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THE 



Library Journal 



OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



CHIEFLY DEVOTED TO 



Xtbrar$ Economy anfc iblioarapb$ 




Vol. 22 



(JANUARY - DECEMBER, 1897) 



NEW YORK : PUBLICATION OFFICE, 59 DUANE STREET 
LONDON : SOLD BY KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., PATERNOSTER HOUSE 

1897 



z 

6,71 

17 
v.0.1 






CONTENTS. 

CONTRIBUTED PAPERS. 

A Congressional or a national library ? 7 

Railroad travelling libraries S: H. Ranch 10 

A word on cataloging Kate E. Sanborn 13 

What may a librarian do to influence the reading of a 

community? A. L. Peck n V 

The librarian and the patriotic societies A ngeline Scott 80 

The trials of the librarian Caroline H. Garland 129 

Weeding out fiction in the Carnegie Free Library of 

Allegheny W: M. Stevenson 133 

\ S: S. Green; F: M. Crunden; Linda A. East- 

Work between libraries and schools a symposium . > man; H: M. Utley ; Mary E. Dousman; 

Mary Medlicott 181 

Children's reading: what some of the teachers say . . . J. C.Dana 187 

School libraries Electra C. Doren 190 

Developing a taste for good literature W: E. Foster 245 */ 

The guileless West on " weeding out " J: R. Harbour ne 251 

Travelling libraries of illustrations . , Hannah J. Carter 293 

The Browne charging system B: W. Pennock 294 

The public school and the public library A. F. Foerste 341 

Co-operation in Providence libraries ......... W: E. Foster 344 

Organization and management of a library staff .... F. P. Hill 381 

Bibliographical endeavors in America R. R. Bo-wker 384 

The place of bibliography in the equipment of a cultivated 

man M. D. Bisbee 429 

Corporate entry : further considerations C: A. Cutter ; Edith E. Clarke 432 

Books for mothers' clubs Linda A. Eastman 436 

President's address at A. L. A. conference, Philadelphia, 

Pa , W: H. Brett Ci 

What of the future ? F: M. Crunden Cs 

The librarian and the importer E. Lemcke Ci2 

Local supervision of travelling libraries F. A. Hutchins Ciy 

Methods of children's library work as determined by I E. M. Fairchild Ct9 

the needs of the children. I., II Emma L. Adams C2S 

The Fisk Free and Public Library of New Orleans . . IV: Beer Csa 

On the literature of library history F: J: Teggart 35 

The selection of books for college libraries A. C. Potter Cy) 

The survival of the fittest among books E. C. Richardson C4S 

A bit of classification : treatment of Harvardiana ... C: A. Nelson C47 

The care of special collections Wilberforce Eames C48 

The care of manuscripts Herbert Friedentuald . C$2 

Notes on the government and control of college libraries G: W: Harris Css 

The London international conference on a catalog of 

scientific literature Cyrus Adler Cs8 

Index prospects and possibilities W: I. Fletcher C6i 

Some heresies about cataloging Dr. G: E. Wire C62 

An elementary talk on charging systems Helen G. Sheldon C63 

Reference work Eleanor B. Woodruff C6s 

Librarians' aids Virginia R. Dodge C6y 

Book selection Elizabeth P. Andrews 70 

Advertising a library Mary Emogene Hazeltine Cj4 

Aims and personal attitude in library work Linda A. Eastman C8o 

Report of the Co-operation Committee W: H. Tillinghast C8i 

Report of the A. L. A. Publishing Section W: C. Lane C84 

Report of the Committee on Library Schools A. H. Hopkins C8? 

Report on gifts and bequests Caroline M. Hewitts C9O 

Proceedings of the Nineteenth Conference, A. L. A., 

Philadelphia C94-*76 

Catalog of bibliographical exhibit Ci77-i84 

The Post-Conference Mary P. Farr Ci8$ 

The work for children in free libraries . . ' Mary W. Plummer 679 

Methods of work for children: the Children's Library 

League Linda A. Eastman 686 

A notation for books Horace Kephart 739 

A handbook'of American libraries F: J; Teggart 74' 



iv 



CONTENTS. 



GENUAL Amcuu: 
The Congressional Library committee and the 

American Library Association 4 

Serial, technical and scientific publications of the 

government '* 

Scoville Memorial Library, Carlelon College, 

Northfield, Minn 7 

The public library movement in Brooklyn ... 18 

The Buffalo Library to be a free library . . . ao, 144 
The A. L. A. Publishing Section printed catalog 

card* al 

UniTcnity of Chicago library classes 22 

The gathering of local history materials by public 

libraries. R. G. Tkwaitet 82 

Books of 1896 83, 136, 194 

New aids for readers 88 

The question of indexes. F. D. Tandy . . .88, 303 

The Free Public Library of New Orleans ... 89 

Library Association of Australasia 90 

Art for the school-room at Denver Public Library. 90 

Report of the Superintendent of Documents . . 91 

Reviews and criticisms for readers 91 

The " new journalism " in public libraries ... 143 

Public documents in the 54th Congress .... 143 
Organization of the Congressional Library, 1897- 

9 ' 

The Congressional Library handbook .... 144 

The Peoria Public Library 144 

Observations upon children's reading 194 

Pictures for school-rooms 194 

Best 50 books of 1 896 for a village library ... 196 

Library Round Table Session of the N. B. A. . . 197 

Library section of Illinois Teachers' Association. 198 

Evaluation of books for children 198 

A children's book-mark 199, 257 

Reading aloud 199 

Miss Sharp's lectures in Cleveland 199 

The Hoboken Public Library 200 

The Second Bibliographical Conference at Brus- 
sels 200, 349 

Opening of the John Crerar Library 200 

Libraries and clubs. Merica Hoagland .... 200 

A French classification and notation 253 

Index to portraits 253, 302, 347 

Recent library legislation in Wisconsin. F. A. 

Hutckint 255 

Exhibits of photographs, posters, engravings, etc. 

C: A. Cutter 256 

The New York Public Library building . 296, 390, 744 
New library building of the University of Illinois. 

/'. F. Bickntlt 303 

Atlanta library meeting 304 

Publications of the Office International de Bibli- 
ographic 304 

Report of the Congressional Library Committee. 305 

The value of maps 346 

Contributions to an index to the literature of mete- 
orology. O. L. Fattig 346 

Trials of librarians. W: Afatknvs 348 

Specifications for bookbinding 348 

An interstate library meeting planned .... 387 

The disinfection of books by vapor of formalin . 388 

Meeting of Library Department of N. E. A. . . 389 

The tariff relating to books 390 

The Newark Public Library building 300 

The Second International Library Conference, 

London, July 13-16, 1897 391, 690 

The Denver union catalog of medical literature . 437 



In memoriam, William Rice, D.D. Mary Medli- 

cott 437 

Affairs at the Congressional Library . . . 438, 693 

"Why there was no strike." 439 

The children's room 439 

A course of bibliology in Dartmouth College . . 439 
The Lawrenceville Branch of the Carnegie Library 

of Pittsburgh. (Illustrated) 44 

An extraordinary title. H. C. Bolton 442 

Justin Winsor 689 

The Chicago Public Library. (Illustrated) . . 692 

A Library League at the Prendergast Library . . 693 

The Kansas City Public Library 694 

Use of ink in libraries 743 

Library statistics of Greater New York .... 745 

The new Columbia. C: Alex. Nelson .... 746 

The Superintendent of Public Documents ... 747 

Deterioration of paper 748 

The Menasha (Wis.) Public Library. (Illustrated.) 

L. E.S. 748 

Travelling libraries in Dunn Co., Wisconsin. 

Gratia Countryman 75 

A gift to the Philadelphia Free Library .... 750 

The Shakespeare memorial window 751 

EDITORIALS : 

Library progress in 1896 3 

The three library events of > 897 3 

Future of the Congressional Library 4 

The work of the Joint Library Committee ... 4 

The new catalog of public documents 4 

Bibliographical work in 1896 5 

Printed catalog cards 5 

The joint library meeting in Brooklyn .... 5 

The public library movement in Brooklyn ... 6 

A. L. A. special meeting 75 

Union meeting of New England associations . . 75 

Affairs at Washington 75 

Indexes 76, 292 

The Free Library of New Orleans 76 

Copyright department of the Congressional Li- 
brary '27 

The " new journalism " in public libraries ... 127 

The question of fiction exclusion 127 

The Massachusetts lists of select fiction .... 128 

Librarians and teachers '79 

Books as tools in school- work 179 

Bibliographic aids '79 

The "tariff on ideas." 180, 380 

The Superintendent of Public Documents 180, 340, 735 
The Philadelphia conference .... 243, 29 , 339 
The English International conference . . . 243, 379 

One result of library organization 243 

J. N. Larned 243 

Libraries as disseminators of political literature. 243 
The New York Public Library plans . . . 291,736 

Georgia as a library state 291 

The library movement in the South 292 

Proposed amendment to A. L. A. constitution . 339 

Reincorporation and place of next meeting . . . 339 

The Librarian of Congress 34i 380 

Differences of English and American library 

method 379 

Appointments in the Library of Congress . . 379, 427 

Library Department of the N. E. A 380 

An English memorial from American librarians . 427 

Questions of originality 427 

Justin Winsor 677 

The Chicago Public Library 677 



CONTENTS. 



Philadelphia's library appropriation 677 

The Cleveland Library I eague 678 

The presidency of the A. L A 735 

A question of precedents 735 

Washington library affairs 736 

Li brary opportunities in New York 736 

COMMUNICATIONS : 

List of subject headings. G.M.Jones 6 

A word on "the national spirit." A member of 

the A. L. A 6 

Civil service methods in libraries a correction. 

W: I. Fletcher 76 

Books for distribution : notice to librarians. G: 

H. Baker 76 

The question of indexes. W: H. Tillinghast . . 128 
Information as to music libraries wanted. Mary 

S. Cutler 128 

Opinions wanted on the Browne charging system. 

Nina E. Browne 128 

Reincorporation of the A. L. A. "Mac&inac" . 138 
Reference notes on catalog cards. M.I.Crandall 180 
A word to catalogers. W: Curtis Taylor . . . 180 
A card from Mr. Putnam. Herbert Putnam . . 244 
Are books on local industries unnecessary in pub- 
lic libraries ? A. B. J. 244 

The children's librarian. Mary S. Cutler . . . 292 

A suggestion for charging systems. C: W.. Smith 340 
The "combined charging system" and its past 

and future critics. Jacob Schwartz . . . 428 
A bibliographer's dilemma. H. C. Bolton . . . 678 
Book lists for library discussion. W; H. Tilling- 
hast 678 

A. L. A. photograph wanted. W: H. Brett . . 737 

Corporate entry. Jacob Schwartz 737 

Books on local industries. W: E. Foster . . . 737 
The American memorial in Shakespeare's church. 

B. C. Steiner 738 

The Magazine of Western History. F: IV. Faxon 738 
The children's reading-room of the Providence 

Public Library. W: E. Foster 738 

A " list of errors in well-known books " proposed. 

C.- K. Bolton 738 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM : 

zoth annual conference, London, Oct. 20-22, 1897. 694 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION : 

Transactions of the executive board 22, 696 

Special notice of reincorporation 23 

European post-conference trip 23, 146, 203, 258, 260, 307 

A. L. A. handbook 24, 93 

Special meeting 91 

Question of reincorporation 92 

Proposed A. L. A. propaganda appropriation . . 92 
igth general conference, Philadelphia, June 21-25, 

1897 MS, 257. 35. 350 

Publishing Section announcement .... 147, 697 

Action on tariff bill 201 

Poole memorial fund 203 

Proceedings, 1896 203, 307 

Invitation from the Institut International de Bibli- 
ographic 261, 307 

A. L. A. badge 261 

A. L. A. organization, 1897-98 696 

Memorial to Dr. W. F. Poole 697 

Invitation from the SocidU Bibliographique ... 751 



STATE LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 

24, 93, 148, 204, 261, 307, 357, 408, 442, 698, 751 

STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 

25. 93. '48, 204, 262, 308, 443, 699, 752 

LIBRARY CLUBS . 39, 102, 152, 209, 265, 313, 446, 706, 755 

LIBRARY SCHOOLS AND TRAINING CLASSES : 

Amherst Summer School ait, 446 

Armour Institute 41, 267, 358 

Columbian University 708 

Drexel Institute 41, 358 

New York State Library School 

42, 153, 268, 314, 447, 708, 757 

Pratt Institute 43, '54, 267, 358, 757 

University of Illinois 268 

Wisconsin Summer School 268, 447 

REVIEWS : 

Catalogue of the public documents of the 536 Con- 
gress R. R. Bowker 43 

Hewins, Books for hoys and girls ..... 211 
lies, Annotated bibliography of fine art C.- A. 

Cutter 211 

American catalogue, 1890-95. P. L. Ford . . . 269 
Municipal affairs : bibliography. R. R. Bowker . 269 
U. S. 54th congress, ist session, index to docu- 
ments. R. R. Bowker 269 

Thwaites, Jesuit relations 314 

U. S. Bureau of Education, public, society, and 

school libraries in the U. S 315 

Weeks, Libraries and literature in North Carolina 

in the i8th century. 6V H. Ranck .... 316 
Contributions towards a bibliography of the higher 

education of women -SV H. Ranck . . . 359 

Aflalo, Literary year-hook, 1897. .SV H. Ranck . 709 
Dixson, Subject index to prose fiction. Helen E. 

Haines 709 

Foote, The librarian of the Sunday-school . .711 

Greenwood, Library year-book S: H. Ranck . . 711 

Hayes, Publications of the state of Ohio .... 712 

Ogle, The free library 712 

Monroe, Bibliography of education 758 

Peabody Institute, Second catalogue. C: A. Nelson 758 

LIBRARY ECONOMY AND HISTORY 

43, >3, 155, 2'2, 270, 317, 359, 409, 448, 712, 759 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 

51, 112, 161, 218, 274, 323, 365, 452, 765 

PRACTICAL NOTES 52,162,32^,414,766 

LIBRARIANS 52, 112, 162, 218, 275, 324, 365, 414, 452, 7 9, 766 
CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 

54, 113, 162, 219, 276, 325, 366, 415, 454, 720, 768 

CHANGED TITLES 55, 163 

FULL NAMES . . 55, 113, 163, 219, 277, 326, 367, 455, 769 

BIBLIOGRAFY 

55, 113, 164, 220, 278, 326, 367, 416, 455, 722, 769 

INDEXES .... 56, 164, 220, 328, 368, 416, 456, 723, 770 

ANONYMS AND PSEUDONYMS 

56, 114, 164, 328, 416, 456, 724, 770 

HUMORS AND BLUNDERS .... 114,220,328,456,724 
PUBLISHERS' NOTE 6, 416 



THE 



Library Journal 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



CHIEFLY DEVOTED TO 



Uibrarp Economy anfc 



VOL. 22. No. i. 

JANUARY, 1897. 
Contents. 



SCOVILLE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, CARLETON COLLEGE. 

Frontispiece 
EDITORIAL ' 3 

Library progress in 1896. 

The three library events of 1897. 

Future of the Congressional Library. 

The Work of the Joint Library Committee. 

The New Catalog of Public Documents. 

Bibliographical work in 1896. 

Printed Catalog Cards. 

The Joint Library Meeting in Brooklyn. 

The Public Library Movement in Brooklyn. 

PUBLISHERS' NOTE 6 

COMMUNICATIONS 6 

List of Subject Headings. 

A Word on " The National Spirit." 

A CONGRESSIONAL OR A NATIONAL LIBRARY ? .... 7 
RAILROAD TRAVELLING LIBRARIES. .SV H. Rqnck. . 10 
A WORD ON CATALOGING. Kate E, Sanborn. ... 13 
THE CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY COMMITTEE AND THB 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 14 

SERIAL, TECHNICAL, AND SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF 

THB GOVERNMENT 16 

SCOVILLE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, CARLKTON COLLEGE. . 17 
THE PUBLIC LIBRARY MOVEMENT IN BROOKLYN. . . 18 



PACK 

THE BUFFALO LIBRARY TO BE A FREE LIBRARY. ... 20 
THE A. L. A. PUBLISHING SECTION PRINTED CATALOG 

CARDS 21 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LIBRARY CLASSES 22 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 22 

Transaction of Executive Board. 

Special Notice. 

European Post-Conference Trip. 

A. L. A. Handbook. 

STATE LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 34 

STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 25 

LIBRARY CLUBS 39 

LIBRARY SCHOOLS AND TRAINING CLASSES 40 

REVIEWS 43 

Catalogue of the Public Documents of the $3d 
Congress. 

LIBRARY ECONOMY AND HISTORY 43 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS . 51 

PRACTICAL NOTES 52 

LIBRARIANS 52 

CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 54 

BlBLIOGRAFY 55 

ANONYMS AND PSEUDONYMS 56 



NEW YORK : PUBLICATION OFFICE, 59 DUANE STREET. 
LONDON: SOLD BY KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., PATERNOSTER HOUSE, 

CHARING CROSS ROAD. 
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THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



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Moliere, Oeuvres completes. Collect, p. L. 
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360 

500 

90 

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400 
420 



4 

140 

75 

1500 
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250 
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WANTED IN COMPLETE SETS: 

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Poole's Index. 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



VOL. 22. 



JANUARY, 1897. 



No. i 



THE year 1896, though it includes the found- 
ing of no great libraries and no exceptional leg- 
islation, is noteworthy as the date of the largest 
conference in the history of the A. L. A., that 
at Cleveland, and for a notable and wholesome 
advance in state and local gatherings, only less 
important than those of the A. L. A. itself, such 
as the Wisconsin convention, the Indiana "li- 
brary institute," and the joint meetings in New 
York state and in New England. In the chain 
of library associations the Illinois Library Asso- 
ciation and the Western Pennsylvania Library 
Club make new links. Wisconsin ranks as the 
banner library state of the year, with its newly- 
formed Travelling Library Association, its li- 
brary section of the state teachers' association, 
its Milwaukee library club, its older state asso- 
ciation, and its effective library commission. 
Ohio was the only state to organize a library 
commission during the year, but bills for the 
purpose were presented to the legislatures of 
Minnesota, Michigan, and Georgia, and ef- 
forts to secure their passage will be renewed 
this year. A library law was passed in Utah, 
and travelling libraries have been established in 
Iowa, under charge of the state library. In- 
deed the extension of the travelling library idea 
is one of the significant events of the .year. 
The system is now in wide operation in New 
York, Michigan, and Wisconsin, and exists in 
some form in several other states ; it is just 
making its way into Iowa, and in Pennsylvania 
it is being energetically developed not only in 
the more remote districts but for outlying parts 
of the larger cities. The growing apprecia- 
tion of the need of close connection between the 
library and the schools has been evidenced by 
the establishment during the year of a library 
section in the National Educational Association, 
an example which has been followed in Wis- 
consin by the organization of a library section 
of the state teachers' association; while the 
tendency to bring the library into closer relation 
to the public has been shown in the extension 
of library advertising, in the establishment of 
children's rooms and "home libraries," and 
is the constant increase of library exhibitions 
of books, engravings, and works of art. In 
library literature the notable production of the 
year was the volume of the long-delayed World's 



Congress papers, which forms perhaps the most 
compact, practical, and comprehensive body of 
library doctrine yet put at the service of the 
profession. In England the bibliographical 
conference of the Royal Society laid the ground- 
work of a magnificent enterprise, while in Great 
Britain as well as on the continent the long- 
continued discussion of the decimal classifi- 
cation seems to promise well for the ultimate 
establishment of an international system of bib- 
liography. 



THE year to come will include at least three 
noteworthy events the national incorporation 
of the American Library Association, if that 
plan be carried through ; the European trip and 
international library conference ; and, most im- 
portant of all, the opening of the new national 
library. The program of the European trip 
has been well arranged, providing at very mod- 
erate cost for a trip which will combine in ex- 
cellent proportion the conference meeting, the 
visitation of libraries, and the usual sight-see- 
ing delights of the tourist under rather un- 
usual advantages in journeying. It has been 
decided to hold the regular conference in Phila- 
delphia instead of Boston, as originally sug- 
gested a decision especially interesting from 
the fact that the first conference, from which 
both the A. L. A. and the L. A. U. K. took 
their origin, was held in Philadelphia in 1876, 
so that the association comes of age, perhaps 
as a nationally incorporated body, in the city of 
its birth. The plan for the reincorporation of 
the association proposes a charter by specific 
congressional act, which will give the organiza- 
tion a national standing, like that of the Amer- 
ican Historical Association, and possibly bring 
it into official relation with the national library, 
with the function given to the boards of visi- 
tors for West Point and for the Naval Academy, 
annually appointed by the President. 



THE future of the national library in its 
new home is really the library question of the 
year. Imprimis* it is to be hoped that the latest 
proposition to make the magnificent new build- 
ing a sort of general pound for all stray de- 
partments that are crowded out from other 
quarters in Washington, will find no favor what- 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



ever. To house in this building this bureau 
and that bureau would be to invite the tradi- 
tionary camel who would grow and grow, leav- 
ing no place for the library proper except the 
reading-room rotunda and some adjacent shelv- 
ing. There is grave danger, otherwise, that 
this magnificent opportunity will be in some 
measure lost, unless a larger foresight is given 
to the consideration of the new library at this 
critical time than is now provided for. The 
removal of the books is the first critical point, 
because this removal gives opportunity for re- 
arrangement and organization which can out- 
line the methods of the library for years to 
come, or for mismanagement which will result 
in a general muddle that cannot be straightened 
out for years. Mr. Spofford has been so busy 
with the mass of detail which he has under- 
taken to handle that he has not trained himself 
as an executive for this kind of work, nor been 
able to keep in touch with the modern develop- 
ments of library organization and practice. 
Nor has he benefited, as was to be hoped, by 
recent experience ; to cite a single instance, 
copyright checks are still unbanked and used, 
without proper safeguards, to pay off the minor 
bills of the library. It will be cruel to load him 
down with this additional work until he frees 
himself from some of the old detail, and even 
his own recommendation for the separation of 
the copyright office has not yet been made ef- 
fective. Mr. Spofford is understood to desire 
the association with himself of a board of direc- 
tion, which could give more continuous atten- 
tion to the interests of the library than one 
made up of congressmen alone, and in the 
present critical time he should certainly be sup- 
plemented either by a commission of practical 
and experienced men, who should stand along- 
side him in planning or providing for the work 
of removal and reorganization, or be given ex- 
ecutive associates who would do this work in 
consultation with him. 



THE joint committee on library, which was 
charged by Congress with planning during the 
recess for the placing of the library in its new 
home and the removal of the books, did some 
good work in the short time which it could util- 
ize, and gave hearings to a number of librarians 
designated either by the president of the A. L. A. 
or cited by the committee itself. It is unfortu- 
nate that after Congress had specially authorized 
this committee to provide for the future or- 
ganization of the library, conflict should have 



arisen from the side of the appropriations com- 
mittee. The recent history of the library ques- 
tion in these particulars is informingly treated 
in the article elsewhere, and a full report is 
given also of the A. L. A. hearing. That this 
library will ultimately become in name as it is 
in fact the national library is beyond doubt, and 
the failure to recognize now this manifest des- 
tiny and to provide now on the large scale 
which this implies will be nothing short of a 
national misfortune. The completion of the li- 
brary within the time assigned and well within 
the money appropriated, has been a triumph of 
executive ability on the part of Gen. Casey and 
his worthy successor, Mr. Green, and the same 
foresight on the part of Congress which put 
the building work in such excellent form, and 
on the part of its trustee, for such Gen. Casey 
considered himself, in executive work, should 
be shown now in providing for the library as was 
shown in providing for its home. The national 
library of America should have the benefit of 
the best experience from national libraries 
abroad, of the widest range of professional co- 
operation at home, and of the largest foresight 
on the part of its governing body, if it is to be 
worthily representative of this great people. 



MEANTIME, the good work of government 
cataloging is progressing in strides. Now that 
Superintendent Crandall has been able to pro- 
vide the initial volume of the " Comprehensive 
index " provided for in the act of 1895, by his 
" Catalogue of public documents of the 53d Con- 
gress and of all departments of the government 
of the United States for the period March 4, 
1893, to June 30, 1895," the only wonder will 
be why we did not have so sensible and useful 
a thing long ago, and it will be in itself the 
only argument needed with congressmen to 
prove how wise it is to have a thing well done. 
It is the general verdict that the work could 
scarcely have been better done, or, as one user 
put it, " it is the easiest book to find things in 
you ever saw." A reference to the entry "li- 
braries " and the following entries will suf- 
ficiently indicate its practical value. It is pecul- 
iarly gratifying to note the pleasant word in 
the preface that "the Ames 'Comprehensive 
index' of documents of the sist and 52d con- 
gresses is recognized as the most successful 
predecessor of the present volume." A bill 
has been presented in Congress to authorize 
Dr. Ames to extend the plan of his index back- 
ward to cover the congresses between the Ben. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



Perley Poore volume and his index referred to. 
But against the form of this bill we must enter 
gentle protest. The act of 1895 was intended 
to systematize and unify the cataloging of gov- 
ernment publications, and now that a superin- 
tendent of public documents, including their 
cataloging, has been provided for, no govern- 
ment catalog ought to be authorized except 
through that office. The relations between 
Superintendent Crandall and Dr. Ames have 
been throughout so courteous and satisfactory 
that if a compact tabulation covering the pre- 
vious congresses must serve in place of the 
better but more costly method of the present 
volume, Superintendent Crandall might very 
properly commit its preparation to Dr. Ames, 
already skilled in this work and already in 
possession of much of the material for it. But 
now that we have unified the work of govern- 
ment cataloging, let us not begin again to di- 
vide the responsibility or take other steps back- 
ward. 

PROGRESS has also been made in unofficial 
national bibliography. The " American cata- 
logue " for 1890-95 was completed, in page- 
proof, before the end of 1896, and the appen- 
dixes, covering state publications, publications 
of societies, etc., will soon be in the hands of 
the binder. The "Annual American catalogue,' 
nearly ready, will this year have a companion 
volume from England, as the publishers of the 
" English catalogue " have decided to adopt the 
American method and make their annual pub- 
lication one of full title entries instead of an ab- 
breviated tabulation. The "Annual literary 
index," including the continuation of Poole's 
index, is in an advanced stage, and will have 
this year a rival in Mr. Brett's "Cumulative 
index," although this is confined to periodicals 
proper and does not attempt to cover the same 
number of publications. Its practical useful- 
ness in libraries in its monthly shape has been 
demonstrated, and it is to be hoped that neither 
publication will make the continuation of the 
other impossible. From France has come, dur- 
ing the year, the complement of the American 
" Publishers' trade list annual," and of Whitak- 
er's " Reference catalogue of English literature," 
in the shape of the " Bibliographic Franjaise," 
the index volume of which, although showing 
the result of composite work on the part of the 
publishing houses contributing to the index, is 
in plan a feature in advance of either its 
American prototype or the English volume. It 



is interesting to note how American bibliograph- 
cal work has given the cue to bibliographical 
progress abroad. 

IT is to be hoped that the problem of printed 
catalog cards may be solved by the tentative 
plan which the Publishing Section of the A. L. A. 
has put forward. This is intended to meet the 
double purpose of supplying the leading libra- 
ries with cards for all books, so far as they can 
be gathered for such cataloging, and the small 
libraries which desire only a limited num- 
ber of cards. The new system is in the most 
capable hands possible, having the advantage 
of the facilities of the Boston Athenaeum and 
of Mr. Lane's direct oversight, as well as of 
Miss Browne's personal skill and practical ex- 
perience. It now remains for the libraries, large 
and small, to support this enterprise, if they 
really want printed catalog cards. Perhaps no 
system can be devised that will more nearly 
meet the double need referred to, and if this 
enterprise should lack support it will scarcely 
be possible to revive the scheme of printed cata- 
log cards for many years to come. 



THERE was a field day in New York state on 
Jan. 14. The joint meeting of the State Library 
Association and the New York Library Club, 
held in Brooklyn at the initiative of the new 
Brooklyn Public Library Association, proved a 
great success, albeit the dinner was cut short at 
both ends and was a less distinctive feature 
of the gathering than usual, because of the suc- 
ceeding public meeting. The symposium in the 
morning on "What librarians should read" de- 
veloped naturally, as Mr. Baker clearly put it, 
into a discussion of what librarians can read, 
Mr. Dewey pointing out that a librarian in the 
midst of his executive duties cannot expect to 
do personal reading in office hours any more 
than any other executive. In the afternoon 
the meeting accomplished the impossible task 
of reviewing most of the leading books of the 
year within three hours, a most useful following 
of the plan suggested by Miss Cutler for the 
Cleveland conference. The absence of Mr. 
Lamed, which was keenly regretted by those es- 
pecially who heard his brilliant, scholarly, and 
masterful address at Cleveland, which so put 
him to the fore among the leaders of the profes- 
sion, was caused, happily, by the need of his 
presence at the other end of the state, where the 
Buffalo city authorities were the same evening 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



discussing the development of the fine subscrip- 
tion library under his charge into a free public 
library. 

NEW YORK, although it has led in state or- 
ganization, thanks to Mr. Dewey's work at 
Albany, has not been foremost in developing 
municipal free libraries perhaps because of 
a wholesome trend toward the development 
of important subscription or privately-endowed 
libraries into free public libraries. This has 
been shown in New York, Brooklyn, and Buffalo, 
New York being the first to emerge from the 
chrysalis stage under the wisely-managed con- 
solidation of the Aster, Lenox, and Tilden 
foundations into the New York Public Library, 
and Buffalo coming next with the plan men- 
tioned above. The new public library associa- 
tion in Brooklyn has not had the entire sympathy 
of many of those most in favor of a public li- 
brary for Brooklyn, since it diverged from the 
original plan of an association to promote public 
interest in that direction and became a public 
library on paper, with a board of directors but 
with no books and no funds. Great credit is 
nevertheless due to the enterprising ladies who 
brought about the eminently successful public 
meeting on Jan. 14, which took the ingenious 
shape of a general reception to Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie, the chief American benefactor of the 
library cause. At that meeting the names of 
the board of directors appointed by the mayor 
were announced, the most of the appointments 
being of complimentary appointees rather than 
of men specially informed as to library progress. 
The mayor's letter made the unfortunate sug- 
gestion that the board might be increased to 25, 
which would be directly contrary to the experi- 
ence in good administration, for so large a body 
of trustees divides responsibility to the extent 
of doing altogether away with it. Altogether it 
is difficult to say whether the new movement in 
Brooklyn, which city is handicapped at the 
present from making appropriations on an ade- 
quate scale for a public library, will really pro- 
mote the cause which all have at heart, or 
by dividing forces rather hinder that develop- 
ment. The organization of so important a 
library as Brooklyn should have, should be in 
the hands of skilled persons, should be careful- 
ly safeguarded from political influences, and 
should in its constitution and plans have the 
benefit of the best library knowledge of to-day ; 
and half good work is often disastrously in 
the way of really good work. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTE. The December number 
of the LIBRARY JOURNAL, being the Conference 
number, suffers the usual delay. The number 
will be mailed to subscribers as soon as the re- 
corder has put the last portion of material in the 
printers' hands. The index to the LIBRARY JOUR- 
NAL for 1896 waits only for the page-proofs of 
this number, on the completion of which it will 
be promptly issued. It is probable that the 
general index of the LIBRARY JOURNAL planned 
last year, will be extended to cover volumes 
I -21 instead of the first 20 volumes, and will be 
issued during the current year. 

Libraries and library assistants are reminded 
that a special rate of $2 per year for the LIBRARY 
JOURNAL is made to library assistants where 
the periodical respectively is taken at the regular 
subscription rate by the library or by the chief 
librarian. Librarians are requested to give 
opportunity to members of their staff to make 
clubs of this kind. 



Communications. 



LIST OF SUBJECT HEADINGS. 
THE edition of "List of subject headings" 
is nearly exhausted, and the Publishing Section 
is considering the publication of a second edi- 
tion. If any librarian or cataloger has noted 
any corrections, additions, or other sugges- 
tions I shall be glad to receive them. 

GARDNER M. JONES. 

SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, } 
SALEM, MASS. 

A WORD ON "THE NATIONAL SPIRIT." 
YOUR first editorial in the current [November] 
LIBRARY JOURNAL contained the following sen- 
tence: "Thefeelingof the Westagainstthe East, 
so rampant before election day, is directly con- 
trary to the national spirit." That looks rather 
curious out here. We have libraries out here 
that receive sundry eastern publications like 
the Sun, the Nation, Harper's Weekly, etc. If 
one can judge anything by them, the East is 
not entirely innocent of malignant feelings 
concerning the West. To the East the West 
has so long been merely an instrument where- 
by they can extort a higher interest on their 
investments, that it is, no doubt, a painful sur- 
prise to find that the worm has found that it has 
feelings and has turned. We are willing to put 
our grade of "national spirit" up against 
the world, Wall Street included. We deplore 
any sort of "national spirit" that does not in- 
clude a recognition of the right of the produc- 
ing classes to at least enough of the products 
of toil to support life. We believe in "equal 
rights for all, and special privileges for none." 
We do not believe that the "national spirit" is 
restricted geographically to the East. 
Respectfully submitted by 

A MEMBER OF THE A. L. A. 

LINCOLN, NEB., I 
Dec. s, 1896. f 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



A CONGRESSIONAL OR A NATIONAL LIBRARY? 



THE appearance, the week before Congress 
opened, of seven members of the American 
Library Association before the joint commit- 
tee on the Library of Congress in Washington 
has been the most interesting happening in the 
library world since the Cleveland conference. 

The date fixed for the completion of the new 
building for the Congressional Library being 
1896, and the appropriation bills making pro- 
vision for the work of each branch of the gov- 
ernment having to be made up at least a year 
ahead, plans for its moving and rearrangement 
in its new quarters began to attract the atten- 
tion of Congress as early as the 53d Congress, 
at its session in 1894-95. In obedience to a 
clause in the appropriation bill passed March, 
1895, Mr. Spofford submitted in December, 
1895, a special report, recommending as the 
most important desideratum in the reorganiza- 
tion of the library, this : that the copyright 
registry should be separated from the manage- 
ment of the library, and a register of copy- 
rights appointed as an executive officer, with 
his assistants, distinct from the library staff. 

A clause for the appointment of this register of 
copyrights was embodied in the appropriation 
bill of May, 1896, but it called for his appoint- 
ment by the joint committee on the library. 
This singular provision, for a committee of 
Congress to appoint an executive officer, was 
the subject of a long discussion in the Senate 
and two days' conference between the Senate 
and the House. The discussion in the Sen- 
ate was very interesting, as throwing light on 
the law governing the library, as were also 
the debates this December in the House.* 

This mode of appointment was finally de- 
clared unconstitutional. But as neither house 
could bring themselves to abdicate the control 
of copyright, which had come under their con- 
trol solely through its being jumbled into the 
duties of the librarian of Congress, and as no 
motion prevailed to put the appointment where 
it properly belongs, in the hands of the Presi- 
dent, the register of copyrights was finally 
dropped altogether. The bill, which contained 
all the appropriations available up to the end 
of Jutie, 1897, was finally passed in about the 
same stereotyped terms as customary for many 

* See Congressional Record, Senate, May ai, 1896 ; also 
same, House, Dec. 17, Dec. 19, Dec. 21, Dec. 22, 1896. 



years, without granting Mr. Spofford's request 
to be relieved of the copyright business, and 
without appropriating a cent for the expenses 
of moving the books into the new building, 
although it was to be ready for occupancy by 
the first of March. 

The question of the means and the manner 
of the necessary changes was, however, given 
over for farther consideration to the joint com- 
mittee on the library, which was empowered, 
for this object, to sit during the recess, and 
give hearings on the subject. It was before 
this committee, shortly before the present ses- 
sion of Congress began, that the American Li- 
brary Association gave its expert testimony 
through Messrs. Brett, Hayes, Dewey, Fletch- 
er, Putnam, Soule, and Baker (see p. 14). This 
testimony is to be printed with the report of the 
committee, and will form interesting reading. 
Unfortunately, the bill which contains the ap- 
propriations for the library had to be brought 
in before the report and testimony of the joint 
committee was ready. The joint committee, 
therefore, was obliged to describe to the appro- 
priations committee the plan which they ex- 
pected to recommend, in order that appropri- 
ations might be made to correspond. 

Their recommendations, in brief, were these : 
That a director, at a salary of $6000, was to be 
appointed in the usual manner for heads of 
departments, namely, by " The President, by 
and with the advice and consent of the Sen- 
ate." That a chief librarian, at $4000, and 
a registrar of copyrights at $3000, were each 
to serve under the director, but were to 
be appointed by the joint committee, as, 
also, each and every subordinate in the li- 
brary staff, copyright staff, or custodian cf 
the building's office were to be. This man- 
ner of appointment was afterwards amend- 
ed by the committee's adding to the clause, 
"by the joint committee on the library," the 
words "on the recommendation of the di- 
rector of the library." That the number of em- 
ployes under the director was to be increase d 
from 42 to 186. 135 of these were for the duties 
under the custodian of the building, the only 
increase to the library staff being nine cata- 
logers. It was represented in the debate that 
Mr. Spofford had asked for no greater increase, 
and had said that with this added force of nine 



8 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



catalogers he could in three years prepare an 
author catalog of the library, including the Law 
Library. The appropriation for the purchase of 
books was to be raised from $4000, which it has 
been for some years, to $8000, with an appro- 
priation for periodical publications of $2500 
instead of $1500, as formerly. Any balance 
remaining of the appropriation for the con- 
struction of the building it being understood 
that there will be a surplus of over $50,000 
was to be made available for expenses of remov- 
al and purchase of furniture. This money was 
to be available for use immediately, the rest of 
the appropriation, being made for the fiscal 
year 1898, of course could not come into use 
until July I, 1897. The joint committee was 
also to be empowered to make all rules and reg- 
ulations for the care of the building and the 
conduct of the library. During the intervals 
between the expiration of one Congress and 
the assembling of the next one it was pro- 
vided that a temporary joint committee should 
be appointed, on the side of the House, by the 
Speaker, to hold over and govern the library 
in the interregnum. 

The joint committee on the library, with its 
changing personnel, was thus constituted the 
permanent board of control of the library, to 
oversee, exactly as do the trustees of public 
and endowed libraries, the management of the 
librarian. This scheme for the management of 
the Library of Congress unfortunately did not 
meet with the approval of the committee on 
appropriations, especially the provision that 
all appointments except that of the director 
should be made by the joint committee. The 
appropriations committee, accordingly, intro- 
duced a bill with different provisions from those 
proposed by the joint committee, and forced 
the latter committee to offer their proposition 
as a substitute, throwing on them the burden 
of proof. 

The main difference in the appropriation 
committee's proposition was that the libra- 
rian, who is to have the $6000 salary, the $4000 
official being termed his chief assistant, is to 
be appointed, as formerly, by the President 
solely. The librarian, instead of a director, 
is to have charge of all branches of the work, 
making all appointments, including those of 
copyright work and the care of the building. 
They also reduce the appropriation for pur- 
chase of books to its old figure, (4000, leaving, 
however, the $2500 for periodical publications. 
An amendment by Mr. Parker to raise the 



$4000 to $25,000, although supported by figures 
giving appropriations in other large libraries, 
was voted down. In every other respect, es- 
pecially as regards the number of employes, 
their bill coincides with that proposed by the 
joint committee, and they say it gives every- 
thing in that line asked for by Mr. Green and Mr. 
Spofford. They make the claim also that their 
bill makes no changes in existing law, leaving 
the present management to continue as it is. 

So far as the House of Representatives is 
concerned, to leave things as they are, rather 
than to create the joint committee a board of 
trustees to make appointments and regulations 
in the library, seemed to find favor, and was 
approved by a majority of 85 to 27, the $6000 
salary, however, being cut down to $5000. 
The grounds on which this vote was given 
were the following: It was argued that to add 
to the appointment of the librarian, which is 
now by the President solely, the necessity of 
confirmation by the Senate, would put it under 
the control of politics, while it was desirable to 
make it a life tenure. But a motion to take all 
the library appointments out of politics by 
placing them under the civil service law was 
met by the remark from Mr. Stone of : " Mr. 
Chairman, I suggest that at this stage of the 
proceedings we ought not to put this House on 
record in favor of a proposition of that kind," 
and it was voted down, 73 to 37. 

Again, it was argued that the joint commit- 
tee was too changing a body to make regula- 
tions and appointments for a service in which 
it was desirable to secure long tenure of ser- 
vice. It was declared also that the head of the 
library was shorn of all control of his subordi- 
nates by being divested of all power of dis- 
missal. Another weighty argument was that 
the appointment of 186 employes was too large 
an amount of patronage to give over to the joint 
committee. 

The proposition of the appropriations com- 
mittee, conservative, leaving things as they are 
save for an increase in appropriation and num- 
ber of employes, having passed the House, 
is now in the hands of the Senate, whereaction 
on it will be followed with much interest by li- 
brarians. 

The debates in the Senate last May and in 
the House this December have brought out 
two facts very plainly. The first is that the 
Congressional Library is a white elephant on 
the hands of Congress. Having, like Topsy, 
"growed," without the moulding of successive 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



legislation, it is now on the basis of the law of 
1800 amended in 1802, which makes it a de- 
partment of Congress. But with an aggregate 
of over 1,000,000 books, pamphlets, musical 
compositions and prints, with accessions of 
from 70,000 to 100,000 yearly, in this magnifi- 
cent building, with a staff of near 200 and the 
necessity of living up to modern requirements 
for an active library, it has become a large 
executive bureau. Congress is therefore either 
in the unconstitutional position of having to 
manage an executive branch of the govern" 
ment, or it must relinquish what, for a century 
past, has been part of its organization. 

The second fact made evident is that by 
making, in 1870, copyright registry a part of 
the duties of the librarian, Congress has com- 
plicated the matter still further by adding an- 
other executive function to what has already 
grown beyond the scope of a legislative body 
to manage, namely, the Congressional Library. 
So that it is unconstitutional for Congress to 
appoint a register of copyrights, although he 
is to perform the very duties which they still 
require their librarian to perform, in spite of 
his many protests. This librarian, though now 
appointed by the President, is so appointed, 
they say, only because of a compromise agree- 
ment between the Senate and the House, be- 
cause at the time of the passage of the law the 
two houses were unable to agree on a candi- 
date. His appointment, they say, can at any 
moment be taken back to be made by the 
j "int action of the two houses. But they do 
admit, apparently, that if they should so ap- 
point a librarian he could not register copy- 
rights. 

Now the resolutions offered in the American 
Library Association meeting at Cleveland 
spoke of the Library of Congress as the Na- 
tional Library. Mr. Spofford, in the special 
report of December, 1895, already quoted, 
calls it the National Library. 

That there are some glimmerings of the 
situation among the members of Congress let 
the following testify: On May 21, 1896, in the 
Senate, Mr. Mills said, among other things: 
"Now, this is no Congressional Library. It 
has the name of Congressional Library, but 
the property belongs to the nation." On Dec. 
19, 1896, Mr. Dockery said in the House: 

"This Congressional Library it is a misno- 
mer to call it the Congressional Library; it is a 
great National Library [loud applause] and be- 
longs to the Government of the United States. 



It belongs to the people of the United States, 
and is an executive bureau, and as such should 
be presided over by some executive officer with 
authority to appoint and remove its employees. 
[Renewed applause.]" 

That it is to be a National Library is surely 
the only ground on which the country has al- 
lowed Congress to spend $7,000,000 on its 
building, as Congress cannot need such accom- 
modations for its own use solely. It is the only 
justifiable ground for requiring authors to con- 
tribute two copies of each work, as it would not 
be equitable to take this property from indi- 
viduals of the nation unless it was to be the 
property of the nation, not solely of the Con- 
gressional body. It is the ground on which 
rests the popular interest in it, which causes 
information about the library in newspapers 
and periodicals to be eagerly scanned and 
sought for. It is the ground on which the 
American Library Association takes deep inter- 
est in its having liberal appropriations and a 
good administration. And a National Library 
it should be. 

As a Congressional Library its usefulness 
has been hampered by, i, insufficient room; 
2, short hours of opening; 3, insufficient ap- 
propriation and assistance; 4, the old-man-of- 
the-sea copyright business; and 5, perhaps not 
least, by appointments made for political in- 
fluence, not by merit only. Number i will 
no longer hinder. Let Congress see to it that 
2, 3, and 4 are equally well provided for. As 
to the last, those who have had experience 
in choosing library assistants by civil service 
or competitive examinations will universally 
bear witness to the excellence of that method 
of testing the applicants and the competence of 
assistants acquired through such tests. 

Let Congress renounce the right, now 96 
years old, which it holds in the Library of Con- 
gress. Let it constitute by statute the library, 
together with the copyrght business, as an 
executive establishment under one executive 
head (copyright and library being two distinct 
branches), with a board of regents, as the 
Smithsonian Institution is organized. Let it 
give it appropriations adequate to its con- 
fessed national scope and importance. Finally, 
let it throw open the appointments to the nation 
at large through civil service examinations. 
The libraries of Italy, Germany, and other 
countries are already so managed. Let Con- 
gress give the nation a library and not only a 
monument of stone. 



10 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



RAILROAD TRAVELLING LIBRARIES.* 



BY SAMUEL H. RANCK, The Enoch Pratt free Library, Baltimore, 



THE system of travelling libraries, under the 
care of the state, was introduced to the Ameri- 
can people in 1892. In that year the legisla- 
ture of New York authorized such libraries, 
and in February, 1893, the first one was sent 
out from Albany. From the day that New 
York began the experiment, interest has been 
growing, and more than half a dozen states 
have already taken up the plan. The purpose 
is that those who dwell in a community far re- 
moved from a library may be able to obtain 
some of the privileges and advantages of those 
who have easy access to a large collection of 
books. In brief, on the application of respon- 
sible parties, and the paymentof transportation, 
a selected numberof volumes (usually 50 or 100) 
are sent from the central library to a commu- 
nity, to circulate among the people for a few 
months. The books so sent form the " travel- 
ling library." This is the New York plan, 
which is developing along the lines followed in 
Australia, where the travelling library has 
been in operation a number of years. 

But long before the state of New York had 
taken up the travelling library some of our 
American railroad companies were circulating 
books to the employes along their lines ; and 
those states that have adopted the system of 
travelling libraries can extend their usefulness 
by enlisting the interest of railroads and rail- 
road men in the work. The railroad, the 
means of travel, should be made the means of 
introducing the travelling library into every 
corner of the state. The experience of the 
Boston and Albany, of the Baltimore and Ohio, 
and of the New York Central railroads, is di- 
rect evidence that the effort would be crowned 
with success. 

The earliest railroad travelling library of 
which I have any knowledge, that of the 
Boston and Albany Railroad Company, was 
opened in Boston, free to all the employes 
of the company, in February, 1869, and was 

*I desire to record my appreciation of the assistance 
received from the three librarians who, by their courtesy, 
made the writing of this sketch possible: Edward L. 
Janes, of the Boston and Albany, W. F. Stevens, of the 
Railroad Branch Y. M. C. A., New York, and A. M. 
Irving, of the Baltimore and Ohio. S. H. R. 



moved to the general office of the company 
at Springfield, Mass., its present location, 
about 1881. The library now numbers in 
the neighborhood of 3000 volumes, all of 
which are for circulation (except some 500 
reference-books). Its circulation is about 3000 
per year. It has received numerous donations 
of money and books, but it is chiefly supported 
by annual appropriations of the company. 
Its government is vested in a committee of five: 
two members of the board of directors, the 
clerk of the Boston and Albany Railroad Com- 
pany, the assistant superintendent, and the 
master mechanic. 

The rules state that "books from stations 
must be in the library Wednesday morning, in 
order that more may be sent the same week. 
Any book received after that time will be 
checked off, but no more sent until the follow- 
ing week." Orders for booki are answered 
every Wednesday, and each borrower may 
draw two books at a time. Books may be re- 
tained two weeks and may be renewed; other- 
wise they are subject to a fine of one cent a 
day. A revised catalog was published in 1889, 
and since then four supplements have been 
issued; from these the borrowers select their 
books. 

The library of the Railroad Branch of the 
Young Men's Christian Association of New 
York City was founded in 1887, by Mr. Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt, who supports it. It contains 
about 7500 volumes, 750 of which are classed 
as railroad books, more or less technical. 
In Baker's Railway Magazine for November, 
Mr. Stevens, the librarian, tells us that, "Dur- 
ing last year 12,337 volumes were drawn by 
1377 readers, 5713 volumes were delivered by 
train service to other railroad branches of the 
association at points along the line of the road, 
and 1131 were delivered to members at stations 
holding special library tickets." The books de- 
livered by train service were sent to 724 read- 
ers along the lines of the New York Central. 

Almost every town in Massachusetts has its 
free public library, and the people who live 
along the lines of the Boston and Albany Rail- 
road have freer and easier access to books and 
libraries than any other people in the world. 



January, "97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



ii 



During the last half century the state of New 
York has spent millions of dollars on books 
for the people. It is, therefore, not unnatural 
that there should be a larger use of the travel- 
ling library of a railroad in a section where, 
until within recent years, the free circulating 
library was almost unknown. Such a library, 
in some of its features both original and 
unique, is found in the Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes' Free Circulating Library. This li- 
brary, after having been moved several times, 
is now at home in a large second-story room, 
in the building at the corner of Pratt and 
Poppleton streets, Baltimore, at the Mt. Clare 
shops. 

In 1884 the late Dr. W. T. Barnard was 
"assistant to president" of the B. & O. corpo- 
ration, and to him the library is largely, if not 
entirely, due. Dr. Barnard was actively inter- 
ested in the B. & O. Relief Association (now 
the Relief Department), and thus acquired a 
knowledge "of the sad lack of educational 
facilities along the main stem and branches 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad." He 
therefore undertook to establish a free circu- 
lating library " exclusively for the use of the 
employes and families of employes of this 
service." His plan was outlined in a circular, 
dated December i, 1884, from which the fol- 
lowing is taken: 

"The establishment of a Free Circulating 
Library for the employes of the company is 
undertaken in the belief that such an institu- 
tion will be welcomed by all classes as a popu- 
lar and desirable measure, and that, through 
its agency and development, much-needed op- 
portunity will be afforded employes to qualify 
themselves for promotion and advancement in 
life, while at the same time their children, 
wherever located, will have at hand facilities 
for study and instructive reading-matter sel- 
dom obtainable outside large cities. This will 
be done without cost to employes and in such 
a manner that the books furnished can be 
utilized not only at reading-rooms (not always 
convenient of access), but also amid the com- 
forts and society of their homes. 

" The plan, in brief, is, by means of contri- 
butions of money and books, to establish a 
compact general and technical library, selected 
with special reference to the wants and tastes 
of employes and their families ; to print inex- 
pensive but carefully prepared catalogs and 
cards on which to make requisitions for books, 
and to so distribute them that every member 
can receive and return literature, without de- 
lay, through the company's train service. . . . 

" This library is therefore to be exclusively 
for the use of all employes, their wives, and 
more particularly, their children. Its mission 
will be to exert an elevating and educating in- 



fluence on those it reaches. It will supply cur- 
rent periodicals, standard works on the sciences, 
general literature, poetry, historical, text, and 
other books of practical utility to engineers, 
mechanics, firemen, and other railroad em- 
ployes, and those especially adapted to educat- 
ing and forming the character of the young. 
Whatever is immoral in tendency will be rigid- 
ly excluded from its shelves, and its manage- 
ment will do all it can to discourage the use of 
literature from which unhealthy and unreal 
ideas of life might be drawn. 

" It has been created and will be sustained by 
voluntary contributions of money and litera- 
ture from the officers and employes of the Bal- 
timore and Ohio Company and outside friends 
interested in their welfare. 

"Its headquarters will be at Baltimore; but 
it will undertake to distribute books, etc., to 
any point on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
lines." 

The plan, as outlined by Dr. Barnard, re- 
ceived the official sanction of the company 
March 2, 1885, through an order of the presi- 
dent, the late Robert Garrett. The order pro- 
vided for the management of the library by a 
library committee, said committee to be com- 
posed of two directors of the Technological 
School, two members of the committee of 
management of the Relief Association, and 
a representative of the B. & O. Company, 
appointed by the president. The principal in- 
structor of the Technological School and the 
secretary of the Relief Association were to be 
members of the library committee ex-officio. 
The Technological School was abandoned some 
years ago, and since then its representation on 
the committee has been dropped. When the 
Relief Association was changed to the Relief 
Department the corresponding officials of the 
latter became members of the library com- 
mittee. The library year begins December i, 
and the members of the committee are appoint- 
ed annually. The president of the company 
appoints the librarian. 

The library committee, as provided for in the 
president's order, organized and began work at 
once. They appealed for aid to those only who 
were financially interested in the company. 
They collected $5391 and received about 1500 
well-selected books as donations. The nucleus 
of the collection was a donation of 600 vol- 
umes to the employees at Mt. Clare by the late 
John W. Garrett, in September, 1869. 

December 3, 1885, the library began its work 
with 4500 volumes on its shelves, 3000 of which 
had been purchased. The first year 16,120 vol- 
umes were circulated, 4850 at Mt. Clare, and 
the remainder at different stations on the lines 



12 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



of the B. & O. The circulation for the second 
year was 23,514; for the third year, 23,470, a 
slight decrease. The fourth year showed an 
increase of more than 2000 over the previous 
year; and since then there has been a steady 
growth in the circulation. The circulation for 
1895 was 37,702, and in 1896, 2500 borrowers 
drew 39,505 volumes from the library. Since 
1885 more than 300,000 volumes have been 
drawn. 

These books travel as far westward as the 
Mississippi River, through eight great states, 
and over a railway system approximating 3000 
miles. They are delivered to borrowers 
through local agents, and the average time, 
from the placing of an order for a book in 
the hands of an agent until the book called 
for is in his hands, is now less than 24 hours 
for the entire system. The library uses 674 
agencies, each agency serving as a deliv- 
ery-station for the employes of the commu- 
nity or department. 

Along with the increase in the number of 
books used there has been a decrease in the 
percentage of fiction. The first year 64 per 
cent, of the circulation was fiction; the percent- 
age of fiction is now less than 53 per cent. 

A book may be retained two weeks, and may 
be once renewed for a like period, or oftener, 
if no application for it is on file. There is a 
fine of one cent per day on books kept over 
time, but a margin of three days is allowed to 
cover the time consumed in transit. 

On leaving the service of the company all 
books must be returned before pay-vouchers 
are cashed; otherwise the value of the book 
will be deducted from the wages of the em- 
ploye. 

The whole system of sending out and return- 
ing a book is similar to that of the registry de- 
partment of the post-office. Every person who 
handles a package receipts for it, so that it is 
possible to trace anything that may be lost. 
The company is responsible for all books in 
transit, and it exacts the same care in the 
handling of library property that is required 
for all other property. 

The system of ordering and charging books 
for circulation is very simple. The borrower 
fills out a requisition blank, that is, by writing 
the name and call numbers of the books he 
wants, which he selects from printed catalogs, 
and by signing his name and address and the 
department in which he is employed. The 
requisition is then countersigned by the agent 



through whom he wishes to get the book, and 
it is sent to the librarian at Mt. Clare, Balti- 
more. The librarian takes the first book on the 
list (using his discretion, however, in case of 
fiction, to select for the reader), and then 
makes out a record-card for the transaction. 
On this card is entered the date, the requisi- 
tion, book, agency and package number, and 
the name of the borrower. The card is filed 
in the order of the book number. Another en- 
try is made on a card under the agency num- 
ber. This entry shows how many and what 
books are at any agency at any time. When a 
book is returned its number is marked off on 
the agency card, and the charge on the card 
filed under the book number is cancelled. A 
new series of requisition numbers begins every 
year on the first of December, and the requisi- 
tion number is always the total circulation of 
the fiscal year to date. 

After all entries have been duly made and 
the requisitions have been stamped and dated, 
the books are wrapped in packages. These 
packages are then stamped and labelled for 
delivery through the baggage department to 
the agents along the lines. Several agencies 
take such a number of books that satchels are 
used in carrying them back and forth. 

To prolong the life and usefulness of the 
books, and at the lowest possible cost, the li- 
brarian uses for binding and repair the leather 
from worn car-seats, which he gets from the 
passenger-car repair-shops. The leather is 
practically useless when it is removed from the 
seats, but the pieces he is able to get makes a 
binding that is both neat and, durable. 

Mr. Irving, the enthusiastic librarian, and 
his assistants are busy getting books ready 
" to catch trains," and when the trains for the 
day have been "caught," he will be able to 
talk to you about his work, but not before. 
Once a year he goes over the lines, visiting all 
the agents in the interest of the library. This 
is done during the summer, when, for about 
four weeks, the library is closed. 

The library now contains about 14,000 vol- 
umes. There have been few additions since 
the B. & O. Company has been in financial 
straits. Gifts of suitable books will be gladly 
received. 

Corporations, like individuals, are recog- 
nizing that their duty to those they employ is 
not complete on the payment of the stipulated 
wage. Hence it is that relief departments, 
Young Men's Christian Associations, and other 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



helpful organizations are established or en- 
couraged by so many of our railroads. These 
organizations raise men to a higher physical, 
intellectual, and moral plane of life the very 
fundamentals of faithful service. In other 
words, it pays to have some regard for the men 
outside of working hours. 

The force of good books in our daily lives is 
being felt and recognized more and more every 
day. To the section hand and his family, liv- 



ing in rock-bound isolation, to the operator in 
the signal-tower, waiting for the click of his 
instrument to call him to duty, to railroad 
workingmen everywhere along the company's 
lines, the books from Baltimore are bringing 
sunshine ; and in the economy of the universe 
I fancy that it is no less important to cause 
such sunshine than it is to cause two green 
blades to grow where now there grows but 
one. 



. A WORD ON CATALOGING. 

BY KATE EMERY SANBORN, Librarian Manchester (IV. H.) City Library. 



WHILE reading Mr. Fletcher's article on 
" Corporate authorship " in the November 
number of the LIBRARY JOURNAL, I discovered 
an additional advantage in a method of cata- 
loging certain books which had already proved 
to have many advantages over an older cus- 
tom. I refer to the practice of entering books 
on an art or science relating to a particular 
place, under ffhe art or science rather than 
under the place. This was recommended by 
the committee on an index to subject headings 
in its report to the Chicago conference. I do 
not know to what extent it has been adopted by 
other libraries, but I am following it in the 
making of a new dictionary catalog, and with 
success and profit. Mr. Fletcher speaks of the 
mass of entries which accumulate under a 
country or state which is considered as the au- 
thor of its reports, etc., and the inconvenience 
of the entry being an author entry instead of 
a subject entry, and he cites as an example the 
Massachusetts Board of Education reports as 
entered in the Boston Athenaeum catalog. It 
is not my purpose to consider the matter of 
corporate authorship, but to point out that this 
inconvenience may be lessened by the subject 
entry being made under the subject, with coun- 
try divisions when necessary. Thus, under 
Massachusetts, Board of Education, would be 
entered all its reports, since the Board is held to 
be the author of its reports, but they would also 
be entered under Education, with a subdivision 
for Massachusetts. The same rule is followed 
with agricultural and geological reports, etc. 
This method has all the advantages of double 
entry, the reports appearing both under the 
subject, as subject, and under the place, as au- 
thor. While it does not reduce the number of 



entries under the state as author, the subject en- 
tries are fewer since these are made under the 
various subjects instead of under the state. 

And this was the object of the committee's 
recommendation mentioned above to reduce 
the number of subheads occurring under coun- 
tries. But its chief raison d'etre to my mind is 
in its usefulness to the consulters of the catalog. 

It is both interesting and profitable to study 
the attitude of mind with which the average 
user of a library approaches the catalog, espe- 
cially if he be unbiassed by any previous expe- 
rience with either dictionary or classed cata- 
logs. 

Believing that, theoretically, this manner of 
entry was preferable to the opposite method, I 
have taken pains to notice how our readers 
look for such books on the catalog, in order to 
ascertain how it works practically. I find that 
people look, without exception, under the sub- 
ject for any book on that subject relating to a 
particular place. 

Members of the Historic Art Club look in- 
variably under Arts, fine, for a history of art 
in any country, and it apparently does not oc- 
cur to their minds to look under the country 
first. 

Thus, in my experience, theory and practice 
agree, and so far as the catalog is now extend- 
ed, I am much pleased with the result attained. 

As to the subheads which do occur under 
countries, states, and cities, I follow the list 
given in the committee's report, and published 
in the conference number of the LIBRARY 
JOURNAL for 1893. It seems so satisfactory in 
every way that I can advise all who are begin- 
ning a dictionary catalog to "go and do like- 
wise." 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



THE CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY COM- 
MITTEE AND THE AMERICAN 
LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

To librarians the specially interesting feature 
of the work done by the joint committee on the 
Congressional Library in its recent sessions 
was the hearing given to members of the 
American Library Association by that com- 
mittee on Dec. I and 2. An executive session 
had preceded (as in fact one followed) this 
hearing, at which the testimony of Mr. Spof- 
ford was taken in detail in regard to the 
arrangement of the books, the methods of cata- 
loging and the catalogs now available, and the 
present condition of the library as regards its 
practical use. 

At the hearing on Tuesday and Wednesday, 
Dec. i and a, there were sitting of the com- 
mittee Senator Wetmore (temporary chairman), 
a'nd Represenatives Quigg, Gumming, and 
Harmer. The following members of the A. L. 
A. were called upon to testify: W: H. Brett, 
president; R. P. Hayes, secretary ; Melvil 
Dewey, of the N. Y. State Library; Herbert 
Putnam, of the Boston Public Library; C: C. 
Soule, trustee of the Brookline Public Library; 
W: I. Fletcher, of Amherst College Library, 
and G: H. Baker, of Columbia University Li- 
brary. 

Certain of those named had been invited 
directly by the committee; others appeared in 
response to the suggestions of the president of 
the A. L. A., but as a whole they appeared in 
response to the request of the joint committee, 
which took the initiative, and not because a 
hearing had been requested by the A. L. A., or 
by them individually. 

The matter of the hearing concerned (i) The 
proper scope of the national library, both as to 
the material it should gather and the service 
it should render; and (2) the reorganization 
of the library upon its removal to the new 
building. The examination was conducted by 
Mr. Quigg in the form of direct questions, and 
the testimony, which was taken down, will 
presumably form part of the voluminous report 
of the proceedings of the joint committee, 
which will later be printed. 

Mr. Dewey was one of the first to be ex- 
amined when the hearing opened on the morn- 
ing of Tuesday, Dec. i. He said that the 
library should be made the national head of 
the libraries of the United States, and that 
its equipment should be proportionate to its 
importance. It should possess comprehensive 
and up-to-date catalogs and indexes of its con- 
tents on the fully classified, or dictionary 
plan it should be the centre of library activity 
in the country and " a great national university 
in itself." It should be systematically and 
thoroughly classified, and each division should 
be in charge of a specialist in that line of 
research. The librarian should have executive 
control of the library, but his force should be 
largely increased, and his work should be di- 
rective oversight, not details of routine. Mr. 
Dewey explained at length the work done by 
the New York State Library, especially in its 



correspondence department and travelling li- 
brary system, and recommended that the former 
be made a prominent feature in the work of 
the national library. He did not think that 
the increase of 32 attendants provided for in 
Mr. Spofford's estimate could do all the work 
that would be imposed upon them in the new 
library. He described in detail modern meth- 
ods of classifying and cataloging, and thought 
that not less than 20 persons would be required 
to start work in that department alone. 

Mr. Soule said that the library should be a 
reference library for every citizen in the coun- 
try, and should be the national centre of educa- 
tional interests. He thought that 20 catalogeis 
would be the minimum number required, and 
he would take the salary list of the British 
Museum as the best criterion of an adequate 
force of employes for the Congressional Li- 
brary. Mr. Dewey was later recalled and 
asked what force he thought necessary to 
properly conduct the library. He replied that 
it depended greatly upon the administration of 
the library, but that there should be not less 
than 100 employes to begin with, of which 
number 60 should be catalogers and librarians. 

The civil service system came up for discus- 
sion, when Mr. Dewey said that in the selec- 
tion of employes civil service rules should 
apply. Mr. Quigg said it was the historic 
policy of Congress to employ its own servants 
and not to get them from the civil service, and 
the committee may not deem it best to inaugu- 
rate a new policy. He therefore asked what 
would be thought of establishing a board of 
examiners, consisting of prominent librarians, 
operating under direction of Mr. Spofford and 
the joint committee, to choose the employes for 
the new library. This, Mr. Dewey thought, 
would be a satisfactory method, and he be- 
lieved the librarians of the country would be 
glad to serve in such a capacity. The question 
of removing the library from direct congres- 
sional control, and providing for its govern- 
ment as an executive department under a 
board of trustees or regents, was then dis- 
cussed. 

Mr. Herbert Putnam was then examined, and 
in response to questions described the scope, 
organization, and methods of administration of 
the Boston Public Library, with especial refer- 
ence to the appointment of employes. He 
doubted the practicability of throwing upon 
the administration of the national library any 
features aside from the natural functions of a 
national library. He did not believe that eight 
catalogers, as proposed, could do the work of 
the library, and thought that at least 30 would 
be required to begin with. 

The session was resumed at 8 o'clock Tues- 
day evening, when Mr. Putnam described the 
method of removal of the Boston Public Library 
to its new building, and also explained the 
system of cataloging in use at the library. 
Revertine to the matter of the selection of em- 
ployes, Mr. Quigg asked Mr. Putnam if he 
would be willing to submit to choosing from 
a list of two or three persons certified by a 
board of examiners over which he had no 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



control. The reply was in the affirmative, if 
such choice were the alternative of a greater 
embarrassment. The suggestion that appoint- 
ments should be made by the joint commit- 
tee, on recommendation of the librarian, was 
considered a good one if the librarian were 
freed from all political pressure. 

Mr. G: H. Baker, of Columbia University 
Library, was then questioned as to the methods 
followed at Columbia. In regard to the na- 
tional library, he thought it should be con- 
trolled by a board of trustees rather than by a 
committee of Congress, the tenure of office of 
the former being more permanent. The trus- 
tees would be men familiar with libraries, 
whereas if any members of the congressional 
committee possessed such familiarity it would 
be by a happy chance. He favored a period- 
ical inspection of the library by a committee of 
librarians, who would report upon the tech- 
nical points of administration. An inspection 
by men of scholarly attainments would also be 
desirable, to ascertain if the library was form- 
ing a well-rounded collection. 

Mr. Quigg suggested that the American Li- 
brary Association might take charge of the 
proposed inspection through a committee ap- 
pointed by the association. 

The hearing was adjourned at n o'clock. 

On Wednesday morning at 10:30 the session 
was resumed, and Mr. Putnam was recalled to 
give suggestions about the removal of the 
library to the new building. When asked 
what steps should be immediately taken when 
the Congressional Library is moved into the 
new building, Mr. Putnam outlined the work 
as follows : Installation of the books, the 
preparation of a comprehensive plan of classi 
fication, organization of the force, preparation 
of the shelf-list, verification of the author 
card catalog, preparation of a printed catalog. 
He emphasized the advisability of getting out 
a comprehensive printed catalog. Upon the 
question of the selection of employes for the 
Congressional Library, Mr. Putnam thought 
that unless the librarian could be relieved from 
the embarrassment of recommendations for 
appointment by the controlling committee, 
trustees, or regents, as the case may be, it 
would be better to have them chosen through 
some kind of civil service system. The mere 
personal weight of a recommendation by the 
library committee or congressional recom- 
mendation of other kind, while it might be of 
the most upright character and removed from 
the slightest suspicion of coercion, would be 
most embarrassing to the librarian. 

W: I. Fletcher, of Amherst College Library, 
was then examined, and expressed views differ- 
ing somewhat from those of his colleagues. 
He said that a limited staff could install the 
library in its new quarters, and that beyond 
that little could be attempted at first. He 
discouraged the idea of attempting to change 
or develop the general scope of the Congres- 
sional Library at this time or to make plans 
for such changes. He thought the Washington 
Public Library should become the place for 
the general public of the city who were not 



engaged in study or research to resort for 
general reading. He opposed the removal of 
the departmental libraries to the Congressional 
Library, but thought there should be co-opera- 
tion between them so as to avoid duplication 
of books. The bibliographical feature of the 
Congressional Library should receive consid- 
eration, but he did not agree with the idea 
advanced by Mr. Dewey that the catalog of 
the library should be made a dictionary cata- 
log. Neither did he advocate the application 
of the civil service system to the selection of 
employes. That system should apply to posi- 
tions regarded as public property. It is not ideal, 
he thought, but is really the choice of two evils, 
the alternative of the spoils system. He would 
hesitate, also, to recommend the selection of 
employes through a board of outside libra- 
rians acting as examiners. He thought that 
when the new era for the Congressional Li- 
brary sets in, the era of development beyond 
the present lines, a superior officer to the 
librarian should be appointed, a director of the 
library, at a salary of not less than f 10,000 a 
year, to perform the executive duties attendant 
upon the growth of the library. 

Rutherford P. Hayes was examined at the 
afternoon session. He thought the entire busi- 
ness part of the library should be put into the 
hands of an executive officer, and the librarian 
should have dealings only with the literary 
part of the work. He would relieve the libra- 
rian of the duty of making appointments, and 
choose the employes through the civil service 
system; and he would like to see the new laws 
governing the library vest discretionary power 
in the administration of the library to make 
such rules and regulations for the conduct of 
the library as they should deem best. He 
thought that the governing power should be a 
little more permanent than is now provided by 
the joint committee, which should at least 
have a term of six years. 

W. A. Croffut, of Washington, then ad- 
dressed the committee in behalf of making the 
library a circulating library, as in earlier days, 
by the payment of a deposit fee of $5. He 
was succeeded by W. T. Harris, commissioner 
of education, who approved of the selection of 
employes by civil service methods, opposed the 
removal of the departmental collections of 
books to the Congressional Library, and em- 
phasized his opinion that the library should be 
a reference library alone, and should not con- 
tain any features of a circulating library. 

Mr. Brett's views were, briefly, that the 
library should be a national institution, and 
not an appendage of Congress; that in catalog- 
ing there should be a shelf list, an accession 
catalog, and as soon as possible a dictionary 
catalog; and that employes should be chosen 
hy means of a competitive examination, held 
by the library authorities, and careful selection 
from the list of successful applicants, but that 
choice should not necessarily be limited to tie 
person who passed highest, but should take 
into consideration other qualifications. 

At the close of the hearing the committee 
were notified of the authority given to the 



i6 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



president of the A. L. A. at the Cleveland Con- 
ference to appoint a special committee of the 
A. L. A. to answer any inquiries addressed by 
the Congressional Committee to the A. L. A. 
with reference to the organization of the Con- 
gressional Library in its new building; and 
President Brett stated his readiness to appoint 
such a committee upon receiving an intimation 
that such inquiries might be forthcoming. 

A direct result of this A. L. A. hearing is 
the movement toward a re-incorporation of the 
American Library Association, with the provi- 
sion that it shall from time to time act as a 
visiting board of the Congressional Library, 
thus carrying out Mr. Quigg's suggestion to 
that effect. Full details of the proposed re- 
incorporation are given elsewhere in this is- 
sue. 

This report will show how much careful 
thought, time, and energy have been given by 
the joint committee to the future of the Con- 
gressional Library. All the various hearings 
conducted by the committee, at which the testi- 
mony of Mr. Green, Mr. Spofford, and others 
were taken on the subject, were equally de- 
tailed and comprehensive, and the final report 
of their proceedings, when printed, will un- 
doubtedly prove to be one of the most interest- 
ing of library documents. 



SERIAL, TECHNICAL, AND SCIENTIFIC 
PUBLICATIONS OF THE GOV- 
ERNMENT.* 

THE following list of the serial, technical, and 
scientific publications of the government, a 
large part of which are not issued as Congres- 
sional documents, has been compiled by Mr. J. 
H. Hickcox. of Washington. It should be 
useful to librarians as giving clue to publica- 
tions not contained in their sets of public docu- 
ments, and furnishing a brief comprehensive 
record of these important issues of the govern- 
ment, which are not now printed in as large 
quantities as formerly and are rapidly ex- 
hausted. 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

Agrostology Division. Bulletins nos. i to 3. 

Animal Industry Division. Bulletins nos. i 

to 16. 

Botany Division. Bulletins nos. i to 7. 

Contributions to N. Amer. Herbarium, 
vols. i to 4. 

Chemistry Division. Bulletins nos, i to 47. 

Entomology Division. Bulletins nos. i to 33. 

Bulletins, new series nos. i to 6. 
Technical series nos. i to 4. 
Insect Life. Vols. i to 7. 
U. S. Etomological Commission Re- 
ports i to 5. Bulletins nos. I to 6. 

Experiment stations. Bulletins nos. i to 32. 

Miscellaneous bulletins, nos. I to 3. 
Record, vols. i to 7. 

Fiber Investigation. Reports i to 8. 

Annual Reports of the six Executive Departments 
excluded. 



Foreign Markets Section. Bulletins nos. I 

to 7. 

Forestry Division. Bulletins nos. i to 13. 

Microscopy Division. Food products (mush- 

rooms). Nos. i to 3. 

Ornithology Division. Bulletins nos. i to 5. 

N. American fauna, nos. i to 12. 

Pomology Division. Bulletins nos. I to 4. 

Road Inquiry. Bulletins nos. i to 20. 

Soils Division. Bulletins nos. i to 5. 

Vegetable Pathology Division. Bulletins 
nos. i to n. 
Journal of Mycology, vols. 5, 6, 7. 

Weather Bureau. Bulletins nos. I to 15. 

Bulletins A C, 4. 

i 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Statistical abstract, 1878 to 1895, nos. i to 18. 

Monthly statement of finance, commerce, 

etc. 4. 

Annual reports on the state of finances, 1790 

to date. 

Annual reports on commerce and naviga- 

tion, 1821 to date. 

Mint reports on the production of gold and 

silver, 1880 to 1894. 

Coast Survey bulletins, nos. I to 34. 

STATE DEPARTMENT. 

Bulletins nos. i to 8 (historical), 1. 8. 

Bulletins of American republics, nos. i to 69. 

Consular reports, nos. i to 193. 

Special consular reports, vols. I to 13. 

Statutes-at-large of U. S., 1789 to 1895. 28 

vols. 

NAVY DEPARMMENT. 

Navy registers, 1815 to 1896. 

Naval Observatory observations, 1845 to 

1890. 4. 

nautical almanac, 1855 to 1898. 

astronomical papers, vols. i to 7. 4. 

General information series (naval intelli- 

gence), nos. i to 15. 

WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Army registers, 1813 to 1896. 

"Roll of honor," names of deceased sol- 

diers, 8 vols. 

Military information division (publications), 

nos. i to ii. 

Records of the war, 106 vols. and 35 atlases. 

Tests of metals and building materials, 1884 

to 1894. 

King's geological survey, 7 vols. 4. 

Wheeler's geographical survey, 7 vols. in 

8. 4. 

Medical and surgical history of the war, 6 

vols. 4. 

Surgeon-General's catalog, 17 vols. 

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT. 

Patent Office reports, 1790 to 1871, 61 vols. 

Patent Office Gazette, 1872 to 1895, 75 vols., 

and indexes. 

Patent Office specifications and drawings, 

1875 to 1895. Monthly volumes (250 copies 
issued), 240 vols. 1. 8. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



INTERS x. DEPARTMENT. Continued. 

Patent Commissioner's decisions, 1869 to 

1894, 21 vols. 

Pension decisions, vols I to 7. 

Land Office decisions, vols. i to 22. 

Land Office reports (annual), 1860 to 1895. 

Land laws and " Public domain," 4 vols. 

Education Bureau, annual reports, 1868 (ist) 

to 1894. 

circulars of information, i867-'6S, nos. i 

to 13. Same, 1870 -'72, n issues, not 
numbered; 1873, nos. i to 5; 1874, nos. 
i to 3; 1875, nos. i to 8; 1876 (none 
issued); 1877, nos. i, 2; 1878, nos. i, 
2; 1879, nos - r to 5; 1880, nos. i to 7; 
1881, nos. i to 6; 1882, nos. i to 6; 
1883, nos. i to 4; 1884, nos. i to 7; 1885, 
nos. i to 5; 1886, nos. i, 2; 1887, nos. i 
to 3; 1888, nos. i to 7; 1889, nos. i to 3; 
1890, nos. i to 3; 1891, nos. i to 9; 1892, 
nos. 1,2; 1893, nos. i to 8; 1894, nos. 
i, 2. 

Hayden's Survey of .Territories. Annual re- 

ports, 1867 -'78 (nos. i -12). 
Bulletins, vols. i to 6. 
[Monographs], vols. i to 13. 4. 
Miscellaneous publications, nos. i to 12. 

Census of U. S., 1790, i vol ; 1800, i vol.; 

1810, i vol. ; 1820, 2 vols. ; 1830, I vol. ; 1840, 
4 vols. ; 1850, 4 vols. , 1860, 5 vols.; 1870,4 
vols.; 1880, 22 vols. 

Geological Survey. Annual reports (Powell, 

etc.), 1879 to 1895. 

Monographs, vols. i to 25. 4. 

Bulletins, nos. i to 135. 

Mineral resources, 1883 to 1884. Same 
(old series), 1867 -'76 (Browne. Taylor 
& Co.). None published from 1877- 
'82. 

CONGRESS. 

American state papers, 1789-1837, 38 vols. 

folio. 

Annals of Congress, 1789- 1824, 42 vols. 

Register of debates, 1824-1837, 29 vols. 

Congressional Globe, 1833-1873. 

Congressional Record, 1873-1896. 

Congressional directory, 1809-1896. 

Congressional documents (sheep bound), 

1817-1889, 2600 vols. 

Congressional contested election cases, 1789 

- 1893, 9 vols. 
Civil Service Commission reports (ist) 1884 to 

1895. 

Court of Claims reports, vols. i to 31. 
Opinions of Attorney-General, vols. i to 21. 
Federal and state constitutions (Poore), 2 vols. 
Trial of Guiteau, 3 vols. 
International Medical Congress transactions, 

1887, 5 vols. 
National Academy of Sciences memoirs, vols. 

i to 7. 4. 

Silver. Report of Paris monetary conference, 
1867. 

Report of silver commission, 1876. 

Report of Paris monetary conference, 1881. 

Report of Brussels monetary conference, 

1892. 
Report of Berlin monetary conference, 1894. 



Interstate Commerce Commission. Annual re- 
ports, 1887- '94. 

Statistics of railways, 1888 (ist) to 1894. 
Labor Dept. Annual reports, ist to loth. 
Special reports, ist to 8th. 

Fish Commission. Annual reports, ist to igth. 

Bulletins, vols. i to 15. 

Smithsonian Institution. Annual report, 1846 
-'94. 

Contributions to knowledge, vols. i to 29. 4. 

Miscellaneous collections, vols. i to 38. 
National Museum bulletins, nos. i to 48. 

Special bulletins, nos. i to 3. 4. 

Proceedings, vols. i to 17. 

Ethnology Bureau. Annual reports, 1879 (ist) 
to 1893. 

Contributions to N. Amer. ethnology, vols. 

i to 9. 4. 
American Historical Association reports, 1890 



Schoolcraft's Indian tribes, 6 vols. 4. 
Wilkes' U. S. exploring expedition (original 

gov't ed. of the narrative), 5 vols. and 

atlas. 4. 

SCOVILLE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, CARLE- 
TON COLLEGE. 

THE Scoville Memorial Library of Carleton 
College, Northfield, Minn., is the gift of the 
son and widow of the late James W. Scoville, 
of Oak Park, 111., who had before his death 
expressed his purpose of erecting the building. 
The cost of the building was $25,000, but by 
careful planning and generous concessions on 
the part of some of the contractors, the build- 
ing represents considerably more value than 
that sum would ordinarily indicate. Patton & 
Fisher, of Chicago, were the architects. 

The building is 68 feet wide and 82 feet deep. 
The exterior is of pink Kasota limestone of re- 
markably even color, with roof of dark Vermont 
slate. The interior woodwork is of polished 
oak. The structure gives the effect of a one-story 
building with attic, but the front portion has 
two floors and the stack-building has three, in- 
cluding the basement, which is entirely above 
ground. The feature of the first floor is the 
large reading-room, with an elliptical arch 
opening into the book-room; the latter is light- 
ed from three sides as well as from above, and 
has an iron and glass floor on a line with the 
reading-room floor. This, with the basement 
floor, gives two levels for books. A third level 
of iron and glass above the main floor will be 
added in the future. The front portion of the 
building contains in the second story a periodi- 
cal reading-room and two seminary-rooms, and 
in the basement the unpacking-room, heating, 
and toilet-room. This portion of the building 
is of ordinary construction and is finished in 
oak, but the book-room, having iron floors 
and cases, has an automatic fireproof door to 
close the arched opening at the delivery-coun- 
ter. 

The main reading-room, really one room, 
ives the effect of two rooms, with central pas- 
sage way to the delivery-counter, by the device 
of massive oak columns with heavily carved 



i8 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



capitals, supporting a heavy cornice. A fire- 
place with window seats at either side, and 
panels beneath and beside the windows at both 
ends of the room, are attractive features. Just 
back of the counter and within the rear build- 
ing are the librarian's office and the cataloging- 
room. The estimated capacity of the stack- 
building is 90,000 volumes. The upper floor 
will not be put in, however, till the library 
grows to need it. The number of volumes is 
at present about 12,500. The building is heat- 
ed by hot water and hot air, and lighted by 
electricity. 

At the laying of the corner-stone, June 10, 
1896, an address was given by Dr. J. K. Hosmer, 
of the Minneapolis Public Library, and when the 
building was turned over to the librarian on 
Nov. 6 a formal reception was tendered to the 
citizens of Northfield by the college faculty, at 
which a brief address was given by the Rev. 
Dr. D. N. Beach, of the same city. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY MOVEMENT IN 
BROOKLYN. 

THE work done during the past year by the 
Brooklyn Public Library Association to awaken 
public interest in the need of a free library, 
supported by taxation, in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
culminated on Jan. 14, when a largely-attended 
meeting was held in the Academy of Music, 
and addresses on the need of a public library 
in the city were made by Andrew Carnegie and 
other prominent men. It had been arranged 
to hold this meeting in connection with the 
joint meeting of the New York State Library 
Association and the New York Library Club, 
which this year was held in Brooklyn at the 
initiative of the local association, thus insuring 
a large attendance of librarians and library 
workers as well as of interested citizens. At 
its close the meeting took in the form of a re- 
ception to Mr. Carnegie and to the directors of 
the projected public library, whose appoint- 
ment by the mayor, under the act of 1892, 
was announced early in the evening. The 
meeting opened at eight o'clock, the platform 
being well filled by members of the local asso- 
ciation, prominent municipal officials, and a 
large representation of the visiting librarians. 

R. Ross Appleton, city tax collector, and a 
member of the Brooklyn Public Library Asso- 
ciation, acted as temporary chairman, and 
called the meeting to order a little after eight 
o'clock. He then read a letter from Mayor 
Wurster, regretting that illness prevented his 
attendance, and expressing approval of this 
" practical beginning of the work of providing 
a public library" for Brooklyn. The mayor in 
his letter then announced the appointment of 
the directors of the proposed library, as fol- 
lows : "The first step in this movement was 
made by the enactment of a law in 1892, en- 
titled ' an act to authorize the city of Brooklyn 
to establish and maintain a public library and 
reading-room in said city and to provide for 
the payment therefor and for the maintenance 
thereof.' Under the terms of this law an in- 
stitution is provided for called ' The Public Li- 



brary.' One of the sections of the act reads as 
follows : ' Whenever the common council, by 
resolution, shall have determined to establish 
and maintain a public library and reading-rocm 
under this act, the mayor of said city shall ap- 
point nine directors for the same, and in addi- 
tion to said number the mayor of said city, the 
president of said board of aldermen, the presi- 
dent of the board of education and the director 
of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences 
shall, by virtue of their respective offices, be 
directors of the said public library and reading- 
room.' Under the authority thus conferred, I 
hereby appoint the following nine directors : 
Hon. Charles A. Schieren, Hon. David A. 
Boody, Charles M. Pratt, Daniel W. McWill- 
iams, Willis L. Ogden, R. Ross Appleton, 
Herbert F. Gunnison, John D. Kelley, and 
Charles N. Chadwick, to constitute, with the 
cx-officio directors, the first board in charge 
of such public library and reading-room. The 
movement which has led up to this has been 
largely fostered and encouraged by the women 
who have been identified with the Public Li- 
brary Association, and I deem it desirable that 
they should be represented upon this first 
board of directors ; but, upon consultation with 
those most active in the matter, I have come 
to the conclusion that it would be more desira- 
ble to enlarge the board to the number of, say 
21, a^d thus permit a fuller representation of 
the entire community than is possible in so 
small a board. With the ex-officio members, 
including the Hon. J. Edward Swanstrom, 
Hon. David S. Stewart, Professor Franklin W. 
Hooper, and the mayor, the full board would 
then consist of 25, and I favor the passage by 
the legislature of an act allowing this increase 
to be made." 

Af'er reading the mayor's letter Mr. Apple- 
ton introduced as permanent chairman of the 
meeting ex-Mayor Boody, who delivered an 
address on the need of a public library in the 
city, and briefly discussed the legislation 
toward that end. He said in part: "In 1892 a 
bill was passed by the legislature permitting us 
to inaugurate this work when the common 
council by its resolution shall have determined 
that a public library and reading-room should 
be established and maintained. That bill au- 
thorized the mayor to name a board of nine 
directors, to which should be added the mayor, 
the president of the common council, the di- 
rector of the Brooklyn Institute, and the presi- 
dent of the board of education. That bill also 
authorized the city to issue bonds to the amount 
of $600,000 for the promotion of this work. 

" The common council has passed the neces- 
sary resolution, the mayor has performed his 
duty in naming the board of directors. When 
I have added to this brief statement a reference 
to the existence of the Brooklyn Library Asso- 
ciation, organized for the purpose of promot- 
ing work of this kind and organized largely by 
a woman, Mrs. Mary E. Craigie, I have given 
a brief history of the work of the Brookly li- 
brary up to the present moment. It is now in 
the hands of our citizens. The city govern- 
ment will undoubtedly follow their wishes. I 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



have heard it said that we are too poor as a 
city to bear the expense of erecting a free li- 
brary. If municipal poverty should in reality 
be urged, then I should feel like replying if 
poverty stands in the way of our prosperity 
then we are too poor not to have a free library. 
We spend in this city annually for our public 
schools about $3,000,000. I believe it would 
be the best kind of economy to spend more 
and the result would be found in smaller bud- 
gets for reformatory purposes and in enhanced 
value to real property. But the great majority 
of our youths are taken from our public 
schools at an early age, when their tastes are 
being formed and their characters fashioned, 
at the very age when they need the supplement 
to the school, a free library. If it is expedient 
to spend so much money for our children un- 
til they reach the age of 12 and 14 and 16, is it 
not wise to do something when those ages are 
passed and when they are still passing through 
the formative years ? Wealth has grave re- 
sponsibilities which relate not only to its own 
preservation but to the welfare of those upon 
whose usefulness and intelligence and virtue 
it depends. Government has great responsi- 
bilities and duties which relate not only to jus- 
tice and usefulness, but to its ultimate exist- 
ence ; and among these duties there is none 
more important than that which shall see that 
the minds of the people shall not starve for 
food. Education in its various forms provided 
by the government aided by individual wealth 
will do more than anything else to insure sta- 
bility of government, respect for property and 
the happiness, contentment, and prosperity of 
the people." 

Dr. Richard S. Storrs followed with a stir- 
ring address on the need of books in human 
life, of their effect upon character, and of the 
absolute necessity of a public library in a city 
that wishes to foster what is best in civic life. 
He spoke of the prevalence of bad literature 
in various forms, of what the public library 
could do to counterbalance its influence, and 
expressed the earnest hope that the Brooklyn 
Public Library might be an accomplished fact 
before the individuality of the city was merged 
into the new municipality of Greater New 
York. He was followed by Father E. W. 
McCarthy, of St. Augustine's Church, who 
said that Dr. Storrs was present to baptize the 
baby, and his own work was only to see that 
nothing was left undone. He spoke of the use 
made by Mr. Carnegie of his wealth, in the 
establishment of libraries, and of the great 
monument left to Brooklyn by Charles Pratt in 
the Pratt Institute, and dwelt upon the part 
that books played, not only in education, but 
in all the qualities that make for the elevation 
of the race. No private or subscription insti- 
tution, he said, however well endowed or gen- 
erously supported, could take the place of a 
free public library supported by the people for 
themselves. 

Andrew Carnegie, the guest of honor of the 
evening, was then introduced by Mr. Boody as 
a man who had spent $5,000,000 in founding 
public libraries, and he received an enthusi- 



astic welcome. Mr. Carnegie spoke with force 
and enthusiasm, and was listened to with un- 
failing interest. 

"People," he said, "are divided into two 
great classes the pessimistic and the optimis- 
tic and whether one belongs to the former or 
to the latter depends chiefly upon whether he 
looks backward or forward. The most pessi- 
mistic must agree that in one respect, at least, 
human society has moved forward. It is not 
so very long ago since the individual concerned 
himself almost solely with himself. It was ex- 
ceptional for the rich, or for those who could 
not be called rich but yet were better off than 
their neighbors, to pay much attention to the 
poverty by which they were surrounded. ' Am 
I my brother's keeper?' was the thought which 
characterized the age. Now, surely, we have 
changed all that, and the reverse is now true. 
It is the exception for any family having wealth 
or surplus income, not to feel, and to act upon 
the feeling, that they are, or should be to some 
extent, 'their brother's keeper'; that their 
abundance should be shared by their fellows 
less fortunate than themselves. There never 
was a time in the history of the world, we may 
well be persuaded, in which there were so 
many of the well-to-do conscious of their duties 
to their less fortunate fellows, or so many or- 
ganizations managed and supported by so 
many contributions from so many people which 
have in view only the relief of poverty, the 
alleviation of suffering, or so much time de- 
voted to these ends by those who lack ability 
to contribute money. They give their time 
and attention, which is better than money and 
counts for much more. 

"Surely if this be so it seems to justify the 
suspicion that there is something wrong some- 
how, or somewhere, in the efforts we make or 
the modes we pursue. And may not the root 
of the trouble be found just here, that we labor 
trimming the branches here and there of the 
poisonous tree instead of laying the axe to the 
root. It is the easiest thing in the world to in- 
crease pauperism through indiscriminate giving 
or injudicious encouragement. No one can 
estimate the effect of the coin carelessly given 
to the beggar. It is an easy task to take from 
one class a given amount of labor and hand it 
over to another class, to which is thus given 
the adventitious aid which enables it to perform 
the labor for less, but the problem is not even 
touched until you increase the total amount of 
labor to be done. Of all the problems which a 
rich man has to study and solve we place as 
among the most difficult how to do genuine 
good by expenditure of money, or time given 
for philanthropic purposes. 

" He is entitled to be considered a wise man 
who so administers his surplus wealth as to 
advance the genuine good of his fellows, and 
not to sap their spirit of independence and self- 
respect. We have not yet reached the full 
noon of the bright day when men having sur- 
plus income beyond their needs will realize 
that to leave millions to children is not to 
benefit the recipients, but probably to injure 
them. If not ere the close of our own day, 



20 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



then certainly during the next generation it 
will be held that the man who accumulates 
millions and hoards them until the last has 
been unmindful of the claims upon him in the 
community in which he has lived, and perhaps 
as the possessor of these millions has been 
false to his trusteeship. Such a man will die 
unwept, unhonored, and unsung; will die dis- 
graced. The rich will act only as trustees to 
make better use of their wealth for the poor 
than the poor could possibly do themselves by 
massing it in some permanent form from which 
good influences will flow forever, instead of its 
being squandered in petty driblets by the 
masses for the gratification of temporary de- 
sires which man shares with the animals. 
Thus is to be sjlved, and thus only, the ques- 
tion of the rich and the poor. In the manage- 
ment of wealth for the public good the best 
test of its efficacy is, will this use of wealth 
help others to help themselves ? Those of our 
race who are incurable and cannot be rendered 
self-supporting are the fit objects of the benev- 
olence of the state or municipality. The av- 
enues for individual wealth are fewer than 
before, but they lead directly to the great need 
the prevention instead of the cure of the 
evils of human society. Now, there is one 
institution which, established in a community, 
must work good and not evil, which helps only 
those who help themselves, which attacks pau- 
perism and want at the root, works not for 
cure but for prevention, about which no taint 
of demoralizing charity hovers, and that is 
what brings you here to-night the free pub- 
lic library." 

Mr. Carnegie then related an incident that 
occurred while he was last in Scotland. " I 
was attending last year," he said, " the open- 
ing of a free library in the little Scotch town 
that was the birthplace of my parents. In the 
addresses of the day the history of the library 
then established in its new building was re- 
lated by one of the speakers. Its nucleus had 
been a little collection of books bought by 
three weavers with their hard-earned money 
and used as a library by them. Several times 
had this pitiful little library been moved from 
pillar to post, in one of its removals the weav- 
ers carrying the books in their own aprons and 
in coal-scuttles. Perhaps the thrill of deepest 
and purest happiness I have ever experienced 
came to me when I recognized in one of these 
library-founding weavers the name of my hon- 
ored father. I know of no lineage that I would 
exchange for this." He reviewed the library 
records of the various cities of the United 
States, and vigorously urged the need of a free 
public library in Brooklyn, that, though per- 
haps furnished through private generosity, 
should be wholly maintained by the public for 
themselves. 

Frederick B. Pratt, of the Pratt Institute, 
followed Mr. Carnegie with a brief and hope- 
ful address on the prospects of the movement. 
He told how from a small beginning the Pratt 
Institute library had developed into an institu- 
tion with a circulation of 300,000 v., he ten- 
dered the earnest wishes of the library he rey- 



resented for the success of the cause, and 
promised every help that could be given by him 
to the new project. Dr. ). S. Billings, of the 
New York Public Library, followed with a re- 
view of the methods of consolidation adopted 
in New York for the Astor, Lenox, and Tilden 
foundations, and gave valuable suggestions 
for the practical work of the Brooklyn associa- 
tion. 

Melvil Dewey was the last speaker, and he 
gave a stirring talk on the need of a public li- 
brary as the corner-stone of the fabric of popular 
education. Without a library the system of 
public education was not complete. Study, he 
said, is in a way harmful unless kept in the 
right path, for a little knowledge is a danger- 
ous thing, and reading, when not properly har- 
nessed, runs riot with youthful minds. He 
inveighed vigorously against the sensational 
newspapers, and said it was a very grievous 
and serious condition of affairs when a Sunday 
sensational journal could have a circulation of 
500,000 and an edition of 1000 copies of a good 
piece of literature should go begging. 

This concluded the speaking, and the stage 
became at once a reception-room, most of the 
audience waiting for an opportunity to greet 
Mr. Carnegie and shake his hand. 



THE BUFFALO LIBRARY TO BE A FREE 
LIBRARY. 

AT a meeting of the board of managers of 
the Buffalo Library on Dec. ir an address was 
issued calling public attention to the need of a 
free library in Buffalo, and stating that with 
public co-operation and financial aid it might 
be practicable to reorganize the Buffalo Library 
to that end. The statement said, in part: " Of 
late years a feeling that the Buffalo Library 
must be made entirely free has been gaining 
ground rapidly. The public mind has been 
awakening to the fact that Buffalo is far be- 
hind other cities in the matter, and that it is 
largely losing, as a consequence, one of the 
greatest educational influences of the time. 

" From its own resources the library can give 
no more to the public at large than it has given 
already. It can go no further in the direction 
of freedom than it has done, by opening its 
reading-rooms to every comer, for all uses of 
books within its own walls, and by distributing 
1000 free tickets among pupils in the public 
schools. Thus far its revenues have barely 
permitted that degree of liberality, and hence- 
forward it will lack the ability to go even so 
far in serving the public of Buffalo if it is not 
helped from other resources than its own." 

It was stated that the resources of the library 
are now much below the amount necessary to 
administer it properly, and that help must be 
extended if it is to continue its work. The work 
done by free libraries in most of the large cities 
of the Union was briefly reviewed, and the need 
of such work in Buffalo was pointed out. and in 
conclusion it was intimated that the library 
might be maintained as a free city institution 
if the city would contribute to its support by 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



21 



such provision as will make it free and properly 
enlarge its work. 

The mayor, in his annual message, dated 
Jan. 4, gives considerable attention to the 
proposition of the library authorities, and urges 
its acceptance by the city. He says in part: 
"The subject of a proposed free library has 
been a leading topic of discussion in the public 
press and among our citizens for several weeks 
past. Our Buffalo Library, which has been 
built up and maintained as a private institution 
for many years, finds that through the opera- 
tion of a law passed by the last legislature it 
will henceforth be deprived of a considerable 
amount of its annual revenue. This law re- 
quires the taxation of all property held by re- 
ligious and benevolentinstitutions, not actually 
used for the purpose of such institutions. It 
affects the Hotel Iroquois property, which is 
owned by the library association, and has 
been a source of income to it. Hereafter the 
library association will be obliged to pay taxes 
upon this property, the amount being estimated 
at about $17,000 a year. Thus crippled as to 
its revenues, the friends of the library apply 
for municipal-aid and offer in return to make 
the institution and all of its privileges absolutely 
free to the public. 

"The executive for one believes that the 
time is ripe for the city to take this progres- 
sive step. A fine collection of books has been 
secured without public expense. It is well 
housed. It is well managed. To make its 
privileges free to all, nothing is asked but that 
the city should guarantee its running expenses, 
and provide reasonably for the enlargement of 
the collection. Considering that other cities 
have been obliged to create their free libraries, 
as well as maintain them, this seems to me a 
proposition most advantageous to the city of 
Buffalo. The subject will be brought formally 
to the attention of your honorable body at an 
early date. I trust that you will see your way 
clear to provide such funds as will be neces- 
sary to give us a public library in the fullest 
sense of the term." 

On Jan. 7 a citizens' meeting was held in the 
library building to consider the proposed reor- 
ganization and a committee was appointed to 
further the work. At the city council meeting on 
Jan. ii the matter was officially taken up by the 
aldermen, and a committee of three was ap- 
pointed to work with the chief city officials and 
the citizens' committee as a conference commit- 
tee in planning for the operation of the library as 
a|free institution. The report of the conference 
committee was submitted to the board of alder- 
men on Jan. 18. It was a long statement, pre- 
senting fully the present needs of the library 
and the great necessity for a free public library 
in Buffalo. It reviewed the library advantages 
of other cities and strongly urged that the Buf- 
falo Library be transferred to city control, rec- 
ommending a yearly appropriation of $40,000 
for its maintenance. A draft for an enabling act 
was appended. The report was accepted by a 
vote of 21 to two. There is little doubt that 
within a short time the Free Public Library of 
Buffalo will be an accomplished fact. 



THE A. L. A. PUBLISHING SECTION 
PRINTED CATALOG CARDS. 

THE A. L. A. Publishing Section recently 
issued a circular to the chief libraries of the 
country, explaining the system of issue of 
printed catalog cards formerly carried on by 
the Library Bureau and now transferred to the 
charge of the Publishing Section, and giving 
details of a new plan by which it is hoped to 
furnish selected cards to the smaller libraries. 
It is hoped that more libraries will subscribe to 
the cards under the new arrangements, as the 
present number of subscribers is not sufficient 
to insure the continuance of the work. " The 
form of the cards will be practically the same 
as heretofore, but translator and editor cards 
will be made only where they seem essential to 
the satisfactory cataloging of the book. Title 
cards will be continued as at present. In the 
case of books of miscellaneous contents (vol- 
umes of essays, etc.), the contents will be 
printed when not too long to go on the card, 
and enough cards will be sent so that one may 
be put into the catalog under each topic treated. 
[The separate items in the contents may be 
underlined in red ink to correspond with the 
topic on the top line.] These cards will serve 
the same purpose as analytic entries, and are 
preferable to the ordinary form of analytic 
entry, since they give full information about 
the book." 

The new proposition for the issue of selected 
cards to small libraries was briefly as follows : 
"Beginning January i, 1897, it is proposed to 
send once or twice a week to the subscribing 
libraries two copies of a short-title list of the 
books cataloged by the Publishing Section. 
On these lists each librarian will mark the 
titles of books he is likely to buy, for which he 
wishes cards, and will return one copy to the 
Publishing Section, retaining the other as a 
record. Two weeks from the date of the list, 
cards will be printed to correspond to the or- 
ders then on hand, and will be immediately 
distributed. An interval of two weeks is al- 
lowed, that librarians may submit the lists if 
necessary to their book committees, and that 
there may be time for orders to come from the 
far west. After two weeks from the date of 
the list orders cannot be filled. 

" Every effort will be made to get the titles 
from the publishers as long in advance as 
possible, so that the cards may be delivered 
about the same time as the publication of the 
books. In case the books are received before 
the cards, they need not be kept out of circula- 
tion, since the retained copy of the list will 
serve as a rough note and can bear in the 
margin the shelf mark, accession number, or 
any other item ordinarily placed on the card, 
till the card itself is received. 

" Cards will be furnished of any size or 
style to match those already in use by the li- 
brary, but libraries using a card lower than the 
standard (7 ^ cm.) have to sacrifice the class 
marks, dictionary headings, etc., which are 
given on the lower margin of the standard 
card. The price a year for the two copies of 



22 



THE L1BRAR Y JO URNAL 



[January, '97 



the list will be $i. The price for the cards will 
be 10 cents a book regardless of the number or 
quality of cards. It is hoped that the larger 
libraries will continue to take all of the cards 
issued. If the number of such subscribers 
warrants, their cards will be sent immediately 
without waiting for orders to come in from the 
smaller libraries. The price for these will be 
at present, $7.50, $9, $10.50 per 1000, accord- 
ing to the quality of card used, but will be 
lessened as soon as the number of subscrip- 
tions warrants." 

.The circulars were sent out generally, and it 
was hoped that a sufficient number of answers 
would be received before the close of the year 
to allow a definite decision. As, however, 
only a few replies had been received by January 
I, the Publishing Section has decided to defer 
the undertaking until the first of February, in 
the hope that by that time a sufficient number 
of subscriptions may have been received. 



American Cibrarjj Association. 



UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LIBRARY 
CLASSES. 

SINCE its foundation the University of Chi- 
cago has extended its instruction by organizing 
non-resident classes wherever six or more per- 
sons unite to pursue a course of study, and are 
willing to pay $6 apiece for 24 hours' instruc- 
tion, and bear the travelling expenses of the 
instructor. During 1896 about 90 classes in a 
great variety of subjects were formed, and 
these subjects have now been extended to in- 
clude instruction on the scope and use of the 
modern library. The plan is to work through 
women's clubs, teachers' clubs, and the staffs 
of the large libraries. The courses offered will 
necessarily be general and free from technical 
details, and they are intended to aid in an in- 
telligent use of the library rather than to afford 
special library training. They would include 
information about travelling libraries ; chil- 
dren's home libraries; and library schools; rela- 
tions between libraries and schools, and between 
libraries and clubs; the use of reference-books; 
the use of catalogs; and such administrative 
principles as may be desired. Classes will meet 
once a week, or oftener if desired. The work 
will be adapted to the needs of the students, and 
will not necessarily be confined to the printed 
outline, which is merely suggestive. Courses 
are offered by Mrs. Zella Allen Dixson, libra- 
rian of the University of Chicago, and by 
Miss Katherine L. Sharp, director of the De- 
partment of Library Economy at the Armour 
Institute of Technology. Two courses were 
given at Cleveland, Ohio, in December, at the 
request of Mr. W. H. Brett, president of the 
American Library Association. A class at 
Denver, Colo., will begin its sessions in Janu- 
ary; and classes at Geneva and at Geneseo, 
111., are forming. A class at the University 
of Chicago, under the instruction of Mrs. Dix- 
son, began work on Jan. 8. 

Further information regarding this-work may 
be obtained by addressing the Class-study Sec- 
retary, University of Chicago. 



President: W: H. Brett, Public Library, 
Cleveland, O. 

Secretary: Rutherford P. Hayes, Columbus, 
O. 

Treasurer: G: W. Cole, 473 Jersey Ave., 
Jersey City, N. J. 
TRANSACTIONS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

A MEETING of the executive board of the 
American Library Association was held at the 
Free Library of Philadelphia, Dec. 3, 1896. 

Present, President Brett, Miss James, Mr. 
Jones, and Mr. Hayes. 

The following letter from Mr. Cole was 
read : 

473 JERSEY AVK., JERSEY CITY, N. J., Nov. 12, 1896. 
To tke Executive Committee ef the American Library 
A ssoci it ion. 

GENTLEMEN : As my plans take me abroad for the 
winter and possibly longer, I hereby tender my resigna- 
tion as treasurer of the Association, and request that the 
vacancy caused by my resignation be filled at your earli- 
est convenience. Yours very truly, 

GKO. WATSON COLR. 

Mr. Cole's resignation was accepted. 

The secretary announced that Mr. Cole had 
turned the treasurer's books over to him, and 
that the funds, amounting to $1475.74, were in 
the hands of Mr. Whitney, chairman of the 
finance committee. 

The president announced the next order of 
business to be the selection of place and time 
of the next meeting of the A. L. A. 

Invitations were received from the Massa- 
chusetts Library Club to meet at or near Bos- 
ton, and from the libraries and many citizens of 
Philadelphia to meet in that city. 

After discussion of the subject, Miss James 
moved that the next meeting of the American 
Library Association be held in Philadelphia, 
beginning June 22, 1897. 

Mr. Jones announced that this date would be 
satisfactory to the European trip committee. 

The motion was unanimously adopted. 

The president having been authorized to ap- 
point the local committee, selected the follow- 
ing: Mr. Thomson, chairman, Free Library ; Mr. 
Montgomery, secretary, Wagner Institute; Mr. 
Stone, Historical Society; Mr. Keen, University 
of Pennsylvania; Mr. Barnwell, Library Com- 
pany of Phila. ; Mr. Edmands, Mercantile Li- 
brary; Miss Kroeger, Drexel Institute; Dr. 
Nolan, Academy of Natural Sciences; Dr. 
Horn, American Philosophical Society. 

The secretary announced the resignation of 
Mr. Carr from the Library School committee, 
and that Mr. Larned declined to serve as chair- 
man, which duty would have devolved upon 
him owing to the absence of Mrs. Elmendorf. 

The president was authorized to fill the va- 
cancies. 

On motion, president and secretary were au- 
thorized to arrange the program for the meet- 
ing of 1897. 

On motion, the secretary was directed to 
secure the papers six weeks before the meeting, 
and to print such as seemed advisable. 

A letter from Miss Cutler was read suggest- 
ing that a session be given at the next confer- 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



ence to a discussion of the new books of the 
year, this feature having proved so interesting 
and profitable at the Cleveland conference. 

The secretary announced having received 
letters from several chairmen of committees 
stating that progress was being made in this 
work, also several suggestions as to program. 

The following communication was received : 

WASHINGTON, D. C., Dec., 1896. 
To the Executive Board of the American Library 

Association: 

We, the undersigned, request you to take action lead- 
ing to the incorporation of the American Library Asso- 
ciation under the laws of the United States with head- 
quarters in Washington. MELVIL DEWEY, 

HERBERT PUTNAM, 
GEO. H. BAKER, 
WM. I. FLETCHER. 

Mr. Hayes made the following motion: 

" Resolved, That it is desirable that the Amer- 
ican Library Association be re-incorporated as 
soon as practicable under the laws of the United 
States with headquarters at Washington. 

" Resolved, That the act of incorporation 
should, if practicable, include a provision that 
the council or a committee of the council of the 
American Library Association shall act as a 
board of visitors to the Library of Congress, 
and annually or as much oftener as specially 
requested to render a report of said visitation 
to the Joint Committee on the Library of Con- 
gress, or other governing board of the library. 

"Resolved, That the president appoint a 
committee of three members of the American 
Library Association, which committee shall 
investigate as to whether such re-incorporation 
may legally be secured upon application of 
this board. If such be found to be feasible 
such committee is authorized to draft a bill for 
such purpose, and the president and secretary 
are authorized to take all steps necessary to se- 
cure passage of the same. 

"Resolved, That such bill shall, if practicable, 
include the provision as to the board of visitors 
above referred to." 

After a full discussion the motion was unani- 
mously adopted. 

The president announced the appointment of 
Mr. Herbert Putnam, of the Boston Public 
Library, as chairman of this committee. 

The secretary was directed to write to the 
chairman of the Senate Committee on Printing 
urging the passage by the Senate of the bill 
"to reduce the cost, increase the value, and 
simplify the methods of publication of Public 
Documents." 

All the members of the board present ex- 
pressed their approval of the "Catalogue of 
public documents" of the 53d Congress, just 
issued by the Superintendent of Documents, 
and the secretary was directed to express to 
Mr. Crandall their favorable opinion of the 
catalog, and their hope that he might be able 
to continue the catalog in the same form for all 
public documents, both past and future. 

The secretary announced progress on the 
A. L. A. handbook. 

The resignation of Mr. Larned from the 
primer committee was read, and the president 
directed to fill the vacancy. 



On motion the sum of $200 was appropriated 
for the necessary expenses of the Publishing 
Section. 

The following resolution was unanimously 
adopted: 

"Resolved, That it is the opinion of the mem- 
bers of this board that the American Library 
Association at its meeting in June, 1897, should 
arrange for the payment in the future of the 
expenses of the members of the board in at- 
tending meetings, and should make a proper 
allowance for the expenses of the secretary." 

On motion, $50 was appropriated for clerical 
assistance for the treasurer. 

On motion, Mr. Charles Knowles Bolton, of 
the Brookline Public Library, Brookline, Mass. , 
was unanimously elected treasurer. 

On motion, adjourned. 

R. P. HAYES, Secretary. 

SPECIAL NOTICE. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO, January, 1897. 

A SPECIAL meeting of the American Library 
Association is hereby called to be held on 
Saturday, February 6, 1897, at 2.30 p.m., in 
Room 15, Hamilton Hall, Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York City. 

The special business is to consider the re- 
incorporation of the American Library Associ- 
ation under the laws of the United States, as 
stated in the following request : 

"WM. H. BRETT, Esq., 

President American Library Association. 
"In accordance with the by-laws of the as- 
sociation, the undersigned members of the A. 
L. A. request you to call a special meeting of 
the association at the earliest date practicable, 
to consider an act upon the following ques- 
tions, to wit : 

"Whether it be expedient to reincorporate 
the association under the laws of the United 
States with headquarters at Washington, D. 
C., and with a provision, if feasible, that the 
association, through its council or otherwise, 
shall from time to time act as a visiting board 
of the National Library (Library of Congress), 
together with such other provisions as may 
seem advisable involving relations with ap- 
propriate federal departments. 

1 HERBERT PUTNAM, 
' MARGARET D. McGuFFEY, 
'WM. I. FLETCHER, 
' NINA E. BROWNE, 
' THORVALD SOLBERG, 
' JAMES L. WHITNEY, 
' HILLER C. WELLMAN, 
' WM. C. LANE, 
' CHAS. C. SOULE, 
1 F. RICHMOND FLETCHER." 
WM. H. BRETT, President, 
RUTHERFORD P. HAYES, Secretary. 
Jan. i, 1897. 

EUROPE A N POST-CONFERENCE TRIP. 
THE European trip committee issues the fol- 
lowing report of progress, Dec. 21: 

It was evident to the committee that the ob- 
jects to be kept in mind in planning the trip 
were: 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



1. To become acquainted with as many Eng- 
lish librarians as possible, and to see as much 
as possible of English methods of library 
administration. 

2. To visit as many places of historic and 
literary interest as possible and also others 
attractive for their natural beauty. 

Correspondence with Mr. MacAlister, secre- 
tary of the L. A. U. K., showed that in order 
to secure a good attendance of English libra- 
rians the conference should be held not later 
than the week beginning July 12. 

The following itinerary has therefore been 
arranged: 

JUNE 26. Saturday. Leave Boston. . 

JULY 5 or 6. Monday or Tuesday. Arrive Liv- 
erpool. 

7. Wednesday, p.m. To Manchester. 

8. Thursday. In Manchester. Evening 

to Birmingham. 

9. Friday. In Birmingham. 

10. Saturday. Kenilworth, Warwick, Strat- 

ford, and to Leamington. 

11. Sunday. In Leamington. 

12. Monday. To London. 

13-16. Tuesday to Friday. Conference. 

17-23. English post-conference under the 
conduct of the L. A. U. K., probably 
visiting Salisbury (spend Sunday), 
Stonehenge, Wells.Glastonbury, Car- 
diff, Bristol, Bath, and Reading, 
reaching Oxford Friday evening, 
July 23. 

24. Saturday. In Oxford. 

25. Sunday. In Oxford or London. 
26-30. In London or elsewhere as suits 

individual tastes. 
31. Saturday. To Cambridge. 
AUG. i. Sunday. In Cambridge. 

2. Monday. To Ely, Lincoln, and Shef- 

field. 

3. Tuesday. In Sheffield. 

4. Wednesday. To Leeds and York. 

5. Thursday. In York. 

6. Friday. To Durham and Newcastle. 

7. Saturday. To Melrose, Abbotsford, 

Dryburgh, and Edinburgh. 

8. Sunday. In Edinburgh, 
q. Monday. In Edinburgh. 

10. Tuesday. To Glasgow -via Stirling, 

Trossachs, and Loch Katrine. 

11. Wednesday. In Glasgow. P.M. to 

Liverpool. 

12. Thursday. A.M. in Liverpool or Ches- 

ter. P.M. sail. 
22. Sunday. Due at Boston. 

The it'nerary may be summarized as follows: 
A week between Liverpool and London, allow- 
ing an opportunity to see some of the leading 
libraries before the conference; the confer- 
ence; a post-conference trip with the L. A. U. 
K. and under their management; a free week 
which may be spent in London, in the English 
country, or in a trip to Paris; and a two weeks' 
trip up the east coast visiting the leading 
cathedral cities and also some of the larger 
public libraries. It will be noticed that over a 
day each is spent in Oxford and Cambridge. 



The trip has been kept within the two months 
originally planned, but the early date of return 
will doubtless lead many to spend an extra 
week in a trip to the English lakes, Wales, 
Ireland, or elsewhere. Such trips can be made 
more comfortably, and probably as cheaply, in 
small parties. 

The travel arrangements will be in charge of 
Henry Gaze & Sons' tourist agency. The net 
cost will be about $350. A circular giving de- 
tails of the itinerary, exact cost, suggestions as 
to clothing, etc., will be distributed in a few 
weeks, at which time an advance deposit will 
be called for. The present circular is sent out 
at the earliest possible moment, that members 
of the A. L. A. may know what is being 
planned by their committee. 

WILLIAM C. LANE, Boston, Chairman. 

GARDNER M. JONES, Salem, Secretary. 

WM. I. FLETCHER, Amherst, Mass. 

Miss C. M. HEWINS, Hartford Ct. 

Miss M. W. PLUMMER, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

THE Library, in its December number, con- 
tains a well-written article on "The American 
Library Association and the international con- 
ference," giving a brief history of the A. L. A., 
its organization and work. The paper is ac- 
curate in detail and animated by a pleasant 
spirit of friendliness. It will be followed in 
later issues by "notices of the life and work of 
some of the chief members of the A. L. A., 
especially those who will probably be among 
the delegates to the international conference." 

A. L. A. HANDBOOK. 

THE A. L. A. Handbook for 1897 will be 
ready for distribution about January 20. Two 
copies will be sent to each member, one of 
which should be used to get a new member of 
the A. L. A. Extra copies may be obtained by 
notifying the secretary. 

State ibtars Commissions. 



CONNECTICUT F. P. L. COMMITTEE : Caroline 
M. Hewins, secretary, Public Library, Hart- 
ford. 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE L. COMMISSION : Miss 
E. P. Sohier, secretary, Beverly. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE L. COMMISSION : J. H. 
Whittier, secretary, East Rochester. 

NEW YORK, PUBLIC LIBRARIES DIVISION, State 
University, Melvil Dewey, director, Albany. 

OHIO STATE L. COMMISSION: C. B. Galbreath, 
secretary, State Library, Columbus. 

VERMONT STATE L. COMMISSION: Miss M. L. 
Titcomb, secretary. Free Library, Rutland. 

WISCONSIN F. L. COMMISSION: Miss L. E. 
Stearns, secretary, Public Library, Milwau- 
kee. 

THE first biennial report of the Wisconsin 
commission for 1895-96, just issued (130 p. 
O.), is a model of its kind and should prove 
widely useful not only as illustrating what 
a library commission can accomplish, but as 
affording information and instruction as to 
details of technical library work. It contains 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



a brief history of the organization and pro- 
ceedings of the commission ; reports of the 
various meetings of the state library associa- 
tion since its organization in February, 1891; 
Mr. Larned's stirring address on " The mission 
and missionaries *of the book"; an admirably 
suggestive "Symposium on library details," by 
six of the advanced pupils of Armour Institute 
library class; Miss Eastman's suggestive paper 
on "The child, the school, and the library," 
first printed in the 1896 school number of the 
LIBRARY JOURNAL; a striking account by Mr. 
Hutchins of what has been accomplished by 
" Traveling libraries in Wisconsin"; a full re- 
port on " Wisconsin Summer School of Library 
Science," by Miss Maude A. Earley ; " Legal and 
statistical aspects of Wisconsin libraries," by 
Florence E. Baker, and a summary of "State 
library commissions," by Miss Stearns, to whose 
enthusiastic energy the commission owes so 
much. It is illustrated with many views of 
Wisconsin libraries, but none of these illustra- 
tions compare in interest to the five pictures of 
the Stout travelling libraries and their tem- 
porary stations in little rural communities. 

Although the report covers nominally a bi- 
ennial period, the commission has really been 
in existence but one year. It was authorized 
by the legislature of 1895, but as the commis- 
sioners were not named by the governor until 
late in the autumn the body was not organized 
until December. Besides Mr. Hutchins and 
Miss Stearns, the other (ex-officid) members of 
the commission are Dr. C: Kendall Adams, 
president of the state university; J. Q. Emery, 
state superintendent of instruction, and R. G 
Thwaites, secretary of the state historical 
society. Within the year of the commission's 
existence free circulating libraries have been 
established in five towns, and two others have 
voted a tax for library purposes; the 30 travel- 
ling libraries established by Senator Stout in 
Dunn county have been in constant use, being 
managed from the Mabel Tainter Library in 
Menomonie, Wis.; 20 similar libraries have 
been given by J. D. Witter to Wood county 
and are being sent out from the Grand Rapids 
Public Library, both these collections having 
been selected and set on foot by Mr. Hutchins 
in dozens of communities libraries that hac 
been neglected and half forgotten have been 
revived to vigorous life through the examph 
and precept of the commission; in dozens o 
others public sentiment is being rapidly arousec 
on the subject; and the agencies enlisted fo 
the advancement of library interests include a 
newly-formed library section of the state teach 
ers' association, a travelling library association 
organized in November, 1896, and co-operativ< 
work on the part of the women's clubs of thi 
state. This is a remarkable showing, and thi 
rapidity with which these results have been 
brought about is most astonishing of all. Wis 
consin has become almost within a twelve 
month not only a library model to the othe 
states of the west, but an example to man) 
of the eastern states where the library move 
ment has never taken such a strong foothol 
or awakened such general interest. 



State 



LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL CALL 
FORNIA. 

President : J. C. Rowell, University of Cali- 
ornia, Berkeley. 

Secretary: A. M. Jellison, Mechanics' Insti- 
ute Library, San Francisco. 

Treasurer: A. J. Cleary, Odd Fellows' Li- 
>rary, San Francisco. 

THE regular meeting of the Library Associa- 
ion of Central California was held Nov. 13 in 
he Mechanics' Institute. President Rowell 
presided, and with a few remarks announced 
he topic of the evening, "Libraries and lit- 
erature of the Orient," and introduced William 
Emmette Coleman, member of the American 
Oriental Society, Royal Asiatic Society, etc., 
paying a graceful tribute to the erudition of 
:his distinguished orientalist. Mr. Coleman 
jave a summary of Hindu literature from the 
earliest Vedic times to the present, followed by 
an account of the libraries of India. He de- 
scribed those in the great cities of Bombay, 
Calcutta, Madras, etc., and gave typical illus- 
trations of the nature of the libraries in the 
smaller cities and towns. The character of the 
literature of Ceylon and Tibet was indicated, 
and their library systems outlined. Of Hindu 
literature Mr. Coleman said : " Vast in extent, 
marvellous in complexity, unique in transcen- 
dental subtlety, grotesque in elaboration, weari- 
some in repetition, the sacerdotal spirit per- 
meates and dominates it all. Hindu science, 
philosophy, poetry, law, fiction, music, gram- 
mar, rhetoric, mathematics, dictionaries, all is 
of a more or less religious character. In meta- 
physical subtlety and analysis, and in exagger- 
ations and repetitions, the Hindu mind to me 
represents the intellect gone to seed." 

Prof. John Fryer, of the University of Cali- 
fornia, followed with a scholarly and most in- 
teresting account of the " Libraries and litera- 
ture of China." Prof. Fryer opened with an 
historical sketch of Chinese writing and litera- 
ture from 2000 B.C. He divided the literature 
into four great classes: Classics, history, phi- 
losophy and the arts, poetry and polite litera- 
ture. Confucius and his disciples were dwelt 
on at some length, although the speaker said 
their teachings might be summarized in the 
phrase, " Walk only in the trodden paths." 
Prof. Fryer gave a vivid picture of the many 
destructions of books by different emperors of 
China, and particularly that ordered by the 
great Chung Wang 246 B.C. This enlightened 
monarch excepted in his destruction only works 
on agriculture, architecture, divination, and 
medicine, as being of benefit to mankind. All 
other branches of literature were considered 
by him an encouragement to idleness and dan- 
gerous to the state. 

Professor Fryer illustrated the paper with 
many examples of Chinese printing and bind- 
ing, from his own library, his long residence in 
China having given him unusual opportunities 
for collecting. 

A. M. JELLISON, Secretary. 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[fanua y t '97 



IN accordance with its custom of making one 
of its monthly meetings each year a social one, 
the December meeting of the Library Associa- 
tion of Central California was held on the 
evening of Dec. n, about the table in the 
banquet-room of the California Hotel. In- 
cluding members and guests there were 36 
persons present. At the conclusion of the sup- 
per President Rowell made some happy re- 
marks, and then introduced Mr. Herbert C. 
Nash, the recently appointed librarian of Stan- 
ford University, who in a very entertaining 
manner related some of his first impressions 
and experiences in the library world. He was 
followed by Mr. A. S. Hallidie, who gave an 
interesting sketch of the Mechanics' Institute 
of San Francisco, with which he has been 
identified from iis foundation. This institu- 
tion, which now has a membership of more 
than 4700 and a library of 73,000 volumes, 
was established in Dec., 1854. The library 
opened with four volumes on its shelves, in- 
cluding a copy of the Bible, a "Cyclopaedia of 
architecture," dictionary, and "Curtis on con- 
veyances." Its usefulness was considerably im- 
paired when some one stole the Bible and the 
dictionary. The institution rallied from this 
severe loss, however, and has enjoyed since 
that time growth and prosperity almost with- 
out interruption. 

The literary exercises closed with a paper by 
Mr. A. B. Davis, who, in his extracts from 
such sources as Pliny, Sir John Maundeville, 
Dr. Johnson's Dictionary, and the Newgate 
Calendar, showed how much amusement can 
be gleaned in out-of-the-way places where it is 
not usually sought for. 

Seated at the table were: Mr. A. S. Hallidie, 
Mr. Herbert C. Nash, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. 
Rowell, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Davis, Mr. and 
Mrs. L. P. McCarty, Prof. W. D. Armes, Mr. 
and Mrs. G. T. Clark, Andrew Cleary, J. 
W. Harbourne, H. F. Peterson, Miss Green, 
Horace Moore, Miss Wade, W. F. Clowdsley, 
Mrs. E. J. C. Gilbert, Wm. Emmette Coleman, 
Miss Klink, John G. Brick, Miss Sawyer, Dr. 
G. A. Danziger, F. J. Teggart, and others. 

GEO. T. CLARK, Secretary pro tern. 
COLORADO LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: John Parsons, Public Library, 
Denver. 

Secretary: Herbert E. Ritchie, City Library, 
Denver. 

Treasurer : A. E. Whitaker, State University 
Library, Boulder. 

THE December meeting of the Colorado Li- 
brary Association was held in the Coburn 
Library of Colorado College, Colorado Springs, 
Dec. n, 1896, at 8 p.m. The audience was 
large and enthusiastic, and the various papers 
were received with interest and applause. 

After the transaction of the miscellaneous 
business of the association the Rev. W. F. Slo- 
cum, president of Colorado College, presented 
a paper on " The relation of the college library 
to the town library." He was followed by Mrs. 
A. J. Peavey, state superintendent of public in- 
struction, who delivered an address on "Dis- 



trict libraries." ' 'A library building for a grow- 
ing city" was then described by J. C. Dana, of 
the Denver Public Library; and "The power 
of the book" was the subject of an interesting 
paper by Louis R. Ehrich, of Colorado Springs. 

Previous to the meeting the" members of the 
association were entertained at a reception 
by President and Mrs. Slocum, of Colorado 
College. 

At the previous meeting of the association a 
revised constitution was adopted, and the mat- 
ters of library legislation and the appointment 
of a state library commission were discussed. 
The association is giving especial attention to 
the last two subjects, and it will this winter, as 
part of the year's work, urge the passage by 
the state legislature of a law creating a state 
library commission. 

CONNECTICUT LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: W. K. Stetson, Public Library, 
New Haven. 

Secretary : Miss M. A. Richardson, Public Li- 
brary, New London. 

Treasurer : Mrs. F. W. Robinson, Otis Li- 
brary, Norwich. 

ILLINOIS LIBRA RY A SSOCIA TION. 

President: Thomas Nelson, Public Library, 
East St. Louis, 111. 

Secretary : Miss E.'L. Moore, Withers Public 
Library, Bloomington. 

Treasurer: P. F. Bicknell, University of 
Illinois, Champaign. 

THE second meeting of the Illinois State 
Library Association was held at the Armour 
Institute of Technology, Chicago, Nov. 27, 
1896. This meeting was held largely in the 
interests of the formation of an Illinois state 
library commission, and to make plans for 
the formation of a library section of the Illinois 
State Teachers' Association. In the absence 
of the president, Mr. Thomas Nelson, the first 
vice-president, Miss Savillah Hinrichsen, pre- 
sided. 

After certain business matters were disposed 
of and a few fitting remarks had been spoken 
by the presiding officer, the first paper on the 
program, "History of library commissions," 
was read by Miss Cornelia Marvin, of the 
Armour Institute of Technology. Miss Marvin 
gave a complete history of the commissions as 
established in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Connecticut, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Ohio, 
and then summarized her paper into the follow- 
ing salient points : " The commissions usually 
consist of five members, who serve for five 
years without pay. They are appointed by 
the governor, with the exception of Connecti- 
cut, where the appointment is made by the 
State Board of Education. Ohio has but three 
commissioners. It is not usual to specify as to 
what persons shall compose the committee. In 
Massachusetts the board has consisted of lead- 
ing librarians and literary people. Wisconsin 
and New Hampshire provide for certain state 
officers on the board. 

"The expenses allowed are usually $500, 
Vermont only allowing $300, and Ohio being 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



27 



most liberal in appropriating $1000. The east- 
ern states, as a rule, appropriate $100 for the 
establishment of a free public library in any 
town fulfilling the conditions of the law, Con- 
necticut alone allowing $200, and no provision 
being made in Wisconsin. Excepting in Massa- 
chusetts, where an annual report is required, 
the law provides for biennial reports, usually 
printed as a state document. The New Hamp- 
shire report is a supplement to that of the state 
librarian. The contents are uniform, usually 
consisting of the library laws of the state, his- 
torical and statistical matter, and suggestions as 
to library methods." 

This was followed by a paper on the " Rela- 
tions of schools and libraries," by Miss Mae 
E. Schreiber, of the Normal School, Milwaukee. 
Miss Schreiber, whose work in connection with 
library reading has attracted so much atten- 
tion, was very enthusiastic and gave inspira- 
tion to others in the following : 

" Each [the librarian and the teacher] needs 
the other to carry on her work to best advan- 
tage. The teacher must be the inspirer, the 
finder of interests, the guide to the individual; 
the librarian must stand ready to meet the 
demands inspired by the teacher, and must do 
what she can to keep enthusiasm alive. Both 
working together may, through the children, 
reach out into the community. 

" The teacher must arouse interest and create 
new interests. She must be a reader, a fre- 
quenter of the library, where she may help 
both librarian and children. She must teach 
children how to read and to get the best there is 
in a book, not by preaching or examining, but 
by heart-to-heart talks over good things found. 
She must appeal to children's sympathies, help 
them to admire and to love the noblest. She, 
as well as the librarian, ought to be trained 
for this work." 

Dr. F. W. Gunsaulus, president of Armour 
Institute of Technology, entered the room at 
this point, and in a few happy remarks gave to 
the association a hearty welcome, expressing 
his appreciation of the efforts that were being 
made by the association and assuring it of 
his sympathy and co-operation with them. 

Miss Ahern presented a paper on the " Li- 
brary Section of the N. E. A.," giving a his- 
tory of the formation of that section at Buffalo 
last July, and outlining the work that the sec- 
tion hopes to accomplish in the future. 

Mr. Homer Bevans, president of the Illinois 
State Teachers' Association, then spoke at 
some length upon the " Relations of schools 
andlibraries." He said in part : "To my mind 
the centre of every community should be the 
school-house and the operations of the school ; 
but these operations ought to be made more 
extensive than they have been in the past. 
Nobody looks to the school-house for informa- 
tion as to the telegraphic reports of the results 
of the election. Nobody looks to the school- 
house for any information of the Deity; no in- 
formation as to salvation. No, there is one 
thing left to the school-house, and that is, to 
take care of the babies. Political information 
we get at the saloon, and religious information 



we get at the church. We simply learn to read 
some words and go out and call it education, 
and I am glad to see an attempt of the library 
people to do something to make use of the 
school-house, or if it is the other way, to en- 
large the functions of the school-house. There 
ought to be telephonic communications with 
the school-house. All roads ought to lead to 
the school-house, as all roads once met in 
Rome. The state teachers' association will 
be glad to welcome the, library people to its 
ranks." 

This was followed by a paper on the " Pres- 
ent status of school libraries in Illinois," by 
Mr. W. W. Bishop, of the Garrett Biblical In- 
stitute, Evanston. Mr. Bishop gave much 
practical information. The present school law 
provides for the purchase of libraries and ap- 
paratus from the school funds remaining af- 
ter all necessary expenses are paid, no provis- 
ions being made for appropriations for libra- 
ry purposes in making up the estimates. In 
giving data for the condition of libraries in 
the district schools of Illinois, there was found 
to be such a tremendous increase of the year 
1895 over 1894, in the number of districts re- 
porting libraries, in the number of volumes 
of these libraries, and in the number of vol- 
umes purchased, that the figures were regarded 
as almost untrustworthy ; but as there were a 
number of prominent educators present who 
corroborated the statements made, there can 
be no doubt of their correctness. The Illinois 
Pupils' Reading Circle, under the direction of 
the State Teachers' Association, has been very 
instrumental in awakening the interest of 
teacher, child, and parent in the matter. 

"Some of the needs and difficulties of the 
country districts " was the subject of a paper 
by Miss Milner, of the Illinois State Normal 
University. Miss Milner gave a number of 
interesting and amusing incidents gathered 
from the personal experience of teachers, and 
showed that the difficulties to be overcome are 
manifold. The people themselves do not al- 
ways realize the want of that which they have 
never had. 

This was followed by the report of the com- 
mittee on the state commission by the chair- 
man, Mr. A. H. Hopkins, of the John Crerar 
Library, Chicago. Mr. Hopkins called atten- 
tion to the circular which had been issued in 
accordance with instructions received at the 
last meeting of the association, urging com- 
pliance with the demands contained therein. 
He then presented the draft of a bill for pres- 
entation at the coming session of the state 
legislature, also in accordance with instruc- 
tions. The bill read as follows : 

" t Be it enacted by the people of the state of 
Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, 
that: 

" Section I. The governor shall appoint five 
residents of the state who shall form a board 
of library commissioners. One member of 
said board shall be appointed for the term of 
five years, one for four years, one for three 
years, one for two years, and one for one year; 
and thereafter the term of office of the commis- 



28 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



sioners shall be five years. All vacancies on 
said board, whether occurring by expiration of 
term or otherwise, shall be filled by the gov- 
ernor. The board shall annually elect a chair- 
man and a secretary. 

"Section 2. The board shall give advice 
and counsel to libraries in the state, and to 
all communities which may propose to estab- 
lish them, as to the best means of establishing 
and administering such libraries, the selection 
of books, cataloging, and other details of li- 
brary management. The board may also send 
its members to aid in organizing new libraries 
or in improving those already established. 
The board shall make an annual report to the 
governor, and the usual number of copies of 
this report shall be published as other official 
reports are published. 

" Section 3. No member of the board shall 
receive any compensation for services as a 
member, but travelling expenses of members 
in attending meetings of the board or in visit- 
ing or establishing libraries, and other inci- 
dental and necessary expenses connected with 
the work of the board shall be paid, provided 
that the whole amount shall not exceed the 
sum of $1000 in any one year. All bills in- 
curred by the board or by its members under 
this law shall be certified by the chairman 
and secretary of the board to the Secretary of 
State, who shall cause the same to be paid from 
the state treasury, and there is hereby an- 
nually appropriated from the general funds in 
the state treasury, not otherwise appropriated, 
a sufficient sum to carry into effect the pro- 
visions of this act. 

" Section 4. This act shall take effect and 
be in force from and after its passage and pub- 
lication." 

The discussion that followed, led by Mrs. 
Dixson, of the University of Chicago, was 
spirited, to the point, and participated in by 
many. Mr. J. W. Menninger, assistant super- 
intendent of public instruction, and other 
prominent educators of the state, spoke en- 
thusiastically on the subject, offering their 
cordial support in the establishment of a li- 
brary section of the Illinois State Teachers' 
Association at the coming meeting of the asso- 
ciation, Dec. 29-31, at Springfield. Owing to 
the fact that so many educators have mani- 
fested so much interest in the movement, it is 
more than possible that the section will soon 
be an established fact. 

Before adjournment of the morning session 
Miss Hinrichsen gave information in regard to 
another bill which is to be presented to the 
state legislature at its session in January; its 
object is to secure the appointment of a library 
commission composed of six persons, who shall 
be non-partisan, who shall have charge of the 
libraries under state control, to promote the 
system of civil service in the personnel of the 
various library forces. 

The afternoon session opened with an ad- 
dress by Mr. John T. Ray, of the board of di- 
rectors of the Illinois Pupils' Reading Circle. 
Mr. Ray gave an interesting account of the 
Circle and the good work that it was ac- 



complishing, commended highly the idea of a 
state commission, and gave assurance of his 
hearty support in the formation of the library 
section of the state teachers' association. He 
brought out many important points of con- 
nection between the school teacher and the li- 
brarian. 

Colonel Thompson, director of the Evanston 
Public Library, followed with a talk on the li- 
brary and the school, telling of the close con- 
nection between the two as it exists in Evanston 
and the good results obtained from the joint 
meetings of the librarians and teachers. 

After further discussion the report of the com- 
mittee on the state library commission was ac- 
cepted, committee discharged, and the report 
referred to the executive committee for their 
consideration and for preparation of the bill for 
presentation to the legislature, provided the 
committee found it advisable. For this pur- 
pose the executive committee was increased by 
three members of the original committee, mak- 
ing a committee of seven. 

Miss Sharp followed with a report of the 
Bureau of Information. The report was very 
complete and clearly demonstrated the need of 
a state commission. The work as done by the 
bureau was carefully outlined ; some of the in- 
quiries received by the bureau were read, and 
the information given included a statement of 
the legal mode of procedure to be followed by 
libraries in obtaining state publications, the 
scope and functions of the state library and 
of the state historical library, proposed work 
of the library section of the state teachers' 
association when established, and an explana- 
tion of the library extension lectures to be given 
by the class-study department of the Univer- 
sity Extension division of the University of 
Chicago. 

The formation of this department has been 
under discussion for some time, and has 
just been definitely decided upon by President 
Harper, of the University of Chicago. Accord- 
ing to the rules of the department each course 
must consist of at least 12 lessons of two hours 
each. The following topics are suggested for a 
possible course, in order to make the plan clear: 

" I. Library extension. 2. Library training. 
3. Home libraries. 4. Travelling libraries. 
5. Libraries and schools. 6. Libraries and 
clubs. 7. Bookbuying. 8. Bookbinding. 9- 
12. Use of reference-books; or, Administrative 
principles. 

" The class-study department of University 
Extension is best suited to this work, because 
it will form a class if six people desire it and 
will support it, and the subject is too new to 
justify support in a popular lecture course. Fi- 
nancial support means that each pupil shall pay 
$6 for the course of 12 lessons, and that the 
class, if outside of Chicago, shall pay the teach- 
er's travelling expenses. The plan has been 
proposed to several towns, and each answer 
expressed interest and gave assurance that it 
was needed, and one city has guaranteed two 
classes or more and wishes the work to begin 
at once. The library is not to train library as- 
sistants nor to interfere with nor criticise local 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



29 



libraries, but rather to furnish information in 
regard to the work of a comparatively new pro- 
fession information which may help people 
in their studies or which may incline them to 
help their local library. Students will probably 
be drawn from women's clubs, teachers, and 
high school pupils. It is to be the means of 
giving the people information in regard to the 
scope of library work and the use of libraries 
without touching technical details." 

The report was accepted, and the thanks of 
the association extended to Miss Sharp for giv- 
ing her time and energy to this work. 

Mr. Willcox followed with a most com- 
prehensive paper on the "Illinois state li- 
brary law, and what amendments to the same 
have been suggested by the experience of 24 
years." Mr. Willcox framed the original state 
law, and consequently was well qualified to 
discuss the question in hand. The library law 
passed by the legislature of Illinois in 1872 was 
the first free public library law placed on the 
statute-book of any state in the Union the 
pioneer and model of many library laws adopted 
by other states since. 

Mr. Willcox considered the six important 
points which the law so carefully and wisely 
provides for, viz.: i. Where shall we lodge 
the power of initiative in starting a public li- 
brary: in the voters of the city at a general 
election or in the city council? 2. Shall the tax 
be mandatory or permissive? 3. Shall the li- 
brary board have exclusive control of library 
funds? 4. Of how many members should the 
library board consist ? 5. How shall the 
election or appointment of the nine members of 
the library board be made ? 6. When shall the 
library year end ? 

He said that in his opinion the Illinois law 
could be amended to advantage in two particu- 
lars only: i. By restoring to library boards ab- 
solute control over library funds. 2. By al- 
lowing more time in which to prepare the 
annual report perhaps by making the year 
end with the calendar year, Dec. 31. 

There was a thorough discussion of the 
points brought out by Mr. Willcox by many of 
the librarians, and there seemed to be a con- 
sensus of opinion favorable to the amendments 
suggested by him and of these only. The fur- 
ther consideration of this matter was left to the 
committee of seven appointed on the state com- 
mission. 

At the opening session the paper of Mr. H. 
W. Milligan on the " Relations of a college li- 
brary to the student " was read by Mr. Bick- 
nell, of Champaign. 

After transacting a little business the meet- 
ing adjourned for the social side of the session, 
and a pleasant two hours were spent enjoying 
the hospitality of Miss Sharp and the young 
ladies of the department of library economy 
of the Institute, renewing old acquaintances 
and making new ones. At the morning session 
the colors of the association were chosen 
white and purple. 

The regular annual meeting of the associa- 
tion will be held Wednesday, Jan. 20, 1897, at 
Springfield. EVVA L. MOORE, Secretary. 



INDIANA LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Miss Elizabeth D. Swan, Purdue 
University, Lafayette. 

Secretary and Treasurer : Miss M. E. Ahern, 
Library Bureau, 125 Franklin street, Chicago 
111. 

IT was decided at a meeting of the executive 
board of the Indiana Library Association, last 
October, to make the annual meeting of the 
association this year a library institute : viz., to 
give the larger part of the time to instruction 
in modern library methods and administration. 
In accordance with this view arrangements 
were made with Miss Cornelia Marvin, of the 
department of library economy of Armour In- 
stitute, Chicago, for a series of lessons along 
these lines. The library institute was well ad- 
vertised throughout the state, and when it 
opened on Tuesday morning, Dec, 29, there 
was an attendance of 60 persons more or 
less actively engaged in library work. This 
being the first library institute on record, there 
was some curiosity as to what would be done. 

After a few remarks by the president, R. F. 
Kautz, and the secretary's report, the first 
work, "Ordering and accessioning," was be- 
gun by Miss Marvin. She said the selection 
of books was a matter to be left almost entirely 
to the librarian. It is important that the pub- 
lic be given a chance to suggest books, as it 
will give them a sort of proprietary interest in 
the library and lead to cheerful co-operation. 
Different blanks and other means of securing 
suggestions were then explained. The propor- 
tion of classes of books as given in the A. L. A. 
primer were explained and Public Libraries 
was recommended, though local needs might 
modify it. Buy books often in small quantities; 
let the public have books while they are fresh 
and new; buy well-bound books, as it is 
cheaper in the end; advertise by bulletin 
boards and in the local papers the arrival of 
new books. Buy from one agent, who will 
grow to look out for the interests of the 
library. Write the order plainly, giving the 
title, author, and publisher, and if possible, 
price. 

As to accessioning, the speaker said that 
after the book had been paid for and received, 
it was not properly part of the library until it 
had been accessioned. Properly kept, the ac- 
cession book was a record of all books that 
had ever come into the library, this book and 
the one showing books withdrawn being a 
record of the books on the shelves. She urged 
the importance of putting the accession num- 
ber safely in the book where it could not be 
destroyed. She discussed at some length the 
technical part of the work, the arrangement of 
the books, the proper labelling of the volumes, 
method of cutting the leaves, marking, and so 
forth. Members of the institute were fur- 
nished with prepared samples of suggested 
forms for every part of the work of the insti- 
tute. 

This was followed by a discussion as to the 
method of ordering serials and periodicals, and 
what ones to have. It was conceded, to start 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



with, that most medium-sized libraries would 
have from $100 to $150 a year to spend in 
periodical literature. 

The question was, what would this money 
buy? Nearly everybody present took part in 
this discussion, and after an hour's delibera- 
tion the list recommended was as follows: 
Atlantic, Harper, Century, Scribner, Harper's 
Round Table, Youth's Companion, St. Nicholas, 
Arena, Forum, North American Review, Review 
of Reviews, Harper's Weekly, Outlook, McClure's, 
London Graphic, Modern Art, Nineteenth Cen- 
tury, BlackivoooTs Edinburgh Magazine, Critic, 
Dial, Nation, Publishers' Weekly, Kindergarten 
Magazine, Popular Science Monthly, Scientific 
American, Engineering, Art Amateur, Life, 
Outing, Ladies' Home Journal. The list price 
of this combination of periodicals was found to 
be $119.25, which, with the discount allowed 
by the publishers to the public libraries, would 
'amount to about $100. 

The afternoon session was fully occupied 
with a discussion of methods of classification 
and cataloging, Miss Marvin closely following 
the line of instruction in these matters as prac- 
tised in the library schools. The general 
principles of classification were brought out, 
fixed and relative location dwelt upon, and the 
D. C. and E. C. explained and compared. Each 
was illustrated by many examples, and general 
directions as to the study of and adaptation 
were given. 

The card catalog in its simplest form was 
taken up and general rules and principles 
mentioned. The various cases and cards were 
spoken of and suggestions given to beginners 
as to catalog literature and library handwriting. 
Following this was practical work of cataloging 
one book which required all of the generally 
used cards and forms. 

Tuesday evening the members of the Insti- 
tute and their friends met Miss Catherine 
Merrill in the parlor of the Denison and listened 
to a highly enjoyable paper by her on "The 
art of criticism." It was the treat of the 
whole meeting to the librarians. After a long 
life of study in the field of literature, Miss 
Merrill gives a sweetly gracious but strong in- 
spiration to those who hear her to follow in 
the beautiful path along which she has gone 
and which no doubt has helped to make her 
the gentle, refined, helpful but strong character 
whom every one that knows her loves. 

Wednesday's session opened with an in- 
creased attendance and interest. The first 
topic taken up was that of the shelf department. 
The work here followed closely the topics given 
in the outline under 025.8 in the D. C. The 
Cutter author numbers were explained, and care 
of maps, clippings, pamphlets, etc., treated. 
The shelf list in various forms was discussed 
and the manner of taking inventory described. 
Some time was given to the care and catalog- 
ing of government documents and every libra- 
rian was urged to study the reports and indexes 
relating to them. The subject of charging was 
first presented in a general way, mentioning the 
importance of good service in this department, 
the chief points of good charging systems, and 



the value of statistics which might be gathered 
here. Two systems, one adapted to a small 
public library and one to a college library, 
were explained in detail and illustrated by 
samples. 

The speaker urged all librarians to collect 
samples and study methods of the libraries 
about them in this as well as in other depart- 
ments. 

The work on binding and repair consisted 
of a brief talk on binding materials, lettering, 
and the process of sending books to the binder, 
also considering the library preparation and 
treatment of the books when returned. 

Wednesday afternoon's program had been 
arranged for the interest of those not engaged 
in specially technical library work. A large 
number of school people and club members 
were present. 

A. V. Babine, librarian of Indiana Univer- 
sity, read one of the most interesting papers 
of the session on the problems and possibili- 
ties of a college library. While, perhaps, the 
subject was an old one, it was presented in an 
interestingly fresh way by Mr. Babine's subtle 
but mild sarcasm, levelled at the well-known 
weaknesses of library architecture, administra- 
tion, and purposes. Among other things he 
said: "In the problems of a college library 
that of having a suitable building is the fore- 
most. The plan of the building should be ap- 
proved by one or more (better more) practi- 
cal librarians. It is easier to enumerate the 
requ'sites of a library building than to find a 
library possessing them. Oftentimes a build- 
ing is erected by one who never made a study 
of library architecture, but who, with infatuat- 
ed pride, fills the landscape with towers and 
turrets, arches and curvings, gargoyles and 
dragons, who throws in the floors and sumpt- 
ously clumsy fireplaces, who calls a building 
fireproof with a heating plant in the base- 
ment, and who puts a plate over the entrance, 
reading, ' Library hall date.' " 

A college library is next to useless without a 
good dictionary catalog, fully representing the 
contents of the stacks, but this catalog should 
not take the place of indexes to individual 
books. The staff of a college library must 
possess many qualifications, but above all, 
familiarity with foreign languages. Improve- 
ments in spelling foreign languages ought not 
be indulged in, and least of all before their 
grammars are mastered or before titles are cut 
down with due respect for sense and meaning. 
The importance of the staff's service and its 
right to an independent existence must be rec- 
ognized by the college authorities. A college 
library ought to be, to an extent, a library 
school. It should not refuse to give instruc- 
tion in detail of library work. The bibliog- 
raphical equipment of a college library should 
fully satisfy its own practical needs and serve 
as a sample collection for those interested in 
library work. Mr. Babine closed his address 
with a stirring appeal to men of means for the 
endowment and equipment of a college library 
in Indiana that shall redeem the lack of munifi- 
cence now existing along that line. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



Mr. Babine was followed by Miss Merica 
Hoagland, president of the Indiana Union of 
Literary Clubs, who gave an interesting and 
suggestive talk on the way in which clubs 
might aid in the establishment of libraries and 
on the strengthening of their influence and 
helpfulness after they were established. 

This paper was followed by the presentation 
of the outline of a library bill proposed by the 
teachers' committee, to be presented to the 
next legislature. It was given by Supt. Goss, 
of Indianapolis, and provoked much discus- 
sion. It seemed to subordinate the library 
side of the question in relation to the school 
side too much to meet the wants and wishes 
of many present. Rutherford P. Hayes was 
next introduced to the association, and ex- 
pressed the opinion that it was a better plan 
to divorce the library management from the 
schools. Library committees should be sepa- 
rate bodies, free from school authorities' super- 
vision. He then spoke of the plans and pur- 
poses of the A. L. A. and urged an interest 
in it by those present. He gave an account of 
library commissions and their work, particular- 
ly of the Ohio commission. The expression of 
opinion at the close of the session showed that 
his view of library management was more 
favored than that presented by the teachers. 

Wednesday night the usual reception was 
given the librarians and their friends by the 
Bowen-Merrill Co. in the Commercial Club 
parlors. Mr. Hayes, Miss Hoagland, and Miss 
Marvin were the guests of honor. Refresh- 
ments were served and a delightful company 
lingered till a late hour. 

The session was opened Thursday morning 
by Miss Marvin on reference work. This was 
a general talk on the objects and methods of ref- 
erence work. The fact that the books were to 
be brought to the readers, as well as the readers 
to the books was emphasized. Work with in- 
dividuals, schools, clubs, factories, etc., was 
dwelt upon. Reference-books and such aids 
as indexes and guides were mentioned. Valu- 
able library bulletins and reference lists were 
exhibited and the manner of compiling these 
explained. The arguments for and against 
access to shelves were briefly stated and a gen- 
eral discussion followed. 

In library literature, periodicals, handbooks, 
catalogs, reports, etc., of special value to li- 
brarians were described and exhibited. The 
importance of a librarian keeping in touch with 
all the literature of his profession was urged. 

This finished the practical work of the in- 
stitute to the eminent satisfaction of all in at- 
tendance, the only regret expressed being in 
regard to the limited time of the meetings. An 
urgent request was made for a longer session 
at another time. A vote of thanks was given 
to the libraries of Ft. Wayne, Indianapolis, 
Evansville, Terre Haute, and Franklin Col- 
lege, to the Bowen-Merrill Co. and Library 
Bureau. 

The officers elected for the year are: Eliza- 
beth D. Swan, of Purdue Univ., president ; T. 
S. Leach, Kokomo, vice-president ; M. E. 
Ahern, secretary and treasurer. 



IOWA LIBRARY SOCIETY. 

President : J. W. Rich, State University Li- 
brary, Iowa City. 

Secretary : Miss Ella McLoney, Public Li- 
brary, Des Moines. 

MAINE LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: E. W. Hall, Colby University, 
Waterville. 

Secretary : Miss H. C. Fernald, State College, 
Orono. 

Treasurer: Prof. G: T. Little, Bowdoin Col- 
lege, Brunswick. 

MASSACHUSETTS LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Herbert Putnam, Public Library 
Boston. 

Secretary : W: H. Tillinghast, Harvard Col- 
lege Library, Cambridge. 

Treasurer : Miss A. L. Sargent, Public Li- 
brary, Medford. 

THE executive committee have decided not 
to resume the preparation of the Lists of 
selected fiction. After the question of con- 
tinuance was referred to them at the last meet- 
ing of the club, the committee sent circulars to 
the 600 persons who had received the lists, 
asking earnestly for replies to inquiries about 
the real practical value of the lists. From the 
replies received about 230 it appeared 
that, while the lists were highly praised, the 
former method of publication, though preferred 
by a majority, could not be continued. The 
lists were found to be practically useful to a 
limited class of libraries scattered over the 
whole country. The committee, therefore, re- 
solved not to assume for the club the expens e 
and burden of this work by their own author- 
ity, but to report their conclusions in detail at 
a club meeting. 

The next meeting of the club will be held at 
Hartford, Ct., on February 3, 'at the union 
meeting of New England associations, under 
the auspices of the Connecticut Library Asso- 
ciation. WM. H. TILLINGHAST, Secretary. 

MICHIGAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: H: M. Utley, Public Library, 
Detroit. 

Secretary: Mrs. A. F. Parsons, Public Li- 
brary, Bay City. 

Treasurer: Miss Lucy Ball, Public Library, 
Grand Rapids. 

MINNESOTA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

President: Dr. W: W. Folwell, State Univer- 
sity, Minneapolis. 

Secretary and Treasurer : Miss Gratia Coun- 
tryman, Public Library, Minneapolis. 

THE Minnesota Library Association held its 
fifth annual meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 29, in 
St. Paul and Minneapolis. A strong attempt 
had previously been made to make this year's 
meeting an especially large and profitable one, 
and the results were not disappointing. The 
state educational association, which met in 
St. Paul on the same date, set aside one session 
of its meetings for the discussion of library 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



matters. The program for this session was 
planned by the library association, and was a 
joint meeting of the two associations. This 
seems to be a good beginning toward establish- 
ing friendly relations throughout the state be- 
tween schools and libraries. It will at any rate 
go to prove that the two branches of educa- 
tional work are aiming toward the same re- 
sults, a point of view which people in Minne- 
sota have not always been quick to take. 

The papers read before the joint meeting 
were as follows: " Library economy in the 
college curriculum," by Miss Lettie Crafts, as- 
sistant librarian of the state university; " Cor- 
relation of the library and school," by Dr. J. 
K. Hosmer, librarian of the Minneapolis Public 
Library; " Minnesota district school libraries," 
by Mr. W. W. Pendergast, State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction. All of these papers were 
listened to with interest, and went far to iden- 
tify the work of the two associations. Miss 
Crafts's paper pleaded for a chair of bibliog- 
raphy in the college faculty and the system- 
atic training of students in using a library. 
She also pleaded for a course in the summer 
school, which should give the teachers an op- 
portunity of learning something of library 
economy. The growing high school libraries 
and district libraries almost demand that the 
teachers should have at least an elementary 
knowledge of library science. 

The afternoon session, held in the Minne- 
apolis Public Library, was a very interesting 
one. Over 35 members were present, repre- 
senting the libraries of St. Paul, Minneapolis, 
State University, Duluth, St. Cloud, Mankato, 
Rochester, Red Wing, Anoka, and Stillwater. 
The president, Dr. W. W. Folwell, was absent, 
and Dr. J. K. Hosmer, of Minneapolis, pre- 
sided. The papers were uniformly good and 
on live topics, the work with the children, per- 
haps, receiving more attention than any other 
one subject. The reports from the various 
town libraries showed great progress through 
the past year, and left one with the impression 
that the Minnesota library spirit is greatly 
awakened. 

The evening session found 45 present. The 
chief paper of the evening was by Miss M. J. 
Evans, of Carleton College, Northfield. She 
spoke on the subject of " How best to render 
the college student familiar with the college li- 
brary." Her remarks were especially helpful 
to college librarians, and set forth particularly 
the field of usefulness which is open to college 
libraries, but every librarian present felt that 
her own horizon had been enlarged, and that 
many of the suggestions were applicable to 
her own case. 

Miss Countryman followed with a paper on 
the need of a state library commission, and 
gave briefly some facts in regard to the bill 
which is to be introduced this winter in the 
state legislature. 

Then followed a pleasant social session, made 
pleasanter by ice-cream and cake. The gal- 
leries of the library had been lighted, and the 
association was taken through the building to 
see the picture gallery and the collection of 



casts which has recently been placed in the 
building. And so closed the best meeting 
which the association has ever held. 

GRATIA A. COUNTRYMAN, Secretary. 

NEBRASKA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, 

President: W. E. Jillson, Doane College, 
Crete. 

Secretary: Miss MaryL. Jones, State Univer- 
sity, Lincoln. 

Treasurer: Mrs. M. E. Abell, Public Li- 
brary, Beatrice. 

THE Nebraska Library Association held its 
second annual meeting in the library building 
the state university on the afternoon of Dec. 
31, from 2 to 4 o'clock. The association is an 
auxiliary of the state teachers' association, 
and was held in connection with the annual 
meeting of that body. The session proved 
exceedingly interesting. It was given up al- 
most wholly to the discussion of travelling 
libraries, and suggestions for instituting this 
system in the state. 

The subject was brought before the associa- 
tion in a paper by Miss Edna D. Bullock, for- 
merly of the state library, who discussed at 
length the New York system of travelling li- 
braries, and told of the success of the plan 
there and in other states where it has been 
adopted. She set forth the scope, purposes, 
practical workings, and cost of a state system 
of travelling libraries, and urged that the mat- 
ter be given serious attention in Nebraska. 

President D. A. Campbell, of the state li- 
brary, then called for a full discussion of the 
subject, and suggestions as to the best means 
of bringing the matter before the legislature. 
Members of the Federation of Women's Clubs 
were present, and as pioneers who have begun 
a system of travelling libraries on a small 
scale promised all possible aid to the move- 
ment for a state system. 

A communication from the university re- 
gents, promising hearty support of the meas- 
ure, was read by the secretary, Mary L. Jones. 
Chancellor MacLean then spoke, heartily favor- 
ing the travelling library. He said he had 
done all he could to help formulate and pass a 
travelling library bill in Minnesota. Such li- 
braries, he thought, fostered the growth of the 
true public libraries, not libraries endowed by 
private munificence but maintained by the 
state as truly educational institutions for the 
uplifting of its people. He suggested that a 
travelling library system should have a close 
connection with the state educational system. 
It should act as an aid in the work of university 
extension, which is only beginning in Nebraska. 
The travelling library could reach places where 
the university extension course could not 
could give university extension work down to 
the fingers and toes, as it were, of this state of 
magnificent distances/ He spoke of the enthu- 
siastic support of the regents and faculty for 
this measure, and gave some information as 
to the nature of the bill presented to the Min- 
nesota legislature. 

Prof. W. E. Jillson, of Doane College, fa- 
vored travelling libraries, and thought a bill 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



33 



should be modelled to suit local conditions. 
Nebraska needs such libraries much more than 
a thickly-settled state like New York, where 
they have proved so useful. 

The association then voted to present a 
memorial to the coming legislature on the sub- 
ject, and to work for the adoption of a bill mak- 
ing a beginning of a travelling library system 
in the state. 

Mr. Campbell read a very interesting article 
in the Chicago Times-Herald, Dec. 26, about 
the travelling libraries started by Senator Stout, 
and later by Mr. Witter, in two localities of 
Wisconsin. The hunger of the people for 
books, their careful and constant use of them, 
were illustrated there and made an almost 
pathetic plea for the plan which has given 
them so much pleasure. 

Officers of the association were elected for 
the coming year as follows: President, Prof. 
W. E. Jillson, of Doane College; first vice- 
president, Miss Edna D. Bullock; second vice- 
president, Miss Carrie Dennis; secretary, Miss 
Mary L. Jones; treasurer, Mrs. M. E. Abell, of 
Beatrice. 

Provision was made for having the state 
library law and a list of the libraries of the 
state published, in order to interest people in 
the subject of libraries. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: W. W. Bailey, Nashua. 

Corresponding Secretary : Miss Grace Blan- 
chard, Public Library, Concord. 

Librarian and Treasurer : Miss A. M. Col- 
by, Public Library, Concord. 

NEW JERSEY LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: John B. Thompson, Trenton, 
N. J. 

Secretary : Miss Beatrice Winser, Public Li- 
brary, Newark. 

Treasurer: Miss Emma L. Adams, Public 
Library, Plainfield. 

NEW YORK LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: A. L. Peck, Public Library, 
Gloversville. 

Secretary : W: R. Eastman, State Library, 
Albany. 

Treasurer: J. N. Wing, Chas. Scribner's 
Sons, 153 Fifth avenue, New York City. 

JOINT MEETING WITH THE N. Y. LIBRARY CLUB.* 

THE annual joint meeting of the New York 
State Library Association and the New York 
Library Club was held this year on January 14, 
in Brooklyn, at the invitation of the Brooklyn 
Public Library Association. The meeting was 
an ll-day, and for that matter almost an all- 
night, affair; the morning and afternoon ses- 
sions being held in the Art Building, on Monta- 
gue street, and a public meeting in the evening 
at the Academy of Music, having been arranged 
to awaken public interest in the matter of 



*This report is largely prepared from the excellent 
notes taken during the meeting by Miss J. A. Rathbone, 
secretary of the N. Y. Library Club. 



establishing a free public library for Brooklyn. 
The Clarendon Hotel was the headquarters of 
the visiting librarians, and here the annual 
dinner was served, in more abbreviated fashion 
than in former years, when this prandial gath- 
ering has formed the social finish of the con- 
ference. There was a large attendance from 
out of town, and Brooklyn and New York also 
made an admirable showing, nearly 200 per- 
sons being present during most of the day. 

The meeting was called to order at 10:20 
a.m., Mr. C: Alex. Nelson acting as chair- 
man in the absence of Mr. Larned, who was 
unable to attend on account of the impor- 
tant business now pending in Buffalo regarding 
the change of the Buffalo Library from a sub- 
scription institution to a free public library. 
Mr. Nelson in a few words welcomed the asso- 
ciations to Brooklyn, which he said had often 
been called the sleeping-chamber of New York, 
and which perhaps merited this designation, 
at least so far as regarded public libraries. 
Nevertheless, though Brooklyn could not boast 
a public library it possessed its full quota of 
free libraries, in the Union for Christian Work 
with its 30,000 volumes and its circulation of 
200,000, in the Pratt Institute library, and in a 
number of other libraries, while through the 
efforts of the Brooklyn Public Library Associ- 
ation and the stimulus derived from the meet- 
ing it was hoped that it would not be long 
before a free public library would be added to 
the list. 

A motion made by Mr. Eastman was carried, 
that the chair appoint a committee to nominate 
officers for the state association; another motion 
appointing a committee of two from the state 
association to act with the club in regaid to 
resolutions was also carried, and Mr. Eastman 
recommended that Mr. Dewey, president of 
the library section of the N. E. A., be asked 
to speak on the relation between that body and 
the library associations at the close of the 
morning's program. 

The regular program was then opened by 
Mr. Eastman, who read an interesting and en- 
couraging paper on "Library progress in the 
state of New York." The library record of 
New York City was first noted. The item of 
$63, 500 appropriated for four free circulating li- 
braries in the city in January, 1896, had in- 
creased by January i, 1897 58$, or to $96,700, 
to be shared by 10 distinct library corporations, 
which if reckoned by branches as well as by 
parent libraries gives a total of 19 libraries 
officially recognized by the city, and circulating 
in 1896 1,529,385 v., an increase of 350,000 v. 
in two years. The first notable impulse to the 
library movement in the state was given by the 
university law of 1892, the salient points of 
which were briefly reviewed by Mr. Eastman, 
by which public libraries are fully recog- 
nized as institutions of higher education and 
the promotion of their interests is made a duty 
of the regents of the university. Under this 
law for five years $25,000 a year has been ap- 
propriated for the libraries of the state and 161 
different libraries have received aid, some of 
them two, three, and four times. In less than 



34 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



five years 106 public libraries were chartered 
by the university, 22 were admitted as uni- 
versity institutions, 41 were registered as 
maintaining a proper standard, and 17 were 
organized under general laws, six of which 
were subsequently admitted and five registered 
by the university. 

In 1896 the state university received the re- 
ports of 807 libraries, containing 4,654,961 v., 
and circulating 5.003,402 v. In free circulating 
libraries alone the increase has been from 238 
in 1893 to 351, a growth of 113 or 47 in three 
years ; these now contain 1,313,299 v. and cir- 
culated in 1896 2,933,628 v. " Tnese figures 
mean that, on an average, there were 10,750 
books issued every day in the year from the free 
libraries, where three years ago there were only 
6260 books a day, and that an increase of 2150 
a day belongs to the last year." As an instance 
the case of the Utica Public Library was cited, 
which three years ago reported a circulation of 
about 158 a day, and which now has an aver- 
age circulation of 600 a day and a frequent 
issue of 1000 a day. 

The new buildings acquired by libraries in 
the course of the past four years were briefly 
reviewed, and 36 new and costly structures 
were noted, while a brief summary was given 
of the many new libraries established all over 
the state. 

The travelling libraries conducted by the 
state were described, and statistics of their 
use were given. There are now in use 234 
sets of the 28 general and nine subject libraries ; 
768 libraries have been sent out on 524 applica- 
tions, and the reported circulation has been 

85,393. 

Mr. Eastman touched upon the increasing 
frequency with which requests for advice and 
assistance are sent to the library training 
schools from local libraries and organizations, 
on the growing thoroughness and extension of 
the library school courses, and on the wide sig- 
nificance of the recent establishment of a li- 
brary section in te National Educational As- 
sociation, and of the development of library 
associations. " All these are multiplying signs 
of the force of the library movement. They 
point to a growing demand for books of the 
better sort, not for entertainment merely, nor 
for excitement, but for information and inspira- 
tion." Mr. Nelson added to Mr. Eastman's 
interesting report the information that a new 
subscription library of 200 members had been 
opened only the day before this meeting by the 
Woman's Fortnightly Club in the 26th ward of 
Brooklyn. 

The following committees were then an- 
nounced: on nominations, A. L. Peck, M. S. 
Cutler, W. S. Sickley; on resolutions, G. H. 
Baker, W. R. Eastman. 

Mr. Richard Jones, Regents literature in- 
spector, then delivered an address on " Litera- 
ture clubs," and the way in which their work 
has been promoted through the university. 
The matter of improving public taste in read- 
ing is one of vital importance. To the question, 
What do people read ? there can be but one 
answer trash, weak trash, not to say vile 



trash. Charles Dudley Warner once asked, 
When do the leisure classes read, and answered 
that it was not in winter, for then the demands 
of society were to be met; nor in summer, for 
then time must be given to recreation. Even 
yet people do not read the great books of the 
world, a statement strikingly illustrated by the 
fact that Mr. Jones had found it impossible to 
get 25 copies of Milton, or Spenser, or Dante 
in the book-stores of Philadelphia. He doubted 
if in all the book-stores of a city of 1,000,000 in- 
habitants there could be found 25 copies of 
"Paradise lost" or of Dante; and twice, in 
Chicago and New York, he had cleared the 
market of copies of Dante. He spoke vigor- 
ously of the need of a higher general standard 
of culture, and of the work done toward that end 
by the literature clubs under direction of the 
regents, who were prepared to furnish courses 
designed not only for teachers and pupils of 
literature, but for all who desired them. He 
mentioned several of the courses now in prep- 
aration or already organized, and urged the co- 
operation of local libraries in the work. The 
books for the courses would, if desired, be 
made a part of the travelling libraries sent to 
communities desiring them. He quoted Wood- 
row Wilson on the value of " mere literature," 
and earnestly urged the claims of the literature 
of power, as more needed than the literature of 
information. 

The next feature of the program was a sym- 
posium on " What should librarians read ? " by 
G. H. Baker, W. A. Bardwell, A. E. Bostwick, 
and Wilberforce Eames. Mr. Baker opened 
the discussion by saying that if he or his col- 
leagues had intended to impress librarians 
with the things they ought to read, but do not, 
that portion of their talk might be omitted, in 
view of Mr. Jones's address. The librarian of 
a modern library, large or small, has so many 
demands upon time and thought that any sys- 
tematic attempt to read is almost impossible, 
except out of business hours. Librarians gen- 
erally must find time to glance at books to see 
what is to be done with them for practical 
purposes. There was no time when so many 
demands were made upon the librarian, when 
the professional standard was so high as at 
present. The librarian should be intelligent, 
widely read, and thoroughly informed, and with 
this greater need there was a smaller possibility 
of meeting it. Some substitutes were suggested 
by which the librarian might, in a measure, 
supply the want of time or opportunity to accom- 
plish the reading so necessary in his work: first, 
adequate, intelligent preparation for his work 
beforehand ; second, an organized systematic 
attempt to utilize others' reading. In a univer- 
sity library it is comparatively easy to enlist 
the help of specialists on different subjects in 
passing on the literature of their subjects for 
the librarian's information, and even in public 
libraries it should be easy to find men and wom- 
en with specific literary taste and knowledge 
who will help him in this way. Some system- 
atic effort should be made by the librarian to 
gather around him people who can counsel him 
on the selection of books and on whose judg- 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



35 



ment and taste he can rely. But the librarian 
cannot get this information at second hand un- 
less he has some capital of his own to start 
with. He should cultivate the power of im- 
bibing briefly a notion of the contents and 
character of a book on almost any subject, of 
obtaining an amount of varied if superficial 
knowledge on most subjects ; but with this he 
should know some one thing thoroughly, that 
he may keep in touch with the methods used 
by students in their investigations and with 
the needs of investigators as a whole. Mr. 
Baker closed with a plea for recreative read- 
ing, often the only kind of reading for which 
the librarian is fit, after the stress of his 
mental work, and recommended a thorough 
acquaintance with the daily papers and with 
the history of our own time as revealed by 
them. 

Mr. Bard well's contribution to the symposium 
was read by his son. It divided the librarian's 
reading into two divisions official and un- 
official; the former consisting of the necessary 
book lists, reviews, catalogs, etc., the latter of 
the general literature that is hardly less im- 
portant. He urged the utilization of odd min- 
utes, the time spent in going to and from 
luncheon, and especially the time spent in 
travelling on street cars, and said that a book 
read but for a short time at frequent intervals 
was better remembered than one read con- 
tinuously. Mr. Bostwick's paper dealt espe- 
cially with reviews as a substitute for reading 
by the librarian, and pointed out the fact that 
modern reviews were written for the critic or 
"for the general reader, but not for the libra- 
rian. What a librarian wants to know about a 
book is: i, to what class of readers does it ap- 
peal? 2, will that class seek for it, or will it be 
desired only by a few ? 3, does it contain any- 
thing objectionable, morally, politically, or from 
a religious standpoint ? 4, what are its literary 
merits ? and 5, how much reliance can be placed 
upon its facts ? None of these questions are 
answered in the ordinary book notices, and the 
only way in which they may be solved is by the 
reviewing of books for librarians by librarians. 
Signed reviews were, from the librarian's 
standpoint, far preferable to unsigned reviews. 
He believed that every book in a library should 
have passed through the librarian's hands. 

Mr. Eamesconcluded the discussion with some 
notes on the necessity of keeping informed in 
the various classes of literature. What a li- 
brarian should read depends largely upon the 
kind of a library under his care, but the thing 
of first importance is to keep in touch with li- 
brary methods and developments. He recom- 
mended that the reading of books in the various 
departments of literature be divided among 
heads of departments, and he said that one of 
the duties of the librarian was the preparation 
of a course of reading for his assistants, to be 
followed at home. 

Miss Cutler and Mr. Richardson both rose to 
endorse Mr. Baker's suggestion that books on 
various subjects be "farmed out" for critical 
reading by specialists, whose work would thus 
materially lighten the duties of the librarian. 



Mr. Dewey took another view of the matter. 
He said that librarians ought to take their 
own medicine and had no more right to ex- 
pect to do their personal reading in office 
hours than had the cashier of a bank or an en- 
gineer. Librarians were paid better salaries, 
given shorter hours and longer vacations be- 
cause their work was being recognized as pro- 
fessional. That meant that they should take 
time for preparation, not only before entering 
their profession but daily while carrying it on. 
When librarians were appointed as mere cus- 
todians of books at trifling salaries they might 
do their reading and study in official hours, 
but now the public demanded their time as 
rigorously as it did that of the expert dentist, 
who would lose his patients if, while being paid 
$6 an hour, he should sit down to read the 
latest work on dentistry. The librarian who 
contented himself with passing on to readers 
only second-hand information without him- 
self knowing thoroughly at least some of the 
great literary masterpieces was making himself 
merely a water-spout instead of a fountain. It 
is his business to urge on the public the read- 
ing of the best books, and he has just as much 
leisure and strength for such reading out of 
office hours as has the merchant or profes- 
sional man who is subjected probably to greater 
nervous strain. The physician notoriously vio- 
lates the rules of health prescribed for his pa- 
tient and the lawyer is the most ingenious and 
persistent violator of the statutes, but the ideal 
librarian cannot preach the reading of the 
literature of power to the rest of the world and 
in his practice neglect it for himself. 

Mr. Cutter agreed with Mr. Dewey that li- 
brarians should know everything, but unfortu- 
nately they did not possess 10 or a dozen con- 
temporaneous lives. He would not advise any 
one to try to read all the books in arts and 
sciences, for instance, and he thought that too 
much should not be expected of librarians in 
that respect. 

Mr. Dewey then spoke briefly on the relation 
that should exist between the library associa- 
tions and the National Educational Association, 
and of the good that co-operation between the 
two could accomplish. On motion of Mr. East- 
man it was "Voted, that this meeting requests 
the executive boards of the New York Library 
Association and the New York Library Club to 
secure, if possible, a representation of their 
respective bodies of not less than five delegates 
at the annual meeting of the National Educa- 
tional Association at Milwaukee in July, 1897." 

The election of officers for 1897 was next in 
order, and resulted as follows: President, A. 
L. Peck, Gloversville Public Library; Vice- 
presidents: Willis A. Bardwell, Brooklyn Pub- 
lic Library, Miss E. G. Baldwin, Teachers 
College, New York; Secretary, W. R. East- 
man, State Library, Albany; Treasurer, J. N. 
Wing, Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. 
The meeting then adjourned. 

The afternoon session opened at 2:30, with 
the presentation of the amendment to article 
6 of the constitution, discussed at the last meet- 
ing, which, on motion of Mr. Eastman, was 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



adopted. The article as amended reads: "There 
shall be regular meetings of the club on the 
second Thursday of each October, November, 
January, March, and May, "the February meet- 
ing being omitted and the first meeting occur- 
ring in October instead of November. The 
following new members were then admitted: 
J. T. Gerald, General Tneological Seminary; 
Miss Jessie Hume, Long Island City; Miss 
Irma Blake, 4 W. gist street, New York; Miss 
Gertrude A. Brewster, Lenox Library. 

The meeting then entered upon the discus- 
sion and criticism of the best books of 1896, to 
which the rest of the afternoon was devoted. 
This exercise was modelled upon the A. L. A. 
catalog supplement session at Cleveland, and 
like that, proved to be of the greatest interest 
and usefulness. There can be little doubt that 
these critical " book talks," so happily planned 
by Miss Cutler, have found permanent place in 
library meetings, and that they can in a meas- 
ure solve some of the difficulties of library re- 
viewing, touched upon in the morning's dis- 
cussion of what librarians should read. A 
classed list of 489 of the leading books of 1896 
had been prepared at the New York State Li- 
brary, and was distributed to those in attend- 
ance at the meeting, while the books in the 
various divisions were presented and com- 
mented upon by various speakers, whose choice, 
however, was not limited to the list, which was 
simply a tentative selection, subject to revision. 
The speaker for each subject or group of sub- 
jects was allowed 10 minutes, except in the 
case of fiction and juvenile books, where 20 
minutes each were given. After a few words of 
introduction by Mr. Eastman, Mr. Peoples pre- 
sented his selection of the reference-books of 
1896, adding to the five titles given in the 
printed list over 30 books of reference pub- 
lished during the year. Among the titles add- 
ed were "American book-prices current," and 
its English congener, "Book-prices current," 
the " American and English cyclopaedia of law." 
Bowerman's " Bibliography of religious de- 
nominations in the U. S.," the "Commercial 
year-book," and the " Cumulative index," the 
second catalog of Peabody Institute, Pirrie's 
" Dictionary of sea terms," Scott's " Book sales 
of 1895," Taylor's " Names and their histories," 
and the recent "Catalogue of government 
documents," issued by Supt. F. A. Crandall. 

E. C. Richardson, of Princeton University, 
was assigned the books on Philosophy and ethics 
and Religion. In the first division, if any titles 
were to be omitted, he suggested that Bigelow's 
" Mystery of sleep," Morton's "On the art of 
living together," and Mrs. Whitney's " Friendly 
letters to girl friends," might be dispensed with, 
and in their place recommended Butler's works, 
edited by Gladstone; Titchenor's "Outline of 
psychology," and Weber's " History of philos 
ophy," which was said to be the first choice of all 
books in that class for the year. In religion 
commendation was given to Abbott's "Chris- 
tianity and social progress," Abraham's "Jew- 
ish life in the middle ages," David's " Buddh- 
ism," and Vincent's "Age of Hildebrand " ; 
"The Bible and the child," by Dean Farrar 



and others, Guerber's "Legends of the Ma- 
donna and Christ," and "Church unity," by 
Shields and others, might be omitted; while 
additions might include Argyle's "Philoso- 
phy of belief," the author's masterpiece; 
Fisher's " History of Christian doctrine," of 
first importance ; Speer's "Study of the man 
Christ Jesus," Byington's " Puritan in England 
and New England," Strong's "Christian eth- 
ics," and Scott's " Origin and development of 
the Nicene theology." 

Natural science and Useful arts were re- 
viewed by T. L. Montgomery, who, as at Cleve- 
land, gave rather short shrift to the " popular" 
scientific books represented by Trowbridge's 
" What is electricity ?" and Chambers's "Story 
of the solar system." Among those commended 
were Mrs. Dana's " Plants and their children," 
Martin's "Story of a piece of coal," and Ma- 
thews's" Familiar trees and their leaves," while 
the list should certainly include Smith's " Eco- 
nomic entomology," one of the best scientific 
books of the year. 

Mr. Cutter prefaced his talk on books in Fine 
arts by a few words on the principles to be ob- 
served in buying art-books for public libraries. 
He thought that books that teach technique 
are not the first bo 'ks to be desired, but that 
it is quite as necessary to have works not of 
information but of inspiration on art themes. 
Of the books listed he mentioned as of special 
value Gardner's " Handbook of Greek sculpt- 
ure," Muther's " History of modern painting," 
Sturgis's "European architecture," and Tar- 
bell's "History of Greek art"; while the 
selection should also include Berenson's "Flor- 
entine painters of the Renaissance," Vernon 
Lee's " Renaissance fancies and studies," 
Goodyear's " History of art," 5th edition, 
and Evans's "Animal symbolism in ecclesias- 
tical architecture." 

The list of books in Social science included 
35 titles, and the presentation of this division 
was the most valuable feature of the session, 
occupying about half an hour instead of the 10 
minutes assigned. It was reviewed by Prof. 
Franklin H. Giddings, of Columbia University, 
who submitted each book to a brief, authorita- 
tive, and masterful analysis, and added to the 
list a number of important works that should 
be included in any selection on the subject. It 
is impossible to give within necessary limits 
an adequate idea of the value and importance 
of Prof. Giddings's summary ; only a few of 
the books mentioned may be briefly noted. 
Among those specially commended were " The 
speaker of the House of Representatives," by 
M. P. Follett, "the best book of the year"; 
" Problems of modern democracy," by E. L. 
Godkin; Hobson's " Problem of the unem- 
ployed"; Keasebey's "Nicaragua canal and 
the Monroe doctrine"; Le Bon's "The crowd"; 
Lowell's "Government and parties in conti- 
nental Europe," "a great book"; Nicholson's 
" Strikes and social problems "; and " America 
and Europe," by D. A. Wells and others. 
Those considered unnecessary were Flint's 
"Socialism," "not worth .the paper it is 
printed on"; and McKechnie's "The state 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



37 



and the individual." Spahr's "Essay on 
the present distribution of wealth in the 
United States," while in a measure com- 
mended, was said to be not wholly fair in 
the use of statistics. Necessary additions to 
the list should include Gannett's " Building 
of a nation," Stimson's " Handbook to the 
labor laws of the United States," and Chance's 
" Better administration of the poor laws." 

Fiction was presented by Miss Helen E. 
Haines, who confessed to having read 43 of the 
8r novels recorded in the printed list, besides 
a number not there included. She had selected 
24 books as representing the best fiction of 
1896, and had divided them into two groups 
first best and second best. The first list in- 
cluded Barrie's "Sentimental Tommy "; "King 
Noanett," by F. J. Stimson; "Sir George 
Tressady," by Mrs. Humphry Ward; "Weir 
of Hermiston," Stevenson's great fragment; 
"The well at the world's end," William Morris's 
last work; Frederic's "Damnation of Theron 
Ware"; " The seats of the mighty," by Gilbert 
Parker; "The Reds of the Midi," by Felix 
Gras," and four books not given on the printed 
list but that should certainly be included: 
"Nephele," by F. W. Bourdillon; "A king 
and a few dukes," by Robert Chambers; 
"Earth's enigmas," by C. G. D. Roberts, and 
" The cat and the cherub," by Chester Bailey 
Fernald. Among, the books in the second 
division were Mrs. Wiggin's " Marm Lisa"; 
"The exploits of Brigadier Gerard," by A. 
Conan Doyle; "Silk of the kine," by L. 
McManus; Crawford's "Taquisara"; "Kate 
Carnegie," and three additions to the printed 
list, " Quo vadis," by H. Sienkiewicz; " Green 
fire," by Fiona Macleod, and Alice Brown's 
short stories, " Meadowgrass." Four books 
were added in a separate group, as hav- 
ing received praise and popularity, but as not 
belonging, in the speaker's opinion, to the best 
fiction of 1896. These were Mark Twain's "Joan 
of Arc," characterized as out of touch with the 
spirit of the time and people it represented and 
lacking historical perspective ; " Madelon," by 
Mary E. Wilkins ; " Adam Johnstone's son," by 
F. Marion Crawford ; and "Tom Grogan," by 
F. Hopkinson Smith. In the brief discussion 
that followed, " GastonLatour," Walter Pater's 
last novel, was added to the list by Mr. Richard- 
son, and "Tom Grogan" found several adhe- 
rents, who dismissed the charge of sensational- 
ism by proving that the story was founded al- 
most wholly upon fact. 

Literature was reviewed by Miss Mary L. 
Davis, of the Pratt Institute Free Library, 
who gave most attention to the poetry of the 
year. She divided the books into two class- 
es "those we must have," and those we 
can do without. Among those specially named 
were Johanna Ambrosius's poems, " W. V.: 
her book," Kipling's "Seven seas," Wat- 
son's " Purple east," and Paul Lawrence Dun- 
bar's poems. Suggested additions included 
Suderman's "Magda," Christina Rossetti's 
poems, "Egbert's Introduction to the study 
of Latin inscriptions," and Sharp's "Lyra 
Celtica." 



Miss Mary W. Plummer reviewed the year's 
production in travel, classifying the books by 
countries, beginning with Japan and ending 
with France. She gave special praise to 
Hearn's " Kokoro," Jaccaci's "On the trail 
of Don Quixote," and Theuritt's "Rustic life 
in France," and named among additions to 
the list Skinner's " Myths and legends of 
our own land," the new editions of Homer's 
"Walks in Florence," Dennie's "Rome," 
Arnold's " Persia revisited," and Withers's 
" English and Dutch in South Africa." 

Biography had been assigned to Miss M. S. 
Cutler, who divided the books into two lists : 
first, those of the most valuable, and second, 
those of a more popular nature. Among the 
best biographies of the year she named Bar- 
rie's " Margaret Ogilvy," Morse's " Life and 
letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes," Dr. Hos- 
mer's "Life of Thomas Hutchinson," Lowell's 
"Joan of Arc," " which gives Mrs. Oliphant's 
'Jeanne d'Arc" no reason for existence"; 
Sloane's "Napoleon," Rossetti's " Family let- 
ters," Ford's and Wilson's biographies of 
Washington, and John Burroughs's "Whitman." 
Also notable in this class were Shorter's 
"Charlotte Bronte," Mrs. Fields's "Authors 
and friends" ; Mrs. Clarke's "My long life"; 
"Dolly Madison," by Mrs. M. W. Goodwin' 
Lodge's "Richelieu"; Romanes's "Life and 
letters"; and Rae's "Sheridan." 

History was to have been reviewed by Mr. 
Lamed, in whose absence it was passed over, 
and Miss Hewins gave a delightful talk on the 
children's books of 1896. The year, she said, 
had produced no very good book for children, 
" that is, no book worthy to be put into the A. 
L. A. selected list." Mrs. Moulton's "In child- 
hood's country" she thought unsuitable for 
children; Wesselhoeft's "Jerry the blunderer " 
was not in all respects desirable, while Crock- 
ett's " Sweetheart travelleis" would not appeal 
particularly to juvenile readers. Among the 
books given qualified approval were James 
Barnes's "For king and country"; Henty's 
three books of the year; and Kirk Munroe's 
"Rick Dale." Eliza Orne White's "A little girl 
of long ago" and Lang's "Animal story- 
book " ranked as the best books of the year in 
that division. 

This closed the day's program. After a few 
words the meeting was declared adjourned, and 
the audience dispersed, most of them making 
their way to the Clarendon Hotel, where all met 
again at the usual "library dinner," with which 
the joint meeting usually gives a social finish to 
its day of work. This year the dinner, though 
enjoyable, was a less important affair, being 
quite subordinated to the evening meeting 
in the Academy of Music arranged by the Brook- 
lyn Public Library Association. There were 
no post-prandial exercises, and most of the 
diners left the last items of the menu undis- 
cussed, in order to reach the academy by eight 
o'clock. The academy meeting, which is re- 
ported elsewhere in this issue, was wholly 
successful and brought to an end what must 
rank as one of the best library field-days New 
York state has known. 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\fanuary, '97 



OHIO LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President : A. W. Whelpley, Public Library, 
Cincinnati. 

Secretary: Miss E. C. Doren, Public Library, 
Dayton, 

Treasurer: C. B. Galbreath, State Library, 
Columbus. 

P&f J tfSYLVA NIA LIBRA RY CL UB. 

President : Jos. G. Rosengarten, Free Li- 
brary, Philadelphia. 

Secretary C. S. Kates, Free Library, Phila- 
delphia. 

Treasurer: Mrs. M. A. Resag, Institute Free 
Library, Wilmington, Del. 

THE December meeting of the Pennsylvania 
Library Club was held at the Drexel Institute 
on Monday evening, Dec. 14, 98 members be- 
ing present. 

After an examination of some of the rare 
books in the Drexel Institute Library which 
were exhibited by Miss Kroeger, the meeting 
was called to order by the vice-president, Mr. 
T. L. Montgomery, in the unavoidable absence 
of the president, Mr. J. G. Rosengarten. 

The principal business of the erening was 
a discussion upon the life and works of Rob- 
ert Burton. Dr. McAlister, president of the 
Drexel Institute, opened the discussion by re- 
lating some reminiscences of his enjoyment of 
the " Anatomy of melancholy " when a young 
student. Mr. Thomson, of the Free Library, 
followed with an account of the life of the 
author, and explained that but little was known 
of Burton's life, owing to the fact that he was 
a quiet country parson who proved his title 
to be called a bookworm by having for 20 
years devoted himself to secluded studies in 
the Bodleian Library, in which building, with 
the aid of the then librarian of that celebrated 
centre of books, he amassed a large part of 
the material forming his extraordinary work 
on melancholy. The speaker gave several il- 
lustrations of Burton's characteristics collected 
from Hearne, Disraeli, Anthony and Wood, 
Notes and Queries, and such other sources of 
anecdotes. It was pointed out that Burton 
did not write the " Anatomy, "but that we owe 
this work to Bacon, who so generously gave us 
his own books, the Shakespeare plays, this 
"Anatomy," together with a few other hundred 
series of works which have passed hitherto 
under the names of other wrkers. The igth 
century "higher criticism" is undoubtedly 
monotonous, and it is rather disappointing 
to find that nobody wrote the works hitherto 
credited to him and that everything is the 
work of some other fellow. 

Miss Mary Farr, now librarian of the Girls' 
Normal School in Philadelphia, and formerly 
first assistant at the West Philadelphia Branch 
of the Free Library, followed with a clever 
paper dealing with the merits both bibliograph- 
ical and literary of Burton's work. The criti- 
cisms advanced lacked melancholy in every 
sense, and her troubles in dealing with the 
Latin portions were described with a tinge 
of real humor. She gave advice to '_ other 



readers in telling them that if they did not 
know Latin, the best plan was to look in a note 
for the translation, and if no such note was 
given, then to pass on to the next paragraph. 
Her paper was received with applause, and the 
club then proceeded to discuss other business. 
With reference to the continuation of the 
Ames catalog, it was explained on behalf of the 
committee who had charge of this matter that 
the club did not desire to express any opinion 
as to who should be the person selected to 
make the desired continuation, and that an in- 
terview had been requested with Mr. Harmer 
at Washington in order that the committee 
might lay before him the reasons that weighed 
with librarians in urgently asking for the con- 
tinuance of the catalog. An early interview 
has been promised, and the action of the com- 
mittee was unanimously approved. 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: W: M. Stevenson, Carnegie Li- 
brary, Allegheny. 

Secretary-Treasurer: W: R. Watson, Carnegie 
Library, Pittsburgh. 

VERMONT LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Miss S. C. Hagar, Fletcher Free 
Library, Burlington. 

Secretary: Miss M. L. Titcomb, Free Li- 
brary, Rutland. 

Treasurer : E. F. Holbrook, Proctor. 

WISCONSIN LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: F. A. Hutchins, Baraboo. 
Secretary and Treasurer: Miss L. E. Stearns, 
Public Library, Milwaukee. 

THE meeting of the Wisconsin Library Asso- 
ciation, originally scheduled for Jan. 28 and 
29, 1897, has been deferred until February 22 
and 23, 1897. 

Programs may be obtained after February I 
by addressing L. E. STEARNS, Secretary. 

LIBRARY SECTION OF THE WISCONSIN 
TEACHERS 1 ASSOCIATION, 

THE meeting of the Wisconsin Teachers' As- 
sociation, at Milwaukee, on Dec. 29, 30, and 31, 
will be memorable for the prominence given to 
library matters. At the December meeting, in 
1895, the teachers' association voted to give a 
" library section " a permanent place on its 
program. 

At the general session of the association, 
held on the morning of Dec. 30, Melvil Dewey, 
state librarian of New York, spoke on "The 
mission of the modern library." Mr. Dewey's 
address was discussed by Miss L. E. Stearns, 
secretary of the Wisconsin Library Commis- 
sion. 

The questions, " How can the public library 
be made an aid to the schools ?" and " How can 
interest in literature be stimulated in communi- 
ties which have no public library?" were then 
thrown open for a general discussion, in which 
Miss Mae E. Schreiber, C. E. Patzer, H. B. 
Hubbell, R. B. Dudgeon, and J. C. Freeman 
took part. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



39 



The discussion was followed by a report on 
"Needed library legislation," presented by 
President Albert Salisbury, of the Whitewater 
Normal School. 

The afternoon session was conducted by F. 
A. Hutchins, chairman of the Wisconsin Li- 
brary Commission. While the morning meet- 
ing of the association was mainly given to 
showing the need and value of libraries and 
their relations to schools, the afternoon session 
was devoted to showing Wisconsin people how 
to get libraries for their communities. Mr. 
Dewey opened the discussion by citing many 
ways of arousing interest and educating public 
sentiment. Dr. G. W. Peckham, of the Mil- 
waukee Library, explained the peculiarities of 
the Wisconsin library laws. 

Miss Mary Edgar, of Madison, then read a 
paper on her plan of awakening interest in the 
best literature. Miss Mae Schreiber, of the 
Milwaukee Normal School, then gave methods 
used by her in training student-teachers to 
read good literature with pleasure. 

Much interest was evinced in these meet- 
ings; and the following sentiment, which ap- 
peared on the back of the programs issued by 
the commission, is in a fair way to be adopted 
as the 

BADGER SLOGAN. 

"Let every Wisconsin community celebrate 
the semi-centennial year by improving or 
founding a free public library." 

L. E. STEARNS, Secretary Lib. Section. 

WISCONSIN LIBRARIANS' INSTITUTE. 

THE officers and librarians of the Stout Free 
Travelling Libraries, of Dunn County, Wiscon- 
sin, held an institute at the Tainter Memorial 
Library at Menomonie, Wis , on Nov. 27, 1896. 
Mr. Hutchins, chairman of the Wisconsin Free 
Library Commission, presided. The meeting 
was informal. Such problems as the following 
were discussed: " How can we advertise the 
travelling library?" "How can we get the 
boys to read ?" " How can we secure careful 
treatment of the books?" "Can small per- 
manent libraries be built up at the travelling 
library stations?" "Can magazines taken by 
patrons be circulated through the libraries?" 
Reports from the various libraries were pre- 
sented, ii of the 25 libraries of 30 volumes 
each show a total circulation of 1823 volumes 
in six months a remarkable showing con- 
sidering the sparsely-settled districts in which 
the volumes circulate. 

After some discussion upon ways of making 
the libraries of greater value to communities, 
the members adjourned to the High School 
building, to meet with the Dunn County Teach- 
ers' Institute, where papers were read by Miss 
L. E. Stearns, of Milwaukee, on "Children's 
reading," and by Miss Louise Sutermeister, of 
Eau Claire, on " The travelling library move- 
ment in America." Miss Waterston, a teacher 
at Knapp, Wis., read an interesting paper on 
the " Influence of the travelling library in 
Pleasant Vallev." The subject of travelling 
pictures was discussed, and it was decided to 



start a system for the use of the schools, under 
the supervision of the county superintendent, 
Miss Elvira Brickley, of Downsville, Wis. 

Senator Stout tendered the visiting delegates 
a dinner, after which Miss Maude A. Earley, 
of Chippewa Falls, Wis., spoke on the travel- 
ling library movement in Chippewa county. 
After voting to hold another institute in March, 
1897, the meeting adjourned. 

The meeting is the more worthy of notice 
as it was undoubtedly the first of the kind ever 
held. L. E. STEARNS, 

Secretary Wisconsin Library Commission. 

NORTH WISCONSIN TRAVELLING LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

President: Mrs. E. E. Vaughn, Ashland. 
Librarian and Treasurer : Miss Janet Green, 
Vaughn Library, Ashland. 

A LARGELY attended and enthusiastic meet- 
ing of the North Wisconsin Travelling Library 
Association was held in the Vaughn Library, 
Ashland, on Monday, Dec. 28, 1896. 

Three committees of five members each were 
appointed by the president, ist, a committee 
on soliciting and selecting books; 2d, a com- 
mittee on soliciting money; and 3d, a commit- 
tee on soliciting members. Any one interested 
in the work may become a member of the as- 
sociation by signing the constitution and pay- 
ing during the year $i, or its equivalent in 
books. 

It was decided to try to send out 10 libraries 
before the first of February, and to confine the 
work to the following counties: Ashland, Bay- 
field, Sawyer, Price, and Iron. 

The secretary reported that since the first 
meeting of the association between 60 and 70 
books and a quantity of magazines had been 
contributed by the people of Ashland. A cir- 
cular asking for books and periodicals has just 
been issued and distributed to the local papers, 
which it is hoped will bring a generous re- 
sponse. JANET M. GREEN, Secretary. 



Cibrarji 



CHICAGO LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Anderson H. Hopkins, John 
Crerar Library. 

Secretary: Miss May L. Bennett, 1888 Sheri- 
dan Road, Evanston. 

Treasurer: W. W. Bishop, Garrett Biblical 
Institute. 

THE 32d regular meeting of the Chicago Li- 
brary Club was held in the rooms of the Library 
Bureau, 215 Madison St., Chicago, Thursday 
evening, November 5, at eight o'clock. The 
program was devoted to the discussion of the 
proposed union list of periodicals in the libra- 
ries of Chicago and immediate vicinity, to be 
compiled by the club. After a short paper by 
Mr. Anderson, which was strongly in favor of 
the work being undertaken by the club, the 
subject was thrown open for general discus- 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



sion. The following resolutions were finally 
adopted : 

' Resolved " I. That the club deem it desirable to un- 
dertake the compilation and publication of a union list of 
the periodicals in the libraries of Chicago and the imme- 
diate vicinity. 

" II. That there be appointed by the president a com- 
mittee of two on finance, whose duty it shall be to secure 
the means necessary for the work. 

"III. That there be also appointed by the president a 
committee of three on compiling and editing. This com- 
mittee shall have the power to appoint sun-committees 
and agents. It shall, with the advice an<1 consent of the 
executive committee of the club, have entire charge of 
the work of preparing the union list of periodicals. 

" IV. The executive committee shall make monthly 
reports to the club of the progress of the work of these 
committee*." 

MAY BENNETT, Secretary. 

MILWAUKEE LIBRARY ROUND TABLE. 

"A little work, a little play 
To keep us going and so good-day ! " 

A MEETING of the Milwaukee Library Round 
Table was held on Dec. 3, 1896. "The Vatican 
Library" the third of a series of papers on 
the great libraries of the world was described 
by Miss Florence Olcott, and followed with a 
talk by Dr. Peckham on "Classification of 
animals." 

At the meeting held on Dec. 17 Miss Agnes 
Van Valkenburgh made a talk on "Modern 
methods of book illustration." The talk was 
illustrated with samples of the different proc- 
esses and proved exceedingly interesting. Miss 
L. E. Stearns gave a report on the Trav- 
elling library librarians' institute recently held 
at Menomonie, Wis., and also read a paper 
written by Miss Delia Waterston, a teacher of 
Knapp, on "What the travelling library has 
done for Pleasant Valley." 

NEW YORK LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Miss M. W. Plummer, Pratt In- 
stitute Library, Brooklyn. 

Secretary: Miss J. A. Rathbone, Pratt In- 
stitute Library, Brooklyn. 

Treasurer: Miss Elizabeth Tuttle, Long 
Island Historical Society, Brooklyn. 

FOR report of joint meeting with N. Y. Li- 
brary Association, see p. 33. 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 
CITY. 

President: W. P. Cutter, U. S. Dept. of 
Agriculture. 

Secretary and Treasurer : F. H. Parsons, U. 
S. Naval Observatory. 

THE annual meeting of the Library Associa- 
tion of Washington City was held at the Co- 
lumbian University Building on Dec. 30, 1896. 
The reports of the retiring officers were listened 
to with pleasure, as they showed that the past 
year was one of profit and gain. Eight meet- 
ings have been held during that time, at which 
13 papers upon subjects connected with the 
librarian's profession were read. The finances 
of the association were reported in good con- 
dition, 71 members being on the roll. 



The president was authorized to appoint a 
committee to be charged with the duty of pre- 
paring a handbook of the society, to contain a 
list of members and such other matter as the 
committee deemed appropriate. 

The subscription for the LIBRARY JOURNAL 
was ordered renewed. 

The following persons were elected as officers 
for the ensuing year: President, W. P. Cutter; 
librarian Department of Agriculture; Vice- 
presidents, Miss A. R. Hasse, office of the 
Superintendent of Public Documents; T. L. 
Cole, of the Statute Law Book Co.; Secretary 
and treasurer, Mr. F. H. Parsons (re-elected); 
Executive committee, Mr. Howard L. Prince, 
librarian U. S. Patent Office; Miss J. A. Clarke, 
librarian of the Department of Agriculture; 
Miss M. A. Gilkey, librarian Free Public Li- 
brary. 

F. H. PARSONS, Secretary and Treasurer. 



Cibrarj) Schools anfc Staining Classes. 



ARMOUR INSTITUTE LIBRARY CLASS. 

AMONG recent speakers before the library 
class were Dr. John Watson (' ' Ian Maclaren "), 
who told of the work of the school with which 
he is connected in Liverpool ; Mr. Thorvald 
Solberg, of the Boston Book Co., who gave an 
interesting talk on his experiences in foreign 
book-stores; and Mr. Melvil Dewey, who visited 
the Institute Dec. 31, and in the evening was 
tendered a reception by the library class. He 
spoke informally upon the national library of 
America. 

The course of lectures on bookbinding, by 
Mr. Irving Way, of Way & Williams, began 
Jan. 5. It includes an introductory view of 
the subject, and separate discussions of prepa- 
ration of ms. by author, selection of type and 
page form, machine vs. hand composition, 
preparation of proofs in galley and page form, 
selection of paper, ink and presswork, illus- 
tration, decoration, sending of press copies and 
putting books on the market. 

Recent notes of work done by graduates are 
as follows : 

Miss Mary J. Calkins, of the class of '96, is 
librarian of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in Chicago. Miss Maude R. Hen- 
derson, of the class of '96, has a position in the 
New York Public Library. Miss Charlotte H. 
Foye, who was in the library class from '95-6, 
has a position as assistant in the John Crerar 
Library, Chicago. Miss Eleanor Roper, of the 
class of '96, has been appointed assistant in the 
library of Armour Institute. 

DREXEL INSTITUTE LIBRARY CLASS. 

A COURSE of six lectures on " The history of 
books and libraries, including the rise ard de- 
velopment of printing" will be delivered by 
Dr. James MacAlister, president of the Insti- 
tute, in the auditorium of the Institute, on 
Tuesday and Friday afternoons, beginning 
March 16. The lectures will be illustrated by 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



an extensive collection of lantern slides de- 
rived from inscriptions, manuscripts, illumina- 
tions, rare books, bindings, portraits, libraries, 
buildings, etc., and the course will cover the 
history and development of language, oral and 
written, the written records of Egypt, Chaldea, 
Assyria, and Babylon, the literature of Greece 
and Rome, and the decline of ancient culture, 
the history of the book in the Middle Ages, the 
renaissance and the revival of literature, early 
printing and engraving, and the development 
of literature and libraries in our own time. 

NEW YORK STA T LIBRARY SCHOOL. 
SELECTION OF BOOKS. 

THE discussion of books as a feature of libra- 
ry meetings is steadily growing in favor. It 
was begun at a regular meeting of the Ameri- 
can Library Association, held during the post- 
conference trip at the Sagamore Hotel, Lake 
George, Sept. 1894. A list of 50 books on his- 
tory for popular use was discussed. The 
meeting of the New York Library Association, 
held at Syracuse, May, 1896, gave an entire 
session to the " Best books of 1895 for a village 
library." The discussion of the "Supplement 
to the catalog of the ' A. L. A.' library," which 
was planned for the Denver meeting of the A. 
L. A., was postponed on account of the ab- 
sence of the committee having it in charge. At 
Cleveland it was given an evening session, 
which extended from 8:17 to u p.m. The 
plan of putting the discussion of special sub- 
jects into the hands of authorities on those 
subjects was introduced, e.g., R. G. Thwaites, 
history; Miss Hewins, children's books. At 
the joint meeting of the New York Library 
Association and the New York Library Club, 
Brooklyn, Jan. 14, 1897, the " Best books of 
1896 for a village library " were considered, and 
at the fall meeting of the New Hampshire 
Association a similar program was carried out. 
At both of these meetings the Cleveland plan 
of division of subjects was followed. 

Owing to the new emphasis laid by the 
association on the selection of books, the meth- 
ods of teaching this subject in the school have 
been even more carefully considered. The 
foundation knowledge of standard authors has 
always been considered preparatory work. 
For four years an attempt was made to take 
up a somewhat systematic study of modern 
authors. This has now been relegated to pre- 
paratory work, and selection is taught by use 
of the current books. A lecture on the most 
important critical reviews and one on American 
publishers begins the course which extends 
over two years, both classes working together. 
Each student subscribes for the Publishers' 
Weekly (at the usual special rates), and checks 
in each number as it appears the books which 
in his opinion are valuable fora public library. 
Medical, law, and very technical books are 
disregarded. The selections of each student 
are submitted each week to the instructor and 
returned with criticisms. 14 foreign and 30 
American serials are examined co-operatively, 
each number of the class being responsible for 



two and noting references for the most valua- 
ble books on the slips which have been cut 
from the Publishers' Weekly. Every week 10 of 
the most important books are taken up in class, 
each student having previously examined the 
books carefully and read two of the best re- 
views which are selected by the instructor. 
In the class discussion the scope of the book, 
the qualifications oi the author to write such a 
book, the question "to what class of readers 
is it of special value ? " are dwelt upon most 
strongly. Incidentally the make-up of the book, 
its illustrations, its cover, and the comparative 
merits of the different publishers, are consid- 
ered. The printed slips for selected books, 
with the selected reviews, are preserved by 
each student for future use. Many of the 
books are read by the class, though only a 
careful examination is required. About 500 
books are taken up in this way in the two years' 
course. Criticisms or suggestions in regard to 
these methods are invited from those who have 
given the matter special thought. 

GKADUATES OF THE SCHOOL. 

Errors which creep into printed statements 
regarding those who have been at some time 
connected with the New York State Library 
School, suggest the desirability of printing in 
the JOURNAL an authoritative list of graduates. 
217 students have matriculated in the schools 
since Jan. 5, 1887. Of these, 22 completed the 
course at Columbia College Library, and are 
counted as graduates of the school though they 
do not hold the state diploma. 45 hold a di- 
ploma from the University of the State of New 
York. Of these 45, 14 have received the de- 
gree B.L.S. Besides these, 44 others hold the 
first-year certificate. 

The significance of the credentials is ex- 
plained by the following extracts from the of- 
ficial handbook: 

" Pass-cards. These are issued to any person 
who passes one or more library examinations, 
regardless of age, sex, residence, or previousin- 
struction. They simply show that the holder 
knows enough of each subject certified to meet 
the required test. 

" first-year certificate. This shows that the 
holder has passed the entrance examinations, 
has completed satisfactorily the work and ex- 
aminations of junior year, and is officially rec- 
ognized as a senior library student. This cer- 
tificate is necessary for admission to the senior 
class. 

"Diploma. This shows that the holder has 
met all entrance requirements, has secured at 
least one year's instruction in residence at the 
school, and has passed each examination of 
the two years' course with a standing of not 
less than 75 per cent. 

"Honor credentials. If three-fourths of all 
the required work is completed with an exam- 
ination standing of 90 per cent, or over, the 
credential is issued 'with honor.' 

"B.L.S. The degree B.L.S. is conferred 
only on graduates who have met all require- 
ments of the course for an honor diploma, and 
who submit diplomas or certificates from reg- 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



istered colleges or pass examinations covering 
at least two full years of general college work. 
Thus the full course for which the degree is 
given includes two years of college work and 
the two years technical work in the Library 
School, so that candidates cannot earn a degree 
in less than four years after graduation from 
the academy or high school." 

STUDENTS COMPLETING COURSE AT COLUMBIA 
COLLEGE LIBRARY I 

Baldwin, Elizabeth C. 
Clarke, Edith Emily. 
Cole, George Watson. 
Cutler, Louisa Salome. 
Denio, Lilian. 
Fernald, Harriet Converse. 
Godfrey, Lydia Boker. 
Hopson, Ema K. 
Jackson, Annie Brown.- 
Jones, Ada Alice. 
Marsee, Isabel Rebecca. 
Medlicott, Mary. 
Miller, Eulora. 
Palmer, Henrietta Raymer. 
Patton, Frances Chauncey. 
Plummer, Mary Wright. 
Prescott, Harriet Beardslee. 
Seymour, May. 
Underbill, Caroline Melvil. 
Ward, Ama Howard. 
Wire, George E. 
Woodworth, Florence. 

STUDENTS HOLDING DIPLOMA FROM UNIVERSITY 
OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK \ 

Avery, Myrtilla, B.L.S. 

Biscoe, Ellen Dodge. 

Bowerman, George Franklin, B.L.S. 

Browne, Nina Eliza, B.L.S. 

Bullock, Edna Dean. 

Bullock, Waller Irene. 

Bunnell, Ada, B.L.S. 

Burdick, Esther Elizabeth. 

Burns, William Savage, B.L.S. 

Cattell, Sarah Ware, with honor. 

Champlin, George Greenman. 

Christman, Jenny Lind, B.L.S. 

Church, Henrietta. 

Davis, Mary Louise, with honor. 

Denio, Herbert Williams. 

Eastman, Rev. William Reed, B.L.S. 

Ellis, Mary. 

Foote, Elizabeth Louisa, B.L.S. 

Forsyth, Walter Greenwood. 

Harrison, Joseph LeRoy, B.L.S. 

Harvey, Elizabeth. 

Hawes, Clara Sikes. 

Hawley, Mary Elizabeth. 

Jones, Mary Letitia, B.L.S. 

Kroeger, Alice Bertha, with honor. 

Leonard, Grace Fisher, with honor. 

Macky, Bessie Rutherford, B.L S. 

Middleton, Jennie Young. 

Olcott, Frances Jenkins. 

Plympton, Charles William, with honor. 

Pond, Nancy May, B.L.S. 



Rathbone, Josephine Adams, B.L.S. 

Rice, Helen Ward. 

Robbins, Mary Esther. 

Sharp, Katharine Lucinda, B.L.S. 

Sheldon, Helen Griswold. 

Silliman, Helen Cornwall. 

Sperry, Helen, with honor, 

Stanley, Harriet Howard, with honor . 

Sutermeister, Louise Mathilde. 

Sulliff, Mary Louise. 

Swayze, Mary Camilla. 

Temple, Mabel. 

Wheeler, Martha Thorne, wit A honor. 

Wilson, Minnie Cornwell, with honor. 

MARY S. CUTLER. 

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, I 
Jan. 5, 1897. J 

PRA TT INSTITUTE LIBRARY SCHOOL 

A NUMBER of interesting lectures have been 
given to the students of the school since the 
opening of the term. Following Mr. Theodore 
L. De Vinne's lecture on printing were two lect- 
ures on bookbinding by Miss Evelyn Hunter 
Nordhoff , on Nov. 20 and 27. Miss Nordhoff also 
gave, on Dec. n and 18, two process-lectures at 
her studio in New York, for the members of the 
second-year class. In the first lecture she dis- 
cussed details of forwarding, and gave a prac- 
tical demonstration of the process of preparing 
a book for its cover. The second lecture dealt 
with bindings proper, and attention was given 
to the various grades and kinds of leather, the 
processes of ornamentation, and the details of 
finishing. The lectures proved most instruc- , 
tive and interesting, the practical demonstra- 
tions that accompanied them serving as effec- 
tive object lessons, and making the subject 
matter more definitely understood and more 
clearly remembered. 

A meeting to organize a graduate association 
was held in connection with the joint meeting 
of the New York Library Club and state asso- 
ciation on January 14. Through such an or- 
ganization it is hoped to strengthen the interest 
of the graduates in the school and keep them 
in touch with one another. Those graduates 
who are interested in the plan but were unable 
to attend the meeting are asked to communi- 
cate with Miss Eleanor H. Frick, Pratt Insti- 
tute Free Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

The Astor Library has engaged two of the 
graduates of the school Miss Sarah S. Oddie, 
class of '95, and Miss Maria V. Leavitt, class 
of '96. It has also taken Miss Bertha Eger, of 
the reference department of the Pratt Institute 
Free Library, as a member of its cataloging 
staff. Miss Gertrude A. Brewster, class of '95, 
has been engaged for the cataloging staff of 
the Lenox Library, resigning her position at 
the Long Island branch of the Pratt Institute 
Free Library in order to take up this work in 
New York. She has been succeeded at the 
Long Island library by Miss Miriam S. Draper, 
class of '95. Miss Bertha G. Carr, class of 
'96, has been engaged by the Globe Company 
of New York City to catalog their library at 
Newburgh, N. Y. 



[January, '97 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



43 



Bemetos. 



CATALOGUE of the public documents of the 53d 
Congress and of all departments of the gov- 
ernmentof the U. S. for the period from March 
4, 1893, to June 30, 1895 [being the " Com- 
prehensive index" provided for by the act 
approved Jan. 12, 1895]; prepared under the 
supervision of the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments. Washington, Gov. Print. Office, 1896. 
638 p. O. 

In the evolution of the cataloging of govern- 
ment publications, the last and the best step 
forward is the new catalog from Superintend- 
ent Crandall's office, covering public documents 
during the period of the 53d Congress, March 4, 

1893, to June 30, 1895. The first step was the 
so-called " Descriptive catalogue " which was 
not descriptive at all of Ben. Perley Poore, 
the 1392 pages of which were devoted to an 
approximately chronological entry of govern- 
ment publications, so far as they could be run 
to earth, from September 5, 1774, to March 4, 
1881, the end of the 46th Congress, and a brief 
reference index of minimum value. This 
hodgepodge, although useful for its material, 
has been of little use as a working catalog. 
The second step was the purposely brief list, ar- 
ranged by departments, which was made a 
feature of the American Catalogue, taking up 
the work at the end of the Poore period and 
continuing it in the parts issued last year to 
June 30, 1895, like Mr. Crandall's catalog. 
The third step, if Mr. Hickcox's "Monthly 
catalogue " is not counted as a permanent cat- 
alog, was that of Dr. J. G. Ames's "Compre- 
hensive index of the publications of the U. S. 
government covering the period 1889 to 1893," 
that of the sist and 52d Congresses, issued in 

1894, which adopted a tabular method present- 
ing in the centre the briefest practicable entry 
arranged by subject, with references to the 
several forms in which the document appeared; 
on the right-hand side a memorandum of its 
place in the regular Senate and House docu- 
ments, and on the left-hand side the name of 
the department issuing, the chairman of the 
committee, or other actual or constructive 
author. This was a valuable piece of work, 
but its tabular feature was something of a 
drawback in practical use. 

The new catalog is thoroughly on the diction- 
ary plan, having no appended index except one 
of " Governmental authors," being an alpha- 
betical list of the departments and subdivisions, 
from which documents issue. It is almost a 
model in typography, the only serious criticism 
being that until the eye has become accustomed 
to the difference in types it is difficult to dis- 
tinguish between the headings and subheadings 
which are respectively in antique or Clarendon 
of different sizes. After one has become accus 
tomed to the catalog the difference is fairly 
evident. A good example of the catalog at 
its best will be found under the headings Li- 
braries and Library. There are here nine 



entries under Libraries, being the titles of the 
general papers in the Chicago conference re- 
port, with 17 cross-references to specific sub- 
jects on which papers are included in that vol- 
ume or to cognate entries; two under Library 
and Rolls Bureau; cross-references to names of 
members under Library committee; one on Li- 
brary fittings, 14 under Library of Congress, 
two under Libraries of departments, one on Li- 
brary pest, and one on Library training. This 
shows the minuteness of the work, which will 
probably be one ground of criticism of the cata- 
log on the part of those unfamiliar with the 
value of close entries in such a catalog. The 
only defect that occurs to us is the difficulty of 
finding out comprehensively the publications 
of any one department, and perhaps this want 
could wisely be supplied by a second appendix, 
giving a bird's-eye view of the departments 
with their several subdivisions logically ar- 
ranged underneath, and in each subdivision 
the regular lines of publication, thus grafting 
into this standard government catalog the 
most distinctive feature of the American Cata- 
logue appendix. 

The office of the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments, and particularly Mr. F. A. Crandall 
himself, is to be heartily congratulated on this 
work, which for an initial volume is remarkably 
successful. The work was begun while Mr. J. 
H. Hickcox was cataloger in the office, but has 
been carried through to completion by Miss 
Edith E. Clarke, who succeeded to the office of 
head cataloger, and to whom Mr. Crandall 
gives pleasant and deserved credit in his pref- 
ace. The coast is now clear for continuing 
the catalog of government publications from 
congress to congress in accordance with the 
provisions of the bill of 1895, with an excellent 
working model, and whether the work be con- 
tinued backward on this excellent plan or on 
the plan adopted by Dr. Ames for the earlier 
volume, undoubtedly the present work will give 
the method for the succeeding volumes. Men- 
tion of the date of the passage of the bill pro- 
viding for the office of the Superintendent of 
Documents, which was approved January 12, 
1895, suggests a further word of praise for the 
enormous amount of work accomplished by 
the new bureau under great difficulties within 
so short a time. R. R. B. 



Cibrars (Economy anb ^i 



GENERAL. 

THE Library contains in its December number 
several articles of interest in reference work. 
These are Bntler Wood's paper on " The selec- 
tion of books for a reference library," " Notes 
on the formation of a small reference library," 
by R. K. Dent, both read at the Buxton con- 
ference; and "On the place of specialization 
in library work," by Basil Anderton. 

THE regents of the University of the State 
of New York have printed as a special pam- 
phlet of 52 pages the proceedings of the li- 



44 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



{January, '97 



brary session at the 1896 University convoca- 
tion. "This includes the remarkably strong 
paper on " The mission and missionaries of the 
book," by J. N. Larned, of the Buffalo Li- 
brary, the addresses on "The correlation of 
library and school," by A. L. Peck and Superin- 
tendent J. A. Estee, of Gloversville, the admi- 
rable paper on " How to develop interest in the 
library," by W. E. Foster, of the Providence 
Public Library, and a full report of the dis- 
cussions, which dealt interestingly with all 
these phases of library work. Those specially 
interested can obtain a copy without expense 
by addressing a post card to the Public libra- 
ries dirision, Regents' office, Albany, N. Y. 

EXAMINATION Bulletin No. 10 of the Uni- 
versity of the State of New York is devoted to 
" Regents' examination papers for the aca- 
demic year 1896." (500 p. O.) Pages 349 -380 
are devoted to the question papers used at 
the 33d library examination, June 16- 19, 1896. 

LOCAL. 

Auburn, N. Y. Case Memorial L. The 
American Architect of Nov. 21 publishes a 
number of competitive designs for the Case 
Memorial Library. 

Augusta, Me. Lithgow L. On Dec. 4 a spe- 
cial meeting of the city council was held to 
consider the question of open shelves for the 
Lithgow Library. The question of whether or 
not it was desirable to permit free access to the 
shelves had previously been submitted to a com- 
mittee of three. At the council meeting the 
committee's reports were presented. The ma- 
jority report, signed by two members, stated 
that the matter had been carefully investigated 
and that information had been obtained from 
II Maine libraries, in only one of which were 
open shelves used. Their conclusion was that 
free access was impracticable under present 
conditions, and that the existing system should 
be given a fair trial. In the minority report 
the other member of the committee recom- 
mended " the adoption of the open-shelf sys- 
tem, with slight modifications, if such shall be 
found necessary to render this system practi- 
cable in this library." At the council meeting 
the majority report was voted down and the 
minority report accepted. 

Baltimore. Enoch Pratt F. L. Branch 6 of 
the library was formally opened on Saturday 
afternoon, Nov. 14. The branch opened with 
about 6000 v. on its shelves and some 40 cur- 
rent periodicals in its reading-room. From 
present indications the use of the reading-room 
of this bra'nch will surpass that of any other 
of the branches of the library. The branch 
is open from 2 to 9 p.m., and thus far there 
have been nearly 1000 readers a week in the 
reading-room. With the opening of this branch 
the combined circulation of the branches sur- 
passes that of the central library. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY; by Lilian Whiting. 
(In Chicago Advance, Dec. 3, 1896.) 2 col. 



Bridgeport (Ct.) P. L. The lithograph ex- 
hibition held early in December in the art- 
rooms of the library proved of general popular 
interest. It included lithographs designed for 
Puck, Truth, and other papers, advertising 
lithographs and " art" posters, and examples 
of black and white work. 

Bristol (Ct.) F. P. L. The library was opened 
Dec. i in the attractive new building obtained 
by remodelling a suitable residence for library 
purposes. The building affords ample room, 
is attractively fitted up and well lighted, andis 
a delightful contrast to the previous crowded 
and inadequate quarters. The entrance leads 
through a hallway to the reception-room, in 
which is the delivery-counter, placed between 
this and the stack-room, with a capacity of 
I2,ooov. On the right is the librarian's private 
room, and in front is the reference-room. An 
easy flight of stairs leads to two pleasant 
reading-rooms on the second floor, where 
papers and magazines are to be found. Back 
of tkese is another stack-room, connected with 
the one on the first floor by a flight of stairs. 
There is also a large attic, easily reached, in 
which many books can be stored. 

The Bristol Library has been in existence as 
a free public library only about five years, 
during which time it has received two bequests 
of $5000 each. Its nucleus dates from 1845, 
when a number of ladies formed a " New car- 
pet society " for the purpose of raising money 
to buy a new carpet for the church. When this 
object was accomplished they converted the 
organization into a friendly society, and by 
sewing and making articles for sale, realized 
money for the purchase of books for common 
reading. In 1868 the society had accumulated 
a library of 445 volumes and had $70 in cash 
on hand. The Y. M. C. A. was then being 
formed in Bristol, and the ladies agreed to 
turn over to it their library (with the unex- 
pended money) in trust to be forever main- 
tained as a circulating library open to the 
public. The association housed and cared for 
it, twice replaced it after fires, and devoted the 
subscription fees received to its increase. By 
this means it had reached the number of 2528 
volumes in 1891, when the first bequest of $5000 
was received and the town voted to take over 
the library and appropriate an annual three- 
fourths of a mill tax for its maintenance. It 
now contains over 6000 v. Charles Wooding is 
librarian. 

Brookline (Mass.} P. L. The library cele- 
brated its sgth anniversary on Dec. 2 by throw- 
ing open the whole building to the public, thus 
giving the people an opportunity to examine 
for themselves the books on the shelves, and 
the librarian and his assistants to explain the 
practical work of the library to such as might 
be interested in it. The innovation proved a 
most popular one, and the library was visited 
by a large number of interested persons. A 
collection of West Indian photographs and a 
number of rare colored views of social events 
in England 200 years ago were on exhibition. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



45 



The library was first opened to the public Dec. 
2,1857- 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) L. The music department 
of the library, which numbers over 2000 v., has 
been augmented by the purchase of over 200 
volumes of music, mostly by modern French 
and German composers. The addition consists 
of recent publications of pianoforte sheet- 
music for two and four hands, bound up into 
volumes; opera scores with words, and opera 
and orchestral scores arranged as pianoforte 
solos. Some 20 volumes of songs by Buck, 
Chaminade, McDowell, Tschaikowsky, and 
others, have been added to the department of 
vocal music, making altogether about 200 vol- 
umes of choice songs, both sacred and secular, 
by modern composers. 

A feature of the library's work has been the 
use made of it by clubs and associations, for 
which reduced subscription rates are made 
Several local clubs have long availed them- 
selves of its facilities, but a rather new de- 
parture has been inaugurated by a club in one 
of the towns on Long Island about 40 miles 
from Brooklyn. In this case, and in consider- 
ation of a given number of subscribers at $5 a 
year, the library engages to pay for the weekly 
delivery and return of a package of books se- 
lected from lists furnished by the members of 
the club. This plan has been found quite sat- 
isfactory, and, it is thought, will lead to the 
establishment of other out-of-town deliveries 
in like manner. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Pratt Institute F. L. A 
new department has been opened in the Pratt 
Institute Free Library the department of Art 
reference. It has been placed in charge of 
Miss Laura Palmer, formerly of the Fine Arts 
Department of the Institute, who is thoroughly 
equipped for the work by study and travel. 

Brooklyn (N. F.) P. L. A. On Nov. 30 a 
committee of the association presented a peti- 
tion to the board of aldermen, reciting the 
need of a public library in the city and the pro- 
visions of the law of 1892 looking toward its 
establishment, asking that directors be ap- 
pointed by the mayor in accordance with that 
law, and submitting the following resolution 
for approval : " Resolved, That this common 
council does hereby determine that a public 
library and reading-room shall he established 
and maintained in the city of Brooklyn, under 
the provisions of chapter 441 of the laws of 
1892 of the state of New York." The resolu- 
tion was adopted, and on Dec. 8 was signed by 
the mayor. On the same date a delegation 
from the association visited the mayor, ex- 
plained the objects of their body, and urged him 
to appoint the nine directors provided for by 
the law of 1892. The rpayor expressed his 
willingness to accede to the request made. 
The efforts of the association to awaken public 
interest in the librarv matter culminated in an 
evening meeting at the Academy of Music on 
Tan. 14. following the all-day session of the 
N. Y. Library Association and the N. Y. Libra- 
ry Club. (See p. 18.) 



Buffalo (IV. y.) L. On Dec. i a bust of 
Robert Burns, presented to the library by the 
St. Andrew's Scottish Society, was unveiled 
with interesting ceremonies. For a few days 
previous to and succeeding the unveiling the 
fine collection of Burns mss., owned by Robert 
B. Adams, of Buffalo, was on exhibition at the 
library. 

Butte(Mont.) P. L. The figures showing the 
use of the library for the year ending Dec', i, 
1896, are as follows: Issued, home use 67,465; 
lib. use 44,946; attendance in ref. dept. 14,499. 
Nearly 2000 v. were added during the year, 
and the total number of v. in the library is 
now given as 20,572. 

Mr. Davies, the librarian, has been untiring 
in his efforts to increase the use of the library 
and make it generally known, and his endeav- 
ors have proved successful. He contributed 
interesting articles on the growth and facilities 
of the library to the various holiday editions 
of the Butte papers, and he furnishes regular 
weekly library articles to the two local morn- 
ing papers. The success of this method of li- 
brary advertising may be estimated from the 
statistics showing the popular use of the li- 
brary. 

The library issues monthly typewritten lists 
of accessions at 10 cents a copy. 

Cam Jen (Me.} F. P. L. The library was 
opened to the public Dec. i. It is the result of 
the appropriation of $1500 voted for the pur- 
pose at the annual election in the spring of 
1896, which through public subscription was 
later raised to $2500. The library opens with 
about 1700 v., and a good selection of mag- 
azines and newspapers. It occupies two light 
and attractively fitted rooms in a business 
block. Miss Katharine W. Harding is libra- 
rian. 

Canaitota (A. Y.) F. L. The library was 
opened on Dec. 4, and has been open regularly 
on week-day afternoons since that time. It is 
hoped that a reading-room will soon be estab- 
lished in connection with it. 

Chicago Hist. Soe. L. The new building of 
the society at 142 Dearborn street was formally 
opened on the evening of Tuesday, Dec. 15. 

Chicago, John Crerar L. The library will be 
opened to the public in its temporary quarters 
on the sixth floor of the Marshall Field & Co. 
building about Feb. r. The cataloging is pro- 
gressing rapidly, and the public reading-room 
is now nearly ready for use. There will be ap- 
propriate exercises when the library is opened. 

Chicago P. L. At a meeting of the Public 
Library board, Nov. 28, a petition was received, 
signed by over 3000 citizens of Bohemian ex- 
traction, asking the board to purchase 1000 
volumes of books by Bohemian authors. The 
board appropriated $250 for the purchase of 
several hundred volumrs. 

Columbus, 0. On Dec. 10 a library council 
was formed for the purpose of formulating 
a plan of organization and a system of co- 
operation, particularly on the part of the pub- 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



\January, '97 



lie libraries and the public schools; it is 
composed of all who are officially connected 
with libraries in the city, and shall act through 
an executive committee consisting of the libra- 
rians of the different libraries. There are three 
libraries in Columbus the Public Library, the 
Public School Library, and the State Library 
and while the council does not aim toward con- 
solidation, it is expected that it will aid in pro- 
moting co-operation and mutual helpfulness 
among them. 

Columbus (0.) P. S. L. Librarian Hensel 
inaugurated on Dec. 17, for experimental pur- 
poses, a travelling library among the outlying 
school buildings, similar in character, though 
less expensive, to that conducted by the state 
library. The purpose is to make the volumes 
in the library available to the poorer children 
who live too far away to walk to the library 
and are unable to pay street-car fare to and 
from their homes to obtain the books. 

Des Afoines (la.) P. L. The trustees held a 
meeting on Dec. 10, and agreed to dismiss the 
mandamus case brought against the city coun- 
cil, upon condition that the injunction suit 
against the library be abandoned, and that 
they be allowed to collect the remaining half of 
the levy for last year, and the council consent 
to levy a tax of two mills for the current year, 
one mill being for maintenance and one for 
building. 

Detroit (Mich.') P. L. On Dec. 3 the library 
board voted to expend f 100 for the purchase 
of books for the blind. The matter was 
placed in charge of Dr. C. Henri Leonard, who 
selected the following 40 books, which will 
cost exactly the sum allowed : " Friends in 
feathers and furs," 2 v.; "The song of Hia- 
watha," 2 v.; "Miscellaneous poems," 3 v.; 
"American history," Montgomery, 3 v.; 
" Swinton's Readings in nature's book," 2 v. ; 
" Easy steps for little feet," Swinton and Cath- 
cart, 2 v.; "Courtship of Miles Standish," 
" Evangeline," "The prisoner of Chillon," 
" The vision of Sir Launfal," " The legend of 
Sleepy Hollow," " The prince and the pauper," 
2v.; " Tanglewood tales," 2 v. ; " The rape of 
the lock," " Motley's Dutch Republics," " As 
you like it," Select poems, by Whittier, 
Longfellow, Lowell, and Bryant, 4 v.; "Eng- 
lish history," Montgomery, 3 v. ; " Merchant of 
Venice"; "Snow-bound"; " The war of inde- 
pendence," Fiske; " Washington and the spy"; 
" Sindbad the sailor"; " Ali Baba and Alad- 
din"; "Jack and the beanstalk, and other 
stories"; " Birds' Christmas Carol"; "Freder- 
ick the Great and his times "; "A Christmas 
carol," Dickens; "Five little fairy-tales"; 
"Nature's myths and stories"; " Life in the 
sea"; "Hamlet"; "Outlines of the world's 
history," 5 v. ; "Constitution of the United 
States"; "Much ado about nothing"; "Mid- 
summer night's dream"; "The discovery of 
America"; " Bits of bird life"; "Sketches of 
the Orient"; "Hero-tales from our history," 
2 v.; "The conspiracy of Pontiac." The 
library had previously received a gift of 30 



books for the blind from a resident of Detroit, 
whose name was not made public. All of these 
books are in modified Braille. 

An examination of the use of the foreign 
books in the library has shown an average cir- 
culation of 77$ among the German books, 34$ 
among the French books, and 138 % among 
the Polish books. In this latter division the 
library possesses about 800 v., which have 
been circulated 842 times for home use and 
266 times for reference use during the past 
three months. The extraordinarily high ratio 
of withdrawals in the Polish department will 
probably lead to its enlargement. 

Evanston, III, A meeting to consider the re- 
lation between the free public library and the 
public school was held on Dec. 4 at the high- 
school building. It was attended by the 100 
school-teachers belonging to the first, second, 
and third school districts, members of the 
school boards and library board, and others in- 
terested in educational work. The first address 
was made by Superintendent F. W. Nichols, of 
the second district, who told of the benefits in 
Evanston of the free circulation of public libra- 
ry books among the public school children, in 
which the school has been used as a sub-libra- 
ry. The teachers are beginning by this system 
to direct the reading of their pupils. Miss L. 
E. Stearns, of the Milwaukee Public Library, 
discussed the value of the utmost co-operation 
between the library and the schools. She said 
that the teachers of Milwaukee ha,d distributed 
during the year 68,000 volumes among their 
pupils. Miss M. E. Ahern, secretary of the 
library section of the National Educational 
Association, also spoke. She called attention 
to the kind of literature offered in school-read- 
ing and the opening up of possibilities of getting 
pupils to read outside because of tastes for 
reading formed in the school-room. President 
J. W. Thompson, of the Evanston library 
board, was chairman of the meeting, and made 
a few remarks at the beginning of the session. 

Fishkill Landing, N. Y. Hoivland L. (Rpt.) 
Added 245; total 6314. Issued 6141 (fict. 5510). 
Receipts $476.81; expenses $338.46. There are 
120 subscribers and 48 stockholders. 

Frederick, Md. Ariz L. The will of Mrs. 
Ann Graham Ross, of Frederick, has recently 
been filed for probate in the Orphans' Court of 
that city. Her grandfather, Thomas Johnson, 
was the first governor of Maryland, and his 
portrait and a number of autograph letters of 
George Washington, John Jay, and others, ad- 
dressed to him were in possession of Mrs. Ross, 
and are now bequeathed by her. The various 
articles are to be deposited for safe keeping 
with the Maryland Historical Society until the 
establishment of the Christian Burr Artz Li- 
brary in Frederick. 

Since the Artz Library has never been men- 
tioned in the LIBRARY JOURNAL, a brief sketch 
of it may be in order. The wife of C. B. Artz 
was Mrs. Margaret C. Artz, who was a Miss 
Thomas, of Frederick. Mrs. Artz died in Chi- 
cago, March 27, 1887, many years after the 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



47 



death of her husband. They had but one 
child, Miss Victorienne Thomas Artz. Mrs. 
Artz in her will gave the daughter $25,000, ab- 
solutely, and the income, during life, of the bal- 
ance of the estate, which was placed in trust. 
Should the daughter have issue the estate 
should go to her heirs, otherwise the library in 
Frederick should be established as mentioned 
above. Mrs. Artz named the three trustees 
who are to receive the library upon the death 
of the daughter. Vacancies in the board of 
trustees are to be filled by the board of alder- 
men of Frederick, with the provision that two 
members of said board shall be members of the 
German Reformed Church, in good and regular 
standing, and the other member shall be a mem- 
ber of the Episcopalian church. The estate is 
now estimated, in round numbers, at about 
$150,000. Miss V. T. Artz, on whose death de- 
pends th establishment of the Frederick Li- 
brary, is the lady who recently gave f 10,000 
to the Boston Public Library for the Longfellow 
Memorial Library. 

Hamburg (N. Y.) F. L. The library was 
opened on Dec. 18, with interesting exercises 
conducted by the leading women's clubs of 
Hamburg and Buffalo. 

Hempstead (L. I.) Circulating L. A. (8th rpt.) 
Added 555 ; total 2155. Receipts $322.90; ex- 
penses $224.60. 

Homestead, Pa. The contract for the new 
library, music-hall, and club-house building, 
presented by Andrew Carnegie to the citizens 
of Homestead, was awarded on Nov. 24 to 
William Miller & Sons, of Pittsburg, for 
$250,000. It is expected to have the building 
ready for dedication next June. The structure 
was designed by Alden & Harlow, and will 
have a frontage of 226 feet, with a depth of 98 
feet. The style is French Renaissance. It will 
be three stories high, and will be built of stone, 
Pompeiian brick and terra-cotta, with a high 
pitched tile roof. The interior will be finished 
in ornamental stucco work and quartered oak. 
Aside from the library proper, the principal 
feature of the new structure will be the club- 
room, gymnasium, and swimming-pool. The 
club-house will occupy the right of the build- 
ing. 

Houston, Tex. Library day. Nov. 25 was 
Library day in the schools of Houston, and 
contributions of books and money were gener- 
ally received for the school libraries. The 
Thanksgiving day exercises were combined 
with addresses and recitations on the value of 
books. 

Hutckinson, Kan. The local Woman's Club 
has been so far successful in its efforts to es- 
tablish a free public library that quarters have 
been secured in one of the business blocks, and 
are now being altered and fitted up for library 
purposes. The library will be opened within 
a short time, and will be wholly free the public. 

Illinois College, Jacksonville, III. The corner- 
stone of the Jones Memorial Library, recently 



given to Illinois College by Dr. H. K. Jones, 
was laid on Nov. n. 

Jamestown, N. Y. Prendergast F. L. On 
Thursday, Dec. 3, the fifth anniversary of the 
opening of the library was observed as Found- 
er's day, with interesting exercises. It was the 
first celebration of the kind, and was largely 
attended. Among the speakers were W: R. 
Eastman, of the state library, and J. N. 
Larned, of the Buffalo Library. 

Massapequa, L. I. Floyd-Jones L. The li- 
brary given to Massapequa by Col. De Lancey 
Floyd-Jones was opened Oct. 29. The build- 
ing is a modest structure, with a frontage of 
about 20 feet, and a depth, including its piazza, 
of 30 feet. The roof is what is usually called 
a hip-roof, projecting over the piazza, and sup- 
ported by four neat columns. The interior 
walls and ceiling are of North Carolina pine, 
varnished. The room contains a handsome 
fireplace mantel and a few pictures. The 
shelving will hold about 2500 volumes. The 
room is lighted by four Gothic windows, two 
on either side, and a smaller window in front, 
all with translucent glass. The library is 
chartered in accordance with the laws of the 
University of the State of New York, and is 
directed by a board of nine trustees. 

Michigan, lid. commission for. A bill provid- 
ing for the establishment of a Michigan free li- 
brary commission is to be introduced into the 
next legislature by Representative-elect John 
Atkinson, of Detroit. It was drawn under 
the supervision of Mr. Utley, of the Detroit 
Public Library, with the co-operation of the 
state library association. 

Michigan State L., Lansing. (Biennial rpt. 
two years ending June 30, '96.) Added 9388 ; 
books for travelling libs. 2000; total not given. 
46,300 books and pm. have been received from 
the state for distribution and exchange. 

A considerable portion of the report is de- 
voted to the travelling libraries system inaugu- 
rated under the law of 1895. "The object of 
the law was to bring the library into closer and 
more sympathetic touch with the people of the 
state, and to remove from the public mind the 
idea that the taxpayers of the state were de- 
barred from the privileges of an institution to 
the support of which they were contributing. 
With this in view, the ' associate' and 'trav- 
elling library ' systems were embodied in the 
law, and it is a pleasure to state that both of 
these new departures in library work have 
been in every way successful." Under the act 
of 1895 10 libraries have become associates of 
the state library and 35 users of associate li- 
braries have obtained books from the state li- 
brary ; "in no case has the privilege been 
abused, and the results have been most satis- 
factory." Travelling libraries of 50 v. each 
have been established and have been sent to 43 
towns or associations, 44 such libraries have 
been kept in circulation, and the statistics of 
their use present a gratifying showing ; in ad- 
dition to these, special collections have been 



4 8 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



{January, '97 



sent to five study clubs. The total circulation 
of the books from May, 1895, to June 30, 1896, 
was 7473; no. readers 1483. 

The appendix includes a classed list of addi- 
tions to the library for the period, reports of 
the associate libraries, and an index to the Jen- 
nison collection. 

Middletown, Ct. Berkeley Divinity School, 
Williams L. The fine library building, erected 
as a memorial to Bishop Williams, of the Ber- 
keley Divinity School, was on Nov. 18 formal- 
ly transferred to the school authorities, with 
appropriate exercises. The building, which 
cost $20,000, was erected by the church people 
of the diocese as a testimonial to Bishop Will- 
iams's work in Connecticut. 

Minnesota, lib. commission for. A bill pro- 
viding for th,e establishment of a library com- 
mission and authorizing the maintenance of 
travelling libraries will be presented to the 
legislature at the winter session. A similar 
bill was introduced last year, but failed. This 
year the bill will be introduced early and will 
be vigorously pushed ; it has had the earnest 
support and indorsement of the state library 
association and of the state federation of 
women's club.s. 

New Brunswick (IV. _/.) F. L. The reference- 
room has recently been refitted, with shelving, 
handsome tables and chairs, by one of the trus- 
tees, whose gift was made anonymously ; it is 
now the most attractive room in the library. 

New Hampshire State L. , 'Concord. At a re- 
cent meeting of the governor and council of 
New Hampshire, William D. Chandler was ap- 
pointed a trustee of the state library, vice 
Frank S. Streeter, term expired. 

New Orleans, La. Fisk F. and P. L. On 
Dec. 7 Mr. William Beer, of the Howard Memo- 
rial Library, was elected librarian of the new 
library, which it is expected will be opened to 
the public some time in January. Mrs. Culbert- 
son, the former librarian of the City Library, 
was made assistant librarian, and three assist- 
ants were appointed. The library rooms are 
now being adequately fitted up, and the work 
of arranging, cataloging, and adding to the 
books, which form the nucleus of the collec- 
tion, is being rapidly prosecuted. 

New York, city lib. appropriation. The fol- 
lowing appropriations for the city libraries 
were made by the board of estimate and ap- 
propriation for the new year : N. Y. Free 
Circulating Library, $50,000, an increase of 
ti5 v ooo over the previous year ; Aguilar Li- 
brary. $ 20.000, an increase of $6000 : Webster 
Free Library $3<;ob, an increase of $500 ; Me- 
chanics and Tradesmen's Librarv, $15,000, an 
increase of $3000 ; Cathedral Free Library, 
$35"O^; Universitv Settlement Library, $2000 ; 
Washington Heights Library. $2000; Riverside 
Library, $ 750; Maimonides Library, $750 ; and 
St. Agnes Librarv, $100. 

New York, Gen. Soc. of Mechanics and Trades- 
men. At the December meeting the new li- 



brary site recently purchased through the 
president of the society, at 48th street and 7th 
avenue, was accepted. As the leases on the 
property bought do not expire for some time, 
the new library building will not be com- 
menced, perhaps, within the year. 

New York P. L. Astor, Lenox, and Tilden 
Foundations. A fine collection of works of art, 
given to the Astor Library in 1890 by W. W. 
Astor, and taken from the collection of John 
Jacob Astor, was recently placed on exhibition 
at the Lenox Library. It includes Gilbert 
Stuart's portrait of Washington, Ceracchi's bust 
of Alexander Hamilton, paintings by Meisso- 
nier, Lefebvre, Robert Fleury, and others, and 
some fine bronzes. 

New York State L., Albany, Two of the 
rooms occupied by the state library have been 
taken by the senate committee on finance for 
permanent use, in spite of protests made by 
the regents and Mr. Dewey at a conference on 
the subject held Nov. 23. The library, how- 
ever, may resume occupation of the rooms in 
May, and continue it until the legislature re- 
assembles in January. The affair has been 
made the basis of an argument of the need of 
a building for the individual use of the state 
library. 

Newark (N. J.} P. L. It was decided by the 
trustees, at a meeting on Nov. 7, to engage 
Prof. A. D. F. Hamlin, professor of architect- 
ure at Columbia University, as advisory archi- 
tect of the proposed new library building. 
Prof. Hamlin's work will begin at once and 
continue until the specifications for the new 
building have been made. He will suggest the 
general features on which the architects who 
will compete will be asked to base their plans. 
Already a number of prominent architects have 
asked to be notified when plans are to be sub- 
mitted. The board has also appointed a com- 
mittee to decide upon a desirable site for the 
new building. 

The annual exhibition of art works was held 
at the library on Nov. 18. 

Newark, N. Y. At a meeting of the village 
trustees on Nov. 30 it was voted to establish a 
free public library, in accordance with the laws 
of 1892. 10 trustees were elected and a libra- 
ry organization effected, and the library will 
probably be an established fact within a short 
time. 

Newbu+yport (Mass.) P. L. (Rpt.) Added 
883; total 31,731. Issued, home use 38,561 (fict. 
and juv. 74.22$). New registration 540 ; total 
cardholders 5916. 

The work of classifying and cataloging was 
begun May i, 1896, and by September all the 
works of fiction as well as those on New Eng- 
land history and genealogy had been arranged 
and the cards exposed for the use of the pub- 
lic. Since these departments were completed 
the work of classifying all the books before 
any further cataloging was attempted has been 
taken up, and 7033 volumes have received clas- 
sification. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



49 



Ogdensburg (AT. Y.) P. L. A loan exhibition 
of curious and interesting relics was held in the 
library building on Nov. 25 and successive days, 
under the auspices of the local chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. Its 
object was to secure funds for the establish- 
ment of a deparment of American industry, 
which the chapter expects to provide for the li- 
brary. 

O-watonna, Minn. The city council on Dec. 16 
appointed a board of nine trustees to assume 
charge of the $10,000 recently left to the city by 
Mrs. E. V. Hunewill, for the purpose of pro- 
viding and maintaining a public library and 
reading-room. The provisions of the will make 
it necessary for the city to provide $15,000, to 
be used with the amount named, and as this 
has not yet been provided, it becomes neces- 
sary for a board of trustees to be elected to re- 
ceive the bequest and take steps to provide 
the $15,000. It will probably be two years be- 
fore the project will be perfected. 

Pelham (N. H.} P. L. The new library build- 
ing was dedicated on Dec. 2, with elaborate ex- 
ercises, the day being generally observed as a 
holiday by the townspeople. There was a 
large attendance of invited guests, among them 
a special representation of G. A. R. men. The 
exercises were opened in the memorial-room of 
the building, where addresses were made by 
C. W. Hobbs, chairman of the building com- 
mittee, and C. W. Seavey, chairman of the 
selectmen. The audience then adjourned to 
the church, where there was prayer, singing, 
and speeches by F. H. Butler, of the G. A. R., 
- Rev. Augustus Berry, G. C. Gilman, of the 
state library commission, and others. 

The building was erected by popular vote at 
the town election of April, 1895, and it is a li- 
brary and memorial building combined, one 
room in the structure, known as the memorial- 
room, being dedicated to the memory of all the 
soldiers who went from Pelham to the Ameri- 
can wars. The library building is located in 
one of the most conspicuous situations in the 
town, near the church. It is a modest struct- 
ure, of tasteful design, of brick, with the front 
entrance in the centre, and reached by neat 
steps of cut granite. On entering the vestibule 
directly to the right is the room for the use of 
the town officers. Passing through the vesti- 
bule the delivery-room is reached. On the left 
is the memorial-room, which runs the entire 
depth of the building, and is lighted on three 
sides. The walls and ceilings are frescoed, 
and the floor, as are all the floors in the build- 
ing, is of hard wood. A feature of the room is 
the collection of marble tablets on the walls, 
containing in gilt the names of all residents of 
the town who have served in the wars from 
Queen Anne's time until the rebellion. The 
stack-room is provided with shelves capable of 
holding all the books the library will receive 
for many years. 

Pennsylvania, libraries in. The report of the 
state superintendent of instruction gives a brief 
review of the libraries of the state. There has 



been considerable progress in the establishment 
of school libraries. " One county superintend- 
ent reports that there are now in his county, 
outside of the large and populous districts, 173 
libraries, containing about 11,000 volumes. All 
except eight of these libraries were established 
within the last 12 years." The Carnegie libra- 
ries, the Scranton, Wilkesbarre, Warren, and 
Cambria libraries are briefly noted. 

Perth Amboy (N. /.) F. L. The library was 
opened as a free public library on Nov. i. It 
had previously been conducted as a subscrip- 
tion library, and the change was effected by 
popular vote at last year's fall election. It 
contains about 4000 v. 

Philadelphia F. L. The first exhibition of 
the season opened at the library on Nov. 19, 
and consisted of a number of valuable and 
curious art works. Among them were plates 
from the " Zapotican collection," the " Antiqui- 
ties of the Russian Empire," and some curious 
and rare old books and fac-similes. 

On Dec. 23 an interesting collection of books 
and memorials relating to Napoleon were' put 
on exhibition in the library. It was largely 
made up of the comprehensive and valuable 
collection of Mr. W. J. Latta, of Philadelphia, 
and included rare autographs and portraits, in 
addition to many contemporary books, manu- 
scripts, caricatures, etc. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Carnegie L. Dec. 15 was 
"city day " at the library, when all the mem- 
bers of the council, heads of departments, 
clerks, and their friends were invited by the 
officers of the institution to visit the different 
departments during the afternoon. The ma- 
jority accepted the invitation and seemed to 
enjoy the innovation. 

Plainfield (N . J.} P. L. On Jan. I the issue 
of books through sub-stations went into effect. 
Two branch stations have been secured for the 
more out-of-the-way districts of the city, and 
deliveries will be made from one three times a 
week, from the other once a week. 

Port Huron (Mich.} P. L. It is intended to 
have during the winter a series of lectures or 
talks in the public library upon questions con- 
nected with books and reading. Mrs. M. C. 
Spencer, state librarian, will probably be one 
of the speakers and will discuss "Travelling 
libraries " or " Study clubs." 

Quincy (III.) P. L. At a recent meeting of 
the library board the need of a catalog of chil- 
dren's books was presented by Mr. Moulton, 
and it was decided that the manuscript of such 
a catalog be prepared and submitted to the 
board for further consideration. 

Ridley Park, Pa. The newly-arranged and 
refitted library will shortly be opened in the 
tower-room of the public school. A number 
of new books have been added, and the library 
has been put in excellent working order. 

Rochester, N. Y. Reynolds L. (iithrpt. 
year ending Sept. 30, '96.) Added 2214; total 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



[January, '97 



33,451. Issued, home use 19,021; ref. use 7105; 
attendance 98,001. 

During the year the library was removed to 
new quarters on Spring street, a reading-room 
being maintained in the old rooms in the Ar- 
cade building. The library committee suggest 
the experiment of a course of lectures "to 
bring the library into sympathetic and bene- 
ficial relation with the reading public." 

Rome, N. Y. Jervis L. (2d rpt. year end- 
ing Dec. i, '96.) Added 1178; total 11,046. Is- 
sued 42,151 (net. 71.5 %). New registration 
1079; total card-holders 2680. Receipts $4623. 29; 
expenses $4598.21. 

Miss Beach, the librarian, urges the need of 
a children's room, and speaks of the difficulty 
of providing adequately for the large number 
of children who use the library in constantly 
increasing force. More books are also needed. 
One ho ne library has been established through 
the generosity of a library friend, and is now 
in successful use. 

St. Louis (Mo.) P. L. The wedding of Miss 
Nellie McCreary, of the cataloging department 
of the library, was celebrated on the even- 
ing of Nov. 28, at the cattery (known to unsci- 
entific minds as the catalog-room), where a cat- 
feast was given, partly in sorrow, partly in 
honor of Miss McCreary, who was about to 
desert the glorious ranks of Catdom and be- 
come plain Mrs. J. W. De Laughter. At five 
p.m. sharp the chief cat had given the signal, 

" Come, put your work away, 
For now's the time for play." 

And promptly accession-book, shelf lists, and 
catalog cards vanished, desks were closed and 
typewriters extinguished, and those who a 
few minutes before were dignified and indus- 
trious cats had suddenly become bustling and 
important housewives, bent upon preparing a 
feast worthy the occasion. For once order 
cards were of less importance than menu cards, 
and the question of how to get the dear little 
ice-cream cats out of the moulds without injur- 
ing their sweet little noses was of more interest 
than the nicest question of classification would 
have been. 

By seven o'clock the room had been changed 
to a real banquet-hall, the table spread with 
fine linen and dainty china, and a profusion of 
flowers everywhere. 12 covers had been laid, 
each being marked by a place card containing 
pictures of a cat, and a few lines of verse clev- 
erly adapted to fit position or fad of the indi- 
vidual. Mr. Crunden's card represented a big 
black cat with the lines: 

" Why should I long the flock to keep 
Who lost my heart while I preserved my sheep ? " 

and that of the bride to be the deserting cat 
an owl and pussycat in a pea-green boat 
with 

' Oh, lovely pussy, pussy, my love, 

Oh, let us be married, too long we have tarried." 

These were the work of an office cat who 
purred gratefully under the praises showered 
upon her. 



Though it is not generally known that the 
feline tribe aspire to mount the winged Pegasus, 
yet this occasion inspired no less than three 
poetical mews and a prose chronicle of the 
origin of the banquet. Miss McCreary went to 
her southern home not only " trailing clouds of 
glory" but also good wishes and amateur 
poetry. Taken as a class the cats proved 
themselves admirable hostesses and "good 
providers," and Mr. Crunden's amiable wish 
that the banquet, though not the occasion, be 
frequently repealed, is echoed, with private 
reservations, by each individual cat. 

Salem (0.) P. L. The library now contains 
1400 v. In the short time it has been open the 
circulation has steadily increased, and the list 
of stockholders and subscribers now numbers 
108. It is open on Wednesday and Saturday 
afternoons. 

Seattle (Wash.') P. L. At a recent council 
meeting it was decided to allow the library an 
additional appropriation of $3000 for the new 
year. This will give it an income of about 
$11,000. 

Shreveport (La.) L. A. Added 228; total 836. 
Issued 4712. Receipts $268.60; expenses 
$174.02. There are 218 members. 

South Norwalk (Ct.) P. L. An exhibition il- 
lustrating the oyster industry and the natural 
history of the bivalve was held at the public 
library early in December and proved to be of 
general public interest. It consisted of the col- 
lection of David C. Sanford, engineer of the 
State Shellfish Commission, and was displayed 
in a series of cases in the art-room. Popular 
talks on oyster culture were also delivered by 
Mr. Sanford. Shortly after the exhibit the col- 
lection was taken by Mr. Sanford to Germany, 
where the government is trying to revive the 
oyster industry. 

Terre Haute (Ind. ) P. L. The library opened 
a month or so ago in its new and attractive 
quarters, formerly the property of the Unita- 
rian church. The building cost originally 
$6000, and $3000 has been spent in alterations 
and improvement; it is not intended as a per- 
manent home, but to serve until an entirely 
new building can be erected. 

Washington, D. C. At a meeting of the 
centre council of the Civic Centre on Nov. 27, 
Miss Clark, from the committee on adult edu- 
cation, reported that the home library com- 
mittee had started the plan of establishing 
home libraries in those sections of the city 
remote from access to the free library. One 
library is already under way, and it is hoped to 
get others ready in a short time. A visitor 
from the central committee superintends the 
distribution of the books. 

Washington (D. C.} P. L. The district 
commissioners have presented an estimate for 
an appropriation of $8300 for the support of 
the library in compliance with the law passed 
in May last (see L. j., 21:298-299). This is 
the first estimate made for the purpose, and it 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



has not yet received congressional sanction. 
The amount asked for seems rather inade- 
quate when it is considered that the^library is 
but poorly supplied with books, nearly all of 
which have been given to it, and that its field 
of work is just opening and should have hearty 
support. 

Wisconsin State Hist. Soc. L. t Madison. The 
44th annual meeting of the society was held 
Dec. 10, and the report of the secretary, R. G. 
Thwaite, was presented. The accessions of 
the year were 5247 books, 3755 pm., giving a 
total of 9002, of which 66$, or 5817 were gifts. 
" The fiscal year just closed, has been for the 
society a season of quiet progress. Although 
seriously hampered for funds, the accessions 
have, in most departments, been customarily 
large; public interest in our work is becoming 
more manifest; the new home for the society, 
so generously provided for by the legislature of 
1895, is in course of construction, and bids fair 
to meet our most sanguine expectations; and 
there is every reason to hope that we shall be 
enabled to remove our collections thither about 
two years hence perhaps to hold our 46th 
annual meeting within its walls." 

Wisconsin Travelling Ls. F. A. Hutchins, of 
the Wisconsin Library Commission, contributed 
an interesting account of the success of the 
travelling libraries established by Senator Stout, 
of that state, to the Milwaukee Sentinel of 
Sunday, Dec. 13. The article has been reprint- 
ed in pamphlet form by the commission. It is 
a striking demonstration of the good that has 
been accomplished by these libraries in the 
more remote rural communities of the state. 

FOREIGN. 

Belfast (Irel.) F. P. L. (8th rpt.) Added, 
lending 1. 539; total 17,123; issued 183,145 
(fict. 66.22$) ; no. borrowers 6359. Added, ref. 
1. 209; total 17,242; issued 55,062; no. readers 
23,656. The visitors to the news-room are es- 
timated at 1,108,083, the highest ever re- 
corded; the art gallery and museum were 
visited by 393,944 persons. 

Bradford(Eng.)P.f.Ls. (26th rpt.) Added 
5693; total 8r, 621. Issued 595, 234 (fict. 478,250), 
of which 76,697 were used in the ref. 1. Visits 
954.835, a net increase of 25,687 over the pre- 
vious year (includes visits to art gallery and 
museum). Total borrowers 10,912. These sta- 
tistics are for the central circulating and refer- 
ence libraries and for the seven branches. 

The reference collection of books on useful 
arts has been cataloged according to the Dewey 
classification. 

Leipzig, Germany, Gustav Fock, of Leipzig, 
announces that he has become agent for the 
sale of two important private libraries that 
of the late Prof, von Kekule, of the University 
of Bonn, and that of the late Prof. Heinrich 
Brunn, of Munich. The Kekule collection is 
devoted almost wholly to science, and includes 
complete sets of nearly all the scientific jour- 
nals, transactions, etc.; it comprises about 
18,000 volumes, dissertations, and pamphlets 



most of which are bound, and is rich in the 
alchemistic works of earlier centuries. The 
collection is valued at 32,000 marks. The 
Brunn library is a valuable collection of works 
relating to archaeology, including many valua- 
ble serial sets. One of its special features are 
the 136 volumes in which are gathered the 
many small essays, reports, dissertations, etc., 
which afforded Prof. Brunn much of his working 
material. The collection is priced at 14,000 
marks. 

Manchester (Eng.) P. F. Ls. (44th rpt.) Add- 
ed 9055; total 266,514 (ref. 1. 107,449). Issued, 
iome use 978,616 (fict. 798,004); ref. use 419, 949. 
No. borrowers 49,987. Visits to news-rooms 
4,289,574. Sunday use, ref. 12,221; news-room 
and juv. rooms 139,626. The library " plant " 
includes, besides the main reference library, n 
lending libraries and four reading-rooms, with 
which the 15 news-rcoms are connected. 

" The most notable incident in the history of 
the libraries during the past year has been the 
decision of the House of Lords in the appeal 
of your committee against the assessment of 
the libraries to income tax. This important 
case began in Oct., 1893, with an ineffectual 
appeal to the Manchester income tax commis- 
sioners. Further appeals were dismissed by 
the queen's bench division in Nov., 1894, and 
by the court of appeal in Jan., iSgs/and then 
your committee resolved to carry the case to 
the House of Lords, which, on 3ist July, 1896, 
reversed, with costs, the judgments of the 
courts below. This judgment affects not only 
the Manchester public libraries, but the whole 
of such institutions throughout the country, 
and the committee have received warm thanks 
for their action from several corporations and 
from the library association. The committee 
acknowledged with gratitude the assistance of 
23 library authorities, who contributed sums 
varying from .5 to ^"50 to a guarantee fund for 
the expenses of the last appeal." 



(!5ifts a lib IkqtKGts. 



Bangor (Me.) P. L. By the will of Augustus 
D. Manson, of Bangor, the library is be- 
queathed $10,000 for a new building. 

Boston P. L. The sum of $ro,ooo has been 
given to the library by Miss Victorienne Thomas 
Artz, of Chicago, for the establishment of 
what shall be known as the Longfellow me- 
morial collection, to consist of rare editions of 
verse or prose by American or foreign authors; 
it may also include mss. 

Ford City, Pa. On Nov. 21, Capt. John Ford, 
a wealthy manufacturer and founder of Ford 
City, announced that he intended to erect a li- 
brary and opera-house in Ford City for the use 
of the public. The estimated cost of the build- 
ing will be about $30,000, and the giver plans 
to stock the library with about 25,000 v. 

Lin-wood, O. By the will of the late Miss 
Phoebe Ferris, of Linwood, that town is be- 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



{January, '97 



queathed the large " Ferris homestead " tract 
of land, on which is a fine residence, to be used 
for the purposes of a free public library, to be 
called " The Joseph Ferris Memorial Library." 
The exact value of the bequest has not yet been 
made public. 

Paulina, Iowa. By the will of the late F. 
G. Frothingham, of Boston, the town of Paulina 
receives $1500 fora public library, and $500 for 
the purchase of books, provided the town will 
furnish a site. 

Princeton Univ. L. It was announced on 
Dec. 14 that Junius S. Morgan, of New York 
City, had given to the library his fine collection 
of early editions of Virgil, valued at about 
$50,000. The collection will be placed in the 
library as soon as the new building is com- 
pleted. 

Stoughton, Mass. By the will of the late 
Henry L. Pierce, of Boston, the town of 
Stoughton is to receive $25,000 for books for a 
free public library. 

Tilden bequests. On Dec. 23 Judge Beekman, 
of the Supreme Court, rendered a decision in 
the protracted Tilden will case, that declares in- 
valid the clause in Mr. Tilden's will providing 
for the establishment of free libraries at New 
Lebanon and at Yonkers. The decision states 
that " No time is specified within which the 
trusts are to be executed, and the law is well 
settled that in the case of a charitable trust 
such a limitation is indispensable to their 
validity. These attempted dispositions are 
therefore void, and the executors and trustees 
rest under no duty with respect to them." The 
fund created for the purpose will now revert to 
the heirs. 

Practical Notes. 



MENDING BOOKS. In the process lectures on 
bookbinding delivered before the Pratt Insti- 
tute Library School, Miss Evelyn Nordhoff 
illustrated practically several methods of mend- 
ing torn or perforated pages. In rebinding, 
the holes made in the fold of the sheet by the 
stitches or saw-marks of the former binding 
were so repaired as to be almost imperceptible. 
A bit of paper, as nearly as possible of the 
same texture as the page, was split, lightly 
touched with gum, and laid over the hole. 
The splitting of the paper made it almost as 
light as tissue, 'while it left a rough surface to 
catch and hold the gum much more satisfactor- 
ily than does the tissue usually used. An 
ordinary tear in the edge of a page was mended 
by tipping the torn edges lightly with gum, 
joining them together and pressing them be- 
tween separate bits of paper similar in texture. 
After these had adhered to the mended page 
they were gently torn away, leaving a suffi- 
cient film behind them to firmly secure to the 
joined edges. A page from the edge of which 
a piece had been torn out required a little differ- 
ent treatment. If it were possible to find the 
missing bit, it might be inserted by lightly tip- 



ping the edges with gum, inserting it in place 
and pressing the pages between bits of paper, 
to be afterwards pulled gently away; but if a 
new piece had to be put in, the method adopted 
was to trace lightly on a bit of paper similar in 
quality to the page to be repaired the outline 
of the tear, and then to tear the paper in the 
desired shape. The tearing gives the neces- 
sary roughened bevel edge, and the bit is then 
inserted in the manner previously described. 

ADHESIVE PAPER. Gaylord Bros., of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., have recently put upon the market 
an "Adhesive parchment paper," specially in- 
tended for library use in repairing torn pages 
of books, magazines, or sheet music. The 
paper possesses much tensile strength, and its 
transparency allows the torn page to be easily 
read after it has been mended. It is partic- 
ularly useful for repairing school-books, and 
should be welcome in the circulating divis- 
ion of libraries, especially for popular fiction, 
where the more costly or tedious methods of 
repairing are out of the question. Samples 
may be obtained of the manufacturers, P. O. 
box 493, Syracuse, N. Y. 

LIBRARY-STACK. (Described in Official Gazette of 
the U. S. Patent Office, Nov. 3, 1896. 77 : 
723). il. 



Cibrariane. 



BEER, William, librarian of the Howard 
Memorial Library, of New Orleans, was on 
Dec. 7 elected librarian of the new Fisk Free 
Public Library of that city, which is to be 
opened this month. Mr. Beer is well known 
as an effective worker, and he has brought the 
Howard Library into the front rank among 
the reference libraries of the country. His ap- 
pointment will not interfere with his direction 
of that library, but he will now act as librarian 
of the two institutions. Mr. Beer has been en- 
thusiastic in his support of the free library 
since it was first planned a year or so ago, and 
he had been acting as adviser to the directors 
since the passage of the city ordinance in Sep- 
tember last, transferring direct control of the 
library and its funds to them. He advocates 
the close co-operation of the Howard and the 
Fisk libraries, the former serving as a refer- 
ence the latter as a circulating library, and he 
will undoubtedly make the new institution an 
important factor in the educational develop- 
ment of the city. 

BOYD, Mrs. L. J., was on Dec. 4 appointed 
librarian of the Harlem Library of New York 
City. 

BROWNE, Miss Nina E. The recent state- 
ment in these columns that Miss Browne had 
severed her connection with the Library Bureau 
to take charge of the cataloging work of the 
A. L. A. Publishing Section was not wholly 
accurate. Miss Browne while acting as cata- 
logerfor the Publishing Section is also retained 
by the Library Bureau as consulting librarian. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



S3 



CRUNDEN, Frederick M., of the St. Louis 
Public Library, has accepted the invitation of 
the New York State Library School Alumni 
Association to deliver the annual association 
lecture at the New York State Library School 
this spring. Mr. Crunden was the unanimous 
choice of the executive committee of the Asso- 
ciation, which selects the lecturer each year, 
and it was a matter of general congratulation 
that he was able to accept the invitation. 

CURRY, Miss Harriet E., librarian of the 
East Liverpool (O.) City Library, died on Nov. 
18, of typhoid fever. Miss Curry had been a 
teacher in the public schools of East Liver- 
pool for several years before she became li- 
brarian. 

DE LAUGHTER MCCREARY. Married in At- 
lanta, Ga., Dec. 2, 1892, Mr. J. W. De Laugh- 
ter, of Charlotte, N. C., and Miss Nellie 
McCreary, late assistant cataloger at the St. 
Louis Public Library. 

DORTCH, Miss Ellen, formally entered the 
field as a candidate for the office of state libra- 
rian of Georgia on Dec. n, when the bill mak- 
ing women eligible to that position passed the 
state senate by a vote of 29 to 5 ; on Dec. 3 it 
passed the house by a vote of 115 to 20. The 
bill was introduced largely through her in- 
fluence, and strong pressure is now being used 
to insure her appointment. Miss Dortch is 
now assistant state librarian. After the pas- 
sage of the bill Miss Dortch issued an address 
of thanks " To the people of Georgia," through 
the local press. 

EDWARDS, Mrs. Jennie, widow of the late 
Major John N. Edwards, has been appointed 
state librarian of Missouri for a term of six 
years, succeeding W. J. Zevely, resigned. 

GROVER, Rev. J. L. , librarian of the Colum- 
bus (O.) Public Library, celebrated his gist 
birthday on Dec. 12. Mr. Grover was former- 
ly in the ministry of the Methodist church, but 
has been librarian of the Columbus Library 
for over 20 years. He is in excellent health 
and is at his desk in the library every day. 
His wife, who is six years his junior, is still 
living. 

HOFFMAN, Charles W., for many years libra- 
rian of the law department of the Congressional 
Library, died at his home in Frederick, Md., 
on December 28. Mr. Hoffman, who was 67 
years of age at the time of his death, was ap- 
pointed law librarian of the Congressional Li- 
brary by Mr. Spofford in 1878. He was a 
lawyer, and an intimate friend of Justice Field, 
Judge Morris, Dr. Toner, and otherwell-known 
residents of Washington. Mr. Hoffman was 
a distinguished linguist. He retired from the 
library some years ago on account of ill health; 
he was unmarried and leaves an estate of about 
$80,000. 

HOWELL, A. C., was on Nov. 20 elected li- 
brarian of the Iowa City (la.) Public Library, 
which was but recently established. 



MARVIN, Miss Mabel, who was in the Ar- 
mour Institute library class from 1895-6, has 
left the library staff of Armour Institute to ac- 
cept a position as assistant cataloger in the St. 
Louis Public Library. 

MATHEWS, W. P., M.D., was on Oct. 31 
elected state librarian of California, succeed- 
ing the late W. D. Perkins. Dr. Mathews was 
born in Virginia in 1843, and was educated at 
Georgetown College and the University of Vir- 
ginia. He came to California in 1870, and set- 
tled at Tehama, where he entered upon the 
practice of medicine, which occupation he fol- 
lowed successfully for 15 years. He served 
in the legislature during the sessions of 1880, 
1881, 1887, 1889, and 1893, representing Tehama 
and Colusa counties, Tehama county and Te- 
hama and Trinity counties. Two years ago 
he accepted the position of assistant librarian 
of the state library at the request of his friend, 
Mr. Perkins. His election was unanimous on 
the part of the trustees. No changes in the 
personnel of the library staff will be made. 

MILLEDGE, Col. John, for eight years past 
state librarian of Georgia, has issued a state- 
ment to the local press, briefly giving his rec- 
ord as head of the state library and enclosing 
several letters on the same subject from well- 
known law-book publishers. Col. Milledge's 
term of office expires this year, and the ap- 
pointment will be made next summer for the 
period of four years. There are already about 
half a dozen candidates for the office. 

MURDOCK, John, has been appointed in 
charge of the scientific department at the Bos- 
ton Public Library. Mr. Murdock, who was 
formerly connected with the Smithsonian In- 
stitution, is a graduate of Harvard (class of 
'73); he is well known as a scientist and is an 
accomplished linguist. 

NOYES, Miss Marcia C., on Nov. 16 began 
her duties as librarian of the library of the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Mary- 
land. This library is in Baltimore and con- 
tains some 10,000 volumes. Since July, 1893, 
Miss Noyes had been in the service of the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

SHARP, Miss Katharine L., director of the 
department of library economy, Armour Insti- 
tute, delivered a course of library extension 
lectures at Cleveland, O., Dec. 10-24. This 
course was the first one given under the uni- 
versity extension division of the University of 
Chicago, and is the result of the work of the 
Bureau of Information of the Illinois State 
Library Association. 

WELLMAN, Hiller C., formerly assistant 
librarian at the Boston Athenaeum, has been 
appointed superintendent of branch libraries 
and stations of the Boston Public Library. 
The position is a newly-created one, and should 
be effective in extending the usefulness of the 
library in this direction. There are now 10 
branches, four reading-rooms, n delivery 
stations, and 15 fire companies that have books 
delivered to them. 



54 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



Cataloging anb (Classification. 

BINGHAMTON (N. F.) CITY SCHOOL L. First 

supplement to the finding list. December, 

1896. 24 p. 

A decimal class list, with author and title 
fiction list. 
Catalogue of works on pedagogy in the 

library. 4 p. 

BOOKS OF 1896. The Independent of Nov. 19 
devotes nearly six pages to a classified list of 
the best books of the year. Publisher and 
price of each work is given, together with a 
brief description of its contents. 

The BOSTON ATHEN^UM will shortly publish 
a catalog of its collection of books from the li- 
brary of George Washington, compiled by A. 
P. C. Griffin. The collection comprises some 
300 volumes, purchased from Henry Stevens 
in 1848 for $3800, which was subscribed for the 
purpose by about 70 residents of Boston, Cam- 
bridge, and Salem. Mr. Griffin has made care- 
ful examination of all of Washington's letters 
in the State Department at Washington and 
elsewhere, and has extracted all available in- 
formation relating to his books, and anno- 
tations including this data will form a useful 
feature of the catalog. In addition to the 
books owned by Washington, the catalog will 
include a number of other volumes belonging 
to the Washington family, and the Athenaeum's 
large collection of Washingtoniana. In an ap- 
pendix will be given the list of Washington's 
books, as shown by the appraiser's inventory 
filed in the Orphans' Court of Fairfax County, 
Va. This list records about 1000, and includes 
nearly all the books in the Athenaeum collec- 
tion. Any informat : on regarding the present 
ownership of the other volumes shown on the 
list will begladly received by W. C. Lane, li- 
brarian of the Athenaeum, Boston. 

The CLEVELAND (O.) P. L. has issued two 
excellent little reference lists on Thanksgiving 
day and on Christmas, "compiled by Margaret 
G. Pierce. The latter is especially full and 
well selected, being a reprint, with additions, 
of the list published in the December number 
of the " Cumulative index." 

DREXEL INSTITUTE (Phila.) L. Reference list 
no. 3, December, 1896. Decoration and de- 
sign. 38 p. O. 
A well-arranged classed list ; most "of the 

books listed are annotated. 

INTERNATIONAL CATALOGING. In the Elec- 
trician (London) of Oct. 30, 1896, M. Walton 
Brown urges the importance of an international 
catalog of applied-science literature. He sug- 
gests a conference of technical societies to con- 
sider the question. 

LIVINGSTON, Luther S., comp. American book- 
prices current : a record of books, manu- 
scripts, and autographs sold at auction in 
New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Cin- 



cinnati, from Sept. I, 1895, to Sept. i, 1896, 

with the prices realized, [vol. 2.] New 

York, Dodd, Mead & Co., 1896. 

7411 items are included in this second vol- 
ume, which is an improvement in arrangement 
over the first. The book is of great usefulness 
to all who buy second-hand books. 

The MERCANTILE L. OF PHILADELPHIA, in its 
Bulletin for Oct., 1896, lists the accessions from 
July to October and contains a two-page list 
of " Reading notes on King Arthur and the 
Arthurian legends," by John Edmands, and a 
short list of books for sale by the library. 

MILWAUKEE ( Wis.) P. L. Finding list of the 
circulating department; compiled by Agnes 
Van Valkenburgh. May, 1896. 390 p. 1. O. 
Contains all books in the circulating depart- 
ment to May I, 1896. A title-a-line author 
list, abbreviated to the utmost simplicity. 
Entries are made under real names, with ref- 
erences from pseudonyms. A compact and 
easily-handled list. 

The NEW BEDFORD (Mass.) F. P. L. Bulletin 
for December contains reference list no. 16 on 
Christmas; list no. 15, in the November issue, 
is on Municipal government. 

The OSTERHOUT F. L. (Wilkes-Barre, Pa.) 
Newsletter for December contains a short 
Christmas reading list, and the first of a series 
of " Historical and descriptive readirg lists," 
covering English history. The November 
number contained an interesting reading list 
on Normandy and Brittany. 

The PATERSON (N. /.) F. P. L. issued in No- 
vember the first number of a monthly bulletin, 
to be sold at one cent a copy, which in paper, 
printing, and make-up is one of the most attrac- 
tive library bulletins issued. The first number 
is a small square 54 p. pamphlet, with a view 
of the Boston Public Library as frontispiece; 
several pages are given to miscellaneous libra- 
ry notes, and the list of new books is followed 
by a special list of books on money, bimetal- 
lism, banking, etc. 

The PROVIDENCE (K. /.) P. L. Bulletin for 
Dec., 1896, contains an extremely interesting 
reference list (no. 38) on William Morris; refer- 
ence list 39, on " Proportional representation 
and analogous measures"; and a useful list of 
the reference lists issued during 1895 and 1896. 
It has also three " special catalogues ": 7, Va- 
cancies in sets of serials; 8, Providence Athe- 
naeum additions in 1895; and 9, Brown Univer- 
sity Library additions in 1896. 

The ST. Louis (Mo.)Y. P. L. Monthly Bvlletin 
for December continues its " Catalog of Eng- 
1'sh prose fiction " from W to Y. 

The SALEM (Mass.) P. L. Bulletin for Novem- 
ber contains reading lists on the Rossettis and 
on William Morris. 

SCRANTON (/>.) P. L. Bulletin no. 6: Addi- 
tions from July to December, 1896. 



January, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



55 



SEATTLE (Wash.} P. L. Bulletin, vol. i, no. i, 

Nov. 1896. 4 p. 

It is pleasant to note that Seattle has come 
into the ranks of the libraries that bring their 
contents and their work regularly before the 
public, and we trust this modest bulletin will 
prove a successful venture. Beginning in this 
first (November)number and continuing month- 
ly it is planned to publish a classed supplement 
to the last printed catalog, covering books 
added up to Nov. i, 1896. The first instalment 
covers Fiction, from A. to E. 

The SOMERVILLE (Mass.) P. L. Bulletin for 
January has special reading lists on the Brown- 
ings, and on Fairy-tales, mythology, and folk- 
lore; the number for December had lists on 
New England and Joan of Arc, and in the No- 
vember issue the lists related to " Municipal 
government " and " Our country." 

The SPRINGFIELD (Mass.) CITY L. A. Bulletin 
for December contains a short selected list of 
" Christmas reading." 

SWANSEA (Mass.) F. P. L. Catalogue. Fall 

River, 1896. 32 p. O. 

Classified on the Cutter expansive system. 
Made very clear and easy to use by a liberal al- 
lowance of headings. History and Geography 
are fully divided; the other classes hardly at 
all, yet sufficiently. The library is a very 
small one, open only on Saturday afternoons 
and evenings, two hours each. 

CHANGED TITLES. 

" NEW JERSEY : from the discovery of Sche- 
yichbi to recent times," by Frank R. Stockton, 
is published by D. Appleton & Co., 1896. 
(Stories from American History.) "Stories 
of New Jersey," by Frank R. Stockton, is pub- 
lished by the American Book 'Co., 1896. Ex- 
cept in their title-pages the text in these two 
books is precisely the same, printed from the 
same plates. There may be some good reason 
for misleading the bookbuying public in this 
way into buying two copies of the same work, 
but in this case, at least one admirer of Stock- 
ton has lost much of his respect for him as a 
man in his permitting such an imposition on 
the public. S: H. R. 

FULL NAMES. 

Taylor, Joseph Richard, translator of " Cap- 
tives of Plautus," Boston, 1896. 

Fiske, Thomas Scott, author of Chapter 6 in 
Merriam and Woodford's " Higher mathemat- 
ics," New York, 1896. 

Woodward, Robert Simpson, author of Chap- 
ter 10 in same book. W: J. J. 

The following are supplied by Harvard College Library: 

Ballmann, J: W:(The presidential campaign); 

Cochrane, Clark Betton (Songs from the gran- 
ite hills of New Hampshire); 

Dalton, Joseph Grinnell (The spherical basis 
of astrology); 

Fairchild, Edwin Milton (The function of 
the church); 



Ferguson, L: Aloysius (Electrical engineer- 
ing in modern central stations); 

Forbush, E: Howe, awaTFernald, C: H: (The 
gypsy moth); 

Gerdtzen, Gerdt Adolph (The problem of 
economical heat, light, and power supply for 
building blocks, school- houses, dwellings, etc.); 

Hamlin, Alfred Dwight Foster (A text-book 
of the history of architecture); 

Hay, Oliver Perry (On some collections of 
fishes); 

Herron, G: Davis (The call of the cross); 

Holmes, G: Kirby, and Lord, J: Smith (Re- 
port on farms and homes, etc.); 

Law, James Duff (Dreams o' home, and oth- 
er poems); 

Lewis, J: B:, and Bombaugh, C: Carroll 
(Stratagems and conspiracies to defraud life 
insurance companies); 

Loase, J: F: (The phonetic structure of the 
English language as it is in actual speech); 

McMahon, Joseph H: (A list of the most 
important Catholic works of the world); 

Niswander, Frank Josiah (Ground squirrels); 

Norris, W: Fisher, and Oliver, C: A: (Text- 
book' of ophthalmology); 

O'Donnell, James H: (Liturgy for the laity); 

Silberstein, Solomon Joseph (The disclosures 
of the universal mysteries); 

Smith, H: Harrison (All the republican na- 
tional conventions, etc.); 

Teggart, F: J: (Catalogue of the Hopkins 
railway library). 



BROWNING, Robert. In the Athetuzum of 
Nov. 28, T: J. Wise continues the bibliography 
of the writings of Browning. This instal- 
ment is devoted to " Collected editions and se- 
lections." 

CYANIDE PROCESS. References to recent liter- 
ature on the subject, comp. by A. D. Nord- 
hoff. (In Mining and Scientific Press, v. 73, 
p. 441, Nov. 28, 1896.) 

DEBATES. Brookings, W. Du Bois, and 
Ringwalt, Ralph Curtis, (tds.) Briefs for 
debate on current political, economic, and 
social topics. With an introduction by Al- 
bert Bushnell Hart. New York, Longmans, 
Green & Co., 1896. D. fi.25. 
75 briefs are presented, together with the 
best references on each side of the question. 
There is also a short bibliography of debating. 

FINE ART. A bibliography of fine arts, to 
comprise nearly 1000 annotated titles, will be 
published early in February by the Library 
Bureau, Boston. Russell Sturgis, president of 
the Fine Art Federation of New York, con- 
tributes a selection from the literature of the 
graphic and plastic arts. Henry E. Krehbiel, 
musical editor of the New York Tribune, fur- 
nishes the department of music. Both con- 
tributors are among the foremost critics in the 
metropolis in their respective fields. In their 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



[January, '97 



forthcoming bibliography they place at the ser- 
vice of booksellers, librarians, readers, and 
students the results of a life-long study of fine 
art and its literature. 

LAKES ERIK, HURON, AND MICHIGAN. The 
Wisconsin State Historical Society is to pub- 
lish in its next report the bibliography of Lakes 
Erie, Huron, and Michigan, which was pre- 
pared by Miss Margaret Mann on the comple- 
tion of the two years' course in the Armour 
Institute library class. 

MILITARY SCIENCE. Sources of information on 
military professional subjects : a classifica- 
tion list of books and publications. Wash., 
Gov. Print. Office, 1896. 4, 109 p. (War 
Dept.,) Adjutant-General's Office. [Publica- 
tion] No. 10. 

MONTENEGRO. Tenneroni, Annibale. Per la 
bibliografia del Montenegro. (Jn La Vita 
Italiana, Oct. 25, 1896, p. 457-462.) 

Music. Matthew, Ja. E. The literature of 
music. New York, A. C. Armstrong & Son, 
n.d. (The book-lover's library.) 10 + 281 p. 
16. $1.25. 

In his preface the author states the object of 
this book to be " to assist the inquirer in his 
search for the most useful works in the princi- 
pal departments of musical literature, and at 
the same time to give some account of such 
books as are of interest, either for their curi- 
osity, for their scarceness, or for the important 
influence they may have exercised in a past 
age." The opening chapter discusses the 
literature of ancient music ; the closing one the 
bibliography of music. The first bibliography 
of music known to the author was begun in 1762 
and completed in 1767. Since then the "books 
which are no books," relating to music, have 
grown to considerable numbers. Other chap- 
ters discuss dictionaries of music, the litera- 
ture of sacred music, of the opera, of musical 
instruments, etc. 

NULLIFICATION. Houston, David Franklin. 
A critical study of nullification in South 
Carolina. N. Y., Longmans, Green & Co., 
1896. (Harvard hist, studies, v. 3.) Net, $1.25. 

There is a five-page bibliography of nullifica- 
tion. 

PAPAL ABSOLUTISM. Vincent, Marvin R. The 
age of Hildebrand. New York, The Christian 
Literature Co., 1896. 12, $1.50. 
Contains eight pages of bibliography. 

SLAVE TRADE. Du Bois, W. E. Burghardt. 

The suppression of the African slave trade 

to the United States of America, 1638-1870. 

New York, Longmans, Green & Co., 1896. 

(Harvard hist, studies, vol. i.) Net, $1.50. 

Pages 299-325 contain a bibliography of the 
subject. 



TAILORING. Select documents illustrating the 
history of trade unionism: I., The tailoring 
trade; ed. with an introd. by F. W. Gallon. 
London, Longmans, Green &Co. , 1896. $1.50. 
Pages 224- 237 are given to a bibliography of 

the subject. The reference numbers are added 

for the works that may be found in the library 

of the British Museum. 

WOMEN. Vol. i of the recently issued report 
of the U. S. Commissioner of Education for 
1894-95 contains a 6-p. bibliography of" select- 
ed books and articles on woman's development." 
INDEXES. 

The ' ' CUMULATIVE INDEX" for December con- 
tains an excellent reading list on Christmas, com- 
piled by Margaret G. Pierce and covering six 
pages. In this number the plan for the new 
year is briefly outlined. During 1897 the num- 
ber of magazines indexed will be increased 
to 100, of which 75 will be included from month 
to month, the remaining 25 to be indexed once 
for the whole year in the December or final 
number; specially timely articles will, however, 
be included in the monthly issues. The bibliog- 
raphies on current topics, prepared for the 
Cleveland Public Library, will also be published 
from time to time in the index, and upon ap- 
plication subscribers will be furnished with 
reference lists on any subject not published, 
postage only being charged. For 1897 the sub- 
scription price is $5, to be paid at any time 
before the issue of the July number. 

CORRECTION. Poole, 1882 ed. "Pressense, Ed- 
mond de," comes before " Present " on p. 1047. 
Should follow " Press " on p. 1049. Poole, ist 
Suppl., 1882-87, p. 98. Entry " Confucianism, 
etc." New Eng. read v. 45 for 46. A. E. 
WHITAKER. 



attb 



" Socio-economic mythes and mythe-makers, 
by Yours truly," is by Dr. H. Augusta Kimball. 

N. E. B. 

Can any one tell who " Miolnir"(Naut-eos) 
is, author of " Poems." Aberystwith, 1860. 
60 p.? A. E. WHITAKER. 

"The three homes," by F: W: Farrar, pub- 
lished by E. P. Dutton & Co., 1896, was orig- 
inally published in 1873 under the pseudonym 
" F. T. L. Hope," which Dean Farrar now 
says stood in his mind for the words " Faintly 
trust the larger hope." Pub. Weekly, Dec. 
19, '96. 

PSEUDONYMOUS ENTRIES. A correspond- 
ent writes : "It has been reported that the 
'Duchess' (Mrs. Hungerford) has sold her 
pseudonym, and that the books now being is- 
sued by the ' Duchess ' are really written by 
another person than Mrs. Hungerford. If this 
is so, are not those libraries entering books 
under the real name rather than under the 
pseudonym giving false information? This is 
simply a straw in favor of using the pseudonym 
when the author persists in using one. " 



January, '97] THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



57 



IMPERFECT SETS. 

Recognizing the importance of periodical literature in modern libraries, THE 
BOSTON BOOK COMPANY established its Library Department with the idea that a 
definite service could be rendered overworked librarians by an intelligent effort to 
supply them with sets of periodicals and Society transactions bibliographically com- 
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Under the old method, librarians were forced to buy such sets or parts of sets 
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It is exactly this burdensome and wasteful labor which THE BOSTON BOOK 
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We find, however, that some librarians still prefer to buy sets by the old 
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THE BOSTON BOOK COMPANY only asks that a fair comparison of price and 
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Remainder Stock of Poole Sets. 

We have bound up for libraries a few sets of two periodicals that are to be 
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martens, Recueil de traitds. 74 vols. Goett., 
1817-96. 65 vols. bound, rest sewed 800 

Nord and 8nd. Vol. 1-64. Berlin, 1877-93. 
Publisher's binding 240 

Numismatic Chronicle. 52 vols. 1836-90. 
16 vols. hf . calf, rest sd 900 

Zeltschrlft fUr wissenschaftliche ZoBlogie. 
Vol. 1-56. With 4 suppl. and 3 indexes. 1848-93. 
Bound 3 IO 

Zeltnng, Botanische. 44 vols. 1843-86. 410, 
boards. Original edition throughout 900 

Zoologlsche Station zn Neapel. Mit- 
theilungen. Vol. 1-8. 1879-88 97 



SETS COMPLETED. 
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: GUTENBERG FRANKFORTMAIN. 



66 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



APPLETON'5 LIBRARY LIST5. 

R more than fifty years Messrs. D. APPLETON & Co. have been engaged in the publica- 
tion of the choicest productions from the pens of distinguished authors of the past and 
present, of both Europe and America, and their catalogue of books now comprises 
several thousand volumes, embracing every department of knowledge. Classified lists of 
these publications have been prepared, affording facilities for a judicious selection of books 
covering the whole range of LITERATURE, SCIENCE, and ART, for individual bookbuyers or 
for a thorough equipment of any library. 
Lists A, B, and C are of books selected especially for School and College Libraries. 

The other lists are of books grouped according to subjects, and include the above. 



LIST D. History. 
E. Biography. 
F. Physical Science. 
G. Menial and Moral Science. 
H. Political and Social Science. 
I. Finance and Economics. 
K. Hygiene and Sanitary Science. 
I .- Philosophy and Metaphysics. 
M. Technology and Industrial Arts. 
N. Anthropology, Ethnology, Archaeology, 

Palaeontology. 

O. Language, Literature, and Art. 
P. Reference Books. 



LIST Q. Poetry and Essay. 

R. Travel and Adventure. 

S. Pedagogy and Education. 

T. Fiction. 

U. Amusements and Recreations. 

V. Evolution. 
W.-Religion 

X.-Law. 

Y. Medicine. 

Z. Juvenile Books. 
A A. Unclassified. 

BB. School and College Text-Books. 
CC. Spanish Publications 



Single lists mailed free. Complete set, ten sections ,1% cents, to cover postage. Bound in one volume, 
340 pages, 8v0, 30 cents. Free to librarians. 

D. APPLETON & CO., Publishers, 

343 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 72 Fifth Avenue, NEW YORK. 

EM. TEROUEM, 

Paris Agency for American Libraries, 



ESTABLISHED 1877, 



31 Bis BOULEVARD HAUSSMANN 31 Bis 



PARIS. 



French and Continental Books purchased at the lowest 
terms. 

Orders carefully executed for out-of-print and new books. 

Binding for books in constant use a specialty of the firm. 

Estimates given on application on all orders. 

The " Catalogue de la Librairie Franfiise " mailed free 
monthly as well as catalogues of second-hand book- 
dealers of eyery locality. 



Auction sales orders attended to, also orders for private 
libraries offered en bloc before auction. 

Mr. Em. Terquem, being the appointed agent in Paris of 
many libraries, colleges, and universities, can furnish 
references in almost every city in the United States. 

Correspondence and trial orders solicited. Small or large 
shipments every week either direct or through his 
agent in New York. 



January t *yi\ 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



67 



INKS AND ADHESIVES. 



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TERMS ON APPLICATION, ALSO LIST OF LIBRARY APPLIANCES, HANDBOOKS, ETO. 



68 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[January, '97 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT OF : : : : : 






LEflCKE & BUECHNER, 



(LONDON. LEIPZIG. PARIS.) 

.812 Broadway, New York. 



*(glE invite Librarians to correspond with us before placing orders. Our facili- 
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Xargegt Stocft of (german anfr jfrencb 
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January, '97] THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 69 

LIBRARY DEPARTflENT 

OF 

A. C. McClurg & Co., 

CHICAGO. 

ORDERS for libraries public, university, college, or school filled with prompt- 
ness and the greatest care. 

Our stock of miscellaneous books is very large and complete, and our special 
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domestic and foreign books which are out of print or which for other reasons are 
difficult to secure. 

Our prices are very low and we shall be glad to correspond with librarians 
regarding their wants. 

Telegraphic address : f\ F> DITTMAPl'Q QO1VQ Telegraphic addresi : 
Putnam, Londen. VJ 1^ \ \J 1 lir\l 1 3 ^Vfll^ Putnam, New York. 

LONDON: rt NEW YORK: 

24 Bedford Street, Strand. * 27 and 29 West 23d Street. 

-__ RnnkrsFi i Fpg AND LIBRARY AnBisnrs > 

nESSRS. PUTNAM have peculiar facilities for handling all library business intelligently and to the best advan- 
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Their Branch House in London (through which they receive English orders for American books) enables them 
to supply, promptly, English books, without the commission usually paid by American dealers. 

Their extensive miscellaneous and retail business makes it practicable to buy all books at the lowest prices, to 
carry a large stock of standard books in every department of literature, and to keep in touch with the current publica- 
tions of the day. Their business experience covers more than half a century. 



"Notes on Neva Books" a quarterly of thtir own publications, will be sent regularly, on apflicatin. 

CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, 

153-157 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Librarians and others will do well to communicate with us before placing their 
orders. 

The latest publications of all the leading American and English publishers are 
kept in stock, thereby enabling us to fill orders with utmost despatch. 

Special attention is asked to our facilities for importing books free of duty. 

Correspondence solicited. Send for catalogues and specimen copy of 
THE BOOK BUYER, a monthly magazine devoted to books, authors, and literary affairs. 



WE solicit correspondence with bookbuyers for private and other LIBRARIES 
and desire to submit figures on proposed lists. Our topically arranged 
LIBRARY LIST (mailed gratis on application) will be found useful by those selecting 
titles. 




THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{January, '97 



Auctioneers and Appraisers, 
666 Washington St., BOSTON, MASS. 

AT PRIVATE SALE. 

To be Sold by the ORDER of the ASSIGNEES 
of INSOLVENCY. The 

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is now offered for sale entire, consisting of about 

25,000 VOLUMES OF BOOKS, 

in Various Departments of Literature, for 
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A very favorable opportunity to acquire a 
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For particulars or privilege of examination, 
apply to 

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666 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



LENGTHY COiESPOnCE 

back numbers of magazines needed to 
complete sets may be avoided by sending list 
of wants to A. S. CLARK, 174 Fulton Street, 
New York City. Magazines will be forwarded 
to librarians "on approval" as to price and 
condition. If returned for any reason, cost 
will be borne by sender. My stock exceeds in 
extent that of any other dealer in the world. 
Catalogue No. 43, a copy of which is at your 
service, helps tell the story. 



"IDEAL" 

NEWSPAPER FILES ARE THE 

BEST. 




WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



EVAN W. CORNELL, 

ADRIAN, - - MICH., 17. 8. A. 



A USEFUL BOOK OF REFERENCE. 



A SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 

OF THB 

Religious Denominations 
of the United States. 



COMPILED BY 



GEORGE FRANKLIN BOWERMAN, 

B.A., B.L.S. 

With a list of the most important Catholic works 
of the world as an appendix. Compiled by 
Rev. JOSEPH H. McMAHON. Strongly bound 
in linen cloth, wide margin for reference 
notes, thick paper, 75 cents. 



PUBLISHED BY THE 



Cathedral Library Association of New York, 



READY SEPT. i: 

Dante and Catholic Philosophy in the 
Thirteenth Century. 

The only translation of Ozanam's celebrated 
woik. 



J. H. HICKCOX, 



906.91 St., 



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Offers his services to public and private 
libraries, students, and others in search 
of government documents or information 
in procuring for a moderate fee missing 
numbers in sets of government publica- 
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government documents and information 
from the several departments, museums, 
and libraries in Washington. 



BOOKS WANTED. 



Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. 

Steele, Chief of the Pilgrims. 

Pardoe, Life of Marie de Medicis, v. 3. 

Don Quixote, ed. by Lockhart, v. i. Boston, 1865. 

Library Co. of Phila., cor. Locustand Juniper Sts. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pilcher's First Aid in Illness and Injury. New York, 
1892. 

Teachers' College, Bryson Library, N. Y. 
Chalmers, George, Opinions on interesting subjects of 

public laws . . . arising from American independence. 

1784. 

Tucker, George, History of the U. S., 4 v. 1860. 
Harvard Subject Index. 1886-91. 

Y. M. O. A. Library, 23d St. cor. 4th Ave., N. Y. 

New England Maf., March and 001.^1892, and Oct., '93. 



January, '97] THE LIBRAR Y JO URNAL 7 x 

.Three Valuable Library Aids. 

IN PREPARATION : 

The Annual Literary Index, 1896 

Including Periodicals, American and English, Essays, Book-Chapters, etc., Special Bibliogra- 
phies and Necrology of Authors. Edited by W. I. FLETCHER and R. R. BOWKER, with the 
co-operation of members of the American Library Association and of the Library Journal staff . 
THE ANNUAL LITERARY INDEX for 1896 is now printing and will be ready earlier than usual 
in the year. This not only covers the full range of periodicals included in Poole's Index, as no 
other publication does, but includes the "essay index," continuing the "A. L. A. Index to General 
Literature," an index to events of 1896, which is practically an index to the daily papers, a list of 
bibliographies of the year, and a necrology of authors, etc. The volume is the fifth annual sup- 
plement to Poole's Index and the third to the "A. L. A. Index to General Literature." It is the 
complement of THE ANNUAL AMERICAN CATALOGUE of books published in 1896, and with it 
makes a complete record of the literary product of the year. It is thus the most comprehensive 
tool in the way of a guide to recent literature furnished for library and trade purposes. The 
edition is limited. 

One volume, cloth, uniform with Poole's Index and the A. L. A. Index, $3.50, net. 
"Of great value to all who would keep advised of the topics and writers in the periodical literature of the day." 
Universalist Quarterly. 

" Good indexing could no further go." The Nation. 



The Annual American Catalogue, 1896 

THE ANNUAL AMERICAN CATALOGUE for 1896 will be issued as soon after the close of the year as 
possible. It will contain : 

(1) Directory of American Publishers issuing books in 1896. 

(2) Full-title Record, with descriptive notes, in author alphabet, of all books recorded in 

THE PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY, 1896. 

(3) Author-, title-, and subject-index to same, in one alphabet. 

(4) Publishers' annual lists for 1896. 

This volume forms the SECOND ANNUAL SUPPLEMENT to the AMERICAN CATA- 
LOGUE, 1890-95, now issuing. 

One volume, half leather, $3.50 ; in sheets, $3.00 ; if ordered and paid for, before publica- 
tion, the price will be, half leather, $3.00 ; in sheets, $2.50. 

The edition as usual is a limited one. The volumes for 1890 to 1893 are all out of print, and 
orders for those of 1894 and 1895, to insure supply, should be promptly filled. The ANNUAL 
ENGLISH CATALOGUE, for which we have the American market, will this year include full title 
entries, after the manner of the American volume, instead of the previous abbreviated entries. 
It will be furnished at $1.50 paper, or bound with the American in one volume, half leather, at 
$5.00, net, unless the change in plan should necessitate increase in price, of which we have not 
yet been advised by the English publishers. 

NEARLY COMPLETED: 

+ 

The American Catalogue, 1890=1895 

PART I. : Including List of Publishers, and Author-and-Title Alphabet, A-H. PARTS n. and Hi.: 
Author-and-Title Alphabet, H-Z. PART iv. : Subject Alphabet; Government Publications 
Smiths. Inst.-War Dept. PART v., completing the work, will be published shortly. 
The present issue of THE AMERICAN CATALOGUE covers the period July i, 1890, to June 30, 
1895. It is in two divisions, of which the first contains the author-and-title alphabet, and 
the second the subject alphabet, lists of government and state publications, publications of soci- 
eties, books in series, etc. Price, $12.50 in sheets ; and $15.00 in half morocco binding. ($10.00 
in sheets ; $12.50 in half morocco, to subscribers paying in advance of publication.) The edition 
is 1250 copies only, and there will be no reissue. 

The appendixes to THE AMERICAN CATALOGUE, 1890-1895, of which the main alphabets were 
supplied last year to subscribers desiring it in parts, are now passing through the press and the 
completed volume will be ready in a short time. 

" Without question the most perfect trade bibliography with which we are acquainted." London Bookselltr. 

* * * 

Address the OFFICE OF THE PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY, 
P. O. Box 943. 59 Duane Street, New York. 



72 THE LIBRARY JOURNAL [ January, '97 

ESTABLISHED 1873 

LONDON t PARIS: LEiPatCt 

3Q WELLINGTON ST , STRAND. 76 RUE DE RENNES. HOSPITAL SIR. 1O. 

GUSTAV E. STECHERT 

Purchasing Agent for Colleges & Libraries 

810 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

(TWO DOORS ABOVE GRACE CHURCH) 

negs to call attention to his facilities for obtaining FOREIGN BOOKS and 
PERIODICALS at more economical rates THAN ANY OTHER HOUSE IN AMERICA 
OR EUROPE can offer, because : 

He employs no Commission Agents, but has his own offices and 

clerks at London, Paris and Leipzig. He has open accounts 

with all the leading publishing houses in the world. 

His experience enables him to give information at once about 
rare and scarce books. 

He receives weekly shipments from England, France and Germany^ and 
can thereby fill orders in quicker time. 

MORE THAN 200 LIBRARIES TAVOR HIM WITH THEIR ORDERS. 



SPECIAL, REFERENCES, 

*' Mr. Stechert has for years furnished this Library with most of its periodicals and European books, and has bought for tu 
many thousand volumes. Mr. Stechert's success is due to his constant personal attention to the business, and the reasonable 
terms he is able to offer. I consider a New York agent far preferable to reliance on foreign agents alone." 

Gco. H. BAKER, Libraria.it of Columbia College, New Yfrk. 



" Seven years ago, in reorganizing the Columbia College library, I spent much time in trying to discover how to get out 
foreign books and periodicals with the least delay, trouble and expense. The result of the comparison of three methods, viz: 
ordering direct from foreign dealers, ordering thtough one agent in London, or ordering through one agent in New York showed 
us that it was to our advantage to give Mr. Stechert all our foreign orders, as he delivered in the library in a single package 
and with a single bill at as low cost as we were able with vastly greater trouble, to get a half dozen different packages in differ- 
ent bills from different places. In reorganizing the New York State Library, I opened the whole question anew, and the result 
of the comparison was the same as before, and we find that the library gets most for the time and money expended by taking 
advantage of Mr. Stechert's long experience, and the careful personal attention which he gives to our orders." 

MELVIL DBWEV, Director of N. Y. State Library, Albany, N. Y. 



*' Mr. G. E. Stechert of New York has served us with fidelity in procuring English, French and German books, both new 
and second hand and also periodicals. His terms are more reasonable than any others that have come to our. notice, while he 
has always guarded our interests very carefully. We find it a great convenience to have one agency in New York, represented 
by branches in different European countries." 

Prof. ARTHUR H. PALMER, Librarian of Adelbert College, Cleveland, O. 



" Your methods and facilities for doing business, as I have examined them here as well as at the Leipzig and London ends, 
seem to me admirably progressive and thoroughly live. 1 deal with you because I judge it for the advantage of this library to 
do so. If I did not, I should not. Up to date I am unable to find a method which is, all things included, so economical of 
time and money as dealing through you." 

ERNEST C. RICHAEDSON, Librarian ef College of New Jersey, Princeton, N.J. 



" Our library committee speaks in the highest terms of your services. You have not only saved us many dollars, but haw 
Blown an intelligent appreciation of our wants for which we thank you. ' ' 

A. B. COLLINS, Act. Librarian of Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y. 

GUSTAV K. STKCHKRT, 

LONDON. PARIS. LEIPZIG. NEW YORK. 



THE 



Library Journal 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

CHIEFLY DEVOTED TO 

Xibrarp Economy an& Bibliograpbp 



VOL. 22. No. 2. 

FEBRUARY, 1897. 
Contents. 



EDITORIAL ................. 75 

A. L. A. Special Meeting. 

Union Meeting of New England Associations. 

Affairs at Washington. 

Indexes. 

The Free Library of New Orleans. 

COMMUNICATIONS .............. 76 

Civil Service Methods in Libraries A Correction. 
Books for Distribution Notice to Librarians. 

WHAT MAY A LIBRARIAN DO TO INFLUENCE THE READ- 
ING OF A COMMUNITY? A. L. Peck ...... 77 

THE LIBRARIAN AND THE PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES. An- 

geline Scott ............... 80 

THE GATHERING OF LOCAL HISTORY MATERIALS BY 
PUBLIC LIBRARIES. R. G. Thwaites. ... .82 



BOOKS OF 1896 I 

NEW AIDS FOR READERS ......... 

THE QUESTION OF INDEXES. F. D. Tandy. 
THE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF NEW ORLEANS. 



LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALASIA ....... 90 



ART FOR THE SCHOOL-ROOM AT DENVER PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY go 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS. . . 91 

CRITICISMS AND REVIEWS FOR READERS 91 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 91 

Special Meeting. 

Proposed A. L. A. Propaganda Appropriation. 

Handbook. 

STATE LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 93 

STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 93 

LIBRARY CLUBS > . , 102 

LIBRARY ECONOMY AND HISTOR 103 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS u 2 

LIBRARIANS n a 

CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 113 

BlBLIOGRAFY 113 

ANONYMS AND PSEUDONYMS 114 

HUMORS AND BLUNDERS 114 



NEW YORK : PUBLICATION OFFICE, 59 DUANE STREET. 
LONDON: SOLD BY KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., PATERNOSTER HOUSE, 

CHARING CROSS ROAD. 
YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $3-00. MONTHLY NUMBERS, 50 ctg. 

Price to Europe, or other countries in the Union, zos.Jer annum.- single numbers, at. 
Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter. 



74 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February >, '97 



GUSTAV FOCK, 

German Agency for American Libraries. Dealer in New and Second- 
hand Books and Periodicals, 



CABLE ADDRESS: BUCHFOCK, LEIPZIG. 
CODE IN USE: ABC CODE. 



MARKS 

Journal de mathematiques pures et ap- 
pliquees. Complete set from the beginning in 

1836101894 1200 

Journal of Philology. Vols. 1-22. 1868-94 225 

Instituto di correspondenza archeologica di 
Roma. Complete set from the beginning in 1829 

101885. 1650 

Lacroix, P., Lettres, sciences, arts, insti- 
tutions, moeurs, etc., en France. 10 vols. 
Bound. 



LEIPZIG: Magazingasse 4. 
NEW YORK: P. O. Box 2943. 

(Pay and Freight Station only.) 

For the essential advantages arising from business communication with my house, see note on 
page 626 "Library Journal," November, 1896. 

IN COMPLETE SETS I OFFER: 

MARKS 

Academic des sciences de Paris. Histotre et 

me'moires de m:ithematique et de physique depuis 

1'origine 1666 a 1779. 84 vols 300 

Alemannia. Zeitichnft f. Sprache, Literatur u. 

Volkskunde d. Elsass?s u Oberrheins. Hrsg. v. 

A. Berlinger, fortges. v. F. Piaff. Bd. 1-23. 1873- 

95. (M.I38.) 9 

AngJia. Hrsg. v. P. WUlcker. Bd. 1-17. 1877-95. 245 
Annalns <' chemie et de physique. Complete 

set. Depuis 1'origine 1789 a 1894 3250 

Annales des sciences naturelles. 7 series. 

Complete set from the beginning in 1834 to 1895. 

Bound 3000 

Bettrage zur Kunde d indogerman. Spra- 

chen. Hrsg. v. F. Bezzenberger. Bd. 1-19. 1877- 

94 125 

Berichte der deutschen botanischen Gesfll- 

schaft, Jahrg. 1-12. 1883-91 160 

Biblioteea de autores espanoles. Principiad* 

en 1846 terminada en 1880. 71 vols. Complete 

Bibiiotheca botanica. Orig. Abhandlgn. aus 

dem. Besamtgebiete d. Botanik. Hrsg. v. Ubl- 

worm, Haenlein, Luerssen u. Frank. Heft 1-35. 

With many plates. 1886-96 (M.6o2.) 260 

Bihliotheca zoologica. Hrsg. v. Leuckhart u. 

Chun. 1888-95. Allout! Bound. (M 859.) 500 

Brorkhaus, Honversations-Lexikon. 14 Aufl. 

16 Biinde. 1893-95 Bound. (M.i6o) 90 

Les grands Ecrivains de la France. 94 

vols. et 7 albums. Allout! 450 

Encyclopaedic des fiaturwissenscfiaften. 

Hrsg. v. Kenngott. Schenk, SchlBmilch, Witt- 

S'.ein u. A. Bd. 1-38. Botany, 5 vols.; Mathe- 
matics, 2 vols ; ZoSlogy, Anthropology. Ethnol- 
ogy, 6 vols.; Geology. Paleontology, 3 vols.; Pnar- 

macognosy, i vol.; Chemistry, vols. 1-13 ; Physics, 

4 v >ls.; Astronomy, 2 vols. 1879-96. (M.sSs.) 325 

Geological survey map of England and 

Wales. In 51 large and 207 small sheets. Com- 
plete set 950 

Geological survey map of Ireland. 252 

sheets and 119 vols., memoirs for sheets. Com- 
plete set 980 

Geological survey map of Scotland. Com- 
plete set 400 

Germania. Hrsgr. v. Bartsch u. Behaghel. 37 

Bde. 1856-92. Allout! Bound 420 

Goethe's Werke. Hrsg. im Auftrage d. Gross- 

herzogin Sophie v. Sachsen. All out to 1896. 

Bound 250 

Grimm, J., Deutsche Grammatik. 4 Bde. 

(Bd 1 : 2. A.) u. Register v. Andresen. 1822-60. 

Halfcalf 40 

Grimm, Deutsches Worterbrch. All out ! 

Complete set 140 

Handbuch der Physik. Hrser. v. A. Winkel- 

mann. 3 Bde in Tin. 1896. (M.ios) 75 

Jnlirbiich it. Jfeues Jahrbuch f. Mineralo- 

gie, Geoloale, u. Palaemntologie. Jahrg. 

1830-94 Mit Beilagebanden. etc 1500 

Jahrbuch, tforphologisches. Hrsg. v. Gegen- 

baur. Band. 1-2 1. 1875-94 Bound ... 700 

Jahrbuch der deutsehen Shakespeare Gesell- 

schtft. Jahre. '-28. 1865-93. Bound 200 

Jahrbucher, Zoologische. Bd. 1-7. u. Suppl. 

1886 95 420 

Jahresbericht uber die Fortschritte d. Mass 

Altertumswissenschaft. Mit BeiblSttern. 

Jahrg. 1-22. 1878-94 560 

Jahresbericht uber die Fortschritte der 

It tans. Philologie. Bd. 1-29. 1866-94. Bound.. 350 
Journal, The Quarterlv, of the Geological 

Society of London. Vols. 1-51. 1845-95 45 



Theolog-homilet. Bibelwerk. Altes u. 
Neues Testament. 36 Tie. Eleg. gebd. (Mi67.3o). 100 

Micro copicn I Society. A complete set of the 
Journal of the Microscopical Socit ty from the be- 
ginning in 1841 to 1894. Bound 500 

Molir-re, Oeuvres completes. Collect, p. L. 
Moland. ae e'd. 12 vols. 1880-94 54 

Monatsiichrift fur Anatomic u. Histologie. 
Bd. 1-12. 1884-05. Bound 300 

Ifaehrichten, Astronomisehe. Hrsg. v. Schu- 
macher. Bd. i 139. 1823-95 1700 

Pnlaeontographica. Hrsg. v. Dunker, Meyer, 
Zittel. Complete set. 1851-96 2010 

Pansaeant,J. D.,l>epeintre-graveur. 6 vols. 
Avec le portrait de 1'auteur. 1864-69. Hlnbd. 
(M.6 4 .) 35 

Pertz, Hfnnume-nta - Germaniae - historica. 
Complete set from beginning to 1895 4700 

Poggendorff's Annalen der Physik u. Che- 
mie. Bd. 1-162. u. Fortsetzung "Wtedemann's 
Annalen," Bd. 1-56. 1878-95 2750 

Pringsheim's Jahrbucher fur Wissen- 
schaftl Botanik. Bd. 1-25. 1858-92 1270 

Rabenhorst, Kryptogamen-Flora. Latest ed. 
Allout! (M. 250.20.) 150 

Reportorium f. Experimentalphysik. Hrsg. 
v.Carl. Bd. I-IT. 1865-82. u. Fortsetzung : Re- 
pertorium d. Physik. Bd. 18-27. 1883-91. 27 
Bde.u Reg. (M.59o.2o.) 120 

Romania. Publi^ par Meyer et Gaston. Vols. i 
324. 18728*95. Bound 500 

Schlfchtendalu. Hallier. FloravonDeutsrfi- 
land. 5. (neueste) A. 30 Bde. 1880-87. Eleg. 
gebd. (M.266.) 175 

Societe dfs anciens teaetes francais. Complete 
set. 57 vols. (728 Francs) 405 

Stahl *. Eisen. Jahrg. 1-15. 1881-96 170 

Transactions of the Chaucer Society. Com- 
plete set from the commencement in 1868 to 1894. . 625 

Virehote-tfirseh, Jahresbericht mit Vor- 
la>ffer: Canstatt's Jahresbericht. 1841-94. 
Bound 780 

Zeitsrhrift fur Berg-, Hutten- w. Salinen- 
tvesen d. preuss. Staates. Bd. 1-43. 1853-95. 380 

Zeitschrift f. d. gesamten Naturwissen- 
schaften. Bd. 1-67. 1853-94 a 5 

Zeitfiehrift f. d. mathemnt. u. naturwissen- 
schaftl. Vnterricht Hrsg. v. J. C. V. Hoff- 
mann. Jahrg. 1-36. 1870-95 150 

Zeitschrift f. veissenschaftl. Slikroskopie. 
Bd. i-'o. 1884-94. (M.220.) 155 

Zritsfhrift f. roman. Philologie. Hrsg. v. 
Grober Bd. 1-19. 1877-95 45 

Zeitschrift f. Volkerpsi/chologie u. Sprach- 
wissenschaft. 19 Bande. 1860-88. (M. 185 40.). 80 

Zeitschrift fur wissenschaftliche Zoologie. 
Bd. 1-58. 1848-95 3100 



WANTED IN COM PL 
Index Xedicus. 

Pools' 8 Index. 



T SETS: 

.deae Catalogue. 






THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



VOL. 22. 



FEBRUARY, 1897. 



No. 



THE American Library Association has had 
its first special meeting, which, .although it 
directly accomplished nothing, will not be with- 
out influence in the future moulding of the 
association. It did not seem advisable under 
the circumstances of the present Congress to 
attempt the reincorporation proposed, which 
should make the American Library Association 
a national organization, recognized by the na- 
tion through act of Congress on the same plan 
with the American Historical Association. 
This is probably a desirable end, but it was the 
general opinion that the time was not yet ripe 
for this act, and that any action toward this 
end should be taken in full conference. While 
it should be to the interests of library develop- 
ment and that means to the interest of all the 
people that there should be a central library 
authority, nationally recognized, which might 
be called upon to furnish members of a board 
of visitors for the national and other govern- 
mental libraries and to report annually, or 
from time to time, upon library economy and 
library progress, the present time and circum- 
stances did not seem auspicious for such re- 
organization, and the American Library As- 
sociation could certainly not afford to put itself 
in the position of seeking aggrandizement for 
itself by a crusade in its own behalf. The spe- 
cial meeting was unanimous in this judgment. 
Under the constitution it was not possible to 
discuss other questions than that put forward 
in the call for the meeting, so that the pro- 
posal to appropriate $500 for the use of the 
secretary in missionary effort, although it met 
with wide approval as well as with some criti- 
cism, could not be acted upon. The fact that 
President Brett, Secretary Hayes, Recorder 
Jones, and others serving the association, 
came to New York from distant cities at con- 
siderable expense in money as well as at 
the outlay of much time and inconvenience, 
emphasizes, however, the desirability of ap- 
propriation by the Association for the travel- 
ling and other expenses of those who serve it 
without remuneration. 



NOT second in interest to this meeting of the 
A. L. A. itself was the union meeting of the 
New England associations by the invitation of 
the Connecticut Library Association at Hart- 



ford in the tame week. The meeting was a 
large one, despite unfavorable weather, bring- 
ing together 150 people interested in library 
advancement. It is evident that nothing, not 
even New England weather, as celebrated by 
Hartford's humorist, can daunt the enthusiasm 
of the library spirit ; indeed, there is nothing 
more striking than the largeness and enthusi- 
asm of any gathering of librarians. It was 
peculiarly gratifying at this meeting to have 
the report of co-operative methods among li- 
brarians in Hartford, which sets an especially 
valuable example to other cities in this respect, 
as well as in Providence, and the real signifi- 
cance of the meeting lay in the emphasis of 
this idea of co-operation for the benefit of 
readers and students among the libraries of a 
great city. 

LIBRARIANS should not forget that there is 
pending before Congress a bill to extend and 
practically complete the reorganization of the 
system of government publications. Mr. Cran- 
dall's bill, dealing with the methods of publica- 
tion of government issues, in the more technical 
sense of publication, is likely to be overlooked 
in the closing days of the session, unless 
members of Congress are reminded of its 
importance. Librarians should, therefore, 
write to their senators, urging the passage of 
the bill "to improve the printing and binding 
methods of the public documents," and should 
also urge early action in the matter on the sen- 
ate committee on printing Senators Hale 
Hansbrough, and Gorman. This bill, though 
emanating from Mr. Crandall's office, is the 
joint result of the plans of Dr. Ames as well as 
of Mr. Crandall, and has the hearty support of 
all intelligently interested in government docu- 
ments. The bill authorizing Dr. Ames to con- 
tinue backward his "Comprehensive index" 
has passed th**- House and is pending in the 
Senate, but the general sentiment of the libra- 
ry profession regarding this bill is undoubtedly 
that expressed in the January JOURNAL. It is 
to be hoped that the provision for separating 
the copyright office from the Library of Con- 
gress will become a law, as one satisfactory 
feature of the general bill on the Library of 
Congress, however unsatisfactory may be the 
other features of this bill. 



7 6 



THE LIBRARY JOURJN AL 



[February, '97 



THE question of indexes, raised elsewhere 
by Mr. Tandy, is one of special interest and 
importance to librarians, and. the suggestions 
put forward by him for organized library effort 
toward better and more plentiful indexes are 
well worthy of support and discussion. Among 
the minor woes of librarians indexless books 
are ever present, and there is no class of work- 
ers to whom thorough and systematic indexes 
are more useful. Of late years publishers have 
come to recognize more fully the added value of 
a well-indexed volume, but there is s>till wide room 
for improvement in this direction. Only too of- 
ten booksare published, the usefulness of which 
would be practically doubled by a good index. 
Prof. Bandelier's important work, "The gilded 
man," was one of the most striking examples of 
the sort, and a very recent instance is found in 
the collection of " Mythsand legends of our own 
land," by Charles M. Skinner a mass of ma- 
terial that an adequate index would have ren- 
dered at least twice as useful. If all books of 
information were supplied with indexes and all 
index-makers were responsible over their own 
signatures for the merit of their work, the path 
to specific information on a subject would be a 
more direct and a less thorny one. A note- 
worthy step in this direction has been made by 
Dr. Eggleston in the initial volume of his im- 
portant series in American history, "The be- 
ginners of a nation," wherein credit is given 
to the maker of the index as himself an author; 
but such examples of index appreciation, if it 
may be so termed, are rare indeed. Capital ser- 
vice in the cause of adequate indexes is done in 
the Dial, where Mr. Thwaites in his reviews of 
current historical literature gives special criti- 
cal emphasis to their importance, and the Nation 
is always a consistent champion of indexes. If 
these examples were followed by the majority 
of reviewers it would not be long before pub- 
lishers generally realized that a good index is 
the necessary corollary of a good book. And 
there is no reason to doubt that a similar re- 
sult might be effected through a well-organized 
and persistent " library movement" toward the 
same end, such as Mr. Tandy urges. At any 
rate, it is well worth trying. 



NEW ORLEANS gives the first contribution to 
the library-founding record of 1897. In the 
Fisk Free and Public Library, formally inau- 
gurated last month, that city establishes its first 
free circulating library, and establishes it in 
such a manner as to insure systematic growth 



and wide usefulness. The process of evolution 
whereby subscription or endowed libraries at 
last find thtir true place as free public libraries 
has more than once been referred to in these 
columns. This principle finds, in a measure, 
fresh illustration in New Orleans, where three 
separate collections, each useful but limited in 
its scope, have been merged into one effec- 
tive organization, supported by the people for 
themselves. Perhaps the most gratifying feat- 
ure of the change was the rapidity with which 
it was accomplished and the hearty co-opera- 
tion that the project received from its very in- 
ception. Nothing could indicate more clearly 
the sure and steady growth of public apprecia- 
tion of the part a public library should play in 
the life of a city, and in the Fisk Free and Pub- 
lic Library it is not difficult to see an entering 
wedge of free library development in the South. 
Nor are these signs of the times confined to 
New Orleans. In Galveston the Rosenberg 
bequest promises to soon take substantial form 
as a free public library, while in Georgia the 
proposed library commission bill has good 
prospect of passage by the coming legislature. 
A southern conference of the American Library 
Association should be directly effective in fur- 
thering the good work, and the suggestion made 
at Cleveland and elsewhere that the conference 
of 1898 be held in Atlanta should have serious 
consideration at the Philadelphia meeting. 



Communications. 



CIVIL SERVICE METHODS IN LIBRARIES. 
A CORRECTION. 

IN the LIBRARY JOURNAL for January I find 
myself reported as testifying before the Com- 
mittee of Congress on the Library that I did 
not favor the application of civil service meth- 
ods to the employment of assistants in that li- 
brary. That is a mistake. I am a civil service 
reformer and intended to be understood un- 
equivocally to favor the extension of civil ser- 
vice principles to the national library. 

W. I. FLETCHER. 

AMHERST COLLEGE LIBRARY, I 
AMHERST, MASS. ( 

BOOKS FOR DISTRIBUTION. NOTICE TO 
LIBRARIANS. 

DR. CHARLES C. P. CLARK, author of "The 
commonwealth reconstructed," New York, 
1878, 216 pages, octavo, has placed the remain- 
der of the edition in our hands for distribution. 
A copy of it will be sent to any library on re- 
ceipt of 12 cents (f.i2)to cover cost of mailing. 
GEO. H. BAKER. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, ' 
NEW YORK CITY. 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



77 



BY A. L. PECK, Librarian Glover sville (N. Y.) Free Library. 



HAVING had opportunity to observe, with 
some care and certainly with keen interest, the 
expectations which communities have as soon 
as it is reported that a library is to be founded, 
I have made an effort to watch how far these 
expectations are realized, how far they are dis- 
appointed, and in what respect the results pos- 
sibly exceed every expectation. In a great 
many cases these expectations become so fixed 
that they have been changed into demands 
upon the library, as soon as the library is es- 
tablished. 

I still recall, with some quiet delight, that on 
the day after a certain gentleman had prom- 
ised to found a library, some anxious readers 
immediately inquired when the books would 
be ready for delivery, and the feverish haste 
with which the public at large expected to use 
these books would have led one to believe that 
as soon as the library was open the demands 
for books would be so great that a reasona- 
ble supply would be impossible. People in the 
street would say that the library would close 
the saloons; others would say, like Franklin, "It 
will improve manners." Older men who never 
expected to use the library themselves anticipat- 
ed great benefit for their sons and grandsons. 
Generally it was maintained that the library 
would improve the intellectual taste of the 
public and change entirely the character of 
reading of the community. When the books 
arrived young and old hastened to the library 
to help the librarian in unpacking the cases, 
and were offended when such assistance was 
promptly and seriously refused. When the 
doors of the library were almost hermetically 
sealed, in order to give the librarian and his 
assistants an opportunity to catalog the books, 
it aroused public anger to such an extent that 
the people inquired whether the librarian 
meant to read the books before they were per- 
mitted to handle them. And so it went on 
through four weary months, during which time 
between 3000 and 4000 books were prepared 
for library use. When finally the books were 
ready for delivery the former eager readers 
drew 57 books on the first day. And so the 
true function of the library began; first, to find 
readers; second, to make the library agreeable 
and pleasant to these; third, to keep readers in 



the habit of coming; fourth, to make the library 
useful to all; and fifth, to make an effort to im- 
prove the general character of reading. And 
after many years of hard and persevering 
work, on the part both of the trustees and the 
librarian, the library has increased in useful- 
ness, and, it may be said, meets some of the ex- 
pectations which its friends had anticipated 
before it was properly organized and opened 
to the public. 

It is, however, not the object of this paper to 
discuss fully in what regard the public library 
meets the expectations of the community that 
maintains it. An attempt at this would simply 
lead to the compilation of a library manual and 
not to a condensed statement of what a library 
may do regarding the improvement of the 
literary taste, not only of its particular readers, 
or of any class thereof, but of the community 
in general. 

While no one will question that the develop- 
ment of a taste for good literature is one of 
the functions of the public library, it would be 
wise not to speak of this function too loudly, 
as the individual readers as well as the com- 
munity might take offence at any such attempt. 
And still it cannot be denied that the public 
library does improve the healthy tone of read- 
ing in the community at large. Whether this 
can be done successfully must in each case de- 
pend upon local circumstances, upon the tact 
and personal exertion of those in charge of the 
library. 

Efforts toward the improvement in the quality 
of reading may be grouped under the following 
heads : first, efforts for the individual reader; 
second, for classes of readers; thirdly, for the 
community at large, also naturally including 
those who never come to the library. 

First, then, as to individual readers: In order 
to be able to influence the individual reader it 
is necessary that those who wish to exert this 
influence shall first gain the confidence of those 
they wish to guide. This guidance must 
be free from" prejudice and cant, and must 
spring apparently from no other source than a 
personal interest in the individual patron of 
the library. We can gain the confidence of 
children most readily, most surely, by bringing 
them in contact with such books as are known 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\Fcbruary, '97 



to us to interest children. The less there is 
said about these matters to the child himself 
the better. Here is Johnnie, who reads nothing 
but Alger books, and you are anxious for his 
own sake that he should read something 
better. While you may be compelled to give 
him his Alger book, because he claims that he 
has a right to get what he wants, still show 
him one or two, or a few books which you 
consider better. If you do not succeed at first, 
do not give up the case as hopeless, but pa- 
tiently give him your attention, try to lure him 
away from his idols. Ask yourself, "What 
does he like in the Alger books?" The an- 
swer is simply that he likes to read about real 
boys and their success. It is success and 
wealth that attract him, and he dreams that his 
career may be similar. The Trowbridge, the 
Kellogg, and the Kaler books will be readily 
accepted as substitutes. If he wants stories of 
school-boys, you may not at first succeed in 
getting him to read " Tom Brown," but give 
him some other books about schools and school- 
boys. If he is in search of adventures, give 
him Ballantyne and some of the earlier Reid 
books, the Henty books, or give him Du Chail- 
lu. I could always interest boys in " Lost in 
the jungle." 

If your friend be one of the girls who seem 
to be wedded to " Elsie " which, by the way, 
is a very serious case make an effort to in- 
duce her to read the " Little women " series, 
some of the books of Joanna Matthews, the 
" Katy " books by Susan Coolidge, the " Witch 
Winnie" and the "Hildegarde" books, and 
others. 

The main thing is that neither should know 
you have intentions to change his or her read- 
ing-matter, and the next thing that he or she 
should become acquainted with other books. 
The change must come from' the young people 
and not from the library official. As soon as 
they think that the library official wishes to 
make a change they suspect that it is done 
from selfish motives. I have heard it often 
said that these things are done for the effect in 
the annual report, and others would say that 
this is " what they are paid for." It is also my 
sincere belief that in small libraries the libra- 
rian himself should take the greatest interest 
in his juvenile borrowers, and, as much as 
possible, give them his own personal attention. 
In the large libraries, naturally, means will be 
provided to engage a suitable person for such 
work. 'We all know that this has been dope 



already, and I need only to mention the excel- 
ent work which Miss Stearns is doing for the 
children in Milwaukee. 

The effort to guide the reading of grown-up 
persons requires still greater care and tact. 
Here, in fact, nothing but direct interest in the 
borrower will lead to success. If you can tell 
Mr. A that you have a book in the library which 
you know that he would like, and if his ex- 
pectations of the book are realized, he will 
always remember it gratefully, and the first 
step toward gaining his confidence will have 
been made. 

If there are a large number of workingmen 
among the users of the library, you will gain 
their confidence by placing in their hands such 
books as will naturally interest and benefit 
them in their trade. In such a manner a 
mutual personal relation between library and 
reader is established, and it will be found that 
such relations will be lasting and fruitful in 
their results. 

Even the inveterate novel-reader must be 
treated with due consideration, and he or she 
will gratefully accept the better novel for the 
good only be sure that it is really a better 
novel, that is to say, more suitable for the per- 
son who is to read it. 

I presume all these efforts for advancing 
and improving the character of reading by per- 
sonal attention are more feasible in a small 
library than in a very large one. But each li- 
brary willing to fill its mission will find some 
persons who can be guided and influenced. 

Efforts to influence a large number of read- 
ers to better appreciation and use of the library 
will first consist in the co-operation of library 
and school. There has been a great deal 
written and said about this, and bibliothecal 
literature suggests various ways in which li- 
braries have made themselves useful to the 
public schools. A word, however, may be al- 
lowed in this connection about the library in- 
fluencing teachers. While it would be unwise 
for the librarian or his assistants to try to 
direct the teachers' general reading, the 
teacher does not and cannot know the re- 
sources of the library in advancing his inter- 
ests as a teacher in his individual school. 
Here personal acquaintance with the teacher 
is the only remedy. The catalogs and lists 
may be ever so well arranged, and cross-refer- 
ences and notes may be scholarly and explicit ; 
still the majority of teachers will be at loss 
what to ask for, where to find just exactly what 



February >, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



79 



they want. Even if admitted to the shelves, 
the large number of books will bewilder them, 
and the natural limit of time will prevent a 
very careful selection. And only direct per- 
sonal influence, with a knowledge of the school 
curriculum on the one hand and a knowledge 
of the resources of the educational department 
of the library on the other, will bring the right 
book in the right hands at the right time. 

If you cannot influence the teachers in your 
school, make yourself acquainted with the 
superintendent and principal. Find out what 
they expect of their teachers and of the school, 
and the influence of the superintendent and 
principal will be with you in each case, and in 
a short time you will find that the teachers 
will use the library systematically and to mu- 
tual benefit of all parties concerned, namely, 
teacher, school, and library. 

To improve the general character of reading 
of larger groups of readers, the librarian must 
take an active interest in all societies that are 
formed for mutual improvement by study and 
research. I recall when the library which I 
have the honor to represent contained only a 
few thousand volumes (it is not very large now) 
that it was very difficult to aid and direct study 
classes, reading circles, and debating clubs in 
their work, and after careful investigation I 
came to the conclusion that the only way in 
which a small library can make itself felt in 
these societies and be of use to them is by in- 
fluencing the topic or program committee to 
compile their programs at the library, and thus 
instead of asking afterward for what the li- 
brary has not, make use of the books which 
the library has, no matter how few. 

The next step in the directing to good litera- 
ture is the effort of the library to furnish in- 
formation on such topics as are of current 
interest. If America is interested in Venezuela 
let the library make it known through the 
local papers and through special lists that 
it has books on this subject. If Cuba is 
the topic of the day, let the same thing be 
done for Cuba. If currency is the all-absorbing 
subject, have all pamphlets and magazine ar- 
ticles at your disposal that will give informa- 
tion on both sides of the question, and you will 
find that without any further efforts the public 
at large will make use of the library in other 
ways than for recreation only. 

A word might be said regarding the recrea- 
tive reading furnished by the library. It is an 
acknowledged fact that a large proportion of 



the books issued by public libraries is popular 
fiction. This is only proper, and here the li- 
brary may exert a healthful influence by guid- 
ing unconsciously the readers to the very best 
kind of fiction, simply by constantly bringing 
the very best novels before them for selection. 
I believe it is far better, instead of admitting the 
so-called "novel fiend" to the shelves, where 
he or she will only be embarrassed by the large 
number, to keep near to the delivery-desk a 
number of carefully-selected novels and hand 
these to any reader who is willing to select from 
books. In this manner, without giving offence, 
the character of the reading of this class of 
readers will gradually be improved. 

The compilation, and if possible, the publica- 
tion, either through the daily press or other- 
wise, of lists of good books, be they new or 
old, will bring before the eye, not only of the 
user of the library but the public at large, 
the best books in the various departments of 
literature that the library contains. 

But what can the library do for those hun- 
dreds of readers who never come near it, and 
are, as it were, beyond its influence ? There is 
one thing certain, that a large majority of those 
who do not use the library are buying litera- 
ture of some kind or another. Curious to ob- 
serve this, I once spent a Saturday evening in 
one of the local book-stores in order to see 
what is bought and who buys reading-matter. 
This reading-matter varied from the Police 
News up to the fashion paper, from the Beadle 
novel through all the grades of paper-covered 
novels up to George Eliot's "Romola." And 
here the problem presented itselfto me: What 
can we do to reach these readers? 

Soon after I called upon the book-dealers of 
the place, and offered them the use of our trade 
literature, and in this manner making the libra- 
ry useful to the local book trade, I called their 
attention to the fact that if they were willing to 
co-operate with the library they certainly could 
improve the character of reading ; first, by bring- 
ing before their customers the best class of 
periodicals only, and by calling their attention 
to the best and newest books. Whenever a 
good book is published, and I anticipate the 
demand for it to become quite large, I inform 
the local dealers of such works, and in this 
manner those that do not use the library virtu- 
ally come within its influence. Last year a 
prominent merchant selected at the library his 
Christmas stock of literature for his depart- 
ment store. 



8o 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



As far as it came under my observation, I 
am led to believe that since the establishment 
of the library in our place the public at large 
have purchased more and better books than 
they ever did before. I know that there have 
been placed in our city outside of the library 
five complete sets of Duruy's histories of Rome 
and Greece, de luxe edition; over 200 sets of 
cyclopaedias; excellent editions of Ruskin, 
Hugo, Dumas, Scott; also de luxe editions of 
the Riverside classics, and a large numbtr of 
valuable illustrated books on art and books of 
reference; which purchases would never have 
been made had it not been for the quiet elevat- 
ing influence of the library. 

While I have no means of ascertaining how 
far similar work can be done by libraries in 
large cities, I recall that Mr. Hild, of the Chi- 
cago Public Library, has made similar state- 



ments of the work and influence of his excel- 
lent library. 

There is one thing certain, that the librarian 
and his staff are responsible for the success 
or failure of this influence. If the librarian 
will sit still in his chair and allow the public 
simply to help themselves, but very little of 
this work will be done. But with a librari- 
an willing to do his duty, and with faithful as- 
sistants, wide awake to their possibilities, and 
sympathizing with the reader and with the 
interests of the community, a great deal can be 
accomplished. 

In conclusion, but one more remark, and that 
is, no matter how well, no matter how faith- 
fully the work may be done, there always re- 
mains more to be done. Let us hope that 
to-morrow will be better than to-day, and the 
future brighter than the past. 



THE LIBRARIAN AND THE PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES. 
BY ANGELINE SCOTT, Public Library, South Norwalk, Ct. 



AMONG the many questions brought for solu- 
tion to the public library, there is one class of 
inquiries on which the librarian is prone and 
fairly to look askance. 

The real student who uses books with a 
workman's knowledge of his tools, or the ig- 
norant but eager seeker of information who 
has to be guided along the highways and by- 
ways of research, never fail of a cordial wel- 
come; but the prize-question people who wish 
to find out "Which president's mother has 
a famous living namesake?" or " Which pres- 
ident's father was a sexton?" and the man 
who has just begun to take an interest in his 
grandfathers, are not as welcome visitors to 
the library. The expert genealogist is the 
keenest wilted of men in unearthing what he 
wants ; but an awful record of valuable time 
misused is written against the people who per- 
sist in first recounting what they know about 
their forebears and then extracting unwilling 
labor from a busy librarian in order to glean 
scanty information about some ancestor un- 
known to fame. Undoubtedly the historical 
activities of such a person may be traced to one 
of the patriotic societies which make Colonial 
or Revolutionary or 1812 ancestry a condition 
of membership; and, if the information we 
procure for this inquirer simply makes him 
think more highly of himself than he ought to 
think, and serves no educational purpose, we 



may well shift the burden of such work on 
other shoulders. 

But there is another side to the question. 
Quoting from the historical sketch of one such 
society, concerning its object: "A spirit of 
reverence for American traditions seized many 
minds within the last few years, which became 
embodied in the organizations of the descend- 
ants of American patriots ; with the object of 
saving such precious relics, traditions, rec- 
ords, and associations with particular places 
as might be preserved." Here is where the 
public library and the patriotic society meet 
on common ground. The merely personal in- 
terest unlocks an unused door into the past and 
often discloses a surprising amount of local 
history in miniature. Sometimes a man who 
has utterly lacked public spirit comes to be 
very proud of his birthplace when he studies 
the old records and neglected histories for some 
personal reason; and out of this newly-kindled 
respect, is led to make the town some memorial 
gift; perhaps a library building, a collection of 
Americana, an historical museum. The school- 
boy is stimulated by what he learns in compet- 
ing for the prize essay written for the Sons of 
the American Revolution, to begin reading 
history with a more vivid sense of its reality. 
The thought of Indians here in Connecticut 
and the traces left of them prove to him 
as interesting as the modern Indian of the 



February^ '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



81 



plains; so that, beginning at home, his interest 
extends to the general condition of the country 
at a given period and the relation of that pe- 
riod to the history of the nation. 

It seems as if the patriotic societies should 
be valuable allies in strengthening the public 
library in the department of local history. 

The importance of this department is em- 
phasized by Justin Winsor, R. G. Thwaites, 
and W. R. Cutter, whose personal experiences 
have entitled them to speak of the value of 
local collections of manuscripts, documents, 
deeds, correspondence, and ephemeral pam- 
phlets. Mr. Cutter exhorts the librarian to col- 
lect exhaustively and to save tenaciously every 
book, pamphlet, map, or scrap of printed mat- 
ter relating to the town. Mr. Thwaites has the 
daily and weekly papers scanned at odd min- 
utes for historical material by the attendant at 
the book-counter of the Wisconsin State His- 
torical Library. 

Another task commended to the attention of 
librarians is that of making a bibliography of 
local history, books written about the town or 
containing allusions to it, pamphlets with ad- 
dresses, sermons, etc., not forgetting thepress 
of the town. In Woburn, Mass., a very valua- 
ble collection of original matter has been gath- 
ered, including lists of Revolutionary soldiers 
and old deeds which have been of much service 
in tracing the descent of property. A former 
town clerk, a postmaster, and a physician ac- 
cumulated the mass of material, which Mr. W. 
R. Cutter has indexed and made available for 
reference.* 

All of these expedients for collecting local 
history require a good deal of watchful labor, 
and the enthusiasm of the hobbyist would be 
invaluable in discovering the hiding-places of 
the old papers and relics and in cataloging them. 
Somebody must tactfully induce people to give 
such material to the library, and how can the 
librarian undertake so much extra work un- 
aided ? 

Here comes in the utility of the patriotic so- 
ciety to the library. Many of the societies do 
not have libraries belonging to their organiza- 
tions, and the interested members might do 
nearly all of the work of collecting and classify- 
ing the material if the librarian would provide 
for its preservation and suggest the working 
methods. In one instance the Daughters of the 
American Revolution aimed to have, some day, 



* In the LIBRARY JOURNAL of May, 1896, Mr. Cutter 
describes a method he has devised for a genealogical in- 
dex in the form of a card catalog. 



an historical library, and began the accumula- 
tion of books on local and state history. They 
placed their bookcase in the public library, 
where the books may be used for reference 
until the society is able to support a chapter 
library. Where there is an assembly-room con- 
nected with the library, the societies might 
repeat, for the general public, interesting pro- 
grams which had been prepared for the chap- 
ter meetings. It would also be possible to 
arrange loan exhibits of colonial pottery, sil- 
ver, furniture, and the like, if the library has 
an available room for the "purpose. Arti- 
cles exhibited should be labelled in such a way 
as to lead those interested to the books in the 
library, which would give more information 
about them. 

The chief difficulty reported from a large 
number of librarians who have made an effort 
along these lines, is the apathy of the public 
which might supply the material wanted for 
local history. The alert librarian needs no 
urging to undertake the development of this 
department of library work, if he is encouraged 
by gifts which need to be cared for. 

At some time when the library has been use- 
ful to a local patriotic society in providing 
genealogical and historical data, while the 
members of it are holding the service in grate- 
ful remembrance, let the librarian show the 
society how much good historical work it may 
do for the library. 

Excepting books (and not always excepting 
them) the material should be given the library 
so that the ordinary funds may not be diverted 
from the purchase of books in general and 
constant demand. This is the implied criticism 
of the " Plea for local history" in the propored 
" Library primer" ; while it commends in a rath- 
er half-hearted way, it must be confessed, the 
bringing of societies organized for the purpose 
of collecting historical material into co-opera- 
tive relations with the library. Mr. Thwaites 
has entered a vigorous protest against slight- 
ing local history by inference in the " Primer," 
which was published in Public Libraries, June, 
1896; and in closing he insists that the libra- 
rian of a community is best equipped for this 
task. In the one department of the history and 
bibliography of its own locality it is possible 
for the smallest country library to excel the 
great metropolitan library all of which only 
places the responsibility of accomplishing the 
work on the librarian; and if he can enlist the 
assistance of whatever historical and patriotic 
societies exist in his town, so much the better. 



82 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



THE GATHERING OF LOCAL HISTORY 
MATERIALS BY PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 

AT the Ashland meeting of the Wisconsin 
Library Association, held Nov. 13, 1896, R. 
G. Thwaites, secretary of the Wisconsin His- 
torical Society, and one of the members of 
the state free library commission, spoke on 
" The gathering of local history materials by 
public libraries." His remarks were so practi- 
cally useful in scope and subject, that a brief 
synopsis of the address is here given to a wider 
audience than that to which it was originally 
presented. 

There is always a deep and general popular 
interest in old pamphlets, newspaper files, and 
the odds and ends of printed matter issued 
in ephemeral form, provided they are old 
enough to have ceased to be commonplace. 
That with which we are all familiar is com- 
monplace, and generally held in slight value; 
but the commonplaces of one generation are 
the treasured relics of the next. It is not 
mere idle curiosity, this interest of ours in the 
things with which our fathers were familiar. 
Relics in museums enable us more accurately 
in imagination to re-dress the stage of history; 
but the literary ephemera of other days, pre- 
served in libraries, are still more valuable as 
mirrors of the past. The chance advertise- 
ment in the old newspaper, the tattered play- 
bill, the quaintly-phrased pamphlet, or musty 
diary or letter of a former time, mean more to 
the modern historian than any other form of 
historical record. In earlier days history was 
thought to be simply the doings of monarchs 
and the conduct of campaigns; but Macaulay 
and Green have shown us that the history of 
the people is what benefits us most how John 
and Mary lived in their wayside cottage, how 
Peter and Paul bargained in the market-place, 
how the literati toiled in Grub street, and how 
seafarers journeyed over the face of the deep. 

Recently Woodrow Wilson said, at the Prince- 
ton sesqui-centennial : "The world's memory 
must be kept alive, or we shall never see an 
end of its old mistakes. We are in danger 
to become infantile in every generation. This 
is the real menace under which we cower in 
this age of change." It is the office of the 
historian to keep the world's history alive. 
There will never be an end of the writing of 
history. Some one has truly said, each gen- 
eration must write all past history afresh, from 
its own changing standpoint. But that this 
may continue, and with increasing advantage, 
there must never be an end of accumulating 
historical material; each generation must ac- 
cumulate its own, for the benefit of its suc- 
cessor. 

In the libraries of the old world there are 
many magnificent collections of broadsides, 
leaflets, tracts, pamphlets, which earnest, 
thoughtful men have, in past generations, ac- 
cumulated for our benefit. One of the most 
notable of these is the collection known as the 
Thomason Tracts, in the British Museum; 
30,000 specimens of the literary flotsam and 



jetsam of the middle of the iyth century 
pamphlets, circulars, prospectuses, broadsides, 
programs, and what not each one carefully 
labelled by the industrious London bookseller, 
Thomason, with the date of its acquisition. 
Thus we have, for the entire period of the 
civil war in England, a faithful day-by-day 
picture of surpassing interest and value, to 
which historians are ever turning as to an in- 
haustible mine of material, and concerning 
which Macaulay and a host of others have re- 
corded words of the warmest praise. 

In olden times enterprises of this character 
were left to the chance of individual initiative. 
To-day they may be better, more systematically 
done by public librarians. It is not possible, 
nor is it advisable, for every public library to 
engage in a task of this character upon any 
extended scale. It is sufficient that a few great 
libraries undertake missions of this sort li- 
braries, perhaps, in widely-separated cities 
but certain it is that each public library can and 
should make collections of this character for its 
own community, and the library at the county 
seat should seek to cover so far as may be its 
own county. 

In specifying what the local library should 
make a serious business of collecting, Mr. 
Thwaites laid special stress upon newspaper 
files, the daily or weekly mirror of the com- 
munity's life ; and these files should, if possi- 
ble, be complete back to the beginning. He 
urged that all manner of published reports be 
obtained of the common council, the county 
board of supervisors, the various public insti- 
tutions located in the community ; the pub- 
lished memorial sermons, society year-books, 
printed rules and constitutions of local lodges, 
catalogs and programs of local colleges and 
academies, published addresses of every sort ; 
any manner of literature published by the 
churches, whether in the form of papers, mem- 
bership lists, appeals for aid, or what not ; 
programs of local musicales, concerts, veteran 
camp-fires, etc., would be found in time to 
have great interest to the local historian. In 
fact, it is difficult to say what should not be 
collected, for all of this printed material will 
prove in due course of time to be a fund of 
information which shall make the library a 
Mecca for all who wish for any purpose to re- 
fresh their memory relative to the life of the 
town. 

Just as we regard everything familiar as 
commonplace and worthless, do we delude 
ourselves with the notion that we and ours are 
to live always. Librarians should remember 
that this generation and its affairs are but 
passing phases of world-life ; in due course 
what they have gathered of the literary drift- 
wood of to-day will be of priceless value to 
their successors in office. All of us librarians 
are missionaries unto the present generation ; 
but let us, in our zeal for present results, not 
forget to be as well missionaries unto the fut- 
ure, and thereby earn the praise which comes 
to him who plants a tree for the delectation of 
those who come after. 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



BOOKS OF 1896. I. 

"THE best books of 1896 for a small library " 
were discussed and criticised at the meeting of 
the New York Library Association and the New 
York Library Club on Jan. 14. The session 
occupied the greater part of- the afternoon, 
and was closely modelled on the A. L. A. cata- 
log discussion at Cleveland. A provisional 
list of 489 of the leading books of 1896 had 
been prepared at the New York State Library, 
and copies were distributed to those present at 
the meeting. The various classes of literature 
were presented by different reviewers, who 
were, however, not limited in tbeir choice to 
the printed list, to which additions were made 
by nearly every speaker. There was much 
less discussion than at the book discussion 
evening at Cleveland, but the session proved 
most interesting and suggestive. The develop- 
ment of these "book-talks" as a feature of li- 
brary meetings within the past two years 
indicates that they possess a definite practical 
value to the librarian who must know what 
books to put in his library, and who has but 
little time in which to acquire that knowledge. 
It shows also that in addition to regarding the 
book from the outside, as an object to be 
classified, cataloged, labelled, and cared for, 
time can be well and profitably spared, in li- 
brary meetings, to look upon it from within 
as literature. 

The following list gives the books in the di- 
visions of Reference, Philosophy and ethics, 
Religion, Social science, Natural science and 
useful arts, and Fine art, as presented at the 
meeting, with brief comment by the reviewer. 
It will be followed in a succeeding issue by the 
books in the remaining classes. 

- BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 

Presented by W. T. Peoples, N. Y. Mercan- 
tile Library. A selection only of the titles list- 
ed by Mr. Peoples is given. 
American book-prices current ; comp. by L. S. 
Livingston. Dodd. net, $6. 
The arrangement comprises 7500 lots (106 
sales) and is in one alphabet by author. 
American catalogue of books recorded July i, 
1890, to June 30, 1895. pts. 1-4- Pub. Week- 
ly. $15. 
Book -prices current. London, Stock. net, 

$7.70. 

Bowerman, G: Franklin, ctmp. Selected bib- 
liography of the religious denominations of 
the U. S. ; to which is added a list of the 
most important Catholic works of the world, 
comp. by J. H. McMahon. Cathedral Lib. 
Assoc. 75 c. 

Gives in systematic form references to the 
best books on the history, doctrine, and polity 
of Am. churches, with publishers and prices. 
Verzeichnis der im deutschen Buchhandel neu 
erschienenen u. neu auferlegten Biicher, 
Landkarten, Zeitschriften, etc., July -De- 
cember, 1895, and January- June, 1806. 
[Catalogue of books, etc., published in Ger- 
many from July-Dec., 1895, and Jan. -June, 
1896.] Leipzig, Hinrichs. 7.7001. 



A complete bibliography of German books 
for sale; each volume in two parts, ist part an 
alphabetical list of authors, etc., 2d part sub- 
iect index. 

Cumulative index to selected list of periodicals. 
Cleveland Public Library, subs., $5. 
30 periodicals were indexed in 1896 ; in 1897 
_t is proposed to index 100. 
Dalbiac, P. H. Dictionary of quotations (Eng- 
lish), with author and subject indexes. Mac- 
millan. $2. 

Dewey, Melvil, ed. Papers prepared for the 
World's Library Congress, held at the Co- 
lumbian Exposition. (U. S. Bureau of Edu- 
cation reprint, whole no. 224.) Washing- 
ton, n. p. 

Griffin, A. P. C. Index of the literature of 
Am. local history in collections published in 
1890-1895. Bost., Heintzman. $5. 
Harper's dictionary of classical literature and 
antiquities ; ed. by Harry Thurston Peck. 
Harper. 6. 

The purpose of the book is to give the stu- 
dent, in a concise and intelligible form, the 
essential facts concerning those questions that 
oftenest arise in the study of the life, the 
literature, the religion, and the art of classical 
antiquity. 

Journal of the Franklin Institute. Index to v. 
121-140. Phila., Franklin Institute. $1.50. 
Supplements the general index to the first 
120 v., published in 1890. 

Koopman, Harry Lyman. The mastery of 
books. Am. Book Co. 90 c. 
Containing why and how much to read, 
what to read, how to read ; reference-books 
and periodicals, etc., etc. 

Lueger, Otto. Lexicon der gesammten tech- 
nik und ihrer hilfswissenschaften. v. 1-3. 
Stuttgart, Deutsche Verlagsanstalt. 30 m. 
per v. 

A technical dictionary on industry, technolo- 
gy, and all useful arts. 

Peabody Institute Library. Second catalog, 
incl. additions made since 1882. pt. I, A- B. 
Baltimore, Peabody Inst. 

Pirrie, V., comp. A technical dictionary of 
sea-terms, phrases and words in the Eng. 
and French languages. Scribner. $2. 
Quarterly Journal of economics. Index of 
writers and subjects, v. i-io, 1886-96. 
Bost. Ellis, subs. 

Sargent, Mary E. a</Abby L. Supplement to 
" Reading for the young," by John F. Sar- 
gent. Library Bureau. $r. 
Scott, Temple, ed. Book sales of 1895. Lond., 
Cockrane. net, 12.6. 

Comprises 5695 lots of books sold in London; 
single lots arranged alphabetically. 
Taylor, I. Names and their histories. Mac- 
millan. $2. 

An alphabetical arrangement as a handbook 
of historical geography and topographical no- 
menclature. 

United States. Catalogue of the public docu- 
ments of the 53d Congress and of all the 
departments of the government of the U. S. 
for the period from March 4, 1893 -June 30, 
1895; prepared under the supervision of the 



8 4 



THE L1BRAR Y JO URNAL 



[February, '97 



Superintendent of Documents. Washington, 
Gov. Print. Office, n. p. 

Wood, Katharine P., comp. Quotations for oc- 
casions. Century. $1.50. 
Arranged and indexed under subjects; the 
book contains about 2500 quotations, covering 
all parts of a dinner menu, and special selec- 
tions for men's dinners, dances, etc. 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Reviewed by E. C. Richardson, Princeton 
University. 

Harris, G. Moral evolution. Houghton. $2. 
Hirsch.W. Genius and degeneration. Apple- 
ton. $3.50. 

Jordan, D: S. Care and culture of men. Whit- 
taker. $1.50. 

Sully, James. Studies of childhood. Apple- 
ton. $2.50. 

These four books are first-class works by 
first-class authors, and are especially vouched 
for by Prof. Warren, of Princeton. 
Bigelow, J: Mystery of sleep. Harper. $1.50. 
Horton, R. F. On the art of living together. 

Dodd. 50 c. 

Whitney, Mrs. A. D. T. Friendly letters to 
girlfriends. Houghton. $1.25. 
Undoubtedly good books for what they were 
intended. Mr. Bigelow's work has, perhaps, 
a little too much of the "mystery" part of its 
title; Dr. Horton's, while cleverly written, as 
usual, is, perhaps, no better than than some of 
his other works. These three books might be 
omitted from a library in order to admit three 
others which are more important than any pre- 
viously noted. These are: 

1. Weber, Alfr. History of philosophy; au- 

thorized tr. by F. Thilly. Scribner. net, 

$2.50. 

Valuable for every library, targe or small; 
for subject-matter, arrangement, style, and 
readableness it is the best outline history of 
philosophy that we have in English. 

2. Titchener, E: B. Outline of psychology. 

Macmillan. net, $1.50. 

Regarded as less readable than Weber, but 
the only really good up-to-date complete out- 
line of the modern psychology, in which there 
has been so much change and progress of late. 
I find it exceedingly interesting as well. 

3. Butler, Jos. Works; ed. by W: E. Gladstone. 

2 v. Macmillan. net, $7. 
For form, arrangement, annotation, and 
especially for luminous paragraph headings 
which are inserted, it is a model edition, and 
is bound to be the standard one for libraries. 

RELIGION. 

Reviewed by E. C. Richardson, Princeton 
University. 
Abbott, Lyman. Christianity and social prob- 

problems. Houghton. $1.25. 

Generally received as distinctly the best sys- 
tematic attempt to show the direct bearing of 
Christ's life and teaching on social matters; 
scholarly, practicable, readable. 
Abrahams, Israel. Jewish life in the Middle 

Ages. Macmillan. $1.75. 

Packed with valuable information. 



Coyle, J: P. The spirit in literature and life. 

Houghton. $1.50. 

A stimulating book. 
Davids, T. W. R. Buddhism, its history and 

literature. Putnam. $1.50. 

Perhaps the best book on the science of re- 
ligion during the year for use in general libra- 
ries ; candid and careful. 

Donald, E. W. Expansion of religion. Hough- 
ton. $1.50. 

Lectures; forcible, readable, brusque in style 
to the point of abruptness ; belongs to liberal 
school. 
Froude, J. A. Lectures on the Council of 

Trent. Scribner. $2. 

Necessary in every well-regulated library. 
Moulton, R: G. Literary study of the Bible. 

Heath. $2. 
and others. The Bible as literature. 

Crowell. $1.50. 

Moulton in his various works on the Bible as 
literature is doing important work, almost too 
well known to mention ; his booki are useful, 
though perhaps it is not necessary for the small 
library to have all of them. 
Schurman, J. G. Agnosticism and religion. 

Scribner. $i. 

Interesting; unconservative. 
Shields, C: W., and others. Church unity. 

Scribner. $i. 

Five lectures by men of different denomina- 
tions. 
Van Dyke, H: J. Gospel for an age of doubt. 

Macmillan. $1.75. 

Excellent from every point of view, and so 
excellent from a literary point of view as to 
make it doubly profitable. 

Vincent, M. R. Age of Hildebrand. Chris- 
tian Literature Co. $1.50. 

An example of historial work made interest- 
ing by an interesting style. 
Watson, J: Cure of souls. Dodd. $1.50. 
Mind of the Master. Dodd. $1.50. 

Both well written and practical ; the former 
is exceedingly helpful, beyond most books of 
the sort, to theological students or ministers. 
White, A. D. History of the warfare of sci- 
ence with theology in Christendom. 2 v. 

Appleton. $5. 

Unacceptable to the most orthodox, but shows 
less anti-religious and even anti-theological bias 
than Dr. White has sometimes been credited 
with, and is a valuable contribution. 

The whole list in theology is good, and to 
none of the books listed can exception be taken. 
If any must be omitted to make room for others 
the following might be spared: 
Farrar, F. W., and others. The Bible and the 

child. Macmillan. $i. 
Guerber, H. A. Legends of the Virgin and 

Christ. Dodd. $1.50. 
Ramsay, W. M. St. Paul. Putnam. $3. 

Additions to the list should include: 

1. Fisher, G: P. History of Christian doctrine. 

Scribner. net, $2.50. 

A complete, comprehensive, judicious sur- 
vey of the whole field in small compass. 

2. Argyll, Duke of. Philosophy of belief. 

Scribner. $5. 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



The crown of a series, and received by au- 
thorities as a very interesting book. 
3. Byington, E. H. The Puritan in England 
and New England. Roberts. $2. 

Of special interest for New England libraries. 
Strong, T: B. Christian ethics. Longmans. 

$5- 

Hampton lectures for 1895; somewhat heavy ; 
learned and powerful. 
Speer, Rob. E. Study of the man Christ Jesus. 

Revell. 75 c. 
Harris, S: God the creator and lord of all. 

Scribner. net, $5. 

Important and valuable, heavy in theme, in- 
teresting in treatment. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

Reviewed by Prof. Franklin H. Giddings- 
Columbia University. 
Bowmaker, E: Housing of the working classes. 

Scribner. fi. 

Belongs to the Social science series, a series 
of unequal merit, in which some valuable books 
and some poor ones have appeared. The 
fact that a book belongs to this series does not 
guarantee its merit. This book is well spoken 
of, but I have not read it. 
Bridgman, R. L. Biennial elections. Heath. 

50 c. 

A good exposition of a special subject, though 
not of general interest. 
Commons, J: R. Proportional representation. 

Crowell. $1.75. 

An excellent presentation of the subject. 
Cowles, J. L: A general freight and passenger 

post. Putnam. 75 c. 

A treatise too special in character to be gen- 
erally needed by libraries. 
Cunningham, W: Modern civilization in some 

of its economic aspects. Scribner. $i. 

Good on superficial aspects of the subject. 
Dickinson, G. L. Development of Parliament 

during the iqth century. Longman's. $2.50. 

A useful book on a subject that is naturally 
of limited interest; necessary to a library. 
Dixon, F. H. State railroad control, with a 

history of its development in Iowa. Crowell. 

$1-75. 

Useful; but so special in its relation to a 
single state as to make it of less general value. 
Ede, W. M. Attitude of the church to some of 

the social problems of town life. Macmillan. 

net, 70 c. 

Relative in its point of view, the Hulsean 
lectures of 1895; fair. 
Fairbanks, Arthur. Introduction to sociology. 

Scribner. $2. 

In many respects a good book, but not com- 
pletely worked out. 
Ferri, Enrico. Criminal sociology. Appleton. 

$1.50. 

The best book for the general reader who 
wants to know something of the Italian school 
of criminology; deals with the problem in a 
large way, and is better balanced than Lom- 
broso's works on the subject. 
Flint, Robert. Socialism. Lippincott. $3.25. 

Superficial; should not be the only book on 
the subject in any library. 



Follett, M. P. The speaker of the House of 
Representatives. Longmans. $1.75. 
One of the best books of the year; a stand- 
ard treatise on a subject that has not received 
special attention. 
Godkin, E. L. Problems of modern democracy. 

Scribner. $2. 

An admirable work. 
Hadley, A. T. Economics. Putnam. $2.50. 

Intended as a college text-book, and is used 
by teachers who have time to take classes 
through two books as the more advanced work. 
Gives the elementary principles of the subject, 
and discusses everything in close relation to 
the questions of the time. Contains a thorough 
study of speculation. 
Hobson, J: A. Problem of the unemployed. 

Scribner. $i. 

Thoroughly good; the best small book on 
the subject. 
Howe, F: C. Taxation and taxes in the U. S. 

under the internal revenue system, 1791- 

1895. Crowell. $1.75. 

One of the necessary books; deals with a 
subject not covered by others. 
Keasbey, L. M. Nicaragua canal and the Mon- 
roe doctrine. Putnam. $3.50. 

The result of long and patient study of our 
relations to Panama and Nicaragua; original 
in its treatment .of economic and political ques- 
tiops. 
Le Bon, Gustave. The crowd. Macmillan. 

$1.50. 

A study of the psychology of crowds the 
way in which men's emotions and actions are 
influenced by being massed; extended also to 
include a study of legislative and public as- 
semblies along the same lines. The subject 
is new to the average reader, and this is the 
only book treating of it in English. It is in- 
teresting and suggestive. The chief criticism 
is that the author is largely indebted for his 
material to Prof. Tarde, his countryman, and 
has not made due acknowledgment of the fact. 
Lecky, W: E. H. Democracy and liberty. 

Macmillan. 2v.,$5. 

Interesting and useful; inadequate from the 
standpoint of democracy, but fair. 
Lowell, A..L. Governments and parties in 

continental Europe. Houghton. 2 v., $5. 

A great book; one of the occasional books. 
Should be in every library. 
McKechnie, W: S. The state and the individ- 
ual, Macmillan. $3. 

Should not go into small libraries; superficial. 
McPherson, L. G. The monetary and banking 

problem. Appleton. $i. 

Well spoken of; not known to reviewer. 
Nicholson, J. S. Strikes and social problems. 

Macmillan. $1.25. 

Best small book on the question. 
Patton, J. H. Political parties in the U. S. 

New Amsterdam Book Co. $1.25. 

General in its treatment. 
Seats, Hamblen. Governments of the world 

to-day. Flood. $1.75. 

A Chautauqua book; fair and clear. 
Spahr, C. B. Essay on the present distribution 

of wealth in the U. S. Crowell. $1.50. 



86 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



A book that must be had as the only work 
dealing with the question; but it cannot be 
unqualifiedly recommended. The conclusions 
reached are frequently unsound. 
Spencer, Herbert. The principles of sociology, 

v. 3. Appleton. $2. 

Vol. 8 of the great "System of synthetic 
philosophy," and well up to the earlier level of 
the works produced by this greatest thinker of 
modern times. Devotes considerable space to 
modern economic methods, and points out that 
much of slavery still lingers in the wages 
system. 

Taussig, F. W. Wages and capital. Apple- 
ton. $1.50. 

Historically good ; the best account of the 
wages fund doctrine. 
Thompson, H.-M. Russian politics. Holt. 

|2. 

A first-class book ; one of the best accounts 
of Russian affairs. 
Walker, F. A. International bimetallism. 

Holt. $1.25. 

Notable as the last work of its author; a very 
able plea for bimetallism and the best book on 
that subject. 
Wells, D: A.., and others. America and Europe. 

Putnam. 

An admirable series of articles on interna- 
tional arbitration ; Mr. Schurz's paper is espe- 
cially excellent. 

Willoughby, W. W. Examination of the nat- 
ure of the state. Macmillan. $3. 

Excellent; one of the best books of the sort 
ever produced in this country. 

Additions should include: 
Stimson, F. J. Handbook to the labor laws of 

the U. S. Scribner. $1.50. 

The title suggests a law-book, but this little 
volume gives much useful information on boy- 
cotting, black-listing, rights of strikers, condi- 
tion of factory worker, etc., and would be 
generally useful in a library. 
Chance, W. C. Better administration of the 

poor laws. Lond., Sonnenschein. 

A book that tells about the problems of the 
administration of charity and the great lessons 
to be drawn from these matters in England 
under the old poor laws. 
Taylor, H. O. Ancient ideals. 2 v. Putnam. 

$5-50. 
Gannett, H: Building of a nation. N. Y., 

H: T. Thomas, subs., $2.50. 

A summary of. the nth census, strongly 
commended for library reference ; pub. in 
1895. 

Giddings, F. H. Principles of sociology. Mac- 
millan. net, $3. 
Mallock, W. H. Masses and classes. Edin- 

boro, Black. 
Pollock, Sir F. First book of jurisprudence. 

Macmillan. 

NATURAL SCIENCE AND USEFUL ARTS. 

Reviewed by T: L. Montgomery, Wagner 
Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia. 

In taking up the list of the books on sci- 
ence for popular libraries one is always struck 
with the fact that it is made up mostly of 



juvenile literature with a sprinkling of books 
which touch but lightly upon the scientific side 
of the subjects they gossip upon, and are classi- 
fied as scientific because no one knows where 
else to put them. 

In the list of scientific books of 1896 prepared 
for discussion the following are named for 
special comment : 
Abbott, C: C. Bird-land echoes. Lippincott. 

$2. 

This is not a scientific book, but is much 
more orderly in arrangement than is usual 
with the author. The chapters are devoted to 
special classes of birds which are disposed of 
in an entertaining manner. The illustrations 
seem to be from photographs taken after a 
most sumptuous diet of worms, as the puffed- 
out appearance of the breasts is far from nat- 
ural. 
Bonney, T. G. Ice work past and present. 

Appleton. $1.50. 

Suitable for the advanced student. It covers 
only the ice work in Great Britain, as only 10 
pages are given to America. It is well written, 
but very poorly illustrated. 
Britton, N. L., and Brown, Edison. An illus- 
trated flora. In 3 v. v. i, Ferns to carpet 

weed. Scribner. $3. 

An admirable work. 
Chambers, G: F. Story of the solar system. 

Appleton. 40 c. 

Unscientific ; superficial ; of very slight 
value. 
Dana, Mrs., F. T. Plants and their children. 

Am. Book Co. 65 c. 

A capital book for young people; interesting 
and accurate. 
Furneaux, W. S. Life in ponds and streams 

Longmans. $3.50. 

A most excellent book for popular use. 
Lowell, Percival. Mars. 

A most interesting statement of the broad, 
physical features of the planet's surface, the 
origin of which it seems to the author impos- 
sible to ascribe to other than intelligent agen- 
cies. 

Martin, E: A. Story of a piece of coal. Ap- 
pleton. 40 c. 

Excellent of its kind; compact and interest- 
ing. 
Mason, W: P. Water-supply. Wiley. $5. 

Full of facts gathered from various sources, 
and has the merit of being a small volume. 
Mathews, F. S. Familiar trees and their 

leaves. Appleton. $1.75. 

A most useful book. It has very good illus- 
trations, drawn from nature by the author, and 
the text reveals the aesthetic as well as scien- 
tific side of the subject. 
Meadowcroft, W: H. The A B C of the X ray. 

Am. Technical Book Co. 75 c. 

A good popular treatise. 
Munro, J: Story of electricity. Appleton. 

40 c. 

A book to create interest in scientific things; 
simply and accurately told. 
Robinson, R. E. In New England fields and 

woods. Houghton. $1.25. 

Composed of a series of papers written by a 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



keen sportsman. The book is most entertain- 
ing. The sketches first appeared in Fvrest and 
Stream, and they possess now a melancholy 
interest from the fact that the author has be- 
come blind. 

Smith, J: B. Economic entomology. Lippin- 
cott. $2.50. 

One of the best popu'ar books on the sub- 
ject. It is on the whole preferable to Corn- 
stock; while the plates are not so well done 
as in that work, they are much more numerous 
and instructive. 

Thompson, E. P. Roentgen rays and phe- 
nomena of the anode and cathode. Van 
Nostrand. $1.50. 

Probably the best book on the subject writ- 
ten during the year. 

Torrey, Bradford. Spring notes from Tennes- 
see.' Houghton. $1.25. 
Useful for the list of birds found by the au- 
thor at Chattanooga. 

Wegmann, E: Water-supply of the city of 
New York. Wiley. $10. 
An interesting historical description of the 
New York system; its many excellent plates 
make it valuable to any engineer engaged in 
the construction of water-works. 
Witchell, C: A. Evolution of birdsong. Mac- 
millan. $1.75. 

Treats of a subject not hitherto handled very 
systematically by ornithologists. The author 
has been 15 years in collecting his data; the 
plates are poor. 

FINE ART. 

Reviewed by C: A. Cutter, Forbes Library, 

Northampton, Mass. 

The great wave of interest in art which has 
swept over the country in the last decade has 
made it imperative to establish some sort of an 
art department even in town libraries. In 
setting one up four lines of purchase are nei es- 
sary: Works of art; Books on art technique; 
Books on art principles, aesthetics, criticism; 
and Art histories. By works of art I do not 
mean pictures and statues, those are beyond 
the means of the town library; the $100 or $200 
which one poor picture would cost would be 
much better spent in procuring 100 or 200 good 
photographic or heliogravure representations 
of the masterpieces of painting, sculpture, and 
architecture. The second class, works on tech- 
nique, the small library should buy last; they 
are too special ; the artist, if there is one in the 
village, should provide these for himself. But 
the third class, the works of aesthetics, criti- 
cism, inspiration, works which will explain, ex- 
cite, develop, guide the sense of beauty, works 
of which we find three very different examples 
in the writings of Ruskin, Van Brunt, and 
Hamerton, these should not be absent. There is 
nothing so likely to kill a rising interest in art 
as feeding it with dry history. In art surely, 
if anywhere, we need the literature of power 
as well as the literature of information. And 
yet there is not one of that quality in this prim- 



ed list.* For which reason I should add to it 
three. 

First, Santayana's "Sense of beauty." 
[Scribner. $1.50.] Lowell, in his "Cathe- 
dral," speaks of 

" Learned folk, 

Who drench you with aesthetics till you feel 
As if all beauty were a ghastly bore, 
The faucet to let loose a wash of words." 

This may be true of the older, metaphysical 
aesthetics. Mr. Santayana is a pupil of William 
James, and his aesthetics are, as is the way 
nowadays, founded on psychology. They are 
not, therefore, always easy reading for the 
learner; while following the method of his 
teacher he has not always succeeded in catching 
his luminous style. But they will repay a little 
effort with an intelligible theory and with oc- 
casional passages of eloquence. The para- 
graph, for instance, on the part which the fly- 
ing buttress plays in charm of the Gothic 
cathedral is the best on that matter that I have 
ever met with. 

Berenson's " Florentine painters of the Ren- 
aissance" [Putnam. $i],a work of what we 
might call the " higher criticism " in art, is in- 
genious and instructive, and should be added 
to the shelves that contain his" Lorenzo Lotto " 
and his "Venetian painters of the Renais- 
sance." 

Vernon Lee's " Renaissance fancies and 
studies" [Putnam. $1.25] is put in the print- 
ed list among "Miscellaneous literature." It 
belongs in Art; it is entirely on Italian art. I 
know there are those who do not rate Vernon 
Lee highly. To me she is delightful. She is 
often able to solve the historic question, "Why 
did this painter paint thus ? " and the even more 
important question, "Ought I to admire his 
painting?" or " Why do I admire it, tho the 
critics say I should not?" or "Why cannot I 
enthuse where so many have teen enthusiastic 
before ? " Take for instance what she writes of 
the fascinating grace of Botticelli's ill-drawn 
figures. It is very acute criticism and good 
psychology. Or her clear and eloquent char- 
acterization of Italian Renaissance sculpture. 
It is admirable, and yet it justifies the title of 
the book, for it is full of what those who have 
not studied and enjoyed and been puzzled by 
the charm of that marvellous sculpture will 
term " fancies." And I confess that in read- 



* The printed list included: 

Fletcher, Banister, and Banister, F. History of architect- 
ure. Scribner. $4.50. 

Gardner, K. A. Handbook of Greek sculpture. Mac- 
millan. $1.25. 

Hamlin, A. D. F. Text-book of the history of architect- 
ure. Longmans. $2. 

Marquand, A., and Frothinpham, A. L., jr., Text-book 
of the history of sculpture. Longmans. $1.50 

Mathews, C: T. Story of architecture. Appleton. f3- 

Muther, R: History of modern painting. 3 v. Mac- 
mi 11 an. $20. 

Sturgis, Russell. European architecture. Macmillan. f 4. 

Tarbell, F. B. History of Greek art. Flood. $i. 

Twombley, A. S. Masterpieces of Michelangelo and 
Milton. Silver. $1.50. 

Van Dyke, J: C., ed. Modern French painters. Cen- 
tury. $10. 



88 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



ing some of the other essays I have been in- 
clined to say, " Very gracious fooling." But 
it is graceful and it is well worth reading. 

I would also add to the list Evans's "Animal 
symbolism in ecclesiastical architecture" [Holt. 
$2], a collection of mediaeval stories and their 
use in mediaeval church decoration, useful both 
to folklorists and to those who are studying 
Romanesque architecture. 

Goodyear's "History of art" [?th ed., rev. 
Barnes. $3] isclear condensed, and interesting. 

Statham's "Architecture for general read- 
ers" [New ed. Scribner. $2] treats not only 
of the history of the art but of its principles 
and practice. Its illustrations are from draw- 
ings made by the author, which was necessary 
because they are chiefly of details, not of monu- 
ments, and many separate objects are repre- 
sented in a single full-page plate. Of course 
they are not so attractive as photographs or 
good process plates from photographs. 

The four histories of architecture given in 
the list are all good. Get them all if you can. 
I have enjoyed Sturgis's "European architect- 
ure " best. It is the richest in thought and 
feeling. All four are well illustrated. Of the 
three general histories each has its peculiar 
excellence. Fletcher's has useful parallel col- 
umns comparing the architecture of different 
lands, the Gothic of France and England, for 
instance; Hamlin's costs least; Mathews traces 
especially the influence of climate, race, re- 
ligion, and politics on architecture, but his 
illustrations are wood-cuts and much inferior to 
the process plates in the others. 

Marquand's "History of Greek sculpture" 
belongs to the set of college histories of art ed- 
ited by J: C. Vandyke ; its bibliography is good 
and it has a most useful list of addresses of 
sellers of photographs and plaster casts. 

Gardner's "Greek sculpture" is a good con- 
densed statement of the present state of knowl- 
edge, doubtful theories being left untouched 
or merely stated; the illustrations are excellent 
but too few. 

Tarbell's "Greek art" is also well illustrated, 
tho not quite so well. It belongs to the 
" Chautauqua reading course." 

Muther's "Modern painting" is not one of 
the first works to be be bought by a small 
library; it is too expensive; but it should not 
be long delayed, for it is a book of living in- 
terest; it treats with fulness and fairness of 
the painters of the day and the art theories 
now under discussion, and its very numerous 
illustrations, though too small for enjoyment, 
are a great assistance to the understanding of 
the text. 



NEW AIDS FOR READERS. 

A PUBLIC telephone (pav station) has been es- 
tablished in the Boston Public Library. It is 
in charge of a stenographer, who, in addition 
to ordinary stenographic and copying work, 
will furnish abstract or verbatim copies of rec- 
ords in the public library or accessible in other 
libraries in Boston and its vicinity. 



THE QUESTION OF INDEXES. 

CANNOT something be done, either by the 
American Library Association or by librarians 
individually, to encourage the publication of 
indexes by regular publishers? Something 
which would tend to cultivate what the Nation 
is pleased to term the " index conscience " ? 

Within the last few years Macmillan in Eng- 
land and Appleton in this country have pub- 
lished a new edition of the essays of Huxley, 
but there is no index either to the set or to the 
individual volume. A complete index to this 
set would be of great value, both to libraries in 
general and to all students of modern science. 

Spencer's " Synthetic philosophy " is another 
good example ; some of the volumes of it are 
indexed and some are not. Such indexes as 
there are in a few of the volumes are very 
meagre instead of being very elaborate, as 
they should be. 

The Macmillan Company has recently com- 
pleted a new and cheap, but excellent edition 
of the works of Dickens. Scribner's Sons are 
about to issue in this country the "Gad's Hill edi- 
tion," which will be more elaborate. It would 
surely be of great service to all students of fic- 
tion to have a complete dictionary index of 
such sets as these. 'A dictionary to a set of an 
authors' novels should cover in one alphabetical 
list (dictionary catalog style) the names of all 
persons and places described, historical events, 
particular abuses attacked, and other things of 
a similar nature. Following the names of all 
the important characters should be a brief de- 
scription, of three or four lines, in the author's 
own words wherever possible. 

The set of Balzac published by Roberts Bros, 
or the edition now being published by Macmil- 
lan should be treated in the same way. Thack- 
eray, Peacock, and many other standard nov- 
elists might be fit subjects for such treatment 
as new and complete editions are published. 

The difficulty in the way of persuading pub- 
lishers to undertake the indexing of their sets 
is that they cannot see how they can get re- 
turns for the compiling, printing, and pubKsh- 
ing of such indexes. If librarians were to take 
this matter up and, subject to definite qualifica- 
tions, agree to purchase these indexes, or cer- 
tain of them, as they might appear, the pub- 
lishers would see that there was an assured 
sale for at least a given number of copies. 
Then if a decided effort were made by librari- 
ans to make the first few of these indexes suc- 
cessful, from the publisher's point of view, it 
would do much to encourage them in the effort. 

Scribner's Sons will publish an index to their 
" Thistle edition " of Stevenson, covering some 
25 pages. This, of course, is briefer than it 
might well be, but it is a great step in the right 
direction. It remains to be seen how this will 
be appreciated by the library world. 

I shall be pleased to correspond with any li- 
brarians who are interested in this movement, 
and would much like to see the matter dis- 
cussed in the LIBRARY JOURNAL. 

FRANCIS D. TANDY, 

Public Library, Denver. 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



89 



THE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF NEW 
ORLEANS. 

THE Fisk Free and Public Library of New 
Orleans was formally opened on the evening 
of Jan. 18. The exercises were held in the li- 
brary building (formerly St. Patrick's Hall, the 
home of the Criminal District Court), and were 
attended by an audience of some 1203 persons. 
On the platform were Very Rev. F. Janssens, 
archbishop of New Orleans ; Mayor Flower, 
Very Rev. Mgr. Mignot, of the St. Louis 
Cathedral ; Right Rev. Davis Sessums, bishop 
of Louisiana ; ex-Justice Charles E. Fenner, 
Rabbi I. L. Leucht, of the Touro Synagogue, 
Mr. Frank T. Howard, president .of the board 
of commissioners of the Fisk Free and Public 
Library ; ex-Mayor John Fitzpatrick, Messrs. 
A. Baldwin, George W. Flynn, S. H. March, 
and A. A. Le Long, of the board of commis- 
sioners ; Councilman A. Brittin, and others. 
Prayer was offered by Archbishop Janssens, 
and Mayor Flower, in a short address, trans- 
ferred the library to the control of Mr. Howard, 
president of the board of commissioners, and 
welcomed those present " to the formal open- 
ing of the Fisk Free and Public Library." Mr. 
Howard accepted the charge of the library, on 
behalf of the commissioners, in a few words. 
Addresses on the value of the library and 
what its influence should be in the future of 
New Orleans were made by the Right Rev. 
Davis Sessums, Bishop of Louisiana, and by 
Judge Fenner, of New Orleans. The benedic- 
tion was pronounced by Rabbi Leucht. The 
exercises were interspersed by orchestral and 
vocal music. 

The history of the Fisk Free and Public Li- 
brary, the first absolutely free circulating li- 
brary of New Orleans, is already familiar to 
readers of the JOURNAL, but it may well be re- 
viewed here, now that the work of consolidation 
and organization is fully accomplished. 

The nucleus of the present library was found 
In three modest collections, owned or con- 
trolled by the city, that have now been amal- 
gamated into a single library. The first, the 
Fisk Library, was the gift to New Orleans of 
the brothers Abijah and Alvarez Fisk. It con- 
sisted originally of a bequest made by Abijah 
Fisk in 1843 to the city of New Orleans, in per- 
petual trust, of a property at the corner of Cus- 
tomhouse and Bourbon streets, then yielding 
an income of about $2000 a year, on condition 
that the property should be devoted to the 
maintenance of a free public library. This be- 
quest was, of course, not sufficient for the 
establishment of a library, and for a time had 
no direct results. Later, however, Alvarez 
Fisk, of Natchez, purchased the 6000 v. private 
library of Mr. B. F. French, of New Orleans, 
and in March, 1847, presented it to the city in 
order to carry into effect his brother's bequest. 
The library thus founded never received very 
adequate appropriations or attained much popu- 
larity, and in 1853 it was transferred to the 
control of the Mechanics' Institute " to be held 
and used for the same uses and trust under 
which the building and library were held by 



the city of New Orleans, the rent of the build- 
ing to be applied to the benefit and enlarge- 
ment of the library." The change did not 
result in the benefits hoped for, and in 1882 the 
University of Louisiana became the successor 
and assignee of the Mechanics' Institute, and 
was duly charged with the care of the library. 
In 1884 the Tulane University of Louisiana 
succeeded the University of Louisiana as heir 
and assignee, and the custodianship of the Fisk 
Free Library became a privilege of Tulane 
University. Under its charge the library was 
faithfully and effectively administered, and the 
collection was increased from 8000 v. to 15,000 
v. On the removal of the university in 1895 
from its old home to new quarters in a less cen- 
tral part of the city, the university authorities 
sought permission to transfer the Fisk library 
to the new university buildings. This, how- 
ever, the city would not consent to, feeling 
that the Fisk library was too valuable and use- 
ful a collection of books to be removed so far 
from the business and geographical centre of 
the city, and thus the library remained in the 
old Mechanics' Institute building until Jan. 16, 
1897, when it was transferred to the new li- 
brary. 

The second collection to be consolidated into 
the new library was the public school library, 
or Lyceum Library, established in 1844 as a 
subscription circulating library, and moved to 
the city hall in 1849. In the next few years 
several similar libraries were established, and 
in 1852 the common council passed an ordi- 
nance domiciling all the municipality libraries 
in the city hall under the name of the " Pub- 
lic Library of the City of New Orleans." Later, 
in 1859, the privilege of life membership 
was extended to "all the white youths of 
the city," and to other contributors on such 
terms and conditions as might be deemed com- 
patible with the interests of the institution. 
For some time after the war the library suffered 
the loss of many books, and all progress was 
at a standstill; and indeed it has never been a 
prominent factor in the educational life of the 
city. 

The third collection to form part of the new 
library consisted of some 8000 volumes of mis- 
cellaneous literature that were housed in the 
state library. These have been transferred to 
the new organization, with the intention of 
making the state library essentially a law li- 
brary. 

The consolidation of the Fisk Free and Public 
libraries is notable chiefly for the ease with 
which the consolidation was effected when it was 
once decided upon, more than half a century af- 
ter the establishment of two separate libraries, 
both of which contemplated in their inception 
what has now been accomplished, and neither 
of which attained the desirable end Until united 
with the other. The first step towards that 
end was made in 1895, when the Criminal Dis- 
trict Court was removed from its home in St. 
Patrick's hall and the question of the disposi- 
tion of the old building was raised. The sug- 
gestion that it be used for a public library was 
made and met at once with popular approval, 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



and in April, 1895, an ordinance was passed 
directing the city to place St. Patrick's hall 
in condition for use as a free circulating 
library, which was to be established by the 
consolidation of the Fisk free library and the 
public library. A board of directors was to be 
appointed to govern the library, to adopt regu- 
lations regarding the use of the books, and to 
exercise authority. On Oct. 2, 1896, this ordi- 
nance was amended by a provision transferring 
to the control of the board of directors the cus- 
todianship of the Fisk free library and its income, 
and all balances to the credit of the public li- 
brary, and giving to the board of directors for 
the maintenance of the new library such in- 
come as could be derived from the rental of 
whatever portions of the St. Patrick's hall 
property were not occupied by the library or 
needed by the city for municipal purposes. 
Thus the handling of the funds of the library 
was taken out of the city treasury and away 
from the influences of partisan politics, and the 
board of directors were made directly responsi- 
ble for the administration of the library. The 
board of directors consists of seven members, 
to serve for life, with the mayor, and succeed- 
ing mayors, as cx-officio life members. Mr. F. 
T. Howard, who has been one of the most 
active workers in the library cause, is the 
president. 

During 1896 the work of altering and fitting 
up the building for its new purposes was dili- 
gently carried on, and on Dec. 7 Mr. William 
Beer was elected librarian of the consolidited 
library (see L. j., Jan., p. 52). The library 
begins work with about 34,000 volumes and 
cannot fail, under the effective charge of its 
librarian, to become a power for good in the 
civic life of New Orleans. Mr. Beer also main- 
tains his position as librarian of the Howard 
library, and he plans the close co-operation of 
the two institutions, the Howard serving as a 
reference library, while the .Fisk library carries 
on the work of a more popular circulating 
library. 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRAL- 
ASIA. 

THE Library Association of Australasia has 
published the " Account of the proceedings of 
the first Australasian Library Conference," held 
at Melbourne, April 21 -24, 1896. The meeting, 
which was the first of the sort held in Australia, 
was reported in the LIBRARY JOURNAL for June, 
1896 (21 : 275). and the proceedings contain 
much that is of interest and usefulness to li- 
brarians. The pamphlet is a large octavo of 
66 pages, including a full report of the meeting, 
the papers read, list of delegates, constitution, 
and officers of the association, etc. The subjects 
treated at more or less length by different speak- 
ers include among others " Cataloging," by H. 
C. L. Anderson, of the New South Wales Public 
Library ; " Libraries from the reader's point of 
view," by Sir Henry Wrixon; "A modellibrary 
building," by W. B. Tappin, illustrated with 
plans of one-story and two-story structures; 
" The librarian and hiswork,"by Hugh Wright 



and E. L. Armstrong ; "Fiction in public li- 
braries," by J. P. Wilson; and "The decimal 
classification of Dewey, " by Caleb Hardy. 
The president of the association is Hon. Dr. 
James Norton, president of the board of trus- 
tees of the New South Wales Public Library; 
the secretary is H. C. L. Anderson, principal 
librarian New South Wales Public Library. It 
is planned to hold the 1897 conference in Syd- 
ney. In connection with the Melbourne meet- 
ing an interesting loan exhibition of rare, old 
and curious books, bindings, etc., was held in 
the McArthur Gallery under the direction of 
the trustees of the Public Library, Museums, 
and National Gallery of Victoria. The meeting 
was in every way successful and stimulating, 
and the association seems to have entered upon 
its work in the most promising fashion. 

ART FOR THE SCHOOL-ROOM AT DEN- 
VER PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

ON Dec. 28-31, 1896, an exhibition of mounted 
pictures, designed chiefly for school-room pur- 
poses, was displayed at the Denver Public 
Library that was as original in plan as it was 
interesting and successful in result. The exhi- 
bition was held during the annual session of 
the state teachers' association, which lasted 
for four days and had an attendance of from 
300 to 700 daily. Its purpose was chiefly to 
show what c.m be done, with material that costs 
little and is easy to get, toward decorating the 
walls of a school-room. The pictures shown 
consisted of full-page illustrations from Scrib- 
ner, Century, Harper's Weekly, Harper's jBazar, 
the Ladies' Home Journal, Life, etc., colored 
supplements from the Art Amateur and Art 
Interchange, colored cartoons from Puck and 
Judge, magazine or book posters, photographs 
of celebrated scenes and paintings, Japanese 
prints, artists' sketches from the Art Amateur, 
etc. From 10 to 20 of each class of picture 
were shown, besides quite large collections 
made in schools of the smaller magazine 
pictures, and they included examples of the 
work of most of the leading American illustra- 
tors. The various classes were grouped sepa- 
rately on screens about seven feet high 
covered with burlap. In the selection and 
preparation of the exhibit, and in the prepara- 
tion of the descriptive circular published con- 
cerning it, the library had the assistance of a 
committee from the Artists' Club, of Denver. 
This circular, of which 500 copies were dis- 
tributed, is well worth the attention of libra- 
rians interested in using the influence of the 
public library toward appreciation of art as 
well as toward appreciation of books. It sets 
forth briefly the essentials of a good picture, 
tells hoV the collection was started, and how 
the selecting and mounting are done in the 
schools, and describes the use made of the 
pictures in the school-room and by the library. 
The several kinds of pictures shown are also 
briefly described and their leading features 
pointed out, and a few practical suggestions 
are given as to mounting and exhibiting simi- 
lar collections. 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF DOCUMENTS. 

THE second annual report of F. A. Crandall, 
Superintendent of Documents, for the year 
ending June 30, 1896, was issued in the latter 
part of January. As the report for 1895 cov- 
ered a period of only six months, during but 
three of which the work of the office was 
actually in progress, the present report really 
presents the record of the first full year of 
work. During the year the Document Office 
has receired a total of 486,871 public docu- 
ments of all kinds, of which 252,602 v. were 
accumulations from various departments, 31, 321 
were duplicates returned by libraries, and 
about 60,000 were copies received for catalog- 
ing purposes. Of the documents received 
105,170 were distributed to depository libraries, 
65,823 to other libraries, 13,580 were distrib- 
uted on the order of congressmen, 951 were 
supplied to departments and bureaus to com- 
plete official files, and 3581 copies were sold, 
bringing in total receipts of $889.09. The re- 
mainder, 297,390 volumes, have been assorted, 
classified, and preserved in the Document Office 
for reference. There are now 445 depository li- 
braries on the list of the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments; 253 other libraries receive certain gov- 
ernment publications under the provisions of 
the printing law of 1895 ; and an additional list 
of libraries, numbering 623, has been created 
to receive the publications of the U. S. Geologi- 
cal Survey; so that there are in all 1321 libraries 
on the distributing list of the office, as against 
the 421 listed in the preceding report. Dur- 
ing 1896 the Document Office has issued 18 
" Monthly catalogues," a " Checklist of public 
documents," a first annual report, a draft of 
a proposed bill to improve present methods of 
government publication, and a " Document 
catalogue" of 638 pages. Mr. Crandall gives 
interesting notes on each of these enterprises. 
He also describes at some length the establish- 
ment of the "document library," which now 
contains about iS.ooov., and which it is hoped 
in time may be made a fully complete and ac- 
cessible collection of government issues. The 
whole report is well worth reading, and is com- 
mended to the attention of librarians. 



REVIEWS AND CRITICISMS FOR READ- 
ERS. 

MR. A. E. BOSTWICK, librarian of the New 
York Free Circulating Library, says in the re- 
cently issued (i 7th) report of that library: "Work 
has been begun on a collection of criticisms 
and reviews to be made accessible to the pub- 
lic. It is hoped that this may in'some degree 
present the advantages of access to the shelves 
without any of its disadvantages. The criti- 
cisms, clipped from the current literary maga- 
zines, which were formerly sold for old paper, 
are pasted on cards about five inches square 
and filed away, alphabetically by authors, like 
catalog cards, each having a written heading 
including author's name, title, and call num- 
ber. 



meritan Cibrarg Association. 



President: W: H. Brett, Public Library, 
leveland, O. 

Secretary : Rutherford P. Hayes, Columbus, 
O. 

Treasurer: C: K. Bolton, Public Library, 
Brookline, Mass. 

SPECIAL MEETING. 

THE special meeting of the American Library 
Association, Feb. 6, 1897, at Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York City, was called to order by 
President Brett at 2:40 p.m. The call for the 
meeting was read by Secretary Hayes (see L. 
j., Jan., p. 23). 

The president stated that in accordance with 
this call the special business of the meeting 
was to consider the reincorporation of the 
American Library Association under the laws 
of the United States. 

Mr. Herbert Putnam, chairman of the special 
committee appointed by the president (the other 
members being Messrs. Dewey and Bowker), 
made his report. The committee having found 
that the executive board had no authority to 
take action toward reincorporation, this special 
meeting was called. As a basis for discussion 
the committee offered the following: 

"Resolved, That the American Library Asso- 
ciation authorizes the executive board, or such 
committee as it may appoint, to take any steps 
necessary to procure the reincorporation of 
the A. L. A. under act of Congress instead of 
under the laws of Massachusetts, provided that 
in the judgment of the executive board such re- 
incorporation prove to be practicable and to be 
of advantage to library interests." 

Mr. Putnam stated that at the hearing before 
the joint committee on the Library of Congress, 
held at Washington, Dec. i and 2, 1896, Hon. 
L. E. Quigg, of the committee, suggested such 
incorporation, and that the act might include a 
proviso that a committee of the association 
should act as a board of visitors to the Library 
of Congress. Mr. Putnam also read a draft of 
an act which would cover the points above 
suggested. 

The report of the committee was accepted. 

After discussion, in which Messrs. Baker, 
Soule, Flint, Skinner, and Miss Kelso took 
part, Mr. Carr offered the following substitute 
motion as an amendment : 

"Resolved, That the executive board take 
under consideration the matter of procuring 
reincorporation, and report thereon to the 
coming annual meeting of the A. L. A." 

After further remarks by Messrs. Flint, Nel- 
son, Putnam, and Bowker, all in favor of the 
amendment, Mr. Carr's substitute was carried. 

This concluded the official business of the 
meeting, which had been called only for the 
consideration of reincorporation. 

Mr. Nelson reported that the proceedings of 
the Cleveland conference would probably be 
issued by March, i. 

Adjourned at 4:071 

GARDNER M. JONES, Retorder. 



9 2 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



\February, '97 



A. L. A. SPECIAL MEETING : ATTENDANCE 

REGISTER, 
'preceding name indicates non-members of A. L. A. 

Anderson, Edwin H. Ln. Carnegie L., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Andrews, Clement W. Ln. John Crerar L., 
Chicago. 

Baker, G: H. Ln. Columbia College L., N. Y. 
City. 

Bigelow, Frank C. Ln. New York Society L., 
N. Y. City. 

*Billings, J: S. Ln. New York P. L., N. Y. 
City. 

Bowker, R. R. LIBRARY JOURNAL, N. Y. City. 

Brainerd, Helen E. Cataloger Columbia Col- 
lege L., N. Y. City. 

Brett, W: H. Ln. P. L., Cleveland, O. 

Browne, Nina E. Ln. Library Bureau, As. 
Secretary A. L. A. Publishing Section, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Carr, Henry J. Ln. P. L., Scranton, Pa. 

*Collar, Mildred A. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Eames, Wilberforce. Ln. Lenox L., N. Y. 
City. 

*Farman, Mary E. As. P. L., Newark, N. J. 

Flint, Weston. Washington, D. C. 

Haines, Helen E. LIBRARY JOURNAL, N. Y. 
City. 

Haines, Martha B. As. P. L., Newark, N. J. 

Hayes, Rutherford P. State Library Commis- 
sioner, Columbus, O. 

Herzog, Alfred C. Ln. P. L., Bayonne, N. J. 

lies, G: Journalist, N. Y. City. 

Jones, Gardner M. Ln. P. L. , Salem, Mass. 

Kates, Clarence S. F. L., Philadelphia. 

Kelso, Tessa L. Ex-Ln., with Charles Scrib- 
ner's Sons, N. Y. City. 

Lemcke, E., of Lemcke & Buechner, N. Y. 
City. 

Lowenstein, Leon B. Memphis, Tenn. 

Martins, Charlotte. As. Ln. Princeton Univ. 
L., Princeton, N. J. 

Merrill, E: B. Ln. Assoc. of the Bar, N. Y. 
City. 

Montgomery, T: L. Ln. Wagner Free Insti- 
tute of Science, Philadelphia. 

Moore, Annie C. As. Pratt Institute F. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Nelson, C: Alexander. Deputy Ln. Columbia 
College L., N. Y. City. 

Nolan, E: J. Ln. Academy of Natural Sciences, 
Philadelphia. 

*Ogden, Lucy. As. P. L., Newark, N. J. 

Plummer, Mary W. Ln. Pratt Institute F. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Prescott, Harriet B. Cataloger Columbia Col- 
lege L., N. Y. City. 

Putnam, Herbert. Ln. P. L., Boston, Mass. 

Rathbone, Josephine A. As. Pratt Institute 
F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Richardson, Ernest C. Ln. Princeton Univ. 
L., Princeton, N. J. 

Skinner, James A. Ln. N. Y. State Teachers' 
L., Albany, N. Y. 

Solberg, Thorvald, with Boston Book Co., 
Boston, Mass. 



Soule, C: C. Trustee P. L., Brookline, Mass. 
Stetson, Willis K. Ln. P. L., New Haven, Ct. 
Stevens, W. F. Ln. Railroad Y. M. C. A. L., 

N. Y. City. 

Stonelake, Isola P. As. P. L., Newark, N. J. 
Thomson, J: Ln. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Tobitt, Edith. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Underbill, Adelaide. Ref. Ln. Vassar College 

L., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Van Hoevenberg, Alma R. As. Ln. Washing- 
ton Heights L., N. Y. 
Van Zandt, Margaret. As. Columbia College 

L., N. Y. Ci,ty. 
Wing, J. N., with Charles Scribner's Sons, 

N. Y. City. 
Winser, Beatrice. As. Ln. P. L., Newark, 

N. J. 

THE QUESTION OF REINCORPORATION. 

Mr. Herbert Putnam, chairman of the com- 
mittee appointed to consider reincorporation, 
makes the following statement of his views on 
the matter: 

I was one of those who last December favored 
immediate action looking to the reincorporation 
of the A. L. A. under United States laws ; 
I signed the call for the special meeting of the 
A. L. A. held on Feb. 6 ; and I neverthe- 
less favored the postponement involved in the 
vote passed at that meeting. 

1. The advantages of a national charter for 
the A. L. A. are as clear to me now as they 
were two months ago, e.g. A national stand- 
ing. Headquarters in Washington. Advan- 
tages to the association similar to those secured 
to the American Historical Association by its 
federal charter. Possible advantages to fed- 
eral interests similar to those secured to federal 
interests by the charter of the National Acad- 
emy of Sciences. 

Why should not a national association be in- 
corporated under national laws ? 

2. Congress is reluctant to grant such special 
charters. It seemed to me, therefore, wise to 
take advantage of Mr. Quigg's offer to intro- 
duce the bill, and to take advantage of it while 
his interest was fresh. 

The meeting of the A. L. A. had to be noti- 
fied 30 days in advance, so that the call had 
to be issued hastily in order to bring the date 
before the adjournment of Congress. 

But 

3. I had not favored final action by the Asso- 
ciation without a definite assurance in writing 
on the part of Mr. Quigg and the joint com- 
mittee on the library of a continued interest in 
the enterprise and readiness to secure passage 
of the bill. 

4. At the date of the meeting such assur- 
ance, though requested, had not reached us. 

On the other hand, the original suggestion 
for the reincorporation of the A. L. A. was 
coupled with a suggestion that it should under- 
take a service in the way of visitation of the 
national library. This suggestion also was ad- 
vanced by Mr. Quigg. I did not and do not 
see why the Association should decline to render 
such a lervice, provided the Library of Con- 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



93 



gress be a national library, whose adminis- 
tration is a matter of national concern, and 
provided the A. L. A. be the best representative 
of the experience and judgment of the library 
profession of the United States and of the in- 
terests represented in the libraries of the 
United States. 

But such a service was not to be volunteered. 
It should be rendered only upon a request on 
the part of the authorities at Washington, ex- 
plicit, formally expressed, and cordially sup- 
ported by the librarians at Washington. 

Down to the date of the meeting such a 
request in such form had not been received. 
On Feb. 6 I could not, therefore, vote for any 
bill with a provision for visitation. 

I had also intimation that certain prominent 
members of the A. L. A. felt that the reincor- 
poration could not be applied for at this time 
without suggesting an ulterior motive of visita- 
tion. 

Though still disposed to favor the reincorpo- 
ration for the advantages to be secured as in- 
dicated above, I favored the postponement of 
the application until it could be made with the 
general approval of members of the A. L. A., 
with no misconstruction of its motive, with 
adequate consideration as to details, and with 
reasonable assurance that it would meet with 
success. HERBERT PUTNAM. 

FEB. 8, 1897. 

Mr. Hayes and Mr. Bowker also desire to ex- 
press their approval of Mr. Putnam's statement 
and their endorsement of the views there set 
forth. 

PROPOSED A. L.A. PROPAGANDA APPROPRIA- 
TION. 

PREVIOUS to the special meeting the follow- 
ing circular was issued by Mr. J. C. Dana to 
members of the A. L. A. and to the various 4i- 
brary associations : 

" To the Special Meetinf of the American Library As- 
sociation, Feb. 6, 1897, AVw York City. 

"It is very important that the membership 
of the A. L. A. be increased. A thousand li- 
brarians, library assistants, and persons inter- 
ested in libraries, can easily be found who, by 
joining the association, will add to its efficiency 
and to their own enthusiasm and effectiveness. 
An association of 1000 members can speak with 
more authority and can do more to promote 
the library spirit and to dignify the library pro- 
fession than can one of 400 or 500. I hereby 
urge such members of the association as may 
be gathered in special session on Feb. 6 to 
adopt a suitable resolution expressing their de- 
sire that the proper officials notify the secretary 
of the association, Mr. Rutherford P. Hayes, 
that he may spend $500 from available funds 
of the association in the next few months in 
such propaganda work for the association as 
to him and the president seem advisable. This 
money would be expended in securing the 
presence at state and city library association 
meetings either of Mr. Hayes himself, or of 
some other able and popular representative of 
A. L. A. interests, in securing the publication 
in proper journals of articles telling of the 
aims of the association, and in the distribution 
by means of periodical literature, or circulars, 



or letters, of such reading-matter as may en- 
courage the growth of the library spirit, and 
in other like ways and always in securing 
new members." 

The matter presented in the circular was, 
however, necessarily deferred for action till the 
annual conference, as it was not embodied in 
the call issued for the special meeting, and was 
therefore out of order, under section 19 of the 
constitution of the A. L. A. 

HANDBOOK. 

THE A. L. A. Handbook for 1897 has been 
published, and copies may be obtained by ad- 
dressing the secretary, R. P. Hayes, State Li- 
brary, Columbus, O. Every member should 
have copies- of the " Handbook," not only for 
reference but for distribution. The new edi- 
tion is modelled closely upon that of 1894, but 
brings the record of library matters up to Jan- 
uary, 1897. The full printed list of members 
of the A. L. A., brought up to the same date, 
will be generally welcomed. Another useful 
feature is the list of library associations, which, 
however, does not include the Western Penn- 
sylvania Library Association or the new 
Travelling Library Association of North Wis- 
consin. A list of state library commissions 
and a short tabulated statement of the library 
laws of the different states would have been 
useful features, and might well be embodied 
in future editions. 



State ibrorg (ZTotntttiseiotte. 



CONNECTICUT F. P. L. COMMITTEE : Caroline 
M. Hewins, secretary, Public Library, Hart- 
ford. 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE L. COMMISSION : Miss 
E. P. Sohier, secretary, Beverly. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE L. COMMISSION: J. H. 
Whittier, secretary, East Rochester. 

NEW YORK : PUBLIC LIBRARIES DIVISION. State 
University, Melvil Dewey, director, Albany. 

OHIO STATE L. COMMISSION: C. B. Galbreath, 
secretary, State Library, Columbus. 

VERMONT STATE L. COMMISSION : Miss M. L. 
Titcomb, secretary, Free Library, Rutland. 

WISCONSIN F. L. COMMISSION : Miss L. E. 
Stearns, secretary, Public Library, Mil- 
waukee. 

State Cibrarg Qlssociatione. 



LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL CALI- 
FORNIA. 

President: J. C. Rowell, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley. " 

Secretary: A. M. Jellison, Mechanics' Insti- 
tute Library, San Francisco. 

Treasurer: A. J. Cleary, Odd Fellows' Li- 
brary, San Francisco. 

THE annual meeting of the association was 
held Jan. 8 at the Mechanics' Institute. Presi- 
dent Rowell presided, and in a brief address 
reviewed the work of the association for the 
year. He dwelt in particular on the good ac- 
complished in bringing the librarians into 
closer and more cordial relations, and outlined 
what might be accomplished in the futurtt 



94 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



\Ftbruary, '97 



Professor William Dallam Armcs, of the 
University of California, read an extended 
paper on the " Plantin Press and Museum of 
Antwerp," in which he described the many 
beauties of that unique repository, illustrating 
it with many photographs and sketches. 

Mr. Kimball made a short address, in which 
he showed the importance of state library com- 
missions, and urged the association to use its in- 
fluence toward establishing one for California. 

The following resolution was unanimously 
adopted : 

" Resolved, That the publishers of Harper's Weekly, 
Scribner's Magasine, Review of Re^iiews, and of all 
other periodicals be earnestly requested to regularly for- 
ward to libraries and subscribers title-page, table of con- 
tents, or index for each volume with the concluding num- 
ber of the same, or, in the case of weeklies, as soon as 
possible thereafter." 

A. M. JELLISON, Secretary. 

COLOR A DO LIBRA RY A SSOC1A TION. 
President: John Parsons, Public Library, 
Denver. 

Secretary : Herbert E. Richie, City Library, 
Denver. 

Treasurer : A. E. Whitaker, State University 
Library, Boulder. 

THE regular monthly meeting of the Colo- 
rado Library Association was called to order at 
8 p.m. on Friday evening, Jan. 15, in the 
Chamber of Commerce, by President Wrritaker. 
Preceding the regular papers on the pro- 
gram and under the head of miscellaneous 
business the association decided to take some 
action regarding the appointment of a state 
library commission. There is now before the 
state legislature a bill introduced by the asso- 
ciation providing for such appointment, and 
the association decided that after conferring 
with the governor and learning whether a sug- 
gestion would be agreeable or not, it would be 
desirable to have the executive committee send 
a list of 15 names to each member of the asso- 
ciation, from which they should select eight 
names to be submitted to the governor, with a 
recommendation that he appoint the commis- 
sion of five members from that list, providing 
the bill passes. 

The association also endorsed a petition urg- 
ing the pass^e of the bill now before Congress 
which relates to the printing and distribution 
of public documents. 

The first number on the program, "Book 
printing," by Mr. J. Harry Carson, was then 
heard. Mr. Carson had all necessary exhibits 
for illustrating bis talk, and the audience had 
a very good idea of the operation of the print- 
ing office when he finished. Mr. CarSon went 
into detail and described the making up of a 
32-page form and the folding of the paper. He 
also showed the various kinds of type and a 
variety of cuts and half-tones, explaining the 
manner of making and using each. 

Mr. A. T. Bowen then talked on " Binding." 
He had with him a selection of the tools of 
his trade, and explained bookbinding in detail, 
giving practical illustrations of sewing, using 
several different methods; and also showed the 
methods of fastening on the case or covers. 
H. E. RICHIE, Secretary, 



CONNECTICUT LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Frank B. Gay, Watkinson Li- 
brary, Hartford. 

Secretary: Miss Angeline Scott, Public Li- 
brary, South Norwalk. 

Treasurer: Miss Anna G. Rockwell, New 
Britain Institute, New Britain. 

JOINT MEETING WITH NEW iNGLAND ASSOCIA- 
TIONS. 

THE sixth annual meeting of the Connecticut 
Library Association and the second union 
meeting of the library associations of the New 
England states was held in the hall of the Con- 
necticut Historical Society, Wadsworth Athe- 
njeum, Feb. 3. 

The morning session, held at n o'clock, was 
a business meeting of the Connecticut Library 
Association, at which the usual reports were 
read and accepted. An invitation from the 
Scoville Memorial Library, Salisbury, to hold 
the May meeting with them was referred to 
the executive board. The following officers 
were elected: President, Frank B. Gay, Hart- 
ford; Vice-presidents, Frederic Bill, Groton, 
Isabella Eldridge, Norfolk, Frederick Hurd, 
Bridgeport, Ellen Spencer, Naugatuck, Mrs. 
Donald T. Warner, Salisbury; Secretary, Ange- 
line Scott, South Norwalk ; Assistant secre- 
tary, Josephine S. Heydrick, Southport; Treas- 
urer, Anna G. Rockwell, New Britain. 

At 1:36 the Massachusetts Library Club held 
a business meeting. 

The union session, at 2 p.m., opened with a 
large attendance, representatives being present 
from all the New England states except Maire. 
Mr. W. K. Stetson, president of the Connecti- 
cut Library Association, introduced Hon. James 
G. Batterson, vice-president of the Wadsworth 
Athenaeum. 

Mr. Batterson, after extending a cordial wel- 
come to the city of Hartford and the freedom 
of the library, expressed the deep interest of 
the people in the importance of the duties of a 
librarian. To know what books to read, how 
to read them, and where to find them were 
questions of great importance in every com- 
munity. The librarian cannot control the 
tastes nor the habit of the reader, but can 
frequently give sound advice. It is to be re- 
gretted that the use of our circulating libraries 
is, to a too great extent, a matter of temporary 
diversion rather than mental discipline and 
useful education. Novel-reading is not to be 
condemned because the characters are ficti- 
tious, for by such means we may exemplify the 
most exalted truth or preach the gospel of love 
and mercy. It is true that the best thoughts 
of great writers of modern times have been 
expressed in fiction, and the question is how 
to use these works as a means of educa- 
tion rather than one of dissipation. The con- 
firmed novel-reader is always being filled but 
never fed; and, though he may submit to ad- 
vice, he never will to dictation. Established 
courses of reading will seldom be followed. 
"Very few of those who read most can bear 
examination on the books they have read; they 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



95 



have simply had a temporary diversion have 
been amused and that is all. 

" I have often thought that a monthly meet- 
ing of the readers in a library, to discuss the 
authors, ask questions, and submit papers on 
the various subjects of their reading, would not 
only be profitable but lead to more careful and 
studious reading. The selection of a subject 
for inquiry and discussion at a future meeting, 
far enough removed to admit of generous 
reading and some preparation, would lead to a 
demand for the authorities on that particular 
subject, and stimulate reading and investiga- 
tion to a most profitable end and purpose. 
Give your readers opportunity for question- 
ings and discussions on the subjects treated by 
the books they read, and you will in a great 
measure correct the vice of aimless and desul- 
tory reading, by providing a point for immedi- 
ate application. One finds that he has gained 
something by the moral which follows the plot 
of a beautiful story; another finds instruction 
in the sublime art of its telling; and both find 
facts in fiction which are well worth saving. 

"An association of library readers for the 
purpose of reviewing in a home-like and con- 
versational way the books which have been 
read might be made very helpful, not only to 
the readers themselves but also to the libra- 
rians and the committee who supply the ma- 
terial for their use. A library reader has been 
attracted by the story of 'Ben-Hur' to the 
enormous wagers laid on the result of the 
chariot race at Antioch, and he sends up the 
question, ' What is the sum of 120 talents in 
our money?' No one answers, and the ques- 
tion is referred to some one who will look it up 
and rep'y at the next meeting. Another asks, 
' Which one of the Caesars is referred to when 
Drusus shouts, " Who but Caesar hath 50 talents 
at order ! " ' Such questions break the ice, and 
the discussion on the relations of Rome to An- 
tioch, the grievances of the Jews, the horses of 
the desert, and the customs of the time becomes 
general, and all who have read the books are 
amazed to find how many interesting and im- 
portant points have been overlooked by hasty 
reading." 

In answer to the call for reports from New 
England library associations, Miss Louise G. 
Bartlett, of the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, re- 
ported from Vermont. The association had 
had but one meeting, as the libraries are so 
widely separated, the librarians in many cases 
having no salary, that it is difficult to get to- 
gether. Since organizing the library commis- 
sion 61 new libraries have been started. 

Mr. W. H. Tillinghast, secretary of the 
Massachusetts Li' rary Club, said that the 
chief question of interest before their club dur- 
ing the year had been that of continuing the 
lists of select fiction The report on the matter 
submitted by the executive board of the club is 
printed elsewhere. (See p. 98.) 

The report from Connecticut given by the 
secretary showed that three meetings of much 
interest had been held, and that 36 towns had 
accepted and added to state aid in behalf of their 
libraries. 



Mr. Herbert Putnam, librarian of the Boston 
Public Library and president of the Massa- 
chusetts Library Club, then gave a most interest- 
ing address, which opened with a graceful re- 
sponse to Mr. Batterson's welcome and a trib- 
ute to the advantages of Hartford in respect 
to its libraries. In examin ; ng the list of sub- 
jects discussed by the American Library Asso- 
ciation, the Library Association of the United 
Kingdom, and many of the state associations, 
he found a large per cent, of the subjects dis- 
cuss< d in the siate association to be the same 
as those in the general associations, and sug- 
gested that, while the general associations 
should take the larger subjects of library ad- 
ministration and economics, the state associa- 
tions might do better to spend a larger per- 
centage of their time on matters of more 
local interest; local history, bibliography, and 
special industrial needs, purchase of books, 
inter-library loans, and especially the discussion 
of books, that would help the librarian in making 
his selections for purchase ; that they insist upon 
a higher standard for library assistants ; and that 
they emphasize the prerogatives of librarians. 
The librarian should be consulted in planning 
the building, in selection of books, and choos- 
ing of assistants. The librarian of to-day has 
a difficult problem presented to him in this 
age <.-f free thought, free speech, and unli- 
censed publication. The idea that a library 
should "deny to the public nothing that a 
bookseller has to offer," he, though of a family 
of booksellers, most emphatically repudiated. 
A library should be progressive in many 
things, but conservative where it concerns a 
question of morals and social order, and he 
earnestly urged the librarians to use their in- 
fluence in counteracting the revolutionary ten- 
dency of the age. 

Justin Winsor, LL.D., of Harvard Uni- 
versity, was unavoidably detained in Boston, 
so his paper on " Maps " was omitted. 

Rev. Samuel Hart. D.D., of Trinity College, 
opened the discussion on "Co-operation in 
Hartford libraries." The method pursued 
among the five libraries of Hartford he ex- 
plained as having sprung up in a natural way, 
according to the nature of the libraries them- 
selves, rather than on a definite plan, and was 
to a great extent useful in the prevention of 
duplicates and the saving of money for neces- 
sary purchases. 

The state library, devoted to works of juris- 
prudence, would have books not needed in the 
other libraries ; the Watkinson Library had 
many large and beautifully illustrated books, 
also many technical works ;ihe Historical So- 
ciety had genealogies and local histories ; the 
Theological Seminary, collect'ons of Bibles in 
different languages, hymnology, special periods 
of ecclesiastical history, as well as theology : 
Trinity College hnd collections of pamphleis 
and sets of scientific works, English state his- 
tory, and lexicography; while the Publi<- Li- 
brary supplied the current and standard lit- 
erature. Thus, by co-operation, they had suc- 
ceeded in making of the five one great library, 
sending the inquirers to the one where the 



9 6 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL, 



[February, '97 



best books on special subjects are to be found. 
He also suggested that it was a great help in 
getting rid of book agents, as one could always 
be sent to the library farthest away. 

Mr. W: E. Foster, of the Providence Li- 
brary, being prevented by illness from at- 
tending the meeting, sent his paper on "Co- 
operation in Providence libraries," which was 
read by Mr. F. B. Gay, of the Wadsworth Athe- 
na-urn. The three Providence libraries repre- 
sented three well-known types which are ideal- 
ly adapted for co-operation with each other, 
namely, the public library, the shareholder's li- 
brary, and the college library. A regular 
monthly meeting of the librarians of the differ- 
ent libraries was held for the purpose of com- 
paring notes and consultation. 

Similar methods for the preventing of dupli- 
cates as those used in the Hartford libraries 
are in use. The fundamental principle con- 
nected with the accessions to the library is, 
that the community as a unit is to be kept in 
mind rather than the constituency of any one of 
the libraries separately. One of the provisions 
of the Athenaeum Library is that the librarians 
of Brown University and of the Providence 
Public Library shall be considered shareholders 
of the Providence Athenaeum, thus making it 
possible to add, without embarrassment, books 
that might not otherwise be selected. The 
Public Library, in its monthly bulletins, by 
placing the initials A. (Athenaeum) and B. 
(Brown) against the titles of such works as are 
also in those two libraries, not only tells where 
the books are to be found, but helps, in future 
purchasing, to prevent duplicating. The last 
bulletin of the year also has 40 pages of a 
record of books added to the three libraries. 
They also unite in the publication of a list of 
their periodicals, serials, and annuals, which 
has been enlarged so as to cover 20 libra- 
ries and reading-rooms in the vicinity of Prov- 
idence. It comprises noo entries, and will ap- 
pear each year in one of the numbers of the 
monthly bulletin. 

In the discussion that followed, Professor 
Perry spoke of the Hartford periodical lists 
published. 

Mr. C: A. Cutter, of Northampton, said that 
the two municipal libraries of that city co-oper- 
ate with each other and also with the Amherst 
College Library. 

Mr. Fletcher, of Amherst, remarked that the 
library superstition that a book once in the li- 
brary should stay there sometimes prevented 
exchanging books to places where they would 
do more good. 

Mr. Lane, of the Boston Athenaeum, said that 
the Athenaeum Library was giving away books 
to the Medical Library without getting any- 
thing in exchange for them. 

Mr. Gay mentioned the transfer of pamphlets 
from the Hartford Public to the Watkinson Li- 
brary. 

Mr. C: D. Hine, of the state board of edu- 
cation, in answer to a question, stated that the 
school libraries of Hartford were mostly in the 
Hartford Public Library, just the place, he 
thought, where they should be. 



Mr. Putnam said he thought the most serious 
question was the getting the book out of the 
catalog, and that some libraries were grow- 
ing poorer from the collections of books which 
they cannot get rid of. 

Mr. Bowker, of the LIBRARY JOURNAL, em- 
phasized the importance of sending lists of 
missing numbers or books wanted to be in- 
serted in the LIBRARY JOURNAL. 

A resolution passed by the Library Associa- 
tion of Central California requesting publishers 
of periodicals to send title-page and index with 
the last number of volume or as soon after as 
possible, without request, was read, and after 
some little discussion a motion was made that 
Mr. W: I. Fletcher and Mr. T. Solberg be in- 
structed to draw up a resolution to serd to the 
A. L. A. committee, desiring them to consider 
the question at the next general conference. 
The vote was put and carried. 

Miss Caroline A. Garland, of the Dover Pub- 
lic Library, read a very bright and interesting 
paper on the " Trials of a librarian," to which 
justice could not be done in a report, but .which 
will appear in full in the LIBRARY JOURNAL. 

Invitations from Prof. Perry to visit the Case 
Memorial Library, and from Dr. Hart to visit 
Trinity College Library, were given, of which 
many present availed themselves the following 
morning. 

Mr. W. C. Lane, chairman of the committee 
on the trip abroad, reported progress and stated 
that a final circular would soon be issued with 
full particulars. The party expect to sail June 
26, either from Boston, New York, or Phila- 
delphia, according to the accommodations that 
can be secured, and the net cost will be about 
$350. 

Mr. Eastman, of the New York State Li- 
brary, said a few words about the library de- 
partment of the National Educational Associa- 
tion, and earnestly advised the executive board 
of each association represented to secure, if 
possible, the attendance of five delegates at 
the annual meeting of the National Educational 
Association of Milwaukee in July, 1897. As 
all the associations would have meetings of 
their own before that date, it was thought best 
to defer action until the state meetings. 

A message of greeting from the Library As- 
sociation of Washington City was read, and an 
invitation was given from the New Hampshire 
State Association to hold the next union meet- 
ing with them a year hence, or at such time as 
the different associations might decide upon. 

The meeting was then adjourned to the 
United States Hotel, where the Connecticut 
Library Association entertained its guests at 
supper, about 150 being seated at the table. 

An informal reception was held in the even- 
ing at the Wadsworth Athenaeum, with an ex- 
hibition of engravings and prints illustrating 
the Stuarts of England, newspaper prints, 
scrap-books, etc., in the Public Library, and 
the treasures of the Historical Society. Charles 
Dudley Warner, who was to have given the 
evening address, was prevented by illness from 
so doing. 

MARY A. RICHARDSON, Secretarv. 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



97 



ILLINOIS LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Col. J. W. Thompson, Public Li- 
brary, Evanston. 

Secretary : Miss Ange V. Milner, State Nor- 
mal College, Normal. 

Treasurer: P. F. Bicknell, University of 
Illinois, Champaign. 

ON Jan. 20, 1897, the Illinois State Library 
Association convened at the state house, in 
Springfield, 111., for the annual meeting. It 
was principally a business meeting. The re- 
ports of the various officers were read and ap- 
proved. The following resolution was adopt- 
ed by a rising vote: 

Whereas, Miss EvyaL. Moore, secretary of the Illinois 
State Library Association, has rendered most efficient 
and valuable service in the discharge of the duties of her 
office during the past year, and has labored unceasingly 
and indefatigably to forward the interests of the associa- 
tion, in all ways within her power, and 

Whereas, It is learned with deep regret that her pro- 
fessional duties will render it impossible for her to ac- 
cept a re-nomination; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the Illinois State Library Association, in 
annual convention assembled, that Miss Moore's services 
in its belialf be and hereby are most gratefully acknowl- 
edged, and the necessity under which she finds herself 
cf declining re-nomination be and hereby is most sincere- 
ly regretted; and be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be spread upon the 
permanent records of the association, and a copy of the 
same forwarded to Miss Moore by the secretary present- 
ly to be elected. 

The following officers were elected : Presi- 
dent, Col. J. W. Thompson, president public 
library board, Evanston; Vice- Presidents, E.S. 
Willcox, librarian Peoria Public Library, and 
G. B. Meleney, Library Bureau, Chicago; Sec- 
retary, Miss Ange V. Milner, librarian Illinois 
State Normal College, Normal ; Treasurer, P. 
F. Bicknell, librarian University of Illinois, 
Champaign. 

This resolution was then adopted: 

Whereas, Miss Katherine L. Sharp has rendered most 
efficient service during the past year as director of the 
Bureau of Information established by the Illinois State 
Library Association, therefore be it 

Resolved, That the association hereby express its ap- 
preciation of Miss Sharp's work as director of the bureau, 
and request her to continue it during the coming year. 

There was a discussion of the steps necessary 
to establish the much-desired state library com- 
mission. 

Mr. Dana's circular was read, requesting the 
special meeting of the A. L. A. soon to be held, 
to authorize the secretary of that body to spend 
$500 in advancing the interests of the A. L. A. 
The wording of the circular was somewhat 
modified and then endorsed by the association, 
and the proper officers were instructed to sign 
it in its amended form and forward it for the 
special meeting. 

It was announced that the National Educa- 
tional Association invited all library associa- 
tions to send duly accredited delegates to the 
meeting of the N. E. A., to be held in Milwau- 
kee next July. It was decided that the presi- 
dent of the Illinois State Library Association 
should appoint a representative to attend that 
meeting. 

The meeting closed with an informal discus- 
sion of a question asked by a new member 
" How is a membership in this association 
going to benefit a subscription library?" 

ANGE V. MILNER, Secretary. 



INDIANA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

President: Miss Elizabeth D. Swan, Purdue 
University, Lafayette. 

Secretary and Treasurer : Miss M. E. Ahern, 
Library Bureau, 125 Franklin street, Chicago 
111. 

IOWA LIBRARY SOCIETY. 

President : W. H. Johnston, Public Library, 
Fort Dodge. 

Secretary: Miss Ella McLoney, Public Li- 
brary, Des Moines. 

THE meeting of the Iowa State Library Society, 
which was held in Des Moines, Dec. 29-31, 1896, 
was one of unusual interest and importance. 
This was the seventh annual meeting of the soci- 
ety, which met as the library section of the state 
teachers' association, as it had done for the two 
meetings immediately preceding. For the first 
day a full program had been prepared, two 
sessions being held. On the second and third 
days only half-day sessions were held, the rest 
of the time being given to the meetings of the 
general body. The following is the program 
in full: 

TUESDAY, DEC. 29. First session. Enrol- 
ment of members. 
Reports of secretary and treasurer. 
Reports of committees. 

History of library work in Iowa W. H. 
Johnston, president board of trustees, Pub- 
lic Library, Fort Dodge. 

_; Second session. Advantages of a state li- 
brary commission W. P. Payne, presi- 
dent board of trustees, Public Library, 
Nevada. 

How to select and purchase books Eliza- 
beth Peterson, librarian Public Library, 
Council Bluffs. 

The proper relation between the library and 
the public Mrs. Rosa Oberholtzer, libra- 
rian Public Library, Sioux City. 
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 30. Third session. Care 
and use of public documents. J. R. Or- 
wig, first assistant, State Library, Des 
Moines. 
Cataloging Abbie R. Knapp, cataloger 

Public Library, Des Moines. 
THURSDAY, DEC. 31. Fourth session. Re- 
ports of committees. 
Election of officers. 

Value of a public library to a community 
Mrs. M. P. Scheeler, librarian Public Li- 
brary, Marshalltown. 
General questions and discussions. 
The subjects of the papers had been chosen 
with the combined purpose of stimulating in- 
terest and'giving practical information. Each 
topic had received careful treatment by the 
person to whom it had been assigned, and each 
paper was followed by a discussion which de- 
veloped its helpful points. 

The paper upon the " History of library work 
in Iowa "traced the development of libraries in 
the state, including the state library, state uni- 
versity library, Iowa historical department, 
various association libraries, and the many free 
public libraries which have been established 
throughout the state, showing how the work 
has developed from small beginnings. 



9 8 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



[February, '97 



Mr. Payne, in presenting "The advantages 
of a state library com.nission," set forth the 
benefits to be derived from a centralization of 
library interestsand theconsequent harmonious 
development of the work throughout the whole 
state, and showed how valuable such a com- 
mission had proved itself in other states. 

" How to select and purchase books " was a 
subject full of practical interest, and the paper 
upon this topic gave helpful suggestions as to 
methods of selecting books in a systematic way 
so that the library might be built up symmet- 
rically. It also considered desirable plans of 
making book purchases, the writer believing 
that the plan of buying from a large central 
house was, upon the whole, more satisfactory 
than any other. 

Mrs. Oberholtzer's paper upon the "Proper 
relation between the library and the public " 
was rich in suggestions as to ways in which a 
library may be made attractive and useful to 
the people who visit it, and set a high standard 
for those who are responsible for library ad- 
ministration. 

" The care and use of public documents " is 
not a fascinating subject to the average libra- 
rian, but the completeness and value of the 
information to be found in the publications of 
the government were made so prominent by 
Mr. Orwig that the sheep-bound volumes bear- 
ing the government imprint took on a new 
interest in the minds of his listeners. Atten- 
tion was called to the various helps which have 
been published in the way of indexes to these 
publications, and the hope was expressed that 
in the near future more complete work might be 
done in this field. 

The lesson in cataloging was in pursuance 
of the course of study which was adopted by 
the society two years ago, the subject of 
"Classification" having been taken up at the 
meeting of last year. Blackboard illustration 
was used to show cataloging methods in de- 
tail, and various books were provided, the 
cataloging of which served as an object lesson. 

The paper upon the "Value of a public 
library to a community" emphasized the civic 
and economic value to the community at large, 
as well as the recreative and educational one 
to the individual. Attention was called to the 
fact that libraries are always classed with 
churches, schools, and business and "industrial 
institutions as elements in the life of a com- 
munity which aid in its development and at- 
tract citizens of the most desirable class. 

One important result of the meeting of the 
society was its decision to withdraw from the 
connection which it has for two years past held 
with the teachers' association, and maintain 
an independent organization. It is the belief 
of a majority of the members that the organi- 
zation will be strengthened and have a better 
growth if the library society meets indepen- 
dently, and at some other date than that of the 
regular meeting of the teachers' association. 
The society will therefore soon become an in- 
corporated body, the following members hav- 
ing been appointed a committee to draft articles 
of incorporation: C. H. Gatch, president board 



of trustees, DCS Moines Public Library; Mrs. 
Lana H. Cope, state librarian; J. W. Rich, li- 
brarian state university, Iowa City. 

The next meeting will be held in Des Moines, 
the time to be fixed by an executive committee 
composed of the president and secretary ex- 
ojficio; Mary Cassidy, librarian Public Library, 
Winterset; Jennie Carpenter, librarian Drake 
University, Des Moines; and J. W. Rich. Mr. 
Rich has for two years served the society most 
acceptably as its president. 

Officers for the year 1897 were elected as 
follows: President, W. H. Johnston; Vice- 
president, W. P. Payne; Secretary, Ella M. 
McLoney; Treasurer, Mrs. Lana H. Cope. 

An earnest attempt is to be made to secure a 
library commission for Iowa. An extra ses- 
sion of the legislature will be held the present 
winter, but as it is called for the special pur- 
pose of revising the code it is possible that no 
other legislation will be taken up. There is 
some hope, however, that the matter of a 
library commission may receive attention. 
ELLA M. McLoNEY, Secretary. 

MAINE LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: E. W. Hall, Colby University, 
Waterville. 

Secretary : Miss H. C. Fernald, State College, 
Orono. 

Treasurer: Prof. G: T. Little, Bowdoin Col- 
lege, Brunswick. 

MA SSA CHUSE TTS LIBRA RY CL UB. 

President : Herbert Putnam, Public Library 
Boston. 

Secretary: W: H. Tillinghast, Harvard Col- 
lege Library, Cambridge. 

Treasurer: Miss A. L. Sargent, Public Li- 
brary, Medford. 

REPORT ON CONTINUING FICTION LISTS. 

THE Massachusetts Library Club accepted, 
as an organization, the invitation extended by 
the Connecticut Library Association to be pres- 
ent at the second union meeting of New Eng- 
land library associations at Hartford, Ct., on 
Feb. 3. About 35 members of the club were 
present. A business meeting was held just be- 
fore the afternoon session of the associations. 
The following report from the executive com- 
mittee was read : 

At the annual meeting in October last the 
committee on lists of select fiction presented a 
report of their year's work. The question 
whether the club should undertake to continue 
the lists was referred to the executive commit- 
tee, with full power, but under the condition 
that the expense to the club was not to exceed 
$50 annually. 

At this time it was thought that the publish- 
ing section of the A. L. A. would be able to 
undertake the publication and distribution of 
the lists, but this they subsequently found 
themselves unable to do, and recommended 
that the lists be published in some library or 
literary journal. 

The 12 numbers published last year cost 
in round numbers, and exclusive of sample 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



99 



copies of no. i, $143, of which $81 was paid 
for printing, $45 for expressage and postage 
on books, and $17 for office expenses and post- 
age on the lists. Independent publication, 
therefore, could not cost much less than $150 a 
year, while publication in a journal would cost 
$60, and perhaps more, since during the first 
year many readers bore the expense of the 
transmission of books, which, of course, could 
not be expected as a permanent arrange- 
ment. 

Either plan seemed to be beyond the re- 
sources of the club, the annual surplus from 
our income never having reached $50. Before 
coming to a decision, however, the executive 
committee wished to ascertain as accurately as 
possible the opinions of those who had re- 
ceived the lists upon their actual value as a 
guide in selecting books, and also whether it 
would be possible to continue independent pub- 
lication by means of an increased subscription 
price. Circulars were sent to all persons who 
had received the lists about 600 in number. 
The circular stated the difficulties of the situa- 
tion, and asked from each recipient a reply to 
questions printed on a detachable sheet. 

Of the 600 persons to whom the fiction lists 
had been supplied for a year, 242 returned the 
sheet of questions with more or less full re- 
plies. From these the following results ap- 
pear : 

1. 141 made considerable use of the lists in 
selecting books for purchase; 85 made little or 
no use of them in this way. 

2. 100 persons, not being members of the 
club, were willing to- pay 50 cents a year for 
the lists published separately, 77 members of 
the club were willing to pay 25 cents a year; in 
all 177 were willing to subscribe; 41 were un- 
willing to pay at all for the lists. 

3. 75 preferred publication in a journal, 94 
preferred independent publication, 30 had no 
preference, and 43 did not reply to this ques- 
tion. 

Criticism of the lists was invited in the circu- 
lar; from what was written under this head it 
appears that the great majority were well 
pleased with the form of the lists and with the 
standard of judgment shown in selecting the 
books. The larger libraries, however, found 
the lists of little value as an aid to selections, 
because books were generally on their shelves 
before the lists containing their titles reached 
the library. Yet these libraries were willing to 
support the lists because they thought them 
likely to be of use to small libraries. On the 
other hand, the very small libraries, which buy 
books but once or twice a year, found the lists 
of no use for reasons which will appear from 
one or two quotations : 

" The lists are all right for a large library, 
but we have no trouble in selecting standard 
works, as we have but little money to spend." 

" They would be useful to purchasing com- 
mittees who had plenty of funds; it is the aim 
of our committee to obtain history, biography, 
and travels, and they put into the library the 
least possible fiction." 

"As many of the books on these lists are 



just out they are more expensive than books 
which have been on the market longer. We 
have only the return from the dog tax to expend 
yearly, so we do not purchase as many of the 
books just published as we otherwise might; 
therefore the lists are not of as much use to us 
as they doubtless are to libraries in larger 
towns." 

"The books from the lists are mostly too 
high-priced for us to purchase." 

There remains a class of libraries of medi- 
um size, say from 1000 to 10,000 volumes, in 
which the lists are really of practical use in 
aiding selection; these libraries 'are by no 
means confined to Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island. Of those willing to subscribe 50 cents 
48 were from other states, including Califor- 
nia, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, 
Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, 
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, Vermont, Washington, and Wis- 
consin. 

The cost of publication on either plan would 
clearly exceed. the sum of $50 allowed by the 
club, therefore the committee voted not to con- 
tinue the preparation of the lists, and notice to 
that effect was sent to th.e publishing section, 
which, pending our discussion, had reserved 
for the use of our readers the works of fiction 
received for cataloging. 

It was well known when this enterprise was 
undertaken that the unaided resources of the 
club would not be enough to carry it on perma- 
nently. Although the support promised for 
the future is not sufficient to make up the de- 
ficiency the committee feel that the experi- 
ment has been both of interest and of use. 
The replies to the circular show clearly 
that the lists are highly valued by libraries 
in a certain stage of growth, and that this 
value is not local but national. There are also 
many indications that a better acquaintance 
with the lists would prove them of use in 
libraries where they have not yet even recogni- 
tion. It cannot be said that the experiment has 
failed, it has simply not had sufficient length 
of trial. 

The club of itself cannot continue the work 
its income under present conditions is too small 
and during the first year there were signs 
that it would be difficult to find a continuous 
supply of readers under the plan adopted. If 
it is desired to continue the experiment it 
should be the work of a larger and more pow- 
erful organization. If the A. L. A. is unable 
to undertake it, a possible means might be found 
in the co-operation of local associations. At 
the time when it was thought that the co-oper- 
ative cataloging might be transferred to New 
York a letter was written to the president of the 
New York Library Club inquiring whether in 
case of such transfer that club would undertake 
the publication of the lists for a year. In_ re- 
sponse to this inquiry a committee to consider 
the question was appointed by the club. The 
retention of the cataloging work in Boston 
naturally prevented the committee from advis- 
ing the New York club to undertake the work, 
but it extended to this club a cordial offer of 



100 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



assistance with the earnest hope that the work 
would not be discontinued. 

We recommend the appointment of a spe- 
cial committee to confer with the committee of 
the New York Library Club and to correspond 
with other library organizations, to see whethe'r 
means can be devised for continuing the work 
begun by the fiction committee of the Massa- 
chusetts Library Club, by co-operation as re- 
gards labor and expense. 

In conclusion the committee wishes to ex- 
press warm appreciation of the work done 
by the fiction list committee, with such en- 
thusiasm, energy, and painstaking carefulness. 
To the Library Bureau we are grateful, not 
only for permission to use the books whenever 
the undertaking became possible, but for other 
favors almost as essential to carrying on tho 
work. 

On motion of Mr. Stone the report was ac- 
cepted and the recommendation of the commit- 
tee was adopted. The president announced 
that the committee would be announced later. 
The meeting then adjourned to attend the ses- 
sion of the Connecticut Association. The ad- 
dresses and discussions were greatly enjoyed, 
while the supper at the United States Hotel 
and the social evening at the Wadsworth Athe- 
naeum were extremely pleasant. 

WM. H. TILLINGHAST, Secretary, 

MICHIGA N LIBRA RY A SSOCIA TION. 

President: H: M. Utley, Public Library, 
Detroit. 

Secretary : Mrs. A. F. Parsons, Public Li- 
brary, Bay City. 

Treasurer : Miss Lucy Ball, Public Library, 
Grand Rapids. 

MINNESOTA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

President: Dr. W: W. Folwell, State Univer- 
sity, Minneapolis. 

Secretary and Treasurer : Miss Gratia Coun- 
tryman, Public Library, Minneapolis. 

NEBRA SKA LIBRARY A SSOCIA TION, 

President: W. E. Jillson, Doane College, 
Crete. 

Secretary: Miss MaryL. Jones, State Univer- 
sity, Lincoln. 

Treasurer: Mrs. M. E. Abell, Public Li- 
brary, Beatrice. 

NEW HA MPSHIRE LIBRA RY A SSOCIA TION. 

President: A. H. Chase, Concord. 

Secretary: Miss Grace Blanchard, Public 
Library, Concord. 

Treasurer: Miss A. E. Pickering, Public Li- 
brary, Newington. 

THEeighth annual meeting of the New Hamp- 
shire Library Association was held in Man- 
chester at the city hall, Jan. 27. It was in 
every way successful. The morning session 
was called to order at 11:30, and was addressed 
first by Mayor Clarke, who paid a deserved 
tribute to Miss Kate E. Sanborn, city librarian, 
and said he was especially glad to welcome to 
the city an organization of the character of the 
association. 



Before the meeting proceeded to the election 
of officers, Miss Caroline H. Garland, of Dover, 
read some amendments, which were unani- 
mously adopted. Their aim was to make the 
president and other officials the active officers 
of the association, and the report of the nom- 
inating committee being next accepted the fol- 
lowing is the new executive board for 1897: 
President, A. H. Chase, Concord; Vice-presi- 
dents, Prof. M. D. Bisbee, Dartmouth College, 
and Col. Daniel Hall, Dover; Secretary, Miss 
Grace Blanchard, Concord; Treasurer, Miss 
A. E. Pickering, Newington. 

Pamphlet copies of a paper on " Co-opera- 
tion among the libraries of New Hampshire," 
written by State Librarian A. H. Chase, were 
in the possession of the members and a discus- 
sion upon the matter was introduced, the point 
most discussed being the recommendation that 
towns and cities interchange the books of their 
libraries on request. Col. Hall, of Dover, the 
first speaker, was heartily in favor of the 
proposition to loan the books of the state li- 
brary at least. These books are the property of 
the whole people of the state, and the right book 
has often been instrumental in the development 
of a great mind. Col. Hall closed by saying 
that the meetings of the association were 
priceless and of inestimable value to the New 
Hampshire public. 

The co-operative suggestion was next dis- 
cussed by Mr. J. H. Whittier, of the State 
Board of Library Commissioners, and by Mr. 
Fred.Gowing, State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

Mr. Whittier called the idea the "travelling 
library craze which our New England town 
library system will outlive." It " savored of 
paternalism," "was wrong in principle and 
with no compensating benefits." 

Mr. Gowing declared that the needs of pupils 
and teachers throughout the state could be 
supplied by the loaning of books, not only 
from the state library, which was a right, but 
from town library to town library. 

Mr. Whittier replied that this was contrary 
to the constitution; that one town could not be 
taxed for the wants of another. 

Mr. Gowing retorted that when Manchester 
was on fire Nashua would be glad to lend her 
engines and men. Everybody now concerned 
in the loan idea was on fire, or ought to be. 
He said New Hampshire was sparsely popu- 
lated, and many teachers found it impossible 
to procure much-desired books. " The greater 
the schoolma'am's disadvantage, all the more 
eager we should be to help her." Mr. Gowing 
thought the physician, the lawyer, and the 
mechanic could argue in favor of the loan idea 
from the standpoint of their professions or 
trades as he could from that of teacher. 

This live discussion was brought to a close 
amid laughter and applause by the need of 
adjournment for dinner at the hotel. Previ- 
ously, however, a committee was appointed to 
report at the next meeting of the association 
on the other points in Mr. Chase's paper which 
touch upon the winning of new members, the 
number of yearly meetings, the publication of 



February^ '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



101 



a state periodical devoted to library interests, 
the forming of a committee to reply to libra- 
rians puzzling over any question, etc. 

At 2:30, after an enjoyable repast, and with 
increased attendance, the association opened 
its afternoon session by welcoming Mr. W. I. 
Fletcher, of Amherst. Mr. Fletcher's subject, 
" Library administration for practical results 
in the community," led him to talk in a most 
charming and entertaining manner. He is not 
in favor of too much conventionality in library 
methods and would like to see, instead of the 
delivery-desk and coolness of employes, shelves 
open of access and hospitality and encourage- 
ment on the library banner. 

Mr. Gardner M. Jones, librarian at Salem, 
Mass., who was present and favored the associ- 
ation by being its next speaker, felt that free- 
dom of access was not best under all circum- 
stances, and that the new and progressive 
Philadelphia library, praised by Mr. Fletcher 
for its open arrangement, suffered a loss of 
many hundred volumes because of its ease of 
access. Mr. Jones had taken pains to think 
what special lines of books would be needed 
in New Hampshire and named works on for- 
estry, good roads, and even cooking, for its 
chief industry, which he understood was that 
of summer boarding. 

Miss Moulton, of Exeter, who was to have 
participated in the discussion upon Mr. Fletch- 
er's paper, was unavoidably absent. 

Miss Grace Blanchard, of Concord, the other 
librarian on the program, said she felt the 
pulse of the public's needs by reading sign- 
boards and newspaper locals, and by thus as- 
certaining what things residents were making 
or doing, she was enabled to call their atten- 
tion the next time they came to the library to 
the works which would be of benefit to them. 

The meeting then adjourned at 4 o'clock. 
Votes of thanks were extended to the peo- 
ple of Manchester, Mayor Clarke, and to 
the retiring president of the association, Mr. 
W. W. Bailey, of Nashua, who has been 
most interested in furthering the cause. The 
good judgment, cordiality, and managing abil- 
ity of Miss Sanborn are also deserving of 
mention as having made the day a success. 
She, with Miss Garland and Mr. Gowing.have 
made the remarkably fine executive committee 
of the past year. Every member present in 
Manchester availed herself of the opportunity 
to visit the public library and there study Miss 
Sanborn's improvements. 

At the rate at which interest and enjoyment 
in the New Hampshire Library Association 
have increased, librarians, thankful that the 
one session has grown into two, will soon be 
clamoring for a meeting to last two days. 

GRACE BLANCEIARD, Secretary. 

NEW JERSEY LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: John B. Thompson, Trenton, N. J. 

Secretary: Miss Beatrice Winser, Public Li- 
brary, Newark. 

Treasurer : Miss Emma L. Adams, Public 
Library, Plainfield. 

A JOINT meeting of the New Jersey Library 



Association and the Pennsylvania Library Club 
will be held in Atlantic City, N. J., on Monday 
April 5. Two sessions will be held, on Monday 
afternoon and evening, and return will be made 
the next day. A public library is much needed 
in Atlantic City, and it is hoped that this meet- 
ing will be effective in strengthening the local 
library sentiment. 

NEW YORK LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: A. L. Peck, Public Library, 
Gloversville. 

Secretary: W: R. Eastman, State Library, 
Albany. 

Treasurer: J. N. Wing, Chas. Scribner's 
Sons, 153 Fifth avenue, New York City. 

OHIO LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President : A. W. Whelpley, Public Library, 
Cincinnati. 

Secretary : Miss E. C. Doren, Public Library, 
Dayton, 

Treasurer : C. B. Galbreath, State Library, 
Columbus. 

PENNSYLVANIA LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Henry J. Carr, Public Library, 
Scranton. 

Secretary: Miss Mary P. Farr, Girls' Normal 
School, Philadelphia. 

Treasurer: Miss Helen G. Sheldon, Drexel 
Institute, Philadelphia. 

THE January meeting of the club was held on 
Monday, Jan. n, by invitation of Professor 
Wilson, in the rooms of the Philadelphia Mu- 
seums. The meeting was attended by 90 odd 
members and was called to order in the library 
of the museum. In the absence of Mr. Rosen- 
garten, the president, owing to illness, Mr. 
John Thomson, of the Free Library, was called 
to the chair. 

After some formal business the following 
officers for the years 1897-98 were nominated : 
President, Henry J. Carr, Scranton Public Li- 
brary ; ist Vice-president, John Thomson, Free 
Library of Philadelphia ; 2d Vice-president, 
Robert P. Bliss, Bucknell Library, Chester, 
Pa.; Secretary, Miss Mary P. Farr, librarian of 
the Girls' Normal School ; Treasurer, Miss 
Helen G. Sheldon, Drexel Institute. 

Prof. William Wilson, the director of the Mu- 
seums, then delivered a short address upon 
the proper interrelations between libraries and 
museum's. He dwelt upon the character of the 
literature which was being collected. This 
was necessarily confined to such books as 
"Consular reports," "Statistical journals," 
and writings which dealt with the production 
and development of manufactures. One result 
of the work has been a serious intention to in- 
troduce the growth of rubber into Florida. A 
representative of the museum will spend a year 
in the upper parts of the Amazon making a 
study and collection of all that is material to 
the proper cultivation and growth of rubber. 
The natives may not be very highly educated, 
but they have been sharp enough hitherto 
whenever seeds have been purchased and 



102 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



taken from the country to boil them before 
parting with them, thereby rendering them en- 
tirely unproductive. After the address he 
conducted the members round various parts of 
the museum and gave a most interesting talk 
on the system pursued, showing in this Com- 
mercial Museum the gradual use of fibrous 
matters from their existence as living plants 
through successive processes till they become 
mercantile articles. 

THE February meeting of the Pennsylvania 
Library Club was held on Thursday, Feb. 4, at 
the Wagner Free Institute of Science, and was 
attended by 70 members. The principal busi- 
ness of the evening was the election. of the fol- 
lowing officers for 1897-98: President, Henry 
J. Carr, of Scranton; Vice-presidents, John 
Thomson and Robert P. Bliss; Secretary, Miss 
Mary P. Farr; Treasurer, Miss Helen G. Shel- 
don. 

The incoming president nominated the fol- 
lowing executive committee: John Edmands, 
chairman; T: L. Montgomery, Alfred Rigling, 
G: P. Rupp, C. S. Kates, Misses Alice B. Kroe- 
ger and Jennie Y. Middleton, Mrs. Fell and 
Mrs. Resag. 

The discussion of the evening was devoted 
to the life and works of Richard Harris Bar- 
ham, of "Ingoldsby" fame. Mr. Lorin Blod- 
get read a long and carefully-prepared descrip- 
tion of the life of Barham, contrasting the 
ecclesiastical and author sides of the writer 
and graphically detailing the characteristics 
of the coterie of punsters and humorists with 
whom Barham passed the brightest part of his 
career. 

Miss Edith Ridgway next read a clever re- 
view of " Ingoldsby's" works, pointing out in 
detail the attitude shown at the beginning of 
the present century towards the legendary part 
of Christian lore. 

The general impression was that the prepa- 
ration of such papers by library assistants be- 
fore their critical peers in library work was 
excellent both for the writers of the papers and 
their companions in library life. 

Notice was given that early in April a union 
meeting between the New Jersey Library Asso- 
ciation and the Pennsylvania Library Club will 
be held in Atlantic City. The meeting prom- 
ises to be very successful, and the Atlantic City 
citizens' committee are taking up the matter 
with a view of making the visit of the libra- 
rians helpful towards the establishment of a 
free library in Atlantic City and pleasant to 
the visitors. 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: W: M. Stevenson, Carnegie Li- 
brary, Allegheny. 

Secretary-Treasurer: W: R. Watson, Carnegie 
Library, Pittsburgh. 

ON Jan. 14 the Western Pennsylvania Libra- 
ry Club met in the lecture-room of the Carnegie 
Free Library of Allegheny. The subject for 
discussion was "Library legislation." Re- 
ports on the present laws of various states had 
been prepared by different members of the 



club, and several of these were read in order 
to show the methods employed in other states 
for the advancement of library interests. A 
general discussion followed. A letter from 
Mr. John Thomson, of the Philadelphia Free 
Library, was read, outlining'the plans for legis- 
lation of the librarians in the eastern part of 
the state. The following resolutions were 
offered and adopted: 

"Whereas, The state of Pennsylvania, according to 
the last census, though second in wealth and population, 
ranks last among the 20 important northern states in the 
number of books in public libraries per 1000 inhabitants, 
Massachusetts having 12^3 [and Pennsylvania seven; and 

" Whereas, This condition of things is largely due to 
the lack of progressive library laws, in comparison with 
other important states ; 

" Resolved. That the Western Pennsylvania Library 
Club is in favor of further legislation to promote the 
establishment and maintenance of free public libraries 
throughout the state. 

" Resolved, further. That, in view of the excellent results 
obtained by means of travelling libraries in other states, 
and the evident demand for libraries of this kind through- 
out Pennsylvania, the club favors an appropriation by 
the state for this purpose." 

It was decided to appoint a committee to 
confer with librarians, library trustees, friends 
of libraries and representatives throughout the 
state, with a view to drafting a plan of general 
library legislation for Pennsylvania. 

There was a good attendance at the meeting, 
and the experiment of a morning hour, loa.m., 
proved a decided success. The subject for 
discussion at the March meeting will be " The 
library and the children." 

WM. RICHARD WATSON, Sec'y-Treas. 

VERMONT LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Miss S. C. Hagar, Fletcher Free 
Library, Burlington. 

Secretary: Miss M. L. Titcomb, Free Li- 
brary, Rutland. 

Treasurer : E. F. Holbrook, Proctor. 

WISCONSIN LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: F. A. Hutchins, Baraboo. 
Secretary and Treasurer : Miss L. E. Stearns, 
Public Library, Milwaukee. 

NORTH WISCONSIN TRAVELLING LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

President: Mrs. E. E. Vaughn, Ashland. 
Librarian and Treasurer : Miss Janet Green, 
Vaughn Library, Ashland. 



Cibrarj} (STInbs. 



CHICAGO LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Anderson H. Hopkins, John 
Crerar Library. 

Secretary: Miss May L. Bennett, 1888 Sher- 
dan Road, Evanston. 

Treasurer: W. W. Bishop, Garrett Biblical 
Institute. 

MILWAUKEE LIBRARY ROUND TABLE. 

"A little work, a little play 
To keep us going and so good-day ! " 

A MEETING of the Milwaukee Library Round 
Table was held on Jan. 23, 1897. After an in- 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



103 



formal luncheon, Miss Mae E. Schreiber made 
a talk on "Library reading at the Normal 
School," illustrated with annotated lists of 
children's books, prepared by students of the 
school. The talk elicited many inquiries into 
Miss Schreiber's methods, and proved exceed- 
ingly interesting. 

On Feb. 5 Mr. George Kilian, in charge of 
the bookbindery at the library, explained his 
method of binding books. 

NEW YORK LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Miss M. W. Plummer, Pratt In- 
stitute Library, Brooklyn. 

Secretary: Miss J. A. Rathbone, Pratt In- 
stitute Library, Brooklyn. 

Treasurer: Miss Elizabeth Tuttle, Long 
Island Historical Society, Brooklyn. 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 
CITY. 

President: W. P. Cutter, U. S. Dept. of 
Agriculture. 

Secretary and Treasurer: F. H. Parsons, U. 
S. Naval Observatory. 

THE 20th regular meeting of the Library 
Association of Washington City was held at the 
Columbian University, Wednesday evening, 
Jan. 27, 1897, Mr. W. P. Cutter presiding. 

Miss Frances M. Durkin and Mr. James W. 
Cheney, both of the War Department Library, 
were elected to membership. The president 
announced that the following had been ap- 
pointed as the committee to prepare a hand- 
book of the association : Mr. F. H. Parsons, 
Miss Edith E. Clarke, and Mr. Henderson 
Presnell; and as program committee Dr. H. 
C. Bolton and Dr. Cyrus Adler. 

The first paper of the evening was presented 
by Mr. W. P. Cutter, and treated of "Printed 
card indexes and catalogs." He said that the 
printed card is coming into use for two pur- 
poses : for a catalog of books, either co-opera- 
tive or independent; and for an index to the 
current literature on a given topic. The Bos- 
ton Public, Harvard, and Crerar are examples 
of libraries that print catalog cards for their 
own use. The co-operative cataloging system of 
the Library Bureau, now transferred to the pub- 
lishing section of the A. L. A., was described. 
Expressing the opinion that this plan had not 
yet proved a financial success, Mr. Cutter sug- 
gested as a practical plan of co-operative cata- 
loging that the central office should obtain of 
publishers a limited and varying number of 
copies of books in the sheets, bind them in a 
standard and durable binding, catalog them, 
and furnish the printed cards with the books. 
Specimens of the Library Bureau and Crerar 
cards were handed around for inspection. 

The demand from investigators for indexes 
to the present as well as the past literature of 
their specialties has led to the publication of 
card indexes. Specimens of three such indexes 
were shown. First, the index to the publica- 
tions of agricultural experiment stations in the 
United States, issued by the Office of Experi- 
ment Stations in the Department of Agriculture. 
These cards contain, beside the index entry 



proper, a summary of the article indexed. 
Second, an index to the literature of American 
botany, issued by the Cambridge Botanical 
Supply Company. This is rather a card bibli- 
ography of American botany than an index. 
Third, an index to new species of plants, pre- 
pared by Miss J. A. Clark, of Washington. 
This serves as a card supplement to the Index 
Kewensis, which covers the field down to 1885. 
The card index to the literature of zoology, 
furnished by an international zoological-bibli- 
ographical institute in Zurich, was also de- 
scribed, and the schemes of the Royal Society 
and the International Bibliographical Institute 
at Brussels for an index to all branches of 
science were alluded to. 

The chief objections to all printed card in- 
dexes or catalogs are the cost of preparation, 
the amount of space they occupy, the danger 
of misplacing the cards, and the time required 
for arranging them. The card system, Mr. 
Cutter .concluded, while not without its draw- 
backs, must be replaced by something better 
before we can disparage it. 

The second paper was prepared by Mr. 
Albert F. Adams, of the National Museum, 
and was read by Miss Margaret Dyer. It was 
a description of a new system of notation, 
known as the "Combining system," devised 
by Mr. Adams. It is hoped that this paper 
will appear in full in the JOURNAL. 

W: S. BURNS, Secretary pro tern. 



Cibrarg (Economy anb ^i 



"GENERAL. 
BARRETT, Francis Thornton. On the selection 

of books for a reference library. Lond., J. 

Bale & Sons, 1896. 10 p. O. 

A paper read at the Buxton conference of 
the L. A. U. K., September, 1896. 

CHADWiCK.Ja. R. Medical libraries: their 
development and use. (In Transactions of 
the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of 
Maryland, 1895-96.) p. 131-141. 
Dr. Chad wick's paper was read at the formal 
opening of the new hall and library of the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, last January, 
and is an interesting account of the growth of 
medical libraries in the United States. A chart 
is given, showing the annual growth of the 
seven principal collections of medical books in 
this country. Dr. Chad wick has been the li- 
brarian of the Boston Medical Library Associa- 
tion for the last 20 years. 

LOCAL. 

Aurora, III. The Woman's Club of Aurora 
(111.) devoted the afternoon of Feb. 2 to the 
subject "The Aurora Public Library." The 
history of the library was presented by Mr. 
Shaw, the librarian, followed by addresses from 
Miss Katherine L. Sharp. Chicago, 111., Miss 
Frances Le Baron, Elgin. 111., and Miss L. E. 
Stearns, of Milwaukee, Wis., on the various 
relations of the library to the community. 



104 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\Fcbruary> '97 



Boston P. L. On Jan. 17 Carl B. Christen- 
son, who said he was a professor in Waterloo 
College, Waterloo, la., was arrested for steal- 
ing books from the public library. There were 
found at his rooms 63 books taken from the 
Boston Public Library, and a number bearing 
the stamp of the Hartford Public Library. The 
arrest was due to information given the police 
by a second-hand bookseller to whom Christen- 
son had offered some of the stolen volumes. 
The defence at first entered was kleptomania, 
but the prisoner pleaded guilty, and on Jan. 
19 was sentenced to three months in the house 
of correction. 

Braddock, Pa. Carnegie F. L. (Rpt., 1896.) 
Added 1059; total 12,343. Issued, home use 
53*065 (fict. 76 %); no exact statistics of ref. use 
are kept. Amount spent for salaries, incl. 
janitor help, $3960. 

The circulation shows a gain of 1113 v. dur- 
ing the year, and a decrease in fiction reading 
from 78 % to 76 %. There has been a gain in 
the issue of books in all classes except fiction 
and natural science, in which latter division 
there has been a loss of 100 v. 

A re-registration of borrowers was con- 
ducted during the year; 8000 persons had re- 
ceived cards since the library was opened in 
1889. There are now 2255 borrowers on the 
register, of whom 646 are residents of outlying 
towns. 

More than one-half the books in the library 
are works of fiction, a proportion that Miss 
Sperry thinks unusually large. She recom- 
mends that the collection be more symmetri- 
cally developed, and that a book fund be estab- 
lished, to be available between the months of 
October and May. " After the holidays there 
are many good opportunities to buy good 
books at auction sales, and it is desirable that 
the librarian should know how much money 
there is to depend on." 

The most important work of the year has 
been the changing of the classed card catalog 
into dictionary form; at present it is impossi- 
ble to undertake a printed catalog, on account 
of its expense. The printing of the library re- 
port, which has not yet been done, is con- 
sidered of more importance. 

" In January an index to events of local 
importance mentioned in the newspapers was 
begun, and has been continued through the 
year. This is largely a labor of love, for the 
benefit of posterity. Years hence, when the 
history of Braddock comes to be written, the 
carefully-preserved files of daily papers, with 
a continuous index to their contents, will be a 
treasure which the historian will appreciate. 
It is probable that the newspapers will co- 
operate with us in the work by printing the in- 
dex for each year." 

The children's room has been made more at- 
tractive, and is constantly used. The addition 
of some quietgames is suggested, as is also the 
plan of teaching the children to cut pictures for 
scrap-books, but lack of sufficient supervision 
makes this impossible at present. 

The library has a collection of about 600 pict- 



ures, mostly illustrations from magazines 
mounted on tag-board, also colored "art sup- 
plements," studies for china painting, em- 
broidery, etc. These were exhibited for a 
week in November, and aroused so much in- 
terest that an art loan exhibition has been 
prepared for February. 

A weekly column of library notes has been 
started in one of the local papers, and copies 
are mailed from time to time to people who it 
is thought will be specially interested. 

Miss Sperry says: " Much of the success of 
the work depends on the intelligence and en- 
thusiasm of the attendants at the loan-desk. 
To increase their interest and to promote good- 
fellowship between us a weekly meeting is ar- 
ranged in the libraiian's office on Tuesday 
afternoons. At such times matters of practical 
interest are talked over and systematic in- 
struction is given in the use of reference- 
books, card catalog, and other library tools. 
Special books are assigned for examination 
during the week and are reported on at the 
next meeting. A manifest interest has been 
aroused, and amply justifies the time spent by 
librarians and assistants in this branch of 
work." 

Bridgeport (Cf.) P. L. The third annual art 
loan exhibition was opened in the art depart- 
ment of the library on Jan. 4. It included 
about 127 pictures oil paintings and pastels 
of which about 75 % were shown at the last 
spring exhibition at the N. Y. Academy of 
Design, and most of the others had been dis- 
played at the Boston Academy of Fine Arts. 
It will be succeeded by a water-color exhibi- 
tion. 

Buffalo (N. Y.) L. On Jan. 19 the board of 
aldermen adopted a resolution providing for 
the introduction into the legislature of an en- 
abling act under which the city may contract 
with the library authorities for the administra- 
tion of the library as a free public institution 
supported by city appropriation. Immediately 
on the passage of the resolution it was signed 
bv the mayor. The bill was promptly sent to 
Albany, and on Jan. 27 was reported from the 
cities committee. Its passage is practically 
assured. 

Carpentersville (///.) P. L. The library build- 
ing given to the village by Mrs. G: P. Lord, of 
Elgin, 111., was opened on Jan. 2. It is deeded 
to the Carpentersville Congregational church, 
subject to a 99 years lease, hrld by the library 
board. The building is of brick, with stone 
trimmings, and contains lecture-room as well 
as reading-room, reference-room, stack-room, 
etc. 

Cedar Rapids (la.) F. P. L. The library was 
opened to the public on Jan. 14, and the statis- 
tics of use for its first week of existence are 
most encouraging. They show a registration 
of 528 borrowers, to whom 566 v. were issued 
for home use, while there were 1012 visitors to 
the reading-room. This is a most gratifying 
exhibit of the place the library has at once 
taken in the life of the community. 



February, '97] 



Chattanooga (Tenn.) L. A. (Rpt.) Added 
430; total 5015; issued 12,000; membership 
332. Receipts $1060.52; expenses 1974.72. 

Chicago, library specialization in. The direc- 
tors of the Public Library, the Newberry Li- 
brary, and the John Crerar Library some 
months since held several conferences on the 
inadvisability of duplicating their collections, 
and agreed on the following classification for 
each library: 

"Public Library. All wholesomely enter- 
taining and generally instructive books, espe- 
cially such as are desired by the citizens for 
general home use. Also collections of news- 
papers, patents, government documents, books 
for the blind, and in architecture and the deco- 
rative arts. 

" Newberry Library. Literature, language, 
history, sociology, philosophy, religion, fine 
arts in part, medicine. 

" The John Crerar Library. Physical and 
natural sciences, useful arts, fine arts in part, 
social sciences and their applications." 

Social science will be included within the 
field of both the Newberry and John Creiar li- 
braries, as the demand for this literature is so 
great that no considerable amount of duplica- 
tion is considered unnecessary. The Crerar Li- 
brary will be strictly scientific, and yet suffi- 
ciently broad in its classification of the sciences. 
Medicine will be omitted only on account of the 
value of the collection already made by" the 
Newberry Library. A number of scientific 
works belonging to the Newberry Library 
already have been purchased and transferred 
to the John Crerar Library. The division of 
classification now being rapidly consummated 
will increase greatly the specialized scope of 
Chicago's three great libraries. It has been 
proposed to publish one large catalog which 
will cover the books of the three institutions. 

Chicago, John Crerar L. The date of open- 
ing of the library has been extended from Feb. 
I to April I. 

Chicago, Newberry L. The bibliographical 
museum of the Newberry Library was opened 
to the public on Monday, Jan. 4. The room 
used for the purpose is on the first floor, west of 
the main entrance ; it is well lighted and fitted 
with several upright wall bookcases and with 
central museum cases, in which the rarer bind- 
ings and mss. are displayed. The complete 
collection numbers about 1500 v. , though only 
a part of that number are yet displayed. 
Amongtheexamplesshown are 53 v. of incunab- 
ula, 51 illuminated mss., 53 v. containing rare 
specimens of early engraving, and in note- 
worthy bindings. The museum is open from 
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on week-days. 

Cleveland (0.) P. L. A number of black- 
boards have recently been placed in the library, 
on which timely bulletins are presented. In 
the juvenile department a recent inscription 
was: "Boys, do you want war stories? The 
following are now in;" then followed a list of 
the books available; another board contained 
this inscription: "Artistic book-making: see 



our open racks"; and the announcement was 
made good by the display of an interesting c< 1- 
lection of fine bindings and rich editions. An 
open rack filled with books was marked: " Old 
friends in new dresses," and another: "A 
choice collection of good books, German and 
English." A collection of books and peri- 
odicals relating to horses was a recent popular 
exhibit. 

Cleveland, O. Case L. A recent exhibition at 
the Case Library consisted of a collection of 
books and plates intended to illustrate furni- 
ture and interior decoration. It showed ex- 
amples of furniture from various periods and 
countries, and was particularly rich in speci- 
mens of colonial furniture; including also re- 
productions of frescoes, tapestries, etc. An 
exhibition of amateur photography was opened 
on Feb. I. 

Colorado, lib. legislation in. On Jan. 15 Sen- 
ator Crosby introduced into the state senate a 
bill creating a board of state library commis- 
sioners, to be appointed by the governor and 
to have supervision of all free public libraries 
in the state. This bill was prepared by the 
officers of the Colorado Library Association 
and has the hearty support oi that body. 

Denver (Colo.) P. L. The library recently 
issued an invitation to the public, as follows : 
"Are you interested in what celebrated men 
and women have accomplished, what they 
looked like, where and how they lived? Call 
and take your choice from the collection of bi- 
ographies which the public library offers this 
week." 

Detroit (Mich.) P. L. In his annual message 
the mayor recommends the establishment of 
two branch libraries as necessary if the library 
is to remain in its present location. He adds: 
"In my opinion too much money is spent by 
the present board of library commissioners for 
scientific and technical works, which are sel- 
dom called for, and not enough is used for the 
kind of books sought for by the average tax- 
payer." 

Erie (Pa.) P. L. On Jan. 14 the contract for 
the construction of the new library building 
was awarded to Henry Shenk for $100,397. 

Forestfort (N. Y.) P. L. The new library 
building was dedicated on Jan. 30 under the 
auspices of the local Literary and Social Union, 
through whose efforts it was established. The 
building, which cost $1300, is two-storied, con- 
taining on the first floor a library-room 20 x 30 
feet and lighted on three sides, with kitchen and 
sitting-room for the use of the caretaker and his 
family; the upper story contains a large room 
not yet in use, and bedrooms for the caretaker. 
The library will be open daily from 9 a.m. to 
9 p.m. ; as yet it is used only as a reading-room, 
but efforts are being made to obtain sufficient 
books to make it a circulating library as well. 
The site for the library was given to the asso- 
ciation by the heirs of the Blake estate in For- 
estport; the money for its establishment was 
raised by subscription, and many of the fittings 
were given by local dealers. 



io6 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



franklin and Alarshall College, Lancaster, Pa. 
The building committee of the college de- 
cided on Jan. 13 upon a site and plans for a new 
library building, to cost $25,000. the gift of 
Gen. J. Watts De Peyster, of Tivoli, N. Y. The 
building will be located in the lower end of the 

campus, and will have room for 75,000 v. 

/ 

Galena (III.) P. L. (2d rpt.) Added 751; to- 
tal 3389. Issued, home use 25,327(fict. 22,547); 
visitors to reading-room 32,569. .New registra- 
tion 186; total cardholders 1387. 

Grand Kupids (Mich.) P. L. The civil ser- 
vice system has been introduced into the ad- 
ministration of the library, and after Feb. I all 
appointments will be made only after a com- 
petitive examination of applicants. 

Green Bay, Wis. Kellogg P. L. (Rpt.) Add- 
ed 546; total 4993. Issued 40,558; visitors to 
reading-room 6441. 

The library was open 303 days, and the cir- 
culation shows an increase of 14,474 over the 
previous year. . 

Greenville, Mich. The libraries of the high 
school and the Ladies' Club have been consoli- 
dated into a public library. 

Hartford, Ct. Watkinson L. (33d rpt.) 1 Add- 
ed 1013 v., 266 pm. ; total 48,884. 

The year's additions included a number of 
rare and valuable accessions to the departments 
of history and architecture. " The collection 
of pamphlets made by Noah Webster were re- 
ceived from the Hartford Public Library as be- 
ing more suitable to this library; volumes of 
Macmillan's Magazine, Educational Review, and 
the London Spectator were given in return, as 
the public library takes these journals and 
needed them to fill its sets." 

The following sets were indexed during the 
year: EnglischeStudien, Anglia, and Die Graph- 
ische Kuenste. " This brings to notice a great 
number of scientific articles filled with the latest 
knowledge, and they have been carried into the 
card catalog. The library duplicates which had 
been accumulating for many years were sent 
to Boston and sold in May. About 714 v. and 
348 ptn. were disposed of by auction for $543. 
Certain books from the Brinley gift were in- 
cluded, and it is interesting to note that nearly 
every one brought a higher price than when 
sold with that library." 

Helena (Mont.) P. L. Mr. Patton, the libra- 
rian, is bringing the library effectively before 
the public through the medium of the local 
press. He has published several interesting 
reading lists in the Helena Independent, among 
the recent ones being good lists on Woman suf- 
frage, ^r<?and con, and Electoral reform. 

Huntington (L. I.) L. A. (22d rpt.) Added 
64; total 3933. Issued 3204. Receipts $352. 41; 
expenses $338.29. 

Hutchinson (Kan.) P. L. The library was 
opened to the public on the afternoon of Jan. 
16. It is open two afternoons and evenings of 
each week. 



Illinois, lib. legislation in. On Jan. 19 Rep- 
resentative Bryant introduced into the state 
legislature a bill amending the library law so 
as to enable townships or cities of not less than 
5000 inhabitants to organize libraries in the 
same manner as is now prescribed for cities of 
larger population. 

Indiana, lib. legislation in. A bill has been 
introduced into the state legislature by Senator 
McCord providing for "a state library system 
in connection with the schools of the state." 
Control of the state library and the state library 
system is vested in the state board of education, 
which shall also act as a state library board. 
The state "system" shall comprise the state 
library and all local libraries supported wholly 
or in part by taxation, and the management of 
the various libraries shall be vested in the local 
school boards, with general supervision and 
inspection by the state board. The bill pro- 
vides at length for the appointment of a state 
librarian and assistants by the library board, 
the former to serve for a term of two years or 
until a successor is appointed ; it outlines work 
to be done by the state library force to aid 
teachers in the use of books, through reading 
circles, etc., and provides for the loaning of 
books from the state library. The bill, as may 
be seen, gives a very wide extension of power 
to school authorities ; it practically gives the 
state librarian authority over all libraries, and 
it is a curious example of what library legisla- 
tion should not be. It has been opposed by 
the state library association and it is to be 
hoped that this opposition will be effective. 

Iowa City (la.) P. L. The library was opened 
on the evening of Jan. 20, when a large audi- 
ence attended the dedicatory exercises. It starts 
work with 1300 v. 

Kansas City (Kan.) P. L. A. Added 208 ; 
total 1450. Issued 3146; membership 172. 

Kansas State L., Topeka. (Biennial rpt. 
two years ending June 30, 1896.) Added 2761; 
total 37,577. _ 

The librarian briefly reviews the library laws 
of the several states where travelling libraries 
or state commissions are established, and urges 
the adoption of similar legislation in Kansas. 
Most of the report is devoted to opposing the 
suggested transference of the miscellaneous 
collection of the state library to the care and 
control of the State Historical Association, 
thus making the library distinctly a law library 
and largely extending the province of the asso- 
ciation. "This attempt to divide the state li- 
brary, and despoil it of one of its principal 
features, has been made with biennial regu- 
larity for a decade of years, but each time has 
failed to meet with the approval of the legis- 
lature. If any plan of consolidation is seri- 
ously contemplated it is only fair to suggest the 
feasibility and propriety of removing the mis- 
cellaneous books of the historical library to the 
state library, leaving the historical department 
in full control of the books, manuscripts, 
papers, and other collections pertaining to the 
history of Kansas and that part of the country 






February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



107 



with which the state is directly connected by 
boundary tradition." 

Kenosha ( IVis.) P. L. A, The first annual re- 
port of the association, presented at a meeting 
held Jan. u, is an interesting review of the 
work accomplished since the first meeting to 
consider the establishment of the library was 
held in January, 1896. The association started 
work with 144 members, each contributing $2 
yearly. With the $288 thus secured a library- 
room was obtained at a nominal rent, contribu- 
tions of furniture, books, and periodicals were 
asked and received in considerable numbers, 
and a gift of $1000 was made to the association 
by G. T. Yule. This was followed by the gift 
of a like sum from Edward Bain, and on March 
14, 1896, the library was opened to the public. 
On the first day 60 books were issued. The li- 
brary now contains 2954 v., and during the 10 
months covered by the report 916 borrowers 
have drawn 14,801 books. The president of 
the association recommends that the present 
plan be tried for the new year, as the time is 
not yet ripe to obtain support by taxation. He 
asks for subscriptions from citizens for the 
support of the library, for new members, and 
for gifts of books and magazines. Children's 
books are especially needed. The thanks of 
the association are tendered to Miss L. E. 
Stearns, of the state library commission, " for 
the many valuable suggestions which she made 
to the management in the preliminary work of 
establishing the library." 

Minneapolis (Minn.) P. L. (7th rpt. year 
ending Dec. 31, '96.) Added 11,034 ; besides 
book purchases $3429.42 have been spent for 
periodicals. Total, ' ' in round numbers," 93,000 
v., of which 20,000 are duplicates. Issued, 
home use 559,053, an increase of 24$ over 1895, 
being "the largest increase in a single year 
which has ever taken place." Library and ref- 
erence use is estimated at 1,000,000, and this is 
said to be a conservative figure. The issue sta- 
tistics show that 48 % of the circulation was from 
the central library, 52 % from branches and sta- 
tions, and 20,877 v. were circulated through the 
public schools. During the year 11,095 borrow- 
ers' cards and 590 shelf permits have been is- 
sued. 

The salary expenses for the staff of 46 per- 
sons amounted to $22,743, as against $22,949 for 
45 persons in 1895. "During six months of 
the year a portion of the staff suffered a heavy 
reduction of wages. The deprivation was borne 
in every case cheerfully, each employe recog- 
nizing that the city was in a strait and crediting 
the board with the best intentions." "Each 
member of the force takes her turn at the refer- 
ence and issuing departments; it often happens 
that these rooms are overflowing, at which time 
every cataloger is needed to take care of the 
crowd. The increase in circulation and the 
added service entailed have seriously inter- 
fered with the progress of cataloging, and it 
has been found impossible to make time for the 
needed inventory of the library." 

During the year the collection of antique 
casts made, at a cost of $10,500, for the Minne- 



apolis Exposition was presented to the library; 
it has been placed in the vestibule and galleries 
of the building, and in it "the board can feel 
that it possesses a treasure in this kind such as 
few cities in America can parallel." 

Dr. Hosmer speaks interestingly on the sub- 
ject of novel-reading, and quotes Andrew Carne- 
gie's praise of "Beside the bonnie briar-bush." 
That book was issued 1006 times during the 
year, a circulation exceeding that of any other 
volume. In order to lead people's minds more 
directly from fiction to other reading he has 
during the year delivered several addresses on 
the library and its use to the pupils of the vari- 
ous schools, and has spoken to teachers on 
German mediaeval poetry. He now plans a 
series of art talks to the pupils of the four high 
schools and six free public historical lectures to 
be delivered in the chapel of the university, as 
the library has no lecture-hall, 

Minnesota, lib. commission for. On Jan. 18 a 
bill was introduced into the state legislature by 
Representative Staples, providing for the estab- 
lishment of a system of travelling libraries 
supported by the state and managed by a state 
library commission. The commission is to con- 
sist of three members appointed by the gover- 
nor, with the president of the state university 
and the state superintendent of public instruc- 
tion as ex-officio members. The commissioners 
are to be allowed travelling expenses, but no 
salaries. The bill appropriates $5000 for 1897, 
and $3000 annually thereafter. 

Nebraska, lib. commission for. On Jan. 18 
Representative Wimberley introduced into the 
state legislature a bill to create a public library 
commission that shall establish and have charge 
of free travelling libraries to be operated 
throughout the state. 

New Haven ( Ct.) F. P. L. (Rpt. year end- 
ing Sept. 30, '96.) Added 4739; total 33,081. 
Issued, home use 243,219 (fict. 51.4 %, juv. fict. 
19.5 #). New registration 6810; total registra- 
tion 12,863. " This year for the first time a 
separate account was kept of the circulation of 
juvenile non-fiction; 16,000 volumes were cir- 
culated, a little over one-fourth of the total 
circulation of non-fiction. There is a slight in- 
crease in the percentage of adult fiction and a 
slight decrease in that of juvenile fiction." 

Mr. Stetson says: "Over a year's experi- 
ence in admitting the public to the shelves, in 
fact expecting patrons to select bocks from the 
shelves, although books are brought by the at- 
tendants when it is so requested, is sufficient 
to show that the public is much pleased, and 
disadvantages to the library are much less than 
was feared in some respects. The fear that 
much more room would be needed is unfounded, 
except as regards fiction. The loss of books 
has not been as large as might have been 
looked for. No larger force Js necessary, on 
account of the labor required to keep books in 
order; what is gained in not having lists to 
look up can be spent in attending to the shelves. 
In my judgment the plan is a success, and so 
long as present conditions continue I think it 
should be continued in operation." 



io8 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



New YorkF. C. L. (i;th rpt.) Added 13,688; 
total 93,681. Issued, home use 752,329 (fict. 
308,062, juv. 223,767); hall use 24,395. New 
cardholders 13860, total registration 8^523. 
Expenses $47,255.21. These statistics cover the 
six branches that make up the library's " plant." 

Mr. Bostwick says: "During the year just 
passed the library has circulated, in round 
numbers, three-quarters of a million volumes, 
at a cost of little more than six cents a volume." 
The circulation, an increase of 97,878 over the 
previous year, is the largest in the history of 
the library; part of it is due to the establish- 
ment of a new branch at Bloomingdale (the 
sixth), but a chief factor in the increase has 
been found in "the present plan of putting 
current literature on the shelves as soon as 
published." "It has been found that many read- 
ers have been attracted by this, and that they 
will even ask to be transferred from one branch 
to another, where they fancy the new books 
are to be obtained a little earlier." 

Mr. Bostwick recommends that a trial of the 
open-shelf system be made at one of the 
branches, preferably the Bloomingdale branch, 
also that the two-book system, now in opera- 
tion at one branch, be extended to all the 
libraries. 

The committee on ways and means recites 
the efforts that have been made to obtain added 
support for the library efforts that have not 
proved very successful, despite the large public 
meeting held in behalf of the library in the 
spring. The library now ranks fourth in the 
United States in point of circulation, the Phila- 
delphia Free Library taking third place. 

N. V. P. L. Astor, Lenox, and Tilden 
foundations. The library has issued the first 
(January) number of a monthly Bulletin, in 
wh ; ch much interesting information concerning 
work accomplished and contemplated is made 
public. The bulletin (40 p. O.) opens with an 
"introductory statement" giving an historical 
outline of the founding of the library and of 
the origin of its three constituent corporations. 
The address presented by the trustees to the 
mayor in March, 1896, outlining the needs and 
proposed scope of the library follows, and the 
report of the director for 1896 cover the re- 
maining 14 pages. 

In the introductory statement the matter of 
a site is given consideration, and the present 
status is stated. It is, briefly, that the reser- 
voir site on Fifth avenue, between 4Oth and 42d 
streets, has been selected by the trustees for the 
purpose; the selection was approved by the 
mayor, but the power to contract with the 
library authorities for the use of the site being 
vested in the Department of Public Parks, it 
was necessary to obtain a resolution from the 
board of aldermen placing the site under the 
control of that department before further ne- 
gotiations could be carried on. This resolution 
was passed by the aldermen on Dec. 22, 1896, 
and signed by the mayor two days later; it 
contained the proviso that the reservoir should 
not be removed until the water-raains now in 
process of construction on Fifth avenue should 



be completed to 38th street, when its usefulness 
would be wholly at an end. " It still remains 
for the trustees to secure from the board of 
estimate and apportionment the proper author- 
ity for the removal of the reservoir, and then 
to enter into negotiations with the Department 
of Public Parks for a contract allowing the use 
of the reservoir site for the establishment of 
a library building." 

Dr. Billings's report is a careful and detailed 
statement of the work accomplished at the 
libraries in 1896. Much progress has been 
made and is now making in the cataloging, 
work that had fallen much behind and was in a 
very unsatisfactory condition when the director 
took charge. On Dec. 31, 1896, the total num- 
ber of volumes in the Astor building was 
283,207; in the Lenox building, 109,577, making 
a total of 392,784. Of pamphlets there are in 
the Astor about 30,000, in the Lenox 39,159, 
making a total of 69,159. The number of 
duplicates is roughly estimated at 15,000. 

In both Astor and Lenox the subject of clas- 
sification and shelf-location will receive special 
attention this year. At present the fixed loca- 
tion is used in both libraries, and the scheme of 
classification is unsatisfactory. A subject cata- 
log for the Astor is being made. At the begin- 
ning of 1896 the Lenox had one cataloger, the 
Astor two, "a force quite unable to deal with 
ordinary current accessions." There are now 
16 catalogers empl >yed, seven at the Lenox, 
cataloging the collection of local histories of 
counties and towns, and the remaining nine 
on duty in the Astor building. "There are 
now on hand at the Astor building about 
25,000 books and pamphlets uncataloged, and 
at least 150,000 books and pamphlets which 
should be recataloged and classified in accord- 
ance with modern ideas. At the Lenox there 
are over 100,000 books and pamphlets wait- 
ing to be cataloged on a satisfactory plan. The 
usual form of accession-book is now being 
kept, but there are no accession-books for the 
volumes obtained prior to 1876." 

Much shelving was added to the libraries 
in 1896, amounting to 5332 lineal feet in the 
Lenox and 4700 in the Astor building. A large 
part of the lower floor of the Astor Library, 
hitherto unemployed, has also been brought 
into use. The total number of current periodi- 
cals- regularly received at the Astor Library 
last year was 1074, and 350 additions were or- 
dered to begin with 1897. The number of 
readers in the Astor increased from 85,182 in 
1895 to 96,260 in 1896, and the number of vol- 
umes consulted increased from 225,477 in J 895 
to 236,513 in 1896. In the Lenox the number of 
readers increased from 9149 in 1895 to 13,228 in 
1896, and the number of volumes used in- 
creased from 35,217 in 1895 to 55,692 in 1896. 
The greatest relative increase is in the depart- 
ment of American history, in which 10,711 vol- 
umeswere called for in 1895 and 27,727 in 1896. 
The most notable addition of the year was the 
fine Emmett collection covering American revo- 
lutionary history. The list of accessions in- 
cludes many notable features, one of special 
interest being the agreement made with the 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



109 



American Bible Society, by which its valuable 
collection of Bibles, and books relating thereto, 
are to be deposited in the Lenox building and 
made available for the use of the public. 

Oakland (Cal.) F. P. L. It has been decided 
to issue a monthly bulletin of accessions, spe- 
cial lists, etc., for free distribution. 

Ohio State L., Columbus. Under the recent 
rules established for the governing of the li- 
brary, books may be drawn for home use by 
any citizen of the state, under very broad 
regulations, the board of library commissioners 
determining what books may and may not be 
circulated. State officers may draw books by 
giving a receipt for them, and citizens desiring 
the same privilege may obtain it on furnishing 
a satisfactory guarantee or by applying through 
the public library in their city. Books may be 
kept for two weeks and renewed for a like 
period, and all expenses connected with their 
issue are borne by the borrower. The library 
has started a travelling library system, by 
forming collections of 25 books which are sent 
to any person or persons applying for them, to 
be kept for one month, or for a longer period if 
desired. The only condition of their use is 
that express charges shall be paid by the bor- 
rower. 

Oregon, lib. legislation in. A bill authorizing 
the establishment of free public libraries in in- 
corporated cities and school districts has been 
prepared for introduction into the state legisla- 
ture. It provides that the municipal authori- 
ties of any incorporated city or the school 
directors of any school district not within the 
limits of an incorporated city shall be autho- 
rized to submit to voters at regular municipal 
elections the question whether or not a tax 
shall be levied or collected, not to exceed 
one mill on the dollar, for the purpose of 
establishing and maintaining in such city 
or district free public libraries and reading- 
rooms, or purchasing books, purchasing or 
leasing buildings for library purposes, etc. 
" If a majority of the votes cast on such 
proposed tax shall be in favor thereof, the 
municipal authorities, or board of directors, 
shall be thereby authorized to levy and collect 
such tax, and expend the same as hereinafter 
provided. Whenever 10 per cent, of the legal 
voters of any city or school district shall peti- 
tion for a tax for library and reading-room pur- 
poses, the municipal authorities, or board of 
directors, must submit the question to the 
legal voters, at the nrxt election.". All m ney 
collected under the law shall be known as a 
" library fund " and used only for the purposes 
authorized. After the adoption of the act in a 
city of less than 20,000 inhabitants five library 
trustees shall be elected, at the same time and 
for similar terms as the other town officers; in 
a school district the school directors shall act 
as library trustees. In a city of more than 
20,000 inhabitants one citizen from each ward 
shall be elected to constitute a board of trus- 
tees, and at each succeeding election a similar 
body shall be elected in the same way. 



Pawtuckct (R. /.) F. P. L. The library was 
reopened on Jan. 22, after having been closed 
for three weeks for a thorough cleaning and 
renovation. Besides installing additional elec- 
tric lights and freshening the interior fittings, 
many of the books have been re-covered and 
some classes have been rearranged on the 
shelves. This is the first time the library has 
received so thorough a renovation. 

Pennsylvania, lib. legislation in. A bill is to 
be introduced into the present state legislature 
asking for the appropriation of $20,000 for the 
establishment of a travelling library system. 
The Pennsylvania Library Club and the West- 
ern Pennsylvania Library Club have been chief- 
ly instrumental in drafting the bill, and will 
urge its passage. 

Pennsylvania State L., Harrisburg. (Rpt. 
year ending Nov. 30, '95.) The additions 
for the year were 4882 v., and the total v. in 
the library is estimated at 122,004. In speak- 
ing of the new library building the librarian 
says "that it is better lighted and has more 
conveniences for study and reference than 
any similar building in the Union." He re- 
grets that "the legislature in its wisdom did 
not see proper to provide for the printing of 
the dictionary catalog which is being made." 

" A catalog, to be available in a reference li- 
brary, must be printed; and it was my earnest 
wish that such a catalog would be issued by 
the state, which would be a credit thereto. 
Apart from this consideration, I may truly ob- 
serve, that the safety really of a large library 
depends upon an accurate and truthful record 
of the volumes contained therein. The last 
catalog was made in 1873 and reprinted in 
1877, and is useless for any reference whatever. 
Many of the books then in the library are not 
to be found, while the whole number was not 
one-third now comprising the library of the 
commonwealth." 

The importance of a good public library act 
is urged, and for the furtherance of this object 
it is suggested that "the subject of a proper 
bill for enactment by the next legislature be 
referred to the attorney-general, superintendent 
of public instruction, and the state librarian." 
As in former reports, most of the space is 
taken up by the yearly list of additions to the 
library. 

The recent fire in the capitol building happily 
did not reach the quarters of the library, which 
escaped wholly untouched. Among the de- 
partments destroyed, however, was the senate 
library, which contains a fine collection of rare 
old laws and documents, some of which were 
not duplicated in the state library, and the loss 
of which cannot be replaced. 

Philadelphia F. L. The usual anniversary 
day celebration held at the library was this 
year fittingly observed on Franklin's birthday, 
Jan. 16. The annual dinner of the trustees was 
held at the University Club, and was followed 
by a public reception at the library, when 
Melvil Dewey spoke on library progress, and 
brief addresses were made by Mayor Warwick, 
Dr. Pepper, and others, 



no 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



Princeton, III. Watson P. Z. The library 
was reopened for the circulation of books on 
Dec. 8. 1896. Great satisfaction has been ex- 
pressed by the public in the decided improve- 
ments made. The library-room, which was 
small and often crowded to its fullest capacity, 
has been enlarged to twice its former size and 
new standard shelving added. One end of the 
room has been devoted to reference-work, and 
the table and books have been speedily put into 
use. The library has been reclass'fied by the 
Dewey decimal system, and a card shelf-list 
and card catalog are being made. The work 
of reorganizing and cataloging is under the di- 
rection of Elizabeth P. Clarke, of Armour Li- 
brary Class, '97. 

Revere (Mass.) P. L. On Jan. 19 the Revere 
town-hall was nearly destroyed by fire, and the 
library, which occupied the upper story, was 
seriously damaged. All the town books and 
records were saved, and a part of the library's 
collection was sucessfully removed, but the loss 
is considerable. The library was insured for 
$1500. 

St. Louis (Mo.) P. L. The St. Louis Republic 
of Jan. 17 contains an interesting article on the 
development and work of the library in its va- 
rious branches. The following comparative 
statistics were given : v. in library Jan. I, 
1897, about 112,000; no. of persons registered 
since the library was made free 45,867; no. 
cards now in use(estimated) 36,000; v. issued for 
home reading during 1896, 506,596. In addition 
to this 51,409 v. and 186,749 periodicals were 
issued for use in the library. The issue f^r 
December, 1896, was 50,530, which is a gain of 
very nearly 50 % over December, 1895, and is 
six times the issue of February, 1894,' the 
largest issue of the year just prior to the open- 
ing of the free library. 

A first step toward securing an adequate 
library building for St. Louis was taken by 
the library board at a special meeting held 
Jan. 26, when the board adopted a bill, ap- 
proved by Gen. J. W. Noble and Arthur Lf-e, 
that will be presented to the legislature asking 
authority to have presented to the people a 
proposition to increase the taxes for five years, 
so that a fund sufficient for the purpose may be 
accumulated. If the bill passes the matter will 
be submitted to voters at the spring election. 

San Prandsco (Cat.) F. P. L. (Rpt. year 
ending June 30, '96.) Added 5368; total 87,727. 
Issued 440,117 (fict. 30.42 %. juv. 17.10$), of 
which 97,977 were issued from the four branch 
libraries. These figures include reference as 
well as home use; the home use of books from 
the main library was 203,987, the ref. use 
138,153. Receipts f57.336.o6; expenses $45,- 
181,54. 

The experiment of free access, tried at the 
Mission branch, has worked well. 

Seattle (Wash.) P. L. The record of the li- 
brary for 1896 is an encouraging one. Found- 
ed in 1890, it now contains about 13.500 v., the 
additions for the past year amounting to 1400 
y. The average monthly circulation for 1896 



was 10,000 as against 6500 in 1895, and there 
are now over 3500 borrowers. The income 
was $7300, with expenses of $8200. Dur- 
ing the year free access to the shelves was in- 
augurated, and the system has worked well; a 
monthly printed bulletin was begun in Novem- 
ber, and the "two-book" system, adopted 
earlier in the year, has been availed of by near- 
ly one-third of the borrowers. 

Stratford (Ct.) P. L. The dispute between 
the town selectmen and the library association 
has been settled by giving the former body rep- 
resentation in the library board. The town has 
for some time been contributing $800 towards 
the support of the library, but has not been fully 
represented in its management. A year ago 
the selectmen announced that they would with- 
draw support unless granted equal represen- 
tation on the board of directors. The asso- 
ciation will now ask the general assembly to 
amend the charter of the library so that here- 
after it will have 22 members on its board of 
directors, half of whom will represent the as- 
sociation and the other half the town. 

Syracuse (A r . Y.) Central L. The annual re- 
port has just been issued. The total number of 
volumes now in the library is 31,145. Circula- 
tion for 1896 was 91,793 volumes, an increase 
of 81^ per cent, above the circulation of the 
last year in the high school building, the loca- 
tion previous to 1894. Reading-room statistics 
for the last six months show 18,392 visitors. 
The Sunday afternoon opening has proved 
s-o successful that it has become a permanent 
thing, the time being increased by one hour. 
During the week the circulating department 
closes at 9 p.m. instead of 8. 

The librarian writes: "The crying need of 
the library is a children's reading-room. As 
I write, every seat in the reading- room is taken, 
several persons are standing, and more than 
half the readers are boys of the poorer classes 
restless, of course. All departments are 
equally overcrowded. We hope for an appro- 
priation to build an addition soon. Lists of new 
books are printed weekly in six local papers. 
A move toward branch libraries, though on 
a small scale, has been made in granting a 
selection of books to the Working Girls' Club 
of Cavalry Church, and another set, of chil- 
dren's books, to a home library. The home 
library movement has been inaugurated by the 
Central New York branch of Collegiate Alum- 
nae, and other libraries will be sent out from 
the central as fast as visitors are obtained." 

Tennessee State L., Nashville. The report of 
the joint committee of the Senate and House 
recently appointed to investigate the state li- 
brary has been presented to the legislature. 
The committee say: " As to the general condi- 
tion of the library, we are gratified to be able 
to state that no state library could be in better 
condition or more attractively conducted, con- 
sidering the limited means placed by the legisla- 
ture at the disposal of the librarian. The books 
are kept clean and in their places, the office is 
run upon business principles, and at the same 



February, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



in 



time with the trost invariable kindness upon the 
part of the state librarian and her assistant." 

Troy (N. Y.) Y. M. A. Z. (Rpt., 1896.) 
Added 1240; total not given. Issued, home 
use 56,282 ; ref. use 18,202. New registration 
301; total borrowers 5204. 

"A great increase in the number who will 
seek the privileges of the library may be ex- 
pected to follow our removal to the Hart Me- 
morial building, where greater and better fa- 
cilities for study will be available, and where 
other inducements to use the library will be 
present." 

Univ. of Mich. L., Ann Arbor. (Rpt. 
year ending Oct. i, "96.) Added, general 1., 
5356 v., 261 pm., 68 maps; total "exceeds 
100,000." Total recorded use 133.515. Addi- 
tions to medical 1. were 643 v., 6 pm. ; to law 1. 
259 v. In addition to the accessions noted the 
general library received during the year two 
valuable collections of books: the philosophical 
library of Prof. George S. Morris, of about 
1 100 volumes, presented by Mrs. Morris, and 
the Alpheus Felch historical library, of about 
3500 volumes, bequeathed to the university by 
the Hon. Alpheus Felch. When these have 
been classified and bound they will be of great 
practical use. 

" Of the readers in the reading-room 58$ were 
men and 42 % women. A registry to determine 
the character of readers was kept during the 
week ending March 14. From this it appeared 
that 96.80 % were university students, 1.60 % 
were high school students, 1.60$ various per- 
sons." 

Walla Walla, Wash. It is proposed to estab- 
lish a free library in Walla Walla under an 
existing statute which provides that a library 
fund of $1000 must be raised before the library 
may be founded. The sum required, however, 
may exist either in money or in books. At 
present about $670 have been raised for the 
purpose. 

Warren (Pa.) F. P. L. (Rpt.) Added 321; 
total 9444. Issued 36,456(fict. 25,576, juv. 6474). 
Cardholders ^43. Receipts$i8os.88; expenses 
$1548.87. The statistics of receipts and ex- 
penditures cover only those of the general 
fund. 

Washington, D. C. U- S. Congressional L. 
Mr. Green's report for 1896 on the construction 
of the building gives the following facts: 
" During the year the book-stacks have been 
completed, and most of the detail finishing of 
the interior has been completed; the work now 
in progress includes the construction of the 
book-carrying apparatus for service between 
the book-stacks, the public reading-room, and 
the capitol, construction of the pneumatic tube 
and private telephone lines to the capitol 
through the tunnel, adjusting and finishing of 
the wood-work of the table fixtures and desks 
in the public reading-room, planng the last of 
the door and window hardware, electric-light- 
ing fixtures, plain painting and placing of the 



few remaining mural pictures and bronze fig- 
ures, the bronze doors of the main entrance, 
construction of the fountain in the west ap- 
proaches, and the planting of shrubs and 
dwarf trees in the grounds to complete their 
design. All of this work is rapidly drawing to 
a close, and the building will, without doubt, 
be entirely completed in every essential par- 
t'cular ready to be placed in the hands of its 
permanent custodian, for occupation and use, 
by the end of February, 1897." 

As this report will probably be the last to be 
presented, Mr. Green devotes much space to a 
general history of the building from the time 
work was begun on it in 1880. 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute L. A compara- 
tive table of circulation prepared by librarian 
Sewall shows an increase of 10,663 ' n tne home 
use of books for 1896 over 1895. The figures 
for -1896 are 146,562; those for 1895 were 
135.899. "Approximately speaking, one-half 
of this increase belongs to fiction, one-quarter 
to juvenile, and the other quarter to the other 
departments of the library. The registration 
of new borrowers during 1896 amounted to 
1778, as against 1680 for 1895, an increase of 
98. These figures show what any official or 
habitu6 of the library already knows, that not 
only are more people coming to the library 
than ever before, but that those who come are 
coming oftener." 

Woonsocket, R. I. Harris Institute L. (Rpt.) 
Added 323; total 13,141. Issued 31,081 (fict. and 
juv. 20,933). 

FOREIGN. 

Gait (Ontario, Can.) P. L. The library was 
formally opened on the afternoon of Jan. 23. 
Its history dates back to 1835, when the town 
was but a straggling settlement, and when, on 
Jan. 9, the Gait Subscription and Circulating 
Library was formed, with a capital of ^25, 
borrowed from a friend on the security of all 
of the members of the association. The library, 
contained in one or two pine bookcases, occu- 
pied for years the home of the librarian, that 
office for a considerable period being filled by 
a widow who carried on a little bakery and 
store in a two-story frame building. The 
book-shelves were in an upper room and were 
reached by an outside staircase, which was 
none too safe in wintry weather. The interest 
taken in the library may be judged from the 
fact that promptly on its organization 150 pay- 
ing members were secured. In 1853 the old 
association became the Gait Mechanics' Insti- 
tute, and for nearly 44 years after that it had a 
prosperous career. In 1896 the town council 
made provision for the housing of the library 
in its present attractive rooms in the new mar- 
ket building, and there is little doubt that with- 
in a year or so, when local finances permit, the 
library law of Ontario will be accepted, and 
the library will become a free public institu- 
tion, supported by taxation. 

Montreal (Can.) P. L. The library of the 
Chateau Ramezay, Montreal, rich in historical 



112 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\Fcbr uary y '97 



and antiquarian lore, is now free to the public. 
Its central site, opposite the city hall, brings it 
directly to the attention of visitors from a dis- 
tance. Chateau Ramezay is one of the most in- 
teresting buildings in America. It dates from 
1705, when Claude de Ramezay, Sieur de La- 
gesse, governor of Montreal, built it as his 
residence. After his death it was used for a 
long "time by La Compagnie des Indes as a 
warehouse for its furs. In 1770 it was once 
more adopted as the governor's official home. 
As such Sir Guy Carleton vacated it when the 
Continental army captured Montreal, an event 
which made the chateau the headquarters of 
Franklin, Chase, and Carroll, the commission- 
ers charged with endeavoring to persuade the 
Canadians to cast in their lot with the thirteen 
revolted colonies. In the vault next the kitchen 
Franklin set up the first printing-press in Mon- 
treal, from which he struck off his manifestoes 
to the inhabitants. On the defeat of Mont- 
gomery at Quebec the governor for the third 
time assumed residence within its walls. From 
1841 to 1849 it was the headquarters of the 
government of the united provinces of Canada, 
and in the council-room, still in excellent or- 
der, the cabinet meetings were held. On the 
removal of the seat of government from Mon- 
treal the chateau underwent many vicissitudes, 
until through the generosity of Mr. H. J. Tiffin 
it was recently handed over, with its contents, 
to the Numismatic and Antiquarian Society as 
trustee for the public. The chateau is filled 
with interesting portraits and relics of the 
early days of Canada; among the names it 
commemorates are many that won fame in the 
colonial history of the United States. The li- 
brary starts work with about 10,000 v. 

South Africa. Laurence, P. M. Public libra- 
ries in South Africa. (In The Library, Jan., 
p.3-i6.) 

An interesting account of library affairs in 
South Africa; the writer has been chairman of 
the library committee of the Kimberley Public 
Library for 13 years. There are now 96 libra- 
ries in South Africa, of which the leading ones 
are in Cape Town, Port Elizabe'h, Kimberley, 
King William's Town, and Grahamstown. 
These five libraries contain 131 543 v. 



anb Ocqneots. 



Lehigh Univ. L., South Bethlehem, Pa. Mrs. 
Coxe, widow of the late Eckley B. Coxe, has 
presented to the university the technical li- 
brary of her husband, which includes the col- 
lection of Julius Wiesback, of Freiburg. It 
numbers about 8000 v. 

Providence (R. I.) P. L. On Feb. 6 the an- 
nouncement was made that John Nicholas 
Brown, of Providence, had given to the Provi- 
dence Public Library Association, for the erec- 
tion of a new building, the sum of $200,000. 
Further details of this magnificent gift will be 
given later, 



(Librarians. 



BISCOE, Miss Ellen D., of the New York State 
Library School, class of '96, has been elected 
librarian of the Eau Claire (Wis.) Public Li- 
brary, succeeding Miss Louise Sutermeister. 

BOLTON, Charles Knowles. The engagement 
has been announced of Mr. C. K. Bolton, libra- 
rian of the Brookline (Mass.) Public Library, to 
Miss Ethel Stanwood, daughter of Mr. Edward 
Stanwood, a trustee of the Brookline Public 
Library. 

BOWERMAN, George Franklin (N. Y. State 
Library School, B.L.S. 1895), who, during 
the month of January, classified and cataloged 
the library of the Saturn Club, Buffalo, N. Y., 
accepted a position Feb. i as assistant in the 
New York State Library. 

DU RIEU, Dr. W. N., director of the Univer- 
sity Library at Leyden, died December 21, 1896. 
Dr. du Rieu was born in Leyden, October 23. 
1829, at which time his father was burgomaster 
of Leyden. In 1864 he was appointed amanu- 
ensis of the University Library. Two years 
later he was promoted to become conservator 
of manuscripts. In 1880 he became librarian 
and director of the library. As an authority 
on bibliographical and historical matters Dr. 
du Rieu was highly regarded abroad as well as 
in his native country. His best-known works 
are ' ' Re pertorium der verhandelingen en bijdra- 
gen betreffende de geschiedenis des vaderlands 
in mengelwerken en tijdschriften verschenen," 
" Registervan acad. diss.," and "Album studi- 
osorum." He also edited the correspondence 
of Christiaan Huygens, and was actively en- 
gaged in arranging to reproduce, by an autotype 
process, fac-similes of rare manuscripts, each to 
be furnished with critical and historical intro- 
ductions. This work, of which the first vol- 
ume Codex Sarravianus-Colbertinus of the 
Old Testament has just been issued, will no 
doubt suffer through the loss of its most enthu- 
siastic projector and supporter. 

HICKCOX, John Howard, died suddenly from 
heart disease in Washington, D. C., January 
30. Mr. Hickcox was born in Albany, N. Y., 
August 10, 1832. When quite young he be- 
came associated with the New York State 
Library, of which he was the assistantlibrarian 
from 1858 to 1864. After the war he removed 
to Washington, where, in 1874, he received an 
appointment in the Congressional Library; A 
few years after he resigned and set himself up 
in the second-hand book business. From the 
start he made a specialty of government pub- 
lications, which led him, in 1885, to begin the 
publication of his "Monthly catalogue of 
United States publications," of which ten vol- 
umes have appeared, carrying the record down 
through 1894, though one or two numbers are 
yet to be published to complete the set. His 
efficient work in this direction led the editor of 
the "American Catalogue" to confide to Mr. 
Hickcox the compilation, on the plan already 
worked out in the volume for 1876-1884, of the 
appendixes to that catalog containing the list 



february, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



of government publications in the succeeding 
volumes for 1884-1890 and 1890-1895. When 
F. A. Crandall assumed the duties of Su- 
perintendent of Documents he very wisely 
included Mr. Hickcox in his staff. But un- 
fortunately Mr. Hickcox had been indepen- 
dent so long that he could not easily subordinate 
himself to the direction of others and shortly 
after his appointment he resigned the position. 
A month ago his only son, who had been his 
close and loved companion for years, died sud- 
denly. Mr. Hickcox never recovered from 
the shock, and, much weakened, he succumbed 
suddenly to heart disease. Mr. Hickcox, be- 
sides his catalogues of government publica- 
tions and numerous contributions tonewpapers 
and reviews on historical and bibliographical 
subjects, wrote the following: " An historical 
account of American coinage," Albany, 1858, 
which at that time proved of great service to 
students of American history; " History of the 
bills of credit, or, paper currency of New 
York, from 1709 to 1789," Albany, 1865; and 
" A bibliography of the writings of Franklin 
Benjamin Hough, M.D.," Washington, 1886. 
By arrangement with Mr. Hickcox's widow his 
business will be continued at 906 M Street, 
Washington, by his old friend, G. A. Whitaker, 
formerly bookseller af 941 Penna. Ave. Mr. 
Hickcox's services to bibliography, especially 
in the line of government publications, were 
many and great, and his work will be held 
in honorable remembrance. 

ROOD, Osna, for eight years cataloger at the 
Newberry Library, has joined the cataloging 
force of the Astor Library, New York. 

Cataloging and Classification. 



The CLEVELAND (O.) P. L. has issued special 
reading lists, nos. 3 and 4, relating to Abraham 
Lincoln and George Washington ; they are 
compiled by Margaret G. Pierce and are full 
and well arranged. 

The FITCHBURG (Mass.) P. L. Bulletin for Jan- 
uary has a reference list on George Washington. 

GUILLAUME, C: E. The decimal classification 
of literature. (In Science Gossip, Jan., 1897, 
p. 208-209; tr from La Nature.} 
Mr. Dewey's classification is considered as 
"solely administrative," not scientific, and the 
author says that " Mr. Dewey, in his classifica- 
tion, shows more the habits of an engineer 
than a scholar." 

NEWTON (Mass.)F. L. Bulletin no. 5: books add- 
ed from October, 1895, to November, 1896. 
Newton, 1896. 73 p. 1. O. 
The PROVIDENCE (R. I.) P. L. Bulletin for 
January has an admirable reference list (no. 
40) on William Wordsworth; it givfs also a 
Useful index to other reference lists published 
in 1896. 

The SALEM (Mass.) P. L. Bulletin for January 
contains classed reading lists on Robert Brown- 
ing, E. B. Browning, and Winter. In the De- 



cember issue there was a four-page classed list 
on " Evolution." 

The SPRINGFIELD (Mass.) L. Bulletin con- 
tinues the " author list of juvenile books in the 
library," and adds a short list of "Tales of 
school and college life." 

U.S. N. Y. STATE LIBRARY BULLETIN, Legisla- 
tion, no. 7, December, 1896. Legislation by 
state in 1896 : seventh annual comparative 
summary and index. 

FULL NAMES. 

" Mrs. Alexander." The Osterhout Free Li- 
brary desires to correct the entry of "Mrs. 
Alexander's " full name in its catalog, from 
Mrs. Annie F. (Thomas) Hector to Mis. Annie 
(French) Hector. The facts in the matter are 
briefly as follows: Some months since the Os- 
terhout Library was asked the authority for 
the form given by it, which is adopted by but 
one other catalog, that of the Milwaukee Pub- 
lic Library. The matter was teferred to Mrs. 
Alexander, who responded, giving her correct 
name as Annie (French) Hector. She was An- 
nie French, and married Mr. Alexander Hec- 
tor, dropping the maiden name after marriage. 
She wrote under her husband's first name as a 
pseudonym, and states that she wishes to be 
known in all catalogs as " Mrs. Alexander." 



BINDINGS. The Portfolio for December, 1896, 
is devoted to Royal English bookbindings, 
by Cyril Davenport. There are many illus- 
trations, some of them very fine. 

CATALOGUE general des grands ecrivains de 
toutes les litteratures. Paris, librairie Gau- 
tier, 1896. 158 p. 8, fr. 1.50. 

CLASSICS. Mayor, Jos. B. Guide to the choice 
of classical books. New supplement (1879- 
1896). London : David Nutt, 1896. 25 + 
128 p. 12. 

This book is a supplement to the work that 
was published in 1879, last edition in 1885. 
The portion "containing the list of authors is 
almost entirely confined to books published 
since 1878." Publishers and prices are given, 
the latter in terms of the country in which the 
book was published. The part of the book 
which is, perhaps, most helpful is that which 
is devoted to "help to the study of ancient 
authors." These helps are arranged alpha- 
betically by subjects : Language, history, 
mythology, etc. The concluding part of the 
volume is devoted to serial lists, such as the 
well-known Teubner series of Greek and Latin 
classics, etc. The chief criticism against the 
work as a whole is that to the uninitiated many 
of the entries are too brief to be fully under- 
stood. 

FINE ART. The annotated bibliography of 
Fine Art and Music by Russell Sturgis and 
Henry E. Krehbiel will be issued about March 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\Fcbruary, '97 



25 by the Library Bureau for the American 
Library Association. In the scope and fulness 
of the notes prefixed to is successive parts, 
the reader and student will find aid thus far 
unexampled in any similar volume. Both con- 
tributors have had for years to answer many 
questions with regard to books. Every im- 
portant question thus put receives its answer in 
the pages of this guide. 

GEOLOGY. Darton, N. H. Catalog and index 
of contributions to North American geology, 
1732-1891, U. S. Geological Survey bulletin, 
no. 127. Washington, Gov. Print. Office, 1897. 
1045 p. 8'. 

" The entries include a complete bibliograph- 
ic list of articles under authors' names and 
analytical lists under localities by states, under 
formations by physiographic regions, and un- 
der a partial classification of 'geologic philoso- 
phy' in which the alphabetical order of head- 
ings is, for some unstated reason, abandoned. 
Under each subdivision the order of entries is 
by date of publication ; but under each year 
titles often stand in accidental order, and this 
involves some inconvenience in such a subject 
as petrography, where the titles of a single 
year overrun a page column. Full references 
to place of publication are given only under 
the author's name. With' so many leading 
lines it is very easy to run down any desired 
subject. Florida coral reefs, for example, will 
be found under Florida ; under Pleistocene 
formation, Gulf region ; under geologic philos- 
ophy, section coral reefs ; and under various 
authors. Errors appear to be very rare, al- 
though one well-known name is repeatedly mis- 
printed." N. Y. Eve. Post, Feb. i, '97. 

JESUIT RELATIONS. The first volume of the 
" Jesuit relations," now in course of publica- 
tion by the Burrows Bros. Co. , of Cleveland, 
contains as an appendix interesting " biblio- 
graphical data" concerning the eight docu- 
ments included in that volume. These are 
Lescarbot's report on "La conversion des 
sauvages," 1610; the " Lettre missive of Ber- 
trand," 1610; three letters of Father P. Biard, 
1611; letter of E> Masse, 1611, and two reports 
on the Canadian missions and Indians by 
Father Jouvency. Mention is made of the 
copies of each document known to be in ex- 
istence, with reference to the various catalogs 
in which they are listed, and collations are 
given. The title-pages of the original docu- 
ments are reproduced in fac-simile, or closely 
imitated. 

SCLATER, P. L. Bibliography of the published 
writings of Philip Lutley Sclater, F.R.S., sec- 
retary of the Zoological Society of London; 
prepared under the direction of G. Brown 
Goode. Wash., Gov. Print. Office, 1896. 
(Smithsonian Institution, Bulletin of the U. 
S. National Museum, no. 49.) 136 p. O. 

THE Revue Internationale des Archives, des 
Bibliotheques et des Musses, published since 1895 



by H. Welter, Paris, announces that it will dis- 
continue publication. It has, presumably, never 
received sufficient support from French libra- 
ries to pur it upon a practicable commercial 
basis. Its short-lived existence recalls the fact 
that France possesses no distinctly library pub- 
lication, as do England and Germany. While 
there are several French book journals of a 
semi-library character, there is no publication 
officially recognized as the organ of the French 
libraries. 

SUMMER SCHOOLS. Bibliography of American 
summer schools. (In report of U. S. Commis- 
sioner of Education, 1894-95, v. 2, p. 1486.) 

U. S. FISH COMMISSION. The report of the 
U. S. Commissioner for the year ending June 
30, 1894, was published in 1896. It contains, 
p. 619-706, a list of papers published by the 
commission, arranged alphabetically by authors 
and followed by an index. 1934 publications 
are noted, and those out of print are indicated. 



Otnongms anb 



John Ackworth, author of " Clog-shop chron- 
icles," is the Rev. F. R. Smith. Library, 
Jan., '97, p. 38. 

Sidney Grier, author of some novels pub- 
lished by Blackwood, "is, I believe, Miss 
Hilda Gregg, a granddaughter of a bishop of 
Cork, who was long ago a popular preacher in 
Dublin." S. ROBERTSON NICOLL, in Bookman, 
Feb. '97. 

Benjamin Swift, author of "Nancy Noon," 
is the ps. of William R. Paterson. Bookbuyer, 
Feb., '97, p. 26. 

Frederick Benton Williams, ps. of Herbert E. 
Hamblen, author of "On many seas," pub- 
lished by Macmillan & Co. Authority of editor. 

4jnmor0 anb JJlnnbere. 

"A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME." Not long 

since a great news company ordered of a prom- 
inent jobber a set of the "Jesuit relations" as 
follows: 

" Please send us 

" i Ruben Gold, by Teraites, vol. i." 

FROM A SALES CATALOG: Stirling, James H. 
Text-Book to Kant. The Critique of Poor 
Reason. 8vo. N. Y.. 1882. 

THE following are among some books asked 
for by public library readers, taken from a li- 
brarian's record of queer blunders: "Poetical 
poems, by Lalla Roohk"; "Black Beauty, a 
little book by Zola "; " The stinking minister"; 
"The stuck-up minister"; "From Jessie to 
Ernest"; "A book describing place where they 
keep leopards on Sandwich Islands "; " Round 
the red lamp chimney"; "Are there any Manx- 
mans in " ? " Dickens Tootpick papers "; " Any 
book telling where sheet iron is mined " ; " Open- 
ing of the chestnut (Burr)"; "Abraham's 
nights." 



February, '97] THE LIBRARY JOURNAL ris 

IMPERFECT SETS. 

Recognizing the importance of periodical literature in modern libraries, THE 
BOSTON BOOK COMPANY established its Library Department with the idea that a 
definite service could be rendered overworked librarians by an intelligent effort to 
supply them with sets of periodicals and Society transactions bibliographically com- 
plete and materially perfect. 

Under the old method, librarians were forced to buy such sets or parts of sets 
as appeared on booksellers' catalogues, or were privately offered to them, taking 
their chances as to the completeness or perfectness of the sets. Before the publica- 
tion of " Poole's Index " the shortcomings of such a mode of purchase were not 
apparent, because the deficiencies in sets so bought were not brought to special 
notice ; but in these days of thorough indexing the constant showing up of tanta- 
lizing defects obliges the conscientious librarian to assume the labor of collation, and 
the subsequent vexatious time and money cost involved in trying to make the 
defects good. 

It is exactly this burdensome and wasteful labor which THE BOSTON BOOK 
COMPANY has endeavored to save librarians, by supplying only sets which have 
passed through the hands of a conscientious and carefully trained staff of collators 

We find, however, that some librarians still prefer to buy sets by the old 
method, and to such librarians we wish to make it known, that while we consider 
our method the economical and preferable one to libraries in the end, we are entirely 
willing to sell uncollated sets to such as prefer to buy them. 

We have always a great many uncollated sets on hand (because conscientious 
collation is a tedious and time-consuming work) and we can offer them as cheaply 
as any other dealers. In such cases we will make an offer of the volumes actually 
on hand, but will not undertake that every page, title-page, index, supplement, 
appendix, plate, or map is supplied, as we do ordinarily. 

THE BOSTON BOOK COMPANY only asks that a fair comparison of price and 
quality be made, and is perfectly willing to sell to librarians on any method they 
may prefer. __ 

Remainder Stock of Poole Sets. 

We have bound up for libraries a few sets of two periodicals that are to be 
included in the next supplement to " Poole's Index," viz.: 

"The Law Quarterly Review," of London, 12 vols., cloth, $30.00 (regular 
price in law sheep, $48.00, net); and "The Juridical Review," of Edinburgh, 
7 vols., cloth, $24.50 (regular price in law sheep, $33.25, net]. 

This special price for cloth sets applies only to our stock now on hand. 

These two sets are recommended to the attention of librarians of General 
Libraries. Sample numbers will be sent on application. 



THE BOSTON BOOK CO., 

Beacon Street, - - BOSTON, MASS. 



n6 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[February, '97 



LIVRKS D'OCCASION 



En vente a la Librairie H. 
PARIS 59, RUE BONAPARTE, 6Q PARIS 



Antiquit^s mexicaines, publ. par Warden. 2 vol. in-fol. 

d.-mar. 1836-44, av. 176 pi. col. 200 fr. 

Archives des Missions scientifiques. Coll. compl. 1850- 

91. 33 vol., av. pi. Superbe ^tat. 200 fr. 

Art de verifier Its dates. Compl. en 44 v. in-8, cart. 

1818-25. 150 fr. 

BARONIUS. Annalts ecclesiastici, 37 v. in. -4, rel. 

1864-84. 330 fr. 

Bibl.de I'Ecole des Chartes. Coll. bien compl., 1839-95. 

55 y- 650 fr. 

Bibliotheque franfaise (e'dittfe par Didot). 54 forts vol. 

gr. in-8 & 2 col. 270 fr. 

Bibliothejjue grecque-latine, e"d. Didot. 70 vol. gr. in-8 

it 2 col. dont 35 vol. rel. 600 fr. 

BORGHESI, CEuvres. 9 t. en 10 vol. Paris, Imp. 

Nat. 1 80 fr. 

Bulletin du /?///o/A *V* (Techener). 1834-95. 55 vol. 200 fr. 
Bulletin monumental (Caumont). 1835-79, av. tabl. 

47 v. 300 fr. 

CAHIER et MARTIN. Melanges d'archeologie. 4 vol. 

in-4, d.-rel. 1847-56. Rare. 400 fr. 

CANCIANI. Barbarorum leges. 5 v. fol. 1781-89, d.- 

bas. 80 fr. 

Cartas de Indias. Folio, avec 208 planches et fac- 
similes. Madrid, 1877. 190 fr. 
CLARAC. Musee de sculpture. 6 vol. texte et 6 all. 

in-4 obi., d.-chag. 280 fr. 

CLINTON. Fasti hellenici. 3 vol. in-4, rel. 60 fr. 

COSTE. Monum. mod. de la Perse. Fol. d.-mar. 

VIVANT-DENON. VCEuvre oHginale. Av. le suppl! 

e>ot. 315 eaux-fortes folio, 1873. 90 fr. 

DEVIC et VAISSETTE. Histoire du Languedoc. 15 

vol., cart, compl. 1860-90. (400 fr.) 240 fr. 

Dissertaz. della Pontif. Acad. Rontana di archeol. 16 

vol. in-4. 1821-64. 180 fr. 

DURUTTE. Esthetique musicale. In-4, 1855, rel. 

Rare. 25 fr. 

Friedrich's d. grossen polit. Correspondenz. Vol. i k 15. 

1879-1887. (245 frO 100 fr. 

Gazette archeol. Coll. compl., 1875-88 (fin de la publ.), 

rel. en 14 vol. in-4. Superbe. 600 fr. 

Gaz. des Beaux-Arts, orig. 1859 91 incl. (dost 20 v. 

rel.) 900 fr. 

Grands Ecr. de la France (Hachette), tout le paru. Cor- 

neille, La Rochefoucauld, Malherbe, Moliere, Pascal, 

Racine, S.-Simon, S^vigne", La Bruyere, La Fontaine, 

de Retz, 82 vol. in-8 et 10 albums de pi. Reliure diffe'- 

rente pour chaque auteur. 750 fr. 

HOLTROP. Monum. typogr. des Pays-Has au XVz 

siecle. In-4. 1868. Reh. (250 fr.) ' 180 fr. 

Hist. gtn. de Paris. Compl. 28 vol. in-4, toile, et 3 atl. 

fol. de plans. Ex. de M. Alphand. 450 fr. 

Jahrb. d. Vereins v. Alterthumsfreunden im Rhein- 

lande. 86 vol. in-8 et in-4. 1842-88. 220 fr. 

fournal du Palais. Vol. i a 88 (1791-1873), rel. demi-bas. 

et demi-chagrin. 130 fr. 

fournal des Economistes. 1842 1895. 700 fr. 

Asiatique. 1822 & 1895. 40 vol. rel., reste br. Tres. 

bel e"tat. 7 oo fr. 

LABARTE. Hist, des Arts industries. 2 e Edition. 3 

vol. in- 4 . (300 fr.) 465 fr. 

LABBE. Nova Biblioth. manuscr. libr. 2 vol. fol., 

bas. 180 fr. 

LEBAS et WADDINGTON. Voy. Grece et Asie Min. 

Compl. Tres rare. 350 fr. 

LECITYER (Collection). Terres cuites de Grece et 

d"Astf Min. 2 vol. fol. avec 117 pi. Rare. 180 fr. 
LENORMANT et DE W1TTE. Monum. ceramograph. 

4 vol. in-4, 580 pi., rel. d.-mar. Superbe. 250 fr. 

Le Livre, rtd. p. Uzanne. Coll. compl. 21 vol. 1880- 

89. aoo fr. 

LORENZ. Catalogue general de la libr. fr. Compl. 

Tomes I i XIII. 450 fr. 

MARTIN. Hist, de France. 17 vol. in-8, av. gr. (dern. 

eVJ.), br. 40 fr. ou bel ex.-d.-chag. 70 fr. 

MatMaux pour rhist. natur. de I'Aomme, dir. par E. 

Cartailhac. 22 vol., av. 300 pi. Rare. 400 fr. 

Mem. Soc. antiquaires de France. 1817-94 ou vol. i i 

54, avec Tail, du t. 96 et les Bull. Compl. 320 fr. 
MICHAUD. Biographie univ. 26 e'd. 45 v. gr. in-8. 

(500 fr.) 200 fr. 

MIGNE. Patrologie lattne. 321 vol., net 1650 fr. 

Patrol, grecque. 166 vol. 3000 fr. 

MOREAU. Album Caranda. Ouvrage termini. 1875- 

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QUERARD. 12 vol., et BOURQUELOT, 6 vol. 18 vol. 

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Rembrandt (fCEuvre de), p. p. Ch. Blanc. 2 vol. fol. 

et fol. max., demi-mar. 1858. (400 fr.) 150 fr. 

Restauration des monum. antiques. Folio. Didot. 4 

vol. divers. (500 fr.) 250 fr. 

REUSS. La Bible; compl. 19 vol. 130 fr. 

Revue arc heologique ; coll. compl. 1844-95. 10 vol. belle 

rel., reste br. 680 fr. 

Revue Art chretien. Orig. (1859) ^ 1895 incl. Rare. 500 fr. 
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Revue linguistique et philol. comp. 1867-91. Rare. 330 fr. 
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Societe archdolog. de Luxembourg. T. i & 38 en 19 v. 

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Stephanus Thesaurus. Didot. 9 vol. fol., d.-ch. Bel 

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Univers pittoresque. 66 vol. (Didot.) (400 fr.) 120 fr. 
VINCI (Leonardo da). Les manuscrits de L. de V. 

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WAILLY. Palegraphie. 2 vol. fol., demi-veau. 80 fr. 
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Arch. (Nouv.) Mus. Hist. nat. Paris. 10 volumes. 

1865-1874. (500 fr.) 200 fr. 

Archives de physiologie. 1869-90. Rare. 650 fr. 

BAILLON. Hist, des Plantes. I \ XIII. 250 tr. 

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Bull. Soc. botanique. 1854 i 95. 600 fr. 

Bull. Soc. chimique. 1858 k 95, avec Rdpert, chimie. 

850 fr. 

BULLIARD. Herbier de la France. Champignons. 

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DESHAYES. Mollusques (Explor. d'Algdrie). 200 fr. 
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Journal de micrographie. 15 vol. 150 fr. 

Journal de phar made. Orig. 181531890.- 380 fr. 

Journal de physique, p. Rosier. 1773-1821. 90 vol. veau. 

Superbe. 350 fr. 

Journal de PEcole Polytechn. Cahiers i & 60. 700 fr. 
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rel. too fr. 

KIENER. Species et Iconogr. des Coquilles. Compl., 

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700 fr. 

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LAPLACE. CEuvres. 7 vol. in-4- rel. 1844-48. 100 fr. 
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LEGENDRE. Fonctions elliptiques. 3 v. in-4, d.-rel. 

bas. 1 60 fr. 

Lumiere ttectrique. Coll. compl. 1870-94. 400 fr. 

MAS. Le Verger, av. 396 planches col. des fruits les plus 

cultiv^s. 8 vol. gr. in-8. 1866-73, re l- Tres rare. 200 fr. 
Materiaux pour 1'hist. de 1'homme, par Cartailhac, 22 

vol. Rare. 400 fr. 

Memoirs of the Roy. Astron. Society. Vol. 17 i 48. 

1849-85. 350 fr. 

Memoires Acad. d. Sciences. 1866-90. Ex. unique. 3000 fr. 
MILNE EDWARDS. Leqons sur la Physiologie. 14 

volumes. (300 fr.) 160 fr. 

Prings Aet'm's Jahrbiicher f ur Botanik. Vol. i 22. 1250 fr. 
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Revue des sciences medicales, par Hayem. 1873-90, rel. 

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STOPPANI. Paleontologie lombarde. 4 vol. in-4, av. 

150 pi. 1858. (228 fr.) 130 fr. 

VERDET. CEuvres. 9 vol., d.-chag. 1868-73. '80 fr. 

Liebig's Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie. Vol. 57 

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February, '97] THE LIBRARY JOURNAL ,, 7 

EDW. G. ALLEN'S 

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28 HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON. 
FOUNDED IN 1856. 

(JJY PPOINTED London Agency for the Libraries of the United States and 
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Relations long existing with all the Booksellers and Publishers of Great 
Britain facilitate the prompt execution of orders for Books, Periodicals, and 
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Scarce Booftg jfounfr, 
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the East have also secured their Foreign Books from the same source, and we have heard from 
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"We cannot, therefore, do a greater service to the Colleges and Universities of the West, 
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" No better endorsement of Mr. Allen's Agency is possible than the list of leading libraries 
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EDW. G. ALLEN'S AMERICAN LIBRARY AGENCY, 

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n8 



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[February, '97 



APPLETON'5 LIBRARY LIST5. 

R more than fifty years Messrs. D. APPLETON & Co. have been engaged in the publica- 
tion of the choicest productions from the pens of distinguished authors of the past and 
present, of both Europe and America, and their catalogue of books now comprises 
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these publications have been prepared, affording facilities for a judicious selection of books 
covering the whole range of LITERATURE, SCIENCE, and ART, for individual bookbuyers or 
for a thorough equipment of any library. 
Lists A, B, and C are of books selected especially for School and College Libraries. 

The other lists are of books grouped according to subjects, and include the above. 



LIST D. History. 
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L. Philosophy and Metaphysics. 

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LIST Q. Poetry and Essay. 

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February, '97] 



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I2O 



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[February, '97 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF THE CORRECT ARRANGING AND LETTERING 
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February, '97] THE LIBRAR Y JO URNAL 1 2 , 



J. A. SCHWEINFURTH, 

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PUBLIC LIBRARIES A SPECIALTY. 



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TERMS ON APPLICATION, ALSO LIST OF LIBRARY APPLIANCES. HANDBOOKS, ETC. 



122 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\February, '97 



LIBRARY DEPARTflENT 



A. C. McClurg & Co., 

CHICAGO. 

ORDERS for libraries public, university, college, or school filled with prompt- 
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Auctioneers and Appraisers, 
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PERFECT SETS. 



cals. I have no imperfect or unguaranteed 
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"IDEAL" 

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A. Q.. P. O. Box 943, N. Y. 

Dunton's Life and Errors. London, 1705. 

Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State 

of New Jersey, v. n and 12. 
Farnham's, A Glance at Private Libraries. Crocker & 

Brewster, Bost., 1855. 
Ntw Etifland Hitttrical and Genealogical Remitter, 

V. 12. 

The Antiquary, v. 31. 

Columbia University Library. N. Y. 

Scon's Poetical Works, y. 2 (Marmion) of Little, Brown 

& Co.'s9 v. ed. of British Poets. 
Sound Money League of Pa., Documents nos. 7 and 8. 

Alfred Lee, Union League, Phlla., Pa. 

Library Journal, July, 1888; index and title-page, '89; 
Aug., '91. 



February, '97 ] THE L1BRAR Y JO URNAL 1 23 

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NOW READY! 

The Annual American Catalogue, 1896 

TH ANNUAL AMERICAN CATALOGUE for 1896, which is now in the bindery, will be published 
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(a) Full-title Record, with descriptive notes, in author alphabet, of all books recorded in 
THE PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY, 1896. 

(3) Author-, title-, and subject-index to same, in one alphabet. 

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* * * 

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Address the OFFICE OF THE PUBLISHERS* WEEKLY, 
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124 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL {February, '97 



LONDON: PARIS: LEIPZIG: 

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VOL. 22. No. 3. 

MARCH, 1897. 
Contents. 



PAGE 

THE PEORIA (!LL.) PUBLIC LIBRARY. . . Frontispiece. 

EDITORIAL 127 

Copyright Department of Congressional Library. 

"The New Journalism " as a Danger to Libraries. 

Fiction at the Carnegie Library of Allegheny. 

The Massachusetts Select Fiction Lists. 
COMMUNICATIONS 128 

The Question of Indexes. 

Information as to Music Libraries Wanted. 

Opinions Wanted on the Browne Charging System. 

Reincorporation of the A. L. A. 

THE TRIALS OF THE LIBRARIAN. Caroline H. Gar- 
land 129 

WEEDING OUT FICTION AT THE CARNEGIE FREE LI- 
BRARY OF ALLEGHENY. W: M. Stevtnton. . . 133 

BOOKS OF 1896 II 136 

"THE Nsw JOURNALISM" IN PUBLIC LIBRARIES. . .143 
PUBLIC DOCUMENTS IN THE S4TH CONGRESS 143 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY, 1897- 

'98 i43 

THE CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY HANDBOOK 144 

THE BUFFALO FREE LIBRARY 144 



THE PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY 145 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 145 

igth General Conference, Philadelphia, June 21- 
25. '897. 

English Post-Conference, June 26-Aug. 22, 1897. 

Publishing Section. 

STATE LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 148 

STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 148 

LIBRARY CLUBS . 152 

LIBRARY SCHOOLS AND TRAINING CLASSES 153 

New York State Library School. 

Pratt Institute Library School. 

LIBRARY ECONOMY AND HISTORY 155 

PRACTICAL NOTES 161 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 162 

LIBRARIANS 162 

CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 162 

BlBLIOGRAFY 164 

ANONYMS AND PSEUDONYMS 164 



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126 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[M 'arch, '97 



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AiiiKiles ilechitnie et de pJii/sitjHe. p. Lavoisier, 
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Paris ; 2200 

ArcMv f. patholog. Anatomic u. Phyxiologie 
M. klinigche UTedizln. Hrsg. v. R. Virchow. 
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Archiv f. klinische CMrurgie. Hrsg. v. La<n- 
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Bibliotheea zoologiea. Hrsg. v. Leuckart u. 
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THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



VOL. 22. 



MARCH, 1897. 



No. 3 



THE general appropriation bill approved 
Feb. 19 makes provision in detail for the Li- 
brary of Congress and creates a specific divi- 
sion to be known as the Copyright Department. 
This subdivision of the work of the Library of 
Congress is in every respect desirable and 
should give opportunity for the effective reor- 
ganization of the copyright bureau. It is to be 
hoped that it will be practicable for the library 
authorities to consider plans by which the copy- 
right office, without increase of its expenses, 
and indeed with some possibility of increased 
income, should be of auxiliary benefit to the 
libraries of the country. The copyright fees 
are 50 cents for entry and an additional 50 
cents for a certificate of entry, and it is usual 
to enclose the full dollar instead of the half- 
dollar for the sake of getting such record. 
Why might not this record be printed in proper 
bibliographical shape on a standard card and 
be delivered in this shape to the copyright 
owner, while serving the additional purpose of 
a card catalog for the Library of Congress and 
permitting the sale of duplicates to the libraries 
throughout the country ? Such a plan would 
not cover the full field of the printed catalog 
card now managed by the Publishing Section 
of the A. L. A., because it would not include 
imported books, but in other respects the field 
would be much widened and there would be 
many advantages in the plan. 



WHILE librarians have been doing their 
" level best " to stem the flood of the reading of 
fiction, particularly of the yellow-covered varie- 
ty, and lead readers of trash into really helpful 
use of reading-time, their newspaper reading- 
rooms, by grace of "the new journalism," 
have been opposing, and more than counteract- 
ing, all their missionary efforts. This literature 
has taken in New York the curious local name 
of "yellow kid" literature, because an extraor- 
dinary caricature of a vulgar small boy dressed 
in "yaller" has been the rival hero of the 
two New York dailies which indulge most in 
" flash " sensationalism. It is gratifying that 
the expression of the better public opinion re- 
garding this class of journals has been voiced 
by the library profession. The Newark Free 



Public Library took the step of excluding the 
two most notorious journals of this class from 
its reading-room, and suddenly it occurred to 
a number of librarians and library boards that 
this was what ought to have been done long 
ago. Several libraries have already fallen into 
line in following Mr. Hill's example, and while 
for the moment the result may be to advertise 
"the new journalism" although no adver- 
tising can be so luridly pervasive as its own 
the rebuke will doubtless have its effect. This 
movement is new evidence of the vital and 
far-reaching relations of the modern library 
spirit with modern life. 



THE removal from the shelves of the Alle- 
gheny Carnegie Library of a considerable num- 
ber of works of second-rate fiction has awak- 
ened the usual amount of press comment and 
criticism. Mr. Stevenson, however, is well 
able to hold his own against his critics, and his 
reasons, which are printed elsewhere, are in- 
teresting and suggestive. In the Allegheny 
" Index expurgatorius" there are, nevertheless, 
some names to which even librarians may be 
tempted to offer an exception notably E. P. 
Roe and "Marion Harland." It may be ques- 
tioned if either of these writers ever produced 
anything that can be called literature, nor are 
their works of interest to persons of intellectual 
perception ; but they are not hurtful indeed 
their aggressive morality is one of their most 
disagreeable characteristics. Both also occupy 
a warm corner in the hearts of a multitude of 
readers, who have found in them a common- 
place and harmless contentment, while among 
the writers whose works remain unbanned are 
a number whose influence must be conceded 
to be more directly towards sensationalism and 
false perspective. Indeed, in glancing over 
the fiction supplement of the Allegheny library, 
the question arises whether the old-fashioned 
trashy novel, with its sentimentality, didacti- 
cism, and high-flown language, is a sharmful in 
its influence as the latter-day school of "slum 
stories" and " keynote " fiction. There is no 
question of the literary skill and excellence of 
construction of many of these later books, and 
they may not be hurtful to the well-balanced 



128 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



and mature mind ; but for the average youth or 
young girl it seems fair to say that the tritest 
platitudes of "poor old Roe," to quote Miss 
Garland's witty defence, or the most tearful 
sentimentalities of Mrs. Holmes, are preferable 
to the imbruted vulgarity of " Maggie, a girl 
of the streets," the perverted hysteria of "A 
superfluous woman," or the morbid unpleasant- 
ness of "Celibates." 



ALMOST from the beginning of the A. L. A. 
in 1876 librarians have wished some better 
guide to the selection of fiction than the aver- 
age book review. The plan for the establish- 
ment of such a guide devised by the Massa- 
chusetts Library Club, under which a committee 
of the club read the principal novels of the 
year and published a monthly "List of select 
fiction," has met with general approval from 
those who have made use of it. This would 
seem to show that such a list can be prepared 
with reasonable promptness, and that the de- 
cision of the selecting committee will be gener- 
ally accepted. It is thought that the list can 
be ultimately made self-supporting through 
subscriptions, but for the present the work is 
beyond the unaided resources of the Massa- 
chusetts Library Club. Various methods of 
continuation have been suggested with which 
readers of the JOURNAL are familiar. The club, 
after a careful survey of the situation, has 
decided that the work of preparation had best 
be kept in its own hands. A widely separated 
corps of readers would lead to unavoidable 
delays and would make impossible one of the 
most useful features of the work, namely, the 
monthly meeting of readers when the books 
are informally discussed, thus maintaining a 
general interest that is impossible in solitary 
work and enabling the committee to keep to a 
more uniform standard. The club now asks for 
subscriptions from other associations, and its 
appeal is given elsewhere. Doubtless the sum 
necessary $150 to $200 could be secured 
from a few individuals, but it is thought prefer- 
able that a work of general usefulness should 
have a more general support, while the fact that 
an association contributes to the work is an ad- 
vertisement of that work to all its members. 
It is to be hoped that all who are interested in 
the work will see that the state or local associa- 
tion of which they may be members gives its 
support to the project. 



CommnnicationD. 



THE QUESTION OF INDEXES. 

THE Co-operation Committee of the A. L. A., 
has under consideration the possibility of secur- 1 
ing the preparation of indexes to books which 
especially need good indexes, but have been 
published with a poor index or with none. I 
shall be glad to receive suggestions based on 
experience but not necessarily in the lan- 
guage immediately resulting from such ex- 
perience as to books which most need this 
attention. 

WM. H. TILLINGHAST, Chairman. 

IN FOR MA TION AS TO MUSIC LIBRARIES 
If A NTED. 

I AM anxious to make a complete list of libra- 
ries containing music, either for reference or 
circulation. Librarians of all such libraries 
who have not recently received a letter of in- 
quiry regarding their music department from 
the New York State Library, would confer a 
favor by writing to me. MARY S. CUTLER. 

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, I 
March 5, 1897. f 

OPINIONS WANTED ON THE BROWNE 
CHARGING SYSTEM. 

WILL those libraries which have adopted the 
charging system described in LIBRARY JOUR- 
NAL, May, 1895, please send word to that effect 
and whether satisfactory or otherwise, to 

NINA E. BROWNE. 
Bos 



ITON ATHENAEUM, ) 
Boston, Mass. ) 



REINCORPORATION OF THE A. L. A. 

FOR one, I am opposed to the proposition to 
make the A. L. A. over into a government- 
supported institution, and an attachment to 
the Smithsonian Institution, with its Proceed- 
ings issued from the Government Printing 
Office, like those of the American Historical 
Association. The latter association considers 
itself fortunate when its Proceedings appear 
from that cave of gloom two years after the 
annual meeting therein reported. The A. L. A. 
is quite familiar with the experience of waiting 
six and eight months for its Conference num- 
ber of the LIBRARY JOURNAL through no 
fault, of course, of your staff, and of course 
through no fault of the unsalaried and other- 
wise busy recorder; but I submit that to treble 
or quadruple that hiatus would be more than 
the most patient among us could bear. The 
saving of expense, in the publication of our 
Confetence proceedings, would be a small 
matter; a far more acceptable reform would be 
the expenditure of enough additional money 
to engage a professional editor to rush the 
Conference number to press, and give the re- 
sult to us not later than three weeks after the 
close of the post-conference tour. This is an 
entirely practicable reform, which should sure- 
ly be adopted at the Philadelphia Conference 
this year. MACKINAC. 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



129 



THE TRIALS OF THE LIBRARIAN.* 
BY CAROLINE H. GARLAND, Dover (N. ff.) Public Library. 



WELL brought up people do not usually dis- 
cuss family trials and grievances outside the 
immediate domestic circle. This privilege is 
generally reserved for the sanctity of the home 
and for the helplessness of the ear that cannot 
get away. Barrie makes Barbara say to the 
little minister, "It must be fine to be able to 
speak for a whole hour to people who can 
neither answer back nor go away." But while 
sometimes persons who can neither answer 
back nor go away are chosen as an audience 
when one elects to pour out the woes that 
afflict him to-day, the worries that annoyed him 
yesterday, and the troubles he expects to have 
to-morrow, more often it is, as to-day, persons 
in whom one counts on a sympathetic ear 
who are rasped by the same causes, who are 
balked in the same aims, who ache in the 
same place. . 

That there must be great good experienced 
in the consideration of afflictions is proba- 
ble, since so many excellent people do it. 
Surely a practice so widely supported should 
not be neglected by persons desiring to experi- 
ence all the good things of life. Yet for us 
the opportunity does not often present itself. 
In the sacred and dignified counsels of the A. 
L. A., where not only brethren but strangers 
meet, it would be rank heresy to introduce so 
strictly a personal subject. But here, among 
this gathering of more nearly related people, 
just as New Englanders, the family, so to 
speak, one may be allowed to admit, indeed 
even to assert, with boldness and hardihood, 
that the path of the librarian is not at all times 
bestrewn with roses, but that there are in it 
very distinct and tangible trials. 

There will be at the outset a difference of 
opinion as to the nature of trials. No two per- 
sons, however experienced in the detection of 
uncomfortable things, will exactly agree as to 
the reason of their discomfort. There is noth- 
ing else which demands nicer judgment and 



* Paper read at joint meeting of Connecticut Library 
Association with New England Library Associations, 
Hartford, Ct., Feb. 3, 1897. 



keener fairness of intention than a correct per- 
ception of what actually constitutes a trial. 
There are some excellent persons who, by 
very reason of their excellence and because 
of the intensity of their goodness and ardent 
aspirations, sigh because they have not more 
hands and feet to work with and that there 
are not more hours in a day; while others re- 
gret that they are not in positions of wider 
range, forgetting that the extension of one's 
horizon usually means simply the seeing of 
more, not different things, and that the country 
beyond is often very like the country near. So 
it is not limitations of that kind that have a 
place in any recital of woes, but rather those 
things which present themselves, often need- 
lessly, to the experience of the well-meaning 
librarian, giving him annoyance, and demand- 
ing a consideration which seems out of propor- 
tion to their magnitude. 

One affliction of this kind and one which 
we have probably all met with and suffered 
from is that whenever well-meaning friends 
wish to do the nice thing by their librarian 
they call him a walking encyclopaedia. It is 
fortunate for whoever invented this phrase 
that his name is lost in obscurity. But ob- 
livion is really much too kind a fate for him. 
Something in boiling oil would be more to his 
deserts. The phrase itself is an abomination to 
the ear and a terror to the imagination, but 
once applied, possesses a frightful tenacity of 
adhesiveness, which protests only serve to in- 
crease. The librarian may be by nature of 
light-hearted disposition, possibly with a ten- 
dency to joke. He loves his neighbor, and 
probably does the very things which draw this 
stigma upon him out of an abounding desire to 
do his whole duty by his fellow-man. But 
after the evil hour when some one in mistaken 
gratitude applies to him this monstrous appel- 
lation, life is changed. Thereafter his neigh- 
bors set him on a different level from them- 
selves. They regard any small error on his 
part with pained astonishment. They bring 
their visitors from out of town to see him, and 
they brag a little on him right before him. 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



They look askance at his light-heartedness and 
regard his jokes with suspicion; when they 
meet him on the street they hesitate to make 
nice every-day remarks about the weather, but 
cast about in their minds to recall the latest 
scientific work of which they have read the 
title, to ask him if it is in the library yet. And 
they simply will not let him go right along, 
doing his duty simply and straightforwardly to 
the best of his ability, asking only a fair field 
and no favors. This, I think, is a genuine 
trial. 

Another difficulty is that you may lead a 
horse to water but you cannot make him 
drink. This truth has been long established. 
Yet many a sanguine reformer, on large or 
small scale, regulates his conduct of life on the 
basis that all one has to do to insure the 
desired result is to show the duty that needs 
to be done to the person that should do it. A 
perennial surprise awaits this sanguine person, 
be he librarian, teacher, minister, or whatever. 
He sees again and again, in the language of 
the day, a failure to connect. This shock is 
not easy to rally from. He feels so sure of his 
own good intentions, so certain of the excel- 
lence of the end toward which he has worked, 
so positive that if the other man would but do 
what was expected of him, all would be well; 
and yet the horse will not drink. If his hope- 
fulness be only a surface thing, well enough 
as far as it goes, but not going very far or deep, 
the person who deliberately adopts as his call- 
ing leading horses to drink, or something so 
like it that it is not necessary to specify the 
difference, will recognize his limitation of 
capacity and consider that his responsibility 
ends there and then. But it is not the person 
who only recognizes things as they are, or 
the person who only looks forward to things 
as they should be, who has the true range of 
vision. It is the one who does both; and it is 
the person who, recognizing the fact that one 
cannot be made to do yet may be induced to 
want to do, that is best fitted to deal with his 
fellow-creatures. 

This recognition of inability to compel leads 
the librarian then to a study of attraction, or 
perhaps more correctly, attractiveness. There 
is a mistaken notion that this quality is a gift of 
nature. This is no more true than that truth- 
fulness or any other virtue is a gift of nature. 
It is true that nature may help or hinder. Un- 



doubtedly some children, being courageous 
and straightforward by nature, find it more 
easy to tell the truth than others more timid. 
In like manner nature grants certain surface 
gifts to some people which make attractiveness 
more easy than to others, but the underlying 
principles of both virtues are acquired, are 
grown, are developed from a force within, and 
are equally a duty. 

The wisdom of stimulating desire rather than 
relying on capacity becomes evident when one 
considers the deadly inertness of the mass 
which a librarian tries to reach. The tragic 
end resulting from a conflict of enthusiasm 
with this inertness is thus described by Kip- 
ling, and though he is speaking of the mis- 
sionary in India it may not be amiss for the 
missionary in New England to hearken: 

" It is not good for the Christian's health to hustle the 

Aryan brown, 
For the Christian riles, and the Aryan smiles, and it 

weareth the Christian down; 
And the end of the fight is a tombstone white, with the 

name of the late deceased, 
And the epitaph drear, A fool lies here, who tries to 

hustle the East." 

Another thing that often seems a trial is the 
impossibility of considering the public as a 
psychological whole. Humanity may not by 
us be regarded as an ocean, but rather as a 
pebbly shore, the coast-line of which may be 
studied in trend, but every atom of which has 
an invincible individuality. The standpoint of 
the public school is different. They are doing 
much there in the way of studying child as a 
whole. It is somewhat the fashion among 
smart writers to hold these efforts up to deri- 
sion, and it must be confessed that many of the 
psychological terms lend themselves easily to 
purposes of ridicule on the part of flippant 
newspaper writers. But whether these jibes 
have or have not a basis of truth, it is a fact 
that teachers deal with youthful humanity in 
the bulk as librarians never can do. The 
teacher takes his apportionment of young life, 
already fitted up to a certain point, adds to it 
his own stint, and passes the group on to the 
next higher grade. The librarian is the teacher 
of an ungraded school every person is indi- 
vidual, differentiated from any other person 
not only by acquirement, but by temperament 
and desire. 

This would be an almost intolerable trial 
were it not that along this line lie also some of 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



the most-to-be desired opportunities. When 
Clark University was opened, a few years ago, 
there were 900 applicants for membership. 
Only 60 were received. This was partly be- 
cause the requirements were high, but princi- 
pally because it was not thought that more 
than this number could come into that personal 
contact with the instructors that was deemed 
the most to be desired in this work. A short 
time ago Princeton University called within its 
borders delegates from all the great institutions 
of learning in this and other countries and for 
a week devoted itself to masterly intellectual 
work. The interest of the week culminated in 
the sermon preached by the president of the 
university. He chose for his subject " Char- 
acter-building." 

Now nowhere in the world is the opportunity 
more open for the two things emphasized by 
these great institutions, character-building and 
personal contact, than in the daily life of the 
librarian in the moderate-sized New England 
town. This is not a new or original idea, but 
it will bear emphasizing, and will prove useful 
in the hours not unknown to many of us when 
we long for the supporting sense of a great 
thought. 

Beside the difficulties that arise from one's 
dealings with the public there are others that 
come from the relations he sustains to those 
over him and to those under him in authority. 
But of the relations of the librarian and trus- 
tees enough has been already said in the meet- 
ings of the A. L. A. The trials that one may 
have with his assistants, however, opens a 
wide and fruitful field. When I undertook this 
paper, this was the side of the subject that ap- 
pealed to me ; but a little honest reflection con- 
vinced me that in all probability the trials a 
librarian may have with his assistants were as 
moonlight unto sunlight and as water unto 
wine compared with the trials an assistant may 
have with her librarian. So until an assistant 
shall have a chance to speak for her side I 
have decided not to speak for mine, but to omit 
that branch of the subject altogether. 

All the tribulations thus far enumerated have 
their origin in things outside and cannot them- 
selves be set aside or entirely removed, though 
they may sometimes be altered or even made 
use of by that person who has learned to 

" Grasp the skirts of happy chance, 
And breast the blows of circumstance." 



But there is another set of afflictions which 
we have always with us. They lie down with 
us at night and alas ! rise up with us in the 
morning. They lodge and abide with us. 
They come not from without, but are born 
within. When I was a little girl and was taken 
regularly to the Friday evening prayer-meeting, 
I remember often joining in one sing-song-ey 
verse, the truth of which has in later years 
been made clear by sorrowful experience. It 
runs thus : 

" But of all the foes we meet 
None so oft mislead our feet 
None betray us into sin 
Like the foes we have within." 

Eugene Field makes known his conscious- 
ness of the same idea and remotely suggests its 
remedy in his small boy who has been " seeing 
fings at night," 

" But when I hear the naughty boys that tempt me into 

sin, 
I try to sqush the tempter's voice that urges me within." 

The troubles that come to a librarian for 
which he himself is responsible, though often 
unconsciously, usually arise from inadequate 
physical health, insufficient mental equipment, 
or temper. Health comes first, because with- 
out doubt the fault oftenest lies there. The 
head of a library, whether of a large library, 
where many different departments must be 
made to fit into one another and make one 
smoothly running whole, or of a small library, 
where the work becomes not only overseeing 
but actually doing, should keep himself in ex- 
cellent physical condition. 

The mental scientists have one good phrase. 
They say one should be not merely negatively 
but positively well. Perhaps some persons will 
think that the impersonal pronoun should here 
be changed, and one should say instead of the 
librarian he, the librarian she should look out 
for her health. There has long been conceded 
to women the weaker place in health. Howells 
in one of his books I quote from memory 
makes two of his characters discuss the chang- 
ing relations of men and women in the business 
world ; one speaks of the advance of woman in 
all lines of professional life, and of her positive 
superiority to men in certain lines of work. 

" Yes," asserts the other, thoughtfully. " I 
don't know what would become of us men if 
women just didn't have nervous headaches." 

Now there is just enough truth in this to 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{March, '97 



make it sting a little, but I have of ten wondered 
whether in the line of library work the matter 
were not more nearly even than we generally 
think. In looking over a group of library peo- 
ple I think an unbiassed person will find as 
many clear eyes, erect shoulders, and elastic 
footsteps among the women as among the men, 
and in my own experience the amount of time 
lost from not feeling well is as large among my 
masculine as among the feminine helpers, with- 
out counting in football. But disregarding the 
man or woman side, the subject of health is a 
most practical one to consider, for fully two- 
thirds of the things which are almost intolera- 
ble trials if .one is partly ill do not ruffle one in 
the least if he is well. The first thing then to 
do to avoid needless trials is to achieve person- 
al health, and this is possible if one remembers 
that the laws of health are like the laws of the 
jungle, 

" many and mighty are they, 

But the head and the hoof of the law and the haunch and 
the hump is, obey ! " 

From the physical to the mental is but a 
step, and allied to the evils that arise from an 
insufficiently nourished physical system are the 
difficulties based on inadequate mental action. 
In youth, when new sensations and emotions 
are chasing one another into his experience, 
one supposes that he is a mysterious and 
unique creation, probably unlike any other on 
the face of the earth; but that larger observa- 
tion which may or may not come with a few 
years more of life will convince him that his 
mental nature is not more different from that of 
his neighbor than is his physical. He even 
learns to see that there are many ways in which 
the mental nature resembles the physical. It 
must be fed with the things which are at once 
nutritious and congenial. It must be trained to 
habitual correctness of attitude and carriage, 
and, especially, it must be used. Now few 
people will accuse librarians of having inactive 
minds; the very nature of their calling insures 
the reverse. But activity within the range of 
work is the outgrowth of necessity. That only 
is of value personally which is acquired in and 
of itself for the pleasure of the exerc : se. These 
two conditions are as dissimilar as the sluggish 
current of a canal, which makes useful all its 
force, and the singing fall of the full stream, 
which gives and to spare. 

With the physical and the mental in good 



order, there is yet another thing to be looked 
out for. Drummond says that the peculiarity 
of ill-temper is that it is the vice of the virtu- 
ous. Years ago, when I received my appoint- 
ment as librarian, one of my friends said: 
" Now that's all very well, but don't get cross." 
" Why should I get cross ? " I asked. " Oh, I 
don't know," she said; " but they always do 
librarians and cooks. I suppose it's because 
they have to get things just so." 

Undoubtedly the habit of accuracy makes 
larger demands upon the temper than a form 
of life in which small errors may be tolerated, 
but on the other hand there are attending it 
larger compensations. It remains for the in- 
dividual to learn to apply the balm of the com- 
pensation to the irritation rubbed up by con- 
stant effort. It is not probable that at the 
present time the public so often suffer from the 
effects of this irritation as does the person him- 
self. It is part of library ethics now that un- 
varying courtesy shall prevail during business 
hours. Librarians themselves recognize that 
anything else is distinctly bad form. This 
restraint sometimes makes a person take out 
on himself what perhaps might be a relief to 
take out on other people, because he makes the 
mistake of curbing his ill-temper instead of 
eliminating it. Self-repression is better than 
nothing, but it is a far cry from that to self- 
control. It has never seemed to me that our 
thought was shielded from the knowledge of 
our fellow-men in order that safely and secretly 
one might indulge in reflections of impurity, 
or harshness, or severity, but rather that the 
processes of growth might be carried on in 
that stillness and quiet and freedom from in- 
terruption which Nature demands for her work. 
The development of sweetening qualities within 
one in no way interferes with that sturdy con- 
demnation of wrong which is naturally associ- 
ated with strength of moral character, nor does 
it militate against a healthy intolerance of poor- 
ly-done work ; but their growth crowds away 
the elements that make up ill-temper just as the 
swelling bulb parts the earth from over itself. 

For the cure, then, or at least the alleviation 
of trials, one will not try so much to control his 
circumstances as to control himself under cir- 
cumstances. As a help toward this he will 
demand of himself health of body, activity of 
mind, sweetness of spirit. Is this much ? Who 
wants less ? 



March, 97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



'33 



WEEDING OUT FICTION IN THE CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY OF ALLE- 
GHENY, PA. 

BY W: M. STEVENSON, Librarian. 



THE exclusion of certain authors from the 
shelves of the Carnegie Free Library, Alle- 
gheny, Pa., has started the old fiction contro- 
versy afresh. For over a year the books of 
certain popular authors had been worn out but 
the people kept asking for them constantly. 

When the supplement to the fiction list was 
issued last January it was thought advisable to 
print a list of authors whose works were worn 
out and which would not be replaced and to 
add some annotations by a reviewer for the 
New York Nation (taken from the "List of books 
for girls and women," by Augusta H. Leypoldt 
and George lies), in order that the public might 
see how these authors are estimated by a com- 
petent critic and not think that the librarian 
was acting arbitrarily in the matter. 

The local press pretty generally condemned 
the action and took particular offence at the 
shattering of that popular idol, Rev. E. P. Roe. 
But teachers and others concerned in the right 
training of the young commended the librari- 
an's action, as was to be expected. . 

The list includes the novels of Horatio Alger, 
Jr., Mrs. C. M. Braeme (" Bertha M. Clay"), 
Martha Finley (Elsie books), May Agnes Flem- 
ing, C. A. Fosdick (" Harry Castlemon "), A. C. 
Gunter, Mary Jane Holmes, E: P. Roe, Mrs. E. 
D. E. (N.) South worth, Mrs. M. V, (H.) Ter- 
hune (" Marion Harland") (in part), and Mrs. 
Augusta J. Evans Wilson. The reasons as- 
signed for withdrawing these books are: First, 
their low rank in the literary scale ; they are not 
immoral, but they are not literature. Sec- 
ondly, the books are made of such poor pa- 
per, so badly bound, and so high in price in 
proportion to their value as reading, that the 
library's funds are utterly inadequate to supply 
the demand for them. Thirdly, the theory ad- 
vanced by librarians of standing, that readers 
to whom books of this grade are supplied will 
gradually rise to something better, has proved 
in the six years' experience of this library abso- 
lutely false. To the young, who have no per- 
sonal literary guides, it is particularly an in- 
justice for the public library to put it in their 
power to acquire thus early in life a vitiated 
taste in their reading, a fault which long years 
of study may not suffice to correct. Fourthly, 



school principals have complained that many 
of their pupils were reading books of this grade 
to the gross neglect of their school studies. 

The question may be properly asked, why 
some authors have been excluded and others 
of no greater merit retained? Why retain "Op- 
tic " and exclude AL^er? Why retain the 
"Duchess" and exclude Mary Jane Holmes? 
The answer is that it is very difficult to draw 
the line between the fiction writers of the lower 
grade and that a number of authors who ought 
to be excluded have been retained simply be- 
cause their books are made of a little better 
paper than that of the excluded books. As 
soon as these are worn out they will also be 
added to the " black list." 

Readers of the LIBRARY JOURNAL mav ask 
further the pertinent question, why the libra- 
rian of this library placed these books on the 
shelves in the first place? The answer is that 
after an experience of ten years as teacher he 
was satisfied that the only way to inculcate a 
fondness for good literature in the young is to 
give them nothing but good literature to read. 
But having had no library experience prior to 
his present appointment seven years ago, he 
was willing to defer to the opinion of such 
eminent librarians as the late Dr. Poole and F. 
B. Perkins. Dr. Poole says in his article on 
the " Organization and management of public 
libraries" ("Public libraries of the United 
States," page 476): " One of the primary objects 
of a public library is to furnish reading for all 
classes in the community, and reading which 
shall be adapted to their various capacities. 
The masses of the public have very little of 
literary culture, and it is the purpose of a 
public library to develop it by creating In them 
a habit of reading. As a rule people read 
books of a higher intellectual and moral stand- 
ard than their own, and hence are benefited by 
reading. As their tastes improve they read 
better books. Books which are not adapted to 
their intellectual capacity they will not read. 
To meet, therefore, the varied wants of read- 
ers there must be on the shelves of the library 
books which persons of culture never read, 
although it is quite probable they did read 
such books in some stage of their mental 



134 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\March % '97 



development. Judged from a critical stand- 
point, such books are feeble, rudimentary, and 
perhaps sensational; but they are higher in 
the scale of literary merit than the tastes of 
the people who seek them, and, like primers 
and first readers in the public schools, they 
fortunately lead to something better." Mr. F. 
B. Perkins, in the same volume, in his article 
on " How to make town libraries successful 
(p. 420), says: "The first mistake likely to be 
made in establishing a public library is choos- 
ing books of too thoughtful or solid a char- 
acter. It is Tain to go on the principle of col- 
lecting books that people ought to read, and 
afterwards trying to coax them to read them. 
The only practical method is to begin by sup- 
plying books that people want to read, and 
afterwards to do whatever shall be found possi- 
ble to elevate their reading tastes and habits." 

As Dr. Poole was librarian of the Chicago 
Public Library when he wrote the article, and 
as that institution contained nearly all the 
books recently withdrawn from this library, it 
is reasonable to infer that they came under the 
class described above as " feeble, rudimentary, 
and perhaps sentimental, which fortunately 
lead to something belter." And as the Boston 
Public Library contains the works of Holmes, 
Roe, Southworth, etc. (see " Catalogue of Eng- 
lish prose fiction," 1885), it is also fair to assume 
that books of this kind had Mr. Perkins's ap- 
proval as the "books that people want to 
read." Members of the A. L. A. will remember 
Dr. Poole's witty remarks at the Chicago con- 
ference in 1893 when the subject of "Weeding 
out public libraries" was discussed, and how 
vigorously he opposed any such policy, He 
was evidently very democratic in his ideas of 
library management, and believed in the pub- 
lic taking care of itself in the matter of choos- 
ing its reading. 

It may be added that at the opening of this 
library the books recently withdrawn were not 
on the original list of fiction selected by the 
librarian. He had followed closely the excel- 
lent list of Miss H. P. James, of the Osterhout 
Free Library, but the popular clamor for the 
old-time favorites was too strong to be with- 
stood. A school library in this city and a 
proprietary library in Pittsburg had been sup- 
plying such books for many years and the pub- 
lic taste could not be easily changed. More- 
over, members of the board of trustees said, 
"Above all things make the library popular." 

Now, what has been the result? The theory 



of improved taste in reading has proved utter- 
ly false. The percentage of adult fiction has 
been rising steadily since the library opened, 
and that, too, in the face of the fact that the 
fiction supply has been greatly curtailed. Here 
are the figures for the six years: in 1891-1892 
adult fiction, 56$; in 1892-1893,60^; in 1893- 
1894, 63 #; in 1894-1895, 67^; in 1895-1896, 
67 # plus; in 1896-1897(11 months) 68 #. 

On the other hand, the juvenile fiction 'has 
steadily declined, as follows: 33 #, 30%, 26$, 
21%, 19$, and 17$ for the eleven months of 
1896-1897 just passed. This may be a hopeful 
sign if it means that the young are reading less 
fiction and more of other classes. Unfortunate- 
ly no statistics have been kept of ihe percent- 
age of juvenile reading in the non-fiction 
classes, but the well-worn appearance of the 
books indicates a decided increase in use. Com- 
bining the adult and juvenile fiction the per- 
centages for the six years are as follows: 89, 90, 
89, 88, 86, 84. These figures seem to indicate a 
slight improvement, but it is to be strongly 
suspected that the decline in the juvenile per- 
centage means simply that as the juvenile 
supply of fiction was reduced the young have 
taken to the so-called adult fiction. The 
desk attendants have frequently reported that 
very young girls were reading nothing but 
Clay, Fleming, and Southworth. A prominent 
educator asked me recently if I knew of any 
way by which his daughter could be induced to 
read something else than story-books. I re- 
plied that that was the question that baffled 
librarians as well as parents. It was discovered 
here that boys in the public schools were run- 
ning races in the reading of Alger and "Optic," 
one boy averaging a volume a day for several 
weeks. 

Now that the supply of boys' books is made 
up chiefly of the writings of Henty, Fenn, Mun- 
roe, and the like, these books are almost as pop- 
ular with the boys as ever the Alger or " Optic " 
books were. It is evident that as long as the 
vulgarizing books for the young are within their 
reach, they will prefer them to those which en- 
noble. There is still a good deal of the bar- 
barian in the average boy, and the novel of 
blood and destruction is just what he takes to 
naturally. It is this- barbarian element in the 
young which is the basis of strength of char- 
acter, and which when properly trained devel- 
ops some of the most admirable traits. Is 
it not the duty of the public library to supply 
boys with books which will make them wish to 



March) '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



'35 



be honorable citizens rather than cowboys or 
Indian killers ? 

The two-book rule has been in force in this 
library for almost a year, and school-cards al- 
lowing 10 volumes of non-fiction books at a 
time have also been in force for over six months, 
but the decline in the fiction percentage as a 
result of that is almost inappreciable. 

In addition to the evidence of statistics I may 
say that I have taken pains to follow the read- 
ing of certain devotees of this kind of literature, 
fiction-fiends, as they might be called, and I 
have never yet discovered a case of improve- 
ment among adult readers. Once the habit is 
formed it seems as difficult to throw off as the 
opium habit. Of course, there are many culti- 
vated people who have read in their youth 
trashy novels, but have they not attained to 
culture, not by virtue of such reading, but in 
spite of it ? We hear a good deal about the 
overworked in large cities who need light fic- 
tion. But the most inveterate fiction-readers 
are among the idlest class in the community. 
Again the argument is used that as all classes 
are taxed for library purposes all classes of 
reading ought to be represented. But the fic- 
tion-readers for the most part are not heavy 
taxpayers, and even if they were the propor- 
tion of fiction in most public libraries is much 
larger than that of any other class of books. 

In an article in the LIBRARY JOURNAL (v. 20, 
p. 342) on "Fiction in public libraries," by Mr. 
E. H. Woodruff, this library is represented as 
having (in 1891-92) the highest percentage (90) 
of fiction in theUnited States, and this wasproba- 
bly not far from the truth. It ought to be said, 
however, in justice to this library, that a good 
many books are classified as fiction that in other 
libraries are not so classified. Some libraries, 
like the Chicago and Los Angeles public libra" 
ries, do not count foreign and magazine fiction 
in the general fiction percentage, and thus 
their figures are really an underestimate. But 
even after making allowance of this kind the 
fiction percentage of this library, it must be ad- 
mitted, has been too high. It must be borne in 
mind, however, that the reference use has 
been uncommonly large, some years more than 
one-half as much as the home use. 

The theory that the character of a community 
is indicated by the percentage of fiction circu- 
lated from the public library does not seem to be 
well founded. If the character of the communi- 
ty counts for anything the city of Allegheny 



ought to have a low percentage of fiction cir- 
culated. It is the very heart of Presbyterian- 
ism in the United States. It is the seat of a 
time-honored and prosperous university, of 
three theological seminaries, much renowned 
in their respective denominations. It has ex- 
cellent public and private schools. It has had 
a public school library for over 20 years. It is 
largely a residence city, with a large class of 
leisure and wealth. What better conditions 
for cultivating a high standard of reading ! 
Salem is the oldest settlement in Massachu- 
setts, and despite its witchcraft stain, is a town 
of noble traditions in literature and science, 
and yet the percentage of fiction circulated 
from the public library last year was 84.62 per 
cent, and the Boston Public Library prints no 
fiction percentage in its last report, leaving 
one to infer that it is too high to be a credit to 
that institution. Strange to say, some Western 
libraries make a much better showing in this 
regard than the older Eastern libraries. Is it 
not fair to conclude, then, that the percentage of 
fiction circulated in any given community 
will depend mainly on the quantity and quality 
supplied by the public library? 

After all the fiction question remains the 
vital question for librarians. If the public li- 
brary is not first and foremost an educational 
institution, it has no right to exist. If it exists 
for mere entertainment, and a low order of en- 
tertainment at that, it is simply a socialistic in- 
stitution, and Goldwin Smith is right when he 
says, " Circulating libraries, maintained at the 
expense of the ratepayer, may fairly rank as 
socialistic, since people have no more right to 
novels than to theatre tickets out of the public 
taxes." ("Essays on questions of the day," 
p. 17.) 

It is the fashion nowadays to blame all our 
social ills on democracy. No doubt the same 
causes that have produced democracy and are 
now tending ever more and more to expand it, 
tend also to a constant lowering of the stand- 
ard of reading and with the march of democ- 
racy the fiction percentage in public libraries, 
unless checked, will grow still larger year by 
year. But there is to be seen in many quarters 
a tendency in the opposite direction. The A. 
L. A. catalog, the select and annotated lists of 
many libraries, and reading aids of all kinds 
are doing an excellent work, and many public 
libraries are in fact as well as in name true 
universities of the people. 



136 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\_March, '97 



BOOKS OF 1896. II. 

HISTORY. 

Reviewed by J. N. Lamed, Buffalo Library 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Adams, G: B. Growth of the French nation. 

Flood. $i. 

As a book prepared for the Chautauqua se- 
ries, this is necessarily a very condensed sur- 
vey of French history, mainly to outline the 
political development of the nation; but it is 
competently and well done. 
Andrews, C. M. Historical development of 

modern Europe, v. i, 1815-1850. Putnam. 

$2.50. 

The work by Prof. Andrews which this volume 
opens and which a second will finish is, in the 
best sense of the term, a study of history, to 
discover the bearing of events upon one 
another and to find their immediate and their 
final, their separate and their total, effects, as 
well as to detect the antecedent influences con- 
cealed in them. It is fairly open only to the 
criticism of Dr. Levermore in the American 
Historical Review, that it exhibits the political 
rather than the completely " historical " devel- 
opment of modern Europe, since religious, in- 
dustrial, and literary movements are scarcely 
touched. 
Andrews, E. B: History of the last quarter 

century in the U. S., 1870- 1895. 2 v. Scrib- 

ner. $6. 

President Andrews has done much better 
work in this narrative of recent American 
events than in his disappointing two-volume 
general history of the United States. He has 
given us the annals of the last 25 years in what 
may be called the very best possible style of 
illustrated newspaper reporting. The story is 
animated and generally accurate. It is both 
interesting and valuable. 
Ashton, J. When William iv. was king. Ap- 

pleton. $3.50. 

Mr. Ashton is a well-known, industrious com- 
piler, who gleans in the British Museum for 
contemporary pictures and gossip to illustrate 
the manner of English life at different periods. 
His rather easily constructed books are always 
interesting and have a certain measure of in- 
structive usefulness. 
Barnes, Ja. Naval actions of the war of 1812. 

Harper. $4.50. 

It would not be fair to compare this book 
with Mr. Roosevelt's "Naval war of 1812," 
for that is a genuine product of historical study, 
while Mr. Barnes has only compiled a series of 
slight sketches of the more notable sea-fights 
of the war; apparently to accompany a series 
of pictures in color, fancy-painted by Mr. Carle- 
ton T. Chapman. But Mr. Barnes's introduc- 
tory chapter shows that he has performed his 
task with a very scanty general knowledge of 
the war. 
Bigelow, Poulteney. History of the German 

struggle for liberty. 2 v. Harper. $5. 

Mr. Bigelow has written his acrount of what 
Is commonly called "the war of liberation," 
which ended in the overthrow of Napoleon I., 
with a very warm interest in the subject, and 



he has evidently studied it with no small thor- 
oughness; but the study has not been that of a 
historian, in the true sense, nor is the writing 
that of a work which can abide in the litera- 
ture of history. In a way it is interesting, but 
it has the indescribable newspaper tone which 
is fatal to a book. The fanciful illustrations 
help to lower the historical dignity of the work. 
Channing, E., and Hart, A. B. Guide to the 

study of American history. Ginn. $2.15. 

While this little book has been prepared es- 
pecially for teachers, any student or any reader 
of American history who cares to be well 
guided will find it invaluable. It will show him 
how to direct his study or his reading to the 
best advantage, and it will assist his choice of 
topics, while it names and estimates for him 
the books from which he must select. The 
part in which method in teaching and study is 
discussed is most admirable. The bibliography 
is hardly less so, though stronger in some divi- 
sions than in others. 
Coleridge, E. P. Res Romanae. London, G. 

Bell & Son. zs. (>d. 

This is an exceedingly useful small manual 
or reference-book of Roman history, containing 
a multitude of lists, of emperors, colonies, 
roads, military and naval terms, important 
laws, and the like, with condensed dictionaries 
of geography and biography, historical allu- 
sions in Roman poetry, and varieties of in- 
formation too numerous to be detailed here. 
Eggleston, E. Beginners of a nation. Apple- 
ton. $1.50. 

There is more than fair promise, in this first 
volume, of a work of really first-rate impor- 
tance in American history. The aim of Dr. 
Eggleston is to write, not the annals of the 
United States, in the ordinary form of chron- 
ologized history, but an account of the life and 
character of the people, from the beginners of 
settlement and social organization in the sev- 
eral colonies down. The present instalment 
treats of the " Rise of the first English colony," 
"The Puritan migration," and the. "Centrif- 
ugal forces in colony-planting." The chapter 
on Roger Williams in the last-named part is 
especially strong and interesting. 
English, W. H. Conquest of the country 

northwest of the river Ohio, 1778-1783. 

Bowen-Merrill. $6. 

This laborious work will greatly assist some 
future writer to prepare an adequate life of 
George Rogers Clarke and to narrate the con- 
quest of the Old Northwest. It is a collection 
of valuable materials, unskilfully put together, 
and the style of writing lacks almost all good 
qualities. 
Gerard, J. What was the gunpowder plot ? 

Lond., Osgood, Mcllvaine & Co. 6s. 

Faith in the old story of "the gunpowder 
plot," which stands unquestioned in most Eng- 
lish histories', is seriously shaken by the in- 
quiries started in this book. Father Gerard 
shows many and strong reasons for concluding 
that the real plotter in the case was Robert 
Cecil, Earl of Salisbury, the chief minister of 
James i., who contrived the conspiracy as a 
trap for the Catholics, whom he treacherously 






March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



137 



inveigled into it. Some, who sold themselves 
as decoys, became victims grimly sacrificed. 
Suspicions to this effect were rife at an early 
day, but gradually died out. They are now 
effectively revived. 

Gibbon, E. Decline and fall of the Roman em- 
pire; ed. by J. B. Bury. Macmillan. $2. 
Gibbon's immortal work holds its supreme 
place; nothing new supersedes it; but time has 
brought enough of fresh discoveries in Roman 
and Byzantine history, even since Milman and 
Smith annotated the great narrative, to de- 
mand a new edition under careful editorship. 
Prof. Bury, historian of the later empire, is 
specially qualified .for the much-needed work. 
Janssen, J. History of the German people at 
close of the Middle Ages. v. i, 2. Herder. 
net, $6.25. 

This is a valuable study, from a Roman 
Catholic standpoint, of the condition of affairs 
and the state of feeling among the German 
people at the beginning of the Reformation 
movement. 

Longstreet, Gen. Ja. From Manassas to Appo- 
mattox. Lippincott. $4. 
Published 30 years after the ending of the 
civil war, General Longstreet's narrative of 
his experiences as a military leader in it, on 
the beaten side, is a more valuable contribu- 
tion to history than it would have been if given 
earlier. He was one of the first to accept its 
results without reserve; he suffered obloquy, 
and time has vindicated him; he can write now 
with calmness of temper and with more clear- 
ness of vision than during the heat of either 
his military or his political fighting days. 
McCurdy. History, prophecy, and the monu- 
ments, v. 2. MacmilUn. $3. 
It is probably safe to say that, for English 
readers, there is no other work yet written 
which sheds upon Jewish history so much of 
the side-light that has been opened within the 
last few years from the monuments and docu- 
ments discovered in Egypt and the Asiatic 
Bible lands. Prof. McCurdy writes with large 
authoritative knowledge, and with the capacity 
of mind which comprehends history in its wider 
reaches. 

March, Thos. History of the Paris Commune 
of 187 r. Macmillan. $2. 
Apparently a painstaking collection of facts, 
but uninterestingly written. 
Marx, Karl. Revolution and counter-revolu- 
tion; or, Germany in 1848. Scribner. $i. 
This little book is a reprint of letters written 
to the New York Tribune in 1851-2 by Karl 
Marx from London. They are most interest- 
ing as showing with how sane and sound a 
judgment "Marx looked at the revolutionary 
movements of 1848 in his own country, from 
which he had been already an exile for several 
years. 

Morris, W. O'C. Ireland, 1494-1868. Cam- 
bridge Univ. Press. 6s. 

Judge Morris is a civilian historian whose 
apparent ambition is to be a military critic, and 
who strives to look at history with the military 
eye. His view of causes and effects, and of 
the quieter forces and movements in human 



affairs, is apt to be obscured by the smoke of 
battles and the dust of armies on the match. 
O'Brien, W. P. The great famine in Ireland. 

Lond., Downey. IQJ. 6<f. 

A dry but useful collection of facts relating to 
the terrible famine and its after-consequences, 
largely from official sources. 
Muir, Sir W. Mameluke or slave dynasty of 

Egypt, 1260-1517 A.D. Lond., Smith & E. 

ioj. 6//. 

For an important period of Egyptian history 
this is the only book that will give much to an 
English reader. 
Powell. W. H. The Fifth army corps (Army of 

the Potomac). Putnam, net, $7.50. 

This does not compare favorably with the late 
General Walker's " History of the Second army 
corps" as a piece of military work, but it fur- 
nishes a valuable record of the great deeds 
and sufferings of one of the most famous of 
the lesser armies which made up the mighty 
Army of the Potomac. 
Sloane, W. Life of Napoleon Bonaparte, v. 

1-2. Century, subs., ea., $7. 

A life of Napoleon which does justice to the 
phenomenal powers of the unscrupulous and vul- 
gar adventurer, without encouraging admira- 
tion and hero worship, is a work to be greatly 
welcomed. Professor Sloane has studied thor- 
oughly and written well, and his history puts 
all its predecessors on the same subject into 
the background. We may hope, perhaps, for 
a new edition of it, some day, in volumes of 
more manageable size, with non- historical 
pictures, drawn from the imagination of ambi- 
tious artists, dropped out. 
Thwaites, R. G., ed. Jesuit relations, v. 1-2. 

Burrows. *?., $3.50. 

Unquestionably the most important historical 
publication of the year is that begun in two 
volumes of Mr. Thwaites's great collection of 
the "Jesuit relations and allied documents," 
with an English translation accompanying the 
original text. It is opening to all students and 
all readers the precious hidden mine from 
which Parkman extracted so much of his fas- 
cinating French-American and Huron-Iroquois 
history. Its effect will be to greatly increase 
the attention given to that attractive historical 
field, in which Mr. Thwaites has succeeded 
Mr. Parkman as the leader of research. 

BIOGRAPHY. 

Reviewed by Miss M. S. Cutler, N. Y. State 
Library. Divided into two class? s: " The most 
valuable biographies " and " the most popular 
biographies," as follows: 

Some of the most valuable biographies of 1896. 
Barrie. Barrie, J. M. Margaret Ogilvy. 

Scribner. $1.25. 
Holmes. Morse, J: T../V. Life and letters of 

Oliver Wendell Holmes. 2 v. Houghton. 

f7- 

Probably the most notable biography of the 
year, considering real value and general inter- 
est. 
Hutchinson. Hosmer, J. K. Life of Thomas 

Hutchinson. Houghton. $4. 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



Counterpart to his Samuel Adams; this is the 
first careful life of Hutchinson that has been 
written. 
Jeanne cTArc. Lowell, F. C. Joan of Arc. 

Houghton. $2. 

Prof. H. Morse Stephens says of it in the 
September New World: " Distinctly the best 
thing in the English language upon the life of 
the maid of Orleans." 
Richelieu. Lodge, Richard. Richelieu. Mac- 

millan. 75 c. 

A distinct acquisition because it supplies the 
need of a good popular life of Richelieu. The 
Bookman calls it "almost a model of short bi- 
ography." 
Romanes, G: J: Life and letters. Longmans. 

$4- 
Rossetti, D. G. Family letters; with a memoir 

by W: M. Rossetti. 2 v. Roberts. $6.50. 
Sheridan. Rae,W:F. Sheridan. 2 v. Holt, 

$7- 

Washington. Wilson, Woodrow. George 
Washington. Harper. $3. 

Popular biographies of 1896. 
Bronte. Shorter, C. K. Charlotte Bronte and 

her circle. Dodd. $2.50. 

Clark, Mrs. M. C. My long life. Dodd. $2. 
Field, Mrs. A. A. Authors and friends. 

Houghton. $1.50. 

Similar in scope to J. T. Field's "Yesterdays 
with authors." 
Lampson, F: Locker. My confidences. Scrib- 

ner. $5. 
Lincoln. Tarbell, I. M., and Davis, J. M. 

Early life of Abraham Lincoln. McClure. 

$i. 

Madison. Goodwin, Mrs. M. W. Dolly Madi- 
son. Scribner. $1.25. 
Mitchell, Maria. Life, letters, and journals. 

Lee. $i. 

Navarro, Mrs. Mary Anderson de. A few mem- 
ories. Harper. $2.50. 
Renan, Ernest and Henriette. Brother and 

sister: a memoir and letters. Macmillan. 

$2.25. 
Roland. Tarbell, I. M. Madame Roland. 

Scribner. $1.50. 

The author had access to new material, and 
the book should perhaps take the place of 
Blind's " Madame Roland " in the " Catalog of 
the ' A. L. A.' Library." 
Ward, Mrs. E. S. Phelps. Chapters from a 

Hfe. Houghton. $1.50. 

The village library buying only a few books 
would do well to combine a selection from the 
"valuable biographies of 1896" and "popu- 
lar biographies of 1896." Hare's "Story of 
my life" should be added to the list; Oliphant's 
"Joan of Arc " should be omitted. 

TRAVEL. 

Reviewed by Miss M. W. Plummer, Pratt In- 
stitute Free Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

There are certain books of travel published 
in 1896 which we need only mention the 
names of the authors alone are a guarantee of 
their excellence or of a great demand. Such 
is Sir John Lubbock's "Scenery of Switzerland 



and causes to which it is due." [Macmillan. 
$1.50.] To be sure, this is almost purely scien- 
tific in its interest so that it would probably by 
most libraries be classed with science rather 
than with travel or description. Stevenson's 
"In the South Seas" is another which there 
can be no doubt about. [Scribner. $1.50.] It 
is criticised as among the poorest of Stevenson's 
work, but even that is on a level with the best of 
most other travellers' achievements. Yriarte's 
"Venice," the new small-sized edition [Coates. 
$3] is another classic that cannot be left out. 

Then there are a few books whose subject re- 
quires that we place them among the desirable 
ones for a library, such as Curtis's " Venezuela, 
a land where it's always summer." [Harper. 
$1.25.] The value of this is chiefly in its time- 
liness, and it is interesting reading but not of 
great importance to the student, being simply the 
collected and Devised sketches of a newspaper 
correspondent. The appendix contains the 
correspondence of the United States and Great 
Britain down to November, 1895. Richard 
Harding Davis's "Three Gringos in Venezuela 
and Central America" [Harper. $1.50] is an- 
other book owing its interest largely to our pres- 
ent interest in Venezuela and in South Amer- 
ican questionsgenerally, though there is always 
a literary note in Mr. Davis's work that makes 
him good reading. The accuracy and fairness 
of the author have been criticised, but even 
granting the justice of the criticism, the book 
need not be spoiled for its purpose of recreative 
reading. Rowan and Ramsey's "Island of 
Cuba" [Holt. $1.25] is another of this class, 
and is compact with information and provided 
with a good index. The book has evidently 
been prepared for the use of students of the 
Cuban question. 

Brehm's "From north pole to equator" 
[Scribner. $6] should perhaps have been in- 
cluded as one of those books whnse admission 
must be taken for granted, since the author of 
the " Tierleben " is known to all librarians and 
lovers of natural history and recognized as one 
of the most interesting as well as accurate 
writers on his subject. The work is a compi- 
lation from his lectures and the illustrations are 
from original drawings. A list of similar 
works by other naturalist travellers is one of 
the valuable features of a very valuable book. 

The rest of the books of travel included may 
be better noted under the names of the coun- 
tries described. 

Japan: Mrs. K. S. Baxter's "In bamboo 
lands" [Merriam. $2.50] is an unpretentious 
book, a plain tale of the experiences of a tourist 
in Japan, and like most unpretentious things 
will be found to have a place and fill a want. 
Her description of social life at the capi'al and 
ports is interesting and doubtless accurate. 

Lafcadio Hearn's "Kokoro" [Houghton. 
$1.25], meaning " Heart," is full of the charm 
and attraction of the Japanese character, of 
which the author has so keen an appreciation. 
It may be compared with that other delightful 
book, Lowell's " Soul of the Far East." 

Knapp's "Feudal and modern Japan " [2 v. 
Knight. $1.50] is a fascinating study of the 



March, '97] 



139 



elements of Japanese character and the inner 
history of the race which culminated so un- 
expectedly a year or two ago in so sudden an 
outburst of power. The author lived in Japan 
two years and had access to the ms. material 
of much older residents. A chapter on "A 
Japanese library " deals with the literature of 
Japan. The illustrations in photogravure are 
excellent, and the book closes with a very use- 
ful classified bibliography. . 

China : Martin's " Cycle of Cathay " [Revell. 
$2] is the work of a man who has lived 60 
years in north and south China as a missionary, 
and one cannot help seeing that h : s book is 
written more or less from an old-fashioned 
point of view. The subject is the Chinese in 
their social and political life, and the book con- 
tains much useful information. 

Italy: Laurence Hutton's "Literary land- 
marks of Venice" [Harper. $i] is a reprint of 
his article in Harper's Monthly, and contains a 
great deal of information that cannot be found 
in ordinary guide-books, or indeed in any other 
one place. As an adjunct to Baedeker, it would 
make a very desirable travelling companion. 

Robertson's " Through the Dolomites from 
Venice to Toblach " [Scribner. $3] is an ac- 
count of the region betwen Italy and Austria, 
which the author asserts and proves to be full 
of historic interest. All the facts necessary for 
tourists' use are given, making the book a 
valuable guide to the region. In this respect 
it is better than Miss Amelia Edwards's book 
on the same subject, which besides is rather 
out of date, having been published in 1873, but 
in literary interest it cannot compare with Miss 
Edwards's work. 

Vuillier's "Forgotten isles" [Appleton. 
$4- 5o], giving impressions of the Balearic 
Islands, Corsica, and Sardinia, has but re- 
cently been translated, but gives one the im- 
pression of a book written in the era of ro- 
mantic travellers. The author's narrative of 
his personal experiences is interspersed with 
tales and legends told him in different places 
by the natives. It iseasy reading, but I should 
say desirable chiefly from the fact that there is 
so little in English on the subject. 

England: Miss Alice Brown's " By oak and 
thorn" [Houghton. $1.25] is a charming col- 
lection of sketches of English travel, perme- 
ated throughout by the keen sense of humor 
which those are familiar with who have read 
her stories. 

Miss Dodd's " On the Broads " [Macmillan. 
$3] deals with the region around Norwich, 
Yarmouth, and Lowestoft, one generally un- 
known to the American tourist, and the subject 
is delightfully treated. 

Mrs. Dorr's " Cathedral pilgrimage" [Mac- 
millan. 75 c.] is a pleasant series of sketches 
in compact form of the cathedrals of Wells, 
Salisbury, Winchester, Canterbury, Ely, Lin- 
coln, York, and Durham. It might easily serve 
as a guide-book, so minute is it in description. 

Rideing's "At Hawarden with Mr. Glad- 
stone " [Crowell. Si] proves to contain also 
brief sketches of Queenstown, Yarmouth, the 
House of Commoni, etc. Some of the papers 



are excellent word-pictures, and the book alto- 
gether is agreeable reading. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward's "Shakespeare's town 
and times " [Truslove. $3] does not claim to 
be a learned biography, but to present the facts 
and their own deductions separately, so that 
the latter may be taken or left; it claims also 
to conserve for us in the shape of excellent 
photogravure illustrations such remains of 
Shakespeare's Stratford as still exist, which 
alone would make it desirable for a library. It 
has a good index and a plan of the town and 
surroundings. 

Africa: Chanler's "Through jungle and 
desert" [Macmillan. $5] would be wanted by 
most American libraries as one of the few 
records of American exploration of the "dark 
continent," even if it were not in itself an in- 
teresting book. 

Loomis's ' ' Eclipse party in Africa " [Roberts. 
$4.50] I have not been able to examine, but the 
name of Professor Loomis is a guarantee of the 
standing of the book, and all genuine records 
of scientific expeditions are desirable. 

Traill's "From Cairo to the Soudan frontier" 
[Way. $1.50] is a reprint of a series of clever 
and witty sketches contributed to the London 
Daily Telegraph. The author, the English his- 
torian, gives the reader a comfortable impres- 
sion of knowing all about the historic back- 
ground of his travelling experiences without 
having to open his guide-book, which cannot be 
said of many travellers who publish their im- 
pressions. 

India: "In India," by Andre Chevrillon, 
[Holt. $1.50] is a series of French impres- 
sionist pictures of Indian cities.'by a writer who 
felt their atmosphere and is able to convey the 
feeling. Not at all a book of statistics or that 
sort of useful information, but very pleasura- 
ble reading. 

Captain Younghusband's " Heart of a conti- 
nent " [Scribner. $6] deals with Manchuria, the 
Gobi desert, the Himalayas, the Pamirs, and 
Chitral. The author, a member of the Indian 
staff corps and medallist of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society, disclaims a scientific equip- 
ment for travelling, but his fitness in other 
particulars, his keen powers of observation, his 
enjoyment in the telling, his simplicity and 
frankness, make him an admirable narrator 
and his book good reading for those who enjoy 
accounts of personal adventure. 

North America: Warburton Pike's "Through 
the sub-Arctic forest " [Arnold. $4] is interest- 
ing, as is Whitney's " Barren grounds," to the 
sportsman chiefly, though his accounts of the 
country and the people are sufficiently interest- 
ing to the general reader also. 

Mrs. A. M. Earle's "Colonial days in old 
New York" [Scribner. $1.25] is really of the 
social historical order rather than a book of 
travel, but is full of fascinating out-of-the-way 
lore. 

Lieutenant Greely's "Handbook of Arctic 
discoveries " [Roberts. $i] is hardly a book of 
travel, but is worth having as a very careful 
compilation to date of all that has been done hi 
the way of Arctic discovery, barring Nansen's 



140 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



iccent explorations. It contains maps and a 
good bibliography. 

Wright and Uphara's "Greenland icefields" 
[Appleton. $2] is a scientific account of the 
voyage of the unfortunate Miranda. The two 
professors made the most of their brief stay in 
Greenland, and the book is packed with infor- 
mation on the geology, flora, and fauna of the 
country and the life of the inhabitants. 

Whitney's "On snow-shoes to the barren 
grounds" [Harper. $3.50] appeared in Har- 
per's Monthly ; it is first of all a book for the 
sportsman, but is also interesting in its descrip- 
tion of the British American wilderness. 

Wilcox's "Camping in the Canadian Rockies " 
[Putnam. $4] is a book for mountain-climbers 
primarily, though the camper whose fad is pho- 
tography and he whose hobby is exploring will 
find the book equally satisfactory one of the 
best descriptions of the region. 

Skinner's "Myths and legends of our own 
land " [2 v. Lippincott. $3] is a book to fill a 
want. The wonder grows as one reads that no 
such collection had ever been made before, and 
one suffers the want even in retrospect. It has 
not a suitable index, however. 

Spain: Jaccaci's "On the trail of Don 
Quixote" [Scribner. $2.50], though of special 
present interest, would be welcome at any time. 
With the artist Vierge, who furnishes the illus- 
trations, the author, himself an artist, travelled 
over a path unknown to tourists, finding a 
country in which things have remained " prac- 
tically unchanged since the time of Cervantes." 

Taylor's "Land of the Castanet" [Stone. 
$1.25] is a pleasantly written, rather super- 
ficial record of travel, but up to date as to the 
relations between Spain and the United States, 
the author having sounded the feelings of the 
Spaniards he met on this subject. 

Mrs. Moulton's "Lazy tours in Sp.ain and 
elsewhere " [Roberts. $i .50] seem to be chiefly 
Elsewhere. A series of impressions by one in 
search of health and pleasure rather than of 
facts. Easy, agreeable reading. 

f ranee : Theuriet's " Rustic life in France" 
[Crowell. $2.50] is illustrated by L'hermitte, 
the French painter, and both text and illustra- 
tions seem to have been a labor of love. The 
book is an effort to preserve for posterity the 
life of the French peasant, before railways and 
commerce shall have entirely invaded his do- 
main and made him like every one else. It is 
a charming study. 

Miscellaneous: Mrs. Macquoid's "In the 
volcanic Eifel" [Dodd. $3] deals with the Ger- 
man country between the Rhine and the Moselle 
from Remagen to Treves. It contains explicit 
directions for tourists in addition to a good de- 
scription of the country, which seems to be a 
most curious one. 

Russell's "Edge of the orient" [Scribner. 
$2] is an account of experiences in Dalmatia 
and Montenegro; the latter country having 
suddenly become interesting again through its 
alliance with Italy, this part of the book has 
especial interest. 

Steele's "Voyage to Viking-land" [Estes. 



$2] is a record of the average tourist trip to 
Sweden and Norway. The principal virtue of 
the tale is that it is told with such evident en- 
joyment in the reminiscence. 

FICTION. 

Reviewed by Miss Helen E. Haines, LIBRARY 
JOURNAL, New York. 

It is to be feared that a person who has 
always delighted in novels, and who has read 
a great many more than library authorities 
would approve, is not a proper person to pre- 
sent the subject of fiction to a gathering of 
librarians, who as a class sternly reprobate the 
reading of novels and yearn to see mankind, 
and especially womankind, following the 
straight and narrow path that is lined with 
Buckle's " History of civilization," Reid's " In- 
tellectual powers of man," and their congeners. 
So it is with some hesitation that I confess to 
having read 43 of the 81 novels listed for discus- 
sion, besides a number that are not included in 
the list, though of the total read but 25 are here 
reviewed. The selection of those chosen has 
not been based wholly upon popularity, which 
generally proves a bad thing to trust to; some 
of the worst novels of the year are those that 
have been much talked about and widely sold. 
It does not include the "keynote" fiction and 
its ilk the morbid and unsavory pessimism 
that is not and cannot be attractive to a healthy 
mind. It excludes also the so-called "slum" 
stories that have been a striking feature of the 
past year books telling of the vice and mis- 
ery and sadness to be found in great cities, and 
that are about as depressing and demoralizing 
as a course of reading in the "new journal- 
ism." Barring these, the endeavor has been 
to choose books that stand out above the rank 
and file by reason of originality, vitality, ex- 
cellence of purpose, grace of style, or simply 
as all-around good stories. Last of all, the 
selection is essentially a personal one, and 
every one who considers it will promptly re- 
arrange it to suit his or her own personality, 
for in novel-reading a never-ending fascina- 
tion is the impossibility of ever agreeing long 
with any one else. 

The novels chosen have been divided into 
three classes. First, those I should place in 
the first rank of the fiction of 1896; second, 
what may be called the second-best; and third, 
several books that have had praise and popu- 
larity but that I do not include among the best 
fiction of the year. 



Barrie's "Sentimental Tommy" [Scribner. 
$1.50] takes rank in the first division, and this 
is not because of the present craze for Scottish 
fiction, but because the book has the permanent 
elements of life and reality. It is instinct with 
vitality, alive with varying emotions, truly 
pathetic witness the whole story of little 
Grizel bubbling with fun; and it possesses 
indisputably the "human" element. As for 
Tommy himself, the boy who always found a 
" w'y " to accomplish the impossible, the mor- 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



141 



al chameleon reflecting every shade and mood 
of his surroundings and associates, yet de- 
ceiving himself more absolutely than he de- 
ceived his observers is he not one of the 
most astonishing and delightful creations of 
fiction ? 

" King Noanett," by F. J. Stimson [Lamson. 
$2] has been called a new " Lorna Doone." 
It is not that, but it is one of the most charm- 
ing books of the year, with a delicate, poetic 
grace and a depth of true and lovely sentiment. 
The story is set in the early days of Virginia 
and the Massachusetts Bay colony, and it gives 
graphic pictures of the life and spirit of the 
time in town and country, inwoven with an 
idyllic romance of the love of two good men 
for each other and for a woman. The descrip- 
tion of the selling of the " redemptioners," or 
indentured slaves, and of the women and girls 
shipped for wives to the Virginia colonists, and 
the glimpse of the treatment of testifying 
Quakers are particularly vivid, and the historic 
atmosphere is excellently sustained. 

Mrs. Ward's "Sir George Tressady" [Mac- 
millan. 2 v., $2] does not, perhaps, rank with 
"Marcella" in depth of interest, at least to 
American readers, but it is a noble book, full 
of high ideals and earnest thought. The book 
is largely a record of the development of a 
man's character from brilliant, cold superficial- 
ity to real earnestness of purpose and a striv- 
ing for what is right, through the influence of 
a noble woman. But, more than that, it is a 
novel of married life: what it may be contrasted 
with what it too often is. In Marcella Max- 
well and her husband we have one side of the 
shield ; in George and Letty Tressady the 
other, and in both pictures the absolute trust 
and affection that nothing can weaken; the 
mutual differences in hopes, thoughts, and 
character that nothing can wholly reconcile, 
there is a breadth of truth and an exactness of 
perception that are indeed remarkable. 

Stevenson's " Weirof Hermiston " [Scribner. 
$1.50] is one of the notable books of the year. 
There is something most pathetic in this mag- 
nificent fragment, that promised to rival in 
power and skill anything he had previously 
produced, and in which he seemed to be about 
to try his hand for the first time at the depic- 
tion of a woman's character. "Weir of Her- 
miston" must rank with "Denis Duval" and 
" Edwin Drood " as a fragment from the hand 
of a master, shadowing forth an harmonious 
whole that can never be realized. 

Stevenson's name brings up thatof the other 
great writer whose work has ended, and whose 
latest book appeared almost at the same time 
that his death came to grieve the English- 
speaking world. William Morris is first of all 
a poet, whether his poetry be couched in verse 
or prose, and throughout his wealth of imagi- 
nation, his beautiful imagery, and his pictu- 
resque traditionary themes there is ever an un- 
dercurrent of spiritual allegory. Such a work 
as " The well at the world's end " [Longmans. 
2 v., $7.50] seems amid modern fiction al- 
most as Chaucer or Spenser would appear in 



the poetry of the day. It is not meant to be 
read in trolley cars, nor in hasty luncheon in- 
tervals, nor to be dipped into for five minutes 
after skimming the daily paper. It is for the 
real leisure time, for the vacation days, away 
from bricks and mortar and the rush for bread 
and butter. Take "The well at the world's 
end " and read it in the quiet summer days, out 
in the green world of nature, and you will feel 
its beauty and its nobility and its poetry as you 
can feel them in no other way. 

Now we take a long step from the spiritual 
to the earthly, and, remembeiing the book dis- 
cussion session at Cleveland, it is with some 
trepidation that I present Harold Frederic's 
" Damnation of Theron Ware" [Stone. $1.50]; 
but in a selection of the best fiction of 1896 I do 
not see how it can be omitted. This story of 
the rapid moral degeneration of a young minis- 
ter is not literature for the Young Person, but it 
is not to be classed with the " keynote " fiction. 
It does not make moral weakness attractive 
or pitiful, but hateful, and it has a strength 
and individuality not to be ignored. There is 
what seems to me a misconception about this 
book that I want to mention. It is often de- 
scribed as portraying the pathetic downfall of 
a man through the lures of wily tempters. In- 
stead of that, it shows a man whose heart was 
rotten at the core, but surrounded by a crust of 
conventionality and seeming fairness. When 
this crust is touched by the first breath of 
temptation it is broken down, and it reveals 
only the badness that was before hidden. 

Gilbert Parker's "The seats of the mighty" 
[Appleton. $1.50] must rank as one of the best 
historical novels of the year. It tells of the 
struggle on the Canadian frontier that culmi- 
nated in the fall of Quebec, and its historical 
setting is excellent. The story is often over- 
burdened with style, and interest flags now 
and then, but there are many stirring scenes, 
and the fortunes of the brave and unlucky 
Robert Stobo, the fair Alixe, and the villan- 
ous Doltaire, do not lack excitement and vari- 
ety. 

Another historical novel out of the common 
run is " The Reds of the Midi," by Felix Gras. 
[Appleton. $i.] It is a story of that Mar- 
seillaise battalion that marched to Paris in the 
early days of the Terror, burning with an en- 
thusiasm for liberty purer than that of their 
fellow-revolutionists, and it is one of the few 
books that tell of the French Revolution from 
the side of the people. 

Foremost among the most striking novels of 
the year is "Quovadis," a story of th edays 
of Nero, by Henryk Sienkiewicz, the Polish 
novelist. [Little. $2.] It is not a good book 
for young people, and its length and general 
appearance would be apt to discourage them 
at first sight, but it is a wonderful picture of 
the corruption of Nero's court, of the Rome of 
that day, and of the dawning triumph of Chris- 
tianity, though it reeks too strongly of torture 
and slaughter to be agreeable reading. It 
should be a "restricted" book, but it should 
be in all fair-sized libraries. 



142 



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\March, "97 



"Nephele," by F. W. Bourdillon [New Am- 
sterdam. $i], is absolutely different from any 
of the books named. It has not had much 
recognition, but it seemed to me one of the most 
graceful and charming of stories. Its author 
wrote the song "The night has a thousand 
eyes," and the book is really more a prose 
poem than a novel. It is a story of spiritual 
affinity, reminiscent of Du Maurier's "Peter 
lobetson" and Kipling's "Brushwood boy"; 
it is permeated with an intense love of music, 
and it has a delicacy of touch and a grace of 
expression that are as charming as they are 
unusual. 

"A king and a few dukes" [Putnam. $1.25] 
was the fantasia with which Robert W. Cham- 
bers followed up his striking story, "The red 
republic." It is not to be taken seriously; but 
it is one of the most original of the year's 
books, light and sparkling, fantastically sar- 
castic, and abounding in really beautiful de- 
scriptions of nature. It is set among the 
Caspian mountains, and tells of the revolutions 
and counter-revolutions of one of the little 
Balkan kingdoms that are always oversetting 
their rulers and turning things topsy-turvy; and 
in verve and wit it is somewhat akin to " The 
prisoner of Zenda." 

Two volumes of short stories also take place 
in the front rank. They are " Earth's enig- 
mas," by Charles G. D. Roberts [Lamson. 
$1.25], a collection of Canadian tales full of 
originality and clothed in poetic language; and 
" The cat and the cherub" [Century. $1.50], 
the sheaf of remarkable stories of Chinatown 
and other places that Chester Bailey Fernald 
first contributed to the Century. The "cherub" 
is one of the most delightful of Chinese babies, 
and the stories are as original as they are brill- 
iant and amusing. 

ii. 

The books in the second division may be 
briefly listed as follows : 
Bunner, H. C. Love in old cloathes, and other 

stories. Scribner. $1.50. 

The title story is a delightful little love-tale, 
clothed in quaint archaic diction, and all the 
stories in the pretty book are capital, full of 
quick perception, sentiment, and fun. 
Crawford, F. Marion. Taquisara. 2 v. Mac- 

millan. $2. 

Crawford is usually to be found in the front 
rank, but " Taquisara," though it must be 
classed as a leading book of the year, is below 
what is to be expected from him. It is an 
Italian story of self-sacrificing love; but it is 
poor in construction and indubitably padded. 
Cut down to half its length it would be a far 
better book. 
Crockett, S. R. Cleg Kelly, Arab of the city. 

Appleton. $1.50. 

A story of a Scotch street-Arab's ascent to re- 
spectability; often pathetic, oftener amusing, 
and rich in quaint types, but very uneven and 
without much depth. 

Doyle, A. Conan. Exploits of Brigadier Ger- 
ard. Appleton. $1.50. 



A capital book of the adventures of one of 
Napoleon's bold fighters, who is delightfully 
Gallic in his unconscious bravado, his impul- 
sive sentiment, and his grandiloquent courage. 
Jewett, S. O. The country of the pointed firs. 

Houghton. $1.25. 

A volume of delicate water-color sketches of 
a little Maine hamlet. 
Macleod, Fiona. Green fire. Harper. $1.25. 

A glowing Celtic romance, its rapid action 
often impeded by a superfluity of language. 
Macmanus, L. Silk of the kine. Harper. $i. 

A novel that deserves more notice than has 
come to it. It is a story of Ireland in the days 
when Cromwell's hand lay heavy upon the 
land. It is quite breathless in its rapid move- 
ment and unflagging interest, and it forms a 
series of vivid and generally accurate historical 
pictures. 
Watson, J: Kate Carnegie. Dodd. $1.50. 

The novel wherein lovers of " The bonnie 
brier bush " hoped to find their joyful expecta- 
tions realized, but which turned out to be rather 
a dull thread of plot on which were strung 
many bits of Drumtochty life and character ; 
excellent but not up to the " brier bush" 
standard. 

Wiggin, Mrs. Kate D. Marm Lisa. Hough- 
ton. $i. 

On the whole, excellent ; for the transcen- 
dental and hysterical goodness of Mistress Mary 
and her fellow-workers is balanced by the fas- 
cinating personality of Mrs. S. Cora Grubb, the 
modern Mrs. Jellyby, " whose soul was always 
in a hired hall" and whose household tumbled 
up anyhow while she instructed reverential 
disciples in faith-healing, Buddhism, vegetari- 
anism, theosophy, and a never-ending succes- 
sion of mystic isms. 

in. 

In the " Debatable land " of Division in. are 
put the following: 

Clemens, S. L. Personal recollections of Joan 
of Arc. Harper. $2.50. 
A book that, to the reviewer at least, appeared 
exasperating in manner, out of touch with the 
spirit of the time and people it represents, and 
pitched in an impossible key. It has undoubt- 
edly done good in making the heroic maid a 
real figure to many in whose minds she had 
been only a semi-myth, it is written in all 
earnestness, and it rises in parts to dramatic in- 
tensity; but the Sieur Louis de Conte is a 
Yankee, not a Gascon, and the whole story is 
out of perspective and out of drawing. 
Smith, F. Hopkinson. Tom Grogan. Hough- 
ton. $1.50. 

A story that its author tells us is founded on 
fact. Yet, notwithstanding, though it opens 
effectively and with promise, it seems sensa- 
tional rather tha.n dramatic, strained in effect, 
and often false to life. 

Wilkins, Mary E. Madelon. Harper. $1.25, 
Of this we may repeat what has been said of 
"Tom Grogan," that it seemed impossible in 
plot and sensational in action, and that it dealt 
with characters, not with men and women. 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



"THE NEW JOURNALISM" IN PUBLIC 
LIBRARIES. 

AT the February meeting of the board of 
trustees of the Newark (N. J.) Free Public Li- 
brary, it was decided to discontinue the library 
subscription to the New York World and the 
New York Journal, and to remove both papers 
from the library reading-room. This action 
was the result of unanimous agreement on the 
part of the trustees and the librarian that both 
the journals named were definitely harmful to 
the public on account of their morbid sensation- 
alism and their exploitation of crime and im- 
morality. In a short interview on the subject, 
printed in the New York Sun of Feb. 25, Mr. 
Hill and various members of the library board 
are quoted as expressing strongly their belief 
that the papers exerted a seriously injurious in- 
fluence. As one member of the board put it : 
" The trustees of the Newark Free Public Li- 
brary never will and never can perform a great- 
er public service than when they decide to keep 
all further issues of the World and the Journal 
out of the library and to burn the copies already 
on hand. The only thing they should have 
done that they did not do was to bury the ashes, 
so that even those could do no more harm." 

Mr. Hill says that his attention was first d rawn 
to the fact that young boys were among the 
most devoted readers of these papers, and that 
on examination he thought them quite unfit for 
the reading-room. 

The matter has been given considerable atten- 
tion by the New York press, and comment has 
been uniformly favorable, though the Jersey 
City News regards the action as "simply asi- 
nine," and asserts that the Herald and the Sun 
are quite as harmful as the World and Journal, 
while the Evening Post is " more fatal to public 
morals than the breath of the upas is to life." 

Public opinion concerning the matter is, how- 
ever, even better evidenced by the prompt way 
in which a number of other libraries have fol- 
lowed the example set by Newark. The Free 
Library of the General Society of Mechanics 
and Tradesmen of New York, formerly known 
as the Apprentices' Library, has ordered the 
World and the Journal removed from their files ; 
similar action has been taken by the library au- 
thorities of the New York Y. M. C. A. Library, 
the New York City Mission reading-room, 
Princeton Theological Seminary, the Century 
Club, Harvard Club, and N. Y. Yacht Club, of 
New York, and the Bridgeport (Ct.) Public 
Library ; in the library of the Union League 
Club of New York the two journals have been 
removed from the reading-room and are held 
for reference use only; while the matter of dis- 
continuing subscription to both the World and 
the Journal and removing them from the files 
is being considered by the authorities of the 
Aguilar Library and the Brooklyn Library. 
Among libraries where action similar to that at 
Newark had been previously taken, are the 
Plainfield (N. J.) Public Library, the Hartford 
(Ct.) Public Library, and the South Norwalk 
(Ct.) Public Library, in each of which the World 
was banished at the end of 1896 ; none of 
these libraries were subscribers to the Journal. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENTS IN THE 54TH 
CONGRESS. 

DURING the two sessions of the 54th Congress 
10 bills relating to public documents were pre- 
sented, but two of which were of general libra- 
ry interest, and but one of which, the "Ames 
catalog bill," has become a law. This bill pro- 
vides for the publication and preparation by 
Dr. J. G. Ames of a "Comprehensive index" 
similar to that compiled by him for the period 
1889-1893, covering all publications of the gov- 
ernment from 1881, the date of the Ben: Perley 
Poore catalog, to 1893, when Mr. Crandall's 
" Document catalogue " begins. It was intro- 
duced in the Senate, as S. R. 172, by Mr. Hans- 
brough, on Dec. 14, 1896, and on the next day 
in the House (H. R. 211) by Mr. Harmer. It 
was never reported on by the Senate committee 
on printing. The House committee reported 
it back and it passed, the joint resolution being 
signed by the President on March 3. The bill 
prepared by Mr. F. A. Crandall, superintendent 
of public documents, for improving the methods 
of printing and distributing the public docu- 
ments, has unhappily failed to pass, and must 
be started afresh in the new Congress. This 
bill(H. R. 8237) was introduced by Mr. Perkins 
April 16, 1896. It was reported back by the 
committee on printing, May 7, 1896, and passed 
with some amendments, relating chiefly to the 
binding of the documents. The bill went to 
the Senate May 9, and was referred to the 
printing committee, by which it was never re- 
ported. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CONGRES- 
SIONAL LIBRARY, 1897-98. 

THE appropriations act, approved Feb. 19, 
contains the law providing for the management 
of the Congressional Library during 1897-98. 
It places the salary of the librarian, " to be ap- 
pointed by the President, by and with the ad- 
vice and consent of the Senate," at $5000, and 
provides for the appointment by the librarian 
of a chief assistant librarian at $4000, an as- 
sistant librarian (superintendent of reading- 
room) at $3000, 12 assistants at from $900 to 
$1800, and 27 assistants, watchmen, etc., at 
from $720 to $900. In the cataloging depart- 
ment there will be a chief of department at 
$3000, and 16 assistants at from $900 to f 1800 
each; there will also be a superintendent of art 
gallery at $2000, and three assistants at $900 
each; a superintendent of maps and charts at 
$2000, and two assistants at $900 each; super- 
intendent of periodicals at $1500, and three at- 
tendants at $720 each; superintendent of manu- 
scripts at $1500, and two indexers at $72oeach; 
superintendent of music department at $1500, 
and three assistants at from $720 to $900; super- 
intendent of congressional reference library at 
the capitol at $1500, and two assistants at $750 
and $900 each ; superintendent of law library at 
$2000, and two assistants at $1400 each ; in all 
$92,020. The law establishes a copy right depart- 
ment in the library, and provides for the follow- 
ing officers, under the direction of the librarian 
of congress: Register of copyrights, at $3000, to 



144 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



hold office on and after July r, 1897; twoclerks 
at $1800 each ; two clerks at $1600 each ; three 
clerks at $1400 each ; 10 clerks at $1200 each ; 
10 clerks at $900 each ; and two clerks at $720 
each ; in all $36,440. 

For the purchase of books, etc., $11.000 are 
allowed, of which $4000 are for miscellaneous 
books, $1500 for law-books, $1500 for reference- 
books for the Supreme Court, $1500 for govern- 
ment exchanges, and for periodicals, serials, 
and newspapers, $3500. For contingent ex- 
penses $500 are allowed to the library and $500 
to the copyright department. 

The custody, care, and maintenance of the 
library building and grounds is put in charge 
of a superintendent, to be appointed by the 
President, " by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the Senate," at $5000, who shall hare 
charge of all disbursements and the employ- 
ment of all necessary employes, for which 
$51,440 are appropriated, besides $35,000 for 
fuel, lights, repairs, etc. This officer shall give 
bonds for $30,000. The act further provides 
that " the officer now in charge of the construc- 
tion of the building [Mr. B. R. Green] is here- 
by authorized and directed to terminate his 
present duty and assume the custody, care, and 
maintenance of the said building and grounds 
on and after March 4, 1897, appoint the em- 
ployes under his charge, procure necessary 
furniture for the said building, and remove 
into it the library." It is also directed that 
" the librarian of congress shall, on and after 
July i, 1897, give bonds in the sum of $20,000 
for the faithful discharge of his duties accord- 
ing to law." ___^_ 

THE CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY HAND- 
BOOK.* 

Now that the Library of Congress is com- 
pleted, its beauties of architecture and decora- 
tion have been a topic of general discussion 
and description in the press and in the leading 
periodicals. The issue of what may be called 
the official manual of the library is therefore 
especially welcome at this time, as giving in 
compact and attractive form all the essential 
data as to the library itself and its magnificent 
new home. This " Handbook of the Library 
of Congress" is similar in style and scope to 
the excellent " Handbook of the Boston Public 
Library" issued last year by the same publish- 
ers. Like that, it is compiled by Herbert 
Small, and is especially rich in illustrations of 
the representative decorations of the library 
building, while its arrangement has been so 
planned as to make it of service as an actual 
guide-book, the various features and depart- 
ments being described as far as possible in the 
order in which they would appear to the 
visitor. 

The description of the new building is pref- 
aced by a short history of the library, which was 



* Handbook of the new Library of Congress in Wash- 
ington; comp. by Herbert Small, with essays on the archi- 
tecture, sculpture, and painting, by Charles Caffin, and 
on the function of a national library, by Ainsworth R. 
Spofford. Boston, Curtis & Cameron, 1897. 128 + 24 P- 
il. D. 30 c.; 50 c. 



founded in 1800, at about the same time that the 
seat of government was transferred to Washing- 
ton. The small collection gathered during the 
first dozen years of its existence was, however, 
lost when the capitol was burned by the British 
troops in 1812, and the library really dates 
from that year, when Thomas Jefferson sold 
his private library of 6700 v. to the government 
for $23,700, thus establishing the nucleus of 
the present collection of some 700,000 books 
and 250,000 pamphlets. The history of the 
new building is briefly given, from the time 
the matter was first presented to Congress by 
Mr. Spofford in his report for 1872. The first 
act providing for the construction of the build- 
ing passed Congress in April, 1886, but final 
legislation on the subject was not had until 
March, 1889. Eight years was the time allowed 
for construction and the total cost was set at 
$6,245,567.94. The building was completed in 
February of this year, well within the original 
time limit, and at about $140,000 below the 
limit of cost. Mr. Small describes clearly the 
plan of the building and the details of its ar- 
rangement ; he then takes up severally the 
various special features of the exterior, the en- 
trance pavilion, main entrance hall, rotunda, 
book-stacks, galleries, pavilions, reading and 
special rooms, corridors and basement, describ- 
ing decorations of each and explaining their 
plan and characteristics. The book is descrip- 
tive and not critical, though Mr. Caffin's essay 
on ' ' The architecture, sculpture, and painting " 
is a brief survey of the decorative features 
from the artistic point of view. The illustra- 
tions cover almost every detail of the beautiful 
structure, from the floor plan and the general 
exterior view, to the rotunda clock, the series 
of ethnological heads and the decorative feat- 
ures of staircase, corridors, and galleries. The 
future of the library in its new home is con- 
sidered by Mr. Spofford, who in his essay on 
"The function of a national library" outlines 
the desirable lines of development and of 
growth. While the library should be in name 
and in fact a national library, it should be first 
of all a library for the use of Congress, and it 
should always remain a reference library. It 
should be the repository of all American pub- 
lications, however ephemeral, and should aim 
especially at the collection of Americana, while 
it should also, as far as possible, be of univer- 
sal range and of well-rounded completeness. 
For all these possibilities the new building 
offers the golden opportunity.; it but remains 
to make the best and most far-sighted use of it. 



THE BUFFALO FREE LIBRARY. 

THE enabling act authorizing the city of 
Buffalo and the managers of the Buffalo Li- 
brary to enter into a contract for the admin- 
istration of the Buffalo Library as a free public 
library, supported by city appropriation, was 
introduced into the state legislature on Jan. 27, 
as already stated in the L. j. (Feb., p. 104). It 
passed the assembly on Feb. 3, and the senate 
on Feb. 4, was signed by Mayor Jewett, of 
Buffalo, on Feb. 10, and by Governor Black on 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



Feb. 13. On Feb. 15 the proposed contract 
was submitted to the common council by the 
committee in charge. It provides for the trans- 
fer to the city for 99 years, with privilege of 
renewal, of the library, consisting of about 
84,000 books and 10,000 pamphlets, and its 
revenues, etc. The right is reserved by the 
library association to sell any of its real estate, 
excepting the library building, and to devote 
the proceeds to the payment of its debts and 
to use the income of anything remaining for 
the benefit of the free library. The contract 
provides that the city shall maintain the li- 
brary and provide for its care, increase, and 
improvement, and shall make annual appropri- 
ation for the same. The library is to be man- 
aged by a board of 10 trustees, to consist of 
the president, vice-president, and three man- 
agers of the Buffalo Library, the mayor, cor- 
poration counsel, and the superintendent of 
education, who shall be members of the board, 
ex-officio, and two citizens who shall complete 
the board. The library is to be open 12 hours 
on week-days and 10 hours on Sundays and 
holidays. The cost of maintaining the library 
is set at $70,000 yearly. The contract was re- 
ferred to the finance committee, and on Feb. 20 
was approved by the aldermen; it was ap- 
proved by the library authorities on Feb. 24, 
and on March i was finally signed by the may- 
or and the library trustees. It is hoped that 
by July the library may be opened to the public 
under the new arrangement. 

THE PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

THE new public library building of Peoria, 
111., was opened on Feb. n. It is a three- 
story edifice, 76 feet front by 135 feet deep, in 
the middle of a block on Monroe st., nearly 
opposite the Government Building, ard faces 
southeast, toward the river. The lot on which 
it stands is 108 feet front by 171 feet in depth. 
An alley at the rear gives an open space between 
the lot line and the building of i6feet, and, most 
of the way, 21 feet, for light and air, and 36 
feet in the rear for future extension of the stack- 
room. The choice of a location in the middle of 
a block rather than on a prominent corner was 
determined by several considerations the 
cheaper cost of the land, the necessity of but 
one front instead of an expensive front on two 
streets, and greater freedom from the dust and 
noise of street traffic. Electric cars running to 
every part of the city pass within half a block 
on each side. 

The accompanying view and plan (see front- 
ispiece) show the external appearance and the 
internal arrangements of the building. It is an 
unpretentious, plain, substantial library build- 
ing, planned more with a view to library uses 
than as a city ornament to show strangers. 
The lower story of the front part is of Lake 
Superior sandstone, the upper stories and the 
rear of read brick with stone trimmings, the 
roof of red tile. 

In one respect the history of this library 
building is unique. In the spring of 1865 the 
Mercantile Library Association of Peoria raised 



the sum of $13,262.50 by subscriptions from 140 
public-spirited citizens, with which they pur- 
chased property for a library. Through care- 
ful management and the advance in values this 
property was sold Dec., 1894, for enough to pay 
for the new library building, which was made a 
free gift to the city of Peoria, the city only 
paying for the ground on which it was erected 
$ 16,000. Not a dollar from taxation went 
into the building, which cost under $70,000. 

The building is larger than the present needs 
of the library require, in consequence of which 
the city school board is permitted tooccupy the 
ground floor and the Peoria Art League, with 
its picture gallery, a part of the third floor, un- 
til wanted by the library. 

The stack-room , which is practically fireproof, 
is 35x64 feet, five 7^-foot stories high, with 
a capacity for 200,000 v. , which, by an ex- 
tension to the alley, can be doubled at slight 
cost and without modifying the present plans. 

A feature of the library that has attracted 
general attention is the artistic scheme of mural 
decoration planned and executed by two 
Chicago artists, F. C. Peyraud and H. G. Ma- 
ratta. The Peoria library is said to be the first 
municipal building in the west to adopt such 
decoration, and the paintings have been de- 
scribed and discussed in the periodicals and 
daily press of Chicago, New York, and other 
cities. Most of the rooms in the building have 
been tinted simply in colors to harmonize with 
the woodwork and marble panelling, and the 
main decoration has been confined to the 
clerestory of the third floor. Here have been 
placed large allegorical paintings representing 
education in relation to the arts, which form one 
continuous series, set in arched panels and di- 
vided by bas-relief cartouches bearing appro- 
priate inscriptions. The oval ceiling of the 
vestibule has also a symbolical painting, while 
on the wall back of the stairway are placed two 
pictures of direct local association; one an au- 
tumn landscape of the view to be had from 
Prospect Heights, Peoria; the other a local set- 
ting, in which is depicted the landing in 1673 
of Pere Marquette and Louis Joliet on the spot 
where Peoria now stands. 



American Cibrarg Association. 



President: W: H. Brett, Public Library, 
Cleveland, O. 

Secretary: Rutherford P. Hayes, Columbus, 
O. 

Treasurer: C: K. Bolton, Public Library, 
Brookline, Mass. 

19 TH GENERAL CONFERENCE, PHIL A DEL- 
PHI A, JUNE 2i - 25, 1897- 

THE committee on program for the Philadel- 
phia meeting of the American Library Associa- 
tion have, in conjunction with the Philadelphia 
local committee, so far perfected the arrange- 
ments for the Philadelphia meeting that they 
are able to announce the following preliminary 
program. As is already known the executive 
board, at their meeting in Philadelphia in De- 



146 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[Afarch, '97 



cember, decided to hold the annual meeting in 
Philadelphia, from the 2ist to the 25th of June, 
inclusive. 

PROGRAM. 

June 21, Monday evening. Social meeting 
at Historical Society. 

June 22, Tuesday morning. President's ad- 
dress; Reports of officers; Reports of commit- 
tees, and other special reports. 

June 22, Tuesday afternoon. Library legis- 
lation; Public documents; Travelling libraries. 

June 22, Tuesday evening. Public meeting ; 
Addresses by Dr. Wm. Pepper, Mr. Henry 
Howard Furness, Dr. Talcott Williams, Agnes 
Repplier, and others. 

June 23, Wednesday morning. Two pro- 
grams will be provided, in different halls, one 
treating of college and advanced library work, 
the other dealing with elementary library 
practice. 

June 23, Wednesday afternoon. Ride to 
Wissahickon. 

June 23, Wednesday evening. Reception 
and organ concert at Drexel Institute. 

June 24, Thursday morning. Continuation 
of the program of Wednesday morning. 

June 24, Thursday afternoon. Books of the 
year; Meeting of Trustees' Section; Election 
of officers. 

June 24, Thursday evening. Addresses by 
an educator, a writer, and a librarian. 

June 25, Friday morning. Miscellaneous pa- 
pers. 

June 25, Friday afternoon. Departure for 
European trip and American post-conference 
excursion. 

It is thought best not to announce any names 
until all have been arranged for. We hope to 
present, not later than next month, a complete 
program. The work of making the arrange- 
ments in Philadelphia is in the hands of the 
local committee, of which Mr. Thomson, of the 
Free Libraries, is chairman. In addition to the 
announcements contained in the program, ar- 
rangements are substantially completed for an 
American post-conference excursion which will 
include a visit to the Delaware Water Gap. 
WILLIAM H. BRETT, President; 
RUTHERFORD P. HAYES, Secretary ; 

Program Committee. 

ENGLISH POST-CONFERENCE. JUNE 26- 
, 1897. 



THE European trip committee has issued the 
following circular : 

At the Cleveland Conference of the Ameri- 
can Library Association an invitation to an in- 
ternational meeting in London in July, 1897, 
was received from the Library Association of 
the United Kingdom. This invitation was ac- 
cepted and a committee appointed to make ar- 
rangements for the trip. 

It is hoped and expected that there will be a 
large attendance of leading American librari- 
ans, trustees, and others engaged in library 
work. The following have already expressed 
an intention of attending the conference 
Messrs. Justin Winsor, Melvil Dewey, Herbert 
Putnam, F. P. Hill, G. W. Cole, W. S. Biscoe, 



E. M. Barton, F. B. Gay, and Misses H. P. 
James, M. Francis, K. E. Sanborn, C. A. Far- 
ey, Mrs. M. H. Curran, and the committee. 

The conference and excursion will afford an 
excellent opportunity to become acquainted 
with the leading English librarians and library 
methods, and to strengthen the bonds which 
already, through our common history and lit- 
erature, bind together ihe two great English- 
speaking countries. The committee have 
realized that many of those participating will 
be visiting England for the first, and perhaps 
the only, time, and have therefore included in 
the itinerary as many places of historic and 
literary interest as possible. 

By vote of the American Library Association 
all members of the Association and their im- 
mediate families can join the excursion, but 
the registration of other persons, not eligible to 
membership in the Library Association on the 
ground of their being engaged in library work, 
is subject to the approval of the committee. 

ITINERARY. 

June 26, Saturday. A.M. leave Boston on 
the Cunard steamship Cephalonia. 

July 5 or 6, Monday or Tuesday. Arrive at 
Liverpool. 

July 7, Wednesday. In Liverpool (Public Li- 
brary, Walker art gallery). P.M. to Man- 
chester. 

July 8, Thursday. In Manchester (Public 
library and branches, Earl Spencer library). 
Evening to Birmingham. 

July 9, Friday. In Birmingham (libraries). 

July 10, Saturday. Kenilworth, Warwick, 
Stratford, and to Leamington. 

July it, Sunday. In Leamington (an attrac- 
tive watering-place). 

July 12, Monday. A.M. to London. 

July 13-16. Tuesday to Friday. In London 
(International conference of librarians, visits to 
London libraries, etc.). 

July 17-23. English post-conference, under 
the conduct of the Library Association of the 
United Kingdom, probably visiting Salisbury 
(spend Sunday), Stonehenge, Wells, Glaston- 
bury, Cardiff, Bristol, Bath, and Reading, 
reaching Oxford Friday evening, July 23. 

July 24, Saturday. In Oxford (Bodleian Li- 
brary, colleges). 

July 25, Sunday. In Oxford or London. 

July 26-30. In London or elsewhere, as 
suits individual tastes. 

July 31, Saturday. A.M. to Cambridge (Uni- 
versity Library, Public Library, colleges). 

August i, Sunday. In Cambridge. 

August 2, Monday. To Ely (cathedral), Lin- 
coln (cathedral), and Sheffield. 

Augusts, Tuesday. In Sheffield (Public li- 
brary). 

August 4, Wednesday. To Leeds (Public li- 
brary) and York. 

August 5, Thursday. In York (cathedral, 
city walls and gates, Roman remains). 

August 6, Friday. To Durham (cathedral) 
and Newcastle (libraries). 

August 7, Saturday. To Melrose Abbey, 
Abbotsford, Dryburgh Abbey, and Edinburgh, 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



August 8, 9, Sunday and Monday. In Edin- 
burgh (old and new town, libraries, museums, 
Holyrood). 

August 10, Tuesday. To Glasgow, via Stir- 
ling (castle), Trossachs, and Loch Katrine. 

August II, Wednesday. In Glasgow (libra- 
ries). P.M. to Liverpool. 

August 12, Thursday. A.M. in Liverpool or 
Chester. P.M. sail. 

August 22, Sunday. Due at Boston. 

TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS. 

All travelling arrangements have been placed 
in the hands of Messrs. Henry Gaze & Sons' 
tourist agency, whose wide experience guaran- 
tees the comfort of the party. Mr. H. E. 
Davidson, of the Library Bureau, will act for 
the committee and have direct charge of the 
excursion. 

The cost of the whole trip, with the excep- 
tion of the two weeks from July 17 to 31, will 
be $290. 

This sum covers all ocean and railroad travel 
and hotel accommodations and transfer from 
railroad station to hotel when necessary. On 
the steamer the rate is on the basis of four per- 
sons in a room, outside rooms. A few inside 
rooms, accommodating only two in a room, 
can be had at the same price. If outside 
rooms are occupied by three persons, an extra 
charge for each person of $15 each way will be 
made, and if by two persons, an extra charge 
of $25 each. No organized sight-seeing under 
the charge of the tourist agents in the fashion 
of so-called personally conducted tours will be 
arranged for, with the exception of the day in 
Warwickshire, the day at Melrose, etc., and the 
day in the Scotch lakes. 75 pounds of personal 
baggage, besides hand baggage, will be carried 
free. Surplus trunks and heavy ocean cloth- 
ng can be stored at Liverpool until the return. 
It should be stated that the cost is higher than 
was expected because all ocean rates have been 
advanced this season. 

Tickets will be good to return during one 
year on any steamer of the Cunard line on the 
basis of f 75 accommodations. Notice of the 
time when one wishes to return should be given 
as early as possible. 

The two weeks from July 17 to 31, not 
covered in the above arrangement, include 
one week which may be spent with the English 
post-conference excursion and a second week 
which may be spent in London or elsewhere 
as each one pleases. It is estimated that the 
expenses of these two weeks and minor expen- 
ses of the remainder of the trip need not ex- 
ceed $75, although a larger amount should be 
taken to cover contingencies. 

REGISTRATION. 

Notice of intention to join the party must be 
received by April i, or it may not be possible 
to provide accommodations, as the time of sail- 
ing is precisely when the steamers are most 
crowded. 

Berths will be assigned in the order in which 
applications are received. Promptness will 
secure the first choice of accommodations. 



Persons who have decided to go are re- 
quested not to delay registration in order to 
make choice of room-mates, but to send their 
deposit at once and arrange such details as 
soon as possible thereafter. 

'I he blank enclosed with circular should be 
illed out at once and sent to the Library Bureau 
with a deposit of $25 for each person. If incon- 
venient to make the full deposit of $25 at once, 
a remittance of $5 will secure registration, but 
the balance of the $25 must be sent before April 
I. The remainder of the full cost of the trip 
must be paid before June 5, or state-rooms will 
not be held. Make checks payable to the Li- 
brary Bureau. 

SUMMARY. 

Cost of trip, excluding July 17 to 31, $290. 
The fortnight from July 17 to 31, and other 
necessary expenses, from $75 upwards. 

Extra charge for extra accommodations on 
steamer as above. 

Deposit of $25 to be sent before April I to 
the Library Bureau. 

Address all correspondence to H. E. David- 
son, Library Bureau, 146 Franklin St., Boston. 
WILLIAM C. LANE, Boston, Chairman. 
GARDNER M. JONES, Salem, Secretary. 
WM. I. FLETCHER, Amherst, Mass. 
Miss C. M. HEWINS, Hartford, Ct. 
Miss M. W. PLUMMER, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

European Trip Committee. 
BOSTON, March i, 1897. 

PUBLISHING SECTION. 
PRINTED CATALOG CARDS. 

THE Publishing Section has issued the fol- 
lowing announcement: 

The circular sent out in December, 1896, of- 
fering to furnish printed catalog cards, to be 
selected by the purchaser from an advanced list 
of titles, has brought so few responses that the 
Publishing Section will not attempt at present 
to carry out this plan, but will continue, as 
heretofore, to print cards for the current books 
as published, and receive subscriptions for the 
whole set. To assure the continuance of this 
work on a satisfactory basis it is very desirable 
that the number of subscribers should be fur- 
ther increased. 

It is possible that the Publishing Section can 
perform an acceptable service by providing 
catalog cards for articles contained in certain 
periodicals, society transactions, or books of a 
composite nature, such as 

One hundred years of American commerce, 

edited by C. M. Depew. 
Biographies reprinted from the Times. 
' Bulletin and Memoirs of the Museum of 

Comparative ZoOlogy. 
Annual report of the Bureau of Ethnology, 

The secretary would be glad to have advice 
and suggestions on this point from librarians, 
and to receive lists of such publications for 
which libraries would like to have printed cata- 
log cards sent to them. 

W. C. LANE, Secretary 
BOSTON ATHBN/F.UM, 1 
February, 1897. f 



148 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



Gtutc tibvarn (TommiGGions. 



CONNECTICUT F. P. L. COMMITTEE : Caroline 
M. Hewins, secretary, Public Library, Hart- 
ford. 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE L. COMMISSION : Miss 
E. P. Sohier, secretary, Beverly. 

THE Massachusetts commission has issued 
its seventh annual report (40 p. O.). covering 
the work accomplished in 1896. Evidently, so 
far as theestablishing of libraries is concerned, 
it will not be long beiore the commission finds 
its occupation gone, for there are now but 19 
towns in the state that are without a free li- 
brary. Of these, two have the free use of 
adjacent libraries, and of the remaining 17 four 
or five are maturing plans for the formation of 
a library, while in nearly all the others there 
are good association libraries. But there is no 
lack of other directions in which the commis- 
sion is of direct helpfulness to the libraries, 
and its work as a supervising and advisory 
body shows no sign of diminishing. Requests 
for advice and information have been received 
not only from residents of the state, but from 
p:rsons all over the country, while a number 
of inquirers have remained anonymous, pre- 
ferring "that even their names or the localities 
they designed to benefit should be unknown to 
the members of the commission." "There is 
hardly a detail relative to the selection of a site, 
the plan, the material for construction, the 
heating, lighting, ventilation, the external 
ornamentation or the interior finish, the ar- 
rangement of the rooms, the shelving and the 
manifold conveniences for the economic and 
systematic administration of a library building 
that has not been the subject of frequent in- 
quiry," while information as to selection, pur- 
chase, classification, and arrangement of books, 
methods of work with the schools, extension of 
reference work, co-operation with clubs and 
associations, and means of raising the standard 
of reading, is constantly sought. During the 
year four towns have been supplied with books 
under the act of 1890, three towns have received 
books under the act of 1892, and one town (Peru) 
has been given books under the special act of 
1896 to replace its library, which was destroyed 
by^fire. The 18 travelling libraries of the Wom- 
an's Education Association are among the 
most valuable auxiliaries of the commission. 
The record of gifts and bequests to Massachu- 
setts libraries during 1896 includes 16 cities or 
towns. 

Besides its summary of work accomplished, 
the report contains a useful precis of "state 
effort to establish free libraries," giving the laws 
now existing in the various states with a note 
on legislation now pending, and a suggestive 
account of " the use of libraries by children," 
with hints for strengthening the relations be- 
tween libraries and schools. The record of 
library legislation is an especially valuable 
feature and should be widely useful. Ap- 
pended are the usual " Roll of honor," listing 
givers of free library buildings in Massachu- 
setts, and the library laws of the state. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE L. COMMISSION: J. H. 
Whittier, secretary, East Rochester. 

NEW YORK : PUBLIC LIBRARIES DIVISION. State 
University, Melvil Dewey, director, Albany. 

OHIO STATE L. COMMISSION: C. B. Galbreath, 
secretary, State Library, Columbus. 

VERMONT STATE L. COMMISSION: Miss M. L. 
Titcomb, secretary, Free Library, Rutland. 

WISCONSIN F. L. COMMISSION : Miss L. E. 
Stearns, secretary, Public Library, Mil- 
waukee. 



State Cibrarg Associations. 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL CALI- 
FORNIA. 

President : J. C. Rowell, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley. 

Secretary: A. M. Jellison, Mechanics' Insti- 
tute Library, San Francisco. 

Treasurer: A. J. Cleary, Odd Fellows' Li- 
brary, San Francisco. 

COL ORA DO LIBRA RY A SSOCIA TION. 

President: A. E. Whitaker, State University 
Library, Boulder. 

Secretary : Herbert E. Richie, City Library, 
Denver. 

Treasurer : J. W. Chapman, McClelland Li- 
brary, Pueblo. 

THE February meeting of the association was 
held at Boulder on the I2th. The best part of 
the day was spent by the visiting members in 
inspecting the state university and particu- 
larly its library, which is in charge of Mr. A. 
E. Whitaker, president of the association, who 
was our guide and instructor. 

The meeting proper was held in the Congre- 
gational church with a large and much inter- 
ested audience present. 

The program was arranged with the idea of 
creating public interest in the question of 
establishing a public library in Boulder, and 
the Rev. Charles Caverno first addressed the 
meeting on that subject. Dr. Caverno was of 
the opinion that when the citizens of a town 
wanted a library the way to get it was to start 
right to work and do it without any red tape 
or preliminaries. He therefore introduced a 
resolution to the effect that the Colorado Li- 
brary Association select a committee of citizens 
to canvass the town and consider ways and 
means of organizing. This committee, consist- 
ing of five members, was duly appointed and 
instructed to report at a public meeting to be 
called by them on or before May I, 1897. 

Mr. G. M. Lee, the chairman of the com- 
mittee on legislation, then made a report on the 
progress of the bill now pending to establish a 
state library commission. Mr. Lee's report 
was highly encouraging although not certain 
for the passage of the bill. 

Mr. J. C. Dana then spoke on the subject 
"A library building for a growing town." Mr. 
Dana exhibited a set of building plans drawn 
with the view of starting on a small scale and 
occupying only a part of the building and using 



March, '97] 



THE LI3RARY 



*49 



more as growth demanded, the remaining por- 
tion of the building being suitable for offices or 
stores. After a discussion of these plans the 
meeting adjourned. 

H. E. RICHIE, Secretary. 

CONNECTICUT LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Frank B. Gay, Watkinson Li- 
brary, Haitford. 

Secretary: Miss Angeline Scott, Public Li- 
brary, South Norwalk. 

Treasurer : Miss Anna G. Rockwell, New 
Britain Institute, New Britain. 

ILLINOIS LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Col. J. W. Thompson, Public Li- 
brary, Evanston. 

Secretary: Miss Ange V. Milner, State Nor- 
mal College, Normal. 

Treasurer: P. F. Bicknell, University of 
Illinois, Champaign. 

INDIANA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

President: Miss Elizabeth D. Swan, Purdue 
University, Lafayette. 

Secretary and Treasurer : Miss M. E. Ahern, 
Library Bureau, 125 Franklin street, Chicago 
111. 

IOWA LIBRARY SOCIETY. 

President : W. H. Johnston, Public Library, 
Fort Dodge. 

Secretary : Miss Ella McLoney, Public Li- 
brary, Des Moines. 

MAINE LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: E. W. Hall, Colby University, 
Waterville. 

Secretary : Miss H. C. Fernald, State College, 
Orono. 

Treasurer: Prof. G: T. Little, Bowdoin Col- 
lege, Brunswick. 

MA SSA CHUSE TTS LIBRA R Y CL UB. 

President : Herbert Putnam, Public Library, 
Boston. 

Secretary: W: H. Tillinghast, Harvard Col- 
lege Library, Cambridge. 

Treasurer : Miss A. L. Sargent, Public Li- 
brary, Medford. 

LIST OF SELECT FICTION. 

THE special committee on the "Lists of se- 
lect fiction " has sent the following letter to the 
various state and local library associations and 
clubs: 

Some time ago the Massachusetts Library 
Club sent out a series of questions regarding 
the " Lists of select fiction," which it pub- 
lished for the year Sept., iSgs-Aug., 1896. 

The answers to these questions showed that 
the lists were helpful to many libraries and 
worth being continued. The club has not the 
money to do this work alone, and, therefore, 
appointed a special committee to learn if the 
other library associations and individuals were 
disposed to co-operate with the club, especially 
as to expense. 

Will your association be willing to give for 
this purpose $10 or more a year for three 
years? Of course if the lists could be made to 



pay for themselves after the first year the 
amount guaranteed by your association for 
the remaining two years would not be called 
for. 

If the executive board of your association 
has not the power to do this, will you present 
the question at the next meeting and report as 
early as possible ? 

NINA E. BROWNE. 
HILLER C. WELLMAN, 
GARDNER M. JONES, 

Committee. 
BOSTON ATHEN.TUM, ( 
March, 1897. ) 

NEXT MEETING. 

The next meeting of the club will probably 
be held in Boston in April, and will take up 
the subject of book illustration in various 
phases. 

MICHIGAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: H: M. Utley, Public Library, 
Detroit. 

Secretary: Mrs. A. F. Parsons, Public Li- 
brary, Bay City. 

Treasurer : Miss Lucy Ball, Public Library, 
Grand Rapids. 

MINNESOTA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

President: Dr. W: W. Folwell, State Univer 
sity, Minneapolis. 

Secretary and Treasurer : Miss Gratia Coun- 
tryman, Public Library, Minneapolis. 

NEBRASKA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

President: W. E. Jillson, Doane College, 
Crete. 

Secretary: Miss MaryL. Jones, State Univer- 
sity, Lincoln. 

Treasurer: Mrs. M. E. Abell, Public Li- 
brary, Beatrice. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: A. H. Chase, Concord. 

Secretary: Miss Grace Blanchard, Public 
Library, Concord. 

Treasurer: Miss A. E. Pickering, Public Li- 
brary, Newington. 

NEW JERSEY LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: J: B. Thompson, Trenton, N. J. 

Secretary: Miss Beatrice Winser, Public Li- 
brary, Newark. 

Treasurer: Miss Emma L. Adams, Public 
Library, Plainfield. 

FIRST JOINT MEETING WITH PENNSYLVANIA LIBRA- 
RY CLUB, ATLANTIC CITY, APRIL $-6, 1897. 

THE first joint meeting of the New Jersey 
and Pennsylvania Library Associations will be 
held at Atlantic City, Monday and Tuesday, 
April 5-6, 1897. From returns already received 
the attendance will be over 100. 

After consultation with the Atlantic City 
local committee the following announcement 
is made : 

The P. R. R. has been selected for the official 
route, and the rate of fare will be : 

From N. Y. to Atlantic City and return $5.00. 

From Phila. " " " " 1.75. 

Special cars for exclusive use of members 
will be attached to train leaving N. Y. Satur- 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



[March, '97 



day, April 3, 1:50 p.m., Phila. 4 p.m., and 
Monday if time of departure is given to the 
secretaries. 

The Grand Atlantic Hotel, Virginia Ave 
and the beach, will be the headquarters. This 
hotel has accommodation for 700, and gives 
the associations the use of its hall with seat 
ing capacity of 200. Rates : one day or less. 
$2.50; Saturday to Tuesday, or any other 
three days, $2.25 per day; week, $15. 

The Atlantic City reception committee, o 
which Mayor Stoy is president and Mr. Scull 
secretary, will attend to the welfare of the 
party, and on Monday evening the associations 
will be received by the mayor; a business ses- 
sion will follow. Tuesday, at 9:30 a.m., a sec- 
ond session will be held, the party leaving on 
p.m. trains. 

The following are among the topics to be 
discussed: "What the state could do for free 
public libraries," " Some aims and prospects 
of the Princeton University Library," " The 
effect of a free public library on the commu- 
nity," and " The public library and the child." 

Librarians who may not be members of either 
association are cordially invited to attend this 
meeting and take part in the deliberations. 
Atlantic City is at its best in April. Any one 
who intends to be present should send name to 
Beatrice Winser, public librarian, Newark, or 
Mary P. Farr, Public Library, Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK LIBRARY ASSOCfA TION. 

President: A. L. Peck, Public Library, 
Gloversville. 

Secretary: W: R. Eastman, State Library, 
Albany. 

Treasurer: J. N. Wing, Chas. Scribner's 
Sons, 153 Fifth avenue, New York City. 

OHIO LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President : A. W. Whelpley, Public Library, 
Cincinnati. 

Secretary: Miss E. C. Doren, Public Library, 
Dayton, 

Treasurer : C. B. Galbreath, State Library, 
Columbus. 

PENNSYLVANIA LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Henry J. Carr, Public Library, 
Scranton. 

Secretary: Miss Mary P. Farr, Girls' Normal 
School, Philadelphia. 

Treasurer: Miss Helen G. Sheldon, Drexel 
Institute, Philadelphia. 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: W: M. Stevenson, Carnegie Li- 
brary, Allegheny. 

Secretary-Treasurer: W: R. Watson, Carnegie 
Library, Pittsburgh. 

VERMONT LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Miss S. C. Hagar, Fletcher Free 
Library, Burlington. 

Secretary: Miss M. L. Titcomb, Free Li- 
brary, Rutland. 

Treasurer : E. F. Holbrook, Proctor. 



WISCONSIN LIBRARY ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Dr. E. A. Birge, City Library, 
Madison, Wis. 

Secretary: Miss Agnes Van Valkenburgh, 
Public Library, Milwaukee. 

Treasurer: Miss Maude A. Earley, Public 
Library, Chippewa Falls. 

THE sixth annual conference of the Wiscon- 
sin Library Association was held at Milwaukee, 
Wis., on Feb. 22 and 23, 1897. The following 
libraries were represented : Appleton, Ash- 
land, Beaver Dam, Beloit, Eau Claire, Fond 
du Lac, Fort Atkinson, Grand Rapids, Green 
Bay, Janesville, Madison, Menomonie, Mon- 
roe, Oconomowoc, Oshkosh, Sheboygan, Two 
Rivers, Wauwatosa, West Superior ; the State 
Historical and University libraries of Madi- 
son, Wis.; the Whitewater, Platteville, and 
Stevens Point normal schools; the Armour In- 
stitute of Technology ; the Public Library of 
Chicago ; and the Evanston (111.) Public Li- 
brary. The State Federation of Women'sClubs, 
the Woman's School Alliance, and the National 
Household Economic Association, were rep- 
resented by a number of delegates. 

The sessions were opened in the large refer- 
ence-room with an address of welcome by J. 
M. Pereles, president of the Milwaukee Public 
Library board, to which response was made by 
F. A. Hutchins, president of the association. 
Mr. Hutchins then made a talk on "Travelling 
libraries in Wisconsin." Mr. Hutchins stated 
that Senator Stout's libraries had become so 
popular that the original 16 travelling libraries 
had been increased to 36 the number of books 
in the last 10 purchased having been increased 
from 30 to 40 books each, the additions being 
mainly copies of children's books. The talk 
was illustrated with a sample library and photo- 
graphs of the localities to which the books are 
sent. 

Mr. Hutchins was followed by Miss Janet 
M. Green, secretary of the Northern Wiscon- 
sin Travelling Library Association, who read a, 
paper on the work done by that organization. 
The association has received donations from 
all parts of the country and is in a prosperous 
condition. Much interest is evinced in the 
work in the northern counties. 

The secretary read a letter from the librarian 
of one of the Witter travelling libraries in 
Wood county, expressing great appreciation 
of the donor's kindness. 

Miss M. L. Clark, vice-president for Wis- 
consin of the National Household Economic 
Association, read the resolutions passed at the 
recent session of that body, endorsing the 
travelling library movement and pledging co- 
operation in the movement as the best means 
For diffusing literature on sanitary and house- 
lold subjects in the rural districts. 

" Travelling pictures " was the subject of an 
nteresting paper by Miss Mary E. Tanner, 
eacher of drawing at the Stevens Point Nor- 
mal School. Miss Tanner explained ways of 
mounting the pictures, and exhibited a number 
of pictures similar to those now being circu- 
ated in Wood county. Miss Tanner's illustra- 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



tions were reinforced by an exhibition by Mrs. 
W. W. Sherman, of Milwaukee, of large pho- 
tographs suitable for such purposes. 

Senator J. H. Stout, of Menomonie, Wis., 
opened the general discussion of travelling li- 
braries and pictures. Senator Stout referred 
to the bill now pending in the state legislature, 
which provides for an increased appropriation 
for the use of the state library commission, 
and stated that it was hoped to start a state 
system of travelling libraries in the near fut- 
ure. Senator Stout advocated the organiza- 
tion of associations in the country districts for 
the discussion of such topics as " good roads," 
as he considered good roads to be an important 
factor in the furtherance of the travelling li- 
brary movement. Mr. Stout was followed by 
Dr. E. A. Birge, Madison, Wis., and Rev. S. E. 
Lathrop, of Ashland. 

Upon the conclusion of the afternoon's ad- 
dresses the 80 delegates from out of town were 
invited to gather around two large round ta- 
bles, upon which supper was served by the 
members of the Milwaukee Library Round 
Table. Opportunity was given for an inspec- 
tion of the library before the opening of the 
evening session, which was devoted to the 
trustees' section, and presided over by Dr. E. 
A. Birge, trustee of the city library at Madison. 
In opening the discussion, Dr. Birge alluded 
to the rapid growth of the association and the 
increasing interest taken in its sessions. He 
spoke of the education the trustees and libra- 
rians were receiving through the discussions 
at the annual meetings, and stated that things 
had not been going so well for the lazy trustee 
and the indifferent librarian since the organi- 
zation of the association. Communities were 
becoming aroused to the importance of the 
part libraries may take in the education of the 
people, which fact augured well for the further 
advancement of library interests. 

Mrs. E. E. Vaughn, founder of the Vaughn 
Library at Ashland, Wis., then spoke on the 
" Responsibility of the trustee to the library." 
Mrs. Vaughn made a plea for sympathetic in- 
terest in the library on the part of the trustee, 
and also urged the appointment of trained libra- 
rians at the head of small libraries, thus reliev- 
ing trustees from much of the Ubor involved 
in the management of the library. Dr. Peck- 
ham, of the Milwaukee Public Library, spoke 
from the dual capacity of trustee and librarian, 
having been a member of the Milwaukee library 
board for many years before assuming the posi- 
tion of librarian. Dr. Peckham stated that a 
distinct line should be drawn between the work 
of the trustee and the work of the librarian. 
The librarian should be in every sense the 
executive officer of the library, the board de- 
termining the general policy of the institu- 
tion. 

Dr. Peckham was followed by the Hon. John 
Johnston, trustee of the Milwaukee Library. 
Mr. Johnston said that the dutv of library 
trustees was plain; that they should first select 
the best librarian to be found and then let him 
do as he pleased. 

Dr. Birge then called upon Col. J. W. Thomp- 



son, president of the Illinois State Library As- 
sociation and trustee of the Evanston (111.) 
Public Library. Col. Thompson stated that 
the relation between the trustee and librarian 
should be that of mutual confidence and cor- 
diality; that there should be oneness of effort 
and oneness of aim. 

Miss Cornelia Marvin, reference librarian of 
the Armour Institute of Technology, then read 
a most comprehensive paper on "Library train- 
ing schools." In the discussion following, Dr. 
Birge, as one of the directors of the University 
Summer School, paid a high tribute to the able 
manner in which the Library Summer School 
had been conducted by Miss Katharine L. 
Sharp, of Chicago. 

Mrs. Chas. S. Morris, president of the State 
Federation of Women's Clubs, then read a paper 
which had been deferred from the afternoon 
meeting, on "Travelling libraries and study 
clubs." Mrs. Morris's paper was one of the 
best of the conference. It referred to the 
efforts being made by the clubs in Wisconsin 
for the establishment of travelling reference 
libraries, and pledged the heartiest co-operation 
in the state travelling library movement. One 
of the first committees to be appointed by the 
new federation was that on library co-opera- 
tion. 

The session on Tuesday motning partook of 
the nature of a round table conference and was 
opened by a paper on the " Wisconsin summer 
school of library science," written by Miss Mar- 
garet G. Pierce, of Cleveland, Ohio, and read 
by the secretary. Miss Pierce spoke of the 
school as inspiring new ideals, its sessions be- 
ing deemed of the utmost helpfulness to those 
experienced and inexperienced in the library 
profession. 

Miss Sue C. Nichols, of Fort Atkinson, 
Wis., then made a talk on the question " Shall 
we give access to shelves?" A vote taken 
after the discussion showed that a large ma- 
jority of the librarians present allowed patrons 
to help themselves. 

Mrs. Sarah H. Miner, Madison, Wis., then 
opened the discussion of " The two-book sys- 
tem " by a comprehensive paper on the methods 
and purposes of the modern innovation. In 
small libraries it was deemed advisable to limit 
borrowers to one work of fiction at a time, and 
the general opinion was in favor of restrict- 
ing the privilege to adults, to prevent over- 
reading on the part of the children. 

Miss Mary J. Doolittle, Beaver Dam, Wis., 
advocated the purchase of duplicates of the 
best books, rather than an attempt to get a 
variety of mediocre literature. 

Miss Agnes Van Valkenburgh, of the Mil- 
waukee Public Library, made a plea for the 
purchase of many good popular novels and 
protested against attempts at keep'ng down the 
percentage of fiction to the detriment of the li- 
brary's popularity among hard-working people. 

" Foreign fiction in small libraries" was the 
subject of an interesting paper by Miss Lucy 
Lee Pleasants, of the Menasha Public Library. 
Miss Pleasants urged the purchase of books 
for the foreign population in their native 



152 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



[Marcft, '97 



tongue on the pleas of taxation and public hap- 
piness. 

In " A diffident child's first visit to a library " 
Miss Minnie M. Oakley, Madison, Wis., al- 
lowed the child to speak for herself, and she 
told in an entertaining way of her visits to the 
"Centerburg," Beaver Dam, Milwaukee, Min- 
neapolis, and Jamestown (N. Y.) public li- 
braries and of the receptions she was accorded 
at each. 

The question-box was then opened and found 
to contain questions on the best magazine bind- 
ings, hours of opening, reservation of books, 
etc., etc., the questions being answered by the 
committee of the whole. 

The delegates assembled after dinner at the 
State Normal School for the "Libraries and 
schools" session, which had been planned 
with a view to interesting the future teachers 
in the mutual relations which should exist be- 
ween the two great factors in education. 

Miss M. E. Ahern, Chicago, 111., secretary of 
the library section of the National Educational 
Association, read a paper on the objects and 
aims of the library section. Miss Ahern, on 
behalf of the section, requested that delegates 
be appointed from the library association to 
attend the forthcoming meeting of the N. E. A. 
in Milwaukee, in July, 1897. The entire mem- 
bership of the Wisconsin Library Association 
will constitute the delegation to this meeting. 

Miss Irene Warren, librarian of the Stevens 
Point Normal School, read an interesting paper 
on the "Normal School Library." Miss Warren 
has library reading classes, gives instruction 
in the use of books, etc., and has started home 
libraries as object lessons to students along 
philanthropic lines. Miss Warren's paper was 
discussed by Miss L. P. Swan, of the West 
Superior (Wis.) Normal School, and by Miss 
Schreiber, of the Milwaukee Normal School. 

"The use and abuse of township libraries" 
was the subject of an interesting paper by W. 
H. Cheever, institute conductor at the Milwau- 
kee Normal School. This paper will undoubt- 
edly be published in the next biennial report of 
the state library commission. 

Miss Mary E. Dousman, of the Milwaukee 
Library, discussed "The best 25 books for 
children from five to nyears of age," and Miss 
Anna H. McDonnell, of the Green Bay Public 
Library, performed a like service for the best 
25 books for children from u to 16 years of 
age. The lists of books were printed by the 
state library commission and were distributed 
at the meeting. (These lists will be sent to all 
who desire them.) 

Miss Mary F. Hall, primary supervisor of 
the Milwaukee schools, read a most original 
and helpful paper on " Books of Adventure for 
Boys," which it is hoped will be printed by the 
commission for general distribution. 

At the short business session in the morning 
the president and secretary declined re-election 
and the following officers were thereupon elect- 
ed: President, Dr. E. A. Birge, trustee City 
Library, Madison ; First vice-president, Dr. 
G. W. Peckham, librarian Milwaukee Pub- 
lic Library; Second vice-president, Mrs. E. E. 



Vaughn, founder Vaughn Library, Ashland ; 
Secretary, Miss Agnes Van Valkenburgh, 
Milwaukee Public Library; Treasurer, Miss 
Maude A. Eailey, librarian Chippewa Falls 
Public Library. L. E. STEARNS, Secretary. 

NORTH WISCONSIN TRAVELLING LIBRARY 
ASSOCIA TION. 

President: Mrs. E. E. Vaughn, Ashland. 
Librarian and Treasurer : Miss Janet Green, 
Vaughn Library, Ashland. 



CHICAGO LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Anderson H. Hopkins, John 
Crerar Library. 

Secretary : Miss Margaret Mann, Armour In- 
stftute, Chicago, 111. 

Treasurer: W. W. Bishop, Garrett Biblical 
Institute. 

BY invitation of Mr. C. W. Andrews the 
Chicago Library Club held its 34th regular 
meeting at the John Crerar Library, Thursday 
evening, Jan. 7, at eight o'clock. 

The meeting was called to order by the pres- 
ident, Mr. A. H. Hopkins, who announced the 
appointments of committees to undertake the 
work of the compilation and publication of the 
union list of periodicals which is to be pub- 
lished by the club. 

Mr. Andrews, chairman of the committee on 
editing, reported that he had received assur- 
ance from the chairman of the committee on 
finance that the club might count on sufficient 
pecuniary assistance for the printing of such a 
list. He said that the committee had voted 
that the club request the librarians of the larger 
libraries of Chicago and vicinity to state how 
far they would be willing to assist the club in 
the preparation of the list in as complete a form 
as possible. 

Mr. Hild, chairman of the committee on 
finance, reported that no definite amount had 
been secured, but the committee had no doubt 
of receiving adequate help from all the larger 
libraries and many of the smaller ones. 

Following Mr. Hild's report, the paper of the 
evening, "Libraries from the outside," was 
read by Mr. H. T. Sudduth. After touching 
upon the subject of free access to books his- 
torically, the practical side was taken up, and 
a plan outlined which would admit all readers 
to the shelves even in the largest public library. 

It was hoped that Mr. Norman Williams, 
president cf the John Crerar Library board, 
would be present to say something of the 
founder, and the inception and scope of the li- 
brary. In his absence Mr. Andrews, librarian 
of the John Crerar Library, spoke briefly of the 
plans and scope of the library, and gave a 
very cordial welcome to the club upon this, the 
first public meeting held in the new library. 
The members of the club then spent a pleas- 
ant hour looking about the library, its beauti- 
ful rooms and very complete equipment. Re- 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



'53 



freshments were served by the young ladies 
of the library staff. MARY B. LINDSAY, 

Secretary pro tern. 

THE February meeting of the club was held 
in the rooms of the Free Public Library of Evan- 
ston, 111., Thursday evening, Feb. 4, at 7:30. 

The usual business of the club was first 
transacted, and the members were notified of 
the resignation of Miss May L. Bennett as 
secretary, and the election of Miss Margaret 
Mann, of Armour Institute of Technology, to 
succeed Miss Bennett. 

The first paper of the evening was by Mr. G. 
B. Meleney, of the Library Bureau, on "New 
devices in library appliances." 

Mr. Meleney said that with the consent of 
the president, he would not confine his remarks 
to library appliances, but would speak on sub- 
jects of general interest to the librarian. He 
stated that the Library Bureau did not lead in 
library devices, but rather followed the sug- 
gestions and demands of the librarian. 

The remainder of the program was given up 
to a series of pipers prepared by assistants in 
the libraries in and about Chicago, and de- 
voted to subjects of interest in the libraries rep- 
resented. 

The first was by Miss Margaret Mann, of 
Armour Institute of Technology, who told how 
the instruction in cataloging is given to the li- 
brary training class. 

Mr. Carl Roden, of the cataloging department 
of the Chicago Public Library, described the 
new public card catalog which has been in 
progress since 1893, and which represents a 
cost of about $20,000. 

Miss Sarah Dickinson, who has charge of the 
periodicals at the John Crerar Libraiy, gave an 
interesting account of the method of keeping 
the records of the large number of periodicals 
subscribed for by this library. 

"Shorter titles under subject entries " was 
the subject of the next paper, presented by 
Miss Mcllvaine, of the Newberry Library. The 
last paper told of the work which is being car- 
ried on by the Free Public Library of Evanston 
with the public schools. This subject was pre- 
sented by Miss Ailing. of the Evanston Library. 

At the close a social hour was spent, and 
light refreshments were served. 

MARGARET MANN, Secretary. 

MILWAUKEE LIBRARY ROUND TABLE. 
"A little work, a little play 
To keep us going and so, good-day ! " 

NEW YORK LIBRARY CLUB. 

President: Miss M. W. Plummer, Pratt In- 
stitute Library, Brooklyn. 

Secretary: Miss J- A. Rathbone, Pratt In- 
stitute Library, Brooklyn. 

Treasurer: Miss Elizabeth Tuttle, Long 
Island Historical Society, Brooklyn. 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 
CITY. 

President: W. P. Cutter, U. S. Dept. of 
Agriculture. 

Secretary and Treasurer : F. H. Parsons, U. 
S. Naval Observatory. 



THE 2ist meeting of the Library Association 
of Washington City was held at the Columbian 
University on Feb. 24, 1897, Mr. W. P. Cutter in 
the chair. 

It was sta'ed that the next meeting would be 
held March 31 in the Temple of the Supreme 
Council of the 33d Degree of the A. and A. 
Scottish Rite of Free Masonry, which has been 
kindly tendered the association for that pur- 
pose. The association expect to have with 
them as guests, on that occasion, Miss Mary W. 
Plummer and the library class of the Pratt In- 
stitute. 

The election of Mr. W. L. Boyden to mem- 
bership was also announced. 

Mr. Parsons was called upon, as chairman of 
the handbook committee, to give a statement 
of the progress made by that committee. He 
said that frequent meetings had been held, 
blanks prepared, and sent to all libraries in the 
district, for information desired ; and as this 
data is received, it is put in shape for the print- 
er. The effort of the committee is to make this 
book as useful as possible to librarians, both 
here and away from the city, by describing as 
far as may be the classes in which each library 
is strong, so that persons desiring a given 
work can tell which will be the most likely 
place to find it. 

The paper of the evening was then read by 
Dr. Cyrus Adler, entitled "The Library of the 
Smithsonian Institution." It was an historical 
account of that library from its inception to 
date, and contained an amount of information 
which will be of great value to all when print- 
ed. The attention which was given it, and the 
questions which were asked the author upon its 
completion showed how much it was enjoyed 
by the hearers. 

F. H. PARSONS, Secretary. 



Cibrars Schools anfo draining Classes. 



NEW YORK STA TE LIBRARY SCHOOL. 
PREPARATION OF BIBLIOGRAPHIES. 

THE original bibliography which must be 
submitted as one of the conditions of gradua- 
tion in the school is one of the important feat- 
ures of the senior year, and no part of the 
school-work is done with greater thoroughness 
or enthusiasm. 

The students in choosing subjects and the 
faculty in approving them are exceedingly anx- 
ious to secure those which will be of practical 
value. 

The bibliography on municipal government 
has been sent to Providence, Chicago, Leland 
Stanford University, New York, and Phila- 
delphia, for the temporary use of persons 
wishing to consult it. We should be glad to 
receive suggestions from librarians, teachers, 
leaders of clubs, or specialists, as to subjects 
for which they wish bibliographies or reading 
lists. 

A list is appended of work in this line which 
has been completed: 



154 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



\March, '97 



Phillips Brooks. G: W. C. Stockwell, '95. 

Hawthorne. N. E. Browne, '89. 

Ben Jonson. Mrs. M. (W.) Loomis, '90. 

Charles Kingsley. E. E. Burdick, '90. 

John Lothrop Motley. M. E. Robbins, '92. 

Charles Sumner. H. W. Denio, '94. 

Bayard Taylor. W: S. Burns, "91. 

John Wesley. E. L. Foote, '92. 

Poems on Lincoln, Grant, Sherman, and 
Sheridan. M. L. Sutliff, '93. 

Members of the A. L. A. H. C. Silliman, 
'95- 

Lists of books for children. J. Y. Middleton, 
'91. 

Higher criticism of the Old Testament. 
(Select.) Rev. W: R. Eastman, '92. 

Christian art. (Select.) M. L. Davis, '92. 

Church history. (Reading list.) Elizabeth 
Harvey, '90. 

Religious denominations of the U. S. (Se- 
lect.) G: F. Bowerman, '95. 

Municipal government in the U. S. M. L. 
Jones, '92; J. A. Rathbone, '93; E. D. Biscoe, 
96. 

New philanthropy. (Reading list.) H. G. 
Sheldon, '93. 

Education of women. M. E. Hawley, '93. 

Consolidated index to university extension 
periodicals. Myrtilla Avery, '95. 

Fairy-tales for children. (Select.) F. J. Ol 
cott, '96. 

English works on King Arthur and the Round 
Table. F. R. Curtis, '96. 

Out-of-door books. (Select.) H.H.Stanley, 
'95- 

Art of the lyth century. (Reading list.) N. 
M. Pond, '96. 

Some famous cathedrals. (Reading list.) L. 
M. Sutermeister, '90. 

Ten great paintings. (Reading list.) Ada 
Bunnell, '91. 

Greek and Latin plays produced by schools, 
colleges, and universities in the U. S. G: G. 
Champlin, '95. 

Angling, supplementing Westwood and 
Satchell's Bibliotheca piscatoria. Henrietta 
Church, '93. 

English literature of later i8th century. (Se- 
lect.) M.. C. Swayze, '89. 

Fiction for girls. (Select ) A. B. Kroeger, 
'91. 

Graded list of history and travel prepared in 
the Lincoln (Nebraska) Public Library for the 
use of the Lincoln public schools. E. D. Bul- 
lock, '94. 

Books to read before going to Europe. 
(Reading list.) S. W. Cattell, '90. 

Maryland : colonial and revolutionary his- 
tory. W. I. Bullock, '92. 

English and American explorations in Africa 
since 1824. (Reading list.) H.. W. Rice, 

'93- 

Travel in America. (Reading list.) C: W. 
Plympton, '91. 

Literature relating to the Hudson river. M. 
T. Wheeler, '91. 

Travels west of the Mississippi prior to 1855: 
a partial bibliography of printed personal nar- 
ratives. K. L. Sharp, '92. 



Josephine and the women of her time. Mary 
Ellis, '92. 

200 books on biography for a popular library. 
(Select.) Mabel Temple, '90. 

History of the I7th century. (Reading list.) 
G. F. Leonard, '95. 

Edinburgh. (Reading list.) W. G. Forsyth, 

'93- 

Venice. (Reading list.) Helen Sperry, '94. 

Japan. (Reading list.) H.. K. Gay, '95. 

Colonial New England. (Reading list.) M. 
C. Wilson, '95. 

Consolidated classified index to the LIBRARY 
JOURNAL, v. 1-9. B. R. Macky, '92 ; J. L. 
Christman, '93 ; C. S. Hawes, '94. 

Cap and gown : some college verse. J. L. 
Harrison, '93. 

ANNUAL VISIT. 

The school will visit the libraries of New 
York and vicinity, April 13-23. 

MARY S. CUTLER. 

NEW QUARTERS. 

The Library School took possession in Feb- 
ruary of its new rooms on the fifth floor of the 
capitol. These are directly over the old quar- 
ters, 60 feet higher. They are reached by 
three elevators, and besides the finer view, the 
quiet and freedom from dust because so much 
further from the street they have much bet- 
ter ventilation and light and more abundant 
room. Instead of the tables heretofore used, 
the students are supplied with standard desks 
and each with an electric student-lamp. Large 
new coat and toilet rooms have been provided, 
and the school begins its second decade by oc- 
cupying quarters better adapted to its work 
than it has ever before enjoyed. 

OMISSION OF SUMMER SESSION OF 1897. 

Two reasons have determined the faculty to 
omit the summer session of the Library School 
for 1897. 

1. The confusion and labor incident to trans- 
ferring the school and all its collections to en- 
tirely new quarters on the upper floor of the 
capitol. 

2. The large number who will be abroad this 
summer attending the International Library 
Congress in London. 

PRATT INSTITUTE LIBRARY SCHOOL. 

A GRADUATE association of the Pratt Institute 
Library School was formed on Jan. 14, on the 
occasion of the joint meeting of the New York 
State Library Association and the New York 
Library Club. About 30 graduates were pres- 
ent, and the meeting was organized by the 
election of Miss Wallis, class of '95, as tempo- 
rary chairman. Miss Plummer was called upon 
to speak, and in a few words told of the un- 
successful efforts of the separate class organ- 
izations to accomplish a definite work, and of 
the evident need for a combination of forces. 

A discussion followed, which was closed by 
the unanimous adoption of the resolution of- 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



'55 



fered by Mr. Berry: " We, as graduates of the 
Pratt Institute Library Training School, do 
hereby form a Graduate Association." 

A constitution was then drawn up and 
adopted. 

The following officers were elected: Presi- 
dent, Silas H. Berry, class of "91; Vice-presi- 
dent, Catharine W. Faucon, class of '94; Re- 
cording secretary, Helen R. Trowbridge, class 
of '95; Corresponding secretary, Grace Han- 
ford, class of '95 ; Treasurer, Edith M. Pomeroy, 
class of '92. 

The association has a membership of 58. 

An interesting list of $200 worth of books on 
American history, compiled by the first-year 
class of the library school, is published in the 
March number of the Pratt Institute Monthly. 
The list was prepared in answer to a request 
received from a newly-established library. 

The school plans to make a library tour of 
Washington and its vicinity during the last 
week in March. The party will leave for 
Washington March 29 and will return on April 
3. During the six days they will visit the 
Corcoran Gallery, the Washington Public Li- 
brary, the Congressional Librarv and its new 
building, the Naval Observatory, War, State, 
and other department libraries, the office of 
public documents, the Johns Hopkins, Enoch 
Pratt, and Peabody Institute libraries of Balti- 
more, and will attend the March meeting of 
the Washington Library Association. 



Cibrarg ^conomg an& ^i 



GENERAL. 

The Century for March contains an interest- 
ing paper on "The art of large giving," by 
George lies, in which the notable library gifts 
to the United States, such as the Newberry, 
Astor, Carnegie libraries, etc., are briefly 
noted, with many other examples of large 
public benefactions. 

LOCAL. 

Allegheny (Pa.) Public School L. The library 
board has established a system of travelling 
libraries for the use of the public schools in 
outlying wards of the city. Each collection 
consists of from 100 to 150 volumes, and the 
libraries will be kept in the>various schools for 
periods of three months, and books issued by 
the teachers for home reading among the chil 
dren. 

Altoona (Pa.) Mechanics' L. and Reading-room. 
(Rpt. year ending Dec. 31, "96.) Added 1880, 
total 24,305. Issued, home use 45,778. Total 
membership 888. Receipts $3953.50; expenses 
$3649-87- 

125 school-children have free membership 
tickets, representing an equal number of shares 
of library stock owned by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Co. Regular membership dues are 
$3 yearly, and junior membership, for boys 
under 21 who are learning trades, is $i yearly. 



Austin (III.) P. L. A free reference library 
of about 500 v. has been opened in Austin, one 
of the suburbs of Chicago, through the efforts 
of the local Woman's Club. It is hoped that it 
may be the nucleus of an adequate circulating 
library. 

Bangor (Me.) P. L. (i4th rpt. year ending 
Dec. 31, '96.) Added 1991; total 40,542. Re- 
paired at library 2080; rebound 541. Issued, 
home use 48,664 (fict. 76$); reading-room use 
40,741 (fict. 53 %). Receipts $6227.96; expenses 
$6023.18. 

During the year the experiment of holiday 
opening was tried; the circulation on the six 
holidays from April to December was 550 home 
use, 457 reading-room use. 

The librarian calls attention again "to the 
great need of the proposed library building." 

Baltimore, Enoch Pratt F. L. (nth rpt. 
year ending Jan. i, '97.) Added 12,840 ; total 
176,329. Issued 653,731 (fict. and juv. 74$), 
of which 53,881 v. were issued for reference and 
library use. There were 165, 877 periodicals ustd 
at the reading- room of the central libraryand in 
the six branches. Since the library was opened 
167 books have been lost, of which 20 were first 
missing in 1896. " The risk of loss is i to 32,- 
686 of circulation. In addition to the missing 
books 64 v. were lost and paid for in 1896." 
New registration 7417 ; cards in force 32,607. 
Expenses for 1896 were $74,227.36, of which 
$20,092.99 were devoted to the construction of 
branch no. 6. 

The establishment of the sixth branch was 
the chief event in the library year. "The 
building was completed in the autumn and 
opened to the public on Nov. 14, with about 
6500 books on its shelves. These books were 
cataloged during the spring and summer and 
were removed to the branch in two days, early 
in November." 

Dr. Steiner opens his report with a short 
tribute to the late Enoch Pratt and his unfail- 
ing efforts to improve and strengthen his great 
library. 

Baltimore, Peabody Institute L. Within the 
past month the newspapers of Baltimore have 
devoted much space to "Duncan's clothes." 
James Duncan, president of the local Federa- 
tion of Labor, at a meeting of the federation, 
spoke of his "being sneered at," because of 
his clothes, when he visited the Peabody Li- 
brary, somewhat poorly dressed and in his 
working clothes. He declared that the Pea- 
body Institute had fallen into the hands of the 
"select few," and that it was the duty of the 
federation to see to it that the same fate did 
not befall the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The 
federation has appointed a committee to in- 
vestigate the management of the Peabody In- 
stitute. 

Braddock, Pa. Carnegie L. The first art 
loan exhibit ever shown in Braddock was 
opened on Feb. 18 in the library building and 
continued for a week. It was arranged by 
Miss Sperry with the help of a local committee 



'56 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL. 



{March, '97 



and included the work of about 60 exhibitors, 
embracing examples of embroidery, woodwork, 
and brasswork as well as of painting. 

Brooklyn (/V. Y.) P. L. A. A book reception 
was given by the members of the association 
on Feb. 2, each person attending being expect- 
ed to wear decorations or badges denoting the 
titles of the books they presented. About 400 
v. were secured, thus forming the nucleus of 
the library. Mrs. H. W. Chatfield was chosen 
librarian of the association. 

Cambridge (Mass.) P. L. (Rpt. year ending 
Nov. 30, '96.) Added 4163; total 51,697. Is- 
sued, home use 133,532 (fict. and juv. .688 %), 
of which 7518 were delivered through the 
schools; lib. use 12,701. No. cardholders 13,- 
168. Receipts $18,396.95; expenses $18,354 06. 

The recataloging of the library has been in 
progress for some time past, and Mr. Gifford 
recommends the publication of a printed fiction 
list as soon as practicable, and ths issue from 
time to time of class lists on special subjects. 
The pamphlets, heretofore practically inacces- 
sible, have been partially classified and a part 
of the collection of government publications 
has been entirely recataloged. Additional 
stack-room will soon be necessary. 

The children's reading-room has often been 
taxed beyond its seating capacity, and its en- 
largement is much needed so that all juvenile 
books for circulation may be placed there for 
free access. 

During the year two new delivery stations 
were established and collections of books were 
also sent for circulation to the Y. W. C. A. and 
other associations. Mr. Gifford believes that 
" deposits of books made in this way in differ- 
ent parts of the city will prove important fac- 
tors in gradually extending the usefulness and 
influence of the public library. And I think 
we should invite requests for temporary loans 
of books f rom any organization which bids fair 
to put them to profitable use among its mem- 
bers." He also recommends that the library be 
opened on Sunday evening. 

Canton (0.) P. L. A. Added 433; total 4904. 
Issued 24,372 (fict. 12,439). New registration 
528; total cardholders 6248. Receipts $2686 04; 
expenses $2117.17; these figures are for the 
general expense fund; in addition $398. 64 were 
spent for the purchase of books. 

Castile, N. Y. Cordelia A. Greene P. L. The 
library was opened to the public on Feb. 22, 
with Miss Emily B. Felt acting as librarian. 
The nucleus of this library consists of the 500 
volumes of the Scribner " model library " and 
about 200 other volumes, the use of which is 
given to the public through the generosity of 
Miss Cordelia A. Greene. The library is open 
on Tuesdays and Saturdays from one to six 
and from seven to nine p.m. 

Chicago P. L. Six rooms in the magnificent 
new building were opened to the public the last 
week in February, and arrangements for the 
complete working of the library in its new 
home are rapidly progressing. 



Cleveland (0.) P. L. The south side branch 
of the public library was opened on Feb. 22. 
Among the recent accessions to the library is a 
collection of the carbon photographs published 
by Braun, Clement & Co., of New York City. 

Columbia Univ. L., New York City. Advance 
sheets of the report of the librarian for 1896 
give the following facts and statistics: Added 
20,584; total about 223,000. "The average 
annual addition for the preceding five years 
has been 18,329. It is probable that an annual 
increase of about 20,000 is what the library 
should expect to realize for the coming year, 
unless large and important gifts should make 
its more rapid development possible. Such a 
growth continued on the lines of selection and 
arrangement which have prevailed in recent 
years in the library, will create in a term of 
years a collection of books ample for all rea- 
sonable demands for university study." Is- 
sued, home use 59,756; use of books in the 
building has increased considerably. 

Columbus (0.) Public School L. (2Oth rpt. 
year ending Aug. 31, '96.) Added 2670; total 
30,203. Issued, home use iO3,o8g(fict. 31. 78 2; 
juv. 36.42 #); ref. use 17,613; cards in use by 
borrowers 9948, of which 4610 are held by adult 
readers. Receipts $7795.14; expenses $6639.11. 

The death of Mr. J. H. Spielman, librarian 
since 1891, which occurred on Oct. 9, 1896, 
necessarily de'ayed the publication of this re- 
port, which was completed by and issued under 
thecharge of Mr. Hensel, the present librarian, 
who was elected to the position on Oct. 20. 
The "school classics" department of the li- 
brary now contains about 6300 v., which are 
issued to the various schools, on requisition 
from principals of primary and grammar grades, 
at the rate of about 1364 v. per month. Sec- 
tion i of the catalog was issued during the 
year. 

Dedham (Mass.) P. L. On Feb. 20 the library 
celebrated its 25th anniversary. 

Denver (Col.) P. L. An interesting co-opera- 
tive work toward the making of a union list 
of medical literature has been started by the 
Public Library and the Colorado Medical Li- 
brary Association, according to resolutions 
passed at the annual meeting of the latter asso- 
ciation in January. The library of the medical 
association has for the past year or so been 
housed in the public library and used for public 
reference. This collection it is now planned to 
supplement by the making of a list of the bound 
medical journals and books not contained in 
the medical library owned by local physicians 
who approve of the scheme. Notices explain- 
ing the plan have been sent to the physicians 
in question, accompanied by a blank form, on 
which is to be recorded, under title, author, 
date, no. v., place and publisher, "a lit of 
books and journals in the private library of 

Dr. , which maybe consulted by patrons of 

the Public Library, Denver, during the follow- 
ing office hours." The lists thus secured will be 
compiled into one list, easy of reference and 
kept always on file in the Public Library. "This 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



'57 



union list will, in regard to any given volume, 
tell in whose office it may be found, and at 
what hour any reader who wishes may visu 
that office and refer to it. This plan will make 
available to the medical men of Denver a very 
large and valuable collection of the best medi- 
cal literature of recent years ; a much larger 
collection than any public institution can offer 
lor many years to come." 

Galena (III.) P. L, (2d rpt. year ending 
Dec. 31, '96.) Added 751 ; total 3389. Issued, 
home use 25,327 (fict. 89$); visitors to reading- 
room 32,569. New registration 186; total cards 
in force 1387. 

Harvard University. It is proposed to es- 
tablish a memorial library at Harvard in honor 
of the late Prof. Francis James Child. About 
$10,000 have already been subscribed for the 
purpose and a number of books have been 
donated. The collection is to be specially in- 
tended for students of English literature. 

Hoboken (N. J.)P. L. March 29 is the date 
set for the opening of the new library building. 

Holbrook (Mass.} P. L. The library was de- 
stroyed by fire on Feb. 28. The town hall, in 
which the library was housed, was saved by 
hard work, but the 7500 books were almost to- 
tally destroyed. The fire broke out in the li- 
brary-room, or in the boiler-room directly be- 
low it. The building was insured for $29,000, 
of which $4000 was on the library; the loss is 
estimated at from $8000 to $12,000. 

Indianapolis, Ind. On Feb. 9 the public li- 
brary of West Indianapolis, a small town across 
the river from Indianapolis, was. opened. It 
occupies three attractive rooms in a central lo- 
cation, and starts work with about 2000 v. The 
library was established by local subscription 
and taxation. With the prospect of final an- 
nexation to the city of Indianapolis, the mana- 
gers have followed the system of the Indianap- 
olis library as far as possible, and practically 
the same rules govern the two libraries. When 
the union of the two cities is made it is expect- 
ed that the library as now organized will re- 
main as one of the branch libraries. 

Iowa City (fa.) P. L. At the municipal elec- 
tion, held March i, a one-mill tax was carried 
for the support of the library, which was opened 
on the 20th of January of this year. The library 
is already circulating on an average 150 books 
a day. 

Kansas State L. On Feb. 2 a bill was intro- 
duced into the state legislature by Congress- 
man Hackney providing for the transfer of the 
books and collections of the state historical so- 
ciety to the state library. 

Lawrenceville, Pa. Plans were recently ac- 
cepted for the Carnegie Library building of 
Lawrenceville. The town is a suburb of Pitts- 
burgh, and the new library is the first of the 
series of branches of the Pittsburgh Carnegie 
Library, which it is planned to establish. The 
building will be of pressed brick with stone 
trimmings, 100x80 feet. The first floor will 



DC devoted to a delivery-room, a children's 
room, and a stack-room at the icar, with a 
book capacity of 25,000 v. A periodical read- 
ing-room, and an auditorium seating 500 per- 
sons, will occupy the basement. The amoui t 
to be devoted to the Lawrenceville branch 
from the entire fund given by Mr. Carnegie is 
7,5co. 

Los Angeles (Cal.) P. L. (Rpt. year ending 
Dec. I, '96.) Added 4415; total 44, 564. Issued, 
home use 497,615 (fict. 227,367, juv. 58,234); 
ref. use 58,697. New registration 4727; total 
registration 26,567. Receipts $26,959.61 ; ex- 
penses $21,633.03. 

During the year 20,620 v. were delivered to 
the schools, an increase of 3204, while 351 of 
the 414 teachers of the city are users of the li- 
brary. $744.21 were received for the school 
work from the board of education and with 
this 700 v. were purchased. There are m w 
four Rudolph indexers in use in the library. 
Several alterations are being made in the in- 
terior arrangement of the library, among them 
the fitting up of a children's department. 
" What the library needs more than anything 
else, except a new building of its own, is a find- 
ing list up to date and gotten out as soon as 
possible." 

Milwaukee ( Wis^ P. L. At a common coun- 
cil meeting on Feb. 5 a bill was recommended 
for passage to the legislature providing for in- 
creasing the local public library tax from its 
present rate of one-quarter of a mill to two- 
fifths of a mill. On Feb. 8 the bill was vetoed 
by the mayor on the ground that the measure was 
less pressing than other legislation to be pre- 
sented to the legislature. The veto was sus- 
tained by the common council. 

Minnesota lib. commission bill. The bill pro- 
viding for the establishment of a state library 
commission and a system of travelling libraries 
was indefinitely postponed by action of the 
state legislature on Feb. 18. The bill had been 
recommended for passage in the senate on Feb. 
5, but was opposed in the house by Represen- 
tative Donnelly. Mr. Donnelly, in speaking 
against the bill, said that "it was not within 
the province of the legislature to supply the 
people with books any more than it was with 
boots. Moreover, he doubted the practicability 
of what was to be attempted. Books were not 
read in a single day, nor a single week. One 
member of a family did not peruse them and 
then return them. They were read by every 
member of the family. Circulation under such 
circumstances was a slow process. Again, how 
were these different libraries to be sent from 
part to part of the state, granted that the prob- 
lem of circulation resolved itself into condi- 
tions which could be successfully met? The 
whole thing was really a scheme for seme deal- 
er to job off a lot of books." He then warned 
his hearers that the $5000 appropriation was 
intended "as a levy to pry a hole in thebarrier 
and in the sacred name of intelligence and edu- 
cation to let in a flood of extravagance upon the 
treasury." 



'58 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



Monmotith, III. Warren County L. A . (Rpt. 
year ending Jan. i, '97.) Added 684; total 
17,501. Issued, home use, books 15,556, maga- 
zines 5965; ref. use, from stack 4918, from open 
shelves (estimated) 26,000. There was an 
average daily attendance of 200 in the reading- 
room. 

Nebraska State L., Lincoln. (Biennial rpt., 
'94-96.) Added 2840; total 36,075. "At its 
last session the legislature appropriated from 
the library fund the sum of $600 ' for the pur- 
pose of purchasing the necessary cards and 
cases and for arranging a card catalog for the 
state library.' This appropriation has been ex- 
pended and considerable progress made toward 
supplying a catalog, which is so much needed." 
Mr. Campbell asks for an appropriation of 
$1800 for continuing the cataloging work. 
Much of the report is devoted to an account of 
the travelling library system, which is recom- 
mended for Nebraska. The estimated cost of 
establishing the system is placed at $2500. 

New Orleans, Mo. Fiskf. and P. L. Since 
its opening in February the library has had an 
attendance averaging 200 readers a day for 
periodicals alone. The circulation of fiction 
begins on March 15, on which day the fiction 
catalog will be ready for distribution at a nom- 
inal price. The statement in the February L. 
j. that the miscellaneous books in the state li- 
brary formed a part of the collection consoli- 
dated into the new library was not wholly 
accurate. This collection has not yet been 
transferred, and though it is hoped that the 
transference may eventually be made, it is 
hardly likely that the removal of the books 
from the state library to the new organization 
can be effected without the aid of the legisla- 
ture, which will not meet for 12 months. 

N. Y. Mercantile L. (?6th rpt. year end- 
ing Jan. i, '97.) Added 6109; total 255,227. 
Issued, home use 186,880 (fict. 52.31 ); ref. 
use 41,540; reading-room attendance 26,626. 
Membership 5090. Receipts $27,328.48; ex- 
penses $26,085.69. 

Both reading and reference rooms are used 
much less in the evening than during the day- 
time. The evening use, in fact, is so constant- 
ly decreasing that the closing of both depart- 
ments before nine o'clock is suggested. The 
poster exhibition held Feb. 12, 1896, was most 
successful. 

N. Y. P. L. Astor, Lenox, and Tilden foun- 
dations. On Feb. 16 Assemblyman Austin in- 
troduced into the state legislature a bill pro- 
viding for the construction of a building in 
Bryant Park, New York City, ta be occupied 
by the public library. The bill provides that 
the New York Department of Public Parks 
shall remove the reservoir and erect within the 
park a building upon plans to be approved by 
the trustees of the library. The city is to issue 
$2,500,000 in four per cent, gold bonds for the 
removal of the reservoir and the erection of 
the library building. 

The library has recently acquired an interest- 
ing and valuable collection of Italian opera li- 



bretti, numbering 1300 v., bound in vellum, 
an average of 10 libretti being bound in each 
volume. The collection was made by a col- 
lector living at the Hague, and it covers a period 
of 161 years, 1705 to 1865; it will probably be 
continued to the present time. 

N. Y. Y. M. C. A. L. An exhibition of fine 
art books was held at the library on Washing- 
ton's birthday. It was specially intended to 
interest and benefit art students, designers, and 
decorators. 

Newport, A. I. Redwood L. and Athenaum. 
(i66th rpt.) Added 707; total 42,043. Issued 
13,404 (fict. 8908). 

The work of cataloging the library has been 
practically completed, and the greater part of 
the librarian's report is devoted to an explana- 
tion of the catalog and to mention of notable 
accessions. 

Niagara Falls (N. Y.) P. L. (Rpt. year 
ending Jan. 31, '97.) Added 950; total 3700. 
Issued 27,154, as against 12,501 in the preced- 
ing year. New registration 1427. 

Norfolk (Fa.) P. L. (Rpt. year ending 
Jan. 31, '97.) Added 850; total not given. Is- 
sued 15,929 (fict. 13,105); visitors to lib. 35,849. 
Membership 65 1, of whom 255 are subscribers. 
The free list includes all public school scholars 
above the age of 15, all teachers, ministers, 
and newspaper editors. 

North Adams (Mass.) P. L. (i3th rpt. n 
months, Jan. i-Nov. 30, '96.) Added 613; 
total 14,480. Issued 63,140 (fict. 52.8 %; juv. 
25.7 #). New registration 868; total registra- 
tion 6810 (teachers' cards 276). Receipts and 
expenses $3562 81. 

The trustees urge that the annual appropria- 
tion be increased from $4500 to $5000. 

Norwich, Ct. Otis L. (Rpt. year ending 
Aug. 31, '96.) Added 1523; total 20,688. Is- 
sued, home use 94,652 (fict. 52.52 %; juv. 22.60 
%). New registration 1008; total registration 
5756. Receipts $7048.26; expenses $6998.29. 

The Sunday opening of the reading-room 
was the only novelty of the year. 

Pawtucket (R. I.) F. P. L. (2Oth rpt. 10 
months ending Sept. 30, '96.) Added 565; total 
15,223. Issued 42,074 (fict. 31,457), of which 
10,993 were drawn on school cards. New regis- 
tration 1471. Receipts $7009.20; expenses 
$6910.55. 

Mrs. Sanders's report is a simple record of 
good work and increasing usefulness, especially 
in the direction of school influence and grow- 
ing reference use. 

The library has recently issued an attractive 
little book-mark, bearing the legend " When in 
doubt on any subject, consult the public li- 
brary," and inscribed with several appropriate 
literary quotations. To it is attributed at least 
a part of the increased crop of questions sub- 
mitted to the library for answer. 

Philadelphia. The descendants of botanist 
John Bartram are planning to establish the 
John Bartram Memorial Library Company for 
a free public library in the neighborhood of the 
Bartram Gardens, Philadelphia. 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



'59 



Philadelphia F. L. Mr. Thomson writes : 
" The library has now the largest circulation in 
the world, having issued 1,349,070 v. during the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1896." 

The Chestnut Hill branch of the library was 
opened Feb. I. This branch was formerly the 
Christian Hall Library Company of Chestnut 
Hill, but has now been transferred to the man- 
agement of the Free Library, which has added 
about 2000 v. to the 8000 books in the original 
collection. 

Philadelphia Mercantile L. (74th rpt. year 
ending Jan. i, '97.) Added 3134; total 179,922. 
Issued 70,737; no. visitors 285,553 (Sundays 
and holidays 12,950). Receipts $19,379.22; ex- 
penses $17,296.21. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Carnegie L. At a recent 
board meeting the trustees voted to appropriate 
$100 for the present year in aid of the work of 
the A. L. A. Publishing Section. Mr. G. A. 
Macbeth, chairman of the library committee, 
introduced the resolution and explained that at 
the Cleveland meeting of the A. L. A. he had 
been much impressed with Mr. lies' plans for 
the appraisal of literature, and that he thought 
the work of the Publishing Section deserved 
the practical support of libraries. 

Portland '(Ore. ,) L. A. (Rpt., 1896.) Added 
963; total 23,887. Issued, home use 31,579 
(net. 69.7 %). Membership 582. Receipts, gen- 
eral fund $3575.79, book fund $1877.30; ex- 
penses, general fund $3568.02, book fund 
$1648.96. 

"The financial condition of the association 
has compelled the most rigid economy in cur- 
rent expenses, including reductions in salaries, 
and it is believed that the directors have gone 
as far in that direction as possible, without in- 
jury to the library. 

" Increasing use is being made of the library 
for purposes of reference and research by mem- 
bers of study clubs and by p ivate students." 
There has been an increase of 26.6 % over the 
circulation of the preceding year, and a de- 
crease of 1.2 % in the issue of fiction. 

Providence (R. /.) P. L. On Feb. 16 a spe- 
cial m-eting of the trustees was held, and it 
was formally voted to accept the gift of $200,- 
ooo, made by John Nicholas Brown, for a new 
library building. 

The only conditions imposed by Mr. Brown in 
connection with his magnificent gift are that 
the trustees shall raise the $100,000 balance 
necessary to complete the building already de- 
signed, and that they shall have removed all 
the buildings now situated on the library prop- 
erty where the new structure is to stand. The 
need of befer accommodations for the library 
have been long before the people of Provi- 
dence, and have already been presented in the 
JOURNAL by Mr. Foster (L. j. 21 1364 -368). The 
structure planned to meet the needs of the li- 
brary, was, however, much beyond the means at 
the disposal of the trustees, and the only course 
practicable seemed to be the construction of 
a part of the building, cramping and injuring 
its full usefulness. 



In the spring of 1890 Mr. Foster issued an 
appeal to the people of Providence, reciting 
these facts and asking subscriptions toward the 
necessary $300,000, but only $1013 was re- 
ceived in response. Now Mr. Brown's gener- 
osity removes the difficulties and clears the 
way to the establishment of the library in a 
spacious, fitting, and permanent home. 

Quincy (///.) F. P. L. The circulation for 
January, 7802, was the largest for one month 
in the history of the library. The Quincy 
Medical Association on Feb. 10 made applica- 
tion for a room in the library, in which they 
would be glad to establish a medical library for 
reference use. The application was granted, 
and the association has put its collection in 
charge of the library. 

Richmond, Va. Rosemary L. The trustees 
announce that unless more subscribers are se- 
cured for the library, and its income is materi- 
ally increased by June i, it will be necessary 
to close it for lack of funds on that date. The 
library was established in 1891, with an endow- 
ment of $4000 from Mrs. Thomas Nelson Page; 
membership dues were fixed at $3 yearly. Its 
receipts have never exceeded $ior o a year, and 
its expenses amount to about $1800. 

Salem (Mass.) P. L. (8th rpt. year ending 
Dec. 31, '96.) Added 2371; total 33,078. 2330 
v. have been bound at a total cost oi $1038.15, 
an average of 44^ c. per v. Issued, home use 
109,117 (fict. 84.62 %); reading-room attendance 
50,000. There are now 179 periodicals on file, 
of which 22 are gifts. Receipts $16,606 05; ex- 
penses $12,441.74. 

"Feeling it important that the needs of the 
library should be known so that any person or 
persons who may cor template giving or be- 
queathing money to the library may be able to 
tell just what direction such gift should tale, 
the trustees present with this report a plan for 
an addition to the library building which, in 
their opinion, will be satisfactory to the public 
using the library and which can be economi- 
cally conducted and be reasonably safe against 
fire." Three plans are shown, one for each 
floor, by which provision is made for housing 
100,000 v., instead of as at present 35,000, for 
a reference-room with space for 15.000 v. for a 
class or study room, and fora women's or chil- 
dren's reading-room. The cost of this addition 
is estimated at $50,000. 

Scranton (Pa.) P. L. (6th rpt. year ending 
Dec. 31, '96.) Added 3157 ; total 27,943. Is- 
sued, home use 155,072 (fict. and juv. 79.81$) ; 
ref. use 4102. New registration 3846 ; total 
cards in use 8366. Receipts, $11,533 ; expenses 
$10,716.82. 

Sheboygan, Wis. The common council on 
Feb. 15 passed an ordinance providing that 
seven per cent, of all license money received 
be used to establish a free public library. The 
late James H. Mead bequeathed $20.000 to be 
used for a free library by the city. This money 
is invested, and when it becomes available, 
will be used in aid of the library. 



i6o 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



, 'g^ 



Washington, D. C. Crandall public document 
bill. In the Washington Post of Feb. 23 a 
communication was printed from Mr. Pitman 
Pulsifer, private secretary of Senator Hale and 
clerk of the committee on printing, opposing 
the provisions of Mr. Crandall's bill " to im- 
prove the printing and binding methods of the 
public documents," on the ground that what it 
seeks to accomplish is already provided for by 
the existing law, passed Jan. 12, 1895. Mr. 
Crandall, in the Post of Feb. 25, answers this 
letter fully, reciting the insufficiency of exist- 
ing provisions and describing the short and 
simple solution of the difficulties supplied by the 
proposed bill. This solution lies in " taking the 
executive reports and serial works out of the 
numbered series of the Congressional docu- 
ments. It is true there is no law for this num- 
bering, but it is a very ancient custom, and if 
Congress refuses to take the responsibility of 
abolishing it, is it reasonable to expect the 
Public Printer to do so ? " The results of the 
present system, " which make the public docu- 
ments grotesquely unusable and an affront to 
the intelligence of the country, will, in all 
probability, never be cured until Congress en- 
acts positive prohibitory legislation of the kind 
embodied in the so-called Crandall bill." 

Washington (D '. C.) F. L. (ist rpt. year 
ending Dec. 31, '96.) " The library was- opened 
to the public on Jan. 6, 1896, with 3151 v. ; 
there were added during the year 5380 v., mak- 
ing the total number now in the library 8351." 
The registration amounts to 6666 persons. 
There were issued for home use 83,066 v. (fict. 
77 %), and 636 non-fiction cards are in use. After 
the first few months free access was given to 
all books, a concession that has proved " bene- 
ficial to the public and economical to the li- 
brary." Only one book is unaccounted for. 
There are two travelling libraries in use, one 
of 100 v. loaned to the Y. M. C. A., the other, 
30 v., in use by the Workingmen'sClub. " These 
volumes are loaned under the most liberal con- 
ditions, being issued on a single card which is 
renewed every 14 days. The association bor- 
rowing the volumes (which are in all cases 
duplicates) is not required to keep an exact 
record of the circulation and is not held re- 
sponsible for the loss of any volume, it being 
believed that losses of this character, unavoid- 
able even under the best management, will be 
compensated for by the resultant good from the 
circulation of the volumes." 

Gen. Greely, president of the association, 
says : "It cannot fail to be a source of grati- 
fication, and especially of wonder, that this 
association, beginning its active work Jan. 
6. 1896, in two small rented rooms, with only 
3151 books, mostly gifts, should in the first 
year circulate upwards of 100,000 volumes. 
No effort was made to stimulate the circula- 
tion ; indeed, the small number of volumes at 
the beginning constrained the board of trus- 
tees to decline the issuance of non-fiction and 
teachers' cards, for fear that the ordinary de- 
mands could not be met by the stock in hand. 
From month to month, however, through gener- 



ous friends, the number of books grew steadily, 
keeping pace with the registration and the de- 
mand for literature. Ii thus resulted that from 
average daily loans of 113 volumesin January, 
from a stock of 3721 volumes, the issues of the 
library rose almost uninterruptedly to an aver- 
age of 416 volumes daily from a stock of 8270 
volumes in November. At the end of the year, 
much to the surprise of every one, and not the 
least to the board of trustees, it appeared that 
the total use of the library had aggregated 
100,446 volumes ; that the average daily circu- 
lation had been 333.7 volumes ; that the num- 
ber of persons registered as borrowers reached 
6666 ; that the number of volumes in the library 
had increased to 8531, and that there was a sur- 
plus in the treasury sufficient to pay the ex- 
penses of the opening month of 1897." 

Washington, D. C. U. S. Congressional L. 
On Feb. 10 two clerks employed in the Con- 
gressional Library were arrested by the Secret 
Service officers, charged with theft of many of 
the most valuable autograph letters and docu- 
ments deposited in the library. The men ar- 
rested, Philip McElhone and Lewis McK. Tur- 
ner, were committed to jail in default of $3000 
bail. The robberies, it has been ascertained, 
were effected by means of duplicate keys, and 
have been in progress, it is said, since last 
August. The room in which the stolen docu- 
ments were kept was one of the upper cham- 
bers of the library, and the confusion incident 
to the change of quarters to the new building is 
believed to have facilitated the thefts. One of 
the most important documents stolen was a diary 
of George Washington of 1784, and a letter of in- 
quiry concerning this, received from a New York 
dealer to whom it had been offered, was the 
means of revealing the whole affair. This 
dealer had a short time previously received a 
letter offering for sale certain autograph let- 
ters. Later two young men called upon him 
and he made some purchases. After this there 
was further communication, and then came an 
offer of the Washington diary. He became 
suspicious and wrote a letter to one of the sen- 
ators, inquiring if any of the government's 
collection of documents were missing. The 
senator replied negatively, apparently not con- 
cerning himself much about the inquiry. This 
did not satisfy the dealer, whose suspicion was 
further aroused by the low price put on the 
diary. The Secretary of the Treasury was 
written to, and at last the Secret Service offi- 
cers started to investigate. Inquiry at the dif- 
ferent departments showed that nothing of the 
nature described had been stolen. Then the 
detectives went to the capitol and an examina- 
tion of the autograph files by Librarian Spof- 
ford resulted in the discovery that nearly 100 
documents were missing. Proofs were finally 
traced to Turner and McElhone, who were de- 
scribed by the New York dealer, and both men, 
on examination, admitted having offered the 
documents for sale, but said that they had not 
abstracted them from the library. A number 
of the stolen documents, 350 in all, were re- 
turned to Chief Hazen, of the Secret Service, 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



161 



from his officers in New York on Feb. 16, hav- 
ing been recovered from the various dealers 
and other persons who had bought them from 
Turner and McElhone. The actual number of 
documents stolen has not yet been staled. It 
is said that a special congressional committee 
will be appointed to investigate the matter. 

Williamsburg, Mass. Meekins L. The li- 
brary building given to the town of Williams- 
burg by the late Stephen Meekins was dedi- 
cated on the evening of Feb. i. The exercises 
were held at the Congregational church. The 
building, which cost about $12,000, is one story, 
40 by 50 feet, and of classic design. The 
exterior walls are of rock-faced granite with 
Ohio sandstone trimmings. Entrance to the 
main hall is through a lobby with polished 
granite columns on each side. The main hall 
is in the centre of the building, 22 feet long and 
12 feet wide, covered by a dome and ceiling 
light of stained glass. To the right of this 
hall is the stack-room, 16 by 30 feet and 12 feet 
high, this being the uniform height of all the 
rooms. The stacks are built to accommodate 
10,000 volumes, but they can be raised and the 
capacity doubled. At the further end of the 
hall is the private office of the librarian, 10 by 
12 feet. At the left of the front entrance is the 
reading-room, 22 by 16 feet, and back of this is 
the reference-room, 15 by 16 feet. The rooms 
are lighted with large plate-glass windows, 
which have ornamental transoms of stained 
glass. The building is heated with hot air and 
lighted with gas. In the basement is the town 
vault. The library starts work with about 8000 
v., 2400 of which were transferred from the 
local library association. 

FOREIGN. 

Aberdeen (Scot 1.) P. L. (i2.th rpt. year end- 
ing Sept. 30, '96.) Added 1938 ; total 45,221 
(21,104 in ref. dept.). Issued, home use 199,- 
500 (net. 50.93$); ref. use 15,769; reading- 
room 52,529. There were 8398 borrowers' tick- 
ets issued, of which 676 were extra non-fiction 
cards. 

The plan of allowing free access to a large 
collection of books in the reference-room has 
worked well, and has led to the exhibition, for 
choice and examination in open cases, of all 
new books added to the various departments. 
Electric light was installed in the library build- 
ing during the year. 

" Since January the library has been recog- 
nized as a branch of the Emigrants' Infor- 
mation Office, established at Westminster under 
the direction of the Colonial Office for the pur- 
pose of supplying intending emigrants with 
accurate and trustworthy information respect- 
ing the colonies. The result has been the 
dissemination of a large number of govern- 
mental circulars and handbooks, and there is 
reason to think that in this way a considerable 
service has been rendered to many in the town 
and surrounding districts." 

Frank f or t-on- Main. The library of Gustav 
Freytag was recently purchased by Leopold 
Sonneman, proprietor of the Frankfurter Zei- 



tung, and presented by him to the City Library 
of Frankfort. The collection includes over 
6000 v., and is especially rich in German his- 
tory, philology, and literature from the isth 
century to modern times. The library is to 
be kept as a separate collection and will be 
known as the Gustav Freytag Library. 

Johannesburg, South Africa. The Johannes- 
burg Public Library will soon remove to a fine 
new building, which has been in process of 
construction for some time past, and which 
will cost $100,000. Its present quarters are 
cramped and inadequate. 

Leipzig. The library of the late Prof. Emile 
Du Bois Reymond, of Berlin, has recently been 
put upon the market by Gustave Fock, of Leip- 
zig. The collection comprises about 14.000 
volumes and pamphlets relating to physiology, 
physics, philosophy, and allied sciences ; many 
of them contain comments and annotations by 
Prof. Du Bois Reymond. It includes also a 
number of valuable sets of scientific journals 
and series. The collection is priced at 22,000 m. 

G. Hedeler, of Leipzig, offers for sale a fine 
private collection of works on electricity, 
gathered since 1850 by a well-known electrician 
and engineer. It contains 2000 books and 
about 5000 pamphlets and periodicals, and is 
rich in publications relating to early telegraphy ; 
of recent issues it includes only rarer and more 
expensive works. The collection is fully cat- 
aloged. 



fJrostical Notes. 



PRESERVATION OF BOUND NEWSPAPERS. The 
following label is used on all volumes of bound 
newspapers in the Boston Athenaum: 



HANDLE WITH GREAT CARE. 



1. The paper on which newspapers are 
printed is generally of poor quality and 
grows brittle with age. 

2. Most newspapers are difficult or im- 
possible to replace if worn or injured, and, 
unlike other publications, they will never 
be reprinted. Only a very small number 
of copies exist anywhere. 

3. Future generations of readers have 
a claim on these volumes, which should 
be respected. 

THEREFORE 
HANDLE CAREFULLY. 



Mr. Lane says, regarding this new device, 
" It seems to us of the highest importance 
that newspaper volumes, of which there are so 
few duplicates in existence, and which are 
printed on particularly poor paper, should be 
handled with special regard to their penshabl. 
nature and the importance of preserving them. 



162 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



CJMfts anb JBcqneete. 



Creek, Mich. By the will of Charles 
Willard, who died on Feb. i, the sum of $40,- 
ooo is bequeathed to Battle Creek for a public 
library. 

Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. 
By the will of the late Peter Kerlen, of St. 
Thomas, Pa, the library of Franklin and Mar- 
shall College will receive about f 10,000 as an 
endowment for the purchase of books. This 
is the second gift the library of the college has 
received this year, the first being the De Pey- 
ster library building, work on which has al- 
ready begun. 

University of Texas, Austin. On Feb. 22, 
Swante Palm, of Austin, presented to the uni- 
versity library his valuable private library of 
25,000 v. Mr. Palm, who was born in Sweden 
in 1815, has lived in Texas for 53 years, and 
for the past 31 years has been Swedish vice- 
consul in Austin ; in 1883 King Oscar of Swe- 
den conferred upon him the order or Knights 
of Warsaw. His library is a miscellaneous 
collection, with a special tendency toward 
works on art. 

Winona, Minn. On Feb. 6, W. H. Laird, of 
Winona, offered to present to the city of Wi- 
nona a public library building to cost $40,000, on 
condition that the city furnish the site, and 
also increase the tax levy for the support of 
the library from f of a mill to one mill for a 
period of 10 years, the tax levy after that 
period to be never less than \ mill. 

^Librarians. 



BULLOCK, Miss Edna Dean, of the New York 
State Library School, class of '94, has recently 
gone to Nebraska City, Neb., to organize the 
public library and supervise its arrangement in 
the new quarters provided by Mr. Joy Morton. 
Mrs. W. M. Cornutt has been elected librarian. 

BURCHARU, E. L., librarian of the Field Co- 
lumbian Museum, of Chicago, has recently sev- 
ered his conneciion with that institution, and 
Mr. Juul Dieserud, formerly assistant libra- 
rian, has received the appointment as his suc- 
cessor. Mr. Dieserud holds three degrees from 
the Royal University of Christiania, Norway, 
where for years he applied himself to the study 
of philology, ancient and modern. He has 
been with Mr. Burch^rd as his only assistant 
since the opening of the museum. The library 
now numbers 8000 books and about the same 
number of pamphlets, all on scientific subjects. 

DAVIS, Miss Florence, has been appointed 
librarian of the Rockville (Ct.) Free Library, 
succeeding Miss Keating, resigned. Miss Davis 
has had several years' experience in the Hart- 
ford (Ct.) Public L'brary. 

DELAP-SUTERMF.ISTER. Miss Louise M. Su- 
termeister, librarian of the Eau Claire (W'is.) 
Public Library, was married on Dec. 24, 1896, 
to Silas Charles Delap, of Kansas City, Mo. 



Miss SutermeSster is a graduate of the New 
York State Library School, class of '90. 

DYCHE-BKNNETT. On Feb. n, Miss May L. 
Bennett, of the Armour Institute Library staff, 
was married to William A. Dyche, mayor of 
Evanston, 111. Miss Bennett was a member of 
the New York State Library School, class of 
'94 (undergraduate), and was active in library 
work in Chicago, being for over a year secre- 
tary of the Chicago Library Club. 

MACK, Miss Katharine M., for two years as- 
sistant-in-chaige of the Astral branch of the 
Pratt Institute Free Library, has been appoint- 
ed librarian of the Public Library of Westfield, 
N. Y. 

METCALF, Miss Anna, librarian of the Harris 
Institute Library of Woonsocket, R. I., has 
been granted six months' leave of absence for 
foreign travel. She will go abroad on March 
31, and will spend much of the summer in Ger- 
many. During her absence Miss Ama H. Ward, 
of Amherst, Mass., will have charge of the In- 
stitute library. 

ROBBINS, Miss Mary E., of the New York 
State Library School, class of '92, is arranging 
and cataloging the Port Jervis (N. Y.)Free Li- 
brary. 

STOCKWELL, George W. C. , of the New York 
State Library School, class of '95 (undergrad- 
uate), is cataloging and classifying the Y. M. C. 
A. Library of Ware, Mass. 

Cataloging anb QTIassifiration. 

ALDEN, H. W. The decimal index in the draft- 
ing-room. (In American Machinist, Feb. 4, 
1897, 20 : 99.) 4^ col. 

Mr. Alden describes his method of indexing 
drawings and patterns. " I do not propose the 
adoption of that part of Mr. Dewey's classifica- 
tion devoted to mechanical engineering, be- 
cause it is far too general in its nature at pres- 
ent, and not sufficiently subdivided. The work 
of any drafting-rcom forms too small a part of 
the general subject of mechanical engineering 
to permit the use of even a perfect classifica- 
tion of that subject, as the subdivisions would 
have to be carried too far." 

BRUMMER, Franz. Lexikon der deutschen Dich- 
ter und Prosaisten der 19. Jahrhunderts. 4th 
ed., enl. Leipzig. Reclam, 1896. 2 v., 477, 
455 P* (Reclam's Universal Bibl., nos. 1981 - 
1990 and 3531-3540.) cl. 5m. 
Contains biographies of 4800 authors, an in- 
crease of 1400 over those in the third edition. 
The list of pseudonyms also has been consid- 
erably enlarged. 

CARNEGIE F. L , Allegheny, Pa. Catalogue of 
fiction: Supplement no. i, includi' g additions 
from Jan., 1895, to Jan., 1897. Authors- ti- 
tles. 58 p. O. 
In the preface Mr. Stevenson explains his 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



'63 



reasons for withdrawing from circulation some 
of the trashier class of novels; following is a 
"list of books no longer on the shelves," in 
which is recorded the names of the authors 
who have been dropped. These include Alger, 
" Robert Appleton," C. M. Braeme, " G. Col- 
more," Martha Finley, May Agnes Fleming, 
Fosdick (" Harry Castlemon " ), A. C. Gunter, 
Mrs. Holmes, E. P. Roe, L. Rousselet, Mrs. 
Southworth, Mrs. Terhune ("Marion Har- 
land"), Augusta Evans Wilson, Virginia Woods. 

The CARNEGIE L. (Pittsburgh) Bulletin for 
February contains a short reading list (2 p.) on 
Richard Wagner. 

A CHURCH reference library. (In Outlook, Feb. 

20, 1897, 55 : 548.) 2 p. 

A classified comprehensive list of books help- 
ful to Sunday-school teachers and others in- 
terested in Bible study. 

DENVKR (Colo.) P. L. has recently issued 
"Trades Assembly list no. i," a list of books, 
magazines, articles, etc., dealing with the his- 
tory of labor unions (53 titles), of which copies 
have been distributed to 2000 members of local 
labor unions. "Trades Assembly list no. 2" 
relates to money, banking, bimetallism, etc., 
and includes 131 titles; it is compiled by F. D. 
Tandy. The report of the teachers' insiitute 
held in Denver, Oct. 31, 1896, compiled by Mr. 
Dana and published by School District no. i, 
Denver, contains, p. 42-52, an interesting 
"list of books on drawing, art, and allied sub- 
jects in the Public Library." 

LOWELL (Mass.) CITY L. Bulletin for Febru- 
ary contains Reference list no. 3, on municipal 
government (9 p.). 

NEW BEDFORD (Mass.) F. P. L. Bulletin for 
February contains Reference list no. 19, on 
William Hamilton Gibson. 

N. Y. F. L. OF THE GENERAL SOCIETY OF ME- 
CHANICS AND TRADESMEN. Monthly bulletin 
of new books, no. i: additions during Jan- 
uary-February, 1897. 

N. Y. MERCANTILE L. Bulletin of new books, 
no. 17, October, 1896. 44 p. O. 

The N. Y. P. L. Bulletin for February con- 
tains among other interesting notes a 6-p. list 
of "periodicals relating to language and phi- 
lology in the New York Public Library and 
Columbia University Library." 

The OSTERHOUT F. L. (Wilkesbarre, Pa.) 
Newsletter continues in its February number 
the excellent series of reading notes on Eng- 
lish history from Edward I. to Richard n. 

The OTIS L. (Norwich, Ct.) Bulletin for Janu- 
ary has a short reference list on the History 
of the Christian Church, compiled at the re- 
quest of a local Epworth League. In the 
February mmber is a short reading list on 
English literature, to be used in connection 
with the series of lectures on the subject de- 
livered by Mr. Richard Burton. 



PATERSON (M J.) F. P. L. Bulletin for 
January contains reference lists on George 
Washington and Abraham Lincoln, and a 
classed list on Italian painting supplied with 
brief critical notes by Prof. J. C. Van Dyke, of 
Rutgers College. 

The PROVIDENCE (R. I.) P. L. Bulletin for 
February contains reference lists 41 and 42. on 
"Mendelssohn and the oratorio of Elijah," 
and "Schubert," and special catalog no. n, 
listing additions to the "School duplicate col- 
lection." 

The SALEM (Mass.) P. L. Bulletin devotes 
its chief special reading list in the February 
number to London ; there are also short lists 
on Philip Gilbert Hamerton and the Best books 
of 1895 : literature. 

The SOMERVILLE (Mass.) P. L. Bulletin for 
February lists all the German books in the li- 
brary, and has also a short reading list on 
Cuba. 

The WALTHAM (Mass.) P. L. Bulletin for 
February has a special classed list on Ger- 
many, embracing history, biography, historical 
fiction, travel, literature, and art (6 p.). 

CHANGED TITLES. 

"The land o 1 the leal," by David Lyall, 
[Dodd, N. Y.], is the same as "Heather from 
the brae," by David Lyall [Revell, N. Y.], ex- 
cept that it has thrle additional stories, and 
the stories are differently grouped. Is there 
no way of stopping such frauds upon the 
public? JOHN EDMANDS. 

FULL NAMES. 
The following are supplied by Harvard Collect Library: 

Camp, Cyrus Carpenter (Labor, capital, and 
money ; their just relations) ; 

Farnham, Amos W: (Oswego normal method 
of teaching geography) ; 

Franceschi, Francesco (Santa Barbara exotic 
flora) ; 

Giffin, W: Milford (Supplementary work in 
arithmetic. Pt. I. Lines) ; 

Howe, Herbert Alonzo (Elements of descrip- 
tive astronomy) ; 

Howell, Edwin Cull, and Young, Franklin 
Knowles (The minor tactics of chess) ; 

Jackson, Robert Tracy (Methods of labelling 
trees and p'ants) ; 

Kelsey, Francis Willey (The Presbyterian 
church and the University of Michigan) ; 

Lighthill, E: Bunford, and August P. (A 
popular treatise on deafness) ; 

Pidgin, C: Felton (The lord of the sea) ; 

Smith. J: L. (Mapa de la isla de Cuba) ; 

Wenley, Robert M: (Contemporary theology 
and theism) ; 

Wetmore, C: A: (Treatise on wine produc- 

Wr'ight, C: Herbert, and Wing, C: B: (A 
manual of bridge drafting). 

Spahr, C: Barzillai, Ph.D., author of "An 
essay on the present distribution of wealth in 
the United States." N. Y. [c. 1896.] W: J. J. 



164 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



Uibliogrnfi}. 



ANATOMY. Bibliographic anatomique: Revue 
des travaux en langue frangaise: Anatomic, 
histologie, embryologie, anthropologie; di- 
rection: A. Nicolas. AnneeiSgy. Paris, Ber- 
ger-Levrault & Cie., 1897. 8. 10 fr. 

AUSTEN, Jane. Adams. Oscar Fay. The story 
of Jane Austen's life. New ed., il. Bost., 
Lee & Shepard, 1897. 280 p. D. $2. 
Contains 7-p. bibliography, of writings by 

and about Miss Austen (p. 259-265). 

BARNARD, Henry. Monroe, Will S. Bibli- 
ography of Henry Barnard. (In Journal of 
Education : New England and National, Feb. 
16, 1897, 45:95-) 3 col. 
The titles are arranged as follows: 

1. Publications by Henry Barnard. 

a. Official reports and documents, . 4 titles 

b. Editorial and journalistic work, 6 " 

c. Monographs and addresses, . . 9 " 

2. Publications relating to Henry Barnard. 

a. American, 74 " 

b. European, . 20 " 

ENTOMOLOGY. Henshaw, S: Bibliography of 
the more importantconttibutions to American 
economic entomology; prepared by authority 
of the Secretary of Agriculture. Part 5: The 
more important writings of government and 
state entomologists and of other contributors 
to the literature of American economic en- 
tomology, L-Z. Wash., Gov. Print. Office, 
1896. 180 p. O. 

FRANCO -PRUSSIAN WAR. Palat, Commandant. 
Bibliographic g6nerale de la guerre de 1870- 
71: Repertoire alphab6tique et raisonne des 
publications de toute nature concernant la 
guerre franco-allemande parues en France 
et a 1'etranger. Paris, Berger-Levrault & 
Cie., 1897. 600 p. 8. 15 fr. 

GEOLOGY. Catalogue des bibliographies geolo- 
giques ; redige, avec le concours des mem- 
bres de la Commission bibliographique du 
Congres, par Emm. de Margerie. Paris, 
Gauthier-Villars et Fils, 1896. 20 + 733 p. 
Reviewed in Science, Jan. 29, 1897. 

GEOLOGY. Watson, T. L. Bibliography of the 
geological, mineralogical, and palaeontologi- 
cal literature of the state of Virginia, no p. 
8, pap. Ithaca, .N.-Y., 1897, (Bulletins of 
American palaeontology, vol. 2, no. 7.) 

GREECE. Legrand, Emile. Bibliographic hel- 
lenique ; ou, description raisonnee des ou- 



vrages publics par les Grecs au xvn siecle. 
Tome iv. Paris, Alphonse Picard & Fils, 
1897. 540 p. 8. [Complete work, 4v., 100 fr.] 

MINERVA: Jahrbuch der gelehrten Welt. He- 
rausg. von K: Trtibner. 6 Jahrg., 1896-1897. 
Por. of J. de Goeje, etched by Therese 
Schwartze in Amsterdam. Strassburg, Karl 
J. TrUbner, 1897. 24+1082 p. 32. 8 m. 
The volume now assumes an international 

character, inasmuch as it includes foreign 

learned societies. 

PHYSIOLOGY. Richet, Ch. Bibliographia physi- 
ologica, 1895. R6pertoire des travaux de 
physiologic de 1'annee 1895, classe d'apres la 
classification decimale. Paris, F61ix Alcan, 
1896. 115 p. 8. 3.50 fr. 

SOCIOLOGY. Stammhammer, J. Bibliographic 
der Social- Politik. Jena, Gust. Fischer, 1896. 
648 p. 8. 18 m. 

SPAIN AND PORTUGAL. FOULCHE-DELBOSC, R. 
Bibliographic des voyages en Espagne et en 
Portugal. Paris, H. Welter, 1896. 353 p. 
8. 12 fr. 

SWINBURNE, A. C. Literary anecdotes of the 
nineteenth century: a contribution toward a 
literary history of the period; ed. by W. 
Robertson Nicoll and T. J. Wise. v. 2. N. 
Y., Dodd, Mead & Co., 1897. 8, subs., $8. 
Incl. a bibliographical list of the scarcer 

works and uncollected writings of Swinburne, 

p. 288-374. 

INDEXES. 

FLETCHER, W: I:, and Bowker, R: R., eds. 
The annual literary index, 1896: including 
periodicals, American and English; essays, 
book-chapters, etc.; with author-index, bibli- 
ographies, necrology, and index to dates of 
principal events; ed. with the co operation of 
members of the American Library Associa- 
tion and of the LIBRARY JOURNAL staff. 
N. Y., Office of The Publishers' Weekly, 1897. 
344 p. O. $3.50. 



QVnoniims anb Pscubonrms. 



Ruth Ogden. The real name of the author 
of " His little royal highness " is Mrs. Frances 
Otis (Ogden) Ide. Mrs. Ide is the wife of Mr. 
Charles W. Ide, of Brooklyn. E. R. NEISSER. 

CORRECTION. Cushing's " Initials and pseu- 
donyms," vol. i, p. 285, col. 2. 

Traveler, A. C. Mrs. H. K. W. Clarke. 

J. C. ROWELL. 



March, '97] THE LIBRARY JOURNAL r6s 

IMPERFECT SETS. 

Recognizing the importance of periodical literature in modern libraries, THE 
BOSTON BOOK COMPANY established its Library Department with the idea that a 
definite service could be rendered overworked librarians by an intelligent effort to 
supply them with sets of periodicals and Society transactions bibliographically com- 
plete and materially perfect. 

Under the old method, librarians were forced to buy such sets or parts of sets 
as appeared on booksellers' catalogues, or were privately offered to them, taking 
their chances as to the completeness or perfectness of the sets. Before the publica- 
tion of " Poole's Index " the shortcomings of such a mode of purchase were not 
apparent, because the deficiencies in sets so bought were not brought to special 
notice ; but in these days of thorough indexing the constant showing up of tanta- 
lizing defects obliges the conscientious librarian to assume the labor of collation, and 
the subsequent vexatious time and money cost involved in trying to make the 
defects good. 

It is exactly this burdensome and wasteful labor which THE BOSTON BOOK 
COMPANY has endeavored to save librarians, by supplying only sets which have 
passed through the hands of a conscientious and carefully trained staff of collators 

We find, however, that some librarians still prefer to buy sets by the old 
method, and to such librarians we wish to make it known, that while we consider 
our method the economical and preferable one to libraries in the end, we are entirely 
willing to sell uncollated sets to such as prefer to buy them. 

We have always a great many uncollated sets on hand (because conscientious 
collation is a tedious and time-consuming work) and we can offer them as cheaply 
as any other dealers. In such cases we will make an offer of the volumes actually 
on hand, but will not undertake that every page, title-page, index, supplement, 
appendix, plate, or map is supplied, as we do ordinarily. 

THE BOSTON BOOK COMPANY only asks that a fair comparison of price and 
quality be made, and is perfectly willing to sell to librarians on any method they 
may prefer. 

Remainder Stock of Poole Sets. 

We have bound up for libraries a few sets of two periodicals that are to be 
included in the next supplement to " Poole's Index," viz.: 

"The Law Quarterly Review," of London, 12 vols., cloth, $30.00 (regular 
price in law sheep, $48.00, nef)\ and "The Juridical Review," of Edinburgh, 
7 vols., cloth, $24.50 (regular price in law sheep, $33.25, net). 

This special price for cloth sets applies only to our stock now on hand. 

These two sets are recommended to the attention of librarians of General 
Libraries. Sample numbers will be sent on application. 



THE BOSTON BOOK CO., 

Beacon Street, - - BOSTON, MASS. 



1 66 THE LIBRARY JOURNAL [March, '97 

FOR AMERICAN LIBRARIES ONLY. FROM H. WELTER PARIS RUE BONAPARTE. 59. 

RERUM GALLICARUM ET FRANCICARUM 

Cf^T? T Pnrr^TP T7C (* Bm net 5e ed., Vol. I., 
OV^IS-lr 1 V_/rxIlO col. 1174 nnder ROUQUET.) 

23 Yolumes folio, Paris 1868-94. Cost 1150 fr, . , for 575 francs, = 115 dollars 

BINDING EXTRA: Cloth, edges uncut: 11O francs. Half morocco 
(demi-chagrin) marbled edges: 15O francs. Half morocco (demi-chagrin) top 
gilt: 18O francs. Full sheep-leather (basane racine) 18O francs. The same 
binding with red edges : 2OO francs. 



NEVER BEFORE has a work like the RECUEIL DES HISTORIENS DES GAULES ET 
DE LA FRANCE, been sold at such a STUPENDOUSLY LOW PRICE. 

NEVER AGAIN will such an important library work appear in the market on terms only 
HALF AS FAVORABLE as those on which I now, and for a short time only, will supply the 
complete set of the learned LEOPOLD DELISLE'S reissue of the RECUEIL, or DOM 
BOUQUET as it is more generally called. 

ONE WORK ONLY can be compared with it, viz.: the PERTZ (Monutnenta Germanise 
historica), the market value of which is now 45OO francs. / have a bound copy for sale at 
this price. 

The RECUEIL had already been valued at, 2000 frs. in I860 (vide BRUNET), before an 
enterprising Paris Publisher, M. Victor PALMfi, had undertaken this reprint, which reproduces 
line tor line the Original Edition, and which has been brought out under the supervision of a 
Commission of members of L'INSTITUT DE FRANCE. Such a control is a full guarantee for 
the excellency of this monumental work, the sets as well as the odd volumes of which 
are now my property. 

HOW CAME THE WORK INTO MY HANDS? 

Well ! a bold Publisher produced within 12 years more than 10O folios, as many 
quartos, and innumerable octavos. At length he found that he had gone too fast. Difficul- 
ties ensued, I profited by them, and now propose to share those profits largely with my customers. 

Some other first-class works had already become my property, out of the same publisher's 
best productions, in the same way, and partly have been completed by me, viz.: 
i TKESOR DE CIIKONOLOGIE, par lecomte de Mas Latrie. (I sold 700 copies in 4 years.) Folio. 1889 

Cost too fr., for SO fr.= 10 dollars 

a REVUE DES QUESTIONS HISTOKIQUES, 1866-1896, and tables. 62 vols. 8 (only a few sets 

left). Cost 660 fr., for 320 fr.=64 dollars 

3 e LES KPOPEES FRANC AISES, par Leon Gautier. 4 vols. 1878-93 (1300 copies sold already). Nearly 

out of print. Cost 80 fr., for 65 fr.= 13 dollars 

4 HISTOIRE LITTERAIRE DE LA FRANCE. 32 vols. 4 (now very rare). Sells 

672 fr.= 134 dollars 

EVERY PUBLIC or CITY LIBRARY, EVERY UNIVERSITY and COLLEGE LIBRARY 
should possess these five works, which I offer, if taken together, instead of 2662 fr., 

FOR 155O frs. unbound (330 dollais). 

FOR 2OOO frs. bound in substantial library binding. (For packing, consular invoice, and 
shipping free to the port of New York, I charge 12 dollars extra, which is half the real cost.) 

Other important remainders will be found in my catalogues. Here I beg to draw your atten- 
tion to the following : 

4 DU CANGE. Glossarium latinitatis. Last edition. 10 vols. 4, thick paper. Cost 400 fr., for 200 fr., 

bound for 240 fr. 

5 The same work, D lit oil paper copies, cost 600 fr., for 300 fr., bound for 350 fr. 

6 ENCYCLOPAEDIE DER NATCRWISSENSCHAFTEN. Vols. i to 27. 8. Cost 390 Marks= 

487 fr. 50, for ". 36 dollars, bound for 54 dollars 

7 ANNUAIREDE LA SOCIETE FRANOAISE DE N UMISMATIQUE ET D'ARCHE- 

O LOG IE, full set, 1866-96. 19 vols., large 8 numerous plates. Cost 570 fr., for 240 fr., bound for 300 fr. 
8 CATALOGUE DES THESES SOUTENCES EN FRANCE de 1803 4 1890. I. and III., Phar- 

macie. II. Sciences. 3 vols., 3, with plates. Cost 22 fr. 50, for 15 fr., bound for 20 fr. 

(Important bibliographical work.completing the French General Catalogues by Lorenz and Querard.) 

9 MEY ER-LUEBKE. Grammaire des langues romanes. I. Phonetique. II. Morphologic. 1800-94 

Cost 45 fr., new for 36 fr., bound for 44 fr. 

C A r ALOGUE des Incunables de la Bibliotheque Mazarine. 8, 1893. Cost 40 fr., for. .20 fr., bound for 25 fr. 
HARRISSE (Henry). The Discovery of North America. 4, 818 pp., and 23 maps, 1892. Cost 150 fr., for 100 fr. 

The same work Dutcli paper, 250 fr. (33 off) Japanese Vellum, 400 fr. (33 % off) 

This present offer is expressly intended for American Libraries. The prices are 
generally even under my Local Trade Prices, and my offer should therefore be under- 
stood as strictly for direct dealing with Libraries only, and not for orders sent through 
agents, to whom these prices will be refused. 

H. WELTER, Export Bookseller and Dealer in second-hand Books. Purchasing agent for the Uni- 
versity Libraries of Ann Arbor, Berkeley (Cat.), Madison, New Haven, Toronto, Chicago, etc. 



March, '97] THE LIBRARY JOURNAL ,6 7 

EDW. G. ALLEN'S 

Bonfcon (fojencg for (American EiBtwies 

28 HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON. 
FOUNDED IN 1866. 

@Tf PPOINTED London Agency for the Libraries of the United States and 
Dominion Governments, and for Several First-class Public and Uni- 
versity Libraries of America. 

Relations long existing with all the Booksellers and Publishers of Great 
Britain facilitate the prompt execution of orders for Books, Periodicals, and 
Scientific Serials, with their continuations. 

Scarce JBoofts 3founE>. 
Sets dDat)e "dp, 

of 3\?erg Class. 



" We have been, for the last twenty years, personally cognizant of Mr. Allen's faithfulness to 
the interests of his American customers. When a resident in Washington, ten years ago, we 
found that the immense Congressional Library largely supplied its shelves through Mr. Allen's 
London Agency. Many of the extensive libraries belonging to the Universities and Colleges in 
the East have also secured their Foreign Books from the same source, and we have heard from 
the officers of these Institutions frequent testimony to the scrupulous exactness with which 
their orders were always filled. 

"We cannot, therefore, do a greater service to the Colleges and Universities of the West, 
to which these presents shall come, than to advise that they employ this inexpensive agency 
for replenishing their Libraries with English Books." PRESIDENT WELCH, Iowa State Agri- 
cultural College. 

" No better endorsement of Mr. Allen's Agency is possible than the list of leading libraries 
that continue to use it. For 30 years, strict integrity and unexcelled facilities have held the old 
and made new patrons. The very large business built up demands only a small commission. 
A library can safely entrust all its London orders to Mr. Allen without getting other estimates 
and feel sure that it is not making a mistake." MELVIL DEWEY, State Library, New York. 



EDW. G. ALLEN'S AMERICAN LIBRARY AGENCY, 

28 Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, LONDON. 

Member American Library Association. SPECIAL TERMS FOR LARGE ORDERS. 



i63 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[Afarch, '97 



.BOOKS W ANTED. 

Any one desiring to dispose of copies of the following insurance publications will please 
communicate with S. S. McC., P. O. Box 555, New York City : 

STATE INSURANCE REPORTS. 

Dates given refer to YEAR OF BUSINESS cov- 
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ALABAMA : Everything prior to year ending 

Sept. 30, 1879 ; Year ending Sept. 30, 1882. 
ARKANSAS : 1870-1874 ; 1884-1887 ; 1890-1892 ; 

Part I of 1893 (Biennial reports. Business 

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CALIFORNIA : 1876 ; 1879. 
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1886-1887, 1892 and 1893. 
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and 1854 ; Part 2 of 1863 ; Part I of 1893. 
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Dec. 31 ; 1893 ; 1894. 
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"ENQUIRER" (Baltimore): Everything after 
vol. i, Dec., i872-July, 1873. 

"FINANCE CHRQNICLE" (London): Vols. 1-6 
(April, 1877). 

" INDEX " (London. Continuation of the Ava- 
lanche of London): Vols. 1-3 (April, 1888) and vol. 
8, 1892. 

"INSURANCE ADVOCATE" (Phila. First vols. 

called the EcAoznd Insurance Echo): Vols. 1-3 (1892). 

"INSURANCE ADVOCATE" (Richmond): Vols. 

1-6 (1875); vol. 8, 1877; every thing after vol. n, 1880. 
" INSURANCE AGE" (New York): Vol. 3, 1875. 
"INSURANCE AGENT" (London): Everything 

after vol. 31, 1886. 
" INSURANCE AGENT "(New Orleans): Vols. 1-6 

(,8 94 ). 
"INSURANCE AND COMMERCIAL MAGAZINE" 

(New York): Vols. 1-13 (1882); Nos. i and 4 of vol. 
24 and 25, 1888. 

"INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE JOURNAL" 
(Called Stater's Journal. Continued as the N. Y. 
Insurance Journal): Vols. 1-3 (1865). 

"INSURANCE CHRONICLE" (Cincinnati): Every- 
thing after vol. 5, Feb., 1871. 

" INSURANCE CRITIC" (New York): Vols. 9-21, 
1881-1893. 

" INSURANCE RECORD" (London): Vol. i, 1863 ; 
vol. 6, 1868. 

"INSURANCE SPECTATOR OF LONDON": Vols. 

1-9 (1886). 

" INSURANCE TIMES" (New York): No. 3 of vol. 

27, 1894. 

'INVESTIGATOR "(Chicago): Vols. 1-3, 1875. 
" NEW ENGLAND INSURANCE GAZETTE AND 

MAGAZINE " (Boston): Vol. n, May, i872-April, 1873 ; 

everything after vol. 16, 1876. 

" NEW YORK UNDERWRITER": Sept.-Dec., 1877. 
"NORTHWESTERN REVIEW" (Chicago): Vols. 

12 and 13, 1875. 

"OBSERVER "(Phila.): Vols. 1-4 and after vol. 6. 
" PACIFIC UNDERWRITER " (San Francisco): 

Vols. 3-4, April, i888-Dec., 1890. 
" POLICYHOLDER " (Manchester, Eng.): Vols. 
1-6 (1888); vol.8, 1890. 

" POST MAGAZINE" (London): Vols. 1-14 (1853); 

vols. 16-20, 1855-1859. 

"PROTECTOR" (New York): Everything after 

vol. 2, April, 1872. 

"RECORD "(New York): Sept.-Dec., 1877. 
"UNDERWRITER" (Phila.): Vols. 18, 19, and 

20, 1885-1887 ; everything after vol. 2t, 1888. 

"UNDERWRITERS' WEEKLY CIRCULAR" (New 

York): Everything except vols. 6-n, Sept., 1867- 
Sept., 1873. 

" U. S. INSURANCE GAZETTE AND MAGAZINE" 

(New York): Vols. 48-50, i879-June, 1880; vol. 53, 
July-Dec., 1881. 

" VINDICATOR " (New Orleans): Vols. 1-3 (1885); 
vol. 7, July-Dec., 1889. 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



169 



OFFICE OF ANDRE SABATIER, COUNSELLOR-AT- 
LAW OF THE TRIBUNAL OF COMMERCE OF THE 
SEINE, 49 RUE LE PELETIER, PARIS. 

JUDGMENT RENDERED by the Tribunal of Com- 
merce of the Seine of June 4, 1896, 

Between Mr. Stechcrt (Gustavo K.), Book- 
seller, residing at 9 K. 16th St., New York, 

And I?Ir. II. Welter, Bookseller, residing at 59 
Rne Bonaparte, Paris. 

The Tribunal of Commerce of the Seine, after having 
deliberated in accordance with the law, has rendered 
judgment as follows : 

WHEREAS by writ of June 17, 1895, Stechert alleges 
that at various times Welter had referred to him in libel- 
lous terms in his catalogues and circulars addressed by 
the latter to his customers; 

WHEREAS these actions constitute disloyal competi- 
tion, for which Stechert is justified in asking satisfac- 
tion, and he would therefore be entitled to claim: 

1. 40,000 francs damages for prejudice suffered. 

2. The insertion of the judgment to be rendered in 
35 newspapers, at Welter's cost, each insertion, how- 
ever, not to exceed 150 francs. 

3. The authorization to distribute lo.ooo copies of 
the said judgment, and payment by Welter of a sum 
of looo francs to pay the expense thereof. 

WHEREAS by writ of January 9, 1896, Stechert claims 
in addition : 

IO.TOO francs as supplementary damages to indem- 
nify himself for the new disloyal action of Welter, 
through which Stechert has suffered. 

The insertion of the judgment in 35 newspapers at 
the plaintiff's choice. 

The authorization to distribute 20,000 copies of the 
said judgment and payment by Welter of 2000 francs 
to cover the expenses thereof. 
As to the general findings : 

WHEREAS Welter in defence of these claims main- 
tains : 

That he himself has suffered numerous disloyal actions 
on the part of Stechert. 

That he only published the statements complained of 
in order to defend himself against the Plaintiff. 

That the latter cannot complain of Welter having acted 
against him in a way which he, Stechert, had initiated. 

That under these circumstances the Plaintiff cannot 
ask for any judgment against him, but 

WHEREAS Welter does not in any way prove the dis- 
loyal manner of acting of Stechert of which he com- 
plains; 

That, moreover, in case proof of such action could be 
given, it would not justify him for having used the same 
methods against his opponent, no one having a right to 
take the law in his own hands; 

WHEREAS it results from the trial, the arguments, 
and from the documents furnished that Welter, in his 
catalogue No. 49, 1891. a large quantity of which were 
distributed among the customers of Stechert, invites the 
said customers to apply directly to him, denouncing the 
bookseller G. E. St., of New York, having a branch in 
London, as having used disloyal methods towards him; 



WHEREAS, although the initials only of the name of 
Stechert had been given, the people of the trade who had 
received the catalogue in question, could not mistake the 
person mentioned therein; 

WHEREAS in 1894 Welter sent to the American cus- 
tomers of Stechert a postal card marked with a stamp at 
the top and bottom of the card, requ< sting the person to 
whom it was addressed not to order from Stechert the 
books mentioned on it, but to send their orders directly to 
him (Welter) or through a confidential agent. 

WHEREAS on the other hand on December 13, 1895, 
Welter caused to be distributed to the public and to the 
booksellers of Paris with whom he was in business rela- 
tions, a circular, in which he accused Stechert. without 
however naming him, but indicating him plainly, of hav- 
ing taken away from him several orders; 

WHEREAS these acts have had the effect and re- 
sult of drawing away to the benefit of Welter a part of 
the Plaintiff's customers; 

That they have injured the commercial reputation of 
the latter, that they constitute methods of disloyal com- 
petition, causing Stecbert harm and damage for which 
Welter owes him compensation. 

WHEREAS the Tribunal finds in these facts of the suit 
sufficient elements of appreciation to fix at 1000 francs 
the amount of the injury suffered by Stechert, and it is 
proper to accept the claims of the latter for the payment 
of damages to the amount of the above-mentioned sum; 

WHEREAS on the other hand, besides the material 
damage suffered by Stechett, the latter has a right to a 
reparation of the damage which he has endured; 

That Welter, having given publicity to his attacks on 
Stechert, the latter should be authorized to publish in fif- 
teen French and foreign newspapers, at his choice, the 
judgment to be rendered, the cost of each of which inser- 
tions not to exceed the sum of 100 francs. 

That the other parts of the two claims for the inser- 
tions are to be rejected, as also the claim requesting the 
distribution of the circular reproducing the judgment to 
be rendered at the expense of Welter, the latter mode be- 
ing identical with'the demand for the insertions wbii h 
shall be granted. 

For these reasons, after reading the revert of the 
referee of ike Court sitting in latt instance, condemns 
Welter to fay to Stechert the sum of One thousand francs 
as damages, authorizes Stechert to have the preiimt 
judgment inserted in fifteen French and foreign papers 
at the expense of Welter, each insertion not to exceed too 
francs, dismissing Stecherft further claim*, and con- 
demns Welter to pay the costs. 

I, the undersigned, sworn translator of the Tribunal 
Civil of the Seine, certify herewith that the present is a 
true translation of the here annexed original. 

Paris, a8th day of January, 1897. 
[SBAL.] (Signed) L. SPRBNGBL. 

Vu par nous, Mairedu ier Arrondissement de 
Paris pour legislation de la signature de M. 
[SEAL] Sprengel, Expert Traducleur-Jurtauprcjdu 
Tribunal Civil de la Seine. 
Paris, le 28 Janv., 1497. 

Signature (illegible). 



170 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



APPLETON'5 LIBRARY LIST5. 

Y71OR more than fifty years Messrs. D. APPLETON & Co. have been engaged in the publica- 
J^v tion of the choicest productions from the pens of distinguished authors of the past and 
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The other lists are of books grouped according to subjects, and include the above. 



LIST D. History. 
E. Biography. 
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BB. School and College Text-Books. 
CC. Spanish Publications. 



Single lists mailed free. Complete set, ten sections, 18 cents, to cover postage. Bound in one volume, 
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D. APPLETON & CO., Publishers, 

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t(J!E invite Librarians to correspond with us before placing orders. Our facili- 
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9 i FOREIGN PERIODICALS A7 LOWEST RATES 



March, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



171 



INKS AND ADHESIVE 



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French and Continental Books purchased at the lowest 
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The "Catalogue de la Librairie Franfiise" mailed free 
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172 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF THE CORRECT ARRANGING AND LETTERING 
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Telegraphic addresg: 
Putnam, London. 



F> DITTMAPI'Q QOMQ Telegraphic 
JT I \J 1 1^1 /A.1 1 & J\JL^(.S Putnam, N< 



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address : 
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NEW YORK: 
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March, '97 ] THE LIBRAR Y JO URN At , 7 3 



JWST PUBLISHED 



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A 'i->mr ^^^ 




Compiled by HERBERT SMALL, with essays on the Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting, by 
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CURTIS & CAMERON, Publishers, 

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LIBRARIES. 



WE solicit correspondence with bookbuyers for private and other LIBRARIES 
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Established 1816. 

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14O Strand, W. C., and 37 Piccadilly, W. : London. 



THE L1BRAR Y JOURNAL 



[March, '97 



J. A. SCHWEINFURTH, 

ARCHITECT, 

nil EXCHANGE BUILDING, BOSTON. 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES A SPECIALTY. 



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AS TO LISTS OF WANTS. 

extended lists of wants in the periodical line, 
and at the same time am requested to say how 
many I can supply and cost of same. This in 
practice entails a loss of time and money. I 
have such a list on my desk now. To answer, 
will engross the time of a well-paid clerk two 
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tions may consider all goods sent " upon ap- 
proval" ; transportation charges at my expense, 
if returned. A. S. CLARK, 

174 Fulton St., New York City. 

BOOKS WANTED. ' ~ 

Wilberforce Eames (Lenox Lib.), 890 5th Ave., N. Y. 

Library Journal, Jan. and Feb., 1895; title and index, 
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Lord, Beacon-Lights of History, set, and v. a, 7, and 8. 

O'Meara, Napoleon at St. Helena. 

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March, '97 J THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 175 

NOW READY! 

The American Catalogue, 1890=1895 

The present issue of THE AMERICAN CATALOGUE covers the 
period July i, 1890, to June 30, 1895. It is in two divisions, of 
which the first contains the author-and-title alphabet, and the second 
the subject alphabet, list of U. S. Government Publications, list of 
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One volume, half leather, $15.00 ; in sheets, $12.50. 

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"Without question the most perfect trade bibliography with which we are acquainted. "- 
London Bookseller. 



The Annual Literary Index, 1896 

Including Periodicals, American and English, Essays, Book-Chapters, etc., Special 
Bibliographies and Necrology of Authors. Edited by W. I. FLETCHER and 
R. R. BOWKER, with the co-operation of members of the American Library 
Association and of the LIBRARY JOURNAL staff. 

THE ANNUAL LITERARY INDEX for 1896 not only covers the full range of 
periodicals included in Poole's Index, as no other publication does, but includes 
the " essay index," continuing the " A. L. A. Index to General Literature," an index 
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ographies of the year, and a necrology of authors, etc. The volume is the fifth 
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erature." It is the complement of THE ANNUAL AMERICAN CATALOGUE of books 
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One volume, cloth, uniform with Poole's Index and the A. L. A. Index, 
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Address the OFFICE OF THE PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY, 
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1 7 6 THE L1BRAR Y JO URNAL [ March, '97 

ESTABLISHED IQ72 
LONDON: PARIS: LEIPZIG: 

30 WCLLiNQTON ST., STRAND. 76 RUE Dt RENNES. HOSPITAL Si R. 10. 

GUSTAV E. STECHERT 

Purchasing Agent for Colleges & Libraries 

810 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

(TWO DOORS ABOVE GRACE CHURCH) 

egs to call attention to his facilities for obtaining FOREIGN BOOKS and 
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can thereby fill orders in quicker time. 

MORE THAN 200 LIBRARIES FAVOR HIM WITH THEIR ORDERS. 

SPECIAL REFERENCES, 

"Mr. Stechert has for years furnished this Library with most of its periodicals and European books, and has bought for u* 
many thousand volumes. Mr. Stechert's success is due to his constant personal attention to the business, and the reasonable 
terms hets able to offer. I consider a New York agent far preferable to reliance on foreign agents alone." 

GEO. H. BAKER, Librarian of Columbia College, New 



" Seven years agOj in reorganizing the Columbia College library, I spent much time in trying to discover how to get out 
foreign books and periodicals with the least delay, trouble and expense. The result of the comparison of three methods, viz: 
ordering direct from foreign dealers, ordering through one agent in London, or ordering through one agent in New York showed 
us that it was to our advantage to give Mr. Stechert all our foreign orders, as he delivered in the library in a single package 
and with a single bill at as low cost as we were able with vastly greater trouble, to get a half dozen different packages in differ- 
ent bills from different places. In reorganizing the New York State Library, I opened the whole question anew, and the result 
of the comparison was the same as before, and we find that the library gets most for the time and money expended by taking 
advantage of Mr. Stechert's long experience, and the careful personal attention which he gives to our orders," 

MELVIL DBWEY, Director of N. Y. State Library, Albany, N. Y. 



" Mr. G. E. Stechert of New York has served us with fidelity in procuring English, French and German books, both new 
and second hand and also periodicals. His terms are more reasonable than any others that have come to our notice, while he 
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Prof. ARTHUR H. PALMER, Librarian of Adelbert College, Cleveland, O. 



" Your methods and facilities for doing business, as I have examined them here as well as at the Leipzig and London ends, 
seem to me admirably progressive and thoroughly live. 1 deal with you because I judge it for the advantage of this library to 
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ERNEST C. RICHARDSON, Librarian of College of Neva Jersey, Princeton, N. J 



M Our_ library committee speaks in the highest terms of your services. You have not only saved us many dollars, but hav* 
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A. 8. COLLINS, Act. Librarian of Reynolds Library, Rochester, it. K. 

GUSTAV K. STKCHERT, 

LONDON. PARIS. LEIPZIG. NEW YORK. 



THE 



Library Journal 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 
CHIEFLY DEVOTED TO 



Economy ant> Biblioarapb\> 

VOL. 22. No. 4. 
SCHOOL NUMBER 

APRIL, 1897. 



Contents. 



PAGE 

HOBOKEN (N. J.) PUBLIC LIBRARY. . . . Frontispiece. 
EDITORIAL 179 

Librarians and Teachers. 

Books as Tools in School Work. 

Bibliographic Aids. 

The " Tariff on Ideas." 

The Superintendent of Public Documents. 
COMMUNICATIONS 180 

Reference Notes on Catalog Cards. 

A Word to Catalogers. 
PUBLISHING NOTE 180 

WORK BETWEEN LIBRARIES AND SCHOOLS. A SYM- 
POSIUM 181 

At Worcester, by S: $jj. Green. At St. Louis, 
by F: M. Crunden. At Cleveland, by Linda 
A. Eastman. At Detroit, by H: M. Utley. 
At Milwaukee, by Mary E. Dousman. At 
Springfield, Mass., by Mary Medlicott. 
CHILDREN'S READING: WHAT SOME OF THE TEACHERS 

SAY./.- C. Dana 187 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES. Electra C. Doren 190 

OBSERVATIONS UPON CHILDREN'S READING 194 

PICTURES FOR SCHOOL-ROOMS 194 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS OF 1896. Caroline M. Hewins. . 194 
BEST 50 BOOKS OF 1896 FOR A VILLAGE LIBRARY. . . . 196 
LIBRARY ROUND TABLE SESSION OF THE N. E. A. . . 197 
LIBRARY SECTION OF THE ILLINOIS TEACHERS' ASSOCIA- 
TION 198 

" EVALUATION " OF BOOKS FOR CHILDREN 198 



A CHILDREN'S BOOK-MARK , . . . 199 

READING ALOUD. Martha Van Rensselaer. ... 199 

Miss SHARP'S LECTURES IN CLEVELAND 199 

THE HOBOKEN PUBLIC LIBRARY aoo 

THE SECOND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL CONFERENCE AT BRUS- 
SELS aoo 

OPENING OF THE JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY aoo 

LIBRARIES AND CLUBS aoi 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION aoi 

Action on the Tariff Bill. 

Poole Memorial. 

Proceedings. 

English Post-Conference, June aS-Aug. aa, 1897. 

STATE LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 204 

STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 304 

LIBRARY CLUBS ao9 

LIBRARY SCHOOLS AND TRAINING CLASSES an 

Amherst Summer School. 
REVIEWS an 

Hewins. Books for Boys and Girls. 

lies. Annotated Bibliography of Fine Art. 

LIBRARY ECONOMY AND HISTORY 212 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS ai8 

LIBRARIANS ai8 

CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 219 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 220 

HUMORS AND BLUNDERS *> 



NEW YORK : PUBLICATION OFFICE, 59 DUANE STREET. 
LONDON: SOLD BY KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., PATERNOSTER HOUSE, 

CHARING CROSS ROAD. 
YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $5.00. MONTHLY NUMBERS, 50 ctt. 

Price to Europe, or other countries in the Union, ao*. j*r annum; tinglt Humbert, *t. 
Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter. 



i 7 8 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



\_April, '97 



GUSTAV FOCK, 



German 
Agency for 
American 
Libraries. 



Cable Address 
fiuchfock, Leipzig. 



LEIPZIG : Magazingasse 4. 




Dealer in New 
and Second-hand 
Books and 
Periodicals. 



Code in TJs: 

ABC Code. 



NEW YORK : P. O. Box 2943. 

(Pay and Freight Station only.) 



The essential advantages arising from business communication with my bouse are : 

Prompt service ; exact execution of the smallest orders. 

Permanent assortment of millions of volumes and pamphlets. Special Line: Complete sets of periodicals and 
pamphlets. Within the last few years I have sold in America the libraries of Prof. Zarncke, Leipzig ; 
Prof. Sauppe, Gottingen ; Prof. Bechstein. Rostock ; Prof. Nagel, Tubingen ; and Prof. Hertz, Breslau. 
3.) The great saving in freight by shipment in collection-consignments to New York. 
4.) The American scholars and libraries having communication with my house can always buy at first hand. 
J5.) Unconditional guarantee for completeness. 
,6.) Binding of every class at the cheapest prices. 

(7.) Facilitation of communication through my New York Agency (T>. O. Box 2943), through which the shipments 
are sent. 

COMPLETE LIBRARIES OF THE LATE PROFESSORS ARE FOR SALE AT PRESENT: 

BKUNN (Munich), the prominent Archaeologist. Price, 14000 Mark. Prospectus and catalogue on demand. 
KEKULE (Bonn), the great Chemist. 18000 volumes. Price, 32000 Mark. Prospectus and catalogue on demand. 
DU BOIS RElflTIOND (Berlin), the celebrated Physiologist. 14000 volumes. Price, 23000 Mark. Prospectus 

and catalogue on demand. 
JttERKKL (Strassburg), the Master of Criminal Law. 1200 volumes. Price, 1500 Mark. Catalogue on demand. 



In Well Collated Complete Sets I Offer: 



MARK 

t/rt/irbnr/1, Korphologisches . Hrsg. v. Gegen- 
baur. Band. 1-21. 1875-94. Bound 700 

Jaltresbericht uber die Fortschritte d. Mass 
Altertumsivissenschaft. Mit Beibiattern. 
Jahrg. 1-22. 1878-94. Bound 560 

Jahreabfricht uber die Fortschritte d. 
Chemle u. verwandten Teile andere Wissen- 
schaften. Hrsg. v. Liebig, Kopp, Naumann, 
Fittica. Jahrg. 1-41. Fiird. J. 1847-96. Bound. 750 

Journal of Philology. Vols. 1-22. 1868-94 225 

Institute di eorrespondenza arehteologica di 
Roma. Complete set from the beginning. 1829 
to 1885. Bound 1650 

Kayser, Cli . O., Vollstandiges Bucher-Lexi- 
kon. 26 vols. so far as published, 1841-95 175 

Kurschner's Deutsche National- litteratur. 
218 vols. All out. 1885-96. Bound 400 

Xa Lumiere electrique. Coll. compl. 1879-94.. 325 

Meyer's Konversationn-'Lrxikon. 4. (letzte 
vollsta'nd.l A. Mit Supplbdn. u. Reg. 19 Bande. 
1885-92. Bound. (180.-) 90 

Moliere, Oeuvres completes. Collect, p. L. 
Moland. at e'd. 12 vols. 1880-94 54 

Monatshefte fur Chemie u. verwandte Teile 
anderer Wissenschaften. Abhandlungen aus 
d. Sitzungsberichten d. kaiserl. Academic d. Wis- 
senschaften. Bd. i bis 15. 1880-94. Vergriffen!.. 420 

Monatssehrift f. Geburtskunde u. Frauen- 
krankheiten. Hrsg. v. Cre'de', Hecker, Martin. 
34B2nde. Alleserschienen. 1853-69. Pp. (294.-). 145 

Jfeuis, the Chemical, and Journal of Physical 
science; ed. by Crookes. Vol. 1-70. 1860-94 425 

Palaeontographica. Hrsg. v. Dunker, Meyer, 
Zittel. Complete set. 1851-96 2010 



MARK 

Poggendorff's Annalen der Physik u. Che- 
mie. Complete set from the commencement, 1824 
to 1894 2700 

Philologus. Zeitschrift f. d. Mass. Alter- 
tum. Bd. 1-54. a Suppl.- Hefte u. 6. Suppl.-Bde. 
1847-95 750 

Jtabenhorst, Kryptogamen-Flora. Latest ed. 
Allout! (M. 250.20.) ^ 150 

Kepertorium f. JExperimentalphysiJe. Hrsg. 
v.Carl. Bd. 1-17. 1865-82. u. Fortsetzung : Ke- 
pertorium d. Physik. Bd. 18-27. 1883-91. 27 
Bde. u. Reg. (M. 590.20.) 120 

Wochenschrift, Berliner philologische . Hrsg. 
v. G. Andresen, H. Heller, W. Hirschfelder, C. 
Belger u. O. Seyffert. Jahrg. 1-14. Berl. 1881- 
94. Bound. (318.-) 150 

Wochenschrift f. klass. Philologie. Hrsg. v. 
G. Andresen u. H. Heller. Jahrg. 1-12. 1884-95. 
(288.-) 130 

Zeitschrift f. oesterr. Gymnasien. Bd. 1-46. 
1850-55 450 

Zeitschrift, Historische . Hrsg. v. H. v. Sybel. 
Bd. 1-67 u. Reg. zu Bd. i-ao. 1859 bis 92. 
(M. 1400.-) 400 

Zeitschrift f. rowan. Philologie. Hrsg. v. 
GrSber. Bd. 1-19. 1877-95 245 

Zeitschrift f. d. mathemat. u. naturtrissen- 
schaftl. Vnterricht. Hrsg. v. J. C. V. Hoff- 
mann. Jahrg. 1-26. 1870-95 150 

Zeitschrift fur wissenschaftl. Zoologie. Bd. 
1-58. 1848-95 3100 

Zeitung, Arehaeologische. Hrsg. v. E. Ger- 
hard, C. Curtius, R. Schoene u. A. 43. Jahrg. 
1 843-85 45 



All correspondence to be addressed directly to my Leipzig house. 




HOBOKEN (N. J.) PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Reprinted by courtesy of City Government. 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



VOL. 22. 



APRIL, 1897. 



No. 4 



THE organization in the National Educational 
Association of a library section marks a notable 
advance in the relations between schools and li- 
braries, and a great step forward in education. 
A first fruit of this was the round table discus- 
sion on libraries and schools at the February 
meeting of the Department of Superintendence 
of the N. E. A. at Indianapolis, and at the gen- 
eral conference of the association in Milwaukee 
in July this section will hold its first regular an- 
nual meeting. Each year the relations between 
libraries and schools have become closer, until 
now this relationship is thus officially recog- 
nized. The teacher, from his point of view, has 
been reaching out : nto the library field by the 
aid of " supplementary reading " and like meth- 
ods, while the librarian on his part has been 
seeking to extend his field of usefulness from 
the adults through the ranks of the children, 
large and small. Each profession naturally em- 
phasizes its part of this joint work of education. 
But let not the librarian magnify his office. His 
work is distinctively supplementary to that of 
the teacher while the child is at school, and 
in a wider sense supplementary of the school 
work after school years throughout life. Like 
the profession of the teacher, the profession 
of the librarian is a worthy and dignified call- 
ing, needing no exaggeration of its functions 
to emphasize its work. Perhaps this word of 
caution is not unneeded , because it is only 
within a few years that the real worthful- 
ness of the library calling has been appreciated, 
and the emphasis of its importance can easily 
go a bit too far. Taken together, the profession 
of education, which embraces both the callings 
of the teacher and the librarian, does so great a 
work in moulding the future, especially in a 
democratic country like our own, that the value 
of its work cannot be overestimated. 



A QUESTION in school relations often asked is 
how the teacher, or the scholar, can do any 
more work, in reading or otherwise, in the 24 
hours still allotted to the day in the order of the 
universe. The question is not to be stated quite 
in this way. The problem is one not of addi- 
tion, but of selection. Ruskin says, " Do you 
know, if you read this, that you cannot read 
that?" and here is the whole solution. The 



field of knowledge has vastly broadened within 
the generation past, and yet it has been found 
that the number of facts to be learned is less 
rather than more. Nature interlinks her works, 
and her knowledges, so that a student learns 
now by principles rather than by details no 
longer in history the names of the popes or of 
the revolutionary battles, or in geography a list 
of the cities in a given state, but the general 
course of events and the outline maps of the 
country, into which individual facts can be fitted 
as needed. This should be the key to the 
reading work of the teacher and the specific li- 
brary work in the schools. The use of tools is 
a large part of educational equipment, and here 
a knowledge of books, and of bibliography, 
the key to books, becomes important. If a child 
is taught how to get at facts, this is worth ten 
times as much as an attempt to crowd the brain 
with facts, and it can be done with one-tenth the 
labor and in one-tenth the time, if it be done 
properly. 

ONE of the most valuable features, therefore, 
of library education in the schools should be a 
knowledge of library aids by the teacher and 
by the scholar. It is too much to expect that 
such more or less costly books as the " Ameri- 
can Catalogue," Poole's "Index," Fletcher's 
"A. L. A. Index," Sonnenschein's " Best books," 
etc., should be in each school library, or that 
schools should be able to subscribe to the " An- 
nual catalogue," the " Annual literary index," 
containing the continuation of the Poole and 
Fletcher lists, the monthly " Cumulative index" 
of Mr. Brett (which indexes monthly not 30 
books, as stated in error by Mr. Peoples in the 
February L. j., but 75), the LIBRARY JOURNAL, 
the Publishers' Weekly, etc. But the teacher 
should know and should inform his pupils just 
how to use these tools as found in the library. 
On the other hand, such publications as the 
' ' List of books for girls and women " really a 
select and annotated bibliography of the best 
books on all subjects the annotated list of 
books on fine art and music, expanding one divi- 
sion of that work, the "Readers' guide" in 
political economy, the Sargent and Ilewins lists 
of books for children, etc., etc., all of them 
moderate in price, should be in most school li- 



i8o 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{April, '97 



braries. Moreover, the teacher directly, or by 
proxy of the librarian, should teach a child how 
to use reference books and how to browse among 
other books for himself, so that the " informa- 
tion clerk " in the library, useful as that official 
is, would be a " guide, philosopher, and friend," 
rather than a labor-saving machine. But bib- 
liography is never to be confused with the real 
use of books : it is only the box of tools ready 
at the hand of the worker, for real work. 



THE "tariff on ideas," as the New York Trib- 
une puts it, i.f., those provisions in the Ding- 
ley bill imposing a duty of 25 per cent, on books 
hitherto imported free, has been taken through- 
out the country as an affront to education and 
intelligence ; and the authorities at Washington 
have already received an avalanche of protests 
from educational institutions of all kinds, as 
well as from libraries. Every library and every 
teacher is interested in this question, and so far 
as state and local associations and individuals 
have not yet acted, each should address some 
kind of protest to senators and representatives 
against the proposed tax on knowledge. The 
resolutions of members of the American Libra- 
ry Association, printed elsewhere, state the 
case fairly and fully, and furnish an excellent 
model or suggestion for such action. 



IN view of the excellent work done by the 
Superintendent of Documents, Mr. Crandall, 
since under the new law he accepted that post, 
there should be no doubt of his retention in the 
public service. Mr. Crandall was not the candi- 
date of the library people for this post, and 
was not supported by the LIBRARY JOURNAL, in 
that his appointment at the time was regarded 
as a political one. But he took hold of the 
work with such broad-minded vigor, has organ- 
ized his office with such intelligence and skill, 
and has altogether done so well that he has 
proved himself the man for the place. The 
position is one which should not be the football 
of party politics, and the country would be the 
better served for the next four years if Mr. 
Crandall's experience could be utilized by keep- 
ing him where he is. Librarians should be 
quick to make known the sentiment of the pro- 
fession in this matter by sending to the new 
Public Printer, Frank W. Palmer, prompt let- 
ters of protest against such action as now, 
unfortunately, seems possible. 



Communications. 



RJ:I--ERENCE NOTES ON CA TALOG CARDS. 

AN appreciable saving in time, money, ar.d 
duplicated effort could be made, where a large 
library is cataloged upon cards, if an abbrevi- 
ated guide to the biography or bibliography or 
other source or sources followed in giving the 
form to the entry, were entered upon the back 
of the author card. 

This entry could direct intelligent users of 
the catalog, promptly and unfailingly, to the 
best biographical notice of the author ; and it 
would save the cataloger a great deal of the 
useless, wearisome, and disappointing labor of 
search in places where a notice is presumably 
or possibly to be found, but where none will 
be found. 

Is it not evident how much more securely and 
quickly the cataloger can progress if he knows 
upon what foundation his predecessor in the 
current catalog built, and is able to avoid du- 
plicating his search on the contrary, has a 
marked trail before him to follow ? 

The librarian, in utilizing to its utmost work 
done, by having it once and for all recorded, and 
in eliminating blind or blundering repetition of 
search for a large percentage of new accessions, 
will be, in a sense, " striking from the calendar, 
unknown to-morrow and dead yesterday," and 
reducing his year to better reckoning. 

MARY IMOGEN CRANDALL. 

A WORD TO CATALOGERS. 

IT may seem a late appeal for a change in 
an adopted practice, but the usual manner of 
cataloging pseudonyms is open to serious criti- 
cism. Such an author-name is as indivisible as 
the title of the fiction it introduces. Both are 
fictitious, and neither is known in any other 
order than that on the title-page. There is no 
Mr. Twain, Mr. Craddock, and so on. It is 
nonsense to print a directory transposition as 
a guide to names which exist in the thought in 
quite another order. It would be quite as 
reasonable to directory titles, and print in 
our catalogs " Copperfield, David"; "Feverel, 
Richard, The ordeal of," etc. 

It is a little late to suggest such a correction, 
but not so late as it will be five years hence. I 
present it for discussion at any rate. 

WM. CURTIS TAYLOR. 

RIDLEY PARK, PA. 



PUBLISHING NOTE. 

IT is regretted that pressure of other matter 
has made it necessary to defer the publication 
of Mr. Foster's paper on " Developing a taste 
for good literature " until the May number of 
the LIBRARY JOURNAL. Other articles in a 
measure supplementing the topics presented 
in the present School number, will also appear 
in later issues. 



April, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



181 



WORK BETWEEN LIBRARIES AND SCHOOLS A SYMPOSIUM. 



AT WORCESTER, MASS. 

BY SAMUEL SWETT GREEN, Librarian Free 
Public Library, Worcester. 

IN the year 1879 systematic efforts were made 
to bring about a close connection between the 
public library and the grammar schools of the 
city of Worcester. 

The objects of the efforts were twofold, 
namely: to afford aid to teachers and scholars 
in making studies more interesting and profit- 
able, and to raise the standard of the reading 
of children. 

For several years previous to 1879 there had 
been intimate relations between the library and 
the high school, the normal school, and collegi- 
ate institutions. 

Certain obstacles have been encountered in 
doing school-work, but they have been over- 
come, and this work has grown into large pro- 
portions. To-day, during the colder months of 
'the year, 2000 volumes belonging to the library 
are in use in school-rooms or homes under the 
supervision of teachers every day that schools 
are open. 

There is, of course, a large use of books by 
children additional to the school use. The gen- 
eral use is looked after at the library with care. 
There seems to be but one opinion among the 
teachers of Worcester regarding the usefulness 
of the work. Work of this kind is facilitated 
and rendered large when, as is the case in 
Worcester, it is encouraged by the superintend- 
ent of schools. 

Besides the work done with books sent to 
school-houses, there is a very large use by chil- 
dren for school purposes yf books within the 
library building. Pupils are there taught how 
to use books in getting information, and, in large 
numbers, make little investigations there every 
day. 

At first books were taken by scholars to and 
from school- houses in lined baskets provided 
by the school department. Now the superin- 
tendent of schools sends a wagon to every 
school-building once in two weeks to bring 
away books that are to be returned and to carry 
books which are wanted. 

A large use is made in doing school-work of 
exhibitions of pictures in the library building. 



The walls of a lecture-hall are covered at one 
time with photographs, etchings, etc., illustra- 
tive of the civil war, the time selected being 
that at which the pupils have just finished 
studying about the later portions of American 
history. The scenes in which Shakespeare 
moved, fac-similes of the earliest editions of 
his works, and views of London and its famous 
places in the time of Addison are shown at 
times when interest is alive in the works of 
these authors. As I am writing a notable ex- 
hibition is going on. Catlin's representations 
of customs among North American Indians, 
Moran's scenes in the Yellowstone Park, a set 
of plates in use in German schools to illustrate 
pictures in natural scenery, and Trouvelot's 
representations of heavenly objects as seen 
through the telescope, have been placed on the 
walls of a large room, and scholars (accompa- 
nied by teachers) from the different school- 
buildings come successive days after school, 
that is to say about 4:30 p.m., to see them. 
Such scholars come as wish to; none are obliged 
to come, but large numbers avail themselves 
daily of the privilege offered. The scholars 
gather in groups about the different sets of pict- 
ures, and the librarian and teachers talk with 
them about the scenes represented. 

The Free Public Library in Worcester was a 
pioneer in bringing about a close connection be- 
tween a public library and schools. It was 
sometime after it began its work before confi- 
dence was inspired in authorities in many other 
places to undertake similar work. After a few 
years, however, when success in doing this kind 
of work had become very evident and its use- 
fulness clearly and indisputably demonstrated, 
attention was attracted everywhere, and all 
over the country town and city libraries under- 
took work similar to that done in Worcester, 
and tried, each library in its own way, to make 
themselves useful to teachers and scholars and 
effect as much as possible by working through 
the teachers. 

It would be interesting to show how the work 
started in Worcester and to give particulars in 
regard to its conduct and results, but in such 
an article as this there is room only to make the 
general statements which have been given, 



l82 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[April, '97 



A T ST. LOUIS, MO. 

BY FREDERICK M. CRUNDEN, Librarian Public 

Library, St. Louis. 

THE St. Louis Public Library was, until two 
years ago last June, a public library only in 
name. The handicap of a subscription fee was 
particularly heavy in the work that a public li- 
brary should do in the schools. Before the fee 
was removed, however, we furnished to schools 
that wished them sets of books 50 copies of 
a single book, such as Franklin's "Autobiog- 
raphy," Scudder's " Book of folk stories" and 
" Book of fables." That more was not done 
was owing chiefly to the fee, but also to lack of 
active co-operation on the part of teachers. 

Since the library was made free its use by 
children has increased enormously. While the 
total number of cardholders has increased (in 
less than three years) from 5000 to 45,000, the 
enrolment of persons under 17 years has grown 
from about looo to 20,000. We send to any 
school that will take them a collection of 100 or 
2oe books, to be exchanged as often as desired. 
Most of the principals, however, do not care 
to take upon themselves the trouble and respon- 
sibility, and prefer to rely on the delivery 
stations. It is therefore our policy to locate 
delivery stations so that each will be con- 
venient to several large schools. We have now 29 
stations, through which 14,235 volumes were 
issued in February. The issue shows a marked 
increase from month to month. It now con- 
stitutes about ^ of the total circulation, and of 
it about 60 % consists of children's books. 

During the last five months we have registered 
an average of more than 1500 names a month, 
which is about the average for the whole period 
since the library was opened free to the public. 
As readers have come in about as fast as we 
could possibly care for them, we have not found 
it necessary, or, indeed, had time to make special 
efforts in any one direction. We try, however, 
to serve the schools by giving every teacher who 
desires it a " teacher's card," on which six 
books can be drawn at once for school use. 
This is additional to the regular and the "extra " 
or "non-fiction" card to which every reader is 
entitled. This has been in operation for seven 
months, and 312 teachers have availed them- 
selves of the privilege. 

Our teachers, like teachers all over the coun- 
try, are realizing more and more the value, the 
necessity of books other than text-books ; and I 
hope to see the day when the initiative will come 
from the teacher, as it does now in a few cases 



when the teacher will agree with the editor of 
the Springfield Republican, that "the liking for 
a good book is of vastly more importance to 
youth than a knowledge o"f equation of pay- 
ments or adverbial elements of the third form." 
When that truth, with all it implies, has been 
accepted by teachers, superintendents, and 
school directors, the value of our schools will 
be doubled through their co-operation with the 
public library. 

Let me add, as a postscript, that we are sup- 
plying four Sunday-schools.three Congregational 
and one Baptist. To three of them a stock of 
books 200 to one, and 100 to each of the others 
was sent, to be changed from time to time ; 
while the fourth makes a weekly requisition for 
books wanted, which are sent on Saturday. 
This school has asked for a stock of books to 
supply a branch library and reading-room, 
which it purposes keeping open every evening 
in the week. 

A T CLEVELA ND, O. 

BY LlNDA A. EASTMAN, Public Library, Cleve- 
land, 0. 

THE co-operation of the library with the 
schools in Cleveland practically began in 1884, 
with the issue of teachers' cards, entitling the 
holder to draw five books at a time. Some 
three or four years later came the next impor- 
tant step, the issuing of books to the schools, 
in sets of from 20 to 50, to be reissued to the 
pupils ; the results of this plan proved so satis- 
factory to the teachers, in spite of the responsi- 
bility for the books which it entailed, that almost 
from the beginning the demand for books by the 
schools has been greater than the library could 
meet. The best books for children are dupli- 
cated largely for this use; for instance, the shelf 
lists show 178 cogies of "Little women," and 
several hundred volumes of Pratt's " American 
history stories." 

In issuing books to the schools, the teachers 
are allowed to make their own selection of 
books, so far as is possible and advisable. In 
two or three districts the principals have per- 
sonally overseen the work, as described by one 
of them, Miss Comstock, in last year's school 
number of the LIBRARY JOURNAL ; in most in- 
stances, however, the books for each room are 
in charge of the teacher. This year, one prin- 
cipal has been furnished with 10 copies each of 
the books in the pupils' reading course pub- 
lished by the Ohio Teachers' Association, and 
the children of this building are being encour- 
aged in a systematic reading of the course. 



April, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



'83 



In two school districts a work has been begun 
which deserves more than the brief mention 
which ic can receive here I refer to a work 
with the mothers in which the library is taking 
a part, by circulating books on child-training, 
housekeeping and home-making, etc., and which 
may go farther than any work heretofore done 
in the co-operation of library and school, as it 
brings in a third (or shall I say a first?) great 
power, the power of the home, and goes back 
of the child, to the parent as affecting the child. 

In the same way as to the day school, books 
are issued to the night schools, to a number of 
boys' clubs, to Y. M. C. A. classes, and to 
Goodrich House social settlement. 

In January, 1896, the Central High School and 
the library joined hands in establishing a branch 
library for the use of the school. The school 
furnishes the room and the greater number of the 
books, while one of the regular assistants of the 
library has charge of the work, which is done 
according to our regular methods. This branch 
has so grown in importance that it now con- 
tains 3500 volumes belonging to the school, 
and about 1000 more loaned from the library ; 
each day, while school is in session, books are 
sent out from the main library to fill any tem- 
porary demand. The reports show an average 
daily reference attendance of over 225 through- 
out the past term, and an average daily issue of 
115 books for home use. The reading lists 
which the high school has published for each 
grade, with helpful suggestions about reading, 
have done much to guide the pupils in their 
selection of books. 

The normal school is looking more and more 
to the library as a fruitful resource ; and except- 
ing such books as may be wanted as text- 
books, the library puts no limit on the books 
sent there for actual use. Most encouraging is 
the fact that a realization is very surely grow- 
ing of the importance of a study of juvenile 
literature as a legitimate part of the normal 
school course ; there yet remains-to be empha- 
sized the fact that pupils need systematic in- 
struction in the use of books. 

The teachers' reading-room, equipped with 
the leading school journals and a reference 
library of several hundred pedagogical works, 
has been moved from the school headquarters, 
owing to its overcrowded condition, into the 
alcove of the library, which contains the books 
on education, and this has tended to bring the 
teachers into closer touch with the library. The 
school holiday series of special reading lists 



published by the library this year has added 
largely to the use of the library by the schools. 

With the expansion of our branch system, the 
use of the library by the children themselves 
has grown rapidly, as each branch is easily 
available to the pupils of several large school 
buildings. When the new South Side branch 
was opened a few weeks ago, such crowds of chil- 
dren presented themselves that it became neces- 
sary to send a notice to the schools in that part 
of the city, assigning to each grade one day on 
which the pupils of that grade and none others 
could be registered and given cards ; so far it 
has been impossible to supply books fast enough 
to meet the demands of this branch, and re- 
peatedly comes the word from there, "Send 
more juvenile books, there is not a juvenile 
book on the shelves." 

During the holiday vacation, and again dur- 
ing the present spring vacation, we advertised 
" Children's week at the library," with the re- 
sult that many little folk have sought and found 
much of their vacation pleasure here. One 
thing which is sure to lead to a wiser and more 
diversified choice of reading on the part of the 
children has been the bringing together of all of 
the children's books into what is known as the 
juvenile alcove. This alcove has heretofore 
contained only the juvenile fiction, and many of 
the best books for young people, scattered 
throughout the library wherever their classifi- 
cation with the subject put them, were practi- 
cally lost to the children. 

A book-mark which originated, like many 
other good things, in Wisconsin, has appealed 
very successfully to Cleveland children with its 
little story. The formation of the children's li- 
brary league is our latest development for the 
creation of a sentiment of respect for books and 
for careful usage of them ; it is in its first in- 
fancy, but it seems to promise a worthy future. 

A plan of organizing reading committees of 
the teachers best qualified to pass judgment on 
every juvenile book put into the library has the 
hearty support of the school authorities, and 
the first steps have been taken toward putting it 
into operation. 

The success of the plan of circulating pictures 
is assured by the co-operation of the superin- 
tendent and the master of drawing of the pub- 
lic schools and of the faculty of the School of 
Art. 

Coming to the higher education, it may be of 
interest to note that books are sent by messen- 
ger from our library to the Hatch Library of 



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[April, '97 



Western Reserve University, to supply books 
wanted there, just as they are sent to the branch 
libraries. 

This is the merest outline of a work for which 
there seems to be unlimited possibilities of ex- 
pansion. Is any line of library work better worth 
while ? 

A T DETROIT, MICH. 

BY HENRY M. UTLEY, Librarian Public 
Library, Detroit. 

SINCE 1887 the Detroit Public Library has 
supplied books specially for the reading of the 
children of the public schools. The scheme, 
which was begun in a small and experimental 
way, has been extended from time to time, 
until, at the opening of the present year, up- 
wards of 7000 books are circulated from 55 
school-houses. Books have not been provided 
for the grades below the fourth, but it is not 
improbable that the young children will yet be 
favored in a manner similar to their elders, and 
that every public school in the city will be made 
a branch of the public library. The books are 
duplicates specially selected for the purpose, 
and the number of copies of each ranges all the 
way from a dozen to a hundred. They were 
carefully chosen with a view to meet all tastes, 
and include the books which have become 
classics by reason of the universal approval of 
young people, and those in which children are 
known to take delight. 

The books are exchanged once in eight weeks, 
or five times during the school year. If re- 
quests come from teachers respecting the as- 
signment of certain books, they are complied 
with ; otherwise the distribution is made by the 
library assistant in charge of this department. 
The task of caring for these books at the school 
is not made irksome to the teachers. They are 
sent out in chests, in which they may be kept in 
the school-room. There is no formality about 
giving them out. Of course, every child in a 
school is personally known to the teacher. No 
guaranty is required. The receipt on file shows 
the whereabouts of every book. If a volume 
is lost or destroyed, the parent of the child is 
expected to pay the cost of replacing it, if able. 
Books in houses in which there are contagious 
diseases are returned directly to the library and 
destroyed. 

When the books are received at the schools 
they are assigned to the different rooms in pro- 
portion to the number of children, and any 
pupil is entitled to draw any one of the books 
to be taken home and kept until read or its re- 



turn is required by the teacher. A ticket in the 
form of a receipt is made out by the child, giv- 
ing the title of the book, the date when drawn, 
and name of the person drawing. These tick- 
ets are filed in their order. When the book is 
returned, they are transferred to another file, 
and at the end of each month are counted and 
the result entered in a blank form of report, 
which reports are compiled at the library at the 
end of the year and show the school circula- 
tion. Last year this amounted in the 4th grade 
to 19,692 ; 5th and 6th grades, 20,756 ; 7th and 
8th grades, 8932 ; gth to I2th grades, 43,364 ; a 
total of 93,744. The reports from the several 
schools show that the comparative use of the 
books bears no uniform relation to the number 
of children in the school. One school, with 
an enrolment more than 40 per cent, greater 
than another, shows less than half its circula- 
tion ; one school shows every pupil to have read 
on the average 8.5 books, another shows an 
average reading of only 2.8. There are two 
grounds of explanation of this discrepancy 
proximity of the school to the library, and the 
interest taken by the teachers in the work. 
Children may have library cards and make use 
of the library, and many whose homes are not 
distant and in the more prosperous sections of 
the city, who have read most of the books 
offered them at the schools, choose instead to 
go directly to the library for their books. But 
more than all things else does the interest 
taken by the teachers show itself in the reading 
of the children. Enthusiastic teachers not only 
inspire their pupils with desire to read the 
books sent out to them, but lead them to the 
library and help them to make judicious selec- 
tions. This influence is a matter of common 
observation at the library. It is encouiaging 
to note that the interest and enthusiasm among 
teachers are growing. As they see the results 
of the reading of good books in the stimulation 
of the mental activity of the pupils in the ac- 
quirement of knowledge and improvement of 
taste, they are more than ever eager to promote 
the good work. 

This system is building up a clientage for the 
public library which will increase as the years 
go on. The habit of reading good books is 
not only one of the best |hings which the school 
can furnish to the child, but is insuring to the 
public library stanch friends and patrons. In 
very many cases, especially in the poor and 
more remote portions of the city, the books 
taken home from the schools are read by all 



April, '97] 



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185 



the members of the family, and in some known 
instances have been the means of inducing the 
taking out of library cards and of advertising 
the library in quarters where it had been hither- 
to unknown or little thought of. 

AT MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

BY MARY ELLA DOUSMAN, Public Library, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

THE motive which underlies the work done 
in the Milwaukee Public Library may be fitting- 
ly expressed in the words of President Eliot, 
that "It is always through the children that 
the best work is to be done for the uplifting of 
any community." 

There is no age limit, and the library strives 
to win the attention of the youngest through a 
plentiful supply of the best colored picture- 
books obtainable, which it urges parents to take 
home to the little ones. These picture-books 
are also sent in large numbers to kindergartens 
and primary grades, where they are received with 
great delight, one teacher having reported that 
some of her children wept when they were pro- 
moted from the primary grades to others where 
there were no picture-books. As long as there 
is a demand for these books in the intermediate 
grades there seems no reason why a few should 
not be sent for the pleasure of the children who 
still enjoy them. The library has published a 
list of these picture-books which teachers and 
parents find useful in making a selection. The 
number of times these books are issued in the 
primary grades is a matter of surprise even to 
the most sanguine; one teacher issuing 30 books 
over 1600 times during the two months the books 
were retained. Another teacher says, "After 
once having the books I cannot do without 
them," and another having a rude and unman- 
nerly class of children says she must have a 
new set of books immediately, as a carefully- 
selected set of stories does much toward teach- 
ing the children to be kind and gentle to one 
another. 

The teachers are urged to come to the library 
to make their own selection of books, but when 
this is not possible they are asked to send lists or 
discuss the special needs of their classes with the 
assistant in charge of the school circulation. To 
keep the resources of the library ever in the 
minds of the teachers a complete catalog of the 
books for young people has been made a part oi 
the manual of school instruction, and special ref- 
erence lists have been published on holidays, 
such as Independence day, Memorial day, 



Washington's birthday, Thanksgiving day, and 
Christmas. 

To still further assist parents and teachers a 
ist of 25 best books for primary and intermedi- 
ate grades has recently been published, giving 
the name of publisher and price of book, thus 
assisting those wishing to purchase suitable 
iooks for home libraries. The list may also be 
used as a call slip at the library, and includes 
such books as Scudder's " Verse and prose for 
aeginners," Norton's "Heart of oak" books, 
Andrews' " Seven little sisters," Schwatka's 
"Children of the cold," Stevenson's "Child's 
garden of verse," Eggleston's " Stories of great 
Americans for little Americans," "Stories of 
American life and adventure," and others. 

To show the steady growth of the system of 
circulation of books through the public schools 
of Milwaukee, one has only to glance through 
the annual reports of the library since the plan 
was put in operation in 1888, when the neces- 
sity of making the library better known to 
children living in the outlying districts became 
apparent. 

The library assumed the cost of transportation, 
and the teacher acted as librarian, issuing books 
to such children as were provided with library 
cards. 

During the first year 2235 books were drawn 
by various teachers, and given out 6728 times, 
each volume being read on an average of three 
times during the six weeks the books were re- 
tained. The experiment proved an unqualified 
success, and in order to meet the increasing de- 
mand for books the library board decided to 
expend $500 in duplicating the best books for 
young people. 

During the second year the work was greatly 
extended, taking in almost every school in the 
city, and at the request of the teachers the time 
of retaining books was extended from six weeks 
to two months, and over $1000 was expended 
for duplicates. The hearty co-operation of the 
teachers, the generosity of the board of trustees 
in the matter of buying duplicates, and the en- 
thusiasm and untiring efforts of the superin- 
tendent of the circulating department have made 
it possible to carry on the work to its present 
extent. 

During the year, beginning in September, 
1895, 20,691 books were issued 65,943 times by 
246 teachers in 41 graded schools, three high 
schools, one state normal school, one school for 
the deaf, three Sunday-schools, and two private 
schools. Books were also sent to hospitals, 



1 86 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



{April, '97 



homes for the aged, and the state industrial 
school for girls. As soon as one set of books 
was returned from the schools or institutions 
there was an eager demand for " more books." 

The present year shows a still greater in- 
crease in the work, or as the old man who de- 
livers^the books expresses it, " They are hun- 
gry for books." It is indeed true, as the rapid 
increase at the main library testifies. Many a 
child living in the outlying districts, after read- 
ing all the books sent to his school, requests 
the teacher to give him his card that he may 
visit the library which is probably miles from 
his home there to still further satisfy his 
"hunger" for more books. 

In addition to the books there is a collection 
of over 2000 mounted pictures which are loaned 
to the schools. These pictures, which are taken 
from the extra copies of Harper's Weekly, 
London Illustrated News, and other good week- 
lies, are neatly mounted on manilla board. The 
work of cutting and pasting is mainly done by 
the assistants during the summer, when the 
regular work is not so heavy, although teachers 
have offered their services on several occasions 
and at such times have been assisted by their 
pupils. These pictures are sent to the schools 
for the same length of time as the books and 
prove a source of great pleasure to the chil- 
dren. 

A T SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

BY MARY MEDLICOTT, Reference Department, 
City Library, Springfield. 

THE work of our library as an aid to the 
schools 'of the city has been a growth of years, 
developing with use and further acquaintance 
with its desirability. 

We, of course, provide works on the princi- 
ples of education, and on the theory and art of 
teaching, for the use of instructors; the writings 
of standard educational authors ; pedagogical 
periodicals and reports of the board of educa- 
tion of our own state, the commissioner of edu- 
cation, and others. Also the latest and best 
books of a practical character as they come 
from the press. We furnish many of the best 
books for reading, directly illustrative of the 
various studies pursued in the schools, for col- 
lateral and general study. 

Each teacher is furnished with a personal 
card and also a teacher's card, entitling to the 
use of six books at a time for school-work. 
Pupils of 12 years old and over are also 
entitled to cards for personal use. Teachers 
are invited to furnish in advance the topics 



they propose to give to their classes, and we 
select the best available books upon these top- 
ics, placing them at the disposal of the students 
for use out of school hours. This tends to im- 
provement in the work of the schools, and to 
familiarity with the use of books for purposes 
of study, cultivating habits of investigation, 
which will be of service later on in life. 

To go a little more into detail as to methods: 
We lately placed in the reference-room addi- 
tional shelves which are used exclusively for 
books for classes in the schools ; assigning 
special shelves to each class or teacher who 
desires it, and labelling them (in L. B. label- 
holders) with the subject represented on the 
shelf, changing the label when the books or sub- 
jects are changed. As for instance : French 
history, General history, American literature, 
Astronomy, Electricity, Glass-making, etc. 
Thus the scholars soon learn where to go for 
their books, and if they require additional help 
they have only to ask at the reference-desk. 
Sometimes the teachers prefer to make their 
own selections of books. 

For this work we utilize the best material 
that the library can furnish : books, the newest 
encyclopaedias, magazine articles, and even 
newspaper cuttings occasionally, especially for 
recent biography. All these are treated as ref- 
erence-books for the time and not allowed to be 
taken home. The scholars are also encouraged 
to search out for themselves books or maga- 
zine articles that will be useful by the aid of 
the catalogs, " Poole's Index, "etc., thus varying 
the methods of study. In our monthly bullet- 
ins we frequently print special lists which are 
of help to them, and we are always glad when 
any of the teachers will aid in the selection of 
the best books for these printed lists. 

We have been very fortunate in the spirit of 
harmony and co-operation between library of- 
ficials and teachers, resulting in mutual benefit. 

Our library is especially well located foi*,the 
work of helping the public schools. It is in 
close proximity to the high school, so that 
often during school hours some of the pupils 
will come in between two "periods" to use 
the books set apart for them ; and again after 
school closes. In immediate connection with 
the library, and under its management, is the 
Art and Natural History Museum, and the re- 
sources of both collections are available for 
purposes of school study. 

From the duplicate geological, mineralogical, 
and lithological specimens in the Natural His- 






April, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



187 



tory Museum, collections have been prepared 
and loaned to the various grammar schools of 
the city. We have prepared and printed in our 
monthly bulletin a selected list of the best books 
in our library to use in connection with the study 
of these specimens, and which may also serve as 
a guide in the building up of school libraries. 

A course of lectures on natural woods, vege- 
table fibres, and kindred topics is being given 
before the teachers, in the natural history hall, 
and for this, too, we have prepared a list of 
helpful books, which has been printed for cir- 
culation among the teachers. 

For the weekly lectures or talks on art, given 
to high-school pupils in one of our lectftre- 
rooms, we likewise furnish much material in 
the way of illustrative Tjooks, both for lecturer 
and pupil. To these may be added the easy 
and practical examination of art objects and 
pictures, and art-books, and of the fuller nat- 
ural history collections. 



The teachers bear witness to the usefulness 
of the library in these ways, and to the exten- 
sion of the so-called "laboratory method" to 
all branches and grades of study. One of our 
school principals writes : " The books thus 
supplied in history, geography, and other de- 
partments of school study are of inestimable 
value, stimulating and developing in the pupils 
a taste for solid literature, and enabling the 
teachers to give a broader education than could 
possibly be done by the use of text-books and 
oral instruction alone." Indeed, he adds that, 
"after having been accustomed for time to 
this method, he should hardly know what to do 
with his school if he could not avail himself of 
the opportunities for this supplementary use of 
books in connection with the text-books in use." 

The librarians also notice gradual improve- 
ment in the methods of study in those who 
come week after week, perhaps year after year, 
to make use of our books for school-work. 



CHILDREN'S READING : WHAT SOME OF THE TEACHERS SAY. 
BY JOHN COTTON DANA, Librarian Denver Public Library. 



THE Public Library of Denver is maintained 
by School District No. One; a district embrac- 
ing about half the population of the city and a 
large proportion of its taxable property. It has 
at present an enrolment of about 10.000 chil- 
dren. The library is a part of the district's ed- 
ucational system; and while it serves the public 
as effectively as its resources permit, every care 
is taken to make it popular with the teachers, 
attractive to the children, and adapted generally 
to the needs of the schools. With this end in 
view a great deaj of attention has been paid to 
the purchase of books for teachers and pupils, 
and every effort has been made to induce both 
teachers and pupils to make use of the library. 
A recent inquiry showed that of the 700 chil- 
dren in the high school over 90 % have library 
cards. Of the total books lent for home use 
about one-third are from the juvenile- room, 
which contains about one-fifth of the library's 
lending department. Of the total number of 
visitors to the library they have averaged for 
a good part of the last winter about 1500 per day 
nearly 700 are children. 

The library came into existence, as an insti- 
tution of practical use to the schools, about five 
years ago, with about 7500 volumes. Since that 
time its connection with the schools has in- 



creased as rapidly as the growth of volumes on 
the shelves has permitted. It now has 35,000 
volumes, a great many of which are all the 
time in teachers' and pupils' hands. Collections 
of from 10 to 50 and 60 volumes are sent to 
teachers' rooms on their request and largely of 
their own selection, and are kept for one month, 
or six months, or as long as wanted. Teachers 
lend these books for home use, or not, as to 
them seems best. This work in the schools has 
been going on for several years; but to a large 
extent only during the past 12 months. 

The school district itself purchased, four years 
ago, about 3000 volumes of supplementary read- 
ers. This. collection it has increased to about 
8000 volumes; the list now including not only 
supplementary readers but a large number of 
books called desk - books, like Matthews's 
"American literature," " Portraits and sketches 
of American authors," " How to teach reading," 
Dole's " American citizen," etc. 

The fact that the school district sustains and 
controls the library; that it is under the super- 
vision of the superintendent of schools, and 
that it has been for several years in close touch 
with teachers and pupils, explains the interest 
taken by teachers in a circular of inquiry about 
children's reading which was recently sent, 



1 88 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[April, '97 



through the principals, to every teacher in 
grades one to four, 101 in all. The principals 
were requested, at one of their meetings, to call 
the attention of the teachers to the fact that in 
answering these inquiries they could help the 
library in its work; but that they were under no 
obligations whatever to make any reply, and 
that no one save themselves and the librarian 
would ever know whether they replied or not. 
The object of this explanation was to make 
sure that only those teachers who were inter- 
ested in the matter for its own sake should ex- 
press any opinions. Of the 101 circulars sent 
out, 73 were returned. The principals of the 
grade schools, 16 in number, were also asked to 
reply to the questions, and 13 did so. Their re- 
plies are included in the figures below. The 
questions and the replies, the latter tabulated 
as fully as possible, were as follows : 

CHILDREN'S READING: OPINIONS AND SUGGESTIONS 

OF TEACHERS. 

Will you help the public library by answering 
as fully as you can the following questions ? Re- 
turn this sheet by mail in the enclosed envelope. 

1. (a) Do you think it would be well for pu- 
pils in your grade to read more books ? (l>) 
What are the reasons for your opinion ? 

To (a) 13 answer, yes; one answers, no. 

2. How early in their school life is it possible, 
on the average, to interest children in indepen- 
dent, outside reading ? 

32 say, in the first grade (children about 6J^ years old). 
25 say, in the second grade " " 7% " " 

14 say, in the third grade " " 85 " " 

3. (a) Could you increase the amount of read- 
ing done by the children in your grade if you had 
books which you could lend them for home use ? 
(b) Could you increase the reading, even in the 
first grade, if you had appropriate books to lend ? 

To (a) 73 say, yes; 2 say, no. 
To (f) 44 say, yes; 6 say, no. 

4. Can you name some of the more essential 
characteristics of the books which especially in- 
terest the children in your grade? 

31 say, " Should be about plants, animals, and 1 other 

familiar things." 

24 say, " Should be about fairies and the like." 
ii say, " Must have human interest " (this essential is 

also impliedly mentioned in many other replies). 
10 say, " Should have illustrations." 

5. (a) To the children of what grade can you 
show the difference between books between 
those that are true to life and those that are not; 
between those that may be called literature, and 
those that may be called silly ? (b) To those, 
say, below the fifth grade ? 

To (f) 32 say, yes; 5 say. no. 



6. What proportion of the children under your 
care do you think are in the habit of reading 
books ? As many as one in 10 ? 

Average of all estimates is 30 per cent. 

7. Do the children under your care read the 
trashy story-paper and "nickel libraries" to 
any great extent ? 

51 say, no; 6 say, yes. 

8. If so, do you think some of them would 
change to better reading if the better were of- 
fered them ? 

9. If you have any decided views on chil- 
dren's reading in general, will you write them 
down on the other side of this sheet? 

^The replies to question I (a) are perhaps what 
might naturally have been expected; and yet it 
seems a little remarkable that there are among 
101 average teachers of children between six and 
II, or among the 73 who replied, only one who 
is of the opinion that it would not be well for 
pupils to read more books than they now read. 
The reasons for the affirmative replies, and a 
good idea of the character of the notes accom- 
panying them, will be found in the following 
extracts: 

" The reading habit should be formed early." 

" Reading would add greatly to their limited 
vocabulary, and improve their language, writ- 
ten and oral." 

" Reading will make them more intelligent 
thinkers." 

"The pupil who does the most outside read- 
ing is a better reader than the one who does lit- 
tle or none; fs more intelligent and a better 
talker." 

" I find all my good readers are those who 
read at home." 

" Those who are liberally supplied by their 
parents with good books as a rule express their 
thoughts correctly." 

"It is easier to influence a child's taste for 
good reading at the age of eight or nine than 
several years later." 

"Reading awakens their interest for other 
things." 

"Children who read good books are better 
prepared for their grade work." 

" I find that pupils who read most are those 
who most intelligently grasp nearly all sub- 
jects." 

" If outside reading did nothing but familiar- 
ize children with good conversational English 
it would be worth while." 

The answers to the second question are prob- 
ably very much affected by the experience of 
those who make the replies. Teachers who 






April, '97] 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



189 



have never taught in the first grade would be 
commonly, I suppose, more sceptical about in- 
teresting children in reading while they are still 
in that grade than those who have had expe- 
rience in primary work. It will be noted that 
the 71 replies to this question all say that it is 
possible to interest children in outside reading 
by the time they are in the third grade. This 
means by the time they are 10 years of age. 

Question 3 (a) comes as a natural result of the 
opinions indicated in the replies to I and 2. If 
one can draw any conclusion from these answers 
it would seem that they indicate that not yet 
has sufficient attention been paid to the reading 
of the very young. We have been talking about 
the " juveniles" in our library work for years, 
and have meant, in general, books for children 
of the age for Oliver Optic and Harry Castle- 
mon ; we should have been putting in a good 
part of our time in the consideration of books 
for children of the age for " Mother Goose, "and 
" Puss in boots," and " Jack the giant-killer." 

Question 3 (b) is also in effect a part of the re- 
ply to question 2. 44 out of 50 teachers are evi- 
dently of the opinion that children of six and 
seven years of age could easily be persuaded to 
take an interest in books at home. In their re- 
plies to question 2, teachers make such remarks 
as the following: 

" Every child would read at home if he had 
anything interesting to read." 

" You can interest children in outside reading 
just as soon as they are able to readat all." 

" My pupils are second grade, and have sur- 
prised me by asking for stories." 

In replying to question 3 some of them say: 

" Surely, and to great advantage even in the 
first grade, and in this grade many more books 
are needed than we now have. The little ones 
are greedy for them." 

Another says that most of the children in her 
grade are from homes where parents have little 
or no leisure to procure books; but gladly make 
use of whatever is placed in their way for the 
children. 

Another says: " I find that two-thirds of my 
children's reading is confined to Sunday-school 
papers." 

The replies to question 4 must be considered 
as being the natural outcome of the movement 
of recent years toward nature study. In the 
schools of this district, in the last two or three 
years, very much attention has been paid to 
natural history. The most elaborate of the 
courses of study issued by the district last fall 



was devoted to the sciences of botany, geology, 
zoology, metallurgy, astronomy, etc. It would 
seem from these replies, in the first place, that 
it is evident that teachers can interest their chil- 
dren in any subjects they wish; and in the sec- 
ond place, that the result of the work of recent 
years, in these particular schools at least, has 
been to interest children in plants, animals, and 
like familiar things. Of course, it is not yet 
proven that paying so much attention to natural 
history is a good thing from an educational 
point of view. The important point to note is 
that teachers can produce certain specific effects 
upon children, can direct their attention and 
their interests, if they wish. 

In answering question 4 some of the teachers 
say: 

"Almost any subject if expressed in short 
sentences and illustrated." 

"Must be true to the child's experience, and 
expressed in the child's simple way." 

"You can interest primary children in any 
tale on earth that you tell them, and in almost 
any that you read to them." 

"A child is interested in the life and actions 
of a normal child if naturally and pleasantly 
described; he is very fond of detail." 

" I find the boys mostly interested in histori- 
cal works, while the girls are attracted towards 
accounts of the manners and customs of the 
various nations." 

" They like stories of modern life which come 
near enough to their own experience to be 
easily understood." 

Question 5 is, of course, very much of a leap 
in the dark, and not much reliance can be 
placed upon the replies. 

It was understood in the drawing up of these 
questions that they would not be of any great 
value by reason of the replies to them that 
might be received. The object kept in view in 
preparing them, and in sending them out, was 
the interesting teachers in several aspects of 
the problem of children's reading. We wished 
to draw attention to the library and to books in 
general; and we took pains to frame the ques- 
tions in such a way as to call the attention of 
the teachers to their own indifference, if they 
were indifferent, and their own ignorance, if 
they were ignorant, of the things the circular 
spoke of. Question 5, it was thought, would 
raise certain questions, and perhaps for the 
first time, in a good many of the teachers' minds. 
The replies to 5 would indicate that more of the 
teachers had given the question serious consid' 



190 



THE LIBRARY JOURNAL 



[April, '97 



eration than librarians generally have supposed. 
They say, for example, that first-grade children 
"can appreciate the difference between a good 
story and goody-goody stories." And "any 
child of average intelligence can be made to see 
and understand the difference, if one will give 
time and attention to the effort." 

The replies to question 6 are, on the whole, 
rather encouraging. If one-third of the chil- 
dren from six to n in the average city school 
are in the habit of reading, we have a great 
field for work, and there is enough to do to 
keep us all busy for many years in taking 
pains that the reading they do is of the proper 
kind. 

In regard to question 7, the general opinion 
seems to be that the story-paper and the 
"nickel library" does not come into a child's 
life until he is past the 4th grade, or is near- 
ly 12 years of age. It would be interesting to 
know if this is a fact. I believe the teachers 
who made replies to question 7 know what they 
are talking about. 

If children can be led to read during the 



years from six to n ; if they can be induced to 
read, in the main, whatever the teacher may 
care to give them ;if they are not likely to come 
in contact with cheap and nasty literature until 
they have passed this period : then is it most 
evident that this is the period in young folks' 
lives within which the public library and the 
school-room library can, and should, do its best 
and most enduring work. Here is the period 
when the reading habit should be formed ; here 
is the period when, to as great an extent as 
possible, right taste should be formed. It is 
suggested by the replies to these questions that 
it is possible, at least, that a great deal of our 
public library work has been aimed at people 
who are already beyond salvation, and that we 
should amend our ways, widen out our chil- 
dren's departments, work our way still more 
thoroughly and effectively into the schools, 
gain the co-operation and the aid of the teach- 
ers they above all others can help us win 
the sympathy and good-will and assistance of 
the parents, and get at the children between 
the ages of six and II, 



SCHOOL LIBRARIES. 
BY ELECTRA C. DOREN, Librarian Dayton (O.) Public Library. 



As great even as a good book is the power to 
communicate to another the love for one. To 
win children to this love, to lead them to appro- 
priate to themselves ideals from characters in 
books, to appeal to the sense of ethical relation 
through their imaginations, to deepen and en- 
rich the emotions by suggestion; in other words, 
to so read a good book into a child that he is 
bound in some way to live it out in himself, is a 
privilege, the hope of which alone is enough to 
sweeten days of unseen and never-to-be-ac- 
knowledged drudgeries of the school-room and 
the library. To make possible this privilege, 
and to realize to a greater degree than has 
heretofore been done the ideal mission of the 
book to the people, is the ultimate aim of the 
school library system of Dayton. 

It is one thing to select books for a given pur- 
pose and bring them together as a symmetrical 
collection of ideas tending toward that purpose; 
it is another to invent and operate the machinery 
for distributing them to convenient points for 
the user; and it is another nd a very different 
thing to use the book to .open it o the reader, be 
he child, woman, or man, GO that if shall be felt 
by him to be a real thing. 



Within the limits of opportunity and with 
such means as have been at its command, the 
Public Library of Dayton has taken the first 
and the second step. The last can only be taken 
when the public shall demand that the course of 
instruction shall include the pleasure of reading 
as well as the study of it as a word-calling ex- 
ercise. To describe this movement so far as it 
has taken place in Dayton with the third step as 
its goal in view is my object. 

A fondness for reading as a preferred form 
of idleness is not necessarily a love for good 
books; it is too often a love for bad books, and 
if unguarded by circumstance, which in itself is 
a kind of circumspect prohibition, or uncor- 
rected by natural good taste or conscience, it 
will soon develop into a vicious habit, and the 
speedy degeneration of memory and will-power 
takes place. Mental and moral fibre having 
been attacked and weakened are thus prepared 
to succumb before temptation of a more active 
sort when the opportunity for it shall arrive. 
Notwithstanding the solicitude often expressed 
by parents, educators, and librarians upon the 
subject of children's reading, it is a matter 
which has been left largely to regulate itself 



April, '97] 



THE LIBRARY