Assistance League affair are seated front from left-: Beverly Pou'ell, Dolores 
Brown. Ka\e If est and Teresa Webb. Standing: Helen .Monroe, Barbara Jefferson and 
Margaret Iludlcy, 

Fashion-in-Orbit- Show Will 
Feature ail Original Ideas 


Sunday afternoon. March 
27. members of the National 
Association of Fashion and 
Acces.sory Designers will en- 
tertain their friends and 
other fashion-minded 
women at their "Fashion-in- 
Orbit" Show. 

Unlike the general run of 
fashion shows, this spring 
season presentation will fea- 
ture all original creations, 
many of tliem geared to- 
ward our more sensible 
taste in dress for those who 
prefer subtle elegance to 
sensational styles. 

Ideas for the show were 
discussed at length at a 
cocktail party in the home 
club member Hilda Caines. 
The_ informal group was 
delighted over the arrange- 
ments which feature clothes 
exclusively created for this 
showing. 

Johnetta Starks, president 
of the local chapter, and 
her members,„_are working 
tirelessly to present at the 
club's initial affair one of 
the most appealing show- 
ings of spring finery in 
town. 

During the afternoon shpw 
each member will be avail- 
able for consultation. Pro- 
ceeds from the show will 

Dr. Theodore Evans 
To Wed Teacher 

Mrs. Geneva 'Williamson, 
a school teacher in Greens- 
boro, N. C. is engaged to Dr. 
Theodore Evans Sr., promin- 
ent Los Angeles dentist. 

The wedding will take 
place in June in Greensboro, 

Following the ceremonies, 
the newlyweds will honey- 
moon in Mexico. 


go toward establishing a 
scliolarship fund in the 
field of dress designing and 
its related fields. 

Tickets to the show can 
be secured from such mem- 


bers as Roberta Stewart, 
Florida Morgan. Anita Bo- 
pan. Jane Gordon. Roberta 
Welch, Sara Batchlor, Inez 
Taylor, Hilda Caines and 
Roberta Stephens. 



ISSTALLATIOX SPEAKER— Atty. Lorea Miller, pub- 
lisher of the California Eagle, will address the If ilton Place 
Democratic Club. Sunday evening, Feb. 2S. at Blarney's 
(Jastle when the cjroup holds its annual installation dinner 
and seats new officers, .itty. Miller will speak on "The 
Democratic Party and Civil Riohts." Tickets can be secured 
by calling L(C:y .idams, RE. 3-36S1. 


y f7^s>il»<^c\»r^c^7%fl^<ts>^l^<^c^«l^r^{^s*»ricy)i»^ 


Bill Smallwood 


^L<;>«<9C>«<9«>«V9«>*S^«>*^^%>*<9«>*V»«>*V:3CriM»\k9«^M»V»C^« 


ATTEND KICKOFF PARTY — Friends of the local 
chapter of the National Association of Fashion and Acces- 
sory Designers are shown during a kickoff party announcing 
the group's forthcoming Fashtcms-in-Orbit Show on March 


27. Pictured seated, front, Roberta Stephens, Inez 'Taylor, 
Frank Gaines and Jane Gordon. Standing from left: Jesse 
Taylor, Bob Steward, Mary Countee of New York City, 
Herman McCoy and Johnetta Starks. 


It was an eleven pound 
son for Lucille and J. D. 
Leonard on Tues. morning. 
He'll be christened J. D. Jr. 
Grabbing an armful of jet, 
Jimmy Peck and attacjie 
case streaked back to Cape 
Canaveral to resume his 
assignment via Space Tech- 
nology Laboratories and the 
USAF on the Able-4 Thor 
solar probe. He hopes to be 
back home within the fort- 
night. Sun. is birthday time 
for Mamie Troxler. 

Sun. was birthday for 
Lillian Nelson so her daugh- 


ter, visiting Detroiter Dit 
Stevens, and her niece, 
Lucille Hopkins, put their 
attractive heads together 
and came up with a delight- 
ful dinner p>arty at the home 
of the latter. Les Daunsilles 
(they now have their state 
charter) installed their new 
officers Sun. at the home of 
Winona White Green (her 
GI husband says adios to 
the army in May). Tues. (1) 
will be Adele Weaver's na- 
tal day; her son Mike 
makes his on the 23. 
Eev. Walter Bryant, winter- 


ing here from the east grew 
weary of c .:ily traweUng our 
local dista es so he's-.taldng 
a* suite in ^ downtown 
hotel. Wear*', too. of fight- 
ing freeways is Dotti Cno- 
zier Lewis so she's put her 
Altadena house v^nth pool 
on the market and will 
move into Westside proper- 
ty. Welcome home. 

Edith Fields Smith's 
mother fell and broke her 
hip; hospitalized, she's do- 
ing nicely. LA to SF: Atty. 
Everett piorter, who^ was the 

^Continued on Page 8) 





( 

- . 

3 


1 
1 


! 

* 

1 





FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS— Among the exhibits uhirh 
highlighted the second annual Festival of the Arts shon' 
sponsored by the Avalon Community Center last Sunday 
afternoon ivcls one showing the works of the celebrated Carl 



By MARY COUNTEE 
(Guest Columnist) 

Having never been Queen for a Day, I cannot 
attest to the exact feeling of one but I have had 
the feeling of being a VIP since my arrival in your 
most hospitable town. 

Also, having a columnist for a cousin, I have 
the advantage over most visitors, I get to put in 
print about the m^ny wonderful people who have 
iDeen so lovely to me. 

A Red Orchid 

A few short hours after landing in Los Angeles 
I found mv self surrounded bv about 65 charming 
folks at the home of ZENOBIA and THOMAS 
MADDOX with "me" as the honored guest. ANITA 
BOGAN. one of your leading florists and a peach of 
a person, presented me with a gorgeous red orchid 
(I had never seen a red one before). So you see 
why I preface this with my feeling of a VIP, from 
the very day I arrived. 

Disnevland and ^notts Berrv Farm were on the 
agenda THELMA HAYES made up and I don't 
think a si.x-year-old could have had more fun than 
I seeing these two fantastic spots. 

VIVIAN DPJVER took me for a day of .seeing 
the beauty and splendor of such famous places as 
the Greek Orthodox Church, paintings in Forest 
Lawn, Wayfarers Chapel in Portugese Bend and 
ending with dinner at Marineland. 

Quick Change 

A quick change of attire on the same day and 
then off to Scandia's on the Sunset Strip where we 
were guests of Sylvanian award winner, ODETTA. 
If you haven't heard the versatile ODETTA— make 
it a must. I remember hearing her at Town Hall in 
New York and she completely captivated the audi- 
ence with her folk songs, blues, spirituals and chil- 
dren's songs. One critic acclaimed her the most warm 
and electrifying artist in the past decade. She open- 
ed at the Ashgrove on Melrose Blvd. on Tuesday. 

A very stimulating evening was spent at the 
lovely home of ELOIS DAVIS. We enjoyed talking 
with WHITNEY YOUNG, dean of Atlanta Univer- 
sity School of Social Studies, about mutual friends 
in Atlanta and Washington, D. C. Also met the 
"boss" of the Eagle, LOREN MILLER, and his 
charming wife, JUANITA. Bay area attornev and 
NAACP figure, NATHANIEL COLLEY, was "there, 
(Continued on Page 10 1 


JChile. formerly of Xctv York City, uho is now making his 
home in Altadcna. Pictured admiring works created by the 
outstanding artist are from left: Geraldine Lackey, Rev. 
Bell Hannibal and Kathcrine Tnvr. — (Adams), 

AKA'S Slate Communit/ 
Leadership Workshop 

In line with the theme of 
Alpha Kappa Alpha nation- 
ally, "New Directions for 
the Second Half Century," 
the Los Angeles graduate 
chapter of the sorority is 
sponsoring a leadership 
workshop in which all fra- 
ternal and social group 
leaders in the community 
are being asked to partici- 
pate. 

The workshop theme, "New 
Directions for Community 
Leaders," will set the tone 
of the four sessions, which 
will be held each Monday 
evening throughout the 
month of March at McCarty 
Memorial Church. ^Ifh ave- 
nue and Adams blvd., at 
7:15 in the Fellowship Hall. 
The first meeting will be 
held March 7. 

Out of this new venture 
in community participation 
it is hoped will come great- 
er insight into themanner in 
which the leadership of our 
community can contribute 
its service to strengthening 
and stabilizing the fast- 
growing Negro community. 

Invitations ha\r> been ex- 
tended to all clubs and or- 
ganizations tcC register their 
leaders and take an active 
part in this first workshop. 

Committee chairman Paith 
Pallict can be reached at 
the USO-YMCA during the 
day. AD. 2-719.3. 

Working through the Com- 
munity Participation Com- 
mittee, Alpha Gamma Ome- 
ga has arranged for work- 
shop leaders of e.xtremely 
high calibre. The first meet- 
ing will deal with the prob- 



FOOD AUTHORITIES— Zelma and Jack, newest own- 
ers and operators of BROTHERS CAFE, 4627 IVest 
Adams hlvd., northeast corner of IVest bird., combine more 
than .If? years of invaluable experience m the preparation 
and serving of the finest food for the most discriminating 
people throughout the Southwest. Zelm/i and Jack are de- 
termined to offer, to the good persons of Los Angeles, 
wholesome hot bread, homemade soup, fresh salad, garden 
fresh vegetables, plent\ of hot coffee and tea, and delicious 
dessert with ci cry lompleic dinner meal at the low, low 
price of $1.25 each. Complete breakfasts, luncheons and 
dinners are served 7 days a week, from S :00 a.m. to 10:00 
p.m. Soups, sanduiihcs and salads are their specialities. By 
all means come in and get acquainted as you buy and try 
Zelma and Jack's .MESU OF THE KEEK: Chilled 
Tomato Juice, Cold Slaw. J^asty and Lengthy OLD FASH- 
IONED CHITTERLISGS. Black Eye Peas, Piping Hot 
Iron Skillet Cornhrend. Delicious Homemade Hot Apple 
Pie Topped with Melted Cheese, and Fresh Hot Coffee or 
Tea. Zelma and Jack's BROTH EAS CAFE affords every 
family a clean, wholesome and quiet atmosphere ideally 
suited for your perfect enjoyment of every meal. No wine. 
beer or alcohol is ever served, no profanity or boisterousness 
is tolerated and every man, woman or child may rest 
assured that at long last ZELMA AND JACK definitely 
have the finest food served in surroundings that are un- 
questionably your HOME A.WAY FROM HOME. Make 
it your family's regular eating habit. Zelma and Jack sug- 
gest you make your family's reservations in advance by tele- 
phoning REpublic 4-9472. 


lems of developing leader- 
ship skills. These sessions 
will be led by two most 
able leaders, Rev. L. L. 
White and Henry Talbert. 


Links' Chairman 
Named for Confab 
Slated m Jul/ 

The Links National 'As 
sembly, to be held here on 
July 1, 2 and 3. is expected 
to attract an estimated 500 
official delegates and visi- 
tors from 8S chapters. 

The headquarters of the 
national meet will he the 
Statler Hotel. Mrs. Henr\- 
Weeden of Lynchburg, Va., 
is national president. Mrs. 
Henry R. Butler, Jr., is the 
Los Angeles chapter presi- 
dent. General convention 
cliairman is Mrs. George G. 
Smith, co-chairman is Mrs. 
Howard Allen, and cotillion 
chairman is Mrs. Gerald 
Barnum. 


PTA President 

Mrs. Charles E. Weddle. 
chairman of the nominating 
committee, announced thai 
Mrs. Clinton H. Dickison, 
safely chairman, and Mrs. 
L. Y.. Montenegro, hospitality 
bureau manager, are candi- 
dates for the office of presi- 
dent of the Los Angeles 
Tenth District PTA. 


^ Bill Smallwood 


\<$yi 


f Continued from Page 7) 
speaker during Annual 
Brotherhood Worship Ser- 
vice in that city. Iota Phi 
Lambda sorority, in which 
our Kate Garcia is a nation- 
al officer, got a very curt 
refusal from do'- n town 
Louisville hotels when they 
attempted to find a location 
for their Aug. convention; 
Kate will be flying that way 
as delegate. 

Eloped 

Nand Hart-Nibbrig, grad- 
uate student at UCLA, elop- 
ed. He and his bride are 
living at the beach. Double- 
take: That noble looking 
dog getting a daily stroll 
with JFtey Mills is a rare 
Weimaraner. Casual about 
the whole thing, Ray is 
getting a mate for it later. 
Blanche Simmons was up 
for birthday hugs last Fri. 
so she and her husband 
Johnny rounded up a rootin' 
tootin' passel of folks and 
swung out with party doin's, 
til just before sun-up. 
Johnny's gift of a watch to 
her was a thing of great 
beauty, jewels a-sparkling. 
They are spending Aug. 
between Boston and NYC 
and other parts around. 

Home from Havana and 
Mexico, Pegga Hawkins has 
plans already fOr her next 
trek. Desiree Clark cho.se 
Sat. evening for a most 
charming little sitJown sup- 
per party, one which I 
found so very enjoyable. Leo 
Draper showed all of those 
extraordinary films he took 
while wandering across 
Europe a few years ago. 
Desiree, ever her warm in- 
gratiating and serene self, 
had an unusual below-the- 
border menu, perfect for the 
chilly night; and her hearth 
glowed with an inviting 
fire. 

Jujfnita and Kelly Wil- 
liams touched stemmed 
glasses with love Tues.; it 


was anniversary time foi 
happy them. Xi Alpha 
chapter of Zeta Phi Beta 
gave their annual Girl-of- 
the-Ycar tea Sun. Dolores 
McAdoo's home will be the 
scene this Sat. for the an- 
nual rededication service of 
the Zetas' graduate chapter 
Alpha Psi. Birthdaying on 
the 4lh: Mildred McKinncy. 
To Say *Hi' 

The recently organized 
Up-to Date Civic and Char- 
ity Club had its installation 
Sun. at Pearl Green's. Elois 
Davis dined the L e n n i c 
Haytons. Toni Atkinson's 
house will be filled Sat. with 
the CCs. Bob O'Neill, a 
Tues.-at-five cocktail party 
host, had a fa.scinating 
crowd up to his eyrie over- 
looking the Hollywood free- 
way to say hi to his brother, 
Oliver, in briefly from Hono- 
lulu enroute to New Haven. 
Bob and his brother both 
wear their well made clothes 
with a kind of raffish dis- 
tinction. It was darn good 
seeing the latter once more. 
He lived here during the 
war. 

Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Mob- 
ley, to the Winter Olympics 
at Squaw 'Valley, partying 
friends at something called 
the Sugar Bowl. B r e i t a 
Chavis has ample cause for 
the renewed sparkle and her 
glow of old, yepi USC frosh 
Helena Stewart will be a 
Spring deb. If her Dad (Rex) 
is Stateside he'll fly in for 
it. If not, her brother, Rex 
Jr., will fill In in the man- 
of-the-family role. 

Revue and Dance 

Theatrical promoter Andy 
Allen presents the Fashion- 
able Girl Finals and" Dance 
featuring the Mel Williams 
Revue with Eddie Clark 
models, Sunday, March 6, at 
the Elks Auditorium, 4016 
S. Central avenue from 3:30 
p.m. to 9 p.m. 


.HAIR STYLIST WANTED- 


Intarasting Work in a Beautiful, Modarnittic, Wastslda Shop. 
Most Luerativa. Apply in Parton al tha ' 

GLAMOUR INSURED BEAUTY SALON 

501 1 W. ADAMS BLVD., AT LA BREA RE. 2-8129 



8— The California Eagle 


uhs, FsishvonsMomem^Akt'^^ 

Thursday, February 25, 1960 


Delta Establishes 
Chapter in Liberia 


Z ':>^' "^ 


Delta Sigma Theta Soror- 
ity recently esta'ilished in 
Monrovia, Liberia ■ its first 
chapter in Africa. 

The 25,000 member soror- 
ity now has 253 chapters 
in 39 states of the United 
States, including Alaska, 
and in the Republics of 
Haiti and Liberia. 

Among the eight Deltas 
comprising the new chapter 
is Mrs. Ellen Mills Scar- 
borough, Liberia's former 
under-secretary of public 
Instruction, who recently be- 
came the first woman elect- 
ed to Liberia's House of 
Representatives. , 

The second Liber'ian mem- 
ber of the new chapter is 
Miss Calista Dennis, a re- 
cent graduate of West 
Virginia State College, ngw 
employed by the Liberian 
Mission to the United Na- 
tions in New York. 

, The remaining six mem- 
bers are Americans who are 
eithc- employed in Liberia 
or whose husbands are em- 
ployed there. 

They are Mrs. Beulah Rat- 
tler Stamps of Chicago, 
president of the chaiitcr: 
Mrs. June Dwcllingham 
CuUins of Little Rock; Mrs. 
Elvi'-a Walker Palmer of 
Tuskegee. Ala.; Mrs. P. 
Juette Johnson Neal of Tus 
kegee Institute. Ala.; .Mrs. 
Elsa Jewel Proctor Hines of 


NAACP Head 
Gets Scroll 
From Count/ 

High commendations for 
his distinguished <'ivic lead- 
ership were extended to 
Edward D. Warren, well- 
known south Los Angeles 
business man and commun- 
ity leader as County Super- 
vi.sor Kenneth Halin this 
week presented him with a 
resolution scroll from the 
Board of Supcrvi.sors. 

In his resolution, Super- 
vi.'.or Hahn pointed out that 
before coming to Los An- 
geles County in 1943, Warren 
1aup;ht school for several 
years in Texas and 
Arkan.sas. 

.Since coming to Los An- 
geles County, "Edward D. 
Warren has contributed sig- 
nificantly to the welfare of 
the people by actively work- 
ing for and supporting 
better schools, parks, play- 
grounds, and swimming 
pools, roads and storm 
drains," the resolution re- 
cited. 

Supervisor Hahn said that 
Warren, recently elected pre 
sidcnt of the Los Angeles 
Chapter of the National As- 
sociation for the Advance- 
ment of Colored People, had 
been a moving force in the 
improvement and develop- 
ment of many community 
impro\ements including 
Roo.se\'elt park and other re- 
creational facilities. 


Friendl/ Sixteen 
In Regular Meet 

The "Eriend'y Sixtcens'' 
held their regular monthly 
meeting at the home of Mrs. 
Esther Alexander. 

The members carried out 
the St. Valentine motif by 
exchanging valentine cards 
with each other. 

The highlight of the after- 
noon was the celebration 
of Mrs. Lucille Bufford's 
birthday. She was the out- 
going president. 

Mrs. Bufford was present- 
ed with a beautiful gift 
and cards from the members. 


Washington, D. C; and Mrs. 
Gertrude La Verne Gross 
Tyler of New York City. 
I 

Aiumni 

Slate 

Dinner 

The Southern California 
Chapter of Howard Univer- 
sity Alumni Association 
plans to celebrate the ob- 
ser\ance of Charter Day at 
a dinner on Wednesday, 
March 2, at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Hollywood Room of the 
Holl>-wood - Knickerbocker 
Hotel. 1714 N. Ivar Street. 

Reservations are available 
at S5.50 per person, and 
may be obtained by \\Titing 
to P. O. Box 39032 Greemead 
Station, Los Angeles 59. 

Guest speaker will be Di". 
Paul Lawrence, Superintend- 
ent of the Willowbrook 
School District. Dr. Lawrence 
received his Bachelor's De- 
gree from New Jersey State 
Teacher's College, his Mas- 
ter's and Doctorate from 
Stanford University. From 
1918 1956 he was assistant 
professor of education and 
assistant in the counseling 
service at Howard Univer- 
.sit\'. 

Officers elected to spear- 
head the year's activities 
are: Dr. Lincoln W. Shumate, 
presiden'; C. Harreld Rose, 
vice president; Inez Fuller 
\\'aulls, secretary; Dr. Mayo 
DcLilh-. treasurer and Atty. 
Albert Matthews, parliamen- 
tarian. Committee Chairman 
arc: .\tty. Doris Thomas, 
program and planning; .^tty. 
Sherman W. Smith, member; 
ship; Dr. Raymond W. John- 
son, social; Dr. Ross Miller; 
wa\s and means; Anderson 
L. Coleman Jr., p u"b 1 i c 
relations. 

The group's immediate pro- 
jects include a spring dance,' 
a beach party and a summer 
boat ride. More serious and 
long range projects are the 
establishing of a scholarship 
fund, and the erecting of 
a Howard University Alumni 
House in Los Angeles. Those 
who are new in the area 
and eld alumni who have 
lost contact are urged to 
apply for membership to 
the above P. O. Box. 

Mrs. Rowland 
Presents Life 
Membership 

An honorary life member- 
ship award was made to 
Arthur F. Neve, director of 
Agencies Division, Welfare 
Federation, Los Angeles area, 
for his judicious leadership 
of the 'Welfare Federation 
and for his cooperation and 
assistance with parent- 
teacher work. 

The award was presented 
h\- Mrs. Dorothy L. Rowland, 
cli.iirman, who pointed out 
that Neve -began his PTA 
work in Fresno where he 
served as vice president and 
program chairman of a local 
a.'sociation. More recently, 
his interest has been in the 
vast welfare work of Tenth 
District PTA, which is a Com- 
munity Chest agency. 

Benefit Show 

A group of friends are 
planning a benefit for Stuff 
Crouch this Sunday after- 
noon at the Elks Auditorium 
from 5 p.m. until 10 p.m. 



Complete P^fty Needs 
frem Abbejf Rents! 



Folding Chairs 
Banquet Tables 
Bridge Tables ; 

Ctiina — Silver | 

Glassware— Linen ; 
Portable Bars ' 

Punch Bowls & Cup< 
Tents and Canopies 


10^ X 

R^TES \ 



Wibhir* 
South Sid* 
Hollywood 
Bavorly Hills 
Inflow oed 
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N. Hollywood 


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HO. 24924 
Ol. 2-Z760 
OR. 7-6171 
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Ent L A. 

Whinior 
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SY. 5-7041 
RA. 3-9571 1 
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TO. «-1714l 
HE 2-2973 1 
Kl 5-1181 
NA. 9-4138 


ABBEY 

HEMIS_ 

iAlli llltlTAL% 



HONORED FOR SI Rl ICE— County Supenisor Ken- 
neth Hahn presents srrnll to Miss .Miriam .Matthfws ior 
her many )rr,rr nl srrvirr with the Exposition Community 
Coordmnimq C'lumtl. Miss .Mattheus recently retired as 
rrnion/il liiirnruin i',r the South Central area. She has been 
'i I live in eoordiniittiui totiruil ^..ort srncr 1934 and she 
>cr-,ed m president r.i the Lxpostti'jn Council in 1050-51. 


Full Social Calendar Set 
For CIAA Greensboro Event 


GREENSBORO. N C. A 
merry round of social activi- 
ties is being planned for fans 
attending the 25th annual 
CIAA Basketball Tourmiment 
being played here Feb. 25-27. 

The national meetings of 
Guardsmen, Inc.. whiih is 
expected to dr.iw more than 
10(1 members and their 
guests from all along the At- 
lantir Seaboard, will high- 
light the social events. 

The social program for 
that organization calls for 
an annual formal on Friday 
night at the High Point 
Armorv', annual meeting and 
brunch on Saturday at the 
Forest Lake Country Club 
and a smaller sdcial event 
on Saturday night in the 
Exposition' Room of the 
Greensboro War Memorial 
Coliseum, scene of the tour- 
ney. 

Several other events are 
scheduled for the Forest 
Lake Country Club, includ- 
ing the CIAA Luncheon for 
members of the press, radio 
and television and coaches 
and officials of the confer- 
ence. That is to be held at 
11:30 a.m.. on Thursday. 

The countrN' club will fea- 


Debutantes 

(Continued from Page 7> 
Junior .Assistance League of 
the Sto\'all Foundation. The 
1960 committee hopes to e\ 
ceed the SHOO donation 
given to the Home from the 
proceeds of the 1959 presen- 
tation. 


ture a floor show and danc- 
ing nightly, Thursday 
through Saturday. 


Compton NAACP 
Plans Banquet 

Compion Branch N.AAfP 
officers will be installed 
Friday, Feb. 26, at the Abra- 
ham Lincoln Elementary 
School, 701 Tamirand in 
Compton. 

Louise Beavers, star of 
film and TV, will be the 
guest speaker at the Comp- 
ton installation banquet- 
Tickets to the affair may 
l)e.<^)Jained from the follow- 
ing, places: Paul Beverly, 
diaitrtan. NE. 2 3722; Atty. 
Ifey i,undy, 527 W. Compton 
bl\-d.; Hills Music and Dance 
School, 214 Omipton blvd.; 
and Talley Ho Dielicatessen, 
401 W. Rosecrans. 


Explorer Post 
Elects Prexy 

Jimmie Mukes was elected 
president of Explorer Post 
536.x last Tuesday at Bel- 
Vue Communitj- Church. 
prior to the registering of 
the boys of the post for 
the yea-- I960. 

Other officers elected were 
Lawrence Smith. \ice presi- 
dent: Dwayne Bry-ar.t. secre- 
tar\ : Larnell Swancy, trea- 
surer; Michel Lacy, serge- 
ant -ai-a-ms: Wilbur Miller, 
reporter; and Rodney Wat- 
son, quarter master. 


FREE STEREO • 4-SPEED PHONOGRAPH OF YOUR CHOICE 


from DRAB a a a-to DAZZLING! 


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No Obliga»ien-«ift Racerd-4-SpcMJ PImnograpti o< Y»«r CiMico 

CALL BR. 2-7901 



with 




L Mix capuila con- 
twits and liquid. 

2. Apply ts hall wttl 
applicatoi. 

I. Let davalop . 


f*n Larieuse 
Haircolor 


Would you tr«de an hour for h«ir 
like this profecsiontl roodel'i? 
One hout is mil it talcei for 
Godefroy'» Larieuse Haircolor 
to bring back youth to gray, dull 
or faded hairl 

Everythiag you need i» in the 
famous red dox. Get Gedefroy'a 
long-laating Larieuse now' 


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NC 

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libra - 

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in 


ted 
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ire h. 
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for 




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l«4 


DIUIREESE AT CLOISTER MAR. 2 


B«llll'iiiilillll;il!lllfflKIIIHllllll«lill!tt;ii;:;iiWi:i||T» r'iniS' 


l"'lli;ill;:!!llllltllllll!lliilMliHIUbli<. 


SOUNDTRACK 


njoith 


*Chazz' Crawford 



liniMMiiiiicaiiiiiiiasiiiiiiiiiiinfflMBBiiiiiMiiiiii 

NOTES OF AN INNOCENT BARSTANDER 

MARIE BRYANTS telegram to LENA HORNE the day 

foUowinR the ashtray hurling was "Shalom, Darling. Shalom" 
. . . Shalom is Jewish for Peace! . . . The benefit for JESSE 
BELVIN ddint come off. His family didn't like the way it 
was being handled and vptoed the affair. There may be 
something for his folks later 



Manchester & Broodway 
PL. 4-3141 

COMING ONE SHOW ONLY 

SAT. MIDNITE 
Feb. 27 SHOW! 


STARTS 11:30 P.M. 


ALL SIATS 90c 


SO UARY— we OARf YOU' 
MI IHRU IT All— AND YOU WIN 


FREE 


? fOR 1 


PASS 


ID A FUTURE MOVK 


ON STAGE 


NEW! DIFFERENT! 

NOT IIK{ OTHf R STAG! SMOWSI 
NOT MOVIIil 


HAVE SEEN THIS KIND OF SHOW 

miver,j::1«„auve! 

100 TIMES SCARIER FOR REAL ! 


ALIVE! 


with other people in charge. 

. . . When Senator JACK KfN- 

NEDY dropped into that 

"summit meeting ' ar the 

Sands in Vegas, JOEY BIS- 
HOP advised him if he got lo 

be prez to make SAMMY 

DAVIS the ambassador to 

Israel . . . PHYLLIS POWE 

and MARY BARGE are the 

two luscious models hired b\' 

CLENWOOD distilleries as 

consumer consultants. The.\' 

can sen.e 3 clubs por week! 

. . . likker huckster FRANK- 

LYN brought it all about! . . . 

Folksinger ODETTA returned 

to the ASHGROVE at 3 times 

her former salary when she 
I appeared there some months 

ago. JEAN NOEL, former press [-[otp] 
; relations gal for the .A-ili- 

grove has deserted the cx- 

presso house to manacje the 
I singer. . . . .Anyone who saw 
. GE theater last Sunday has j^^^. 

to admit (and why not • that d^u^ ,,,,., loj^,,.^,^ ,,.„h such 

SAMMY DAVIS, JR. did a ,„„ ,,,,,„j, ^^ ^'at Cole, Roy 

Feld and: 
Oklahoma 


Vocalist 
A Return 
Favorite 

Delia Reese, one of the top 
sellers of song, and comic 
Gary Morton, open at the Clo 
ister. Wednesday. March 2 
for a three-day engagement 

In the past .\ear, Delia has 
sk.\ rocketed to stardom via 
her many hit recordings, tele- 
\ision. motion pictures and 
club appearances. 

Delia has made many top 
sellers including "Don't You, 
Know" and "And That Re- j 
minds Me. " She has appeared 
with Ed Sullivan si.x times 
and is set to do an equal' 
number of guestings on the i 
l>opular (.'BS show. Al.so. she | 
has gucsiod on Patti Pages' 
"Big Reco-d." ! 

Two >ears ago she made 
her film debut in Columbia's! 
"Let'.s Rock" and the previous 
>ear \^ as \oled "the most, 
promising girl singer" hy the 
Disk Jockeys of America. Juke- I 
bo.\ operators. Billboard, Cash '■ 
Box and Variety. j 

Everybody's Favorite ' 

Her club dales include such 
cafes as the Fountaiiicbleau 
Hotel m Miaini Beach; Latin' 
Casino in Philadelphia: Clojs- i 
ter, Blaek Or<'hid. and Mister j 
Kelle.\'s iti Chicago, El Moi" 
occo in .Montreal, to name a 



Vienna Choir 
In Concert at 
Philharmonic 


card to your councilman could 

bring an investigation of the 

senseless beatings and kill- 

T,. , ,..., , , iiRs of Negroes by the police? 

Those charmmg little good- ' sHAKE UP - As mum as it 

will ambassadors, "The Vienna is, a big stake up in one of 

Choir Boys," will be at the j the top medical centers re 


Thursday, February 25, 1960 


The California Eagle— 9 


PEOPLE & PLACES 

DIDJA KNOW — That a sim walk down the aisle with 
pie thing like a 3 cent postal Arnett Bruce in Oakland come 

(Continued on Page 10) 


Philharmonic Auditorium on 
Februarv 


suited in the one involved 
i moving to new Wcstside 


/.\ COS CERT— J a 

prnuipdl ti ii'ir nf thr 


Id-rcnr 
MctriipnUtnri Ofcri. 
In/7 (.irijiif) nf nine 


lined s'lnqrr and 

, is n inciiilirr of 

t ( Irlniilrd f'n ill 


iiiul inUrunniital artists under thr dirritt'in nf 11 illKim 11. 
Si hade, u lin lull frrlnrrn tun siiiirssirr enmirts ol inrrly- 
htiird Bill It Silri tiniis nn the Miirv limn .h lifts Si rir\ m thr 
Siiutii M null 11 (,r,:r mid ihr I'hlthin iiinirr .1 nilit'iruiin at 
S.Jil J- ndiiy itnd Siitindny nii/htf. Mnirh 4 mid 5. 


Saturday evening, rt-uiuarx , q^j^^f^^^j,, 

27. This is the sixteenth dif ; p^^y JOHNSON - Top Ari- 
ferent group of youngsters ^^.^^ ^^^^ representative 
froni Austt-ias musical cap. .^ed h.s flashy Renault 
taltotourtheU.S. since 1932.1 f,o^ Phoenix to L. A. in T 

The winning ways and in- hrs., to be on hand for the 
comparable singing of these Shriners affair the other eve. 
boys, aged 8 to 14, contri While here he caught Lena 
butes more toward spreading Home at the Grove. With the 
international goodwill than personable Dorothy Barranick 
any number of diplomats with on his arm, he fractured the 
their Homburgs and sober waiters by paying SIO.OO to 
faces. , display his t-ompany's brand 

Their program consists of on his front row center table! 
religious .songs, Austrian and ARNOLD HOFFMAN — Own 
Viennese walt/.es and folk er of the popular Arnolds 
songs. They will al.so present Liquor stores was among the 
one of the enchanting oper- opening day crowd attending 
ellas. which is always a hap- ''he Winter Games al Squaw 
il.N- anticipated feature of Valle>-: 
their concerts. ; HARRY CAREY — He will 



MILES n.U IS. mternn- 
tmiially-inninus jnzz trumpet 
.pln\rr, liill iipptnr in ron- 
irrt rJ thr Shrinr Auditnr- 
iii'ii. !^i;ti/t iii:y , I'ehntary 27. 
J nun II u till Miles Dmi! 
(Juintit III the Shrine will 
hi The Afndirn J/:zz Qunr- 
/. /. Jiukie mid Rn\ Krai and 
thr Paul Uo'n Oiiintrt. 


top 


FIRST TIME HERE! 


sweetheart of a joh as "The Hamilton. Irving 
Pat.sy " . . . Incidentally, starred at the 
Sammy joined the Negro 
(Continued on Page lili 



State Fair. 

Comic (iar.v Morton began 
his career as a musician, 
playing trumpet at New '^'ork 
resort hotels during the sum- 
mer months. It was after his 
discharge froin the Arm.v he 
began seriously to contem- 
ilale a career as a humorist. 
Versatile Performer 

His first professional ap 
pearance as a comic was at 
a small New Jersey night 
spot. Since he has pla.sed 
such engageinenls as the Chez 
Parce in Chii-ago: Elegante in 
Brookl\ri: Flamingo in Las 
Vegas; Latin Casino in Phi, 
adelphia; .\tlanlic Cit>-'s Steel 
Pier: El .Morocco in Montrea 
to name a feu-. 


Audrey p. Franklyn offers 

an evening of memorable song 
with the divine talents of . . . 

Mahalia 

Jackson 

Wednesday Night, March 2nd, 8:30 p. m. 

tha beautiful Santa Monica Civic Aud. Pico & Main 

TIcktK— 53.75. S3.f.O. 52. 5U. SJ.OO Sanu Monici Civic Tlrkrt Otfir«. So. C«I, Musit 
Co., 737 8. Hill, and all MulutJ Agenclei. Call MA, 3*1144 (or your nearbst lieney. 

0-6776 or EX. 3-9961 for ticket reservations 


ISH'S SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 

Randaxvous •( Centanrad Cliirki 

-HEADQUARTERS FOR FUN LOVERS— 

2851 CRENSHAW at 29th St. 

FINEST DRINKS - CRISP CHICKENS 

CHARCOAL STEAKS 


BARRY S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

2636 CRENSHAW BLVD. 

FINE FOOD - SUPERB COCKTAILS 

GOOD FOOD BY CHEF PEARLINE HOPPS 

BARTENDER TONY CASINO 

JACK FREEMAN NELLIE MINOR 

Manager Hostess 



TOP 4 
RECORDS 

SAM'S 
RECORD SHOP 

5162 W. Adams Blvd. 

"Behind the Door" 

Vernon Green 

"Peace of Mind" 

Willie Hoyden 

"Earth Angel" 

Penguins 

4. "Best Party Fun" 

Redd Foxx 


1. 

2. 
3. 


EDWIN PEARL PRESENTS 

1959 SYLVANIA AWARD WINNER and 
VANGUARD RECORDING ARTIST . . . 

ODETTA 

Plus 

BILLY FAIER - Banjo Virtuoso 

TWO WEEKS ONLY - Tuesday, February 23, Thru 

March 6th — Tickets Now on Sale at 

Ashgrove, $2.00 

THE ASHGROVE CONCERT CABARET 

8162 MELROSE, HOLLYWOOD 

Reservations: OL 3-2070 


HOLLYWOOD FLIPPED-SO LAS VEGAS PAID MORE DOUGH 

FOR THE SWINGINGEST SHOW ON ENTERTAINMENT ROW . . . Starring 

LEROY 'SLOPPY' DANIELS 

* Cothy 'Yo-Yo' Cooper * Lottie, 'Aifss Body' * Christine Chapman's Band 


MAKE RESERVATIONS BY TELEPHONING: DUdley 4-7725-LAS VEGAS, NEV. 


New EL MOROCCO CLUB, 1332 'r St.; Us Vegas, Nov. 


■MAKE A DATE TO GET STRAIGHT BCHINDm 


+ WILDCAT CHATMAN 

"CADILLAC SPECIAL" 

+ BILLY and PEGGY . : 


+ MEDALLIONS 

"MAGIC MOUNTAIN" 

African Cuban Dancesations 

TALENT SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY - GUEST STARS WELCOME - DANCINO 

3 BIG SHOWS NITELY ■ NO MINIMUM - NO COVER 

JAZZVILLE CLUB - 5510 Holywood Blvd. & Western - HO. 5-1806 

Plenty of Free Parking on Western Ave. Just North of Hollywood Blvd. HO. 5-1806 H 


.JIMMY MADDIN PROUDLY PRESENTS NITELY. 

TERRY GIBBS 

"MR. VIBES HIMSELF" 

PLUS TWO STELLAR ENTERTAINERS 


• AL McKIBBIN 

Former Bassist with Duke Ellington 


• MARY ANN McCALL 

Everybody's Favorite Voctalist 


UMSPrAKABLE 
HORROR! 



MONSTERS CAPTURE 
OIRLS FROM AUDIENCE 


GIRLS! 

BfttNC AN iscotn 
10 noncT YOU 

WHEN THE UGHTS 
GO OUT' 


DON'T DARE 
SEE IT 

ALONE! 


PLUS SCREEN SHOW! 


MIDNITE SPOOK SHOW 

SAT., FEB. 27, 11:30 P.M. 

SEE AD ON THIS PAGE 

FAMILY NIGHT 
EVERY TUESDAY 


50c 


ADULTS «*\/V» CHILDREN 

UNDER 12 YEARS OF AGE 

FREE WHEN ACCOMPANIED 
BY PARENTS 


a T ■ T 1 



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ADULTSi 

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SUN. ONLY 


CHILDREN 


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CONTINUOUS SAT., SUN. 1 

- 3 TERRIFIC MOVIES 


P.M. 


STARTS FRIDAY 
"THE VAMPIRE" 

"HOUND OF THE 
BASKERVILLES" 

'MAD MAGICIAN" 


DllJ.I RUSK and rniinr 
Car\ Mnrinn nprn n ihree- 
'lierk en'/ni/i 1114111, Miir. 2, 
at thr Cinistrr. 



Alpha Service Invites You to . . 
Put your best looks forward 
on all festive occasions 


* Dyeing * Weaving 
Alterations * Repairing 


Careful Cleaning * Delivery on Request 


4J ne ^/^Ipha 4^( 


435 E: VERNON AVE. 

MNKPms i vnv JA Ti s r v i Na 1 — 


eyvicc 


AD.^-9363 


CHOICE DRINKS • DELICIOUS FOOD • DANCING 

Everyone's Making it to Jimmy Maddin's fabulous 

SUNDOWN CLUB 

6507 SUNSET BLVD. at Wilcox ^^ ^ ovvi 

FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE HW- A^HMM 1 

ENJOY CHOICE COCKTAILS - FINE FOOD - ENTERTAINMENT AT 

LEE ROY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 47th & CENTRAL 

Featuring Fashions at Lunch Time Every Wednesday 12 Noon 'Til 2 P.M. 

P Al 1. BRYANT TRIO OPENS FRI.. >IAR. 4 

LEE ROY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 47th AND CENTRAL 

BOB ASHLEY - SLIM MATHIS - GRADY JENNINGS, Mixologists DICKIE BARROW, Chef 


PLAYMATE — Imnr,ene 
(jnea. nnii' apprarin// at thr 
Pnsndrnn Plnyhnuse in "I'lir 
Inurpnstrr, ' in-stars ^iith 
King Dn/iniiin tn thr j-art 
tiLO ihnrnitcr cnniedy de- 
picting the familiar fun, 
farce, and fruitratinn r,f last- 
mi; loic end marriage. 


Hotel Watkins & Rubaiyat Room 

to see, hear and en joy 

Entertainment Mon.-Ttiur.-Fri.-Sat.-Sun. 

] WE TAKE PRIDE IN OUR EXCELLENT I 

; FOOD AND TOP MIXIOLOGISTS 

HOTEL WATKINS 

2022 WEST ADAMS BOULEVARD, AT WESTERN 

BILL WATKINS, Prop. RE. 2-8111 



* • 


For Your Delight . . . Every Night . . . 

BERT 'Organist' KENDRIGKS' TRIO 


Featuring TONY BAZLEY, Drums and WILLIAM GREEN, Reeds 

TENOR 


ATTEND MARTY'S 

SUNDAY "YAWNING" SESSIONS 

and SUNDAY fVENINO MATINEES 


(ALTO 


FLUTE) 


MARTY'S 58th & BROADWAY 



FREE INFORMATION Contact "CEIES" K/NG, I// 

4233 CENTRAL 


BAIL BONDS 


AD. 3-6161 
24 Hr. Service 




Treat Your Family to the BEST . . . EAT FOR LESS at 

COLLINS' RESTAURANT t 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 


• PRIVATE DINING ROOM • GOTHAM ROOM 
4771 W. ADAMS »t PALM GROVE 


OOURMET ROOM 
KE. 1-2030 


COMMITTEE INCLUDING EDDIE 'ROCHESTER' ANDERSON, 'DOT' McGEE & CELESTUS KING PRESENTS 
ALL STAR BENEFIT DANCE-CONCERRT FOR JULIUS 'STUFF' CROUCH 

Sfarri-ng DINAH 'Blues Queen' WASHINGTON 

ROY MILTON'S ORK. * EDDIE 'ROCHESTER' ANDERSON * MABEL SCOTT * SCATMAN CROUTHERS * JOHN Ti 
* PENGUINS * RUDY RAY MOORE * JEAN VEGAS * WILLIE HAYDEN * 'STUFF' SMITH * BEN WEBSTER 

* BENNY CARTER * VERNON GREEN * MEDALLIONS 

ELKS BALLROOM, 4016 SO. CENTRAL, SUN., FEB. 28-5 to 10 PM 



10-The California Eagle 


Thursday, February 25, 1960 '^'~ 


Dorothea Foster 

(Continued from Page 8) 

Chicago visitor BOB COLEMAN and others. We 
plan to join ELOIS again on Feb. 28 at Blarney's 
Castle for the installation dinner of the Wilton 
Place Democratic Club. Atty. LOREN MILLER will 
be guest speaker. 

Clubbing Date 

Our "clubbing" date with VIRGINIA JOHN- 
SON included the Cloister with DINAH WASH- 
INGTON and DAKOTA STATEN, GEORGE 
SHEARING at the Crescendo. 

It was fun lunching with HARRIETTS JOHN- 
SON at FRANK SINATRA'S cozy restaurant, 
Puccini's in Beverly Hills. Sorry I 'won't be here 
for HARRIETTE'S Lingerie show on March 20 at 
the Moulin Rouge but I did see all of the pretties 
that she will be showing. There was a $200 gown 
(to sleep in, no less) that I would love to have and 
it was a dream. 

Had dinner with XERNONA CLAYTON at the 
Beverly Hilton and saw the beautiful International 
Ballroom where the AKA formal ''will be held on 
March 12. Wish I could be here but THELMA 

HAYES and I will be sf^eing romantic Acapulco, 
Mexico on March 12. XERNONA left for a vaca- 
tion in Chicago on Friday. 

Such Nice People 

When Y\'ONNE WILLIAMS entertained the 
Talley Pals at luncheon on Saturday. I met such 
nice people as GLORIA ROBERTS "(GLORIA stu- 
died music at Julliard in New Yortc), CAROL 
GENTRY. MARJORIE TOWLES (she is now MRS. 
JAMES E\^ANS) and her father-in-law, Mr. FRED 
EVANS of Terre Haute. Ind., who is visiting his 
daughter HARRIETTE SHIELDS. 

Sunday evening Y\'ONNE and her hubby 
EVAN (they will be parents in May) entertained 
U S at d inner. My cousin JIM SCOTT and his wife 
BETTY joined us along with San Franciscan folks 
JOE and LURLENE ZACHERY. EUGENE 
(Continued on Page 12i 




PERFECT[0}i ISTS — Intematinnnllx ncrlnimrd as the qrenieft expnnfnts of modern 
intz are ihr fnshinnahle four nhore, hrtter knoun ff.f thr MJQ or Modern .Inzz Quar- 
tet, uho T^ill afpenr in concert nt the Shrme Auditorium Saturday, Fehrunry 27th, along 
x<ith the equal! \- Ulu^triou* inzz trumpeter , M ilrs Dr.-i^: nho the siTjinij and fxvinging 
Jackie and Rov Krai and the solid Paul Horn Quintet. Plfnt\: of prize pasteboards are 
still on hand for this arand date that u'Ul set \ou straiaht. BFy TIfRRK! " ' ! 


■SEE - HEAR - ENJ01 
COMING MARCH 7n6 - DILLA REESE 

OPENING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2 

DELLA REESE 

^ -^ GARY MORTON 

Reservations — OL. 7-1510 

It's IS to sumij at 

the oloistor 

sunset strip ol. 7-1510 



FOOD AVTlinRITll.S—Zelma and Jark, neue<t own- 
ers and operators of ^BROTHERS CAFE. 4627 IVest 
Adams bhd., northeast corner of If est b/id.. lomhme more 
than 50 years of tni aluable experience in the pre paralion 
and serving of the finest food for the most disinminattng 
people throughout the Southu'est. Zelma and Jack are de- 
termined to offer, to the aond persons of Los Angeles, 
u holesome hot bread, homemade soup, fresh salad, garden 
fresh vegetables, plenty of hot coffee and tea, and delicious 
dessert H'tth ever\ complete dinner meal at the loii\ low 
price of $1.25 each. Complete breakfasts . luncheons and 
dinners are served 7 days a ueek, from S :00 a.m. to 10:00 
p.m. Soups, sanduiehet and salad' are their specialities. By 
all means come in and get acquainted as \ou buy and try 
Zelma and Jack's MEW. OF THE irPEK: Chilled 
Tomato Juice. Cold Slate-. Tasty and Lei gthy OLD FASH- 
IONED CHITTERLINGS. Black Eye Peas, Pipmg Hot 
Iron Skillet Cornhread. Delicious Homemade Hot Apple 
Pie Topped uith Melted Cheese, and Fresh Hot Coffee or 
Tea. Zelma and Jacks BROTHERS CAFE affords every 
family a clean, u-holesome and quiet atmosphere ideally 
suited for your perfect enio\ment of every meal. Xo uine, 
heer or alcohol is e% er served, no profanity or hoisternusness 
U tolerated and every man. iioman or child may rest 
assured that at long last ZELMA AND JACK definitely 
htve the finest fond ser<ved m 'urmundincs that are un- 
questionably '.our HOME AWAY FROM HOME. Make 

it your family's regular eatina habit. Zelma and Jack sug- 
gest you make your family's re^er- atmns in advance by tele- 
phtning REl'uhlie 4-0472. 


s^'-hf'lli'fi Your \frt Affair nt thf 

ZENDA BALLROOM 

LARGEST DOWNTOWN DANCE rLOOR 

05? W, 7th ST. fOPPOSITE STATLER WOTELl 

REASONABLE RENTS— CALL E. BOHLEN, HO. 4-64V6. MA. 9-9384 

Aviilabi* for Ren>3i% 03"c»i. Wedding Receotions. etc. 



People 

(Continued from Pag«^ 9) 
March 27 and then back here 
to hve' 

HILLTOPPERS — They could 
' n't get a mumbling note out 
of Dinah Washington when 
she attended their affair but 
she flew all the way from 
New York to sing for the 
and Rinke\-dinks affairs ! 
NAT COLK — S. F. Masons 
refused to rent their hall for 
his appearance claiming tJnat 
they didn't like the nrowd he: 
attracts which could include 
the Henry Fords, vou know! I 
BAILEY & SONS — The found 
er of the pioneer California j 
business which dates backi 
many, many years came from 
his Newhall home to renew! 
acquaintances with his old; 
friends in Cotton Liquor Store j 
on west 35th and Western ; 
avenoo the other a.m.! | 

PRETTY PAIR — Correctly at- i 
tired in fstshionable originals,! 
topped with expensive mink 
cape stoles, our own Society] 
Editor, Dorothea Foster, and \ 
her curvaceous cousin, Mary] 
"N. Y.'s Finest" Countee, made 
drivers weak as they halted 
traffic at its peak when they 
attended the fabulous Sunset 
Strip cocktail party of the 
Vanguard Reoord Society for 
the foremost folk singers. 
MARIE HOLMES — Along 
with Charles D'Antiqnac, June 
Smith and Marietta 'Williams 
of Chicago are toasting bar- 
tender Mac Newman in the 
Sportsmen's Club because he's 
not going to take that tripl 

DESIREE MILES — Smooth 
cocoa brownskin law major; 
is setting her sights on a de- 
gree from Hastings Law Col- 
lege in S. F. While going to 
school she works as a librar- 
ian at the 'Vernon Branch! 
THELMA LEE — Les Beau 
Dames club member who de- 
signed all the costumes for 
her club's affair is toying 
with the idea of going into 
business after so many offers, 
from some of Hollj-wood's i 
top manufacturers of wo- 1 
men's wear! 

POTENTATE — After the 
Shriner's show was over, Mou- ; 
lin Rouge waiters handed | 
him a bill of $35.00 and be- 
cause of his height he didn't 
have such a long drop! 
TONY ATKINSON — That 
gorgeous group finding its 
uay to the St. Andrews Place 
addres.s and exciting the Sat. 
afternoon gardeners in the 
1200 block on St. Andrews 
Place were making it to the 
C. Cees club meet! 
GREAT LAKES — That six 
foot fence going up in the 
Country Club district is an- 
nouncing that the pooJ will 
be in use come the hot days! 
HUCKSTERS — They will 
hold their fourth meeting 
come March 3, at the Golden 
Mirror, the first since they 
reorganized! 

MAYORS CONFERENCE — 
Joseph Mayor of Melody' Ad- 
ams, KRKD's record favorite 
nightly from 12 midnight to 2 
in the yawning, had as his 
in person guest the erstwhile 
ex-mayor of Harlem, Willie 
Bee' Br>-ant whose radio 
show Is all the go from 10 
p.m. to 12 midnight over KA 
LL Such intelligence and 
(Continued on Page 12) 


■Phil Gordon Makes the- 


NEW YORK SCENE 


The Show Must Go On 

It is cold and the March winds are a little previous here 
in New York, and almost everyone has some version of the 
grippe or flu. so clear sounding voices are a rarity either on 
the phone or off. However, this has not caused any slack in 
the activities on the social front, so here goes nothing. 
'Cemdy Ball' a Sweet Success ■''• 

On Sunday night in the j Ellington and his orchestra. 
Louis XVI Suite of the Wal- The gals of the club, starting 
dorf Astoria Hotel, the Bon ' from the President, L'Tanya 
Bons had their formal, "Candy ^ Griffin, and including all the 
Ball." with the music for' very glamorous and lovely 
dancing played by Mercerl (Continued on Page 12) 


(Continued from Page 9) 
Artist Guild piloted by MAG- 
GIE HATHAWAY figuring 
that his illustrious name as 
a member might give the Ne- 
gro actors a bettor shake in 
their quest for better roles. . . . 
When you hear JOHNNY NASH 
sing "I Am Just A Little Boy 
Looking For A Little Girl" 
you'll know that's what he 
"means! . . . JACK THOMP- 
SON ,1ust purchased the air 
tickets to Texas to show his 
pals there is no doubt about 
him marrying that luscious i 
Dallas school teacher. 

Singer TOMMY YOUNG- 
BLOOD and his Solid Senders 
orche.stra provide Blue Mon- 
day entertainment at the 
House of Morgan at 1316 East 
Olympic Blvd. (and there's 
the address! . . . Jazz singer 
CARMEN MACRAE include? 
in her repertoire "I Remem- 
her Clifford " in tribute to the 
latp CLIFFORD BROWN . . . 

Screen actors are being ex- 
tremely wary about piving 
out information about future 
movie plans because of the 
strike that's scheduled for 
March. . . . Everyone com- 
pletely overjoyed at JUANITA 
MOORE'S Acad em v Award 
nomination. Rea.son: Not only 
is she a great talent, she's 
also a ver>- sweet person. 


DAVID BOUBION — He stole 

;a mat'^h on Gilbert Lindsay. 
As field depntv- for Council- 
man E(i Roybal he arranged 
for the councilman to p'-esent 
the Shriners a Cit>' resolution 
of salute during their Star of 
Stars show the other night. 
Lindsay is field deputy to 
Supervisor Hahn and is al-o 
the illustrious potentate of the 
Shriners! 


THE ONE AND ONLY 

MILES DAVIS 
QUINTET 

MODERN JAZZ 
QUARTET 

JACKIE & ROY 

SATURDAY, 
FEB. 27, 8:30 P.M. 

SHRINE AUDITORIUM 

TICKETS: So. Calif. Music Co., 737 S. Hill S».; ^Um'% 

Record Shop, 5162 W. Adams Blvd.; and all Mutual 

Agencies. Plea»e call MA. 3- 11 44 or MA. 2-3272. 

from only $1JS 

Take Your Best Dcrte te This Grecrt Shew 



• 


SHIMMERING SILVER AND GOLDEN 


I 


IF 



^i 


HAIR STYLIST 

WANTED 

GLAMOUR INSURED 

BEAUTY SALON 

5011 W. ADAMS BLVD. 


BLENOBD »COTCH WHISKY • 86 PROOF 

tmp*ffwf by W. A. Tay/or 4 Co.. N. Y., N. Y.\\ 
So/t Distributor* for tha U. S. A. 


Must Apply In Parson 


RE. 2-8129 


PAID QUARTERLY 
IN INSURED SAFETY 

EFFECTIVE 
JANUARY 1, 1960 


WHEN YOU OPEN OR ADD TO YOUR 
BROADWAY FEDERAL SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

Gifts for you! Stunning silverware, golden monogrammed keys, toi- 
letry kits... lavish rewards ioT your good saving sense! Presents for 
putting your dollars to work at Broadway Federal Savings where 
your account earns at the current high rate of 4/a% paid four times 
a year. 

Open or add to your account and get your free giffc-for-thrift today! 
Reminder: accounts opened hy the 10th earn from the 1st. 

LUXURY HOSTESS SERVING SET 

Open or add to your account in amooata 
of $100 or more and receive this exqui- 
site two-piece hostess serving set in 
famous William Ropers silverware. Per- 
fect for holiday dinners and year Vooad 
serving. 


GOLDEN KEY TO HIGH EARNINGS 

Open or add to your account in amounta 
of $50 or more and get a golden ignition 
key, monogrammed for you. Complete 
vnth key chain. This personalized gift is 
given in addition to others yoa may 
receive. 






FIVE-PIECE PLACE SETTING 

Open or add to your account in 
amounts of $500 or more and receivs 
a five-piece place settinfin Int«v 
national's contemporaryxinlandia 
pattern. Gleaming stainleM steel fat 
years of wear. 


FREE GUEST-PAC FOR ONE 
AND ALLI 

Inveetmrs and vintors alika, ask for 
voor tree goestiMC of trxvetsize UA' 
letxies. A gift for everyone iriio visits 
«■ at BEoadwiy FadenI SaTingiu 


BROADWAY 

FEDERAL SAVINGS and Loan Association 
Broadway at 45th— Los Angeles— AD Q.-A'2lT\ 

CMNRt AoMHl Rate 4K% Paid Qi Mrt«» GMiy acoeoNt iMwad tp to aOUOOO 


. r., , 


iei^lffii^ 


FAST SERVICE 


UOST • RENT • SEL-L • BUY • HIR 


TRADS 


k 


tu«l 


^ 


I 


I 

I 



"YDUU HND IT IN THE WANT ADS! 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 



Cl'S'X f\ }1ASD — Peter Gunn (series Star Craig 
i>tevens) protects n jrightentd uoman (guest star Diahann 
Carroll ) uho ts threatened by her husband in the storyline 
of "Sing a Song of Murder," the Mo-nday, March 7, 
tpisnde of "Peter Gunn" on the XBC netuork. 



THE MOST — A new kind of horror shoiv , unlike any- 
thing exer here before, plays the stage of the Manchester 
Theater, Saturday night. Only one performance will he 
given and this ts a special midnight show starting at 11:30 
p.m. Appearing tn person, are such famous moiic monsters 
as the Fly, the creature with a man's budy and a fly's head: 
Teen Age Frankenstetn and Frankenstein of 1970: the 
Daughter of Dracula; the (Jolossol Beast and countless 
others. The public never before has seen these famous 
monsters all in person. They are said to be 100 times scarier 
for real, than on the screen. ^ ou'll see beautiful Hollyiuood 
slave maidens captured and at the mercy of half humcrn 
beasts. It is said that the show features scenes so scary it docs 
not dare tn advertise them. The Manchester Theater man- 
agement warns the public that this is not a movie. Every 
monster appears tn perso-n, and every scene is on stage. Un- 
less you can take it. you are advised to stay home. This 
dnublehcader — on stage — super shocker promises to be most 
unusual indeed.' .Make it if you can take it.'.'.'.' 


SCHOOL OF INSTRUCTION 


LEARN TO TYPE AT HOME 

$5 Down-$5 Month 
PRACTICE 

TYPEWRITERS 
$4950 

WILSHIRE TOWER 

143 So. Western Ave. 

DU. 3-5605 


INCOME TAX SERVICES 


FEDERAL RETURN 

$250 

CR. 4-6061 


INCOME TAX SERVICE 

Personal Ineom* Tax Accountants 
We Coma to Your Phona 

RE. 2-1576 


ROOFING OF All KINDS 


WALTER SLATER 
ROOF CO. 

"Personalized Service" 
• TERMS 

• INSURED 
• LICENSED 

• Est. 1918 
1273 S. Cochran Ave., LA. 19 
WEbster 6-5284 


ROOFING and 
REPAIRING 

Specializing in general roof- 
ing and repairing. We repair 
wood shingles — white roof 
coating and gutter instaiUtion. 

WEbster 8-6828 


EXPERT ROOFING 

jNew roofing or repairing done 
quickly and inexpensively. 
Free estimates. 


ALTMAN STA-ROCK 
ROOFING CO. 

REpublic 4-4935 


-LEGAL NOTICE 


16354 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

In the Superior Court nt the 
State of California. In and for the 
(iiuntv of l^^ Angeles. 

In The mailer of the Estate of 
Alir" Smari. also known as Alice 
Loui-^e Smart, deceased. 

Nolire is herebv Riven to credi- 
tors having claims aKainst the 
^aid decedent to file claims in 
the office of the clerk of the afore- 
said court or to present ihem to 
the iindersicned at the office of 
his attorney,. Miller & Maddox. 
2824 South Western Avenue, i^n 
th« citv of Los Angeles. In the 
aforesaid County, which latter of- 
fice Is the plac-e of business of the 
undersigned in all matters per- 
taining' to said estate Such claims 
with the necessary vouchers must 
he filed or presented as aforesaid 
within si\ months after the first 
publication of this notice 
Dated J'ebruary IT. 106n. 

Booth B Smart 
Miller & Maddox. att«)rneys-at 
law, 2824 South Western Ave- 
nue. Los Anaelei. California. 
RE 1.4143»' 

Administrator #t the Estate of 
■aid decedent. 
iPubli.'heri In the California 
Eagle newspaper Keb. 25-March 3- 
10-17 ) 

15682 

CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS 
Fictitious Firm Name 

TH.F; I NDERSTGNED do here- 
h\ i-ertlfy that they are conduct- 
inc a Applicance busine.ss at 4Su5i; 
W Adamd Blvd.. City of Ixi.s An- 
geles 16. County of Lo.s .VoBele.s. 
."state of California, under the flc- 
iliioii« firm name of Ted'.s Home 
Appliance Service and that .lald 
firm i.s composed of the followlnE 
peroon."* .whose names and ad- 
dre.ss.st'.i* are a.* follows, to-wit: 

Therxiore Leonard Banks. Jr., 
2&W Kmipau. Los Anceles. Calif. 

riouglaji Ft. Bell. 2649 S. Rlmpau. 
I-os Angele.s. Calif 

Business Addres.s: l.mi Nananu, 
LoK Angeles. Calif IJ', 7^777. 

v^ ITNEtfS mv hand this 3rd day 
of Kehruarv. 1^60- 

j/ThPodore L. Banks. Jr. 
-DotiEla." rt Ttell 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

M 
COI .VTV^OR LOS ANOELE3S 

O.V THIS .^rd day of February 
A T> . 106(1. before me Attorney 
L'tren Miller, a Notary Public In 
and for »aid County and State. 
residinK therein duly roramissioned 
and .iworti. per.sonally appeared 
before me Theodore Leonard 
Parik.". .Ir. and Douglaa R Bell, 
known to me to be the persons 
whose name are subscribed to the 
■within Instrument, and acknow- 
ledged to me that they executed 
the same 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. 1 


LEGAL NOTICES 


have hereunto set my hand and 
affi.xed tny offi'ial seal the day 
and year in thi.*i certificate fir.st 
alKJve written. 

(SICAL) 

I-riRE.v Mlf.LKF;. 

Notary I'liMii- in and for Said 

County and State 

My Commission Expires 1961. 
Published in the California Eaglp 
Newspaper Feb. 11-18-25. March 3. 
1960. 


FINEST UPHOLSTERING 


Set the Stage for 


New Furniture with our 


Gistom 
Uphostery^ 



§i:Rvi€i: 

Send your work to an Old, Es- 
tablished, Reliable upholsterer. 
30 years of guaranteed work- 
manship. 

• FREE ESTIMATES 

• REASONABLE PRICES 

• EASY PAYMENT PLAN 

LA SALLE 
UPHOliTERING CO. 

2121 West Jefferson Blvd. 

REpublic 3-4614 


SEWING AND KNITTING 


SEWING and 
KNITTING 

We do all types of sewing 
and knitting expertly. Most 
reasonable rates. 

ADams 2-5679 

ELECTRICAL SERVICk" 


ELECTRICIAN 

RELIABLE, SAFE, 

REASONABLE, 

DESIRES WORK. 

CALL MA. 9-0947 


ELECTRICIAN — Reliable, 
safe, reasonable. WANTS 
WORK. MA. 9-0947. . 


ELECTRICIANS 
CONTRACTORS 

Wiring — Repairing — Alterations 

Call J. J. MASTER 

WEbster M653 

CRMtview 6-7945 

VEimont 8-9124 


TREE SERVICES 


FINEST TREE 
SERVICES 

DAVIS TREE SERVICE-Tops them 
all. Big or small. TRIMMING, 
PRUNING, REMOVING. Expert 
tree men. Specialists in palm 
tree trimming. All cuttings 
hauled away. 

Call Day or Night 


Ic 2-1303 


CHILD CARE 


LICENSED child care. 5 days 
a weelt. 3635 S. Arlington 
Ave. RE. 3-0885. 

MISCELLANEOUrFOfTsAii 


Fishing Tackle, complete outfit 
and miscellaneous items. Less 
than half price. 6025 S. Ver- 
mont. 


PAINTING « PAPERHANGING 


• PAINTER 

• PAPER HANGER 

• LOUVRE WINDOWS 

INSTALLED 

• MISCELLANEOUS 

REPAIRS 

CALL 

R. J. Mac DUFF 
AX. 2-6851 AX?2-2604 


PLASTERING & REPAIRING 


PLASTERING and 
REPAIRING 

New ceilings— No job too large 
or too small. Guaranteed 
workmanship. Free estimates. 

Rl. 7-3438 


EXPERT PLUMBING 


DAVIDSON 
PLUMBING CO. 

SINCE 1927 

24 Hr. Emergency 
Repair Plumbing 

Richmond 9-1046 

WEbster 1-1628 

PLeasant 3-7595 

Any Place— Any Time 

MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


FINEST PAINTING 


PAINTING 


5 ROOMS-EXCLUSIVE 


195 


COMPLETE 


BATH 
KITCHEN 


511 
523 


Compiata 


Complat* 
FRff SSTIMArBS 



FURNISHED ROOMS FOR RENT Thursday, February 25, 1960 


The California Eagle— 11 


FURNISHED ROOMS 
FOR RENT 

NICE ROOMS-West of Central. 
Singles and doubles. Privileges. 
Private entrances. Near every- 
thing. Children permitted. 1007 
East 50th Sf. 

Call Anytim* 

WEbster 5-0485 

WES«rDirApfs7^0(rRENT"~^ 


FURN. APARTMENT FOR RENT 


TILE - SHINGLE - FLAT 

REPAIRS . ' . ' $5 

FREE ESTIMATES 

NO. 3-4525 

SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION 


Instruction Offered 

An 8 waalc praparatery course 
for these taking CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMS for U. S. Pott Office 
CLERK-CARRIER. Cemplala In- 
formation and applications call 

RE. 4-8912 


PIANO & VOICE 
COACHING 

• PIANO INSTRUCTION 

• VOICE COACHING 

Beginners and Advanced 
ELLA HILL TRIPLETT 

Taachar of Piano A Voice Coach 

STUDIOS 

2128 Delaware 

SANTA MONICA 

EX. 3-5963 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophont, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sighttinging. 

PL. 2-1179 


INSTRUCTION IN ORGAN 

OR PIANO - NOTE, 

EAR, CHORDS, 

HYMNS-LESSONS $1.00 

DU. 9-2653 

BUSINESTOPPORTUN ITY 


SERVICE STATION 
FOR LEASE 

Thriving garage and service sta- 
tion on corner of 120th and Cen- 
tral. Needs some investment. 
Ideal fo renergetic owner who is 
willing to build a better busi- 
ness. 

AXminister 3-2830 

DANCE J^NsfRUCTION 


NEWER & LARGER QUARTERS 

CAROLYN SNOWDEN SCHOOL 

OF DANCE 

2111 South La Brea Blvd. 

WE. 6-1440 WE. 3-2263 

Beginners Class in Ballet, 

Acrobatics, Modern Tap 

Tots Enrolling Now Teens 

MONEY TO LOAN 


MONEY TO LOAN 

That Is Our Principal 

Businessll! WE LOAN 

MONEY ON MOST 

ANYTHING! I i 

$ $ $ $ $ 

Because Some People Do Not Re- 
deem Their Pledges WE ALWAYS 
HAVE MANY CHOICE ITEMS FOR 
SALE AT A FRACTION OF THEIR 
VALUE - CLOTHING • JEWELRY - 
APPLIANCES - TOOLS - RIFLES 
GUNS. '" ^ 

* ? * * 5 


$1000 


SUITS 
FROM 

CMDIT, TOO/ I I 
BANKAMIRICARD one/ . 
INTiRNATIONAL 

LUGKY'S LOAN CO. 

4265 S. CENTRAL AVE. 

* * * ? * 

BAiiir^DOiLEOriNSTRUCTI^ 


American 
Barber 
College 

Triple-A Rating 

- 1248 Hour Course — 

— Approved for Vets — 

349 South Hill Street 

MA. 9-3303 


BEGINNERS— Violin or Piano 
one-half C-il hour lessons 
$1.00 call AX 5-9159. 

PUBLICATION SERVICES 


AGENTS WANTED: To sell the 
bonk ever>on'' j.s talkine about, 

abc picture book of emi- 
nf;nt negroes past and 

PRFSENT. Fabulou.<! commissions. 
WRITE A. B.C. PICTURE BOOK 
PUBLISHING CO.. P.O. BOX 
1-8767, Cimmaron Station, L.A. 18, 
Calif. 

Telephone PL. 2-1061. 5-7 p.m. 

serviceT 


SELF-HELP 

For all persona! problems. 
Send your name and address 

to SELF HELP 
Box 37002 L.A. 37 


SELL Coleman's nationally 
odvertised household prod- 
ucts and cosmetics. Salary 
guaranteed plus commission 
Call now. RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Coleman. 

FAMILY INSURANcTpLAN 


• INSURES BOTH .. . 

HUSBAND AND WIFE 

• NO EXTRA COST.. 

FOR CHILDREN or 

CHILDREN BORN AFTER 

POLICY ACQUIRED. 

ALL QUESTIONS ANSWEREDII 

CALL EARL HADEN 
OR. 7.1486 

EMPLOYA^NT^OPPORTUNmE^ 


Work at Long Beach Douglas? 
Then join UAW Local 148. The 
Union that fights for the right of 
all workers regardless of race, 
color, sex or creed. Contact your 
Steward and sign up today. We 
need you, you need usi 

Ed Speedy Wlanecki. 
4120 Long Beach Blvd., L.B. 7 
GA. 7-8935 - ME. 4-1985 . 


SELL Colemon's nationally 
odvertised household prod 
ucts and cosmetics. Salary 
guaranteed plus commission 
Call now, RE. 3-2677. Paul 
L. Coleman, 

HBlP^WANTEDr 


MAR-FASH-SHO wants girls 
for courses in fashion, 
photo, T.V. modeling and 
personal grooming. Terms. 
3425 W. Adams Blvd. 
RE. 5-6447 — RE. 4-9420 


Hair StyUst Wanted 

Glamour Insured Beauty Sa 
Ion, 5011 West Adams Blvd., 
La Brea. Apply in person. 
RE i-8129 


FEMALE BEAUTY OPERATOR 
WANTED — Shampooing 
only. $12 per day, 5 days a 
week. 13518 Ventura Blvd., 
Sherman Oaks. ST. 4-9065. 

FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT~^ 


ROOM, nicely furnished, pri 
vate home. No cooking. Pri' 
vate entrance. Share bath 
$38 per nfonth. RE. 5-0573. 


ROOM FOR RENT— Bed linen 
and gas heat, your company 
welcome. RE. 1-551S. 


De Luxe Furnished Apartment 

RENTS FOR $81 

Easily Worth $100! 

• MODERN SINGLES 

• UTILITIES INCLUDED 

• CHOICE LOCATION 

• HEATED SWIMMING POOL 

PARK ADAMS APTS. 

3528 W. Adams Blvd. 
at 6th Ave. 

REpublic 3-0642 


Quiet, 
Comfortable 

BRICK BUILDING 

FOR ADULTS 
ONLY! 

Furnished • Refrigeration 

Washer & Dryer • Ufil. Paid 

Bachelors— Singles— Doubles 

$40 Up, $57 Up, $80 Up 
The Paulson Apts. 

1979S. ESTRELLA 

W. of Figueroa, N. of 23rd St. 

Manager Rl. 9-8909 

If No Answer, Rl. 7-3450 


FURNISHED SINGLES 
Nice for Couple— Child O.K. 
-Utilities Paid- 
Private Entrance and Bath 
Newly Decorated 
XInt. Transp. and Shopping 

Washer — Oryer 

Near Normandie 

$12.50 Weekly and up 

V225 WEST 39th PLACE 

'__RE^-2423__ 

APARTMENT FOR RENT 


PLANTATION HOTEL 

$8.00 week and up, newly dec 
orated rooms, hot and cold 
water in all rooms. Some 
with -rivate showers. FREE 
PARKING. 1104 E. 40th Pi. 
Corner Central Avenue. AD 
3-9328. 


NOW RENTING 

ROYAL 
PALM 
, APTS. 

1518 South Wilton 

Between Pico & Venice 

Place 
PRESTIGE ADDRESS 

Beautiful redecorated & nicely 
furnished SINGLE APTS. 

• Maid service 

• Home phone 

• Elevator service 

• Heated swimming pool 

• Entire building is carpeted 

• $70 and up. Utilities Paid 

UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 

See Mrs. Bierman in the premises 

RE. 1-5287 


BACHELOR 

APARTMENT 

ON WEST 20th ST. 

WE. 1-7260 

$60 MONTH 

UTILITIES PAID 


Modern, 

Comfortable 

Brick Building 

For Adults Only! 

WELL FURNISHED 
WASHER AND DRYER 

UTILITIES PAID 
SINGLES AND DOUBLES 

Frederick Apts. 

1647 W. Eleventh Street 
One Block West of Union Ave. 

$55 - $60 - $70 
DU. 9-761 3 


UNFURN. APT. FOR RENT 


UNFURNISHED APTS. 
FOR RENT 

Large 1 bedroom apartments. 
Less than year old. Southeast 
section. Child permitted. 

^99 Per Month 

LU. 7-1870 


3 Room Front Apt., 1 b«^ 
room. Wall bed, refrigerator. 
Adults only, 

AD. 3-7624 


HOUSES FOR RENT 


CLEAN— QUIET 

ADULTS ONLY 

Steam Heat - Carpeted 

Furnished - Refrigeration 

Washer - Utilities Paid 

Bachelors - Singles - Doubles 

$48 Up, $60 Up, $85 Up 

Weekly Rates Available 

ALEXANDRIA 
APARTMENTS 

1953 South Estrella 

(1 BIk. W. of Harbor Freeway); 
Between Adams & Wash. Blvd. 

Phone: Rl. 8-3078 


3 RM. HOUSI AND 

2 BDRM. APARTMENT 

1547 W. 48th ST. 

RE. 2.9590 

HOUSES FOR SALE 


FOR SALE 
$395 DOWN 

7 RM., 3 BEDRM. STUCCO 
5 YEARS OLD 

RE. 2-9590 

$500 DOWN 

3 RDRM. FRAME 

11 8th & SAN PEDRO 

RE. 2-9590 


$2,000 DOWN 

4 UNITS + 3 RMS, 

WESTSIDE - FRAME, 

INCOME $315 MO. 

RE. 2.9590 


WESTSIDE SHOWPLACESIII 

Bachelors $12.50 Up 
Singles, $16 and Up 
Doubles, $20 and Up 

• Convenient — Clean 

• Newly Decorated 

• Modern Furniture 

• Elevator Service 

• Utilities Paid 

• Best Transportation 

1501 W. ADAMS BLVD. 
(At Catalina) 


FURNISHED kitchenette, $45 

mo. Furnished room $9.50 

wkly. Good transportation. 

DU. 9-8992 


$38 MO. — Single apartment. 
Water & gas furnished. 342 
N. Bixel. PL. 8-1125 or OL. 
3-6645. 


NEW 
SOUTHWAY HOTEL 

A home away from home— 
trantientt welcome. 

Furnished Apts. and Roemi 

^X X*9w per week 

5119 South Avalen Blvd. 

AD. 3-7033 

ujwjrnTapartment FORlwriT 


ONE (1) bdrm. unfur. Modern 
apartment Westside. Adults. 
WE. 5-7066. 1724 S. High- 
land. 


$2,500 DOWN 
5 UNITS STUCCO 

Ineom* $329.50 

217 W. 47th ST. 
« RE. 2-9590 


5 OLD HOUSES ON 

100'«138' LOT 

$1,000 DOWN 

RL 2-9590 



acreage for SALE 


DESERT LAND 

IN ANTELOPE VALLEY. ROAD 
FRONTAGE ON PROPOSED FREE- 
WAY. ROAD NOW CUT FROM 
LANCASTER TO HIWAY (66). 
10 ACRES $3,000 
$35 DOWN; $35 MONTH 
GENE WILSON AX. 5-3779 

REAlTsTATE FORTAir 


V^TSTERN STAB REALTY — 

1953 West Jefferson Blvd. 
RE. 4-2538. $2500 dwn. home 
& Income. North of Wash- 
ington on Harvard. Five (5) 
room two (2) bdrm. down- 
stairs and six (6) room 
three (3) bdrm. upstairs. 
This won't last. Call RE. 
4-2539. ASK FOR WOFFORD 
—WE NEED LISTINGS, WE 
TRADE, BUY & SELL. 


LARGE 

FURNISHED 

SINGLE 

BEST WEST ADAAAS 
LOCATION 

NEAR CRENSHAW 

RE. 1 -7629 
RE. 3-6019 

UTIL PAID - $70 MONTH 


HAYES 
MOTEL 


^ 


The P«op/e's Choice 

960 E. Jefferson 

AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


AL "SMITTY" SMITH 

SUGGESTS: 

\For real refreshment 

. . . taste the famous flavor 
from the land of sky blue waters 

Jlkin/nS rlfrJhtng 



I rii<a. Bamm Brewing Co., St. Paul, Minn. A San Franciico, Calif. 

In Gloss and Cans at Your 
Favorit* Shopping Confer 

H. W. PINGREE COMPANY 


I 


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Kh 




fe-The California Eagle Thursday, February 25, 1960 


NEW YORK SCENE 


(Continued from Page 10) 
officers and members, were 
fabulously attired, and the 
gtiests followed suit, so that a 
gorgeous picture resulted in 
this chic atmosphere, and a 
very relaxed and enjoyable 
evening was experienced by 
all. 

I was privileged to J»e the 
Master of Ceremonies for the 
brief introductions and the 
cute vocal dueting of Julie 
Hunter and Rubie Johnson. 
Throughout the evening the 
beverages were flowing freely, 
and the free bon bons were in 
keeping with the theme of the 
club. 

Mecca of Entertalninent 

Also went to the Radio City 
Music Hall to see Yul Brynner 
and the late-gfeat Kay Ken- 
dall in a real funny, funny, 
"Once More With Feeling," 
and enjoyed this most much 
for laughs, along with the al- 
ways completely entertaining 
Music Hall stage show, with 
the Rocl<ettes, Corps de Ballet, 
Symphony Orchestra, Smokey 
the Wonder Horse, Beatrice 
Kraft and her dancers. Was in 
the quite charming company 
of a lovely from Greenville, 
S.C, who was referred to me 
through Sammy Whiteman, 
and who is a secretary at the 
Hillcrest Center for Children 
In Bedford Hills, N.Y. Her 
name is a simple one, but the 
lady Is not; Miss Sadie Wil- 
liams. 

Night aubs SpcnrklA 
• Around the town we stopped 
by the Monday Night Get-To- 
giether at the Spotlite Club on 
l25th street and joined in the 
fon, along with cosmetologist 
Vid prize-winner, Alpage Ter- 
rell, Duke's Specialty Co. 
salesman, Ralph Cook, bar- 
tenders, Rocky and male- 
model, Carl, and a host of 
lovelies. Small's Paradise was 
rocking to the swinging 
sounds of Sarah McLawler and 
her trio, featuring the sensa- 
tional jazz violin of her hubby 
Richard Otto. 

Ram Ramirez and Sir Robert 
Harvell (currently at the Copa 
Lounge) were among those in 
attendance. This week its the 
Ray Bryant jazz group at 
Smalls. Modern jazz altoman, 


Lou Donaldson, is heading his 
Quintet at Count Basie's, 
while Clark Monroe continues 
to host to these pleasant 
sounds. ^kT\ Grant opens to- 
night at (the Copacabana for 
four weeljcs, after his Ed Sul- 
livan stint last Sunday. We 
had a long gabfest with Gen- 
eral Grant in the Palm Cafe 
one night while celebrities, Al 
Jackson, comedian, Nipsey 
Russell, Baron Wilson, Ralph 
Cooper, disc jockeys. Jack 
Walker and The Burner, along 
with some out-of-town charm- 
ers, were making with the 
food and drink, plus 'sound- 
ing' on and at each other. It 
was different anyway. 


* ^ * SHOW BUSINESS * * * 


"Long Dreom" A Nightmors To Be Forgotten 

"The Long Dream" opened on Wednesday and closed 
on Saturday, which was really too long a run for this 'you 
should excuse the expression' vehicle at the Ambassador 
Theatre. This was a new (?) play by Ketti Frings, based 
upon the novel by Richard Wright, with the production 

directed by Lloyd Richards,*^ '■ ; 

with Lawrence Winters, Isa- 
l)elle Cooley, R. G. Armstrong, 
Joya- Sherrill, Helen Martin 
and Al Freeman, Jr. 

The story was embarrassing 
and pointless, depicting a 
'Handlierchlef-Headed Negro 
undertaker' Uncle-Tomming 
throughout, for no really good 
reason, except that the scene 
of this debacle was Missis- 
sippi. 

Al Freeman Outafanding 

The only outstanding per- 
formances were by young Al 


Freeman, Jr. (who shows 
promise, if he ever gets a role 
to f)ortray) and the quickie, 
but excellent bit done by 
Helen Martin, as the Madam 
of a House of 111 Repute. The 
audience went home through- 
out the performance, applaud- 
ed very weakly whenever it 
was mandatory that applause 
be tendered, religiously avoid- 
ed meeting the furtive glances 
of any and everyone near, and 
found one and all, other top- 
ics for discussion during In- 


termissions, than the play (?) 
itself. 

A sigh of relief, and a hand 
for their guts, were the final 
tributes paid the unfortunate 
actors who braved this catas- 
trophe. "The Long Dream" 
was their nightmare, and we 
wish it a sleep only disturbed 
by infinity. 'Bye. 

PHIL (X)RDON 


COMMENCEMENT PLANS 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The 
combined baccalaureate and 
commencement exercises will 
be held at Florida A&M Uni- 
versity, May 28 in Lee Hall 
Auditorium. 

The speaker will be Dr. 
Benjamin F. Mays, president 
of Morehouse College, Atlanta. 


People 

(Continued from Page 10) 
wealth and entertainment 
knowledge as presented by 
these paragons of platters 
could well enhance any major 
video show. 

MACK PINKSTON — Looking 
like a well heeled Wall Street 
banker with his mingled 
grey hair is back in town and 
the chicks are still giving him 
that over-theshoulder lookl 


Frat Teams Drill 

The Kappas, Alphas, Ome- 
gas and Sigma basketball 
teams started drilling for the 
opening garnes of the Inter- 
fraternity series which gets 
i underway at the Loyola gym. 


Dorothea Foster 

(Continued from Page 10) 
ZACHERY and MARY JANE MASSEY, school 
teacher from Berkeley. t*- l 

Must mention ANITA|B(IGAN, JOHNETTA 
STARKS, HILDA CAINES fetijoyed her lovely 
home) and ROBERTA WELSH,. all members of Na- 
tional Association of Fashion* fed Accessories De- 
sigers, who are making plans for their Fashion 
Show on the 27th of March. It was fun hearing 
about all the unusual plans the ladies are making. 
Thanks, DOROTHEA, for letting me sound-off 
in your space and thanks to all of the grand 
people at the Eagle office. WALLER (one of the 
nicest), ABIE, ROY and all the rest at the office. 
Also a big thanks to FRANKLYN AJAYE. JUNIOR 
GILLIAM, ANN O D O M, FRANCES HAYNES, 
ANNE and JIMMIE WILEY and the LINDSAYS, 
for contributing so greatly to my lovely stay In 
Los Angeles. 


High Court 
Kills Fines 

(Continued from Page 1) 

could not constitutionally re- 
quire." 

Stewart said Little Rock 
and North Little Rock author- 
ities "failed to demonstrate 
a controlling justification for 
the deterrence of free associa- 
tion which compulsory dis- 
closure of the membership 
lists would cause." 

Freedoms Protected 

'Xike freedom of speech 
arvd a free pressj" he said, 
"the right of peacable assem- 
bly was considered by the 
framers of the Constitution 
to lie at the foundation of a 
government bcised upon the 
consent of an informed citi- 
zenry'." 

"Freedoms such as these are 
protected not only against 
heavy-handed frontal attack 
but also from being stifled 
by more subtle governmen- 
tal interference," he said. 

Stewart said "there was 
substantial uncontroverted ev 
idence" that public identifi 
cation of NAACP members 
"had been followed by har 
assment and threats of bod 
ily harm." 

In a separate opinion, Jus 
tices Black and Douglas said 
the ordinance violated the 
constitutional rights of free 
dom of speech and assembly. 

They said these rights "are 
beyond abridgment either by 
legislation that directly re 
Strains their exercise or by 
suppression or impairment 
through harassment, humili 
ition, or exposure by govern 
ment." 



DRAMATIC — Mtl 
■ Torme grabs a struggitnij 
Elinor Donohue in a kidnap 
' attempt in MGM's hard- 
'hitting flicker, " Girls 
Tovin." Mamie Van Doren, 
P^v Anthony. Cathy Cros- 
ly, Gtgi Perreau, Gloria 
Talbott and Maggie Hayes 
Star, along with teen age 
, vocalist, Paul Anka, at the 
_ M anchester Broadway 
Theatre. Catch Manches- 
ter's special Midnight Stage 
Show, starring all the spooks, 

i 


EVERY DAYS A SPECIAL DAY AT /^y///''^^/ 



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• •-— -^-^ '■-• - -^ ■ _ "|illL"T 


Did Labor Goof ? 


Wilkins Knoivs Nothing of ^Red' Chdm 




r ! 


I 



UCLA LIcRARY COUP 
405 HILGARD AVE 
'..OS ANGELES 24 CALIF 

llbVI 


—Accused of Stabbing Man— 




2101 W. VarMa Avmua, I. A. 


Continuous Publication for 79 Yoirs 


AX. 5^135 


Vol. LXXIX-No. 51 


Thursday, March 3, 1960 


AX. 5-3135 

Our«f.T0%)ni ISc 


Bunco Pair Get *5900 
From Retired Worker 


TEENAGE GANG SUSPECT— Kenneth Bragg, 17, suspect in the teenagt gang kill- 
ing early this year of Louis Hardeman in a South Los Angeles housing project, is flanked 
by 77th Street Dels. Sgt. J. A. Breuer, left, and Sgt. E. C. Henry. (Adams) 


Alabama Students 

V 

March on Capitol 


A thousand Negro students in Montgomery, Ala., 
marched from Alabama State College Tuesday to the 
steps of the state capitol as the sitdown movement, 
started a month ago, continued to leap from city to 

t^itj: and across state bord ers. . . -■- .jxcretwy-ottheliAACP, 

— — ^2 ^ j^ jj^g capitol. the Students --.'-- _ 


(^tea 





Bom too Lots 

The people who are scream- 
ing for Caryl Chessman's 
execution were born too late 
to get the full vaiue of their 
bloodthirsty attitude. They 
g«Tj should have 
iitll lived in Eng- 
land 150 
; years ago. At 
[that time 
I England had 
the death 
(f&^* penalty f o r 
T* J more than a 
^-^- -^hundred 
^■m crimes. 

An execu- 
iMnn MMI«r ^ , g „ was 

really an event those days, 
too. They didn't believe in 
holding a quiet little killing 
in an enclosed cell with a 
dozen witnesses. They had 
first class hangings to which 
the public was invited free. 
Farmers came from miles 
around to eat their lunch,- 
spend the day and watch 
some unfortunate fellow get 
strangled to death in the 
public square. 

Nobody enjoyed the public 
hangings any more than the 
English pickpockets. As to- 
day's phrase goes, they really 
got with it. Funny thing 
about it was that one of the 
crimes punishable by death 
was picking pockets. Every 
time some blundering, pick- 
pocket got caught with his 
hands in somebody's pocket 
and got the death sentence 
word was passed around to 
the other members of the 
(Continued on Page 4) 


raised their voices to sing the 
National Anthem and the 
Lord's Prayer, then they re- 
turned to the campus. 
3000 Strong 

In Nashville, Tenn, where 
some 80 str dents who parti 
cipated in sitdowns last week 
were facing trial, a crowd of 
Negroes estimated at 3000 
jammed the courtroom and 
filled the courthouse corri- 
dors Monday. 

On that day, three of the 
80 students who participated 
in the movement designed to 
end, segregation at lunch 
counters, were fined a total 
of $160. The other cases were 
still to be heard. 

The two Negroes and one 
white youth wht> went on trial 
were from F i s k University 
and Tennessee A & I. John Ira 
Nye, 20. white Fisk student, 
was given the maximum fine 
of $50 for disorderly conduct. 
He was said to be an ex- 
change student from. Whittier 
College, Whittier, Cal. 

Bomb Threats 

In Nashville, too, the Ne- 
groes sang. Here the "Battle 
Hymn of the Republic" was 
added to their repertoire. 

Bomb threats were reported 
from Fisk University and also 
from Friendship Junior Col 
lege at Rock Hill, S. C, but 
there wejre no explosions. 

Other incidents were re 
pori;ed in various parts of the 
country. In Montgomery two 
white men beat a Negro 
woman >with baseball bats. 

In Chicamauga, Ga., ter- 
rorists fired shotgun blasts 
into two Negro homes. 
BoTcotts 

In some cities there were 
demonstrations as in Tuskgee 
where 400 students marched 
to the city square. Elsewhere 
there were picket lines out- 
side Woolworth's, Kress' and 
other stores. Such demonstra- 
(Continued on Page 2) 


Laborites Launch 
S. African Boycott 

LONDON— Some 7000 cheering, banner-waving 
demonstrators in Trafalgar Square heard Labor 
Party leader Hugh Gaitsklll launch a nation-wide 
boycott of South African products Sunday night, 
At the end of the rally, part ' 


of the crow* marched to 
nearby South Africa House, 
but were met with counter- 
demonstrator* in truck* plas- 
tered with pro-South Africa 
posters. 

Shouts of "Fascist Swine I" 
were hurled by the laborites 
as scuffles broke out between 
the two groups. 

Police broke up the melee, 


arresting nine persons. 

Prime Minister Macmillan 
let it be known that the gov- 
ernment does not support the 
boycott 

The boycott was initiated 
as a protest against South 
Africa'* racist policies. A 
similar boycott is already in 
effect in s(»ne African coun- 
tries. 


Labor Charge 
Not Backed by 
Roy Wilkins 


Roy Wilkins, executive 


told the Eagle Tuesday 
afternoon in a long-dis- 
timce telephone call from 
New York that he "knows 
nothing" about charges 
the Los Angeles branchidi'dn't believe that Negroes 


of the association is 

"Communist dominated." 

He said no such charges 

have been initiated ift New 


NAACP Drive 

A meeting to lounch the 
membership drive of the 
NAACP is being held tbU 
Sunday at 3:30 p-m. at the 
Second Baptist Church, 2412 
Griffith ovenue. 


York and that as far as he 
knows no such charges have 
been sent to New York from 
members in Los Angeles. 
No Knowledge 

He expressed puzzlement as 
to the source of such a report. 

Charges of Communist 
domination, however, were 
made against the Los Ange- 
les branch by the executive 
board of the AFL-CIO Council 
and served as the basis for 
the labor body's, refusal to 
support the local NAACP's 
membership drive. 

During the course of a 
(Continued on Page 3) 


20 Years' 
Pension from 
City Taken 

Bunco artists, on th* 
prowl again, this week 
kricked a 67-year-old re-. 
tlred maintenance em- 
ployee of the city out of 
all the money he had ob-' 
tained from his pension 
and all that he and hisjf 
wife had saved during 
long years of work. 

Edward Randolph, 10909 S. 
Wilmington avenue, was 
bilked out of $5900 in new $5, 
$10, $100 and even $1000 de- 
nominations he had just 
drawn from the Security- First 
National Bank* at Commercial 
and Main streets. 

Just Off Boot 

Like so many others, lie 
was - duped. b^-«^nuR) 
talked with an accent "like 
an Indian or a Jamaican" 
who had just come off a boat, 
and the Jamaican's friend. 

The tall tale in this case 
was that the "foreigner" 


Eagle's Choice 



could get their money out of 
banks once they deposited it. 
All they give you in return, 
he said, was ration books. 

He had money — he earned 
$400 a month on the ship — 
but he wouldn't trust it to 
any bank. To prove what he 
said, he flashed a roll, bound 
by a rubber band, that looked 
like money. 

Randolph said he could 
prove that banks permit you 
to withdraw your money 
whenever you want to. 
Talked About Pension 

At the time of the conversa- 
tion, Randolph was sitting in 
his car at George's Service 
Station, at 67th and Central 
avenue. He had his bank 
book with him. He had ap- 
parently talked a bit about 
the pension he had received 
after 20 years of work. 

Someone evidently over- 
heard him and tipped off the 
bunco artists. 

After Randolph drew out 
his money and showed the 
skeptical foreigner the $100 
(Continued on Page 3) 


Member 
Of Huns' 
Jailed 

By BOT SMRH 

Kenneth Bragg, 17, cl 
1251 E. 114th street, WM 
picked up by police late 
Tuesday and accused <rf 
the teenage gang killing 
of Louis Hardeman early t^ 
year. 

Bragg reportedly admitted 
the stabbing, but in a state- 
ment to the Eagle he denied 
even knowing that he bad 
cut the 42-year-old mam 
Boloagvd to Kub* 

Police said that Bragg is a 
member of the "Huns" gang, 
but advised that tiie "Huns" 
have not had run-ins with tht 
law. • 

Police also said that ra«B> 
bers of the gang were coop- 
erative. 

In talking to the Eagle, 
Young Bragg avoided naming 
the "Huns" and referred to 
the group as a "club." 
2 Others Held 

Bragg was held on a murder 
charge by the district attomejr 
Wednesday and was being 
detained in ("Georgia Street Ju- 
venile Hall. 

He was to appear in court 
Thursday in a pre-detention 
hearing. 

Two other juveniles were 
(Continued on Page 2) 


OPAL JONES HONORED— Opal Jones., head of Avalon 'Community Center, tvas the 
recipient ef an award Monday evening as the " fVoman-of -t he-Year" selection of the Cali- 
fornia Eagle, from left. Emcee Tom Hon kins. Eagle. Editor Grace . E. Simons, uho 
presented a Glen Lukens' original ceramic howl to Mrs. Jones; and Councilman Edward 
Roybal. principal speaker, holding embossed copy of City Council resolution honoring Mrs. 
Jones. — (Adams). 



PRODUCER HONORED— Julius Epstein, right, pro- 
ducer of "Take a Giant Step" is presented the first annual 
Ira Aldrich award by Atty. Loren Miller, publisher of 
the California Eagle. The award is designed to honor films 
which "most faithfully and honestly reflect contemporary 
Negro life," (See Theatrical Stsiiam. it 


Senators Plan 
To Talk Rights 
Law to Death 

WASHINGTON — With both 
Republicans and northern 
Democrats — and majority 
Leader Lyndon Johnson — 
determined to get some kind 
of an election year civil 
rights law on the federal 
statute books, the Senate was 
wound up in an around-the- 
clock filibuster led by Rich- 
ard Russell, (Georgia's senior 
Democratic senator. Russell 
said his colleagues are deter- 
mined to "talk the biU to 
death." 

Much of this week's fussing 
and feuding revolved around 
efforts of the Dixiecrats to 
find time-killing, devices that 
would serve their purpose and 
their skirmishing led to min- 
or victories. 

Vice President Nixon gave, 
the filibusterers a minor par- 
liamentary assist Monday 
when he ruled that the Senate 
clerk jnust read all amend- 
ments "that may be offered. 
Senator John McClellan, who 
has been taking bows all 
over the nation for What he 
describes as his "fight for 
democracy in labor unions," 
enlisted in the effort to keep 
southern Negroes from the 
polls when he announced 
that he would offer a seven 
page amendment to the bill 
— seven pages carefully de- 
signed to gut the administra- 
tion bill. 

Students Hit 

Russell dragged in student 
sit-in demonstrations at 
southern stores with the flor- 
id charge that they were de- 
signed to "start a race rjot of 
terrible proportions." He did- 
n't say who would • do the 
rioting. 

A portion of southern strat- 
egy seems to revolve around 
the effort to get the House to 
pass the almost meaningless 
bill voted out by the Rules 
Committee. They hope to 
hurry a House vote on that 
measure and rush it through 
the Senate without amend- 
ments but their strategy may 
XContinued on Page 4> 


Opal Jones Given 
Award by Eagle 

Something new was added to the community 
Monday night when the California Eagle presented 
an award to Mrs. Opal Jones, executive director of 
Avalon Community Center, as its selection as 
■ «• "Woman-of-the-Year." 


r^iK.. 


■i o- 


— -^w*^— ^.l^-.^" . ! i^-^J**'- r- «** ^ "* ^"- -.fc - I ■- ■ ; ' 


Lover Boy's 
Girl Friend, 
Wife Queried 

"Lover Boy" Eugene Haw- 
kins, arrested last week on 
forgery charges and held — 
briefly — on $5000 bail, did- 
n't rest long in jail, which 
surprised no one, including 
the police. 

He made bail and is now 
out on bond awaiting a March 
16 preliminary hearing in 
Municipal Court on one count 
of forgery, and a trial in 
Dept. 101 of Superior Court 
April 28 on two counts of for- 
gery and one count of per- 
jury. 

Wife, Girl Friend 

The names of women keep 
popping up whenever Haw- 
kins gets into the toils of the 
law. Police are now interested 
in two. 

One is Miss Miriam ("Mi 
mi") Kritzer, 3295 HiUock 
drive, whom he referred to as 
his "girl friend." The other 
is Mrs. Flo Herman, who pol- 
ice say is believed to be his 
wife. 

Miss Kritzer,* according to 
police, reported early this 
((Continued on Page 3) 


It was the Eagle's first 
such selection — but that 
wasn't all that was new. 
There was at the affair, given 
by Marty Zuniga and at 
Marty's, 5735 S. Broadway, an 
unusual blending of the 
races — Negro, white and 
Mexican ■ American. 

The blending was a result 
of the wide interests of the 
honoree for everyone there 
had touched Opal Jones' life 
in some significant manner. 

There was something else 
that was unusual. That was 
the award itself, which was a 
precious, prize-winning hand- 
made tinted glass bowl, cre- 
(Continued on Page 7) 


'Other Woman- 
Plans to Sue : 
Dootsie's Wife 

Felida Woods, statuesque 
23-year-pld secretary at Douto 
Records, backed up, her denial 
of adultery charges this we^ 
by threatening to sue Dootsis 
Williams' wife for a oooJ $100,- 
(XX) for "besmirching my rep- 
utation." '■ 

Dootsie. meanwhile, 
swit<;hed lawyers and pre- 
pared to add' a charge of 
"fraud" to his previous an- 
nulment suit in countering 
his wife's $10(X)-a-month sepa- 
rate maintenance plei, and 
also to deny her claim fer a 
share of their conununity 
property. 

Incidentally, business at the 
Dooto Record Co. is repotted 
as "booming." 

Signed StotesssBt 

Miss Woods, whom Mrs. Jo- 
sephine Williams named as 
the "other woman," said in a 
signed statement: 

"I am seeking legal counsel 
of my own not only for the 
purpose at defending me in 
this ill-advised domestic ac- 
tion but also in order to file 
a $100,000 defamation and 
libel action against Mrs. Wil- 
liams for her false allegations 
in which she involved me." 

She said further: 

"I do not know whether or 

not Mrs. Williams' actions are 

her own, oc whether they ara 

influenced by people who; 

(Continued on Page 3) 


In fhm ffogfi 

Editericds ... 
Church AetlTities „. 

Sports 

The Tee .._ -.... 

BiU SmoUwoed 

Domthea Foster — 

People 

Sbow Busiaeas . 

Ch<m Crawfttd ...... 

Jen Edwodfds .....~».~ 

Whof* CoeUag — 


4 
. S 

. s 

. 8 

.7 
. 8 

. 9 

.10 

9 


s 



SfVAYS OVERFLOW CROWD^The Rev. Martm 
Luther Kin^i Jr. is shown as he nvayed the overflow crmpd 
of some dOOff at Zion Hill Baptist Church Sundgy 
nomn. See Church Page, (Adams) 



^■?&*S^^vi 


;?; ''M-Jfe; 


V v^ 


.i>rf-^. 


2— The California Eagle 

Thursday, March j3, 1960 


Civil RiglitsF 
Act Upheld by 
High Court : 


'n: 


^^mm^I 






WASHINGTON — rlThe :SU- 
preme Court Monday ;1?r^«jH" 
ed the breath of Kfe- buiA' 
Into the 1957 federal -civil 
righta-act which- had been 
stabbed In the back by a 
Georgia federal district judge 
with a unanimous holding 
that the section aimed at pro-, 
tecting Voting rights of Ne- 
groes is constitutlenal. 

The nation's highest court 
also took a slap at Louisiana 
segregationists when it order- 
ed 13T7 Negroes restored to 
the voters rolls in that state. 

The court revejsed a find- 
ing by U.S. District Judge T. 
Hoyt Davis at Macon, Ga., 
that sections of the 1957 act 
aimed at protecting voting 
rights of Negroes were uncon- 
stitutional. 

niasrollT Purged 

Then, based oa its findings 
In the Georgia case, the court 
held that 1377 Negro voters 
had been Illegally purged 
from the rolls in Louisiana's 
Washington Parish {county). 
Th« court ordered them re- 
stored. 

This first Supreme Courti- »■ » ■ ■«. ^ I A > 

l!r'or'"L'S'v.;T/h,r*i,l Liberia Hits French Atom 

resulted in a federal govern- 
ment victory which presum- 
ably will permit the Negroes 
to vote in Louisiana's April 
19 state election. 


■^?&;'flr'.' 


Torrid' Dancer 
Gets New Breaks 

By CHAZZ CRAWFORD 

Vivacious Barbara Walden, the former lady un- 
dertaker turned movie star who won out over 300 
white aspirants for a choice role in "The Private 
Lives of Adam and Eve," confided to me last week 
that her dance sequehce in the film has been 
deleted. The Johnson Office that controls rtiovie 
censorshop has decreed that Miss Walden's dance 
was just too torrid for celluloid. 
Oddly enough, though, she«^ 


/iRT EXHIBIT— A selection of paintings hy Mrs. Helen 
IVrtght, night school student uho shows refreshing talent, 
is noiu on display in the Safety Savings Community Con- 
ference Room. 


Bomb Blast in Sahara 


WASHINGTON — Liberia 
has called upon world opin- 


The decisions coincided with j ion to condemn France for 
the opening in the Senate of test exploding recently an 
a drive to break a Southern L^^n^i^ bomb in the Sahara 
filibuster and pass a new I 

civil righU law aimed at I desert against the wisljes of 

Africa and in defiance of 


helping Negroes vote. 


3 Held for 
Gang Killing 

(Continued from Page 1) 
also being held. 

Six adult (18 - year - old) 
members of the gang were 
released when the D.A. re- 
fused to file on them. ' 
Kbaw Gang Members j 

Hardeman, of 2235 E. 114th \ 
Ktreeti was fatally stabbed \ 
Jan. 24. He told police he| 
could recognize the members 
of the youthful gang who at- I 
tacked him as he was goi^g^l 
Into hJs house, but he died 
before he could identify any 
of them. His death came on 
Feb. 1. 

Since then police have been 
combing the neighborhood for 
the killer. They arrested and 
questioned a half dozen or 
more of th^ members of the 
gang. As a result of their in- 
vestigation, officers were 
raaaonabiy certain that it 
was young Bragg who had! 
thrust the knife into Harde- 1 
man's back. ' i 

Late Tuesday afternoon, \ 
they picked up Bragg and ac- ] 
cuaed him of the crime. He 
was taken to 77th Street Po- 
lice Sution by Det. Sgts. J. A. 
Brewer and Sgt. E. C. Henry. 
Spadol Interv i ew 

In a special interview he 
told the Eagle: 

"We were involved in a 
club fight, so when we got to 
Imperial Courts to fight, the 
other gang wasn't there. 

"As we were leaving, this 
man was standing by his car. 
... He started calling me 
vulgar names. ... I started i 
back" to the car and he called 
me more names. I had my 
knife in my hand and he 
grabbed me by the leg and 
we fell and he was cut Unin- 
tentionally. Then we left. 

"I didn't know he was cut 
until today when police pick- 
ed me up. " 

Stabbed ia Bock 

Hardeman, who lived at 
2235 E. 114th street, was a 
man concerned about juve- 
nile dellnquOKy who «pent 
a good portion of his spare 
time working with teenagers 
in gyms and. playgrounds. 

After he was stabbed, Har- 
deman told police that on the 
night of Surid^y, J&n, 24, he 
was- locking ' up his car and 
going into his house. A num- 
ber of teenagers were; stand- 
ing around hurling bottles at 
each other. 

Hardeman spoke to them, 
warned theni they rhight 
break some windows, would- 
n't b« able- to pay for them 
and then would be In trouble. 

One of the gang spoke up. 
"Best thing you can do, old 
m»n," he said, "is go inside." 

As h« turned to go into the 
house, one of the gang Jump- 
ed him from behind with % 
knUe and stabbed him in the 
back. The knife penetrated 
«h« lung. 


resolutions passed in the last 
session of the United Na- 
tions. ' 
In a statement issued after 
the explosion, Liberia's Sec- 
retary of State J. Rudolph 
Grimes said that the action 
of the French Government 
was in complete disregard 


of world opinion in general 
and of African opinion in 
particular. 

The Liberian Government 
had hoped that in the in- 
terest of humanity Franco 
would have refrained from 
going ahead with the ex- 
plosion, Secietary Grimes 
said. 

By exploding the bomb, he 
added, France has not onlv 
shown complete disregard 
for the lives, feeling and 
happiness of the people of 
Africa, but has also flouted 
the United Nations. 


Her recent activity has in- 
cluded a role on a forthcoming 
"77 Sunset Strip" television 
episode entitled "^Safari" and 
she is up for a juicy part on a 
"Bourbon Street Beat" seg- 
ment. She has also been favor- 
ably mentioned as the girl to 
play Sidney Poitier's love in- 
terest in the George Glass pro- 
duction of "Paris Blues." 

Wjth so much going for her, 
luscious Miss Walden should 
be in our midst for a long time. 
She's a practical girl who re- 
fuses to allow success to dis- 
turb her. She may have her 
head in the clouds, but she has 
her feet orf the ground. 


has been told that the film 
clip may be used as a "trailer" 
to advertise the film that is 
due for an early release. Shape- 
ly Miss Walden has been at- 
tracting major attention for one 
reason or another since she 
decided she had had it as a 
lady mortician and developed 
big eyes for show business. 
No Bandemas 

She made eyebrow-lifting 
news as ' a newcomer to films 
who had the audacity to turn 
down a role in the "Raintree 
County" film a few years ago. 
She considered the role as a 
"bandana days" type of thing 
with heavy emphasis on dia- 
lect, and would have no part 
of it. 

Since then, the 24-yoar-old 
beauty has often been referred 
to as the sepia answer to Jayne 
Mansfield. Her measurements 
are 36-22-40. 

She has just recently been 
approached by Playboy maga- 
zine to pose for stills for a 
spread in the book that would 
show off her scenic curves. The 
voluptuous miss did not state 
as to whether she had accepted 
the offer, but did say that she 
is scheduled for a pictorial lay- 
out in Look magazine. 
Hot Copy 

Barbara has been "hot copy" i(,ounters. Similar action was 
for the nation s columnists 
since her entrance Into show- 
business. The Associated Press 
carried a lengthy story on her 
to papers throughout the na- 
tion when she was selected as 
one of Satan's Seven Sinners 
in "The Private Lives of Adam 
and Eve" that stars Mickey 




Thousands of 
Students March 

(Continued from Page 1) 
tions have been held in New 
York, Philadelphia, Chicago 
and elsewhere in the North. 

They were also taking 
place, however, in some cities 
in the South, such as in Char- 
lohe, N. C, and Richmbnd 
and Hampton, Va. 

At Winston - Salem, N. C. 

several hundred Negroes voted 

! to boycott downtown stores 

having segregated lunch 


taken at Richmond. 

In Chattanooga, scene of 
tension early last week, police 
were out in full force, aided 
by the Fire Department, to 
prevent new mass demonstra- 
tions. 


In many cities, stores were 
Rooney, the reason being tha'tj shutting their doors or were 
the AP writer considered it a [closing their lunch counters 
rare feat when Hollywood se-jas Negroes, frequently aided 
lects a Negro lovely over 300! by white students, sought to 


white hopefuls. 


end jim crow. 



138 Yeart^ 
To Equalize 

WASHINGTON.— Negroes will require 138 years, 
or until 2094. t6 secure equal participaUonin skilled- 
??aJ?trainmk and cmployment-nf present advance- 
ment Ses pirsist, accord ing to a survey made pub- 
lie last Thursday. 


■Jri 


APPOVNTED— James M. 
Woods, builder, has just re- 
ceived word of appointment 
to two housing posts. 

J. M. Woods 
Gets 2 Housing 
Appointments 

James M. Woods, president 
of Woods Construction Com- 
pany and Pioneer Builders, 
and treasurer of Safety Sav- 
ings and Loan Association, 
has just received notice of 
two appointments. 

He has been appointed to 
the International Housing 
Committee ef the National 
Association of Home Builders, 
and he has also been named 
chairman of the Minority 
House Committee of the Home 
Builders Association of Los 
Angeles, Orange and Ventura 
Coi/nties. 

The construction company 
head, active in many areas in 
the housing field, is a member 
of the FHA Urban Develop- 
ment Committee, and a mem- 
ber of the board of the Re- 
modeling Contractors Associa- 
tion. 



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PROSPERITY 

Dr. Paul A. Baran. professor 
of Economics at Stanford Uni- 
versity will be the speaker on 
Friday, March llTat 8 p.m. at 
the Unitarian Public Forum. 

The topic of his talk, which 
will be held at the Auditori- 
um of the First Unitarian 
Church at 2936 Eighth street, 
will be: Can We Have Pros- 
perity With Peace? 


The nation-wide study of 
racial discrimination in ap- 
prenticeship training pro- 
grams was compiled by Her- 
bert Hill of the Ubor Dept 
of the NAACP. 

The survey, entitled "The 
Negro Wage Earner «nd Ap- 
prenticship," reports on the 
number of Negroete in con- 
struction trades and other ap- 
prenticeship programs in Bal- 
timore, Boston, Chlcftgo, Cleve- 
land, Detroit, and San Fran- 
cisco as well as other cities. 
It indicates that Negroes con- 
stitute less than one per cent 
of those admitted into ap- 
prenticeship training pro- 
grams. 

The study notes that "no 
matter what the formal or in- 
formal hiring procedure, the- 
ultimate authority to hire an 
apprentice resides with man-- 
agement. Therefore, nianage- 
ment is basically respTinsible 
for rejection of Negro ap- 
prentices on the basis of race." 

It also clearly shows that 
organized labor, ma'nagement, 
state and federal government 
offic