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RE-EL^CTtD — Ldufird 
'Warren, uho has guided the 
' KAACP for the past year, 
tvas re-e/erted president Sun- 
day for the first tuo-year 
term in- the branch's history. 

Warren Wins 
fte^ledion as 
NAACPHead 

Edward D. barren, real 
estate broker, was re-elected 
president of the NAACP in the 
annual meeting Sunday at the 
Second Baptist Church that 
was sometimes heated, but 
inever acrimonious. 

Warren thus becomes' the 
first president of the branch 
*e, be elected tor a two-year 
term, in accwtlance with a 
recently adopted constitution- 
, ai change. 

C3iMi M«)«ritT 

Warren defeated the Rev.J 
John N. Doggett, 168 to 121,] 
after Manuel D. Talley, also 
a candidate for the presidency, 
wiihdKW his name and asked 
his supporters to back Rev. 
Doggett 

ffighest scorer for local 
branch offices was Atty. Loren 
Miller, publisher of the Calif- 
ornia Eagle, who received 225 
votes to become first vice 
president. 

Miller was also top scorer 
for members of the national 
executive board. For that 
office he received 239 votes 
out of the 289 counted. 
17 Votes Cball«ng«d 

Voting figures are still terf- 
tative since 37 of the 326 bal- 
lots cast were challenged. The 
challenges were based princi- 
pally on technical grounds 
and Warren said Tuesday that 
probably most of the chal- 
lenged votes would be fpuhd 
(Continued on Page 4) I 


aiOl W. V'rnaii Aycnua, L. A. 


Continuous Publication for 80 Years 


AX. S-lllS , I 


Vol. LXXX-No. 40 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 
; t 


AX. 5-31^5 


!Out>of-Town 15c 


Change in 
Assembly 





Enr THE DOZEK—^The LevAs family doesn't believe in doing things by halves. IF hen 
it was indicated that the children needed their tonsils out, they nent to the University 
Hospital en masses-all nine children. James Lewis, the father, had his tonsils out. too, 
for good measure. Mrs. M^ry Graves, director of nurses, is examining Joseph, 3, the 
youngest of the clan. The others are: Ronald, Donna, Anthony, Michael and James Lewis 
and their cousins who live with them, George, Jerry and Sharon Allen. 




Asked 

Ghzens Group 
Says Present 
Lines Unfair 

Charging that "botli Demo- 
crats and Republicans have 
joined hands . and forgotten 
party differences to gerry- 
mander Negro communities in 
the past." a ".Non Partisan 
Citizens Committee" last Fri- 
day presented a plan to a 
legislative committee by which 
ihp south central area of the 
oily would be divided into 
Jour, a<».sembl\ and two con- 
igress^ional districts. Nepro 
I voters would be in a majority 
in three of the as.'emhly dis- 
tricts and in both i-ongres- 
sional districts. 

; Under the plan laid before 
[the Assembly Elections and 
|Reat*p'<^tiopment Committee, 
the 62nd ' asaembly district 
would be bounded by Olym- 
pic on the north. Florence 
avenue on the Kouth. Ala- 
meda on^^'^ east and Ver- 
mont on the west. Tl^e 63rd 
district would also be b<)unded 
by Olympic, on the north, 
Slauson oh_t}}e south, Ver- 
mont on the east and would 
extend west to La Brea, and 
beyond in a few instances. 
Combin*^ DUtricts 
The 62nd and 63rd districts 



'White' Air Force 
Officer Fights Slur 

WASHINGTON — A young .\ir Force captain, 
whose white appearance belies hi.s Negro ance.stry, ij^,"'^"*^ '^^^^f^^^'il^'l^'* 
came to Washington this week to try to get a trans 
fer from a situation that has become intolerable. 

Capt. Gharlos .VI. Penny, 32. *~ ~ 

is jstationed at .McCciinel Air'Clyg TecicherS 


Calif. Team 
Segregated in 
St. Petersburg 

Discrimination in the hous- 
ing of members of a Calif- 
ornia State College football 
team in St Petersburg, Fla., 
has brought forth protests 
and a demand that any future 
athletic event where such 
practices are followed should 
be summarily earfcelled. 


^t.l:KlS(i ^JLL h.S — Capl. Tony Ruiz, head of 77th Street detectives, conducted an on- \ 
ihespnt iniefligalitin immediately after Tuesday' f shoot in tf of a liquor store otUner on E,.) 
7)rd street. Three \egrofs are sought for the killing. (Adams) ■ j. « . .; , 

-■ '—-^ ■ • ■ . . ■. ■ ; ■--' ,'j ■, 

Hunt THree Men ^ 
la JRrerChri$tni«|$| 
Robbery^ Murder 1 

Grief settled upon the family of Sol Herman 
Weiss, of 13425 Blythe street, Van Nuys, Tuesday, 
sweeping away all thoughts of joy at Christmas time. 

Far Weiss waa killed in^ 
broad daylight, slain by a 


bandit who had just robbed 
his liquor store at* 1014 E. 
Florence avenue. 

Shot in Chest 

M K. K- . , ^'^l.'TT^^^^rT'^ °'i Hi.s body was found lying on 

would be combined to form: Humboldt State College, up ^j,^ lawn in front of 1006 E. 


; one congressional district, north, went to St. Petersburg] 

; Under the plan, the 62ndrdis- to play in the Holiday Bowl' 

tiict would have 196.000 'resi- last Saturday. ; 


73rd street about 4:30 p.n>. 


Fon-e Base near Wichita. 


Liberia is 
Given Seat on 
U. N. Council 

JfEW YORK — Liberia Tues- 
day became the first Aftican 
TMtion south of the Sahara to 
become a jnember of the 
United Nations Security Coun- 
cil. 

The selection came as a 

compromise after a 13-baIlot 

deadlock, with Ldberia and 

"Ireland splitting the two-year 

term. *- 

Western nations had origi- 
nally backed Portugal for the 
seat, but when opposition to 
that choice remained strong, 
the West switched to Ireland. 

Portugal is one of the Euro- 
pean powers that still has l By and large they were 
possessions in Africa where descendants of French or 
conditions ar«i reported on a i Spanish settlws Who had mar- 
par with those of South Africa.! (Continued on P»ge 4) 


Louisiana Historf 

Ijouisiana residents have less 

reason to get themeselves into I - 

a tizzy over race' than the ^ Kan., wrhere he is commander Pf|5S T6ST TOf 

people of any other State. Its of the food .service squadron, ■yg* q • • i 

citizens of African descent! 'Secret' Told 'ViCe PrinCipal 
have always played- a large! . ^ . : . I Five Negroes were among 

part in its history. When thel Penny said the latest mci- ^^^ 5^ teachers who have 
Americans took over in 1803 dent involved pressure 


201.000 - a total of 397.000. The 
average .si/e of California as- 
sembly districts is estimated 
at 19.1.000 inhabitants 
congressional 


Evers'Case 

Too R^ for 

Miss. Paper 


There was a bullet hole in his 

chest. .1 

Aee*pt R'uling j He was the fafhpr of two; 

When the players arrived children one 16, the* other 11. When justice is .so perverted 

in the Florida city, they wei-e Capt. Tony Ruiz, rfead of the' th«t ft calls forth a rel^lie 

informed that Negro team derettives at 77.th Street Sta-ifrom a dgily newspaper! in 

.. . ^members would have 10 be i ion, was on the scene prob-i Jack.ion, Miss., the heaii| pi 

,:„„„,. ,^'^'^'* ' 'P' lodged in Negro hou.<^ing. ing for clues shortly after the the •'bjack-belf. 

pro.ximately 400.000. ., The ruling was accepted by ! shooting. 

None Saw Robl^ry 

He said " there apparently 


district 

(Continued on Page 3) 


In 


that's nfws. 
a longthy editorial pete.' 


the "'State Times " of Jack- 
son, e,\pressed grave eonttejjji 


they found a large free colored 
population of such influence 
that the first governor found 
it expedient to organize them 
into a Territorial Militia. 

Many of 

these colored 

\ people were 

1 mercha n ts, 

A others were 

?W;"C influential in 



the 
tual 


intellec- 
life of 
Orleans' 


i New 
and some of 
'■■M them, w er e 
uaran MiiMr' Slaveholders. 


brdught on a white girl, a 
civilian employr.; at the base, 

whom he had been dating 
openly for the i>ast two 
months. 

He said that the base com- 
mander. Col. Arthur McGib- 


b«en advised that they have 
passed the Board of Educa- 
tion examinatfoif for vice 
principals of '^^e m e n t a r y 
schools. 

From 1956 up to the present 

time, only three Negroes had 

made the grade. 

Those \%ho qualified are 

ney, ordered another officer Mary Phillips Lindsay, who 


The plan locates the 5.}th jj^^ ,^3^ , 

between Imperial on; Lt. C.v.' Glenn M. Anderson,; 

upon, learning of the ^^^^K^'g^sno one 4n the store but i over the sentencing of Medg^r 
suffered by the Negro Plav-jweiss and the killer at- the ^V-ers, NAACP field secre^aify 
ers, denounced the action ^-^^ ^j^ ^^^ robbery. It appear- 


is now .serving as an acting 
vice principal, and Hazel 
Ayers Henry. Owen Lloyd 
Knox. Evelyn Leonard Barber 


Trouble Hits One 
fainily Nine Times 

Bubble, bubble, toil -and trouble, tFouble, trouble 

—repeated nine times — greeted the family of Mr. 

and Mrs. James Lewis, 1401 Cliveden street, Comp- 

ton, Tuesday, as other people prepared for Christmas. 

At 4 p.m. on the dot, the six Lewis' children and 
their three cousins who liye^ 


with them trooped into the 
University Hospital, 37^ S. 
'Vermont, aU headed lor the 
<^rating table. 

'The oldest of the troupe is' 

George Allen, 16; the young- 
est Joseph Lewis, 3. 

.In between there are Ronald 

. Lewis, .&; Donna, &', . Anthony, 

7: Michael, 5 And James, 4; 

and Jerry Alfen, 12, and 

Stiaron Allen, .10..' 

All nine are going to yield 
that! tooaUa to the knUo of, 


skilled surgeon. Dr. John Cole- 
man. 

For good measure, Lewis, a 
truck operator for the county, 
decided to join' the parade and 
have his tonsils out, too. 

Mrs., Lewis, who works as 
a 'clerk 'foi-' tHe county, says 
she plans on making gaUons 

of soup over the holidays in- 
stead' :of ' .the ' tr&aitibft'dl tur- 
key. - 

But cheer up. kids, it won't 
Ijtst Ibhg; ah'd; "boy hoW yoifll 
be tucking in the food come 
New Year's Day! 


last Wednesday to speak to 
the girl aiid tell her his "sec- 
ret" There was an implied 
threat. Penny said, that if the _ _ _ _ 

girg didn't heed the warning ! 3^^' La Verne' Dilfon Parks' 
things might beconio. difficult 
for her. ' • 

The young airman said the 
girl had known of his back- 
ground ever since they met. 

N^t 'raising' 

He .said he believes his i 
great grandfather was a Negro 
and that he jalso has some In- 
dian ancestors, but that while 
some of his relatives are 
"passing." he doesn't feel he 
should have "to cross a line." 

Trouble at the base is no* 
the first time Penny has em 
"Countered this particular 
biaod of race problem. At the" 
Negro school he attended in 
L Plata, Md., the other boys 
caUed him "white boy," and 
took out "a lot of theii 
grudges against whites on 
me." 

Eyen at Howard University, 
the other students treated him 
with coolness. 

The trouble . at the basei 
owever, was the last straw. 
Penny came to . Washington 

t« go .directly to the Defense 
Oei^. and place hi^ case be- 
fore "Q»e Air Force inspector 
gef*r»t, ^ 

•". H^ wants at show-down with 
the service to whic*i he has 
devoted ^^ght years oL his life. 


Adam Powell, 
Secretary Wed 

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — 

Adam Claj-ton Powrell. >vfiose 
divorce from pianist Hazel 
Scott was made final only 
two weeks ago, was married 
here in a private ceremony 
last Thursday. 

The bride is the former 
Ivette Diago, 29, Powell's 
secretar>- for the past year 
until she . resigned a month 
ago. She is a native of San 
Juan. 


.Monday in a letter to Dr. Roy 
E. Simpson, director of the 
State Departoient of Educa- 
tion, and asked for a policy 
ruling to avoid such incidents 
in the future. 

Ask Pollqr Stotement 
"It would seem quite clear 
to me," said Anderson, "that 
no California educational in- 
stitution should submit to 
such discriminaJtion, and that 
any athletic event which in- 
volved such practices in any 
(Continued on Page 4> 


ed, he aaid, as if the man had 
come into the store, pulled a 
gun and .grabbed the^ bills 
from the till. ' 

Then he fled down tJie al- 
ley between Florence and 73rd 
street ' 

Weiss ran alter him down 
the alley. As he drew near and 
appeared to be gaining, the 
thug turned, aimed his pistol 
and fired. 

While no one had seen the 
robbery itself, • there were 
(Continued on Page 2) 



for Mississippi, to 30 days Jsh 
jail and a fine of tlOOiftjtr 
contempt of coUrt. 

Fnadeni for All 

It is indeed strange to firid 
words like the Ibllowing com- 
ing, from the' Deep South.- 
Said the' "State Times:"! '■ 

"Under our American con- 
cept the rich, the poor; jthe 
literate, the illiterate; toe 
conformist, the non-confolrm-^ 
ist — all are entitled to 
dom of speech. • ' . 

"In the contempt trial of 
Medgar Evers in Hattiesbirg, 
— ! Jimmy Finch, district attoij- 
ney, ^aid the people should 
stop and think before we piob 
off and speak out against th^, 
freedom. ' f 

•This is the direct ahtl- . 
thesis of what Gov. Ross Bat;- 
nett has been telling our peo- 
ple,. He says that the judJdd^l- 
pattern of today is a threait ; 
to the freedom of every maii, | 
woman and child in. America.! 

"Our speaker of the house. 
Walter Sillers, an' eminent atj^ 
ttM-ney, has warned repeatedlir 
that our' people should guar^ 
against the intrusion . of the 
court s upon tiie individual 
liberties of our pettier: In 
this warning he' is joined by 
J.oe Patterson, our state at|>' 

(Continued on Page 4) [^ 


"^FORTHE yOiJ^'GSTERS-JA few of theJSOO iou,if- 

' sters who jam>-packed.the Largi Theater on^QSrd street 

Saturday aftv^ooH are tkown- with Dr. Ckrixtopker L. 

Taylor, center, who sent out a "call for'ali tots" to attend 

hit tixth annual Christmas party. Shown aiso art tomt-of 


the members of Dr. Taylor's staf who along with Mru. 
Taylor helped in the festivities. Some of thf staff members 
are Pat BernMniex.'Glom Sutton, Bitiie Ktnierici^ Btu- 
hara Ruilins ■and Marcella George. John Buciner is showtL 
at left, (See Social Page.J (AdamsJ^ 


fmaturmd 
IntJSNifog'e t 

Editoclols ..._ ! J;*i 

Church AetlTittw .....^^^i 
'Spttts :■.■-■.., — r...,..,.;.i« 

Til* Tea . ^-...,1^ — ~_...l2 

PtwethM FefljK .--^^....10 
Bin SmoUweoA '....^ • 

.rMpia ......:..- i-_.ju 

Chttt Cnnrfard ..:^-^ — 19 
Show BnaliMas — ..-14 ; 


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2— The -Califb rnla E«gl« 


; Thursday, December 22, 1960 


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rie of more than $3 million 
fall due. 

In Baton Rouge, meanwhile, 
the legislature was still try- 
ing to find ways to circum- 
vent the integration order. 
Latest plan is to rajse the 
state income tax from 2 to 3 
cents on the dollar, to pay for 
the special legislative sessions 
and to provide funds for a 
private school plan for white 
students. 


Charged 

To 3 U. Officials 

li ^F^ ORLEANS — The federal government, 
Which since Nov. 14 has consiste;itly overruled all 
attempts of the Louisana governor and legislature to 
e^fprce segregation in New Orleans, on Tuesday inti- 

tiated contempt actions against three of the state's 

top omciais. ^ 

The U.S. Justice Department Friday when bills and sala 

asked a U.S. Court to reader a 
. oontempt decision against Lt. 

Gov. C-C. (Taddy) Aycock, 

House Speaker Thcmias Jewell 

and Staite Supperintendent of 

Education Shelby Jacteon. 
,^,^ Wlthhald Salarias 

Season for the contempt re- 

.quests* was the withholding 

by the state <rf salaries of 
, teachers in New Orleans' inte- 
grated schools. 
The motions filed by U.S. 

Wst Atty. M. Hebum Many 

said the three men refuse to 

"draw, sign and issue salary 

checks to employees at Wil-- 

Mam Frantz Elementary 

Soho<d and McDonogh 19 

Elementary School and to cer 

tain other employees." 
The federal action came 

after St Louis heiress Miss 

Ellen Steinberg said she was 

d^Ksrtting hall a million dol- 
lars In a New York bank lor 

u^e by the school board to 

meet its <:rt>ligations. 
.., Eugene Sands, president of 

Magnetic Research ol White 

• Plains, N.Y., said his firm 
would send $5000 to supple- 
ment Miss Steinberg's offer 
There were also reports that 
offers of- aid came from Los 
Angeles, but the details were 
not released. 

Bnainewman Act 

Additional backing for the 
«cSiooI board came from busi- 

• ness men in New Orleans 
Last Wednesday as 100 civic 
leaders called for an "imme 

. diate end to threats, defama 
tion and resistance to those 
who administer our laws." 

They took out a large ad in 
the daily papers to get their 
message across to the i>e<^le 
of the city. 

They called for an end to 
Bfcreet demonstrations and 
Urged full suppOTt for "city 
oClicialst the police and the 
duly elected school board of 
the parish of Orleans." 
Fiacmcial Pinch 

Business men admitted that 
the violence and hj^te cam- 

■ palgn launched when four 
little Negro girls, all six years 

■ old, entered the two schools in 
mid -November have seriously 

' burt biwiness. The loss allect- 
i ed both those who cater to the 

' people of New Orleans and 
those who depend upon the 
tourist trade. 

,/ The financial pinch is ex- 
pected to hit the schools this 


f 


Season*! EreeVinjs 

THE ENGLISH 
BUSINESS AND 
PROFESSIONAL 
CENTER ^ 

8500 S. Broadvy/ay 
PL. 3-5544 


I 


U. N. Censures 
Segregation in 
South Africa 

NEW YORK— By a voti or 
90-0, the U.N. General Assem- 
bly Sunday called on Soutli 
Africa to end apartheid (seg- 
regation) laws in the man- 
dated territory of South West 
Africa. 

A resolution asking the U.N. 
to investigate conditions in 
the territory and propose 
steps toward self-government 
was adopted 78-0 with 15 ab-, 
stentions. 

Violation 
. The resolution hrtd South 
Africa's policies in South 
West Africa violated her ob- 
ligations under the 1920 
Leagne of Nations mandate. 
The South African govern- 
ment has refused to convert 
the mandate to a U.N. trustee- 
ship. 

In other resolutions, the 
assembly commended Ethio- 
pia and Liberia, for asking 
the world court to find South 
Africa guilty of such viola- 
tions; urged an end to arbi- 
trary imprisonment and de- 
portation of Africans in the 
territory, and sought punish-' 
ment of police and soldiers 
who shot and killed 11 Afri- 
cans there a year ago as they 
were demonstrating against 
forced resettlement. 

South Africa had moved 
that the assembly refuse to 
consider the resolutions on 
grounds the issues involved 
were before the court. This 
motion was defeated 82-1 with 
only /5outh Africa voting for 
it. 


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MACY'S PICKETED— Macy's Drpartment Stare in New 
York is being picketed in protest agninst refusal of its At- 
lanta subsidiary, Davison-Paxnn, to serve "Segroes at' its 
lunck counter. Picket line eJtitndrd three blockj. The dem- * 
onst ration was called by CURE. 


U.N. Congo Debate 
Ends in Deadlock 

By GRACE E. SIMONS 

United Nations' efforts to compromise the two 
opposing views on the Congo ended in failure Tues- 
day, but the U.N. Assembly voted funds for contiuing 
the Congo operation before adjournment until March 

7. • ■ 


Efforts at arriving at some I °^ approving U.N. actions in 

kind of settlement in the !^^PP«,^"e ^ '^^ff^"''" ""'^ 

Congo itself floGndered, with P^°''.";" ,\"'^ f^"^ ""^J^^ 

the country splintered by s.ep-IJT'/'^^S^^ '^"^ ^^^'^^T 

aratist mov^ents and the ^^^* ^°";<1 Pf.™'^ ^^"^ ^''"- 

vening of parnament. 

The British representative, 


mounting threat ot civil war. 
Struggle for Control 

The stumbling block in the 
U.N., as in previous debates. 


in speaking on behalf of that 
resolution, advocated "prompt, 
lair and open trials for de 


was the question of support of jp^^^j premier Lumumba and 
the jailed premier. Patrice 1^^,^^ imprisoned leaders." 



Hunt Three Men 

(Continued from Page 1) 
some who saw a man run 
down the alley to a car parked 
on 73rd street. Two men were 
sitting in the car. 

As the thief pulled open the 
car door, one of the men 
gunned the engine and sped 
away. •■ 

Some reports indicated that 
possibly two men, instead of 
one, entered the store, while 
only one of the trio remained 
in the car. 

Police got a description of 
[the oar and of the three men, 
' all Negroes, who made their 
escape. 


SCIENCE GRANT 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Presi- 
dent S. J. Wright announced 
this week that Fisk University 
has Seen granted $82,400 by 
the National Science Founda- 
tion to support a Summer 
Science Institute for 60 teach- 
ers of^ science and mathe- 
matics in secondary schools. 


Lumumba, versus support for 
the pro-Western President 
Joseph Kasavubu and the 
"strong man" dictator, also 
pro- Western, Col. Joseph Mo- 
mutu. 

The UJD "conflict. In turn, 
reflects the struggle in the 
Congo over control — whether 
there shall be a strong cen- 
tral government as advocated 
by Lumumba or a loose fed- 
eraaetion of semi-independent 
provinces, favoced by Belgium 
with the support of othar 
Western powers. 

Two resolutions, reflecting 
ihese opposing viewpoints, 
were debated in the U.N. As- 
sembly, one proposed by the 
United States and Great Bri- 
tain, the other by India, Yugo- 
slavia and six other - Afro- 
Asian nations. 

Both Resolutions Fail 

A two-thirds majority was 
needed for passage. The Unit- 
ed States resolution just bare- 
ly failed of passage, winning 
43 votes, with 22 against and 
32 abstentions. No African 
nation supported the U.S. 
Stand. Five opposed it and 18 
abstained. 

The Afro-Asiaii resolution, 
backed by the Soviet bloc, re- 
ceived 28 votes, with 42 
a^rainst and 27 abstentions. 
Many African nations sup- 
ported this proposal. 

This resolution sought the 
immediate release of Lumum- 
ba and the convening of the 
parliament that was elected 
just prior to the formal grant- 
ing of freedom last July 1 and 
suspended in September by 
Mobutu when he ^t himself 
up as rulw. 

It also sought the neutraliz- 
ing of Mobutu's Congolese 
army. 

The U.S.-British resolution, 
on the contrary, had the effect 


Irriplicit^ in that approach 
was the,<:oncept that Lumum- 
ba's arrest was legitimate, 
which is hotly disputed by 
Lumumba's supporters. 

No Agreement 

CK-er the weekend, represen- 
tatives of the various factions 
in the Congo met in; Brazza- 
ville across the Congo River 
from Leopoldville. Kasavubu 
attempted to bring about 
minimum agreement between 
the warring factions, but was 
unable to gain headway. 

Neither Moise Tshombe, 
head of secessionist Katanga 
Province and generally re- 
gard as a Belgian puppet, nor 
Albe,rt Kalonji, president of 
the South Kasai Province, also 
tagged with pro-Belgian lean- 
ings, would agree to any lim- 
iting of their powers by a cen- 
tral government. 

Present at the meeting were 
representatives of Lumumba's 
Congolese National Movement. 

Blockade, Battles 

On their return to Leopold- 
ville, all the politicians made 
widely divergent and contra- 
dictory statements. from 
which it was appparent that 
nothing hart been solved. 

^4^nwhile, Mobutu has 
proclaimed an economic boy- 
cott on Oriental Province. 
Lumumba's stronghold, and 
battles were t hreatening on 
the borders of that province. 

In Kivu Province, at the 
capital Bukavu, there was a 
battle Friday between Congo- 
lese troops and a U.N. service 
company composed of Nigeri- 
ans. The Congolese had jailed 
a 50-member Austrian medical 
team, claiming that the Aus- 
trians were in reality Bel- 
gians in disguise. 

In the six hour battle, one 
Nigerian was reported killed 


Off icer Awarded 
For ReKuing Five 

Officer Henderson Cooper, of Newton Street 
Police Station, and Policewoman Dorothy Pettigrew, 
at present assigned to the Main Jail, were among 
police officers given awards for meritorious service 
during the year 1960. - j^. 

Cooper was one of eight 
officers given Qass "A" com- 
mendations for exceptional 
police work "beyond the call 
of duty." 

Sow noBMa 

Miss Pettigrew, along with 
18 men in the department, re- 
ceived a Class "B" commenda- 
tion for meritorious police 
work. 

Cooper's award resulted 
from his rescue of five per- 
sons from a flaming residence 
at 1244 E. 21st street E>ec. 4. 
1959, three of whom were 
children. 

Cooper saw flames rising 
from the roof of the house and 
entered to check few sleeping 
occupants. 

He led one person to safety. 
When a woman screamed hys- 
terically that her grandchil- 
dren were asleep in the rear 
bedroom, he ran back into the 
house and found three sniall 
children. He grabbed all three 
in his arms and carried them 
outdoors. 

Determined to Jump 

Then he learned there Was 
someone on the second floor of 
the building. Cooper again ran 
back into the house and rush- 
ed up the stairs, which by this 
time were engulfed in flames. 

Standing near the front 
window was a man so terri- 
fied tha^e refused to follow 
the OTfiCer down the stairs as 
directed and insisted that he 
was going to jump out the 
windQW. Realizing that the 
jump could ' be fatal, the 
officer directed him to assist 
in tying bed sheets togetiier. 
Cooper then anchored one 
end of the line around his arm 
and dropped the other end out 
the window, permitting the 
man to lower himself to safe- 
ty- 
After checking #the remain- 
ing rooms and finding them 
vacant, Cooper ran back down 
the stairs and through the 
front door just as part of the 
ceiling vcollapsed across the 
staircase. 

He then arou.sed the occu- 
pants of neighboring houses. 
The award given him was 
in recognition of his display 
of conspicuous courage in the 
face of extreme danger, with 
complete disregard lor his 
personal safety. 

Policewoman Pettigrew was 
given her award for work done 
as an agent while she was 
working at the Narootics Divi- 
sion. 


March, of Dimes-supported 
research, in addition to de 
veloping two anti-polio vac- 
cines, has increased medical 
knowledge in a wide range of 
diseases, including cancer, 
measles and the common cold 


DUTY, PLilS — Hender- 
son Cooper was awarded a 
Class "A" commendation for 
exceptional police work "be- 
yond the call of duty" for 
saving the lives of five peo- 
ple, three of XL-bom were 
children, during a fire on E. 
21st street. 



OfiiegasO^ 
Conclave Mon. 
In San Antonio 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas. — 
Four college presidents are 
scheduled to be panel partlci- 
pants during the Omega Psi 
Phi Fraternity's 47th Grand 
Conclave that opens here at 
San Antonio, on Monday, Dec. 

The fraternity's theme fdr 
the year is "Yovth ot the 
World: Accelerators of Prog- 
ress and Change." 

Top Leaden 

The four presidents will be 
heard on Thursday afternoon 
at the 2:15 session. They are: 
Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, More- 
house College, Atlanta; Dr. 
Samuel Nabrit, Texas South- 
ern University, Houston; Dr. 
W. S. Davis, Tennessee A. k I. 
University, Nashville, Tenn.; 
and Dr. John F. Potts, Voor- 
hees Junior College, Denmark, 
S. C. 

The conclave opens with 
registration at 10 a.m. at' St' 
Phillips College Auditorium. 

Business sessions >^ill con- 
tinue Tuesday, Dec. 27 at the 
Villlta Assembly Building, 
Presa and Villita streets. 

H. Carl Moultrie, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, the national 
executive secretary, will pre- 
side during part of the session^ 

Presiding at the fraternity's 
opening session will be the 
Grand Basileus, Dr. I. Grpgory 
Newton, professor of Political 
Science, North Carolina Col- 
lege, Durham, N. C. 

In addition to Moultrie and 
Newton, other officers are: 
Cary D. Jacobs, first vice- 
grand basileus; JamM - L. 
Felder, second vice- basileus; 
Walter H. Riddick, grand 
keeper of records and seal; 
J. B. Blayton, grand keeper of 
finance; Ellis F. Cprl>ett, kli- 
tor of Oracle; Charles A. Ray, 
co-director, public relations; 
W. O. Walker, cO-director, 
public relations; Carl A. 
Earles, grand counselor and 
S. D. Kane, grand marshall. 


MERIT AWARDED — 
Policewoman Dotothy Petti- 
grew, along with 18 men, 
was awarded for " merit or- 
ioifs" work by the Police 
Dept. - 


and three U.N. soldiers were 
reported wounded. One of the 
latter was British. Ten Congo- 
lese were said to have been 
killed. 


Dogs, Cats Are 
Fine Xmas Gifts 

Here's a Christmas gift sug- 
gestion from the Los Angeles 
S.P.C.A.— the gift of a new 
pet. if your iamily is able and 
willing to care for the'animal 
properly. 

A wide selection of healthy, 
affec^onate dogs and cats are 
available now at S.P.C.A. 
shelters, awaiting adoption in- 
to suitable homes, says George 
Crosier, general manager of 
the Society for Prevention* of 
Cruelty to Animals. 


Sornefbing to buy? Something to 
lell? Try a clattified ad in tht 
Eagl«. They cott only $1 tor 1S 
wordi. And they get retultt. 



OMEGA LEADER - Dr. 
. /. Gregory Newton, ^rttni 
basileus, wilt f reside at the 
opening session of the Ome- 
ga Psi' 'Phi conclave in San 
Antonio. Texas. Monday, 
Dec. 26. 


Six to Sue 
UCLA Over 
Permit Rule 

Six UCLA students filed 
suit this week in Superior 
Court challenging a univer- 
sity regulation barring the 
distribution of literature on 
the campus without permis- 
sion of university officials. 
' The suit, which is support- 
ed by the American Civil Lib- 
erties Union, asks for « court 
order declaring the regulation 
unconstitutional and in viola- 
tion of the First and ,14th 
Amendments. ' J -^ 

The regulation was adopted 
on November' 13, 1959, ; and 
went into effect last Febru- 
ary. It provides that "no lit- 
erature may be ' distributed 
free or sold in connection with 
meetings or events without 
permission obtained in ad- 
Trance." i' 

ACLU Attys. A. L. Wirin and 
Lawrence Steinberg said the 
students hoped to, distribute 
a pamphlet discussing bo^ 
sides of , thep racial segrega- 
tion issue, but objected to the 
university's "paternalism" im- 
plicit in the regulation.; 


^8 Days Only-Beginnins SUNDAY, Dec. 251 


y/Sh/:^^/' 


ALAN FREED 


I 


STAGE 


N ROL-U 


«TAIININ« 


.» JACKIE WILSON , 

[IM^ T»^mpt"i"ril B9Smti»fhd"J"Aione «/ LMat^ 


5 BIO STAGE SHOWS DAILY ^ 

' ^^f-i^Special Midnigkt Shew en New Yetor's Ivel 

a C yCu4: FEATURE MOVI^ en eiant Ser««n 


UNITED ARTISTS 


lOOVNTOWN-Mi A-arMtfw* 
[MA^TOm^OMf* OpM 10:M i 



A samigs . account 

opens the 
door to 59 


banking services 
at Bank of America ! 


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SAFETY SAVINpS 

and UOAN ASSOCIATION 

,2638 South Western Avenue • Los Angeles 18 • RE 1-7361 

. Free Parking ^ 


' BE READY FOR 1961 ^ . . v , .1 j " 

TOP WAGES - STEADY WORK 

CAN BE YOURS AS AN 

AMI. Trained Auto Spedalisl 

BRAKES -2 WEEKS • ALIGNMENT -2 WEEKS • BASIC MECH AN- 
ICS-8 WEEKS • RADIATORS -6 WEEKS •MASTER AUTbMATIG 
TRANSMISSION - 4 WEEKS • MASTER TUNE UP - 4 WEEKS ^ 
BODY -FENDER -FRAME (unit body) - 8 MONTHS • MASTER 

MECHANIC - 8 MONTHS 

DISCRIMINATION IS UNKNOWN AMONG THOSE WITH TOP AUTOMOTIVI SKILLS a •! i 

TRAINING CAN GHJICKLY PUT YOU IN THIS CLASS •^•"••- '^•^•»- 

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME AT A.M.I., THE ONLY SCHOOL OF ITS KIND IN THE wabi wi 
STUDENTS WORK ON LATE MODEL CARS TO GAIN THE EXP^IENCE Nf CISSA»\r H* 

TO JOURNEYMAN STATUS «.nt«wB»>AiiT l 


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INSTITUTE 


4931 SO. VERMONT (atSOth) PL 3.5111 

— — —— — — — — — — ^ — -^LIP AND MAIL- — — — —•«._ ^ J.* J?"-- ' 

AUTO MECHANIC«NSTITU?E H 

C Ayr [ *W1 so. VERMONT, L. A. 37 PLWlli 

^ ** ™" I GEFITtEMEN: D PLEASE SENI^ ME FULL INFoiJ. 

MATION ABOUT A. M. I. TRAINING D PLEASf 

ENROLL ME FOR 

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I NAME: 

STREET ADDRESS: .....;.V. I' '" , Si';-^'^ >.^^^ '■ ' 1 
^'^ •• ^ZONE:.;...STATl....,::.;J-i 

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IF YOU ENROLL 
BEFORE 

DE(.31ST 


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TItAINING. 1 


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REAPPORTION MKTsT COS FKRKSCF.— Attorney Gmtral Stanley Mosk denier) 
ponders figures prrstnteii h\ a non-portisun citizens lomniitlee tihiih unitd re-dinning of 
(isseniblf and conqresstonul dislrnt boundary lines. From left to right: Atty. .Miirpnn 
Moten. II rndelt iirecn. Donald Derriiks, -M osi and Dax-rd Siott Sr. 'the iotnriiitlrf ap- 

pearfd at a legislfttivf henrinti lost Friday. (Adams) \ 


Residents Protest I 

Unfair Boundaries 1 

(Continued from Page 1> ,«>' the 66th would be 150,000.' 

the north tind Artesia on the. The two districts would be 

south and between Alameda combined into one congres- 

on the east and Western ave- sional district with a popula- 

nue on the west. The 66th dis-tlon in excess of 350,000. 
trict \^-ould be located between; **Net Mn^^iag 

the 55th and the 62nd with J Acting as spokesman for the 
Van Ness as its western boun- committee. Wendell Green. 
dar\. The population of the sentmfel editor, told the as- 
55th would l>e 203.000 and thatlgennbly committee, headed by 
' j Robert Crown, that the group 

"i$ not approaching with hat 

in hand ^>egging ior a hand- 
out." He also assured the as- 
sembUmen that it ' was not 

"giddy with a sense of powjr 
making excessive demands.*' 

The case for the plan was 
bolstered by carefully drawn 
nmps with 1960 censu.s fiRiire.s 

. . . .showing population and resi- 

\Vest-thp la.^t great front ier^^„^.^ p^^,.,, p^rks. AHv. 
lor the V\p.st— Dr. R O Hara^ „„,.g^„ Moten, David Scoit 

: .Sr.. and .\I rs. M a r n e -s b a 


Color is Badge ! 
Of Honor, Says 

Fund Director ! 

GREENSBORO, N.C.— Refer- 
ring to Africa as the "bridge' 
between the Ea.st and the 


British Weigh 
Bill to Ban Bias 

LONDON-The 

House of Commons lost 

'Wednesday 9<nre formal 
tint reading to a bill 

that would bar dis- 
crimination in England. 


Thursday, December 77, 1960 The Cslitomi* ^0^"j 

Dr. Weekes' 'Progfess- 

.'TooSlow' for Warren 


:i^r 


Taikeit lollalMiialed in ihe 
prepaialiun uf Ihe maps and 


Suffocation Try 
Awakens Woman 

Miss Geneva Mae Sims, 32, of 601 E. 27th street, 

told police that she w^s awaker^ed about 2:30 Satur- 

"day morning when a man she identified as James 

Green was liolding a pillow over her face, shutting 

off the air. ♦" 

She struggled free and:.. ■ . 

fought him off. He left. but< unempioyiTienT 

return,ed about 7:30 a.m. j, _ 

Afraid he would kill her. she Mere IflCreaSeS 

called the police. 


Unemployment in the Lots 
Miss Sims said this was the Angeles - Long Beach-Orange 
second time Green* 28. a truck|County area ro.sp to 168.900 in 
driver, had tried to kill her .November from l.Vi.HK) in Oi ■ 
while she slept. tober. a 3.'^ pfrceiii iiuTeajit- 

The first time, about a .ompared with Uie same 
month ago. she a.woke to find^month in 19.59 when 126.40(J 
him bending over her. with persons were seeking jot>s. 
his nands around her throat, ^.^e rate of 'unemploymeni 
attempting Xo strangle her, j,„^j,^,„,^.(j ^^ 55 jj^i^-gm of Uie 


300 Towns 
In South Hit 
By Boycotts 

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.- 
Th« NAACP went to the 
communitT laat week for 
support of its "No Christ- 
mas Gift Buying" d r i ▼ « 
through a series ol public 
meetings in Tacont lots. 

The association launched 
the pre-Christmos boTcott 
throughout the Southeast 
lost week. Mrs. Ruby Hur- 
ley, NAACP southeast re- 
gional director, said in- 
volved ore more than 300 
communities in six states: 
Georgia, Florida. North odd 
South Carolina, Mississippi 
and Tennessee. 


Lanier of New York City, 
urged the Founders' Day au- 
dience at Bennett ("oliege, 

recenlly lo re-ldenlify them- ,.o„e<-tion ol >tati..ti<-». 
we know as a free .society ,. Kegfo*. In Moioritr 
pa.^^s from our gene, ation." " di.Mri.-i Ixnindaiy lines 

<r- are diawn as proposed b\ Ihe 

Dr. Lan.er^d.recior of AfrU',.i,i.^^„^ ,-ommiiiee both the 
can .Affairs tor the Phelps- j ,-^.-„^ and- «2nrt a.s.semblv di.*- 
Stoke.-< Fund, who recently j^.,^ ^^.,,^,,^ ^^^.^ an ' over- 
toored .\fr>ca. said: I whelming majoii.y of Negro 

'Vou and 1 should cherish voters. The B-lrd district would 
th • idea that color is not a 'have about .Vi pt-r cent Nesro 
di.^grate. hut an honor Deep population and th*" 66th dis; 
are the roots ol' our heritage ,,.i(.t somewhat less than a 

; majority, 
reminded hisj The committee's plan would 
listeners that highly organ-, eliminate the 61st assembly 
ized and complex civilizations ! district now represented oy 
flourished in Africa long be- 'Jess I'nruh and would split up 
fore the white man came to. that district between the 66th. 
the continent. Evidence re-' 62nd and e.'ird distfitts. It 
veals that as early as 3.31.T would also remove a sub- 
B.C. the African-Esypllansi slantial numl>er of Negio 


Xmas Party 

Planned for 

Hate Victims 

WASHINGTON — There will 
be some Christmas cheer this 

year in the drab Ihes of 
thoQsands of Negro«s in 
Fayette and Haywood Coun- 
ties, Tenn., who face stars'a- 
tion and exposure because 
they dared exercise their rigiit 
to vote. 

There will be a 
dinner- candy for the young- 
sters and a "Carol .Sing" al 
Owen College in Memphis 
WedneMiMV. Dec. 21.. 


Dr. LeRoy Weekes, vice president of the UrbW 
League, and Edward Warren, president of; the 

NAACPj clashed this week in their estimate of r^e^ 
progress in the United States. 
The clash came In continu-*^ r— 

ing cdmments over articlestn /».■■' 

written by Nigericin journalistiT GGT JODS 0% 

Oladele Bibliari. in which he _ — . - 

was sharply critical ot condi- 1 BUS DriVOFS 

lions he found here. 


{In Jacksonvillflj 


Found Nothing Good 

Dr. Weekes, stressing! JACKSONVILLj:. -F 1 a 
I aechievements, was critical of i Nine Negro, bus' drivers were 
j Bibliari ^ecause during "the hired here recently, accofd-l 

four n^lhs he spent in thisiing to Ruby Hurley, NAACP 

country, he never found atty- 'sou theasrregional director, the 
'thing good to write about." 'first hired in this Florida 
I The good things Dr. Weekes city, 

I thought Should have been I Tiiey wilf not be restricted 
I mentioned are. to quote him. to driving within the Negro 

sDecial^"^^**""*^'"" **' '^*''*' «^'s"''">- community, Mrs. Hurlev aaid 
'^ naetion in the armed forces: "'»_. .>,„„i„.„„«„t 'k_«»i^ 

Xhis employment break 


and in the nation's capital 


.1 1.. /^ .j--ithroug 

ti.e Supreme Court decision »,. .,,p* ^ 

(19.".li calling for integrated I jj^Y^^j^j^^'' 


Caravoa 


in Africa." 
The speaker 


Memphis citi/eiis, orguiii/ed 
by .\tty. James K. K.<le.>i, are 
bringing the farmers and their i""^' 
children to the ciiy in a cara- 
van pro«es.>iion that will 
travel down Beale street to 
the festivities aJ the college. ! 

College Pres. (,'harles Dink-; 
ins will play the 'role of Santa. 

Tlie "Carol Sing" is expected! 


!s<-hooIs, the j>latform.s of the 
'two major political parties- 
this year "which speMe^l out 
jcoinpleie bills of civil liber- 
Supreme Court decisiojis 
since 19.>-1 that have furthered 
integration and student sit-ins 
In the South. 

Warren, a lealestate broker, 
backed Bibliari's^criticisms. j 
Who Are We Kidding r 
Progress- in the racial field, 
he said, is so slow it some- 


employment 

h stemmed from 

puth council activi- 

The council has also 


mittee of the Chamber x>i\ 
Commerce in an effort to iron' 
out lunch counter bias. j j 
Meanwhile, sit-in demohs^-| 
tions are continuing in con- 
junction with a "No Christmas' 
Gift Buying" withholdiitg 
campaign against the entire! 
downtown shopping district, i 


to be the biggest civil rights 

yuletide celebration in the ; '''"^^ *'''*" 8*>*« '»*'^'*^'*''^*- 

country, and will servers the| -"^ went on: - • 

"Somebody s dodging the 
truth. The facts are obvious. 


: as 
renewed 
aid the 


had developed 
uage. 


a written lang- 


Packages Left 
In Open Cars 
Invite Thieves 


starting point of a 
nationwide drive to 
beleagured Negroes. 

No Federal Aid 

Some 300 familieshave beenj 
voters from the 26ih congies- evicted or face eviction. Tents 
sional district now repre are being .set up as their onlv 
senled by James Roosevelt shelter against the "cold of 

repie- winter. 

! Auiic:il4« to 

lu !>eiid in aid 
nirl 


and the '2^iii district 


Safely Install | 

Christmas Tre«| 
To Prevent Flrej 

Don't let your Christmas I 
tree be the cause of needleiis ' 
"Everywhere you look you -tragedy and fire, 
can find segregation. We have' The Los Angelei Fire Dfe- ) 
been covering up too long oneipartment makes the followinj[f ! 
of the bad features of Atneri- suggestions: • ■« 


Who are we kidding when we 
say great atrides are being 
made? 


uJ 


U- 


Khe said. 

She blamed that attack on 
Greens drinking. 

Arrested at the 27th street 
address. Green denied that he 
had attacked Miss Sims. He 
said. "I didn't do anything to 
that woman last night. I 
wasn't even there. I w as in ><>" re 
Santa Monica." 

The marks on Miss 


labor force in .November. It 
was 5.4 percent ii. October 
and 4.5 percent in November 
a year ago. 


Christmas shuppris aie _- 
ing wainrd b\ ihr I.o.> •.Ap- '., 
^ele.s Holite •Drpanmerit <if 
Ihe danger- of le.)\ing Christ-| 
mas put kuges and gills, in 


of \\asliin;iioii. \ 


to be 
,jand driving alone if you've | Advisory Committee on C^hil 
_ _ _ Sims' i'ione some drinki'ng. advises dren and Youth, 

neck he said were caused dur- the National Automobile Club. The committee met at the tion to the thief 
ign a quarrel they had some. Drive after drinking and L'GLA Extension Building on dows and doors 
time ago. Death rides by your side. ;S. Hill street. " i loPked. 


.vei.leU by Clyde- Doyle. , App.-al.^ 

Ministers Speak guxcinmnii 

Conunmee >poke>ineii told have so f;u- 

Ihe as.sf mblymdii ihal .N'r^io 

I'uiniiiiiiiiiies Ii3\e a iniii> ul 

inieresl in iiiau.^' problems 

iiiwing out of what the> 

i-alled "ihe laiis of '.lilr" aiiU 

added thai sui li coiuliliLtiis are 

apt lo prevail for a "loii^ 

lime i"j i-ome." 

mm.inum wage of S1.25 an automobiles. ,.,„nninee of minis.eis .Six children in .he vicinity 

hour be sei for women and| During the Christmas sea- [beaded br- Rev. M a u r i c e of Vermont and Florenre ave- 

children employed in agi icul-. son. ihefis. Horn automobiles Oawkins appeared beloie the'nues are reponed io have 

future wa.<! given unanimous a p- increase at an alarming rate.; assemblymen Thursday to; whoopiiij; coush. Dr. Pauline 

Shoppers are adv i.sed not to voice a plea for fairness in le- O. Roberts. .Southwest District 


Make sure you select 'la 
fleshly cut .tree with firmly 


$1.25 Farm ^ 

Wage Proposed 

A rtcomntf ndaiioii that, a 


can society. The Negro salutes 
the F d r i"^*' same flag and fights in 
v^n.i''i.r ,*,r ""■ -same Army as the while attached needles, 
senu in aul ^^,^^^,^ ^j^j,„.^ „^^ ,he i>«.ne 
no iespoii.se.' ,.,_ , , 
.,., , , , . . . ■ . Ills ot 

I lie .vl<-ii|pliis parly is being 

aided by the Crusaders, 
.\iioii\ niou 


r 


peace. 


Report Six With 
Whooping Cough 


Ghana, Guinea 
Seek ^lose Tie 


DEATH RIDES 

Leave drinking alone 

going to be driving,' proval Friday by Gov. Brown's ( 


leaxe purchases 
plain sight. This 


is an ia.\ita-. tion also 
e\en if win- 
are securelv 


health officer. announ<-ed this 
week. 


Nkrumah was accompanied 


in cars In' districting plans.. The delega 
included Revs 
Sylvester Odom. Jame.s Har- All of these children are by cabinet ministers anf'. lead- 
eeit. J^rry Ford and Clayton pre-school age. ranging from ling members of the ruling 
Mc^'oy. 12 to .'i vears old. Convention Peolpes Party. 


Keep the tree outside and in 
waier imtil you set it up for 
det-oialing. A , 

When setting up the tree. 
select the . coolest spot you 
can, away from radiators, 
healers and fireplaces. i 

ACCRA. Ghaiw — Piesideiii! jj possible, set the 'tree l# 
Kwame Nkrumah was «^-|iri a tree holder that ineiudea 
peeled to leave here Friday a container of wafer in which 
for a weeks visit to Conakry, the trunk can rest. Keep th* 
capital of Guinea. Container filled. Do not put 

Apparent purpo.se of the trip lights on aluminum trees 

is to form the nucleus of a ^ : , ; 

Union of West African States.' 


Equality it your bUsintu, "^mt I 
can't carry out th* equality fight i 
intelliocntly unleti you >r« inform- 
ed of what it happening in your | 
own community, your country mni—\- 
tht world. Subtcrib* now to th* ' i 
California Eagle. Ratet — f4 a year. 


-At this, time of Ihe gear it it a 
pleasure to tarn ttfide from 
eveiydaU affairs and sen4 lo 
»mr /rien4ls, old and newf warm 
Season's Greelmi^ mnd Sincere 
jmUlieii fo'l^ iht etming 


jeer."- 

,Mmtk» Wttrikntiag tompa w y 

a»71 W. $!•»••■ Ave. 

Im Angelas 47, Califwai* 


GEORGE G. SMITH CO. 

INVESTMENTS AND 

REAL ESTATE 

AUTMOtizn AsiNt ro« 
Lwurr SAVINGS a loan assn. 

HIGHLY PKRSnSM.n.KI) 

sF.KYii.yr 

3*24 S. WESTEtN AVE. 

lOS ANGEIES RE. I-933S 


Compliments of 
Our Good Friends 

J. A. POWERS, 

INC. 

4855 West Jefferson 

Leg Angela* 16 






treason s K^reetings 

Sir Debuteers Socia 


Club 


Willi* Gandy, prM. — Aaron AAarthall, vie* pr««. 


I 
I 

I 

Mombors: Howard BradUy! Natthaniol Chouteau; William Craig; Manual Doniz; Jama* | 

Lea; Willi* Macon; Don Mintors; Eunie* Price; Phil Rhoten; Goorga Wobb; Harry J 
WdU; Lucius Williams. I 


WATCH FOR NEW SURPRISE IN '61 


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"BE HAPPY" 

CONTACT TONY LEASE 

MIYAKO TRAVEL MA. 54060 


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UNIVERSITY > I SEASONS CMCTINW 


Season's Greetings From. 

BAIIAN'S MARKETING. 

54^9 W/ ADAMS BLVD. 

Leading Pioneer Grocers of 

West Adams 

Since 1926 


TYPPWRITFR M :»mce iy^6 

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Season's Ci reelings 


ARTHUR L. CORNSWEET 
Merry ChrUtnu* 




) TEXACO SERVICE STATION} I 

5299 West Washington 1 1 
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M. POWELL 


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527 W. COMPTON 

COMPTON 

NB. 6^1 1M ' 


Season 's Greetin as 


, , 1828 S. Western Avenue |.> 




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MERR^Ci:HRISTMAS 
HAPPY NEW YEAR 

From > 

E.G. AND LOUELLA ALLEN 

1512 16th ST., SANTA MONICA, CALIF. 


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be bright and 
with love and 


May yours 
gay, fiHed 
laughter. 



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AD. 2-8952 


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4-mm California Eagle 



ornia 


\ Loren Mllhr, Publisher 

Th* Califaniia Engl* stands for cempl*t« integration of 
Negroes into every piiose of American iife tlirougii the deitiocrcrtic 
processes. 

We fovon , , 

.1*' nPC o|^ local, state and notional levels. 

3. Docent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

*» Adequfrte old age pensions and social security. 
- S. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 
. ^ Doveiopment and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: ^ 

1. Jim Crow in oil forms. 

2. Communists and oil other enemies of democracy. 

Published fvery Thuiiday for Over 79 Ytirt 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of^an Ness AXminster 5-3135 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 ^»#^;><r%»^^aCV»#>SCX#^^S g\»^^agV#^^Sg\»^^^^ 

Battleaxe & Bread 

By Lmtfmr 1. Orangmr 


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JV. 


ewspapey 


'papi 


The Kennedy Cabinet 


The composition of the Ken- 
nedy cabinet isn't calculated to 
set Negro voters dancing in the 
streets. The failure to include a 
Negro is disappointing, especially 
in light of the fact t,hat the cabi- 
net was carefully picked to 
accord major recognition to all 
other groups from; which Presi- 
dent-Elect Kennedy drew the 
support necessary for his elec- 
tion. 

Mr. Kennedy did say that he 
offered the postmaster general- 
ship to Congpressman William 
I>awson and Dawson agreed that 
the offer had been made and he 
had declined. We're not much im- 
pressed by this adroit maneuver 
because it proceeds on the 
assi/mption that there was only 
one-Negro in the whole countery 
who was of cabinet structure and 
that his declination disposed of 
the matter. 

One of the most important 
posts in the cabinet is that of the 
attJl^ney general which went to 
Robert Kennedy, the president- 
elect's brother. We don't know 
what *ie plans to do in the civil 
rights controversy, rie has no 
record on that issue and his only 
qualifications for the .position, as 
far as we can see, were his 
activities as counsel for the com- 
mittee which investigated labor 
abuses. That committee was 
headed by Arkansas Senator 
John McClellan, a bitter-end seg- 
regationist. Of course, that com- 
mittee did nothing about the 
widespread and \inlawful racial 
discrimination practiced by 
unions. We can only hope that 
Attorney General Kennedy will 
tackle the civil rights problems 


with the vigor for y.hich he has 
been so widely acclaimed. 

Secretary of Health Abe Ribi- 
coff holds another cabinet post of 
importance , to Negroes but his 
publicity "has been consistently 
slanted to depict him as a "mod- 
erate" and his known ambition to 
get toe the Supreme Court — may 
of may not — dispose him to take 
it easy in his dealtt^gs with racial 
matters. 

The men with the best: records 
on racial issues, Stewart Udall 
and Orval Freeman, occupy the 
posts of Secretary of Interior 
and Agriculture, respectively, 
and their activities will have 
little direct impact on civil rights 
matters. 

The new postmaster general is 
a resident of Los Angeles but if 
Mr. Day has taken any stands on 
racial issues they have escaped 
our notice. Is is disturbing Jo note 
that his first assistant is a South 
Carolinian distinguished for 
nothing except partisan activi- 
ties. 

The important fJbsitions of Sec- 
retary of Defense and of the 
Treasury are in the hands of con- 
servative Republicans who have 
been discreetly silent on issues of 
major impyortance to N e g r a 
voters. 

Taken as a whole the cabinet is 
a carefully selected political 
group carefully grounded on dead 
center. There isn't a crusader in 
the lot and it se^ms that if the 
new administration is going to 
assert any leadership on civil' 
rights issues that leadership wiil 
have to come from the new presi- 
dent. We'll have to wait and see 
what he has in mind. 


- Short Sighted CityAtty. 


Apparently, Roger Amebergh 
Isn't going to have any opposi- 
tion in thel^ce for city attorney. 
He has been an all-things-to-all- 
.men pubHc (rfficial with the re- 
sult that nobody can find an 
issue on which to oppose him. 

The most significant thing 
about Mr. Arnebergh's office is 
that he rarely Ands a place for a 
Negro attorney on his staff. One 
deputy did serve under him but 
when he resigned that seemed to 


end the matter. 

We place little importance on 
the claim that there have been 
no applications for the jobs. In 
comparison there are a number 
of deputies in the. district attor- 
ney's and attorney general's of- 
fices. Even the public defender's 
office dropped its ancient color 
bar a few years ago. Only the 
county counsel and the city at- 
torney seem unable to find Negro 
lawyers to assist them. 


Rev. Henderson Speaks Out 


The Rev. J. Raymond Hender- 
son, pastor of Second Baptist 
Church, brought his Christian 
brethren up short in San Fran- 
cisco last week with a simple 
plea that "the National Council 
of Churches should do more than 
talk" about the Christian family. 
He recommended that they take 
a Strong stand on the New 
Orleans situation. The churches 
responded with a resolution con- 
demning mob violence and, in 


effect, urging New Orleans Chris- 
tians to support school integra- 
tion. 

The Rev. Henderson has al- 
ways served as the strong voice 
of conscience in this community 
and in church affairs. He can be 
counted on to cut through silemje 
and evasion on all moral issues. 
Los Angeles has every reason to 
be proud of a minister who in- 
sists on the practice" as well as 
the preachments of Christianity. 


' s 


-A 



A big part of my business is 
writing and answering letters. 
Long letters and short ones, 
letters that are explanatory 
and informative, or argu- 
mentative and persuasive, bet- 
ters that do something for 
some one else and letters that 
ask some one to do something 
for the Urban League. 

And a big part of my avoca- 
tional pleasure is in reading 
some kinds of letters, though 
generally I don't answer them. 
Some of these 
letters com- 
ment on some-' 
thing reported 
about me or on 
.something I 
am quoted as 
having ."Stated. 
Sometimes 
people just 
write to me to 
share their 
Gwayet feelings about 
something in which they as- 
sume I am Interested. And 
sometimes they are so right. 
Diatnista Nknimah 
There's the chap from 
Brooklyn, for instance, who is 
"of the opposite race," as 
some of us so quaintly de- 
scribe those whom the census 
lists as "white." He is evident- 
ly a reader of the Amsterdam 
News, because he addressed 
his little note to me at that 
office, even thouRh it had 
nothing to do with anything' 
this column had recent Ijf Cfir- 
ried. 

My correspondent is dis- 
trustful of Ghana's volatile 
prime minister, and comes 
right out and says so. That's 
all right; he has piehty of 
company — some of it in Ghana 
— but his authority quoted 
doesn't constitute very sound 
reason for trust or mistrust. 

'• 

He includes a clipping of a 
"New York Daily News'" edi- 
torialette. It's entitled^ "Make 
Up Your Mind. Mr. N." The 
editorial refers to reports 
some weeks ago that Ghana 
intends to nationalize all for- 
eign business concerns within 
its borders. It .contrasts this 
reported intention with the 
need of Ghana for Investment 
of foreign capital. The Daify 
News is not^ reassured by Mr. 
Nkrumah's denial of any such 
intention, citing his , Marxist 
socialism as reason for skep- 
ticism as to hi^ government's 
trustworthiness and advising 
private capital to "bypass 
Ghana" unless and until 
"Nkrumah offers an ironclad 
guarantee against such 
thieven." as nationalizing 
business concerns. 

Like Castro?--- 

My correspondent-'attached 
to this clipping a note of just 
33 words: "I don't trust this 
guy. He will do the same 
thing Castro did." I presume 
the "guy" he doesn't trust Is 
Prime Minister Nkrumah, not 
the editorial writer of the 
Dally News. As a matter of 
feet, I don't see why he has 


to trust either. The News' edi- 
tor is writing to appeal to the 
kind of people who read tjie 
paper, thereby encouraging 
advertisers to buy space in it, 
while'Ghana's prime minister 
is running his country in such 
a way as to appeal to a major- 
ity of his voters, thereby in- 
suring his continuance in 
power and advancing his 
dream of "Free Africa." 

Mr. Nkrumah's dream of a 
free Africa may not accord 
with the ideas of people in 
New York City, Los Angeles, 
or even Nigeria. And the edi- 
torials of the Daily Xews 
may seem downright silly to 
many readers with different 
notions about Ghana or for- 
eign capital or both. 

Right to NatloliallM 

But the. point is thaj (^hana 
has a perfect right to nation- 
alize its domestic or foreign 
businesses — if the people of 
the country think this is the 
thing to do. And foreign 
capital has a perfect -rrght to 
enter, withdraw or stay out 
of Ghana entirely, if the 
prospect ot a fair return for 
capital investment seems 
dubious. This isn't a matter 
for trust: it's a matter of 
figuring the odds. And busi- 
ness is generally pretty good 
at that sort of figuring, at 
-home and abroad, and a good 
thing for the American people 
that it is. ' 

The Daily News editorial 
contrasts what it calls "Chris- 
tian honesty" with "Marxist 
larceny," but the comparison 
isn't that simple. There is 
such a tlfing as dishonesty on 
the part of p)eople who will 
swear they are Christians; and 
Marxism, so far as I've -ob- 
ser\ed, is more apt to be 
- muddle-mindedness than out- 
right dishonesty. The dis- 
honesty is shown by those — 
such as Castro and his Com- 
munist tutors — who use Marx- 
Ism as the come-on while en- 
trapping the simple - minded 
into the toils of the Com- 
munist world conspiracy. 

I repeat, this isn't a matter 
for trust or lack of trust; it's 
a matter for understanding. 
We in this country have got 
to understand not only what 
the New African nations do 
or say, but also the reason 
why they act as they do. Un- 
derstanding this, we'll come to 
understand also that some- 
times their appearance of 
morality of lack of morality 
is an accurate reflection of 
what they see in us. 

Not what we are, but what 
they see. Af times what we 
are is what they see — and it's 
not pretty at all. At-» times 
what they see is an>-thing but 
what we are-and that's un- 
fortunate. But when we quit 
worrying about how much we 
can trust Nkrumah and his 
fellows, and put some thought 
to how we can get them to 
trust us^when that time 
comes, we'll be on the road to 
effective world statesmanship. 


NAACP Selects Warren: 
Miller Leads National List 


(Continued from Page .1) 
to be valid after checking the 
names again.st office lists. 

Atty. James R. Akers Jr., 
former NAACP president, ob- 
tained 197 votes for the post 
of second vice president. Dr. 
H. Claude Hudson took third 
place with 172 votes. 

Although five vice presi- 
dents were elected, Warren 
advised that according to a 
recent amendment to the na- 
tional constitution, only/fhree 
are regular voting rnembers of 
the branch executive. 
Ballard L«a<U 

Placing fourth and fifth 
were the Rev. C. W. Arnold, 
135 votes, and Atty, Herbert 
Simmons Jr., 121. 

Top scorers for the branch 
executive committee were E. 
H. Ballard, 208; Johnny Oti.s, 
207; and Vivian Strange, 202. 

Others ejected to the 18- 
member committee are: 

Rev. L. Sylvester Odom, 183; 
Beecham Jackson Jr., 168; W. 
L.. Robinson, 165; Verjnon 
Thompson, 165; Yen tress John- 
son, 162; Dred Scott Neusom, 
157; Sadie Brewer, 156; Rosa 
E. King, 149; Carl J. Johnson. 
148; Ralph L. Davis, 138; 
James T. Allen, 133; Jahn S. 
Gary, 133; Joseph E. ' Grim- 
mett, 128; J. B. Carter, 126; Joe 
Jones, 123. 

Veto Clea« 

Votes for treasurer and 
secretary were both so close 
that they could easily be up- 
set by the counting of the 37 
challenged ballots. 

As of the initial count, 
Julia De Passe received 117 
vote* for secretary, losing out 
to Patricia M. Elmore, wha 
received 128 votes. 

For treasurer. Dr. Frederick 
H. Spann obtained a count of 


Xmas Story 

Nearly 300 music tlHidents 
will appear in Markham 
Junior High School's third an- 
nual Christmas Concert to- 
night (Thursday), according to 
Principal J. Crosby Stone. 

The hour-long program In 
the school's auditorium, 104th 
street and Compton avenue, 
begins at 7:45 p.m. There u 
no admission charge. 

t ■ i ■ 


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.■:V.J 


Even' Case 
Too Raw for 
Miss. Paper 

' (Continued from Page 1) 
torney general, the Citizens 
Council, many other trusted 
officials and editors of our 
state. . . 

Hop«pns to Be a Negre 
"In Mississippi today we 
find our highest officials,' our 
governor and two United 
States senators, our legisla- 
tive leaders voicing criticlsm> 
of the courts ... 

"Yet. after all of the critl-- 
cism which has been directed 
ift our courts, who is it that 
i^ landed in jail. Is it Gov. 
Barnett? No. Sifeaker Walter 
Sillers? No. Either of our two 
United States senators? "So. 
The individual happens to be 
Ji Negro who represents the 
most unpopular organization- 
in our state and one to which 
we as segregationists do not 
subscribe." 

The editorial ends by say- 
ing that if the "humblest citi- 
zen is denied ."the right to 
express his opinion today, "all 
of us jnay be slaves tomor- 
row."'. 

Tried to Begister 

The sentencing of Evers, 
who is free on bond while his 
case is. being appealed, is 
tied to the st?ange case of 
Clyde Kennard, a young 
poultry farmer, former stu-, 
dent at the University of 
Chicago, andean applicant for 
admission to MIsslssIpp 
Southern University. 

When Kennard appljMl^t 
the university, he J^s re- 
jected for "defici^Kies in 
schoolastic records." 

When he drove away from 
the university's administra- 
tion building, Kennard was 
arrested for "reckless driving" 
and officers searched his car 
and "found" illegal whisky. 
Kennard was jailed on this 
charge. 

Marked Man 

Any Negro who applies to 
a "white"' school in Mississip- 
pi is a marked man and, al- 
though nothing was heard 
from Kennard for a time as 
he went about his poultry 
business, last spring he was 
again hauled in by law of- 
ficers. 

The new charge against 
Kennard was that he agreed 
with another person to pur- 
chase five sacks of chicken 
feed to be stolen by the other 
person. The feed retails at $5 
a bag. 

The all white jury found 
Kennard guilty in ten min- 
utes. 

Evers was asked in Jackson 
for a comment on the verdict 
rendered in the Forest County 
court nearly 100 miles away. 
He said the verdict was "a 
mockery of judicial justice." 
For this he was cited for pon- 
tempt, found guilty and given 
30 days in jail and fined $100. 


\ywood 

■ V 



.) -■. 


i It. 


Letters to the Editorl 



To the Editor: 

It is my intention to ptcket 
Negro churches in Los An- 
geles until the current picket- 
ing of Woolworth has ceased. 

The manner of picketing Is 
ows: One church each 
y, from 10 a.m. to noon, 

ith a sign reading: "Picket- 
ing Woolworth is a Christian 
Duty." 

I intend to maintain Gand- 
hism discipline, and to wear 
cotton garments as a symbol 
o Gandhi's dress. , 

I have chosen Negro churches 
because when a Negro pickets 
by my side. (I am Caucasian) 
people understand so much 
better. A biracial picket line 
is educational to the commu- 
nity. 

Chur.ches were chosen be- 
cause the Negro ministers rep- 
resent the most solidified 
leadership of the Los Angeles 
Negro Community. 

My being a Caucasian has 
no bearing on this project be- 
cause to feel otherwise would 
be to say that a race is in- 
volved in an idea. 

No organization is sponsor- 
ing this; it is my own idea 
and doing. Nor do I consider 
that Negro ministers are my 
opponents. Rather this method 
has been chosen to ask for a 
demonstration of brotherhood 
where it will count, in front 
of Woolworth. 

Each week a letter will be 
sent to a Negro minister in- 
forming him (or her) that 
his church has been choisen 
for that Sunday's "Satya- 
graha" or Soul Force Walk. 
The Hindu word was given 
deeper meaning by Christ's 
"Sermon on the Mount." 

The original of this letter 


Loren Miller Says . . . 


129 votes, against 115 for 
Cecil Peterson. 

For the national executive 
board, in addition to Miller, 
those elected were Dr. -H. 
Claude Hudson (second with 
198 votes*; Daisy Bates of ' 
Little Rock, "with' 189 votes; 
Joseph Kennedy of San Fran- 
cisco, 154. 

Others of the 16 elected on 
the basis of the partial returns 
were: Daisy Lampkin, H. T. 
Delany; Walter Reuther, 
Arthur B. Spingarrw Stephen 
G. Spottswood, Felix H. Dunn, 
James Hcnton, A. S. Wiggins, 
William A. Ross, Chester L 
Lewi% S. Ralph Harlow, with 
a tic for 16th place between 
George V. Gardon and Carl 
Murphy. 

Judge Bernard Jefferson, as 
chairman, performed skillfully 
to keep the meeting at an 
even keel (almost) and mov- j 
Ing rapidly. Mrs. Alice Taylor 
served as secretary. 

The Rev. J. Raymond Hen- 
derson, in whose church the 
meeting was held, delivered 
the invocation. , 

'Rev. Ellis Casson, NAACP 
regional representative from . 
San Francisco, represented the 
national office as an official 
observer. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ried Negro women. Andrew 
Jackson enli.sted their support 
in the war of 1812 by flattrey 
and they gave him a big hand 
in the battle of Ne,w Orleans. 

Held Their Own 

This group of persons pretty 
well held its own until the 
Civil War. Sons and daugh- 
ters were often educated in 
France and the beautiful girls 
in many instances became 
wives or -mistresses of some 
of the leading citizens of the 
state. When thfe Civil War 
broke out the wellto-do Ne- 
groes, with a fine disregard 
of race, organized a regiment 
of "free men of color" to fight 
for the South and the New 
Orleans Picayune (still being 
published, Incidentally) said 
of them: 

"We must pay well de- 
serred compliments to the 
companies Af free men of 
colot* all well dressed, well 
drilled, and comiertablT un- 
iformed. Most of these coin- 
sanies bare provided them- 
seWes with arms unaided 
bT the administration.*' 
When the Civil War ended, 
these Negroes grabbed for 
pollticisl power and for the 
first time remembered their 
identity with other Negroes 
who had been slaves. Thresp 
Santa Dominican brothers 
named Rouandez showed up 
with a dream jxf making 
Louisiana a state controlled by 
persons of African descent. 
They established a daily news- 
paper, The New Orleans Tri- 
bune, and began to urge 
Louisiana Negroes to follow 
the example of Haiti, the 
Dominican Republic and Li- 
beria which they described as 
the "three Governments 
among civilized nations entire- 
ly In the hands of men of the 
African race." They controlled 
a faction of the Republican 
party called the "Purt Radi- 
cals" and tried to v^n the 
party nomination for a Negro 
In 1868 but their moii lost the 
nomination in the lUyjublican 


. -■*i.,.^- 


l■_ 



convention by a vote of 45 to 
43. 

Bid For Power ' 

This bid for power by Ne- 
groes frightened the wits out 
of the so-called "Compromis- 
ing Republicans" and they 
promptly chose a Negro for 
lieutenant governor. The New 
Orleans Tribune was repudi- 
ated as "the organ of the Re- 
publican party." Undaunted 
the Pure Radicals put their 
own candidate in the field but 
he lost the gubernatorial race 
amid cries of corruption. 

The Pure Radicals didn't 
give up the ghost with their 
loss in 1868 but they lost 
ground in the stormy ten 
y^ars that followed and gradu- 
ally dropped out of sight after 
the Republicans abandoned 
the Sciuth in the Compromise 
of 1876. During the yeirs in 
which they sought power they 
pressured the legislature into 
enacting laws forbidding seg- 
regation in schools and places 
of public accommodation. Thiy 
were influential in passing 
another law, vetoed by thi 
governor, making racial dis^ 
crimination a crime. \ 

Cross Colo; Line 

When Reconstruction finally 
came to an end many of these 
"free men of xx)lor" moved 
over the color line. Literally, 
thousands of them began to 
"pass" for white and some of 
their descendants are num- 
bered among rich and power- 
ful Louisianans to thts^ day. 
Some of those descendants 
know these facts; most of 
them do not. 

The point is that one way 
or another Louisianains .of Af- 
rican descent have played a 
large part in the state's his- 
tory. There has been more 
racial intermixture in Louisi- 
ana than in any other state 
of the union. Some of the 
people who are j^elling for 
segregation today have more 
Negro ancestors than those 
they are trying to keep out 
of the public schools. It's a 
wise child who knows the race 
of his own. great grandfather 
In LoulaUna. 

i ■ . ■■• '. 


if 


is to be sent to the Victory ,< 
Baptist Church, and my jfirst ; 
Satyagraha Walk' will be 
there at 10 a.m. Christmas / 
Day. I welconje^others to. join 
me. ' .Lt " 

Yburs in Brotherhoodi 

Sidney .Plotnick' 


Dear Sir: "^ ' 

I would like' to pot In 
word of ""appreciation df equkl 
opportunities extended |o 
members of our race (FEPC). 

While shopping at the May 
Company downtown, I iwas 
very gratified and happy to 
have my check OK'd tiyja 
Negro clerk, who was wearing 
a badjge giving her thei ajr- 
thority to do so. ^ I 

I think we should gire Cr*^- 
it to those companies who do 
give us equal opportunitlM as 
well as censor those who 
not. ■* : 

Since your fine paper his 
done so nrtfch for pur race ^n 
opening the way for fair eqi- 
ployment — perhaps by print- 
ing this you can encourage, 
dther companies to offer «8 
better jobs, for which we. are 
equally qualified. i 

Helen Thompson I 
L.A. Housewife I l. 


: I 


•■t :r 




V" 


Fla. Jim Crovks 
Cat. State Teanji 

(Continued from Page Ill- 
degree should quite obviously 
have been cancelled. - ' | 

"I would like to be Inforhi^d 
if^ there is any policy ciirrient- 
ly obser\'ed by the State .Col- 
leges with regard to discrim- 
inatory praptices, in or out^oif- 
state. ■ ^ I 

"If such a policy exists, |wi8 
it violated by. the <arrafige- 
ihents made for th^ housinff 
of the Humboldt State foot- 
ball tearii? [ 
Opposes Action | 

"If there is no policy of jany 
kind \yith respect to thisiinji- 
portant matter, are immediate 
steps being taken to devfeli^ 
one which is in line withi tl^e 
intent of this administrtdti(^n 
and the State Legislature «8. 
expressed in many: spepit^t 
actions? i j 

"Since it will, after July 4, 
1961, be the responsibility of 
the; new Board qf State Col- 
lege 'Tjustees, of which I am 
an extOfficio membet, tO; ies- 
tablisH policies for tlie Stafe 
Colleges,. I am particularly 
concerned about present prac- 
tices\and also plans that the 
Department of Education may 
have in' this regard for , the 
coming six months.", . '■ 


.!' ' 


.♦ - 


X 


STANDS ON HANDS i 
The spotted skunk has 
unique habit of stahdingi On 
its hands when excited. 


CALIFOJINI 
EAG^LE 

'7fc« Important Now»pa$»ot* 
3101 W. VarnonlAv*. 
Los Ang«l«t 8, Calif. 
AXminstor 5-3195 


LOREN MILLER 
Publisher 



Thursday 
Vol. LXXX 


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Doc. 22, iMO 
No. 40 


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GRACE SIMONS_Ex«ciJtiv« Editer 

F. P. WALLER, Jr Adv. M|r. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON i 

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Adjudication Decree Number 11 _ 
Due of Adjudication July 1, jiiaB 

PubUahed every thuraday! My 
Tha California Eaala Publiahlilo 
Co.. 2101 Weat Vernon Avaniie, at 
Van NlMa, Lot AnOelea 8,~ Oallt. 
Entered aa Second Claaa Mitttir 
November 3, 1937, at the IN«I 
Office at Lea Angolee. CaHferHla. 
undr the Act of March S, VmT 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 
BY INTERSTATE f 
UNITED NEWSPAPtflt ' 

*« ritih Avsnut , 
Naw v«pk 17, N«w Vtrii , 


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W 





Citizens Must Act 
On Rights-ACLU 

NEW YORK — Individual citizens shape the 
course of civil liberties in the United States, the 
American Civil Liberties Union declared in its 40th 
annual report, "By the People," just released .here 
on the eve of the 169th anniversary of Bill of Rights 

Day. ^ 

"By action or inertia — singly 


%i^i. 


irough private groups Or 


during its 40th anniversary 
year: 


I^ernmenV representatives -It^ought efforts to ^nsor 
" books, magazines ana tnovies 


SAMPLER PAINTJXGS AT SAFhTY — For the 
Christmas season, the unusual paintings of Marion Sampler 
uill be on display in the Safety Sax-ings Community Con- 
ference Room. 2638 S. Western avenue. Sampler is assistant 
head of the Graphii} Department of I'ictor Gruen Asso- 
ciates, Architects. He is a graduate in art of the University 
of Southern California. 


people determine the progress 
or setbacks in the preserva- 
tion of their basic constitu- 
tional rights," Patrick^Murphy 
Malin, ACLU executive direc- 
tor, stated in the introduction. 
Backs Sit-ins 

The ACLU report singled 
out three areas of current 
tension in which citizens can 
make their influence felt: 
civil rights for Negroes, sep- 
aration of church and state, 
and the House Un-American 
Activities Committee. 

Endorsing the Negro lunch- 
counter sit-ins and other legal 
measures being used to win 
equality. Malin wrote that 
people "could privately do a 
lot more than they are now 
doing" to hasten the end of 
racial discrimination, "with- 
out waiting for government 
action." But in any case, he 
emphasized, what federal, 
state, and municipal govern- 
ments do will be determined 


either by legislation or oy 
pressure groups such as the 
Citizens for Decent Literature. 

It joined in the mounting 
attacks against loyalty oaths, 
including the loyalty provi- 
sions to the National Defense 
Education Act. 

It supported legal caseb to 
correct malapportionment of 
voting districts. 

It backed the right of unions 
to use members* dues for 
political purposes. 

Homdwiitlog on Wall 

It fought the use of wire- 
tapping and police brutality. 

It pressed an extensive 
campaigri for creation of 
municipal citizens' review 
boards to hear complaints of 
malpractice by police. 

The sit-ins by Negroes In 
southern cities were described 
as "additional handwriting on 
the wall for tho.se who have 
not. vet learned that machine 


Jobs Foynd for 
Older Workers^ 

During the month of 
November the Los Angeles 
Metropolitan Offices of th« 
Department of Employment 
had 1752 new work appUca 
tions from persons over 45> 
Of these 188 were giv^n 
counselling assistance, 61p 
were referred to jobs and are 
working. Henry H o J t z m a n, 
field supervisor, announced 
this week. 

"Ability is ageless," Holtz- 
man said, "and we have high- 
ly qualified older workers in 
a wide range of vocations hi' 
our files. 

"Employers who are looking 
for qualified applicants should 
phone RL 8-6511." 1 


John Hargrove Gives Aid 
To 'Chesf for 26lh Year 


John E. Hargrove Is still do- 
ing something he has done for 
more than 25 years — speaking 
on behalf of the Community 
Chest. 

Hargrove, director of public 

Save on Parties, 
Students Advised 

WILBERFORCE, Ohio. — Dr. 
Charles Wesley, president of 
Central State College here, 
urged college students to 
spend "less on parties and 
socials and more on the 
NAACP." at a Freedom Fund 
rally here last^woek. 


relations for the Protective Or. 
der of Dining Car Waiters Lo- 
cal 465, has publicized the 
Community Chest before tholi- 
sands of people during his 
long volunteer stint. 

For his outstanding service, 
he received a diamond -studd- 
ed Red Feather pin last year, 
thereby being honored as one 
of very few ever to wear this 
award. 


Equality It your buslncu. You 
can't carry out the ^equality fight 
Intelligently unlets you are inform- 
ed of what it happening In your 
own community, your country and 
the world. Subtcriba now to the 
California Eagle. Ratea — 14 a year. 


The California Eagle- $ 
Thursday, December 22, 196C 


Gompers to Get 
4 Classrooms 


Gompers Junior High Sdiool 
will benefit greatly due to 
the recent School B9nd[s elec- 
tion victory- j | : j 

In addition to fbul" new 
classrooms, the school will be 
provided with dressing roont 
and shower facilities for giris* 
physical eduatieoit: The Iwnds 
also permit the enlarging and 
remodeling of the boys' phy- 
sical education dressing and 
shower room facilities, the 
provision of a new textbook 
room, and the remodeling of 
the administrative offices.' 


'Spartacus' Theater Party 
For Stovall Home Jan. 8 

"Operation 'Spartacus' Theater-Party" was 
launched this week by a group of community volun- 
teers to solicit by telephone calls the sale of tickets 
to the "Spartacus" theater-party January 8 at the 
RKO Pantages Theater, Hollywood. 
The gala theater-party, the^ 


^ , ^ . I civilization spells the doom of 

by the pres-sure exerted on i ^ ^ j ^^ j discrimination (in 
them by the people. northern housing as in south- 

In the same manner, Malin ^^^ ^,^^. ^^^ schooling) . . . 
observed, citizens play a key ^^^^^ industry means big 
role in the separation of ^^^^^-^^ ^^^ supermarkets 
church and state. .^^^^^^ ^j ^^^jj j^^^ ^^^ 


Serpent 

Repeating the ACLU's con- 
viction that the IJouse Un- 
American Activities Commit- 
tee should be abolished, Malin 
said this "serpent in our 
demi-paradise of a free demo- 
cratic government and a free 
society can be scotched only 


first of its kind to be held 
in the community^ will bene- 
fit the Stovall Home for the 
Aged, a non-profit organiza- 
tton opened in 1956 at 4000 E 


theater-party may be obtained! 
by calling REpublic 2-2424 or 
REpublic 4-5968. I 

Woody Strode, former UCLA 
and Los Angeles Ram football 


shack stores, skilled workers 
and college students instead 
of share-croppers and handy- 
roen. Modern industry needs 
a large body of well-disposed 
workers and customers, at 
home, as well as enthusiastic 
friends in Asia and Africa . . ." 
Even though the 1960 politi 


by the people, through their ^^^ ^^^^^ platforms and the 


representatives 

The ACLU report al.so re- 
viewed other high points of 
the organization's activities 


Fairmont Street, according to star, playl an important sup- 


Pr. Gerald L. Stovall, presi- 
dent of the Foundation. 

Tickets for the theater- 
party are being sold for S5 
and $10 each and reservations 
or additional information con- 
c e r n i n g the "Spartacus" 


porting role in "Spartacus 
and is serving as an honorary 
member of the theater-party 
committee headed by Dr. 
Leroy R. Weekes. 

"Spartacus" stars Kirk 
Douglas, Laurence Olivier, 


1960 Civil Rights Act reflect 
the increasing demand for 
civif rights progress, the re- 
port said, the nation "can- 
not realistically expect further 
federal legislation at more 


Jean Simmons, Peter Ustinov, 
Tony Curtis, Charles Laughton than a snail's pace 
and John Gavin. The film had 
its Los Angeles premiere re- 
cently and is showing ex- 
clusively at the RKO Pantages 
Theater. 


"The immediate practical 
question, with, regard to gov- 
ernmental efforts to end dis- 
crimination, is still this two- 
(Continued on Pag'c 12> 



"Our Fondest Felicitqtjons Go Forth to Fach of You, Along JF'tth Our 

Sincere Wishes That fl' his Will Be a Most Memorial Yuletide Season" 

FOR UN^QUALED BARGAINS PATRONIZE CALIFORNIA EAGLE ADVERTISERS 


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Christmas Music 
1o Recall Us to 
A Spiritual ideal 


-S ANT An 

MONICA 

NEWS 


Christmas Eve 
Communion 
Af First AME 

Festal of Holy Communion 
service will be held at First 
AME Church, 8th and Towne 
avenue, on Christmas, eve. 
Saturday. Dec. 2t. at 10:30 
p.m. Dr. H. H. Brookins will 
deliver the sermon on the 
subject. "Night Before Christ- 
mas. What?" Special Christ- 
mas music will be presented 
by the Cathedral Choir under 
the direction of Charles Turn- 
er, minister of music. 
I On Sunday, Dec. 25, Christ - 
I mas morning, 8 to 8:30, Dr. 
Brookins will be one of the 


6— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 




Holy Sacrameiit 
To Commemor^^-^^ 
Birth of Christ jj 

Christian togetherness will be demonstr«ed! tn 
'churches all over the world on Dec. 25 as prayers and 
songs ot adoration fill the air in commemoratior^ of 
the birth of Christ Jesus a lmost 2000 years ago. , ^ 

The angels sang "O"-'" "" 


Basis of Christmas is Spirit 
Of Selfless Love, Sacrifice 


A -program designed to bring greater emphasis The Phiiomathean club held 



Peace on . 

Earth, good will toward alj i 'MESSIAIT 

men," but in His ministry j^^ "Messiah" will be dl- 

Jesus said He came not to ^^^^^ j^y Albert McNeil «t 

bring peace, but a sword, ^^pi^s independent Chuirch, 

However, in the command- ^^25 £ I8th street, at 7:30 

ments He admonished . that ^ ^^^ j^^ gS. . I 

I man love his neighbor a*!*^ goloisfe from the University 

l*^"^^"- ; Seventh Dav Adventist church 

Cordial invitations nav« ^jj .-^^ with Victor Graham 

; been extended by ministers to I j^^ Elirjor -Miller of llJde- 

I everyone to attend Com- Lgndent for the production. 

'munion services at = '•hnr^h it- 


church 


At the 10:4.5 a.m 


Brook 


ins will deli\pr the Christma.': 


on the spiritual ideals of the holiday season has been its traditional Christmas par-j-^ ™„>==..„„ tu /•.•,:.. 
arranged by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum »>' 'V «he dub house on Ded^^. '"*::?'*«♦' The cathedral 


the.sis that Christmas 1960, finds the Christian 

—» church at: almost every 


sionere B. Jack Ansley and A. E. England. The day-l;«^«7..;^;'_': '."i'.t.'itf..""'™? - i '"'»"" I VI 1 WHl 

Religions to Be 
Discussed ^^ 


nolia avenue.<!. 

Hamilton Methodist 

At 6 a.m. Sunday morning. 


^long program will be heard in... 
the Los Angeles vt«»y.«rioi M 
Sports Arena, on 
Dec. 24. 


the evening festivities. Mrs. ^^ - 

Memcrial^I- J"anita Waters installed ^GOCl IS NeOtef 
Saturday l^^rs. Esther Coleman as presi-| . , 

dent of the club. Many guests: At ChnStlVIOS 


in 

church 

blending too much 


services, 
will be 


Aiijong the churches of the 
community which will partici- 


wore pre.sent. 


The 


pate in the annual Christmas junior 


musical festival will be the ^ Pacific 

AME Churches, with Dr. H. H.'trophys to Danny Barrett and 

'Linda Ward who made the 


the choir will sing 


Laymen to Hear 
Detroit Atty. 
At Ferris Meet 

The AME Layinen's second 
quarterly board meeting will 
be held Tuesday evening. Dec. 
27th ' at Bethel AME Church 
in Perris, Calif omia. y ^ 

The speaker for the meeting jscriptures 

.will be the Connectional Presi- 
dent, Atty. Herbert L. Dudley 
of Detroit,, Mich., who is visit- 
ing the state with his wife 
and her mother. 

Rev. Wallace Young is the 
pastor of Bethel, Eve Bell isj^^g ^^ ^^^ j^^ ^^^^ Bap-jice left la.st Monday to 
Sf msll^y' R^^^^i^ril^itist S.urch choir will.sing alreiatives in Houston and Dal 
Primin is presiding bishop of ^•^'^ P-"™- . • * 

the Fifth Episcopal District, i The program will be heard p ^ Hatchclt. l.'i.'?S 

over a loud-speaker system on. g^^ppf j., attending the fun- 
the outside as well as for those ip^g, ^j ^^^^ father in Topeka. 


By REV. JOHN C. BAIN 

* ' Christmas is a time When 
Little Mermaid and the over-awhing love of God 
Neptune corltest at j seems nearer to earth and hu- 


.level. and alrttaM every front., /-UMrr-h 

retreat.' Once again the^Hamiltort^Methodist C h u r^ch 
.stands accused of^^^H .hold sunnse 
with the LJif«r "cann*^ ^oods 
social topography of the so- j distributed. Th«. Gospel Choii 
cietv which it has been sent'w'll lead w-orsh.p at the Gen- 

■ eraL Hospital. Rev. John IS 

'Doggett, pastor, will /p^ak on 

' "keeping Christmas Alive,' 

painful recogni-at the 11 -a.m. service 


Gteefings 

.BETHEL 
AME CHURCH 

1511 W. 36th Stroot 


I ,. 


to save. 

This is a geriou* charge 
made all the more so by the 


.finals after three elimination | time when we turh aside from|(-iu^ today Thursdaj 


icontests. Linda' is the daugh-lthe way of .self-interest to 
for one-half hour at 12 noon;lter of R^v. and Mrs. H, Ward.jgrect the One who truly loved :.5]7or-um, 2»v« .S. Western ave 


It IS 

a special holiday 'g,,p.r„^jjy irue. We face ai 
pngram of Our Authors Study Mugiv ijicture. but our heJirt*! 
" - • at the are" lifted by the certain 'services. Rev. James 


E. Jones 


<ev 
alsi 


SafetyxSaying.s aqd Loan Au-ji^no^.jpjge that it is a picture 


Mt. Sinai Baptist Church choir She is also a pupil at the Jan; us. ^^^^ ^^ 8 p.m. 

^t 7:30 pjn.; Victor>- BaptistlMatus Studio. A joyful thne when a re- Speakep; on the panel will 

I Church chdlrs will sing 10 se- ' . * . newed awakening of the good, 'include Dr. X'.ornish Rbgers. 

Elections at 8 pm- Wesleyi Mr. and Mrs. Ivory Hilliard. the beautiful and true become t pastor of C-alvarv MeXhodi.st 

iMethodist Church choir singS'63T Broadway avenue in Ven- 'signs that the Chri.si Child be-Jchurch: Dr. Jacob Pressman.. '^''<*^'"* ^^'♦^ ^^*^*' '** °^''- '" " 

'"'""" visit'longs to all of us I -okk; rxf Tomrvio d/>»v. *m- onHismall 


that can be charrged 

Lost Uie Meoning 

I submit to you 


that the 


'rabbi of Temple Beth,- Am; and 


measure, to the 


will lead the c:hristmas medi 
tation. The choirs ar^ the An- 
gelic, Westminster and Sane 
tUar>'. The churclv address is' 
2230 W. Jefferson bhd. ' 
Peoples Independent 
Communion .service at the 8 
^'•'^iand 10 a.m. .serxices at Peoples 


.\hmad Obeici, of Sudan, a that we have somehosv lostU„dependent Church, 1025 E 



V. 


the deeper meaning of Clnrist- 1 jg^j, street, will be administier- 
mas. In a kind of typical Ip^j j,^. Rgv. Maurice A. Daw-' 


COMPTON AVENUE 

7TH DAY 
ADVENTIST CHURCH 

Pastor Barveg W. Kibble. Jr. 

10905 COMPTON AVE. 

LOS ANOELES 59 

lOrain «.127S 


who gather for vnewing <»iiu Ka^isas. 


and 
listening within the arena 
The program will begin with .j.^^^ Membership Committee 
Dr. William F. Connell sound- .^^ ^^^ ^..^^^p ^^^ ,^^, ^^^^ 
ing the first notes of Mendel-,^ , ^^, ^, ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ 

ssohns "Hark the Herald An- ^j^- ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ Crawford 
gelesSing. on the organ. .^ ^^^.^^ ^.^^^ memberships 

FM radio station, KRHM., taken in were Mrs. Louise i 
will broa<icast the entire 12*2 'Quails. Robert Spalding, Roy: 


"The mere lapse of years is graduate student ^rr L^^C 

nfot life. Knowledge, truth. Robert L. Demp.s is the^in- u '- 

16th 'ove. bcaut\. goodnc.<.s. faith, siructor of the club is Mrs. Pharisaical manner, we have j^j^j. 

alone can give vitalitv to the Vassie R. Wright is the presi->-'^a"l'^^ ^"^ ordinar.N, and .pj^p Sanctuary Choir of yer 
mechanism of e.Msiame." dent. ReTreshments will be turned aside from the • weign- ^ < Contin tied i^n Page Ti 

' ^ (Continued on Page 7) 


tl 


DR. FRED E. "STEPHENS 

Minister 
.VM. Ctirislma-s Mu.5ical| by 

Seiiior Choir. 

.\M. Ctiristiiias S«rmon' by 

Dr. Stephon.«. 


— James Martineau served. 


MAY THERE BE LOVE AND PEACE IN YOUR HEARTS AS YOU C^EBRATE XMAS 


n 


hour program. 


ST. AGNES CATHOUC CHURCH 

REV. HENRY G. ALKER 

Confessions: Saturdays and Eve. of First Fndays 
3:30«. 7:30-9. Evps. of Holy Days. 4-6, 8-9 p.m 

Vermont Ave. ami W. Adams Blvd. RE. 


1-4922 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S; Bodlong at West Vernon 
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2S 
' 'Christmas: love's Rights-Way" 

Swnday School-9:30 A.M. Worship- 1 1:00 A.M. 

HEAUNG SERVICE AT 5 P.M. 


4fAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH- 


...>« CM friAiiEBrtA «T PLeasant 3-4535 

«330 »0. F'0«^E«O* »J: _^ poGGETT. JR.. CASTOR 

8 a.m.— Early Wor.hi^. Rev. J. N. Doogett Jr., Preachmo 

6 a.m. — Suliiriaa Serviea 

f :3D a.m.— Church School (for All Ao««) 

10:4S a.m.— Youth Church 

10:45 a.m.— R«v. J. N. tJoqget. Jr Preaching 

S-30 p.m.— Methodist Youth and Wesley Fellowsh.p 


Lester Forbes, Mitchell Gar- 
'retr, Mrs. Willie Lee Smith, 

Samuel Seals, Alfred Com- 

mings. E. L. Sanders, Mrs. 

Ola Mae Stewart. Mrs. Mild- 
ired Ishman, J. C. Ramiro and 
I John Smith. Twenty-six dol- 
jlars was reported, 
i Mr. and Mxs. E. G. Allen 
' will be hosts to the Member- 
iship Committee oh Jan. .T 

« « * 

The Youth Branch of the 
iN.AACP recently held election 
of officers with the following 
results: .\1 Davis, president; 
j Sandra Pegues. vice-president; 
I'Gail Powell, secretarj-; Mary 
[ Fields, corresponding secre- 
jt|ar>'; Charles Wilson, treas- 
jurer; Lorey Dav^s, .sergearU-at- 
I arms. j 




California Eagle Advertisers Merit Your Support ^ 



HOME RADIO AND 
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Serving th» Sootheait tna 

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Experience Radio and television 

145t fell Flareece Avenwe 

lO$ ANGHES lU. 5-4411 


-NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC. 

29^5 J, Broedway Avenue— Rev. Anita L Edmonds, Pastor 
.f'-lf Fentatottal and Interracial 

*J« AJ4.-$«nday School 10:45 A.M.-Worship Service 

r-.aO PJKl.-ivenin9 Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.-Prayer Service 


Bowen Memorial Metflioilist Chirch 

f JtTjeHl AND TWHITT $t«KTS - «V. JOHM C lAlM. WNISTIt 

:, SUNDAY, DEaMBER 25 

.-,; ": YOUTH tieOOHmOH DAT 

The public Is cordially invited to attend. 

CHUXCH OF CHRISTIAN FIllOWSHIP 

^ 3125 W. ADAMS WVD. 

JJ. a.m.— Morning Worship Servic* 
Rev. Jame. H. Hargett Will Speak 
StJNTSAY SCHOOL, 9:30 a.m.-KlnrtergartPn Through 5th Grade 
SUNDAY scnu ^^ 3^.-61 h Grade Through H.gh School 


!-»■ 


WiSTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
2230 W. JfFPWSON BLVD. RIpublle 4-1566 


Rev. James E. Jones. Pa.itor 
9-30 and 11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 
B 30 a m -Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade- 

n'S»7;n.-Church School - 7th Grade Through College Sr. 
7 p.m.— Westminster Bible Hour 


-Adult Clajisci 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 

1564 W. »4lh FtACf ^ '*'*'* 

AAessages to All 
^ Services Sunday and Thursday at 8 PAA. 
Wednesday 2-4 P.AA. 
REV. OTIS STOVALL, Minister 


Every Day Could j 
Be Like Xmas f 

By REV. WELFOBD P. CARTER f 

This is a season of good f 
will? All of our animosities I • 
are forgotten for the day and 1 1 
we feel in harmony and fel- f 
lowship with the spirit of the if 
occasion. | \ 

We are anticipating great; 
things as we prepare to cele- 
brate the birthday Ol our 
Christ. We are ready to do a 
kindness to a friend or enemy 
alike, for this particular day, 
but what <A tomorrow? Christ 
who came to bring peace and 
good will did not come to 
I bring it for one day, but for 
every day. He means foV us 
to love and live in a friendly 
relationship with all n>ankind 
every day. Until we le^rn to 
do this we are not living ac- 
cording to the pattern intend f 
pd by the Prince of Peace. Let * 
us. try to practice the spirit of • 
Chri.«!tmas. I 

f 

f 



WEBB 
PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS 

Free Delivery of Prescri'pfions 
City-wide Service 

231 W. VERNON 

LOS ANGELES 

AOams 3-7171 


BEULAH BAPTIST CHURCH 
1454 East 100th Street 
ynm •• NeiiK** A" oirr 

Sundmy S<(i«*i, 9i}0 m.m, 

Mamimt Wen lll^; 1 1 aua. 

I r.U., ( p.m. 

lev. J. O. tarMeft, fmtfr 


I P "greater TRliELIGHT MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 

J I tlV. OSCAI JOHNSON MINISTIt 

JZ ^ Dtvrtt S*rvic« 11 *.fr\. TO 12:45 p.m. Evroing 7 p.nn. to 8:45 p.m. 

( B. T. U. 6 p fT*. to 7 p.m. Tutsd^y Nit« Jr. trid Sr. Wi'llton. Service 

Jm 7:30 to 8:25 p.m Tjtidiy B'btt L*ssoo. 8:30 'o 945 p.m. 

{ 127* W. 29Hi St.. let AnaaUs - Rt. 3-7423 

} 


I 
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3 I st,-/su.\s (;R}:Eri\GS to tuk'reTders 

Of THE'CAUFORSIA FACLE 


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HOSPITAL 


2109 WEST 
VERNON AVENUE 


AXhiinster 1-2311 


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^irsf Rpck Baptist Church 

3930 S. Wastarn Avanu* 

' R«y. L«« P. Jam«s, Ministar 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
11 a.m. BTU «i30 p.m. Evonin« Sarvico 
7:30 p.m. Song Sorvieo «:45 p.m. Public 
is Invitod to Pray with us at "7:30. pm. 
on Wodnosday. 


Sunday School 
To Unveil Tree 

A Christmas tree laden with (J 
gifts will be unveiled at New^ 
Community Church. 5965 S. i 
Broadway ave, tonight, Thurs- 
day, at 7:30 p.m. Gifts of all 
kinds will be given away by 
the Sunday School under the 
direction of Mrs. KaKtherine 
McCluney. 

Rev. Anita L. Edmonds, 
pastor of the church will 
speak on Christmas morning 
on "No Room at the Inn," 
at the 11 a. m. service. 

At 8 p. m. Dec. 25, several 
singing groups will offer a 
Christmas musical conducted 
in the spirit of riv«lr>'. Each 
. group attempting to sing the 
most beautiful and moving 
I number: 

A preaching marathon is 
scheduled at the chureh on 
;Ne\V Year's eve, beginning 
at 9 p.m. and (•onrluding a 



CHURCH OF RELIGIOUS SCIENCE 


THE FOUNDER'S CHURCH FOUNDED IN 1927 
Dr. W. H.D. Hornaday, Minister 

3251 WEST 6TH STREET, lOS ANGELES 
PHONE DU. 8-2181 


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f Dr. Darence Woods \ 


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from 

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RE 2-6877 


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•.' -■' 



FUNERAL HOMES 


GENERATIONS OF ^ 

FUNERAL SERVICE - ' ' 

PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE 


1030 E. Jefferson Blv<j., Los Angeles 
. - ADams 2-51 8* , ^irf 

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ChrisfUm Science to Tell 
Christmas Story of Liqht 


■- 


Prociairaing that the same 
'..flight ot hope and joy which 
' guhled 'the shepherds of old 
to the, Christ child is again 
leading to the Qmst, Truth, 
which saves and heals, the 
Lesson -Sennon entitled "Chris- 
tian Science" will be heard 
Sunday In all Churches of 
Christ, Scientist. 
The Christinas story to be 


Pioneer Doctor 
Is Buried Here 

Dr. Monroe Alpheus Majors, 
vo^ran {rioneer race leader 
and medical man, whose life 
spanned the entire period of 
fr d«n of Negroes in the VS., 
(1864-1960) was buried here 
last Saturday. Among surviv- 
ing relatives are his diftghter 
Mrs. W. A. Grace Boswell, and 
grandchildren Rev.' Hamilton 
Boswell of San Francisco, 
Georgia B. Qark, Rotoert, War- 
ren, Jr., and Cha^. Boswell. 

Among his many firsts was 
first Negro physician West of 
the Rockies. Places in which 
he practiced were his birth- 
"i>lace Waco, Austin, Brenham, 
Texas, Deoatur, 111., Indianap- 
olis, Chicago, Los Angeles and 
Monrovia. Among his, friends 
were: Paul Lawrence Dunbar, 
T. Thos. i^ortune Dr. Dan Wil- 
liams, Dr. U. G. Dailey, Booker 
T. Washington, Frederick 
Douglass, Henry Ward Beecher 
•nd Clarence Darrow. His for- 
mer Chicago pastor and life- 
long family friend. Rev. Harold 
"M. Kingsley, officiated. ' 


read from Matthew's Gospel 
will Include the following, 
"Now when Jesus was bofn In 
Bethlehem of Judaea in the 
days of Herod trie king, be- 
hold, there came wise men 
f rom"^ the east to Jwusalem, 
saying, Whfcre is he that is 
bora King of the Jews^ for we 
hfve seen his star in the east, 
and are come to worship him 
. . . When they saw the star, 
they rejoiced with exceeding 
great joy" (2:1, 2, 10). 
Etemol Down 
In "Science and Health with 
Key to the Scrfptures" Mary 
Baker Eddy writes, "Led by a 
solitary star amid the dark- 
ness, the Magi of old foretold 
the Messiaship of Truth. Is the 
wise man of today believed 
when he beholds the light 
which heralds Christ's eternal 
dawn and describes its efful- 
gence?" (p. 95). 


Church Services 

(Continued from Page 6) 
mont Square Methodist 
Church, 4410 Bydlong avenue, 
augmented by voices from the 
Lincoln Memorial Congrega- 
tional Church, will present the 
Christmas Oratorio by Saint- 
Saens at the Christmas Eve 
service, Dec. 24, at 11 p.m. 

On Christmas morning the 
Brass Choir and organ will 
present a period orf sacred 
music, beginning at 10:40 a.m. 
The title of Rev. A. C. Austin's 
message will be "This Is 
Christmas." 


Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


New York, N. Y. (Special) — 

For the first time scienc* has 
foftnd a, new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain — without 
surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid ease after 
another ,"very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by a doctor's observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, while gently jelieving 
pain, actual reduction dV re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 

And most amazing of all — 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where a doctor's 
observations were continued 
over a period of many months ! 

In fact, results were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 
to make such astonishing state- 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 
a problemi" And among these 
sufferers were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions, 
some of 10 to 20 years' standing. 

All this, 'mthout the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance (Bio- 
Dyne*)— the discovery of a 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured 
tissue on all parts of the body. 

This new heating substance 
is offered in suppository or oint- 
went form called Preparation 
H*. Ask for individually'sealed 
convenient Preparation H Sup- 
positories or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli- 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drug counters. 


Mrs. Leftridge 
Gives Anhuai 
Yule Message 

By CennlUa Leftridge 

Those who know the mean- 
ing of the miracle manger, 
when the word was made 
flesh and came to (^ell among 
us, know that Christmas isn't 
just another holiday. It has 
a message and purpose which 
offer a hope for all mankind, 
the faithful as well as the 
unfaithful. 

It was our first Christmas 
when God gave us His best. 
His only son Jesus, in the form 
of a little child as a Messiah. 
Not just "a son* of man" but 
'.The Son of Man." Before His 
coming the heavens foretold 
and awaited Him. 

The only way that CJod 
could express His love for us 
was through His son, who was 
moved by our lost world. He 
came to seek, to save, teach- 
ing us love, humility, and for- 
giveness. 1 wonder are we. His 
children, are we accepting His 
best and in sincerity are we 
going about our Fathers 
business? 

Many names were ascribed 
to Him by the prophets: Shep- 
herd, King, Man of Peace, but 
none fitted Him as well as 
Redeemer and Savior. Chirst is 
our Savior; list us put Christ 
back in Christmas instead of 
using the term Xmas to des- 
ignate the anniversary of His 
birth. 

1 pray that if we put the 
Bibles back into the schools 
it \yill lesseh juvenile delin- 
quency. 

God bless e<^ryone and 
may the New -Year bring you 
Peace. 


/ , ... 


Pacoima Church Presents Xmas 
Good Somoriton Story 



? 


Calvary Baptist Church, 12920 Vaughn stteet in 
Pacoima, this year' became the first of the community 
churches to participate in the Van Nuys Star of Beth- 
lehem j)arade which was held recently. 

m The float was designed by 

fr?3s^.^^!«;v^^^^.,/^. V-,. ^ Jesse C. Tyler, Jr. with cos- 

tumes by Roeetta Petefson. It 
told the story of the Good 
Samaritan, the parable which 
teaches that love must know 
no limit or boundary of race, 
creed or color. I 

Rev. .HlUery T. Broadous, 
pastor of the church, described 
the float to the television 
audience. John Taylojr was 
the wounded man; Th^o Mc- 
Connell the priest, Ray Burns, 
the Levite and Jesse CJ Tyler 
was the Good^Samarita 



RIV. H. T. BROADOUS 


SHOCKING TRITTH 

In spite of the fact that 
most everyone sings the song. 
"Oh Little Town of Bethle- 
hem" every Christmas time, 
only 58 per cent of the per- 
sons questioned knew that it 
was the city of Jesus' birth, 
according to a recent survey 
by the Pathfinder Youth club 
of the Seventh Day Adventist 
church. 


Young Minister 
Preaches at 
St. Mark AME 

St. Mark AME Church spon- 
jored its pre-Christmak pro- 
gram last Sunday afternoon. 
Thomas Kemp, youthful min- 
ister and a USC studelt, ad- 
dfrssed the youth group at the 
130th and A v a 1 o n Street 
Church. 

This is the second lermon 
presented by the minister, who 
is an active member m Sec- 
ond AME Church. 

Rev. J. Ernest Wi liams, 
minister of St. Mark, indicated 
that from time to time youth- 
ful ministers will have the op- 
portunity to share his pulpit. 


•t !•▼. JeoMt E. JoBM 

Occasionally I have the for- 
tune or the misfortune of 
hearing progressive and 
sometimes modem Jazz in 
which various instruments 
are from time to time fea- 
tured as soloists. Each soloist 
Improvisise as the mood 
strikes and sometimes the 
soloist is "so far out" that the 
melody is lost in the riff. 

Sometimes in the baubles 
and the tinsel and lie wiap- 
pings that represent and 
dramatize ^Christmas, one gets 
the feeling that a page has 
been taken from a Philhar- 
monic or Newport score. 

Or when one harks to hear 
"Hark the herald angels sing 
— joy to the world the Lord is 
come; let earth receive her 
king," improvisations of 
pleasantries, vanity and pride 
have distorted the melody of 
Christmas beyond all re- 
cognition. Especially when a 
pet shop displays a hand- 
somely bound leather book, 
with a, gilt inscription "Our 
Puppy's Baby Book." 

Or a popular Southern de- 
partment store catalogue sug- 
gests a live black Angus 
steer wrapped 'as bes^ we 
can." The wildest score being 
a gold plated garbage can 
filled with imported caviar at 
$12,125.49 delivered. 

Christmas is still Christ's 
birthday, a historical fact 
wliether we ^jelieve it or not. 
Wlien you do your Christmas 
shopping, you can still Jiear 
the melody? 


Thursday, Dteember 22, 1960 The Califbrnl^&BJ*^ 


Self SoeHf ice is Basis of 
Spirit of Christmas Season 


(Continued from Page 6) 
tier matters" tWkt Ue at the 
very heart <rf our faith. 

We have lifted rituca above 
righteousness, and have 
sought to latlsfT. rather than 
to BOT*. Harry Emerscm Foe- 
iick, that "be«coi\^ light of the 
American pulpit," pointed us 
the way years ajo when he 
preached, "Christ Himself As 
Christmas." This Is a truism 
which has somehow eluded us. 
We have become caught up in 
office parties, cross conimer- 
cialism, selfi^ giving, and all 
th« other trappings which 
make a mockery of this Holy 
Day. 

Selfless Lot* 

Christnuis is a s{rfrit. It is 
the spirit of "God in Christ, 
reconciling .the world unto 
Himself." It is the spirit of 
selfless love, of genuine sacri- 
fice. It is tlte spirit which 
should make us uncomfort- 
dble when we gathei- around 


Holiday Cheer 

Merry Christmas and Hap- 
py New Year to ail my 
friends, sisters nd brothers 
for their thoughtfullness 
during my" illness and for 
their donations, beautiful 
flowers and cards. 

Leola B. Wilson, 
Organizer and 
founder of the 
Phyllis Wheatley 
Home 


our "IfeitlVe board," when we 
remetnber that millfons aroand 
the wcwld are hungry. It fa the 
spirit of deepest humility, 
when we are pointed not to a 
palace, but to a statue, to find 
the Saviour d the worlit 

God grant that we can re- 
capture the rapture at the 
real Christmas message, and 
that we may resolve that next 
Christmas will find the church 
answering the charge — 
"Rise up! O men ot God, 

The Churd^ for you doth 
^ait, 't III ' i 
Her strength t^MMjual to lier 
task, ., ' 

Rise up; and make her greet! 


Christ's Day 
Challen^i^ 

Bt Rev. John K. Doggett. Jr. 

Christmas is a sign of God's 
confidence in the human race. 
This trust is represented in 
the birth bf Jesus, which em- 
bodied the spirit of God to 
the fullest. All of us are chal- 
lenged to strivr. to be like 
Jesus in order to show appre- 
ciation for God's gift. 

Let us make Christmas 
Christ's day. 


m 


"No age or time of life, no 
position or circumstance, has 
a mon(^>oly on success. Any 
age is the right age to start 
doing." 

^ Gerard 


~"^« called /Itmiiw^ ^omiLf,.." 

. . . we shall always remember the elegant appointments, 
beautiful equipment and thoughtful attenfioh— a prestige 
tribute at moderate cost." 

Funeral Dir^tors - Serving All JVith the Finest 

^1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Richmond 7-9121 


Terry Rovensdale 

NUMEROIOCY AND CARD READING 
.1379 W. 38th PLACE - RE. 4-7915. 


iMfNTAL COMFORTMl 


ISPIR/rUAt ADVISOR I 


ELDER J; B. MOORE 

Divine Healer From Birth 

AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER. WE WILL NOT FAIL 

Church at the Sons of God— Moses & A»ron 

1434 EAST 65th ST. LU 2-5600 

<1\ N. 4th Ave., Pocatello, Idaho CE. 2-9438 



Santa Monican 
Quits Job to i 
Fight for Ideabj 

Mrs. Ruth V. Ryan of Santa | 
Monica, a widowed mother of| 
two girls, resigned from her I 
job at St. Johns' Hospital in I 
order to devote her time to 
the fight for true democracy 
for all citize/is. 

Concerned about the events 
in , Louisiana, Arkansas and 
Georgia, Mrs. Ryan wrote the 
hospital a long letter of resig- 
nation in which she said. In 
part. "The time for this stupid 
vacillating is long gone. "The 
peoples of the world are ask- 
ing each other onstantly now- 
adays how America can ex- 
port a commodity she does not 
believe in herself. 

SonctitT of IndiTiduol 
"Democracy is the best an- 
swer to Communism. Democ- 
racy is everybody's business. 
I have wanted for years to 
I work at making democracy 
' a reality in America and now 
for whatever time I have left. 
!l hope to do so. 

., "I firmly believe that Amer- 

; ica's greafest gift to the world 

lis our Constitution with its 

[glorious Bill of Rights, which 

is dedicated to the ."sanctity of 

the Individual, under God." 

Mrs. Ryan is a member of 
the executive board of the 
Santa Monica NAACP and 
works in other community' 
organizations. 



J$lfi$l^^lfJ$Sfi$lSi$lf^$l£i$lf^i^^ 



i::^. 


r 


Merry Christmas 
Happy N^w Year! 


Passing years bring no greater 
extending Holiday Greetings. 


And, on this our first Chri 
world's inhumanity of man to 
It is a guiding light to hope 


^ISt^^lSL^S^S^SLiX^StG^S^S^^^S^^i^ 


SEASON'S GREETINGS 

- PROM TH€ INTIRE KfiSONEL OF - 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 



TIME is the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
tion to Los Angeles families for more than 20 years 
-T- satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and 
honest service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reason- 
able. 7 > 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 

CONTINUING TO SERVE YOU 
AT OURTEMPOkARY LOCATION 

1430 East 103rd St. . LO. 6-0022 


March, Aprir 
Win Zodiac 
Tea Honors 

The table representing 
March won first prize at the 
annual Zodiac Tea of Pasa- 
dena's First AME Church, at 
the YWCA one afternoon re- 
cently. Mrs. Martha Lunday 
was chairman of the March 
group. 

Second prize went to No- 
vember with Mrs. Mary Rog- 
ers as ifhairman. 

The gold cup award for the 
larg^t amount of money rais- 
ed Went to Mrs. Anna Lou 
Parker, representing April. 

Special guests of the tea 
were: Dr. and Mrs. Howard 
McDonald, of Los Angeles 
State College: Dr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Pitts of State Col- 
lege, and Charles iTnder. 

Tom Ralls designed .the 
guest table centerpiece. Miss 
AllieL. Almore was chairman 
with Mrs. Mamie Elders co- 
chairman. Courtesy Club 
members served as hostesses. 


man- 


So, in the Spirit pf the Season, our fervent wishes are 
extended that your Yuletid'e will be a Happy One, and 
that 1961 will rev^ard you Vichly. 


HARRISON -ROSS 


Henry C. Ball, 
Organist, Dies 

Concert organist Henry C. 
Bell, 57, who was known lo- 
cally as Hinri LeBel was bur- 
ied in Rose Hill cemetary in 
Portland following funeral 
services conducted by Rev. 
Harley Akers, at the Colonial 
Mortuary. He had been ill 
about 10 days. 


Fftff INFORMATION Contact "CEUS" KING, III 

BAILB6NDS"^,LT 

24 Hr. Service 



leasure.than the age-old custom of 


stntas in the Sixties — in the midst of a 
— the Star of Bethlehem still shines, 
tranquility! 


Leon Harrison 


am son 


Lucille Yerger I- 

Leslie U. King, Jr. ' 
William H. Smith, Jr. 



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STAFF 


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STORES WIU CIOSE CHRISTMAS EVE AT 
DAY and MONDAY, DECEMBER 26! 


7 PJM. & REMAIN CLOSED 




WmM 




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|:|:j:-I5H(!l?x-:-:':^':-:'::;-::;:::X::i^^^$::; 

•^ 3 frontic dqys of "lost minute' chores. 
Then, not one but two holidays with oil stores 
closed! We've tried to make things easier for you by list- 
ing, displaying, and kOW PRICING all the foods for your 
FESTIVE FEAST . . . and moy we wish you an'd yours every 
wonderful thing for o TRULY MERRY CHRISTMAS! 

NORBEST BRANO-(^.S.D.A. Grade A 

OVEN READY— TOM 




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TURKEYS 




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WITH TURKEY OR HAM SERVE OCEAN SPRAY CRANBERRY SAUCE 

FARMER JOHN^READY TO SERVE! 


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ROASTING ^ 

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RATH i 1 < 


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^B^ DIPS Fi^* Delicious Flavors 

BBQ. BLUE CHEESE, NIPPY, 

ONION OR SHRIMP 8 -oz. Carton. . , 



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10-02.- 

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CHRISTMAS TREE 
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LEAD OR SARAN 

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PRICES EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 22, SI O- S4 


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Thursday, December 22, 1960 


Th^^Callfornia Eagle-^ 


Bay Area National- Council Holds /^i 
Impressive FouhcJer's Day Program; ^; 


HARDWORKISG STAFF— Shoun folloi^ir,,, Dr^ C. L. 
Taylor's sixth annual Christmas party iihich attracted 
some 3J00 youngsters are members of the pjif>iilar South 
Loi^ Angeles dentist's staff it-'ho assisted him in pinying 
Santa Cla us. From left:, Halter Espiiiosa, oi;.- ner of the 


I.argo Theater n'here the party was held: Willie Johnson, 
Billie kendritk. Pat Hernandez. Barbara Rollins, Dr. (j. 
L. Taylor . Dr. Frank' Peterson . (iloria Sniton. .Mary 
Srni/h, h.sther (Gutierrez, Alma .Mt Far/and and Dorothy 
Fendtnon. (.idtims) 


Dr. Taylor, Doll League, Avalon Center 
Christmas Parties Spark Yule Spirit 


The newly formed Bay 
Area, Southern California 
Council of l;^e National 
Council of Negro Wonaen, 
celebrated its Founder's I>ay 
with an impressive program 
last Thursday in the Carter 
Education Center of Calvar>' 
Baptist Church in Santa 
Monica. 

Winsome Mabel Hall, for- 
merly of Cleveland. Ohio, 
organized the chapter and is 
its president. She also was a 
fashion model for Lane and 
Bryant, top department store 
in Cleveland. In addition, 
she held memberships in the 
NAACP, League of Voters, 
Jewish Welfare and wag 
associated with the AME 
Church of Cleveland. - 

Mrs. Hall has been resid- 
ing in Santa Monica only 
one year and .<?aw the nee^ 
for such an organization aS 
the Bay Area Council. 

In celebrating their 
Founder's Day the group also 


honored ^ citizens of the Bay 
Area for their contributions 
towards the growth of the 
fine Bay Area community. 
Appearing on the program 


Rev. and Mrs. Welford P. 
Carter, Rev. and Mrs. H. S. 
Davis, Rev. and Mrs. J. W. 
Burcher, Rev and Mrs. Char- 
les Williams, Rev. and Mrs. 


were Esther Sandeis, mist- , E. L. Holmes, Rev. and Mrs. 


ress of ceremonies; Gospel 
Choir, John Dooley, 11, Sadie 
B. Boozier, Atty. Eugene Hall 
and Gloria Cranes. 

The new council is com- 
prised of 40 local women who 
hold meetings monthly wtth 
membership open to all local 
women. 

Those receiving the Coun- 
cil's achievement scroll in- 
cluded: 


' F. M. Sadler, Rev. and Mrs. 
Harold Bynum, and Rev. and 
Mrs. Herbert Ward. 

Also Mrs. Sadie Bo<^er, 
Mrs. Ida Dooley, Mrs. Mar- 
garet Mayis, Mrs. Beatrice 
McCarroll, Mrs. Louise Fin- 
ley, Mrs. Maude E. Ward, 
Mrs. Helen I Brantley, Mf. 
Vernon BrunsMi, Mr. Dave 
Wesson, Mrs. Juanita Wateifs, 
Mr. E>Q. Allen, Mr. Goodrich 


McNeil, Mrs. Rose Wesson. 
Mrs. Vada King, Mrs. ,Ester 
Coleman, Mr. Chauncy Gacy 
ladd, and Mr. Joseph Bees. ; V 
Also Mrs. Thelma Terry,' 
Mr. Silas White, Mrs. Daisy 
Payne, Miss Edna Heard, 
Mrs. Martha Sheffield, Mis. 
Allie Cook, Mr. Alfred Quinn, 
Mr. Donald Brunsoin, Miss 
Elane Blanks, Mr. Joseph 
Spalding, Mrs. Mary Mc- . 
Neil, Mr. Manual Murrel, 
Mrs. Bessie Osborne, Mrs. 
Loretta Edwards, Mr. Leroy 
Witherspoon. Mr. Hilli«rd 
Lawson and Mr. Sherman 
Jones. ; 


Santa came early this past 
weekend to some thousands 
of children in Los Angeles 
as Dr. Christopher L. Taylor 
of South Los Angeles gave 


Bristovv and the rest of the 
Avalon crew spent ' their 
time sorting gifts — including 
dolls given them by the. Doll 
League and the Marine's 


r 


his aimual Christmas i>arty Toys fo^ Tots — wrapping 
Saturday and the Doll packages and preparing for 
League followed suit with the rush of young guests ex- 
its annual ' gift^giving to peoted the following evening, 
many more children Sunday. 

Not to be outdone, the 
Avalon Community Center 
followed up the two greatly 
appreciated parties with a 
third one Monday night at 
the Center. 

This was th«> sixth year in 
succession that Dr. Taylor 
and his staff have under- 
taken to give as many 
youngsters as they can herd 
together a grand afternoon 
of fun and gifts. 

This year the youngsters 
came -from Tar and wide — 
some 3500 of them, flocking 
to the Largo Theater on 
103rd street in throngs that 
formed lines clear to the 
street and stretched far 
around the comer. 

Walter Espinoto, manager 
of the theater, said it was 
the "best turnout" he has 
had all year. 

The youngsters were treat- 
ed to a super-coUossal movie, 
and. in addition were loaded 
down with candy-filled stock- 
ings, toys and otiier gifts 
that to a youngster spell 
"Christmias." 

Anotlier 1500 gathered at 
the CJarver Junior High School 
Sunday morning, whfen the 
Doll League took charge, 
with dolls and dolls and 
more dolls, calculated to 
please the heart of any and 
every little miss. 

Actor WilHam I Bill I Walk- 
er donned the traditional 
whiskers and red robe and 
made a jolly old Saint Nick 
as he handed out the treats 
to eager.'small hands. 

As others played on Sun- 
day afternoon, Mrs. Opal 
Jones, Lindsay Vickers, Joe 


They were ready and wait- 
ing Monday when 500 eager 
tots and teenagers thronged 
the Avalon Community Cen- 
ter, to witness the Christ- 
mas shpw, gloat over their 
gifts and munch their candy. 
At the Center, Joe Bristow 
took over the role of Santa 


Claus. 

It was a great weekend for 
the youngsters. And it was 
a great weekend, too, for 
Dr. Taylor and his staff, the 
Doll Leaguers and the Ava- 
lon workers. 

Merry Christmas to all, 
and to all good night. 



Miss Ba 
Reid Troth 

4 

Revealed 




I" 


GIFT GIVING— Pat Hernandez. Gloria Sutton (back to camera). Alma McFarland. 
Dr. C. L. Taylor' and the rest of his staff members n-ere busy as bees during Dr. Tay- 
lor's silcth annual Christmas party held last Saturday at the Largo Theatre in South l.os 
Angeles. (Adams) 


Girls League 
At Jefferson 
Making Toys 

The Girls' League of Jef- 
ferson High School under the Moore, Wanda Weaver. Janis 

Sterling, Dawn and Donna 
Bostic, the monks ,of the 
Cathedral of Notre Dame; 
Cathy Neal. Cynthia White, 
Royda and L,eslie Brown, the 
royal people; Debby Gould, 
Sheila Sloan and Dion White, 
the merrvmakers. 


Dance Theatre 
To„ Stage Play 
At Holman Mon. 

Eunice Cain, director of the 
Children s Dance Theatre, 
will present a Christmas 
dance program Monday, Dec. 
26. from 7 io 8 p.m. at Hol- 
man Methodist Church Fel- 
lowship Hall, 3320 W. Adams 
blvd. 

The advanced students 
will be featured in a cre- 
ative ballet, "The Juggler of 
Notre Dame." They have 
previously appf)eared in five 
performances. 

Janice Hill will dance the 
role of the juggler; Donzalea 


MISS DOLORES E. 
BALL — Betrothal an- 
nounced. 

At a family dinner party 
at the Islander Restaurant 
in Hollywood, Mrs. L. eJ 
Ball announced the engage- 
ment of her daughter, Do- 
lores E. Ball, to Ronald D. 
Reid. 

The informal announce- 
ment was made to 16 mem- 
,bers of the couple's respec- 
tive families and came as 
a tuprise to those attending, 
iContinued on Page 11 1 


energetic leadership of Mrs. 
Betty Riley, a teacher of 
English, turned aside from 
its many social activities 
this month to lend a hand to 
the less fortunate. 

All year long the Girls' 
League has sponsored school 
parties, selected the girl-of- 
thg-month, and, as of the 
winter te^n 1961, created a 
financial srfiolarship to he 
given to one of the grad- 
uating' seniors, whose name 
will be revealed at a later 
date. 

This December, however, 
the young ladies turned their 
attention to other and vital 
facets in the development 
of their personalities: that 
of giving of themselves for 
thie bettermejit of humanity. 
The girls have been busy 
making yam ' toys, stuffing 
dolls and making baby lay- 
ettes for the iinfortunate 
children who are confined 
to hospitals in the United 
SUtes. 

' Also, the league has been 
instrumental in getting gift 
boxes filled for the Red Cross 

To the delight of Mr. Sam 
Hamerman, principal, the 
entire student body has con- 
tributed most generously to 
the filling of these boxes 
wlUch will be distributed in 
disaster arieas throughout 
the world; \ 



GOLDEN .WEDDING — Shoun. being honored on their golden wedding anniversary are--'{ 
from left: Mr. and .Mrs, Isiah Brown of Shreveport, La., the honored couple, and 3f r.-. | 
and .Mrs. Evangelist Broun, brother and sister-in-law of Mr. Brown of Miriden, L«. j^ 
They are visiting in the city and l..cre gnats for the special occasion. 

Cooperettes Seat 
New Officers 

The Cooperettes Club Inc. 
prepared for an active 1961 
by installing their new offi- 
cers early, with installation 
ceremonies being held in the 
lovely home of Ann Craig. 

The gavel was passed to 
the new presiilent, Lillian 
Atwood, by Roislyn Goddard 
who has vpry capably held 
the office for the past two 
years. 

Following the installation, 
club membei? proceeded to 
the Town Tfivern where they 
toasted their officers with 
cocktails. -' 

Christmas Party 

The Freelancer Club's an- 
nual Christmas Party was 
held recently following their 
regular meeting in the home 
of Margaret Watts. Velma 
Craig ^as installed pres. 



.1:, 

J 


J 


CAKE CUTTING— Mrs. Isiah Brown is pictured cutting' j 
a huge tier cake during the celebration of her 50th weddinfr 
anniversary attended by scores of friends last week. i 

«^<l|ill Smallwood •«»'l 


THE LIS F HAS LONG— Some of the .IhIO youngsters 
who jammed the Largo theater, 01 lO.Wd street, at the 
sixth annual (Christmas party given by Dr. Christopher L. 


'Taylor Saturday .afternoon, W shown waiting their turn. 


of the block, curved and con- 
(Adams) 


The line stretched to the end 
tinued on around the i orner. 



FOUNDER'S DAY PROGRAM-M embers of he Bay 
Area Council of National of Negro Women are pictured 
followipg their Founder's Day Prpgram held last Thursday. 
Seated are: Mary Johnson, treasurer; Betty Simmons, fi- 
netujal secretary; Arlene Lewis, member; Gloria Cranes, 
memhtr; Mabel Hall, president; Eloise Sykes, membership 


chairman; and .ilfrcdu Hubbard, corresponding secretary. 
Standing: Tossie Ruby, ways and means chairman; Esther 
Saunders, chaplain; Ida Dooley. recording secretary and 
historian; Lilie Mae Rogers, Shedrtck Jones, Ann T. Davis 
and Marie B. Watts. (Adams) 


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Lindsa/ Vickers 
Gives .Xmas Part/ 

Lindsay Vickers, staff 
mem,ber of the Avalon Cwn- 
munity center, was hostess to 
a gay and delightful pre- 
Christmas cocktail party in 
her beautifully arranged 
apartment, 1151 Plymouth, 
last Friday night. 

Among her friends enjoy- 
ing the festivities were or- 
ganist Jacltie Davis, Walter 
Hutherson, Capt and Mrs. L. 
Barrett of Riverside, Joyce 
Sherman, Mr. and Mrs. Joe^ 
Bristow, Isabelle Dotsey, 
Sandrk Gladstone, Barbara 
Dyce, artist Charles and Mrs. 
White, Opal Jones, Mr. and 
Mrs. Rudolph Collins, Mr. 
And Mrs. Laffle Robinson, 
Charles Barrett and Alice 
Greecy. , 

Asslstinf Miss Vickers with 
the party was Carlene Phil- 
lips. 


* - I 




Xmas E\e is Edith Hou- 
ston's birtthday while next 
day is ditto for Lena Tucker 
and Dorothy Howard. Dr. 
and Mrs. Warren Brooks 
(.\ureliatand their two kids 
jetted to the nation's capital 
. for the holidays. Atty.. and 
Mrs. Ivan Johnson's house- 
guest is Chicagoan Bruce 
McGoodwin .(he's ' Etorothy's 
cousin). 

Betty and Jim Scott's son, 
Scotty, reaches tpwn today 
(Thurs.) for two Weeks leave 
from S'Diego's Naval base; 
he's been reassigned there 
for 24 weeks. 

HoUdOT Hopping 

Xmas Eve hosts: Dr. and 
Mrs. Wayraan McCoo. Eve- 
lyn Pride Cox and her Harry 
will be in town from San 
Mateo over the New Year's 
Eve weekend. Dr. and Mrs. 
Andre Tweedy moved into 
that Leimert Park house 
they built. The Ernie Weav- 
ers have their customary 
Xmas day open house. Phil- 
, iidelphia's Dr. and Mrs. Jack 
Smith (Catherine) visited 
Mary and Bud Clay (Jack 
and Mary are brother and 
sister) and the foursome left 
Mon. night for Xmas in 
Mexico City. 

Ida Lee hostessed an Xmas 
party Tues. at her spacious 
place. Lillian Hall, back in 
town via Detroit changed 
her last name to Hayes and 
is apt. shopping. Clara 
Prince . an^ Ptfarl Lawson 
have SF on their holiday 
calendar. Ex-Angeleno Jodie 
Cooper underwent major 
surgery In NYC. Walthea 
Simms Jones headed for a 
spa in Mexico for hot min- 
eral baths. Margaret Outley 
and Frances Rajfin Xmas- 
party-entertained H o 1 m a n 
Church's Sunday School 
teachers last Frid. at the 
home of the latter. 

Tuletld* te England 

Freddy Clark, who uSed to 
really brighten this place 


I • ^.J 


•* •' 'rr»>-.-~..v^— -■--M--«' - y , ^ :j »' ' >-— ^^ ^^ .-».-• 


when he lived here, Is Yule-| \ 
tiding in England. The Jphni ; 
Simmon.ses (Blanche) and. "I. 
Carrie Holcomtj have asked 
friends in for New Year'sj 

Eve at the home of the! -;. 
former. LA to NYC: H. M. ■ 
Owens who took the 66 ". j 
route but pluckily, rushing ; 
to his injured wife's bed-; f, 
side. Pasadena^s J. "Robert •, 
Smith holidaying in Jamaica ' 
enroiite to S'A^merica on as-; *'( 
signment Elliot (Carpenter; ^: 
takes a birthday on the 28th. I >■', 
First day of the year is an-.j '.; 
niverssuy for Pinki and By- ' -v'_ 
ron Webb so they're having '"" 
open house on that date, 
naturally. [, i ,« 

Zrelda Sealy picked thei . ! 
Thurs. after Xmas to enter- ' 
tain her girl chums over I * 
cocktails at her home. Dr. j ' 
and Mrs. Mayo DeLdlly are i 
readying their house'for the; 
New Year's Eve party of the i y 
Friday Nig^hters Club. Delia i ', 
McDoiiald is a birthday girl h 
tomorrow (Frid.): ■ > ] 

And S« to Ghana . | 

SC grad Herman Bailey 
'f teaching at Fla. A and M ^. 
this year) is home for Xmas \ "' 
visiting his parents; next : 
year he goes to C^hana to ; 
teach art Handsome, the ; 
gift Judy Bailey Taylor and ; 
her Gerald got from her par- j 
ents. A duplex, no less. Next j 
Wedn. coffee hostess: Ruth ■ j 
Spencer, her honored guests j "^ 
being Florence Draper of C3ii ( 
and Grace Morgan Jones of | 
Sacramento. \ 

The Girl Friends have no ' 
peers when it gaily comes to 
their annual Sun. before 
Xmas cocktail party at.Wil- '•■ 
fandel. Last Sun. was a de- 
lightful triumph again for 
them and the -town turned 
out, eager, chic and merry. ; 
I, for one, enjoy it for you do \ 
get to, hug- folk you some- \ " 
kJiow don't see through the i 
year. Atty. and:Mis. Vtaoe 

(Continued on Faga 1^^ 


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K>USHING A WAXING 

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AND STAFF 

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LOS ANGELES 


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loe«l •nd long Distance Moving Sine* 1929 - Boxes and B»rr«li for S*l« 

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"MHRY CHtlSTMAS AND IRT WISHIS TO All OUR FtlENDS" 

MEOICAL, DENTAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL 
ASSOCIATION AND WOMEN'S AUXILIARY 


MERRY CHRISTMAS AND 
BEST WISHES TO ALL 

SUPERVISOR KENNETH HAHN 

2ND QISTRICT 


'Season's Greetings to All My Friends" 

KARL RUNDBERG 

COUNCILMAN, 11 TH DISTRICT 



"Sincere Grtetings to All My Frimds" 

HOX. FRANK BONEI.I.I 

Supervisor First IHstrict 
Chairman I. .A. Coiinlu Board of Supemisort 


Al'AI.OS COMMUSITY CES'TER—Sitnta Clans nrrlved at thr Aralon Comlfiu- 
nily Crnter Ir.st Monday night and distributed toys to some .^00 ihiidren uho aho \en- 
joyed h xtty drlifihtful Yule program. Shoun above are. from left. I.oneltita Childs. h.tsi- 
dene Cole. Knrrn .Milihell nilh her. mother l.avay .Mtt,hetl, Santa Clans (Joe RristiJfi) 
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5000 SOUTH VERMONT, LOS ANGELES 
PLcasant 3-4551 


Dorothea Foster 

(Continued from Page 10) 

from the Doll League Charity Club on Sunday at 
Carver Junior High, which naturally made the 
Leaguers very happy and, oh, so grateful to their 
wonderful foliowers. 

Sir Debuteers chose the Warehouseman's Hall for 
their annual Christmas party on Friday night. ; 

Got Your Ticket? 

A gala crowd was on hand for the opening of 
Raisin, in the Sun on -Tuesday evening at the Hunt- 
ington-Hartford Theatre. 

Looking fonvard to the Stovall Foundation show- 
ing of "Spartacus" on Jan. 8 at the Pantages. Block 
tickets are available to clubs if they will call RE. 
2-LM24 or RE. 4-5968. ^ 

Rinkevdinks making lavish plan.*? for their formal 
on Jan. VI at the Beverly Hilton with E.ARL BOSTIC 
and his great orchesira providing the music. 

It i.s with great sorrow to all of us who knew and 
loved CECEL NE.-\L MILLS, who passed away on 
Sundav, that our sympathy goes out to her husband 
TOMMY and their three children. > 

ETHEL MADDOX entertained the CC's on Wed- 
nesday and plans were completed for the CC's an- 
nual Christmas party which will be held on Dec. 17| 
at the Brentwood home of JUDGE and MRS. DAVID. 
WILLIAMS. 

The annual Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical 
Association dance will be on Dec. 30 at the Los 
Angeles Breakfast Club. . - 

The Marquisettes will hold sway on Kew Year's 
eve at the Carolina Pines. Ditto, on New Years eve 
will be the fabulous dancing party and breakfast 
with the Hilltoppers at the Cocoanut Grove. 


Seniors Attend 
Youth Conference 

Among the Centennial 
ftigh School seniors pj rtici- 
pating in the Youth Leader- 
ship Conference held r«cent- 
l.v at Union Oil Center vere: 
Verina Elliott, Lupe Garcia, 
Jeri Hendericks. F r a n c i s 
Lands, Dora McNeal, I>>nald 
Meadows, Emma Ruth Smith, 
Juanita Vera. Donald ^Vhite 
and Larry Woods. Joseph 
Watson was the sponsor. 


SMALLWOOD 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Townsend. Jr. have an Xmas 
anniversary. 

Dot Watson doingsplendid- 
4y at Kaiser Hospital, hop- 
ing to be discharged next 
week. Virginia Morgan plan- 
ning a Xmas party at her 
colorful and so welPappoint- 
ed apartment Edith' Fields 
Smith toying with similar 
idea; her parties always cull 
a gleaming group and come 
into full bloom around mid- 
night. Rhetta Nickerson 
birthday on 12th. 

Hilltoppers set for their 
New Year's Eve shebang; 
happy is member Dotti Cro- 
7ier Lewis since she sold her 
Altadena house 'n pool and 
moved back to LA*and life. 

Newcomers: Former' How- 
ard Univ. employee Thelma 
Smith and her husband, Guy. 
who has taken a post in 
City Hou.sing. Shirley Gibbs 
buffing her nails and hum- 
ming until jet take-off time 
for her u.sual KaySee Xma.s 
fun-time. Byron Webb takes 
down another birthday this 
Sun. (lit. 

Handsomest wedding gift 
of all. that one given to 
bride-to-be Judy Bailey and 
hei beloved by Judy's ador- 
ing parents. Dr. and Mrs. 
William Bailey. Judy's wed- 
ding this Sat. a.m. promises 
to be one of the loveliest 
performed in St. John's at 
Bronson and Washington. 
This Xmas is certainly bound 
to be one of the most signifi- 
cantly happy ones for 
Haroldine and Bobby Brew- 
ingtoh; they are comfortably 
and proudly settled in that 
new home of theirs in Alta- 
dena. 


Thursday, December 22,' 1960 The . California Eaglc-T1 



Christmas Greetings to Our Many Friends 

SIMON LEVI CO., LTD. ' 

IFHOLESALE LIQUOR DISTRIBUTORS 
ENTRAL- AVENUE 


5935 SOUTH 
LOS ANGELES 


AD. 44141 


■\OVH PATnOWi'dE IS APPREt.lATED- 


t "Merry Christmas to Our .Many (.ustoruers and Friends 

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DOOTONE RECORDS 

Extends to All Sincere Best ^Wishes for the 

Christmas Season — May You Enjoy Health 

and Happiness During the New Year 


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214 SO. BROADWAY 
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DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 


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EVERYONE WILL DRESS UP FOR CHRISTMAS, 
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Get ready for the Holidays — No cash needed — As little 
as $3.00 a week pays for $100.00 worth of clothes, ac- 
cessories, gifts. Radios, Watches, and Luggage for men and 
boys of all ages! See all the new styles in Leather Goods and 
Jackets — Suede Coats and Jackets. Dress up — Go places 
and enjoy life — Wear and enjoy your new clothes while 
paying! 

* NO INTEREST * NO CARRYING CHARGES * 
' -^ FREE CREDIT * 
New Sweaters — New Wool Shirts — Sport Clothes — 
Play Clothes — Work Clothes — Dress Clothes — Tuxedos — 
Poys Suits — Trousers — Shirts — Shoes — Everything for 
the boy! 

MEN, see our New Hats! Buy arty* suit 
in the House, and get $10.00 worth of 
shirts FREE! 



We cater to you, and I do mean YOU! 
Yes, we cater to His Majesty, the 
working man. 

Buy any suit and get $20.00 off the 
price of any top coat! 



Miss Ball 

(Continued from Page 91 

Miss Ball aliend.-< Los .^n- 
gtrles Cit\' College and is em- 
ployed a.i a clerk for the 
Board uf Education at Cam- 
bria Adult School. She is a 
graduate u( Lx>s Angeles 
High Scliool. 

Her fiance, a graduate of 
Long Beach State, manages 
his familWs bu.>.ine.s.s. the 
Faxton'.s Liquor Store and 
Super Market in Pat-oima.- 

Mr. Reid is the .>40ii of 
Margie Nitkens of thi.« city. 
Miss Ball is the daughter of 
Mrs. Ball and the late L. F. 
Ball. 


LOAN MONEY AVAILARLEI 

WESTSiOE 
MORTGAGE CO. 

S«l*i • RcntaU • liunraiN* 

M<KINNEY REALTY CO. 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

4M7 WIST AOAMt M.VO. 
lO> ANOIIIS 

RE. 5-0265 


FREE! OUR CHRIST- 

GIFT TO YOU! 

A $10 SWEATER OR 

A $10 PAIR OF 

TROUSERS FREEI 

With any suit 

purchase priced 

$39 or morel 



s 


Buy any suit and get $20.00 off the 
price of the second suit! 

All the new Colors and Styles! We 

can fit you! Sizes up to 50! i^^ 

• FREE PARKING N€XT DOOR WHILE YOU PURCHASE YOUR NEW CLOTHES • 

See the new Continental and Ivy League Styles. Black suits- 
Grey suits— Blue suits— Brown suits— Green suits. 

• FREE ALTERATIONS * FIT GUARANTEED • WE CATER TO YOU 

WE ARE OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT; BUY NOW! PAY LATER; 

REGULAR HOURS: 9:30 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. 

OPEN EVERY SATURDAY NITE UNTIL 8:00 P.M. 

A Union Crew to Serve Vou Better 
We Cater to California Eagle Newspaper Readers ~ ■- 

VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 
OPEN DAILY TILL DECEMBER 24TH * 9:30 A.M. UNTIL 9 AT NIGHT 


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SHOE REPAIR 

PHONE AD. 3-9003 
4370 S. CENTRAL AVE. 


PREMIERE DEC. 27 

NM MVSICM. RCWE 
SMtt n«w at bex»IRct< I 
S«. C*l. Musk C*. 
AN Mutual A9«nci*l 

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DON'T MISS THIS!! 


SECURE INFORMATION AND TICKETS FROM EMERSON SMITH 

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6««r||« RaiiN«y 


BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO. Holders of four 
tickets enridied their Christ- 
inas fuiMlB by $18,314 wdi last 
Sunday rtX CaUente Race 
Track in sharing first-place 
money in the 5-10 public 
handicapping contest. 

Five winning horses were 
enough to take first-place 
share from the gross pool of 
$106,528. The consolation pool 
was divided into 141 shares 
worth $173 each for four hor- 

A Negro couple from Los 
Angeles wat one of the lucky 
four tg! win first^place money. 

"Wirming numbers were 7- 
10-2-7-8-7. The crowd of 14,659 
sent $380,796 through the 
mutuels for the 11 races not 
including the $108,528 in the 
5-10 pool. No racing will be 
held this Sunday Christmas 
day. 

fHORSES TO WATCH THAT 
ARE' FIT AND READY) 

CALIENTE 
STXmDA PATCH. Ready for the 
.charmed ctrele. 


A LATE DATE. Watch out for 
thin one. 

PATTY DRAKE. In Smart hands. 

LADY ROBIN. My Sl*€p»r. 

AFTER THE BALL. Wire to 
wire. 

POTEN BAT. Tralnlntr Sharply. 

SEA LASS. Next out O.K. 

NIBBLUNGO. Mexico City, Fly- 
er. 

BIG RISK, aockerg Special. 

DUKE OF DIAMONDS. A spark- 
ler. 

EL TOR.VADO. A fit maiden. 

RIVER ROCK. Better then rat- 
ed. 

GOLDEN GATE 

AK-SISSY. This one ran nv. 

SEVENS UP. Look out. a Roodle. 

FINE PRINT. Wire to wire. 

STYLISH MAID. She cm fly. 

ADIEU. Longshot special. 

OWEN LORA. Oockers Koodie. 

GET RICH. Xmas money. 

ODD FELLOW. Over a distance 
O.K. 

SOUD SIGN. Ready ,ter a kill- 


'% 


KI QUBE»J. Go back to this 
one. 

KEEP THIS COLUMN FOR 
FURTHER REFERENCES AS IT 
ONLY APPEARS IN THE CALI- 
FONIA RAOLE OUT AND ON 
YOUR NEWSSTANTl E V K R Y 
WEDNESDAY. ALSO WATCH 
THIS COLUMN' VOK THK OPEN- 
ING OF SANTA ANITA IN N'prXT 
WEEK PAPER. FOR THE BF.ST 
IN THE SPORT OF KINGS ITS 
THE EAGLE. 

YOUR WRITER WI.SlHES 
EVERYBODY A VERY MERRY 
CHRI»TMAS AND A HAPPY NE\\' 
(YEAR. 



r* YHE TEE 


.WITH MAGGfC HATHA WAr. 


TO HALL OF FAME— Conch Jake Gailher (right), 
head coach of' the famed Florida A ':£ M University Rat- 
tlers and tfne of the uinningest coaches in football, will be 
inducted into the National Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics Hall of Fame in Kansas City, Mo., next March. 
He is shown above getting a plaque for his uork in race 
relations from the Greater Miami Urban League. The auard 
uas presented hy League President Karl Bishopric 


We could not believe our I "If you are not in the Wo- 
eyes when we read in a ,week- men's G«lf Association how 
ly paper that Thelma Cowan did you turn professional?" 
had become the first Negro we ask«d. 


woman to "turn pro." We 
hastened to the phone and 
called Thelma to congratulate 
her and ask her, "How on 
earth did you manage to join 
the WPGA? (Women's Profes- 
sional Golfers A^ocia^pn) 
Did you hnye to file a suittto 
get in?" 

"No," she answered, "I am 
not a metnber and I have not 
filed a suitJ* 


Prairie View, 
Arkansas to 
Vie in Bowl 

The once beaten Prairie 
View Panther football team 
will oppose Arkansas A and 
M college in the 33rd annual 
Prairie View Bowl scheduled 
in Houston, Tex., on Dec. 31. 

Prairie View, perennial host 
in the nation's second oldest 
bowl game, ended in a three,- 
way tie and with a 9-1 season 
record for the Southern Con- 
ference championship. ' 

The Panthers also were in a 
four-way deadlock with 
Grambling college, Southern 
University and Florida A and 
M for the 1960 National Ne- 


s^^. 


BLADDER TROUBLE 
OF OLDER MEN 

siKh as frequent, slow or 
burning urine, loss of con- 
trol, getting up nights, make 
th«m lose sleep, constantly 
tiled, nervous, feeling old. 
back-aches, leg pains, lower 
abdomen pressure and c6n- 
stipation. 

Gat wall fcuter and at less 
eeatt with tthe natural method 
of Chbopcaetic Science supple- 
mented with the century-old 
CUa«M Herb*. No obligation 
tat consultation. 

DR. HONGLIN IPP, D. C. 
818 S. Spring St 

Manday A Friday, 11 ».m.-7 p.m. 

TvMiay A Thwrt., 1 1 a.m.-5 p.in. 

S«MMl«ys, 12 p.m.-1:30 p.m. 


"I decided to teach golf in 
my back yard and later jnay- 
be on some of the public 
courses," she answered. By 
this time we were pretty hot [g^ College title 

under the collar. 
• Thelma was once the four- 
time winner of the Negro Wo- 
men's Championship and 
many times (since she lost 
her championship) made 
statements to this writer that 
[she was "too tired to fight." 



Lakers 
Release 
New Rate^ 

The Los Angeles Lakers, 
who pioneered a student rate 
for major league basketball 
earlier this season, have an- 
nounced a serviceman'* rate 
for all their remaining home 
games «t the Sports Ar^na. 
I All servicemen in uniform 
will be able to buy seats for 
$1. and they can sit in the reg- 
ular $2 reserved section. 

Dec. 1?, Monday, 8J0i p.m., 
St. Louis. Arena. 

Dec. 14. Wednesday, g:JO p.m.. 
St. Louis, Arena. 

Jan. 3. Tueaday, 8:3o pm.. Boa- 
ton. Arena. 

.Ian. 5. Thunday,- 8:30 p.m., Bt. 
Louis, Arena. 

Jan. 6. »lday. »:30 p.m.. St. 
Louis. Arena. 

Jan. 10. Tuesday, 8:)0 p.m. 
York. Arena. 

Jan. 11. Wednesday, 8:3p 
New York, Arena. 

Jan. 14. Saturday. 11:00 
Cincinnati. Arena: TV. 

Jan. 15. .Sunday, 8:30 p.m. 
clnnall. Arena. 

Jan. 24. Tuesday, 8:30 p.m. 
acme. Arena. 

Jan. 25. Wednesday. 8:3« 
.'5.\ raruse. Arena. 

Jan. 29. Sunday, 2:30 p.iB 
irolt. Arena [ 

Jan. :«). .Monday. 8:30 p.m.. De- 
troit. Arona. 1 

Fell. 8. \Vp<1ne»day. S:3<l p.m.. 
St. I-ouis. Arena . 

Frl>. O. ThBrsda.v. 8:30 pm.. Si. 
Loui". .Xrona. 

Feb I'J. UVdneaday, 8:30 P.m.. 
Boston. ArrnH 

I Fab. 26. Sunday. 2;30 pm... Phil- 
adelphia. Arpna. 

Feb. IT. .Monday. 8:30 p.m.. 
Philadelphia. AYena. 

March 11. Saturday. 11:00 a.m.. 
Cincinnati. Arena; TV. j 

March 12. .Sunday, 2:3(1 p.m.. 
Qnclnnatl. Arena. | 


, New 

a.ra., 
. Cln- 
. Syr- 

p.m., 
.. De- 


Wilmi Bndolph 
Slated to Rim' 
Bt Sports Arena 

Willowy Wilma Rudolph, 
the super star of the 1960 
Olympiad who won three gold 
medals, will make he/ first 
competitive appearance in the 
United States since her Rome 
conquests in the second an- 
nual Los Angeles Ijivitational 
indoor track and field, meet at 
the Sports ^Arena Saturday 
evening, Jan? 21. 

This surprise entry was dis- 
closed by meet director Her- 
schel Smith, who announced 
that he secured the entry of 
America'! No- 1 track and 
field personality. 

The pretty sprinting star 
will be accompanied by her 
Olympic and college coach. Ed 
Temple, of Tennessee State. 

"Skeeter" Rudolph person- 
ally was responsible for the 
greatest American women's 
track showing since 1932, the 
Babe Didrikson era. She es- 
tabl^hed an Olympic record 
In ^ach event in which she 
competed. 

Olympic Champion Otis 
Davis, who rocketed to a, fan-' 
tastic world record of 44.9 to 
win the 400 meters at Rome, 
also announced he would com- 
pete in the second annual Los 
Angeles Invitational Indoor 
track meet at the. Sports 
Arena. 

Davis is the fourth entrj' — 
and the fourth gold medal 
holder — to enter the meet. 


Prairie View's only defeat 
of the season was to Gramb- ' 
ling. I 


SICSFD — Hank Aaron 
sii/ned his 1961 contract with . 
Milwaukee. The 2()-yenr- 
old ccnlerfielder played l.>3 
games last season, batting 
126 runs and slamming 
home runs for a .292 avcr- 
at)c. 


'in 

fo 


"I have not been active in ' 
Vernoncrest (all Negro) or! 
Rancho (all wiWte club which t 
the city had to threaten with 
loss of time if thev did not ac- 


Santa Anita 


Huskies Basketball Team 
Enter Two Cage Tourneys 



It IS a known fact that the' . ™. , .u ■ . ■% M ■ 

„,t!^; • ..11 U-. •• --J cept Thelma) since the inte- ; BJ ^^-^^ Ml^kd^A 

WPGA IS lily white and, ^^. . ,,,... u N^f*0 IwlOaY 

.., ,- 1- J * — 1 .u,..Ki"ation of golf clubs, she ex- iEfltC l*adSft 

will be harder to crack than I*. . . * .mm^m^r^^ m a^^^^« 

Men's PGA. Sifford, Spiller 
and many others have at- 
tempted for the past 10 years 


Now Method! 

^ DU. 8-7048 

Urinary, Personal PreWems 
Olands and All Clini<ai 
Matters. Yewn« Doctor 
bmtft Unusval Cas«« 

RESULTS! 

* (Cenaaltatlen Confidential) 


to become members of the 
latter organization and the 
most they have accomplished 
is that Sifford has been given 
a "player's card" (no< a mem- 
bership). ' 
When we brought these 
facts to Thelma's attention 
she said. "I feel that the 
fight Ls over since the Atty. 
Genera! has decided to help 
fight PGA." 

"But." we reminded her, 
"didn't you know that repre- 
sentatives of the California 
Eagle, Bill Spiller and the 
Western Avenue Women's 
club brought this situation 
to the attention of the attorney 
general, met with him and 
mapped out these plans?" We 
also- reminded Thelma that 
when the Western Avenue 
Women left the Vemondale 
l(all Negro golf club) to fight 
for integration in the all 
white municipal golf clubs, 
I she refused to go along. Thel- 
[ma explained that the reason 
I she refused was because to 
[fight for integration ruined 
I your ability to score and at 
ithat time she was the Negro 
champion. 


Set Dec. 26 


gration of golf clubs." she ex 
[plained. 

Let us make it cr>-stal clear 
for the records, Thelma is NOT 
a Negro female professional 

and cannot become a "pro* j Beautiful Santa Anita Park 
fessional" until she applies to! has scheduled a half-hour 
the WPGA in Florida and is] earlier start than usual for 
accepted. (Can't you just see i Its banner opening oq the 
the Florida white women pro- j holiday Monday, Dec. 26^ to 
fessionals accepting ANY ONEi u.sher^in its 'Traditions of the 
OF COLOR without the Su- 1 Turf"' winter "racing season 


5.5 days 


that will extend 
through Mar. 11. 

The gates will open at 10:30 
a. m. and starting the first 
of eight races will begin .at 
12:.'}0 p. m. Featuring the 
traditional .sprint^ the $20,000 

is ex- 
prove 
Betsy particularly attractive. 

I The many thou.sands of vis- 


int-^t 
landi 


AUTOMATIC TRANSiMISSIONS 

ADJUSTED - REPAIRED - EXCHANGED 

$7050 



79' 


And Up A Exchange 

freTToan car-no money down 

A/se Compfoto Motor Qvorhoul 

SAM'S AUTO SERVICE 

3635 S NORMANDIE AVE. OPEN SUNDAY 


preme Court, attorney general. 
NAACP National Legal^ Re- 
dress Committee and our new 
President John Kennedy beg- 
ging, pleading and suing. 

Presently the only women 
golf pros are ALL WHITE. 

Here are a few names — Loijise Palos Verdes Handicap 
Suggs, Mickey Wright. Patty j pected, as always, to 
Berg, Wiffi Smith 
Rawls. 

A few others who shoot in itors here for the Pa.<M»dena 
the consistent 70's are: Betty i Tournament of Roses and the 
Jameson. Fay Crocker. Mar- 1 football game, as well as local 
lene Bower Hagg (and horjrace goers, will have an op- 
sister) Jackie Pung and many I portunity to see at the regu- 
others. We hope to LIVE to lar 1 p. m. post time the 
see the day when some young $25,000 Breeders' Trial Stakes 
Negro girl will play golf well j on Friday, Dec. 30, and the 
enough and then FIGHT hard double bill of the $25,000 Mal- 
enough to become the first ! ibu Stakes and $20,000 Las 
Negro womefi's golf profes- ' Flores Handicap on the fol- 
sional. [lowing Saturday. 

I The New Year holiday rac- 

I iM^iiAiMk IImmaIimi '"^ offering on Monday. Jan. 
LipSCOmD - ilOineillli ^2. will be the $25,000 San Gab- 
Big D3ddv Lipscamb of the riel 'Cap on the spectacular 
Baltimore Colts and Leo No- hillside-infield grass cpurse. 
melini of the San Francisco 
49ers are scheduled to meet in 
a wrestling match some time 
in January. 


After playing eight games 
in eleven days the East Los 
Angeles College basketball 
team was beginning toj work 
as a unit. Coach Dave "Taylor 
planned no rest for hi-S busy 
charges , as he entered ELA 
in holiday toumjimenlts at 
Chaffey College and Glejidale. 

This week the Huskie^ were 
at Chaffey where they [faced 
San Bernardino on Wednes- 
day, and were to meet Either 
Orange Coast or Glendalle on 
Thursdav 


off their record at four and 
four. After losing the opening 
three. ELA recovered to whip 
Citrus, Trade Tech, Pasadena, 
and Chaffey while losing an 
overtime match to Cerritos'. 

The starting five has shaken 
djAn to include Louis Hood 
aid Felix Patterson at for 
wards, Allan Shapiro at 
cinter, Charles Battery* and 
Claries Kennedy at guards. 
Tne Green and White rec- 
ord tnight have been better 
but for Hood and Battey who 


Aa Idea 

The new. Los Angeles Angels of the American Li^ague 
with GeneraL Manager Fred Haney. President Bob Reynods 
and Board Chairman Gene Autry certainly have an Excel- 
lent opportvmity to capture the fancy of the Negro baseball 
fans by naming Emmett Ashford, the only Negro umpire in 
Triple-A baseball, to the staff of American League Umpires. 
Ashford is ranked as one of three best arbiters in the Pacific 
Coast League. Negro fans are big supporters of baseball and 
since the National League is way a^iead of the American 
League in the number of Negro players.it would certainly 
be wise if the local franchise holders stepped in, named: Ash- 
ford to the staff and assure thern»elves a warm welcome on 
opening day at Wrigley Field. i ' 

When Sanford (Sandy) Stephens, shows up in PasAdena 
Jan. 1 with the University of Minnesota to play W^hi^gfon* 
he will become the first Negro quarterback in the history of 
the Rose Bowl. The 6 foot junior from Uiuontown, Pa.; who 
weighs 215 pounds rolled up 164 yards net In 57 ruiiining 
plays and completed 20 of 52 passes for 305 yards and wits 
responsible for 11 touchdowns scoring nine himself and pass- 
ing for two more. He is also the team's regular puntef. His 
55 kicks totaled 1.946 j'ards for a 35.3 average. He retikmed 
16 punts for 111 yards and nine kickoffs for 230 yards. • 

Stephens, a political science student, also interoepted 
three pa.sses and returned them for 74 yards in the cljosihg 
victory over Wisconsin, a victory that moved Minnesota|back 
into the No. 1 position in the national polls and earneid th^ 
Gophers a ticket in the Arroyo Seco classic. ^ 

In addition to Stephens, the Gophers boast a sophomore 
tackle in Bobby Lee Bell rated ^s one of Minnesota's all- 
time finest; Bill Munsey, a 196* pound 511 sophomore half- 
back who carried, the ball 51 times for a gain of 225 yaijds or 
4.4 yards per carry, and 20- year-old Judge Allen DicksoiJ, the 
team^s punting specialist, who also had the second best per- 
play ground gaining record on the Big Ten team. He made 
W2 yards in 31 tries and was never thrown for a loss. 


.* 


(.- 


Buck Shqw to 

. Lawrence T. "Buck" Shaw, 
who has coached the Phila- 
delphia Eagles to their first 
Eastern Conference champion- 
ship since 1949, this week 
was named to direct the East 
squad in the llth annual AII- 
Star Pro Bowl garne Jan. 15 
at the Los Angeles Coliseum. 
Announcement was '; made 
by Paul J. SchisSler. manag- 
ing director of the charity 
grid classic, that annually 
pits the aH stars of the East- 


Coach East 

I etn conference of the ■ NFL 

I against the elite of the We«t- 

[ern conference. The West 

I holds a 6.^ edge, in trie 10 

! games played. ! 

I The Jan. 15 game will hiiark 

I the third time that Shaw, 

I football's 'famed Silver I Fox,.. 

has coached a Pro Bowl team. 

iLast January, his Eaistern 

squad lost to the West, ^-21, 

and in 1955, when hej was 

coaching the San Fraiicisco 

49ers, he directed the West 

to a 26-19 victory. I 


Between tournaments East "^^"^'^ ^° »"«* /""' K*""^* 
L. A. will go up again.<H ,he i f«»P^>^'«'>- Only against 


use Frosh at a 
the Loyola U. gym. This game 
is set for Frldaj', Decerpbcf- 
23. at 6:C5 p. m. •- .. j 

On the day aftfr- 0uiat-" 
mas the Huskies move over to 
Glendale College where they 
open the Sam Bany tojurna- 
ment against EI Caminp. On 
Tuesday. Dec. 27. at GleUdale 
it will be either L.A.CC. or 
Harbor as the Huskii^ op- 
ponent 

Next ELA home game! Is at 
B/lvedere Junior high on Fri 
Jan. 6, with top rated 


neutrnl site {Trade Tech and Chaffey were 
neutral '"ie.,jj^^ Huskies at full strength. 

Felix Patterson leads all 
ELA scorers with 127, closely 
followed by Chuck Kennedy 
with 126. Both have a respect- 
able 16 point average. Battey 
and Hood are right behind 
with 15 point averages dur- 
ing their brief appearances. 


DvAM DAiMt M^Ifav n^akers at the midway mark. 

riep r Qllll niAKei | After five league, Levin 

Richard' Levin of Hamilton, had 132 points for a 26.4, 

High, a forward on the i irverage. Williams of Manual 

school's basketball team, isJArts is fourth with 106| and 

well ahead of the other top 1 21.2 average. S ' ^ i 


B^lvt 
day, 


Conference game. 

It has taken Coach Ti 


Stokes May Recover 

Maurice Stokes. Cincinnati 
Royals basketball player who 
was stricken with a brain ail- 
ment three vears ago. may 
Long Beach in a Metropjlitan : walk out of the hospital four 


; years from now, 
ylor's j to Jack Tw>'man, 


Huskies eight games to level 'guardian. 


according 
his legal 




f-v- 

& PHONO 
REPAIRING 


a4llJHaLes &C JHoJels 


Reasenabio Prices 
Guaranteed Workmanship 

AVENUE TV & RADIO 

4957 So. Central 

AD. 4-0970 

JAMES HUMPHREY 
Proprietor 



« CALIENTE « 

IN OlD MEXICO ^ 
orrias iviry sati a sun. 

RAIN OR SMINt 

^ THOROUGHBRED 



DONT CUSS - CAU USi DON'T CUSS - CALL USl 


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24-HOUR EMERGENCY 
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Special Rates for 
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AX. 4-9917 
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^ In January ^ 

49or iVERY SATURDAY 
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STARTS NEXT MONDAY - thrillin£ thoroughbred rMJn( In Sant* Anita'l 
world-famous setting of beauty and tradition. You will tnjoy every luxury 
and convenience while you set- the nation's greatest horses and jockeys 
in action. Attend Santa Anita often during the 55-day meeting. Post time 
is 12:30 p.ni. opening day (gates open 10:30 a.m.) - other days 1 A) pjn. 
(gates open 11:00 a.m.)- Reach Santa Anita by auto, Tanner or MTA bM 



;t-^ -' 


THE PALOS VERDES handicap (S20,000-added) on opening day start* 'i 
season-long parade of events (^3,365,000 in stakes and purses) includii^ 
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beautiful appointments, exquisite gardens, and courteous service from' 
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CURRENT 
ANNUAL RATE 
PAID QUARTERLY 



BROADWAY 

PBDKIIAL. SAVINGS 

and Lo^n Association 

45th and Broadway • ADams 2-42n 


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ORDER RESERVED SEATS now by mail for any diy of the 1960^1 meeting.' 
Dec. 26 through Mar. 11. Send check or money order for S1.30 each. AHow 
four days for return of tickets. Thousands of reserved seats are placed oh 1 
sale every racing day at Santa Anita Park. No phone reservations pleanl 
You pay admission charges (Grandstand or €li^ House) at the entrance" 
gates. Plan your days with family and friends at beautiful Santa' AnitaJ 


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Murray 1-7401 or Hlllcrest 7-2171 

More than a quarter-century of winter thoroughbred racinjg; 
featuring regular track and the cxclushw hillside grass cours4 




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Tlitmdty, D#c«rnber 22, I960' The California Eagle— 13 


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♦«%■"■>*■&'" "'fc.:^ y ^2(^ *5t*^ ^"^^^st ''■^t "« 





■ HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS— Jackie ITihon, famous for 
"Lonely Teardrops, I'll Be Satisfied and Alone at Last," 
heads Alan Freed's (liganjic S day Christmas Rock and Roll 
'stnge show at the United Artist Theatre. 9th and Bro/id- 
uay, doii>ntou'n. Five biff stage shou's daily nitk a special 
midnight shmv.nn Nnv Year's eve. Make it.'!!! 


People & Places 


jrailLDING — That club chair- 
man who spread the word 
around 'that certain members 
made off with six grand of 
the building fund has been 
voted the year's biggest prac- 
tical joker. They say she is 
mad because she wasn't elect- 
ed president to take charge of 
the funds I 

ILOWOUT — Wilton Place 
Demos had a big election at 
hrnd when one of the mem- 
bers attempted to stack the 


meet for the presidents seat 
He and his friends » found 
themselves a hornet's nest, 
.^fter the stings, a sensible 
election followed I 
VICE SQUADS— Nobody's talk- 
about the incident involving 
two vice officers and a high- 
way patrolman but they would 
have if they had been sons of 
Ham. But regardless of who 
they were it was handled in a 
pretty sloppy manner, espe- 
(Continued on Page 15) 



'Sassy' Joins 
Heri Monday 
On Channel 11 

The or Wood chop per'. 
Woody Herman, with his 
great entertaining unit, and 
songstress Sarah Vaughan. in- 
ternationally known as 'The 
Divine One." will he featured 
on KTTVs "Great Music From 
Chicago" special jazz concert, 
Monday. January 2, 9 p.m., 
Channel Eleven. 

Assisting artists will be 
Chicago vocalist Frank 
D'Rone, Nat "King"' Cole's 
protege, and the Ray Bryant 
quintet of "Madjson" and 
"Little Susie" recording fam*. 

"Great Music's" i«zz concert 
will include the following se- 
lections: ■ 

Muskrat Ramble, played by 
Woody Herman's Orchestra. 

Misty and Linger Awhile, 
sung bv Sarah Vaughan. 

Ray Bryant Trio. 

I Could Write a Book, sung 
by Frank D Rone. 

Woody Herman. 1940- "60. by 
Woody Herman and the Or- 
chestra. 

Summertime, sung by Sarah 
Vaughan. 

How High the Moon, .«ung 
by Sarah Vaughan. 

Jam Session, including 
Woodv Herman, the Orches- 
tra. Sarah Vaughan, Frank 
D'Rone and the Ray Bryant, 
Trio. 

Most VervatiU 

Herman is one of the most 
versatile bandleaders in the 
busines,"?. He doubles on clari- 
net and alto saxaphone, sings 
novelty and ballad numbers, 
j emcees a show and can. when 
I he wants to, execute a fancy 
bit of hpofing. 

His latest band has been 
voted tops in the country by 
the readers of Metronome 
magazine, is hailed by Time, 
Parade and other magazines 
as "the band that brought 
back dancing." 

Slngaational Sarah 

Dipping her lush voice into 
the heart of a melody and 
freeing a choice galaxy of 
notes. Sarah Vaughan leisure- 
ly colore, shapes and releases 
them in scintillating designs 
X6 present a kaleidoscope of 
(Continued <Sn Page 141 



•K' ' "■"■ 


■'■■'. i.y 


VIRGIN ISLAND STEEL BAND— Sets neu' attendance records at the INSOMNI AG 
— Afro-Cuban coffee house presenting all the excitement and suspense of the limho dance 
and uith the dnncino ^f Princess Gloria. Cr rat rnUrtairimrnt at Hrrmosa Beach. Be there! 


_i 




The Edward Fishers' Xmas cards are rather 
unique. The expectant parents sign 'em Eddie, LiU 
and (?) Fisher. . . .Dapper Al Vigal trained in last 
week from Gotham. Says he will sojourn here for the.*.- 
winter. . . . Says although this is a rest period, donft \ 

exclude him from your guest ® ' - 

lists. He can make the scene! 



. . Mari« Brroafi pretty 

^daughter Julie and her steady 
beau motored to Nevada and 
tied the knot! . . . We ordered 
several of the cards bearing 
the inscription: You've feeen 
Very Good, So Don't Expect 
Any Presents! . . . Like the 
John Mathis boy says in the 
song: When we're all alone by 
an unlisted phone, where no 
chaperone can get oar num- 
ber. Then, let's misbehave! 


Biggest Break ! 

Theater scribe Den Broiia 
has fixed up real posh quajr- 
ters in his far west diggings 
for world weary newspapier 
folks to be entertained. Dtjat 
has one room devoted to Aiti- 
can art and also a "beatnik" 
n-om in his showplace. Like, 
dad, we're real proud to be in- 
cluded in Jihe exclusive mem- 
bership. . . . Actor Noomdn 
Brown worked at Columbia 
last week essaying the role ai 
(Continued on Page 14) 



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Recommendations for Dining, Wining and the Best of Entertainment 



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Nitely except Tuesdays at 
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FROM ^LL OF US TO EACH OF YOU' 
VISIT AND ENJOY . . . 

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ENTERTAINMENT 

And Atmesphoro Boyend Cemparel 
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TODAYII - SEE and ENJOY 

FANTABULdUS STYLE SHOWS 

PUploying — ^-^i^— ^— 


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Konny Donnic — Drums 

Buddy Woodson — Bass 

Vivian Foars — Piano 


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W* Novo tif Bmtt Food in Town bf Chof Ofedyjt 
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■ ..■tL:_ 


-■>-.J- 


M-.The CafrfomU Eagle Th'ursd 


SBOrBlZ 


■y MAGGIE HATBAWAT 

Ctoie with me to dine with 
Sanuny Davis Sr. and his in- 
^erestinjr family. Thousands of 
tfrti?les have been written 
Ipbout Sammy Davis Jr. "the 
greatest showman on earth " 
|>ut this will be the first ex- 
clusive article ever written on 
the proud father and his fam- 
ly. 

i When the family invited us 
UP for dinner Sammy simply 
»aid, "Come west on Sunset, 
turn right at the Beverly Hills 
Hotel and just wind up to the 
top of the mountain." We did 
Exactly what he said and got 
lost We finally went back 
flown the canyon, flagged a 
tob and asked, "Do you know 
?vhere the Sammy Davise 


December 22, 1960 I ■■ gl f^ I 

Like the Cool . 
Yule of Happy 


:-;FM Happenings 


arrived — an hour late — we 
were admitted into the beauti"^- 
ful $75,000 mansion by Sirs. 
Rita Davis. Mrs. Davis is 
petite, doll-size bundle of end- 
less energy. Sammy Sr. affec-| Pete Rugolo. whose birthday! 
tionately calls her "Pee Wee." I falls on Christmas, will be 
She introduced us to Sandra, ' Leonard Feather's expert 
their beautiful 20 year old | guest on "The Blindfold Test" 
daughter. Their little 7 year old over KNOB-FM (98) at 9 a.m. 
daughter, Suzette, introduced Sunday. 

saT-I-m^l^.^'Li" T '^'k'H' ^"eoIO is a composer and 
fw'rthrvnn?^'i-^"** ''^'*i'^°"d"<^'o'- «"d currently is 

H<. S^l T^ ^T ""• ""^Ki!" " '""Sic director of the "ThrHler" 
cle Sammy Davis Jr. was born ; ^^ 

on Dec. 8 and my daddy Sam- ' 


my Sr. was born on Dec. 12, 
what do you think of that?" 
Before we could answer her 
mother announced that dinner 
■ as and had been ready. 
Mrs. '^Pee Wee" Davis served 


Jive. Oh yes, he knew the; baked turkey. Hawaiian roast 
pavises, they are the only Ne- pig (with apple in his mouth) 
|n> family presently living in and every known vegetable. 
Beverly Hills. When we finally | (Continued on Page 16) 


i HUNTINGTON HARTFORD THEATRE 

I NOW PLAYING! Final perfs. Jan. 7 

I S«TS MOW: Bw OHics, Mutual Agencies & S. Cal. Mioic Co., 737 S. Hiil 

\ Mail Orders Accepted 



series. 

Feather will play various 
unidentified Christmas . jazz 
recordings. The guest will un- 
dertake to identify the artists 
and comment on the perform- 
ances. This will be among the 
shows taped for publicttion in 
Down Beat, where Ft ther's 
"Blindfold Test" has been a' 
regular feature since 1951. 

Howard Lucraft will pre-j 
sent jazz from Sweden for 
Christmas Day on Jazz Inter- 1 
national over KNOB-FM (98>' 
at 7 p.m. . 

Principal performer will be 
Arne Domerus in articulate 
sa.xophone .«!tyling.s with the 
fanta.stic big band of Harry 
Arnold. 

Lucraft's exrlusixe Music 
N'ew.s .spot will be included 
with late.st Holl>-wood record 
ings and happenings, plus 
comments on recent films. 



|.,, y- i.'f..<i,i ■*--rT-j-i|fr-frc., , ■ fi ■> fffff|i-r. 




Success 


S0UNDTRA(!K| 

(Continued from Page 13) (Billy says he pl«ns to co-pr©. 
a convict in "Birdman Of Al-jduce the movie and also a^* 
fatraz." He's being called ! pear in it. .. . . | 

"One Take" Brown bv the dir 


•^ I 


ectors cause Nacunoa finds 

o \t what they want and let's 

•em have it jusi that way. No 

Otto Premingers production:'"*'^*'*^*' • • • Beniia Hamilton, 

Frank Sinatra and another ac- 


YV LEI IDE ACTIOy — Smilry. the world's most eA- 

tnted purfio'se, Inunchrs thr Yiilr sf/i'son at ^larhirlnnd Jof 
thf Pfiiihr hy tifif>in^ tkrouqh a Chrt^tn\as urtalh. 'I'rfftt 
your lnr::ly to a holidny tit Marinrland. just mintilfs atriay 


P/iiJ Gordon Makes tlie- 


NEW YORK SCENE 


Cool Happenings 

Well, this week my 
StcT* Gonzeles and I 


bo> 
have 


'completely, so you 


the 
7.8 


a raism in the sun 


o new ploy by LORRAINE HANSBERRY with 

DOUGLAS TURNER ■ DIANA SANDS 

directed by LLOYD RICHARDS 

EVfNINGS: MONDAY (Mctpt opening) thru THUISOAY — »:J0 tM. 

Orch. $4.85; Mm. S4.S5, 4 30, Bolcony S3.75. 3.20, J.4S 
fVENINCS; OPENING, ftlOAT AND SATUtOAY— 1:30 r.M. 

Orch. $5.95; Men. $5.95, 5.40; Sokon- $4.30, 3 75, 3.20' 
**AnN«$; WEDN£$OAY AND $ATU«DAY— 230 f.M. 

Orch. $4.30: Men. $4 30, 3.75: Bal<ony $3 20, 2.45, 2.10 
niCES FOI NEW YEAr$ EVE ONIY — «:30 P.M. 

Orch. $7.05; Mezz. i7^.QiS. 5.95, Bolcony $4.»5, 4.30, 3.75 
(Tox included in ofl lilted prices) 
Pteoje encleie Hamped, oddretsed envelope for moil orderi. 


'Sassy' on TV 

(Continued from Page 13) . 
musical imagery. 

And she will do just that 
during KTTV's "Great Music 
From Chicago's jazz concert, 
Monday. January 2, 9 p.m„ 
Channel Eleven. 

"Sa.ssy." as she i.-! known 
; affectionately to her count- 
less fans all -over the world, 

I began her musical education nhp delicious prime 
at^the age of seven. Today jan^ the .show was 
.<;he is an accomlpi.<hed plan-'hv the sparkling dance and 
ist and organist. '^.'ng routines of Norma Miller 

•and her Four Flash Dancers, 

S a b r 1 n a 

and her partner in .<iong, come- 

jdi^n. Jack Wakefield, and a 


I Yuletide Portiei 

Monday night at Branker's 
.Melod\' Room,' we will enjov 
been curtailed. However, not the ."ird Annual C'-ristmas Par- 
should ,y give\n by Mr. and Mrs 


of "Exodus" had its Los An- 
geles nrcmiere last night at 
the' Fox Wilshire Theatre, 
where it will be shown e.\- 
ckisively on a reserve seat 
basi.s. 

Policy will be one perform 
ance each evening, with 
matinees on Wednesday. Sat- 
urday and Sunday. Daily 
matinees will beheld during 
Christmas week only. Seats 
. e now available by mail 
order and at the theatre box 
office. 

Stellar Cost 
Based on the runaway best- 
seller by Leon Uris, "Exodus" 
features an international cast 
of stars headed by Paul New- 
|man. Eva Marie Saint, Ralph 
iRichard.son. Peter Lawford. 
iLee J. Cobb. Sal Mineo. John 
I Derek. Hugh Griffith, Gregory 
Ratoff. Feli.x Aylmer, David 
Opatoshu and Jill Haworth, 

"Exodus'' was pronuced and 
directed by Preniinger in Tech- 
nicolor and the new Pana- 
vision 70 process entirely on 
location in Israel and Cyprus. 
It has already recorded the 
largest advance in motion pic- 
ture' history, j 


•tor were sweating it out last 

week in an isolated cell for a .4.1. ™^,.i^» i« *■»..» *i%M 

Devil At Four :"!i?'it '^.PT'"^ '* ^ 


In reply to several, (at least 
two) inquiries in reference io- 
the caricature created foe thjB 
column bj' artist Col Ball«f 
and as to "what are we trying 
to prove with it," let it go sifi ' 
record that the only thing wje 


s'-;uence in 
O'clock." This flick is Bernie'fi 
biggest break to date, so'm 
told. . . . Billy Eckstine has 
purchased the film rights to a 
new novel called 'The Scene." 


artist and the subject bo<h,:, 
have a sense of humor, ana ' 
apparently a krt <rf people 
don't "rte drawing <rf th^ 

(Continued on Page 15) 


P My Yuletide Message 

£| ".MERRY CHRISTMAS," "HAPPY NEW YEAR" 
ARE THE EMPTY WORDS WE HEAR; 
IN A WORLD OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS, 
H.VFRED, HUNGER, STRESS AND FEAR. 

"PEACE AND GOOD WILL"; STILL ARE . 

STRANGERS, 
out; TO LEADERS WHO ARE BLIND; 
TO THE GOOD. OF BROTHERHOOD 
AND THE NEEDS OF ALL "MANKIND. 

OH. IF THIS VILETIDE.COULD BRING US 
I NIVERSI TV UNITV, 

EREEDONL TRUTH AND EQUAL JUSTICE; 
^VHAT A HEANEN EARTH WOULD BE! 

—ANDY RAZAF 


/ 


know about the 17 inches of Ceorge Palmer and the Mon 

Knrwir t-h o t- fall. tr\ »t^w^ ♦W.n . ... ./ » .. . ^ 


snow that fell* to start 
week, followed' by the 
degrees of cold weather. 

Through it all, on Wednes- 
day night I attended the 16th 
.Annual Dinner-Dance of the 
International Union of Build- 
ing Service Employees, at The 
Boulevard in Queens, enjoye'd 


SANDY SANFOHD — Toast,. 

ma.ster and bartender deluxe'"^^ sexpot-bosomy 

at Marty's Lounge on Broad- 


day NigHt Camp Fund com- 
mitte^and friends. This after- 
noon, toys will be distributed 
at United >Iutual Life Insur- 
a. ce Company's Chri.stWias 
Party For Children. 

.\11 that's left now is last- 
miniilih shopping, trimming 
the Christmas tree anc av<fait- 

,. ... . , ing .'^anta Claus on Sunday. 

jf * , Then we'll all ball for a week 

or so as the parties affd fun 
i-ontiniip throughout the lioli- 
day.s. HO ... HO ... HO . 
Have a.\cr\' Merrv Cliristma 


ribs. etc. 


long Lie' 
Cast Set 
For Play 

After overcoming a difficult 
opening weekend when three 
of the leading members of the 
cast were injured in an auto- 
mobile accident, the presenta- 
tion of Samuel A. Bo>ea's new- 
play. "A L,ie Is A Century 
-.Long'' inters the second week 
s. of its lim'iied run at the ^ev- 


f 
{ 
f 
i 

I 

f 

c 


"May your hearts 

* he filled uith joy, 

may you e^n'joy a nonderjul 
fteu- year of Peace 
and happiness" • 

Raymond Burr 


a^^M^»»^>»»*^l*-^^^^ »*»*» * ^ >ii^ '^ lli^ * * * * * * 


way was surprised 

with a swinging 

1 1 awtee Sunday e\e! 


bv wifie 


birthday 


ivENT OF THE YEAR 

"^* (EXCLUSIVE lOS RNCELES ENGAGEMENT) 

SUNDRY EVENING JAN. 1st 

8 P.M. TO 2 A.M. 



Ht 


t^'-4^- 


HAL ZEIGER presents 

THE MOST CREATIVE 
MUSICAL GIANT OF 
THIS GENERATION! 


•^;. 





PLAYING HIS HIT RECORDS 

^GEORGIA ON MY MIND' ' 2 
'RUBY' • *HARD HEARTED HANNAH' 
*COME RAIN OR COME SHINE' • 'WHAT'D i SAY' 
. / "THE GENIUS OF RAY CHARLES' 


. : hj-pnotist. 

Charming Elaine Daniel, 
I Suson and Don and others of 
I the gang from Local 32B's 
'Health Center, all contributed 
{greatly to a most pleasant 
'evening. > 

I Show Times 

i On Thursday, with Steve do- 
ing the chauffeur honors, we 
went to The Apollo to s»»e the 
Louis Jordan Sbow. which was 
swinging, 'with outstanding 
'song styling by Betty Roche, 
; funny bits by Clay Tysoa. the 
[curly-headed .youn.o; Mr. U.S. 
j Bonds, the Cashmeres and last. 
j out by no means least, Mr, 
Jordan and his inimitable 
; novelty songs, alto sa.\ solos. 
Uhc Tjmpany Five, and a line 
o' very healthy chorus girls. 
I The Jordanettes, This week its 
a religion show, headlined by 
jProf. Alex Bradford, «nd start 
ing tomorrow through the 
iChri.stmas Holidays, it will be 
\ Jocko and his Rockeuhip Re- 
' vue. 

I Ruth Coleman Visits 

I •\oung -Miss Ruth Coleman, 

i< aughter of Dr. and Mrs. 

i Arthur H. Coleman of .San 

Franci.sco, trained into New 

jYork from the Emma ^Villard 

School in Troy, a. id after 

! spending the day siglitseeing 

.with DoDo, \vp took her to 

Idlewild to catch her .jet for 

home and farrtfcly for the holi- 

' da>s. 

i Cordon Plays Santa 

I La.st Sunday, I played Santa 
I Claus iwith costurne. beard et 
all as The Yulctiders. Inc. pre- 
I sented "Toyland ' at the Dawn 
Casino, and everyone . attend- 
ing brought a toy for distribu- 
tion to needy children for 
Christmas and the girls of the 
club for granting me this 
privilege. 


and I'll be .seeing you again 'erlv Hills Playhouse. 2541 
before the New Year. Okay?|soulh Roben.son Boulevard.' 
Swell . . . .And Jingle Bells to Beverly Hills. j 

you too!!!,': j 7hp production was directed | 

PHIL CORDON I fContinued on Page l.*!" i 

• • • • • iTif • • • ~* • •"• 


"BE HAPPY" 

CONTACT TONY LEASE 

MIYAKO TRAVEL MA. S-3060 



€ 


V A 


it" i .. 


;•'* 


i: 


B:' 


* "Talk of the Town 

For votir holiday , entertainment 
the fabulous^ . . 

^ CLUB TOWN miL 

"^ ■ Presents Nitely 

^ ^ SONNY CRISS & HIS TRIO 

Stevenson, M. C. 


W SEASON'S GREETINGS 
i CREDELL'S KITCHEN 

«f DELICIOUS MEALS - CATERING TO PARTES 

^ 2122 WEST JEFFERSON, L9S ANGELES 1», CALIF. 

a Rt 4-9591 ^^ 


-il 



Vent 


(Ju*t a LHtU 
Jazz) 


^ 9527 S. Main at Golden 

^ Pl| S'2971 

•^ Plenty of Free Parking 

'^ Your Hosts 

\ Hugh Lovel . .,. Doug Stone 

• • '• • • • • • • * • • • .-A- 


C 
I 
f 
f 

f 

f 

e 


MR. FAT BURGER 



Gonrtnient Locations 


2601 S. 
9101 S. 


CENTRAL AVEJ 
CEHTRAL AVE; 


I 




m F 


. K -1 


vt 


, V- 

' .(I 

tf 


•i* 

■i i - 

:4 

■■i 

. -I' 


,1 


(If 


;;^^4/EARLB0STIC 


^> 


n 


vm^ 


S»l6\Hfi 




<*\ 


And His Fomous Orchestra 


HOLLYWOOD 

ALLADIUM 

6215 Sunset Blvd. -HO 9-7356 


ADVANCE SALE 
TICKETS AT 

ALL MUSIC CITY STORES • HOTEL WATKINS • PALLADIUM 

FLASH RECORDS fJmff^rson at Wester 
^Oft TABLE ReSERVATIONS CALL Hollywood ^-61 51 


FJ\r.iinLOi's —Tcr. 

ry (Hhb.t Quartet is Sft to 
open at J'lif Suinrnit on Fri- 
day, Dcccntbcr 23. for a ten- 
day engaqcntent. Jointng the 
Quartet to provide a real 
su'ingtng holiday sea/on at 
The Summit will he the 
Stan Kenton All-Stars on 
December 23. 24 ..30 and 31. 


SCRIBE 

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# AX 5-3135 • 

SCRIBE 

$4 PER YEAR $2.50 SIX MONTHS 

CLIP ANB MAIL TO: CALIFORNIA EAGLE NEWSPAPER 
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D NEW SUBSCRIPTION Q CHECK 

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CITY: 


!••••••*' 


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r 


t' 


J. ,B. FINNEY PONTIAG. 

CREDIT REPAIR - BUDGET TERMS 

NO MONEY DOWN | 

8141 S. VERMONT AVE. PL. 2-3721 








■I - ; F • 


. I 


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i ■ ' I- 


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LIMBO DAIVCING with 

VIRGIN ISLAND STREL BAND 


s;^- 


THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY- OPEN 24 HOURS 


SWINGING FOLK MUSIC - TUESDAY, WiD^fESDAY CVININGS 
AND SILENT MOVIES, TOO - GALLERY - BOOK SHOP 


INSOMNIAC " """ *^'" 


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AX. 5-3135 •CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


^^EADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.II|L 


s 'I 


'People & P laces 


j: 


LEGAL NOTICES 


(Continued from Page 13) 

'daily, when you think of the 

years they have been on the 

job, their families and their 

repatations. 

SHRINEHS — The entertain- 
ment committee which in- 
cludes Tommy Tucker and 
Walter Goodlow were out lin- 
ing up four bracket stars for. 
the annual show coming up 
soon! 

ESSIE BENSON — Fast devel- 
oping into One of the south- 
land's finest real estate sales- 
ladies, she will soon put in for 
her broker's license. She op- 
erates out of Herman Bailey's 
W. Adams office! 
NUMBERS— The inside behind 
the ,big crack-down on the 


\^ 36952 

NOTICE OF THE SALE OF 

REAL PROPERTY AT 

PRIVATE SALE 

No. 409424 

I „»c CK» ^^^A !».,. «^ fv,« In the Superior Court of the 

gered because bankers have h^as. ane soia L«na on tne y;^J^,g „( California, in and for th* 

idea! " ' ' 


operations is that it was trig. I Lena Home show than she' 


been refusing pay-offs on big 
hits! 

RAYMOND BRUCE — KGFJ's 
public relations man and cele- 
brated disc-jokey was a panel 
member of KABC's squabble 
about whether -Rock 'n Roll 
music is good or bad. He 
tofck the negative and opened 
people's eyes to a lot of things 
which are bad for radio other 
than Rock 'n Roll. 
VALERIE TAYLOR — In pass 
ing orchids to the Pasadena 
NAACP Special Activities 
Committee, it should be noted 
that there wasn't a harder 
worker for their successful 


ISAAC PARKER — Postal em- 
ployee and a volunteer Com- 
munity Chest worker just 
turned in a check for $448 
donated 1)V J. HaTen. own*' 


SOUNDTRACK 


with. 


C^Aa^z \..^yawjord 




(Continued from Page 14) 
scribe is not a drawing, per 
Be, but a caricature. 

Masterful Storrlinc 

And caricatures are Cal's 
stock in trade, although he is 
also a fine portrait pairtier. A 
caricature, for the benefit of 
theuninitiated is a "take off" 
or an exaggeration. Cal is a 
past master at the art and 
uses a 'bold stroke' in many 
instances to get his message 
across. Whereas, in reality, we 
probably resemble a portrait 
of a mobster, Cal figured our 
readers would appreciate the 
"tongue in cheek" sketch of 
us. 

We would appredat? a line 
or two from you as to how it 
strikes you. And oi course, if 
yoi are not completely in ac- 
cord with us, we may arrange 
to have a gunslinger pay you 
a call. ... 
. A hardboiled editor who is 


Academy Names 
Redd Foxx for 
'Grammy' Award 

This has been the biggest 
vwek in the successful career 
of Redd Foxx, nationally-pop- 
jular nightclub and recording 
comedian, currently making it 
at the Red Flame, 107th and 
Vermont. Within the space of 
several days: 

1. Foxx was nominated for a 
National Academy of Re- 
cording Arts and Sciences' 
"Grammy" award for his per- 
formance on the Dooto Rec- 
ords long-play album, "The 
Best Laff": in the category 
"Comedy Performance — Spok- 
en Word." 

2. He was booked for a 
three- month tour of Japan and 
Australia, beginning in Janu- 
-ary. 

Several years before record- 
ed comedy became a hot-sell- 
er in the general industry, 
•Foxx achieved a "gold rec- 
ord," symbolic of a million- 
sale, for his "Laff of the 
Party." But, up to now, a 
"Grammy" award has eluded 
him. 

"I believe," says Dootsie 
Williams, Dooto president, 
"that Foxx has earned this 
recognition, and I expect him 
to win this year." 

Th4 Grammy Award is simi- 
lar to the "Oscar" presented 
knnually for best perform- 
ances in motion pictures and 
the "Emmy" presented for 
similar performances on tele 
vision. 


County of Los Angele-x 

In the Matter of the EaUte Ot 
A.NDEXLAR WOOD. Deceased. 

.N'otlce Is hereby given that the 
iinderilsned Executor of the Es- 
tate of Andellar Woods, deceased, 
will sell at private sale, to the 
highest bidder, upon the terms 
_ I nnd conditions hereinafter men- 

Of the Auto Photo Company tloned and suhiect to confirmation 
at "K^tA anrf Ponrpal Althmiph I '■>' 'he said Superior Court, on or 

at A6Ta ana Lentrai. Aunougn^f,^j. ,^^ ,j^ ^^^ ^^. ^^^^^^ 
M.* Harren doesn t live in our. i960, at the office ot vinre Mon- 

communitv ' he is interested!"""* Townsend. Jr., Attorney for 
corr.miinii;, lie is iniere.Meu ^^^ Kxecutor. 323 West Florence 

enough to help see that the 'Avenue, t^ltv of Los Anccleg 3. 

local area reaches iu goal. I J^"""'-): »' 'r{",w*"*>*'£?' f^^'.^l 

. . . »,_ ^- .California, all the rlRht. title and 

And guess who was the first interest of said deceased at the 
to send him a thank /oj note ".'!'« of death and aii the riRht 

^ •, T-j T> 1- II 1 title and Ineresl that the e.-sate of 

... Councilman Ed Roybai: junld deceased has acquired by 
ROBERT McFERRIN — World operation of law or otherwise 


famous' baritone with N. Y. 
Philharmonic Orchestra and 
the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany took time out from his 
busy schedule to give a 
concert for the Dorsey High 
students in their school au- 
ditorium before an SRO crowd! 
ROY GARDNER — He was a 
big spender in the Congo 
Room the other eve. He is a 
former boxing manager a«d 
handled some top boxers dur- 
ing his time! 

AL HI9BLER —'in town to 
keep a date at the Hollywood 
Palladium, also kept one at 
the Town Tavern and deli^-ht- 
ed the elbow-benders with 
songs. 

JIMMY WITHERSPOON — He 
won't go into the Birdland 
with the Count Basie Ork. In- 
stead he heads for London in 
Jan., for 21 days of concerts:! 
FLORINE RAY — Social work 
supervisor in Chicago being 
shown around to the happy 
places by Helen Wright and 
she's weeping because she 


aware that we are making the 
opening night scene for "A 
Raisin In The Sun" is insistent 
that we retuij- to the Eagle of- 
fice and knock out a review. 
Let it be said that the people 
who populated the Huntington 
Hartford stage made> every 
moment county The story line 
by Lorraine Hansberry is mas- 
terful, and the cast played 
their roles with adroitness. It 
is the best play to arrive in 
town in longer than we care 
to remember. 

Footnotes 
Piano-vocalist Camille How- 
ard is back in town and ap^won't be in town for the ter- 
pearing at Nicolai's in MonteWrific League of Allied Arts 


bello. 


Gilbert Simpson 


playing center on 20th Century 
Fox basketball team which 
also boasts Rafer Johnson as 
forward. ... We dug jazz critic 
LeoDcnrd Feather's article ex- 
pi ining the come-uppance of 
jazz. In olden days. Feather 
explained, there was the con- 
cept that jazz was a form of 
music at which no self re- 
specting performer could or 
would want to make a living. 
The old joke: Don't tell 
mother I've become a jazz 
musician. She thanks I'm in 
Boston shining shoes. But 
things are looking up now. 
Perhaps, the scribe says, it 
may not be ttx) long before 
some youngster, who some- 
how got sidetracked into boot- 
blacking for a living, may ac- 
tually want to say, "Don't tell 
mother I'm shining shoes. She 
thinks I'm in Chicago, playing 
jazz. 

May we take this opportun- 
ity to wis.;, you and yours a 
merry little Christmas! 


'Long Lie' 

(Continued from Page 14) 
by Walter Brough and .stars 
Rex Ingram and Pauline 
Myers. The three injured 
actors were: Marvis Hughes, 
who suffered bruises and 
lacerations, Morris Buchanan, 
who sustained a wrenched 
neck and back, and Rhoda 
Jordaji who was most seri- 
ous!^ hurt and hospitalized 
and"^who received permission 
to appear in the opening per- 
formances only a few hours 
before the curtain rose. How 
ever, all three will be suf- 
ficiently recovered to appear 
this weekend. 

"The other cast members 
are: Jakie Deslonde Edward 
Rowan, Mae Henderson, 
Norris Nyack, and Jack 
Crowder. Reservations may be 
mide by calling OL. 7-0t70. 


Nov. 26 affair! 

ALTHEA POLK — Cuny and 
iiresistable as ever, flew from 
Alaska to be with her family 
during the holidays. She is 
one of the top Army clerks in 
the 49th state! 

r^liGArNOTicES 


SCRIBE 

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$4 PER YEU 12.60 SIX MONTHS 

CLIP ANI> MAIL TO: CALIFORNIA EAGLE NEWSPAPER 
2101 WEST VERNON AVI., LOS ANGELES I, CALIFORNIA 

n NEW SUBSCRIPTION D CHECK 

n RENEWAL D MONEY ORDER 


NAME IN FULL:.. 
STREET ADDRESS: 
CITY: 


ZONE; 


STATE: 


38019 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 
LOS ANGELES 
No. 323420 
Notice of Hearing ot Petition to 
Borrow Money and Exeuit* Deed 
ot Trust 
In the Matter of the Esiate of 
ARTHUR C. CHAPPEJLb 
■ Ucceajed 
Notice U hereby jjlx-en that 
Bertha Chappell. Adminisiratlx of 
the said estate, ha.i filed herein 
her verified petition prayinK for an 
ortler authorizing the peiltioner to 
borrow money and execute a deed 
of truat upon real estate herein- 
after described: and that December 
16. 1960. at 9:15 a.m.. in the 
fomla. in and for the County of 
Los Angeles. Department 4 thereof, 
has been appointed aa the time and 
place for nearinsr of said petition, 
when and where any persons Inter- 
ested in the said estate may ap- 
pear and object to the tfrnnUng of 
said petition. 

Reference is hereby made to the 
said petition for further partic- 
ulars. 

.'•aid real e.state is situated- in the 
Count V of Los AnEele.«. State of 
California, and is described as fol- 
lows : 

Lot 47. 48 and t9. Block E. .'Starks 
Palm Tract ss shown on map rec- 
orded in Book 8. ■?«« 98 of Map.'>. 
office of the County Recorder of 
said County 

Dated .January 1. 1961. 
Eowart^ S. Hardwick 
Attornej'-at-Law 
1518 E. 103rd St. 
Los Angeles 2. Calif. 
Harold J. Ostly. 
County Clerk and Clerk of 

said Superior Court. 
By A. L. Oraham, Deputy. 
Publish in California Eagle news- 
paper. December 22-29. I960. 

38011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 

And FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of tl'e Rotate of 
WALTER SNELL 
Deceased 
NoUce Is hereby given to credit- 
ors havinK claims airalnst the said 
decedent to file said claims In the 
•office ot the clerk of the aforesaid 
colirt or to pre.«ent them to the 
undersiffned at the office of her 
Attone». 

MACEX3 G. TOLBERT 
4272 .South Central Avenue 
In the City of Los ArjKeles 11-. In 
the aforesaid County, which latter 
office is the place of business of 
the undersigned In all matters per- 
taining to sftld estate. Such, claims 
with the necessary vouchers muji 
be filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated December 19. 19S0. 
Macco G, Tolbert 
Attorney.at-Law 
427Z South *Cantral Avenua 
Los Angeles 11. California, 
MaTllda M. SneM 
Administratrix f>1 tha Eatat* 
of said decedent. 
^Publish In California Eagle news- 
paper Dec. -22-29. 1960: Jan. 6-12. 
1961. 


other than or in addition to that 
of .said deceased at the time of 
dpalh. in and to all that certain 
real property particularly described 
as follow.-*, lo-wit: 

Lot 1S5 of Palton Orange Grove 
Tract, as per map recorded In 
Book 2. Page 100 of Official Rec- 
ords of Los Angeles County. State 
of California. More commonly 
known as 1530 East 23rd Street. 
Los Angeles, California 

Terms of Sale: Cash in lawful 
moaey of the raited States on con- 
firmation of sale, or part cash and 
balance evidenced by note secured 
l>v mortgage or Trust Deed on the 
property so sold. Teif per cent of 
amount bid to be depo«ited with 
bid. -.. ( 

Bids or offers to be In Nrriting 
and will be received at the afore- 
.<aid office at any time after the 
first publication hereof and before 
date of sale. 
Dated December 5, 1960 

VERBKL 1,. BRENSON 
Executor of the Esiate 
of said decedent. 
Vince Monroe Townsend 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Los Angeles 3. California 
Attorney for Executor 

(Published in the California 
Eagle Dec. S, 15. 22, 29, 1960.) 


1 -LEGAL NOTICB 


37010 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 43S-2S5 

In the Superior Court Of the 
.'late of California. In and for the 
County of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estata of 
JAMES A. GREEN, Deceaacfl. 

Notice Is hereby given tojcredlt- 
on having clairaa against tte said 
decedent to file said claims In the 
office of ■ her Attorney, . Vlnct 
Monroe Townsend, Jr., 223;, West 
Florence Avenue, In the Oty of 
Los Angeles, in the aforesaid 
County, which latter office is the 
place of business of the under- 
signed In all matters pertaining to 
.«aid estate. Such claims with the 
necessary vouchers must b« filed 
or presented . as aforesaid within 
six months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice. 
Dated December 5. 196() '■ 

ELLA H. GREEN. 
Executlrx of the will 
of said decedent, 
Vince Monroe Townsend, Jr. 
Attorne-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Los Angeles 3, California 
PL. 8-S30« 

(Published In the California 
Eagle Dec. S, 15. 23, 29. 19M.i 

HELTwANTED^^Fii^ 


(California Eagle) 

35985 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-154 

In the Superior Court of the 
State of California. In and for the 
Count.v of Los Angeles. In . the 
M,-»ttcr of the Estate of Edna 
Wright Brown, also known as 
Edna Brown, algaEdna W. Brown, 
also known as E^a Wright, De- 
ce'»sed. 

.Notice is hereby given to creditors 
having claims against the said de- 
cprlenl to file said claims In the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them .10 the un- 
dersigned al his office at 2822 
South Western Avenue, in the City 
of Los Angeles. In the aforesaid 
County, which latter office is the 
place 9l business of th« undersigned I 
in all mattfrrs pertaining to said j 
estate. Such claims with the neces- 1 
sarj- vouchers musl.be filed ort 
J prej;e5lled ^f » foresaid within six 
momlin. afrtr ite first publication 
of thta nolict. 

Dated: .Vov. 21. 1960. 
Loren Miller, In Pro-Per 

Attorney-at-Liw 

2822 South Western Avenu* 


WOMAN 
EXPERIENCED 

Apt. house mgr. for 16-unit 
bitJg, No children, 3 room 
Furn. apt. and salary. C«ll Ed 
Stanley. 

MA. 8-0211, Ext. 714 

Week Days 

MONEYTO LOAN 


Combine Your 1st 

and 2nd Trust Deed 

at a Reasonable Cost. 

Also 1st and 2nd 

Trust Deeds 

Bought and So|d^ 

AX. 2-7088 

Rl. 8-3572 

iMPorniTciFFOirsAit 


INSTRUCTIONS-SCHOOIS 


Adjusters Train 
At Local Schoot 

The Adjusters and Investiga- 
tors Training Center, Inc., 601 S. 
Rannpart Blvd., is training hun- 
dreds of personnel who work on 
the millions of claims filed in 
fhe United States annually, stated 
George Roberts, manager. 

Roberts said that about one- 
hundred-million claims are filed 
every year by insurance agen- 
cies, railroads, airlines, finance 
companies, steamship lines, and 
others, and the opportunities in 
this field are unlimited. The de- 
mand exceeds the supply of 
trained investigators, according 
to Roberts. 

The field offers excitement, 
good pay, and a fine future, ac- 
cording to Roberts, who urg^s 
yoOng people to look into a 
careec in investigation. ^ 


Thursday, December 22, 1960 The California Eagle-i-15 


FURN. APT. FOR RENT 


REAL ESTATE FOR SAli 


OWN HOME 
BY RENTING 

M««l«mistic 7 bcdrvem hemes In 
Cempten. Own by Mnting and 
Mve. Excellent eppertwnity for 
responsible party who wants his 
own home. Conveniently located 
.on West Cressey Street, off Wil- 
mington, (wst north of Rosecrans. 
Call for informatiofi. 

Murray 1-0116 


OPEN HOUSE by owner, 2 on 
lot 2 br. S12;950 f. p. $950 dn. 
629 E. 106th St off Ava^on. 
RI. 7-3346. I . 


S995 DN. $85. MO. GI RESALE 
4 bdfms. 1\ baths, stt^cco. 
Many extras. PL. ,4-282^ ttl 

7. 1700 W. 65th. .' i 


OPEN SUN. — 3 bdrm. plvs 
furn. apt. $1,500 dn. Vac 
Clean. Well bit. AX. 3-6267. 


MEN -WOMEN 
■^ 18-45 

Learn J 

Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 

HEAVY 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BROCHURE NOW! 

ADJUSTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART, L.A. 57 

DU 8-7163 

WRNISHiiTROOM^^ 


UNFURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 

$65 Per Month 

Unfurnished house. Newly deco- 
rated. 2 large bedrooms, wall 
to wall carpeting. Real fire- 
place. Children welcome. 

AXminster 2-0458 


3 BDR. frame k inc. R-4 jcor. 
lot. Gramercy & San MscHno 

RE. 4-1157. ! 


FURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 


3 LARGE BEDROOMS 
$85 per • month rents a roomy* 
6 room, 3 bedroom house. West- 
side location, Carr>eting includ- 
ed. Washing ' machine available. 
C-hildren invited. Ideal for family 
living. Near everything. 


HOUSES « APTS. WANTED 


FREE SERVICE!!! 

TO LANDLORDS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside; 
4020 South Western Avenue 
AX. 2-1991 


ACREAGE FOR SALE 


Lot Angeles. CaMfomiji 

LOREN .MILLER 

Executor of the will 

of said decedent 

(PublLsh In California Eacle 

Dec. 1-8-15-22. 1960) 


36099 

I California Eaglel 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-063 

In the Superior Court ot the State 

of California, in and for the County 

of Los Angeles. In the Matter ot 

the Estate of Humphrey R Gomez. 

also known as U. R. Gorhez. also 

known as Humptirey Ramoz Gomez. 

Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given to creditors 
having claims a^'a'r.rt the said de- 
cedent to lile ■•id claims In the 
office of the nerk ol the aforesaid 
court or to pr^^^.'nt them lo the un- 
dersigned at the office of her at- 
torneys. Miller. Maddox A Malone. 
2824 South Western Avenue, in the 
City of Los Angeles. In the afore- 
said County, which latter office is 
the place of Du;'nc.<5 of the under- 
signed in ail -natters pertaining tn 
said estate. Siirh claims with the 
necessary .ou.-ners must he filed or 
presented as 8fnrc>.airt w.lhin six 
months after the first publication 
of this notice. 

Dated: Nov. 22. llJ&i 
Miller, Maddox A, Malona 
Attorneyi-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 

LILLIAN B GOMEZ. 
Executrix of the will 
of said decedent. 
(Publish In California Eagle 
Dec 1-8-15-22. 1960) 


'60 KAItMANN GHIA coup* 
with Porsche super eng. 
Porsche Tach. RSK rear 
stabilizer, factory equip- 
ment and tools. Best {offer. 
Richard Huff. 6R. 945394. 

EXfW~BEAlHYli£iaii^^ 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

• 

5543«A HOLMES AVENUE ^ 
It new open for business and of- 
fering expert beauty care from 
t:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. tor ap- 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, 
general operator. I 


LU. 1-6227 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Plane, Violin, ciallo. 

Clarinet, S^'ophone, lA^pet, 

Drums, SightsingingJ 

PL a-1179 I '^ 


ELECTRICAL REPAIRING 


36692 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 435-255 
In the Superior Court of th* 
State of California. In a^tf (or the 
County of Los Angeles. 
In the Matter of the EaUta of 
JAHES A. GREEN 
Deceaaed . 
Notice la hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned a tha etflc* of her attor- 
ney 
VINCE MONROE TOWNSE.ND. Jr. 

223 West Florence Avenue 
In the City of Lea Angeles 3. in the 
aforesaid County, which latter of- 
fice is the place of business of the 
undersigned In all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the nec«s»ary vouchers must be 
filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after tha first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated: December 5. 1960 
ELLA H. GRKEN. 
Executrix -Of the will of aald 
decedent. 
VINCE MONROU; TOWNSEND. Jr. 
Attorncy-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenue 
LOi Angeles S. California. 
PL. 8-5.109- 
Publish In Callfomla Eagle newa- 
pepar DMcmbcr »-16-33->9. 19«0. 


(California Eagle) 
37080 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 433710 
In the Superior Court of the 
State ot Callfomla. in and for the 
County of Los Angeles. In the 
.Matter of the Bst&te of Ivory 
SiVnon. Dcf-eased. .Votice Is hereby 
g!\en-by the under«icned. Bald" 
M. Krt.«lo\*ich. PuMir Adminis-, 
Irator, as .Administrator of the E«-l 
taie of Ivory .<lmon De< eased, tol 
the Creditors of. and all person.* 
having claims against the said 
decedent, to present them, with 
the necessary vouchen, within lix 
months after the first publication 
of this notice, to the said Admln- 
L.trator at hi* office at 437 Sout^ 
Hill St . Los Angeles 13. CallfoP 
nia. which said office the under- 
signed selects as a place of busi- 
ness In all, matters connected wltli 
said estate, or to file them, with 
the necessary vouchers, within six 
months after the first publication 
of this 'n<*lce. In the office of the 
C'erli rr the Superior Court of the 
State cf California In and for the 
Coiin'y of Lo» Angeles. 
Dated D»r. S. 1960 

BALDO M KRISTOVICH 
Public Administrator 
as administrator of the 
estate ot said decedent. 
MAdlaon 8-9211 
(Published in California Eagia 
Dec. 8. 15. 22, 19, 1980) 


WE SPECIALIZE in alj elec- 
trical work. Large or bmall, 
old or new. Reaeonable an(] 
reliable. WE. 9-0900. | 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES I 


(OUforn'a Laglc) 
17037 
NOTICE OF HEARINO OF 
PETITION FOR PROBATE 
OF WILL 
No. 435585 
In the Superior Court of the 
State of Cairfomla. In and tor the 
Ctounty wf L.oa Angeles. In the 
Matter of the EsUte of Blanche 
Oritfln. aka Blanche Fuggctt. Da- 
ceased. 

Notice is hereby given that tha 
petition ot Sally Sliaw Newman 
for the Probate of the Will of the 
above-named deceased an for the 
Kssuance of Letters of Admlnlsira- 
Uon with the Will Annexed thereon 
to th» petitioner to which refer- 
ence Is hereby made for further 
particulars. wUl ba heard at 9:15 
oclock a.ni.. en Dec. 28. 1980. at 
tha court room ot Department 9, 
of th* Superior C:ourt of the StaM 
of California, in and for the County 
of Los Ark«les. City of Lee Al»- 
geles. 

Dated: D«c. 5. 1980 
MILLER. MADDOX A MAUONI 
2834 So. Western Ave. 
RE. 1-4143 
Attorneys for Patltlonar 

HAROLD J. OSTLT 
County aerk and Clark of 
the Superior Court ',: lh« 
State ot California. In and 
" for the County of LOS 

Angeles. 

By E. B. Walssburd, 
Deputy 
(Publlahed In Callfomla EafU 
Dec. H IS, 22. 1960) 


DOCTORS TAX SHELTER 

PE LUXE MlfDICAL BUILDING 
«iih 7 suites and a large labora- 
tory. Top location. In\e5tig,itp for 
inrome ta\ shelter under lease- 
back arrangement. Especiallv suit- 
able for purchase bv a ihedlral 
group. Lovir Down PaytBeiit and 
terms available. Crenshaw 
For Particulars Call 
SYcamere 8-9644 


FOR SALE OR LEASE 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITY 


Tavern for sale or leajse 
San Bernardino. IncliKJ 
bars. Pit Bar-B-Q 
Tap beer. Piano bar, et(|, 
Fontana. 


VAIley 2-317l( 


ATM 


ng 2 

en. 
Call 


KicH 


for 

more 

grow pow^r 

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HAYES 
MOTEL 

'Th* Pfljopfe's Cho/ce 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
Ri. 4.9346 


KERN CO. LAND 

10 acres, 5 miles west of Rosa- 
mond. Good soil, shallow water, 
good neighbors. Only $5000, 
$1000 dn., $60 per month. 
THOMAS REALTY CO. 
V223 West Avenue I 
Lancaster, California 
WHitehall 2-1426 

reaTestate for sale 


FOR RENT 


2 — ONE Bedroom apts. West- 
side. Call RE. 3-9826 after 5 
p.m. 


UNFURNISHED AFARTMENT 
FOR RENT 


$7S— Brand new unfwm. 1 
iMdrm. apartment with 
garfoag* disposal, utilitias 
pd. 528 Wast 78th St. 1 
or 2 childron accepted, 
inquire at Apt. 8. 


DANDY 4 flat— 1620 W. 25th 
St. Poten. $330. mo. F. P. 
$29,500' Trms. Appt. only. 
RB. 4-2538 & RE. 3-2025. 


3 OH LOT, 63rd k 8th Ave. 
$215. ino. • Inc. $3,000 ^ dn. 
Kashu. RE. 4-1157. 


S19S dn. $70 mo. 3-br., 2 ba., 
frplc. Pacoima. Vac. SHIEK 
EM. 6-9525. 


$800 Dn. 2 bdr. stucco. Covered 
patio. Childs play yjard. 
PL. 1-0333. 


6 RM 2 bdrm. stucco. No dOwn 
to vets. $750 dn. to non-yets. 
PL 7-2268. 


OPEN SUN. 123 W. 86th PI. 3 
bdr. fenced. Near all $10;50!D. 
PL. 8-0050. ; ■ 


GI Rent with option to b^y. 2 
bdr., stuc, h.w. firs, i PL. 
7,4153. i 

-4- 


DUPLEX — Only $500 dn. $10,- 
950 f .p. income $110. mO., "S 
yrs. old. NE. 2-8469. 


FOR RENT W/OPTION | TO 
BUY. 3, Room hous^ — cute, 
$69. mo. 2 br. hoiise-f-lg. 
gar. clean $75. mo. SOUJTH- 
EAST CALL HU. 2-5961.; 


OWN. must seU Ig. 3 bf.. 2 
ba + den, new carpet. i$16. 
950 dn. 30 yr. FHA. 6715 5 
Ave. RL 7-3346. . 


1037 W. 48th 3t. 2 bdr. k den. 
No loan charge. Compleitely 
redecorated in & out. Qpen 
Sunday 1-5. PL. 0-1281. Eves 
WE 4-0203. 


IT OWNER. Home + Inc. 2 on 
lot 2 br. $12,950 f. p, $950. 
dn. 2145 Calif. Ave., Long 
Beach. RL 7-3346. 


OPEN SON. 6002 5th Ave. 2 
bdrm., stucco. Corner lot. 
Spotless. Will trade or sell. 
Lovv dn. PL. 8-0050, 


8: BdrtB. plus den, redec., : int 
$9S0' dn. 7811 Dalton 

or w. PrinClpalSi "~ only. 
4-7104. 


, By 
!OL. 


$69. MO. CLOSING COSTS 
ONLY. 3 bdnris., stucco, 
disp., garage. £|^CE3) ; PL. 

4-2187 till? 


$100 DOWN. 3 BEDROOM 
HOME IN FONTANA NEAR 
KAISER STEEL AGENT! AT. 
6-5811. • ' 


HAVE PROPERTY IN \ 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

Licensed and Bondmd Real fsfote Broker 




s 


I** 

IS 

IS 


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Cl» ■■« MAIL — — — — ^ — — CLIP ,1^ MAK- — — — . 

WANT ADS $1.0tt 9 WANT ADS $ 1.00 • WANT ADS $1.00 • WANT ADS $1.00 i 

I 


USE THIS CONVENIENT FORM TO PLACE 

CLASSIFIED ADS 

Writ, your ad JUST AS YOU WANT IT TO BE PUBLISHED THURSDAY, ineludina your 
ADDRESS Of TELEPHONE NUMBER, or both as part of the ad. 

CUSSIFICATION DESIRED 
Such as "Real Estate for Sale," "Furnished Room For' Rent," "Apt. Wanted," "Personals," 
"Mbc For Sale," etc— Pleaae PRINT CLEARLY no more than one word in each square beiow. 


ADS 

First Word 

2. 

••. 

$■1 

4. 

5. 

• 

6. 

n 

7. 

8. 

9. 

MINIMUM 

10. 

$1.00 

11. 

$1.10 

12. 

$1.20 

Every 

13. 

$1.30 

14. 

$1.40 

IS- 

$1.50 

Additional 
Word 

16. 

$1.60 

17. 

$1.70 

IS. 

$1.80 

10c 

19. 

$1.90 

20. 

$2.00 

2'' 

$2.10 

Pay Amount 
In Ust 

22. 

$2.20 

23. 

$2.30 

24. 

$2.40 

square you 
fill In. 

25. 

$2.50 

26. 

$2.60 

27. 

$2.70 


Now fo figurm addmg ond tefepfione numberst^ 

2101 Wosff Vomon Avenue — Equals 4 Words 
AXminster S-3135 - Equals 3 Words 


Classified Ad Dept. 
Los Angeles 8, Calif. 


CALIFORNIA EAGLE 
2101 West Veraon, at Van Ness 

Gentloment 

I am erKlotlng $..... check, money order or coins in payment of mv 

cleMlfied PlesM Inaert it in the next Issue of yOur CALIFORNIA EAGLE. . :~; .- ,. 


PRINT YOUR NAAAJ IN FULL. ...................... .....i 


»..•••*« 


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Addrets .....; .....j.... ... Phone. ... .•..•'•v«**.. 

Your CALIFORNIA EAGLE is published every THURSDAY Ads must reach your CALI - , 
FORNIA EAGLE office by 9:00 a.m. Wednesday for insertitfn oA the foitowinfl day g • 
(Clauif led offices open Monday through Fridey 8:30 «.m. to 6:30 p.m.. Saturday 9:30 4.m. I | 
to 2i30 p.m. .. I I 

WANT A0$ $1.00 • WANT AD$ $1.00 WANT ADS $100 • WANT A0$ $1.00 | 

— — — — «UP aMt MAft -._«,«, -..— _ ^_ _ ..» — —air ee< «A» ..a *. •— . — ^- »_ 




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16— The California 

Eagie 

Thursday, 

DecemJDer 22, 

1960 


SHOW BUSINESS 


(Continued irom Page 14) 
We dnnk ciMui^a^e chuing 
toe dinner, creme-de-menthe 
after dinner and Sandra sur- 
prised everyone with a mince- 
meat pie that she' had baked 
with brandy. 

We then retired to the bar 
to sample, the Davis' 30 year 
old whiskey (which was as 
smooth as water) and topped 
It ott with a home-made egg- 
nog. 

As the afternoon wore on 
we found out that Sammy Sr. 
had attained success "the hard 
way." He was bom of slave 
grand -parents and his first jo^) 
was delivering ice. 
' He quit this job to work in 
)« cotton seed mill and later 
aoceiited work in the New 
/ York shipyards. 
' "Regardless of how hard 1 
worked," he said, "I was never 
too tired to go and rehearse 
to get In a stage show. I re- 
hearsed and was hired to work 
in such shows as^'Come Along 
Mandy,' "Yellow Gal,' and 
"Shuffle Along,' but the strang- 
est thing would happen to me, 
every time the show would 
open, I would became so 
frightened I would run away, 


so I never opened. 

"Finally in 1919 Will Mastin 
(who is no relation to me), 
talked me into working in an 
act, which omsisted of 12 peo- 
ple. Later they cut this act 
down and this is when the 
Will Mastin Trio was organ- 
ized," Davis said. 

-In 1S25 Sammy Davis Jr. was 
bom. He was so talented that 
his father Sammy Sr. started 
training him at the tender age 
of one! 


ACLU Wants Action on Rights, 
Un-American Activities Group 


>« (Continued from Page 5) 

told one: WUl the White 
House and the Department of 
Justice and the other federal 
agencies energetically and 
courageously use their al- 
ready-existing powers, in 
southern voting and educa- 
tion and in northern housing: 
and will northern states and 
municipalities act to solve 


February, the ACLU report 
noted, it has been "deeply in- 
volved in the protest -move- 
ment." Through direct legal 
defense of arrested students, 
through advice and counsel 
to groups involved in the _ 
campaign, and through num- ]^^ 
crous public statements, the 
Union stressed the constitu- 
tional right of peaceful pro 


Dr. G. 


F, 

AA. 


Jackson 

D. 


5617 S. VERMONT AVE. 

LOS ANGELES 37 

PL. 3-4331 


■]■' 


the multiplying problems of test through picketing and 
their own baliwicks?" the right of Negroes to be 

Since the first sit-in tooki served at eating places open 
place in North Carolina last' to the general public. i 


'■Service h Our Business" 

^ FIRWOOD LUMBER 
CO., INC. 

M YIARS SIRVICINO THE »UILDI* 

rricat Thai Art Rifhl 

Quality and Sotvic* That CmniH 

Sarvin« Mm Entira 

Let Ansalat Arat 

W* Oalhrtr iUrwk«r* 

Call lOrain t-lMS ft NEwmarit S-lMt 

1371 E. IIMi St., In Angalat 


SHARKEY'S AQUARIUM & PET SHOP 

1500 W. SANTA BARBARA, LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 
AX. 3-7550 

"WHERE YOUR PATRONAGE IS APPRECIATED" 


YOUR 


YLLETIDE FELlC.lTATIOSf 

LUMBER 


AND 


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Kree Help and Information With All Your Projects 
PATIO - GARAGE - ADD-A-ROOM - FENCING— BTC 
VUit Our »«i«tlf«l DUnl-y «o«m lor llfl«»y '^*^;^[J^*^1JZl . 


poNotRosA rmt wood rmnMls 

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»'«5»« MILL 4 LUMBER CO. SAKAB 

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**67a7 CRENSHAW BLVD. (N«ir W«Mne«) - Wl DIIIVW 


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Financing 



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: PHARMACY ^1 

5479 W. Adams Blvd. " 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Telephone WEbster 5-2,070 | 

George Lax, Pharmjot * 

inaiwiwwawir 


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DE6RUY REALTY | 

[3325 W. Wt«hln«ton Blvd.j 
RE. 1-2437 f 


Wc Give BLUE CHIP STAMPS 


Ma^ipg MnltiiaaH frnm all of ujs at 


THURS., FRI., SAT., DEC. 22-23-24 


KLAC 


BROAD MIEASTED CALIFORNIA GROWN 



POPPY BRAND bRADE "A- 

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FROZEN 


4-5 LBS. 


DUCKLING 


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MIDWEST Vil. tkfke : PURE PORK ;,'.; A 2c 

BACON 47ii>. ; Sausagewdib. 


FRESH TURKEYS 
Toms45!^ HenL 55!^ 

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FROM WISCONSIN -ONE YE'aR OLD 

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TIN 


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69 


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REGULAR 

FOIL 



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2600 South Vormont Avonuo, Let Angolos - 3«21 South La Broa, Los Angolos - 609 North Dillon, Los Anfolos - 6t40 Lo Tiiora, Wottchostor - 7980 Wost Sunsot, Hollyweed - 6601 Loui^ 
Canyon Mvd./ North Hollywood - t440 Lincoln llvd., Santa Monica - 79B5 Santa Monica Blvd., HollyiKfood - 3217 Wott Mognoiia, Burbank - 11210 San^ Monica Blvd., Santo Monica 


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// you have a question concerning some 
outstanding persons, send it to Qxiestion 
Box, TONE Publications Inc., 702 E. 63rd 
St., Chicago 37, Illinois. 


laestion 


ox: 



Tlic M(i<!,<izinc Pictttrc Srctitm 

DECEMBER 1960 

CONTENTS 

PAGE 
The Sadd«it Christmas Story . 
by Jerald Claire 


in your 
local paper 

listed 
on cover 



Staples 


The 
magazine 



Recently, a gospel quartette called 
the Staple singers appeared in our 
community. What is the name of the 
young lady lead'singer, and have any 
of their songs been recorded? 

Sarah J., Selma, Ala. 

Her name is Mavis Staples. Re- 
cently, an album was released on the 
VJ label. titled ••Will The Circle Be / 
Unbroken," and a best seller called 
'•Uncloudy Day." 


Is Ray Charles blind or does he 
wear sun glasses as a habit? 

William D., Houston, Tex. 

At the age oj six. Charles was 
struck with an illness ichich left him 
completely blind. He attended a 
school jar blind children in St. Au- 
gustine, Fla., where he studied music. 


Harris 


Is it true that singer Joe Williams is 
scheduled to leave the Count Basi* 
band? What are his chonces for suc- 
cess as single performer? 

Marilyn R., Saginaw, Mich. 

We, too, have heard the same ru- 
mor, but we do not know ij if is true. 
As to Williams' chances jor sxiccess 
as a single, your guess is as good as 
ours. We like him best with the band. 
Ed. 

What position did famed journalist 
and lecturer, Dr. Margurite Cartwright 
occupy in connection with the Univer- 
sity of Nigeria? 

Carl T., Wilberforce, Ohio 

The Hunter College professor, con- 
sidered an authority on Africa and its 
problems, was one of the first mem- 
bers of the Provisional Council of the 
University. 

\ ' . ' 

Readers have >^ritten asl<ing who 
are the people behind TONE. In 
November, the editors published a 
picture of Donald Mcllvaine, the pub- 
isher. In this issue TONE introduces 
ib its readers Edgar Morton Harris, 
advertising manager. 


Sunday on the River 

Words Of Faith 

by Maholia Jackson 

Strings the Thing 


Little Mon Who Wasn't There 
by Jerald Claire . 

DEPARTMENTS 


3 
A 

7 
7 

10 



Question Box, People, 2; Food, 
Beauty Hints, 9, Music Whirl 11. 



COVER 


"AFRICAN MADONNA", a 
lensllive oil painting by Helene 
Urszenyi-Breznay, reflects the 
spirit and the mood with which 
, TONE approaches Chrijtmas and 
the holiday seoson. Struggle and 
beauty enmeshed in qui^t jeren- ( 
Ify is our impression of this Ma- 
donna, brought to America from 
Ghana by the Ahmad Jamal En- 
terprises. 


(ind next issue 


"The Man Who Shoo t s 
the Stars" 

PHOTOG- Isaac 
"Ike" Sutton is 
the man proba- 
bly most liked by 
most Negro 
stars. He is a for- 
mer entertainer 
withi a special 
feeling for every 
celebrity he photogrophs. Sutton 
and his cameras have photo- 
graphed practically all the top 
Negro entertainers within the last 
15 years. What are some of his 
problems? How does he moke 
friends? What ore the off stage 
dispositions of the start? Mr, Sut- 
ton gives you a complete account 
in the next Issue of TONE. 





Donald W. Mcllvaine 

Editor and Publisher 
Carl E. Srni»h ' "" 

Managing Editor 

Charles W. Leonard 

Associate Editor 
Vincent Tubbf 

Associate Editor 
Edgar M. Harris 

Advertising Manager 

TONE is distributed nationally 
with newspapers in selected com- 
munities Editorial and business 
offices at T02 E 63rd St.. Chicago 
37, 111 Copyright 1960. TONE Pub- 
lications. Inc.. 702 E. 63rd St.. Chi- 
cago 37. Ill- All rights reserved. 


people.^-* 


FAMED 
Olympic 
400 mctcf 
champion 
GEORGE 
RHODEN, 
quite pos- 
sibly is the 
first Negro ever to appear in a 
television commercial for a ma- 
jor tobacco manufacturer. The 
1952 Olympic medal winner was 
recently interviewed in a KENT 
cigai'ette commercial. 

HOW CAN 
a 1 - y e a r - 
old Korean 
girl in her 
faraway na- 
t i V e land 
help 1,00 
e 1 e m e n t a r y 
school children learn to read and 
write'' Children of school P. S. 
80 in East Hailem will tell you 
that's exactly what Lee Hyun 
Yung is doing bt>cause they have 
"adopted" her as their daughter. 
The children, mostly of Puerto 
Rican descent, write to Lee 
whose parents are both dead, in 
English and send money to help 
care for her. It's all patt of the 
Foster Parents Plan. Inc. which 
has more than 1.500 school 
groups in America helping to 
support homeless and parentless 
ovcr.scas children. Lee wrote to 
her "parents" at P. S. 80: "I will 
pay you back some day for the 
help you send." A fifth grader 
replied: "We do not want you to 
pay us back. We are helping you 
because we love you." 


r:-.^ 




Ik 1^^. '^HP'' music has 
^ ^BM^B launched 

m any Ne- 
groes into 
successful, 
money-rfiak- 
ing careers. 
Many of these Negroes do not 
sing or read a note of music. One 
such person is Chicagoan Gran- 
ville White, a distributor of Co- 
lumbia records throughout the 
Midwest. Promoting almost ex- 
clusively the work of jazz artists. 
White 33, and the father of four 
children, has held his top public 
rela 



"Go^d idea Gibson, . . . Thinking 
of these 6n yoor own time?" _ 


.V J 


.iv 


Ir'wM" ' 


"SANTA, CLAUS" the 
gases up his simulated 


whole year through is John McFerren as he 
"reindeer sleigh", bearing ••gifts of survival' 



UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO students Leonard Levin, left, and Kevin 
Krown, cat breakfast by Mr. and Mrs: John McFerren. The .itudents 
»- wanted to "see for themselves:' the stony of Hayxvood and Fayette 
county, Tennessee. ' ■ ' V 


NO HOLLY dangles 
from John McFerren's 
county store. 



Up. 


•J 


The 

Saddest 

Christinas 

Story 


By Jerald Claire 

IRISTMAS was never the most exuberant holiday season in the red-dirt counties 
of Fayette and Haywood, Tennessee, but somehow, after the cotton and bean 
picking was done, the counties' poverty-stricken inhabitants sighed an "amen" 

and looked anxiously to the^fomtng year. " ' 

Their sustenance came not from their material possessions, for few of the 21,000 
Negroes --and 8,000 whites --in Fayette had ^ny. For generations, chained to the 
soil by unbroken bonds of friendship, kinship, and "home," their unfettered and simple 
lives fbllowed the sun into dusk and moon into dawn. 

Year- after year old folks died and babies were born in the unbelievably miserable 
shacks and shanties that dot the red earth which fed and housed these forgotten people 
who learned to live together, separately? because some are black and some are white. 
Today, from the north, east and west, covered vans are rumbling over Tennessee 
highways bringingfood, clothing, and shelter to a beleagured Negro populace in Fayette 
and Haywood because the good red earth is no longer a protector and provider. 

THE EARTH ISSILENT BECAUSE NEGROES DECIDEDTHEYWANTEE* TO VOTE. 

John Mc F'erren is 35 years old. He is married and is the owner of a grocery store 
on Route 76, just two miles south of Sommerville, the Fayette County Seat. By default, 
he is the self-appointed Messiah and 20th-century Moses on- whom it is reported that 
a price of $2,000 has been placed on his head. >iv 

It»was to Mc Ferren and the garage beside his store that a group of six University 
of Chicago students traveled nea'rJy a thousand miles with a van load of food and cloth- 
ing to add another chapter to America's ignoble volumes on bigotry and intolerance. 

The "gifts" which were collected from generous people in Chicago will be distri- 
buted before and after Christmas, but they are not gifts of merriment. They are 
gifts of survival. 

In a community which is said to be controlled by a doctor, a lawyer, and a banker, 
the desire of 21,000 Negroes to vote has cost them their homes, their livelihood and 
for some, their life. 

For Christmas things will not be better. The counties, economically, are expected 
to collapse. The white and Negro economic boycott against each other is expected to 
intensify.^ Mortgages on Negro-owned property and that of white sympathizers will 
continue to be foreclosed. 

William Har'd, Gavin Mac Fadyen, Marie Eastman, Leonard Levin, Edward Cohn 
and Kevin Krown, all white students who were stealthily led out of Fayette County 
by Mc Ferren and later "escoi-ted" out of Haywood by Sheriff's police who did not 
believe they were on a "docum-entary tour for thf university" all agree that Fayette 
and Haywood counties are America's/saddest Christmas story. v . ■ 


Ill 


nil in» 



a r.,,.,, 





li ' 



■IJPTHE RIVER", ontheSS Peler Stiu/vesant, c-amer- 
aiixni Joe BUinco, left, and producer-scenarist Gordon 
Ilitchetis prepare for a 'shot. 





ON -DECK Thrills 


/ 








M and W MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 547 E. 63rd STREET • CHICAGO 37, ILLINOIS 

', . Dealers Inquiries Invited. 


Al'THFNTIC STARS" of the soon-to-be released New York docunientdrii jUm 
'Sintddii On the Rii-er" ca'sufdlji rclu.v on tlic stcrti of tlie SS Peter .Sf iii/rcsdiil. 




ClULmSH FUN Behind Daddi/s Ixick 


THE DAY BEGINS in a Child's 
eyes 


aN attempt at a "sorially meaning- 
ful statement about life among 
Negroes in- New York City" is 
currently being recorded on a twenty- 
minute documentary film scheduled to 
be released soon in the United Slates 
and Europe. 

The film, a prodigious effort.-- be- 
cause of what it expects to accomplish 
--is the brainchild of Gordon ffitchens, 
its scenarist and producer. andKenneth 
Resnick, who supervises Uie camera 
work of Joseph Bltnico, Amatsia Chuini 
and Joseph Marzano. 

It is called "Sunday on the River" 
because the film, in its four basic parts, 
introduces the viewer to Harlem oh a 
summer Sunday morning; to anupriver' 
boat trip of a Negro church social group; 
their picnic at Bear Mountain and their 
return 'downriver at the end of the day 
on the SS Peter Stuyvessant. 


Driclly, this is the film. Rut within 
twenty kaleidoscopic minutes, the docu- 
mentary tielves deeply into the social 
and economic crucible that has forged 
the American Negro, m;iking him dis- 
tinct, but portraying vividly the unique 
racial endowments which allow him to 
make his undeniable contributions to 
America and the world. 

Produeer Hitchens has chosen a typ- 
ical Harlem Sunday and has emphasized 
worshij) and recreation because, as he 
says, "It is our thought that Harlem can 
be understood, at least partly, in terms 
of how its Negro citizens go to church, 
how they relax on a day off and how they 
take an excursion boat trip to Bear 
Mountain to escape for one day the 
heat and monotony of the cramped city. 

"We have captured a quality of 
religious expression that is charac- 
teristic of American Negroes-- that of 


worship through unhibited joyous ex- 
pression of the senses. This is not 
to say that Negroes lack spirituality, 
rather, they supplement and thereby 
enrich a spiritual with a sensual ap- 
proach to their deity, the latter con- 
ceived of as personal, immediately 
accessible and benevolent." 

ifitchens adds: "Spiritual ecstasy 
(jf this sort IS perhaps less a matter 
of dogma than it is a celebration of 
nature and the fact of being alive." 
■ Adding the musicjil background to 
the picture which is framed in the 
blight of Harlem dwellings, is- George 
Tipton, of the Ink Spots, who sings 
Negro folk songs accompanied by two 
guitars. 

Decrying the unrealisti(''--and "so- 
called daring excursions" 'of Hollywood 
to portr.iy the Negro in recent "non- 
steceotype" films, the producers con- 



THE INK SPOTS famed George 
Tipfon .si)K/.s Ndgro folk songs m 
"Sundaii On the River".. 

elude: , ' 

"We have tried to find our magic 
in the natural drama of real people 
acting out the only roles they have, 
that of life itself. That's what a 
documentary film is," an authentic 
st.iteiTUMit about the way people live." 


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VVctAi^ ci (ZLyalik . . . 


By IMahalia Jackson 


It is my sincere belief that my success is due to my firm, 
unwavering faith in the true laws and princijbles of life as. laid 
down by God. The Bible gives us all of the formulas we need. 
Because of my early training, in spite of materiallykhumhle 
surroundings, I stuck to the WORD: "Be not weary in well doing, 
for in due season ye shall reap if ye faint iiot. Be not anxious 
in anything, but by prayer and supplication'make your request 
known to GOD and he will see to it." 

My constant prayer and unfaltering aim in life has been to 
lift the hearts and eyes of my fellowman to God through song; 
for many I hope to haye accomplished this. Because of my trust 
in His word, as I have .tried to bless others, He has blessed me. 
My climb has not been easy, but nothing worth attaining is. I 
could have become discouraged, but while in the deepest pitfalls 

of dispair I heard the voice of God through His son say "Be of 

good cheer, for I have overcome the worfii." ■ 


City : State. 


stnng's rhe ThiNg! 


I OST American youngsters jump at' 
opijortunities as fast as Nature 
fills vacuums.' And in the field 
of music m;ii<ing, the long-time short- 
age of stringed instrument players is 
attracting bright youngsters alert to 
the times. 

Last year, more than 50,000 string 
players joined the ranks of America's 
amateur musicians. According to the 
American Music Conference, most of 
them were of school age. 

Is this popularity of strings afad-- 
or IS it a harbinger of a change in 
altitude towards orchestral music? 

Actually, it is neither. Although 
the number of people playing stringed 
instruments has expanded only recent- 
ly, the playing of other orchestral 
instruments has been increasing stead- 
ily since World War II. According to 
AMC, the number of youngsters playing 
instruments or receiving instrumental 
instruction in schQols has more thiin 
tripled since 1946. 

In 1959, more than 9,000,000 young- 
sters were engaged in musical acti- 
vities of all kinds. 

This rapid growth in the popularity 
of orchestral music has been respon- 
sible for the new surge of interest in 
stringed instruments. Many of the 
nation's musical youngsters wanted 
organized outlets for newly acquir*d 


talents. The result has been a sudden 
increase in the number of school or- 
chestras in the United States. 

In 1958, there were approximately 
23,000 school orchestras; by 1959, the 
total had jumped to more than 26,000. 
Orchestras call for skilledstringplay- 
ers -- creating the great opportunity 
that youngsters are responding to. 


Learning to play stringed instru- 
ments t;ikes a little longer than most 
instruments. So, when the acceleration 
in the formation of new school orches- 
tras started, many school conductors 
found It difficult 'to fill the string 
sections. 

Music educators and teachers have 
been taking steps to help fill the string 
^ections. Marion Egbert, educational 
consultant for tht American Music 
Conference, says: 

"A variety of new teaching tech- 
niques shows that playing stringed 
instruments is easier than commonly 
believed-- and that string fnusic is 
as rewarding and enjoyable as other 
t>|pes. In addition, school instruction 
in strings has increased noticeably 
and the formation of summer music 
workshops and community music ed- 
ucation programs is being encouraged 
nationally." ■ 



01>iE DAY , this small boy with a big bass violin 
will be bigger than his stringed instriiment. But 
he ie big enough now to learn to play and he is 
obviously off to an excellent musical start. 


BEGINNING THE CAREER almost 
appears to' be more than the young 
tot above can hear. A little short on 
reach, for the moment, but not desire 


Mr, Druggist: If your wholesaler does not carry Ultra Wave products, ask him to get them for you or wrte direct to the Company. 


■•C 


"CULTURE-GROOM'' 
YOUR HAIR 
WITH... 


rtrmcACQ/^ 



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Well-groomed men in all walks of life are changing from ordinary hair dressings to new 
Ultra Wave Hair Culture. They know that Ultra Wave Hain.Culture, when used as di- 
rected, not only straightens the hair hut cultures it . . . lea^li^the hair lustrous, natural 
in appearance, and easier to manage. Why don't you culture-groom your hair with Ultra 
Wave today! 

If your favorite drug store or Barber shop does not carry Ultra Wave, ask them j,o get it 
for you or write direct to Johnson Products Company. 

Johnson Products Co., Inc. • 5831 South Green Street .Chicago 21, Illinois . Dept. T-5 




TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY EGGNOG: A delicious rum eggnog^ America's favorite holiday 
hospitality cup, equal in every respect to the traditional Early American eggnog shown here, 
can be made easijy and quickly, with prepared mix and gold Puerto Rican rum. Dairies every- 
where now prepare the mix for home delivery and for supermarltets. They recommend adding 
8 ounces of rum to each quart of mix. A thicker, picher beverage results if a cup of whipped 
cream is folded into the mixture. Add a touch of Americana to your tioliday entertaining- - - 

' 'UNBEATABLE RUM EGGNOG 

V 

Major dairies everywhere make excellent 

•• eggnog mix available for home delivery or at 

supermarkets. They recommend adding one cup 

.;- (8 ozs.) of gold Puerto Rican rum to each quart. 

' ' J 'If you prefer a thicker, richer beverage, try 

fojding in a cup of whipped cream. 


its 
un 


RUM EGGNOG 


A COLONIAL RECIPE 


Beat 12 egg yolks until light; add 1/2 lb. 
sugar and beat until mixture' is thicte. Stir 
in 1 qt. milk and a "fifth" of gold rum. Chill 
3 hours. Pour into punch bowl. • Fold in 1 qt. 
heavy creaip, stiffly whipped. Dust with nutmeg. 
(Serves 20) Egg whites beaten with powdered 
sugar until frothy can be used, as decoration. 



HINTS 


h'dilli Kedxl 


How can I make my eyes look larger? 

Floririe P., Roanoke, Virginia 

Create the illusion of size by arching the eye- 
brows just a little lower than regularly, being care- 
ful not to exaggerate this effect or straighten the 
brow too much, since this will give the face a 
severe expression. Removing just a few of the hairs 
from the upper edge of the brows and accentuating 
the lower arch a trifle with an eyebrow pencil will 
give the desired effect. Keep eye shadow away from 
hollow section next to the nose; follow shadow by 
applying eyeliner. Mascara only the tips of the 
lashes. Use a white pencil eyeliner across the 
lower inside edge of the lower lid to open the eye 
even wider. 



When cleansing and lubncatingfthe face at night 
how long should the cream stay otv 

Mrs. Carrie S.,. Grand Rapids, Mich. 


You do not have to go to bed wi 
face in order to get the proper 
lubricating skin food. All the cr 
absorb, will be absorbed by 1 
twenty to thirty minutes. Then, 
cloth over your face to further i 
lient's action, and to remove 
from your face. Follow by 
freshener. 


th a grease coated 
benefit from your 
earn your face will 
eaving it on from 
hold a warm wash 
ncrease the emol- 
the excess cream 
pattirig with skin 


Wh.it methods of hair removal can be performed 

at home? 

Eslelle M., Minmi, Honda 


The hot wax method, and a cold method done with 
a jelly or cream. Neither method is permanent in 
its^results. Follow carefully and quite literally the 
directions that come with the product you buy. 

I have trouble applying lipstick because of 
Up hair. 

Mrs. Ruby C, Portland, Ore. 

So often it is difficult to apply your lipstick 
properly due to the tiny pore hairs on the upper 
lip which hinder the smooth application of your 
lipstick. This can be removed either by electroly- 
sis pr methods mentioned in the above question. 


What can I do' about straight eye lashes? 
Maxine J., Gary, Indiana 


Mrs. 


If the lashes are very straight and do not curl 
even with the use of mascara, use an eyelash 
curler. Never clamp down tightly on. the lashes. 
A curler should be used by gently squeezing it 
up and down the length of the lashes. The curler 
maybe used either before or after using mascara. 


fU 



Little man who wasn't there 


:^- 


■ By Jcrald Claire 


He blows— like erazy, like mad. like wilcii He blows because he was made 
to blow! He blows because he is Miles Davis. Sweet, muted .sounds. Deep, 
gurfiling penetrating notes that touch the soul and make man know that 
out of a horn — comes plenty. 

He blow,s and he is gone. Vanishing like an exalted mystic. Mr. Davis is at one 
and the .same time a god aiul a devil. disapp(>aring from his audience in a manner 
designvd to bring adulation at his reappearance, but in actuality, it is a manner 
insulting and humiliating. 

Perhaps the reader has never attended a Miles Davis concert (;r show. The ohly 
thing one carf possibly mi.ss is Miles, himself. On ()ccasion after occasion, before 
audiences large and small, the great trumpetei- blows. And then, before his well 
deserved applause has ended. Miles, almost contemptuously, fades into the back- 
ground and ofT stage, hardly acknowledging the plaudits, ofi.his eager, eolhusiastic 
and worshipful fans. Why'' Who really knows? 


Somehow, one gets the impression that Miles Davis has transcended above and 
beyond the thousands who have helped to make his name and music a hou.schold 
word— at least one feels that Miles, himself, thinks he has. Then, too, perhaps 
this great artist feels his continued presence on stage when not playing detracts 
trom his supporting players. Whatever the rea.son, this unsmiling and» apparently 
ungracious, talented genius who feels he must disappear after each of his own 
solos, makes his audience feel that Ihev must not only pay homage to his musical 
wizardry, but to a monstrous ego. too. It is really tob much to ask. 

There is, however, a rea.ssuring and comforting a.ipi'-ct in most of Miles Davis' 
appearances. His accompanying musicians, after completing .solos of their own, 
remain on staj^e. », 

What a horror it would be Jo attend a Miles Davis concert and di.scover that 
everyone hah left the .sUige! With Miles, however, such an event may not be beyond 
the realm ofWssibility. - g 


THE MUSIC WHIRL 


Nat Cole's greatest! 


! 


Mr. Cole believes this ;ilbum 
to be the greatest recording 
of his career. We have no 
alternative but to agree. The 
lyrics and melodies of this 
niagnificently designed album 
immediately catches the young 
lii love and projects in song 
what they are thinking. Wild 
IS love, the title song starts 
the production, and moves 
very effectively with meaning 
into every passage. 

Two lovely ballads stand 
out as the mood changes peri- 
odically. They are "A Beau- 
tiful Evening" and "Are You 
Uiseiuhhnted." Nal sings in 
a mood of emphatic sincerity. 
The album cover is simply 
illustrated with photographs 
of each song. The Capitol 
album sell's for $7.95. 



Playboy jazz allstars 


Top-notch musicianship takes 
dominance in this package of 
st.irs all in one seemingly big 
jazz festival. Naturally the 
climax comes when the "in- 
cofiiparable Ella P'itzgerald 
bfSmgs dfiwn the house with 
Imr fantastic rendition of "How 
High the Moon." Here, Ella 
sings, riffs and scats through 
6 minutes aivd 4 seconds of 
pure excitement. Special 
treats are in store for the 
listener with sounds provided 
by such greats as Count Basic, 
Oscar Peterson, Chet Baker, 
Dave Brubeck, Frank Sinatra, 
Paul Desmond, Louis Arm- 
strong, Barney Kessel, J. J. 
Johnson, Stan Kenton, Benny 
Goodman, The Four Fresh- 
men, the Hi-Lo's, Earl Gar- 
ner, Ray Brown, and others. 
This is a collector's item. 
It sells for $9.00. 



U 


a joyful noise 


jj 


10 


Columbia Records has pro- 
duced a gem! Good spirit- 
ual emotion fills the air when 
you hear4he Abysinnian Bap- 
tist Choir of Newark, N.J. 
sing. One hundred and twenty 
voices mark an achievement 
never before put on wax. 

At once the listener has 
been placed in the midst of 
this unique atmosphere .... 
the mood has been set . . . the 
"joyful noise unto the Lord" 
builds in cresendo until only 
the rafters of the church re- 
main unshaken by its mighty, 
message. Here is "truly an 
exciting experience." The 
professor Alex Bradford con- 
ducts. 



.(JiiKV**.-*:-. ■» 


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tiles ranging from 2>/^ (o 14, widths AAAA to 
EEEE! You'll feature exclusive Velve(-ecz ahoet 
with foamy-soft atr-cushion innersoles that lei 
you "wilk on air." Every6Hl^ wean shoes — and 
because Mason shoes are never told through 
stores, folks must buy from you! Rush the 
coupon for your FREE telling outfit , . . have 
an EXTRA payday next Saturday! 



Ml NIP MASON I 

I I D«pt 07 ■ 6Mat«n Sh»« Mfg. C»tnpmt*y i 

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i> I 

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PERSONAL 


Wo will pay you SH)0 cich wci'k' 
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write to Crown Life, 20.3 No Wa- 
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MAGNIFYING 


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ADVANCE SPECTACLE CO., Inc.. Dcpt T12 

%i7 S DIAKBOfN ST CHICAGO S III 


Mih 


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FEB. ISSUE CLOSES DEC. 30. FORWARD. 
ORDERS TO TONE PUBLICATIONS, INC., 
702 E. 63RD ST., CHICAGO 37, ILLINOIS 


• • • PROFITAILE 
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• • • Of INTniST TO WOMIN 


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• • • MISCELLANEOUS 


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1 ILLINOIS DEPT T-4 


Grid Stars Vie for Rpse Bowl 




GEORGE FLEMI'SG— Washington Huskies' great fleet- 
footed back lias voted the outstandirrg player in last year's 
Rose Boivl game. 


BOBBY LEE BELL — University of Minnesota's sterling 
tackier is labeled in the Big Ten Conference as one of the 
Gophers' all-time tinot. 


SANDY STEPHENS— Minnesotan will became the first 
Negro T-quarterback for a Rose Bowl team in the hisioi^ of 
the Pasadeiia classic. 


CHARLIE MITCHELL— Rated as the best- preak-away 
threat at Washington since Hugh McElhenny and probably 
the fastest back Coach Jim Owens has ever had: 


XMAS TREE FIRE KILLS 


First Negro 
T-Quarterback 
Plays in Bowl 



C Al.1 F O R.M I A 


3AV GHVO'IIH 

diloo '^ AHvaan 'nnr 


c( {' 


By Edw. 'Abie' Robinson 

I am picking the^ Uni-j^'"' '*'■ "'""" *"""*' ^ *• 


Continuous Publication for 80 Years 


versity of Minnesota in Vol. LXXX-No. 41 
the Rose Bowl on Jan. 2,i ^ 

and you can credit just 
about every football writ- 
er in town for helping me 
make up my mind. 

Ever since the Gophefrs 
checked into the plush Hun- 
tington-Sheraton Hotel in Pas- 
adena hardly a kind word 
has been written about a lad 
called Sanford (Sandy) 
Stephens, the key man in the 
University of Minnesota of- 
fense, who led his team to 
eight victories (six of them 
over Big Ten opponets). was 
responsible for 11 touchdowns, 
driviiig ovei for nine aiid 
passing for two more. 

First Ne9ro Quorterbock 

The reason the L.A. writers 
are cool toward young Steph 
ens, who incidentally, is a 
junior and a Political Science 
major, might well be the fact 
that he will be the first Negro 
T-quarterback to lead a Rose 
Bowl team in the history of 
the granddaddy of all bowl 
games. '| 

Judging by tfie lineage they 
have been devoting to him, 
they just don't seem to fancy 
the idea, so in every instance 
they have all but ignored the 
6 foot, 215 p^o u n d e r from 
Uniontown, Pa', who rolled up 
164 yards net in 57 running 
plays and completed 20 out of 
52 passes for 305 yards. 

Also the team's regular 
punter, his 55 kicks totaled 
1,946 yards for a nifty 35.3 
average. He returned 16 punts 
for 111 yards and nine kickoffs 
for 203 yards. 

Coolness Noted 

We haven't had a chance to 

talk personally with the 

* Gophers but my man who is 

close to the squad revealed 

(Continued on Page 6) 

Man is Shot 
Over Turkey 

A 22-year-old man who tried 
to take back a turkey he had 
given his girl friend for 
Christmas was shot to death 
Saturday night at the home of 
23-year-old Rose Marie Love. 

Clarence~Sledge, 22, of* 215 
W. 42nd street, was shot in 
tH|i back of the head and in 
the middle of the back. 
Admits Shooting 

Mrs. Love admitted t-h e 
shooting, but claimed she shot 
when Sledge struck her with 
a lug wrench. 

Raymond Wheeler, 4159 S.j 
Hooper avenue, told Newton i 
street officers that he was 
visiting his daughter , at Mrs. 
Love's home, when Sledge 
knocked at the door and de- 
manded that he be let in. 

When Mrs. Love refused to 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Thursday, December 29, 1960 


Hollywood Studios yill 



Crow Castir^g 

Conciliation 
Through FEP 
Brings Change 


DREAM SHATTERED — .Mrs. Juanita ..MacklinS dream of moving her Excep- 
tional Children's School into its new $75,000 building was shattered early Sunday when 
an automobile ploughed throuf^h the ncicly plastered wall and came to rest inside the 
building. The planned Feb. 1 opening has been indefinitely delayed. (Adams) 







7HMe/i 


Hit-Run Auto Hits 
Children's Home 

A rampaging hit-and-run driver in the pre-dawn hours 
Sunday sent a car through the freshly plastered wall of the 
new S75.0O(i building destined to house the Exceptional Chil- 
dren's Home, 122nd and San Pedro streets, and effectively 
crushed the high hopes of Mrs. Juanita Macklin for a Feb. 1 
Grand OpKjning. . J" 


rm No Expert 

You can't call me an ex- 
pert beclfuse I never had a 

job as a sports writer in my , . , j , ,_ ^ 

of control and ploughed 
life. In my private capacity],, ^^,, u ^u u -u- 

:. th.t n^hnHv n.n through thc bu.lding, to come 


I suppose that nobody can 
outdo me in picking the wrong 
man to win an event whether 
it's in boxing, football, base- 


Thc hit-and-run car hit a mightily to bring the project 
second auto, v,hich went out ; ^° completion. 

Money. Time Donated 
Many organizations and in- 


to rest inside. 

Driver Injured 


dividuals have donated time, 
money and labor to help con- 
struct the home which, once 
Driver of thc second car wasst jg ,„ operation, will be able 

ball or track. I've even been|LeRoy T. Hughes, 2009 Cordett|to take care of 100 children. 

known to be wrong about who : avenue, who is unemployed. | /i^i present Mrs. Macklin 

wSbld win a wrestling match; He was seriously 


3 African Nations 
In Economic Bloc 

CONAKRY, Guinea — The 
union of Ghana, Guinea and 
Mali to "promote a common 
economic and monetary 
policy" was announced here 
Saturday in a joint statement 
issued by the presidents of the 
three West African countries. 



injured in 


although win- 
ners in such 
events are al- 
ways known 
i n advance. 
The only 
thing I do 
know is that 
sports events 
can't be won 
these days^w. 
without Negro^" „,„ 

players. . 

For example. Stanford Uni- 
versity has been drawing the 
color line ever since it was 
established and it wound up 
the current football season 
with a perfect record — ten 
losses and no wins. t- 

The only team in -profes- 
sional football that. bars Ne- 
gro players is the Washing- 
ton Redskins and althoiigb 


present 
cares for 18 children. 


^the accident, sustaining , a| The new building contains 
I crushed chest and broken nbs. four large dormitories, a con- 
' The driver of the car that suiting room, dining room, of- 
caused the accident spedlfice, two therapy rooms, a 
away, without even bothering 'clinic, an isolation room, 
to give aid to thc injured man. and many other facilities. 

Mrs. Macklin, executive dir- Mrs. Macklin had been busi- 
octor of the home, told the ly making preparations for of- 
Eagle that members of Labor- ficlal opening of the new 
ers' Union No. 200 had just] facility. Now that opening 
finished a S30(M) plastering will have to await the corn- 
job, inside and out — material |pletion of costly repairs, 
and labor donated by the! . - 


Owner George Marshall hires 

and fires coaches by the doz-|sents a serious loss 

en, he can't get any place, community as well a; 


union. 

S2000 Damage 
Total damage to the new 
structure was estimated at be- 
tween $1800 and S2000. 

In addition to the smashed 
wall. Mrs. Macklin said the 
plumbing was wrecked, as 
was also electrical wiring and 
the floor of the building. 

The gaping hole in the wall 

and the other damage repre- 

to the 

to Mrs. 


(Continued on Page 4) 'Macklin, who has struggled 


In th9 Eag/e 

Editorials , 4 

Church ActiTitlM 5 

Sports - 8 

Tbe Tee _., B 

Dorothea Foster ^ „ 10 

BiU Smollweod • 

People T 

Chax Crowferd T 

Show Buslnees • 


Br Maggie Rathawor 

Jim Crow casting of "extras" 
— one of the continuing sores 
in the motion picture industry 
that dates back many years 
to the days ^^hen Hollywood 
was young — is on its. way out. 

Central Casting, on Holly- 
wood blvd., which heretofore 
has handled white actors only, 
will begin, iri the near future, 
to cast all actors — whites, 
Negroes, Oriejntals, everybody. 

FEP ConciUation 

The switch in policy stems 
from conciliktion efforts of 
the young Fair Employment 
Practices Commission, plus 
the energetid efforts of inter- 
ested individuals and the In- 
ternational Artists organiza- 
tion, formed jabout a year ago 
to fight against all forms of 
segregation jn Hollywood. 

Segregated! casting was its 
first target. 

Among the individuals who 
pushed hardest for the change 
in policy are actor Byron Ellis, 
who filed a petition with the 
FEP commission c^taining 
500 signatures: Maggie Hatha- 
way, Eagle golf editor who is 
also a Hollywood extra, and 
Atty. Edwarid Maddox, who 
gave legal advice. 

Plan ContolidatioB 

After the petition was filed 
about three |months ago, FEP 
got in tou<;h with Central 
Casting and discussed the 
case with them. 

Last week, Ellis advised, the 
FEP commission wrote to Cen- 
tral Casting,; confirming their 
understandirig that as soon as 
necessary technical arrange 
ments for the change-over 
could be made, all casting 
would be cjonsolidated from 
one central ©ffice. 

For almost a decade Jasper 
Weldon has handled exclusive 
casting of Negro extras for 
Motion Pictijre producers, TV 
and radio. Jasper operates out 
of his homi at 110 E. 99th 
street. 

Artistk Orgoaix* 

Negro actors understand- 
ably objected to the Jim Crow 
set- up. It not only set them 
apart on a racial basis but 
also limited the number of 
parts for wlTlch they might 
otherwise be » considered. 

A year ago Maggie Hatha- 
way took the lead in organ- 
izing International Artists. As 
president of; the organization 
she took up the issue with 
Central Casting and also filed 
a petition, drawn up by Atty. 
(Continue id on Page 4) 


HE.4RT BREAK — Mrs. Joyce Jackson mourns the death of her baby daugjiter, Gwen^ 
dolyn, who was burned to death when their Grape street house caught fire from a blaze 
on their Christmas tree. Two-year-old Charles was critically burned. Surviving children 
include, front: Curtis, 3, and Jerry, 7. Rear: Pamela, 10; Mrs. Jackson, and Eddie, 8. 
(Verdell Young) 


• • tl 



>?<. 


TINDERBOX — IFitnesses claim that the Jackson home, 9617 Grape street, went 'u^ 
in flames and smoke in less than 20 minutes. (Verdell Young) j 


TOP STORIES 

For picture coverage 
and o review of the top 
stories of 1960. from the 
point of view of the Ne- 
gro struggle for equal- 
ity, see Page 3. 


France Ignores 
Protissts, ^ires 
New A-Bomb 

Overriding the protests of 
African nations, France again 
on Tuesday exploded an 
atomic bomb in the Sahara 
desert. 

This is the third bomb 
France has fired there. The 
fifst was detonated Feb. 13. 

The African nations opposed 
the tests because of fear of 
atomic fallout. 

France denied there was 
any danger of fallout injuring 
nomads in the desert or peo 
pie in nearby countries. 

Japan prepared a written 
protest to the continuing 
atomic explosions. The Soviet 
Union also protested the re 
newed testing, as did Morocco, 
the Algerian government in 
1 Tunis and other, nations. 


{Baby Girl Die$ cis 
Blaze Guts Hbme 

A Christmas tree fire, Friday night, at th< 
home of Eddie R. Jackso% 9617 Grape street, Watts, 
spread quickly to nearby drapes, to thej walls, to the 
roof, and engulfed the whole house. \ 

In less than 20 minutes, according jto witnesses,} 
the wood and plasterboard * i^ — 


structure was nothing but a 
mass of charred ruins. 

Dies in Flomes 

In that 20 minutes, little 
Gwendolyn Jackson, 4, died 
in the flames. Her two-year- 
old brother, Charles, was bad- 
ly burned, but was rescued by 
firemen who broke out one of 
,the windows in the 'living 
room, grabbed the screaming 
child and brought him out- 
side. 

The other five Jackson 
children >— Pamela, 10; Ed- 
die, Jr., 8; Jerry, 7; Sandra, 6; 
and Curtis, 3 — fled from the 
burning building to safety. 
Also escaping the flames were 
the children's mother, Mrs. 
Joyce Jackson, and a boarder, 
William Cairdwell. 

Mrs. Jackson, sad eyed and 
distraught, told the Eagle 


that she was *n the kitchen 
when Gwendolyn rushed in 
and told her tpe tree was on 
fire! ! 

Apparently jfrightened, the 
child ran and hid: 
"■ Cardwell, sata Mrs. Jackson, 
grabbed a rubber mat and be- 
gan slapping i at the tree to 
put out the fiije. The tree top- 
pled; flames lieaped from the 
burning brakches to the 
drapes, shot up to the ceiling. 

Mrs. Jackson and Cardwell 
herded the five youngsters out 
of the house. When they tried ■ 
to get back in to search for 
the two bab^, they were 
stopped by a sheet of fire, 
smoke and heat , 

Hid Under Bed 

When thb f<re was brought 
under control,' firemen found 
(Continued on Page 4) 


^,r .1,. 1 


^RmajjlBgyyiH^ y . 1 1 wt* ' jW ^ ^^"^"»wW ■ ^ p ■ ■^ ■■■■ ■ iff Mt. *P ifwm y j i vi>*i ' j^ ^ n^"w. i^ ^^ 



2— The California Eagie Thursday, Decernber 29, 1960 


Was Dawson's 


' J 


vf 


1 


N 


r 


Cooked- Up Affair? 

NEW YORK — (VIP) — Speculation over Presi- 

dent-Elect John F. Kennedys offer of the bostmaster- 
generalship to Democratic Rep. William| A. Dawson 
and his rejection of thie Cabinet post has been voiced 
by prominent Americans of bot-h races and political 
pa rt i OS-. • ' 


In a teloplioiie poll i-oiiduct- 
cu by Vital Information Press. 
Xpw York syndicate wliich 
services tlie Negro press na- 
tionally, opinion was sharply 
divided as to the motives both 
of Senator Kennedy in offer- 
ing and Rep. Dawson in re- 
jecting the, historic op(K)ituni- 
ty for-a Negro to hold cabinet 
status. I 

Confiimation Problem? 

Meanwhile, in \V;u4hington. i 


lact that Dawson will go 
along with alnjjost anytliing 
the party says. | Frankly. I'm 
pleased that he rejected the 
job. I don't think his accept 

ance would have helped his 
race." 

In variance with litis posi 

tioii t^as the attitude of civil 
riglitSileader Dr. Martin Luther 
Kng, who termed the Kennedy 
offer an "important step." 
■•.No matter whether it was 







TOP REGISTRAR — Cecil Peterson, center, receives $100 check^af an an-ard to, re- 
i/iSterinff the largest number of voters I'l the A./.VC/' voter it'oistrntion ririvr. Peterson 
figistered more than 1600 voters. From left: Edii-nrd Warren. SIAdP president: Pcttr- 
son: and Ted llriqht, registration ihairnufi. I Adams) 


Kennedy Given 50,000 
Vote Edge in 2 Districts 


Two Los Angeles assembly districts — the ,35th 
land 62nd— with the largest concentration of Negro 
'^voters in Los Angeles gave President Elect John F. 

Kennedy a whopping majority of 50,904 votes over i was based "on the fact ihat hejGarrtuf'r C. Taylor, said: 

Vice President Richard M. Nixon 
i The 62nd led the parade 

with a Kennedy majority 


25,742 and the 5.5th chipped ! ^^^^^" ^^"^^ ^^^ ''^"^ district stone of South Carolina 


in with 25.162 more votes. 


seat bv a margin of 22.766. 


Women Killed 
By Gunmen at 
Liquor Store 

A 50 - year - old w o a\ a a, 
Kmilia Garcia, clerk in her 
husband's liquor store, died 
without regaining conscious- 
ness Monday, Dec. 26, after 
being shot in the face by one 
of three bandits who attempt- 
ed to rob the Garcias' liquor 

^tore at 2903 S. Maple avenue. 

^ The shooting occurred Fri- 

:::<tay night when the gunmen, narr,na\an 

*:.mtered the store and after! Other assembl> Uistiictsl""^Pa'»"- 

ifsking for a bottle of winejwith substantial*«vegro popu- 1 ~" 

threatened the owner with ailations are the 63rd, the 6'3<^ilA#«nt^cl Turlcf^V 

i and the 66th districts. The Ne- 1 *'*«■■ ■ ***■ ■ ** ■ ■*'^ 7 

Igro population ratio is s^^"^^- Dm#>I#^ ie Qlrtin 
! where close to 40 per cent in;****^'*'/ >* QIUIIl 


knowledgeable sources raised | motivated by political consid- 
the issiie of witetlier Dawson's erations or a deep moral feel- 
failure to accept the post was ing. the important thing is 
attributable to fear that Sen-|that ii was dohe," Dr. King 
ate confiiTnation would be declared. He ad(^ed that Daw- 
wilhheld due to oppasiiion byjson "probably declined be- 
Southern Senators or the fact cause he fell he could serve 
that a former Dawson congres- i»is citunlry better in his I""*^®" T*«||^ 
sional setTctarj' was twice in- oni position." lUllv 

dicle<i in 19.')2 and convicted HonestjOffer 

and sentenced in HI.")-!. on a 
federal grand jury iSi;irge ol 
peddling influence (or llie 
sale of ,x>st olfi.e jobs. ,^^ ,^^ ^.^^.^ 

From Phooni.x, An/.. Kepub- ^j^pr to Dawsoii would have 
lican Sen. Barry tk>ldwater, 1,^^^ j„ade if it had not been 
who claaraoteri.'«'d ("nrigress-^jppprg 

man Dawson as -qualified •, >,p^v York, City Board of 
and the Kennedy ofler as Education member and New 
"proper" admitted to a "suspi- 1 York Protestant^^^uncil of 
cion" that Dawson's rejtH-tion Churches President" Rev. Dr 


MAYBE y EXT CHRISTMAS— Babies Lavontie, age 1& months, and Timwy,' 2>a ; 
\curs. didn't sf>,nd Christinas in their oivn home this year. They are available for a^p-^^ 
ti'.n Irom III, Children's Home Sneiety (RE. 3-114E). Maybe next year.'. \ ■:'~-'''^ 




Girl Who Won't 

Receives 
Death Threat 


Giri's Story Jails 1^011 


Presiflcnt and publi.-iici 
John Sengstacke of tlie Cliica- : ^''■'^i •-''<■ .Mailieu.- 
o Defender ne^paper chain escaped death .Saturday ni;,'lit 
believe the 


Alter being treated at Ccn-.home. 
tral Receiving Hospital and] arrest 
released, Tangie Smith told 


He was J)laced under 


'•"'"^^■'^' police .she had been forced to 
when she r.-lused to .speak" in ] 'ake a large dose of narcotics 
priK-^iie to D.tvid Mines while! and was left to die in a motel 
she w.is \ isiting .Margaret Hi!] ! at 4766 S. Main street, Friday. 

Prf)foU-al 1156 E Miss Smilli accused Eunice] something to bgy!? Sometwna to 

W 70th ""'^ '^'"y * classified ad in the 


Sweets denied i the charge 
and told police ! all lie had 
done was to take the girl 
and' a man to tlje rpotel and 
leave them therej. 


J 


and Violet 
Ilih strcei 


Sweets. 30; of 134 'i 


Eagle. They cost only 51 for IE 


would have had to face lhe| "I l)elieve it Was an honest 
ne , I ;Post Office Senate Committeejoffer. 1 profoundly regret liiat 

Qf, 19.357 majority and CharleS|Which is headed by Sen. John- Congressman Dawson did not 

•lioose to serve. I think the 


Harold C. Burton, senior Ne- offer was motivate<l as pari of 


Aiii^ered ai t h c lefusal 
Hines went to his room in' 
ilie same building, got lii.s, 
gun. leiuined and siiot at Miss 
.Mailiews. lie missed. Escaping 
into an adjoining rfiom, slit 
locked herself in. He banged 
on tiie door and tiireatened to 


Street and took police to nisi words. And ttiey gfet retuits 


Only the heavHv Mexican; Despit the thumping 50.904 gro Republican leader in New Uie thrust of the times. Those; "^ '^ " '^■ 

pt^ulated olsl district which i vote majority returned by Ne-|York Slate and district leaderijn the position of leadership! Police lound the gun 5n the 
igave Kennedy a maiority of igro voters in the 55th and 62nd ol Harlem's 12th .\ss<-mbly have decided to break the back yard of the apartment 
30.661 and the heavily jew- 1 districts. Kenne<iy lost the ' District, lommented: moud and there is awareness j building. They booked Hines 


I, 


ish populated 61st district 1 state by some 30,000 and man- ; Pie-Arronged? of tlie .Ne^rro vote." 

which ran up a Kennedy ma- i aged to win Las Angeles coun- if the offer was nude, li Racial Affair 

jorlty of 40,521 topped the ma- 1 ty by a thin 20,000 vote edge, m.iy ha\e been with a pie-i .New York Gov. Nel.son A 
jority given Kennedy in the Hawkins headed the drive for^ arranged uiidei-standing thai . Roc-kefeller who credited the 
62nd district. " Negro votes in the Kennedy Dawson would reject it. I cant Kenne<iy offer to "Henry Cabot 

understand a noan of D.iwson's Lodge's campaign speech" 
political stature turnin? down lauded the President-Elect's 
what is known to be the hi;^- offer to Mr. Dawison as a "woii- 
gest political patronage po-i dreful offer", ^ 

tion in the country' . James Kilpairick. Rahinond 

Former Dodger star J ukiejin^p^^.j^i^pa^tch editor who re- 
Robinson, who figured l>iomi-'c.entlv debated the segrega- 


for assault with 
commit inurder. 


attempt to 


pistol and a sawed-off s 
.iiun. 

'Look out Joe: " Mi-s. tiaicia 
warned her husband. 

At that one of the thugs i^^j^^^^^. ^.j^^ g-^^^ ^^^.^ him phoned about 10 minutes later. '.said he felt that liad i;ie Ken- 

a majority of 11.279 and the *Com* and Get If 

66th contributed a 13..5S1 vote 


wheeled around, aimed 
.Mrs. Garcia and fired. 


at 


Early the next morning 

Hamilton Howard, 40. of 128 

^K. 103rd street, telephoned 

Newton Police Station and 

said he had driven the gtin- 

men's car. In his room police 

found a sawed-oft shotgun. 

—They arrested him and also 

"■j^rrested John Joseph Mendez 

21, of 421?* E. Adams, and 

Robert Eugene Wilkerson 21, 

of the same address. The three 

inen were charged with 

murder. 


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Receives Grant 

liATON ROUGE. La.. —-For 

his tec'liniqufs as a researeher , 

ai>d efficiency as a teaciier. ' 

Dr. Woodrow II. Jones, pro-, 

l'os,sor of biolo.^y at Southern! 

l'ni\ersily. has been^given a! 

S9.9<)d N a t i n a I Science 

Faculty Fellowship- to doi 

lion issue with Dr. Martin further lesearcli in the areaj 

Luthei- King on a national 'of .iincitebrare zoology, eco-i 

.nedy offer to Dawson bwn ielevision network, told Vital logy and oceanography. | 

Wheeler said he heard Mrs. | sincere, the President -ElecH information Press that he "had i ■ 


!each of them. Tire eSrdj pre- 1 (Continued from Page 1 • 
.iferred Kennedy by an 11.857iopen the door, he left, but nenily in the Nixon campaign 



FREE 

CUSTOMER PARKING 

AT 

345 ELM AVENUE 


Love tell someone over the; would have named 


another „0 particular ol|)iection to the' 
""ofier." Kilpatri([k added thali 


margin. 

Tlie 55th. G2nd, bard, 65thlphone. "If you want your jqualified Negro, 
and 66th districts all chose turkey,' come and get it." • "There are nian\ .\eguM-s ..j^ „j,j; ^ strictlly racial otter; 

Democratic assembl\-men and Sledge returned in about 'x^^i^r qualified than Dawson, "to repay the colbred- vote. " 
cast majorities for Democratic ' five minutes and demanded i^^obinson said. "I think Ken-j The southern editor praised; 
congressional candidates. Only: his turkey. | nedy has made a lot of good ; oawson as "very sagacious" 

the 55th, represented by Ver- 1 Mrs. Love told him to stand iaPPO'ni'"^"^''- ' ^^""'^ -^ay for rejecting the job. 
non Kirkpatrick. and the 62nd, under the window and she ;«".^"^hing about Brother Bobby , >,-ec,ro Congressman . Pujbert , 
represented bv .Augustus F.' would drop it down to him. I" *>"' -Mr. Kennedy should re- ^j^ of Philadelphia declared 
Hawkins, gave larger major- 1 This angered Sledge who'"^''"]''^'" .^'^^^ .^"* -^«'-'"" ^"'^crypucally: "I do not know 
ities to Kennedy than they broke open the door and rush-jl*"^ """ '" °''"*"' whether the offer was made or 

did to Democratic assembly ;ed toward Mrs. Love with the Tm Pleased' not I have not talked to either : 

candidates. KiJpatrick won by heavy wTcnch in hi.s hand and I ' 'i ^^''-^ a fine gestuic but Congressman Dawson or the 
a 24.119 majoriU' while Haw- started heating her, Wheeler; 't is pos.sil)le they got agree- 1 President-Elect. ' 
kins' maiority ■was 25 045. 'said. |ment from Dawson in advance. .\ spokesman for New York 

The 65th district, represent- j Sledge then pushed the/« '""» '^ ''o^^"- '^ '^ •* known .Continued |)n Page 4i 
ed by Assemblj-man Jess Un-|.voun g woman into the 
ruh who doubled in brass as J kitchen. 

the Kennedy Southern Califor- ' Wheeler said, he heard Mrs. 
nia campaign manager, gave j Love warn Sledge not to come 
Unruh a 14,943 vote majoritj;: toward her. Her warning was 
while preferring Kennedy by followed by 



mt th 


WITH THESE 



• • • 


'I 


BANG-UP NEW YEAR 


. ..J the sharp sound ^ 

an 11,279 margin. Don Allen . of gunshot. Sledge lay mo- 1 


BE READY FOR 1961 . . . 

TOP WAGES - STEADY WORK 

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swept the 63rd district by auionless on the floor. 


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— New Coarage in iSooth — 



TERROR OF \EJy ORLEANS— This little six-yiar-old youngster, escortal by her 
parents and U.S. marshals. i:.as vne of four^ uho brought terror to hate- filled .\ f li' 
Orleans raeists, starting Aor. 14. The battl ■ for integration of the first schools in the 
Deep South ^continues as the year ends. 





SOUTH REPLIES TO SIT-IXS—The student sit-ins that mept the country, after 
starting quietly in Greensboro. S. C. on Feb. 1. marked a strong, new beginninij in 
race relations in the South — the most important dei elopment in the United States for 
Negroes during 1960. The v.recking of the home, in mid-.-l pril, of .Itty. Z. .llcxander 
Looby, City Council member, in Nashville, ivas part of the South' s reply to the slu- 
» dent demornstrations. 

--Sooth Africans iSpeak Out — 



^BURN HATED PASSBOOKS— In an historic act of defiance, South Africans, in 
March, burned the hated passbooks, symbol of inferior status, as they staged a nafion- 
ti'ide strike. Picture uas taken at Orlando, near Johannesburg. 

Cal. 'Equal Rights' Statutes 

A complete catalogue of California statutes relat- 
ing to civil rights was issued Tuesday by Atty. Gen. 
Stanley Mosk under the title of "Equal Rights Under 
the Law." 

The format used in the publication is a ready 
reference listing under the ^ ' 



CONGO STORY — Most significant development abroad 
during the current year, as far or Negroes are concerned, 
IT the continuing story of the Congo, centering around de- 
posed premier Patrice Lumumba, and his advocacy of a 
strong, democratically elected central government. 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


The California Eagle— 3 


Sit-ins, N'Orleans, 
Congo, Kennedy 

Head 1960 News 

Three Negro college students • in Greensboro, 
N.C., and four little Negro first grade pupils in New 
Orleans furnished the two top domestic stories of 
1%0 in the area of race relations. 

It was symptomatic of our troubled times that 

the stories of what happened*^ 

in Greensboro and New Or-|g>^ voter is a tangled one. He 
leans topped the news that started out as less than a fav- 
Negro voters threw their jonte for the Democratic nom- 
weight around on Nov. 8 and ^ 'nation, far behind Sen. Hu- 
decided who was to become , l>ert Humphreys and Adlai 


— Kennedy Booed, Idolized ^^ 



i -.1 


BOOED IN JULY — Sen. John F. Kennedy smiles as he was booed at the packed meet- 
ing at the Shrine Auditorium in July during the Democratic convention, when he already 
had the nomination practically in his pocket. ' 


president of the United, States. 
Spotlight on Africa ; 
It was inevitable that Africa 
would furnish the top interna- 
tional story of 1960, and sig- 
nificant that the country 
where the most far-reaching 
conflict erupted was the Con- 
ga, which sirffered most bit- 
terly during its years of sub- 
mission to coloiriali.sm. 


Stevenson. Negro voters let 
Kennedy know how they felt 
at>out him in the Wisconsin 
primaries when he trailea 
Humphrey^ by three and four 
to one in tne Negro precincts. 
Washington, D.C. voters also 
turned him down by hand- 
some majorities and when he 
appeared at a Los Angeles 
pre-convention rally in Shrine 


There, freedbm coming like auditorium he got a mixed 

a bolt out of the: blue, touch- round of boos and cheers. 
,cd off fratricidal strife, faced i Couldn't Take Nixon 

ithe United Nations with its| What looked like the politi- 

niost crucial test, and put new cal handwriting on' the wall 
! strains on the already strained eame when Kennedy foix^ 

relations between the United 

States Pn the one hand and 


subjects of emplojTnent, hous- 
ing, business services, educa- 
tion and government prac- 
tices, with key statutes under 
the separate codes. Copies are 


Franklin H. Williams. 

"In the past few years Cali- 
fornia has joined the growing 
list of states which provide 
statutory support to the con- 


available for distribution to stitutional promise of equal 
individuals and organizations protection and opportunity for 
recfuesfing them. all citizens," declares Atty. 

The reference catalogue was Gen. Mosk in the foreward of 


compiled under the direction 
of Mosk and Asst. Atty. Gen. 


the catalogue. 
"In employment, housing 


business services and public 
facilities, our legislature has 
substantially broadened the 
opportunities available to all 
regardless of race or religion, 
"While we can be proud of 
these statutes, in cold fact, 
laws are only printed docu- 
ments. Whether they become 
living expressions of constitu- 
tional guarantees translated 
into realistic expK?riences will 
be determined by you, the 
citizen. Knowledge of the law 
and compliance with it are 
vital prerequisites for these 
provisions to be meaningful." 


the Soviet Union on the other. 

All of the major issues that 
are keeping the world in tur- 
moil are joined in the Congo 
struggle for power — the Af- 
ricans' fight for independence 
against its, colonial masters, 
the struggle of backward 
countries against poverty, ig- 
norance and separatist ten- 
dencies, and the world-wide 
struggle between the Soviet 
bloc and the West. 

Sot at Counter 

By contrast, independence 
came to 40 million j^frieans 
in Nigeria in an orderly fash- 
ion. 

The three Greensboro col- 
lege students made history by 
the simple act of sitting down 
to buy a cup of coffee at a 
lunch counter .on Feb. 1, 1%0, 
where coffee was for sale to 
the general public. The trou- 
ble was that the lunch count- 
er was located in a variety 
store which solicited Negro 
patronage in every depart- 
ment except its cafe. 

The quiet action of those 
three students served as the 
spark that lighted fires of re- 
volt across the South, leaping 
from town to town, and state 
to state. As the sit-ins spread, 
attracting ever more thous- 
ands, awakening a sympa- 
thetic response in the north, 
it became apparent that a new 
movement had entered upon 
the American scene, bringing 
to the fore a fresh layer of 
young leadership, and signal- 
ing an unprecedented south- 
wide assault on all phases otf 
discrimination. 

Not UtUe Rode 

The fight In New Orleans 
wsis not a new fight. The 
same battle has already been 
carried on in Little Rock, in 
Clinton, Tenn., in Nashville, 
and elsewhere. But^lt is, also, 
a different fight. 

All the four Negro first 
graders — all of them girls- 
wanted to do was to enter two 
New Orleans- schools thereto- 
fore reserved for whites. That 
was like the attempts of the 
nine high school students in 
Little Rock in 1957. 

But New Orleans is not Lit- 
tle Rock; in addition to which 
it comes after Little Rock. The 
governor of Louisiana and the 
legislature are fighting with 
h»ud bombast against integra- 
ifon — but the governor has- 
n't called out the troops, the 
mobs haven't found ready re- 
sponse, and the Federal courts 
have stood firmly by their de- 
cision. 

The particular significance 
of the New Orleans fight lies 
in the fact that it is the first 
city in the Deep South to face 
the school integration issue 
head on. 

Tangled Story 

The atory of President Elect 
John F. Kennedy and the Ne- 


when 
the nomination of Texas Sen- 
ator Lyndon B. Johnson as his 
vice presidential running 
mate. A Johnson spokesman 
had been booed so loudly at 
(Continued on Page 4) 



IDOLIZED IN NOVEMBER— Just before the elections, less than four months after 
he uas booed. Sen. Kennedy uas greeted as a messiah when he appeared at the Elks Hall 
on Central .Ive. "Touch him! Touch him!" uas the cry as thousands pressed toward 
him, hands outstretched. The Negro vote proved decisive in Kennedy's election. 



MARCHING FOR FREEDOM— Thousands of Los 
Angeles residents marched from the Shrine .luditorium to 
the Sports .irena. headquarters 
lino, last July, to make known 


of the Democratic Conven- 
ihcir demand for "Freedom 


Now!" Heading the march, being interviewed as they 
walked, are the Rev. Martin Luther King, center, and Roy 
If^'ilkins, to the right of King. . 



INDEPENDENCE— Cyril 

Uchuno, Nigeria's secretary 
of External Affairs, addressed 
a dinner meeting here Nov. 
30 celebrating Nigeria's in- 
dependence that became ef- 
fective at the stroke of mid- 
night. 


Lumumba Forces 
Stage Kidnapping 


I that some 300,000 Baluba 
! tribesmen are starving. The 
U.N. was rushing food to the 
area. 

A section of the province 
has been taken over by Al- 
bert Kalonji who has declared 
it independent. He has given 
no aid to the starving Balu- 
l>as. 


Pro-Lumumba forces in the Congo this week 
demonstrated that they are as adept at kidnapping as 
are the forces of pro-Western "strong man," Col. Jo- 
s(!ph Mobutu, who last month arrested and impris- 
oied the former premier, Patrice Lumumba 

In a raid Sunday, 60 soldiers 
fiom Stanleyville, Oriental 
Piovince capital which is con- 
•trjlled by Lumumba follow- 
ers, arrested Jean Miruho, 
ppesident of neighboring Kivu 
Piiovince, at the capital city of 
Biikavu, two other members 
of the provincial government 
arid an army officer. 

[The ease with which the 
raid was carried out seemed 
to substantiate reports that a 
part of the Congolese garrison 
in Bukavu is pro-Lumumba. 

3ukavu was the scene last 
week of a six-hour battle be- 
tvyeen Nigerian and Congolese 
trrtops who had imprisoned 52 
Austrians on the grounds that 
th?y were Belgians in dis- 
gi) ise. 

Miruho, the provincial presi- 
dent, ha* shifted his alleg- 
iance back and forth between 
Lumumba and Mobutu as the 
seesaw struggle for power con- 
tiiiued. 

In southern Kasai Province, 
meanwhile, the U.N. reports 


i Tent Colony 
Set Up for 
Refugees 


Man, 122, Dies 
in W. Virginia 

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — 
William Edward "Uncle Dave" 
Davis, the oldest man in' the 
country drawing Social Secur- 
ity benefits, died here Satur- 
day. 

He "calculated" he would 
have been 122 years old 
Christmas Day. 

Davis said his parents were 
slaves on a tobacco plantation 
at Winston-Salem, N. C. and 
that he was named for the 
plantation owner. 


SOMERVILLE, Tenn. — The 
first seven families evicted 
from their homes in Fayette 
County took Up . living in a 
tent colony near here this 
week, as a federal judge in 
Memphis refused to grant a 
government plea to halt 
further evictions. 

For Christmas, the tent- 
dwellers, the first of an ex- 
pected 300J faimilies, were 
given food] by the Fayette 
County Civic and Welfare 
League. 

From Chicago, meanwhile, 
it was reported, food and 
clothing is being shipped In 
by truckloads. 

The tents are pitched on a 
200-acre farm owned by Shep 
Towles, a Negro. The floors 
are of earth. Inside are beds, 
kerosene lamps and wood 
stoves. The families have 
piled their household furnish- 
ings behind the tents. 

They get water from Towles* 
house across the road. 

The iFayette County Negroes 
werfe evicted after they regis- 
tered and voted at the Nov. 
8 elections — and after the 
cotton crop had been gathered. 


\ 



4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


Loren Miller, Publisher 

Th« California EagI* stands for complete integration of 
Nogreos into evory phase of American life through the democratic 
procosMS. 

We favor; 

1. FIPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Docont housing for oil Amoricans. 

3. Roprosontotion in Government. 

4. Adoqucrte old age pensions and social security. 

5. Coiloctive bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Dovolopmont and oncouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: - 

1. Jim Crow in ail forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

Published Every Thursday for Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Comer of Vc^n Ness AXminster 5^135 


J nc <y^mportayit <^\q 


Battleaxe & Bread 


cwspcfoer 


papi 


Citizens and Police 


In outlining his opposition to 
a proposed Police Review Board 
which would investigate com- 
plaints against police officers. 
Mayor Norris Poulson called at- 
tention to the fact that the Police 
Commission has the authority to 
refer complaints to a Hearinc: 
Examiner for investigation and 
report. These examiners are ci- 
vilians who are directly respon- 
sible to the Commission. 

The mayor is technically cor- 
rect but the ordinance has fal- 
len into disuse because of the 
timidity of past and present 
Police Commisioners who" insist 
on permitting police officers to 
investigate themselves. 

We don't know whether or 
not the mayor intends to prod 
his police commissioners into ac- 
tion under this ordinance, but we 
hope so. We're not as sure as he 
is that the procedure is an effec- 
tive substitute for the proposed 
police review board, but we do 
think that it should be utilized. 


Present procedures under which 
all complaint.^; are investigated 
by police and under which the 
complainant faces prosecution if 
police investigators decide his 
claim lacks merit are wholly in- 
adequate. 

The maxor's suggestion that 
all police offip^ers be insured i.*: 
a good. one. If such insurance 
were required as the mayor pro- 
poses the citizen whose rights 
were invaded would be able to 
recover from the insurer in the 
event that he sued and secured 
a judgment. 

We don't think that every 
person who complains against 
police officers has a just case 
but we do think that wherever 
there has been an abuse of police 
authority the offending officer 
should be penalized and that 
when a court renders a judgment 
against an officer there ought to 
be some assurance tfiat the ag- 
grieved person can recover for 
the harm that has been done. 


Too Little, Too Late 


President Eisenhower's Christ- 
mas Message 'with its plea for 
fair play and tolerance was good 
enough as far as it went, but the 
plain truth is that it was too lit- 
tle and too late. 

The president has been im- 
plored to take a strong stand 
against racial discrimination and 
segregation ever since he took 
public office, and the pressure to 
take that stand was intensified 
after resistance stiffened to the 
^ 1954 Supreme Court school de- 
cisions. 

Mr. Eisenhower took refuge 
in weasellng statements on law 
enforcement: he refused to con- 
demn the Manifesto signed by 
more than a hundred southern 
senators and congressmen call- 
ing for resistance to court orders; 
he carefully evaded anv state- 


ment that could have been con- 
strued as approval of school inte- 
gration. 

The New Orleans situation, 
that apparently evoked h i s 
Christmas Message, can be 
traced to his own inactivity and 
to the timidity and equivocation 
with which he treated the school 
integration decision. 

What he said last week will 
fall on ears made deaf by six 
years of constant, insistent and 
hysterical opposition to the Su- 
preme Court's mandate. The 
president of the United States 
could have made himself heard 
above the din of racism. Future 
historians will rank the presi- 
dent's failure to speak out on ra- 
cial issues as the greatest single 
deficiency- of the Eisenhower ad- 
ministration. 


Reapportionment Plan 


ii California legislators are 
looking for an equitable plan for 
i-eapportionment of the south 
central area of Los Angeles thev 
should adopt the proposal made 
by a non-partisan citizen's com- 
mittee to the Assembly Commit: 
tee on Reapportionment last 
week. 

Under the proposal, four as- 
sembly districts would be created 
in the south central area of the 
city. Two of those assembly dis- 
tricts would be combined to form 
one congressional district and 
the other two would be combined 
to form another congressional 
district 

The profKJsed districts — both 
assembly and congressional — 
9Te contiguous and each of lhe:r. 
contains persons with an identi- 
ty of social, political and econom- 
ic interests. The assemblymen 
aiid congressmen who represent- 
ed them in Sacramento or in 
Washington would have the ad- 
vantage of speaking for united 


constituencies. 

It is quite true that a part of 
the unity may be traced to the 
fact that each district now has. 
or \\\\\ have in the very near fu- 
ture, a majority of Negro voters. 
Those voters reside in their com- 
munities less from choice than 
from the pressure that forces 
them to live in racially segregs*- 
ed areas of our city. 

That very segregation shapes 
their beliefs and attitudes on po- 
litical, economic and social is- 
sues. It is symptomatic of the 
fact that they are denied econom- 
ic opportunity and deprived of 
the free choice of residence. They 
can never break out of the vi- 
cious circles that hem them in 
until they secure a greater voice 
in government, local, state, and 
federal. 

The realities of American po- 
litical life are that Negroes do 
not win congressional seats until . 
and unless a given district has 
a majority of Negro voters. 


By Lester B. Granger 



Troubled City 

NEW ORLEANS — T h i .-^ 
metropolis of the bayou coun 
try is a deeply troubled cit\. 
New Orleans, which for gen- 
erations -has prided itself on 
being cx)smop>olitan. sophisti- 
cated and far above the hog- 
m'aw-and-chittlin' kind of 
naked race hate for which the 
Old South is notorious, has 
suddenly found that "it" can 
happen here — just as disgrace- 
fully and with the same cal- 
amitous results a.< in Little 
Rook. 

Dunn' two. da\s in town 
devoted tx)nstanljy to inter- 
views, meeting--; and conversa- 
tions with lead- 
ers of both 
races. I have 
not found one 
single person 
of optimistic 
outlook so far 
as the immedi- 
ate future o f 
race relations 
i s concerned. 
This i.N not to 
Granger say that the\ 
are despairing. On the- con- 
trary, theirs ;s for the most 
part a realistic detemiination 
that sees plainly the obsi<'.cl?s 
facing so.-ial r^efonn but re- 
fuses to bp.i'K aw.-iy from whHt 
they arc dotcrminei must be 
a winnir.;: ti^h: 

Many Obrtades 
These leade.-s l.sied some uf 
the obstacles fo.- m> bc.nefi: 
The b.ggost. nf i-aur,se. :> the 
uncou:h. t',amboy.<n;ly irrc 
.>;pons.b!c co\err.or with his 
stooge ic^.S.slature Sitting r. 
Baton F.v>a::e a n d pass;n^ 
troublc-.-T-. a k ; r g legislation 
as fa?: a> dirt\. clever i:tt!e 
minds car. cor..~c:\e i: Ar.d 
hack of ;.'-.c legi.-iature is the 
fact of a ;:-h: control on th'' 
state go\e:nmer.: by the rur.^1 
parishes -."rvurtie^. lo >ou ' 
where illiteracy, miscegena- 
tion ar.ci fet'>hlc-rr..n.''ednes.~ are 
as fam;'.;ar :.">day as the hoil 
w-ee\;! wa,- ...omc ^enerat..ons 
ag.->. 

.^r.oTher :mpor:art obstacle 
to progress :« the slush fund 
provided b>' the legislature for 
the emp'.o\Tner.t of a staff of 
lawyers who have nothing to 
do except f:gure out new wa.vs 
for h-.iraiJslng Negro citizens 
and blocking off intervention 
by the various deparrments of 
inte.-es; ;n the Federal govern 
ment. The SSirt-OOO available for 
r.hi? pu.-pose can hire quite a 
lot of crooked legal talent — 
and such talent is easy to find 
around the State House at 
Raton Rouce 

WUhy-Woshy Mayor 

Still another obstacle is the 
la.k of any firm, determined 
government in the City of New 
Orleans. Mayor Mo.-rison is re 
garded by those with whom I 
talked is a pleasant man who 
wants to get along, retnain in 
City Hall and make as few 
eiiemies as possible. Conse- 
quentlv. :.hese cntics fee'., the 


Mayor enjo\-s little real re- 
spect and wields almost no in- 
fluence that can be used in 
this emergency. 

A. fourth obstacle to recov- 
ery in racial relations in the 
predictable future is the size, 
leadership and financial re- 
sources of the White CiUzens 
Council. Its headed by a 
brutish, smart, wealthy and 
compIeteK' unscrupulous oper- 
ator>who has set his sights on 
a political empire like that 
once headed by Huey Long. 
Only Huey Long declared 
"every- man a king," while 
Perez promises only to main- 
tain "white supremac>-." He 
therefore has a smaller fol- 
lowing than Long, but what 
the Negro- haters lack in num- 
bers they make up for in un- 
inhibited obscenity and fan- 
tastic exhibitions of depravity. 

Low Registration 

The fifth obstacle tha. all of 
my friends reported to me i.< 
the low registration record of 
Negro voters. They tell me 
that in a city with more than 
2iK).000 citizens of color, there 
are only 35.000 colored voters. 
This IS a large percentage 
compared with most southern 
cities, true, but in New Or- 
leans there is more education, 
better o.-gan.zation and less of 
direct action to discourage Ne- 
gro voter registration. .\nd the 
reed is so much greater for an 
informed, united and alert",Ne- 
gro electorate that these lead- 
ers i-onsider ;t a t.^a.gedy that 
more has not been done along 
this line. .\nd they end their, 
report with the sad comment 
that in the .\^.000 "Nt'gro voters 
j;roup there .ire probably 2^ 
<iiffercnt factions — a hang- 
over from the Huey Long 
every man a king kind of 
thinking. ' 

Well. 1 responded with fee 
h!c locula.-ity. we never had a 
Huey Long in Manhattan or 
nearby hut we surely have 
split leadership— probably far 
more than 23 different factions 
in. Harlem alone. But jocular- 
ity was not what they wanted 
- and what they wanted. I 
couldn't supply. .\s I told 
nearly 6iV guests of both races 
vv-ho compn.sed a record-break- 
•.ng dinner gatheriypH>n my 
!a.-t evening in town, there 
:sn t any patent formula guar- 
anteed to produce success in a 
dr,\c against hatred that is a 
combination of igno.-ance and 
fear 

T>.e only thing you can do 
IS to sia.-t driving, ke*p driv- 
ing and drive until you are 
through with the job— know- 
ing that if you turn rabbit you 
will breed a following gen- 
eration of rabbitty leadership. 
but if you show dedication 
and courage, those who take 
u the .iob after you v^ill show 
t.hese qualities ih even greater 
measure. It won't be a MerrA" 
Christmas m New Orleans for 
most but they are working 
^ ard for a Nevip Year ahead. 



(Continued from Page 1» 
He never will. Take a look at 
the World Series winners in 
ba.seball. over the past decade 
Or better still, take a look at 
the losers in the major lea 
gues. The fewer Negroes thev 
have, the ^ower liovv i thev 
frnish 

They Sored Us 

If ;t hadn I been for N* 
gro runners, .lumpers and hur 
dlei-s. the I'niied Stales would 
have made a sad showing in 
the Olympics last summer, 
.^nd guf^ss who are the big 
names m the professional and 
ama;eur basketball" Negroes. 
.of course. Who do you think 
IS the best boxer m the, whole 
wide world" 

For .<ome reason that es- 
capes me. the example of Ne- 
groes in sp)orts has little ef- 
fect on .Americans The few 
heavy thinkers who put their 
minds to it come up with the 
» laim that there's something 
about Negroes' arms, or legs. 
or heels, or toes that makes 
them able to run faster or 
.iump higher or hit a baseball 
farther or dunk a basketball 
m a hoop quicker or ruh 
better with a football than 
other people 

Tliat's Nonsense 

That s all nonsense. Negro 
athletes excel in their chosen 
f.elds because they are thrust 
into positions where race can't 
hold them back once they get 
the chance to hit a baseball. 
run. jump, catch a forward 
pass or ^ust another guv' in 
the jaw. They've got the same' 
opportunity as their competi- 
tors and they're out to hold 
their .lobs. The only way they 
can do that is to outdo the 
comp>etition. 

I don't expect to be around 
when 11 happens but some day 
sornebody is going to hit on 
the fact that America could 


get where it wants to be fast- 
er by using the skills of Ne- 
groes just as those skills art 
utilized in athletic competi- 
tion. If somebody gave me the 
commission I could round up 
' a bunch of Negro lav\yers who 
could do a mighty good job 
for a corporation thai wanted 
to win lawsuits. They would 
be about as tough in the court 
room as Willie Mays and 
Hank .\aron are in baseball 
or Wilt Chamberlain and El- 
gin Baylor are on the basket- 
ball court. 

Just As Hard 
.\r.d if 1 were presadeni of 
the United States i don't wor- 
ry. I wont make in I could 
pick up a pretty good set of 
public servants vvho had at 
least one Negro great grand- 
father. Given th? opportunity 
to hold the kind of jobs I 
could give them, they would 
hustle just as hard to prove 
that they were as much better 
than their competition as Jim 
Brown does to show that he's 
the best fullback in the busi- 
ness. 

Oh well, it was only yester- 
day that Negroes were barred 
from professional and amateur 
sp>orts. I supjKjse it isn't too 
much to hc^>e that the time 
will come when the example 
will sink in. America sure 
could do with a set of diplo- 
mats as good in their busi- 
ness as Floyd Patterson is 
with his fists. We might even 
bring that Mr K. down a peg 
or two. 


Art"^xhiWt 

Loans from 45 museums 
and many private colliections 
in eleven countries comprise 
the .\rt Nouveau ' exhibition 
opening at the Los Angeles 
Count>- Museum Jan 18. 



REGULAR MEETISG 


'J'u.as the nerk before Christmas and all .through our 
uorld. 

.Vo/ n creature uas thinking, but uith hilliold un- 
furled 

If ith dreams was bedazzled, by lights, lolored, be- 
pearled. 

// hile our leaders uere meeting ue. dulled beyond 

fright. 
I'erdammter .1 merikanschen! See Old Suk is quirk. 
i nd General Hensinger, in IVashingtoii, right/ 
.Mit Donner and Blitzen that is the trick; 
Soon Deutscher Soldaten and for all. Good Xight.' 


U. S. South, Conga Fight 
Dominate News in 19^ 


'Continued from Page 3^ 
the Shrine meeting that he 
couldnt finish his statement 
and Johnson's selection by the 
Democratic convention loosed 
a chOT\is of bitter atttacks 
trom Negro delegates, some- of 
whom went home to sulk in 
iheir p9iitical tcrits. 

Forti^ately for Kennedy his 
opponent was Vice President 
Richard M. Nixon whose pop- 
ularity fias been at a low 
*bb in SegTo communities all 
during -;ifis political life. No 
matter how much they mut- 
tered, Jfegra voters knew all 
along that they would vote 
for Kennedy as against Nixon. 
As the campaign drew to a 
close a Georgia judge tossed 
the Rev. Martin Luther King 
inta, jail for four months on ' 
whiit is known in court house 
language as a bum beef. 
DMiding VotM 

Kennedy called King's wife 
and his brother and campaign 
manager, Robert, telephoned 
the judge. That about did it. 
Kennedy carried the criUcal 
states of Illinois, Missouri. 
Texas, Pennsylvania, and New 
Jersey by razor thin majori- 
ties *— and those majorities 
came frcwi Negro precincts. 

Ironically enough, Negro 
voters cast the deciding votes 
for him in South Carolina and 
North Cairolina. The Republi- 
can national chairman sum- 
med it up after the returns 
w^e all m: "We didn't pay 
enough attention to the Negro 
voters," he said ruefully. 

A? the struggle against seg 
greg^tion and discrimination 

Unified Casting 

'Continued from Page It 
Vince Townsend, with the 
Screen Extras Guild. 
. Neither of these actions 
brought about any change in 
the situation. In fact, pressure 
from some sources caused con- 
cern among the 50 members 
of International Artists, so 
that membership dwindled to 
10. Some mehibers reported 
that they were told they 
would not receive calls for 
jobs as long as they continued 
to belong to the organization. 

Under these conditions, the 
organization disbanded, but 
the fight continued. Ellis filed 
the petition to the FEP Com- 
mission in October, along with 
a telegram from Sammy Davis 
Jr.. requesting action. 

The FEP Commission took 
up the case from there and 
held conferences both with 
the extras and with Central 
Casting. 

Agreement in principal has 
now been reached, though no 
precise date has as yet been 
set for putting the new policy 
into effect . . 


in the Uniled States contin- 
ued on many fronts and in 
«verj' section of the country, 
so, too, the comi>anion strug- 
gle for independence (Uruhu!) 
continued throughout Africa. 

Of special significance was 
the flare-up in South Africa in 
March, when p>olice of)ened 
fire on thousands of unarmed 
Africans who were protesting 
against the law compelling 
them to carry "passbooks." 
Scores of .\fricans were kUIed 
and hundreds wounded. The 
day of the massacres hcis gone 
down in history as "bloody 
Monday." 

Those demonstrations, which 
ai one time reached the pro- 
portions of a general strike, 
are a prelude to mighty erup- 
tions there, and elsewhere 
that cannot long be delayed. 


Letters 

I>ear Editori 

In regards to your article 
published in the last of Oc- 
tober there was an editorial 
stating that there were over 
5.000,000 Negro voters in the 
United States. 

For my information, would 
you please inform me on what 
basis you have reached this 
figure. I have in my posses- 
sion a letter from the Depart- 
ment of Commerce, by Fred- 
erick H. Mueller. Secretary, 
Washington 25, D.C. stating 
that there were 107 million 
civiliaris of voting age at the 
date of the November general 
election. 

Of this and out of this 
group of citizens reaching the 
voUng age, etc., 9.988,000 are 
Negroes. This estimate in- 
cluded residents of the United 
States that were ineligible be- 
cause of confinement in men- 
tal institutions and prisons, 
and those required to pay poll 
tax, etc., and subject to other 
barriers such as living in the 
District of Columbia. 

As a continued reader of 
your paper, I would like this 
-iWormation to impress upon 
njy friends and associates to 
vote, so will you please in- 
form me of the percentage of 
Negro vote in this election. I 
know that it was low, and 
what percentage would you 
say, in your honest <H>inion 
actually voted? And the num- 
ber of registered voters? 
Yours truly 

H. ANDERSON. 

Ed. Note: — Because of 
southern restrictions on vot- 
ing, failure to register in the 
north and west and disquali- 
ficaUon only about half <rf 
•Uglble Negroes can, or do 
vote. 


Dawson Bid 
Left-Honiied? 

(Continued from Page 2) 

Democratic Congressman 
Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., who 
is honeymooning in Puerto 
Rico, said Congressman Powell 
"wouldn't get into this even il- 
he were in the city." 

Associate Editor of The 
Pittsburgh Courier, George 
Schuyler, said of the Dtwson 
refusal: "I don't know what 
was in his mind in rejecting 
the job. It would have been a 
great thing few the group htd 
he taken it." > '"'" 

The man who started it afl - 
— Henry Cabot Lodge — ^would- 
have no comment on the situ- 
ation. , « 

In turning down the job. 
Congressman Dawson was 
passing up a department 
which employs half a million 
people and which, last ye*r, ■ 
operated on a budget of 3.8 
billion dollars. \ ^ 

The Illinois Congressman is 
known to be of failing health. 
Rumors had beeti rife nation- 
ally recently that he would 
resign his post in the House 
of Representatives. 

Baby Girl Dies 
in Xmtis Flames 

(Continued froim Page 1) 
the charred body of the little 
girl' under the l)cd in the bed- 
room. 

Charles was taken to (Gen- 
eral Hospital, suffering frtHn 
second and third; degree bums 
over the whole of his body. 

The children's father had 
left the house a short time 
before the fire broke out 

The City Fire Department 
said the blaze was caused 
when a lighf ' bulb on the 
Christmas tree created- a short 

The fireman >vho rescued 
Charles was David Richardson, 
who climbed through the win- 
dow. 

Another fireman, William 
G. Lowe, of Station .£5. re- 
ceived bums on his hand dur- 
ing rescue attempts. 

C A L I F O R N I A 
EAGLE 

The Important Newspaper" 
2101 W. Vamon Av*. 
Los Angeles 8, CalH. -^ 
AXminster 5-3 135 

LOREN MILLER 
Publisher- 


of 

j, Chu: 

I, cone 

i Tab« 

, 4155 

ning 

throi 

i I Ev 

merl 

Bapt 

'of ( 

. ■ this, 

i' to^'bt 

i vival 

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V 


f~i 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXX 


D«c 


29, 1960 
No. 41 


GRACE SIMONS— Executive Editor 

F. P. WALLER, gr Adv. Mgr- 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

^Circulation Mgr. 

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'61 


-SANTA- 
MONICA 
NEWS 


MIXJSTERS IVIVES ENTERTAIN HUSBANDS— 

In the joyful spirit ''of Christmas members of the AME 
Ministers Jyivfs Alliahce invited their husbands to relax in 
the spirit of the se-ason at the home of Rev. II. H. Brook- 
ins. Pictured from left, front rou- : Mrnes. Pauline Clasco. 
Mary Burks, B'etty Tolivcr. Cleo Love. Grace Kyle. Ann 
Davis, Nora Gibson. Dora Taylor, president of the group: 


.Idah Scott. IliiUic Dell Quinn, Helen Brookins. Margar- 
et Ouens. Bernice Allen, Evangelist Ross. Nellie Stevens 
and Evd'Vicltst Hu'lson. Standing: Re;s. T. L. Scott. L. 
It . Kni'/htt-n. I:. Cricr. Harry Davis. J. P. Gtbspn, Fred 
A. S/ephrn.<. C. It'. Love. Brycc Taylor. Rtifph King, (). .1 . 
Hurks. //. //. Brookins and Stephen Brookins, .1 . K. 
(Juinn. h. I'. If dliams. C. D. Toliver and L. L. Ouens; 
Mrs. Mnttte irUUnms and Mrs. Mary King. I J. Bctnks) 


Rev. M. L. King 
Expected Here 

The California ministers 
and the members of the 
Western Christian Leader- 
ship Conference will meet 
here Saturday, Jan. 14, with 
Rev. Martin Luther King in 
an effort to complete a mer- 
ger of the groups which 
have been assisting in the 
struggle for civil rights 
waged by the Southern 
Christian Leadership Con- 
ference. 


Gr. Tabernacle 
Revival to Open 
On January 8 

Rev. G. L. Dedford, p 
of the Macedonia Baptist 
Church of San Francisco, will 
conduct a revival at Greater 
Tabernacle Baptist Church, 
4155 McKinlcy avenue, begin- 
ning Jan. 8 and continuing 
through Jan. 13. 

Evangelist Dedford was for 


Jehovah's Witnesses to 
Open Assembly Dec. 30 

The University congregation of Jehovah's Wit- 
nesses will usher in the New Year at the Los An- 
geles Trade-Tech Jr. College. They will hold their 
semi-annual assembly in the school auditorium, 
Dec. 30-Jan. 1, where over 2500 delegates will meet 

for advanced ministry train-* ~ ' z 

ing. 

Marcus Johnson, presiding 
minister of the local congre- 
gation, stated that, "entire 
families of the Witnesses ben- 
efit from the Bible discourses 
and dramatizations which 


serve in the public interest. 
I Children as well as parents 
j are taught to apply Bible 
j principles in their daily liv- 
ing." 
pastor. The assembly, sponsored by 
the Watch Tower Bible & 
Tract Society of New York, 
will feature its New York rep- 
resentatives. Tod Jaracz and 
Russell D; Cantwell as well as 
many local ministers. Jaracz 
will deliver the keynote ad- 
dress of welcome at 7 p.m. on 
rtierly pastor of Greater Olivet j Friday which will be followed 
Baptist Church of Los Angeles. I by a symposium stressing. 

Rev. E. S. Johnson, pastor 
of Greater Tabernacle, said 
this week that this is expected 
to be one gf the greatest re- 
vivals ever conducted at the 
church. * 


"Personal growth in the Min- 
istry of Peace," conducted by 
Cantwell. 

A public lecture at 3 p.m. 
Sunday, will be given by Jar- 
acz. 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West, Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1 

"Communion of Joy"— Rev. Howard! R. Carey preaching 

Sunday School-9:30 A.M. Worship-lliOO A.M. 

HEALING SERVICE AT 5 P.M. 


AME Family 

Celebrates 

Christmas 

On Tuesday evening, Decem- 
ber 20. the AME ministers 
wives of greater Los Angeles 
and vicinity, sponsored their 
annual Christmas party. The 
gala affair took place in the 
beautiful spacious manse of 
First AME Church. 1809 Well- 
ington road, the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. H. Hartford Brook- 
ins. It was a colorful and de- 
lightful experience and associ- 
ation for all who attended. 

Mrs. Brice U. Taylor, presi- 
dent of the alliance, together 
with her efficient conjmittees, 
left no detail unattended, in 
making this one of the finest 
Christmas parties ever. All 
who attended were lavish in 
praise for the warmth, friend- 
liness and sincerity that pyer- 
meated the partv. 

Gifts were exchanged, and 
many games were played and 
lovely carol singing was led 
•by Mrs. Ralph King. The la- 
dies, whose honored guests 
were their husbands, were said 
to have taken extreme plea- 
sure in making their hard 
World Calendars working mates feel that their 

On Sunday. Jan. 1 from 3-5 labours are not in vain, and 

p.m. a panel of youth and | that "the wives" are not un- 

young' adult speakers will ! mindful of it.. 

prese.nt "Calendars of the 


Students to 
Be Honored 
At Hamilton 

I Sundav. Jan. 1, at Hamilton 
I Methodist Church. 6330 S. 
I Figueroa street, will be Stu- 
jdent Recognition Day and 

Communion. The following 
I students will bo honored at 
1 the services: Misses Robbie 
|Chappe!!, Gloria Redman. Mar- 
' garct Dixon. Thomasine Davis. 

Donald Bernard. Harry Gip- 

son. Jr.. Clarence Moore. Jr.. 
|Tavis Watson, and Geoffery 

McGlover. 
Rev. John X. Doggett. Jr. 

will be speaking at the 8 a.m. 

service and Dr. T. R. W. Harris. 
Sr. will si)oak at the 10:4.o 
I a.m. service on- the subject 

"The Greatness of a Religious 

Experience." Acts 26:13. Spe- 
cial music will be rend«"ed by 
! the choirs. 


Rev. Welford P. Carter will 
conduct a watch service at 
Calvary Baptist Church from 
10 p.m. through miWiight on 
Saturday, Dec. 31. Holy com- 
munion will be celebrated at 
ld:45 a.m. on Jan. 1. A testi- 
monial ser\ice is on the 
agenda for the evening wor- 
ship hour. 

• • • 

Dart WMton, Sr. 

Dave Weston, Sr., the father 
of Dave Weston, choir leader, 
was in the city visiting his 
son. Death came unexpededly 
and Dave accompanied' the 
body of his father to Lufkin, 
Texas for the funeral and 
burial. Arrangements were 
made by Spalding Mortuary. 

Surviving in addition to the 
choir director are his daugh- 
ters: Mrs. Gessa Mayfield of 
Rustin. La.; Mrs. Weltha Bal- 
ton, Mrs. Wortha Cooper, Mrs. 
Netta Bishop and Mrs. Frank- 
lin McClure; and two sons, 
Willie H. and Matthew C. 
Weston. 

• • « 

ManboU Murray 

Marshall Murray, 40, of 670 
Brooks avenue, was found 
dead in his pick-up truck 
parked in front of 672 Brooks 
avenue, about 2:30 p.m. on 
Dec. 20. 

Funeral services were held 
on Dec. 24 in the Spalding 
.VIortuar>' Chapel, with inter- 
merit in Woodiawn Cemetery. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Mamie Murray, and his 
two children, Marsha Lee and 
.Marshall Junior Murray. Also 
his father and mother, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Murray, and his 
brother Odie Lee .Murray; his 
: aunts, Everta Chalk, Annie 
Gibson, Viola King and Lillie 
.Mae Robinson. Ho was also 
the nephew of Junior, Albert 
Ethel and Blumer Murrayi 

* • • 

NAACP Activities 

The NAACP Installation 
banquet will be held on Jan. 
19. The Executive Board meet- 
ing will be held on Tuesday, 
Jan. 3, at 7:30 p.m. 

The area meeting will be 
held on Feb. 16. 
. * • • 

VENICE NEWS 

' Mr. and Mrs. E. Cole and 
Beverly Cole, of Hennessey, 
Okla. are visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. V. Wilson and Mr. and 
Mrs. M. Gray of Venice. They 
(Continued on Page 12) 


Clergymen Plan Solemn Rites 
Stressing Retrospection, Hope 

Candilelight meditations, introspection and projection of 
hope for the future in peace, brotherhood, mutual under- 
standing and the willingness to share one another's burdens, 
will bt the order of the prayer and watch services, scheduled 
to begin in churches throughout the city Saturday, Dec. 31 
as early as 9 p.m. 

N*w Community Church 

Several dergymen will assist with five minute medita- 
tions as Rev. Anite L. Edmonds, pastor of the New €om- 

, munity Church, 5965 S. Broadway avenue, counts off the last 
hour of 1960. Rev. C. Martin of Little Rock, Ark. will continue 
to preach the week long revival now in progress at the church 

leach night at 7:30. 

Westminstet Presbyterian Church 

10:45 p.m. watch service by candlelight will offer medi- 
I tations and appreciation prayers conducted" by Rev. James 

E. Jones. At 11 a.m. Sunday, the sacrament of baptisjri will be 

consummated as well as the holy Eucharist ceremony, at the 
I 2230 W. Jefferson blvd. church. 

t ' . 

I Bowen Memorial Methodist 

1 A real olefashioned testimonial service will be conducted 

by the Rev. John C. Bain at Bowen, 36th and Trinity streets, 

beginning at 11 p.m. 

First AME Church 

Eighth and Towne will offer New Year's eve services be- 
I ginning at 10:45 p.m. Rev. H. H. Broookins will preach on 
I New Years Day on "God Will Meet Us at Every TUrn." The 
i sacred Lord's Supper will follow. 

Gront AME Church 

Rev. H. W. Murph will hold candlelight watch service at 

11-12 p.m. Saturday at the 105th and Central avenue church. 

I Rev. F. K. Price will speak at the 10:45 a.m. service on Sunday. 

I Word AME Church 

i - Rev. L. S. Odom will conduct services at the 25th and 
Magnolia street sanctuary beginning at 10:45 p.m. Saturday. 
At 10:45 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 1, Rev. Odom will preach on "A 
.Meritoriu5 Decision," with holy communion following the 
serrnon. 

People's Independent Church of Christ 

j Rev. Maurice A. Dawkins will issue ai midnight altar call 
for prayers for the New Year at the 18th and Paloma street 
church. The High S(^hool and college students will interrupt 
their annual party in the basement of the church at 11 p.m. 
to join in the meditation candlelight service. Following the 
midnight service the party will continue with adults partici- 
pating with their children for the first festive occasion of the 
year. -^^ ~ d^ 

Rev. Dawkins will preach on "Safer Than a Known Wa^' 
at the 8 and 11 a.m. services on Sunday. 

McCoy Memorial Baptist Church 

Starting at 9 p.m. Rev. E. A. Anderson will have the Revs. 
C. Chambers, W. Duncan, S. R. Russel, E. Brown, A. McCord, 
L. Walker and A. Fortune as guest speakers during the watch 
service at the 802 E. 46th street church, Saturday evening. 

Holman Methodist Church | 

Rev. L. L. White will conduct the 11 p.m. hour-lorig ser- 
vice of gratitude, introspection and retrospection at the 3320 
W. Adams blvd. church. The carillon at the church will 
sound the stroke of midnight and send forth the "message of 
the birth of a new day and the year 1961. 

Other Churches 

Watch services are also scheduled at Price Chajjel AME, 
Mt. Sinai, Victory, Trinity-, St. Andrews and St. Paul Baptist 
Churches. Also the numerous Catholic and Episcopal congre- 
gations will also join in the prayers for more understanding 
among men and nations and for peace of mind and strength of 
heart for everyman in 1961. 

Exi>erience the spiritual lift gained during the watch ser- 
vice at a favorite church. Join neighbors in the church near- 
est home. 


The California feagle— 5 
Thursday, December 29, 196 



EVANGELIST — Rev. G. 
L. Dedford of San Fran- 
cisco will conduct a revival 
at Greater Tabernacle Bap- 
tist Church beginning Jan. S. 


Bethel Love 
Feast Set 

Bethel AME Church. 1511 W. 
36th street, reportedly ■ pre- 
pared its congregation for the 
new year with its closing serv- 
ice of the year on Wednesday 
evening. A' Love Feast was 
conducted by the newly 'ap- 
pointed minister. Rev. Fred E. 
Stephens for the class leaders, 
officers and members. This 
spiritual emphasis service 
wsis designed to prepare the 
group - for the sacrament of 
holy communion which will be 
consummated at both the 8 
and 11 a.m. services on Sun- 
day, Jan. 1. 

Preparations are being made^ 
at Bethel for the relocation of 
the church. 



Wayne C. Howard 

M. D. 

231 V^. Vernon Avenue 
ADams 3-6191 ' 


-HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH- 


6330 so. FIGUEROA ST. PLeasant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. DOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 

Saturday. 10 p.m. — Watch Service. Rev. J. J. Lewis Preaching 

8 a.m. — Rev. J. W. Doggett. Jr.. Preaching 

"Where to Start"— Gen. 1..! 

9:30 a.m. — Church School (for All Ages) 

10:45 am. — Youth Church 

10:45 a.m. — Rev. J. N. Dogget, Jr Preaching 

6:30 p.m. — Methodist Youth and Wesley Fellowship 

7:30 p.m. — Vesper Communion Service 


World,'! with guest artist 
Robert- O'Neil presenting a 
dramatic interlude, at the 
Baha'i Center. 331 S. New 
Hampshire avenue. 

Coordinator of the program 
is Serrita Carmargo Herbert. 


Election 

The Baptist Ministers Union 
will hold election of officers 
at the meeting on Tuesday. 
Jan. 3 at 11 a.m. in McCoy 
Memorial Baptist Church, 802 
E. 46th street. 


NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC. 

5965 S. Bi;oadway Avenue— Rev. Anita L Edmonds, Pastor 

Pentacost.al and Interracial 

9:30 A.M.-Sunday School 10:45 A.M.-Worship Service 

7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.— Prayer Service 


"■ "^c called A>uftiUtm<f ^amiltf. . . .— 

... a precious memory: elegant mortuary surroundings, 
beautiful cars, services in our own church— truly a tribute 
of distinction." 


Funeral Dirtitors - Serving 
1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET 


All IVith the Finest 
- Richmond 7 9121 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Ghurcli 

EAST 36th AND TRINITY STREETS - REV. JOHN C. BAIN, MINISTER 

SUNNDAY; JANUARY 1 
HOIY COMMUNION - REV. IAIN PREACHING AT 9 AND 11 A.M. 

The public is cordially invited to attend. 


Terry ftavensda/e 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING <r 

_1379 W. 38fh PLACE - RE. 4-7915 


fAlNTAL COMFORrCRl 


\iP\Rnu/ki ADV/sor, 


CHU;iCH 

OF 

CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

- 

i 

3125 

W. 

ADAMS BLVD. 


11 a 

.m.— Morning Worship Service 


Rev. 

James H. 

Hargett WiU Speak 


SL'^'DAY SCHOOL, 

9:30 

a.m 

—Kindergarten Through 5lh 

Grade 


11 

a.m. 

-6th Grade Through High School 1 


ELDER J. B. MOORE 

Divme Healer From Birth 

AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER. WE WILL NOT FAIL 

Church at the Sons irf GocJ— Moses & Aaron 

217 [.Florence Ave. PL 1-6892 

421 N. 4th Ave., Pocatello, Idaho' CE. 2-9438 



WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones. Pastor 

9-30 and 11.00 a.m.— Morning Worship 

9 30 a.m.— Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade — Adult Classes 

11 00 a.m —Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr 

7 p.m. — Westminster Bible Hour 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 

1564 Wr 36fh PLACE AX. 1-9831 

AAgssages to All 

Services Sunday and Thursday at 8 P.M. 

Wednesday 2-4 P.M. 

REV. OTIS STOVALL, Minister 



First JJock Baptist Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 
Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
1 1 a.m. BTU 6:30 p.m. Evening Sorvic* 
7:30 p.m. Song Sorvico 8:45 p.m. Public 
it invited to Pray with us at 7:30 pm. 
on Wednesday. 


TIME is the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
tion to Los Angeles families for more than 20 years 
— satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and 
honest service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reason- 
able. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 

CONTINUING TO SERVE YOU 

AT OUR TEMPORARY LOCATION 

1430 East 103 rd St. LO. 6-0022 



— '. — "■ f '^T '^f* .- ' -J-. ' 


6-The California Eagle -- Thursday, December 29, 1960 f^ 



Beautiful Coliente in Old 
Mexico: More than 800 players 
iu the crowd of 12,694 collected 
Christmas bonuses in the 5-10 
public handicapping contest 
last Saturday at Caliente Race 
Track. 

Holders of 57 tickets which 
named five winners in the six 
races embraced by the 5-10, 
received $1,325^0 for each 
ticket. 

Consolation money was 
divided into_789 shares worth 
S32.each for four horses. The 
1KX)1 grossed $111,914, a new 
5-10 record for a Saturday, In 
eluding Kentucky Derby Sat 


Basketball Classic 
Underway at Arena 

The Los Angeles Basketball 
Classic, now the nation's No. 
1 basketball tournament, got 
under way Wednesday at the 
Sports .-^rena with Coach John- 
ny Woodcn's fast rising UCLA 
xeam winning convincingly 
over Michigan State. 

While tall, talented and ter- 
rific Indiana and California's 
undefeated defencjing cham- 
pion resign as co-favorites in 
the Dec. 28-29-30 Classic, 
Wooden's newest version of 
ths Bruin "Firehouse Five" 
must be considered as "dark 
horses" in the 12-game bat- 
tle for the tall, gold tourna- 
ment championship trophy. 

Rounding out the Classic 
draw are such other cage 
powers as Iowa, Michigan 
State and Minnesota af the 
Big Ten and SC and Stanford 
of the Big Five. As a result 
of early season games to date, 
SC and Iowa rate high along- 
side UCLA as teams which 
could suprise and take it all. | 


urdays. Winning numbers 

were 12-4-6-4-6-3. Eight' Ne. 

groes shared in the pool. 

(Honts To Watch That An 

Fit And r.MdT) 

CALIENTE 

Haalth Rays. Now fit. 

Precept. Give another chance. 

Simi Pau. Off bad In last. 

Bander Mix. Cheap but game. 

Litandro. Mile or over o.k. 

Sir Paiaor, My special. 

Inimitable. Watch out for thU 
one. 

Station Break. Wire to wire. 

Flaahy Winner, A real goodie. 

Qaliano. In smart hands. 

Exalt. Get yours on this one. 

Turnus. Sharp »« they come. 
SANTA ANITA 

Good Start. Fit and fast. 

Mighty Mine. Ix>ve8 the track. 

Britch Roman. This one ca.n fly. 

Bent Spur. At a price. 

Sundown II. Will make them 
hussle. 
. Ann's Knight. Clockers goodie. 

Oh So Iron. My special. 

Field Service. My longshot. 

King's MarahaiU 'WIU best the 
best. 

Le Beau. Worked very fast. 

Keep this column for fur- 
ther reference as it only ap- 
pears in the California Eagle, 
out and on your newsstand 
every Wednesday. For the best 
in the sport of kings it's the 
Eagle. 



-J?,-" 


'/" 


Lakers to Play Benefit 

The Los Angeles Lakers re 
turned from a tour that took 
them to N. Y., Syracuse, Phil- 
adelphia, St. Louis, Detroit 
and back to Philadelphia, 
playing six games in eight 
days. 

The club will return home 
to play the World Champion 
Boston Celtics in a game co- 
sponsored by the Salesian 
Fathers Tuesday evening;, ^^an. 
3. 

Scheduling favors the 
Lakers in January, February 
eind March. They have 18 
dates at the Sports Arena 
during that period. 


AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 



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And Up C Exchange 
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OPEN SUNDAY 


FOR 24-HOUI SIRVICi — — — — — 
CALL Plymouth 6-8347 J^ Plymotith 6-0997 

POWELL BAIL BONDS 

JOEL A. POWEU JOHN A ECHOLS 

10951-53 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANOfLIS 61, CAUF. 

FREE BAIL INFORMATION 


GOPHER — Bill Munsey. 
Minnesota's most effectite 
ground gainer, carried the 
ball 51 times for a net gain 
of 225 or 4.4 yards per try 
and is one of the team's fast- 
est hacks. 

Tan Stars 
Set for 
Rose Bowl 

(Continued from Page 1) 
that the Gophers noted the 
coolness toward their No. 1 
quarterback and seemed to 
think* it's a scheme to get 
them grumbling among them- 
selves because the Minnesota 
players, from the coach on 
down to the waterboy, are 
fully aware of the lack of pub- 
licity that h£is been given to 
their players, and especially to 
Stephens, Bobby Lee Bell, Bill 
Munsey and Judge Dickson. 

Thert my man recalled the 
treatment the press gave the 
1947 Illinois team which show- 
ed up for the Rose Bowl 
against USC, which also had 
a number of Negro players, 
led by Claude "Buddy" Younj;. 
The treatment boomeranged 
and Illinois went on to rout 
USC something like 48 to 0. 

Coach Jim O.vens. who.sp 
Washington Huskies have de- 
veloped into one of the most 
exciting football teams any- 
where with such bread and 
butter players as George 
Fleming, Ray Jackson, Joe 
Jones and Charlie Mitchell, 
isn't too happy about the po- 
sition in which' the press has 
put his team. 

Despite the fact that he's 
had quite a few bad breaks, 
including the fact that his No. 
2 fullback, Joe Jones, came 
down with a kidney disorder, 
the p»ress has been billing his 
squad as the invincible team 
that handed Wisconsin a 44 
to 8 defeat in the same Rose 
Bowl game last year. 

It just might be that the 
Gophers will take the field on 
Jan. 2 boiling mad and steam- 
ed up for victory. 

It's a good bet that Minne- 
sota's outstanding players like 
Dick Larson, Roger Hagberg, 
Tom Brown, Dave Mulholland, 
Greg Larson and Coach Mur- 
ray Warmath are hep to the 
dlvide-and-conquer campaign 
of West Coast writers. 


GOPHER — Judge Dick- 
son, the University of Min- 
nesota's punting specialist, 
also had the second best per- 
play //round gaming record 
on the Itiri Ten co-cham- 
pion shk< team. 


HUSKIE—Joe Jones. No. 
2 fullback who underwent 
emergency surgcri for ap- 
pendicitis, is reported in 
good health but it is ques- 
tionable if the valuable sec- 
ond stringer will\see action 


HUSKIE — Ray Jackson, 
leading ground gainer for 
Washington, has lost only a 
total of six yards all season. 
He scored the Huskies' 
fourth touchdown against 
JVisconsin. 


Four Sepia Stars to ^lay 
In 3rd Annual Copper Bowl 


Four outstanding Negro col- 
lege griddcr.s will take part 
in the third annual Copper 
Bowl football game at Arizona 
State Unixersitv Stadium in 
Phoenix, Dec. 31. 

Three will be on the roster 
of the .National All-Stars and 
one on the South-West. The 
National.s will be coached by 
Charles A. (Ripi Engle of 
Pcnn State, who handles the 
defense, and Pete Elliott of 
Illinois, the defensive coach. 
The .= oiith-West will be 
coached hy Jim Sutlierland of 

^Washins^ton State and Evfrett 
(Sonn.\ I Grnndolius of Colo- 

j rado. Sutherland will handle 

I offense. Grandelius, defen.se. 

I Cilff Roberts. Illinois tarkle, 
is the heawest man on either 

j squad. He stands 6'3' and 
weighs 2oO pounds. He's a 
three-letter winner from Piiil- 

'dclphia. Pa. \\(^ was the 

I first plaver'to accept a Cop- 
per Bowl hid. 

\ Two other National All- 

jStars are ha]fb;:<k? — .Marshall 

Starks of Illinois and Willie 

Jones, of Purdue. Starks is 21, 


.5' 11" and 190 bounds. His 

j home is in Rockfoitd, 111. Jones 

is also 21, 5' 11" and weighs 

■ 193 pounds. His residence is 

' Robstown, Tex. 

Burrell's Cboice 
Starks was recoriimended to 


Copper Bowl offic 
Burrell. Illoins 


als by Bill 
ilost Valu- 


able Player in tlie Big Ten 


in the Cop- 
is playing 


last year and also 
' per Bowl. He now 
Canadian professional foot- 
ball. ^ 

Starks was named to the 
, third all-Big Ten and was 
'si.xth among Big Ten scorers. 
Jones made second all-Big 
Ten and was |voted Most 
Valuable back by his Purdue 
teammates. j 

The lone South-West Negro 
player is Cleveland Jones of 
Oregon. The halfjback stands 
only 5'3';"; wtigh's 148 
pounds. He has bpcarheadcd 
the. Oregon offensive and de- 
fensive teams for ihe past two 
years. | 


"AUTOMOTIVl SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS'" 

• Brake Tune-Up Specialists • Free Pici(-Up, Deiivery 

SPECIAL FREE ENGINE CLEANING WITH LUBRICATION 

HENRY LEZINE'S MOBIL SERVICE 

1921 S. CENTRAL AVL Rl. 84044 "?^^.'' 



EXPANDED BUS SERVICE - EXPANDED BUS SERVICE 



Rafer Johnson 
Athlete off Year 


ifoin 


Rafer Johnson, 
new Olympic recjord 
points in the 
Rome, Saturday 
Southern Cali 
of the Year by 
Hall board of at 

Johnson also 
world record in 
Ion with 8,683 
up in the 
championships 
Ore., last summer, 


Nat 


who set a 

of 8,392 

decathlon at 

was named 

ia Athlete 

the Helms 

ics. 

holds the 
the decath- 

p)oints piled 
ional AAU 

at Eugene, 


hleti 


HoleinOne 
Tourney Set 
For LA Open 

A $1000 hole-in-one tourna- 
ment for spectators will be 
conducted during the 35th an- 
I nual $50,000 Los Angeles Open 
I golf tournament Jan. 5-9 at 
I Rancho, Pres. Don Sorenson, 
: of the sponsoring Los Angeles 
j Jr. Chamber of Commerce, an- 
nounced Tuesday. 
I A 120-yard shot will bo set 
up on the driving range near 
the 18th hole at Ranrho. Any 
fan firing an ace will receive 
the $1000, or, if more than one 
ace is scored, tlje prize will 
be split. 

Lesser prizes of golf balls, 
golf clothes and equipment 
will be given to persons com- 
ing close to the hole. 

Tab will be three shots for 
$1. Irons will be provided at 
the course, so it won't be! 
necessary for spectators to 
bring along their own sticks! 
unless they wish. 

The hole-in-one tournament 
is an innovation for the L.A. ^ 
Open. It has been tried else- j 
where in the country and has. 
been popular. ; 

Preseason tickets for the 
Open, good for all five days of 
play, are priced at $7.50 and | 
are available at all Southland | 
golf courses and driving 
ranges and the Jr. Chamber 
office, 404 S. Bixel. 

Entries are mounteing for: 
the event and are expected to 
top 500 before dreadline. ' 



The cham:pion Green Bay Packers landed seven pilayen^ 
including three who will be playing for the first time, <m thf 
Weston Conference squad for the AH-Star Pro Bowl game 
against the Eastern Conference Jan. 15 at the Coliseum. ^ 

Packers also have their coach, Vince Lombardl, who'M be 
aiming to run the West's victory skein to seven against four 
for the East in the eleventh annual charity classic. 
Sarenth for Ricbter 

Los Angeles Rams have four players ^chosen on the squad 
of 34 by the seven Western division NFL eoaohes — Les Riohter, 
Jon Amett, Eddie Meador and Jim PhiUips. 

For' Riohter, named both as linebacker and offensive 
center, it Will be his seventh Pro Bowl. Halfback Amett will 
be in the classic for the fourth straight time, while both 
defensive back Meador and end PhiUips are playing for the 
first time along with 11 more. 

The Baltimore Colts matched the Packers with seven 
players, led by rifleman Johnny Unitas, Player of the Game in 
the West's 38-21 victory last January., 

Iron Mom NemelUni 

The fast-finishing Detroit Lions landed six, San Fran- 
cisco 49ers five, Chicago Bears four and Dallas Cowboys one. 

The 49ers have the Iron Man of both West and East 
squads in 36-year-old Leo Nomeilini,262-pound defensive 
tackle, who will be representing the West for the ninth time. 

While 21 of the 34 players of the West are veterans of the 
game compared to 26 of the East, the Westerffers have the 
most aggregate Pro Bowl appearances, 72 com'pared to 65 for 
the East. 

Also, the 13 W&st first timers are, far from NFL rookies 
for thoy include such as Bart Starr, Henry Jordan and Jim 
Taylor of the Packers, Nick Pietrosante, Alex Karras and Jim 
Gibbons of the Lions, Bruce Bosley and Charles Krueger of 
the 49ers, Andy Nelson of the Colts, Johnny Morris of the 
Bears, and Jim Doran of the Cowboys along with Meador and 
Phillips of the Rams. 

City Officially Welcomes Angels 


I Los Angeles' new entry in 
the American League, the 
"Angels," received an official 
welcome from the Board of 
Supervisors at ceremonies in 
the Hall of Administration, 

iwith the new baseball team's 
executives present. 

Board of Supervisors' Chair-- 

;man Ernest E. Debs -wel- 

icomed Gene Autry', chairman 

j of the Board of the "Angels", 
Robert O. Reynolds, president, 

I and f"red Haney, general man- 
ager. 

I "We are a home-owned 
team starting fresh and hope 

' to make a good showing in a 

tough league our first year 

out," Autry told the Board, 

adding: 

"Our primary concern is 

giving the fans the kind of 

Classic Top Player 

Clarence Childs. All-Ameri- | 
ca halfback at Florida A&Mj 
University, and quslrterback I 
Don Smith of the Langston | 
University Lions were voted 
the top performers for their; 
teams in the 28th annual. 
Orange Blossom Classic by the | 
working press in the Orange 
Bowl Stadium in Miami. 
FAMU defeated Langston 40- 
26. 


! baseball they want to see, and 
1 1 can assure everyone that 
I our team, under - the able 
! guidance of Fred Haney, will 
jbe hustling and giving their 
'all. They're all proud to be 
members of the first Ameri- 
can League team; to move 
west." 


Duel at Sports Arena 

Big Pancho Gonzales and 
Lew Hoad will battle in Jack 
Krammer's 1961 World Series 
of professionals at the Sports 
Arena on Jan. 19 and 20. 

The pros will play three 
single matches and one 
double each evening in their 
only West Coast appearance. 


New Method! 

DU. 8-7048 

Urinary, Personal preblonw 
Glands and All Clinical 
Matters. Young Doctor 
Invites Unusual : Catoa 

RESULTS! 

(Consultation Confidtntial) 



CHOSEX — irUma Ru- 
dolph, liiho uill appear in 
the L.A. Invitational on 
Jan. 21', lias named top In- 
ternational "cithtfte of the 
year" in Europe. She's 
America's Olympic triple 
gold-medalist and world's 
fastest womari. 



EXPANDED BUS SERV- 
ICE — The heavy dark line on 
the map shows route of the 
new Vernon-Santa Barbara-La 
Cienege Line 27 of the Los 
Angeles Metropolitan Transit 
Authority. Beginning January 
1, passengers traveling between 
the south and western areas of 
Los Angeles and IVest Holly- 
wood will have the benefit of 
through bus service on Line 27. 


H^ BEAUTIFUL ^ 

« CALIENTE « 

IN OLD MEXICO ^ 

OrriRS IVEKY SAT. A SUN. - 
RAIN OR SHIN! 

^ THOROUGHBRED 



1t% RACES EVERY 
,. ^ SAT. & SUN. Ji^iA- 


12 


■(^ 


AND SATURDAY 
DAILY DOUBLE « QUINELA^ 


EXPANDED BUS SiRVICt - tXPANDED BUS SERVICE 


y^ BOOKS & MUTUELS ^ 
SUN. POST TIME 12 NOON 

FANTASTIC RETURNS 

For Your Wager w. 

4^ ^* 

Two Dollars or More 
if^. Foreign Book Open Daily Hi- 

On All Major Tracks 

Greyhound Racing 
<^ To Be Resumed ^ 
^ In January ^ 

49er EVERY SATURDAY 
<^ AND SUNDAY NIGHTS ^ 


JOHN S. ALESSIO 

4/^ Ixacetiv* DirMter i/^ 


STARTS NEXT SUNDAY!! 

BUS SSRVICE 
ON LINE 27! 



La Cienego's Restaurant Row 

and Shopping Center, 
Crenshaw Shopping Center, 

Santa Barbara and 
Vernon Avenue areas linked 

by M«T«A'$ new, 
convenient, through service. 


-r 


ron TiMSTABLSS AMO 
IMFOnmATIOM CALL I 

RICHMOND 7'4455 


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&s^ople & Places 

I'il-atAiif-A. J. CLABKE — If I cooi grand, their second in 
a o^' xn embers of the commu-|One year. The pretty bank 
iViy' feel Jionored at being 'clerk at Security-First Ka- 
•/.\cn passes for "Raisin in theltional at Western and Wash- 
Sun" — ^, don't. When Eagle ;ington told Fred Griffin, the 
eaitofcftrace Simons arrived at i noted pharmacist, that it 
life? thfraler with an escort ; couldn't have been won by a 
'£h\»j*day ni^ht, prepared fori more deserving lady because 
s^treat, she was blunUy in- she was pressed for funds due 
formed that the passes don't | to ^n operation on her mother. 


mean 'a thing if there's a pay- 
ing customer in the offinj 


The Rinkeydinks are one of! 
the few groups that give more 


Passes had heew handed out! than they receive — and in the! 
bv "Raisin" press agent A. J. 'community where it counts I 
Clarke • - 1 E V E L Y N GRIFFIN— Perhaps ! 

GBEEN EYES— Those narrow ;ifs because she came from al 
minds who voiced suspicion atifamily of four beautiful sisters i 
the manner in, which the|but whatever the reason, you| 
Rinkeydinks gave away a, (Continued on Page 12> ) 



DO COME TO 


NOW APPEARING' 


HO. 2-8771 


TERRY GIBBS 

FOOD • DANCING 
ENTERTAIN3IENT 

6507 Sunset at Wilcox Hcllywood 




Thursday, December 29, 196^1 The California EagIe-7 





"LIKE E.^SY. ^I.^^"— You'll fjtt till- rmsiiuje dirtrtly 
from ART BLAKEY and the Jazz MtiSt'tt/ers "sindinii" 
'ivith othtr jazz arcats in the big concert and dance at the 
EmLassy Deceniher Ji'. Ahlc artist climaxes smash run at 
Zebra Loungi ami nu'ards /''Hoiiert uith Friday ntt/ht 
crincrrt. 


YEARS BIGGEST HEEKEy 

iiifily f>rii(iits the year's- b 
ori/aniit, Jimmy Smith, Thrill If, 
toxi/i from the bandstand at 65 
1/eorniniii/ Tridiiy. J), i . 30. 
1-0777. 


\ M 



-^ 


NITELY - LIMITED ENGAGEMENT 


'Gcnume Excitement !" 


WASfMiNGToTJ 

„,rf ;,;-BnTER-EARtH R^vUE 



FRANK StNNES- NEwO '«' " " 

\Jiyuo'/2. 01 4-6650 


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n'loht. Junuary ], t<j the ili- 
Ui/ht 0' his leiiend of inn.- 
irh'i nil! If on hand at fh, 
Pallr.diuin. (See Difpiay.) 


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ROCK 


PRESTON EPPS 


LOU 


featuring 

(MY LITTLE 
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even I V • FNGRGEMENT) 


SUNDAY EVENING JAN. 1st 
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>' 


HAL ZEIGER presents 

THE MOST CREATIVE 
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THIS GErfERATION! 


v'/ 



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-RUBY' • *HARD HEARTED HANNAH' 
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*THE GENIUS OF RAY CHARLES' 


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And His Famous Orchestra 


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iMest attraction, sninping 

this. top talent taking the 

^5 South Central avenue. 

ZIHRA LOiSGE: LI'. 


Backstage at "RAISIN IN THE SUN"^ . . . The 
magnificent cast gracioush- accepted our congratula.- 
tory mouthin^s with the possible exception of the 
celebrated CLAUDIA IMcNEIL, who has settled com- 
fortably in the role of LEN A YOUN GER and gives it 
monumental impact. -^' ~ ^- 

Miss McNeil brushed aside' And vyhereas we had saunt- 
ered into tlie actress' drcss- 
our kudos on her performance, j„„ quarters to pay -our com- 
and sternly reprimanded uspliments. ue Ufre suddenly 
for being the reporter who 'enmeshed in a verbal conflir; 
dared to make the allegation 'with her. Although, sevci-.ii 
that her temjDerament while members of the transfixed on- 
working on the film version ' lookers told us we 'iu-ld our 
of "Raisin" Wcis uncalled for. own" in ^rentlemanly l.:shior,. 

"You may as well know that wp were suddenly a litilr tirrcj 
you have a distinction. "^liss of it al' 


McNeil lashed 

thai- distinction 

only reporter in 


at us. "and' Spftepin- tlie blo\<.. n,, i,. 
is bein^ the speak, talented DIANE SANDS 
mv 20 "vearsiand DOUGLAS TURNER gro( 


in showbusiness who has Iiad ed us like ol' budd\' bud<l 


!an>*t!iing adverse to 
I me." 


say about Bctli of them have that certaii 
(Continued on Paf,'e J'^i 


{j"pfy^ 





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-4 


♦ ■■ ■ 

8-The California Eagle T^ur sday, Dec ember 29, JI960 

Qiazz^undtrad 

- -i:_,,n/) from Paee 7) linst^^ari of aninor tho n»K.,^~. 


(Continued from Page 
magic 


instead of aping the others 

that spells out STAR.f^^^'l^^y'- 
,.» inSDired oerform Incidentally, the play is sold 
They ga^e 'f^P^^'-'^ P«nom\!out for the balance of its l;a 
ances t^at J'-'l be talked i^un. thanks to Miss McNeil 
about for "^^"^ \;°^^^^- ^^ , f nd the others and they could 
yV'e told 


Doug this was the j have stayed for a much 


firist time Wf had witnessed! lengthier period 

the play. »>"' ^^'^ ^*i^t his per ' 

^"'^ ^ - as the YOUNGER /TT^nTi "lyUNE 


formance as tne YOUNGER gloriA Lyj 
lad must havo matched that mcDANIELS 
ofSIPW^y POITIER or OSSIE vocal f 
nA^^ ^^^ KMiliod that had we'recpive 


you won't deny that 

and GENE 

were the big 

^^He ,.,.,od.that had we I -^V/'-^^J: ^Lif 'Sar 'tr^J' 
g^n tho other actors we ment in 1961 . . ELLA fT^- 
^oulrf still rca ize that he is ^ GERALD purchased a home 
^«rg a complete y different on Sierra Drive in BeveHy 
ewractenzat.on of the part. I Hills! . . . Nothing but rave 
i. preferring to play it his way (Continued on Page 12i 




|.v.'';-jsf«e!Kf*y''' 


of 



FLICUT (A)MM.IM)! R-flVrli I'.nn, nv.ner 
/ ct/)is' \iii- C.hind ('.lull. I (iinnuindi (I tin dttenlion of ior- 
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hru jcil the btoutx ij/i till' .\ i:i- ^ rnr's I fe flight hcinif 
solicited for sfxtrts tnlhusuisli. \ 


NO 

COVER 

NO 

MINIMUM 


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* TAMMY * DESIREE 

• nnrrTU "* popular demand 

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- FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE - 

RE. 1-3973 


2 SHOWS TODAY' 

MATINEE 2:00 P.M. • EVENING 7:30 P.M. 




^ SWINGING 'SUNDAY MORNING SPECIAL 


^ 


IEXC3DUS 

MATINEES 2:00 P. M • EVENINGS DAILY 8:00, SUNDAY 7:30 

Price scale:,£VES. (Fn . Sal , H0I5 -Orch or Loge S3.50: Balcony $2.50 
EVENINGS (Sun thru Thurs )-OrchesIra or Loge SZ.80: Balcony J2.20 
MATINEES (Wed . Sat. 4 Sun l_0rch»«|r3 or Loge $2.50: Balcony $1.80 
Special Holiday Matinees Christmas Wetli, December 25 thrii January 2 

ALL SEATS RESERVED. HOIIDAY PRICES DURING 
CHRISTMAS AND EASTER WEEKS. ALL PRICES TAX INCL. 
MAIL ORDERS ARE BEING ACCEPTED NOW 

Sencj Siamped Sei' Acidres'^ed Enve cd? E"*'ose Chi^cli or Mone/ Order State Pref- 
erence ana finip o( Pertormance Ma«e Checks Pavabe to Fo« WjIsMire Theatre 
Seats no.v on saie 3! So fai f Mu< c Co . 737 S H J St and all Mutual Agencies 

Fox WILSHiRE Theatre 3443 wnsn<re eivd seveny hhis • ol 3 osea 



W^^ 


- --{ — 


n 


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^ RACKED BY ^ 

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I; FRIDAY, DEC. 30-7:30 P.M. 'TIL 2 A.M. I; 

i; EMBASSY AUD. 9th & GRAND^: 
:; ART BLAKEY - n"I -" j; 

"■ BOBBY TIMMONS • LEE MORAN ■ 

\ ♦ WAYNE SHORTER \ 

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'p Gloria Smith, Vocalist-An All Star^ Concert Jazz Band g 

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"b 16 PIECE ALL STAR CONCERT JAZZ BAND"a 

"a WITH DEXTER GORDON - CURTIS AMY \ 

■ ONZY MATTHEWS - EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION: ■- 

■ GLORIA SMYTH, VOCALIST ■ 
■" ROBERTOR'S LATIN ACES ■ 


_■_■_■_ 



«^« THEATRICAL i^ 


ONIY 4 DAYflE fT TO Sg, HEAK I ENJOIT 


WANK!!? 


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STAGE 


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STARRINS 


REIKAUSCi — I'lie Corgenus 'Inmiiiy. One of the reas- 
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[Lonely T eardrops" i'TJ/ Be Satisfie<f'i" Alone at Lasf 
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J. ""..Justine , • ..y^rtirttnd*"* .^ .-ul 

ilL' 4 BIG STAGE SHOWS DAIIT % 

Special Midnight Show on Now Year'. Eve I |-j 

FEATURE MOVI£ on Qiant Screen 


5 



DOWNTOWN - Wi » Broodwuy 
MA.y-1676-l>oortOpen10:30AJft.f^» 


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\ 


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EAGLE CHRfS/rMAS PARTY— Old St. Xi.k showed uf, at the 2101 
H'. Vernnn address of the (California LnnU nffur fuicr on (jhristma^ t.ir 
end once the day after Christmas. Att\. Ilcrnian (J. Ln^iish u as "Old Man 
ff'hiskers" the first time, tic hosted n Christmas party lor the entire stall. 
Ruth Curiningham teas the' second ',isitor irorii the Sorlh Pole. She hroiivhl 
■three huge boxes of groceries, each lontainmq n turkey and other sii[<plic>. 
The day after Christmas the t.'Uilc had its third visit jrom Santa, this hctnn 
Rev. H. Bel held llannihal uilh'his (ar loaded uilh toys from Smut .Muhacl 


(^hiirih in Studio (City find Holy Xativity (Church in Westchester. Since 
Allx. hnqlish had contrihulid to thf Joy of Lac/te staffers, it uas fitting 
that they, in turn, should spread joy in the community. This thev did 
on Saturday. Pii lurid Irom left: L-eretle .M . Hfdri<t. A. D. Joncs, 
(Chazz (Craiiford Ruth ( .unninqham . .Mno'Jie HathaiLa\ . iiraic E. Simons, 
Ally, ilerman (). hni/lish. II in^cl Clean. .Mare Hui/hei. Dorothea Foster, 
M. .\le\,crs and f.ilu'. " .i hie" Rohmson. {Ua'ry .hiann I 


Through Friends, Eagle Staff is Able to 
Brighten Three Families' Homes on Xmas 


Br 

Edw. "Abie" Robinson 

and 

V»rdeU Young 

Thanks to the Les Ami 
^^i>. the Just Frionris Cluh 
«nd the Chi Delta Chapter of 
Alpha Chi Omega, three 


families had Christmas din- 
ners in their own homes 
. Siyiday. 

Eagle baskets of food that 
were given to them brought 
near tears mixed with wide, 
happy smiles to the faces of 
23 children and their parents. 


Beautician Ruih Cunning- 
ham had arranged to ha%e 
the baskets delivered to the 
Eagle office Friday night, 
following a request relayed 
tn her by staff member C. 
Marie Hughes, after it was 
learned that the three homes 


would have little to eat while 
most others were feasting. 

The Eagles Edward "Abie" 
Robinson and photographer 
Verdell Young distributed 
the baskets Saturdav. 

(Tn make the children's 
eves shine even more brighl- 



RISKEYDISKS PLAY SA ST A— Members of the Rtn- 
'keydinks are shonn at fsh hians' Sportsmen s Cluh ns they 
enarded $1000 to Certrndr Doby. 1 / uas a real Christmas 
for .Mrs. Dohy ti hose husband is unemployed and uhosr 
mother just underurni fin expensive operation. Pictured 


are: Ilihleriardi Rouic . .Jeri Rnndfer, Ann Malhrouijh . 
Bernice Brooke. IT mi (Carey. Ish lian' I. ma Raruc. 
.-Inn Odom. Lillian kazarian. liorlime R."h.!,\, ,:rd .-Hv, 
Pay nr. f ^ ouno) 


ly. the Rev. H. Belfield Han- 
nibal. vicar of St. Luke's 
Episcopal Church in Fire- 
stone Park, stopped by the 
flagle office Monday, with a 
car filled with toys and other 
gifts. 

(He had run out of names 
of vouiigsiers. who might 
otheiAvise be forgotten. Didi 
we know of any? 

<\\e supplied him with the 
names of the three families 
to whom we had given 
baskets, and the family of 
Mrs. Joyce Jackson, whose 
little cirl. Gwendolyn, was 
burned to death when their 
home at 9617 drape street. 
Watts, burned down P'riday 
night*. 

There was Mrs. Lucille 
Washington. 1.3031 Willow- 
hrook a V e n u f . and her 
family of eight who had 
little in their cupboard until 
we arrived Saturday morn- 
ing with a basket of food 
that contained a turkey and 
an assortment of staples and 
other food that made the 
hare shelves look* hke a 
small grocery store. 

Mts Washington beamed 
as if she had just been given 
a new lease on life, and 
the voungsiers' big eyes 
sparkled. U'hen they said 
goodbve and closed the door 
behind us. we heard happy 
\oii-es and laughter. 

Over on Largo street, at 
(Continued on Page 10» 



CLUBS 




FASHIONS 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 


The California Eagle— 9 


Sandra Hoskins Plans for 
Graduation and Marnage 


Mrs. Barney Hoskins and 
daughter Sandra are more 
than busy these days plan- 
ning two big events in San- 
dra's life — graduation next 
iTionth from UCLA and her 
U'edding Feb. 11 to Alonzo 
Wilkens IIL at beautiful 
church rites to be directed 
by Mrs. Harrietta Flowers 
Williams. 

Many pre-nuptial courtes- 
ies are planned for the pop- 


ular bride-elect. Among the 
early hosts were the Dave 
Arbors, parents of the groom 
-to-be, who had a Christmas 
Day dinner at their Harvard 
blvd. home as a family get- 
together honoring the young 
couple. 

Early January hostesses 
include Miss Iva Washing- 
ton who will serve a lunch- 
eon at her Kingsley drive 
home for Sandra and her 


bridesmaids on Saturday, 
Jan. 7. and ori Sunday morn- 
ing. Jan. 8, Mrs. Bessie' Burke 
and her sister, Mrs. Ethel 
Bruington, are co-hosting 
Sandra's first shower at 
breakfast in the Wilfandel 
Club House. 

The prospective groom ar- 
rived Friday for the holi. 
days from Moser Lake, 
Wash., where he is stationed 
with the United States Army. 
Air Force. 



AID SCHOOL Bl'lLDJyG— Committee members of the .1//. S'ebo Grand Lodge, 
Prince Hall ^tasons. and the Order of the Eastern Star are shoun presenting a check 
to the director of the Lxicptioneil Children's Home to help liith the nciv schools build- 
inq program. From left: Stella Burrell. grand secretary; Bertha Kirby. worthy matron 
of Ruth Chapter .No. 4: James Smith, deputy grand master of .Mt. Scho Lodge: and 
J uanita Mackhn, executnc director of the school. (Young) 

Mt. Nebo Grand Lodge ,to 
Support Exceptional Home 


•^f Bill Smaflwood 


J€)>3 


Tom Bradley's birthday 
today (29i will get a tribute 
tonight at the Delta dance. 
Fulbright scholar and Phi 
Beta Kappa .Diane Lewis 
(Ursula Phelps' daughter', 
home from Cornell for the 
holidays, is spending her 
first Yuletidc here in five 
years. Montana McNcclv's 
home ■ was the scene for 
Alpha Delta chapter of 
Gamma Phi Deltas Xmas 
party. Effa Man ley gave her 
annual birthday party last 
night (28) for old buddy 
lUiot Carpenter. 

'Xmas Eve party host^; 
Hazel and Rocky Washing- 
ton. Marilyn Holder' to 
undergo major surgerv^ Tlic 
Thirteen Aids and guests are 
midday lunching Frid. hi 
the Bev! Hilton. Ruby Bnr- 
bee Wilson had a bad fall. 
injuring her foot. 

Ghana Visitois 
The Mai Whitfields and 
twc kids arc visiting here 
■from Ghana. Billy Duro.ssean 
put aside his medical books 
at Howard U. and jetted to 
the coast for the holidays: 
he finds the nation's capital 
captivating. Today (29) is 
anniversary champagne 
time for Clara and Louis 
Love. The Jimmy Lees hav- 
ing their customary New 
Year's Eve party. 
Ethel Branhiun found a 


wonderful promotion at her 
office awaiting her recent 
return from Africa and 
Europe. Former local school- 
marm Diane Watson, teach- 
ing now in Okinawa, spent 
Xmas fortnight between 
.'Singapore. Hong Kong. 
Manila. Bangkok and Tokyo; 
wonder if shp saw Gladys 
Martin in Tokyo. 
, Helen Garrott, who thrives 
mightily on incessant giddy- 
van, takes a deep breath 
and is off again as she 
chairmans the forthcoming 
art exhibit via the .National 
Urban League's local line- 
up. Sue Harbin Bailey in 
town from Carmel holidav - 
ing with her mate Cal. 
Louise Beal made it to town 
'for merry Yule from her 
studio-^ at ."^'Diego State Col- 
lege for Women. 

Huss Aplenty 

Frid. is Dr. and Mrs. Roy 
Andrew's choice for their 
party night. Linda Graham's 
nfght-afterXmas party was 
for .Steve Curry, home for 
Xmas from West Point can- 
didate training school in 
ole Virginny. Rosalie Young 
due home from Mexico City 
and the also-there Buddy 
Clays (Maryt will be flying 
in sho/tly, too. And Dr. and 
.Mrs. Warren Brooks (Aure- 
liai jet home next week 

(Continued on Page 10) 


Party Honors 
Althea Clark 


Allhea Polk Clark, from 
.Alaska, who is visiting her 
parents and daughter for the 
Christmas holidays, was en- 
tertained with a buffet din- 
ner party in the home of 
her mother ^nd -father on 
llalldale last Monday night. 

Scores of .Mrs. Clark's 
fiiends attended the affair. 
She will take a Jet flight to 
Detroit on Saturday morn- 
. ing before returning to Alas- 
ka. 

.\mong the guests attend- 
ing the party were: .Mr. and 
Mrs. Amos (javine, Sidney 
.'ackson, Verner Deckard. Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Greiiier, Mr. 
and Mrs. .M. Talbert. .Mr. and 
rf. Geo. Bryant, .Mr. and 
.Mrs. .\. Reeves. Mr. and Mrs. 
Art Johnson, Homer Wood- 
lofv, Mr. and Mrs. John Cal- 
houn, Leona Robinson, Syl- 
via Martin. Mr. and Mrs. 
1 loyd Glenn. Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hollingsworth, Mr 
and rs. Major White, John 
Lee, Esterline Powell, Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert Ward, Oliv- 
ia Page, Bernice Young, Mr. 
and Mrs. Major White. John 
rie Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Clark and Tom Wynn. 


Mt. Nebo Grand Lodge. F. 
and A. A. Y'. Masons, 253 W. 
f-1.«t street, has selected for 
1961 the theme of "Doing 
It in the Comrrtunity 'Whete 
It Counts " 

After their recent tour of 
the building program cur- 
rently under way at the Ex- 
ceptional Children's Home, 
they have voted to make 
this their most important 


charity project ofi the year 
and ptarted their program 
off by presenting Mrs. Juan- 
ita Macklin, executive direc- 
tor of the school, with a 
check last Sunday after- 
noon. 

James Smith, deputy 
giandmaster of Mt. Nebo 
Lodge, is spearheading the 
project. Following a visit to 
the school, in wliich rcpre- 



ASXVAL X.MAS CHEER— Members of the .Medical. 
Dental and Pharmaceutical .'Auxiliary's Christmas commit- 
tee arc shown preparing baskets wiih toys, food and cloth- 
ing to bring cheer to several families who might have gone 
unnoticed. This is an annual project of the group and sup- 
plcmenls their many other community projects. Shown 


from left: Maggie Rawls, chairman; Kate Evans, co- 
chairman; Ethel Sheen; little Jimmy Ran,' Is who isn't a 
member of the committee but brings in a lot of toys; Je'ssie 
Russell and Lenora Hynes. Also a member of the committee 
IS Irene Towls. (Adams) , •■ 


sentatives were accompan- 
ied by Stella Burrell, grand 
secretary of the Order of the 
Eastern Star, and Bertha 
Kirby,. worthy matron of 
Ruth Chapter No. 4, they de- 
cided that there are many 
avenues through which their 
organization can help the 
school. 

Mr. Srtiith, who was re- 
cently elected to his post in 
the lodge, will work out an 
all-year program so that his 
group can sponsor various 
activities to raise funds to 
meet the needs of the school. 

Ira Bolton. is grandmaster 
of Mt. Nebo; Rosa Hays, 
grand matron of the order 
ot the Eastern Star: Caro- 
Ivn D e v e r o u a X, Heroine 
grand matron; Pearl Reaves, 
national officer, and Weltha 
Bolton, Daughter of Isis. All 
are woiiiing in the interests 
of the project. 


Students Give 
Xmas Baskets 

Some fifty East Los Ang- 
eles College students return- 
ed to the campus from their 
vacation to pack boxes and 
deliver them to some 200 
needy families. 

This community project 
was adopted by ELAC five 
yea-rs ago when 35 food 
baskets were filled. The 
amount of the college con- 
tribution has increased each 
year to the present 200. 

Deltas Annual Ball 

The Delta Sigma Thet* 
Sorority will hold its an- 
nual White Christmas Ball 
at the Hollywood Palladium 
on Thursday, Dec. 29, from 
10 p.m. until 2 a.m. 


• i 


^gr-^^^- '^^--»- ■* 


i » 



Dorothea Foster 


1 


gala Christmas partv at the beau^fnVTnH c ^'^ * 

are looking forward to their January meet^nf n 

np ^2x1^\^"o^°"^^ °f MRS. JOHN JOHNsSn 
iday'2rtvTn'^?n;.r''''^^ ^^^^O hosted a hol- 
WORTHaVI?^'^'^^'^ evening while MAEDELLE 
WURTHAM served eggnogs on Christmas morning. 

The Fun 1-osted 

Also, LOUISE and ALLEN GEORGE gathered 
dJfdouTdi;;Se;'^ "^^^^" ^°-^ -^ later le^^JlSl 
n.. DR- a"d MRS. JOHN SOMERVILLE poured egg- 
thP ^n w^H^ "ir"*"^ ^^°"^ 11 to 1 p.m^ NatSraIfy 

T^ii^^^^^'"^" P^^t the appointed hours, 
hie h-?S?^^S,-^^^^'^^^R ^^'^s 'n the honor spot at 
VAINO ^'^^" ^^ ^'^ charming wife, 

While RUTH CUNNINGHAM helped the Eagle 
statf pack and distribute baskets on the night before 
Christmas eve, she raved happily about the partyH)f 
the Just Friends Club. _ 

Big Stocking? 

Happy wasn't the word to describe the faces of 
VERNA RICHARDS and HATTIE SMITH, who wel- 
comed their mom from Springfield, Ohio and an- 
nounced that she liked California so well that she 
will remain. 

MARGARITE HOLLAND seems to be a very 
happy lady since Santa left a beautiful set of lug- 
gage in her stocking. 

JEANETTE and PETE PETRIE gave their son, 
JAMES, a new Valiant for Christmas. 

MARGARET and RICHARD JOHNSON complet- 
ed their Eastern tour just in time for the holidays 
and started into the swing of things by entertaining 
their Garden Club in their Fontana ranch home. 

Of Travelers 

Speaking of traveling and travelers, BERNARD 
and CORJS ROBERTS spent Christmas in Las Vegas, 
while JOYCE and WILLIAM WALKER and their 
daughter PATRICIA, spent their holidays with their 
parents in Oakland. ■ 

ATTY. ADOS NICKOLSON of Chicago is en- 
joying the California sunshine and our gay holiday 
party life, of both of which we have had plenty. 
ALICE and STONEY JACKSON are spending the 
holidays in Palm Springs; and newlyweds JOAN and 
WALLY ANDERSON of San Francisco spent the 
holiday with JOAN'S dad, JOSEPH, and her twin 
brother JOSEPH, JR. and sister PEGGY who just 
returned from teaching school in Nantes, France. 

The attractive trio dining at Puccini's were 
OLIVIA PERKERSON. JESSIE MAE ROBINSOxN 
and petite L'TANYA GRIFFIN, who is spending the 
holidays in Los Angeles from New York. The trio 
will depart Friday for Phoenix, Ariz, where they will 
spend the New Year's Weekend. 

Starting 1961 Right 

Yesterday, DR. and MRS. GEORGE SEELY 
poured cocktails froom 4 until 6, and later that even- 
ing the Cbuntry Clubbers held their annual Christ- 
mas dance at the Nikabob Restaurant. 

Also, IRMA and CARL WATSON hosted a delic- 
ious buffet and had a holiday chitchat with some 
long time friends. 

To bring 1961 in right, the Couple Club's an- 
nual New Year's eve party will be held at the home 
of ETHEL and AL MADDOX. 

MINNIE MEYEIRS is having many friends and 
relatives in on New Year's day at the ranch home 
of her parents in Perris. 

HESTER and JOE CAVALIER are making elab- 
rt-ate plans for their annual New Year's day party, 
while JAMES and GWEN MOORE will be entertain- 
ing friends at their Pacoima home. 

Among the many balls of the season the Hill- 
toppers will hold their New Year's eve ball at the 
Ambassador Hotel. 

Looking forward to Jan. 12 when the Rinkey- 
dinks will host their annual ball and I understand 
JOE MALBROUGH is designing some fabulous 
gowns for the girls to wear. 



««®« Bill SmallwooQ ^ 


from Xmas in 

original Xmas card, that of 

the Lamarr Hills. Darn 

clever. Irene Morris gets 

birthday hugs aplenty Sun. 

(1>. 

Xmas in Alaska: AI 
Walker, who is there for 18 
months with other engineers 
from his aircraft company, 
hard at work ort a missile 
project. 

Former local newscribe 
Corrinc Adams Claybrooks 
(she wed a Chica. medic, 
lives there now) will be in 
town soon; she's to be a 
grandmama this new year 
a-comin' Up. Tony Hill pack- 
ing his bags for his custom- 
ary' Jan. trip to Chi. 

Ethel Bruington and 
^Bessie Burke have selected 


(Continued from Page 9) 
D.C. A most the second 


Sun. of Jan. for 
their luggage shower break- 
fast at Wilfandel to lend joy 
to bride-to-be Sandra Hos- 
kins who becomes Mrs. 
Alonzo Watkins in mid. 
Feb., as you know by now. 
Shirley Gibbs planes in 
shortly from I Her KaySee 
holiday. Chuck Davis planes 
out for Atlanta and More- 
house. V a 1 e n a Broussard 
went to St. LooJ Ethel Bow- 
les holidaying in St. Loo. 

Terri Jones, the six-year- 
old Pasadenan who will be 
the first Negro child to rep- 
resent Jackson School In the 
Rose Parade, is the grand- 
daughter of L. A.s Helen 
Duckett Robinson. Terri will 
sit with a Japanese boy on 
the float. I 


S/R DEBVlhlKS CLVli—Monhrrs tire ihuMH fiurin^ 
ihiir anniitil (jhri>liii(if Parly lirlil Inst iridn\- iiiijht nl 
tihii/i ihcy h'tnori ,i tnembrrs nj the l>rrss oloni/ tilth their 
nivrs. Shniiii Irniil rnn- tro/n left: ll'illic Mniun. Phil 
Rholrrt. Il'nlry llnizirr. tjiuu; ll'ultr Gnndy, prcudcnt : 


Jniiies Lee. M/iniirl Diniz iiiul If ilhuin (Irnu/. Si'hind 
rfitv: 1 lurry H'rlls. .larhn Miirsh/ill, r/Vf firisidinl ; Don 
Mintrn.. Eiiniir I'ruc, Gcort/r W,bl>. Snlhnriicl CJi'iulcatt 
find Iloti/ird liriidlcy. ( Adniiif) 



10— The California Eagle 


Thursday, December 29. 1960 



Wm. Freeion p,f|h Annual Student Art Show 

Slated for Foshay Junior Iriigh 


Holds 
Xmas 


Lavish 
Party 


Thirty-Eight 

Join Family 

Reunion Party Urban League 


William Kroolon. who op- 
erates the cafeteria in E\- 
position Park, held his an- 
nual Christma.s party in his 
beautiful homr ai 1201 
Longwood on C h r i s t m a s 
night. 

Scores of frionds. as well 
as his staff, attended the 
festive occasion and enjoyed 
Caterers James (Jimmyi 
Jackson's and Harvoy Gill's 
wonderful buffet dinner of 
dishes of all descriptions 
which adorned a lonj; table 
brightly arranged in the tra- 
ditional Christmas manner. 

A four spout champagne 
fountain ran continuousls 
throughout the evening. 
Guests also enjoyed cock- 
tails. Serving as waiters for 
the affair were Robert .Aub- 
rey Jr. and Ernest Stringer, 
the bartenders were Hubert 
Ledou.x and James Jackson. 

Among the guests attend- 
ing were: O. Estill, John H. 
Jackson, Lucille Thomas. 
.Adaris Williams Floren( e 
Hunt, Judith Knight. James 
Willis, Joo Durel, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. Chaun(\', .Mr. and 
Mrs. .Milton John.son, Mr. 
and Mrs. C). D. Jones, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. L. Dean. .Mr. 
and Mrs. W. Thronis, .Mr. 
and Mrs. H. Holmes. Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Aubry. 

Also Marga.ret Varrtado- 
Celic Smith, Betty Davis. G. 
Porchc, Mary E. Taylor, Carl 
Lockheart, (J. Bowman. Mr. 
and Mrs. Obie Paddo, George 
Milton, R. S. Lewis. P>etty 
/rt-> rinn /^1 1 ^ Davison, H. Miller, Mary 

*b*J,UUU CtieCK to Jones. Mackie .Martin C L 

McPhcrson. Adricnnc Dung- 


On Wcdnesda.v. Jan. 1. 
.Tames .\. Foshay Junior Hisli 
.'-'i liool. .'JT."!! .'^. Harvard blvd.. 
will hold its fifth annua! 
■ Indent art show in tile aud- 
itorium of the school. 

The art work will be 
;;roupofl into 10 caJegories 
-with a 1st, 2nd and 3rd 
prize ribbon awarded in each 
category. First prize win- 
ners will receive art ma- 
terials. Four grand lawards 
will be presented, divided 
into the following divisions: 

A five dollar purchase 
award: PTA award, consist- 
ing of five dollars of art ma 


lenals: nembrandl award, 
con-istinj; it{ five dollars of 
art materii'.l: and an associ- 
ated teachers' award. 

Judges lor the four grand 
pri/.es are: Dr. Vincent La- 
nier, associate profes^^or of 
art educalioiv L'ni\ermt>- of 
.^outher.'i California: Hujzh 
R. Fole\, principal of Fosh- 
a\ ; ."^Irs. Lycurgus Johnson, 
president of Foshay PT.\: 
and .Mi.ss Esther Tutunjian 
and -Miss Janet t^uirsfeld. as- 
sociate an teachers from 
C.S.C. doing student teach- 
ing under the supervision of 
.Mrs. Wildred Hough, chaii 


man of the Art Deiiariment 
a: F('.-.'ha>\ 

Judges for ihe 10 subject 
< ; leqories aie: .Mr. Albert 
Porter, ait supervisor. Los 
.\ngeles City School District: 
Mis Mclanie Blocker, art 
teacher" at Car\er Junior 
High: .Mrs. .Margaret Works, 
art teacher at Doi.sey High; 
.Mrs. Phyllis Oster, art teach- 
er Los Angeles City Schools 
r.ow on sabbatical leave; 
.Mrs. Elizabeth Vaughn, 
.■^chool librarian at Foshay 
and an authority on African 
art; and .Mr. George Venablc, 
head counselor at Foshav. 


Eagle Staff Enjoys Spreading Christmas Cheer 


Guild Presents 


At their first reunion since 
their golden wedding anni- 
versary in 1956, thirty- 
eight members gathered to 
welcome Rev. and Mrs. John 
H. Pay ton from Phoenix, 
Arizona. They were ac- 
companied by their daugh- 
ter and her husband. Hazel 
znd Kermit Brown. 

The reunion in the form 

. of a family dinner was held 

in the home of Nolan and 

Georgia Payton, son of Rev. 

and Mrs. Payton. 

Among the relatives at- 
tending were John and Lor- 
raine Payton, Ethel and 
Boyd Pickett. Sally Anne 
Fayton, Sherrie Benson, Es- 
sie Benson, Flossie Taylor, 
Rudy and Cjmthia Taylor." 
Verbest Palmer. Meryyn and 
Harriette Beasley and their 
three daughters' families 
Charles and Barbara Ruth 
Bartholomew and son, Jac- 
quelyn Taylor, Kathleen and 
Gray Cole and Izora Smalley 
and family. 


Presentation of a check for 
S3,000 by Wanda Wiley, 
Guild president to Dr. Le- 
roy Woekes, Urban League 
Board vice-president, and 
Wesley Brazier, executive 
director, highlighted the 
holiday breakfast attended 
by 150 Urban League Guild 
members and friends Sun- 
day in the Regency Room 
of the Sheraton West Hotel. 

Speaker of the morning 
was Dr. Marion Holmes, 
professor of art at UCLA. 
Also on the program were 
Mrs. Marnesba T a c k e 1 1, 
Judge Bernard Jefferson and 
Miss Berenice Booker who 
.sang a Christmas carol. Mar- 
is r Wilson, first vice-presi- 
dent, reported on two recent 
awards given to the Guild. 

Associate members wel- 
comed into regular member- 
ship of the Guild by Elly- 
nore Adams, membership 
chairman, were: Charlene 
Hampton, Elois Irons, Ella 
Morrison, Thelma Wallace 
and Lucille Ward. 


ery Betty Sloan and Maggie 
Hatliaway. 

Events Planned 

Mrs. James Davis, presi- 
dent of the Centennial PTA 
Chapter, presided over the 
recent meeting of the group's 
brief business m(?cting. 

Plans were discus.scd for 
starting a local blood bank, 
and a fund-raising Donut 
Sale for the near future. 


'Continued from Pasjc 9' 
the home of Mrs. Arnola 
Ha\"ward. the scene was a 
little different. \et much the 
same. 

When we came \s a I king up 
to the porch, with a basket 
full of food, everyone stood 
still and stared at us. One 
of the children \enturcd the 
question: 

"Is this for us?" 

When we said. '"Yes, " they 
had no reluctance about 
showing their joy and 
appreciation— and another 
fami 1 y was made happy 
through the help of the 
Eagle and Mrs. Cunning- 
ham's fine organizations. 

Over at the third and last 
home, we found Mr. and 
Mrs. Ettg^ne Olden and all 
the meitibers of their famil> 
in their neat ItvUc apart- 
ment. Olden was cuttin;: 
The children's hair, and w>ren 
\Ke announced that we nail 
brought a basket for the 
family, he said, with a quiet 
smile and glistening eyes: 

"I jxist had faith and hope 
and went about cutting my 
little boy's hair." 

We agreed that this was 
one of the best assignments 
we had worked on this \eat, 
and prayed that in 1961. 
through our wonderful or- 
ganizations, vve could make 
etery day like Christmas for 
families such as these in our 


coininunii.v, uii.i only neeii •■ 
little help when they arc 
down on their, luck. 

It was two days later when 
the Rev. Hannibal came into 
the Eagle office. He had 
been working with churches 
in .Studio City and West- 
chester, and had played the 
role of St. .Nick all day 
Christmas and on .Monda>. 

We were glad to give him 


liie names of our new friends 
so that he could complete 
.Santa's kindly chores, and 
we want to take this method 
of saluting the Rev. Hanni- 
bal who gave up his holiday 
with his famil.v to bring 
cheer to other families. 

Vi'c certainly hope that 
these people, and others, will 
find time to visit him at his 
church. 1772 E. 83rd street. 


(;/FTS FOR THE NREDY-Dcpositing Christmas gifts 
in (itir of the boxes for the Pacific Lodge Boys Home and 
the .lialon Community Center are Colonel William T, 
Hradlry. district engineer for the U. S. Artiiy Engineer 
Dtitriit. Los Arigeles. and Barbara J ran Harringtott: sec 
rii/iry, finance and Accounting Branch. An (mnual affair, 
these fjifts include toys, clothing, money, canned goods, 
r/rocerirs. etc.. to the institutions ichick are part of the 
('.iinimnnity Chest program. Colonel Bradley is a resident 
'if ^^'in Gabriel, residinij at 8345 JosttrS road, while Bar- 
harri lixcs lit 1725 Park avenue in ihir Echo Park district. 
<l . S. Army Engineer photo.) 

Negro Hisfory Week Chairman Plans 
General Committee Meeting for Even 

(General meeting of the 
\- a r i o u s committees and 
chairmen participating in 
the thirty-seventh annual 
observance of Negro History 
Week (Feb. 12 through Feo. 
191 will be held on Tues- 
day evening, January 3 at 
the home of Dr. Roy D. An- 
drews, general chairman, at 
3955 Mt. Vernon Drive at 
8 p.m. 

Mrs. Vassie D. Wright, 
president of Our Authors 
Study Club, the Los Angeles 
Branch of the Association 
for the Study of Negro Life 
and History, in making the 
announcement said this 
years lliemc, "Freedom and 
Democracy for the Negro Af- 
ter 100 Years," (1861-19611 
will depict progress the Ne- 
gro has made during this 
period in the week-long ac- 


tivities.being planned. 

Community response hais 
been heartening, she said. 
This year's activities will be 
diversified and pncompa-s 
many phases of the devel» 
opment of the 9 Negro eco- 
norriically as well as cultur- 
ally since slavery. 

A Centennial luncheon 
and a beautiful souvenir 
journal which will chron- 
icle the Negro's history in 
America will bei two of the 
highpoiift features of the 
celebration. 

Historians who 
hance the joirrnal ai^d^ per 
sons interested in x placing 
advertisments therein . are 
urged to contact Mrs. Wright 
immediately ^at RE 5-6442. 
January 31 is deadline for 
all advertising material, 
Mrs. Wright said. 


might/en 


Catering 

To Somali or Large Groups 
Specializing in all Type of Parties ' 
Buffet - Cocktail - Dinner 
24-Hour Service — Experienced Personnel 

Bertha Thomas 

and i J 

Rose Brown Catering 
4474 Victoria Park Dr. WEbster 9-7215 


^AHC^ % 




SPHINXMEN 


e« AlPHA MITA CHAMI* af AlFA PHI AlPHA 

FUTIRNITT, INC.. anrf WISTWOOO CHAPTIR 

•< NAACR 


— Present Their — 


Charity Ball 

FRIDAY, DEC. 30-10 P.M. to 2 A.M. 

• DANNY'S SEXTET 

Playing Your Favorite Done* Music 
Donation $2 - at Door $2.S0 Procoods to NAACP 

FOX HILLS COUNTRY CLUB 

5800 WEST SLAUSON AVENUE 


• 

-k 
-k 

-K 


• ••••••••••*•**•* •-A'** * • * • • • 


VICTOR 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY 


CLOTHING 
COMPANY 
MA. 4-0801 



MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


MA. 4-0801 

PRICE OF ANY 


in. 


BIG SALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY 

$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE 

SUIT ANO TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy jny suit in the house during our big sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREE'I! 
Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of t^vo suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as liMle as $3 00 
!.'!?l.''.ir.^*' ^'°°°° "^""^^ ''^^*~*' '°°'<'"9 ''°»''«' slio" ""d -ccessories for men and 


tr NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT 
*Wear and enjoy your clothes wliile paying* 
Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREE! 



But act now. 


P«y later !l!||!! 

$8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MOREIIIII!!| 

$7.95 ** $9.95 up to $24.95, WORTH MUCh'mORE! 



.IINI!!! 

/ 
SHIRTS now pric^ $4.95 ,* $6.95 

TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 

ALL $30.00 men's suits and top coats ?.-. .i 

ALL $40.00 " " " " ." 

ALL $50.00 " " " " " 

ALL $60.00 " " " " " 

ALL $70.00 " " " " " [ .. 

ALL $80.00 " " " " ' .^ 

ALL $90.00 " " ." " " ..:!....... 

HURRY SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEARIHimi 

Parle FREE next door as you buy your now dothes. We cater to you, and we do mean YOU"! 
I . iA,...u-. * ».j:„ . p,,y Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 

A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.Ml - 


$15.00 
$25.00 
$35.00 
$45.00 
$55.00 
$65.00 
$75.00 


* 

.4 

''I 


4 

3 


Luggage * Watches * Radios' 

OPEN DAILY 9:30 


m 


:-i 


^ 


-t. 


VICTOR 

214 SOUTH BROi^DWAY 


CLOTHING CO. 

IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 


^^^^¥^^¥^^^f^ -f 4 ^^^if^^^^jfifjf jf jf ^ 


^ 


A 


1$ 




FAST SERVICE 



HIRE* TRAD5 


"WHIU HND IT IN 1HE WANT AK! 


Angelenos wishing to make 
the New Year's Eve Cham- 
pagne Flight to the New 
China. Club in Reno, Nevada, 
may make reservations as late 
as noon Friday, Emereon 
Smi.th, vice-president of the 
DeVoe Travel Agency, said 
this week. 

Profitable Package 

In issuing his "last call for 
a lucky New Year's Eve," 
. Smith added: 

"This flight to Reno shapes 
up as one of the best enter- 
tainment buys of the year. 
Under the sponsorship of New- 
China Club owner Bill Fong, 
Angelenos are being offered a 
package that includes cham- 
pagne and food aloft, dinner 
in Reno, free refreshments in 
Reno, free presents for the 
Ladies,cash refund, and sou- 
venirs for everyone." 

The New Year's Eve flight is 
the first of a series being 
sponsored by Fong and the 
New China Club, Reno's fam- 
ed interracial casino. 

Cheaper Than Walking 

Cost of the flight— $3C plus 
tax — is actually less than half 
the cost of usual first-class 
air trips to Reno. All flights 
will be made bj luxurious 
Convairs, with pfetty steward- 
esses in attendance. 

For additional information, 
call Eme^rson Smith at the 
DeVoe Travel • Agency, 2610 1 
Crenshaw blvd., REpublic 
1-116& ^ 

See Display Ad on Page 8> 


l-LEOAL NOTICES 


(The California Eagle) 

38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 436-714 

c. . '*'e^ Superior. Court of the 

State ol California, in and for ihp 

County of Lo.s Angeles. In the 

Matter of the Estate of Delia Mc- 

Kee. Deceased. 

Notice Is hereby given to Cred- 
itor* having cl«im.s against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
undersigned at the office of his 
Attorn;^s. Miller, Maddox & Ma- 
lone 2821 South Western Avenue 
in the City of Los Angeles in the 
aforesaid County, which latter of- 
fice is the place of business of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchers must b • 
filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice 
. Dated: Dec. 22. I960 
MILLER, MADDOX &. MALONE 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenut 
Los Angeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 

THOMAS M. McKKE' JR. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publish In the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29, i960, 
Jan. 5-12. 1%1) 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 

New China Club 
Will Play Host 
New Year's Eve 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


BEAUTY OPEtATOR WANTED MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


decedent to file .«aid claim.? in the 
office of the f lerii of the aforesaid 
'ourt or tr pie.-.ent them to the un- 
dersigned a the office of her attor- 
ney 
VI.NTi; MO.VROK T0W.\<5K.M1> Jr. 

2:i3 \Ve.«t Klorrnte Avenue 
in the Ciiy of I,o.s Angele.s .*. in Ihr 
afore.'iaid County, nhiih latter of- 
fice is the olare of bu.<iness of tlic 
undersigned in all matrrr."* t>ertaiii- 
ina to .-said estate. Such claim's with 
the necos.-sac.v voucher.^ mu.it ho 
filed or pi'e.=ented ay aforesaid 
within .si\ months after the first 
puhlicatioh of this notice. 
Dated: Deienihcr .i. 1960 

ELLA H. GF;F.EN. 

Executrix of the c^^ ill of said 
drrf-dcnt 
Vl.N'CE JlONROi: TOWNPEND. Jr. 
.\ttorne>'-at-lJi\v I 

223 West Klorcnce Avenue \ 

I.ns Ansoles 3. California. ; 

PL. 8-3nn9 I 

PuMi.«h in California Fa?le news- 1 


.<i«Ie tf California in and for the 
CoiMi'x- of L.o« Aii'-^le*. 
Paled I'if. fi 1960 

BALDO .M. KRISTOVICH 
PubLc .administrator 
«« adrainl.'tralor of the 
estate of said decedent. 
.MAdison.R-92n 
(riihljshed In California Eagle 
Dec. 8. 15.. 22 19. 1960) 

HIUM^^ANtED^iMAlE 


paper r>ernmlier S-I5-22-;9. 196n. 


38019 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OT^ 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 
LOS ANGELES 
No. 3J3420 
Notice of Hearinfl of Petition to 
Borrow Money and Execute Deed 
of Trust 
In the Matter of the Esiate of 
ARTHUR C. CHAPPELL 
Deceased 
Notice Is h e r e b y given that i coun 
Bertha Chappell. Adrainisirati.\ of 
the said estate, has filed herein 
her verified petition praying for an 
order aulhorizlne the petitioner to 
borrow money and execute a deed 
of trust upon real estate herein- 
after described : and that Novem- 
ber 29, 1961, at 9:15 a.m.. in th" 
fornla. in and for the Couniy ol 
Los Angele.s. Department 4 thereof, 
has been appointed as ilie time and 
place for hearing of said petition, 
when and where any persons inter- 
ested in the .«aid estate mav ap- 
pear and object to the Kranting ol 
said petition. 


hereby made to Ih** 
for Jurther panic- 


Reference is 
said petition 
ulars. 

Said iral e.'tale i.s sjiuatPd in the 
County of Los An;;ple>, State o( 
California, and is described a.s fol- 
lows : 

Lot 47. 48 and 49. Block E. Stark.s 


I 3695? ' 

NOTICE OF THE SALE OF 
REAL PROPERTY AT 

, PRIVATE SALE 

[ No. 409424 

In the Pnprr-ior Court of t*ie 

[.•^taip of California in and for the 

jCouniv of Los ,\ns:rlcs. 

In the .Mkltcr of the E.-lBte of 

|.\NDELLAR WOCiD. Deceased. 

I Xotice i.s hereby civen that the 
under.signed Executor of the Es- 
tate of Andellar Woods, decea.sed. 

I will .sell at private sale, to the 
highest tiiddcr. upon tlie terin.s 

land conditions hereinafter men- 

: tioned and subject lo lonfinnalion 

I hv the -said Superior Court, on or 
afier the 2^rd da.\ of T>ccombcr. 
19GII. at the office of \in.e Mon- 
roe Tov.n;end. .Ir.. Attorney for 

I the E.xecutor. 223 West riorenee 
Avenue, Citv "bf Lo> .\n:elPs 3 
IV of Los Ansdcs. "State of 
California, all the richt. title an'l 
interc.-t of said derr;i-r(l at tin- 
time of deaili and all the liqiit. 
ulle and ineresi that Ih.^ psate of 
said dei'ea^f-d has aciuired b\ 
operatinni of law O'- otherwise, 
other than or in addilinn to tha' 
of ~:\\i\ dc'iri^e,! at tlie time of 
rleatl}. in and in all that certain 
real propertv. [.anicularly described 
a.s follows, to-wif: 

Lot li"5 of t>alton Oranse Grove 
Tract, a- t>er man recorded in 

)i;ook 1. Pas;,. 100 of Official Rec- 

; ords of I.ns Angples County. State 

I of Californi;i. .More rommonlj 


WOMAN 
EXPERIENCED 

Apt. house mgr. for 16-unit 
bidg. No children. 3 room 
furn. apt. and salary. Call Ed 
Stanley. 

MA. 8-0211, Ext. 714 
Week Days 

moneTtoIoan 

Combine Your 1st 

and 2nd Trust Deed 

at a Reasonable Cost 

Also 1st and 2nd 

Trust Deeds 

Bought and Sold. 

AX. 2-7088 

Rl. 8-3572 

expert beauty treatment 


RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaufe Shoppe 

operator wanted 

4919 Wast Adamt Blvd. 
let Angalas 16, Calif. 


Thursday, December 29, 1960 The California EagIe-11 


instructions-schools 

Adjusters Train 
At Local School 

The Adjusters and Investiga- 
tors Training Center, Inc., 601 S. 
Rampart Blvd. is training hun- 
dreds of personnel who work on 
the millions of claims filed in 
the United States annually, stated 
George Roberts, manager. 

Roberts said that about one- 
hundred-million claims are filed 
every year by insurance agen- 
cies, railroads, airlines, finance 
companies, steamship lines, and 
others, and the opportunities in 
this field are unlimited. The de- 
mand exceeds the supply of 
trairled investigators, according 
to Rok>erts. 

The field offers excitement, 
good pay, and a fine future, ac- 
cording to Roberts, who urges 
young people to look into ai 
career in investigation.' I 


EUBANKS STUDIOS ^o» "nt 

Veict, Piano, Violin, Collo, 
Clarinal, Saxopheno, Trumpol, 
I Drums, Sighttinging. 
I PL 2-1179 

I FORNISHlS'ROoJ^^r^^ 


houses for rent furnished 


2 — 
I sii 
' p.m 


- ONE Bedroom apts. West- ! % 1 2 -SD \Nfip\c \\i 
side. Call RE. 3-9826 after 5 ^ ' ^•-"-' VVCEKiy 

j Separate cottage, utilities 

■ I paid, children and pets wel- 

I come. 


unfurnished apartment 

FOR rent ~^ 


AX. 2-0458 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The People's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


$75— Brand new unfurn. 1 __^ 

b*drm. apartment w i t hj HOUSES « APTS. WANTED 
garbage disposal, utilities i — ^ 

pd. 528 West 78th St. ij FREE SERVICE!!! 

or 2 children accepted. TO LANDLORDS. 


Inquire at Apt. 8. 


FURNISHED ROOM 
FOR RENT 

Tuo I todn pfrasant rooms. u>e 
Of upstairs kill hens. Refined, 
cmplo.vpd men Reas. Call eves. 

RE. 5-8783 


WESTSIDE APARTMENT 

$85 Month 

! ■' ■ 

2 large bedrooms, 
5 rooms unfurnished. 
1 teenager welcome. 

Near everything. 

Beautiful stucco unit. 

At 2020 Harcourt. 

Call WEbstcr 4-0975 
or WEbster 1-8046 


We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. EasTside 
and Westside. 
4020 South Woctorn Avoiiuo 
AX. .2-1991 

ACREAGE FOR SALE 

KERN CO. LAND 

10 acres, 5 miles west of Rosa- 
mond. Good soil, shallow water, 
[good neighbors. Only $5000,' 
$1000 dn., $60 per month. 
THOMAS REALTY CO. " 
1223 Woit Avonut I 
Lancaster, Califttrnia 
i WHitahall 2-14126 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


$1 Day and up 

1007 East 50th St. 


known as l.";.";'! Kast 23rd Street 
Lo-^ Ansfir-. 'Californf.T i 

Terms of jS^alr: Ca^ii In lawful! 
iiionc.\- of tlie I'niteil States on con- 
firiimlion ni" s.ile. or p.irl ra-li aiv' 
balance r\idenpcd b\- note secured 
\'y tnortca^c or Trust Deed on the' 
I'lOperty sci .sold. Ten per rent of 


Hearings to Resume 

WASHINGTOiX, Dec. 19 — 
The Commission cul Civil 
Rights will resume iWTiear- 
ings in March into denials of 
the right to vote in Louisiana, 
Chairman John A. Hannah 
announced this week. 

1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


Palm Tract as shown on map rec- i amount lid to he dcpo.sited with 

orded in Book 8. Page 98 of .Maps, j bid. 

office of the Caunty Recorder ol | Bid* or ofi'-rs to be In uriiin;; 


37010 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-253 

In the Superior Court of the 
Slate of Calirornia. in and for the 
Countv of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
JAAIES A. GREfeN. Deceased. 

Xotice is hereby given lo credit 
ors havinjr claims a(?ainst the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of her Atiorney. Vinct 
-Monroe Townsend, Jr.. 223 West 
norence Avenue, in the City of 
Los Angeles, in the aforesaid 
County, which latter office Is the 
place of business of the under- 
signed in all mailers pertaining to 
said estate. Such claims with the 
necessary voucher.a must be filed 
or presented' as aforasaid within 
.si.x months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice. 
Dated December 5. 1960 

ELLA H. GREEN. ' 
Executirx of the will 
of .said decedent. 
Vince Monroe Townsend, Jr. 
Attorne-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Lot Angeles 3, California 
PL. 8-5309 

(Published in the California 
Eagle Dec. 8, 15. 22, 29. 1960.) 

(The California Eagle) 
38225 
_ ♦JOTICE OF HEARING OF 
PETITION FOR PROBATE 
OF WILL 
No. 437-158 
In the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles. In the 
Matter of the ElsUte of Annie V. 
Henderson, Decea.sed. 

Notice is hereby given that the 
petition of Carrie Wa.shinglon for 
the Probate of the Will of the 
above-named deceased and for the 
issuance of Letters testamentary 
thereon to the petitioner to which 
reference is hereby made for further 
particulars, will be heard at 9:13 
o'clock a.m.. on Jan. 13. 1961. at 
the court room of Department 4. 
of the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the County 
of Los Angeles. City of Los An- 
geles. 

Datf>d: Dec. 21. 1960 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
11 11 East Vernon Ave. 
Los Angeles,- Calif. 
AD. 2-6149 

Attorney for Petitioner 
HAROLD J. OSTLY. 
• "ounty CletJt and Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and 
for the Countv of Los Angeles 
By A. L. GRAHAM. Deputy 
(P\ibli.sh in the California Eagle 
.Newspaper I>ec. 29. I960; Jan. 5. 
•Ian 12. 1961. 



322 West Manchastar Blvd. 

Manchester & Broadway 

JUST MINUTIS AWAY VIA 
HARBOR FRIIWAY 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

Plenty of Free Parking 

New Bargain ^Cc 
Admission . QJ 

YUl BRYNNER — 
STEVE McQueen in 

"MAGNIFICENT 

SEVEN" . 

PLUS SECOND HIT 

"Wizard of Baghdad" 

Attend Gala 

FAMILY NITE 

every TUESDAY 
ADULTS SOe 

Children Free When 
Accompanied by Parents 


said Count V. 

Dated January 6. 1961 
Edward S. Hardwick 
Attorncy-at'Lavv 
1518 E. 103rd St. 
Los Angeles 2. Calif. <'«>-.! 
Harold J. Ostly, 
C«unty Clerk and Clerk of 

said Superior Court. 
By A. L, Graham. Deputy. 
Publish in California Lai'lc news- 
paper. December 22-29. 19611 


3«011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 

AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of the E.5tate of 
WALTER SNELL 
Deceased 
Notice Is hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims again.sl the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
undersigned at the office of her 
Atloney, 

MACEO G. TOLBERT 
4272 South Central Avenue 
in the City of Los Angeles 11. In 
the aforesaid County, whicii latter 
office is the place of busine--.s of 
the undersigned in all matier.s per- 
taining to said eilate. Such claims 
with the necessary vouchers must 
be filed or presented as afore.<aid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated December 19. 1960. 
Maeeo G. Tolbert 
Attorney-at-Law 
4272 South Central Avenue 
Los Angeles 11. California. 
Matilda M. Snell 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
Publish in California Easle new.«- 
paper Dec. 22-29. 1960: Jai^ 5-12. 
1961. 


and will be received at the afore- 
■^aid offiie ai any time after the; 
fir.-t piit'lication hrr*o^ anfl before' 
date of silc. Janunrv 6. 1961. r 

vi;r:i;i:L i. iiRE.vsON ' 
K-seculor of tlie Esiate 

of .'^al'l <lecoilcnt. i 

Vioce Monroe Townsend , 

223 West Florence Avenue 

Uos Angeles 3. California i 

Attorney for Executor ; 

(Publi.= hed in the Californi 1 

Easle Dec. S. 15. 22. 29. 196ii.) 


(California Eagle) 
37080 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 433710 
In tlic Superior Court of the 
.State of California, in. and for the 
County of Los .\ni:etc.^. in th'^ 
.Matif^r of the E.^^tate of Ivory 
.■Million. Decf-ascd- .Votice i..* hrreti.v 
civen by the imder.-i^ned. liald" 
M. Kristoviih, Puliltc- Admini.s- 
trator. a.< Administrator of the Ks- 
tuie of Ivory .'Jimon. Deceased, to 
the Creditors of. and all persons 
bavins claim.s against tlie said 
decedent, to present them, with 
thp neces.sarv- vouciiers, within sIn 
Mionth.s after the first publication 
of this notice, to the said Admin- 
istrator at his offif-e 
Hill St.. Los Ansflc^ V, Califor- 
nia, which said offi<-^ the under- j 
signed select' a" a place of busi- 
ne.s:. in all ^natters connected witii 
said estate." or to file them, with 
the necessary vouclier.". vvithin si\j 
months after the first publication 
ot this notice, in the office of the! 
C'erV <: the Superior Court ot the' 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

SS43V2 HOLMES AVENUE 
la now opan for businass and of- 
faring expart baauly cara from 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap- 
pointmant call Robbit Bradford, 
ganaral eparator. | 

LU. 1-5227 

Ell CTRICAl REPAIRING I 

WE SPECIALIZE in all elec I 
trieal work. Large or small. 
old or new. Reasonable and 
reliable. WE. 9-0900. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


'$1000 DOWN 

EXCELLENT 
COMPTON AREA ' 
2-2 bedrms., 2-3 b«dfms. We 
will sell four such bidgs. only 
to responsible parties who will 
live in the bIdg. . and care for 
them. Properties will bring no 
immediate earnings but an 
at 437 South I equity will be built up as lime 
goes on. Start now to build a 
comfortable future. Principals 
only. 

CONTACT HELLERMAN 

5400 WILSHIRE BLVD. 
WEbsler 8-2451 • 


MEN - WOMEN 
■^ 18 - 45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pity 

FASCINATING 

ACTION. PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 


; UNFURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 


$65 Per Month 


to 'wall carpeting. Real fire- 
place. Children welcome. 

AXminster 2-0458 


Unfurnished house. Newly deco-i 
|S|f)acious Eastside private^ rated. 2 large bedrooms, w9»l| 

rcoms, with private entrances, 

icooking facilities. Between 2 

Inajor buslines. West of Cen- 
tral. Near schools, churches, ! ^"«N. HOUSE FOR RENT 

shopping. • 3 laRGE BEDROOMS 

WE. 5-0485 


$695 Down 

VACANT 
5 room, 2 bedroom 

Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwood floor*. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-4156 


FURN. APT. FOR RENT 

OWN HOME 
BY RENTING 


I $85 per month rents a roomy, | j^cq^^j p^Qpjujy pQ^-,^^, 
6 room, 3 bedroom house. West-j ■. 

i side location. Carpeting includ- 
ed. Washing machine available. | 
Children invited. Ideal for family j 
living. Near averything. 


"^EAVY M«J-,„:..'i, ^K-w,-— .\— ... :- HOUSES FOR RENT UNFURN 

I EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY '«<'"•'"'»»'« ^ badroom homat in 


GET BROCHURE NOW! 
ADJUSTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART. LA. 57 

DU 8-7163 


Compton. Own by renting- and' C ^TA AA 

sav*. Excallant opportunity fcrj 4>OvJ.UU 

ratponsibl* party who wants hit 

own homa. Convaniantiy locatad Rustic 6 room, 3 bedroom 

^oi. West Cressay Straat off Wil- ^ouse, yard for children, pefs 

mingten, |utt north of Rosacrans. ' "^ 


I Call for information. 

i j Murray 1-0116 


O. K. 


AX. 2-0458 


DUPLEX 
$500 Down 

$10,950 full price. 
Income $110 per month. 

Only 6 years old. 
Best buy of the week. 
Be independent for lift. 

NE. 2-8461 



BUSINESSMEN FROM TIjIE SANTA MONICA, OCEAN PARK and VENICE BAY AREAS FIRMLY RISOLYE 

to go all olut to merit your continued patronage during the next yoar. 

Nothing will be left undone that will add to your pleasure* and satisfaction. 

KEEP BAY AREA DIRECTORY HANDY and PATRONIZE CALIFORNIA EAGLE ADVERTISERS 


36592 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 435-255 
Iri tha Superior Court of tlie 
State o{ California, in and (or tlic 
Countv of Los Ansrclcs. 
In the Matter of the E.^^taie of 
JAMES A. GREE.V 
Deceased 
Notice Is hereby eiven to credit- 
ors having claims asainsi the said 


HAVE PROPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR>NEE0 MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

Licensed and Bonded Real Estate Broker 


BILL & SILVERIO'S 


AND NUt:SERY 


FLOWER SHOP 


rarmarly With R«yal Hawaiian Halal. Hanalvlv 


# Complelf* t'lnrftl S.'r\ic 

' l-'lowors Wirrd 

EXbreok 5-2235 
1 938- 14th Street 


rjatio and Indoor Planlings 
.\n.v whore ' 

EXbroek 5-7044 

Santa Monica 


LINK VAUGHN 


VAUGHN PRINTING & LITHO 

PHONE EXbrook 5-5168 

1516 THIRD STREET 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 



,..and plan j or your future! 

Let one of Broadway Federal's courteous savings 
specialists show you how to open your savings 
account. He'll acquaint you with our new high rate 
of ieaminsrs— now4'i5o per annum paid four times a 
year; with all accounts insured in perfect safety. 
He'll plan- with you for a consistent savings 
program. He'll start your dollars working for you 
to help you reach your goals. Come in and join 
the Broadway Federal family of successful savers. 
Or open an account by mail. Either way, we're 
bappy to serve you. 


ALLEN MAINTENANCE CO. 

1453 SIXTEENTH STREr 

EX. 4-4748 SANTA MONICA 


MITCH BASILA 


REAL ES 

ASSOCIATiD 

JACK SIMMS « 

817 Pico Blvd., SantL 
EXbroek 4-4629-EXbroek 4-120:: 


REAL ESTATE 


MILTON GOTTLIEB 

8 OAKMONT DRIVE 
lOS ANGELES 49, CALIFORNIA 


INVESTMENTS 


GRanite 2-5389 

. i 


TATE 

WITH 

ASSOCIATES 

Monica, Calif. 

Rat. EXbroek 9-5621 


MYERS BROS. CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS 


MICHAEL ICHINOSE 

CONSTRUCTION 
SUPERINTENDENT 


3407 San Fornando Road 

Phono Clinton «4U1 
Lei Angolos 65, Calif. 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


SAMUEL D. YASNEY 


ERNEST AUERBACH 
506 WiUhira Blvd., 


EX 3-2737 


CO., REALTORS 
Sa^ta Monica, Calif. 

Homo: 01 6-4806 


EX 5-4335 


HAND CAR! WASH 


\jp 


Polish- - 
Steam Clean 

BENNIE WIL 
729 Montana Ave., Sar^ta 


CURRENT 
ANNUAL RATE 
PAID QUARTERLY 



BROAD>AAAY 

PKDBRAL SAVINGS 

and Loan Association 

45th and Broadway • A Dams 2-4271 


But. EXbrook 5-2465 

SCOTT & VAIDNAIS 

OK RUBBER WELDERS 


Tri ad 


New & \iit4 
Recapping & 

E. I. 

3723 Santa Monica Blvd., 


EXbroek 5-1649 


Ros. EXbroe4( 3-2391 


■ MACK & SONS SERVICE 

UNION OIL - STOPWEAR LUBRICATION 
WASHING - TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 


Horschol S Stanloy YounQor 
Proprietors 


1925 Broadway 
Santa Monica 


EX 3-6421 


X 

Motor 
lAMS 

Monica, Calif. 


Ro>. EXbrook 4-4516 


Tires 
Truing 


VADI4AIS 


Santa Monica, Calif. 


Sweet Daddy's Nite Life Cafe \ 

FAMOUS FOR FINE FOODS 

TEXAS CHILI (OUR SPECIALITY) 

CONTINUOUS (LIVE) ENTERTAINMENT 


EX 4-9950 

J. B. Blackman, Prep. 


1710 Olympic Blvd. 
Santa Monica, Calif. 


Painting of All Kinds Stooplojack Work 

J. AND C. WINDOW SER\lfCE 

• Dust and Wafer Proofing 

• Caulking of All Kinds 

• Cauking All Roofs 

JEFFERS AND COOPER 
1547 ANAHEIM ST., HARBOR CITY, CAUF. 


\ 


12-The California Eagle Thursday, December 29, 1960 


'Phil Gordon Makes tin 


NEW YORK SCENE 


• l!^ • 


PEOPLE 6l placed 


■^^■^1 


iContinupd from Page 7) j William Madison, Joe Howard zine writer is 
will find her always working and Roy Andrpws walkinglctor for Jazz 


roail\ in; 


ice; 


HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ONE AND ALL'" 

Well, its just a series of parties, dances, dinner, visitor. 

fnl ?hl"r;:'"%""^ "^'■'^ ^"^ ^^ evorj-where in ,he U. i ,: 
ng the Christmas Holiday season. I am >ack at 13n,h S 

with the manager, Phil Gross- ♦>- -" . _ ■ 

man. Henry, the owner, and [LOVED ONES Let 

all the boys, Billy Mason. 'make 1961 choi 

Kenny Keene. Harold' Irv'ing 

and Al Butterfield. We are 

having a ball and seeing some 

pretty frightening sights as 

we serve the 'juice' to the 

revelers. 

Faces and Spac«s 

The Monday Night Camp 
Fund Third Annual Christmas 
Party at Brankers was ^ huge 
success, with a full-campli- 
Tnent turnout of- bar-owners, 
liquor salesmen, bartenders 
and barmaids, hostesses, re- 
sort-owners, entertainers and 
lust nice, interested people 
like: Rose Yuen, of the Ren- 
ney. Fannie Pierre, of the 
Dawn. Frankie Bizell. Walter 
Beeman. Allen Peterson. 
Madeline vl Harold Jones. 
Rose Simmons.' .\ddie Pullen. 
Tondelayo. "Cookie." etc. TV' 
star Lonnie -Sattin rendered a ' 
few fine songs, and Rudyj 
Rutherford and the combo j 
kept the music swinging or i 
relaxed, U>r the benefit and 
dancing pleasure of all. Mr. I 
& Mrs. Gegrge Palmer and 
all of the Camp Fund Com-i 
mittee acted as hostesses and 
served the turkey. ham. 
potato salad, baked beans. | 
and other delicious food, while 
the beverages flowed freely 
land for FREE) all through 
the night.- It was real fun. and 
mast gratifying to be there 
and to emcee the festi\ ities. 
Sammy Davis Tops 

Sammy Davis. Jr. is cook- 
ing' at The Copa, and keeping 
Jules Podell happy by packing 
the house and sending them 
all away smiling. Count Basic. 
Joe Williams & Co. are wing- 
ing a^ong, but swingingly. at 
Birdland, on their last engage- 
ment together before, it is re- 
ported that Joe Williams will 
be leaving Basie to start on 
his own, as a single. We cer- 
tainly wish the best of every- 
thing to Joe, as he is one ot 
the 'boss' vocalists in the 
country and deserves top bill- 
ing and money, along with the 
Johnny Mathis, Billy Eck.stine, 
Nat Cole. Sammy Davis, Jr.. 
and others, group. 

Counting Out Blessings 

Santa Claus was very good 
ito me this year, and I think 
1961 is going to be even bet- 
ter, so I'll be able to get 
around a lot and keep all you 
misplaced New Yorkers, now 
in sunny California, informed 
of the many happenings on 
the New York Scene, as well 
as letting The local gentry 
know that lack-of-aotivity was 
not why jou may now be liv- 
ing in L.A. or points there- 
abouts. New York is still the 
ONLY CITY IN THE WORLD, 
so there . . . But the W^st 
Coast is fast trying-to sneakp 
up on us, and I love you one 
and all out there for just hav- 
ing so much heart!!! 

Now don't hate me so much 
vrva don't even want to wish 
me a HAPPY NEW YEAR like 
I did for you. I was only 
TELLING IT LIKE IT ARE!! 
Bvnc for now. FRIENDS AND 


n some manner trying to help 
the other guy and it makes 
her no-never-mind if it be in 
Watts. Central Avenue. West- 
ern a\p:nie. Baldwin Hills or 
Bc\oil\- Hills, and for the 
■■brothci|f." she counts her.self 
in to help, but for social 
climbiiii; she bows our sia'i- 
ou.'ily and lets the fools rush 


prornotion direc- 
Sound and the 
; he is kin of 


pa.'it those big supcr-markets.l Zebra Loungt 
^oing to the small community | boxer Ray Arthonyl 
markets, liquor ^stores arid hot SAMMY WARREN — Top 
dog stands, etc.. they ain't official was 
cra/cc. the.v're showing that'.\ntler of th» 
our community is no stronger Rulers Counci 
than its weakest links and flolden West 
.*in<e our weakest link is not cidentally hi^ 


NOTICING— When vou 


supporting 
ncss. that 
I hey make it 
catch port therti! 


.1, 


opened a spacious liquor store 


the 5500 


block on W, 


communilx- biisi 
is precisely wh> jin 
a fiabit to sup-'.\rlams 

iPHEDICnONSl— That in '61 Joe 


PHIL GORDON , doctors like L. C. Nichols. EARL ANTHONY — E.xmaga- 1 Cooper, Nelsdn Cre.swell andlgifts to each other! 


*^nop i^/tHcl t^ave 4:i^t Jhriftimart ^orCL^ver\fda\f ^pcciala 


i^ ^ ir 






*Chazz' Soundtrack %\^ 

(Continued from Page 8i r'jJearing the decks f or' ; ^ 
notices pouring in for the : hilarious New Year's Eve ^ivui 


Elks 
reelected Chief 
Past E.xalted 
No. 41 of the 
Elks Lodge. In- 
sist c r just 


will come 


Tricky Davis 

with a job! 

ADRIENNE DUNCEE — New 

comer to city who strolls like 
a four figured fashion model 
was one of the most di.scussed 
topics during that Xmas party 
the other eve and the surprise 
was who has those big eyes 
for her! 


j"Only in Ameiica" play tl^at 
up, bowed in locally the other 
night. But we've got to see the 
hunk of theater to find out 
about the part that describes 
a "Negro Vertical Plan " to 


Legal secretary BESlOQl 
PARKS is thrilled no end, TS^ 
folks back home gifted !m» 
with a mink stJole for XraS 
She's the personable yoaQg 
lady who works for Mtg. 


off.sot segregated schooling in | NEW CHINA CLUB in- Reno: 


the .south. The writer lam-jSoAvhy not a press junket for 
poons the situation saying it's the 4th EstaterS or do yoU 
alright for Negroes to stand l. ink we're airaid of the skiei 
up but not "sit in" so they i after those traffic accident!? 
ZERA COLLIER — She and heijcan go to .integrated schools . . . It just came out wWy 
postman hubby spent this where the desks arc remved.! JOHNNY MATHIS has such 
Xmas making others happy. Huh???? . . , Yeah, it kind of perfect diction. He was a 
foregoing their usual personal! wiccked us. too: .speech ma.jor inthe coUeg* 1|» 


The LEON BRATTONS are, 


attended in San Franciscdt 


t^nep a^nd <^ave a/^t J nrijiiwiart Jfor CL^vcrudau 4^p€ciauf 



MORRELL'S YORKSHIRE 


DINAH WASHINGTON — She 

doesn't know it but 'after the 
Western Avenue Women Golf- 
ers paid a S.30O tab to catch 
her show they weren'J; allowed 
to keep the lush at S35 per. 
and were forced to leave it 
in the kitchen. That's one 
group .vou just can't afford to 
be angry with becau.se they 
reallv know their clubs! 


Santa Monica 

iC'ontinup fiom Page 'i' 
are al.so guests of their moth- 
er. .Mrs. E. .McCann of 642 
Brooks avenue. 


New Bethel Bapti.st Church 
will hold a watch night meet- 
ing on Saturday. Dec. .31. from; 
10 p.m. until 12 midnight. 
• ■• * 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. ^^e. 661 j 
Vernon a\enue. jeLstreamed to 
Dallas lo visit 'friends and 
relatives for the holidaxs. ' 


SLICED 

BACON 


BONELESS BRISKET- 


D.A. GRADE "A" 


FROZEN 

OVEN-READY 

20-24 LBS. 


CORNED 
BEEF 

59: 

U. S. D. A. GRADE "A" OVEN READY 4-5 LBS. 

FRESH YOUNG DUCKLINGS 

- PORK LOINS 

ROASTS 

WHOLE OR JIAc! .SV^"^^^ ^^^ 

RIB HALF **^b , y<^^LOIN & RIB 

RIB END Y/^^RIB 
SIX RIB CUTZ/M^&E 


TOM 

TURKEYS 

39' 

45: 
CHOPS 


lb. 


JERSEYMAI 


SOUR CREAM 




COUNTRY STYLE RIBS 49 


HALF SLICED 


QUAIL BRAND 


PiNEAPPLlfePork & Beans 

2N0.1 A JCC '^^ 0% 0"VC 
FLAT .^^ 'i^Sa \^ NO. TA _C m 
TINS ^mtm ^W^M TINS ^^M 


/IMPORTED i'5 OT. BTt. 
DON CARLOS RUM 

CARTIER IMPORTED 

FRENCH 

BRAND 


/ JANE *NOERSOM-g or PK(5. 

f SLICED CHEESE 

AMERICAN-PIMIENTO-SWISS . . 


4/5 QT. 
BTL. 



OH BOY FROZEN 


PIZZA 



3 


ALPS IMPORTED SLICED 

SWISS 

HEESE 




WITH 
CHEESE 


WESTWOOD 



HJR^fOSlOlS — Rm- 

Ifttcs (ihi^nll set to be sren 
and heard ns they pass nhmp 
the musical tiord Sunday, 
January 1, at the Pnl Ind- 
ium, along uith -Earl Bos- 
tic's band uho uill he 
hand to make music grand 
ffir f ol i "U- frs of Ray 
Charles. (See display.) 


rSALES PRICES EFFECTIVE AT* ALL THRIFTIMART MARK 

2600 South Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles - 3621 South La Brea, Los Angeles - 609 North Dillon, Los AngoUs - 6«40 La Tijera, Westchester - 7980 W««t Sunset Halivw»~l AAAi 
Canyon Blvd., North Hollywood - 8440 Lincoln Blvd., Santa Monica - 7985 Santa Monica ^Ivd., Hollywo<Ml - 3217 W«.t Magnolia, Urbonk - 11210 ^iJilii^^^ 

. ■ ■ . • ■ ."■ ■ V: 


Unirtl 


:4^ 


- ^*»*-^'rr* :rf?_'*v<. ~^ ~ 


") 


/ ) \^\y 


% 


PIRATES PITCHER SHOT 


NAACP Leader Gets 


— Segregated Casting Ends — 




Top Housihg 



C AUI F O R.N I A 


Vol. LXXX-No. 42 






THE IMPORTANT h^EWSPAPER 

Thursday, January 5, 1961 


1 o- 

AX. 5-3135 

Out-of-Tewn 15c 


Dr. Curtis King 
Burial Thursday 


E\D OF .-/A ERA — Srrrcn i xtms iclchrntcd tlirir lut'iry ovrr fro't ii'itcd instinr/ uhrn 
they ti/'f'fnriii fr/r n ijiilralion til (Jctilrid lliisttng on I lollyuorid bird. Vucsdiiy niorttitii/. 
.Mimhers tirid officers of 1 ntenuilioiinl Artists. lihi(h. irirricd on the iit/hl iii/iiin>l Jiiii 
Crow, /irr, from Icit: II isli\ (i/i/r. Edi^tir il .Mnddox (iittoiticy for the i/r>iuf>). .Mngijif 
Hftthminy. Byron Ellis. (Jcoryc Dav.s, Eiltirut I'/iylor, Cilrii Robimon and Evelyn Bur- 
uell. (Adnins) 



Times Change 

The world does move and 
times do change even if the 


Negroes Register 
At Central Casting 

By Maggie Hathaway 

Jan. 3. 1961 will go down in history as "freedom 
day" for Negro screen "extras" in Hollywood, for it 
was on that day that what had 'come to be known 
as the "peonage system" of Jim Crow hiring finally 
crumbled. * 


Weaver Made 
Housing Chief 
By Kennedy 

Wlien Robert C. \Vea\er 
a.>isume.s his job as administra- 
tor of the Federal Housing and 
Home Finance Agenc-^ he wiH 
be backed up by an executive 
order abolishing all racial dis- 
crimination and segregation 
in publicly assisted housing, 
the Eagle learned this week. 

\Vea\-er. whaM? appointment 
was announced by President 
Elect John F. Kennedy Satur- 
day, will direct the affairs and 
shape policy for the Federal 
Housing Administration, thej 



Well Known 
Doctor Dies of 
Heart AttacR^ 


Hit by Stray Bijllet — 


DIES SCDDESEY — Dr. 


On Tuesday morning lo.") 
joyous and jubilant actors and 


movemgj^tf an^ the changes, a^n^esses made their first ap- 
««» so s'tow that they escape p^ara nee at Central Casting, 
the naked eye. Take the case 5504 Hollywood blvd., to reg- 


•1 


oi Robert. C. Weaver. Presi 
dent-Elect Kennedy's choice to 
head the Housing and Home 
Finance Agency. Weaver got 
into public 



istor at the newly unified 

agoric>-. 

Hiint for Central Casting 

From the days when Holly-, 

wood vvas >oung up to the last! 

day of last \oar. Negro extras, 

were called for acting jobs 

through a .segregated .setup 

headed for almost a decade by 1 

Jasper Woldon. who operated' 

out of his home at 110 E. 99th 

street. 


Loran Millar 


Tckes. 
liberal, 
the 


a 

had 


life a w a y 
back there in 
1934 when he 
became a 
"N e g r o Ad- 
visor" on 
h o u s i n g af ■ 

if^""^ ^c *!^p When thpv arjived- at Hol- 
tnen »ecre- j^.^^.^^^w^^^^ Western, many of 
I tary 01 tne, ^.^ ^.Quldn't find the 

Interior 
Harold Ickes. 
f rei? wheeling 
been president of 


tures?" "Are ■ you. going to 
make a picture on Hollywood 
blvd. today?" "Are you really! 
movie stars?" "Can v.e have 
your autographs?" 

The extras finally found the 
"casting" building and head- 
ed for the elevator. The Ne- 
gro woman operator congrat- 
ulated them and wished them 
luck. 

Creeling them at the Cen- 
tral office were Jasper Weld- 
on. along with Doug Dakin, 
lop casting director, and sev- 
eral photographers. 

The laugh of the day came 
when, asked routine questions 
about name, age, etc.. not a 
single one of the actors and 


Public Housing Agency and 
the Urban Renewal and Rede- 
velopment Agency over which 
the HHFA has jurisdiction. 
The non -discrimination order 
\vill be aimed at all agencies 
and will be signed by the then 
President Kennedy. 
An acknowledged cxi)ert on 


branch of the 


actresses would admit to be- 
"casling office", and slopped' jng over 39. 
pedestrians at the bus load- Completing Details 

ing zone, waitresses in the Neither Weldon nor Dakin 
forner drugstore and an\onp w-ould make a statement to 


Chicago orancn 01 ine..^.|.^|^ would listen, asking, the press about the new cast- 
NAACP at one time during :., ^yj^^^^ j^ (^^pj^t^al Casting?" ing policy. Dakin said, "Call 
his tempestuous career. He; g^^> ^^ j,^^ pedestrians, me later, pr else cal.t 'Duke' 

who had never hoard of Cen-| Wales. pu;fc(yc relations direc- 
tral Casting, were delighted lor for lh<^producers." 
at' meeting real live actors. When we finally located 

"Do you people work in pic-! iConlinued on Page 


2) 


wanted to see to it that Ne- 
groes got their "fair share' 
of the jobs creal^ by the 
construction of public housing 
and proportionate share of the 
new housing units. It is easy 
to see now that this philos- 
ophy was a New Deal variant 
of the Separate But Equal 
rule. 

Negro Advisor ' 
Nobody saw anything wrong 
about Weaver being appointed 
as a "Negro Advisor" ' and 
even the most equalitarian 
minded New Dealers didn't 
dream, of suggesting' that af 
Negro be named to head the^^jj^^^^^ ^.j^^-^^ harassment and violence to prevent 



Dr. N. Curtis King, promi- 
nent South Los Angeles doc'- 
lor who founded and for many 
years operated the Rose Nctta 
Hospital. •1112 S. Hooper, ave- 
nue, died suddenly Thursday 
at the age of 66 of a heart 
attack at his Shangri - Da 
ranch near Elsinore. 

Funeral seivices will be 
held this Thursday (today) at 
1 p.m. f r o rri the .\ngelus 
Funeral Home, with the Rev. 
Llo\d Galloway, pastor of: 
Lincoln Memorial Congrega- 
tional Church, officiating. 
Lincoln Memorial Burial 
The Rev. L. M. Curtis, who 
* was pastor of the Macedonia 
I Baptist Church when Dr. King 
I was a member, will also par- 
Iticipate in the services. Burial 
'will take place in Lincoln Me- 
morial Cemetery. 
On Wednesday commemo- 
, rati\e .ser\iees were being held 
in Elsinore where Dr. King had 
made his home for -some time, 
in .t>^<>tw^en two extensive 
\v;oyJd trips, during which he 
SOMERVlLjLE, Tenn. — One.'wa-'^ depre.s.^ed by the pitiful, 
of the N>g-o sharecropper?; Po^'-'ty ^nd disease he wit-! 


A'. (Curtis 
Ro.yf S'lllfi 
luddrnly fit 
innih ncur 
Thursdny ' 


mil, founder of 
Ilospitnl, died 
his Sh(in</ri-[.n 

E I s i n ii r r Ins t 
a hriirt altii4 k. 


M Dweller 
iFWoUnded by 
Sliot from Auto 



Neg 

e\ieted in the Teniiessee xote 
battle was spot last Wednes 
dav as he 1 


ly asleep in his rmanv vears here siii<e 1929 


new "home" in the tent vil- 
ilage near hce 


and before that at Ncwnan, 

jCa.. combined the skill and 

Early B. Williams, first "set- j competence of the well trained 

jHer" of "Freedom Village," j doctor wijth the friendliness 

was shot 'in 


Frank "Waco" Jackson, 


the arm by some- and symptithv of the old-style ,-,. . ■, , 1 u j j \ • liJir ii. ■»« 

6m firing a shotgun (rom a ' „a°,ltion^r. ' P'™'-'^ P'"''^'^'' " ''? "^^ ^".'?,<"i ^•™'«L'i^°J' ""^ "^^ 


Tulane U. Students 
Blast La. Jackals' 

Close to 100 white students of New Orleans' Tu- 
lane University spoke out in anger and contempt 
this week against their governor, their legislators 
and the "packs of marauding jackals" who have in- 


nOlSiyC CHIEF— Roh- 
rrl C Weaver, nie'iibrr nf 
Seiv York hoiistng horird 
nnd SAAl^P ihnnnuin. \ns 
apf<oinied her.d nf the Eed- 
ernl Housing Ageney tridtty. 


four Negro 
:encies were schools. 

The students" 


federal housing program 

a matter of fact the govem 

mental housing a 

loaded up with bankers andi xhe students' names are 

real estate brokers who were printed on a well written 

on the ragged edge of relief brochure enti'Ied. "Toulanians 

and with social workers who. Di.s.sent." 

had dreamed dreams and seen ' Unreality 

visions of federal assistance -^hr arti'le states: 

to the .ill fed and ill housed; -The public affairsof 

of the land. state have taken on.; in 


si.x-vear-olds from attending "white' 


the 

the 

The bankers and brokers, p^st two months, an 'aura of 


who escaped the relief rolls mnreality which. b>- compan- 
by getting appointments to son, makes .Mice in Wonder- 
head the housing agencies jand appear stark realism. 
took their prejudices with, -Tlie governor and the leg- 
them and the social worker iriaiure reveal themselves 

underlings were so happy at masters of Orwellian double- - . . 

^uSg FDR to their side of, speak - to hate the Negro is Persecuting the Negro and the 
winning fun ^^^^^^^ that'to love^him: to discriminate lather to any modicum of poU- 


mischief and rampant van- 
dalisiri peaceful protest. 
Ignorant Bigots 

"In such an atmosphere one 
feels impelled to succumb to 
the general irrationalism and 
lash out with the sarnc in- 
teipperate, unconsidered, epi- 
thet-hurling One see's and 
hears on every side. Yei, what 
does this accomplish? 

"Does it help to assert that 
the legislators are ignorant 
bigots with orte eye to quiet- 
ing their own inadequacies by 


housing 


the iiuua.i.fe 1 1- ■■'''■, "V- "' jitical or 

thev were content to acquiese agamsfthe Negro i.s. to accord ; '^'"-'*' "' 

in the Jim Crow schemes of him equality, peaceful protest!^"'/'" 

in the Jim_ ^^^ ^^^^^^ mcludesthe hurling of roc-ksi ^'th'" r'-ach 


econamic advantage 
the melee may bring 


their superiors, 
government became an 
(Continued on Page 4^ 


Featured 
In the Eagle 


EditoricOs 

Church Activities 

Sports 

Tb« T»« 

Bill Smallwood .... 

P«opl« 

Chazz Crawford .. 
Show Bualna" 


active and eggs, telephone harass- 
!ment, rioting in the streets 
and constant threats of viol- 
ence: both major political 
parties, both presidential can- 
didates and the federal judi 


. 4 
5 
6 
. 6 
. 7 
. 9 
. 9 
.10 


"Does it help to notice that 
the state judiciary abandons 
all semblance of judicial de- 
corum and lends itself to the 
patently farcical segregation 
struggle? Is it of any use to 


passing car ejarly in the morn- ^^ 
ing 

Sheriff 'jUnarailabltt 

Sheriff C. I . Pattat could not 
be reached. He was reported 
out on an investigation and 
"unavailable for an indefinite 
period." 

Williams Jwas one of the 
growing number of sharecrop- 
pers who, tsgether with his 
wife and children, was put off 
urban housing. Weaver .-served >.s land aft. r he had r^gister^ 
as Rent Administrator for thej'^d and vol^d in the No%. 8 
state of New York under Gov. election. 

Averell Harnman from 19.54 to' ^^"^ . ^1"'^."" , ,„ 

1958 and now holds the job of pucaUonilund, meanwhile 
chairman of the New York has appealejl ^oPr^^.Eisen 

City Redevelopment Commis j, j i„i,„.:«„ tr> 

sion. He beg^n his housing I fauyer and J,yndon Johnson to 
career as an advisor to Secre-fvisit Freedom Village in Faj - 
tarv of the Interior Harold :ette County, Tenn. 
Ickes under Jhe early New The orgarii/.ation 
Deal Public Works Adminis- urged Gov. Buford 
tration when that agency and Atty. U-n. Pu>gers to pro 
(Continued on Page 4. 1 iContinu^d on Page 


ne.ssed in Africa 
where. 

Dr. King 


and else- ^ 


throughout hi.-;, 


-KlLLiSa ESDS BRIGHT C.lREER -^ l^ran% ".Wacy 
Jnckson, Pittsburg Pirntes pitrlier uho was jdefinitety on 
his Xifiy to the Major Ecngues," uas hit hy Ip stray bullet 
early .Momlay ninrninp: at d hot-dog stand in (ionipton. 7'jr^' 
jornicr Centennial High athletr uas killed- ins\(tntly\ I- 

\ ■ r 

'Waco' Jacksoin, 
On His Way' to 
Big League, Slain 

•-old 


?l-vear- 


Forgot Bills 


.lor Leagues, was shot and killed early Monday mom- 
Those who knew'"him best ! ing during a quaiTel in which he had plajyed no part. 
tell of the many occasions on The former Centennial High School jCIF basket- 

he would treat whole i ball player, who was signed* 


families who had health prob- 
lems but little money, 
just forget to send in a bill. 
^•ti\e in many cixic pr 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Conference 


which H ..V^UXU ..V «.^,„„.l t,,C».,^l, ....W ..CiO 0.f,I,W. ^ , L ., il. 

services for ^he 

^,,ji - ~ -. ipromising player,' who was 

innocent bystander who wentiuked bv everj-body and who 
.... . ,,.,^ „,„, outside a cafe to see what | had made an imipressive show- 

Active m man> < imc ,_proj- ^,.^3 happening and wasiing during hi.7 brief period 

jstruck by astray bullet as he with the Piratjes, has b^n 
j turned to go back inside. 
Funeral Saturday 
The killing took place at the 
Hot Spot. 11624 S. Wilming- 
on a\enue, I shortly after 2 
a.m.-; where .lack.son and sev- 


Brown Urgesi 
Stronger Laws 
Against Bias 


JL p.m. 
j^shIey-( 


Salkjr- 

GrigSby 

9920 Central 


scheduled for 
day from the 
Mortuary Inc., 
avenue. ' 1 

'On HisI Way* 
Cliet Brewer,! former b 


ase- 


eral of his friends liad stopped | ball player who is at prestent 
off to got a hot dog. !Jhe West CoastI scout for ihe 

Idcnlity of his a.'-sailant is j Pirates, told iHe Eagle that 
not known. He and another] both he and Branch Riclfey, 
hian who was with him fledUhe ball club's general mam..- 
after the sliooting. ' ; 


ciary are communist-inspired r^^unt the idiocies of Uic 
and the national capilol is ^'hiet executive who engages 
•seething with subversion :;'" debate with a newsman, 
teachers who obey federal! asking him if he would want 
court orders are to be investi-lh's four-yeair-old daughter to 



I SACR.'V-MENTO — Governor, 
has alsoigfiniund. G. Brown Tuesday 
Ellington I ^,pgp£j the state legislature to 
"extend our laws against dis- 
crimination in housing" andi 
tc establish the "principle that 1 
an e.stablished pattern of dis- j 
crimination is a proper basis 


(Continued bn Page 3| 


li 


Senators Propose Itule | 
Changes to Curb Debatle 

WASHINGTON' — Democrats zigzajgged tow^i-d 
for disciplinary action by state a redemption of their platforin pledges !to curb sen- 
licensing bodies. ' atorial filibusters and to break the House Rules C^m- 
The governor did not spell rnittcQ's power to bottle up civil' rightsi legislation; as 
out his proposals for e-'^tpnd- r^^gj-ggg organized this week. Prospects are "that 

ine legislation banning '^"^'^here will be little change Cf - ■ , ^^ ■ - i,^ 

^'hM Senate rules and that thel"^" "^^^ «f ^Mssjssippi |-ho 
'"at ,,„ . , D,,i„^ ,-^„,„,it,« ,..;ii v,„' boiled the Kenwedy ticket ^ast 

fall and campaigned for the 


ing legislatiofn banning 
ing discrimination but 
leaders of the coiHmitlee 


led the fighl for fair employ- ^ , 
ment legislation have readied ;|^"/\"",,'^ 
a bill that would put enforce- 
Uient of housing laws .un%r 
(Continuerf on Page 3) 


House Rules Committe will bej 


of it.s power but 


on gave the move to change] 


gated for subversion and dis- 
loyalty; the people of Louisi- 
ana who elected Kennedy 
electors did not really do so 
and the vote of the electors 
should be changed; the press 
calls peaceful protest criminal 


marry a Negro? 

Defend VUification 

"Can it be believed that- the 
mayor of a city of 600,0(X)-odd 
souls aisserts in a news confer- 
ence that telephone cam- 
(Continued on Page 4) 


TEST Dlf ELEER Jl OUSDED — Shun above out- 


side their tent in "Freedom Village'' near Sv 
are the wife and children of Eorly B. 
uas uounded in the arm last If ednesday 
from a passing auto. (Photo Ay .H'llhers; 
SCEf.J, I 


merville, Tenn., 
JCilliams, tiho 
by a shot fired 
courtesy of the 


ning of each session and that 
filibusters- may not be mount- 


Hawkins Heads 
Top Gommittee 

SACRAMENTO — Assembly- 
pan Augustus F. Hawkins 

(Dem.> Tuesday took over the i;'^';";^^;/--^--^^"^^-"^;^: 
taskof heading he important ^^^^^, ^^^^^ filibuster 

Rules Committee of the ^^y'^^ halted by t%v^ thirds 

of senators present and voting 
and it seems likely that the 
power to curb debate will be 
changed to give three fifths 
of senators present and voting 
the right to choke off talk- 
fests after reasonable debate. 

Colmer Ouster 

The congressman slated to 

that 'be purged from the House 

I Rules Committee is William 


that a Mississippi congress- ^^^^'O" «f a"p"t^P^"<i^"*: 
man will be ousted to make ^'a^ «f ^^^'^M' ^hc present 

vv^Av for a more liberal mem-'R"'-!? I rn"!!^Tr.\^ ^^Z^'^r 
. • jof eight Democrats an,d tour 

, , ... Republicans bijit Colmer and 
Vice President Richard ^lx- l^i^gj^^^^i How|ird Smith, Vir- 


ginia Democrat!, have consist- 


filibuster rules a boost with|p^jjy ^.^^^^ ^-^^ ^^e Republi- 
a ruling that the Senate may i^.^j^-^i^j^onty to! stvmie all leg- 
change its rules at the begin- ! jg,jjyQ„ unacceptable to them. 


Assembl.v. 

He is the first Negro to head 
this committee which clears 
appropriations for interim in- 
vestigating bodies, in addition 
to handling other legislative 
matters. 

Hawkins was elected to the 
62nd Los Angeles district in 
1934 and has served in the 
legislature ^er since 
time. 


r 


House Speaker Sam Rayh^m 
is understood to be baclpns 
the ousting of Colmer but fihat 
move will not ^Ive the prob- 
lem. Under House rules, ^e 
Rules Committee has entire 
jurisdiction to determine wtiat 
legislation is sent to the floor 
of the House fojr a vote. Wh6h 
he is opposed ^o any legisla- 
tion. Smith sirAply refuses to 
call a meeting of liis Commit- 
tee and has disapjt>eared i for 
weeks at a time. He could pur- 
sue the same tactics even mt^ 
t^oimer's ouster. ! 


1 


2— The California Eagle 
Thursday, January 5, 1961 


African States 
Meet to Plan 
Joint Policies 

CASABLANCA, Morocco — A 
four-day "summit conference" 
of seven African-Asian na- 
tions to set up a neutralist, 
anti -imperialist bloc was 
scheduled to get under way 
here Tuesday. 

Nations represented in addi- 
tion to Morocco are Ghana, 
Guinea, Mali, United Arab 
Republic, Algerian Nationlists, 
Ceylon and Libya. 
■ King Mohamed V of Mor- 
occo was greeting the presi- 
dents, foreign ministers and 
other representatives and had 
arranged an ii.ipressive recep- 
tion for his guests. 

Among those attending are 
Pres. Kwama Nkrumah of 
Ghana :.Pres. Sekou Toure, of 
Gyinea; Pres. Madib6 Keita of 
Mali; Pres. GaraaJ Abdel 
Nasser of the UAW; Premier 
Ferhat Abbas of the Algerian 
Nationalists; Foreign Minister 
Abdel Quadir al Allam of 
Libya; and Alwin Perera, Cey- 
lonese delegate who is am- 
bassador in Cairo. 

Subjects on the agenda were 
reported as the worsening sit- 
uation in the Congo and the 
"indecision" of the U.N., 
coupled with strong support 
for imprisoned premier Pa- 


UN Slaps Belgium |4 Scholarships 
For Aid to MobutuTo be Offered 

For Oratory 


Beligum, paralysed by nationwide strikes over 
the Congo-caused austerity program, was given a 
rebuke Monday for open military intervention in 
the Congo. Belgium was accused of aiding "strong 
man" Col. Joseph Mobutu's troops that were sent tq 

attack Lumumba followers in?' ' 

an unsuccessful attempt tOiMobuty in Thysville, south of 

regain control of Kivu Prov- 1 l^opoldville. The southern 

ince. I province of Katanga, the in- 

With an easy disregard for dustrial and mining heartland 


international commitments. 
Mobutu had asked, and ap- 
parently had been granted, 
permission to fly paratroopers 
into the Belgian-administered 
U.N. trusteeship territory of 
Ruanda-Urundi because there 
were no adequate — and 


of the country, is controlled 
by' Moi.se Tshombe. 

Plan 'New Deal' 
A clash was reported Satur- 
day in the northern area of 
Tshombe's domain. near 
Nyemba. during which 10 re- 
belling Baluba tribesmen 


available — landing fields mjwere said to have been killed can History.' 


Four -scholarships for the 
winner and runners-up in the 
oratorical contest scheduled 
as part of Negro History Week 
activities will be presented by 
Our Authors Study Club, the 
sponsoring organization. Mrs. 
Vassic D. Wright, president, 
announced Monday. 

Negro History Week will be 
observed Feb. 12-17. 

Theme of the oratorical 
contest which is open to all 
high school seniors will be, 
"The Negro's Role in Ameri- 



UEAI Y DUTiES—Mane 

('. Barksdnir, h rita Sigma 

J Thfta extcutiv • director, 

I 'lordinalrs n c I , r i t i f s of 


Kivu I^ovince. 1 by U.N. Nigerian troops 

Machine- Gunned 1 Despite the divided author- 

The Mobutu forces accord- lity. however, Kasavubu has 

ingly had flown to Usumbura.' called for a political round- 


capital of Ruanda-Urundi, and 
frorri there were escorted to 
the Congo border by Belgian 
troops. - I 

At the border they were met 
by a machine gun baragc 
from Lumumba troops and a 
number of Mobutu's para- 
troopers were wounded. 

One reports says that 30 of 
them were taken to a hospital 
in Usumbura. Other reports 
said a number of Mobutu's 
men were captured. 

The U.N. representative in 
the Congo. Rajeshwar Dayal 
of India, said in a report to 
Dag Hammarskjold. U.N. sec- 


table conference Jan. 2,"), to 


According to Miss Estelle 
Edmer«on, John Adams Junior 
High , School instructor and 
chairman of the Oratorical 
Contest Committee, students 


2S.0(h) mcmh,ry i 
iha/itcrs in the I 
ami Utati.' 


NAACP to install 
Officers Sunday 

Dr. St. Paul Epps will install the newly elected 
officers of the Los Angeles Branch NAACP at the 
Bel-Vue Community Presbyterian Church, where he 
is pastor, 675 E. 118th street, on Sundiy, Jan. 8. 

The installation meeting is scheduled to begi n at 
3 p.m. 


r; 267 Del In 
y., Liberia 


Man Shot in 
Tenf Colony 

(Contlnuecl from Page 1) 
tect the lives of the tent 
dwellers. 

Funds Welcomed 
SCEF, in addition, has asked 
that letters and telegrams be 
Members of the Executive sent to Pres. Eisenhower, Sen. 


Officers to be installed are 
are follows: 

Edward D. Warren, presi- 
dent: Atty. Loren Miller, first 
vice president; Atty. James 
Akers Jr.. second vice presi- 
dent; Dr. H. Claude Hudson, 
third vice president; Mrs. 
Patricia Elmore, secretary'; 
and Dr. Frederick N. Spann, 
treasurer. 


"modify the basic law^' of the! entering the contest will be 
Congo. I judged on the content, general 

It is assumed bv correspond- 1 ''^^''^^'''■''"^55 and^ delivery of 
ents in Leopoldville that thisP^eir speeches. The- contest 
indicates that Kasavubu in-j^^'" *^^^ P'^ce on Friday, 
tends to disregard the plec- ! ^^''- ^"^ ^^ ^ p.m. 
tions iust prior to the grant-' ' 

int; of independence last July 
1, and install some kind of a 
new parliament with his Qp^pj |f£ DOOFS 


iCentrai Casting 


trice Lumumba; support forj^f Mobutu's men crossed into 
Algerians against the French; Kivu Province from Ruanda- 
Urundi at dawn Sunday. 
Calls for Disarming 


Joseph lleo, as pre 

(Continued from Page 1> 
I "Duke" Wales, he surprised 
I us by treating us "downright 
^^^ "^' human," ar)d gave us a "right 
* ''to the point" statement. 

"We are going to complete 
the details for caslisg Negroes j 
and Orientals through Central 


protege 
mier. 

Meanwhile on Tuesday 
f^sentatives of five more 
tions comprising the 


Congo Conciliation Committee 
arrived at Leopoldville. brin^- 
retary general, that about 100 ing the number to nine. 

Countries now represented as f^gt as we can. 
are Ghana, India. Pakistan ' 
Sudan. Senegal. Nigeria. Ma 
laya, Ethiopia and Liberia. 



and protest against the ex- 
plosioh by France ef its third 

atomic bomb in the Sahara; j^, his protest to Belgian. 

last week. : Ambassador Walter Loridan DiieSrtAce Eit-mc 

From Peking, Chinese Pre- . Hammarskjold charged that DUSineSS ririTlS 
mier Chou En-lai sent cabled jBejgium had violated the |n/>.<AMCA Cmwc 
greetmgs, pointing out that; ^ands-off resolutions of the, '"*''^^*'*^' 30/5 
his government has always; united Nations by permitting I Hi iri RvrvflctrAA* 
given "firm support to the j Mobutu's troops to pass'*"'"' DroaSTreCT 
peoples of Algeria, the Congoj through the Belgian-adminis- i The business population of 
and other African countries injtpred trust territory. Los Angeles County increased "'Everyone wi 

their struggle against colonial- 1 . He said he found it difficult : 1'^ per cent during the past' 
ism." He also called for re- to believe that troops could ;f've years, according lo sta- 
lease of Lumumba. have landed by plane and tistics released by Dean D. 

Not represented at the con-j then been transported to the -"^'addu.x. regional vice presi-, 
ference were India. Indonesia,^ border of Kivu Province ""with-'dent of the Los Angeles office|old Fair Employment Practic 
Ethiopia, Nigeria and Tunisia, out the knowledge of the of Dun & Bradstreet. Inc. les Commi.ssion. after a peti 

Tunisia is currently feuding responsible authorities of Bel-' Basing his facts on a com-;tion was filed witfi that agen 
with Morocco over Mauritania, giurn ij, the trust territory." parison of physical counts in'cy_5=everal months ago. 


"At present," he continued, 
"it is too soon to say if there 
will be a Negro aide or not. 
That will be left to the execu- 
tives at Central to decide." 
No Hitches 

We said there would be no 
protests from our gro^p so 
long as the treatment was im- 
partial and fair. 

'Don't worry," he replied, 
be happy." 

The change-over from the 
segregated casting set-up was 
brought about through the 
■onciliation efforts of the year- 


PLASSER — Uihna //. 
Rtiy. program assistant of 
Delta Sigtun Theta, is al' 
ready laying plans for Del- 
ta's Golden J n\iii ersary in 
1963. 


'Mistake' 
Listed as 


Killing 
First 


Kefauver. Gov. Ellington and 
other representatives seeking 
action on behalf of the vic- 
tims of hate who have no 
homes, no jobs, no food, no 
money — because they dared to 
mark ballots in the president- 


Committee are: James Allen. 
Dr. E. H. Ballard. Mrs. Sadie 
Brewer; Dr. J. B. Carter, Ralph 
Davis, Dr John S. Gary, Jos- 
eph E. Grimmett. Beacham 
Jackson Jr.. Carl J. Johnson, 
Ventress Johnson, Joe Jones, 
Mrs. Rosa E. King, Dred Scott j ial election. 
NeUsom, Rev. L. Sylvester. SCEF asks that money for 
Odom, Johnny Otis, Rev. W.I tents and food for Fayette 
L. Robinson, Mrs. Vivian County victims be sent to John 
Strange and Vernon Thomp- iMcFerren, Route 4, .Box 133, 
son. iSomerville, Tenn.; and that 

Elected fourth and fifth vice j donations for similar victims 
presidents, respectively, were in Haywood County be sent to 
Rev. C. W. Arnold and Atty. O'Dell Sanders, 307 W. Margin 
Herbert Simmons, Jr. Street, Brownsville, Tenn.; or 

^ I to the SCEF, Inc., 822 Perdido 

j Street, New Orleans, 12, La. 
^Q^gl Deleaate ■ "^^^ NAACP national office 
** in New York has been sending 

To Attend Meet assistance since last July 6 

and to date has provided $7,- 
At White House "^'^ worth of food which is dis- 
r^u wwiiii«7 ■■*'***'* tributed twice monthly by the 

John A. Jackson, executive; Memphis NAACP. 
director for the Stovall foun- The Memphis NAACP has 
dation, will leave by plane also; distributed a dd i t i o n a 1 
on Saturday, Jan. 7. for Wash-i truckloads of clothing and oth- 


Some of the other nations said 
they would send observers. 


-^^ POMADE 

with Lanolin 
For lustrous, well 
groomed healthy hair. 
Won't Rub Off 
Non-Greasy , , .^-- 


MANN'S 
UNION OIL 
SERVICE 



TIRES 
TUBES 
BATTERIES 
ACCESSORIES 
SERVICE CALLS 
TIRE REPAIRING 
EXPERT LUBE 
FREE PICKUP 

and Delivery 

4000 SOUTH 
WESTERN AVE. 

AX. 1-9566 



- INTkODUCING - 

TUGGIE'S 

AUTO REPAIR 

SPiCIALIZING IN 

BRAKES 

• REPAIRS 
• TUNE-UPS 
4000 SO. 

WifmN AVE. 

AX. 1-9566 


He asked Belgium to "takei the January, 1961 and January, 
immediate and effective mea- 1956 editions of the Dun & 
sures" to see that there is no! Bradstreet Reference Book, 
repetition of such an incidenti Maddux reports that Los An- 
and further demanded that ge'.es County ha.'< S.3,732 busi- 
Belgian authorities disarm ness firms listed in the 1961 
any other Congolese troops Reference Book while in the 
entering the trust territory. 1956 edition, 76,336 firms were 
Country Divided listed. 

The thwarted attack on 


The petition, containing .500 
names, was filed by Byron El- 
lis, actor and officer of Inter- 
national Artists, and Maggie 
Hathaway, Eagle reporter, ac- 
tress and president of Inter- 
national Artists. 


1961 Homicide j 

Frank Smith, 44, of 26331 
Halldale avenue, was arrested i 
Sunday on suspicion of a 
murder "by mistake" in what 
, police listed as the first homi- 
cide of the new jear. 

A mechanic, John T. Haw- 


kins, 4f). whose 


given as W. 52n(l street, was 
shot at a bar at ^376 S. Main 
street. 

Smith said he Had a dispute 
with another man. Willie B. 
.Marshall of 1162 E. 25th street, 


Kivu Province underlines the 
fact that Mobutu and Pres. 
Jcfeeph Kasavabu, who work 
together, are in effective con- 
trol of only a portion of the each January 


address was 


ington, D. C. 

Jackson was appointed by 
Governor Brown as a delegate 
to the first White House Con- 
ference on the Aging. He is 
the only Negro resident of 
Southern California to attend 
the conference as an officially 
appointefd ' delegate and will 
participate in the conference 
-•cction on 
organizations. 

He will be accompanied by 
his wife, Mary, and their 
three children, Jeanctte, Doug- 
las and David. 

The Jacksons have alsc 
been invited to attend the 
presidential inauguaration. 


er supplies from NAACP bran- 
ches, other groups and indi- 
viduals from across the coun- 
tr>'. 


Judge Williams 
is Transferred 


Judge David W. Williams, 
iocai community !^ho has been a.ssigned to the 
Van Nuys court during the 
last half of I960, has been 
transferred to a Courthouse 
misdemeanor trial court. 

Announcement of the shift 

w;'s made by Judge Gerald C. 

■^^>pple as he undertook the 

'■,ost of presiding judge of the 

"tinicipal Court. 


*r 


Willowbrook 
Youth, 16,, Held 
For Murder 

A 19-year-old youth, Joe 
Vernie Foster, of 1S16 E. 124th 
street, was shot to death Sat- 
urady afternoon in' the after- 
math of a fight tha^ broke out 
at a party last Thursday 
night. 

Sheriff's officers said that 
Robert Lee Crosby, 16, of 1737 
E. 122nd street, admitted the 
shooting, but clairhed Foster 
had a gun and he shot in 
self-defense. 

Named 'Butich' 

"'When police arrij/ed at the 
scene of the shootfng, at the 
rear of 1752 Palm Lane, 
■Willowbrook housihg project, 
two of those involved in the 
ffghfts said that it was "Butch" 
who lives on 122nd street, who- 
did the shooting. < » 

While the officers were talk- 
ing to Arthur Thomas Gibson, 
20, of 1735 Palm Lane, and 
Fred Dupree Jr., 19, of 1542 E. 
122nd street, Crosby returned 
to the scene and gave him- 
self up. 

He told police he had 
tlirown his gun into a garbage 
pail. He said he had come to 
Paim Lane to return the gun 
"Someone" had given him 
after the fight at 1960 130th 
street, Compton, the ^previous 
Thursday. He cduldrt-'t recall 
the name of the person or the 
exact address. 

Toster Fired Twice' 

He said that he was ac- 
costed by Foster. Gibbon. Du- 
pree, and Joe Nathan Edwards, i 
20, of 1738 E. Palm Lane. ji 

Foster, he said, pulled out ' 

a small gun and fired twice, I 
but the gun did not go off. 

Fearing that Foster was out ' 

to "get" him, he fired the gun , 

he had in his hand, Crosby I 
said. 

Officers said tHey were con- 
vinced, after investigating, 
that ithe quarrel was^ not a •' 
gang fight. 

Arrested in addition to Cros- ' 
by were Gibson, Dupree and \ 
Edwards, and Lee Otis Sand- 
ers, 22, of 1643 E. Palm Lane; 
Roosevelt Murray, 23, of 1700 
E. Pa.lm Lane; and two 
youths, 16 and 17 years old. 


*:l 


Ask Ban on Race Togi 

According to .Maddu.x, busi- ATHENS, Ohio, — The and was hitting Ijiim with the 
ness concerns in all part of ^AACP this week asked Ohio butt of the gun when some 
the United States are asked University at Athens to dropjone grabbed him and the gun 
by Dun & Bradstreet for copies' r^^'al 'fS'' f'"'"" '^^ housing | went off .accidentally, 'killing 
of their financial statements' applications 
This vear, re 


r ' Hawkins. 


territory of the Congo. quests are. being sent to ap- 

The two large northern proximately three million 
provinces of Kivu and Oriental business concerns — to the 
are under the control of fol-' corner grocery store worth a 
lowers of the legally elected few thousand dollars as well 
premier, Patrice Lumumba, as to businesses worth 
who has been imprisoned byi millions, , 



exKRT mmm wauk 

• Guar. SatMaetlen • All Jobs IV*/come 

MOTOR TUNE-UP $5.50 

Call Ftrmon at HI. 7-962'B 

4822 West Adams at Vineyard 


"t^v^ 




CO. 


/ 


n^. 


INVITES YOU TO 



(Uf , i. #• 



9 Ob 




/ 


CONTROLLED CALORIE DIET 


TIn ptlicwiit Way to Um er Control Wtight 

. S^hfy . . . Siirtfy . . . itisify ... 

Rich-fasting, hunger-appeasing ond scientifically for-, 
mulated liquid diet designed to facilitate th« loss of 
stored body fat without damaging health. Vanilla or 
Chocolate. Ready to use ... no measuring or mixing 
. . . does not separate or settle out o n sta nding . . / 
smooth, nerer grainy . . . made with ^^^ delicious 
full-flavor non-fot milk. 

*P.nenf wko with t* let. weiglif ihould centult th.ir dectort bcfor* 
ttaiting « r*4ucinf program bccout. any dieting it not recemmmdcd 
in c.rtoin conditiont. 



7 DAYS SUPER-SPECIAL SALE 
AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 


214 so BROADWAY 


DOWNTOWN 
lOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


MA. 4-0801 


I f 


^ THIS IS OUR GREATEST SALE ^ 

Buy *ny Suit at $29.00 to $99.00 and get a $20.00 Jacket or a $20.00 Pair of 
Shoes FREE! 

Buy two Suits and get a $40.00 Car Coat FREE! or buy 2 suits and get a $60.00 
Top Coat FREE! 

TOOO Good Looking Shirts, values to $10.00, NOW for $4.95 each! 

$10 PAIR OF TROUSERS FREE!!! 

Buy any sport coat and get a $10.00 Pair of Trousers FREE! 

Pay Cash or as little at $3.00 a week pays for $100.00 worth of clothes, shoes 
and accessories for Men and Boys of all ages. 

FREE CREDIT • NO INTEREST • ALTERATIONS FREE AND FIT GUARANTEED 

We cater to His Majesty, the Working Man! 

SALE LAST OIVLY 7 DAYS!!! 

This Sale is for 7 days ONLY . .. So HURRY, Buy Now, Pay Laterl 

Store Hours: 9:30 to 6:00. Open every Saturday night until 8:00 P.M. 

PARK FREE ALWAYS Next Door to Store!!! 

All Luggage at Half Price • Buy any watch and get a $20.00 Jacket FREEI 

$29 SLACK SLIT FREE 

Buy 2 suits and get a $29.00 slack suit FREE ... 1 1 1 

We CaiBT to California Eagle 
Newspaper Readers 


% CHUCK ROAST ..a STEAK SALE 

59 


^ GOLDEN PtEMHIM KEF 
U.S.OJL GRADED OIOKE^-KST CUTS! 

CENTER CUT CHUCK or 

7-BONE ROASTS 

MMinimoTM nil nm ton jn DIM wii ti»iB»_n«i«c ap, 

aOD ROASTS 03*^ BEEF ROASTS 49^ 331 RIB ROASTS o5S 



II 


SHORT 


wtumawi 

CHUCK STEAKS 

MM* iMI 

CHUCK STEAKS 

■DIKUSS 

CHUCK STEAKS 


49- 

55- 

89- 


SWEET ARIZONA. ^^ ^^ i 

GRAPEFRUIT :: 39° «»khoi^ 


CXT«A fANCV TmC< MF»T 


BELL PEPPERS 19 


l^' 


M Star zuw 

PEACHES 


H«l>« w SIkW 


Cons ■ 


00 





**»*»»»( 


^*%«S>v! 


NEW PROCESS! 

ORANGE JUICE 

56^z. 9 ■ 
Cons ■ 


PEANUT HUTTER 


CREAMY OR CRUNCHY 


JELL-0 


■^%^:- 


sensationa 

veuYs 


V 


VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 South Broadway MA. 44)801 


S: 


^^ Downtown Los Ang*f«s, CalH. — Plenty of free Parking NeMf Door 

^vO * GET YOUR EASTER CLOTHES AT VICTOR NOW AND SAVE * 






fc- 


-< •-« -■«•- 


^ 



Order Landlords 
To Halt Evictions 

The New Year dawned chill and forbidding to the 
growing population of hungry, homeless Negro 
sharecroppers at the tent colony outside Somerville, 
Tenn., Sunday morning. 

As a result, however, of two separate decisions 
Friday in Concinnati and 


(■OOPhRA'l I()\' — Liherifin and hrneli nurses cnnprrnte 
nt Jerusalem's Hadnssnh Hospllnl. The Llbertnns 
envino sferifiljzed trninini; in Israel. 


are anion ff 


in trealtng an eye patient 
hundreds of Africans rr- 


Polio Shots 

"Dollar-A-Shof polio im- 
munizations will bp available 
to the Southwest Community 
on Thursday. Jan. 12. from 6- 
S p>Qi. at the Southwest Dis-. 
tricn Health Center. 3834 S. 
Western avenue, the Rev. R. 
Wolf, chairman of the South-' 
west Health Council, announ- 
ced, this week. 


Man, Woman Held 
As Bunco Suspects 

A man and woman were picked up Tuesday after- 
noon by police as suspects wanted on numerou.s bunco 
charges. 

Arrested were Mary M. Grier. 34, of 718 W. 79th 
street, and a man who was identified only -as Wil- 
liams. 

John W. Frower. .506 


for 


II. 


new lease on 
TRAVEL! 


life 


II 


GO MEXICO 



2 E. 

46th street, told officers the 
pair engaged hirri in conver- 
sation in front of ^ phone 
booth at 4513 S. Avalon blvd. 
Williams, speakmg in a brok- 
en accent, claimed he was 
from the West Indiet; and that 
some girl had just taken him 
for S50, Frower said. 

He asked Frower if he could 
help him locate the Seaman's 
Club.. It was then Mrss Grier 
walked by and Williams of- 
fered her a dollar if she would 
assist them. He pulled out a 
roll of bills. j 

Miss Williams told 
she had never seen Wiliamsi vvas 


Memphis, there was some 
hope that evictions of at least 
some of the other 700 families 
of Fa.vette and Haywood 
Counties might be halted. 
Injunction Granted 
The Cincinnati court granted 
a Justice Department plea for a 
temporary in.junction against 
37 Ha.\-wood County land- 
owners to pre\ent evictions 
scheduled for Jan. 1. 

In Memphis Judge Marion 
S. Boyd signed an order tem- 
porarily restraining Fayette 
County landowners from "inti- 
midating, threatening, coerc- 
ing . . . their Negro share- 
cropper tenants for the pur- 
pa-ie of interf erring with the 
right of such persons to 
vote." 

The landlords deny that the 
\oting- issue is involved in 
their refusal to renew the 
leases of the Negroes, some 
of whom ha\e farmed the 
same land for the past 23 
years. They claim that the 
evictions were necessitated by 
the introduction of machinery. 
Claim Fifth Amendment 
Two of the white group, 
however, sought refuge in the 
Fifth Amendment at the non- 
jury trial before Judge Bojd. 
while two white witnesses 
testified to pressure being ap- 
plied against them when they 
refused to follow the anti-Ne- 
gro edicts. 

A N' e g r o witness, James 
Aver>-. 48, father of three chil- 
dren, told the court that after 
registering to vote Ma,%- 20 he 
was told by Thomas Crowder 
Chapman Jr. to make ar- 
j rangements for a new place 
officers! to farm in 1961. Avery said he 
not able to find a place 


fusal to sell necessities; re- 
fusal to extend credit or lend 
money; refusal to renew in- 
surance policies; circulating 
lists of Negro registrants to 
help merchants penalize them; 
refusal to deal with mer 
chants accused of selling to 
Negroes who registered: and 
the coercing of suppliers. 

Laws Urged 
Agaiiisf Bias 

(Continued from Page 1) 
t||ie supervision of a state com- 
mittee against disonmination. 

Added Powen 

Under the proposal, the pre- 
sent Fair Employment Pract- 
ices Committee would be giv- 
en additional jurisdiction and 
would be empowered to act in 
all oases where discrimination 
ir charged in employment, 
hou.sing and places of public 
accommodation. Washington 
and Oregon on the Pacific 
Coast and a number of east- 
ern states now have such laws. 

The proposal to give state 
licensing agencies the power 
to take discipliriary action 
against licensees who persist 


Stray Bullet 
Hits Pittsburgh 
Pirate Pitclier 

(Continued from Page 1 1 
get,; were of the opinion that 
Jackson, "a quiet, nice boy." 
waS "definitely on his way to 
the! Major Leagues." 

Jackson was in Los Angeles 
between seasons. He pitched 
hisj last ball game for the 
Losi Angeles ■ Braves thhee 
we^ks ago and struck out the 
firsf 10 men who came up to 
bat for the Los Angeles Coast- 
ers.! 

lihe young athlete, who was 
t>or 1 in Haynes, La. and came 
to JOS, Angeles in 1948, was 
signed by the Pirates in 1959 
and turned over to their Idaho 
Falls club in the Pioneer 
Leajgue. 

Class A 

List season he chalked up 
the surprisingly good .354 ERA 
(earned run average) record. 


Thursday, January 5; 1961 


The California Eagle— 3 


Meany's Adviser 
Was Pal of Batista : 

NEW YORK— Charges that the adviser on Cuban ' 
affairs to AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany is one of Ex- 
Dictator Batista's henchmen were made here recent-- 
ly by William Worthy, reporter for the Baltimore • 
Afro-American," accor(iing to a report in the "Na- ' 
lional Guardian." 't ■ ■- 


and 
rati 


97th 

as J 


gun 
was 


was hiked to a Class A 

JcLOkson and three of his 

frieirts — Louis Sherrill, 22, 

of ;!438 S. McKintey avenue; 

Thotnas Minter, 21. of 231 E. 

street; and Albert Thom- 

r. — went to the Hot Spot 

aboitt 2 a.m. Monday. 

Tpe man who later pulled a 

and fired the fatal shot 

sitting at a table when 

SheJTill, who was standing at 

the counter, looked around 

and' saw the man staring at 

him, 

."^'hat are you staring at me 


before. The officers, however, 'in Ha>wood County, 
suspected them of being bun-j Charles W. .Scott. Stanton 
CO artists. In questioning Miss j constable, and Miss Mar>- 


Grier. police found an identifi- 
cation card made out to "Mrs. 
Williams' in her wallet. 


in discrimination also has the 

backing of the committee andjfor?!" Sherrill asked, 
bills to effectuate that power "tm not." was the reply. 
will be offered in both hous-j "I'm staring at my friend 
e,s. The bill is al.so aimed at v^'ho•s got my money.'" 
real estate brokers who refu.se 1 Pulled Gun ' 

to offer housing for sale or' Jdekson's friends went out- 
rent to non-whites. side. The man at the table 
■ [told his friend to take him 
Old Age Assutance 'home, but when he got out- 
Other items of particular side, he started bickenng with I 
interest to Negro voters in theishe-rrill again, then pulled his; 
governor's message were his 'gun. | 
suggestions that old age as- Jack.son. hearing the com-j 
sistance be tied to a cost of motion, opened the screen i 
living formula WTlh increases ^fjoor to see what was hap- 1 


County land- 1 for the aged as prir'es went 


Income Tax Class 

A new class in Income Tax 
Preparation will be offered by 
Roosevelt Adult School. 4.50 S. 
Fickett street, starting Jan. 23. 
according to Dr. G. Leon Gard- 
ner, principal. 


Ware. Ha.vwood v^uu.nv ,<i,.u-|ior rne ageo as prices went uplpening When he .saw that 
owner and supply company | and his proposal that the leg- ^pp of the men had a gun. he 
bookkeeper, both refused I0|islatu're take a "hard look" atl,ur(,ed to go back inside 
answer questions "on the, the aid to needy children pro 
grounds that any answer I 

gixe might tend to jncrimi- For various reasons. Negroes! Sherrill in The lip. A second 

constitute a disproportionate Ishqt hit Jackson in the back 


naie me. ' when the\- were 
placed on the stand by John 
Doar. Civil Rights Division at- 
tornev. 


Worthy, who recently visited 
Cuba, stated that Eusebio 
Mujal Barniol, former secre- 
tary-general of the Cuban 
Conferedation of Labor (CTTC), 
and now an aide to Meany, 
fled when Batista was over- 
thrown, taking with him the 
funds of the organization he 
headed. 

Owned Rranch 
Worthy reported the follow- 
ing: 

Durinr Batista's reign. 
Mu.jal acquired a e,093-acre 
estate, pig farm and cattle 
ranch, valued at $4.(X)0,0(X). 
The estate included a town, 
an aqueduct, an electrical 
plaint, silos, pasteurizing 
plants and modem pig-breed- 
ing facilities. 

M u .1 a 1 never explained 
how he got the estate. -His 
only ostensible income was 
a S24.n00-a-year salar\ from 
the CTC. For tax purposes 
his estate was valued at 
$70,000. 

When Fidel (Zastro called 
from the hills for a general 
strike in the cities to over- 
-=ihrow Batista in the spring 
of 1958, Mu.jal went on tele- 
vision to warn that anyone 
who struck would lose his 
job. 

After Mu.jal fled, the Rev- 
olutionary Government 
found that he had taken al- 
most all of the union's re- 
tirement fund, lea\ing CTC 
bankrupt. Revolutionar\' of- 
ficials say that they can 
only guess at Mujal's wealth 
because records show that 
he sent money to foreign 
banks regularly. 

Mujal went first to Brazil 
and later to Washington, 
where he joined Meany. 


'Spartacus' 
Party will Aid 
Stovall Home 

A "Spartacus" theater-party 
to be held Sunday evening, 
Jan. 8. at the RKO Pantages 
Theater, Hollywoodi will bene- 
fit the Stovall Home for 'the 
Aged, a non-profit organiza- 
tion opened in 1956 at 4000 E. 
Fairmont street. 

The entire theater has been 
taken over for the "Spartacus" 
theater-party, according to Dr. 
Leroy R. Weekes, theater-party 
chairman, and the event will 
have all the trappings of a 
premiere. 

Woody Strode, former UCLA 
and Los Angeles Ram football 
star, plays an important sup- 
porting role in "Spartacus" 
and is serving as^n honorary" 
member of the theater-party 
committee. 

Reservations or additienal 
information concerning the 
"Spartacus" theater-party may 
be obtained by calling REpub- c 
lie 2-2424 or REpublic 4-5968. j 


that moment, four shots 
out. One of them hit 


number 
aid for 


of mothers getting) He 


children and • there Ifloor. dead. 


9 


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"for a new lease on //fe-TRAVEL"l 

wherever you wish to travel, by land, se^ or air, you 
need a travel agent! Let Tony Lease be that rrtan! For air 
'travel anywhere in the United States or anywhere in the 
world, Tony Lease will make your worry-free reservations 
and provide ticket delivery! If you belong .to a group 
and wish to plan a tour let Tony Lease host a travel 
party! He is here to serve you! 

CALL TONY LEASE 

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have been strong demands to 
I Refused to Sign 'rurtail the prpsram The go\- 

I Mrs. fclsthor Green, a white ,ernor indicated his belief that 
woman, said she refusf'd to the welfare of children must 
sign a petition presented to! be considered as the prime ob- 
her by Shelby Dixon. Stanton! jective. 
cotton ginner. pledging to take 
economic action against Ne- 
groes, who registered. Dixon, 
she said, \isiied her fanri in 
the fall of 19.59. 

'He asked her to pledge that 
she would not help any mem- 
bers of the NAACP. the Hay 
wood County Ci\il and Wel- 
fare I^eague (a Negro voting 
rights group I. "or an.vone else 
that the central committee 
doesn't approve of." 

"That was too broad." Mrs.i 
Green said. "I told him it 
didn't sound right and I didn't 
wapt to sign." 

Won't Speak 

Issac Smith Carter, a white 
man who lives on a farm near, 
Da'ncyville. testified thatj 
farmer Robert K. Archbell 
"wouldn't speak to me any 

! more" after he told Archt)efl 

j he would have nothing to do 
with reprisals against Negroes ; 
who voted. 

I The injunction was sought 
by Alty. Gen. 'William P. 

I Rogers against 45 landowners, 

124 merchants and one hank. 

Among charges in the com- 
plaint were: 

Termination of leases or 
sharecrop arrangements: ter- 
mination of employment: re- 


reeled and fell to the 


New Lighting 

The 3.5-year-old street light- 
ing system on Broadway be- 
tween Santa Barbara a\enue 
and 4.3rd place will be re- 
placed by a modern electrolier 
svstem. 


Ifhomas. thinking the bul- 
let.<i were blanks, chased the' '. ^~ 

su.'Jpecl and hit him with a- his mother. Mrs. Hazel Grigs- 
beer bottle. The .stranger fled. I by, and five brothers and sis- 

Jack.son. who lived at 1801 'ters — Frances and Carolyn, 
E. aOSth street, is surM\ed by and Willie, Charles and Allen. 


Thieves Rob 
2 Churches 

Burglaries at two chujches 
were reported to police last 
Tuesday by church officials. 
Hardest hit was Providence 
Baptist Church, 370314 Trinity.' 
Among items taken were a 
typewriter and electric clock 
valued at $85. 

All People's Church, 806 E. 
20th street, was robbed of 
Christmas packages and $3.60 
in change. With no sign* of 
breaking and entering in evi- 
dence, it appeared the church 
was opened with a Itey which 
was lost about six months 
ago. 


Something to buy? Somethtn^ te 
tell? Try a classified ad In the 
Eagle. They coit only $1 for IS 
wordi. And they get results. 



BUSINESSMEN FROM THE SANTA MONICA, OCEAN PARK and VENICE BAY AREAS FIRMLY RESOLVE 
TO GO ALL OUT TO MERIT YOUR CONTINUED PATRONAGE DURING THE. CURRENT YEAR 

KEEP BAY AREA DIRECTORY HANDY and PATRONIZE CALIFORNIA EAGLE ADVERTISERS 


BILL & SILVERIO'S FLOWER SHOP 


AND NURSERY 


yprwrly WItfc «oyl Mowujiaii Hof I. HoboImIm 

« Complole FlornI Sf-rx irp • ratio and Indoor Planlinps 
'Flower;; Wired AnyuhorP'' 


EXbrook 5-2235 
1938-Mth Street 


EXbrook 5-7044 

Santa Monica 


LINK VAUGHN 


VAUGHN PRINTING & LITHO 

PHONE EXbrook 5-5168 

1516 THIRD STREET 
SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 



ALLEN MAINTENANCE CO. 

1453 SIXTEENTH STREET 

EX. 4-4748 SANTA MONIcil 


MILTON GOmiEB 

8 OAKMONT DRIVE 
LOS ANGELES 49, CALIFORNIA 


INVESTMENTS 


GRanite 2-5389 


Water and Power keep pace with 
Los Angeles' dynamic growth! 


Every week Los Angeles' population increases an average of more 
than 1.000. Our City now is third most populous in the nation, and is 
still growing. This means new homes, business, industry... and all 
must have ample water and p)ower ready when needed. 

Meeting this ever-increasing demand is the job of your Department 
of Water and Power. De^ite sub-normal rainfall of the past two 
years, while water demands increased ... despite a tremendous 
growth in use of electricity... there was plenty of water and power 
for all needs. 

These rising requirements were met by planning and building 
ahead. For example, in the 1959-60 fiscal year, yoiir DWP invested 
over $52 million in new water and power facilities. Still it continued 
to be completely self-supporting from its revenues, imp>osing no cost or 
burden on the taxpayers. In fact, the DWP contributed more than $6 
million to the general city funds of Los Angeles during the fiscal year. 

In the table are financial highlights from 
the DWP Annual Report for 1959-60. The 
complete report will be mailed upon request 
Write Water and Power, Division 402, Box "^ JB 

36^9 Terminal Annex, Los Angeles 54. mmmmmmmt 


A/MTCH BASILA 

REAL ESfTATE 

ASSOCIATID ynjH 

JACK SIMMS ft ASSOCIATES 

SI 7 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica, Calif: 
EXbrook 4-4629-EXbreok 4-1202; R«s. EXbrook 9-5621 


MYERS BROS. CONSTRUCTION CO.. INC. 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS . 


MICHAEL ICHINOSE 

CONSTRUCTION 
SUPERINTENDENT 


3407 San F«rnand« Read 

Phono Clinton 6-3181 
Let Angolas 65, Calif. 


■ TMM LK mma m 


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS OF THE ANNUAL REPORT 

During the fiscal year 1959-60, current revenues met all operating 
costs and paid for part of the multi-million dollar construction 
program. The remaining cost of construction was financed by 
issuing revenue bonds, to be repaid by future Department earn- 
ings. Here's what was received and how it was used: 
WHAT WAS RECEIVED WATER POWER 

Total income $37,611,637 $115,025,559 

HOW IT WAS USED 

For operation of the water 

and electric systems 21,013.780 66,331,055 

For interest on debt 3.200,239 8,723,306 

To provide for depreciation 7,197,613 16,758,626 

Net income (Total income less 

*o»e three items) 6,200,005 23.212,572 

Part of net income transferred 

to general City government 1,520.000 4,844,000 

•Remainder of net income used to 

repay bonds and to pay part 

of construction costs 4,680,005 18,368,572 

'Besides current revenues, funds borrowed by issuing revenue 
bonds in tfie amount of $12 million for wafer and $15 million for 
power were used for ttie large construction program to meet grow- 
ing needs for water and electricity. 


REAL ESTATE 


.i. 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


SAMUEL D. YASNEY 

ERNEST AUERBACH CO., REALTORS 
506 Wilthira Blvd., Sai^ta Monica, Calif. 


EX 3-2737 


EX 5-433S 


HAND CAR WASH 


Homo: OL 6-4806 


EXbrook 5-1649 


Ret. EXbrook 3-21^1 


MACK & SONS SERVICE 

UNION OIL - STOPWEAR LUBRICATION 
WASHING - TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 


Hcrschol t StanUy Yeungor 
Proprietort* 


1925 Broadway 
Santa Monica 


EX 3-6421 


Polish - V/ax 


Steam Clean Motor 

BENNIE WIlIiAMS 

729 Montana Ava., Santa Monica, Calif. 


I 


Sweet Daddy's Nile Life Cafe 

FAMOUS FOR FINE FOODS 
TEXAS CHILI (OUR SPECIALITY) 
' CONTINUOUS (LIVE). ENTERTAINMENT 

EX 4-9950 1710 Olympic Blvd. 

J. B. Blackman, Prop. Santa Monica, Calif. 


But. iXbreek 5-2465 Jtot. EXbrook 4-4516 

SCOTT & VADNAIS 

OK RUBBER WELDERS 

New & Used Tfres 
Recapping & Tr^ad Truing 

E. L. VADNAIS 
2733 Santa Monica Blvd., Santa Monica, Calif. 


Painting of All Kinds 


Steeplejack Work 


J. AND C. WINDOW SERVICE 

• Dust and Water Proofing 

• Caulking of All Kinds 

* Cauking All Roofs 

JEFFERS AND COOPER 
1547 ANAHEIM ST., HARBOR CITY, CALIF. 


— ^ 





4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 5, 1961 


Loren Miller, Publisher 

The California Eagle stands for complete integration of 
Negroes into every phase of American life tFirough the democratic 
processes. 

We favor: ^ • 

1. FEPC on local, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and all other enemies of democracy. 

PublishBd Bvery Thursday for Over 79 Years 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Von Ness AXminster 5-3135 

J ne s^mportani <y\ewspapey 


The Weaver Appointment 


President Elect Kennedy's apr 
polntment of Robert C. Weaver 
M head of the Housing and Home 
Finance Agency \s one of the 
most important he has made. As 
head of the Agency, Mr. Weaver 
will administer the public hous- 
ing, urban renewal and redevel- 
opment programs and the mort- 
gage insurance system of Federal 
Housing Administration. 

The new appointee is well 
qualified for the job. He was one 
of tlie first appointees in the first 
New Deal housing agency; he 
served as New York's rent admin- 
istrator under Gov. Averell Har- 
riman and he now heads New 
York City's urban renewal and 
redevelopment agency. He is an 
acknowledged authority on urban 
housing with numerous articles 
and books to his credit. Even 
more important, he is a Negro 
■and is the present chairman of 
the national Board of the 
NAACP, and chairman of the 
National Committee Against 
Discrimination in Housin'g. 

Ever since the inception of the 
housing program the thrust of 
federal policy has been in the 
* direction of bolstering and inten- 
sifying residential segregation. 
FHA began its career by requir- 
ing imposition of racial restric- 
tive covenants as a condition of 
loan insurance; it still tolerates 
and encourages discrimination by 
builders and developers. 

That the Public Housing 
Authority connives at racial seg- 
regation in public housing is 
evident from the record which 
shows that 80 per cent of such 
housing is operated on a segre- 
gated basis. The urban renewal 
and urban redevelopment pro- 
grams have been used, and are 
still being used, to clear Negroes 
out of redeveloped and renewed 
urban areas. 


The practical result of a quar- 
ter of a century of federal policy 
has been the intensification and 
spi-ead of urban residential seg- 
regation. 

Nobody knows the intricate 

story of residential segregation 
and the manner in which it is 
furthered by governmental 
agencies better than Mr. Weaver. 
He has been an active participant 
in the long fight against that 
evil. 

Of course, the new administra- 
tor won't be aWe to reverse 
governmental policies overnight. 
He will take charge of an agency 
staffed by employees who are 
steeped in old practices and who 
owe an emotional allegiance to 
time tested devices that eventu- 
ate in residential segregation. 
In addition, he will have to buck 
the pressures of the real estate 
and home building lobbies with 
their almost fanatical beliefs in 
Tacial myths. Every change he 
proposes will meet the opposition 
of the Dixiecrat-Conservative Re- 
publican congressional coalition. 
The reversal of racial policies 
by federal housing agencies will, 
of course, immediately benefit 
the non-white population but it 
will have equally important 
meaning for Americans as a 
whole. Urban growth, redevelop- 
ment. »and renewal are bein^ 
strangled by residential segrega- 
tion and unless that cancer is 
rooted out our cities will stag- 
nate. 

Quite apart from racial prob- 
lems, Mr. Weaver win bring to 
his new duties a technical compe- 
tence and an understanding of 
urban housing problems that has 

been lacking in the Eisenhower 
administration. We can e.xpect a 

bold and imaginative approach 

that will stimulate home building 

and produce shelter for America's 

ill housed millions. 


Reduce South 's Power 


Gordon Tiffany, director of the 
Civil Rights Commission, is on 
sourid ground when he urges 
reddction in congressional repre- 
sentation by states which dis- 
franchise Negro voters. The 

Fourteenth Am^dment provides 
for such reduction but its man- 
date has never been implemented. 
If the Tiffany propos^ were 
adopted Mississippi would lose 
one half of its present congres- 
sional delegation. That represen- 
tation would be increased as 
Mississippi 1 o we red barriers 
Against Negro voters. 


The "good people" of Missis- 
sippi who e.xcuse their failure to 
speak out, and act, against dis- 
franchisement of Negtoes would 
I'egain their voices if they lost 
representation in Congress. 

Disfranchisement of Negroes is 
not as e.xtensive in other south- 
ern states as it is in Mississippi 

but every one of them would lose 

congressmen under the Tiffany 

proposal. 

Soft words will never persuade 

the Dixiecrats of the error of 

their ways. Loss of Congressional 
seats would. 


W. H. Terry, Good Citizen 


The death of W. H. Terry re- 
itooves another of the dwindling 
band of pioneers whose work and 
tacrifice has made an indelible 
impress on the Negro community 
of Los Angeles and on the city 
its«if. 

He was, A self effacing man," a 
contractor, who stuck to his job 


but who was always on hand to 
play an honorable part in civic 
and community affairs. 

Los Angeles is a better city for 
what he did and all of us enjoy a 
greater measure of freedom be- 
cause of the part he played in 
making our city a better place 
in which to live. 


Battleaxe & Bread 

•y Lofterl. Orangor 


Remember when we cheered 
the advent of "good old 1960?" 
When we joyfully waved good- 
bye to dreary 1939 and pre- 
dicted all sorts 
of goodies to be 
coming our 
w a y i n the 
New Year? 

T h e r » was 
no reason — no 
sensible rea- 
son, that is — 
for the optim- 
ism. It was just 
the incurably 
wistful and 



Graagar 


wishful thinking of the hu- 
man animal that whafs ahead 
can't possibly be worse than 
what's behind and that any 
change is apt to be for the 
better. There's no justifica- 
tion for such a belief, of 
course: as witness, nuclear re- 
search, tail fin cars, Levit- 
towns. Frank Lloyd Wright 
architecture, Nazism and Com- 
munism. White Citizens Coun- 
cils, beatniks, and all the host 
of small and big changes that 
have marked .sliifts in the po- 
litical, economic, scientific 
and social structure. 

What's Aheod 

So, before we call "good old 
1960" a complete stinker and 
joyfully hail the entrance of 
1961, let's lake a realistic look 
at what's ahead and see what 
needs to be done in order to 
make some of our optimism 
comp true. 

For instance, there are jobs 
— and what happens to jobs 
will determine whait happens 
to the fortunes of possibly a 
hundred thousand colored 
families in these I'ni ted 
States. The outlook for 1961 
isn't good, .^nd it could re- 
main notso-good for some 
years to come.- unless some- 
thing is done to change the 
pattern. 

The nation passed the four 
million unemployed mark 
weeks ago and is heading 
deep into the five million 
range. Forecasters are warn- 
ing that the six million mark 
will be reached by Spring un- 
less steps are taken jointly 
by government, industry and 
labor to ward off a serious 
recession. Remember 19-197 
Well, this can be even worse. 

Inttrnational Outlook 

There are international af- 
fairs — and the interest of 
.American Negroes in world 
affairs has stepped 'way up 
since New .Africa came on the 
scene. The .scene doesn't look 
good— not for 1961 or 1962 or 
some years beyond — and we'd 
be silly to kid ourseKes. The 
Jree nations have gotten tired 
of remaining constantly on 
the qui Mve: consequently 
the various alliances against 
Comumnist imperialism ha\e 
weakened.. 

Soviet Russia, aided by In- 
experienced and shortsighted 
new or neutralist nations of 
Africa and Asia, has given 
what may well be the death 
blow to the United Nation's 
capacity for defending the 
peace. Sekou Toure has given 
Russia a comfortable moorage 
for political and economic ex- 
pa ns ion designs. Commu- 
nist China will undoubtedly 
precipitate fresh aggression 
against her weak Asian neigh- 


bors during- the year ahead — 
and chances are that the Big 
Four of the free world will 
find excuses for looking the 
other way when it happens. 

We're not likely to have an- 
other Korea right away, only 
more of Viet Nam and Laos 
and Cambodia. But that'll be 
enough to sap the enthusiasm 
of free nations for freedom's 
defense. Look, therefore, for 
further weakening of the pos.- 
ture agkinst Communist ag- 
gression. 

New Orleont Pattern 
Moscow is reported to an- 
ticipate "pleasanter relations" 
with the new Administration. 
If that happens, it's bad news 
for all of us. and it probably 
won't happen. Moscow's idea' 
of pleasant relations is when 
the Reds have their own way 
— and even the short-witted 
among us are beginning to un- 
derstand that when the Reds 
have their way the rest of us 
who hope some day to develop 
a decent form of society will 
be on our way out. So look for 
more barroom diplomacy from 
K. and Co. 

The Bourbon South will con- 
tinue to he a disgrace to 
American government, an im- 
pediment to the development 
of a third of our netion and 
a threat to .American security 
in world affairs. 'Because the 
representatives of Bourbonism 
maintain their grip on the 
Congress through control of 
key chairmanships, there will 
he slight tendency on the part 
of the Presidency to risk sabo- 
tage of its over-all program 
by bearing down heavily on 
civil rights. 
Louisiana is showing the 
rest of the mutinous South 
how to finagle and delay, ob- 
struct and intimidate — and 
make the citizens pay for it 
— in slowing down the inte- 
gration crawl. Other • states 
will take the hint. Look for 
more, not less, of the New 
Orleans-style demonstrations. 
Look for more gradualism in 
enforcing the Constitution, but 
look for the Kennedy admin- 
istration to be more imagina- 
tive in Initiating and adver- 
tising the small gains. 
Cabinet Issue Dead 
There will be no more talk 
for a long time about "a 
Negro in the Cabinet." The in- 
nocent among us will'applaud 
the Presidentelect for "offer- 
ing" the Postmaster General's 
spot to Bill Dawson and will 
feel reproachful that the ven- 
erable political boss of Chi- 
cago declined if. 

The more sophisticated will 
recogni/e t hat the offer was 
like asking your grandmother 
to dance, knowing that her 
friends will like the gesture 
and that the old lady will de- 
cline, .so ever>body will be 
happy. Look for the Democrats 
to make the Republican rec- 
ord of job-dispensing look bad 
by contrast. They will hand 
out more jobs and better ones 
to reward the faithful and 
proselyte further among the 
unconverted. And the propor- 
tion of t^'egro Democrats will 
increase, and their party in- 
fluence will remain where it 
is — at lower levels and in re- 
stricted areas. 

• happy new year, 
everybody: 


Loren Miller Says . . . 


'Continued from Page 1) 
partner in the promotion of 
residential segregation. 
Kept HU Head 

During his service In the 
housing agency. Weaver did 
his best to see to it that Ne- 
groes got their "fair share" of 
both housing and jobs. That 
was about all he could do but 
he never lost his belief that 
residential segregaUon was 
the basic evil that doomed Ne- 
groes to Inferior housing and 
slum sections of the cities. 

During the long legal battle 
over racial restrictive coven- 
ants. Weaver did the spade 
work on facts, figures and 
statistics designed to per- 
suade the Supreme Court that 
judicial enforcement of such 
covenants ran counter to the 
constitutional command for 
equality. Later he helped 
found the National Committee 
Against Discrimination in 
Housing. He became one of 
the mainstays in the NAACP 
fight against governmental 
assistance to discriminatory 
builders and developers. 
A New Day 
The changing times were 
reflectejl in Weaver's appoint- 
ment as Rent Administrator 
by Governor Averell Harri- 
man of New York in 1958. He 
wasn't a "Negro " rent admin- 
istrator or a "Negro Advisor" 
to the rent administator. He 
was the rent administrator. 
When Rockefeller ousted Har- 


riman as New York's gover- 
nor. Weaver lost his job. He 
found another: as chairman 
of the New York City Urban 
Redevelopment Commission. 
Again he wasn't chairman of 
the "Negro" commission and 
he wasn't just a member of 
the City Commission. He was 
the chairman of the New York 
City Redevelopment Commis- 
sion. 

Now W e a V e r has been 
named to head the nation's 
Housing and Home Finance 
Agency. He's .not its advisor, 
or one of its underlings. He's 
going to be the man who 
heads the tremendously im- 
portant agency that is in di- 
rect charge of the nation's en- 
tire housing program. What 
he does in the next few years 
will shape the face and the 
fuBure of America's cities, and 
the lives of millions of urban 
dwellers. 

It's a far cry from a "Ne- 
gro Advisor^' on housing af- 
fairs to head of the nation's 
housing program. Weaver is 
where he is because he 
wouldn't let go of the Amer- 
ican dream and because the 

American dream has expanded 
to a point where it has a 
place for Negroes who share 
it and work to expand it. 


Blow Seen for Tbiilanians BIqst 
Housing Bias La. 'Way of Life' 

In Appointment 


You can't always tell what 
makes a man tide until you 
meet his wife. 


ffontlniird from r«e« 1) 

laiinclird the tfiir-m] public 
housing program 

Harvard Orad ' 

Weaver, who liokU three 
degrees from Harvard, ih a 
lone time foe of rarlal re*!- 
dentlal segregation. He sup- 
ervl.sed preparation of an 
"economic brief" in the famed 
Race Restrictive Covenant 
rases and is tlie author of a 
hook. "The Negro G-hetto," and 
numerous articles attacking 
segregation. He is present 
chairman of the national 
Board of Direrlois of the 
NAACP and is one of the 
founders and chairman of the 
National Committee Against 
Discrimination in Housing. 

It will cost Weaver .$1500 a 
year to take the HHFA posi- 
tion since his New York job 
paid that much more than the 
fedora] post offers. He told 
new.smen Sunday, that he will 
resign from his .NAACP post 
as chairman of the Board but 
will continue his membership. 

Washington Born 

Bcwn in Washington, D.C., 
and educated in its public 
schools, Weaver took his A.B., 
A..M. and Docjor of Philo.sophy 
degrees from Harvard where 
he majored in economics. 
After leaving his housing post, 
■the new appointee served in 
the War Production Board and 
the War Manpower Comrtriis- 
sion. 

He left public service after 
World War II to accept a job' 
ill Chicago as director of tte 
Marsl'.all Field Fund and mov- 
ed on to the Whitne.v FountJla- 
lion. He also worked for the 
Ford Foundation for a brief 
period. ^ 

Cabinet Post 
Political rumor has it that 
Weaver will be one of the top 
contenders for the cabinet 
position as Secretary of Ur- 
ban Affairs if the Kennedy 
administration is successful in 
gott;ng Congress to establish 
such a post. 

Weaver's long and well 
kn'»wn opp>osition to residen- 
tial segregation is expected to 
stir up opposition to his ap- 
pointment by southerners who 
h-ivc stymied all efforts to 
insert non - discriminatory 
amendments in housing legis- 
lation. 

End FHA Bias 
The order which will be 
issued by the new president 
will require admission of Ne- 
groes to all public housing 
projects and will require af- 
firmative covenants of non- 
discrimination by builders and 
lending agencies which build 
housing for sale or rental 
under the FH.^ program. It 
will require similar covenants 
from private developers who 
secure benefits under the ur- 
ban renewal and urban redo- 
Nelopment program. 

During his presidential cam- 
pa gn. President Elect Ken- 
nedy "-aid repeatedly that dis- 
crimination under federal 
hoiising programs could he 
"ended by a stroke of the 
pen "' The Democratic party 
platform contained a plank 
pledging the party to end such 
discrimination. 


'Continued from Page 1) 

'Tmlgn* of organized vilifica- 

llon «nd Intimidation are 

wilhin the rights of 'peaceful 

dlHiienf'7 

"U If credible that packs of 
triHraudlng Jackals destroy 
property and Inflict bodily in- 
jury with impunity, while col- 
lege students are arrested for 
distributing protesting but 
non -inflammatory literature 
opposing segregation? Assur- 
edly, to state these things is 
to labor the obviojs; yet per- 
haps the mere putting them 
on paper relieves the inner 
tension and makes possible a 
sober analysis of the situa- 
tion . . . 

"It is, possibly, difficult for. 
one who has not liveu in the 
South to appreciate the facil- 
ity with which the southerner 
can toss aside the accumulat- 
ed findings of 50 years of so- 
cial science and assert, iii the 
face of overwhelming evi- 
dence to the contrary, that the 
Negro is "obviously" inferior, 
but, withal, a happy creature 
— see how they sing and 
dancel 

Prefer Death 

"It is quite common to hear 
white men and women state 
that they wov»iJd prefer their 
children dead to seeing them 
going to integrated schools. 
And the trag'ic fact is that 
these attitudes are most pre- 
valent in the. very areas 
where education hats made the 
slightest inroads . . . > 

"Of course, in the city of 
New Orleans a considerable 
body of moderate opinion per- 
sists; opposition to school 
closure and willingness to ac- 
cept 'token' integration. 

"But these moderate groups 
are. like their counterparts the 
world over, the most insistent 
upon the forms of 'democ- 
racy' and the processes of 
law; they lack the organiza- 
tion and numbers of the fren- 
zied segregationists (though 
one group of white mothers 
voluntarily transports eight 
white children to the integrat- 
ed school and receives, for its 
trouble, constant telephone 
harassment). 

"Where one such group con- 


tributes to pay the salaries of 
the teachers in the integrated 
schools, its segregationist • 
counterparts contribute to th^ 
cost of mass rallies, hate lit- 
erature and all the accoutre- 
ment of rabid violence. And at 
the center of the discord are 
the politicos, at once the in- 
stigators and the beneficiar- 
ies of the public convulsions. 

"The legislature sits in con- 
tinuous special session at an 

estimated cost of $14,000 per 
day. The sessions are almost 
whoHy occupied' by a parade--' 
of politicians before the mic- 
rophones, denouncing all mod- 
eration las subversion, castli 
gating reason as cornrnunism, 
and vowing undying devotion 
to our 'southern w'ay of life' . 
• — including open and manda- 
tory racial discrimination and 
the accompanj'ing exploita- 
tion of poor-white and Negro 
afike. l 

"And most- ironically of all, 
it is now proposed that the 
state sales tax be increased 
by one percent to finance the 
continued opposition to the in- 
evitable. The people of the 
state are asked to subject 
themselves to a painfully re- 
gressive tax measure in order 
to enable the politicians to 
completely destroy the educa- 
tion system which holds the 
only hope of enligTitenment 
for the great mass 6f those 
people. . ; •- 

"Does history record a more 
bitter satire? 

"This is the dilemma which 
Louisiana faces — the; impos- 
sible conflict of reason arid 
unreason. The U.S. Supreme 
Court has, in effect, declared ■ 
that ignorance, prejudice, big- ', 
otry and venality will no loiig- 
er be acceptable as the basis 
of state legislation relative to 
public education. 

"Yet these four hosemen of' 
the modern racist apocalypse 
presently hold sway in Louis- 
iana. The issue, at this writ- 
ing, remains in doubt, but the 
gloom is virtually tinrelieved. . 


After arresting a man for 
pickirfg a woman's pocket in 
a department store, Tokyo 
police proceeded to arrest the 
lady. She had been so busy 
shoplifting that she had not 
noticed that she had been 

robbed. 

• * • 

At the insistance of his wife. 
Sam Houston, the lusty Texas 
Jiero. joined the Baptist 
Church. After he had been 
baptized by irpmersion in the 
river, the preaJcher said, ".Your 
sins are ndw all washed 
away." To which Sam Houston 
replied, "God help the fish." 

• • * 

Said one port miss to an- 
other at a soda counter. "What 
I really crave is one of those 
darling foreign sports cars — 
with the foreign sport still in 
it£ 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

'The Important Newspaper' 

2101 W. Vernon Ave. 

Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

AXminster 5-3135 

LOREN MILLER 
Publisher 

Thursday Jan. 5, 1961 
Vol. LXXX No-. -42 

GRACE 6IMONS....Executiv« Editor 

F. P. WALLER, Jr Adv. Mgr. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

.._ Circulation Mgr. 

CALME RUSS Office Mgr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. G. Allen .- 1512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph. EX. 5-1591 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 

1907 20th Street (Upstairs) 

Phona EXkrook 4-3082 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! 

a $4.00 for 1 Year 
G $1.50 for 3 Months 
G $2.50 ^or 6 Months 

Adjudication Decree Number 123228 

Oite of Adiudication July 1, 1923 

Published every Thursday by 

The California Eagle Publishing 

Co., 2101 West Vernon Avenue,' «t 

Van Nms. Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

Entered as Second Class Matter 

November 3, 1937, at the Post 

Office at Los -Angeles. California, 

undr the Act of March 3. 187J. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWSPAPERS 

545 Fifth Avenue 
New York 17, New York 


Death Takes 
Curtis King 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ects, he was best known for 
the founding of the Rose Netta 
Hospital and the many hours 
he spent there during the '40s 
and the early '50s. 

Dr. King is survived by his 
daughter, Mrs. Rose Marie 
Terry, a teacher at the 102nd 
Street School; a brother, C. S. 
King, who lived with him at 
his ranch; and his former 
uife, Mrs. Rosa Mae King, 
who married Dr. King in 1925 
and who for four years held 
the position of superintendent 
of nurses at Rose Nctta. 
Practice^ in eGergia 
Born in Princeton, K.v., and 
educated in Cairo, III., Dr. 
King worked his way through 
college at Roger Williams 
University in Nashville and 
completed his medical work 
at iWcharry. graduating in 
1924. After interning at Tus- 
kegce, he went to Georgia and 
began practice in Newnan, 
Ga.. wiiere after establishing 
himself by dint of arduous 
\\ork. he finally founded the 
Curtis King HospitaF in that 
city. 

At Newnan he specialized 
in' and became an authority 
on the treatment of venereal 
disease. In 1929 he, his wife 
and daughter left the South 
and headed for Los Angeles. 

For years he was in charge 
of the South Los Angeles Ve- 
neral Clinic; he served for 
three years in charge of the 
102nd Street Clinic; was a 
panel physician for the Los 
Angeles General Hospital; ex- 
amdning physician for the 
Selective Ser\-ice Board; mem- 
ber of the 28th Street Clinic, 
and examining physician for 
the State Boxing Commission. 
Blood Bank 
In 1942 an interracial blood 
bank was set up under Dr. 
King's supervision at the com- 
pletel.v integrated Rose Netta 
Hospital. 

He was a member of nu- 
merous medical, civic and 
other organizations, including 
the Los Angeles County Medi- 
cal Ass'n; the National Medi- 
cal Ass"n; Southern California 
Medical, Dental and Pharma- 
ceutical Ass'n; member of the 
board of directors of the Los 
Angeles County branch of the 
American Cancer Society; a 
33rd Degree Mason; and a 
member of the South Los An- 
geles Chamber of Commerce. 
On Thursday Dr. King tele- 
phoned from Elsinore to his 
daughter, <vho lives at 9418 
Zamora avenue, saying he 
hadn't been feeling too well 
since Christmas, but that he 
expected to come in to "see her 
the next day. 

In mid-afternoon she re- 
ceived another call saying 
that an ambulance had been 
summoned to take her father 
to the Good Samaritan Hos- 
pital for observation. 

Shortly after that, Efr. King 
suffered a severe heart attack 
and died before the ambulance 
arrived. 


IfsNotOur 
Fault -Ifs the 
'Typo' Gremlin 

In order to explain to 
readers what is meant by a 
"typo," the Rockville find.) 
Tribune ran the following ex- 
planation: 

"O n e of my newspaper 
friends relates that recently 
there was a discussion, wi^h 
perhaps some ugly words, go- 
ing on in his office concerning 
a 'typo.' A customer overheard 
some of the remarks and 
wanted to know what, it was. 
Law of the *Typo' 
"TTie answer is that lit is an 
abbreviation of the >ivo,rd's 
't.\pographical eiTor'^an ugly 
mixing of letters or wjords in 
a line that is as annoying as 
it is Unintentional. 

"The Law of the ;Typo 
works like this: j 

"I. Most of the time, the 
t.N-po will appear in a storj* or ' 
ad that is important Typos 
rarely appear in stories, or ads"" 
you don't care about. 

2. Typos are sneaky. Some- 
times four pr fi\e will appear 
in one issue of a publication. 
After much swearing, check- 
ing, probing, detective ; work, 
you'll have the t\- p 6 s so 
frightened that they go away. 
You think they are gone for 
good. But they are not. When 
you've forgotten all about 
them, back they come. 
One in a. Million; 
"3. If you write a story 
about, say. Mrs. Winterbottom 
and her friends and it icomes • 
out fiends, you can be pretty 
sure that after you : have 
Calmed Mrs. Winterbottom ', 
down and promised her that 
the typo was one of those one- 
in-a-million-years type of thing, 
the very next story you write 
about her will have ariother 
typo in it. ' ;^ 

"Perhaps something lifee her 
husband was seen looking at 
the new window do"wntown 
will be the way you wijite it, 
only after the typo has crept 
in. it will read that her hus- 
band was seen looking at the 
new widow downtown. : 
The Typo's Cousins 
"4. The t\'po has soma 
cousins and they are no im- 
provement over the tjixi. One r ' 
is the headline on the wrong 
story. If usually works . this 
way — a very important local. J 
personality dies and over his 
obit appears this headline:. 
'Improvement Seen in Local 
Affairs.' 

"5. Another cousin of the 
typo is the wrong cjutline 
imder a picture. You'll t-un a 
picture of a pretty girl in a .' 
bathing, suit and somehow the 
cutjine will read. The Hu- 
mane Society announce^ that 
this little pet is looking for a 
good home and a kindly, 
master.' 

''6. The typo is as much a 
pa:rt of American life -as the 
mosquito and about as hard 
to kill."— Tfte American Press, 
December 1960. I 


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I'd rather lose in a cause 
that will one day win, than 
win in a cause that will some 
day lose.— Woodrow Wilson. 


\^o 



"THE IFORLD OF SPIRIT" — Ret: S. S. Heyluger. 

pastor r>f the Mnnr-Emeth Fnundation, ui/l spfnk on the 
"JTorld nf the Spirit." fit II a.m. Sunday. Jan. 8, at 
Baccs Hall, 1528 S. Vermont avenue. The lecture is one in 
a series of lectures held at Baces\ Hall each ueek hy the 
I oiindnti'in. \ 

Christian Education Worl(sliop 
Opens Jan. Id at First Baptist 

Rev. Roy L. Thompson announced this week 
that Dr. Herman Waetjen, professor of New Testa- 
ment studies at the USC, will lead Christian Edu- 
cation workers in a study of. the formation, of the 
New Testament at the annual workers series, which 
will Bo held at First Baptists^ 


-SANTA- 
MONICA 
NEWS 


Church, 760 S. Westmoreland I ornia Council of Churches, 
avenue, on Jan. 10, 17. 24, and! Mrs. Wallace G. Frasher is 
31, and the sessions will begin! the director of the department 
at 7 p.m. with a special pre- \ and Rev. Roy L. Thompson is 
sentation of the latest develop. 1 serving as th« dean of this 
ments in the use of Audio- j workshop series, 
visual aids. i 

tOher courses will be offer- j Goal Reoched 

ed in the areas of Administra- j GLENDALE — The Southern 
tion. Foundations of Teach- California Conference of 
ings. Adult Work, Youth and , seventh-d^y Adventists today 
Children's Work. j announced that its 57th an- 

The Workshop Series is nual World Mission Appeal 
sponsored by the Department public fund drive goal of 
of Christian Education of the $215,000 has been passed. 
Church Federation of Los An- 1 William L. Barclay said 
geles and the Southern Calif- $221,327.56, has been raised. 


Rev. Townsend 
Dies at 91 in 
Little Rock 

Rev. V. M. Tswnsend, Sr., 
D.D., of 2123 Cross street. Lit- 
tle Rook, Ark., the fatiier of 
Atty. Vince Monroe Townsend. 
Jr., 3662 S. .-\rlin*;ton avenue, 
died at his Little Rock home 
on Saturdav, Dec. 31. He was 
91. 

On last Thanksgiving Day. 
Rev. Townsend, Sr. then in his 
91st year, retired from the ac- 
tive ministry of the AME 
Church, at the Northeast Ar- 
kansas Conference, in Wynne, 
Ark. He served for 63 consecu- 
tiev years as an Itinerant 
Elder "in tJie AME Church. 

A special celebration was 
given his retirement at the 
Conference, and his son, Atty. 
Townsend, was the principal 
speaker for the occasion. 

Rev. Townsend. Sr., served 
for more than 50 years as a 
Presiding Elder in the AME 
Church, and attended and 
participated in the last 16 
consecutive General Confer- 
ence Quadrennial sessions. 

Just -si.x days after his 91st, Eb^arVwilliam.s Gloria Steph- 
birthday party, Rev. Townsend I ^^, g,^^,,^ Williams. Gfegory 

Williams. Johnny Stevens, 
Ronnie Coeman. Charlene 
"^^*"^! Moore. Jerome Wiliams and 
Mary Coleman. 

The party which followed 
was the fifth annual party 
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. 
Zcckery Coleman of 525 
Broadway avenue. 

Mrs. Li I lie .M. Rodgers is in 
Athens, Texas attending the 
funeral of her sister. 

The next meeting of the 
NAACP Membership Commit- 
tee will m«<et at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. .M. B. Allen, 
1945 22nd street. 
_ _ Twentv-six dollars in mem- 

Rev' g' L. Bedford^ pastor of, berships'was turned in at the 
the Macedonia Baptist Church home of the E. G. Aliens last 

Mondav evening. The mem- 
NAACP 


ClnircbT)i?tP5 


Thursday, January 4, 1961 


The California Eagle— 5 


The home of Rev. W. P. 
Carter was entered by a burg- 
ler on New Year's eve by rip- 
ping off a screen door. Papers 
and items of value to the Car- 
ters only, were taken. 
• • « 

The Better Children Club 
held its New Year program 
last Saturday under the super- 
vision of Mrs. Mary Coleman 
of Venice. The children, five 
to ten years of age presented 
a play entitled "The Birth of 
the New Born King," which 
was directed by Mary Louise 
! and Anna Mae Moore. 
. The president of the group 
is Zeckery Coleman; vice- 
president, Anna Mae Moore; 
secretary, Mar\' Louise Moore 
and advisor, Mae Ruth Forbes. 
Members include Clifford 
Goodnite. Danny Williams, 
Jerry Turner, Mary J. Moore, 
Kathy Turner. Mattie Moore, 
Pam Forbes. Mary Lizza Witi- 
ker. Sonny Forbes, Johnny Lee 
Turner. Lara Scott, Beatris 
Williams. Buddy Legans, 


Sr. contracted a cold, which 
[quickly developed into pneu- 
imonia, from which he 
recovered. 

He is survived by his 
widow, Mrs. Essie Cox Town- 
send. two daughters. Mrs. 
Mary Dinkins of Arkadelphia, 
.\rk.. and Mrs. Thelma Lewis, 
of Washington. D.C.. and his 
son, Vince Monroe Townsend, 
Jr., of Los Angeles. 

Former Olivet 
Pastor to Open 
Revival Series 



^1000 Pledged 
To First AME 
Building Fund 

By Sarah Nelson 

A capacity audience wit- 
nessed new faith and vows in 
religion at historic First AME 
Church, 8th and Towne ave- 
nue, on New Year's day. The 
pastor. Dr. H. H. Brookins, de- 
livered the message, the ser- 
mon topic being "God Will 
Meet Us at Every Corner." 

Among the recent distin- 
guished pulpit guests were 
Bishop R. R. Wright. Jr.. who 
pledged $1000 to the building 
fund for the new church edi- 
fice; and Dr. J. Russell Brown, 
of Chicago, secretary of the 
AME Church, who administer- 
ed the. New Year's Day com- 
munion. There were four ac- 
cessions at this service in- 
cluding one convert. 

The spirit of the ser\ice ran 
high with the official family 
endorsing the proposed pro- 
gram for 1960-61, the high- 
light of the year to be a 
combined Men and Women's 
Day effort which will be held 
early this year, terminating 
on the fourth Sunday in Feb- 
ruary. The membership is 
eagerly looking for^vard to a,. . , , 
successful culmination of this hospital for treatment of the 

gigantic project. Dr. H. H.lfi''"*'"^ TJ^'^^.,^^*^ "^'P' "^'^ 
Brookins has demonstrated hisi^-J''^^^'^ buildmg contrac- 
ability to revolutionize the 
program of the church and yet 
preserve its fine traditions. 


Witnesses Hear of God's i 
Interest in Man's Affairs i 

The University congregation of JehovahTs Wit- 
nesses and others who assembled at the Los Angeles 
Trade-Tech Auditorium last, week heard The^ore 
Jaracz of New York speak on the subject, "Is God 
Interested in the Affairs of Man." 
God's interest in man 


LAST RTTtS HELD— 
funeral services Mere held 
for pioneer contractor // ood- 
jord 'Terry, in the chapel 
of .-Inoclcs Funeral Home, 
uhich iias one of the huild- 
ine/s he constructed. 

I Angelas Rites 
Conducted tor 
IW. H. Terry, 89 

A virus infection was fatal 

Tuesday. Dec. 27. for Wood- 

j ford H. Terry of 1152 E. Adams 

I blvd. Death came two weeks 

[after he was admitted to the 


was 

scripturally outlined by Mr. 
Jaracz as he cited such vital 
provisions made by God for 
man's need. "Among the 
simple but necessary things 
needed by man," he said, "are 
the air we breathe, the sun for 
heat and light, water and food 
and the Bible as a divine 
guide. " 

Individual Account 

He quoted passages from 
Revelation, chapter 11 an^ 12 
t • further stress God's interest 
in man by putting peace dis- 
turbers on judgment, adding, 
"God has determined to de- 
.stroy those that are destroying 
or ruining this earth, there- 
fore we have reached the 
stage where each individual 
must give an accounting as to 
where he stands in his love 
for God and His Kingdom." 

The district minister urged 
the assembled delegates, "not 
to follow the course of indif- 
ference to the Creator's right 


interested in the affairs ,, of 

men. 

Live in Peace 

"God has purposed to elim- 
inate selfish men and preserve 
only righteous persons who 
desire to live in f>ermanent 
peace under God's' kingdom 
for which Christians are 
taught to pray," Jaracz said. 

A baptismal ceremony was 
held by the .Witnesses in 
which many in the local con- 
gregation participated, demon- 
crating interest in God by 
making a dedication to serve 
Him. 


HAMILTON WOMEN 

The Women's Society of 
Christian Service, of Hamilton 
Methodist Church, 6330 S. Fig- 
ueroa street, will "hold its an- 
nual Thank Offering service 
at 10:45 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 8, 


with Mrs. Itasca Lewis as the 
eous purposes since He is still' guest speaker. 


\fASNTAl COMFORTfRl 


I SPIRITUAL ADVISOR I 


ELDER J. B. MOORE 

Divine Healer From Birth 

AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER. WE WILL NOT FAIL 

Church «f the Sons of God— Moses & Aaron 

217 E.Florence Ave. PL 1-6892 

421 N. 4th Ave., Pbcatcllo, Idaho CE. 2-9438 



WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones, Pastor 

9:30 and 11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 

9:30 am —Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade— Adult Classes 

11:00 a.m.— Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr. 

7 p m— Westminster Bible Hour 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 

"Given Unto You"— Rev. Howard R. Carey preaching 

Sunday School-9:30 A.M. Wonhlp-1 1 :00 A.M. 

HEALING SERVICE AT 5 P.M. 


of San Francisco, will conduct! 
a revival at 
Greater Taber- 
nacle Baptist 
Church, 4155 
McKinley ave- 
nue, starting 
Sunday, Jan. 8. 
R e V. E. S. 
Robinson, pas- 
tor of Greater 
'Tabernacle an- 
nounced last 

week that Rev. E. 5. JOHNSOM 
Bedford is the former pastor- 
of Greater Olivet Baptist 
Church and is a gifted evan- 
gelist. Many souls are expect- 
ed to be won for Christ during ' 
the revival meetings which I 
will be conducted each night | 
through Jan. 13. ! 



hers .joining the NAACP in 
eluded Essie and John Lundy. 
Charles Rooks. David Ragin, 
Luther and Sidney Yates and 
Roosevelt Epps. 

Among the members present 
at the fellowship meeting 
were: Rhene Crawford, Delia 
Powell, Louella Allen, Ola 
Stewart, Arabelle Preston. Sue 
Bodolay. C. M. Garland, E. G. 
Allen. Harold Preston. R. J. 
Hatchctt. Julio Martines. 
Moses Boozer and Oriel Powell. 


for inactive. 

Funeral services for the 
Birmingham. Ky. native were, 
held on Dec. 30 at the Angeles 
Funeral Home. Interment fol- 
lowed at Lincoln Slemorial' 
Park. I 

For more than 3') years Mr. 
Terry operated a general con- ■ 
tracting busine.ss in Los An-' 
geles. where he has lived for 
.52 years. Among the build- 
ings he constructed were the 
Angelus Funeral Home, the 
Rev. Martin Luther King, at HudsonWvdell Building on 
Zion Hill Baptist Church. 51st | central avenue, the Jones 
and McKinley avenue. j. Mortuary in Pasadena and the 

Among the items on the homes of several professional 
agenda will be the completion and busines-smen in the area. 


Martin L. King 
To Confer Here 
With Ministers 

Ministers from all over the 
state will meet on Jan. 14. for 
an all-dav conference with the 


■ NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC- 


5965 S. Broadway Avenu*— Rev. Anita L Edmonds, Patter 

Pentacostal and Interracial 

9:30 A.M.-Sunday School 10:45 A.M.-Wor«hip Service 

7:30 P.AA.-Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.-Prayer Service 


Rev. P. J. Ellis 
Re-elected Head 
Of Bapt. Union 

The Baptist Ministers Cnion 
reelected its incumbent of- 
ficers during the regular meet- 
ing of the group at McCoy 
Memorial Baptist Church on 


Two Guests 
Set to Speak 
At Bethel 

Bethel AME Church will 
hold its second Quarterly 
Meeting at the 1511 W. 36th 
s>treet church on Jan. 8 with 
Presiding Elder A. K. Quinn 
preaching at the U a.m. ser- 
vice. 

At 3:30 p.m. Rev. Paul E. 
Kidd of Walker Temple AME 
Church, will speak at the Fel- 
lowship service. Rev. Kidd was 


of plans for the presentation 

of issues to the state legisla- 

j ture during the coming scs- 

I sion. As veil as continued 

non-violent pressure for civil 

I rights. 


CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

3125 W. ADAMS BLVD. 

I 11 a.m.— Morning Worship Seriice 

Rey. James H. Hargett Will Speak 
SLNDAY SCHOOU 9:30 a.m.— Kindergarten Through 5th Grade 
11 a.m.-€th Grade Through High School 


Jan. 3. Rev. P. J. Ellis as recently appointed to Walker 
president of the group has ledTpmpie by Bishop H. Thomas 
the group through a most suc-jPrjmm and is reported to be i 
cessful year. Rev. C. H. Henson building a stronger church I 
is vice-president. Rc\-. Claude, through his dedicated leader- 
Evans, secretary. 'ship. 
According to reports from Dr. Fred F. Stephens, the' 


Though born in Kentucky, 
Mr. Terry was raised in Tenn- 
essee. He "was married for 
more than 50 years to Jessie 
L. Terry who survives him. He 
was the father of public rela- 

tions man. Frank Terry of 

-Good temper, like a sunny los Angeles: Mrs. Juanita 
day, sheds a ray of brightness [ Barbce of Washington. D.C.. 
over everything; it is the I who is office manager for 
sweetener of toil and the! congressman James Roose- 
soother of disquietude:" |velt; and Mrs. Buelah Good- 

— Washington Irving 'man of New York City. 

Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


y 




IS THE RIGHT 

PRICE FOR A 

FUNERAL SERVICE 


the group. S5000 is being sent pastor of Bethel will preach, surgery. 


N>w York. N. Y. (SpwiaD- 

For the first time science has 
found a new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain - without 


■HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH 


6330 SO. FIGUEROA ST. PUeasant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. DOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 

a a.m.— Rev. J. Lewis. Preaching 

"We Are Well Able — Numben 13:31 

9:30 a.m. — Church School (for All Ages) 

10:45 am. — Youth Church 

10 45 a ni— Thank Offering Service — Mrs. Stasca Lewis. Speaker 

6:30 p.m. — Methodist Youth and Wesley Fellowship 

7:30 p.m. — Vesper Communion Service 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Church 

EAST 36fh AND TRINITY STUIfTS - B!V. JOHN C. IAIN, MINISTIR 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 

"LIFE CAN BE LIVABLE" 

REV. BAIN PREACHING AT 9 ANO II A.M. 

The puibiic is eordiilly invit«d to tttend. 


to the Montgomery Improve- 
m e n t Association by the 
Un'ion. Bringing to date a 
total of $12.00Ci spent by the 
Union for the good of man- 
kind under Rev. Ellis" leader- 
ship. 

Rev. E. A. Anderson will 
preach the installation sermon 
at 11 a.m. Sunday at McCoy 
Memorial Baptist Church, 802 
E. 46th street. 

Last Sunday Rev. Anderson 
ioined ministers of every faith 
in prayers for a peaceful and 
prosperous >ear for all, spirit-' 
uallv as well as materiallv. 


at the 8 'a.m. worship service 


Christian Science 

Importance of understand 
ing the spiritual meaning 
the Eucharist and of truly 
commemorating the life of 
Christ Jesus will be empha- 
sized at the semiannualcam.; 
munion .service in all Christ- 
ian Science churches on Sun- 
da v. 


Holman to Hold 
Mission Classes 


In one hemorrhoid case after 
another,"very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by a doctor's observations. 
Pain was relieved promptly. 
, And, while gently relieving 
I pain, actual reduction or re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 
And most amazing of all — 
' this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where a doctor's 
observations were continued 
I over a period of many months! 
In fact, results were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 
to make such astoni.'hinp state- 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 

a problem!". And among' these 
sufferers ■were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions, 
some of 10 to 20 years' standing. 

All this, without the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance (Bio- 
Dyne*)— the discovery of a 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing in.iured 
tissue on all parts of the body. 

This new healing substance 
is offered in suppository or oinf- 
vicvt form called Preparation 
H^. Ask for individually sealed 
convenient Prcp.aration H Sup- 
positories or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli- 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drug counters. 


Tabor Revival 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 

1564 W. 36th PLACE AX. 1-9831 

Messages to Ail 

Services Sunday and Thursday at 8 P.AA. 

Wednesday 2-4 P.AA. 

REV. OTIS STOVALL, Minister 


Holman Methodist Church. 
.3320 \V. Adams blvd.. will ob- 
ser\'o Mission Sunday on Jan. 
.Mt. Tabor Baptist Church, p. beginning at 4 p.m. Sev- 
6612 S. Western avenue, will eral teachers will conduct 
open a revival at 7:45 p.m. on classes on various subjects 
Jan. 8, with the Rev. S. W.lduring the afternoon. 
Jackson of Shreveport. La., as Rev. L. L. White will con- 
the evangelistic speaker. duct the usual inspirftational 

Rev. J. Terrell Stewart, pas- m or n i n g services at the 
tor of the church said that the; usual inspirational .services 



services would 
through Jan. 13. 


continue church with special music by I 


the choir. 


Terry Ravensdale 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING 
.1379 W. 38th PLACE - RE. 4-7915 


•**^ 



First Rock Baptist Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 
Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
1 1 a.rp. BTU 6:30 p.m. Eyoning Sorvica 
7:30 p.m. Song Sorvleo 8:45 p.m. Public 
li invited to Pray with ut at 7:30 pm. 
on Wednesday. 


" "^e called /J^utuUoHf ^cuftiltf, . . .— 

. . . the elegant mortuary, thoughtful service and beautiful 
cars provided a tribute of distinction for our beloved." 

Funeral Directors - Serving All With the Finest 

1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Richmond 7 9121 


TIME is the test of 
satisfaction 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
tion to Los Angeles families for more than 20 years 
— satisfaction through reliable, painstaking and 
honest service. And PEOPLE'S prices are reason- 
able. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 

coy TIN U IS G TO SERVE YOU 
AT OUR TEMPORARY LOCATION 


1430 East 103rd St. 


LO. 6^)022 


The right price for a funeral service 

is a matter of individual choice at 

Angelus Funeral Homes. We offer a 

complete display of plainly marked 

merchandise, permitting each family 

to select according to what they 

can easily afford.' 



FUNERAL HOMES 


3 GENERATIONS*OF 

FUNERAL SERVICE - 

PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE 

1030 E. Je^ffcrson Blvd., Los Angeles 
ADams 2-5188 

718 E. Anaheim Street, Long BeacJi 
HEmlock 2-0449 




.''^''^^ 



l\^' 


THE BAHA'IS OF LOS ANGELES CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO HEAR A PANEL DISCUSSION OF THE BAHA'I WORLD FAITH ON 

WORLD RELIGIOIV DAY 
SUNDAY - JAXUARY 15-8:00 P.M. 

L.A. BAHA'I CENTER 

331 SOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE 

EVKRVONE IS INVITED - NO ADMISSION CHA ROE - NO COUECnONS - KEntESHMENTS 


w<)i!l.liKr,i.u;ioM>« 


f t 



\ ^7 rfo 


New Method! 

DU. 8-7048 

Urinary, Parsonal Preblcmi 

Glands and All Clinical 

.Matters. Young Doctor • 

Invitos Unusual Casos 

RESULTS! 

(Consultation Confidential) 


! 


*— The California Eagle 


ihursday, January 5, 1961 



Gaerge Ramtay 


ral 


All That Jaiz. 


Beautiful Caliente in 01d| 
Mexico — Six tictsetholders who, ha 
selected five horses in the 5- 
10 public handicapping con- 
test last Sunday recetved Sll.'"" pcrsequidor 
781.S0 each at Caliente RacC; ^if^-'"^ ^'" 
Track. 

Consolation awards of $84.40 
each went to 279 other ticket- 
holders who had four hor.'-^ef- 
picked correctly in tJie six- 
race scries. 

The 5-10 pool grossed SU^t,- 
72S. Winning horses were Ly- 
cos Boy. at S33.40, Flashy Win- 
ner at S9. One Tony Ton.\' at 
$3. Admiral Fame, 'at .S29.20. 
Hody at ST.80 and Kind Vie at 
S3. 40. Jocke\- Omarc Pirado 
scored two wins icn the n-10 
with his only mount.s. Win- 
ning Numbers were T4-1-11- 
lA-3. 

The crowd of 11,I.")2 sent 
$387,245 through the mutuels 
for the 11 race nrogrpm not 
including the 5-10 pool. 

Caliente Horses to Watch That 


Quenioy. Mv real conrli 
Corrival. Off bad in 


Blew-M>^-Stack. Flrnty .p^rd 
Tah tdtp for 


A 


il>pr 


fii'iii 


1 and r> 
horset 


Rc<H'l.> 


for 


m-l iKip.l- 


M\ 


Anno Domini. > 
Daring Sickle. 
Ia.i;t in trouhir 

Bayards Khal. 

kilhnc 

Wonga. Ill ^ "' ■• 
Royal Sickle. 

-pri'ial 

Santa Anita 

Hasty Ace. M> -1""' '■ 
Hasty Ace. \V atrh mil 

Rhin. ( In.kct', i;iii.i|ii- 

Bostotj Teaparty. w I'l 1 

trni I- 

Chicago Wind, ■rin- 

run 

Big Joke. ; mil t fo"i 
P.ovc It. .Mijnr> fri.iv 
More Glory. ['.►•Itri llin 
Nimble Feet. I'il a tli- • in 
Martial Rule. , U ir.- I" " irr 
Scotland. \\ al'li oul /-for 


ad- 
about 


Pro Tennis 
Clinic Set 
For Sunday 

Opening weekend action in 
the 43rd annual Los Angeles 
Metrop61itan Tennis cham- 
pion.iiliips will be suspended 
for 90 minutes Sunday (Jan. 
5i so that competitors in the 
e\pnt will be able to view the 
1-30 p.m. pro clinic whicli will 
be conducted by Jack Kramer's 
troupe of touring professionals 
on Griffith Playground Tennis 
Centers exhibition court. 

The free net clinic and the 
lOGl edition of the Met-Net are 
co-.'ipon.'^ored h_\' tlie Recrea- 
tion and Park Department and 
the MTA. 


fn 


HIP 


i.r rlf 


lalfd 


(i" 


tin 


Are Fit and Ready 
Four Star. Rnadv for tliP brjl. 
Bright Lea. Watch out for tin.-. 


Resolved. \ ^r^ gain'- 

Keep tliis column for furllic_i- 
reference as it only appca^^ 
in the California Kaglc. out 
on \our news .<tandc very Wed- 
nesday. For the best in the 
sport of king^ its tlic Calif- 
ornia Kagle. 


lim Brown. Top Ball 
Carrier, to Play Jan. 15 


The eleventh annual AH- 
Star Pro Bowl game between 
the Western and Eai^tcrn Con- 
ferences of the N'FL at the Los 
Angeles Coliseum Jan. 15 will 
mean just that — the greatest 


'Eagles. (Lasti. the .^Ir. F\cry- 
iliiiig of pro football this sea- 
son: and Johnn\ Cnitas, Colts. 
i\\'csti. Player qf the tiame in 
the lOGO Pro Bowl. 

Pass Recei\ing — Ra.\- Beir\ . 


USr and St. Mary 
Cagers Play Here 

Two of tlie most exciting 
basketball teams on the West 
Coast. Cni\crsit\- of San Fran- 
li.Mo and St. .^iary's come to 
Los Angeles this weekend to 
epen the lOtil West Coast 
Athletic t'onfereiue basket- 
ball seasoii against Pepper- 
dine and Loyola. 

L'.'^K. fresli from the cham- 
pionsliip HI the WCAC holiday 
tourney, is pai-ed b\ three 
Sensational shooting so[)ho- 
mo-es anfl junior deadeye Bob 
(iaillard. The latter was Most 
Valuable in the tournament. 
ill-WCAC last year, and has 
been getting excellent sup|M>rt 
from Henry Jolinson. a trans- 
fer from Fast LAJl': E<1 
-Thomas, a former prep all- 
.\nieru,in up from the Frosh. 
and Lloyd Moffat, an exciting 
two-haid set-shot artist from 
Waoliington. D.C. 



Dodgers Play 
77 Home Tilts 
In 


E. J. fBuzzic) Bava.si, vice- 
president and general man- 
ager of the Los Angeles Dodg- 
ers, announces the club will 
play a 75-date. 77-game home 
schedule in 1961 at the Coli- 
seum. 

The schedule includes 59 
,single night games, one Satur- 
day day game, one holiday 
day game (May 30 1. two twi- 
light-night doubleheaders and 
12 Sunday afternoon games. 

The club will open the sea-^ 
son with a three-game series — 
all nights — wilh the Philadel- 
phia PhTllies April 11, 12, 13. 

Before moving to (he road, 
the Dodgers will play a total 
of 15 home games, entertain- 
ing the Phillies, World Cham- 
pion Pirates, St. Louis Cardi- 



.-9i 


Avery Brundage, International Olympic Committeie presi- 
dent, and his' recent proposal to bar gold medal winners from 
defending their titles in the OljTnpic Games by riot per- 
mitting them to compete again is about as silly sls t!he pro- 
gram he sanctioned to develop American amateur athletics. 

Brundage, during his years in offic;eas head oif the Olym- 
pic Committee, has made few rec-ommendations to i|mprove 
I and develop greater interest in amateur sports. The grey 
I headed brother has stood still. While the profcssionalls have 
grown into a million dollar business annually, jimateur 
'S{K)rts have fallen off and in many cases died out, ; 

1 BoxiiTg is a good" example. In a city as large | a£ Los 
!.\ngeles tliere is not a single amateur boxing club j of any 
'stature. At the present rate of interest in amateur boxing, the 
I United Slates can't hope for, man \- more Olympic champions 
if major cities like Los Angeles, New York and Chicago lose 


rilOSf. J()n\S(J\ BOYS— Rifrr nnri Ji'ii. I',rmrr 
I (JI..I ffr.r nlhlrlrs. iiu:,ir una lint l^trt. Hit/ lli'sithrr 
Riiifr fi'jH the Sit.'/iitin .luii'd. the best honor nil ti'ii/iteitr 
r.thlele can receiir. Johnson hr.d n lotnl of l/'ll voln to 
nifiner-up U'ihiin Riid'ilfh i 1 .07'K The fornirr f/reat Bruin 
ilemthlon thimpiiju is un/lit ,'i'iliiitl in 20tk (.eiitury [ox 

^lUtll'l. 


nals, Cincinnati Reds and San interest. j 

Francisco Giai.its. j y^-^p showing of our athletes in the past Olj-mplg games 

The Pirates will be at the .^ys a strong- indication that other countries arc not only 
Coliseum for the first week- dpveloiiing moie iiiiere^t in amdiicur sports but in miany in- 
stances are far ahead of us. j 

Brundage's idea is pimed at uprooting prbfessieonils from 

amateur sports. P^ven if what he claims is true th»|t a few 

^psos.slip 'in as amaleurs^il isn't going Lp'flJp prove' the Olym- 

p^ Games by not allowing a iliampiorVvlo «|efend hiS cham- 

,. ... ..... ■ 'I fj; 


end of the .season, including a 
Frida\' night game, a Saturday 
Ladies Night and a Sunday 
afternoon game (April li, 15,. 
161. ( 

The first visit of the (iiantsi 
is set for a pair of midweek 
night games April 25, 26. 

Eacli of the National League 
\isiting clubs will be in Los 
Angeles four times during the 
\ear. 


Negro Sports Stars 

players of the two divisions as Colts, i VVesH, 71 receptions for pJQ|rAf| IqJ" j\|y3rdS 


I 


chosen by the men who know 
best, the 13 coaches. 

Many all-star games 
misnomers, but not the 


1298 yards and 10 id's. Also 
the 2-3- J-5 receivers. Sonn\ 
are Randle. Cards, i East > 
Pro Pliillips. Rams. (West' 


Jim 


Bowl. Just take a quick look Gibbons, Lions, iWc.-ti 

at the 1960 NFL leaders, w ho Retzlaff. Eagles. lEa:.!'. 

will be arriving next weekend Scoimg — Paul ^ Honuing, 

to prepare for the charity Packers, iVVe.^t>, li6 points. 

classic under coaches Buck new NFL record. 

Shaw of the East and Vince Punting — Jerry Norlnn. 

Lombardi of the West: Cards. (East'. 39 punts. 4.J.6 

Ball carrying — Jim Brown, average. 
Browns, (Easti, 1257 yards on Punt returns — Abe Wood- 
215 attempts, 5.8 average. Also son, 49ers, iWest', 13 returns. 
the 2-3-4-finishers, Jim Tay- 1 13.4 average, 
lor, Packers, (West), 1101 Infcrccptions — Norton. 
yards; John Crow, Cards, ^Cards. (Easti. ID inieiceptions i,a 
lEasti, 1071 yards; and .Nick; returned for 96 yards. j!^'^-'']^ 

Pietrosante, Lk)ns, (Westi, 872 That gives the Pro Bowl^aJ, 
yards. seven of the eight NFL lead- limi 

Passing — Mill Plum, Browns, ers, and if that isn't enough, 
(Eastt, first in percent c-om- of the 44 All-Pro VMO players, 
dieted, 60.4; first in average as cliosen by .\iso<iated Press 
gain, 9.19 yards; first in per- and UPI. 43 of em will be in 
cent of interceptions, 2.0. .-\lso the game either on offense or 
No.a. 2-3. Norm Van Brocklin, defense. 


Dann\ Murtaugh. manager 
Jim of the Uorld Sec ies-i hampion 
Jim piti.'^burgh Pirates, was named 
"Man of the Year" by Sport 
maga.'ine this ucek. The an- 
nouncement of the 1 tth annual 
award uas made in the new 
iFebruar\' issue of the maga- 
zine. 

The magazine also an- 
nounced iis 14th annual "Toj) 
Performer' a w a r d s in 12 
sports. 


1 1 ro 
BoMnc 


ih 


F'lo\ri 


paiirrvon: tia--p- 
\\ illio .Ma' n: Corit-i;,. i;;i>krt-| 
J. .T> I.u'-a-: Pro r.H,«lvCll>aH i 
('li?.mhrrlair>: ('nllt,-;:o !-"oo' - 
.Inr rielllno: Pro h'ootli.Hil 
n Hrnwn: S«;niniiiis. Chri- 
von Saltza; Hoik(>. lioi.\.» Hu": 
Tcnni.- N'''alo H'ra^rr: Track an'l i 
I'lrlfl. \\ iima Uiidolph: i;,,ir .Xmoia ; 
PaI'M'-r anfl Hor.T Ra.inc. I'.ill i 
Harta'k. 



Yo-Yo Classes 
To Get Under Way 
At Playgrounds 

Youngsters 15 \ears o( age 
iHnd under will be eligible to 
attend >o->o instruction ses- 
sions plated to get under way 
the week of January 23-28 at 
municipal pla\grounds. 

During the first two weeks 
of the three-week twirling 
school, instructors will teacli 
bo\s and girls 10 basic twirl- 
ing maneuvers which will be 
featured in the 1961 >oyo 
contests. 

Distri'ct champions will com- 
pete in city-wide finals slated 
|for Queen Anne Playground, 
1240 West . blvd., on Satur- 
dav, Feb. "26. 


pibnship. In fad. he couldM't figure out k quicker program to 
completely wreck the games. 

Amateur sports in America as we know Ihem serve to pre- 
pare an atlilete for professional status. F"or instance; if pro- 
fessional track m^ets uere popular in this countrjt, promoters 
would be making Wilma Rudolph big fat offers but they 
would not have before her Olxmpic Games performaince be- 
cause tfiey just hadn't heard about her. [ 

Without ]» doubt — and Brundage knows it ^- Wijma >vas 
ihe individual, star of the games and was the principal Ameri- 
can who saved liis face and jierhaps his job. ', 

'H'e was so unaware of Wilma's athletic ability that his 
committee lefused to permit lier name to be posted in previous 
.\merican meets, when her coach Ed Temple of Tennessee 
Stale-sent in her credentials, but when she established the 
new time of 11.3 in the IfiO-meter and the new mark of 23.2 
in the 200-niclers tlie committee did an about-face. We cer- 
tainly hope thai our new government will show some jinterest 
in amateur sports as they are. currently being handled in this 
countr.v. For the spirit of competition among our amateur 
athletes is dying a slow death and the reason for this can be 
traced to men like Brundage and their far-from-progressive 
amateur programs. . I ■' 

ATfl Ranks Ashe No. 1 Net Starj 

Arthur Ashe. Jr.. of Rich- American Tennis Association 
mond, Va.. is ranked as the released this week by its 
.No. 1 player in the .Men's President. 
Singles and. Junior Singles. 


Eaton 


'M(riorcycle Racing 


I 


JIM J()ll\^()\—Br'.tlie' r>f ()l\nit>u- de,athl',n ihnni- 
pi'in Rcilir J'lhns'in. j; r;.f \i luted in the lust round oi the 
Sntihnni FoolbfiU LeO:^ue dritjt ln>t J'iir\dti\. J he ex-Jiniin 
r; '.J th'iun h\ the Sr.n lio'iitno 4'hrs. He teiii ninke it ii.t fin 
ofleiisn f end or delensne hni k. 


Dr. Hubert 

of Wilmington, N. C; j 
Following Ashe in the Men's 
This is a feat unprecedented Singles are two former cham- 
in the annals of the American pjons, George Stewjart of 
Tennis Association for a junior Washington, D. C. atl=No. 2, 
player to win the top spot in and Wilbert Davis 6t New 
bothevcnt.s. Perhaps it is un- York at No. 3 with; Wilbur 
J. C. Agajanian announced fQualled in the history of the Jenkins of St. Louis, S Mo., in 
that his first 14-event motor- game. .)he fourth spot. Damella 

cycle program at Ascot Sta- The top .«pot in tlic Wom- Everson of Detroit,; Mich., 
dium in Gardena is slated for en's Singles went to a new- garnered the second ranking 
Sunday afternoon. Jan. 15. comer, boin of Polish par- in. the Women's Singles. 
Races begin at 2:30 p.m.:,cntage in Nicaragua. .Mimi ,4rvelia Mitchell of NeW York, 
practice laps at 12:30. The.Kanarck of New York'. .\. Y. .\. Y. and Gwen McEvans 
cvcllng will be headlined by These are among the features from Wilberforcfe" are third 
the 1.5-lap main event. of the I960 rankings of the and fourth respectively\ 



Big Televisiori^adio Robertson vs. Baylor 
Time for L A. Open 


O.scar I Big Oi Robertson, 
new NB.\ star, will be at 


the 
the 


Extensive television and 
radio coverage has been set : Sports Arena for the first time 
for the 35th annual $50.0fX)'on Saturdav. Jan. 11. Oscar's 
Los Angeles Open golf tourna- 1 the top scorer, plav -maker 
mcnt. Prcs. Don Sorcnsen. of i etc. of the Cincinnati Royals. 
the sponsoring Jr. Chamber | and will duel the Lakers' El- 
of Commerce, announced this gin Bav lor. 

; week. 

i Station KTTV has been 
granted television rights to 
the first $50,000 golfing event Irv Ka/e, publicity director 

I ever played in Los Angeles, "f 'he Hollywood Stars Base- 
Bill Welsh and his staff will 
call a portion of each dav's 
play in the Jan. 6-9 com 
petition at Rancho. 


Publicity Head Here 


GEORGE FLEMMI\G—His line defensive and oil ensue 
performance tvus a bi/j factor in U'ashiniilon Huskies' 17 
to 7 victory 01 er Minnesota in the Rose Bon/. A Iso ui i ounl- 
ing for bad moments as far as the Gophers uere lonicrned 
xiere Huskies' Ray Jackson and (Charlie .\HtchcU. n fiiiir of 
liohtnimj fast bai ks 'u ho puked up \ardnge zvhen they 
needed it most. Bright spot for .Minnesota uas shifts 
"Sandy' Stephen ulio ran and passed liith tienundnus 
poise. He looked especially yjod in ihr seioinl hnlt -lihen 
he engineered the Gophers' only touchdoim. 


Radio coverage will be the 
largest in tourney history 
with a total of 50 broadcasts 
to be heard on KBIG. Chief 
announcer Roy Storey also 
reports seve^jil of the broad- 
casts will be heard on a West- 
ern network. 

There will be 10 radio 
broadcasts daily, starting at 
8 a. m. and concluding at 5 
p. m. 


ball team and riow head of 
the publicity staff for the L..\. 
]|.'\ngels of the .\merican Base- 
ball Le,fgue, arrived in town 
from New York la.st Mondav. 


George Wasliiirgton Carver, 
the renowned scientist, last his 
life savings in the failure of 
an Alabama bank. When told 
he was S70.000 poorer, Dr. 
Carver said mildly. "I guess 
somebody found a u.se for it. 
I was not using it myself." 


AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 



ADJUSTED - REPAIRED - EXCHANGED 


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$7050 


79 


And Up & Exchange 

FREE LOAN CAR-NO MONEY DOWN 

A/so Complete Motor Overhaul 

SAM'S AUTO SERVICE 


3625 S NORMANDIE AVE. 


OPEN SUNDAY 


Dodgers Schedule 
31 Exhibition Tilts 

The Los .\iigeles Dodgers 

I have scheduled thirty-one 1961 
Spring training exhibition 

'games, E. J. (Buz/.ie). Bavasi. 
vice-president and general 

j manager, announced last 
week. 

Seven major league teams 
will visit Dodgcrtowii, Vero 
Beach. Fla., home base of the 
Dodgers. In tlie order of their 
appearance they will include 

•the Kansas City Athletics, 
Milwaukee Braves, New York 
Yankees, Minneapolis Twins. 

• Washington Senators, St. 
Louis Cardinals and Chicago 
White Sox. This is the most 
extensive home-base schedule 

'ever arranged for the Dodgers. 



« CALIENTE « 


ifi^ 


IN OLD MEXICO 

OrFERS fVERY SAT. A SUN. 
RAIN OR SHINI 


^ 


NOW IN SERVICE!!! 

■ ' . -V 

3US SERVICE 
ON LINE 27! 


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Lakers vs. Hawks 

SI. Louis Hawks, the West- . 
ern Division leaders, move in 
against the Lakers tonight 
(Thursday 1 and Friday night ■* 
at the Sports Arena. 

The Lakers are making an 
U-game home stand at the 
Arena. The Lakers' box office 
will be open daily from 10, 
a.m. until 6 p.m. during the 
home games. | 


"AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS'" 

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For Your Wag«r 

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Fri., Jan. 6th 

■*^ 49«r EVERY SATURDAY ^ 

AND EVERY FRI., SAT., 
^ SUN. EACH WEEKEND ^ 


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4/^ Ixacutiv* Olraclar ^ 



La Cietnega's Restaurant Row 

and Shopping Center, 
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Santa Barbara and 
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ron TIMETABLES AND 
INFORMATION CALL 

RICHMOND 7'44SS 


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Thursday, January 5, 1961 


The Californta Eagle— 7 


Medical, Dental, Pharmaceutica 
Auxiliary Holds 


Thpl^os Angf-les Breakfast ral, Driital and rhannarrut- 

Club has bprn the sptting for . ical Aiixiliarv to romo up 

fw-ores of so-ial affairs dur- witli ono Dial is cortain to- 

ing 1960 but it took the Medi- be momorablp for tho 2.:-)(it\ 


Gay 


Forma 



last 


Friday's 


\vho attended 
atinual ball. 

Margaret Roue was chair 
man and Laura Fouler co 



(^iHL E7TS' Ci CLESrS •^tmaGJnii''"tnri and I'l-ilmirninn lire ihon ii mlh one nf thrir mnny 
guests duriurf the yny nununl yiiilc/ide Ball (fuen hy the niciniic'y nf the MedunI . Den- 
tnl find Ph'irmni eulii nl AuxUuiry, Fmni left: Mrs. Oils Rene, ihnirrnnn: Dr. Il'iliinni 
R. II ilhniiis, Jr., and Mrs. JeUcrs'/n ioiilir, i u-i liait 'nun. (.-fd/mis) 



K\J(jy/\G TOP ^OCI.n. — I'nkinri a hrenlher fro 

Medicals' <innunl f'lrmnl hrill uhii h eiltrrirted some 2.500 i/ueils me, from lejt: Ed^ninei 

Fenronee. Dr. Lerr,\ nnd Sylvia ll'eeies, Clr.rn and J'eiene It'chh. (,hlnnis) 


chairman. They were assist- 
ed by members of the Ball 
Committee and did a mag- 
nificent job in making the 
affair *a success. 

Usually after Christmas, 
people seem e.vhausted from 
all the hustle and bustle that 
goes with the Dec. 23th day. 
However guests arrived for 
this affair sparkling as 
proudly as the brightly dec- 
orated ballroom. The women 
were breath-taking in their 
richly designcdl*reations and 
the men were equally suave 
in their bow ties and dark 
formal suits. 

The gay spirit and the jov- 
ial atmosphere which pre- 
\ailed as guests started ar- 
riving was more noticeable 
this jear than in any prev- 
ious >ear. partly beiause 
the delightful dance music 
provided the background for 
a brilliant and sophisticated 
affair. 

The annual dance aKo 
served as a salute to tlip 
many friends of the organi 
•zation who have supported 
their manj community un- 
dertakings such as their pop- 
■ular Medical Variety Show, 
Alfna Wells, scholarship pro- 
ject. Life Membership in the 
NAACP. The Medicals and 
the Auxiliary also contribut- 
ed this year to the American 
\ Cancer Association, United 
Negro College Fund. Commu- 
nity Health Association. 
United Nations Association 
of L.A.. Count.v Conference on 
Human Relations. Coynty 
(Conference on Christians and 
Jews. Y..M.C.A.. Red Cross. 
Urban League, Legislative 
Needs. vthe Los Angeles Coun- 
ty Heart Association, the 
National Council of Negro 
Women and the March of 
Dimes, as well as distribut- 
ing Christmas baskets to 
needy families. 

The organization's service 
record to this communitv- can 
hardly be topped as indicat- 
ed by the number of their 
activities and by the fact 
that each project is handled 
in a practical and down to - 
earth manner. 

Dr. Roy D. Andrews. D.D.S., 
is president of the Associa- 
tion and Mrs. Hilda Allen 
is Auxiliary president. Both' 
gave a lot of attention to 
teamwork this last vear and 
the result has been gratify- 
ing. 

At the annual '^'uleude 
hall, on the dance floor and 
in the patio and cocktail 
lounge of the spacious 
Breakfast Club, we .spotted 
Dr. and 3Jrs. Chris Taylor, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Hayes, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Evans, 
Dr. Artis Whfte, Dr. and Mrs. 
Roland Nickens, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Price, Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
ibert Duckett, Dr. and,, Mrs. 
Walter Hines, Mr. and Mrs. 
Eason. 

Also Dr. and Mrs. (ieorge 
Price, Dr. James and Shirie.v 
Jones, I>. "and Mrs. Larry 
Scott. !\fr. and Mrs. Joe 
Spaulding. Dr. and Mrs. 
Shedrick Jones. Atty. James 
Akers, Walter Smith, I>r. and 
Mrs. Lawrence .Miles, .Mr. 
and Mrs. Bob Tierne.v, Mrs. 
L. Wilco.x.'.Mr. and .Mrs. Rud- 
ie Minificld. 

Others were: -Mr. and .Mrs. 
Edward Stiger, Dr. and Mrs. 

(Continued on Page 8) 



/'/y.V/?i1/.^tr£L''776'.:/Z.5 — Shot^n attending the annual 
Medical Auxiliary ball arc some nf the tity's finest pliar- 
rnaciits. pictured tt-i'li rncnibers nl tit,- .lu.\iliai \'s dame 
ronimitlee and a feu ';inst'. Scaled from left. Imz\ 
It'ciuls, hl\une Chuheitcr, Ma>yarct-^Rene, chainnan of 


^ uletide Ball; nnd Laura Smilherman. Utartdtng: Fred 
Criffin. Ph.D.: Otis Rene, Ph. C; Ethel Sheen; Clifford 
Prime. Ph.C: Luther If nuts. Ph.C: Laura Fouler, co- 
chairman of bell: Dr. Emily Dean and Marie Iredcinks. 

{ Adanii) 



OFFfCERS fflDDLF — Elated n: er the ,olr„ful co-j. d 
uhlch attended their annual hall, nlli,rts nf the .'\tediial. 
Dental nnd Phar mai eiitu nl .Inn. and its .luxiliaty me dis- 
cussing the outstandinij holidm social, from left: Dr. 


Roy D. .hidreus, D.D.S.: asso,iatiott president: .Mrs. Hi!' 
da .lUcn, .iuxilinry president; (Juendo/yn .indrcus and 
Dr. Hon. at d .-illcn. (.4 dams) 



.4SMAL YLLI.FtDE BAIA.—Smnrtly gnuned ladtc^ 
and siiaxe ijrntleincn brnurAit class to the annual Medual 
.iuxihnry formal hall held at ihe Los .I naeles Breakfast 
Cluh last Friday. I'iiturcd from left: Geraldme .11 nods. 


Dr. Robert r. .11 nods. D. D. S.: Delight Fhomas,-Dr. 
.Joseph //. Honard, D. D, S.; Marjnrie Cranlord, Mnlisa 
Sliijcr, Dr. Clarence Littlejohn and .inilln Liltlejohn. 

(.idaiiis) 



ARRAY or PERSOSALITILS—Fhe .Medical Au.yil- 

iary's annual Y uletide ball lias uell attended by many uell 
tnoun personalities, .luxiliary members .a>e shoun liith, 
from left: Dodye Evans, Dr. U'aynion McCio, Berlie 


Dixon, Eddie Beal, .Mary Bcnl, .\Liry //. McCoo, Don 
Mills, of the .Mills Brothers, and y'aola "Mills Rodgers. 

(.4 dams) 


ik Bill Smallwood ^i:^' 


Edith Jones jetted home 
from NYC and Columbus, O.: 
she buried her cousin in the 
latter city. The Eddie Ar- 
nolds (Thalia t of Palo Alto 
were in town. Long Beach's 
Dr. Charles Terry and family 
have his Dad visiting them 


from the nation's capita}. 
Beulah Terry Goodman, now 
of NYC, and her sister, Juan- 
ila, now of D.C., were in 
town for their father's funer- 
al. The Teacup Club meets 
Sat. with Louise Collier. 
Angelique Sratlon spent 


most of her holidajs a-bed 
with virus. Libby Clai*|f gets 
to regale the Womeri's Sun- 
day - Breakfast Club and 
guests this Sun. a.m. about 
her African^ trip; this club is 
adopting two African home.- 
less children, by the way. 


Santa Baby 

It's a girl, Leslie by name, 
for the Lester Ortickes (Ger- 
trude) as of last Wed. 
League of Allied Arts meets 
Sun. in the Wilfandel's up- 
stairs room right after the 
(Continued on Page 8^ 



TEARFUL JSD HAPPY REl'MOS—Dmtsle IIU- 
liaihs is shoun emhradng his sister, Mrs. (Joririnr Hunter 
of Mianii;'Fla., at thf Union Station. It n.-^s the first time 


thty had seen iiuh nthcr in 40 yidrs. Piiturcil from Irf I.- 
Mrs. James (Uark. Mr. Wtliuitns, Mrs. Hunter, J unnita 
II i/li/imr. Il'illinms' Xiiir, nnd James Clark.. his unrle. 



JOIST EFFORT — Checking ticket sales at intermission, 
members of ALPHA PHI ALPHA SPHISX duh and 
JfESTirOOD Chapter S. A. A. C. /'. shnu jny of 
successful fund raising event. From left, front ron' : Rohcrt 
Farrell, Elmira Collins, Judith Knight, Helena Rudolph, 


Betty Myles. Robert Sim/leton. Second rote: Eduard Fant, 
I iei'ir II ilkotz. Richard II illiamf. Sicne of gaiety, r:ith 

social prnrjrcss the theme, nas ballroom of Fox Hdls 
Country Cliih last Friday evening. 



GALA NEfV YEARS PARTY— Members of the Royal^ 
Dragons Social Club are shown during their annual Xcn' 
■ Year's party when they entertained some 125 quests at the 
DMC Hall last Sunday. Pictured seated from left: Walter 
Laremore, Gus Smith and Russell Albams. Standing from 

Parties Ring In New Year 


Parties ringing in the New 
Year and ringing out the old 
sprouted out in all sections 
of the southland. Dr. and 
Mrs. Julius Hill of St. An- 
drews place invited some 25 
guests into their lovely home 
and enjoyed the traditional 
New Year's menu of black- 
*ye peas, cornbread and chit- 
terlings. 

Over on Broadway in the 
Masonic Hall the Cooperettes 
Social Club ushered in the 
New Year on Sunday and the 
'guests wore colorful pap>er 
}iats and the festivities Ijist- 
ed until the wee hours of the 
morning. 

Dr. and Mrs. Chris Taylor 
entertained with a drop-in 
Bolree in their beautiful 
Grayburn street home in 
Leimert Park. Dr. and Mrs. 
E. Stratton lured i)ersonali- 
■ties to their hilltop home in 
Baldwin Hills on Saturday 
night to enjoy a superb even- 
ing of champagne and ex- 
cellent foods. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ovit Pierce 
entertained friends with an 
after-the-game cocktail sip 
with Mr. Pierce reaching way 
down in the cellar and pour- 
ing vintage of 20 years ago. 
The Royal Dragon Club 
brightly decorated the DMC 
Hall for their party on Sun- 
day night and, in addition 
to delicious foods, they had 
the excellent Ship Mates 
Combo featuring Ginger 
Smock, Al Mitchei'll, Art 
Maryland and Leroy Morri- 
son whose music made it a 
delightful dancing New 
Year's party. 
In Santa Monica, the Bay 


Area Chapter of the National 
Council of Negro Women, 
Inc.. held their New Year's 
party in the cozy home of Ida 
Dooley. \! e m b e r s invited 
their husbands and friends 
to a buffet and gift-giving. 

One of the largest cele- 
brations was held in the 
beautifully decorated dining 
room of the Playroom. Beaut- 
iful Christmas trees adorned 
the walls, vari-colored tinsel 
hung from overhead and a 
snow white tree shone 
brightly from the corner of 
the room. Noisemakers were 
jammed together elbov,' to 
elbow. 

Club Holds Dance 

The Centurions Car and 
Social Club ushered in the 
New Year with a swinging 
dance at the Aeronautical 
Ballroom last Friday night. 

Guests enjoyed dancing to 
the music of Leroy 's Latin 
Quintet and his Seven Sons. 

Bostic Band to Play 
Rinkeydinlcs' Formal 

The Kinkeydinks Club, Inc., 
announced that Earl Bostic 
^will play for their formal on 
Jan. 12 at the Beverly Hilton 
Hotel. 

Area Chairman 

Mrs. Maude E. Oliver, of 
1353 W. 30th street, has been 
named area chairman of the 
Diabetes Association of 
Southern California's person- 
to-person drive in the South 
Central area, scheduled for 
Jan. 22. 23 and 24. 


/(■//.• Jimmy II thon. Chester Hnynes. .Ilfred .l/«v. Dari 
Postill. Curtis II' at Is. La Folia Phelps, Elmo Phelps, 
Lowell Hall and Fred Edwards, president of the club. 

(Youn/;) ^ 


^c Bill Smallwood ^^ 

(Continued^rom Page 7i 


shower for Sandra Hoskins: 
the league has high hopes 
playwright Lorraine Hans- 
berry will still be in town 
and can visit with them. 

Santa really lovied Vernice 
Spann; left her a full length 
blonde mink and a dazzling 
diamond ring, The Rocky 
Washingtons ( H a z e 1 1 had 
the cast of Rai.sin in the Sun 
to New Year's Eve doings at 
their place. N'Yorker Arizona 
Harris currently visiting our 
town, but glamorously. 

Sacramento's Rhetta Haw- 
kins and Avis Wagoner dash- 
ed down for the holidays 
with .local relatives: their 
niece Rhetta Nickerson and 
family dined them but sump- 
tuously. Dr. and Mrs. Mur- 
dock Wharton expect their 
baby in May or June and 
hope his mother. Cordelia, 
wintering here, will stay over 
for the event. 

Warmly So 

-Nice, warmly so, having 
Frances Williams in town 
again it briefly. Bob (Rus- 
sell) Evans who used to live 
here is now the toast of one 
of London's plush, glinty 
clubs. Tonya Lee, to be Mrs. 
Thaddeus Winston come 
summer, will be a Catholic 
bride. Tues. (10) is anniver- 
sary for the R. S. Mounts 
(Barbara). Jini Scott takes a 
birthday Mon. (9), his Betty 
takes hers Wed. (11). Group 
5 of the Jack and Jills plan 
a theater party for this 
irionth. 


Juanita Miller has been 
abed battling flu. Anita 
Grant. Blanche Clark. Joan- 
na Sutton, Marion Maddox. 
Flora Chi.solm, Carolyn Shif- 
f lett . and Annie Laurie 
Adam^ pulled on their glov- 
es, arranged their furs and 
swept in a fashionable cot- 
erie to see Raisin in the Sun. 
Herman Bailey, teaching at 
"Famcee" this school year 
(he goes, to Ghana in the 
summer prior to assuming 
a professorship there), 
rounds up his local holiday- 
ing, leaves tomorrow for Fla. 

With Gala Accent 

One of the holiday's more 
delightful parti-; was the 
one Adelaide Hardy gave 
with gala accent on' Betty 
Hudson Nichols who is home 
to stay after seven years of 
Salt Lake City life; Betty's 
husband will join her here 
later. 

Pasadena's Dr. Jesste Mos- 
es' son, Danny, back to class- 
rooms at North (^rolina's St. 
Augustine College after Yule- 
tiding out this way. Ethel 
Holbert home from a Chi 
Xmas. Frances Gates. Mary 
Grant and Irene Henderson 
are tomorrow (Frid.) night 
hostesses to Pitt Los Club at 
the latters. 

Howard Hall took unto 
himself a bride recently. 
Looked like ole times again, 
seeing Maggi Neal and Em- 
mett Ashford partying dur- 
ing the Xmas. 


Sweet 

Sixteen 

Party 

Nancy Rowland, just turn- 
ed 16, and her popular par- . 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Steve 
Rowland gave a delightful 
dancing party at the Pacific 
Town Club Thursday eve- 
ning. 

5k)me 150 young people 
and friends of Nancy were 
present to join in the festivi- 
ties, which will be a memor- 
able occasion in her young 
life. 

The club was brightly dec- 
orated in green and gold and 
the same color scheme was 
carried out in decorations in 
the dancing area. The huge 
table was laden with refresh - 
menL«:. 

Pretty Nancy was elegant 
in a party frock of burnt 
orange peau do soie with 
matching accessories, and 
graciously received her 
guests as they arrived. 

The Latin Jazz Quintet 
provided fnusic for the eve- 
ning and ."^et the pace for a 
most entertaining affair. 


Libby Clark 
Is Breakfast 

Speaker Sun. 


Libby Clark, public rela- 
tions consultant for Coca 
Cola Bottling Company and 
former newspaperwoman, 
will be principal speaker 
Sunday at the JanuarV meet- 
ing of the Women's Sunday 
Morning Breakfast Club at 
the Clark Hotel at 9 a.m. 

Recently returned from Af- 
rica where she covered the 
independence celebrations of 
Nigeria and visited Ghana, 
Liberia, and Senegal, Miss 
Clark will give a detailed ac- 
count of her trip in conjunc- 
tion with exhibiting pictures 
and handicraft from the var- 
ious countries. 

African dignitaries in the 
area will be guests. A high 
point feature of the program 
will be the presentation of 
original African music and 
dancing. 



CLUBS 




FASHIONS 


8— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 5, 1961 


Dootsie Williams and Sister' 

i 

Hold Reunion after 40 Years 


Although the cool but 
thrilling sounds of sleigh 
bells and the warm, hearten- 
ing .sounds of Christmas car- 
ols are to be heard no more 
in the land for a year, the 


neither he nor Mr. Clark 
knew what she looked like. 
She had sent word, however, 
that .she could be identified 
by a plum -colored coat. 
"As I waited, " Williams 


was on a blind date. Uncle 
Clark and I eagerly scanned 
the faces of ever' lady who 
left the train, .searching for 
.some form of recognition. 
Now . . . it .seems a propos 
that mysi.ster would be the 
last one to get off!" 

Mrs. Hunter is a buxom, 
state.sque, effervescent lady 
who. like her brother, laughs 
easily and heartily. On see- 
ing each other at Union Sta- 
tion, thev acted just like . . . 


Nationa 
President 
At Ball 


Among prominent national 
figures arriving in' town for 
the holidays and particularly 
the annual Vuletide Ball of 
the Medical. Dental and 
Pharmaceutical Association 
of Southern California , and 
■its Auxiliary were Dr. and 
Mrs. A. C. Terrence of Opel- 
ousas. La. 

Dr. Terrence i.<! the nation- 
al president of the National 
Medical .\.ssociation. He and 
his lovely wife were the 
house guests of Dr. and Mrs. 
Howard Allen. Mrs. Allen is 
serving her fourth term as 
president of the Women's 
Auxilian,- of the Association. 

The Terrences were the 
guests of honor at the annual 
ball which was attended by 
lop bracket .socialities from 
San Francisco, Oakland, 
Berkeley, San Diego, Santa 
Barbara. Pacoima, Fresno 
and Bakersfield. 


joyous spirit of the holidays said. "I began to feel like I 
still lingers on in the unus- 
ual story of Dootsie Wil- 
liams, wealthy recording 
company executive, and Mrs. 
Corinne Hunter of Miami, 
Fla. 

They are brother and sis- 
ter, born in Mobile, Ala. But 
n»t until a few days before 
ChrLstmas had they .seen 
each other in more than 40 
years. The reunion occurred 
at the Union Station in Los 
Angeles when Williams and ; 
his uncle. Jame.s Clar^, went 
to meet Mrs. Hunter. r' 

The joy of the reunion con- 
tinues for Mrs. Hunter who, 
as -she declares, "is living up" 
every minute of her .schedul- 
ed three-week visit with her 
brother, "and I'm .seriously 
thinking of moving from 
Miami' to live in Los Ange- 
les." 

"Tne last time I .saw my 
sister," Williams explains. "I 
was only three years old. 
When our family separated, 
.she was taken to Florida and 
reared by relatives while I 
remained in Mobile for a 
short time before my mother 
brought me to live here." 

Actually. Williams was un- 
aware that his sister, who 
had married prosperously in 
Miami, was alive until re- 
tired Southern Pacific chef 
Clark, through a'chance con- 
versation with another train- 
man, learned that Mrs. 
Hunter still survived. 

Finding her. however, was- 
n't easy. Many long-distance 
telephone calls were placed 
to Mobile, Florida, and Chi- 
cago before she, an expert 
sHk finisher married to a 
successful businessman, was 
located in Miami. 

Williams immediately in- 
vited her to spend Christmas 
with him — and she accepted. 

The next dramatic episode 
occurred at the railroad depot 
when Williams and Clark ar- 
rived to await .Mrs. Hunter's 
train. 

She is Williams' only liv- 
ing close relative, but he had 
no photographs of her, and 


; well, just like lortglost bro- 
ther and .sister. {■ 

Speechless, they fell into 
each others armsj 

The eyes of both; were sud- 
denly clouded with mist and 
Mr.s. Hunter cried- unasham- 
edly. I - 

"Thank God." I she said 
softly, "j've found by bro- 
ther at last." j -\ ' 

For tlTo momcntj. Williams 
seemed too dazed to speak. 

But later he didisay: 

"Its amazing how quickly 
we've made up I those 40 
years of being sej^arated. It 
seems now like Cbrrine and 
I have been together all 
along. We get on just that 
well!" 1 ■ 



yASCY Ron LAM) — Popular L../. High student 
and historian of the school's Xeptunettcs (a girls' swim 
club) was intcrjaincd with a sti.rct ll^- birthday fiarty. She 
is a B-1 h student and has been saimming for cighjlyear*. 


Medicals Parent Education Series 

« i 

Scheduled at LA. High 


• (Continued from Page T) 
Darnon Lee. Mr. and Mrs. Er- 
vin Storj'. Dr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Bledsoe. Anna Miles, Mr. 
and Mrs. Dave Arbor. Dr. 
and Mrs. Harry E. Thomas, 
Bob Thomas, Yvonne Cosby. 
Annette Bruce, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Norton, Bob Steward, 
Mr. and Mrs. Gene Ramos. 
Hal Miller. Arlene Provost, 
Dr. and Mrs. Ted Evans, Jr., 
Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Bryanr, 
Atty and Mrs. Earl Broady. 

Out - of - towners included 
Johnetta Kelso, of Menji#iis, 
Tenn.; Dr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Boger of Chicago and Dr. 
and Mrs. A. C. Terrence of 
Opelousas, La. 


pres ■ 
High 


Townsends Observe 23rd 
Wedding Anniversary 


Atty. and Mrs. Vince Mon- 
roe Townsend, Jr., of 3662 S. 
Arlington avenue, quietly 
observed their 23rd wedding 
anniversary Sunday, Dec. 25, 
Christmas Day. 

Atty. Townsend, and Mrs. 
Townsend, the former Lilyan 
E 1 i z at) e t h Mansfield, of 
Columbus, Ohio, were mar- 
ried Dec. 25th, 1937, in 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

The observance consisted 
of a quiet family dinner at 
the home of the Townsends, 
with their immediate family 
and a few intimate friends. 

Among those attending the 
dinner were: Mrs. Bessie A. 
Johnson, Mrs. Tommie Lee 


* 

son, Rob- . 
grandson, '^ 


Reeves, and Mrs. James W. 
Parker, long time friends of 
the "Townsends. Also present 
were: Mr. Bowling Mans- 
field, brother of Mrs. Town- 
send; his wife, Elizabeth; 
daughter. Judith 
ert; and their 
David. 

Following the dinner. "TC 
many beautiful gifts were 
opened, some representing -|t 
the Christmas occasion, 
others the anniversary obser- -^ 
vance. 

During the evening, the .Aj 
Townsends were visited by 
many friends and well-wish- w 
ers, who brought congratula- 
tions and best wishes for the 
future. 


Mrs. Steven Rowland 
idcnt of Los .\ngeles 
School Parent-Teacher Assoc- 
iation, announces that a ser- 
ies of parent-education lec- 
tures has been scheduled to 
begin Wednesday afternoon 
Jan. 11th from 1:30 to 3:30 
p.m. in room 224 of Los Ang- 
eles High School. 

Mrs. Sylvia L. Bogen. well 
known teacher and lecturer 
in the field of child study 
and parent education, will 
lead the discussions. The 
general topic of the series is 
"Attaining Peaceful Co-exist- 
ence with our Tecn-Agers." 
The specific sub-topic to be 
discussed at the first lecture 
will be "Understanding Typ- 
ical Behavior Patterns within 
the Family." 

Subsequent lectures will be 


he_ld at the .Memorial Hall 
Auditorium of L..A. High 
School, Olympic a« Rimpau. 

The dates are ats follows: 
Jan. 18. 25. Feb. 1 and 8. 

The .series is being spon- 
sored by the Parent^Teacher : 
.'Associations of tlollywood 
High, John Burroughs Junior ' 
High. Virgil Junior High and 
L. A. High. i 

§ - - 

Horace Hannpton ; 
Visits in City 

Horace Hamptort", member ; 
of a pioneer California-.j 
family and a resident of | 
Laton, Calif, for th.e past 10 p 
years, spent thei holida>5 ■ 
visiting friends and relatives • 
in the citv. 




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SHOW BUSINESS 


SAMMY DAVIS SR. 


By Moggie Hathaway 

Ed. Note: This is the second 

and conclusive article on 

the life of Sammy 

Davis Sr. 

Sammy Sr. taught his little 
son Sammy Jr. some of the 
most intricate routines and at 
the age of 5 Sammy Jr. was 
starred in a Warner Bros, 
production called "Ruf us 
VJones for President," co-star- 
ring Ethel Waters. 

Monte Corbitt was one of 
the members of the Will Mas- 
tin Trio and when he left the 
act to become a business man 
in Detroit, little Sammy Jr. 
was placed in the act thus 
becoming a part of the Will 
Mastin Trio. Sammy Sr. re- 
vealed that the trio was liv- 
ing on 5th street in the Morris 
Hotel when Sammy Jr. was 
drafted into the Armv. "One' 
day," he .c:aid, "I actually went ! 
hungry for 72 hours, then 
Lownard Reed booked us in a' 
show at Shepps Playhouse." j 

Later Sammy Jr. rejoined, 
the act and it sky-rocketed to 
success, .\fter becoming one! 
of the most sought after ads 


in the show world Sammy 
Davis Sr. retired in July, 19.57. 
Befor^retiring Sammy Sr. 
married mta "Pee Wee" Davis 
in Dec. 1951 and he proudly 
remarked,. "Pee Wee was the 
best things thai could have 
happened to me She changed 
my entire life." 

I Mrs. Davis was a nurse in 
New York City and "accident- 
lly" met her hu&and through 
a girl friend (Carolyn Car- 
ringtoni on a visit to Sammy 
Sr.'s home. 

They adopted their two 
children and moved to Bev- 
erly Hills in June. 1960. 
Sandra, their eldest daughter 
was born in Morristown. N. J. 
She attends City College and 
her favorite sport is basket- 
ball. Sandra laughingly said, 
"My brother Sammy Jr. is my 
favorite male singer and my 
favorite female vocali.st is 
Peggy Lee.' Mrs. Davis had 
not had a chance to say very 
much hut jnanaged to reveal 
that her hobbies were cameras 
and she attended Hollywood 
Photograph Studios. She sad- 
ly remarked that she had to 
I Continued on Page 10) 


* * • • • • •*••*•••*•••••••••*•* 

'^ Emtertainmeiit Whirl '^ 

• *••*•••••,••••• *••••*•••••• 


Thursday, aJnuary 5, 1961 


The Ca lifornta Eagle— ^ 




ChA^Z 


This scribbler saw the (last days of 1960 still clocking 
off news. Maybe none of the_it«his was as staggering as 
your week, but here's a playback on some of the last minute 
happenings that held our interest: ; 

Actor FRENCHIA GUIZON Held a house rocking open:, 
house Christmas day and took'*^^ — - — ■ — • 



home movies of the proceed- 
ings, with a motion picture 
camera that was a Yule gift! 
A gal named BELLE 
BARTH, currently working the 
Cloister, was putting down 
some of the roughest humor 
heard around these patts in a 
week of BLUE Mondays, and 
informed her audience, "If I 
embarra.ss you 
friir>nds." . . . Queen DINAH 
WASHINGTON and youthful 
Latin actor RAFAEL CAMPOS 
were carrying on a scorching 
romance out Giro's way! 


.l/.-/A/.\(7 //'— 0« Jfinutiry 6, the 'J'rtnier.r houtue into 
1 hr !^iirnriiit tor a Irn-ilny rn^aqcincnt. llnKhd h\ iUaiide 

« 


and Cliff Trenicr, these eight talented people hare appeared 
in all the leading clubs throughout the U.S. and abroad. 


L£NA HORNE mentioned that 
a script was being prepared 
for her to return to the Broad- 
way stage again . . . Socialite 
CONSTANCE WASHINGTON, 
a member of the VOICES OF 
HOPE Choir Of The Hour was 
buying all new frocks to go 
with her new svelte shape. 
She shelved over 35 pounds 
the Metrccal wayl 
I The word came that MARI- 
! LYN MONROE has gone back 
to Joe DI MAGGIO, in t he 


eyent you care! . . . Enter- 
prising BOB THOMAS, the,; 
personable '"lothes salesman 
for ZEIDLER & ZEIDLER is' 
toying with the idea of a big. 
time promotion around thC 
time spring has sprung! . . ^ 
We made a personal call toj 
the Public Relations man for 
"Raisin In The Sun" and got 
tell your'this resppnse from his record- 
ing device: Raisin In the Sun 
is a complete sellout for the 
balance of it's run. It may re-- 
turn on February 6th. If there 
is any other matter vou care 


to discuss, please begin talk- 
ing when you hear the beep! 
THE LEON BRATTONS' New 
Year's eve splash saw the year 
in on an Afro-Cuban note with , 
drummer LOUIE POLIEMON: 
BROWN serenading the ex-; 
elusive mob on hand with his; 
bongos and timbales . . . Had* 
a ph ilosophical chat wltli- 
LITTLE RICHARD, former^ 
Rock and Roll Star, who is 
now an Evangelist. Richard; 
(Continued on Page 11) ; 


People 


JACOBS & FARBER PRESENT 

ONE OF THE GREATEST SINGERS 
OF OUR TIME! 

WILLIAM 

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SAT. EVE. JAN. 21, PHILHARMONIC AUD. 

RETURNING FROM A TRIUMPHAL WORLD-WIDE TOUR FOR 
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ORDER NOW BY MAIL FOR CHOICE SEATS-SEND TO 
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Tickets: $1,50, $2.00, $2.50, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00. 
^>.' Eneips* (t*nip«d,v ••tiU^dretsed envelope. 



HILLSTOPPERS — .\ topnight 

! young socialite pun-hased S.30 

: dollars worth of ducats and 

j slept through the New 'Year's 

benefit! 

WILLIE MAYS — He kicked 
off the New 'i'ear by packing 
his ba.sebal! uniform and his 
high priced TV set and is .said 
to have moved from his New 
I York home! 

FOR RENT — that sign is still 
prominently displayed on the 
window of that La Cieneg^ 
club which a noted bandlead- 
er and his wife are s^id to 
[have purchased! 
IREV. CHARLES — Ray — His 
gospel session drew fi.rnX) soul.s 
at the Palladium in Hollywood 
(Continued on Page lOi 


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•ENJOY A SWINGING THING- 


RICKIE HARROW PRESEIVTS 

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VOCALIST - JENNIE THOMPSON, DANCER 

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3 BIG SHOWS NIGHTLY - 9:30 P.M. - 11:00 P.M. U 12:30 A.M. 

WATCH FOR THE OPENING JAN.UARY 13 

CHRISTINE JORGENSON ^^— 

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.JTOP Ql'ALlTY ESTERTAIS MEST — And how 

could you miss u-ith Sonny Criss. Brilliant young star nith 
his trio is one of the attractions that are making the opening 
neeks of Cluh Toun Hill a major success. 



FOREMOST JAZZMAX — Chico Hamilton and his 
■ quintet have been accepted as one of the most unusual 7 oices 
in jatz today. Jefferson High School's famous son delights 
numerous fans nith brief ueekend appearance at Sunset 
Strip's Cluh Renaissance. 


NEW YORK SCENE 

I do hope that all those bad heads are not quite so light 
by now, as the New Year has been royally welcomed by one 
and all. And may this be a most happy and prosperous one, 
with progress and accomplishment our byword. 

Pawing of Frienda With lovely Laura Prescott 


It- is most regretfully that 
I report the passing of two 
fine people this week; Mrs. 
Rosalie Wilson and Mrs. Fred- 
dy Johnson (Louise Woods). 
Mrs. Wilson was like a mother 
to me for years and made the 
best cakes in the world. Louise 
was the wife of my music 
coach, a beautiful girl, (both 
physically and spiritually), 
the possessor of a gorgeous 
trained lyric soprano voice, 
and a young woman on the 
threshold of a sparkling ca- 
reer. She had done cabaret 
and Broadway shows (Mr. 
Wonderful and Bells Are 
Ringing), had traveled 
throughout Europe, and her 
unfortunate demise in her 


on my arm, I went to Bird- 
land to catch Count Basie, 
Joe Williams & Co., along with 
John Handy and his group. 
The house was packed to the 
rafters on that Wednesday 
night, and Basie was cooking 
with gas as. he swung the 
chandliers loose and Joe Wil-. 
liams sang the songs, "Baby 
Won't You Pleas^ Come 
Home', 'Everj-day", "Its A- 
VVonderful World", and many 
others, to the complete pleas- 
ure and satisfaction of the 
enthusiastic onlookers which 
included LaVerne Baker, Nat 
Cole. Sammy Davis, Jr. (cur- 
rently at the Copa), Rose 
Hardaway and others. Start-, 
ing tonight it will be Quincy 


earlv thirties seems such a! Jones and his orchestra, plus 
wa.ste(urt|css the Man' Up-. the singing, swinging Gloria 
stairs hag an awful need" for j Lynne and the Earl May 
good sporanos iju his heavenly 1 Trio. I'll report on that show 
chorus I. ; after I see it. / 

'Chazz' Soundtrack 


CONCERT and SHOW! 

- FRIDAY, J AN. 13th 
t 8:30 P.M. 


ir ^ •PEOPLE 6l places • 


it • 


HAL ZEIGER presents 

THE MOST CREATIVE 
MUSICAL GIANT OF 

THIS GENERATION! 




PLAYINO HIS H/r RECORDS 

'GEORGIA ON MY MIND* 
'RUBY' . 'HARD HEARTED HANNAH' 
'COME RAIN OR COME SHINE' > 'WHAT I SAY' 
'THE GENIUS OF RAY CHARLES' 


PASADENA 
CIVIC AUD. 

SY 2-9473 


ALL SEATS 
RESERVED PRICES: $3.50, 2.75, 2.00 (tax inci) 
Seats now on sale at Pasadena Aud. box-office, 
So. Calif. Music Co., 737 So. Hill, and all Mutual Ticket 
Aimcies. FOR TELEPHONE RESERVATIONS: HO 7-6151 


(Continued fix>m Page 9) 
Sunday and the elbow to el- 
bow mixed gathering certain- 
ly enjoyed it without inci- 
dent. Earl Bostic. incidentally, 
set the stage for Hal Zigler's. 
great production! 
DR. UNCOLN SHUMATE — 
I .Several top medics do^vn 
[south LoR Angeles way are 
toying with the idea of get- 
ting him to head a ne\v medi- 
^cal center in that area! 
j HAZEL SIMPSON— Pulled out 
of the gas station at Adam.s 
and Western the other eve and 
promptly tied up traffic with 
her sleek Bonneville loaded 
with ranch fresh eggs! 
JOE MALBROUGH — He i.<; 
kicking off the New Year by 
selling $39 dresses for fi\e 
bucks at his Exposition and 
Western Avenoo shop! 
ELIHU McGEE — He accounts 
for the fact that the Congo 
Room upstairs at Vernon and 
Central is the swingingest 
bistro on the famed avenoo! 
TOMMY TUCKER — During 
the past three months he has 
held more conference-; with 
bankers, builders and loa'n 
company officials than the 
newly elected president Be- 
hind the confabs could be a 
new and modern hotel! 
H. CLAY JACKE — Dapper at- 
torney, who looks more like a 
Wall Street banker, just closed 
out the year getting his 12th 
straight acquittal and wall de- 
fend a white client on .a mur- 
der come Jan. 5! 
BETTY PERKINS — A smooth 
chocolate brownskin from 


Santa Monica operates her, FIREBUG — That 7-year-old 
fathers' Neighborhood-Store at .who caused a 2 alarm fire on 


jOth and Normandie! 



S01:L JAZZ— Direct from 
.Vrr.. york, tenor saxaphon- 
ist Tony Ortegn tmd his 
Quartet appear nttefy at the 
Black Orchid on H'est 
Washington hUd. 


W. 37th place, by setting the 
neighbor's garage on fire and 
starting a bla7.e at his parents' 
home is nursing a hot seat 
this week! 

LILUAN BIffiWSTER — Cute 
and ouA'y police clerk ipul led 
up at Henry Lezine's Mobil- 
gas station in a flashy Cor- 
vrtte and the males screamed, 
"An angel on wheels!" 
JESSIE ROBINSON— Topflight 
postal official and his pretty 
wife tossed a little ringing in 
of the New Year in their spa- 
cious Compton home! 
SITTING DUCKS — Neighbor- 
hood groceries, liquor, drug 
stores, etc. operated by one or 
two people are being terroriz- 
ed by a band of thugs who live 
in one section of the city and 
operate in the other. If Negro 
officers were working the Rob- 


bery Detail at Wilshire, New- 
ton. Hollenbeok, University 
and 77th, they could put a 
halt to this growing menace 

because they can spot a thug 
at the drop of a hat! 
JUNE WARE — Pretty and 
wealthy property owner in 
Leimert Park was rushed to 
University Hospital when she 
came down with pneumonia! 
BALLINGER KEMP — Wifie 
presented him with a baby for 
Christmas' 

DODIE EVANS — Pretty coffee 
cream brownskin wifie of Dr. 
Ted Evans in Pa.sadena was 
real chic in a Bob Steward 
creation at the .MDPA formal! 
HORACE HAMPTON— Gentle- 
man farmer in Laton. Calif., 
just east of Fresno, in town on 
his yearly visit with friends 
and relatives. He owns a fruit 
and vegetable farm! 


(Continued from Pa^e 9> ' 
plans to write a best seller 
this year based on his lif%! 

Learned that jazz thrush 
HELEN HUMES is now play- 
ing cocktail drums and sing- 
ing with the NINA RUSSELL 
trio! . . . Enjoyed exchanging 
small talk with tailor ERNIE 
COTTON, who is not only boss 
man with a needle, but one of 
the nicest guys in threadsville 
. . . .\ lu.scioLTS new vocallure. 
NANCY WILSON, (is she 
JACKIE'S sis?) got the biggest 
play album-wise over at this 
reporter's turntable. She really 
COOKS. The LP is on Capitol, 
the label that is perhaps 
responsible for unearthing 
more fine talent than any 
other. 

Our cood friends COLUMBIA 
and RCA VICTOR also had 
quite a year though with well 
timed releases on rosters that 
included MAHALIA JACKSON 
(Col. \ JOHNNY MATHIS 
(Col.). LAMBERT, HENDRIX 


& ROSS (Col.) and* MIRIAM 
MAKEBA, DELLA REESE and 
BELAFONTE on ..RCA. All 

blockbusters! J 

The new surge of syndicated 
shows integrating Negro actors 
into the television ejjisodes is 
bringing about a more realis- 
tic picture on the tube. The 
possible exception is the high- 
ly rated "Untouchables" show 
that has yet to our kpo%vledge 
to employ a Negro actor even 
in a street scene. Are they try- 
ing to tell us that Negroes 
were non-existent during the 
prohibition, bathtub gin era?? 

Central Casting is setting 
up machinery tb include 
Screen Extras in all various 
racial groups under one roof. 
The move was brought about 
by petitioning Negro extras 
who complained to FEPC that 
discriminatory"" tactics were 
being used in the old casting 
system. Writer MAGGIE 
HATHAWAY played a big role. 


.^ 


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DOROTHY McNAMEE ALLEN 



TERSA TILE 

— 

Milt 

Bruckner, 

one of jazz' 

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est tnfluc 

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presently 

appearing 

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at 

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SHOW BUSINESS 

(Continued from Page 9i , dolls from foreign countries, 
quit her studies because shejl just finished writing a Xmas 
was, never able to get the|leller to him." 'May I read it' 
family dinner on time. 'I coaxed. When Suzette pre- 

At this point Suzette, the'sented the letter, it wa? the 
baby, invited us to visit wi^hlcutest little writing that we 
her and her doll family. En- j had seen in many years and 
route to the nursery we saw ; this is what Su/.otte wrote to 
a room that resembled The her "famous brother Sammy 
London Shop. Whose room is and his wife. May Britt: 
that? we asked. "Oh." she "Dearest brother and sister, 
hurriedly answered, "j u s t Thank you for the money you 
daddy's, he has about a hun-^gave me. 1 bought a leather 
dred suits in there." We took, jacket, dress, sweater, skirt. 
a quick glance and noticed jsusf>enders and a doll-outfit. 
about 2(X) pair of shoes. .50:1 liked your telegram. Much 
caps, hundreds of hats and | love. Your sister. Suzette." As 
2f»0 of the most beautiful we finished reading this letter 
French pleated shirts. Slizette suddenly asked, "How 

After Suzette had showed do you spell elephant?" Oh. 
us her doll collection she re-^we said. "Go and a^k daddy." 
marked. "My favorite doll is That was our cu/~To hastily 
Pitiful Pearl and my brother depart with,-^ "Happy New 
Sammy has sent me many, Year." 


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HANK STEWART'S 

BLACK ORCHID 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE • RESTAURANT 

— Presents — 

DIRECT FROM NEW YORK SOUL JAZZ 

TONY ORTEGA QUARTET 

FEATURING MONA ORBECK, VIBES, PIANO 
SOUL FOOD - DRINKS - ENTERTAINMENT 

4557 WEST WASHINGTON BLVD. 

AVAIlAkLI FO« KANOUETS, FASHION SHOWS, PABTIIS 

WE. 6-9212 


TONY OffTEOA 


RECORDIXG ARTIST- 
Trumpeter Russell Jacquet 
leads ueekend and Sunday 
morning jam sessions at 
Compton' s Cluh Starlight. 


100 CHOICE 


it^^l 


^^ 


ao. 


"BEST DANCING SINCE 
'WIST SIDE STORY' ' 
i A. Ixomintr 


A 

Hilarious 


Romantic . \fn>\'*"*4L 


^''""r^hm 


Q\^% 


\ 


ISIAND 

(.A tr<* t >w> tf Ni* •< Mna iman 
CAST OP 42 


Itorring J.ofi Dv/rand • OoJ*4«l Pip«f • MOfrri BucKonon • John Hoykf 

SA M vd IMS • wca ii« • c» ■ ffx to lid 

MAnNO«-*osaaiia,SaC><I(.MullcOli. . ^.^ 

}l7t&HJ9t>'«)MHutu|l«fm*« I Vin SL.Noftllol Hpljywod BN<. 

I« 100 CHOICE SEITS $2 




iMAS'QUE CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

4731 W. WASHINGTON BLVD. 
WE. 3-3016 

Mf7f Buckner Trio 

NITELY EXCEPT WEDNESDAYS 

NEVER ANY ADMISSION 

OR COVER CHARGE 



t' 


LIMBO DANCING wuh 

VIRGIN ISLAND STEEL BAND 
THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY— OPEN 24 HOURS 

SWINGING FOLK MUSIC - TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY EVENINGS AND SILENT MOVIES, TOO - GALLERY - BOQK SHOP 

INSOMNIAC NERMOSA BEACH FRontier 4-9388 


^: 


•I 


fi 


I 


yi 


.? 


FAST SERVICE 


v-o 


• R ENIX 


se:i_i_ 


B U Y 


MIRE 


TRAD^ 



IfOUU HND IT IN THE WANT ADS! 


OUND* SERVICE • EMRL-ON^MENT • RERSOMAU! 


AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 

37010 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-255 

In the Superior Court of the 
Stale of California, in and for the 
C(uinr.\' of Los Angeles. 

In the -Matter of the Estate of 
J.\Mi:s A. GR1;KN. Deceased. 

.Voli.-e is hereby given to credit- 
ors haMnpr rlaim.-; against the said 
(If.-edent to file said claims in the 
offirp of her Altornev. Vlnct 
.\lonio.-> Touii.spnd. Jr.. 223 West 
llorenic .\venue. in the City of 
Ixts -Xnceles.' in the aforesaid 
County, which latter office is the 
placH of husine.s.s of the u'nder- 
si.;ncd in all matters pertaininR to 
.inid estate, .'^uch claims with thei 
n>i;c.->ar.v \oucher,s must be filed 
or presented as aforesaid within 
.M.^c months after the first publica- 
lif>n of this notice. 
Dated December 5. 196il 

FLLA H. GREK.V. 
];\e.'utirx of the will 
of fnid decedent 
Vince Monroe Townsend, Jr. 
Attorne-at-Law 
223 West Florence Avenue 
Los Angeles 3. California 
PL. 8-5309 

I Published in Uie California 
T;a£le l^rr. S, l.i. ;2. 29. 196(i.) 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


I EXPERT BEAUTY TREATMENT 


THOMAS M. McKEE. JR 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publish in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. 1960. 
Jan. 5-12-19. 1961 


' jThc California Eagle) 
38225 
MOTICE OF HEARING OF 
PETITION FOR PROBATE 
OF WILL 
No. 437-158 
In the Superior Court of the 
Slate nf California, in and for the 
Counl.\ of Los Angeles. In the 
Matter of the Estate of Atlnie \'. 
Henderson, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given that the 
P'-titinn of Carrie Washington for 
the Probate of the Will of the 
abo\e-namcd deceased and for the 
issuance of Letters testamentary 
thereon to the petitioner to which 
reference is hereb.\- made for further 
particulars, will be heard at 9;15 
o clock a.m.. ,on Jan, 13. 1961. at 
the court room of Department 4, 
Cif the Superior Court of the State 
fif California, in and for the Countv 
of Los Angeles. Citv of Los Aii- 
gclc-i 

Dated: Dec. 21. 196/1 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
ItllEast Vernon Ave. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 
AD. 2-6149 

Attorney for Petitioner 
H.\ROLD J. OSTLV. 
County Clerk and Clerk of i 
the Superior Court of t he- 
State of California, in and 
for the Countv of Los Angeles 
Bv A, L GRAHAM, Deputv 
'Publish in the California Eagle 
New.~paper Dec, 29. 19fiO; Jan. 5. 
Jan. 12. 1961. 


38011 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 435-425 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 
;AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 
LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of the Instate of 
WALTER SNELL 
Deceased 
Notice Is hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or 10 present them to the 
undersigned at the office of her 
Attonev. 

MACEO G tolbp:rt 
4272 South Central Avenue 
in the City of Los Angeles 11. in 
the aforesaid County, which latter 
office is the place of t>usiness of 
the undersigned in all matters per- 
taining to said estate. Such claims 
with the necessary vouchers musi 
be filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice 
Dated December 19. 19Hii. 
Maceo G. Tolbert 
Attorney-at-Law 
4272 South 'Central Avenue 
Lo» Angeles 11. California. 
Matilda M. Snell 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of <aid decedent. 
Publish ill California Eagle news- 
paper Dec. 22-29. 1960: Jan. 5-12. 
1961. 


12. California, on Januar.\' 11, 1961, 
at 9:3<J a in . :\i which time pro- 
ponervts ind opponents of the pro- 
posed ti.^p will be heard 

.Arthur .1. Bauni, Cbtfir-ninn 
Milton Breivogel. Director of 

Planning 
THE KKC.IONWL PLANNINC 

COMMISION 
County of Los Angeles 
Published in California Eagle 
newspaper. IV-emher "29. 1960 and 
January 5. 1961 

HELP WANTED-FEMALE 


UNFURNISHED 
FOR RENT 


APARTMENT 


I INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


WOMAN 
EXPERIENCED 

Apt. house mgr. for 16-unit 
bidg. No children. 3 room 
furn. apt. and" salary. Call Ed 
Stanley. 

MA. 8-0211, Ext. 714 

Week Days 


( 1 he California Eagle) 

38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 436-714 

In Ihe .Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the 
Countv of Los Angeles In. the 
Matter of the Estate of Delia IMc- 
Kee. Deceased 1 

Notice is hereb.v given to cred- 
itors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to, the 
undersigned at the ofHce of' his 
.-\ttorneys. Miller. Maddox & Ma- 
lone 2S21 South Western Avenue. 
in the Cit.v of Los .\ngeles. in the, 
aforesaid Count.^'. which latter of-' 
fice is the place of business of the 
undersigned in all matters pertam- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessapN' vouchers must be 
filed or. presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 

Dated Doc. 22. 196"! 
MILLER, MADDOX & MALONE 

Attorneys^at-Law 

2824 South Western Avenue 

Los Angeles. California 

RE. 1-4143 


38634 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-585 

In the Superior Court of the 

State of California, in and for the 

County ot Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate ol 
BLANCH?: GRIFFIN, also Knov. n 
as IJLANCHI-; FCGGETT. Deceas- 
ed. 

Notice i.s hereby given to rre<1i!- 
ors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the i-lerk of the aforesaid 
court or lo present them to tnc 
undersigned at the office of l.er 
.\ttorneys. Miller. Maddox A.- Ma- 
lone. 2824 .South Western Av?nue 
in the City of Los Angele.«. in the 
aforesaid County, which latter of- 
fice is the place of tiusiness of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing lo said estate .such claims 
with the necessars' vouchers must 
be filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
Dated Dec 29. 1960 

SALLY SH.AW NE\\MAN 
.Administratrix with-the- 
Will-Annexed of the Estate 
of said dPCPdcnt 
Miller. Maddex &. Maione 
Attorney 5-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, Califernia 
RE. 1-4143 

(Published in ihp California 
EaR-le Newspaper Jan. ,t. 12. 19. 26. 
1961,) 


38181 
ZONE EXCEPTION 
CASE NO. 5781-(2) 
A PCHLIC HE.VRING in the mat- 
ter of a 'request for an exception 
to the R-1-50OI iSingle-l-'amily Res- 
idence. 50011 sq, ft, min ) Zone, in 
order to establish, operate and 
maintain a nursery school, in con- 
junction with an existing church 
on the soutlnv'esterly corner of 
Rosecrans Avenue and Cahita Ave- 
nue, in the Willowbrook-Enterpriz : 
Zoned District. Los Angeles County, 
wilj be held before the Zoning 
Board, in the Hall of Records, in 
Ihe Regional Planning Commission 
hearing room. Room 501. located at 
?2<) North Broadwa.v-. Los Angeles 


SITUATION WANTED 

"apartment hotel" 

HOME MAINTENANCE 

PLUMBING 

ELECTRIC 

SMALL JOBS ONLY 

D& J 
MAINTENANCE 

PHONE EVES. 
LO. 7-1505 

MONEY TO LOAN 

i 

Combine Your 1st 

and 2nd Trust Deed 

at a Reasonable Cost. 

Also 1st and 2nd 

Trust Deeds 

Bought and Sold. 

AX. 2-7088 

Rl. 8-3572 

BEAUTY OPERATOR WA NTED 

RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaute Shoppe 

OPERATOR WANTED 
4919 West Adams Blvd. 
Lqs Angeles 16, Calif. 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

55431/2 HOLMES AVENUE ! 
1$ now open for business and of-! 
fering expert beauty care from I 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap-! 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, ^ 
general operator. I 

LU. 1-6227 ! 

MATTRESS & SPRING FOR SALE 1 

Near New j 

Mattress 
and Springs. 

Excellent 
Condition.' 
Only $10. 

1 Call 

j WE. 5-0485 

ELE CTRICAL REPAIRING 

WE SPECIALIZE in all elec-l 

trical work. Large or small, | 

old or new. Rea.sonable and 1 

! reliable. WE. 9-0900. | 


$75— Brand new unfurn. 1 . 
b«drm. apartment with; 
garbage disposal, utilities 
pd. 528 West 78th St. 1 j 
or 2 children accepted. ' 
Inquire at Apt. 8. 

FURN. HOUSE FOR RENT 

3 LARGE BEDROOMS j 
$85 per month rents a roomy,! 
6 room, 3 bedroom house. West- 
side location. Carpeting includ-i 
ed. Washing rnachine available.! 
Children invited. Ideal for family 
living. Near everything. 


DUPLEX 
$500 Down 

$10,950 full price. 

Income $110 per month. 

Only 6 years old. 

Best buy of the week. 

Be independent for life. 

NE. 2-8461 


Thursday, January 5, 
REAL ESTAllv?^ SALE 


.1961 


The California Eagle— 11 


UNFURNISHED HOUSES 


$95.00 

Rustic 8 room, 5 bedroom 
house, fenced yard for child- 
ren. 

Western Rentals 

AX. 2-0458 


DO YOU WANT S120 mo. ad- 
ditional income? Then 
make this distinctive duplex 
yours. Only 5. yrs. old with 
disposal, double garage & 
attractive yard. (Lot 135 /t. 
deep to alley. S5.50 down. 
$10,950 f.p. VIC ODLAND, 
1607 E. Compton, Compton. 
Calif. NE. 2-8469. 


FURNISHED HOUSES 


$85.00 


SERVICES 


Beautiful 5 room, 2 bedroom 
house, fenced yard. Children 
welcome. Washer included. 

AX. 2-0458 


BY OWNER — Homo + 

inc. 2 

on lot. 

2 hdr. $12.9.50 

f. p. 

$950 dr 

. 2115 Calif. 

Ave., 

Long Pr 

ach RI. 7-33J6. 


DUPLEX— Only SoOO dn 

sio.- 

950 f.p. 

Income $110 

mo. 5 

yrs. old 

NE. 2-8469. ■, 



$695 Down 

. VACANT 

5 room, 2 bedroom 

Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwood floors. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-4156 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


NOW IS THE TIME to buy this 
5 rm.. 2 bdr. stucco home. 
NO DOWN to vet. Only $750 
dn. to non-vets. Coonis Real 
Estate, 9227 S. Broadwai 
Los Angeles 3. PL. 7-2268. 


$500 DOWN — Cute 2 bdrm. 
stucco across from tAhens 
Pk. Rugs, curtains. Tile 
bath, panel ray heat. $75 
mo. Stover Realtv. 
OR. 4-6022 — OR. 8-9961 


107. DOWN — 3 Bdrm & den. 
2 baths, hrdwd. firs., redec- 
orated. Vacant. $11,750 f. p. 
PL. ■4-2827 'til 7 


OWNER MUST SELL — 9 bdr. 
2 ba. -■ don, new carpet. 
$16,950; $1950 dn. 30 yr 
FHA. 6715 5th Ave. RI 7-3346. 


BRAND NEW 
HOME IN 

PALM SPRINGS 

You'll love this 3-bdrni. 
quality built Doll House 
It's completely furnished, 
so just bring your "grub" 
and check for $2,500 and 
move in. White stucco with 
blue trim, attached single 
garage, wall to woll car- 
peting, sliding glass door' 
to patio. Excellent location 
about Vi. mile from exclus* 
ive Racket Club. Priced 
right at $13,950. For ar- 
rangements to see proper- 
ty call Miss Rossini at 

FA.. 1-41 82 


We Serve Parties 

PARTY SERVICE 

Exper. cook — American and 
French foods, hora d'oouvret, 
hot or cold. Waiters, barten- 
d«7v^ for parties, weddings, 
lurfchjions. 

EM. 9-9452 
AFTER 6 P.M. 


HOUSES i APTS. WANTED 

FREE SERVICE!!! 

TO LANDLORDS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside. 

4020 South Western Aevpue 
AX. 2-1991 

HOUSES 7oR RENT 


$395 DOWN— S7S mo; -Vacant 
& redec. 5 rm. ia9th t. $600 
DOWN— S10,500..,Xlnt. 5 rm 
- kitchenette. 3 BDR.M — 
Stucco. $850 dn. $12,500. Nr 
CenturyAvalon. 8 ROOMS— 
$1000 down. 2 baths. W. 90th 
St. Vac. Redec. 6 UNIT Stuc- 
co, $3000 dn. Modern stucco. 
2 bdrm apts. .\DAMSON 
REALTY, .\.\. 3-6267. 5401 S. 
Western A\e.. L. .\. 



I 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


MUSICAt INSTRUCT ION 

EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Piano, Violin, Collo, 
Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 
Drums, Sightsinging. 
1 PL 2-1179 

FURNISHED ROOMS TO RENT 


FOR R^NT with option to buy. 
3 room house, cut. $69 mo. 
2 br. house. Ig. gjrr.. clean. 
$85 mo. Southeast. HU 2-5861 

ACREAGE FOR SALE 

I KERN CO. LAND 

10 acres, 5 miles west of Rosa- 
mond. Good soil, shallow water, 
good neighbors. Only $5000, 
$1000 drr, $60 per month. 

j THOWAS REALTY CO. 

I 1223 West Avonue I 

Lancaster, California 

i WHitohall 2-1426 


LARGE 4 BEDROOM — $500 
dn! Mu.st sell. $9950 F. P. 
Realtor. .NE. 5-7111. 


VETS i 
HO DOWN ! 


.MOVE IN today: — Vacant 5 
(2 bdrm I. stucco. Only -1 yrs 
old. hrdwd. floors, double 
garage. ONLY S695 dn. Cos- 
mopolitan Realty. 446 W. 
120th St.. Los Angeles 61. 
PL. 7-4153 

3 BEDROOM STUCCO — $8,50 
down. $12,500. Modern. Near 
Centurj-.^valon. .\X. 3-6267. 



SI 00 DOWN — 3 bedroom home i 
in Fontana. Nr Kaiser Steel. 
Agent. .\T. 6-58?? 


INSTRUCTIONS-SCHOOLS 


MAKE BIG PAY AS AN 
AUTO SPECIALIST 

AUTO MECHANICS INSTITUTE 

THE ONLY SCHOOL OF ITS KIND IN THE WORLD - 

CAN TRAIN YOU IN ONLY THREE WEEKS - 

(PROVIDING YOU HAVE MECHANICAL ABILITY) 

Classes Every Day & Monday, Wednesday & Friday Nights in I 

BRAKES TUNE-UP ENGINES 

RADIATORS AUTOMATfC AUT OPARKS 

ALIGNMENT TRANSMISSIONS POWER STEERING 

Futu's Now . . Com« in Today . . Viiitorj Ar« Alway* W«l««fw« | 


Invesf in Your 

CnCC COUNSELING 
-U\LL (FORMATION 

by callifVfl 

PL. 3-5111 

Auto Mechanics 

Institute 

4931 S. VERMONT 


I 1 

I AUTO MECHANICS INSTITUTE 

4931 S. Varment Av«., L*< AngaUs, Col. ' 

I Please send tie more inforrnation on yOui I 
training classes in 

Lam. 1 

' Address _ '. I 

I City 



MEN - WOMEN 
•^ 18-45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now tor Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 

' HEAVY 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BROCHURE NOW! 
ADJUSTERS, INC. 

i 601 S. RAMPART. L.A. 57 

DU 8-7163 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

Ihe People's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


HAVE PROPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

LIcmnsed and Bonded Real Estate' Broker 


i 


ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential 

POMONA 

No down payment for vets. From $13,770, 
Full Price. From $76.08 per month, includes 
principal and interest, wall-to-wSU 'carpeting, 
rear yard redwood fenced, forced air heat, 
built-in range and oven, hood and disposal, 
2-car garage. 3-bedroom, 2-barh homes. Phone 
collect. Randy Anable. 

EDgewood 8-0088 


• •**•••***••**•***•**•***** 


1^^ 


FURNISHED ROOM 
FOR RENT 

Two rlran plea>iant rooms u>.c 
of upstairs klt'-hrn.s. Rpfincd 
cmplovcl men Rt»as Call f\er 

RE. 5-8783 


...mid plan for your future! 

Let one of Broadway Federal's courteous savings 
specialists show you how to open your savings 
account. He'll acquaint you with our new high rate 
of earnings— now 4 '2 % per annum paid four times a 
year; with all accounts insured in perfect safety. 
He'll plan with you for a consistent savings 
program. He'll start your dollars working for you 
to help you reach your goals. Come in and join 
the Broadway Federal family of successful savers. 
Or open an account by mail. Either way, we're 
happy to serve you. 


$1 Day and up 

1007 East 50fh St. 
Spacious Eastside private 
rooms, with private entrances, 
cooking facilities. Between 2 
major buslines. West of Cen- 
tral. Near schools, churches, 
shopping. 

WE. 5-0485 


FURN. APT. FOR RENT 


OWN HOME 
BY RENTING 

Mod«rniftic 2 badroom hemai in 
Compton. Own by ranting and 
IMV. Excallant opportunity for 
ratponsibia party who wants hit 
own homa. Convaniantly locatad 
on Watt Crastay Straat, off Wil- 
mington, jutt north of Rotacrans. 
Call for information. 

MUrray 1-0116 

FOR RENT 


2 — ONE Bedroom apts. 

West- 

.side. 

Call RE. 

3-9826 

after 5 

p.m. 





Attractively furnished ipartmant 
■ for rent in the Leimert Park arts. 
Reasonable. 2908 W. Vernon Av«. 
Call after 5 p.m.. Mr«. Lawk. 

RE. 5-0614 or AX. 2-S83S 


CURRENT 
ANNUAL RATE 
PAID QUARTERLY 



BROAD>A^AY 

PKDBRAL SAVINGS 

and Loan Association 

45th and Broadway • ADanns 2-4271 


WESTSIDE APARTMENTr 


$85 Month 

2 large bedrooms, 
5 rooms unfurnished. 
1 teenager welcome. 

Near everything. 
Beautiful stucco unit. 

At 2020 Harcourt. 

Call WEbster 4-0975 
or WEbster 1-8046 




VICTOR 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY 


CLOTHING 
COMPANY 
MA. 4-0801 



MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


BIG SALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 
$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit l< good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in tho house during our big sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREEH! 
Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3.00 
a week pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for njen and 
boys of all ages. 

NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT * 

*Wear and enjoy your clothes while paying* 
Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREE! 
But act now IMIIIII P«y later !!'"" 

SHIRTS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MORE!!!!!!!! 
TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $7.95 ** $9.95 up to $24.95, WORTH MUCH MORE! 

ALL $30.00 men's suits and top coats $15.00 

ALL $40.00 ." J25.00 

ALL $50.00 " ' " • •• PS.OO 

ALL $60.00 " f*5.00 

ALL $70.00 '.... PS.OO 

ALL $80 00 " " " " ' $65.00 

I ALL $90.00 ••••• $75.00 

r HURRY SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEAR!!!!!!!! 

Park FREE next door as you buy your now clothes. We cator to you, and we do mean YOU!!! 

Luggage * Watches * Radios * Play Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 

OPEN DAILY 9:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.M. 

VICTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY • IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 

•.••••••*•*•*•*•********* ^** 






3f 


•Hi 


-J: 


12-The California Eagle Thursday, January 5, 1961 


'S BAKERIES 


' l;AILY UMJiO SPECIAL 


THUR., FRI., SAT., SUN., JAN. 5-6-7-8 



CLUB 

CUB 

SIRLOm 
TIP 


BONELESS 


iNew York $«79:T-BONE $«05 

lb i STEAKS I 


STEAKS 


PORTERHOUSES 


FILLET 
STEAKS 


$179 Breakfast $109 


1 


STEAKS 


I 


GROUND 

BEEF 


GROUND 

CHUCK 


43; 59! 

GROUND 

ROUND 



FARMER JOHN PURE PORK 

LINK O^C 

SAUSAGE '"^W a 

WILSON'S CERTIFIED 

SLICED 

BACON 



MRS. FRIDAYS FROZEN ' CARNATION FROZEN ' KG' O >■ 'ST FROZEN 

BREADED s oz MtkC PERCH or COD ^^C ' BEEF 
SHRIMP pkg: •!¥., FILLETS MB rkg\JV„ STEAKS 


Si-'CLD FROZEN 


10^.':?,*l"*'iK2LTur 49* 


LEE'S SMOKED 5-7 LBS. 


1 - EASTERN PORK SMALL SIZE UNDER 3 LBS. 


"EXTRA 

SMOKED 

FLAVOR" 


PICNICS ^SPARERIBS 

C W^k ^^M ^Hl C 



lb. 


HILLBROOtf IMPORTED 


SCOTCH WHISK V m' 


$429 

VODKA 



MINUTE MAID FROZEN 

ORANGE JUICE 


QUAIL BRAND; 


PEAS, >'"■ CORN, 

CUT GREEN BEANS or TOMATOES 



303 T-II^ 

YOUR 

CHOICE 


6 

S & F BRAND 


PEANUT BUTTER 


•QUAIL BRAND' 


APPLE SAUCE 



16 OZ 


GRAMZEE 


80 PROOF ^ ^l^^tf^O 
4 5QT. S^^P^O 


BTL. 



MT. LAS3LN EXTRA LARGE 

PRUNES 

$100 


SOLID HEAD^ GREEN 

CABBAGE 

'lb. 


3. $100 ^ 

CELLO BAGS ■ - . ^K^B 

GRAPEFRUI 


ARIZONA 
TABLE-SIZE 





FOR 


EACH 


< I 


VSr ffcSlHVt )HI HK.tli III IIMI! ill .\' 



JANE ANDERSON FROZEN 1% LB. PKG. OF 3 

BEEF TAMALES 

JANE ANDERSON 8 OZ. PKG. (MAKES 1 PINT) Y 

CHILI CON CARNE 

GRAND TASTE-6 OZ. PKG J ~itf% d* 

LARGE SLICED BOLOGNA 25 


CERAMIC 


ASH 
TRAYS 


^IS^Ui'it'^ 


\ 


SALES PRICES EFFECTIVE AT ALL THRIFTIMART MARKHS CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN EVERY NEIGHBORHOOD 


2600 SOUTH VERMONT AVENUE, LOS ANGELES — 3621 SOUTH LA BREA, LOS ANGELES — 609 NORTH DILLON, LOS ANGELES — 6840 LA TliERA> WESTCHESTER — 7980 WEST SUNSET, HOLLYWOOD ^ 6601 LAUREL 

CANYON BLVD., NORTH HOLLYWOOD — 8440 LINCOLN BLVD./ SANTA MONICA 7985 SANTA MONICA BLVD., HOLLYWOOD 3217 WIST MAGNOLIA, BURBANK 11210 SANTA MONICA BLVD., SANTA MONICA 


>4 


-I •• -=^, ■» 


^ \ 


■■■■^'i. 


/ i 


KKK THREATENS TO BiPJOME 

' . JAN 18 1961- <.»?5'T51" 'O"' 


Santa Fe RR Grilled oli- 





ia» 


Jiarge 


— Accuses Railroad — 




2101 w. Vernon Av«nu«, u A. Coiitinuous Publicotion foF 80 Yeors 


AX. 5-3135 


Vol. LXXX-No. 43 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


10 


AX. 5-3135 

Out-of-Town 15c 


Race Bars Tumble Down 
At Georgia University 

Courts Tell Governor fo 
Keep College Doors Open 



133.4 MilUon Phoaes 

Don't get me wrong. I'rn not i 
opposed to telephones. Really. 
I'm not. They're mighty handy] 
things to have. Like when you i 
want to know what Jackie | 
Robinson hit the year he. 
joined the: 
Dodgers,] 
why you can 
phone The 
Times sports •, 
desk and get 
i the figures 
.^^) without mov- 
* i n g away 
f from the TV 
^ Or you can 
■^ *»^ « call UL 8900 
""" "'"•' and get the 
mechanical answer that it is 
now 9:42 and 30 seconds. But 
there's a limit to all good 
things, including telephones. 
That awful truth came home 
to me when I read in the 
paf>ers last week that there 
are 133.4 million phones in the 
world, f^igure that five per- 
,sons have access to each 
phone and you're hit with the 
sickening fact that 667 million 
people may call you the next 
minute. You can take what- 
e\er comfort there is in know- 
ing that one million of the 
phones are out of order, that 
another one million homeown- 
ers haven't paid their bilL'; 
and can't call out and that 1.4 
million others are on vaca- 
tions and away from their 
phones. But that still leaves 
650 million people poised at 
their instruments with the 
power in their hands to ring 
you at any moment of the day 
or night 

Gigantic Conspiracy 
Millions of these people are 
already banded together in a 
conspiracy which makes the 
Communist Conspiracy look 
like the handiwork of ama- 
teurs. They have a list of 
eyery good TV and radio pro- 
gram in the whole world and 
the devilish part of it is that 
they know the minute and the 
hour you settle back to look at 
or listen to those programs. 
(Continued on Page 4) 


TELLS OF ABUSE— Lennie Andreas, left lop. is shoun 
u-ith his wife, Mrs. Ella Andrews, and Charles E. IP'tlson. 
chief counsel for the FEP, at first public henrina under 
California's FEP lav:. Lower picture shoxis Andrews testi- 
fying to abusive language of Santa Fe official. ( .4 dams) 

Worked 14 Years 
On Broom Brigade 

Lennie L. Andrews, of 1533 We.stern avenue^ San 
Bernardino, who worked for the Santa Fe Railroad 
as a car cleaner for nearly 14 years before he was 
fired last March, was his own best witness when he 
took'the stand Monday at the first public hearing 

5 conducted since the 6sl-ib]ish- 
ment of the Califoi%(ia -Fair 
L^mployment Practices Com- 
mission. 

Andrews claims he was 
j fired after he filed a com- 
; plaint charging discrimina- 
tion with the F1:P. That com- 
plaint was filed last Feb. 15. 
He was fired on March 30. 

Testimony Buttressed 

Over objections from the 
counsel for the Santa F"e. 
Andrews told of his lengthy 
service during eight years of 
which he was lead man. of 
his education which included 
a five-year automobile- 
mechanics course, his service 
with the Navy in this country 
and overseas, his repeated ef- 
forts to obtain promotion to 
mechanic and of the insulting 
language to which he was 
subjected by an official of the 
company. 

His testimony was buttress- 
ed by that of fellow em- 
ployees, union officials, and 
FEP investigator Murrraiy 
Brasky, who investigated An- 
(Continued on Page 4) 


ATLANTA — The walls of law, custom and 
prejudice that have excluded Negroes from the Uni- 
versity of Georgia for 175 years came tumbling 
down this week as two Negro students were enroll- 
ed after three topsy-turvy days of legal backing 

'and filling by the governor, 

the legislature and the courts. 
The two are 18-year-old Char- 
layne Hunter and 19-yearold 
Hamilton Holmes. 

When the dust settled the 
federal courts had had the 
last say. In quick succession. 
Federal District Judge Wm. ^. 
Bootle ordered the two stu- 
dents admitted, first denied 
and then granted a motion 
for a stay to permit an appeal 
from his order and Tuesday 
issued an injunction forbid- 
ding tlje state auditor from 
withholding funds for the uni- 
versity's operation. 

Stay Issued 

Judge Booties stay order 
issued Monday was in effect 
only a few hours before it 
was overturned by the federal 


'Indian Prince/ 
Woman Jailed 
For Burglary 

A man who claims he is an 
Indian Prince and a while 
woman were arrested ort sus- 
picion of burglary last Thurs- 
day after they were .<eon hud- 
dling together, allegedly dis- 
cussing some "hot" merchan- 
dise, at the Intermis-sdon Club. 
4370 \V. Adams blvd. 

The woman. Helen Roberta 
Reece, 26, also known as Bob- 
by I>umas, '>allege<lly aU.tK*A\G«uTt at Appeals for the Fifth 
the arresting officers who i Circuit. During the few hours 

it was in effect the university 



were taking them to jail 52000 
in cash if they would let her 
out of the squad car at the 
next red light. 

Found SIOOO 


halted admission proceedings 
for the students but as quick- 
ly resumed them when the 
Court of Appeals acted. Atty. 


Arrested along with, Miss, Gen. Eugene Cook caught an 
Reece was Rudolph La' Marr, | airplane and went to Wash - 
50, who sometimes u^ theiington Monday night to ask 
name of Ali Ra.s<hid. a'nd who! Supreme Court Justice Hugo 
lives at 3431 S. LaBrea avenue, i Black to overrule the Court 
La Marr .said ho works at theiof Appeals but the justice 


Elderly 

Woman 

Warned 

A Ku Klux Klan threat 
to "get out — or else" was 
telephoned Monday night 
to an elderly woman in 
Pasadena. 

Recipient of the threat, ac- 
cording to Pasadena police, 
was Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Washington, who is close to 80 
years old, and who lives with 
her son George Washington 
and his wife Madeline at 829 
N. Summit street. 

Race Epithets 

About 10 p.m. the phone 
rang. A man's voice at the 
other end of the line said he 
was from the Ku Klux Klan 
and in language 1 ib e r a 11 y 
sprinkled with ugly race 
epithets wanted to know if she 
was white, or what. 

He warned her, the Eagle 
w:as informed, to move oiit of 
her home — or it would be 
btirned down. 

Police said the caller also 
threatened to bum a cross on 
the Washington lawn. 
Crack Pot? 

Police inclined to dismiss 
the call as a "crack-pot" 
threat, but nonetheless they 

(Continued on Page 4) 


iriNS JUDGMENT ON CAR CONTRACT— Alfred 
Gray, Union Station redcap, right, won a $140ff juUgment, 
after charging concealment of finance charges in ctir eon- 
•Uwet. He it thogm with his attorney, David J. Lee, (Story 
Page- 3.) (Adams) 



T.alu.Ti Service Station -at 27th 

and Western. 
I Officers observed the two in 

close conversation at the In- 
termission Club. La .Marr had 

been namod as a su5i>ect in a 

previous crime involving the 
; theft of a motor car. 
! At La Marr's home, police 

found more than Slf>X) in cash, 
'a number of mens suits with- 
out labcLs. two casimiere 

sweaters \\\\h lur collars and 

extra collars, .ill of which 

were believed to have been 

stolen, together with" -a supply 
[of white, \ellow and red pills, 
j resembling benzedrine tablets, 
I Seconal and nembutal. 
A Real Prince 
j They also found a hypoder- 1 Firemen wearing gas masks 
;mic syringe. j rescued electrician Ray John- 

I La Marr claimed he had aison, 38, of 2352 Virginia ave- 

legal riglit to u.->e. both the nue, from the basement of an 
I name of La .Marr and that of office building at 607 S. Hill 
I .-Ml Raschid, asserting that he street Tuesday. 


turned the plea over to the 
full court which issued an 
order Tue.sday morning deny- 
ing the request without com- 
ment. 

Meanwhile Gov. Ernest Van- 
diver was riding off in all 
directions at once. Elected oii 
a solemn promise to "save" 
the state from integration, he 
got down on his gubernatorial 
hands and knees ^lor)day to 
(Continuecl ort Page 4) 


Electrical Fire 
Critically Burns 
Ray Johnson 


DUE HERE— Rev. Martm 
Luther Krng, Jr., icill nr- 
ri'ce here Saturday to nport 
on sit-ins and help II est 
(^oast ministers form Chris- 
tian Leadership Conference. 


British Labor 
Aids Belgians 

LONDON — Britain's great 
Trade Union Congress Tues- 
day arranged to send 50,000 
pounds ($140,000) as a loan to 
the striking General Confeder- 
ation of Labor in Belgium. 

The money is to aid the 
iamilies ot striKers. 



was in reality a prince from 
India. He said he had earned 
the $1010 police found "in his 
apartment. , 

When police searched Miss 
Reeoc's apartment, afjer ob- 
taining her permis.sion, they 
found an assortment of appli- 
ances, including a TV set, a 
beige telephone and seyeral 
suits with the labels removed. 
One of the suits bore a clean- 
ing tag in the name of 
"Swank," a known dealer in 
"hot" merchandise. 


Traffic was hailed for more 
than an hour as firemen 
from nine companies battled 
the blaze and billowing smoke 
to rescue Johnson, who suffer- 
ed third-degtee burns over 
most of his body. 

He was taken to Central Re- 
ceiving Hospital. Treated there 
also was fireman Albert Du- 
bin, "who was overcome by 
smoke. 

The fire apparently was 
caused when Johnson's drill 


'Let Them Conief 
Cubans Tell Visitor 

By Grace E. Simons 

*'I wanted to see for myself if there's any place 
under the sun where there isri't discrimination. I 
looked everywhere. I tried to find it. Bui there 
wasn't any." 

637 W. 119th street, was 
discussing her trip to Cuba 


Mrs. Odessa Cox, of 



LIKES FIDEL — Mrs. 
Odessa (Jox searched for dis- 
crimination, but found none, 
during trip to Cuba. 


over the Ghristmas-Nejv Year's 
holiday with some 400 other 
tourists who travelled under 
the auspices of the Fair Play 
for Cuba Committee. 
Wonderment 

Mrs. Cox who, with her hus- 
band Raymoi^d Cox operates 
the Utopia Cleaners at 1820 
E. 97th street, returned to Los 
Angeles Icist Thursday. 

Wonderment at what she 
had ^seen in Fidel Castro's 
Cuba shone from her eyes, 
spilled over in her speech. She 
seemed Impelled to tell more 
and more aiid more ... 

"Negroes were in all walks 
of life," she said. "The head 
of the Army is a Negro. There 
are Negro captains and Negro 
officers of all kinds, all the 
(Continued on Page 2) 


tpuched a high voltage con- 
En route to the .Main Jail inlduit and sent sparks into ma- 
(Continued on Page 3), |terials stored in the basement. 


NEfV POST— Rev. L. Syl- 
vester Odom, pastor of Ward 
AMB Church, was advised 
by Aity. Gen. Stftnley Mask 
Tuesday that he had been 
appointed to the Stale Ad- 
visory Committee, Co-nstitu- 
tional Rights Section of the 
Department of Justice, for 
a one year term. 


Pennsylvania Court Won't 
Hear Baptist Inc. Wrangle 


Dies from Knifing 
At Friend's Door 

"Alice, let me in! I think I'm cutl". Timer Calen, 
54, a laborer who lived at l533yo E. 23rd street, 
called out to Alice Binion, 48, of 1138 E. Adams blvd. 
last Thursday evening. 

Miss Binion, who had been arguing and fight- 
ing with Calen a few minutes '^ 


By Borbccra Mounts 

The Pennsylvania Supreme 
Court ruled this week that it 
does not have jurisdiction 
over the disputed issue of who 
is president of the National 
Baptist Convention, Inc. 

The Pennsylvania Court de- 
cided that since the organiza 
tion' was incorporated in the 
District of Columbia, the case 
can be heard only by the 
courts there. 

The case arose as a result 
of the dispute that erupted 
violently at the Philatlelphia 
Convention of the organiza- 
tion last September. 

Two ministers claim the 
presidency — the Rev. J. H. 


Jackson, pastor of Olivet Bap- 
tist Church of Chicago, who 
has been president for seven 
years, and Dr. Gardner C. Tay- 
lor, pastor of Concord Baptist 
Church of Christ, Brooklyn. 

Prior to the decision. Dr. 
Taylor made public a letter 
he had sent to Dr. Jackson on 
Dec. 12. inviting him to a con- 
ference in which the two 
night settle the dispute 
amicably. He says he has re- 
received no reply to his pro- 
{K>sals. 

Rev. P. J. Ellis, of Morning 
Star Baptist Church here in 
Los Angeles who is president 
of the local Baptist Ministers 
Union, said Tuesday that he 


doubted seriously that Dr. 
Jackson would meet with Dr. 
Taylor since Rev. Jackson con- 
siders himself the duly elect 
ed head of the group and sees 
no reason for such a meeting. 

Following the decision of 
the Penn.sylvania Supreme 
Court, Atty. I. W. Crippins, 
counsel for the defendants, 
said that absolutely no evi- 
dence has been presented in 
the case to date. 

Dr. Taylor said: "We will 
decide in a few days as to 
how we will proceed in up- 
holding Baptist principles of 
free choice upon which we 
stand. I thing we should seek 
(Continued on Page 5) 


before, refused to open the 
door. Instead she went to the 
phone and called Galen's son. 
Clezell Calen, of the 23rd 
street address. 

At Foot of Stain 

Then she opened the door 
and saw Calen lying at the 
foot of the stairs, bleeding. 
She called an ambulaiice. 

When police arrived they 
found the walkway heavily 
splotched with blood. They 


Featured 
In the Eagle 

Editorlcdx 4 

Church Activities 5 

Sports 8 

Tho Te« 8 

BUI SmaUwood - 9 

Dorothea Foster 10 

People 6 

Cbazz Crawford 6 

Show Business 7 


examined Calen, but could 
find no pulse. His /heart had 
stopped beating. He had been 
stabbed in the abdomen. 

The officers were met by 
Calen's son, who told them 
that both the suspect and the 
death weapon were in the 
house. 

Miss Binion told police that 
Calen, her boy friend, had 
wanted her to go \yith him to 
24th and Long Beach to have 
a drink, but that she had re- 
fused arid they had begun to 
quarrel. 

Cut Him a LitUe 

She. said she "cut him a 
little bit and "closed the door 
on him and wouldn't let him 
in." 

She said she couldn't re- 
member where she got the 
knife from, or where she had 
put it. 

She claimed that Caleri had 

l)eaten her on previous 

occasions and that when they 

(Continued on Page 3) 


Gov't Won't 
Give Aid to 
Tent Colony 

NEW YORK — The federal 
government will not use any 
of its surplus food to help 
feed Tennessee sharecroppers 
facing the rigors ©f win t er in 
a tent village near Swnerville. 

The Federal Agriculture De 
partment ruled that there is 
no "urgent need" among the 
families at Freedom Village 
who were evicted from their 
■farms after they were bold 
enough to register and vote in 
the Nov. 8 elections. 

(The government has, how- 
ever, appropriated $1,00,000 to 
aid Cubans in Miami.) 

The finding of the federal 
agency was in sharp contra- 
diction to statements of* 
NAACP workers on duty in 
Tennessee. They report that 
the need for food, clothing 
and shelter is "acute." 

It is so acute, in faict, that 
the NAACP this week issued 
its second nationwide apeal , 
to all its branches in 45 states 
asking for conti*)Utions to aid 
the displaced sharecroppers in 
Fayette and Haywood Coun- 
ties. 

The new appeal asked all 
NAACP units to send at least 
$50 from their treasuries to 
Jesse Turner, N.'^ACP Mem- 
phis Branch presidenf," 236 S. 
Wellington street, Memphis, 
Tenn. 

The first appeal last sum- 
mer brought more than $8000 
which has been used to send 
in packages of food, clothing 
and later tents to the families 
who have no homes, no jobs 
and no way of earning a liv- 
ing. 

They and their children are 
huddled in tents, lighted by 
kerosene lamps, heated by 
stoves. Their house furnish- 
ings are stacked behind the 
tents 



APPOINTED — Mayme 
G. Lewis has just been ap- 
pointed director to the board 
of the Los Angeles Young 
Republicans. She will cover 
48 county clubs with ii mem- 
bership ofJ^OO. — (Story on 
Page 3). 


1 


2— The California Eagle 
Thursday, January 12, 1961 

Stovall Home 
Benefit Party 
Fills Theater 

A near capacity crowd filled 
the Hollyivt>od Pantages The- 
ater Sunday night to attend { 
lie Spartacus "Theater Party." 
The show which was a fund- 
raising event for the Stovall 
i-'oundation w-as an outstand- 
iii.Lj success. 

Bonefits ' for the special 
showing of lliis spectacular 
motion picture will be turned 
over to the non-profit Senior 
Citizen's Home. 

Tlie benefit committee was 
headed by Chairman LeRoy R. 
Weekes. M.D., vice-president 
of the foundation; Gerald L. 
Stovall. M. D. president, and 
John A. Jackson, e.xecutive di- 
rector of the Stovall Home for 
iho -A.ged. 

Woody Slrodes significant 
rule tlirilled the audience with 
his superb perfoirnance of 
■•Draba" which will long be 
remembered by the hugej 
ciawd that attended. i 



[X THEBJU.IMJS — -I/m. 

Bronx, X. Y.. regional ilir,it'ir 

of Scgro Jt'ornc.-i. (ind hrr hiishanil non first priz,- 

recent XCS'lf Intcrniitional Diliutnnte Bull. The 


Sathaniil MnnU. of the 

oi the SatioTuil Council 

at the 

prize 


ii'as a 


iveek's tri/t to 
on the isle. 


Xiissnit. Ihihi.nms. I'he MeaJes are 


Deerfield Park Loses 
Fight to Bar Negroes 


CLASS IN WRITING 

A practical course in maga- 


CHICAGO — A federal district court decision upliolding 
the right of Deerfield P-ark. Trf Cliicago suburb, to condemn 
lan^d and halt the building of an integrated housing develop- 
ment was upset by. the United States Court of Appeals for 

the eighth circuit last week. • 

The circuit court ordered a against the Village Board to 
trial on the S750,(XX) damage pre\ent unlawful Iiara.<.sment 
j claim of Mofiern Community of Progress" construction pro- 
Developers and its Illinois .-ub-'gram. and also asked $7.'S0,IX)0 
jsidiary, Progress Development dama;^es. 
I Corp.. with instructions that if, 


U.N. Council | 
Will Meet on 
Congo Crisis 

The steadily disintegrating 
conditions in the Congo wcie 
due for another hearing in 
the United Nations, probably 
to start today. Thursday, as 
supporters pf Imprisoned Pre- 
tnier Patrice Lumumba con- 
tinued to extend their control 
over new areas. 

The U. N Security Council 
meeting was called for by the 
Soviet Union, charging "fi'esh 
acts of; Belgian aggression." 
The specific' acts referred to 
dealt with Belgium's use of 
her protectorate. Ruanda- 
Urundi, as a base for Belgian- 
backed Col. Mobutu's forces in, 

their ill-starred New Year's! NEW YORK — Defending stitdeiits arrested in 

Day attack on Ki\-u Province, ronnection with sil-in protest" demonstrations and 

Hatchet Man Captured Ispeedin;; up legal activities foi; school desegregation 

In that attack, it has now 'in several states are the major ol)jectives of the 
been revealed. Mobutu lost a^NA^VCP Legal Defense and Education Fund for 1961. 


Somebody's Face Is Red 

:; Thunderous threats of massive interyention in Laos 
to battle seven batallions of Communist North "Viet-Nam 
troops that had crossed the border subsided last week to 
Ifrii than a whisper. 

It was suddenly found that no North Viet- Nam troops 
hod in fact invaded Laos, nor were they expected to. 

Lame excuses from Vientiane, capitol of Laos, said' 
there may have been some shou'sng at the border as if an 
attack was imminent, ond that the Lootian border posts 
apparently panicked and reported- the invasion as a fact. 

Then, possibly to cover up embarrassment 'o'^r mili- 
tary reverses, officials announced the invasion under way. 

A plaintive report in the Chicogo Daily News from 
Vientiane- said that "nobody here knows for sure what is 
going on— at ieast not until two or three days after it has 
happened," and added that no correspondent has been 
allowed to visit any battle zone. 


Visitor Can't Find 
Race Bias in Cuba 

(Continued from Page 1) | before invited us to their 
way down — and up. There are {homes, brought us flowers, 
blacks training whites and] "Everywhere we found 
whites training blacks. j warmth, enthusiasm for Fidel. 

^ No-one calls him Castro. They 
No Negro Streets j jovg him. they lo^e him like 

"I even watched as I walked ; a brother 
along the street as the 'people I 


NAACP Defends 
1700 Sitdowners 


jCustomer Sliot 
At Gas Station 


proof sustains, the pleading, 
/ino writing, editing, and pub- j the court can enjoin state con- 
iishing will be offered next demnation of the two sites. , 
semester at East Las Angeles | Progress Development Corp. 
College. j bought 22 acres in Deerfield 

"I in 1959 after a long search by 
I local builders. Chicagoland cit-! 
izens backed the formation of 
the subsidiary following meet- 
ings arranged by the .iVmeri- j 
can Friends Service Commit- 
tee, at whicli the stor>' uas 
tcld of successful integration 



Builder Told 
He Must Sell 
Home to Negro! 


iiltendant 


H.\RTFORD. Conn. — Tlie 

. o ,, , ^ ^ u , '^'^'^ '^'^-'^ ordered a Hamdeni 

in Concord Park and Greenbeli ,real estate de%eloper to sell a 


good portion of his men killed 
wounded or captured. ' 

Among those taken prisoner 
was his security chief, Maj. 
Gilbert Pongo, the man who 
brought Lumumba back to 
Leopoldville as a prisoner. 

Pongo. -Mobutu's , cliief 
Iiatcliet man. taken to .Stanley-, 
ville in Lumumba's territory.! '"^ ti'hng siatTQ' 
cabled Pres. Joseph Kasavubu'^^'*^ accused of shootiftg a cus 
appealing for Lumumba's re-"omer early Friday mormn;: 
lease "in the interest of na-^f'^'' ^'^^^ nistomer threatened 
tional unity."' , him ^^»th a knife. 

He also denounc-ed Ills James Newton Robinson. 3."3. 
former chief, Mobutu, for plot- 'of 2f*) F. HTth street, sold 
ting with the "colonialists."' I Rol)ert Butler. 2(1, of St! I W. 

Tshombe's Troubles i ^^^ ^""«*'' '^^'^ l"^'"''^ "^ "''" 

Lumumba forces meanwhile! •■^^"''' Kobmson closed the c;ir 

have 'captured control of the *'''"'' ''** ^''''' "* ' '^ '">' ""' 

northern .section of mineral-! '^'''^p'' "^ ^^^ '"'^^ '" '"""'"''^ '*"' 

I — .,A,. fr„m the man on the 


the fund'si 


hou.<e to a Xegro who was re- 
buffeii in i)revious attempt.', 
to bu\. 

Tlie directi\e came from a. 
three-man tribunal tliatl 
judge<i the case on behalf of' 
the State Civil Riglit.s Com- 
mission. The complaint came 
Jones, a New 


MANN'S 

UNION OIL 

SERVICE 



• TIRES 

• TUBES 

• BAHERIES 

• ACCESSORIES 

• SERVICE CALLS 
•TIRE REPAIRING 

• EXPERT LUBE 

• FREE PICKUP 

ond Delivery 

4000 SOUTH 
WESTERN AVE. 

AX. 1-9566 



- INTRODUCING - 

TUGGIE'S 

AUTO REPAIR 

SPECIALIZING IN 
' BRAKES 
* REPAIRS 
* TUNE-UPS 
400O SO. 
WESTERN AVE. 
AX. 1-9566 


, for 

more 

^grow power 

insist 

on^ 


Knoll in the Philadelphia area 
and the Princeton. N.J.. com- 
munity. 

. Arrangements were- made 

I for bonds to be placed for land 

'improvement. Thus 31 lots on 
nvo sites were recorded. Sev.- 
er and water were put in for 

,39 of the lots, and two models from DeWitt 
were under roof in November pj^ven NeTO 
1959. when news of Progress" Jones" said ' he w.is turned 
sales policy became public. ^own be<\TUse of his race when 
After a number of public he tried to buv a house in the 
and private meetings and pub- Bonham Heights development 
lie furor, the Deerfield Park ;„ Hamden. The ca.<e is the 
District took steps to condemn f^^i ,o ^^^^ i,,p ^959 amend- 
both sites for parks. ment to the state's law against 

On December 22. 1959. viola- discrimination in housing, 
tion of the Fourteenth Amend- 1 The tribuna. ordered the de- 
ment to the U.S. Constitution veloper, Albert Swanson. to 
and the VS. Civ-il Rights Act sell Jones a hou.se within 30 
was charged in a suit filed in;da\-s. Swanson's attornej-s said 
the federal distric-t court in they will seek a Superior Court 
Chicago. It sought an in- j injunction against the order. 

junction against the Park Dis- , 

trict's proceeding 'with con- { .\ man is never a failure 
demnation of the properties until he has failed at some- 
in Deerfield, and an injunction 1 thing he really likes. 


Piovince ami 

a new "iiide- 

there, known 


rich Katanga 
ha\e .>ie' irp 
pendent state' 
as- "Lualaba."' 

Forces loyal 10 Linnumba 
ilso hold Oriental Pruxince 
and most of Kivu Prvinc.--. 

Moise Tshombe 
puppet who heads Katanga 
PnniiiL-e. was iiaving diploma- 
tic difficulties in 
his trouble with 
men. 


Thurgood Marshall 
director -counsel 
this week. 

Approximately ITIX) stu- 
dent.s were arrested and con- 
victed during 19bG sit-in 
demonstrations for whom at- 
torneys for the Legal Defense 
Fund ha\ e filed suits. Marshall 
said some 75 Negro and white 
lawyers throughout the coun- 
try are now engaged in de- 
fending the students. 

Original School Cases 

As the new year begins, 
cases , include renewed legal 
.iction in two of the original 
five cases which resulted in 
the ."^uprc-ne Courts 1954 de- 
■ ■ision dutlauing segregation 
in i)ublic education. 

On s i t - i n demonstrations, 
Marshall said: 

"Most of them (the Negro 

students! ' ha\c been charged 

i and convicted for crimes sucfT 


passed by. Nobody paid an> 
attention to whether a person 
was light or dark. , 

"I tried my best to see^ 
there wasn't some race feel- 
ing. But there was nothing. 
Nothing at all. In the offices, 
there v/ere dark Cubans and 
light Cubans. In the houses — 
they were all together. Negro 
families next door to white 
families. There was no 'Negro 
street,' no 'white street.' 

"I talked to a mother of 
eight — a dark-skinned Cuban 
— and asked her what the 
revolution had done for her. 
She lived in a trashy, bam- 
like house. Under Batista she 
announced; P*^^ S25 a month. Now she 
I pays $5 for the same house. 


thousand 
Th^- will 
/re teaching 
and their 
countryside 
write. This 
is the "Year of 
By J^rt. 1, 1962, 


money from the man on 

pas.-^nger side of the car. 

When he went around to 

rolled, Butler rei)ortedlv| 

started c u r s i n 1; him and | 

accused him of slamming the, .■ , , , . 

, , , , ; . , ;,, , r as disorderlv conduct, trespass 

hood down and lumped out of I. ^^_...._ •...;.,. , : ._j 

Beleiati'if 'he car uiili a knife in his ■,..,• 

" '^ ' ^ ' " " , ijaradin':: without a icense. ' 

land. ' 

He stan.'d toward Robinson "The only crime they have 
addition to *ho told him to halt. Tne at-: «'mm'"efi ^^as to protest in 

an orderly and peaceful 


On the List 

"But she's on the list for a 
new house. 'We'll get a house,' 
she said. 

"Befor^ she did day work. 
She was the only one in the 
family who could get a job. 
Now her husband and her 
two so^s are employed and 
she stays at home. Proudly 
she told of her three children 
who are studying for careers 
— one to be a nurse, another 
a teacher, another a secretary. 

"At the American Constil- 
ate,"' Mrs. Cox continued, 
"they said that 90 per cent of 
the people are against Castro, 
but I don't know where they 
were. We didn't see them. 


Year of Education 

'Fidel called for 4000 volun-. 
teer teachers. Ten 
answered the cal; 
get no pay. They 
the children — 
parents — in the 
how to read and 
year, 1961, 
Education." 

they want everyb<j)dy to know 
how to read. 

"I never saw feuch happy 
people, and they're well dress 
ed even in the cot|intryside. 

' "We stayed at 
Riviera. Before thie revolution 
no dark faced people could 
stay there. They couldn't rent 
a room. "They coulij only work 
as menials. Now everyone i.s 
welcome. ' !. 


♦s ' 


Free to Go Anywhere 

"No," she replied to a ques- 
tion, "we were free to go any- 
and : where, to talk to anyone, peo- 
ple in the street, anybody— 
and We did. 

"People we had never seen 


We'll Die pOrst 

"Homes are_ springing up 
everj'where. We went into one 
home, we passed in pinar d^l 
Mar. It was -the iiohie of a 
Negro couple. There were 
flags on the door, and Fidel'-s 
picture. In every room of the' 
house there was a picture of 
Fidel. Before, they told us, 
they lived in a house made 
of pasteboard boxes with the 
bare groiHid for a floor. They 
pay S20 a month for the two- 
bedroom house. It wijl belong 
to them in 15 years. 

"People are not jittery about 

! an invasion," Mrs.! Cox ,re- 

j ported, '*byt they are on the 

' alert. They. expect it to come, 

; though they don't kiiow when. 

! "She quoted a child in the 

! street, a dentist, many whonn 

: she met aH voicing the same 

^sentiment. , 'Let them pome,' 

jliey told her. 'We'll die before 

wVil — give up What we've 

got'." 

Mrs. Co.x Said she was the . 


Lumumba"s lendant hacked away a.s ,u 1 • 1 f ,v, ' 

Butler kept coming toward """^nner the (tenial ol ineiripeaied ^g ^yl^ highest court , only Negro woman among the 


Sunday, in Llizaljeiiuille. ho him. pulled his gun and fired 
canceled a scheduled visit to Willie Yarbrough. 9.53'- W 
the United States. angril\- tell- ti2nd strtM?t. driver of the car. 


right tp sit at lunch counters," | i-ea^j^eij ^j^g u. 
he pointed out. "To protest | cquj-j; Dec. 31, 


.S. Supreme 
when Legal 


400 who took the trip with the 
Fair Play group. Onlj' five of 


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w.. v........ ^.„.^.. »..i,.... ,,-.,■ „-.M. -,.11-^-, ui.xt-i w. ....r .c.,,^"*.'""'^^ injustices is the foun- 1 Defense Fund attorneys filed, the total number were Ne 

ing new«,men that the United told i>olice'iie accidently blew •'^^''°," °^ our American democ- three petitions in behalf of ISigroes. She was the only per 


Statets felt his presence here 
at the present time would not 
be "opportune."' 

Tshombe aJ.so denounced the 
U. S. consul in Eliza bet hvi lie.! 
William Canup. who lie said! 
denied him a visa. 


The earth's population of 
approximately three billion 
averages out at about 100 hu- 
mans per square mile of fer- 
tile soil. 


the horn as he drove into the: 
filling station. The attendant,] 
he assumed, resented this and! 
.so lie slammed down the hood 
after he put in the oil. 

Police found a .22 caliber 
revolver and a small pen i 
knife at the scene. They also^ 
found a car\ ing knife with a 1 
seven inch blade in the purse I 
of Margaret Ann Gray of' 
449'2 W. 74th street, a pas-| 
senger In Butlers car. 


The first sit-in case to he ap- 


Negro students arrested last son who went frcan Los An« 
spring in Baton Rouge. La. ; geles. 



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Sharpening Focus 
On Rights Keynote 
Of NAACP Meet 

NEW YORK — "The year 1960 must be set down 
as the one in which the civil rights issue moved into 
the sharpest focus since World War I," Roy Wilkins. 
NAACP executive secretary, told the 52nd annual 
meeting of the association's 225 delegates here this 
week. '^ . 


He pointed to "lively and 
exciting years'' ahead if tiie 
appointment of Robert C. 
Weaver, the association's na- 
tional board chairman, to the 


NAACP, sentenced to six 
months in jail and fined $1200; 
Medgar Evers, NAACP field 
secretary in Mississippi, sen- 
tenced to a month's imprison 



post of administVator of the''"^"^ ^"^ ^"^^'^ 5100; and 
Housing and Home Finance I ^^^ disbarment proceedings 
Agency "is an indication of' against Samuel W. Tucker, 
the temper and direction of NAACP counsel in three Vir 


the new administration." 
Mood for Movement 

The ""mood for movement" 
by Negroes toward justice and 
equality, he continued, was re- 
flected by NAACP activities 
during 1960. 

That mood was reflected in 
an increase in membership by 
«5.000 to 386,808, an increase 
fn financial support and a 
series of imdertakings. includ- 
ing the sit-in demonstrations, 
"withholding of trade" cam- 
paigns throughout the South, 
aid to persecuted share- 
croppers in Tennessee and a 
sertes of favorable legal deci- 
sions. 

While there was a spirit of 
optimism -based on the past 
year's achievements, stress 
was placed during the confer- 
ence upon, the mountainous, 
barriers that still confront Ne- 
groes throughout the United 
States. 

Labor Discrimination 

Herbert Hill, labor secre- 
tary, in a review of the five- 
year record of the AFL-CIO. 
asserted that the merged labor 
federation has not taken ac- 
tion "on its own initiative" to 
reduce racial discrimination 
among member unions. 

He declared that AFL-CIO 
affiliated unions are "guilty of 
discriminatory r« c i a 1 prac- 
tices" in four categories: out- 
right exclusion of Negroes, 
segregated locals, separate 
racial seniority lines in col- 
lective bargaining agreements 
and exclusion of Negroes 
from apprenticeship training 


gmia cases. 

Legal Victories 

Legal victories included the 
U. S. Supreme Court decision 
stating that Arkansas school 
teachers do not have to list 
outside organizational ties; 
and the Supreme Court deci- 
sion in the Tuskegee boundary 
case which had threatened to 
bar 400 Negroes from voting. 

Wilkins pointed out that 
the association, through its 
Memphis branch, has supplied 
food, clothing and, recently, 
tents to Tennessee share- 
croppers. 

Commenting on school de- 
segregation he declared that 
four little Negro girls enter- 
ing newly -integrated schools 
in New Orleans, "upset the 
whole white race in the State 
of Louisiana" and observed 
that Louisiana, "through its 
shameful performance may 
have Speeded school desegra- 
tion by awakening the country 
to the menace of extreme seg- 
regationists." 

The NAACP leader vowed 
there will be no let-up in the 
pressures for complying with 
the 1954 Supreme Court deci- 
sion, and asserted that ten- 
sions will disappear "only 
when justice and equality are 
the order of the day." 


JOURNALISM ffIXyERS—Hii:h school uinnrrs in 
the annual Community Chest journnlism contest are. from 
left: Delores Moore and Daiid Cohen, both of h.dison Jr. 
High: and Dorothy Buchanan and Seit/'i llayasi of Jordan. 


Decision Awaited 
On Oil Co. Bios 

ALBANY, N. Y. — The New York Court of Ap- 
peals reserved decision this week on a bid by the 
Arabian Oil Company (Aramco) to set aside two 
lower court rulings that it has no right to question 
job applicants about their religion. 


UN Chief Talks 
Only to White 
South Africans 


JOH.ANNESBURG — Albert 
Luthuli, former head of the 
programs controlled by labor 53^^^^ African National Con- 
unions, igress, said Sunday that U.N. I operations. Chester 


The oil company'.s appeal* 
was oppo.'^cd by the American' 
Jewish Congress, which ac- 
cused Aramco of serving as 
the "tool and agent" of Saudi 
Arabia in .■screening Jews from 
employment both in Saudi 
Arabi and in the United j 
States. ' 


In his summan* remarks. 


NAACP Joins Fight 

Shad Poller of New York, 
chairman of the .AJCongrcSs 
Commission on Law and 
Social Action, asked the court 
to uphold decisions calling on 
the New York State Commis- 
sion Against Discrimination 
(SCAD) to probe charges that 
Armaco's job practices violate 
the State Fair Employment 
Law. 

In a friend-ofthe-court brief 
signed by Thurgood Manshall, 
the NAACP supported the 
American Jewish Congress po- 
sition. 

Armaco's attorney argued 
that the company asks job 
applicants to state their re- 
ligion because it must com- 
ply with a ban on the entry 
of "undesirable persons, in- 
cluding Jews" to Saudi Arabia, 
where Armaco conducts its 
Bordeau, 


Breakfast Club 
Initiates Fund 
To Aid Student 


Afro -Asian Group 
In Neutral Block 

Eight Afro- Asian nations, meeting in Casablanca, 
Morocco, last week, formed a neutralist bloc and 
issued a manifesto calling for the immediate release 
and reinstatement in power of imprisoned Premier 
Patrice Lumumba of the Congo and the disarming 

*of the "illegal bands" of Congo 

'strong man" Col. Joseph 


ecretar\' General Dag Ham 


Jack E. Wood. Jr., special as- |j„a^kjoid's mission will fail 


sfstant for housing, declared 


unless he confers with non- 


housing discrimination re-:.^^.f,j^g j^g^j^j^ 
mains "the most pervasive j Luthuli said he wants to 
area of civil rights denial"^pet ^ith Hammarskjold who 
and stated it would be one oi'^^ f^^ during his visit to South 


the principal targets of the 
NAACP during the coming 
year. 

Asks 'Aggressive Effort' 


Africa has talked only to 
w^hite politicians. 
„ Luthuli spoke from his home 
in Natal Province, where he Is 
Successful accomplishment j confined by the government. 

of school Integration "nol 

longer rests principally with'|.|« • ^^ . 

the courts, but depends large- IMlgeriO V^USTS 


ly upon the aggressive effort 
of the Negro community to 
secure the benefits of what 


counsel for Armaco. also said 
that American political in- 
terests in the Middle East re- 
qi>ire that the company be 
granted an e.\emption from 
the state anti-discrimination 
law. 

Acas as Tool 

Poller countered by charg- 
ing that Armaco uses the re- 
ligious question on its job 
application form as a device 
for barring Jews not only 


By C. Marie Hughes 

The Women's Sunday Morn- 
ing Breakfast Club's monthly 
meeting had its usual over- 
flow crowd Sundav at the 
Clark Hotel. 

Libhy Clark, well known 
public relations consultant, 
was the principal speaker. 
She gave a detailed report 
entitled ".K Portrait of Africa" 
and ga\o interesting high- 
lights of her trip to Africa 
last October when Nigeria 
achieved its independence. 

Many Achievements 

Among the many achieve- 
ments in the past year by the 
Breakfast Club were a cash 
payment of S500 for a life 
membership in the NA.-\CP. a 
i pledge of Sl'X) a year for 
I sickle cell re.search, SlOiX) to 
I the Children's Ho-^pital. SlOfXI 
to the 'Orthopaedic Hospital, 
"adoption" of two 


Mayme Lewis 
Made Director 
Of GOP Youth 


Majine G. Lewis, public 
relations e.xpert and active Re- 
publican leader, has just been 
named director of the board of 
the Los Angeles Young Repub- 
licans for the year 196L 

The announcement was 
made by the president, Phil 
Curran. letst Tuesday evening 
at the Statler Hotel during the 
monthly Executive Committee 
meeting. 

As the director, Mrs. Lewis 
will .s€r\-e as chairman of the 
"First Voters Committee" for 
Ivos Angeles County. The coun- 
ty organization which she will 
cover has 48 clubs with a 
membership of 3600. 

Mrs. Lewis is coordinator o£ 
the Young Republicans Un- 
1 i»m i t e d, an organization 
founded following- organiza- 
tional efforts of the Repub- 
lican Community Advisory 
Committee of which Paul R. 
Williams is chairman. She is 
also director of the Republican 
vTonununity Service Center. 

Mayme "G. " as she is 
known, is a native of Kansas 
City, Mo., where she attended 
sc-hool. She completed her 
training here at L'SC in Office 
.Management and Busines.s 
Control. Listed among several 
major firms with which she 
has been associated are Union 
Oil of Southern California. 
Gulf Oil Company, Union 
Mortgage Company and the 
Consolidated Realty Board of 
Southern California. 


argument, she said, 
started inside the house, con- 
tinued out on the porch and in 
African the yard. She said that Galen 
children from Kenya and the| started hitting her. and she 


Mobutu. 

Members of the group 
threatened to withdraw all 
their forces ir<9m the United 
Nations troops in the Congo 
unless their demands are met. 

Their combined force^, in- 
cluding 2300 Ghana ti-oops, 
3240 Moroccanj and 750 
Guineans, account for approxi- 
mately a third of the total 
U. N. -force. No date was set 
for withdrawal, however. 

The "Casablanca Charter" 
nations also pledged all-out 
support for Algeria inde- 
pendence and approved enlist- 
ment of "African and other 
volunteers" in the Algerian 
indei>endence army. -- 

They further agreed to co- 
oi>erate in political, economic 
and military fields to promote 
or safeguard their own inde- 
fiendence. 

Represented at the four-day 
conference were Ghana, 
Guinea, Mali, the United 
Arab Republic, the Algerian 
Government in Exile. Libya 
and Ceylon, as well as 
Morocco. 

Redcap Wins 
Award in Car 
Contract Case 

Alfred Gray, 2701 Halldalc 
street, a redcap at Union Sta- 
tion, won a $1400 judgment 
lait week against General 
^'oto^s Acceptance Corpora- 
tion and Chieftain Pontiac. 

Gray, through his attorney, 
David J. Lee, of the new law 
firm of Lee, La Vigne and 
Davis, charged concealment of 

I $.500 in finance charges in 

g| J * f\ .1^ I connection wnth the purchase 

DieeaS to UeaTn|of a 1956 Pontlac from Chief- 

(Continued from Page 1) tain. 
started arguing she thought He further asserted that the 
he was going to beat her «"»''. was repossessed after he 
again. 
The 



you no 


STJ RI'ISG—.^ 

Baluba child, one of 300.000 
uho face starvation, is hein</ 
spoon fed by a Belgian nurse 
at a refugee camp in South 
Kasai Province in the Congo. 


Democracy, 
French Style 

Reports from Algeria stated 
that DeGauIIe wasn't taking 
any chances on last week's 
vote. 

Waldo Drake, of the Los 
Angeles Times' European 
Bureau, reported that the 
French army had been di- 
rected to haul some one and 
a half million illiterate tribes- 
men to back country polls and 
"ad\ise" them to vote "yes." 

Just to make it easy, wlien 
they arrived at the polling 
places, the Algerians found 
two piles of small paper 
squares, on open counters. 
White squares were marked 
"yes,'' purple squares "no." 

The voter picked up one of 
the squares, went behind a 
small curtain, put the paper 
in an envelope and then 
dropped it in the ballot box. 


The California Eagle— 3 
Thursday, January 12, 1961 

Driver Held; 
Vet of 2 Wars 
Killed by Car 

Police booked John H 
Allen, 68, of 461 E. 43rd street, 
on suspicion of manslaughter 
when the car he was driving 
struck and killed Eugene E. 
Hall, 71, of -512 E. 46th street, 
about 6 p.m. Sunday. 

Hall, who fought in 
both the Spanish American 
War and World War I. wasP 
crossing the street at 46th and 
Avalon blvd. when he was 
struck down. Hall was born in 
South Carolina*, spent most of .■ 
his early life in New York 
and mo\ed to Los Angeles in 
1921. 

He had been recei\ing med- 
ical care at .Sawtelle Veterans' 
Hospital. 


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giving of Christmas packages 
to 89 children. 

Mrs. Theresa Lindsay, club 
president. emphasized that 
without the consistant coop- 


shoved the knife towards him 
in an effort to keep him away 
from her. She didn't recall 
actually cutting him. 

After he stopi>ed coming to- 


had been paying on it for 17 
months, despite the fact that 
he was ill at the time and of- 
fered to pay all amounts due. 

At the trial. Atty. Lee con- 
tended that the contract was 
illegal and void on its face. 
Judge Arnold Praeger sustain- 
ed his contention. 

Gray was not required to 
take the witness stand. 


wards her, she turned, ran 
into the house and closed the 
door. 


French Envoy 

LAGOS, Nigeria — Nigeria 
the courts have declared as 'ordered the French ambassa- than 800 employees 
law," said NAACP General: dor and his st-.ff last Thurs- 
Counsel Robert L. Carter. day to leave the 
He also stressed cases in! within 48 hours. * 


eration of tlic enthusiastic 

and energetic members, these 

things would be impossible. 

African dignitarie<; and rep- ^ 
from employment in Saudi j re.sentatives from the Coca I began responding. Before the 
Arabi but also from jobs injcgia Bottling Company were meeting closed a start had al- 


■which the association has 
been forced to defend itself 
from southerly investigating 
communittees, legislators and 
unjust courts. 

Carter cited the cases of 
Father Theodore R. Gibson, 
president of the Miami 


The action was taken in pro 
tes. against France's atomic 
test program in the Sahara 
which Nigeria considers a 
"grave insult." 

French planes and ships 
have been banned and transit 
facilities withdrawn. 


its New York City operation,! ^rnong spc-ial guests seated 
where the company h.^s more ^^ jj^p head t.Tble. 

New Project 

"No American court can re- The talented club regulars, 
country, quire Saudi Arabi to admit an intricate part of the Break- 1 — 
Jews," Polier said. "But this fast Club, furnished the musi- $ 
court can and should bar^cal background which was' 
Aramco from acting as the ^ well received and enjoyed by ^ 
tool and agent of a foreign the audience, 
power in violating the laws, a new project materialized 
of the state." 'at Sunday's meeting when ^ 

He said that Charles Joan W.-'tkms. a young in- 
Abrams, a former chairman telligent .\egro student attend- V>- 


ready been made toward pro- 
viding Miss Watkins with the 
money she needs to go to 
Fisk Universitv. 


NEW DRIVING CLASS 

A new class in driver edu- 
cation designed to help adults 
learn how to drive an automo- 
bile safely and also to assist 
students to pass the State ex- 
amination for driver licenses 
will open at Belmont -Metro- 
politan Adult School. 1575 W. 
Second street, on Jan. 31. 



EXPERT MECHANICAL WORK 

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of SCAD, and Mrs. Caroline 
Simon, a former member of 
SCAD, had both proposed that 
Aramco hire employpes with- 
out d'scrimination, subject 
only to receiving a Saudi 
Arabian visa. However, even 
this procedure — which would 
be acceptable to AJCongress— ^ 
has been rejected by Aramco, 
he noted.* 

Arbitrary Exclusion 

Polier further charged that 
Aramco "uses the possibility 
of travel to Saudi Arabia as a 
formula to disguise the fact 
that it is actually honoring 
a commitment to its business 
partner — Saudi Arabia — to 
exclude Jew ' ■ any part 
of its payro' i or do- 

mestic." 

Under this formula, the 
AJCongress leader said. 
"Aramco has arbitrarily desig- 
nated all positions in its em- 
ploy with the exception of a 
limited number of employees 
at the lowest levels as re- 
quiring work in Saudi Arabia. 
It then claims a bona fide 
occupational qualification ex- 
emption for all positions since 
Jews cannot obtain visas to 
Saudi Arabia." 


Haitian Banking Sociaty in Haiti, specializing n investments 
wiith substantial profts, is ncreasing its captal to $2,000,000 ^. 

ing Whittier College, made an Privilege Sto.t at S% interest— Great Secuniy. 

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SAIESRENTALS 


'Indian Prince/ 
Woman Jailed 

(^Continued from Page 1^ 
j company with the co-dofend- 
ant and Miss Mary Brady, who 
had also been arrested. Miss 
Reece allegedly made her of- 
fer of a S2000 bribe to the ar- 
resting officers. 

Miss Reece seemed especial- 
ly put out about being charged 
with the theft of the tele- 
phone. "You would hardly call 
it stealing." she commented. 
"I put a $10 deposit on it." 


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4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 ■<»/^0.»<50»<5gXXSC>»<T)<rv<»^^g%»^^gV»/'a< 




Loren Miller, Publisher 

The California Eagl« stands for compl«t« integration of 
Negroes into every phase of American life througli the democratic 
processes. 

We favor: ^ 

1 . FIPC on local, state and notional levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans^ 

3. Representation in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Development and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

^. C'"^muni«t« and all othmr anemiei or aemocracy. 

ihursdoy for Over 79 Years 
2101 W«ar v«in«n, «.arner of Von Ness AXminster 5*3135 

<Jtte <y^ynportant <y newspaper 


The Governors Message 


Governor Brown's message to 
the legislature urging extension 
of "our laws against discrimina- 
tion in housing" is good as far as 
it goes. But it doesrt't go very 
far. 

Discrimination in housing is so 
deeply rooted in custom, law, and 
public attitude that its removal 
requires specific legislation and 
we won't get that kind of legis- 
lation without strong support 
from the governor's office. 

The only specific recommenda- 
tion made by the governor was 
that the legislators enact laws 
providing that "an established 
pattern of discrimination is a 
proper basis for disciplinary 
action by state licencing bodies." 
Under that principle, a real 
estate broker who refused to sell 
or rent housing for racial reasons 


might be disciplined by the State 
Board. That isn't enough. 

California needs legislation of 
the kind now in effect in Colo- 
rado, Oregon and eastern states 
forbidding discrimination in the 
sale or rental of all housing, 
whether such shelter is publicly 
assisted or privately owned. - 

There was a time when the 
nation could afford to let the 
private house owner discriminate 
in sale? or rentals but that time 
has gone. We are becoming a na- 
tion of city dwellers and nowhere 
is that trerfd more marked than 
in California. 

The cities are the people and 
orderly urban growth requires 
that residential segregation be 
eliminated. Its elimination is 
essential for city planning, urban 
redevelopment and urban re- 
newal, and it cannot be elimi- 
nated without strong laws. 


Tractors and Civil R ights 


The claim of Tennessee planta- 
tion owners that they are 
ousting Negro share croppers 
because of the advance of 
mechanical farming is an ob- 
vious fraud. It is significant that 
these ousters were begun only 
after Negroes had won their 
fight to register and vote in two 
Tennessee counties where they 
are in the majority. 

What the plantation, owners 
' are after is the retention of, 
political control. They are afraid 
that Negro voters will oust their 
stooge county officials and re- 
place them with men who will 
enforce the law. 

Enforcement of the law would 
diminish the many pronged 


rackets by which Negro croppers 
are cheated out of their earnings 
and kept poor and poverty 
stricken. 

In the long view, mechaniza- 
tion of agriculture is inevitable. 
The tractor will replace the 
mule-drawn plow and the reaper 
will pick the cotton now gather- 
ed by hand. That process, no 
matter how orderly, is bound to 
work hardships on cropper fami- 
lies. 

However, the Tennessee coun- 
ties aren't ready for wholesale 
mechanization and the fact that 
the ousted families are those 
whose heads registered to vote 
butresses the government's case 
that the present issue is the right 
to vote. 


Get a Good Halfback 


As it must to all states, inte- 
gration came to Georgia last 
week with a federal court order 
to admit two Negroes to the 
state university. The order is be- 
ing met with the usual threats of 
closing of the state institution. 

Georgia can't close its univer- 
sity. It is going to have to bow 


to the court order. Our sugges- 
tion is that it give in gracefully 
and get out and recruit a few 
good Negro football players. A 
star Negro halfback will at least 
get the state a spot of favorable 
publicity and distract attention 
from the fatuous threats to 
eliminate college training for all 
Georgians. 


The Devil for the Witch 


The Kennedy administration 
has been getting a lot of mileage 
out' of planted stories that the 
Democrats are preparing to re- 
deem their platform pledge to 
curb the power of the House 
Rules Committee by ousting Rep. 
William Colmer of Mississippi 
and replacing him with a 
"liberal." 

It turns out that what the 
Democrats are preparing to do is 
to swap the Devil for the Witch. 
C o 1 m e r ' s replacement will be 
Rep. Carl Elliott of Alabama to 
whom the "liberal" tag has been 
attached. 

Colmer's ouster and replace- 
ment by Elliott will leave the 
Rules Committee as firmly 


stacked against civil rights leg- 
islation as ever. The record 
shows that the Alabaman hasn't 
cast a good civil rights vote in 
his entire career. It is more than 
safe to assume that he will use 
his new position to enhance his 
position with 'Alabama segrega- 
tionists. 

Of course, Elliott will probably 
cast desirable votes on medical 
care for the aged, minimum 
wage and aid for education as 
long as such bills are purged of 
any language that might give 
any comfort to the cause of inte- 
gration. 

The sum of the matter is that 
the Democrats have decided to 
leavfe control of the Rules Com- 
mittee in the hands of the South. 


Battleaxe & Bread 

f y Imtimr 1. Gronger 



ROMA — Rome Is different, 
and don't let anybody con- 
vince ycu that it isn't. And 
when you add up all the dif- 
ferences, it comes out that 
Rome is one of this world's 
few truly civilized great 
cities. 

Rome has charm and beauty 
and sparkle, for Rome is no 
more Italian than Milan. 
Venice. Florence or Naples. 
Milan i.«! a big factory city 
with a cathedral: Venice is 
Coney Island 
with a mil- 
, lion pigeons 
at feeding 
time in St. 
Marks 
Square; 
Florence is 
museums and 
"such - like";' 
and Naples 
..." Well. 
"Naples is CraB9«t 

Naples" as one American 
Italian visiting there put it a 
couple of years ago, "and 
Naples isn't really a city at all. 
It's an accident that happened 

' a lot of people!" 

Philosorbical Shrug 

Koine's charm. I think, lies 
in the fact that it's been 
here for going on 3.000 years 
and ha.s been an important 
world center, for 'more than 
2.000 years; but it has never 
allowed itself to get the big 
head about it — not since the 
barbarians came in and 
knocked the bejabbers out of 
its amny and its citizens and 
destroyed what was left of the 
old Roman Empire 
! Since then its citizens have 
tended to cross their fingers 
when things go well and 
shrug philosopically when 
they don't, without exhibiting 
the., shaky jim-jams such as 
New Yorkers and Parisians 
experience when their cities 
are in trouble. 

Mayl>e this is a good thing, 
maybe it isn't, but this philo- 
sophical balance in the midst 
of turbulence is a blessed 
change to this refugee from 
Manhattan's stress and strain. 
For two weeks, that is. Then, 
after the International Corifer- 
ence of Social Work winds up 
on the 15th. I head back for 
Manhattan and beyond. 
Smart Students 

I^ast night I had dinner with 
two young Americans — both 


New Yorkers, students at Ben- 
nington College and studying 
in Paris this year. Like sm*rt 
students they spent th<tir 
Christmas vacaUon in Roma 

One I was happy to see, be- 
cause Cecille Miller has been 
someone special .to me ever 
since before she entered Man- 
hattan's Brearley School to 
succeed brilliantly and send 
lier mother, Mrs. Daphne. 
Miller, and her aunt an uncle. 
Judge and Mrs. Darwin Teles- 
ford, into spirals of expecta- 
tion and speculation about 
"what'U that child do next?" 

Well, last night she con 
sumed a huge dish of pasta, 
which had a long name but 
was a glorified edition of 
la.sagna — with cheese yet — 
a solid helping of saltimbocca, 
a good dollop of Brolio Rosso 
and a dessen that had cream 
and .stuff oozing out of it. 
iSaltinbocca was my sugges- 
tion, not only for iLs flavor 
but also for its name, which 
means "jump into the mouth." 
It's veal, sliced thin, with an 
overlay of delicately spiced 
ham and with a delicious wine 
sauce. I don't know whether 
Cecille's jumped or flew, but 
it got where it belonged in a 
burn.'. 

L«v« This Town 

.^t Pancrazio's the fatunate 
guests eat in a cellar over 
2,000 years old — the remains 
of an old Roman theatre that 
was there under the Caesars. 
A three-man combo produced 
music — violin, guitar and a 
.soulful tenor who guessed 
what the ladies wanted and 
gave it to them. 1 mean song, 
of course, with dramatics and 
ogling. 

It was perfect, that e\ening. 
what with youth (my two stu- 
dent guests), age (the cellar 
and mei. the music and the 
food? And I don't know another 
place in the world where the 
combination could be had. If 
I seem to be going overboard 
about Rome, pay it no mind. 
For I'm already way out 
there. I really love this town 
as one that has never let me 
down, in summer, winter, 
spring or fall. And thank God 
the Olympics are long gone, 
the spring visitors haven't 
arrived and I and 2,000 other 
members of the International 
Conference can have Our 
Town all to ourselves. 


Loren Miller Says . . . 


(Continued from Page 1> 
The moment you get comfort- 
able you can expect one of 
these conspirators to grab his 
phone, ring you up and chortle 
that he just wanted to chat 
with you a moment. Of course, 
the caller prefaces the hour 
long conversation with the 
statement that he'll only take 
a moment but don't let that 
fool you. 

These conspirators also have 
your eating habits down to a 
split second and the days on 
which you're apt to have a 
good meal. Right after the 
second bite you can depend on 
one of them to call. It used to 
be that you could fend off 
such a caller with the false 
promise that you would call 
him back. But that doesn't go 
any more. The rules of the or- 
ganization forbid extending 
any such leeway to the vic- 
tim. Now he announces with 
preconceived cunning that he 
is just leaving his home and 
must talk to you right then 
and there. And he does while 
the steak gets cold. 

No Hiding Place 

There's no relief in .sight. If 
>t)u get a silent number one 
of the conspirators snoops it 
out and passes it around to 
his henchmen and by week's 
end the telephone is ringing 
as gaily and ghoulishly as 
ever. To borrow a phrase from 
the old spiritual: there's no 
•hiding place down here. 

I know from bitter experi- 
ence that these conspirators 
are out recruiting new mem- 
bers night and day. I under- 
stand that they now have 
Youth - For - Telephone - Call 
clubs and that they latch on 
to babies right out of swad- 
dling clothes and teach them 
the tricks of the trade from 
the day the littte brats can 
jam a sticky finger into the 
holes on the dial. Moreover. 
the phone comi>anies are now 
installing phones on trains, in 
autortiobiles and in helicop- 
ters, so that every conspirator 
can ply his trade without let 
or hindrance. 

Don't Call Me ' 

The worst is yet to come. 
It won't be long before phones 
ape hooked up to TV screens 
and these caller-inners can not 
only force you to talk to them 
but can look you dead in the 
eye and prevent you from 
making the excuse that you 
were just w«iklng out at th« 


door. Or they can nail you 
while you're forking up a bite 
of steak, fix you with a 
beady glance and in etfwt 
dare you to go ahead and eat 
\our meal. 

I'm a Kennedy man but I 
don't look for any relief dur- 
ing his administration. I don't 
think he's got the nerve to 
venture that far out on the 
New Frontier. He wouldn't 
d^re to offend the millions of 
conspirators with a law to 
curb their nefarious practices. 
I'm at the end of my wit5. 1 
don't know what to do nor 
where to turn. Meanwhile 
don't call me. JJll call you. 


Klan Threatens 
Elderly Woman 

'Continued trom Page 1^ 
^^e^e keeping around-the- 
clock watch on the house. 

The \yashingtons. who have 
lived in Pa.sadena for more 
than 2Q years, moved into their 
present home only a few 
months ago. 

The area i.f one of mixed 
population — Negroes, white 
and Orien t a 1 — with a fair 
sprinkling of racially mixed 
families. 

Monday night's call was the 
first hostile act that the fam- 
ily has experienced, and police 
advised that so far there has 
been no attempt on the part 
of the caller or anyone else 
to carry out his threat. 


Judge Reduces 
'Human Kite' 

Damage Award 

The $135,000 damage award 
granted Alphonso (the Human 
Kite) Woodall by a jury on 
Nov. 22 for injiiries suffered 
during the filming of a TV 
show, has been reduced to 
$70,000 by Superior Court 
Jfdge Reginald L. Bauder. 

If Woodall does not accept 
the lower amount a motion for 
a new trial by defense attor- 
ney Warren Lane will be 
granted. Judge Bauder said. 

Woodall originally sued for 
$150,000 damages from the 
Wayne Steffner Productions, 
Inc. and Jerome Wheelo, driver 
of the car which pulled his 
kite. 


— What Do You Mean, Bias? — ^ 



i- 


Santa Fe Hearing 
Major FEP Test 


iContin.ued trom Page li 
drews' complaint from Feb. ID 
to May of last year. 

Andrews told of his repeat- 
ed requests for promotion, 
starting back in 1949. how 
white men who had just been 
hired were advanced despite 
their lack of experience, and 
how. on one occasion in 1959 
he had been told, with em- 
phasis, by L. P. English, a 
Santa Fe superintendent, that 
he would never be given a 
promotion. 

Laxy, No Good 
He quoted English as say- 
ing that he was "lazy, no 
good, not worth a damn" and 
so incompetent t-hat the fore- 
man "had to lead me around." 
He also quoted English as 
saying that he was' "too 
damned smart." and that he 
■'had him on his list." 

Early Jackson, a car cleaner 
who is the father of 14 boys, 
told the hearing that he was 
present when English gave 
Andrews tlie tongue lashing. 
He. too, said that English 
told Andrews he was on his 
"list." He was more specific 
than Andrews in qualifying 
the kind of list referred to. 
Tells Santo Fe Policy 
Brasky in his tcstimon\ . 
told of. the company's hiring 
policy and said there was 
evidence that white men hdd 
been hired and upgraded, al- 
though they did not have An- 
drews' qualifications or ex- 
perience. 

He also said that manage- 
ment had told him that in 
California the Santa Fe does 
not hire Negroes as brake- 
men,, firemen or clerks.^That 
statement brought loud pro- 
test from the Santa Fe Coun- 
sel who sought to have it 
striken from the record. 

Brasky's report was turned 
in to the FEP office for 
further evaluation, after which 
the complaint against the 
Santa Fe was filed. 

Denies Charges 
Robert B. Curtiss, attorney 
for the Santa Fe, in his open- 
ing statement denied that 
Andrews had been refused 
promotion because he is a 
Negro, or that he was fired 
because he had complained to 
the FEPC. He said, instead, 
that the immediate cause of 
his being fired was the fact 
that he had fallen asleep oh 
the job. Andrews had not been 
upgraded, said Curtiss, be- 
cause his supervisors did not 
feel that he warranted up- 
grading. 

Andrews told in detail 'the 
circumstances on the occasion 
when he was supposed to have 
fallen asleep and emphatical- 
ly denied the accusation. He 
countered with the accusation 
that the railroad had changed 
the transcript of a company 
trial which upheld his dis- 
missal to show that he had 
admitted being asleep. 

Curtiss also attempted to 
block the hearing by calling 
for a dismissal of the com- 
plaint. He claimed that the 
FEPC did not have jurisdic- 
tion since the case had been 
submitted to the Railroad Ad- 
justment Board under the Na- 
tional Railway Labor -Act be- 


fore the FEP had filed cliarges 
against the Santa Fe and that 
the Railway Board had accept- 
ed jurisdiction. 

Took Case Feb. 15 

Charles E. Wilson, chief 
r counsel for the FEP. pointed 
eut that the FEP Commission 
had taken jurisdiction on Feb. 
15,. long before the case had 
been submitted to the Rail- 
road Board. 

John Anson Ford, commis- 
sion chairman, emphasized 
that if the commission did 
not take jurisdiction in the 
case it would "abdicate its 
responsibility," .-and added 
that "if this commission does 
not invoke state law in this 
case we would leave unpro- 
tected an important area of 
human rights." 

Hearing officer Malcolm 
Peattic. of Sacramento, denied 
the motion for dismissal, and 
the hearing proceeded. 

("urtiss then sought to re- 
strict the scope of the hearing 
by protesting against inclu- 
sion of testimony regarding 
events prior to September. 
19.59, the date the FEP Com- 
rfiission was established. 

After Wilson pointed out 
that the history of the case 
was pertinent to the com- 
plaint. Peattic ruled rn his 
favor and the ease again pro- 
ceeded, with Andrews review- 
ing his experiences with the 
Santa Fe from the time he 
was hired. 

Charges against the union, 
which was named as joint de- 
fendant, were dropped when 
the union agreed to abide by 
any decision of the commis- 
sion. 


TV SERVICING 

.A new class in TV sonicing 
will open at Belmont -Metro- 
politan Adult School. 1,575 W. 
Second street, on Jan. 30. H. O. 
Backer, principal. announcfKi 
this week. 

CALIFORNIA 
E^GLE 

'The fmportant Newspaper' 

2101 W. Vernon Ave. 

Los Angeles 8, Calif. 

AXminster 5-3^35 

LOREN MILLER 
Publisher 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXX 


Jan. 12, 1961 
No. 43 


GRACE SIMONS... Executive Editor 
F. P. WALLER, Jr. _ Adv. Mgr. 
EDWARD ."ABIE" ROBINSON 

.'— CircuUtion Mgr. 

CALME RUS&. Office Mgr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. G. Allen ._• 1512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph. EX. 5-1591 

STA. MONICA BRANCH OFFICE 

1907 20th Street (Upstairt) 

Phone EXbrook 4-8082 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! 
D $4.00 for 1 Year 
D i1-50 for 3 Months 
a $2.S0 for 6 Months 

Adjudication Decree Number 123228 

Dite of Adjudication July l, 1923 

Published every Thursday by 

The California Eagle Publishing 

Co., 2101 West Vernon Avenue, at 

Van Ness. Los Angeles 8. Calif. 

Entered as Second Class Matter 

November 3, 1937, at the Post 

Office at Los Angeles, California, 

undr the Act of March 3, 1879. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 

BY INTERSTATE 

UNITED NEWSPAPERS 

645 Fifth Avenue 

New YSrk 17, New York 


Georgia (^ovY 
Huffs 'n' Puffs, 
Then Yields 


(Continued from Page 1) 
beg the state legislature- taf 
change a 1956 Ia"w ordering 
the university clos'ed in event 
of integration. • ' ( 

Reverses Couree | 

.■\pparcntl>' disturbed by 
niutierijigs from the wool hat 
counties to which he owes hiSt 
•"election, Vandivcr ordered the- 
university shut down late; 
Monday night as he issued a| 
blast calling the cotrft orderl 
"harsh and vicious" and am 
"act of tyranny." He was: 
equally outrgiged at Judge' 
Booties Tuesday order forbid- 
ding the cutting of university 
funds. 

The governor sent the judge 
a stinging telegram of protest 
but kept his official skirts' 
clean with the gratuitous ad- 
vice that "my respect for law 
ful procedures* and my oath 
as governor preclude any act 
of dofiaticc on my part." 

Asks Repeol 

In liis plea to the legisla 
ture to repeal the universitjf 
closing law. Vandiver virtually 
acknowledged defeat of his 
-^segregation promise with the 
..^statement that the 1956 law^ 
had been .turned "from 
iiource of iiope to an albat 
If allowed to remain, its ef 
foct will be to close the doo 
of Georgia's hallowed halls, to 
cease bringing learning and 
enlightenment to over 750(1 
young men and women . . 

t^eorgia has another la' 
which iipquirps closing ol 
grade schools in event of in 
togration and Atlanta schools 
are undeV an order to begin,^ 
integration next fall. The; 
governor said that retreat dnj 
the university closing law 
would not disturb grade 
.school legislation. He has said 
that he will propose a "free- 
dom of choice" c0nstitutional 
amendment which' will, nod 
"force an\- child to associate"! 
with children of another raccj 
Lawyers said thait it is ob 
\ious that the proposed legis 
lafion is unconstitutional. 

Students Calm 

Students ,'at the university 
loi^i the integration prder as 
a i^atter of coui^e with a few^ 
exceptions. Some 500 of the| 
7500 in attendance gathered! 
to boo the Negro students at| 
registration but mo.st of themf 
cxpdcssed only mild curiosity.^ 
Another minority registered a 
vigorous protest against the 
closing order. 

Hamilton will pursue pre 
medical .studies at the univer 
sity while Miss Hunter enter- 
ed the school of journalism. 


Merrit Winners 

Scientist Patricia- Barth and, 
sprinter Wilma Rudolph have 
been selected by Ij^Tademoiselle 
Magazine among the "Ten 
Young Women of the Year" for 
merit awards for 1960. 

Miss Earth's discovery of 
cancer patterns and Miss Ru- 
dolph's unprecedented "win of 
three gold medals at the 
Olympic Games earned them 
recognition. 


V 



- SANTA n 

MONICA 

NEWS 


YOUTH CENTER PLANS UNDERWAY— Community leaders are uorkuu, on plan; 
'for a center to help combat delmquency by presenting an interesting proijratn. Suited from 
Ifft: Mrs. Marncsba T. Tackett, Mrs. Marguerite P. Moore. Sam Fleishman, urehiteet. 
r.nd Mrs. Quecn B. Iverson. Standing: Dr. //. Claude Hudson. James S. l.aster. Rei . 
./. J. Iverson, Dr. Ralph Richardson. Otis L. Neal and A Ity. h.reretle M . Porter. 



TO SING AT WARD — The Mtntum Glee Singers uiU appear at Hard AME 
Church. 25th and Magnolia avenue, on Sunday at 3 :30 p.m. 


WESTMINSTER PfiESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones. Pastor 

9:30 and 11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 

9:30 a.m.— Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade — Adult Classes 

11 00 am— Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr. 

7 p.m.— Westminster Bible Hour 


Youth Center 
To be Erected 


Mrs. Mary Mitchell, who has 
been active in community 
work, has been confined to her 
bed since November. She re- 
ceived many greeting cards 
which made the holidays 
much more enjoyable. She 
asks that her gratitude be 
made public so that all those 
who remembered her might 
know that her condition is im- 
proved. 

• « • 

Mrs. Nellie Ray, wife of Rev. 
Willie Ray, a member of Calv- 
ary Baptist Church, died Mon- 
day morning at the Santa 
Monica Hospital during emer- 
gency surgery. Mrs. Ray is the 
daughter of Mrs. Viney Smith. 
Funeral arrangements are be- 
ing made by Spalding Mort- 
uar>'. 

• * • 

Alfonso and Sam Evans are I 
in Muskogee, Okla. attending 
the funeral of their father. 

t « • • 

Herman Williams and Her- 
man, Jr. have returned from 
their sojourn in the East. They 
visited friends in Forester, 
Ark. as well as Chicago. 

• • • 

Mrs. Susie Mays of lith 
street is undergoing treaynent 
in the County Hospital. 

• • • 

The AAACP installation ban- 
quet will be held at the Phil- 
omatheon Club, 1810 Broad- 
way avenue, on Jan. 20. Mrs. 
Terea Hall Pirtman will be 
the speaker. 

• « • 

The Area Conference of the 
NAACP will be held on Feb. 
18. 

• • • .n 

The Central District meeting 
at Olivet Baptist Church in 
Ventura is being attended by 
youth delegates from Calvar>' 

Baptist Church. 

« • • .. 

Calvary Baptist Church 
.Men's Day will be directed by 
Robert Leak, on March 12. 
Mrs. Laura Wilder will be in 
charge on -March 19 for Wo- 
men's*Day. 


Purcl)t)enis 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


The California Eagle— 5 



MISSIUNARII S \EI Dl D—Rot„rl Leu is. center, out- 
lines the territory tihcre the need for missionaries is great to 
JehovahtS H'itnesses Sondra I'enus and Hilly Eduards. 

Jehovah's Witnesses Hail 
Unity of Congregations 

Is it possible for people from ail nations, kindreds, 
races and tongues to have one thought oa all mat- 
ters in this divided world? According to Robert 
Lewis who has recently returned ffom his missionary 
assignment in Mississippi, it is not only possible but 
" "* it is being done right now by 

Jehovah's Witnesses who may 
be found in 179 different 


lands, 


the sea. He now serves the 

Motropolitan Congregation. 

"The oneness and together- 

n<\ss of Jehovah's Witnesses 

is one that does not exist in 

any oihor organization on 
earth. " Lewis said. "By co- 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15 

"What About Me, Lerd?"-Rev. Howard R. Carty preaching 

Sunday School— 9:30 A.M. Worship- 1 1 :00 A.M. 

HEALING SERVICE AT S P.M. 


The Membership Committee 
of the NAACP will meet Mon- 
day, Jan. 16 at the home of M. 
B. Allen, 1945 22nd .street. Cer- 
[tificates of merit will be 
Di-sturbed b> the steady in-|awarded at this meeting 
(TPase in ju\onile delinquency 


Walter Dunlap 
Last Rites to 
Be Held Sat. 

Walter C. Diuiiap died late ,. , , . 

' operating and working to 

Jan. 9 from complications gether I ho Witnesses are 
which developed followin;; teaching people of good-will 
surger\- fiv a frailumd hip '« have unity of mind and 
sustained when he fell while:^'^^ peaceably wherever they 
. , . i mav live. This they do by con- 
taking a shower in the hos-jg^^g^j.^g together, bv a 

pi_^l cottage where tic had study of Gods word, the. Bible, 
been undergoing treatment for and b\' living according to the 
a nervous disorder. He was 7-1. Divine Will, making them a 
For more than 20 \ears he, different, united people in 
served as a uaiter tm the this split-up world. " 
Southern Pacific railroad and 


Rev. Martin L. King, Jr. to 
Meet with Western Ministers 

The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., president of the 
Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and inter- 
nationally known civil rights leader, will confer with 
local ministers on Saturday, Jan. 14, from 1-5 p.m", at 
Zion Hill Baptist Church, 51st and McKinley, avenue. 

The conference will bring*" 
together ministers from 
Southern California and rep- 
resentatives from other sec- 
tions of the state who have 
been meeting regularly for 
several months laying the 
ground work for organization 
of a Western Christian 
Leadership Conference. It is 
anticipated that the Western 
Christian Leadership group 
will be formally organized at 
Saturday's meeting, a'icordingf 
to Dr. L. Sylvester Odom, co- 
ordinator of the local group. 

Dr. Odom stated that all 
ministers of all denominations 
are expected to hear Dr. King 
in his first hand report on the 
critical conditions in the deep 
south. It is anticipated that 
pastors will bring contri- 
butions from their churches to 
assist Dr. King in carrying 
out the vital work o( his 
leadership group. 

Rev. King will speak at the} 
Woodland Hills Methodist 
Church, on Sunday, Jan. 15. | 
Attract Support 

Dr. King will be thehonoreej 
at an informal reception at 
the Wilfandel Club Saturday] 
evening sponsored by the local 
conference committee, In com- 



MOURNED — Mrs. Alice 

Griffin, SS. mother of Floyd 
and Larry Laurence, died 
Jan. '^. 

Alice Griffin's 
Funeral Held 


menting on the coming confer- 
colonies and islands of|<^"f*' Dr. Odom stated: "It is 


•NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC. 


5965 S. Broadway Avenue— Rev. Anita L Edmonds, Pastor 

Pentacostal and Interracial 

9:30 A.M.-Suii(iay School 10:45 A.M.-Worship Service 

7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.— Prayer Service 


CHU;iCH OF CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

3125 W. ADAMS BLVD. 

i 11 am.— .Morning Worship Service 

Rev. James H. Hargelt Will Speak 
SL.ND.AY SCHOOL, 9:30 a.m.— Kindergarten Through 5lh Grade 
11 am -6th Grade Through High School 


-HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH- 


6330 SO. FIGUfei^OA ST. 


PLeasant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. DOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 

8 a.m. — Rev. J. Lewis. Preaching 

"The Challenge of the Colossal" — Numbers 13:31 

9:30 a.m. — Church School (for All Ages) 

10:45 a m. — Youth Church 

6:30 p.m. — Methootst Youth and Wesley Fellowship 


in Los Angeles County, a Cit 
ii ns Commitloc has been 
formed to aid Paradise Baptist 
Church in erecting a Youth 
Center to direct the leisure of 
all youth in tiie area of 51st 
street and S. Broadway ave- 
nue. 

Rev. .\. J. Iverson. the min- 
ister of Paradi.se Baptist 
Church outlined the need for 
•such a Youth Center at af re- 
,cent luncheon meeting of busi- 
ness and professional citizens 
in the Clark Hotel. 

Following an hour discus- 
sion of the pressing needs for 
^jsuch a Youth Center the group 
chose .Vtty. Everette M. Porter, 
former member of the Califor- 
nia Adult Authority as general 
chairman of the committee 
and the Honorabh- Goodwin J. 
Knight as co-chairman. 

The first effort toward rais- 
ing S50,000, needed for equip- 
ment in the Youth Center 
will be the Citizens Com- 
mittee Inaugural Banquet in 
the International Room at the 
Beverly Hilton Hotel. Tuesday 
Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. 


Venic* News 

The i>astor and members of 
New Bethel Baptist Church 
will worship at St. Vistal Bap- 
tist Church in Long Beach on 
Sunday, Jan. 15. 

L. Moore, 1021 Stracy avenue 
is recuperating at home fol- 
lowing a stay at the Washing- 
ten Hospital in Culvef City. 

m * * 

Mrs. Maude Johnson is re- 
covering from an illness in 
her home, 340 Vernon avenue. 


was interested in the prob- 1 Episcopal Church will offici- 
loms of railroad workers. He ate. 

was born in Fort Madison. Mr. Dunlap i.s survived by 
Iowa and had boon a resident i his widow. Irma Dunlap: his 
of Los Angeles for 12! years. I daughter, Mrs. Star Shepherd 
Funeral services will be of Minneapolis; his sister, Mrs. 
held in the chapel of the J. S. | C. Marie Hughes; and brother, 
Williams Funeral Home at 10 Garrett Dunlap and four 
a.m. Saturday. Father Llew- nieces and a nephew, all of 
ellvn Williams of St. ThoriPslLos Angeles. 


Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


our hope that the proposed 
Western Christian Leadership 
Conference will attract the 
support of the entire ministry 
of Southern California, and 
that this group will be able 
not only to lend valuable as- 
sistance to the Southern Con- 
ference but also will be able 
to help other groups in al- 
leviating the social problems 
in California and throughout 
the Western states. 


16to be Baptised 
At Price Chapel 

Baptismal rites for seven 
converts and nine babies will 
be conducted at Price Chapel 
AME Church, 213 E. 43rd 
street, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday, 
Jan. 15. 

. Rev. Jerry W. Ford will 
preach on "Come Home." 

At 7:30 p.m. the Senior 
Choir, directed by Eugenia 
Clark, will present a special 
program around the theme: 
"Making a New Start." 


Mrs. Alice Griffin, 82, 3416 S 
Budlong, the mother of Floyd 
and Larry Lawrence, stepped 
into eternal light on Jan. 5 
after years of combating the 
infirmities which accompany 
old age. In spite of her years 
she remained active and inter- 
ested in current events and her 
church. . k 

Funeral services were held 
at the Angefhs Funeral Home 
on Tuesday, Jan. "10, with in- 
terment in Evergreen Ceme- 
tery. Rev. Frank Bowdan of 
the Pentecostal ,A post oil c 
Faith Church officiated at the 
service. ~^ 

Mrs. Griffin was born in 
Little Rock, Ark., but had 
lived most of her life in Los 
AngeleSjj In addition to her 
two sons she is survived by a 
sister, who lives in Chicago. 


Doris Akers, 

The N. P. Greggs Gospel 
Choir will present Doris Akers\ 
and the Sky Pilot Choir at 3^ 
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 at the 
People's Independent Church, 
1025 E. 18th street. 

The building fund of the 
church is expected to receive 
a boost from the concert. 


r\ 


I New York. N. V. (Special) — 
For the fir.st time science has 
found a new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain - without 
surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
* * * 1 «nother,"very striking improve- 

H. Griffin, of Bisbee, Ariz, ment" was reported and veri- 
is visiting his daughter Frank- fied by a_iioctor's observations. 
ie and her daughter Alma at ■ . Pf'n was relieved promptly, 
the home of Mrs. A. Middle- ' And, while gently relieving 
brooks. 613 Santa Clara ave- 
nue. 


E. Stalling of Waco. Texas, 
is in Venice visiting his child- 
ren. Mrs. F. Webster and J. 
Stalling and his grandchild- 
ren, Barbara Ann, Betty, Ro- 
bert and Billy Ray Webster. 


Baptist Wrangle 


Baha'is Slate 


Bowen Memorial Methodist GJiurch 

EAST 36th A.NO TRINITY STREETS - REV. JOHN C. SAIN, MINISTER 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15 
REV. XERXES WALKER GUEST SPEAKER AT 11 A.M 

REV. BAIN PREACHING AT 1 A.M. 

The public is cordially invited to attend. 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 

1564 W. 36th PLACE AX. 1-9831 

Messages to All 
Servkat Sunday and Thursday at 8 P.M. 
Wednesday 2-4 P.AA. i 

REV. OTIS STOVALL, Minister 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ways to save the denomina- 
tion from long and costly liti- 
■ >■ II >« !• • Igation and protect the good 

World Religion I name of this part of the 
On Sun.lav. Jan. l.',. at 8. Christian church. I hope we 
p. m.. the Bahais of Los An- can find such a way. 
will present a round tabic dis- I" his letter proposing the 
cussion: "Whv One World Re- P^af^ ^a^ks, Taylor said that 
ligion^," in honor of World ' as Christian ministers each 
Religion Dav. a special Baha'i I has an obligation to probe 
commemorative dav. It will be prayerfully for a solution to 
held at the Bahai Center. 331 j^he difficulty. He further sug- 
S. New Hampshire ave. j gested that two or three men 

Speakers will be .Mrs. R.I sharing his and Dr. Jackson's 
Jacoby. Mrs. lUiss Garcia. El- j respective views be included 
wyn Van Zandt and Anthony [in the conference, with unity] 
Lease, chairman of the as.sem- 1 of the denomination its ulti-! 
bly. mate goal. 


I pain, actual reduction or re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 
And most amazinfr of all — 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where :i doctor's 

I observations wore continued 
over a period of many months! 
In fact, results were .'■o thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 

I to make such astonishing' state- 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 
a problem!" And among these 
sufferers were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions, 
some of 10 to 20 years' standing. 

All this, without the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance (Bio- 
Dync''')- the discovery of a 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured 
tissue on all parts of the body. 

This new healing substance 
is offered in suppository or oint- 
vent form called Preparation 
//*. Ask for individually sealed 
convenient Preparation H Sup- 
positories or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli* 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drujr counters. 


MiNTAL coMPonriRma^^ SPIRITUAL ADVISOR mm 

ELDER J. B. MOORE 

Divine Healer From Birth 
AFTER YOU HAVE TRIED ALL OTHERS 
WHY NOT TRY ELDER M<X>RE 
i AND HIS MAKER? WE WILL NOT FAIL . 

ST. JOHN BAPTIST CHURCH 

1313 E. 22nd St. RE. 8-7580 

I 421 N. 4th Ave., Pocatcllo, Idaho CE. 2-9438 




First Rock Baptist Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 

Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
1 1 a.m. BTU 6:30 p.m. Evoning Sorvic* 
7:30 p.m. Song S«rvic* 8:45 p.m. Public 
if invited to Pray with us at 7:30 pm. 
on Wodnesday. 


"" "^e called AimiUf^^ ^a^mltf . . .— 

, . . for prestige and moderate ^ices." 

/ uneral Directors - Serving All With the Finest 
1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - Richmond 7 9121 


Terry Ravensdale 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING 
1379 W. 38fh PLACE - RE. 4-791 5_ 


[ TIME is the test of 

satisfaction 

j PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME has brought satisfac- 
tion to Los Angeles families for more than 20 years 
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PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 

CONTINUING TO SERVE YOU 
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NEW! 


IMPORTANT LECTURE SERIES 
ON THE WORLD OF SPIRIT 

Rev. S. S. HEYLIAGER 

Noted Teacher-Philosopher, and Metaphysician 

SPEAKER JAN. 15 

Rav. S. S. Heyliager 

EACH SUNDAY AT 11 A.M. 

Baces Hall - 1528 N. Vermont Ave. 


10:45-Orgdn Meditation 
11:00-Worship Service 


Mr. Jack Crowder-Minister of Music 
Mrs. Gwendolyn Heyliager/Organist 

Church of Spiritual Rt^. .t&i;on 

(Maor-Emeth Foundation) 
3522 WEST 8TH STREET, LA 5 

Dunkirk 5-8804 

Call For Personal Appointments 


t 






i M^ 



:I\^ 


THE BAHA'IS OF LOS ANGELES CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO HIAR A PANEL DISCUSSION OF THE BAHA'I WORLD FAITH ON 

WbRLD RELIGION DAY 
SIJNDAY-JAIVIJARY 15-8:00 P.M. 

L.A. BAHA'I CENTER 


331 SOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE 

EVERYONE IS INVITED - NO ADMISSION CHARGE - NO COLLECTIONS - REFRESHMENTS 


&^^ ^ \ Vt(t<4|i»l lull t t i V4 Ml 

Wry !•• .prva*! tin W»wmt'<li?' irf" 



r.W' 



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WARFIELD AT PHILHARMONIC 

- — ■ -^ — ^ ■ — ZZUZZ ~ 


6— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


ChA^Z 



s>- 


'Mr. and Mrs. RAFAEL CAMPOS (Dinah Washington) are 
making the round of Holl>-wood parties. The pair showed up 
at one where DINAH played the piano while ELLA FITZGER- 
ALD chirped. A GONE show! . . . BOOTS WADE phoned to 
say she and ERNIE ANDREWS were on the way to get some 
Red Beans and rice when that 
automobile accident happened 
in Vejras. Boots is still nursing 
severe bruises. . . It's repo rted 
that HARRY BELAFONTE and 
REVLON Cosmetics who spon- 
sor his television spectaculars 
aren't seeing eve to eye! . . . 
Pluttory BUTTER FLY. MC- 
QUEEN who is probably best 
known for her performance of 
a scatterbrain in "Gone With 
The Wind" is making a come- 
back as an actress. She has 
been assigned a role in a 
movie musical called "Diffi- 
cult Woman" . . . 

Both LILLIAN RANDOLPH 
end CHARLES LAMPKIN ap- 
peared on separate segments 
of the "Day In Court" show 
last week. Placement was by 
UL CUMBER agency. . . Hand- 
some vocalist JESS DAVIS is 
up for an acting role on a 
popular television show! . . . 
Over the weekend we checked 
ithe new revival of "Carnival 
Island" out at El Capitan. And 
fit still .MOVES on the new 
premises. But the defects are 
Btill there, too! Rather than re- 
view it. per se, we will hit on 
dt lightly. The book or plot 
needs boistoring if they expect 


HOUSE FOR SALE 


Corner lot house— 3 bedrms., 
V/2 bath, breakfast nook, 
garbage disposal, spacious 
fenced backyard, landscaped 
front lav/n, convenient loca- 
tion, schools, shppping cen- 
ter, church, etc., IV2 car ga- 
rage, appliance inc. $14,000 
-i$ 1,000 down. 14903 Beck- 
ner Street, La Crescenta. 
EDgewood 3-6931 


a Broadway debut or even a 
comfort;able run. here, but let 
us hastily add that it has a 
great potential. Mundane in 
spots, it breaks into boisrterous 
merrimept at others. It has 
the help of ALBERT McNEIL'S 
choral direction, JIMMY 
FIELD'S choreography and 
dancers and a hell-bent and 
working cast. Castwise, JEAN 
DURAND, with the bald pate 
gets top, billing, and rightly 
so. The'*hap e.xudes sex and 
cLarm, and is enough of an 
actor to use the proper re- 
,straint instead of hamming it 
the way some of the others 
are Inclined to do. Jean ap- 
parently has that particular 
bone structure that enables 
him to go bald as a billiard 
ball, and with or without that 
gimmick he delivers strongly. 
He'll get somewhere. You 
watch! Other notables who 
contribute heavily are 
GEORGIA CARR, DELORES 
PIPER, CARLETON JOHNSON, 
MAURICE BUCHANAN, CHES- 
TYN EVERETT, JAY LOFT- 
LYNN. FELICIA K. WOOD (a 
living doll) HOWARD ANDER- 
SON (Rochester's brother, and 
we think we got his name 
right) and the GOOD LORD 
only knows where we put our 
program although JAY LOFT- 
LIYNN made sure we had at 
least a couple in our hands be- 
fore we left the theater . . . 

We left t^e Carnival Island 
show to go on to the party 
tossed by the winsome Colum- 
bia Records Press Relations 
?al KERRY COWIN at SHIR- 
LEY MANNES "MANNE 
HOLE" for blues vocalist BIG 
MILLER. Now. Big Millers a 
thriller. We drank Hot Saki 
and Black Beer at Shelley's 
(Continued on Page 7i 


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People 

WALTER GOODLOW— He was 

named public relations direc- 
tor for Sterling Liquors to pro- 
mote the sales of a seven- 
year-old bourbon called Geo. 
T. Stagg. Among the first to 
stock it were Tommy Tucker, 
Ish Evans, tBert Kenner, Celes 
King and Eddie Atkinson! 
W. E. BARNETT — Editor of 
Nite Life mag., will be toss- 
ing his second anniversary 
pawtee in the plijsh Clark 
Hotel come Feb. 1, and top 
Angelenos have tabbed this 
as "An Evening With 
Bamettl" 

HOT LUSH — That being 
peddled below selling price 
could be the brands lifted 
from Dynamite Jackson's 
Cocktail Lounge on W. Adams 
when thieves cut through the 
roof and four walls Monday 
night after closing! 
CATHERINE ALLEN — Effi- 
cient head of Record Clerks in 
busy Newton Division is put- 
ting in her 19th year with the 
LAPD! 

ATTY. ED MADDOX— He will 
leave the Miller, Maddox and 
Malone law firm and join 
Atty. Alpha Montgomery in 
San Diego soon! 
CENTRAL CASTING — No 
ticeably missing from ^he first 
call for movie extras last 
week for all night work at 
MGM were Maggie Hathaway 
and Byron Ellis, leaders in the 
bout for better deals for Ne- 
gro Hollywood bit players. In- 
cidentally rumor has it that 
although calls go into Central 
Casting's Hollywood office the 
names of those picked for the 
jobs still come from the 99th 
street address! 

EMMA ADAMS — If teenagers 
want to know what she look- 
ed like when she was a junior 
high student contact Curtis 
Howard, the sheriff. He has a 
photo of the jazzy gang which 
includes Blossom McGinnis, 
Lois Gaines, 'Virgcc Fudge 
and Emma! 

AWILDA THURMOND — Cool 
coffee cream complexioned 
clerk in Nat Diamond's Furni- 
ture Store with curves to 
match her pretty looks is 
heading for the altar! 
REDD FOXX— That L. A. to 
N. Y. telephone call from his 
West Coast broker had people 
back stage in the Apollo 
Theater all shook up. They 
wouldn't believe the comic 
when he told them he had 
hired a broker to handle his 
wealth. Now they call him the 
loaded Foxx! 

RAY MILLS — Midnightcrs 
and early morning commuters 
have made his Ray's Kitchen 
just about top spot for the 
ham-and-egg bit! 
RUTH BOWEN— Jets in this 
week to check up with her 
client Dinah Washington and 
also take in the Rinkeydink 
formal. Her New'York agency- 
handles several box office 
personalities! 

JEEP SMITH — Since he left 
town several months ago 
leaving wife, daughters and 
band and hasn't returned. 
(Continued on Page 7) 



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freshint/ cntirtninnu nt our toxin has heard. Featured at the 
piano bar, Mhs, If il.'iams renders all of your favorites in 
her oiin pleasint/ manner. j 


Baritone 
To Appear 
January 21 

The great American bari 
tone, William Warfield, who 
will sing at Philharmonic 
Auditorium on Saturday, Jan. 
21, has truly earned the title 
of "musical ambassador" for 
the United States. 

For four out of the last eight 
years, Warfield has toured the 
world under the auspices of 
the U. S. State Department. 
His first tour was as "Porgy' 
in George Gershwin's "Porgy 
and Bess," which was intro- 
duced to wildly enthusiastic 
European audiences in 1952. 
Again in 1955, Warfield toured 
Europe as soloist with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra 

Two solo recital tours, made 
for the State Department in 
1956 and 1958, took Warfield 
around the world many times. 
He sang in Africa, the Near 
East and Asia, as well as 
Europe. Early purchases are 
suggested. 


NEW YORK SCENE 

If I sound a little smug and difficult as I scnbe ttus 
week, you must forgive me because I just Eot^my new 196% 
Rambler, and then bid fond farewell and Godspeed to the 
old faithful Green Hornet, ^^hich I was fortunate enough to 
place in loving hands for its remammg days of driving 


service. Let us pray!!! 

Also there is now only a 
small bit of finishing touches 
to the painting of my aunt's 
apartment to be done, and this 
labor of stupid volunteering 
will bite the dust. Amen!!! 
Thanks to my boy Steve Gon- 
zales for all his kind help and 
artistry during the painting. 
HoppT Holidays 

Margaret GlanviHe was the 
charming hostess at a swing- 
ing New Year's Day party at 
her plush coop apartment on 
Fifth Avenue. She had delici- 
ous egg nog, plenty of alcohol, 
tasty appetizers, and finally, 
peas and rice, Brazilian food, 
roast pork and a swinging 
home-made cheese cake. Her 
guests from Philly, Washing- 
ton, D. C, New Jersey and 
New., York, consisted of lovely 
ladies and dapper gentlemen, 
and everyone had a ball 
Gordon Making It 

WNEW's production super- 
visor. Bob Hodges, was kind 
enough to recommend me for 
a job cutting some Dubonnet 
Wine commercials, so I had to 
make some audition tapes 
with three 'choice' gals, all 
using French accents; one 


from Paris, Yvonne Constant, 
and two local girls, Gretchen 
Walther and Zelda Sears. I 

also personally recommended 
Louise Stubbs and Mary 
Louise for the job, and they in 
turn made tapes with- scMne. 
Frenchmen. 

Talented Team 

The next day I; got a call 
that I had been selected for 
the job, and later one from 
Louise Stubbs that she too 
had been chosen. Next a.m. 
we both did the jobs for real, 
as I cut four commercials, two 
with a,most lovely French gal 
from 'Tunisia'; Danielle Clary, 
and two with 'WT^EW French 
dj,'jeafi Michel, while Louise 
did three with Jean Michel. 
Something New 

It was wonderful experience, 
and nice money, and perhaps 
Louise and I have begun a 
new trend which may open 
horizons for the future. 
Big Apple Jumps 

Count Basie closed at Bird- 
land, prior to his current ^tint 
at the Apollo Theatre, and the 
closing was a 'gas,' with 
Frank Sinatra and the Clan 
(Continued on Page 7) 


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-SAXSATIONAL SOUNDS BY- 


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FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS 
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BUDDY WOODSON, Bast 
CHARLES COKER, Piano 


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Happenings in the Entertkinment Whirl 


( i 



>. 


If E JF^NT STROLLING — Cameras Jn hand through some of our favorite 
spots v;e found swinging scenes like this everywhere, from the left, at the RE- 
NAISSANCE (haven't you been there yet?) vocalist GENE McDANIELS 
whispers (because Chico Hamilton was on stage) with KATIE REGAN. 
BUDDY ROBBINS and GINNIE QUINN-<it the BIT (wow, it's a coffee 
house and always crowded) , we saw LES McCANN (the ultimate in chitter' 


ling jazz) with three queens who each smiled so prettily when we passed that 
u-e had' to stop and say "hi": that's FAYDELL JONESf BARBARA 

BRYANT and ERNESTINE JVILLIAMS When we got to the CLUB 

TOWN HILL tee were too late to hear the joke but got a shot (bourbon and 
photo) of J'ERN STEVENSON (top disc jockey and M. C), CARLTON 
(N. A. A. C. P.— Attack). RICHARDSON, JIMMY (musician's Uion), 


CLARK and our host, DOUG STONE. Orchids to Doug and Hugh for 
opening a really imaginative place. In the rumor stage, CLUB TOWN HILL 
planning a Gourmet dining room addition. We're in favor of that all the way 
so reserve us some Lobster Tails. Well, next week we stroll again, see you at 
your favorite club, (Young photo) 


■ I 


'Chazz* Soundtrack 


t (Continued from Page 6) 
■glorified coffee house and list- 
ened to "BIG" and a healthy 
chick named HANNA DEE (al- 
so on Columbia) sing those 
down and out, and sometimes 
up blues . . . Say, hey,' why 
don't you check that ring that 
ABIE ROBINSON (of the 
Eagle) gave his GLADYS for 
a Xmas present???. ... Say, 
now. about that little deal at 
Shelley's Manne hole. Big Mil- 
ler thumped a " tcunbourine 
..gainst Ms ample thigh and 
warbled that down home 
.stuff:... . He really preaches, 
and so does HANNA. DEEI . . . 
Both SEPIA and EBONY mag- 
azine carry stories on the 
SAMMY DAVIS - MAY BRITT 
marriage. For different angles, 
read 'em both ! . . , Comic 
REDD FOXX along with the 


BASIE band currently break 
ing it up at the APOLLO in 
New York. Now, how about 
that???. . . NICE GUY TYPEi 
GARY GREENE TV repairman 
over in the 20th's on the east- 
side on Hooper. He's for you. 
Look him or Humphrey up in 
your directory when trouble 
coines. They're tops! 


DR. HENRY JENKINS — For 

mer New Orleans medic and 
his school teaching wife just 
adopted a baby to go with 
their smart Baldwin Hills 
home! 

LIONEL HAMPTON — Added 
his 41st musical honor last 
week when Playboy magazine 
named him winner of the 
vibe division of th^ir annual 
jazz poll! 



-k ^ •PEOPLE & PLACES • ^ i. 


(Continued from Page 6) 
Martin "Fuzzy" Gower is now 
heading the Jeepsters band 
and making it click! 
DIG THIS — That gal friend 
of a local Musician Union 


CONCERT and SHOW! 

- FRIDAY, JAN. 13th 
► 8:30 P. M- 


H;^ ZEIGER presents 

THE MOST CREATIVE 

MUSICAL GIANT OF 

THIS GENERATION! 





PLAYING HIS HIT RECORDS 

*6C0ReiA ON Mr MIND* 
*ltUIY' • 'HARD HEARTID HANNAr 
'COME RAIN OR COME SHINE' • 'WHAT'D I il^' 
\t^, *THE COilUS or RAY CHARUS* 


PASADENA 
CIVIC AUD. 

SY 2-9473 



N. Y. Scene 

(Continued from Page 6) 
all present, along with Red 
Foxx. 

Chitterlings were served and 
every members of the Clan, 
Peter Lawford. Sammy Davis, 
Jr., Frank Sinatra, Dean 
Martin, Joey Bishop, etc., han 
died their hog maws like ole 
pros. What I say? 

Basie had done fabulous 
business for Birdland and is 
now doing the same at the 
theatre, along with Red Foxx, 
Lambert, Hendricks & Ross 
and of course. Joe Williams. | 
Gifts Galore 

DoOo received a lovely gift 
from L.A., compliments of De- 
Velma Williams, and we both 


REVEALING — 'One of the most controversial fibres of 
the past decade will make her South Los Angeles'^ debut 
starting Friday, January 13. at Red Flame, 107th and Ver- 
mont ave. Christine Jorgensen, the former American G. 1. 


ALL SEATS 
RESERVED PRICES: $3.50. 2.75, 2.00 (tax md) 
Seats now on sals at Pasadena Aud. box-offrce, 
So. Calif. Music Co., 737 So. Hill, and all Mutual Ticket 
Agencies. FOR TELEPHONE RESERVATIONS: HO 7-6151 



official who is trying to worm 
her way into a social club 
shouldn't attempt it via the 
back door. Just make out an 
application. The group favors 
Jncle Toms and particularly 
the kind that fail to fight for 
better wages! 

JUANITA MACKLIN — Excep- 
tional Children's director cele- 
brated" with her' friends on 
Xmas day showing theni how 
the Plasterer's Union present- 
ed their new unit with a 
$3,280 job. Monday she was in 
tears. A drunk motorist smash- 
ed into the building and 
wrecked entire east wing! 
EARL GRANT — He is as 
close to Sammy Davisj Jr., in 
the running for Mr. Show 
Business as two and two and 
the way he upset the plush 
opening night crowd at the 
Crescendo last week proved it. 
During the first show he 
sported a wild black velvet 
two button coat, black pants 
and black patent leather 
shoes. In his second show he 


wondering why Negro officers, 
aren't assigned to the Robbery 
Detail: 

CARDS — They streamed in 
Xmas, from such wonderful 
people as Opal Jones, Bob and 
Virginia Johnson, Claire C. 
Williams, The Green Bay 
Packers, Corinne Simmons, 
Jeri ' and Robert Woods, Geo. 
A. Ramsey, Batiste L. Hanes, 
Jr., L. A. State College, Andy 
and Ruth Hatcher, Ronnie 


Jones, University of California 
at Berkeley, Frank Bull, Hattie, 
Charles, Jo-Ann and CRarlene 
Fuqua, Bob Scoles, Bob Mike,- 
Dorothy Bowick, Lucille Ash- 
ford, Jesse Robinson, Clarence, 
Marge, Margo Lovette and 
Sam Hamermcin to name a 
few! 

MAURICE FLEMING — Ten 
will get you a grand that he 
will be the top Negro at the 
new Airport! 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


The California Eagle— 7 


got a giant Mission Pak from 

Dr. and Mrs. Coleman and i was dapper in a purple velvet 


family of San Francisco. 

Ho . . . hum . . . Guess I'll 
go for another drive in my 
new Rambler, so I'll close un- 
til next week. Maybe by then 

I'll be 'less cool.' 'Bve now 

PHIL GORDON 


100 CHOICE 


"BEST DANCING SINCE 
-WIST SIDE STORY' " 
l.A. {xoinintr 


A 

Hilarious 
Romantic 




CAST OP 42 - — ««^ 

•tarring Jian Durcmd • Dolom Pipar * Morris tuchanan •John Hawker 
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wSHSaSwiSllSfSiyJ*** I «« St to^rthot Hollywood BIV4 

I 300 CHOICE SEATS $2 


EL CAPITAN 



coat lined in red satin, t la- 
vender pants and moccasin 
styled shoes! 

EASTSIDERS — Merchants 
and liquor owners are dis- 
turbed over the increasing' 
number of robberies and are 


iNOWil 


GUILDA WILLIAMS 

PLAYING PRETTY AT THE PIANO 

Attend Our Famous Blue Mon. Sessions 
and Enjoy Fine Entertainment 

INTERMISSION ROOM 

4370 W. AQAMS BLVD. 

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for ^'a new lease on life" . 
TRAVEL! 

GO MEXICO 


JUST A LITTLE DIFFERENT— The best way to 
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DOROTHY McNAMEE ALLEN of DOROTHY'S 
STEAK HOUSE. Delicious, choice steaks, or breakfast 
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from all over our town. 


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In serving our customers, we are endeavoring to place before you the highest 
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under the most sanitary conditions. 


DOROTHY MeNAHEE ALLEN 


3915 So. Western Aye. 

Los Angeles 


LTANYA GRIFFIN — Flew 
in from New York to be with 
her sons during tfie holidays — 
looking good as ever! 


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RE. 1-7201 


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HOT DOGS (French Fried) 
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OPEN: From 11:00 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. — AAon. Thrii Sat. 
Sunday — 12:00 Noon to 9:00 p.m. 



9 


DAY 
FIESTA 
IN 
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Mexico City— Pyramids— C 
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Vlfherever you wish to (rayd, by land, sea or air, you 
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travel anywhere in the United States' or anywhere in the 
world, Tony Lease will make your woi^-free reservations 
and provide ticket delivery! if you belong to a group 
and wish to plan a tour let Tony Lease host a travel 
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''WORRY ¥RSM RESERVATIONS' 

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FRontier 4-9388 | 

s 


•T 


J.- 


8— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 



YHE TEE 


WITH MAGGIE HATHAWAY, 




t - 




Now that we have finished 

^ one of our hardest integration 

»- fights in Hollywood it is nice 

t get back to the "Tee," So 

come and take a trip with us 

to the famous 550,000 L.A. 

Open held at Rancho Golf 

_ Course. 

1 The first day was Pro-Celeb- 
rity Day and we went straight 

~ ro the 7th hole to watch Bob 

- Hope, who was drawing one 
~ of the largest galleries. Bob 

• nit'" a terrific tee shot straight 

• lown the middle of the fair- 

• VAy and scored a par on the 
" riolc but we noticed his caddy 

• was packing his bag. When 
;; we asked why Bob was not 

- .?oing to pla<^ any longer the 

2 .-addy said that Bob was ill 
Z uid thought he 4iad better 

quit. 

We caught Micktij- Rooney 
on the 16tH hole and watched 
liiin out-drive some of the 
oros. Wo would be willing to 
bet. that .Mickey can get as 
much distance as Ben Hogan. 
On the 18th hole Mickey quit 
;|iocaUse he cojuld not get a 
"■'hot which. he had hooked out 
f th" +- — " 
iiiv.- next iiii^v.- ua.>o w.. 
sp<>nt following Charlie Sifford 
and Ray Boots, our two Negro 
professional.^. (We don't know 
why more did not attempt to 
qualify. 1 Charlie did not have., 
to qualify because the PGA 
officials e.xempted him. 

We arrived at the Rancho ; 
dub house at noon and vvere^ 
told that the weekly press had 
to park on Motor Ave. on a lot 
that was set aside for them. 
After parking, a shuttle bus 
picked us up and carried us to 
the golf course. When we ent- 
ered the press room there was 
a Negro sheriff on the door 
and he info.rmed us that the 
reason we had to park so far 
away was because they only 
had 125 parking spaces and 


125 players had registered for 
those spots. 

We were given a lovely desk 
and we were served ham sand- 
wiches, sunkist orange juice, 
coffee, beer, "Cokes" and pie. 
There were 50 top sports re- 
porters (I sat next to Sid Ziff 
of The Mirror), 40 typewriters. 
40 phones and two TV sets. 
Every time we would return 
to the press room after walk- 
ing 18 holes, most of the re- 
porters would ask, "Did you 
see anything exciting?" "Any 
one trampled on yet?" There 
were 10..500 spectators and the 
Junior Chamber. must be com 
plimented for handling them 
so expertly; not one spectator i 
was in.iured. ! 

Bob Goalby of Crystal Riv- 1 
er, Fla. won the top money, 
($7,500). He shot 67-70-71-67., 
Charles Sifford shot 70-"fi9-73- j 
70 to take .'^ixth place which 
j netted him $900. 
t The last two days of the! 
•tournament Siffprd's gallery i 
consisted of .500 fans mo.stly^ 
1 Negroes. We have never seen; 
!him putt so well. We couldn't] 
ihelp noticing that there were! 
»>— o doctors following Sif- j 
I lord T>r. Wells Forde, Beall 
and Baiie.. Siff^-H's n Atty. 
Herman Engn^a alon^; ■•■•*•'' ' 
Mrs. Sifford and Charlie Jr. ; 
- :>re also in the crowd. We 
later saw Atty. English take a 
few shots at the "iiole in one" 
for SIOOO and his ball landed 
a few inches inside the "glori- 
'tied circle ' 

I The Junior Chamber will not 
jsponsor the L.A. Open next >-ear 
[because the national PG.A 
I tournament will be played in 
Los Angeles. We were inform- ( 
ed that this tournament will , 
i be played on a private course, j 
I Question for the .Atty. General 
I — "Is PGA going to allow our 
I Negro professionals .to partici- 
pate in its Califojnia tourna- 
'ment?" 


I Apache Senior 
Is Voted Team's 
Top Cage Player 

Coach Ted Berner of Cen- 
tennial Senior High School 
has announced that Roy 
Walker, a senior student, has 
been voted the most outstand- 
ing defensive player on the 
school's varsity basketball 
team. 

Playing in the Kiwani's 
Third Annual Invitational 
Basketball Tournament in San 
Bernadino recently, W- a 1 k e r 
broke the tournament re- 
bound record of 68. and won 
the All-Tournament Trophy is 
one of the five outstanding 
players of the three-game ses- 
sion. 

.The Apaches, having de- 
feated Riverside Poly 52-42. 
and Redlands. .58-.56. were 
barely eased out of first place 
by Antelope Valley, who eked 
out a 43-42 score in the final 
tournament game, leaving 
Centennial as second place 
trophy winners. However, the 
Apaches upheld a long-stand- 
ing tradition of the school, 
and again brought home the 
sportsmanship trophy. 

Walker, an outstanding 
scholar as well as an athlete. 



National Hockey 
League Boasts 
First Tan Player 

Southern California sports 
fans may get a chance to see 
Willie ORee, the first " Negro 
t( play in the National Hockey 
I^eague. who made his debut 
with the Boston Bruins in Chi- 
cago last December. A native 
of Frederickton; New Bruns- 
wick, he appeared in a game 
against the Chicago Black 
Hawks and commanded con- 
siderable attention for his play 
at left and right wing. 

ORee, while playing with 
Hull-Ottawa of the Eastern 
Pro League, scored 15 goals 
and 10 assi.sts. 
I Jack Demp.sey. who .success 
Probably the two greatest , nounced his starting backfield, I fully spon.sored two meetings 
football teams ever assembled the betting is that John Crow'la.st September between the 
for one game launch practice! of the Cardinals, Tommy Mcj I Toronto Maple Leafs and the 
this weekend for the Eleventh | Donald of the Eagles and Jim Boston Bruins at the Sports 
annual All-Star Pro Bowl j Brown, of the Browns will open Arena, will bring the Cleve- 
game scheduled Sunday. Jan.! with Van Brocklin. Hand Barons and the Van- 

15. at the Los Angeles Coli-I Lombard! is expected to go couver "Canucks' hockey 
seum with the kickoff at 1 ' with Johnny Unitas of the '-clubs here for games on Feb. 1 
.p.m. ■ j Colts at quarterback. Paul i a^fl 2. 

The Eastern Conference^®'^""^ of the Packers and; The clubs are tops in their 
squad under the t^uidance of'^'^"^ Moore of the Colts as , leagues, the West Coast and 
canny Buck Shaw, who will be ' halfbacks 'and Packer Jim | American Ice Hockey Leagues, 


Pro'Bowlers Drill 


Taylor at fullback. 


' respectively. 


ooaching his farewell game, 
will drill at Southern Cal's Bo- 
vard, Field, w'hile the W^est, 
under Vince Lombard!, will 
work out at Wriglev Field. 
First practices are set forl.^^^ P?'"*^ °^ ^^^ current, bas- ' jes in an Jtnportant Big Five 


Bmins, Trojans Cage Teams Tangle 

UCLA is nearing the mid- [take on Washington's Husk- 


Saturday afternoon with 
twice-a-day drills commencing 
Sundaj' morning. 
. The game has oodles of 
angles. No 1, of course, for 
Lombard! and his eight Green 
Bay Packers on the West 


ketball season and the .iury ^.j^^n at 9 o'cloc-k. Then, the 
IS .still out on the Bruins. Is; ^ . , 1 „^ j ,.. , • 
this one of John wooden's"^^^ night, SC and Washing- 

top teams, a team of cham- 1 ton go at it again in the open 
pionship potential? Or is it I er and UCLA battles Califor 


a team which blows hot and 
cold, especially in the shoot- 


7 .squad will be revenge or^-: '"S department 


Shaw and his eight Eagles for 
the 17-13 vietor\- Philadelphia 


The answers, could be sup- 
plied this weekend 'Jan. 13- 


nia's aroused Bears, who were 
.soundly defeated twice by the 
Trojans at Berkeley la.st week, 
in the nightcap. 
Off' the opening weekend of 


scored in the recent World '14) when the question-mark! conference play, the Tro.ians 


Champion.<;hip thriller. 

Also, Norm Van Brocklin, 
the Mr. Evervihing of pro foot- 
baJI this season, will be play- 
ing his final game in the sta- 
dium where he launched his 
pro career as a Ram in 1949. 

While Shaw has not an- 


Bruins and SC's high-flying are now the team to catch. 
Trojans host -two more double- The Bruins', who split their 
headers in the .Los Angeles two-game -series at Seattle, 
Sports Arena. are rated even with Califor- 

On Friday, the Bruins face nia and Stanford, which was 
Arizona's Wildcats, always a idle last week, » as the dark- 
Border Conference cage pow- [ horse entries in the early run- 
er, at 7 p.m. while the Trojans i ning. % 





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Big *0' Leads 

Royals Against 
Lakers Saturday 

The National Baasketball 
Assn. has never been labeled 
a "rookie's paradise." 

Not many of them have 
been able to stand up under 
the "initiation." In recent 
years, however, there's been 
one. each time who's made it 
big. Real big. 

Two seasons ago it waisthe 
Lakers' Elgin Baylor. Last 
season it was Wilt (The Stilt) 
Chamberlain of the Philadel- 
phia Warriors. It's no mystery 
who the big guy is this time. 

Of course,, it's the "Big O." 

His >.."fect on the NBA was 
heard like an explosion in 
Cincinnati and felt like one 
in other cities of jthe league. 

The "Big O" isueally Oscar 
Robertson and he "-is expected 
to detonate in the seventh 
NBA city — Los Atigeles — 
Saturday morning (Jan. 14) at 
the Sports Arena when he 
makes his local debut with the 
Cincinnati Royals. 

And if he doesn't* blow the 
roof off the Arena "Saturday 

he gets a second opportunityition, setting several scoring records and .being named a] 
Sunday night. ^^.state. Games are .scheduled Jan. 29 and Feb. 5 at Sports Arena. 


Abe Saperstein's thirty-fourth annual edition trf Globe- 
trotters shapes up as one of the greatest in the series tA 
wonder squads that have thrilled 72 countries on six ipontin. 
ents with amazing ability and hilarious byplay. Two brilliant 
newcomers have been added to the stellar array of veterans in 
Goyoner Vaughn, a great star fjom the University at. Illinois, 
and Frank Burks from the Universdty of Wisconsin. 

They have fitted in most admirably into a "uriit already 
comprising the peerless Meadowlark Lemon, comedian su- 
preme; Murphy Summdns, the dribbling marvel; set shot 
wonder and captain, Clarence Wilson; six foot eight inch Joe 
Buckhalter, and the other crack holdover specialists, Charles 
CTex") Harrison, Jackie Fitzpatrick and Ernest Wagner. 

Vaughn came to the Trotters after three brilliant seasons 
at Illinois, where ihs total of 1,001 points made him the third 
highest scorer in the school's history. He 1^ the Illini In 
scoring last season with 411' tallies for St 17.9 and ranked 
fourth nationally in best free throw percentages. Goyoner, 
who gained much all-star recognition, hail§ from Edwards- 
ville. 111., where he paced the high school to state runner-up 
laurels in 1956. 

Like Vaughn, Burks was a prep .phlenom, scoring nearly 
half his Wells High School team's points in Chicago ccMnpeti* 



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ROYAL SOCIAL CLUBS .{XMAL FORMAL— Mrwbrrs nf ihr 
eight-x ear-old Royals arc shoun follniving thr introdui lion during thtir annual 
jormnl dance at the AInyflourr Bnllrnom in I ngleti'ond.last Saturday evrnintj. 
■from left: ^adine Fairley, .Martha Diikcrson, Mamie Heath, Maggie 


Posey. Ann Jnrkson. Uatlie }\eiihy. Lillian Baly, Lunicc Parker, Bessie 
Myers, Trudie 11 hii khnin, Peniola II ilUnnis. Bernice Youijq, Johnnie Mae 
Ford and C.leo Bradley. Standing from left: Aritola Bell, president and 
If ini Orr, uho introrluced the liuh. (Adams). ; 

' i " I \ - " . 


Royal Social and Charity Club Entertains 
One Thousand Guests at Annual Formal Ba 


By WINI ORR 
Bowing before a near one 
thousand guests, the Royal 
Social and Charity Club en- 
tertained " fecenjly at the 
Mayhower Ballroom in 
Ingiewood. 

The Royals were organized 
eight yearis ago and enjoy 
an active annual calendar of 
events. The club \or.g af;o 
adopted the Foundation for 
the Junior Blind as its an- 
nual charity . endeavor to 


which they contribute. 

The ladies chose white as 
the color for their gowns, 
although the fabrics were 
\aried. Some chose satin 
beaded with seed pearls, 
others peau de sole and still 
others rich brocade. 

The president, .^rizola Bell, 
was elegant in an ic<? blue 
brocaded sheath with match- 
ing pumps. 

Most of the gowns follow- 
ed the same pattern which 


was in the regal manner of 
sheathed skirts in front With 
full overlaying train from the 
waist in the back, dropping 
just inches below the hem- 
line. The fitted bodice with 
spaghetti straps was high- 
lighted with the club's colors 
in a yellow rose corsage with 
ro\al blue ribbon. The ladies 
wore royal blue slippers and 
white gloves. 

As a token of thejr esteem, 
the club presented its pre.si- 


dent with a gift. 

Introduced by Wini Orr, 
club and social coordinator, 
the members bowed as fol- 
lows: Peacola Williams. Na- 
dine Fairley. Eunice Parker, 
and .Martha Dickenson. 

Officers are: Trudie 
Whickham, sick and condo- 
lence: Ora Townsend. par- 
liamentarian; Mamie Heath, 
critic: Maggie Possey. social 
hostess; Cleo Bradley, re- 
porter; Ann Jackson, ser- 



geant-atarms; Johnie Mae 
Ford, business manager; 
Hattie Newboy. treasurer; 
Lillian Baty, financial sec- 
retary; Bessie Myers, corres- 
ponding secretary; Bernice 
Young, recording secretary; 
Cel( ste King, vice president: 
and Arizola Bell, president. 

Two of the members who 
were unable to attend the 
dance due to illness were 
Ora Townsend and Celeste 
King. II • 


Les Petites 
Officers 
nstalled " 


NEIV OFFICERS SEATED —'Officers of Me Doll 
League Cluh, Inc., are shnun follouing their annual instal- 
lation in the home of Nellie Broun last Saturday night. 
Pictured from left: Euvalda Morris, recording secretary: 

Doll League Club 
Seats Officers 


Ruth Ball, sergcanl-al-arms : Helen Smith, financial Secre- 
tary: Frank Lal'igne, installing officer: l^ulu Bendy, presi- 
dent : I.inina Adamjs, lice-president: Faye II agner. cor- 
responding secretary, and Glndycc Clark, reporter. (Adams) 


Ne^ officers of the popular 
Doll -League Club Inc., were 
installed by Atty. Frank La- 
/Vigne in the beautiful West 
20th street home of club 
member Nellie • Brown last 
Saturday night in a ver\' gay 
atmosphere." 

This year's president is 
personable Lulu Bendy, 
charter rnember of the Doll 
League, and she announced 
that she and her officers, as 
well as the members, will be 
striving to make their forth- 
coming social event,=; much 
more interesting and impres- 
sive. Extensive work and 


thought will be given par- 
ticularly to the group's an- 
nual Christmas party and 
their winter fomial at which 
time they request their 
guests to bring dolls and 
toys to be given underprivi- 
Icged children. 

Realizing the fact that to 
get the^est possible toys and 
dolls for some 2500 children 
isn't going to be an easy 
task, club members elected 
suce officers _as E u v a 1 d a 
Morris, Ruth Ball, Helen 
Smith, Emma Adams, Faye 
Wagner, Gladyce Clarke and 
Fannie De Mann to assist 
Mrs. Bendy. \ 


W Bill Smallwodd ^^ 


.41mfna Lomax and brood 
left Mon. for Tuskegce where 
tliey'l! - live while mama 
turns put another paper. 
Marilyn Holder had surgery 
Tues. Nuffy Calloway jet- 
streakr. \n on the 23rd to 
get away from the ice and 
snov*' for a spell, g&ily park- 
ing her knapsack at Eloise 
Davis' as usually she does. 
Dr. and Mrs. Chas. Holley 
(Melba) are moving to Ro- 
dhester, Minn. Sat. (14 • is 
birthday for Estelle Shcr- 
^wpod. 

.The Hezz Howards <Doro- 
tliy)* bade adieu to her sis- 
tef. Colleen Williams of the 
nation's capitol, who house- 
guested with them through 
the Yule and after the Rose 
Bowl doings. Schoolmarm 
Ida Lee and her brother, 
Raymond Walls, lost their 
brother in Chi. Pasadena's 
Rose Garner will be 88 on 
Sun. (15). Cullen Fentress 
takes a birthday Mon. (16), 
ditto next day. for Dr. Leroy 
Welekes. Just learned Eva 
PaytOn is living here again 
atter years of Manhattan. 
Welcome, honey chile. 
Off to .Washington 

l\veive-Thirty-three Club 


due to n^eet Sat. with Delia 
Williams. Attj-. Herbert Sim- 
mons to tie on the 20th for 
the Inauguration. Portia 
C'xaig leaves Tues. for the DC 
doings; her son, Craig, leaves 
on the 30th for the Dodgers 
training camp as a rookie 
prospect. Inauguration 
bound; SF's Dr. and . Mrs. 
He'bic llenderson, Atty. Ter- 
'ry Francois, the Byron Rum- 
fords. The Dadsons Club are 
tal'ing judo instruction these 
Mon. evenings, the young- 
uns as well as their dads. 

Who but indomitable Ruby 
Wilson could possibly lend 
undimmed glamour even to 
a wheelchair? She attended 
the Bev-Hilton luncheon of 
her club, the Thirteen Aids, 
wA le convalescing from a* 
nasty fall: the club present- 
ed -a sizeable check to the 
Korean Orphanage . project, 
their '60 program. Inaugura- 
ticft - headed: Atty. Vaino 
Spencer, her husband, Lor- 
enzo, and her mother. Jo 
Hol.mes is going, too. The 
Bob Brewingtons: And 
thanks to you. 

Tues. (17) is anniversary 
time for the Ralph Johnsons 

XContinued^oh Page 10) 



Les Petite Femmes held 
their annual Installation 
Party at the lovely home of 
their treasurer. Mrs. Bonzell 
Chouteau, 1712 E. 124th 
street. 

■ The 1961 officers installed 
by Mr^. JCenneth Terrell are: 
President, Mrs. Althena 
Townsend; Vice - president, 
Mrs. Evelyn Byrd; treasurer, 
Mrs. Bonzell Choteau: sec- 
retary, Mrs. Bernice Hilson; 
business manager, Mrs. Pa- 
tricia »M. Elmore and chap- 
lain, Mijss Marjorie Fraiser. 

The vfry simple installat- 
ion service delivered by Mr. 
Terrell was attended by the 
other members of the club: 
Mrs. Berle Wilson, Mrs. Rita ■ 
Jean Wright and Mrs. Har- 
riet Terrell; and guests. 
Highlighting the ceremonies 
was the surprise chc-rnpagno 
communion of appreciation 
and greetings to outgoing 
president, Mrs. Evelyn Byrd. 

Mrs. Townsend paid tribute 
to the outgoing president 
thanking her in behalf of 
the club's past activities, 
which are known to the Los 
Angeles scene by many. She 
promises to do her best to 
fulfill the .office duties of 
the office ju.st vacated with 
all the vital interest, and 
verve she, possesses in, 
furthering the club's steady 
growth for 1961. 

A lovely table was spread 
and everyone enjoyed the 
evenings entertainment. 




1 — 


• CWBS • 




FASHI0N5 


i* Thursday, January 12, 1961 


The California Eagle — 9 



CLUB LEADER — Beaming president of the Royal Socinl and Charity Club, Aritola 
Bell, nith mistress of ceremonies, II ini Orr, as she received a surprise token from club 
nietnhers during their formal last Saturday. Looking on fnjm left cvre members Hattie 
Seuhy and Lillian Bat\. (Adam<). 



EX ROUTE TO SYDXEY, AUSTRA LLf—Siioun^ stopping over briefly at the Los 

Angeles Airport last ucek is Mrs. Ella Stctcvirt, of Toledo, Ohio, second from left. She, 
is the former president of the National Association of Colored llotnen and is en roulr 
to attend a conference in Australia. She is the only Xcgro If oninn delegate from this 
country and li'dT also visit many other foreign countries. She teas greeted by A(rs. 
Ernestine Hollouay, left, tind Mrs. R/tha Beck who is shon n nelcoming Mrs. Fred 
Taylor, Mrs. Stewart's traveling companion. ('.1 merican .Airlines Photo.) 


FXCHASCE CAl LL—Lulu Bind\. left, u shoun re- 
ceivihg ga\cl from outgoing' president , Sylfia Fortson. of 
the Doll League at their annual installation pariy. (Adams). 

AKA St)rority Slates , ! i 
Annual Benefit Affair 


Ottawa Visitors 
Arrive- in C\\y 

.Mrs. Hardiman Cureton, 
nee Pat Flowers, and young 
sons. Hardy Jr. and Karl, ar- 
rived from Ottawa, Canada 
last week. Mrs. Cureton is 
stopping with her parents. 
Mr. and Mrs, Orlando 
Flowers. 

Both Pat and Hardy Jr., 
will participate in the 
H o s k i n s. Wilkins wedding 
scheduled lor February. 


Tern pel ite Club 
Feted with Part/ 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart 
. Thomas' beautiful south Los 
Angeles home at 2351 East 
ll9th street was brightly 
decorated when thipy enter- 
tained rhembers of the 
Tcmpelite. Club during the 
holidays. 

Secret pals were revealed, ' 
gieetings were exchanged 
and visitors introduced. 

James R. Villareal, presi- 
dent of the club, acted as 
master of ceremonies for the 
evening. The hostess served 
a delicious turkey dinner. 


Debuteers Club Maps' Plan's 


Willie Gandy. president of 
the Sir Debuteers Social Club, 
presided over the group's 
first meeting of the New 
Year last Sunday in his sub- 
urban home ill South Los An- 
geles. 

The meeting was high- 
lighted with many important 
events which ^he club will 
participate in during the 
year in addition to their reg- 
ular events, which includes 
their annual Spring Frolic. 
Informally, they listed four 
times they will hold get- 
acquainted parties and per- 
haps the biggest event com- 
'ing up soon is the opening of 
their new Social Club at 89th 


Members of the graduate 
chapter of the Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Sorority are enthusias- 
tically making plans for 
their annual benefit subscrip- 
tion. Fantasia Arhericana, to 
be held at the International 
Room of the Beverly Hilton 
Hotel on Friday, March 10. 

Derotha Allen and Norma 
Earles are co-chairmen for 
this year's event and plans 
have been made for "some- 
thing new!" This year's af- 
fair will have a Latin Amer- 
ican theme and promises to 
be the most fabulous affair 
held, beginning with the in- 
vitations that will soon be 
in the mail. Invitations are 


limited to the seating capac- 
ity of the hotel and recipients 
are urged to accept their 
bids early. 

Proceeds from this affair 
will be used to further the 
Health project, which is con- 
centrating on Sickle Cell; 
scholarships, and other com- 
munity services. 


Income Tax Class 

D o r s e y Adult School an- 
nounced a class in Income 
Tax to begin Tuesday, Jan. 
17. The class will meet for 
10 weeks from 7 to 9:30 p.m. 
9:30 p.m. / 



and Avalon. 

The club has a spacious 
patio and will be opened to 
the public some time next 
month. It has been complete- 
ly remodeled inside and 
out. Tentative plans call for 
"an elaborate invitational to 
all club officials at which 
time Walter (^oodloe, public 
relations and promotion di- 
rector for Sterling Liqjors, 
will be asked to serve as 
host and introduce the Sir 
Debuteers and tell plans aC 
the new club. 

The Sir Debuteers' first 
big public dance will be held 
some time in July and fliey 
expect to announce a sensa.- 
(tional attraction for the 


Occasion. 


\ 


ANNUAL SENEFIT SUBSCRIPTION— Members of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee of AKA Sorority are ready to receive reservations for the Fantasia Americana. 
Sorors Norma Earles, Derotha Allen, co-chairman of the affair, and Janie Johpson, Inez 
Broiunj reservations^ are discussing seating arrangements. (Adams). ' 


Luggage Shower 
Attended by 75 

More than seventy-live 
smartly dressed young ladies 
were guests of Mrs. -Bessie 
Burke and Mrs. Ethel Bruinjg- 
ton on Sunday morning at a 
breakfast luggage shower 
held at the Wilfandel Quh 
House, honoring Miss Sandra 
Hoskins. 

The popular bride-elect 
Miss Hoskins and Mr. Alonzo 
Wilkins III are scheduled to 
wed on Feb. 11. * 

Among those attending 
were Mrs. Aurora Hoiskins, 
bride's to be mother; Mrs. 
Bernice Arbor, mother of the 
groom to be. Also Mesdames 
Inez Roberson, Teresa 
Daniels, Patricia Cureton, 
Patsy Watson, Jackie Gramt, 
Karleen Downs, B rend a 
Moore and Sandra Speights. 


\Y' 


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'-• f)arl'tng Dotie ivho usually pens this interesting and in- 
'formative column ueei/y has requested a leave of absence 

since 'family duties are noiv demanding all her time. Houcver, 
' Dettic Xi'ill aliiays share a iiarm spot in our hearts hen at the 

Eafle and the uclcome hack sign will ahvays he hung for her 
-juturn. 

OUR GLESr 
U'insnmc ff'ini Orr. who turned out her first social column 

way hark uhcn the I'-Car ambled noisily doxin Central ave- 
.Jiue and .ti hen II cstrrn nicntie was known as "wav across 
■tTiibn." has never r/oltcn for away from the social end of 

i-hings in this fast i/rowintf city of oars. Despite the fad that 

the J( estside. Conipion. Pasadnia, Santa Monica and Venice 
' hme oftgroun the Eastside. she has the uncanny ahility of 

iefping her finger on social happenings, as any good newspaper 

woman would — Edttor. 

Like an Old Shoe^ 

• Guest writing for the Eagle is like looking 
Ihfough your doset and finding an old pair of shoes 
that not only fits as well as ever, but feels so good. 
~ ' The year 1961 is getting off to a rollicking start 
with half the population on liquid 900 diets; appre- 
hension and anticipation at the coming inaugural; 
speculation as to the 'Outcome of the Cuban situa- 
tion (and I have a REAL curiosity where this ques- 
tion is concerned as my one and only off-spring is 
~ stationed at Guantanamo Base). ' . 

And How They Fly 
Bui. as the saying goes: "Life goes on." There's 
turmoil a-plenty in one household what with CRAIG 
JANUARY preparing to take off for the Dodger 
trailing camp in Florid^ ; brother JOHN packing on 
the other couch getting ready for his scholastic in- 
-vasion of Mexico; and mother, PORTIA CRAIG, 
Shopping like mad in her haste to plane out on the 
57th for Washington, B.C. and the Presidential In- 
auguration of John F. Kennedy and the accom- 
panying festivities. 

— First lady of journalism in our town, CHAR- 
XOTTA A. BASS due hotne any minute from her 
irip to Mexico City. ANN MALBROUGH who, with 
son KEVIN and sistier WILMA WILLIAMS flew 

^ome for a family re-union in Tennessee, rushing 
^to town just in time to get changed for her 
•ilinkeydink Club Dance. 

- JOE MALBROUGH who stayed home to tend the 
Store busy getting the gowns ready for the usual 
spectacular appearan^^e of the club. Incidently, he 

,has an Idea that will soon be put into practice, 
namely, renting gowns of a uniform color to clubs. 
He plans to feature several styles and of course 
;v«ry them frequently. Should certainly relieve some 
J^o can't stand the tariff on the kind you have to 
3JtJce with you. 

~ Speaking of ideas, that's no idea the JEEP 
SMITH band has, but cold business since Jeep has 
turned over the Jeeps ters to the direction of 
MARTIN "FUZZY" GOWER; they are as swinging 
-as ever. 

:: Glimpsed LADY CLAIRE WILLIAMS, JUANITA 
^REEN and ALICE CREECY of the Ladies of Para- 
•*ise Club enjoying the Royal Social and Charity 
' ^lub Dance at the Mayflower. 
Z Fun chatting with GLADYS and GENERAL 

fOODS whom I hadn't had the pleasure of seeing 
ages. 
_: BEA DEVAUGHN making progress like crazy 
2fter her long siege of illness and grateful to so 
■many of her friends that she hasn't been able to 
thank personally. Bea says she will never be able 
1j3 show her heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to 
3fll of her friends who made a long and painful con- 
valescence almost a pleasure. 
~ EUGENE KNOX making his plans to dr'we to 
JSew Orleans for Mardi Gras, and enplane from 
-♦here to Columbus, Ohio to visit his family. BILLY 
PARKER and KELSO ^BARBOUR makjng many a 
■ .cup of tea a real event as the tea gets cold and the 
conversation warmer. 

As we go to press I have no choice but to com- 
ment on the University of Georgia. Closing the 
■doors will not close the education gates for the 
Negro, because it looks like he is here to stay. But 
,1t seems they would realize «o many of their own 
are being deprived of that which is so important: a 
kittle book learning. 

Sunday night at the fireside and through the 
, medium of TV and the courtesy of the General 
Electric Theatre, SAMMY DAVIS, JR. in "Memory 
Tn White" with the apropos remark of RONALD 
•REAGAN, a memorable portrait. Just wish they 
could have chosen a different title, or was it a time- 
Ty one? 

_ How are we to forget — MABEL JONES, one of 
the truly fine fashion commentators battling like a 
champ an -illness that has her medics baffled. 

Lest I forget to mention it^ am now a staff 
writer for the new monthly ^blication "Angel 
City," a neat little mag of our city and folks. 
V. Christmas trees down, lights but, gifts packed 
away — all indicative that the holidays are over 
and so back to normal. 
' LIBBY CLARK driving her new little compact 

car into the new year. Carnival Island moved to 
Hollywood and I do wish the cast success. In case 
you hadn't heard, this is the fast moving musical 
that Nick and Edna Stewart wrote and which 
started in their Ebony Showcase only to be thought 
to be bigger than the small house. ; 

Best of luck to you all in '61. 


10— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


it 

4 


■ :-k 


IMPOtTfD tY THI lUCKIMOHAM COIPOIATION, lOCKfmUl CfNTU, NfW VOM 


i 



L. A. CH.iPl'lR OF DRIFTERS — following their 
regular monthly meeting. Drifters arc iholin hiaking their 
initial how to the Southland's cltih circle. Fhcy were 
granted their chapter from the national hod\ in October 
1960. Seated front from left: E.dwina ilolloman, presi- 


dent: I era llatson. Jiianita Martin. Bernice Early 
(secretary) and Ruth Robinson. Second roxv: Johnnie H'il- 
Hams, lice-president : Sara Ray, treasurer; .Margaret Love 
cores ponding secretary, and Jessie Johnson. 


nc 


National Drifters 

Grants LA. Group Charter 


Among the - Southlands 
newest organizations to hh- 
nounce their program for tiic 
1961 season are the Driftrrs. 
Inc., Los Angeles Chapter. 
Following the National con- 
vention of Drifters. Inc.. .held 
in Indianapolis fn 1959, per- 
mission was granted to 
members to organize a local 
chapter. 

In October. Betty Garrett 
of Indianapolis installed the 
chapter in this area. Other 
new West Coast chapters to 
be installed were in the Bay 
Area, including San Fran- 


cisco, Oakland, and Berkeley. 

The civic-Ynindcd Drifters 
are life members of the 
NAACP and the Urban 
League and their charity pro- 
jects are designed to support 
those who have the most 
need in their comrhunities. 

The home of Juel Collins 
was the setting of the group's 
last monthly meeting whicli 
was pres-ided over by their 
president,' charming Edvvina 
Holloman. 

The president, along with 
Margaret Lwc, held a con- 
ference with represei^tatives 


of the California Eagle to ex- 
plore the best possible 
methods of serving the com- 
munity. 

Funds to be raised for pro- 
jects selected by the group 
will come frorri an elaborate 
rummage sale to be an- 
nounced at a later date. 

Members of the Drifters 
are Dolores Carter, Juel Col- 
lins, Jessie Johnson, Marga- 
ret Love, Vera Watson, Ed- 
wina liolloman, Ruth Robin- 
son, Juanita Martin, Bernice 
Early, Sara Ray, and Johnnie 
Willianu. 



CiOLDES KEYSTOXE CLUB— Former residents of Pittsburgh. Pa., aAo formed a 
club two years ago are shown during their annual holiday parly. Pictured from left: Dan 
IVashington, Joe\t alker, president: Bill Bailey. Milton (Bud) Swan and Tommy Sands. 

Keystone in Second Year I ^^"= °' ^^'*'>' 

Hold First Meet 



Members of the Golden 
Keystone Club celebrated 
their second year with a 
lavish holiday party in the 
home of William and Mary 
Hostin on West Pico. The 
club members are former 
residents of Pittsburgh, Pr., 
and the party and the cele- 
bration was attended by 
wives and friends of th£ club. 

The group has been work- 
ing closely with the 28th 
street YMCA and has partici- 
pated financially in the 
campers program. 

At a recent meeting of the 
group and under their presi- 
dent Joe Walker all mem- 
bers have pledged their full 
support to charities which 


the club selects as projects 
during 1961. 

Mr. ■ and Mrs., Hostin 
proved to be a ^delightful 
host and hostess to the sec- 
ond annual affair as the club 
and their guests enjoyed 
cocktails, buffet and dancing 
throughout the evening and 
they ushered in the New 
year on a festive note. 

Slates Classes 

The YWCA-Woodlawn Cen- 
ter is offering a series of 
classes to adults in Charm, 
Crochet and Knitting, Dra- 
matics, Dressmaking, Modern 
Dancing and Draperies and 
Slipcovers. 


JACOBS & FARBER PRESENT 
ONE OF THE GREATEST SINGERS 
k OF OUR TIME! 

WILLIAM 

WAItFIELD 

SAT. EVE. JAN. 21, PHILHARMONIC AUD. 

RETURNING FROM A TRIUMPHAL WORLD-WIDE TOUR FQR 
THE U. S. STATE DEPARTMENT. STAR OF MOM'S "SHOWBOAT". 
ACCLAIMED IN THE INTERNATIONAL TOURING PRODUCTION 
OF "PORCY AND BESS." IN A PROGRAM OF GREAT SONGS 
AND SPIRITUALS. 

ORDER NOW BY MAIL FOR CHOICE SEATS-SEND TO 

JACOBS A FARBER, P.O. Bex 1 829, Let Angeles 28, Calif. 

Tickets: $l,SO, $2.00, $2.50, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00. 

Enclose stamped, selfaddressed envelope. 



Beatrice Moman was 
hostess to the first meeting 
of the 1961 season last Sun- 
day when the Fans of Gaiety 
Club met in her home. This 
marks the last meeting be- 
fore the group's annual elec- 
tion. ^ 

Mrs. Moman, in addition to 
serving a wonderful Spanish 
dinner following the meet- 
ing, was declared winner of 
the club's prize which was a 
canned ham. 

Before the close of the 
1960 season the Mary Ann 
Bayliss home was the scene 
of the group's annual holiday 
party at which time they ex- 
changed gifts. 

' Guests attei^ding the meet- 
ing at the home of Mrs. 
Moman included husbands 


\Bill 
Smallwood 

(Continued from Page 9) 
(Inez). Alpha Phi Zeta Chap- 
ter of Zeta Phi Beta met 
Sat. as Esther Muldrew, 
Maigaret Ralney, Irma Rich- 
ardson and Mary Rollins en- 
acted roles as hostesses. This 
Sat. is Founder's Day lunch- 
eon time for the Zetas at an 
intimate restaurant out La 
Cienega way. Speaker will 
be soror Rosalind Meeks. 
Leontyne King: j^nd thanks 
to J ou, especially. . 

More. Anpn | 

SDlego's Al Montgornery 
and wife, Kay, weekended in 
town, put up suijiptuously 
at the Statler. They have 
some merry plans for the 
next fortnight or so which 
should be delightfully pro- 
vocative; some of their local 
cronies will dash do'vn to 
S'Diego to take part but 
gladly. Of it all, more anon. 

I .\ to Chi: Opal Jones, 
whose address while there 
will be Hull House. Mil 
Blount could havewvell used 
seven league boots last Sat. 
With friends she attended 
a matineie of Raisin In The 
Sun, swished on to BevHills 
for cocktails, dined at Dave 
Chasen's THEN made the 
curtain for A Lie Is A Cen- 
tuii' Long! Some anxious 
mcnicnts over at Tess and 
Gi! Lindsay's; her mother 
has been quite ill these; past 
few days or more. j, 

Tall, lean Bernie Harper 
liT town for seven weeks of 
nonchalance. Last time I 
saw him ( at an astonishing, 
party) his entrance got such 
a^hunderous ovation I 
thought for an instant he'd 
arrived with the U.S. Cav-' 
alpy. Owner of a we'l cush- 
ioned checking account, 
Bernie maintains the effete 
look and on him it looks 
dain good. Freda and Rene 
DeKnight were in town very 
briefly enroute tp Honolulu. 

Westside Society 
Schedules Meeting 

: Mrs. Leo L. Lott, president 
of the Westside Benevolent 
Society, announced f'at the 
group's first meeting for the 
New Year is scheduled for 
Jan. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the 
auditorium of Bethel AME 
Church. Members ar.- urged 
to attend and bring a friend. 
The churcl^is located at 1511 
W. 36th street. 

and friends of the members. 
The only member absent for 
the meeting was Jeanett Col- 
lery, because of illness. 


CENTENNIAL 

Centennial Senior High 
School's debate squad, under 
the direction of Mrs. Maple 
Cornwell, has been invited 
by the University <rf Southern 
California to its 25th An- 
nual Invitational High 
School Forensic Tournament, 
to be held Friday and Satur- 
day, Jan. 13 and 14, at the 
Bovard Auditorium. 

Representing the Apaches 
as championship debaters in 
Friday's session are James 
Page, Clarence Broussard, 
Larry Moss and Ira Hawkins. 

"On Saturday, 12 of our 50 
forensic people have been in- 
vited to represent Centennial, 
because of their outstanding 
tournament record," Mrs. 
Cornwell stated. 

Those • featured in Satur- 
day's event will include: 
Clarence Broussard and 
Katie Smith as extempor- 
aneous speakers, Larry Moss, 
Allen Gantt and Margaret^ 
Higgins in impromptu speak- 
ing, and Emily Blake, James 
Page and Vivian Clark in 
oratory. Suzie Claude will 
represent the school in dra- 
matic interpretation, Jerome 
Ferrell in humorous speak- 
ing, and Robert Warren, Ira 
Hawkins and Gloria Foley 
will compete in oratorical 
interpretation. 

GOMPERS 

G o m p e r s Junior High 
School is presenting its 
"Winter '61 Father-Son Night 
on Thursday evening, Jan. 
19. The program will take 
place in the Activity Room 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

The activity- packed eve- 
ning. sUrts at 6:30 p.m. with 
a round robin volleyball 
tournament featuring four 
teams. The teams will con- 
sist of fathers, faculty men, 
A9 boys, and an All-Star 
team. Each team will 'play 
each other once. Fathers are 
urged to participfite. 

A social period will follow 
at 7:3G^.m. during which ire- 
freshments will be on sale. 
Apple pie a la mode, coffee 
or milk will be available. 
The Gompers Junior High 
School Swing Band will play 
for the entertainment of the 
group. 

HOOPER AVENUE 

Hooper Avenue P.T.A. Child 
Welfare Chairman Mrs. Otis 
Pearson and Co-Chairman, 
Mrs. James Matthews, report- 
ed on their Christmas pro- 
gram which many families 
in the ° community enjoyed 

Drew Medical 
Auxiliary in 
Regular Meet 

The Wohien's Auxiliary to 
the Charles Drew Medical 
Society held its regular 
rnonthly meeting last Satur- 
day at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. George Sealey, with 
Mrs. Zrelda Sealey and Mrs. 
Winifred Toney as hostesses. 

Mrs. Irene Bledsoe, Health 
Chairman who worked with 
Mental Health, Polio and 
Los Angeles Tuberculosis So- 
cieties during the holiday 
season, gave an interesting 
report on the projc": and 
cheer the group brought to 
many patients during the 
Yuletide season. 

Several new members who 
recently took up residence in 
the city were present to join 
the Auxiliary. The • new 
members and their husbands 
were guests of the society. 
They included Mrs. Ann 
Bobo and^Mrs. Joyce Bobo, 
wives of "two brothers, both 
physicians. 

Mrs.^, Lillian Alexander, 
widow of a physician from 
New Jersey and former presi- 
dent of the National Medical 
Association's Women's Aux- 
iliary, spoke to the gr.K'p- 

All of the new members 
were officially welcomed by 
the Auxiliary and folowin.^ 
the meeting the members 
and their guests enjoyed a 
delightful social hour. 


during the holidays. 

The Executive Board re-'" 
ported that all the children 
attending Hooper received 
gifts, fruit and nuts. In addi- 
tion each room held parties , 
with mothers assisting the 
teachers. 1 j 

Mrs. Hugh Howell, F.T.A.' 
president, attended the re- 
cent Parliamentary and Pres- 
ident Workshop at the South- 
' east Health Center at 49th 
and Avalon. She also, along 
with members, attended the 
Fremont Council meeting at , 
Russell Elementary School. 

Parents are being urged to 
support the ♦ Hooper, Ave. 
P.T.A. ' 

DORSEY P.T.A. 

Dorsey Adult School an:; 
nunces a series of lectures 
entitled 'Toward Better Fam- 
ily Living" to be given by f 
Dr. James S. Simkin. Thjs 
lecture series is co-sponsoreST' 
by Baldwin Hills P.T.A., Mrs. : 
Irwin Haus, Parent Educa- 
tion Chairman; and Windsor 
Hills P.T.A., Mrs. E. E. 
Hughes, Parent Education 
Chairman. 

The lectures will be held 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. with. •• 
the first three scheduled for. 
Wednesdays at Windsor Hills.,* 
School and the last thre.e 
scheduled for Thursdays at 
Baldwin Hills School. Regis- 
tration will be held at 9 a.m. 
at Windsor Hills School on 
Jan. IL 

Dates and titles of lectures 
are as follows: 

Jan. 11 — What Makes a - 
'Good Home? ^ 

Jan. 18 — EJveiybody Else 
Does! • 

Jan. 25 — Discipline, Re- 
spect, Responsibility. ^ , 

(These three lectures will . 
be held at Windsor Hills 
School.) 

Feb. 2 — Teaching Values* 

Feb. 9 — Preparation "for - 
Adolescence. 1 

Feb. 16 —(Goals and 
Achievement. ,- , -i". 

(These three lectures will : 
be held at Baldwin Hills 
School.) v. I " J' 

Bridge Club 
Installs New 
Club Officers 

The Rainbow Bridge and 
Charity Club had its first 'y, 
meeting of the year at the 
■^ home of Mrs. Juani'a Jack- 
son. Officers for the year are; 
President, Leon a Powell; "i-\ ' 
vice president, Elizabeth 'V 
Johnson; treasurer. Alberta f :. 
Boone; recording secretary, 
Wallacesteen Gilmore; fi- 
n a n c i a 1 secretary, Leona ■: 
Walton; business manager. 
Jewel Rawls; corresponding ' 
secretary. Ruby Clarke; re- 
porter, Henrietta Capers; •. 
parliamentarian, ^ 
Xouise Home; sergeant-at- 
arms, Juanita Jackson: social _ 
hostesses,' P a 1 1 n e Knight, 
Mattie Mc Calibb and Bea- 
trice Williams. 

Honorary members arc 
Gertrude Dailey, Maxine 
Reed and Mariam Canty. '. „ 
Members on leave of ab- 
sence, Robbie Wilder.] 

Beautiful trophies were 
presented to Mrs. Gilmore 
and Mrs. Johnson by the 
club for outstanding' work ■ , 
in furthering the high goals " . 
that made it possible for this 
club to triple its giving to •.' 
charity this year. | j 

Plans are in the making' 
for the May Festival. Bridge • :_ 
-was played. j ^^ I ..,. 

Wilton Demos Meet ; 

Wilton Place Democratic j 
Club members attended a 
special meeting last M mday, • 
in the home of Mrs. Gussie . -" 
Kizzie, 3509 Country Club \ . 
Drive. Plans were announced 
for the installation flihner 
and appointments of commit- 
tee chairmen and representa- 
■■ fives were made. 


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AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EAGLE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 A.M. 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


38011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 

^AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of the ISstate of 
WALTER SNELL 
Deceased 
Notice is hereby given to credit- 
ors liavinK claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in thf 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
undersigned at the, office of her 
Ationey. ' 

MACEO G. TOLBERT 
1272 South, Central Avenue 
in the City of^Los Anseies 11. in 
tile aforesaid County, which latter 
office is the place of business of 
the undersigned in all matters per- 
tainiiis to said estate. Such claims 
with the necessary vouchers must 
be fJled or presented as aforesairi 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
■ Dated December 19, 19tiO. 
. M'aceo G. Tolcert 
,Attorne.y.at-Law 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


FEMALE HELP WANTED 


■ I 


4272 South Central Avenue 
Los Angeles 11. Californ.ia. 
Matilda M. Snell 
Administratrix of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
Publish in California Eagle news- 
paper Dec. 22-29. 1960: Jan. 5-12, 
1961. 


RnCHESTER 


iH«irji-at.«.mananMBniiu 
322 West Manchester Blvd. 
Manchester & Broadway 

JUS1 MINUTfS AWAT VIA 
HARBOR FRIEWAY 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 
Plenty of Froe Parking 


(The California Eagle) 
38249 
NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 436-714 
In the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the 
County of Los Angeles. In the 
Matter of the Estate of Delia Mc- 
Kee. Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given to, cred- 
itors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to tlic 
undersitjned at the office of his 
Attorneys. Millar. Jiladdox & Ma- 
lonc 2S21 South Western Avenue. 
in the City of Los .^njieles, in the 
afore,said County, which latter of- 
,fice is the place of business of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchers must be 
filed or presented as aforesaid 
within .six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 

Dated ■ Dec. 22. ' 1960. 
MILLER, MADDOX A. MALONE " 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Anqeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 

THOMAS M. McKEE. JR. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publi.sh in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. 1960. 
Jan. 5-12-19. 1961 


GIRLS AND WOMEN 

Sell new products, appeals fo 
everyone. Spare time or full 
time. 

HO. 9.1911 -Studio F 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


-r 



EdWynn-Jidith 

Anna Maria Alberghetti 


APb 


as "The Princess" 

K»«t».u».-TECHNICOfcOR'' 


PLUS SECOND HIT 


B 



•UMU n«Mii»aM" 


(Callfornlp Eagle) 
39118 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

" No. 435-703 

In the Superior Court of the State 

of California, in anjr for the County 

of Los Angeles. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
LUCILLE BENDY. Deceased. 
Notice Is hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims aeainst the .«aid 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court'or to present them to the un- 
dersigned at the office ot his At- 
torneys. Miller. Maddox & Malone. 
2S24 South Western Avenue, in the 
City of Los Angeles, in the afore- 
said County, which latter office is 
the place of busine.'^.s of the under- 
signed in all matters pertaining to 
said e.state. Such claims with the 
njcessary vouchers must be filed 
or presented as aforesaid within 
six montlis after the first publica- 
tion of this notice. 
Dated: Jan. 6. 1961. 

,' ERNEST BEND^* 

Executor of the will 
of .said decedent. 
MILLER, MADDOX d. MALONE 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 
(Publi.sh in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Jan, 12. 19, 2«, 
Feb. 2. 1961) 


SALES 


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FOR THE FIRST TIME! 
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PART TIME ... OR FULL TIME 

HIGH EARNINGS ' 


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Company . . . Fabulous 

RELAX-A-CIZOR 
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Exciting Free Sales Training 
Program 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Plane, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PL. 21179 

FURNISHIED^OOM^ajlENT 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


(REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


WINDSOR HIUS 


5 ROOM — 2 bdrm. stucco. No 
down to vets. $750 dn. to 
non-vets. PL 7-2268. 


Lovely English home, 2 bedrms., 

1 i bath, paneled deh-family 

room, wet bar. $42,000 full ; $100 DOWN— 3 "bedroom home $ 1 8,950 fu 

price, good financing. 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 


The California Eagle— 1 1 


WESTSIDE HOUSES FOR SALE INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


6 ROOM SPANISH 


DOROTHY MARSHALL 
DU. M059 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

the People's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


ROOM FOR RENT 

Male or female— newly decorated 
room with all the home privi- 
leges. Reasonable rent. 13437 
Brownell, San Fernando, Calif. 
Phone EMpire 6-8871 
Rolland Teal 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


Famous product practically sells Singles $1 6.50 wkly., $60-65 


-FOR 24-HOUR SERVICE^- 


CAIL PLymouth 6-8347 - PLymouth 6-0997 

POWELL BAIL BONDS 

JOEl A. POWELL JOHN A. ECHOLS 

10951-53 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES 61, CALIF. 

FREE BAIL INFORMATION 


itself. Endorsed by beauty edi 
tors of Vogue, Harper's Bazaar,, 
and Glamour. Over 300,000 
users! Applicants must tj* well 
groomed, pleasant. Fringe bene- 
fits and advancement opportuni- 
ties, t. 

! FOR APPOINTMENT 
CALL MISS LOUISE 

OU5-80in 

If You're Now Working, We"!! 
Arrange Interview in P.M. 


mo., newly decorated, w-w 
carpeting, dressing room, large 
closets, utilities included. 
1102 South Mariposa Ave. 


3 Rooms 

Incl. Utilities. 

Furnished 

Westside 

HO. 5-0574 


HOUSES i APTS. WANTED 


H^LP WAhTTED-BOYS & MEN 


BEFOftE 


»U BUY - TRY BILL FROELICH' 

THriVDERBIRD 

— SPECIALISTS — 


■*j!'*Sftf -Sfj A'^ 




BOYS AND MEN 

Sell new products, appeals to 
everyone. Spare time or full 
time. 

HO. 9-1911 -Studio F 

BEAUTY^PERAToTwMiTlEO^^ 


RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaute Shoppe 

OPERATOR WANTED 
i 4919 WMt Adtms Blvd. 
Let AngoUt 16, Calif. 


FREE SERVICE!!! 

TO LANDLOI^OS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments, 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside. 

4020 South Western Aevnue 
AX. 2-1991 


7 ROOMS— 13/4 BATHS I— West - 

Side 3 bdrm. & den. Firepl. 
$1750 down, maybe less. 
AX 3-6267 

S600 DOWN ^^10.500! Xlnt. 5 
room & furn. guest house. 
So. of Imperial. AX 3-6267. 


5 ROOM— 2 bdnn.^ only $750 
down. Easy terms. 

PL 3-622"6— WE 8-9563 


price. $2,950 down, 
in Fontana near Kaiser | No loan charges. 9147 S. Harvard I 
Steel. Agent. AT 6-5811. 


Rlty. PL 6-1348; 
1-3092. 


Eve FA 


DANDY— 4 flat— 1620 W. 25th 
St. Potcn. $330 mo. F.P. S29,- 
500. Trms .'\ppt. only: 
RE 4-2538 & RE 3-2025 


G.I. RENT with option to buy. 
2-bdrm. stucco, hrdwd. firs. 
PL 7-4153 


NR- VENICE & LA CIENEGA— 

Charming 3 bdrm. modern 
stucco. 1^4 baths. Carpets & 
drapes. Nice fenced yard. 
$19,950. Low down payment 
takes. AX 2-0107. 


SALE OR TRADE 

ONLY SlSOOdn. 3 bdrm. stucco,.! p„„,,, home for Compton 
2-car gar. S14.o00 f.p. Lewis Home. 

call MRS. TAYLOR of 

CANNADY 
REALTY CO. 

RE. 4-6622 

INCOME PROPERTY FOR SA LE ~ 

WILSHIRE DISTRIC-^ s 

Smart modern triplex, " d- 
rcxDm each. Income $2 id 

owner's. $10,000. 

DOROTHY MARSHA. 
! OU. M059 


OWNER must sell Igs. 3 bdr.. 
2 ba. -: den, new carpel. 
$16,950; SI .950 dn. 30 yr. 
FHA. 6715 5th Ave. RI 7-3346 


NO DOWN PYMT. TO GL— 2- 

bdrm. stucco, hrdwd. & tUe, 
Close to s{hls.. shopp'g & 
transport. PL 4-2827 'til 7- 


1525 W. 94th Place 

LOVELY SPANISH STUCCO 
3 bedroom, 1 i baths, garbage 
disposal, patio with barbecue. 
Priced for quifk sale. 

PL. 9-8143 or OR. 1-4755 


S750 DN— $85.90 per mo. G.L 
resale. 4-bdrm,. I'z baths, 
stucco Large landscaped lot. 
Close to everything. ^ 
PL 4-2827, 'til 7. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


DUPLEXES FOR SALE _ 

OLYMPIC-HIGHLAND AREA 
M24 LONGWOOD PLACE 

Deluxe 5 years old^ double — 
owners unit 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 
Family Room, built^ins, fireplace. 
Will sacrifice: Make offer. Cash 
or Trade. 
CR. 5-4488 WE. 6-5848 Eves. 


HOUSES FOR SALE 


BY OWNER— Home + inc. 2 
on lot. 2 br. $12,950 f.p. $950 

dn. 2145 Calif. Ave., Long 

Beach. RI 7-3346. 


DUPLEX— Only $500 dn. $10,- 
950 f.p. Income $110 mo., 5 
yrs. old. NE 2-8469. 


2 NEW HOUSES ON 1 LOT— 

S-bdim. + 2-bdnn., blL-ins., 
w/w ccirpet, $1500 handles. 
PL 4-2827 'til 7. 


DESERT ACREAGE FOR SALE 


5 BDRM.— 3 ba., - 2 apts. 159x 
150 R-3 lot. $2500 dn. 
NE 5-8009— NE 5-2008 


2 STORES— & 4 rentals. S362.50 
mo. income. $27,000. Rltr. 
NE 5-7111 


$1990—5 acres M-1 zoning, 
Antelope V a 1 1 e y-Victorville 
area. ■ 

BOX 5025, INGLEWpO 

LOW DOWN 
LOv /JONTHLY PAYMENT!). 


1073 S.. MANSFIELD AVENUE 

Open Sunday 1-4 p.m. 
$6000 Down — 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths. Wilshire-La Brea Area' 

near L.A. High. 
CR. 5-4488 WE. 6-5848 eves. 


1 


OPEN HOUSE-SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

POMONA 

7 POSSESSIONS 

All hove been re-financed and have TOP 25 YEAR 
LOANS. 


SOME WITH 
FENCES. 


WALL-TQrWALL CARPETING AND STEEL 


YETS 
NO DOWN 



HOME, UNFURN., FOR LEASE 


FOR LEASE — Altadcna. Gregory 
.\in contcnipor4r> . 3 bedroom. 2 
bath, fireplaoc. new electric ap- 
plianecs. 2 landscaped patio.s b\' 
Eckbo. Minutes from LA. freeway. 
.?225 per month. 

DOROTHY MARSHALL DU. 1-1053 


FURNISHED HOUSES FOR RENT 


REDECORATED 


INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 


BOB KIMBLE 


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DU8-7163 

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OF AMERICA'S MOST WANTED CAR 

THUNDERBIRD 

FOR 1961 


CRUISEMATIC 

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AUTOMATIC 

TRANSMISSION I 


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PLUS TAX & Lie. 

All Colors and Models 
Galaxies, Falcons and Trucks 

(SPECIAL RATES FOR ALL CREDIT UNION MEMBERS) 

BILL FROELICH 
FORD CO. 

18th Street and Western Ave. 
Los Angeles 

(ACROSS STREET FROM WESTERN PLAZA) 

U«B AN BOURGEOIS pB 1.7^31 
BOB KIMBLE ■%»• ■ ^ W^P I 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

5S43V2 HOLMES AVENUE 
It new ep«n for butinaw and of- 
fering expert beauty care frem 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap- 
pointment call Robbie Bradford, 
general operator. 

LU. 1-5227 


SERVICES 


We Serve Parties 

PARTY SERVICE 

Exper. cook — American and 
French foods, hers d'oeyvres, 
hot or cold. Waiters, barten- 
ders, for parties, weddings, 
luncheons. 

« EM. 9-9452 
AFTER 6 P.M. 


5 room - 
paid — 
welcome. 


■ 2 bedroom, utilities 
children and peii 

AX. 2-0458 


FOR RENT-UNFURN. HOUSES 


$80.00 


3 BEDROOMS wjth ^y* BATHS, BUILT-IN RANGE AND 
OVEN. 

MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!! 

$15,500 to $16,500 

NAME YOUR OWN DOWN PAYMENT! 

Directions: Take San Bernardino Freeway to Towne 
Ave* exit . . North one block to La Verne . . . East 
on La Verne to Los Flores . . . Then north one block 
to Model House at 1004 Ashfield. 

AtUED REALTY 

10OOO EAST RUSH ST., EL MONTE 
Gilbert 4-4526 


I 
I 

I 


No c 


ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential 

POMONA 


1 


Jown payment for vets. From $13,770, 

Full Price. From $76.08 per month, includes 

principal and interest, wall-to-wall calrpeting, 

'' rear yard redwood fenced, forced air hieat, 

built-in range and oven, hood and disposal, 

I 

2-car garage. 3-bedroom, 2-bath homes. Phone 
collect. Randy Anable. 

EDgewood 8-008b ° 


Rustic 7 room, 3 bedroom and r^ 
den, fenced yard, child welcome;'! 

AX. 2-0458 "^ 


FOR RENT— W/option to buy. 
3 room house — cute. $69 mo. 
2 BR. house — Ig. gar. clean, 
$85 mo. SOUTHEAST 
HU 2-3861 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


$695 Down 

VACANT • 

5 room, 2 bedroom 

Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwodd floors. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-4156 


• ••••••••••••**•*.• Vr' *••••*•• • 

CLOTHING 
COMPANY 
MA. 4-0801 


VICTOR 


"^ 214 SOUTH BROADWAY 


BEST BUYS — Unrest4-icted 
Propertj'. Reed Allen, Jr. 
AX 1-7494 


BRAND NEW 

HOME IN 

PALM SPRINGS 

You'll love this 2-bdrm. 
quality built Ooll House 
It's completely furnished, 
so just bring your "grub" 
and check for $2,500 and 
movo in; White stucco with 
blue trim, attached single 
garage, wall to wall car- 
peting, sliding glass door 
to pcrtje. Excellent location 
about Vi mile from exclus- 
ive Racket Club. Pricitd 
right at $13,950. For ar 
rangements to tee proper- 
ty call Miss Rossini at 

FA. 1-4182 


HAVE PROPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? | 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 
601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 
Ufrtamd and Boncfod R«af Csfcrto Broker ; 

f T- 


-¥■ 

-k 
-k 

-k 
-K 
-k 

• 



MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


BIG SALE [AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 

$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. ^ 

Your credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house during our big sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREEH! 
Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3.00 
a week pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for men and 
boys of all ages. . > i ■ { - 


NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT * 

*Wear and enjoy yourclothes while paying* 
Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREE! 
But act now Illllll! <" i I i 1. Pay later.. Illllli 

SHIRTS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MOREIlHini 
TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * ^7.95 ** $9.95 up to $24.95, WORTH MUCHMOREl 




• ••••• I 


ALL $30.00 men's suits- and top coats 

ALL $40.00 " " " " ." , 

ALL $50.00 " " " " " 

ALL $60.00 " " " " " '. : 

ALL $70.00 " " " " "... 

ALL $80.00 " " " " ' :. 

ALL $90.00 " " " " " 

HURRY SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEAR!!!IIIII | 

Park FREE next door as you buy your new clothes. We cater to you, and we do mean YOUIIl 
Luggage * Watches * Radios * Play Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 


3f 

if 

i, 

A- 


OPEN DAILY 9:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.M. 

VICTOR CLOTHING CO 

• IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES "^ 

• *^ * * * •"• •••'-• • • •^ 


$15.00 

$25.00 

$35.00 

$45.00 

$55.00 ^ 

$65.00 

$75.00 Jf 

. >f 

>f 


214 SOUTH BROADWAY 

•*•••*••*•* 


( 


'-.^' -:• ■ «.^--; . . .,--4J- — - 




"^^ 



Dorothea Foster 


- fiarling Dotic' who usually pens this interesting and in-, 
formative rolurnn ncekly has requested a leave of absence 

'since family duties are note demanding nil her time, lloiieirr, 
Doitic ivill nliiays share a narm spot in our hearts here at the 
Eagle a'nd the nclconie hack sign ifill always he hung for her 
^Utrn. • 

QLR GLtSJ" 
U- insonic If'ini Orr, who turned out her first social column 
Uiny^arh when the I'-Cfir ambled noisily down Central ave- 
UiUe arid lihrn U ester ii avenue was known as /'way across 
•town. has never gotten for away from the social end of 
f-hings in this fast growing city of ours. Despite the fact that' 
the .K estside. Compinn, Pasadena. Santa Monica and I'enice 
hme outgrown the I'.astside. she has the uncanny ability of 
ierping her finqer on social happenings, as' any good newspaper 
woman would — Editor. ^ ' , 

Like an Old Shoe 

Guest writing for the Eagle is like looking 
-through your closet and finding an old pair of shoes 
that not only fits as well as ever, but feels so good. 
The year 1961 is getting off to a rollicking start 
with half the population on liquid 900 diet*; appre- 
hension and anticipation at the coming inaugural; 
speculation as to the outcome of the Cuban situa-' 
tion (and I have a REAL curiosity where this Ques- 
tion is concerned as my one and only off-spring is 
stationed at Guantanamo Base). * ^ 

And How They Fly 
But, as the saying goes: "Life goes on." 'There's 
turmoil a-plenty in one household what with CRAIG 
JANUARY preparing to take off for the Dodger 
training camp in Florida; brother JOHN packing on 
the otlper couch getting ready for his scholastic in- 
;^asion^ of Mexico; and mother, PORTIA CRAIG, 
\ Shopping like mad in her haste to plane out on the 
^7th f<^ Washington, D.C. and the Presidential In- 
■auguration of John F. Kennedy and the accom- 
^'anying festivities. • 

- First lady 6f journalism in our town, CHAR- 
XOXTA A. BASS due home any minute from her 

• irip to Mexico City. ANN MALBROUGH who, with 
son KEVIN and sister WILMA WILLIAMS flew 

^ome for a family re-union in Tennessee, rushing 
3hto town just in time to get changed for her 
•Rinkeydink Club Dance. 

- JOE MALBROUGH who stayed home to tend the 
ytore busy getting the gowns ready for the usual 
spectacular appearance , of the club. Incidently, he 
has an Idea that will soon be put into practice, 
namely^ renting gowns of a uniform color to clubs. 
He plans to feature 'several styles and of course 

;v«ry them frequently. Should certainly relieve some 

jfibo can't stand the tariff on the kind you have to 

3jrtte with you. 

~ Speaking of ideas, that's no idea the JEEP 

5MITH band has, but cold business since Jeep has 

tjumed over the Jeepsters to the direction of 

MARTIN "FUZZY" GOWER; they are as swinging 

-as ever. 

:.: Glimpsed LADY CLAIRE WILLIAMS, JUANITA 

3&REEN and ALICE CREECY of the Ladies of Para- 

*se Club enjoying the Royal Social and Charity 

iClub Dance at the Mayflower. 

X Fun chatting with GLADYS and GENERAL 

fOODS whom I hadn't had the pleasure of seeing 
ages. 
_ BEA DEVAUGHN making progress like crazy 
jfiter her long siege of illness and grateful to so 
■many of her friends that she .hasn't been able to 
thank personally. Bea says- she will never be able 
Id show her heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to 
2JI of her friends who made a long and painful con- 
valescence almost a pleasure. 

"" EUGENE KNOX making his plans to drive to 
iSTew . Orleans for Mardi Gras, and enplane from 
-there to Columbus, Ohio to visit his family. BILLY 
BARKER and KELSO BARBOUR making many a 

• .cup of tea a real event as the tea gets cold and the 
cenversation warmer. 

As we go to press I have no choice but to com- 
ment on the University of Georgia. Closing the 
Tdoors will not close the education gates for the 
Negro, because- it looks like he is here to stay. But 
.It seems they would realize so many of their pwn 
are bSing deprived of that which is so important: a 
Sttle book learning. 

Sunday night at the fireside and through the 
Tnedium of TV and the courtesy of the General 

' Electric Theatre, SAMMY DAVIS, JR. in "Memory 
Tn White" with the apropos remark of RONALD 
flEAGAN, ^ memorable portrait. Just wish they 

. could have chosen a different title, or was it a time- 
Ty one? 

• . How are we to forget — MABEL JONES, one of 
the truly fine fashion commentators battling like a 
champ an illness that has her medics baffled. 

Lest I forget to mention it, I am now a staff 
writer for the new monthly publication "Angel 
City," a neat little mag of our city and folks. 
Ir. Christmas trees down, lights out, gifts packed 
away — all indicative that the holidays are over 
and so back to normal. 

IJBBY- CLARK driving her new little compact 
car into the new year. Carnival Island moved to 
Hollywood and I do wish the cast success. In case 
you hadn't heard, this is the fast moving musical 
that Nick and Edna Stewart wrote and which 
started in their Ebony Showcase only to be thought 
lo be bigger than the s'mall house. 

Best of luck to you all in '61. 



■• 7 


PTA News 


10— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 12, 1961 



dent.: I era 11 ai\on, Jua'itta Martin. Bernicc Early 
( secretary j'^and Ruth Robinson. Second row: Johnnie If'il' 
Hams, iice-'presidenl ; Sara Ray, treasurer; .Margaret Lovc, 
cores ponding secretary,- and Jessie Johnson. 


E. J, CljAPI'ER or DRIEEERS — Following -iheir 

rrgillgr innnlhly meeting . Drillers are shown rimkini/ their 
initial how to the HsifUltliind^ s iliib lirctt. I'hcy were 
granted their chapter irnm the iinjiomil boiiy. in October 
1960. Seated front froin left: t/.dwina Hol/omnn. prcsi- _ 

National Drifters, Inc. ' 
Grants LA. Group Charter 


. Bill 
Smallwood 


Among the Southlands 
newest organizations to an- 
nounce their program for the 
1961 season are the Driltrrs. 
Inc., Los Angeles Chapter. 
Following Jhe National con- 
vention of Drifters. Inc.. held 
in Indianapolis in 1959. per- 
mission w a s granted to 
members to organize a local 
chapter. 

Ira October, Betty Garrett 
of Indianapolis installed the 
chapter in this area. Otiier 
new West Coast chapters lo 
be installed were in the Bay 
Area, including San Fran- 


cisco. Oakland, and Berkeley. 

The civic-minded Drifters- 
are life rrK-mfeers of the 
-\AACP and the Urban 
League and their charit.v pro- 
jects are designed to support 
liiosc ' wlio have the most 
need in their communities. 

The home of Juel Collins 
was the setting of the group's 
last monthly meeting whicli 
was presided over by their 
president, charming Edwina 
Holloman. 

The president, along with 
Margaret Love, held a con- 
ference with representatives 


of the California Eagle lo c.\- 
plorc the best possible 
meth'ods of serving the com- 
munity. 

Funds to be raised for pro- 
jects selected by the group 
will come from an elaborate 
rummage sale to be an- 
nounced at a later date. 

Members of the Drifters 
are Dolores Carter, Juel Col- 
lins, Jessie Johnson, Marga- 
.ret Love, Vera Watson, Ed- 
wina Holloman, I\uth Robin- 
son. Juanita Martin, Bernice 
Early, Sara Ray, and Johnnie 
Williams. 


• Continued from Page 9) 
(Inez). Alpha Phi Zeta Chap- 
\ ter of Zeta Phi Beta • met 
Sat. as Esther Mu>drew, 
Maigaret Rainey, Irma Rich- 
ardscr. and Mary Rollins en- 
acted roies as hostesses. This 
Sat. is Founder's Day lunch- 
eon time for the Zetas at an 
intimate restaurant out La 
CienegEi, way. Speaker will 
be soror Rosalind Meeks. 
Leontyne King: And thanks 
to J ou, especially. 

More, Anon 

S'Diego's Al Montgomery 


CENTENNIAL 

Centennial Senior High 
School's debate squad, under 
the direction of Mrs. Maple 
Cornwell, has been invited 
by the University of Southern 
California to its 25th An- 
nual Invitational High 
School Forensic Tournament, 
to be held Friday'and Satur- 
day, Jait. 13 and 14, at the 
Bovard Auditorium. 

Representing the Apaches 
as championship debaters in 
Friday's session are James 
Page, Clarence Broussard, 
Larry Moss and Ira Hawkins. 

"On Saturday, 12 of our 50 
forensic people have been in- 
vited to represent Centennial, 
because of their outstanding 
tournament record," Mrs. 
Cornwell stated. ^ 

, Those featured in Satur- 
day's event will include: 
Clarence Broussard and 
Katie Smith as extempor- 
aneous speakers, Larry Moss, 
Allen Gantt and Margaret 
Higgins ill Impromptu speak- 
ing, and Emily Blake, James 
Page and Vivian Clark in 
oratory. Suzie Claude will 
represent the school in dra- 
matic interpretation, Jerome 
Ferrell in humorous speak- 
ing, and Robert Warren, Ira 
Hawkins and Gloria Foley 
will compete in oratorical 
interpretation. 

GdMPERS 

Gompers Junior High 
School is presenting its 
Winter -61 Father-Son Night 
on Thursday evening, Jan. 
19. The program will take 
place in the Activity Room 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

The activity -packed eve- , 
nirfg sUrts at 6:30 p.m. with^ 
a round robin volleyball 
tournament featuring four 
teams. The teams will con- 
sist of fathers, faculty men, 
A9 boys, and an All-Star 
team. Each team will play 
each other once. Fathers are 
urged to participate. - 

A social period will foUpw 
at 7:30 p.m. during which re- 
freshments will be on sale. 
Apple pie a la mode, coffee 
or milk will be available, j. 
The Gomper§ Junior High 
School Swing Band will play 
for the entertainment of the 
group. 

HOOPER AVENUE 

Hooper Avenue P.T.A. Child 
Welfare Chairman Mrs. Olis 
Pearson and Co-Chairman, 
Mrs. James Matthews, report- 
ed on their Christmas pro. 
gram which many families 
in the community enjoyed 


during the holidays. 

The Executive Board re- 
ported that all the children 
attending Hooper received 
gifts, fruit and nuts. In addi- 
tion each room held parties 
with mothers assisting the 
teachers. 

Mrs. Hugh Howell, P.T.A. 
president, attended the re- 
cent Parliamentary and Pres- 
ident Workshop at the South- 
east Health Center at 49th 
and Avalon. She also, along 
with members, attended the 
Fremont Council meeting a? 
Russell Elementary School. 

Parents are being urged to 
support the Hooper Ave. 
P.T.A 


• fl 


^.-} 


t 


DORSEY P.T.A. 

Dorsey Adult School' an 
nunces a series of lectures 
entitled 'Toward Better Fani- 
ily Living" to be given by 
Dr. James S. Simkin. This 
lecture series is co-sponsored 
by Baldwin Hills P.T.A., Mrs. 
Irwin Haus, Parent Educa- 
tion Chairman; and Windsor 
Hills P.T.A., Mrs. E. E. 
Hughes, Parent Education 
Chairman. 

The lectures will be held 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. with 
the first three scheduled for 
Wednesdays at Windsor Hills' 
School and' the last three 
scheduled for Thursdays at 
Baldwin Hills School. Regis- 
tration will be held at 9 a.m. 
at Windsor Hills School on 'j; 
Jan. 11. .RV] 

Dates and titles of lectures, 
are as follows: . - 

Jan. 11 — What Makes a'.|. 
Go6d Home? !. 

•Jan. 18 ^- Everybody Else 
Does! 

Jan. 25 — Discipline, Re- 
spect,, Responsibility. • 

(These three lectures will 
be hera at Windsor <Hllls 
SchooL) i ^t 

Feb-. 2 — Teaching Values. 

Feb. 9 — Preparation for 
Adolescence. 

Feb. 16. — Goals and 
Achievement ' , 

(These three lectures will 
be held at Baldwin Hills 
School.) _ 


:i T 


•-I 




J;- 


Bridge 
nstalls 


Dfew Medica 
Auxiliary 


in 



arid wife, Kay, weekended in p, i . • 

town, put up sumptuously ReQUlar MSSt 

The Women's Auxiliary to 


(iOLDEX KEYSTOSE CLUB— Former residents of Pittsburgh. Pa., who formed a 
club two years ago are shown during their annual holiday party. Pictured from left: Dan 
Washington, Joe .Walker, president: Bill Bailey. .Milton (Bud) Swan and Tommy Sands. 


Keystone in Seconqk Year 



M e m b e r .s of the Golden 
Keystone Club celebrated 
their second year with a 
lavish holiday party in the 
home of William and Mary 
Hostin on West Pico. The 
club members are former 
residents of Pittsburgh. Pr., 
'and the party and the cele- 
bration was attended by 
wives and friends of the club. 

The group has been work- 
ing closely with the 28th 
street YMCA and has partici- 
pated financially in the 
campers program. 

At a recent meeting of the 
group and under their presi- 
dent Joe Walker all mem- 
bers have pledged their full 
support to charities which 


■the club selects as projects 
during J961. 

Mr. ;iir>d Mrs. Hostin 
proved to be a delightful 
host and hostess to the sec- 
ond annual affair as the club 
and their "guests enjoyed 
cocktails, bjiiffet and dancing 
throughout the, evening and 
they ushered in the New 
jiear on a f^tive note. 
^ ■ ■ I 

Slates Classes 

The YWCA-Woodlawn Cen- 
ter is offering a series of 
classes to adults in Charm, 
Crochet ankl Knitting, Dra- 
matics, Dressmaking, Modern 
Dancing aijid Draperies and 
Slipcovers, i 


IMrOtnO »Y THC lUCKMCHAM COirOIATI^ COCKfmUl CIHTM. MW YOW 


JACOBS & FARBER PRESENT 

ONE OF THE GREATEST SINGERS 

OF OUR TIME! 

WILLIAM 

WARFIELD 

SAT. EVE. JAN. 21, PHILHARMONIC AUD. 

RETURNING FROM A TRIUMPHAL WORLD-WIDE TOUR FOR 
THE U. S. STATE DEPARTMENT. STAR OF MOM'S "SHOWBOAT". 
ACCLAIMED IN THE INTEltNATIONAL TOURING PRODUaiON 
OF "PORGY AND BESS." IN A PROGRAM OF GREAT SONGS 
AND SPIRITUALS. 

ORDER NOW BY MAIL FOR CHOICE SEATS-^SEND TO 
JACOBS A FARBIR, P.O. Bex 1829, Let Angeles 28, Calif. 

Tickatt: $1,50, $2.00, $2.50, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00. 
Encles* »tainp«d, t«lfaddr«s*ed •nvclep*. 



Fans of Gaiety 
Hold First Meet 

Beatrice Moman was 
hostess to the first meeting 
of the 1961 season last Sun- 
day when the Fans of Gaiety 
Club met in her home. This 
marks the last meeting be- 
fore the group's annual elec- 
tion. 

Mrs. Moman, in addition to 
Serving a wonderful Spanish 
dinner following the meet- 
ing, was declared winner of 
the club's prize which was a 
canned ham. 

Before the close of the 
1960 season the Mary Ann 
Bayliss home was. the scene 
of the group's annual holiday 
party at which time they ex- 
changed gifts. 

Guests attending the meet- 
ing at the home of Mrs. 
Moman included husbands 


at the Statler. They have 
some merry plans for the 
next fort- night -or so which 
should be delightfully pro- 
vocative; some of their local 
cronies will dash do'vn to 
S'Diego to take part but 
gladly. Of it all. more anon. 

IK to Chi: Opal Jones, 
\vhosc address while there 
vill be Hull House. Mil 
Blount could have well used 
seven league boots last Sat. 
With friends she attended 
a matinee of Raisin In The 
Sun, swished on to BevHills 
for cocktails, dined at Dave 
Chasen's THEN made the 
curtain for A Lie Is A Cen- 
tury Long! Some anxious 
mcmcnts over at Tess and 
Gi! Liridsay's; her mother 
has been quite ill these past 
few days or more. 

Tall, lean Bernie Harper 
In town for seven weeks of 
nonchalance. Last time I 
saw him ( at an astonishing 
party) his entrance got such 
a thunderous ovation I 
thought for an instant he'd 
arrived with the U.S. Cav- 
alry. Owner of a we'l cush- 
ioned checking account, 
Bernie maintains the effete 
look and on him it looks 
darn good. Freda and Rene 
DeKnight were in town very 
briefly enroute to Honolulu. 


Westside Society 
Schedules Meeting 

Mrs. Leo L. Lott, president 
of the Westside Benevolent '.Af 
Society, announced f^at the 
group's first meeting for the ^ 
New Year is scheduled for "^ 
Jan. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the 
auditorium of Bethel AMii; "♦ 
Church. Members ar.- urged 
to attend and bring a friend. -^ 
The churcl^is located at 1511 
W. 36th street. -^ 

and friends of the members. .^ 
The only member absent for 
the meeting was Jeanett Col- k- 


New 
Club Officers, 

The Rainbow Bridge and 
Charity Club had its first 
meeting of the year at the 
home of Mrs. Juani*a Jack- 
son. Officers for the year are; 
President, Leon a Powell; 
vice president, Elizabeth 
Johnson; treasurer. Alberta- 
Boone; recording secretary, 
Wallacesteen Gilmore; fi- 
nancial secretary, Leona . 
Walton; business manager. 
Jewel Rawls; corresponding 
secretary, Ruby Clarke; re- 
porter, Henrietta Capers; 
parliamentarian, 
Louise Home; sergeant-at- 
arms, Juanita Jackson: social 
hostesses, P a 1 1 n e Knight, 
Mattie Mc Calibb and Bea- 
trice Williams. 

Honorary members are 
Gertrude Dailey, Maxine 
Reed and Mariam Canty. 
Members on leave of ab- 
sence, Rob"bie Wilder. ( 

Beautiful trophies were 
presented to Mrs. Gilmore 
and Mrs. Johnson by the 
club for outstanding work 
in furthering the high goals 
that made it possible for this , 
club to triple its giving to 
charity this year. 

Plans are in the making 
for the May Festival. Bridge 
was played. 

Wilton Demos Meelj 

Wilton Place Democratic 
Club members attended a 
special meeting last M >ndayi 
in the home of Mrs. Gussic . 
Kizzie. 3509 Country Club 
Drive. Plans were announced 
for the installation dinner 
and appointments of commit 
tee chairmen and representa; 
tives were made. I . 

**•*•** * * * * • r* 


the Charles Drew Medical 
Society held its regular 
monthly meeting last Safur- 
'day at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. George Sealey, with 
Mrs. Zrelda Sealey and Mrs. 
Winifred Toney as hostesses. 

Mrs. Irene Bledsoe, Health 
Chairman who worked with 
Mental Health. Polio and 
Los Angeles Tuberculosis* So- 
cieties during the holiday-^ 
season, gave an interesting 
report on 'the proje.-'t and 
cheer the- ^roup brough'; to 
many patients du~ri'>g the 
Yuletide season. 

Several new memliers who 
recently took up residence in 
the city were present to join 
the Auxiliary. The new 
members and their husbands 
were guests of the 'society. 
They included Mrs. Ann 
Bobo and Mrs. Joyce Bobo, 
\vi\es of two brothers, both 
physicians. 

Mrs. Lillian Alexander, 
widow of a physician from 
New Jersey and former presi- 
dent of the National Medical 
Association's Women^s Aux- 
iliary, spoke to the group. 

All of the new members 
were officially welcomed by 
the Auxiliary and fo'iowin.T 
the meeting the members 
and their guests enjoyed a 
delightful social hour. 

• 


- . I ■ 


■>v!'- 


• > 


II 


lery, because of illness. 


Catering 

To Small or Large Groups 

Specializing in all Type of Parties 

Buffet • Cocitail - Dinner 

24-Hour Service — Experienced Personnel 

Bertha Thomas ~ j 
and I I 

Rose Brown Catering 
4474 Victoria Park Dr. WEbster 9-7215 




Talk of the Town 


For your inexpensive entertainment 
the fabulous . . . 

aUB TOWN HILL 

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^ SONNY CRISS & HIS TRIQ 
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Plenty of Free Parking 

i ■ ^ 

Your Hosts 
Hugh Level . . . Doug Stone 

• • * •'• * • • • 


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FAST SERVICE 


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AX. 5-3135 • CALIFORNIA EA6LE CLASSIFIED DEPT. 


AX. 5-3135 


DEADLINE WEDNESDAY AT 9 AM. 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


38011 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-425 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN 

AND FOR THE COUNTY OF 

LOS ANGELES 
In the Matter of the Estate of 
WALTER SNELL 
Deceased 
Noiice is hereby given to credit- 
ors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims ifl thf 
oifice of the clerk qt the -aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
undersigned at the, office of her 
Attoney. ' 

MACEO G. TOLBERT 
• 272 South Central Avenue 
in tlie City of Los Angeles 11. in 
the aforesaid County, which latter 
office is the place of business of 
the undersigned in all matters per- 
taining to said estate. Such claims 
iiith the necessary vouchers must 
be filed or presented as afore.«aid 
within six months after the first 
pul'licaiion of thi.s notice. 
Dated December 19. 1961). 
Maceo G. TolDert ^ 

' Attorney-at-Law 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


FEMALE HELP WANTED 


■ I 


4272 South Central Avenue • 
Los Angeles 11. Califorrvia. 
Matilda M. Snell " . 

Adnjjnistratrix of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
Publish in California Easle news- 
paper Dec. 22-29. 1960: ~ Jan. 5-12. 
1961. 




m 


RnCHESTER. 


»viu.sa.ai.mMSQ 
322 West Manchester Blvd. 
Manchester & Broadway 

JUS1 MINUTIS AWAY VIA 
' HARBOR FREIWAY 

PHONE: PL. 3-1431 

Plenty of Free Parking 



Ed Wynn*ith Anderson 
kk Maria Alberghetti 

as "The Princess" 

PLUS SECOND HIT 


B 



7Z 

(The California Eagle) 

38249 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 436-714 

In the Superior Court of the 

State of California, in and for the 

County of Los Angeles. In the 

Matter of the Estate of Delia Mc- 

Kee. Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given to cred- 
itors having claims against the said 
decedent to file said claims in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the 
undersigned at the office of his 
Attorne.NS, Miller. Maddo\ & Ma- 
one '2B21 South Western Avenue, 
n the City of Los .\^geles. in the 
a foresaid County, wtfich latter of- 
fice is the place of business of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ing to said estate. Such claims with 
the necessary vouchers must be 
filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 

Dated- Dec. 22. 1960. 
MILLER, MADDOX & MALONE 
Attorneys-at-Law 
2S24 South Western Avenue} 
LoS Anqeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 

THOMAS M. McKEE. JR. 
Administrator of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
(Publi.sh in the California Eagle 
Newspaper Dec. 29. 1960. 
Jan. 5-12-19. 1961 


GIRLS AND WOMEN 

Sell new ' products, appeals to 
everyone. Spare time or full 
time. 

HO. 9-1911 -Studio F 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


(Callfornlp Eagle) 

39118 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

No. 435-703 


SALES 


NOW! 

FOR THE FIRST TIME! 

■ i 

PART TIME ... OR fULL TIME 

HIGH EARNINGS 

t 

Nation's Leading Slenderizfng 
Company . . . Fabulous 

RELAX-A-CIZOR 

NO CAR REQUIRED .... 
NO SALES EXPERIENCE'. . . 

Exciting Free Sales Training 
Program 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voict, Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet. Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PI. 21179 

FURNISHiD^ROOMTrollENT 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


■%■ 


5 ROOM — 2, bdrm. stucco.. No 
down to vets. S750 dn. to 
non-vets. PL 7-2268. 


WINDSOR HILLS 

Lovely English home, 2 bedrms., 

I i bath, paneled den-family 

room, wet bar. $42,000 full $100 DOWN— 3 bedroom home SI 8,950 fu 

price, good financing. 


I Thubday, January 12, 1961 


The California Eagle— 11 


WESTSIDE HOUSES FOR SALE INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


6 ROOM SPANISH 


DOROTHY MARSHALL 
DU. M059 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The People's Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 


7 ROOMS— 13/4 BATHS!— West- 
side 3 bdrm. & den. Firepl. 
$1750 down, maybe less. 
AX 3-6267 

jSSOO DOWN— $10,500! Xlnt. 5 

j room & furn. guest house. 

So. of Imperial. AX 3-6267. 


|S ROOM— 2 bdrm., only $750 
I down. Easv. terms. 

PL 3-6226— WE 8-9563 


ROOM FOR RENT 

Male or female— newly decorated 
room with all the home privi- 
leges. Reasonable rent. 13437 
Brownelt, San Fernando, Calif. 
Phone EMpire 6-8871 
Rolland Teal 


G.I. RENT with option to buy. 
2bdrm. stucco, hrdwd. firs. 
PL 7-4153 


price. $2,950 down, 
in Fontana near Kaiser ' No loan charges. 91 47 S. Harvard 
Steel. Agent. AT 6-5811. 


SALE OR TRADE 

ONLY S1500 d_n. 3_bdr_m. siucco. ; p^^,,,^, ^^^^ f^; Compton 

Hom^. 

call MRS. TAYLOR of 


2-car gar. $14,500 f.p. Lewis 
Rlty. PL{ 6-1348; Eve FA 
1-3092. ' ■ 


DANDY— 4 flat— 1620 W. 25th 
St. Potcn. $330 mo. F.P. $29,- 
500. Trms Appt. only: 
RE 4-2538 & RE 3-2023 


CANNADY 

REALTY eo: 

• RE. 4-6622 


OWNER must sell Igs. 3 bdr.. .^rri m ^onocarv r^ ^~rr,^ 
2 ba. 4 den. new carpet. '^COME "PROPERTY FOR SALE 

$16,950; $1,950 dn. 30 yr. 
FHA. 6715 5th Ave. RI 7-3346 I 


WILSHIRE DISTRICT 


FURNISHED APARTMENTS 


In tlie Superior Court of the State Famous product practically sellstSingles $16 50 wkly $60-65 

of California, in and for the County " 

itself. Endorsed by beauty edi- 


of Los Angeles. 
In the Matter of the Estate of 

LUCILLE BE.NDY. Deceased. 
Notice Is hereby given to credit- 
ors having- claims against the .»aid 
decedent Jta file .said claims, in the 
office of the cleric of the aforesaid 
court or to present them to the un- 
dersigned at the office of hi.-! At- 
torneys. Miller. Maddox & Malone. 
2824 South Western Avenue, in the 
City of Ix)3 Angeles, in the afore- 
said County, which latter office is 
the place of bujine.^s of the under- 
sig-ned in all matters pertaining to 
said e.'tatc. Puch claim.-; with the 
nscessarv -/ouchens must be filed 
or presented a.s aforesaid within 
six months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice. 
Dated: Jan. 6. 19fil. 

ER.VEST BE.\DV 
Executor of the will 
of said decedent. 
MILLER. MADDOX A. MALONE 
Aftorneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 
RE. 1-4143 
(Publi.«h in the California Eagle 
.Newspaper Jan. 12. 19, 26, 
Feb. 2. 1961) 


Hafper's Bazaar, 


mo., nev^/ly decorated, w-w 
carpeting, dressing room, large 


tors of Vogue 

and Glamour. Over; 300,000 i closets, utilities included 
users! Applicants myi\ be well 1102 South Mariposa Ave. 
groomed, pfleasant. Fringe bene 
fits and advancement opportuni- 
ties. 


-FOR 24-HOUR SERVICE 


CAIL PLymouth 6-8347 - PLyihouth 6-0997 

POWELL BAIL BONDS 

^ JOEL A. POWELL JOHN A. ECHOLS 

10951-53 S. MAIN ST., lOS ANGELES 61, CALIF. 

FREE BAIL INFORMATION 


FOR APPOINTMENT 
CALL MISS LOUISE 

■ OL. 5-8011- 

If You're Now Working, We'll 
Arrange Interview in P.M. 


HELP WANTED-BOYS t MEN 


BOYS AND MEN 

Sell new products, appeals 
everyone. Spare time or 
time. 


to 

full 


BEFORE YOU BUY - TRY BILL FROELICH' 

THUNDERBIRD 

— SPECIALISTS — 




HO. 9-1911 -Studio F 

beautTopmator^vantIed^ 


RE. 1-9188 

Gladys' Beaute Shoppe 

operator wanted 

4919 WMt Adams Blvd. 
Los Angalet 16, Calif. 


3 Rooms 

Incl. Utilities. 

' Furnished 
Westside 
HO. 5-0574 


HOUSES « APTS. WANTED 


FREE SERVICE!!! 

TO LANDLORDS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside. 

4020 South Western Aevnua 
AX. 2-1991 


NR. VENICE S LA CIENEGA— 

Charming 3 bdrm. modern 
stucco. 1^4 baths. Carpets & 
drapes. Nice, fenced yard. 
S19.950. Low down payment 
takes. AX 2-0107. 


NO DOWN PYMT. TO GL— 2- 

bdrm. stucco, hrdw|d. & tile. 
Close to schls., shopp'g & 
transport. PL 4-2S27 nil 7. 


1525 WA94th Place 

LOVELY SPANISH STUCCO 

3 bedroom, 1 i baths, garbage 
disposal, patio with barbecue. 
Priced for quick sale. 

PL. 9-8143 or OR. 1-4755 


DUPLEXES FOR SALE 

OLYMPIC-HIGHLAND AREA 
1124 LONGWOOD PLACE 

Deluxe 5 years old double — 
owners unit 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. 
Family Room, bullt-ins, fireplace. 
Will sacrifice: Make offer. Cash 
or Trade. 
CR. 5-4488 WE. 6-5848 Eves. 

HOUSES FOFSALE 


Smart modern triplex, 
room each. Income $2 
owner's. $10,000. 

DOROTHY MARSHA. 

DU. M059 


d- 
id 


BY OWNER— Home + inc. 2 
on lot. 2 br! $12,950 f.p. $950 

dn. 2145 Calif. Ave., Long 

Beach. RI 7-3346. 


DUPLEX— Only $500 dn. $10,- 
950 f.p. Income $110 mo., 5 
yrs. old. NE 2-8469. 


2 NEW HOUSES ON 1 LOT— 

3-bdrm. + 2-bdrm., blL-iiis., 
w/w Cctrpet, $1500 handles. 
PL 4-2827 'til 7. 


DESERT ACREAGE FOR SALE 


5 BDRM — 3 ba., + 2 apts. 159x 
150 R-3 lot. $2500 dn. 
NE 5-800<^NE 5-2008 ' 


S7S0 DN.— $85.90 per mo. G.L 
resale. 4 -bdrm,. I'z baths, 
stucco Large landscaped lot. 
Close to everything. 
PL 4-2827, 'til 7. 


2 STORES— & 4 rentals. S362.50 
mo. income. $27,000. Rltr. 
NE 5-7111 


$1^990—5 acres M-1 zoning, 
Antelope V a 1 1 e y-VictorvJile 
area», , . ' 

BOX 5025, INGLEWOO 

LOW DOWN ; 
LOv /MONTHLY PAYMENT b. 


1073 S. MANSFIELD AVENUE 

Open Sunday 1-4 p.m. 
$6000 Down — 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths. Wilshire-La Brea Area 

near L.A. High. 
CR. 5-4488 WE: 6-5848 eves. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


OPEN HOUSE-SATURDAY & SUNDAr 

POMONA 

POSSESSIONS 


VETS 
NO DOWN! 


All have been re-financed and have TOP 25 YEAR 
LOANS. 


HOME, UNFURN., FOR LEASE 


FOR LEASE — Altadcna. Gregory 
.\in contenipoEar> . 3 bedroom, 2 
bath, fireplace, new electric ap- 
pliances. 2 land.scaped patios by 
Eekbo. Minute.'i from LA. freeway. 
.?22o per month. 

DOROTHY MARSHALL DU. 1-1059 


SOME WITH 
FENCES. 


WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING AND STEEL 



FURNISHED HOUSES FOR RENT 


INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 


BOB KIMBLE 


URBAN BOURGEOIS 


MEN - WOMEN 
'^ 18-45 

Learn 
Insurance Adjusting 

AND INVESTIGATION 
Step Up Now for Better Pay 

FASCINATING 

ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - low Cost 

HEAVY 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BROCHURE NOW! 

ADJUSTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART, L.A. 57 

DU8-7163 

EXMRTBEXurr TREATMENT 


WILL MAKE YOU THE PROUD OWNER 
OF AMERICA'S MOST WANTED CAR 

thijnderbirA 

FOR 1961 

^^ ^^^ ^^ CRUISEMATIC 
^XK^Z AND 

' m^^f^9^9 AUTOMATIC 
^ PLifTAX*UC.> TRANSMISSION] 

All Colors and Models 
Galaxies, Falcons and Trucks 

(SPECIAL RATES FOR ALL CREDIT UNION MEMBERS) 

BILL FROELICH 
FORD CO. 

18th Street and Western Ave.| 
I Los Angeles 

(ACROSS STREET FROM WESTERN PLAZA) 

U8BAN BOURGEOIS 
BOB KIMBLE 


RE. 1-7331 


BRADFORD'S 
BEAUTY SALONT 

5543 Vs HOLMES AVENUE 
I* new pp«n for businsM and ef> 
faring axpait baawly cara from 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For ap- 
peintmant call Robbia Bradford, 
ganaral eparaler. 

LU. 1-5227 


SERVICES 


We Serve Parties 

PARTY SERVICE 

Exdlr. cftok — Amariean and 
Frorrch foods, hort d'oauvraa, 
hot or cold. Waitara, barton- 
dors, for partias, waddings, 
lunchoens. 

EM. 9-9452 
AFTER 6 P.M. 


REDECORATED 

5 room — 2 bedroom, utilities 
paid — children and pets 
welcome. 

AX. 2-0458 


FOR RENT-UNFURN. HOUSES 


$80.00 

Rustic 7 room, 3 bedroom and 
den, fenced yard, child wefcome. 

AX. 2-0458 


FOR RENT— W/option to buy. 
3 room house — cute. S69 rno, 
2 BR. house — Ig. gar. clean, 
$85 mo. SOUTHEAST 
HU 2-3861 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


$695 Down 

VACANT , ' 

5 room, "2 bedroom 

Stucco. 

4 years old. 

Hardwood floors. 

Double garage. 

Beautifully landscaped. 

PL. 7-41 56 


BEST BUYS — Unrestricted 
Property. Reed Allen, Jr. 
AX 1-7494 


BRAND NEW 

HOME IN 

PALM SPRINGS 

You'll love this 2-bclrm. 
quality built Doll House 
It's completely, furnished, 
so just bring your "grub" 
and check for $2,500 and 
move in. White stucco with 
blue trim, attached single 
garage, wall to wall car- 
peting, sliding gloss dpor 
to patio. Excellent locotton 
about Vt mile from exclus- 
ive Racket Club. Priced 
right at $13,950. For ar- 
rangements to see proper- 
ty call Miss Rossini at 

FA. 1-4182 


HAVE PROPERTY IN 

TEXAS 

FOR SALE OR NEED MANAGING? 

WRITE O. T. WALTON'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

601 EAST 19th ST., BRYAN, TEXAS 

Licensed and Bonded Roof Fstcrte Brofcor 


3 BEDROOMS with }V* BATHS, BUILT-IN RANGE AND 
OVEN. i 

MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!! 

$15,500 to $16,500 

NAME YOUR OWN DOWN PAYMENT! 

Directions: Take San Bernardino Freeway to Towne 
Ave. exit . . .. North one block to La Verne .s^^-^^East 
on La Verne to Los Fiores . . . Then north one mdek- 
to Model House at 1004 Ashfield. 

1 ALLIED REALTY 

lOOet) EAST RUSH ST., EL MONTE 
! I- Gilbert 4-4526 


I 

I 
I 

I 


ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential 

POMONA 

- ' ^ '" ' 

No down payment for vets. From $13,770, 

Full F^rice. From $76.08 per month, 'includes 

■ i ^ 

principal and interest, wall-tq.-wall carpeting, 

rear yard redwood fenced, forced air heat, 

built-in rartge and oven, hood and disposal, 

2-car garage. 3-bedroom, 2-bath homes. Phone 

collect. Randy Anable. ,_ ■ 

I EDgewood 8-008b 


I 


• ••*••*••••* T^**** •*•••• • • 

CLOTHING 


YICTO 


^S^ 


BIG^ALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 214 SO. BROADWAY MA. 4-0801 

S30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRIC^ OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FREE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house during our big sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREE!!! 
Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3.00 
a week pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for men and 
boys of all ages. 


• • * 

* 214 SOUTH BROADWAY 

-K 
-k 

-k 

¥ 

-k 

-K 

^214 SOUTH BROADWAY 

••**•***••*• 


MONEY 
DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 



NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FREE CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT 

*Wear and enjoy your clothes while payfng* . | 
Buy any sport coat in the house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREEl 
But act now IIIIIII! I I Pay later Illllli 

SHIRTS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $8.95 ALL WORTH MUCH MOREIIUl!!! 
TROUSERS now priced $4.95 * $6.95 * $7.95 *|;:f9,9S up to $24.95, WORTH MUCH'MC 


3f 

COMPANY I 
MA. 4-0801 * 





ALL $30.00 men's suits and top coats $15.00 

ALL $40.00 " " " " ." 


ALL $50.00 

ALL $60.00 

ALL $70.00 

ALL $80.00 

ALL $90.00 

HURRY ... 


$55.00 ^ 
$35.00 ^ 
$45.00 ^ 
$55.00 ^ 
$65.00 
$75.00 


SAVE DURING OUR BIG SALE OF THE YEAR11IIIIII I 

Park FREE next door as you buy your new clothes. W« cater to you, and we do mean YOUlll 
Luggage * Watches * Radios * Play Clothes * Sport Clothes * Dress Clothes * Work Clothes 

OPEKh DAILY 9:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY 'TILL 8 P.M. 


VICTOR CLOTHING CO 


2t 


IN DdWNTOWN LOS ANGELES "^ 

*••***••** •- * * * •* 


^ 


■^ ^ >. —.»■,_»--- 


\ ' ■ ^ ■ -I 


•li 


12— The California Eagle 


Thiir<rlav lanuarv 12 1961 JI^I MADIG AN — Mud. home free, 
.inursaay, January iz, ivoi appropriate — Nm^ ni. 


-- ,■ J 


i.f.T>4i.^rri 


w 
I 

T 
H 

RflMSn 




6««rg« RamMy 


BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO: Three lucky 
ticket holders who selected all 
six horses correctly received 
$24^10.40 for the Avinning 
sha'res last Sunday at Cali- 
ente Race Track in the 5-10 
public handicapping contest. 

Consolation 5-10 awards of 
S272;20 each went to 89 ticket- 
holders who picked five horses 
in the 5-10 series. Winning 
numbers were 9-12-5-7-5-2. 

The 5-10 pool grossed $107,- 
602. The longest price horses 
in the 5-10 were Golden Orbit 
at $18.20 and Mabel B«ll at 
$10. 

Apprentice jockey Jesus 
Quesada who rode his, first 
winner on Saturday on a re- 
cognized track scored two in 
the 5-10. 

, Attendance wa.«! 15.196. Mu- 
;tuel handle for the 11 races. 


1 -LEGAL NOTICES 


(The California Eagle) 

33225 

-MOTICE OF HEARING OF 

PETITION FOR PROBATE 

OF WILL 

No. 437-158 

In the Superior Court of the 

State of California, in and for the 

County of Los Ansele.":. In the 

Matter of the Estate of Annie V". 

Henderson. Deceased 

Notice Is hereby given that? the 
petition of Carrie Washington for 
the Probate of the Will of. the 
above-named rtei-eased and for the 
issuance of Lqtter.s testamentarv 
thereon to the "petitioner to which' 
referenie is hereby made for further 
particulars, will be heard at 9:15 
orlook am., on Jan. 1."?. 1961. at 
the court roonu of Department i. 
of the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the Countv 
of Los Angeles. City of Los Aii- 
seles. 

Dated: Dec. 21. 1960 
THOMAS G. NEUSOM 
1111Ea*t Vernon Ave. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
AD. 2-6149 

Attorney for Petitioner 
HAROLD J. OSTLV 
County Clerk and Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and 
for the Countv of Los Angeles 
By A. L. GRAHAM. Deputv 
(Publish Jn the California Eagle 
N«w«paper Dec. 29, 1960: Jan. 5. 
Jan. 12. 1961. 


$419,414, not including the 
grossed 5-10 pool of $107,602. 

(HORSES TO WATCH THAT ARE 

FIT AND READY) 
CALIENTE 
TRIB.4L BEAUTY — Go bnik to 

this one. 
D.\RK REtiARDS — Look out for 

this one 


TIDAL PRINCE — -Mv goodie 
L.\DY ROBIN -- Long.-hot .>ipoi-ial. 
Hl-V- .\LL In smart hands, 

SCNKIST BILL — Worked verv 

fast. 
K.\LIK — Krom a winning stable. 
.KATHY J.\.NE — Plenty speed but 

faint heart. 
SAYASEA — Wailing for a spot. 
.SOCIETY PAT — Thiows rider g.o 

hack. 
(HORSES TO WATCH AT SANTA 

ANITA) 
SANTA ANITA 
WY.NC.V.M — A fit maiden. 
ROMANZO YCAZO — Will ride o k 
U ISE .ILiNE — Look out Tor this 

fine. 
.NK\ADA DICKK — Mv special. 
FAIR .\l.\rER — Needed la.sl race 

go ba.k. 
ARDENT LOVE - Cloiki-rs goodie 
.UNIILE DA.NCER — .Much bolter 

than rates. 
lENNY .DELIEr - .Mv goodirv 
C.V.NNET ~ Wire to uirc 
TV L.ARK — One of Iho h.st. ' 
PUSH H()RSE — Gel .M>urs on 

(his OIKV 
MR. KRDl.llY -- .My best bit. 



t 


jiyl^BWMw H r> ami f j 


14-Year-Old Lad Star$ in Three C.I.F. Sports 


38634 
t NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

F ' . = No. 435-585 • 

j. In the Superior Court of th»- 

1 State of California, in and for the 

County of Lo« .^ngele.«. 

In the Matte r of the Estate 0/ 
BLANCHE GRIFFIN, also knov. n 
»» BLANCHE FUGGETT, Deceas- 
ed. 

Notice is hereby givpn to credit' 
nrs having claim,"> against the said 
decedent to file said claim.^ in the 
office of the clerk of the aforesaid 
court or To present them to the 
undersigned at the office of her 
-Attorney*. Miller. Msuldox & Ma- 
lotie. 2824 South Western Avonue 
In the City of Los .\ngele.«. in the 
aforesaid County, which latter of- 
fice is thq place of busine.«.« of the 
undersigned in all matters pertain- 
ine to said estate. Such claimp 
with the necessary vouchers mu.st 
b« filed or presented as aforesaid 
within six months after the first 
publication of this notice. 
bUed Dec. 29. 1960 

.«!ALLY ?:HAW NEWMAN 
.\d^inistratrix with-the- 
^Vill-.\nnexed of the Estate 
of said decedent. 
Mitler, Maddox i, Malon* 
Atterneys-at-Law 
2824 South Western Avenue 
Lot Angeles, California 
RE. 1.4143 

(■published in the California 
Eayle Newspaper Jan. 5. 12. 19. 36. 
1961. 1 

HiiTwANTED-MAlE 


Men or Boys to 

sell new products 

part or Full 

time. Studio F 

HO. 9-1911 

Girls and Women to 

sell new products 

part or FuJI time. 

Studio F 

HO. 9-1911 



.^ BEAUTIFUL .,^ 

« CALIENTE « 

IN OLD MEXICO 

^^ OfFMS fVI«Y SAT. A SUN. 
RAIN OR SHINf 

^ THOROUGH9RED ^ 


'm^€£M€f 


10% RACES EVERY if «% 
^ SAT ». CIIN X^ 




SAT. A SUN 
"•* AND SATURDAY 

.^DAILY DOUBLE & QUINELA44 

BOOKS & MUTUELS 

■*^SUN. POST TIME 12 NOON^ 

■lA' FANTASTrC RETURNS ^ 
For Your Wager 

'^ Two Dollars or More ^ 

Foreign Book Open Daily 
^ On All Major Track* ^ 

■«i-Greyhound RacingiA^ 

^ To B« Resumed ^ 

FrI., Jan. 6th 

•** 49«r IV^RY SATURDAY ^ 

AND EVERY FRI., SAT., 
■** SUN. EACH WEEKEND ^ 

* • * 

JOHN S. AlESSIO 

•M' (xacutive Director vr 


By Edw, *Abit' Robinsoa ■ 

Loyola University and Notre 
Dame scouts should cast their 
peepei-s in the direction of 
Bellflower and the campus of 
St. John Bosco. a private 
.school for boys, during base- 
ball, basketball, track and 
football practrce. A 14-year- 
old. 5'-8'2.' and a 140 pounder 
just migh't interest them. 

The growing lad of 14 has 
been cutting some fancy 
<-apers in the .lunior Varsity 
sports since he arrived on 
.'"° - ''---•«.<>'*»* campus two years ago. He won 

GREG JACKSON starting berths on the ba.so- 


ball team as a short stop and 
pitcher; in basketball as a for- 
ward, and in football as a 
hard running back and in the 
classrooms as a strictly "A" 
student. 

A shoulder injury cut short 

his activities last November 

land for a while it looked like' 

I football '^^as ai bit too rough 

jfor the kid who i.s popularly 

I known on the campus as Greg 

Jackson, but one of his most 

.enthusiastic supporters, liis 

mother, Mrs. "Doris .lackson. 

had other ideas. She bundled 

'him into the family station 

' wagon and hauled him over 


jta Dr. Julius W. Hill, the noted 
j bone specialist who is known 
as the best bone marf in the 
country among college and 
professional athletes. Dr. Hill 
took a look at the shoulder 
.^and told mother to go home 


and sleep because everything 
would be alright That was 
back in November but tlie in- 
jury didn't take any starch 
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when basketball season rolled 
around he had won himself a 
starting position on the 
.school's team in the powerful 
(.'.I.P'. League. 


[ ' Dr. Hill thinks Greg will 
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' age should be in the neighbor- 
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j With his speed and versatility 

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\ The chance of Greg putting 
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through three thick New York 
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ichasc it with an apple pie and 

! a few cartons of milk. 


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ROBSEILEEN EATON 


itiot Fails; Negroes Back at Georgia U 


—Forward Africa!— 



CAklf oir - I A 


ON THE MARCH— Africans in the Congo. Nyasaland. 
Kenya, the Rhodesias and South Africa, and every place 


between, are marching fonuard to freedom. The spirit that 
can't be downed is shown in the above picture. 


4^<i . . . 


Fint AnnlT*naT7 

R h«s been almost a year 
since the four students sat 
down in that Greensboro 
variety store and asked for a 
cup' of coffee. The waitresses 
were amaz- 
ed: "Y o u 
know we 
can't se r v e 
you," they 
Aaid. The Ne- 
gro counter 
girl was hor- 
rified: "Y o u 
are dumb," 
she shouted, 
"that's why 
you'll never 
You kno^y 



2 Students Return 
In Uneasy Truce 

ATHENS, Ga. — The two Negro students who 
captured, yielded, then re-captured a beachhead in 
the first integrated school in Georgia's history were 
quietly attending classes this week, while six Klans- 
men faced court action for their part in a stone- 
throwing riot at the university^) : — 

a week ago. 


Millar 


get ■ anywhere 


you're not supp>osed to sit 
down here." 

The four would' not be mov- 
ed. They just sat there until 
the store closed. Nobody serv- 
ed them. Nobody molested 
them. They just sat. That 
night— Feb. 1, 1960— the re- 
porters sent out a story to the 
newspapers of the country. 
Not a long story. Not an 
heroic story. Just a story say- 
ing that four Negro students 
had sat down in a white va- 
riety store counter and had 
not been waited on. Some 
newspapers printed the story. 
Some didn't. None of the 
dailies gave it a banner line. 
Almi^tT Tired 

After all, it wasn't much of 
a story, then. Four Negro stu- 
dents had sat at a white 
variety store counter but stu- 
dents were always doing 
things, engaging in stunts. 
Like panty raids. Like throw- 
ing Winter out of upper stories 
of diM-mitories. This, too, wuld 
pass. And besides that, maybe 
they were Reds. Reds were 
always stirring up trouble. 

Only the Negro students in 
other colleges and universities 
in (*ie South understood what 
had happened. They under- 

(Continued on Page 4) 


Hulan Jack 
Sentenced, 
Will Appeal 

NEW YORK — Manhattan 
Borough President Hulan E. 
Jack was given a orte-year 
suspended sentence here Mon- 
day for letting a contractor 
pay $4400 for remodeling his 
Harlem apartment. 

The sentencing automatic- 
ally removed him from his 
$25,000-a-year .position, the 
highest municipal post held 
by a Negro. 

General Sessions Judge 
Joseph A. Sarafite used harsh 
terms 4n rendering the sen- 
tence. He accused Jack of a 
"betrayal of trust," and said 
that if It were not fqr his loss 
of office, "this cou'rt would 
jail you because of the seri- 
ousness of your offenses." 

Jack, however, declared 
later that "I am convinced of 
my innocence," and said he 
would appeal the conviction 

Jack wi^ sentenced to one 
year for conspiracy and one 
year for violation of the city 
charter. Both terms, which 
would have run concurrently, 
were suspended. 


Charlayne Hunter, 18, and 
Hamilton Holmes, 19, were 
walking gingerly in their 
exacting roles, but they were 
finding smiling and friendly 
encouragement from a num- 
ber oi their school mates at 
the Athens campus, and strong 
backing tram, spme 300 of the 
school's professors. 

Hioten Stibdued 

The hostile students who 
were among the 2000 who 
shouted racial epithets, shot 
off fire-crackers and hurled 
stones at Miss Hunter's dormi- 
tory last Wed.iesday night, in 
the company of known Klans- 
men, were noticeably subdued 
when classes started Monday. 

Their new mood was attri- 
buted to a firmly worded 
statement from Joseph A. Wil- 
liams, dean of students, that 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Critically Hurt 
Gunman Faces 
Felony Charges 

The Santa J Monica distri'ct 
attorney's office Friday filed a 
four-count complaint against 
William Edgar Boyd, 28. who 
allegedly shot his wife in the 
abdomen, then engaged in a 
furious half-hour gun battle 
punctuated with the use of 
tear gas by 20 Santa Monica 
policemen. Bail was set at 
$25,000. 

The battle occurred about 
1:40 p.m. Wednesday after 
Boyd accosted his wife at the 
door of a shack occupied by 
Hubert Franklin at 1738 21st 
street, pushed her insidS. 
threatened to kill her and 
bashed her over the head with 
a .22 rifle. He then shot her 
twice. When police arrived he 
barricaded himself in the 
house and opened fire on the 
officers. 

Wife Escapes 

During the confusion, Mrs. 
Boyd escaped from the build- 
ing followed later by Frank- 
lin. The officers ordered Boyd 
to surrender. The demand was 
met by rifle fire. Officer Earl 
Grugett lobbed a tCcir gas 
grenade through a window 
and was cut by flying glass. 
Two other tear gas shells 
were thrown into the shack 
along with shotgun blasts. 
Twelve slugs lodged in Boyd's 
body before he slumped semi- 
conscious against a rear door. 
Officers dragged him outside. 

He was taken to the prison 
ward of General Hospital 
where he remains in critical 
condition. He was booked on 
suspicion of assault with in- 
tent to kill. 

Bride of Two Months 

Mrs. Boyd went into shock 
on the operating table and 
five pints of blood were ad- 
ministered to check internal 
bleeding. Her condition was 
considered as fair. 

According to reports, Mrs. 
I (Continued on Page 4) 


Senate Votes 
To Bury Ban 
On Filibuster 

WASHINGTON — The south 
won the battle to preserve the 
filibuster last week when 
middle western Republicans 
ganged up with Dixiecrats 
and far western Democrats 
and recorded a 50 to 4^ vote 
to send proposals for a chajngej 
ii. Senate rules to the Riiles 
Committee. President- .Elect 
John F. Kennedy maintained 
a studied neutrality in the 
fight. California senators vot- ' 
ed against ^he referral. 

Referral of the proposals for 
change to the Rules Commit- 
tee means that even if the 
Committee does render a fav- 
orable report on changes to 
shut off debate by a simple 
majority as proposed by some 
senators or by a three fifths 
majority as proposed by oth- 
ers the report itself wojild be 
subject to a filibuster. 
Johnson Gambit 

Ostensible architects Of the 
fancy shuffle that sent the 
proposed rules changes to the 
Rules Committee were Dem- 
ocratic Majority Leader Mike 
Mansfield of ^Montana and 
Republican Minority LeaJer 
Everett Dirksen of Illinois but 
political observers said it was 
the brain child of Vice Presi- 
dent Elect Lyndon B. John- 
son. 

Referral of the proposed 
changes in the Senate fili- 
buster rule to the Senate rules 
committee is a "signal from 
those who voted for it that 
the 87th Congress does not 
intend to act seriously on any 
civil rights legislation," 
NAACP Secretary Roy wdkins 
charged. \ 

"By burying (this issue) 
the rules committee," the 
NAACP wire stated, "this Con 
gress is laying the basis for 
blocking any action to change 
the rules at the beginning of 
the 88th Congress in January 
1963." 

Issue Buried 

Thejfear of the NAACP and 
of liberal senators of both par- 
ties who fought for a change 
in the rules this month is that 
iii Januarj', 1963, the then 
president of the Senate, Vice 
President Johnson, may not 
rule that the Senate can 
change rules by majority vote 
(Continued on Page 4) 


DELT.I DUL HIRE — 
Dr. Jeanne L. \ohlc. na- 
tional president of Delta 
Sigma Theta and professor 
at y.Y.L'., tiho has recent- 
ly toured Afriui, will speak 
at Delta's Founders Day 
meeting at the Stallir next 
Saturday. 



-^ 




21*1 w. varneii avmh*, i; A. Coiitinuous Publication for 80 



AX. 5-3135 


Vol. LXXX-No. ^4 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


10' 

AX. 5-3135 

Out-of-Town 15 


Two Womeri Die 
Closed Room 




Two women, who tried 
to keep themselves warm 
in their unheated room by 
burning charcoal in a 
metal can, were found 
dead of carbon monoxide 
poisoning on the morning 
of Friday, the 13th. They 
had been dead for many 
hours. 

The two vvomen who were 
found fully clothed on the 
bed in a small room at 1616 
E. 23rd street were Mrs. 
Bernice Thompson, 46, and 
Mrs. Mary Lou Stansell, 40. 
Utilities Cut Off 

According to one report, 
both gas and electricity had 
been turned off for some time. 
Mrs. Thompson, to whom the 
room weis rented, was report- 
edly on relief. 

Police, after breaking into 
the apartment, found an iron 
kettle on top of the can con- 
taining bttrned charcoal sticks. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NEU^ VEEP-l^orcn Mil- 
ler, publisher of the Calilor- 
rtia Edffli . 7; II s n a in e d 
A .1 A C P fitr president at 
the associations recent an- 
nual meeting m A <!;■ ^ ork. 
(Story Page 2.) 


■ 1 


Seek Funds 
R>r Tenn. 

Tent Colony 

The NAACP frankly wants 
money — a lot of it. But it 
doesn't want that money for 
itself. It wants it for the fund 
that is being collected to send 
to the relief of the sharecrop- 
pers in Tennessee who are \ 
hous^ in the "Freedom Vil- ; 
lAge" tent colony in Fayette: 
County. 

The local branch asks that 
money — folding money, 
quarters, dimes and nichols — 
be brought to a mass rally 
called for the People's Ind^ 
pendent Church. 1025 E. 18th 
street, Sunday, Jan. 29 at 3 
p.m. That's 'Rev. Maurice A. 
Dawkins' church. 

Money Only 

Edward D. Warren, branch 
president, said the appeal is 
being made for money only, 
and not for foodstuffs and 
clothing. The money will be 
used to purchase what is nec- 
essary, thus saving shipping 
costs for bulk packages. Mon- 
ey is also needed, he said to 
buy more tents for the refu- 
gees. 

A cheering note came from 
Washington with announce- 
ment that the AFL-CIO has 
allocated $2000 to aid the Ten- 
nessee sharecroppers. 

In New York, meanwhilt ef- 
forts are bing made to co- 
f Continued on Page 4) 



B.iCK IN JAIL— Eugene "Rough Lover" Hawkins was 
hack in jail Tuesday, with bail Qn a charge of beating and 
robbing Olympic boxing promoter Eilee'n Eatrjn expected 
to he $100,000. Police helin'e this latest arrest may. keep 
Hawkins behind bars for a long time. , 


Rev. King Hopeful 
Kennedy will Aid 
Civil Rights Fight 

The Rev. Martin Luther King, in a whirlwind 
weeltend, told the ugly truths about segregation to 
two large, predominantly white audiences, helped 
launch officially the Western Christian Leadership 
Conference, attended a reception in his honor at the 
— and was instru- ^ '■ 


'Lover/ 

Friend 

Jailed 

The man pplice arreste(3 
Tuesday, for the daring 
robbery attack early Sat- 
urday morning on Aileen 
Eaton, wife of Olympics . 
boxing promoter Cal Eaton, ' 
was none other than that 
well-known character, Eugene 
"Rough Lover" Hawkins. , 

He was taken to jail with 
bail recommended at $100,000. 
He already has some $90,(XK) 
to $95,000 bail bonds outstand- 
ing on prior arrests. 

Fisger Bitten x 

Police were hopeful that 
this -time they have a case 
they can make stick against 
Hawkins, who is known for 
having an uncanny way with 
women and also with the law. 
They're hoping. He already has 
chalked up against his record 
six. pages filled vwth arrest 
notations. 

The single piece of evidMice 
that may prove Hawkins' un- 
doing is a bite .on one of his 
fingers — a human bite — ^re- 
ceived, police believe, in an- 
other robbery Monday a week 
ago. ^ 

In that escapade, the victim 
was Mira Griss of West Los 
Angeles, who bit down hard 
when her assailant put his 
hand over her mouth to pre- 
vent her from screaming. She 
bit so hard, she almost bit off 
the finger. ^ 
^ Girl Friend Arrested 

Depiity Dist. Atty. Anthony 
Joyce said Tuesday that doc- 
tors report Hawkins' injury is 
from a human bite Hawkins 
claims he slammed the car 
door on his hand. 

Arrested along with Hawkins 
((Continued on Page 4) 


Wilfandel — and was 
mental in collecting some 
$1400 to aid the fight in the 
South. 

At the start of his activity, 
he was met at the airport by 
Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, and 
then immediately upon ar- 
riving in town held a press 
conference at the Ambassadott 
Odom President ' 

To newsmen he expressed 
optimism over civil rights 
prospects under Kennedy and 
foresaw the end of massive 
resistance in the Deep South. 

The Leadership Conference. 


Featured 
In the Eagle 

EditoriaU 4. 

Church AcUTities ..._. 5 

Sports - 6 

The Tee — ~ S 

Bill SmaUwood : 10 

Dorothea Fester .....10 

People ~ * 

Chan Crawford 8 

Show Biuinau 8 



'FREEDOM' IN TENNESSEE— Sharecroppers JValker Allen and his wife registered 
and voted in the Nov. 8 election in Tennessee. Evicted from their home, they now live in a 
tent in Fayette County's "Freedom Village." Their children, shown with them 
among 55 youngsters in the tent colony. The NAACP has launched 
bring them aid. 


KcS- 


» ■ 


/ 


t' 


are 
a second drive to 


which had been in the or- 
ganizational stage for some 
time, was set up as a fully 
functioning entity, with Rev. 
King making the keynote ad- 
dress at Zion Hill . Baptist 
Church Saturday afternoon. 

The Western. Conference 
seeks to promote the struggles 
of Negroes in this ar^a and to 
coordinate that work with the 
herculean efforts being made 
by its counterpart in the 
South, the Southern Christian 
Leadership Conference, of 
which the Rev. King is the 
head. 

The Rev. L. Sylvester Odom, 
pastor of Ward AME, was 
elected president of the new 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Sugar Ray 
ipby's Dad 

NEW YORK — Sugar Ray 
Robinson, former boxing 
champ, denied Friday that he 
is the father of a boy bom 
Feb. 9, 1953" to Mrs. Barbara 
Trevigne, a singer and danc- 
er. 

Mrs. Trevigne claimed the 
child was born as the result 
of a tryst with Robinson in a 
Ndw York Hotel May 10, 
19^2. 

At the paternity trial, both 
(^orge Gainford, Robinson's 
former manager, and Charles 
L. Austin, financial secretary 
at the Pompton Lakes camp, 
testified that Robinson never 
left the camp where he was 
iu training for a bout with 
Joey Maxim June 25. 


President Asked to Halt 
Aid to Biased Colleges 

WASHINGTON — An end of federal assistance 
to publicly supported colleges and universities 
which discriminate on racial grounds was urged by 
the Federal Civil Rights Commission this week. 

The commission said it had found "that the 
been" 


federal government has 
a silent partner in the crea- 
tion and perpetuation of sep- 
arate colleges for Negroes." 

Calling for fund cut-off 
action by Congress or the exe- 
cutive branch of government, 
the commission said: 

"The , Supreme Court has 
held that the federal govern- 
ment is prohibited by the 
Constitution from maintain- 
ing racially segregated educa- 
tional institutions. It is not 
sound policy for the federal 
government to subsidize the 
unconstitutional operations of 
others; to do indirectly what 
it is not permitted to do 
directly." ] _ 

Five of the six civil rights 
commissioners joined in the 
recommendation. Three of the 
six joined on a companion 
proposal that federal funds be 


withheld from private institu- 
tions which practice discrimi- 
nation. The other three took 
no part in this. 

The report went to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, President- 
elect Kennedy and to Con- 
gress. 

Much of the lengthy docu- 
ment titled "Equal Protection 
of the Laws in Public Higher 
I'ducation 1960," dealt with 
six southern states, referred 
to as "the resistant states." 

The commission labeled 
Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi 
and South Carolina the hard- 
core states of segregation, 
saying that when the report 
was drafted Negroes were not 
enrolled in a single one of 
the 49 public higher educa- 
tional institbtions in those 
, states. 


c 


•1 '- . 


I i 


2— The California Eagle 
Thursday, January 19, 1961 


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Motel Owner 
Spots Sliotgun, 
Calls Police 


r, Mrs. Mat tie Springfield, 
'owner of a motel »t 1428 E, 
^ Adams Blvd.. told police she 
."answered the buzzer at the 
.cashier's window e<ariy Mon 
: day morning. A man told her 
he wanted to see the man who 
hacfrented Room No. 9 earl- 
ier in the evening. 

As she opened' the office 
door to see if he was going 
to the right room she saw a 
man in a car pointing a saw 
ed-off double-barrel shotgun 
at her. She stepped back into 
the office, slammed the door 
and called police. 

The man who rented the 
room earlier had told Mrs 
Springfield that someone was 
coming "to get him" but she 
thought the person was com 
" ing "to pick him up." 

Suspects are two male Ne 
groes about 37 years old, 
round faces with broad feat- 
ures. One had reddish pro- 
cessed hair. They have not 
been apprehended. 


o * 

t „ 


Urban League 
Member Drive 
Opens Sunday 

Sunday, Jan. 22, has been 
proclaimed "Urban League 
Sunday" in local churches. It 
marks the beginning of the 
league's 19 61 membership 
campaign drive. 

The goal of the campaign 
this year is 5.000 new mem- 
bers, acording to Mrs. Thomas 
A. Boger, general campaign 
chairman. Renewals of pre- 
vious memberships will also 
be solicited by more than 250 
volunteer workers. The drive 
will run until Friday, March 
3. 

Chairmen of the corps of 
volunteers are: Church, Wil- 
liam Bailey; Labor, Eugene 
Pickett; South Los Angeles, 
John Kelly; Urban League 
Guild, Mrs. Lucille Ward; 
Fraternal, William Henrj-; 
Social and Pleasure Clubs, 
Phil Rhoten; and Civil Service, 
Richard A. Warren. Tom Haw- 
kins Is publicity -chairman. 


vCmr OF HOPE CHANT 

A research grant of $105,000 
has been awarded to the City 
of Hope for a pilot study of a 
parent-oriented hospital pro- 
gram for leukemic children. 



BURNS FATAL — Pallbearers carry the remains of William Perdue Cardwell, uho 
rescued four children from their burning home last Dec. 23 and died 'from burns received 
during the rescue. The funeral v.as held at the Vtter-McKinley Aroadicay Mortuary 
Saturday. (Sheffield Studio.) . 


Man Who Saved 4 
Dies from Burns 

Burns received when he helped rescue four chil- 
dren from a burning house during Christmas week 
cost William P. Cardwell his life. He died Jan. 10 
from third-degree bums sustjained when flames from 
a Christmas tree raced through the frame home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Jackson, *~ ' ^~ 

9617 Grape street in Watts. p|y|nq TOClcle 

Nets $35 Fine 

Thomas Gillespie, assistant 
manager of the Mellinger Co.. 


One child was burned to 
death and another was so 
severely burned that he died 
later. 

Cardwell, 46. was born in 
Manlfattan, Kansas. He had 1T17 -Westwood blvd.. was 
lived in Los Angeles for 28 ^0""^ guilty last Tuesday of 


years. He was a tile-setter by 
trade and had served in the 
Armed Services during World 
War II. 

Funeral ser\-ices were held 
on Saturday at the Utter-Mc 
Kinley Broadway Mortuary 
with Rev. Arthur Smith, a 
vice-president of the firm, 
performing the ceremony for 
the heroic man. Interment was 
in Paradise Cemetery. 

Surviving are his widow, 
Mrs. Vivian Cardwell; brother 
Percy, both of Los Angeles; 
and a half-brother M. Cot- 
trey of -Oxnard. 


Venice Talk on FEP 

When the Adult Citizens 
Council of Venice meets at 8 
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 at Oak- 
wood Playground, Dennis V. 
Fargas, commission consult- 
ant, will speak on "How The 
California Fair Employment 
Practice Commission F<inc- 
tions." 


battery and disturbing the 
peace. He was fined $35 and 
given a five-day suspended 
sentence and one year's pro 
bation. 

The charges against Gilles- 
pie stemmed from an en- 
counter he had last Dec. 21 
with Isidro de Rieras, photo- 
grapher, 34. of 1018 E. 42nd 
place, at the Mellinger Co. 
office. 

Rieras had gone there to 
reclaim a $5 deposit he had 
made on a correspondence 
course which he found un- 
satisfactory. 

^'"Gillespie refused to make 
the refund and when Rieras 
said that he was taking down 
his remarks on a tape re- 
corder in his briefcase. Gil- 
lespie made a flying tackle 
at him, twisting his wrist 
and otherwise injuring him, 
Rieras claimed. 


Gift Return 
Request Gets 
Police Action 


Early Sunday morning. John 
Williams Daniels, of 5917-7-8 
E. Compion, went to the home 
of Mr.<;. Jennie Reyes, 4276 
L^imert blvd.. and demanded 
SIO he had paid for Christ- 
mas gifts he had given her 
and her .son. police reported. 

Mrs. Reyes, who had armed 
herself with a gun after Dan- 
iels had broken into her apart- 
ment New Year's Day, grabl|>ed 
the gun. went into the Ii\Hng 
room and asked who Was 
there. 

Daniels came to the front 
door and demanded that ^he 
let him in. She refused. He 
then went to. the side of ihe 
house and broke the glass! in 
a wind^' and started to climb 
in. 

Mrs. Reyes called police and 
started shooting. Daniels grab- 
bed her and dragged her out 
to the street just as the bo- 
lice arrived. | 

He denied he had broken 
into the house. He claimed; ajl 
he did was to Knock at the 
front door and after the shoot- 
ing started went around the 
side of the house. When the 
second bullet was fired he 
lunged in through the window 
and grabbed Mrs. Reyes, 
cutting his wrist in the melee. 


Loren Miller 
Hamed Veep at 
NAACP Meet 


NEW YORK — Loren Miller, 
publisher of the California 
Eagle, attorney and housing 
expert, was raised to the post 
of vice president of the NA- 
ACP at the asfsociatlon's re 
cent annual meeting here. He 
previously served as a board 
member. 

Two new members were 
named to the National Board 
Chester 1. Lewis, attorney and 
president of the Witchita 
Kans. NAACP; and Joseph G 
Kennedy, of San Francisco, 
attorney and president of the 
NAACP Northern" California 
Area Conference. 

MwUoB Xe>»I*ete<i 

Dr. H. Claude Hudson and 
Mrs. Daisy Bates were among 
those re-elected to the board. 

Roy Wilklns was re-elected 
executive secretarj-. 

Dr. Robert C. W^eaver, re- 
cently named administrator 
of the Federal Home Finance 
Agency by President-elect 
Kennedy, was re-elected chair- 
man of the bocird, but will 
resign Jan. 20 to take up his 
new duties. 

Dr. Channlng H. Tobias will 
continue to serve as chairman 
emeritus. 

Other top NAACP officers 
re-elected include Arthur B. 
Spingain of New York, presi- 
dent; Bishop Stephen Gill 
Spottswood of _ Washington, 
vice chairman; ^Alfred Baker 
Lewfs, Old Greenwich, Conn., 
treasurer and Dr. Harry J. 
Greene of Philadelphia, assis 
tant treasurer. 

Miller has served on the 
board since 1956. He is also a 
member! of the NAACP Na- 
tional Lfegal Committee. 



NAACP OFFICERS INSTALLED— The Rev. St. Paul Epps installed NAACP offi. 
cers, elected for the next two years, at the Bel-Vue Community Presbyterian Church Sun- 
day. From left, front: Dr. Frederick N. Spann, James Akers, Edward D. Warren {pres- 
ident) , Dr. Epps, Vernon Thompson, Dr. John G. Gary. Second row: Rev. U\ L. Ro- - 
binson. Bcecham Jackson, James Allen, Mrsi Sadie Brewer, Dr. J. B. Carter, Mrs. Fiv, 
ian Strange, Johnny Otis, Dred Scott Neutom, Rev. C. fV. Arnold, Ralph L. Dam, 
Mrs, Rosa E. King, Ventres! Johnson and Joe Jones7 


Roybal Opens 
Campaign Mon. 

A kick-off campaign meet- 
ing to re-elect Edward Roybal 
to Citj' Council will take place 
next Monday, (Jan. 23), in the 
California Room of the Alex- 
andria Hotel, 5th and Spring 
Streets at 7:30 p.m. 

Roybal asked his friends in 
the 9th Council District ,to 
help him in his re-election 
and to take part in this, most 
imF>ortant organizational cam- 
paign meeting wh^ the is- 
sues of the campaign will be 
outlined to meet the needs of 
the district 


Negro History Planners 
Slate Full Week Feb. 12-19 

Plans are moving along swiftly for this year's | 
celebration of Negro History Week, Feb. 12-19, once j 
more , under the sponsorship of Mrs. Vassie D. i 
Wright's Our Authors' Study Club, the Los Angeles 
chapter of the Association for the Study of Negro 
Life and History. ■'■- 

A general Planning Com- pob DeCoy is arranging aj 
mittee meeting; of which Dr. giant motorcade from 12 noon' 
Roy D. Andrews is chairman, to 3 p.m., with business,; 
has been scheduled for 3 p.m. fraternal, social and civic or-; 
this Sunday at Ilolman Meth-,ganizatlons invited to enter; 
odist Church. W. Adams and [ automobiles. , 

Fourth avenue. T T T T T ~ 

Oratorical Contest elimina-,' ' * ^ ^ ^ 
tioris will be held, also at 
Holman, at 7:30 p.m. Monday,! 
Jan. 23. . . i 

A Youth Sing has been \|^- 
schoduled and youth choirs Haitian Banking Society in Haiti, specializing n investments 
throughout the city are in- wiith substantial profts, is ncreasing its captal to $2,0Q0,000 „ 

vitcd to participate, with re- j'*'^ Privilege Stock at S% interest— Great Security. 
hearsals set for Saturdav, Jan.i , , ., ' . . . . ■- . . 

21, and Saturday. Jan. ^8, at 4 j VI- *"''»*"''• ♦• •*" increase n capital or invest your capital m 4» 

„™ K „ » u ^„ „* n.: current account. 

p.m. both daj-s at Price 

Chapel. 213 E, 43rd street, un- .yj. Haitian Banking Society For Economic Development, n 

der the direction of Mrs. Eu-| . 390, Ave. J. J. J. Dessaimes, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 

genia Clark. '******* it-#ife«:Ae 

On opening day, Feb. 12. i$ $ ^ ^-^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 


Quote of Week 

The harsh and hzoMtj 
dialogue between Mosodw 
and Washington Imxs bo«B 
going on for Tears now, ia 
accordance with the tbeocy 
of Paylov's * dog. Khruifa- 
Cher lings the bell ia Moi- 
cow, and Lincoln White, 
the S t o t e Deportment's 
spokesman, salivates and 
barks in Washington. — 
James Reston, New Totk 
Times. 


Somtthina to buy? Somtthing tc 

" Trv a elatilf 

EaglCi They coat only $1 for 15 


itil? Try a elatalfitd ad in tile 


words. And Ihcy gat rotulta. 


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SATURDAY, JANUARY 7th, 9 AM TO 1 PM 



(^«« 


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BROADWAY 

FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

45tli and Broadway • ADams 2-4271 


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THANKS RECEPTION HOSTESSES — The Rn. Martin Luther King, center, 
thanked the hostesses at the reception given in his honor Saturday night at the Wilfan- 
delClub. From left: Marge DeLarge, Evelgrt^ Evans. Rev. King. Mary Batiste and 
Given Green, administrative secretary •/ t)ie newly formed Western Christian Leadership 

Conference. (Chuck Williams) 


WRONG ADDRESS 

ALBANY. N. Y.— The 
Times-Union, conduct- 
ing c telephone survey, 
asked residents if they 
know where Laos is. 

"I don't know where 
he is," one v/oman re- 
plied, "but he doesn't 
live here. Why don't 
you try acfoss the 
street?" 


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Lumumbd Bound, 
Beaten with Guns 

Patrice Lumumba, imprisoneid premier of the 
Congo, was secretly transferred from Thysville 
prison to Elizabethville Tuesday. c 

Bound together with two of his supporters, he 
was beaten sickeningly, 


Africans, ordered by Belgian 
officers, beat him in the face 
with rifle butts. 

Hepertvd Transferred 

Earlier reports said that he 
was transferred, handcuffed 
and under close guard, from 
the jail in Thysville to another 
jail in, Elizabethville, capital 
of Katanga Province and the 
headquarters of his arch rival, 
Belgian puppet, Moise Tshom- 
be. 

That report came from of- 
ficals of the Belgian air line, 
but the government in Leo- 
poldville professed to know 
nothing of such a move. 

If he has been shunted 
from one prison to another, 
the reason for the action has 
not been made clear. 

Troops Unreliable? 

There is speculation, how- 
ever, that it evidences the 
growing unreliability of the 
troops of the central govern- 
ment who reportedly let him 
go free for a brief period last 
Friday during an army mutiny 
at the Thysville prison. 

Tshombe in Katanga, how- 
ever, doesn't seem too easy 
about having Lumumba in his 
bailiwick, f ar coincidental 
with the report of Lumumba's 
arrival at Elizabethville came 
another report that Katanga 
authorities had arrested some 
100 of Lumumba's supporters. 

In Kivu Province, Lumum- 
ba's men were also reported 
as giving Belgian soldiers, 
who aren't supposed to be in 
the Congo, a hard time. Three 
of them arc said to have been 


killed in a border fight and 
16 captured. 

V. N. Mot* Defeated 

In the United Nations, 
meanwhile, efforts by Asian- 
African nations, backed by the 
Soviet Union, to have the Se 
curity Council find Belgium 
guilty of violating its trustee- 
ship over Ruanda - Urundi, 
failed of passing, but the 
issue may still be brought 
before the General Assembly 
when it convenes in March. 


Willowbrook to 
Act on Sale of 
School Bonds 

On Tuesday, Jan. 24, the 
voters of the Willowbrook 
School District will be asked 
to approve the sale of bonds 
to qualify the district to ac 
cept state funds to construct 
seven new classrooms at An- 
derson and six at Mona Park 
Schools to relieve double 
session classes. 

The voters are being asked 
to authorize $123,000 in bonds, 
$65;000 to b. sold immediately 
and $50,000 to be held in re 
serve for sale as required to 
maintain eligibility for state 
funds in the next two years. 

A two-thirds majcwrity of the 
voters must approve the 
bonds. 

Polling places will be open 
at the school cafeterias at 
each of the five district 
schools from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
— Lincoln, Marian Andtrson 
Carver, Mona Park and Wil 
lowbrook. 


You can own stock of • . . 

Bank of America 

Bullock's, Incorporated 

Standard Oil -Company of California 

Union Oil Company 

If interested call Nicholas Coulas 

Quincy Cass Associates 

Member Pacific Coast Stock Exchange 

727 West Seventh Street, Los Angeles 17, Calif. 
MAdison 3-5151 



• Guar. Satisfaction • All Jobs tVefceme 

MOTOR TUNE-UP $5.50 

Ca'l Fermon of U. 3-9628 

4822 West Adorns at Vineyard 


Andrews' Rehiring 
Asked of Santa Fe 

Lennie L. Andrews, who was fired from the job 
he had held for 14 years as a Santa Fe car cleanef 
affer he filed charges of bias with tlie FEP Commis- 
sion, should be reinstated with liine months' back 
pay and promoted at the first opportunity, the Com- 
mission was told after flve?^- ^- 


days of testimony here Fri- 
day. 

The four hearing commis- 
sioners took the case under 
advisement, but are not ex- 
pected to arrive at a decision 
for three to four weeks. 

•Boyl' 

"Andrews was fired because 
he had the audacity to file a 
complaint with the FEPC," 
Charles E. Wilson, chief coun- 
sel* for the Fair Employment 
Practices Commission, said jn 
his summation. 

He also claimed that Santa 
Fe's Barstow yards, where 
Andrews worked, treat Ne- 
groes much as they are treat- 
ed in the South. As confirma- 
tion, he pointed to the fact 
that on the witness stand 
railroad officials repeatedly 
referred to Negro employees 
by the offensive designation 
of "boys." . 

In demanding reinstatement 
of Andrews, Wilson also ac- 
cused the Atchison, Topeka 
and Santa Fe of being guilty 
o* two violations of the Fair 
Employment Practices Act — 
first, failure to promote And- 
rews and second, firing him 
after he had filed a complaint. 
LaxT. Shiftless 

Santa Fe attorney, Robert B. 
Curtlss, denied both accusa' 
tions, claiming that Andrews 
was not promoted because he 
was lazy, slow and shiftless, 
and didn't deserve advance- 
ment, and that he was fired 
because he fell asleep while 
on duty. 

Andrews denied that he had 
been asleep. He did, however, 
a.imit to being in an empty 
car one night last March 
when he had no duties to 
■perform. 

Taking cognizance of that 
fact, Wilson pointed out that 
a reprimand or demerits 
would be in order because of 
the infraction of rules, and 
also -ecommended that And- 
rews be docked one month's 
salary from the back pay that 
he maintained is due him. 
Clean Record 

To buttress his claim. that 
the firing was unfair, Wilson 
brought out through testi- 
mony at the hearing that 
others who had been fired for 
sleeping (even if the accusa- 
tion were true, which is de- 
nied) had substantial prior 
records of demerits. 

Andrews had not received a 
single demerit during the 
nearly 14 yearis that he served 
the railroad. 

On the question of Andrews 
being lazy and shiftless, his 
leadman, Louis Johnson — a 
witness called by the com- 
pany — testified that he had 
no criticism of Andrews' work. 

Most of ttie time Andrews 
worked for the Santa Fe he 
had been either a regular or 
substitute lead man over the 
coach cleaners, Wilson stated. 

He also pointed) out that on 
one occasion Aiiidrews had 
saved the life of 'a man who 
had just lost a foot in a rail- 
road yard accident, that he 
had completed a correspond- 
ence and shop course in die- 
sel engines and that on two^ 
separate occasions he had , 
been recognized by the com- ■ 
pany for safety suggestions, i 

Andrews filed his complaint! 
with the FEPC in mid-Febru-i 
ary 1960. When Santa Fci 
officials received a copy of the 
complaint they requested and 
were given 10 days in which | 
to investigate. It was at thci 
end of that period that And- 
rews was fired. 

Charges against the Broth ' 
erhood of Railway Carmen, 
which was originally named 
along with the railroad, were 
dropped through a consent 
order issued just before th5 
hearing was "^ convened. The 
union agreed that it would 
reinstate Andrews to member- 
ship, without penalty, if he is 
re-hired by the railroad. 


If the commission finds the 
Santa Fe guilty of discrimina- 
tion, the case could be settlea 
by compliance on the part of 
the company. Otherwise the 
Commission is empowered to 
appeal to the courts for an 
enforcement order. The rail- 
road could appeal such an 
order to a higher court. 



Author fo Tell 
Facts on Cuba 
Sunday Night 

Dr. Paul M. Sweezy, co- 
author of "Cuba, Anatomy of 
a Revolution." and visiting 
professor at Stanford Univer- 
sity, will speak at Channing 
H-all, 2936 W. 8th street, Sun- 
day night on 'The Truth 
About Cuba." 

The meeting, which is 
scheduled for 8:15 p.m., is 
leing held under the auspices 
of the Los .Angeles Chapter of 
thf^ Fair Play; for Cuba Com- 
mittee. 

Tl>e Rev. Stephen H. Fritch- 
man, co-chairman of the 
committee along with former 
attorney general Robert ' W. 
Kennedy, wiH preside. Martin 
Hall, chairman of the local 
Fair Play chapter, will also 
speak. ■• ^ 

Cuban revolutionary songs 
will be sung by some mem- 
bers of the choir of the First 
Unitarian Church'. A question- 
and-answer period 'will follow 
the talks. 

Sweezy, who is co-editor of 
the "Monthljf Review," spent 
considerable j time in Cuba 
this past summer. 

Dancefjoor Tilt 
Brings I Gunplay 

Charles VVIilford Jones. 32, 
of 13I6I2 WL Olympic blvd., 
was arrested! Monday after re- 
portedly shooting Robert Nash, 
of 1.507 W. 37th place. Jones 
claims Nash started to argue 
with him while he was danc- 
ing with a girl and cut him. 

Nash was shot after Jones 
claimed someone put a gun 
in his hand. Jones was taken 
to the hospital for treatment 
and later booked. 

Nash told poftce he didn't 
pull a knife oh Jones because 
he never carried a knife. He 
said a man by the name of 
Morgan and Jones were try- 
ing to frame him because ne 
had^ moved from Morgan's 
ai,artment owing him some 
money. 

He thought Morgan had 
been the cause of the trouble 
and had used Jones to start 
tho fight. 


%~ i-^ 


AIRMAN— McHekry Nor- 
man Jr., son of Maidic Nor- 
man and McHenry Norman. 
1672 If. Jefjersw blvd., 
has been assigned to the Stra- 
tegic Air Command, at Van- 
denberg AFB. Norman is a 
graduate of Manual Arts. 


Bullet Fired 
At Bar Gets 
Man Booked 

A man identified as Fred 
Philpot, 36, of 979% S. Mari- 
posa, came ^nto a bar at 2305 
S. Maple, Sunday night and 
showed the owner a gun. 
Archie Plummer told police 
Philpot said he was having a 
little trouble with a man call- 
ed "Big Mac" and was carry- 
ing the weapon for protection. 

He left the bar and came 
back a little later and claim- 
ed the man at the nearby li- 
quor store refused to serve 
him. After hearing a shot 
Plummer returned from the 
kitchen where he had gone to 
wash dishes in time to see 
the suspect put the gun in his 
pocket and walk out the front 
door. 

Several customers were in 
the^ bar at the time of the 
shooting, but no one was in- 
iured. A small hole was found 
in the wall but officers were 
unable to find the bullet. 

Philpot was caught a few 
minutes later at 24th and 
Maple and bcqked. 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


The Cafiforriia fagFe-3 


Ex-Mailman - 
Knifed to Death 
Near 'Hilltop 

Clifton Lee Harris, of 1360 
E. 48th street, a former mail- 
man who worked out of Kear- 
ney Station at Central and 
Vernon, died of knife wounds 
received during a fight at the 
Hilltop Cafe early Sunday 
morning. 

Harris was found, still alive, 
sprawled on his back in the 
roadway near the curb across 
the street from the cafe, but 
there was a large and spread- 
ing pool of blood just out- 
side the Hilltop at 5423 S. 
Broadway. 

Murderer Escopes 

Police said that the murder- 
er escaped and that his ident- 
ity is unknown, though he is 
believed to have been a friend 
of the slain man. 

Harris had been slashed in 
the back, chest and arm. He 
was taken by ambulance to 
Central Receiving Hospital 
where he died. 

Witnesses said that Harris 
and his assailant were argu- 
ing about money while they 
were in the Hilltop. Harris re- 
portedly told the other man, 
"We've been friends too long 
to fight over a $10 bill!" 
CoUopied 

But they continued to fight, 
nonetheless, in the cafe and 
out into the street. 

Police believed that Harris 
received the fatal wounds just 
outside the cafe and then 
must have staggered across 
the street before collapsing. 

Harris worked at Kearney 
from June, 1957 tq^an., 1959, 
as a temporary substitute. 

The wettest place on earth 
is Cherrapunji, India, where 
the average anual rainfall is 
458 inches — more than 10 
times greater than the figure 
fo.' New York. 



ALPHA PRESIDENT — 
Dr. William H. Hale, presi- 
dent of Langst&n University, 
has been elect'ed general 
president of Alpha Phi Alpha 
fraternity. 


Negro Labor Council 
Plans Meeting Tues. 

The Negro American Labor 
Council will meet at 7:30 p.m. 
Tuesday, Jan. 24, at the office 

of the Brotherhood of Sleep- 
ing Car Porters, 4006*4 S. Cen- 
tral avenue, according ot L. B. 
Thompson, national vice-presi- 
dent. 


VICUNA 

The vicuna is the /Smallest 
member of the camel family, 
according to the National 
Automobile Club, 



A savings^ account 

opens the 

door to 59 




banking services 
at Bank of America ! 

' ii>Tieir*i nosT AUB sATiacs Vnectunei • aniin fimml npestT iiisnixac coakutm* 


flUs 




\ 


III? 


I 

I 


fi . 


OFFICIAL STATEMENT 


Statement of Condition as of December 31, 1960 


ASSETS 

First Trust Deed Loans $27,588,927.68 

Loans on Savings Accounts 61,716.14 

Real Estate Owned 1 ,351 ,379.32 

Investment in Stock of Federal Loan 

Bank ' 405,000.00 

Cash and U.S. Government Bills and 

Bonds 2,367,769.95 

Office Building and Equipment (Less 

Depreciation) . ._ ./ 290,275.40 

Other Assets 32,308.03 

TOTAL $32,097,376.52 


. LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Savingi Accounts $28,044,544.58 

Advances From Federal Home Loan 

Bank .,•... 1 ,962,500.00 


Loans in Process 
Other Liabilities 


Specific Reserves and Deferred Credits 
General Loss Reserver. . 1,439,724.64 

Surplus 63,397.00 

I 

iN^l^nL •••••••••••••••• . 


485,041.41 
38,095.37 
64,073.52 

1,503,121.64 
$32,097,376.52 



PU ANNUM 


BROADWAY FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

4501 So. Broadway at 45th St. ADams 2-4271 

LOS ANOCliS 37, CALIfORNIA 



MR ANNtIM 


• 

•¥. 
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¥ 

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-¥. 

¥ 
M 

■¥ 

• 


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CLOTHING 
COMPANY 
MA. 4-0801 


VICTOR 

214 SOUTH BROADWAY! 



MONEY 

DOWN 

NO INTEREST 
FREE CREDIT 


BIG SALE AT THE VICTOR CLOTHING CO., 21 4 SO. BROADWAY WA. 4-0801 
$30.00 TOP COAT FREE WITH ANY SUIT PURCHASE OR $30.00 OFF THE PRICE OF ANY 

SUIT AND TOP COAT OR TWO SUITS. 
Your credit is good with us. You get a gift for each customer you bring or send in. 
$10.00 TROUSERS FRfE BIG SALE OF THE YEAR FREE $30.00 SUIT 

Buy any suit in the house duT^g our big sale of the year and get a $30.00 suit FREEIil 
Yes, you get $30.00 off the price of two suits during this big sale. Pay cash or as little as $3.00 
a weekj pays for $100.00 worth of good looking clothes, shoes and accessories for men and 
boys of all ages. 


3 NO INTEREST * FREE ALTERATIONS * FRK CREDIT * NO DOWN PAYMENT 


*Wear and enjoy your clothes while paying* ! 
Buy any sport coat in tb« house and get a $10.00 pair of trousers FREEI 

I ■ Pay later 



But act now., 


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4— The California Eagle 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


toren Mi'/fer, Publisher 

Th« California Eagle stands for complete integration of 
Negroes Into every phase of American life through the democratic 
processes. 

We favor: 

1. FEPC on total, state and national levels. 

2. Decent housing for all Americans. 

3. Representirtlon in Government. 

4. Adequate old age pensions and social security. 

5. Collective bargaining rights for all workmen. 

6. Pevelopment and encouragement of Negro business. 

We oppose: 

1. Jim Crow in all forms. 

2. Communists and oil other enemies of democracy. 

Publlshod Every Thursday for Over 79 Yeors 
2101 West Vernon, Corner of Von Ness AXminster 5-3135 

<jlte <<Jntporian1: <^\ewspaper 


The Eisenhower Years 


Although his administration 
was marked by a series of strik- 
ing and favorable advances in 
the field of civil rights, President 
Eisenhower will get little credit 
for the fateful changes in race 

r 

relations that' occurred between 
1952 and 1960, the years of his 
presidency. The irony of it is 
that had he not muffed the 
chances presented to him he 
might have become the same 
kind of a legend in the lore of 
freedom as the first Republican 
president. 

The difference between the 
two men lies in the fact that 
Abraham Lincoln had the polit- 
ical sixth sense to seize Civil War 
opportunities to strike down the 
institution of slavery while 
Dwight Eisenhower was blind 
to corresponding opportunities to 
strike a death blow at the Jim 
Crow system. 

The Supreme Court epitomized 
its decade long undermining of 
the Separate But Equal doctrine 
with the School Cases in 1954. In 
the wake of that dramatic deci- 
sion* the president missed his 
chance of greatness. He could 
have summoned the nation to a 
great moral crusade to accept 
the decision and to have done 
witih the immorality of racial 
segregation but he vacillated un- 
til a violent storm of opposition 
blew up and then managed only 
a meaningless summons to his 
countrymen to obey the law. 

The southerners even turned 
his plea for law obedience 
against him by passing a series 
of obstructionist laws and bid- 
ding for their obedience. These 


obstructionist laws finally came 
to flower in Little Rock and still 
the president could find no words 
to kindle the American spirit. He 
tbok refuge in the ultimate legal- 
ism of sending troops to enforce 
rights which he was unwilling to 
proclaim as great moral prin- 
ciples. 

He was to repeat that pattern 
when his ,party leaders intro- 
duced civil rights legislation in 
Congress. At one point he pro- 
fessed ignorance of the m.eaning 
of one of the most important 
passages in administration spon- 
sored legislation. Always he put 
his support on careful, naked 
legal grounds.' He was a lover 
without passion. 

When the Sit Downs swept the 
South and laid bare the moral 
issue that underlies the Negro's 
quest for civil rights, Dwight 
Eisenhower stuck to legalisms: 
the issue was one for the courts, 
he said. 

It was only toward the "end 
that the president rose a mite 
above his careful legal position. 
He found a few spare words to 
praise the New Orleans white 
family that had to flee its native 
city because its child attended 
an integrated school. In his last 
message to Congress he spent 
two lines on the observation that 
there were moral issues involved 
in the segregation question. 

The kindest, and at once the 
harshest, thing that can be said 
of Dwight Eisenhower is that he 
never understood the general do- 
mestic issue of our times. Men 
who fail to understand evil fail 
their times as much as those who 
promote evil. ' 


Pretty Sorry Outlook 


The Senate vote to refer the 
proposal to set limits on debate 
to the Rules Committee means 
that there is little chance for a 
curb on the filibuster at this 
session of Congress. 

The vice of the referral of pro- 
posed rules change to the Rules 
Committee lies in the fact that 
no changes can be reported out 
until after the inauguration. If 
the Rules Committed does pro- 
pose changes Johnson will be in 
the Senate chair and he is almost 
certain to rule that changes in 
rules are themselves subject to 
unlimited debate. Thus there will 
be a filibuster against the at- 
tempt to end filibusters! 

The vote to refer was close, 
50 to 46. The 50 votes came from 
Middle Western Republicans, 


Dixiecrats and Far Western 
D^inocrats — the same grouping 
that emasculated the civjl rights 
bills of 1957 and 1959. 

Architect of this scheme to 
subvert the 1960 Democratic 
platform was Vice President 
Elect Lyndon B. Johnson who 
worked through his stooges. 
Senate Majority Leader Mike 

Mansfield an'd his partner of 
many years, Republican Leader 
Everett Dirksen. 

The nub of the matter is that 
Johnson is. still running the 
Senate, a fact underscored by his 
selection to head the Democratic 
Caucus even after he assumes 
the vice presidency. 

A Johnson dominated Senate 
isn't apt to produce much by way 
of civil rights legislation. 


Overruling the Mob 


The difference that time brings 
even in the Soyth can be 
measured by the course of events 
that took place when Autlierine' 
Lucy entered the University of 
Alabama five years ago and what 
is happening in the caa^ of the 
two Negro youngsters who are 
now attending the University of 
Georgia. 


r-. 


■V. .. 


Georgia University officials 
panicked in the face of another 
mob last week. The two students 
were suspended "for their own 
protection." But Judge William 
Bootle would have none of that 
fuzzy attempt to substitute mob 
law for constitutional rules. He 
ordered the students re-enrolled 

The students are back. It is 
our guess they'll stay there. 


/ 

f'^ 


Battleaxe & Bread 

By Imstmr B. Granger 



CrangK 


ROME — This morning at 
six-thirty I opened my eyes 
for the tenth consecutive 
morning to hear rain splash- 
ing in the narrow street out- 
side my cell-like room. Ordi- 
narily I might have used the 
half-hour before required ris- 
ing to relax a bit before tak- 
ing the bus and "metro" out 
to the Exposition grounds 
where the International Con- 
ference of Social Work is be- 
ing held. 

But not in this bed, which 
was undoubtedly designed by 
apprentice sausage-makers^Jts 
mattress feels 
as if it is com- 
posed of giant 
squashy sau- 
sages tied 
loosely to- 
gether, so that 
the occupant of 
the bed rolls 
about trying to 
find a stable 
resting place 
for his weary 
bones. And he 
doesn't go to bed, either, un- 
til he is wear>', for my bed 
does not encourage idling 
around. You get intiTit when 
you are good and sleepy, and 
when you are through sleep- 
ing you p;ot up. 

Dingy Archway 

Or perhaps the bed was de- 
signed especially for this pur- 
pose by the Knight's of the 
Holy Grail, who have owned 
the Hotel Columbus for cen- 
turies and who still occupy 
the building's first two floors. 

When I was brought to this 
hotel two squares from "St. 
Peter's Church, on Via della 
Conciliazione that runs dir- 
rectly into the church's piazza, 
I had a brisk argument with 
the cab driver to the effect 
that this could not possibl.v 
be the Hotel Columbus where 
the conference's officers were 
quartered. 

It looked like the entrance 
into the courtyard of a second- 
rate Parisian pension. You 
simply walked through a 
dingy archway into the court- 
yard and Wandered left until 
you found the actual hotel 
entrance. And when you 
found it, it still wasn't much. 
Real Italian 

Well, my driver won. be- 
cause my forty-seven words 
of Italian didn't allow me to 
carry the argument A-ery far. 
as I limped out of the cab, 
(Yep, my knee has "gone off, 
again with a misplaced cart- 
ilage!) and went in to reg- 
ister. 

Actually, I found myself in 
far better circumstances than 
if I had landed at the plush, 
chrome-plated Excelsior on 
Via Veneto, or even at the 
Metropole, favorite of Arner-. 
lean tourists. 

The Albergo Colombo, as 


the natives call the Columbus, 
is cheaper, for one tlyng; it 
is "vermomcnto Italiano" in 
accommodations, service and 
the fact that not a half-dozen 
of the staff speak English. 

True, the water is never hot, 
ranging from lukewarm to 
fairly warm; and true, its ele- 
vator carries only two I pas- 
sengers with the operator. 
True, the "reading" light" by 
my bed is a 20-watt affair and 
the total wattage in all the 
lights of the room and bath 
combined ■Wouldn't exceed 250 
. . . but who cares? If you 
want to live like a New York- 
er, whyncha go back where 
you came from? New York,- 
for instancel " , 

Love This Town 

But I'm not going anywhere 
until I have to, for as I've 
remarked before I love this 
town. Who cares about a lit- 
tle drippy weather, or even 
pouring rain, 'when a bus 
ride in Rome is a cohstant 
adventure? Where in NeW 
York or California would you' 
find a taxi driver giving & 
traffic oop a .stiff argument, 
shaking his finger' in the 
other's face, holding up traf- 
fic the vvhile and then driv- 
ing away without bumps on 
his head or summons in his 
pocket? This I saw yesterday 
morning, with my own two 
eyes I 

And the buses themselves — 
lumbering through a morning 
traffic unbelievably jammed 
with tiny cars, motor bikes, 
scooters, bikes and trucks, all 
competing on even terms for 
space to squeeze by. 

And the arguments that go 
on between passenger and bus 
driver, when the former is 
carried on extra square after 
he has signaled he wants to 
get off. Then he lets the bus 
driver have it, and the driver 
reciprocates in kind, with all 
the explosive force of Latin 
temperament. Jaws jut out. 
eyes flash, fingers point, fists 
wave — until one is sure 
either or both disputants will 
be scalped. 

Then the liquid stream of 
fiery invective dies down. The 
passenger alights. When on 
the sidewalk he turns and 
grins and waves at the driver, 
who returns the greeting as 
he pulls off. 

I wouldn't go so far as to 
say this always happens. 
Sometimes somebody must 
forget the act and bust some- 
body on the snoot. But it 
hasn't happened yet; and 
I've watched at least a half- 
dozen times. So even if there 
\vere no conference, being in 
Rome would still be important 
to me. for it's one of the few 
western cities that have re- 
jected standardization. God 
bless the Romans — and, as 
I've stated — I love Rome! 



(Continued from Page 11 
stood because they, too. were 
tired. Tired of thie law's de- 
lays, tired of token integra- 
tion,^ tired of second class 
citizenship, tired o^ the talk of 
a distant rosy future, tired — 
almighty tired — of the quib- 
bles of judges, tired and worn 
down-->4>y barren promises. 
A^ su^denl^ the Sit Down 
movement swept the South. 
Movement pi Truth 

Just as sudderfly, everybody 
understood what the Sit Downs 
meant. In that flashing mo- 
ment of truth, <i the whole 
world knew thMt the sit- 
c^owns weren't student stunts 
like panty raids and water, 
lossings and Uiat they weren't 
Red inspired or Communist 
led. Somebody said that the 
students had sat down that 
they might grow tall and 
there was- revealing truth in 
that catch phrase. 

They had sat down that 
they might grow tall — tall 
in the eyes of their fellows, 
tall in the eyes of those who 
had demeaned them so long, 
tall in the eyes of the whole 
wcfTld, but above all tall in 
their own self respect, tall in 
their own self esteem, tall in 
their own dignity, tall like 
free men are tall. They had, 
lo put it simply, challenged 
the morality of the Jim Crow 
system. 

No Debate 

And that, I think, explains 
the greatness of the sit down* 
movement. You can debate 
the constitutionality of a fair 
employment ordinance; you 
can question the legal wis- 
dom of a Jim Crow law; you 
can test a discijminatory rule 
or regulation by the applica- 
ble constitutional- and legal 
principles. 

But there can be ho moral 
justification for denying a 
man food or drink because of 
his race or color. You cannot 


Gunman Faces 
Felony Charges 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Boyd told police that her hus- 
band became infuriated when 
she refused his requests to 
sign annulment papers and 
relinquish ownership of the 
family car. A bride of two 
months, Mrs. Boyd lived with 
her mother and three children 
by a previous marriage. 

Three policemen were named 
as victims of the battle, with 
wound^'^f varying degrees, 
none of them serious. 


I, 


Gene Hawking 
Held in Jail in 
Eaton Robbery 

(Continued from Page 1) 

was his latest girl friend, 
Marian Kritzer, whose car he 
was driving when he attacked 
Mrs. Eaton. 

The attack on Mrs. Eaton, 
who is a light promoter in her 
own name, occurred early Sat- 
urday morning as she entered 
the driveway of her home at 
800 Tremaine avenue. 

A stranger approached her 
and asked directions. Mrs. 
Eaton, who has been around 
boxers and knows a bit about 
fighting, said she knew it was 
a hold-up, but nonetheless, the 
man knocked her unconscious. 

Gagged, Tied { 
When she came to, she 'was 
gagged with a handkerchief. 
Her stockings, which had been 
ripped- from her /^egi, had 
been useld to bind her legs and 
arms. She reported that the 
robbers got away with jewelry, 
clothes and money for a total 
value of $3200. 

Two men were with the man 
who first approached her. 
They warned her npt to 
scream, but she ignored them 
and yelled. That was when she 
was hit over the head from 
behind. 

Both Mrs. Eaton and Mirs. 
GrisS , identified Hawkins. 

Police reported that Hawkins 
and Mrs. Kritzer lived in her 
Hollywood home at 3296 Hil- 
lock. They had, however, 
checked in at a hotel in Holly- 
wood at 9876 Wilshire blvd. as 
"Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Clark." 

'Fingers' Prospects 

Police believed . that Mrs. 
Kritzer was Hawkins' accom- 
plice in his most recent ven- 
tures. They believed that she 
"fingered" wealthy women 
with whom she was associated 
in a card club, and that 
Hawkins picked up, from there. 

Hawkins, who specializes in 
knocking- women about and 
beating them until they are 
bruised and bloody, has some 
60 counts chalked up «igainst 
him in the past two years. 

Atty. Joyce estimated that 
crime — up to now at any rate 
— has paid off handsomely for 
the 27-year-old lover-boy. He 
said that Hawkins' "take" 
amounts to something like 
$100,000 a year. 

Hawkins was out on bond 
on two counts of forgery com- 
mitted about two months ago. 
Two weeks ago he was picekd 
up on a hit-and-run count 
when he nearly ran down a 
p>pliceman. ' , 

He has so many accumu- 
lated arrests for drunk driv- 
ing, driving after his license 
has been revoked, wreckless 
driving and other assorted ac- 
counts that the judge can send 
him up for more than four 
years on those charges alone 
He H awaiting sentencing on 
those charges. 

Also pending is trial on an- 
other arrest, due to come up 
the end of this month, involv- 
ing extortion, first and second 
degree burglary, two counts 
of assault with attempt to 
rape, grand theft of money 
and grand theft auto. There 
were three victims — t\yo -| 
women and one man. " 5)4. 


Rev. king Founds 
West Conference 


make a case for the righteous- 
ne-s of saying to a man that 
he may not stay his hunger 
or quench his thirst because 
ho i.s black or brown. Y^ou may 
-say the law requires these 
things; you may shout that 
cu'itom decrees them: you 
may argue that your business 
.will be ruined unless you fol- 
low the old ways but you can 
never square your- actions 
with morality. 

New Holiday 

Something of the same kind 
h.'pr.ened on a larger scale 
when Harriet Beecher Stowe 
wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin. 
.Mter its publication nobody 
could keep the slavery ques- 
tion cabined and Iconfined to 
questions of the value of 
slaves as property or the loss 
in cotton crops or the legal 
quibble as to whether or not 
the Constitution protected 
slavery. Slavery had become 
A moral issue and it was 
doomed. Make Jim Crow a 
moral issue and it must 
collapse. 

The sit downers took a 
mighty step in that direction, i 
I think we ought to declare 
February 1 a national holiday. 


Bum Charcoal 
To Get Warm, 
Two'Suffocate 

(Continued from Page 1) 
All the windows in the room 
and in the connecting bath 
were tightly closed. ? '" "" 

Mrs. Katie Jemmett,' of .the 
same address, called police > 
after she had been unable to 
arouse either Mrs. Thompson 
or Mrs. Stansell. 

* Broke Into Room 

The officers slit the front 
door screen and forced open 
the door in order to effect an 
entry. 

Mrs. Jemmett said she had 
not seen either of the women 
since the previous day when 
she noticed them in the yard. 
Both, she said, seemed some- 
what unsteady on their feet. 

Mrs. Thompson, who is sur- 
vived by a son, Charles 
Thompson, of 10422 Alabama 
street, will be buried from the 
chapel of the J. S. Williams 
Funeral Home, at 1:30 p.m. 
Saturday. 

Mrs. Stansell is survived by 
her mother, Mrs. Lois Pirtle, 
1251 Adams blvd. Mrs. Stan- 
sell will be buried t($day, 
Thursday, from Walker Tem- 
ple on E. 25th street, at 10 
a.m., with arrangements be- 
ing handled by Angelus Fun- 
eral Home. Burial will be in 
Paradise Cemetery. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
organization, an I Rev. Maurice 
A. Dawkins chairman of the 
board. 

Wanted to Know 

Rev. King made his week- 
end trip to Los Angeles at the 
invitation of the Rev. Fred 
Doty, pastor of the Woodland 
Hills Community Church, 
whose members have become 
concerned about the repeated 
shameful incidents in the 
South, such as in New Orleans 
and, at the University , of 
Georgia, and sought first-hand 
information 'about the devel- 
oping struggle. 

Rev. King addressed the 
packed church Sunday morn- 
ing and in the evening ad- 
dressed another overflow 
crowd at Canoga Park High 
School on the "Future of In- 
tegration." The school meeting 
was also held under the 
auspices of Rev. Doty's church. 

A number of students at- 
tended the evening, meeting 
and many of them were 
among the hundred odd per- 
sons who flooded Rev. King 
with written questions after 
his. talk. ' 

Deliberate Crawl 

The $1400 in donations was 
collected, after appeals by 
Rev., King, at the Leadership 
Conference and the Wilfandel 
reception. 

At FrMay's press conference, 
the Southern leader expressed 
confidence that "we will get 
much more forthright action 
in the present situation 
(under Kennedy) than in the 
peist eight years." 

He characterized the present 
pace of integration as an "all 
deliberate crawl," and pointed 
out that in six years only six 
per cent of the Negro children 
in the South have been placed 
in integrated schools. This, he 
said, is token integration, 
brought about through evasive 
schemes and representing b'ad 
faith. 

No New Party 

Because of his belief that 
Kennedy will use the power 
of his position to tackle the 
civil rights question. Rev. 
King said he was not think- 
ing in terms of calling for 
the formation of a new, in- 
dependent party in the South. 

"We thust work through 
existing parties," he said, 
"usi^gjji^^moral and politi- 

NAACP Seeks 
Funds for Tenn. 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ordinate the work of five, or- 
ganizations, all of which have 
l)een aiding the Tennessee 
victims. 

The organizations are the 
NAACP, the National Share- 
croppers' Fund, the Congress 
of Racial ■ Equality (CORE) 
and the National (Committee 
for Rural Schools.- 

Another Meeting Pleoined 

Need for coordinatibii of the 
efforts is seen in the fact that 
here locally CORE has estab- 
lished a "Freedom -' Village 
Emergency HDommittee" to aid 
the tent dwellers, anc^ advises 
that it has already invited 
Tennessee leaders John Mc- 
Ferren, of Fayette County, and 
Odell Sandere, of Haywood 
County, to come here some 
time in February to address 
a CORE -sponsored mass meet- 

■ CORE apparently didn't 
know what the NAACP was 
planning, and vice versa. 

The New York move h£is as 
its aim the elimination of the 
duplication of efforts and a 
pooling of resources so as to 
give the most support possi- 
ble to the Tennessee victims. 

At present, 13 families are 
living in the Tent Colony 
where they are housed in sur- 
plus army tents and are liv- 
ing under primitive conditions, 
without jobs, money, homes. 

They were evicted from the 
farms they have share-cropped 
for many years after they reg- 
istered and voted in the Nov. 
8 elections. 


Widows' Horixons 

"Reorganizing Your Life" 
will be the subject of a talk 
by Dr. Paul Popenoe when the 
series "New Horizons for 
Widows" opens Wednesday, 
January 18, at 7:30 P. M., at 
the American Institute of 
Family Relations, 5287 jSunset 

blvd. • . r . 


Senate Stalls 

<f^ntinued from Page 1) 
at the opening of the session. 

Johnson has held in the 
past that the Senate is a con- 
tinuing body and is governed 
by the same rules from ses- 
sion to session. If he so rules 
in 1963, and if the Senate does 
not vote to overrule him, any 
change in the filibuster rule 
would be subject to the exist- 
ing two-thirds requirement. 

Thus, a filibuster could be 
conducted in 1963 against the 
motion to change the filibust- 
er rule. If by any chance the 
Senate rules committee should 
bring forth a report at this 
scission or in 1962 calling "tor 
a change in the present rule, 
the adoption of such a report 
will require a two-thirds vote 
of Senators present. 

The NAACP wire called the 
referral to the rules commit- 
tee a repudiation of both Re- 
publican and Democratic plat- 
form pledges. 


Synagogue Bombed 

JOHANNESBURG, South Af- 
rica — Terrorists dynamited 
the city's main Jewish syna- 
gogue early Sunday morning. 

It was the fourth incident 
ir recent months of the bonlb- 
ing of religious institutions. 




•'t I 


f- 


cal pressure to bring those 
parties to take a forthright" 
position on civil rights." 

Pointing out that the "Presi- 
dent has the power to do a 
great deal," he added that "if 
we use the necessary pressure, 
the administration will have 
to do something." 

Like Tidal Wave 

He said that the develop- 
ments in New Orleans and 
Georgia indicate the "gradual 
death of massive resistance in 
the Deep South," and that the 
"whole attempt to block in- 
tegration is as futile as trjnng 
to hold back a tidal wave." 

Rev. King credited the stu- 
dent sit-ins with giviiig new 
courage and a new "sense (tf 
dedication to Southern Nft- 
groesr As for Southern whites, 
he said many of them now 
feel that integration is in- 
evitable and that they mustf 
accept it. There is also a 
significant number, he added, 
who feel that integration is 
not only inevitable, but is 
also morally right. It. "j 


.^^!rt 


it^,-.- 




Ga. Riot Fails, 
Tension Fills 
Univ. Campuf 

(Continued from Page 1) 

"Students attending and tak- 
ing part in riots and demon- 
strations will be suspended or 
expelled. " ' ' 

That declaration was made 
after Federal Judge W. A. 
Bootle in Macon pooh-poohed 
the university's contention 
that the two Negro students 
had been suspended "for their 
own protection" and ordered 
their re -admission on Monday 
morning. 

Klaasmen Charged 

■► The judge said that he had 
been informed that the reason 
law and order had brpken 
down was that ad e equate 
police protection had not been 
provided. Jhis was an obviQus 
slap at state officials. 

"The six Klansmen, arrested 
after their gart in last week's 
riot, were bound over for trial 
Tuesday on charges df carry- 
ing weapons to a public gath- 
ering. They 'were Released 
under bonds of $500 each. '. 

Police also disclosed Tues- 
day they had .arrested a man 
believed to be the gunman 
who disarmed a campus guard 
and fled after seeking out: 
Miss Hunter's dormitory Sun- 
day night. 

Police on Guard 
Contrary to the situation 
when the riot occurred, this , 
week Athens detectives, the 
police and agents of the 
Georgia Bureau of Investiga- 
tion were continually cruising- 
the streets of the sprawling 
campus. More than 30 state 
highway patrol officer s — 
about a third of the state's 
total number — were on active 
duty. 

Both Miss Hunter and 
Homes were accompanied by 
armed bodyguards as they 
proceeded from class to class! 
A number of the students in 
Miss Hunter's dormitory 
greeted her in friendly 
fashion and a 1 1 e m p t-e d to . 
make her feel at ease. Al- 
though subdued by the gruel- 
ling experiences, the attractive 
coed flashed her engaging 
smile at those who spoke to 
her pleasantly on carhpus. j > 
The day after the riots, 
some 300 faculty members 
petitioned the school for re- 
turn of the two Negro Stu- 
dents. They declared ] that ^e 
faculty "will not retreat fibm 
the' responsibility of Istandfng | 
steadfastly by the rul^s of iaw 
and; morality." j 

■"^e school was i^nusually 
quiet, as the second'^attle^of 
G e o r g i a — almost a hundred 
years after the Civil V^ar 
"March Through Georgia,?' — 
seemed headed for a vict^rj'. 
for integration. . 


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u 


CALIFORNI 
EAGLE 

'The Important Newspat 
2101 ^W. Vernon Avai 
JLos Angeles 8, Calif.] 
AXminster 5-3ll35 

LOR EN MILLER I 

Publisher i 


Thursday 
Vol. LXXX 


Jan. k 9, 1961 
No. 44 


GRACE SIMONS— Exacutiv* Editor 

F. P. WALLER, Jr >dv. Mgr. 

EDWARD "ABIE" ROBINSON 

■ . , , .Circulation Mgr. 

CALME RUSS Office Mgr. 

BAY AREA REPRESENTATIVE 

E. Q. Allen f512 16th St. 

Santa Monica, Cal. Ph. EX. 5,-1591 
STA. MOnICA branch OFFICE 

1907. 20th Street (Upstairs) 
Phone EX brook 4.8082 

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Adjudication Decree Number 123228 
Dite of Adjudication July 1. 1fl2S 
Published every Thursday by 
The California Eagle Publishing 
Co., 2101 Wert Vernon Avenue, at 
Van NeM, Los Angeles 8, Calif. 
Entered as Second Class Matter 
November 3, 1937, at the Post 
Office at Los Angeles. California, 
«"?'• the Act of March 3, 187*9. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 
BY INTERSTATE \ 
UNITED NEWSPAPERS • 

648 Fifth Avenue 
New York 17, New Yertc 


is' 



WELCOME TO THE FIRM-Leon Harmon extends a cordial tcelcorne to Mrs. 
tannie E. Benjamin as she enters the office after joining the Harrison-Ross Mortuary 
■staff as managing director and vice-president. (Jack Davis) ' ' 


Mrs. Fannie Benjamin Joins 
ffarrison-Ross Mortuaries 

Leon H. Harrison, president of the Harrison-Ross 
Mortuaries announced last week that Mrs. Fannie 
E. Benjamin has joined the firm as managing direc- 
for and vice-president. Mrs. Benjamin has sei-ved in 
various mortuaries for over 30 years anci sis well 
known in community club, church and ff-aternal 
circles. » 

Other 


appointments an- 
nounced by Harrison were Le- 
Roy D. Johnson as personnel 
director and Richard H. John- 
son, who will serve as an in- 
surance advisor and morti- 
cian. 

True Friend 
Harrison -Ross offers those 
seeking solace a kindly and 
understanding service similar 
tc that of a tried and true 
friend. The service is so de- 
signed as to, alleviate the de- 
pression generally associated 
with funerals. 

The pas*l colored fleet with 


its flower car and singing 
chapel are regular features of 
the Harrison- Ross service. 

Mrs. Benjamin is an organ- 
ist of note and is the first Am- 
erican Negro to be elected to 
serve on the board of the Los 
Angeles Chapter of the Am- 
erican Guild of Organists. She 
has served as organist at Peo- \ 
pie's Independent Church of 
Christ for 30 years. 



rson 


"X pure heart is an excel- 
lent thing — and so is a clean 
shirt." 

— G'. C. Lichtenberg 


VERMONT SQUARE METHODIST CHURCH 

4410 S. Budlong at West Vernon 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22 

"Prepare for Yoiir Opportunity"— Rev. A. C. Austin, pt^eaching 

Sunday S«hool-9:30 A.M. Worship- 1 1:00 A.M. 

Rkv. H. R. Carey Healing Service at 5 p.m. Rev. A C. Austin 


•NEW COMMUNITY CHURCH INC. 


' 5965 S. Broadway Avenue— Rev. Anita L. Edmonds, Paster 

Pentacostal and Interracial 
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School 10:45 A.M.— Worship Service 

7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. Wednesday 8 P.M.— Prayer Service 


CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

3125 W. ADAMS BLVD. 

11 a.m. — Moftiing Worship Service 
Rev. James H. Hargett Will Speak 
SUNDAY SCHOOL, 9:30 a.m.— Kindergarten Through 5th Grade 
11 a.m.-6th Grade Through High School 


%; 


Rev. Anderson 
Off to Board, 
Inauguration 

The Mid-Winter Board Meet- 
ing of the National Baptist 
Convention Inc. convened at 
the National Baptist Bath 
House Hotel in Hot Springs, 
Ark., on Jan. 17. Among the 
group representatives partici- 
pating were Allen Jordan, 
president of the National Bap- 
tist Laymen and Dr. O. Clay 
Maxwell, president of the Na- 
tional Sunday School and Bap- 
tist Training Union Congress. 
Both are from New York. 

Rev. A. E. Anderson, board 
member of the Natiorfal Bap- 
tist Convention Inc., and pas- 
tor of the McCoy Memorial |%^.-_|-^_«,„ r\2— 

Baptist Church. 802 E. 46th ucveioper,. uies 

street, left Los Angeles last George A. Foster, 81, 107 
[Sunday evening, for H o t'Glorietta avenue, Pasadena, 
! Springs, and eventual attend- [passed away on Jan. 18 at the 
' ance of the Presidential inau- 1 General Hospital after a 


Rev. L. S. Odom 
Elected to Head 
NewWCLC ^ 

Rev. L. Sylvester Odom, pas- 
tor of Ward A.M.E. Church, 
was elected to the presidency 
of the newly-formed Western 
Christian Leadership Coinfer- 
ence. 

Ministers of many denomi- 
nations and from major cities 
of the Western States, met 
Saturday Jan. 14 to elect the 
organization's first full s\zXe 
of officers. 

Equal treatment under the 
law and the freedom to per- 
sue happiness and employ- 
ment in any chosen field with- 
out segregation, won the com- 
bined support of mdnisters of 
the west as they organized in 
support of Rev. Martin Luther 
King and his Southern Christ- 
ian Leadership Conference. 

On a lecture tour. Rev. 
King, president of the South- 
ern Christian Leadership Con- 
ference, assisted in the devel- 
opment of the organizational 
structure and served as key- 
noter at the opening session. 
Results of the Conference 
election placed the Rev. Maur- 
ice Dawkin.s as chairman of 
the Board of Directors. Vice- 
president-at-large were the| 
Revs. Edward Stovall of Berk- 
eley; P. J. Ellis of Los Ange- 
les, and F. M. Lockridge of 
San Diego. Elected Regional 
vice presidents were the ReV. 
Samuel McKinney of Seattle; 
M. C. Williams of Denver; O. 
B. Williams oi Portland; T. C. 
Coles of Las Vegas; L. K. Wil- 
liams of Albuquerque:; Cas- 
per Glenn of Tucson; and J. 
\V. Ford of Los Angeles. 

The Rev. James Hargett was 
elected secretary and Rev. C. 
W. Arnold, a-sistant secretary 
with Rev. John Doggett treas: 
urer. 

Additional Fosts 
The following ministers 
were elected to the Board of 
Directors: Revs. M. L. Scott, 
Owen De Vaughn, P. J. Ellis, 
Isaiah Scipio, F. D. Ferrell, L. 
G. Degeddingseze, James Ed- 
ward Jones, Hillery Broadus, 
Welford Wilson, Roy Thomp- 
son, Seth Toney, R. A. C. Fost- 
er, H. A. Green, J. L. Richard, 
John Dorn, Joseph Williams, 
S. O. J. Evan% M. M, Jeffer- 
son, and A. A. Peters. 

Additional posts went to 
Rev. W. H. Warfford, chaplin 
and Rev. A. T. Broadus, histor- 
ian. Rev. Marvin Robinson of 
Pasadena was elected to fill 
the post of administrative co- 
ordinator-at- large. 

Regular coordinators elect- 
ed were Rev. Claude McKin- 
ney, Northwest Pacific area; 
Rev. Joseph Griffin, Inter- 
mountain Pacific area and E. 
V. Hi., Southwest Pacific Area. 



\)\ 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


The California Eagle— 5 



- SANTA n 

MONICA 

NEWS 


FOVND CONFERENCE — The Western ^Christian 
Leadership Conference' uas officially launched he^ Satur- 
day, u-ith the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.. right, as the 
main speaker. The Rev. L. Sylvester Odom was selected to 
head the new organization. The two are shown at a press 
conference at the Ambassador. (Chuck Williams) ' 


1st AME Building Fund 
Guild to Seek $700,000 

After 88 years, the oldest Church among Negroes 
In the city of Los Angeles, girds for relocation. The 
spirit of the people at First AME Church spells "For- 
ward for God." On Jan. 10, a large number of women 
met at the Wilfandel Club :> 


George Foster, 
Willowbrook 


under the chairmanship of 
Mrs. Paul R. Williams, for the 
purpose of conducting 'the 
pledge program for $700,000. 

A well organized plan was 
outlined by Rev. H. H. Brook- 
ins to the women who over: 
whelmingly endorsed and 
committed themselves to it'. 
With $100,000 already pledged 
without, effort, the five [year 
plan is designed to include 
every member of the cqurch, 
according to Sara Nelson, re- 
porter for the cchurch, the 
"fever" of building seems to 
have gripped every organiza- 
tion and member of the 
church. 

Plans for the future include 
activity in which the members 
will, on Feb. 26, observe Men 
and Women's Day for local 
and connectional budgets, so 
that the relocation program 
can take front place in the 
program. 

The Pastor, Dr. Brookins, an- 
nounced that the second Sun- 
day in Februai>', which is the 
day on which the African 
Methodist Episcopal Church 
was founded, will be "Loyalty 
Day." All members" of the 
church will be requested to 


after the worship service 
and secured their written 
pledge to the program. , 


first worship and return and 

stay home until a member of I Sunday morning 

the guild has visited them Jah. 22 and 29. 


McCarty Opens 
Revival Week 


A week of reviv.'l services 
will open a,t McCa.ty Mem- 1 
orial Christian Church, 4101 
W. Adams blvd., Jan. 22, af 
10:40 a. m. with the minister 
preaching on "This Jesus." 

Church officers ha^ set up 
this special effort ^to strength- 
en spiritual life of .members 
as well as to present the 
Christian message to the com- 
munitj". Rev. Kring Allen, pas- 
tor, lists challenging topics 
for each of his sermons in the 
series. He is recognized as a 
most effective pteacher, 
thoroughly prepared by train- 
ing and experience. 

Mrs. Marion Downs Pierce 
will be song leader at the 
7:30 services each night in the 
week. The choir under. . the 
direction of John Herrod will 
present special music at the 
services on 


The NAACP installation 
banquet wdll be held Friday, 
Jan. 17 at 8 p.m. at the Philo- 
mathean Club, 1810 Broadway. 
Mrs. Terea Hall Pittman will 
be the speaker. i 

• • • " 

Eagle newsboy. Dixon Addy 
was the rfecipienl oi more 
than $20 from cuitomfos on 
his paper route during the 
holidays. tWxon, who is 10 
years old, delivers almost 50 
paipers a week. He is a stu- 
dent at McKinley School, 
where he takes an active part 
in the athletic program. He 
wishes to thank .those who 
made his Christmas so eniov- 
able. •* ' 

.♦ • * 

The Membership Committee 
of the NAACP met at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. M. B. 
Allen last week. Memberships 
totalling $54 was reported. 
Added to the membership roll 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Ted Far- 
ley, Reba Walker, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Williams, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ed Foster, Robert Smith, 
Lucille Ligans, Mr. and Mis. 
Zackery Coleman, Mr. and 
Mrs. Melvin Forbes, Mis. Dena 
Goldring, Richard Young, Jean 
D. Young, George Quarls, Mat- 
tie B. and M. B. Allen, Jr., Ar- 
tena Williams, L. Hurd and 
Margaret Thomeis. 

Others present were: Rene 
Crawford, Alia Mae Carter, 
Rosa Yeager, Helen Bristow, 
Essde Garland, Delia Powell, 
Ethel Sullivan, Joel Smith, 
Oriel Powell, AraBell and 
Harvey Preston, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ivory Hilliard, E. G. and 
Louelle Allen, Mary Green, 
Evelyn Snyder and others. A 
delicious repast was served by 
the hostesses. 



MARTIN L. TOPSIL 

Martin Topsil 
Funeral Set at 
2nd Bapt. Sat.. 


The women of Calvary Bap- 
tist Chtrch will sponsor the 
program,, at 7 p.m. in the 
church dn Sunday, Jan. 22. 


Martin L. Topsil, 23 E. Ave- 
nue 38, pioneer member of 
2nd Baptist Church, died Jan. 
16 after suffering a stroke of 
paralysis a week ago. 

Funeral services will be con- 
ducted at 2nd Baptist Church 
at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan.- 21, 
with Connor-Johnson in charge 
of arrangements and inter- 
ment in Evergreen Cemetery. 

Mr Topsil was born in 
Clarksdale, W. Va., and had 
lived in Los Angeles since 
1923. He had also been a mem- 
ber of the 2nd Baptist Church 
since 1923. For more than 20 ■ 
years he was head of one of 
the Usher Boards in the 
Church. He was employed 
by the Broadway Department 
Store for many years and jvas 
retired by the store with a 
good employment record. 

Surviving are his son and 
daughter, Albert and Eleanor 
Topsil; granddaughter, Artha; 
sister-in-laws. Belle and Cbr- 
rine Patton; and brother-in- 
law, Clarence Patton, all of 
the Los Angeles area. 


WESTMIKSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
2230 W. JEFFERSON BLVD. REpublic 4-1566 

Rev. James E. Jones, Pastor 

9:30 and U;:00 a.ni.— Morning Worship 

9:30 a.m.— Church School Kindergarten to 6th Grade— Adult Classes 

11 :00 a.m.— Church School — 7th Grade Through College Sr. 

7 p.m.— Westminster Bible Hour 


Science Shrinks Piles 

New Way Without Surgery 

Stops Itch— Relieves Pain 


guration, Jan. 19. 


•HAMILTON METHODIST CHURCH' 


6330 so. FIGUEROA ST. PLeasant 3-4535 

REV. JOHN N. DOGGETT. JR., PASTOR 

8 a.m. — Rev. J. Lewis, Preaching 

"The Adequate Chritt" — John 6:68 

9:30 a.m. — Church School (tor All Age*) 

10:45 a.m. — Rev. John N. Doggett, Jr., Preaching 

6:30 p.m. — Methodist Youth and Wesley Fellowship 


Bowen Memorial Methodist Gliurcli 

lAST 3«th AND TRINITY STREETS - REV. JOHN C. BAIN, MINISTER 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22 

"IMPROVING OUR PRAYER IIFE" 

REV. BAIN PREACHING AT 9 A.M. AND 11 A.M. 

Th« public is cordially invited to attand. 


BLESSED CHAPEL INC. 


1564 W. 36th PLACE 


AX. 1-9831 


Messages to AH 

Services Sunday and Thursday at, 8 P.M. 

Wednesday 2-4 P.M. 

REV. OTIS STOVALU Mini$t«r 



Heart Attack 
Takes Life of 
J. E. Sidney 

Requiem mass for realtor i"oved to Pasadena. 
James Eugene Sidney wa.s re- Funeral arrangements 
j cited at 1 p.m. Jan. 16 at Holy '"^on^Pl^^^- 

I Name Catholic Church. Inter- — 

ment followed at Holy Cross VEiriCE NEWS 

Cemetery. Mrs. B. McClendon, 

Mr. Sidney at 44 was a vie- Westminster avenue is 
tim of a heart attack suffered ^P^^^'^S at St. John's hos- 
in the office of a building he ^ 
managed ! at 4th avenue and 


I lengthy illness 

He leaves his widow, Am- 
intha, daughter Lucille De- 
Costa and two sons. Joseph A., 

j president of the Willowbrook 
School Board and Irving G., 

[Supervisor in the Los Angeles 
Post Office. 

Mr. Foster came to Los An- 
geles in 1923 and was one of 
the developers of the Willow- 
brook community, where he 
lived until 1950 when he 


are 


655 
re- 


WHEN YOU NEED DIRECTION 

CALL DU. 5-8804 

MAOR-EMETH FOUNDATION 

Church Services 1 1 p.m. Sunda^ 

BACES HALL 

1528 N. VERMONT AVE. ^ 
Church of Spiritual Revelation 

Rev. S. S. Heyliager, Minister 


New York, N. Y. (Special) - 

For the first time science has 
found a new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids, stop itch- 
ing, and relieve pain — without 
surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid. case after 
another,"very striking improve- 
ment" was reported and veri- 
fied by a doctor's observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, wh'ile gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction or re- 
traction (shrinking) took place. 

And most amazing of all — 
this improvement was main- 
tained in cases where a doctor's 
observations were continued 
over a period of many months! 

In fact, results were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able 
to make such astonishing state- 


ments as "Piles have ceased to be 
a problem!" And among these 
sufferers were a very wide va- 
riety of hemorrhoid conditions', 
some of 10 to 20 years' standing. 

All this, without the use of 
nircotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any kind. The secret is 
a new healing substance ( Bio- 
Dyne*)— the discovery of a 
world-famous research institu- 
tion. Already, Bio-Dyne is in 
wide use for healing injured 
tissue on all parts of the body. 

This new healing substance' 
is offered in suppository or oint- 
ment form called Preparation 
H*. Ask for individually sealed 
convenient Preparation H Sup- 
positories or Preparation H 
Ointment with special appli- 
cator. Preparation H is sold at 
all drug counters. 


First Rock Boptlst Church 

3930 S. Western Avenue 

Rev. Lee P. James, Minister 

Sunday School 9:30 am. Morning Worship 
11 a.m. BTU 6:30 p.m. Evening Service 
7:30 p.m. Song Service 8:45 p.m. Public 
It invifed to Pray with us at 7:30 pm. 
on Wednesday. 


Washington blvd. about 1 p.m. 
Thursday Jan. 12. 

The young realtor was born 
in Kansas City, Mo. he came 
to Los Ang^eles in 1932 and 
for several years operated a 
Liquor store at 29th and Cen- 
tral avenue. For 20 years he 
worked in real estate with of- 
fices a.t 2601 W. Vernon 3ve- 
; nue. 

[ He is survived by his wife 
[Eleanor and twin children 
iMelvyn ■'and Marvelyn; a 
[grandson, Eugene Paul Sid- 
ney; his aunt, Mrs. Mamie 
Jackson Martin ■ all of Los 
Angeles, and his parents Mr. 
and Mrs. George Sidney of 
Kansas City. 
Sidney had been an active 


Mrs. D. Warfield, wife of 
the Rev. Mr. Warfield, pastor 
of St. Paul Baptist Church in 
Venice, is recuperating from 

surgery at General Hospital. 

« * * 

J. Stallings and his father 
and children visited the 
northern part of the state re- 
cently. They reported having 
a wonderful reunion with 
family relatives and friends. 
E. Stallings is visiting the 
home of J. Stallings here in 
Venice. He plans to return to 
Waco, Texas soon. - \ 

* * * i 

Marvin Cole, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Cole, left last Sunday 
for Richmond. He will enter 
the hospital there for surgery. 


When you choose a funeral director, you look for 
service. To those of us at PEOPLE'S FUNERAL 
HOME, service means complete reliable service, A I 
planned in good taste for everyone's convenience. 

PEOPLE'S FUNERAL HOME 


member of the Consolidated 
Realty Board since 1952 and 
was a former member of the 
Royal Dragons Club. 


ISP/R/TUAL ADVISOR I 


^■r MENTAL COMFORTER I 

■ ELDER J. B. 

Divine Healer From Birth 

Healing Meetings Every Wednesday Night-7:30-8:30 p.m. 
AFTER YOU HAVE TI?lED ALL OTHERS 

WHY NOT TRY ELDER MOORE 
AND HIS MAKER? WE WILL NOT FAIL 

ST. JOHN BAPTIST CHURCH , 

1319 E. 23nd ST. 

Residence Rl 8-7580 

421 N. 4th Ave., Pocatello, Idaho CE. 2-9438 


^'J(/e called /l^miiwif ^amiltf,. 

. . . bereavement is a family loss and we wanted their 
family to take care of our beloved-we are very thankful." 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS-SERVING ALL-WITH THE FINEST 

1201 SOUTH HOPE STREET - RI. 7-9121 



Terry Ravensdale 

NUMEROLOGY AND CARD READING 
_I379 W. 38th PLACE - RE. 4-7915. 


42BO South Central Av*nu» 


ADMn* 2-7181 


••l 


DISCIPLES OF JESUS CHRIST IN REVIVAL JAN 22 - 29 

REV. KRING AUEN, Pastor, Preaching at each Service 

Sunday, January 22, 10:40 a.m. '7HIS JESUS." 7:30 p.m. "WHO IS CHRISTIAN?" 
Monday, 7:30-"WHAT IS THE CHURCH?" Tuatday, 7:30-'A HAPPY FUNERAL." Wadnctday, 
7:30-"SUPPER IS READY." Thursday, 7:30- "WHAT MUST I DO TO BE LOST?' Friday, 7:30 
-"GUESTS OF GOD." Sunday, January 29, 10:40 «.ni.-"THE VERDICT IS YOURS." 7:30 p.m.- 

McCARIY MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH "°',J',S, it:™.""" 


AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS"- 

• Brake Tune-Up Specialists • Free ?kk%, Deiivery 

SPECIAL FREE ElilGiNE CLEANING WITH LUBRICATION 

HENRY LiZINE'S MOBIL ISFRVICE 

1921 S. CENTRAL AVL Rl. M044 "V;:;^rV 



FREE INFORMATION ..... Contact "CELE5" KING, III 

BAIL BONDS'Hl ^ 

■*•*■" ■•^■'■^•^ 24 Hr. Service 


Automatic Cos f /of/iu Dryir Wutfroltd it tho now RCA WhiRLfOOL 

Modem Gas clothes dryers ■ ■ ^■ 

treat your laundry gently 
as ilamb. They dry 20% 
faster than any other kind 
of automatic drying -and 
cost only V* as much to 
use! See them now while 
this free installation offer 
lasts at appliance dealers 
selling: RCA Whirlpool • 
Majrtag • Norge • Frigid- 
aire • Philco-Bendix • 
Hamilton • Easy • Speed 
Queen • O'Keefe & Merritt 
Blackstone. Offer applies 
to dryer part of washer- 
dryer combinations, too. 



GKS. 

■f l\l l>l\l| dryer combinations, too. ^^^^^HmMS 

INSTALLED FREE NoW 

^UTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS COMPANY . " 


.If 




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I 


6-The California Eaglej 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 





w 
I 

T 


RAMSEY 



BEAUTIFUL CALIENTE IN 
OLD MEXICO: An unidentifed 
bettor won 592,851.40 last Sun- 
day at the Caliente Race 
Track. 

The lucky selector, who had 
all six winners in the series, 
received the $76,704.20 win- 
ning share and 12 of the $1,- 
345.60 consolation prizes. A 
5-10 pool grossed $113,636. 
The huge crowd of 15,633 
sent $412,225 through the 
mutuels for the II races not 
including the 5-10 pool. 

Light-heavyweight champion 
Archie Moore and his wife 
were guest of the Stewarts. 

Santa Anita — two big fea- 
tures are in store for the fans 
this week. On Thursday, Jan. 
19, the Santa Ynez Stakes for 
the 3-year-old fillies will b* 
the main event for the dis- 
tance of 6'2 furlongs. This 
will mark its 10th running 
and carries an added value of 
§15,000. 


On Saturday, Jan. 21, The 
San Pasqual Handicap will be 
the featured attraction. This 
will be its 24th presentation. 
It will share double-header 
billing with the San Marcos 
Handicap on, Turf. • . 

(HORSES TO WATCH THAT ARE 
FIT AND READY) 
CALIENTE 
Dair'ing Red — Go back to this one. 
Deeded. — My special. 
Nagual.— Getting good again. 
Royal Paiha. — Over a distance O.K. 
Miss Aqullia. — Didn't run to works 

tab. 
Scamper Phar — Next out O.K. 
Basalite— Now fit. 
Station Break— Threw ride last 

out. 
Dee Jay — Very (good now. 
Jungle Light — This one has class. 
Get Rythum — ifi smart hands. 
Burner's Baby-^A real goodie. 

SANTA ANITA 
Rustic Village— My hot goodie. 
College Boy — Niext out O. K. 
Rablero — Wire to wire. 
Real Pie — Six furlong.s O.K. 
Empiric — Clockers Special. 
Rhin — Will make them hus.-sle. 
Flight Pal— Mile or over O.K. 
Happy Harry — This one can fly. 
Prince Blessed — A real staka. horse. 
Prove It — One of the best. 
Umbo — Love a route. 
Game — From a smart stable. 



Wilma Rudolph, the No. 1 personality to emerge from the 
1960 Olympiad at Rome, and every other still-active U. S. 
track and field gold metal winner headline a strong field 
for the second annual Los Angeles Invitational Indoor meet 
Saturday evening, Jan. 21, at the Sports Arena. 

In addition, a crack mile cast will matc^h the great Jim 
Beatty, who recorded the world's fastest mile (3.58) in 1960, 
a^d such distance running stars as Ernie Cunliffee, Archie 
San Romani Jr., Bob Holland and George Larson. 

Wilma. who captured three gold medals at Rome in a 
fantastic display of sprinting, shares the spotlight with three 
other U. S. gold medalists from Rome and another from 
Melbourne and Helsinki. 

Her own school, little Tennessee State, offers one of them 
— broad jumper Ralph Boston who shattered the almost in- 
destructible record of Jesse Owens with his jump of 26 ft. 11 U 
inch^ 

Also there's Don Bragg, world record holder in the pole 
vault (15 ft. 9*2 in.1 as well as Otis Davis, who broke a world 
standard in the 400 meters at Rome. The other Olympic gold 
medal winner is shot putter Parry O'Brien, a silver medalist 
in Italy after winning gold awards at Melbourne (1956) and 
Helsinki .(19521. 

Wilma will be making her first Los Angeles appearance 
and -also will be competing for the first time in this country 
since her triumphs in Europe. Her oposition will include 
Tigerbelle teammate Martha Hudson and Irene Robertson, 
another Olympian. 

Virtually every event will present an Olympic team mem- 
ber or standout p^former. 


Laker Cagers 
To Attend 
Cage Clinic 

A free basketball clinic 
featuring the incomparable 
Elgin Baylor and other stars 
of the Los Angeles Lakers 
will be sponsored by the Mu- 
nicipal Sports Division of the 
City Recreation and Park De- 
partment at the Sports Arena 
in Exposition Park from 10 
a. m. to 1 p. m. Saturday, 
Jan. 28. 

Emphasizing that admission 
to the event will ^be by tick- 
et only, Dudley C* Shumway, 
supervisor of municipal sports 
in the Recreation and Park 
Department, said that the 
Sports Arena's doors will be 
open at 10 a. m. Jan. 28. Hoop 
enthusiasts of all ages are 
invited to atend the clinic, he 
added. 

Free ducats can be obtained 
from recreation directors at 
municipal playgrounds 
throughout Los Angeles or by 
calling MAdison 4-5211, Sta- 
tion 505, to request them, 
Shumway said. 


Tordan Edqes 
Teiferson in 
City Cage Tilt 

The Jordan High basketball 
team, with eyes toward the 
school's annual fall Athletic 
Banquet sponsored by Jordan 
High School's Youth Service, 
scored an impressive 54 to 51 
victory over Jefferson High in 
the feature game of the city 
high school Basketball Tour- 
ney at Venice High last Satur- 
day. 

Sharp shooting John, Ander- 
son, a guard, drilled in 18 
points in the final quarter to 
pull his team into the lead 
after Jeff had led late in the 
game 37 to 36. Anderson ac- 
counted for 10 field *goals for 
20 points. 

This was the fourth of a 
total of eight games sched- 
uled. 

In other games Roosevelt 
surprised Marshall, 66-57; 
Dorsey nodded Canoga Park, 
53 to 50 in overtime and Poly 
turned back Venice, 61 to 42. 

The tourney moves over to 
L.A. State College gyin games 
on Jan. 21, 23, and 25. 





r^ THE TEE 


NO. / ATTRACTIO'S — Mcndou-lark Lemon, the 
delightful comedian par excellance, leads the fabulous, ex- 
citing, hilarious Harlem Globetrotters in- a tremendous 
douhleheader basketball game at the Shrine Auditorium 

on Sunday, January 29. 


1960 ProgreM 

Now that another golfing 
y*>ar has passed, we are hap- 
py to report that a little pro- 
gress was made in the direc- 
tion of integration by our golf 
clubs. 

Cosmopolitan Golf Club was 
tl.e first club to vote to "leave 
Fox Hills." Thedr tournaments 
will be held on other golf 
courses whose clubs are not 
iguilty of segregating. (Even 


Maury WiUs 

Tabbed lor 
Pay Raise 

Thirty-eight contracts were 
mailed last Thursday to mem- 
bers of the 1961 Los Angeles 
Dodgers, E. J. (Buzzie) Bavasi, 
vice-president and general 
manager, announced. 

"After a fourth-place fin- 
ish," Bavasi ssdd, "there will. . . ^ r,- „ a t.K^^<c 
not be the customary numberi^™-P"'?ili^J^M^''^l°iff 
of salary Ljcreases among the 
Dodgers. Not as many as in 
the past, in any event." 

"There will be, for that mat- 
ter, a few cuts although it is 
;iot our practice to deal out 
severe pay slices. When you 
reach that point with a player 
it's better not to have him 
around." 

While Bavasi did not single 
out those due for raises or de- 
creases, It was rather obvious 
that Norm Larker, who bat- 
tled Dick Groat for the bat- 
ting crown right down to the 
final day of the 1960 season, 
and Maury Wills, who stole 
fifty bases and finished in the 
top ten among the league's 
batters, were in line for pay 
hikes, among others. 


WITH MAGOff HATHAWAY- 


I 

Boots Nonioe, Dan Valdez 
In Featherweight Title Go 


Back in 1958, Boots Monroe 
was regarded as one of the. 
best young fistic prospects to 
come along in years. 

This impression was short 
lived as in Feburary of 1959, 
he was bombed out by Tolucc 
Lopez in two rounds at Holly- 
wood Legion Stadium. He hit 
the boards a total of four 
times before Referee . Lee 
Grossman wisely halted the 
mismatch. 

Npw, two years older and 
wiser and a division heavier. 
Boots gets another chance for 
stardom. He moots tough 
Danny Valdez in a 12-rounder 
tonight, Thursday at the 
Olympic for the vacant Calif- 
ornia fektherweight title. 

A win over Valdez, who is 


Indoor Mile Race Is Top Feature 


ranked ninth in the world, 
would put Monroe in line for 
some money matches. A loss 
will probably write finish to 
his career. 

Though he only tipped the 
Fairbanks at 122 pounds, Mon- 
roe was a top high school 
football player. He was the 
defensive halfback on the 
Ce.'^.tcnnial High team which 
won the CIF title from Glen- 
dalo Hoover in 1954. 

The offensive fullback was 
a guy named Paul Lowe, who 
now does his stuff for the Los 
Angeles Chargers. 

Continuing their policy of 
one televised and one off "TV 
main event, the Olympic has 
Alfredo Escobar and Irish 
Noel Humphreys paired in the 
video feature. 


To Defend Golf Crowns 


Joe Roach and Pet^ Brown 
willdefend their amateur and 
pro titles, respectively, in the 
eighth annual North-South 
Golf Tournament Feb. 20-24 
at the Miami Springs course. 

Roach, a native Miamian, 
has won the crown the ■Jast 


National Ne^ro links cham 
pion. Brown, from Jackson, 
Miss., dethroned Harrington 


last year and captured the 
Asbury Park title recently. 

Ted Rhodes, four-time Na^ 
tional Negro pro champion 
and Charles Sifford, current 
National titleholder, will give 
the young Mi*sissippian a 
tough battle. 

Richard Gardner will be 


fours years and is a f ormft^ ;'aJnong those who are expect- 


^ to give Roach, now of Los 
Angeles, a run for . the big 
trophy.- 


.«« /-UftirE \\ "BEST DANCING SIN 

100 Cnuiv*c \ ^gjj jipg j^Qgy, 

"'Si^ mm. 


ISIANI) 


CAST OF 42 ' — ^•ri.r- 

starrlng Jean Durond • Doloret Pip*c * Morrtt luchcmon 'John Howkar 
„ and Mii» G*orgio Carr ' " -= ^^^ 

SCraiUlt PlijSUr lUJO (oetdt Hat) v—Bo V*. 

Sjt !-0O 1511 13 « . PSICti S.50 • BJJ • C.a te iKl 

SEATS KOV». Bra CJffKtSaOM.IiliaiC Co, , „ ,. „^. ^„.. .,„..., 

:C3 CHOICE SEATS $2 ^' HO.a-Bgoa 


EL CAPITAN 



An International mile race 
featuring Istvan Rozavolgyi, 
Hungarian freedom fighter, 
and Terry Sullivan of Rho- 
desia, Africa's first sub-4m. 
runner, against outstanding 
Americans will be the high- 
light of the Second Annual 
Los Angeles Indoor Games at 
the Memorial Sports Arena 
Feb. 11. 

Meet Chairman Glenn Davis 
hzLS the assurance of Dan Fer- 
ris, National AAU Secretary, 
that both Rozsavolgyi, world's 
No. 1 1500-meter runner in 
1959 and third-place finisher 
at Rome in the 01>-mpics; and 
Sullivan who chased Herb 
Elliott to the tape iri two post- 
Olympic races, will be in the 
brilliant field. 

Rozsavolgyi's 3:38.9 1500- 
meter time gained him the No. 
1 world ranking two years ago. 


AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 



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OPEN SUNDAY 


Angels Report 
To Spring Drills 
At Palm Springs 

The Los Angeles Angeles 
will report for their first 
American League spring train- 
ing camp on Friday, Feb. 24, 
at Palm Springs, Calif., it was 
announced today by General 
Manager Fred Haney. The en- 
tire squad will report to the 
Polo Grounds in the California 
resort city for uniforms on 
Feb, 25 with workouts due to 
begin the following day. 

The Angels will start their 
26-game exhibition schedule 
on Saturday, March 11, 
against the Chicago Cubs at 
Palm Springs. Los Angeles 
will also host the Cubs the 
following day. The schedule 
runs through April 9. 

The new American League 
entry — the first club to rep- 
resent the junior circuit on the 
West Coaist — will play 11 
games in Palm Springs and 15 
on the road, including a pair 
with the Atlanta Crackers at 
Atlanta, prior to the start of 
the 1961 season. The Angels 
open their first campaign at 
Baltimore on Tuesday, April 
11. 


and he ran 3:39.2 at Rome. 
The Hungarian, now 31, is 
holder of the world's 20(X)- 
meter record of 5:02.2, and 
former holdei" of the 1(X)- 
meter mark. 

Sullivan, 23, impressed track 
critics by running a 3;59.8 
mile in Dublin last SepteiVi- 
ber, and defeated Americans 
Dyrol Burleson and Jim Grelle ' 
in the British Empire vs. USA 
meet. 


Barons vs. Canucks 

Cleveland Barons meet the 
Vancouver Canucks at the L. 
A. Sports Arena, Wednesday 
and Thursday nights. Feb. 1 
and 2. The games are sponsor. 
ed by Jack Dompsey who had 
the Boston Brums and tho 
Toronto Maple Leafs at the 
Arena last September. 



A & T Student 
To Represent U.S. 

GREENSBORO. N.C.— Junius 
Byron Russell, Jr., 18, a stu- 
dent at A&T College has been 
selected as one of a four 
member "All .'American" 4-H 
Club group to represent the 
United States at the Interna- 
tional Agricultural Exhibition 
in Cairo, Egypt. 


^ 



'■MM*- 


SIGNED — Archie Moore, 
170 pound kingpin, and 
Erich Schoeppner of Ger- 
many signed to meet in 15- 
round light • heat'yweight 
championship fight at Madi- 
son Square Garden in New 
York Mar. 20 or 21. 


Chargers' Coaches 
To Attend Banquet 

Two assistant coaches of the 
Western Division title win- 
ning Los Angeles Chargers 
and several stars of the team 
will be Special guests at the 
Jefferson High and Jordan 
High banquets tonight 
(Thursday) i 

Offensive end Coach Al 
Davis, tackle Ernie Wright 
and defensive back Jim Sears, 
former SC ail-American, will 
headline Jefferson's banquet 
at Rand's Roundup on South 
Figueroa. 

And offensive line coach 
Joe Madro, end Trusse Norris 
and all-pro defensive .back 
Dick Harris, will spark Jor- 
dan's banquet in the niulti- 
purpose room on the school's 
campus. 

The Chargers' all-pro quar- 
terback Jack Kemp and Brad 
Pye, Jr., a member of the 
club's public relations staff, 
will be special guests at Nar 
bonne High's fall banquet 
Friday night, Jan. 20. 


Club accepted ONE Negro.) 

Earl Reason, progressive 
president of Cosmo, must be 
complimented for his ability 
to continue to make this or- 
ganization one of the largest 
on the West Coast. (In 1%1 
we would like to see Cosmo 
select and sponsor amateur 
Ray Boots in all tournaments ) 

The Dental, Medical and 
Pharmaceutical Golf Club 
ALSO left Fox and held its 
annual' Thanksgiving tourn- 
ey at the popular Whittier 
Narrows County Course. 

Rumor has it that Dr. Wel- 
les Forde was invited to join 
the Whittier Narrows Men's 
Club. If so he will be their 
first Negro member. Dr. Jer- 
ene Webb's hard work as 
tornament chairman for the 
medical men cannot go un- 
noticed. He -must be a true 
'divot digger" because he tees 
these tournaments off at the 
"crack of dawn." , 

The' Calif omi| Rubaiyat 
Golf Club finally called a 
meeting and disbanded, thus 
enabling the male members 
to reorganize and play some 
golf. This group is to- be 
complimented for sending ALL 
of its wcwnen members a check 
to cover funds that they had 
invested in the organization. 

The Western avenue Negro 
Women after a 5-year fight 
finally convinced the Western 
Avenue Caucasian Women 
golfers (out of court) that 
they should accept Negro wo- 
men golfers. 

ElUa Montgomery and Marie 
Brown were voted in and play- 
ed their 1960 Christmas tourn- 
ament with them. Ella won 
the club prize. Their militant 
president P^gy Hubber must 
be saluted for her patience 
and encouragement during 


Title Go Officially 
SMor Miami Beach 

Floyd Patterson and Inge- 
mar Johansson will finally 
tangle in their rubber match 
March 20 in Miami Beach. 

The 15 round bout is the 
first heavyweight title match 
to be staged indoors since 
Nov. 30, 1956, when Patterson 
knocked out Archie Moore to 
become the world champion. It 
is also Che first interracial 
heavyweight champion 
ship bout in the history erf the 
famed Miami Beach ar^na. 

The fight will be promoted 
by Himibert (Jack) Fugazy 
executive director of Feature 
Sports Inc. Seats in the 18,000 
capacity Miami Beach (Conven- 
tion Hall have been scaled 
from $100 ringside, to $20, 
They expect a live gate of 
$1,000,000, with another $2,- 
000,000 coming from nation- 
wide TV. 



'^•t My vMnieii free... 
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24 HOUR SERVICE 

^^^ . AX, 4-9576 

JUiffereni 



ousc 

• 'Steaks Our Specialty" * 

BEVERAGES - ICE COLD BEER | 

DOROTHY McNAMEE ALLEN 
In serving our customers, we are endeavoring to place before you the highest 
grade of fine, wholesome food available, presented in a pleasing atmosphere 
uader the most sanitary conditions. 

DOROTHY McNAMEE AILEM . ="'"2;.^::^^ *"'- 


BEAUTIFUL i ^ 


CALIENTE 

IN OLD MEXICO 

erpiRS iviRY SAT. a sun. 

RAIN OR SHINI 

THOROUGHBRED 


m^&^M^^ 


141 RACES EVERY if O 
.. ^ SAT. A SUN. Xtfc^A- 

AND SATURDAY 

'^'^ DAILY DOUBLE A QUINEU 

•M^ BOOKS A MUTUELS ^ 

SUN. POST TIME 12 NOON^ 

FANTASTIC RETURNS 
in For Yevr Wager ff^. 

Two Dollars or Mora 

'1^ Foreign Boole Opon Dally ^ 

On All Mafer Tracks 

Groyhound Racing 

^ FRIDAY ^ 

■» 49or EVERY SATURDAY «!■ 

AND EVERY FRI., SAT., 
i/^ SUN. EACH WEEKEND 4» 

4* • ^ 

JOHN S. ALESSIO. 

-1^ IxacKtlTs Olr*cl*r 4A- 


•the heait d the figbt. 

The Goslden Tees are in for 
nothing but eagles and para 
in '61 because of that beauti- 
ful plaque that they present- 
ed this writer. The inscription 
read "For your continued fight 
for golf integration." (Thank 
you, 'I tournament chairman 
Bob 'Williams.) 

Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, 
who in the past was bitter 
because of the continuous 
fight at Western, changed his 
mind and agreed to call a 
meeting to reinstate all coun- 
ty clubs. 

Superintendent Norman 
Johnson made a giant step 
toward progress when he 
had vowed never to rneet with 
the Caucasian women at West- 
ern) -he came to Western last 
month to set up the meeting 
for March 1961. 

Bing and Bob Crosby .sent 
their first invitations to Ne- 
gro golfers Charlie Sifford and 
Harry Mills. They wall play in 
their lush, rich Pebble Beach 
$55,000 tournament. One-hun- 
dred and fifty pros and 150 
amateurs, including the big- 
gest names in show and 
sports z will tee off Thurs- 
day. The low scorers only viall 
play the final round Sunday. 
See you there. 

:;ad Note — Vemoncrest 
Golf Club is the only club that 
did not show any progress in 
1960. They continued to hold 
Labor Day tournaments at 
Fox. It is the only club left 
there and will face a picket 
line in September, They were 
given a year's notice to leave. 

Bafylor. Wife to 
fitiend Inaugural 

Three members of the Los . 
Angeles Lakers basketball 
squad, Elgin Baylon Jerry, 
West and Hot Rod Hundley 
competed in the annQal NBA 
All-Star game at SjTacuse last 
Tuesday. 

Baylor was acownpanied by 
■his wiie, Ruby, on the trip. 
The Lakers have a night off 
Friday and Elg and Ruby 
have accepted' an invitation to 
be present at President Ken- 
nedy's inaugural j>alL 



WHAT'S 
DOING 


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Starting guns are familiar to most people, biit few have 
heard of a "Stopping gun". It's used in our Defensive 
Driving course to show how long it takes you to stop 
your car. That's a "stopping gun" on the bumper of the 
car in the picture. 

The instructor riding in the car pulls a string and fires 
the "gtm" as a signal to the driver to stop as fast as he 
can. A chalk mark is shot onto the pavement as the gun 
goes off, and a second m§rk is made, when the bribes 
are applied. 



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By measuring the distance between the chalk marks, 
the driver learns^ how far his car travelled before he re- 
acted to the noise'of the gun. 

We pay lots of attention to safe driving at the phone 
company, and we've found just being alert avoids lots of 
accidents. 

Every telephone employee who drives in his' work takes 
a "Defensive Driving" course. . ■ ■ '' 

This special training really works. Our drivers have 
one of the best safety records anywhere. 

/, * ♦ 
For somt unknown reason, 
squirrels like to gnaw oa 
telephone cables. 

Their chewing puts 
holes in the cable's outer 
covering and lets moisture 
get inside. This, iii turn, 
interferes with telephone 
service. 

To protect phone cables, we cover them with metal 
roofs or wrap them with steel tape. 

Squirrels don't like this, but it keeps our cables from 
being damaged and helps us keep your telephone service 
dependable. • ♦ * « ♦ 

SPECIAL SERVICE TO GROUPS 

Are you the program chairman for a service club 
or a church group or a member of such an organiza- 
tion? , 

Pacific Telephone will be happy to provide a pro- 
gram for you. We have many -new and different 
programs and films for clubs and schools. Por ex- 
ample, our lecture demonstration, "Rockets Red 
Glare." Our speaker will explain the intricate system 
of detection and warning that has been set up to as- 
sure around-the-clock protection of Southern Califor- 
nia. He will describe how the rocket, Nike is trig- 
gered to intercept an enemy plane and you will see a 
film of a high flying plane actually being destroyed 
by Nike. This is a program of paramount interest to 
all. 

If you'd like such a program or further informa- 
tion, just call or visit your local telephone business 
office at 3233 W. Vernon Avenue. 


I 


! 


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■ n^-' 



T H E AMERICAN PEOPLE 



THE HOUR 

HERE IS THE Answer 

FOR GOD'S SAKE, WAKE UP! 

■ ■■"•', . ' - • ■ I , - . - 


''-*■ 


.<? 


THE HOUR IS LATE 

America is at war. A war we are losing. We are under 

attack by Godless Communism on a world front and 

Godless materialism on the home front. Selfishness, 

perversion and division within our borders are the 

forces through which Communism takes over. 

It is an ideological war. We are losing it because we are 
not fighting it. Republicans and Democrats — it is the same. 
We move heedless and headless without an ideology against 
an ideological enemy. America is in danger of losing her Ufe 
and the Free World its freedom. 

Gims, dollars and diplomacy alone are no match for an 
enemy who has all these but advances because of the super- 
arm of an ideology. 

America needs an ideology. A change of policy is not 
enough. We need a change of motives and character. A great 
cleansing and vmiting force for the nation. 

We judge ourselves by our ideals. Others judge us by 

the way we Uve. Unfaithhilness in the home, perversion in 

. high places and low, decadence iif the arts, lawless youth, 

class war, race war, dishonesty — these are becoming the 

marks of American Ufe. We are all responsible. 

These are no weapons with which to win the struggle 
/ for the' hearts and minds of the millions of the world. And 
no USIA can make them so. 

' The fact is that millions who would never join the 

Communist party make its advance inevitable by the way 
they live. , 

Chftocellor Adenauer of <jermany said, "Conununism 
is a false ideology. But it is an ideology and can only be 
met with moral and spiritual weapons. We are in an ideo- 
logicfd battle. Therein Ues the decisive task. It may last 
decades, but it must be won. A nation with an ideology is 
always on the offensive. A nation without an ideology is 
self-satisfied and dead." 

Because we do not live an ideology we fail to recognize 
those who do. We were fooled by Mao Tse-txmg. We were 
fooled by Castro. In our blindness we are led by those in 
our own press and government whose task it is to -ftiake 
Commimists Ic^k like harmless reformers till they are 
safely in power. 

Our greatest sin has been to cheat the world of the 

nation-saving truths upon which America was founded. Our 

^destiny is to free the world of tyranny. Instead, we have 

cashed in our fighting faith for a soft materialism and re- 

. treated Before the greatest tyraimy the world has ever 

known. 

"Men must choose to be governed by God or they con- 
demn themselves to be ruled by tyrants." In WiUiam Penn's 
words lies America's death sentence. Or her one hope.. 

The hour is late. But not too late to turn to the answer. 

There is an answer. It is Moral Re-Aimament. 

HERE IS THE ANSWER 1 

1 Throughout 1960 the ideological force of Moral Re- 

Armament has been at work in crisis points across the 
i world. ? 

GERMANY 

i- On December 10, 1960, Bonn newspapers announced 

Chancellor Adenauer's launching of an ideological offensive 
for Moral Re- Armament in Western Germany. 

The newspaper, Westdeutsche Allgemeine wrote: "At 
last we go on the offensive. Moral Re-Armament gives 
d^ocracy the moral backbone it lacks today." 

120,000 people, including 17,000 oflScers and men of the 
German NATO force, have seen the films and plays of 
Moral Re- Armament in recent weeks. 

One of these plays, Hoffnung (Hope), was produc 
and performed by coal miners from the German Ru 
many of them leading Communists before being won to ti. 
ideology of Moral Re-Armament. 

A senior officer of the Ministry of Defense states, "The 
news of what MRA did for the Army is rolling like waves 
into the Ministry, breaking on our desks." 

JAPAN . 

Following the riots last June, Prime Minister Kishi 
said, "But for Moral Re-Armament Japan y^ouj^ be under 
Commimist control today." Thisi month he wHtes. "Our 
greatest need now is to go on the offensive and make the 
ideology of Moral Re- Armament the policy of our govern- 
ment and of ovu: people. Only then can Japan survive the 
testing years ahead and play her part in saving Asia from 
tyranny. Our experience last summer shows that you can- 
not answer ideological attack without an ideology. At the 
crucial hour men in labor, youth and poHtics, trained in 
Moral Re-Armament, stood up and refused to compromise 
with evil." 

Earher Gabriel Marcel, eminent French Catholic philoso- 
pher, commenting on the development of this force in Japan, 
wrote, "In Tokyo a few months ago I saw the importance of 
idl that is being achieved. It creates-a striking contrast with 


^ 


the sterile talk among professional politicians who seem 
too often not to grasp the magnitude of what is at stake." 

THE CONGO 

Congolese leaders invited an MRA force to their nation 
six weeks before independence. The force included black 
and white from South Africa, former Mau Mau leaders and 
white settlers from Kenya, as well as Americans and 
Europeans. President Kasavubu told them, "You have 
found the secret of liberation for Africa. All men niust 
think how to give this moral basis to the country." 

At the height of the emergency his government asked 
them to broadcast twice daily on the national radio on the 
theme, "An Answer to Crisis." These broadcasts are still 
continuing. i 

Commanders of UN contingents from 13 nations re- 
quested showings of the MRA films for their troops. 

"We would have known a more terrible catastrophe but 
for the films and action of Moral Re-Armament in our 
country," said Jean BoHkango, Rjlinister of Information and 
National Defense. "Through Moral Re-Armament we have 
seen the way to save our country from Communism and 
set her on a new road." j 

FREE CHINA 

In September 1960 the National Assembly tmanimously 
voted "to give assistance to the advancement of Moral Re- 
Armament in Formosa." It further requested that every year 
Chinese delegations should take part in MRA Assemblies. 

The first trainees are now at Caux, Switzerland. 
General Ho Ying-Chin, wartime premier and commander- 
in-chief of the Chinese armies, said, "If we had had Moral 
Re- Armament, we would never have lost the mainland. 
Only with Moral Re- Armament can we recapture the main- 
land from Communism." 

LATIN AMERICA 

At a time when printing houses, radio stations and TV 
channels in Cuba are turning out Communist propagemda 
for the hemisphere, Eudocio Ravines, former Communist 
and delegate to the Comintern, founder of the Commimist 
Party in Peru, says: "The basic problems of Latin America 
are not under-development, but corruption and Commu- 
nism. While our countries welcome economic aid, alone it 
cannot touch the root problem. Without a moral ideology, 
it may even aggravate the problem. The best export the 
United States of America or any nation can send to Latin 
America is Moral Re-Armament." 

In the port of Rio de Janeiro where strikes and lawless- 
ness had created what the papers called "a reign of terror," 
dockers trained in Moral Re-Armament brought a revolu- 
tionary answer. They united the rival unions, they fought 
corruption, they drastically reduced the turn-around 
time of ships, they held the first democratic election in the 
history of the port, defeating the Communist candidates. 
Now they have told the story in a film. Men of Brazil, 
^ which is speaking to the world. 

ITALY 

With Italy within 1% of Communist take-over in the 
Spring elections, an MRA force is in action. They were 
invited by Italian leaders including Prince and Princess 
Castelbarco Albani, whose family gave a Pope to the 
Church, and Signora Maria Dosio, leader of the rice workers 
of Italy, and a Marxist until she returned to her Catholic 
faith after meeting Moral Re-Armament. 

The plays went first to Milan, heart of industrial Italy 
and to Sesto San Giovanni, where 80 ^o vote Communist. 
After one performance a Communist sdid: "Unless we get| 
this answer there will be a blood-bath in Italv by spring. 
This is our one hope." "^ 

SWITZERLAND 

An MRA force with its plays and films was welcomed in 
the Catholic monastery and convent schools of eastern 
^iwitzerland last autumn. His Grace Dr. Bernardus Kaelin, 

bbot Primate of the world Benedictine Order, 1947-59, 
addressed the MRA World Assembly at Caux. He said, "The 
ideology of Moral Re- Armament can win all men because its 
standards are universally valid. It is not a religion, nor a 
substitute for a rehgion. It is not a sect. It has four mighty 
pillars — absolute honesty, purity, unselfishness and love — 
on which human living must be based. It is a new way de- 
signed to forestall a false ideology. May it win the world." 

, General Henri Guisan, war-time commander-in-chief of 
the Swiss Army, gave -this message to his people in the 
foreword to the MRA handbook. Ideology and Co-Existence, 
which went to every home in Switzerland and to 87,000,000 
homes throughout the Free World: "Ideological neutrality 
can be dangerous, for refusal to fight for what is right 
plays the enemy's game. We must not allow these military 
virtues to be killed in us by greed for profits and an easy 
life. I long that our whole people should face, realistically 
the forces which confront us today." 

AMERICA ■ ■ ' I 1" ■ I"- . ■ " 

In 1960 America produced a supreme weapon in the 
war of ideas — the MRA picture "in Technicolor, The 
Crowning Experience. It poses the choice to all men every- 
where of Moral Re-Armament or Communism. The story 


was inspired by the life of the great educator Dr. Mary 
McLeod Bethune, bom of slave parents, who rose to be 
adviser to Presidents. Stars of the film are Miuiel Smith, 
Broadway's original "Carmen Jones," and Tennessee-bora 
Ann Buckles of the New York cast of Pajama Game. 

The Crowning Experience had its world premiere oti 
Broadway last October. Stars from Hollywood, 300 UN 
delegates representing 73 countries, and leaders from every 
walk of New York life were among the distinguished audi- 
ence who packed the theater. 

In its Academy Award qualifying run in Hollywood 
The Crowning Experience premiere drew the greatest star- 
studded audience for many seasons. In a front page story 
The Hollywood Reporter stated that the film topped the 
week's box office business in Los Angeles. 

^ The Los Angeles Herald and Express in an editorial 
said, "A vivid dramatization of the struggle of free people 
everywhere to roll back the advance of Communism." Of 
Muriel Smith, the drama critic wrote, "She quite possibly 
sang and acted her way into an Oscar nomination." 

The South African National Board of Censors has 
unanimously passed The Crowning Experience for unlimited 
distribution. 

In the prologue of the film, Joel McCrea, one of Holly- 
wood's most distinguished stays, says, "The future of th& 
world depends on millions making the right choice. Many 
do not know the real America. But The Crowning Experi- 
ence is the kind of picture the world is waiting to see, 
because it portrays the true America to which the whole 
world can and will respond." 

FOR GOD'S SAKE, WAKE UP! 

The evidence is inescapable. We need now to act. When 
will. America begin to fight the ideological war and make 
Moral Re- Armament her national policy? 

Washington, clean, straight, and God-directed would 
be an invincible force leading mankind to its destiny. 

The vu*gent need is for patriots — Democrat and Re- 
publican, labor and management, black and white, young 
and old — who will put right what is wrong in their own 
lives and in the life of the nation. Such men will take on 
the task of arming America with her true ideology. 

It means absolute standards of honesty, purity, un- 
selfishness and love,; applied drastically, personally and na- 
tionally. It means men accepting the guidance of God. 
Definite, acciu^te, adequate information can come from the 
mind of God' to the minds of men. It comes to those who 
listen iand obey. It is the new dimension of statesmanship. 

Dr. Frank Buchman, bom in Pennsylvania, initiator of 
Moral Re-Armament, has done what no other American 
has done. He has not only seen the need for an ideology 
but has given a lifetime to raise up a world force of men 
and women trained and committed to fight and win the 
ideological war. 

The governments of France, Germany, Greece, Japan, 
Free China, the Philippines, Thailand and Iran have deco- 
rated him with their nation's highest honors. In jecent 
months leaders from 16 African nations have urged him to 
come to their countries before it is too late. In America 97 
Senators and Congressmen said in a message to him, "You 
are giving a imiting idea to nations which can tum the 
ideological tide in the world today." 

Speaking to a World Assembly "for the Moral Re- 
Armament of the Nations at Mackinac Island, Michigan, 
Dr. Buchman said: 

"My deep personal wish is to have every American 
free imder the direction of God to fight for America; so to 
fight that America really be free, free from the tyranny of 
sin, imder God's direction, the imseen but ever-present 
Power. I wish this no less deeply for everyone in every 
nation. 

"I don't want our sons, especially our fighting sons, to 
go about without an answer. It simply enslaves them. 
It is not good enough. It will drive them to the same 
philosophy that rules our opponents. We shall never create 
an inspired democracy that way. Men must learn to have 
a faith that will create the ri^t revolution. If we can 
spread this revolution fast enough we can save America 
and the world. Unless we have this revolution there will 
be a revolution of chaos. 

"It needs this stronger dose. Sin leaves us with such 
a dull, heavy thud. 'The blood of Jesus Christ His Son 
cleanseth us from all sin.' That is the discovery everyone 
- is looking for. That is the answer. 

"Then you will hive 'a wonderful example that the 
whole world will want to follow. You will have an America 
to which the wise. and honest can repair. And that is what 
the world exjjects today of America. You will have a battle- 
cry of freedom, and that is what America wants. You will 
have a democracy that is really inspired. 

"Then our yoimg men and our old men will fight as 
Lincoln fought of Old. Our yotmg men will know what to 
fight for and our wars will be won. And we shall be at 
peace with, all men and' the whole world. 

"The houi is late. Here is the answer.^ For God's sake, 
wake up!" * H 


^^ 


This page, like all the action of Moral Re-Armament, is financed by the sacrificial gifts of men and women from all walks of life, determined to bring this answer to 
America and the world. Contributions, which are tax deductible, and requests for information, may be sent to:, . 


. { 


MORAL RE-ARMAMENT 


640 Fifth Avenue. New York 1 9 . 833 South Flower Street, Los Angeles 17 • Cedar Pobit, Mackinac Island, Michigan 


^ 



THE FASTEST BOXGO ALIVE— That's what they "re calling PRES- 
TON EPPS, So like skeptical ue believe not uhat ue hear from rumor, ue 
must see. He sau\ ue heard, we agreed. Pandora's Box has quite a show. If 
you haven't heard A fro-Cuban, J azt yet pick up on the happenings at Pandoras 
Box this weekend. Sharing the spotlight iiith EPPS is LOU RAlf'LS who 
sings in the style coming to he known its "soiit" sinking. Pandtira's box is a 


coffee house and the menu is an experience all by itself , and within the student's 
budget too. Driving south horn Hollywood we looked in on HA\K STEW- 
ART at the BLACK ORCHID, where DIMPLES JACKSON TRIO was 
preparing for this weekend's grand opening. Dimples and hubby demonstrate . 
remarkable versatility between the Hammond, piano or just about any string 
instrument with brother (you see it's a family group)' on drums. Black Orchid ' 


will probably lead the way back to the era of cafe society, with chitterlings and 
steaks how can they miss. JERRY LINDERMAN invited us to the Club 
INTJME where a new group, CLIFFORD SCOTT quartet, was holding 
forth in grand \lyle. This cat blows a "mad" sax, and threatens to make the 
I NT I. ME rank with the top L.A. Jazz spots. This we would like to see. We 
notice many friends who would like to see a top jazzery right in our midst. 


8— The California' Eagle 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


DO COME TO 



BOB GEFAELL A Bill BAPST PRESENT""^ 

TERRY GIBBS' BIG BAND 

FOOD • DAIVCING 
ENTERTAINMEI^T 

6507 Sunset at Wilcox Hollywood 


r-K * • 


• ••**•• *^ 




CLUB STARLITE 


* 


MRA Film to 
Be Considered 
For Oscar Race 

Members of the Motion Pic- 
ture Academy will attend a 
special screening of "The 
Crowning Experience", star- , 
ring Muriel Smith, at thej 
Academy Theatre Jan. 24 toj 
coTisider the film for nom-j 
ination in the Oscar awards 
race. Produced by Moral Rc- 
Armament, the film was in- 
spired by the life of the great ' 
educator, the late Mary Mc-' 


-K 

-K 
-¥ 
-¥ 




3f 


1520 W. Manchester PL. 3-9575 3^ Leod Beihune 

' The special showing 

; DON ALLEN, M.C. 

* Entertainment * Dancing * Dining Every Night 

MONDAY NITE: 

SILVER DOLLAR TALENT NIGHT 

EVERY TI ESDAV: 

Party Nite — BuFfet — Goodies for All 
liVEDXESDAY XITE: 

PRIZE NITE — DANCE CONTEST 

THIRSDAY NITE: 1^^ 

ARTIST SHOWCASE 

FRIDAY. SATURDAY. 
SUNDAY: 

DANCE & FLOOR SHOW 

THIS WEEKEND: 

The Click Clacks and Johnny Taylor 

EVERY NITE: 

DANCING WITH THE SUPERB MUSIC 
OF THE JAY HODGES BAND^ j 

• • *• * • • • *^ ^ * 


'Chazz* Soundtrack 

NOTES OF AN INNOCENT BAR-STANDER 

Dancer-Comic FOSTER JOHNSON in town to visit with 
former wife, the luscious NICHEL NICHOLl^ prior to her de- 
parture for London. The songstres.s opens ^t the Stork Club 
there on thle 22nd. Their young son is one of the actors in 
"Only in America" currently at the Ivar theater . . . 20th 

CENTURY FOX (now there's V-^- ~ — ^ 

a swinging Hollywood studio) , FOOSEI ... . Attention Acad- 
has extended RAFER JOHN-ipmy Members: It should be 
SON'S contract and will see to hard for you to overlook the 
it that he gets co-star billing i significant .acting chore turn- 
with ELVIS PRESLEY injed in by WOODY. STRODE in 
"WILD IN THE COUNTRY." j Spartacus. He should by all 
A .southwest niterv- is ad- 1 "^^4"*, be nominated in the 
, „, , ■ , Best, Male Supporting Role 

vertismg they 11 host a party i^^ ■ -- 


People & Places 


for DINAH WASHINGTON and 


IS re- 
_ served for Academy members.' 
I Muriel Smith, the famed con- 1 
.^tralto who created the role of| 
^ Carmen Jones on Broadway, 
I has been widely . hailed as a 
jf- 1 possible Award winner. She 
i received highest plaudits from 
>^ both New York and Los An- 
geles press. 

In response to public de- 
mand. Moral Re-Armament 
will reschedule "The Crown- 
ing Experience" for more pub- 
lic -Showings in the near fu- 
ture. 


t?,|;ory. I 

I Sohuve stuck on the way 
now spouse RAFAEL CAMPOS: jimmY RICKS (formerly with 
Only they really got hung onjhj', RA-VENS) and LAVERNEJ 
the bridegroom's name. BAlCER get- together on "You're: 
Mispelled it RAFEL C^^-,' tbe^Boss' . . . Some real dovvni 


DR. CHRIS TAYOR — He ar- 
ranged for 110 students grad- 
uating in Jeff's Winter '61 
class to have their After- 
Prom Dance at the plush Pa- 
cific Town Club. Following the 
affair which lasted until 4 
a.m.. class president Ernest 
Glass and prom chairman 
Carol Smith thanked the good 
"doc"' for everything he h<id 
done in their behalf and, in 
parting, they said they hoped 

home warblingi . . . Hairsty- 
list OMAR tetts us she will 
supervise cla.s.ses at the Pacific 
Beiuty School in Huntington 
Park: 


I that their behavior had made 
possible future favors for oth- 
ter teenagers from Jeff — and 
'the "doc" was ready to give 
jthem the family jewels! 
i MOVIE EXTRAS — Words ooz- 
ling out of the recent union 
I meeting have it that orchids 
I should be tossed in the direc- 
jtion of Fredia Rentie, Byron 
ElKs, James Malcolm, Eugetie 
Jackson, and Freddy Baker for 
'insisting that Negro extras 
should be cast from a HoUy- 
'wood office! 

MAE JOHNSON — Those 

friends who went along with 

the bit player when she was 

i fired as Pearl Bailey's stand- 


in are seriously thinking 
about sending her a book oil 

the Sit- Iris! 

BILL DUFFT— Member of Peo- 
ple's Funeral Home's Board 
of Directors doesn't know it, 
but Abie Robinson has been 
tabbed to kickoff the opening 
of the new site at 42nd and 
S. Central, if he continues to 
talk about that socialite and 
her woomanoe which involved 
those tough and dangerous 
union officials. Proceeds col- 
lected from his funeral would 
go to Jefferson 'High's Scholar- 
ship fund, which means he 
wouldn't be bumped off in 
vain I 


z -K 
- * 


fe 


'You've got a whole J 
^^^^'j^.^ lot of soul 1 

to be so 
young!" 



IFRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS 

CLUB-RENAISSANCE PRESENTS . . . 

GEliK NcDAMELS- TEDDY EDWARDS 

^. BESSIE GRIFFIN and GOSPEL PEARLS EVERY SUNDAY EVENING FEATURING DELORES ADDISON 

RENAISSANCE ^^^8428 SUNSET BLVD. 



! . 


MARCEL MARCEAU. 

acknowledged to be the 
world's greeatest pantomimist , 
began a Ihnited tivo-weeks 
engagement .Monday, Jan- 
uary 16. at the Huntington 
Hartford Theatre. 



SPEND YOUR LEISURE MOMENTS AT THE RUBAIYAT ROOM 

GUfSr NIGHT EVERY MONDAY - RUBAIYAT ROOM 

January 23rcl, Teddy Edwards— January 30tli, Clifford ScoH 

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BILL WATKINS' RUBAIYAT ROOM IN THE . . r 


WATKINS HOTEL 


ADAMS and MANHAHAN PLACE. 


'ZENDA BALLROOM— 926'/2 W. SEVENTH ST. 


NOWI Alto Available en Saturdays — largest in Downton L. A. — For Your Next Club Dane* 
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lOOMG 

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ZACHARY SCOTT 


Th« Giants of Terror! 


EXQC 


\\m^ 


•Jo*«ph Harrts--| 
S»9 %t*otm Fr*«*ntaUonf 


Introducing KEY MEERSMAN 
and BERNIE HAMILTON 

Directed by LUIS BUNUEL 

A VALIANT RELfASE 

[^ Exclusive 2-'ni«atr« Engagement,') 


Starts FRIDAY 

JAN. 201 


DOWNTOWN 

LOS ANGELES 

615 S. Broadway 

MA. 7-2944 

Open 11 30 J m. 


MOUVWD HIGHLAND 

HOLLYWOOD 

HO. 3-9371 

Open All Nignt 
Open 12 30 5 » m. 


Prize Winner 
[Opens Fridiiy 

I 'The Young One" is Luis 
jBunuel's prize film, the first 
this director has made^ in Eng- 
lish and the first to deal with 
the American .scene. It opens 
an exclusive two-theatre en- 
gagement Friday, Jan. 20. at 
the Downtown Los Angeles 
and Hollywood Theatre in 
Hollywood. 

Starring Zachary Sicott and 
inroducing Key Meersman 
and Bernie Hamilton, talented 
thespian and brother of the 
famous Chico Hamilton, in 
featured roles, "The Young 
One" is described by one 
critic as "Brilliant, savage and 
the ultimate in compassion." 

Winner of the extraordinary 
merit award at the Cannes 
Film Festival. 


THE CLIFFORD SCOH QUARTET 

(FORMERLY WITH BILL DOGGET) 

Appearing Fridays; Saturdays & Sundays 

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COCKTAIL LOUNGE * RESTAURANT 
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THE DIMPLES JACKSOX HARRIS TRIO 



WITH GUEST ARTISTi 

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• REASONABLY PRICED DRjINKS • INCOMPARABLE CUISINE BY MR. LOVELY 

CALL PL. 6-9960 or PL. 0-1291 FOR RESERVATIONS 

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BY LARRY GLENN 
PARTIES 


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KENNY DENNIS, Drums 
BUDDY WOODSON, Bass 
CHARLES COKER, Piano 


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■ ^ 






/ 



RINKEYDIXKS. ISC. — Membrrs are shoun in smart, hlnik. full length 
formals, with poodles frnm the Cnrr Lee Kennels in Mnlihu. Pictured from 
left: Ann Mnlbrough, puhlirity chairman; Hildegardc Hnsiic, business man- 
ager; Jan Otiens; Hint Carey; Lena Barnes, parliamcnlarian ; Bernice 


Brooks, historian: Ruth Bnuen, mistress of ceremonies ; Anne Odotn. presi- 
dent: Horlense Ridley, acting vice president: Ruby Jones, financial secretary; 
Jen Rrfncifer, recording secretary: Alice Payr^e, treasurer; and Lillian 
Kniartnn, corresponding secretary, (Adams) 


Rinkeydinks Cl 
Second Annua 

The saying goes that the teinatiprial Ballroom of the 

French have a word for it. Beverly Hilton Hotel, the 

K so, last Thursday night in Rinkeydinks' Inc.. at the 

the beautfiully- decorated In- club's Bal Elegante formal. 


added extra zing to that out in a setting that depicted 

"word". the gay streets of ParU even 

The formal theme was down to its ]i\e poodles. 

French, and it was carried Before the opening of the 



SHOULDER TO SHOULDER — Among the capacity 
ctmjifl attending the' second annual Rinkeydinks' formal 
were, seated, from left: Margaret Cockran. A uirlie Wil- 
liams. Jeri Rancifer. Jerry Harvey ,' Sallye H arren. Jeanne 


Smith. Dottie Smith. Zona Jnhiiton and Alary .-I ridei .\on.. 
Standing, from left: L. I'. Johnson, Chris Hind man, John 
Rancifer, Clarence Jackson, Ray Smith and H. Duke Sim- 
mo'ns. (Adams.) 



DISTINGUISHED GUESTS — Attending the second 
annual RtHieydinks' formal were many notables of the 
community. Seated from left: Peter Dauterite' Sandford 


Jones, lerna Dnuterive, Ethel Bradley, 'lorn Br/ullev. 
.Marie Gladden. Anthony Saudm, Eleanor Sriiidin and Rob- 
ert Gladden. (Adams) 



ALL ABOARD AT BAL ELEGANTE— There is no 

doubt that those above are enjoying the Rinkeydinks' affair. 

'■ Among the charmers seated are Genard Stanchmore, Bar- 


bara Mansfield, Ethel Turner, Marlene Charbonet, Betty 
Reed, Lita U inston, Delyte Thomas and Shirley E^vans. 
(Adams) 



BAND PERSONALITIES— Peppy Prince and Les Hite, 
famed as two of the Southland's finest conductors of big 
orchestras, are shown attending' the Bal Elegante formal. 
Shown with R'lnkeydink club member Lena Barnes, fourth 
jr«tn-left in the hack row, are front: Louise Prince^ 


Peppy Prince, Mrs. and Mr. Artie Stokes, Sor^ny 
and Zee Maddox, and Mr. ttnd Mrs. If'illiam Gray. 
Standing arc Mrs. and Air. T. Harvard, Lili^Jfilliams, 
.Mrs. Barnes, Clifford Solon and iMr^. and Mr. Lcs Hite. 

. ! (Adams.) 


ub in Sparkling 
Bal Elegante 


Gay 
Forma 


affair, the dance committee, 
chaired by charming Jeri 
Rancifer and comprising, in 
addition. Lena Barnes, Lil- 
lian Kazarian, Hildegrade 
Bostic and Anne Odom, ar- 
rived at the hotel at 8 p. m. 
They preceeded with speed 
and artistry to transform the 
ballroom into a typical 
French ctiy. capturing its 
fascinating gaiety, allure 
and charm. 

The decorations included a 
street scene of a cafe on Rue 
de-La Paix, complete with 
flower carts and a replica 
of the famed and traditronal 
French magnum of 
champagne. So successful 
were their decorations and 
-settings that when guests 
started arri\ing the huge 
ballroom immediately be- 
gan to hum with laughter 
and gaiety that continued 
throughout the evening. The 
place sparkled as if one were 
in a Paris ballroom. 

Ruth Bowen of the New 
Vork Chapter flew into town 
especially for the local chap- 
ter's second annual affair. 
She acted as mistress of 
ceremonies, wearing a crisp 
beauty of a gown made of 
mink and featuring red ac- 
cessor ies. 

California designer Joseph 
Malbrough. who creates most 
of the club's gowns for pub- 
lic affairs, included the sug- 
gestion of France in each of 
the member's brilliant black 
gowns of sequin bodices 
with chiffon skirts, featuring 
spaghetti strips and a strik- 
ing red rose at the waistline. 

Following the introduction, 
the fashionable guests, num- 
bering easily 2.500. were 
entertained delightfully by 
such box office attractions 
as Earl Grant, Nellie Lutch- 
er, Dinah Washinigton. Earl 
Bostic and Jimmy Wither- 
spoon. The huge crowd gave 
them an ovation f thev will 
never forget. .r j> 

On the serious Side of the 
invitational affair, the Rin- 
keydinks 'selected' this way 
of saying "thank you" to 
[their many friends who have 
supported them f in their 
community projects, such as 
donating $1000 to Jefferson 
High School's Scholarship 
Fund, aiding the NAACP and 
the Urban League and pre-: 
senting ariother thousand 
dollars at an annual Christ- 
mas award benefit. 

The Rinkeydinks have two 
spectacular events scheduled 
for the 1961 sea.son but won't 
. reveal the details until con- 
tracts are signed and sealed. 

An invitation has been ex- 
tended the local chapter to 
.join their sister chapter 
when they fly to Paris in the 
Spring. 

It was revealed following 
the formal that the local 
chapter will seek three new 
members to make their 
membership total 15. 

Among the throng that 
turned out at the Bal Ele- 
gante were Beverly Jones 
and Dr. J. K. Lightfoot, Dr. 
and Mrs. Julius W. Hill, 
Berenice Bobker. Bernice 
Lawson, Lee Trainor, Jack 
Trainor, Esther Worrill, B. Y. 
Worrill. Mr. and Mrs. H. 
Jones, B. A. Jones, Mr. and 
Mrs. F. Cotton, Mr. and Mrs* 
S. Smoke, Mr. and Mrs. F. 
Billinger, Mrs. Jaye Thomas, 
Olive Poole and Alvin White. 

Also Mr. and* Mrs. Juan 
Neucke, Miss Floyd Miller, 
Lorenzo Willis. Nancy Willis, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Merrill,- 
Pat Moore, Miss V. Dooley. 
Nelson Creswell, Mr. and 
Mrs. Max Cazanave, Joel 
Fluellen. Mr. and Mrs. 
Eugene Person, Mr. and Mrs. 
Homer Minor, Watson 
Childs, Mr. and Mrs. Mose 
Bardford, O. D. Barnes, Bar- 
bara Hubbard, Geneva La- 
mar, Mr. and Urs. E. S. 
Burris. 

Also Bettye Jackson, Bob 
Nelson, William McHenry, 

(Continued on Page 9) 


-/■ !. 


■t 



CLUBS 




FASHIONS 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 


The California Eagle— 9^ 



1! 


t1 


FASHIONABLE RINKEYDINKS— Dnncr committee members are taking n puff dur-t_ 
irit) their sr<ond annual ai fair. Floral dci oral inns r/tmc from .Initn Bor/nn. Pictured are';' 
Lena' Barnes, Lillian Kazarian, Hildeyarde Bn<tic, Jeri Rancifer and Arrnr OJotn, ( A dams) ' 


\.^^. 



A BROAD.U AY MUSICAL PACKAGE— Pure manic that vny feu- cluhs can boast' 
of Ti<jv this SIO0,0lh^ pdikaoe of performing stars. They sang and played free of charge and 
this rare combination hrouoht the house don n and received one of the largest ovations^ 
ever giirn pcrfoi mers. From left, illustrious Earf Grant, jazzy Nellie Lutcher% dynamic 
Dinah It ashitufton. bluesy Jimmy llithcrs.ponn and the scintillating Earl- Bostic tvitk\ 
his horn. (Adams.) 



m 


■1 i 


NOTHING IS NEGLECTED— Designer Joe Malbrough, who designed the marveloM^\ 
Rinkeydinks' formals. is shown getting members Jeri Rancifer, Anne Odom and Hpr^'^ 
tense Ridley in readiness for their introduction. (A darns.) 


•> 


■■ Cfc * " tgn ifc .»» y ^*i^»st.^"-.<.^'w -,^~K4g^- 


-■>**°^^<>3SNHM|PMI««MRM^^ 


.■A 



Dorothea Foster 


By TOMMY BERRY 

Our guest this week i^the charming Tommy 
Berry, former columnist for the Kansas City Call 
and one of the founders of that city's Fellowship 
liouse. 

She has been residing in Los Angeles for the past 
six years with her daughter Bootsie Howard, wife of 
Dr. Joe Howard. She is a member of the Los Angeles 
Probation Department. — Ed, 

Hi folks ... 

When the Eagle asked me to be its guest column- 
ist this week, I was delighted that I could share the 
pages with the good editorial writing of Loren Miller 
and Lester Granger, news tidbits with Bill Small- 
wood and other good writing folks, but since every- 
one is taking a breather from the holiday festivities, 
I'd like to reminisce on ^ the wind-up. 

It's always good to dine and dance with the good- 
looking Country Clubbers with URSULA MURRELL 
as head. . . . Spotted in the group was LOIS KNOX 
of D.C. DR. and MRS. TERRANCE of Louisiana 
guesting with the HOWARD ALLENS. EVELYN and 
ttARRY COX in high spirits. Good-looking MAJOR 
and MRS. LOVING and all of a sudden there was 
.COL. VANCE MARSHBANKS with his Mrs. As the 
•rumor goes QOL. MARSHBANKS heads an eleven 
^an doctor astronaut team. But at any rate here is 
S man who has remained through the years, a 
friend, a gentleman and very much in love with his 
own three women, his wife and two lovely daugh- 
ters. 

r JOHN and GEN RUDFUD enjoying their folks 
"from Louisiana. IVAN DIXON winging his way to 
4^ew York for a TV series. SIDNEY POITIER and 
IJUANITA in Paris happily expecting. 
- The G. T. BRYANTS of Kansas City visiting their 
•threesome, the LORENZO WALLACES. 

~ Africa-Bound? 

The ARTHUR KNIGHTS of Chicago in L.A. The 
.EDGAR LOVES anticipating a year in Africa if wife 

MARGARET will give. And then off to the C.C.'s, a 
"real swell bunch at the home of ETHEL and AL 

MADDOX with their beautiful young daughter 
\fresh, dewey, lovely, assisting. 
~ Slim OUEDA WILLIAMS in black sequins; 
iJLARA HARRIS always smart, cute EDITH HOUS- 
-TON with a new hair-do; MAUDE BROADY having 
Ik ball; DELLA WILLIAMS always elegant; ANN 
"COLEMAN, fresh; and loads of others and after the 
-New Year comes the traditional after-the-game 

dinner with PAT and DR. G. McLEOD with all the 
Honest food turned elegant with silver and cutwork 
"^ut everybody just loved that foolishness, food 
Hthat i^. 

- And off to DOLLY and BOB BLACKBURN's to 
-christen their cute new bar . . . and how I wish I 
Tould fly to D.C. by special invite to the Inaugura- 
Jtion but JERRY WOODS will be going and quite 
-€orrect and I don't know who else — and then came 
nhe Rinkeydinks and that was the living end,-head- 
_5d by ANNE ODOM. But let me tell you of the soft 
^andle-light complemented with red, and this group 
-U)f gals in black sequins and chiffon who knocked 
"everybody out with all this and the Beverly Hilton, 

Poodle Not a Ham 

RUTH BOWEN, the cute member from New 
York, did herself proud with announcement of the 
group heading for Paris in the Spring. The grey 
poodles didn't give one care about having their pic- 
tures made and one was insulted with ABIE ROBIN- 
SON and all the goings-on, but all the celebrities 
were there with JIMMIE WITHERSPOON singing 
his heart out. JIM GILLIAM of baseball fame with 
his young wife expecting, just kids, but a pack of 
energy. And then there was EARL GRANT sending 
up Oh's-and Ah's with velvet and silk tux and when 
he opened it up . . . boy! . . . but Earl is now flying 
all over Japan with a stop-off in Pearl Harbor for a 
concert for our boys there, thep after six weeks to 
do a show for Ed Sullivan. 

On to LAS VEGAS and maybe to meet the 
Rinkeydinks in Paris. And I looked up to see HENRY 
WOODS in baby Persian lamb and a black homburg. 
and that was the living end until DINAH WASH- 
INGTON, looking radiant in green chiffon, just toss- 
ing that little ole sable aside, and if you didn't see 
her new husband RAFAEL CAMPOS with an act- 
ing career then you should'uv. But she is always a 
hand clapper, NELLIE LUTCHER singing and play- 
ing with all chiming in. The CAS SAVELLS with a 
small informal. The EDWARD BRAMLETTS (Ed- 
na's mom) visiting EDNA and CARL LOFTON from 
Cincy and I'm all out of space n' breath n' time. 

'Bye now. 

Honored On Anniversary 


Talented music director 
Albert and Helen McNeil en- 
tertained 35 guests at a din- 
ner-dance in honor of their 
seventh wedding annivers- 
ary. 

The affair was held at 
their home on Don Diablo 
drive in the Baldwin Hills 
Estates. The decor was in 
keeping with the Yuletide 
season. Music for dancing 
was furnished by the Vince 
Gomez quartet. 

Guests present Were Dr. 
Oner B. Barker, Jr., Mr. and 
Mrs. William Boykin, Miss 
Owol Cappell, Mr. and Mrs. 
&ne*t Carbaugh, Mr. Dellino 
Cl»new6, Mrs. Bettye Day, 
Mr. and Mrs. Garron G<M'don, 
Mrs. Constance Hall, Mrs. 
Phyllis Hollaway, Mr. and 
Mw. Chester Hanley, Miss 


Nira Harden. 

Also Dr. James Hutchinson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Jones, 
Miss Marian Kaddish, Mrs. 
Madelyhne Lewis, Mr. Mario 
Lomell, Mr. Bill O'Connor, 
Mr. and Mrs. Julian Omer- 
berg, Mr. Lester Orticke, Miss 
Ets Osako, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Pleasant, Mrs. M. 
Porter, Mr. Robert Rupert, 
Mrs. Olive Sklles, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Vaughn, Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald Watson (Dr. Louise 
Watson), Dr. Artis White, 
Mr. George Yamamoto. 

Surprise Birthday 

Louise Anderson, well 
known club woman and so- 
cialite, surprised her hus- 
band Carney Anderson with 
a birthday party in Pasa- 
dena last Saturday. 


m- 


^' ,^ 



«^r Bill Smallwood ^ 


10— The California Eagle 

Retiring 

Official 

Honored 

More than 150 county em- 
ployees, community leaders, 
court officials, ahd friends 
gathered at a luncheon Fri- 
day to pay tribute to Senior 
Deputy Probation Officer 
Georgia C. Weist who is re- 
tiring after 30 years. 

Miss Weist was lauded by 
Chief Deputy Probation Of- 
ficer Harold R. Muntz, Cap- 
tain Ruth Johns of the Sher- 
iff's Department, rejiresent- 
ing the County Women Peace 
Officers Association, and 
Mrs. Audrey Jones, Attorney 
and president of the Twelve 
Big Sisters, for the service 
to children and families of 
the community. Master of 
Ceremonies was David P. 
Macpherson, director of the 
Southwest Area Office of the 
County Probation Depart- 
ment. 

Those attending included 
Superior judges, referees, 
many administrators from 
correctional agencies, and 
forty of the staff members of 
the Southwest Office. 

Miss Weist has won high 
praise for her contribution.'^ 
to the field of youth wel- 
fare and probation. She was 
a founder of the Los An-- 
geles County Women's Peace 
Officers Association, and was 
its president in 1958. She 
has also been active in the 
Twelve Bi"^ Sisters, a serv- 
ice organization for girls, 
and in numerous community 
organization.''. ^ 

Club Holds 
Regular Meet 

La Vern Sails was hostess 
to the regular meeting of 
the Ladies of Paradise Club 
last week. 

Committees reported on 
their recent affairs, their 
annual Christmas party and 
their award benefit at which 
three pirate chests filled 
with silver were given away. 

Club members contributed 
to cheer a member who has 
been ill for the past several 
months. 

The group holds a, life 
membership in the NAACP 
and recently supported the 
NAACP Seals drive. Next 
meeting will be iiel^ in the 
Santa Monica home of Opal 
Richardson. ^ 

Miscellaneous Gifts 
Showered Upon 
Sandra Hoskins 

Mrs. Kathryn Morris Hu- 
ante was a most delightful 
hostess at the new Viewpark 
home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed Morris, at a 
pretty miscellaneous shower . 
and luncheon complimenting 
Miss Sandra Hoskins. bride 
elect of Mr. Alonzo Wilkins 
III. • 

Most of the guests were 
former roommates and 
friends of the hono/ee and 
the hostess when /hey at- 
tended UCLA. *■ 

Gives Fashion Show 

Girl Scout troop No. 799 
held a Fashion Show re- 
cently with Mrs. Rosemary 
Osburn as coordinator. 

The Fashion Show was a 
huge success under the 
guidance of Mrs. William 
Files, 

Clothes were furnished by 
Robert Hall. 

The Girls who participated 
were; Stephanie Thomas, 
Marlyn Stewart, Kathy Jack- 
son, Cynthia Hawkins, 
Jacquelyn Kea, Cynthia 
Jonnson, Patricia Blair, 
Gayle Harris, Cynthia Col- 
lein, Jacquelyn Troup, Linda 
Burgess, Gwendolyn Cooper, 


Thursday, January 19, 1961 



SURl'RISr. BIRTHDAY— Cusiie Tucker is shown enjoy 
inij the shotf at the (J'jcoanut Crovc last Tuesday ivith her 
husband. Tommy, ivho surprised her on her iirthday, first 
tvith a flashey blue Thunderbird and, second, with dinner 
tit the famed Cocoanut Grove showhousc featuring. Paul 
Anka and starring the hour Step Brothers. ' - . 

Tominy Tucker Surprises 
Wife on Her Birthday 


How to surprise your wife 
on her birtliday — don't give 
her mirik/ Instead, make it a 

Thunderbird and dinner at 
the Ambassador's popular 
Cocqanut Grove. But her 
birthday must fall on a 
right that youthful Paul 
Anka is in town. 

Gussie Tucker was so sur- 
prised wiien her husband 
presented her with a sleek 
light blue Thunderbird she 
was speech Icbs. Since it was 
her birthday her husband 
suggested tiiey lia\o dinner 
and take in a show. She 
quickly decided on the Am- 
bassador at which Paul 
Anka was making his first 
West Coast nightclub — debut 
along with such wonderful 
entertainers as the Four Step 
Brothers, Dorothy"D o r b e n, 
group dancers, and swinging 


Freddy Martin orchestra. 

Mrs. Tucker still hadn't 
fully recovered from the sur- 
prise of receiving her excit- 
ing gift when she got her 
second surprise — her dap- 
per husband ushered her to 
a ringside table where they 
found Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Eullis, Mr. and Mrs. Brad 
rye 'and Mr. and Mrs. Edw. 
".-\bic" Robinson. 

They all rose and gave out 
with the Happy Birthday bit. 
Mrs. Tucker was really non- 
plussed but finally broke out 
in smiles. The group and the _■ . ■ 

Cocoanut Grove show helped bISteS AnRUal 
provide her with a gay eve- 
ning. 

ning. The party left the Grove 
with Al Williams of the Step 
Brothers .ioining making the 
_ rounds which included the 
Memorv Lane and Club 
Town Hill. . 


Banquet 

Honors 

Knights 

A gala banquet was held 
recently for the Junior 
Knights and Junior Daugh- 
ters of the Knights- of Peter 
Claver and Ladies Auxiliary 
at St. Leo's Catholic Shurch 
Hall. It was replete with fun 
and gaiety. 

' Hosting the affair were 
area deputies, Pierre J3.- 
Thomas, Lady Louise Rus- 
sell and Julius Pratt. 

Junior Knights Command- 
ers having boys present 
were: Frank Whittier, Coun- 
cil No. 87; Eldridge Charles, 
Council No. 96; Whitley 
Austin, Council No. 113; and 
Richard B. Thomas, Council 
No. 128. 

Junior Daughter Counsel- 
ors present were: Ladies Ann 
Walker, Court No. 87; Ann 
Revere, Court No. 96; Al- 
berta Guidry, Court No. 113; 
Agnes Smith, Court No. 99; 
Louise Russell, Court No. 128; 
land Mae Moore, Court No. 
ll2L 

Responsibilty fpr the 
growth of Junior Knights 
and Daughter councils and 
courts, who at adults age 
may be Senior Knights and 
Ladies, is entrusted* to Sir 
Knight William J. Knox, Sr., 
and Lad.v Alma Branlett, 
Western States district dep- 
uties, and various area dep- 
uties of the Knights of Peter 
Claver. 

, More than 200 Junior 
Knights and Daughters were 
present. 

Zenith Club 


Talent Show 


Local Delta Officer to,. 
Attend Inaugural Ball. 


Dr. Geraldine P. Woods, 
national first vice-president 
of Delta Sigma Thcta Inc.. 
will probably travel the 
greatest distance of all 



DR. G. P. WOODS 


Deltas to attend a conference 
of National officers at Del- 
ta's Washington headquart- 
ers. She will also participate 
in Inaugural activities! this 
week. 

Dr. Woods, in her second 
term as national first vice- 
president, has served Delta -^ 
in a number of posts, includ- 
ing the vice-presidency and 
presidency of the Los An- 
geles Alumnae Chapter. 

She will be conferring with 
other Delta officers in Wash- ^ 
ington on matters relating "^ 
to the organization's public 
service projects. "^ 


.job opportunititcs, volun- 
teers, mental health, and in- 
ternational proiccts. 

Dr. Woods, who holds a 
Ph.D. in nuero-embryology, 
is married to Los Angeles 
dentist. Dr. Robert Woods, 
and is the mother of three 
. children. 

Other community organi- 
zations to which Dr. Woods 
contributes her services are 
Jack and Jill, the Auxiliary 
to the Medical, Dental and 
Pharmaceutical Assn. and the 
Lullaby Guild, . 

Annual Banquet 
Slated for Statler 

The Consolidated Realty 
Board's 12th annual banquet 
is scheduled for Feb. 3 at the 
Statler Hilton Hotel. 

Kay Murray is^ general 
chairman of the banquet at 
which new officers will bf 
installed. • 


Zenith Social Club an- 
nounced that March 12 is 
the date scheduled for its 
annual talent Show, t<) be 
' held in the Miramar Hotel 
in Santa Monica. M;^ 

Nine years ago the'^ioip 
held its first show to rSse 
funds for the Exceptional 
Children's H6me. 

The Zenith Club is the 
backbone of the $85,000 
building program currently 
underway at the home. 

This year's show is ex- 
pected to be one of the best 
in the club's history. Social 
and civic organizations are 
urged to enter amateur tal- 
ent in the contest. 


Esterljne Powell's husband 
Bill, in! a coma at Sawtelle. 
The Russell Thompsons (Lu- 
vercha Bray) entertaining at 
dinner Frid. Jessie McKinney 
was rushed to Good Samari- 
tan Hosp. last Frid. The doc- 
tor eyed Gil Lindsay, shoVed 
him into bed and cancelled 
all his Inaugural plans. 
The Girl Friends met Mon. 
with Lena Tucker. 

Atty. Com Brown took the 
wingswept route as of Sat. to 
DC for a day or so and no 
doubt will be back by the 
time you, read this. Maxine' 
Heflin settled herself com- 
fortably in her room on the 
City of LA streamliner last 
Sun. and scooted off to Chi. 
for a few days, then to the 
Inaugural Ball and onto 
NYC for a long fortnight of 
fun-fun. Lee Meriweather, 
who lives now in SF, was in 
town over the, weekend. Zen- 
obia Allen convalescing at 
home Sftor surgery. 

Met Debut 

N'Yorker Arizona Harris 
who had been visiting our 
town leisurely bade tempor- 
ary adieu and left Sat. for 
her home in , Westchester, 
N.Y. She plan.s to dispose of 
her place and move to LA 
in the near future. The Sat. 
Afternoon Club meet Sat. 
with Pasadena's Marian 
Moore. SF's^Bill Allen in NYC 
to attend the Met debut of 
Leontyne Price next Frid. To- 
day fl9) is Gwen Gordon's 
birthday. Ditto tomorrow for 
Loren Miller while Sat. (21) 
is natal day for Pauline 
Slater and Eddie Atkinson 
Jr. 

Mon. (23) gets birthday 
hugs for Weslcen Foster and 
Maude Broady and Dr. Yo- 
lande Stovall Brooks gets 
hers the next day while 
Deegee Howard so noncha- 
lantly nods to hers Wed. (25). 
Henry McPherson Jr. is host 
tomorrow night (Frid.) at 
Larchmont Hall to a coterie . 
of friends who will de danc- 
ing and celebrating their 
high school commencement, 
as will their host. 'The 
Robert McFerrins (Sarah) 
plan a combination piano 
and voice studio now that 
they've moved completely to 
LA. 

Fast Footwork 

After last Sunday's after- 
noon concert (Shrine), Edith 
Fields Smith gathered unto 
her a merrie houseful of folk 
who promptly paid homage 
to her cocktails and buffet 
while stimulating talk flow- 
ed and flowed. Edith, ever 
provocative, undulated about 
in a leopard Idunging outfit 
-which almost distracted us 
from her usual excellent buf- 
fet table. Edith and Bill 
Dobson, on hand, lamented 
our inability to have attend- 
ed that recent Sun. night 
party they gave which rang 
a rollicking welkin, so every- 
body reported. 

Helen Garrott Is just about 
herself again after recent Ill- 


ness. Edith (Brooks) Brown 
has been ill abed, too. The 
Eddie Beals moved into ono 
of those spacious Leimert 
Park apartments last wee.K. 
Clever: The miniature 
Chiiiese garden bowls creat- 
ed by imaginative E u 1 a 
Pharr as Xmas gifts foi* her 
friends. Eula's do-it-yourself 
touch always was pretty 
wonderful. KGFJ's Tom Haw- 
kins should be told about 
George Thompson; he's pro- 
gram director at the Bev.- 
Hills YMfcA whence his 
career began as a Janitor 
and not a check may be 
issued via BevHills American 
Legion post unless it bears 
George's signature. ^ " 

Atlanta to L.A.: Lydfa Bur- 
well Hinkson, the merriest 
widow of them all. She's 
coming up lor her next 
marital round, fighting fit 
iand fresh as ever, her foot- 
work unimpaired. Here a 
week, she heads for NYC. 
Made us promise, too, we'll 
visit Atlanta before autumn. 
We'll go via Tuske^ee. 
C'mon! 


,.• I 


•ni 


ft 


■ i 


Rinkeydinks 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Lucille Harris, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Skeeter Pipkins, Audrey 
Scott, Oles and Thelma 
Hayes, Quinett Phillips, , 
Eugene Pickett, Dorothy 
Pickett, Ina Davis, Elizabeth 
Taylor, Jackie and John 
Moore, La Rue Ewina, Ear- 
lene Shaw, Leonard Samp- 
son, Mary Mercadante, Don^ 
Land, Howard Herty, Cecilia*- 
Bruce, Duke and Gwen 
Woods, Clifford Solomon, Mr. 
and Mrs* Joe Gordon, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Lawson, 
Mr. ond Mrs. Curtis Thomp- 
son, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. 
Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Curtis Moore and. Paul Har- 
ris and Mrs. and Mrs. Oliver 
Odom. 

Also attending were Dr. 
and Mrs. Russell Andrew, 
Dr. and Mrs. Roy Andrews, . 
Mr. and Mrs. Augustus 
Gross, Mr. and Mrs. ThomaS 
Phillips, Mri and Mrs. Randy 
Dale, Dr. and Mrs; Lamont 
Cranford, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 
Clemons, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
neth Terry, Mr. and Mrs. T. 
C^arinar, Anita Bogan. Clara 
Taylor, Irene and Clarence 
Sharp, Faye Warner, Mr. 
and Mrs. Tommie Barnes, Dr. 
and Mrs. CJeorge F. Jackson 
Sr., Milton Gentry, Joan 
Southern, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wright Filmore, '^ Jeanette 
Paronte, Pat Blach. Eva and 
William Burton, Marion and 
Al Wilson, Fannie' De Mann, 
Ella Redmond and Bill 
Youngblood. 


U'J 


PIONEER'S CLUB 
The Pioneer's Club , will 
meet at 2 p.m. Suhdyy,. Jan. 
22 at the home of M.^. Chaf- 
lotta A- Bass, 4073 S. Central 
avenue. 



Installs Of i 


CHICAGO VISITOR 

Lillian Coleman of Chi- 
cago is the house guest of 
Charity White at her Mans- 
field avenue home. 


:ers 

The American Assn. for 
Afro- American Relations 
held- its installation of of- 
ficers at the church of Chris- 
tian Fellowship, 2nd avenue 
and W. Adams blvd. Rev. 
James Hargett, pastor of 
Christian Fellowship, offi- 
ciated. '' 

Officers installed were: Dr. 
Brandon A. T. Bowlin, presi- 
dent; Nnanna Ibok-Ete, first 
vi^e- president; Dr. Edna 
Griffin, second vice presi-. 
dent; and Olu Dolu, third 
vice-president; Mrs. Wesley 
Prevost, recording secretary; 
Mrs. Odessa Cox, correspond- 
ing secretary; Mrs. Floy 
Sibrie, financial secretary; 
James A. King, treasurer; 
Meta Dee, chaplain; Ifeagwu 
Chukwue MekaOmeke, audi- 
tor, and Pitts O. Kigbe, co- 
ord ihator. 


for "a new lease on life" 
TRAVEL! M 


GO ME]KICO 


.;( 


****••••*••• 




i$ 



__.„ — ^,. . — ^^., Delta, with 28,000 mem- ^^ 

JoAnne Cormia, Willetta bers in 267 chapters in the M 

Files, Onnette Henry, Wanda United States. Haiti, and 

Milan, Sharon Winston, and Liberia, concentrates its pub- -^ 

Patricia Clayton. lie service efforts in library, 


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THUNDERBIRD SPECIALISTS— Shovfn here with 
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REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


[Thursday, January 19, 1961 


The California Eag le— 1 T 


BRAND NEW 

HOME IN 

PALM SPRINGS 

You'll lov* this 2-bdrm.^ 
quality built Doll House 


MNOGA PARK - 'i A. Spac. DUPLEXES FOR^SALE 

"3 + den. 2 ba., sep. din.-rm., • — ^ . - 

2 frplcs., w/w crpts.. elect., j OLYMPIC-HIGHLAND AREA 
bit-ins., sprklrs., fed., fully i 


i FOR SALE BY OWNER 


OWNER SACRlFICING-1 bedrm. 

1124 lONGWOOD PLACE house with big yard on R-4 k,t 

Indscpd. ^195a Cub. dn. j ^^^e* uAi.^rbedrooms 2 bath! 223 East 99th Street. Most r,«,s. 

PI 1-257 J I Family Room, built-ins, fireplace, enable down paynnent. Priced" tc 

-,__..., __... _«.. ..>._«| DOWN— $10,.5OO! Xlnt. 5'^''' sacrifice: Make offer. Cash sell.. Buy direct from owner iv 

Its completely furnisned,: ,^„ p fTTrr, „,,o=f h,^,,..» or Trade. telpnhoninri 

CA :••<* !»:»« w...... "i»».k'' ^^^ * ^"'^"- Suest house. I gR $^488 WE. 6-5848 Eve». **'^°^ 

so just bring y©"' fli-ub^ So. of Imperial. AX. 3-6267. j *•"• ^^^'"' - '• " "^^^^ ' **• ! RE. 3-2389 

and check for $2,500 and; 


. . «« .N^,..» «»..... -w. y^T r, ; REAL ESTATE BARGAINS 
move in. White stucco with NO DOWN PYMT. TO GL— 2 \ 

I blue trim, attached single 
garage, wall to wall car- 
peting, sliding gloss door 


bdrm. stucco, hrdwd. & tile, i pQR SAIE BY OWNER-Two large' 
Close to sehls., sho 
transport. PL. 4-2827 


I INCOME PROPERTY 


Close to schls., shopp'g &;b,j,^„^ house, big yard..Will'^0^ ^ALE BY OWNER-Eastsid* 
2827 'til 7. !, . u I . j . °^P'«'<- Near everything. At 


to patro. Excellent location I $600 DOWN— $10,500. Clean ^ 
about Vi mile from exclus-j room & kitchenette. So. of 
ive Racket Club. Priced' imperial. AX. 3-6267. 
right at $13,950. For or-^^^^^ p^^^ _ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^ 

rm., 2 bdrm.. redecorated 
stucco. Hrdwd.. tile, fenced. 
PL 7-2268. 


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ACTION-PACKED BUSINESS 

EXCITING FUTURE 

HIGH EARNINGS 

Short Course - Low Cost 

HEAVY 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

GET BROCHURE NOW! 
ADJUSTERS, INC. 

601 S. RAMPART, L,A. 57 

DU 8-7163 


FREEDOM FIGHTERS 

For "One World 

Religion - Brotherhood" 

Telephone -j 
Dr. E. H. Bronner" 

MA. 8-2077 i, 

^ < — 

Specialty printing, 

business cards, 

throw aways, menu?, 

posters, direct mail. 

House to house distribution. 

WE. 3-4634 


rangements to see proper- 
ty coll Miss Rossini at 

FA. 1-4182 


$5000 DN.— 6 stuc. Us. 5 yrs. 
old. 1 bdr. ea. Inc. $420 mo. 
RE. 1:2119 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


EUBANKS STUDIOS 

Voice, Piano, Violin, Cello, 

Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, 

Drums, Sightsinging. 

PL. 2-1179 


Large 5 rooms. 2 bedroom 
apartment. Near Washington 
and Arlington. 2343'/? West 
20th Street. Immediate pos- 
session. Children welcome. 
No pets. 

For appointment call . . . 

YE. 7-6753 


WINDSOR HILLS 

Lovely English home, 2 bedrms., 
li bath, paneled den-family | $3000 DN. — Sparklg. 2 & den 
room, wet • bar. $42,000 full stuc. Crpt. Drps. Vic -Pico- 
price, good financing. Harvard. RE 1-2119 

DOROTHY MARSHALL 
DU. 1.1059 


redecorate house. Located at 1243-1245 E. 51st St. Large 
2609 South Tichenor. Priced low yarcJ. Ideal for home and „in 
for quick salef Low, low downicorne. Low, low down payment, 
payment. Call owner. I ^^'^f ^'^^^ed for quick sale 

OTQO Contact owner. 

RE. 3-2389 , p^ 3-2389 


WEST5IDE H OUS ES FOR SALE | ^i5oO DN.-Dlx. dplx. 2 & Ige 

6 ROOM SPANISH ' ^""' ^'* ^^- >wr., &2 bdr., i 


APT. FOR RENT 

3-rm. apt. Centrally located. All 
modern conveniences. Ground 
floor. 

9 to 5 PL. 7-2293; After 6 
LO. 6-7823 ■ LU. 2-7957 


FURNISHED ROOMS TO RENT 


Girls and Women to 

sell new products 

part or full trme. 

Studio F 

HO. 9-19T1 


CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 


Baltimore - Washington 

CHARM SCHOOL 

(By Correspondence) 

(FIRST LESSON FREE) 
P. O. BOX 21 7U, JESSUP, MD. 


TAPE RECORDER FOR SALE 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The People'si Choice 

960 E. JEFFERSON 
AD. 3-9295 

3700 S. WESTERN 
RE. 4-9346 

/-Rental- 
Beautiful 4-room 

unfurnished apartment. 
Garbage disposal. 

5121 W. 20th St. 


FURNISHED HOUSES FOR RENT 


$21.50 Weekly 

Modern 2 bedroom. Utilities 
paid. Children and pets wel 
come. TV included. 

AX. 2-0458 


UNFURN. HOUSES FOR RENT 


$80.00 

Four bedroom, large yardi 

Children and pets welcome. 

Empty noyv. 

AX. 2-0458 


S3500 DN. — Lov. 3-bdr. ^an. 
stuc, l^i ba. 8784 S- Har- 
' vard. RE. 1-2119. 


Mountain-Desert 
Resort Acreage 

10 dwn., $10 mo, S995.00-10 

(tan) acres mostly level between . HOUSES FOR SALE 
Palm Springs and Salton Sea. 


S5" DN. — Cute 2 bdrm. stucco. 
i Rugs included. $70 mo. 
OR. 4-6022 


$18,950 full price. $2,950 down. 
No loan charges. 9147 S. Harvard 

SALE OR TRADE 

Fontana 
Home. 


home for Compton 


ba. upr., crpt. & drps. Pico 
Hauser. RE. 1-2119. 

: 2 NEW HOUSES ON I LOT- 

3-bdrm. -^ 2-bdrm., bit-ins. 
w/w carpet, $1500 handlies 
PL 4-2827 'till 7. 


call MRS. TAYLOR of 

CANN ADY 
REALTY CO. 

RE. 4-6622 


5 BDRM., 3 ba. + 2 apts. 159 
150 R-3 lot, $2500 dn. - 
NE. 5-8009— NE. 5-2008' 


2 STORES & 4 rentaU. $36..'^^ 

mo. Income $27,000. Rltr. 

NE. 5-7111 


.,««« ,« 1073 S. MANSFIELD AVENUE 

$30 dwn., $30 mo. $3,000. 10 r\ c j t a 

acres level on road NW Victor-! ^OP^" Sunday 1-4 p.m. ; 
ville nr. Adelanto. Only 2 par-i?6000 Down - 3 bedrooms, 2 
j,l,_ ] baths. Wilshire-La Brea Area 

! near L.A. High. 

EX. 8^719 - EX. 7-5751 I CR. 5-4488 WE. 6-5848 eves. 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


OPEN HOUSE-SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

POMONA 

7 POSSESSIONS 

All hav« been re-financed and have TOP 25 YEAR 
LOANS. 

SOME WITH WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING AND STEEL 
FENCES. 


( 


YETS j 
NO DOWN 1 



3 BEDROOMS with P/4 BATHS, BUILT-IN RANGE AND 
OVEN. I 

MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!! 

$15,500 to $16,500 

NAME YOUR OWN DOWN PAYMENt! 

FOR RENT— W /opt ion to buy I Directions: Take San Bernardino Freeway to Towne 
3 room house— cute. $69 mo. Ave. exit . . . North one block to La Verne . . . East 
2 br. house^Ig par. clean, on. La Verne to Los Flores . . . Then north one block 
85 mo. Southeact. HU 2-086!. |,^ ^^j^, „^y,^ ^ ^^^ Ashfield. 


BRAND NEW - 

Tape Recorder 
1616. 

Perfect condition. 

Reduced to only $222. 
MA. 8-2077 


BEAUTY OPERATOR WANTED | LIMOUSINE FOR SALE 


RE. T-9188 

Gladys' Beaute Shoppe 

OPERATOR WANTED 
4919 West Adam* Blvd. 
Los Angeles 16, Calif. 


1930 Packard 

Limousine. Beautiful classic 
car. Excellent condition. Law 
mileage. Good motor and 
tires. 

WE 5-5842 


ROQM FOR RENT 

Male or female— newly decorated 
room with all the home privi- 
leges. Reasonable rent. 13437 
Brownell, San Fernando, Calif. 
Phone EAApire 6-8871 
Rolland Teal 


RENT witli option to buy, 2 

bdrm. frame.' S75 per mo. 

PL. 7-2268 


HOUSES « APTS. WANTED 


•FOR 34-HOUR SERVICE ' 


CALL PLymouth 6-8347 - Plymouth 6-0997 

POWELL BAIL BONDS 

JOEL A. POWELL JOHN A. ECHOLS 

10951-53 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES 61, CALIF. 

FREE BAIL INFORMATION 


FREE SERVICE!!! 

TO "LANDLORDS 
We need furnished or unfur- 
nished houses and apartments. 
Doubles and singles. Eastside 
and Westside. 

4020 South Western Aevnue 
AX. 2-1991 


GI. RENT with option (b buy. 

2-bdrm. stucco, hrdwd firs. 

PL. 7-4153 

INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE 


ALLIED REALTY 

10000 EAST RUSH ST., EL MONTE 
Gilbert 4-4526 


I 

I 

I 


ONLY 2 HOMES 

in Beautiful Residential ^ 

j POMONA. 

No down payment for vets. From $13*770, 
Full Price. From $76.08 per month, includes 
principal and interest, wall-to-wall carpeting, 
rear yard redwood fenced, forced air heat, 
built-in range and oven, hood and disposal, 
2-car garage. 3-bedroom, 2-bath homes. Phone 
collect. Randy Anable. | . 

EDgewood 8-0088 


I 


5121 W. 20th St. 

8-unit stucco. 10 years old. 

$62,000 F. P. 
$20,000 Dn. 



HOME, UNFURN., FOR LEASE 


FOR LEASE — Altadena. Gregor.v 
Ain contemporary. 3 bedroom. 2 
bath., fireplai-e. new electric ap- 
pliances, 2 landscaped patios by 
Eckbo. Minutes from LA. freowa.v. 
S225 per month. 


' REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 

!BEST BUYS — Unrestricted 
Property. Reed Allen, Jr. ; 
AX 1-7494 i^^ 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


DOROTHY MARSHALL DU. 1-10591 


Plan your work. 


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$„$$$$$$ 


•M- 






>' 


441' 


j_ ! work your plan. 

I IBUFFORD REALTY CO 
'^ 3000 W. Jefferson Blvd. 


SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSN. 

2512 SOUTH CENTRAL AVENUE 

LOS ANGELES 11, CALIFORNIA 

ADams 1-9118 


CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1960 
..'ASSETS , 

First Mortgage Loans $14,077,489.57 

Other Loans ,.. 75,726.46 

Real Estate Owned . 1 84,383.09 

U. S. Bonds and Stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank. ....•.-.. ---^ 606,500.00 

Cash on Hand and in Banks. . 1,290,000.68 

Office Building and Equipment (Net) 75,791 .55 

Other Assets , 243.63 




Total Assets $16,310,134.98 

' ■ ■ • ■ ' ' ■ '. 

L ! A B I LIT! ES AND CAPITAL 

Savings Accounts . . . $13,490,130.72 

Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank ; 750,000.00 

Other Liabilities • • 1 32, 121 . 1 2 

Deferred Credits , . 95,636.65 

Guarantee Capital Stock ,. 28,000.00 

Reserves and Undivided Profits ' 1,814,246.49 


REpublic 5-0246. 

• —Westside— 

1843 W. 51st Place 

5:rm. Frame. Hdwd. Lge. lot. 

Gar., side drive. $13,500 F. P. 

$2,500 Dn. 


2410 FOURTH AVE. 
7 ROOM FRAME 

Lge. lot. Side dr. Hardwood- 
tile features. Lot 75x150. R-4 
zone. 

$34,500 F. P. 

Make offer. 

Wilshire-La Brea District 

14-rm. Studio Duplex 

4-car gar. Income $300 per mo. 

$40,000 F. P.-$6,000 Dn. 

Make offer. 


AT VICTOR CLOTHING CO 



Total Liabilities $16,310,134.98 


■1' 


44> 


44% 


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 


I'ree Brake Adjuflment at 

ED'S 

MOBILE SERVICE 

Hoover & Manchester 
PL. 1-5912 

• Motor $Z 95 

Tune-up ;.';:: 

FREE BRAKE ADJ. 

WITH LI BE JOB 

• Open 24 Hours 

• We Pick-up & 
Deliver 

• Brake Specialists 

• S&H Green Stamps 

• All Mechanical 
Work 

Unconditionally 

Guaranteed 

ED'3 MOBILE SERVICE 

ED BEYMAR, Owner 

PL. 1-5912 

Hoover & Manchester , 


This Is Our GREATEST SALE in 40 YEARS at the Same Address, 214 Sc Broadway 
* * * VICTOR CLOTHING COMPANY IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES * * * 

I $100 OUTFIT FOR $3 PER. WEEK 

Pay Cash or as Little as $3.00 a Week Pays for f 100.00 Worth of Good Looking 

Clothes, Shoes and Accessories for Men and Boys of All Ages 
Boy Any Fine'BRONSON Suit at $29.00 and You Get a $20.00 Jacket FREE! 
or a $20.00 Pair of Freeman Shoes FREE! 
Buy Two Suits and Get a $30.00 Slack Suit FREE! I 

Buy One Suit and Get a $40.00 Car Coat for Only $1 9.95! 

Buy Two Suits and Get a $40.00 Car Coat FREE! 
Buy Any Sport Coat Priced $29.00 or More and Get a 
- $10.00 Pair of Trousers FREE! 

^ $69 TOP COAT FREE 

Buy Two Suits and Get a $69.00 Top Coat FREE! or $30.00 
Off the Price of Any Suit and Top Coat or Tw^Suits 
Over 1,000 Shirts, Values to $12.00, NOW $4.95 Each! 
Trench Raincoats, $29.95, All the New Styles in One, Two 
and Three Button Suits and Sport Coats. 

Buy Any Gold Watch and <5et a $20.00 Sport Jacket FREE!! 
ALTERATIONS FREE! FIT GUARANTEED — WE CATER TO YOU, AND 
I . WE DO MEAN YOU! / 

Buy Any Suit or Top Coat and Get a $15.00 Wool Shirt FREE! — TUXEDOS! 

EASTER WARDROBE HEADQUARTERS 

Get Your Easter Clothes Now, Ray Later! Easter Is Early This Year — April 2 
Get Your Easter Clothes Now and SAVE! We Cater to California Eagle Readers 

STORE HOURS: 
9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. OPEN EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT UNTIL 8:00 P.M. 

VfCTOR CLOTHING CO. 

214 South Broadway, DoWntown Los Angeles, California 

THIS BIG SALE IS FOR 15 DAYS ONLY •HURRY! • YOU ARE 

WELCOME IN YOUR WORK CLOTHES! 

PlBnfy of Paved, Free Parking Next Door to Store 




n 



-L. 




1 


4 




..w.£»hi'-&y<tstfi»>4re!4>sim0» 


Ur 


IS-The California Eagle Thursday, January 19, 1961 | 

Checker Contest At Ttiriftimart 


NEW YORK SCENE 




\