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I 2— The -Califbrril* E<q l» 


Thursday; December 22, 1960 


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Charged 

To 3 La Officials 

1, NEW" ORLEANS — The federal government. 

Which smce Nov. 14 has consiste;itly overruled all 

attempts of the Louisana governor and legislature to 

ejtfdrce segregation in New Orleans, on Tuesday inti- 

H*^?2.f °"**™P^ actions against three of the state's 
top oCHciaix. <$> 

The U.S. Justice Department Friday when bills and sala- 


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Mked a U.S. Court! to render a 
cootempt decision against Lt. 
Gov. C. C. (Taddy) Aycock, 
House Speaker Thomas Jewell 
and Stale Supperintendent of 
EAroation Shelby Jackson. 
Withheld Salaries 

Reason tor -the contempt re- 
.qucets* was the withholding 
by the state <rf salaries of 
teachere in New Orleans' inte- 
ffrated schools. 

The motiosis filed hy U.S. 
Dtet Atty. M. Heburn Many 
said the three men refuse to 
"d?aw, sign and issue salary 
checks to employees at Wih 
Mam Frantz Elementary 
Soho<d and McDonogh 19 
filementaiy School and to cer- 
tain other employees." 

The federal action came 
after St Louis heiress Miss 
lafen Steinberg said she was 
depositing half a million dol- 
lars in a New York bank for 
u^e by the. school board to 
fneet its obligations. 
I EJuftene Sands, president of 
Magnetio Research of White 
Plains, N.Y., said his firm 
would send $5000 to supple- 
ment Miss Steinberg's offer. 
There were also reports that 
otters of aid oame from Los 
Angeles, but the details were 
DOt rei^eased. 

Iniinatimen Act 

Additional backing for the 
mAiooI board came from busi- 
ness men in New Orleans. 
Last Wednesday as 100 civic 
lead«8 called for ah "imme- 
diate end to threats, defama- 
tion and resistance to those 
Who administer our laws." 

They took out a large ad in 
<}ie daily papers to get their 
mdnsage across to the people 
of the city. 

They called for an end to 
0beet demonstrations and 
lurged full suppcal; for "city 
officials, the police and the 
duly elected school board of 
the parish of Orleans." 
Financial Pinch 

Business men admitted that 
the violence and hj^te cam- 
paign lannohed when four 
llttie Negro girls, all six years 
old, entered the two schools in 
mid-Novenaber have seriously 
hurt business. The loss affect- 
ed both those who cater to the 
people of New Orleans and 
those who depend upon the 
tourist trade. 

The financial pinch Is ex- 
pected to hit the schools this 


rie. of more than $3 million 
fall due. 

In Baton Rouge, meanwhile, 
the legislature was still try- 
ing to find ways to circum- 
vent the integration order 
Latest plan is to raise the 
state Income tax trom 2 to 3 
cents on the dollar, to pay for 
the special legislative sessions 
and to provide funds for a 
private school plan for white 
students. 


Sea8on*i Cieetings 

THE ENGLISH 

BUSINESS AND 

PROFESSIONAL 

CENTER 

8500 S. Broadway 

PL. 3-5544 

M>ii»aaMlii> n i i e lWI> ii nl> ii» t> ii< 


U. N. Censures 
Segregation in 
South Africa 

NEW YORK— By a vot^ or 
90-0, the U.N.-General Assem- 
bly Sunday called on Soutb 
Africa to end apartheid (seg- 
regation) laws in the man- 
dated territory of South West 
Africa. 

A resolution asking the U.N. 
to investigate conditions in 
the territory and propose 
steps toward self-government 
was adopted 78-0 with 15 ab- 
stentions. ' 

Violation 
, The resolution held South 
Africa's policies in South 
West Africa violated her ob- 
ligations under the 1920 
League of Nations mandate. 
The "South African govern- 
ment has refused to convert 
the mandate to a U.N. trustee- 
ship. 

In other resolutions, the 
assembly commended Ethio- 
pia and Liberia, for asking 
the world court to find South 
Africa guilty of such viola- 
tions; urged an end to arbi- 
trary imprisonment and de- 
portation of Africans in the 
territory, and sought punish- 
ment of police and soldiers 
who shot and killed 11 Afri- 
cans there a year ago as they 
were demonstrating against 
forced resettlement. 

South Africa had moved 
that the assembly refuse to 
consider the resolutions on 
grounds the issues involved 
were before the court. This 
motion was defeated 82-1 with 
only ^outh Africa voting for 
it. 


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^MACY'S PICKETED— Maci's Department Store in New 
YorJi is being picketed in protest against refusal of its y4 1- 
lanta Sirbs'tditiry , Davison-Paxnn, to serve "Negroes tit' its 
lunch counter. Picket line exfftndcd three blocks. The dem- 
onstration was called by CORE. 


U.N. Congo Debate 
Ends in Deadlock 

By GRACE E. SIMONS 

United Nations' efforts to compromise the two 
opposing views on the Congo ended in failure Tues- 
day, but the U.N, Assembly voted funds for contiuing 
the Congo operation before adjournment until March 

"Efforts at arriving at. some °^ approving U.N. actions 



iVita 



Hunt Three Men 

(Continued from Page 1) 
some who saw a man run 
down the alley to a car parked 
on 73rd street. Two men were 
sitting in the car. , 

As the thief pulled open the 
car door, one of the men 
gunned the engine an<f sped 
away. 

Some reports indicated that 
possibly two men, instead of 
one, entered the store, while 
only one of the trio remained 
in the car. 

Police got a description of 
the car and of the^three men, 
all Negroes, who made their 
escape. 


ADams 1-9236 

DOCTORS' 
T'HARMACY 

■ W. B. ADAMS, Proprietor 
4012 SOUTH CENTRAL AVE.j 

Zmmummmimt 



SCIENCE GRANT 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Presi- 
dent S. J. Wright announced 
tl^is week that Fisk University 
has Been granted $82,400 by 
the National Science Founda- 
tion to support a Summer 
Science Institute for 60 teach- 
ers of- science and mathe- 
matics in secondary schools. 


kind of settlement in the 
Congo itself floQndered, with 
the country splintered by sep- 
aratist movements and the 
mounting threat of civil war. 
Struggle for Control 

The stumbHng block in the 
U.N., as in previous debates, 
was the question of support of 
the jailed prferhier, Patrice 
Lumumba, versus support for 
the pro- Western President 
Joseph Kasavubu and the 
"strong maji" dictator, also 
pro- Western, Col. Voseph Mo- 
rn utu. 

The U.N. conflict. In turn, 
reflects the struggle in the 
Congo over control — whether 
there shall be a strong cen- 
tral government as advocated 
by Lumumba or a loose fed- 
eraaetion of semi-independent 
provinces, favwed by Belgium 
with the support of other 
Western powers. 

Two resolutions, reflecting 
.these opposing viewpoints, 
were debated in the U.N. As- 
sembly, one proposed by the 
United States and Great Bri- 
tain, the other by India, Yugo- 
slavia and six other --> Afro- 
Asian nations. 

Both Seaelutiens Fail 

A two-thirds majority was 
needed for passage. The Unit- 
ed Slates resolution just bare- 
ly failed of passage, winning 
43 votes, with 22 against and 
32 abstentions. No African 
nation supported the U.S. 
stand. Five opposed it and 18 
abstained. 

The Afro-Asiaii resolution, 
backed by the Soviet bloc, re- 
ceived 28 votes, with 42 
against and 27 abstentions. 
Many African nations sup- 
ported this proposal. 

This resolution sought the 
immediate release of Lumum- 
ba and the convening of the 
pio-liament that was elected 
just prior to the formal grant- 
ing of freedom last July 1 and 
suspended in September by 
Mobutu when he ^t himself 
up as ruler. i 

It also sought the neutraliz- 
ing of Mobutu's Congolese 
army. 

The U.S. -British resolution, 
on the contrary, had the effect 


in 
supporting Kasavubu and 
Mobutu and called upon the 
president to restore conditions 
that would permit the recon- 
vening of parliament. 

The British representative, 
in speaking on behalf of that 
resolution, advocated "prompt, 
■fair and open trials for de- 
posed Premier Lumumba and 
other imprisoned leaders." 

Irriplicit^ in that approach 
was the.-concept that Lumum- 
ba's arrest was legitimate, 
which is hotly disputed by 
Lumumba's supporters. 
No Agreement 

Ch'er the weekend, represen- 
tatives of the various factions 
in the Congo met in- Brazza- 
ville across the Congo River 
from Leopoldville. Kasavubu 
attempted to bring about 
minimum agreement between 
the warring factions, but was 
unable to gain headway. 

Neither Moise Tshombe, 
head of secessionist Katanga 
Province and generally re- 
gard as a Belgian puppet, nor 
Albejt Kalonji, president of 
the South Kasai Province, alsp 
tagged with pro-Belgian lean- 
ings, would agree to, any lim- 
iting of their powers by a cen- 
tral government. 

Present at the meeting were 
representatives of Lumumba's 
Congolese National Movement. 
Blockade, Battle* 

On their return to LeopOld- 
ville. all the politicians made 
widely divergent and contra- 
dictory statements, from 
which it was appp>arcnf that 
nothing hart been solved. 

^I^nwhile, Mobutu has 
proclaimed an economic boy- 
cott on Oriental Province. 
Lumumba's stronghold, and 
battles Were threatening on 
the borders of that province. 

In Kivu Province, at the 
capital Bukavu, there was a 
battle Friday between Congo- 
lese troops and a U.N. service 
company composed of Nigeri- 
ans. The Congolese had jailed 
a 50-member Austrian medical 
team, claiming that the Aus- 
trians were in reality Bel- 
gians in disguise. 

In the six hour battle, one 
Nigerian was reported killed 


Off icer Awarded 

For Rescuing Five 

Officer Henderson Cooper, of Newton Street 
Police Station, and Policewoman Dorothy Pettigrew, 
at present assigned to the Main Jail, were among 
police officers given awards for meritorious service 
during the year 1960. ! 

Cooper was one of eight 
officers given Class "A" com- 
mendations for exceptional 
police work "beyond the call 
Of duty." 

Saw Flomeg 

Miss Pettigrew, along with 
18 men in the department, re- 
ceived a Class "B" commenda- 
tion for meritorious police 
work. 

Cooper's award resulted 
from his rescue of five per- 
sons from a flaming residence 
at 1244 E. 21st street Dec. 4. 
1959, three of whom were 
children. 

Cooper saw flames rising 
from the roof of the house and 
entered to check for sleeping 
<x;cupants. 

He led one person to safety. 
When a woman screamed hys- 
terically that her grandchil- 
dren were asleep in the rear 
bedroom, he ran back into the 
house and found three srnall 
children. He grabbed all three 
in his arms and carried them 
outdoors. 

Determined to Jump 

Then he learned there was 
someone on the second floor of 
the building. Cooper again ran 
back into the house and rush- 
ed up the stairs, which by this 
time were engulfed in flames 

Standing near the front 
window was a man so terri- 
fied that-he refused to follow 
the oifi^ down the stairs as 
directed and insisted that he 
was going to jump out the 
window. Realizing that the 
jump could be fatal, the 
officer directed him to assist 
in tying bed sheets together, 

Cooper then anchored one 
end of the line around his arm 
and dropi>ed the other end out 
the window, permitting the 
man to lower himself to safe- 
ty. 

After checking *the remain- 
ing rooms and finding them 
vacant, Cooper ran back down 
the stairs and through the 
front door just as part of the 
ceiling •collapsed 'across the 
staircase. 

He then aroused the occu- 
pants of neighboring houses. 

The ^ward given him was 
in recognition of his display 
of conspicuous courage in the 
faci^of extreme danger, with 
complete disregard for his 
personal safety. 

Policewoman Pettigrew was 
given her award for work done 
as ,an agent while she was 
working at the Narcotics Divi- 
sion. ,, • 


March, of Dimes-supported 
research, in addition to de- 
veloping two anti-polio vac- 
cines, has increased medical 
knowledge in a wide range of 
diseases, including cancer, 
measles and the common cold- 


and three U.N. soldiers were 
reported wounded. One of the 
latter was British. Ten Congo- 
lese were said to have been 
killed. 


DUTY. PLUS — Hender- 
son Cooper was awarded a 
Class "A" commendation for 
exceptional police work "be- 
yond the call of duty" for 
saving the lives of five peo- 
ple, three of whom were 
children, during a fire on E. 
21st street. 



Omegas Open 

Conclave; Mon. 
In San Anfonio 

SAN ANTONIO, Texaa. — 
Four college presidents are 
scheduled to be panel partici' 
pants during the Omega Psl 
Phi Fraternity's 47th Grand 
Conclave that opens here at 
San Antonio, on Monday, Dec. 

The fraternity's theme f*r 
the year is "Yoyth ot the 
World: Accelerators of Prog- 
ress and Change." 

Top Leaders 

The four presidents will be 
heard on Thursday afternoon 
at the 2:15 ses^on. They arc: 
Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, More- 
house College, Atlanta; Dr. 
Samuel Nabrit, Texas South- 
ern University, Houston; Dr. 
W. S. Davis, Tennessee A. & I. 
University, Nashville, Tenn.; 
and Dr. John F. Potts, Voor- 
hees Junior College, Denmark, 
S. C. 

The conclave opens with 
registration at 10 a.m. at St' 
Phillips College Auditorium. 

Business sessions will con- 
tinue Tuesday; Dec. 27 at the 
Villita Assembly Building, 
Presa and Villita streets. 

H. Carl Moultrie, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, the national 
executive secretary, will pre- 
side during part of the session^ 

Presiding at the fraternity's 
opening session will be the 
Grand Basileus, Dr. I. Gregory 
Newton, professor of Political 
Science, North Carolina Col- 
lege, Durham, N. C. 

In addition to Moultrie and 
Newton, other officers are: 
Gary D. Jacobs, first vice- 
grand basileus; James L. 
Felder, second vice-basileus; 
Walter H. Riddick, grand 
keeper of records and seal; 
J. B. Blayton, grand- keeper of 
finance; Ellis F: Cprbett, Mi- 
tor of Oracle; Charles A. Ray, 
co-director, public relations; 
W. O. Walker, co- director, 
public relations; Carl A. 
Earles, grand counselor and 
S. D. Kane, grand marshall. 


MERIT AWARDED — 

Policewoman Dorothy Petti- 
grew, along with IS men, 
was awarded for "meritor- 
ioifs" work by the Police 
Depi. - 


Dogs, Cats Are 
Fine Xmas Gifts 

Here's a Christmas gift sug- 
gestion from the Los Angeles 
S.P.C.A.— the gift of a new 
pet, if your iamily is able and 
willing to care for theanimal 
properly. 

A wide selection of healthy, 
affectionate dogs and cats are 
available now at S.P.C.A. 
shelters, awaiting adoption in- 
to suitable homes, says George 
Crosier, general manager of 
the Society for PreventioiT of 
Cruelty to Animals. 


something to buy? Something to 
•ell? Try a classified ad in the 
Eagle. They cost only $1 for 15 
words. And they get results. 



OMEGA LEADER — Dr. 
.1. Gregory Newton, ^tmi 
basileus, will preside at the 
opening session of tke Ome- 
ga Psi' Phi conclave in San 
Antonio, Texas, Monday, 
Dec. 26. 


Six to Sue 
UCLA Over 
Permit Ririe 

Six UCLA Students filed 
suit this week in Superior 
Court challenging a univer- 
sity regulation barring the 
distribution of literature on 
the campus without permis- 
sion of university officials. 
' The suit, which is support- 
ed by the American Civil Lib- 
erties Union, asks for a court 
order declaring the regulation 
unconstitutional and in viola- 
tion of the First and 14th 
Amendments. 

The regulation was adopted 
on November 13, 1959, and 
went into effect last Febru- 
ary. It provides that "no lit- 
erature may be ' distributed 
free or sold in connection with 
meetings or events without 
permission obtained in ad- 
-ranee." 

ACLU Attys. A. L. Wirin and 
Lawrence Steinberg said the 
students hoped to distribute 
pamphlet discussing both 
sides of thep racial segrega- 
tion issu^, but objectifd to tite 
university's "paternalism" im- 
plicit in the regulation. 


fi Days Only- Beginning SUNDAY, Dec. 251. 


r/JfrAh^/"^ 


MAN FREED 

STAGE 


I 


«TAIIRIN« 

•t JACKIE WILSON , 

iMtfy Ttrdropt"i"ril Bo SMti$fhd"J"MoM at lasf^ 

|w5„a^£S-* v«.-s.r* ^?i«i5!-»*^; 

5 BIG STAGff SHOWS DAILY * 

SpMid MMmslit Shew mi Horn Yom'o tvl 
FEATURE MOVIE on Giant SerMit 


iC^ 


UNITED ARTISTS 


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m n o m m n tm* 


opens the 
door to 59 


banting seivices 
at Bank of America ! 


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and UOAN ASSOCIATION 

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RE.^PPORTlO^'M^:^r COSIERESCE—.^tomey Geueral Stanley Mosk (,nitn) 
ponders fipiirfs prist nte'ti h\ a niin-pnrUmn litlzfns ifjnirnit/ei' iihiih unicd rt-draititrt; of 
afsemhlx and inngrcs.<'n)Ht:l distrnt. houndiiry lines. From lelt to rit/hl : Ally. .Mortinn 
Moten. Hf lid el I lirren. Dnnnld Derruks, M osk and Dnx'id Siolt ^V. 'J'lie eoniinittee tip- 
prnrfd jtt a legislative henrint) last Friday. (Adnins) ,. ^ 


Residents Protest 
Unfair Boundaries 


(Continued from Page 1> ■ 
the north lind Artesia on the 
south and between Alameda 
on the east and Western ave- 
nue on the west. The 66th dis- 
trict would be located between 
the 55th and the 62nd with 
Van Ness as its western boun- 
dary. The population of the 
55th would be 203,000 and that 


Si% 


Try 


focation 
Awakens Woman 

i Miss Geneva Mae Sims. 32, of 601 E. 27th street, 
told police that she was awaker^ed about 2:30 Satur- 
"day morning when a ma^ she identified as James 
Green was holding a pillo\v over her face, shutting 
off the air. ^ '" 

She struggfed free andi.. ■ . 

fought him off. He left, but<unempioymenT 

returned about 7:30 a.m. j, . 

Afraid he would kill her. sheTiere InCreaSeS 

called the police. Unemployment in the Lo« 

Miss Sims said this wa.s; the Angeles - Long Beach Orange 

second time Green. 28. a tiauk County area io.<(> lo 168.900 in 

driver, had tried to kill her November from l.>fi.lOO in Oc- 

while she slept. tober. a 33 percent increase 

The first time, about a lompar^'d with the s a ni t- 

month ago. she awoke to find inonlh in 19.^9 wlien 126. i(X) 

him bending o\er lier. with persons were seeking job.s. 

his nands around her throat. r^he rate of unemploymenl 

attempting to k'trangle her, .^„,(,^,,„^.^J ^y 5 g p^,^.j,pHjj y,e 

she said. 'labor force in .November. It 

She blamed that attack on:^^^ 5 _j p^nent ii. October 

Green's drinking. !^„(i 45 percent in November 


300 Towns 
In South Hit 

By Boycotts 

ST. PETERSBURG. Fla. - 
The NAACP went to the 
community last week for 
support of itc "No Christ- 
mas Gilt Buying" drive 
through a series of public 
meetings in yaccmt lots. 

The association launched 
the pre-Christmas boycott 
throughout the Sftutheast 
last week. Mrs. Ruby Hur- 
ley, NAACP southeast re- 
gional director, said in- 
volved are more than 300 
communities in six states: 
Georgia, Florida. North aiid 
South Carolina, Mississippi 
and~ Tennessee. 


Color is Badge 
Of Honor, Says 
Fund Director 

GREENSBORO, N.C.— Refer- 
ring to .Africa as the "bridge 
between the Ea.st and the 
West — the last great frontier 
for the West" — Dr. R. OHara 
Lanier 
urged the 

dieiiee at Bennett College, 
recently 10 re-ideniify thern- 
.selves with .Africa. "le.-;t what 
we know as a tree society 
pa.ss from our generation." 

Dr. Lanier, direclor of AfrU 
can .Affairs tor the Phelps- 


of the 66th would be 150,000.] 
The two districts would be 
combined into one congres- 
sional district with a popula- 
tion in excess of 350,000. 
- "Not Begging 
Acting as spokesmaQ for the 
committee, Wendell Green,- 
Sentrnfel editor, told the as- 
sembly committee, headed by 
Robert Crown, that the group 
"is not ?pproaching with hat, 
1 in hand "begging for a hand- 
:out." He also assured the as- 
semblymen that it'^was not 
j "giddy with a sense of power 
making excessive demands." 

The case for the plan was 
i bolstered by carefully drawn 
', inaps with 1960 census Jigure.s 
I showing population and resi- 
dence. Perrv Parks, Atlv. 


British Weigh 
Bill to Ban Bias 
' LONDON — The 
House of Commons lost 
Wednesday gcrre formal 
first reoding to a~^U 
that would bar dis- 
crimination in England. 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 The CslifOrnis E^l»-? 


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Xmas Party 

Planned for 

Hate Victims 


Morgan Moten, David St-oil 

of New York City. <-,. ^^^^ ^j,,. Marnesba 

Founders' Day an- Tackeit coilahoialed in the 

preparation of ihe maps and 

collection of .siaiL-^tics. 

Negroes In Majority 
If di.sirid biiiuidary line.< 
are drawn as prupo.sed by the 
ciii/.ens commiuee both the 
rCjth and 62nd a.s.sembly dis- 
triiLs would ha\e an over- 


Dr. Weefces' 'Procpress- 
.'TooSlow' for Warren 

Dr. LeRoy Weekes, vice president of thef'tJdSlMi 
League, and Edward Warren, president <rf **>« 
NAACP] clashed^this week in their estimate of r*ce 
progress in the United States. 

The clash came in continu- ^ ' " 

ing comments over articles!^ ^^ *. ■ l_ 
written by Nigerian journalist 17 GGT JODS CIS 
Oladele Bibliari, in which he L, _^ , 

was sharply critical of condi-IBUS DriVOrS 
tions he found here. ■ ■ ■ »■■ i -1 

round Nothln, Good Jin JackSOnVljl6| j 
WASHINGTON — There will ^''- '^'^kes, stressingj JACKSONVILLE, .Fla, !-4 
be some Christmas cheer this a^^cJi'^^ements, was critical of 1 Nine Negro bus drivers were 
year in the drab lives of Bibliari ^ecause during "the] hired here recently, accofd^ 
"thoasands of Negroes in f*>"^ ninths he spent in thisjing to Ruby Hurley. NAACP. 
Fayette and Haywood Coun- ^^V"^>'' he never found arty- ! southeast regional director, th* 
ties, Tenn., who face starva- ^''i,"^ 2°*^ *** ^'"** "*»°"^- '^'P^ hired m this Flonda 
tion and exposure because ,J\f°^ things Dr. Weekes city. . , ; 

they dared exercise their right 1'"°"°^' should have beeni They will not be restricted 
10 vote ] mentioned are, to quote him, to driving within the Negro' 

There will be a soecial*''^'^""^'"'" **^ '"*''*' discnmi- 'community. Mrs. Huriev »aid. 

.. ^ , .V .naetion in the armed forces __._. .„„i„.^ „„* "u— ..i,. ' 

dump'- candy for the young- 1 , :.. .,,„ .,„i: .„ ,...„:i„, I This employment break-j 


sters and a "Carol 
Owen College in 
Wedne.'.iijiv. Dec. 21. 


" 'and in the nations capital, L, „ , 
al .1 c- r- . J ■ • • through 

|l .e Supieme Court decision |,^t*acp 


Stoke.-i Fund, who recently 

toured .Africa, said: j^whelming majoriiy of 

"You and I .-should cherish v(.ieis. Tlie fi.ird district would 
th ■ idea tlial color is not a I have about ,w per cent Ne^ro, 
disgrace, but an honor- Deep; population and the 66ih dis- 
trict somewhat less than a 
: majority, 
reminded hisj The committees plan would 
listener's that highly organ-, eliminate the 61st assembly 
ized Snd complex civilizations! district, now represetj^ied by 
flouri.'^hed in Africa long be-] Jess Unruh and would split up 
fore the white man came to, that district between the 66tH^ 
the i'6ntinent. f^idence re-'6>2nd and 6.3rd disyi'cts. It 
veals that as early as 3.31.5 would also remove a sub- 
B.C. t h e A,frican-Eg\rptLans,'stantial number of Negro 
had developed a written lang 


are the roots of our heritage 
in Africa." 

The ■ Speaker 


this year . "which spelled out 

ll complete bilLs of ci\il liber- 

[ties." Supreme Court decisions 

'since ]9.'J4 that have furthered 

integration and student sit-ins 

ill the South. 

Warren, a real estate bioker, 
backed Bibliari's criticisms. 
I Who Arc W« Kidding t 
I Progres-s- in the racial field, 

some- 


uase. 


Packages Left 
In Open Cars 
Invite Thieves 


$1.25 Farm 
Wage Proposed 


Arrested at the 27th street 
address. Green deTiied That he 
had attacked Miss Sims. He 
said, "I didn't do anything to 
.that woman last night. I 
wasn't even there. I was 
Santa Monica." 


a year ago. 


DEATH RIDES 

Leave drinking 


alone if fure was gi\en unanimou.^ ap- 

in you're going to be driving. ' provat Friday by Gov. Brovvn's 

[and driving alone if you've | Advisory Committee on Chil- 


Cluisimas shuppeii are be- 
in^ rallied b\ the Los .An- 
geles Holice Depailmeiil of 
I lie danger of lea\injr Chii.sl- 
A iccommendaiioii lliat a mas paikages and gifts Jn 
miiiimnm wage of S1.'2.t an automobiles. \ 

hour be set for women andl Dining the Chii.-^iinas -sea-, h^^aded 
childien employed in agt icul-. .son. thefts 


voters from the 26th congres- 
sional district 11 o w repre- 
sented b.v James Rooseselt 
and the 23id distiict 
.seiited by Cl>de Doyle. 

Ministers Speak 

Coiuiniitee spokesmen told 
the asseinl)l>iiiaii Jhal .\e_L;i<) 
i-oininuiiii ie.s lia\e a uiiil> of 
interest in ina\i> pioblenis 
glow in t; out of -what they 
called "llie taii.< of dife" and 
added 1)91 stii li coiidit ic«jis ate 
apt to prevail for a "loiij; 
lime to coine.'' 

A coiiimitiee of ministers 
h\- Ke\- 


.Sing „, , 

.Mempliisl,iy-;^i calling for integrated 

, : schools, the platforms of the 

Caravan ! two major political parties 

Memphis citizens, organized | 

by .\tty. James F. K.^iles, are 

bringing the farmers and their 

children lo the ciiy in a cara- 

,van pro«ession that will 

Negro j,.j,^.p| jIo^vh Beale street to 

Ihe festivities aJ the college. 

College Pres. Chailes Dink- 
ins will play the role of Santa. 

Tlie "Carol Sing" is expected 
to be the biggest civir rights: he said, is so slow it 
yuletide celebration in the*''"*'^ *''*" ^oes backwards, 
country, and will serve; as the 
starting point of a renewed 
nationwide drive to aid the 
beleagured Negroes. 

No Federal Aid 

Some 300 families have been 
evicted or face eviction. Tents 
are being set up as their only- 
shelter against the cold of 
repie- winter. 

i Appeal.'* to the Federal 

goveinmeiii to send in aiti 

lia\e su far 

■ " peace 


stemmed from! 
. outh council activi-i 
ties. The council has also; 
agreed to meet with a com- 
mittee of the Chamber iof 
Commerce in an effort to iron 
out lunch counter bias. 

Meanwhile, sit-in demonsir-! 
tions are continuing in con- 
junction with a "No Chrlstmlas; 
Gift B u y i n g" withholdii^g 
campaign against the entire 
downtown shopping district. '■ 


Safely Install 
Christmas Tree 


To Prevent Fire 

Don't let your . Chiistmiis ; 
tree be the cause of needlen 
, tragedy and fire. 


Tile .Vleinplijs parly is beiA 
aided by tile Crusader s, 
.\iionynious uf \\asliiii^;toii. \ 


Report Six With 


' The marks on Miss Sims' j done some drinking, advises dren and Youth. 
neck he iaid were caused dur-the National Automobile Club.| j^e committee 
ign a quarrel they had some. Drive after drinking and UCLA Extension 
time ago. 'Death rides by your side. IS. Hill street. 


Ghana, Guinea 
Seek Close Tie 

ACCRA. Ghatta — President 
Kwame Nkrumah was e,x- 
pected lo leave here Friday 
fora week's visit to Conakrv. 
■epoited 10 have capital of Guinea, 
assemniv men l- ,n u r s n a y lo^whooping cough. Dr. Pauline .Apparent purpose of the trip 
Shoppers are advised not to voice a plea for fairness in re- O. Roberts. Southwest District is to form the nucleus of a 
eave puichasp.s in cars in' rti.stricting plans., The delega- health officer, announced this Union of West African State 


sea- 
Jiom .aulomobiieslDywkins appeared before the' nues 
increase at an alarming rate. j,.^semb|vmen 'Fhursdav lo 


Whooping Cough 

Six children in the vicinity 
Maui ice.of V'ermimi and Florence ave 
are 


- I 


: I. 


Jle wertt on: . 

"Somebody's dodging the 
truth. The facts are obvious. 
Who are we kidding when we 
say great strides are being 
made? 

"Everywhere you look you 
can find segregation. We have' The Los Angeles Fire Dfe- 1 
been covering up too long oneipartment makes the following 
of the b^d features of Ameri- suggestions: 

Make sure you select *'a 
fleshly cut .tree with firmly 
attached needles. 

Keep the tree outside and in 
waiei- imtil > ou set it up for 

decorating. , 

When selling up the tree, 
select 'ihe coolest spot ybu 
can. away from radiators, 
heaiei-s|..,and fireplaces. 

ft pfcssible. set the tree ujp 

in a tiee holder that includes 

a confainer of water in which 

the ^unk can rest. Keep the 

ner filled. Do not put, 

ts on aluminum tree* 


can society. The Negro salutes 

ithe same flag and fights in 

I the .same .Army as the white 

iman, but doesn't gel the l>ene- 
met no lespoii.-ie. .-, , 
.... Ills 01 


plain sight. This is an in\ita-,tion also included Revs. week. 


^ 


met at the, tion 10 the thief. e\en if win- Syl\ ester Odom. James Har-' All of 
Building on dows and doors are securely^ gett. Jerry Ford and Claxton pie-schoo 

I lofked. ■ ' McCov. 1 2 to .i .\ears 


! Nkritmah wa.'; accompa 
the.se children are by cabinet ministers anc'. 1 
age. ranging from ing members of the 
old. Convention Peolpes Pa 


'-,4/ this, time of tite vear it is « 
pleasare to tnrn a.iide from 
eveiydajl affairs and send lo 
•nr friends, old and newf warm 
Sttaon's Oreetingt nni Sincere 
■Iftfhheii to^ iht Coming 

,Marti« Diifribttlln* C*me«"y 

2071 W. StavM* *va. 

Im Ai|(*I«< 47, CalitorKia 


GEORGE G. SMITH CO. 
WVESTMENTS AND 
REAL ESTATE ; 

AUTHoaiztD AOiNt roa 

LWIRTY SAVINGS A LOAN ASSN. 

HlfiHI. Y Ph:Rsn\A I.IZKJt 

sKR\it:tr 

2»34 S. WESTERN AVE. 

LOS ANGELES RE. 1-9338 


Compliments of 

Our Good Friends 

i 

J. A. POWERS, 

INC. 

4855 West Jefferson 

Lot Angeles 16 


"BE HAPPY" f] 

CONTACT TONY LEASE | | 

MIYAKO TRAVEL MA. 5-3060 | { 

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'Reason s \-jreetings 

Sir Debuteers Social 


Club 



UNIVERSITY 1 1 SEASONS CMBTINCS 

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Season's Greeting's From 


BAIIAN'S MARKET INC. 

5469 W. ADAMS BLVD. - 

Leadinq Pioneer Grocers oF 

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Since 1926 


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W*lls; Lucius Williams. 


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\ t SINK REAMING SERVICE J 

J < (Sink ■■larfiitt fer Oii^eialil ,f ? 
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Season .<■ (Irertings 


(DtiMWWiav 


ARTHUR L. CORNSWEET 
Mtrry ChrUtnwi - 




TEXACO SERVICE STATION If 

5299 West Washington |l 


WE 1-2321 

M. POWELL 



If 
If 
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1661 East V03rd Street 


^ Ki»tMLWi««*»aB ft ii> 1 >» aW i» «i»«(i»«i»«* »)»»«•«»« 


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8729 WILSHIRE BLVD. 

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516 SO. LAKE AVENUE 
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AHY. RAYFIELD LUNDY 

527 W. COMPTON 
COMPTON 
NE. 6-1106 ' 


*Dr. E. Pearl Riley 
5 Dr. Marcus S. W. 
J 1828 S. Western Avenue • 


McBroomJ, tl 
McBroom • "" 


17 DAYS IN EUROPE 


I 




• Ruimd Trip Air Tiansporiaiion I.os Augeics lo JXii-ope 

• IT Ua.vs U nil Vi.-iis to Lisbon. Maririri, .Nirf, Romf. P*'"ls 
antl London * 

• .Ml Hoiels and .^rconimodHlioiis Imluded 

• Comprehrnsive .siRhtseeing: 

A SMCIAL orr.SIASON VAIUI FOa 0*M.Y 





MERRY' CHRISTMAS 



ind 


HAPPY NEW YEAR 

rom 

E. G. AND LOUELLA ALLEN 

1 51 2 1 6th ST., SANTA MONICA, CALIF. 


I Season's Greetinos 

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Worry-ifraa rosarvalions. 


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'79 

ONE WAY COACH ONE WAY COACH 

CONTACT TONY LEASE 

MIYAKO TRAVEL 

Ma JI-30M 

-GIVE THi KRFEa GIFT T0 YOUIt FAiKULY^ 


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i>«r-**i*».»» •« 



4^Th« California Eagle 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 


.dTi'TkiA .<CU3k. A.A ^^'^ A. . id^k < 


Loren Miller, Publisher 


\lo^ ct 


j 1 


Th« California Eagio stands for complete integration or 
Noflroos Into ovory phase of American life through the demo(^rytic 
processes. , J/^ 

We favor: \ ' ^ 

1/ nPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Amirieons. 

3. Representfrtion in Government. 

4. Adequfrte old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in cril forms. 

2. Conimunists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Pubf/sfied fvery 7hur§dey tor Over 79 Years 
2,101 West Vernon, Corner of Vc^ Ness AXminster 5-3135 

/I/ 




The Kennedy Cabinet 


The composition of the Ken- 
nedy cabinet isn't calculated to 
set Negro voters dancing in the 
streets. The failure to include a 
Negro is disappointing, especially 
in light of the fact that the cabi- 
net was carefully picked to 
accord major recognition to all 
other groups from which Presi- 

"dent~Elect Kennedy >drew the 

•support necessary for his elec- 
tion. * 

Mr. Kennedy did say that he 
offered the postmaster general- 
ship to Congressman William 
Dawson and Dawson agreed that 

■ the offer had been made and he 
had declined. We're not much im- 
pressed by this adroit maneuver 

.because it proceeds oji the 
assumption that there was only 
one Negro in the whole countery 
who was of cabinet structure and 
that his declination disposed of 
the matter. 

One of the most important 
posts in the cabinet is that of the 
attorney general which went to 
Robert Kennedy, the president- 
elect's brother. We don't know 
what he plans to do in the civil 
rights controversy, rie has no 
record on that issue and his only 
qualifications for the ..position, as 
far as we can see, were Ifis 
activities as counsel for the com- 
mittee which investigated labor 
abuses. That committee was 
headed by Arkansas Senator 
John McClellan, a bitter-end seg- 
regationist. Of course, that com- 
mittee did nothing about the 
widespread and unlawful racial 
discrimination practiced by 
unions. We can only hope that 
Attorney General Kennedy will 
tackle the civil rights problems 


with the vigor for which he has 
been so widely acclaimed. 

Secretary of Health Abe Ribi- 
coff holds ;another cabinet post of 
importance to Negroes but his 
publicity "has been consistently 
slanted to depict him as a "mod- 
erate" and his known ambition to 
get to«the Supreme Court — may 
or may not — dispose him to take 
it easy in his dealfngs with racial 
matters. 

The men with the besti records 
on racial issues, Stewart Udall 
and Orval Freeman, occupy the 
posts of Secretary of Interior 
and Agriculture, respectively, 
end their activities will have 
little direct impact on civil rights 
matters. 

* The new postmaster general is 
a resident of Los Angeles but if 
Mr. Day has taken any stands on 
racial issues they have escaped 
our notice. Is is disturbing Jo note 
that his first assistant is a South 
Carolinian distinguished for 
nothing except partisan activi- 
ties. 

The important positions of Sec- 
retary of Defense and of the 
Treasury are in the hands of con- 
servative Republicans who have 
been discreetly silent on issues of 
major importance to Negro 
voters. ' 

Taken as a whole the cabinet is 
a carefully selected political 
group carefujly grounded on dead 
center. There isn't a crusader in 
the lot and it se^ms that if the 
new administration is going to 
assert any leadership on civil' 
rights issues that leadership will 
have to come from the new presi- 
dent. We'll have to wait and see 
what he has in mind. 


Shortsighted CityAtty. 


Apparently, Roger Amebergh 
Isn't going to have any opposi- 
tion in the race for city attorney. 
He has been an all-thiTigs-to-all- 
.aien public (rfficial with the re- 
sult that nobody can fijnd an 
issue on which to oppose him. 

The most significant thing 
about Mr. Arnebergh's office is 
that he rarely fmdsV place for a 
Negro attorney on his staff. One 
deputy did serve under him but 
when he resigned that seemed to 


end. the matter. • - 

We place little importance on 
the claim that there have been 
no applications for the jobs. In 
comparison there are a number 
of deputies in the. district attor- 
ney's and attorney general's of- 
fi,ces. Even the public defender's 

ice dropped its ancient color 
bar a few years ago. Only the 
county counsel and the city at- 
torney seem unable to find Negro 
lawyers to assist them. 


Rev. Henderson Speaks Out 


The Rev. J. Raymond Hender- 
son, pastor of Second Baptist 
Church, brought his Christian 
brethren up short in San Fran- 
cisco last week with a simple 
plea that "the National Council 
of Churches should do more than 
talk" about the Christian family. 
He reccMnmended that they take 
a Strong stand on the New 
Orleans situation. The churches 
responded with a resolution con- 
demning mob violence and, in 


effect, urging New Orleans Chris- 
tians to support school integra- 
tion. 

The Rev. Henderson has al- 
ways served as the strong voice 
of conscience in this community 
and in church affairs. He can be 
counted on to cut through silence 
and evasion on all moral issues. 
Los Angeles has every reason to 
be proud of a minister who in- 
sists on the practice' as well as 
the preachments of Christianity. 


Battleaxe &. Bread 


By Ltiimr I. Granger 


>c»o/^< 



A big part of my business is 
writiiM and ansyering letters. 
Lon^Bfetters and, short ones, 
letfew that are explanaitory 
and informative, or argu- 
mentative and i>ersuasive, ]et- 
.ters that do something for 
some one else and letters that 
ask some one to do something 
for the Urban League. 

And a big part of my avoca- 
tional pleasure is in reading 
some kinds olt letters, though 
generally ^^n't answer them. 
Some of these 
letters com- 
I ment on some-^ 
thing reported 
about me or on 
something I 
am quoted as 
having stated. 
Sometimes 
people just 
write to me to 
Jji hare th e i r 
Cmnger^Y feelings about 
sometbing /fn whi<Si they as- 
sume I ahri interested. And 
sometimes tH5y are so right. 

Distrusts Nkrumah 

There's the chap from 
Brooklyn, for instance, who i.? 
"of the opposite race," as 
some of us so quaintly de- 
scribe those whom the'census 
lists as "white." He is "Evident- 
ly a reader of the Amsterdam 
News, because he addressed 
his little note to me at that 
office even though it had 
nothing to do with anything" 
this column had recently "c^ir- 
ried. 

My correspondent is dis- 
trustful of Ghana's volatile 
prime minister, and comes 
right out and says so. That's 
all right; he has pleTtty of 
company — some of it in Ghana 
^^but his authority quoted 
doesn't constitute very sound 
reason for trus^ or mistrust. 

He includes a' clipping of a 
"New York Daily News'' edi- 
torialette. It's entitled, "Make 
Up Your Mind, Mr. N." The 
editorial refers to reports 
some weeks ago that Ghana 
intends to nationalize all for- 
eign business concerns within 
its borders. It ^contrasts this 
reported intention with the 
need of Ghana for investment 
of foreign capital. The Daily 
News is not reassured by Mr. 
Nkrumah's denial of any such 
intention, citing his , Marxist 
socialism as reason for skep- 
ticism as to hi^ government's 
trustworthiness and advising 
private capital to "bypass 
Ghana" unless and until 
"Nkrumah offers an ironclad 
guarantee against such 
thievery" as nationalizing 
business concerns. 

Like Castro?- -» 

My correspondent-'attached 
to this clipping a note of just 
13 words: "I don't trust this 
guy. He will do the same 
thing Castro did." I presume 
the "guy" he doesn't trust is 
Prime Minister Nkrumah, not 
the editorial writer of the 
Daily News. As a matter of 
tact, I don't see why he has 


to trust either. The News' edi- 
tor is writing^o appeal to the 
kind of people who read t)ie 
paper, thereby encouraging 
advertisers to buy space in it, 
while Ghana's prime ntinister 
is running his countiy^ such 
a way as to appeal to a major- 
ity of his voters, thereby in-; 
suring his continuance in 
power and advancing his 
dream of "Free Africa." 

Mr. Nkrumah's dream of a 
free Africa may not accord 
with the ideas of people in 
New, York City, Los Angeles, 
or even Nigeria. And the edi- 
torials of the Daily News 
may seem downright silly to 
many readers with different 
notions about Ghana or for- 
eign capital or "both. 

Right to Nationcdize 

But the- point is that Ghana 
has a perfect right to nation- 
alize its domestic or foreign 
businesses — if the people of 
the country think this is_ the 
thing to do. And foreign 
capital has a perfect right to 
enter, withdraw or stay out 
of Ghana entirely, if the 
prospect of. a fair return for 
capital investment seems 
dubious. This Isn't a matter 
for trust: it's a matter of 
figuring the odds. And busi- 
ness is generally pretty good 
at that' sort of figuring, at 
-home and abroad, and a good 
thing for the American people 
that it is. 

The Daily News editorial 
contrasts what it calls "Chris- 
tian honesty" with "Marxist 
larceny," but the comparison 
isn't that simple. There is 
such a thing as dishonesty on 
the part of people who will 
swear they ate Christians; and 
Marxism, so far as I've 'Ob- 
served, is more apt to be 
- muddle-mindedness than out- 
right' dishonesty. The dis- 
honesty is shown by those — 
such as Castro and his Com- 
munist tutors — who use .Marx- 
ism as the come-on while en- 
trapping the simple • minded 
into the toils of the Com- 
munist world conspiracy. 

I repeat, this isn't a matter 
for trust or lack of trust; it's 
a matter for understanding. 
We in this country have got 
to understand not only what 
the New African naiions do 
or say, but also the reason 
why they act as they do. Un- 
derstanding this, we'll come to 
understand also that- some- 
times their appearance of 
morality or lack of morality 
is an accurate reflection of 
what they see in us. 

Not what we are, but what 
they see. At times what we 
are is what they see — and it's 
not pretty at all. At-* times 
what they see is anything but 
what we are— and that's un- 
fortunate. But when we quit 
worrying about how much w* 
can trust Nkrumah and his 
fellows, and put some thought 
to how we can get them to 
trust us — when that time 
comes, we'll be on the road to 
effective world statesmanship. 


NAACP Selects Warren: 
Miller Leads National List 


(Continued from Page |1) 
to be valid after checking the 
names against office lists. 

Atty. James R. Akers Jr., 
former NAACP president, ob- 
tained 197 votes for the post 
of second vice president. Dr. 
H. Claude Hudson took third 
place with 172 votes. 

Although five vice presi- 
dents were elected, Warren 
advised that according to a 
recent amendment to the na- 
tional constitution, only three 
are regular voting members of 
the branch executive. . . 
BaUard I^ds 

Placing fourth and fifth 
were the Rev. C. W. Arnold, 
135 votes, and Atty, Herbert 
Simmons Jr., 121. 
' Top scorers for the branch 
executive committee were E. 
H. Ballard, 208; Johnny Otis, 
207; and Vivian Strange, 202. 

Others elected to the 18- 
member committee are: 

Rev. L. Sylvester Odom, 183; 
Beecham Jackson ir., 16S; W. 
L. .Robinson, 165; Vertnon 
Thompson, 165; Ventress John- 
son, 162; Dred Scott Neusom, 
157; Sadie Brewpr, 156; Rosa 
E. King, 149; Carl J.. Johnson, 
148; Ralph L. Davis, 138; 
James T. Allen, 133; John S. 
Gary, 133; Joseph E. ' Grim- 
mett, 128; J. B. Carter, 126; Joe 
Jones, 123. 

Vet* CloM 

Votes for treasurer and 
secretary were both so close 
that they could easily be up- 
set by the counting of th« 37 
challenged ballots. 

As of the initial count, 
Julia De Passe received 117 
votes for secretary, losing out 
to Patricia M. Elmore, wha 
received 128 votes. 

For treasurer. Dr. Frederick _ 
N. Spann obtained a count of 


129 votes, against 115 for 
Cecil Peterson. 

For the national executive 
board, in addition to Miller, 
those elected were Dr. -H. 
Claude Hudson (second with 
198 votes); Daisy Bates of 
Little Rock, "with 189 votes; 
Joseph Kennedy of San Fran- 
cisco, 154. 

Others of the 16 elected on 
the basis of the partial returns 
were: Daisy Lampkin, H. T. 
Delany; Walter Reuther, 
Arthur B. Spingarn, Stephen 
G. Spottswood, Felix H. Dunn, 
James Henton, A. S. Wiggins, 
William A. Ross, Chester I. 
Lewi% S. Ralph Harlow,, with 
a tie for 16th place between 
George V. Gardon and Carl 
Murphy. 

Judge Bernard Jefferson, as 
chairman, performed skillfully 
to keep the meeting at an 
even keel (almost) and mov- 
ing rapidly. Mrs. Alice Taylor 
served as secretary. 

The Rev. J. Raymond Hen- 
derson, in whose church the 
meeting was held, delivered 
the invocation. , 
•Rev. Ellis Casson, NAACP 
regional representative from 
San Francisco, represented the 
national office as an official 
observer. 


Xmas Story 

Nearly 300 music stlidents 
will appear in Markham 
Junior High School's third an- 
nual Christmas Concert to- 
night (Thursday), according to 
Principal J. Crosby. Stone. 

The hour-long program In 
the school's auditorium, 104th 
street and Compton avenue, 
l>egin8 at 7:45 p,m. There u 
no admission charge.. 


f 


Evers' Case 
Too Raw for 
Miss. Paper 

( (Continufed from Page 1) 
torney general, the Citizens 
Council, many other trusted 
officials and editors of our 
state. . . 

Hapepns to B« a Nt^rs 
"In Mississippi today we 
find our highest officials, our 
governor and two United 
States senators, our legisla- 
ytive leaders voicing criticism- 
of the courts . . . 

^'Yet, after all of the criti- 
cism which has been directed 
at our courts, who is it that 
is landed in jaij. Is it Gov. 
Barnett? No. ^eaker Walter" 
Sillers? No. Eithejf of our two 
United States senators? No. 
The individual happens to be 
•& Negro who^ represents the 
most unpopular organization- 
in our state and one to which 
we as segregationists do not 
subscribe." 

The editorial ends by say- 
ing that if the "humblest citi- 
zen is denied "the right to 
express his opinion today, "all 
of us ,may be slaves tomor- 
row."' 

Tried to Register 

The sentencing of Evers, 
who^is free on bond while his 
case is being appealed, is 
tied ' to the stf&nge case of 
Clyde K'ennard, a young 
poultry farmer, former stu-.. 
dent at the University of 
Chicago, and ,an applicant for 
admission to Mississippi 
Southern University. 

When Kennard appli 
the university, he w|i^ re- 
jected for "deficien^es in 
schoolastic records." 

When he ilrove away from 
the university's administra- 
tion building, Kennard was 
arrested for "reckless driving" 
and officers searched his car 
and "found" illegal whisky. 
Kermard was jailed on this 
charge. 

Marked Mem 

Any Negro who applies' to 
a "white"' school in Missi.ssip-. 
pi is a marked man and, al- 
though nothing was h*ard 
from Kennard for a time as 
he went about his poultry 
business, last spring lie was 
again hauled in by law of- 
ficers. 

The new charge against 
Kennard was that he agreed 
with another person to pur- 
chase five sacks of chicken 
feed to be stolen by the other 
person. The feed retails at $5 
a bag. 

The all-white jury found 
Kennard guilty in ten min- 
utes. 

Evers was asked in Jackson 
for a comment on the verdict 
rendered in the Forest County 
court nearly 1(X) miles away. 
He said the verdict was "a 
mockery of judicial justice." 
For this he was cited for con- 
tempt, found guilty and given 
30 days in jail and fined $100. 



Letters to the Editor 


To the Editor: 

It is my intention to ptcket^) 
Negro churches in Los An- 
geles until the current picket- 
ing of Woolworth has ceased. 

The manner of picketing is 
3ws: One church each 
/, from 10 a.m. to noon, 
'ith a sign reading: "Picket- 
ing Woolworth is a Christian 
Duty.** 

I intend to maintain Gand- 
hism discipline, and to wear 
cotton garments as a symbol 
o Gandhi's dress. « 

I have chosen Negro churdbes 
"because when a Negro pickets 
by my side. (I am Caucasian) 
people understand so much 
better. A bi-racial picket line 
is educational to the commu- 
nity. 

Chur.ches were chosen be- 
cause the Negro ministers rep- 
resent the most solidified 
leadership of the Los Angeles 
Negro Community. 

My being a Caucasian has 
no bearing on this project. be- 
cause to feel otherwise would 
be to say that a race is in- 
volved in an idea. 

No organization Is sponsor- 
ing this; it is my own idea 
and doing. Nor do I consider 
that Negro ministers are my 
opponents. Rather this method 
has been chosen to ask for a 
demonstration of brotherhood 
where it will count, in front 
of Woolworth. 

Each week a letter will be 
sent to a Negro, minister in- 
forming him (or her) that 
his church has been chosen 
for that Sunday's "5atya- 
graha" or Soul Force Walk. 
The Hindu word was given 
deeper meaning by Christ's . 
"Sermon on the Mount." 

The original of this letter 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ried Negro women. Andrew 
Jackson enlisted their support 
in the war of 1812 by flattrey 
and they gave him a big hand 
in the battle of New Orleans. 

Held Their Own 

This group of persons pretty 
well held its own until the 
Civil War. Sons and daugh- 
ters were often educated in 
France and the beautiful girls 
in many instances became 
wives or » mistresses of some 
of the leading citizens of the 
state. When thfe Civil War 
broke out the well-to-dc| Ne- 
groes, with a fine disregard 
of race, organized a regiment 
of "free men of color" to fight 
for the South and the New 
Orleans Picayune (still being 
published, incidentally) said 
of them: 

"We must pay well de- 
served compliments to the 
companies of free men of 
coloMoll well dressed, well 
drilled, and; comfortably un- 
iformed. Most of these eotn- 
ipdoies hare provided them- 
selves with arms unaided 
by the administration." 
When the Civil War ended, 
these Negroes grabbed for 
political power and for the 
first time remembered their 
Identity with other Negroes 
who had been slaves. Thre^e 
Santa Dominican brothers 
named Rouandez showed up 
with a dream ipf making 
Louisiana a state controlled by 
persons of African descent 
Tliey established a daily news- 
paper, The New Orleans Tri- 
bune, and began to urge 
Louisiana' Negroes to follow 
the example of Haiti, the 
Doininican Republic and Li- 
beria which they described as 
the "three Governments 
among civilized nations entire- 
ly in the hands of men of the 
African race." They controlled 
a faction of the Republican 
party called the "Pure Radi- 
cals" and tried to jwin the 
party nomination for a Negro 
■ in 1868 but their mari lost the 
nomination in the Republican 


convention by a vote of 45 to 
43. 

Bid For Power 

This bid for power by Ne- 
groes frightened the wits out 
of the so-called "Compromis- 
ing Republicans" and they 
promptly chose a Negro for 
lieutenant governor. The New 
Orleans Tribune was repudi- 
ated as "the organ of the Re- 
publican party." Undaunted 
the Pure Radicals put their 
own candidate in the field but 
he lost the gubernatorial race 
amid cries of corruption. 

The Pure Radicals didn't 
give up the ghost with their 
loss in 1868 but they lost 
ground in the stormy ten 
j'^ars that followed and gradu- 
ally dropped out of sight after 
the Republicans abandoned 
the S6uth in the Compromise 
of 1876. During the yelirs in 
which they sought power they 
pressured the legislature into 
enacting laws forbidding seg- 
regation in schools and places 
of public accommodation. Th^y 
were influential in passing 
another law, vetoed by thfe 
governor, making racial dis^ 
crimfnation a crime. ' 

Cross Color Line 

When Reconstruction finally 
came to an end many of these 
"free men of >color" , moved 
over the color line. Lit«'ally, 
thousands of them began to 
"pass" for white and some of 
their descendants are num- 
bered among rich and power- 
ful Louisianans to this^ day. 
Some of those descendants 
know these facts; most of 
them do not. 

Tlie point is that one way 
or another Louisianains ,of Af- 
rican descent have played a 
large part in the state's his- 
tory. There has been more 
racial intermixture in Louisi- 
ana than in any other state 
of the union. Some of the 
people who are j'elling ' f or 
segregation today have more 
Negro ancestors than those 
they are trying 'to keep out 
of the public schools. It's a 
wise child who knows the race 
of his own. great grandfatRer 
in Louisiana. 


is to' be sent to the Victory / 
Baptist Churdi, and my first 
Satyagraha Walk will Ije . ; 

there at 10 a.m. Christmas • ; 

Day. I welcome others to*Jo>n J" 

me. -J 

Ybnn in Brotherhood, ' 
Sidney, Piotolck 


1. 

r- 






Dear Sir: ■«; v ' 

I would lilte to pat In la 
word of "appreciation <rf cqukl 
opportunities extended to 
members of our race (FEPC). 

While shopping at the May ' 
Company downtown, I was 
vefy gratified and happy to 
have my check OK'd t|y a 
Negro clerk, who Was wearing 
a badge giving her- thCj ati* 
thority to do so. ■ 

!• think we should give crtd- 
it to those companies who do 
give us equal opportunitlM as 
well as censor those who <^0' 
not . j^ 

Since your fine paper ' hiB 
done so much for our race In 
opening the way for fair eqi- . 
ployment — perhaps by prinjt- 
ing this you can encourage. 
other companies to offer us 
better jobs, for which we are 
equally qualified. j | 

Helen Thompaoii ' 
L.A. Housewife j 


u ■ Y'- 
'f\ ' •■'■}. \ 

- . * " l 

• *■ -. 


V 




I 


Fla. Jim Crows 
Cal. State Tecim 

(Continued from Page i) 
degree should quite obviously 
have been cancelled. 

"I would like to he informed 
if there is any policy current- 
ly obser\'ed by the State CoS- 
leges with regard to discrim* 
inatory practices, in or out-of- 
state. •'5 : 

1 ■■ 

"If such a policy exists, Was 
it violated by- the «rrahge- 
ments made for the housing 
of the Humboldt S^te foot- 
ball teani? 

Opposes Action 

"If there is no polity of lany 
kind with respect to this im- 
portant matter, are immediate 
steps being taken to develop 
one which is in line with, the 
intent of this administraltion 
and the State Legislature as 
expressed in many spedfle 
actions? 

"Since*^it will, after July 1, 
1961, be the responsibility of 
the new Board of State CoJ- 
lege 'Tjustees, of which I am 
an extOfficio membeir, to es- 
tablish policies for the SftafC' 
Colleges,. I am particularly 
concerned about present {H^- 
tices%jind also plans that the 
Department of Education m«y 
l^ave in" this regard for , the 
coming six months." '-, I 


11 




STANDS ON HANDS 

The spotted skunk has W 
unique habit of standingr on 
its hands when excited. 

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Tfca Importoitt Newspapftfl 

3101 W. VamonlAvei. i 

Let Angeles 8, talH* | 

AXmiiM»*r 5^13S 


L.OREN MILLEH 
PubUshcr 


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Thursday 
Vol. LXXX 


Dm. 22, 1M0 
NeJ40 


GRACE SIMON&_ExKlltlv* Eilter 

F. P. WALLER, Jr Adv. M«r. 

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Citizens Must Act 
On Rights-ACLU 

NEW YORK — Individual citizens shape the 
course of civil liberties in the United States, the 
American Civil Liberties Union declared in its 40th 
annual report, "By the People," just released .here 
on the eve of the 169th anniversary of Bill of Rights 
Day. «> 

"By action or inertia — singly, 
•hrough private groups 6r 


SAMPLER PAISTJSCS AT SAFt.lY — For the 
Christmns season, the unusual paintings of Marion Sampler 
uill he on display in the Safety Savings (Community Con- 
ference Room. 26JS S. II estern ntcnue. Sampler is assistant 
head of the (irnphiis Department of I'ictor Gruen Asso- 
ciates, Architects. He is a ffradunte in art of the University 
nf Southern California. 


'Spartacus' Theater Party 
For Stovall Home Jan. 8 

"Operation 'Spartacus' Theater-Party" was 
launched this week by a group of community volun- 
teers to solicit by telephone calls the sale of tickets 
to the "Spartacus" ".theater-party January 8 at the 
RKO Pantages Theater, Hollywood. 

The gala theater-party, the;> — 

first of its kind to be held | "^P^f^r-party may be obtained 
in the community, will bene- by calling REpublic 2-2424 or 
fit the Stovall Home for the j REpublrc 4-5968. 
Aged, a non-profit organiza-i Woody Strode, former UCLA 
tion openea in 1956 at 4000 E.iand Los Angeles Ram football 
Fairmont Street, according to' star, play* an important sup- 
Pr. G«rald L. Stovall, presi- 1 porting role in "Spartacus" 
dent of the Foundation. i and is ser\'ing as an honorary 

Tickets for the theater- member of the ' theater-party 
party are being sold for S5 committee headed by Dr. 
and $10 each and reservations Leroy R. Weekes. 
or additional information con- "Spartacus" stars Kirk 
cerning the "Spartacus" I Douglas, Laurence Olivier. 


government representatives — 
people determine the progress 
or setbacks in the preserva- 
tion of their bas^c constitu- 
tional rights," Patrick Murphy 
Malin, ACLU executive direc- 
tor, stated in the introduction. 
Backs Sit-ins 
The ACLU report singled 
out three areas of current 
tension in which citizens can 
make their influence felt: 
civil rights for Negroes, sep- 
aration of church and state, 
and the House Un-American 
Activities Committee. 

Endorsing the Negro lunch- 
counter sit-ins and other legal 
measures being used to win 
equality, Malin wrote that 
people "could privately do a 
lot more than they are now 
doing" tr> hasten the end of 
racial discrimination, "with- 
out waiting for government 
action." But in any case, he 
emphasized, what federal, 
state, and municipal govern- 
ments do will be determined 
by the pressure exerted on 
them by the people. 

In the same manner, Malin 
observed, citizens play a key 
role in the .separation of 
church and state. 
Serpent 
Repeating the ACLU's con- 
viction that the IJousc Un- 
American Activities Commit- 
I tee should be abolished, Malin 
j said this "serpent in our 
I demi-paradise of a free demo- 
I cratic government and a free 
(society can be scotched only 
by the people, through their 
representatives." 
I The ACLU report also re- 
j viewed other high points of 
!the organization's activities 

Jean Simmons, Peter Ustinov, 
Tony Curtis, Charles Laughton 
and John Gavin. The film had 
its Los Angeles premiere rc- 
I cently and is showing ex- 
1 clusively at the RKO Pantages 
Theater. I 


—y 

during its' 40th anniversary 
year: 

It fought efforts to icensor 
books, magaizines and |novies 
either by legislation lor oy 
pressure groups siich as the 
Citizens for Decent Literature. 

It joined in the mounting 
attacks against loyalty oaths, 
including the loyalty provi- 
sions to the National Defiense 
Education Act. 

It supported legal casefe to 
correct malapportionment of 
voting districts. 

It backed the right of unions 
to use members' 'dues for 
political purposes. 

Hetndwiiting on Wall 

It fought the use of wire- 
tapping and police brutality. 

It pressed an extensive 
campaigri for creation of 
municipal citizens' reiview 
boards to hear complaints of 
malpractice by police. 

The sit-ins by Negroes In 
southern cities were described 
as "additional handwriting on 
the wall for those who have 
not yet learned that machine 
civilization spells the doom of 
racial discrimination (in 
northern housing as in south- 
ern vofing and schooling) . . . 
Modern industry means big 
factories and supermarkets 
instead of small farms and 
shack stores, skill&d workers 
and college students instead 
of share-croppers and handy- 
naen. Modern industry needs 
a large body of well-disposed j 
workers and customers atj 
home, as well as enthusiastic 
friends in Asia and Africa . . ." 

Even though the 1960 politi- 
cal party platforms and the 
1960 Civil Rights Act reflect 
the increasing demand for 
civif rights progress, the re- 
port said, the nation "can- 
not realistically expect further 
federal legislation at more 
than a snail's; pace. 

"The immediate practical 
question, with, regard to gov- 
ernmental efforts to end dis- 
crimination, is st4H this two- 
(Continued on Page 12) 


Jobs Found for 
Older Workers" 

During the month of 
November the Los Angeles 
Metropolitan- Offices of the 
Department of Employment 
had 1752 new work applica- 
tions from persons over 45 
Of these 188 were giv^n 
counselling assistance, 61^ 
were referred to jobs and are 
working, Henry H ol t z m a n, 
field supervisor, announced 
this week. 

"Ability is ageless," Holtz- 
man said, "and we have high- 
ly qualified older workers in 
a wide range of vocations in 
our files. 

"Employers who are looking 
for qualified applicants should 
phone RL 8-6511." 


John Hargrove Gives Aid 
to 'Chesf^jfer 26lli Year 


John E. Hargrove is still do- 
ing something he has bone for 
more than 25 years — speaking 
on behalf of the Community 
Chest. 

Hargrove, director of public 


Save on Parties, 
Students Advised 

WILBERFORCE, Ohio. — Dr. 
Charles Wesley, president of 
Central State College here, 
urged college students to 
spend "less on parties and 
socials and more on the 
NAACP," at a Freedom Fund 
rally here last_^week,. 


relations for the Protisctive Or- 
der of Dining Car Waiters Lo- 
cal 465, has. publicized the 
Community Chest before thou- 
sands of people during his 
long volunteer stint. 

For his outstanding service, 
he received a diamond-studd- 
ed Red Feather pin last year, 
thereby being honored as one 
of very few fver to wear this 
award. " » 


Equality I* your business. You 
can't carry out the equality fight 
intelligently unless you are inform- 
ed of what is happening In your 
own community, your country and 
the world. Subscribe now to the 
California Eagle. Rates — 14 a year. 


'Th« California Eagle- $ 
Thursday, btwambtr 32, 196C 


6omp0rs to ^ft 
4 Classrooms !• 

Gompers Junior Hiffh Sdiooi 
will benefit greatly due- to ■■: 
the recent School Bonds elec 
tion victory- 

In addition to four n< 
classrooms, the school will be 
provided with dressing roont 
and shower facilities for girls* 
physical eduatieon. The bond^ 
also permit the enlarging and 
remodeling of the boys' phy- 
sical,, education dressing and 
shower room facilities, the 
provision of a new textbook 
room, and the remodeling of 
the administrative offices.' 




"Our Fondest Felicitations Go Forth to Farh of You, Along IFith Our 

Sincere Wishes That This Will Be a Most Memorial Yiiletide Season" 

FOR UNEQUALED BARGAINS PATRONIZE^ALIFORNIA EAGLE ADVERTISERS 


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CONTACT TONY LEASE 


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::.>H. 



1 , 



i& 


.i»: 


Christmas Music 
To Recall Us to 
A Spiritual 14^\ 

A program designed to bi'ing greater emphasis 
on the spiritual ideals of the holiday season has been 
arranged by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum 
Commission, Supervisor Kenneth Hahn and Commis- 
sioners B. Jack Ansley and A. E. England. The day- 

: *long program will oe heard in 

LOymOn to H©Or ^^ ^°* Angela; Memorial 


-SANTA- 

MONIGA 

NEWS 


Christmas Eve 
Communion 
At First AME 

Fpstal of Holy Communion 
service will be held at First 
AME Church, 8th and Towne 
avenue, on Christmas, eve. 
Saturday. Dec. 24, at 10:30 
p.m. Dr. H, H. Brookins will 
deliver the sermon on the 
subject, "Night Before Christ- 
mas. What?" Special Christ- 
mas music will be presented 
by the Cathedral Choir. under 
the direction of Charles Turn- 
er, minister of music. 

On Sunday, Dec.^25, Christ- 
mas morning, 8 to 8:30, Dr. 
Brookins will be one of the 
panel speakers over Channel 
V. KTLA, on the program "In 
:God We Trust." The .subject 
will hp "What Does Christ- 
ma,'; Really Mean?' i 

At the 10:4.5 a.m. Dr. Brook- 
ins will deliver the Christma.s 
Day me.ssage. The .Cathedral 
Choir will .sing at this worship 
.service. 


6— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 




Holy Sacrament 
To Commemorate 
Birth of Christ 

Christian togetherness will be demonstrated: In 
churches all over the world on Dec. 25 as prayers and 
songs ol adoration fill the air in commemoratioi^ of 
the birth of Christ Jesus al most 2000 years ago. ; , 

The angels sang "Peace ori ,**"" ~ ' 


>- 

7 ^ 

M 

'1 

m 

^■M 

'^ 



■-■ s 


Basis of Cliristmas is Spirit 
Of Selfless Love, Sacrifice 


'everyone to atteVid Com- 


: Detroit Atty. 
At Perris Meet 

The AME Laymen's second 
' quarterly board meeting will 
- be held Tuesday evening, Dec. 
: 27th ' at Bethel AME Church 
, in Perris, Calilomia 


Sports Arena. 
Dec. 24. 


on Saturday, 


Among tile churches of the 
community which will partici- 
pate in the annual Ohristmas 
musical festival will be the 
AME Churches, with Dr. H. H. 
Brookins reading appropriate 


The Philomathean Club held 

its traditional Christmas par- 
ity at the club house on Dec. 
jl7. Gifts were ejthanged and 

officers were installed during 

the evening festivities. Mrs. ~ " ' — "_• 

';M. Juanita Waters installed i|3o€l TS NeOrGi* 

JMrs. Esther Coleman as presi- - ■ , 

dent of the club. Many guests 1/4^ ChriStlllCIS 
were present. ^ ^ ' I 3^ „j.^_ j^^j^ ^ ^^^^ 

I 'I Christmas is a time when 

The Little Mermaid and the over-arching love of God 
.Junior Neptune c-orftest at ^^seems nearer to earth and hu- 
brought 


The speaker for the meeting scriptures, the choir will sing 
• .will be the Conhectional Presi- 1 for one-half hour at 12 noon; 
dent, Atty. Herbert L. Dudley Mt. Sinai Baptist Church choir 


I Pacific Ocean Park 
Itrophys to Danny Barrett and 
'Linda Ward who made the 
i finals after three elimination 
contests. Linda' is the daugh- 
ter of Rfiv. and Mrs. H, Ward. 


of Detroit,, Mich., who is visit- 
ing the state with his wife 
and her mother. 
Rev. Wallace Young is thei 


a^t 7:30 p.m.; Victory Baptist 

Church ch(38rs will sing 10 se- 

I lections at 8 p.m.; Wesley 


iPV. 

also 


pastor of Bethel, Eve Bell is' Methodist Church choir sings 

president of the Perris Lay-!*^ » P;"^-' ^"^ ^^ -l^^- ^' 
;men. Bishop H. Thomasi^st Church choir will ♦sing a 

~ Primin is presiding bishop of ^-^ P"'- 
the Fifth Episcopal District. ' The program will be heard 


man affairs. It is a time when 
wo feel a strange tenderness j, 
pulling at our heart strings, a' 

ime when we turn aside from|nub. todaN-. Thursday, at the 
the way of .self , inlero.st toj gafetv Saving.^ and Loan Au 

^, . _ ■. . .u T ."'■''^' ^'''*°"*' ''■''''*''*">■ '°^'^'^dito.ium.26:i8.S.VVe..ternave 

She is also a pupil at the Jan us. 

Matus Studio. a .ioyful time when a re 

' * * I'lewed awakening of the good, I include Dr. Cornish Rbgers. I 

Mr. and Mrs. Ivory Milliard. ! the beautiful and true become! pastor of Calvary Methodi.st 
637 Broadway avenue in Ven-! signs that the Chri.si Child be-' Church; Dr. Jacob Pressman, 
left last Monday to visit | longs to all of us. j rabbi of Temple Beth,- Am; and 

^ l.^hmad Obeid, of Sudan 

'The mere lapse of years is graduate student ar USC. 
not life. Knowledge, truth.' Robert L. Demp.s is the, in 


to att«id 
munion services at a church i 
By DR. L. SYLVESTER ODOM. Ward AME Church; on Chri.stmas eve. or on Sun 

■ Bi 
Ilia, ha 
Chui'ch i 
of the Sa'turnay 
thesis that Christmas 1960. finds the Christian 

♦ church at: almost every 
le\el. and almo.st ever.\- front, 
in retreat.' Once again _ 

church stands accused ofi^^^^l . , ^ , •,, u 

^lending too much with the, Later : canned goods wiM be 
social topographv of the so- distributed. The Gospel Choir 
cietv which it has been sent 'will lead worship at the Gen 
to save. ^ : era! Hospital. Rev. John N 

mi-- — ^ v. 'Doeeett. oastor, will speak on 
This is a serious charge, .M"ss'^"^' f° f 

maae all tne more so by the 
inward and painful recogni- 
tion that i( is true. Our "hope 
The history of three of the ^yps, however; in the fact that 
worlds greatest rejigions wUHvvhile it is true, it is not|Cni!d 


'MESSIAH* 

The "Messiah" will bej di- 
rected by Albert McNeil at 
Teople's Independent Church, 
1025 E. 18th street, at 7:30 
p.m. Friday. Dec. 23. , . 
i Soloises from the Univeijsity 
Seventh Dav Adventist church 
Cordial inviUtions have ^„ . j,^ with Victor Graham 
been extended by i^inisters 10 1 ^^jj ^^.^^^ -^jji^^ of Uide- 

ipendent for the production. 


Earth, good will toward all, 
men,'" but in His ministry 
Jesus said He came not to 
bring peace, but a sword. 
However, in the command- 
ments He admonished . that 
man Iqve his neighbor as 
himself. 


Ji.shop Pike, of the Epi.scopal Diocese of Califor-'day. which is Chri.stmas day 
ha.s hurled a ringing challenge at the Christian Midnight watch services wi I 
in his provocative article in the current issue he 'lelrl on Saturday at \\-- 
Sa-turViay Evening Post. It is the Bi-shop'sl^^ ^ thurch i.th and M 


History of Four 
Religions to Be 
Discussed ^^ 


II 

at Ward 
ag 
nolia avenues. 

Hamilton Methodist 

At 6 a.m. Sunday morning. 

thp' Hamilton Methodist- C h u rch 

■'■"" hold sunrise services 


Greetings 

BETHEL 
AME CHURCH 

1511 W. 361b Str»«f 


I "keeping 


Christmas Ali\e, 
!at the 11 -a.m. service. i 

Westminstcx Presbyterioui 

, The cantata. '.'The Christ , 
by^^awley will be 


told, at a special holiday! eternally true. We face an ! sung by the three choirs of .the ^ 
program of Our Authors Study ^ugiy picture, but our hekrUs; church at the 9:.30 and 11 a m 

are lifted by the certain'service-s. Rev. James E. Jones 
knowledge that it is a picture 
that can be changed. 


; nue, at 8 p.m. 

Speakers on the panel will 


ce leit last Monday to 
relatives in Houston and Dal- 
las. 


will lead the Christmas medi 
tation. The choirs ar^ the An- 
gelic, Westminster and Sanc- 
Lbst the Meaning . tliarj'. The church address is 

^ ., , - • „ , ,j,„ 2230 W. Jefferson -blvd.' 
I submit to you Jhai the. p^p,„ Independent 

dilemma we face is due, in no; Communion .service at the 8 
ismall measure, to the fact, ^^^j -[q a.m. services at Peoples 
a I that we have somehow lostUj^jj^p^f^^jpnt Church, 1025 E. 
the deeper meaning of Christ- Ugt.^ street, will be administier- 
mas. In a kind of typical Ip^j j,^. pg^. MauHce A. Daw-' 



->. 


COMPTON AVENUE 

7TH DAY 
ADVENTIST CHURCH 

Pastor Harvey W. Kibble, Jr. 

10905 COMFTON AVE. 

lOS ANGELES 59 

LOmmi «.127S 


over a loud-speaker system on 
the outside as well as for those 
who gather for viewing and 
listening within the arena. 
The program will begin with 
iDr. William F. Connell sound - 
■ing the first notes of Mendel- 
jssohn's "Mark the Herald An- 
geles Sing," on the organ. 

i FM radio station, KRHM, 
I will broadcast the entire 124 
' hour program. 


ST. AGNES CATHOUC ^HURCH 

REV. HENR^G. ALKER , 
Confessions. Saturdays and Eve. of Ffrst Frida>s 
3:30-6. 7:30-9. Eves, of Hol.v Day?. 4-6; 8-9 p.m 

RE. 1-4922 


Vermont Av*. and W. Adams Blvd. 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S Budlong at West Vernon 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25 
"Christmas: lov«'s Riglit-of-Way" 

Swnday School-9:30 A.M. Worshi,i-l 1:00 A.M. 

HEALING SERVICE AT 5 P.M. 


-HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH' 


OM SO FIQUEROA ST. PLeasant 3-4535 

REV JOHN. N. DOGGETT. JR., RASTOR 

8 i.tn.— Early Wor$hi(}, Rev. J. N. Oogoett Jr., Preachino 

6 a.m. — Suhrise Service 

t:30 a.m. — Church School (for AH Ao«t) 

10:45 a.m.— Youth Church 

10:45 a.m.— Rev. J. N. t>ogget. Jr Preachma 

«:30 p.m.— Mtthodiit Youth and Wesley Fellowship 


R. L. Hatcholt, l-V^S 16th 
street, is attending the fun- 
'eral of his father in Topeka. 
Kansas. 

* '^ * 
i The Membership Committee 
of the .N.A,.\CP met last Mon- 
!day e\ening «•■ the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Crawford 
in Venice. New memberships 
: taken in were Mrs. Louise 
'Quails. Robert Spalding, Roy 
\ Lester Forbes, Mitchell Gar- 
rett. Mrs. Willie L(e^"~Srnith, 
Samuel Seals, ^;^^frea Com- 
mlngs, E. L. SSwlers, Mrs. 
Ola Mae Stewart. Mrs. Mild- 
ired Ishman, J. C. Ramiro and 
jjohn Smith. Twenty-six dol- 
(lars was rejjorted. 
I Mr. and Mrs. E. f!. Allen 
;will be hosts to the Member- 
ship Committee on Jan. .3. 

The Youth Branch of the 
N.A.ACP recently held election 
of officers with the following 
results: .W Davis, president; 
j Sandra Pegues. vice-president; 
jGail Powell, secretary; Mary 
! Fields, corresponding secre- 
jtjary; Charles Wilson, treas- 
[urer; Lorey DavMs; .<;ergeanit-at- 
larms. 


.ove, beauty, goodness, faith, struc-tor of tlie club is Mrs. Pharii^aical manner, we have 
alone can, give vitality to the:Vas.sie R. Wright is the ptesi->-'^au"eri the ordmary, and 
mechanism of e.\i.sia lice." dent. ReTreshments will be^W"^f* -^^'^^ '^''"^ ''^'- "'^^'^'^"' 

— James .Martineau served. ' (Continued on Page T) 


kins. 
The Sanctuary Choir of Ver- 
<Contint5ed un Page 7i 


DR. FRED E, .«ITEPHENS 

Minister 

8 .^.M. Chrislma-s Musical; by 

Spnior Choir. 
II A.M. rhristnis.'s Sermon by 
Dr. Stephen.':. 


MAY THERE BE LOVE ANiD PEACE IN YOUR HEARTS AS YOU CHEBRATE XMAS 





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TELEVISION SERVICE CO. 

Serving the Southeast and 

Southwest Areas — 23 Years 

E>iperience Radio and Television 

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LOS ANGELES LU. 5-6411 


-NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC 


SMS S. tfoadway Avanu«— R«v. Aitif* L Mmondt, Pt»»or 

Pmtacettal and bitarracial 

f:M AJIA.-S«iMUy School 10:4S A.M.-Worrfiip Sorvico 

7:30 PJW.-ivo«i«9 Sorvieo. Wodno«lay 8 P.M.-Pray«r Sorvico 

Bowen Henorial Methodist Cbirch 

■ACT J«t* AH» TWHITY SniETS - «IV. JOHM t lAIM. MINISTIK 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2S 

YOUTH IICOONITION DAT 

Tho public it cordially invitad to aHand. 


CHUXCH OF CHRISTIAN FEUOWSHIP 

3125 W. ADAMS BLVD. 

11 a.m.— Morning Worship Service 

Rev. Jame» H. Hargett Will Speak 

BTivCAT SCHOOL. 9:30 a.m.-KlMrtergarton Through 5th Grade 


11 a.m. -6th Grade Through High School 


Every Day Could I 
Be LikeXmas £ 

By REV, WELFORD P. CARTER ; { 

This is a season of good ' J 
will.S All of our animosities 
i are forgotten for the day and 
we feel in harmony and fel- 
lowship with the spirit of the 
occasion. 

W^e are anticipating great 
things as we prepare to cele- 
brate the birthday kA out 
Christ. We are ready to do a 
kindness to a friend or enemy 
alike, for this particular day, 
but what o* tomorrow? Christ 
who came to bring peace and 
good will did not come to 
bring it for one day, but for 
every day. He means idr us 
to love and live in a friendly 
relationship with all rrvankind 
every day. Until we learn to 
do this we are not living ac- 
cording to the pattern intend J. 
ed by the Prince of Peace. Let 
u.<; try to practice the spirit of 
Christmas. 



WEBB 
PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS 

Free Delivery of Prescriptions 
City-wide Service 

231 W. VERNON 
lOS ANGELES 
ADami J-7171 


BEULAH BAPTIST CHURCH 
1454 East 100th Street 

w;r/ •• NoMHifl A If 0«y 
Mitlian Services 

Sunday Sthaal, 9i}0 m.m. 

M»rn§na lyerttiip, 7 1 a.m. 

t.T.V., i p.m. 

>ev. J. O. tarneft, fott»r 

i ; 


. I GREATER TRUELIGHT MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 
If 

H 
If 


'-«ta»fMi«iaB.<l 


RIV. OSCAR JOHNSON MINISTtR 

^'Mn .Service 11 •.m. To 12:45 p.m. cve*iiiig 7 p.rti. To 8:45 p.rn. 
T. U. 6 p.m. To 7 p.m. Tuesday NiTe Jr. »nd Sr. M.sjion . Service 
7:30 TO 8:25 p.m. Tuesday Bible Lesson, 8:'30 to 9:45 p.m. 
1276 W. 29th St., let Angeles - RI. 3-7423 


1 1fcjit Swff '^'i^ ^rtt Viut V^t Bow Tiiiie ^lie 


• ^vrfm* 


i^^J-^e-eewi 


E-Z WAY MARKET m 

ill 
I 

AXminster 1-2311 | 


SL.-1S0.\-S CRflETISGS TO THE REJIXERS 
^ OF rHE~(:?iI.IFORMJ EAGLE 

I DIVERSITY HOSPITAL 


2109 WEST 
VERNON AVENUE 



CHURCH OF RELIGIOUS SCIENCE 

THE FOUNDER'S CHURCH FOUNDED IN 1927 
Dr. W. H.:D. Hornaday, Minister 

3251 V«^EST 6TH STREET, LOS ANGELES 
PHONE DU. 8-2181 


WfeSTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
M30 W. JfFFiRSON BLVD. REpublie 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones. Pa.stor 

9-30 and 11:00 a.m.— .Morning Wor.ship 

n -M a IB -Church School KlnderEsrlen to 6th Grade-Adult Classes 

llOO «.m.-Church School - 7th Grade Through College Sr. 

7 p.m.— Westminster Bible Hour 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 


1S64 W. >«rii PtACE 


Ax. 1-9831 


AAessages to All 
' ServloM Sunday and Thursday at 8 PJM. 
Wednesday 2-4 P.AA. 
REV. OTIS STOVALL. Minister 


yuMd& GM^etin^i 


Sunday School 
To Unveil Tree 


f 

■i 

I Dr. Darence Woods | 

I 2031 W. Jefferson Blvd. 
RE 2-6877 






First Rpck Baptist Church 

3930 S. W«st«rn Avanu* 
' R«v. L*« P. James, Ministar 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
11 a.m. BTU 6:30 p.m. Evonintf Sorvieo 
7:30 p.m. Song Sorvieo t:4S p.m. Public 
is invitod to Pray with u* at 7:30. pm. 
on Wodnooday. 


and a HAfPY NEW Yli.iR 

from 

JASPEk WELDON 


.Of CiNTKAL CASTINO. 


A Christmas tree laden \vith||: 
.gifts will be unveiled at New 
Communily Church. 5965 S. 
Broadway ave, tonight, Thurs- 
day, at 7:30 p.m. Gifts of all 
kinds will be given away by 
the Sunday School under the 
direction of Mrs. KaKtherine 
McCluney. . 

Rev. Anita L. Edmonds, 
pastor of the church wijl 
speak on Christinas morning; 
on "No Room at the Inn," 
at the 11 a. m. service. 

At 8 p. m. Dec. 25, several 
singing groups will offer a 
Christmas musical conducted 
in the spirit of rivalry. Each 
group attempting to sing the 

rmber""'''"' "'' "'"'"^ f H. A. HOWARD i 

A preaching marathon is | income TA.v COUN.SEIXOR 
scheduled at the church onjl automobile insuraiNce 
New Year's eve, beginning !|', 4826 S. Avalon | 



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4 BEAUTIFUL BANQUET ROOMS ., 
FACItlTIES: 50-450 - WE CATER YOUR BANQUET 
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GOOD DEAL FOR CLUBS AND SOCIAL GRdUPS 


4269 S. Wostorn Avo., (.os Angolot 


Froo Parking 


For l^^servations Call AX. 5-2222 


at 9 p.m. and conrluding at 
midnnight, according to Rev. 
Edmonds. 


iAD 2-8504 AD 2'8137j 

tol>i>lMinMii>iwnMil>iil>ia»iii>Mi>irl 


CAUFQRNm CHURCH 
FURNITURE COMPANY 

11900 CENTER ST., HOLLYDALE 

, DKSIGNftRS A>[d MANUFACTURERS OF 
FINE CHURCH FURNITURE SINCE 1926 
CO-VIPETENj; RELIABLE AND COURTEOUS 


SERVICE 


NE. 6-,"?4.S7 


t:XTENDED TO ALL 

» • , ME. 3-1275 



IS THE RIGHT 

PRICE FOR A 

FUNERAL SERVICE 


The right price for a funeral service 
is a matter of individual choice at 
Angelus Funeral Homes. We offer a 
complete display of plainly marked 

merchandise, permitting each family 

to seject according to what they 

can easily afford. 



FUNERAL HOMES 


GENERATIONS OF \ ' ; 

FUNERAL SERVldE - 

PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE | 

I ■ 

1030 E. Jefferson Blvd., Los Angeles 
AOams 2-518^ ^ 

714 E. Anaheim Street, .Long Beach > 
HEmtocIc 2-0449 I 


-r^. 


i- 




1 


- 


-? (.3 


- -;-f •*Ys;y-v.t-.j^J;: J 


t-y 


Christian Science Iq Tell 

Christinas Story of M^ht 


: Pradftimli^ that the s«ine 

N light o( hope and ^oy which 

'culded the shepherds of old 

to the, Christ child is again 

leading to the Qirist. Truth, 

which saves and heals, the 

Lesson-Sermon entitled "Chiis- 

tian Science" will be heard 

Sunday in all CSiurdies ot 

Christ, Sciential. 

The Christmas story to be 


Pioneer Doctor 
Is Buried Here 


Dr. Monroe Alpheus Majors, 
vc^ran i^oneer race leader 
and medical man, whose life 
spanned the entire period of 
fr dom of Negroes In the U5., 
(1864-1960) was buried here 
last Saturday. Among surviv- 
ing relatives are his daug^hter 
Mrs. W. A. Grace Boswell, and 
grandchildren Rev. Hamilton 
Boswell of San Francisco, 
Georgia B. Qark, Rotoert, War- 
ren, Jr., and Cha< Boswell. 

Among his many firsts was 
first Negro physician West of 
the Rockies. Places in which 
he practiced were his birth - 
"Jylace Waco, Austin, Brenham, 
Texas, Decatur, 111., Indianap- 
olis, Chicago, Los Angeles and 
Monrovia. Among his friends 
were: Paul Lawrence Dunbar, 
T. Thos. Fortune Dr. Dan Wil- 
Uams, Dr. U. G. Dailey, Booker 
T. Washington, Frederick 
Douglass, Henry Ward Beecher 
and Clarence Darrow. His for- 
mer Chicago pastor and life- 
long family friend. Rev. Harold 
M. Kingsley, officiated. 


read from Matthew's Gospel 
will include the following, 
"Now when Jesus was born In 
Bettilehem of Judaea in the 
days o* Hftod the king, be- 
hold, there came wise men 
from the east to Jerusalem, 
saying, Whfere is he that is 
born King of the Jews'? for we 
hrve seen his star in the east, 
and are come to worship him 
. . . When they saw the star, 
they rejoiced with exceeding 
great joy" (2:1, 2, 10). 
Eternal Dawn 
In "Science and Healtti with 
Key to the Scriptures" Mary 
Baker Eddy writes, "Led by a 
solitary star amid the dark- 
ness, the Magi of old foretold 
the Messiaship of Truth. Is Jthe 
wise man of today believed 
when he beholds the light 
which heralds Christ's eternal 
dawn and describes its efful- 
gwice?" (p. 95). 


Church Services 


Mrs. Leftridge 
Gives AniNial 
Yule Message 

By CenBiUa Leftridge 

Tli^e who know the meaii^ 
ing of the miracle manger, 
when the word was made 
flesh and came to dwell among 
us, know that ChrBtmas isn't 
just another holiday. It has 
a meilsage and purpose which 
offer a hope for, all mankind, 
the faithful as well as the 
unfaithful. 

It was our first Christmas 
when God gave us His best. 
His only son Jesus, in the form 
of a little child as a Messiah. 
Not just "a son* of man" but 
VThe Son of Man." Before His 
coming the heavens foretold 
and awaited Him. 

The only way that God 
could express His love for us 
was through His son, who was 
moved by our lost world. He 
came to seek, to save, teach - 


(Continued from Page 6) 
mont Square M e t h o d i s 1 1 ing us love, humility, and for 
Church, 4410 Bydlong avenue, giveness. I wonder are we, His 
augmented by voices ftx>m the | children, are we accepting His 
Lincoln Memorial Congrega-|best and in sincerity are -" 
tional Church, will present the 
Christmas Oratorio by Saint- 
Saens at the Christrnas Eve 
service, Dec. 24, at 11 p.m. 

On Christmas morning the 
Brass Choir and organ will 
present a period of sacred 
music, beginning at 10:40 a.m. 
The title ot Rev. A. C. Austin's 
message will be "This Is 
hristmas." 


Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


New York, N. Y. (Special) — 

For the first time science has 
foftnd a new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain — without 
curgery. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
another ."very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by a doctor's observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction (JV re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 

And most amazing of all — 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where a doctor's 
observations were continued 
over a period of many months ! 

In fact, results were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 
to make such astonishing state- 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 
a problem 1." And among these 
sufferers were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions, 
some of 10 to 20 years' Standing. 

All this, without the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance (Bio- 
Dyne*)— the discovery of a 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured 
tissue on all parts of the body. 

This new heating substance 
is offered in tuppository or oint- 
ment form called Preparation 
H*. Ask for individually 'sealed 
convenient Preparation H Sup- 
positories or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli- 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drug counters. 


. . . we shall always remember the elegant appointments, 
beautiful equipment and thoughtful attention— a prestige 
tribute at moderate cost." 

Funeral Jiirfctors - Serving All With the Finest 

1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Richmond 7-91 21 _ 


Terry ftovensda/e 

NUMEI^OIOGY AND CARD READING 
.1379 W. 38th PLACE - RE. 4-7915. 


we 
going about our Father's 
business? 

Many names were ascribed 
to Him by the prophets: Shep- 
herd, King, Man of Peace, but 
none fitted Him as well as 
Redeemer and Savior. Chirst is 
our Savior; let us put Christ 
back in Christmas instead of 
using the term Xmas to des- 
ignate the anniversary of His 
birth. 

I pray that if we put the 
Bibles back into the schools 
it vyill lessen juvenile delin- 
quency. 

God bless everyone and 
may the New Year bring you 
Peace. 


),»%m 


?•' .^ 


Pocpima Church Presents 

Good Samoriton Sfory 

Calvary Baptist Church, 12920 Vaughn stijeet in 
Pacoima, this year became the first of the community 
churches to participate in the Van Nuys Star of Beth- 
lehem.parade which was held recently. 

The float was designed by 
Jesse C. Tyler, Jr. with" cos- 
tumes by Rosetta Peteison. It 
told the story of the Good 
Samaritan, the parable which 
teaches that love must know 
no limit or boundary of race, 
creed or color. 

Rev. Hillery T. Briadous, 
pastor of tha church, described 
the float to the television 
audience. John Taylor was 
the wounded man; Thipo Mc 



Connell the priest, Ray 
the Levite and Jesse C 


was the Good "Samarita i 


REV. H. T. BROADOUS 


iMfNTAL COMPORTM ^■■■i SP/R/rUAL ADVISOR 1^ 

ELDER J. B. MOORE 

*■/!■ Divine Healer From Birth 

I AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 
WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER. WE WILL NOT FAIL 

Church at th« Sons of God— Moses & Aaron 

1434 EAST 65th ST. LU 2-5600 

421 N. 4tli Ave., Pocatello, Idaho CE. 2-9438 



Santa Monican 
Quits Job to 
Fight tor Ideal 

Mrs. Ruth V. Ryan of Santa 
Monica, a widowed mother of 
two girls, resigned from her 
job at St. Johns' Hospital in 
order to devote her time to 
the fight for true democracy 
for all citize/is. 

Concerned about the events 
in , Louisiana, Arkansas and 
Georgia, Mrs. Ryan wrote the 
hospital a long letter of resig- 
nation in which she said. In 
part. "The time for this stupid 
vacillating is long gone. The 
peoples of the world are ask- 
ing each other Onstantly now- 
adays how America can ex- 
port a commodity she does not 
believe in herself. 

Sonctity of Individual 

"Democracy is the best an- 
swer to Communism. Democ- 
racy is everybody's business. 
I have wanted for years to 
work at making democracy 
a reality in America and now 
for whate\er time I have left. 
I hope to do so. 

"I firmly believe that Amer- 
icas greatest gift to' the world 
is our Constitution with its 
glorious Bill of Rights, which 
is dedicated to the sanctity of 
the individual, under God." 

Mrs. Ryan is a member of 
the executive board of the 
Santa Monica NAACP and 
work^ in other community 
organizations. 


SHOCKING TRUTH 

In spite of the fact that 
most everyone sings the song, 
"Oh Little Town of Bethle- 
hem" every Christmas time, 
only 58 per cent of the per- 
sons questioned knew that it 
was the city of Jesus' birth, 
according to a recent survey 
by the Pathfinder Youth club 
of the Seventh-Day Adventist 
church. 


Burns, 
Tyler 


Young Minister 
Preaches at 
St. Mark AME 

St. Mark AME Church spon- 
sored its pre-Christmas pro- 
gram last Sunday afternoon. 
Thomas Kemp, youthfm min- 
ister and a USC studeitt, ad- 
dfessed the youth group] at the 
130th and Avalon Street 
Church. 

This is the second sermon 
presented by the minister, who 


is an active member 
ond AME Church. 
Rev. J. Ernest Wi 


minister of St. Mark, indicated 
that from time to time youth- 
ful ministers will have the op- 
portunity to share his pulpit. 


Sec- 


liams. 


Xmas Nelody? 


By Bar. JoOMa E. JOBca 

OccasKmally I have the for- 
tune OT the misfortune of 
hearing progressive and 
sometimes modem jazz in 
which various instruments 
are from time to time fea- 
tured as soloists. Each soloist 
improvisise as the mood 
strikes and sometimes the 
soloist is "so far out" that the 
melody is lost in the riff. 

Sometimes in the baubles 
and the tinsel and tie wrap- 
pings that represent and 
dramatize ,C:hristmas, one gets 
the feeling that a page has 
been taken from a Philhar- 
monic or Newpot score. 

Or when one hatks to hear 
Hark the herald angels sing 
— joy to the world the Lord is 
come; let earth receive her 
king," improvisations of 
pleasantries, vanity and pride 
have distorted the melody of 
Christmas beyond all re- 
cognition. Especially when a 
pet shop displays a hand- 
somely bound leather book 
with a. gilt inscription "Our 
Puppy's Baby Book." 

Or a popular. Southern de- 
partment store catalogue siig- 
gests a live black Angus 
steer wrapped 'as bes^ we. 
can." The wildest score being 
gold plated garbage can 
filled with imported caviar at 
$12,125.49 delivered. 

Christmas is still Christ's 
birthday, a historical fact 
whether we -believe it or not. 
When you do your Christmas 
shopping, you can still hear 
the melody? 


Thursday, E)«eember 22,' 1960 


T1» 


ilB Eh|I#-7 


! i 


Self Sacrifice Is Batik ctf 
Spirit of Christmas SMtcii^^ 1 H 

(Continued from Page 6) 


M.: 


tier matters" tfifct lie at the 
very heart <rf our faith. 

We have lifted ritual ed>ove 
rightaoamcn, a.nd have 
sought to •MitbifT. rather than 
to tciTa. Harry Emeiscm Fos- 
:lick, that "beacon light of the 
American pulpit,'^ pointed us 
the way yeare n.zo when he 
preached, "Christ Himself As 
Christmas." This is a truism 
which has somehow eluded us. 
We have become caught up iri 
office parties, cross coinm»- 
cialism, selfish gmng, and all 
th« other trappings which 
make a mockery of this Holy 
Day. 

Selfless Lova 

Christmas is a spirit. It is 
the spirit of "God in Christ, 
reconciling .the. world unto 
Himself." It is the spirit of 
selfless love, oi genuine sacri- 
fice. It is tfle spirit which 
should make us uncomfort- 
able when we gathw around 


■Holiday Cheer 

Merry Christmas and Hap- 
py New Year to all my 
friends, sisters .id brothers 
for thedr thoughtfiillness 
during my" illness and for 
their donations, beautiful 
flowers and cards. 

Leola B. Wilson, 
Organizer and 
founder of the 
Phyllis Wheatley 
Home 


our "tarn* bOKd,* wfctn we 
remembef tlMt mtOfons aioana 
the wwld are htingiy. It )■ the 
spirit of deepest JunBilt^. 
when we ate poiirtsd not to ■ 
palace, hot to a ataMe, to find 
the Saviour ot the worid. 

God grant that we can re- 
capture the raptive oi the 
real Chrialsnaa . measage, and 
that we may resolve that next 
Christmas will find tiie church 
answering the ^Jiarge — 
"Rise up! O men of God, 
The Church for you doth 

wait. 
Her strength unequal to her 

task, 
Rise up; and make her great! 


Christ!s Dciy 
Challenge^ 

By Bar. J^in IT. Deg^att Jr. 

Christmas is a sign of God's 
confidence in the human race. 
This trust is represerrtied in 
the birth bf Jesus, which em- 
bodied the spirit 'of God, to 
the fullest. All of us are chal- 
lenged to strivr. to be like 
Jesus in order to show appre- 
ciation for God's gift 

Let us make Chris t m a s 
Christ's day. / 


"No age or time of life, no 
position or circumstance, has 
a mon(^)oly on success. Any 
age is the right age to start 
doing." 

I — Gerard 


W2i 


1St^iSStS£StGtStG£&£^Sti^i^l^^St^^^ 


SEASON'S GREETINGS 

- PROM THf ENTIRE PERSONEL OF - 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 



TIME is the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
tion to Los Angeles families for more than 20 years 
— satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and 
honest service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reason- 
able. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 


CONTINUING TO SERVE YOU 
AT OUR TEMPORARY LOCATION 


1430 East 103rd St. 


LO. 6-0022 


March, April 
Win Zodiac 
Tea Honors 

The table representing 
March won first prize at the 
annual Zodiac Tea of Pasa- 
dena's First AME Church, at 
the YWCA one afternoon re- 
cently. Mr.s. Martha Lunday 
was chairman of the March 
group. 

Second prize went to No- 
vember with Mrs. Mary Rog- 
ers as i^hairman. 

The §old cup award for the 
largest amount of money rais- 
ed Went to Mrs. Anna Lou 
Parker, representing April. 

Special guests /of the tea- 
were: Dr. and Mrs. Howard 
McDonald, of Los Angeles 
State College; Dr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Pitts of State Col- 
lege, and Charles; iTnder. 

Tom Ralls designed ,the 
guest table centerpiece. Miss 
AllicL. Alhfiore was chairman 
with Mrs. Mamie Elders co- 
chairman. Courtesy Club 
members served as hostesses. 


Henry C. Ball, 
Organist, Dies 

Concert organist Henry C. 
Bell, 57, who was known Jo- 
cally as H«nri LeBel Was bur- 
ied in Rose Hill cemetary in 
Portland following funeral 
services conducted by Rev. 
Harley Akers, at the Colonial 
Mortuary. He had been ill 
about 10 days. 


fRU INFORMATION Contact "C£i£S" KING, III 

BAIL BONDSl ^i^ 

24 Hr. Service 




Merry Christmas 
Happy New Year! 


Passing years bring no greater pleasure than the age-old custom of 
extending Holiday Greetings. 

And, on this our first Christrnas in the Sixties — in the midst of a 
world's inhumanity of man to man — the Star of Bethlehem still shines. 
It is a guiding light to hope and tranquility! 


So, in the Spirit of 
extended that ybur 
that 1961 will rev^ard 


Leon Harrison 



the Season, our fervent wishes are 
Yuletid'e will be a Happy One, and 
you richly. 


.M. 


Lucille Yerger I- 

Leslie U. King, Jr. ' 
William H. Smi 



\ 


HARHISON-ROSS 


ortuarlcs 

STAFF 


Berth* J. R. Massengale 
arrlson —Rose M. Coleman 

Adam AA, Berry, Jr. 
\\\, Jr. -Russell F. Davis 

Samuel H. Wilson 
Roy C. Brooks 
Loverine Butler 
Paralee S. Mcintosh 
Helen G. Perkins 
Ethelene Gent 
Juanita Driver 
Carl Roberson, Jr. 


FINEST FUNERAL 
DIRECTORS 


LEON HARRISON, 
GENERAL MANAGER 




■'■■>,>'' 


J 



l^/l/J/^,) 




STORES Will CLOSE CHRISTMAS EVE AT 
DAY and MONDAY, DECEMBER 26! 



7 PJM. & REMAIN CLOSED 


•t*fc 


!****« 


mmmm 




H 

OR. 

Spneiefs 


?fm^: 



SUGAR 




POWDERED 
R BROWN 








h<^s, 


frantic days of "last minute" chores 
Then, not one but two holidays with all stores 
closed! We've tried to make things easier for you by list- 
ing, displaying, and LOW PRICING oil the foods for your 
FESTIVE. FEAST . . . and may we wish you and yours every 
wonderful thing for a TRULY MERRY CHRISTMAS! 



y 



Jx^:?§^^^ 





fresA Pact 



FROZEN 


\ 


NORBEST BRAND— 1^.S.D.A. Grade A*- 

OVEN REAI^Y— TOM 

TURKEYS 


FARMER JOHN 


'" BACON 


ic 


NORBEST— GRADE A 


OVER READY— HEN 







^B> PREMIUM QUALITY 
or PAVO BRAND 

; INDIVIDUALir BOXEO 

TOMS 43i HENS 49 

12 L8S. 

WITH TURKEY OR HAM SERVE OCEAN SPRAY CRANBERRY SAUCE 


TURKEYS 



LANCASTER FARMS! 

ROASTING 

CHICKENS 

« RATH / ^ 

tk Heat 'N' Eat Sausage' 


SMOKIES 


IC 


»-oz. 

PKG. 






"-*f4P« 


FARMER JOHN-^READY TO SERVE! 

COOKED HAMS 

49- ; 


FULL 

SHANK 

HALF 



WHOLE OR 

BUTT END 


m 




Roll . . 


MORRELL 


tc 


Tax 


^^' 


-j;\»i 'u-'^wiMteajujij, 




CENTER CUT 

HAM SLICES 


PACIFIC— 12-oz. Jar 

OYSTERS 


$#f19 

■ lb. 

GOURMET DELICATESSEN 


JUMBO-FOR COCKTAILS 

SHRIMP 


CANNED HAM 


^Q> 1st Qualty GRADE AA 

BUTtTER 



5-lb.. 


Mb. Pkg. 


MOLDED 


CRANBERRY SALAD cotJ^ 


COIiilhf faff^^ MONTEREY JACK CHEESE 

^ ^ftOB MILD I 


29< 


^^B^ EGG NOG Q^ort 

^9^ DIPS Fi^* DeliciM* Flavors 

BBQ, BLUE CHEESE, NtPPY, 

ONION OR SHRIMP 8-<». Carton. . . 


43< 


! f 


^1^ BAKERY 




f!^ ^':>iykiiir^ 


HORTENINS 


CHEDDAR CHEESE Lb 59< BLEU CHEESE DRESSING i6oz49< 


^^ ROLLS 

PARKERHOUSE 

29« 

Douen '■^ 
BRO'AM 'N SERVE 


NO. 1 RED EMPEROR 


l\\ 1^« 


Pks. 


PRICE INCLUDES "10c Off" LABEL 

IC 


3-lb. 
Can 


\ IMPERIAL I^ARQARiNE ,.,b p^, .34c 

A Price include* "' 5c Off Lobel 

^^LUCKY WHIP TOPPING 9^-0. con .49e 






SCHILLING 

GROUND 

SCHILLING 

PUMPKIN PIE SPICE I -ox 


CURTIS CANDY 

[baby ruth NUGGETS OR ^ Ac >iu 

BUTTERFINGER CHIPS ll-oz. Pkg ^y*:cTo; 

ice Cream Rolled in Ceceonuf 

SNOW Halls Box Of 6 

BERRY SHERBET 2 Pots 

GOLDEN PREMIUM 

EG^NOG ICE CREAM p- ^ 



of 12 29* 

TREATS PARTYf CRACKERS 

l-lt>. Pkg....... 33* 


I*"^'i 


CEURY ?*^ 


FRESH CRISP 



LBS. 
FANCY SWEET AMZONA 

GRAPEFRUIT 

8 LB. ^ Ac 
' BAG ^9 jJPL 


I JONES DAIRY FARM FROZEN 

LINK SAUSAGE < >b pk. 89«^ 

I EAST POINT 

! OYSTERS io'2-oz. Con. 

: PRINCELLA 

YAMS 

FRESH PACt|fROZEH ITALIAN 

GREEN BEANS 2 ?;:f: 35« 


LIBBY'S FROZEN [ 

STRAWBERRIES &...... 29- 1 MttEO VEOHABIES 

CHICKEN OF THd SEA ^ | 

PICTSWEET FROZEN 


49« 


4 '*c.'4-'- n«« 


2 VtT 39« 


IICMT CHUNK TUNA J-- 33« igRUSSEL SPROUTS .o„ «, 25« 


KAISER 


' 


BELL'S SEASONING i--...; 15< 


DARK, MILK OR ASSORTED 

CHOCOUTES lb Box 


98« 

$125 

M*«8c^t'o^ 


Wired In Series . tUkm Plu< 


Plus 
5c Tax 


CHRISTMAS TREE 
LIGHT SETS 

LEAD OR SARAN 

ICICLES B 


PkQj. S ■ 
Plux 4e Tox 
Reautar 25c Pko. 



String of 8 

Porollel Burning ______ 

String of 7 ^^Mc Tox 

Outdoor mt% MA . Plu* 

String of 15 ^^eaPaP t2e Tox 

WHITE 

SNOW -a, „, 

lO-oz. Aerosol Con *V« P'>« 2c Tox 


We RcMrre «!• Right to Lhhit Quantitict 

Pleat* Call Local Store Ibr Ho«t 

PRICES EFFECTIVE DECEMBER SS, SI fr 94 


Ruy^ 


^2^1^ 


for the mST of the BEST for the UASl' 



I? 






1r ' 


t 


- - I 


■< I 




K ■ ( 




Thursday, December 22, 1960 


Th^ California Eagle-9 


Bay Area National' Council Holds 1 
Impressive Founder's Day Program 


IIARDHORKISG ST.-fFF—Shoun follouiv,, Dr. C. L. 
Taylor's xixth annual Christmas party nh'ich otlraited 
snme 3j00 ynungsters are members of the ftupiilar South 
Loi Angeles dentist s staff uho assisted hirn in playina 
Santa Claus. from left: II alter tsptnrjsn, uumr of the 


I.arpo Theater where the party tw.f held: II iUie Johiisan, 
RiUie Kendrick. Pat Hernandez, Barbara Rollins. Dr. (j. 
L. liiytor.. Dr. Frank' Peterson, Gloria Sutton. Mary 
Smith, hs/her Gutierrez, Alma Mi Farlond and Dorothy 
Fendirsnn, (Adanis) 


Dr. Taylor, Doll League, Avalon Center 
Christmas Parties Spark Yule Spirit 


Santa came early this past 
weekend to some thousands 
of children in Los Angeles 
as Dr. Christopher L. Taylor 
of South Los Angeles gave 
his annual Christmas party 
Saturday and the Doll 
League followed suit with 
its annual ' gift-giving to 
mahy more children Sunday. 

Not to be outdone, the 
Avalon Community Center 
followed up the two greatly 
appreciated parties with a 
third one Monday night at 
the Center. 

This was the sixth year in 
succession that Dr. Taylor 
and his staff have under, 
taken to give as man y 
youngsters as they can herd 
together a grand afternoon 
of fun and gifts. ^ 

This year the youngsters 

i~ came from far and wide — 

'y some 3500 of them, flocking 

jtrt the Largo Theater on 

103rd street in throngs that 

formed lines clear to the 

street and stretched far 

around the comer. 

Walter Espinoita, majnager 
of the theater, said it was 
the "beat turnout" he has 
had all year. 

The youngsters were treat- 
ed to a super-coUossal movie, 
and in addition were loaded 
down with candy-filled stock- 
ings, toys and other gifts 
that to a youngster spell 
"Christmias." 

Another 1500 gathered at 
the Carver Junior High School 
Sunday morning, whfen the 
Doll League took charge, 
with dolls and dolls and 
more dolls, calculated to 
please the heart of any and 
everv- little iftiss. 

Actor WilHam iBill) Walk- 
er donned the traditional 
whiskers and red robe and 
mad«> a jolly old Saint Nick 
as he handed out the treats 
to eager. 'small hands. 

As others played on Sun- 
day afternoon. Mrs. Opal 
Jones, Lindsay Vickers, Joe 

Girls League 
At Jefferson 
Making Toys 

The Girls' League of Jef- 
ferson High School under the 
, energetic leadership of Mrs. 
Betty Riley, a teacher of 
English, turned aside from 
its many social activities 
this month to lend a hand to 
the less fortunate. 

All year long the Girls' 
League has sponsored school 
parties, selected the girl-of- 
the-month. and, as of the 
winter term 1961, created a 
financial scholarship to he 
given to one of the grad- 
uating seniors, whose name 
will be revealed at a later 
date. 

This December, however, 
the young ladies turned their 
attention to other and vital 
facets in the development 
of their personalities: that 
of giving of themselves for 
the bettermejit of humanity. 
The girls have been busy 
making yam ' toys, stuffing 
dolls and making baby lay- 
ettes tot the unfortunate 
children who are confined 
to hospitals in the United 
SUtes. 

Also, the league has been 
instrumenUl in gettirtg gift 
boxes filled for the Red Cross 

To the delight of Mr. Sam 
Hamerman, principal, the 
entire student body has con- 
tributed nuMt generously to 
the fillins of these boxes 
which will be distributed in 
disaster arvas throughout 
the world: \ 


Bristovv and the rest of the 
Avalon crew spent "their 
time sorting gifts — including 
dolls given them by the. Doll 
League and the Marine's 
Toys for Tots — wrappdng 
ixackages and preparing for 
the rush of young guests ex- 
pected the following evening. 


They were ready and wait- 
ing Monday when 500 eager 
tots and teenagers thronged 
the Avalon Community Cen- 
ter, to witness the Christ- 
mas shpw, gloat over tlieir 
gifts and munch their candy. 
At the ■ Center, Joe Bristow 
took over the role of Santa 


Claus. 

It was a great weekend for 
the youngsters. And it was 
a great weekend, too, for 
Dr. Taylor and his staff, the 
Doll Leaguers and the Ava- 
lon workers. 

Merry Christmas to all, 
and to all good night. 



The newly formed Bay 
Area, Southern California 
Council of 1;he National 
Council of Negro Won\en, 
celebrated its Founder's l?ay 
with an impressive program 
last Thursday in the Carter 
Education Center of Calvary 
Baptist Church in Santa 
Monica. 

Winsome Mabel Hall, for- 
merly of Cleveland, Ohio, 
organized the chapter and is 
its president. She also v/as a 
ifashiori model for Lane and 
Brjant, top department store 
in Cleveland. In addition, 
she held memberships in the 
NAACP, League of Voter^, 
Jewish Welfare and was 
associated with the AME 
Church of Cleveland. - 

Mrs. Hall has been resid^ 
ing in Santa Monica ' only 
one year and saw the need 
lor such an organization ajs 
the'Bay Area Council. 

In celebrating theit 
Founder's Day the group als<> 


Miss Ball, 
Reid Troth 
Revealed 


honored citizens of the Bay 
Area for their contributions 
towards the growth of the 
fine Bay Area community. 

Appearing on the program 
were Esther Sanders, mist- 
ress of ceremonies; Gospel 
Choir, John Dooley, 11, Sadie 
B. Boozier, Atty. Eugene Hall 
and Gloria Cranes. 

The new council is com- 
prised of 40 local women who 
hold meetings monitiily with 
membership open to all local 
women. 

Those receiving the Coun- 
cil's achievement scroll in- 
cluded: 


Rev. and Mrs. Welford P. 
Carter, Rev. and Mrs. H. S. 
Davis, Rev. and Mrs. J. W. 
Burcher, Rev and Mrs. Char- 
les Williams, Rev. and Mrs. 
E. L. Holmes, Rev. and Mrs. 
' F. M. Sadler, Rev. and Mrs. 
Harold Bynum, and Rev. and 
Mrs. Herbert Ward. 

Also Mrs. Sadie Boozier, 
Mrs. Ida Dooley, Mrs. Mar- 
garet Mays, Mrs. Beatrice 
McCarroll, Mrs. Louise Fin- 
ley, Mrs. Maude E. Ward, 
Mrs. Helen 1 Brantley, Mr. 
Vernon Brunson, Mr. Dave 
Wesson, Mrs. Juanita Wateirs, 
Mr. E/G. Allen, Mr. Goodrich 


McNeil, Mrs. Rose Wessoh. 
Mrs. Vada King, Mrs. EsUr 
Coleman, Mr. Chauncy GaiC* 
ladd, and Mr. Joseph Bees. ; ' 
Also Mrs. Thelma Terrjr, 
Mr. Silas White, Mrs. Dai^ 
Payne, Miss Edna Heard, 
Mrs. Martha Sheffield, Mrt, 
AUie Cook, Mr. Alfred Quinn, 
Mr. Donald Brunson, Miss 
Elane Blanks, Mr. Joseph 
Spalding, Mrs. Mary Mc- 
Neil, Mr. Manual Murrel, 
Mrs. Bessie Oslxjme, Mrs. 
Loretta Ekiwards, Mr. Leroy 
Witherspoon. Mr. HiUiani 
Lawson and Mr. Sherman 
Jones. 




GIFT GIVING— Pat Hernandez, Gloria Sutton (back to camera). Alma^ McFarland, 
Dr. C. L. Taylor and the rest of his staff members were busy as bees during Dr. Tay- 
lor's si)cth annual Christmas party held last Saturday at the Leirgo Theatre in Soiilh Los 
Angeles. (Adanis) 

Dance Theatre 


To Stage Play 
At Holman Mon. 

Eunice Cain, director of the 
CJiildren's Dance Theatre, 
will present "k Christmas 
dance program Monday, Dec. 
26. from 7 to 8 p.m. at Hol- 
man Methodist Church Fel- 
lowship Hall, 3320 W. Adams 
blvd. 

The advanced students 
will be featured in a cre- 
ative ballet, "The Juggler of 
Notre Dame." They have 
previously apppeared in five 
performances. 

Janice HUl will dance the 
role of the juggler; Donzalea 
Moore, Wanda Weaver. Janis 
Sterling, Dawn and Donna 
Bostic, the monks of the 
Cathedral of Notre Dame; 
Cathy Neal, Cynthia White, 
Royda and Leslie Brown, the 
•royal people; Debby Gould, 
Sheila Sloan and Dion White, 
the merr\ makers 


MISS DOLORES E. 

BALL — Betrothal an- 
nounced. 

At a family dinner party 
at the Islander Restaurant 
in Hollywood, Mrs. L. F. 
Ball announced the engage- 
ment of her daughter, Do- 
lores E. Ball, to Ronald D, 
Reid. 

The informal announce- 
ment was made to 16 mem 
,bers of the couple's respec- 
tive families and came as 
a suprise to those attending, 
(Continued on Page 11 » 



GOLDEN JVEDl)ING — Shown. being honored on their golden wedding anniversary are . 
from left: Mr. and Mrs. Isiah Brown of Shreveport, La., the honored couple, ancl Mr,.\ 
and Mrs. EvangeSst Brown, brother and sister-in-law of .Mr. Brown of Minden. La. i 
They are visiting in the city and were guests for. the special occasion. 

Cooperettes Seat 
New Officers 

The Cooperettes Club Inc. 
prepared for an ;active 1961 
by installing their new offi- 
cers early, with installation 
ceremonies being held in the 
lovely home of Ann Craig. 

The gavel was passed to 
the new president, Lillian 
Atwood, by Roislyn Goddard 
who has vpry capably held 
the office ifor the past two 
years. 

Following the installation, 
«lub members proceeded to 
the Town Tfivern where they 
toasted their officers with 
cocktails. ' 

Christmas Party 

The Freelancer Club's an- 
nual Christmas Party was 
held recently following their 
regular meeting in the home 
of Margaret Watts. Velma 
Craig ^a« installed pres. 



CAKE CUTTING— Mrs. Isiah Broitm 'is pictured cutting 
a huge tier cake during the celebration of ker 50th wedditif- 
anuiversary attended by scores of friends last week. 

«®«|ill Smallwood ««*» 


THE LIXE HAS LO\G—Some of the .o()(7 youngitns 
ivho 'jammed the Largo theater, on 10 nd Urect, nt the 
\ixth nnniicd ( hiniinm pai If gucn ij Dr. Chnstophct L. 


Taylor Saturday afternoo 
The line Hretched to the en, 
ttnued on aiound the cornet 



FOUNDER'S DAY PROG RAM-Members of he Bay 
Area Council of National of Negro fVoinen are pictured 
follouing their Founder's Day Prpgram held last Thursday. 
Seated are: Mary Johnson, treasurer; Betty Simmons, fi- 
nendud secretary; Arlene Leiais, member; Gloria Cranes, 
memhtrt Mabel Hall, president; EJoise Syies, membership 


chairman, and Alfreda Hubbard, corraponding ncretary. 
Standing: Tossie Ruby, ways and means chairman; Esther 
Saunders, chaplain; Ida Dooley, recording secretary and 
historian; Lilie Mae Rogers, Shedrick Jones, Ann T, Davis 
and Marie B. Watts. (Adams) 


re shown waiting their turn, 
of the block, curved and con- 
(Adams) 

Lindsay Vickers 
Gives Xmas Party 

Lindsay Vickers, staff 
men^ber of the Avalon Com- 
munity center, was hostess to 

a gay and delightful pre- 
Christmas cocktail party in 
her beautifully arranged 
apartment, 1151 Plymouth, 
last Friday night. 

Among her friends enjoy- 
ing the festivities were or- 
ganist Jackie Davis, "Walter 
Hutherson, Capt and Mis. L. 
Barrett of Riverside, Joyce 
Sherman, Mr. and Mrs. Joe^ 
Bristow, Isabelle Dorsey, 
Sandrta Gladstone, Barbara 
Dyce, artist Chajles and Mrs. 
White, Opal Jones, Mr. and 
Mrs. Rudolph Colllns,^ Mr. 
and Mrs. Laffle Rqbinson, 
Charles Barrett and Alice 
Greecy. , 

Assisting Miss Vickers with 
the party, was Carietie Phil- 
lips.*^ 


7* 


Xmas E\'e is Edith Hou- 
ston's birtthday while next 
da.y is ditto for Lena Tucker 
and Dorothy Howard. Dr. 
and Mrs. Warren Brooks 
(.\ureliai'and their two kids 
jetted to the nation's capital 
for the holidays. Atty.. and 
Mrs. Ivan Johnson's house- 
guest is Chicagoan Bruce 
McGoodwin .('he's ' Dorothy's 
cousin). 

Betty £^nd Jim Scott's son, 
Scotty, reaches tpwn today 
(Thurs.) for two weeks leave 
from S'Diego's Naval base; 
he's been reassigned there 
for 24 weeks. 

HolidOT Hoppin? 

Xmas Eve hosts: Dr. and 
Mrs. Wayraan McCoo. Eve- 
lyn Pride Cox and her Harry 
will be in tosvn from San 
Mateo over the New Year's 
Eve weekend. Dr. and Mrs. 
Andre Tweedy moved into 
that Leimert Park house 
they built. The Ernie Weav- 
ers have their customary 
Xmas day open house. Phil- 
,3delphia's Dr. and Mrs. Jack 
Smith (Catherine) visited 
Mary and Bud Clay (Jack 
and Mary are brother and 
sister) and the foursome left 
Mon. night for Xmas in 
Mexico City. 

Ida Lee hostessed an Xmas 
party Tues. at her spsurious 
place. Lillian Hall, back in 
town via Detroit; changed 
her last name to Hayes and 
is apt. shopping. Clara 
Prince . and Ptfarl Lawson 
have SF on their holiday 
calendar. Ex- Angeleno Jodie 
Cooper underwent major 
surgery in NYC. Walthea 
Simms Jones headed for a 
spa in Mexico for hot min- 
eral baths. Margaret Outley 
and Frances lUigin Xmas- 
party-Mitertained H o 1 m a n 
Church's Sunday School 
teachers Jast Frid. at the 
home of the latter. 

Ttil«tM* ia apflaad 

Freddy dark, who u^ed to 
really brighten this place 


/ 


when he lived here, is Y«l«-; 
tiding in England. The John 
Simmonses (Blanche) and 
Carrie Holcomlj have asked 
friends in for New Year's 
Eve at the home of the 
former. LA to NYC: H. M. 
Owens who took the 66; 
route but pluckily, rushing 
to his injured wife's bed- 
side. Pasadena's J. Robert 
Smith holidaying in Jamaica 
enroiite to S'America on as- , 
signmenL Elliot Carpenter 
takes a birthday on the 28th. 
First day of the year is an-, 
niversary for Pinki and By- 
ron Webb so they're having 
open house on that " date, 
naturally. ! 

Zrelda Sealy picked the/ 
Thurs. after Xmas to enter- ' 
tain her girl chums ' over 
cocktails at her home. Dr. 
and Mrs. Mayo DeLilly are 
readying their house for the] 
New Year's Eve party of the 
Friday Nighters Club. Delia 
McDtmald is a birthday girl 
tomorrow (Frid.); i 

And So to Choaa 

SC grad Herman Bailey 
'(teaching at Fla. A and M 
this year) is home tor Xmas , 
visiting his parents; next 
year he goes to Ghana to ; 
teach art Handsome, the : 
gift Judy Bailey Taylor and 
her Gerald got from her par- | 
ents. A duplex, no less. Next ! 
Wedn. coffee hostess: Ruth 
Spencer, her honored guests ; 
being Florence Draper «rf Chi i 
and Grace Morgan Jones ot ! 
Sacramento. \ 

The Girl Friends have rio 
peers when it gaily comes to 
their aimual Swu h^ore ' 
Xmas codrtall party at.WiI> j 
fandel. Last Sun. "was a de- ° 
lightful triumph again foe i 
them- and the town ttuned. 
out, eager, chic and merry. ! 
I, for one, enjoy it for you do j 
get to , hug- folk you some- 
how don't see through -the I 
year, Atty. and-:Mcs. V^ioft \ 

(Continued oh-Fa|(t-'l]j[^\_^ 




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PJ 


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^g^iSKI 


X- 


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BEAUTY CAR WASH 

DR. GRADY D. 

I AU CUS $1.15 

ORANGE, D. C. 

ALSO STEAM CLIANING 

AND STAFF 

POLISHING & WAXING 

AD. 2-5906 - AO. 2-«70C 

350S R«dM Rd. AX 2-4M7 

424 EAST VERNON 

LOS ANGELES 

LOS ANGELES 

McCAllSON VAN t STORAGE CO. - MOVIN6, STORAOE, SHIPPING 

Loul end Long Distance Moving Sine* 192? — Boxes and krrels for Salt 

AOKNTS POR UNITED VAN LINES 

Iir W. ManciiMlcr, los Angtln PI. ♦-5411 


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"MHKY CHRKTIMAS AND ICST WISHES TO All OUR FRIENDS" 

MEDICAL, DENTAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL 
ASSOCIATION AND WOMEN'S AUXILIARY 


MERRY CHRISTMAS AND 
BEST WISITES TO ALL 

SUPERVISOR KENNETH HAHN 

2ND DISTRICT 


"Seasoji'i Greetings to All My Friends" 

KARL RUNDBERG ^ 

COUNCILMAN, 11TH DISTRICT 



. i 


SMALLWOOD 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Townsend, Jr. have an Xmas 
anniversary. 

. DotWatsohdoingsplendid* 
jy at Kaiser Hospital, hop- 
ing to be discharged next 
weelc. Virginia Morgan plan- 


um :^-^.\^ > 
Thursday, December 22* 1960 The California E*gl#-1 1 



"Sincere Creetini/s to All My Fritnds" 

HOX. FRANK BOIVEIXI 

Supervisor First JH.tfritt 
C.hairnian /..-I. Cnniilu Hoard of Stiperrisorx 


AVAl.OS COMMI'SITY CEWTERSanta Clans arrived nt the Avnlon CoTti/fiii- 
Tiily Crnlir l,ut M'mday night and distributed toys to some .''00 ihddren itlio also 
joyfil ii ri'i y delit/lilfiil Yule program. Shoun above are. from left, Louetlita Childs. /-.V 


f 


immmim 


^\'f ^Vehome \onr Patronauf 

THE CARPET CORNER 

Complete Line of Carpetina — 

One of the Finest Displays of 

y> ational (Carpels and Rnt/s 

WALL-TO-WALL AND THROW RUGS 

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 



1 

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QUALITY FURNITURE GOING 

AT COST 

GRUNDIG MAJESTIC - MOTOROLA 

CUSTOM BARS - FABWLOUS LAMPS 

MARBLE TOP TABLES 

100% NYLON CAItPETING-10 YEAR GUARANTEE 

STEREO - HI-FI - TELEVISION 

Grandig Majestic — Motorola — Metz — Olympic 
Admiral — Packard B«l| 

Appliances: 
Kelvinotor — Admiral Amana — RCA Whirlpool 

Furnishings: 

Oriental, Danish Modern — Contemporary 
Provincial 

OPEX DAILY IXTIL9 —SUSDAYS 1-6 

WESTWAY FURNITURE 

5000 SOUTH VERMONT, LOS ANGELES 
PLaasant 3-4551 


dene Coif. Kiirrn Milt hell irith her, mother l.nvay 
and Lena Childs. (Adams) 

Doivthea Foster 

(Continued from Page 10> 

from the Doll League Chanty Club on Sunday at 
Carver Junior High, whieh naturally made the 
Leaguers very happy and, oh, so grateful to their 
wonderful followers. 

Sir Debuteers chose the Warehouseman's Hall for 
their annual Christmas party on Friday night. ? 

Clot Your Ticket? 

A gala crowd was on hand for the opening of 
Raisin, in -the Sun on ^Tuesday evening at the Hunt- 
ington-Hartford Theatre. 

Looking forward to the Stovall Foundation show- 
ing of "Spartacus" on Jan. 8 at the Pantage.s. Block 
tickets are available to clubs if they will call RK. 
2-2424 or RE. 4-5968. , 

Rinkevdinks making lavish plaiK for their formal 
on Jan. 12 at the Beverly Hilton with EARL BOSTIC 
and his great orchestra providing the music. 

It is with great sorrow to all of us who. knew and 
lo\ed CECEL NEAL MILLS, who passed away on 
Sundav, that our sympathy goes out to her husband 
TOMMY and their" three children. 

ETHEL MADDOX entertained the CC's on Wed- 
nesday and plans were completed for the CC's an- 
nual Christmas party which will be held on Dec. }Z 
at the Brentwood home of JUDGE and MRS. DAVID. 
WILLIAMS. 

The annual Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical 
Association dance will be on Dec. 30 at the Los 
Angeles Breakfast Club. 

The Marquisettes will hold sway on New Year's 
eve at the Carolina Pines. Ditto, on New Year's eve 
will be the fabulous dancing party and breakfast 
with the Hilltoppers at the Cocoanut Grove, 


.Mitthetl, Santa Claus (Joe Rrisloir) 

Seniors Attend 
Youth Gonferente 


en- 


Among the Centejnnial 
High School seniors psrtici- 
pating in the Youth Leader- 
ship Conference held recent- 
ly at Union Oil Center were: 
Verina Elliott, Lupe Gircia, 
Jeri Hendericks, Francis 
Lands, Dora McNeal, Donald 
Meadows, Emma Ruth ariith, 
Juanita Vera. Donald White 
and Larry Woods. ji>seph 
Watson was the sponsor. 


ning a 

colorful and so welLappoint 
ed apartment. Edith" Fields 
Smith t»ying with similar 
idea; her parties always cull 
a gleaming group and come 
into full bloom around mid- 
night. R h e 1 1 a Nickerson 
birthday on 12th. 

Hilltoppers set for their 
New Year's Eve shebang; 
happy is member Dotti Cro- 
zier I^ew.is since she sold her 
Altadena house 'n pool and 
moved back to LA-and life. 

Newcomers: Formed How- 
ard Univ. employee Thelma 
Smith and her husband, Guy. 
who has taken a post in 
City Housing. Shirley Gibbs 
buffing her nails and hum- 
ming until jet take-off time 
for her u.sual KaySee Xmas 
fun-time. Byron Webb take.s 
down another birthday this 
Sun. (lit. 

. Hand.somest wedding gift 
of all, that one given to 
bride-to-be Judy Bailey and 
hei' beloved by Judy's ador- 
ing parents, Dr. and Mrs. 
William Bailey. Judy's wed- 
ding this Sat. a.m. promises 
to be one of the loveliest 
performed in St. John's at 
Bronson and Washington. 
This Xmas is certainly bound 
to be one of the most signifi- 
cantly happy ones for 
Haroldine and Bobby Brew- 
ingtoh; they are comfortably 
and proudly settled in that 
new home of theirs in Alta- 
dena. 


Xmas party at her , L,,, Anqcles 7, Calif, 
anf! sso well aoDOint- • "* 


"SEASON'S GREETINC^y^A i 

Raymond G. Osborne laborafories, hci 

235 West 27th Street iij'^ '■ 


Rl. 9-3111 


Christmas Greetings to Our Mftny Friends 

SIMON LEVI CO., LTD. I 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DISTRIBUTORS ■ 

593S SOUTH CENTRAL AVENUE I 

LOS ANGELES I AO. 44141 

yOlR PATIfOy.iaF. IS APPREt.nrED- 


f -M 

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erry 


Christmas to Our Many Customers and Friends" . 


NATIONAL CASH REGISTERS - 

fash Regi.<rtcrs Sold, Boughi. Rented. Repaired and Exchanged 
Expert Repairing by Factory Trained Servieemen 

936 SOUTH HOPE STREET, LOS ANGELES 

BRANCH OFFIGgSIN GlENDALE, HOLLYWOOD, ; 
HUNTINGTON~PARK AND PASADENA 

«»i»- T^^ Wii m n m W aa im fta a W * H im W^iiaa 


DOOTONE RECORDS 

Extends 1o Alt Sincere Best Wishes for the 

Christmas Season — May You Enjoy Health 

and Happiness Duriftg the N,ew Year 


^ 


= 


BROADWAY 



OPEN UNTIL 900 P.M. EVERY NIGHT UNTIL CHRISTMAS 

No Cash Needed * Get Your Christmas Clothes Now * Pay Later 

* CASH OR CREDIT * 

EVERYONE WILL DRESS UP FOR CHRISTMAS, 
SO CAN YOU! 

New Leather Coats! — New Trench Coats! — New Car 
Coats! — New suits in One, Two and Three Button Models! 
Get ready for the Holidays — No cash needed — As little 
as $3.00 a week pays for $100.00 worth of clothes, ac- 
cessories, gifts. Radios, Watches, and Luggage for men and 
boys of all ages! See all the new styles in Leather Goods and 
Jackets — Suede Coats and Jackets. Dress up — Go places 
and enjoy life — Wear and enjoy your new clothes while 
paying! 

* NO INTEREST * NO CARRYING CHARGES * 
■ it FREE CREDIT i^ 
New Sweaters — New Wool Shirts — Sport Clothes — 
Play Clothes — Work Clothes — Dress Clothes — Tuxedos — 
Poys Suits — Trousers — Shirts — Shoes — Everything for 
the boy! 

MEN, see our New Hats! Buy any* suit 
in the House and get $10.00 worth of 
shirts FREE! 

We cater to you, and I do mean YOU! 
Yes, we cater to His -Majesty, the 
working man. 

Buy any suit and get $20.00 off the 
price of any top coat! 

Buy any suit and get $20.00 off the 
price of the second suit! 

All the new Colors and Styles! We 
can fit you! Sizes up to 50! 


Miss Ball 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Miss Ball siUends Los .\n- . 
geles City Collfge anil is em- 
ployed a.i a ilerk for the 
Board of Education al Cam- 
bria Adult S<liool. She is a 
giaduaie of Los .Angeles 
High School. 

Her fiance, a graduate of 
Long Beach Slate, manages 
his famil\Cs bu.-^iiie.-i.s. the 
Faxton's Liquor Store and 
Super Market in Pacoima.- 

Mr. Reid is the now of 
Margie N'ickens of this city. 
Miss Ball is the daughter of 
Mrs. Ball and the late L. F. . 
Ball. . 




LOAN .MONEY AVAIIABIEI 

WESTSIDE 
MORTGAGE CO. 


Sal*. • Rantali 


Trust D«*4l 
li%.ur«n<* 

McKINNEY REALTY CO. 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

4*27 WIST ADAMS ■IVO. 
lOt ANOflK 

RE. 5-0265 


I 


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Greelinyi 

MRS. A. C. 
BILBREW 


FREE! OUR CHRIST- 

GIFT TO YOU! 

A $10 SWEATER OR 

A $10 PAIR OF 

TROUSERS FREEI 

With any suit 

purchase priced 

$39 or morel 


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See the new Continental and Ivy League Styles. Black suits- 
Grey suits— Blue suits— Brown suits— Green suits. 

• FREE ALTERATIONS • FIT GUARANTEED • WE CATER TO YOU 

WE ARE OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT; BUY NOW! PAY LATER; 

REGULAR HOURS: 9:30 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. 

OPEN EVERY SATURDAY NITE UNTIL 8:00 P.M. 

A Union Crew to Serve You Better 
We Cater to California Eagle Newspaper Readers 

VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES^ CALIFORNIA 
OPEN DAILY TILL DECEMBER 24TH * 9:30 A.M. UNTIL 9 AT NIGHT 


NOEl 

BOSTON FACTORY 
SHOE REPAIR 


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PREMIERE DEC. 

Ndr WKKAL REVUE 

Stats now at boxofficv' 
St. Cii. Music Co. 
AH Miitu*! A9«iKi« 

"THE 


17 




E»». lexc. Mon.) 8:30 
Sat. 7:30-10:30 

LAS PAIMAS THEATRE 

L«s P;>lmas flt Hollyvwod 

HO-5-7191 


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UP THE 

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HOME OF THE KENO QUEEN AND THE FONG OPEN | 

-IN- 

RENO, NEVADA 

• ^ I I. » . ' 

flights by luxurious Convqirs — Champagne served aloH 

i^ BEAUTIFUL PRESENTS FOR THE LADIES— 
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Thur»d»y, December 22, 1960 


B'^^CING 



I 

T 


BflMSET 



G««rg« RsiRtcy 


BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO. Holders of four 
tickets enriched their Christ- 
■aas funds by $18,314 epph last 
Sunday it CaUente Race 
Irack in sharing first-place 
money in the 5-10 public 
handi<<ai^ing contest. 

Five winning horses were 
enough to Uke first-place 
share from the gross pool of 
$106,528. The consolation pool 
was divided into 141 shares 
worth $173 each for four hor- 

A Negro couple frcwn Los 
Angeles was one of the lucky 
feur tqi win first' place money. 

Winning numbers were 7- 
10-2-7-8-7. The crowd of 14,659 
sent $380,798 through the 
mutuels for the 11 races not 
including the $108,528 in the 
5«10 pool. No racing will be 
held this Sunday Christmas 
diy. 

(HORSES TO WATCH THAT 
ARE FIT AND READY) 

CALIENTE 
STXnUJA PATCH. R«ady for the 
.charmed drcle. 


A LATE DATE. Watch out for 
thia one. 

PATTY DRAKE. Tn Smart hands. 

LADY ROBIN. Mv Slfeeper. 

AFTER THE BALL,. Wire to 
wire. 

POTB2^ BAT. Training Sharpiy. 

SEA LASS. Next out O.K. 

NIBHLUNGO. Mexico City . Fly- 
er. 

BIG RISK. Clockerg Special. 

DUKE OF DIAMONDS. A sparlt- 
ler. 

EL TOR.VADO. A fit maiden. 

RIVER ROCK. Better then rat- 
ed. 

GOLDEN GATE 

AK-SISSY. This one ran fly. 

SEVENS UP. Loolc out, a goodie. 

FINE PRINT. Wire to wire. 

STYLISH MAID. She can fly. 

ADIEU. Longshot special. 

GWKN LORA. Cloclsers goodie. 

GET RICH. Xma."! money. 

ODD FELLOW. Over a disUnce 
O.K. 

SOLID SIGN. Ready ,for a kill- 
i 


"I* 


KI QUEEN. Go baclc to thl.i 
one. 

KEEP THIS COLUMN FOR 
FURTHER REFERENCES AS IT 
ONLY APPEARS IN THE CALl- 
FONIA EAGLE OUT AND ON 
YOUR NEWSSTAND EVER V 
WEDNESDAY. ALSO WATCH 
THIS COLUMN FOR THE OPEN- 
ING OF SANTA ANITA IN NEXT 
WEEK PAPER. FOB THE BE.ST 
IN THE SPORT OF KINGS ITS 
THE EAGLE. 

YOUR WRITER WI.SlH.KS 
EVERYBODY A VERY MERRV 
CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW 
YEAR. 


r^ YHE rEE 


.WITH MAGOli HATHAWAY, 



TO HALL OF FAML—Conih Jnke Gaither (riffht). 
head coach of'the famed Florida A iS M University Rat- 
tlers and one of the ninningest coaches in football, will be 
inducted into the National Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics. Hall of Fame in Kansas City, Mo., next March. 
He is shown above getting a plaque for his work in race 
relations from the Greater Miami Urban League. The award 
was presented hy League President Karl Bishopric 
■' I ■— "^ 


We could not believe our 
eyes vrhen we read in a week- 
ly paper that Thelma Cowan 
had beccune the first Negro 
woman to "turn pro." We 
hastened to the phone and 
called Thelma to congratulate 
her and ask her, "How on 
earth did you manage to join 
the WPGA? (Women's Profes- 
sional Golfers Associatipn) 
Did you haye to file a suitito 
get in?" 

"No," she answered, "I am 
not a member and I have not 
filed a suit." 


BLADDER TROUBLE 
OF OLDER MEN 

such ay frequent, slow or 
burning urine, loss of con- 
trol, getting up nights, make 
them lose sleep, constantly 
tiled, nervous, feeling old, 
back- aches, leg pains, lower 
abdomen pressure and c6n- 
stlpation. 

Get well faster and at less 
eeatt witii tthe natural method 
of Chtropractlc Science supple- 
mented with tlxe century-old 
Cttlaeae Herbs. No obligation 
tot consultation. 

DR. HONGLIN IPP, D. C. 

818 S. Spring St. 

M^day & Friday, 1 1 a.m.-7 p.m. 

TuMsy A Thur$., 1 1 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Svinciay*, 12 p.m.-1:30 p.m. 


New Method! 

DU. 8-7048 

Urinary, Personal Problems 
Olandc and All Clinical 
Maltora. Young Doctor 
Invjfet Unuwal Catoa 

RESULTS! 

' (Consultation Confidential) 


"If you are not in the Wo- 
men's G«lf Association how 
did you turn professional?" 
we asked. 

"I decMed to teach golf in 
my back yard and later ^ay- 
be on some of the public 
courses," she' answered. By 
this time we. were pretty hot 
under the collar. 
• Thelma was once the four- 
time winner of the Negro Wo- 
men's Championship and 
many times (since she lost 
her championship) made 
statements to this writer that 
she was "too tired to fight." 

It is a known fact that the 
WPGA is "lily white" and 
will be harder to crack than 
Men's PGA. Sifford, Spiller 
and many others have at- 
tempted for the past 10 years 
to become members of the 
latter organization and the 
most they have accomplished 
is that Siiford has been given 
a "player's card" (not a mem- 
bership). ' 
When we brought these 
facts to Thelma's attention 
she said, "I feel that the 
fight is over sjnce the Atty. 
General has decided to help 
fight PGA." 

"But." we reminded her, 
"didn't you know that repre- 
sentatives' of the California 
Eagle, Bill Spiller and the 
Western Avenue Women's 
club brought thi.s situation 
to the attention of the attorney 
general, met with him and 
mapped out these plans? " We 
also- reminded Thelma that 
when the Western Avenue 
Women left the Vemondale 
f(all Negro golf club) to fight 
for integration in the all 
white municipal golf clubs, 
I she refused to go along. Thel- 
ma explained that the reason 
(she refused was because to 
[fight for integration ruined 
j your ability to score and at 
ithat time she was the Negro 
champion. 


Prairie View, 
Aricansas to 
Vie in Bowl 

The once beaten Prairie 
View Panther football team 
will oppose Arkansas A and 
M college in the 33rd annual 
Prairie View Bowl scheduled 
in Houston, Tex., on Dec. 31. 
Prairie View, perennial host 
in the nation's second oldest 
bowl game, ended in a three.- 
way tie and with a 9-1 season 
record for the Southern Con- 
ference championship. 

The Panthers also were in a 
four-way deadlock with 
Grambling college, Southern 
University and Florida A and 
M for the 1960 National Ne- 
gro College title. 

Prairie View's only defeat 
of the season was to Gramb- 
ling. 



":3S>*- 


S--V?«;«^j^ 


Lakers 
Release 
New Rate 

The "Los Angeles Ilakere, 
who pioneered a student rate 
for ma.1or league basketball 
earlief this season, have an- 
nounced a s<;rviceman's rate 
for all their remaininglhOTne 
games «t the Sports Ari^na. 
I All servicemen in uniform 
will be able to buy seats for 
$1, and they can sit in the reg- 
ular $2 reserved section. 

Dec. 12; Monday, 8;30 p.m., 
St. Louis, Arena. 

Dec. 14, Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., 
St. _Loui8, Arena. 

Jan, 3, Tuesday, 8:30 pm., Bos- 
ton. Arena. 

.Tan. 5. Thursday," 8:30 p.m., St. 
Louis, Arena. 

.Ian. 6. >>lday, J:30 p.jn 
Louis. Arena. 1 

Jan. 10. Tuesday,- 8:30 p.ni., 
York. Arena. 

Jan. 11. Wednesday, 8:30 
New York, Arena. | 

Jan. U, Saturday. 11:00 
Cincinnati, Arena: T\'. 

Jan. 15. .Sunday, 8:30 p.r(i. 
cinnati. Arena. 

Jan. 24, Tuesday, 8:30 p.nii. 
acuse. Arena. 

Jan. 25, Wednesday. 8:30 
Syracuse. Arena. 

Jan. 29. .Su-nday, 2:30 p.m 
iroit. Arena. 

Jan. :fO. .Monday. 8:30 P 
troit. Arena. 

Fph. 8. Wcflne.'day, S:3l! 
St. Louis, Aicna , 

Fell. fl. Thursda.x-. 8:30 pm.. 
Louis, -Arena. 

Feb. Tl. Ucdnesday. S:30 p,m., 
Boston. Arena. 

Feb. 26, .Suixrtay, 2:30 pm,,, Phil- 
adelpliia. Arena. 

Feb. 27. .Monday, 8:30 p.m., 
Plilladelphia, A'rena, 

March 11. Saturdav, 11:00 a.ra,, 
ClnclnnaU, Arena: TV. 

Uarch 12, Sunday,' 2:30 p,m.. 
Cincinnati. Arena. 


,. St. 
, New, 

P.;n., 

a.ra., 
. Cln- 
. Syr- 

p,m,, 
,, De- 
,, De- 

p,ni,. 


St. 


Wilma Rudolph 
SljUed to Boil' 
flit Sports Aiena 

Willowy Wilma Rudolph, 
the super star of the 1960 
Olympiad who won three' g<^d 
medals, will make heif first 
competitive appearance in the 
United States since her Rcnne 
conquests in the second an- 
nual Los Angeles Invitational 
indoor track and field, meet at 
the Sports ^Arena Saturday 
evening, JanT.21. 

This surprise entry was dis- 
closed by meet director Her- 
schel Smith, who announced 
that he secured the entry of 
America'! No. 1 track and 
field personality. ' 

The pretty sprinting star 
will be accompanied by her 
Olympic and college coach, Ed 
Temple of Tennessee State. 

"Skeeter" Rudolph person- 
ally was responsible for the 
greatest America;n women's 
track showing since 1932, the 
Babe Didrikson era. She es- 
tablished an Olympic record 
in each event in which she 
competed. 

Olympic Champion Otis 
Davis, who rocketed to a.fan-' 
tastic world record of 44.9 to 
win- the 400 meters at Rome, 
also announced he would com- 
pete in the second annual Los 
Angeles Invitational Indoor 
track meet at the. Sjjorts 
Arena. 

Davis is the fourth entry — 
and the fourth gold medal 
holder — to enter the meet. 


AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 

ADJUSTED - REPAIRED - EXCHANGED 

REpublic I $7050 

2-5174 _ 

And Up & Exchange 

fRETLOAN CAR-NO MONEY DOWN 

Also Comp/ef* Motor qvarhaul 

SAM'S AUTO SERVICE 

a«35 S NORMANDIi AVE. OPEN SUNDAY 



"I have not been active in 
Vernoncrest (all Negro) or 
Rancho (all white club which 
the city had to threaten with 
loss of time if they did not ac- 
cept Thelma) since the inte- 
gration of golf clubs," she ex- 
plained. 

Let us make it crystalclear 
for the records, Thelma is NOT 
a Negro female professional 
and cannot become a "prO' 
fessional" until she applies to 
the WPGA in Florida and is 
accepted. (Can't you just see 
the Florida white women pro- 
fessionals accepting ANY ONE 
OF COLOR without the Su- 
preme Court, attorney general, 
NAACP National Legal^ Re- 
dress Committee and our new 
President John Kennedy beg- 
ging, pleading and suing. 

Presently the only women 
golf pros are ALL WHITE. 
Here are a few name 


SIGXr.D — Hani Aaron 
signed his 1961 contract with 
Milwauice. The 26-y car- 
old ccnterfielder played 1.^3 
games last season, batting 
126 runs and slamming 
home runs for a .292 ai 
age. 


'% 


Huskies Basketball Team 
Enter Two Cage Tourneys 





•j. :- 


An Idaa 

The new. Los Angeles Angels of the American League 
with GeneraL Manager Fred Haney, President Bob Rejl-nods 
and Board Chairman Gene Autry certainly have an ^'^cel- 
lent opportunity to capture the fancy of the Negro baseball 
fans by naming Emmett Ashford, the only Negro umpire in 
Triple-A baseball, to the staff of American League Umpires. 
Ashford is ranked as one of three best arbiters in the I^adfic 
Coast League. Negro fans are big supporters of basebaljl and 
•since the National League is way ahead of the American 
League in the number of Negro players.it would certainly 
be wise if the local franchise holders stepped in, namedj Ash- 
ford to the staff and assure theniiselves a warm welcome on 
opening day at Wrigley Field. i ' 

When Sanford (Sandy) Stephens, shows up in Pasadena 
Jan. 1 with the University of Minnesota to play WVishi^gfon' 
he will become the first Negro quarterback in the history of 
the Rose Bowl. The 6 foot junior from Uniontown, Pa.^ who 
weighs 215 pounds rolled up 164 yards net !n 57 running 
plays and completed 20 of 52 passes for 305 yards and was 
responsible for 11 touchdowns scoring nine himself and pass- 
ing for two more. He is also the team's regular punter. His 
55 kicks totaled 1,946 yards for a 35.3 average. He retikmed 
16 punts for 111 yards and nine kickoffs for 230 yards. « 

Stephens, a political science student, also intercepted 
three pa.sses and returned them for 74 yards in the closing 
victory over Wisconsin, a victory that moved Minnesota back 
into the No. 1 position in the national polls and earned the 
Gophers a ticket in the Arroyo Seco classic. ^ 

In addition to Stephens, the Gophers boast a sophomore 
tackle in Bobby Lee Bell rated as one of Minnesota's all- 
time finest; Bill Munsey, a 196' pound 5-11 sophwnore half- 
back who carriedthe ball 51 times for a gain of 225 yards or 
4.4 yards per carry, and 20-year-old Judge Allen DicksoiJ, the 
team's punting specialist, who also had the second best per- 
play ground gaining record on the Big Ten team. He inade 
142 yards in 31 tries and was never thrown for a loss. '■ 




-■1 


'b 


Santa Anita 
Race Meet 
Set Dec. 26 


Beautiful Santa Anita Park 
has scheduled a half-hour 
earlier start than usual for 
its banner opening 09 Ahe 
holiday Monday, Dec. 26, to 
usher^in its "Traditions of the 
Turf"' winter racing season 
that will extend 55 days 
through Mar. 11. 

The gates will open at 10:30 
a. m. and starting the. first 
of eight races vvill begin .at 
12:.S0 p. m. Featuring the 
traditional sprint^ the $20,000 
Lobiise j Palos Verdes Handicap, is ex- 


Patt>- 
Betsy 


Suggs, Mickey Wright 
Berg, Wiffi Smith, 
Rawls. 

A few others who shoot in 
the consistent 70's are: Betty 
Jameson, Fay Crocker, Mar- 
lene Bower Hagg (and her 
sister) Jackie Pung and many 
others. We hope to LIVE to 
see the day when some young 
Negro girl will play golf well 
enough and then FIGHT hard 
enough to becorrie the first 
Negro women's golf profes- 
sional. 


Lipscomb - Nomelini 

Big Daddy Lipscamb of the 
Baltimore (i^olts and Leo No- 
melini of the Sari Francisco 
49ers are scheduled to meet in 
a wrestling match some time 
in January. 




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■tffr IsKvtiva Wractar 4fl- 


After playin'g eight games 
in eleven days the East Los 
Angeles College basketball 
team was beginning tol work 
as a unit. Coach Dave "Taylor 
planned no rest for hi4 busy 
charges, as he entered ELA 
in holiday tournaments at 
Chaffey College and Glendale. 

This week the Huskie^ were 
at Chaffey where they faced 
San Bernardino on Wednes- 
day, and were to meet kthet 
Orange Coast or Glendale on 
Thursday. 

Between tournaments East 
L. A. will go up agalni^t the 
use Frosh at a neutral site, 
the Loyola O. gym. This b»>ne 
is set for Friday, Decer^bfr- 
23, at 6:15 p. m. ^^ ' .. I .-<-. 

On the day aft<af Chtiatj 
mas the Huskies move o"/pr to 
Glendale College where they 
open the Sam Barry tourna- 
ment against El Camin>. On 
Tuesday, Dec. 27, at Glendale 
it will be either L.A.C C. or 
Harbor as the Huskiie op- 
ponent. 

Next ELA home gamel is at 
Belvedere Junior high o|i Fri- 
day, Jan. 6, with top rated 
Long Beach in a Metropolitan 
Conference game. 

It has taken Coach Taylor's 
Huskies eight games to level 


pected, as always, to prove 
particularly attractive. 

The many thousands of vis- 
itors here for the Pa.sadena 
Tournament of Ro.ses and the 
football game, as well as local 
race goers, will have an op- 
portunity to see at the regu- 
lar 1 p. m. post time the 
S25,(XX) Breeders' Trial Stakes! 
on Friday, Dec. 30, and the 
double bill of the $25,000 Mai- [ 
ibu Stakes and $20,000 Las 
Flores Handicap on the fol- 
lowing Saturday. 

The New Year holiday rac- 
ing offering on Monday, Jan. 
2, will be the $25,000 San Gab- 
riel 'Cap on the spectacular 
hillside-infield grass cpurse. 


DON'T CUSS - CALL 


3 


< 


I/) 
«A 

3 
U 


off their record at four and 
four. After losing the opening 
three, ELA recovered to whip 
Citrus, Trade Tech, Pasadena, 
and Chaffey while losing an 
overtime match to Cerritos. 

The starting five has shaken 
dDwn to include Louis Hood 
aid Felix Patterson at for 
w ards, Allan . Shapiro at 
center, Charles Battery and 
Claries Kennedy at guards. 
Tie Green and White rec- 
oid might have been better 
bit for Hood and Battey who 
rriissed two and four games 
respectively. Only against 
Tjrade Tech and Chaffey were 
the Huskies at full strength. 

Felix Patterson leads all 
ELA scorers with 127, closely 
followed by Chuck Kennedy 
with 126. Both have a respect- 
able 16 point average. Battey 
and Hood are right behind 
with 15 point averages dur- 
ing their brief appearances. 


Ruck Shaw to Coach East 


. Lawrence T. "Buck" Shaw, 
who has coached the Phila- 
delphia Eagles to their first 
Eastern Conference champion- 
ship since 1949, this week 
was named to direct the East 
squad in the 11th annual All- 
Star Pro Bowl ganie Jan. 15 
at the Los Angeles Coliseum. 
Announcement was made 
by Paul J. SchiSSler, manag- 
ing director of the charity 
grid classic, that annually 
pits the all stars of the East- 


ek-n conference of the NFL 
against the elite of the West- 
ern conference. The West 
holds a 6-4 edge in the 10 
games pliayed. 

The Jan. 15 game will mark 
the third time that Shaw, 
football's famed Silver ; Fox, 
has coached a Pro Bowl team. 
Last January, his Ealstem 
squad lost to the West, ^-21, 
and in 1955, when he^ was 
coaching the San Fraricisco 
49ers, he directed the West 
to a 26-19 victory. i 


Prep Point Maker 

Richard" Levin of Hamilton 
High, a forward on the 
school's basketball team, is 
well ahead of the other top 


i n^akers at the midway mark. 
I After five leagues, Levin 
i had 132 points for a 26.4; 
{average. Williams of Mjinuar 
I Arts is fourth with 106: ani 
21.2 average. 


Stokes May Recover 

Maunice Stokes, Cincinnati 
Royals basketball player who 
was stricken with a brain ail- 
ment three years ago, may 
walk out of the hospital four 
years from now, according 
to Jack Twyman, his legal 
guardian. 


USI DON'T CUSS - CALL USI 


MAI^LOCK'S 

24-HOUR EAAERGENCY 
TOWING SERVICE 

Special Rates for 
Garages and Dealers 

AX. 4-9917 
1359 W. Santa Barbara 


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specialists show you how to open your savings 
aqcount. He'll acquaint you with our new high rate 
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STARTS NEU MONDAY - thrillins thoroughbred rKing in Smtt Anita's 
world-famous setting of tieauty and tradition. You will Injoy every luxury 
and convenience while you seethe nation's greatest horses and jockeys 
in action. Attend Santa Anita often during the SSniay meeting. Put time 
is 12:30 p.m. opening day (gates o^en 10:30 a.m.) — other days I jX) pjai 
(gates open lljOO i.m.)- Reach Santa Anita by auto, Tanner or MTA basj 


-1 



■:i 


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THE PALOS VERDES handicap (S20,000-added) on ^ning day starts ai 
season-long parade of events (^3,365,000 in stakes and purses) includinf 
four $100,000 classics. Racing truly is the Sport of Kings at Santa Anita 
and you can share this regal pleasure in many ways — superb dining, 
beautiful appointments, axquisite gardens, and courteous serviet from' 
the moment you enter the spacious parking area. 



!!•- 




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ORDER RESERVED SEATS now by mail for any day of the 196041 mectiflcj 
Pec. 26 through Mar. 11. Send check or money order for $1.30 etch. AHoW; 
four days for return of tickets. Thousands of reserved seats arc placed en 
sale every racing day at Santa Anita Park. No phone reservations please. 
You pay admission charges (Grandstand or Cli^ House) at the entrance^ 
gates. Plan your days with family and friends at beautiful Santa AnitaJ 

I.: 

LOS ANGELES TURF CLUB, INC. [ 

SANTA ANITA PARK • 'ARCADIA. CALIFORNIA 

Murray 1-7401 or Hlllcr^t 7-2171 

More than a quarter-century of winter titoroughbred racing 
featuring regular track and the cxclushre hillside grass cours^ 


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.,tJ^-...l.,". .L-i-.' iv-.i'-.-J;.'"*!,.-.. 



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Thorsdiy, D^ctpb*!" 22, I960' The California Eagle— 13 

II I ) •> I . . . 1 ■ ■■ I II, 


>i 



^HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS— Jackie Wilson, fnmous for 
"Lonely Teardrops, I'll Be Satisfied and Alone at Last," 
heads Alan Freed's giganjic S day Christmas Rock and Roll 
stage shnu- at the United Artist Theatre, 9th and Brond- 
uay, downtoun. Five big stage shows daily Kith a special 
midnight sh')iv on Xni.' Yearns ere. Make it.'!!! 


People & Places 


BUILDIKG — That club chair- 
man who spread the word 
around' that certain members 
made off with six grand of 
the building fund has been 
voted the year's biggest prac- 
tical jolter. They say she is 
mad because she wasn't elect- 
ed president to take charge of 
the funds! 

BLOWOUT — Wilton Place 
Demos had a big election at 
h-nd when one of the mem- 
bers attempted to stack the 


meet for the president's seat. 
He and his friends -found 
themselves a hornet's nest. 
After the stings, a sensible 
election followed! 
VICE SQUADS— Nobody's talk- 
about the incident involving 
two vice officers and a high- 
way patrolman but they would 
have if they had been sons of 
Ham. But regardless of who 
they were it was handled in a 
pretty sloppy manner, espe- 
(Continued on Page 15) 


FEATURING THE ARTISTRY OF 





svJwstr BLVo 

ArGAROHE* Sr. ^1 
HOLUYWOOO 


i JAzz 



NIGHTLY EXCEPT TUESDAY 

LES McCANN Ltd. 

TUESDAYS ONLY - RUTH PRICE 


'Sassy Joins 
Herd Monday 
On Channel 11 

'The 01' Woodchopper', 
Woody Herman, with his 
great entertaining unit, and 
songstress Sarah Vaughan, in- 
ternationally known as 'The 
Divine One.' will he featured 
on KTTV's "Great Music From 
Chicago" special jazz concert, 
Monday. January 2, 9 p.m., 
Channel Eleven. 

Assisting artists will be 
Chicago vocalist- Frank 
D'Rone, Nat "King'« Cole's 
protege, and the Ray Bryant 
quintet of "Madison" and 
"Little Susie" recording fame. 

"Great Music's" .i«zz concert 
will include the following se- 
lections: ■ 

Muskrat Ramble, played by 
Woody Herman's Orchestra. 

Misty and Linger Awhile, 
sung by Sarah Vaughan. 

Ray Bryant Trio. 

I Could Write a Book, sung 
by Frank D Rone. 

Woody Herman. 194n-'60, by 
Woody Herman and the Or- 
chestra. 

Summertime, sung by Sarah 
Vaughan. 

How High the Moon, sung 
by Sarah Vaughan. 

Jam Session, including 
Woody Herman, the Orches- 
tra. Sarf»h Vaughan, Frank 
D'Rone and the Ray BrJ'ant 
Trio. 

Most Versatile 

Herman is one of the most 
versatile bandleaders in the 
business. He doubles on clari- 
net and alto saxaphone, sings 
novelty and ballad numbers, 
emcees a show and can, when 
he wants to. execute a fancy 
bit of hpofing. 

His latest band has been 
voted tops in the country by 
the readers of Metronome 
magazine, is hailed by Time, 
Parade and other magazines 
as "the band that brought 
back dancing." 

Slngsotional Sorah . • 

Dipping her lush voice into 
the heart of a melody and 
freeing a choice galaxy of 
notes, Sarah Vaughan leisure- 
ly colors, shapes and releases 
them in scintillating designs 
16 present a kaleidoscope of 
(Continued rfh Page 14) 



'N' 


'-»ji'.^*i: 


VIRGIN 

— Afro-C 
and with 


din 


ISLAND STEEL BAND— Sets newatten 
iibnn coffee house presenting all the excitem 
the dancing of Princess Gloria. Great entertair 


ent 



ce records at the INSOMNIAC 

and suspense of the Umbo dance 

mcntat Hermosa Beach. Be there! 


^ i 




' The Edward Fishers' Xmas cards are rather 
unique. The expectant parents sign 'em Eddie, lil 
and (?) Fisher. . . . "Dapper Al Vigal trained in la$t 
week from Gotham. Says he will sojourn here for the 
winter. . . . Says although this is a rest period, donft 
exclude him from your guest 





■ «>- 


lists. He can make the scene! 
. . Marie Bryoafi pretty 
daughter Julie and her steady 
beau motored to Nevada and 
tied the knot! . . . We ordered 
several of the cards bearing 
the inscription:. You've ^en 
Very Good, So Don't Expect 
Any Presents! . '. . Like the 
John Mathis boy says in the 
song: When we're all alone by 
an unlisted phone, where no 
chaperone can get onr num- 
ber. Then, let's misbehave! 


Biggett Break 
Theater scribe Den BzoifB 
has fixed up real posh quter- 
ters in his far west digging 
for world weary newspaper 
folks to be entertained. Don 
has one room devoted to Afti- 
can art and also a "beatnik" 
rtom in his showplace. Like, 
dad, we're real proud to be ih- 
cluded in the exclusive mem- 
bership. . . . AfH<x Noomte 
Brown worked at Columbia 
last week essaying the role ;of 
(Continued on Page 14) j 


GOURMET GUIDE 

Recommendations i or Dining, Wining and the Best of Entertainment 




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"CHITTLIN JAZZ" RE- 
TURNS— After touring the 
East's top sports JVnrld Pa- 
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McCan, Ltd.. liith Ron Jef- 
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is back at his stall on Sunset's 
leading coffee house. The 
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shows even greater promise 
on this newest appearance. 
Nitely except Tuesdays at 
Sunrt and Gardner, Holly- 
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Convenient 
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jg Da ys Only-Beginninf SUNDAY, Dec. 251Z ; 


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JANUARY 2ncl, 1961 — PLAZE JOHNSON 

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iw.iif cagig inursaiyy, Decem b 

SH§W1IZ 



Thursday, December 22, 1960 


It magciz batbawat 

I Ctoie with me to dine with 
$ammy Davis Sr. and his in- 
teresting family. Thousands of 
jirti<fles have been written 
kbout Sammy Davis Jr. "the 
grea;test showman on earth " 
^ut thia will be the first ex- 

ilusive article ever written on 
he proud father and his fam- 
ly. 

I When the family Invited us 
UP tor dinner Sammy simply 
said. "Come west on Sunset. 
turn right at the Beverly Hills 
Hotel and just wind up to the 
top of the mountain." We did 
Exactly what he said and got 
|ost. We finally went back 
flown the canyon, flagged a 
tab and asked, "Do you know 

V'here the Sammy Davisc .._ „„_. .^^ 

Jive?" Oh yes, he knew the, baked turkey, "Hawaiian" Voas^ 
Pavises, they are the only Ne- pig (with apple in his mouth) 

o family presently living in and every known vegetable. 

^erly Hills. When we finallyl (Continued on Page 16) 


arrived — an hour late — we 
were adniitted into the beauti 
ful $75,0(X) mansion by Mrs. 
Rita Davis. Mrs. Davis is a 
petite, doll-size bundle of end- 
less energy. Sammy Sr. affec- 
tionately calls her "Pee Wee." 
She introduced us to Sandra, 
their beautiful 20 year old 
daughter Their little 7 year old 
daughter, Suzette, introduced ' Sunday 

f liUhnT. J^ 1 -^"** ^^'^ conductor and 
a birthday on Dec. lo, my un! 


Like the Cool. 
Yule of Happy 
FM Happenings 

Pete Rugolo, whose birthday 
falls on (Christmas, will, be 
Leonard Feather's expert 
guest on "The Blindfold Test" 
over KNOB-FM (98) at 9 a.m. 


cle Sammy Davis Jr. was born 
on Dec. 8 and my daddy Sam- 
my Sr. was born on Dec. 12, 
what do 3'ou think of that?" 
Before we could answer her 
mother announced that dinner 

as and had been ready. 

Mrs. "Pee Wee" Davis served 


i HUNTINGTON HARTFORD THEATRE 

I NOW PLAYING! Fin4l perfj. Jan. 7 

I SMTS >IOW: Bw OHke, Mutual Agencies & S. Cal. Musk Co., 737 S. Hill 

g Mail Orders Accepted 



aFaisininthesun 


o new ploy by LORRAINE HANSBERRY wiHi 

DOUGLAS TURNER • DIANA SANDS 

directed by LLOYD RICHARDS 

fVfNINGS: MONDAY (*>c*pt opening) thru THUCSOAY — 8;30 P.M. 

Orch. $4.85: Mm. $4.85. 4.30. Bolcony $3.75, 3.30, 2.65 
EVfNINCS; OffNINC, FHOAY AND $ATU»OAY— i:30 P M. ' 

Orch. J5.95; Mezi. $5.95, 5.40; Bolconv $4.30, 3.75, 3.20- 
MATINtIS: WEdVjESDAY AND SATUHDAY— 230 P.M. 

Orch. $4.30: Men. $4 30, 3.75, Balcony $3 20, 2.65, 2.10 
PtlCeS FOI NEW YEAI'S EVE ONIY— 830 PJK. 

Orch. $7.05; Mezi $7.05, 5.95, Bolcony $4.85, 4.30, 3.75 
(Tox Included in oil Irtted prices) 
Pfe«sc enclose stomped, oddressed envelope for moil orders. 


currently is 
music director of the "Thriller" 
TV series. 

Feather will play various 
unidentified Christmas jazz 
recordings. The guest will un- 
dertake to identify the artists 
and comment on the perform- 
ances. This will be among the 
shows taped for publication in 
Down Beat, where Ft ther's 
"Blindfold Test" has been 
i regular feature since 1951. 
I Howard Lucraft will pre- 
jsent jazz from Sweden for 
'Christmas Day on Jazz Inter- 
national over KNOB-FM (98) 
at 7 p.m. . 

Principal performer will be 
Arne Domerus in articulate 
sa.xophone -sjylings with tlie 
fantastic big band of Harry 
Arnold. 

Luciaft's exclusi\e Musi c 
News spot will be included 
with latest Holly-wood record 
injrs and happeninjrs, plus 
commcnl.s on recent films. j 

'Sassy' on TV 

I 

(Continued from Page 13) .1 
musical imagery. | 

And she will do just that^ 
during KTTV's "Great Music 
From Chicago'^ jazz concert. 
'Monday. January 2, 9 p.m., 
I Channel Eleven. 

"Sassy," as she is known 
[affectionately to her count- 
less fans all over the world, 
.began her musical education 
j at the age of seven. Today 
shp is an accomlpished pian- 
i.st and organist. 



tlif world's most edv- 
se/ison at Marineland of 


YV LET IDE actios; — Smiley 

cnted pijrf>oise, launches the Yule 

the Pacilic hy zipping thyough a (Ihri.stnins urealh. Tre'at 

yniir farK'.ly to a holiday at Marinelnnd , just riiiiii/lrs away 

via Frrnitiy. 


Phil Gordon Makes the- 


NEW YORK SCENE 


Cool Happenings j Yuletide Partiet 

Well, this week my boy j Mondav night- at Branker's 
Stev* Gonzeles and I have Melodv Room,' we will enjoy 
been curtailed. However, not, the 3rd Annual C'-ristmas Par- 
completely, .so you should ty given by Mr.' and Mrs. 
know about the 17 inches ofoeorge Palmer and the 3sion- 
snow that fell, to start the^av Night Camp Fund corn- 
week, followed by the 7.8 mitle^rand friends. This after- 
d-grees of cold weather. -^o^n. tovs will be distributed 

Through 11 all, on Wednes- gi United Mutual Life Inkur- 
day night I attended the 16th i a. ce Company's Chri.stmas 
.Annual Dinner-Dance of the pgrtv For Children. 
International Union of Build- , ,", ... ..' , ,. • v ,. 

o ■ T-. , 1 r„, A 1 thai s left now is last- 

ing Service Employees, at The „. -, , . ■ ■ 

6 f .? • . ;TV,.r,i,)« el,/^r.,„r,r, tPimming 


'Exodus' 

Advance 

Success 

Otto Prernin^er's production 
iof "E.\odus" had its Los .An- 
geles premiere last night at 
the Fox Wilshire Theatre, 
where it will be shown ex- 
ckisively on a reserve seat 
basis. / 

Policy will be one perform 
ance each evening, with 
matinees on Wednesday, Sat- 
urday and Sunday. Daily 
matinees will beheld during 
Christmas week only. Seats 
V e now available by mail 
order and at the theatre box 
office. 

Stellar Cast 

Based on the runaway ibest- 
seller by Leon Uris, "Exodus" 
features an international cast 
of -Stars headed b.v Paul New- 
man. Eva Marie Saint, Ralph 
Richardson, Peter Lawford. 
Lee J. Cobb. Sal Mineo. John 
Derek. Hugh Griffith. Gregory 
Ratoff. Felix Aylmer. David 
Opatoshu and Jill Havvorth. 

"K.xodus" was prociuced and 
directed by Preminger in Tech- 
nicolor and the new Pana- 
vision 70 process entirely On 
location in Israel and C\prOs. 
It has already recorded the 
largest advance in motion pic- 
ture hi.storv. i 


SOUNDTRACK 


(Continued from Page 13> ! Billy says he plans to co-p«»« 
a convict m "Birdman Of Al-jduce the movie and ateo a|^ 
catl-az." He's being called I pear in it. .. . j' 

"C>ne Take" Brown by the dir- j j„ , ^ ^^^„, (.t j.^ 

oTwh»?';^. *^"H*',"^'ltwo) Inquiries in reference 1ir»- 

VL h.v! .^f c^w Z"*^ ^4nthe cari^ture created foe th. 

em have it jusi that way. No' , . , o^+jof r»i m/>n«» 

r»ts.koc' «-.~.- u n*— icolumn by artist Col BoHaf 

and as to "what are we trying 


^ f 


retakes! . . . Beraic Hamilton. 

Frank Sinatra and another ac- „ _ , .^. .. „ ,„^ i* „„->», 

•tor were sweating it out last ^« PJi^^'lT^hJ knU^«lin*^ ^ 

week in an isolated cell for a '•^^''r^, *,^* J^vinT L^af ^ 

s'^.uence in "Devil At Your'^^^^.^^'J'l.^t.^^^ 

O'clock." This flick is Bernie's 

biggest break to date, so'm 


told. . . . Billy Eekstino has 

purchased the film rights to a 
new novel called 'The Scene;" 


artist and the subject both. 

have a sense of humor, and 

at>pareii:tly a krt of peoi^ 

don't The drawing ot tfaip 


(Continued on Page 15) 


« My Yuletide Message 

af ".MERRY CHRISTMAS," "HAPPY NEW YEAR" 
ARE THE EAIPTY WORDS WE HEAR; 
IN' A WORLD OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS, 
HATRED, HUNGER, STRESS AND FEAR. 

"PEACE AND GOOD WILL"; STILL ARE 
^STRANGERS, 
E#. DUL TO LE.ADERS WHO ARE BLIND; 
iS TO THF. GOOD^OF BROTHERHOOD 
8j. AND THE NLEDS OF ALL .MANKIND. 

% OH. IF '1 HIS ^ UI/ETIDK.COULD BRING US 

Ni I NivERsnv UNni'. 

y: KRF.KDOM. TRUTH AND EQUAL JUSTICE; 
U WH.VF A HEAVEN EARTH WOULD BE! 
S —ANDY RAZAF 


fj. 

I 4f 


4 


\l 


?x 


i r 


. i 

t;! 


SANDY SANFOHD — Toast 
master and bartender delu.xe 
at Marty's Lounge on Broad- 
way was surprised by wifie 
with a swinging birthday 
1 1 av.tee Sundav eve! 


EVENT OF THE YEAR 

"^^^•^VaUSlVE LOS ANGEUS ENGAGEMENT, 

SUNDAY EVENING JAN. 1st 
8 P.M. TO 2 A.M. 



HAL ZEIGER presents 

THE MOST CREATIVE 
MUSICAL GIANT OF 
THIS GENERATION! 



PLAYING HIS HIT RECORDS 

'GEORGIA ON MY MIND' 
RUBY' • 'HARD HEARTED HANNAH' 
'COME RAIN OR COME SHINE' • 'WHAT'D i S 
'THE GENIUS OF RAY CHARLES' 


^/EARL BOSTIC 

lji_^ k^r\i His Fomous Orchestro 


I HOLLYWOOD 

_ ALLADIUM 

6215 Sunset Blvd. • HO 9-7356 


Boulevard in Queens, enjoyed 

the delicious prime ribs. etc.. 

and the .';liow was highlighted 

by the sparkling dance and 

s. ng routines of Norma Miller 

and her Four Flash Dancers, 

|tlie sexpot bosomy. S a b r i n a 

and lier partner in .siong. oome- 

ldi<xn. Jack Wakefield, and a 

i hjpnolist. 

! Charming Elaine Daniel, 
Susan and Don and otliers of 
I tlie gang from Local 32Bs 
I Health Center, all contributed 
j greatly to a most pleasant 
! evening. 

i Show Times 

1 On Thursday, with Steve do- 
!ing the chauffeur honors, wc 
'went to The Apollo to see the 
Louis Jordan Show, which was 
j swinging, 'with outstanding 
I song styling by Betty Roche, 
funny bits by Clay Tyson, the 
curly-headed youn,<^ Mr. ,U.S. 
Bonds, the Cashmeres and last, 
but by no means least. Mr. 
Jordan and his inimitable 
novelty songs, alto sa.\ solos, 
the Tympany Five, and a line 
o! very healthy chorus girl.«, 
The JordsJnettes. This week its 
a religion sliow, headlined by 
Prof. Alex Bradford, and start- 
ing tomorrow through the 
Christmas Holiday.*, it will be 
Jof-l<o and his Rocket>ihip Re- 
vue. 

Ruth Coleman Visits 
Young Miss Ruth Coleman, 
<aughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
Arthuj; H. Coleman of ,San 
Franci.■^co. trained into N'ew 
York from the Emma ^Villa^d 
School in Troy, a. id after 
spending the day sigittseeing 
with DoIX), we took her to 
Idlewild to catch her .jet for 
home and family for the holi- 
days. 

Cordon Plays Santo 
Last Sunday, 1 played Santa 
Claus (with costume, beard et 
all as The Yuletiders. Inc. pre- 
sented "Toyland" at the Dawn 
Casino, and everyone, attend- 
ing brought a toj' for distribu- 
tion to needy children for 
Christmas and the girls of the 
club for "granting me this 
privilege. 


All that's 
miniuV shopping, 
the Christmas tree ano av<'ait- 
ing Satita Claus on Sunday. 


'Long Lie 
Cast Set 
For Play 

After overcoming a difficult i 
opening weekend when thi'ee; 
of the leading members of the 
east were injured in an auto- 


Then we'll all ball for a week I mobile accident. Ihe presenta- 
or .so as tlic parlies affd fun tion of -Samuel A. Bovea's new 
continue tliioughout the lioli-'piay. "A Lie Is A Century 
(Uiys. HO . .'. HO . . . HO . . .jLong' enters the second week 
Have a.\cry Meriy Christrhas. Lf its lim'iled run at the Sev- 
and I'll be seeing you again ' erlv Hills Playhouse. 2tA 
before the Xew Year. Okay?koulh Roben.son Boulevard. 
Swell . '. . And Jingle Bells to Beverly Hills, 
you too::::: | xhe production was directed 

riHL OORDOX ' I ^Continued on Page l.'Si 


f 
f 
f 
f 
f 



"\lay your hearts 

be filled iiith joy, 

may you enjoy a ivondcr 

tie-K year of peace 

and happiness." 

Raymond Burr 


Zm'm^*m*m % im v iim ^ m- %»%m^i m 9H0T m 'm m ^m^ m' 



ifiriirifiririririririf'ki^ir 


"BE HAPPY" 

CONTACT TONY LEASE 

MIYAKO TRAVEL MA. 5^60 


-K 
-K 


"Talk of the Town " 

For your holiday , entertainment 
the fabulous^ . . 

CLUB TOWN miL 

Presenfs Nitely 

ir SONNY CRISS & HIS TRIO 
Vera ^'"VJ''''' Stevenson. M. C. 

9527 S. Main at Golden 

pi 5-2971 

Plenty of Free Parking 

* 

Your Hosts 
Hugh Lovel . .,. Doug Stone 

• ■•••**•*•*•• 




SEASON'S GREETINGS 
CREDiLL'S KITCHEN 

DELICIOUS MEALS - CATERING TO PARTIES 

2122 WEST JEFFERSON, LOS ANGELES U, CALIF. 

RE. 4-9591 






ADVANCE SALE 
TICKETS AT 

ALL MUSIC CITY STORES • HOTEL WATKINS • PALLADIUM 

FLASH RECORDS ^Jefferson at Western) 
^Olt TABLE RESERVATIONS CALL HO/iywood 7-615 7 


TJ\ T.I B I riO US —Ter- 
ry (Hhhs Quartet is set to 
open fit The Suiiiinit on Fri- 
day, Dcicnihcr 23. for a ten- 
day engagement'. Joining the 
Quartet to provide a real 
swinging holiday seas'on at 
The Summit will be the 
Stan Kenton All-Stars on 
December 23, 24^.30 and 31. 


SCRIBE 

# AX 53135 • 





# AX 5-3135 • 

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$4 PER YEAR $2.50 SIX MONTHS 

CUP AND MAIL TO: CALIFORNIA EAGLE NEWSPAPER 
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D NEW SUBSCRIPTION n CHECK 

n RENEWAL n MONEy ORDER 


NAME IN FULL: 

STREET ADDRESS: . . ^ , 

CITY: ZONE: 


J. B. FINNEY PONTIAC 


CREDIT REPAIR - BUDGET TERMS 
NO MONEY DOWN 


I 8141 S.VERMONT AVE 


PL 2-3721 



t: 



Regal Hotel and Anni^ 


Walter Joseph Miller, Mpr, • 
[815 EAST 6th ST. AAA. 5-7673 

SPACIOUS PARKING ACCOMMODATIONS 



Is, 


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ifDuu RNP IT IN iHE ¥umnm 


OUND» service: • EMPL-O^'rvlENT • PERSONAL- 


AX. 5-3135 •CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


'#-< 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 AM- 




People & P laces 


(Continued from Page 13) 

*cially, when you think of the 

years they have been on the 

job, their families and their 

repatations. 

SrHINEBS — The entertain- 
ment committee which in- 
cludes " Tommy Tucker and 
Walter Goodlow were out lin- 
ing up four bracket stars for 
the annual show coming up 
soon! 

ESSIE BENSON — Fast devel- 
oping into one of the south- 
land's finest real estate sales- 
laf^ies, she will soon put in for 
her broker's license. She op- 
erates out of Herman Bailey's 
W. Adams office! 
NUMBERS— The inside behind 
the big crack-down on the 


operations is that it was trig. 
gered because bankers have 
been refusing pay-offs on big 
hits! 

RAYMOND BRUCE — KGFJ's 
public relations man and cele- 
brated disc-jokey was a panel 
member of KABC's squabble 
about whether -11 o c k 'n Roll 
music is good or bad. He 
to&k the negative and oi>ened 
people's eyes to a lot of things 
which are bad for radio other 
than Rock 'n Roll. 
VALEKIE TAYLOR — In pass- 
ing orchids to ,the Pasadena 
NAACP Special Activities 
Committee, it should be noted 
that there wasn't a harder 
worker for their successful 


SOUNDTRACK 


wHh. 


K^^nazz ^^^yawjord 


(Continued from Page 14) 
scribe lis not a drawing, per 
B€, but a caricature. 

Mostsrful Storrlina 

And caricatures are Cal's 
stock in trade, although he is 
also a fine portrait painter. A 
caricature, for the bervefit of 
theuninitiated is a "taice off" 
or an exaggeration. Cal is a 
past master at the art and 
uses a 'bold stroke' in many 
instances to get his message 
across. Whereas, in reality, we 
probably resemble a portrait 
of a mobster, Cal figured our 
readers would appreciate the 
"tongue in cheek" sketch of 
us. 

We would appreciate a line 
or two from you as to how it 
strikes you. And of course, if 
yoi jire not completely in ac- 
cord with us, we may arrange 
to have a gunslinger pay you 
a call. ... 
. A hardboiled editor who is 


Academy Names 
Redd Foxx for 
'Grammy' Award 

This has been the biggest 
week in the successful career 
of Redd Foxx, nationally -pop- 
ular nightclub and recording 
comedian, currently making it 
at the Red Flame, 107th and 
Vermont. Within the space of 
several days: 

1. Foxx was nominated for a 
National Academy of Rc; 
cording Arts and Sciences' 
"Grammy" award for his per- 
formance on the Dooto Rec- 
ords long-play album, 'The 
Best Laff"; in the category 
"Comedy Performance — Spok- 
en Word." 

2. He was booked for a 
three-month tour of Japan and 
Australia, beginning in Janu- 
ary. 

Several years before record- 
ed comedy became a hot-sell- 
er in the general industry, 
•Foxx achieved a "gold rec- 
ord," symbolic of a million- 
sale, for his "Laff of the 
Party." But, up to now, a 
"Grammy" award has eluded 
him. 

"I believe," says Dootsie 
Williams, Dooto president, 
"that Foxx has earned this 
recognition, and I expect him 
to win this year." 

Th4 Grammy Award is simi- 
lar to the "Oscar" presented 
Annually for best perform- 
ances in motion pictures and 
the "Emmy" presented for 
similar performances on tele- 
vision. 


aware that we are making the 
opening night scene for "A 
Raisin In The Sun" is insistent 
that we return to the Eagle of- 
fice and knock out a review. 
Let it be said that the people 
who populated the Huntington 
Hartford stage madcN every 
moment county The story line 
by Lorraine Hansberry is mas- 
terful, and the cast played 
their roles with adroitness. It 
is the best play to arrive in 
town in longer than we care 
to remember. 

Footnotes 

Piano-vocalist Camille How- 
aid is back in town and ap 
pearing at Nicolai'sin Mont 
bello. ... Gilbert Simpson f 
playing center on 20th Century 
Fox basketball team which 
also boasts Rafer Johnson as 
forward. . . . We dug jazz critic 
Leonard Feather's article ex- 
pl ining the come-uppance of 
jazz. In olden days, Feather 
explained, there was the con- 
cept that jazz was a form of 
music at which no self re- 
specting performer could or 
would want to make a living. 
The old joke: Don't tell 
mother I've become a jazz 
musician. She thanks I'm in 
Boston shining shoes. But 
things are looking up now. 
Perhaps, the scribe says, it 
may not be too long before 
some youngster, who some- 
how got sidetracked into boot- 
blacking for a living, may ac- 
tually want to say, "Don't tell 
mother I'm shining shoes. She 
thinks I'm in Chicago, playing 
jazz. 

May we take this opportun- 
ity to wisu. you and yours a 
merry little Christmas! 


'Long Lie' 

(Continued from Page 14) 
by Walter Brough and stars 
Rex Ingram and Pauline 
Myers. The three injured 
actors were: Marvis Hughes, 
who suffered bruises and 
lacefations, Morris Buchanan, 
who sustained a wrenched 
neck .and back, and Rhoda 
Jordan who was most seri- 
ously hurt and hospitalized 
and. who received permission 
to appear in the opening per- 
formances only a few hours 
before the curtain rose. How- 
ever, all three will be suf- 
ficiently recovered to appear 
this weekend. 

The other cast members 
are: Jakie Deslonde Edward 
Rowan, Mae Henderson, 
Norris N y a c k, and Jack 
Crowder. Reservations may be 
made by calling OL. 7-0770. 


SCRIBE 




• AX 5-3135 

• 

135 

^ 

« 

Ul 

lA 

1 

u 

a 

in 



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SCRIBE 

^ PER YEAR $2.60 SIX MONTHS 

CUP AND JMAIL TO: CALIFORNIA EAGLE NEWSPAPER 
2101 WEST VERNON AVE., LOS ANGELES •> CALIFORNIA 

n NEW SUBSCRIPTION D CHECK 

D RENEWAL D MONEY ORDER 


NAME IN lULL: ' 

STREET ADDRESS: , 

CITY: ZONE: STATE: 


Lena Home show than she 
>vas. She sold Lena on the 
ideal 

ISAAC PARKER — Postal em- 
ployee and a volunteer Com- 
munity Chest worker just 
turned in a check for $448 
donated by J. HaTen. ov/ti«> 
of the Auto Photo Company 
at 33rd and Central. Although 
M." Harren doesn't live in our 
community,' he is interested 
enough to help s^ that the 
local area reaches its goal. 
And guess who was the first 
to send him a thank you note 
. . . Councilman Ed Roybal! 
ROBERT McFERRIN — World 
famous baritone with N. Y. 
Philharmonic Orchestra and 
the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany took time out from his 
busy schedule to give a 
concert for the Dorsey High 
students in their school au-^ 
ditorium before an SRO crowd! 
ROY GARDNER — He was a 
big spender in tlie Congo 
Room the other eve. He is a 
former boxing manager a«d 
handled some top boxers dur- 
ing his timel 

AL KIBBLER — In town to 
keep a date at the Hollywood 
Palladium, also kept one at 
the Town Tavern and deli^^ht- 
ed the elbow-benders with 
songs. 

JIMMY WITHERSPOOM — He 
won't go into the Birdland 
with the Count Basie Ork. In- 
stead he heads for London in 
Jan., for 21 days of concerts! 
FLORINE RAY — Social work 
supervisor in Chicago being 
shown around to the happy 
places by Helen Wright and 
she's weeping because she 
won't be in town for the ter- 
rific League of Allied Arts 
Nov. 26 affair! 

ALTHEA POLK —Curvy and 
iiTPsistable as ever, flew from 
Alaska to be with her family 
during the holidays. She is 
one of the top Army clerks in 
the 49th state! 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


36952 

NOTICE OP THE SALE OF 

REAL PROPERTY AT 

PRIVATE SALE 

No. 409424 

In the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeie.i. 

In the Matter of the Estate ol 
A.N'DBLLAR WOOD. Deceased. 

Notice is hereljy siven that the 
iinderBljned Executor of the Es- 
tate of Andellar Woods, deceased. 
will sell at private sale, to the 
hijfhe.it bidder, upon the terms 
and conditions hereinafter men- 
tioned and subject to confirmation 
by the said. Superior Court, on or 
f^fter the 33rd dav ow December. 
I960, at the office of VInce Mon- 
roe Tovvn.'send. .Jr., Attorney for 
the Kxecutor, 323 West Florence 
Avenue. City of Los Angeles 3. 
County of Los Angeles, State of 
California, all the right, title and 
interest of said deceased at the 
time of doaih and all the right, 
litle and inerrst that the esate of 
.said decea,«Pd has acquired by 
operation of law or otherwise. 
other than or in addition to that 
of .said deceased at the time of 
rtpath. in and to ail that certain 
real property particularly described 
as follows, to-wit : 

Lot lfi5 of Daiton Orange .Grove 
Tract, as per map recorded in 
Roolc 2, Page 100 of Official Rec- 
ords of Los Angeles County, State 
of California, More comrnonly 
known as 1530 East 23rd Street, 
Lo.s Angeles. California. 

Terms of Sale: Cash in lawful 
money of the lT,nited States on con- 
firmation of sale, or part cash and 
balance evidenced by note secured 
hy mortgage or Trust Deed on the 
property so sold. Ten> per cent of 
■imount bid to be depioiited with 
bid. •.. s 

Bids or offers to be In Vriling 
and will lie received at the afore- 
,said office at any time after the 
first piibliration hereof and before 
date of sale. 
Dated December 5. 1960 

VKRBEL L. BRENSON 
Executor of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
Vince Monroe Tewnsend 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Los Angeles 3, California 
Attorney for Executor 

(Published in the California 
Eagle Dec, 8. 13, 22, 29, 1960.) 


fia Weight, De- 


l-LKSAl NOTICES 


38019 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 
LOS ANGELES 
No, 313420 
Notice of Hearing of Petition to 
Borrow Money and Exeoute Deed 
of Trust 
In the Matter of the Estate of 
ARTHUR C. CHAPPBLL 
Deceased 
Notice \a hereby given that 
Bertha Chappell. Administratix of 
the said estate, has filed herein 
her verified petition praying for an 
oitter authorizing the petitioner to 
borrow money and execute a deed 
of trust upon, real estate herein- 
after described: and that December 
16, 1960. at 9:15 a.m., in the 
fornia, in and for the County of 
Lor Angeles, Department 4 thereof, 
has been appointed as the time and 
place for hearing of said petition, 
when and where any persons inter- 
ested in the said estate ma.v ap- 
pear and object to the granting of 
said petition. 

Reference is hereby made to the 
said petition for further partic- 
ulars. 

.Said real estate is situated in the 
County of Los Angeles, State of 
California, and is described as fol- 
lows: 

I^t 47, 48 and 49, Block E. Starks 
Palm Tract as shown on map rec- 
orded in Book 8, 'Page 98 of Map.', 
office of the County Recorder of 
said Coimiy. 

Dated ,lanuar>- 1, 1961. 
Edwartj S, Hardwick 
Attorney-at-Law 
1518 e, 103rd St, 
Los Angeles 2, Calif. 
Harold J, Ostly. 
County Clerk and Clerk of 

said Superior Court. 
By A. L. Qraham, Deputy, 
Publish in California Eagle news- 
paper, December 22-29, I960, 


(California Eagle) 
35985 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 435-154 
In the Superior Coiirt of the 
State of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles, In . the 
Matter of the Estate of Edna 
Wright Brown, also known as 
Edna Brown, algoEdna W, Brown, 
also known as EO* 
censed. 

Notice is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against the said de- 
cprienl to tile said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them .to the un- 
dersigned at his office at 2822 
Soutli Western Avenue, in the City 
of Los Angeles, in the aforesaid 
County, which latter office is the 
place of business of the undersigned 
in all matters pertaining to said 
esta'te. Such claims with the neces- 
sary vouchers must.be filed or 
iprefletUed aaT » foresaid within siX 
moittll.i. after th^ first publication 
of tht» notlc«. J 

Dated: Nov, 21, 1960. 
Loren Miller, In Pro-Per 
Attorney-at-Law 
2822 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 
LOREN MILLER 
Executor of the will 
of said decedent 
(Publish in California Eagle 
Dec, 1-8-15-22, 1960J 


38011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

' No, 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN 

And FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of tbe. Ivslalie of 
WALTER SNELL 
Deceased 
NoUce Is hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims against the said 
decedent to file .said claims in the 
■office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
coiirt or to present them to the 
undersigned at the office of her 
Attoney, 

MACEO G. TOLBERT 
4272 South Central Avenue 
In the City of Los Angeles 11-. In 
the aforesaid County, which latter 
office is the place of business of 
the undersigned In all matters per- 
taining to suld estate. Such. claims 
with the necessary vouchers must 
be filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six. months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated December 19, 1960, 
Maeeo G. Tolbert 
Attdrney-at-Law 
4Z7Z South "Central Avenue 
Los Angeles 11. California. 
Matilda M, Snell 
Administratrix .of the Estate 
of Slid decedent, 
^Publish In California Eagle news- 
paper Dec. 22-29, I960: Jan, 5-12, 
1961, 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


3701O 
NOTICE TO CREDJTOrts 
No. 435-255 j. 

In the Superior Court 6f the 
State of California, in and (or the 
County of 1,08 Angeles. i 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
JAMES A. GREEN. Decease^. 

Notice is hereby given to {credit- 
ors having claims against tile said 
decedent to file laid claims In the 
office of- her Attorney, Vlnct 
Monroe Townsend, Jr,. 223i West 
Florence Avenue, In th'e City of 
Los Angfles, in the aforesaid 
County, which latter office Is the 
place of liusiness of the under- 
signed in all matters pertaining to 
said estate. Such claims with the 
necessary vouchees must be filed 
or presented ■ as aforesaid Iwithln 
six months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice. 
Dated December 5, 1960 '. 

ELLA HL GREEN. 
Executirx of the ■will 
of said decedent, 
Vince Monroe Townsend, Jr. 
Attorne-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Los Angeles 3, California 
PL. 8-5309 

(Published in the California 
Eagle Dec, 8, 15, 22. 29. .1960.) 

HEIP WANTEO-FEMALE 


WOMAN 
EXPERIENCED 

Apt. house mgr. fer 16-unit 
bidg. No chil<dren. 3 room 
furn. apt. and salary. Call Ed 
Stanley. 

MA. 8-0211, Ext. ^14 

Week Days 

MONEy'tO lOAN 


Combine Your 1st 

and 2nd Trust Deed 

at a Reasonable Cost. 

Also 1st and 2nd 

Trust Deeds 

Bought and So d, 

AX. 2-7088 

Rl. 8-3572 

IMPORTElTcAtrFOR^AlE 


36099 
I California Eagle) 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 435-063 
In the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the County 
of Los Angeles. In the Matter ol 
the Estate of Humphrey R, CJomez, 
also known as H, R, Gorhezi also 
known as Hump.hrey Ramoz CSomez, 
Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given to creditors 
having claims agaT.st the said de- 
cedent to lile Mid daims in the 
office of the cierk ol the aforesaid 
court or to pr^^ont them to the un- 
dersigned at the office of her at- 
torneys. Miller. Maddox & Malone, 
2824 South Western Avenue, in the 
City of Los Angeles, In the afore- 
said County, which latter office is 
the place of Duslnc.<s of the under- 
signed in all -natters pertaining to 
said estate. Surh claims with the 
necessary .-o'.icners must be filed or 
presented as aforesaid vsilhfn six 
months after the first publication 
of this notice. 

Dated: Nov. 22. 1!)6'>. 
Miller, Maddox & Malone 
Attorney«-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles. California 

LILLIAN B. GOMEZ, 
Executrix of the will 
of said decedent. 
(Publish in California Eagle 
Dec. 1-8-15-22. 1960) 


36592 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-255 
In the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
JAMES A. GREEN 
Deceased , 
Notice la hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned a the dftice of her attor- 
ney 
VINCE 5IONR0E TOWNSEND. Jr. 

223 Wist Florence Avenue 
In the City of Les Angeles 3. In the 
aforesaid County, which latter of- 
fice is the place at business of the 
undersigned In all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchen must be 
filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated: December 5. 1960 
ELLA H, GREEN, 
Executrix. of the will ijf said 
decedent, 
VINCE MONROK TOWNSEND. Jr, 
Attorney-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenue 
L.OS Angeles 3, OUfomta, 
PL. 8-5.^09 
Publish In California Eagle newj- 
p&per December 8-15-33-29, 1960. 


(California E:agle) 
37080 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 433710 
In the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles, in the 
Matter of the Estate of Ivory 
Simon. Deceased. Notice Is hereby 
given h>- the undersicned. Baldo 
M. Kristovich. Public Adminis- 
trator, as Administrator of the Es- 
t3i.e of ivoiy ,<imon. Dei eased, to 
the Creditors of. and all persons 
having claims against the said 
decedent, to present them, with 
the neces.*ary vouchers, within six 
months after the first publication 
of this notice, to the said Adinln- 
istrator at hU office at 437 South 
Hill St.. Los Angeles 13. CalifoP 
nia, which said office the under- 
signed selects as a place of busi- 
nesn In all matters connected with 
said estate, or to file them, with 
the necessary voucher^ within six 
months, after the first publication 
of this notice. In the office of the 
C'erk o; the Superior Court of the 
.State cf California in and for the 
County of Los Angeles, 
Dated: Dec, 6. I960 

BALDO M: KRISTOVICH 
Public Administrator 
as administrator of the 
estate of said decedent. 
MAdlson 8-9211 
(Published In California Eagle 
Dec, g, 15. 22. 29. 1960) 


(California Lagle) 
37037 
NOTICE OF HEARINO OF 
PETITION FOR PROBATE 
OF WILL 
No. 435585 
In the Superior Court of the 
State of Calffornia. In and for the 
County >of Los Angeles. In the 
Matter of the Estate of Blanche 
Qrlfftn, aka Blanche Fuggett. De- 
ceased. 

Notice Is hereby given that the 
petition of Sally Shaw Newman 
for the Probate of the Will it the 
above-named deceased an" for the 
Issuance of Letters of Administra- 
tion with the Will Annexed thereon 
to the petitioner to which refer- 
ence Is hereby made for further 
particulars, will b« heard at 9:15 
o'clock a,m., on Dec 28, 1960, at 
the court room of Department 9. 
of the Superior Court of the StaM 
of California, In and for the County 
of Los Armeies, City Of Lea An- 
geles. 

Dated: Dec, 5. 1960 
MILLER, MADDOX A. MAUONK • 
2824 So. Western Ave. 
RE, 1-4143 
Attorneys foe Petitioner 

HAROLD J. OSTLT 
County Clerk and Clerk of 
the Suparior Court o; th« 
State of California, In and 
for the County Of t,OS 
Angeles, 

By E. B. Welssburd, 
Deputy 
(Published In California EaffU 
Dee. 8. 15, 22, 1960) 


INSTRUaiONS-SCHCKHS 


Adjusters Train 
At Local Sciiooi 

The Adjusters and Investiga- 
tors Training Center, Inc., 601 S. 
Rampart Blvd., is training hun- 
dreds of personnel who work on 
the millions of claims filed in 
the United States annually, stated^ 
George Roberts, manager. 

Roberts said that about one- 
hundred-million claims are filed 
every year by insurance agen- 
cies, railroads, airlines, finance' 
companies, steamship lines, and 
others, and the opportunities in 
this field are unlimited. The de- 
mand exceeds the supply of 
trained investigators, according 
to Roberts. 

The field offers excitement, 
good pay, and a fine fut.ure, ac- 
cording to Roberts, who urgAs 
yoiing people to look into a 
career in investigation. ^ 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 The California Eagle^lS 


FURN. APT. FOt RENT 


REAL ESTATE FOR SAU 


OWN HOME 
BY RENTING 

Modamiatic 2 bedfom hemM in 
Compten. Own by nnting and 
Mv». ExccliMit opportunity for 
retponaibU party who want* hit 
own hem«. Coitvanioirtly located 
pn Wast Cressey Street, off Wil- 
min^en, jwat niarth of Roaocran*. 
Call for infermatioii. 

Murray 1-0116 


UNFURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 


MEN -WOMEN 
''18-45 

Learn J 

Insurance Adjusfing 

. AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 

HEAVY 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BROCHURE NOW! ' 

ADJUSTERS, INC. 

801 S. RAMPART, L.A. 57 

DU^-7163 

FuiSisiiiiriooi^TorRi^ 


$65 Per Month 

Unfurnished house. Newly deco- 
rated. 2 large bedrooms, wall 
fo wall carpeting. Real fire- 
place. Children welcome. 

AXminster 2-0458 

¥ — 


OPEN HOUSE by owner, 2 on 
lot 2 br. $1%950 f. p. |950idn. 
629 E. lO&th St off Avalon. 
RI. 7-3346. i 


S99S DN. $85. MO. GI RESALE 
4 bdrms. 1\ baths, stiicco. 
Many extras. PL. 4-282^ til 
7. 1700 W. 65th. . .'i 


OPEN SUN. — 3 bdrm. plus 
furn. apt. $1,500 dn. yac 
Clean. Well bit AX. 3-6267. 


BDR. frame & Inc. R-4 jcor. 
lot. Gramercy k San Marino 

RE. 4-1157. ; 


FURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 


3 LARGE BEDROOMS 
$85 per nnonth rents a rooirry,; 
6 room, 3 bedroom house. West- 
side location. Carpeting includ- 
ed. Washing ' machine available. 
Children invited. Ideal for family 
living. Near everything. 


3 ON LOT, 63rd & 8th Ave. 
$215. mo. inc. $3,000 dn. 
Kashu. RE. 4-1157. 


S195 dn. $70 mo. 3-br., 2 ^ba., 
frpj^. Pacoima. Vac. SHIEK 
EM. 6-9525. 


S800 Pn. 2 bdr. stucco. Covei 
patio. Childs play yja; 
PL. 1-0333. 




HOUSES « APTS. WANTED 


FREE SERVICE!!! 

TO LANDLORDS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside; 
4020 South Wottom Avonuo 
AX. 2-1991 


ACREAGE FOR SALE 


'60 KAIiMANN GHIA jeeup* 
with Porsche super J eng. 
Porsche Toch. RSk rear 
stabilizer, factory equip- 
ment and tools. Best offer. 
Richard Huff. GR. 9-^394. 
1 

EXPERT BEAUTY TREATMENT 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

• 

55431/] HOLMES AVENUE 
la now open fer buslneas and of- 
fering expert beauty care from 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. tor ap- 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, 
general operator. 

LU. 1-5227 

MUSICAL INSTRUCTION^ 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Plane, Violin, cjalle. 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Tnimpot, 

Druma, Sighttinging. 

PL 2-1179 


ELECTRICAL REPAIRING 


WE SPECIALIZE ii^^'al] elec 
trical work. Large or small 
old or new. Resttonable and 
reliable. WE. 9-0900, 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


DOCTORS TAX SHELTER 


PK LUXE MEDICAL BUILDII^G 
wiih 7 suites and a largp 
lory. Top location. Inve.^ti 
inromp ta\ shelter under 
back arranRPrnent. Eiipcriall 
able tor purchase liy a 
Kroup. Low Down PavrBi 
terms available. Crenshaw 
For Particulars Call 
SYcamore 8-9644 


.iC;i 


labora 

to for 
Ipa.cp- 

y suit- 

pdlral 

and 

Area. 


FOR SALE OR LEASE 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNltY 

Tavern for sale or lease 
San Bernardino. Includ ng 2 
bars. Pit Bar-B-Q. Kichen 
Tap beer. Piano bar, etcj. Ca 
Fontana. 

VAIley 2-317^ 


for 
more 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

-The PBOptB's Cfio/ce 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3706 S. WESTERN 
Rii 4.9346 


KERN CO. LAND 

10 acres, 5 miles west of Rosa- 
mond. Good soil, shallow water, 
good neighbors. Only $5000, 
$1000 dn., $60 per month. 
THOMAS REALTY CO. 
1223 West Avenue I 
Lancaster, California 
WHitahall 2-1426 

reaTestate for sale ^^^^"^^ 


FOR rent 


2 — ONE Bedroom apts. West- 
side. Call RE. 3-9826 after 5 
p.m. 


UNFURNISHED APARTMENT 
FOR RENT 


$75— Brand new unfum. 1 
badrm. apartment with 
garbage disposal, utilities 
pd. 528 West 78th St. 1 
or 2 children accepted. 
Inquire crt Apt. 8. 


DANDY 4 flat— 1620 W. 25th 
St. Poten. $330. mo. F. P. 
$29.500- Trms. Appt. only. 
RB. 4-2538 & RE. 3-2025. 


6 RM 2 bdrm. stucco. No dbwn 
to vets. $750 dn. to non-yets. 
PL. 7-2268. 

OPEN sun. 123 W. 86th ?1. 3 
bdr. fenced. Near all $10j50d. 
PL. 8-0050 


GI Rent with option to b^y. 2 
bdr., stuc, h.w. firs. iPL. 
7<r4153. 


DUPLEX — Only $500 dn. $10,- 
950 f.p. income $110. me., 5 
yrs. old. NE. 2-8469. 


FOR RENT W/OPTION i TO 
BUY. 3 Room house — cute, 
$69. mo. 2 br. house-j-lg. 
gar. clean $75. mo. SOUTH- 
EAST CALL HU. 2-5%l.; 


OWN. 

must 

saU 

Ig. 3 

hi.. 

2 

ba 

+ den. 

new 

carpet. $16. 

»dO 

dn. 30 

yr. 

FHA. 

6715 

5 

Ave 

RL 7-3346 


j 



1037 W. 48th St. 2 bdr. * <}«n. 

No loan charge. Completely 
redecorated in & out. Open 
Sunday 1-5. PL. 0-1281. Eves 
WE. 4-0203. 


BT OWNER. Home + Inc. 2 on 
lot 2 br. $12,950 f. pi $950. 
dn. 2145 Calif. Ave., Long 
Beach. RL 7-3346. 


OPEN SUN. 6002 5th Ave. 2 
bdrm., stucco. Corner lot. 
Spotless. Will trade or sell. 
Low dn. PL. 8-0050, 


$: Bd^ plus den. redec.,;in't. 

$9Se"' dn. 78II Daiton., By 

onw. PrinClpaISf~~onIy. ;OL. 

4-7104. 

$69. MO. CLOSING COSTS 
ONLY. 3 bdrms., stucco, 
disp., garage. J|X|rc^ PL. 
4-2187 till 7. 


$100 DOWN. 3 BEDROOM 

HOME IN FONTANA NEAR 
KAISER STEEL AGENT AT. 
6-5811. • 


HAVE PfiOPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

601 EAST 19tft ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

Licensed and Bondmd fteol Esfote Brokf 



I 


s 


IS 


s 




g 


I"* 

!l 

IS 

\^ 

il 

I 


USE THIS CONVENIENT FORM TO PLACE 

CLASSIFIED ADS 

Writ* your ad JUST AS YOU WANT. IT TO BE PUBLISHED THURSDAY, including y«ur 
ADDRESS or TELEPHONE NUMBER, or both m part of the ad. 

CLASSIFICATION DESIRED 
Such as "Real Eatate for Sale," Turnishad Room For' Rent," "Apt. Wanted," "Perwneb,' 
"Misc. Per Sale," etc-Please PRINT CLEARLY iw mere than en* word in each aquar* b*lew. 


First Word 


ei» m»* MAIL CIW aiirf M«a — — . 

WANT ADS n.Oft % WANT APS $1.00 » WANT ADS $1 .00 • WANT ADS $1.0 | 

' I 

$1 

|l 
-•! 
>P 
g' 

ii 

>t 

SI 

H»p 

\\ 

?! 
§1 

!5l 
SI 


ADS 

•1 

MINIMUM 


Every 

Additional 

Word 

10c 


Fay Amount 
in laat 

aquar* y*u 
fill In. 


4. 

7. 

10. 

$1.00 

T3. 

$1.30 

16. 

$1.60 

19. 

$1.90 

22. 

$2.20 


25. 


$2.50 


5. 

• 

8. 

11. 

$1.10 

14. 

$1.40 

17. 

$1.70 

20. 

$2.00 

23. 

$2.30 


3. 

6. 

9. 

' -*■ 

12. 

$1.20 

15. 

$1.50 

18. 

$1.80 

21. 

$2.10 

24. 

$2.40 


26. 


$2.60 27. 


$2.70 


Now fe figtm addr»s$ and t«f«phoi»« nunUtmnt 

2101 West Vernon Avenue — Equals 4 Words 
AXminster S-3135 - Equals 3 Words 


CALIFORNIA EAGLE 
2101 West Vernon, at Van Ness 


Classified Ad Oept. 
Los AhRvIm 8« Calif. 


Gentlemeni ^. 

I am aneletlng $..... diack, money order or coins in payment of vk/ 

claaalflad. Please insert it in the next issue of yOur CALIFORNIA EAGLE. 


PRINT YOUR NAAAS IN FULL. 


Address i..., .. , Phone. 


Your CALIFORNIA EAGLE Is published every THtiRSDAY Ads must reach your CALI- 
FORNIA EAGLE office by 9:00 a.m. Wednesday for insertion • on the followlnfl day 
(Clauif led offices open AAonday through Friday 8t30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.. Saturday 9:30 am. 
to 2i30 p.m. 


••I 

81 
I 

$i 

n 


day 8 I 
I 


WANT A0$$1.00 • WANT A0$ $1.00 WAKT ADS $100 • WANT A0$ $1.00 |. 

_ „_ ^'^^ Cyp an^ HUM «^.B_ ^''mm «B.^»'^ .^m ^' «., ^ mCUP ' *"" " 


«IAK 

mi, 

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t6-T»i« CaRfbrriiii f^le ^ 


Thursday, i>ecember 22, 1960 




SHOW BUSINESS 


(Omtlnued from Page 14) 
We dnank lAmzapagae duiing 
the dinner, creme-de-menthe 
after dinner and Sandra sur- 
' piteed everyone with a mince- 
meat pie that she had baked 
witii brandy. 

We then retired to the bar 
to sample. the Itavis' 30 year 
old wj^iskey (which was as 
nttoo<h as water) and topped 
it oK with a home-made egg- 
nog. 

As the afternoon wore on 
we found out that Sammy Sr. 
had attained success "the hard 
way." He was bom of slave 
grand-parents and his first job 
was delivering ice. 

He quit this job to work in 
m cotton seed mill and later 
axxeiked work in the New 
/ Ywk shipyards. 
■ "Regardless of how hard 1 
worked," he said, "I was never 
too tired to go and rehearse 
to get in a stage show. I re- 
hearsed and was hired to work 
infuch shows as^'Come Along 
Mandy,' "Yellow Gal.* and 
•Shuffle Along,' but the strang- 
est thing would happen to me, 
every time the show would 
open, I would became so 
frightened I would run away, 


so I never: opened, 

"Finally in 1919 Will Mastin 
(who is no relation to me), 
talked me into working in an 
act, which consisted of 12 peo- 
ple. Later they cut this act 
down and this is when the 
Will Mastin Trio was organ- 
ized," Davis said. 

In 1925 Sammy Davis Jr. was 
bom. He was so talented tiiat 
his father ^mmy Sr. started 
training him at the tender age 
of one! 


ACLU Wants Action on Rights, 
Un-American Activities Group 


(Continued from Page 3) 
told one: WiU the White 
House and the Department of 
Justice and the other federal 
-agencies energetically and 
courageously use their al- 
ready-existing powers, in 
southern voting and educa- 
tion :and in northern housing: 
and will northern states and 
municipalities act to solve 


February, the ACLU report 
noted, it has been "deeply in- 
volved in the protest move- 
ment." Through direct legal 
defense dl arrested students, 
through advice" and counsel 
to groups involved in the 
campaign, and through num- 
erous public statements, the 
Union stressed the constitu- 
tional right of peaceful pro- 


Dr. G. F. Jackson 

. M. D. 

r 

561 7 S. VERMONT AVE. 

LOS ANGELES 37 

PL. 3-4331 


the multiplying problems oil test through picketing and 
their own baliwicks?" | the right of Negroes to be 

Since the first sit-in took! served at eating places open 
place in North Carolina last' to the general public. 


"Set-vice Is Our Business" 

' FIRWOOD LUMBER 
CO., INC. 

M YEARS SERVICINO THE BUILDER 

Print Thai Ara RiglM' 

Quality and Scnrica Thai Cawita 

Serving Itw Entira 

Lo« Angalas Araa 

W* D»liv0r Anywkar* 

Call lOrain i-llS5 t NEwmark S.1M2 

2371 E. 119lh St., les Angalas 


SHARKEY'S AQUARIUM & PET SHOP 

150Q W. SANTA BARBARA, LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 
AX. :i-7550 

"WHERE YOUR PATROf^AGE IS APPRECIATED" 


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44t0 W. Adam* RE 5-94B1 }: 
Lacy • Carlita • Ray i' 





ADAHS-HAUSER | 

PHARMACY _ I 

5479 W. Adams Blvd. ^ J 

Los Angeles, Calif. .| 

Telephone WEbster 5 2070 | 

J 


George Lax, Pharmicst 



Wc Give BLUE CHIP STAMPS 


Hap^jg Hnlthaga from all nf us at 


THURS., FRI., SAT., DEC. 22-23-24 


CALIFORNIA GROWN 



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AGO 21 ILLINOIS DEPT T-J 


Grid Stars Vie 



GEORGE FLEMING— IFashinoton Huskies' great fleet- 
footed back was voted the outstandin-g player in last year's 
Rose Bowl game. 



Bowl V 



BOBBY LEE BELL — University of Minnesota's sterling 
tackier is labeled in the Big Ten Conference as one of the 

Gophers' all-time finest. 


SANbr STEPHENS— Minnesotan will become the first 
Negro T-qmrterback for a Rose Bowl team in the histor^ of 
the Pasaderta classic. .- 



CHARLIE MITCHELL— Rated as the best- break-away 
threat at Washington since Hugh McElhenny and probably 
the fastest back Coach Jim Owens has ever had.' 


XMAS 



FIRE 


First Negro 
T-Quarterback 
Plays in Bowl 



CAl.1 F O R.M I A 


aAV OHVO'IIH '^t fr 

dBOO AHVHsri vnar 


^WHi^llHyun^iS^* 

By Edw. 'Abie' Robinson 

I am pickine the Uni-'^"" ^' ^•'■"•" Avenue, i. a. Continuous Publication for 80 Years 

versity of Minnesota in 


Vol. LXXX-No. 41 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


the Rose Bowl on Jan. 2, 
and you can credit justj 
about every football writ- 
er in town for helping me 
make up my mind. 

Ever since the Gophers 
checked into the plush Hun- 
tington -Sheraton Hotel in Pas- 
adena hardly a kind word 
has been written about a lad 
called Sanford (Sandy) 
Stephens, the key man in the 
University of Minnesota of- 
fense, who led his team to 
eight victories (six of them 
over Big Ten opponets). was 
responsible for 11 touchdowns, 
dnviiig ovei for nine a. id 
passing for two more. 

First Negro Quarterback 

The reason the L.A. writers 
are cool toward young Steph- 
ens, who incidentally, is al 
junior and a Political Science I 
major, might well be the fact 
Thai he will be the first Negro 
T- quarterback to lead a Rose 
Bowl team in the history of 
the granddad(Jy of aU bowl 
games. ;f 

Judging by the lineage they 
have been devoting to him, 
fney just don't seem to fancy 
the idea, so in every instance 
thev have all but ignored the 
6 foot, 215 pounder from 
Uniontown, Pa'., who rolled up 
164 yards net in 57 running 
plays and completed 20 out of 
52 passes for 305 yards. 

Also the team's regular 
punter, his 55 kicks totaled 
1,946 yards for a nifty 35.3 
average. He returned 16 punts 
for 111 yar^s and nine kickoffs 
for 203 yards. 

Coolness Noted 

. 'We haven't had a chance to 

talk personally with the 

' Gophers but my man who is 

close to the squad revealed 

(Continued on Page 6) 


Hollywood Studios 
End Jim Crow Castihg 

Conciliation 
Through FEP 
Brings Change 



DREAM SHATTERED — Mrs. Juanitn MackUn's dream of moving her Excep- 
tional Children's School into its new $75,000 building was shattered early Sunday when 
an automobile ploughed throuf^h the nculy plastered wall and came to rest inside the 
budding. The planned Feb. 1 opening has been indefinitely delayed. (Adams) 



a%e(€ 


Man is Shot 
Over Turl(ey 

A 22-yearold man who tried 
to take back a turkey he had 
given his girl friend for 
Christmas was shot to death 
Saturday night at the home of 
23-year-old Rose Marie Love. 

Clarence" Sledge, 22, of* 215 
W. 42nd street, was shot in 
the back of the head and in 
the middle of the back. 

Admits Shooting 

Mrs. Love admitted th e 
shooting, but claimed she shot 
■when Sledge struck her with 
a lug wrench. 

Raymond Wheeler, 4159 S. 
Hooper avenue, told Newton 
Street officers that he was 
visiting his daughter at Mrs. 
Love's home, when Sledge 
knocked at the door and de- 
manded that he be let in. 

When Mrs. Love refused to 
(Continued on Page 2) 


3 African Nations 
in Economic Bloc 

CONAKRY, Guinea — The 
union of Ghana, Guinea and 
Mali to "promote a common 
economic and monetary 
policy" was announced here 
Saturday in a joint statement 
issued by the presidents of the 
three West African countries. 




Tm No Expert 

You can't call me an ex- 
pert because I never had a 
job as a sports writer in my 
life. In my private capacity 
I suppose that nobody can 
outdo me in picking the wrong 
man to win an event whether 
it's in boxing, football, base- 
ball or track. I've even been 
known to be wrong about who 
wiWild win a wrestling match 
although win- 
ners in such '■ 
events are al- 
ways known 
i n advance. 
The only 'fj^ 
thing I do • 
know is that 
sports events 
can't be won 
these days 
without Negro 
players. , 

For example, Stanford Uni- 
versity has been drawing the 
color line ever since it was 
established and it wound up 
the current football season 
with a perfect record — ten 
losses and no wins. ^^ 

The only team in -profes- 
sional football that. bars Ne- 
gro players is the Washing- 
ton Redskins and although 
Owner George Marshall hires 
and fires coaches by the doz- 
en, he can't get any place. 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Hit-Run Auto Hits 
Children's Home 

A rampaging hit-and-run driver in the pre-dawn hours 
Sunday sent a car through the freshly plastered wall of the 
new S75,0O(3 building destined to house the Exceptional Chil- 
dren's Home, 122nd and San Pedro streets, and effectively 

crushed the high hopes of Mrs. Juanita Macklin for a Feb. 1 

. tj . i- 



(.oren Millar 


Grand Opening 

The hit-and-run car hit a 
second auto, v^hich went out 
of control and ploughed 
through the building, to come 
to rest inside. 

Dri/er Injured 

Driver of the second car was 
LeRoy T, Hughes, 2009 Cordett 
avenue, who is unemployed. 
He was ' seriously injured in 
the accident, sustaining , a 
crushed chest and broken ribs. 

The driver of the car that 
caused the accident sped 
away, without even bothering 
to give aid to the injured man. 

Mrs. Macklin, executive dir- 
ector of the home, told the 
Eagle that members of Labor- 
ers' Union No. 200 had just 
finished a $3000 plastering 
job, inside and out — material 
and labor donated by the 
union. 

S2000 Damage 

Total damage to the new 
structure was estimated at be- 
tween S1800 and S2000. 

In addition to the smashed 
wall. Mrs. Macklin said the 
plumbing was wrecked, as 
was also electrical wiring and 
the floor of the building. 

The gaping hole in the wall 
and the other damage repre- 
sents a serious loss to the 
community as well a^ to Mrs. 
Macklin, who has struggled 


mightily to bning the project 
to completion. 

Money, Time Donated 

Many organizations and In- 
dividuals have donated time, 
money and labor to help con- 
struct the ^lome which, once 
it is in operation, will be able 
to take care' of 100 children. 

At present Mrs. Macklin 
cares for 18 children. 

The new building contains 
four large dormitories, a con- 
sulting room, dining room, of- 
fice, two therapy rooms, a 
clinic, an isolation room, 
and many other facilities. 

Mrs. Macklin had been busi- 
ly making preparations for of- 
ficial opening of the new 
facility. Now that opening 
will have to await the com- 
pletion of costly repains. 


\n the Eagle 

Editorials , 4 

Church ActiTittea 5 

Sports 6 

The Tee , 6 

Dorothea Foster 10 

Bili Snvaliwood 9 

People 7 

Chaz Crawford 7 

Show BusinMs S 


By Maggie Hathaway 

Jim Crow casting of "extras' 
— one of the continuing sores 
in the motion picture industry 
that dates bick many years 
to the days when Hollywood 
was young — is on its. way out. 

Central fasting, on Holly 
wood blvd., which heretofore 
has handled \vhite actors only, 
will begin, in the near future, 
to cast all Victors — whites, 
Negroes, Orientals, everybody. 

FEP Conciliation 

The switch in policy stems 
from conciliition efforts of 
tihe young ptair Employment 
Practices |C<t)mmission, plus 
the energetic efforts of inter- 
ested individuals and the In- 
ternational Artists organiza- 
tion, formed about a year ago 
to fight against all forms of 
segregation in Hollywood. 

Segregated casting was its 
first target. 

Among the individuals who 
pushed hardest for the change 
in policy are actor Byron Ellis, 
who filed a petition with the 
FEP commission containing 
500 signaturejs; Maggie Hatha- 
way, Eagle golf editor who is 
also a Hollywood extra, and 
Atty. Edwarld Maddox, who 
gave legal advice. 

Plan Cbnsolldotion 

After the petition was filed 
about three {months ago, FEt 
got in touch with Central 
Casting jind discussed the 
case with them. 

Last week,] Ellis advised, the 
FEP commission wrote to Cen- 
tral Casting, confirming their 
understanding that as soon as 
necessary technical arrange 
ments for jthe change-over 
could be made, all casting 
would be consolidated from 
one central office. 

For almost a decade Jasper 
Weldon has Handled exclusive 
casting of Negro extras for 
Motion Pictijre producers, TV 
and radio. Jasper operates out 
of his homi at 110 E. 99th 
street. 

Artistk Organize 

Negro actors understand- 
ably objected to the Jim Crow 
setup. It not only set them 
apart on aj racial basis but 
also limited the number of 
parts for wRlch they might 
otherwise he considered. 

A year ago Maggie Hatha 
way took the lead in organ 
izing International Artists. As 
president of the organization 
she took up the issue with 
Central Casting and also filed 
a petition, drawn up by Atty. 
(Continuiid on Page 4) 


HEARTBREAK — Mrs. Joyce Jackson mourns the death of her baby daughter, Gwen- 
dolyn, who was burned to death when their Grape street house caught fire frorn a blaze 
on their Christmas tree. Two-year-old Charles was critically burned. Surviving children 
include, front: Curtis, 3, and Jerry, 7, Rear: Pamela, 10; Mrs. Jackson, and Eddie, 8. 
(Verdcll Young) [ 



TINDERBOX — Witnesses claim that the Jackson home, 9617 Grape street, went up 
in flames and smoke in less than 20 minutes. (Verdell Young) \ 


TOP STORIES 

For picture coverage 
and a review of the top 
stories of 1960, from the 
point of view of the Ne- 
gro struggle for equal- 
ity, see Page 3. 


France Ignores 
Protests, Fires 
New A-Bomb 

Overriding the protests of 
African nations, France again 
on Tuesday exploded an 
atomic bomb in the Sahara 
desert. 

This is the third bomb 
France has fired there. The 
fifst was detonated Feb. 13. 

The African nations opposed 
the tests because of fear of 
atomic fallout. 

France denied there was 
any danger of fallout injuring 
nomads in the desert or peo 
pie in nearby countries. 

Japan pfepared a written 
protest to the continuing 
atomic explosions. The Soviet 
Union also protested the re- 
newed testing, as did Morocco, 
the Algerian government in 
Tunis and other, nations. 


Baby Girl Dies ds 
Blaze Guts Home 

A Christmas tree fire, Friday naght, at th< 
home of Eddie R. Jackson, 9617 Grape $treet, Watts, 
spread quickly to nearby drapes, to the; walls, to the 
roof, and engulfed the whole house. 

In less than 20 minutes, according to ■witnesses^ 

the wood and plasterboard * i 

structure was nothing but a! that she was in the kitchen 


mass of charred ruins. 

Dies in Flames 

In that 20 minutes, little 
Gwendolyn Jackson, 4, died 
in the flames. Her two-year- 
old brother, Charles, was bad- 
ly burned, but was rescued by 
firemen who broke out one of 
,the windows in the living 
room, grabbed the screaming 
child and brought him out- 
side. 

The other five Jackson 
children »-t Pamela,! 10; Ed- 
die, Jr., 8; Jerry, 7; Sandra, 6; 
and Curtis, 3 — fled from the 
burning building to safety, 
Also escaping the flames were 
the children's mother, Mrs, 
Joyce Jackson, and a boarder, 
William Cardwell. 

Mrs. Jackson, sad eyed and 
distraught, told , the Eagle 


when Gwendoilyn rushed in 
and told her t^e tree was on 
fire: 

Apparently ifrightened, the 
child ran andj hid. 
' CardweU, said Mrs. Jackson, 
grabbed a rublj>er mat and be- 
gan slapping ,at the tree to 
put out the fiije. The tree top- 
pled; flames teaped from the 
burning branches to the 
drapes, shot up to the ceiling. 

Mrs. Jackson and Cardwell 
herded the five youngsters out 
of the house. When they tried 
to get back in to search for 
the two babies, they were 
stopped by a sheet of fire, 
smoke and heat 

Hid ttader Bed 

When the fire was brought 
under control, firemen found 
(Continued on Page 4) 


i\ 



2— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


Was Dawson's 'No' 
Cooked -Up Afrair? 

NEW YORK — (VIP) — Speculatiorl over Presi- 
dent-Elect John F. Kennedy's offer of the postmaster- 
generalship to Democratic Rep. Williamj A. Dawson 
and his rejection of the Cabinet post has been voiced 
by prominent Americans of bot-h races and political 
pa rt i OS-. • — 

In a telL'pliunc poll fonducl- lact lliat Dawson will 
cu hy Vital Information Press. 
\»'w York svndicatp which 


go 
along witli almost anytliing 
ihe party sajs. j Frankly, I'm 
pleased that he rejected the 
job. I don't thiiik his accept 
ance would have helped his 
ra<'e ■■ 


lOP REGISTRAR— Cecil Peterson, ctnlcr. receives $100 ,hrck^cif un a:i-arJ t;i re- 
li'istering the largest niirnher of voters in the SAACP voter iiiiislrntinii drive. Peterson 
f, mistered more than 1600 voters. From left: I'.dicnrd Jl'nrn-n. S.IACjP prrsident: Pctir- 
.y'ln: and Ted U'riijhf, registration ihairnuri. lAiLinn) 


Women Killed 
By Gunmen at 
Liquor Store 

A 50 - year • old w o ni a n, 
lOmilia Garcia, clerk in her 
husband's lifjuor store, died 
without regaining conscious- 
ness ]VIonday, Dec. 26, after 
being shot in the face by one 
iif three bandits who attempt- 
id to rob the Garcias' liquor 
5-tore at 2903 S. Maple avenue, 
r The shooting occurred Fri- 
r:^tay night when the guirmen 
"miered the store and after 


Kennedy Given 50,000 
Vote Edge in 2 Districts 

Two Los Angeles assembly districts — the 5oth 
and 62nd — with the largest concentration of Negro 
voters in Los Angeles gave' President Elect John F. 
Kennedy a whopping majority of 30,904 votes over 
Vice President Richard M. Nixon. 

Tlie 62nd led the paradt 
with a Kennedy majority ot 
25,742 and the 5.5th chipped 
in with 25.162 more votes. 


services the Negro press na- 
tionally, opinion vas sharply 
divided as to the motives botli 
of Senator Kennedy in offer- ' ,-i„-e. 

jng and Rep. Dawson in re- ,„ v;iriance wiith this posi- 
lecting the, histonr oppoi tuni- ^-^^^^ ^,.^ ^j^g attitude of civil 
ty for-a Negro to hokl cabinet riglitsUeader Dr. Martin Luther 
st'''^''-''^- Kng, who termed the Kennedy 

Confirmation Problem? offer an "important step. " 

Meanwliile. in Washington. "No matter whether it wa.s 
knowledgeable sources raised j motivated by political consid- 
the issue of wlijether Dawson's jerations or a deep moral feel- 
failure to a('(vpi the po.<t was'ing. the important thing is 
filtributable to fear that .Sen- ; that it was done," Dr. King 
'ate confirmation would be declared. He added that Daw- 
Withheld due to oppasiiion byison "probably declined be- 
.^outhern S<mators or the fact cause he felt he could serve 
that a former Dawson congres- his country better in his pres- 
Isional secretary was twice in- eni position." 
I dieted in li).52 and convicted HonestlOifer 

and sentenced in li)5-) on a 
federal grand jury enlarge f)i 
I peddling intiueiice tor the 
sale of post office jiibs. 



■^ "1 


M.IYBi: y EXT CHRISTMAS— Babies Lavonne. age 16 months, and J tmmy,j/2 
\,>a>. didn't sl'.nd Christmas in their oun home this year. They arc avnilahle for ad<op- 
ti'.n honi II,, Cliiidrens Home Sofiety (RE. 3-U41). Maybe next year.'. '. . ,._ 


President .'I n d publi>ii('i' 
,Iolin .SengstacJie of the ("liica- 
go Defender newspaper chain 
said he didn'ti believe I lie 


Girl Who Won't 
Talk Receives 
Death Threat 


Girl's Story Jails Mem 


He was placed und«- 


offer to Dawsofi would liave 
been made if it had not been 
. .sincere. 

New York t'iiy Buuid of 


Other assembl.\ distiictsi'^^"^P'' "g"- 
asking for a bottle of wineiwith substantial Negro popu- ^ — 

threatened the owner with a 'Nations are the 6,3rd. the 65th 
and a .sawed-off shot- 1 and the 66th districts. The Ne- 
:gro population ratio is some- 
where close to 40 per cent in 

each of them. The C3rd pre-.! (Continued from Page li' \ 
ferred Kennedy by an ll.SoTjopen the door, he left, but 


pistol 
.-:un. 

"Look out Joe: ' MiT<. liuicia 
warned her husband, 

.\t that one of the thugs 
wheeled around, aimed 
Mrs. Garcia and fired. 

Early the next 


From Plioeni.x, \\\/... licpub- 

lican Sen. Bariy Goldwater, 

,wh<> characteri.'cd Congress- 

imaii Dawson as ■■(|ualified" 

[and the Keniicdy otter as gfi^fation member and Nevv; 
["proper " admitted to a "suspi- 1 York Protestant Council of 
;cion" iliat Dawson s i(\ieclion Cluirches President Rev. Dr. 
I was based "on the fact that he 'Gardner C. Taylor, said: » 
'would liave had to face 1he| "I believe it was an honesi 

• : ■ • 7' -j - — ;Post Office Senate Commit tee 'offer. 1 jirofoundly regret that: 

of, 19.357 majority and Charles^vvhich is headed by Sen. John- Congressman Dawson did not; 
Wilson won the 66th district stone of Soul li Carolina." Ichoose to serve. I think the 

seat by a margin of 22,766. Harold C. Burton, senior Xc- offer was motivated as part ol 

the ihrust of the times. Those; 
in the position of leadcrsliipi 
lia\(' decided to break the 
iiioud and there is awareness 
Hi' the .Negro vote." 

Racial Affair 
.\cw York Gov. Nelson .\ 
Rockefeller who credited the 
Kenne<iy offer to "Henry Cabot 
understand a naan of Dawson's i Lodge's campaign speech" 
political stature turning down landed the President-Elect's 
what is known to ho the hi.L;- offer IqMi'. Dawson as a "won- 
gest political paironaue posi- drcful offer.'' ^ i 

lion in the counlry." i ja„-,e.s Kilpairick. Kichinurid; 

Former Dodger star -lackieximes-Dispatch editor who re- 
Robinson, who figured promi- eontlv debated the segrega-. 
nenily in the Nixon campaign. ,jo„ "issue with Dr. Martin 


Eagle. 
' >words. 


They cost only 11 for 
And they a** results. 


Only the heavilv Mexican] Despit the thumping 50.904 gro Republican leader in New 
populated 51st district which | vote majority returned by Ne-JYovk Stale and district leader 
igave Kennedy a majority of igro voters in the 55th and 62nd ol Harlem's 12th -\sseriibl\- 
30,661 and the heavily Jew- j districts. Kennedy lost the ' District, lomm^ntcii: 
ish populated 61st district | state by some 30,000 and man- ; Pre-Arranged? 

which ran up a Kennedy ma-! aged to win Las Angeles coun- ■if the offer was ni.ul.-. n 
jority of 40,521 topped the ma-' ty by a thin 20,000 vote edge, may have been with a pre- 
jority given Kennedy in the Hawkins headed the drive for^arraiiged imdeisiandini' ihai 
62nd district. Negro votes in the Kennedy Dawson uould reject it. i cani 


.\ller being treated at Ccn-.home. 
tral Receiving Hospital and. arrest. 

J T- cv,,;ti-, tnlH Swcels denied; the charge 

V..raIe,.M;Wu.w.nauowlv "''''"'■ "'' " "d told police i all he ha^d 

.•scap;dd:.athSi:;d;;vn;g;^i'-'i-'^'-'-^'^''^"^°'-^'^'^.^>one was ,o take the girl 

when slie lefused to speak in 'a^e a large dose of narcoticsj 3^1^ a man to the ipotel and 

private 10 David Hines while, and was loft to die in a motelj leave them there!. 

she was visiting .Margaret Hill' at 4766 S. Main street. Friday.! '. 

and Violet ProieU-al 11.56 E Miss Smith accused Eunice, something to buy*? Somethii\g 10 
11th slrcl. ■ Sweets. 30. of 134'. W. 70th!«li' Try a class.f.ed ad .n thj 

A, ,.,,.,,., I , . 1 - I Street and took police lo h'is 

.Aiigeied ai 1 li c leiusal. 

[Hines went lo his room in 

the same building, got hi.s 

guii. ret ui lied and sliot at .Miss 

.Maihe\\>. He mis.sed. E-scajjina 

into an adjoining ixjom, slit 

locked herself in. He banged 

on liie door and threatened to 

kill her. 

Police louiid the gun 3n the 
back \ard of ilie aijarlment 
building. Tlic>' booked Hines 
lor assault uiih attempt 10 
rommit inurtlei. 


Wanted Turkey 
Back, is Slain' 


Hamilton 
^ E. 103rd 

\ e w t o n Police Station and 
said he had driven the gun- 
men's car. In his room police 

_ found a sawed-off shotgun. 

—They arrested him and also 

""arrested iohn Joseph Mendez 
L'l, of 421% E. Adams, and 
Robert Eugene Wilkerson 21, 
..f the same address. The three 
men were charged with 

. murder. 


, majority; the 65th gave him phoned about lOminutes later.'said he felt ihat had the Ken- Luiliei King on a national 

ja majority of 11.279 and the; 'Come and Get It' , .ntnly offer 10 Dawson been j^ievision network, told Vital 

'eeth contributed a 1,3..581 vote! Wheeler said he heard Mrs.|sin<eie, tiie President -Elect information Press that he "had 

morning j margin. I Love tell someone over thejwould have named another : „o p,.j,.fi,.^,i;,i. objection to the 


Receives Grant 

B.VfON ROUOE. La.. —-For 
hi^ t(^lini(|ucs a'- a researcher 
ai>d etlicienr\ ,1.- a teacher.' 
Dt. Woodiow II. .Jones, pro-. 
f(>.ssin- of hiolo_;> at Southern I 
L'ni\ iM'sitw has been- given a' 
S9.y()(i National Science 
P" a c u 1 t >■ I'ellowship to do 
further research in tlie areaj 
ot .iin eitehrale /oolog\ 
log\ and oceano.graiJhy 


eco- : 


128 


Howard. 40. of xxo| ^^^^ --^^^^^ ^.,^^^ 
street, telephoned ^^ gg^j^ districts 


«: 


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b'ird, 65th 1 Pitone.- "If you want yourjqualified Negro. ofier.'' Kilpatrick added that 

all chose I turkey; come and get it." I "There are maii\' .\egnM-s -n ^as a strictjly racial offer 

Democratic assembl\-men and! Sledge returned in about better qualified than Dawson," ,o ,.epay the colbr.ed- vote." 
cast majorities for Democratic I five minutes and demanded! Rohin.son said. "I think Ken-| The sotithern editor praised 
congressional candidates. Only i his turkey. 'nerty has made a lot of good|Dawson as '^very sagacious" 

the 55th, represented by Ver- 1 Mrs. Love told him to stand iaPP«''}ime"ts. 1 won t^ -^a-Vifor rejecting the job. 
non Kirkpatrick. and the 62nd, under the ^vindow and she:« Y. l.'\"". "".^^.^^ .::.™ .'ri,Y^°^^^^^ ^'''-'■'' Congressman Robert 

would riron it rinwii to him. i 

member that the Negro vote,f.rypucally: "I do' not know 
put him in office, whether t'h^ offer was made or 

■I'm Pleased' not. 1 have not talked to either 

"11 was a fine gesiuie but C_>>ngressman Eiawson or the 
Wheeler'''^ is possible they got agree- 1 President-Elect. 
•ment from Dawson in advam'e: .V spokesman 
then pushed 1 ii '> ^i* turn it down. It is ,1 known 1 Continued 

woman inlo 




FREE 

CUSTOMER 

AT 

345 ELM AVENUE 




VtflTM THESE 


J j^ (> to turn it down. 


for New York 
m Page 4'i 


represented bv .\ugustus F. : would drop it down to him. )—'>"' Mr. Kennedy should re- xi^ of Philadelphia declared 
Hawkins, gave larger major-! This angered Sledge wfioi"^''"^''*^'- ^'i^' ^'^^ '^^■^'•" 
ities to Kennedy than they | broke open the door and rush- 
did to Democratic assembly ed toward Mrs. Love wth the 
candidates. KHpatrick won by heavy wrench in his hand and 
a 24,119 majority while Haw- 1 started beating her, 
kins' majority was 25.04.5. ^said. 

The 65th district. repre.sent- 1 Sledge 
ed by Assemblyman Jess Un-j.voung 
ruh who doubled in brass as ; kitchen. 

the Kennedy Southern Califor- Wheeler said he heard y\\s. 
nia campaign manager, gave \ Love warn Sledge not to come 
L'nruh a 14,943 vote majority : toward her. Her warning was 
while preferring Kennedy by, followed by the sharp sound 
an 11,279 margin. Don Allen t of gunshot. Sledge lay mo- 
swept the 63rd district by aUionless on the floor. 


BANG-UP NEW YEAR 


1 




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ldt»r 



TERROR OF \EJr ORLEANS— This littbe six-ymr-old youngster, escorted by her 
parents and U.S. marshals, lias one of foiir^ uho brought terror to hate-filled y> eiv 
Orleans racists, starting A Of. 14. The battl ■ for integration of the first schools in the 
Deep South continues as the year ends. 



SOUTH REPLIES TO SIT-!SS—The student sit-ins that suept the country-, after 
starting quietly in Greensboro. \. C. on Tcb. 1. marked a strong, ncn' beginning in 
race relations m the South — the most important development in the United States for 
Negroes, durino 1960. The urecking of the home, in mid-April, of .Itty. Z. .llcxnnder 
Looby, City Council mcnibtr, in Nashville, was part of the South's reply to the stu- 
dent dememstrations. 

--South Africans Speak Out — 


BURN HATED PASSBOOKS— In an historic act of defiance. South Africans, in 
March, burned the hated passbooks, symbol of inferior status, as they staged a najion- 
wide strike. Picture was taken at Orlando, near Johannesburg. 

Cal. Equal Rights' Stdtutes 



CONGO STORY — Most significant development abroad 
during the current year, as far ar Negroes are concerned, 
is the continuing story of the Congo, centering around de- 
posed premier Patrice Lumumba, and his advocacy of a 
strong, democratically elected central government. 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


The California Eagle— 3 


Sit-ins, N'Orleans, 
Congo, Kennedy 

Head 1960 News 

Three Negro college students in Greensboro, 
N.C., and four little Negro first grade pupils in New 
Orleans furnished the two top domestic stories of 
1960 in the area of race relations. 

It was symptomatic of our troubled times that 
the .stories of what happened*^ 


-Kennedy Booed, Idolized — 



BOOED IN JULY — Sen. John F. Kennedy smiles as he ivas booed at the packed meet' 
ing at the Shrine Auditorium in July during the Democratic convention, ivhcn he already 
had the nomination practically in his pocket. ' 



A complete catalogue of California statutes relat- 
ing to civil rights was issued Tuesday by Atty. Gen. 
Stanley Mosk under the title of "Equal Rights Under 
the Law." 

The format used in the publication is a ready 
reference listing under the' 


subjects of emplojTnent, hous- 
ing, business services, educa- 
tion and government prac- 
tices, with key statutes under 
the separate codes. Copies are 
available for distribution to 
individuals and organizations 
requesting them. 

The reference catalogue was 
compiled under the direction 


Franklin H. Williams. 

"In the past few years Cali- 
fornia has joined the growing 
list of states which provide 
statutory support to the con- 
stitutional promise of equal 
protection and opportunity for 
all citizens," declares Atty. 
Gen. Mosk in the foreward of 
the catalogue. 


of Mosk and Asst. Atty. Gen. "In employment, housing 


business services and public 
facilities, our legislature has 
substantially broadened the 
opportunities available to all 
regardless of race or religion. 
"While we can be proud of 
these statutes, in cold fact, 
laws are only printed docu- 
ments. Whether they b>ecome 
living expressions of constitu- 
tional guarantees translated 
into realistic experiences will 
be determined by 'you, the 
citizen. Knowledge of the law 
and compliance with it are 
vital prerequisites for these 
provisions to be meaningful." 


in Greensboro and New Or- 
leans topped the news that 
Negro voters threw their 
weight around on Nov. 8 and 
decided who was to become 
president of the United, States. 
Spotlight on Africa \ 

It was inevitable that Africa 
would furnish the top interna- 
tional story of 1960, and sig- 
nificant that the country 
where the most far-reaching 
conflict erupted was the Con- 
go, which suffered most bit- 
terly during its years of sub- 
mission to colonialism. 

There, freedom coming like 
a bolt out of the- blue, touch- 
ed off fratricidal strife, faced 
the United Nations with its 
most crucial test, and put new 
I strains on the already strained 
relations between the United 
States on the one hand and 
the Soviet Union on the other. 

All of the major issues that 
are keeping the world in tur- 
moil are joined in the Congo 
struggle for power — the Af- 
ricans' fight for independence 
against its colonial masters, 
the struggle of backward 
countries against poverty, ig- 
norance and separatist ten- 
dencies, and the world-wide 
struggle between the Soviet 
bloc and the West. 

Sat ot Counter 

By contrast, independence 
came to 40 million ./^fricans 
in Nigeria in ari orderly fash- 
ion. 

The three Greensboro col- 
lege students made history by 
the simple act of sitting down 
to buy a cup of coffee at a 
lunch counter .on Feb. 1, 1960, 
where coffee was for sale to 
the general public. The trou- 
ble was that the lunch count- 
er was located in a variety 
store which solicited Negro 
patronage in every depart- 
ment except its cafe. 

The quiet action of those 
three students served as the 
spark that lighted fires of re- 
volt across the South, leaping 
from town to town, and state 
to state. As the sit-ins spread, 
attracting ever more thous- 
ands, awakening a sympa- 
thetic response in the north, 
it became apparent that a new 
movement had entered upon 
the American scene, bringing 
to the fore a fresh layer of 
young leadership, and signal- 
ing an unjtfecedented south- 
wide assault on lall phases of 
discrimination. 

Not Little Rock 

The fight in New Orleans 
was not a new fight. The 
same battle has already been 
carried on in Little Rock, in 
Clinton, Tenn., in Nashville, 
and elsewhere. But it is, also, 
a different fight. 

All the four Negro first 
graders — all of them girls- 
wanted to do was to enter two 
New Orleans- schools thereto- 
fore reserved for whites. That 
was like the attempts of the 
nine high school students in 
Little Rock in 1957. 

But New Orleans is not Lit- 
tle Rock; in addition to which 
it comes after Little Rock. The 
governor of Louisiana and the 
legislature are fighting with 

5.ud bombast against integra- 
on — but the governor has- 
n't called out the troops, the 
mobs haven't found ready re- 
sponse, and the Federal courts 
have stood firmly by their de- 
cision. 

The' particular significance 
of the New Orleans fight lies 
in the fact that it is the first 
city in the Deep South to face 
the school integration issue 
head on. 

Tcmgled Storr 

The story of President Elect 
John F. Kennedy and the Ne- 


gro voter is a tangled one. He 
started out as less than a fav- 
orite for the Democratic nom- 
ination, far behind.. Sen. Hu- 
bert Humphreys af\A Adlai 
Stevenson. Negro voters let 
Kennedy know how they felt 
about him in the Wisconsin 
primaries when he trailed 
Humphreys by three and four 
to one in the Negro precincts. 

WcLshington, D.C. voters also 
turned him down by hand- 
some majorities and when he 
appeared at a Los Angeles 
pre-convention rally in Shrine 
auditorium he got a mixed 
round of boos and cheers. 
Couldn't Take Nixon ,i 

What looked like the politi- 
cal handwriting on' the wall 
came when Kennedy forced 
the niomination of Texas Sen- 
ator Lyndon B. Johnson as his 
vice presidential running 
mate. A Johnson spokesman 
had been booed so loudly at 
(Continued on Page 4) 
' «> 



IDOLIZED IN NOVEMBER— Just before the elections, less than four months after 
he lias booed. Sen. Kennedy was greeted as a messiah when he appeared at the Elks Hall 
on Central Ave. "Touch him.' Touch him!" was the cry as thousands pressed toward 
him, hands outstretched. The Negro vote proved decisive in Kennedy's election. 



MARCHING 


Angeles residents marched from 
the Sports Arena, headquarters 
tino, last July, to make known 


FREEDOM— Thousands of 


the Shrine Auditorium to 
of the Democratic (Jonven- 
their demand for "Freedom 


Now!" Heading the march, being interviewed as they 
walked, are the Rev. Martin Luther King, center^ and Roy 
If'ilkins, to the right of King, , 



INDEPENDENCE— Cyril 
Uchuno, Nigeria's secretary 
of External Affairs, addressed 
a dinner meeting here Nov. 
30 celebrating Nigeria's in- 
dependence that became ef- 
fective at the stroke of mid- 
night. 

1 


Lumumba Forces ' 
Stage Kidnapping 

Pro-Lumumba forces in the Congo this week 
demonstrated that they are as adept at kidnapping as 
a:e the forces of pro-Western "strong man," Col. Jo- 
s(;ph Mobutu, who last month arrested and impris- 
oned the former premier, Patrice Lumumba. 


In a raid Sunday, 60 soldiers 
fi'om Stanleyville, Oriental 
Piovince capital which is con- 
trjlled by Lumumba follow- 
ers, arrested Jean Miruho, 
president of neightwring Kivu 
Pijovince, at the capital city of 
Bukavu, two other members 
of] the provincial government 
and an army officer. 

The ease with which the 
raid was carried out seemed 
to substantiate reports that a 
part of the Congolese garrison 
in Bukavu is pro-Lumumba. 

Bukavu was the scene last 
w«ek of a six-hour battle be- 
tween Nigerian and Congolese 
trciops who had imprisoned 52 
Austrians on the grounds that 
th?y were Belgians in dis- 
gu ise. 

Vliruho, the provincial presi- 
dent, hay shifted his alleg- 
iaiice back and forth between 
Ltmumba and Mob^utu as the 
seijsaw struggle for power con- 
tinued. 

In southern Kasai Province, 
'meanwhile, the U.N. reports 


*>- 

that some 300.000 Baluba 

tribesmen are starving.. The 

U.N. was rushing food to the 

area. 

A section of the province 
has been taken over by Al- 
bert Kalonji who has declared 
it independent. He has given 
no aid to the starving Balu- 
has. 


Man, 122, Dies 
In W. Virginia 

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — 
William Edward "Uncle Dave" 
Davis, the oldest man in the 
country drawirig Social Secur- 
ity benefits, died here Satur- 
day. 

He "calculated" he would 
have been 122 years old 
Christmas Day. 

Davis said his parentsjvere 
slaves on a tobacco plantation 
at Winston-Salem, N. C. and 
that he was named for the 
plantation owner. '__ '- 


Tent Colony 
Set Up for 
Refugees 

SOMERVILLE, Tenn. — The 
first seven families evicted 
from their homes in Fayette 
County took up . living in a 
tent colony near here this 
week, as a federal judge in 
Memphis refused to grant a 
government plea to halt 
further evictions. 

For Christmas, the tent- 
dwell^rs, the first of an ex- 
pected 300^' families, were 
given food . by the Fayette 
County Civic and Welfare 
League. 

From Chicago, meanwhile, 
it was reported, food and 
clothing is being shipped In 
by truckloads. 

The tents are" pitched on a 
200-acre farm owned by Shep 
Towles, a Negro. The floors 
are of earth. Inside are beds, 
kerosene lamps and wood 
stoves. The families have 
piled their household furnish- 
ings behind the tents. 

They get water from Towles' 
house across the road. 

The iFayette County Negroes 
were evicted after they regis- 
tered and voted at the Nov. 
8 elections — and after the 
cotton crop had been gathered. 



4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


'»/'»o»»^&cx»<agv»<so»/^gxxagx>^'ag\»<^ 


Loren Miller, Publisher 

Th« California Eogl* stands for complete integration of 
Nogroos Into evory phase of American life through the democratic 
processes. 

We favor; 

1. FEPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: - 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Published Every Thursday tor Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Van Ness AXminster 5-3135 


Jne 0^# 


ntpoytant 


JV. 


ewspaper 


pap< 


Citizens and Police 


In outlining his opposition to 
a proposed Police Review Board 
which would investigate com- 
plaints against police officers. 
Mayor Norris Poulson called at- 
tention to the fact that the Police 
Commission has the authority to 
refer complaints to a Hearing 
Examiner for investigation and 
report. These examiners are ci- 
vilians who are directly respon- 
sible to the Commission. 

The mayor is technically cor- 
rect but the ordinance has fal- 
len into disuse because of the 
timidity of past and present 
Police Commisioners who' insist 
on permitting police officers to 
investigate themselves. 

We don't know whether or 
not the mayor intends to prod 
his p)olice commissioners into ac- 
tion under this ordinance, but we 
hope so. We're not as sure as he 
is that the procedure is an effec- 
tive substitute for the proposed 
police review board, but we do 
think that it should be utilized. 


Present procedures under which 
all complaints are investigated 
by police and under which the 
complainant face§ prosecution if 
police investigators decide his 
claim lacks merit are wholly in- 
adequate. 

The mayor's suggestion that 
all police offij^^ers be insured is 
a good. one. If such insurance 
were required as the mayor pro- 
poses the citizen whose rights 
were invaded would be able to 
reco\er from the insurer in the; 
event that he sued and secured 
a judgment. 

We don't think that every 
person who complains against 
police officers has a just case 
but we do think that wherever 
there has been an abuse of police 
authority the offending officer 
should be penalized and that 
when a court renders a judgment 
against an officer there ought to 
be some assurance that the ag- 
grieved person can recover for 
the harm that has been done. 


Too Little, Too Late 


President Eisenhower's Christ- 
' mas Message 'with its plea for 
fair play and tolerance was good 
enough as far as it went, but the 
plain truth is that it was too lit- 
tle and too late. 

The president has been im- 
plored to take a strong stand 
against racial discrimination and 
segregation ever since he took 
public office, and the pressure to 
take that stand was intensified 
after resistance stiffened to the 
, 1954 Supreme Court school de- 
cisions. 

Mr. Eisenhower took refuge 
in weaseling statements on law 
enforcement: he refused to con- 
demn the Manifesto signed b\' 
. more than a hundred southern 
senators and congressmen call- 
ing for resistance to court orders; 
he carefully evaded anv state- 


ment that could have been con- 
strued as approval of school inte- 
gration. 

The New Orleans situation, 
that apparently evoked h i s 
Christmas Message, can be 
traced to his own inactivity and 
to the timidity and equivocation 
with which he treated the school 
integration decision. 

What he said last week will 
fall on ears made deaf by six 
years of constant, insistent and 
hysterical opposition to the Su- 
preme Court's mandate. The 
president of the United States 
could have made himself heard 
above the din of racism. Future 
historians will rank the presi- 
dent's failure to speak out on ra- 
cial issues as the greatest single 
deficiency of the Eisenhower ad- 
ministration. 


Reapportionment Plan 


ll California legislators are 
looking for an equitable plan for 
reapportionmient of the south 
central area of Los Angeles thev 
should adopt the proposal made 
by a non-part'isah citizen's com- 
mittee to the Assembly Commit: 
tee on Reapportionment last 
week. 

Under the proposal, four as- 
sembly districts would be created 
in the south central area of the 
city. Two of those assembly dis- 
tricts would be combined to form 
one congressional district and 
the other two would be combined 
to form another congressional 
district. 

The proFMJsed districts — boi h 
assembly and congressional — 
are contiguous and each of then: 
contains persons with an identi- 
ty of social; political and econom.- 
ic interests. The assemblymen 
and congressmen who represent- 
ed them in Sacramento or in 
Washington would have the ad- 
vantage of speaking for united 


constituencies. 

It is quite true that a part ol 
the unity may be traced to the 
fact that each district now has. 
or \\\\\ have in the very near fu- 
ture, a majority of Negro voters. 
Those voters reside in their com- 
munities less from choice than 
from the pressure that forces 
them to live in racially segrega*- 
ed areas of our city. 

That very segregation shapes 
iheir beliefs and attitudes on po- 
litical, economic and social is- 
sues. It is symptomatic of the 
fact that they are denied econom- 
ic opportunity and deprived of 
the free choice of residence. They 
can never break out of the vi- 
cious circles that hem them in 
until they secure a greater voice 
m government, local, state, and 
federal. 

The realities of American po- 
litical life are that Negroes do 
not win congressional seats until . 
and unless a given district has 
a majority of Negrro voters. 



Battlea^Ke & Bread 

By letter B. Granger 

Mayor enjov-s liUle real re- 
spect and wields almost no in- 
fluence that can be used in 
thi.s emergency. 

-A. fourth obstacle to recov- 
ery in racial relations in the 
predictable future is the size, 
leadership and financial re- 
sources of the White Citizens 
Council. It's headed by a 
brutish, smart, wealthy and 
completely unscrupulous oper- 
ator who has set his sights on 
a political empire like that 
once headed by Huey Long. 
Only Huey Long declared 
■'even,- man a king," while 
Perez promises only to main- 
tain "white supremacy." He 
thc-efore has a smaller fol- 
lowing than Long, but what 
the Negro-haters lack in num- 
bers they make up for in un- 
inhibited obscenity and fan- 
tastic exhibitions of depravity. 
Low Registration 

The fifth obstacle tha. all of 
my friends reported to me is 
the low registration record of 
Negro \oters. They tell me 
that in a city with more than 
200.000 citizens of color, there 
src only 3.5.000 colored voters. 
This is a large percentage 
compared with most southern 
cities, true, but in New Or- 
leans there is more education. 
better organization and less of 
ciireci action to discourage Ne- 
gro \ote- registration. And the 
r.eed is so .much greater for an 
informed, united and alert Ne- 
gro electorate' that these lead- 
ers consider it a tragedy that 
more has not been done along 
tills line. .And they end their^ 
report with the sad comment 
That in the 33.000 Negro voters 
group there arc probably 25 
<iifferent factions — a. hang- 
o\er from the Huey Long 
e\er>'-man-a-kmg kind of 
ihinking. ' 

V.'cll. I responded with fee- 
ble locula.ity. we never had a 
iiuey Long in Manhattan or 
p.e.^rb\- but we surely have 
split leadership — probably far 
more than 25 different factions 
in. Harlem alone. But jocular- 
ity was not what they wanted 
- and what they \^anted. I 
couldn't supply. .\s I told 
nearly 6W guests of both races 
who comprised a record-break- 
'ng dinner gatheripg^on my 
last evening in town, there 
isn't any patent formula guar- 
anteed to produce success in a 
drive against hatred that is a 
combination of ignorance and 
fear. 

The on!>- thing you can do 
is to sLa.-t driving, keep driv- 
ing and drive until you are 
through uiih the job— kno\v- 
:ng that if you turn rabbit you 
will breed a following gen- 
eration of rabbitty leadership. 
but if you show dedication 
and courage, those who take 
u the job alter you will show 
these qualities ifi even greater 
measure. It won't be a Merr>' 
Christmas m New Orleans for 
most but they are working 
! ard for a New Year ahead. 


Troubled City 

NEW ORLEANS — This 
metropolis of the bayou coun- 
try is a deeply troubled city. 
New Orleans, which for gen- 
erations has prided itself on 
being cosmopolitan, sophisti- 
cated and far above the hog- 
maw-and-chittlin' kind of 
naked race hate for which the 
Old South is notorious, has 
suddenly found that "it" can 
happen here — just as disgrace- 
fully and with the same cal- 
amitous results as in Little 
Rock. 

During two. da\'s m town 
devoted constanUs' to inter- 
views, meetings and conversa- 
tions with lead- 
ers of both 
race^:. I have 
not found one 
single person 
o f optimistic 
outlook so far 
as the immedi- 
ate future of 
r ace relations 
i s concerned. 
This IS not to 
Granger say that the\ 
are despairing. On the' con- 
trar\-. theirs is for the most 
part a realistic determ.ination 
that S6^es plainly the obstacl?s 
facing social reform but re- 
fuses to hack au'a\' from what 
they are determined must be 
a winning fight. 

Many Obstacles 
■ These leade.-s l.stcd .■-om.e uf 
the obstacies for m\ benefit. 
The b.g^est. nf i-ourse. is the 


uncouth 

. 1 

la.mbON 

.in 

Iv 

rre 

sixins.h 



; over no 

r W:-h 

his 

stooge 

1 ■"'C' 

.slatuie 

^ 

ttmg 

n 

Baton 

Ko. 

.:e a " 

d 

pas 

= in^ 

t.-oiible- 

TV. a 

k 1 :: i; 

ie 

gisla 

tion 

as fast 

h.> 

dirt\. 

■ie\ 

er 1 

ttle 

minds 

■"1. r> 

con. "01 

\ e 


■\nd 

b..^ck of 

I hi 

^ ieci.^jatu 

-e is 

the 


fact o' a t;;ht controi or, tiie 
state go\ ernmer.; by the rural 
paris'^es ' .'r>'L;r:.e_s. to \'ou > 
where ii]i;erac>". miscegena- 
t.on and feebic-ni.n "^ednes.- are 
as familiar :od.-.y as i>.e boil 
Meevil w.-i,^ ,-ome generations 
ago. 

.Another important obstacle 
to prog^e^>s is the slush fund 
provided by the legislature for 
the eniploNTnent of a staff cf 


lawNTrs w' 


ha\e nothing to 


do except figure out new wa\'s 
for h.^rassmg Negro citizens 
and blocking off inter\'ention 
by the various deparrmenis of 
interest m the Federal govern- 
ment. The S50.000 available for 
this purpose can hire quite a 
lot of crooked legal talent — 
and such talent is easy to find 
around the State. House at 
liaton Rouge. 

Wishy-Woshy Mayor 
Still another obstacle is tiie 
lack of any firm., determined 
go\ ernm-ent in the City of New 
Orleans. Mayor Morrison is re- 
garded by those wit.h whom ! 
talked as a pleasant man who 
wants TO get along, remain m 
City Hall and m.ake as few 
enemiies as possible. Conse- 
quenth". these critics feel, the 



(Continued from Page 1' 
He never will. Take a look at 
the -World Series winners in 
baseball. o\e'r the past decade. 
Or belter still, take a look at 
the losers m the major lea- 
gues. TTic fewer Negroes thc> 
have. The lower down The\ 
fi'hish 

They Saved Us 

If it hadn't been for Ne- 
gro runners, jumpers and hur- 
dlers, the United States would 
ha\e made a sad showing m 
the Olympics last summer. 
And guess who arc the big 
names in the professional and 
amateur basketball" Negroes, 
of courjic. Vv"ho, do you think 
is the be.^t boxer in the, whole 
wide world "i" 

For --ome reason that e^- 
capes mc. the example of Ne- 
g.-oes in sports has little ef- 
fect on .Americans. The few 
heavy thinkers who put their 
minds to it come up with the 
claim that there's something 
about Negroes" arms, or legs, 
or heels, or toes that makes 
them able to run faster or 
jump higher or hit a baseball 
farther or dunlf a basketball 
m a hoop quicker or run 
better with a football than 
other people. 

Tliot's Nonsense 
That's all nonsense. Negro 
athletes excel in their chosen 
fields bet'ause they are thrust 
into positions where race can't 
hold them back once they get 
the chance to hit a baseball. 
run. jump, catch a forw-ard 
pass or Ijust another guy in 
the jaw. They've got the sam.e' 
opportunity as their competi- 
tors and they're out to hold 
their lobK The only way they 
can do tllat is to outdo the 
competitio/i. 

I don't/expect to be around 
when ifnappens but some da\- 
soiTiebody is going to hit on 
the fact that America could 


■get where it wants to be fast- 
er by using the skilig of Ne- 
groes just as those skills are 
utilized m athletic competi- 
tion. If somebody gave me the 
commission 1 could round up 
■'a bunch of Negro lawyers who 
could do a mighty good job 
lor a corporation that wanted 
TO win lawsuits. They would 
be about as tough in the court 
room as Willie Mays and 
Hank Aaron are in baseball 
or Will Chamberlain and El- 
gin Baylor are on the basket- 
ball court. 

Just As Hard 

And if I were president of 
the United States idon'i wor- 
ry. I wont make iti I could 
pick up a pretty good set of 
public servants who had at 
least one Negro great grand- 
father. Given th? oppwrtunity 
to hold the kind of jobs I 
could give them, they would 
hustle just as hard to prove 
that they were as much better 
than their competition as Jim 
Brown does to show that he"s 
the best fullback in the busi- 
ness. 

Oh well, it was only yester- 
day that Negroes were barred 
from professional and amateur 
sports. I suppose it isn't too 
much to hoi)e that the time 
will come when the example 
will sink in. Amerida sure 
could do v.ith a set of diplo- 
mats as good in their busi- 
ness as Floyd Patterson is 
with his fists. We might even 
bring That Mr. K. down a peg 
or two. 


Art Exhibit 

Loans from 45 museums 
and many private colliections 
in eleven cc^ntries comprise 
the "Art Nouveau" exhibition 
opening at the Los Angeles 
Count>- Museum Jan. 18. 



REGULAR MEETIXG 

"J'uas the neek- before Christmas and all through our 
iLorld, 

\ot a creature ica.c thinking, but uilh billfold un- 
furled 

If ith dreams ivas bedazzled, by lights, lolored. he- 
pearled. 

II hile our leaders uere meeting ■ue, dulled beyond 
fright. 
■ I'trdammter A merikanschen! See Old Sick is quick. 
h nd General Hensinger, in H'ashington. right f 
.Mit Donner anet Blitten that is the trick; 
Soon Deutscher Soldaten and for all, Good Sight! 


U. S. South, Congo Fight 
Dominate News in 19^ 


fCantinued from Page ?^ 
the Shrine meeting that he 
couldn^ /inish his statement 
and Johnson's selection by the 
I>emoGratic convention loosed 
a chorus erf bitter atttacks 
from Negro delegates, some-of 
•wh^ went home to sulk in 
their political teiits. 

FoftiJ|iately for Kennedy his 
opponent was Vice President 
Richard M. Nixon whose pop- 
ularity. A as been at a low 
ebb in Xegro communities all 
during. ijhis political life. No 
matter how much they mut- 
tered, Negre voters knew all 
along that they would vote 
for Kennedy as against Nixon. 
As the campaign drew to a 
close a Georgia judge tossed 
the Rev. Martin Luther King 
intO: jail for four months on ' 
what is known in court house 
language as a bum beef. 
Deciding Votes 

Kennedy called King's wife 
and his brother and campaign 
manager, Robert, telephoned 
the judge. That about did it. 
Kennedy carried the critical 
states of Illinois, Missouri, 
Texas, Pennsylvania, and New 
Jersey by razor thin majori- 
ties ^ and those majorities 
came from Negro precincts. 

Ironically enough, Negro 
voters cast the deciding votes 
for Ivim in South Carolina and 
NortJi Carolina. The Republi- 
can national chairman sum- 
m^ it up after the returns^ 
w&e all in: "We didn't pay 
enough attention to the Negro 
-. voters," he said ruefully. 

As the struggle against seg 
gregation and discrimination 

Unified Casting 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Vince Townsend, with the 
Screen Extras Guild. 

Neither of these actions 
brought about any change in 
the situation. In fact, pressure 
from some sources caused con- 
cern among the 50 members 
of International Artists, so 
that membership dwindled to 
10. Some mehibers reported 
that they were told they' 
would not receive calls for 
jobs as long as they continued 
to belong to the organization. 
Under these conditions, the 
organization disbanded, but 
the fight continued. Ellis filed 
the petition to the FEP Com- 
mission in October, along with 
a telegram from Sammy Davis 
Jr., requesting action. 

The FEP Conmiission took 
up the case from there and 
held conferences both •with 
the extras and with Central 
Casting. 

Agreement in principal has 
now been reached, though no 
precise date has as yet been 
set fw putting the new policy 
into effect 


in the United States contin- 
i^d on many fronts and in 
«!very section of the country, 
so, too, the companion strug- 
gle for independence (Uruhu!) 
continued throughout Africa, 

Of special significance was 
the flare-up in South Africa in 
March, when police opened 
fire on thousands of unarmed 
Africans who were protesting 
against the law compelling 
them to carry "passbooks." 
Scores of .Africans were killed 
and hundreds wounded. The 
day of the massacres has gone 
down in history as "bloody. 
Monday." 

Those demonstrations, which 
at one time reached the pro- 
portions of a general strike, 
are a prelude to mighty erup- 
tions there, and elsewhere 
that cannot long be delayed. 


Letters 

Dear Editor: 

In regards to your article 
published in the last of Oc- 
tober there was an editorial 
stating that there were over 
5,000,000 Negro voters in the 
United States. 

For my information, would 
you please inform me on what 
basis you have reached this 
figure. I have in my posses- 
sion a letter from the Depart- 
ment of Commerce, by Fred- 
erick H. Mueller, Secretary, 
Washington 25. D.C. stating 
that there were 107 million 
civiliarts of voting, age at the 
date of the November general 
election. 

Of tills and out of this 
group of citizens reaching the 
voUng age. etc., 9.988,000 are 
Negroes. This estimate in- 
cluded residents of the United 
States that were ineligible be- 
cause of confinement in men- 
tal pnstitutions and prisons, 
and those required to pay poll 
tax, etc., and subject to other 
barriers such as living in the 
District of Columbia. 

■As a continued reader of 
your paper, I would like this 
iWormatitwi to impress upon 
niy friends and associates to 
vote, so will you please in- 
form me of the percentage of 
Negro vote in this election. I 
know that it was low, and 
what perceitUge would you 
say, in your Rbnest c^inion 
actually voted? And the num- 
ber of registered voters? 
Yours truly 

H. ANDERSON. 

Ed. Note: — Because of 
southern restrictions on vot- 
ing, failure to register in the 
north and west and disquali- 
fication only about half of 
eligible Negroes can, or do 
vote. 


Dawson Bid 
Left-Honded? 

(Continued from Page 2) 

Democragc Congressman 
Adam Cla>'ton Powell. Jr., who 
is hogeymooning in Puerto 
Rico, said Congressman Powell 
"wouldn't get into this even if 
he were in the city." 

Associate Editor of The 
Pittsburgh Courier. George 
Schuyler, said of the Dewson 
refusal: "I don't know what 
was in his mind in rejecting 
the job. It would have been a 
great thing for the group had 
he taken it." 

The man who started it afl 
— Henry Cabot Lodge — ^would' 
have no comment on the situ> 
ation. « 

In turning down the job. 
Congressman Dawson was^ 
petssing up a department 
which employs half a million 
people and which, last year, 
operated on a budget of 3.8 
billion dollars. 

The Illinois Congressman is 
known to be of feiiling health. 
Rumors had been rife nation- 
ally recently thiat he would 
resign his post in the House 
of Representatives. 

Baby Girl Die^ 
In Xmas Fjames 

(Continued from Page 1) 
the charred body of the little 
girl' under the bed in the bed- 
room. 

Charles was taken to Gen- 
eral Hospital, suffering from 
second and third degree bums 
over the whole of his body. 

The children's father had 
left the house a short time 
before the fire broke out 

The City Fire Department 
said the blaze was caused 
when a light ' bulb on the 
Christmas tree created- a short 

The fireman who rescued 
Charles was David Richardson, 
who climbed through the win- 
dow. 

Another fireman. William 
G. Lowe, of Station .£5, re- 
ceived bums on his hand dur- , 
ing -rescue attempts. 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

The Imporfant Newspaper' 
2101 W. Vernon Ave. 
Los Angoles 8, Calif. 
AXminstor 5^135 ^ 

LOREN MfLLER 
Publisher 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXX 


Dec. 29, 1960 
No. 41 


GRACE SIMONS— Executive Edited 

F. P. WALLER. Jr Adv. Mjr. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

Circulation Mgr. 

CALME RUSS Ot<ice Mgr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. G, Allen _. 1512 16th St. 

Senta Monica, Cal. Ph. EX. 5-1591 
STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 
1907 2Cth Street (Upstair*) 
Phone cEXbr ook *-SCX2 __ 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! 
a $4.00 for 1 Year 
D tl.50 for 3 Months 
Q $2.S0 for 6 Months 

Adjudication Decree Number 123231 

O^te Of Adludication July 1. 192* 

Published every Thursday Bjr 

p»e California Eagle Publi»hl«a 

Co,. M01 West Vernon Avenue, it 

Van Ness. Los Angeles 8, C»lN. 

Entered as Second Class Matter 

November S. 1937, at the Po« 

OWJce at Los AngeMs. CaliforHUW 

""»i_**^ *« «♦ Mw«h ». 1S7S. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWST>APERS 

5« Fifth Avenue , 
New Yorfc 17, New York 


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» • • 

Clmarcli Watch Services to Hail '61 



-SANTA- 
MONICA 
NEWS 


MIXISTERS IFIVES ENTERTAIN HUSBANDS— 

In the joyful spirit of Christmas members of the AMh 
Ministers U ires Alliance invited their husbands to relax in 
the spirit of the se<ison at the home of Rev. //. H. Brook- 
ins. Pictured from left, front roll-: .Mrnes. Pauline Clasco. 
Mary Burks, Betty Toliver, Cleo Love. Grace Kyle. Ann 
Davis, Xora Gibson. Dora Taylor, president of the flroup: 


hlah biott IhAlie Dell Quinn, Helen Brookins. Margar- 
it (Jt^tnr Birnice Allen. Evangelist -Ross, Nellie Stevens 
and Evan'^clist Hudson. Standing/: Revs. T. L. Scott. L. 
II . kni'/lirrn. /.. Cricr. Harry Davis. J. P. Gibspn, Ered 
A. Stephens. G. IT. Love, Bryce Taylor, Ralph King, (). A. 
Burks. //. //. Brookins and Stephen Brookins, A. K. 
(Juinn. I.. I'. II illiams. C. D. Toliver and L. L. Ouens; 

.Mrs. Mnttie Uilliams and .Mrs. Mary King. (J. Bonks) 


Rev. M. L. King 
Expected Here 

The California ministers 
and tiie members of the 
Western Christian Leader- 
ship Conference will meet 
here Saturday, Jan. 14. with 
Rev. Martin Luther King in 
an effort to complete a mer- 
ger of the groups which 
have been assisting in the 
struggle for civil rights 
waged by the Southern 
Christian Leadership Con- 
ference. 


Jehovah's Witnesses to 
Open Assembly Dec. 30 

The University congregation of Jehovah's Wit- 
nesses will usher in the New Year at the Los An- 
geles Trade-Tech Jr. College. They vv.ill hold their 
semi-annual assembly in the school auditorium, 
Dec. 30-Jan. 1, where over 2500 delegates will meet 
for advanced ministry train-* . 


Gr. Tabernacle 
Revival to Open 
On January 8 

Rev. G. L. Dedford, pastor 
of the Macedonia Baptist 
Church of San Francisco, will 
conduct a revival at Greater 
Tabernacle Baptist Church, 
415o McKinley avenue, begin- 
ning Jan. .'^ and continuing 
through Jan. 13. 

Evangelist Dedford was for- 
merly pastor of Greater Olivet 
Baptist Church of Los Angeles. 

Rev. E. S. Johnson, pastor 
of Greater Tabernacle, said 
this week that this is expected 
to be one of the greatest re- 
vivals ever conducted at the 
church. 


ing. 

Marcus Johnson, presiding 
minister of the local congre- 
gation, stated that, "entire 
families of the Witnesses ben- 
efit from the Bible discourses 
and dramatizations which 
serve in the public interest. 
Children as well as parents 
are taught to apply Bible 
principles in their daily liv- 
ing." 

The assembly, sponsored by 
the '%Vatch Tower Bible & 
Tract Society of New Yorl;. 
will feature its New York rep- 
resentatives. Ted Jaracz and 
Russell D. Cantwell as well as 
many local ministers. Jaracz 
will deliver the keynote ad- 
dress of welcome at 7 p.m. on 
Friday which will be followed 
by a symposium stressing. 
"Personal growth in the Min- 
istry of Peace," conducted by 
Cantwell. 

A public lecture at 3 p.m. 
Sunday, will be given by Jar- 
acz. I 


Students to 
Be Honored ; 
At Hamilton | 

Sundav. Jan. 1, at Hamilton . 

I Methodist Church. 6330 S.' 

IFigueroa street, will be Stu- 1 

I dent Recoj^niiion Day andi 

Communion. Tlic following 

I students will ho honored at 

I the services: Misses Robbie 

iChappoll, Gloria Redman. Mar- 

'garct Dixon. Thomasine Davis, 

Donald Bernard. Harry Gip- 

son. Jr., Clarence Moore. Jr., 

, Tavis Watson, and Geoffery 

McGlover. 

Rev. John X. Do;;gett, Jr. 
will be spoakin;:: at the 8 a.m.j 
spr\ice and Dr. T. R. W. Harris.* 
Sr. will speak at the IOi-I.t j 
I a.m. spn.-ifT on- the subject! 
"The Greatness of a Religious i 
Experience." Acts 26:13. Spe- 
cial music will be rendered by i 
the choirs. ! 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West, Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1 

"Communion of Joy"— Rev. Howard R. Carey preaching 

Sunday School-9:30 A.M. Worthip-llrOO A.M. 

HEALING SERVICE AT 5 P.M. 


•HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH- 


6330 SO. FIGUEROA ST. PLeasant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. DOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 

Saturday. 10 p.m. — Watch Service, Rev. J. J. Lewis Preaching 

8 a.m. — Rev. J. W. Doggett. Jr., Preaching 

"Where to Start"— Gen. 1;1 

9:30 a.m. — Church School (tor Ail Ages) 

10:45 a m. — Youth Church 

10:45 a.m. — Rev. J. N. Oogoit, Jr Preaching 

6:30 p.m.— Methodist Youth and Wesley fellowship 

7:30 p.m. — Vesper Communion Service 


World Calendars 

On Sunday. Jan. 1 from 3-5 
p.m. a panel of youth and 
young- adult speakers will 
p r e s e.n t "Calendars of the 
World,", with guest artist 
Robert- O'Neil presenting a 
dramatic interlude, at the 
Baha'i Center, 331 S. New 
Hampshire avenue. 

Coordinator of the program 
is Serrita Carmargo Herbert. 


AME Family 

Celebrates 

Christmas 

On Tuesday evening, Decem- 
ber 20, the AME ministers 
wives of greater Los Angeles 
and vicinity, sponsored their 
annual Christmas party. The 
gala affair took place in the 
beautiful spacious manse of 
First AME Church, 1809 Well- 
ington road, the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. H. Hartford Brook- 
ins. It was a colorful and' de- 
lightful experience and associ- 
ation for all who attended. 

Mrs. Brice U. Taylor, presi- 
dent of the alliance, together 
with her efficient corrjmittees, 
left no detail unattended, in 
making this one of the finest 
Christmas parties ever. All 
who attended were lavish in 
praise for the warmth, friend- 
liness and sincerity that per- 
meated the partv. 

Gifts were exchanged, and 
many games were played and 
lovely carol singing was led 
'by Mrs. Ralph King. The la- 
dies, whose honored guests 
were their husbands, were said 
to have taken extreme plea- 
sure in making their hard 
working mates feel that their 
labours are not in vain, and 
that "the wives" are not un- 
mindful of it. 


Election 

The Baptist Ministers Union 
will hold election of officers 
at the meeting on Tuesday, 
Jan. 3 at 11 a.m. in McCoy 
Memorial Baptist Church, 802 
E. 46th street. 


Rev. Welford P. Carter will 
conduct a watch . service at 
Calvary Baptist Church from 
10 p.m., through midnight on 
Saturday, Dec. 31. Holy cora- 
imuhion wdll be celebrated at 
10:45 a.m. on Jan. 1. A testi- 
monial service is on the 
agenda for the evening wor- 
ship hour. 

* * * 

Dare Weston, Sr. 

Dave Weston, Sr., the father 
of Dave Weston, choir leader, 
was in the city visiting his 
son. Death came unexpectedly 
and Dave accompanied' the 
body of his father to Lufkin, 
Texas for the funeral and 
burial. Arrangements were 
made by Spalding Mortuary. 

Surviving in addition to the 
choir director are his daugh- 
ters: Mrs. Gessa Mayfield of 
Rustin, La.; Mrs. Weltha Bal- 
ton. Mrs. Wortha Cooper, Mrs. 
Netta Bishop and Mrs. Frank- 
lin McCIure; and two sons, 
Willie H. and Matthew C. 
Weston. 

* * * 

Marshall Murray 

Marshall Murray, 40. of 670 
Brooks avenue, was found 
dead in his pick-up truck 
parked in front of 672 Brooks 
avenue, about 2:30 p.m. on 
Dec. 20. 

Funeral services were held 
on Dec. 21 in the Spalding 
.Mortuary Chapel, with inter- 
merit in Woodlawn Cemetery. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Mamie Murray, and his 
two children, Marsha Lee and 
Marshall Junior Murray. Also 
his father and mother, Mr, and 
Mrs. John Murray, and his 
brother Odie Lee .Murray; his 
aunts, Everta Chalk, Annie 
Gibson, Viola King and Lillie 
Mae Robinson. Ho was also 
the nephew of Junior, 'Albert 
Ethel and Blumer Murray: 
,j> • * 

NAACP Activities 

The NAACP Installation 
banquet will be held on Jan.j 
19. The Executive Board meet- 
ing will be held on Tuesday, 
Jan. 3, at 7:30 p.m. 

The area meeting will be 
•held on Feb. 16. 

* • * 

VENICE NEWS 

' Mr. and Mrs. E. Cole and 
Beverly Cole, of Hennessey, 
Okla. are visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. V. Wilson and Mr. and 
Mrs. M. Gray of Venice. They 
(Continued on Page 12) 


Clergymen Plan Solemn Rites 
Stressing Retrospection, Hope 

Candilelight meditations, intros{>eotion and projection of 
hope for the future in peace, brotherhood, mutual under- 
standing and the willingness to sihare one another's burdens, 
will bfe the order of the prayer and watch services, scheduled 
to begin in churches throughout the city Saturday, Dec. 31 
as early as 9 p.m.. 

New Community Church 

Several clergymen will assist with five minute medita- 
tions as Rev. Anita L. Edmonds, pastor of the New -Com' 
munity Church, 5965 S. Broadway avenue, counts off the last 
hour of 1960. Rev. C. Martin of Little Rock, Ark. will continue 
to preach the week long rfevival now in progress at the church 
each night at 7:30. 

Westminster Presbyterian Church 

10:45 p.m. watch service by candlelight will offer medi- 
tations and appre<5iation prayers conducted" by Rev. James 
E. Jones. At 11 a.m. Sunday, the sacrament of baptism will be 
consummated as well as the holy Eucharist ceremony, at the 
2230 W. Jefferson blvd. church. 

Bowen Memorial Methodist 

A real ole-fashioned testimonial service will be conducted 
by the Rev. John C. Bain at Bowen, 36th and Trinity' streets, 
beginning at 11 p.m. 

First AME Church 

Eighth and Towne will offer New Year's eve services be- 
ginning at 10:45 p.m. Rey. H. H. Broookins will preach on 
New Year's Day on "God Will Meet Us at Every Turn." The 
sacred Lord's Supper will follow. 

Grant AME Church 

Rev. H. W. Murph will hold candlelight watch service at 
11-12 p.m. Saturday at the 105th and Central avenue church. 
Rev. F. K. Price will speak at the 10:45 a.m. service on Sunday. 

J, Ward AME Church 

- Rev. L. S. Odom will conduct services at the 25th and 
Magnolia street sanctuary beginning at 10:45 p.m. Saturday. 
At 10:45 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 1, Rev. Odom will preach on "A 
Meritorius Decision," with holy communion following the 
sermon. 

People's Independent Church of Christ 

Rev. Maurice A. Dawkins will issue ai midnight altar call 
for prayers for the New Year at the 18th and Paloma street 
church. The High School and college students will interrupt 
their annual party in the basement of the church at 11 p.m. 
to join in the meditation candlelight service. Following the 
midnight service the party will continue with adults partici- j 
pating with their children for the first festive occasion of the 
year. -;,- 

Rev. Dawkins will preach on "Safer Than a Known Way" 
at the 8 and 11 a.m. services on Sunday. 

McCoy Mem'oriol Baptist Church 

Starting at 9 p.m. Rev. E. A. Anderson will have the Revs. 
C. Chambers, W. Duncan, S. R. Russel, E. Brown, A. McCord, 
L. Walker and A. Fortune as guest speakers during the watch 
service at the 802 E. 46th street church. Saturday evening. 

Holman Methodist Church 

Rev. L. L. White will conduct the 11 p.m. hour-long ser- 
vice of gratitude, introspection and retrospection at the 3320 
W. Adams blvd. church. The carillon at the church will 
sound the stroke of midnight and send forth the message of 
the birth of a new day and the year 1961. 

Other Churches 

Watch services are also scheduled at Price Chapel AME, 
Mt. Sinai, Victory, Trinity, St. Andrews and St. Paul Baptist 
Churches. Also the numerous Catholic and Episcopal congre- 
gations will also join in the prayers for more understanding 
among men and nations and for peace of mind and strength of 
heart for everyman in 1961. 

Experience the spiritual lift gained during the watch ser- 
vice at a favorite church. Join neighbors in the church near- 
est home. o 


The California Eagle— 5 
Thursday, December 29, 196 



EVANGELIST — Rev. G. 

L. Dedford of San Fran- 
cisco U'ill conduct a revival 
at Greater Tabernacle Bap- 
tist Church beginning Jan. S. 


Bethel Love 

Feast Set 

Bethel AME Church. 1511 W. 
36th street, reportedly, pro- 
pared its congregation for the 
new year with its closing serv- 
ice of the year on Wednesday 
evening. A Love Feast was 
conducted by the newly- ap- 
pointed minister. Rev. Fred E. 
Stephens for the class leaders, 
officers and members. This 
spirituail emphasis service 
was designed to prepare the 
group - for the sacrament of 
holy communion which will bo 
consummated at both the 8 
and 11 a.m. services on Sun- 
day, Jan. 1. 

Preparations are being made 
at Bethel for the relocation of 
the church. 



Wayne C. Howard 

M. D. 

231 W. Vernon Avenue 
ADams 3-6191 ' 


^EW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC. 


5965 S. Broadway Avenue— Rev. Anita L Edmonds, Pastor 

Pentacostal and Interracial 

9:30 A.M.-Sunday School 10:45 A.M.-Wership Service 

7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.— Prayer Service 


■" "^e called AfutuU^uUf. ^amUtf. . . .— 

... a precious memory: elegant mortuary surroundings, 
beautiful cars, services in our own church— truly a tribute 
of distinction." 

Funeral Dircctois - Serving All IVith the Finest 

1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Richmond 7 9121 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Church 

EAST 36th AND TRINITY STREETS - REV. JOHN C. BAIN, MINISTER 

SUNNDAY, JANUARY 1 

HOir COMMUNION - REV. RAIN PREACHING AT 9 AND )l A.M." 

The public is cordially invited to attend. 


Terry Rawensdaie 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING 
_1379 W. 38fh PLACE - RE. 4-7915. 


CHURCH 

OF 

CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

- 


3135 

w. 

ADAMS BLVD. 


11 a 

.m.— Morning Worship Service 


Rev. 

Jamc 

9 H. 

Hargett Will Speak 


SL'NDAY SCHOOL. 

9:30 

a.m 

—Kindergarten Through 5ih 

Grade 


11 

a.m. 

-6th Grade Through High School i 


\MIN1AI COMfORJiRm^^ SPIRITUAL ADV/SCR ■■ 

ELDER J. B. MOORE 

Dii'ine Healer From Birth 

AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER. WE WILL NOT FAIL 

Church at the Sons of God— Moses & Aaron 

217 E.Florence Ave. PL 1-6892 

421 N. 4tK Ave., Pocatello, Idaho CE. 2-9438 



WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones. Pastor 

9W and 11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship 

D 30 a.m.— Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade— Adult Classes 

11 00 a.!ii —Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr^ 

7 p.m. — Westminster Bible Hour 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 



1 564 Wr 36th PLACE 


AX. 1-9831 


AAgssages to All 

m 

Services Sunday and Thursday at 8 P.M. 

Wednesday 2-4 P.M. 

REV. OTIS STOVALL, Minister 



First Rock Baptist Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 

Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
1 1 a.m. BTU 6:30 p.m. Evening Sorvice 
7:30 p.m. Song Servic* 8:45 p.m. Public 
it invited to Pray with u« at 7:30 pm. 
on Wednesday. 


TIME is the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
tion to Los Angeles families for mpre than 20 years 
— satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and 
honest service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reason- 
able. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 

CONTINUING TO SERVE YOU 
AT OUR TEMPORARY LOCATION 

1430 East 103rd St. LO. 6-0022 



6-The California Eagle -- Thursday, December 29, I960 1 


RACING 



Beautiful Coliente in Old 
■Mexico: More than 800 players 
ii. the crowd of 12,694 collected 
Christmas bonuses in the 5-10 
public handicapping contest 
last Saturday at Caliente Race 
Track. 

Holders of 57 tickets which 
named five winners in the six 
races embraced by the 5-10, 
received $1,325^0 for each 
ticket. 

Consolation money was 
divided into 789 shares worth 
S32 .each for four horses. The 
pool grossed $111,914, a new 
5-10 record for a Saturday, in- 
cluding Kentucky Derby Sat- 



BBMSn 


Basketball Classic 
Underway at Arena 

The Los Angeles Basketball 
Classic, now the nation's No. 
1 basketball tournament, got 
under way Wednesday at the 
Sports Arena with Coach John- 
ny Woodcn's fast rising UCLA 
^cam winning convincingly 
over Alichigan State. 

While tall, talented and ter- 
rific Indiana and California's 
undefeated defending cham- 
pion resign as co-favorites in 
tlie Dec. 28-29-30 Classic, 
Woodon's newest version of 
lbs Bruin "Firehouse Five" 
must be considered as "dark 
horses" in the 12-game bat- 
tle for the tall, gold tourna- 
ment championship trophy. 

Rounding out the Classic 
draw are such other cage 
powers as Iowa, Michigan 
State and Minnesota af the 
Big Ten and SC and Stanford 
of the Big Five. As a result 
of early season games to date, 
SC and Iowa rate high along- 
side UCLA as teams which 
could suprise and take it all. 


urdays. Winning numbers 

were 12-4-6-4-6-3. Eight' Ne- 

groes shared in the pool. 

(HorsM To Watch That Am 

Fit And IZeody) 

CALIENTE 

Health Rayt. Now fit. 

Precept. Give another chance. 

SImi Pais. Off bad In last. 

Bender Mix. Cheap but game. 

LIsandro, Mile or over o.k. 

Sir Pastor. My special. 

Inimitable. Watch out for this 
one. 

Station Break. Wire to wire. 

Flashy Winner. A real goodie. 

Gallano. In smart hands. 

Exalt. Get yours ort this one. 

Turnui. Sharp as they come. 
SANTA ANITA 

Good Start. Fit and fast. 

Mighty Mine. Loves the track. 

Britch Roman. This one can fly. 

Bent Spur. At a price. 

Sundown II, Will make them 
hussle. 

Ann'i Knight. Clockers goodie. 

Oh So Iron. My special. 
■Field Service. My longshot. 

King's Marshall. Will best the 
best. 

Le Beau. Worked very fast. 

Keep this column for fur- 
ther reference as it only ap- 
pears in the California Eagle, 
out and on your newsstand 
every Wednesday. For the best 
in the sport of kings it's the 
Eagle. 


Lakers to Play Benefit 

The Los Angeles Lakers re- 
turned from a tour that took 
them to N. Y., Syracuse, Phil- 
adelphia, St. Louis, Detroit 
and back to Philadelphia, 
playing six games in eight 
days. 

The club will return home 
to play the World Champion 
Boston Celtics in a game co- 
sponsored by the Salesian 
Fathers Tuesday evening, Jan. 
3. 

Scheduling favors the 
Lakers in January, February 
and March. They have 18 
dates at the Sports Arena 
during that period. 


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GOPHER — Bill Munsey, 
Minnesota's most effective 
ground gainer, carried the 
ball 51 times for a net gain 
of 225 or 4.4 yards per try 
and is one of the team's fast- 
est hacks. 

Tan Stars 
Set for 
Rose Bowl 

(Continued from Page 1) 
that the Gophers noted the 
coolness toward their No. 1 
quarterback and seemed to 
think it's a scheme to get 
them grumbling among them- 
selves because the Minnesota 
players, from the coach on 
down to the waterboy, are 
fully aware of the lack of pub- 
licity that has been given to 
their players, and especially to 
Stephens, Bobby Lee Bell, Bill 
Munsey and Judge Dickson. 

Then my man recalled the 
treatment the press gave the ■ 
1947 Illinois team which show- ! 
ed up for the Rose Bowl ; 
against USC, which also hadj 
a number of Negro players, ' 
led by Claude "Buddy" Young. I 
The treatment boomeranged ] 
and Illinois went on to rout 
USC something like 48 to 0. j 

Coach Jim O.vens, whoso 
Washington Huskies have dc- 1 
veloped into one of the most 
exciting football teams any- ' 
where with such bread and \ 
butter players as George] 
Fleming, Ray Jackson, Joe 
Jones and Charlie Mitchell. 
isn't too happy about the po- 
sition in which' the press has 
put his team. 

Despite the fact that he's 
had quite a few bad breaks, 
including the fact that his No. 
2 fullback, Joe Jones, came 
down with a kidney disorder, 
the press has been billing his 
squad as the invincible team 
that handed Wisconsin a 44 
to 8 defeat in the same Rose 
Bowl game last year. 

It just might be that the 
Gophers will take the field on 
Jan. 2 boiling mad and steam- 
ed up for victory. 

It's a good bet that Minne- 
sota's outstanding players like 
Dick Larson, Roger Hagberg, 
Tom Brown, Dave Mulholland, 
Greg Larson and Coach Mur- 
ray Warmath are hep to the 
divide-and-conquer campaign 
of West Coast writers. 


GOPHER — Judge Dick- 
son, the University of Min- 
nesota's punting specialist, 
also had the second best per- 
play ground gaining record 
on the lii/^ Ten co-cham- 
pionsh^ team. 


'lit 


HUSKIE—Joe Jcnes. No. 
2 fullback who underwent 
emergency surgcrji for ap- 
pendicitis, is reported in 
good health but it is ques- 
tionable if the valuable sec- 
ond stringer will\s^ action 


iger will S£ 

toP] 


HUSKIE — Ray Jackson, 
leading ground gainer for 
Washington, has lost only a 
total of six yards all season. 
He scored the Huskies' 
fourth touchdown against 
Wisconsin. 


Four Sepia Stars to Play 
In 3rd finnnal Copper Powl 


Four outstandinf; Negro col- 
lege griddcr.s will take part 
in the third annual Copper 
Bowl football game at Arizona 
State Uni\ersity Stadium in 
Phoenix, Doc. 31. 

Three will bo on the roster 
of the National All-Stars and 
one on the South -West. The 
Nationals will bo coached by 
Charles A. (Ripi Englo of 
Penn State, who handles the 
defense, and Pete Elliott of 
Illinois, tlio dofonsi\o coach. 

The .Cout!i-\Vost will be 
coached b\- Jim .Sutlierland of 
Wa.'ihintrton State and Evfrett 
(Sonn.\i Grandolius of Colo- 
rado. Sutherland will handle 
offense, Grandeliu'=, defense. 

Cilff Roberts, Illinois taekle, 
is the heaviest m.in on either 
squad. lie standi 6'3" and 
weighs 2ri0 pounds. He's a 
three-letter winner from Piiil- 
delphia, l\'i. H(^ was the 
first pla\er'to accept a Cop- 
per Bowl hid. 

Two other National All- 

Stars are halfbacks— Marshall 
Starks of Illinois anri Willie 
Jones, of Purdue. Starks is 21 


5' 11" and 190 jiounds. His 
[ home is in Rockfoild, 111. Jones 
I is also 21, 5' 11" and weighs 

193 pounds. His residence is 

Robstown, Tex. 

Barren's Cl|oice 

I Starks was recornmended to 
i Copper Bowl officjals by Bill 
iBurrell, Illoins' Most Valu- 
[able Player in tljie Big Ten 
i last year and also! in the Cop- 
\ per Bowl. He now is playing 
i Canadian professional foot- 
j ball. 

I Starks was named to the 
third all-Big Ten and was 
sixth among Big Ten scorers. 
Jones made second all-Big 
Ten and was yoted Most 
Valuable back byj his Purdue 
teammates. i 

The lone South-West Negro 
player is Cleveland Jones of 
Oregon. The halfback stands 
only 5'3's"; weighs 148 
pounds. He has [spearheaded 
the -Oregon offensive and de- 
fensive teams for the past two 
years. 



"AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS'" 

O Brake Tune-Up Specialists • Free Picl(-Up, Delivery 

SPECIAL FREE ENGINE CLEANING WITH LUBRICATION 

HiNRY LEZINE'S MOBIL SERVICE 

1921 S. CENTRAL AVE Rl. 8-8044 "V^^h'^T' 




Rafer Johnson 
Athlete of Year 


ifoin 


Rafer Johnson 
new Olympic recjord 
points in the 
Rome, Saturday 
Southern Call 
of the Year by 
Hall board of athjletics 

Johnsbn also 
world record in 
Ion with 8,683 
up in the 
championships 
Ore., last summer, 


who set a 

of 8,392 

ecathlon at 

was named 

ia Athlete 

the Helms 


holds the 

the decath- 

points piled 

1 AAU 

at Eugene, 


HoleinOne 
Tourney Set 
For LA Open 

A $1000 hole-in-one tourna- 
ment for spectators will be 
conducted during the 33th an- 
nual $50,000 Los Angeles Open 
golf tournament Jan. 5-9 at 
Rancho, Pres. Don Sorenson, 
of the sponsoring Los Angeles 
Jr. Chamber of Commerce, an- 
nounced Tuesday. 

A 120-yard shot will be set 
up on the driving range near 
the 18th hole at Rancho. Any 
fan firing an ace will receive 
the $1000, or, if more than one 
ace is scored, the prize will 
be split. 

Lesser prizes of golf balls, 
golf clothes and equipment 
will be given to persons com- 
ing close to the hole. 

Tab will be three shots for 
$1. Irons will be provided at 
the course, so it won't bo 
necessary for spectators to 
bring along their own sticks 
unless they wish. 

The hoIe-in-OTie tournament 
is an innovation for the L.A. 
Open. It has been tried else- • 
where in the country and has, 
been popular. : 

Pre-season tickets for the 
Open, good for all five days of 
play, are priced at $7.50 and 
are available at all Southland j 
golf courses and driving | 
ranges and the Jr. Chamber 
office, 404 S. Bixel. | 

Entries are mounteing for 
the event and are expected to: 
top 500 before dreadline. ' 


The champion Green Bay Packers landed seven ptayefs, 
including three who will be playing for the first time, on the 
Western Conference squad for the All -Star Pro Bowl game 
against the Eastern Conference Jan. 15 at the Coliseum. ^ 

Packers also have their coach, Vlnce Lombardi, wtoo'M be 
aiming to run the West's victory skein to seven against four 
for the East in the eleventh annual charity classic. 
Serenth for Rlcbter 

Los Angeles Earns have four players, chosen on the squad 
of 34 by the seven Western division NFL coaches— Les Riditer, 
Jon Amett, Eddie Meador and Jim Phillips. 

For' Richter, named both as linebacker and offensive 
center, it will be his seventh Pro Bowl. Halfback Amett will 
be in the classic for the fourth straight time, while both 
defensive back Meador and end Phillips are playing for the 
first time along with 11 more. 

The Baltimore Colts matched the Packers with seven 
players, led by rifleman Johnny Unitas, Player of the Game in 
the West's 38-21 victory last January. 

Iron Man NemelUni 

The fast-finishing Detroit Lions landed six, San Fran- 
cisco 49ers five, Chicago Bears four and Dallas Cowboys one. 

The 49ers have the Iron Man of both West and East 
.squads in 36-year-old Leo Nomellini,262-pound defensive 
tackle, who will be representing the West for the ninth time. 

While 21 of the 34 players of the West are veterans of the 
game compared to 26 of the East, the Westerrrers have the 
most aggregate Pro Bowl appearances, 72 comipared to 65 for 
the East. 

Also, the 13 W^t first timers are far from NFL rookies 
for they include such as Bart Starr, Henry Jordan and Jim 
Taylor of the Packers, Nick Pietrosante, Alex Karras and Jim 
Gibbons of the Lions, Bruce Bosley and Charles Krueger of 
the 49ers, Andy Nelson of the Colts, Johnny Morris of the 
Bears, and Jim Doran of the Cowboys along with Meador and 
Phillips of the Rams. 

City Officially Welcomes Angels 


I Los Angeles' new entry in 

'the American League, the 
"Angels," received an official 
welcome from the Board of 
Supervisors at ceremonies in 
the Hall of Administration, 
with the new baseball team's 
executives present. 
Board of Supervisors' Chair- 

• man Ernest E. Debs wel- 
comed Gene Autry, chairman 

! of the Board of the "Angels", 
Robert O. Reynolds, president, 

\ and ^red Haney, general man- 
ager. 

"We are a home-owned 
team starting fresh and hope 
to make a good showing in a 
tough league our first year 
out." Autry told the Board, 
adding: 

"Our primary concern is 
giving the fans the kind of 

Classic Top Player 

Clarence Childs. All-Ameri- 
ca halfback at Florida A&M 
University, and quarterback 
Don Smith of the Langston 
University Lions were voted 
the top performers for their 
teams in the 28th annual; 
Orange Blossom Classic by the \ 
working press in the Orange 
Bowl Stadium In Miamti 
FAMU defeated Langston 40- 
26. 


baseball they want to see, and 
I can assure everyone that 
! our team, under ' the able 
I guidance of Fred Hanty, will 
'be hustling and giving their 
all. They're all proud to be 
members of the first Ameri- 
can League team to move 
west." 


Duel at Sports Arena 

Big Pancho Gonzales and 
Lew Hoad will battle in Jack 
Krammer's 1961 World Series 
of professionals at the Sports 
Arena on Jan. 19 and 20. 

The pros will play three 
single matches and one 
double each evening in their 
only West Coast appearance. 


New Method! 
DU. 8-7048 

Urinary, Personal prebUnw 
Glands and All Oinical 
Matters. Young Doctor 
Invites Unusual : CasM 

RESULTS! 

(Consultation Confldtntlall 


EXPANDED BUS SERVICE - EXPANDED BUS SERVICE 



CHOSEX — Jf'ilma Ru- 
dolph, tiho Ziill appear in 
the L.A. Invitational on 
Jan. 21', ivas named top In- 
ternational "athlete of the 
year" in Europe. She's 
America's Olympic triple 
gold-medaliit and world's 
fastest womaH. 


STARTS NEXT SUNDAY!! 

8(/J SERVICE 
ON LINE 27! 


EXPANDED BUS SERF- 
ICE — The heavy dark line on 
the map shows route of the 
new Vernon-Sonta Barbara-La 
Cienege Line 27 of the Los 
Angeles Metropolitan Transit 
Authority, Beginning January 
1, passengers traveling between 
the south and western areas of 
Los Angeles and West Holly- 
wood will have the benefit of 
through bus service on Line 27. 


ifi^ BEAUTIFUL « 

« CALIENTE « 


EXPANDED BUS SERVICE - EXPANDED BUS SERVICE 


IN OLD MEXICO ^ 

OFFERS IVERY SAT. « SUN. 
RAIN OR SHINf 

^ THOROUGHBRED^ 

-(^MMilfiMBMiillflHii'M- 

10% RACES EVERY 
.. ^ SAT. & SUN. AA4A- 
AND SATURDAY 

"^DAILY DOUBLE & QUINELA 

4^ BOOKS & MUTUELS M- 

SUN. POST TIME 12 NOON 

FANTASTIC RETURNS 

For Your Wager w. 

Two Dollars or Mora 

.f^ Foreign Book Open Daily Hi- 

On AH Major Tracks 

Greyhound Racing 
-(^ To Be Resumed ^ 
^ in January ^ 

49er EVERY SATURDAY 
^ AND SUNDAY NIGHTS *»■ 

JOHN S. ALESSIO 

H^ Exaculiva Diractar ^ 


; 



La Cienega's Restaurant Row 

and Shopping Center, 
Crenshaw Shopping Center, 

Santa Barbara and 
Vernon Avenue areas linked 

by M«T«A's new, 
convenient, through service. 


fon TtmeTABLEs and 

IMfOnMATIOM CALL 

KICHMOMP 7-4455 


Si 


i 


f, 




i 


W'Wi 


Id 
Ik 


People & Places 


1r&.MA^ A. I. CLARKE — If 

aa^' niembers of the commu- 
iufv" feel honored at being 
"'.von passes for "Raisin in thie 
.Sub" — don't. When Eagle 
p3U<Jfc0race Simons arrived at 
tta>* theater with an escort 
'ChjUiSday night, prepared for 
a ?1reat, stie was bluntly in- 
formed that the passes don't 
mean'a th4ng if there's a pay- 
arg customer in the offing. 
Passe-s had boen handed out 
■by "Raisin'" press agent A. J. 
t:iarke!- 

GREEN EYES— Those narrow 
minds who \oiccd suspicion at 
the manner in which the 
Rinkeydinks K^^e away a 


, coo^l grand, their second in 
:one year. The pretty bank 
'clerk at Security-First Ka- 
Itional at 'Western and Wash- 
ington told Fred Griffin, the 
j noted pharmacist, that it 
couldn't have been won by a 
jmore deserving lady because 
she was pressed for funds due 
i to an operation on her mother. 
jThe Rinkeydinks are one of 
I the few groups that give more 
! than they receive — and in the 
community where it counts! 
i E V E L Y N GRIFFIN— Perhaps 
it's because she came from a 
family of four beautiful sisters 
but whatever the reason, you 
(Continued on Page 121 


DO COME TO 


NOW APPEARING 


TERRY GIBBS 

F001I • DANCING 
ENTERTx%IIV^fENT 

Hollywood 


6* #^ 

"LIKE E.-)SY. MA\"— You'll ytt the mainge directly 
from ART BLAKIY and the Jazz Mnstnijers "scndinn" 
i:ith other jazz arcals in the big concert and dance at the 
Lnibass\ Deceniher .11'. A/i/c artist climaxes xtnush run at 
Zebra Louri^t and jiK'nrds ioltoicerf uith Friday nit/ht 
ccinccri. 




Thursday, December 29, 196^ The California Jagle-7 





YEAR'S BIGGEST UEEKEND— ZEBRA LOU-NGE 

<;/.>( /v presents the year's biggest attraction, swinging 
organist. Jimmy Smith. Thrill Ir, this-top talent taking the 
to-u/i from the bandstand at S.^'^S South Central aieniie. 
beamnuui Friday. J),,. JO. Z^BRA LOIXGE. LU. 

1-0777. 


'Genuine Excitement !" w^' 

WASfMSNGToTM 

,„. /,.;-B!TTER-EAR.tH R^vUE 

nm SENNES' NElO '«' » '" 

\Jyx£>W 01 4-6650 


GEMVS RETl'RXS — 

Kay (AiutJtS, the fouilul 
siiiiier of Hues and halL.df. 
returns uith hie o'ehestni 
and en/ertain,rs \e;r Yiar's 
night. Junuury ], to the ili- 
iii/ht of his leijtnil of fiuiy 
'iih'i liiil hi on hand at th, 
Pallr.dlum. (See Disp/iiy.) 


MR. BONGO 
ROCK 


PRESTON EPPS 


tou 


featuring 

(MY LITTLE PAUII C 

BLACK BOOK) HlinLg 


PANDORA' BOX 

8118 SUSET - CORNER CRESENT HEIGHTS — OL. 6-9192 


rJiNfOF THE YEAR! 


SUNDAY EVINING JAN. 1st 

8P.M-T0 2A.M. 



HAL ZEIGER presents 

THE MOST CREATIVE 
MUSICAL GIANT OF 
THIS GENERATION! 


^/ . 





Sj. 


EH^^^ 


IMI^^^^ 


PLAYING HIS HIT RECORDS 

'GEORGIA ON MY MIND' 
-RUBY' • *HARD HEARTED HANNAH' 

COME RAIN OR COME SHINE' • *WHAT'D I SAY' 
. -THE GENIUS OF RAY CHARLES' 


THt 


PLUS 




^ EARL BQ^TIC 

And His Famous Orchestra 


W^.h 


^ 


RftELETS 


HOLLYWOOD 


iLLADIUM 

6215 Sunset Blvd. • HO 9-7356 


ADVANCE SALE 
TICKETS AT 

ALL MUSIC CITY STORES • HOTEL WATKINS • PALLADIUM 

fLASH RECORDS (Jefferson at Western) 
FOR TABLE RESERVATIONS CALL HOUywood 7-6151 


Back.stage at "RAISIN IN THE sUN" ... The 

magnificent cast graciously accepted our congratula- 
tory mouthings with the possible exception of the 
celebrated CLAUDIA McXEIL, who has settled com- 
fortably in the role of LENA YOUNGER and gives it 

monumental impac-i. ' 

Miss McNeil brushed aside' And whe.^eas we had saunt- 

erod inU) tlie actress' dross- 
our kudos on her perfoi-manoc, i„„ quarters to pay. our com- 
and sternly reprimanded us plimciits. we u<io suddonlv 
for being the reporter who enmcslicd in a vnbal eonflii 1 
dared to make the allegation with her. .MthoUijh. sever. ii 
that her temperament while members of the tran-fixi^d on- 
working on the film veision lookers told us we ■.i.-id on,:- 
of "Raisin'' was uncalled for. own" in ;^entlemanly l.^^hioi,. 
"You may as well know that, we we.-e su(idonly a liijo tirm 
you have a di.stinction." Miss of it all. 

McNeil lashed at us. "and Spftepin;-; tiic i)l(..-.\. -,,, 1,, 
that distinction is beinij tlie speak. tal.i;i(>a DIANE SANDS 
■only reporter in my 20 years and DOUGLAS TURNER grn: 
'in showbusiness who lias liad ed us like ol' budfi;. budd;. . 
i anything ad\-erse 10 say about Beth of thcin ha\c that oerta:,; 
I me." (Continued on Page Si 


^ammmmi^ 



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8-The California Eagle T^urs c^ay, Dec ember 29, 1960 

"CBazFloundtrack 


(Continued from Page 7) 
that spells out STAR 
inspired perform - 


i instead of aping the others. 
i Smart boy! I 

"'^^*'' *"r inspired" "nerfom'i Incidentally, the play is sold 
They gave ^P^P"^'"'^ ?«•"""" [out for the balance of its LA 
ances that ^'-'^ J'^ talked; run, thanks to Miss McNeil 
about for months to como. ^^^ the others and they could 

We told Doi\S this was the have stayed for a much 


first time wo had witnessed! lengthier period. 

tiie play, b';; '';l,V'^l,i'^ P"r! Surely you won't deny that 

formance ^'> the YOUNGER qloBIA -LynNE and GENE 

oiSlDtte^ POITIER or OSSIEj vocal finds of I960 and will 
PAVIS.H.- rep hod that had we receive the •■big .star" trea ' 
^^n th.- other actors, vve,ment in 1961 . ." ELLA FITZ- 
^oaid .St. 11 reah/.o that he is, GERALD purcha.sed a home 
gjvirg a comple.c y d.fterent on Sierra Drive in Be edy 
cWract.-n/at.on ot the part.' Hills! . . . Nothing but rave 
prcfernnn; to play it hi.s way (Continued on Page 12 1 





FLUnrr COMMIXDI R — Urli Fono. ou-ner uf Las 
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2 SHOWS TODAYi 

MATINEE 2:00 P.M. • EVENING 7:30 P.M 



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EVENINGS (Sun. thru Thurs )-0rche5tra or Loge $2.80; Balcony $2.20 
MATINEES (Wed . Sat. 4 Sun l-0rch»5tra or Loge $2.50; Balcony $1.80 
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ALL SEATS RESERVED. HOLIDAY PRICES DURING 
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w 



F.AGLE CHRISTMAS PARTY— Old Si. Xi.k shour,! up m the 2101 
H . y tTtinn addres! of the Ijrdtjrirntn L'k/Ic "fftir tuiir on Chrtslinn'^ hrr 
and once the day after (jhrlflmas. Ally. Iliriiui/i (). hnsH.Ai tins "Old Mtin 
H'hiskers" the first time. He hosted n Chri.^lnias party lor the entire flali. 
Ruth (.uriningham fcny the feirmd i iMinr Irnin the Snrlh P'lle. She hroiKjht 
three huge ho.xes of ijrneerin. eiii h I'ml'iininq n turkey eind olhir supplier. 
The dny after (Airi\tinnt the Lmile hud its llii'd mil Jr'jiii Sr,/it/i. lliis heinn 
Rex. H. Bellicld Hunnlhal uith hi.s air ioiided nilh toys fnnn Sunil .Uiih/u/ 


(Aiinih in Sliniio (hly find Holy 'Sntii'ily (Jhtireh in ITestchester. Since 
Ally, t.nvlifh had eniitriiiiili d to I hr joy of E/ir/le itnfiers.it uas fittintf 
ih/il they, ni turn, .\lii,itld spread joy in the < oiii imniity. 'J'his they did 
on Sniiirdny. Pu lurid Ironi lei I: T.-erellr M. Hedriik. A. D. Jones, 
(Ai/izz (Jrmiford Ruth ( '.unninrjhnni . .Mnnijie Htithmmy . Crnec E. Simons, 
Ally. Her/nnn O. i.ni/lish. II insel Cilenn. .\I/ir':e Hut/he,^: Dorothea foster, 
.1/. .Meurs (ind i.(l;i\ " .H'ti" Rohin.'on. (Hiirr\ .-Idtiniil 


Through Friends/ Eagle Staff, is Able to 
Brighten Three Families' Homes on Xmas 


Br 

Edw. "Abie" Robinson 

and 

VerdeU Young 

Thanks tn the Lps Ami 
&Ub. thp Just Friends Cluh 
imdthe Chi Delta Chapter of 
Alpha Chi Omega, three 


families had Christmas din- 
ners in their own homes 
. Su,nda\'. 

Eajjle baskets of food that 
were g[i\pn to them brought 
near tears mixed With wide, 
happy smiles to the faces of 
23 children and their parents. 


Beautician Ruih Cunning- 
ham had arranged to ha\e 
the baskets delivered in the 
Eagle office Friday night, 
following a request relayed 
In her hy staff member C. 
Marie Hughes, after it was 
learned that the three homes 


uoLild have little to eal while 
most others were feasting. 

The Eagles Edward "Abie'" 
Robinson and photographer 
\'erdell Young distributed 
the baskets Saiurdav. 

tTo make the chiltlren's 
e\es shine even more bright- 



RISKEYDIXKS PLAY SA Sl'A— Members of the Rtn- 
'keydint^ are shonn nt hh Einns' Sportsmen s Cluh as they 
awarded {■1000 to (ierhude Dol>\. 1 1 uns n real Christmas 
for .Mrr. Dohy ii hose hiishnnd is unemployed and ti hose 
mother just undernenl fin expinuir operation. Pie lined 


are: H ildeaardr Rostie. .Teri Rnndfrr, Ann M alhroiioh . 
Herniee Brooke ll'ini (jnrey . hh l:nn^. l.r,:r, Barnes. 
Ann Odom. Lillian Kaznriein. llorhnu- R:il'.:,\. erd All'' 
Pay ne. ( Yonnr/ ) 



CLUBS 




FASHI0N5 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


The California Eagle— 9 


Sandra Hoskins Plans for 
Graduation and Marriage 


Mrs. Barney Hoskins and 
daughter Sandra are more 
than busy these days plan- 
ning two big events in San- 
dra's life — graduation next 
ir,onth from UCLA and her 
■wedding Feb. 11 to Alonzo 
Wilkens III, at beautiful 
church rites to be directed 
by Mrs. Harrietta Flowers 
Williams. 

Many pre-nuptial courtes- 
ies are planned for the pop- 


ular bridc'elect. Among the 
early hosts • were the Dave 
Arbors, "parents of the groom 
-to-be, who had a Christmas 
Day dinner at their Harvard 
blvd. home as a family get- 
together honoring the young 
couple. 

Early January hostesses 
include Miss Iva Washing- 
ton who will serve a lunch- 
eon at her Kingsley drive 
home for Sandra and her 


bridesmaids on Saturday, 
Jan. 7, and on Sunday m<MTi- 
ing, Jan. 8, Mrs. Bessie- Burke 
and her sister, Mrs. Et^el 
Bruington, are co-hosting 
Sandra's first shower at 
breakfast in the Wilfandel 
Club House. 

The prospective groom ar- 
rived Friday for the holi- 
days from Moser Lake. 
Wash., where he is stationed 
with the United States Army- 
Air Force. 


ly. the Rev. H. Belfield Han- 
nibal. vicar of St. Luke's • 
Episcopal Church in Fire- '• 
stone Park, stopped by the j 
Eagle office Monday, with a 
car filled with toys and other 
gifts. 

(He had run out of names 
of youngsters who mighty 
otherwise be forgotten. Did' 
we know of any? 

I We supplied him with the , 
names of the three families 
to whom we had given 
baskets, and the family of 
Mrs. Jnvce .lackson. whose 
little girl, fiwendolvn. was 
burned to death when their 
home at 9617 (nape street. 
Watis. \urned down Friday 
night). / 

There was Mrs. Lucille 
W-ashington. 1.3031 Willow- 
brook a V e n u e, and her 
family of eight who had 
little in their cupboard until 
we arrived .Saturday morn- \ 
ing with a basket of food 
that contained a turkey and 
an assortment of staples and 
other food that made the 
bare shelves look' like a 
small grocery store. 

Mrs. Washington beamed 
as if she had just been given 
a new lease on life, and 
the. youngsters' big eye.s 
sparkled. When they said 
condbye and closed the door 
behind us. we heard happy 
voices and laughter. 

Ovei on Largo street, at 

(Continued on Page lOt 



AID SCHOOL BVILDIXC-Committre members of the .Mt. Xebo Grand Lodge. 
Prinee If nil Masons, and the Order of the ^Eastern Star arc shoun presenting a check 
to the dir'ertor of the fiXieptiorwl Children's Home to help 'iiilh the neiv sihool's build- 
inq proqrani. prom left: Stella Bnrrell. prnnd secretary: Bertha Knby. Korlhy matron 
of Ruth (Chapter \o. 4: James Smith, deputy grand master oi .Ml. y.cho Lodge; and 
Juanitei Marklin, exccutiic director of the school. (Young) 

Mt. Nebo Grand Lodge to 


Support Exceptional Home 


-« Bill Smallwood «- ^'']' ^°'°:^ 


Mt. Nebo Grand Lodge, F. 
and A. A. Y. Masons. 253 W. 
fist street, has selected for 
1961 the theme of "Doing 
It in the Comifiunity Where 
It Counts. " 

After their recent tour of 
the building program cur- 
rently under way at the Ex- 
ceptional Children's Home, 
they have voted to make 
this their most important 


charity project of> the >ear 
and Ftarted their program 
off by presenting Mrs. Juan- 
iia Macklin, executive direc- 
tor of the school, with a 
check last Sunday after- 
noon. 

James Smith, deputy 
grandmaster of Mt. Nebo 
Lodge, is spearheading the 
project. Following a visit to 
the school, in wiiich repre- 
ss. "«» 


Tom Bradley's hirthdciy 
today 1 29 1 will get a tribute 
tonight at the Delia dance. 
Fulbright scholar and Phi 
'Beta Kappa Diane Lewis 
(Ursula Phelps' daughter i, 
home from Cornell for the 
holidays, is spending her 
first Yuletido here in five 
years. N^ntana .M(.\oclv's 
home was' the scene for 
Alpha Delta chapter of 
Gamma Phi Deltas Xmas 
party. Effa Manley gave her 
annual birthday partv last 
night <28) for old "budd.v 
Elliot Carpenter. 

'Xmas Eve party hnsts; 
Hazel and Rocky Washjtij' 
ton. Marilyn Holder to 
undergo major .surgerv^ 'l'\\c 
Thirteen Aids and guests a.e 
midday lunching Frid ai 
the Bev. Hilton. Ruby Bnr- 
bce Wilson had a had 
injuring her foot. 

Ghana 'Visitors 
The Mai Whitfiekls 
twc kids arc visiting 
from Ghana, Billy Durossean 
put aside his medical books 
at Howaid U. and jetted to 
the coast for the holidays: 
he finds the nations capital 
captivating. Today (29> is 
anniversary c h a m t> a g n e 
time for Clara and Louis 
Love. The Jimmy Lees hav- 
ing their customary New 
Year's Eve party. 

Ethel Branham found a 


fal 


and 
heic 


wonderful promotion at her 
office awaiting her recent 
return from Africa and 
P!!urope. P'ormer local school- 
marm Diane Watson, teach- 
ing novv in Okinawa, spent 
Xmas ^fortnight between 
."^ i n g i,p o r e. Hong Kong, 
Manila. Bangkok and Tokyo; 
wonder if shp saw Gladys 
Martin in Tokvo. 

Helen (iarrott. who llirivps 
mightily on incessant giddv- 
>ap, takes a deep breath 
and is off again as she 
chairmans ■ the forthcoming 
art exhibit via the National 
I'rban League's local line- 
ufi. .Sue Harbin Bailey in 
town from Carmel holidav - 
ing with her male Cal. 
Louise Beal made it to town 
'for meriy Yule from her 
siudics at .S'Diego State Col- 
lege for Women. 

Huss Aplenty 

Kiid. is Dr. and Mrs. Roy 
.\n(lipw's choice for their 
party night. Linda Graham's 
night-after-Xmas party was 
for Steve Curry, home for 
Xmas from West Point can- 
didate training school in 
ole Virginny. Rosalie Young 
due home from Mexico City 
and the also-there Buddy 
Clays (Marvi will be flying 
in shortly, too. And Dr. and 
.Mrs. Warren Brooks 'Aure- 
lia I jet home next week 

(Continued on Page 10) 


Althea Clark 

Allhea Polk Clark, from 
.\laska, who is visiting her 
parents and daughter for the 
Christmas holidays, was en- 
tertained with a buffet din- 
ner party in the home of 
her mother ^nd -father on 
llalldale last Monday night. 

Scores of Mrs. Clark's 
fiiends attended the affair. 
She will take a Jet flight to 
Detroit on Saturday morn- 
ing before returning to Alas- 
ka. 

.^mong the guests attend- 
ing the parly wore: Mr. and 
Mrs. .\mos (javine. Sidney 
.tackson, Verner Dcckard. Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Greitier. Mr. 
and Mrs. .M. Talbert. Mr. and 
vs. Geo. Bryant. .Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Reeves. Mr. and Mrs. 
Art Johnson, Homer Wood- 
lojv. Mr. and Mrs. John Cal- 
houn, Leona Robinson, Syl- 
via Martin, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd Glenn, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hollingsworth," Mr 
and rs. Major White. John 
Lee. Estcrline Powell, Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert Ward, Oliv- 
ia Page, Bernice Young. Mr. 
and Mrs. Major White, John 
nie Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Clark and Tom Wynn. 



AXXUAL XMAS CHEER— Members of the Medical, 
Dental and Pharmaceutical Auxiliary's Christmas commit- 
tee arc shown preparing baskets ui&t toys, food and cloth- 
ing to bring cheer to several families uho might have gone 
unnoticed. This is an annual project of the group and sup' 
picments their many other community projects. Shown 


from left: Maggie Rauls, chairman; Kate Evans, co- 
chairman: Ethel, Sheen; little Jimmy Rauls uho isn't a 
member of the committee but brings in a lot of toys; Jessie 
Russell and Lenora Hynes. Also a member of the committee 
is Irene Tou'h. (Adams) , * 


senlatives were accompan- 
ied by Stella Burrell, grand 
secretary of the Order of the 
Eastern Star, and Berbha 
Kirby,. worthy matron of 
Ruth Chapter No. 4. they de- 
cided that there are many 
avenues through which their 
organization can help the 
school. 

Mr. Smith, who was re- 
cently elected to his post in 
the lodge, will work out an 
all-year program so that his 
group can sponsor various 
activ-itics to raise funds to 
meet the needs of the school. 

Ira Bolton is grandmaster 
of Mt. Nebo; Rosa Hajrs, 
grand matron of the order 
of the Eastern Star: Caro- 
Ivn Deverouax, Heroine 
g?and matron; PeaJl Reaves, 
national officer, and Weltha 
Bolton, Daughter of Isis. All 
are working in the interests 
of the project. 

Students Give 
Xmas Baskets 

Some fifty East Los Ang- 
eles College students return^ 
ed to the campus from their 
vacation to pack boxes and 
deliver them to some 200 
needy families. 

This community project 
was adopted by ELAC five 
years ago when 35 food 
baskets were filled. The 
amount of the* college con- 
tribution has increased each 
year to the present 200. 

Deltas Annual Ball 

The Delta Sigma Thet* 
Sorority will hold its an- 
nual White Christmas Ball 
at the Hollywood Palladium 
on Thursday, Dec. 29, frcttn 
10 p.m. until 2 a.m. 


i 


r 



Dorothea Foster 



^.nJf %"'^ °"*^ « .^^^ t^° "^ost joyous holiday week- 

home of ERNES^INE^UcK'^ddenti;^ 

are looking fonvard to their January meetlnln 

np^AMf.'J/o^.°"^^ °f M^S. JOHN J0HNs5& 
iday'Srty'S. St^^''^^ ^^^^^ hosted a hoi- 
wSlTHATVT LS ir^^'^ ^''^"'"^ ^^"^ MAEDELLE 
WUKIHAM served eggnogs on Christmas morning. 

The Fun Lasted 

Also. LOUISE and ALLEN GEORGE gathered 
deff^TouTcTi^nSe;'^ ^^^^^^' ^°-"^ -^ late^r fe^'eT'a 
n.„ ^^:f "d MRS. JOHN SOMERVILLE poured egg- 
the^n"n w^H^ "^^"^"^ ^^^"^ ^^ to 1 p.m": Naturaify 
th^ ^T Apvm^^'^oLp^'^ *^^ appointed hours, 
hi. hSt^H^^S,-^^^^^^^^ ^'^^ *" the honor spot at 
VAINO "^ ^'''^" ^^ ^^^ charming wife, 

While RUTH CUNxNINGHAM helped the Eagle 
staff pack and distribute baskets on the night before 
Christmas eve. she raved happily about the party-of 
the Just Friends Club. , 

Big Stocking? 

Happy wasn't the word to describe the faces of 
VERNA RICHARDS and HATTIE SMITH, who wel- 
comed their mom from Springfield, Ohio and an- 
nounced that she liked California so well that she 
will remain. 

MARGARITE HOLLAND seems to be a very 
happy lady since Santa left a beautiful set of lug- 
gage in her stocking. 

JEANETTE and PETE PETRIE gave theii; son, 
JAMES, a new Valiant for Christmas. 

MARGARET and RICHARD JOHNSON complet- 
ed their Eastern tour just in time for the holidays 
and started into the sVCing of things by entertaining 
their Garden Club in their Fontana ranch home. 



'^^ Bill Smallwood •s^l 


from Xmas in 
original Xmas card, that of 
the Lamarr Hills. Darn 
clever. Irene Morris gets 
birthday hugs aplenty Sun. 

(11. 

Xmas in Alaska: Al 
W^alker, who is there for 18 
months with other engineers 
from his aircraft company, 
hard at work on a missile 
project. 

Former local newscribe 
Corrinc Adams Claybrooks 
(she wed a Chica. medic, 
lives there now) will be in 
town soon ; she's to be a 
grandmama this new year 
acomin' up. Tony Hill pack- 
ing his bags for his custom- 
ary Jan. trip to Chi. 

Ethel Bruington and 
"^Bessio Burke have selected 


(Continued from Page 9) -. ■ 'r 

D.C. A most the second Sun. of Jan. tmt 


their luggage shower break- 
fast at Wilfandel. to lend joy 
to bride-to-be Sandra Hos- 
kins who becomes Mrs. 
Alonzo Watkins in mid- 
Feb., as you know by now. 
Shirley Gibbs planes in 
shortly from i her KaySec 
holiday. Chuck Davis planes 
out for Atlanta and More- 
house. V a 1 e n a Broussard 
went to St. Loo. Ethel Bow- 
les holidayirlg in St. Loo. 

Terri Jon«fs, the six-year- 
old Pasadenan who will be 
the first Negro child to rep- 
resent Jackson School in the 
Rose Parade, is the grand- 
daughter of L. A.s Helen 
Duckett Robinson. Terri will 
sit with a Japan^e bo^ on 
the float. i 


SIR DEBVILI.RS CLIJ B—Mnnhrrs are s/wtin flarinf; 
thtir annunl (Jiri.^i/'ias I'tir/y hthl InsI l ridn\' jiif/ht til 
%ihitli they hoii'inil numhrrs 'if the press nlont/ tiilh their 
ii'ires. Shall- n Iron I rtijr from left: Jl'iUic Mae'm. Phil 
Rholen. If es/ey llnnier. ,juist; ll'il/ie Clnndy, president : 


James Lee. Mdniiel Deiiiz tiiul II illuuii C.rniii. Ser'tnd 
ron': Hurry II ells, Aaron Marsluill, nee president ; Don 
Minters. Etiniee Price, Gconie 11 ehh. Snthnniel (Jhoiilenu 
and Ilonard Bradley. (Adams) 



10— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 29. 1960 



Of Travelers ... _ . 

Speaking of traveling and travelers, BERNARD yVITI. irGSlOn 


and CORIS ROBERTS spent Christmas in Las Vegas, 
while JOYCE and WILLIAM WALKER and their 
daughter PATRICIA, spent their holidays with their 
parents in Oakland. 

ATTY. ADOS NICKOLSON of Chicago is en- w D 4- 

joying the California sunshine and our gay holiday AfTlBS r6riy 
party life, of both >of which we have had plenty. ' 

ALICE and STONE^ JACKSON are spending the 
holidays in Palm Springs; and newlyweds JOAN and 
WALLY ANDERSON of San Francisco spent the 
holiday with JOAN'S dad, JOSEPH, and her twin 
brother JOSEPH, JR. and sister PEGGY who just 
returned from teaching school in Nantes, France. 

The attractive trio dining at Puccini's were 
OLIVIA PERKERSON. JESSIE MAE ROBINSON 
and petite L'TANYA GRIFFIN, who is spending the 
holidays in Los Angeles from New York. The trio 
will depart Friday for Phoenix, Ariz, where they will 
spend the New Year's Weekend. 

Starting 1961 Right 

Yesterday, DR. and MRS. GEORGE SEELY 
poured cocktails froom 4 until 6, and later that even- 
ing the Cbuntry Clubbers held their annual Christ- 
mas dance at the Nikabob Restaurant. 

Also, IRMA and CARL WATSON hosted a delic- 
ious buffet and had a holiday chitchat with some 
long time friends. 

To bring 1961 in right, the Couple Club's an- 
nual New Year's eve party will be held at the home 
of ETHEL and AL MADDOX. 

MINNIE MEYEIRS is having many friends and 
relatives in on New Year's day at the ranch home 
of her parents in Perris. 

HESTER and JOE CAVALIER are making elab- 
orate plans for their annual New Year's day party, 
while JAMES and GWEN MOORE will be entertain- 
ing friends at their Pacoima home. 

Among the many balls of the season the Hill- 
toppers will hold their New Year's eve ball at the 
Ambassador Hotel. 

Looking forward to Jan. fl2 when the Rinkey- 
dinks will host their annual ball and I understand 
JOE MALBROUGH is designing some fabulous 
gowns for the girls to wear. 


Holds Lavish 


William Frpolon. who 0|)- 
rrates the cafoteria in E.\- 
position Park, held his an- 
nual Christmas parly in his 
beautiful homo at 1201 
Longwood on Christmas 
night. 

Scores of friends, as well 
as his staff, attended the 
festive occasion and enjo\ed 
Caterers James 'Jimmyi 
Jackson's and Harvey Gill's 
wonderful buffet dinner of 
dishes of all descriptions 
which adorned a long table 
brightly arranged in the tra- 
ditional Christmas manner. 

A four spout champagne 
fountain ran continuousls 
throughout the evening. 
Guests also enjoyed c-ock- 
tails. Serving as waiters for 
the affair were Robert Aub- 
rey Jr. and Ernest Stringer, 
the bartenders were Hubert 
Ledou.x and James Jackson. 

Among the guests attend- 
ing were: O. Estill, John 11. 
Jackson, Lucille Thomas, 
Adaris Williams Florence 
Hunt, Judith Knight, James 
Willis, Joe Durel, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. Chauncy, Mr. and 
Mrs. .Milton John.son, Mr. 
and Mrs. (). D. Jones, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. L. Dean, .Mr. 
and Mrs. W. Tlnonts, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. Holmes, Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl .\ubr\-. 


Fifth Annual Student Art Show 
Slated for Foshay Junior High 


On Wednesda.v. Jan. A, 
.Tames .\. P'oshay Junioi- High 
Scliool. ;j7.'i1 S. Harvard blvd., 
will hold its fifth annual 
.'ludenl art show in tlie aud- 
itorium of the school. 

The art work will he 
grouped, into 10 calegorie.s',/ 
-with a 1st, 2nd and 3rd 
prize ribbon awarded in each 
category. First prize win- 
ners will receive art ma- 
terials. Four grand awards 
will be presented, divided 
into the following divisions: 

A five dollar purchase 
award; PTA award, consist- 
ing of five dollars of art ma- 


terials: Rembrandl award, 
lon^isting r^f five dollars oi 
art materia!: and an associ- 
ated teachers' award. 

Judges lor the four grand 
prizes are: Dr. Vincent La- 
nier, associate profes."-or of 
art ediicationj. Uni\er»ity of 
.'Southern California: HuKh 
R. Foley, principal u[ Fosli- 
a\-; .Mrs. Lycurgus Johnson, 
president df Fo'^has- PT.\: 
and .Miss F.sther TutLmJian 
and .Miss Janet Quirsfeld, as- 
sociate art teachers from 
L'.S.C. doing student teach- 
ing under the supervision of 
Mis. Wildred Hough, chair- 


CIF'I'S I- OR THE ShLDY -De positing Christmas gift! 
in one of the buxis for the Pacific Lodgc Boys Home and 
the .linl'jn Community Center arc Colonel William T. 
Bradley, diflriet engineer for the U. S. Army Engineer 
District. Los Arigeles. and Barbara J (an Harringtorf: see- 
rilnry, iinancc and Accounting Branch. An (innual affair, 
thise mits include toys, clothing, money, canned e/oods, 
iiioceries. etc.. to the institutions uhich are fifirt ol the 
( .'immuiiily Chest program. Colonel Bradley is a rtsidcnt 
Gabriel . residing at, 8345 Josard road, tihilr Bar- 
l>i:ra lives at 1725 Park avenue in the Echo Park district. 


.hiiiy Engineer photo.) 


wian Plans 
General Connmittee'''Meeting for Event 


man of the .\rt Depariment "f S'ln 
a! F('.sMia\'. 

Jud.ces for the lO subject I I' 
. .■ le;,'ories arc: .M..-. .-Mhert \a/ I /-I 

Porter, ait supervisor. Los Neoro Historv WeoK 'Criai'mian 

.\ngeles City .School District: 
.'^Iis Melanie Blocker, art 
trachei" at Carver .Junior 
Hi.!?h: Mis. .Margai.'-i Works, 
an leaclier at D-oisey High; 
Mrs. Phyllis Oster, art teach- 
er Los .-Xngeles City Schools 
i.ow on sabbatical leave; 
.Mrs. Elizabeth Vaugiin. 
school librarian at Foshay 
and an authority on .-African 
art; and Mr. George Venable, 
head counselor at Fosha\-. 


Eagle Staff Enjoys Spreading Christmas Cheer 


Thirty-Eight 
Join Family 
Reunion Party 

At their first reunion since 
their golden wedding anni- 
versary in 1956, thirty- 
eight members gathered to 
welcome Rev. and Mrs. John 
H. Payton from Phoenix, 
x\rizonc% They were ac- 
companied by their daugh- 
ter and her liushand. Hazel 
End Kermit Brown. 

The reunion in the form 
of a family dinner was held 
in the home of Nolan and 
Georgia Payton. son of Rev. 
and Mrs. Payton. 

Among the relatives at- 
tending were John and Lor- 
raine Payton, Ethel arid 
Boyd Pickett, Sally Apne 
Fayton. .^herrie Benson, E.';- 
sie Benson, Flossie Taylor, 
Rudy and Cjmthia Taylor,' 
Verbest Palmer. Meryyn and 
Harriette Beasley and their 
three daughters' families 
Charles and Barbara Ruth 
Bartholomew and son, Jac- 
quelyn Taylor, Kathleen and 
Gray Cole and Izora Smalley 
and family. 


Also Margaret Vainadn, 
Celie Smith, Betty Davis, G. 
Porchc, Mary E. Taylor, Carl 
Lockheart, (J, Bowman, Mr. 
drlJlJ/l T^'V/>Ql>'VltQ and Mrs. Obie Paddo, George 
KJU'H^U JTAtJ^e^Af-f-O Milton, R. S. Lewis, Betty 
/n/-> r\/-\r\ /^-i j . Davison, H. Miller, Mary 

0d,(/UU Check to Jo-T^^. Mackio Martin, C L 

McPhcrson, Adrienne Dung- 
cry Betty Sloan and Maggie 
Hathiaway. 


Urban League 

Presentation of a check for 
S3,000 by Wanda Wiley, 
Guild president to Dr. Le- 
roy Wcekes, Urban League 
Board vice-president, and 
Wesley Brazier, executive 
director, highlighted the 
holiday breakfast attended 
by 150 Urban League Guild 
members and friends Sun- 
day -in the Regency Room 
of the Sheraton West Hotel. 

Speaker of the morning 
was Dr. Marion Holmes, 
professor of art at UCLA. 
Also on the program were 
Mrs. Marnesba T a c k e 1 1, 
Judge Bernard Jefferson and 
Miss Berenice Booker who 
sang a Christmas carol. Mar- 
iar Wilson, first vice-presi- 
dent, reported on two recent 
awards given to the Guild. 

Associate members wel- 
comed into regular member- 
ship of the Guild by Elly- 
nore Adams, membership 
chairman, were: Charlene 
Hampton, Elois Irons, Ella 
Morrison, Thelma Wallace 
and Lucille Ward. 


Events Planned' 

Mrs. James Davis, presi- 
dent of the Centennial FTA 
Chapter, presided over the 
recent meeting of the group's 
brief business meeting. 

Plans were discussed for 
starting a local blood bank, 
and a fund-raising Donut 
Sale for the near future. 


I Continued from Page 9 
the home of Mrs. Arnola 
Ha\-ward. the scene was a 
little different, yet much the 
same. 

When we came walking up 
to the porch, with a basket 
full of food, everjono stood 
SI ill and stared at us. One 
of the children ventured the 
question; 

"Is this for us?" 

When we said. "Yes. ' they 
had no reluctance about 
showing their .ioy and 
appreciation— and another 
f ami 1 y was made happy 
through the help of the 
Eagle and Mrs. Cunning- 
ham's fine organizations. 

Over at the third and last 
iTome. we found Mr. and 
Mrs. fcugene Olden and all 
the meitibers of their family 
in their neat little apart- 
ment. Olden was cutting 
The children's hair, and when 
we announced that we had 
brought a basket for the 
family, he said, with a quiet 
smile and glistening eyes: 

"I ,iust had faith and hope 
and went about cutting my 
little boy's hair." 

We agreed that this was 
one of the best assignments 
we had worked on this .>ear, 
and prayed that in 1961, 
through our wonderful or- 
ganizations, we could make 
every day like Christmas for 
families such as these in our 


c(iminunn\, wjid only neeu ;. 
little help when they are 
down on their, luck. 

It was two days later when 
the Rev. Hannibal came into 
the Eagle office. He had 
been working with churches 
in Studio City and West- 
chester, and hati played the 
role of St. Nick all day 
Christmas and on Monday. 

We were glad to give him 


the names of our new friends 
so that he could complete 
.Santa's kindly chores, and 
we want to take this method 
of salutuig the Rev. Hanni- 
bal who gave up his holiday 
with his famil>- to bring 
cheer to other families. 

V,'c certainly hope that 
these people, and others, will 
find time to visit him at his 
church. 1772 E. 83rd street. 


General meeting of the 
various committees and 
chairmen participating in 
the thirty-seventh annual 
observance of Negro History 
Week (Feb. 12 through Feo. 
19t vvill be held on Tues- 
day evening. January 3 at 
the home of Dr. Roy D. An- 
drews, general chairman, at 
3955 Mt. Vernon Drive at 
8 p.m. 

-Mrs. 'V'assic D. Wright, 
president of Our Authors 
Study Club, the Los Angeles 
Branch of the Association 
for the Study of Negro Life 
and History, in making the 
announcement said this 
vears tlieme, "Freedom and 
Democracy for the Negro Af- 
ter 100 'i'ears," ( 1861-1961 > 
uill depict progress the Ne- 
gro has made during^ this 
period in the week- long ac- 


tivities. being planned. 

Community response has 
been heartening, she said. 
This year's activities will be 
diversified and encompa-s 
many phases of the devel- 
opment of the i Negro eco- 
nomically as well as cultur- 
ally since slavery. 

A Centennial luncheon 
and a beautiful souvenir 
.iournal which will chron- 
icle the Negro's history in 
America will be \wo of the 
highpoir* features of the 
celebration. 

Historians who might 'enr 
hance the journal and per- 
sons interested in placing 
advertisments therein are 
urged to contact Mrs. Wright 
immediately at RE 5-6442. 
January 31 is. deadline for 
all advertising material, 
Mrs. Wright said. 


\ 


Catering 

To Small or Large Groups 

Specializing in all Type of Parties 

Buffet • Cocktail - Dinner 

24-Hour Service — Experienced Personnel 

Bertha Thomas 

and , 

Rose Brown Catering 
4474 Victoria Park Dr. WEbster 9-7215 





SPHINXMEN 


e« ALPHA DIITA CHAMiR of ALFA 
FRATIRNirr, INC.. and WISTWOOD 
•f NAACP 


— Prtsont Their — 



Charity Ball 

FRIDAY, DEC. 30-10 P.M. to 2 A.M. 

^DANNY'S SEXTET 

Playing Your Favorite Dance Music 
Donation $2 — at Door $2.50 Proceeds to NAACP 

FOX HILLS COUNTRY CLUB 

5800 WEST SLAUSON AVENUE 


* 

-k 
-k 

-k; 

-k 

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• 
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-k 


*•••••*••••*******••*••*•*• 


VICTOR 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY 


CLOTHING 
COMPANY 
MA. 4-0801 



MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


BIG SALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 

$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE 6f ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house during ourbig sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREE'!! 
Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3 00 
a week pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for men and 
ooys or all ages. , s; 


NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT 
*Wear and enjoy your clothes while paying* 



.iniii! 


Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREE! 

But act now !!!!!!!! Pay later.. .. 

/ 
SHIRTS now pric^ $4.95 * $6.95 * $8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MOREIIIIIIII 

TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $7.95 ** $9.95 up to $24.95, WORTH MUCn'MOREI 
ALL $30.00 men's suits and top coats Cis no 



$25.00 
$35.00 
$45.00 
$55.00 
$65.00 
$75:00 


ALL $40.00 

ALL $50.00 " " " " 

ALL $60.00 " " " " " 1 

ALL $70.00 " " " " " ,,,,] 

ALL $80.00 " " " " ' i ........... 

ALL $90.00 " " , " " " .... :^ ...... . 

HURRY SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEARIIHIII! 

Park FREE next door as you buy your new dothes. We cater to you, and we do mean 'YOU'" 
Luggage * Watches * Raclios * Play Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 

OPEN DAILY 9:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.M. 


VICTOR CLOTHING CO 


> 

3f 

3f 
3f 




214 SOUTH BROADWAY • IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 


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FAST SERVICE 


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[Id joy 

Hos- 

Mrs. 

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laySee 

Vanes 

lore- 

kssard 

Bbw- 

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has 
said. 

ill bo 
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level- 
eco- 

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Ivenir 
Ihron- 

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the 
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1-6442. 

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TRAD^ 


'yom. HND IT IN THE WANT ADS! 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 

New China Club 


AX. 5-3135 


«>_ 


Will Play Host 
New Year's Eve 

Angelenos wishing to make 
the New Year's Eve Cham- 
pagne Flight to the New 
China Club in Reno, Nevada, 
may make reservations as late 
as noon Friday, Emerson 
Smith, vice-president of the 
DeVoc Travel Agency, said 
this week. 

Profitable Package 

In issuing his "last call for 
a lucky New Year's Eve," 
Smith added: 

"This flight to Reno shapes 
up as one of the best enter- 
tainment buys of the year. 
Under the sponsorship of New 
China Club owner Bill Fong, 
Angelenos are l)eing offered a 
package that includes cham- 
pagne and food aloft, dinner 
in Reno, free refreshments in 
Reno, free presents for the 
ladies,cash refund, and sou- 
venirs for everyone." 

The New Year's Eve flight is 
the first of a series being 
sponsored by Fong and the 
New China Club, Reno's fam- 
ed interracial csisino. 

Cheaper Than Walking 

Cost of the flight— $3C plus 
tax — is actually less than half 
tlie cost of usual first-class 
air trips to Reno. All flights 
will be made bj luxurious 
Convairs, with ptetty steward- 
esses in attendance. 

For additional information, 
call Emerson Smith at the 
DeVoe Travel ■ Agency, 2610 
Crenshaw blvd., REpublic 

i-nea 

See Display' Ad on Page 8) 


1-llOAl NOTICES 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


1 1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


(The California Eagle) 
38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 436-714 
In the Superior Court of the 
Male ol California, in and for thi> 
County of Lo.s Angelrs. In the 
r'Jatter of the Estate of Delia Mc- 
Kee. Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given to fred- 
Itorj having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
undersigned at the office of his 
Attorne>s. Miller, Maddox & Ma- 
lone. 2821 South Westprn Avenue 
m the Cit.v of Los Angeles, in the 
aforesaid County, which latter of- 
fice is the place of bu.siness of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchers must b- 
11 ea or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 

Dated : Dec. 22. 1960 
MILLER, MAOOOX A. MALONE 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenu* 
Los Angelet. California 
RE. 1-4143 

THOMAS M. McKEE. JR. 
Administrator of the Estate 
pt .said decedent. 
(Publish In the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. 196CI, 
Jan. 3-12. 19€1) 


Hearings to Resume 

WASHINGTON, Dec. 19 — 
The Commission on Civil 
Rights will resume its hear- 
ings in March into denials of 
the right to vote in Louisiana, 
Chairman John A. Hannah 
announced this week. 

I -LEGAL NOTICES 


37010 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-255 

In the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the 
County of Loa Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
JAMES A. (JREE.N'. Deceased. 

Notice i.s bTehy given to credit 
ors having claim? ai;ainst the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of her Attorney. Vinct 
.Monroe Townsend, Jrr. 223 We«t 
Jlorence Avenue, in 4.he City of 
Los Angeles, in the aforesaid 
County, which latter office is the 
place of busines.s of the under- 
siened in all matters pertaining to 
.*aid estate. Such claims with the 
necessary voucher.^ must be filed 
or presented as aforesaid within 
si.v months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice. 
Dated December 5. 1960 

ELLA H. GREEN. ' 
I-;.xecutir.\ of the will 
of .^aid decedent. 
Vine* Monroe Townsend, Jr. 
Attorne-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenus 
Los Angeles 3, California 
PL. 8-5309 

(Published in Uie California 
Eagle Dec. 8. 15. 22, 29. 196U.) 

(The California Eagle) 

38225 

»MOTICE OF HEARING OF 

PETITION FOR PROBATE 

OF WILL 

No. 437-158 

In the Superior Court of the 

State of California, in and for the 

Countv of Los Angeles. In the 

Matter of the Elstate oi Annie V. 

Henderson. Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given that the 
petition of Carrie Washington for 
the Probate of the Will of the 
above-named deceased and for the 
issuance of Letters testamentary 
thereon to the petitioner to which 
reference is hereby made for further 
particulars, will be heard at 9:15 
o'clock a.m.. on Jan. 13. 1961. at 
the court^ room of Department 4. 
of the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the Count.v 
of Los Angeles. City of Los An- 
geles. 

Dati-d: Dec. 21. 1960 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
miEast Vernon Ave. 
Los Angeles.' Calif. 
AD. 2-6149 

Attorney for Petitioner 
HAROLD J. OSTLY. 
I'ountv Clerk and Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and 
for the Countv of I^os Angeles 
K^ A I. CRAHAM. Deputy 
* Piihli...h in tile California Eagle 
.Newspaper Drc. 29. I960: Jan. 5, 
.)an 12. 1961. 



322 West Manchester Blvd. 
Manchester & Broadway 

JUST MINUTIS AWAY VIA 
HARtOR FRilWAY 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

Plenty of Frme Parking 

New Bargain ^fc 
Admission . J 

YUL BRYNNM - 
STEVE McQUEEN in 

"MAGNIFICENT 

SEVEN" . 

PLUS SKOND HIT 

"Wizard of Baghdad" 

Attend^Gala 

FAMILY NITE 

EVERY TUESDAY 
ADULTS 50c 

Children Fr*« Wh«n 
Accompanied by Paronts 


38019 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 
LOS ANGELES 
No. 3J3420 
Notice of Hearing of Petition to 
Borrow Money and Execute Deed 
of Trust 
In the Matter of the Estate of 
ARTHUR C. CHAPPELL 
Deceased 
Notice is h e r e h v given that 
Bertha Chappell. Admlnislrati.v of 
the said estate, has filed herein 
her verified petition praving for an 
order authorizinE the petitioner to 
borrow money and execute a deed 
of trust upon real estate herein- 
after described: and that Novem- 
ber 29, 1961, at 9:13 a.m.. in th" 
fornla. in and for the Cotiniy ol 
Los j^ngele.s. Department 4 thereof, 
has been appointed a.s tiie time and 
place for hearing of said t)clition. 
when and where any tiersoii,< inter- 
ested in the said estate mav ap- 
pear and object to the Kranti'ng ol 
.said petition. 

Keterencp is hereby made to the 
-aid petition for lurther partic- 
ular;. 

Said ical estate i.< situatcil in tlie 
County of Los AnttPlc.-. State of 
California, and is descrit^ed as fol- 
lows : 

Lot 47. ^8 and 49. Block E. .-^lark.s 
Palm Tract as shown on map rec- 
orded in Book 8. Page 98 of .Vlap^^. 
office of the County Reorder of 
said Count \. 

Dated January 6. 1961 
Edward S. Hardwick 
Attorn«y.at-Law 
1518 E. 103rd St. 
Lot Angeles 2. Calif. <^« 
Harold J. Ostly. 
County Clerk and Clerk of 

said Superior Court. 
By A. L. Graham. Deputy. 
Publish in California Ka^le news- 
paper. December 22-29. 19611 


38011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 

AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of the E.stale of 
WALTER SNELL 
Deceased 
Notice Is hereby siven to credit- 
ors having claim.s asain.st the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
undersigned at the office of her 
Attoney. 

-VIACEO G. TOLHERT 
4272 South Central Avenue 
in the City of Los Angeles U. in 
the aforesaid County, whicn latter 
office i.s the place of busine.-.s of 
the undersigned in all matters per- 
taining to said ettate. Such claims 
with the necessary vouchers must 
be filed or presented a.s aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 1 

Dated December 19. 19(». j 

Maeeo G. Tolbert 
Attorney-at-Law 
4272 South Central Avenue 
Lot Angeles 11. California. 
Matilda M. Snell 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
Publish in California Ea;1e news- 
paper Dec. 22-29. 1950: Jar*< 5-12. 
1961. 

36592 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 435-255 
In the Superior Court of ilie 
State of California, in and for the 
Countv of Los Angeles. 
In the Matter of the Estate of 
JAMES A. GREEN 
Deceased 
Notice Is hereby triven to credit- 
ors having claims asain.sl the said 


decedent to file said claims in the 

office of the clerk of the aforesaid 

i-oiirt or te pre.sent them to tlie tin- 

flcrsigncf! a the office of her allor- 

nev 

Vl.vri; MO.VROR TO\VNi5ENn. jr. 

223 West t-~]oreni-e Avenue 
in the rii\ of Los .An^ele.s -. in III'- 
aforesaid County, whicli latter of- 
fice is the place of business of the 
iindersigncd in all iiuittrr.5 pertain- 
ins to said estate. Such claims with 
the neccs.^-ar.v voucher."^ mu--t br 
filed or pi'c.sented ay aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated: Decemhcr 5. I960 

ELLA H. GfiEEN. 

E\erutri\- of thecwill of saiil 
dccr-dpnt. 
Vl.N'CE MONP.Oi; TOWNSEND. Jr. 
.Mtorncv'-at-Law 

22'! West Kloronce Avenue 

I,ns Angeles 3. California. 

n,. R-5""f) 
1 Ptil'li.-;h ill California Eaj?lp news- 
paper Dernmber 8-1"i-22-29. 19Bn. 

i 36951 •' 

NOTICE OF THE SALE OF 

REAL PROPERTY AT 

PRIVATE SALE 

No. 409424 
In the .'Superior Court "f 'be 
.Slate of C.nlifoniia. in and for thf 

jCounlv of I^os .\nKrlc.s. 

j In tlic Mkttrr of the Estate of 

jANDELLAR AVOOD. Deceased. 

I Notice i.s hercbv civen that the 
under.signed Executor of the Es- 

1 tale of Andellar Woods. decea.= cd. 

; will .sell at private sale, to the 
hislic.st birldcr. upon tlic terms 

I and conditions hereinafter men- 
tioned and subject lo lonfirmation 

t ti>' the saiil Svipcrior Court, on or 
after the 23rd da> of December. 

I 19{;ii. at the office of \"inc-e Mon- 
roe Tov,n;end. .Ir.. .\tiorney for 
the Executor. 22.'} West Florence 

I Avenue. City 'of Lo< .\n:cles 3. 
Counu of l.o.s Angeles. 'State of 
California, all tlie risht. title anil 
interest of said de(o:isifl at the 
time of death and all the liglit. 
title anil incrc«l that thf> esate of 
.-aid drrcasfii has aciiuired h.\ 
niteratioiv of la^v O'- otherwise, 
other than fir in addition to tha' 
of -.liil dcii:i.'r,l at tlif time of 
rif-atli. in and to all that certain 
real property i.aniculariy described 
a.s follows. lo-wi!: 

Lot li;.") of tialton Orange Grove 
Tract, a- per .truip rfroi'dnd in 
i:ook 2. Pagp 100 of Official Rec- 
ords of Los Angeles County. .State 
of Californi;i. .More rommonh 
known as I,l.?ii East 23rd street'. 
Lo- Aiigrlr-. ("alifornia. 

Terms of Sak: Ca^ii In lawful 
money of the I'niteil States on con- 
fiinijition of sale, or part ra-li aiv' 
balan'-e c\ idenred b.\- note .secured 
by mortgage or Trust Deed on the 
property so sold. Ten per rent of 
amount lid to be dcpo.sited with 
bid. 

Bids or offers to be In writing 
and will lie received at the afore- 
said office ai any time after the 
rir-t piiblifalioii her^o^ anrl before 
date of s.ile. Januarv 6. 1961. 

vi;f:i;i:L i, j;renson 

i;xenilor oi" tlie Estate 

of .said decedent. 
Vince Monroe Townsend 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Los Angeles 3. California 
Attorney for Executor 

(Published in the Californi 
Eagle Dec. S. 15. 22. 29. 19Gii.) 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


state ff California in and for the j 
CoiMi'v of Lo.i Angf'li-'s. 
Paled I'lc. (, 1960 

BALDO M. KRISTOVICH 
Public Administrator 
a.s admiiii.-^trator of the 
estate of said decedent. 
.\l.-\dison ..S-9211 
iPtihlished in California Eagle 
Dec. 8. 13. _ '22. 29. 1960) 

|«UMW7kNTED^^^FEMALE 


WOMAN 
EXPERIENCED 

Apt. house mgr, for 16-unit 
bidg. No chiidr%n. 3 room 
furn. apt. and salary. Call Ed 
Stanley. 

MA. 8-0211, Ext. 714 
Week Days 

moniFtoToan 

Combine Your 1 st 

and 2nd Trust Deed 

at a Reasonable Cost. 

Also 1st and 2nd 

Trust Deeds 

Bought and Sold. 

AX. 2-7088 
Rl. 8-3572 

EXPERT BEAUTY TREATMENT 


BEAUTY OPERATOR WANTED 

RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaufe Shoppe 

OPERATOR WANTED 
4919 W«tt Adams Blvd. 
Lot Angeles 16, Calif. 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 The California Eagle-1 1 


EUBANKS STUDIOS ^^^^ent 

Voice, Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sighttinging. 

I PL. 2-1179 


HOUSES FOR RENT FURNISHID 


INSTRUCTIONS-SCHOOLS 

Adjusters Train 

At Local School 

The Adjusters and Investiga- 
tors Training Center, Inc., 601 S. 
Rampart Blvd., is training hun-' 
dreds of personnel who work on 
the millions of claims filed in 
the United States annually, stated 
George Roberts, manager. 

Roberts said that about one- 
hundred-million claims are filed 
every year by insurance agen-' 
cies, railroads, airlines, finance 
companies, steamship lines, and 
others, and the opportunities in 
this field are unlimited. The de- 
mand exceeds the supply of 
trained investigators, according; 
to Roberts. 

The field offers excitement,; 
good pay, and a fine future, ac-i 
cording to Roberts, who urges 
young people to look into ai 
career in investigation. I 


I FURNISHED ROOMS TO RENT 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The People's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4*9346 


2 — ONE Bedroom apts. West- 1 <t] 2 -SO VJoe>\e Iv/ 
I side. Call RE. 3-9826 after 5 ^ ' ^■-'^ VVeeKiy 

prn. j Separate cottage, utilities 

UNFURNiSHED~APARTMENf iP*''^' children and pets wel- 

FOR RENT come. 

I '—. 

$75-Brand new unfurn. 1 ^^- ^-O^^^ 

bedrm. apartment with; HOUSES « APIS. WANTED 
garbage disposal, utilities I — 

pd. 528 West 78th St. II FREE SERVICE!!! 


or 2 children accepted. 
Inquire at Apt. 8. 


FURNISHED ROOM 
FOR RENT 

Two clOHii pleasant rooni^. use 
of up.siair.-. kitrhens. Rpfinpd. 
cmplo.vpd men. Rca.*;. Call e\es. 

RE. 5-8783 


WESTSIDE APARTMENT 

$85 Mpnth 

2 large bedrooms, 
5 rooms unfurnished. 
1 teenager welcome. 

Near everything. 

Beautiful stucco unit.. 

At 2020 Harcourt. 

Call WEbster 4-0975 
or WEbster 1-8046 


(California Eagle) 
I 37080 

I NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 433710 
In tlic Superior Coun of tlic 
.■^late of California, in and for thp 
I Count.v of Lo.'i .-\n^rlc.-, in the 
I .Mattf-r of ilip K.>tatc of Ivory 
i Simon. DGrfa.scil. .Votico is liPrctiv 
jciven by ttip undcr.-iined. Ualik' 
[M. Kristovich. Puiiiic Admini.-;- 
trator. as Administrator of the i;s- 
tr.ie of ivory .'^iinon. Deceased, to 
j the Creditors of. and ail persons 
' havin.c: claims against the .said 
decedent, to present them, with 
the necessary \ouchers, within six 
months after the first publication 
of this notice, to the said Admin- 
istrator at his office at 437 South 
Hiil St.. f.os Angeles 11. Califor- 
nia, which .said offi<e the under- 
signed selects as a place of busi- 
nesf, in all matters connected witii 
said estate.' or to file them, with 
tlie necessary vouchers, within si\ 
months after the first publication 
ot this notice, in the office of the 
C'erl- ( : the Superior Court of the 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

S543V3 HOLMES AVENUE ! 
It now open for business and of- 
fering expert beauty care from 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap- 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, 
general operator. | 

LU. 1-5227 

Elte CTRlCAl REPAIRING I 

WE SPECIALIZE in all elec- 1 
trical work. Large or small, 
old or new. Reasonable and | 
reliable. WE. 9-0900. ! 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


MEN - WOMEN 
•^ 18 - 45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 

HEAVY 
I EMPLOYMENT 'OPPORTUNITY 

I GET BROCHURE NOW! 
I ADJUSTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART. L.A. 57 


$1 Day and up 

1007 East 50th St. 
Stacious Eastside private 


I UNFURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 

$65 Per Month 

Unfurnished house. Newly deco- 
rated. 2 large bedrooms, wall 
I r4oms, with private entrances, to ■>«all carpeting. Real fire- 
' place. Children welcome. 

icooking facilities. Between 2 „ 

j I AXmmster 2-0458 
jniajor buslines. West of Cen- " 

tral. Near schools, churches, * ^""N. HOUSE FOR RENT 


shopping. 

WE. 5-0485 


TO LANDLORDS. 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside. 
4020 South Western Avenue 
AX. ^-1991 

ACREAGE FOR SALE 

KERN CO. LAND 

10 acres, 5 miles west of Rosa- 
mond. Good soil, shallow water, 
igood neighbors. Only $5000,' 
$1000 dn., $60 per month. 
THOMAS REALTY CO. 
1223 West Avenue I 
Lancaster, Califftrnia 
WHitehall 3-149* 

j REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 

I $695 Down 

i 

VACANT 

5 roonn, 2 bedroom 

; Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwood floors. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-4156 


FURN. APT. FOR RENT 

OWN HOME 
BY RENTING 


3 LARGE BEDROOMS ! 

I $85 per month rents a roomy, j^coME PROPERTY FOR SAlt 
6 room, 3 bedroom house. Wesf-i^ 

■ , side location. Carpeting includ-j 

. ed. Washing machine available.] 
Children invited. Ideal for family! 
living. Near everything. ' 


DU 8-7163 


$1000 DOWN 

EXCELLENT 
COMPTON AREA " 
2-2 bedrms., 2-3 bedrms. We 
will sell four such bidgs. only 
to responsible parties who will^ 
live in the bIdg. , and care for! 
them. Properties will bring no' 
immediate earnings but an 
equity will be built up as timef 
goes on. Start now lo build a 
comfortable future. Principals, 
only. 

CONTACT HELLERMAN ' 
5400 WILSHIRE BLVD. 
WEbster 8-2451 • 



u J . -. u J u • HOUSES FOR RENT UNFURN. 
Modernistic 2 bedroom hemes in 

Compton. Own by renting- and' C:£ir\ r\r\ 

save. Excellent opportunity for: ^oU.UU 

responsible party who wants his 

own home. Conveniently located Rustic 6 room, 3 bedroom 

on West Cressey Street off Wll- ^ouse, yard for children, pets 
mington, |ust north of Rosecrant. i ' '^ 

Call for information. jO. K. 

Murray 1-0116 1 


AX. 2-0458 


DUPLEX 
$500 Down 

$10,950 full price. 

Income $110 per month. 

Only 6 years old. 

Best buy of the week. 

Be independent for lift. 

NE. 2-8461 



BUSINESSMEN FROM TIjtE SANTA MONICA, OCEAN PARK and VENICE BAY AREAS FIRMLY RESOLVi 

to go all ojut to merit your continued patronage during the next year. 

Nctiiing will be left undone that will add to your pleasure* and satisfaction. 

KEEP BAY AREA DIRECTORY HANDY and PATRONIZE CALIFORNIA EAGLE ADVERTISERS 


HAVE PROPiklY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE O^EED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

Licensed and Bonded Real Bstate Broker 


BILL & SILVERIO'S FLOWER SHOP 

AND NURSERY 


Formerly With Rayal Howsiian Hettl. Heneiuiu 


C Coniplelc J'lnral .S.'r\ icp • 

' Kloupr.'i Wired 

EXbrook 5-2235 
1 938- 14th Street 



»,.andplan for your future! 

Let one of Broadway Federal's courteous savings 
specialists show you how to open your savings 
account. He'll acquaint you with our new high rate 
of earnings— now 4 4 5o per annum paid four times a 
year; with all accounts insured in perfect safety. 
He'll plan with you for a consistent savings 
program. He'll start your dollars working for you 
to help you reach your goals. Come in and join 
the Broadway Federal family of successful savers. 
Or open an account by mail. Either way, we're 
happy to serve you. 



rlalio and Indoor Planlings 
.\ny«hrrc' 

EXbrook 5-7044 

Santa Monica 


LINK VAUGHN 


VAUGHN PRINTING & LITHO 

PHONE EXbrook 5-5168 

1516 THIRD STREET 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 


ALLEN MAINTENANCE CO. 

1453 SIXTEENTH STREET 

EX. 4-4748 SANTA MONICA 


MILTON GOTTLIEB 

8 OAKMONT DRIVE 
LOS ANGELES 49, CALIFORNIA 


INVESTMENTS 


GRinite 2-5389 


CURRENT 
ANNUAL KATE 
PAID QUARTERLY 



BROAD^VAY 

PBDBRAL SAVINGS 

and Loan Association 

45th and Broadway • ADams 2-4271 


MITCH BASILA 


REAL ESTATE 

ASSOCIATID WITH 

JACK SIMMS & Associates 

817 Pice Blvd., Santli Monica, Calif. 
EXbrook 4-4&29-EXbrool( 4-120: 


REAL ESTATE 


SAMUEL D. 


Ret. EXbrook 9-5621 


MYERS BROS. CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS 


MICHAEL tCHINOSE 

CONSTRUCTION 
SUPERINTENDENT 


3407 San Fornande Road 
Phono Clinton «-31t1 
lei Angeles 65, Calif. 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


YASNEY 


ERNEST AUERBACH 
S06 Wlithire Blvd., 


EX 3-2737 


CO., REALTORS 
Sa^la Monica, Calif. 

Homa: 01 6-4806 


EX 5-4335 

\ 


HAND CM[ WASH 


V/a 


Polish- 
Steam Clean 

BENNIE WIL 
729 Montana Avo., Sar^ta 


But. EXbrook 5-2465 

SCOTT & VAjDNAIS 

OK RUBBER WELDERS 


Trtad 


New & Use(jl 
Recapping & 

E. L 

2723 Santa Monica Blvd., 


EXbrook 5-1649 


Rett EXbrook 3-2391 


MACK & SONS SERVICE 

UNION OIL - STOPWEAR LUBRICATION 
WASHING - TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 


Harichol & Stanley Youngor 
Proprietors 


1935 %r—4way 
Santa Monica 


EX 3-6421 


X 

Motor 
lAMS 

Monica, Calif. 


Rat. EXbrook 4-4516 


Tires 
Truing 


VADI4AIS 


Santa Monica, Calif. 


Sweet Daddy's Nile Life Cafe 

FAMOUS FOR FINE FOODS 

TEXAS CHILI (OUR SPECIALITY) 

CONTINUOUS (LIVE) ENTERTAINMENT 


EX 4-9950 

J. B. Blackman, Prep. 


1710 Olympic IM. 
Santa AAenica, Calif. 


Painting of All Kinds Steeplejack Work 

J. AND C. WINDOW SER\^E 

• Dust and Water Proofing 
' • Caulking of All Kinds 
• Cauking All Roofs 

JEFFERS AND COOPER 
1547 ANAHEIM ST., HARBOR CITY, CAUP. 


i 


■ •-,i*wiij ,..i.ium ^^f^i^^m^mm^mm^ 


12— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 29, I960' 


'Phil Gordon Makes th 


ic- 


m YORK SCENE 


• a •PEOPLE & PLACES* « • 


ft-.- 


%:■■ 


I 1 


WHOLE 
HAMS. 


FULL 

SHANK 

HALF 


HAPPY .\EW YEAR TO YOU ONE AND ALL'" 

cift hIIIv '^' ■'"■''^* •'^'■'^^ **^ P^'"^'*'^- '^^^^^^- di""ors. Msitor. 
E.ft dehvermg and work here as evorvwhero i„ ,ho u -; iu, -' 

nnnrvr! ^'^■•'.^»'"*-% "°"day season. I am back a, I^.Sth S . 

With the manager, Phil Gross- ?> — ._. 

man. Henry-, the owner, and! LOVED ONES Lets loallv 

all the bo\-s, Billy Mason, ' make 1961 choup' 

Kenny Keene. Harold » Irving i 

and Al Butterfield. We are 

having a hall and seeing some 

pretty frightening sights as' 

w» serve the 'juice' to the' 

revelers. 

Fams and Spaces 

The Monday Night Camp 
Fund Third Annual Christmas 
Party at Brankers was 51 huge 
success, with a full-campli- 
rnent turnout of- bar-owners, 
lirjuor salesmen, bartenders 
and barmaids, ho.stos-ses. re- 
sort-owners, entertainers and 
lust nice, interested people 
like: Rose Yuen, of the Ren- 
ney. Fannie Pierre, of the 
Dawn. Frankie Bizell. Walter 
Beeman, .\ II e n Peterson, 
Madeline ,1- Harold Jones. 
Rose Simmons, .^ddfe Pullon. 
Tondelayo. "Cookie." etc. TV 
star Lonnie Sattin rendered a 
few fine songs, and Rudy 
Rutherford and the combo 
kept the music .^winging or 
relaxed, fpr the benefit and 
dancing pleasure of all. Mr. 
Sr Mrs. Gegrge Palmer and 
all of the Camg Fund Com- 
mittee acted as hostesses and 
served the turkey. ham. 
potato salad, baked beans, 
and other delicious food, while 
the beverages flowed freely 
land for FREEi all Through 
the night. It was real fun. and 
mo.«it gratifying to be there 
and to emcee the testis ities. 
Sounmy Davis Tops 

Sammy Davis, Jr. is cook 
ing' at The Copa. and keeping 
Jules Podell happy by packing 
the hou.se and sending them 
hU away smiling. Count Basic. 
Joe Williams & Co. are\ving 
ing afong. but swingingly. at 
Birdland, on their last engage- 
ment together before, it is re- 
ported that Joe Williams will 
be leaving Basie to start on 
his own. as a single. We cer- 
tainly wish the best of every- 
ahjng to Joe, as he is one of 
the 'boss' vocalists in the 
country and deserves top bill- 
.ing and money, along with the 
Johnny Mathis, Billy Eck.stine, 
Nat Cole. Sammy Davis, Jr., 
and others, group. 

Counting Our Blecsinga 

Santa Claus was very good 
(to me this year, and I think 
1961 is going to be even bet- 
ter, so I'll be able to get 
around a lot and keep all you 
misplaced New Yorkers, now 
in sunny California, informed 
of the many happenings on 
the New York Scene, as well 
as letting the local gentry 
know that lack-of-activity was 
not why you may now be liv- 
ing in L.A. or points there- 
abouts. New York is still the 
ONLY CITY IN THE WORLD, 
so there . . . But the West 
c:oa.«t is fast trying-to sneakp 
up on us, and. I love >ou one 
and all out there for just^ hav-,^ 
ing so much heart!!! 

Now don't hate me so much 
XTTU don't even want to wish 
rne a HAPPY NEW YEAR like 
I did for vou. I was only 
TELLING IT LIKE IT ARE!! 
Byne for now. FRIENDS AND 

DINAH WASHINGTON — She 

doesn't know it but after the 
Western Avenue Women Golf- 
ers paid a $.300 tab to catch 
her show they weren'.t allowed 
to keep the lush at S3.5 per. 
and were forced to leave it 
In the kitchen. That's one 
group you just can't afford to 
be angry with because the> 
reallv know their clubs! 


'Continued from Page 7) I 

'Will find her always working 
in soine manner tr\ing to help 
the other gu.v and it makes 
lier no-ne\cr-mind if it be in 

Watts, Central .Avenue, West- 
ern avenue, Baldwin Hills or 
Rpxoily Hills, and for the 
•biollira-s'' she counts licr.splf 
in to help, but for social 
;-limbino; she bows our giaci- 
ously and lets the fools rush 

in ! 

NOTICING — When \ ou caUh 
PHIL GORDON I (lodoi.s like L. C. Nichols. 


William Madison, Joe Howard 

and Roy Andrpws walking 
pa.^^t those big super-markets, 
s;oiiig to the small communit.v 
market.';, liquor -.store-s arid hoi 

dng Stands, etc., they ain't 
cra/.cc, they're showing that 
our community is no stronger 
than, its weakest links and 
.-^ince our weakest link is not 
supporting community busi- 
ness, that is preciselx' u'hy 
ihe\- make it a habit to sup- 
port them! 
EARL ANTHONY — E.\ in aga- 


'WABREN 


zine writer is 

ftor for Jazz 
Zebra Lounge 
bo.Ncr Rav A 
SAMMY 

official was 
Antler of th 
Rulers Counci 
f;oldon West 
cidcntally hi 
opened a spa 
in the 5500 

.Vclams! 
predictions!— Th 


I Cooper, Nelson 


i^ftop <:>^nd t^ave 4^^t U Urittiynart jj~or CL^vcr\fda\f i^pecials 


KHJ'^AD.o^s FEAtuREs TH^ PERRY ALLEN SHOHIT 


prorriotion direc- 

Sound and the 

; he is kin of 
thony! 

Top Klks 
reelected Chief 
• Past E.xalted 
1 No. 41 of the 

Elks Lodge. In- 

sister just 

US liquor store 

block on W. 


CIO 


lat in '61 Joe 
Creswell and 


Tricky Davis will come up 

with a job! 

ADRIENNE DUNGEE — New 

comer to city who strolls like 
a four figured fashion model 
was one of the most di.scusscd 
topics during that Xmas party 
the other eve and the surprise 
was who has those big eyes 
for her! 

ZERA COLLIER— She and her 
pastman hubby spent this 
Xmas making others happy, 
foregoing their usual personal 
gifts to each other! 


"Chazz' Soundtrack 7^ I 

fConlinued from Page 8i '■•Jparing the decks tot]§^ 

notices pouring in for the hilarious New Year's Eve liash. 
"Only in America" play that . . . I>cgal secretary BEBMQ^ 
bowed in locally the other I PARKS is thrilled no end, "Bpr 
night. But we've got to see the folks back home gifted 'hj|f 
hunk of theater to find out vvith a mink stole for Xmii. 
about the part that describes She's the personable yooDg 
a "Negro Vertical Plan" to lady who works for At^. 
offset segregated .schooling in ^ NEW CHINA CLUB in R^i4: 

the south. The writer lam -; §0 (»vhy not a press junket for 
poons the situation saying it's the 4th Estaters or do 'you 
alright for Negroes to stand i". ink we're afraid of the sklMI 
up but not "sit in"' so they 1 after those traffic accident^? 
can go to .integrated schools . . . It iust came out wti^ 
where the desks are remved. ' JOHNNY MATHIS has such 
Hull???? . . . Yeah, it kind of perfect diction. He w«i h 
wrecked us. too; speech rnaior in the college Ih* 

The LEON BRATTONS are, attended in San Frandsco. 7 


t^ltop 4^/^ncl i^ave 4S/^t *J Uriftimart j^or Cl^verxfdau t^pecUtUt 



FARMER JOHN'S FULLY COOKED OR LEE'S SKINNED ^^ 

HAMS 


FEATURING VAN DE KAMP'S 


SUNNY VALLEY 


LARGE 
GRADE *'A" 



.49^ '■ ^"^ 


VICTOR BORCE F = 07!M 

9AME HENS 

16 OZ. T^O* 
BOX M MeM. 




CANNED HAM 19 


LB. 
TIN 


$ 


6 


MORRELL'S YORKSHIRE 

SLICED 

BACON 


4c OFF DEAL ' 

LOG CABIN 


SYRUP 


/ 


CINCH 


HOT CAKE 
MIX 



BONELESS BRISKET- 


FROZEN 

OVEN-READY 

20-24 LBS. 


CORNED 
BEEF 

57it>. 

U.S.D. A, GRADE '"A" O'VEN READY 4-5 LBS. 

FRESH YOUNG DUCKLINGS 

- - -PO R K LOINS 

ROASTS i CHOPS 

WHOLE OR it Ac ! CENTER CUT 

RIB HALF ^y. 

END 
SIX RIB CUT 


U.S.D, A. GRADE "A" CALIFORNIA BRAND 

TOM 
TURKEYS 

39: 

45: 



JERSEYMAID 


SOUR CREAM 


OIN & RIB 

RIB 
END 


75! 


Santa Monica 

iContinup from Page -i' 
are al.'^o gue.et.'s of their moth- 
er. .Mrs. K. MK'ann of 6-12 
Brooks avenue. 


New Bethel Bapti.-vt Church 
will hold a watch night meet- 
ing on Saturday. Dec. .31. from} 
JO p.m. until 12 midnight. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. VV. C. Lee, 661 | 
Vernon avenue, jetstrcamed to 
Dallas 10 \ i.-^il ^fnend.s and 
relatives for ihe ho!ida\s. 




COUNTRY STYLE RIBS 49 


HALF SLICED 


QUAIL BRAND 

VV 


piNEAPPLife Pork & Beans 


IMPORTED 1/5 (JT. BTV. , 

DON CARLOS RUM 

CARTIER IMPORTED 

FRENCH 

BRAND 


/ JANE ANDERSOM-8 0?. Pxi. 

' SLICED CHEESE 

AMERICAN-PIMIENTO-SWlSS . . 



3^*1 


ALPS IMPORTED SLICED 

SWISS 

HEESE 




LB. 

_ )^ ^^^H ^^^^^i^^^^^ ^L^ BAG 

HJRMOMOl'S — Rrn- 

Uttcs (tt<^nll set to be seen 
find henrd as they puss nlung 
the musirni nnrd Siniday, 
Jetnuarv 1, at the Pnl Ind- 
ium, along uilh Karl Bos- 
tic's band who nill he on j 
hfind to make music grfnid 

for folh'ners of Ray 2600 South Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles - 3621 South La Breo, Los Angeles - 609 North D lion, Los Angeles - 6«40 La Tijera, Westchester - 7980 We«t Sunu* llall»w««^ ami 
Ckarles. (See display.) Canyon Blvd., North Hollywood - 8440 Lincoln Blvd., Santa Monica - 7985 Santa Monica lllvd., Hollywood - 3217 West Magnolia, Burbank - 11210 1 onta Monj collyj' "t juila 


SALES PRICES EFFECTIVE AT ALL THRIFTIMART MARKE1 S CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN iVIRY NII6HBORHOOD: 


i 


V 


/ 


\ ■ ■ 


\k 


4 


*L^ 


\ ' i 


^- 


PIRATES PITCHER SHOT 


NAACP Leader Gets 


— Segregated Casting Ends — 




Top Housihg 



CAI.r fr O R.N I A 


Vol. LXXX-No. 42 "• 



^"i? *» eaaaoNv sot k 

■ - - M 



THE IMPORTANT NEWSPAPER 

'^il' iiMMI TMIifliimn 1 i ulTMinW 
2101 W. yERNON AVE., LA. 8, CAL. Thursday, January 5, 1961 


10 


AX. 5-3135 


Out-of-Town 


15c 


Dr. Curtis King 
Burial Thursday 


il.VD OF .-/.\ ERA — Sircni A xlrtis cclcJtrntcd llirir 'cnl'iiy ot rr unn i/tilcd institif/ uhrn 
thc\ appeared for rioistralion at Central (jastui// nii llollyii'ind hlvd. I'lieiday inonuiif/. 
.Mern/ifrs and nifircrs nt I nternali'jnal .Irtists. uliuh larricd rm /lie (ii/ht ai/ainst Jim 
Crov:. are, frotii left: II eyliy (,'ale. Eihuard Maddox latt'iiney fnr the i/r'mp). Mnnoif 
HnthniLiiy . Ryr'in L/lis, (Jeorr/e D/ivis, Lillian I'ayl'ir, (Hen R'lbimon and Lielyn Biir- 
urll. (Adams) 




Negroes Register 
At Central Casting 


<^4 


Weaver Made 
Housing Chief 
By Kennedy 


Wlicn Robert C, \Vpa\er 
assumes his job as administra- 
tor of the Federal Housing and I 
Home Finance Agenc> he wiUi 
be backed up by an executive! 
order abolishing aH racial dis-j 
crimination and segregation; 
in publicly assisted housing, 
the Eagle learned this Week. ] 

Weaver, vvho,se appointment! 
was announced by President | 
Elect John F. Kennedy Satur-| 
da\', will direct the affairs andj 
shape policy for the Federal! 
Housing Administration, thej 



— Hit by Stray Bullet — 


DIES SUDDESL^ 


By Magpie Hathaway 

Jan. .3, 1961 will go down in histofy as "fi-ecdorrij public Housing Agency and 
;day" for Negro screen "e.xtras" in Hollywood, for itithe Urban Renewal and Rede- 
was on that day that what had 'come to be known velopment Agency over which 
as the "peonage' system" of Jim Crow hiring finally the hhfa has jurisdiction, 
crumbled. * - .The non-discrimination order 

„ „ ' „ 1 — tiirfx;''" •' \tp voii croincr to"^vill be aimed at all agencies 
On Tuesdax- morning l.j.>;tures. .'\re jou going lo, .. .•» . 

times do change even if ihc joyous and jubilant actors and i Tval*^ ^ picture on Hollywood 

moverasnts an^ th* chaJigesjafrtj esses made their first ap-:t>lvd. today?" "Are you really 

««• so s'loW that they escape 'p,»ara nee at Central Casting 


A'. (Jurtix 
Rri>e Sella 
suddenly al 
mm h near 
J hnrsdav 


Times Change 

The uoild does mo\e and 


III'/, j'lunder nf 
Hospital, died 
his Shani/ri-Ln 

I: I s I n 'I r r last 
n heart nttnek. 


the naked eye. Take the case 5504 Holl>-wood blvd., to rcg- 
o< Robert C. Weaver. Presi- jstor at "the newly unified 
dent-Elect Kennedy's choice to agency. 


head the Housing and Home 

Finance Agency. Weaver got 

into public 

"f I I f e away 

back ihere in 

\ 1934 when he 

jbecame a 

^■^ ■■>•' e g r o Ad- 

> ' ^ V i s o r" o n 

./^ X h o u s i n g af- 

fairs to the 

0«.~ \' ^ * t he n Secre 



Hunt for Central Casting 

From the days when Holly- 
wood was \oung up lo the last 
da\- of last \ear, Negro e.xtras 
were called for acting jobs 
a 


movie stars?" '"Cajn v.e have 
your autographs?'' 

The extras finally found the 
"casting" building and head- 
ed for the elevator. The Ne- 
gro woman operator congrat- 
ulated them and wished them i 
luck. 

Creeling them at the On 
Iral office were Jasper Weld 


and will be signed by the then 
Presideint Kennedy. 
An acknowledged expert on 


l.oran Millar 


through a .segregated set-up ^^ along with Doug Dakin, 
headed for almost a decade by , ^^^ casting director, and sev- 
Jasper Wcldon. who operated ' ^^y, photographers, 
out of his heme at 110 E. 99th ^^^ laugh of the day came! 
strff"f- when, asked routine questions! 

Whcii thry arjived- at Hoi- alsout riame, age. etc., not a 
"f^ tVe 'y^^'ood and We'slern, many of single one of the actors and 

tary 01 i^j^^ actors couldn't find the! actresses would admit to be- 

1 n t e r 1 o r ;,,j,g,^^j|.|„ office", and stopped 'jng' over 39. 

pedestrians at the bus load-i Completing Detoils 

ing zone, waitresses in the Neither Weldon nor Dakin 

'r drugstore and am one , would make a statement to % 

branch of the.:..,.. rj i:,..„„ „..i,;„„ 1 


Harold Ickcs. 

Tckes, a free wheeling 
liberal. had*beeri president of ^ 

the Chicago branch of the.-^.,^|^ would listen, asking,! the press about the new cast- 
NAACP at one time during,. . ^^j^^^^ j^ (^.^^t^^i c^jstj^g..- , ^^^g policy. Dakin said, "Call 
his tempestuous career He; .^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ podostriaiis, me later, or else call 'Duke- 
wanted to see to It that Ne- ^.,^^ ^^^ ^^^.^^ ^^^^.^ ^^ c'en-|Wales, pu;bqc relations direc- 
groes got their fajr share ^^^j casting, were delighted lor for lh<^producer.s." 
of the .lobs created by the^^,^^^^. ;^^j j^^.^ ^^.j^,.^ 1 ^Vhen we finally located 
construction of public housing; .,^^ ,g ^,^^|^ -^ ^^_\ eContinued on Page 2 

and proportionate share of the _ 

new housing units. It is easy 
to see now that this philos- 
ophy was a New Deal variant 
of the Separate But Equal 
rule. 

Negro Advisor 

Nobody saw anything wrong 
about Weaver being appointed 
as a "Negro Advisor"' and 



M Dweller 
ll^Wounded by 
Shot from Auto 


SOMERVILLE, Tcnn 


of the Neg-o sharecropper^j PO^^'-'V ^nd disease he wit 

ne.ssed in Africa and else 


evicted in th|e Tennessee vote 
battle wa.s 
day as he 
new "home 
lage near he 
Early B. W 
tier" of "F: 
was shot in 
one firing a 


Tulane U. Students 
Blast La. Jackals' 


Close to 100 white students of New Orleans' Tu- 
even the most equalitariah , lane University spoke out in anger and contempt 
minded New Dealers didn't ^^jg week against their governor, their legislators 
dream, of suggesting that a- ^^^ ^^^ "packs of marauding jackals" who have in- 
Negro be named to head tho^^^j^^^^^ rioting, harassment and violence to prevent 

four Negro six-year-olds from attending "white" 
;encies were schools. * 


HOUSING CHIEF— Rob- 
ert C. U eaver. memher nf 
Sev: York hniishtg hoard 
and SAACJP ehairmtin. -i^ns 
appointed head fif the Erd- 
ernl Housing Agcney Friday. 


pers who, 

wife and chilldren, was put off 
urban housing. Weaver .served i h>s land after he had register 
as Rent Admini<^trator for the j cd and vot^d in the Nov. 8 
state of New York under Gov. election. 

' The Southern Conference 

Fund, meanwhile, 

thrNew'Torkihas appealed to Pres. Eisen- 


tn 
federal housing program. 
a matter of fact the govem- 
mental housing 


loaded up w'ith bankers and fho students' names are 
real estate brokers who were printed on a well written 
on the ragged edge of relief brocliure enti'led. "Toulanians 
and with social workers who Di.ssent." 
had dreamed dreams and seen' Unreality 

visions of federal assistance r^hr^ artuie .states: 
to the .ill fed and ill housed "The public affairsnf the 
of the land. state have taken on.; in the 

The bankers and hroke'rs j^-^^^ (^^^ months, an aura of 
who escaped the relief rolls-unn^ality which, by compari- 
by getting appointments to ^Qp^ niakos .Mice in Wonder- 
head the housing agencies ia„d appear .'^tark realism. 
took their prejudices with, 'The governor and the leg- 
them and the social worker i; lavuro reveal themselves 
underlings were so happy at masters of Ovweliian double- 
Winning FDR to their side of ^ speak — to hate the Neg^o is 


the housing program 


that to lov echini: to discrimfriate 
thev were content to acquiese againstMhe Negro is to accord 
in the Jim Crow schemes of him equality; peaceful protest 
their superiors. The federal 
government became an active 
(Continued on Page 4^ 


mischief and rampant van- 
dalism peaceful protest. 
Ignorant Bigots 

"In such an atmosphere one 
feels impelled to succumb to 
the general irrationalism and 
lash out with the sarne in- 
temperate, unconsidered, epi- 
thet-hurling one sees and 
hears on every side, '^et, what 
does thi.s accomplish? 

"Does it help to assert that 
the legislators are ignorant 
bigots with one eye to quiet- 
ing their own inadequacies by 
persecuting the Negro and the 
other to any modicum of poli- 
tical or economic advantage 
which the melee may bring 
within reach? 

"Does it help to notice that 
the state judiciary abandons 


feafured 
In the iagle 

Editorials * 

Church Activities 5 

Sports ^ 

The Te« 

Bill Smallwood 

PeopU 

Chazx Crotwford 

Show BuaineM 


includes . tlie hurling of rocks 
and eggs, telephone harass- 

iment, rioting in the streets ,, • j- ■ 1 j 

and constant threats of viol-laU semblanc-e of judicial de 


ence: both 
parties, both 


viol 

major political 
iirosidential can- 


Averell Harriman from 19.54 to 
1958 and now holds the job of lEd'-'^'at-'O"*/ 
chairman of the New Yorkjhas appealc 
City Redevelopment Commis- 1 hower and Se"^. Estes Ke^ 
sion. He began his housingjfauyer and Lyndon Johnson to 
career as an advisor to Secre-fvisit Freedoii Village in Faj 
tary of the Interior Harold [e«e County, 
Ickes under the early NeW| Tlie orgait 
Deal Public VVorks Adminis- , urged Gov. 
when that agency! and Atty. G^ 


tration 


(Continued on Page 4) 


Well Known 
Doctor Dies of 
Heart AttacK ^ 

Dr. N. Curtis King, promi- 
nent South Los Angeles doc- 
tor who founded and for many 
years operated the Rose Netta 
Hospital, 411i2 S. Hooper, ave- 
nue, died suddenly Thursday 
at the age of 66 of a heart 
attack at his Shangri - La 
ranch near Elsinore. 

Funeral sei vices will be 
• held this Thursday 1 today) at 
1 p.m. from the .\ngelus 
Funeral Home, with the Rev. 
Llovd Gal Iowa V-, pastor of! 
Lincoln Memorial Congrega- 
tional Church, officiating. 
Lincoln Memorial Burial 
The Rev. L. M. Curtis, who 
■*\vas pastor of the Macedonia 
! Baptist Church when Dr. King 
I was a member, will also par- 
Iticipate in the services. Burial 
will take place in Lincoln Me- 
morial Cemetery. 

On Wednesday commemo- 
rative .services were being held 
in Elsinore where Dr. King had 
made his home for. some time, 
in tjj^etw^en two extensive 
\voijid trips, during which he 
Onc^vas depressed b.v the pitiful 



lot la.st Wednes 
jy asleep in his 
in the tent vil- 
e 

lliams, first "set 
ieedom Village," 
1 he arm by some 
shotgun from a 
passing car elarly in the morn- / 
ing 

Jnovailable' 

Pattat could not 

He was reported 

ilnvestigation and 

for an indefinite 


Sheriff 

Sheriff C. 
be reached, 
out on an 
"unavailable 
period." 

Williams .Iwas one of tlic 
growing number of sharecrop 
tDgether with his 


in 
where. i. 

Dr. King, tliroughout his 
many vears liere siii<e 1929 
and before that at Ncwiian. 
Ga.. combined the skill and 
competence of the well trained 
doctor wi^h the friendliness 
and symp&thy of the old-style 
practitioner. 

Forgot Bills 

Those who knew him best 
tell of the many occasions on 
which he would treat whole 
families who had health prob- 
lems but little money, and 
just forget to .send in a bill. 

Active in many civic .proj- 
(Cohtinued on Page 4) 


j -KlLLL\a ESDS BRIGHT CAREER -^ Vrank "M'ac^" 

Jnekson , Pittsburg Pirates piteher u hn uas "definit7~tr on 

his 'li'ay to the Major Ecarjurs." lias hit hy n stray bulLct 

! early Monday riinrntnf; at a hot-dor; stand in Gonipton. I hc 

' former Centennial High athlete uas killed instantly, ,' -■ 

'Waco' Jackson, 
On His Way" to 
Big League, SIgin 

Frank "Waco" Jackson. 21-\ear-ol(i Pittsburgh 
Pirate pitcher who was headed straight for the Ma- 
jor Leagues, was shot and killed early Monday morn- 
ing duriffg a qj.iarrel in which he had played no part. 

The former Centennial High School CIF basket- 
ball player, who was signed 
bv the Pirates in 1959. was an 


Funeral 


services for the 
promising plaver. ' who was 
innocent bystander who vventuked bv everj-body and who 
outside a cafe to see vvhat; had made an impressive show- 
ing 


Brown Urges 


vvas happening and was jng during his brief period 

I struck by a stray bullet as he svith the Pirates, has b*en 

i turned to go back inside. ! scheduled for 1 p.m. Saljur- 

j Funeral Saturday jday from the Ashley-Grigsby 

The killing, took place at the Mortuary Inc., 9920 Central 

^_J^Hot Spot. 11624 S. Wilming- 'avenue. [ 

avenue, i shortlv after 2! 


._jHot 

pton 


„,., _ 'On His Way* ■ I 

r,l _^^^^^ I •^■■|« a.m., where .lackson and sev-' Cliet Brewer, former bise 
\I|nnnPr I nW\ 'pral of his friends had stopped ball player who is at presjent 


ioff to get a hot dog. the West Coast scout for the 

Identity of his assailant is Piriites, told the Eagle that 

not known. He and another , botli he and Branch Rickey, 

^ hian who was with him fled 'the ball clubs general majna- 

afler the shooting. ; ' (Continued on Page Z\ > 

SACR.\-MENTO — Governor., ^^* — ! — 


Against Bias 


corum and lends itself to the 
patently farcical segregation 


didates and tlie federal judi- struggle? Is it of any use to 

' recount the idiocies of tlie 


oiary are communist-inspired 
and^ the national capilol is 
seething with subversion; 
teachers who obey federal 
court orders are to be investi- 
gated for subversion and dis- 
loyalty; the people of Louisi- 
ana who elected Kennedy 
electors did not really do so 
and the vote of the electors 
should be changed; the press 
calls peaceful protest criminal 


ch^ief executive who engages 
in debate with a newsman, 
asking him if he would want 
his four-year-old daughter to 
marry a Negro? 

Defend Vilification 
"Can it be believed thatthe 
mayor of a city of 600,(K)0-odd 
souls asserts in a news confer- 
ence that telephone eam- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Tenn 

ization lias also! £(}„-„, ,1^1. G. Brown Tuesday] 
Buford Ellington yrgpj the state legislature to 
n. Rogers to pro- -pxtend our laws against dis- 
crimination in liousing" and 
to establish the "principle that i 
an established pattern of dis- j 
crimination is a proper basis 


(Continued on Page 2) 


Senators Propose Rule 
Changes to Curb Debate 


TEXT DWELLER WOUNDED — S'lonn above out 
side their tent in "Freedom Village" near SvrnerL'ille, Tcnn., 
are the wife and chtUrm of Early B. Williams, uho 
uas Hounded in the arm last Wednesday by a shot fired 
from a passing auto. (Photo by .Withers; courtesy of the 

SCLF.) \ 


WASHINGTON — Democrats zigzagged toward 
for disciplinary action by state a redemption of their platform pledges to curb sen- 
licensing bodies." atorial filibusters and to break the House Rules Cpm- 
The governor did not spell mittec's power to bottle up civil rights legislatioiii as 
out his proposals for c-'^t^id- (-gj.,g,'.ggg organized this >yeek. Prospects are "'^ hat 


ing legislation banning hous- ! 

f j: ; :.>..»;„„ K,,^ ..-tcto Tiiere Wl 


Senate 
House 


ing discrimination but state 
leaders of the coinmittee that 
led the fight for fair employ- 
ment legislation have readied ; f^f'/^"'\«""f 
a bill that would put enforce- 
ment of housing laws urid^r 
(Continued on Page 3) 


be little cliange in, 


rules and that 


■Cnlmer of Mississippi who 


Rules Committe vvil/be ■ ^^^'1^^ the Kennedy ticket ^St 


its power but 
Mississippi congress- 


Hawkins Heads 


fall and campaigned for the 
election of an "independent" 
slate of electors. The present 
Rules Committee is^ com posed 
of eight Democrats and four 
, ^,. ! Republicans but Colmer and 
Vice President Richard >i'>^- ijchairman Howard Smith, Vir- 
nn gave the move to change 


that a 

iiian will be ousted to make 
vviiy for a more liberal mem- 
ber. 


, filibuster rules a boost with 

Top Committee a ruUng that the Senate may 

r..Vr.»,.r-xTT-^ A ui ' clia iigc 1 ts Tulcs at thc bcgtn - 

SACRAMENTO -- Assembly- ^^.-^f ^^^.^ ^^^^i^^ ^^^ that 

man Augustus K Hawkins, j.^^^^^^^^.j^^ ,^^j ^e mounl- 
(Dem. Tuesday took over the, ^^ ^ ^ ^^^j, changes. Un- 

taskof heading the important. ^^^ - p^, rules a filibuster 
ommittee of the ' _ ,_,.„^ kw n.-r. thirrie 


Rules C 
Assembly. 

He is the first Negro to head 
this committee which clears 
appropriations for interim in- 
vestigating bodies, in addition 
to handling other legislative 
matters. 

Hawkins was elected to tlie 
62nd Los Angeles district in 
1934 and has served in the 
legislature ever since that 
time. f 


may be halted by two thirds 
of senators present and voting 
and it seems likely that the 
power to curb debate will be 
changed to give three fifths 
of senators present and voting 
the right to choke off talk- 
fests cifter reasonable debate. 

Colmer Ouster 


ginia Democrat, have consist- 
ently voted with the Republi- 
can minority to stymie all leg- 
islation unacceptable to them. 
House Speaker Sam Rayb^rn 
is understood to be baclong 
the ousting of Colmer but that 
move will not solve the prob- 
lem. Under House rules, the 
Rules Committee hjis entire 
jurisdiction to determine what 
legislation is sent to the floor 
of the House foir a vote. Wh6n 
he is opposed ^o any legisla- 
tion. Smith simply refuses to 
call a meeting of his Commit- 
tee and has disapp^ired for 


The congressman slated to i weeks at a time. He could pur- 
be purged from the House sue the same tactics ev«i wiQi 
Rules (S^ramittee is William I Colmer's ouster. 


t 




, ['■ 


1 


2— The California Eagle 
Thursday, January 5, 1961 


African States 
Meet to Plan 
Joint Policies 

CASABLANCA, Morocco — A 
four-day "summit conference" 
of seven African-Asian na- 
tions to set up a neutralist,! 
anti-imperialist bloc was 
scheduled to get under way 
here Tuesday. 

Nations represented in addi- 
tion to Morocco are Ghana, 
Guinea, Mali, United Arab 
Republic, Algerian Nationlists, 
Ceylon and Libya. 

King Mohamed V of Mor- 
occo was greeting the presi- 
dents, foreign ministers and 
other representatives and had 
arranged an ii.ipressive recep- 
tion for his guests. 

Among those attending are f^oni there were escorted to 
Pres. Kwama Nkrumah of 
Ghana: Pres. Sekou Toure, of 
Guinea; Pres. Madibd Keita of 


U N Slaps Belgium |4 Scholarships 
For Aid to MobutulTo be Offered 

For Oratory 


Beligum, paralysed by nationwide strikes over 
the Congo-caused austerity program, was given a 
rebuke Monday for open military intervention in 
the Congo. Belgium was accused of aiding "strong 
man" Col. Joseph Mobutu's troops that were sent tq 
attaclt Lumumba followers in ' 
an unsuccessful attempt to 
regain control of Kivu Prov- 
ince. 

With an easy disregard for 
international 


commitments. 
Mobutu had aslted, and ap- 
parently had been granted, 
permission to fly paratroopers 
into the Belgian-administered 
U.N. trusteeship territory of 
RuandaUrundi because there 
were no adequate — and 
available — landing fields m 
Kivu Province. 

Machine-Gunned 

The Mobutu forces accord- 
ingly had flown to I'sumbura. 
capital of RuandaUrundi, and 


Mali; Pres. Gamal Abdel 
Nasser of the UAW; Premier 
Ferhat Abbas of the Algerian 
Nationalists; Foreign Minister 
Abdel Quadir al Allam of 
Libya; and Alwin Perera, Cey- 
lonese delegate who is am- 
bassador in Cairo. 

Subjects on the agenda were 
reported as the worsening sit- 
uation in the Congo and the 
"indecision" of the U.N., 
icoupled with strong support 
for imprisoned premier Pa- 


Mobutu in Thysville, south of 
Leopoldville. The southern 
province of Katanga, the in- 
dustrial and mining heartland 
of the country, is controlled 
by' Moise Tshombe, 

Plan 'New Deal' 
A clash was reported Satur- 
day in the northern area of 
Tshombe's domain, near 
Nyemba, during which 10 re- 
belling Baluba tribesmen 
were said to have been killed 
by U.N. Nigerian troops.' 

Despite the divided author- 
ity, however, Kasavubu has 
called for a political round- 
table conference Jan. 25, to 
"modify the basic law'-' of the 
the Congo border by Belgian ' Congo. 

troops. , j It i.s assumed hy corrcspond- 

At the border they were met ents in Leopoldville ,that this 

a machine gun baragc 


by 

from Lumumba troops and a 
number of Mobutu's para- 
troopers were wounded. 

One reports says that 30 of 
them were taken to a hospital 
in Usumbura. Other reports 


indicates that Kasavubu in- 
tends to disregard the elec- 
tions just prior to the grant- 
ing of independence last July 
1, and install some kind of a 
now parliament with his 
protege, Joseph Ileo, as pre- 
mier. 


Four scholarships for the 
winner and runners-up in the 
oratorical contest scheduled 
as part of NegroHistory Week 
activities will be presented by 
Our Authors Study Club, the 
sponsoring organization, Mrs. 
Vassie D. Wright, president, 
announced Monday. 

Negro History Week will be 
observed Feb. 12-17. 

Theme of the oratorical 
contest which is open to all 
high school seniors will be, 
"The Negro's Role in Ameri- 
can History." 

According to Miss Estelle 
Edmer.son, John Adams Junior 
Hiith .School instructor and 
chairman of the Oratorical 
Contest Committee, students 
entering the contest will be 
judged on the content, general 
effectiveness and^ delivery of 
their speeches. The- contest 
will take place on Friday, 
Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. 


Central Casting 
Opens Its Doors 


(Continued from Page 1) 
"Duke" Wales, he surprised 
us by treating us "downright 
human," and gave us a "right 
to the point'' statement. 


said a number of Mobutu's 

men were captured. | Meanwhile on Tuesday^ rep- 

The U.N. representative in | r^sentatives of five more na- 

the Congo, Rajeshwar Daval tions comprising the U. N. 

of India, said in a report to Congo Conciliation Committee, ..^^^ ^^^ comolete 

Dag Hammarskjold, U.N. sec- arrived at Leopoldville, bring- ^^^^j,^ for castisg Negroes 

trice Lumumba- suooort fori 'f f/.^^"^'^'' '^^^ ^"""^ ^°^, ^ '' J^"d Orientals through Central 

trice Lumumba, support tort of Mobutu's men crossed into Countries now represented; as fast as we can 

Algerians against the French; Kjvu Province from Ruanda- are Ghana, India, Pakistan' 



HEAVY D U Tl ES— Marie 
(j\ Barksdfi/c, hrltn Sigma 
J Ihi'ta excciitiv' ilirector, 
coordinates activities of 
28,000 tiicmhcrs in 267 Delta 
chapters in the L'i ^'., Lihc 
and IlMiti.^ 


and protest against the ex 
plosioti by France ef its third 
atomic bomb in the Sahara 
last week. 

From Peking, Chinese Pre- , Hammarskjold charged that 
mier Chou En-lai sent cabled I Belgium had violated the 
greetings, pointing out thati j,ands-off resolutions of the 


Urundi at dawn Sunday. 
Calls for Disarming 
In his protest to Belgian.! 
Ambassador Walter Loridan gy^jp^gg FlmiS 


Sudan. Senegal. Nigeria, Ma- 
laya, Ethiopia and Liberia. 



PLJSSER — ll'ilma //. 
Ray, program issistant of 
Delta Siff'iin Theta, is al- 
ready laying plans for Del- 
ta's Golden Jn\iiversary in 
1963. 


"At present," he continued, 
I "it is too soon to say if there 
will be a Negro aide or not. 
That will be left to the execu- 
tives at Central to decide." 
No Hitches 

IM^iforaco Qn%#c ^'^ ^^^^ there would be no 
- ...-, ntrewaC/ ^Uy^ protests from our group so 

his government has always' united Nations by permitting !%■ iri R^»,rlc#»-^^* 'ong as the treatment was im- 1 
given "firm Support to the Mobutu's troops to pass!**""' OraaSTreCT ^^^^-^^i ^^^ f^^^ i 

'-peoples of Algeria, the Congo through the Belgian-adminis- 1 The business population of "Don't worry," he replied.! 
and other African countries initpred trust territory. ] Los Angeles County increased "Everyone will be happy." |lOA1 U#\m 

..u-=_ -. , !_-..—,-_:-, .„ ^^^ changeover from the ! I ^O I nOlT 


'Mistake' 
Listed as 


their struggle against colonial- [ . He said he found it difficult | ^0 per cent during the past 
ism." He also called for re-|to believe that troops could jf'^'e years, according to sta- 


segregated casting set-up was 


lease of Lumumba. ! have landed by plane and t'stics released hy Dean D. brought about through the 

Not represented at the con-jthen been transported to the} -^laddu'^. regional vice prosi-,j -onciliation efforts of the year- 
ference were India, Indonesia, border of Kivu Province "with- 'dent of the Los Angeles office old Fair Employment Practic- 


Ethiopia, Nigeria and Tunisia, out the knowledge of the of Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. 
Tunisia is currently feuding! responsible authorities of Bel-! Basing his facts on a com- 


es Commission, after a peti- 
tion was filed witfi that agen- 


with Morocco over Mauritania, jgiufti in the trust territory." ' parison of phvsical counts in'O' several months ago 
Some of the other nations saidi He asked Belgium to "take, the January, 1961 and January.! The petition, containing .500 

immediate and effective mea-; 1956 editions of the Dun &| names, was filed by Byron El- 
sures" to see that there is noi Bradstreet Reference Book. I ''-''• af^or and officer of Inter- 
repetition of such an incident | Maddux reports that Los An- national Artists, and Maggie 


they would send observers. 


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• ACCESSORIES 

• SERVICE CALLS 
•TIRE REPAIRING 

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- INTkODUCING - 

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SPMCIALIZINO IN 

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• RVAIRS 
• TUNI-UPS 
4000 SO. 

WIfTIRN AVi. 
AX. 1-95*6 ' 


and further demanded thatige'.es County ha.'^ S.3.732 bu:<i 
Belgian authorities disarm ness firms listed in the 1961 
any other Congolese troops Reference Book while in the 
entering the trust territory. . 19,56 edition, 76, .336 firms were 
Country Divided listed. 

The thwarted attack on According to Maddux, busi- 
Kivu Province underlines the ness concerns in all part of 
fact that Mobutu and Pres. | the United States are asked 
Joseph Kasavnbu, who work by Dun & Bradstreet for copies 
together, are in effective con- of their 


Hathaway, Eagle reporter, ac- 
tress and president of Inter- 
national Artists. 


Killing 

First 

icide 

44, of 2633 
was arrested 
Sunday on sus])icion of a 
murder "by mistake" in what 
police listed as the first homi 
cide of the new year 

A mechanic, jQhn T. Haw 
kins, 4d, whose 


Frank Smith, 
Halldale avenue, 


Ask Ban on Race Tags 

ATHENS, Ohio, — The 

NAACP this week asked Ohio 

University at Athens to drop 

racial tags "from its housing 

trnancial ' statements ' applications. f 


address was 
given as W. 52n(l street, was 
shot at a bar at ^376 S. Main 
street. 

Smith said he Had a dispute 
with another man. Willie B 
Marshall of 1162 5. 25th street 
and was hitting him with the 
butt of the gun when some- 
one grabbed him and the gun 
went off ^accidenially, killing 
Hawkins 


NAACP to Install 
Officers Sunday 

Dr. St. Paul Epps will install the newly elected 
officers of the Los Angeles Branch NAACP at the 
Bel-Vue Community Presbyterian Church, where he 
is pastor, 675 E. 118th street, on Sunday, Jan. 8. 

The installation meeting is scheduled to beg in at 
3 p.m. 'r ^ 

Officers to be installed are ! ^M ^^ da#%4 IM 
are follows: MQIl OIIOI III 

Edward D. Warren, prc^si- ^ ■ ^^ ■ ' _ 

Tent Colony 


(Continued from Page 1) 

lives of the tent 


dent; Atty. Loren Miller, first 
vice president; Atty. James 
Akers Jr., second vice presi- 
dent; Dr. H. Claude Hudson, 'tect the 
third vice president; Mrs. | dwellers. 
Patricia Elmore. secretary;: Funds Welcomed 

and Dr. Frederick N. Spann.i SCEF, in addition, has asked 
treasurer. that letters and telegrams be 

Members of the Executive sent to Pres. Eisenhower. Sen. 
Committee are: James Allen, Kefauver, Gov. Ellington and 
Dr. E. H. Ballard, Mrs. Sadie other representatives seeking 


Brewer; Dr. J. B. Carter. Ralph 
Davis, Dr John S. Gary, Jos- 
eph E. Grimmett, Beacham 
Jackson Jr., Carl J. Johnson 


action on behalf of the vic- 
tims of hate who have no 
homes, no jobs, no food, no 
rnoney — because they dared to 


Ventress Johnson, Joe Jones, rnark ballots in the president- 
Mrs. Rosa E. King, Dred Scott | jal election. 


NeUsom, Rev. L. Sylvester 
Odom, Johnny Otis, Rev. W. 
L. Robinson, Mrs. Vivian 
Strange and Vernon Thomp- 
son. 


SCEF asks that money for 
tents and food for Fayette 
County victims be sent to John 
McFerren, Route 4, Box -133, 
Somerville, Tenn.; and that 


trol of only a portion of the each January. This year, re-j 
territory of the Congo. i quests are. being sent to ap- [ 

The two large northern : proximately three million 
provinces of Kivu and Oriental' business concerns — to thej 
are under the control of fol-' corner grocery store worth a' 
lowers of the legally elected few thousand dollars as well! 
premier, Patrice Lumumba, as to businesses worth 
who has been imprisoned byl millions. . 



mm uumm 


* Guar. Satisfaction * All Jobs We/com* 

MOTOR TUNE-UP $5.50 

Call fTman at M. 2-9638 

r 4822 West Adams at Vineyard 




^.i 


/(J^ 




co.^ 


mat 


Elected fourth and fifth vice I donations for similar victims 
presidents, respectively, were in Haywood County be sent to 
Rev. C. W. Arnold and Atty. O'Dell Sanders, 307 W. Margin 
Herbert Simmons, Jr. " Street, Brownsville, Tenn.; or 

'to the SCEF, Inc., 822 Perdido 

[Street, New Orleans, 12, La. 
I^Q^gl DeleQOte ! '^^^ NAACP national office 
** !in New York has been sending 

To Attend Meet «s«!«tance since last July 6 

and to date has provided $7,- 
A* lA/hit^ U Q|j<A' 300 worth of food which is dis- 
r^t WW III I V7 I ■ww^w^j.-^^j^g^^ j^,jpp monthly by the 

John A. Jackson, executive! Memphis NAACP. 
director for the Stovall foun-j The Memphis NAACP has 
dation, will leave by plane also, distributed a d d i t i o n al 
on Saturday, Jan. 7, for Wash-, truckloads of clothing and oth- 
ington, D. C. i er supplies from NAACP bran- 

Jackson was appointed by '"hes, other groups and indi- 
Governor Brown as a delegate l^iduals from across the coun- 
to the first White House Con-'^'">'- 
ference on the Aging. He is ~ 

the only Negro resident ofju^jge WilliamS 
Southern California to attend »* 

the conference as an officially Jj TrOnsferred 
appointed delegate and will 

participate in the conference Judge David W. Williams, 
-pction on local communitv ^^'^o has been a.ssigned to the 
organizations. " A'^n Nuys court during the 

„ .,, ^ . ^ ^ last half of 1960, has been 

He will be accompanied by transferred to a Courthouse 
his wife, Mary, and their 


three children, Jeanctte, Doug- 
las and David. 

The Jacksons have alsr 
been invited to attend the 
presidential inauguaration. 


misdemeanor trial court. 

Announcement of the shift 

w;!s made by Judge Gerald C. 

Ki'pple as he undertook the 

nost of presiding judge of the 

'".inicipal Court. 


Willowbrook 
Youth, 16, Held 
For Murder 

A 19-year-old youth. Joe 
Vernie Foster, of 1816 E. 124th 
street, was shot to death Sat- 
urady afternoon in the after- 
math of a fight that broke out 
at a party last Thursday 
nig*ht. 

Sheriff's officers said that 
Robert Lee Crosby, 16. of 1737 
E. 122nd street, admitted the 
shooting, but claimed Foster 
had a gun and he shot in 
self-defense. 

Named 'Butch' 

' When police arrived at the 
scene of the shootfng. at the 
rear of 1752 Palm Lane, 
Willowbrook housing project, 
two of those involved in the 
figlyts said that it was "Butch" 
who lives on 122nd street, who 
did the shooting. < » 

While the officers were talk- 
ing to Arthur Thomas Gibson, 
20, of 1735 Palm Lane, and 
Fred Dupree Jr., 19, of 1542 E. 
122nd street, Crosby returned 
to the scene and gave him- 
self up. 

He told police he had 
t'hrown his gun into a garbage 
pail. He said he had come to 
Paim Lane to return the gun 
"someone" had given him 
after the fight at 1960 130th 
street, Compton, the ^ previous 
Thursday. He couldn't recall 
the name of the person or the 
exact address. 

'Foster Fired Twice' 

He said that he was ac- 
costed by Foster. Gibfeon. Du- 
pree, and Joe Nathan Edwards, 
20, of 1738 E. Palm Lane. 

Foster, he said, pulled out [ 
a small gun and fired twice, I 
but the gun did not go off. ' 
Fearing that Foster was out i 
to "get" him, he fired the gun 1 
he had in his hand. Crosby i- 
said. ■ 

Officers said they were con- , 
vinced. after investigating, | 
that the quarrel was not a J 
gang fight. ( 

Arrested in addition to Cros- [ 
by were Gibson, Dupree and 
Ed-wards, and Lee Otis Sand- i 
ers, 22, of 1643 E. Palm Lane; i , 
Roosevelt Murray, 23, of 1700 
E. Palm Lane; and two I 
youths, 16 and 17 years old. ! 


< 



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214 SO BROADWAY .os-'A^JSE'SrcMir MA. 4-0801 

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Newspaper Readers 


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Tin PtRcievt Way to Lett or Control Wtight 

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*Ptraon< who with fa lost weight should consult their doctors b«for» 
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TOOTH BRUSH 

WITH PURCHASE OF ONE 3</4-em. TUIE 

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W« Reecrr* the Right to Limit Quentitiet 
PLSASE CALL LOCAL STORE FOR HOURS 
PRICES IFHCTIVI JA|4UARY 5. 6, 7 & 8 


RilYon ^22> for the MOST of the BEST ^or the LeAST! 


of I 

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tol 


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Jop 

24th 

sat- 

Iter- 

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Iday 

ihat 
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Ithp 
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the 
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lect, 
Jthp 
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Jilk- 
pon^ 
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to 

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^■■■■■li 



Order Landlords 
To Halt Evictions 

The New Year dawned chill and forbidding to the 
growing population of hungry, homeless Negro 
sharecroppers at the tent colony outside Somerville, 
Tenn., Sunday morning. 

As a result, however, of two separate decisions 
Friday in Concinnati and t- ' 


cooni-R.rnos _ uherim 


I , . - - - ""'^ hrnrii nurses cnnfirrnte in trcnt'mg nn rvr fntleiit 

ril J,,usnlcn,s Hndnssnh Hosftlnl. The Lihertnns are among hundreds nf Afrunns re- 
cniiriQ spinnhzrd trnining in Israel. ■ ■ 


Polio Shots 

"Dollar-A-Shot" polio im- 
munizations will be available 
to the Southwest Community 
on Thursday. Jan. 12. from 6- 
9 fV-m. at the Southwest Dis- 
trict Health Center, 3834 s. A man and woman were picked up Tuesday after- 
Western avenue, the Rev. R. noon by police as suspects wanted on numerou.s bunco 
Wolf, chairman of the South- charges. 

west Health Council, announ- Arrested were Mary M. Grier. 34, of 718 W. 79th 

street, and a man who was identified only -as Wil- 
liams. 


Man, Woman Held 
As Bunco Suspects 


I ed- this week. 


/Oi 


/# 


o new \ease on /i7e 
T I^A V E L ! 


II 


GO MEXICO 



John W. Frower. .5064 E. 
4fiith street, told officers the 
pair engaged him in conser- 
sation in front of %. phone 
booth at 4513 S. Avalon blvd, 
Williams, speaking in a brok- 
en accent, claimed he was 
from the West Indies and tJiat 
some girl had just taken him 
for $50, Frower said. 

He asked Frower if he could 

help him locate the Seaman's 1 Avery. 48. father of three chil 

Club. It was then Mhis Grier dren. told the court that after 

walked by and Williams of- 1 registering to vote May 20 he 

fered her a dollar if she would i was told by Thomas Crowder 

assist them. He pulled out a Chapman Jr. to make ar- 

roll of bills. j ranpements for a new place 

Miss Williams told officers, lo farm in 1961, Avery said he 

she had never seen Wiliamsjwas not able to find a place 

'before. The officers, however, in Ha\wood County. 

{suspected them of being bun-j Charles W. Scott. Stanlon 

CO artists. In questioning Miss j constable, and Miss Mar-j- 


Memphis, there was some 
hoi)e that evictions of at least 
some of the other 700 families 
of Fayette and Haywood 
Counties might be halted. 
Injunction Granted 

The Cincinnati court granted 
a Justice Department plea for a 
temporary in.junction against 
37 Ha\-wood County land- 
owners to prevent e\ictions 
scheduled for Jan. 1. 

In Memphis Judge Marion 
S. Boyd signed an order tem- 
porarily restraining Fayette 
County landowners from "inti- 
midating, threatening, coerc- 
ing . . . their Negro share- 
cropper tenants for the pur- 
pase of interferring with the 
right of such persons to 
vote." 

The landlords deny that the 
voting- issue is involved in 
their refusal to renew the 
leases of the Negroes, some 
of whom have farmed the 
same land for the past 25 
years. They claim that the 
evictions were necessitated by 
the introduction of machinery. 

Claim Fifth Amendment 

Two of the white group 
however, sought refuge in the 
Fifth Amendment at the non- 
jury trial before Judge Boyd, 
while two white wifnesses 
testified to pressure being ap- 
plied against them when they 
refused to follow the anti-Ne- 
gro edicts. 

A Negro witriess. James 


fusal to sell necessities; re- 
fusal to extend credit or lend 
money; refusal to renew in- 
surance policies; circulating 
lists of Negro registrants to 
help merchants penalize them; 
refusal to deal with mer- 
chants accused of selling to 
Negroes who registered; and 
the coercing of suppliers. 

Laws Urged 
Agaiiist Bias 

(Continued from Page 1) 
t^e supervision of a state com- 
mittee against discrimination. 

Added Powers 

Under the proposal; the pre- 
sent Fair E^mployment Pract- 
ices Committee would be giv- 
en additional jurisdiction and 
would be empowered to act in 
all ra.ses where discrimiiiation 
if charged in employment, 
housing and places of public 
accommodation. Washington 
and Oregon on the Pacific 
Coast and a number of ea.st- 
ern states now have such laws. 

The proposal to give state 
licensing agencies the power 
to take disciplinary action 
against licensees who persist 
in discrimination also has the 
backing of the committee and 
bills to effectuate that power 
will be offered in both 


S^ Bullet 
Hits Pittsburgh 
Pirate Pitcher 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ger were of the opinion that 
Jackson, "a quiet, nice boy." 
wa5 "definitely on his way to 
the Major Leagues." 

Jackson was in Los Angeles 
betjveen seasons. He pitched 
his, last ball game for the 
Losj Angeles Braves thi-ee 
weeks ago and struck out the 
first 10 men who came up to 
bat for the Los Angeles Coast- 
ers.! 

The young athlete, who was 
bor 1 in Haynes, La. and came 
to JO& Angeles in 1948, was 
signed by the Pirates in 1959 
and turned over to their Idaho 
Falls club in the Pioneer 
League. 

Class A 

Ltst season he chalked up 
the surprisingly good .354 ERA 
(eai'ned run average ( record, 
and was hiked to a Class A 
rating. 

Jackson and three of his 
frieidii — Louis Shernll, 22, 
of ;!438 S. McKinley avenue; 
Thomas M inter, 2!, of 231 E. 
97th street; and Albert Thom- 
as Jr. — went to the Hot Spot 
aboit 2 a.m. Monday. 

Tile man who later pulled a 
gun and fired the fatal shot 
was sitting at a table when 
Sheirill, who was standing at 
the counter, looked around I 
and saw the man staring at 
him. 

."\K'hat are you staring at me 
for?|" Sherrili asked. 

"I'm not." was the reply. 
"I'm' staring at my fnend 


Thursday, January 5; 1961 


The California Eaflle— 3 


Meany's Adviser 
Was Pal of Batista 

NEW YORK— Charges that the adviser on Cuban 
affairs to AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany is one of Ex- 
Dictator Batista's henchmen were made here recent- 
ly by William Worthy, reporter for the Baltimore 
Afro- American," according to a report in the "Na- 
tional Guardian." v . 


hous 
es. The bill is al.so aimed at who's got my money." 
real estate brokers who refuse! Pulled Gun * 

to offer housing for sale or! Jackson's friends went out- 
rent to non -whites. [side. The man at the table j 
• told his friend to take himi 
Old Age Assistance 'home, but when he got out- 
Other items of particular | side, he started bickering with 
interest to Negro voters in theiSherrill again, then pulled his 
governor's message were his! gun. 

suggestions that old age as- ; jackson, hearing the com- 
si.stance be tied to a cost of motion, onened the screen 


living formula with increases 


Grier, police found an identifi- 1 Ware, Haywood County land- 'for the aged as prices went up 
cation card made out to "Mrs. 'owner and supply company and his proposal that the leg- 
bookkeeper, both refused tojislatu're take a "hard look" at 
answer questions "on the the aid to needy children pro- 
grounds that any answer I 


Williams" in her wallet. 


Income Tax Class 

A new class in Income Tax!"''^ '^'«'^' '^"^^ 


Preparation will be offered by 


nate me." when 


to incrimi- 
the\' were 


Roosevelt Adult School. 4.50 S. ' P''*''^'^'„"" . 'i*^ .''"'"j;'. *'-^'. -^"^^ 
Fickett street, starting Jan. 23, 


#ram. 


door to see what was hap- 
pening. When he saw that 
one of the men had a gun, he 
turned to go back inside. 

Xt that moment, four shots 
rang out. One of them hit 


Worthy, who recently visited I ^ 
Cuba, stated that Eusebio 
Mujal Barniol, former secre- 
tary-general of the Cuban 
Conferedation of Labor (CTCi, 
and now an aide to Meany, 
fled when Batista was over- 
thrown, taking with him the 
funds of the organization he 
headed. 

Owned Rronch 

Worthy reported the follow- 
ing: 

Durinr Batista's reign. 
Mujal acquired a 6-,093-acre 
estate, pig farm and cattle 
ranch, valued at $4,000,000. 
The estate included a town, 
an aqueduct, an electrical 
plant, silos, pasteurizing 
plants and modern pig-breed- 
ing facilities. 

Mujal never explained 
how he got the estate. -His 
only ostensible income was 
a S24.000-a-year salan. from 
the CTC. For tax purposes 
his estate was valued at 
$70,000. 

When Fidel Castro called 
from the hillsfor a general 
strike in the cities to over- 
throw Batista in the spring 
of 1958, Mujal went on tele- 
vision to warn that anyone 
who struck would lose his 
job. 

After Mujal fled, the Rev- 
olutionary Government 
found that he had taken al- 
most all of the union's re- 
tirement fund, leaving CTC 
bankrupt. Revolutionarv' of- 
ficials say that they cani 
only guess at Mujal's wealth | Burglaries at two chujches 
because records show that | were rejjorted to police last 
he sent money to foreign t Tuesday by church officials. 
banks regularly. | Hardest hit was Providence. 

Muial went first to Brazil I ^aptist Church, 3703i^ Trinity.' 
and later to Washington.' ^'"'^"K items taken were a 


Spartacus' 
jParty will Aid 
Stovall Home 

A "Spartacus" theater-party 
to be held Sunday evening, 
Jan. 8. at the RKO Pantages 
Theater, Hollywood, will bene- 
fit the Stovall Home for the 
Aged, a non-profit organiza- 
tion opened in 1956 at 4000 E. 
Fairmont street. 

The entire theater has been 
taken over for the "Spartacus" 
theater-party, according to Dr. 
Leroy R. Weokes, theater-party 
chairman, and the event will 
have all the trappings of a 
premiere. 

Woody Strode, former UCLA 
and Los Angeles Ram football 
star, plays an important sup- 
porting role in "Spartacus" 
and is serving as an honorary" 
member of the theater-party 
committee. 

Reservations or additional 
i>nformation concerning the 
"Spartacus' theater-party may 
be obtained by calling REpub- • 
lie 2-2424 or REpublic 4-5968. \ 


Thieves Rob 
2 Churches 


where he joined Meany. 

New Lighting 

The 3,5-year-old street light- 


according to Dr. G. Leon Gard- 
ner, principal. 


Doar. Ci\il PJght.'; Division at- 
torney. 

Refused to Sign 

Mrs. Esther Green. 


typewriter and electric clock 
valued at $85. 

, All People's Church. 806 E. 
20th street, was robbed of 
Christmcis packages and $3.60 
in change. With no signs of 


''LEASE ON LIFE" TOURS 

9 DAY Mexico Oty— Pyramids— Cl 

FIESTA I'nivnrsitv Oitv— Rnll ▼ 


DAY 
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Fig-hts — Ifaxco — Arapuico— 
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DAYS Exciting: and Thorougti 
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MEXICO Visit 14 Cities- 

All Hotel Inc. 


^250 


'for o new /ease on //fe-TRAVEL"! 


wherever you wish to travel, by land, se; or air, you 
need a travel agent! Let Tony Lease be that nianl For air 
"travel anywhere in the United States or anywhere in the 
world, Tony Lease will make your worry-free reservations 
and provide ticket delivery! If you belong .to a group 
and wish to plan a tour let Tony Lease host a travel 
party! He is here to serve you! 

^ CALL TONY LEASE 

"WO«Ry fMl RESERVATIONS" 

MA. 5-3060 


ED'S 


MOBILE SERVICE 


HOOVER & MANCHESTER 


PL. 1-5912 


For various reasons. \egroesjSherrill in the lip. A sec-ond|'"E ^vstem on Broadway be- _^ 
constitute a disproportionate shdl hit Jackson in the back, j 1^^'^^" J'anta Barbara a^fnu^j breaking and entering in evi'- 
number of mothers gettmg He reelori and fell to the and 4.3rd place w,l b^ re- ^ence. it appeared thl church 
aid for children and ■ there!floJ>r. dead. | Pl^ced by a modern electrolier, ^.^^ opened with a key which 

have been .strong demands to' Thoma.'^. thinkmg the bul- /^-^■'^^'"'t^- | was lost about six months 

curtail the program. The go^- let.? were blanks, chased the I ago. 

a white, ernor indicated his belief that jsu.'ipect and hit him with a- his mother. Mrs. Hazel Grigs-: 

j woman, said she refus<»d to the welfare of children must! beer bottle. The .stranger fled.jb.v. and five brothers and sis- j somethinp to buy? Something te 

sign a petition presented to! bo considered as the prime ob- 1 Jack.son. who lived at 1801 ters — Frances and C-arolvn, ""' ''^x'h ' classified ad in the 

'her by .Shelby Dixon. Stanton I jective. E. 105th .street, is survived by and Willie, Charles and Allen. ' „;?iV. Ind^they* aSt'^e'Jits.'"" " 


MOTOR $ 
TUNE-UP 


6 


Pirtf 


• Open 24 Hours 

• We Pick-up & Deliver 

• Brake Specialists 

• S&H Green Stamps 

• All Mechanical Work 

Unconditfonally Guaranteed 

ED'S MOBILE SERVICE 

ED BEYMER, Owner-PL. 1-5912 

Hoover & Manchester 


cotton ginner. pledging to take 
economic action against Ne- 
groes, who registered. Dixon, 
she said, visited her larni in 
the fall of 1959. 

He asked her to pledge that 
she would not help any mem- 
bers of the N'AACP, the Hay- 
wood Countj- Civil and Wel- 
fare league (a Negro voting 
i rights group I, "or an\-one else 

OC that the central committee 

^^ ; doesn't approve of." 
Plu« : "That was too broad." Mrs. 
Green said. "I told him it 
didn't sound right and I didn't 
wapt to sign." 

Won't Speak 

Issac Smith Carter, a white 
man who lives on a farm near 
D a n c y V i 1 I e. testified that 
farmer Robert K. Archbell 
"wouldn't speak to me any 
more" after he told Archbell 
he would have nothing to do 
with reprisals against Negroes 
who voted. 

The injunction was sought 
by Atty. Gen. William P. 
Rogers against 45 landowners, 
24 merchants and one bank. 

Among charges in the com- 
plaint were: j 

Termination of leases or, 
sharecrop arrangements: ter- 
mination of employment; re- 



BUSINESSMEN FROM THE SANTA MONICA, OCEA N PARK and VENICE BAY AREAS FIRMLY RESOLVE 
TO GO ALL OUT TO MERIT YOUR CONTINUED PATRONAGE DURING THE CURRENT YEAR 

KEEP BAY AREA DIRECTORY HANDY and PATRONIZE CALIFORNIA EAGLE ADVERTISERS 


BILL & SILYERIO'S FLOWER SHOP 


AND NURSERY 


Formerly With Royal Hawaiian Hotel. Honolulu 

• Complete Floral Sfr\iie • Patio and Indoor Plantings 
'Flowers Wired Anywhere' 


EXbrook 5-2235 
1938-Mth Street 


EXbrook 5-7044 

Santa Monica 


LINK VAUGHN 


VAUGHN PRINTING & LITHO 

PHONE EXbrook 5-5168 

1516 THIRD STREET 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 



ALLEN MAINTENANCE CO. 

1453 SIXTEENTH STREET 

EX. 4-4748 SANTA MONICA 


MILTON GOTTLIEB 

8 OAKMONT DRIVE 
LOS ANGELES 49, CALIFORNIA 


INVESTMfNTS 


GRanit« 2-5389 


Water and Power keep pace with 
Los Angeles' dynamic growth! 


MITCH BASILA 

REAL ES, TATE 

ASSOCIATID ^TH 

JACK SIMMS & ASSOCIATES 

817 Pice Blvd., Santaj Monica, Calif: 
EXbrook 4-4629-EXbreok 4-12021 Res. EXbrook 9-5621 


Every week Los Angeles' population increases an average of more 
than 1,000. Our City now is third most populous in the nation, and is 
Ktill growing. This means new homes, business, industry ... and all 
must have ample water and power ready when needed. 

Meeting this ever-increasing demand is the job of your Department 
of Water and Power. Despite sub-normstl rainfall of the past two 
years, while water demands increased ... despite a tremendous 
growth in use of electricity.., there was plenty of water and power 
for all needs. 

These rising requirements were met by planning and building 
ahead. For example, in the 1959-60 fiscal year, your DWP invested 
over $52 million in new water and power facilities. Still it continued 
to be completely self-supporting from its revenues, imposing no cost or 
burden on the taxpayers. In fact, the DWP contributed more than $6 
million to the general city funds of Los Angeles dxiring the fiscal year. 

In the table are financial highlights from 
the DWP Annual Report for 1959-60. The 
complete report will be mailed upon request 
Write Water and Power, Division 402, Box 
3669 Terminal Annex, Los Angeles 54. 


■ TiM IK Mima ■ 


■w 


■MtmoniFMTai 


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS OF THE ANNUAL REPORT 

During the fiscal year 1959-60, current revenues met all operating 
costs and paid for part of the multi-million dollar construction 
program. The remaining cost of construction was financed by 
issuing revenue bonds, to be repaid by future Department earn- 
ings. Here's what was received and how it was used: 
WHAT WAS RECEIVED WATER POWER 

Total income $37,611,637 $115,025,559 

HOW IT WAS USED 

For operation of the water 

and electric systems 21,013,780 66,331,055 

For interest on debt 3,200,239 8,723,306 

To provide for depreciation 7,197,613 16,758,626 

Net income (Total income less 

above three items) 6,200,005 23,212,572 

Part of net income transferred 

to general City government 1,520,000 4,844,000 

•Remainder of net income used to 

repay bonds and to pay part 

of construction costs... 4,680,005 18,368,572 

•Besides current revenues, funds borrowed bf issuing revenue 
bomb in the amount of J12 million for water and $15 million for 
power were used for the large construction program to meet grow- 
ing needs for water and electricity. 


REAL ESTATE 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


SAMUEL D. YASNEY 

ERNEST AUERBACH CO., REALTORS 

506 Wilihire Blvd., Saijta Monica, Calif. 


EX 3-2737 


Home: OL 6-4806 


MYERS BROS, CONSTRUCTION CO., 

INC. 

GENERAL 

BUILDING CONTRACTORS 


MICHAEL ICHINOSE 

3407 San Fernando Road 

CONSTRUCTION 
SUPERINTENDENT 

Phone CLinton 6-3181 
Los Angeles 65, Calif. 

EXbrook S-1649 

Res. EXbrook 3-23^1 

MACK & SONS SERVICE 


UNION OIL - 
WASHING - TIRES 

- STOPWEAR LUBRICATION 
- BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 

■ 

Hartchel t Stanley Youngar 1925 Broadway 
Proprietor!* Santa Monica 


EX 5-4335 


EX 3-6421 


HAND CAR WASH 

Polish - V/ax 
SteaTn Clean Motor 

BENNIE WIlLiAMS 
729 Montana Ave., Satita Monica, Calif. 


Bus. EXbrook 5-2465 Res. EXbrook 4-4516 

SCOTT & VADNAIS 

OK RUBBER WELDERS 

New & Used Trres 
Recapping & Tr^ad Truing 

E. L. VADNAIS 
2723 Santa Monica Blvd., Santa Monica, Calif. 


Sweet Daddy's Nile Life Cafe ' 

FAMOUS FOR FINE FOODS 
TEXAS CHILI (OUR SPECIALITY) 
' CONTINUOUS (LIVE). ENTERTAINMENT 

EX 4-9950 1710 Olympic Blvd. 

J. B. Blaclcman, Prop. Santa Monica, Calif. 


Painting of All Kinds 


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Steeplejack Work 


J. AND C. WINDOW SERVICE 

• Dust and Water Proofing 

• Caulking of All Kinds 

• Cauking All Roofs 

JEFFERS AND COOPER 
1547 ANAHEIM ST., HARBOR CITY, CALIF. 


1^ M 


-^ 



4— The California Eagle 


Loren fAUler, Publisher 

The California Eagle stands for complata integration of 
Negroes into every phase of American life through the democratic 
processes. * 

We favor: 

1. FEPC on local, state and national levels. ' ^ 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Reprossntotion in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Published Every Thursday for Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Van Ness AXminster 5-3135 


Thursday, January 5, 1961 ,<XSO»#^C%»^'SgS<»/^gx»<sCX»^'S<rS»^^CS»<^C 

Battleaxe & Bread 

■y Lector -S. Qranfimr 


The Weaver Appointment 


President Elect Kennedy's ap- 
pointment of Robert C. Weaver 
M head of the Housing and Home 
Finance Agency is one of the 
most important he has made. As 
head of the Agency, Mr. Weaver 
will administer the public hous- 
ing, urban renewal and redevel- 
opment programs and the mort- 
gage insurance system of Federal 
Housing Administration. 

The new appointee is well 
qualified for the job. He was one 
of tlie first appointees in the first 
New Deal housing agency; he 
served as New York's rent admin- 
istrator under Gov. Averell Har- 
riman and he now heads New 
York City's urban renewal and 
redevelopment agency. He is an 
acknowledged authority on urban 
housing with numerous articles 
and books to his credit. Even 
more ihiportant, he is a Negro 
■and is the present chairman of 
the national Board of the 
NAACP, and chairman of the 
National Committee Against 
Discrimination in Housin'g. 

Ever since the inception of the 
housing program the thrust of 
federal policy has been in the 
* direction of bolstering and inten- 
sifying residential' segregation. 
FHA began its career by requir- 
ing imposition of racial restric- 
tive covenants as a condition of 
loan insurance; it still tolerates 
and encourages discrimination by 
builders and developers. 

That the Public Housing 
Authority connives at racial seg- 
regation in public housing is 
evident from the record which 
shows that 80 per cent of such 
housing is operated on. a segre- 
gated basis. The urban renewal 
and urban redevelopment pro- 
grams have been used, and are 
still being used, to clear Negroes 
out of redeveloped and renewed 
urban areas. 


The practical result of a quar- 
ter of a century of federal policy 
has been the intensification and 
spread of urban residential seg- 
regation. 

Nobody knows the intricate 

story of residential segregation 
and the manner in which it is 
furthered by governmental 
agencies better than Mr. Weaver. 
He has been an active participant 
in the long fight against that 
evil. 

Of course, the new administra- 
tor won't be able to reverse 
governmental policies overnight. 
He will take charge of an agency 
staffed by employees who are 
steeped in old practices and who 
owe an emotional allegiance to 
time tested devices that eventu- 
ate in residential segregation. 
In addition, he will have to buck 
the pressures of the real estate 
and home building lobbies with 
their almost fanatical beliefs in 
racial myths. Every change he 
proposes will meet the opposition 
of the Dixiecrat-Conservative Re- 
publican congressional coalition. 

The reversal of racial policies 
by federal housing agencies will, 
of course, immediately benefit 
the non-white population but it 
will have equally important 
meaning for Americans as a 
"whole. Urban growth, redevelop- 
ment, -and renewal are being 
strangled by residential segrega- 
tion and unless that cancer is 
rooted out our cities will stag- 
nate. 

Quite apart from racial prob- 
lems, Mr. Weaver will bring to 
his new duties a technical compe- 
tence and an understanding of 
urban housing problems that has 
been lacking in the Eisenhower 
administration. We can e.xpect a 
bold and imaginative approach 
that will stimulate home building 
and produce shelter for America's 
ill housed millions. 


Reduce South 's Power 


Gordon Tiffany, director of the 
Civil Rights Commission, is on 
sourid ground when he urges 
redJUction in congressional repre- 
sent;ation by states which dis- 
franchise Negro voters. The 
Fourteenth Amq^idment provides 
for such reduction but its man- 
date has never been implemented. 

If the Tiffany proposal were 
adopted Mississippi would lose 
one half of its present congres- 
sional delegation. That represen- 
tation would be inyeased as 
Mississippi lowered barriers 
against Negro voters. 


The "good people" of Missis- 
sippi who excuse their failure to 
speak out, and act, against dis- 
franchisement of Negroes would 
i-egain their voices if they lost 
representation in Congress. 

Disfranchisement of Negroes is 
not as extensive in other south- 
ern states as it is in Mississippi 
but every one of them would lose 
congressmen under the Tiffany 
proposal. 

Soft words will never persuade 

the Dixiecrats of the error -of 

their ways. Loss of Congressional 
seats would. 


W. H. Terry, Good Citizen 


The death of W. H. Terry re- 
moves another of the dwindling 
band of pioneers whose work and 
sacrifice has made an indelible 
impress on the Negro community 
of Los Angeles and on the city 

itself. 

He was. a self effacing man, a 
contractor, who stuck to his job 


but who was always on hand to 
play an honorable part in civic 
and community affairs. 

Los Angeles is a better city for 
what he did and all of us enjoy a 
greater measure of freedom be- 
cause of the part he played in 
making our city a better place 
in which to live. 



Rftmember when ||||e cheered 
the. advent of "good old 1960?" 
When we joyfully waved good- 
bye to dreary 1959 and pre- 
dicted all sorts 
of goodies to be 
coming our 
w a y i n the 
New Year? 

T h e r ft was 
no reason — no 
sensible rea- 
son, that is — 
for the optim- 
i.sm. It was just 
the incurabl.v 
Granger wistful and 
wishful thinking of the hu- 
man animal that what's 'ahead 
can't possibly be worse than 
what's behind and that any 
change is apt to be for the 
better. There's no justifica- 
tion for such a belief, of 
course; as witness, nuclear re- 
search, tail-fin cars, Levit- 
towns, Frank Lloyd Wright 
architecture, Nazism and Com- 
munism. White Citizens Coun- 
cils, hoatniks. and all the host 
of .small and big changes that 
have marked shifts in the po- 
litical, economic, scientific 
and .social structure. 

What's Ahead 

."^n. before we call "good old 
1960" a complete stinker and 
joyfully hail the entrance of 
1961. let's lake a realistic look 
at what's ahead and see what 
ne^-ds to be done in order to 
make some of oijr optimism 
come true. 

For instance, there arc jobs 
— and what happens to jobs 
will determine what happens 
to the fortunes of possibly a 
hundred thousand colored 
families in these. United 
States. The outlook for 1961 
isn't good. And it could re- 
main not-so-good for some 
years to come, unless some- 
thing is done to change the 
pattern. 

The nation passed the four 
million unemployed mark 
weeks ago and is heading 
deep into the five million 
range. Forecasters are warn- 
ing that the six million mark 
will be reached by Spring un- 
less steps are taken jointly 
by government, industry and 
labor to ward off a serious 
recession. Remember 1949? 
Well, this can be even worse. 

International Outlook 

There are international af- 
fairs — and the interest of 
Arnerican Negroes in world 
•affairs has stepped 'way up 
since New Africa came on the 
scene. The .scone doesn't look 
good— not for 1961 or 1962 or 
some .\ears beyond — and we'd 
he silly to kid oursebfes. The 
free nations have gc^ten tired 
of remaining constantly on 
the qui vi\c; consequentlv 
the various alliances against 
Comumnist imperialism ha\e 
weakened.. 

Soviet Russia, aided by in- 
experienced and short-sighted 
new or neutralist nations of 
Africa and Asia, has given 
what may well be the death 
blow to the United Nation's 
capacit.v for defending the 
peace. Sekou Touro has given 
Russia a comfortable moorage 
for political andr economic ex- 
pansion designs. Commu- 
nist China will undoubtedly 
precipitate fresh aggression 
against her weak Asian neigh- 


bors during the year ahead — 
and chances are that the Big 
Four of the free world will 
find excuses for looking the 
other way when it happens. 

We're not likely to have an- 
other Korea right away, only 
more of "Viet Nam and Laos 
and Cambodia. But that'll be 
enough to sap the enthusiasm 
of free nations for freedom's 
defense. Look, therefore, for 
further weakening of the pos- 
tme agkinst Communist ag- 
gression. 

New Orleans Pattern 
Moscow is reported to an- 
ticipate "pleasanter relations" 
with the new Administration. 
If that happens, it's bad news 
for all of us, and it probably 
won't happen. Moscow's idea 
of pleasant relations is when 
the Reds have their own way 
— and even the short-witted 
among us are beginning to un- 
derstand that when the Reds 
have their way the rest of us 
who hope some day to develop 
a decent form of society will 
be on our way out. So look for 
more barroorn diplomacy from 
K. and Co. 

The Bourbon South will con- 
tinue to be a disgrace to 
American government, an im- 
pediment to the development 
of a third of our nation and 
a threat to .American security 
in world affairs. 'Because the 
representatives of Bourbonism 
maintain their grip on the 
Congre.ss through control of 
key chairmanships, there will 
be slight tendency on the part 
of the Presidency to risk sabo- 
tage of its overall program 
by hearing down heavll^j^mi 
civil rights. \ 

Louisiana is showing the 
rest of the mutinous South 
how to finagle and delay, ob- 
struct and intimidate — and 
make the citizens pay for it 
— in slowing dou'n the inte- 
gration crawl. Other • states 
will take the hint. Look for 
more, not less, of the N?w^ 
Orleans-style demonstrations. 
Look for more gradualism in 
enforcing the Constitution, but 
look for the Kennedy admin- 
istration to be more imagina- 
tive in initiating and adver- 
tising the small gains. 
Cabinet Issue Dead 
There will be no more talk 
for a long time about "a 
Negro in the Cabinet." The in- 
nocent among us will applaud 
the President-elect for "offer- 
ing" the Postmaster General's 
spot to Bill Dawson and will 
feel reproachful that the ven- 
erable political bo.ss of Chi- 
cago declined it. 

The more sophisticated will 
rocogni/.c t hat the offer was 
like asking your grandmother 
to dance, knowing that her 
friends will like the gesture 
and that the old lady will de- 
cline, .so everybod.v will he 
happy. Look for the Democrats 
to make the Republican rec- 
ord of job-dispensing look bad 
by contrast. They will hand 
out more jobs and better ones 
to reward the faithful and 
proselyte further among the 
unconvf^rted. And the propor- 
tion of 5s'egro Democrats will 
increase, and their party in- 
fluence will remain where it 
is — at lower levels and in re- 
stricted areas. 
• HAPPY NEW YEAR, 
EVERYBODY! 


Loren Miller Says . . . 


(Continued "from Page 1) 
partner in the promotion of 
residential segregation. 
Kept His Head 

During his service in the 
housing agency. Weaver did 
his best to see to it that Ne- 
groes got their "fair share" of 
both housing and jobs. That 
was about all he could do but 
he never lost his belief that 
residential segregaUon was 
the basic evil that doomed Ne- 
groes to inferior housing and 
slum sections of the cities. 

During the long legal battle 
over racial restrictive coven- 
ants, Weaver did the spade 
work on facts, figures and 
statistics designed to per- 
suade the Supreme Court that 
judicial enforcement of such 
covenants ran counter to the 
constitutional command for 
equality. Later he helped 
found the Na.tional Committee 
Against Discrimination in 
Housing. He became one of 
the mainstays in the NAACP 
fight against governmental 
assistance to disciiminatory 
builders and developers. 
A New Day 
The changing times were 
reflecte,d in Weaver's appoint- 
ment as Rent Administrator 
by Governor Averell Harri- 
man of New York In 1958. He 
wasn't a "Negro" rent admin- 
istrator or a "Negro Advisor" 
to the rent administator. He 
was the rent administrator. 
When Rockefeller ousted Har- 


riman as New Y^ork's" gover- 
nor, Weaver lost his job. He 
found another: as chairman 
of the New York City Urban 
Redevelopment Commission. 
Again he wasn't chairman of 
the "Negro" commission and 
he wasn't just a member of 
the City Commission. He was 
the choirman of the New York 
City Redevelopment Commis- 
sion. 

Now Weaver has been 
named to head the nation's 
Housing and Home Finance 
Agency. He's .not its advisor, 
or one of its underlings. He's 
going to be the man who 
heads the tremendously im- 
portant agency that is in di- 
rect charge of the nation's en- 
tire housing program. What 
he does in the next few years 
will shape the face and the 
futSure of America's cities, and 
the lives of millions of urban 
dwellers. 

It's a far cry from a "Ne- 
gro Advisor" on housing af- 
fairs to head of the nation's 
housing program. Weaver is 
where he is because he 
wouldn't let go of the Amer- 
ican dream and because the 
American dream has expanded 
to a point where it has a 
place for Negroes who share 
it and work to expand it 


Blow Seen for Tbulamans Blast 
Housing Bias La. 'Way of Life' 

In Appointmenl 


i 


i 

r 


fContlniiod from Vn^n 1) 


j'Mibllc' 


llirre 
IK a 
re«l- 
sup- 


lauhclied Uif (f<ifin\ 
housing prrigrnrn. 

Horvard Orad 

Weaver, who liolrU 
degrees from HHivard, 
long time foe of racial 
dential segregation. He 
ervlsed preparation of an 
"economic brief" in the famed 
Race Rpstjictive Covenant 
cases and is the author of a 
t)ook, "The Negro Ghetto," and 
numerous articles attacking 
segregation. He is present 
chairman of the national 
Board of Directors of the 
NAACP and is one of the 
founders and chairman of the 
National Committee Against 
Discrimination in Housing. 

It will co.st Weaver .SI 500 a 
year to take the HHFA posi- 
tion since his New York job 
paid that much more than the 
federal post offers. He told 
newsmen Sunday- that he will 
resign from his .NAACP post 
as chairman of the Board but 
will continue his membership. 
Washington Born 

Born in Washington, D.C., 
and educated in its public 
scliools. Weaver took Iiis A.B., 
A.M. and Doc^tor of Philosophy 
degrees from Harvard where 
he rnajored in economics. 
After leaving his housing post, 
the new appointee .served in 
tlie War Production Board and 
the War Manpower Commi-s- 
sion. 

He left public .ser\ice after 
World War II to accept a job' 
in Chicago as director of the 
Marsliall Field Fund and mov- 
ed on to the Whitney Founda- 
tion. He hTso worked for the 
Ford Foundation for a brief 
period. ^ 

Cabinet Post 
Political rumor has it that 
Weaver will be one of the top 
contenders for the cabinet 
position as Secretary of Ur- 
ban .Affairs if the Kennedy 
administration is successful in 
. getting Congress to establish 
suc-h a post. 

Weaver's long and well 
known opposition to residen- 
tial segregation is expected to 
stir up opposition to his ap- 
pointment by southerners who 
h;-ivc stymied all efforts to 
insert non - discriminatory 
amendments in housing legis- 
lation. 

End FHA Bias 
The order which will be 
issued b.v the new president 
will require admission of T^'e- 
groes to all public housing 
projects and will require af- 
firmative covenants of non- 
discrimination by builders and 
lending agencies which build 
housing for sale or rental 
under the FH.\ program. It 
will .require similar covenants 
from private developers who 
secure benefits imder the ur- 
ban renewal and urban redc- 
\e!opment program. 

During his presidential cam- 
pa gn. President Elect Ken- 
nedy said repeatedly that dis- 
crimination under federal 
hoiising programs could be 
"ended by a stroke of the 
y>eh " ' The Democratic party, 
platform contained a plank 
pledging tlic party to end such 
discrimination. 


'C'ontjnued from Page 1) 
■pdicni* of organized vilifica- 
tion Mnd Intimidation are 
wilhin the rights of 'peaceful 
dlhKenf? 

"In If cr«»dible that packs of 
marauding jackaLs destroy 
profierty and inflict bodily in- 
jury with Impunity, while col- 
lege students are arrested for 
distributiiig protesting but 
non -inflammatory literature 
opposing segregation? Assur- 
edly, to state these things is 
to labor the obviojs; yet per- 
haps the mere putting them 
on paper relieves the inner 
tension and makes possible a 
sober analysis of the situa- 
tion . . . 

"It is, possibly, difficult for 
one who has not llveu in the 
South to appreciate the facil- 
ity with which the southerner 
can to.ss aside the accumulat- 
ed findings of 50 years of .so- 
cial science and assert, in the 
face of overwhelming evi- 
donce to the contrary, that the 
Negro is "obviously" inferior, 
but, withal, a hajspy creature 
— see how they sing and 
dance! 

Prefer Death 

"It is quite common to hear 
white men and women state 
that they wo\*Jd prefer their 
children dead to seeing them 
going to integrated schools. 
And the trag'ic fact is that 
these attitudes are most pre- 
valent in the* very areas 
where education has made the 
slightest inroads . . . 

"Of course, in the city of 
New Orleans a considerable 
body of moderate opinion per- 
sists; opposition to school 
closure and willingness to ac- 
cept 'token' integration. 

"But these moderate groups 
are, like their counterparts the^ 
uorld over, the most insistent^ 
upon the forms of 'democ- 
racy' and the processes of 
law; they lack the organiza- 
tion and numbers of the fren- 
zied segregationists (though 
one group of white mothers 
voluntarily transports eight 
white children to the integrat- 
ed school and receives, for its 
trouble, constant telephone 
harassment). 

"Where one such group con- 


tributes to pay the salaries of 
the teachers in the integrated 
schools, its segregationist 
counterparts contribute to thg 
cost of mass rallies, hate lit- 
erature and all the accoutre- 
ment of rabid violence. And at 
the center of the discord are 
the politicos, at once the in- 
stigators and the beneficiar- 
ies of the public convulsions. 

"The legislature sits in con- 
tinuous special session at an 
estimated cost of $14,000 per 
day. The sessions are almost 
wholly occupied by a parade- 
of politicians before the mic- 
rophones, denouncing all mod- 
eration ias subversion, casti- 
gating reason as communi.sm, 
and vowing undying devotion 
to our 'southern way of life' 
— including open and manda- 
tory racial discrimination and 
the accompanying exploita- 
tion of poor-white and Negro 
alike. 

■■.A.nd most ironically of aU, 
it is now proposed 1±iat the 
state sales tax be increased 
by one percent to finance the 
continued opposition to the in- 
evitable. The people of the 
state are asked to subject 
themsehes to a painfully re- 
gressive tax measure in order 
to enable the politicians to 
completely destroy the. educa- 
tion system whioji holds the 
only hope of enligTitenment 
for the great mass of those 
people. 

"Does history record a more 
bitter satire? 

"This is the dilemma which 
Louisiana faces — the impos- 
sible conflict of reason and 
unreason. The U.S. Supreme 
Court has, in effect, declared 
that ignorance, prejudice, big- 
otry and venality will no long- 
er be acceptable as the basis 
of state legislation relati\'e to 
public education. 

"Yet these four hosemen of 
the modern racist apocalypse 
presently hold swayin Louis- 
iana. The issue, at this writ- 
ing, remains in doubt, but the 
gloom is virtually unrelieved- 


You can't always tell what 
makes a man tick until you 
meet his wife. 


After arresting a man for 
pickirfg a woman's pocket in 
a department store. Tok\uj 
police proceeded to arrest the 
lady. She had been so busy 
shoplifting that she had not 
noticed that she had been 

robbed. 

• • « 

At the insistance of his wife. 
Ram Houston, the lusty Texas 
■hero, joined the Baptist 
Church, .\fter he had been 
baptized by irpmorsion in the 
river, the pre^her said, "Your 
sins are now all washed 
away." To which Sarn Houston 
replied, "God help the fish." 

* • * 

Said one pert miss to an- 
other at a soda counter, "What 
I really crave is one of those 
darling foreign sports cars— 
with the foreign sport still in 
it." 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

'Tha Important Newspaper' 

2101 W. Vernon Ave. 

Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

AXminster 5-3135 

.^^ 44 

LOREN MILLER 
Publisher 

Thursday Jan. 5, 1961 
Vol. UXX No: -42 

GRACE SIMONS....Executive Editor 

F. P. WALLER. Jr Adv. Mgr. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

.._ Circulation IVIgr. 

CALME RUSS Office Mgr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. G. Allen 1512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph. EX. 5-1591 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 

1907 20th street (Upstairs) 

Phone EXbrook 4-S0S2 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! 
O $4.00 for 1 Year 
n $1.50 for 3 Months 
G $2.50 ^or 6 Months 

Adjudication Decree Number 123228 

Oite of Adiudication July 1, 1923 

Published every Thursday by 

The California Eagle Publishing 

Co., 2101 West Vernon Avenue; at 

Van Nose, Loi Angeles 8, Calif. 

Entered as Second Class Matter 

November 3, 1937, at the Post 

Office at Los -Angeles, California, 

undr the Act of March 3, 1879. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWSPAPERS 

545 Fifth Avenue 
New York 17, New York 


Takes 
Curtis King 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ects, he was best known for 
the founding of the Rose Netta 
Hospital and the many hours 
he spent there during the '40s 
and the early '50s. 

Dr. King is survived by his 
daughter, Mrs. Rose Marie 
Terry, a teacher at the 102nd 
Street School; a brother, C. S. 
King, who lived with him at 
his ranch; and his former 
wife, Mrs. Rosa Mae King, 
who married Dr. King in 192.5 
and who for four years held 
the position of superintendent 
of nurses at Rose Netta. 
Practiced in eGergia 
Born in Princeton, K.v., and 
educated in Cairo, 111., Dr. 
King worked his way through 
college at Roger Williams 
L'ni\'ersit.v in Nashville and 
completed his medical work 
at Meharry. *raduating in 
1924. After interning at Tus- 
kegee, he went to Georgia and 
began practice in Newnan, 
Ga.. where after establishing 
himself by dint of arduous 
work, he finally founded the 
Curtis King Hospital in that 
city. 

At Newnan he specialized 
in and became an authority 
on the treatment of venereal 
disease. In 1929 he, his wife 
and daughter left the South 
and headed for Los Angeles. 

For years he was in charge 
of the South Los Angeles V'e- 
neral Clinic; he served for 
three years in charge of the 
102nd Street Clinic; was a 
panel physician for the Los 
Angeles General Hospital; ex- 
amaning physician for the 
Selective Ser\"ice Board; mem- 
ber of the 28th Street Clinic, 
and e.xamining physician for 
the State Boeing Commission. 
Blood Bank 
In 1942 an interracial blood 
bank was set up under Dr. 
King's supervision at the com- 
pletel.v integrated Rose Netta 
Hospital. 

He was a member of nu- 
merous medical, civic and 
other organizations, including 
the Los Angeles County Medi- 
cal .\ss'n; the National Medi- 
cal Ass'n: Southern California 
Medical, Dental and Pharma- 
ceutical Ass'n; member of the 
board of directors of the Los 
Angeles County branch of the 
American Cancer Society; a 
33rd Degree Mason; and a 
member of the South Los An- 
geles Chamber of Commerce. 
On Thursday Dr. King tele- 
phoned from Elsinore to his 
daughter, Who lives at 9418 
Zamora avenue, saying he 
hadn't been feeling too well 
since Christmas, but that he 
expected to come in to see her 
tlje next day. 

in mid-afternoon she re- 
ceived another call saying 
that an ambulance had been 
summoned to take her father 
to the Good Samaritan Hos- 
pital for observation. 

Shortly after that. Dr. King 
suffered a severe heart attack 
and died before the ambulance 
arrived 


It's Not Our 
Fault -It's the 
'Typo' Gremlin 

In order to explain to 
readers what is meant by a 
"typo," the Rock\ille (Ind.) 
Tribune ran the following ex- 
planation: 

"O n e of my newspaper 
friends relates that recently 
there was a discussion, wi^h 
perhaps some ugly words, go- 
ing on in his office concerning 
a 'typo.' A customer overheard 
some of the remarks and 
wanted to know what it was. 
Law of the 'Typo' 
"The answer is that it is an 
abbreviation of the word's 
'typographical eiTor' — an upl.v 
mixing of letters or words in 
a line that is as annoying as 
it is unintentional. 

"The Law of the Typo 
works like this: 

"I. Most of the time, the 
typo will appear in a story or 
ad that is important T>pos 
rarely appear in stories or ads' 
you don't care about. 

2. T\-pos are sneak.v. Some- ■ 
times four or fixe will appear 
in one issue of a publicatio.n. 
After much sx^earing. check- 
ing, probing, detective work, 
you'll ha\e the typos so 
frightened that they go away. 
You think they are gone for 
good. But they are not. When 
you've forgotten all about 
them, back they come. 
One in a. Million 
"3. If you write a story 
about, say. Mrs. Winterbottom 
and her friends and it comes.- 
out fiends, you can be pretty 
sure that after you have 
Calmed Mrs. Winterbottom 
down and promised her that 
the typo was one of those one- 
in-a-million-years type of thing, 
the very next story you write 
about her will have another 
typo in it. 

"Perhaps something like her 
husband was .seen looking at 
the new window doNvntown 
will be the way you write it, 
only after the typo has crept 
in, it will read that her bus- 
band was s^n looking at the 
new widow downtown. 
The Typo's Cousins 
"4. The t.vpo has some 
cousins and they are no im- 
provement over the tj-po. One ' 
is the headline on the wTong 
story. It usually works, this 
■way — a very important local. J 
personality dies and over his 
obit appears this headline:. 
•Improvement Seen in Local 
Affairs.' 

"5. Another cousin of the 
typo is the wrong outline 
under a picture, you'll run a 
picture of a pretty girl in a 
bathing, suit and somehow the 
outline will read. The Hu- 
mane Society announces that 
this little pet is looking for a 
good home and a kindly 
master.' 

"6. The typo is as much a 
part of American life -as the 
mosquito and about as hard 
to kill."— The American Press, 
December 1960. 


I'd rather lose in a cause 
that will one day win. than 
win in a cause that will some 
day lose.— Woodrow Wilson. 




a 


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'• '/•//£ UORLD OF SPIRIT" — Ret: S. S. Heylmger. 
pnstnr of the Mnnr-Emeth foundation, uill spenk on the 
"World of the Sf>irit." fit II a.m. Sunday. Jan. S, at 
Baie.r Ilnll. 1^28 S. J'ermont avenue. The lecture is one in 
ei scries of lectures held at Baces Hall each uerk hy the 

I oiindnti'iri. \ 


Rev. Townsend 
Dies at 91 in 
Little Rock 

Rev. V. M. Tevvnsend, Sr., 
D.D., of 2123 Cross street, Lit- 
tle Rock, Ark., the fatiier of 
Atty. Vince Monroe Townsend, 
Jr., .3662 S. Arlington avenue, 
died at his Little Rock home 
on Saturdav, Dec. 31. He was 
91. 

On last Thanksgiving Day, 
Rev. Townsend, Sr. then in his 
91st year, retired from the ac- 
tive ministry of the AME 
Church, at the Northeast Ar- 
kansas Conference, in Wynne, 
Ark. He served for 63 consecu- 
tiev years as an Itinerant 
Elder "in tiie AME Church. 

A special celebration was 
given his retirement at the 
Conference, and his son, Atty. 
Townsend, was the principal 
speaker for the occasion. 

Rev. Townsend, Sr., served 
for more than 50 years as a 
Presiding Elder in the AME 
Church, and attended and 
participated in the last 16 
consecutive General Confer- 
ence Quadrennial sessions. 


Christian Education Worksliop 
Opens Jan. 10 at First Baptist 


-SANTA- 
MONICA 
NEWS 


birthday party, Rev. Townsend 
Sr. contracted a cold, which 
quickly developed into pneu- 
I monia, from which he never 
recovered. 

' He is survi\ed by his 
[widow, Mrs. Essie Cox Town- 
isend, two daughters, Mrs. 

Rev. Roy L. Thompson announced this week Mary Dinkins of Arkadelphia, 
that Dr. Herman Waetjen, professor of New Testa- Ark., and Mrs. Thelma Lewis, 
ment studies at the USC, Will lead Chrifitian Edu- of Washington, D.C., and his 
ration workers in a study of. the formation, of the^o"' Y'"^*' Monroe Townsend, 
New Testament at the annual workers series, which ^^■' 

will be held at First Baptist '■> : 

Church, 760 S. Westmoreland i ornia Council of Churches. 
avenue, on Jan. 10, 17, 24, and I Mrs. Wallace G. Frasher is 
31. and the sessions will begin the director of the department 
at 7 p.m. with a special pre- \ and Rev. Roy L. Thompson is 
.«;entationof the latest develop., serving as the dean of this ReVlVGl dGriCS I 


The home of Rev. W. P. 
Carter was entered by a burg- 
ler on New Year's eve by rip- 
ping off a screen door. Papers 
and items of value to the Car- 
ters only, were taken 
• * • 

The Better Children Club 
held its New Year program 
last Saturday under the super 
vision of Mrs. Mary Coleman 
of Venice. The children, fiv\j 
to ten years of age presented 
a play entitled "The Birth of 
the New Born King," which 
was directed by Mary Louise 
and Anna Mae Moore. 
. The president of the group 
is Zeckery Coleman; vice 
president, Anna Mae Moore 
secretary, Mary Louise Moore 
and advisor, Mae Ruth Forbes 
Members include Clifford 
Goodnite, Danny Williams 
Jerry Turner, Mary J. Moore 
Kathy Turner, Mattie Moore, 
Pam Forbes, Mary Lizza Witi' 
ker. Sonny Forbes, Johnny Lee 
Turner, Lara Scott, Beatris 
.-■ „, . W i 1 1 i a m s. Buddv Legans 
Just .six days^after^ his 91st ^^^^^^ Williams, Gloria Steph- 


use of Audio- 


ments in the 
visual aids. 

tOher courses will be offer- 
ed in the areas of Administra- 
tion. Foundations of Teach- 
ings.^ 
Children's Work. 

" The Workshop Series is 
sponsored by the Department 
of Christian Education of the 
Cirurch Federation of Los An- 
geles and the Southern Calif- 


workshop series. 


Goal Reached 

GLENDALE — The Southern 

I California Conference of 

Adult Work, Youth and | geventh-diy Adventists today 

announced that its 57th an- 
nual World Mission Appeal 
public fund drive goal of 
$215,000 has been passed. 

William L. Barclay said 
$221,327.56, has been raised. 


Los Angeles. 

Former Olivet 
Pastor to Open 
Revival Series 


WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones, Pastor 

3-30 and 11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 

9:30 am —Church School Kindercarten to 6th Grade— Adult Classes 

11 00 am.— Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr. 

7 p m— Westminster Bible Hour 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 

"Given Unto You"— R«v. Howard R. Caray preaching 

Sunday School-9:30 A.M. Worship-llrOO A.M. 

HEALING SERVICE AT 5 P.M. 


Rev. G. L. Bedford, pastor of 
the Macedonia Baptist Church ,, , ■ r~. 

of San Francisco, will conduct ^^.''.'^^f^Lf:!"!^!- ^^^ 
a revival at 
Greater Taber- 
nacle Baptist 
Church, 4155 
McKinley ave- 
n u e. starting 
Sunday, Jan. 8. 
R e V. E. S. 
Robinson, pas- 
tor of Greater 
Tabernacle an- 

j nounced last 
week that Rev. E. S. JOHNSOW 

1 Bedford is the former pastor 
of Greater Olivet Baptist 
Church and is a gifted evan- 
gelist. Many souls are exi>ect- 

led to be won for Christ during 

I the revival meetings which 

'will be conducted each night 

through Jan. 13. 



ens. Sheila Williams, Gfegory 
Williams, Johnny Stevens, 
Ronnie Coeman, Charlene 
Moore, Jerome Wiliams and 
Mary Coleman. 

The party which followed 
was the fifth annual party 
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs 
Zeckery Coleman of 525 
Broadway avenue. 

Mrs. Li Hie M. Rodgers is in 
Athens, Te.xas attending the 
funeral of her sister. 

The next meeting of the 
NAACP Membership Commit- 
tee will me^let at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Allen, 
1945 22nd .street. 

Twenty-six dollars in mem- 
berships was turned in at the 
home of the E. G. Aliens last 

mem- 
bers joining the NAACP in- 
cluded Essie and John Lundy, 
Charles Rooks, David Ragin, 
Luther and Sidney Yates and 
Roosevelt Epps. 

Among the members present 
at the fellowship meeting 
were: Rhene Crawford, Delia 
Powell, Louclla Allen, Ola 
Stewajtt, Arabelle Preston, Sue 
Bodolay. C. M. Garland, E. G. 
Allen, Harold Preston, R. J. 
Hatchctt, Julio Marlines, 
Moses Boozer and Oriel Powell. 


NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC. 


5965 S. Broadway Avenua- Rav. Anita L Edmonds, Pastor 

Pentacostal and Interracial 

9:30 A.M.-Sonday School 10:45 A.M.-Wor$hip Service 

7:30 P.M.-Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.-Prayer Service 


Rev. P. J. Ellis 
Re-elected Head 
Of Bapt. Union 

The Baptist Ministers Union 
reelected its incumbent of- 
ficers during the regular meet- 
ing of the group at McCoy 
Memorial Baptist Church on 


Two Guests 
Set to Speak 
At Bethel 

Bethel AME Church will 
hold its second Quarterly 
Meeting at the 1511 W. 36th 
.sitreet church on Jan. 8 with 
Presiding Elder A. K. Quinn 
preaching at the 11 a.m. ser- 
vice. 

At 3:30 p.m. Rev. Paul E. 
Kidd of Walker Temple AME 
Church, will speak at the Fel- 
lowship service. Rev. Kidd was 


Clnir^T)imt5 


Thursday, January 4, 1961 


The California Eagle— 5 


m Pledged 
To First AME 
Building Fund 

By Sarah Nelson 

A capacity audience wit- 
nessed new faith and vows in 
religion at historic First AME 
Church, 8th and Towne ave- 
nue, on New Year's day. The 
pastor, Dr. H. H. Brookins, de- 
livered the message, the ser- 
mon topic being "God Will 
Meet Us at Every Corner." 

Among the recent distin- 
guished pulpit guests were 
Bishop R. R. Wright, Jr., who 
pledged $1000 to the building 
fund for the new church edi- 
fice; and Dr. J. Russell Brown, 
of Chicago, secretary of the 
AME Church, who administer- 
ed the. New Year's Day com- 
munion. There were four ac- 
cessions at this service in- 
cluding one convert. 

The spirit of the ser\ice ran 
high with the official family 
endorsing the proposed pro- 
gram for 1960-61, the high- 
light of the year to be a 
combined Men and Women's 
Day effort which will be held 
early this year, terminating 
on the fourth Sunday in Feb- 
ruary. The membership is 
eagerly looking forward to a 
successful culmination of this 
gigantic project. Dr. H. H. 
Brookins has demonstrated his 
ability to revolutionize the 
program of the church and yet 
preserve its fine traditions. 



LAST RITES HELD— 

Luneral services Here held 
for fiioneer contractor II ood- 
ford Terry, in the chapel 
of .Inffclcs Funeral Ilotnr, 
which li'as one of the huihl- 
ini/s he constructed. 

Angelus Rites 
Conducted tor 
W. H. Terry, 89 

A virus infection was fatal 
Tuesday, Dec. 27, for Wood- 
ford H. Terry of 1152 E. Adams 
blvd. Death came two weeks 
after he was admitted to the 
hospital for treatment of the 
ailment which had kept the 
89ycar-old building contrac- 
tor inacti\p. 

Funeral services for the 
Birmingham, Ky. native were 
held on Dec. 30 at the Angeles 
Funeral Home. Interment fol- 
lowed at Lincoln Memorial 
Park. 

For more than S.t >oars Mr. 
Terry operated a general con- 
tracting business in Los An- 
geles, where he has lived for 
Ministers from all over the: 52 years. Among the build- 


Witnesses Hear of God's 
Interest in Man's Affairs 

The University congregation of Jehovah^s Wit- 
nesses and others who assembled at the Los Angeles 
Trade-Tech Auditorium last, week heard Theodore 
Jaracz of New York speak on the subject, "Is God 
Interested in the Affairs of Man." 
God's interest in man was '^ 


scripturally outlined by Mr. 
Jaracz as he cited such vital 
provisions made by God for 
man's need. "Among the 
simple but necessary things 
needed by man," he said, "are 
the air we breathe, the sun for 
heat and light, water and food 
and the Bible as a divine 
guide." 

Individual Account 
He quoted passages from 
Revelation, chapter. 11 an'^ 12 
t ■ further stress God's interest 
in man by putting peace dis- 
turbers on judgment, adding, 
"God has determined to de- 
stroy those that are destroying 
or ruining this earth, there- 
fore we have reached the 
stage where each individual 
must give an accounting as to 


interested in the affairs ,of 
men. 

Live in Peace 

"God has purposed to elim- 
inate selfish men and preserve 
only righteous pversons who 
desire to live in permanent 
peace under God's' kingdom 
for which Christians are 
taught to pray," Jaracz said. 

A baptismal ceremony was 
held by the .Witnesses in 
whiqji many in the local con- 
gregation participated, 'demon- 
sjtrating interest in God by 
making a dedication to serve 
Him. 


HAMILTON WOMEN 

The Women's Society of 
where he stands in his love | Christian Service, of Hamilton 
for God and His Kingdom." Methodist Church, 6330 S. Fig- 
The district minister urged |Ueroa street, will 'hold its an- 
the assembled delegates, "notjnual Thank Offering service 
to follow the course of indif- at 10:45 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 8, 
ference to the Creator's right- with Mrs. Itasca Lewis as the 
eous purposes since He is still guest speaker. 


Martin L. King 
To Confer Here 
With Ministers 


l/MfNrAL COMfORTERl 


iSP/ft/rUAl ADV/SOftI 


ELDER J. B. MOORE 



Di 


H 


Fr 


euler r ram 


Birth 


AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER. WE WILL NOT FAIL 

Church at the Sons of God— Moses & Aaron 

217 E. Florence Ave. PL 1-6892 

421 N. 4th Ave, Pbcatcllo, Idaho CE. 2-9438 


state will meet on Jan. 14. for 
an all-day conference with the 
Rev. Martin Luther King, at 
Zion Hill Baptist Church, 51st 
and McKinley avenue. 

Among the items on the 
agenda will be the completion 
of plans for the presentation 
of issues to the state legisla- 
ture during the coming ses- 
sion. As well as continued 
non -violent pressure for civil 
rights. 


"Good temper, like a sunny 
day, sheds a ray of brightness 
over everything; it is the 
sweetener of toil and the 
soother of disquietude!" 

— Washington Irving 


ings he constructed were the 
Angelus Funeral Home, the 
Hud.son-Wydell Building on 
Central avenue, the Jones 
.Mortuary in Pasadena and the 
homes of several professional 
and businessmen in the area. 
Though born in Kentucky, 
Mr. Terry was raised in Tenn- 
essee. He ■'was married for 
more than 50 years to Jessie 
L. Terry who survives him. He 
was the father of public rela- 
tions man. Frank Terry of 
Los Angeles; Mrs. Juanita 
Barbee Of Washington. D.C., 
who is office manager for 
Congressman James Roose- 
velt; and Mrs. Buelah Good- 
man of New York Citv. 


Jan. .3. Rev. P. J. Ellis as, recently appointed to Walker 
president of the group has led 1 Temple by Bishop H. Thomas 


Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


CHU;iCH OF CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

3125 W. ADAMS BLVD. 

/ 11 a.m.— Morning Worship Senice 

Key. James H. Hargett Will Speak 

;.\D.AV SCHOOL. 9:30 a.m.— Kindergarten Through 5th 


Grade 
11 a.m. -6th Grade ThrouKh High School 


•HAMILTON METHODIST CF^UltCH- 


6330 SO. FIGUEROA ST. PUeisant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. DOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 

a a.m. — Rev. J. Lewis. Preaching 

••We Are Well Able — Numbers 13:31 

9:30 a.m. — Church School (for All Ages) 

10:45 am. — Youth Church s*. _ 

ni —Thank Offering Service — Mrs. Stasca Lewis. Speaker 
6:30 p.m. — Methodist Youth and Wesley Fellowship 
7:30 p.m. — Vesper Communion Service 


10:45 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Ghurcli 

lAST 36fh AND TRINITY STUtlTS - HIV. JOHN C. BAIN, MINISTIR 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 

"IIFE CAN BE IIVABLE" 

REV. SAIN PREACHING AT 9 AND )1 A.M. 

The public is cordially invittd to »t1end. 


the group through a most suc- 
cessful year. Rev. C. H. Henson 
is vice-president. Rev. Claude 
Evans, secretary. 

According to reports from 
the group. S-jOOO is being sent 
to the Montgomery Improve^ 
ment .-Association by the 
Un'ion. Bringing to date a 
total of S12.00n spent by the 
Union for the good of man- 
kind under Rev. Ellis' leader- 
ship. 

Rev. E. A. Anderson willj 
preach the installation sermon j 
at n a.m. Sunday at McCoy 
.Memorial Baptist Church, 802 
E. 4fith street. 

Last Sunday Rev. Anderson 
joined ministers of every faith' 
in prayers for a peaceful and' 
prosperous year for all, spirit-' 
uallv as well as materiallv. i 


Primm and is reported to be j 
building a stronger church | 
through his dedicated leader- ! 
ship. 

Dr. Fred E. Stephens, thej 
pastor of Bethel will preach j 
at the 8 'a.m. worship service. ! 


Christian Science 

Importance of understand- 
ing the spiritual meaning of 
the Eucharist and of truly 
commemorating the life of 
Christ Jesus will be empha- 
sized at the semi -annual' cam.^ 
munion service in all Christ- 
ian Science churches on Sun- 
daw 


Holman to Hold 
Mission Classes 


New York. N. Y. (Spe<-i«n - 

For the first time science has 
found a rffew healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain — without 
surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
another,"very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by a doctor's observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction or re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 

And most amazing of all — 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where a doctor's 
observations were continued 
over a period of many months! 

In fact, results were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 
to make such astoni.=;hinR state- 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 
a problem!". And among' these 
sufferers were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions, 
some of 10 to 20 years' standing. 

All this, without the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance (Bio- 
Dyne*)— the discovery of 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured 
tissue on all part? of the body. 

This new healing substance 
is offered in suppository or oint- 
vicnt form called Preparation 
//*. Ask for individually sealed 
convenient Prep.aration H Sup- 
positories or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli- 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drug counters. 



m 


IS THE RIGHT 

PRICE FOR A 

FUNERAL SERVICE 


Tabor Revival 

Mt. Tahor Baptist Church. 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 

1564 W. 36th PLACE AX. 1-9831 

Messages to All 

Services Sunday and Thursday at 8 P.M. 

Wednesday 2-4 P.AA. 

REV, OTIS STOVALL, Minister 


Holman Methodist Church, 
.3320 W. Adams blvd., will ob- 
serve Mission Sunday on Jan. 
P, beginning at 4 p.m. Sev- 
6612 S. 'Western avenue, will pral teachers will conduct 
open a revival at 7:45 p.m. on classes on various subjects 
.Tan. 8, wilh the Rev. S. W.lduring the afternoon, 
.lackson of Shreveport, La., as r^v. L. L. White will con- 
the evangelistic speaker. 'duct the usual inspirftational 

Rev. .T. Terrell Stewart, pas- m o r n i n g services at the 
tor of the church said that thCj usual inspirational .services 
services would continue church with special music by 
through Jan. 13. 'the choir. 




Terry Ravensdale 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING 
.1379 W. 3Sth PLACE - RE. 4-791 5_ 


First Rock Baptist Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 
Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

Sunday School 9:30 «fn. Mornma Worship 
1 1 ».rp. BTU 6:30 p.m. Eyanlng Service 
7:30 p.m. Song Service 8:45 p.m. Public 
is invited to Prey with ut el 7:30 pm. 
on Wednesday. 


~ "^e called /J^mlUoHf ^amiltf, , . .— 

. . . the elegant mortuary, thoughtful service and beautiful 
'cars provided a tribute of distinction for our beloved." 

Funeral Directors - Serving All IFtlh the Finest 
1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Richmond 7.9121 


TIME is the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
tion to Los Angeles families for more than 20 years 
— satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and 
honest service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reason- 
able. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 

coy TIN U IN G TO SERVE YOU 
AT OUR TEMPORARY LOCATION 

1430 East 103rd St. LO. 6-0022 


The right price for a funeral service 

is a matter of individual choice at 

Angelus Funeral Homes. We offer a 

complete display of plainly marked 

merchandise, permitting each family 

to select according to what they 

can easily afford. 



FUNERAL HOMES 


3 GENERATIONS OF 

FUNERAL SERVICE - 

PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE 

1030 E. Jc^fferson Blvd., Los Anseles 
ADams 2-S188 

718 E. Anaheim Street, Long Beach 
HEmlock 2-0449 


, V ,; I',, i. .. !■•." 

. .,...„.l ,:.. k,^...l. .!•;. ■■! 





THE BAHA'IS OF LOS ANGELES CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO HEAR A PANEL DISCUSSION OF THE BAHA'I WORLD FAITH ON 

WORLD RELIGION DAY 

!§; VIVDAY - JAXr ARY 15-8:00 P.M. 

L.A. BAHA'I CENTER 




331 SOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE 

EVERYONE IS INVITED - NO ADMISSION CHARGE - NO COLLKTIONS - REFRESHMENTS 



New Method! 

OU. 8-7048 

Urinary, Parsonal Problems 
Gland* and All Clinical 
Matters. Young Doctor ' 
invites Unusual Casn 

RESULTS! 

(Consultation Confidential) 


f 


*— The California Eagle 


hursday, January 5, 1961 



George Ramtey 


Beautiful Caliente in Old 
Mexico — Six ticketholders who 
selected five horses in the 5- 
30 public handicapping con- 
test last Sunday recotved SU.- 
781.80 each at Caliente Race 
Track. | 

Consolation awards of $84.4nj 
each went to 279 other ticket 
holders who had four horses 
picked correctly in Uie six- 
race scries. 

The .'lO poo! grossed 5K>I.- 
72S. Winning horses were L\ ■ i 
cos Boy. at S33.40. Flashy Win-, 
ncr at S9. One Tony Ton.\- »t 
$8. Admiral Fame, "at .S29.20. 1 
Hody at S7.80 and Kind Vie at 
S3.40. Jockey Omarr Picado 
scored two wins icn the ,^-Ki 
uith Iiis only mounts. Win- 
nine Numbers were 7'-4-l-ll- 
lA-3. 

The crowd of Ill.'C sent 
$387,245 through the mutuels 
for the II race nro5;rpm not 
ineluditi;; the .l-in pool. 

Caliente Horses to Watch Th-it 
Are Fit and Ready 
Four Star. r>?l-i> fftr 1!'P i-^ f.l 
Bright Lea. Watrli oiii fnr tlinj 


Que'iioy. 
Corrival, 


M;-' rpal conrilP 
Off bad in I 


iia' k 


lal.. 


Blew-My'-Stack, ri<-nt.\ 


All That Jazz. 


art I 


Tab loio 


1 1 > p r 


prrd 

for 

fii'iii 


Persequidor. A 

Mexi, n .CpI; 

Anno Doniini. I- ir ai"1 r' a'h 
Daring S'ckle. I-orKOl abni.t 

la.^t in tronblf 

Bayards Khal. Rc,"l.' f"|- a 

U 1 1 1 1 n L- 

Wonqa. Ill ^Pi^ "i-'i'l l''ii"^- 
Rpyal Sickle. My l"ii- lu'l 

-pri'i.ll „ 

Santa Anita 
Hasty Ace. M •■ I"'' 'i' 
Hasty Ace. \\Htrh oul t'U I in • 

Rhin. ( In.Kn , ^..."|!<- 

Bostot] Teapaity. Wil l"' i" 'I" 


Pro Tennis 
Clinic Set 
For Sunday 


Opening weekend action in 
the -ISrd annual Los Angeles J 
iMetrop61itan Tennis cliam- 
pioiKsIiips will be suspended 
for 90 minutes Sunday (Jan. 
Si s.o that competitors in the 
e\ent will be able to view the 
1-30 p.m. pro clinic which will 
bo conducted by Jack Kramer's 
troupe of touring professionals 
on Griffith Playground Tennis 
Center's exhibition court. 

The free net clinic and the 
19G1 edition of the Met-Net arc 
co-.'^ponsored by the Re<Tea- 
tion and Park Department and 
the MTA. 


ir; 


Chicago Wind. 


M t 


Big Joke 
P.'Ovc It. Mi-'n'\\ tiMii- 
More Glory- I'.'-liri lh;i 
Nimble Feet. I'll a tl 
Martial Rule. . \S ii"'- I" 
Scotland. ^\ ;<t'-li out ■ 


to I 


till 


Resolved. \ I"; sa"''' 
Keep this column for furthe^r 
reference as it onl>- appears 
in the California Kaglc. otil 
on xour ncus stande \'er>' U'rd- 
nr>.'day. For tlie best in the 
st>ort of kings, its tlic Calif- 
ornia Kagle 


^•v 


Jim Brown, Top Ball 
Carrier, to Play Jan. 15 


The ele\cntli annual All- 
Star Pro Bowl game betweeji 
the Western and Ea.'-tern Con- 
ferences of the NFL at t!ic Lc- 
.\ngeles Coliseum Jan. l.j will 
mean just that — the greatest 

players of the two divisions as Colts, iVVesti. 71 iTceplinns for 
chosen by the men who know 1298 \ards and Id tds. .\lso 
best, the']3 coaches. ihe 2-3-I-.') receivers. Sonn\ 

Manv all-star games are Itandlc. Cards, i Fast i ; Jim 


Eagles. (Lasli. nic .^Ir. F\cr\- 
ihiiig of pro football this sea- 
son: and Jolinnv Cnita>. Colts. 
I West I. Plaver of Ihe tiamc in 
thf 1960 Pro BovVl. 

Pass RcfCiviiig — Ra\- Bci r.v. 


USF and St. Mary 
Cagers Play Here 

Two of the most exciting 
basketball teams on the West 
Co, (St. Cni\cisil.v nf San Fran- 
i-iyrn and St. .Mar>'s come to 
Los Angeles this weekend to 
open the 10(il West Coast 
Athletic Conference basket- 
ball scasoji against Pepper- 
dine and Loyola. 

L'SK. fresh from t'ne cham- 
pionship in the WCAC holiday 
tourney, is paced by three 
sensational shooting sofjho- 
mores and junior deadeye Bob 
iCaillard. Tlip latter was Most] 
: Valuable in the tournament. | 
all-\\'CAC last \ear. and ha.s! 
been getting excellent suppx>rt ! 
from Henry Jfihnson. a trans-' 
f'-r from " Fast LAJC; Ed; 
Thomas, a former [irep all- 
.\nieiiiMn up from the Frosh.. 
and Llo\d .Moffal. an exciting, 
two-haid set-shot artist from' 
\Va:?liington. D.C. i 



Dodgers Play 
77 Home Tilts 
In Coliseum 

E. J. (Buzzie) Bavasi, vice- 
president and general man- 
ager of the Los Angeles Dodg- 
ers, announces the club will 
play a 75-date, 77-game home 
schedule in 1961 at the Coli- 
seum. 

The schedule includes ,'39 
single night games, one Satur- 
day day game, one holiday 
day game (May 30 1, two twi- 
light-night doubleheaders and 
12 Sunday afternoon games. 

The club will open the sea- 



Avcry Brundage, International Olympic Committee presi- 
dent, and his' recent proposa} to bar gold medal winners from 
defending their titles in the 01\-mpic Games by not per- 
mitting them to compete again is about as silly as the pro- 
gram he sanctioned to develop American amateur athletics. 


Thurs 


I'llOSI J()II\S(J\ nOYS—R'ilrr nud Jim. for/nrr 
I (J L.I .</r:r dlhlrtrs. iiialr urns ln<t i^cik. Hi'/ Il'Othr) 
Riiln non ihr Siilliitin .1 -,iiirii . tlir hrsi hnnof nn unnitilir 
cllilclr can recrivc. Jnhn^rin lin,! n Inlnl of l.f>ll I'jln I'l 
rininrr-uf} U'llinn Rudolph i I .Ol'K I lir jniiiKr i/rcnt Brian 
ilrii:thloti iluinipioii is widir I'mliHil In 20th (.cnluiy I n.x 
Studi'i. 


Brundage. during his years in office as head of the OlyTTi- 

pic Committee, lias made few recommendations to improve 

and develop greater interest in amateur sports. The grey 

., headed brother has stood still. While the professionals have 

son with a three-game series- ^^^.^ i^,^ ^ ^.„j^,, ^^„^^ business annually, amateur 

a 1 nights — with the Philadcl- . , r ,t tr j j j .. 

, ■ rTi-Mi- » -I 11 11 1 •) sports have fallen off and in manv cases died out. 

phja Phniics April 11, IJ, 13. ' , - ^^.i.^ 

Before moving to (he road. I Bo.xing is a goocT example. In a city as large as Los 

the Dodgers will -play a total i ■^•'R'^l''-'^ l^'iPre is not a single amateur boxing club of any 
of ].') home games, entertain- ■'''l=''^^''f- ^^ '^e present rate of interest in amateur boxing, the 
ing the Phillies, World Cham-jUnited States can't hope for man.\- more Olympic champions 
pion Pirates, .St. Louis Cardi- if major cities like Los Angeles. ,\ew York and Chicago lose 
nals, Cincinnati Reds and San ' int'crest. 
Franci-sco Giants. 

The Pirates will be at the 

Coli-seum for the first vvcck- |(]pvcloping more inieipvi ji, nmateur sports but in many 

end of the season, including a^ta,„^.p.,j ;j,-p far ahead o( u*;. 

Friday night game, a S^aiurdayi p„, „,,.,„„•„ ,h„.. ,. /. 

Ladies Night and a-^Sunday 

afternoon game (April 11, 15, i^ i- ^s , . . ■ . ..-■ - ., ^, 

^ ' ''^ffsos.slii) in as amaleur^^il isn t going ta Improve the Olym- 

pkf Games by not allowing a ihampioiv-.to .^efend his cham- 
pionship. In fact, lie rouldii^i figure out a'quicker program to 
completely wreck tlie games. 

Amateur sports in Amerien as ue know lliem serve to pre- 

.,,,., pare an athlete for |irofessional status. ?'or instance, if pro- 
\isiling clubs will be in Los . . •^ 

Angeles four times during the 


Th€ 
Club 
score 
ing IS 


161. ^ 

The first \isit of the (wanisi 
is set for a pair of midweek' 
night games April 25. 26. > 

Each of the National League 


The showing of our athletes in the past Olympic games 
was a strong- indiOation that other countries are not only 

in- 

are far ahead o( u*;. 

Brundage's idea is Ruined al uprooting jirbfessieonals from 
amateur sjiorts. PJven if uhat he claims is true tha-t a few 


\ear. 


misnomers, but not the Pro Phillips. 
Bowl. Just take a quick look Gibbon-, 
at the 1960 NFL leaders- who Rel.daff. 
\y\\\ be arriving next weekend Sconn, 
to prepare for the charit.v Packers. 


Negro Sports Stars 
Picked for Awards j 

Daiin\- Murtaugh. managcri 
of the World Series-champion j 
Rams. I West 1 : Jim Pittsburgh Pirates, was named 
Lions, iWe>ti; Jim 
Eagles. lEa^ti. 
; — Paul Houiung. 
I \">'c.^l I, 176 poinl.>. 


classic under coaches Buck new .NFL record. 

Shaw of the East and Vincc Punting — Jerr.v Nortnn. 

Lombardi of the West: Cards, (Easti. 39 punls. 1,1.6 

Ball carrjing — Jim Brown, average. 
Browns. (Easti, 1257 yards on Punt returns — \bc Wood- 
215 attempts. 5.8 average. .Mso son. 19ers, iWcsti, 13 returns. 
the 2-3-4-finishers, Jim Tay- 113.4 average, 
lor. Packers. (West>, 1101 Interi'cptions — Norton, 
yards: John Crow. Cards. ^Cards. iF.isti. lo inlerceptions hafi' 
(Easti, 1071 yardsT and Nick' returned for 96 yards. ;i^'^''j^ 

Pietrosante, Li-ons, iWesti,872 That gives the Pio Bowl,,^!/ 
j'ards. seven of the eight .NFL lead- limi 

Passing — Milt Plum. Browns, ers. and if ^tliat isn't 


"Man of Ihe Year" by Sport 
maga.'ine ihis Week. The an- 
nouncement of the 1 1th annual 
award was made in the new | 
I l-"cbruai\ I issiie of Ihe maga- 
zine. 

The magazine also an- 1 
nounced iis Itlh annual "Tori 
Performer" awards in 12 
sports. I 


lli'rn ih.'V air: 

Bosaic i-'!i<vfl 
w il! 


com- of the 41 .\1 


average as chosen by Associated Press \[^'^\"^ 


I Easti, first in percent 

dieted. 60.4: first in 

gain, 9.19 yards; first in per- and L'Pl, 43 of em will bo in 

cent of interceptions, 2.0. .-Mso the game either on offense or 

No.s 2-3. Norm Van Brocklin. defense. 


Pall, rv, 111: f.a.-f- 

.Ma- -: ('■■ilrt:.' l;.■^^l^^l- ; 

.Ij it;. I. ma-: Pr.> I;a,-^KcH)a!l i 

("iipjilhi ilHin : ('nil..i;(> l-'nir- 

.)oo [Iillinn: Pin l-'ooll.all. 

rirnwn; Su inii'un:;. Clin- 

^..r.nrrli 'OH Sallza : Hi..kf>. UoM.v Hull: 

• """fo"' I Tpniii.-. NValo l-Ta-cr: 'rraik an'l I 



Yo-Yo Classes 
To Get Under Way 
At Playgrounds 

Youngsters 15 \eais of age 
and under will be eligible to 
attend >o-vo insliuction ses- 
sions slated to get unrler wa.v 
the w'eek of January 23-28 at 
municipal playgrounds. 

During the first two weeks 
of the three-week twirling 
school, instructors will teach 
bovs and girls !(♦ basic twirl- 
ing maneuvers vvhii-li vvill be 
featured in the 1961 v o-\o 
contests. 

District champions will com- 
pete in citv-wide finals slated 
for Queen Anne Playground, 
1210 West . blvd., on Satur- 
day, Ych. '!i5. 


f(?ssional track m/?et'- were popular in this country, promoters 
would be making Wilma Rudoljih big fat offers but they 
would no't have before her (>l.vmpic Cames performance be- 
cause ihev- Just hadn't heard, about her. 

Without a doubt — and Brundage knows it — Wjlma was 
ihe individua^siar of tlie games and was the principal Ameri- 
can who saved his face and perhaps his job. 

'He was so unaware <A Wilmas athletic ability that his 
(■ommirtec refused to permit her name to be posted in previous 
American meets, wiien her coach Ed Temple of Tennessee 
Slate sent in her credential.-, but when she established the 
new time of 11.3 in the lOOmeter and the new mark of 23.2 
in the 200-mclers the committee did an about-fac-e. 'We cer- 
lainlj- hope thai our new government will show some interest 
in amateur sports a.-~ thev a, -e. currently being handled in this 
'coiintiv. For the s[)iiit of <ompetition among our amateur 
athletes is dving a slow death and the reason for this can be 
traced to men like Brundage and their far -from -progressive 
amateur programs. 


ATA Ranks Ashe No. 1 Net Star 


Arthur Ashe. Jr.. of Rich- American Tennis Association 

mond, Va.. is ranked as the released this week by its 

No. 1 plaver in the Men's Pre^-ident. 
Singles and Junior Single.* 


Eaton 


Dr. Hubert 
of Wilmington, X. C. 
Following Ashe in the Men's 
This IS a feat unprecedented .singles are two former cham- 


in the annals of the American 


pions, George Stewart of 


'Motorcycle Racing 


JIM JOIIWSOS- 

pi 'in R alt r J 'ihii s u n . 


Pro U>60 plavers.j i-irM. 

Pal 


VV ilma f.ud'.lptl: 'Inir .Xnvl 
r aiirl Hor.-r Ra.ai-. 71; 
■k. 


-Briilhcr rif ()l\iiipic dci nlhlmi iJiuin- 
"liiis fi'liilcd III tlir hrst nnnui >ii ihr 
.\ /iliiiiifi! Friothnll Lcaxnf drujt Inst J'tir\dri\. Thi 
fiiis ih'isfii hy ihr Snii i rnmisi 't 4'h'i 
fiifnisivf rnd nr dcirnsh'C bnik. 


rx-Mi itiii 

H r I an nuikc it its fin 


Tennis Association for a, junior Washington. D C. at' No. 2, 
player to win the top spot in and Wilbert Davis of New 
both events. Perhaps it is un- york at No. 3 with Wilbur 
J. C. Agajanian announced equalled m the history of the Jenkins of St. Louis, Mo., in 
that his first 14-event motor- game. ,]-;p fourth spot. Damella 

cycle program at Ascot Sta- The top .--poi in the Worn- Everson of Detroit, Mich., 
dium in Gardena is slated for en's Single.'; went to a new- garnered the second ranking 
Sunday afternoon. Jan. 15. comer, horn of Polish par- m the Women's Singles. 
Races begin at 2:30 p.m.:, outage in Nicaragua. Mimi Arvelia Mitchell of New York, 
practice laps al 12:30, ThejKanarek of New York. .\. Y. X. Y. and Owen McEvans 
rviling will be headlined by These are among the features from Wilberforce are third 
the 15-lap main evenC of the I960 rankings of the and fourth i-espective(y. 



Big Television^adio Robertson vs. Baylor 

Time for Li Ai Open 0.scar i Big Oi Robertson, the 
I Extensive television and I "'^■^^' •'^"^■■^ ■^^'^'■' ^^ '" ^r at the 
radio coverage has been set | Sporls Arena for the first time 
for the 35th annual S50,000|on Saturda.v, Jan, II. O.scar's 
Los Angeles Open golf tourna- i the top scorer, play-maker 
ment. Pros. Don Sorensen, of! etc, of the- Cincinnati Royals, 
the sponsoring Jr. Chamber! and will duel the Lakers' El- 
of Commerce, announced this gin Bajlor, 
week. 

Station KTHV has been 
granted television rights to 

the first $50,000 golfing event Ir^' Ka/e. publicity director 
I ever plaved in Los .\ngeles. 

Bill Wel.s"h and his staff willi*'/'" tf«m and riow head of 
call a portion of each 
play in the Jan. 6-9 com- 
petition at Rancho. 

Radio coverage will be the 
largest in tourney history 
with a total of 50 broadcasts 
to be heard on KBIG. Chief 
announcer Roy Storey also 


Publicity Head Here 

Irv Ka/.e. publicit.V" directoi 
of the Hollvwood Stars Base- 


dav'si"^^ publicity staff for the L..\. 
.'\ngels of the .\merican Base- 
hall League, arrived in town 
from New York last Mondav. 


reports seve^l of the broad 
casts will be heard on a West- 


t G(K>rge Washington Carver, 
,the renowned scientist, last his 
jlife savings in the failure of 
!an Alabama bank. When told 


was 570,000 poorer. 
Carver said 


_._ ,. . guess 

ern network. 'somebody found a u.se for it. 

There will he 10 radio { was not using it myself." 
broadcasts dailv, starting at 


NOW IN SERVICE ! ! ! 

BUS SSRVICE 


tmty 



;^HOU.bWY StNT* MOtlICi 


ON LINE 27! 


GEORGE E'LEMMISG—IIis fine defensive and oil ensue 
performance H'as a hii) factor in If asliiiK/lon Huskies' 17 
to 7 victory oier Mtnnes'tln in the Rose Bon I. .Uso auoitnl- 
ing for bad iiioinents as far as the (jophrrs iiere lOiuerned 
licre Huskies' Ray Jaikson and (jhnrlte Mitchell, n pair of 
linhlnini/ fast bai ks n ho puked i: t> Mirdnqe nhen lhe\ 
needed it tiio^t. Brii/ht spot for .Minnesota luis shilt\ 
"itandy' Stephen xiho ran and passed lulh ti i tin ndoi/s 
poise. He looked espenallx good in the seiond hall -.ihen 
he engineered the Gophers' only toui hdon n. 


6 a. m. 
p. m. 


and concluding at 


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{Dodgers Schedule 
31 Exhibition Tilts 

I The Los .\ngcles Dodgers 
I have scheduled thirty-one 1961 
I Spring training exhibition 
'games, E. J. (Buzziei. Bavasi. 
vice-president and general 
j ma nagcr, announced last 
week. 

Seven major league teams 
vvill visit Dodgcrtown, Vero 
Beach, Fla.. home base of the 
Dodgers. In Ihe order of their 
appearance they will include 
the Kansas City Athletics, 
Milwaukee Braves, New York 
Yankees. Minnca|)olis Twins. 
Washington Senators, St. 
Louis Cardinals and Cliicago 
White So.x. This is the most 
extensive home-base schedule 
ever arranged for the Dodgers. 


-FOR 24-HOUR SERVICE ' 


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JOEl A. POWELL JOHN A. ECHOLS 

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FREE BAIL INFORMATI«N 


Lakers vs. Hawks ^^ 

St. Louis Hawks, the West- 
ern Division leaders, move in 
against the leakers tonight 
(Thursday I and Friday night 
at the Sports Arena. 

The Lakers are making an 
11-game home stand at the 
Arena. The Lakers' box office 
will be open daily from 10 
a.m. until 6 p.m. during the 
home games. 


"AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS" 

• Brake Tune-Up Specialists • Free PicJ^-Up, Delivery 

8PKIAL FREE ENGINE CLEANING WITH LUBRICATION 

HENRY LEZINE'S MOBIL SERVICE 

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~1- 



Thursday, January 5, 1961 


Med I 


The Californta Eagle— 7 


cal, Dental/ Pharmaceutica 


Auxiliary Holds Ga/ Formal Ball 


ly 
le 
ks 


Thp Los Angples Brf^akfast 
Club has brrn the sotting for 
proBPs of so<-ial affairs dur- 
ing 1960 but it took the Medi- 


ral. Lleiiial aiul f'iiannarTut ■ 
ical AiixiTiarx- to ronip up 
■vvith one thai is rntain to. 
be memorable for the 2.5(»<i 


T.K'ho attended last Knday's 
annual ball, ■* 

Margaret Rene was chair- 
man and Laura Fowler to- 



(^&LLIISC! (^LLSIS -^^.jGJteirnnvi nuA t '!.< hmr nmn arc fh'iu n Kith one of their runny 
guests /iurmT the <in\ nunuol Yulctitic Ball ,/nrn liy the nicmiicr's nf the Mrdim/. Dcii- 
tnl fitiii Phnriniu culunl ,liixiiinr\. frr,,,, /rft: Mr^. ()tts Rriir, (liiurnian: Dr. If'Uliniii 
R. II tilinins. Jr., fuiii Mrs. JriUrs'jii I oi^!(r, i i,-i h'ln 'null, f.hl/inn) 



KSJOYISCi rOP SOCl.H. — Tnkiri// a hrcithrr lrr,,ii^lhc ,/fnne floor during th^' 
.^J rdirnis' i:nnur,l I'lrnirJ hnll lihv h nltriutcd sotiir 1.500 ijinsts-nrc, front left: Eduittfi 
Fearoiur. Dr. Lrrr,\ r.nd Sxhiin II rckes. Clnr/i and J'rrrnr If clili. (Adrtins) 


chairman. They wore assist- 
ed by members of the Ball 
Committee and did a mag- 
nificent job in making the 
affair^a success. 

Usually after Christmas, 
people seem exhausted from 
all the hustle and bustle that 
goes with the Dec. 25th day. 
However guests airived for 
this affair sparkling as 
proudly as the brightly dec- 
orated ballroom. The women 
were breath-taking in their 
richly designetf^Tgations and 
the men were equally suave 
in their bow ties and dark 
formal sttits. 

The gay spirit and the jov- 
ial atmosphere which pre- 
Kailed as guests started ar- 
ri\ing was more noticeable 
this i'ear than in any prev- 
ious year, partly because 
the delightful dance music 
provided the background for 
a brilliant and sophisticated 
affair. 

The annual dance also 
ser\ed as a salute to the 
many friends of the organi- 
zation who ha\e supported 
their manj- community un- 
dertakings such as their pop- 
ular 'Medical Variety Show, 
Alma Wells, scholarship pro- 
ject. Life Membership in the 
NAACP. The jHedicals and 
the Auxiliary also contribut- 
ed this jear to the American 
Cancer Association, United 
>'egro College Fund. Commu- 
nity Health Association, 
United Nations Association 
o(f L.A., Count>' Conference on 
Ijluman Relations, Cognty 
Conference on Christians and 
Jews, Y.M.C.A., Red Cross, 
Urban League. Legislative 
Needs, ^the Los Angeles Coun- 
ty Heart Association, the 
National Council of Negro 
Women and the March of 
Dimes, as well as distribut- 
ing Christmas baskets to 
needy families. 

The organizations service 
record to this community can 
hardly be topped as indicat- 
ed by the number of their 
acti\itiefi and by the fact 
that each project is handled 
iri a practical and down-to- 
earth manner. 

Dr. Roy D. Andrews. D.D.S., 
is president of the Associa- 
tioii and Mrs. Hilda Allen 
is Auxiliary president. Both 
Ea\e a lot of attention to 
teamwork this last year aijd 
the result has been gratify- 
ing. 

At the annual Yuletide 
hall, on the dance floor and 
In the patio and cocktail 
lounge of the spacious 
Breffkfast Club, we spotted 
Dr. and 3Jrs. Chris Taylor, 
Mr. and .Mrs. George Hayes, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Evans, 
Dr. Artis White, Dr. and Mrs. 
Roland Nickens, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Price, Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
ibert Duckett, Dr. and,Mi-s. 
Walter Hines, Mr. and Mrs. 
Eason. 

Also Dr. and Mrs. (ieorge 
Price, Dr. James and Shirley 
Jones, Dr. and Mrs. Larry 
Scott. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Joe 
Spaulding, Dr. and Mrs. 
Shedrick Jones, Atty. James 
Akers, Walter Smith, Dr, and 
Mrs. Lawrence Miles, -Mr. 
«nd Mrs. Bob Tierney,' Mrs. 
L. Wilcox,' Mr. and Mrs. Rud- 
ie .Minificld. 

Others were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Stiger, Dr. and Mrs. 

(Continued on Page 8) 



PH^^ RM'iCEVriCALS — Sho-iui attending the nnnunl 
Medical Auxilieiry ball arc some ni the iity's finest phar- 
ni/iLlsts. pictured mth nie'nhers oi ihr .1 u.xilini \' \ dtime 
.onimillfc and a feu 'Hn^l^. Sinlul hon, Icli. I„cz\ 
llauli, tlaine Chicheittr, Mat gat tt- Rene, thai' man vf 


} uletidc Boll ; and Laura Smitherman. Standing: Fred 
Criffin. Ph.D.: Otis Reae. Ph. C; Ethel Sheen: Clifford 
Pnn,e. Ph.C: Luther Hauls. Ph.C: Laura Fouler, co- 
chaitmnn rjl ball: Dr. Emily Dean and .Marie Fredericks. 

(Adams) 



I ■ 

V 


OFFICERS HL'DDLF — Elated o-.cr the colorful cro-ud 
lihich attended their annual- hall . nllhrtf rif the .Medunl. 
Dental find Pharma< eut'ual .L'^sn. and its .luxiliaty me dis- 
cussing the outstanding hol>da\ 'social. Erom left: Dr. 


Roy D. Andreiis, D.D.S.. nsioiialion president: Mrs. Hil- 
da .! Ilenp, .-{ u.xilinry president; (J'uendohn .4ndrcus and 


Dr. Ifrjlfhd Allen. (Adams) 



A.WLAL YL LI. FIDE BALL— Smartly qonned ladies 
find suave cirntlemcn hrouaht class to the iinnual Medual 
.4 uxilwry formal ball held at \he Los Anr/eles Breakfast 
Cluh last Friday. Pictured from left: G'eraldine .11 oods. 


Dr. Robert T. .11' oods. I). D. S.: Delight Fhomas. Dr. 
Jou-ph II. Uonard. D. D. S.; Mnrjoric Cranlord, .\Lilisa 
Slir/cr, Dr. Clareme Littlejohn and .fnilla Llttlejohn. 
(Adams) 



ARRAY OF PERSOSALFFIES—Fhe .Medical Auxil- 
iary's annual Yuletide ball fi.as well attended by many uell 
knoun personalities. .■! uxiliary members .are shoivn liitli, 
from left: Dodye Einns, Dr. Ilaymon McCoo, Bcrlie 


Dixon, Eddie Beal, Mary Bcal. .Mary //. MeCoo, Don 
Mills, of the .Mills Brothers, and Xaola iMilh Rodgers. 
(.Flams) , 


i^ Bill Smallwood '^^ 


Edith Jones jetted home 
from NYC and Coliimbus, O.; 
she buried her cousin in the 
latter city. The Eddie Ar- 
nolds (ThaHa) of Palo Alto 
were in town. Long Beach's 
Dr. Charles Terry and family 
have his Dad visiting them 


from the nation's capitaj. 
- Beulah Terry Goodman, now 
of NYC, and her sister, Juan- 
ita. now of D.C., were in 
town for their father's funer- 
al. The Teacup Club meets 
Sat. with Louise Collier. 
Angelique Bratton spent 


most of her holidays a-bed 
with virus. Libby Clarjf gets 
to regale the Wome;i's Sun- 
day » Breakfast Club and 
guests this Sun. a.m. about 
her African, trip; this club is 
adopting two African home_- 
less children, by the way. 


Santo Baby 

It's a girl, Leslie by name, 
for the Lester Ortickes (Ger- 
trude) as of last Wed. 
League of Allied Arts meets 
Sun. in the Wilfandel's up- 
stairs room right after the 
(Continued on Page 8) 


1 


^^ 



TEARFUL J\D HAPPY REUMOX—Dootsie Jl U- 
liams is shown embrotintj his sister, Mrs. (Inrinnr Uiintir 
of ^liaitit,'Fln., at ihr Union Station. It uris the first tunc 


thfy hcd srcit <(i<h other in 40 yiiirs. l^icturcd from left: 
Mrs. James CJark, Mr. II illinnis, Mrs. Hunter, J uariitn 
II illiai'is. II lUiiuns' nijc, and Jainrs (J/ark, .his uncle. 



JOIST EFFORT — Checking ticket sales at intermission, 
members of ALPH.i PHI ALPHA SPHI\X cluh and 
fUESTIfOOD Chapter .V. A. A. C. P. shou- ,ny of 
successful fund raising event. Frnm left, front roii' : Robert 
Farrell, Eltnira Collins, Judith Knight, Helena Rudolph, 


llettx Myles. Robert Sin//leton. Second roic : Ednard larit, 
I'ietor ll'ilkolz. Richard Hillianif. Scene of gaiety, liith 
social proi/rrss the thtnie. Ktis ballroorn of J nx 1 1:11s 
Country C.ltih last Friday ifcnt'i};. 



GALA XEIV YEARS PARTY— Members of the Royal^ 
Dragons Social Club are shown during their annual Xcn' 
Year's party when they entertained some 125 guests at the 
DMC Hall last Sunday. Pictured seated from left: IF alter 
Laremore, Gus Smith and Russell Albams. Standing from 

Parties Ring In New Year 


left: Jimmy llilson, Chester Haynes, .Ilfred May, Dan 
Postcll. Curtis Watts, La Folia Phelps, Elmo Phelps. 
Lowell Hall and E'red Ednards, president of the club. 
( Young) 


Parties ringing in the New 
Year and ringing out the old 
sprouted out in all sections 
of the southland. Dr. and 
Mrs. Julius Hill of St. An- 
drews place invited some 25 
guests into their lovely home 
and enjoyed the traditional 
New Year's menu of black- 
6ye peas, cornbread and chit- 
terlings. 

Over on Broadway in the 
Masonic Hall the Cooperettes 
Social Club ushered in the 
New Year on Sunday and the 
•guests wore colorful paper 
fiats and the festivities last- 
ed until the wee hours of the 
morning. 

Dr. and Mrs. Chris Taylor 
entertained with a drop-in 
(Boiree in tJieir beautiful 
Grayburn street home in 
Leimert Park. Dr. and Mrs. 
E. Stratton lured personali- 
■ties to their hilltop home in 
Baldwin Hills on Saturday 
night to enjoy a superb even- 
ing of champagne and ex- 
cellent foods. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ovit Pierce 
entertained friends with an 
after-the-game cocktail sip 
with Mr. Pierce reaching way 
down in the cellar and pour- 
ing vintage of 20 years ago. 
The Royal Dragon Club 
brightly decorated the DMC 
Hall for their party on Sun- 
day night and, in addition 
to delicious foods, they had 
the excellent Ship Mates- 
Combo featuring Ginger 
Smock, Al Mitchell, Art 
Maryland and Leroy Morri- 
son whose music made it a 
delightful dancing New 
Year's party. 
Jn Santa Monica, the Bay 


Area Chapter of the National 
Council of Negro Women, 
Inc., held their New Year's 
party in the cozy home of Ida 
Dooley. NC e m b e r s invited 
their husbands and friends 
to a buffet and gift-giving. 

One of the largest cele- 
brations was held in the 
beautifully decorated dining 
room of the Playroom. Beaut- 
iful Christmas trees adorned 
the walls, vari-colored tinsel 
hung from overhead and a 
snow white tree shone 
brightly from the corner of 
the room. Noisemakers were 
jammed together elbow to 
elbow. 

Club Holds Dance 

The Centurions Car and 
Social Club ushere(^ in the 
New Year with a Swinging 
dance at the Aeronautical 
Ballroom last Friday night. 

Guests enjoyed dancing to 
the music of Leroy's Latin 
Quintet and his Seven Sons. 

Bostic Band to Play 
RInlccydinks" Formal 

The Kinkeydinks Club, Inc., 
announced that Earl Bostic 
will play for their formal on 
Jan. 12 at the Beverly Hilton 
Hotel. 

Area Chairman 

Mrs. Maude E. Oliver, of 
1353 W. 30th street, has been 
named area chairman of the 
Diabetes Association of 
Southern California's person- 
to-person drive in the South 
Central area, scheduled for 
Jan. 22, 23 and 24. 


i 


c^(l 


Bill S 



aiiwoo( 


!I6V5 


(Continued^rom Page 7) 


,shovvcr for Sandra Hoskins; 
the league has high hopes 
playwright Lorraine Hans- 
berry will still be-in town 
and can visit with them. 

Santa really lo\'ed Vernice 
Spann; left her a full length 
blonde mink and a dazzling 
diamond ring. The Rocky 
Washingtons (Hazel) had 
the cast of Raisin in the Sun 
to New Year's Eve doings at 
their place. N'Yorker Arizona 
Harris currently visiting our 
town, but glamorously. 

Sacramento's Rhetta Haw- 
kins and Avis Wagoner dash- 
ed down for the holidays 
with local relatives; their 
niece Rhetta Nickcrson and 
family dined them but sump- 
tuously. Dr. and Mrs. Mur- 
dock Wharton expect their 
baby in May or June and 
hope his mother, Cordelia, 
wintering here, will stay over 
for the event. 

Wormly So 

Nice, warmly so, having 
Frances Williams in town 
again if briefly. Bob (Rus- 
sell) Evans who used to live 
here is now the toast of one 
of London's plush, gJinty 
clubs. Tonya Lee, to be Mrs. 
Thaddeus Winston come 
summer, will be a Catholic 
bride. Tues. (10) is anniver- 
sary for the R. S. Mounts 
(Barbara). J ins Scott takes a 
birthday Mon. (9). his Betty 
takes hers Wed. (11). Group 
5 of the Jack and Jills plan 
a theater party for this 
rrionth. 


Sweet 

Sixteen 

Party 

Nancy Rowland, just turn- 
ed 16, and her popular par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Steve 
Rowland gave a delightful 
dancing party at the Pacific 
Town Club Thursday eve- 
ning. 

Some 150 young people' 
and friends of Nancy were 
present to join in the festivi- 
ties, which will be a memor- 
able occasion in her young 
life. 

The club was brightly doc- 
orated in green and gold and 
the same color scheme was 
carried out in decoration.s in 
the dancing area. The hgge 
table was laden with refresh - 
mepts. 

Pretty Nancy was elegant 
in a party frock of burnt 
orange peau do sole with 
matching accessories, and 
graciously received her 
guests as they arrived. 

The Latin Jazz Quintet 
provided piusic for the eve- 
ning and set the pace for a 
most entertaining affair. 

Libby Clark 
Is Breakfast 
Speaker Sun. 

, Libby Clark, public rela- 
tions consultant for Coca 
Cola Bottling Company and 
former newspaperwoman, 
will be principal speaker 
Sunday at the January meet- 
ing of the Women's Sunday 
Morning Breakfa.st Club at 
the Clark Hotel at 9 a.m. 

Recently returned from Af- 
rica where she covered the 
independence celebrations of 
Nigeria and visited Ghana, 
Liberia, and Senegal, Miss 
Clark will give a detailed ac- 
count of her trip in conjunc- 
tion with exhibiting pictures 
and handicraft from the var- 
ious countries. 

African dignitaries in the 
area will be guests. A high 
point feature of the program 
will be the presentation of 
original African music and 
dancing. 



CLUBS 




FASHIONS 


8— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 5, 1961 


Dootsie Williams and Sister' 
Hold Reunion after 40 Years 


Nationa 

Presi(dent 

At 


.Among prominent national 
figures arriving in town for 
tlie holidays and particularly 
the annual Vuletide Ball of 
the Medical, Dental and 
Pharmaceutical Association 
of Southern California . and 
"its Auxiliary were Dr. and 
Mrs, A. C. Terrence of 0{>el- 
ousas. La. 

Dr. Terrence is the nation- 
al president of the National 
Medical A.ssociation. He and 
his lovely wife were the 
house guests of Dr. and Mrs. 
Howard Allen. Mrs. Allen is 
serving her fourth term as 
president of the Women's 
Auxiliary of the Association. 

The Terrences were the 
guests of honor at the annual 
ball which was attended by 
lop bracket .socialities from 
San Francisco, Oakland, 
Berkeley, San Diego, Santa 
Barbara. Pacoima, Fresno 
and Bakersfield. 


Although the cool but 
thrilling sounds of sleigh 
bells and the warm, hearten- 
ing .sounds of Christmas car- 
ols are to be heard no more 
in the land for a year, the 
joyous spirit of the holidays 
still lingers on in the unus- 
ual story of Dootsie Wil- 
liams, wealthy recording 
company executive, and Mrs. 
Corinne Hunter of Miami, 
Fla. 

They are brother and sis- 
ter, born in Mobile, Ala. But 
n»t until a few days before 
Chri-stmas had they .seen 
each other in more than 40 
years. The reunion occurred 
at the Union Station in Los 
Angeles when Williams and 
his uncle, James Clar^, went 
to meet Mrs. Hunter. r* 

The joy of the reunion con- 
tinues for Mrs. Hunter who. 
as she declares, "is living up" 
every minute of her schedul- 
ed three-week visit with her 
brother, "and I'm seriously 
thinking of moving from 
Miami to live in Los Ange- 
les." 

"Tne last time I .saw my 
sister," W^illiams explains, "I 
was only three years old. 
When our family separated, 
.she was taken to Florida and 
reared by relatives while I 
remained in Mobile for a 
short time before my mother 
brought me to live here." 

Actually, Williams was un- 
aware that his sister, who 
had married- prosperously in 
Miami, was alive until re- 
tired Southern Pacific chef 
Clark, through a'c'hance con- 
versation with another train- 
man, learned that Mrs. 
Hunter still survived. 

Finding her, however, was- 
n't easy. Many long-distance 
telephone calls were placed 
to Mobile, Florida, and Chi- 
cago before she. an expert 
silk finisher married to a 
successful bu.sinessman, was 
located in Miami. 

Williams immediately in- 
vited her to spend Christmas 
with him — and she accepted. 

The next dramatic episode 
occurred at the railroad depot 
when Williams and Clark ar- 
rived to await Mrs. Hunter's 
train. 

She is Williams' only 'liv- 
ing close relative, but he had 
no photographs of her, and 


neither he nor Mr. Clark 
knew what she looked like. 
She had .sent word, however, 
that she could be identified 
by a plum -colored foat. 

"As I waited." Williams 
said. "1 began to feel like 1 
was on a blind date. Uncle 
Clark and^I eagerly scanned 
the faces of every lady who 
left the train, searching for 
.some form of recognition. 
Now ... it seems a propos 
that my sister would be the 
last one to get off! " 

Mrs. Hunter is a buxom, 
statesque, effervescent lad\' 
who, like her brother, laughs 
easily and heartily. On see- 
ing each other at Union Sta- 
tion, they acted just like . . . 


well, just like !onp:-lost bro- 
ther and sister. 

Speechless, they fell into 
each other's arms. 

The eyes of both were sud- 
denly clouded with m'ist and 
.Mrs. Hunter cried unasham- 
edly. 

"Thank God." she said 
.softly, "rve found by bro- 
ther at last." 

For the moment. Williams 
seemed too dazed to speak. 

But later he did say: 

"It's amazing how quickly 
we've made up those 40 
years of being separated. It 
seems now like Corrine and 
I have been together all 
along. We get on just that 
well:" 



Med 


icais 


(Continued from Page 7) 
Damon Lee. Mr. and Mrs. Er- 
vin Stor>-. Dr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Bledsoe. Anna Miles. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dave Arbor. Dr. 
and Mrs. Harry E. Thomas, 
Bob Thomas, Yvonne Cosby. 
Annette Bruce, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Norton, Bob Steward, 
Mr. and Mrs. Gene Ramos, 
Hal Miller, Arlene Provost. 
Dr. and Mrs. Ted Evans. Jr., 
Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Bryanr, 
Afty and Mrs. Earl Broady. 

Out - of - towners included 
Johnetta Kelso, of Menjpiiis, 
Tenn.; Dr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Boger of Chicago and Dr. 
and Mrs. A. C. Terrence of 
Opelousas, La. 


XAXCY ROII'LAXD — Popular L../. High student 
and historian of the school's \ eptunettes (a girls' s'witn 
cluh) 'lias cntcrjainid u ith a szicct M birlhd/iy party. She 
is a B-1 1 sfudcnt and has hern siiimmin; for eight years. 

Parent Education Series 
Scheduled at L. A. High 


Juanita Miller has been 
abed battling flu. Anita 
Grant, Blanche Clark, Joan- 
na Sutton, Marion Maddox, 
Flora Chisolm, Carolyn Shif- 
flett . and Annie Laurie 
Adam? pulled on their glov- 
es, arranged their furs and 
swept in a fashionable cot- 
erie to see Raisin in the Sun. 
Herman Bailey, teaching at 
"Famcee" this school year 
(he goes, to Ghana in the 
summer prior to assuming 
a professorshi"p there), 
rounds up his local holiday- 
ing, leaves tomorrow for Fla. 

With Gala Accent 

One of the holiday's more 
delightful parti-; was the 
one Adelaide Hardy gave 
with gala accent on" Betty 
Hudson Nichols who is home 
to stay after seven years of 
Salt Lake City life; Betty's 
husband will join her here 
later. 

Pasadena's Dr. Jessie Mos- 
es' son, Danny, back to class- 
rooms at North Carolina's St. 
Augustine College after Yule- 
tiding out this way. Ethel 
Holbert home from a Chi 
Xmas. Frances Gates, Mary 
Grant and Irene Henderson 
are tomorrow (Frid.) night 
hostesses to Pitt Los Club at 
the latters. 

Howard Hall took unto 
himself a bride recently. 
Looked like ole times again, 
seeing Maggi Neal and Em- 
mett Ashford partying dur- 
ing the Xmas. 


Townsends Observe 23rd 
Wedding Anniversary 


Atty. and Mrs. 'Vince Mon- 
roe Townsend, Jr., of 3662 S. 
Arlington avenue, quietly 
observed their 23rd wedding 
anniversary Sunday, Dec. 25, 
Christmas Day. 

Atty. Townsend, and Mrs. 
Townsend, the former Lilyan 
E 1 i z »tj e t h Mansfield, of 
Columbus, Ohio, were mar- 
ried Dec. 2.5th, 1937, in 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

The observance consisted 
of a quiet family dinner at 
the home of the Townsends, 
with their immediate family 
and a few intimate friends. 

Among those attending the 
dinner were: Mrs. Bessie A. 
Johnson, Mrs. Tommie Lee 


Reeves, and Mrs. James W. 
Parker, long time friends of 
the Townsends. Also present 
were: Mr. Bowling Mans- 
field, brother of Mrs. Town- 
send; his w'ife, Elizabeth; 
daughter, Judith; son, Rob- 
ert; and their grandson, 
David. 

Following the dinner, 
many beautiful gifts were 
opened, some representing 
the Christmas occasion, 
others the anniversary obser- 
vance. 

During the evening, the 
Townsends wore visited by 
many friends and well-wish- 
ersi who brought congratula- 
tions and best wishes for the 
future. 


Mrs. Steven Rowland, pres- 
ident of Los .\ngelcs High 
School Parent-Teacher .Assoc- 
iation, announces that a ser- 
ies of parent-education lec- 
tures has been s<'heduled to 
begin Wednesday afternoon 
Jan. 11th from 1:30 to 3:30 
p.m. in room 224 of Los .Ang- 
eles High School. 

Mrs. Sylvia L. Bogen. well 
known teacher and lecturer 
in the field of child study 
and parent education, will 
lead the discussions. The 
general topic of the series is 
"Attaining Peaceful Co-exist- 
ence with our Tecn-Agers." 
The specific sub-topic to be 
discussed at the first lecture 
will be "Understanding Typ- 
ical Behavior Patterns within 
the Family." 

Subsequent lectures will be 


held at the Memorial Hall 
.Auditorium of L..A. High 
School, Olympic at Rimpau. 

The dates are as follows: 
Jaiv IS, 25, Feb. 1 and 8. 

The .series is being spon- 
sored b\' the Pa rent -Teacher 
.Associations of Hollywood 
Higli, John Burroughs Junior 
High. 'V'irgil Junior High and 
L. A. High. 

f 

Horace Hampton 
Visits in Cit'/ 

Horace Hamptort. member 
of a pioneer California, 
family and a resident of 
Laton. Calif, for the past 10 
jears. spent the holida\j 
visiting friends and relatives 
in the citv. 


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SHOW BUSINESS 

SAMMY DAVIS SR. 


By Maggie Hathaway 

^ Ed. Note: This is the second 

and conclusive article on 

the life of Sammy 

Davis Sr. 

Sammy Sr. taught his little 
son Sammy Jr. some of the 
most intrioate routines and at 
the age of 5 Sammy Jr. was 
starred in a Warner Bros, 
production called "Rufus 
Jones for President," co-star- 
ring Ethel Waters. 

Monte Corbitt was one of 
tile members of the Will Mas- 
tin Trio and when he left the 
act to become a business man 
in Detroit, little Sammy Jr. 
was placed in the act thus 
becoming a part of the Will 
Maslin Trio. Sammy Sr. re- 
vealed that the trio" wa.s liv- 
ing on ,5th street in the Morris 
Hotel when Sammy Jr. was 
drafted into the Armv. "One 
day," he said. "I actuailv went 
hungry for 72 hours,' then 
Leonard Reed booked us in a 
show at Shepps Playhouse." 

Later Sammy Jr. rejoined 
the act and it sky-rocketed to 
success, .^fter becoming one 
of the most sought after acts 


in the show world Sammy 
Davis Sr. retired in July, 19.57. 
Beforf^etiring Sammy Sr. 
married Kita "Pee Wee" Davis 
in Dec. 1951 and he proudly 
rema*ked,- "Pee Wee was the 
best things thaj could have 
happened to me. She changed 
my entire life." 

I Mrs. Davis was a nurse in 
New Yoi-k City and "accident- 
jly" met her husband through 
[a girl friend (Carolyn Car- 
ringtoni on a visit to Sammy 
Sr.'s home. 

They adopted their two 
children and moved to Bev- 
erly Hills in June, 1960. 
Sandra, their eldest daughter 
was born in Morristown, N. J. 
She attends City College and 
her favorite sport is basket- 
ball. Sandra laughingly said, 
"My brother Samm.v Jr. is my 
favorite male singer and my 
favorite female vocalist is 
Peggy Lee." Mrs. Davis had 
not had a chance to say very 
much hut jnanaged to reveal 
that her hobbies were cameras 
and she attended Hollywood 
Photograph Studios. She sad- 
ly remarked that she had to 
I Continued on Page 10) 


• *•••••*•*••••• ••*******^*^ 

-^ Enter taiiimeiit Whiri'^ 


• ••••** *••,**•*• •*•••*••*••• 


. Thursday, aJnuary 5, 1961 The California Eagl*--^ 


FEATURING THE ARTISTRY OF 

tRT 






CJiAZZ 



This scribbler saw the (last days of 1960 still clocking 
off news. Maybe none of tW_ii«rns was as staggering as 
your week, but here's a playback on some of the last minute 
happenings that held our interest: ; 

Actor FRENCHIA GUIZON held a house rocking open:, 
house Christmas day and tookiy- — ' 


Af.-lhlSG 1 r — On Jnnufiry 6, the J'nniers Ixtunce into 
The Stuniint for a trn-iliiy nifrat/criicnt. Headed by Claude 


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I People 

HILLSTOPPERS — A topflight 

! young socialite purchased S.30 

i dollars worth of ducats and 

slept through the New Year's 

benefit! 

WILLIE MAYS — He kicked 
off the \ew Year bj- packing 
hi.s ba.seball uniform and his 
high priced TV set and is said 
to have moved from his New 
York home! 

FOR RENT — that .sign is still 
^prominently displayed on the 
I window of that La Cieneg^ 
club which a noted bandlead- 
' er and his wife are sajid to 
[have purchased! 
JHEV. CHARLES — Ray — His 
i gospel .session drew 6,000 souls 
at the Palladium in Hollywood 
; (Continued on Page 10) 


find Cliff Trerricr, these eight talented people have appeared 
in all the leading clubs throughout the U.S. and abroad. 


home movies of the proceed- 
ings, with a motion picture 
camera that was a Yule gift! 

A gal named BELLE 
EARTH, currently working the 
Cloister, was putting down 
some of the roughest humor 
heard around these parts in a 
week of BLUE Mondays, and 
informed her audience,' "If I 
embarrass you, tell your 
friends." . . . Queen DINAH 
WASHINGTON and youthful 
Latin actor RAFAEL CAMPOS 
were carrying on a scorching 
lomance out Giro's way! . . . 
LENA HORNE mentioned that 
a script was being prepared 
*for her to return to the Broad- 
way stage again . . . Socialite 
CONSTANCE WASHINGTON, 
a member of the VOICES OF' 
HOPE Choir Of The Hour was 
buying all new frocks to go 
with her new svelte shape. 
She shelved over 35 pounds 
the Metrecal way! 

The word came that MARI- 
LYN MONROE has gone back 
to Joe DI MAGGIO. in the 


event you care! . . . Enter- 
prising BOB THOMAS, the. 
personable i-lothes salesman 
for ZEIDLEB & ZEIDLER is' 
toying with the idea of a big 
time promotion around the^ 
time spring has sprung! . . ^ 
We made a personal call tof 
the Public Relations man for- 
"Raisin In The Sun" and got 
this resppnse from his record- 
mg device: Raisin In the Sun 
is a complete sellout for the 
balance of it's run. It may re-- 
turn on February 6th. If there 
is any other matter you care 
to discuss, please begin talk- 
ing -When you hear the beepi 
THE LEON BRATTONS' New 
Year's eve splash saw the year 
in on an Afro-Cuban note with , 
drummer LOUIE POLIEMON": 
BROWN serenading the ex-; 
elusive mob on hand with his^ 
bongos and timbales . . . Had- 
a philosophical chat with - 
LITTLE RICHARD, former- 
Rock and Roll Star, who is 
now an Evangelist. Richard 
(Continued on Page 11) ; 


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JAZZ MUSIC - FINE FOOD - COCKTAILS 


• BREAKFASTS 

• LUNCHEONS 

• DINNERS 
SERVER ALL RAY R(V ROROTHY RRANICK 

2851 S. CRENSHAW | .sh. »oRT^sME>r, au. | RE. 4-9577 


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58TH & BROA DWAY 


BERT KENDRIX'S TRIO 

FEATURING TONY BAZLEY, DRUMS; WILLIAM GREEN, ALTO-TENOR-CLARINET-FLUTE 
PRESENTING FINEST MUSIC EVERY DAY FROM 5 P.M. TO 2 A.M. PL 3-0318 


INEXPENSIVELY SATISFYING 


GUARANTEED WORKMANSHIP 


Alpha Service Invites You to . . 
Put your best looks forward 
on all festive occasicms 



* Dyeing * Weaving 
* Alterations * Repairing 
* Careful Cleaning * Delivery on Request 


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ervicc 


AD. 2-9363 


®For Your Horn* Away from Home — Convenient — Beonomical — Modem 
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4961 W. WASHINGTON BLVD. L.A. 16, CALIF. WE. 4-1566 


TOMMY TUCKER'S 

PLAYROOM 

DINERS CLUB & AMERICAN EXPRESS 
CARDS ACCEPTED 

COCKTAILS * FINE FOOD 

4907 W. Washington Jt'.., 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. WE. 6-3730 ^o**"' ™«"" 



•ENJOY A SWINGING THING- 


RICKIE RARROW PRESEIVTS 

"HOLmY IN SWING" 

WITH BOOTS AND VICKIE DANCE DUO - ANN YOUNG, 
VOCALIST - JENNIE THOMPSON, DANCER 

• REASONABLY PRICED DRINKS • INCOMPARABLE CUISINE BY MR. LOVELY 
3 BIG SHOWS NIGHTLY - 9:30 P.M. - 11:00 P.M. -r^ 12:30 A.M. 

WATCH FOR THE OPENING JANUARY 13 

— ^ CHRISTINE JORGENSON ^^— 

all this and more at the incomparable 

RED FLAME 107th & Vermont Rve. 


KIRK DOUGLAS 
LAURENCE OLIVIER 
JEAN SIMMONS 
CHARLES LAUGHTON 
PETER USTINOV 
JOHN GAVIN 

TONY CURTIS 


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M th« heroic 
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You'll Hove a Swinging Time When You Make it to 

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RUBAIYAT ROOM IN THE . . . 

Displaying •^— — — ^^^-^^ 


RUBAIYAT TRIO 

Kenny Dennis — Drums 

Buddy Woodson — Bass 

Vivian Fears — Piano 


HOTEL WATKINS 

We Have the Best Food in Town by Ch«f Gladys 
BILL WATKINS, Prop. RE. 2-81 1 1 

2022 W. ADAMS AT MANHATTAN PLACE 


MR. BONGO 
ROCK 


PRESTON EPPS 


LOU 


featuring 

(MY LITTLE PAUII C 

BLACK BOOK) RHIILiI 


PAHDORA's eax 

8118 SUNSET — CORNER CRESCENT HEIGHTS — OL. 6-9192 


— SPEND YOilR HOLIDAY SEASON AT THE RUBAIYAT ROOM 
GUfSr NIGHT EVERY MONDAY - RUBAIYAT ROOM ^ 

JAN. 9 — FAMOUS JAZZ PERSONALITY 

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WATKINS HOTEL ADAMS and MANHATTAN P'^rP 


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^ I ^r WW N I MK W E K N I Dalicieus Food-ReasonabIa Drinks | 


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OUmX WILUAMS, Nightly T 

MONDAY SESSIONS EVERY MbNDAY, 4 to 7 P.M.-JAM SESSION WED. 10 P.M.-SUNDAY MATINEE 4 to 7 P.M. W 


3661 SO. WESTERN RL 2-6061 ^ 


I 


10— Th« California Eagle Thursday, January 5, 1961 



\{ minHmum ^^^^ ^^- western at Pico 


NO 

COVER 


smnin. 



BEST OF THE UNDRESSED 

ir TANGERINE 

WEST COAST'S FAVORITE COMEDIENNE 

* TAMMY * DESIREE 

• nnrrm by popular demand 

BREEZY ^ AiKO NURI 

ir HANA CHAN ic BABY DOLL 

- FOR RESERVATIOfNS PHONB - 

RE. 1 -3975 



CONCERT and SHOW! 

- FRIDAY, JAN. 13th 
V 8:30 P. M. 


ipP QUALITY ESTERTAi:^IE\-T — And how 

rnuld you miss with Sonny Criss. Brilliant young star with 
his trio is one of the attractions that are making the opening 
weeks of Cluh Town Hill a major success. 


FOREMOST JAZZMAN — Chico Hamilton and his 
quintet have been accepted as one of the most unusual i aires 
in jazz today. Jefferson High School's famous son delights 
numerous fans with brief weekend appearance at Sunset 
Strip's Club Renaissance. 


ir ^ ir PEOPLE 6l places • ^ • 



HAL ZEIGER presents ^^. 

THE MOST CREATIVE 
MUSICAL GIANT OF 
THIS GENERATION! 







PLAYINO His HIT RECORDS 

^If PeUOK/ 
v^ ^GEORGIA ON MY MIND' 

^ •RUBY' • 'HARD HEARTID HANNAH" 

'COME RAIN OR COME SHINE' • 'WHATO I SAY' 
'THE GENIUS OF RAY CHARLES' 


PASADENA 
CIVIC AUD. 

SY 2-9473 


ALL SEATS 
RESERVED PRICES: $3.50, 2.75, 2.00 (tax inci) 
Seats now on sale at Pasadena Aud. box-office, 
So. Calif. Music Co., 737 So. Hill, and all Mutual Ticket 
Agencies. FOR TELEPHONE RESERVATIONS: HO 7-6151 


(Continued from Page 9) 
Sunday and the elbow to el- 
bow mixed gathering certain- 
ly enjoyed it without inci- 
dent. Earl Bostic, incidentally, 
set the stage for Hal Zigler's 
great production! 
DR. UNCOLN SHUMATE — 
Several top medics down 
South Los Angeles way are 
toying with the idea of get- 
ting him to head a new medi- 
cal center in that area! 
HAZEL SIMPSON— Pulled out, 
of the gas station at Adams 
and Western the other eve and 
promptly tied up traffic with 
her sljceii Bonneville loaded 
with ranch fresh eggs! 
JOE MALBROUGH — He is 
kicking off the New Year by 
selling $39 dresses for five 
bucks at his Exposition and 
Western Avenoo shop! 
ELIHU McGEE — He accounts 
for the fact that the Congo 
Room upstairs at Vernon and 
Central is the swingingest 
bistro on the famed avenoo! 
TOMMY TUCKER — During 
the past three months he has 
held more conferences with 
bankers, builders and loan 
company officials than the 
newly elected president. Be- 
hind the confabs could be a 
new and modern hotel! 
H. CLAY JACKE — Dapper at- 
torney, who looks more like a 
Wall Street banker, just closed 
out the year getting his 12th 
straight acquittal and will de- 
f(?nd a white client on. a mur- 
der come Jan. 5! 
BETTY PERKINS — A smooth 
chocolate brownskin from 


Santa ^'Ionica operates her 
fathers' Neighborhood Store at 
50th and Normandie! 



SOUL JAZZ— Direct from 
A «» York, tenor saxaphon- 
ist Tony Ortega and his 
Quartet appear nitely at the 
Black "Orchid on H'est 
Washington bird. 


[FIREBUG — That 7-year-old 
I who caused a 2 alarm fire on 
W. 37th place, by setting the 
neighbor's garage on fire and 
starting a bla7>? at his parents' 
home is nursing a hot seat 
this week! 

LILUAN BREWSTER — Cute 
and curvy police clerk ipulled 
up at Henry Lezine's Mobil- 
gcis station in a flashy Cor- 
vette and the males screamed, 
"An angel on wheels!" 
JESSIE ROBINSON— Topflight 
postal official and his pretty 
wife tossed a little ringing in 
of the New Year in their spa- 
cious Compton home! 
SITTING DUCKS — Neighbor- 
hood groceries, liquor, drug 
stores, etc. operated by one or 
two people are being terroriz- 
ed by a band of thugs who live 
in one section of the city and 
operate in the other. If Negro 
officers were working the Rob- 


bery Detail at Wilshire, New- 
ton. Hollonbeck. University 
and 77th, they could put a 
halt to this growing menace 

because they can spot a thug 
at the drop of a hat ! 
JUNE WARE — Pretty and 
wealthy property owner in 
I^imert Park was rushed to 
Uni\-ersity Hospital when she 
came down witli pneumonia! 
jBALLINGER KEMIJ-^^ Wifie 
presented him with a baby for 
Christmas! 

DODIE EVANS — Pretty coffee 
; cream brownskin wifie of Dr. 
jTed Evans in Pa.sadena was 
I real chic in a Bob Steward 
'creation at the MDP.\ formal! 
HORACE HAMPTON— Gontle- 
jman farmer in Laton, Calif.. 
,,just east of Fresno, in town on 
■ his yearly \isit with friends 
and rclati\cs. He owns a fruit 
I and vegetable farm! 


.^. 


24 HOUR SERVICE 

AX. 4-9576 

'jS^ different 

<JDoroin\4 s ^^tcak <JloHse 

'Steaks Our Specially" ^ 
BEVERAGES - ICE COLD BEER 

In Mrving our customers, we are endeavoring to place before you the highest 
grade of fine, wholesome food available, presented in a pleasing atmosphere 
under the most sanitaiy conditions. 


DOROTHY McNAMEE ALLEN 


391 5 So. Western Ave. 

Los Angeles 



VERSA TILE — Milt 

Bruckner , one of jazz' great- 
est influences, is presently 
appcarinp nitely at Cluh 
.Masque on U ashing ton 
blvd. 


SHOW BUSINESS 

(Continued from Page 9i 
quit her studies becau.se she 
was. never able to got the 
family dinner on time. 

At this point Su/.ctte, the 
baby, invited us to visit wi^h 
her and her doll family. En- 
route to the nursery we saw 
a room that resembled The 
London Shop. Whose room is 
that? we asked. "Oh," she 
hurriedly answered, "just 
daddy's, he has about a hun- 
dred suits in there." We took 
a quick glance and noticed 
about 2(X) pair of shoes, .50 
caps, hundreds of hats and 
2f>0 of the nnost beautiful 
French pleated shirts. 

After Suzette had showed 
us her doll collection she re- 
marked. "My favorite doll is 
Pitiful Pearl and my brother 
San^my has sent me many 


.dolls from foreign countries. 
jl just finished writing a Xmas 
(letter to him." 'May I read it-' 
!l coaxed. When Suzette pre- 
'sented the letter, it was the 
cutest little writing that we 
I had seen in many years and | 
J this is what Suzette wrote to 
her "famous brother Sammy 
and his wife. May Britt; ' 

; "Dearest brother and sister.. 
Thank you for the money you: 
I gave me. I bought a leather' 
1 jacket, dress, sweater, skirt, 
suspenders and a doll-outfit.; 
I liked your telegram. Much' 
love. Your sister. Suzette." As{ 
I we finished reading this letter j 
Slizette suddenly asked. "How ! 
do you spell elephant?'' Oh.' 
we said. "Go and i^k daddy." 
That was our cu/~T6 hastily 
depart with.---a "Happy New 
jYear." 


HANK STEWART'S 



BLACK ORCHID 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE • RESTAURANT 


— Presents 

DIRECT FROM NEW YORK 


SOUL JAZZ 


TONY ORTEGA QUARTET 

FEATURING MONA ORBECK, VIBES, PIANO 
SOUL FOOD - DRINKS - ENTERTAINMENT 

4557 WEST WASHINGTON BLVD. 

AVAILASLI FOR SANOUETS, FASHION SHOWS, PARTliS 

WE. 6-9212 


TOfir MTIOA 



GENE NORMAN PRESENT!* 

THE LIHELIGHTERS — JACK NYE ORK. 

Plus the Incomparable 


EARL GRANT 

CRESCENDO — 8572 SUNSET — OL. 2-1800 


RECORDING ARTIST- 
Trumpeter Russell Jacquet 
leads weekend and Sunday 
morning jam sessions at 
Compton's Cluh Starlight. 


NEW YORK SCENE 

I do hope that all those bad heads are not quite so light 
by now, as the New Year has been royally welcomed by one 
and all. And may this be a most happy and prosperous one, 
with progress and accomplishment our byword. 
Passing of Friends 
It- is most regretfully that 


I report the passing of two 
fine people this week; Mrs. 
Rosalie Wilson "and Mrs. Fred- 
dy Johnson (Louise Woods). 
Mrs. Wilson was like a mother 
to me for years and made the 
best cakes in the world. Louise 
was the wife of my music 
coach, a beautiful girl, (both 
physically and spiritually), 
the possessor of a gorgeous 
trained lyric soprano voice, 
and a young woman on the 
threshold of a sparkling ca- 
reer. She had done cabaret 
and Broadway shows (Mr. 
Wonderful and Bells ' Are 
Ringing), had traveled 
throughout Europe, and her 


With lovely Laura Prescott 
on my arm, I went to Bird- 
land "to catch Count Basle, 
Joe Williams & Co., along with 
John Handy and his group. 
The house was packed to the 
rafters on that Wednesday 
night, and Basie was cooking 
with gas as he swung the 
chandliers loose and Joe Wil- 
liams sarig the songs, "Baby 
Won't You Please Come 
Home'. 'Everj'day", "Its A 
Wonderful World", and many 
others, to the complete pleas- 
ure and satisfaction of the 
enthusiastic onlookers which 
included LaVerne Baker, Nat 
Cole. Sanimy Davis, Jr. (cur- 
rently at the Copa), Rose 
Hardawav and others. Start- 


unfortunate demise in herjing tonight it will be Quincy 
early thirties .seems such a' Jones and his orchestra, plus 
waste(urt|ess the Man Up- i the singing, swinging Gloria 
stairs hal an awful need for jLynne and the Earl May 
good sporanos in his heavenly , Trio. I'll report on that show 
chorus). >fter I see it. 


'Chazz' Soundtrack 


(Continued from Page 9i 
plans to write a besT seller 
this year based on his life! 

Learned that jazz thrush 
HELEN HUMES is now play- 
ing cocktiil drums and sing- 
ing with the NINA RUSSELL 
trio! . . . Enjoyed exchanging 
small talk with tailor ERNIE 
COTTON, who is not only boss 
man with a needle, but one of 
the nicest guys in threadsville 
. . . .\ luscious new vocallure. 
NANCY WILSON, (is she 
JACKIE'S sis?) got the biggest 
play album-wise over at this 
reporter's turntable. She really 
COOKS. The LP is on Capitol, 
the label that is perhaps 
responsible for unearthing 
more fine talent than any 
other. 

Our good friends COLUMBIA 
and RCA VICTOR also had 
quite a year though with well 
timed releases on rosters that 
included MAHALIA JACKSON 
iCo].\ JOHNNY MATHIS 
(Col.). LAMBERT, HENDRIX 


& ROSS (Col.) and MIRIAM 
MAKEBA, DELLA REESE and 
BELAFONTE on ..RCA. All 

blockbusters! • 

The new surge of syndicated 
.shows integratmg Negro actors 
into the television episodes is 
bringing about a more realis- 
tic picture on the tube. The 
possible exception is the high- 
ly rated "Untouchables" show 
that has yet to our knowledge 
to employ a Negro actor even' 
in a street scene. Are they try- 
ing to tell us that Negroes 
were non-existent during the 
prohibition, bathtub gin era?? 

Central Casting is setting 
up machinery to include 
Screen Extras in all various 
racial groups under one roof. 
The move was brought about 
by petitioning Negro extras 
w-ho complained to FEPC that 
discriminatory tactics were 
being used in the old casting 
system. Writer MAGGIE 
HATHAVyAY played a big role. 


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4370 W. ADAMS AT CRENSHAV^^ BOULEVARD 
PRESENTING 

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G. MORROV/, BASS - B. FREEMAN, DRUMS 

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BARS - CHOICE COCKTAILS BY MIXOLOGISTS - DELICIOUS 

MEALS SERVED INEXPENSIVELY 

BLUE MON. EVERY MON. - FINE ENTERTAINMENT 

INTERMISSION ROOM 

4370 W. ADAMS BLVD. 


DON'T COOK TONITEim: 


CALL RE. 1-7201 


AL'S 


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& SHRIMP BOAT 


260g^SO. CRENSHAW (NEAR ADAMS) 

FINGER LICKIN' CHICKEN ^ 

LIP SMACKIN' SHRIMP 

OPEN MON. . THRU SAT. 4 P.M. TO. 2:30 A.M. 
SUNDAYS - 12 NOON TO 9 P.M. 

TELEPHONE ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED - NO DELAY 
GOOD TO GO - CALL RE. I -720 1 - FRBE DBLIVtRY 


SUNDAY MORNING SPECIAl 


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'WEST SIDE STORY' " 

L A. fxommtr 


ou^ — 


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ttorring Jtan Durand • Do(»r»i Piper • Mof rii Buchanan • John Howl cf 

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EL CAPITAN 



MAS'QUE CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

4731 W. WASHINGTON BLVD. 
WE. 3-3016 

M/7f Buckner Trio 

NITELY EXCEPT WEDNESDAYS 
NEVER ANY ADMISSION 

OR COVER CHARGE v 



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RE. 


ClaJ 


LIMBO DANCING wuh 

VIRGIN ISLAND STEEL BAND I 

THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY— OPEN 24 HOURS I 

SWINGING FOLK MUSIC - TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY EVENINGS AND SILENT MOVIES, TOO - GALLERY - BOQK SHOP ■ 

INSOMNIAC HERMOSA BEACH FRontier 4-9388 1 

■I 


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Icott 

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isip. 
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)up. 
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FAST SERVICE 



AX. 5-3135 


UOST ' RENT • SELL • BUY • HIRE • TRAD^ 


YDUU HND IT IN THE WANT ADS! 


OUND • SERVICE • EMPLOYMENT • PERSONAL! 


yVEDNESDAY 


CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE 


AT 9 A.M. 


1-LEGAl NOTICES 

37010 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-255 

In the Supt-rior Coiirt of the 
Si.i;^ of California, in and for the 
Counu' of Lo.< .\ngele.-!. 

In the -Matter of the Estate of 
J.\Mi:.-: A i;Ri:i;N'. Ueccased. 

.V01..-P i!i hereby c>ven lo credit- 
ors h.T\int' flaim,-; asainst the said 
,1. .Client to rile said claims in the 
oflirn of lior .■attorney. Vlnct 
.Montiio TnuiKsend, .Jr.. 223 U'est 
llorcH'C .\venue. in the City of 
I.o.< -\ncPl--'. in the aforesaid 
(".iun!.\. u-hi.h latter office i.s the 
filac- of iMisine.s,, of the under- 
puned in all matters pertaining to 
.•^aid c.-lale. .'-:uch claiin.s with tha 
n.c.,-.-ar> \nuchcr.= niu.'^t be filed 
or prest-ntcrt a.^; aforesaid within 
.vi\- ni.Mitlis after the first publica- 
li'in of ihi.« notice. 
liaiC'i Deccnihcr 3. 1960 

KLLA H. GItEKX, 
i:\ecutirx of the willj 
of f:\iri decedent. 
Vinc« Monroe Townsend. Jr. 
Attorne-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Los Angeles 3. California 
PL. 8-5309 

I rul.'i.-^hcii lu ilie California 

7:hsIp I'cc. <, i.-i. 2::. -29. igiiii.i 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


THOMAS M. McKEE. JR 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publish in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec' 29. 1960. 
Jan. 5-12-19. 1%1 


1-LEGAL NOTICES 


I EXPERT BEAUTY TREATMENT 


Jihc California Eagle) 
38225 
MOTICE OF HEARING OF 
PETITION FOR PROBATE 
OF WILL 
No. 437-158 
In the .Superior Court of the 
Slate nf California, in and for the 
CounI.\ of Los Angeles. In the 
Matter nf the Kstate of Annie V. „„„„, „ 
Henderson, Oereased. ?^i 

Notice IS hereby given that the'lirL 

p-tition of Carrie Washington fori 
the Probate of the Will of the 
iibove-nanicd deceased and for the 
j-^uame of l.cttcr.s testamentary 
I hereon to the petitioner to which 
ri'fcreni'e is hereby made for further 
particulars, uill be heard at 9;li 
o cloi-k a ni . .on Jan. 13. 1961. at 
the court room of Department 4. 
cif the Superior Court of the Slate 
of California, m and for the Countv 
of Los Angeles. Citv of Los An- 
geles 

Dated: Dec. -'l. 1960 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
llHEast Vernon Ave. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 
AD. 2-6149 

Attorney for Petitioner 
II.VROLD J OSTLY. 
Counl.\ Clerk and Clerk of 
Ihe Superior CouiT of the- 
.^ta'.e of California, in and 
for the Countv of Los Angeles 
R.^■ A. L GRAHAM. Deputv 
I Publish in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. 19i:0: Jan. 5, 
.Ian 12. 1961. 


38011 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 435-425 
rN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 
:AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 
LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of the F-:.«tate of 
■ WALTER SN'ELL 
Deceased 
.Votice Is hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims against the .said 
decedent to file ,aaid claini.s in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or lo present them to the 
undersigned at the office of her 
.Mtonev. 

MACEO G. TOLHKRT 
4272 South Central Avenue 
in the City of Los Aiigele.s 11. in 
the aforesaid County, which latter 
office is the place of liusine.5s of 
the undersigned in all matters per- 
laining to said e.state. Such claims 
with the necessary vouchers must 
be filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated December 19. t9rtii. 
Maceo G. Tolbert 
Attorney-at-Law 
4272 South Central Avenue 
Lo» Angelei 11. California. 
Matilda M. Snell 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of ?aid decedent. 
Publi.sh ill California Easle news- 
22-29. 1960: Jan. 5-12. 


12. C'a 11 for n i.'i. on .1aiuiar,\' 11. Itl61. 
at 9:.117 a in . ;il which lime pro- 
ponents md opponents of the pro- 
posed 'il;;e will be heard. 

.Arthur .1. Baum. Ch^iiinnn 
Milton Breivo<;el. Director of 

Planning 
THE Ki;(;iON.\L PLANNLV: 
COMMISION 

County nf Los Angeles 
Piihlished in California Eagle 
newspaper. Deeember '29. 1960 and 
January 5. 1961, 

HELP WANTED-FEMALE 


WOMAN I 
EXPERIENCED 

Apt. house mgr. for 16-tjnif 
bidg. No children. 3 room 
furn. apt. and salary. Call Ed 
Stanley. 

MA. 8-0211, Ext. 714 

Week Days 


SITUATION WANTED 

^PA RTM ENT*HOTEir 

HOME MAINTENANCE 

PLUMBING 

ELECTRIC 

SMALL JOBS ONLY 

D& J 
MAINTENANCE 

PHONE EVES. 
LO. 7-1505 


■|i 


< 1 he California Eagle) 

38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 436-714 

In the Superior Court of the 

State of California, in and for the 

I'ount.v of Los Angeles In .the 

Ma'ter of the Estate of Delia IMc- 

Kee. Drceased I 

.Notiee is hereb>- gi\en to cred 


gi\en to cred- 
itors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the elerk of the aforesaid 
I ourt or to present them to, the 
undersianed at the ofTce of'his 
,\ttorne.\s. Miller. Maddn.\ & Ma- 
lone 2S21 South We:»tern .-Avenue 


38634 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-585 
In the Superior t'ourt of tht 
Stale of California, in and for the 
County ot Los .^ngele.-!. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
I5LA.VCHE GRIKKIN. also Knov. n 
as ULA.NCHK EVGGETT. Deceas- 
ed. 

Notice is hereby t:i\en to ."redi'- 
ors havlnst claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforessid 
court or lo present them In lie 
iinder.«.igned . at the offiee of l.er 
Attorneys. Miller. .Maddo.\ A.- Ma- 'MONEY TO LOAN 

lone. 2824 .South Western Avonuei i 

in the City of Los Angeles, in the I 

aforesaid County, which tatter of | <^ ri r-r-\ K i r\ o Vniii- let 

fice is the place of business of the| V^UIIIUUIt; I UUI I il 

undersigned in all matters pertain- 1 

ing to said estate. Such claims -j n,-j /k-i/H I ri IQf" [jPPCi 

with the necessary vouchers nnistdnU Z-flU I lUbl LVeeU 

be filed or presented as aforesaid ^ 

within slx»months after the fi'M 3^3 ReaSOnaO 2 LOSt. 

publication of this notice. , ' " '^'-"-'^' '"-■t^'»- >->--< 

Dated Dec. 29. 1960 

SALLY SHAW NEWMA.N 

.\dmlnistratri.\ with-the- 

Will-Annexed of th<> Estate 

of said decedent. 
Miller. Maddex il. Malone 
Attorneys -at- Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, Califtrnia 
RE. 1-4143 

(Published in thp California 
Easrle Newspaper .Ian. S. 12. 19. 26, 
19S1.) 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

5543 1/2 HOLMES AVENUE 
Is now open for business and of- 
fering expert beauty care from 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap- 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, 
general operator. 

LU. 1-6227 

MATTRESS & SPRING FOR SALE 

Near New 

Mattress 

and Springs. 

Excellent 

Condition.' 

Only $10. ■ 

Call 
WE. 5-0485 

ELECTRICAL REPAIRING 


UNFURNISHED APARTMENT 
FOR RENT 

$75-Brand new unfurn. 1 
bedrm. apartment with 
garbage disposal, utilities 
pd. 528 West 78th St. 1 
or 2 children accepted. 
Inquire at Apt. 8. 


I INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


FURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 


WE SPECIALIZE in all elec- 
trical work. Large or small, 
olcJ or new. Reasonable and 
reliable. WE. 9-0900. 

SERVICES 


3 LARGE BEDROOAAS 

$85 per month rents a roomy, 
6 room, 3 bedroom house. West- 
side location. Carpeting Includ- 
ed. Washing rnachine available. 
Children invited. Ideal for farnily 
living. Near everything. 


UNFURNISHED HOUSES 


$95.00 

Rustic 8 room, 5 bedroofn 
house, fenced yard for child- 


ren. 


Western Rentals 

AX. 2-0458 


FURNISHED HOUSES 


38181 

ZONE EXCEPTION 

CASE NO. 5781-(2) 

A PCHLIC HE.4R1NG in the niat- 

n Ihe City of Los .\ns:eles in the.j ter of a- reouest for an exception 

afore-aid Count.i-. whiih latter of-'l to the H-l-SOdi i.Sinple-Kamily Kcs- 

fice is the place of business of the t idence. .VXHI so. ft. min.l Zone, in 

undersigned in alt matters pertain- ! order to establish, operate and 

ine to said estate. .Such claim.i; with j maintain a nurser.\ school, in con- 

the necessary \ouchers must be i junction with an existinc cliurch. 

filed or firesented as aforesaid I on the southwesterly < orner of 

within si\ months after the first ' Rosecrans Avenue and Cahita Ave- 

publit.-ation r>f this notice. nue. in the Willowbrook-Enterprl/ : 

Dated Dec 22. 196" Zoned fJistrict. Los Angeles Count\. 

MILLER, MADDOX A. MALONE will be held before the Zonihs 

Attorneyr-at-Law : Board, in the Hall of Records, in 

2824 South Western Avenue the Regional Planning Commission 

Los Angeles, California hearing room. Room 501. located at 

RE. t.4143 221) North Broadway. Los Angeles 


Also 1st and 2nd 

Trust Deeds 

Bought and Sold. 

AX. 2-7088 

Rl. 8-3572 ^^ 

BEAUTY OPERATOR WANTED 


We Serve Parties 

PARTY SERVICE 

Exper. cook — American and 
French foods, hors d'oeuvres, 
hot or cold. Waiters, barten- 
dett^ for parties, weddings, 
luricheons. 

EM. 9-9452 
AFTER 6 P.M. 


$85.00 ' 

Beautiful 5 room, 2 bedroom 
house, fenced yard. Children 
welcome. Washer included. 

AX. 2-0458 


DUPLEX 
$500 Down 

$10,950 full price. 

income $110 per month. 

Only 6 years old. 

Best buy of the week. 

Be independent for life. 

NE. 2-8461 


DO YOU WANT $120 mo. ad- 
ditional income? Then 
make this distinctive duplex 
jour-s' Only 5 yrs. old with 
disposal, double garage & 
attractive yard. (Lot 1.3.5 ft. 
deep to alley. $5.50 down. 
$10,950 f.p. VIC ODLAND, 
1607 E. Compton, Compton, 
Calif. NE. 2-8469. 


BY OWNER — H 

ome + 

inc. 2 

on lot. 

2 bdr. 

$12.9,50 

f. p. 

S950 dr 

. 2M5 

Calif. 

.\ve., 

Long r? 

ach RI 

7-3316. 


DUPLEX- 

-Only $500 dn 

$10,- 

950 f.p. 

Income $110 

mo. 5 

yrs. old 

NE. 2 

8469. ; 

< 


Thursday, January 5, J961 


The California Eagle — 1 1 


REAL ESTAI 


SALE 


$695 Down 

VACANT 
5 room, 2 bedroom 

Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwood floors. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-4156 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


Cute 2 bdrm. 


NOW IS THE TIME to buy this 
5 rm., 2 bdr. stucco home. 

i NO DOWN to vetr. Only S750 

j dn. to non-vets. Coonis Real 
Estate, 9227 S. Broadwaf 

I Los Angeles 3. PL. 7-2268. 

BRAND NEW 

HOME IN 

PALM SPRINGS 

You'll love this 3-bdrm. 
quality built Doll House 
It's completely furnished, 
so just bring your "grub' 


$500 DOWN ^„.. _ .. 

stucco across from tAhcns j «'"*' cheek for $2,500 and 
Pk. Rugs, curtains. Tile niove in. White Stucco with 
bath, panel ray heat. $75 blue trim, attached single 
mo. Stover Realty. \ garage, wall to wa4l car- 

OR. 4-6022 — OR. 8-9961 j petlng, sliding glass door 

to patio. Excellent location 


107, DOWN — 3 Bdrm & den. 
2 baths, hrdwd. firs., redec- 
orated. Vacant. $11,750 i. p. 
PL. 4-2827 'til 7 


about ' i mile from exclus- 
ive Racket Club. Priced 
right at $13,950. For ar- 

OWNER MUST SELL - 9 bdr. j [""S*'""*' 1° *?*. Pl^P^"- 

2 ba. - den. new carpet.l^V "" W'" »«»«'"' «^ 

$16,950; $1950 dn. 30 yr! 
FHA. 6715 5th Ave. RI 7-334"6.| 


FA. 1-4182 


HOUSES & APTS. WANTED 

FREE SERVICE!!! 

TO LANDLORDS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastslde 
and Westside. 

4020 South Western Aevoue 
AX. 2-1991 

HOUSESTOR RENT 


$395 DOWN— S75 mo. -Vacant 
& redec. 5 rm. 109th t. $600 
DOWN— $10,500.. ,Xlnt. 5 rm 
- kitchenette. 3 BDRM — 
Stucco. $850 dn. $12,500. Nr 

j Century-Avalon. 8 ROO.MS— 
■$1000 down. 2 baths. W. 90th 

I St. Vac. Redec. 6 UNIT Stuc- 
co, $3000 dn. Modern stucco. 
2 bdrm apts. ADAMSON 
REALTY, AX. 3-6267. 5401 S. 
Western Ave.. L. X. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



1 


VETS i 
NO DOWN ! 


RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaute Shoppe 

OPERATOR WANTED 
4919 West Adams Blvd. 
Los Angeles 16, Calif. 


MUSICAL INSTRUCT ION 

EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

I PL 2-1179 

FURNISHED ROOMS TO RENT 


FOR R5NT with option to buy. 

3 room house, cut, $69 mo. 

I 2 br. house, Ig. gar., clean. 

$85 mo. Southeast. HU 2-5861 

ACREAGE FOR SALE 


LARGE 4 BEDROOM — $500 
dn! .Must sell. $9950 F. P. 
Realtor. NE. 5-7111. 


MOVE IN today: — Vacant 5 
(2 bdrm I. stucco. Only 4 yrs 
old, hrdwd. floors, double j 
garage. ONLY $695 dn. Cos 
mopolitan Realty, 446 W 
120th St., Los Angeles 6L 
PL. 7-4153 


KERN CO. LAND 

10 acres, 5 miles west of Rosa- 

mond. Good soil, shallow water, ,3 BEDROOM STUCCO — $850 

good neighbors. Only $5000, i down. $L2,500. Modern. Near 

$1000 dn., $60 per month. Centurv-Avalon. .A.X. 3-6267 

THOMAS REALTY CO. 



1223 West Avenue I 

Lancaster, California 

WHitehall 2-1426 


$100 DOWN — 3 bedroom hpme i 
in Fontana. Nr Kaiser sleel 
Agent. .\T. 6-58'.'? 


ipr 


MAKE BIG PAY AS AN 
AUTO SPECIALIST 

AUTO MECHANICS INSTITUTE 

THE ONLY SCHOOL OF ITS KIND IN THE WORLD - 

CAN TRAIN YOU IN ONLY THREE WEEKS - 

(PROVIDING YOU HAVt MECHANICAL ABILITY) 

Classes Every Day & Monday, Wednesday & Friday Nights in I 

BRAKES TUNE-UP ENGINES 

RADIATORS AUTOMATIC AUT OPARKS 

ALIGNMENT TRANSMISSIONS POWER STEERING 

Invent In Your Futu'e Now . . Com* in Today . . Viiitort Aro Always Wolcemo j 


fBEE 


COUNSELING 
l(l^ORMATION 
by callinfi 

PL. 3-5111 

Auto Mechanics 

Institute 

4931 S. VERMONT 


I 1 

I AUTO MECHANICS INSTITUTE 

4931 S. Vermont Ave, Las Angeles, Col. ' 

I Please send me more informatjon on youi | 
faming classes in 


INSTRUCTIONS-SCHOOLS 

MEN -WOMEN 
"^ 18-45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 

HEAVY 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BROCHURE NOW! 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The Peop/e's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


HMl PROPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 
601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

Licensed and Bonded Real Estate Broker 


! 

! 


ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential 

POMONA 

No down payment for vets. From $13,770, 
Full Price. From $76.08 per month, includes 
principal and interest, wall-to-vi/all 'carpeting, 
rear yard redwood fenced, forced air heat, 
I built-in range and oven, hood and disposal, 
2-car garage. 3-bedroom, 2-bath homes. Phone 
collect. Randy Anable. 

EDgewood 8-0088 




FURNISHED ROOM 
FOR RENT 

Tuo r\v»n pleasant rooms, use 
nf upstairs kitchrns. Rpfined. 
cmplo.\cd men. Reas. Call e^P.«. 

RE. 5-8783 





*•*•••*•*=••***••*••*•**•••** 


VICTOR 


CLOTHING 
COMPANY 


3f 


« 214 SOUTH BROADWAY 


I* 


$1 Day and up 

1007 East 50th St. 
Spacious Eastside privatei 
rooms, with private entrances, -^ 
cooking facilities. Between 2 _^ 
major buslines. West of Cen- ! 
tral. Near schools, churches, 
shopping. ,■¥■ 

WE. 5-0485 -K 



MA. 4-0801 ^ 


MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


FURN. APT. FOR RENT 


BIG SALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 
$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house during our big sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREE!!! 
'V^ Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3.00 
k^ a week pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for njen and 

Moderniitic 2 badroom homas in ^V* °* *" *ge»- 

Compton. Own by renting and 
save. Excallent opportunity for 
raspontibia party who wants hit 
own home. Conveniently located 

Wear and enjoy your clothes while paying* 


OWN HOME 
BY RENTING 


on West Cressey Street, off Wil- 
ington, just north of Rosecrans. 
Call for information. 


MUrray 1-0116 

FOR RENT 


2 — ONE Bedroom apts. West- 
.side. Call RE. 3-9826 after 5 
p.m. 


Attractively furnished apartment 
for rent in the Leimert Park area. 


Reasonable. 2908 


J W. Vernin 
.. Mrs. La wis. 


Ave. 


Call after 5 p.m. 

RE. 5-0614 or AX. 2-5835 


WESTSIDE APARTMENT 


$85 Month 

2 large bedrooms, 
5 rooms unfurnished. 
1 teenager welcome. 

Near everything. 
Beautiful stucco unit. 

At 2020 Harcourt. 

Call WEbster 4-0975 
or WEbster 1-8046 



3 NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT 



.l!!ll!l 


Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREEl 
But act now III!!!!! Pay later 

SHIRTS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MORE!!!!!!!! 
TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $7.95 ** $9.95 up to $24.95, WORTH MUCH MOREI 

ALL $30.00 men's suits and top coats $1 5.00 

ALL $40.00 " " " " ." $25.00 

ALL $50.00" " " " " " $35.00 

ALL $60.00 ^45.00 

ALL $70.00 " " " " " $55.00 

ALL $80 00 " " " " ' $65.00 

ALL $90.00 " " ' $75.00 

HURRY SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEAR!!!!!!!! 

Park FREE next door as you buy your new clothes. We cater to you, and we do mean YOUIII 

Luggage * Watches * Radios * Play Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 

OPEN DAILY 9:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.M. 

VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

* 214 SOUTH BROADWAY • m DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 


If 


I'll 


^v 


12— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 5, 1961 


TMRING 


VAN DE KAMR'S bakeries 


§C%,JXC ''''' '^^^'''^ *■'' 


THUR., FRI., SAT., SUN., JAN. 5-6-7-8 



SIRLOlU 
TIP 


BONELESS 


TOP SIRLOIN S 

I New York $«79 T- B 6 N k $« 05 i^ 
[STEAKS 1^ ; STEAKS 1^ I 

p6rterkome$ 

FILLET $f79 BreaJcfast $«b9i^^ 

STEAKS 1^ STEAKS 1^ 


GROUND 

BEEF 


GROUND 

CHUCK 


4w lb. d V lb. 

GROUND 

ROUND 



FARMER JOHN PURE PORK 

LINK 
SAUSAGE 

WILSON'S CERTIFIED 

SLICED 


23 


C 

EA. 


BACON 



MRS. FRIDAYS FROZEN 


CARNATION FROZEfJ 


hO! D Kisr FROZEN 


BREADED go/ AO^ PERCH or COD OftC ' ^^EF ift , o; $lOO' NORTHERN 

SHRIMP PKG.- •!¥., FILLETS MB PKG^y,, STEAKSIUpkos 1 "■" 


LEE'S SMOKED 5-7 LBS. 

PICNICS 


"EXTRA 

SMOKED 

FLAVOR" 


HILLBROOI' IMFGPTtD 

SCOTCH WHISKY ' 

GRAMZEE 


80 PROOF ^ ^l^^tf^O 



SLICED FROZEN 

NORTHERN mf^i 

HALIBUT ■lYi, 

EASTERN PORK SMALL SIZE UNDER 3 LBS. 

SPARERIBS 

c 


MINUTE MAID FROZEN 

ORANGE JUICE 

^ . -QUAIL BRAND-/--- 


PEAS, -CORN, 

CUT GREEN BEANS or TOMATOES 


S & F 



303 TINS 

YOUR 

CHOICE 


PEANUT BUTTER 



16 OZ. 
JAR 


■QUAIL BRAND' 


APPLE SAUCE 



JANE ANDERSON FROZEN VA LB. PKG. OF 3 

BEEF TAMALES 


JANE ANDERSON 8 OZ. PKG. (MAKES 1 PINT) 


YOUR CHOICE 




MT. LAS3L'l EXTRA LARGE 

PRUNES 

.$100 


CHILI CON CARNE 

GRAND TASTE-6 OZ. PKG - iPfe d* 

LARGE SLICED BOLOGNA 25 


MAZOLA 
MARGARINE 

FtATURED ON KTTV CHANNEL 11 

1-LB. 
CTN. 




SOLID HEADS GREEN 

CABBAGE 


3 .$100 ^c 

CELLO BAGS | ^0 ^b. 

GRAPEFRUi 


ARIZONA 
TABLE-SIZE 




< I 


CERAMIC 

CHOICE OF 4 COLORS 

L REG. 59c VALUE 

^ ASH 
TRAYS 


EACH 


VNf Ml-SMiVI 1H( HII.Ki I" LIVII |)I A^ 




filANT SIZE 


SALES PRICES EFFECTIVE AT ALL THRIFTIMART MARKETS CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN EVERY NEIGHBORHOOD: 


2600 SOUTH VERMONT AVENUE, LOS ANGELES — 3621 SOUTH LA BREA, LOS ANGELES — 609 NORTH DILLON, LOS ANGELES -^ 6840 LA TUERA; WESTCHESTER — 7980 WEST SUNSET, HOLLYWOOD 6601 LAWEL 

CANYON BLVD., NORTH HOLLYWOOD — 8440 LINCOLN BLVD., SANTA MONICA -^ 7985 SANTA MONICA BLVD., HOLLYWOOD — 3217 WIST MAGNOLIA, BURBANK 11210 SANTA MONICA BLVD., SANTA MONICA 








i-* 


Doil 
oppc 
I m nl 

thing! 
want I 
Robir 


mech^ 
now 
there'l 
thinj 
Tha 
to m\ 
pap 
are 13 
worldl 
sons 
phone 
sickeij 
peopl^ 
minu^ 
ev^r 
mg ' 
phone 
anothi 
ers 
and c| 
millic 
tions 
phone 
650 
their 
powei] 
you a| 
or nig 

Mil 
alreacj 
consp 
€omr 
like 
teurs. 
every I 
granil 
.the d^ 
they 
•hour ; 
or lis 
(( 

Brii 
Ail 

LOt 

.Trade 
day 
poiino 
the St 

^ation 


* 






^-n 


V. 


•K 


' 


-.^•, 


KKK THREATENS TOBMN HOME 


JAN 1 8 1961 


Stinta Fe RR Grilled ~oH- 





ia» 


Jiarge 


— ^crM5^5 Railroad — 




2101 w. Vernon Avenue, L. A. Coiitinuous Publication for 80 Years ax. sous 


Vol. LXXX-No. 43 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


10 


AX. 5-3135 


Out-of-Town 15c 


Race Bars Tumble Down 
At Georgia Uniyersity 

Courts Tell Governor to 
Keep College Doors Open 



J 1 ng 
f from 


l..aran l*\wr 




133.4 MiUion Phoaes ! 

Don't get me wrong. I'm not , 
opposed to telephones. Really. 
I'm not. They're mighty handy] 
things to have. Like when you i 
want to know what Jackie 
Kobinson hit the year he 
joined the , 
IkT^ D o d g f r s,] 
why you can; 
phone The 
Times sports ] 
desk and get; 
the figures 
without mov- 
a w a y 
the TV 
Or you can 
■ call L'L 8900 
and get the 
mechanical answer that it is 
now 9:42 and 30 seconds. But 
there's a limit to all good 
thingfs, including telephones. 

That awful truth came home 
to me when I read in the 
papers last week that there 
are 133.4 million phones in the 
world. P'igure that five per- 
,sons have acce.ss to each 
phone and you're hit with the 
sickening fact that 667 million 
people may call you the next 
minute. You can take what- 
e\er comfort there is in know- 
ing that one million of the 
|>hones are out of order, that 
another one million homeown- 
ers haven't paid their bilL<: 
and can't call out and that 1.4 
million others are on vaca- 
tions and away from their 
phones. But that still leaves 
6.30 million people poised at 
their instruments with the 
power in their hands to ring 
you at any moment of the day 
or night. 
] Gigantic Conspiracy 
Millions of these people are 
already banded together in a 
conspiracy which makes the 
Communist Conspiracy look 
like the handiwork of ama- 
teurs. They have a list of 
every good TV and radio pro- 
gram in the whole world and 
the devilish part of it is that 
they know the minute and the 
hour you settle back to look at 
or listen to those programs. 
(Continued on Page 4) 


TELLS OF ABUSE— Lennie Andreivs. left top. is shoun 
with his ivije, Mrs. tlln Andrews, and Charles E. IP'ilson. 
chief counsel {or the FEP, at first public hearina under 
Calif (irnia s FEP law. Lower picture shoiLS Andrews tcsti- 
fxtng to abusive language of Santa Fe of filial. (Adams) 

Worked 14 Years 
Ot\ Broom Brigade 


ATLANTA — The , walls of law, custom and 
prejudice that have excluded Negroes from the Uni- 
versity of Georgia for 175 years came tumbling 
down this week as two Negro students were enroll- 
ed after three topsy-turvy days of legal backing 

and filling by the governor, 
the legislature and the courts. 
The two are 18-year-old Char- 
layne Hunter and 19-year-old 
Hamilton Holmes. 

When the dust settled the 
federal courts had had the 
last say. In quick succession, 
Federal District Judge Wm. ^. 
Bootle ordered the two stu- 
dents admitted, first denied 
and then granted a motion 
for a stay to permit an appeal 
from his order and Tuesday 
issued an Injunction forbid- 
ding the state auditor from 
withholding funds for the uni- 
versity's operation. 

Stay Issued 

Judge Bootle's stay order 

issued Monday was in effect 

only a few hours before it 

was overturned by the federal 


'Indian Prince/ 
Woman Jailed 
For Burglary 

A man who claims he is an 
Indian Prince and a white 
woman were arrested ort sus- 
picion of burglary last Thurs- 
day aiter they wore seen hud- 
dling together, allegedly dis- 
cussing some "hot" merchan- 
dise, at the Intermis.Mon Club. 
4370 W. Adams blvd. 

The woman, Helen Roberta 
Reece, 26, a"lso known as Bob- 
by Dumas, )allegedly oitegedjQourt of Appeals for the Fifth 
*^' .-^ - -.«: --..-- (;;ij.cuit. During the few hours 


^he arresti'hg officers who 
were taking them to jail $2000 
in cash if they would let her 
out of the squad car ^at the 
ne.xt red light. "^ 

Found SIOOO 


it was in effect the university 
halted admission proceedings 
for the students but as quick- 
ly resumed them when the 
Court of Appeals acted. Atty 


Arrested along with, Miss i Gen. Eugene Cook caught an 
Reec-e was Rudolph La ^ Marr.j airplane and went to Wash- 
.50, who sometimes uses the|ington Monday night to ask 
name of Ali Ra.s<hid. and whol Supreme Court Justice Hugo 
Uves at 3431 S. LaBrea avenue. I Black to overrule the Court 


La Marr said he works at the 
Xatum Service Station 'at 27th 
iand Western. 

[ Officers obsor\-ed the two in 
i 'Close conversation at the In- 

Lennie L. Andrews, of 1535 Western avenue, San termission Club. La .Man- had 
Bernardino, who worked for the Santa Fe Railroad been named as a su.=ipe(f-t in a 
as a car cleaner for nearly 14 years before he was previous crime involving the 
fired last March, was his own best witness when he 
took'the stand Monday at the first public hearing 

» conducted since the eisl-ablish- 



DUE HERE— Rev. Martm 
Luther Ktng, Jr.. will ar- 
rive here Saturday to ri fort 
on sit-ins and help II est 
(joast ministers form (Airis- 
tian Leadership Conference. 


British Lobor 
Aids Belgians 

LONDON — Britain's great 
Trade Union Congress Tues- 
day arranged to send 50,000 
pounds ($140,000) as a loan to 
the striking General Confeder- 
ation ol Labor in Belgium. 

The money is to aid the 
iamilies oX strikers. 



rnent of the Califo'riria Fair; 
Employment Practices Com-; 
mission. 

Andrews claims he was 
fired after he filed a com-| 
plaint charging discrimina- ' 
tion with the FEP. That com-' 
plaint was filed last Feb. 15.! 
He was fired on March 30. | 

Testimony Buttressed | 

Over objections from tlio 
counsel for the Santa Fe. 
Andrews told of lii.s lengthy 
scr\-ice during eight years of 
which he was lead man, of 
his education which included 
a five-year automobile- 
mechanics course, his service 
with the Navy In this country 
and overseas, his repeated ef- 
forts to obtain promotion to 
mechanic and of the insulting 
language to which he was 
subjected by an official of the 
company. 

His testimony was buttress- 
ed by that of fellow em- 
ployees, union officials, and 
FEP investigator Murrray 
1 Brasky, who investigated An- 
(Centinued on Page 4) 


7<LIV POST— Rev. L. Syl- 
vester Odom, pastor of Ward 
AME Church, was advised 
by Atty. Gen. Stanley Mosk 
Tuesday that he had been 
appointed to the State Ad- 
visory Committee, Co-nstitu- 
tional Rights Section of the 
Department of Justice, for 
a one year term. 


theft of a motor rar. 

At La Marts home, police 
found more than ,S10<X1 m cash, 
a number of m.cn's suits with- 
out labels. two cashmere 
sweaters with lur collars and 
e.\tra collars, all of which 
were belie\ed to have been 
stolen, together with'* supply 
of white, \elknv and red pills, 
i-esembling benzedrine tablets, 
Seconal and nembutal. 

A Real Prince 

They also found a lu'poder- 
mic syringe. 

La Marr claimed lie had a 
legal right to u.se, both the 
name of La .Marr and that of 
.Ali Raschid. asserting that he 
was in reality a prince from 
India. He said he had earned 
the SIOIO police found 'in his 
apartment. 

When police searched Miss 
Recce's apartment, after ob- 
taining her permission, they 
found an assortment of appli- 
ances, including a TV set, a 
beige telephone and several 
suits with the labels removed. 
One of the suits bore a clean- 
ing tag in the name of 
"Swank," a known dealer in 
"hot" merchandise. 

En route to the Main Jail in 
(Continued on Page 3), 


of Appeals but the justice 
turned the plea over to the 
full court which issued an 
order Tuesday morning deny- 
ing the request without com- 
ment. 

Meanwhile Gov. Ernest Van- 
diver was riding off in all 
directions at once. Elected on 
a solemn promise to "save" 
the state ftom integration, he 
got down on his gubernatorial 
hands and knees iMopday to 
(Continued ort Page 4) 


Electrical Fire 
Critically Burns 
Ray Johnson 

Firemen wearing gas masks 
rescued electrician Ray John- 
.son, 38, of 2352 Virginia ave- 
nue, from the basement of an 
office building at 607 S. Hill 
street Tuesday. 

Traffic was halted for more 
than an hour as firemen 
from nine companies battled 
the blaze and billowing smoke 
to rescue Johnson, who suffer- 
ed third-degcee burns over 
most of his body. 

He was taken to Central Re- 
ceiving Hospital. Treated there 
also was fireman Albert Du- 
bin, who was overcome by 
smoke. 

The fire apparently was 
caused when Johnson's drill 
touched a high voltage con- 
duit and sent sx>arks into ma- 
terials stored in the basement. 



Elderly 

Woman 

Warned 

A Ku Klux Klan threat 
to "get out — or else" was 
telephoned Mopday night 
to an elderly woman in 
Pasadena. 

Recipient of the threat, ac- 
cording to Pasadena police, 
was Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Washington, who is close to 80 
years old, and who lives with 
her son George Washington 
and his wife Madeline at 829 
N. Summit street. 

Race Epithets 

About 10 p.m. the phone 
rang. A man's voice at the 
other end of the line said he 
was from the Ku Klux Klan 
and in language liberally 
sprinkled with ugly race 
epithets wanted to know if she 
was white, or what. 

He warned her, the Eagle 
was informed, to move out of 
her home — or it would be 
btirned down. 

Police said the caller also 
threatened to bum a cross on 
the Washington lawn. 
Crack Pot? 

Police inclined to dismiss 
the call as a "c r a c k • p o t" 
threat, but nonetheless they 
(Continued on Page 4) 


^ 


IVIKS JUDGMENT ON CAR CONTRACT— Alfred 
Gray, Union Station redcap, right, won a $140Cf judgment, 
after charging concealment of finance charges in car ton- 
tract. He it sho%m with his attorney, David J. Lee.\ (Story 
Page's.) (Adams) 


Pennsylvania Court Won't 
Hear Baptist Inc. Wrangle 


By Barbora Mounts 

The Pennsylvania Supreme 
Court ruled this week that it 
does not have jurisdiction 
over the disputed issue of who 
is president of the National 
Baptist Convention, Inc. 

The Pennsylvania Court de- 
cided that since the organiza 
tion' was incorporated in the 
District of Columbia, the case 
can be heard only by the 
courts there. 

The case arose as a result 
of the dispute that erupted 
violently at the Philadelphia 
Convention of the organiza- 
tion last September. 

Two ministers claim the 
presidency — the Rev. J. H. 


Jackson, pastor of Olivet Bap- 
tist Church of Chicago, who 
has been president for seven 
years, and Dr. Gardner C. Tay- 
lor, pastor of Concord Baptist 
Church of Christ, Brooklyn. 

Prior to the decision. Dr. 
Taylor made public a letter 
he had sent to Dr. Jackson on 
Dec. 12. inviting him to a con- 
ference in which the two 
night settle the dispute 
amicably. He says he has re- 
received no reply to his pro- 
posals. 

Rev. P. J. Ellis, of Morning 
Star Baptist Church here in 
Los Angeles who is president 
of the local Baptist Ministers 
Union, said Tuesday that he 


doubted seriously that Dr. 
Jackson would meet with Dr. 
Taylor since Rev. Jackson con- 
siders himself the duly elect 
ed head of the group and sees 
no reason for such a meeting. 

Following the decision of 
the Pennsylvania Supreme 
Court, Atty. I. 'W. Crippins, 
counsel for the defendants, 
said that absolutely no evi- 
dence has been presented in 
the case to date. 

Dr. Taylor said: "We will 
decide in a few days as to 
how we will proceed in up- 
.holding Baptist principles of 
free choice upon which we 
stand. I thing we should seek 
(Continued on Page 5) 


'Let Them Conief 
Cubans Tell Visitar 

By Grace E. Simons 

"I wanted to see for myself if there's any place 
under the sun where there isri't discrimination. I 
looked everywhere. I tried to find it. Bui there 
wasn't any." 

Mrs. Odessa Cox, of 637 W. 119th street, was 

discussing her trip to Cuba 
over the Christmas-New Year's 
holiday with some 400 other 
tourists who travelled under 
the auspices of the Fair Play 
* '^ for Cuba Committee. 
Wonderment 
? Mrs. Co.x who, with her hus- 
band Raymond Cox operates 
^'.i the Utopia Cleaners at 1820 
E. 97th street, returned to Los 
Angeles last Thursday. 

Wonderment at what she 
had •■seen in Fidel Castro's 
Cuba shone from her eyes, 
spilled over in her speech. She 
seerhed impelled to tell more 
and more and more ... 

"Negroes were in all walks 
of life," she said. "The head 
of the Army is a Negro. There 
are Negro captains and Negro 
officers of all kinds, all the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



LIKES FIDEL — Mrs. 
Odessa Cox searched for dis- 
crimination, but found none, 
during trip to Cuba. 


-y- 


Dies from Knifing 
At Friend's Door 

"Alice, let me in! I think I'm cutl'l Timer Calen. 
54, a laborer who lived at ISSSi/o E. 23rd street, 
called out to Alice Binion, 48, of 1138 E. Adams blvd. 
last Thursday evening. 

Miss Binion, who had been arguing and fight- 
ing with Calen a few minutes'^ 
before, refused to open the 


Goi^'t Won't 
Give Aid to 
Tent Colony 

NEW YORK — The federal 
government will not use any 
of its surplus food to help 
feed Tennessee sharecroppeni 
lacing the rigors of winter in 
a tent village near StHnerville, 

The Federal Agriculture De 
partment ruled that there Is 
no "urgent need" among the 
families at Freedom Village 
who were evicted from their 
.farms after they were bold 
enough to register and vote in 
the Nov. 8 elections. 

(The government has, how- 
ever, appropriated $1,00,000 to 
aid Cubans in Miami.) 

The finding of the federal 
agency was in sharp contra- 
diction to statements of 
NAACP workers on duty in 
Tennessee. They report that 
the need for food, clothing 
and shelter is "acute." 

It is so acute, in fact, that 
the NAACTP this week issued 
its second ^ nationwide apeal 
to all its branches in 43 states 
asking for conti*)Utions to aid 
the displaced sharecroppers in 
Fayette and Haj-wood Coun- 
ties. 

The new appeal asked all 
NAACP units to send at least 
$50 from their treasuries to 
Jesse Turner, N.\ACP Mem- 
phis Branch presidenf," 236 3. 
Wellington street, Memphis, 
Tenn. 

The first appeal last sum- 
mer brought more than $8000 
which has been used to send 
in packages of food, clothing 
and later tents to the families 
who have no homes, no jobs 
and no way of earning a liv- 
ing. 

They and their children are 
huddled in tents, lighted by 
kerosene lamps, heated by 
stoves. Their house furnish- 
ings are stacked behind the 
tents 


door. Instead she went to the 
phonp and called Calen's son, 
Clezell- Calen, of the 23rd 
street address. 

At Foot of Stairs 

Then she opened the door 
and saw Calen lying at the 
foot of the stairs, bleeding 
She called an ambulance 

When police arrived they 
found the walkway heavily 
splotched with blood. They 


featured 
In the Eagle 

Editorials 4 

Church Activities 5 

Sports 8 

The Tee 8 

Bill Smallwood 9 

Dorothea Foster 10 

People 6 

Chazz Crawford < 6 

Show Business 7 


examined Calen, but could 
find no pulse. His /heart had 
stopped beating. He had been 
stabbed in the abdomen. 

The officers were met by 
Calen's son, who told them 
that both the suspect and the 
death weapon were in the 
house. 
If, Miss Binion told police that 
Calen, her boy friend, had 
wanted her to go with him to 
24th and Long Beach to have 
a drink, but that she had re- 
fused and they had begun to 
quarrel. 

Cut Hini a Little 

She said she "cut him a 
little bit and closed the door 
on him and wouldn't let him 
in." 

She said she couldn't re- 
member where she got the 
knife from, or where she had 
put it. 

She claimed that Calen had 
beaten her on previous 
occasions and that when they 
(Continued on Page 3) 



APPOINTED — Mayme 
G. Lewis has just been ap- 
pointed director to the board 
of the Los Angeles Young 
Republicans. She will cover 
48 county clubs with d mem- 
bership of 3)600. — (Story on 
Page 3). 


•■y 


M 


2— The California Eagle 
Thursday, January 12, 1961 

Sfovall Home 
Benefit Party 
Fills Theater 

V near capacity crowd filled 
the Hollywood Pantages The- 
ater Sunday night to attend 
he Spartacus "Theater Party." 
The show which was a fund- 
laisinj? event for the Stovall 
Foundation was an outstand- 
;ii.^ success. 

Benefits for the special 
sliowinj; of tliis spectacular 
motion picture will be turned 
o\er to the non-profit Senior 
Citizen's Home. 

The benefit committee was 
headed by Chairman LeRoy R. 
W'eekes. 'm.D., \-ice-president 
of till- foundation; Gerald L. 
.Sio%al!. M. D. president, and 
John .\. Jackson, executive di- 
! color of the Stovall Home for 
I lie Aged. 

Woods- Slrodes siiinificant 
role ihrilU-d the audience with 
;iis .^uperb perfoiTnance of 
-Uraba" wliicli will long be 
icmembei'od by the 
i-iawd that attended. 



I\ THE B.ni.lMJS — -I/m. Xuthanid MauU, of the 
Bronx, X. Y.. regional tiir, rtor of the y, atiojial Council 
of Scgro .IFonun. and her husband Kon first prize at the 
recent XCSJf Internationa/ Ihliiiiante Ball. The prize 
z:vw a zceek's trip to Xassaa. llahi.nim-. The Meades are 
shoiirt on the isle. 


Deerfield Park Loses 
Fight to Bar Negroes 


U. N. Councit I 
Will Meet on 
Congo Crisis 

The steadily disintegrating 
conditions in the Congo were 
due for anotlior hearing in 
the United Nations, probably 
to start today. Thursday, as 
supporters of imprisoned Pre- 
mier Patrice Lumumba con- 
tinued to extend their control 
over new areas. 

The U. N Security Council 
meeting was called for by the 
Soviet Union, charging "fresh 
acts of. Belgian aggression." 
The specific acts referred to 
dealt with Belgium's use of 
her protectorate, Ruanda- 
Urundi, as a base for Belgian- 
backed Col. Mobutu's forces in 
their Ill-starred New Year's 
Day 


Sopiebody's Face Is Red 

< THunderous threats of massive intervention in Loos 
to battle seven batallions of Communist North Viet-Nam 
troops that had crossed the border subsid^ed last week to 
less than a whisper. 

It was suddenly found that no North Viet-Nam troops 
had in fact invoded Laos, nor were they expected to. 

Lame excuses from Vientiane, capitol of Laos, said 
there may have been some shou';Jng at tTie border as if an 
attack was imminent, and that the Laotian border posts 
apporently panicked and reported /the invasion as a fact. 

Then, possibly to cover up embarrassment 'ov<er mili- 
tary reverses, officials announced the invasion under way. 

A plaintive report in the Chicago Daily News from 
Vientiane said that "nobody here knows for sure what is 
going on — at :east not until two or three days after it has 
happened," and added that no correspondent has been 
ollowed to visit any bottle zone. 


Visitor Can't Find 
Race Bias in Cuba 

(Continued from Page 1» | before invited us to their 
way down — and up. There are i homes, brought us flowers. 


blacks training whites 
whites training blacks. 


NAACP Defends 

t ■ 

1700 Sitdowners 


XEW YORK — Defending .students arrested in 
attack on Kivu Province. | connection witii sit-in protest' demonstrations and 


CHICAGO — A federal district court decision upiiulding 
the right of Deerfield Pttrk. "inCliicago iuburb, to condemn 
land and halt the building of an integrated housing develop- 
ment was upset liy tlie United States Court of .Appeals for 

the eighth circuit last we<^k. • 

The circuit court ordered a against the Village Board to 
IjutTgi trial on the 5750,000 damage, pre\'ent unlawful liara.s,?ment 
[claim of Modern Communit> of Progress' fonstruction pro- 
Developers and its Illinois .-^ub- gram, and also asked .ST.'iO.OOO 


,sidiary. Progress Development damage: 
CLASS IN WRITING | Corp.,' wiUi instructions that if , — 

A iiractical course in maga- proof sustains^ the pleading, 
,'iii(> writing, editing, and pub- the court can enjoin state con- 
lishing will be offered next demnation of the tvvo sites, 
semester at Ea-i Las Angelesj Progress Dex'elopment Corp. 
College. j bought 22 acres in Deerfield 

in 1959 after a long search by 
I local builders. Ghicagoland cit- ! 
j izens backed the formation of 
the .subsidiary following meet- ■ 
ings arranged by the Ameri- j 
Ccin Friends Seivice Commit- 1 
tee, at which the stor\" was 


Customer Shot 
At Gas Station 



Builder Told 
He Must Sell 
Home to Negro 


Hatchet Man Captured 

In that attack, it has now- 
been revealed, Mobutu lost a 
good portion of his men killed, 
wounded or captured. 

Among those taken prisoner 
was his security ' chief. Ma,]. 
Gilbert Pongo, the man who 
brought Lumumba back to 
Leopoldville as a prisoner. 

Pongo. Mobutu's , cliief 
hatcliet man, taken to Stanley- 
ville in Lumumba's territory, 
cabled Pres. Joseph Kasavubul 
appealing for Lumumba's re-' 
lea.se "in tlie iniPbest of na- 
tional unity. " I 

He also denounc-ed his 

former chief, Mobutu, tor plot-' 

ting with the "colonialists." 1 

Tshombe's Troubles I 

Lumumba f.n-ces meanwhile I '^f''^'" Kobmson closec 

hood he w;is told 


.speeding up legal activities foi; school desegregation 
in several states are the major ol)jectives of the 
NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund for 1961. 


No Negro Streets 

"I even watched as I walked 
along the street as the "people 
passed by. Not^dy paid any 
attention to whether a person 
was light or dark. 

"I tried my best to .see^if 
there wasn't some race feel- 
ing. But there was nothing. 
Nothing at all. In the offices, 
there were dark Cubans and 
light Cubans. In the houses — 
they were all together. Negro 
families next door to white 
families. There was no 'Negro 
street,' no 'white street.' 

"I talked to a mother of 
eight — a dark-skinned Cuban 
— arid asked her what the 
revolution had done for her. 
She lived in a trashy, bam- 


and I "Everywiiere we found 
j warmth, enthusiasm for Fidel. 
I No-one calls him Castro. They 
; Idve him, they love him like 
a brother. i 

Year of Education 

'Fidel called for 4000 voIun-_ 
teer teachers. Ten thousand 
answered the call. They will 
get no pay. They're teaching 
the children — and their 


countryside 
write. This 
is thje "Year of 
By J^n. 1, 1962, 


Thurgood Marshall, the fund's! '"'^^ house. Under Batista she 
director -counsel, announced! P*^^ ^^5 a month. Now she 
this week. ! P^ys $5 for the same house, 

^ i 

Approximately ITuO s I \^ On the List 

dents were arrested and cdn- 
vicled during 1960 sit-in 


"But she's on the list for a, 


have captin-ed control of the 

ir^DTfr^nr, ,- r^ northern .section of mineral- 

H.\RTFOPD, ( onn. — Tliej 


MANN'S 

UNION OIL 

SERVICE 



• TIRES 

• TUBES 

• BAHERIES 

• ACCESSORIES 

• SERVICE CALLS 
•TIRE REPAIRING 

• EXPERT Cube 

• FREE PICKUP 

and Delivery 

4000 SOUTH 
\^ESTERN AVE. 

AX. 1-9566 



- INTRODUCING - 

TUGGIE'S 

AUTO REPAIR 

SPECIALIZING IN 
' BRAKES 
* REPAIRS 
* TUNE-UPS 
400a SO. 
WESTERN AVE. 
AX. 1.9S66 



tcld of successful integration state ha.s ordered a Hamden 
m Concord Park and GreenbeU [real estate developer to sell a 

: Knoll in the Philadelphia area, |,ouse to a Neo-ro who was re- 

iand the Princeton. N.J.. com- buffed in previous attempts 
munity. to buy. 

I Arrangements were- made: Tlie" directive came from a 
for bonds to be placed for land three-man tribunal iliat 

! improvement. Thus 51 lots on: judged ji^^ ^.^^ ^„^ behalf of 
nvo sites were recorded. .Sow the State Civil Right.s Com- 
e.- and water were put in for mission. The complaint came 

,39 of the lots, and two models from DeWitt Jone.«, a .\ew 
were under roof in November, fjave^i Ne'^ro. 
1959, when news of Progress' Jones" .said he was turned 
sales policy became public. <iosvn be(.-ause of his race when 

he tried to buy a Iiouse in the 
Benham Heights development 
in Hamden. The case is tlie 


^atan.ga Piovince and 
I have .se* up a new "iiide- 
j pendent staie" tliere. known 
; as "Lualaha.'' 

' Forces loyal, lo Lumumba, 
also hold Oriental Province 
j and most of Kivu Prvincc. 
I Moise Tsliomibe, Belgian 
i puppet wlio heads Katanga 
|Pro\ince, was iiaving diploma- 
i tic difficulties in addition to 


A filling station attentlant 
was accused of shooting a cus- 
tomer early Friday morning 
after the customei- threatened 
hinr with a knife. 

James Newton RolMnson. 'S'>. 
of 260 E. S7th street, sold 
Tiobert Butler, 2(1, of St; I W. 
B6th street, two quarts of oil. 
tlie car 
w;is 1 o I ft by the 
driver of the car to collect his 
money from tlie m.an on the 
pas.'ienger side of the car. 

When he went around in 
C(jllecl. Butler r e p o r t e d 1 \- 
started c u r s i n g liiin and 
accuse<l him of slamming the 


demonstrations for whom at- ,,j^g gj^j^j 
lornoys for the Legal Defense " 
Fund have filed suits. Marshall 
said some 15 Negro and white 
lawyers throughout the coun- 
try are now engaged in de- 
fending the students. 

Original School Cases 

As the new year begins, 
cases include renewed legal 
action in two of file original 
five cases which resulted in 
the ."Supreme Court's 1954 de- 
rision outlawing segregation 
in public education. 

On s i t - i n flem(jnstraiions. 
Marshall said: 

"Most of them (the Negro 


new house. 'We'll get a house,' 


"Before she did day w'ork. 

Site was the only one in the 

family who could get a job. 

Now her husband and her 
I two sons are employed and 

she stays at home. Proudly 
j she told of her three children 
I who are studying for careers 
! ^-one to be a nurse, another 
I a teacher, another a secretary. 

I "At the American Consul- 
late,' Mrs. Cox continued, 
1 "they said that 90 per cent of 
' the people are against Castro, 
but I don't know where they 
i were. We didn't see them. 


students I ■ ha\e bet^n charged 
I and con\icted for crimes sucfv 


Free to Go Anywhere 

"No," she replied to a ques 


, , , I ■ „ I ,,. , r as disorderlv conduct, trespass, tion, we were free to go anv 

liood tlown and umped out ofl. . , . ■-,.,- j u . * n . 

interfering with business and, where, to talk to anvone. peo 


• if the car with a knife in his 
liand. 

He starU'vi t<jward Robinson 
who told him to halt. Tne at- 


anybody — 


After a number of public 
and private meetings and pub- 
lic furor, the Deerfield Park 
District took steps to condemn 
both sites for parks. 

On December 22, 1959, viola- 1 
tion of the Fourteenth Amend- 1 


first to te.st the 1959 amend- 1 ^''^'^ ^^^ ^'^ pre.sence here,i)ie liorn as hi: 


ment to the state's law against 
discrimination in housing. 
Tlie tribuna. oixlered the de- 


ment to the U.S. Constitution : veloper, Albert Swanson, to 
and the U.S. Civil Rights Act 'sell Jones a hou.se within 30 
was cha.-ged in a suit filed in! days. Swanson's attornej-s said 
the federal distric-t court ini they will seek a Superior Court 
Chicago. It sought an in- j injunction against the order. 

junction against the Park Dis- 1 , 

trict's proceeding 'with con- j .\ man is never a failure 
demnation of the properties until he has failed at some- 
in Deerfield, and an injunction i thing he really likes. 


liis trouble with Lumumba's tendant backed away as 
men. : Butler kept comin.g toward 

Sunday, in Elizal)Oiii\ ille. he him. pulled his gun and fired, 
canceled a scheduled visit to, 'Willie Yarbrough. 9.53'j W. 
the United States. angril\- tell- (;2nd street. dri\er of the car, 
ing newsmen that the United' told police he accidently blew 

drove into thej 
tilling stati(jn. The attendant,! 
he assumed, resenteci this and'; 
so he slammed down the hood 
alter he put in the oil. 

Police found a .22 caliber 
revolver and a small pen^ 
knife at the scene. They also^ 
found a car\ing knife with a| 
seven inch blade in the purse I 
of Margaret Ann Gray of I 
449'i W. T4th street, a pas-| 
senger in Butler's cai'. 


parading without a license. ' i pie in the street 

"The only crime they have^nd we did. 
committed was to protest in; "People we had never seen 

an orderly anri peacefulj ; 

manner the denial of theiripealed to the highest 


parents — in the 

how to read and 

year, 1961, 

Education." 

they want everyb<|)dy to know 

how to read. 

"I never saw ^uch happy 
people, and they'r^-.well dress- 
ed even in the coiintryside. 

"We stayed at the Havana 
Riviera. Before the revolution 
no dark faced people could 
stay there. They couldn't rent 
a room. They could pnly work 
as menials. Now everyone i.s 
welcome. 

We'll Die First 

"Homes are. springing up 
everj'where. We went into one 
home we passed in Pipar dpi 
Mar. It was 'the home of a 
Negro couple. There were 
flags on the door, and Fidel's 
picture. In every room of the 
house there was a picture of 
Fidel. Before, they told us. ■ 
they lived in a house made 
of pasteboard boxes with the 
bare ground for a floor. They 
pay S20 'a month for the two- 
bedroom house. It 'Will belong 
to them in 15 years. 

"People are not jitterv' about 
an invasion," Mrs. Cox re- 
ported, "byt they are on the 
alert. They expect it to come, 
though they don't kx.ow when. 
"She quoted a child in the 
street, a dentist, many whom 
she met all voicing the same 
sentiment. , 'Let them come,' 
they told her. "We'll die before 
we'll give up what we've 

got'." 

\Irs. Cox said she was the 

court only Negro woman among the 
Supreme! 400 who took the trip with the 


at the present time would not 
be "opportune." 

Tshombe also denounced the 
U. S. consul in Elizabethville. 
William Canup, who lie said 

denied him a visa. 

V 

The earth's population of 
approximately three billion 
averages out at about lOO hu- 
mans per square mile of fer- 
tile soil. 


right to sit at lunch counters.' | reached the U. .S. 

he pointed out. "To protest ; court Dec. 31. wlien Legal [Fair Play group. Onlv five of 
against inju.stues is the foun-, Defense Fund attomevs filed, the total number w^re Ne- 
dation of our American democ-; three petitions in behalf of ISigroes. She was the only per- 
^3^> • ' ; Negro students arrested last son who went from Los An- 

The tirsi sit-in case io lie ap-: spring in Baton Rouge, La. geles. 


ANY WAY YOU SAY IT.. 


WagoiS*^'^ 


o'Th 



AT VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 



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Sharpening Focus 
On Rights Keynote 
Of NAACP Meet 

NEW YORK — "The year 1960 must be set down 
as the one in which the civil rights issue moved into 
the sharpest focus since World War I," Roy Wilkins, 
NAACP executive secretary, told the 52nd annual 
meeting of the association's 225 delegates here this 

week. .. 


He pointed to "lively and 
excitinjj years' ahead if the 
appointment of Robert C. 
Weaver, the association's na- 
tional board chairman, to the 


NAACP, sentenced to six 
months in jail and fined $1200; 
Medgar Evers, NAACP field 
secretary in Mississippi, sen- 
tenced to a month's imprison- 



post of administVator of the '"^"^ ^"^ ^^"^^ ^^^' ^^^ 
Housing and Homo Financei^^^ disbarment proceedmgs 
Agency "is an indication ofl?g^'"fl Samuel W. Tucker, 
the temper and direction of 


the new administration." 
Mood for Movement 

The "mood for movement" 
by Xecjroes toward justice and 
equality, he continued, was re- 
flected by NAACP activitigs 
during 1960. 

That mood was reflected in 
an increase in membership bv 
45.000 to 3S6.S0S. an increase 
In financial support and a 
series of undertakings, includ- 
jng the sit-in -demonstrations, 
"withholfUng of trade" cam- 
paigns throughout the South, 
aid to persecuted share- 
croppers in Tennessee and a 
series of favorable legal deci- 
sions. 

While there was a spirit of 
optimism based on the past 
year's achievements, stress 
was placed during the confer- 
ence upon the mountainous 
barriers that still confront Ne- 
groes throughout the United 
States. 

Labor Discrimination 

Herbert Hill, labor secre- 
tary, in a review of the five- 
year record of the AFL-CIO. 
asserted that the merged labor 
federation has not taken ac- 
tion "on its own initiative" to 
reduce racial discrimination 
among member unions. 

He declared that AFL-CIO 
affiliated unions are "girilty of 
discriminatory racial prac- 
tices" in four categories: out- 
right exclusion of Negroes, 
segregated locals, separate 
racial seniority lines in col- 
lective bargaining agreements 
and exclusion of Negroes 
from apprenticeship training 


NAACP counsel in three Vir- 
ginia cases. 

Legal Victories 

Legal victories iincluded the 
U. S. Supreme Court decision 
stating that Arkansas school 
teachers do not have to list 
outside organizational ties; 
and the Supreme Court deci- 
sion in the Tuskegee boundary 
case which had threatened to 
bar 400 Negroes from voting. 

Wilkins pointed put that 
the association, through its 
Memphis branch, has supplied 
food, clothing and, recently, 
tents to Tennessee share- 
croppers. 

Commenting on school de- 
segregation he declared that 
four little Negro girls enter- 
ing newly - integrated schools 
in New Orleans, "upset the 
whole white race in the State 
of Louisiana" and observed 
That Louisiana, "through its 
shameful performance m a j' 
have Speeded school desegra- 
tion by awakening the country 
to the menace of extreme seg- 
regationists." 

The NAACP leader vowed 
there will be no let-up in the 
pressures for complying with 
the 1954 Supreme Court deci- 
sion, and asserted that ten- 
sions will disappear "only 
when justice and equality are 
the order of the day." 


JOURNALISM M'INNERS—Hlsh school winners in 
the annual Community Chest journalism contest are. from 
left: Dclorcs Moore and David Cohen, both of Edison Jr. 
High: and Dorothy Buchanan and Seigo Hayasi of Jordan. 


Decision Awaited 
On Oil Co. Bios 

ALBANY, N. Y. — The New York Court of Ap- 
peals reserved decision this week on a bid by the 
Arabian Oil Company (Aramco) to set aside two 
lower court rulings that it has no right to question 
job applicants about their religion. 


UN Chief Talks 
Only to White 
South Africans 


JOH.ANNESBURG — Albert 
Luthuli. former head of the 
programs controlled by labor banned African National Con- 
"""'"^- [gress. said Sunday that U.N. 

In his summarj- remarks. Cp„j.etarv General Dag Ham- 
Jack E. Wood. Jr.. special as- l^j^arskjoid's mission will fail 
sistant for housing, declared ^^ig^g ^e confers with non- 
housing discrimination re-!.^^.f^j^g j^g^jg^g 
mains "the most pervasive] Luthuli .'wiid he wants to 
area of civil rights denial" jj^p^.^ ^j^^ Hammarskjold who 
and stated it would be one of j.^, f^r during his visit to South 
the principal targets of thel^rloa has talked only to 
NAACP during the comingLyf,i.je politicians. 
J'^^'"- ^ Luthuli spoke from his home 

Asks "Aggressive Effort' U^ ^^^x^.\ Province, where he is 

Successful accomplishment i(,onfined by the government, 
of school Integration "no 
longer rests principally with 
the courts, but depends large- 
ly upon the aggressive effort 
of the Negro community to 
secure the benefits of what 


Nigeria Ousts 
French Envoy 

LAGOS, Nigeria — Nigeria 
the courts have declared as'oj-dered the French ambassa- 


law." said NAACP General 
Counsel Robert L. Carter. 

He also stressed cases In 
which the association has 
been forced to defend itself 
from southerr^ investigating 
communittees. legislators and 
unjust courts. 

Carter cited the cases of 
Father Theodore R. Gibson, 
presfdent of the Miami 


dor and his .=tiff last Thurs 
day to leave the country 
within 48 hours. 

The action was taken in pro- 
test against France's atomic 
test program in the Sahara 
which Nigeria considers a 
"grave insult." 

French planes and ships 
have been banned and transit 
facilities withdrawn. 



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COUGHS? COLDS? 
ASTHMA? BRONCHITIS? 


The oil company's appeal' 
was opposed by the American! 
Jewish Congress, which ac- 1 
cused Aramco of serving as! 
the "tool and agent" of Saudi j 
Arabia in .screening Jews from! 
employment both in Saudi i 
Arabi and in the United j 
States. I 

NAACP Joins Fight I 

Shad Poller of New York.' 
chairman of the AJCongreSs 
Commission on Law and 
Social Action, asked the court 
to uphold decisions calling on 
the New York State Commis- 
sion Against Discrimination 
(SCAD) to probe charges that 
Armaco's job practices violate 
the State Fair Employment 
Law. 

In a friend-of-the-court brief 
signed by Thurgood .Marshall, 
the NAACP supported the 
American Jewish Congress po- 
sition. 

Armaco's attorney argued 
that the company asks job 
applicants to state their re- 
ligion becau.se it must com- 
ply with a ban on the entry 
of "undesirable persons, in- 
cluding Jews" to Saudi Arabia, 
where Armaco conducts its 
operations. Chester Rordeau, 
counsel for Armaco. also said 
that American political in- 
terests in the Middle East re- 
qi>ire that the company be 
granted an exemption from 
the state anti-discrimination 
law. 

Acas as Tool 

Poller countered by charg- 
ing that Armaco uses the re- 
ligious question on its job 
application form as a device 
for barring' Jews not only 
from employment in Saudi 


Breakfast Club 
Initiates Fund 
To Aid Student 

By C. Marie Hughes 

The Women's Sunday Morn- 
ing Breakfast Club's monthly 
meeting had its usual over- 
flow crowd Sunday at the 
Clark Hotel. 

Lihby Clark, well known 
public relations consultant, 
was the principal spj?akor. 
She gave a detailed report 
entitled ".A Portrait of Africa" 
and gave interesting high- 
lights of her trip to Africa 
last October when Nigeria 
achieved its independence. 

Many Achievements 

Among tlie many achieve- 
ments in the past year by the 
Breakfast Club were a cash 
payment of SoOO for a life 
membership in the NAACP. a 
pledge of SI no a year for 
sickle cell research. SIOOO to 
the Children's Hospital. $1000 
to tlie 'Orthopaedic Ha>i[)ital, 
"adoption" of two 


Afro-Asian Group 
in Neutral Block 

Eight Afro- Asian nations, meeting in Casablanca, 
Morocco, last week, formed a neutralist bloc and 
issued a manifesto calling for the immediate release 
and reinstatement in power of imprisoned Premier 
Patrice Lumumba of the Congo and the disarming 

<Jof the "illegal bands" of Congo 
"strong man" Col. Joseph 


Mayme Lewis 
Made Director 
Of GOP Youth 


Mayme G. Lewis, public 
relations expert and active Re- 
publican leader, has just been 
named director of the board oif 
the Los Angeles Young Repub- 
licans for the year 1961. 

The announcement wzis 
made by the president, Phil 
Curran, last Tuesday evening 
at the Statler Hotel during the 
monthly Executive Committee 
meeting. 

As the director, Mrs. Lewis 
will serve as chairman of the 
"First Voters Committee" for 
I.^s Angeles County. The coun- 
ty organization which she will 
cover has 48 clubs with a 
membership of 3600. 

Mrs. Lewis is coordinator of 
the Young Republicans Un- 
l>>mited. an organization 
founded following- organiza- 
tional efforts of the Repub- 
lican Community Advisory 
Committee of which Paul R. 
Williams is chairman. She is 
also director of the Republican 
Community Service Center. 

Mayme "G," as she is 
known, is a native of Kansas 
City, Mo., where she attended 
school. She completed her 
training here at USC in Office 
Management and Business 
Control. Listed among several 
major firms with which she 
has been associated are Union 
Oil of Southern California. 
Gulf Oil Company, Union 
Mortgage Company and the 
Consolidated Realty Board of 
Southern California. 


Mobutu. 

Members of the group 
threatened to withdraw all 
their forces fT&m the United 
Nations troops in the Congo 
unless their demands are met. 

Their combined forces, in- 
cluding 2300 Ghana troops, 
3240 Moroccan§ and "750 
Guineans, account for approxi- 
mately a third of the total 
U. N. i force. No date was set 
for withdrawal, however. 

The "Casablanca Charter" 
nations also pledged all-out 
support for Algeria inde- 
pendence and approved enlist- 
ment of "African and other 
volunteers" in the Algerian 
independence army. -- 

They further agreed to co- 
operate in political, economic 
and military fields to promote 
or safeguard their own inde- 
pendence. 

Represented at the four-day 
conference^ were Ghana. 
Guinea, Mali, the United 
Arab Republic, the Algerian 
Government in Exile, Libya 
and Ceylon, as well as 
Morocco. 



srjRri\a—j youno 

Balubn child, one of 300.000 
uho face starvation, is bcint/ 
spoon fed by a Belgian nurse 
at a refugee camp in South 
Kasai Province in the Congo. 


Bleeds to Death 

(Continued from Page 1) 
started arguing she thought 
he was going to beat her 
again. 

The argument, she said, 
started inside the house, con- 
tinued out on the porch and in 
African ! the yard. She said that Calen 
children from Kenya and the started hitting her, and she 
giving of Christmas packages Lhoved the knife towards him 


to 80 children. 

Mrs. Theresa Lindsay, club 
president, emphasized that 
without the consistant coop- 
eration of the enthusiastic 
and energetic members, these 
things would be impo.ssible 


in an effort to keep him away 
from her. She didn't recall 
actually cutting him. 

After he stopped coming to- 
wards her, she turned, ran 
into the house and closed the 
door. 


African dignitaric; and rep-! 
resentatives from the Coca began responding. Before the 
Arabi but ajso^from jobs injeola Bottling Company were meeting clo.sed a start had al- 


its New York City operation.' a^nong special guests seated 
where the company has more ^^ ^^^ head tnble. 
than 800 employees. j^g^ Project 

"No American court can re- The talented cluh regulars, 
quire Saudi Arabi to admit an intricate part of the Break- j — 
Jews," Poller said. "But this fast Cluh, furnished the musi- 1$ 
court can and should bar|Cal background which was' 
Aramco from acting as the, well received and enjoyed by 
tool and agent of a foreign! the audience. 
power in violating the lawsj a new project materialized 
of the .state." at Sunday's meeting when ^ 

He said that Charles, Joan Watkins. a young in-1 


ready been made toward pro- 
viding Miss Watkins with the 
money she needs to go to 
Fisk University. 


Redcap Wins 
Award in Car 
Contract Case 

Alfred Gray, 2701 Halldalc 
street, a redcap at Union Sta- 
tion, won a SHOO judgment 
lait week against General 
^■!otors Acceptance Corpora- 
tion and Chieftain Pontiac. 

Gray, through his attorney, 
David J. Lee, of the new law 
firm of Lee, La Vigne and 
Davis, charged concealment of 
.$.500 in finance charges in 
connection with the purchase 
of a 1956 Pontiac from Chief- ' 
tain. 

He further as.serted that the 
car was repossessed after he 
had been paying on it for 17 
months, despite the fact that 
he was ill at the time and of- 
fered to pay all amounts due. 

At the trial, Atty. Lee con- 
tended that the contract wa^ 
illegal and void on its face. 
Judge Arnold Praeger sustain- 
ed his contention. 

Gray was not required to 
take the witness stand. 


Democracy, 
French Style 

Reports from Algeria stated 
that DeGaulle wasn't taking 
any chances on last week's 
vote. 

Waldo Drake, of the Los 
Angeles Times' European 
Bureau, reported that the 
French army had been di- 
rected to haul some one and 
a half million illiterate tribes- 
men to back country' polls and 
"advise" them to vole "yes." 

Just to make it ea.sy, when 
they arrived at the polling 
places, the Algerians found 
two piles of small paper 
squares, on open counters. 
White squares were marked 
"yes," purple squares "no." 

The voter picked up one of 
the squares, went behind a 
small curtain, put the paper 
in an envelope and then 
dropped it in the ballot box. 


Something to buy? Something tc 
sell? Try a classified ad in the 
Eagle. They cost only $1 for 15 
words. And they get results. 


The California Eagle— 3 
Thursday, January 12, 1961 

Driver Held; 
Vet of 2 Wars 
Killed by Car 

Police booked John H 
Allen, 68, of 461 E. 43rd street 
on suspicion of manslaughter 
when the car he w.ts driving 
struck and killed Eugene E. 
Hall, 71, of -512 E. 46th street, 
about 6 p.m. Sunday. 

Hall, who fought in 
both the .Spanish American 
War and World War I. ua»= 
crossing the street at 4Gth and 
Avalon blvd. when he was 
struck down. Hall was born in 
South Carolina', spent most of - 
his early life in New York 
and mo\ed to Los "Angeles in 
1921. 

Ho had been receiving med- 
ical care at Sawiclle Veterans' 
Hospital. 


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Abrams. a former chairman 
of SCAD, and Mrs. Caroline 
Simon, a former member of 
SCAD, had both propiiiscd that 
Aramco hire emplo\pes with- 
out discrimination, subject 
only to receiving a Saudi 
Arabian visa. However, even 
this procedure — which would 
be acceptable to AJCongrcss — : 
has been rejected by Aramco, 
he noted.^ 

Arbitrary Exclusion 

Polier further charged that 
Aramco "uses the possibility 
of travel to Saudi Arabia as a 
formula to disguise the fact 
that it is actually honoring 
a commitment to its business 
partner — Saudi Arabia — to 
exclude Jew ' - any part 
of its payro' i or do- 

mestic." 

Under this formula, the 
AJCongress leader said, 
"Aramco has arbitrarily desig- 
nated all positions in its em- 
ploy with the exception of a 
limited number of employees 
at the lowest levels as re- 
quiring work in Saudi Arabia. 
It then claims a bona fide 
occupational qualification ex- 
emption for all positions since 
Jews cannot obtain visas to 
Saudi Arabia." 


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appeal to the club for funds .yj. Subscribe to ©or increase n capital or invest your capital in .(^ 
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Hardly had she voiced her! | 

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'Indian Prince/ 
Woman Jailed 

(Continued from Page 1) 
company with the co-dofend- 
ant and Miss Mary Brady, who 
had also been arrested. Miss 
Reece allegedly made her of- 
fer of a S2000 bribe to the ar- 
resting officers. 

Miss Reece seemed especial- 
ly put out about being charged 
with the theft of the tele- 
phone. "You would hardly call 
it stealing," she commented. 
"I put a $10 deposit on it." 


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4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


Loren Miller, Publisher 

The California Eagle stands for complete integration of 
Negroes Into every phase of American life through the democratic 
processes. .^ 

We favor: ^^ 

1. FEPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1 . Jim Crow in all forms. 

^. C^-^munlsts nnd all oth«r snemieb or democracy. 

ihursday for Over 79 Years 
3101 W«ar vvinvn, vomer of Van Ness AXminster 5-3135 


The Governors Message 


Governor Brown's message to 
the legislature urging extension 
of "our laws against discrimina- 
tion in housing" is good as far as 
it goes. But it doesrt't go very 
far. 

Discrimination in housing is so 
deeply rooted in custom, law, and 
public attitude that its removal 
requires specific legislation and 
we won't get that kind of legis- 
lation without strong support 
from the governor's office. 

The only specific recommenda- 
tion made by the governor was 
that the legislators enact laws 
providing that "an established 
pattern of discrimination isi a 
proper basis for disciplinary 
action by state licencing bodies." 
Under that principle, a real 
estate broker who refused to sell 
or rent housing for racial reasons 


might be disciplined by the State 
Board. That isn't enough. 

California needs legislation of 
the kind now in effect in Colo- 
rado, Oregon and eastern states 
forbidding discrimpation in the 
sale or rental of all h o u s i n t?, 
whether such shelter is publicly 
assisted or privately owned. - 

There was a time when the 
nation could afford to let the 
private house owner discriminate 
in sales or rentals but that time 
has gone. We are becoming a na- 
tion of city dwellers and nowhere 
is that trerfd more marked than 
in California. 

The cities are the people and 
orderly urban growth requires 
that residential segregation be 
eliminated. Its elimination is 
essential for city planning, urban 
redevelopment and urban re- 
newal, and it cannot be elimi- 
nated without strong laws. 


Tractors and Civil R ights 


The claim of Tennessee planta- 
tion owners that they are 
ousting Negro share croppers 
because of the advance of 
mechanical farming is an ob- 
vious fraud. It is significant that 
these ousters were begun only 
after Negroes had won their 
fight to register and vote in two 
Tennessee counties where they 
are in the majority. 

What the plantation owners 
are after is the retention of, 
political control. They are afraid 
that Negro voters will oust their 
stooge county officials and re- 
place them with men who will 
enforce the law. 

Enforcement of the law would 
diminish the many pronged 


rackets by which Negro croppers 
are cheated out of their earnings 
and kept poor and poverty 
stricken. 

In the long view, mechaniza- 
tion of agriculture is inevitable. 
The tractor will replace the 
mule-drawn plow and the reaper 
will pick the cotton now gather- 
ed by hand. That process, no 
matter how orderly, is bound to 
work hardships on cropper fami- 
lies. 

rfowever, the Tennessee coun- 
ties aren't ready for wholesale 
mechanization and the fact that 
the ousted families are those 
whose heads registered to vote 
butresses the government's case 
that the present issue is the right 
to vote. 


Get a Good Halfback 


i 


As it must to all states, inte- 
gration came to Georgia last 
week with a federal court order 
to admit two Negroes to the 
state university. The order is be- 
ing met with the usual threats of 
closing of the state institution. 

Georgia can't close its univer- 
sity. It is going to have to bow 


to the court order. Our sugges- 
tion is that it give in gracefully 
and get out and recruit a few 
good Negro football players. A 
star Negro halfback will at least 
get the state a spot of favorable 
publicity and distract attention 
from the fatuous threats to 
eliminate college training for all 
Georgians. 


The Devil for the Witch 


The Kennedy administration 
has been getting a lot of mileage 
out' of planted stories that the 
Democrats are preparing to re- 
deem their platform pledge m 
curb the power of the House 
Rules Committee by ousting Rep. 
William Colmer of Mississippi 
and replacing him with a 
"liberal." 

It turns out that what the 
E>emocrats are prepar-ing to do is 
to swap the Devil for the Witch. 
C o 1 m e r ' s replacement will be 
Rep. Carl Elliott of Alabama to 
whom the "liberal" tag has been 
attached. 

Colmer's ouster and replace- 
ment by Elliott will leave the 
Rules Committee as firmly 


stacked against civil rights leg- 
islation as ever. The record 
shows that the Alabaman hasn't 
cast a good civil rights vote in 
his entire career. It is more than 
safe to assume that he will use 
his new position to enhance his 
position with 'Alabama segrega- 
tionists. 

Of course, Elliott will probably 
cast desirable votes on medical 
care for the aged, minimum 
wage and aid for education as 
long as such bills are purged of 
any language that might give 
any comfort to the cause of inte- 
gration. 

The sum of the matter is that 
the Democrats have decided to 
leave control of the Rules Com- 
mittee in the hands of the South. 


BatAleaxe & Bread 

By Lmttmr 1. Gronger 



ROMA — Rome is different, 
and don't let anybody con- 
vince j'cu that it isn't. And 
when you add up all the dif- 
ferences, it comes out that 
Rome is one of this world's 
few truly civilized great 
cities. 

Rome has charm and beauty 
and sparkle, for Rome is no 
more Italian than Milan. 
Venice, Florence or Naples. 
Milan is a big factory city 
with a cathedral: Venice is 
Coney Island 
with a mil- 
, lion pigeons 
at feeding 
time in St. 
Mark's 
Square; 
Florence is 
museums and 
"such - like"; 
and Naples 
..." Well, 
"Naples is Grangw 

Naples" as one American- 
Italian visiting there put it a 
couple of years ago, "and 
' Naples isn't really a city at all. 
It's an accident that happened 

' a lot of people!" 

Philosophical Shrug 

Home's charm, I think, lies 
in the fact that it's been 
here for going on 3,000 years 
and has been an important 
world center for imore than 
2,000 years; but it has never 
allowed itself to get the big 
head about it — not since the 
barbarians came in and 
knocked the bejabbers out of 
its army and its citizens and 
destroyed what was left of the 
old Roman Empire. 

Since then its citizens have 
tended to cross their fingers 
when things go well and 
.shrug philosopically when 
they don't, without exhibiting 
the., shaky jim-jams such as 
New Yorkers and Parisians 
experience when their cities 
are in trouble. 

Maybe this is a good thing, 
maybe it isn't, but this philo- 
sophical balance in the midst 
of turbulence is a blessed 
change to this refugee from 
Manhattan's stress and strain. 
For two weeks, that is. Then, 
after the International Confer- 
ence of Social Work winds up 
on the 15th, I head back for 
Manhatt-an and beyond. 
Smart Students 
Last night I had dinner with 
two young Americans — both 


New Yorkers, students at Biin- 
nington College and studyfeg 
in Paris this year. Like sm.trt 
-Students they spent thdir 
Christmas vacation in Roma. 

One I was happy to see, be- 
cause Cecille Miller has been 
someone special to me ever 
since before she entered Man- 
hattan's Brearley School to 
succeed brilliantly and send 
her mother, Mrs. Daphne, 
Miller, and her aunt an uncle. 
Judge and Mrs. Darwin Teles- 
ford, into spirals of expecta- 
tion and speculation about 
"what'll that child do next?" 

Well, last night she con- 
sumed a huge dish of pasta, 
which had a long name but 
was a glorified edition of 
lasagna — with cheese yet — 
a .solid helping of ."^altimbocca, 
a good dollop of Brolio Rosso 
and a desseri that had cream 
and stuff oozing out of it. 
• Saltinbocca was my sugges- 
tion, not only for its flavor 
but also for its name, which 
means "jump into the mouth." 
It's veal, sliced thin, with an 
overlay of delicately spiced 
ham and with a delicious wine 
sauce. I don't know whether 
Cecille's jumped or flew, but 
it got where it belonged in a 
hurrj'. 

Love This Town 

At Pancrazio's the fortunate 
guests eat in a cellar over 
2,000 years old — the remain.^; 
of an old Roman theatre that 
:was there under the Caesars. 
A three-man combo produced 
music — violin, guitar and a 
soulful tenor who guessed 
what the ladies wanted and 
gave it to them. I mean song, 
of course, with dramatics and 
ogling. 

It was perfect, that evening, 
what with youth (my two stu- 
dent guests t, age (the cellar 
and mei, the music and the 
food" And I don't know another 
place in the world w'here the 
combination could be had. If 
I seem to be going overboard 
about Rome, pay it no mind. 
For I'm already way out 
there. I really love this town 
as one that has never let me 
down, in summer, winter, 
spring or fall. And thank God 
the Olympics are long gone, 
the spring visitors haven't 
arrived and I and 2,000 other 
members of the International 
Conference can have Our 
Town all to ourselves. 


Loren Miller Says . . . 


(Continued from Page 1) 
The moment you get comfort- 
able you can expect one of 
these conspirators to grab his 
phone, ring you up and chortle 
that he just wanted to chat 
with you a moment. Of course, 
the caller prefaces the hour- 
long conversation with the 
statement that he'll only take 
a moment but don't let that 
fool you. 

These conspiratore also have 
your eating habits down to a 
split second and the days on 
' which you're apt to have a 
good meal. Right after the 
second bite you can depend on 
one of them to call. It used to 
be that you could fend off 
such a caller with the false 
promise that you would call 
him back. But that doesn't go 
any more. The rules of the or- 
ganization forbid extending 
any such leeway to the vic- 
tim. Now he announces with 
preconceived cunning that he 
is just leaving his home and 
must talk to you right then 
and there. And he does while 
the steak gets cold. 

No Hiding Place 
There's no relief in sight. If 
>ou get a silent number one 
of the conspirators snoops it 
out and passes it around to 
his henchmen and by week's 
end the telephone is rlnj;ing 
as gaily and ghoulishly as 
ever. To borrow a phrase from 
the old spiritual: there's no 
hiding place down here. 

I know from bitter experi- 
ence that these conspirators 
are out recruiting new mem- 
bers night and day. I under- 
stand that they now have 
Youth - For - Telephone - Call 
clubs and that they latch on 
to babies right out of swad- 
dling clothes and teach them 
the tricks of the trade from 
the day the little brats can 
jam a sticky finger into the 
holes on the dial. Moreover, 
the phone companies are now 
installing phones on trains, in 
automobiles and in helicop- 
ters, so that every conspirator 
can ply his trade without let 
or hindrance. 

Don't Call Me 

The worst is yet to come. 
It won't be long before phones 
are hooked up to TV screens 
and these caller-inners can not 
only force you to talk to them 
but can look you dead in the 
eye and prevent you from 
making the excuse that you 
were just walking out o< the 


door. Or they can nail you 
while you're forking up a bite 
of steak, fix you with a 
beady glance and in effect 
dare you to go ahead and eat 
>our meal. 

I'm a Kennedy man but I 
don't look for any relief dur- 
ing hi^ administration. I don't 
think he's got the nerve to 
venture that far out on the 
New l-'rontier. He wouldn't 
d^re to offend the millions of 
conspirators with a law to 
curb their nefarious practices. 
I'm at the end of my wits. I 
don't know what to do nor 
where to turn. Meanwhile 
don't call me. X'H call you. 


Klan Threatens 
Elderly Woman 

'Continued from Page 1^ 
were keeping a round-the- 
clock watch on the house. 

The Vyashingtons, who have 
lived in Pasadena for more 
than 2(1 years, moved into their 
present home only a few 
months ago. 

The area i.>? one of mixed 
liopulation — Negroes, white 
and Orien t a 1 — with a fair 
sprinkling of racially mixed 
families. 

Monday night's call was the 
first hostile act that -the fam- 
ily has experienced, and police 
advised that so far there has 
been no attempt on the part 
of the caller or anyone else 
to carry out his threat. 


Judge Reduces 
'Hutnan Kite' 
Damage Award 

The $135,000 damage award 
granted Alphonso (the Human 
Kite) Woodall by a jury on; 
Nov. 22 for injuries suffered 
during the filming of a TV 
show, has been reduced to 
$70,000 by Superior Court 
Ji'dge Reginald L. Bauder. 

If Woodall does not accept 
the lower amount a motion for 
a new trial by defense attor- 
ney Warren Lane will be 
granted, Judge Bauder said. 

Woodall originally sued for 
$150,000 damages from the 
Wayne Steffner Productions, 
Inc. and Jerome Wheelo, driver 
of the car which pulled his 
kite. 


— What Do You Mean, Bias? — 



A 


4^> 


Santa Fe Hearing 
Major FEP Test 


(Contin.ued Irom Page li 
drews' complaint from Feb. in 
to May of last year. 

Andrews told of his repeat- 
ed requests for promotion, 
starting back in 1949, how 
white men who had just been 
hired were advanced despite 
their lack of experience, and 
how, on one occasion in 1959 
he had been told, with em- 
phasis, by L. P. English, a 
Santa Fe superintendent, that 
he would never be given a 
promotion. 

Lazy, No Good 
He quoted English as say- 
ing that he was "lazy, no 
good, not worth a damn" and 
so incompetent t-hat the fore- 
man "had to lead me around." 
He also quoted English as 
saying that he was "too 
damned smart," and that ho 
"had him on his list." 

Early Jackson, a car cleaner 
who is the father of 14 boys, 
told the hearing that he was 
present when English gave 
Andrews the tongue lashing. 
He. too, said that English 
told Andrews he was on his 
"list." He was more specific 
than Andrews in qualifying 
the kind of list referred to. 
Tells Santa Fe Policy 
Brasky in his tcstimon\. 
told of. the company's hiring 
policy and said there was 
evidence that white men hdd 
been hired and upgraded, al- 
though they did not have An- 
drews' qualifications or ex- 
perience. 

He also said that manage- 
ment had told him that in 
California the Santa Fe does 
not hire Negroes as brake- 
men,, firemen or clerks. That 
statement brought loud pro- 
test from the Santa Fe Coun- 
.sel who sought to have it 
striken from the record. 

Brasky s report was turned 
in to the FEP office for 
further evaluation, after which 
the complaint against the 
Santa Fe was filed. 

Denies Charges 
Robert B. Curtiss, atlorne\' 
for the Santa Fe, in his open- 
ing statement denied that 
Andrews had been refused 
promotion because he is a 
Negro, or that he was fired 
because he had complained to 
the FEPC. He said, instead, 
that the immediate cause of 
his being fired was the fact 
that he had fallen asleep oh 
the job. Andrews had not been 
upgraded, said Curtiss, be- 
cause his supervisors did not 
feel that he warranted up- 
grading. 

Andrews told in detail 'the 
circumstances on the occasion 
when he was supposed to have 
fallen asleep and emphatical- 
ly denied the accusation. He 
countered with the accusation 
that the railroad had changed 
the transcript of a company 
trial which upheld his dis- 
missal to show that he had 
admitted being asleep. 

Curtiss also attempted to 
block the hearing by calling 
for a dismissal of the com- 
plaint. He claimed that the 
FEPC did not have jurisdic- 
tion since the case had been 
submitted to the Railroad Ad- 
justment Board under the Na- 
tional Railway Labor Act be- 


fore the FEP had filed ciiarges 
against the Santa Fe and that 
the Railw&y Board had acrept- 
ed jurisdiction. 

Took Cose Feb. 15 
Charles E. Wilson, thief 
-counsel for the FEP. pointed 
eujL that the FEP Commission 
had taken jurisdiction on Feb. 
15,, long before the ca.^e had 
been submitted to the Rail- 
road Board. 

John Anson Ford, commis- 
sion chairman, emphasized 
that if the commission did 
not take jurisdiction in the 
case it would 'abdicate its 
responsibility." and added 
that "if this commission does 
not invoke state law in this 
case we would leave unpro- 
tected an important area of 
human rights." 

Hearing officer Malcolm 
Poattic. of Sacramento, denied 
the motion for dismissal, and 
the hearing proceeded. 

Curtiss then sought to re- 
strict the scope of the hearing 
by protesting against inclu- 
sion of testimony regarding 
events prior to September. 
19.59, the date the FEP Com- 
rfiission was established. 

After Wil.son pointed out 
that the history of the case 
was pertinent to the com- 
plaint. Pcattie ruled in his 
favor and the case again pro- 
ceeded, with Andrews review- 
ing his experiences with the 
Santa Fe from the time he 
was hired. 

Charges against the union, 
which was named as joint de- 
fendant, were dropped when 
the union agreed to abide by 
any decision of the commis- 
sion. 


TV SERVICING 

.■\ new class in TV scr\-icing 
will open at Bclmont-Metro- 
politan .Adult School. 1.575 W. 
Second street, on Jan. 30. H. O. 
Backer, principal, announced 
this week. 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

'The Important Newspaper' 

2101 W. Vernon Ave. 

Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

AXminster 5-3135 

LOREN MILLER 
Publisher 


Thursday 
Vol. IXXX 


Jan. 12, 1961 
No. 43 


GRACE SIMONS... Executive Editor 
F. P. WALLER, Jr. . Adv. Mgr. 
EDWARD ."ABIE" ROBINSON 

-..- Circulation Mgr. 

CALME RUSS. Office Mgr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. G. Allen ._•: 1512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph. EX. 5-1591 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 

1907 20th Street (Upstairs) 
Phone EXbr ook 4-8082 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! 
n $4.00 for 1 Year 
G ^1'50 for 3 Months 
n $2.S0 for 6 Months 

Adjudication Decree Number 123228 

Dite of Adjudication July 1. 1923 

Published every Thursday by 

The California Eagle Publishing 

Co., 2101 West Vernon Avenue at 

Van Ness, Los Angeles 8. Calif. 

Entered as Second Class Matter 

November 3, 1937. at the Post 

Office at Los Angeles, Calltornia, 

lindr the Act of March 3, 1879. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 

BV INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWSPAPERS 

&4S Fifth Avenue 

New York 17, Niw York 


Georgia Oov'r 
Huffs 'n' Puffs, 
Then Yields 


iContinucd fiom Page 1> 
beg the .'-lale legislature t* 
change a 195(i la'w ordering 
the uni\"i'rsit\- c!o.'=rd in event 
of jnti^gration. ■ ' j 

Reverses Couree 

Apparoinl.v disturbed by 
muticriji^js from the wool hat 
counties to which he owes his 
'election. Vandivcr ordered the 
university shut down late 
Monday night as he issued a 
blast calling the court order 
"harsh and vicious" and an 
'act of tyranny." He was 
equally outraged at Judge 
Booties Tuesday order forbid- 
ding the cutting of universitj" 
funds. 

The governor sent the judge 
a stinging telegram of protest 
but kept his official skirts 
clean with the gratuitous ad- 
vice that "my respect for law- 
ful procedures' and my oath 
as go\ern(ir preclude any act 
of d(>fiaticc cm my part." 

Asks^ Repeal 

In liis plea to the legisla- 
ture to repeal the university 
closing law. Vaiidiver %'irtually 
^acknowledged defeat of hi4 
'-segregation promise with thS 
>-tatemei)t that the 1956 law 
had beoii turned "from a 
source of iiopc to an albatrossj 
If alloucd to remain, its ef-^ 
foct will ho to close the doors 
of Georgia's h.iUowod halls, to 
cease bringing learning and 
enlightenment to over "500, 
\oung men and women ..." 

ficorgi;; ha.'^ another law 
which refjuires closing of 
grade .sch(K)ls in event of in- 
tegration and .-\tlanla schools 
arc imder an order to begin 
integration next fall. The 
go\ernor said that retreat oT 
the uni\rrsiiif closing law 
would not disturb grade? ' 
.school legislation. He has saidi 
that he will jiropose a "free- 
dom of choice" constitutional 
amendment which wil], not 
"force any child to associate'" " 
with children of another raceJ 
Lawyers said that it is ob- 
vious that t!ie jtroposed legis-i . 
lation is unconstitutional. • 

Students Colm 

Students, at the university- 
tod^ the integration order as 
a Blatter of course wnfh a few 
exceptions. Soine 500 of the 
7500 in attendance gathered' 
to boo the Negro students atj 
registration but most of them' 
expdessed only mild curiosity.- 
Another minority registered a 
vigorous protest against thef 
closing order. 

Hamilton will pursue pre- 
medical studies at the uni\'er-' 
sity while Miss Hunter enter- 
ed the school of journalism. 


Merrit Winners' 

Scientist Patricia' Barth and 
sprinter VVilma Rudolph havel 
been selected by .VTademoiselle- 
Magazine among the "Ten; "■ 
Young Women of the Year" fori 
merit awards for 1950. 

Miss Barth 's discovery- ofi 
cancer patterns and Miss Ru- 
dolph's unprecedented '"Win of 
three gold medal.« at the 
Olympic Games earned them 
recognition. 


Yt 

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- SANTA n 

MONICA 

NEWS 


YOUTH CEXTER PLANS VNDERJV,1Y—Communily leaders are xiorkm,, on plani 
for a center to helt< enmbat delmquency h\ presenting an inlcrestint/ program. ^,ated from 
irjt: Mrs. Marneiba T. Taekett. Mrs. Marguerite P. Moore, Saia tiehhman. arehilcel. 
r:'id Mrs. Queen B. Iverson. Standing: Dr. H. Claude Hudson. James S. La.<./er. Rei . 
./. J. Irerson, Dr. Ralph Richardson. Otis L. \' eal and . I ll\. h.verette M . Porter. 



TO SING AT JTARD — The Menturn Gl^e Singers uill 
(church. 2rith and Magnolia avenue, on Sunday at .1:30 p.m. 


appear at 


Mrs. Mary Mitchell, who has 
been active in community 
work, has been tx>nfined to her 
bed since November. She re- 
ceived many greeting cards 
which made the holidays 
much more enjoyable. She 
asks that her gratitude be 
made public so that all those 
who remembered her might 
know that her condition is im- 
proved. 

* * * 

Mrs. Nellie Ray, wife of Rev. 
Willie Ray, a member of Calv- 
ary Baptist Church, died Mon- 
day morning at the Santa 
Monica Hospital during emer- 
gency surgery. Mrs. Ray is the 
daughter of Mrs. Viney Smith. 
Funeral arrangements are be- 
ing made by Spalding Mort- 
uary. 

* * • 

Alfonso and Sam Evans are 
n Muskogee, Okla. attending 
the funeral of their father. 

* « * 

Herman Williams and Her- 
man, Jr. have returned from 
their sojourn in the East. They 
visited friends in Forester, 
Ark. as well as Chicago. 

* • * 

Mrs. Susie Mays of Uth 
street is undergoing treatment 
in the County Hospital. 

* * ♦, 

The NAACP installation ban- 
quet will be held at the Phil- 
omatheon Club, 1810 Broad- 
way avenue, on Jan. 20. Mrs. 
Terea Hall Pittman will be 
the speaker. 

* • * 

The Area Confecence of the 
NAACP will be held on Feb. 
18. 



r: 


vg 


Rev. Martin L. King, Jr. to 
Meet with Western Ministers 

The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., president of the 
Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and inter- 
nationally known civil rights leader, will confer with 
local ministers on Saturday, Jan. 14, from 1-5 p.m at 
Zion Hill Baptist Church, 51st and McKinley avenue. 
The 


Hard A. ME 


WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James K. Jone>;. Pastor 

9;30 and 11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 

9 30 a.m.— Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade — Adult Cla.'=ses 

11 00 a m.— Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr. 

7 p.m. — U estmin.sler Bible Hour 


Youth Center 
To be Erected 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15 

"What About Me, lord?"— Rev. Howard R. Carey preaching 

Sunday School-9:30 A.M. Worship- 11:00 A.M. 

HEALING SERVICE AT S P.M. 


NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC 

5965 S. Broadway Avenue— Rev. Anita I. Edmonds, Pastor 

Pentacostal and Interracial 

9:30 A.M.-Sunday School 10:45 A.M.-Worship Service 

7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.— Prayer Service 


7^ 


CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

3125 W. ADAMS BLVD. 

11 am. — .^lo^ning Worship Service 
Rev. James H. Hargett Will Speak 
SL.ND.W SCHOOL. 9:30 am.— Kindergarten Through 5th Grade 
11 am -6th Grade Through High School 


•HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH- 


,6330 SO. FIGUEROA ST. 


PLeasant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. OOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 
8 a.m. — Rev. J. Lewis. Preaching 

'The Challenge of the Colossal" — Numbers 13:31 
9:30 a.m. — Church School (for All Ages) 
10:45 am. — Youth Church 
:30 p m. — Methooist Youth and Wesley Fellowship 


Disturbed by the .steady in- 
(Toaso in juvonilo delinquency 
in Los Angeles County, a Citi- 
zens Committee has been 
formed to aid Paradise Baptist 
Church in erecting a Youth 
Center to direct the leisure of 
all youth in the area of 51st 
street and S. Broadway ave- 
nue. 

I Rev. .\. J. Iver.son. the min- 
ister of Paradise Baptist 
Church outlined the need, for 

'such a Youth Center at a^ re- 
cent luncheon meeting of busi- 
ness and professional citizens 
in the Clark Hotel. 

P'ollovving an hour discus- 

,sion of the pressing needs for 

Isuch a Youth Center the group 
chose Atty. Everette M. Porter, 
former member of the Califor- 
nia Adult Authority as general 
chairman of llie committee 
and the Honorable Goodwin J. 
Knight as co-chairman. 

The first effort toward rais- 
ing S50.000, needed for equip- 
ment in the Youth Center 
will be the Citizens Com- 
mittee Inaugural Banquet in 
the International Room at the 
Hoverlv Hilton Hotel, Tuesday 
Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. 


The Central District meeting 
at Olivet Baptist Church in 
Ventura is being attended by 
youth delegates from Calvary 

Baptist Church. 's 

* « • \ 

Calvary Baptist Church 

-Men's Day will be directed by 

Robert Leak, on March 12. 

iMrs. Laura Wilder will be in 

charge on -March 19 for Wo- 

Imen's^Day. 

* * * 

The Membership Committee 
of the NAACP will meet Mon- 
day, Jan. 16 at the home oif M. 
B. Allen, 1945 22nd street. Cer- 
tificates of merit will be 
awarded at this meeting. 

Mm* 

Venice News 

The pastor and members of 
New Bethel Baptist Church 
will worship at St. Vistal Bap- 
tist Church in Long Beaoh on 

Sunday, Jan. 15. 

* * • 

L. Moore, 1021 Stracy avenue { 
is recui)erating at home fol- 
lowing a stay at the Washing- 
ten Hospital in Culve/ City. 

* » • 

Mrs. Maude Johnson is re- 
covering from an illness in 
her home, 340 Vernon avenue. 

* * * 

E. Stalling of Waco, Texas, 
is in Venice visiting his child- 
ren. Mrs. F. Webster and J. 
Stalling and his grandchild- 
ren, Barbara Ann, Betty, Ro- 
bert and Billy Ray Webster. 
ii< * * 

H. Griffin, of Bisbee, Ariz, 
is visiting his daughter Frank- 
ie and her daughter Alma at 
the home of Mrs. A. Middle- 
brooks, 613 Santa Clara ave- 
nue. 


MlSSIOXARflS NEl 1)1 D—Roh,,l Lmis. eenter, out- 
lines the territory ii here the need for missionaries is great to 
Jehovah'tS Witnesses Sondra Ten/is and Billy Eduards. 

Jehovah's Witnesses Hail 
Unity of Congregations 

Is it possible for people from all nations, kindreds, 
races and tongues to have one thought on all mat- 
ters in this divided world? According to Robert 
Lewis who has recently returned ffom his missionary 
assignment in .Mississippi, it is not only possible but 


Walter l^unlap 
Last Rites to 
Be Held Sat. 


Walter ('. Dunlai) died late .. . , . 

' operating and working 

Jan. 9 from complicationsi gather the Witnesses 

which 


de\-eloped followin;;; 
surgery f(v a fractured liip to 
sustained when he fell while 
taking a shower in the hos- 


it is being done right now by 

Joho\ah's Witnesses who may 

bo found in 179 different 

lands 

the sea. He now serves the 

.Metropolitan Congregation. 

"The oneness and together 
n(\ss of Jehovah's Witnesse§ 
is one that does not exist in 
aii>' otliei organization on 
earth. " Lcuis said. "By co- 

to- 

are 

teaching people of good-will 

have unity of mind and 

live jjcaccably wherever they 

ma>- live. This they do by con- 


conference will bring 
together ministers from 
Southern California and rep- 
resentatives from other sec- 
tions of the state who have 
been meeting regularly for 
several months laying the 
ground work for organization 
of a Western Christian 
Leadership Conference. It is 
anticipated that the Western 
Christian Leadership group 
will be formally organized at 
Saturday's meeting, a'i^cording 
to Dr. L. Sylvester Odom, co 
ordinator of the local group. 

Dr. Odom stated that allj 
ministers of all denominations 
are expected to hear Dr. King 
in his first hand report on the 
critical conditions in the deep 
south. It is anticipated that 
pastors will bring contri- 
butions from their churches to 
assist Dr. King in carrying 
out the vital work o^ his 
leadership group. i 

Rev. King will speak at thej 
Woodland Hills Methodist] 
Church, on Sunday, Jan. 15. j 
Attract Support 

Dr. King will be the honoree 
at an infonnal reception at 
the Wilfandel Club Saturday 
evening sponsored by the local 
conference committee. In com- 
menting on the coming confer- 



va 


colonies and islands of|<^"f^^' Dr. Odom stated: "It is 

our hope that the proposed 
Western Christian Leadership 
Conference will attract the 
support of the entire ministry 
of Southern California, and 
that this group will be able 
not only to lend valuable as- 
sistance to the Southern Con- 
ference but also will be able 
to help other groups in al- 
leviating the social problems 
in California and throughout 
the Western states. 


MOURNED — Mrs. Alice 
Griffin, SS, mother of Floyd 
and Larry Laurener, died 
Jan. ^. 


Alice Griffin's 
Funeral Held 


gregating together, by a 
pi^^l cottage where he had ' study of Clod's word, the. Bible, 
been undergoing treatment for and b\- living according to the 
a nervous disorclcir. He was 74.1 Di\ine Will, making them a 

For more tlian 2(1 \eais he | different, united people in 
.served as a waiter on the this split-up world." 
Southern Pacific railroiid andi 

was interested in the prob- 1 EpLscopal Church will offici- 
lems of railroad woikers. He ate. 

was born in Fort .Madison. Mr. Dunlay is survived by 
Iowa and hiid iieen a r(\'^ident i his widow. Irma Dunlap; his 
of Los Angeles for 21 yeais. Idaught<^>'. Mrs. Star Shepherd 

Funeral servitfes will be of Minneapolis; his sister, Mrs. 
held in the chapel of the J. S. Ic. Marie Hughes; and brother, 
Williams Funeral Home at 10 Garrett Dunlap and four 
a.m. Saturday. Father Llew- nieces and a nephew, all of 
ellyn Williams of St. ThompslLos Angeles. 


Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


16to be Baptised 
At Price Chapel 

Bap'tismal rites for seven 
converts and nine babies will 
be conducted at Price Chapel 
AME Church, 213 E. 43rd 
street, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday, 
Jan. 15. 

, Rev. Jerry W. Ford will 
preach on "Come Home." 

At 7:30 p.m. the Senior 

Choir, directed by Eugenia 

Clark, will present a special 

program around the theme: 

'Making a New Start." 


Mrs. Alice Griffin, 82, 3416 S 
Budlong, the mother of Floyd 
and Larry Lawrence, stopped 
into eternal light on Jan. 5 
after years of combating the 
infirmities which accompany 
old age. In spite of her years 
she remained active and inter- 
ested in current events and her 
church. ' 

Funeral services were held 
at the AngefUs Funeral Home 
on Tuesday, Jan. "10, with in- 
terment in Evergreen Ceme- 
tery. Rev. Frank Bowdan of 
the Pentecostal ApostoHr 
Faith Church officiated at the 
service. 

Mrs. Griffin was born in 
Little Rock, Ark., but had 
lived most of her life in Los 
Angeles. In addition to her 
■two sons she is survived by a 
sister, who Lives in Chicago. 


Doris Akers^ 

The N. P. Greggs Gospel 
Choir will present Doris Akers 
and the Sky Pilot Choir at 3 
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 at the 
People's Independent Church, 
1025 E. 18th street. 

The building fund of the 
church is expected to receive 
a boost from the concert. 


r 


Bowen Memorial Methodist GJiurch 

EAST 36th AND TRINITY STREETS - REV. JOHN C. BAIN, MINISTER 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15 
REV. XERXES WALKER GUEST SPEAKER AT 11 A.M. 

REV. BAIN PREACHING AT 9 A.M. 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 


Baha'is Slate 
World Religion 


On 
p. m. 


Sunday. Jan. 15, at 8 
the Baha'is of Los An- 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 

1564 W. 36th PLACE AX. 1-9831 

Messages to All 

ServkM Sunday and Thursday at 8 P.M. 

Wednesday 2-4 P.M. 

REV. OTIS STOVALL, Minister 


Baptist Wrangle 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ways to save the denomina- 
tion from long and costly liti- 
gation and protect the good 
name of this part of the 
I Christian church. I hope we 
I can find such a way." 

In his letter proposing the 
peace talks, Taylor said that 
as Christian ministers each 
has an obligation to probe 
prayerfully for a solution to 
the difficulty. He further sug- 
gested that two or three men 
sharing his and Dr. Jackson's 
Jacoby, Mrs. P.u.ss Garcia. El- i respective views be included 
wyn Van Zandt and Anthony | in the conference, with unity] 
Lease, chairman of the a.=scm- i of the denomination its ulti-I 
bly. ' mate goal. ■ \ 


will present a round table dis- 
cussion: "Why One World Re- 
ligion''," in honor of World 
Religion Day. a special Baha'i 
commrmorativo day. It will be 
held-at the Baha'i Center, 331 
S. Xpw Hampshire ave. 

Speakers will be Mrs. R. 


New York, N. Y. (.Special) - 

For the fir.st time science has 
found a new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain — without 
surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
another,"very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by a doctor's observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction or re- 
tractiqn (shrinking) took place. 

And Tiiost amazing of all - 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where a doctor's 
observations were continued 
over a period of many months! 

In fact, results were .so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 
to make such astonishinsr state- 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 
a problem!" And among these 
sufferers were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions, 
some of 10 to "20 years' standing. 

All this, without the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance (Bio- 
Dyne^)— the discovery of a 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured 
tissue on all parts of the body. 

This new healing substance 
is offered in suppository or oint- 
vent form called Preparation 
//". Ask for individually sealed 
convenient Preparation H Sup- 
,positorics or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli- 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drug counters. 



MiNTAL COMfORTtn^^^m SPIRITUAL ADVISOR t^ 

ELDER J. B. MOORE 

Divine Healer From Birth 

AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER? WE WILL NOT FAIL . 

ST. JOHN BAPTIST CHURCH 

1313 E. 22nd St. RE. 8-7580 

421 N. 4th Ave., Pocatello, Idaho CE. 2-9438 



First Rock Baptist Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 

Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

^Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
1 1 a.m. BTU 6:30 p.m. Evoning Sorviee 
7:30 p.m. Song Service 8:45 p.m. Public 
is invited to Pray with u* at 7:30 pm. 
on Wednesday. 


"" "^e called AitfUinxynXf ^amdtf. . . ."" 

, . . for prestige and moderate prices." 

I uneral Directors - Serving All Jfith the Finest 
1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Richmond 7-9121 


TIME is the test 
I satisfaction 


of 


Terry Ravensdale 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING 
.1379 W. 38th PLACE - RE. 4-7915. 


PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
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— satisfaction through reliable, painsta-king and 
honest service. And PEOPLE'S prices, are reason- 
able. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 

CONTINUING TO SERVE YOU 
AT OUR TEMPORARY LOCATION 

1430 East 103 rd St. LO. 6^)022 


NEW! 


IMPORTANT LECTURE SERIES 
ON THE WORLD OF SPIRIT 

by 

Rev. S. S. HEYLIAGER 

Noted Teacher-Philosopher, and Metaphysician 

SPEAKER JAN. 15 

Rev. S. S. Heyliager 

EACH SUNDAY AT 11 A.M. 

Baces Hall - 1528 N. Vermont Ave. 


10:45-Orgdn Meditation 
11:00-Worship %prvice 


uon 


Mr. Jack Crowder-Minister of Music 
Mrs. Gwendolyn Heyliager, Orgaiilst 

Church of Spiritual R^ . 

(Maor-Emeth Foundation) 
3522 WEST 8TH STREET, LA 5 

Dunkirk 5-8804 

Call For Personal Appointments 


pre- 

liiver- 
^nter- 
sm. 

TS 

and 

[have 

Sselle 

"Ten 

r" for 

of 

Ru 

in o' 

the 

Ithiem 


WOUUHil IK,H>N It^ 





THE BAHA'IS OF LOS ANGELES CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO HiAR A PANEL DISCUSSION OF THE BAHA'I WORLD FAITH^ON 

WORLD RELIGION DAY 
SIJXDAY-JANIJARY 15-»:00 P.M. 

L.A. BAHA'I CENTER 

331 SOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE 

EVERYONE IS INVITED - NO ADMISSION CHARGE - NO COLLECTIONS - REFRESHMENTS 


\\<)^^fJ>Hl:l,Hri(>^^>\^ 





\; 


WARFIELD AT PHILHARMONIC 

. . ^ , -i , — ^ ~~~nz 


6— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


ChAZZ 

'a®l!IIBIDII§lMIK 



'Mr. and Mrs. RAFAEL CAMPOS (Dinah Washington) are 
making the round of Hollj-\vood parties. The pair showed up 
et one where DINAH played the piano while ELLA FITZGER- 
ALD chirped. A CONE show! . . . BOOTS WADE phoned to 
say she and ERNIE ANDREWS were on the way to get some 

Eed Beans and rice when that,* ~ 

. J i ■ J a Broadway debut or even a 

automobuo accident happened .^^^^.^^ble run. here, but let 


in Vojras. Boots is still nursing 
pev'orp bruises. . . It's repo rted 
that HARRY BELAFONTE and 

REVLON Cosmetics who spon- 
sor his tolcvision spectaculars 

aren't .«^M^;ri::r eve to eye! . . . 
FUittory BUTTERFLY MC- 
QUEEN wlio is probably best 
known f"r lior porformance of 
a scattorbrain in "Gone With 
The Wind " is making a come- 
back as an actrc^ss. She has 
been assigned a role in a 
movie musical called "Diffi- 
cult Woman" . . . 

Both LILLIAN RANDOLPH 
and CHARLES LAMPKIN ap- 
peared on separate segments 
of the "Day In Court" show 
last week. Placement was by 
LIL CUMBER agency. . . Hand- 
some vocalist JESS DAVIS is 
up for an acting role on a 
popular television show! . . . 
Over the weekend we checked 
ithe ifow revival of "Carnival 
Island" out at El Capitan. And 
dt still MO'VES on the new 
premises. But the defects are 
Btill there, too! Rather than re- 
view it, per so, we will hit on 
it lightly. The book or plot 
needs bolstering if they e.xpect 


HOUSE FOR SALE 


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garbage disposal, spacious 
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us hastily add that It has a 
great jKrtential. Mundane in 
spots, it breaks Into boisrterous 
merrLmept at others. It has 
the help of ALBERT McNEIL'S 
choral direction, JIMMY 
FIELD'S choreography and 
dancers and a hell-bent and 
working cast. Castwise, JEAN 
DURAND, with the bald pate 
gets top, billing, and rightly 
so. The'tfhap e.xudes sex and 
cl.arm, and is enough of an 
actor to use the proper re- 
,straint instead of hamming It 
the way some of the others 
are Inclined to do. Jean ap- 
parently has that -particular 
bone structure that enables 
him to go bald as a billiard 
ball, and with or without that 
gimmick he delivers strongly. 
He'll get somewhere. You 
watch! Other notables who 
contribute heavily are 
GEORGIA CARR, DELORES 
PIPER, CARLETON JOHNSON, 
MAURICE BUCHANAN, CHES- 
TYN EVERETT. JAY LOFT- 
LYNN, FELICIA K. WOOD (a 
living doll) HOWARD ANDER- 
SON (Rochester's brother, and 
we think we got his name 
right) and the (X)OD LORD 
only knows where we put our 
program although JAY LOFT- 
LIYNN made sure we had at 
least a couple in our hands be- 
fore we left the theater . . . 

We left the Carnival Island 
show to go on to the party 
tossed by the winsome Colum- 
bia Records Press Relations 
gal KERRY COWIN at SHIR- 
LEY MANNES "MANNE 
HOLE" for blues vocalist BIG 
MILLER. Now, Big Miller's a 
thriller. We drank Hot Saki 
and Black Beer at Shelley's 
(Continued on Page 7) 


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People 

WALTER GOODLOW— He was 
named public relations direc- 
tor for Sterling Liquors to pro- 
mote the sales of a seven- 
year-old bourbon called Geo. 
T. Stagg. Among the first to 
stock it were Tommy Tucker, 
Ish Evans, tBert Kenner, Celes 
King and Eddie Atkinson! 
W. E. BARNETT — Editor of 
Nite Life mag., will be toss- 
ing his second anniversary 
pawtee in the plysh Clark 
Hotel come Feb. 1, and top 
Angelenos have tabbed this 
as "An Evening With 
Bamettl" 

HOT LUSH — That being 
peddled below selling price 
could be the brands lifted 
from Dynamite Jackson's 
Cocktail Lounge on W. Adams 
when thieves cut through the 
roof and four walls Mondaj 
night after closing! 
CATHERINE ALLEN — Effi- 
cient head of Record Clerks in 
busy Newton Division is put- 
ting in her 19th year with the 
LAPD! 

ATTY. ED MADDOX— He will 
leave the Miller, Maddox and 
Malone law firm and join 
Atty. Alpha Montgomery in 
San Diego .soon! 
CENTRAL CASTING — No 
ticeably missing from ^he first 
call for movie extras last 
week for all night work at 
MGM were Maggie Hathaway 
and Byron Ellis, leaders in the 
bout for better deals for Ne- 1 
gro Hollywood bit pjayers. In-' 
cidentally rumor has it that 
although calls go into Central 
Casting's Hollywood office the 
names of those picked for. the 
jobs still come from the 99th 
street address! ! 

EMMA ADAMS — If teenagers 
want to know what she look- \ 
ed like when she was a junior, 
high student contact Curtis j 
Howard, the sheriff. He has a 
photo of the jazzy gang which 
includes Blossom McGinnis, 
Lois Gaines, Virgec Fudge 
and Emma! 

AWILDA THURMOND — Cool 
coffee cream complex! oned 
clerk in Nat Diamond's Furni- 
ture Store with curves to 
match her pretty looks is 
heading for the altar! I 

REDD FOXX— That L. A. to 
N. Y. telephone call from his 
West Coast broker had people 
back stage in the Apollo , 
Theater all shook up. They 
wouldn't believe the comic j 
when he told them he had 
hired a broker to handle his 
wealth. Now they call him the ' 
loaded Foxx! I 

RAY MILLS — Midnighters 
and early morning commuters 
have made his Ray's Kitchen 
just about top spot for the ' 
ham-and-egg bit! I 

RUTH BO WEN— Jets in this 
week to check up with her| 
client Dinah Washington and' 
also take in the Rinkeydink! 
formal. Her New" York ageno'; 
handles several box office i 
personalities! | 

JEEP SMITH — Since he left 
town several months ago 
leaving wife, daughters and 
band and hasn't returned, 
(Continued on Page 7) 



Pl.lXO JRTISTRY—The loirlv and talented GUILDA 
JIILLIAMS opened at ihc IXTERMISSION ROOM, 

4370 If est Adiiins himUicril , jfist east of Crenshaw , 
for limited enijiuieinent hut friinns'ing some of the most re- 
freshinrj entertainment oar tozin has heard. Featured at the 
piano bar. Miss, II ilH/ims renders all of your favorites in 
her oiin pleasint/ manner. j 


Baritone 
To Appeal 
January 21 

The great American bari- 
tone, William Warfield, who 
wUI sing at Philharmonic 
Auditorium on Saturday, Jan. 
21, has truly earned the title 
of "musical ambassador" for 
the United States. 

For four out of the last eight 
years, Warfield has toured the 
world under the auspices of 
the U. S. State Department. 
His first tour was as "Porgy" 
in George Gershwin's "Porgy 
and Bess," which was intro- 
duced to wildly enthusiastic 
European audiences In 1952. 
Again in 1955, Warfield toured 
Europe as soloist with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Two solo recital tours, made 
for the State Department in 
1956 and 1958, took Warfield 
around the world many times. 
He sang in Africa, the Near 
East and Asia, as well as 
Europe. Early purchases are 
suggested. 


NEW YORK SCENE 

If I sound a little smug and difficult as I scnbe t^ 
week, you must forgive me because I just ^ot my new 1964, 
Rambler, and then bid fond farewell and Godspeed to the 
old faithful Green Hornet, wjhich I was fortunate enough to 
place in loving hands for it s remaining days of dnvmg 
service. Let us pray!!' * 


Also there is now only a 
small bit of finishing touches 
to the painting of my aunt's 
apartment to be done, and this 
labor of stupid volunteering 
will bite the dust. Amen!!! 
Thanks to my boy Steve Gon- 
zales for all his kind help and 
artistry during the painting. 

Happy Holidays 

Margaret Glanville was the 
charming hostess at a swing- 
ing New Year's Day party at 
her plush coop apartment on 
Fifth Avenue. She had delici- 
ous egg nog, plenty of alcohol, 
tasty appetizers, and finally, 
peas and rice, Brazilian food, 
roast pork and a swinging 
home-made cheese cake. Her 
guests from Philly. Washing- 
ton, D. C, New Jersey and 
New. York, consisted of lovely 
ladies and dapper gentlemen, 
and everyone had a ball 
Gordon Making It 

WNEW's production super- 
visor, Bob Hodges, was kind 
enough to recommend me for 
a job cutting some Dubonnet 
Wine commercials, so I had to 
make some audition tapes 
with three 'choice' gals, all 
using French accents; one 


from Paris, Yvonne Constant, 
and two local girls, Gretchen 
Waltber and Zelda Sears. I 

also personally recommended 
Louise Stubbs and Mary 
Louise for the job, and they In 
turn made tapes with some 
Frenchmen. 

Talented Team 

The next day L- got a call 
that I had been selected for 
the job, and later one from 
Louise Stubbs that she too 
had been chosen. Next a.m. 
we botli did the jobs for real, 
as I cut four commercials, two 
with a most lovely French gal 
from Tunisia; Danielle Clary, 
and two with WNEW French 
dj. Jean Michel, while Louise 
did three with Jean Michel. 
Something New 

It was wonderful experience, 
and nice money, and perhaps 
Louise and I have begun a 
new trend which may open 
horizons for the future. 
Big Apple Jumps 

Count Basie closed at Bird- 
land, prior to his current stint 
at the Apollo Theatre, and the 
closing was a 'gas,' with 
Frank Sinatra and the Clan 
(Continued on Page 7) 


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HOTEL WATKINS 

We Have the Best Food in Town by Chef Gladys 
BILL WATKINS, Prop. RE. 2-81 1 1 

2022 W. ADAMS AT MANHATTAN PLACE 


SPEND YOUR LEISURE MOMENTS AT THE RUBAIYAT ROOM 

GUEST NIGHT EVERY MONDAY .- RUBAIYAT ROOM 

January 16, Harold Land - January 23, /Teddy" Edwards 

You'll Have a Swinging Time When You Malte it to 
BILL WATKINS' RUBAIYAT ROOM IN THE . . . 


WATKINS HOTEL 


ADAMS and MANHATTAN PLACE 


MR. BONGO 
ROCK 


PRESTON EPPS 

^_IB featuring 


LOU 


(MY LITTLE 
BLACK BOOK) 


RAWLS 


o 


PAPIDORA'S BOX 

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Happy Happenings in the Entertain meet Whirl 




It E If ENT STROLLING — Cameras in hand through some of our favorite 
fPots ive found siiinging scenes like this everywhere, from the left, at the RE- 
XJISSANCE (haven't you been there yet.') vocalist GENE McDJNlELS 
lihispir.i (because Chico Hamilton ivas on stage) ivith KATIE. REGA\ 
BUDDY ROBBINS and GINNIE QUINN—^xt the BIT (u-oic, itS a coffee 
house and always crowded) we saw LES McCANN (the- ultimate in chitter- 


ling jazz) with three queens who each smiled so prettily zvhen we passed that 
we had to stop and say "hi": that's FAYDELL JONESf BARBARA 

BRYANT and ERNESTINE WILLIAMS When we got to the CLUB 

TOWN HILL i^e were too late to hear the joke but got a shot (bourbon and 
photo) of J'ERN STEVENSON (top disc jockey and M. C), CARLTON 
(N. A. A. C. P.— Attack), RICHARDSON, JIMMY (musicians Uion), 


CLARK and our host, DOUG STONE. Orchids to Doug and Hugh for 
opening a really imaginative place. In the rumor stage, CLUB TOfl'N HILL 
planning a Gourmet dining room addition. We're in favor of that all the way 
so reserve us some Lobster Tails. Well, next week we stroll again, see you at 
yjur favorite club. (Y'oung photo) 


'Chazz* Soundtrack 

' 1 Continued from Page 6) [BASIE banfl currently break- 
j^lorifiod coffPG house and list- ing it up at the APOLLO in 
ened to "BIG" and a healthy New York. Now, how about 
chick named HANNA DEE (al-L.j^^jT>7 NICE GUY TYPE- 

so on Columbia I sing those c;^R-y Greene TV repairman 
down and out. and sometimes ^..^^ j^ ^j^^ 20th's on the east- 


up blues . . . Say, hey, why 
<lon't you check that ring that 
ABIE ROBINSON (of the 
Eagle) gave his GLADYS for 
a Xmas present???. . . Say. 
now. about that little deal at 
Shelley's Manne hole. Big Mil- 
ler thumped a tambourine 
..gainst his ample thigh and 
warbled that down home 
stuff:. .. . He really pireaches, 
and so does HANNA. DEEI . . . 
Roth SEPI.\ and EBONY mag- 
azine carrv stories on the 
SAMMY DAVIS ■ MAY BHITT 
marriage. For different angles, 
read em both ! . . . Comic 
REDD FOXX along with the 


side on Hooper. He's for you. 
Look him or Humphrey up in 
your directory when trouble 
comses. They're tops! 


DR. HENRY JENKINS — For 

mer New Orleans medic and 
his school teaching wife just 
adopted a baby to go with 
their smart Baldwin Hills 
home! 

LIONEL HAMPTON — Added 
his 41st musical honor last 
week when Playboy magazine 
named him winner of the 
vibe division of thoir annual 
jazz poll! 


CONCERT and SHOW! 

- FRIDAY, JAN. 13th 
t 8:30 P.M. 


HAL ZEIGER presents 

THE MOST CREATIVE 
MUSrCAL GIANT OF 
THIS GENERATION! 




PLAYING HIS HIT RECORDS 

*e{0lt9IA ON MY MIND* 
'KlfflY* • 'HARD HEARTED HANNAH" 
■COME RAIN 0* COME SHINE' • 'WHAT'D I SA^IT' 
■THE GENIUS OF RAY CHARUS* 


PASADENA 
CIVIC AUD. 

SY 2-9473 



ix 


• PEOPLE & PLACES • ^ • 


(Continued from Page 6) 
Martin "Fuzzy" Gower is now 
heading the Jeepsters band 
and making it click! 
DIG THIS — That gal friend 
of a local Musician Union 


official who is trying to worm wondering why Negro officers. Jones, University of California 


her way into a social club 
shouldn't attempt It via the 
back door. Just make out an 
application. The group favors 
Jncle Toms and particularly 
the kind that fail to fight for 
better wages! 

JUANITA MACKLIN — Excep- 
tional Children's director cele- 


N. Y. Scene 

(Continued from Page G1 

all present, along with Red 

Foxx. 
Chitterlings were served and 

every members of the Clan, 

Peter Lawford, Sammy Davis, 

Jr., Frank Sinatra, Dean 

Martin, Joey Bishop, etc., han- 
dled their hog maws like ole 

pros. What I sav? 
I Basie had done f a b u lo u s i<^'ose to Sammy Davis, Jr., in! 
'busine.ss for Birdland and is ^he running for Mr. Showj 


aren't assigned to the Robbery 
Detail! 

CARDS — They streamed in 
Xmas, from such wonderful 
people as Opal Jones, Bob and 
Virginia Johnson, Claire C. 
Williams, The Green Bay 
Packers, Corinne Simmons, 
Jeri and Robert Woods, Geo. 
A. Ramsey, Batiste L. Hanes, 


brated with her friends on I Jr., L. A. State College, Andy 
Xmas day showing therri how land Ruth Hatcher, Ronnie 

the Plasterer's Union present- 1 

ed tlieir now unit with a| Thursday, January 12, 1961 
$.3,280 job. Monday she was in 
tears. A drunk motorist smash- 
ed into the building and 
wrecked entire east wing! 
EARL GRANT — He is as 


at Berkeley, Frank Bull, Hatlie, 
Charles, JoAnn and Charlcne 
Fuqua, Bob Scoles, Bob Mike, 
Dorothy Bowick, Lucille Ash- 
ford, Jesse Robinson, Clarence, 
Marge, Margb Lovette and 
Sam Hamenrian to name a 
few! 

MAURICE FLEMING — Ton 
will get you a grand that he 
will be the top Negro at ^he 
new Airport! 


The California Eagle— 7 


! now doing the same at the' 
! theatre, along with Red Foxx, 


Business as two and two and 
the way he upset the plush 1 


100 CHOICE 


RLl' EAL1\ G — One of the most contro; crsi(d fii/uns of 
the past dtcade will make her South Los Angeles dchut 
starting Friday, January 13. at Red Flame, 1 07 th and ler- 
rnont ave. Christine Jorgensen, the former American (i. I. 


ALL SEATS 
RESERVED PRICES: $3.50, 2.75, 2.00 (tax inci) 
Seats now on sale at Pasadena Aud. box-office, 
So. Calif. Music Co., 737 So. Hill, and all Mutual Ticket 
Agencies. FOR TELEPHONE RESERVATIONS: HO 7-6151 



Lambert, Hendricks <S Rossi 0?^"'"^ "'ght crowd at the; 
and of course, .Joe Williams. 1 Crescendo last week proved it. j 
Gifts Galore j During the first show hej 

DoDo received a lovely gift; sported a wild black velvet 1 
from L.A., compliments of Do- i two button coat, black pants ; 
Velma Williams, and we both! and black patent leather 
got a giant MLssion Pak from j shoes. In his second show he 
Dr. and Mrs. Coleman and ! was dapper in a purple vqlvet 
family of San Franci.sco. ^oat lined in red satin,* la- 

Ho . . . hum . . . Guess I'll vender pants and moccasin 
go for another drive in my styled shoes! 



"BEST DANCING SINCE 
TWEST SIDE STORY' " 

l.A. Exomrnar 


Romantic , 



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I'll be 'less cool.' 'Bve now.... 
PHIL GORDON 


EASTSIDERS — Merchants 
and liquor owners are dis- 
turbed over the increasing 
number of robberies and are 


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PLAYING PRETTY AT THE PIANO 

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LTANYA GRIFFIN — Flew 
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8— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 



THE TEE 


WITH MAGGIE HATHAWAY. 


: tr 


■ d- 


125 players had registered for 
those spots. 

We were given a lovely desk 
and we were served ham sand- 
wililes, sunkist orange juice, 
coffee, beer, "Cokes" and pie. 
There were 50 top sports re- 
porters (I sat next to Sid Ziff 
of The Mirror). 40 typewriters, 
40 phones and two TV .sot.s. 
Every time we would return 
to the press room after walk- 
ing 18 holes, most of the re- 
porters would ask, "Did you 
see anything exciting?" "Any 
one trampled on yef?" There 
were 10.5(X) spectators and the 
Junior Chamber must bo com- 
plimented for handlinj; them 
so expertly; not one spectator 
was injured. 

Bob Goalby of Crystal Riv- 
er. Fla. won the top money 
,, AT- I D„^„^,.! i$"^'00i. He shot GT-TO-Tl tiT. 

V.,. r.uu'h ^lu■W^y R"""^, i Charles Sifford .shot T0-.;f)-7::- 
:, ,1,0 Ihtn hole and watched i.^ ^^ ^^^^ ^.^,,, ^^^^.^^ ^^|,.^.,, 


Now that uo have finished 
one of our hardest integration 
tights in Hollywood it is nice 
i get back to the "Tee," io 
come and take a trip with us 
to the famous S50.000 L..'\. 
Open hold at Rancho Golf 
Course. 

The first day was Pro-Celeb- 
rity Da\- and we went straight 
iO the Tth hole to watch Bob 
Hope, who was drawing one 
of the largest galleries. Bob 
!iit a terrific tee shot .straight 

.own the middle of the fair- 

v'ay and .scored a par on the 
•lole but ue noticeti his caddy 
was packing his bag. When 
'vo asked uh\- Boh was not 

ioing to play an\' longer the 
.■adfiy sairi that Bob was ill 

uid thoiiLjht ho -liad hotter 

luir. 


netted him ,S9()0. 

The last two days of tlio 
; tournament Sifford's galliM> 
! consisted of r>m fans mostly 
'Negroes. We liave n(^ver soon 


1 II 


TlCXt lui. 


llti I 


■.uni oiit.(lri\c some of the 

:)ics. Wo \K(iulil h(> willing to 

h!or lliai MickoN' I'an get as 

;r.wi-!i (iivi.niro ,is Ron Hogan. 

On tlio lSt!i liolo Mickey quit 

i„..-.,u.-o ho 00^,1,1 not get a ^ ^^.^ ^^^,,^,,., 

.hot wh.ch he had hooked '>ut ,^^,^ P^^^.^,.^^ ^^.^ „,^,,^ ^^.,,^^ 

,u~^c. doctors following ."^if- 
,.^^ ^lord r>r. Wells Fordo, Boal 

spent tollowmgUiarlieMffordi^^j ^3,,^^ «;iff^-.rs ..\tlv. 
and Ray Boots, our two Negro, ^,p,.j^3^ Kngn.sii alo„K -'i''^ 
profo.'.siondls. (We don t know,^j^^ .Sifford and -Charlie .Tr. 
uliy more did not attempt to . ^^^ ^^^^ -^^ ^j^^ crowd. We 
qualify, I Charhe did not haveU ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^.^ English take a 
to (juahfy because the PG.-\ | ^p^^. ^j^^^^. ^^ ^j^p ..,,0,^ j^i ^np- 
officials exempted him. i ^ ^j. jjq^;, ^^^j p,,^ ^all landed 

Wo arnwd at the Rancho a few inches inside the "glori- 
ciiih hOLiso at noon and were ' fied circle#' 
told that tiio weekly press hadi The Junior Chamber will not 
to park on .Motor Ave, on a lot^sponsor the LA Open next year 
tiMt -iva-~ >ot aside for them, ' because the national PC".,\ 
.\flci- parking, a shuttle bus tournament will bo plasod in 
nicked lis ap and carried us to Los Angeles. We wore mform- 
tho golf course. When we ent- ed that this tournament will 
o:-ci1 the picss room there was be played on a pri\-ato course. 
a Nogio sheriff on the door ^ Question for the .-\tty. Cenoral 
and lie informed us that the — "Is PG.-\ going to allow our 
loason we had to park .so far Negro professionals to partici- 
av\.-iy was b(>cause they only 1 pate in its Califojnia tourna- 
had 1_',") parking spaces and'ment^" 

Pro'BowIers Drill 


Piobably the two greatest 
football team.s ever a.ssembled 
for one game launch practice' 
this weekend for the Eleventh, 
annual .All-Star Pro Bowl! 
game scheduled Sunday. Jan.- 
1.3, at the Los Angeles Coli-} 
seum with the kickoff at 1 

o.m. I 

1 

The Eastern Conference 
squad under Vhe guidaftnce of 
canny Buck Shaw, who will be 
coaching his farewell game, 
will drill at Southern Cal's Bo- 
\ard, Field, while the West, 
under Vince Lombard!, will 
work out at Wrigley Field. 

First t-)i'actices are set for 
.Saturday afternoon with' 
iwice-a-day drills commencing 
.-Sunday morning. 

The game has oodles of 
ingles. No 1, of course, for- 
Lombard! and his eight Green 
Bay Packers on the West 
squad will be revenge on 
.-^haw and hi.s eight Eagles for 
the 17-1.3 victory Philadelphia 
-cored in the recent World ^ 
Championship thriller. 

.-Mso, Norm Van Brocklin,: 
t-io .Mr. Ever\ thing of pro foot- i 
h:-i!l rhks sea.'ion. will be play- ; 
i.ng his final game in the sta- 1 
(iium where he launched his , 
:iio career as a Ram in 1949. i 

While Shaw has not an- '' 


nounced his starting backfield. 
the betting is that John Crow 
of the Cardinals, Tommy Mc; 
Donald of the Eagles and Jim 
Brown of the Brov\ ns will open 
with Van Brocklin. 

Lombard! is expected to go 
with Johnny Cnitas of the 
Colts at quarterback. Paul 
Hornung of the Packers and 
Lenny Moore of the Colts as 
halfbacks 'and Packer Jim 
Tavlor at fullback. 


Apache Senior 
Is Voted Team's 
Top Cage Player 

Coach Ted Berner of Cen- 
tennial Senior High School 
has announced that Roy 
Walker, a senior student, has 
been voted the most outstand- 
ing defensive player on the 
school's varsity basketball 
team. 

Playing in the Kiwani's 
Third Annual Invitational 
Basketball Tournament in San 
Bernadino recently. Walker 
broke the tournament re- 
bound record of 68, and won 
the All -Tournament Trophy is 
one of the five outstanding 
players of the three-game ses- 
sion. 

The Apaches, having de- 
feated Riverside Poly 52-42, 
and Redlands. .58.56. were 
barely eased out of first place 
by Antelope Valley, uho eked 
out a 13-12 scare in the final 
toutnament game. I e a \- i n g 
Centennial as second place 
trophy winners. However, the 
Apaches upheld a long-stand- 
ing tradition of the school.r 
anrl again brought homo the 
sportsmanship trophy. 

Walker, an outstanding, 
scholar as uell as an athlete, I 

National Hockey 
League Boasts 
First Tan Player 

Southern California sports 
fans ma.\' get a chance to see 
Willie O'Roe, the first Negro 
t( pl.i\- in the National Hockes- 
Longuo. who made his debut 
with the Boston Bruins in Chi- 
cago last D(H-ember. .\ iiatixe 
of Frodorickton. Now Bruns- 
wick, he appealed in a game 
against the Chir-ago Black 
Hawks and commanded con- 
siderable attention for his pla\- 
: at loft and right wing. 
! O'Reo, while pla>-in<i with 
i Hull-Ottawa of the P^astern 
Pro League, scored 15 goals 
and ID assists, 
j Jai-k Demp,s<>\'. who success- 
! fully sponsored two meetings 
last September bet\\een the 
Toronto Maple Leafs and the 
Boston Bruins at the Sport.s 
.-\rena. will bring the Cleve- 
land Barons and the Van- 
couver "Canucks" hockey 
clubs here for games on Feb. 1 
and 2. 

The clubs are tops in their 
leagues, the West Coast and 
.Vmerican Ice Hockey Lea,gues. 
rospocti\-ely. 



Brains, Trojans Cage Teams Tangle 

I UCLA is nearing the mid- [take on Washington's Husk- 
way point of the (urrent. has- jes jn an important Big Five 
ketball season and the jury ^,3,,^ ^^ p ^■^.^^.^^ j^^^^^ ^^e 
is .still out on the Bruins. Is . , ^,, , .., , 

this one of John Woodons "'^"^ "'S^t. ^^ and Washing- 
fop teams, a team of cham- : ton So at it again in the open- 
pionship potential? Or is it fr a'ld UCLA battles Califor- 
a team which blows hot and "ias aroused Bears, who were 
cold, especially in the shoot- soundly defeated twice by the 
ing department? jTrojatis at Berk'eley last week. 

The answers could be sup- in the nightcap, 
plied thi.s weekend iJan. 1.3-, Off the opening weekend of 
141 when the question-mark ' conference pla>'. the Trojans 
Bruins and SC's highflying are now the team to catch. 
Trojans host -two more double- : The Brwins, who split their 
headers in the I^os Angeles two-game series at Seattle, 
Sports Arena. are rated even with Califor- 

On Friday, the Bruins face nia and Stanford, which was 
Arizona's Wildcats, always a idle last week, as the dark- 
Border Conference cage pow- horse entries in the early run- 
er, at 7 p.m. while the Trojans ning. . 



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■BIG (y AT SPORTS ,1 RES .l—Baskclhall fans ii;ll 
III- siitiit] llir tlio heyt hiiskclhtdl plnyirs in the -tvnrld in 
till sfiinc iidiiif this Siitiitdfix unii Siindny. 


Big *0' Leads 
Royals Against 
Lakers Saturday 

The National Baasketball 
Assn. has never been labeled 
a "rookie's paradise." 

Not many of them have 
been able to stand up under 
the "initiation." In recent 
years, however, there's been 
one. each time who's made it 
big. Real big. 

Two seasons ago it was the 
Lakers' Elgin Baylor. Last 
Reason it was Wilt (The Stilt) 
Chamberlain of the Philadel- 
phia Warriors. It's no mystery 
who the big guy is this time. 

Of course, it's the "Big O." 

His i.:fect on the NBA was 
heard like an explosion in 
Cincinnati and felt like one 
in other cities of the league. 

The "Big O" is really Oscar 
Robertson and he is ex{>ected 
to detonate in the seventh 
NBA city — Los Angeles — 
Saturday morning (Jan. 14) at 
the Sports Arena when he 
makes his Kx:al debut with the 
Cincinnati Royals. ^ 

And if he doesn't* blow the 
roof off the Arena "Saturday 



Abe Saperstein's thirty-fourth annual edition <rf Globe- 
trotters shapes up as one of the greatest in the series of 
wonder squads that have thrilled 72 countries on six contin- 
ents with amazing ability and hilarious byplay. Two brilliant 
newcomers have been added to the stellar array of veterans in 
Govoner Vaughn, a great star from the University o(f Illinois, 
and Frank Burks from the Universdty of Wisconsin. 

They have fitted in most admirably into a unit already 
comprising the peerless Meadowlark Lemon, coirfedian su- 
preme; Murphy Summons, the dribbling marvel: set shot 
wonder and captain, Clarence Wilson; six foot eight inch Joe 
Buckhalter, and the other crack hojdover specialists, Charles 
("Tex") Harrison, Jackie Fitzpatrick and Ernest Wagner. 

Vaughn came to the Trotters after three brilliant seasons 
at Illinois, where ihs total of 1,001 points made him the third 
highest scorer in the school's history. He led the Illini In 
scoring last season with 411' tallies for a 17.9 and ranked 
fourth nationally in best free throw percentages. Govoner, 
who gained much all-star recognition. hail5 from Edwards- 
ville, 111., where he paced the high school to state runner-up 
laurels in 1956. 

Like Vaughn, Burks was a prep phenom, scoring ne&rly 
half his Wells High School team's points in Chicago COTipeti* 


he gets a .second opportunilyltion, setting several scoring records and being named a^ 
Sunday night. state. Games are scheduled Jan. 29 and Feb. 5 at Sports Arena. 

> ■■ : 


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Rolphs Buyers now select only the choicest, where- 
ever they are best . . . and at the best prices! Then, 
flovor and tenderness are "precision-perfected" in 
a "spotlight" of almost airless refrigeration that 
never v^es from start to showc^ase and doesn't 
dehydrate as in old-fashioned methods. 


Ralphs expert Butchers super-trim all Golden Prem- 
ium Meats before weighing! All "tail", on steoks, 
heoyy chine bone, excess fat . . . up to o half pound 
or more on a 2 lb. Porterhouse to save you 35c to 
4^c]^r pound on Hit Finest Meots "^'11 Ever EotI 


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ROYAL SOCIAL CURS AWL'JL F<)R.\Li L—Mrmhm: „f thr 

tight-\enr-r,ld Rriynh id r shrm n jiiU'imnq the mlrodui lum during ihnr annual 
fnrnial dnmr nt the .\ln\ll'iiirr Rnllmrmi in I nolmond I'isl Snlii>dn\ rrrnina. 
from left: }\admp }-nirlt\, Mnrtha Dukrrs'm, Mnniic Hrnlli, Mngijie 


P'lsrx. A nil JiukMin. Iliillir \ei:.h\. Lillinn Raly. Kuniic Pnrker, Bessie 
Myers. Trudic II hiikhiiiii, Prnl'iln II illifitns. Bcrnue Ynittir/, Johnnie Mfie 
Fnrd nnd Clrn Rrndlix. Stiindini) jrnm left: Arizola Bell, president and 
If tni Orr, ulin intnidiurd the tilth. (Afinnis), 


Royal Socialand Charity Club Entertains 
One Thousand Guests at Annual Formal Ball 


Bv VVINI ORR 
Bowing beforp a near ohp 
thousand guests, thp Ro>al 
Social and Charity Club pn- 
Tprtainpd rpcpnjls' at thp 
Mayflowpr Ballroom in 
Inglewood. 

Thp Royals vvprp organ i/pd 
fight \pars ago and Pn.io> 
an apti\p annual caloncia. of 
events. The club Ion;:; aC'i 
adopted the Faundyilmi for 
the Ju-nior Blind as it.s an- 
nual charity endea\or to 


uhich thev contribulp. 

Thp ladies chose while as 
ihp color for thpir gowjis. 
although thp fabrics wptp 
\aripd. Some chose satin 
bpadpd with seed pearls. 
others ppau dp soie and still 
others rich brocade. 

Thp president, .^ri/.ola Bell, 
was elegant in an irv blue 
brocaded sheath with match- 
ing pumps. 

Most of the gowns follow- 
ed the same pattern which 


uas in the regal mannei of 
sheathed skirts in front with 
full overla>ing train from the 
waist in the back, dropping 
just inches below the hem- 
line. The fitted bodice with 
spaghetti straps was high- 
lighted with the club's C'oiois 
in a yellow rase corsagp with 
ro\al blup ribbon. The ladies 
wore ro\al blue slippers and 
white glo\ps. 

A% a token of thejr eslepm, 
tlip club presented its piesi- 


deiit v^ith a gift. 
f Introduced by Wini Orr, 
club and social coordinator, 
the nipmbprs bowpd as fol- 
lows: Ppacola Williams. TVa- 
dine Fairlpy. Eunice Parker, 
and .Martha Dickeison. 

(~» f f i c e r s arc: Tiiiriie 
Whickham, sick and condo- 
Ipiicp; Ora Townsetid. par- 
liamentarian: .Mamie Heath, 
critic: Maggie Possev, social 
lioslp.ss; CIpo Riadle.\, rp- 
porter; Ann Jackson, spr- 



.Vf/f OFLICLRS SEALED — -Olfirers of'thr Doll 
Lengue (Jh/h. Ine., are shn-u n f'/llnu im/ their annual iristnl- 
laiinn in the hnrne of ]\ellie Rmnn Inst Saturday night. 
Pieturrd jr'jrti left: Eurald/i M'irris, reiording setretary: 

Doll League Club 
Seats Officers 


Ruth Rail, sert/rnnt-nt-firriis : Helen S'nilh. finaniuil seitr- 
tary : Iritnk Lnl iqne, in>tiillin</ niluer; Liiln Rendy. presi- 
dent: h.iiiiiin .•{dai/is, lii e-president : tti\e II miner . i hr- 
retp'inding Si iretary , nnd Ctlnd\ie (.jlnrk . repmlir. (Adeinn) 


NeW officers of the popular 
Doll League Club Inc.. were 
installed by Atty. Frank La- 
Vigne in the beautiful West 
20th street home of club 
member Nellie Brown last 
Saturday night in a very gay 
atmosphere. 

This year's president is 
personable Lulu Bend\. 
charter rriember of the Doll 
League, and she announced 
that she and her officers, as 
well as the members, will be 
striving to makp their forth- 
coming social events much 
more interesting and impres- 
sive. Extensive work and 


thought will be given par- 
ticularly to the group's an- 
nual Christmas party and 
their winter formal at which 
time they request their 
guests to bring dolls and 
toys to be given underprivi- 
leged children. 

Realizing the fact that to 
get the best possible toys and 
dolls for some 2500 children 
isn't going to be an easy 
task, club members elected 
suce officers as E u v a I d a 
Morris. Ruth Ball, Helen 
Smith. Emma Adams, P'aye 
W agner. Gladyce Clarke and 
Fannie De Mann to assist 
Mrs. Bendv. ; 


*^^ Bill Small wood ^^ 


.Mmrna Loma.x and brood 
left Mon. for Tuskpgcp wherp 
the.' '|l Ine while mama 
turns out another paper. 
.Manl>n Holder had sLngpr\' 
Tups. Nuffy Callouay jer- 
streakr- jn on the _'.3rd to 
get away from the ice and 
snovv' for a spell. gail\' park- 
ing hpr knapsack at Eloise 
Davis' as usualK' shp does. 
Dr. and Mrs. Chas. Hoi ley 
'Melba) are mo\ing to Ro- 
chester, Minn. Sat. il4i is 
birthday for Estelle Sher- 
wood. 

The Hezz Howards i Doro- 
thy) bade adieu to her sjs- 
tef. Colleen Williams of the 
nation's capitolj who house- 
guested with them through 
the Yule and after the Rose 
Bowl doings. Schoolmarm 
Ida Lee and her brother. 
Raymond Walls, lost their 
brother in Chi. Pasadena's 
Rose Garner will be 88 on 
Sun. <15>. Cullen Fentress 
take;- a birthday Mon. il6i. 
ditto ne.xt day for Dr. Leroy 
WeekPs. Just learned Eva 
Payton is living here again 
atter years of Manhattan. 
W'plcome, honey chile. 
Ofl to Washington 

Twelve-Thirty-three Club 


due lo meet Sat. with Delia 
Williams. Attj-. Herbert Sim- 
mons to DC on the 20th for 
t h r' Inauguration. Portia 
Craig leaves Tue.s. for the DC 
doings: her son, Craig, leaves 
on the 30th for the Dodgers 
train ng camp as a rookiP 
pi o^P'Pct. Inauguration 
bound: SF's Dr. and Mrs. 
h'p'bic Henderson, Atty. Ter- 
'ry Francois, the Byron Rum- 
foids. The Dadsons Club are 
taking judo instruction these 
.Man. evenings, the young- 
uns as well as their dads. 

Who but indomitable Puby 
Wilson could possibly lend 
undimmed glamour even to 
a wheelchair? She attended 
the Bev-Hilton luncheon of 
her club, the Thirteen Aids, 
wA le convalescing from a 
nasly fall: the club present- 
ed 'n sizeable check to the 
Korean Orphanage . project, 
tlicir '60 program- Inaugura- 
tion - headed: Atty. Vaino 
Spencer, her husband, Lor- 
er-zo, and her mother. Jo 
Holmes is going, too. The 
Bob Brewingtons: And 
thanks to you. 

Tues. (17) is anniversary 
time for the Ralph Johnsons 

.(Continued on Page lOJ 



LXCIIASCL CAILL—Lnlu Bendy, left, is shonn re- 
teiii'iiii qii'ycl frnrii nutgning presidi nt , S\li;ifi Inrtsnn, nf 
the D'lll Lenf/iie nt their nnniiril imlnllnti'in pnrty. ( Adams). 

AKA St^rority Slates 
Annual Benefit Affair 


Members of the graduate 
chapter of the Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Sorority are enthusias- 
tically making plans for 
their annual benefit subscrip- 
tion, Fantasia Americana, to 
be held at the International 
Room of the Beverly Hilton 
Hotel on Friday, March 10. 

Derotha Allen and Norma 
Earles are co-chairmen for 
this year's event and plans 
have been made for "some- 
thing new." This year's af- 
fair will have a Latin Amer- 
ican theme and promises to 
be the most fabulous affair 
held, beginning with the in- 
vitations that will soon be 
In the mail. Invitations are 


limited to the seating capac- 
ity of the hotel and recipients 
aie urged to accept their 
bids early. 

Proceeds from this affair 
will be used to further the 
Health project, which is con- 
centrating on Shckle Cell; 
scholarships, and other com- 
munity services. 

Income Tax Class 

D o r s e y Adult School an- 
nounced a class in Income 
Tax to begin Tuesday, Jan. 
.17. The class will meet for 
10 weeks from 7 to 9:30 p.m. 
9:30 p.m. 


geant-at-arms; Johnie Mae 
Ford, business manager; 
Hattie Newboy. treasurer; 
Lillian Baty, financial sec- 
rptars : Bessie Myers, corres- 
ponding secretar\ ; Bernice 
■^'oung, recording secretary; 
Cel( ste King, vice president: 
and Arizola Bell, president. 

Two of the members who 
v^ere unable to attend the 
dance due lo illness were 
Ora Townscnd and Celeste 
King. 

Les Petites 
Officers 
Installed ^ 

Les Petite Femmes helJ 
their annual Installation 
Party at the lovely home of 
their treasurer. Mrs. Bonzell 
Chouteau, 1712 E. 124th 
street. 

The 1961 officers installed 
by Mr. JCenneth Terrell are: 
President. Mrs. Althena 
Townsend: \-ice - president, 
Mrs. Evelyn B>rd; treasurer, 
Mrs. Bonzell Choteau: sec- 
retar>'. Mrs. Bernice Hilson; 
business manager, Mrs. Pa- 
tricia M. Elmore and chap- ■ 
lain, Mi.ss Mar.iorie Fraiser. 

The \pry simple installat- 
ion service delivered by Mr. 
Terrell was attended by the 
other members of the club: 
Mrs. Berle -Wilson, Mrs. Rita 
Jean Wright and Mrs. Har- 
riet Terrell: and guests. 
Highlighting the ceremonies 
was the surpri.se chrtnpagne 
communion of. appreciation 
and greetings to outgoing 
president, Mrs. Evelyn Byrd. 
Mrs. Townsend paid tribute 
to the outgoing president 
thanking her in behalf of 
the ctub's past activities, 
which are known to the Los 
Angeles scene by many. She 
promises to do her best to 
fulfill the office duties of 
the office just vacated with 
all the vital interest, and 
verve she possesses in 
furthering thp club's steady 
growth for 1961. 

A 1ovp1\- table was spread 
and everyone enjoyed the 
evenings entertainment. 

Ottawa Visitors 
ATrive in City 

Mrs. Hardiman Cureton, 
nee Pat Howers. and young 
sons. Hardy Jr. and Karl, ar- 
rived from Ottawa. Canada 
last week. Mrs. Cureton is 
stopping with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs, Orlando 
Flowers. 

Both Pat and Hardy Jr., 
will participate in the 
H o s k i n s. W'ilkins wedding 
scheduled for February. 




• CLUBS 



FASHIONS 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


The California Eagle— 9 



CLV B LEADER — Beaming president of thr Roxtil Soiial find Charitv Club 
Bell, Jiith mistress of ceremonies. II mi Orr, m: she rei en ed n surprise token fro 
memhers during their formal Inst Snturdny, Lor,kinij on Jroni left are members 
yeiiby and Lillian Baty. (Adams). 


Arizola 

m club 

Hattie 



E\ ROUTE TO SYDXtY, Al'STR.I LLI—Sho-.i n stopp,,,,, over briefly nt the Los 
Angeles Airport Inst ueek is Mrs. t.lla Stexv<irt. 'it 'l''/edo. Ohio, second from left. She, 
is the former president of the y.ntionnl .-I \.\rii lalion ot (Colored II omen and is en route 
to attend a eonlerenee in Austrnlin. She i' the only \earrj II oinan delegate from this 
lOUntry and nill also iisit many other lureion countries. She uas greeted hy .Mrs. 
Ernestine Hollonny, left, and Mrs. R/thn Beck liho is sh'i'an i^elcoming Mrs. Fred 
Taylor, Mrs. Stenart's traveling companion, { .i merican .iirhnes Photo.) 


Tempelite Club 
Feted with Part/ 

.Mr. and .Mrs. Stewart 
Thoma§' beautiful south Los 
Angeles home at 2351 East 
llPth street was brightly 
decorated when they enter- 
tained linembers of the 
Tempelite Club during the 
holidays. 

Secret pals were revealed, ' 
greetings were exchanged 
and visitors introduced. 

James R. Villareal, presi- 
dent of the club, acted as 
master of ceremonies for the 
r-v(?ning. The hostess served 
a delicious turkey dinner. 


Debuteers Club Maps Plans 


Willie Candy, president of 
the Sir Debuteers .Social Club, 
presided o\er the group's 
first meeting of thq New 
Year last Sunday in his sub- 
urban home in South Los An- 
geles. 

The meeting was high- 
lighted with many important 
events which ^he club will 
participate in during the 
year in addition lo their reg- 
ular events, which includes 
their annual Spring Frolic. 
Informally, they listed four 
times they will hold get- 
acquainted parties and per- 
haps the biggest event com- 
'ing up soon is the opening of 
their new Social Club at S9th 



ANNUAL BENEFIT SUBSCRIPTION— Members of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee of AKA Sorority are ready to receive reservations for the Fantasia Americana. 
Sorors Norma Earles, Derotha Allen, co-chairman of the affair, and Janie Johnson, Inez 
Broun, reservations, are discussing seating arrangements. (Adams). 


and Avalon. 

The club has a spacious 
patio and will be opened to 
the public some time next 
month. It has been complete- 
ly remodeled inside and 
out. Tentative plans call for 
'an elaborate invitational to 
all club officials at which 
time Walter Goodloe, public 
relations and promotion di- 
rector for Sterling L;i]jors, 
will bo asked to serve as 
host and introduce the Sir 
Debuteers and tell plans <rf 
the new club. 

The Sir Debuteers' first 
big public dance will be held 
some time in July and they 
expect to announce a s«isa- 
ftional attraction for ttie 
occasion. ' 


Luggage Shower 
Attended by 75 

More than seventy-five 
smartly dressed young ladies 
were guests of Mrs. Bessie 
Burke and Mrs. Ethel Bruing- 
tori on Sunday morning at a 
breakfast luggage shower 
held at the Wilfandel Qub 
House, honoring Miss Sandra 
Hoskins. 

The popular bride-elect 
Miss Hoskins and Mr. Alonzo 
Wilkins III are scheduled to 
wed on Feb. 11. 

Among those attending 
were Mrs. Aurora Hoskins, 
bride's to be mother; Mrs. 
Bernice Arbor, mother of the 
groom to be. Also Mesdaraes 
Inez Roberson, Teresa 
Daniels, Patricia Curet<m, 
Patsy Watson, Jackie Grant, 
Karleen Downs, B rend a 
Moore and Sandra Speights. 


) 


: ^ 
■ c 


- r 



Dorothea Foster 



PTA News 


-- fiarlrng Dotie nho usiiatly firns this intercstini/ and in- 
'fcirinntivc roluinn ucekly ha:, rcqueilcd a Iravc of absence 
since fciniilv duties are non' deinandin/j all her tinic. lloiiCier, 
Deitic tiill nlu/iys shnre n i-i/ir/n spot in our henrts here rit the 
f.aglc riiiil the u.clc'i>iie hack fig/i iiill nhi'iiys he hiini/ i'lr hrr 
jrxiurn. 

OLR GUEST 

// ns'iinc II mi Orr, icho turned out her first social column 
fiV7y hnch nlun the I -Ciir luiiblcd noisily dot; n Central ave- 
J3U£ iind li. hrn II i<tc'n iircnue litis knoiin ns "uv7v across 
hiicn. has nacr i/oltcn for nuny from the social end of 
t-hini/r in this last i/rojiino city of ourx. Despite the fact that 
the ,11 cslside, Coniplon . Pasadena. Santa Monica and Venice 
heire oftc/roun the l.nstsidc. she has the .uncanny ahilily of 
kefpini/ hit linr/cr on yocial happrnini/s, as any i/O'id ncnspaper 
lioninii lioti id — t.diloi , 

Like an Old Shoe 

Guest writing for the Eagle is like looking 
ihrough \our closet and finding an old pair of shoes 
that not only fits as vveJl as ever, but feels so good. 
The year 1961 is getting off to a rollicking start 
with half the population on liquid 900 diets; appre- 
hension and anticipation at the coming inaugural: 
speculation as to the 'outcome of the Cuban situa- 
tion (and I have a REAL curiosity where this ques- 
tion is concerned as my one and only off-spring is 
stationed at Guantanamo Base). 

And How They Fly 
But, as the saying goes: "Life goes on." There's 
turmoil a-plenty in one household what with CRAIG 
JAN'UARY preparing to take off for the Dodger 
traiViing camp in Florid^; brother JOHN packing on 
the other couch getting ready for his scholastic in- 
vasion of Mexico; and mother, PORTIA CRAIG, 
Shopping like mad in her haste to plane out on the 
47th for Washington, D.C. and the Presidential In- 
•auguration of John F. Kennedy and the accom- 
panying festivities. 

1. First lady of journalism in our town, CHAR- 
XOTTA A. BASS due hofrie any minute from her 
irip to Mexico City. ANN MALBROUGH who, with 
son KEVIN and sister WILMA WILLIAMS flew 
•Jome for a family re-union in Tennessee, rushing 
3hto town just in time to get changed for her 
■Rinkeydink Club Dance. 

- JOE MALBROUGH who stayed home to tend the 
Store busy getting the gowns ready for the usual 
spectacular appearance of the club. Incidently, he 
has an Idea that will soon be put into practice, 
namely, renting gowns of a uniform color to clubs. 
He plans to feature several styles and of course 
v«ry them frequently. Should certainlv relieve some 

JiSbo can't stand the tariff on the kind you have to 

3Jrtte with you. 

- Speaking of ideas, that's no idea the JEEP 
SMITH band has, but cold business since Jeep has 
Jjirned over the J e e p s t e r s to the direction of 
MARTIN "FUZZY" GOWER; they are as swinging 
-«s ever. 

:: Glimpsed LADY CLAIRE WILLIAMS, JUANITA 
^REEN and ALICE CREECY of the Ladies of Para- 
■dise Club enjoying the Royal Social and Charity 
^lub Dance at the Mayflower. 
Z Fun chatting with GLADYS and GENERAL 
J^OODS whom I hadn't had the pleasure of seeing 
Si ages. 

_ BEA DEVAUGHN making progress like crazy 
j:fter her long siege of illness and grateful to so 
■many of her friends that she hasn't been able to 
thank personally. Bea says she will never be able 
in show her heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to 
3JI of her friends who made a long and painful con- 
valescence almost a pleasure. 

" EUGENE KNOX making his plans to driA^e to 
2few Orleans for Mardi Gras, and enplane from 
-♦here to Columbus, Ohio to visit his family. BILLY 
BARKER and KELSO •, BARBOUR makjng many a 
.cup of tea a real event as the tea gets cold and the 
conversation warmer. 

As we go to press I have no choice but to com- 
ment on the University of Georgia. Closing the 
tloors will not close the education gates for the 
Negro, because it looks like he is here to stay. But 
.it seems they would realize so many of their own 
are being deprived of that which is so important: a 
■little book learning. 

Sunday night at the fireside atid through the 
medium of TV and the courtesy of the General 
Electric Theatre, SAMMY DAVIS, JR. in "Memory 
Tn White" with the apropos remark of RONALD 
■REAGAN, a memorable portrait. Just wish they 
could have chosen a different title, or was it a time- 
ly one? 

How are we to forget — MABEL JONES, one of 
the truly fine fashion commentators battling like a 
champ an illness that has her medics baffled. 

Lest I forget to mention it, I am now a staff 
writer for the new monthly publication "Angel 
City," a neat little mag of our city and folks. 
■,■ Christmas trees down, lights out, gifts packed 
away — all indicative that the holidays are over 
and so back to normal. 

LIBBY CLARK driving her new little compact 
car into the new year. Carnival Island moved to 
Hollywood and I do wish the cast success. In case 
you hadn't heard, this is the fast moving musical 
Jhat Nick and Edna Stewart wrote and which 
started in their Ebony Showcase only to be thought 
lo be bigger than the small house. 
Best of luck to you all in '61. 


10— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 



L. A. CUAI'I'l R OF DRII-rKRS^J'olloiiino their 

regular monthly nieclini/. Drifters arc shoiin niaknu/ their 
initial hoii' lo the Soiilhtands i/iili ijrcle. I hey nerc 
granted their ihaplrr Iroin the iialional liody in October 
I'MO. Sealed front honi left: hduina 1 1 ollomnn, presi- 


dent: I era II at son. Juanita 
f secretary) and Ruth Robinson. 
Hams, vice-president : Sara Ray, 
cores ponding secretary, and Jes 


Martin. Bcrnice l.arly 
Second roil': Johnnie 11 il- 
treasurer; .Margaret Lofe, 
sie Johnson. 


nc 


National Drifters, 
Grants LA. Group Charter 


Among the Southlands 
newest organizations to an 
nounce their program for tho 
1961 season are the Dritlrrs. 
Inc., Los Angeles Chapter. 
Following the National con- 
vention of Drifter.s. Inr., lield 
in Indianapolis in 19.o9, per- 
mission was granted to 
members to organize a local 
chapter. 

In October. Betty (Jarreit 
of Indianapolis installed the 
chapter in this area, (^tlior 
new West Coast chapters lo 
be installed were in the Ba> 
Area, including San Fran- 


li.sco, Oakland, and Borkelo>. 

Tlie rivic-'minded Drifters 
HIP life members of the 
-NAACP and the Urban 
I^eague and their charity pro- 
jects are desic;ned to support 
those \\ho ha\e the most 
need in their communities. 

The home of Juel Collins 
uas the setting of the groups 
last monthly meeting whicli 
was presided over by their 
president, charming Edwina 
Holloman. 

The president, along with 
.Margaret Lo\e, held a con- 
ference with representatives 


of the California Eagle to ex- 
plore the best possible 
methods of serving the com- 
munity. 

Funds to be raised for pro- 
jects selected by the group 
will come frorri an elaborate 
jummage sale to be an- 
nounced at a later date. 

Members of the Drifters 
are Dolores Carter, Juel Col- 
lins, Jessie Johnson, Marga- 
ret Love, Vera Watson, Ed- 
\vina Holloman, Ruth Robin- 
son, Juanita Martin, Bernice 
Early, Sara Ray, and Johnnie 
Williams. 



ISOLDES' KIYSTOSE CLl'B— Former residents of Pittsburgh. Pa., uhq formed el 
club tivo years ago are sho-un during their annual holiday party. Pictured from left: Dan 
Washington, Joc\ll alker, president: Bill Bailey. .Milton (Bud) Su'an and Tommy Sands. 

Keystone in Second Year Fans of Gaiety 

Hold First Meet 



Members of the Golden 
Keystone Club celebrated 
their second year with a 
lavish holiday party in the 
home of William and Mary 
Hostin on West Pico. The 
club members are former 
residents of Pittsburgh, Pr., 
and the party and the ccle- 
'bration was attended by 
wives and friends of tfve club. 

The group has been work- 
ing closely with the 28th 
street YMCA and has partici- 
pated financially in the 
campers program. 

At a recent meeting of the 
group and under their presi- 
dent Joe Walker all mem- 
bers have pledged their full 
support to charities which 


the club selects as projects 
during 1961, 

Mr. ■ and Mrs., Hostin 
proved to ^be a ^ delightful 
host and hcfetess to the sec- 
ond annual affair as the club 
and their guests enjoyed 
cocktails, buffet and dancing 
throughout the evening and 
they ushered in the New 
jear on a festive note. 

Slates Classes 

The Y WC A -Woodlawn Cen- 
ter is offering a series of 
classes to adults in Charm, 
Crochet and Knitting. Dra- 
matics, Dressmaking, Modern 
Dancing and Draperies and 
Slipcovers. 


IMPOITtD tY THE lUCKINCNAM COtPOIATION, lOCKfrfllH CtNTH, NfW YOM 


JACOBS & FARBER PRESENT 

ONE OF THE GREATEST SINGERS 

OF OUR TIME! 

WILLIAM 

WARFIELD 

SAT. EVE. JAN. 21, PHILHARMONIC AUD. 

RETURNING FROMT A TRIUMPHAL WORLD-WIDE TOUR FQR 
THE U. S. STATE DEPARTMENT. STAR OF MOM'S "SHOWBOAT". 
ACCLAIMED IN THE INTERNATIONAL TOURING PRODUCTION 
OF "PORCY AND BESS." IN A PROGRAM OF GREAT SONGS 
AND SPIRITUALS. 

ORDER NOW BY MAIL FOR CHOICE SEATS-SEND TO 

JACOBS « FARBER, P.O. Box 1829, Let Angelas 28, Calif. 

Tickets: $1,50, $2.00, $2.50, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00. 

Enclose sUmped, salfaddressed envelope. 



Beatrice Moman was 
hostess to the first meeting 
of the 1961 season last Sun- 
day when the Fans of Gaiety 
Club met in her home. This 
marks the last meeting be- 
fore the group's annual elec- 
tion. " 

Mrs. Moman, in addition to 
serving a wonderful Spanish 
dinner following the meet- 
ing, was declared winner of 
the club's prize which was a 
canned ham. 

Before the close of the 
1960 season the Mary Ann 
Bayliss home was the scene 
of the group's annual holiday 
party at which time they ex- 
changed gifts. 

" Guests attending the meet- 
ing at the home of Mrs. 
Moman included husbands 


iBill 
Smallwood 

• Continued from Page 9) 
(Inez). Alpha Phi Zeta Chap- 
ter of Zeta Phi Beta met 
Sat. as Esther Muldrew, 
Mi;?paret Rainey, Irma Rich- 
aidscr. and Mary Rolli(js^ en- 
acted loles as hostesses. This 
Sat. is Founder's Day lunch- 
eon time for the Zetas at an 
intimate restaurant out La 
Cienega way. Speaker will 
be soror Rosalind Meeks. 
Leontyne King: And thanks 
to jou, especially. 
More, Anon 

S'Diego's Al Montgomery 
and wife, Kay, weekended in 
town, put up sumptuously 
ar the Statler. They have 
sorr'e merry plans for the 
next fort-night or so which 
should be delightfully pro- 
vocatixe: some of their local 
cronies will dash do'vp to 
S'Diego to take part but 
gladly. Of it all, more anon. 

I.\ to Chi: Opal Jones, 
whose address while there 
vill be Hull House. Mil 
Blount could have well used 
seven league boots last Sat. 
With friends she attended 
a matinee of Raisin In The 
Sun, swished on to BcvHills 
for cocktails, dined at Da\e 
■Chasen's T^EN made the 
curtain for A Lie Is A Cen- 
tura Long! Some anxious 
mcimcnts over at Tess and 
Gil Lindsay's; her mother 
has been quite ill these, past 
few days or more. 

Tall, lean Bernie Harper 
in" town for seven weeks of 
nonchalance. Last time I 
saw him ( at an astonishing 
party) his entrance got such 
a'Hhunderous ovation I 
thought for an instant he'd 
arrived with the U.S. Cav- 
alry. Owner of -a we'l cush- 
ioned checking account, 
Bernie maintaiiis the effete 
look and on him it looks 
dam good. Freda and Rene 
DeKnight were in town very 
briefly enroute to Honolulu. 

Westside Society 
Schedules Meeting 

Mrs. Leo L. Lott, president 
of the Westside Benevolent 
Society, announced f^at tho 
group's first meeting for the 
New Year is scheduled for 
Jan. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the 
auditorium of Bethtl AMcJ 
Church. Members ar'.- urged 
to attend and bring a friend. 
The churcl^is located at 1511 
W. 36th street. 

and friends of the members. 
The only member absent for 
the meeting was Jeanett Col- 
lery, because of illness. 


CENTENNIAL 

Centennial Senior High 
School's debate squad, under 
the direction of Mrs. Maple 
Cornwell, has been invited 
by the University of Southern 
California to its 25th An- 
nual Invitational High 
School Forensic Tournament, 
to be held Friday and Satur- 
day, Jan. 13 and 14, at the 
Bovard Auditorium. 

Representing the A"paches 
»& championship debaters in 
Friday's session are James 
Page, Clarence Broussard, 
Larry Moss and Ira Hawkins. 

"On Saturday, 12 of our 50 
forensic people have been in- 
vited to represent Centennial, 
because of their outstanding 
tournament record," Mrs. 
Cornwell stated. 

Those featured in Satur- 
day's event will include: 
Clarence Broussard and 
Katie Smith as extempor- 
aneous speakers, Larry Moss, 
Allen Gantt and Margaret^ 
Higgins in impromptu speak- 
ing, and Emily Blake, James 
Page and Vivian Clark in 
oratory. Suzie Claude will 
lepresent the school in dra- 
matic interpretation, Jerome 
Ferrell in humorous speak- 
ing, and Robert Warren, Ira 
Hawkins and Gloria Foley 
will compete in oratorical 
interpretation. 

COMPERS 

Gompers Junior High 
School is presenting its 
Winter '61 Father-Son Night 
on Thursday evening, Jan. 
19. Tlie program will take 
place in the Activity Room 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

The activity-packed eve- 
ning, starts at 6:30 p.m. with 
a round robin volleyball 
tournament featuring four 
teams. The teams will con- 
sist of fathers, faculty men, 
A9 boys, and an All-Star 
team. Each team will 'play 
each olher once. Fathers are 
urged to participate. 

A social period will follow 
at 7:30 p.m. during which re- 
freshments will be on sale. 
Apple pie a la mode, ccrffee 
or milk will be available. 
The Gompers Junior High 
School Swing Band will play 
for the entertainment of the 
group. 

HOOPER AVENUE 

Hooper Avenue P.T.A. Child 
Welfare Chairman Mrs. Otis 
Pearson and Co-Chairman, 
Mrs. James Matthews, report- 
ed on their Christmas pro- 
gram which many families 
in the community enjoyed 

Drew Medical 
Auxiliary in 
Regular Meet 

The Women's Auxiliary to 
the Charles Drew Medical 
Society held its regular 
monthly meeting last Satur- 
day at the horfie of Dr. and 
Mrs. George Sealey, with 
Mrs. Zrelda Sealey and Mrs. 
Winifred Toncy as hostesses. 

Mrs. Irene Bledsoe, Health 
Chairman who worked with 
Mental Health. Po'io and 
Los Angeles Tuberculosis So- 
cieties during the holiday 
season, gave an interesting 
report on the proje.-^t and 
cheer the group brough' to 
many patients duii'^g the 
Yuletide season. 

Several new members who 
recently took up residence in 
the city were present to join 
the Auxiliary. The new 
members and their husbands 
were guests of the society. 
They included Mrs. Ann 
Bobo and^Mrs. Joyce Bobo, 
wives of two brothers, both 
physicians. 

Mrs., Lillian Alexander, 
widow of a physician from 
New Jersey and former presi- 
dent of the National Medical 
Association's Women's Aux- 
iliary, spoke to the gr.)i.>f . 

All of the new members 
were officially welcomed by 
the Auxiliary and fo lowin:: 
the meeting the members 
and their guests enjoyed a 
delightful social hour. 


during the holidays. 

The Executive Board re- 
ported that all the children 
attending Hooper received 
gifts, fruit and nuts. In addi- 
tion each room held parties 
with mothers assisting the 
teachers. 

Mrs. Hugh Howell, P.T.A. 
president, attended the re- 
cent Parliamentary and Pres- 
ident Workshop at the South- 
east Health Center at 49th 
and Avalon. She also, along 
with members, attended the 
Fremont Council meeting at 
Russell Elementary School. 

Parents are being urged to 
support the Hooper Ave. 
P.T.A. 

DORSET P.T.A. 

Dorsey Adult School an- 
nunces a series of lectures 
entitled "Toward Better Fam- 
ily Living" to be given by ' 
Dr. James S. Simkin. This 
lecture series is co-sponsored" 
by Baldwin Hills P.T.A-, Mrs. 
Irwin Ha us. Parent Ekluca- 
tion Chairman; and Windsor 
Hills P.T.A., Mrs. E. E. 
Hughes, Parent Education 
Chairman. 

The lectures will be held 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. with 
the first three scheduled for 
Wednesdays at Windsor Hills 
School and the last three 
scheduled for Thursdays at 
Baldwin Hills School. Regis- 
tration will be held at 9 a.m. 
at Windsor Hills School on 
Jan. 11. 

Dates and titles of lectures 
are as follows: 

Jan! 11 — What Makes a 
Good Home? 

Jan. 18 — Everybody Else 
Does: 

Jan. 25 — Discipline, Re- 
spect, Responsibility. 

(Ttiese three lectures will 
be held at Windsor Hills 
School.) 

Feb. 2 — Teaching Values. 

Feb. 9 — Preparation "for 
Adolescence. | 

Feb. 16 -^ i G o a 1 s and 
Achievement. 

(These three lectures will 
be held at Baldwin Hills 
School. ) 

Bridge Club 
Installs New 
Club Officers 

The Rainbow Bridge and 
Charity Club had its. first 
meeting of the year at the 
home of Mrs. Juani'a Jack- 
son. Officers for the year arc; 
President, Leon a Powell; 
vice president, Elizabeth 
Johnson; treasurer. Alberta 
Boone; recording secretary, 
Wallacesteen Gilmore; fi- 
nancial secretary, Leona 
Walton; business manager, 
Jewel Rawls; corresponding 
secretary, Ruby Clarke; re- 
porter. Henrietta Capers; 
parliamentarian, 
Louise Home; sergeant-at- 
arms, Juanita Jackson: social 
hostesses, P a 1 i n e Knight, 
Mattie Mc Calibb and Bea- 
trice Williams. 

Honorary members arc 
G ej t r u d e Dailey, Maxine 
Reed and Mariam Canty. 
Members on leave of ab- 
sence, Robbie Wilder. 

Beautiful trophies were 
presented to Mrs. Gilmore 
and Mrs. Johnson by the 
club for outstanding work 
in furthering the high goals 
that made it possible for this 
club to triple' its giving to 
charity this year. 

Plans are in the making" 
for the May Festival. Bridge 
was played. 

Wilton Demos Meet 

Wilton Place Democratic 
Club members attended a 
special meeting last M >nday, 
in the home of Mrs. Gussic 
Kizzie, 3509 Country Club 
Drive. Plans were announced 
for the installation dinner 
and appointments of commit- 
tee chairmen and representa- 
■ ti\es were made. 


************* •J^ 


-K 
M 


Talk of the Town 




^ tor your inexpensive entertainment 
'¥■ the fabulous ... 

: CLUB TOWN HILL t 


Pr«s*nts Nifly 





^ SONNY CRISS & HIS TRIO 

Vera "T.^^"'- Stevenson, M.C. 

9527 S. Main at Golden 

PL. 5-297J 
Plenty of Free Parking 

Your Hosts 
Hugh Level . . . Doug Stone 


T^ 


del 

o:f 

und 
Aid 


III 

p 

«rr| 

the 

tpi 

w itj 

l.el 

w id 

jiiiH 


( 


FAST SERVICE 


re- 

Hdren 

Jived 

Jaddi- 

larties 

the 

.T.A. 

■e re- 

1 Pres- 

>Uth- 

49th 

ilong 

the 

lg at 

lool. 

ied to 

Ave. 


an- 

lures 

iFam- 

^n bv 

This 

Jisored 

1- Mrs. 

iuca- 

Indsor 

E. 

tation 

held 

with 
hd for 

Hills 

j three 

|ys at 

^egis- 

a.m. 
)1 on 

:tures 
Ikes a 
Else 
. Re- 
will 

nils 

lalues. 
^n for 

and 

will 
Hills 


IW 


and 

first 

kt the 

Jack- 

jtr arc; 

lowell: 

^abeth 

llberta 

fetarv, 

fi- 

iLeona 

lager, 

^nding 

re- 

lapers; 

]i a n, 

Int-at- 

[socialt^ 

[night, Y 

Bea- 

a r e 

laxine 

Tanty. 

Jf ab- 

were 

tlmore 

the 

work 

goals 

3r this 

ing to 

faking . 
Bridge 


\€et 

cratic 
Bed a 
|>ndav, 

Jua>ie 
Club 
lun(:^d 
Sinner 
Immit- 
Isenta- 


1*^ 
• 



:iflMlU HND IT IN THE WANT ADS! 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


38011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 

AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of the tislale of 
WALTER SNELL 
Ueceased 
Notice is hereby Kiven to credit- 
ors liavinK claims asainst the .said 
dc. Client to file .-jaid claim.s in thi 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to pre.^pnt them to the 
undersigned at the office of her 
Attoncv. ' 

MACEO G. TOLBERT 

1-72 South, Central Avenue 

ill th.. City of'Los Anselca 11. in 

til.- aforesaid County, which latter 

office is the place of business of 

tlic undersigned in all matters per- 

t;uninc: to said e.state. Such claims 

"ith the necessary vouchers must 

be fflod oi- presented as aforesaid 

uitliin six months after the first 

puMuauon of tliLs notice. 

Oaled r>eiembrr 19. 19i;ii. 

Maceo G. Toloert 

Attorney-at-Law 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


I 


FEMALE HELP WANTED 


4272 South Central Avenue 
Lo» Angeles 11. Califorrtia. 
Matilda M. Snell 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of «aid decedent. 
Publish in California Easle new.s- 
paper Dec. 22-29. 1960: Jan. 5-12. 
1961. 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


nnCHESTER 


322 West Manchester Blvd. 
Manchester & Broadway 

JUS1 MINUTIS AWAY VIA 
HARBOR FREIWAY 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

Plenty of Free Parking 



Ed Wto- Judith Anderson 
Anna M.\ri.\ Alberghetti 

a«"The Princess" 

A Pctm..! ititM-TECHNlCOL-Ofc 
PLUS SECOND HIT 


fl 



(The California Eagle) 

38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 436-714 

In the Superior Court of the 

State of California, in and for the 

County of Lo.s Angeles, fn the 

Matter of the Estate of Delia Mc- 

Kee. Deceased. 

Notice is Hereby given to cred- 
itors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present tliem to the 
undersicned *at the ofrce of his 
Attorne>s. Miller. Maddox & Ma- 
lone li.^Jl South Western Avenue. 
in the City of Los .\n(;cles. in the 
lUoresaid County, which latter of- 
,fice is the place of business of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchers must be 
filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 

Dated ■ Dec. 22. 1960 c 

MILLER, MADDOX <S. MALONE 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Anqeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 

THOMAS M. McKEE. JR. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publish in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. I960. 
Jan. 5-12-19. 1961 


GIRLS AND WOMEN 

Sell new products, appeals to 
everyone. Spare time or fulT 
time. ^ 

HO. 9-1911 -Studio F j 


fCallfo'-nifi Eagle) 

39118 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-703 


SALES 


N OW ! 

FOR THE FIRST TIME! 

PART TIME ... OR FULL TIME 
HIGH EARNINGS 

Nation's Leading Slenderizing 
Company . . . Fabulous 

RELAX-A-CIZOR 

NO CAR REQUIRED . . . 
NO SALES EXPERIENCE . . . 

Exciting Free Sales Training 
Program 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Plane, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PL. 2-1179 

FURNISHED ROOMSj.ia RENT 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


WINDSOR HIU.S 

Lovely English home, 2 bedrms., 

U ba'h, paneled den-family 

room, wet bar. $42,000 full SIOO DOWN 

price, good financing. • ! .,„ Fontana 


5 ROOM — 2 bdrm. stucxo. No 
down to vets. $750 dn. to 
non-vets. PL 7-2268. 


The California Eagle— 1 1 


WESTSIDE HOUSES FOR SALE INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


6 ROOM SPANISH by OWNER-Home -f inc. 2 

3 bedroom home $18,950 full price. $2,950 down. °" lot. 2 br. $12,950 f.p. $950 


DOROTHY MARSHALL 
DU. M059 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

the People's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


7 ROOMS— 13/4 BATHS!— West- 
side 3 bdrm. & den. Firepl. 
$1750 down, maybe less. 
AX 3-6267 

JS600 DOWN— ^$10,500! Xlnt. 5 
i room & turn, guest hou^c. 
I So. of Imperial. AX 3-6267. 


near Kaiser No loan charges. 9147 S. Harvard 
Steel. Agent. AT 6-5811 


SALE OR TRADE 

ONLY S1500ci_n.3_bdrm. stucco,, F„^,^^3 home for Compton 


2-car gar. $14,500 f.p. Lewis, Home 
Rlty. PL 6-1348; Eve FA' 
1-3092. 


DANDY— 4 flat— 1620 W. 25th j 

St. Poten. $330 mo. F.P. $29,- ' 

500. Trms Appt. only: I 

RE 4-2538 & RE 3-2025 i 


call MRS. TAYLOR of 

CANNADY 
REALTY CO. 

RE. 4-6622 


5 ROOM— 2 bdrm.^ 
down. Easy terms 

PL 3 •6226— WE 8-9563 


OWNER must sell Igs. 3 bdr.. 

only $750 2 ba. - don, now c-arpot. 

516,950; SI .9.50 dn. 30 yr- 

FHA. 6715 5th Ave. RI 7-3346. 


G.L RENT with option to buy. 
2-bdrm. stucco, hrdwd. firs. 
PL 7-4153 


ROOM FOR RENT 

Male or female— newly decorated 
room with all the home privi- 
leges. Reasonable rent. 13437 
Brownell, San Fernando, Calif. 
Phone EMpire 6-8871 
Rolland Teal 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


In the Superior Court of the State Famous product practically sells iSinales $16 50 wklv $60-65 
of California. In and for the County,, =' i- • /•, 

of Los Angeles. j itself. Endorsed by beauty edi- 

In the Matter of the i:.«tate of ._ , , ., ,, ,0 

tors of Vogue, Harpers Bazaar, 


LtTClLLE BK.NDV. l>;cea.seil 

Notice !.■! herehy given to credit- 

orfl havirifr claims afrain.'^t the .<Hid 

decedent to file .said claims in the 

office of the clerk of tlie aforesaid 


mo., newly decorated, w-w 
carpeting, dressing room, large 

and Glamour. Over 300,000 ;closets, utilities included. 

users! Applicants must be well ii02 South Mariposa Ave 

court or to pre-^ent thc.n to the un- 1 groomed, pleasant. Fringe bene 
ilersigned at the office of lii.« At- " ' r- » 

torneys. Miller. Maddox & Malone. 

2S24 South West^fiTsAvenue, in the 

City of I>03 Anp,ele9. in the afore- 


said County, which latter office i.= 

the place of Ini.^ine.s.s of the undcr- 

sig-ned in all matters pcrtainin); to 

said estate, .'^uch claim.s with the 

n-C«S39rv -.oucher.s must be filed j 

or presented a.« aforesaid within 

six months after the lirst publica- 1 

tlon of thi.s notice. | 

r>ated: Jan. 6. 19^1. j 

' , KR.NE.^T BE.VUV j 

i;xeciitor of the will 

of .said decedent. ] 

MILLER, MADDOX A. MALONE 
Aftorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 
(Puhlish in the California l-:agle 
.Ve\^spaper Jan. 12. 19. 26, 
Fel.i. 2. 1961) 


fits and advancement opportuni- 
ties. 


-FOR 24-HOUR SERVICE ' 


CAll Plymouth 6-8347 - Plymouth 6-0997 

POWELL BAIL BONDS 

JOEl A. POWELl JOHN A. ECHOLS ^ 

10951-53 S. MAIN ST., lOS ANGEIES 61, CALIF.' 

FREE BAIL INFORMATION 


FOR APPOINTMENT 
CALL MISS LOUISE 

OL. 5-8011 

If You're Now Working, Well 
Arrange Interview in P.M. 


HELP WANTEO-BOYS i MEN 


BOYS AND MEN 


3 Rooms 

Incl. Utilities. 

Furnished 

Westside 

HO. 5-0574 


HOUSES & APTS. WANTED 


FREE SERVICE 


II 


NR. VENICE 4 LA CIENEGA— 

Charming 3 bdrm. modern 
stucco. 1^4 baths. Carpets & 
drapes. Nice fenced yard. 
S19.950. Low down payment 
takes. AX 2-0107. 


NO DOWN PYMT. TO GI.— 2- 

bdrm. stucco, hrdwd. & tHo. 
Close to ."ichls., sliopp'g & 
transport. PL 4-2827 'til 7. 


DUPLEXES FOR SALE 


INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 
WILSHIRE DISTRIC^ ; 

Smart modern triplex, 
room each. Income S2 
o\A/ner'5. $10,000. 

DOROTHY MARSHA. 
DU. M059 


dn. 214.5 Calif. Ave., Long 
Beach. RI 7-3346. 


DUPLEX— Only $500 dn. $10,- 
950 f.p. Income $110 mo., 5 
yrs. old. NE 2-8469. 


2 NEW HOUSES ON 1 LOT— 

3-bdnn. + 2-bdrm., blL-ins., 
w/w carpet, $1500 handles. 
PL 4-2827 'til 7. 


DESERT ACREAGE FOR SALE 


[$1990-5 acres M-1 zoning, 

^■Antelope V a 1 1 e y-Victorviile 

.d| 

;area. 


BOX 5025, INGLEWOO 


1525 W. 94th Place 

LOVELY SPANISH STUCCO 


OLYMPIC-HIGHLAND AREA 
1124 LONGWOOD PLACE 

Deluxe 5 years old, double 
owners unit 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, I, 
Family Room, built-ins, fireplace.] 
Will sacrifice: Make offer. Cash 


5 BDRM.— 3 ba.. - 2 apts. 159x 
1.50 R-3 lot. S2500 dn. 
NE 5-8009— NE 5-2008 


3 bedroom, 1 J baths, garbage ^p 5.44B8 
disposal, patio vvith barbecue. 


I 


STORES— & 4 rentals. S362.50 
mo. income. $27,000. Rltr. 
NE 5-7111 


LO. 


LOW DOWN 
/MONTHLY PAYMENIb. 


Priced for quifk sale. 

PL. 9-8143 or OR. 1-4755 


S750 DN.— S85.90 per mo. G.I. 
resale. I-bdrm., 1'2 baths, 
stucco Large landscaped lot. 
Close to everything. 
PL 4-2827. 'til 7. 


WE. 6-5848 Eves. I 


HOUSES FOR SALE 


1073 S. MANSFIELD AVENUE 

Open Sunday 1-4 p.m. 
$6000 Down — 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths. Wilshire-La Brea Area 

near L.A. High. 
CR. 5-4488 WE. 6-5848 eves. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


TO LANDLORDS 
V\/e need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside. 

4020 South Western Aevnue 
AX. 2-1991 


OPEN HOUSE-SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

POMONA 

7 POSSESSIONS 

All have been re-financed and have TOP 25 YEAR 
LOANS. 


i 


VETS 
NO DOWN 


SOME WITH 
FENCES. 


WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING AND STEEL 



Sell new products, appeals to ^ HOME, UNFURN., FOR LEASE 

everyone. Spare time or ful' 
time. 


BEFOfiE 


>U BUY - TRY BILL FROELICH' 

THVXHERBIRD 

— SPECIALISTS — 




HO. 9-1911 -Studio F 
BEAUTY OPERATOR WANTED 


RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaute Shoppe 

OPERATOR WANTED 
f 4919 Watt Adams Blvd. 
Los Angeles 16, C«!if. 


FOR LEASE — .Mtadpna. (.;r<'Kor> 
.\ln coiitcniporarv . 3 bedroom. 2 
bath, fireplace, tuu clrctrir ap- 
pliances. 2 landscaped patio.s b\ 
Eckbo. Minutes from L.A. frceua>". 
S223 per iiinnth. 

DOROTHY MARSHALL DU. 1-1CJ3 

FURNISHED HOUSES FOR RENT. 


INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 


BOB KIMBLE 


URBAN BOURGEOIS 


WILL MAKE YOU THE PROUD OWNEr( 
OF AMERICA'S MOST WANTED CAR 

THIJNDERBIRD 

FOR 1961 

^^ HH ^^ CRUISEMATIC 
^XIE^X AND 

^ m^^f t^^^^f AUTOMATIC 

PllfTAXiLIC. TRANSMISSION! 

All Colors and Models 
Galaxies, Falcons and Trucks 

(SPECIAL RATES FOR ALL CREDIT UNION MEMBERS) 

BILL FROELICH 
FORD CO. 

18th Street and Western Ave.| 
Los Angeles 

(ACROSS STREET FROM WESTERN PLAZA) 

U«BAN BOURGEOIS p^ 1 .7^3 1 
BOB KIMBLE ■%*• ■ # ^#^# ■ 


MEN - WOMEN 
•^ 18-45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pty 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 

HEAVY 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BRCXIHURE NOW! 
ADJUSTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART, L.A. 57 

DU 8-7163 _ 

EXPERT BEAUTY TREATMENT 

BRADFORD'S" 
BEAUTY SALON 

5543V2 HOLMES AVENUE 
it new pp«n for busincM and of- 
fering expert beauty care from 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap- 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, 
general operator. 

LU. 1-5227 


REDECORATED 

5 room — 2 bedroom, utilities 
paid — children and pets 
welcome. 

AX. 2-0458 
FORRENT-UNFURN. HOUSES ~ 


S80.00 


3 BEDROOMS with 1 ',4 BATHS, BUILT-IN RANGE AND 
OVEN. 

MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!! 

$15,500 to $16,500 

NAME YOUR OWN DOWN PAYMENT! 

Directions: Take San Bernardino Freeway to Towne 
Ave. exit . . . North one block to La Verne . . . East 
on La Verne to Los Flores . . . Then north one block 
to Model House at 1004 Ashfieid. 

ALLIED REALTY 

10000 EAST RUSH ST., EL MONTE 
Gilbert 4-4526 


ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential 

POMONA 

No down payment for vets. From $13,770, 
Full Price. From $76.08 per month, includes 
principal and interest, wall-to-wall carpeting, 
rear yard redwood fenced, forced air heat, 
built-in range and oven, hood and disposal, 
2-car garage. 3-bedroom, 2-bath homes. Phone 
collect, Randy Anable. 

EDgewood 8-008b 


AX. 2-0458 


FOR RENT — W/option to buy. 
3 room house — cute. S69 mo. 
2 BR. house — Ig. gar. clean, 
$85 mo. SOUTHEAST 
HU 2-5861 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


Rustic 7 room, 3 bedroom and '^ 
den, fenced yard, child welcome:' 

-¥■ 


$695 Down 

VACANT 

5 room, 2 bedroom 

Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwood floors. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-4156 


SERVICES 


We Serve Parties 

PARTY SERVICE 

Expar. cook — American and 
French foods, hort d'oauvraa, 
hot or cold. Waiters, barten- 
ders, for parties, waddinfs, 
luncheons. 

EM. 9-9452 
AFTER 6 P.M. 


BEST BUYS — Unrestricted 
Property. Reed Allen, Jr. 
AX 1-7494 . 


BRAND NEW 
HOME IN 

PALM SPRINGS 

You'll love this 2-bdrm. 
quality built Doll House 
It's completely furnished, 
so just bring your "grub" 
and check for $2,500 and 
mov* in. White stucco with 
blue trim, attached single 
garage, wall to wall car- 
peting, sliding glass door 
to patio. Excellent location 
about Vi mile from exclus- 
ive Racket Club. Priced 
right at $13,950. For ar- 
rangements to see proper- 
ty call Miss Rossini crt 

FA. 1-4182 


• ••••••••••-^••Vri •••*••••• 

CLOTHING 
COMPANY 
MA. 4-0801 


VICTOR 


214 SOUTH BROADWAY 



MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


BIG SALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 

$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit is good with us. You get ,a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG ^ALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house during our big sate of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREE!!! 
"^ Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as liMle as $3.00 
^ a week pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for men and 
boys of all ages. 


NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT * 

*Wear and enjoy your clothes while paying* 
Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREE! 
But act now IIJIIJ!! ^ Pay later Illllll 

SHIRTS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MOREIIUIHI 
TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $7.95 * * $9.95 up to $24.95, WORTH MUCH'MOREl 

ALL $30.00 men's suits and top coats $15.00 


HAVE PROPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 
601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

Ue^itsed and Bonded R«ol Ssttit9 Broker , 
« ^ 




3f 


ALL $40.00 " " " " . " $25.00 

ALL $50.00 " " " " " $35.00 

ALL $60.00 " " " " " $45.00 

ALL $70.00 " " " " " $55.00^ 

ALL $80.00 " " " " ' $65.00 

ALL $90.00 " " " " " $75.00 

HURRY SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEARIiiliill 

Park FREE next door as you buy your new do thes. We cater to you, and we do mean YOUIIl 
Luggage * Watches * Radios * Play Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 

OPEN DAILY 9:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.M. 


VICTOR CLOTHING CO 


^ 214 SOUTH BROADWAY • 

• •*••****••*• 


IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 


3f 
5f 


*••**•**** 


• • * •* 


:^ 


) 


T*- 



Dorothea Foster 



PTA News 


-- fiarltng Dolic nho usually pens this intercstUK/ and iii\ 
forninti'iC column licekly htn rrqueslc/i n Irnvc of absence 
since fnnnly duties iife non' demanding all her time. Hon ex rr, 
Dottic liiU nlnays share a i-(irin spot in our hearts here at the 
haglc and the uclconie hack .^i^n liill nlnays he !iun// for her 
-return. 

-■ t)LR GLKS'I" 

// insonic If'ini Orr, ulio turned out her first social column 
ivfiy hack rihcn the I -Chr ambled noisily dot: n Central eive- 
MUJ and lihen II ester n menue Mas knoun as "uny cnrosf 
■tr>un. has never i/oltcn jor nuay from the social end of 
Ihinus in this fast (ironinq city of ours. Despite the fact that 
the Jl cslstde. Compion. Pasadena. Santa Monica and I'rnice 
kme ouloroun the hnstside. she has the uncanny ability '>^ 
kefpm// her finr/er on social happenimjs , as any oood ncnspaper 
li Oman liouid — Editor. 

Like an Old Shoe 

Guest writing for the Eagle is like looking 
fhrough \our closet and finding an old pair of shoes 
that not only fits as well as ever, but feels so good. 

The year 1961 is getting off to a rollicking start 
vvith half the population on liquid 900 diet*; appre- 
hension and anticipation at the coming inaugural: 
speculation as to the outcome of the Cuban situa-' 
tion (and I have a REAL curiosity where this (Ques- 
tion is concerned as my one and only off-spring is 
•stationed at Guantanamo Base). 

And How They Fly 

But, as the saying goes: "Life goes on." There's 
turmoil a-plenty in one household what with CRAIG 
JANUARY preparing to take off for the Dodger 
training camp in Florida; brother JOHN packing on 
the other couch getting ready for his scholastic in- 
-vasion of Mexico; and mother, PORTIA CRAIG, 
Shopping like mad in her haste to plane out on the 
;^7th for Washington. D.C. and the Presidential In- 
•auguration of John F. Kennedy and the accom- 
panying festivities. 

1 First lady of journalism in our town. CHAR- 
XOTTA A. BASS due home any minute from her 
irip to Mexico City. ANN MALBROUGH who, with 
son KEVIN and sister WILMA WILLIAMS flew 
■5ome for a family re-union in Tennessee, rushing 
3ito town just in time to get changed for her 
"Rinkeydink Club Dance. 

- JOE MALBROUGH who stayed home to tend the 
Store busy getting the gowns ready for the usual 
spectacular appearance of the club. Incidently, he 
has an idea that will soon be put into practice, 
namely, renting gowns of a uniform color to clubs. 
He plans to feature several styles and of course 
vary them frequently. Should certainly relieve some 

JMfio can't stand the tariff on the kind you have to 
3Jrtte with you. 

- Speaking of ideas, that's no idea the JEEP 
SMITH band has, but cold business since Jeep has 
turned over the J e e p s t e r s to the direction of 
MARTIN "FUZZY" GOWER; they are as swinging 
-as ever. 

:: Glimpsed LADY CLAIRE WILLIAMS, JU ANITA 
:6REEN and ALICE CREECY of the Ladies of Para- 
■dise Club enjoying the Royal Social and Charity 
■Club Dance at the Mayflower. 
X Fun chatting with GLADYS and GENERAL 

fOODS whom I hadn't had the pleasure of seeing 
ages. 

_ BEA DEVAUGHN making progress like crazy 
jfter her long siege of illness and grateful to so 
■many of her friends that she, hasn't been able to 
thank personally. Bea says she will never be able 
lo show her heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to 
301 of her friends who made a long and painful con- 
^raJescence almost a pleasure. 

EUGENE KNOX making his plans to drive to 
ITew Orleans for Mardi Gras, and enplane from 
-♦here to Columbus, Ohio to visit his family. BILLY 
BARKER and KELSO BARBOUR makjng many a 
.cup of tea a real event as the tea gets cold and the 
conversation warmer. 

As we go to press I have no choice but to com- 
ment on the University of Georgia. Closing the 
"doors will not close the education gates for the 
Negro, because- it looks like he is here to stay. But 
It seems they would realize so many of their own 
are b^ng deprived of that which is so important: a 
■fittle book learning. 

Sunday night at the fireside and through th^ 
medium of TV and the courtesy of the General 
Electric Theatre, SAMMY DAVIS, JR. in "Memory 
In White" with the apropos remark of RONALD 
flEAGAN, tA memorable portrait. Just wish they 
could have chosen a different title, or was it a time- 
ly one? 

How are we to forget — MABEL JONES, one of 
the truly fine fashion commentators battling like a 
champ an illness that has her medics baffled. 

Lest I forget to mention it, I am now a staff 
writer for the new monthly publication "Angel 
City." a neat little mag of our city and folks. 
,- Christmas trees down, lights out, gifts packed 
away — all indicative that the holidays are over 
and so back to normal. 

LIBBY CLARK driving hei^new little compact 
car into the new year. Carnival Island moved to 
Hollywood and I do wish the cast success. In case 
you hadn't heard, this is the fast moving musical 
Jhat Nick and Edna Stewart wrote and which 
started in their Ebony Showcase only to be thought 
lo be bigger than the small house. 

Best of luck to you all in '61. 


10— The CaNfornia Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 



/.. .1. CILII'll R or DRIl ri:RS — I'ollouinii their 
regular monthly mectim/. Pnlters arc shonn inaknui their 
initial hon lo the Southland^ iliili i iri te. Tiny nerc 
arnntril their ihaplrr Inun the nntional liody in October 
I'l'^O. Srnteil lr',nt I'oni left: hdKina f I oUoiinin , presi- 


dent.: I 


II alson. Jiia;iila .Martin. Hernue l.arl\ 


f set retnry ) and Ruth Robinson. Seiond ron- : Johnnie 11 il- 
hams, 'i ice-president : iiara Ray, treasurer; .Mfirynret Lovc, 
c'lrespondinij secretary, and Jessie Johnson. 


Natio 


na 


Drift 


ers 


inc. 
Grants LA. Group Charter 


Bill 
Smallwoo'd 


Among the Southland's 
newest organizations to hii 
nounce their program for the 
1961 season are the Driltris. 
Inc.. Los Angeles Chapter. 
Following. the National con- 
vention of Drifters, Inc. holtl. 
in Indianapolis in 19159. per 
mission was granted to 
members to organize a lo<al 
chapter. 

In October. Betty (Jarreit 
of Indianapolis installed the 
chapter in tliis area. Other 
new West Coast chapters lo 
be installed were in the Ba>- 
Area, including San f'ran- 


tisco, Oakland, and Bnrl\elev. 

The <ivir-mindcd Dritleis 
a IP life members of the 
>'.\ACP and the Urban 
l^ea;iuc and their charitv pro- 
jocis are designed lo support 
I hose ulio ha\e the most 
iifi^d in Ilioir communities. 

The home of ,Iuel Collins 
was the setting of the group's 
last monthly meeting which 
was presided over by their 
president, charming Edwina 
Holloman. 

The president, along with 
.Margaret Love, held a con- 
ference with representatives 


of the California Eagle lo c.\- 
plore the best possible 
methods of serving the com- 
munity. 

Funds to be raised for pro- 
jects selected by the group 
will come from an elaborate 
rummage sale to be an- 
nounced at a later date. 

Members of the Drifters 
are Dolores Carter, Juel Col- 
lins, Jessie Johnson, Marga- 
ret Love, Vera Watson, Ed- 
^vina Holloman, Ruth Robin- 
son. Juanita Martin, Bernice 
Early, Sara Ray, and Johnnie 
Williams. 


CENTENNIAL 

Centennial Senior High 
School's debate squad, under 
the direction of Mrs. Maple 
Cornwell, has been invited 
by the University of Southern 
California to its 25Ui An- 
nual Invitational High 
School Forensic Tournament, 
to be held Friday and Satur- 
day, Jan. 13 and 14, at the 
Bovard Auditorium. 

Representing the Apaches 
as championship debaters in 
Friday's session are James 
Page, CUrence Broussard, 
Larry Moss and Ira Hawkins. 

'•On Saturday, 12 of our 50 
forensic people have been in- 
vited to represent Centennial, 
because of their outstanding 
tournaihent record," Mrs. 
Cornwell stated. 

Those featured in Satur- 
day's event will include: 
Clarence Broussard and 
KaUe Smitli as extempor- 
aneous speakers, Larry Moss, 
Allen Gantt and Margaret 
Higgins in impromptu speak- 
ing, and Emily Blake, James 
Page and Vivian Clark in 
oratory. Suzie Claude will 
represent the school in dra- 
matic interpretation, Jerome 
Ferrell in humorous speak- 
ing, and Robert Warren, Ira 
Hawkins and Gloria Foley 
will compete in oratorical 
interpretation. 

CdMPERS 

Gompers Junior High 
School is presenting its 
Winter '61 Father-Son Night 
on Thursday evening, Jan. 
19. The program will take 
place in the Activity Room 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

The activity-packed eve- 
ning sUrts at 6:30 p.m. with 
a round robin volleyball 
tournament featuring four 
teams. The teams will con- 
sist of fathers, faculty men, 
A9 boys, and an All-Star 
team. Each team will play 
each other once. Fathers are 
urged to participate. 

A social period will follow 
at 7:30 p.m. during which re- 
freshments will be on sale. 
Apple pie a la mode, coffee 
or milk will be available. 
The Gompers Junior High 
Sdhool Swing Band will play 
for the entertainment of the 
group. 

HOOPEH AVENUE 

Hooper Avenue P.T.A. Child 
Welfare Chairman Mrs. Otis 
Pearson and Co-Chairman, 
Mrs. James Matthews, report- 
ed on their Christmas pro- 
gram which many families 
dn the community enjoyed 



• Continued from Page 9) 
(Inez I. Alpha Phi Zeta Chap- 
, ter of Zeta Phi Beta ■ met 
Sat. as Esther Muldrew, 
Maiparet Rainey, Irma Rich- 
ardscr. and Mary Rollins en- 
acted loles as hostesses. This 
Sat. is Founder's Day lunch- 
eon time for the Zetas at an 
intimate restaurant out La 
Cionega^ waj'. Speaker will 
be soror Rosalind Meeks. .. 

Leontyne King: And thanks QrgW MeCJlCa 
to J ou, especially. 
More, Anon 
S'Diego's Al Montgomery 
and wife, Kay, weekended in 
to\«.n, put up sumptuously 
ar the Statler. They have 
some merry plans for the 
next fortnight -or so which 
should be delightfully pro- 
vocative; some of their local 
cronies will dash do^vn to 
S'Diego to take part but 
gladly. Of it all. more anon. 
I .\ to Chi: Opal Jones, 


in 


Auxiliary 
Regular Meet 

The Women's Auxiliary to 
the Charles Drew Medical 
Society held its regular 
monthly meeting last Satur- 
day at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. George Sealey, with 
Mrs. Zrelda Sealey and Mrs. 
Winifred Toncy as hostesses. 

Mrs. Irene Bledsoe. Health 


whose address while there Chairman who worked with 


vill be Hull House. Mil 
Blount could have well used 
seven league boots last Sat. 
With friends she attended 
a matinee of Raisin In The 
Sun, swished on to BcvHills 
for cocktails, dined at Da\o 
Chasen's THEN made the 
curtain for A Lie Is A Cen- 


Mental Health. Polio and 
Los Angeles Tuberculosis' So- 
cieties during the holiday 
season, gave an intcesting 
report on the proio-t and 
cheer the- g'roup brough' to 
many patients duri'^g the 
Yuletide season. 
Several new members who 


tury Long! Some anxious recently took up residence in 


COLDEX Kl.ySrnSE CLIR-Former residents of Pittsburgh. Pa., uho fortiied a 
club two years aijo are shoiin during their annual holiday party. Pictured from left: Dan 
ll'ashington, Jor Jl alter, president: liill llailey. .Milton ( liud) Suan and Tommy Sands. 


Keystone in Second Year 



Members of the Golden 
Keystone Club celebrated 
their second year with a 
lavish holiday party in the 
home of William and Mary 
Hostin on West Pico. The 
club members are former 
residents of Pittsburgh, Pr.. 
'and the party and the cele- 
bration was attended by 
wives and friends of the club. 

The group has been work- 
ing closely with the 28th 
street YMCA and has partici- 
pated financially in the 
campers program. 

At a recent meeting of the 
group and under their presi- 
dent Joe Walker all mem- 
bers have pledged their full 
support to charities which 


the club selects as i>rojccts 
during 19G1. 

Mr. a lid M]-s. Hostin 
proved to be a delightful 
iliost and hpstess to the sec- 
ond arHiualaffair as the club 
and their guests enjoyed 
cocktails, bbffet and dancing 
throughout! the. evening and 
they ushered in the New 
year on a festive note.' 

Slates Classes 

The YWCA-Woodlawn Cen- 
ter is offering a series of 
classes to adults in Charm, 
Crochet arjd Knitting. Dra- 
matics, Dressmaking, Modern 
Dancing aipd Draperies and 
Slipcovers.^ 


Fans of Gaiety 
Hold First Meet 

Beatrice Moman was 
hostess to the first meeting 
of the 1961 season last Sun- 
day when the Fans of Gaiety 
Club met in her home. This 
marks the last meeting be- 
fore the group's annual elec- ScheciuleS MeetinO 
tion. ^ 

Mrs. Leo L. Lott, president 


moments over at Tess and 
Gi! Lindsay's; her mother 
has been quite ill these past 
few days or more. 

Tall, lean Bernie Harper 
in town for seven weeks of 
nonchalance. Last time I 
saw him ( at an astonishing 
party) his entrance got such 
a thunderous ovation I 
thought for an instant he'd 
arrived with the U.S. Cav- 
alry. Owner of a we'l cush- 
ioned checking account, 
Bernie maintains the effete 
look and on him it looks 
dam good. Freda and Reno 
DeKnight were in town very 
bricflv cnroute to Honolulu. 


the city were present to join 
the Auxiliar>-. The new 
members and their husbands 
were guests of the 'society. 
They included Mrs. Ann 
Bobo and Mrs. Joyce Bobo, 
wives of two brothers, both 
physicians. 

Mrs. Lillian Alexander, 
widow of a physician from 
New Jersey and former presi- 
dent of the National Medical 
Association's Women's Aux- 
iliary, spoke to the gMup. 

All of the new members 
were officially welcomed by 
the Auxiliary and fo lowin;; 
the meeting the members 
and their guests enjoyed a 
delightful social hour. 


during the holidays. 

The Executive Board re- 
ported that all the children 
attending Hooper received 
gifts, fruit and nuts. In addi- 
tion each room held parties 
with mothers assisting the 
teachers. 

Mrs. Hugh Howell, P.T.A. 
president, attended the re- 
cent Parliamentary and Pres- 
ident Workshop at the South- 
east Health Center at 49th 
and Avalon. She also, along 
with members, attended the 
Fremont Council meeting at 
Russell Elementary School. 

Parents are being urged to 
support the Hooper Ave. 
P.T.A. 

DORSEY P.T.A. 

Dorsey Adult School an- 
nunces a series of lectures 
entitled "Toward 'Better Fam- 
ily Living" to be given by 
Dr. James S. Simkin. This 
lecture series is co-sponsored 
by Baldwin Hills P.T.A.. Mrs. 
Irwin Haus, Parent Educa- 
tion Chairman; and Windsor 
Hills P.T.A., Mrs. E. E. 
Hughes, Parent Education 
Chairman. 

The lectures will be held 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. with 
the first three scheduled for 
Wednesdays at Windsor Hills 
School and the last three 
scheduled for ^Thursdays at 
Baldwin Hills School. Regis- 
tration will be held at 9 a.m. 
at Windsor HillS School on 
Jan. 11. 

Dates and titles of lectures 
are as follows: 

Jan. 11 — What Makes a 
Good Home? 

Jan. 18 — Everybody Else 
Does: 

Jan. 25 — Discipline, Re- 
spect, Responsibility. 

(These three lectures will 
be held at Windsor Hills 
School.) 

Feb. 2 — Teaching Values. 

Feb. 9 — Preparation for 
Adolescence. 

Feb. 16 — Goals and 
Achievement. 

(These three lectures will 
be held at Baldwin Hills 
School.) 


Bridge Club 
Installs New 
Club Officers, 


The Rainbow Bridge and 
Charity Club had its first 
meeting of the year at the 
home of Mrs. Juani'a Jack- 
son. Officers for the year are; 
President. Leon a Powell; 
vice president, Elizabeth 
Johnson; treasurer. Alberta 
Boone; recording secretarv', 
Wallacesteen Gilmore; fi- 
n a n c i a 1 secretary, Leona 
Walton; business manager. 
Jewel Rawls; corresponding 
secretary. Ruby Clarke; re- 
porter. Henrietta Capers; 
parliamentarian, 
Louise Home; sergeaht-at- 
arms, Juanita Jackson: social 
hostesses, P a 1 i n e Knight, 
Mattie Mc Calibb and Bea- 
trice Williams. 

Honorary members arc 
Gertrude Dailey, Maxine 
Reed and Mariam Canty. 
Members on leave of ab- 
sence. Robbie Wilder. 

Beautiful trophies were 
presented to Mrs. Gilmore 
and Mrs. Johnson by the 
club for outstanding work 
in furthering the high goals 
that made it possible for this 
club to triple its giving to 
charity this year. 

Plans are in the making 
for the May Festival. Bridge 
was played. 

Wilton Demos Meet 

Wilton Place Democratic 
Club memh>ers attended a 
special meeting last M mday, 
in the hon?^ of Mrs. Guj,sie . 
Kizzie, 3509 Country Club 
Drive. Plans were announced 
for the installation dinner 
and appointments of commit- 
tee chairmen and representa- 
tives were made. 


IMPOtTtD lY THE lUCKINCHAM COIPOtATIO*^ lOCKfFElUt CfNTEI. NfW YOtK 


JACOBS & FARBER PRESENT 

ONE OF THE GREATEST SINGERS 

OF OUR TIME! 

WILLIAM 

WARFIELD 

SAT. EVE. JAN. 21, PHILHARMONIC AUD. 

RETURNING FROM A TRIUMPHAL WORLD-WIDE TOUR FOR 
THE U. S. STATE DEPARTMENT. STAR OF MOM'S "SHOWBOAT". 
ACCLAIMED IN THE INTERNATIONAL TOURING PRODUCTION 
OF "PORGY AND BESS." IN A PROGRAM OF GREAT SONGS 
AND SPIRITUALS. 

ORDER NOW BY MAIL FOR CHOICE SEATS-SEND TO 

JACOBS « FARBER, P.O. Box 1829, Le* Angaivs 38, Calif. 

TIckttc $1,50, $2.00, $2.50, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00. 

Enclosa stamped, salfaddratsad anvalopa. 



Mrs. Moman, In addition to 
Serving a wonderful Spanish 
dinner following the meet- 
ing, was declared winner of 
the club's prize which was a 
canned ham. 

Before the close of the 
1960 season the Mary Ann 
Bayliss home was the scene 
of the group's annual holiday 
party at which time they ex- 
changed gifts. 

Guests attending the meet- 
ing at the home of Mrs. 
Moman Included husbands 


Catering' 

To Small or Large Groups 

Specializing in all Type of Parties 

Buffet - Cocktail • Dinner 

24-Hour Service — Experienced Personnel 

Bertha Thomas 

and 

Rose Broivn Catering 

4474 Victoria Park Dr. WEbster 9-7215 


Westside Society *••*••****••• 

Talk of the Town" 

For your inexpensive entertainment 
the fabulous,. . . 

CLUB TOWN HILL 

PrmfnU Nlt«ly 

^ SONNY CRISS & HIS TRIO 
Vera ^^^.i '"'• Stevenson. M. C. 

9527 Sa Main at Golden 

PL S'2971 j 

Plenty of Free Parking 

Your Hosts j 

Hugh Lovel . . . Doug Stone 

* • • • •'• ••*•••• 


of the Westside Benevolent \M 
Society, annoutjqed f'at the 
group's first meeting for the l. 
New Year is scheduled for "^ 
Jan. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the 
auditorium of Bethel AMhJ "1^ 
Church. Members ar.- urged 
to attend and bring a friend. -^ 
The churct^is located at 1511 
W. 36th street. -^ 

and friends of the inembers. .x^ 
The only member absent for 
the meeting was Jeanett Col- »- 
lery, because of illness. "^ 




IN 
THi 

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323 


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FAST SERVICE 


re- 

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IfDUU HND IT IN THE WANT ADS! 


OUND « SER V I CE « EMRL. O Y M E NX • P E R S O M A U 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


_X 


38011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN 

AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the MalttT of the fc;state of 
WALTEi: SNELL 
Decea-«ed 
Noikp is hereby Kiven to credit- 
ors liavins claims against the said 
dc. Client to file said c-lnims in thi 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
(I'urt or ID present them to the 
iindcrsipned at the , office of her 
Ationev. ' 

MACEO G TOLEERT 
l'-'72 South Central Avenue 
ill til.' City of Lo.s Anseles 11. in 
thr aforesaid County, niiich latter 
<i.fficc is the place of business of 
the undersigned in all matters per- 
tiiiniiu to said estate. Such claims 
"ith tile necessary vouchers must 
l.c filed or pre.-iented as aforc-^aid 
uitliiii six months after the first 
publiraiion of tiiis notice. 
l>Hlo<l ncc.rnbrr 19. 19i;ii. 
Maceo G. TofDert 
', Attorney-at-Law 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


FEMALE HELP WANTED 


■ I 


4272 South Central Avenue 
Lo» Angeles 11. California. 
Matilda M. Snell 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
Publi.sh in California Easle new.s- 
paper Dec. 22-29. 1960: Jan. 5-12. 
1961. 


RnCHESTER: 


fivitxm,m.tummimmimitM 

322 West Manchester Blvd. 
Manchester & Broadway 

JUS1 MINUTfS AWAY VIA 
HARBOR FREIWAY 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

Plenty of Free Parking 



i\DW\'NN-Jn)ITHAiNDERSON 

Am Mari.\ Alberghetti 

a»''The Princess" 

k p«m«... >.io« • technicol-or 
PIUS SECOND HIT 



(The California Eagle) 

38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 436-714 

In the Superior Court of the 

State of California, in and for the 

County of Los Angeles. In the 

Matter of the Estate of Delia Mc- 

Kee. Deceased. 

Notice is hereby gixen to cred- 
itors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present tliem to the 
underslcrned at the ofHce of his 
Attornevs, Miller. Madrlnx & Ma- 
lone IJS'jr Smith Western .Xvenue. 
in the City of Los .\jit;eles. in the 
;i foresaid County, which latter of- 
fice is the place of business of "the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ins to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchers must be 
filed or presented as aforesaid 
within si\ months after the first 
publication of this notice. 

Dated ■ Dec. 22. 1960. 
MILLER, MADDOX A. MALONE 
Attorney s-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Anqeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 

THOMAS M. McKEE. JR. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publish in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. 1960. 
Jan. 5-12-19. 1961 


GIRLS AND WOMEN 

Sell new products, appeals to 
everyone. Spare time or full 
time. 

HO. 9-1911 -Studio F I 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


SALES 


NOW ! 

FOR THE FIRST TIME! 

PART TIME ... OR FULL TIME 
HIGH EARNINGS 

Nation's Leading Slenderizing 
Company . . . Fabulous 

RELAX-A-CIZOR 

NO CAR REQUIRED ... 
NO SALES EXPERIENCE . . . 

Exciting Free Sales Training 
Program 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Plana, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PL. 2-1179 

FURNISHED ROOMS TO RENT 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


f REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


"tr 


WINDSOR HILLS 


15 ROOM— 2 bdrm. stucco. No 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


The California Eagie— 11 


/TESTSIDE HOUSES FOR SALE INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


irt.h,t'fnel7d hJ?!^Iv' non. vets. PL 7-2268: 6 ROOM SPANISH i BY OWNER-Home + inc. 2 

room, wet bar $42,000 full SlOO DOWN— 3 bedroom homo $18,950 full price. $2,950 down, p*" ^^^- 2 _br. $12,950 f.p. $950 
price, good financing. ' jn Fontana near Kaiser No loan charges. 9147 S. Harvard i ^"- 2145 Calif. Ave., Long 


DOROTHY MARSHALL 
DU. M059 


Steel. Agent. AT 6-5811. 


fCallfornip Eagle) 

39113 •> 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-703 

In the Superior Court of the State 

of California, in and for the County 

of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of tlie Instate of 

L,TICILLE BE.NDV. IViea.se'i. 

Notice ig hereby giien to rrcdit-i j 

or.i havinjr claims atrain.xt the .■^aidj 

decedent to file said rlaim.s in the jers! Applicants mu«> be well 
office of the clerk of the afore.-^aid i '^'^ 

court or to prc-icnt them to the im- , gi-Qo^ne^j crieasant. Fringe bene- 
ilersigned at the office of hi.= At- 
torneys. Miller. Maddox & Malone. 
2S24 South Western Avenue, in the 
City of Los Anpeles. in the afore- 
said County, which latter office i.= 
the place of bu.sine.-s of the under- 
signed in all matters pertaining to 
said e.«tnte. .'^uch claini.< with tlie 
nicesaarv -.oucher.^ mu.-^t be filed 
or presented a.s aforesaid within 
six months after the first publica- 1 
tlon of thi.' notice. j 

Dated: Jan. 6. 19i'I. j 

KR.N'E.<T BE.N'UV j 
i;xecntor of the will 
of .said decedent. ] 
MILLER. WADDOX <l MALONE 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 
(Puhli.<h in the Callfo^iia l-:asle 
.\eu .-paper Jan. 12. '19, 26, 
Fell. 2. 1961) 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The People's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


7 ROOMS— 13/4 BATHS!— West - 

side 3 bdrm. & den. Firepl. 
$1750 down, maybe less. 
AX 3-6267 


I $600 DOWN — $10,500! Xlnt. 5 
; room & furn. guest house. 
I So. of Imperial. AX 3-6267. 


SALE OR TRADE 

ONLYS1500d_n.3_bdrm.stuceo.:p„,,^j,3 home for CorDpton 


2-car gar. S14.500 f.p. Lewis , n^rne 
Rlty. PL: 6-1348; Eve FA' 
1-3092. ' 


5 ROOM— 2 bdrm.. only $750 
down. Easy terms. 

PL 3-6226— WE 8-9563 


DANDY— 4 flat— 1620 W. 25th! 
St. Potcn. S330 mo. F.P. $29,- ' 
500. Trm.s Appt. only: | 

RE 4-2538 & RE 3-2025 

^ ! 

OWNER must sell Igs. 3 bdr..; 
2 ba. -■ den, now carpel, i 
516,950; SI .950 dn. 30 yr. 
FHA. 6715 5th Ave. RI 7-3346 i 


call MRS. TAYLOR of 

CANNADY 

REALTY CO. 

RE. 4-6622 


Beach. RI 7-3346. 


DUPLEX— Only $500 dn. $10,- 
950 f.p. Income $110 mo., 5 
yrs. old. NE 2-8469. 


'G.I. RENT with option to buy. ^q dqwN PYMT. TO GI 

j 2-bdrm. stucco, hrdwd. firs, 
I PL 7-4153 


-2- 


ROOM FOR RENT 

Male or female— newly decorated 
room with all the home privi- 
leges. Reasonable rent. 13437 
Brownell, San Fernando, Calif. 
Phone EMpire 6-8871 
■ Rolland Teat 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


Famous product practically sells Singles $16.50 wkly., $60-65 

itself. Endorsed by beauty edi-jmo., newly decorated, w-w 

tors of Vogue, Hacper's Bazaar, 'carpeting, dressing room, large 

Glamour. Over 300,000 closets, utilities included. 

102 South Mariposa Ave. 


•FOR 24-HOUR SERVICE 


CALL Plymouth 6-8347 - Plymouth 6-0997 

POWELL BAIL BONDS 

JOEl A. POWELL JOHN A. ECHOLS 

10951-53 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES 61, CALIF. 


FREE BAIL INFORMATION 


fits and advancement opportuni- 
ties. 

FOR APPOINTMENT 
CALL MISS LOUISE 

OL. 5-8011 

If You're Now Working, We'll 
Arrange Interview in P.M- 

HELP WANTED-BOYS A MEN 


3 Rooms 

Incl. Utilities. 

Furnished 

Westside 

HO. 5-0574 


HOUSES & APTS. WANTED 


BOYS AND MEN 


FREE SERVICE"! 

TO LANDLORDS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside. 

4020 South Western Aevnue 
AX. 2-1991 


bdrm. stuccu, hrdwd. &. tile. 
Close to hichls., shopp'g & 
NR. VENICE & LA CIENEGA— j transport. PL 4-2^27 'til 7. 

Charming 3 bdrm. modern -.----^,—,__,.;^ 

stucco. 1^. bath.s. Carpets & DU_PLEXES FOR SALE _ 

drapes. Nic;'e fenced yard. OLYMPIC-HIGHLAND AREA 
S19.950. Lovv down payment 1124 LONGWOOD PLACE 

takes. AX 2-0107. Deluxe 5 years old double - 

owners unit 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 
Family Room, built-ins, fireplace. 1 
Will sacrifice: Make offer. Cash; 


INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 

WILSHIRE DISTRIC^ 

Smart modern triplex, 
room each. Income S2 
owner's. $10,000. 

DOROTHY MARSHA. 

DU. 1-1059 


2 NEW HOUSES ON 1 LOT— 

3-bdrm. -^ 2-bdrm., blL-ins., 
w,'w caipet, $1500 handles. 
PL 4-2827 'til 7. 


DESERT ACREAGE FOR SALE 


5 BDRM.— 3 ba., -- 2 apts. 159x 
1.30 R-3 lot. S2.500 dn. 
NE .5-8009'— NE 5-2008 


1525 W. 94th Place 

LOVELY SPANISH STUCCO , 

3 bedroom, 1 J baths, garbage ^.p 5.4488 
disposal, patio with barbecue. 
Priced for quick sale. 

PL. 9-8143 or OR. 1-4755 


2 STORES— & 4 rentals. S362.50 
mo. income. S27.000. Rltr. 
NE 5-7111 


($li990— 5 acres M-1 zoning, 

Antelope V a 1 1 e y-VictorvJile 

! 
jarea. 

BOX 5025, INGLEWOO 

LOW DOWN , 
LOx /lONTHLY PAYMENIb. 


S7S0 DN.— S85.90 per mo. G.I. 
resale. 4-bdrm,. 1'2 baths, 
stucco Large landscaped lot. 
Close to everything. 
PL 4-2827. 'til 7. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE ^ 



WE. 6-5848 Eves. 


1073 S. MANSFIELD AVENUE 

Open Sunday 1-4 p.m. 
$6000 Down — 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths. Wilshire-La Brea Area 

near L.A. High. 
CR. 5-4488 WE: 6-5848 eves. 


( 


Sell new products, appeals to HOME, UNFURN., FOR LEASE 


everyone, 
time. 


Spare time or full 


BEFORE 


YOU BUY - TRY BILL FROELICH' 

THUNDERBIRD 




HO. 9-1911 -Studio F 
BEAUTY OPERATOR WANTED 


RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaute Shoppe 

OPERATOR WANTED 
4919 WMt Adams Blvd. 
Los Angeles 16, Ca!if. 


INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 


MEN - WOMEN 
■^18-45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now tor Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION. PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - low Cost 

HEAVY 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BROCHURE NOW! 
ADJUSTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART, L.A. 57 

DU 8-7163 

EXPERT BEAUTY TREATMENT 


FOR LEASE — .Mladpna tlrcRor.^ 
\in coiiteniporar> . 3 ticdrooni. 12 
bath, fireplaic. nrw electric ap- 
pliances. '2 ianfiseaped patio.s b>' 
Eckbo. Minutes from L-.\. frcewa.v. 
.$22o per montli. 

DOROTHY MARSHALL DU. 1.1C53 
FURNISHED HOUSES FOR RENT ~ 


REDECORATED 

5 room — 2 bedroom, utilities 
paid — children and pets 
welcome. 

AX. 2-0458 
FORRENT-UNFURN. HOUSES 


S80.00 


OPEN HOUSE-SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

POMONA 

7 POSSESSIONS 

All have been re-financed and have TOP 25 YEAR 
LOANS. 

SOME WITH WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING AND STEEL 
FENCES. 

3 BEDROOMS with Ma BATHS, BUILT-IN RANGE AND 
OVEN. 

MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!! | 

$15,500 to $16,500 I 

NAME YOUR OWN DOWN PAYMENT! 

Directions: Take San Bernardino Freeway to Towne 
Ave. exit . . .. North one block to La Verne .>y^East 
on La Verne to Los Flores . . . Then north one Dto<k_ 
to Model House at 1004 Ashfield. 

ALLIED REALTY 

10000 EAST RUSH ST., EL MONTE 
Gilbert 4-4526 

•^~*~*~* • • * • • •"iTT"*"* 


VETS 
NO DOWN 



ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential 

POMONA 

No down payment for vets. From $13,770, 
Full Price. From $76.08 per month, includes 
principal and interest, wall-to-wall carpeting, 
rear yard redwood fenced, forced air heat, 
built-in range and oven, hood and disposal, 
2-car garage. 3-bedroom, 2-bath homes. Phone 
collect, Randy Anable. 

EDgewood 8-008b 


AX. 2-0458 


FOR RENT— W/ option to buy. 
3 room house — cute. $69 rno. 
2 BR. house — Ig. gar. clean, 
S85 mo. SOUTHEAST 
HU 2-5861 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


BOB KIMBLE 


URBAN BOURGEOIS 


WILL MAKE YOU THE PROUD OWNER 
OF AMERICA'S MOST WANTED CAR 

THUIVDERBIRD 

FOR 1961 


CRUISEMATIC 

AND 

AUTOMATIC 

TRANSMISSION I 


'4,353 

PLUS TAX & Lie. 

All Colors and Models 
Galaxies, Falcons and Trucks 

(SPECIAL RATES FOR AIL CREDIT UNION MEMBERS) 

BILL FROELICH 
FORD CO. 

18th Street and Western Ave. 
I Los Angeles 

(ACROSS STREET FROM WESTERN PLAZA) 

Zr.m^'^' RE. 1-7331 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALOhT 

5543 Va HOLMES AVENUE 
It new open far business and of- 
fering expert beauty care from 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap- 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, 
general operator. 

LU. 1-5227 

SERVICES 


We Serve Parties 

PARTY SERVICE 

Expjir. c6ek — American and 
French feeds, hers d'oeuvres, 
hot or cold. Waiters, barten- 
ders, for parties, waddings, 
lunchesns. 

EM. 9-9452 
AFTER 6 P.M. 


Rustic 7 room, 3 bedroom and r^ 
den, fenced yard, ciiild welcome. ' ' 


$695 Down 

VACANT ' 

5 room, 2 bedroom 

Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwood floors. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-4156 


BEST BUYS — Unrestricted 
Propert}'. Reed .Mien, Jr. 
.\X 1-7494 


VICTOR 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY 


CLOTHING I 

COMPANY * 

MA. 4-0801 * 



MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


BRAND NEW 

HOME IN 

PALMf SPRINGS 

You'll love this 2-bdrm. 
quality built Doll House 
It's completely furnished, 
SO just bring your "grub" 
and check for $2,500 and 
move in. White stucco wtth 
blue trim, attached single 
garage, wall to wall car- 
poting, sliding glass door 
to patio. Excellent location 
about Vi mile from exclus- 
ive Raclcet Club. Priced 
right at $13,950. For ar- 
rangements to tee proper- 
ty call Miss Rossini at 

FA. 1-4182 


BIG §ALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 
$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS IfREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house during our big sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREE!!! 
'^ Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3.00 
^ a weei< pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for men and 
boys of all ages. 

^ NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS 1 FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT 
*Wear and enjoy your clothes while paying* 
Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREE! 


HAVE PROPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 
601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS ' 

LIfnsed and Bonded Roo/ istpf9 Broker 



But act now. 


.Illllli! 


Pay later. 



.Illllli 


SHIRTS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MOREII!ll!!I 
TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $7.95 *^/$*-95 up to $24.95, WORTH MUCn'MO^i^ 

ALL $30.00 men's suits and top coats :~^ $15.00 

ALL $40.00 " " " " . " $^5.00 

ALL $50.00 " " " " " $35.00 

ALL $60.00 " " " " " $45.00 

ALL $70.00 " " " " " $55.00 

ALL $80.00 " " " " ' $65.00 

ALL $90.00 " " " " " $75.00 

HURRY SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEAR!!!I!III 

Park FREE next door as you buy your new clothes. We cater to you, and we do mean YOUIll 
Luggage * Watches * Radios * Play Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 

OPEN^ DAILY 9:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.M. 

VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 


^ 214 SOUTH BROADWAY ' 

• •**•**■***••• 


IN DdWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 

• •••**••** *- •••^ 


3f 

If 


^ 


^ 


T 


12— The California Eagle 



inursaay, January \ z, i^o i [ .^pproprivik _ now f,i. 

■I'inAl. PRINCE -- M\ Knodli- 
I.APV ROBIN -- I.niiK^h.it >|i.riHl. 
Ill-V- ALL In snuirl hHiuU, 

Sl'NKIST lULL -- Wnrkorl \or\- 
fast. 


RSMSn 



6*erg« Rain««y 


KALJI"' — P'roni a winning slnhln. 
KATHV JANfc; — riciit> spocrt but. 

faint hcarL 
SAYASKA -- Waiting fnr a spot. 
SoriF.TV PAT - 'niMius iidci- K'l 
ha. k 
; (HORSES TO WATCH AT SANTA 
ANITA) 
SANTA ANITA 
j WV.NCAM - A fil inaidrn 
] RDNLWZO ^•^A/.I1 Will ii'l.^ .. k 
W IS1-; .IUM-; - - Look out lor ihis 


BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO: Three lucky 
ticket holders who selected all 
six horses correctly received 
S24.210.4n for the winning 
shares last Sunday at Call- 
ente Race Track in the 5-10 
public handicapping contest. 

Consolation 5-10 awards of 
.S272.20 each went to S9 ticket- 
holders who picked five horses 
in the .5-10 series. Winning 
numbers were 9-12-.'5-7-.t-2. 

The .T-in pool grossed $107,- 
602. The longest price horses 
in the .t-10 were Golden Orbit 
at $18.20 and Mabel Bell at 
$10. 

Appri ntice jrH-kev Jesus 
Quesada who rode his first 
winner on Saturday on a re- 
cognized track scored two in 
the .■5- 10. I 

.Attendance whs I.'i.lW. .Mu- 
tuel handle fnr the 11 races.! 


$419,411, not including tlir , .-^ '•,':■.'.' .i^, ^.,, ., , 
grossed ,.i-li) pool of SlOi.hOJ. | n n(;lh: |i\\c|.r .. m 


\I-A.\1>.\ IiICKK Mv v|), 

IMR ,\I.\"!1-:R - Noc'di rl la.-l la, 
h.'i 

k. 

lurh liiMti'l- 
(HORSES TO WATCH THAT ARE' than nitr,. 

FIT AND READY) l|■NN^■ IH-.LIi;!' Mv ;;.iodi.- 

CALIENTE .l.VNNi:'!' U:ir to wwi- 

TRIBAL PLALTY — (;<i ba.k to lA' L.\RK Dm- of ilir 1,.m 

this onr PLISH IliHlSi-; - (;(.'l loui-, 

DARK r,K(;ARI)3 — Look out lorj ihis mir 

this onr Imp. l-:i;hl.lA' - .\lv li.'^l h. l. 



14-Year-Old Lad Stars in Three C.I.F. Sports 


GREG JACKSON 


By Edw. 'Abie' Robinson 

Lo.\i(>j)i University and Notre 
Dame .scouts should cast their 
peepers in the direction of 
Bel If lower and the campus of 
SI. .John Bosco, a private 
s( hool for boys, during base- 
ball, basketball, track and 
football practfce. \ 11-year- 
old. 5'-8'2. and a 1 10 pounder 
jusi might interest Ihcm. 

The growing lad of U has 
been cutting some fancy 
<Hpers in the .Junior Varsit> 
.sports sin^-e he arrived on 
campus two > ears ago. He won 
starting berths on the ba.sc- 


ball team as a short stop and 
pitcher: in basketball as a for- 
ward, and in football as a 
liard running back and in the 

j classrooms as a strictly "A" 

jstudent. 

, .\ shoulder injury cut short 
jhis activities la.st' November 
land for a while it looked like 
I football "tvas a bit loo rough 

for thp kid who is popularly 
i known on the cami)us as (}reg 

Jackson, but one of his most 
|Cnthusiastic supjiorters. his 
[mother. Mrs. Doris .laikson. 

liad other ideas. .Sho buiKilcd 
'liim into the famil\- station 

wagon and hauled him o\ei 


to Dr. Julius \V. Hill, the noted 
bone sjiecialist who is known 
as the best bone man in the 
country among college and 
professional athletes. Dr. Hill 
took a look at the sliouldei 
; and told mother to go home 
and sleep becau.se everything 
would be alright Tliat wa.s 
back in November but tlie in- 
,jur\- didn't take any slarch 
oul of >oung Jackson because 
wlien basketball .season rolled 
around he had won himself a 
starting position on the 
school's team in the powerful 
C.I.K. League. 


■ Dr. Hill thinks Greg will 
grow in a hurry and by college 
age should be in the neighbor- 
hood of 6 feet and 170 pounds. 
With his speed and versatility 
he should e.xccll in all three 
sports. 

The chance of Greg putting 
on poundage is very good. His 
mother and father own the 
Baby Beef -^larket at 3007 S.^ 
Lentral and it is no effort at 
all for the youngster to wade 
Uirough three thick New York 
cuts at one sitting and to 
cha.-^e It u ith an apple pie and 
a few cartons of milk. 


I -LEGAL NOTICES 


(The California Eagle) 

^8225 

♦NOTICE OF HEARING OF 

PETITION FOR PROBATE 

OF WILL 

No. 437-158 

In th.? Superior Court of Ihp 

.State "f ralifnrnia. in and for Ihp 

iTount.v of Los .\nsrlps. In the 

Matter of the K.siatp of Annie \'. 

Henrler.eon. Deceaserl 

N'otir-e is hrreb.v juen that th*- 
petition nf Camp Washington for 
the Prohatp of ihp Will of ihp 
abo\p-naniPf1 dp' pased and for the 
issuance of Lrttprs Ipstamenlarv 
thereon to thp potitioiier to which 
refereh'p i.s horeby madp for furthpr 
particulars, w :!l hp heard at 9.1"i 
o'clock am. on Jan. l.T. 1961. at 
the court room of Department 4. 
of the Superior Court of the .Stale 
of California, in and for the Count\ 
of r.os AnspU'N. Citv of Los Ari- 

Dated Dpc. Jl. ir^Wi 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
HtlEast Vernon Ave. 
Loi Angeles. Calif. 
AO. 2-6149 
Attorney for Petitioner 

H.XROLD r OSTL-i" | 

Countc Clprk and Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and 
for the Countv of Los .Angeles 
By A. L. GRAHA-M. Deputv 
(Publish 4n the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29, 19fi0: Jan 5 
.Tan. 12. 1961. 


38634 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-585 ■ 

In the S'lppiior Court of th"- 
State of California in and for the 
County of Lot; .Xneeles. 

In the Matter of the K.«tate of 
BUANCHR GRirfnN. also Knov. n 
a» BLANCHE F1GGETT. Deceas- 
ed. 

Notice i.«^liprel'v Ei\en to .-redil- 
rtr^ havinc c aim- again.^t the .«a;it 
deeeHenr to file said claims in the 
office of the c.prk of thp aforesaid 
court or -o prp«pnt them to the 
undersigned at the office of Vier 
.attorneys. Miller. Maddox & Ma- 
lcin». 2824 South ^Vesle^n Avenue 
in the City of I,08 -\ngple.= . in tnp 
aforesiaid CoLint\, which latter of- 
fic« ia thq pla'P of husinp.<.<> of thp' 
undersigned in all matters pertain- j 
ing to said estate.^ Such claims 
with the ne'essary Aoiichprs must 
b« filed or prp.=»pntPd a.R afore.«aid 
within si.-s: months after the first: 
publication of thi>: notiee. 
D«ted Pec. 29 1960 I 

.SALL^ SH.\W NEW.MA.N 
.VdVninistratnx nifh-the- 
\\"i!l-.\iine\pd of the E.'fate 
c said dP'-edent 
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28Z4 South Western Avenue 
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HAWKINS ROBS EILEEN EATON 

Riot Fails; Negroes Bacic at Georgia U 


— Forward Africa! — 




2iai W. Varnen Avanua, I. A. 


Continuous Publication for .80 


AX. 5-31 35 


Vol. LXXX-No. AA 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


10' 

AX. 5-3135 

Out-pf-Town 15c 


•^ 


Two Women Die 
In Closed Room 


OK THE MARCH— Africans m the Congo . XyasalanJ. 
Kenya, the Rhodesias and !>ou/h Africa, and every place 


hetueen, are marching foriiard to freedom. The ipint that 
can't be downed if shoun in the abor e picture. 


aicK 



t.*r«n Millar 




First AnniTenarf 

H has been almost a year 
smce the four students sat 
down in that Greensboro 
vjiriety store and asked for a 
cup of coffee. The waitresses 
were amaz- 
|ed: "Y o u 
know we 
can't serve 
jT>u," they 
!Aaad. The Ne- 
gro counter 
^^ girl was hor- 
1 rifled: "You 
lare dumb," 
I she shouted, 
"that's why 
you'll never 
get • anywhere. You kno\y 
you're not supposed to sit 
down here." 

The four would' not be mov- 
ed. They just sat there until 
the store closed. Nobody serv- 
ed them. Nobody molested 
them. They just sat. That 
night— Feb. 1. 1960— the re- 
porters sent out a story to the 
newspapers of the country. 
Not a long story. Not an 
heroic story. Just a story say- 
ing that four Negro students 
had sat down in a white va- 
riety store counter and had 
not been waited on. Some 
newspapers printed the story. 
Some didn't. None of the 
dailies gave it a banner line. 
AlmightT Tired 
After all, it wasn't much of 
a story, then. Four Negro stu- 
dents had sat at a white 
variety store counter but stu- 
dents were always doing 
things, engaging in stunts. 
Like panty raids. Like throw 
jng water out of upper stories 
of dormitories. This, too, wuld 
pass. And besides that, maybe 
they were Reds. Reds were 
aiways stirring up trouble. 

Only the Negro students in 

other colleges and universities 

in the South understood what 

had happened. They under- 

( Continued on Page 4) 


2 Students Return 
In Uneosy Truce 

ATHENS, Ga. — The two Negro students who 
captured, yielded, then re-captured a beachhead in 
the first integrated school in Georgia's history were 
quietly attending classes this week, while six Klans- 
men faced court action for their part in a stone- 
throwing riot at the university^' . 

Senate Votes 
To Bury Ban 
On Filibuster 

■WASHINGTON — The south 
The hostile students who! won the battle to preserve the 


a week ago. 

Charlayne Hunter, 18. and 
Hamilton Holmes, 19, were 
walking gingerly in their 
exacting roles, but they were 
finding smiling and friendly 
encouragement from a num- 
ber of their school mates at I 
the Athens campus, and strong! 
backing from spme 300 of the 
school's professors. I 

Rioten Subdued i 



Two women, who tried 
to keep themselves warm 
in their unheated room by 
burning charcoal in a 
metal can, were found 
dead of carbon monoxide 
poisoning on the morning 
of Friday, the 13th. They 
had Been dead for many 
hours. 

The two women who were 
found fully clothed on the 
bed in a small room at 1616 
E. 23rd street were Mrs. 
Bernice Thompson, 46, and 
Mrs. Mary Lou Stansell, 40. 
Utilities Cut Off 

According to one report, 
both gas and electricity had 
been turned off for some time. 
Mrs. Thompson, to whom the 
room was rented, was report- 
edly on relief. 

Police, after breaking into 
the apartment, found an iron 
kettle on top of the can con- 
taining burned charcoal sticks. 
(Continued on Page 4i 


were among the 2000 who | filibuster last week when 

western Republicans 
up with Dixiecrats 


shouted racial epithets, shot, middle 
off fire-crackers and hurled i ganged 


stones at Miss Hunter's dormi- 
tory last Wed.iesday night, in 
the company of known Klans- 
men, were noticeably subdued 
when cla.sses started Monday. 
Their new mood was attri- 
buted to a firmly worded 
statement from Joseph A. Wil 


and far western Democrats 
and recorded a 50 to 4& vote 
to send proposals for a chaingc 
ii. Senate rules to the RUles 
Committee. President E>)cct 
John F. Kennedy maintained 
a studied neutrality in the 
fight. California senators vot 


DlL'l 1 DUh HI Rh — 

Dr. Jeanne L. A ohic. na- 
tional president of Delta 
Higiiia I heta and professor 
at .N.).( ., i^ ho hill rcicnt- 
l\ loured .Ifridi, u :H >pi/ik 
at Deltn's f minders Day 
iiieett'ii/ til the Slnlhr ntxt 
Salurd/i\ . 



BACK IN JAIL— Eugene "Rough Lover" Hawkins U'as 
back in jail Tuesday, with bail on a charge of beating and 
robbing Olympic boxing promoter Eileen Eaton expected 
to he $100,000. Police helinr this latest arrest may keep 
Ua'ivkins bchinil bars for a long'' tunc. 


Hulan Jack 
Sentenced. 
Will Appeal 


liams, dean of students, that ^d against ^he referral. 
(Continued on Page 4) 

Criticaliy Hurt 
Gunman Faces 
Felony Charges 

The Santa Monica di-stri'ct 
attorney's office Friday filed a 
four-count complaint against 
William Edgar Boyd. 28. who 
allegedly shot his wife in the 
abdomen, then engaged in a 
furious half-hour gun battle 
punctuated with the use of 
tear gas by 20 Santa Monica 
policemen. Bail was .set at 
$25,000. 

The battle occurred about 
1:40 p.m. Wednesday after 
Boyd accosted his wife at the 
door of a shack occupied by 
Hubert Franklin at 1738 21st 
street. pushed her insidf*. 
threatened to kill her and 
bashed her over the head with 
a .22 rifle. He then shot her 
twice. When police arrived he 
barricaded himself in the 
house and opened fire on the 
officers. 

Wife Escapes 

During the confusion, Mrs. 
Boyd escaped from the build 


NEW YORK — Manhattan 
Borough President Hulan E. 
Jack was given a one-year '"g followed later by Frank- 
suspended sentence here Mon- l'"- The officers ordered Boyd 
day for letting a contractor to surrender. The demand was 
pay $4400 for remodeling his "^et by rifle fire. Officer Earl 
Harlem apartment. Grugett lobbed a tear gas 

The sentencing automatic- grenade through a window 
allv removed, him from his and was cut by flying glass. 
$25.000-a-year position. the|Two other tear gas shells 
highest municipal post held | were thrown into the shack 
by a Negro. along with shotgun blasts. 

General Sessions Ju d gel Twelve slugs lodged in Boyd's 


Joseph A. Sarafite used harsh 
terms in rendering the sen- 
tence. He accused Jack of a 
"betrayal of trust," and said 
that if it were not for his loss 
of office, "this court would 
Jail you because of the seri- 
ousness of your offenses." 

Jack, however, declared 
later that "I am convinced of 
my innocence," and said he 
would appeal the conviction. 

Jack w£»s sentenced to one 
yeai for conspiracy and one 
year for" violation of the city 
charter. Both terms, which 
would have run concurrently, 
wera suspended. 


body before he slumped semi 
conscious against a rear door 
Officers dragged him outside. 

He was taken to the prison 
ward of General Hospital 
wtiere he remains in critical 
condition. He was booked on 
suspicion of assault with in- 
tent to kill. 

Bride of Two Months 

Mrs. Boyd went into shock 
on the operating table and 
five pints of blood were ad- 
ministered to check internal 
bleeding. Her condition was 
considered eus fair. 

According to reports, Mrs. 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Referral of the proposals for 
change to the Rules Commit 
tee means that even if the 
Committee does render a fa\ - 
orable report on changes to 
shut off debate by a simple 
majority as proposed by somi' 
senators or by a three fifths 
majority as proposed by oth- 
ers the report itself woyld be 
subject to a filibuster. I 

Johnson Gambit 

Ostensible architects of the 
fancy shuffle that sent the 
proposed rules changes to the. 
Rules Committee were Dem ■ 
ocratic Majority Leader Mike! 
Mansfield of Montana and| 
Republican Minority Lea Jen 
Everett Dirksen of Illinois but 
political observers said it was 
the brain child of Vice Presi- 
dent Elect Lyndon B. John- 
son. 

Referral of the proposed 
changes in the Senate fili- 
buster rule to the Senate rules 
committee is a "signal from 
those who voted for it that 
the 87th Congress does not 
intend to act seriously on any 
civil rights legislation," 
NAACP Secretary Roy Wilkins 
charged. 

•'By burying (this issue) in 
the rules committee," the 
NAACP wire stated, "this Con- 
gress is laying the basis for 
blocking any action to change 
the rules at the beginning of 
the 88th Congress in January 
1963." 

Issue Buried 

The; fear of the NAACP and 
of liberal senators of both par- 
ties who fought for a change 
in the rules this month is that 
i.i Januar>'. 1963, the then 
president of the Senate, Vice 
President Johnson, may not 
rule that the Senate can 
change rules by majority vote 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Seek Funds 
Fw Tenn. 
Tent Colony 

The NAACP frankly wants 
money — a lot of it. But it 
doesn't want that money for 
itself. It wants it for the fund 
that is being collected to send 

[to the relief of the sharecrop- 
pers in Tennessee who are 
housed in the "Freedom Vil- 
lage" tent folon\' in Fayette 
County. 

The local branch asks that 
money — folding money. 

iquartors, dimec and nichols — 

I be brought to a ma.ss rallj' 
called for the People's Inde- 

Ipendent Church. 1025 E. I8th 
.street. Sunda^v, Jan. 29 at 3 

ip.m. That's Rfv. Maurire 

' Dawkins' church. 

Edward^ D°*w?rren branch i launch officially the Western Christian Leadership , , ^ , 

pr^lS .?aid t'he appe"r?s Conference, attended a rec eption in hi s honor at the p^K„l5 PJ-J 

being made for money only, Wilfandcl - and was msUn- '^ ."^^^^ ;„ th. or P^^'^" ^ ^^^ 

and not for foodstuffs and mental in collecting somel which had been in the or- ^^^ _ 

clothing -The IZey will be .S1400 to aid the fight in th*^ganlzatlonal^ stage ^ for some^j^^ j, ; ^ ^^^ former ^ boxink 


Rev. King Hopeful 
Kennedy will Aid 
Civil Rights Fight | 

The Rev. Martin Luther King, \x\ a whirlwind I 

A- 'weekend, told the ugly truths about segregation to' 

two large, predominantly white audiences, helped 


'Lover/ 

Friend 

Jailed 

The man police arrested 
Tuesday for the daring 
robbery attack early Sat- 
urday morning on Aileen 
Eaton, wife of Olympics 

boxing promoter Cal Eaton, 
was none other than that 
well-known character, Eugene 
"Rough Lover" Hawkins. 

He was taken to jail with 
bail recommended at $100,000. 
He already has some $90,000 
to $95,000 bail bonds outstand- 
ing on prior arrests. 

Fioger Bitten 

Police were hopeful that 
this time they have a case 
! they can make stick against 
I Hawkins, who is known for 
having an uncanny way with 
women and also -vnXh the law. 
They're hoping. He already has 
chalked up against his record 
six pages filled with arrest 
notations. 

The single piece of evidence 
that may prove Hawkins' un- 
doing is a bite on one of his 
fingers — a human bite — ^re- 
ceived, police believe, in an- 
other robbery Monday a week 
ago. 

In that escapade, the victim 
was Mira Griss of West Los 
Angeles, who bit down hard 
when her assailant put his 
hand over her mouth to pre- 
vent her from screaming. She 
bit so hard, she almost bit off 
the finger. 
^ Girl Friend Arrested 

Deputy Dist. Atty. Anthony 
Joyce said Tuesday that doc- 
tors report Hawkins' injury is 
from a human bite Hawkins 
claims he slammed the car 
door on his hand. 
Arrested along with Hawkins 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Sugar Ray 
He's 


A A//' / / l.r-J.onn Mil- 

Ifr, publisher oi ihe Catilor- 
ili'i hnali . ". Ii V '/ '/ "/ (■ d 
\ .1 .1 C I' rill' president at 
ihe iissoeialiori s riiciii an- 
nual meeluig in Siii.- ) ork. 
(Story Page 2.) 


used to purchase what is nec- 
essary, thus saving shipping 
costs for bulk packages. Mon- 
ey is al.so needed, he said to Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, and 
buy more tents for the refu- then immediately upon ar- 
gees. riving in town held a press 

A cheering note came from] conference at the Ambassador 
Washington with announce- { 
ment that the AFL-CIO has To 


time, was set up 
functioning entity, 


^^ -fu ^^'^^ champ, denied Fridav that he 
with Rev.!.._ ^i.r ,_.,u-_ -.r _ ". I 


is the father of a 


South. 

At the start of his activity, ,., ,„^ .„.,,,, „. „ , 

he was met at the airport by King^aking the keynote ad-jp^^ g ^g.g ^^ ^^^ 

dresr* at Zion Hill . Baptist 1^,^^^^^^^ ^ RinPAr a 

Church Saturday afternoon. 


' allocated $2(XX) to aid the Ten- 
I nessee sharecroppers. 
j In New York, mcanwhilf ef- 
j forts are bing made to co- 
I (Continued on Page 4i 


Odom President 

newsmen 


boy bom 
Barbara 
Tre\igne, a singer and danc- 
er. 


optimism over 


The W e s t e r n . Conference j Mrs. Trevigne claimed the 

seeks to promote the struggles, child was born as the result 

of Negroes in this area and to of a tryst with Robinson in a 

he expressed I coordinate that work with the' NeW York Hotel May 10, 

civil rights i herculean efforts being made 1952. 


t he 


prospects under Kennedy and by its counterpart in 
foresaw the end of massive South, the Southern Christian 
resistance in the Deep South.' Leadership C o n f e r e n c e, of 
The Leadership Conference 


At the paternity trial, both 
George Gainford. Robinson's 
former manager, and Charles 


featured 
In the Bagle 

Editorials - 4 

Cburcb Activitie* 5 

Sports 6 

The Tee - 6 

Bill Smallwood . 10 

Dorothea Foster 10 

People 8 

Cbazz Crawford 8 

Show Business 8 



'FREEDOM' IN TENNESSEE— Sharecroppers M'alker Allen and his wife registered 
and voted in the Nov. 8 election in Tennessee. Evicted from their home, they nou> live in a 
tent in Fayette County's "Freedom Village." Their children, shoun with them, are 
among 55 youngsters in the tent colony. The NAACP has launched a second drive to 
bring them aid. 


which the Rev. King is thoiL. Austin, financial secretary 
head. at the Pompton Lakes camp. 

The Rev. L. Sylvester Odom, I testified that Robinson never 
pastor of Ward AME. was [left the camp where he \vas 
elected president of the newiii, training for a bout 
(Continued on Page 4) I Joey Maxim June 25. 


with 


President Asked to Halt 
to Biased Colleges 


WASHINGTON — An end of federal assistance 
to publicly supported colleges and universities 
which discriminate on racial grounds was urged by 
the Federal Civil Rights Commission this week. 

The commission said it had found "that the 
federal government has been 
a silent partner in the crea- 
tion and perpetuation of sep- 
arate colleges for Negroes." 

CaUing for fund cut-off 
action by Congress or the exe- 
cutive branch of government, 
the commission said: 

"The ^Supreme Court has 
held that the federal govern- 
ment is prohibited by the 
Constitution from maintain- 
ing racially segregated educa- 
tional institutions. It is not 
sound policy for the federal 
government to subsidize the 
unconstitutional operations of 
others; to do indirectly what 
it is not permitted to do 
directly." 

Five of the six civil rights 
commissioners joined in the 
recommendation. Three of the 
six joined on a companion 
proposal that federal funds be 


withheld from private institu- 
tions which practice discrimi- 
nation. The other three took 
no part in this. 

The report went to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, President- 
elect Kennedy and to Con- 
gress. 

Much of the lengthy docu- 
ment titled "Equal Protection 
of the Laws in Public Higher 
Education 1960." dealt with 
six southern states, referred 
to as "the resistant states." 

The commission labeled 
Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi 
and South Carolina the hard- 
core states of segregation, 
saying that when the report 
was drafted Negroes were not 
enrolled in a single one of 
the 49 public higher educa- 
tional institutions in those 
states. 


2— The California Eagle 
Tiiursday, January 19, 1961 


1! 

H 


I 

n 
-tf 

■V 

-M 
■M 
■M 
•M 
•M 
•M 
-M 




Motel Owner 
Spots Sliotgun, 
Calls Police 


Mrs. Mat tie Sprin^eld, 
owner of a motel at 1428 E, 
. Adams Blvd.. told police she 
answered the buzzer at the 
ciishier's window early Mon 
day morning. A man told her 
he wanted to see the man who 
had rented Room No. 9 eaxi 
ier in the evening. 

As she opened the office 
door to see il he was going 
to the right room she saw a 
man in a car pointing a saw 
edoff double-barrel shotgun 
at her. She stepped back into 
the office, slammed the door 
and called police. 

The man who rented the 
room ecirlier had told Mrs. 
Springfield that someone was 
coming "to get him" but she 
thought the person was com- 
ing "to pick him up." 

Suspects are two male Ne 
groes about 37 years old, 
round faces with broad feat 
ures. One had reddish prO' 
cessed hair. They have not 
been apprehended. 


Urban League 

Member Drive 

. Opens Sunday 

^ Sunday, Jan. 22, has been 
•• proclaimed "Urban League 
\ Sunday" in local churches. It 
-• marks the beginning of the 
league's 19 61 membership 
• campaign drive. 

The goal of the campaign 
• this year is 5.000 new mem- 
- befs. aoording to Mrs. Thomas 
A. Boger, general campaign 
chairman. Renewals of pre- 
vious memberships will also 
be solicited by m.ore than 250 
volunteer workers. The drive 
will run until Friday, March 
3. 

Chairmen of the corps of 
volunteers are: Church. Wil- 
liam Bailey; Labor, Eugene 
Pickett; South Los Angeles, 
John Kelly; Urban League 
Guild. Mrs. Lucille Ward; 
Fraternal. William Henrv'; 
Social and Pleasure Clubs, 
Phil Rhoten; and Civil Service, 
Richard A. Warren. Tom Haw- 
kins is publicity chairman. 



BURNS FATAL — Pallbearers carry the remains of U'illiam Perdue Cardivell, tcho 
rescued four children from their burning home last Dec. 23 and diedlfrom burns received 
during the rescue. The funeral v.as held at the I'tter-McKinley Brondutiy Mortuary 
Saturday. (Sheffield Studio.) 


Man Who Saved 4 
Dies from Burns 


Burns received when he helped rescue four chil- 
dren from a burning house during Chri.stmas week 
cost William P. Cardwell his life. He died Jan. 10 
from third-degree burns sustained when flames from 
a Christmas tree raced through the frame home of 

Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Jackson, 
9617 Grape street in Watts. 

One child was burned to. ^ 

death and another was soj^^j^j $35 FlIIC 

severely burned that he died 

later. ( Thomas Gillespie, ai;.<Sistant 

Cardwell, 46, was born in 1 manager of the Mellinger Co.. 

Manhattan. Kansas. He had'l'^l'^ Westwood blvd.. wa.s 

lived iii Los Angeles for 28: found guilty last Tuesday of 


iFlying Tackle 


Gift Return 
Request Gets 
Police Action 


years. He was a tile-setter by 
trade and had served in the 
Armed Services during World 
War H. 

Funeral services were held 
on Saturday at the Utter-Mc 
Kinley Broadway Mortuary 
with Rev. Arthur Smith, a 
vice-president of the firm, 
performing the ceremony for 
the heroic man. Interment was 
in Paradise Cemetery. 

Surviving are his widow, 
Mrs. Vivian Cardwell; brother 
Percy, both of Los Angeles; 
and a half-brother M. Cot- 
trev of Oxnard. 


CITT OF HOPE GRANT 

A research grant of $105,000 
has been awarded to the City 
of Hope for a pilot study of a 
parent-oriented hospital pro- 
gram for leukemic children. 


Venice Talk on FEP 

When the Adult Citizens 
Council of Venice meets at 8 
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 at Oak- 
wood Playground, Dennis V. 
Fargas, commission consult- 
ant, will speak on "How The 
California Fair Employment 
Practice Commission Func- 
tions." 


battery and disturbing the 
peace. He was fined $35 and 
given a five-day suspended 
sentence and one year's pro- 
bation. 

The charges against Gilles- 
pie stemmed from an en- 
counter he had last Dec. 21 
with Isidro de Rieras. photo- 
grapher, 34. of 1018 E. 42nd 
place, at the Melliiigcr Co. 
office. 

Rieras had gone tliero to 
reclaim a $5 deposit he had 
made on a correspondence 
course which he found un- 
satisfactory. 

Gillespie refused to make 
the refund and when Rieras 
said that he was taking down 
his remarks on a tape re- 
corder in his briefcase. Gil- 
lespie made a flying tackle 
at him, twisting his wrist 
and otherwise injuring him, 
Rieras claimed. 


Early Sunday morning, John 
Williams Daniels, of 5917-7 8 
E. Compton. went to the home 
of Mrs. Jennie Reyes. 4276 
[I^eimert blvd., and demanded 
$10 he had paid for Christ- 
'mas gifts he had given her 
land her son. police reported. 
' Mrs. Reyes, who had armed 
; herself with a gun after Dan- 
,iels had broken into her apart- 
ment New Year'.s Day. grabbed 
.the gun. went into the living 
room and asked who was 
; there. 

i Daniels came to the front 
,door and demanded that she 
let him in. She refused. He 
then went to the side of tlie 
house and broke the gla.ssi in 
a window and started to clitnb 
in. 

.Mrs. Reyes called police and 
started shooting. Daniels grab- 
I bed her and dragged her out 
jto the street just as the po- 
ilice arrived. 

He denied he had broken 
into the house. He claimed a41 
I he did was to Knock at the 
front door and after the shoot- 
ing started went around the 
side of the house. When the 
second bullet was fired he 
lunged in through the window 
and grabbed Mrs. Reyes, 
i cutting his wrist in the melee. 


loren Miller i 
Kamed Veep at 
NAACP Meet 

NEW YORK — Loren Miller, 
publisher of the California 
Eagle, attorney and housing 
expert, was raised to the post 
of vice president of the NA- 
ACP at the association's re- 
cent annual meeting here. He 
previously served as a board 
member. 

Two new members were 
named to the National Board, 
Chester I. Le\vis, attorney and 
president of the Witchita, 
Kans. NAACP; and Joseph G. 
Kennedy, of San Francisco, 
attorney and president of the 
NAACP Northern" California 
Area Conference. 

Hudson Be>*l*cted 

Dr. H. Claude Hudson and 
Mrs. Daisy Bates were among 
those re-elected to the board. 

Roy Wilkins was re-elected 
executive secretarj-. 

Dr. Robert C. Weaver, re- 
cently named administrator 
of the Federal Home Finance 
Agency by President-elect 
Kennedy, Wcis re-elected chair- 
man of the board, but will 
resign Jan. 20 to take up his 
new duties. 

Dr. Channing H. Tobias will 
continue to serve as chairman 
emeritus. 

Other top NAACP officers 
re-elected include Arthur B. 
Spingain of New York, presi- 
dent; Bishop Stephen Gill 
Spottswood of Washington, 
vice chairman; Alfred Baker 
Lewis, Old Greenwich, Conn., 
treasurer and Dr. Harry J. 
Greene of Philadelphia, assis- 
tant treasurer. 

Miller has served on the 
board sitice 1956. He is also a 
memberj of the >;AACP Na- 
tional Li^gal Committee. 



}<AACP OFFICERS INSTALLED— The Rev. St. Paul Epps installed NAACP offi.' 

cers, elected lor the next tuo years, at the Bel-Vue Community Presbyterian Church Sun- 
day. From left, front: Dr. Frederick N . Spann, James Akers, Eduard D. If'arrcn ( pres' 
ident). Dr. Epps, Vernon Thompson, Dr. John G. Gary. Second roiv : Rev. IT. L. Ro- 
binson. Bcecham Jackson. James Allen, Mrs. Sadie Brewer, Dr. J. B. Carter, Mrs. Viv 
ian Strange, Johnny Otis, Dred Scott Neutom, Rev. C. W. Arnold, Ralph L. Dam, 
Airs. Rosa F. King, Fentress Johnson and Joe Jones. 


Roybal Opens 
Campaign Mon. 

A kick-off campaign meet- 
ing to re-elect Edward Roybal 
to City Council will take place 
next Monday. (Jan. 23), in the 
California Room of the Alex- 
andria Hotel, 5th and Spring 
Streets at 7:30 p.m. 

Roybal asked his friends in 
the 9th Council District to 
help him' in his re-election 
and to take part in this, most 
important organizational cam- 
paign meeting whtre the is- 
sues of the campaign will be 
outlined to meet the needs of 
the district 


Negro History Planners 
Slate Full Week Feb. 12-19 

Plans are moving along swiftly for this year's 
celebration of Negro History Week, Feb. 12-19, once 
more . under the sponsorship of Mrs. Vassie D. 
Wright's Our Authors' Study Club, the Los Angeles 
chapter of the Association for the Study of Negro 

Life and History. '• ■ — 

A general Planning Com- j Bob DeCoy is arranging a 
mittee meeting, of which Dr.i giant motorcade from 12 noon 
Roy D. Andrews is chairman,; to 3 p.m., with business, 
has been scheduled for 3 p.m.! fraternal, social and civic or- 
this Sundav at Holman Meth- ,ganizatlons invited to enter 
odist Church. W. Adanxs and automobiles. 
Fourth a\enuc. 

Oratorical Contest elimina- 
tions will be held, also at 
Holman, at 7:30 p.m. Monday, 
Jan. 23. 

A Youth SiiiK has been 
scheduled and youth chqirs 
throughout the city are in- 
vited to participate, with re- 
hearsals set for Saturdav. Jan. , , .. . ... ... 

21. and Saturdav, Jan. 28. at 4 </»■ S»'»»»"''>« ♦* •«' 'ncre.te n capital or invwt your capital m ^ 
p.m. both d"ays at Price ^ current account. 

Chapel, 213 E. 43rd street, un- .y*. Haitian Banking Society For Economic Development, ^ 
der the direction of Mrs. Eu- 390, Ave. J. J. J. Deualmes, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 

genia Clark. ******* ****** 

On opening da.\-. Feb. 12. '9$^$'$^$ ^^^^^9 


Quote of Week 

The harsh and branf 
dialogue between Moscow 
and Washington bos b««i 
going on for years now, ia 
accordance with the theorf 
of Pavlor'B ' dog. Kbnisli. 
Cher rings the bell in Ma|- 
cow. and Lincoln White, 
the State Departmental 
spokesman, soliyotes ond 
barks in Washington. — 
James Reston, New Yctk 
Times. 


$ 


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Haitian Banking Society in Haiti, specializing n investment* 
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Priiiltoc Stock at S^c interest — Great Security. 



MEAT OePARTMSNTS 


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lead a 


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All accounts are insured to $10,000 by an agency of ihe United States Government 


WE WILL BE OPEN FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
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One 5-lb. Bag 

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JANUARY 19. 20, 21 & 22 ONLY S 

LIMIT ONt COUPON PER CUSTOMER S 

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York 



THANKS RECEPTION HOSTESSES — The RexK Martin Luther King, center, 
thanked the hostesses at the reception given in his honor Saturday night at the Wilfan- 
dei Club, from left: Marge Debar ge. Evelyn Evans, Rev. King, Mary Batiste and 
Cuen Green, administrative secretary of the newly formed Western Christian Leadership 

Conftrtncc. (Chuck ff'illiams) 


WRONG ADDRESS 

AlBANY. N. Y.— The 
Times-Union, conduct- 
ing a telephone survey, 
asked residents if they 
know where Laos is. 

"I don't know where' 
he is," one v/oman re- 
plied, "but he doesn't 
live here. Why don't 
you try across the 
street?" 



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ipecify 


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IND 

mi 

59' 


Lumumba Bound, 
Beaten with Guns 

Patrice Lumumba, imprisoned premier of the 
Congo, was secretly transferred from Thysville 
prison to Elizabethville Tuesday. 

Bound together with two of his supporters, he 
was beaten sickeningly. 


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Africans, ordered by Belgian 
officers, beat him in the face 
with rifle butts. 

Reported Transferred 

Earlier reports said that he 
was transferred, handcuffed 
and under close guard, from 
the jail in Thysville to another 
jail in, Elizabethville, capital 
of Katanga Province and the 
headquarters of his arch rival, 
Belgian puppet, Moise Tshom- 
be. 

That report came from of- 
ficals of the Belgian air line, 
but the government in Leo- 
poldville professed to know 
nothing of such a move. 

If he has been shunted 
from one prison to another, 
the reason for the action has 
not been made clear. 

Troops Unreliable? 

There is speculation, how- 
ever, that it evidences the 
growing unreliability of the 
troops of the central govern- 
ment who reportedly let him 
go free for a brief period last 
Friday during an army mutiny 
at the Thysville prison. 

Tshombe in Katanga, how- 
ever, doesn't seem too easy 
about having Lumumba in his 
bailiwick, far coincidental 
with the report of Lumumba's 
arrival at Elizabethville came 
another report that Katanga 
authorities had arrested some 
iOO of Ldmumba's supporters. 

In Kivu Province, Lumum- 
ba's men were also reported 
as giving Belgian soldiers, 
who aren't supposed to be in 
the Congo, a hard time. Three 
of them are said to have been 


killed in a border fight and 
16 captured. 

n. N. Mot* Defeated 

In the United Nations, 
meanwhile, efforts by Asian- 
African nations, backed by the 
Soviet Union, to have the Se 
curity Council find Belgium 
guilty of violating its trustee 
ship over Ruanda - Urundi 
failed of passing, but the 
issue may still be brought 
before the General Assembly 
when it convenes in March. 


Willowbrook to 
Act on Sale of 
School Bonds 

On Tuesday, Jan. 24, the 
voters of the Willowbrook 
School District will be asked 
to approve the sale of bonds 
to qualify the district to ac 
cept state funds to construct 
seven new classrooms at An- 
derson and six at Mona Park 
Schools to relieve double 
session classes. 

The voters are being asked 
to authorize $125,000 in bonds, 
$65,000 to b. sold immediately 
and $50,000 to be held in re 
serve for sale as required to 
maintain eligibility for state 
funds in the next two years. 

A two-thirds majority of the 
voters rhust approve the 
bonds. 

Polling places will be open 
at the school cafeterias at 
each of the five district 
schools from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
— Lincoln, Marian Andtrson, 
Carver, Mona Park and Wil- 
lowbrook. 


-You can own stock of 


Bank of America 

Bullock's, Incorporated 

Standard Oil -Company of California 

Union Oil Company 

If interested call Nicholas Coulas 

Quincy Cass Associates ' 

Member Pacific Coa3t Stock Exchange 
727 West Ssventh Street, Los Angeles 17, Calif. 
MAdison 3-5151 


■5 



mm mmkk mi 

* Guar. SafMatfion * All Jobs tVefceme 

MOTOR TUNE-UP ...... $5.50 

Co 'I ftrman at Ml. 3-9628 

4822 West Adams at Vineyard 


Andrews' Rehiring 
Asked of Santa Fe 

Lennie L. Andrews, who was fired from the job 
he had held for 14 years as a Santa Fe car cleaner 
affer he filed charges of bias with the FEP Commis- 
sion, should be reinstated with nine months' back 
pay and promoted at the first opportunity, the Com- 
mission was told after five '^ 


days of testimony here Fri- 
day. 

The four hearing commis- 
sioners took the case under 
advisement, but are not ex- 
pected to arrive at a decision 
for three to four weeks. 
•Boy I' 
Andrews was fired because 
he had the audacity to file a 
complaint with the FEPC," 
Charles E. Wilson, chief coun- 
sel for the Fair Employment 
Practices Commission, said in 
■his summation. 

He also claimed that Santa 
Fe's Barstow yards, where 
Andrews worked, treat Ne- 
groes much as they are treat- 
ed in the South. As confirma- 
tion, he pointed to the fact 
that on the witness stand 
railroad officials repeatedly 
referred to Negro employees 
by the offensive designation 
of "boys." 

In demanding reinstatement 
of Andrews, Wilson also ac- 
cused the Atchison, Topeka 
and Santa Fe of being guilty 
o' two violations of the Fair 
Employroent Practices Act — 
first, failure to promote And- 
rews and second, firing him 
after he had filed a complaint. 
htaj. Shiftless 

Santa Fe attorney, Robert B. 
Curtiss, denied both accusa- 
tions, claiming that Andrews 
was not promoted because he 
was lazy, slow and shiftless, 
and didn't deserve advance- 
ment, and that he was fired 
because he fell asleep while 
on duty. 

Andrews denied that he had 
been asleep. He did, however, 
aamit to being in an empty 
car one night last March 
when he had no duties to 
perform. 

Taking cognizance of that 
fact, Wilson pointed out that 
a reprimand or demerits 
would be in order because of 
the infraction of rules, and 
also -ecommended that And- 
rews be docked one month's 
salary from the back pay that 
he maintained is due him. 
Clean Record 

To buttress his claim that 
the firing was unfair, Wilson 
brought out through testi- 
mony at the hearing that 
others who had been fired for 
sleeping (even if the accusa- 
tion were true, which is de- 
nied) had substantial prior 
records of demerits. 

Andrews had not received a 
single demerit during the 
nearly 14 year's that he served 
the railroad. 

On the question of Andrews 
being lazy and shiftless, his 
leadman, Louis Johnson — a 
witness called by the com- 
pany — testified that he had 
no criticism of Andrews' work. 

Most of tne time Andrews 
worked for the Santa Fe he 
had been either a regular or 
substitute lead man over the 
coach cleaners, Wilson stated. 

He also pointed; out that on 
one occasion Andrews hadj 
saved the life of 'a man who 
had just lost a foot in a rail- ; 
road yard accident, that he 
had completed a correspond-; 
ence and shop course in die- 
sel engines and that on two 
separate occasions he had : 
been recugnized by the com- 
pany for safety suggestions. ! 

Andrews filed his complaint [ 
with the FEPC in mid-Febru- [ 
ary 1960. When Santa Fcj 
officials received a copy of the 
complaint they requested and j 
were given 10 days in which 
to investigate. It was at the 
end of that period that And- 1 
rews was fired. : 

Charges against the Broth ! 
erhood of Railway Carmen.: 
which was originally named ! 
along with the railroad, werej 
dropped through a consent 
order issued just before th? 
hearing was convened. Thej 
union agreed that it would j 
reinstate Andrews to member- j 
sliip, without penalty, if he is 
re-hired by the railroad. 


If the commission finds the 
Santa Fe guilty of discrinxina- 
tion, the case could be settlea 
by compliance on the part oC 
the company. Otherwise the 
Commission is empowered to 
appeal to the courts for an 
enforcement order. The rail- 
road could appeal such an 
order to a higher court. 


Author to Tell 
Fads on Cuba 
Sunday Night 

Dr. Paul M. Sweezy, co- 
author of "Cuba, Anatomy of 
a Revolution," and visiting 
professor at Stanford Univer- 
sity, will speak at Channing 
Hall, 2936 W. 8th street, Sun- 
day night on "The Truth 
About Cuba." 

The meeting, which is 
scheduled for 8:15 p.m., is 
leing held under the auspices 
of the Los .Angeles Chapter of 
thf^ Fair Play for Cuba Com- 
mittee. 

The Rev. Stephen H. Fritch- 
man, co-chairman of the 
committee along with former 
attorney general Robert ' W 
Kennedy, wil\ preside. Martin 
Hall, chairman of the local 
Fair Play chapter, will also 
speak. 

Cuban revolutionary songs 
will be sung hy some mem- 
bers of the choir of the First 
Unitarian Church. A question- 
and-answer period ^will follow 
the talks. 

Sweezy, who is co-editor of 
the ".Monthly Review," spent 
considci-able time in Cuba 
this past summer. ; 

Dancefloor Tilt 
Brings Gunplay 

Charles Wilford Jones. 32. 
of 1316'2 Wl Olympic blvd., 
was arrested Monday after re- 
portedly shooting Robert Nash. 
of 1.507 W. 37th place. Jones 
claims Nash started to argue 
with him while he was danc- 
ing with a girl and cut him. 

Nash was : shot after Jones 
claimed someone put a gun 
in his hand. Jones was taken 
to the hospital for treatment 
and later booked. 

Na.sh told police he didn't 
pull a knife on Jones because 
he never carried a knife. He 
.>aid a man by the name of 
Morgan and Jones were try- 
ing to frame him because he 
had', moved from Morgan's 
a^-artment owing him some 
money. 

He thought Morgan had 
been the cau.sf of the trouble 
and had used Jones to start 
th^ fight. 



AlRM.iN—McHchry Nor. 
man Jr., son of Maidic Nor- 
man and MrHenry Norman, 
1672 If. Jefferson bird., 
has been assigned to the Stra- 
tegic Air Command at Van- 
denberg AFB. Norman is a. 
graduate of Manual Arts. 


Bullet Fired 
At Bar Gets 
Man Booked 

A man identified as Fred 
Philpot. 36, of 979V2 S. Mari- 
posa, came into a bar at 2305 
S. Maple, Sunday night and 
showed the owner a gun. 
Archie Plummer told police 
Philpot said he was having a 
little trouble with a man call- 
ed "Big Mac" and was carry- 
ine the weapon for protection. 

He left the bar and came 
back a little later and claim- 
ed the man at the nearby li- 
quor store refused to serve 
him. .After hearing a shot 
Plummer returned from the 
kitchen where he had gone to 
wash dishes in time to see 
the suspect put the gun in his 
pocket and walk out the front 
door. 

Several customore were in 
the '^ bar af the time of the 
shooting, but no one was in- 
jured, .^K small hole was found 
in the wall but officers were 
unable to find the bullet. 
/ PhilfKJt was caught a few 
minutes later at 24th and 
Maple and bcoked. 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


The California Eagle— 3 


Ex-Mailman 
Knifed to Death 
Near 'Hilltop' 

Clifton Lee Harris, of 1360 
E. 48th street, a former mail- 
man who worked out c& Kear- 
ney Station at Central and 
Vernon, died of knife wounds 
received during a fight at the 
Hilltop Cafe early Sunday 
morning. 

Harris was found, still alive, 
sprawled on his back in the 
roadway near the curb across 
the street from the cafe, but 
there was a large and spread- 
ing pool of blood just out- 
side the Hilltop at 5423 S. 
Broadway. 

Murderer Escapes 

Police said that the murder- 
er escaped and that his ident- 
ity is unlcnown, though he is 
believed to have been a friend 
of the slain man. 

Harris had been slashed in 
the back, chest and arm. He 
was taken by ambulance to 
Central Receiving Hospital 
where he died. 

Witnesses said that Harris 
arxl his assailant were argu- 
ing about money while they 
were in the Hilltop. Harris re- 
portedly told the other man, 
"We've been friends too long 
to fight over a $10 bill!" 
Collapsed 

But they continued to fight, 
nonetheless, in the cafe and 
out into the street. 

Police believed that Harris 
received the fatal wounds just 
outside the cafe and then 
must have staggered across 
the street before collapsing. 

Harris worked at Kearney 
from June, 1957 tq Jan., 1959, 
as a temporary substitute. 



ALPHA PRESIDENT — 
Dr. William H. Hale, presi- 
dent of Langs ton University, 
has been elected general 
president of Alpha Phi Alpha 
fraternity. 


Negro Labor Council 
Plans Meeting Tues. 

The Negro American Labor 
Council will meet at 7:30 p.m. 
Tuesday, Jan. 24, at the office 

of the Brotherhood of Sleep- 
ing Car Porters. 4006 'i S. Cen- 
tral avenue, according at L. B. 
Thompson, national vice-presi- 
dent. 


VICUNA 

The vicuna is the /Smallest 
memt>er of the camel family, 
according to the National 
Automobile Club. 


The wettest place on earth 
is Cherrapunji, India, where 
the average anual rainfall is 
458 inches-^ more than 10 
times greater than the figure 
fo/ New York. 





A savings account 

opens the 

door to 59 
banking services 
at Bank of America ! 


RATIONAL T«UST AUB lAVIUSS ASSOCIATlOR • aCIIIIft fEBE»*L OCMSiT IMSUPiUCf C0«»OIATiai 




**•*•••***••****•••******** 


VICTOR 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY 



fllllllflU: 


llllllllimr? 


OFFICIAL STATEMENT 


Statement of Condition as of December 31, 1960 


ASSETS 

First Trust Deed Loans $27,588,927.68 

Loans on Savings Accounts 61,716.14 

Real Estate Owned 1 ,351 ,379.32 

Investment in Stock of Federal Loan 

Bank ' 405,000.00 

Cash and U.S. Government Bills and 

Bonds • 2,367,769.95 

Office Building and Equipment (Less 

Depreciation) . ._ 290,275.40 

Other Assets 32,308.03 

TOTAL ; $32,097,376.52 


LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Saving*, Accounts $28,044,544.58 

Advances From Federal Home Loan 

Bank . . • 1 ,962,500.00 


Loans in Process 
Other Liabilities 


Specific Reserves and Deferred Credits 
General Loss Reserver. . 1,439,724.64 
Surplus 63,397.00 


485,041.41 
38,095.37 
64,073.52 

1,503,121.64 


TOTiAL $32,097 J76.52 



BROADWAY FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

4501 So. Brood way at 45th St. ADamt 2-4271 

PER ANNUM LOS ANGELES 37, CALIfORNIA 



MR ANNUM 


* 

-¥■ 
-¥■ 

-K 

-¥■ 
-^^ 

-¥• 
-¥. 

-¥• 

^ 214 SOUTH BROADWAY 

• •••••••••** 


CLOTHING 
COMPANY 
MA. 4-0801 


MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


BIG SALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 

$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Ypur credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house duTWig our big sale of th^ year and get a $30.00 suit FREEIII 
Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3.00 
a week pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for men and 
boys of all ages. 

• , _ • 

™ NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT 

*Wear and enjoy your clothes while paying* 
Buy any sport coat in tbe house and get a $1 0.00 pair of trousers FREEl 

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4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 .»/^g>»<56X»OgVX50»<aCX»^^CX»^^gXXS6 


Loren Miller, Publisher 

Th« California Eagi* stands for eomploto integration of 
Negroes Into overy phase of American life tlirough |he democratic 
processes. 

We favor: 

1. PEPC on lo«al, state and notional levels. 

2. Decent housing for oil Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate oldxoge pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bai^goining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in crii forms. 

2. Communists and oil other enemies of democracy. 

Published Every Thursday for Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Von Ness AXminster 5-3135 


<Jne ^^mportant <y\ewspap 


er 


The Eisenhower Years 


Although his administration 
was marked by a series of strik- 
ing and favorable advances in 
the field of civil rights, President 
Eisenhower will get little credit 
for the fateful changes in race 
relations that occurred between 
1952 and 1960, the years of his 
presidency. The irony of it is^ 
that had he not muffed the 
chances presented to him he 
might have become the same 
kind of a legend in the lore of 
freedom as the first Republican 
president. 

The difference between the 
two men lies in the fact that 
Abraham Lincoln had the polit- 
ical sixth sense to seize Civil War 
opportunities to strike down the 
institution of slavery while 
Dwight Eisenhower was blind 
to corresponding opportunities to 
strike a death blow at the Jim 
Crow system. 

The Supreme Court epitomized 
its decade long undermining of 
the Separate But Equal doctrine 
with the School Cases in 1954. In 
the wake of that dramatic deci- 
siony the president missed his 
chance of greatness. He could 
have summoned the nation to a 
great moral crusade to accept 
the decision and to have done 
witih the immorality of racial 
segregation but he vacillated un- 
til a violent storm of opposition 
blew up and then managed only 
a meaningless summons to his 
countrymen to obey the law. 

The southerners even turned 
his plea for law obedience 
against him by passing a series 
of obstructionist laws and bid- 
ding for their obedience. These 


obstructionist laws finally came 
to flower in Little Rock and still 
the president could find no words 
to kindle the American spirit. He 
tGok refuge in the ultimate legal- 
ism of sending troops to enforce 
rights which he was unwilling to 
proclaim as great moral prin- 
ciples. 

He was to repeat that pattern 
when his .party leaders intro- 
duced civil rights legislation in 
Congress. At one point he pro- 
fessed ignorance of the meaning 
of one of the most important 
passages in administration spon- 
sored legislation. Always he put 
his support on careful, naked 
legal grounds.' He was a lover 
without passion. 

When the Sit Downs swept the 
South and laid bare the moral 
issue that underlies the Negro's 
quest for civil rights, Dwight 
Eisenhower stuck to legalisms: 
the issue was one for the courts, 
he said. 

It was only toward the end 
that the president rose a mite 
above his careful legal position. 
He found a few spare words to 
praise the New Orleans white 
family that had to flee its native 
city because its child attended 
an integrated school. In his last 
message to Congress he spent 
two lines on the observation that 
there were moral issues involved 
in the segregation question. 
, The kindest, and at once the 
harshest, thing that can be said 
of Dwight Eisenhower is that he 
never understood the general do- 
mestic issue of our times. Men 
who fail to understand evil fail 
their times as much as those who 
promote evil. 


Pretty Sorry Outlook 


The Senate vote to refer the 
proposal to set limits on debate 
to the Rules Committee means 
that there is little chance for a 
curb on the filibuster at this 
session of Congress. 

The vice of the referral of pro- 
posed rules change to the Rules 
Committee lies in the fact that 
no changes can be reported out 
until after the inauguration. If 
the Rules Committee does pro- 
pose changes Johnson will be in 
the Senate chair and he is almost 
certain to rule that changes in 
rules are themselves subject to 
unlimited debate. Thus there will 
be a filibuster against the at- 
tempt to end filibusters! 

The vote to refer was close, 
50 to 46. The 50 votes came from 
Middle Western Republicans, 


Dixiecrats and Far Western 
Democrats — the same grouping 
that emasculated the civil rights 
bills of 1957 and 1959. 

Architect of this scheme to 
subvert the 1960 Democratic 
platform was Vice President 
Elect Lyndon B. Johnson who 
worked through his stooges, 
Senate Majority Leader Mike 
Mansfield an^ his partner of 
many years. Republican Leader 
Everett Dirksen. 

The nub of the matter is that 
Johnson is still running the 
Senate, a fact underscored by his 
selection to head the Democratic 
Caucus even after he assumes 
the vice presidency. 

A Johnson dominated Senate 
isn't apt to produce much by way 
of civil rights legislation. 


Overruling the Mob 


The difference that time brings 
even in the Stiyth can be 
measured by the course of events 
that tpok place when Autherine 
Lucy entered the University of 
Alabama five years ago and what 
is happening in the case of the 
two Negro youngsters who are 
now attending the University of 
Georgia. 


Georgia University officials 
panicked in the face of another 
mob last week. The two students 
were suspended "for their own 
protection." But Judge William 
Bootle would have none Of that 
fuzzy attempt to substitute mob 
law for constitutional rules. He 
ordered the students re-enrolled 

The students are back. It is 
our guess they'll stay there. 


Battleaxe & Bread 

By Lester B. Granger 



Grangar 


ROME — This morning at 
six-thirty I opened my eyes 
for the tenth consecutive 
morning to hear rain spla.sh- 
ing in the narrow street out- 
side my cell-lilie room. Ordi- 
narily I might have used the 
half-hour before required ris- 
ing to relax a bit before tak- 
ing the bus and "metro" out 
to the Exposition grounds 
where the International Con- 
ference of Social Work is be- 
ing held. 

But not in this bed, wliiih 
was undoubtedly designed by 
apprentice sausage-makers. Its 
mattress feels 
as if it is com- 
posed of giant 
squashy sau- 
sages tied 
1,0 o s e 1 y to- 
gether, so that 
the occupant of 
the bed rolls 
about trying to 
find a stable 
resting place 
for his weary 
bones. And h<^ 
doesn't go to bed, either, un- 
til he is wear>-, for my bed 
does not encourage idling 
around. You get intcTit when 
you are good and sleepy, and 
when you are through sleep- 
ing you get up. 

Dingy Archway 

Or perhaps the bed was de- 
signed especially for this pur- 
pose by the Knights of the 
Holy Grail, who have owned 
the Hotel Columbus for cen- 
turies and who still occupy 
the building's first two floors. 

When I was brought to this 
hotel two squares from "St. 
Peter's Church, on Via della 
Conciliazione that runs dir- 
rectly into the church's piaz/.a, 
I had a brisk argument with 
the cab driver to the effect 
that this could not possibly 
be the Hotel Columbus where 
the conference's officers were 
quartered. 

It looked like the entrance 
Into the courtyard of a second- 
rate Parisian pension.. You 
simply walked through a 
dingy archway into the court- 
yard and wandered left until 
you found the actual hotel 
entrance. And when y o u 
found it, it still wasn't much. 
Real Italian 

Well, my driver won. be- 
cause my forty-seven words 
of Italian didn't allow me to 
carry the argument very far. 
as I limped out of the cab. 
<Yep, my knee has "gone off 
again with a misplaced cart- 
ilage!) and went in to reg- 
ister. 

Actually, I found myself in 
far better circumstances than 
if I had landed at the plush, 
chrome-plated Excelsior on 
Via Veneto, or even at the 
Metropole. favorite of Amer- 
ican tourists. 

The Albergo Colombo, as 


the natives call the Columbus, 
is cheaper, lor one thjng; it 
is '■vermomciilc llaliano" in 
accommodations, service and 
the fact that not a half-dozen 
of the staff speak English. 

True, the water is never hot, 
ranging from lukewarm to 
fairly warm; and true, its ele- 
vator carrjes only two ' pas- 
sengers with the operator. 
True, tlie "reading" light" by 
my bed is a 20-watt affair and 
the total wattage in all the 
lights of the room and bath 
combined wouldn't exceed 250 
. . . but who cares? If you 
want to live like a New York- 
er, whNncha go back where 
you came from? New York,- 
for instance I 

Love This Town 

But I'm not going anywhere 
until I have to, for as I've 
remarked before 1 love this 
town. Who cares about a lit- 
tle ilrippy weather, or even 
pouring rain, when a bus 
ride in Rome is a constant 
adventure? Where in New 
York or California would you 
find a taxi driver giving a 
traffic cop a stiff argument, 
shaking liis finger in the 
other's face, holding up traf- 
fic the while and then driv- 
ing aw.M>- without bumps on 
his head ' or summons in his 
I)ocket? Tills I saw yesterday 
morning, with my own two 
eyes ! 

And flie buses themselves — 
lumbering through a morning 
traffic imbelievably jammed 
with tiny cars, motor bikes. 
scooters, bikes and trucks, all 
competing on e\'en terms for 
space to sijueeze by. 

And the arguments that go 
on between jiassenger and bus 
dri\er. when the former is 
carried on extra square after 
he has signaled he wants to 
get off. Then he lets the bus 
driver ha\'e it, and the driver 
rec'iprocates in kind, with all 
the explosive force of Latin 
temperament. Jaws .iut out. 
eyes flash, fingers point, fists 
wave — until one is sure 
either or both disputants will 
be .scalped. 

Then the liquid stream of 
fiery invective dies down. The 
passenger alights. When on 
the sidewalk he turns and 
grins and waves at the driver, 
who returns the greeting as 
he pulls off. 

I wouldn't go so far as to 
say this always happens. 
Sometimes somebody must 
, forget the act and bust some- 
body on tlie snoot. But it 
hasn't hapuoned yet; and 
I've watched at least a half- 
dozen times. So even if there 
were no conference, being in 
Rome would still be important 
to me. for it's one of the few 
western cities that have re- 
jected standardization. God 
bless the Romans — and, as 
I've stated - I love Rome! 


Loren Miller Says . . . 


Gene Hawkins 
Held in Jail in 
Eaton Robbery 

(Continued from Page 1) 

was his latest girl friend, 
Marian Kritzer, whose car he 
was driving when he attacked 
Mrs. Eaton. 

The attack on Mrs. Eaton, 
who is a fight promoter in her 
own name, occurred early Sat- 
urday morning as she enteyed 
the driveway of her home at 
800 Tremaine avenue. 

A stranger approached her 
and asked directions, Mrs. 
Eaton, who has been around 
boxers and knows a bit about 
fighting, said she knew it was 
a hold-up, but nonetheless, the 
man knocked her unconscious. 

Gagged. Tied 

When she came to, she was 
gagged with a handkerchief. 
Her stockings, which had been 
ripped- from her .teg's, had 
been used to bind her legs and 
arms. She reported that the 
robbers got away with jewelry, 
clothes and money for a total 
value of $3200. 

Two men were with the man 
who first approached her. 
They warned her not to 
scream, but she ignored them 
and yelled. That was when she 
was hit over the head from 
behind. 

Both Mrs. Eaton and Mi's. 
GrisS identified Hawkins. 

Police reported that Hawkins 
and Mrs. Kritzer lived in her 
Hollywood home at 3296 Hil- 
lock. They had, however, 
checked in at a hotel in Holly- 
wood at 9876 Wilshire blvd. as 
"Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Clark." 

'Fingers' Prospects 

Police believed that Mrs. 
Kritzer was Hawkins' accom- 
plice in his most recent ven- 
tures. They believed that she 
"fingered" wealthy women 
with whom she was associated 
in a card club, and that 
Hawkins picked up from there. 

Hawkins, who specializes in 
knocking^ women about and 
beating them until they are 
bruised and bloody, has some 
60 counts chalked up against 
him in the past two years. 

Atty. Joyce estimated that 
crime — up to now at any rate 
— has paid off handsomely for 
the 27-year-old lover-boy. He 
said that Hawkins' "t a k e" 
amounts to something like 
$100,000 a year. 

Hawkins \^as out on bond 
on two counts of forgery com- 
mitted about two months ago. 
Two weeks ago he was picekd 
up on a hit-and-run count 
when he nearly^ ran down a 
pjaliceman. 

He has so many accumu- 
lated arrests for drunk driv- 
ing, driving after his license 
has been revoked, wreckless 
driving and other assorted ac- 
counts that the judge can send 
him up for more than four 
years on those charges alone 
He is awaiting sentencing <on 
those charges. 

Also pending is trial on an- 
other arrest, due to come up 
the end of this month, involv- 
ing extortion, first and second 
degree burglary, two counts 
of assault with attempt to 
rape, grand theft of money 
and grand theft auto. There 
were three victims — two.r; 
women and one man. ' , 


Rev. King Founds 
West Conference 


i*^ 


(■Continued from Page 1) 
stood because they, too, were 
tired. Tired of the law's de- 
lays, tired of token integra- 
tion,, tired of second class 
citizenship, tired oJ the talk of 
a distant rosy future, tired — 
almighty tired — of the quib- 
bles of judges, tired and worn 
down -fey barren promises. 
And su|ldenl3l the Sit Down 
movement sw&'pt the South. 
Movemeat pf Truth 

Just as suddenly, everybody 
understood what the Sit Downs 
meant. In that flashing mo- 
ment of truth, •;'! the whole 
world knew thMt the s?it- 
c'owns weren't student stunts 
like panty raids and wateV 
lossings and Uiat they weren't 
Red inspired or Communist 
led. Somebody said that the 
students had sat down that 
they might grow tall and 
there was revealing truth in 
<hat catch phrase. 

They had sat down that 
they might grow tall — tall 
in the eyes of their fellows, 
tall in the eyes of those who 
had demeaned them so long, 
tail in the eyes of the whole 
world, but above all tall in 
their own self respect, tall in 
their own self esteem, tall in 
their own dignity, tall like 
free men are tall. They had, 
to put it simply, challenged 
the morality of the Jim Crow 
system. ' 

No Debate 

.■^nd that, I think, explains 
the greatness of the sit down* 
movement. You can debate 
the constitutionality of a fair 
employment ordinance; you 
can question the legal wis- 
dom of a Jim Crow law; you 
can test a discaminatory rule 
or regulation by the applica- 
ble constitutional- and legal 
principles. 

But there can be no moral 
justification for denying a 
man food or drink because of 
his race or color. You cannot 


make a ca.se for the righteous- 
ne-s of saying to a man that 
he may not stay his hunger 
or quench his thirst because 
ho is black or brown. You may 
.say the law requires these 
things: you may shout that 
custom decrees them: you 
may argue that your business 
.will be ruined unless you fol- 
low the old ways but you can 
never .scjuare your" actions 
with morality. 

New Holiday 

Son-.ething of the same kind 
h.' jjr.f'ned on a larger scale 
when Harriet Beecher Stowe 
wrol(> Uncle Tom's Cabin. 
.\fter its publication nobody 
could keep the slavery ques- 
tion cabined and confined to 
questions of the value of 
slaves as property or the loss 
in cotton crops or the legal 
(juibble as to whether or not 
the Constitution protected 
slavery. Slavery had become 
a moral i.ssue and it was 
doomed. Make Jim Crow a 
moral issue and it must 
collapse. 

The sit downers took a 
mighty step in that direction. 
I think we ought to declare 
February 1 a national holiday. 


Gunman Faces 
Felony Charges 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Boyd told police that her hus- 
band became infuriated when 
she refused his requests to 
sign annulment papers and 
relinquish ownership of the 
family car. A bride of two 
months, Mrs. Boyd lived with 
her mother and three children 
by a previous marriage. 

Three policemen were named 
as victims of the battle, with 
wound^^f varying degrees, 
none of them serious. 


Burn Charcoal 
To Gel Warm, 
Two'Suffocate 


(Continued from Page li 
All the windows in the room 
and in the connecting bath 
were tightly closed. ? 

Mrs. Katie Jemmett,' of -the 
same address, called police 
after she had been unable to 
arouse either Mrs. Thompson 
or Mrs. Stansell. 

^ Broke Into Room 

The officers slit the front 
door screen and forced open 
the door in order to effect an 
entry. 

Mrs. Jemmett said she had 
not seen either of the women 
since the previous day when 
she noticed them in the yard. 
Both, she said, seemed some- 
what unsteady on their feet. 

Mrs. Thompson, who is sur- 
vived by a son, Charles 
Thompson, of 10422 Alabama 
street, will be buried from the 
chapel of the J. S. Williams 
Funeral Home, at 1:30 p.m. 
Saturday. 

Mrs. Stansell is survived by 
her mother, Mrs. Lois Pirtle, 
1251 Adams blvd, Mrs. Stan- 
sell will be buried tcJday, 
Thursday, from Walker Tem- 
ple on E. 25th street, at 10 
a.m., with arrangements be- 
ing handled by Angelus Fun- 
eral Home. Burial will be in 
Paradise Cemetery. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
organization, an 1 Rev. Maurice 
A. Dawkins chairman of the 
board. 

Wanted to Know 

Rev. King made his week- 
end trip to Los Angeles at the 
invitation of the Rev. Fred 
Doty, pastor of the Woodland 
Hills Community Church, 
whose members have become 
concerned about the repeated 
shameful incidents in the 
South, such as in New Orleans 
and at the University of 
Georgia, and sought first-hand 
information ' about the devel- 
oping struggle. 

Rev. King addressed the 
packed church Sunday morn- 
ing and in the evening ad- 
dressed another overflow 
crowd at Canoga Park High 
School on the "Future of In- 
tegration." The school meeting 
was also held under the 
auspices of Rev. Doty's church. 

A number of students at- 
tended the evening meeting 
and many of them were 
among the hundred odd per- 
sons who flooded Rev. King 
with writterT questions after 
his talk. 

Deliberate Crawl 

The $1400 in donations was 
collected, after appeals by 
Rev.. King, at the Leadership 
Conference and the Wilfandel 
reception. 

At Frifday's press conference, 
the Southern leader expressed 
confidence that "we will get 
much more forthright action 
in the present situation 
(under Kennedy) than in the 
past eight years." 

He characterized the present 
pace of integration as an "all 
deliberate crawl," and jwinted 
out that in six years only six 
per cent of the Negro children 
in the South have been placed 
in integrated schools. This, he 
said, is token integration, 
brought about through evasive 
schemes and representing bad 
faith. 

No New Party 

Because of his belief that 
Kennedy will use the power 
of his position to tackle the 
civil rights question. Rev. 
King said he was not think- 
ing in terms of calling for 
the formation of a new, in- 
dependent party in the South. 

"We must work through 
existing parties," he said, 
"usiiyjjgi^^moral and politi- 

NAACP Seeks 
Funds for Tenn. 

(Continued from Page 1> 
ordinate the work of five or- 
ganisations, all of which have 
l>een aiding the Tennessee 
victims. 

The organizations are the 
NAACP, the National Share- 
croppers' Fund, the Congress 
of Racial ■ Equality (CORE) 
and the National (Committee 
for Rural Schools. 

Another Meeting Planned 

Need for coordination of the 
efforts is seen in the fact that 
here locally CORE ha^ estab- 
lished a "Freedom " Village 
Emergency 'Committee" to aid 
the tent dwellers, and advises 
that it has already"' invited 
Tennessee leaders John Mc- 
Ferren, of Fayette County, and 
Odell Sanders, of Haj'wood 
County, to come here some 
time in February to address 
a CORE -sponsored mass meet- 
ing. 

CORE apparently didn't 
know what the NAACP was 
planning, and vice versa. 

The New Y-ork move has as 
its aim the elimination of the 
duplication of efforts and a 
pooling of resources so as to 
give the most support possi- 
ble to the Tennessee victims. 

At present, 13 families are 
living in the Tent Colony 
where they are housed in sur- 
plus army tents and are liv- 
ing under primitive conditions, 
without jot)s, money, homes. 

They were evicted from the 
farms they have share-cropped 
for many years after they reg- 
istered and voted in the Nov. 
8 elections. 


Widows' Horizons 

"Reorganizing Your Life" 
will be the subject of a talk 
by Dr. Paul Popenoe when the 
series "New Horizons for 
Widows" opens Wednesday, 
January 18, at 7:30 P. M., at 
the American Institute of 
Family Relations, 5287 Sunset 
blvd. 


Senate Stalls 

(Continued from Page 1) 
at the opening of the session. 

Johnson has held in the 
past that the Senate is a con- 
tinuing body and is governed 
by the same rules from ses- 
sion to session. If he so rules 
in 1963, and if the Senate does 
not vote to overrule him, an>' 
change in the filibuster rule 
would be subject to the exist- 
ing two-thirds requirement. 

Thus, a filibuster could be 
conducted in 1963 against the 
motion to change the filibust- 
er rule. If by any chance the 
Senate rules committee should 
bring forth a report at this 
s«sion or in 1962 calling lor 
a change in the present rule, 
the adoption of such a report 
will require a two-thirds vote 
of Senators present. 

The NAACP wire called the 
referral to the rules commit- 
tee a repudiation of both Re- 
publican and Democratic plat- 
form pledges. 


Synagogue Bombed 

JOHANNESBURG, South Af- 
rica — Terrorists dynzimited 
the city's maiin Jewish syna- 
gogue early Sunday morning. 

It was the fourth incident 
ir recent months of the bomb- 
ing of religious institutions. 


cal pressure to bring those 
parties to take a forthright 
position on civil rights." 

Pointing out that the "Presi- 
dent has the power to do a 
great deal," he added that "if 
we use the necessary pressure, 
the administration will have 
to do something." 

Like Tidal Wore 

He said that the develop- 
ments in New Orleans- and 
Georgia indicate the "gradual 
death of massive resistance in 
the Deep South," and that the 
"whole attempt to block in- r 
tegration is as futile as trying 
to hold back a tidal wave." 

Rev. King credited the stu- 
dent sit-ins with giving new 
courage and a new*sense of 
dedication to Southern Ne- 
groes. As for Southern whites, 
he said many of them now 
feel that integration is in- 
evitable and that they must, 
accept it. There is also a 
significant number, he added, 
who feel that integration is 
not only inevitable, but is 
also morally right. 


Ga. Riot Fails, 
Tension Fills 
Univ. Campus 

(Continued from Page 1) 

"Students attending and tak- 
ing part in riots and demon- 
strations will be suspended or 
expelled. " 

That declaration was made 
after Federal Judge W. A. 
Bootle in Macon pooh-poohed 
the university's contention 
that the two Negro students ■ 
had been suspended "for their 
own protection" and ordered 
their re-admission on Monday 
morning. 

Klaasmen Charged 

The judge said that he had 
been informed that the reason 
law and order had broken 
down was that adec^uate 
police protection had not been 
provided. J'his was an obvious 
slap at state officials. 

The six Klansmen, arrested 
after their part in last week's 
riot, were bound over for trial 
Tuesday on charges of carry- 
ing weapons to a public gath- 
ering. They were released 
under bonds of $500 each. 

Police also disclosed Tues- 
day they had' .arrested a man 
believed to be the gunman 
who disarmed a campus guard 
and fled after seeking out . 
Miss Hunter's dormitory Sun- 
day night. 

Police on Guard 

Contrary to the situation 
when the riot occurred, this 
week Athens detectives, the 
police and agents of the 
Georgia Bureau of Investiga- 
tion were continually cruising 
the streets of the sprawling 
campus. More than 30 state 
highway patrol officer s — 
about a third of the state's 
total number — were on active 
duty. 

Both Miss Hunter and 
Homes were accompanied by 
armed bodyguards as they 
proceeded from class to class. 

A number of the students in 
Miss Hunter's dormitory 
greeted her in friendly 
fashion and a 1 1 e m p t-e d to 
make her feel at ease. Al- 
though subdued by the gruel- 
ling experiences, the attractive 
coed flashed her engaging 
smile at those who sf>oke to 
her pleasantly on campus. 

The day after the riots, 
some 300 faculty members 
petitioned the school for re- 
turn of the two Negro stu- 
dents. They declared that the 
faculty "will not retreat from 
the> responsibility of standing 
steadfastly by the rules of law 
and. morality. " 

■"The school was unusually 
quiet, as the second Battle of 
G e o r g i a — almost a hundred •" 
years after the Civil War 
"March Through Georgia," — 
seemed headed for a victprj' 
for integration. . 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

'The Important NawtpapJr" 
2101 W. Vernon Av«. 
ios Angenss 8, Calif.j 
AXminster 5-3135 I 

LOREN MILLER I 

Publisher 

Thursday Jan. 19, 1961 
Vol. LXXX No. 44 

GRACE SIMONS— Executive Editor 

F. P. WALLER, Jr JKflv. Mar. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

Circuliition Mgr. 

CALME RUSS Office Mqr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. Q. Allen f512 16th 8t- 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph. .EX. 5-1591 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 

1907 2Cth street (Uprtaire) 

Phone EXbrook 4-8082 

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Adjudication Decree Number 123228 
Dite ot Adjudication July 1, 192S ■ 

Published every Thursday Oy 

The California Eagle PubllshInQ 

Co., 2101 West Vernon Avenue, at 

Van Ness, Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

Entered as Second Class Matter 

November 3, 1937, at the Post 

Office at Los Angeles, California, 

undr the Act of March 3, 1879. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWSPAPER* 

54S Fifth AvMue 
New York 17, New Yortc 


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8, Calif. 
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. II ELCOME TO THE FIRM-Leon Harmon extends n 
tannie E. Benjamin as she enters the office after joining the 
>taff as rnmaging dine tor and vice-president. (Jack Davis) 

Mrs. Fannie Benjamin Joins 
Harrison-Ross Mortuaries 

Leon H. Harrison, president of the Harrison-Ross 
Mortuaries announced last week that Mrs. Fannie 
E. Benjamin has joined the firm as managing direc- 
ror and vice-president. Mrs. Benjamin has sei-ved in 
various mortuaries for over 30 years anci as well 
known in community club, church and ff-aternal 
circles. '" 

other appointments an- '^s flower car and sing-ing 
nounced by Harrison were Le- fhapel are regular features of 
Roy D. Johnson as personnel the Hctrrison-Ross ser\'ice. 
director and Richard H. John- Mrs. Benjamin is an organ- 
eon, who will serve as an in- ist of note and is the first Am- 
Burance advisor and morti- erican Negro to be elected to 


(jrdinl Kclio/ne to Mrs. 
]Iarrison-Ro>s Mortuary 


cian. 

True Friend 

Harrison -Ross offers those 
seeking solace a kindly and 
understanding service similar 
to that of a tried and true! Christ for 30 vears. 

friend. The service is so de- 1 '- 

signed as to alleviate the de- 
pression generally associated j 
with funerals. 


serv^e on the board of the Los 
Angeles Chapter of the Am- 
erican Guild of Organists. She 
has served as organist at Peo- 
ple's Independent Church of 



/I nderson 


The pas*?l colored fleet with 


A pure heart is an e.xcel- 
ent thing — and so is a clean 
shirt." 


G. C. Lichtenberg 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22 

"Prapare for Yoor Opportunity"-Rev. A. C. Auitin, preaching 

Sunday S«hool-9:30 A.M. Worship-llrOO A.M. 


Rev. Anderson 
Off to Board, 
tnauguration 


-NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC.- 


The Mid-Winter Board Meet- 
ing: of the National Baptist} 
Convention Itu-. convened atj 
the National Baptist Bathi 
House Hotel in Hot Springs, 

B-„ uDr. ui-c- ..: •> »*..- Ark., on Jan. 17. Among the 

R«v. H. R. Carey Healing Service at 5 p.m. Rev. A C. Au»t n |,„^„,,„ ^„„..^^ „,^»: , 

"^ |i group representatives partici- 

pating were Allen Jordan, 
president of the National Bap. 
tist Laymen and Dr. O. Clay 
Maxwell, president of the Na- 
tional Sunday School and Bap- 
tist Training Union Congress. 
Both are from New York. 

Rev. .\. E. .Anderson, hoard 
member of the Natiorfal Bap- 
tist Convention Inc., and pas- 
tor of the McCoy Memorial 
Bapti.st Church, 802 K. IGth 
street, left Lo.s Angeles last 
Sunday evening, for 


5965 S. Broadway Avenue— Rev. Anita I. Edmonds, Paster 

Pentacostal and Interracial 

9:30 A.M.-Sunday School 10:45 A.M.-Worihip Service 

7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.— Prayer Service 


Rev. L. S. Odom 
Elected to Head 1 
New WCLC 


Rev. L. Sylvester Odom, pas- 
tor of Ward A.M.E. Church, 
was elected to the presidency 
of the newly -formed Western 
Christian Leadership Confer- 
ence. 

Ministers of many denomi- 
nations and from major cities 
of the Western States, met 
Saturday Jan. 14 to elect the 
organization's first full slate 
of officers. 

Equal treatment under the 
law and the freedom to per- 
sue happiness and employ- 
ment in any chosen field with- 
out segregation, won the com- 
bined support of ministers of 
the west as they organized in 
support of Rev. Martin Luther 
King and his Southern Christ- 
ian Leadership Conference. 

On a lecture tour. Rev. 
King, president of the South- 
ern Christian Leadership Con- 
ference, assisted in the devel- 
opment of the organizational 
structure and served as key- 
, noter at the opening session. 
I Results of the Conference 
[election placed the Rev. Maur- 
ice Dawkins as chairman of 
the Board of Directors. Vice- 
president-at-large were the 
Revs. Edward Stovall of Berk- 
eley; P. J. Ellis of Los Ange 
les. and F. M. Lockridge of 
San Diego. Elected Regional 
vice presidents were the ReV. 
Samuel McKinney of Seattle; 
M. C. Williams of Denver; O. 
B. Williams oi Portland; T. C. 
Coles of Las Vegas; L, K. Wil- 
liams of Albuquerque.; Cas- 
per Glenn of Tucson; and J. 
V,'. Ford of Los Angeles. 

The Rev. James Hargett was 
elected secretary and Rev. C. 
W. Arnold, assistant secretary 
with Rev. John Doggett treas- 
urer. 

Additional Fosts 
The following ministers 
were elected to the Board of 
Directors: Revs. M. L. Scott, 
Owen De Vaughn, P. J. Ellis, 
Isaiah Scipio, F. D. Ferrell, L. 
G. Degeddingseze, James Ed- 
ward Jones, Hillery Broadus, 
Welford Wilson, Roy Thomp- 
son, Seth Toney, R. A. C. Fost- 
er, H. A. Green, J. L. Richard, 
John Dorn, Joseph Williams, 
S. O. J. Evan^, M. M. Jeffer- 
son, and A. A. Peters. 

Additional posts went to 
Rev. W. H. Warfford, chaplin 
and Rev. A. T. Broadus, histor- 
ian. Rev. Marvin Robinson of 
Pasadena was elected to fill 
the post of administrative co- 
ordinator- at- large. 

Regular coordinators elect- 
ed were Rev. Claude McKin- 
ney, Northwest Pacific area; 
Rev. Joseph Griffin, Inter- 
mountain Pacific area and E. 
V. Hi., Southwest Pacific Area. 


Cl)urcl)t)m 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


The California Eagle— 5 



-SANTA- 

MONICA 

NEWS 


FOUND CONFERENCE — The IFestern Christian 
Eeadership Conference u'as officially launched here Satur- 
day, uith the Re%'. Martin Luther King Jr.. right, as the 
main speaker. The Rev. L. Sylvester Odom u'tis selected to 
head the neic organtzation. The tuo are shoit'n at a f>ress 
conference at the Ambassador. ((Jhuck irUliams) ' 


1st AME Building Fund 
Guild to Seek $700,000 

After 88 years, the oldest Church among Negroes 
in the city of Los Angeles, girds for relocation. The 
spirit of the people at First AME Church spells "For- 
ward for God." On Jan. 10, a large number of women 

met at the Wilfandel Club ?- 

under the chairmanship of ^f**^"" ^^^ worship service 
Mrs. Paul R. Williams, for the 
purpose of conducting 'the 
pledge program for $700,000. 

A well organized plan was 
outlined by Rev. H. H. Brook- 
ins to the women who over: 
whelmingly endorsed and 
committed themselves to it'. 
With $100,000 already pledged 
without, effort, the five I year 
plan is designed to include 
every member of the chjurch. 


and secured their written 
pledge to the program. 


McCarty Opens 
Revival^Week 


The NAACP Installation 
banquet will be held Friday* 
Jan. 17 at 8 p.m. at the Philo- 
mathean Club, 1810 Broadway. 
Mrs. Terea Hall Pittman will 
be the speaker. 

• « • " 

Eagle newsboy. DLxon Addy 
was the recipient o(f more 
than $20 from custoraeiS on 
his paper route during the 
holidays. Dixon, who is 10 
years old, delivers almost 50 
papers a week. He is a stu- 
dent at McKinley School, 
where he takes an active part 
in the athletic program. He 
wishes to thank those who 
made his Christmas so eniov- 
able. ^ 

* • • 

The Membership Committee 
of the NAACP met at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. M. B. 
Allen last week. Memberships 
totalling $54 was reported. 
Added to the membership roll 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Ted Far- 
ley. Reba Walker, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Williams, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ed Foster, Robert Smith, 
Lucille Ligans, Mr. and Mrs. 
Zackery Coleman, Mr. and 
Mrs. Melvin Forbes, Mrs. Dena 
Goldring, Richard Young, Jean 
D. Young, George Quarls, Mat- 
tie B. and M. B. Allen, Jr., Ar- 
tena Williams, L. Kurd and 
Margaret Thomas. 

I Others present were: Rene 
Crawford, Alia Mae Carter, 
Rosa Yeager, Helen Bristow, 
Essie Garland, Delia Powell, 
Ethel Sullivan, Joel Smith, 
Oriel Powell, AraBell and 
Harvey Preston, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ivory Hilliard, E. G. and 
Louelle Allen, Mary Green, 
Evelyn Snyder and others. A 
delicious repast was served by 
the hostesses. 



MARTIN L. TOPSIL 

Martin Topsil 
Funeral Set at 
2nd Bapt. Sat. 


The women of Calvary Bap- 
tist Charch will sponsor the 
program- at 7 p.m. in the 
church dn Sunday, Jan. 22. 


Martin L. Topsil, 23 E. Ave 
nue 38, pioneer member of 
2nd Baptist Church, died Jan. 
16 after suffering a stroke of 
paralysis a week ago. 

Funeral services will be con- 
ducted at 2nd Baptist Church 
at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 21. 
with Connor-Johnson in charge 
of arrangements and inter- 
ment in Evergreen Cemeten.'. 

Mr. Topsil was born in 
Clarksdale, W. Va., and had 
lived in Los Angeles since 
1923. He had also been a mem- 
ber of the 2nd Baptist Church 
since 1923. For more than 20 
years he was head of one of 
the Usher Boards in the 
Church. He was employed 
by the Broadway Department 
Store for many years and )vas 
retired by the store with a 
good emplojTnent record. 

Surviving are his son and 
daughter, Albert and Eleanor 
Topsil; granddaughter. Artha; 
sister-in-laws, Belle and Cor- 
rine Patton; and brother-in- 
law, Clarence Patton, all of 
the Los Angeles area. 


A week of reviv.'l services 
.will open at McCa.tv Mem- 
according to Sara Nelson, re-.^rial Christian Church, 4101 
porter _ for the ;c-hurch, the,^ ^dams blvd., Jan. 22, a^ 


"fever" of building seems to 
have gripped every organiza- 
tion and member of the 
church. 


10:40 a. m. with the minister 

preaching on 'This Jesus." 

Church officers ha^e set up 

„, f .u f ^ ■ \ A this special effort to strength- 
Plans for the future include i . .., , ,., , f 
,.. ... u- t. iu „ „u „|cn spiritual life of members 
activity in which the members *^ ,, , ^ .,_ 


' as well as to 


the 


CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

3125 W. ADAMS BLVD. 

11 am. — Morning Worship Service 
Rev. James H. Hargett WiU SpeaJt 
SUNDAY SCHOOL, 9:30 a.m.— Kindergarten Through 5th Grade 
11 a.m.-6th Grade Through High School 


George Foster, 
Willowbrook 
Developer, Dies 


will, on Feb. 26, observe Men "" .""" "= '" present 
and Women's Dav for local I Christian message to the com- 
and connectional budgets, sol r"""'t>'- Rf^--I^['"g Allen, pas. 
that the relocation program |t°r, lists challenging topics 
can take front place in the i ^^r each of his sermons m the 
program. I scries. He is recognized as a 

The Pastor, Dr. Brookins, an- "lost effective preacher, 
nounced that the second Sun- 1 thoroughly prepared by train- 
day in Februan,', which is thejinR and experience, 
day on which the African Mrs. Marion Downs Pierce 
Methodist Episcopal Church | will be song leader at the 

7:30 services each night in the 
week. The choir under, the 
direction of John Herrod will 
present special music at the 
Sunday morning services on 
Jan. 22 and 29. 


was founded, will be "Loyalty 
Day." All members" of the 
church will be requested to 
first worship and return and 
stay home until a member of 
the guild has visited- them 


WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones, Pastor 

9;30 and 11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 

9;30 a.m.— Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade— Adult Classes 

11:00 a.m.— Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr. 

7 p.m. — Westminster Elble Hour 


Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


George A. Foster. 81, 107 
H o t Clorietta avenue, Pasadena, 
Spring.s, and eventual attend- Ipa.^sed away on Jan. 18 at the 
ance of the Presidential inau- ' General Hospital after a 


guration. Jan. 19. 


■HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH- 


6330 SO. FIGUEROA ST. PLeasant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. DOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 

8 a.m. — Rev. J. Lewis, Preaching 

"The Adequate Christ" — John 6:68 

9:30 a.m. — Church School (for All Ages) 

10:45 a.m. — Rev. John N. Doggett, Jr., Preaching 

8:30 p.m. — Methodist Youth and Wesley Fellowship 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Ghurcli 

EAST 36th AND TRINITY STRUTS - REV. JOHN C. BAIN, MINISTER 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22 

"IMPROVING OUR PRAYER LIFE" 

REV. BAIN PREACHING AT 9 A.M. AND 11 A.M. 

The public li cordially invited to attend. 


Heart Attack 
Tal(es Life of 
J. E. Sidney 

Re()uicm mas.s for re; 
James Eugene Sidney wa.s re- 
cited at 1 p.m. J.Tn. 16 at Holy 
Name Catholic Church. Inter- 
ment followed at Holy Cross 
Cemeterv. 


I lengthy illness 

He leaves his widow. Am- ' 
intha, daughter Lucille De- 
Costa and two sons, Joseph A., \ 
irresident of the Willowbrook I 
; School Board and Irving G., I 
Supervisor in the Los Angeles i 
Post Office. j 

Mr. Foster came to Los An-' 
geles in 1923 and was one of| 
the developers of the Willow- 1 
brook community, where he 
lived until 1950 \(rhen he| 
realtor. '^'-'^*^'^ to Pasadena. 

Funeral arrangements are 
incomplete. 


WHEN YOU NEED DIRECTION 

CALL DU. 5-8804 
MAOR-EMETH FOUNDATION 

Church Services 1 1 a.m. Sunday 

BACES HALL 

1528 N. VERMONT AVE. ^ 
Church of Spiritual Revelation 

Rev. S. S. Heyliager, Minister 


New York, N. Y. (Specie!) - 

For the first time science has 
found a new healing: substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain — without 
surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
another,"very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by a doctor's observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, wKile gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction or re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 

And most amazing of all — 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where a doctor's 
observations were continued 
over a period of many months ! 

In fact, results were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 
to make such astonishing state- I 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 
a problem!" And among these 
sufferers were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions, 
some of 10 to 20 years' standing. 

All this, without the use of 
rircotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance (Bio- 
Dyne*)— the discovery of a 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured 
tissue on all parts of the body. 

This new healing substance 
is offered in suppository or oint- 
ment form called Preparation 
//*. Ask for individually sealed 
convenient Preparation H Sup- 
positories or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli- 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drug counters. 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 


1564-W. 36th PLACE 


AX. 1-9831 


Messages to All 

Services Sunday and Thursday at 8 P.M 

Wednesday 2-4 P.M. 

REV. OTIS STOVALL, Minister 


VEriCE NEWS 

Mrs. B. McClendon, 6551 

Mr. Sidnev at 44 was a vie- l^^^'")"^^^^ , ^^^""t *^ u'""' 
tim of a heart attack suffered I ^"P^^^'"^ ^^ S^" •'°'^"« ^°«- 
in the office of a building he ^^ , , , 

managed 'at 4th avenue and 



First Rock ^ptist Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 

Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
1 1 ujn. BTU 6:30 p.m. Evening Service 
7:30 p.m. Song Service 8:45 p.m. Public 
li Invited to Pray with u« at 7:30 pm. 
on Wednesday. 


Washington blvd. about 1 p.m. 
Thursday Jan. 12. 

The j'oun? realtor was born 
in Kansas Cit.v. Mo. he came 
to Lo.s Angeles in 1932 and 
for several years operated a 
Liquor store at 29th and Cen- 
tral avenue. For 20 years ho 
worked in real estate with of- 
fices at 2601 W. Vernon ave- 
nue. 

He i.s survived by his wife 
Eleanor and twin children 
Melvyn "and Marvelyn; a 
grandson, Eugene Paul Sid- 
ney; his aunt, Mrs. Mamie 
Jackson Martin all of Los 
Angelas, and his parents Mr. 
and Mrs. George Sidney of 
Kansas City. 

Sidney had been an active 


Mrs. D. Warfield, wife of 
the Rev. Mr. Warfield, pastor 
of St. Paul Baptist Church in 
Venice, is recuperating from 

surgery at (General Hospital. 

* + * 

J. Slallings and his father 
and children visited the 
northern part of the state re- 
cently. They reported having 
a wonderful reunion with 
family relatives and friends. 
E. Stallings is visiting the 
home of J. Stallings here in 
Venice. He plans to return to 

Waco, Texas soon. 

« * « 

Marvin Cole, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Cole, left last Sunday 
for Richmond. He will enter 
the hospital there for surgery. 


MCNrAL COMFORTER i^HB SPfRITUAl ADV/SOR IH 

ELDER J. B. MOORE 

Divine H enter From Birth 

Healing Meetings Every Wednesday Night— 7:30-8:30 p.m. 
AFTER YOU HAVE TI?lED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER? WE WILL NOT FAIL 

ST. JOHN BAPTIST CHURCH 

1319 E. 22nd ST. 

Residence Rl 8-7580 

421 N. 4th Ave., Pocatello, Idaho CE. 2-9438 



When you choose a funeral director, you look for 
serrice. To those of us at PEOPLE'S FUNERAL 
HOME, service means complete reliable service, 
planned in good taste for everyone's convenience. 

PEOPLES FUNERAL HOIVTE 


member of the Consolidated 
Realty Board since 1952 and 
was a former member of the 
Royal Dragons Club. 


. . . bereavement is a family loss and we wanted their 
family to take care of our beloved— we are very thankful." 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS-SERVING ALL-WITH THE FINEST 

1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Rl. 7-9121 


Terry Rayensdale 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING 
_1379 W. 38th PLACE - RE. 4-7915. 



42SO South Cantral AT»nu» 


ADams 2-7181 


DISCIPLES OF JESUS CHRIST IN REVIVAL JAN 22 - 29 

REV. KRING ALLEN, Pastor, Preaching at each Service 

Sunday, January 22, 10:40 a.m. "THIS JESUS." 7:30 p.m. "WHO IS CHRISTIAN?" 
Monday, 7:30-"WHAT IS THE CHURCH?" Tutiday, 7:30-"A HAPPY FUNERAL." Wednesday, 
7:30-"SUPPER IS READY." Thursday, 7:30- "WHAT MUST I DO TO BE LOST?" Friday, 7:30 
-"GUESTS OF GOD." Sunday, January 29, 10:40 a.m.-'7HE VERDICT IS YOURS." 7:30 p.m.- 

Mccarty memorial christian church '''Vuk r.:*."'^" 


"AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS'" 

• Brake Tune-Uo Specialists • Free Pick-Up, Delivery 

SPECIAL FREE ENGINE CLEANING WITH LUBRICATION 

HR^NRY LEZINE'S MORIL ISfERVICE 

1921 S. CENTRAL AVE. Rl. 8-8044 "^J^ 



FREE INFORMATION Contact "CELES" KING, III 

BAIL BONDS'Hl Sr ' 

■"*■" ■•^■'•^•^ 24 Hr. Service 


>iifomq»ic Go$ 9/ofh*s Dryr illuiiroltd it tht new RCA WHIRLPOOl. 

Modem Gas clothes dryers 
treat your laundry gently 
as a. lanib. They dry 20% 
faster than any other kind 
of automatic drying -and 
cost only Vt as much to 
use! See them now while 
this free installation oflfer 
lasts at appliance dealers 
selling: RCA Whirlpool • 
Maytag • Norge • Frigid- 
aire • Philco-Bendix • 
Hamilton • Easy • Speed 
Queen • O'Keefe & Merritt 
Blackstone. Offer applies 
to dryer part of washer- 
dryer combinations, too. 



CLOIHES. 

WIVI kl\%| dryer combinations, too. ^^^^^|MMA 

INSTALLED FREE NOi? 
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^UTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS COMPANY 


.<( 


6-TIie California Eagle 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


i 
i 

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AiMcj 



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RAMSEY 



0««rg« RamMy 


BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO: An unidentifed 
bettor won 592,851.40 last Sun- 
day at the Caliente Race 
Track. 

Thp lucky selector, who had 
all six winners in the series, 
received the ST6.704.20 wln- 
ninjr share and 12 of the $1,- 
313:60 consolation prizes. A 
5-10 pool grossed S113,636. 
The huge crowd of 15,633 
sent S412.225 through the 
mutuels for the II races not 
including the 5-10 pool. 

Light-heavyweight champion 
Archie Moore and his wife 
were guest of the Stewarts. 

Santa Anita — two big fea- 
tures are in store for the fans 
this week. On Thursday, Jan. 
19, the Santa Ynez Stakes for 
thp 3-\ear-old fillies will be 
the main event for the dis- 
tance of G'i furlongs. This 
will mark its 10th running 
and carries an added value of 
515,000. 


On Saturday, Jan. 21, The 
San Pasqual Handicap will be 
the featured attraction. This 
will be its 24th presentation. 
It will share double-header 
billing with the San Marcos 
Handicap on> Turf. 

(HORSES TO WATCH THAT ARE 
FIT AND READY) 
CALIENTE 
Dair'ing Red — Go back to this one. 
Deeded. — My special. 
Nagual. — Getting good again. 
Royal Pa»ha. — Over a dl.stance O.K. 
Miss Aqullla.— Didn't run to works 

tab. 
Scamper Phar — Next out O.K. 
Basal ite — Now fit. 
Station Break— Threw ride last 

out. 
Dee Jay — Very .good now. 
Jungle Light— This one has class. 
Get Rythum — In .smart hanrts. 
Burner's Baby— A real goodie. 

SANTA ANITA 
Rustic Village — My hot Koodie. 
College Boy — Next out O. K. 
Rablero — Wire to wire. 
Real Pie — .Six furloncs O.K. 
Empiric — Clockers Special. 
Rhin — Will make them hu.s.-ile. 
Flight Pal — Mile or over O.K. 
Happy Harry — This one can fly. 
Prince Blessed — A real stake horse 
Prove It — One of the best. 
Umbo — Love a route. 
Game — FYora a smart stable. 



Wilma Rudolph, the No. 1 personality to emerge from the 
1960 Olympiad at Rome, and every other still-active U. S. 
track and field gold metal winner headline a strong field 
for the second annual Los Angeles Invitational Indoor meet 
Saturday evening, Jan. 21, at the Sports Arena. 

In addition, a crack mile cast will mateh the great Jim 
Beatty, who recorded the world's fastest mile (3.58) in 1960, 
and such distance running stars as Ernie Cunliffee, Archie 
San Romani Jr., Bob Holland and George Larson. 

Wilma, who captured three gold medals at Rome in a 
fantastic display of sprinting, shares the spotlight with three 
other U. S. gold medalists from Rome and another from 
Melbourne and Helsinki. 

Her own school, little Tennessee State, offers one of them 
— broad jumper Ralph Boston who shattered the almost in- 
destructible record of Jesse Owens with his jump of 26 ft. 11 '4 
inch, 

.\l«o there's Don Bragg, world record holder in the pole 
vault (15 ft. 9^2 in.l as well as Otis Davis, who broke a world 
standard in the 400 meters at Rome. The other Olympic gold 
medal winner is shot putter Parry O'Brien, a silver medalist 
in Italy after winning gold awards at Melbourne (1956) and 
Helsinki (1952i. 

Wilma will be making her first Los Angeles appearance 
and -also will be competing for the first time in this country 
since her triumphs in Europe. Her oposition will include 
Tigerbelle teammate Martha Hudson and Irene Robertson, 
another Olympian. 

Virtually every event will present an Olympic team mem- 
ber or standout performer. 


Laker Cagers 
To Attend 
Cage Clinic 

A free basketball clinic 
featuring the incomparable 
Elgin Baylor and other stars 
of the Los Angeles Lakers 
will be sponsored by the Mu- 
nicipal Sports Division of the 
City Recreation and Park De- 
partment at the Sports Arena 
in Exposition Park from 10 
a. m. to 1 p. m. Saturday, 
Jan. 28. 

Emphasizing that admission 
to the event will ^be by tick- 
et only, Dudley C* Shumway, 
supervisor of municipal sports 
in the Recreation and Park 
Department, said that the 
Sports Arena's doors will be 
open at 10 a. m. Jan. 28. Hoop 
enthusiasts of all ages are 
invited to atend the clinic, he 
added. 

Free ducats can be obtained 
from recreation directors at 
municipal playgrounds 
throughout Los Angeles or by 
calling MAdison 4-5211, Sta- 
tion 505, to request them, 
Shumway said. 


Tordan Edqes 
Tefferson in 
City Cage Tilt 

The Jordan High basketball 
team, with eyes toward the 
school's annual fall Athletic 
Banquet sponsored by Jordan 
High School's Youth Service, 
scored an impressive 54 to 51 
victory over Jefferson High in 
the feature game of the city 
high school Basketball Tour- 
ney at Venice High last Satur- 
day. 

Sharp shooting John. Ander- 
son, a guard, drilled in 18 
points in the final quarter to 
pull his team into the lead 
after Jeff had led late in the 
game 37 to 36. Anderson ac- 
counted for 10 field *goals for 
20 points. 

This was the fourth of a 
total of eight games sched- 
uled. 

In other games Roosevelt 
surprised Marshall, 66-57; 
Dorset nodded Canoga Park, 
53 to 50 in overtime and Poly 
turned back Venice, 61 to 42. 

The tourney moves over to 
L.A. State College gym games 
on Jan. 21, 23, and 25. 



NO. J ATTRACTION — Mi-adowlark Lemon, the 
delightful comedian par excellnnce, lends the fabulous, ex- 
citing, hilarious Harlctn Globetrotters in a tremendous 
doubleheadcr basketball game at the Shrine Auditorium 
on Sunday, January 29. 


Maury WUls 
Tabbed f or 
Pay Raise 

Thirty-eigtit contracte were 
mailed last Thursday Vb mem- 
bers of the 1961 Los Angeles 
Dodgers, E. J. (Buzzie) Bavasi, 
vice-president and general 
manager, announced. 

"After a fourth-place fin- 
ish," Bavasi said, "there will 
not be the customary number 
of salary increases among the 
Dodgers. Not as many as in 
the past, in any event." 

"There will be, for that mat- 
ter, a few cuts although it is 
iiot our practice to deal out 
severe pay slices. When you 
reach that point with a player 
it's better not to have him 
around." 

While Bavasi did not single 
out those due for raises or de- 
creases, it was rather obvious 
that Norm Larker, who bat- 
tled Dick Groat for the bat- 
ting crown right down to the 
final day of the 1960 season, 
and Maury Wills, who stole 
fifty bases and finished in the. 
top ten among the league's 
batters, were in line for pay 
hikes, among others.' 



THEnE 


.WITH mAQOIt HATHAWAY' 


Boots Nonioe. Dan Valdez 
In Featherweight Title Go 

Back in 1958, Boots Monroe I ranked ninth in the world 
was regarded as one of the would put Monroe in line for 
best young fistic prospects to some money matches. A loss 
come along in years. vvill probably write finish to 

This impression was short i*^'^ career. 
lived as in Feburary of 1959, j Though he only tipped the 
he was bombed out by Toluco ; Fairbanks at 122 pounds, Mon- 
Lopez in two rounds at Holly- 1 roe was a top high school 
wood Legion Stadium. He hit football player. He was the 
the boards a total of four defensive halfback on the 


times before Referee . Lee 
Grossman wisely halted the 
mismatch. 

Now, two years older and 
wiser and a division heavier, 
Boots gets another chance for 
stardom. He meets tough 
Danny Valdez in a 12-roundpr 
tonight, Thursday at the 
Olympic for the vacant Calif- 
ornia fe&therweight title. 

A win over Valdez. who is 


Indoor Mile Race Is Top Feature 


C'c-.tcnnial High team which 
won the CIF title from Glen- 
da lo Hoover in 1954. 

The offensive fullback was 
a guy named Paul Lowe, who 
now docs his stuff for the Los 
Angeles Chargers. 

Continuing their policy of 
one televised and one off TV 
main event, the Olyrnpic has 
Alfrcflo Escobar and Irish 
Noel Humphreys paired in the 
video feature. 


To Defend Golf Crowns 


Joe Roach and Petfe Brown 
willdefend their amateur and 
pro titles, respectively, in the 
eighth annual North-South 

Golf Tournament Feb. 20-24 
at the Miami Springs course. 
Roach, a native Miamian, 
has won the crown the last 
fours years and is a former 
National Negro links cham- 
pion. Brown, from Jackson, 
Miss., dethroned Harrington 


last year and captured the 
Asbury Park title recently. 

Ted Rhodes, four-time Na- 
tional Negro pro champion, 
and Charles Sifford, current 
National titleholder, will give 
the young Mississippian a 
tough battle. 

Richard Gardner will be 
among those who are expect- 
ed to give Roach, now of Los 
Angeles, a run for the big 
trophy. 


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SIDE STORY'" 

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OPEN SUNDAY 


An International mile race 
featuring Istvan Rozavolgyi, 
Hungarian freedom fighter, 
and Terry Sullivan of Rho- 
desia, Africa's first sub-4m. 
runner, against outstanding 
Americans will be the high- 
light of the Second Annual 
Los Angeles Indoor Games at 
the Memorial Sports Arena 
Feb. 11. 

Meet Chairman Glenn Davis 
has the assurance of Dan Fer 
ris. National AAU Secretary, 
that both Rozsavolgyi, world's 
No. 1 1500-meter runner in 
1959 and third-place finisher 
at Rome in the Olympics; and 
Sullivan who chased Herb 
Elliott to the tape in two post 
Olympic races, will be in the 
brilliant field. 

Rozsavolgyi's 3:38.9 1500 
meter time gained him the No. 
1 world ranking two years ago 


Angels Report 
To Spring Drills 
At Palm Springs 

The Los Angeles Angeles 
will report for their first 
American League spring train- 
ing camp on Friday, Feb. 24, 
at Palm Springs, Calif., it was 
announced today by General 
Manager Fred Haney. The en 
tire squad will report to the 
Polo Grounds in the California 
resort city for uniforms on 
Feb. 25 with workouts due to 
begin the following day. 

The Angels will start their 
26-game exhibition schedule 
on Saturday, March 11, 
against the Chicago Cubs at 
Palm Springs. Los Angeles 
will also host the Cubs the 
following day. The schedule 
runs through April 9. 

The new American League 
entry — the first club to rep 
resent the junior circuit on the 
West Coast — will play 11 
games in Palm Springs and 15 
on the road, including a pair 
with the Atlanta Crackers at 
Atlanta, prior to the start of 
the 1961 season. The Angels 
open their first campaign at 
Baltimore on Tuesday, April 
11. 


,/ 


/ 


c^ 
^O^ 


24 HOUR SERVICE 

- AX. 4-9576 

JDorothu s t^ieak <jtou3e 

• 'Steaks Our Specialty" ' 
BEVERAGES - ICE COLD BEER 


DOROTHY McNAMEE ALLEN 
In serving our customers, we are endeavoring to place before you the highest 
grade of fine, wholesome food available, presented in a pleasing atmosphere 
under the most sanitary conditions. 

DOROTHY McNAMEE MIEN ^''"^."1^^ *''• 



and he ran 3:.''.9.2 at Rome. 
The Hungarian, now 31. is 
holder of the world's 2000- 
meter record of 5:02.2. and 
former holder of the 100- 
meter mark. 

Sullivan, 23, impressed track 
critics by running a 3:59.8 
mile in Dublin last Septem- 
ber, and defeated Americans 
Dyrol Burleson and Jim Grelle 
in the British Empire vs. USA 
meet. 


Barons vs. Canucks 

Cleveland Barons meet the 
Vancouver Canucks at the L. 
A. Sports Arena. Wednesday 
and Thursday nights, Feb. 1 
and 2. The games are .■sponsor- 
ed by Jack D^mpsey who had 
the Boston Bru'ns and the 
Toronto Maple Leafs at the 
Arena last September. 



A Cr T Student 
To Represent- U.S. 

GREENSBORO, N.C.— Junius 
Byron Russell, Jr., 18, a stu- 
dent at A&T College has been 
selected as one of a four 
member "All American" 4-H 
Club group to represent the 
United States at the Interna- 
tional Agricultural Exhibition 
in Cairo, Egypt. 


SIGNED — Archie Moore, 
110 pound kingpin, and 
Erich Schoeppner of Ger- 
many signed to meet in 15- 
r'jund light - heavyueight 
championship fight at Madi- 
son Square Garden in Neuf 
York Mar. 20 or 21. 


Chargers' Coaches 
To Attend Banquet 

Two assistant coaches of the 
Western Division title win- 
ning Los Angeles Chargers 
and several stars of the team 
will be special guests at the 
Jefferson High and Jordan 
High banquets tonight 
(Thursday). 

Offensive end Coach Al 
Davis, tackle Ernie Wright 
and defensive back Jim Sears, 
former SC all-American, will 
headline Jefferson's banquet 
at Rand's Roundup on South 
Figueroa. 

And offensive line coach 
Joe Madro, end Trusse Norris 
and all-pro defensive back 
Dick Harris, will spark Jor- 
dan's banquet in the multi- 
purpyose room on the school's 
campus. 

The Chargers' all-pro quar- 
ter 'oack Jack Kemp and Brad 
Pye, Jr., a member of the 
club's public relations staff, 
will be special guests at Nar- 
bonne High's fall banquet 
Friday night, Jan. 20. 


1960 Progress 

Now that another golfing 
yar has passed, we are hap- 
py to report that a little pro- 
gress was made in the direc- 
tion of integration by our golf 
clubs. 

Cosmopolitan Golf Club was 
tl.e first club to vote to "leave 
Fox Hills." Their tournaments 
will be held on other golf 
courses whose clubs are not 
.guilty of segregating. (Even 
semi -private Rio Hondo Men's 
Club accepted ONE Negro.) 

Earl Reason, progressive 
president of Cosmo, must be 
complimented for his ability 
to contiiiue to make this or- 
ganization one of the largest 
on the West Coast. (In 1961 
we would like to see Cosmo 
select and sponsor amateur 
Ray Boots in all tournaments ) 

The Dental, Medical and 
Pharmaceutical Golf Club 
ALSO left Fox and held its 
annual Thanksgiving tourn- 
ey at the popular Whittier 
Narrows County Ck>urse. . 

Rumor has it that Dr. Wel- 
les Forde was invited to join 
the Whittier Narrows Men's 
Club. If so he will be their 
first Negro member. Dr. Jer- 
ene Webb's hard work as 
tornament chairman for the 
medical men cannot go un- 
noticed. He -must be a true 
"divot digger" because he tees 
tliese tournaments off at the 
'crack of dawn." , 

The California Rubaiyat 
Gk)lf Club finally called a 
meeting and disbanded, thus 
enabling the male members 
to reorganize and play some 
golf. This group is to* be 
complimented for sending ALL 
of its women members a check 
to cover funds that they had 
invested in the organization. 

The Western avenue Negro 
V.'omen after a 5-year fight 
finally convinced the Western 
Avenue Caucasian Women 
golfers (out of court) that 
they should accept Negro wo- 
men golfers. 

Ella Montgomery and Marie 
Brown were voted in and play- 
ed their 1960 Christmas tourn- 
ament with theii^. Ella won 
the club prize. Their militant 
president Pe,ggy Hubber must 
be saluted for her patience 
and encouragement during 


■the heait at the fight. 

The Golden Tees are in for 
nothing but eagles and pars 
in '61 because of that beauti- 
ful plaque that they present- 
ed this writer. The inscription 
read "For your continued fight 
for golf integration." (Thank 
you, tournament chairman 
Bob Williams.) 

Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, 
who in the past was bitter 
because of the » continuous 
fight at Western, changed his 
mind and agreed to call a 
meeting to reinstate all coun- 
ty clubs. 

Superintendent Norman 
Johnson made a giant step 
toward progress when he 
had vowed never to meet with 
the Caucasian women at West- 
ern) he came to Western last 
month to set up the meeting 
for March 1961. 

Bing and Bob Crosby sent 
their first invitations to Ne- 
gro golfers Charlie Sifford and 
Harry Mills. They will play in 
their lush, rich Pebble Beach 
$55,000 tournament. One-hun- 
dred and fifty pros and 150 
amateurs, including the big- 
gest names in show and 
sports z will tee off Thurs- 
day. The low scorers only will 
play the final' round Sunday. 
See you there. 

.J a d Note — Vernoncrest 
Golf Club is the only club that 
did not show any progress in 
1960. They continued to hold 
Labor Day tournaments at 
Fox. It is the only club left 
there and will face a picket 
line in September. They were 
given a year's notice to leave. 

Baylor, Wife to 
Attend Inaugural 

Three members of the Los 
Angeles Lakers basketball 
squad, Elgin Baylor, Jerry 
West and Hot Rod Hundley 
competed in the annQal NBA 
All -Star game at Syracuse last 
Tuesday. 

Baylor was accompanied by 
his wife, Ruby, on the trip. 
The Lakers have a night off 
Friday and Elg and Ruby 
have accepted an invitation to 
be present at President Ken- 
nedy's inaugural balL 


Title Go Officially 
Set for Miami Beach 

Floyd Patterson and Inge- 
mar Johansson will finally 
tangle in their rubber match 
March 20 in Miami Beach. 

The 15 round bout is the 
first heavyweight title match 
to be staged indoors since 
Nov. 30, 1956, when Patterson 
knocked out Archie Moore to 
become the world champion. It 
is also Che first interracial 
heavyweight champion- 
ship bout in the history of the 
famed Miami Beach ar^na. 

The fight will be promoted 
by Humbert (Jack) Fugazy, 
executive director of Feature 
Sports Inc. Seats in the 18,000 
capacity Miami Beach Conven 
tion Hall have been scaled 
from $100 ringside, to $20. 
They expect a live gate of 
$1,000,000. with another $2,- 
000,(XX) conoing from nation- 
wide TV. 


"^et My women free... 
or the Meed of year 
armies shall cover 


■^ 


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BEAUTIFUL 

CALIENTE 

IN OLD MEXICO 
erriRs iviry sat. a sun. 

RAIN OR SHINI 


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JOHN S. ALESSIO 

4^ Ixawtiv* Olractor \ 




WHATS 
DOINO 


Starting guns are familiar to most people, but few have 
heard of a "Stopping gun". It's used in our Defensive 
Driving course to show how long it takes you to stop 
your car. That's a "stopping gun" on the bumper of the 
car in the picture. 

The instructor riding in the car pulls a string and fires 
the "gun" as a signal to the driver to stop as fast as he 
can. A chalk mark is shot onto the pavement as the gim 
goes off, and a second mgirk is made when the brakes 
are applied. 



MARK FDREST-BRODERICX CRAWFORD 


NOW SHOWING 




pi;"^REE BLONDES] 
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^rsGinc nm-ii 

VIRLl T ■-- 

OLnmC I CENTIRT 

OMVI-M I Biivt-ai 

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By measuring the distance between the chalk marks, 
the driver learns^ how far his car travelled before he re- 
acted to the noisebf the gim. 

We pay lots of attention to safe driving at the phone 
company, and we'v* foimd just being alert avoids lots of 
accidents. 

Every telephone employee who drives in his work takes 
a "Defensive Driving" course. 

This special training really works. Our drivers have 
one of the best safety records anywhere. 

***** 

For somt unlcnown reason, 

squirrels like to gnaw oh 
telephone cables. 

Their chewing puts 
holes in the cable's outer 
covering and lets moisture 
get inside. This, in turn, 
interferes with telephone 
service. 

To protect phone cables, we cover them with metal 
roofs or wrap them with steel tape. 

Squirrels don't like this, but it keeps our cables from 
being damaged and helps us keep your telephone service 
dependable. • ♦ « . ♦ 

SI»ECIAL SERVICE \0 GROUPS 
Are you the program chairman for a service club 
or a church group or a member of such an organiza- 
tion? 

Pacific Telephone will be happy to provide a pro- 
gram for you. We have many -new and different 
programs and films for clubs and schools. For ex- 
ample, our lecture demonstration, "Rockets Red 
Glare." Our speaker will explain the intricate system 
of detection and warning that has been set up to as- 
sure around-the-clock protection of Southern Califor- 
nia. He will describe how the rocket, Nike is trig- 
gered to intercept an enemy plane and you will see a 
film of a high flying plane actually being destroyed 
by Nike. This is a program of paramount interest to 
all. 

If you'd like such a program or further informa- 
tion, just call or visit your local telephone business 
office at 3233 W. Vernon Avenue. 


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TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 

THE HOUR IS LATE 
HERE IS THE ANSWER 

FOR GOD'S SAKE, WAKE UP! 


THE HOUR IS LATE 

America is at war. A war we are losing. We are under 

attack by Godless Communism on a world front and 

Godless materialism on the home front. Selfishness, 

perversion and division within our borders are the 

forces through which Communism takes over. 

It is an ideological war. We are losing it because we are 
not fighting it. Republicans and Democrats — it is the same. 
We move heedless and headless without an ideology against 
an ideological enemy. America is in danger of losing her life 
and the Free World its freedom. 

Guns, doUars and diplomacy alone are no match for an 
enemy who has all these but advances because of the super- 
arm of an ideology. 

America needs an ideology. A change of policy is not 
enough. We need a change of motives and character. A great 
cleansing and uniting force for the nation. 

We judge ourselves by our ideals. Others judge us by 
the way we live. Unfaithfulness in the home, perversion in 
high places and low, decadence in the arts, lawless youth, 
class war, race war, dishonesty — these are becoming the 
marks of American life. We are all responsible. 

These are no weapons with which to win the struggle 
for thef hearts and minds of the millions of the world. And 
no USIA can make them so. 

The fact is that millions who would never join the 
Communist party make its advance inevitable by the way 
they Uve. 

Chancellor Adenauer of Germany said, "Communism 
is a false ideology. But it is an ideology and can only be 
met with moral and spiritual weapons. We are in an ideo- 
logical battle. Therein hes the decisive task. It may last 
decades, but it must be won. A nation with an ideology is 
always on the oSensive. A nation without an ideology is 
self-satisfied and dead." 

Because we do not live an ideology we fail to recognize 
those who do. We were fooled by Mao Tse-tung. We were 
fooled by Castro. In our blindness we are led by those in 
our own press and government whose task it is to make 
Communist§_ Iqok like harmless reformers till they are 
safely in power. 

Our greatest sin has been to cheat the world of the 
nation-saving truths upon which America was founded. Our 
..destiny is to free the world of tyranny. Instead, we have 
cashed in our fighting faith for a soft materialism and re- 
treated before the greatest tyranny the world has ever 
known. 

"Men must choose to be governed by God or they con- 
demn themselves to be ruled by tyrants." In William Penn's 
words lies America's death sentence. Or her one hope.. 

The hour is late. But not too late to turn to the answer. 

There is an answer. It is Moral Re-Armament. 

HERE IS THE ANSWER 

Throughout 1960 the ideological force of Moral Re- 
Armament has been at work in crisis points across the 
world. 

GERMANY 

On December 10, 1960, Bonn newspapers announced 
Chancellor Adenauer's launching of an ideological offensive 
for Moral Re- Armament in Western Germany. 

The newspaper, W estdeutsche Allgemeine wrote: "At 
last we go on the offensive. Moral Re-Armament gives 
democracy the moral backbone it lacks today." 

120,000 people, including 17,000 oflicers and men of the 
German NATO force, have seen the films and plays of 
Moral Re-Armament in recent weeks. 

One of these plays, Hoffnung (Hope), was produc 
and performed by coal miners from the German Rii 
many of them leading Communists before being won to ti. 
ideology of Moral Re-Armament. 

A senior officer of the Ministry of Defense states, "The 
news of what MRA did for the Army is rolling like waves 
into the Ministry, breaking on our desks." 

JAPAN 

Following the riots last June, Prime Minister Kishi 
said, "But for Moral Re-Armament Japan \vould be under 
Communist control today." This, month he writes, "Our 
greatest need now is to go on the offensive and make the 
ideology of Moral Re-Armament the policy of our govern- 
ment and of our people. Only then can Japan survive the 
testing years ahead and play her part in saving Asia from 
tyranny. Our experience last summer shows that you can- 
not answer ideological attack without an ideology. At the 
crucial hour men in labor, youth and politics, trained in 
Moral Re-Armament, stood up and refused to compromise 
with evil." 

Earlier Gabriel Marcel, eminent French Catholic philoso- 
pher, commenting on the development of this force in Japan, 
wrote, "In Tokyo a few months ago I saw the importance of 
all that is being achieved. It creates-a striking contrast with 


the sterile talk among professional politicians who seem 
too often not to grasp the magnitude of what is at stake." 

THE CONGO 

Congolese leaders invited an MRA force to their nation 
six weeks before independence. The force included black 
and white from South Africa, former Mau Mau leaders and 
white settlers from Kenya, as well as Americans and 
Europeans. President Kasayubu told them, "You have 
found the secret of liberation for Africa. All men must 
think how to give this moral basis to the country." 

At the height of the emergency his government asked 
them to broadcast twice daily on the national radio on the 
theme, "An Answer to Crisis." These broadcasts are still 
continuing. 

Commanders of UN contingents from l.'J nations re- 
quested showings of the MRA films for their troops. 

"We would have known a more terrible catastrophe but 
for the films and action of Moral Re-Armament in our 
country," said Jean Bolikango, lylinister of Information and 
National Defense. "Through Moral Re-Armament we have 
seen the way to save our country from Communism and 
set her on a new road." ] 

FREE CHINA 

In September 1960 the National Assembly unanimously 
voted "to give assistance to the advancement of Moral Re- 
Armament in Formosa." It further requested that every year 
Chinese delegations should take part in MRA Assemblies. 

The first trainees are now at Caux, Switzerland. 
General Ho Ying-Chin, wartime premier and commander- 
in-chief of the Chinese armies, said, "If we had had Moral 
Re-Armament, we would never have lost the mainland. 
Only with Moral Re-Armament can we recapture the main- 
Jand from Communism." 

LATIN AMERICA 

At a time when printing houses, radio stations and TV 
channels in Cuba are turning out Communist propaganda 
for the hemisphere, Eudocio Ravines, former Communist 
and delegate to the Comintern, founder of the Communist 
Party in Peru, says: "The basic problems of Latin America 
are not under-development, but corruption and Commu- 
nism. While our countries welcome economic aid, alone it 
cannot touch the root problem. Without a moral ideology, 
it may even aggravate the problem. The l)est export the 
United States of America or any nation can send to Latin 
America is Moral Re-Armament." 

In the port of Rio de Janeiro where strikes and lawless- 
ness had created what the papers called "a reign of terror," 
dockers trained in Moral Re-Armament l^rought a revolu- 
tionary answer. They united the rival unions, they fought 
corruption, they drastically reduced the turn-around 
time of ships, they held the first democratic election in the 
history of the port, defeating the Communist candidates. 
Now they have told the story in a film. Men of Brazil, 
^ which is speaking to the world. . 

ITALY 

With Italy within 1% of Communist take-over in the 
Spring elections, an MRA force is in action. They were 
invited by Italian leaders including Prince and Princess 
Castelbarco Albani, whose family gave a Pope to the 
Church, and Signora Maria Dosio. leader of the rice workers 
of Italy, and a Marxist until she returned to her Catholic 
faith after meeting Moral Re-Armament. 

The plays went first to Milan, heart of industrial Italy 
and to Sesto San Giovanni, where 80*?^ vote Communist. 
After one performance a Communist said: 'Unless we get 
this answer there will be a lilood-hath in Italy by spring. 
This is our one hope." '^ 

SWITZERLAND 

An MRA force with its plays and films was welcomed in 
the Catholic monastery and convent schools of eastern 
Avitzerland last autumn. His Grace Dr. Bernardus Kaelin, 
bbot Primate of the world Benedictine Order, 1947-59, 
aildressed the MRA World Assembly at Caux. He said. "The 
ideology of Moral Re- Armament can win all men because its 
standards are universally valid. It is not a religion, nor a 
substitute for a religion. It is not a sect. It has four mighty 
pillars — absolute honesty, purity, unselfishness and love — 
on which human living must be based. It is a new way de- 
.signed to forestall a false ideology. May it win the world." 
General Henri Guisan, war-time commander-in-chief of 
the Swiss Army, gave this message to his people in the 
foreword to the MRA handbook, Ideology and Co-Existence, 
which went to every home in Switzerland and to 87,000,000 
homes thftjughout the Free World: "Ideological neutrality 
can be dangerous, for refusal to fight for what is right 
plays the enemy's game. We must not allow these military 
virtues to be killed in us by greed for profits and an easy 
life. I loiig that our whole people should face, realistically 
the forces which confront us today." 

AMERICA 

In 1960 America produced a supreme weapon in the 
war of ideas — the MRA picture "in Technicolor, The 
Crowning Experience. It poses the choice to all men every- 
where of Moral Re-Armament or Communism. The story 


was inspired by the life of the great educator Dr. Mary 
McLeod Bethune, bom of slave parents, who rose to be 
adviser to Presidents. Stars of the film are Muriel Smith, 
Broadway's original "Carmen Jones," and Tennessee-bom 
Ann Buckles of the New York cast of Pajama Game. 

The Crowning Experience had its world premiere on 
Broadway last October. Stars from Hollywood, 300 UN 
delegates representing 73 countries, and leaders from every 
walk of New York life were among the distinguished audi- 
ence who packed the theater. 

In its Academy Award qualifying nm in HolijTvood 
The Crowning Experience premiere drew the greatest star- 
studded audience for many seasons. In a front page story 
The Hollywood Reporter stated that the film topped the 
week's box office business in Los Angeles. 

The Los Angeles Herald and Express in an editorial 
said, "A vivid dramatization of the struggle of free people 
everywhere to roll back the advance of Communism." Of 
Muriel Smith, the drama critic wrote, "She quite possibly 
sang and acted her way into an Oscar nomination." 

The South African National Board of Censors has 
unanimously passed The Crowning Experience for unlimited 
distribution. 

In the prologue of the film, Joel McCrea, one of Holly- 
wood's most distinguished stars, says, "The future of the 
world depends on millions making the right choice. Many 
do not know the real America. But The Crowning Experi- 
ence is the kind of picture the world is waiting to see, 
because it portrays the tme America to which the whole 
world can and will respond." 

FOR GOD'S SAKE, WAKE UP! 

The evidence is inescapable. We need now to act. When 
will, America begin to fight the ideological war and make 
Moral Re- Armament her national policy? 

Washington, clean, straight, and God-directed would 
be an invincible force leading mankind to its destiny. 

The urgent need is for patriots — Democrat and Re- 
publican, labor and management, black and white, young 
and old — who will put right what is wrong in their own 
lives and in the life of the nation. Such men will take on 
the task of arming America with her true ideology. 

It means absolute standards of honesty, purity, un- 
selfishness and love,; applied drastically, personally and na- 
tionally. It means men accepting the guidance of God. 
Definite, accurate, adequate information can come from the 
mind of God' to the minds of men. It comes to those who 
listen and obfey. It is the new dimension of statesmanship. 

Dr. Frank Buchman, bom in Pennsylvania, initiator of 
Moral Re-Armament, has done what no other American 
has done. He has not only seen the need for an ideology 
but has given a lifetime to raise up a world force of men 
and women trained and committed to fight and win the 
ideological war. 

The governments of France, Germany, Greece, Japan, 
Free China, the Philippines, Thailand and Iran have deco- 
rated him with their nation's highest honors. In recent 
months leaders from 16 African nations have urged him to 
come to their coimtries before it is too late. In America 97 
Senators and Congressmen said in a message to him, "You 
are giving a uniting idea to nations which can turn the 
ideological tide in the world today." 

Speaking to a World Assembly for the Moral Re- 
Armament of the Nations at Mackinac Island, Michigan, 
Dr. Buchman said: 

"My deep personal wish is to have every American 
free under the direction of God to fight for America; so to 
fight that America really be free, free from the tyranny of 
sin, under God's direction, the imseen but ever-present 
Power. I wish this no less deeply for everyone in every 
nation. 

"I don't want our sons, especially our fighting sons, to 
go about without an answer. It simply enslaves them. 
It is not good enough. It will drive them to the same 
philosophy that rules our opponents. We shall never create 
an inspired democracy that way. Men must leam to have 
a faith that will create the ri^t revolution. If we can 
spread this revolution fast enough we can save America 
and the world. Unless we have this revolution there will 
be a revolution of chaos. 

"It needs this stronger dose. Sin leaves us with such 
a dull, heavy thud. 'The blood of Jesus Christ His Son 
cleanseth us from all sin.' That is the discovery everyone 
is looking for. That is the answer. 

"Then you will have a wonderful example that the 
whole world will want to follow. You will have an America 
to which the wise and honest can repair. And that is what 
the world expects today of America. You will have a battle- 
cry of freedom, and that is what America wants. You will 
have a democracy that is really inspired. 

"Then our young men and our old men will fight as 
Lincoln fought of old. Our yoimg men will know what to 
fight for and our wars will be won. And we shall be at 
peace with, all men and'fhe whole world. 

"The hour is late. Here is the answer. For God's sake, 
wake up!" 


This page, like all the action of Moral Re-Armament, is financed by the sacrificial gifts of men and women from all walks of life, determined to bring this answer to 
America and the world. Contributions, which are tax deductible, and requests for information, may be sent to: | 


MORAL RE-ARMAMENT 


640 Fifth Avenue, New York 19 . 833 Houth Flower Street, Los Angeles' 17 • Cedar Point. Mcufkinac Island. Michigan 



THE FASTEST BOXGO ALU E— That's uhat they are calling PRES- 
TOX EPPS. So like skeptical ue brliar not lihnl ne hiar from rumor, lie 
must see. He saic. ue heard, ue agreed. Pandora's Box has quite a show. If 
you hnvt-n't heard Afro-Cuhan Jazz \rt puk up on the happenings at Pandora's 
Box this ueekcnd. Shnring the spotlight uilh EPPS is LOl' RAII LS uho 
sings in the style comhiq to he knrm n ns "soul" sint/ing. Pandora's box is a 


coffee house and the menu is an experience all by itself, and within the student's 
budget too. Dririna south from Hollyuood we looked in on HASK STEJf- 
ART at the BLACK ORCHID, where DIMPLES JACKSON TRIO was 

preparing lor this weekend's grand opening. Dimples and hubby demonstrate 
remarkable tersalilily between the Hammond, piano or just about any string 
instrument with brother (you see it's a family group) on drums. Black Orchid 


will probably lead the way back to the era of cafe society, with chitterlings and 
steaks how can they miss. JERRY LIXDERMAN invited us to the Club 
IX'flME where a new group, CLIFFORD SCOTT quartet, was holding 
forth in grand ir/y/r. This cat blows a "mad" sax, and threatens to make the 
IXTIME rank with the top L.A. Jazz spots. This we would like to see. Wt 
notice many friends who would like to see a top jazzery right in our midst. 


8— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


DO COME TO 

——BOB GEFAELl « Bill BAPST PREStNT— ^ 

^11 TERRY GIBBS' BIG BAND 

m FOOD • IIAIVCIIVG 

I^^P^^^^B 

_^^ ■7''^nrM?B»T" .* ■■■■'VNkMK"''VW 

HO. 2-8771 

r ^ 6507 Sunset at Wilcox Hollywood 


* 

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SILVER DOLLAR TALENT NIGHT 

EVERV TIESDAY: 

Party Nite — Buffet — Goodies for All 

# ^EDI¥ESDAV NITE: 

PRIZE NITE — DANCE CONTEST 

# THI RSOAY NITE: 

ARTIST SHOWCASE 

# FRIDAY. .SATrRIL\Y. 
SrNDAY: 

DANCE & FLOOR SHOW 

# THI^ WEEKEXII: 

The Click Clacks and Johnny Taylor 

# EYERY NITE: 

DANCING WITH THE SUPERB MUSIC 
OF THE JAY HODGES BAND 

*********** 


3f 


MRA Film to 
Be Considered 
For Oscar Race 

Members of the Motion Pic- 
ture Academy will attend a 
special screening of "The 
Crowning Experience", star- 
ring Muriel Smith, at Ihe 
Academy Theatre Jan. 24 to 
cotisider the film for nom- 
ination in the Oscar awards 
I race. Produced by Moral Ro- 
I Armament, the film wa.s in- 
spired by the life of the great 
i educator, the late Mary Mc- 
Leod Bethune. 

The special showing is re- 
served for Academy members. 
: Muriel Smith, the famed con- 
tralto who created the role of 
Carmen Jones on Broad\va.\', 
has been widely hailed as a 
possible Award winner. .She 
received highest plaudits from 
both New York and Los An- 
geles pre.ss. 

In response to public de- 
mand. Moral Re-Armament 
will rescliedule "The Crown- 
ing Experience" for more pub- 
lic showings in the near fu- 
ture. 


*Chazz* Soundtrack 1 

NOTES OF AN INNOCENT BAR-STANDER 

Dancer-Comic FOSTER JOHNSON in town to visit with 
former wife, the lusc;ious NICHEL NICHOLS prior to her de- ! 
parture for London. The songstress opens at the Stork Club 1 
there on the 22nd. Their .\oung son is one of the actors in 
•Only in America" currenth' at Ihe Ivar theater . . . 20th i 

CENTURY FOX (now there'sV -^ - I 

a swinging Hollywood studioi POOSEI ... .Attention Acad-} 
has extended RAFER JOHN-'<'nny Members: It should be 
SON'S contract and will see to hard for you to overlook the 
it that he gets co'^star billing : significant acting chore turn- 
with ELVIS PRESLEY in: ed in by WOODY STRODE in 
"WILD IN THE COUNTRY." ; Spartacus. He should by all 

means be nominated in the; 

Best, Male Supporting Role 

category. 


PeoDle & Places 


OR — He ai 

itUfientsVcrrar 


A southwest niterv is ad- 


for DINAH WASHINGTON and I 


Sortuve stuck on the way 


now spouse RAFAEL CAMPOS, jimmy rickS (formerly with 
Only they really got hung on;|hf>,.RA-yENS) and LAVERNE 
the bridegroom's name, i BAXER "get- together on "You're 
Mispelled it RAFEL .C^iiM-' the. Boss" . . . Some real down 


DR. CHRIS TAYOR — He ar-|that their behavior had made 
ranged for 110 students^grad- j possible future favors for oth- 
uating in Jeff's Winter '61 er teenagers from Jeff — and 
cla.ss to have their After- the "doc" was ready to give 
Prom Dance at the plush Pa- j them the family jewels! 
cific Town Club. Following the mOVIE EXTRAS — 'V\'ords ooz- 
affair which lasted until 4'ing out of the recent union 
a.m.. class president Ernest meeting have it that orchids 
Class and prom chairman: should be tossed in the direc- 
Carol Smith thanked the good tion of Fredia Rentie. Byron 
"doc' for everything he had ejj.js jaj^pg Malcolm, Eugene 
done in their behalf and, in Jackson, and Freddv Baker for 
parting, they said they hoped insisting that Negro extras 

should be cast from a HoUy- 
home warblingt' . . . Hairsty- wood office! 
list OMAR telts us she will MAE J O H N S 6 N — Thbse 
supervise classes at the Pacific friends who went along with 
Beauty School in Huntington the bit pla\er when she was 
Park! fired as Pearl Bailey's stand- 


lin are seriously thinking 
about sending her a book on 
the Sit-InsI 
BILL DUFfY— Member of Peo- 

! pie's Funeral Home's Board 
jof Directors doesn't know it, 
but Abie Robinson has been 
'tabbed to kickoff the opening 
;of the new site at 42nd and 
:S. Central, if he continues to 
italk about that socialite and 
jher woomanoe which involved 
I those tough and dangerous 
union officials. Proceeds col- 
i lected from his funeral would 
I go to Jefferson -High's Scholar- 
ship fund, which means he 
wouldn't be bumped off in 


'You've got a whole I 

.^"T^-K 'o* of soul I 

to be so 
young I " 





MARCEL MARCEAV, 

acknowledged to be the 
world's greeatest pantomimist. 
began a Ijniited tW'o-weeks 
engagement Monday, Jan- 
uary 16. at the Huntington 
Hartford Theatre. 


' "THE 




STARRING 


ZACHARY SCOTT 


The Gianfs of Terror! 

^^^ *^M^^ Joe< 


Joe«ph Harris-^ 
S*9 Si>ora Pr««*ntaiion I 


Introducing KEY MEERSMAN 
and BERNIE HAMILTON 

Directed by LUIS BUNUEL 

A VillANT (EI.EASE 

^elusive 2 -Theatre Engagement! 


Starts FRIDAY 

JAN. 20I 


DOWNTOWN 

LOS ANGELES 

615 S Broadway 

MA. 7-2944 

Open 1 1 30 a m. 


HOLLYWO HIGHLAND 

HOLLYWOOD 

HO. 3-9371 

Open AH Nigm 
Opfn 12 30 5 » m 


Prize Winner 
Opens Friday 

'The '\'oung One" is Luis 
jBunuel's prize film, the first 
I this director has made in Eng- 
jlish and the first to deal with 
I the American .scene. It opens 
'an e.xclusive two-theatre en- 
igagement Friday, Jan. 20, at 
the Downtown Los Angeles 
and Hollywood Theatre in 
Hollywood. 

Starring Zachary Scott -and 

inroducing Key Meersman 

and Bernie Hamilton, talented 

I Ihespian and brother of the 

j famous Chico Hamilton, in 

[featured roles, "The Young 

I One" is described by one 

icritic as "Brilliant, savage and 

;thf- ultimate in compas.sion." 

I Winner of the extraordinary' 

j merit award at the Cannes 

Film Festival. 


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!r :^n- 



Riy< h E} Dl.\ AS . ].\C. — Members are shoun in snin'ri. hlruk. full letifith 
iormnh. tctth pnndles frnm the (Inrr Ler Kennels in Mnlihii. Piitiirerl from 
left: Ann Mnlhrniigh. piihlirl/y chairman: Hilfle(/ardi Hnslir. business ninn- 
eger ; Jan Onens: If ini Cnrey ; Lena Barnes, parluunrnlnrinn : Berntce 


Broitks. hislnrinn : Ruth Bmien, mistress of eeremonies ; Anne Odom. presi- 
dent: H'lrlrnse Ridley, acting vice president : Ruby Jones, financial secretary; 
Jen R/rniiler, recordinij secretary: Alice Payne, treasurer; and Lillian 
K/izarinn, cnrresprindihg secretary. (Adams) 


Rinkeydinks Cl 
Second Annua 

The saying goes that tho teinational Ballroom of the 

French have a word for it. Beverly Hilton Hotel, the 

If so, last Thursday night in Rinl<pydinks ' Inc., at the 

the beautfiully decorated In- club's Bal Elegante formal. 


ub in Sparklin 
Bal Elegante 

added extra zing to that out in a setting that depicted 

"word". the gay streets of Pari> e\cn 

The formal theme was down to its live poodles. 

French, and it was carried Before the opening i.f tlie 



SHOULDER TO SHOULDER — Among the .apacity 
croujd attending the' second annual Rinkeydinks' formal 
were, seated, from left: Margaret (,'ockran. A uirlie H'il-i 
Hams, Jrri Rancifer. Jerry flan ey . Sallye II arren. Joanne^ 


Smith, Dotlie Srnith. fonn J i>lni.\r,ii and Mary Anderson. 
Standing, from left: L. I . John.yon, (Jhris ffindinnn, John 
Rancifer. Clarence Jackson, Ray Smith anil fL f)uke Si'ii- 
mons. /"A dams. ) 



DISrjyaUfSJlED quests — a ttendina the second 
annual Rinkeydinks' formal were ninny notables of the 
community. Seated from left: Peter Dnuleriie', Sand ford 


Jones. I erna f)auteriie, Ethel Bindley, loin Ihiidlrx. 
Mane Gladden. Anthony Sniidin, f^leanor Siiiidin and Roll 
ert Gladden. (Adams) 



JLL ABOARD AT BAL ELEGANTE^—There is no 
doubt that those above are en'joyrng the Rinkeydinks' affair. 
Among the ehariHers seated are Genard Stanchmore, Bar- 


bara M ansfield , f.lhel Turner, .Mnrlene (jharhonet , Betty 
Reed, f^ita M inston, Delyte 'Thomas and Shirley E.vans. 
(Adams) 



BAND PERSOy ALITIES— Peppy Prince and Les Hite, 
famed as tuo of the Southland's finest conductors of big 
orchestras, are shotin attending the Bal Elegante formal. 
Shown with Rinkeydink club member Lena Barnes, fourth 
irom Uft m the hack row, are front: Louue Prince j 


Peppy Prince, Mrs. and Mr. Artie Stokes, Sor^ny 
and Zee Maddox, and Mr. and Afrs. If'illiam Gray. 
Standing are Mrs. and Mr. T. Hnxvard, Lili^^Tilliams, 
■Mrs. Barnes, Clifford Solon and Afrs. and Mr. f.cs Hite. 

(Adams.) 


g Gay 
Forma 


affair, the dance committee, 
chaired by charming Jeii 
Rancifer and comprising, in 
addition. Lena Barnes, Lil- 
lian Kazarian, Hildegradc 
Bostic and Anne Odom, ar- 
rived at the hotel at S p. m. 
They preceeded with speed 
and artistry to transform the 
ballroom into a typical 
French ctiy. capturing its 
fascinating gaiety, allure 
and charm. 

The decoration.s included a 
street scene of a cafe on Rue 
de La Paix, complete with 
flower carts and a replica 
of the famed and traditiDnal 
French magnum of 
champagne. .So successful 
were their decorations and 
settings that when guests 
started arri\ing the huge 
ballroom immediately be- 
gan to hum with laughter 
and gaiety that continued 
throughout the evening. The 
place sparkled as if one were 
in a Paris ballroom. 

Ruth Bowen of the New 
York Chapter flew into town 
especially for the local chap- 
ters second annual affair. 
She acted as mistress of 
ceremonies, wearing a crisp 
bt^auty of a gown made of 
mink and featuring red ac- 
cessot les. 

Talifornia designer Joseph 
Malbrough. who creates most 
of the club's gowns for pub- 
lic affairs, included the sug- 
gestion of France in each of 
the member's brilliant black 
gowns of sequin bodices 
with chiffon skirts, featuring 
spaghetti strips and a strik- 
ing red rose at the waistline. 

Following the introduction, 
the fashionable guests, num- 
bering easily 2.300. were 
entertained delightfully by 
such box office attractions 
as Earl Grant. Nellie Lutch- 
er. Dinah Washington. Earl 
Bostic and .limmy Wither, 
spoon. The huge crowd gave 
them an ovation they will 
never forget. ' .P 

On the serious side of the 

vitatiohal affair, the Rin- 
keydinks 'selected this way 
of saying "thank you" to 
their many friends who have 
supported them in their 
community pro.iects. such as 
donating $1000 tp Jefferson 
High School's Scholarship 
Fund, aiding the NAACP and 
the Urban League and pre- 
senting another thousand 
dollars at an annual Christ- 
mas award benefit. 

The Rinkeydinks ha\'e two 
sp>eotacular events scheduled 
for the 1961 season but won't 
reveal the details until con- 
tracts are signed and sealed. 

.kr\ invitation has been ex- 
tended the local chapter to 
join their sister chapter 
when they fly to Paris in the 
Spring. 

It was revealed following 
the formal that the local 
chapter will seek three new 
members to make their 
membership total li5. 

Among the throng that 
turned out at the Bal Ele- 
gante were Beverly Jones 
and r>r. J. K. Lightfoot, Dr. 
and Mrs. Julius W. Hill. 
Berenice Booker. Bern ice 
Lawson, Lee Trainor, Jack 
Trainor, Esther Worrill, B. Y. 
Worrill. Mr. and Mrs. H. 
Jones, B. A. Jones, Mr. and 
Mrs. F. Cotton, Mr. and Mrs.* 
S Smoke, Mr. and Mrs. F, 
Billinger, Mrs. Jaye Thomas, 
Olive Poole and Alvln White. 

Also Mr. and^Mi-s. Juan 
Neucke, Miss Floyd Miller, 
Lorenzo Willis, Nancy Willis, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Merrill,- 
Pat Moore, Miss V. Dooley, 
Nelson Creswell, Mr. and 
Mrs. Max Cazanave, Joel 
Fluellcn. Mr. and Mrs. 
Eugene Person, Mr. and Mrs. 
Homer Minor. Watson 
Childs, Mr. and Mrs. Mose 
Bardford, O. D. Barnes, Bar- 
bara Hubbard. Geneva La- 
mar, Mr. and Iirs. E. S. 
Burris. 

Also Bettye Jackson, Bob 
Nelson, William. McHenry, 

(Continued on Page 9) 


^3 



CLUBS 




FASHlONi 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


The California Eagle— 9, 



EASHIOSABLE R I \ K EY D I S K S—Dnnce committee mewhrrs are lakinz n puff dur- 
Uio their sciond annual nifair. floral decotat ions riinie from A'Utn Bor/ati. f^utuied art' 
Lena Barnes. Lillian Kmiirinn. Hildrynrde Bo<nr, Jeri Rrincijer and Anne Odo"!. (.-Idams) 



A BROAIlll AY M.l SICAt. PACK ACr—Pwe m,.,nc that -.cy fei.- cluhy can boast 
of un\ tins S /('('. ('('i' pin kr.i/c ol pci iorniimi sla's. I'hiy sanij and pla\ed tree of charge and 
this nil e cfifiii'i'iatioii hroin/ht the house don n and rcicnid one of the larqest ovations _ 
ever given pcrloi iiirrs. from lelt, illustrious Earl Chant, /c.zzv Srllie Lull her: dynamic 
f)inah Hashiiu/fon . hiUcn Jmi'iiy II ithir spoon and the st iiitlilalirig Ear I Bostic with 
his horn. I .f dams. ) 



X07IHNG fS XEGLECTED— Designer Joe .Malbrough. who designed the maneltrnt^l 

Rinkeydinks' formals. is shown getting mcmhcrs Jen Rancifer, Anne Odom and HoiyJ^ 
tense Ridley in readiness for their introduction. (Adams.) -,--.;?■] 

.-^.^ i 


.•*^— ^i»*'^v ! 


■"^''■^^■^^ *^ -=*-— *^*'-_ ^-^* ^'rri 



t\ 


.«> 



Dorothea Foster 


J 


By TOMMY BERRY 

Our guest this week i^the charming Tommy 
Berry, former columnist for the Kansas City Call 
and one of the founders of that city's Fellowship 
House. 

She has been residing in Los Angeles for the past 
six years with her daughter Bootsie Howard, wife of 
Dr. Joe Howard. She is a member of the Los Angeles 
Probation Department. — Ed. 


Hi folks . . . 

When the Eagle asked me to be its guest column- 
ist this week, I was delighted that I could share the 
pages with the good editorial writing of Loren Miller 
and Lester Granger, news tidbits with Bill Small- 
wood and other good writing folks, but since every- 
one is taking a breather from the holiday festivities, 
rd like to reminisce on ^ the wind-up. 

It's always good to dine and dance with the good- 
looking Country Clubbers with URSULA MURRELL 
as head. . . . Spotted in the group was LOIS KNOX 
of D.C. DR. and MRS. TERRANCE of Louisiana 
SUesUng with the HOWARD ALLENS. EVELYN and 
HARRY COX in high spirits. Good-looking MAJOR 
and MRS. LOVING and all of a sudden there was 
COL. VANCE MARSHBANKS with his Mrs. As the 
rumor goes COL. MARSHBANKS heads an eleven 
JTian doctor astronaut team. But at any rate here is 
3 man who has remained through the years, a 
friend, a gentleman and very much in love with his 
own three women, his wife and two lovely daugh- 
ters. 

: JOHN and GEN RUfeFUD enjoying their folks 
"from Louisiana. IVAN DIXON winging his way to 
4^ew York for a TV series. SIDNEY POITIER and 
^JUANITA in Paris happily expecting. 
- The G. T. BRYANTS of Kansas City visiting their 
■threesome, the LORENZO WALLACES. 

Africa-Bound? 

The ARTHUR KNIGHTS of Chicago in L.A. The 
EDGAR LOVES anticipating a year in Africa if wife 
MARGARET will give. And then off to the C.C.'s, a 
"real swell bunch at the home of ETHEL and AL 
MADDOX with their beautiful young daughter 
ifresh, dewey, lovely, assisting. 

~ Slim OUIDA WILLIAMS in black sequins; 
i^LARA HARRIS always smart, cute EDITH HOUS- 
-TON with a new hair-do; MAUDE BROADY having 
3 ball; DELLA WILLIAMS always elegant; ANN 
"COLEMAN, fresh; and loads of others and after the 
-New Year comes the traditional after-the-game 
dinner with PAT and DR. G. McLEOD with all the 
IZionest food turned elegant with silver and cutwork 
"but everybody just loved that foolishness, food 
Hhat is. 

- And off to DOLLY and BOB BLACKBURN'S to 
-christen their cute new bar . . . and how I wish I 
Tould fly to D.C. by special invite to the Inaugura- 
Jtion but JERRY WOODS will be going and quite 
-correct and I don't know who else — and then came 
Ilhe Rinkeydinks and that was the living end,-head- 
_ed by ANNE ODOM. But let me tell you of the soft 
3<;andle-light complemented with red, and this group 
-Of gals in black sequins and chiffon who knocked 
"everybody out with all this and the Beverly Hilton, 
y4»o. 

Poodle Not a Ham 

RUTH BOWEN, the cute member from New 
York, did herself proud with announcement of the 
group heading for Paris in the l^pring. The grey 
poodles didn't give one care about having their pic- 

s^ tures made and one was insulted with ABIE ROBIN- 
SON and all the goings-on, but all the celebrities 
were there with JIMMIE WITHERSPOON singing 

1 his heart out. JIM GILLIAM of baseball fame with 
his young wife expecting, just kids, but a pack of 
energy. And then there was EARL GRANT sending 
up Oh's and Ah's with velvet and silk tux and when 
he opened it up . . . boy! . . . but Earl is now flying 
all over Japan with a stop-off in Pearl Harbor for a 
concert for our boys there, thep after six weeks to 
do a show for Ed Sullivan. 

On to LAS VEGAS and maybe to meet the 
Rinkeydinks in Paris. And I looked up to see HENRY 
WOODS in baby Persian lamb and a black homburg. 
and that was the living end until DINAH WASH- 

'. INGTON, looking radiant in green chiffon, just toss- 

■ ing that little ole sable aside, and if you didn't see 
her new husband RAFAEL CAMPOS with an act- 
ing career then you should'uv. But she is always a 
hand clapper. NELLIE LUTCHER singing and play- 
ing with all chiming in. The CAS SAVELLS with a 
small informal. The EDWARD BRAMLETTS (Ed- 
na's mom) visiting EDNA and CARL LOFTON from 

; Cincy and I'm all out of space n' breath n' time. 

'Bye now. 

Honored On Anniversary 


TaJented music director 
Albert and Helen McNeil en- 
tertained 35 guests at a din- 
^ner-dance in honor of their 
seventh wedding annivers- 
ary. 

The affair was held at 
their home on Don Diablo 
drive in the Baldwin Hills 
Estates. The decor was in 
keeping writh the Yuletide 
season. Music for dancing 
was furnished by the Vince 
Gomez quartet. 

Guests present were Dr. 
Oner B. Barker, Jr., Mr. and 
Mrp. William Boykin, Miss 
Cwol Cappell. Mr. and Mrs. 
Eme*t Carbaugh, Mr. Delfino 
CUneros, Mrs. Bettye Day, 
Mr. and Mrs. Garron Gwdon, 
Mrp. Constance Hall, Mrs. 
Phyllis Hollaway. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chester Hanley. Miss 


Nira Harden. 

Also Dr. James Hutchinson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Jones, 
Miss Marian Kaddish, Mrs. 
Madelynne Lewis, Mr. Mario 
Lomeli, Mr. Bill O'Connor, 
Mr. and Mrs. Julian Omer- 
berg, Mr. Lester Orticke, Miss 
Ets Osako, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Pleasant, Mrs. M. 
Porter, Mr. Robert Rupert, 
Mrs. Olive Sklles, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Vaughn, Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald Watson (I>r. Louise 
Watson), Dr. Artis White, 
Mr. George Yamamoto. 

Surprise Birthday 

Louise Anderson, well 
known club woman and so- 
cialite, surprised her hus- 
band Carney Anderson with 
a birthday party in Pasa- 
dena last Saturday. 




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\ 


10— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


Retiring 
Official 
Honored 

More than 150 county em- 
ployees, community leaders, 
court officials, ahd friends 
gathered at a luncheon Fri- 
day to pay tribute to Senior 
Deputy Probation Officer 
Georgia C. Weist who is re- 
tiring after 30 years. 

Miss Weist was lauded by 
Chief Deputy Probation Of- 
ficer Harold R. Muntz, Cap- 
tain Ruth Johns of the Sher- 
iff's Department, represent- 
ing the County Women Peace 
Officers Association, and 
Mrs. Audrey Jones, Attorney 
and president of the Twelve 
Big Sisters, for the service 
to children and families of 
the community. Master of 
Ceremonies was David P. 
Macpherson, director of the 
Southwest Area Office of the 
County Probation Depart- 
ment. 

Those attending included 
Superior judges. referees, 
many administrators from 
correctional agencies, and 
forty of the staff members of 
the Southwest Office. 

Miss Weist has won high 
praise for her contributions 
to the field of youth wel- 
fare and probation. She was 
a founder of the Los An- 
jroles County Women's Peace 
Officers Association, and was 
its president in 1958. She 
has ahso been active in the 
Twelve Bir; Sisters, a serv- 
ice organization for girls, 
and in numerous community 
organizations. ^ 

Club Holds 
Regular Meet 

La V'ern Sails was hostess 
to the regular meeting of 
the Lad'es of Paradise Club 
last week. 

Committees reported on 
their recent affairs, their 
annual Christmas party and 
their award benefit at which 
three pirate chests filled 
with silver were given away. 

Club members contributed 
to cheer a member who has 
been ill for the past several 
months. 

Tile group holds a life 
membership in the NAACP 
and recently supported the 
NAACP Seals drive. Next 
meeting will be nc\^ in the 
Santa Monica home'of Opal 
Richardson. 

Miscellaneous Gifts 
Showered Upon 
Sandra Hoskins 

Mrs. Kathryn Morris Hu- 
ante was a most delightful 
hostess at the new Viewpark 
home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed Morris, at a 
pretty miscellaneous shower 
and luncheon complimenting 
Miss Sandra Hoskin.'^. bride 
elect of Mr. Alonzo Wilkins 
III. 

Most of the guests were 
former roommates and 
friends of the honc^ee and 
the hostess when /hey 
tended UCLA. *" 


at- 


Gives Fashion Show 

Girl Scout troop No. 799 
held a Fashion Show re- 
cently with Mrs. Rosemary 
Osburn as coordinator. 

The Fashion Show was a 
huge success under the 
guidance of Mrs. William 
Files, 

Clothes were furnished by 
Robert Hall. 

The Girls who participated 
were; Stephanie Thomas, 
Marlyn Stewart, Kathy Jack- 
son, Cynthia Hawkins, 
Jacquelyn Kea, Cynthia 
Jonnson, Patricia Blair, 
Gayle Harris, Cynthia Col- 
lein, Jacquelyn Troup, Linda 
Burgess, Gwendolyn Cooper, 
JoAnne Cormia, W 1 1 1 e 1 1 a 
Files, Onnette Henry. Wanda 
Milan, Sharon Winston, and 
Patricia Clayton. 



SURPRISE niR'niDAY^Ciisslc 'I'urkrr IS shoivn enjoy 
iiiij the shniv at llir (.'ji (iiinut (I'uji liisl I ucsdny liiih her 
hushitiul. loiiuiix. iilir, iiirprtseti liir o/i her tirthday, first 
U'llfi a tldihey blue 1 hunderbird and. second, uilh dinner 
C.7 the janied (^oioniutt Grove shouhousc featuring Paul 
.1 nk/i rind sliirnn// the t our Step Brothers. 

Tommy Tucker Surprises 
Wife on Her Birthday 


How to surprise .\our wife 
on her birtlrda.N' — don't give 
fier mink.' Instead, make it a 

Ihundcrbird and dinner at 
the Ambassador's popular 
Cocftaiiut drove. But her 
birthday must fall on a 
i' i g h t that youthful Paul 
.■\nka i.s in town. 

Cussic Tucker v.as so sur- 
prised wiien her husband 
presented lier with a sleek 
light blue Tluinderbird she 
was spccchicKs. Since it was 
her birtliday Ikm husband 
suggested they iia\c dinner 
and take in a show. She 
([Uickly decided on the Am- 
bassador at uhiicli Paul 
Anka was making iiis first 
West Coast ninfitchib — debut 
along with sucli wonderlul 
entertainers as tlie Four Step 
Brother.s, Dorothy" D o r b e ji, 
group dancers, and s'.\inging 

Local Delta Officer to 
Attend Inaugural Ball. 


Freddy Martin orchestra. 

.Mrs. Tucker still hadn't 
fully recovered from the sur- 
jirise of receiving her excit- 
ing gift when she got her 
second surpri.se — her dap- 
per husband ushered her to 
H ringside table where they 
found Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
I".ullis, Mr. and Mrs. Brad 
1 ye 'and Mr. and Mrs. Edw. 
".\bie" Robinson. 

The.v all rose and gave out 
with the Happy Birtliday bit. 
Mrs. Tucker was really non- 
lilussed but finally broke out 
in smiles. The group and the -i . 

Cocoanut Grove show helped jlatCS AnPUS 
provide her with a gay eve- 
ning. 

ning. The party left the Grove 
with Al Williams of the Step 
Brotliers joining making the 
_ rounds which included the 
Memory Lane and Club 
Town Hill. 


Banquet 

Honors 

Knights 

A gala banquet was held 
recently for the Junior 
Knights and Junior Daugh- 
ters of the Knights- of Peter 
Claver and Ladies Auxiliary 
at St. Leo's Catholic Shurch 
Hall. It was replete with fun 
and gaiety. 

'Hosting the affair were 
area deputies, Pierre 5.' 
Thomas, Lady Louise Rus- 
sell and Julius Pratt. 

Junior Knights Command- 
ers having boys present 
were: Frank Whittier, Coun- 
cil No. 87: Eldridge Charles, 
Council No. 96; Whitley 
Austin, Council No. 113; and 
Richard B. Thomas, Council 
No. 128. 

Junior Daughter Counsel- 
ors present were: Ladies Ann 
Walker, Court No. S7; Ann 
Revere, Court No. 96; Al- 
berta Guidry, Court No. 113; 
Agnes Smith, Court No. 99; 
Louise Russell, Court No. 128; 
and Mae Moore, Court No. 
1121. 

Responsibilty for the 
growth of Junior Knights 
and Daughter councils and 
courts, who at adults age 
may be Senior Knights and 
Ladies, is entrusted to Sir 
Knight William J. Knox, Sr., 
and Lady Alma Branlett, 
Western States district dep- 
uties, and various area dep- 
uties of the Knights of Peter 
Claver. 

More than 200 Junior 
Knights and Daughters were 
present. 

Zenith Club 


Dr. fleraldine P. Woods, 
national first \ice-president 
of Delta Sigma Theta Inc.. 
will probably travel the 
greatest distance of ail 



DR. G. P. WOODS 


Deltas to attend a conference 
of National officers at Del- 
ta's Washington headquart- 
ers. She will also participate 
in Inaugural activities this 
week. 

Dr. Woods, in lier second 
term as national first vice- 
president, has served Delta 
in a number of posts, includ- 
ing the 'Vice-presidency and 
presidency of the Los An- 
geles Alumnae Chapter. 

She will be conferring with 
other Delta officers in Wash- 
ington on matters relating 
to the organization's public 
service projects. 

Delta, with 28,000 mem- 
bers in 267 chapters in the 
United States, Haiti, and 
Liberia, concentrates its pub- 
lic service efforts in library, 


job opportunititcs, volun- 
teers, mental health, and in- 
ternational proiects. 

Dr. Woods, who holds a 
Ph.D. in nuero-embryology, 
is married to Los Angeles 
dentitet, Dr. Robert Woods, 
and is the mother of three 
children. 

Other community organi- 
zations to which Dr. Woods 
contributes Jier services are 
Jack and Jnl, the Auxiliary 
to the Medical, Dental and 
Pharmaceutical Assn. and the. 
Lullaby Guild, 

Annual Banquet 
Slated for Statler 

The Consolidated Realty 
Board's 12th annual banquet 
is scheduled for Feb. 3 at the 
Statler Hilton Hotel. 

Kay Murray is general 
chairman of the banquet at 
which new officers will be 
installed. 


CHICAGO VISITOR 

Lillian Coleman of Chi- 
cago is the house guest of 
Charity White at her Mans- 
field avenue home. 


Talent Show 

Zenith Social Club an- 
nounced that March 12 is 
the date scheduled for its 
annual talent show, to be 
held in the Miramar Hotel 
in Santa Monica. ^ 

Nine years ago the froup 
held its first show to rmse 
funds for the Exceptional 
Children's Home. 

The Zenith Club is the 
backbone of the S85,000 
building program currently 
underway at the home. 

This year's show is ex- 
pected to te one of the best 
in the club's history. Social 
and civic organizations are 
urged to enter amateur tal- 
ent in the contest. 

Installs Officers 

The American Assn. for 
Afro-American Relations 
held its installation of of- 
ficers at the church of Chris- 
tian Fellowship, 2nd avenue 
and W. Adams blvd. Rev. 
James Hargett, pastor of 
Christian Fellowship, offi- 
ciated. 

Officers installed were: Dr. 
Brandon A. T. Bowlin, presi- 
dent; Nnanna Ibok-Ete, first 
vice-president; Dr. Edna 
Griffin, second vice presi- 
dent; and Olu Dclu, third 
vice-president; Mrs. Wesley 
Prevost, recording secretary; 
Mrs. Odessa Cox, correspond- 
ing secretary; Mrs. Floy 
Sibrie, financial secretary; 
James A. King, treasurer; 
Meta Dee, chaplain; Ifeagwu 
Chukwue MekaOmeke, audi- 
tor, and Pius O. Kigbe, co- 
ordirtator. 


Esterljne Powell's husband 
Bill, in; a coma at Sawtelle. 
The Russell Thompsons (Lu- 
\ercha Bray) entertaining at 
dinner Frid. Jessie McKinney 
was rushed to Good Samari- 
tan Hosp. last Frid. The doc- 
tor eyed Gil Lindsay, shoved 
him into bod and cancelled 
all his Inaugural plans. 
The Girl Friends met Mon. 
with Lena Tucker. 

Atty. Coi^i Brown took the 
wingswept route as of Sat. to 
DC for a day or so and no 
doubt will be back by the 
time you . read this. Maxine 
Heflin settled herself com- 
fortably in her room on the 
City of LA streamliner last 
Pun. and scooted off to Chi- 
for a few da.vs, then to the 
Inaugural Ball and onto 
NYC for a long fortnight of 
fun-fun. Lee Meriweathcr, 
who lives now in SF, was in 
town over the weekend. Zen- 
obia Allen convalescing at 
home ?iftcr surgery. 

Met Debut 

■N'Yorkcr Arizona Harris 
who liad been visiting our 
town leisurely bade tempor- 
ary adiep and left Sat. for 
hei' home in Westchester. 
N.Y. She plans to dispose of 
her jjlace and move to LA 
in the near future. The Sat. 
Afternoon Club meet Sat. 
with Pasadena's Marian 
Moore. SFs Bill Allen in NYC 
to attend the Met debut of 
Leontyne Price ne.xt Frid. To- 
da.v 1 19 1 is Gwen Gordon's 
birthday. Ditto tomorrow for 
Loren Miller while Sat. (21) 
is natal day for Pauline 
Slater and Eddie Atkinson 
Jr. 

-Mon. r23t gets birthday 
hugs for Wesleen Foster and 
Maude Broady and Dr. Y'o- 
lando Stovali Brooks gets 
hers the next day while 
Deegee Howard so noncha- 
lantly nods to hers Wed. (25). 
Henry McPherson Jr. is host 
tomorrow night (Frid.) at 
Larclimont Hall to a coterie 
of friends who will de danc- 
ing and celebrating their 
high sfhoo! commencement, 
as will, their host. The 
Robert McFerrins (Sarah! 
plan a combination piano 
and voice studio now that 
they've moved completely to 
LA. 

Fast Footwork 

After last Sunday's after- 
noon concert (Shrine), Edith 
Fields Smith gathered unto 
her a merrie houseful of folk 
who promptly paid homage 
to her cocktails and buffet 
while stimulating talk flow- 
ed and flowed. Edith, over 
provocative, undulated about 
in a leopard lounging outfit 
which almost distracted us 
from her usual excellent buf- 
fet table. Edith and Bill 
Dobson. on hand, lamented 
our inability to have attend- 
ed that recent Sun. night 
party they gave which rang 
a rollicking welkin, so every- 
body reported. 

Helen Garrott Is just about 
herself again after recent ill- 


ness. Edith (Brooks) Brown 
has been ill abed, too. The 
Eddie Reals moved into ono 
of those spacious Leimert 
Park apartments last wee's. 
Clever: The miniature 
Chiriese garden bowls creat- 
ed by imaginative E u 1 a 
Pharr as Xmas gifts for her 
friends. Eula's do-it-yourself 
touch always was pretty 
wonderful. KGFJ's Tom Haw- 
kins should be told about 
George Thompson; he's pro- 
gram directof at the Bev.. 
Hills YMCA whence his 
career began as a Janitor 
and not a check may be 
issued via BevHills American 
Legion post unless it bears 
George's signature. 

Atlanta to L.A.: Lydia Bur- 
well Hinkson, the merriest 
widow of them all. She's 
coming up for her next 
marital round, fighting fit 
and fresh as ever, her foot- 
work unimpaired. Here a 
week, she heads for NYC. 
Made us promise, too, we'll 
visit Atlanta before autumn. 
We'll go via Tuskegee. 
C'monI 

I 

Rinkeydinks \ 

(Continued from Page 9) 
Lucille Harris, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Skeeter Pipkins, Audrey 
Scott, Oles and Thelma 
Hayes, Quinett Phillips, 
Eugene Pickett, Dorothy 
Pickett, Ina Davis, Elizabeth 
Taylor, Jackie and John 
Moore, La Rue Ewina, Ear- 
lene Shaw, Leonard Samp- 
son, Mary Mercadante, Don 
Land, Howard Herty, Cecilia 
Bruce, Duke and Gwen 
Woods, Clifford Solomon, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Gordon, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Lawson, 
Mr. ond Mrs. Curtis Thomp- 
son, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. 
Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Curtis Moore and Paul Har- 
ris and Mrs. and Mrs. Oliver 
Odom. 

Also attending were Dr. 
and Mrs. Russell Andrew, 
Dr. and Mrs. Roy Andrews, 
Mr. and Mrs. Augustus 
Gross, Mr. and Mrs. ThomaS 
Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. Randy 
Dale, Dr. and Mrs. Lamont 
Cranford, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 
demons, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
neth Terry, Mr. and Mrs. T. 
(3arinar, Anita Bogan. Clara 
Taylor, Irene and Clarence 
Sharp, Faye Wagner, Mr. 
and Mrs. Tommie Barnes, In. 
and Mrs. George F. Jackson 
Sr., Milton Geratry, Joan 
Southern, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wright Filmore, ' Jeanette 
Paronte, Pat Blach, Eva and 
William Burton, Marion and 
Al Wilson, Fannie De Mann. 
Ella Redmond and Bill 
Youngblood. 

PIONEER'S CLUB 
The Pioneer's Club . will 
meet at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 
22 at the home of M/s. Chaf- 
lolta A. Bass, 4073 S. Central 
avenue. 


for "a new lease on life" 
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Mrs. 
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Igroup 
Itrivcl 


THUNDERBIRD SPECULISTS—Sftou^n here with 
the classic 1961 model are BOB KIMBLE (inside) and-% 
URBAN BOURGEOIS (Handing), two of Froelich-^ 
Fonls \ouiij representatives. Bob and Urban uili ansu:er^ 
your inquiries regarding/ Ford's extended uarranty covering 
12.000 miles or one full year of driving. (See Page 2.) 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


BRAND NEW 
HOME IN 

PALM SPRINGS 

You'll love this 2-bdrm.' 
quality built Doll House 


(Thursday, January 19, 1961 

CANOGA PARK - '^ ATSpac: DUp^jxEs" pOR SALE 

, 3 + den. 2 ba., sep. din.-rm., : 

2 frplcs., w/w crpts., elect., OLYMPIC-HIGHLAND AREA 
bit-ins., sprklrs., fed., fully 


The California Eagl e— 1 1 


1124 LONGWOOD PLACE 


Indscpd. S31,950. Cub. dn. 
DI 1-2573 


FOR SALE BY OWNER 

OWNER SACRIFICING-1 bedrm. 
house with big yard on R-4 lot 


u' 1*1 * .T J IS600 DOWN— $10,.500! Xlnt. ^ . , 

It s_ completely furn.lhedj; ^oom & turn, guest house °^ '^^^« 
so just bring your grub go. of Imperial. AX. 3-6267 
and check for $2,500 and 


Deluxe 5 years old double — 

owners unit 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 223 East 99th Street. Most re^s- 
_ i Family Room, built-ins, fireplace, onable down payment. Priced" tc 
5,Will sacrifice: Make offer. Cash jell. Buy direct from owner Ibv 


'>"«e. CR. 5-4488 WE. 6-5848 Eve.. "^'^P^°"'"9 


RE. 3-2389 


REAL ESTATE BARGAINS 


I INCOME PROPERTY 


NOW! 
FOR THE FIRST TIME! 


Men or Boys to 

sell new products 

part or full 

time. Studio F 

HO. 9-1911 


MR TIME ... OR FULL TIME i INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 
, HIGH EARNINGS 


Nations Leading Slenderizing 

Company . . . Fabulous 

RELAX-A-CIZOR 

•jf No Car Required . . . 

-^f No Sales Experience . . . 

•ji; Exciting Free Sales Training 
Program 


MEN -WOMEN 
•^ 18-45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 


FREEDOM FIGHTERS 

For "One World 
Religion - Brotherhood" 

Telephone ; 
Dr. E. H. Bronner' 
MA. 8-2077 ■ 


Specialty printing, 

business cards, 

throw/ aways, menus, 

posters, direct mail. 

House to house distribution. 

WE. 3-4634 


385 Month 

'targe 5 rooms. 2 bedroom 
apartment. Near Washington 
and Arlington. 2343V2 West 
20th Street. Immediate pos- 
session. Children welcofne. 
No pets. 
For appointment call . . . 

VE. 7-6753 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


APT. FOR RENT 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 13-rm. apt. Centrally located. All 

., . _. modern converiiences. Ground 

voice. Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PL. 2-1179 


move in. White stucco with NO DOWN PYMT. TO GI.-2 

blue trim, attached single bdrm. siucto, hrdwd. & tile. poR SALE BY OWNER-Two large TZTTTTrTJ^ 

garage, wall to wall car- '^1:^,:^,,^^^^^ ,\^^^roo^ House, big yard. Will ^°,^J-^^,,Y, "^^i-^^t 

petmg, sliding glass door _ll±!^lt!r___ redecorate house. Located / at 1243-1245 E. 51st St. Large 


lla 

lOV 


to patro. Excellent location . $600 DOWN— 510,500. Clean ."5! 2609 South Tichenor. Priced low yarjj. ideal for home and .j'n 
about Vi mite from exclus-| room & kitchenette. So. of for quick sale. Low, low down come. Low, low down payment 


ive Racket Club. Priced Imperial. AX. 3-6267. 
right at $13,950. For or- ,5350 ^q^j, _ 5-.^ p^^ ^^ ^ 
rangements to 4ee proper- ^^ b bdrm., redecorated 
ty tall Miss Rossini at ' stucco. Hrdwd., tile, fenced. 


FA. 1-4182 


PL 7-2268. 


S5000 DN — 6 stuc. U's. 5 yrs. 
old. 1 bdr. ea. Inc. $420 mo. 
RE. 1-2119 


payment. Call owner. 
RE. 3-2389 


I Price slashed fo 
Contact owner. 

RE. 3-2389 


quick sale 


WESTSIDE HOUSES FOR SALE _| 54000 DN.-Dlx. dpix. 2 & Ige 

6 ROOM SPAN ISH ' '^""- ^'-^ ^^- '^^- ^ 2 bdr., ^ 


ba. upi., crpt. & drps. Pico 
Hauser. RE. 1-2119. 


home for Compton 


WINDSOR HILLS 

Lovely English home, 2 bedrms., ' 

11 bath, paneled den-family | S3000 DN — Sparklg. 2 & denlpQ^fg^^ 
room, wet . bar. $42,000 full t;iuc. Crpt. Drps. Vic • Pico- I Home, 
price, good financing. 1-I;irvarfi RF 1-2119 I 

^ Ha.vaid. ut._i_niJ. ^^^ ^^^^ TAYLOR of 

DOROTHY MARSHALL $3500 DN. — Lov. 3 bdr. Span. r' A k\k\ A r>,\y 

DU. M059 I stuc, I'-i* ba. 8784 S. Har- 1 LANNAUY 

vard. RK. 1-2119: i REALTY CO. 


$18,950 full price. $2,950 down. 

No loan charges. 9147 S. Harvard 
r A I r />r^ -rn A r>r 2 NEW HOUSES ON 1 LOT-^ 
bALh UK I KAUt 3bdrm. - 2-bdrm., bit-ins 


Mountain-Desert 
Resort Acreage 

JO dwn., $10 mo, $995.00-10 

(ten) acres mostly level between ^OUSES FOR SALE 
Palm Springs and Salton Sea. 


S."^"" DN. — Cute 2 bdrm. stucco. 

Rug.s included. S70 mo. 
OR* 1-6022 


w w carpet, S1500 handlev 
PL 4-2827 'till 7.' 

5 BDRM., 3 ba. - 2 apts. 159 
1.50 R-3 lot, $2500 dn. 
NE. 5-8009— NE. 5-2008 ■ 


RE. 4-6622 


2 STORES & 4 rentals. S3U..'' 

mo. Income $27,000. Rltr. 

NE. 5-7111 


,073 S. MANSFIELD AVENUE 

$30 dwn., $30 mo. $3,000. 10; ^ <- j , i j 

acres level on road NW Victor-' OPS'^^ Sunday 1-4 p.m. 
ville nr. Adelanto. Only 2 par- ^6000 Dov/ri - 3 bedrooms, 2 
j,l,_ : baths. Wilshire-La Brea Area 

' near L.A. High. 

EX. 8-4719 - EX, 7-5751 ^CR. 5-4488 WE. 6-5848 eves. 


floor. 

I 9 to 5 PL. 7-2293; After 6 
LO. 6-7823 - LU. 2-7957 


FURNISHED ROOMS TO RENT 


i HEAVY 

Famous product practically sells EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 
itself. Endorsed by beauty edi- 

of \?ogue, H"— ■» GET BROCHURE NOW! 


tors ot Vbgue, Harper's Bazaar, 
and Glamour. Over 300,000 
users' Applicants must be well 
groomed, pleasant. Fringe bene- 
fits and advancement opportuni- 
ties. 

FOR APPOINTMENT 
CALL MISS GREEN 


ADAISTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART, L,A. 57 

DU 87163 


, CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 


Baltimore - Washington 

CHARM SCHOOL 

(By Corrfspondence) 

(FIRST LESSON FREE) 
P. O. BOX 217U, JESSUP, MD. 
If You're Now Working, We'll 

. , , • D AA TAPE RECORDER FOR SALE 

Arrange Interview in P.M. ] 


OL. 5-801 1 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The People'Si Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 

-Rental- 
Beautiful 4-room 

unfurnished apartment. 
Garbage disposal. 

5121 W. 20th St. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


OPEN HOUSE-SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

POMONA 

7 POSSESSIONS 


1 


1 


; FURNISHED HOUSES FOR RENT 

$21.50 Weekly 

Modern 2 bedrcxjm. Utilities 
paid. Children and pets wel- 
come TV included All have been re-financed and hove TOP 25 YEAR 

AX. 2-0458 ^°'^^^- 

SOME WITH WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING AND STEEL 
FENGCS. 

3 BEDROOMS with ^V* BATHS, BUILT-IN RANGE AND 
OVEN. 

MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!! 

$15,500 to $16,500 

NAME YOUR OWN DOWN PAYMENT! 

I ■ I 

FOR RENT— W option to buv i Directions: Take San Bernardino Freeway to Towne 


VETS 
NO DOWN I 


I 


UNFURN. HOUSES FOR RENT 

$80.00 

Four bedroom, large yard. 

Children and pets welcome. 

Empty now. 

AX. 2-0458 



3 room house — cuto, $69 mo 
2 br. house — Ig. par: clean, 
85 mo. Southeart. HU 2-5861. 


Girls and Women to 

sell new products 

part or fu'l time. 

Studio F 

HO. 9-19T1 

BEAUTY OPERATOR WANTED 

RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaufe Shoppe 

^ OPERATOR WANTED 
^4919 West Adams Blvd. 
Los Angeles 16, Calif. 


BRAND NEW - 

Tape Recorder 
1616. 

Perfect condition. 

Reduced to only $222. 

MA. 8-2077 

i LIMOUSINE FOR SALE 


RENT with option to buy, 2 

bdrm. frame. S75 per mo. 

PL. 7-2268 


■y 


1930 Packard 

Limousine. Beautiful 


ROOM FOR RENT 

Male or female— newly decorated 

room with all the home privi-! v 

leges. Reasonable rent. 13437 GI. RENT with option to buy. 
Brownell, San Fernando, Calif 
Phone EMpire 6-8871 
Rolland Teal 


2-bdrm. stucco, hrdwd firs. 
PL. 7-4153 


HOUSES t APTS. WANTED 


INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


Ave. exit . . . North one block to La Verne . . . East 
on>^^ La Verne to Los Flores . . . Then north one block 
to Model House crt 1004 Ashfield. 

ALLIED REALTY 

10000 EAST RUSH ST., EL MONTE 
Gilbert 4-4526 


I 
I 

I 


ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential 

POMONA 

No down payment for vets. From $13,770, 
Full Price. From $76.08 per month, includes 
principal and .interest, wall-to-wall carpeting, 
rear yard redwood fenced, forced air heat, 
built-in range and oven, hood and disposal, 
2-car garage-. 3-bedroom, 2-bath homes. Phone 
collect, Randy Anable. 

EDgewood 8-0088 




FREE SERVICE!!! | 

TO LANDLORDS ! 

We need furnished or unfur- j 
r- 11 .. J-.- ', ' nished houses and apartments. 

car. Excellent condition. Lowip^^bles and singles. Eastside 


classic 


mileage, 
tires. 


Good motor and | and Westside. 

I 4020 South Western Aevnue 


5121 W. 20th St. 

8-unit stucco. 10 years old. 

$62,000 F. P. 
$20,000 Dn. 


WE 5-5842 


FOR 24-HOUR SERVICE . 

CALL PLymouth 6-8347 - PLytnouth 6-0997 

POWELL BAIL BONDS 

JOEL A. POWELL JOHN A. ECHOLS 

10951-53 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES 61, CALIF. 

FREE BAIL INFORMATION 


AX. 2-1991 


HOME, UNFURN., FOR LEASE 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


FOR LEASE - Ait.uiena. Gregor.v j BEST BUYS — Unrestricted 
Ain contcmporar.v, 3 bedroom. :; Property. Rccd_ Alien, Jr. ■ 
bath, fireplar-e. nfw electric ap- AX 1-7494 - 

pliances. 2 land.'^capcd patios by 
Erkbo. Minutes from LA, freeway, 
S225 per month. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


DOROTHY MARSHALL DU. 1-1059 


$ $ $ $ $$$$$$$$$$$$$ 


4A^ 


4A- 
¥^ 
iA- 
1» 

iff 

^. 

iA 


4 it 


U 


\)<^ 


>(KS 


$ $ $ $ ^ 

iA 
iA 


44% 


SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSN. 

2512 SOUTH CENTRAL AVENUE 

LOS ANGELES 11, CALIFORNIA 

ADams 1-9118 


CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1960 

ASSETS , 

First Mortgage Loans \..- $14,077,489.57 

Other Loans 75,726.46 

Real Estate Owned 1 84,383.09 

U. S. Bonds and Stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank < . . . 606,500.00 

Cash on Hand and in Banks 1 ,290,000.68 

Office Building and Equipment (Net) 75,791 .55 

Other Assets 243.63 


Total Assets $16,310,134.98 

^ . LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Savings Accounts $13,490,130.72 

Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank 750,000.00 

Other Liabilities 132,121.12 

Deferred Credits 95,636.65 

Guarantee Capital Stock , 28,000.00 

Reserves and Undivided Profits 1,814,246.49 


j Plan your work, 

work your plan. 

BUFFORD REALTY CO, 

3000 W. Jefferson Blvd. 

REpublic 5-0246 

—Westside— 

1843 W. 51st Place 

5-rm. Frame. Hdwd. Lge. lot. 

^'Gar., side drive. $13,500 F. P. 

$2,500 Dn. 


iA 


AT VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 



iA 
iA 


2410 FOURTH AVE. 
7 ROOM FRAME 


Lge. lot. Side dr. Hardwood— 
■*'' tile features. Lot 75x150. R-4 


$34,500 F. P. 

Make offer. 


Wilshire-La Brea District 

14-rm. Studio Duplex 

•yv 4-car gar. Income $300 per mo. 

$40,000 F. P.-$6,000 Dn. 

Make offer. 


^ 


Total Liabilities $16,310,134.98 


m 


44% 


^$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 


I'ree Brake .idjitslment at 

ED'S 

MOBILE SERVICE 

Hoover & Manchester 
PL. 1-5912 

• Motor ^£95 

Tune-up ;.';;; 

FREE BRAKE ADJ. 

WITH I.LBE JOB 

• Open 24 Hours 

• We Pick-up & 
Deliver 

• Brake Specialists 

• S&H Green Stamps 

• All Mechanical 
Work 

Unconditionally 

Guaranteed 

ED'S MOBILE SERVICE 

ED BEYMAR, Owner 

PL. 1-5912 

Hoover & Manchester , 


This Is Our GREATEST SALE in 40 YEARS at the Same Address, 214 So. Broadway 
* * ^ VICTOR CLOTHING COMPANY IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES * * * 

. $100 OUTFIT FOR $3 PER, WEEK 

Pay Cash or as Little as $3.00 a Week Pays for ^100.00 Worth of Good Looking 

Clothes, Shoes and Accessories for Men and Boys of All Ages 

Buy Any Fine BRONSON Suit at $29.00 and You Get a $20.00 Jacket FREE! 

or a $20.00 Pair of Freeman Shoes FREE! 

Buy Two Suits and Get a $30.00 Slack Suit FREE! 

Buy One Suit and Get a $40.00 Car Coat for Only $1 9.95! 
Buy Two Suits and Get a $40.00 Car Coat FREE! 

Buy Any Sport Coat Priced $29.00 or More and Get a 
- $10.00 Pair of Trousers FREE! 

^ $69 TOP COAT FREE 

Buy Two Suits and Get a $69.00 Top Coat FREE! or $30.00 
Off the Price of Any Suit and Top Coat pr Two Suits 
Over 1,000 Shirts, Values to $12.00, NOW $4.95 Each! 
Trench Raincoats, $29.95. All the New Styles in One, Two 
and Three Button Suits and Sport Coats. 

Buy Any Gold Watch and Get a $20.00 Sport Jacket FREE!! 
ALTERATIONS FREE! FIT GUARANTEED — WE CATER TO YOU, AND 

WE DO MEAN YOU! 
Buy Any Suit or Top Coat and Get a $15.00 Wool Shirt FREE! — TUXEDOS! 

EASTER WARDROBE HEADQUARTERS 

Get Your Easter Clothes Now, Ray Later! Easter Is Early This Year — April 2 
Get Your Easter Clothes Now and SAVE! We Cater to California Eagle Readers 

STORE HOURS: 
9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. OPEN EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT UNTIL 8:00 P.M. 

VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 South Broadway, DoWntown Los Angeles, California 

THIS BIG SALE IS FOR 15 DAYS ONLY •HURRY! • YOU ARE 

WELCOME IN YOUR WORK CLOTHES! 

Plenty of Paved, Free Parking Next Door to Store 






-■— -.■-r r»--'r.;-vr- 


-^; r - 1 JS^B%^^ 


12— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 | 


Checker Contest At Thriftimart 


The su|K>rmarkpt phooker 
who has put many a can of 
pineapple into your grocpry 
bag may p<^t a rhance to see 
that tropical fruit growing on 
tht stalk and your vote should 
help toward a wonderful all- 
expenses - paid vacation in 
Hawaii. 

THRIFTIMART has entered 
all its checker-cashiers in the 
Checker of the Year Awards, 
sponsored annually by Super- 
market Institute and National 
Cash Register Company. First, 
they will select a company 
winner and the votes of cus- 


jv'ention of Supeimarket Insti- 
tute — May 7-10. There, the ten 
I regional winners will he iiar- 
I rowed down to one — the lOHl 

Checker of the Year. Pri/cs 
,will include a tour of Hawaii. 
Second and third-place win- 
ners will win vacations in the 
Hollywood Beach }IotcI. Holly- 
wood, Florida. 

The Che<ker of tlu- Year 
Award is not a boauiv coiiiesl 
— the' candidates are judged 
on cuslcjmer courtps> . neat- 
ness, efficiencj' and ra^h rc;;- 
ister accuracy. VOTK .NOW! I! 


NEW YORK SCENE 

still Rambling around in the new^^buggy and ha\ing a. 
good time in this, the only city in the world. Steve joined me | 
on one of my maiden trips to St. .-Mbans Naval Hospital to 
take care of some business and we had lunch in the charm- I 
ing company of several Na\-.\' nurses: just. Barbara, Millie, I 

Joyce and Lois, "to us. as we? — | 

ignore all that Ensign ja/./ -van Show on Feb. 19. Don't'/ 
where nice gals arc concerned. ' miss it. 


TIMMIE ON EP'S TV SHOW 

Monday night the Camp, 
I Fund affair was held at the; 
-Spotlite Bar, and a goodly 
.crowd turned out for the fun 


and prizes. Comedian Timmie 
Rogers was on hand and we 
had a long gabfest. duiing 
which he informed mc that he 
will appear on the Ed Sulli- 1 recording. 


This week it will be Fannie 
Pierre's Dawn Cafe for the 
Camp Fund affair of .Mr. & 
Mrs. George Palmer. Its so | 
(■o/..%' there, it should be kicks. 

Congrats and e\eT\' good 
fortune to L.A.'s fine dress de- 
signer and very sharp looker, 
Johne;,tta Starks, on her new 
singing career, and her re<'ent 


if 




VITALLY VEEDF.D -THRIFTIMART STORES. 

INC.. nvnounccd the npnuno of '^'\-;!l\j?S!!^*\l'- 
rnitly. the all nnv. ultra inr„lrr,i 1 1 1 Kit 1 IM ART 
;> located at 5005 tl Sc/undo houlcvnrd in Hauthorne and 
will scric the Hauthornr-Rcdrjfido Bench area. 1 his is the 
first of ten (10) ncu- Til RI hT I M A RT markets to he 
opened in 1961. <ini"K the clwrri markets in Bnkcrsfield. 
Lancaster, Las icgas. Riiersidr. San Bernardino. San 
Diego and throughout the greater Los .hu/cles area. Qual- 
ity nnd freshness of merchandise rn all departments is ih- 
sured by THRlFTIMAR'l' operating their nivn produce 
warehouse, meat parking plant, drliiat^i, en kitchen and' 
Smart if Final Ins irh'jfrsale Company. (See Display o>i 
Page 12.) \ 


-Phil Ciordon; 


tomers will count heavily. 
Ballot boxes will be in the 
THRIFTIMART Stores through 
February 14, according to Mr. 
.Roger M. Laverty, Sr., Presi- 
dent. 

The THRIFTIMART winner 
•will then compete among 
supermarket checkers through- 
out the state for the title of 
California Checker of the Year. 
Then, ten regional winners 
will be chosen. They will be 
flown by United Air Lines to 
Chicago for the annual eon- 

1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


(The California Eagle) 

38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 436-714 

In the .Superior Court of the 

State of California. In and for the 

Countv of I, OS Angeles In ^e 

Matter of the Estate of Delta Mc- 

Kee. Deceased, 

Notire is: hereby Ri\pn to cred- 
itors havinc 4laim--i again.''t the said 
rieredent to file said claim.*: in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present tjiem to the 
undersigned at the office of hi.i 
.xtlorne.v.s. Miller. Maddox & Ma- 
lone. J824 South Western Avenue. 
in the ni.v of I^os .Angeles, in the 
aforesaid Count.v. which latter of- 
fice is the place of bu.siness of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. .Such claims with 
the necessar.v \ouchers must be 
f'led or presented as aforesaid 
within si.v month.s after the first 
publiratiop of this notice. 

Dated: De.- 22. 1160. 
MILLER. MADDOX & MALONE 
Attorneys- at- Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles. California 
RE. 1-4143 

THO.M.\.S M. McKEE. .1 R. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publish in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. 1960, 
.Ian, 5-12-19. 1961 

(California EagletT 

39118 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-703 

In the Superior Court of the State 

W)f California, in and for the County 

' of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the K.«tate of 

LfriLLK BK.VDV. Deceased 
Notire !.<; herehy given to credit- 
ors havinc claims asain.st the ..^aid 
decedent to filp .^^aid claims in the 
office of the clerk of the afore.«aid 
court or to present them tolthe un- 
dersigned at the office of hi.a .At- 
forney.s. Miller. .Maddox & Malone. 
2R24 .South Western Avenue, in the 
Cit.v of 1,03 .Ani^ele.c. in the afore- 
<flld County, which latler office i.« 
the. place of l^u.siness of the under- 
signed in all matters pertaining to 
said estate. Such claims with the 
necMBaxj- voucher.« mu.st l)e filed 
or presented a.s aff>re.said within 
six months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice- 
Dated: Jan. 6 I9fi1, 

BR.VE.ST BENDT 
Executor of the will 
of .said decedent 
MILLER. MADDOX A MALONE 
Atterneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenu* 
Lot Angeles, California 
RE, 1-4143 

(Publish in the California Eiagit 

Newspaper .Ian. 12. 19. 21), 

Feb, 2, 19611 


33634 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-585 

'n the Superior Court of th' 

S'ate of California, in and for the 

County of l,os .AnEeies 

In tho Matter of th<» E."tate of 
BI^.VCHK CJRIPF'IN. also icnovn 
as RI-A.Ni-Hp; l-rGGETT, Decea.s- 
ed . 

N'otico i.s herehv iriven to .-redil- 
ors having claims against the said 
decedem to file said claims In the 
office of the c'erk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
indersisned at the officp of her 
.^rtorne.vs. .Miller. Maddox & Ma- 
lone. 2824 South Western Avoniie 
in the ("it>- of I^.« .\nEetPs. in the 
afore.«aid Count\. which latter of- 
fice Is th"* place of hu = iness of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
'nE to .«aid estate. Such claims 
with the neces.^arx- \otichers must 
he, filed or presented as aforesaid 
within SIT month*: after the first 
pn'olication nf this noli' e 
Dated D*'- jn i960 

i^MA.y SH,\W NKWMA.X 
.Administratrix with-tha- 
\\ ill-.\nne\ed of the Estate 
of ^aid decedent 
Miller, rviaddox A. Malone 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 

■ iPiihlished In the California 
Eaffle News i>a per .iRn h P 19 26 
ISfli 


PERSONAL 


ACNE AND PIMPLES 

"Dit«pp«arad in 5 days after 
taking your harb capsule." 

Writ* Mrs. D. E. Harris 
Sand $1 for 10-day supply of 
Formula A. 

, HERBS 

51(0 HOILYWOOO SIVD. 
LOS ANCtlES 28, CALir. 



322 West Manchester Blvd. 
Manchester & Broadway 

JUST MINUTIS AWAY VIA 
HARIOR FRIEWAY 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

Plmnty of free Parking 

IN COIORSCOPE 

"GOLIATH 

AND THE 

DRAGON" 

PLUS SrCONO HIT 

1 Blondes In His Life' 

with Jock Mahoney and 
Grata Thyssan 

Attend Gala 

FANILY NITE 

EVERY TUESDAY 

ADULTS SOe 

Childrmi Under 12 Fraa When 
Accompanied by Parent 



i^ltop <i;:>^ncl ^ave\::/^t U hrifiimart jf-or <^ver\fda\fi Specials >Zl^hop ^^Atnd <^ave ^Mi U Uriftimar t jf-or Cl^ver\fda\f *^pecial§ 



1^1,/^C FOR DAILY RADIO SPtCIALS 


THUR., FRI., SAT., SUN., JAN. 19-20-21-22 


PAY UTILITY BILLS 


AT THRIFTIMART 



JANE ANDERSON 


CALIFORNIA GROWN 


DELIVERED DAILY 


FRESH FRYING 

CHICKENS 


JANE ANDERSON 12 INCH, 1% POUND ^^^ ^K^ ^ 

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JACK KRAMER PRESENTS 

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Officer Tells All at Numbers^ Hearing 


FIND HAWKINS' 'SUCKLri^ 


sr 


10 


AX. 5-3135 


Out-of-Town 


15c 



Vol. LXXX-No. 45 


2101 W. VERNON AVE., L.A. 8, CAL. 


Thursday, January 26, 1961 


At $1 Million Numbers Hearing - — 



KINGPIN — Ernest Russell, left, who police say is the kingpin of a local $1 millinn num- 
bers racket, is shoun with his attorney, Wesley Russell (no relation), center, and James 
Goodlow, Xiho reportedly is No. 3 man in the gambling set-up. The three are shoun at 
the hearing Tuesday into charges against 30 arrested last November. (Adams) 


this week. 




Th* First Shot 

I didn't get around to look- 
ing at it but the National 
Broadcasting Company tired 
the first shot in the Civil War 
centennial with a TV show 
NBC says that it 
will give 
both 
"equal 
with 
week's 
gram 
senting 
northern 
view of the 
war and with 
the next 
week's prO' 
gram looking 
at it from a southern view- 
point What NBC is saying is 
that it will paint the usual 
picture of the South "s effort 
to break up the nation and 
1 reserve slavery In as heroic 
a light as the North's sacri- 
fice to preserve the Union and 
blot out the slave system. 



sides 

time" 

one 

pro- 

pre- 

the 


84 to Testify About 
Kingpin,t1encKrni(@t[| 

The preliminary hearing into chau"ges filed 
against Ernest Russell, alleged kingpin in the city's 
numbers racket, and 29 of his henchmen was pro- 
ceeding this week in what may prove to be the 
longest trial of its kind in Los Angeles history. 

T7 ^ It was estimated that the 

_ - I preliminary hearing alone 

Five Arrested 
For Murder at 
Lucky Spot 

Five men were arrested 
Sunday night in the vicinity 
of the Lucky Spot Bar, 1105% 
E. Vernon avenue, and 
charged with suspicion of 
murder in the stabbing death 
of a 40-year-old laborer, War- 
ren Syria. 

Syria was stabbed in the 
chest, reportedly with a six- 
inch butcher knife. 

Hit with Crutch 

Witnesses said that the 
fight started outside the bar 
over the purchase of some 


U.S. Plans to Send 
White Track Team 
To South Africa 

NEW YORK— The United States has bowed to 
segregationist demands of South Africa and has 
agreed to 'send a lily white track team to that coun- 
try for meets-scheduled early this spring. 

Announcement that the^>~ 

KkV> (American Athletic 


Under this scheme of I wine, and then continued in- j^^; 3 


would probably run for at 
least a month, and possibly 
considerably longer, and that 
the subsequent trial if the 30 
are held to answer could 
easily cost the county $200,000. 
SI Million a Year 

Police claim that Russell's 
"take" and that of his syndi- 
cate amounts to well over $1 
million a year. Deputy District 
Atty. Anthony Joyce estimated 
that a day's haul netted at 
least $35,000. 

Among the 30 arrested 
whom police have tabbed as 
"top" operators in the organi- 
zation are John Cornish, 42, 
of 4021 S. Woodlawn avenue; 
James N. Goodlow, former 
sergeant in the sheriff's de- 
partment; Johnnie Hill Taylor, 
Kathryn Elfrieda Belt and 
Roswell Webb. 

Cornish they claim is the 
No. 2 man, and Goodlow the 


Union) had agreed to the 
humiliating demand brought 
a vehement pretest from the 
NAACP. 

"Bloody Monday* 

Accusing the AAU of 
knucl<ling under" to South 
Af.'ica's apartheid (segrega- 
tion) policy in an action that 
IS an "insult" to "every Negro 
athlete," the NAACP po.'»ited 
out that the Ijack meet will 
mark the first anniversary of 
the "Sharpeville massacre of 
March 21, 1960, whert police 
and troops shot down black 
men, women and children in 
cold blood with automatic 
weapons." 

The appearance there of 
American athletes, the NAACP 
Stated further, will "help 
white South Africa celebrate 
the killings." 

South Africa apparently 
made the request that no Ne- 
gro athletes be included in 
the team, and the AAU agreed 
to atude. by thatirKtoct^oty. 
Same Difference 

Roy Wilkins, executive sec- 
retary of the NAACP, wired 
Daniel J. Ferris, AAU ^secre- 
tary, on Jan. 17, stating fur- 
ther: 

"According to today's New 
York 'Daily News,' South 
Africa has asked AAU to send 
all-white track stars there 
this spring but according to 
New York 'Times' the request 
was for "preferred athletes.' 
Same difference. South Africa 
m'eans don't send Negro ath 
Ictes. 

"National Association for 
Advancement of Colored Peo- 
ple enters most vigorous pro- 
test against AAU complying 
in any way with this request. 
AAU will insult every Negro 
athlete and every loyal Am- 
erican Negro family if it 
(Continued on Page 4) 


things, Jefferson Davis will 
appear to be as great a patriot 
as Abraham Lincoln and his 
southern supporters who 
wrote a constitution resting 
on the "great cornerstone of 
slavery" — as one of them put 
i* — will be hailed as equal in 
virtue to the men who wrote 
(Continued on Page 4 1 


side 

They said that one of the 
suspects bash€d Syria over 
the head with a crutch,' splin- 
tering the crutch and toppling 
the victim to the floor. While 
he lay on his back, they co/i- 
tinued, another of the sus- 
pects stabbed him in the 
(Continued on Page 2) 


Still testifying in the middle 
(Continued on Page 4) 


South Africa to Get 
U. S. Missile Gear 

CAPETOWN, South Africa- 
Missile tracking and telemet- 
ry equipment connected with 
the U.S. defense and research 
development program will Be- 
gin operating in South Africa 
within a few months, the 
South African government 
said last week. 



SPEAKER— Henry A. Mc 
Pherson Jr., athlete and 
scholar, will be one of the 
Commence/ntut speakers at 
Tairfax Htgfi' graduation to- 
night, Thursday. (Story on 
Page 3). 



LACC PREXY — Ronald 

Everett, uho has set his sights 
on a diplomatic post , seems to 
be "on his nay." He has just 
been elected president of the 
Student Body at City Col- 
lege. (Story on , Page 3.) 
( .4 darns). 


Aileen Eaton Takes Stand, 
Tells of Attack, Robbery 



STAR WITNESS— Aileen 
Eaton, right, and her hus- 
band, Olympic promoter Cal 
Eaton, are interviewed at 
Eugene Hawkins' hearing by 
Eagle reporter, C. Marie 
Hughes. Mrs. Eaton is 
State's star witness. (Adams) 

Hawkins 
Bored at 
Hearing 


By C. Marie Hughes 

As the preliminary hearing 
into thj^ latest Accusations 
against Eugene "Rough Lover" 
Hawkins opened Tuesday 
afternoon, police revealed they 
had found a new and intrigu- 
ing piece of evidence in the 
Beverly - Hilton Hotel room 
occupied by him and his 46- 
year-old- redheaded alleged 
accomplice, Mrs, Marian 
Kritzer. 

That evidence was a list of 
names, in Hawkins' hand- 
writing, of wealthy women 
who appeared to be next in 
line on his "sucker list," ac- 
cording to Deputy District 
Atty. Anthony Joyce. 

Ready to Testify 

The hall outside Division 2 
in the Hall of Justice where 
the hearing was being held 
was buzzing with individuals 
waiting and willing to testify 
on the latest charges against 
Hawkins — two counts of rob- 
bery and one of conspiracy. 

Named with Hawkins on all 
three charges is Mrs. Kritzer, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



CAMERA SHY — Mrs. 
Manan Kritzer, arrested as 
Hawkins' accomplice, was 
camera shy ahen she ap* 
feared in court Tuesday. 
Hawkins, left, whose bitten 
finger may be his undoing. 
(Adams) 


<S>- 


Granger Elected Head 
Of World Social Workers 

NEW YORK — Lester B. Granger, executive di- 
rector of the National Urban League, was elected 
last week president of the International Conference 
of Social Work. It is the first time a Negro has been 
elected to the post. Granger is a columnist for the 

Eagle. 

Granger's election came at 
the biennial meeting of the 
conference in Rome, which 
ended Jan. 14. More than 2,500 
delegates from fifty-four coun- 
tries attended. Pope John 
XXIII received the delegates 
in a special audience at the 
conclusion of the meeting. 

A former vice president of 
the Conference, Granger, who 
has served more than 40 years 
in the field of social work, 
was U.S. chairman of the In- 
ternational Conference for four 
years (1952-56). In this Capa- 
city he lead ,the American 
delegation, to biennial meet- 
ings in India, Canada and 
Germany. He has served also 
as president of the National 
Conference of Social Work, 


representing social welfare in 
the United States. 

Last November, Granger 
was named by Labor Secre- 
tary James P. Mitchell to the 
chairmanship of the Federal 
Advisory Council on Employ- 
ment Security. He also serves 
on the directing boards of the 
State University of New York, 
the New York School of Soqial 
Work, the American Council 
to Improve Our Neighborhoods 
(ACTION), and the American 
Heritage Foundation. 

The National Urban League 
is an interracial organization 
designed to increase opportun- 
ities for Negroes and to better 
race relations in America. It 
has 63 local affiliates and was 
founded in 1910. | 



STUDENT COUNCIL AT JEFF— Members of the 
Student Council at Jeff for the Summer '61 semester are 
shown above. Front: Frank Garze, left, Student Body 
president for Winter '61, and right, Booker Washington, 
newly elected Student Body president. Second row: Anna 
Clark, Mary Flemings, Alma Jones, Gladys Betters, Pat- 


ricia Valenzuela. Third row: Eligha Cambric, Henry 
Johnson, Lorraine Parry, Jackie Reese. Fourth row: Sen- 
telle Rucker, Sandra Jones, Givendolyn Johnson, '^ellie 
Harris. Fifth row: Cleveland Batiste, George Young and 
J. Janes, student activities coordinator. 


i> ■ 

N.Y. Schools 
Ordered to 
Desegregate 

NEW YORK — Racial seg 
regation in public schools is 
as I unconstitutional in the 
north as it is in the south, 
and it is prohibited whether 
it is arrived at by state law 
orl by gerrymandering of 
school districts. 

That was the burden of a 
decision handed down by U.S 
Judge Irving R. Kaufman who 
ordered the New Rochelle 
School Board to present a plan 
of desegregation by April 14 
that will become operative no 
later ttian next September. 
■ The gerrymandering of dis- 
trict lines was accomplished 
by the transfer of white chil- 
dren in the (Jistrict to schools 
outside the district, the court 
said. 

The court referred to Lin- 
coln school. The parents of 
Lincoln school pupils had 
asked the court to find that 
their constitutional rights 
had been violated. 

The board's principal con- 
tention was that the existenc-9 
of an all-Negro or a nredomi- 
nantly Negro school is not, in 
.ind of itself, a violation of 
the Constitution. 

"The constant reiteration of 
this argument indicates the 
board's preoccupation with se- 
mantics at the expense of re- 
alities," Kaufman said. 



Hawkins Bill 
ill Ban All 
Housing Bias 

SACRAMENTO — Assembly 
Bill No. 7, "to put teeth" into 
the enforcement of non-discri- 
mination in housing, has been 
proposed in the state legisla- 
ture by Assemblyman Augus- 
tus Hawkins, it was reported 
this week by the California 
Committee for Fair Practices. 
The bill is now being circu- 
lated to permit other assem- 
blymen to sign as co-sponsors. 

Under the proposed mea- 
sure, the Hawkins Fair Hous- 
ing Law enacted In 1959 
would be extended to prohibit 
discrimination on the beisis of 
race, color, religion, national 
origin or ancestry in the sale 
or rental of all- housing — pri- 
vate as well as public and 
publicly assisted housing. It 
would also provide for admin- 
istration enforcement by the 
Fair Employment Practices 
Commission (which will be- 
come the Fair Practices Com- 
mission). 

Forword Step 

"Successful enactment o t 
A.B. 7 will give us the broad-, 
est, soundest and most effec- 
tive • legislation against hous- 
ing discrimination to be found 
((Continued on Page 2) 


Featured 
In the Eagle 

Editorials 4 

Church Activities 5 

Sports • 

The Tee 6 

BiU Smallwood 9 

Dorothea Foster ^.10 

People 7 

Chazz Crawford 7 

Show Business S 

Cooking _„ -....12 


y. 


i>-*i. 


*- A - *-.-—> 


m-^^-ii-r--.--'.-^^ 


--aga«t=!3»«i»<jj[ ia. ' ,aa : at ?> 


a 


Vf - 





9 -Th« California Eagle 
^N^f sday, January 26, IVbV 

wkins bill , 
ill Ban All 
inq Bias 




J^Continued from Page 1) 
SSiiyhere in the United 

Ses," Assemblyman Haw- 
! declared. "The housing 
lis passed In 1959 was a first 
sCBp — now let's complete the 
joK." 

"Assemblyman Hawkins in- 
cluded in A.B. 7 all the pro- 
visions agreed upon by the 
Sade coalition of California or- 
JAQizations backing civil 
^bts." stated C. L. Dellums. 
iSlSirman of the California 
littee for Fair Priactices, 
Western Regional presi- 

jt of the NAACP. "We must 
jSpy continue joint action to 
|55)^illze community support." 
f'As outlined by the Califor- 
^a Committee for Fair Prac- 
fices, A.B. 7 contains provi- 
sions to: 

1. Make it unlawful "to re- 
fuse to sell, rent or lease or 
otherwise to deny or withhold 
from any person or group of 
persons such housing accom- 
modation because of the race, 
color, religion.'Vational origin 
or ancestry of^ such person 

"Such housing accommoda- 1 
tion" includes all housing 
"other than a single unit 
dwelling occupied in whole or 
part by the owner as his res- 
idence." 

■^ 2. Forbid discrimination "in 
^the terms, conditions or pT-ivi- 
^eges" of housing accommoda- 
=^ions, "or in the furnishing of 
facilities or services in connec- 
tion therewith." 
." "3. Prohibit discrimination by 
.""any person, bank, mortgage 
Company or other financial in- 

ftution to whom application 
made for financial assis- 
tsmce . . 

4. Make it illegal "for" any 
person to aid, abet, incite, 
compel or coerce the doing of 
any of the acts or practices 
d^lared unlawful." 

5. Empower the State Fair 
Employment Practice Commis- 
sion "to prevent violations" of 
the provisions of A.B. 7. 

6. Authorize the Commission 
to proceed in a housing dis- 
crimination case "in the same 
manner and with the same 
powers as provided. . . in the 
case of an unlawful employ- j 
ment practice . . . and the 
powers, duties and rights of 
the State Fair Employment 
^Practice Commission, its chair- 
man, members, attorneys or 
■agents, the complainani the 

respondent, the Attorney Gen- 
^Tpl and the Superior Court, 
shall apply to any proceeding 
4inder 'the provisions of this 
:»ection." 




f^ Wf'^^^ ^- 


SCHOOL OPENING NEJRS — Mrs. Juanita Macklm, ri^ht, watches with pride as 
her Exceptional Children's Opportunity School moves a step closer to completion. A f em- 
bers of jPainters' Union Local No. 434, shown above, are paint'tng the inlcriot, tis iheir 
contribution to the new project. Damage a couple of -weeis ai/o when a car smashed its 
way inside the building has been repaired — hut not paid for, 'Opening is tentatively set 
for March 5. (Verdell Young) 


UN, Goaded, Asks 
Lumumba Release 


Johnson Given 
Service Award 


Five Arrested 
For Murder 
At Lutky Spot 

fCojitinued from t&ge 1) 
chest with the long-bladed 
knif(\ \ 

Syria; struggled to his feet. | 
staggered to the door, andj 
there collapsed. Police found 
him lying, bleeding to deatli, 
m front of the cafe. A butcher 
i k 'iif> was found across the 
strcer Broken pieces of the 
crutch were picked up both 
inside and outside the cafe. 
Some Admit Fight 

Those arrested were: Leon- 
ard Robinson, 27, of 932 E. 
Adams blvd., who was accus- 
ed of the stabbing; V. I. Rob- 
ertson, 30, of 632'i W. 47th 
street; Casby Dixon, 28, who 
admitted having "a fight with 
that guy" and hitting him 
with McNeil's broken crutch; 
Cornelius Robertson, 25, of 938 
S. Hemlock; and James, Alton 
McNeil, 26, of 1157 'i E. 25th 
street. 

McNeil admitted to police 
that he had had an argument 
with Syria who "threw a 
punch" at him. 

"I hit him on tlie head with 
my crutch," McNeil continued. 
Deny Stcd>bing 

Dixon said he "didn't re- 
member" cutting Syria, and 

I added that he had seen Leon-, brother, Otis McLathen 36. of 
lard Robinson "with a longhigj £. 54th street, who said 
[knife in his hand." ihe was asleep when hts sister 



FOR LIFK — Mrs. Lucille Graves, /'resident of the If omen's .'Auxiliary of the Early 
CaUfornians, hands a $100 check to NAACP business manager Charles Thomas, at tin 
initial payment on a $500 life membership to ihe NAACP. The membership was taken 
gut in memory of the late lack WiUianis, one of the founders of the Early Calif ornianS. 
From left: Mrs. Isabell Dorch, Mrs. Dorothy Baker, Mrs. Hazel McFarland. Thom- 
as, Mrs. Graves, Mrs. Bessie Mays and Mrs. Ella Mae Scruggs. 


Woman Refuses to Tell 
Who Shof Her in Ankle 


Negro Students 
On Par with Whites 

HOUSTON *— Twelve Negro 

children who entered "white" 

When police arrived at 5115 Holmes avenue ' schools last Fall in the na- 

Sunday morning they found Ruth Ai-mstrong sitting I "°"'s, largest segregated 

ankle She told police she had been shot but refused |^ev by the Houston Chronicle 
to tell them who shot her. 'shows. 

Police, however, arrested her — - '■ 


Clarence R John^ion Sr 'nf Robinson, who' re c e i v e dl^^^^s shot. Thev also arrested 
lopoo r^ , , ' ^'■' '^•''ome cuts in the fighting,|Ra .-m o nd Le 

1 2938 Farm dale .\ve.. was|,aid he was playing the pin Holmes avenue. 


Blanc. 511 [ 

- and Elainej 

A ♦u TT-^jTVT.^- , .• •■ .u ^ 1. lamong tiio.se honored -Mon- hall machine and "didn't have Brown, 20, of 10420 Wiggins' 

As the Unit&d Nation's action m the Congo began day, in San Francisco, as one anything to do with the^gtreet i 


to weaken following last week's cruel beating of Pre 
mier Patrice Lumumba upon his transfer in chains to 
Elizabethville, Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold 
for the first time sought Lumuba's release from jail. 
Hammarskjold's action was^ 


I of si.\ employees of the Re 
gional Public Housing Admin 
istration Office to receive 
Superior Service award 
1960. 


MANN'S 

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WESTERN A SANTA BARBARA 
AX. 1-9566 


the United' Arab Republic and 
Guinea, asked that their 1235 
soldiers in the Congo be sent 
home, fhe UAR requesting re- 
lease by Feb. 1. 

It came also after Congo- 
lese anger mounted percipi-' 
tately, especially when UN 
leaders showed solicitous con- 
cern for whites arrested in 
Lumumba territory in contrast 
to their hands-off policy when 
the fate of African leaders 
was involved. 

Last Friday, Rajeshwar Da-, 
yal of India, head of the U.N. 
mission in the Congo, sent_ a 
sharp note to pro-Lumumba 
leaders in Oriental Province 
warning that; '"arbitrary ar- 
rests and ill-treatment of 
Europeans will not be toler- 
ated." 

Accuse U.N. 
Lumumba leaders replied 
by accusing the United Na- 
tions of complicity in the 
secret transfer of the premier 
from the jail injThysville to 
enemy territory in Katanga 
Province. 

Antoine GLzenga, leader in 
Stanleyville who claims to 
rule the Congo in Lumumba's 
name, told the U.N. officials^ 
to stay out of the affair, and 
asked why they were not 
"equally persistent" in drying 
to get Lumumba i^eleased as 
in seeking the freeing of 
Europeans. 

The anger of Lumumba's 
followers increased when 
President Kasavubu's foreign 
minister, Justin Bomboko, fol- 
lowed the white man's lead 
and lamented the arrested of 
Europeans. 

New 'AtrocitT' Stories 
Reports of rough treatment 


fight." He added that "some- 
one got a knife and cut me." 
None of the men arrested 
m admitted stabbing Syria. 
I Cornelius Robertson, broth- 
Johnson, who has been Re- if- of I- V. Robertson, said that 
Intergroup Relations' both Robinson and Dixon had 
Adviser for THA in Los An-'knive.s. and then added, "I 
geleS and San Francisco fori didn't see nobody cut nobody, 
tlie past 12 years, was his; and I didn't cut nobody." 
agency's national candidate 
for the Distinguished Service 
Award presented annually by 
jthe Housing and Home Fi- 
{ nance Agency, over-all hous- 
„ „ w- ,, T 1 ,'*"S agency "for the federal! Olu Delu, president of the 

Hammarskjoia l " ^^u ay. ^^^^^.^^^^^1^^ ^^ ^ nominee fori Union of Nigerian Students of 


ir the nature of a request, not|°* """^ ^""^ missionaries were 

an order. | again flooding foreign news gj^^^gj 

Anger Mounts j services. It was reports of 

Tf „.,,„ ft . •• similar "atrocities" last July 

It came after two nations 


just after the Congo was 
granted independence that 
served as the pretext for Bel- 
glum to resume military con- 
trol of the country. Tliose 
"atrocity" charges were never 
verified. 


The suspects claimed the\- 
tliought a house party was 
going on and tliey knew 
nothing about the shooting. 

Mrs. Armstrong's sister. ^ 
Manila Beckett, of 5416 Mor- 
gan avenue^ told the officers 
she arrived after the shot was ^ 
fired. 

<«■ 


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A/t n m /I A A n/\f\iM\JXJ\j\j\/\J\J\l\JX/X/M\/\/\J 


Program Set at 
Rogers Park 


made the statement that a po- 
litical settlement in the Congo 
is impossible without the help 
of Lumumba. He urged Kasa- 
vubu to bring Lumumba to 


28, 


CONTROLLED PRODUCTS, Inc. 

LU. '5-0963 

7010 SOUTH ALAMEDA, LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


the HHFA honor, he becamdlSoutliern California, is being 

automatically eligible for the' p r e s e n t e d by the College 

PHA award. | Chapter of the Los Angeles 

In ad .ition to a hand'somej -NAACP in a program entitled, 

the capital, Leopoldville, and|^^"tificate citing Johnson forj-Africa Today/' at Will Rog^ 

suggested that Lumumba be! service of superior nature to ers Park Auditormm, 103rd 

released | the federal government, he re- 1 and Centra) avenue, Jan 

„ ' _ ^_^ _ , . ceived a cash award of S3U0. I at 7:30 p.m. 

* U.N. Debote Asked | . 1 

The new country of Mali, 
meanwhile, has asked for ai 
new debate on the Congo in 
the U.N. Security Council. 

In making his request»Pres- 
ident Modivo Keita complain- j 
ed of the beating and transfer! 
of Lumumba. 

U.N. observers in Elizabeth- 
ville last Wednesday told how\ 
Lumumba and two other men 
were dragged off a plane, 
trussed with ropes and tied 
together. 

Then African troops, under 
the command of Belgian offic- 
ers, clubbed them, hit them 
in the face with rifle butts,: 
kicked them and pummeled 
them. I 

When they fell to the! 
ground,^ the gendarmes let, 
them lie for a while, then re- 
sumed their beating. ' 

"It was sickening," taid 
one of the U.N. soldiers. ' 


$$$$$ $$$,$$$$ 

Here is an opportunity to 4^ 

INVEST PROFITABLY!!! 

Haitian Banking Society in Haiti, specializing n investments 
Uqya g Posey? ^"''^ substantial profts, is ncreasing its captal to $2,000,000 

ROCK HILL SC The' Privilege Stock at S%' interest — Great Security. 

Woolworth five - and - dime .y>. S«'''»«fil'e to our increase n capital or invest your capital in .(^ 
Store now displays artificial | current account. 

flowers in the space formerly ^ Haitian Banking Society For Economic Development, y^ 
reserved for whites -to eat. 390, Ave. J. J. J. Dessalines, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 

Negroes are allowed to buy, ****** ****•• 

the flowers. '$$$$$$$ $$$$$? 



brings you the 


AUTO CREDIT INSURANCE AGENCY 

. COMPLETE AUTO INSURANCE COVERAGE 
SY. 6-31 14 -MU. 1-5795 

589 EAST GREEN. AT MAD/SON 
PASADENA, CALIF. 


A & B AUTO UPHOLSTERY 

Downtown Los .\ngc!cs Area 
.-^eat Covers - I'ph'ilsttTin? — Convertible Tops 

SAME LOCATION SINCE 1932 - CALL AL GARCIA 
Rl 8-1313 1132 S. MAIN ST. 


8000 S. 


AL'S AUTO TOP SHOP 

• AUTO TOPS • SEAT COVERS • CARPETS 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
BROADWAY PLACE PL. 1-9681 




jEVER MADE! 


The NEW 

GOOD HOUSEKEEPING 
COOKBOOKS 

20 HANDSOME VOLUMES 

of the finest recipes ever created 

in Good Housekeeping's test kitchen 


■of 


/Vow- 
GOOD'S;, !?'"'y.Tr°'»« 


Jnty 


3S 


"rS 


FINEST QUALITY! STRICTLY FRESH! 

FRYING 


U.S.O.A. . 
GRADE A 


PIANO CLASSES | 

Piano classes for all levels 
of i)erformance are offered by 
the extended day division of 
East Los Angeles College this 
Spring semester. 


We Extend ConiiraliiUilion^ to the KaQle for' Its Great Seriiire 
and fhiinkx In Our Wonilfrfiil f'.uslomers 

DONA-RIE SHOP 

High Sillied fashions fur Particular People 
3706 W. WASHINGTON ILVD. 


Across From Ralphs 7th Ave. Market 


HI. 3-4732 


One of the Main Arteries of Harrison-Ross Is lis Communication Room 



In the Communications Room of HARRISOK-ROSS MORTUARIES, several of the staff members were observed while per- 
forming their respective duties in thai vital artery of the business. (Left to right): ROY C. BROSKS, comptroller; RICHr 
ARD H. JOHNSON, mortician; LE ROY D. JOHNSON HI, pertotmel director; BERTHA R. MASSENGALE, family 
consultant, communicating with a funeral procession several miles away via the two-way radio instaHation; SAMUEL C. fVIL' 
SON. asst. manager; MRS. PARA LEE SCOTT McINTOSH, Florist; and LESLIE U. KING, secretary-treasurer. Like mgelt 
watching overhead in the inserts are: MRS. FAXNIE R. BENJAMIN, managing director; ADAM BERRYj mortician; and 
MR. LEON HARRISON, president and general inanrige