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MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON 
CITY PLANNING AND ZONING 



LONDON: HUMPHREY MILFORD 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION 

ON 

CITY PLANNING AND ZONING 

INCLUDING REFERENCES ON 
REGIONAL, RURAL, AND NATIONAL PLANNING 

BY 

THEODORA KIMBALL 

LIBRARIAN, SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

HONORARY LIBRARIAN, AMERICAN CITY PLANNING INSTITUTE 

ASSOCIATE, BRITISH TOWN PLANNING INSTITUTE 




CAMBRIDGE 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS 
1923 



COPYRIGHT, 1923. BY HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS 

ALL BIGHTS RESERVED 
PRINTED AT THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS, CAMBRIDGE, MASS., U.S.A. 



To HERBERT HOOVER 



The enormous losses in human happiness and in money which have re- 
sulted from lack of city plans which take into account the conditions of 
modern life need little proof. The lack of adequate open spaces, of play- 
grounds and parks, the congestion of streets, the misery of tenement life and 
its repercussions upon each new generation, are an untold charge against 
our American life. Our cities do not produce their full contribution to the 
sinews of American life and national character. The moral and social 
issues can be solved only by a new conception of city building. 

From Mr. Hoover's address at the meeting of May 10, 1922, called by the 
Russell Sage Foundation, on the Plan of New York and its Environs 



PREFACE 

THE considerable demand for collected current information on city planning and 
zoning, particularly from cities and towns initiating work in this field, has been 
brought to the attention of the writer by the numerous inquiries about city plan- 
ning received at the Harvard University School of Landscape Architecture, the 
National Conference on City Planning, and the Division of Building and Housing 
of the Department of Commerce, from municipal officials, plan commissions, en- 
gineers, landscape architects, architects, real estate boards, lawyers, chambers of 
commerce, civic improvement societies, students, and interested citizens. It has 
seemed worth while to compile in book form the information necessary to 
answer the greater number of these inquiries. 

The first part of the book is directed more especially to those just beginning 
their studies in this field, who may desire to know what city planning is and what 
it does for a city, what books and magazines to read about it, what organizations 
are backing it, what funds are being appropriated for it, and how, having come 
to believe in it themselves, to launch a campaign for the education of others. In 
these pages, perhaps the beginner may gain an idea why the citizens of St. Louis 
recently passed bond issues totalling $87,000,000 to carry out the public works 
laid out on their city plan, and why over three hundred cities and towns have 
appointed commissions to work on phases of city planning and zoning. 

From the shorter and longer lists of references included in the Manual, libra- 
ries and plan commissions may select what they wish to buy for their shelves, and 
from the extensive bibliography, the city official may find precedent or parallel 
for his problems, and the student a guide to matter for his essay or an outline for 
systematic reading. In fact, the second or bibliographical portion of the book is 
probably the most comprehensive list of references on the subject available. 

In 1915, the National Conference on City Planning published a Classified 
Selected List of References on City Planning, by the writer, arranged in the same 
fashion as the bibliography in this present book following the outline classi- 
fication published in 1913 as City Planning, a Comprehensive Analysis, by Pro- 
fessor J. S. Pray and the writer. Such of the references in the 1915 List as have 
not been superseded by later articles or books have been retained in the Manual, 
but these have proved to be only a small proportion of the more than two thou- 
sand references comprised in the present bibliography, in view of the tremendous 



viii PREFACE 

growth of interest and activity in the field during the last eight years. In the 
case of subjects recently come to public attention, such as aerial mapping, a 
longer list of references has been given than to subjects more completely epito- 
mized in the standard American reference books on city planning, of which The 
Planning of the Modern City, by Mr. Nelson P. Lewis, and The Law of City Plan- 
ning and Zoning, by Frank B. Williams, Esq., should be mentioned as undoubtedly 
the most important. In the case of some subjects in less developed portions of the 
field, the references given are inadequate because of the dearth of printed infor- 
mation. In all cases there has been an attempt to give references of practical 
value, with cross references to names of American cities illustrating the subject 
in question, and to give not only a variety of sources, but also especially sets of 
periodicals available in libraries of smaller cities. 

The Table of Contents is expected to serve as an index to the various features 
of the first part of the book, but a full subject index has been provided as a key 
to the bibliography. It has been suggested that selected headings from this index 
might well be used as a "subject heading list" for an office library on city plan- 
ning. The outline of the bibliography, which precedes the references, is con- 
densed from the Pray and Kimball 1913 classification scheme before mentioned, 
and thoroughly revised to accord with recent progress in the subject. Where the 
sequential classification numbers vary from those in the 1913 scheme, this may 
usually be counted a matter of revision or addition, although in a few cases new 
numbers have been used for greater convenience in arranging the bibliography. 

In order to make the price of the book as low as possible, no author index to 
the bibliography has been included. It was felt by those members of the Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning who were consulted that the author index 
would be of little use as compared with the subject index, and that therefore the 
extra expense entailed would not be justified. Since the authors' names are 
printed in black type, the reader who desires the writings of a particular author 
on given subjects should have no difficulty in finding these. The reader suffi- 
ciently interested in the whole subject to be desirous of finding out how many 
articles by an author have been included in the entire Manual will have no re- 
course but to run his eye through the black names on all the pages, thereby, 
perhaps, learning something else as well for his pains. 

Acknowledgment is gratefully made to the many people concerned in city 
planning and allied work who have given information for various sections of this 
Manual, and especially to Professor George C. Whipple and Professor James 
Ford of Harvard University, Flavel Shurtleff, Esq., Secretary of the National 
Conference on City Planning, Dr. John M. Gries, Chief of the Division of Build- 



PREFACE ix 

ing and Housing of the Department of Commerce, Mr. Lawrence Veiller, Secre- 
tary of the National Housing Association, Dr. Shelby M. Harrison and others of 
the Russell Sage Foundation, Edward M. Bassett, Esq., of New York, Mr. H. H. 
B. Meyer, Chief Bibliographer of the Library of Congress, and Miss Rebecca B. 
Rankin, Librarian of the New York Municipal Reference Library. The co- 
operation afforded by the Library of the Harvard School of Landscape Archi- 
tecture, with the sanction of Professor James Sturgis Pray, has made possible the 
assembling of the extensive bibliography; and the skill, enterprise, and patience 
of the writer's assistant, Miss Mildred R. Bradbury, have constantly promoted 
progress. Above all, the assistance and encouragement rendered by Professor 
Henry V. Hubbard of the School at all stages of the Manual's preparation have 
increased its scope and caused to appear what we hope will prove a useful hand- 
book for American students of city planning. 

T. K. 
CAMBRIDGE, June 24, 1923 



CONTENTS 

City Planning Facts: An Introductory Statement of Principles and Procedure ... 3 

Ten References for the Shelf of a City Planning Commission 12 

The National Conference on City Planning 13 

Contributed by Flavel Shurtleff, Secretary 

Services performed by The Division of Building and Housing, Department of Com- 
merce, Washington Contributed by John M. Gries, Chief 15 

National Organizations active in promoting City Planning 17 

State Organizations to promote City Planning 18 

A List of American Periodicals devoting space to City Planning and Zoning 20 

I/Union Internationale des Villes and the American Centre of Civic Documentation . 23 

Contributed by Stephen Child 

Records of City Planning Progress in the United States 24 

Town Planning in other Countries 26 

Suggestions on conducting Publicity Campaigns for City Planning and Zoning ... 33 

Lantern Slides and Films on City Planning Subjects 38 

Twenty-five References for a City Planning Library 40 

Short List of Typical American City Plan Reports 43 

Universities, Colleges, and Technical Schools offering Instruction in City Planning . 47 
Selected List of Students' Theses on City Planning Subjects, Harvard University 
School of Landscape Architecture, prepared under the direction of Professor James 

SturgisPray 49 

Municipal Appropriations for the work of City Planning Commissions 51 

Contributed by The National Conference on City Planning 
Bibliography: A Selected List of References covering the field of City Planning 53-188 

Outline of the Bibliography (Arranged in Classified Form) 55 

Subject Index to the Bibliography (Alphabetical) 177 



CITY PLANNING 



ISSUED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF 
THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CITY PLANNING 



CITY PLANNING FACTS 

AN INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES AND 

PROCEDURE 



INDUSTRY AND HOMES 

CITIES have grown with the development of manufacture and trade, and more 
and more people have come to live in the city to be near the work offered in its 
factories, shops, and offices. Reduced to the very simplest elements, life in a 
city may be expressed in terms of places of work and places for people to live 
and the means of transportation between; and, since life cannot continue all 
work and no play, we must have places for recreation as well as workshops and 
homes. 

When we speak of planning the city, or city planning, we are talking 
about the arrangement for convenience and comfort of the greater or smaller 
groups of these homes and shops and roads and parks, so that people who live 
in cities may have the fullest measure of health, wealth, and happiness. 

CITIES, TOWNS, AND REGIONS 

The city, however, is not a thing unto itself: it is a vital part of the region in 
which it is situated. It depends on many smaller towns and agricultural areas 
for its food supplies and for customers to purchase its products. In many re- 
spects the interests of every unit in the whole region are bound up together, 
and the welfare of each is dependent on the welfare of the whole, just as the in- 
terests of regions and states are bound together in national interests, and their 
welfare dependent on the integrity and prosperity of the nation. Thus city or 
town planning should not be thought of as sharply divided off and limited by 
the conditions within existing boundaries of city or town. We must think of it 
as the planning of a city or town in the light of its relations to other cities and 
towns and to the surrounding rural areas. For example, the roads from the 
country over which food supplies are brought to the city must be made to come 
in as directly as possible, and there must be enough public open land preserved 
in the region so that future generations may not lack for supplies of water and 
fresh air. 

REMEDIAL AND PREVENTIVE PLANNING 

Some of the cities now existing have been wisely planned, but most of them have 
grown up haphazard in a jumble of factories and homes and unrelated streets. 
It is not surprising that they are afflicted with various inconveniences and ills. 
There are slums and "blighted" districts, and people have trouble in finding 



4 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

homes and in getting from home to work. We might liken such a city to a half- 
sick man who has let himself run down, overwhelmed by the things that have 
happened to him one after another. Just as proper medical skill can help him 
gradually to recover his health, a wise program of replanning and readjustment 
can help a city to correct its worst physical defects. Similarly, we may liken 
undeveloped land, or perhaps a very small village, to a strong and healthy child. 
Just as he may be guided to become a robust man in full enjoyment of his powers, 
the open land or little village may be planned to offer the best opportunities for 
the full development of community life. To borrow medical terms, in one case 
we have remedial planning, and in the other, preventive planning. By fore- 
thought and direction we may save the future from the mistakes of the past. 

WHAT CITY PLANNING INCLUDES 

City planning is the control and guidance of the physical development of cities 
and towns. According to the criterion suggested by Mr. Edward M. Bassett for 
the regional Plan of New York, it deals actually with those elements of city life 
which can be expressed on maps with streets and buildings and parks, with 
railroads and docks. While city planning must take into consideration many 
intangible facts, its recommendations must be concrete. They must be capable 
of being shown on a map, and they must be accompanied by a program of regu- 
lation, legislation, and finance that will make the map gradually come true on 
the ground. This "dynamic" plan or map is not fixed once for all and inca- 
pable of change; its main outlines being fixed, its detail is constantly developing 
as the city grows and changes. 

It is easier to understand what city planning includes if we think of it in 
terms of this living map. There is first the street plan, with its main thorough- 
fares, and its secondary streets for business and residence. Some of the main 
streets extend off into the country and form motor transport highways between 
farm and city or between one city and another. There are trolleys and perhaps 
rapid transit lines. There are railroads coming into the city, with passenger 
stations and freight terminals. There may be approaches by river or sea, with 
ranges of docks and piers. There are coming to be airplane landing fields. 

The green areas of the parks and parkways stand out on the map. There are 
small in-town parks and large outlying reservations, connected by strands of 
parkway and boulevard. There are playgrounds and recreation buildings dotted 
over the city, mostly beside school buildings; and there are bathing beaches and 
recreation piers, if the city is fortunate enough to have available waters. There 
are public buildings conveniently grouped in a main civic center and smaller 
local centers. 

Besides the public ways and open spaces and the public buildings, there are 
large numbers of private buildings on the map. The development of these can- 
not be controlled in the same way as streets and parks, which the city owns, 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 5 

but must be guided by regulations imposed by the city for the general welfare. 
City planning therefore includes " zoning," or the public regulations governing 
the use of private real estate (see " A Zoning Primer/' issued by the Department 
of Commerce) ; and zoning districts must be distinguished on the map. Zoning 
regulations determine the effective use of the land for residence, business or 
manufacturing, and the height and ground area of the structures which may 
be built upon the land. Zoning regulations and building laws work together 
to prevent the unsafe, unhealthy crowding of buildings and to foster types of 
dwellings that will make good homes. 

PLANNING COMPREHENSIVELY 

If we go up in an airplane and look down upon the city, we may see all these 
many elements of the city plan in one comprehensive view, such as we could 
never have if we rode around the city and thought only about streets and build- 
ings, or rode around the parks and thought only about green spaces. It is this 
kind of large mental view which we need in developing the city plan for the 
future. Mr. Thomas Adams has said: 

Cities do not grow all of them are planned. Most of them are planned in 
piecemeal fashion by surveyors acting for real estate owners, by railway engineers 
acting for their shareholders and traffic superintendents, and by individual archi- 
tects or builders acting for their separate clients. The ultimate result is a hap- 
hazard collection of plans of land, means of transportation and buildings. But 
the city interests are not entirely ignored, because every city has more or less power 
to control these separate plans in the interest of safety, health and convenience. 
Such control, however, is within restricted limits and the evils that arise from 
dealing with related parts and problems of the city, as if they were unrelated and 
disconnected, must remain in the absence of any planning of the city as a compre- 
hensive whole. 

The major street plan should be worked out coincidently with the zoning 
plan and park system for the entire city, and problems of transportation by 
motor, rail, and water should be treated as parts of a larger whole. The housing 
problem cannot be divorced from the street plan and the location of industries. 
Any one of these problems may be set apart for purposes of study and discus- 
sion, but it cannot be solved without a consideration of all the related factors. 

The motto, " One thing at a time and that done well," is good in city planning 
only when applied to the successive steps in an orderly program of general 
development. 

BASIC LEGISLATION 

Before a city can spend public funds, however small, to prepare a city plan 
and before this plan can become binding, as a guide for future growth, the city 
must have the proper legislative authority. This may be already contained in 
the state constitution or in the city charter, or it may have to be specifically 



6 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

secured by the city from the state. In some cases a city commission or city 
council may create a city planning board under the city's general powers. How- 
ever, since city planning includes zoning, and since recent experience has shown 
that zoning may best be done under a specific enabling act (see " A Standard 
State Zoning Enabling Act," issued by the Department of Commerce), it is safest 
to begin on very firm ground, with the backing of specially granted authority. 

Cities may find a collection and explanation of American legislation funda- 
mental to city planning in the authoritative book by Mr. Frank B. Williams 
entitled, "The Law of City Planning and Zoning." This book will help those 
initiating city planning work to check up what powers a city now enjoys and 
what powers it must secure. A paper plan is of little use unless its provisions can 
be carried out. 

THE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

In the earlier days of city planning in the United States, many of the plans were 
prepared by unofficial committees. It is now recognized that city planning is 
a necessary part of municipal administration and that the first step towards a 
plan is to create an official city planning body, frequently called the city plan- 
ning commission. This commission usually has from five to fifteen members 
and is composed of representative citizens, serving without pay, together with 
(ex-officio) certain city officials most concerned in carrying out the plan, com- 
monly the city engineer and the head of the park department, and sometimes 
the mayor and city attorney. The citizen members should be selected to form 
an efficient working body and should have overlapping terms of office. Fre- 
quently a small executive commission with a much larger Advisory Council or 
Citizens' Committee has been found desirable, the small commission concen- 
trating on the development of the plan and the large committee promoting a 
general knowledge of it and securing public support. 

Except in very small towns, the executive secretary of the city planning 
commission would better be a paid official giving his whole time to the work and 
especially trained for it. 

EXPERT ADVICE 

A city needs expert advice in the development of its plan just as a sick man 
needs a doctor's skill or an accused man the services of a lawyer. The problems 
of a city are so complicated that a local city planning commission (if it does not 
contain experts among its members) can hardly be expected to arrive at com- 
prehensive solutions unless it employs outside assistance. The employment of 
experts familiar with the experience of other cities in solving similar problems is 
now customary practice. If the city or town is small, one man skilled in city 
planning is usually employed. If the city be large and the problem such as to 
require diverse knowledge, a group or committee of experts is secured. This 
latter method was used by the government of the United States during the Great 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 7 

War when new towns were laid out by the United States Housing Corporation 
to house the employees in war industries. 

In choosing expert advisers a city planning commission should consider their 
technical training and experience, their breadth of view, and the practical re- 
sults of their work in other cities. 

THE SURVEY AND THE PLAN 

A good doctor gives his patient a thorough physical examination before he pro- 
ceeds to a diagnosis. The first step in city planning is likewise an examination of 
the physical city as it exists in itself and as it is related to the surrounding 
region. Such a civic survey comprises many branches, each of which is impor- 
tant to the interpretation of the others. Survey studies usually include the prepa- 
ration of a topographic map, if the city does not already have one, maps 
showing distribution of population, use of land, land values, housing conditions, 
street traffic, transportation, and terminals, and public recreation areas. Aerial 
surveys are now considered essential to study of the broad relations of city and 
region. In addition to the physical survey, studies of social and economic con- 
ditions and of legal and administrative powers are carried on. 

In the analysis and interpretation of the facts gathered in these surveys, 
which may be the cooperative work of several local officials and agencies, 
expert advice becomes especially desirable. Under such guidance, these facts 
should be translated while fresh and vital into the structure of the city plan. 
The plan, as first created, will be like a view of the city seen from an airplane 
high above it. Only the main outlines will be laid down, leaving details to be 
gradually worked out. 

A CONSTRUCTIVE PROGRAM 

The city planning commission having been appointed and having begun its 
work, with the aid of competent technical advice, the next step is to inform the 
public thoroughly concerning the value of city planning and what it can do for 
the city. Frequently, as has already been suggested, this educational campaign 
is carried on by a large advisory committee of citizens or a city planning associa- 
tion. The interest of every voter in the community should be aroused so that 
all will understand and be favorable to city planning, and, when the time comes, 
vote for and not against the financing of the plans proposed. Suggestions for 
conducting educational campaigns for city planning may be obtained from the 
Secretary of the National Conference on City Planning. (See also p. 33.) 

When the city planning commission and its advisers are ready with the out- 
line of the city plan, or with some important part which seems to demand early 
attention, this should be published in such form that it may be widely dis- 
tributed to citizens and readily comprehended by them. A concise summary of 



8 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

the plan and well selected illustrations help the reader who will not attempt to 
encompass the full text. 

An essential part of a city plan is a " progress program" covering perhaps a 
period of thirty years and showing the order in which the various projects pro- 
posed by the plan should be taken up, and the possible methods of financing 
these. This program will show priority projects on which public attention may 
first be concentrated. Unless some such program is attached to the plan, it 
would not be surprising if many citizens were frightened by the magnitude of a 
long look into the future. It is here that the "One thing at a time and that done 
well" helps the accomplishment of the other things that must come after. 

Constant alertness on the part of the city planning commission will be neces- 
sary to guide the construction of the plan, cooperating with the various municipal 
departments charged with this, and providing for changes of detail to meet new 
conditions as they arise. The work of the city planning commission is only 
begun when the plan is published. The commission must continue the education 
of the public, continue the defense of the plan against the encroachment of 
selfish interests, and be constantly watchful of opportunities to enlist coopera- 
tion of the public transportation companies and of surrounding municipalities 
in the development of the city. 

FINANCING THE INVESTMENT 

The public improvements proposed by the city plan must be paid for. Since 
many of these improvements will be enjoyed more by the future than the present 
generation, it is felt that future citizens should share in the payment. Certain 
classes of improvements may with equity be paid from bond issues if the life 
of the improvement is long enough so that the benefit will be reaped in the future. 
There is a general feeling, however, among those whose opinion is valuable in 
this matter, that many of the improvements, especially those correcting mis- 
takes of the past, are such as can be equitably assessed, at least in part on the 
areas benefited. The book by Mr. Nelson P. Lewis, "The Planning of the Mod- 
ern City," discusses this subject in detail. 

Another method, excess condemnation, employed more abroad than in the 
United States is beginning to be used here, particularly in street improvements. 

A striking instance of financing important public improvements may be 
cited from Kansas City, Mo., in the construction of its parks and parkways: 

Instead of incurring a debt and leaving the bill to be paid by posterity, the people 
of the city have felt so sure of their immediate value to the community as a whole 
that they have assessed themselves for the entire cost in order to pay cash. 

It will be a part of the duty of the city planning commission, with the advice 
of other city officials and of its experts, to decide what program of financing will 
best be adapted to the city and its needs. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 9 

PRESENT ADVANTAGES AND FUTURE RETURNS 

The advantages of zoning are immediate. It is hard to name a municipal in- 
vestment, which, in return for the relatively small amount of money required 
to do it well, shows such beneficial results in stabilized property values, increased 
home ownership, rehabilitation of blighted districts, and attraction of industry. 
The returns for other phases of city planning which take longer to materialize 
may be less immediate but are none the less substantial in terms of both comfort 
and prosperity. Mr. Nelson P. Lewis quotes Mr. John Burns, the father of 
British town planning legislation, as saying that: 

Investment in a good plan, whether it be for new parts of a city or for the correc- 
tion of older parts, if regarded for a period of a year, may appear expensive; if 
considered for a period of five years it will be profitable; when considered for a 
period of fifty years it will be an investment which in subsequent days will make 
the community regret that it did not adopt it sooner. 

Mr. Lewis continues: 

Mr. Burns further notes that the neglected hamlets of a hundred years ago are 
the squalid industrial towns and cities of to-day, and he pleads that we should so 
arrange the physical life of a hamlet, village, town or city that it can grow naturally 
and at each stage avoid the cost, nuisance, ugliness, and squalor which one sees 
wherever a town encroaches on the country. . . . 

Instances may be cited where towns have grown very rapidly and have developed 
into great commercial or industrial cities, although their plans violate almost every 
principle laid down by city planning authorities. Their growth, however, has been 
due to certain natural advantages and to the general development and prosperity 
of the districts tributary to them, and they have grown in spite of the handicap of 
a poor plan. When its defects and the embarrassment to business due to them 
become apparent vast sums are often spent to cure the defects which might have 
been discovered and avoided had sufficient study been given to the plan when it was 
first under consideration, and the increased cost of doing business for a period of 
years and the large sums spent in the correction of the plan might have been saved. 
The cost of reconstruction has run far into the millions in nearly every large city 
except Washington, which was so planned as to provide for future growth. To give 
figures for different towns is unnecessary, but the total would be staggering. The 
beneficial results of such changes as have been made will be evident upon a com- 
parison of the taxable values in their vicinity before and after the improvements 
have been carried out. 

WHY DELAY? 

Cities seldom stop growing. If they continue to grow without a plan, their in- 
conveniences and ills are continually aggravated. The sick man is getting sicker, 
and every day it becomes more difficult and more expensive to cure him. Public 
health is damaged by bad housing and lack of playgrounds, public wealth is 
wasted by building wreckage and costly haulage, and public happiness is clouded 
by poverty and ugliness. 



10 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

The advertising slogan, " Eventually, why not now?" has become a national 
byword. It applies in city planning, along with, " A stitch in time saves nine," 
and, "It is never too late to mend." Today is the time to begin. 

CITIES WITH PLANS ADOPTED OR IN PROGRESS 

In the invitations to the National Conference on City Planning in June, 1922, 
the Secretary of the Conference reported that "every city of the Metropolitan 
class in the United States with a population of over 300,000 has adopted city 
planning as a part of its official program." During 1922, news of city planning 
in various stages was received at the Library of the Harvard School of Land- 
scape Architecture from nearly one hundred and fifty cities and towns. Of 
these, at least twenty-five reached the point in 1922 of issuing published plan 
reports. Of the forty-three cities in the United States with a population of one 
hundred and fifty thousand or over, city planning news was received during 
1922 from all but three; and of these three only one has not had some form of 
city plan report in the past. The competitive instinct for securing municipal 
advantages seems to be thoroughly aroused in many quarters and before long 
it will be easier to make a list of the principal cities which are laggards in city 
planning than to review the accomplishment of those which are active. 

The statistics to date are not available as to city planning legislation in all 
states of the Union, but this information is now being assembled at the office of 
the Division of Building and Housing of the Department of Commerce. In 
Massachusetts, where there is a compulsory city planning law, fifty-three plan- 
ning boards are already in operation. The Secretary of the Massachusetts State 
Division of Housing and Town Planning has compiled information showing that 
twenty states have state-wide laws authorizing cities to appoint planning com- 
missions, although only three states have state departments or divisions. 1 

The statistics for zoning legislation have been compiled at the Department 
of Commerce to January, 1923. Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia 
have enabling legislation, and in the entire country one hundred and nine cities, 
towns, and villages were zoned up to January 1, 1923 as compared with fifty-five 
just one year before. More than fifteen million people live in the zoned cities, 
towns, and villages, or twenty-seven per cent of the total urban population of 
the country. 

The National Conference on City Planning issued in 1922, with a supplement 
in 1923, a list of cities which have shown an interest in city planning either by 
making city planning studies or by the appointment of city planning boards, in- 
cluding zoning boards, which comprises over three hundred cities distributed 
among thirty-eight states and the District of Columbia. 

1 This became four in May, 1923, by the addition of New York, to Massachusetts, Pennsyl- 
vania, and California. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 11 

Of the larger cities, there might be especially mentioned for their city plan- 
ning work: New York, Chicago, Boston, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, 
Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Milwaukee, Kan- 
sas City (Mo.), and St. Louis. The Chicago Plan is historic and has been the 
inspiration of much other planning work. The most recent undertaking, and the 
most extensive, is the Plan of New York and its Environs under the auspices 
of the Russell Sage Foundation. This is a great regional plan to be offered to 
the local authorities of the Metropolitan area as a guide to future development. 
This project will also be a demonstration of city planning technique which will 
undoubtedly benefit city planning work throughout the country. 

SOURCES OF INFORMATION 

The National Conference on City Planning (with its Secretary's office at 130 
East 22d Street, New York) is a national association solely devoted to the pro- 
motion of city planning. Within this organization and with the same officers 
is the American City Planning Institute, composed of those engaged in technical 
city planning work. The National Conference and the Institute have published 
many valuable papers on city planning and the Secretary is in constant touch 
with city planning projects throughout the country (see p. 13). 

The Division of Building and Housing of the Department of Commerce has 
collected and issued extensive and up-to-date information on zoning, and is now 
undertaking the same service in regard to city planning. Inquiries for informa- 
tion should be addressed to the Division of Building and Housing, Department 
of Commerce, Washington, D.C. (see p. 15). 

The Library of the School of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University 
with its extensive collections on city planning is recognized as a national 
center of information and has cooperated with the Department of Commerce in 
the formation of the latter's files. The Librarian of the Harvard School furnishes 
annually for publication a review of city planning progress, the series now cov- 
ering from 1910 to date; and several long and short bibliographies on city plan- 
ning have been issued. The resources of the Library have been freely used in the 
preparation of the present Manual, and much information thus made more gen- 
erally available. 

T. K. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 
April, 1923 



12 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

TEN REFERENCES FOR THE SHELF OF A CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

ADAMS, THOMAS. Modern city planning, its meaning and methods. Special number of 
National Municipal Review, June 1922, v. 11, pp. 157-177. plans. (Technical Pamphlet 
Series.) 

BASSETT, EDWARD M. Zoning. [26 pages.] (National Municipal League, Technical 
Pamphlet Series No. 5, 1922.) 

BIRD, CHARLES S., JR., Editor. Town planning for small communities, by Walpole (Mass.) 
Town Planning Committee. New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1917. 492 pages, illus., 
plans. (National Municipal League Series.) 

KIMBALL, THEODORA, Editor. Municipal accomplishment in city planning and published 
city plan reports in the United States. From information assembled largely by the 
Detroit City Plan Commission. Published under the auspices of National Con- 
ference on City Planning, Boston, 1920. 79 pages. 

LEWIS, NELSON P. The planning of the modern city, a review of the principles govern- 
ing city planning. With the assistance of Harold M. Lewis. 2d edition, revised. New 
York, John Wiley & Sons, 1923. 457 pages, illus., photos, plans, diagrams. 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CITY PLANNING. Proceedings, published by the Conference, 
1910 to date. (A valuable file of general and technical papers.) 

NOLEN, JOHN, Editor. City planning; a series of papers (by seventeen specialists) present- 
ing the essential elements of a city plan. New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1916. 447 
pages, illus., plans. (National Municipal League Series.) 

PRAY, JAMES STURGIS, AND THEODORA KIMBALL. City planning, a comprehensive 
analysis. Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1913. 103 p. (This outline, revised 
to date, has been used for the arrangement of the bibliography in this present 
Manual.) 

ROBINSON, CHARLES MULFORD. City planning, with special reference to the planning 
of streets and lots. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1916. 344 pages, illus., plans. 
(Of especial importance in relation to the platting of residential districts.) 

WILLIAMS, FRANK BACKUS. The law of city planning and zoning. New York, The 
Macmillan Co., 1922. 738 pages, tables. (The Citizen's Library of Economics, 
Politics and Sociology New Series.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 13 

THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CITY PLANNING 

THE National Conference on City Planning dates from 1909, which was a sig- 
nificant year in city planning in the United States. In that year the Burnham 
Plan for Chicago was finished, and the Committee on Congestion of Population 
in New York City called a conference in Washington to discuss problems of con- 
gestion of population. The Washington conference was for a part of its delibera- 
tions a hearing before a congressional committee and the proceedings were pub- 
lished as a congressional document. That conference adopted a resolution calling 
for the appointment of an executive committee to prepare a conference on city 
planning for 1910. 

Frederick L. Ford, the city engineer of Hartford, was elected chairman of the 
executive committee and Flavel Shurtleff, a Boston lawyer, was appointed 
secretary, in connection with investigating and reporting upon the law and 
practice involved in carrying out city plans. This report was financed by the 
Russell Sage Foundation of New York City. 

For several years the Conference on City Planning was continued only by a 
yearly resolution calling for a conference in the succeeding year, but in 1919 a 
constitution was adopted which stated the purpose of the organization: "to 
promote the cause of city, town and regional planning." 

Several of the yearly meetings have been noteworthy milestones in the prog- 
ress of the city planning movement in the United States. At the Philadelphia 
conference of 1911 was assembled the first comprehensive city planning exhibit 
in the United States and in this same year Pennsylvania passed permissive legis- 
lation looking to the creation of planning commissions in cities of the second 
class. 

In 1912 the conference met in Boston and in the next year the legislature of 
Massachusetts passed an act making planning boards mandatory in every city 
of the state with a population of 10,000 and over. 

The conference of 1914, entertained in Toronto by the Dominion Conserva- 
tion Commission, was the first planning conference held in Canada and one of its 
chief results was the retaining of Thomas Adams, the well-known town planner 
of Great Britain, as the consultant on city planning to the Conservation Com- 
mission of Canada. Here were presented various arguments for zoning in Amer- 
ica, and two years later New York City adopted the first zoning ordinance under 
which Greater New York was zoned for industry, for business and for residence. 

The Cleveland conference of 1916 was soon followed by state-wide authoriza- 
tion of city planning commissions.' 

The conference of 1919 in Niagara Falls and Buffalo stimulated interest in 
the Buffalo region as a planning unit, and the Buffalo City Planning Association, 
organized in the next year, included in its program a plan for the entire region for 



14 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

which Buffalo was the business center. This was the first conscious effort at a 
regional plan in the United States. At this conference also was organized the 
American City Planning Institute, a technical group composed of members of 
the National Conference on City Planning, who as engineers, landscape archi- 
tects, architects, lawyers, or as specialists in other fields, have been for at least 
two years in responsible charge of some major phase of city planning. 

In the fifteen years of the Conference history, city planning and zoning legisla- 
tion has been passed by the legislatures of 22 states, 185 cities have appointed 
plan commissions, 125 cities and towns have passed zoning ordinances, and 90 
cities and towns have secured plans for their future development. 



FLAVEL SHURTLEFF, Secretary 



130 EAST 22d STREET, NEW YORK 
April 28, 1923 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 15 

SERVICES PERFORMED BY THE DIVISION OF BUILDING 

AND HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, 

WASHINGTON 

A GROWING demand for the Federal Government to take an active interest in 
building and housing prompted the Congress of the United States to authorize 
such work in the Department of Commerce beginning with the fiscal year 1921- 
1922. The Act appropriating the funds says among other things, "That as much 
of this sum as necessary shall be used to collect and disseminate such scientific, 
practical, and statistical information as may be procured, showing or tending to 
show approved methods in building, planning, and construction, standardiza- 
tion, and adaptability of structural units, including building materials, and codes, 
economy in the manufacture and utilization of building materials and supplies, 
and such other matters as may tend to encourage, improve, and cheapen con- 
struction and housing." Accordingly, Secretary Hoover set up the Division of 
Building and Housing. 

The activities of this Division have developed along four main lines : statistics 
and economics; elimination of waste; technical service for municipalities; and 
information service for home owners. 

Statistics on current prices of building materials in cities of the United States 
are collected and made public, as are figures on building activity, production, 
consumption and stocks of certain building material items, and tables and charts 
showing wholesale price indices, tenancy, home ownership and similar data. 

The Division is cooperating with civic groups, individuals, members of the 
construction industry, architects, engineers, material producers and dealers, real 
estate men, contractors and others, in efforts to provide better houses at lower 
cost and to eliminate wastes that have burdened building and housing in the past. 
Small house plans designed to utilize standard sizes of materials, and to meet 
regional needs in various parts of the country are distributed at small cost by the 
Architects' Small House Service Bureau, endorsed by Mr. Hoover and the De- 
partment. A booklet, "How to Own Your Home," has been prepared by the 
Division for the aid of prospective home owners, and includes sections on financ- 
ing a home, choosing the site, building a house, and other related subjects. 

Technical services for municipalities were undertaken in order to provide 
where possible a sound basis for greater uniformity in construction regulation. 
Unwarranted and obsolete restrictions have placed a burden upon building in 
many communities, and retarded the progress of proper housing and construc- 
tion. A Building Code Committee of prominent engineers and architects has 
issued a report on " Recommended Minimum Requirements for Small Dwelling 
Construction," and a Sub-Committee on Plumbing is working on the essentials 



16 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

of plumbing code regulations. An Advisory Committee on Zoning makes avail- 
able, to municipalities and states desiring it, information on zoning matters. 

Zoning and city planning are being more and more widely resorted to as 
remedies for the wastes resulting from undirected city growth and misplaced 
construction, and in answer to requests from many sources Mr. Hoover appointed 
the Advisory Committee on Zoning, which is composed of men familiar to those 
interested in housing and planning problems: 

Mr. EDWARD M. BASSETT, 

Counsel, Zoning Committee of New York. 
Mr. IRVING B. HIETT, 

Past President, National Association of Real Estate Boards. 
Mr. JOHN IHLDER, 

Manager, Civic Development Department, Chamber of Commerce of the United 

States. 
Mr. MORRIS KNOWLES, 

Of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, and Chairman of the Zoning 

Committee of Pittsburgh. 
Mr. NELSON P. LEWIS, 

Past President of the American City Planning Institute, and in charge of the 

Physical Surveys for the Plan of New York and its Environs. 
Mr. J. HORACE MCFARLAND, 

President of the American Civic Association. 
Mr. FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED, 

Past President of the American Society of Landscape Architects, and Past 

President of the American City Planning Institute. 
Mr. LAWRENCE VEILLER, 

Secretary and Director of the National Housing Association. 

These men prepared "A Zoning Primer," an elementary statement of zoning 
principles, and "A Standard State Zoning Enabling Act/' with full notes for the 
benefit of states authorizing city zoning. A number of states already have used 
this Standard Act as the model for their zoning legislation. There has been 
issued also by the Division of Building and Housing a Selected Bibliography of 
Zoning, prepared by Miss Theodora Kimball for the Committee, and a statement 
" Zoning Progress in the United States," which comprises a list of state zoning 
laws and municipal ordinances. 

The Division of Building and Housing endeavors to render a real service to 
the public at large through its efforts to better construction and to improve 
housing conditions in the United States. 

JOHN M. GRIES 

Chief of the Division of Building and Housing 
May, 1923 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 17 

NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN PROMOTING 
CITY PLANNING 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CITY PLANNING and AMERICAN CITY PLANNING 
INSTITUTE, 130 East 22d Street, New York City. Flavel Shurtleff, Secretary. 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Washington, D. C. John M. 
Gries, Chief, Division of Building and Housing. 



AMERICAN Civic ASSOCIATION, Union Trust Building, Washington, D. C. Miss 
Harlean James, Secretary. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ARTS, 1741 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C. 
Miss Leila Mechlin, Secretary. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, The Octagon, Washington, D. C. 
Committee on Community Planning. Clarence S. Stein, Chairman. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PARK EXECUTIVES l and AMERICAN PARK SOCIETY, 
Minot, N. D. Will O. Doolittle, Secretary. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR MUNICIPAL IMPROVEMENTS, 2 P. O. Box 234, St. Peters- 
burg, Fla. Charles Carroll Brown, Secretary. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS, 33 West 39th Street, New York City. 
John H. Dunlap, Secretary. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, 18 Tremont Street, Boston, 
Mass. Bremer W. Pond, Secretary. 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES, Mills Building, Washington, 
D. C. John Ihlder, Manager, Civic Development Department. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REAL ESTATE BOARDS, 18 Consumers Building, 
Chicago, 111. Herbert U. Nelson, Executive Secretary. Emerson W. Chaille*, 
Chairman City Planning Committee, 308 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis. 

NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 366 Madison Avenue, New 
York City. John C. Long, Secretary, Educational Department. 

NATIONAL HOUSING ASSOCIATION, 105 East 22d Street, New York City. Law- 
rence Veiller, Secretary and Director. 

NATIONAL MUNICIPAL LEAGUE, 261 Broadway, New York City. H. S. Dodds, 
Secretary. 

PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, 315 Fourth Avenue, 
New York. George D. Butler, Correspondence and Consultation Bureau. 

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION, 130 East 22d Street, New York City. Depart- 
ment of Surveys and Exhibits; Department of Recreation; etc. 

ZONING COMMITTEE OF NEW YORK, 233 Broadway, New York City. Edward 
M. Bassett, Counsel. 

1 Name changed in 1921 from American Association of Park Superintendents. 

2 Name changed in 1918 from American Society of Municipal Improvements. 



18 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



STATE ORGANIZATIONS TO PROMOTE CITY PLANNING 

MASSACHUSETTS 

AT the third annual conference of Massachusetts City and Town Planning Boards 
in 1915, the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards (Arthur C. Comey, 
Secretary, Cambridge, Mass.) was formed under the auspices of the Massachu- 
setts Homestead Commission. It has held annual meetings and published a 
series of useful bulletins. It has cooperated with the Division of Housing and 
Town Planning of the State Department of Public Welfare, which superseded 
the Homestead Commission in 1920, and has been largely instrumental in secur- 
ing legislative appropriation for the appointment of a field worker for the Divi- 
sion in 1923. The proceedings of the Federation Conferences appear in the 
Division's annual reports. 

CALIFORNIA 

The California Conference on City Planning held its first meeting in October, 
1914, as an auxiliary body to the League of California Municipalities. It pub- 
lished several bulletins in 1915, and has promoted city planning and zoning in 
the state. A meeting was held in March 1923 in connection with pending legis- 
lation. The temporary headquarters of the Conference are with the City Plan- 
ning Commission of Los Angeles, G. Gordon Whitnall, Director. The California 
Commission of Immigration and Housing is the official state agency authorized 
to promote city planning work. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

The Division of City Planning and Municipal Engineering (B. A. Haldeman, 
Chief) in the Pennsylvania State Bureau of Municipalities at Harrisburg (estab- 
lished in 1919) is the active center for promoting city planning in the state. 

There are two unofficial organizations. The Pennsylvania Housing and Town 
Planning Association organized several years ago has not been very active. The 
former Pennsylvania State Association of City Planning Commissioners is in 
process of reorganization (1923). The State Bureau issued a bulletin in June, 
1923, for the Association of City Planning Commissions of Cities of the Third 
Class (Leo F. Buettner, Secretary, Johnstown, Pa.) describing progress in those 
cities. 

OHIO 

The Ohio State Conference on City Planning (Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Secre- 
tary, Chamber of Commerce, Cleveland) was inaugurated in 1919 at the invita- 
tion of the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce. It has held annual conferences and 
conducted active and successful campaigns for the passage of state enabling 
legislation for city planning. Its latest achievements (1923) in securing authority 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 19 

for the appointment of regional planning commissions and for the establishment 
of city maps are especially notable. Its bulletins have been issued in mimeo- 
graphed form, and extensive educational work through the newspapers has been 
carried on. 

IOWA 

At the first annual conference on town planning in Iowa held in Des Moines in 
March 1920, the Iowa Town Planning Association was organized (Holland S. 
Wallis, Secretary, Ames, Iowa). The Association has been very active in promot- 
ing city planning and zoning throughout the state. It has held successful meet- 
ings and published an excellent monthly mimeographed bulletin "Civic Improve- 
ment Items" beginning in January 1922. It led the campaign for a state zoning 
enabling act, based on the Department of Commerce Standard Act, signed by 
the Governor on April 24, 1923. 

INDIANA 

The first Indiana State Conference on City Planning (John B. Reynolds, Secre- 
tary, Chamber of Commerce, Indianapolis) was held at Purdue University in 
February 1923. At this meeting the progress since the passage of the state ena- 
bling laws for city planning and zoning in 1921 was reviewed. Professor Lommel 
of the Purdue Engineering School has summarized this in a mimeographed paper 
no. 2 of the Engineering Extension Service, called " Status of City Planning in 
Indiana." 

NEW YORK 

A Bureau of Housing and Regional Planning has just been established (1923) in 
the New York State Department of Architecture. The bureau is to be composed 
of the state architect, the state commissioner of highways and the industrial 
commissioner, with five lay members to be appointed by the state architect. 

The New York State Conference of Mayors and other City Officials (W. P. 
Capes, Secretary) has included city planning in its programs. 



20 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

A LIST OF AMERICAN PERIODICALS DEVOTING SPACE 
TO CITY PLANNING AND ZONING 

THE following periodicals, published in the United States, carry articles or items 
on city planning and zoning with sufficient frequency to make it worth while for 
the specialist to keep in touch with their columns. Those which have been 
marked with a star should be taken regularly by libraries attempting to follow 
city planning progress; and those marked with a double star may be considered 
especially useful. 

The back files from their beginnings of American City (from 1909), Landscape 
Architecture (from 1910), Housing Betterment and National Municipal Review 
(from 1912), and of the Engineering News-Record from about the same period are 
very valuable for articles or news items. 

References will be found in the Bibliography in this Manual to two civic peri- 
odicals no longer published : Municipal Affairs, a quarterly, published in New 
York by the Reform Club from 1897 to 1902; and Civic Comment, issued occa- 
sionally by the American Civic Association from 1919 to 1921. Except for the 
few references to Municipal Affairs and to the general magazines such as Century 
and Scribner's, the periodical references in the Bibliography are to fairly recent 
files of periodicals still continuing publication, mainly to some of those contained 
in the following list. In cases where no reference to articles in a magazine on the 
list have been given this may be taken to indicate either that the same subject 
has been covered more fully elsewhere or that the magazine contains mainly 
short news items in this field. 

A valuable weekly index of civic publications may be found in the New York 
Municipal Reference Library Notes. The Public Affairs Information Service, In- 
dustrial Arts Index, and Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature furnish additional 
references to magazine articles, but it is hardly necessary for anyone except a 
bibliographer to follow regularly these more general periodical indices. 

In several cities the municipal authorities or chambers of commerce publish 
local organs which feature city planning and zoning items. Typical of these are 
the Baltimore Municipal Journal, Denver Municipal Facts, Boston Chamber of 
Commerce Current Affairs, and Greater New York, organ of the Merchants' Asso- 
ciation. The Port of New York Authority plans are featured in The Port of New 
York. The Citizens City Plan Committee of Pittsburgh has published a regular 
monthly, Progress, devoted to the Plan, since January 1921, and at various times 
other planning associations have issued little magazines to promote popular 
interest in the subject. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 21 

LIST 

AERA (monthly). American Electric Railway Association, 8 West 40th Street, New 
York City. Harlow C. Clark, ed. 

AMERICAN ARCHITECT (and ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW) (bi-weekly). Architectural and 
Building Press, Inc., 243 West 39th Street, New York City. W. A. Crocker, ed. 

AMERICAN BUILDER (monthly). American Carpenter and Builder Co., 1827 Prairie 

Avenue, Chicago, 111. W. A. Radford, ed. 

**AMERICAN CITY (monthly). Civic Press, 443 Fourth Avenue, New York City. Harold 
S. Buttenheim, ed. 

AMERICAN CONTRACTOR (weekly). American Contractor Publishing Co., 131 North 
Franklin Street, Chicago. Edward J. Brunner, ed. 

AMERICAN ECONOMIC REVIEW (4 times a year). American Economic Association, New 

Haven, Conn. Davis R. Dewey, man. ed., Cambridge, Mass. 

**AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, JOURNAL OF THE (monthly). Press of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects. C. H. Whitaker, ed., 250 West 57th Street, New 
York City. 

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (monthly). American Public Health Asso- 
ciation, 169 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Mass. A. W. Hedrick, ed. 

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY (bi-monthly) . University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 
111. A. W. Small, ed. 

AMERICAN MAGAZINE OF ART (monthly). American Federation of Arts, 1741 New 
York Avenue, Washington, D. C. Miss Leila Mechlin, ed. 

AMERICAN MUNICIPALITIES, Iowa (monthly). Municipal Publishing Co., Marshall- 
town, Iowa. Frank G. Pierce, ed. 
*AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS PROCEEDINGS (monthly, except June and 

July). 33 West 39th Street, New York City. 

*ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER, of California (monthly). Architect and Engineer, Inc., 
626-629 Foxcroft Building, San Francisco, Calif. Frederick W. Jones, ed. 

ARCHITECTURAL RECORD (monthly). Architectural Record Co., 115-119 West 40th 
Street, New York City. Michael A. Mikkelsen, ed. (Absorbed PARK INTER- 
NATIONAL.) 

ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDING (monthly). Wm. A. Comstock Co., 23 Warren Street, 
New York City. Wm. A. Comstock, man. ed. 

BUILDING AGE (monthly) . Building Age Publishing Corporation, 239 West 39th Street, 
New York City. Charles G. Peker, ed. 

CANADIAN ENGINEER (weekly). Monetary Times Printing Co. of Canada, Ltd., 

62 Church Street, Toronto, Canada. 
*ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING (weekly). Engineering and Contracting Publishing 

Co., 9 So. Clinton Street, Chicago, 111. H. P. Gillette, ed. 

**ENGINEERING NEWS-RECORD (weekly). McGraw-Hill Co., Inc., 10th Avenue at 
36th Street, New York City. E. J. Mehren, ed. 

GOOD ROADS (weekly). E. L. Powers Co., 461 Eighth Avenue, New York City. E. L. 

Powers, ed. 

**HousiNG BETTERMENT (quarterly). National Housing Association, 105 West 22d 
Street, New York City. Lawrence Veiller, ed. 

KANSAS MUNICIPALITIES (monthly). League of Kansas Municipalities, Lawrence, 

Kansas. Albert A. Long, ed. 

**LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (quarterly). Landscape Architecture Publishing Co., Cam- 
bridge 38, Mass. Henry V. Hubbard, ed. 



22 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

MODERN CITY (hionthly). Modern City Publishing Co., Franklin Building, Baltimore, 
Md. Robert E. Lee, ed. 

MUNICIPAL AND COUNTY ENGINEERING (monthly). Engineering Publishing Co., 
702 Wulsin Building, Indianapolis, Ind. Samuel C. Haddan, ed. 

NATION'S BUSINESS (monthly) . Chamber of Commerce of U. S. , Mills Building, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Merle Thorpe, ed. 

NATIONAL BUILDER (monthly). Tradepress Publishing Corporation, 542 So. Dearborn 

Street, Chicago, 111., A. H. McQuilkin, ed. 

**NATIONAL MUNICIPAL REVIEW (monthly). National Municipal League, 261 Broad- 
way, New York City. Harold W. Dodds, ed. 

**NATIONAL REAL ESTATE JOURNAL (bi-weekly). Porter-Bede-Langtry Corporation, 
139 No. Clark Street, Chicago, 111. George E. Henry, ed. 

PACIFIC MUNICIPALITIES (monthly). H. A. Mason & W. J. Locke, eds. and pubs. Pacific 

Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
*PARKS AND RECREATION (bi-monthly). American Institute of Park Executives and 

. American Park Society, Minot, N. D. Will 0. Doolittle, ed. 

PLAYGROUND (monthly). Playground and Recreation Association of America, 315 
Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

PUBLIC WORKS (and MUNICIPAL JOURNAL) (weekly). Public Works Journal Corpora- 
tion, 243 West 39th Street, New York City. A. Prescott Folweli, ed. 

REAL ESTATE RECORD AND BUILDER'S GUIDE (weekly). Record and Guide Co., 119 

West 40th Street, New York City. Frank E. Perley, ed. 

*SURVEY (weekly). Survey Associates, Inc., 112 East 19th Street, New York City. 
Paul U. Kellogg, ed. 

TEXAS MUNICIPALITIES (bi-monthly). League of Texas Municipalities, Austin, Texas. 
**TowN PLANNING INSTITUTE OF CANADA, JOURNAL OF THE (bi-monthly). The Institute, 
Ottawa, Canada. Alfred Buckley, ed. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 23 

L'UNION INTERNATIONALE DES VILLES 

AND THE 

AMERICAN CENTRE OF CIVIC DOCUMENTATION 

THE purpose of this important international organization is to collect civic infor- 
mation of all sorts from all over the world, study it and publish, at least quarterly, 
Note-Books containing brief items of current civic data classified under many 
convenient headings. The headquarters is in Brussels but well developed 
"Centres" are now functioning in Paris for France, Brussels for Belgium, Rome 
for Italy, Dtisseldorf for Germany, while in many other countries steps are being 
taken towards initiating such " Centres." 

While in Europe cities support their various National "Centres" by joining 
officially paying a fee depending upon population, this did not seem to be a feasi- 
ble arrangement for America. 

The work of organizing an American Centre has been taken up by a committee 
of the American Society of Landscape Architects. This Committee made a 
thorough investigation and was able to avail itself of the services of Miss Theo- 
dora Kimball, the Librarian of the School of Landscape Architecture at Harvard 
University. The Committee finds that such a Centre of Civic Documentation 
could far better be arranged in Washington than elsewhere; that it could best 
be organized in the Division of Building and Housing of the Department of 
Commerce, and furthermore that all the material needed for the establishment 
of such a centre is readily available in Washington, either at the Library of 
Congress or in other Governmental Departments; that it will therefore be un- 
necessary to spend any money on this account. 

The Committee found, however, that while Secretary Hoover and his Depart- 
ment are much interested, no funds are available for financing the matter. But 
the Committee believes that an organization which, as Senator Vinck the 
Director of the Brussels office has recently said, is "a tool of such enormous 
efficiency," stimulating, as it will, better civic conditions by the distribution of 
authentic, up-to-date, civic information, must not be permitted to fail; and the 
Committee has under consideration several very promising methods of securing 
funds for this purpose. 

Special Committee of the American Society of Landscape Architects to co- 
operate with the International Union of Cities and Its Centres of Civic Docu- 
mentation : 

STEPHEN CHILD, Chairman, 

JAMES STURGIS PRAY, Harvard University, 

FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. 



24 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



RECORDS OF CITY PLANNING PROGRESS IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

IN December 1914, the American City published a list of American city planning 
reports covering from 1900 to that date, compiled by the late Charles Mulford 
Robinson, Mr. Frederick Law Olmsted, and Miss Theodora Kimball. 

In 1917 the Town Planning Committee of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects published the first comprehensive review of city planning progress in the 
United States, edited by Mr. George B. Ford. This work is now out of print, and 
no later edition of it has been issued. 

In 1920 the Detroit City Plan Commission assembled information from the 
principal cities of the country as to execution of city planning projects and edu- 
cational campaigns. This information was turned over to the National Confer- 
ence on City Planning, and, under its auspices, supplemented and edited for 
publication by Miss Theodora Kimball. To a digest of the replies from various 
cities was added a list of city plan reports published in the United States subse- 
quent to 1900. The pamphlet was called " Municipal Accomplishment in City 
Planning" and may still be obtained from the Secretary of the National Con- 
ference. Its list of reports superseded the list published by the American City in 
1914. The progress recorded in this pamphlet attracted considerable attention in 
the periodical press, including summaries in the Engineering News-Record and 
American Review of Reviews. 

Two periodicals have each published a series of annual reviews of city planning 
progress, The National Municipal Review and Landscape Architecture. The 
series in the former was inaugurated by Charles Mulford Robinson in January 
1913, and continued to his death in 1917, after which the reviews were carried on 
by Miss Kimball. Beginning in 1922 they constitute a briefer summary of pro- 
gress than the Survey in Landscape Architecture. The references for the series 
are given below. 

The reviews in Landscape Architecture, also written by Miss Kimball, began 
in April 1912, covering city plan reports from 1910. At first the annual article 
was confined strictly to published reports, but the scope has been enlarged, and 
it now appears in the form of a survey of progress, accompanied by a list of the 
reports of the year. 

The American City has just undertaken (beginning June 1923) to cover sys- 
tematically progress in the legal side of city planning in a department conducted 
by Frank B. Williams, Esq. 

The National Conference on City Planning in its Proceedings has published 
brief reports from cities where plans are in preparation or under way, and papers 
on the plans of cities where the annual conferences have been held will be found 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



25 



in the Proceedings for that year. In the 1922 Proceedings the Conference pub- 
lished a "list of cities which have shown an interest in city planning either by 
making city planning studies or by the appointment of city planning boards, in- 
cluding zoning boards." This list revised to April 1923, was issued as a bulletin 
of the Conference. 

REFERENCES 

MUNICIPAL ACCOMPLISHMENT IN CITY PLANNING and Published City Plan Re- 
ports in the United States, edited by T. Kimball from information assembled 
largely by the Detroit City Plan Commission. Published under the auspices of 
the National Conference on City Planning, 1920. 79 pages. 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 
Surveys by T. Kimball: 

April, 1912; vol. 2, p. 111-126. 

April, 1913; vol. 3, p. 119-134. 

January, 1915; vol. 5, p. 75-104. 

January, 1918; vol. 8, p. 87-100. (Covering three years.) 

January, 1920; vol. 10, p. 80- 87. (Covering two years.) 

January, 1921; vol. 11, p. 90- 95. 

January, 1922; vol. 12, p. 112-116. 

January, 1923; vol. 13, p. 122-139. Reprinted. 

NATIONAL MUNICIPAL REVIEW 
Reviews by C. M. Robinson: 

January, 1913; vol. 2, p. 160-166. 

July, 1914; vol. 3, p. 538-547. 

July 1915; vol. 4, p. 383-397. 

July and October, 1916; vol. 5, p. 388-394 and 638-642. 

September, 1917; vol. 6, p. 598-604. 



Reviews by T. Kimball : 

November, 1918; vol. 7, p. 605-613. 
January, 1920; vol. 9, p. 21- 31. 
January, 1921 ; vol. 10, p. 39- 50. 
January, 1922; vol. 11, p. 27- 33. 
February, 1923; vol. 12, p. 77- 82. 



Reprinted. 
Reprinted. 
Reprinted. 
Reprinted in fuller form. 



26 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



TOWN PLANNING IN OTHER COUNTRIES 

THE forthcoming full catalogue of the International Town Planning Exhibition 
at Gothenburg, Sweden, 1923, is to contain a series of brief articles on town plan- 
ning work in each of the many countries to be represented. Reports from dele- 
gates at the meetings of the International Garden Cities and Town Planning 
Federation, often published in Garden Cities and Town Planning, and delegates' 
reports at the Interallied Town Planning Conference in Paris in 1919, etc., give 
the best available accounts of progress. 

The following notes, compiled from information at hand, are intended mainly 
to give the student an idea of organizations to get in touch with, magazines to 
read, and subjects of town planning interest in foreign countries. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

The British technical society in this field is the Town Planning Institute, founded 
in 1913, with its Secretary's office at Maxwell House (11 Arundel Street, Strand), 
London. Its Papers are published serially as separates and also made up into an 
annual volume. The Garden Cities and Town Planning Association (3 Gray's Inn 
Place, London) has published a monthly periodical since 1906 and conducted an 
active and effective campaign for the formation of garden suburbs and garden 
cities. The success of Letch worth, the first garden city, is now established. The 
National Housing and Town Planning Council (Henry R. Aldrich, Secretary, 
41 Russell Square, London), originally founded as The National Housing Reform 
Council, has been interested in immediate housing problems and legislative relief, 
especially by furthering the passage of the Housing, Town Planning, etc., Acts; 
and the Council has also conducted effective local educational campaigns. 

The Department of Civic Design at the University of Liverpool is a center for 
town planning study, and has published the Town Planning Review since 1910. 

In addition to Garden Cities and Town Planning and the Town Planning Re 
view, the periodicals to follow for city planning articles and news in Great Britain 
are the weekly Municipal Journal (London), the Journal of the Royal Institute 
of British Architects, and the monthly Journal of the London Society. 

The Housing, Town Planning, etc., Act passed in 1919, superseding the older 
act of 1909, makes town planning obligatory after a certain date deferred from 
1923. The Government exercises its authority over town planning and promotes 
the preparation of town planning schemes through the Ministry of Health. 
Mr. Raymond Unwin is the principal technical adviser to the Ministry in matters 
of town planning. 

Starting from the earlier proprietary villages like Port Sunlight and with the 
emphasis distinctly on social and economic aspects, town planning and site plan- 
ning have made rapid progress in Great Britain; and especially since the war 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 27 

problems are coming to be treated in regional and national terms. The problems 
of London and its region are of particular moment. To the American student of 
town planning going abroad, England has more to offer than any other country, 
both in current activities and in historic examples with suggestions of practical 
application in our own land. 

REFERENCES 

GARDEN CITIES AND TOWN PLANNING ASSOCIATION. Reports of annual meetings in 

Garden Cities and Town Planning. 
GREAT BRITAIN, MINISTRY OF HEALTH. Housing and town planning. Part II of Annual 

report. 1st, 1919-20; etc. 
See also references in Bibliography under subject number 6100, for London of the Future 

and other regional studies. 

FRANCE 

The Societe Frangaise des Urbanistes, formed in 1913, is the technical association 
corresponding to the Town Planning Institute, with its headquarters at the 
Muse*e Social (5, rue Las-Cases, Paris), which has long been actively interested in 
promoting town planning and maintaining collections on the subject. The 
French garden city association (I/ Association des Cites- Jardins), through its 
Secretary, M. Georges Benoit-Levy, has been issuing propaganda since 1904. 
During the war, the Renaissance des Cites (23, rue Louis le Grand, Paris), was 
formed (1916) to promote the adequate reconstruction of the destroyed towns. 
It did extensive educational work and assisted in the preparation of demonstra- 
tion plans, notably Rheims, Chauny, and Pinon. 

The French town planning act passed in 1919 in cognizance of urgent recon- 
struction problems requires cities and towns, with certain exceptions, to formu- 
late planning schemes. The Ministry of the Interior has general supervision of 
town planning matters, cooperating with the Ministry of the Liberated Regions 
for matters within the latter's province. 

The Ecole des Hautes Etudes Urbaines of the Institut d'Histoire, de Geogra- 
phic et d'Economie Urbaines (29, rue de SeVigne) is training men in problems of 
urbanisme and the same Institute promotes the Union des Villes et Communes de 
France and publishes La Vie Urbaine and its fortnightly supplement. At the 
same address, the Association Frangaise pour 1'Etude de TAmenagement et de 
P Extension des Villes has its headquarters. 

The Department of the Seine has an Office des Habitations d bon Marche (32, 
Quai des Celestins) responsible for building garden suburbs on the outskirts of 
Paris. 

From the historical point of view, the work of Haussman for Napoleon III in 
modernizing Paris to produce an effect of civic magnificence is most instructive, 
especially in comparison with the recent competition studies for greater Paiis, 
based on social and hygienic considerations. To the student of city planning, also, 
many of the smaller French cities, such as Lyons, Ntmes, Nancy, and Tours 



28 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

possess much of interest. The rebuilding of towns in the devastated regions and 
the development of the Paris suburbs are doubtless the most interesting current 
subjects for study. 

REFERENCES 

BENOIT-LEVY, GEORGES. Garden villages in France. Housing Betterment, June 1919, 
vol. 8, no. 2, p. 14-16. 

More recent news notes of garden suburbs in Housing Betterment, Jan. 1922. 
L'ENQUETE du Congres Interallte pour determiner la politique de 1'habitation et du plan 
d'ame'nagement et d'extension urbain et rural. La Vie Urbaine, Apr.-June 1921 ; vol. 3, 
p. 85-98. 

Status of France defined in answer to questionnaire on housing and town planning 
policy sent to members of 1920 Interallied Conference. 
JAUSSELY, LEON. Chronique de rurbanisme. La Vie Urbaine, Mar .-June 1919, vol. 1, 

p. 181-202. 

ROSENTHAL, LEON. L'urbanisme en France du XVII siecle a nos jours. La Cite (pub- 
lished in Brussels), Jan. 1921, vol. 2, no. 3, p. 63-68. 
See also references on French reconstruction in Bibliography under subject number 1293. 

BELGIUM 

There is a Socie*te des Urbanistes beiges with its headquarters at Brussels. 
Brussels is also the headquarters of FUnion Internationale des Villes, which 
brought about the Ghent town planning congress of 1913 and which has in- 
augurated an International Centre of Civic Documentation (see page 23). 
L'Union des Villes et Communes beige (rue de la Re*gence 3 bis, Brussels), corre- 
sponding to the French Union, has as director Senator Vinck, who, with MM. 
Louis van der Swaelmen and Paul Otlet, is largely responsible for the progress of 
town planning in Belgium. The Government is promoting reconstruction along 
town planning lines, through the various Ministries and Commissions concerned 
and riJnion des Villes. 

The two Belgian periodicals which regularly contain town planning news are : 
La Citt, published monthly in Brussels (Librairie Lamertin) since July 1919, 
and La Mouvement Communak, also monthly, established in January 1921, as 
the official organ of F Union des Villes. 

REFERENCES 

ABERCROMBIE, PATRICK. Brussels: a study in development and town planning. Town 
Planning Review, July and Oct. 1912, Jan. 1913; vol. 3, p. 97-113, 188-195, 258-272. 
illus., plans. 

CHILD, STEPHEN. Some impressions of a two months' visit in Belgium. Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Jan. 1921; vol. 11, p. 66-69. 

See also references in the Bibliography under subject numbers 0, 998, and 1293. 

GERMANY 

There is a Deutsche Akademie des Stadtebaues, a technical society, recently 
founded. The Deutsche Gartenstadt-Gesellschaft, active for many years, has 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 29 

been instrumental in founding a number of garden suburbs. The K. Technische 
Hochschule in Berlin has published an extensive series of papers comprising 
lectures and studies on current and historic phases of city planning (see Bibliog- 
raphy, subject number 180). The monthly periodical Der Stddtebau (published by 
Ernst Wasmuth A.G. in Berlin) carried through the war and still is the main 
source of information on contemporary German work. A considerable number 
of German books on city planning have been published since 1914, both new 
works and new editions of older works, including those of Dr. Stiibben and Dr. 
Brinckmann. The German garden city association has renewed its propaganda 
work and several interesting garden suburb schemes are now being built. 

The nineteenth century modernizing of Berlin is considered less instructive 
to students than the examples of mediaeval town planning to be seen in towns 
like Rothenburg. Again, Munich, Dresden, and Frankfurt have much to offer 
the student. The Rhine cities, and ports like Hamburg, are noted for the com- 
bination of commercial and recreational uses along the waterfront. Dusseldorf 
is often cited as an excellent example of the application of modern German town 
planning principles. The zoning system and land policies of the German cities 
and the history of city planning in Germany are given in several articles men- 
tioned in the Bibliography. 

REFERENCES 

CHILD, STEPHEN. Production, not reconstruction, the order of the day in Germany; 

housing and town planning notes of a visit in October 1921 . American City, May 1922 ; 

vol. 26, p. 437-441. illus. 
EBERSTADT, RUDOLPH. Town planning and housing in Germany. Garden Cities and 

Town Planning, Sept -Oct. 1922; vol. 12, p. 144-145. 
KOCH, HUGO. Recent park planning in German cities. Architectural Record, May 1922; 

vol. 51, p. 447-454. 



SELECTED REFERENCES ON TOWN PLANNING IN MANY 
PARTS OF THE WORLD 

AUSTRALASIA 

READE, CHARLES C. Planning and development of towns and cities in South Australia; 
report by the Government Town Planner. Adelaide, Govt. Printer, 1919. 
See reference in Bibliography under subject number 707. 

SULMAN, JOHN. An introduction to the study of town planning in Australia. Sydney, 
Govt. Printer of New South Wales. 256 pages, illus., plans, etc. 

WALLER, A. G. Town planning in New Zealand. Journal of the American Institute of 
Architects, Dec. 1918; vol. 6, p. 567-577. 

See also Australian and New Zealand Conference Proceedings in Bibliography under sub- 
ject number 40. 

AUSTRIA 

ABERCROMBIE, PATRICK. Vienna, as an example of city planning. Town Planning Re- 
view, Oct. 1910, Jan. 1911; vol. 1, p. 220-234, 279-293, and plates, illus., plans. 



30 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

CANADA 

ADAMS, THOMAS. The beginnings of town planning in Canada. In Proceedings of 8th 

National Conference on City Planning, 1916, p. 222-230. 
. Town and regional planning in relation to industrial growth in Canada. Journal of 

Town Planning Institute of Canada, June-Aug. 1921; vol. 1, nos. 4^5, p. 9-15. 
The HOUSING and town planning work of the Commission of Conservation. Ibid. , Feb. 1, 

1921; vol. 1, no. 2, p. 2-4. 
News of the activities of such Provincial organizations as the Ontario Town Planning 

Association has been given in the publications of the Commission of Conservation and 

lately in the Journal of the Town Planning Institute. 
See also references in Bibliography under subject numbers 2, 40, 961, 1522. 

CHINA 

CHINESE cities making themselves modern. Canton has had to handle some unusual 
problems in making its narrow alleys into broad streets. Trans-Pacific, Mar. 1922; 
vol. 6, no. 3, p. 51-55. illus. 

CZECHO-SLOVAKIA 

[PROPAGANDA of garden cities in Czecho-Slovakia, a letter from Professor Fabinger, 
Secretary of Czecho-Slovak Garden Cities Association.] Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning, Jan. 1923; vol. 13, p. 13-14. 

STYL. [Monthly review published by the Association of Architects, Prague.] 

DENMARK 

There are several official departments in Copenhagen interested in town planning, and 
several architects and engineers, including the Afdelingsingenjor A. Bjerre at the 
City Hall. For description of the Danish town planning laboratory, see reference in 
Bibliography under subject nujmber 998. 

EGYPT 

McLEAN, W. H. Local government and town development in Egypt. Town Planning 
Review, Apr. 1917; vol. 7, p. 83-97, and plates. 

By the author of the Alexandria town planning report. 

FEDERATED MALAY STATES 

READE, CHARLES C. Town planning and development in the Federated Malay States. 

Preliminary report by the Government Town Planner. F. M. S. Govt. Press, 1922. 

30 pages. 
. Town planning in British Malaya. Garden Cities and Town Planning, Jan. 1922; 

vol. 12, p. 6-8. illus. 

GREECE 

LHERITER, MICHEL. La nouvelle Athenes: e*tude d'urbanisme. La Vie Urbaine, Oct. 15, 

1921 ; vol. 3, p. 309-345. ilius., plans. 
MAWSON, THOMAS H. The re-planning of Athens. Garden Cities and Town Planning, 

Aug. 1916; vol. 6, p. 107-112. 
By the author of the Plan. 
MAWSON, JOHN W. The Salonika town planning act. Town Planning Review, Dec. 1921 ; 

vol. 9, p. 147-154. plans. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 31 

HOLLAND 

BERLAGE, H. P. Amsterdam, past and present. Garden Cities and Town Planning, Jan. 
1922; vol. 12, p. 3-6. plans. 

FOCKEMA-ANDREAE (Burgomaster of Utrecht). De hedendaagsche Stedenbouw. See 
reference in Bibliography under subject number 250. 

NEDERLANDSCH INSTITUUT VOOR VOLKSHUISVESTING (D. Hudig, Secretary-Director, 
Amsterdam) publishes a monthly illustrated periodical Tijdschrift voor Volkshuisvesting, 
is initiating a Serie voor Stedenbouw, and has a city planning committee. The Institute's 
1921 annual report gives a list of societies and individuals constituting its membership. 

At the Hague, there is a DIENST DER STADTSONTWIKKELING EN VOLKSHUISVESTING. 

INDIA 

GEDDES, PATRICK. [Reports for Madras towns, 1914-15, Indore, 1920, etc.] 

LANCHESTER, HENRY VAUGHAN. Town planning in Southern India. In Town Planning 
Institute, London, Papers and discussions, 1916-17; vol. 3, p. 89-115. 

MIRAMS, A. E. Town planning in Bombay under the Bombay Town Planning Act, 1915. 
Ibid., 1919-20; vol. 6, p. 43-56. diagrams. 

RICHARDS, E. P. [Report for Calcutta Improvement Trust on Calcutta and contiguous 
areas, 1917.] 

IRELAND 

CORK HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS. Complete report and comprehensive plan for devel- 
opment of Cork Harbour, by George F. Nicholson, consulting engineer. 1922. 

For plan of Dublin, see reference in Bibliography under subject number 880. 

ITALY 

ADSHEAD, STANLEY D. An introduction to the planning of modern Italian towns. Town 

Planning Review, Apr. 1912; vol. 3, p. 52-54. illus., plans. 
CATTANEO (Awocat). Housing and town planning in Italy. Garden Cities and Town 

Planning, July 1914; N. s. vol. 4, p. 172-174. 
SANJUST DI TEULADA, EDMONDO. Piano regolatore della citta di Roma. 1908. 

JAPAN 
GULICK, LUTHER. City planning in the Flowery Kingdom. American City, Apr. 1921 ; 

vol. 24, p. 429. 
GOTO, BARON S. Greater Tokyo plan for 7,000,000 population. Improvement program. 

Trans-Pacific, Dec. 1921; vol. 5, p. 45-54. illus., plan. 
UCHIDA, K. Awakening interest in a better Tokyo. City planning association active. 

Ibid., p. 55-58. illus. 

In addition to the Japanese national city planning bureau in the Department of Home 
Affairs there are municipal city planning bureaus in Kioto, Kobe, Nagoya, Osaka, 
Tokyo, and Yokohama. 

LATIN AMERICA 

AMERICAN CITY magazine published a series of illustrated articles featuring city planning 
and municipal improvements in Latin America: Jan. 1915, on Chile, by John E. 
Lothrop; and Jan.-Dec. 1918, on eight leading cities of South America and on Mexico 
City, through the courtesy of the Pan-American Union. 

See also reference in Bibliography under subject number 880 for Montevideo 
competition plans. 

GASTON, PEDRO PABLO. El nuevo piano de la Habaiia. Revista de la Sociedad Cubana de 
Ingenieros, June 1918; vol. 10, p. 331-357. plan. 



32 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

REVISTA MUNICIPAL, edited by Dr. F. Carrera Justiz, published fortnightly in Havana, 
carries news of city planning in Latin America and other parts of the world. 
See also reference in Bibliography under subject number 998. 

NORWAY 

GIERLOFF, CHRISTIAN. The garden city movement in Norway. Garden Cities and Town 
Planning, Oct. 1921; vol. 11 p. 237-238. illus. 

Also previous article by the same author (Secretary of the Norwegian Housing and 
Town Planning Association), Ibid., Mar. 1920. 

PALESTINE 

ASHBEE, C. R. [Report on Jerusalem, 1918-1920.] Published in London by Murray, 

1921. 
GEDDES, PATRICK. The city of Jerusalem. Garden Cities and Town Planning, Nov. 1921 ; 

vol. 11, p. 251-254. illus., plan. 

PORTUGAL 

PARKER, BARRY. Oporto. Town Planning Review, Oct. 1916; vol. 7, p. 28-40, and plates. 
Reviews his Report on Oporto, with plan for remodelling the central area. 

ROUMANIA 

BUCAREST. A new modern city in the making. American City, May 1911 ; vol. 4, p. 219- 
223. illus., plan. 

RUSSIA 

GROER, ETIENNE DE. De Turbanisme en Russie. La Vie Urbaine, Dec. 15, 1921 ; vol. 3, 
p. 417-425. maps. Also translated in Garden Cities and Town Planning, July-Aug. 
1922. 

Brief historical sketch and outline of modern city planning in Russia to 1920, with 
bibliography. 

GUELMAN, J. Garden cities for Russia. Garden Cities and Town Planning, Feb. 1923; 
vol. 13, p. 21-24. 

SPAIN 

BARCELONA, AYUNTAMIENTO. Reforma interior de Barcelona. [Report, 1907.] 

LA SOCIEDAD CIVICA DE LA CiUDAD JARDIN, Barcelona, began in 1920 a tri-monthly 

bulletin Civitas. 

MADRID'S scheme of city planning. American Architect, Aug. 11, 1920; vol. 118, p. 173. 
See also reference on La Ciudad Lineal in Bibliography under subject number 5550. 

SWEDEN 

SWEDEN. [Report of Royal Committee.] Betankande med forslag till stadsplanelag och 
forfattingar. Stockholm, Govt. Printer, 1920. 379 pages, illus., plans. 
Contains proposals for city planning and housing. 

The Kungliga Byggnadstryelsen, in Stockholm, and the Stockholms Stads Byggnad- 
skontor (Stadsplanebyran) are both active in promoting city planning. 

The Stadtsingenjor of Gothenburg, A. Lilienberg, has been active in bringing about the 
International Town Planning Exhibition there in the summer of 1923 (see ante). 

See also reference in Bibliography under subject number 230, and analysis of Swedish 
Town Planning law in Mr. Williams's book (700). 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 33 



SUGGESTIONS ON CONDUCTING PUBLICITY CAMPAIGNS 
FOR CITY PLANNING AND ZONING 

Prepared in response to numerous requests for information on this subject. Rewritten 
from article by the author in Landscape Architecture, Quarterly, July 1922. For a list 
of references on educational campaigns, see p. 70, of this Manual. 

WHOM TO REACH 

To attract the attention and arouse the interest of every voter, man and 
woman, in the community, and to convince them of the value of city planning 
so that they will vote for and not against it when the issue comes up, is the object 
of an educational campaign for city planning. No group of citizens and no section 
of the locality should be overlooked; nor must non-resident property owners, 
whose opposition might be a disturbing element, be forgotten. Citizens and tax 
payers alike have something to gain from the adoption of a comprehensive city 
plan, and of zoning regulations, and every one of them, however obscure or 
modest, is worth reaching. 

When those who have organized to conduct the publicity campaign have 
secured the aid of their local newspapers, have enlisted the support of the civic 
and social clubs in the community, have convinced the Chamber of Commerce 
and other business organizations, and have lined up the municipal officials, 
have in short done everything they can think of to reach the voters,, they still 
have an additional opportunity in educating the boys and girls who are the voters- 
to-be. Moreover, there may be some other stone left unturned which will prove a 
new and original rallying point. 

SECURING NEWSPAPER AID 

The first step in a publicity campaign is to make the editors of the local news- 
papers realize not only that city planning and zoning are good things but that the 
subjects have news value. When they understand that more than a hundred com- 
munities in the United States have already adopted zoning and that all the large 
cities have zoning plans in progress, they will see that there must be something in 
it. The fact that their city is behind other cities and is losing advantages which 
others have gained, lends itself to write-ups and editorial comment. If space can 
be secured for a series of special articles and for pithy paragraphs on the editorial 
page in some given column, this will be a valuable addition to the ordinary news 
items of local meetings and lectures which occur in the course of the publicity 
campaign. Without the continued aid of the newspapers, there is no hope of 
reaching the great mass of citizens. With newspaper support, the photographs, 
cartoons, and telling arguments, furnished or inspired by the leaders of the cam- 



34 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

paign, will be seen and gradually absorbed by those who would not read a pam- 
phlet on city planning or zoning alone, but who must vote for the plan if it is to 
succeed. 

ENLISTING SUPPORT OF LOCAL CLUBS 

When the newspapers have agreed to give space to the campaign, there should be 
a thorough stock taking of local clubs which have been accustomed to promote 
civic improvement and the doings of which are followed with interest by many 
who are not active participants. The City Club, The Women's Clubs, Civic Im- 
provement Associations of various sorts, Neighborhood Clubs, Junior Leagues, 
Art Associations, Commercial Clubs, may all be willing to add a speaker to their 
programs and to appoint a representative to serve on a general citizens' advisory 
committee to aid in the promotion of city planning and zoning. 

ENROLLING BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS 

The backbone of such an advisory committee may well be composed of repre- 
sentatives from the Chamber of Commerce and other business organizations of 
the community, especially the local real estate board. There is no group of men in 
a town more intimately concerned with the problems which city planning helps to 
solve than the realtors. There is a talking point when the local board realizes that 
the National Association of Real Estate Boards through its President and other 
officials has gone on record as believing in and desiring to promote zoning and 
city planning. 

Chambers of Commerce throughout the country have proven themselves will- 
ing and generous agents in forwarding civic improvement. The officers and ap- 
propriate committees of the Chamber of Commerce, or Board of Trade, should be 
thoroughly informed of the nature and value of city planning, so that an official 
endorsement by the Chamber may attract the support of lesser business organiza- 
tions and doubting citizens who measure the worth of a cause by its financial 
backing. It is often the case that a group from the Chamber of Commerce is the 
active force in initiating the publicity campaign. 

CONVINCING MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS 

The close cooperation of local municipal authorities should be secured at the very 
outset of the campaign. If the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, or Common Coun- 
cil, or Board of Selectmen, and the various Boards of Commissioners, Building 
Department, Street Department, Public Works Department, Park Department, 
and so on, can be made to see early in the game substantial advantages gained in 
other cities by planning, a tremendous amount of time may be saved. A hostile 
administration may postpone the approval of a comprehensive plan or the pas- 
sage of a zoning ordinance until the next election, when, however, it may become 
a successful issue, backed by the educated force of public opinion. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 35 

As soon as the Mayor or Board of Aldermen is convinced, an official city plan 
commission should be appointed to begin the study of a comprehensive plan, 
taking advantage of any work towards this end already undertaken by some 
existing board or committee. It is not well to appoint a special zoning commis- 
sion without a plan commission, for it should not be forgotten by the municipal 
officials that zoning is only a part of the general city planning program and that 
it is of little value unless related to other studies being made for the orderly de- 
velopment of the municipality as a whole. 

EDUCATING FUTURE CITIZENS 

Allies not only to support the plan in the future but also to interest parents and 
friends in its adoption may be gained through talks in the public schools. Group 
meetings for teachers are needed so that they may understand what city planning 
is and does, before they teach its advantages to their pupils. If prizes are offered 
for the best essays on " What a Plan will do for Our Town," the questions asked 
by the children of parents and relatives will often stimulate interest in the subject 
in quarters not reached in any other way. In many cities city planning is coming 
to be taught regularly as a part of elementary and high school courses in civics, 
and some of the general textbooks on civics now carry a chapter on the subject. 

FOLLOW-UP WORK 

A publicity campaign for city planning is not finished when the municipality has 
pledged itself to a plan program, for instance, in the case of zoning, when hear- 
ings are being successfully conducted, and even when the ordinance has actually 
been passed. The first two years of zoning in operation are critical ones and the 
essential integrity of the zoning plan depends on a continuing educational cam- 
paign until such time as its benefits can speak for themselves. Popular opinion 
must be thoroughly roused against selfish proposals for changes in the plan. Real 
instances of tangible advantages arising from the passage of the zoning ordinance 
should be described in the newspapers, so that those who have voted for the 
ordinance may feel confirmed in the wisdom of their action, and that doubting 
Thomases may be converted by what they can see before their very eyes. So, too, 
in the case of the official street plan constant watchfulness is necessary to prevent 
individual owners from securing subversive exceptions. In each case having by 
the original campaign attracted attention, convinced of value and "made the 
sale," the leaders of the movement can by suitable publicity keep their customers 
satisfied with their purchases and prevent unnecessary exchanges and alterations. 

SUCCESSFUL PUBLICITY METHODS IN ZONING CAMPAIGNS 

In a community there may be already well established methods of conducting a 
publicity campaign. Certain points of attack may have proved more favorable 
than others. A list of all the methods which have been used successfully in zoning 



36 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

and city planning campaigns in various cities in the United States comprises prac- 
tically all the means and methods used in many other kinds of educational cam- 
paigns. 

The publicity in the newspapers has included daily "feature" columns, dis- 
play articles in "magazine" sections, special supplements, letters to the editor, 
official advertisements of hearings, advertisements inserted as part of the cam- 
paign, and, of course, editorials and news items. 

Official organs of local bodies, chambers of commerce or citizens' commit- 
tees, have given regular space and special numbers to city planning and zon- 
ing, and periodicals with wide local circulation have run articles and features. 

Special pamphlets and reports have been issued at various stages in the game 
and these have been backed up by widely circulated bulletins, flyers, even post- 
card notices, besides posters and window displays. 

In all printed matter the use of photographs and cartoons has proved effective. 
In fact the general principles of modern advertising should be applied to all ma- 
terial prepared for use in the city planning campaign. 

Lectures, conferences, meetings, and discussions, in many cases illustrated by 
lantern slides or moving pictures, reach some people averse to reading printed 
matter, and bring out and drive home points which need to be emphasized. Ad- 
dresses by speakers from other cities where city planning or zoning has proved its 
value and by local officials who have become convinced, debates or readings of 
prize essays, all have their place in a live campaign. Fuel for publicity may often 
be found in discussion at the numerous public hearings held during the later stages 
of the preparation of the zoning plan. 

Talks to children in the public schools, as already suggested, field work by 
children in finding examples in various neighborhoods where zoning is needed, or 
in listing streets where congestion is evident, lectures to parent-teacher associa- 
tions, and so on, have all been successfully employed in several cities. 

An exhibition of photographs and drawings showing conditions in the town, 
the repetition of which will be prevented by zoning, would be an effective feature 
in the campaign. "Know your town" exhibits have proven valuable in several 
instances and city planning takes its place with other features of such a civic 
exhibition. 

When a lot of people are working for a common cause, they come to believe 
thoroughly in it, and the more people who work, the more centers of support. 
Those publicity methods which make the greatest number of people feel that they 
are helping to secure city planning are the best methods for any given com- 
munity. 

HOW TO GET HELP 

The Civic Development Department of the Chamber of Commerce of the 
United States (Mills Bldg., Washington, D. C.) aids in promoting city planning 
and zoning, its work being carried on chiefly through local chambers of commerce 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 37 

which are members of the national chamber; and the Office of the Secretary of 
the American Civic Association (Union Trust Bldg., Washington, D. C.) is a 
source of general information on campaigns for civic improvement. 

The Library of the School of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University 
has been making a special collection of information on city planning and zoning 
publicity campaigns in cities of the United States, and this information has been 
used in the preparation of the present article. 

The Division of Building and Housing of the Department of Commerce, 
Washington, D. C., is collecting information from cities in different parts of the 
country where publicity campaigns have been conducted and where zoning is now 
in operation. Secretary Hoover's Advisory Committee on Zoning has prepared 
for the Division of Building and Housing a Zoning Primer explaining the nature 
and advantages of zoning, which is an excellent example of an educational pam- 
phlet and has been given large publicity in newspapers and magazines. 

Nearly all the organizations listed on p. 17 are leading in promoting phases of 
city planning most closely allied to their respective fields. 

The office of the Secretary of the National Conference on City Planning, 130 
East 22d Street, New York, constantly aids in furthering educational work in 
city planning and keeps in touch with movements throughout the country. 



y 
38 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



LANTERN SLIDES AND FILMS ON CITY PLANNING 

SUBJECTS 

THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ARTS (Miss Leila Mechlin, Secretary, 1741 New 
York Ave., Washington, D. C.) has, in addition to a travelling exhibition on city 
planning, two lectures on Civic Art, with lantern slides. The Federation circular 
describes these as follows : 

401. Civic ART: A. By Leila Mechlin, Editor, American Magazine of A rt. A review 
of the best that has been done in city building in this country with reference to work 
of similar character abroad. What city planning means and how it embraces archi- 
tecture, landscape architecture, sculpture, down to design of minor features such as 
lamp posts, pumps, trolley poles, etc., etc. A lecture purposed to arouse interest in 
town planning. 57 illustrations. 

402. Civic ART: B. By Leila Mechlin, Editor, American Magazine of Art. Differs 
from A in being confined entirely to examples in the United States buildings, 
monuments, sculpture, parks, water-fronts, works of special worth and significance 
illustrating the most successful accomplishments, with brief comment. Originally 
prepared for use in Camps of the United States and French armies in France. 

60 illustrations. 

To obtain a lecture and the slides, application should be made to the Secretary 
of the Federation, with payment of an advance rental fee of $5.00. Transporta- 
tion charges both ways should later be paid. 

THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CITY PLANNING also expects to undertake 
the circulation of three or four sets of slides on city planning at a nominal charge. 

THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL (8 Arlington St., Boston) Readers' Service has offered 
lantern slides on "The Town Beautiful" for a rental fee. 

THE COMMITTEE ON PLAN OF NEW YORK AND ITS ENVIRONS (130 East 22d St., 
New York) has several sets of lantern slides which will be loaned in the New York 
region on payment of a small fee. 

THE BUFFALO City Planning Association has excellent sets of slides for local 
loaning purposes, and similarly the CHICAGO Plan Commission, BOSTON Plan- 
ning Board, CLEVELAND City Plan Commission, and PITTSBURGH Citizens Com- 
mittee on City Plan have notable lantern slide collections. 

THE CHICAGO PLAN COMMISSION prepared and used a moving-picture film 
entitled "A Tale of One City" which received widespread attention. The Ameri- 
can City Bureau inaugurated in 1922 a Civic FILM SERVICE, Inc. (443 Fourth 
Ave., New York), starting with a zoning film called " Growing Pains." This film 
has met with marked success. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 39 

In England, THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH had a housing film prepared, to show 
the garden suburb type of development. Films of the British war housing de- 
velopments were shown in Canada and the United States to accompany lectures 
by Mr. Thomas Adams. 

The British center for town planning lantern slides for loan or purchase is the 
office of THE GARDEN CITIES AND TOWN PLANNING ASSOCIATION (3 Gray's Inn 
Place, London). In connection with its propaganda work it has assembled a 
large collection on garden cities and suburbs, and on many special phases of 
town planning. 



40 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



TWENTY-FIVE REFERENCES FOR A CITY PLANNING 

LIBRARY 

ADAMS, THOMAS. Modern city planning, its meaning and methods. Special number of 
National Municipal Review, June 1922, vol. 11, pp. 157-177. plans. (Technical 
Pamphlet Series.) 

A convenient summary. 

BASSETT, EDWARD M. Zoning. [26 pages.] (National Municipal. League, Technical Pam- 
phlet Series no. 5, 1922.) 

The authoritative brief treatise on the subject. 

BIRD, CHARLES S., Editor. Town planning for small communities, by Walpole (Mass.) 
Town Planning Committee. New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1917. 492 pages, illus., 
plans. (National Municipal League Series.) 

COMEY, ARTHUR C. Regional planning theory, a reply to the British challenge. Cam- 
bridge, 1923. 18 pages, diagrams (part colored). 

An up-to-date exposition of the English garden city theory, the challenge referred 
to by Mr. Comey, will be found in Town Theory and Practice, edited by C. B. 
Purdom. London, Benn Bros., Ltd., 1921. 139 pages, illus. 

KNOWLES, MORRIS. Industrial housing, with discussion of accompanying activities; such 
as town planning, street systems, development of utility services, and related engineer- 
ing and construction features. New York, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1920. 408 pages, 
illus., plans. 

KIMBALL, THEODORA, Editor. Municipal accomplishment in city planning and published 
city plan reports in the United States, from information assembled largely by the De- 
troit City Plan Commission. Published under the auspices of the National Conference 
on City Planning, Boston, 1920. 79 pages. 

. Manual of information on city planning and zoning, including references on re- 
gional, rural, and national planning. Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1923. 
(Issued under the auspices of the National Conference on City Planning.) 188 pages. 

LEWIS, NELSON P. The planning of the modern city, a review of the principles governing 
city planning. With the assistance of Harold M. Lewis. 2d edition, revised. New York, 
John Wiley & Sons, 1923. 457 pages, illus., plans, diagrams. First published 1916. 

Contains carefully verified information on American and foreign city planning 

practice. 

MOODY, WALTER D. What of the city? America's greatest issue city planning, what it 
is and how to go about it to achieve success. Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co., 1919. 
441 pages, illus., plans. 

On the promotion of city planning with especial reference to the experience of 

Chicago. 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CITY PLANNING. Proceedings, published by the Conference 
(130 East 22d St., New York City), 1910 to date. Some volumes contain illus. 

A valuable file of general and technical papers by representatives of the various pro- 
fessions engaged in city planning work, including engineers, landscape architects, 
architects, lawyers, realtors, social economists and municipal officials. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 41 

NICHOLS, J. C. Real estate subdivisions, the best manner of handling them. 2d edition. 
Washington, American Civic Association, 1916. 15 pages. (Department of City Mak- 
ing, Series II, no. 5.) First published Nov. 1912. 

NOLEN, JOHN, Editor. City planning; a series of papers (by seventeen specialists) present- 
ing the essential elements of a city plan. New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1916. 447 
pages, illus., plans. (National Municipal League Series.) 

. New ideals in the planning of cities, towns and villages. New York, American City 

Bureau, 1919. 138 pages, illus. 

A short, popular and readable book. 

PLAN OF NEW YORK AND ITS ENVIRONS, Russell Sage Foundation. The meeting of May 
10, 1922. [25 pages.] 

Of great importance as a demonstration of regional planning ideals and technique. 
Contains addresses in behalf of planning, by Herbert Hoover, Elihu Root, and 
others. The organization for preparing comprehensive surveys and plans is more 
fully outlined in the Report of Progress, Plan of New York, May 1922-February 
1923. 67 pages. 

PRAY, JAMES STURGIS, and THEODORA KIMBALL. City planning; a comprehensive anal- 
ysis of the subject arranged for the classification of books, plans, photographs, notes 
and other collected material, with alphabetic subject index. Cambridge, Harvard 
University Press, 1913. 103 pages. (Used for the arrangement of the bibliography 
in this present Manual.) 

ROBINSON, CHARLES MULFORD. City planning, with special reference to the planning of 
streets and lots. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1916. 344 pages, photos, plans. 
Of especial importance in relation to the platting of residential districts. 

. The improvement of towns and cities or the practical basis of civic aesthetics, 5th 

revised edition. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1922. 313 pages. First published 
1901. 

. Modern civic art or the city made beautiful, 4th edition. New York, G. P. Put- 
nam's Sons, 1918. 381 pages, illus. First published 1903. 
An interpretation of civic ideals. 

SHURTLEFF, FLAVEL, and FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. Carrying out the city plan, the prac- 
tical application of American law in the execution of city plans. New York, Survey 
Associates, 1914. 349 pages. (Russell Sage Foundation.) 

Should be supplemented by F. B. Williams's Law of City Planning and Zoning. 

TAYLOR, GRAHAM ROMEYN. Satellite cities, a study of industrial suburbs. New York, D. 
Appleton & Co., 1915. 333 pages, illus., plans. (National Municipal League Series.) 

U. S. BUREAU OF INDUSTRIAL HOUSING AND TRANSPORTATION. Report of the United 
States Housing Corporation. Washington, Government Printing Office, 1919-20. 
2 vols. illus., plans. 

Vol. I (1920), edited by James Ford: Organization, policies, transactions. 391 
pages. Vol. II (1919),"edited by Henry V. Hubbard: Houses, site-planning, utili- 
ties. 524 pages. A valuable compendium of technical methods, fully illustrated. 

UNWIN, RAYMOND. Town planning in practice; an introduction to the art of designing 
cities and suburbs. London, T. F. Unwin, 6th impression, 1919. 416 pages, illus., 
plans. First published 1909. 

The standard British work on the subject. 



42 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

WACKER'S manual of the plan of Chicago; municipal economy. Especially prepared for 
study in the schools of Chicago, Auspices of the Chicago Plan Commission, by Walter 
D. Moody. 2d edition, 1916. 137 pages, illus., plans. First published 1912. 

WAUGH, FRANK A. Rural improvement; the principles of civic art applied to rural con- 
ditions, including village improvement and the betterment of the open country. New 
York, Orange Judd Co., 1914. 265 pages, illus. 

WILLIAMS, FRANK B. The law of city planning and zoning. New York, The Macmillan 
Co., 1922. 738 pages. (The Citizen's Library of Economics, Politics and Sociology 
New Series, edited by R. T. Ely.) 

The authoritative comprehensive work. A brief summary was published as Tech- 
nical Pamphlet Series no. 8 of the National Municipal League, 1922. 

The following books which are out of print would be particularly useful additions to the city 
planning "library." 

ADAMS, THOMAS. Rural planning and development, a study of rural conditions and prob- 
lems in Canada. Ottawa, Commission of Conservation, Canada, 1917. illus., plans. 

KURD, RICHARD M. Principles of city land values. New York, Published by The Record 
and Guide, 1903. 159 pages, illus., plans. (All impressions, including latest, 1911, 
now out of print.) 

The following large and expensive folios contain many interesting illustrations. 

HEGEMANN, WERNER, and ELBERT PEETS. The American Vitruvius: an architects' 
handbook of civic art. New York, The Architectural Book Publishing Co., 1922. 298 
pages, illus., plans. 

MAWSON, THOMAS H. Civic art; studies in town planning, parks, boulevards and open 
spaces. London, B. T. Batsford, 1911. 375 pages, illus., plans. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 43 



SHORT LIST OF TYPICAL AMERICAN CITY PLAN REPORTS 

THE reports in this list have been selected to represent the various types of 
American city plan publications comprehensive or on some special problem 
of city planning, prepared by a group of consultants or by a single specialist, 
proposals or records of accomplishment, notable as exemplifying general prin- 
ciples of city planning or as a collection of highly specialized illustrations or sta- 
tistics useful to other municipalities facing similar special problems. In the period 
of more than two decades covered by the list, there has been a marked develop- 
ment of technique in the presentation of city plan reports, which may be readily 
gathered by the student through examination and comparison of the almost 
forty reports here mentioned, and also of some of those not mentioned, equally 
worthy of study, out of the very large number of plan reports already published 
in the United States. 

1902 U. S. CONGRESS. SENATE COMMITTEE ON THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. The im- 
provement of the park system of the District of Columbia. I. Report of the 
Senate Committee on the District of Columbia. II. Report of the Park Com- 
mission. Edited by Charles Moore. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 1902. 
179 pages, illus., plates, maps (folded), plans. (57th Congress. 1st Session. 
Senate Report no. 166.) 

1909 COMMERCIAL CLUB OF CHICAGO. Plan of Chicago prepared during the years 

MCMVI, MCMVII, and MCMVIII, by Daniel H. Burnham and Edward H. 
Bennett, architects; edited by Charles Moore. Chicago, 1909. 164 pages, 
illus., plates (part folded), plans, maps, diagrams. Many of the illustrations 
are colored renderings by Jules Gue*rin. 

MASSACHUSETTS. METROPOLITAN IMPROVEMENTS COMMISSION. Public improve- 
ments for the Metropolitan District. Report of the Commission on Metropolitan 
Improvements appointed under Resolves of 1907, chapter 108, to consider the 
sujbject. Boston, State Printers, 1909. 318 pages, plates, maps, and diagrams 
(part folded). 

1910 OLMSTED, FREDERICK LAW. The improvement of Boulder, Colorado. Report to 

the City Improvement Association, March 1910. 106 pages. 
NEW HAVEN Civic IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE. Report of the New Haven Civic 
Improvement Commission, Cass Gilbert, architect, Frederick Law Olmsted, 
landscape architect, to the New Haven Civic Improvement Committee, Dec. 
1910. New Haven, Printed by the Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company. 
138 pages, illus., plans, tables, diagrams. 

1911 OLMSTED, FREDERICK LAW. Pittsburgh main thoroughfares and the downtown 

district; improvements necessary to meet the city's present and future needs. 
Prepared under the direction of the Committee on City Planning. Adopted 
by the Commission, Dec. 1910. Published, 1911. 169 pages, illus., maps 
(1 folded), plan. 



44 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

1911 ROBINSON, CHARLES MULFORD. Better Binghamton; a report to the Mercantile 
cont. Press Club of Binghamton, N. Y., Sept. 1911. Cleveland, O., Printed by the 
J. B. Savage Co., 1911. 105 pages, illus., plates, folded map. 

KESSLER, GEORGE E. A city plan for Dallas. Report of Park Board. [Dallas, 
Printed by the Southwestern Co., 1911.] 58 pages, illus., plates, plans (part 
folded). 

SEATTLE MUNICIPAL PLANS COMMISSION. Plan of Seattle. Report of the Munic- 
ipal Plans Commission, submitting report of Virgil G. Bogue, engineer, 1911. 
Seattle, Lowman & Hanford Co., [1911]. 191 pages, plates, plans, diagrams, 
folded maps (in pocket). 

1913 GOODRICH, E. P., and GEORGE B. FORD. Housing report to the City Plan Com- 

mission of Newark, N. J. Report made for Mr. Goodrich and Mr. Ford by 
Dr. James Ford. Newark, 1913. 75 pages, plates, maps, tables. 

ARNOLD, BION J. Report on the improvement and development of the transporta- 
tion facilities of San Francisco. Submitted to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors. San Francisco, [The Hicks-Judd Co.], 1913. 475 pages, illus., 
plates (including maps, plans, diagrams), tables. 

NEW YORK (CITY) HEIGHTS OF BUILDINGS COMMISSION. Report to the Com- 
mittee on the height, size and arrangement of buildings of the Board of Esti- 
mate and Apportionment of the City of New York. Dec. 23, 1913. 295 pages, 
illus. 

1914 BRUNNER, ARNOLD W., and CHARLES DOWNING LAY. Studies for Albany. [New 

York, Bartlett-Orr Press], 1914. 101 pages, illus., plans (3 folded, 1 colored). 

NEW YORK (CITY) BOARD OF ESTIMATE AND APPORTIONMENT. Development and 
present status of city planning in New York City. Being the report of the Com- 
mittee on the City Plan, Dec. 31, 1914, together with papers presented at a meet- 
ing of the Advisory Commission on City Plan, Dec. 17, 1914. New York, The 
Board, 1914. 76 pages, illus., map, plans (folded). 

1915 CHICAGO ASSOCIATION OF COMMERCE. Smoke abatement and electrification of 

railway terminals in Chicago. Report of the Chicago Association of Commerce, 
Committee on smoke abatement and electrification of railway terminals. Chi- 
cago, [Rand, McNally & Co.], 1915. 1177 pages, illus., plans, plates, diagrams 
(part folded, part colored). 

OLMSTED BROTHERS. Report on a proposed parkway system for Essex County, 
N. J. Brookline, Mass., June 4, 1915. 84 pages, map. 

1917 MINNEAPOLIS Civic COMMISSION. Plan of Minneapolis, prepared by Edward H. 
Bennett, architect; edited and written by Andrew Wright Crawford, Esq. 
Minneapolis, The Commission, 1917. 227 pages, illus., maps, plates and plans 
(part colored, part folded). 

NEW YORK (CITY) COMMISSION ON BUILDING DISTRICTS AND RESTRICTIONS. Final 
(comprehensive) report, June 2, 1916. New York, Board of Estimate and Ap- 
portionment Committee on the City Plan, 1917. 299 pages, illus., maps (part 
folded), plans. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 45 

ST. Louis CITY PLAN COMMISSION. Problems of St. Louis, being a description, 
from the city planning standpoint, of past and present tendencies of growth, with 
general suggestions for impending issues and necessary future improvements. 
St. Louis, Mo., Nixon-Jones Printing Co., 1917. 140 pages, illus., plans (1 
folded) . Harland Bartholomew, city plan engineer. 

This report was followed by a notable series of detailed studies, each published 
in a separate report, on major streets, recreation, zoning, public building 
group, housing, transit, and terminals. 

1919 NOLEN, JOHN. City plan for Akron, prepared for Chamber of Commerce. [Cam- 

bridge, The University Press], 1919. 91 pages, illus., plans (part folded), dia- 
grams. 

Contains legal summary published in full in pamphlet by F. B. Williams en- 
titled "Akron and its planning law." 

MANNING, WARREN H. City plan of Birmingham. Published by subscription, 
Birmingham, Ala., 1919. 47 pages, illus. , maps, plans, and charts (part folded) . 

FAIRMOUNT PARK ART ASSOCIATION. The Fairmount Parkway; a pictorial record 
of development from its first incorporation in the city plan in 1904 to the com- 
pletion of the main drive from City Hall to Fairmount Park in 1919. Phila- 
delphia, Fairmount Park Art Association, 1919. [30 pages.] illus., plans, sec- 
tions. 

1920 HAYNES, ROWLAND, and STANLEY P. DAVIES. Public provision for recreation. 

Cleveland, Cleveland Foundation Committee, 1920. 198 pages, illus., maps, 
tables. (Cleveland Recreation Survey.) 

NOLEN, JOHN, and BION J. ARNOLD. The city plan of Flint, Michigan, as ap- 
proved by the City Planning Board and accepted by the Common Council. 
Flint, Published by the City Planning Board, 1920. 95 pages, illus., maps 
(folded), plans, diagrams. 

CALIFORNIA RAILROAD COMMISSION. ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. Report on rail- 
road grade crossing elimination and passenger and freight terminals in Los 
Angeles. Los Angeles, 1920. 587 pages, illus., maps and diagrams (part folded 
and part colored). Richard Sachse, chief engineer. 

MILWAUKEE BOARD OF PUBLIC LAND COMMISSIONERS. Zoning for Milwaukee. 
Tentative report of Board of Public Land Commissioners, June 1920. 56 pages, 
illus., maps, plan (folded). Arthur C. Comey, consultant. 

NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY PORT AND HARBOR DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION. Joint 
report with comprehensive plan and recommendations. Albany, J. B. Lyon Co. 
(State Printers), 1920. 495 pages, illus., maps (part folded), plans, diagrams. 

BARTHOLOMEW, HARLAND. The city plan of Hamilton, Ohio, Published by the 
Chamber of Commerce, 1920. 66 pages, illus., plang. 
Legal section by Alfred Bettman. 

1921 CLEVELAND CITY PLAN COMMISSION. The Cleveland zone plan, report to the City 

Plan Commission outlining tentative zone plan for Cleveland, by Robert H. 
Whitten and Frank R. Walker, City Plan advisers, 1921. 23 pages, illus., 
plans, cartoons. 

CITIZENS COMMITTEE ON CITY PLAN OF PITTSBURGH. A major street plan for 
Pittsburgh, a part of the Pittsburgh plan. Issued by the Committee, Sept. 1921 . 
65 pages, illus., plans (part folded). Frederick Bigger and Harland Bartholo- 
mew, consultants. 



46 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

1921 PORTLAND (ORE.) CITY PLANNING COMMISSION. Major traffic street plan, boule- 
cont. yard and park system for Portland, Ore., 1921. 97 pages, illus., maps, folded 

plan. (Bulletin no. 7 of the Commission.) Charles H. Cheney, consultant. 

1922 BARTHOLOMEW, HARLAND. The Lansing plan, a comprehensive city plan report 

(to City Plan Commission) for Lansing, Mich. [1921, published 1922.] 62 

pages, illus., plans (1 folded). 
EAST ORANGE CITY PLAN COMMISSION. City plan for East Orange, Essex County, 

N. J., prepared by the City Plan Commission. New York, Technical Advisory 

Corporation, 1922. 80 pages, illus., plans (part folded), tables. 
FALL RIVER (MASS.) PLANNING BOARD. Report of the Planning Board; Report of 

Arthur A. Shurtleff, Town Planner. Boston, The Pinkham Press, 1922. 43 

pages, illus., plans, folio. 

John P. Fox, consultant on zoning. 
PATERSON (N. J.) CITY PLAN COMMISSION. The thoroughfares and traffic of 

Paterson. A report prepared by Herbert S. Swan. Approved by City Plan 

Commission, Jan. 20, 1922. 82 pages, illus., plans. 

Followed by second report on Separation of Street and Railroad Grades, by 
H. S. Swan and A. W. Tuttle, also published 1922. 
ST. PAUL CITY PLANNING BOARD. Plan of St. Paul, the capital city of Minnesota; 

Edward H. Bennett and William E. Parsons, consultant city planners; George 

H. Herrold, city plan engineer. Submitted to the citizens of St. Paul by the 

City Planning Board. Published by the Commissioner of Public Works, 1922. 

64 pages, illus., plans (part folded), diagrams. 
SPRINGFIELD (MASS.) PLANNING BOARD. A city plan for Springfield, Mass. 

Progress report by the Planning Board, May 1922. 59 pages, photos, plans, 

diagrams. Technical Advisory Corporation, consulting engineers. F. L. Olm- 

sted, special adviser. 

The forthcoming final report will contain extensive information on city plan- 
ning technique. 

1923 NORWOOD (MASS.) TOWN PLANNING BOARD. Report to the citizens of the town, 

1923. Report of Arthur A. Shurtleff, Town Planner. Supplementary re- 
ports: Zoning, by John P. Fox. Civic centers, by Harry J. Carlson. Legal 
aspects, by Flavel Shurtleff. 40 pages, illus., diagrams, folded map and plan. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 47 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS 
OFFERING INSTRUCTION IN CITY PLANNING 

THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, where 
graduate instruction in City Planning was first offered in 1910, announced in 
May 1923, a full technical course in City Planning leading to the master's degree 
in that specially designated field (M.L.A. in City Planning). This new option in 
City Planning comprises several of the courses in this subject already given in the 
School, amplified and arranged to give a more intensive technical training. Pro- 
fessor J. S. Pray, Chairman of the School, and Professor H. V. Hubbard, both 
members of the American City Planning Institute, will continue their instruction 
aided by the present staff of the School. Distinguished practitioners of city plan- 
ning from outside the University will also give lectures. The Library of the 
School has for some time been considered the national center of information on 
city planning, and, with the recent addition of the Charles Mulford Robinson 
Memorial City Planning Library, gives unequalled opportunities for research. 

The Chair of Civic Design at the UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS was founded in 
1913 and was occupied by Charles Mulford Robinson as Professor of Civic 
Design until his untimely death in December 1917. Since that date under- 
graduate instruction in city planning has remained a regular part of the work in 
the Department of Landscape Gardening. Mr. Harland Bartholomew, City Plan 
Engineer, of St. Louis, has been appointed Associate Professor of Civic Design 
(non-resident) and makes periodic visits to the University to conduct his in- 
struction. 

In addition to the courses in city planning offered at Harvard University and 
the University of Illinois, the following institutions announce city planning lec- 
tures or class work: 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY. 

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE. 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 

OREGON STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. 



48 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 

AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS. 

THROOP COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY. 

STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON. 

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN. 

In England technical courses in town planning are given at the University of 
Liverpool, Department of Civic Design, and at the University of London. In 
Paris the ficole des Hautes Etudes Urbaines conducts a course in Urbanisme, and 
similar instruction is being instituted in Belgium. The Technische Hochschule 
in Berlin has one of the oldest courses in city planning. 

Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and other parts of the world are also active 
in introducing the subject into their Universities. 

For references to published articles on instruc- 
tion in city and town planning, see page 88. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 49 



SELECTED LIST OF STUDENTS' THESES ON CITY PLANNING SUBJECTS 

Prepared under the direction of Professor James Sturgis Pray 
In connection with the City Planning Course at the 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Bound manuscript with illustrations, available for consultation at the Library of the 
School of Landscape Architecture, Robinson Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 

DATE LIST FURNISHED BY J. S. PRAY 

1910 HARE, S. H. The city block. 

PHILLIPS, W. L. The effect of successive improvements in the means of transporta- 
tion upon street plans of cities. 
POND, B. W. Report on the historical development of civic waterfronts. 

1913 McCRARY, I. J. Principles of city planning as applied to small towns of New Eng- 

land. 

SMITH, F. B. The interiors of city blocks. 

WEIRICK, R. F. The esthetic treatment of a city's waterfront, with especial refer- 
ence to the grouping of public buildings on river banks. 

1914 BEAL, R. W. Footways in cities. 

BLANEY, H. W. Planning for freight transportation within the city. 

1915 FLINT, H. L. The business district in the city plan. 

JOHNSTON, D. B. The market-place in the light of its historical development. 
MORRISON, B. Y. A study of the minor architectural features of civic decoration, 

especially fountains and monuments. 

PEARSE, R. J. The work of certain unofficial agencies for city planning. 
PEETS, E. Design aspects of city street trees. 
WHITE, S. H. Street design in relation to topography. 

1917 BLANCHARD, R. W. What can city planning do to prevent the American slum? 
CORNELL, R. D. Land subdivision into high class residential property. 

SMITH, F. B. Garden city movement in England and in the United States. (Travel- 
ling Fellowship report.) 

1918 SMITH, J. H. The planning of industrial communities with special reference to the 

stabilization of employment. 
ZEHRUNG, S. D. Planning health and pleasure resorts. 

1920 SEARS, W. R. Alleys. 

STRONG, W. A. Parking spaces for motor vehicles in cities. 
WALKER, H. J. A study of street vistas in town planning. 

1921 AUGUR, T. B. Garden cities for America, a logical step in industrial and urban prog- 

ress. 

FRENCH, P. Building lines. 
GARDNER, K. A. Zoning. 
INGALLS, G. F. City approaches. 

LEE, G. H. The preservation of the individuality of cities. 
WHITNEY, J. F. City boundaries. 



50 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

1922 CRAM, R. N. New England town commons, based on the study of certain Massa- 

chusetts examples. 

ZACH, L. H. Promoting city planning: the extent, methods and success of city 
planning publicity and educational campaigns in this country. 

1923 DILL, M. H. Leftover areas in city plats. 
ELIOT, C. W., 2d. How city planning pays. 

HEAD, F. Bridges: their location in relation to the city plan. 

SIAS, R. D. The residential lot as a factor determining the block, with special 

reference to its depth. 
STEVENSON, M. Waterfront possibilities of cities with special regard to their 

recreational advantages. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



51 



MUNICIPAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE WORK OF CITY 
PLANNING COMMISSIONS 

Prepared by FLAVEL SHURTLEFF, Secretary, National Conference on City Planning 
CITIES OF 300,000 AND OVER 



1921 1922 1923 

Chicago $30,000.00 $30,000.00 $40,000.00 $40,000.00 

Detroit 50,000.00 42,040.00 27,771.66 27,360.00 

Cleveland 28,580.00 35,100.00 7,500.00 5,000.00 

St. Louis 20,200.00 18,888.03 20,596.00 21,850.00 

Boston 8,002.97! 7,313.12 17,072.56 2 32,192.88 3 

Pittsburgh 30,100.00 25,815.00 26,670.00 27,360.00 

Los Angeles 10,806.67 18,407.00 20,415.00 21,901.00 

Buffalo 18,940.00 20,840.00 20,600.00 20,820.00 

Cincinnati 4 

Minneapolis 40,000.00 6 

Indianapolis 6 .... 24,000.00 26,360.00 

CITIES OF 100,000 TO 300,000 

1920 1921 1922 1923 

Rochester, N. Y $25,400.00 $26,000.00 $26,000.00 $21,000.00 

Portland, Ore 5,000.00 .... .... 6,500.00 

St. Paul, Minn 25,000.00 25,000.00 12,780.00 12,780.00 

Omaha, Neb .... .... 4,000.00 7 

Syracuse, N.Y 5,000.00 10,000.00 7,600.00 4,425.00 

New Haven (see next page) .... .... .... .... 

Dallas, Texas .... 6,000.00 

Grand Rapids, Mich 150.00 12,500.00 14,450.00 14,890.00 

Paterson, N. J 22,700.00 5,000.00 3,300.00 

Youngstown, Ohio 6,600.00 8,700.00 4,630.00 3,100.00 

Utica, N.Y 6,024.00 7,944.00 7 7,997.00 7 

Troy, N. Y 4,500.00 11,000.00 7 3,000.00 

1 Plus $2,000 for investigation of housing conditions. 

2 Plus $10,000 for preliminary work on zoning and a comprehensive city plan. 

3 Includes $25,000 for comprehensive city plan and zoning. 

4 The Technical Advisory Corporation of New York has been employed to make a city 
planning report. For this purpose $90,000 is being raised by the city planning committee, a 
voluntary organization. 

6 Appropriation for the years 1922 and 1923. 

6 All Indiana cities have a minimum appropriation of 3 mills on the dollar of assessed valua- 
tion if they have a city plan commission. 

7 Includes appropriation for zoning. 



52 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



CITIES UNDER 100,000 

1920 1921 

Allentown, Pa $1,300.00 $800.00 

Anderson, Indiana 1 

Ashtabula, Ohio 

Brookline, Mass 600.00 1,100.00 2 

Canton, Ohio .... .... 

Dayton, Ohio 200.00 50.00 

Easton, Pa 300.00 300.00 

East Orange, N. J 5,750.00 5,000.00 

Elizabeth, N. J 

Flint, Michigan 7,021.97 6,132.62 

Framingham, Mass 500.00 500.00 

Gary, Indiana 5,000.00 

Green Bay, Wis 12,000.00 

Greensboro, N. C .... .... 

Hartford, Conn 100.00 100.00 

Natick, Mass 700.00 580.00 

New London, Conn .... .... 

Perth Amboy, N. J 2,500.00 

Quincy, Mass 250.00 250.00 

Rock Island, 111 3,500.00 

Scranton, Pa 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Shreveport, La 

Sioux City, Iowa .... 

South Bend, Indiana .... .... .... 

Taunton, Mass 300.00 300.00 

Topeka, Kansas 3,000.00 

Walpole, Mass .... .... 

Waltham, Mass. .... .... 

Wichita, Kansas 

York, Pa 100.00 700.00 



1922 
$500.00 

2,000.00 
1, 500.00 2 



300.00 



4,418.77 

500.00 

9,000.00 

.... 

10,000.00 2 

50.00 

200.00 

250.00 

2,500.00 

250.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

6,500.00 

3,500.00 

300.00 

5,000.00 



18,000.00 3 
5,000.00 



1923 
$2,000.00 

7,500.00 

700.00 

3,000.00 

300.00 

7,500.00 
6,085.00 

500.00 
1,000.00 

200.00 

50.00 

800.00 

250.00 

4,500.00 

250.00 

1,000.00 

1,200.00 
11,000.00 

300.00 
5,000.00 

100.00 
1,000.00 

5,000.00 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR ZONING, PRIMARILY FOR EXPERT WORK 

Albany, New York .................................. $15,000.00 

Buffalo, N. Y ........................................ 11,000.00 

Chicago, Illinois .................................... 155,300.00 

Clinton, Mass ....................................... 2,500.00 4 

Decatur, Illinois .................................... 2,000.00 

Elizabeth, New Jersey ............................... 8,800.00 

Maiden, Mass ....................................... 1,500.00 

New Haven, Conn .................. . . ............... 25,000.00* 

Quincy, Mass ........................................ 1,500.00 

Rockford, Illinois ................................... 2,500.00 

Scranton, Pa ......................... ............... 5,000.00 

1 City Planning Engineer's salary paid out of other appropriations. 

2 Includes item for zoning. 3 Includes appropriation for zoning. 

4 In 1924 appropriation for $2,500 will be asked. 

5 These amounts include also a regional survey and highway traffic plan. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

A SELECTED LIST OF REFERENCES COVERING THE FIELD 
OF CITY PLANNING 

Arranged according to a revision of CITY PLANNING, a Comprehensive Analysis, by J. S. Pray 
and T. Kimball Published by The Harvard University Press, 1913 

A Subject Index to the Bibliography will be found on p. 177. 



OUTLINE OF THE BIBLIOGRAPHY 

ARRANGED IN CLASSIFIED FORM 

NOTE: Gaps in serial numbering merely indicate places left in the Classification 
Scheme for expansion. Reference numbers here used are the first in 
the series for the given subject. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY . / '.,' 

PERIODICALS 2 

SOCIETIES 21 

CONGRESSES. CONFERENCES. EXHIBITIONS 40 

COLLECTED WORKS AND ENCYCLOPEDIAS 180 

BIOGRAPHY 205 

HISTORY 210 

European 

Ancient 215 

Mediaeval 225 

Modern 230 

Oriental. 235 

American V 240 

GENERAL WORKS 250 

Brief General Papers 270 

CITY PLANNING MOVEMENT 500 

Educational and Publicity Campaigns 540 

LEGISLATION. LAWS AND COURT DECISIONS 700 

Creative 

General Planning Laws 707 

Creation of City Planning Agencies . . . 714 

Acquisition of Public Property. Condemnation 722 

Excess condemnation and Replotting . . . . . * . .... 724 
Regulative 

Zoning Legislation 765 

Platting Legislation . . 770 

METHODS OF TECHNICAL PROCEDURE 800 

Making of Surveys 815 

Methods of Presenting Data 832 

Presentation of City Plans 850 

Construction. Municipal Engineering 860 

Cooperation and Functions of Specialists 875 

Professional Charges and Examinations 878 

Competitions 880 

STUDY AND TEACHING 900 

Special Schools 980 



56 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



COMPOSITION OF CITY PLANS. PLANNING. REPLANNING 

THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN . .^ .' . v :V . ..- * T 1200 

General Considerations ...., 1205 

Special Considerations 

Social .... ||| . . . 1210 

Economic ; . v . : 1225 

Esthetic ..... .... . .,, 1235 

Historic ..;... . . . . .'.. .. . . . . ,: . 1270 

War Memorials 1292 

Reconstruction after War . ... . 1 ." . 1293 

FUNDAMENTAL DATA. Civic SURVEYS 1300 

Climate, Topography, etc 1320 

Population. Growth of Cities. Housing. Public Health and Safety . 1400 

Growth of Cities and Decentralization ............. 1424 

Cost of LiVing. . . 1428 

Housing ...... ... .... . . . iS .... .--. . . 1430 

Industrial Conditions .... .... . .*..-, . . 1437 

Food Supply and Markets ........:.. 1443 

Public Health and Safety 1445 

Water-Supply and Disposal of Wastes . . . . f . . . . , . '. 1456 

Fire Prevention 1478 

Public Recreation 1495 

Legal and Administrative Conditions . .- 1500 

Federal, State, and Metropolitan Authorities . . . 1521 

Municipal Departments and Commissions . .-...'. . . /., .* . . 1535 

Art Commissions . . 1538 

Relation of Municipality to Public Utilities . . .'-.-... . . . 1541 

Economic and Financial Conditions 1550 

Urban Land 1563 

Taxation in Relation to Development 1568 

Financing of Municipal Improvements 1570 

ZONING : SUBDIVISION OF CITY AREA INTO FUNCTIONAL DISTRICTS . . 1600 

Special Problems * . . . , . ... . . . 1613 

Administrative Centers. Community Centers . . . . . . ^ . . 1627 

Business Districts .,,>.. .... . . .' . . . 1630 

Industrial Districts i . . . . . ;--'^ ... 1650 

Residential Districts ..:.>.,. .. 4 , ...'., 1675 

Low-cost Residential Districts . . ... ... < .X>v. : -.: . 1697 

Agricultural Areas / .;'. v.Vw . 1715 

Boundaries and Approaches 1745 

PLATTING: SUBDIVISION OF CITY AREA INTO STREETS AND LOTS . . . 1800 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 57 

ELEMENTS OF CITY PLANS 

CHANNELS OF TRANSPORTATION 2000 

STREETS, ROADS, FOOTWAYS .' 2050 

Motor Transportation as affecting Street Plans 2058 

Legislation, including Setbacks and Street Widening 2070 

Street Traffic 2076 

Street Design. Form. Arrangement. Width. Cross-section . . . 2080 

Pavements . . . ; . . 2120 

Special Problems 2128 

Types of Streets According to Function 

Major Traffic Streets and Squares 2170 

Parkways, Boulevards, and Pleasure Roads 2205 

Local Business Streets and Squares 2230 

Residential Streets and Squares ...... 2235 

Alleys . . 2242 

Footways. Sidewalks 2250 

Street Furniture . 2290 

Street Lighting ,. 2310 

(Street Planting, see 4875) 
(Subsurface Structures, see 2850) 

STREET RAILROADS AND RAPID TRANSIT 2350 

Motor Busses in relation to Transit 2358 

Car-tracks, Stations, and Terminals 2382 

RAILROADS AND TERMINALS 2450 

Electrification 2457 

Rights of Way. Stations and Grounds 2460 

Freight Terminals 2495 

Elimination of Grade Crossings 2510 

WATERWAYS AND COMMERCIAL WATERFRONTS . . 1 . ..... . . . 2550 

Inland Waterways . ..>... .... , . , ...... . . . 2580 

FreePorts >,.-..... ... ,,. . ... ... . 2729 

AERIAL TRANSPORTATION TERMINALS 2795 

CONDUITS AND WIRES. SUBSURFACE UTILITIES 2850 

Water-supply Distribution and Sewerage Systems 2880 

Central Heating Systems 2902 

Electric Wires X ' 2915 

Electric Power Supply ".*.,.. . 2926 

BLOCKS AND LOTS. LAND SUBDIVISION 3000 

Restrictions 3020 

Special Problems 3065 

Residential Subdivision 3380 



58 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

STRUCTURES. BUILDINGS 3415 

Buildings 

Esthetic Aspects 3455 

Legislation 3460 

Arrangement. Height 3470 

Buildings for Special Uses 3560 

Public and Semi-Public Buildings, including Schools and Com- 
munity Centers 3563 

Commercial and Industrial Buildings .."..... 3595 

Residences. Low-cost Houses 3633 

Minor Buildings 3675 

Building groups. Monumental Squares. Civic Centers 3700 

Bridges 3740 

Minor Structures , . .. . 3820 

Monuments, Statuary, and Fountains . . ; ... 3830 

Billboards 3880 

PUBLIC OPEN SPACES (OTHER THAN FOR TRAFFIC) ... . 4000 

Parks and Park Systems 4040 

Legislation and Administration ....',. . . 4050 

Park Equipment 4055 

Landscape Parks and Reservations . . . . . v , . . . . . . . . 4100 

Forest and Water-supply Reservations . , ; . . . . 4160 

Small Parks. Commons . . , .... . . . . 4250 

Squares . .>.;;. . . 4255 

Botanical Garden^, Zoos, and Fair Grounds ,, , . . . 4265 

Playgrounds and Athletic Fields . . . . 4300 

Recreation Center and School Playgrounds . . . . , 4318 

Special Sports >>.... . . . . . 4347 

Recreational Waterfronts . . . v . . . . ' .......*,.... 4370 

Tourist Camps . , . . . . ..:.......... . . .... 4460 

Cemeteries - . .. . v 4480 

VEGETATION. CITY PLANTING * 4800 

Street and Roadside Planting 4875 

Lot Planting ..,,.. ... .... 4900 

Building Decoration . 4910 

TYPES OF CITY PLANS 

GENERAL. ... ..... ;-. . . . . v~ . . . 5200 

TYPES DISTINGUISHED BY DOMINANT FUNCTION . ^^ 

Capital Cities ..... 5305 

War Camp Cities 5311 

Industrial Cities 5320 

Mining Towns and Labor Camps 5322 

Health Resorts 5333 

Garden Villages for Disabled Ex-Service Men . . 5349 

Garden Cities 5350 

Ideal Types 5550 

TYPES DISTINGUISHED BY SIZE . 5600 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 59 

REGIONAL, RURAL, AND NATIONAL PLANNING 

REGIONAL PLANNING 6100 

RURAL PLANNING . . . .VV.V> . . 6300 

Land Settlement 6400 

STATE PLANNING ... 6500 

State Highways 6510 

State Forests ' . 6570 

State Parks . . . ....,,. . 6580 

NATIONAL PLANNING 6600 

National Highways 6610 

Railroads and Waterways 6620 

Conservation of Natural Resources 6640 

Reclamation 6650 

Power Supply 6660 

Water-Supply 6665 

National Forests 6670 

National Parks 6680 



CITY PLANNING 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Abercrombie, P. Town planning litera- 
ture [a brief summary of its present extent]. 
(In Town Planning Institute, London, Papers 
and discussions, 1915-16; vol. 2, p. 5-21; 
with discussion p. 22-26.) 

Also in Town Planning Review, Oct. 
1915; vol. 6, p. 77-100. 

Boston Public Library. Catalogue of books 
relating to architecture, construction and deco- 
ration. 2d edition with an additional section 
on city planning. Boston, 1914. City plan- 
ning, p. 427-475, 480. 

Check list of references on city planning. 
Compiled by the Division of Bibliography, 
Library of Congress, and the Department of 
Landscape Architecture, Harvard University, 
p. 61-123. (Special Libraries, May 1912; vol. 
3, no. 5, whole number.) 

Garden Cities and Town Planning Asso- 
ciation. A catalogue of selected books on 
housing, town planning, and the garden city. 
[London, The Association, 1919.] 4 p. 

Kimball, T. Classified selected list of refer- 
ences on city planning. Boston, National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1915. 48 p. 

Should be used in connection with this 
Manual of Information for papers mainly 
of historic interest and for European pub- 
lications to 1915 unless of present practi- 
cal value to American city planners. 
Cross references to this 1915 list in the 
present text are made as follows: see 1915 
Classified Selected List. 
Brief list of references on city plan- 
ning. (In American Institute of Architects, 
Committee on Town Planning, City plan- 
ning progress in the United States, 1917, p. 
198-201.) 

ed. Municipal accomplishment in 

city planning and published city plan reports 
in the United States. Published under the 
auspices of National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1920. 79 p. Accompanied by flier: 
Ready references for the shelf of a city plan 
commission. 

The list of published city plan reports 
supersedes the American City list of 1914. 



For titles of plan reports since 1920, see 
Kimball Surveys hi Landscape Architec- 
ture, mentioned on p. 24 of this Manual. 

Munro, W. B. A bibliography of municipal 
government in the United States. Cambridge, 
Harvard University Press, 1915. 472 p. 

Includes references on city planning, 
public utilities, sanitation and public 
health, public safety, education and gen- 
eral betterment, and municipal finance. 

Seine (Dept.) Commission d'Extension de 
Paris. Documentation bibliographique. I. In- 
ventaire des documents relatifs a Pamenage- 
ment et 1' extension des villes et conserves au 
Musee Social. [Paris], 1913. 53 p. 

Stubben, J. [Lists appended to sections and 
chapters.] (In his Der Stadtebau, 1907. An 
edition also published in 1915.) 

Covers a large number of continental ref- 
erences of historical interest. 

Tablettes documentaires municipales; bib- 
liographic analytique des Etudes et informa- 
tions relatives aux questions municipales. 
Publication no. 5 de 1'Union Internationale 
des Villes, Bruxelles. 1921 to date. SSrie 1: 
Urbanisation. 

A digest of current publications and arti- 
cles on town planning in many languages 
prepared by the International Centre of 
Civic Documentation described on p. 23 
and in American City, Apr. 1922. 

Unwin, R. Bibliography. (In his Town 
planning, 1909 and later impressions, p. 405- 
411.) 

See also special bibliographies entered under 
subjects in this list, e. g. Housing, Zoning. 

It is possible to keep up with city planning 
literature by following the current lists and 
reviews published in the American City, Muni- 
cipal Reference Library Notes (New York), 
National Municipal Review, Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Engineering News-Record, Journal of 
the American Institute of Architects, Housing 
Betterment, Town Planning Review, Garden 
Cities and Town Planning, La Vie Urbaine, 
Der Stadtebau, etc. 



62 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



PERIODICALS 

For a list of American periodicals regularly devoting 
space to city planning, see p. 20, noting especially 
American City, Landscape Architecture, Housing Better' 
ment, National Municipal Review, etc. For suggestions 
as to foreign periodicals see p. 26 ff . and the " review of 
continental periodical literature" in Garden Cities and 
Town Planning, Apr. 1921. 

2 The City Plan. Published quarterly as 
the official organ of the National Conference 
on City Planning. Boston; vol. 1, no. 1, Mar. 
1915, to vdl. 3, no. 4, Apr. 1918. 

No more published. The National Con- 
ference on City Planning now has a repre- 
sentative on the editorial board of the 
National Municipal Review and a page 
of American City Planning Institute 
Notes in Landscape Architecture. See 
also p. 13. 

Garden Cities and Town Planning. Lon- 
don, Garden Cities and Town Planning Asso- 
ciation; vol. 1, no. 1, Oct. 1904, to date, illus. 
Monthly. 

The periodical began as: The Garden 
City, and has been numbered in several 
series. 

Housing. Issued by the British Ministry of 
Health, Housing Department. London; vol. 1, 
no. 1, Aug. 2, 1919, to vol. 2, no. 46, June 
1921. Fortnightly. 

No more published. Contained informa- 
tion for municipal officials and those con- 
cerned in town planning and housing 
schemes, with illustrations and plans. 

Journal of the Town Planning Institute of 
Canada. Ottawa, Canada; vol. 1, prelim, no., 
Oct. 1, 1920, to date, illus. Bi-monthly. 

Town Planning and Conservation of Life, 
issued quarterly under the direction of the 
Commission of Conservation of Canada. 
Ottawa; vol. 1, no. 1, Aug. 1914, to vol. 7, 
no. 1, Jan.-Mar. 1921. 

Originally entitled, Conservation of Life, 
and issued bi-monthly up to July 1915. 
No more published. Canadian town 
planning news is now found; in the Jour- 
nal of the Town Planning Institute of 
Canada. 

The Town Planning Review. The journal 
of the Department of Civic Design at the 
School of Architecture of the University of 
Liverpool; vol. 1, no. 1, Apr. 1910, to date, 
illus. Quarterly. 



4 La Cite, revue mensuelle Beige: urban- 
isme, architecture, art public, reconstruction 
des regions devaste'es. Bruxelles, Librairie 
Lamertin; vol. 1, no. 1, July 1919, to date, 
illus. Monthly. 

La Vie Urbaine; revue publiee sous la direc- 
tion de Louis Bonnier, Marcel Poete. Institut 
d'Histoire, de Geographic, et d'Economie Ur- 
baines de la Ville de Paris. Paris, Editions 
Ernest Leroux; vol. 1, nos. 1-2, Mar.-June 
1919, to date, illus. Bi-monthly. 

Devoted largely to urbanisme, especially 
in its social and economic aspects. Sup- 
plemented by the fortnightly sheet La 
Quinzaine Urbaine, Paris, Union des 
Villes et Communes de France; no. 1, 
Jan. 1, 1921, to date. 

6 Der Stadtebau. Montasschrift fur die 
kunstlerische Ausgestaltung der Stadte nach 
ihren wirtschaftlichen, gesundheitlichen und 
sozialen Grundsatzen. Berlin, E. Wasmuth; 
vol. 1, no. 1, Jan. 1904, to date. Monthly. 
There is a compiled index to vol. 1-10. 



SOCIETIES 

For further information on Societies, see pp. 17, 18, and 
26 ff. See also Conferences (40). 

21 International Garden Cities and Town 
Planning Association. [Formation and meet- 
ing, Aug. 1913.] (Garden Cities and Town 
Planning, Sept. 1913; vol. 3, p. 224-226.) 

Report of conference and annual meet- 
ing, London, 1920. 23 p. 1922, 27 p. 

Reports of other conferences published in 
Garden Cities and Town Planning. Name 
of Association changed in 1922 to Inter- 
national Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning Federation. 

22 American City Planning Institute. 
[Notice of formation.] (In Proceedings of 9th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1917, 
p. 302-303.) 

Also note in City Plan, Aug. 1917; vol. 3, 

P.I. 

[Papers] no. 1. See 270, Olmsted. 

The preliminary papers given at the joint 
conference of the American City Plan- 
ning Institute and Town Planning Insti- 
tute of Canada were published, without 
revision by the Institute, in the Canadian 
Engineer, Oct. 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13, and 20, 
1919. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



63 



American Park and Outdoor Art Associa- 
tion. [Addresses, proceedings, and reports.] 
1897-1904. partly illus. 

In 1904 this association and the American 
League for Civic Improvement united to 
form the American Civic Association. 
National Conference on City Planning, 
Proceedings: 

1st, Washington, 1909, published in Sen- 
ate Document no. 422, 61st Congress, 
2d session. 
2d-15th, published by the Conference, 

1910-1923. 
2d, Rochester, 1910. 
3d, Philadelphia, 1911. 
4th, Boston, 1912. 
5th, Chicago, 1913. 
6th, Toronto, 1914. 
7th, Detroit, 1915. 
8th, Cleveland, 1916. 
9th, Kansas City, Mo., 1917. 
10th, St. Louis, 1918. 
llth, Niagara Falls and Buffalo, 1919. 
12th, Cincinnati, 1920. 
13th, Pittsburgh, 1921. 
14th, Springfield, Mass., 1922. 
15th, Baltimore, 1923. 
The publications of the American Civic 
Association, National Municipal League, 
American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments, American Society of Landscape Archi- 
tects, American Institute of Architects, Royal 
Institute of British Architects, American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers, Institution of Muni- 
cipal and County Engineers (British), National 
Association of Real Estate Boards, American 
Academy of Political and Social Science, Na- 
tional Housing Association, and others, contain 
material pertinent to city planning. See also 
p. 17. 

26 Garden Cities and Town Planning 
Association, London. [Reports, etc.] 

Founded in 1899 as the Garden City 
Association. Since 1904 it has published 
a monthly periodical. See 2. 
National Housing and Town Planning 
Council, London. See p. 26. 

Town Planning Institute (British). [Notice 
of formation, membership, etc.] (Town Plan- 
ning Review, Jan. 1914; vol. 4, p. 329-330.) 

Papers and discussions, 1914-15 to 

date. London, The Institute, 1916, to date, 
illus. 

Papers are issued as separates, and super- 
seded by bound volume each year. 



Register of members, July 1922. (In 

its Papers and discussions, vol. 8, no. 9, p. 
154-165.) 

Town Planning Institute of Canada. 
[Notice of formation in 1919, and list of mem- 
bers.] (Journal of the Town Planning Insti- 
tute of Canada, Oct. 1, 1920; vol. 1, prelim, 
no., p. 1-2, 10-12.) 

28 Societe Francaise des Architectes Ur- 
banistes. [Formation of society, and consti- 
tution.] (In Agache, Auburtin, and Redont, 
Comment reconstruire nos rite's de"truites, 
1915, p. 255-257.) 

Founded in 1913. 

Association pour 1'Etude de 1* Aminagement 
et de 1'Extension des Villes. [Notice of ob- 
jects, etc.] (La Quinzaine Urbaine, publie'e 
par 1'Union des Villes et Communes de 
France, sheet in each number.) 

Also in La Vie Urbaine, Dec. 1919, inside 
back cover. 

S. U. B. manifesto de la Societe des Ur- 
banistes beiges. (La Cit6, Sept. 1919; vol. 1, 
no. 3, p. 37-40.) 

29 Deutsche Akademie des Stadtebaues. 
[Notice by Dr. Siedler.] (Stadtebau, 1921; 
vol. 18, no. 9-10, p. 106-107.) 

Notice of formation also in Survey, Apr.l, 
1922; vol. 48, p. 28. 

Deutsche Gartenstadt - Gesellschaft, see 
6350. 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Stadtebau und 
Landesplanung, Berlin. [Notice of formation, 
etc.] (Stadtebau, 1921; vol. 18, no. 7-8, p. 
85.) 

CONGRESSES. CONFERENCES. 
EXHIBITIONS 

For a more complete list of references to earlier con- 
ferences and exhibitions, interesting as showing the 
development of public interest in city planning, see 1915 
Classified Selected List. 

40 Congres International de PArt Public. 
[Proceedings published in L'Art Public, by 
Institut International de FArt Public.] 

1st, Brussels, 1898. 

2d, Paris, 1900. 

3d, Liege, 1905. 

4th, Brussels, 1910. 

(1907) Garden City Association, London. 
Town planning in theory and practice. A re- 
port of a conference arranged by the Garden 
City Association, held at the Guildhall, Lon- 
don, on October 25th, 1907. London, The 
Association, [1908]. 72 p. illus., plans. 



64 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Congresses. Conferences. Exhibitions (cont.) 

(1909) Garden Cities and Town Planning 
Association, London. The practical applica- 
tion of town planning powers; a report of a 
National town planning conference arranged 
by the Garden Cities and Town Planning 
Association, held at the Guildhall, London, on 
December 10th, 1909. Ed. by Ewart G. Cul- 
pin. London, P. S. King & Son, [1910]. 72 p. 

(1910) Royal Institute of British Architects. 
Town planning conference [and exhibition], 
London, 1910. Transactions. London, The 
Institute, 1911. 812 p. illus., plans. 

Notice of the conference may be found in 
Town Planning Review, Oct. 1910; vol. 1, p. 
178-219 which has text of several papers, and 
in Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1911; vol. 1, 
p. 91-93. 

(1910) Berlin Allgemeine Stadtebau-Aus- 
stellung, 1910. [Notice.] (American City, 
Sept. 1910; vol. 3, p. 120-124.) 

(1910) Hegemann, W., ed. Der Stadte- 

bau nach den Ergebnissen der Allegmeinen 
Stadtebau-Ausstellung in Berlin [1910], nebst 
einem Anhang: Die Internationale Stadtebau- 
Ausstellung in Diisseldorf. Berlin, E. Was- 
muth, 1911, 1913; 2vol. illus., plans. 

Vol. 1, Berlin; vol. 2, Verkehrswesen, 
Freiflachen; vol. 3, announced before the 
war as in preparation. 

(1912) Canadian Housing and Town Plan- 
ning Congress. The first Canadian housing 
and town planning congress, Winnipeg, July 
15, 16, and 17, 1912. [Proceedings, papers, 
discussions.] Winnipeg, Canadian Printing 
and Bookbinding Co., [1912]. 120 p. 

(1912) Kongress fur StSdtewesen, Diissel- 
dorf. Verhandlungen des ersten Kongresses 
fur Stadtewesen, Diisseldorf, 1912. Bd. 1, 
Stadtebau. Herausgegeben im Auftrage der 
Stadtverwaltung Diisseldorf, 1913. 320 p. 
illus., plans. 

(1913) Congres International et Exposition 
compare e des Villes, organist sous le haut 
patronage et avec le concours de la Ville de 
Gand a 1'occasion de I'Exposition Universelle 
en cette ville, 1913, et sous les auspices de 
PUnion des Villes et Communes beiges. 
Bruxelles, Union Internationale des Villes, 
[1914]. 233+351 +88 p. illus., plans. 

I. Construction des villes. II. Organisa- 
tion de la vie communale. 



(1914) Liverpool Town Planning and Hous- 
ing Exhibition, 1914. Transactions of Con- 
ference held March 9-13, 1914 ... ed. by 
S. D. Adshead and P. Abercrombie. Liver- 
pool, University Press, 1914. 168 p. illus., 
plans. 

(1917-18) Australian Town Planning Con- 
ference and Exhibition. Official volume of 
proceedings of the first Australian Town 
Planning and Housing Conference and Exhi- 
bition. Adelaide (South Australia), Oct. 17 
to 24, 1917. Adelaide, Published by South 
Australian Executive, 1918. 162 p. + 74 
plates, illus., plans. 

Proceedings of 2d Conference held at 

Brisbane, Queensland, July 30 to Aug. 6, 1918. 
192 p. illus., plans. 

(1919) New Zealand Town-Planning Con- 
ference and Exhibition. Official volume of 
proceedings of the first New Zealand Town- 
Planning Conference and Exhibition, May 20 
to 23, 1919. Wellington, Govt. Printer, 1919. 
303 p. illus., plans. 

(1919) First Interallied Town Planning 
Conference, held in Paris, June 11, 12, & 13, 
1919, under the auspices of the Socie"te" Fran- 
yaise des Urbanistes. [Summary in English of 
proceedings, by G. B. Ford.] Paris, La Bibli- 
othque de la Renaissance des Cites, [1919]. 
31 p. 

(1919) The International Garden Cities and 
Town Planning Association Conference in 
Brussels on reconstruction. (Garden Cities 
and Town Planning, Dec. 1919; vol. 9, p. 
239-240.) 

See also 1293. 

(1920) Inter-Allied Housing and Town 
Planning Congress, London, June 1920. [Pa- 
pers and reports, published as series of sepa- 
rates. London, National Housing and Town 
Planning Council.] 

(1922) Manchester and District Joint Town 
Planning Advisory Committee. A record of 
the town planning exhibition held in the 
Town Hall, Manchester, Oct. 1922, together 
with Proceedings of the various conferences 
held in connection with the exhibition. Ed. 
by P. M. Heath, Town Clerk, Manchester, 
England. 242 p. + appendices, illus., plans. 

Points from the Manchester Conference, 
1922. (Garden Cities and Town Planning, 
Nov. 1922; vol. 12, p. 172-174.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



65 



(1922) Association Francaise pour 1'Etude 
de PAmenagement et de 1'Extension des 
Villes. [Proceedings of International Confer- 
ence at Paris, Oct. 21-28, 1922.] In press. 

Notice in La Quinzaine Urbaine, Dec. 2, 
1922; no. 51, p. 402-404. 

(1923) International Cities and Town Plan- 
ning Exhibition, Gothenburg, Sweden. [Pre- 
liminary announcement, 1923.] 46 p. illus. 

60 American City Bureau. [Exhibition 
described in 1915 Classified Selected List was 
sent abroad.] 

Emergency civic exhibition. (Town Plan- 
ning Review, Jan. 1915; vol. 5, p. 335.) 

Geddes, P. Town planning and civic exhi- 
bitions. (In his Cities in evolution, 1915, 
p. 246-294. plan, maps.) 

(1909) Robinson, C. M. The city plan exhi- 
bition, New York. (Survey, May 29, 1909; 
vol. 22, p. 313-318.) 

(1911) Philadelphia. First municipal city 
planning exhibition in America, May 15- 
JunelS, 1911. [Handbook.] 77 p. plan. 

(1913) New York's city planning exhibi- 
tion. (American City, Dec. 1913; vol. 9, 
p. 504-511. illus.) 

(1913) Ghent. ComitS d'Etudes du "Vil- 
lage Moderne." Le village moderne a PExpo- 
sition universelle et internationale de Gand, 
1913. Notes comptes rendus vues et 
plans. Bruxelles, Goemaere, [1913]. 248 p. 
illus., plans. 



COLLECTED WORKSfAND 
ENCYCLOPEDIAS 

180 Stadtebauliche Vortrage aus dem 
Seminar fur Stadtebau an der K. technischen 
Hochschule zu Berlin, hrsg. von den Leitern 
des seminars fur Stadtebau, J. Brix und F. 
Genzmer. Berlin, W. Ernst & Sohn, 1908- 
1920; vol. 1-7, each consisting of 8 parts, 
vol. 8, 1915, 4 parts, vol. 9, 1920, 8 parts, of 
which several had been issued by Sept. 1922. 
Many of these Vortrage contain illustrations 
and plans. 

For detailed contents of vols. 1-7, see 1915 

Classified Selected List. 

190 Union Internationale des Villes et 
Comites Internationaux d'Art Civique " pour 
la Belgique." Programme-tables des mati- 



&res d'une Encyclopedic des villes et de Part 

civique. Leyde, A. W. Sijthoff, [1915]. 133 p. 
Published also as Appendix 2 in Swaelmen, 

L. van der, Pre'liminaires d'art civique, 1916, 

p. 167-298. 

A complete outline of the proposed con- 
tents of the Encyclopedia. 

Rapport introductif au Gouverne- 

ment Beige. Bruxelles, Union Internationale 
des Villes, [1918]. 14 p. 

Official report on the projected monu- 
mental Encyclopedia. 



BIOGRAPHY 

The following references relate to a few of the most im- 
portant modern practitioners of city planning, not now 
living. For material on ancient and mediaeval town 
planners, see History. 

205 BURNHAM, DANIEL HUDSON. Moore, 
C. Daniel H. Burham, architect, planner of 
cities. Boston, Houghton Mifflin Co., 1921. 
2 vols. portraits, plates. 

ELIOT, CHARLES. Eliot, C. W. Charles 
Eliot, landscape architect. Boston, Houghton, 
Mifflin Co., 1902. 770 p. illus., plans. 

HAUSSMANN, Baron GEORGES EUGENE. 
Smith, E. R. Baron Haussmann and the 
topographical transformation of Paris under 
Napoleon III. (Architectural Record, Aug., 
Sept., Nov., Dec., 1907, Jan. 1908; vol. 22, p. 
121-133, 227-238, 369-385, 491-506, vol. 23, 
p. 21-38. illus., plans.) 

I/ENFANT, Major PIERRE CHARLES. [Re- 
ports and memorials.] (In Records of Colum- 
bia Historical Society, Washington, 1899; 
vol. 2, p. 26-157.) 

Jusserand, J. J. Major PEnfant and 

the federal city. (In his With Americans of 
past and present days, 1916, p. 137-195, and 
his En Amerique jadis et maintenant, 1918, 
p. 127-192.) 

OLMSTED, FREDERICK LAW, Sr. Olmsted, 
F. L., Jr., and T. Kimball, eds. Frederick 
Law Olmsted, landscape architect, 1822-1903. 
Volume 1, Early years and experiences. New 
York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1922. 131 p. 
plates. 

Part I, Biographical notes. 

Nolen, J. Frederick Law Olmsted and 

his work. (House and Garden, Feb., Mar., 
July, 1906; vol. 9, p. 73-83, 117-128, vol. 10, 
p. 3-11. illus., plans.) 



66 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Biography (cont.) 

ROBINSON, CHARLES MULPORD. Pray, J. S. 
Minute on the life and services of Charles 
Mulford Robinson, Associate member, pre- 
pared for the American Society of Landscape 
Architects. (Landscape Architecture, July 
1919; vol. 9, p. 180-193. portrait.) 

Bibliography of writings by Mr. Robin- 
son, p. 189-193. 

SITTE, CAMILLO. Henrici, K. Camillo 
Sitte. (Stadtebau, Mar. 1904; vol. 1, p. 33-34. 
portrait.) 

WREN, Sir CHRISTOPHER. Life and works 
of Sir Christopher Wren. From the Paren- 
talia or Memoirs by his son Christopher. 
[London, E. Arnold, 1903.] 259 p. Especially 
p. 117-121: Proposals for rebuilding the City 
of London after the Great Fire. 



HISTORY 

210 Aldridge, H. R. [Historical sketch of 
town planning.] (In his The case for town 
planning, 1915, Part 1, Chapters 1-5, p. 11- 
120. illus., plans.) 

Brinckmann, A. E. Stadtbaukunst, ges- 
chichtliche Querschnitte und neuzeitliche 
Ziele. Berlin-Neubabelsberg Akademische 
Verlagsgesellschaft Athenaion, 1920. 138 p. 
illus., plans. 

Cities of the past. (1) The planning of 
Hellenistic cities, by P. Gardner. (2) Town 
planning in the Roman world, by F. J. 
Haverfield. (3) Rome, by T. Ashby. (4) 
Entwicklung der Stadtebau-Ideals seit der 
Renaissance, by A. E. Brinckmann. Discus- 
sion. (In Royal Institute of British Archi- 
tects, Town planning conference, London, 
1910, p. 109-183. illus., plans.) 

Hughes, T. H., and E. A. J. Lamborn. 
Towns and town-planning, ancient and mod- 
ern. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1923. 156 p. 
illus., plans. 

Triggs, H. I. Types of ancient and modern 
towns. (In his Town planning, 1909, p. 56- 
119. plans.) 

Unwin, R. Of the individuality of towns; 
with a slight sketch of the ancient art of town 
planning. (In his Town planning, 1909 and 
later editions, p. 15-114. illus., plans.) 



EUROPEAN 

Ancient 

216 Bosanquet, R. C. Greek and Roman 
towns. (Town Planning Review, Jan., Oct. 
1915; vol. 5, p. 286-293, vol. 6, 101-113. 
illus., plans.) 

1. Streets. 2. Town planning in Syria. 

Haverfield, F. J. Ancient town planning. 
Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1913. 152 p. illus., 
plans. 

See further archaeological works and such 
treatises as Anderson and Spiers, The Archi- 
tecture of Greece and Rome. 

Mediaeval 

225 Adshead, S. D. The gridiron plan: 
Winchelsea. (Town Planning Review, Apr. 
1913; vol. 4, p. 44-46. illus., plan.) 

The " most perfect example ... of a 
mediaeval town laid out on a gridiron 
plan " in England. 

Brinckmann, A. E. Deutsche Stadtbau- 
kunst in der Vergangenheit. Frankfurt a. M., 
H. Keller, 1911. 160 p. illus., plans. Also 
rev. and enl. ed., 1921. 

Ebhardt, B. Der Einfluss des Mittelalter- 
lichen Wehrbaues auf den Stadtebau. Berlin, 
W. Ernst & Sohn, 1910. 40 p. illus., plans. 
(Stadtebauliche Vortrage, Bd. 3, Heft 8.) 

Sickel, C. Das Stadttor im Stadtbilde. 
1912. 63 p. illus., plans. (Ibid., Bd. 5, 
Heft 2.) 

Siedler, E. J. Markischer Stadtebau im 
Mittelalter. Beitrage zur Geschichte des 
Entstehung, Planung und baulichen Entwick- 
lung der markischen Stadte. Berlin, J. 
Springer, 1914. 148 p. illus., plans. 

Tout, T. F. Mediaeval town planning; 
a lecture delivered at the John Rylands 
Library on the 13th December, 1916. Man- 
chester, The University Press; London, Long- 
mans, Green and Co., 1917. 35 p. plans. 

Reprinted from Bulletin of the John Ry- 
lands Library, 1917; vol. 4, no. 1. Also in 
Town Planning Review, Apr. 199; vol. 8, p. 
7-36. 

Zeller, A. Die Auflassung alter Festungs- 
werke. Berlin, W. Ernst & Sohn, 1912. 44 p. 
illus., plans. (Stadtebauliche Vortrage, Bd. 5, 
Heft 7.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



67 



Modern 

230 Abercrombie, P. The era of archi- 
tectural town planning; a study of certain 
influences at work during the Renaissance. 
(Town Planning Review, Oct. 1914; vol. 5, 
p. 195-213. illus., plans.) 

Brinckmann, A. E. Stadtbaukunst des 
achtzehnten Jahrhunderts. Berlin, W. Ernst 
& Sohn, 1914. 76 p. illus., plans. (Stadte- 
bauliche Vortrage, Bd. 7, Heft 1.) 

Brix, J. Aus der Geschichte des Stadte- 
baues in den letzten 100 Jahren. 1912. 75 p. 
illus., plans. (Ibid., Bd. 4, Heft 2.) 

Features of English towns, a series of 8 
articles. (Town Planning Review, April 1912- 
July 1913; vol. 3-4.) 

Include interesting historical facts. 

Hammarstrand, N. The plan of Paris. 
Transformations affecting the central quar- 
ters. Esthetic problems connected with these 
operations. (Journal of the American Insti- 
tute of Architects, Feb. 1920; vol. 8, p. 67-86. 
illus., plans.) 

Includes history and historical illustra- 
tions. 

Josephson, R. Stadsbyggnadskonst i Stock- 
holm intill ar 1800. Stockholm, Nordiska 
Bokhandeln, [1918]. 355 p. illus., plans. (At 
head of title: Samfundet Sankt Erick.) 

Shows the influence of other European 
town planning on the development of 
Stockholm. 

Nuttall, Z. Royal ordinances concerning 
the laying out of new towns. (Hispanic Amer- 
ican Historical Review, Nov. 1921; vol. 4, 
p. 743-749; Addenda, May 1922; vol. 5, 
p. 249-254.) Also reprinted. 

Ordinances issued by King Philip II of 
Spain, 1573, for towns in New World. 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. The scope and results 
of city planning in Europe. (In U. S. 61st 
Congress, Senate Document 422, City plan- 
ning, 1909, p. 63-70.) 

Stiibben, J. Vom franzosischen Stadtebau. 
Berlin, W. Ernst & Sohn, 1915. [2 parts.] 
illus., plans. (Stadtebauliche Vortrage, Bd. 8, 
Heften 2 and 3.) 

L'urbanisme au XVIII 6 siecle, les ide*es du 
Marquis de Tourny; with plan of Le Bor- 
deaux de Tourny. (La Vie Urbaine, Feb. 15, 
1921; vol. 3, p. 47-63.) 



ORIENTAL 

235 Borrmann, R. Vom Stadtebau im 
islamischen Osten. Berlin, W. Ernst & Sohn, 
1914. 32 p. illus., plans. (Stadtebauliche 
Vortrage, Bd. 7, Heft 2). 

Venkatarama Ayyar, C. P. Town planning 
in ancient Dekkan; with an introduction by 
Patrick Geddes. Madras, Printed at the Law 
Printing House, [1916]. 199 p. 

AMERICAN 

240 Howe, O. M. Early town planning in 
New England. (American Architect, Oct. 13, 
1920; vol. 18, p. 464-469. illus.) 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. The town planning 
movement in America. (In American Acad- 
emy of Political and Social Science, Housing 
and town planning, 1914, p. 172-181.) 

Shurtleff, F. Six years of city planning in 
the United States. (In Proceedings of 7th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1915, 
p. 33-41.) 

Waugh, F. A. A comparison of town plans. 
(Landscape Architecture, July 1921; vol. 11, 
p. 161-166. plans. Editorial, p. 203.) 
On New England. 

The history of city planning in the last 
twenty-five years may be traced in the con- 
gresses and exhibitions, see 40 ff. For current 
information as to conditions in various coun- 
tries, see p. 26 ff. 

GENERAL WORKS 

250 Aldridge, H. R. The case for town 
planning. A practical manual for the use of 
councillors, officers, and others engaged in the 
preparation of town planning schemes, with an 
appendix by Frank M. Elgood and Edmund 
R. Abbott. London, The National Housing 
and Town Planning Council, [1916]. 679 p. 
illus., plans. 

Prepared for use in Great Britain. See 

oho 210, 812.2. 

Cadbury, G., Jr. Town planning, with spe- 
cial reference to the Birmingham schemes. 
London, Longmans, Green & Co., 1915. 201 p. 
illus., plans. 

Evans, F. N. Town improvement. New 
York, D. Appleton & Co., 1919. 261 p. illus. 

Written to stimulate popular interest. 

Since it practically omits zoning, it should 

be supplemented by the Zoning Primer, 

1600. 



68 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



General Works (cont.) 
Hegemann, W., and E. Peets, see 3455. 
Lewis, N. P. The planning of the modern 
city; a review of the principles governing city 
planning. With the assistance of H. M. Lewis. 
2d rev. ed. New York, John Wiley & Sons, 
1923. 457 p. illus., plans. First ed., 1916. 

Mawson, T. H. Civic art; studies in town 
planning, parks, boulevards and open spaces. 
London, B. T. Batsford, 1911. 375 p. illus., 
plans. 

Nolen, J. New ideals in the planning of 
cities, towns, and villages. New York, Ameri- 
can City Bureau, 1919. 138 p. illus. 

A popular introduction to the subject. 
Purdom, C. B., ed. Town theory and prac- 
tice. See 5350. 

Robinson, C. M. City planning, with spe- 
cial reference to the planning of streets and 
lots. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1916. 
344 p. illus., plans. 

The improvement of towns and cities; 

or, The practical basis of civic aesthetics. 

New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons. 4th rev. ed., 

1913, reprinted 1922. 313 p. First ed., 1901. 

Page references to body of text hold good 

for all editions. 

Modern civic art; or, The city made 

beautiful . New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 
1903. 381 p. illus. 4th ed., 1918. 

Page references hold good. 
Triggs, H. I. Town planning, past, present 
and possible. London, Methuen & Co., [1909]. 
334 p. illus., plans. 

Unwin, R. Town planning in practice; an 
introduction to the art of designing cities and 
suburbs. London, T. F. Unwin, 1909. 416 p. 
illus., plans. 

Subsequent impressions (6th, 1919) have 
revised introduction. Page references 
hold good for all editions. 
Also translated into German, 1910. 

General Works in Foreign Languages 

250 Baumeister, R. Stadt-Erweiterungen 
in technischer, baupolizeilicher und wirth- 
schaftlicher Beziehung. Berlin, Ernst & 
Korn, 1876. 492 p. 

The historic early work, especially known 
for its theory of zoning. 
Fockema-Andreae, J. P. De Heden- 
daagsche Stedenbouw. Utrecht, H. de 
Vroede, 1912. 106 p. + plates. 



Ford, G. B. L'urbanisme en pratique, precis 
de Purbanisme dans toute son extension prat- 
ique comparee en Ame"rique et en Europe. 
Paris, Ernest Leroux, 1920. 196 p. plans. 
(Collection "Urbanisme," Serie C.) 

Gurlitt, C. Handbuch des Stadtebaues. 
Berlin, Der Zirkel, Architekturverlag, 1920. 
464 p. plans, sections. 

Kataoka, Y. [Investigation of modern 
cities. Tokyo, Architecture and Technology 
Association, 1917.] 458 p. illus., plans. 

Text in Japanese. A summary of city 
planning in Japan, Europe, and the 
United States. 

Schultze-Naumburg, P. Stadtebau. 2. 
verm. Auflage. Miinchen, G. D. W. Callwey, 
1909. 481 p. illus., plans. (Kulturarbeiten, 
Bd. 4.) 

Of especial interest for its pictures show- 
ing contrasts of types and "before-and- 
afters." 

Sitte, C. Der Stadtebau nach seinen Kiinst- 
lerischen Grundsatzen. Ein Beitrag zur 
Losung moderner Fragen der Architektur 
und monumentalen Plastik unter besonderer 
Beziehung auf Wien. 4. Aufl. vermehrt um. 
"Grossstadtgriin." Wien, K. Graeser & Kie, 
1909. 216 p. illus., plans. First ed., 1889. 

Translated as 

L'art de batir les villes. Notes et re- 
flexions d'un architecte, traduites et com- 
pletes par C. Martin. Paris, Librairie 
Renouard, [1902]. 196 p. illus., plans. 

Latest French translation published in 
Switzerland, 1918. 

Stiibben, J. Der Stadtebau. 2. Aufl. 
Stuttgart, Alfred Kroner, 1907. 652 p. illus., 
plans. (Handbuch der Architektur, 4. Teil, 9. 
Hlbd.) First ed., 1890. 

A later edition has been published, 1915. 

Swaelmen, L. van der. Pre"liminaires d'art 

civique, mis en relation avec le " Cas Clinique" 

de la Belgique. Leyde, A. W. Sijthoff, 1916. 

299 p. plans, diagr. 

Outlines 

254 Pray, J. S., and T. Kimball. City 
planning; a comprehensive analysis of the 
subject arranged for the classification of 
books, plans, photographs, notes, and other 
collected material, with alphabetic subject in- 
dex. Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 
1913. 103 p. 

The outline used for arranging the bibli- 
ography in this Manual. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



69 



Union Internationale des Villes, see 190, for 
elaborate outline of city planning published 
as preliminary announcement of the Encyclo- 
pedic. 

Collected Papers 

See also 40 

265 American Academy of Political and 
Social Science. Housing and town planning. 
Philadelphia, The Academy, 1914. 296 p. 
(Annals, vol. 51.) 

A group of papers by specialists. 

Nolen, J., ed. City planning; a series of 
papers presenting the essential elements of a 
city plan. New York, D. Appleton & Co., 
1916. 447 p. illus., plans. (National Muni- 
cipal League Series.) 

Seventeen essays by Messrs. Olmsted, 
Nolen, Williams, Bouton, Bennett, 
Comey, Goodrich, A. A. Shurtleff, Saville, 
Wadsworth, Haldeman, Davies, G. B. 
Ford, J. Ford, F. Shurtleff, Robinson, 
and McFarland, with a brief biographical 
sketch of each. Bibliographies accom- 
pany each essay. 

Brief General Papers 

See also p. 3 of this Manual 

270 Adams, T. Some town planning 
principles restated. (American City, Mar. 
1915; vol. 12, p. 213-216.) 

Adshead, S. D. An introduction to civic 
design. (Town Planning Review, April 1910; 
vol. 1, p. 3-17.) 

Bartholomew, H. The principles of city 
planning. (American City, May 1922; vol.26, 
p. 457-461. illus.) 

From first annual report of Memphis 
City Planning Commission. 
Bushnell, H. City plans. (In his Work and 
play, New York, C. Scribner, 1864, p. 308- 
336.) 

Eldridge, T. B. What city planning means 
to Raleigh. (American City, Aug. 1922; 
vol. 27, p. 143-145. plans.) 

From pamphlet issued by City of Raleigh, 
Jan. 1922. 

Eliot, C. W. The indispensableness of city 
planning. (American City, Sept. 1909; vol. 1, 
p. 25-26.) 

Hoover, Herbert. [Address on need for city 
planning.] (In Plan of New York and its En- 
virons, Russell Sage Foundation, Meeting of 
May 10, 1922, p. 13-14.) 



Knowles, M. Setting up a city plan pro- 
gram. (In 7th Yearbook of City Managers' 
Association, 1921, p. 112-121.) 

A brief statement of the subject matter 

of city planning work. 

Lewis, N. P. The city plan defined by a 
municipal engineer. (In Proceedings of 7th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1915, 
p. 1-12.) 

Olmsted, F. L., Sr., see 2050. 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. City planning. (In 
Nolen, J., ed., City planning, 1916, p. 1-18.) 
This should be used in preference to his 
Introductory address on city planning, 
1910. 

Root, Elihu. [Address on need for city 
planning.] (In Plan of New York and its 
Environs, Russell Sage Foundation, Meeting 
of May 10, 1922, p. 18-23.) 

Unwin, R. What is town planning?; an ex- 
tract from a lecture. (Garden Cities and 
Town Planning, Jan. 1912; N.S. vol. 2, p. 11- 
15.) 

Waterhouse, P. The problem of the de- 
velopment of cities. (Journal of the Royal 
Institute of British Architects, Nov. 1918; 
vol. 26, p. 9-12. diagr.) 

Wetherell, F. E. Town planning. Issued 
by Iowa Town Planning Association. [1922.] 
Mimeographed. 22 p. 

300 Adams, T. Town planning terms: 
the use of the word "zoning." (Garden 
Cities and Town Planning, Aug. 1921; vol. 11, 
p. 183-184. diagr.) 

'Also in American City, Sept. 1921; vol. 
25, p. 213. 

310 Lasker, B. What constitutes a city 
plan? Summary statement . . . embodying 
the essential principles of city planning. (Sur- 
vey, Feb. 19, 1921; vol. 45, p. 734.) 

Lewis, N. P. [Definitions of city planning 
and] Elements of a city plan. (In his Plan- 
ning of the modern city, 1916 and 1923, 
p. 9-11, 44-53.) 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Principles of city plan- 
ning: introductory statement. Boston, 1920. 
(American City Planning Institute Papers 
no. 1.) 

Also in Landscape Architecture, July 1920; 
vol. 10, p. 172-174. 



70 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



General Works (cont.) 

Stein, C. S. Community planning and 
housing: recommendations of the American 
Institute of Architects. (Journal of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects, Dec. 1921 ; vol. 9, 
p. 399-400.) 

322 Kimball, T. Personality and human 
beings in town-planning work. (American 
City, June 1920; vol. 22, p. 609.) 



CITY PLANNING MOVEMENT 

For Societies, Conferences, Congresses, and Exhibitions, 
see 21 ff. 

600 Gale, Z. Civic improvement in the 
little towns. Washington, Mar. 1913. 28 p. 
(American Civic Association Department of 
city making. Series II, no. 7.) 

James, H. Where to begin in town im- 
provement. (National Municipal Review, 
May 1921; vol. 10, p. 274-277.) 

On garden and street tree planting as 
leading to interest in larger civic improve- 
ments. 

Lewis, N. P. Sequence of operations in city 
planning work. (In Proceedings of 13th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1921, 
p. 1-5.) 

Nolen, J. Getting action in city planning. 
(In Proceedings of 13th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1921, p. 162-175.) 
A very useful summary. 

Olmsted, F. L. How to organize a city plan- 
ning campaign. (American City, Oct. 1913; 
vol. 9, p. 303-309.) 

Robinson, C. M. Work of individuals and 
societies. (In his Improvement of towns and 
cities, 1913, etc., p. 253-270.) 

Wacker, C. H. Gaining public support for a 
city planning movement. (In Proceedings of 
5th National Conference City Planning, 1913, 
p. 222-243.) 

Waugh, F. A. Improvement programs; Or- 
ganization and management. (In his Rural 
improvement, 1914, p. 224-259. illus.) 

610 Farwell, P. T. A typical village im- 
provement society; Other improvement soci- 
eties. (In his Village improvement, 1913, 
p. 13-58. illus.) 

613 Abercrombie, P. A civic society; an 
outline of its scope, formation and functions. 
(Town Planning Review, Apr. 1920; vol. 8, 
p. 79-92.) 



Hiett, I. B. Realtors are community build- 
ers, President's address before Executive 
Committee, National Association of Real 
Estate Boards. (National Real Estate Jour- 
nal, Mar. 27, 1922; vol. 23, no. 7, p. 24-25.) 

Jones, H. V. Resume" of activities of com- 
mittee on city planning, National Association 
of Real Estate Boards; remarkable progress 
in city planning and zoning. (National Real 
Estate Journal, May 8, 1922; vol. 23, no. 10, 
p. 39-40.) 

616 Clay, S. H. City building. A citation 
of methods in use in more than one hundred 
cities for the solution of important problems 
in the progressive growth of the American 
municipality. Cincinnati, Clark Publishing 
Co., 1913. 164 p. 

Ford, G. B. Chambers of commerce and 
city planning. (American City, May 1914; 
vol. 10, p. 448-449.) 

Goodwin, E. H. Chambers of commerce 
and city planning. (In Proceedings of 13th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1921, 
p. 187-194.) 

Kinsloe, J. R. A city plan and how to get 
it; the secretary's part. La Crosse, Wiscon- 
sin Association of Commercial Secretaries, 
1919. 11 p. 

EDUCATIONAL AND PUBLICITY CAMPAIGNS 

For information on lantern slides for city planning 
lectures, see p. 38. 

640 Ball, C. B. The promotion of zoning 
in Chicago. (American City, Jan. 1923; vol. 
28, p. 11-14. illus.) 

Bartholomew, H. Publicity and the city 
plan. (American City, Nov. 1914; vol. 11, 
p. 380-382.) 

In Newark, N. J. 

Brainerd, H. B. Effective publicity aids 
Cleveland city plan. (American City, Aug. 
1921; vol. 25; p. 127-128. illus.) 

Buettner, L. J. Making the city plan effec- 
tive. (American City, Apr. 1922; vol. 26, 
p. 323-326. illus.) 

Based on his experience in Johnstown, Pa. 

Kimball, T. Helps in conducting publicity 
campaigns for zoning. (Landscape Architec- 
ture, July 1922; vol. 12, p. 274-277.) Also 
preprinted. 

A revision of this may be found on p. 33. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



71 



Kingsley, S. C. Methods of winning public 
support for a city planning program. (In 
Proceedings of 14th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1922, p. 174-181.) 

MacNeille, P. R. The campaign for a civic 
center in Summit, N. J. (American City, 
Oct. 1922; vol. 27, p. 350-352. plan, diagr.) 

Madison, C. I. Introducing the community 
(Boulder, Colo.) to the citizens. (American 
City, Mar. 1922; vol. 26, p. 241-242. illus.) 

Moody, W. D. What of the city? Ameri- 
ca's greatest issue City planning what it is 
and how to go about it to achieve success. 
Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co., 1919. 441 p. 
illus., plans. 

The first extensive treatise on the "pro- 
motion " of city plans, giving fully the 
experience of Chicago. 

Popularizing the city planning principle. 
Discussion. (In Proceedings of 4th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1912, p. 168- 
172.) 

Robinson, C. M. Popular education in art. 
(In his Improvement of towns and cities, 
1913, etc., p. 237-252.) 

Schaaf, A. H. A state campaign for city 
planning. (In Proceedings of 9th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1917, p. 133- 
138.) 

The campaign in Indiana, led by real 

estate men. 

Woodward, S. Methods of winning public 
support for a city planning program. (In 
Proceedings of 14th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1922, p. 182-185.) 

The experience of Worcester, Mass. 

The educational campaigns conducted in 
Chicago, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Baltimore, 
Johnstown, Buffalo, St. Louis, and Dallas 
might be especially mentioned; also the state- 
wide work of the Ohio State Conference on 
City Planning, Iowa Town Planning Associa- 
tion, Massachusetts Federation of Planning 
Boards, and Chicago Real Estate Association 
in Illinois, 1921. The national campaign con- 
ducted by the Canadian Commission of Con- 
servation (see 2) resulted in the formation of 
provincial and local organizations to promote 
town planning, such as the Ontario Town 
Planning Association, etc. The propaganda 
work of the Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning Association, London, is described in its 
monthly magazine, see 2. 



643 Film on zoning wins wide-spread ap- 
proval. (American City, Jan. 1923; vol. 28, 
p. 60.) 

See also p. 38. 

National Conference on City Planning. The 
use of moving pictures in city planning 
Committee report by E. H. Bennett, L. Veil- 
ler, H. S. Swan. (In its 13th Proceedings, 
1921, p. 183-186.) 

New York (City) Municipal Reference Li- 
brary. Visualizing citizenship [study of mo- 
tion pictures from a civic standpoint] by Ina 
Clement. New York, 1920. (Supplement, 
Part II, to Municipal Reference Library 
Notes, June 23, 1920, p. 283-309.) 

The Chicago Plan Commission's film " Tale 
of One City " is described in Moody, see 640. 

644 Buffalo City Planning Association. 
Bulletins. 1922. illus., plans. 

Part of an intensive educational cam- 
paign. An account of the work of the 
Association is given in paper by C. J. 
Hamlin in Proceedings of National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1922. 
Citizens Committee on City Plan of Pitts- 
burgh, organized to promote city planning in 
the Pittsburgh district. [Publications includ- 
ing monthly magazine Progress, fliers, etc., 
1919 to date.] 

City planning tabloids Boston Chamber 
of Commerce campaign. (American City, 
Feb. 1914; vol. 10, p. 166.) 

Cleveland City Plan Commission. [Reports 
and fliers.] 1919-21. 

Of especial interest for their illustrations 
and popular appeal. 

Flint, K. R. B. Town planning; a pro- 
gram of civic preparedness for Vermont com- 
munities. Norwich University Record, Feb. 8, 
1919; vol. X, no. 19. [Northfield, Vt.] 70 p. 
(Norwich University studies, Political Science 
Series, no. 2.) 

An educational bulletin which various 
state officials concerned in questions of 
rural and town planning helped to pre- 
pare. 

Grinnalds, J. C. [Series of articles on city 
planning and zoning.] (Municipal Journal, 
Baltimore, 1920 to date.) 

Wacker, C. H. An appeal to business men; 
Provide work now for the unemployed; Rela- 
tion of national prosperity to city planning; 
Business and the Chicago plan. Chicago, The 
Plan Commission, [1921]. 17 p. 



72 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Educational and Publicity Campaigns (cent.) 

646 An effective exhibition of a commun- 
ity survey Springfield, 111. (American City, 
Feb. 1915; vol. 12, p. 95-100. illus.) 

See also 50. 

Extension work in landscape architecture 
a symposium. (Landscape Architecture, 
Jan. 1922; vol. 12, p. 61-94.) 

Summarizes work of a number of public 
agencies for civic improvement. 

548 Ackerman, F. L. City planning in 
schools; from address, "The architectural 
side of city planning," delivered at National 
Conference on City Planning, 1915. (Real 
Estate Magazine, Oct. 1915; vol. 6, p. 92-94.) 

Beck, M. L. City planning; Garden cities. 
(In her Better citizenship through art training 
Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co., 1921, p. 13- 
33.) 

Intended as a syllabus for high schools or 

study clubs. 

Buettner, L. J., see 540. 

Hughes, R. O. The planning of the com- 
munity. (In his Community civics, Boston, 
Allyn and Bacon, 1917, p. 28-71. illus., 
plan.) 

James, H. The building of cities. New 
York, Macmillan Co., 1917. 201 p. illus. 
(Everychild's Series.) 

Conversational text for class-room use. 

Moody, W. D. Wacker's manual of the 
plan of Chicago; municipal economy. Espe- 
cially prepared for study in the public schools 
of Chicago, auspices of the Chicago Plan Com- 
mission [Chicago, Printed by H. C. Sherman], 
1912. 147 p. illus., plans. 2d rev. ed., 1916. 

Accompanied by Teachers' Hand-book, 

110 p. 

New York (City) Board of Education. Sylla- 
bus for high schools: first year civics. Adopted 
by the Board of Superintendents, June 1919. 
City planning, p. 38-40; Civic beauty, p. 41- 
44. 

Tentative syllabus for high schools: 

Civic activities. Adopted Sept. 14, 1922. 
City planning, p. 29; Civic beauty, p. 30. 

Newark, N. J., Board of Education. [Mun- 
icipal civic leaflets.] Issued for the study of 
Newark in the schools of Newark, N. J. No. 
23, City planning, 1912, 6 p. 



Nolen, J. The planning of cities, towns and 
villages; outlines of lectures. U. S. Army 
Educational Commission, Dept. of Citizen- 
ship, Bureau of Housing and Community 
Planning, 1919. 10 p. 

See also Nolen, New Ideals, 250. 
Taylor, C. K. How would you plan a city? 
(St. Nicholas, Aug. 1920; vol. 47, p. 917-919. 
plans.) 

The results of a class study of city plan- 
ning told for children. 



LEGISLATION 
Laws and Court Decisions 

700 Williams, F. B. The law of city plan- 
ning and zoning. New York, Macmillan Co., 
1922. 738 p. (The Citizen's Library of Eco- 
nomics, Politics and Sociology New Series. 
Edited by R. T. Ely.) 

The authoritative comprehensive treatise 
on the subject. Contains bibliography 
and tables of statutes. Main contents: 

Planning the city as a whole. Planning the public 
features, including excess condemnation, zone con- 
demnation, and replotting. Public utilities, the 
waterfront, streets, setbacks, and traffic regula- 
tions. Planning the private features (zoning). 
City planning finance. Planning for the promo- 
tion of beauty. Planning administration. 

The subjects covered in this book will be 
kept up to date by Mr. Williams's 
monthly column in the American City 
from June 1923. 



Adams, T. Need for a constructive policy 
in regard to town planning. (City Plan, June 
1915; vol. 1, no. 2, p. 2-6.) 

Discusses the type of legislation desirable. 

The need of town-planning legislation 

and procedure for control of land as a factor in 
house-building development. (Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects, Feb., Mar. 
1918; vol. 6, p. 68-70, 135-137.) 

Aldridge, H. R. Compulsory town plan- 
ning; paper read before the Town Planning 
Institute. (Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning, Feb. 1916; vol. 6, p. 25-32.) 

Bassett, E. M. Constitutional limitations 
on city planning powers. (In Proceedings of 
9th National Conference on City Planning, 
1917, p. 199-214; with discussion, p. 214- 
227.) Also reprinted as Bulletin no. 10 of the 
Conference. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



73 



Chandler, H. P. The attitude of the law 
toward beauty. See 1235. 

The legal aspects of city planning; includ- 
ing discussion and paper by A. W. Crawford: 
Certain principles of a uniform city planning 
code. (In Proceedings of 3d National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1911, p. 229-260.) 
McBain, H. L. American city progress and 
the law. New York, Columbia University, 
1918. 269 p. 

Intended to show how the law as it stands 
facilitates or obstructs cities in applying 
new policies to existing problems. Several 
chapters relate to the field of city plan- 
ning. 

Massachusetts Federation of Planning 
Boards. Massachusetts city and town plan- 
ning law. 48 p. (Bulletin no. 9, Aug. 1921.) 
An excellent example of a convenient 
compilation of laws of a given state for 
the use of its local planning boards. 
National Conference on City Planning. Re- 
port of the Committee on Legislation. (In its 
5th Proceedings, 1913, p. 247-259.) 

Drafts of recommended acts. See also 
earlier discussion at 1912 Conference, 770. 
Shurtleff, F., andF. L. Olmsted, Jr. Carry- 
ing out the city plan; the practical applica- 
tion of American law in the execution of city 
plans. New York, Survey Associates, 1914. 
349 p. (Russell Sage Foundation Publica- 
tions.) 

Singapore Improvement Trust. Legislation 
Committee, Town Planning and Housing, etc. 
Memorandum by the Deputy-Chairman on 
legislative powers and methods of some other 
countries. Singapore, [1921]. 32 p. 
- Williams, F. B. The law of the city plan, 
rev. ed. New York National Municipal 
League, 1922. 39 p. (Technical Pamphlet 
Series no. 8.) First ed., 1920. 
See also 824, 1505. 

CREATIVE 

General Planning Laws 

The general acts of Italy, Sweden, Germany, Eng- 
land, France, and the provinces of Canada are 
discussed in Mr. Williams's book. 

707 Bombay. Mirams, A. E. Town plan- 
ning in Bombay under the Bombay Town 
Planning Act, 1915. (In Town Planning 
Institute, London, Papers and discussions, 
1919-20; vol. 6, p. 43-56; with discussion, 
p. 57-63. illus.) 



France. Laws. Town planning and repa- 
ration of damages caused by the events of the 
war. New York, National Civic Federation, 
1919. 51 p. 

Translation by Roscoe Pound, Dean, 
Harvard Law School. The law is dis- 
cussed by F. B. Williams in the National 
Municipal Review, Oct. 1919. 

Great Britain. Housing, town planning, 
etc., act, Oct. 1919. London. H. M. Station- 
ery Oftice, 1919. 44 p. 

A manual of the act will be found in H. C. 
Dowdall's Local Development Law (London, 
T. F. Unwin, 1919. 230 p.). The law is 
discussed by F. B. Williams in American City, 
Apr. 1920. 

The new regulations and the future of town 
planning; summary of town planning regula- 
tions, 1921. (Housing, Apr. 1921; vol. 2, 
p. 254, 260-262.) 

Holland. Hudig, D. Dutch housing legis- 
lation. Amsterdam, Nederlandsch Instituut 
voor Volkshuisvesting, [1920]. 16 p. 

Regulation of town planning, p. 8-11. 

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Municipal Affairs. 
Model form of development by law, prepared 
by the Town Planning and Rural Develop- 
ment Branch, adapted for an urban area of 
5000 population and over. Regina, Sask., 
[1921]. 24 p. 

Includes provisions for zoning law, plat- 
ting regulations, etc. 

South Australia. Reade, C. C. Planning 
and development of towns and cities in South 
Australia; report by the government town 
planner . . . upon existing conditions and 
defects and the need for town planning legis- 
lation relating thereto in conformity with the 
provisions of the town planning and develop- 
ment bill, 1919. Adelaide, Govt. Printer, 
1919. 48 p. 

See further retrospective article by Mr. 
Reade, Town planning legislation in South 
Australia, in Town Planning Review, Dec. 
1921; vol. 9, p. 157-161. 

Creation of City Planning Agencies 

714 Baker, M. N. City planning; model 
city charter. See 1535. 

Ford, F. L. The commission on the city 
plan at Hartford, Connecticut Charter 
amendment. (In Proceedings of 2d National 
Conference on City Planning, 1910, p. 172- 
174.) 



74 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Creation of City Planning Agencies (cont.) 

An ordinance creating a planning board; 
Form of by-law for towns. (In Annual report 
of Massachusetts Division of Housing and 
Town Planning, 1921, p. 45-47.) 

Plan commission legislation. (City plan, 
Jan. 1916; vol. 1, no. 4, p. 9-13.) 

Williams, see 700. See also his provision 
for city planning and zoning commission 
powers in the proposed charter for Nassau 
County, N. Y. 

See also 1635. 

Acquisition of Public Property 
Condemnation 

722 Illinois. Legislative Reference Bu- 
reau. Eminent domain and excess condemna- 
tion. [Springfield, 111., 1919.] p. 455-515. 
(Constitutional Convention Bulletin no. 7.) 

Great Britain. Ministry of Reconstruction. 
Committee dealing with law and practice re- 
lating to the acquisition and valuation of land 
for public purposes. Reports 1-4. London, 
H. M. Stationery Office, 1918-19. [Cd. 8998, 
9229] [Cmd. 156, 424]. 

Massachusetts. [Report of Committee on 
Eminent Domain, Dec. 29, 1903.] 101 p. 
(House Legislative Document no. 288.) 

Contains reports on English and French 
methods. 

Supplementary report of the tax com- 
missioner, attorney-general, and chairman of 
the Homestead Commission relative to uni- 
form methods and procedure for taking land 
for public purposes. Boston, State Printers, 
1916. 78 p. (House Document no. 1750.) 
Includes the special commission report 
(House Document no. 1851 of 1915), to 
which this is supplementary. Discusses 
current American practice, with reference 
to town planning needs. 
Shurtleff and Olmsted, see 700. 
See also 1570. 

Excess Condemnation and Replotting 

724 Chicago Bureau of Public Efficiency. 
Excess condemnation. [Chicago, The Bureau, 
1918?] 58 p. plans. 

Reviewed by H. S. Swan in National Muni- 
cipal Review, Mar. 1919; vol. 8. p. 174-175. 

Crawford, A. W. Excess condemnation 
and public use. (In Proceedings of 2d Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1910, 
p. 155-163.) 



Condensed in American City, Nov. 1910; 
vol. 3, p. 224-226. 

Cushman, R. E. Excess condemnation. 
New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1917. 323 p. 
(National Municipal League Series.) 

Gives text of American statutes and con- 
stitutional provisions. Contains bibli- 
ography. 

Detroit City Plan Commission. Excess 
condemnation, a few facts in support of pro- 
posed constitutional amendment approved by 
Common Council of Detroit, Mar. 8, 1919. 
Detroit, The Commission, Mar. 1919. [8 p.] 

New York (City). Excess condemnation: a 
report of the Committee on Taxation, with a 
report prepared by H. S. Swan for the Na- 
tional Municipal League. New York, 1915. 
122 p. 

A review of the movement for excess con- 
demnation for public improvements. (Engi- 
neering and Contracting, Oct. 2, 1918; vol. 
50, p. 324-326.) 

Swan, H. S. Excess condemnation in street 
improvements. (American City, Mar. 1916; 
vol. 14, p. 258-262. illus., plans.) 

Summary of report for National Muni- 
cipal League. 

Tiefenthaler, L. Milwaukee embarks on 
street-widening program. (American City, 
Aug. 1922; vol. 27, p. 163.) 

Excess condemnation to be employed. 

Williams, see 700, first reference. 

728 Baumeister, R., J. Classen, and J. 
Stiibben. Die Umlegung stadtischer Grund- 
stiicke und die Zonenenteignung. Berlin, 
E. Toeche, 1897. 152 p. illus., plans. 

Marsh, B. C. Land policy in Frankfort-on- 
the-Main. (In his An introduction to city 
planning, 1909, p. 52-58.) 
" Lex Adickes." 

Williams, on zone condemnation and re- 
plotting, see 700, first reference. 
See also 1293 and 1703. 

REGULATIVE 

760 Shurtleff, F., and F. L. Olmsted. Use 
of the police power in the execution of a city 
plan. (In their Carrying out the city plan, 
1914, p. 138-167.) 

Williams, F. B. Public control of private 
real estate. (In Nolen, J., ed., City planning, 
1916, p. 48-87.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



75 



Zoning Legislation 

766 Bassett,E. M. The Board of Appeals 
in zoning. Published by Zoning Committee 
of New York, [1921]. 25 p. 

Full statement of origin, operation, and 
advantages of such a board. 
Summary in American City, Jan. 1922; 
vol. 26, p. 50-51. 

Zoning, National Municipal League 

pamphlet. See 1600. 

Interim zoning. (American City, 

March 1922; vol. 26, p. 238.) 

An impartial statement of its dangers and 
possibilities. 

" Zoning " that was not zoning. 

(Housing Betterment, Nov. 1922; vol. 11, 
p. 387-388.) 

Shows dangers of piecemeal zoning. 

Present attitude of courts towards 

zoning. Paper read at 15th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, May 1, 1923. To be 
printed separately in advance of Conference 
Proceedings. 

A most important discussion of the rela- 
tion of state enabling acts to court de- 
cisions. 

Bettman, A. The constitutionality of zon- 
ing. (American City, Sept. 1922; vol. 27, 
p. 212-216.) 

Recent court decisions on zoning. 

(In Proceedings of 12th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1920, p. 148-153.) 

Contains humorous account of the 
western corral decision, repeated by 
A. W. Crawford in Civic Comment (Ameri- 
can Civic Association), Sept. 20, 1920, 
as " zoning and jaw-distended mules." 
Cheney, C. H. Procedure for zoning or 
districting of cities. San Francisco, Sept. 
1917. 15 p. plans. (California Conference 
on City Planning, Bulletin no 2.) 

Prepared for the use of California cities. 

Crawford, A. W. Prevention of billboards 
in residential districts. Zoning and billboards. 
(In his The billboard nuisance, American 
Civic Association pamphlet, Series II, no. 13, 
rev. 1920, p. 15-20.) 

Davis, E. H., comp. Zoning. [38 p.] plans. 
(St. Louis Public Library Monthly Bulletin, 
July 1917, N.S. vol. 15, no. 7.) 

A compilation showing the advance of 
the movement in the United States, 
mainly of historical interest. 



Haldeman, B. A. The control of municipal 
development by the " Zone system " and its 
application in the United States. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 4th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1912, p. 173-188; with discussion, 
p. 188-191.) 

Condensed in American City, Sept. 1912; 
vol. 7, p. 222-225. plan. 

McBain, H. L. Law-making by property 
owners. Shall the exercise of the police power 
be made to depend on property owners? 
(Political Science Quarterly, Dec. 1921; vol. 
36, p. 617-641.) 

Includes a discussion of the validity of 
clauses in zoning ordinances requiring the 
consent of property owners. 
Merrill, E. A. The legal view of zoning. 
(Philadelphia Realtor's News, Jan. 1922; 
vol. 3, p. 5-6.) 

Legal objections and tests of a good or- 
dinance. 

Newman, B. J. Zoning and nuisances in 
Philadelphia. (Housing Betterment, Nov. 
1922; vol. 11, p. 401-403.) 

Swan, H. S. The law of zoning; a review 
of the constitutionality of zoning regulations 
which control buildings in accordance with 
a general plan of municipal development. 
Supplement to National Municipal Review, 
Oct. 1921; vol. 10, p. 519-536. (Technical 
Pamphlet Series, no. 11.) 

Court decisions, grouped according to the 
different phases of zoning. 
The non-conforming building in zon- 
ing. (American Architect, Nov. 13, 1918; 
vol 114, p. 592-594.) 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce. A standard 
state zoning enabling act, under which muni- 
cipalities can adopt zoning regulations, rev. 
ed., Jan. 1923. Mimeographed. 16 p. 

Prepared by Secretary Hoover's Ad- 
visory Committee on Zoning. 
Veiller, L. Zoning. (In his A model hous- 
ing law, published by Russell Sage Founda- 
tion, New York, rev. ed., 1920, p. 375-381.) 

Legislation suggested in connection with 
v the housing law. 

V Whitten, R. H. The zoning of apartment 
and tenement houses, an important legal de- 
cision (East Cleveland) which will help to 
preserve our American cities as cities of 
homes. (American City, August 1920; vol. 
23, p. 140-142.) 

Regional zoning. See 6100. 



76 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



\ Zoning Legislation (cont.) 

Williams, F. B. Planning the private fea- 
tures. Building regulation and zoning. (In 
his Law of city planning and zoning, 1922, 
p. 191-355.) 

See also 1600 ff. 

Platting Legislation 

770 Bostwick, A. L. Municipal control of 
street planning. (Municipal Journal, New 
York, July 29, 1915; vol. 39, p. 145-147.) 

A comprehensive survey of laws relative 

to platting in the United States and 

Canadian provinces to 1915. 
Crawford, A. W. How to secure power to 
prevent building within the lines of platted 
streets. (City Plan, Jan. 1917; vol. 2, no. 4, 
p. 8-9.) 

Fisher, C. F. Replatting a city area. 
Property owners and city authorities unite to 
vacate and replat a section of Portland, Ore. 
Terms of agreement. Legal procedure. 
(Municipal Journal, New York, June 29, 1916; 
vol. 40, p. 892-893. plans.) 

Done by voluntary agreement. 
The legislation necessary for intelligent 
city planning. ( In Proceeding of 4th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1912, p. 138- 
151.) 

Deals largely with municipal control of 

platting. 

National Conference on City Planning. En- 
forcing an official city plan for streets as a 
police power regulation. Boston, 1922. [8 p.] 
(Bulletin no. 2, series 1922, i.e. bulletin no. 17 
of the Conference.) 

Comments on Windsor, Conn., court 

decision. 

New York (State). An act to amend the 
Greater New York Charter, in relation to 
the official map and plan, to prevent build- 
ings in streets shown on such map and plan, 
and to empower the board of appeals to grant 
building permits in certain cases. (No. 2178, 
Int. 1827. In Senate, Apr. 17, 1923.) 

An important example of a practical 

method. 

Whitten, R. H. Erection of buildings 
within the lines of proposed streets laid down 
on the final map of the City of New York. 
New York, Board of Estimate and Apportion- 
ment, Committee on the City Plan, 1917. 7 p. 
map. 

Williams, F. B. Enforcing the city plan. 
(National Municipal Review, July 1921; 



vol. 10, p. 374-377.) Also reprinted as Bulle- 
tin no. 16 of National Conference on City 
Planning. 

Among cities which have published platting 
regulations may be noted: New York City, 
Rochester, and Syracuse, N. Y.; Haverhill, 
New Bedford, and Revere, Mass.; Akron, 
Cleveland, Toledo, and Hamilton, O.; In- 
dianapolis; Baltimore, Md.; Detroit, Mich.; 
St. Louis, Mo. ; and Portland, Ore. 

The Ohio state law (1923) relating to plats 
and requiring cities to have official street 
plans is of especial interest. Under this act, 
Cincinnati adopted a plan, Apr. 1923. 

Montana passed an act in 1917 cover- 
ing the platting of additions to towns and 
cities, requiring one-ninth of each plat, with 
certain exceptions, to be set aside by the de- 
veloper for public parks and playgrounds. 
(Chap. 41, Sec. 4981, Art. 9, Political Codes 
of Montana, vol. 1.) 

See also 1800 ff. 

774 For legislation relating to special 
elements of the city plan, see Streets, 2070; 
Buildings, 3460; Parks, 4060; etc. (See 
Subject Index.) 

METHODS OF TECHNICAL PROCEDURE 

X 800 Adams, T. Modern city planning: 
its meaning and methods. Special number 
of National Municipal Review, June 1922; 
vol. 11, no. 6. p. 157-177. maps. 
Outlines technical procedure. 
Enowles, M. Development of the town 
plan. (In his Industrial housing, 1920, p. 53- 
117. illus., plans.) 

Includes experience of U. S. Shipping 
Board war housing. 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Report of the United States 
Housing Corporation. Vol. 2, Houses site 
planning utilities. 1919. 

Appendices: note especially 
1. Instructions for collection of general 
information on sites. 

3. Instructions for collection of engi- 
neering information. 

4. General instructions to committee of 
designers. 

5. Instructions to surveyors. 

6. Tentative instructions to engineering 
designers. 

9. Suggestions to town planners. 
10. Instructions to field staff concerning 
operations. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



77 



Suggestions for Official Procedure 

812.1 Cheney, C. H. What city planning 
commissions can do. San Francisco, 1915. 
22 p. illus., maps. (California Conference on 
City Planning, Bulletin no. 1.) 

Massachusetts. Homestead Commission. 

Information and suggestions for city and 
town planning boards. Boston, 1914. 12 p. 
(Bulletin no. 2.) 

812.2 Abercrombie, P. The new town 
planning regulations. (Town Planning Re- 
view, July 1921; vol. 9, p. 111-119.) 

Suggestions as to the part of the Town 
Planning Committee, the constructive 
town planner, and the owner in carrying 
out the new procedure regulations of the 
British Ministry of Health, 1921. 

Aldridge, H. R. The administration of the 
town planning duties of local authorities. 
London, National Housing and Town Plan- 
ning Council, 1922. 95 p. 

A supplement to his Case for Town Plan- 
ning, 1916. 

Great Britain. Local Government Board. 
Manual on the preparation of state-aided 
housing schemes. London, H. M. Stationery 
Office, 1919. 52 p. illus., plans. 

812.3 Ford, G. B., see 250, for procedure 
in France. 

Making of Surveys 

815 Adams, T. The making of regional 
surveys. (In Proceedings of American So- 
ciety for Municipal Improvements, 1920, 
p. 55-59.) 

Abstract in Engineering News-Record, Aug. 
4, 1921; vol. 87, p. 201-202. 

Civic Survey of Greater London [table 
showing investigation of data]. (Town Plan- 
ning Review, Mar.-Apr. 1918; vol. 7, opp. 
p. 192.) 

Comey, A. C. A schedule of civic surveys. 
Boston, 1916. 16 p. (Massachusetts Home- 
stead Commission, Bulletin no. 5.) 

Ford, G. B. Fundamental data for city 
planning work. (In Nolen, J., ed., City plan- 
ning, 1916, p. 353-386. maps, plans.) 

Contains bibliography. 
Geddes, P. The city survey: a first step. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, Feb., 
Mar., Apr. 1911; N.S. vol. 1, p. 18-19, 31-32, 
56-58.) 

See also Geddes, entries under 1300. 



Harrison, S. M. Community action 
through surveys. Paper presented in part 
at the Indianapolis meeting of the National 
Conference of Charities and Correction, May 
1916. New York, Department of Surveys and 
Exhibits, Russell Sage Foundation, [1916]. 
29 p. 

Lanchester, H. V. Civic survey and recon- 
struction. (In Problems of Reconstruction, 
London, T. Fisher Unwin, 1918, p. 293-302.) 
Nolen, J. The local survey as a basis for 
city planning studies. (City Plan, June 1915; 
vol. 1, no. 2, p. 13-16.) 

Plan of New York and its Environs. Report 
of progress, May 1922-Feb. 1923. 67 p. 

Mainly devoted to progress on surveys 
as follows: 

Physical survey, by N. P. Lewis. 
Economic and industrial inquiry, by 
R. C. McCrea and R. M. Haig (including 
statements by F. L. Olmsted and W. W. 
Stewart). 

Social and living conditions survey, by 
S. M. Harrison, including Housing, by 
L. Purdy and W. D. Heydecker; Recrea- 
tion, by L. F. Hanmer and C. A. Perry; 
School facilities, by G. D. Strayer and 
N. L. Engelhardt; Public health and 
sanitation, by H. Emerson, M.D.; Public 
building programs, by H. H. Hart. 
Legal survey, by E. M. Bassett. 
Swaelmen, L. van der. Civic development 
survey. (In his Preliminaries d'art civique, 
1916, p. 141-163. diagr.) 

Based^on the work of H. V. Lanchester for 

the Royal Institute of British Architects. 

Unwin, R. Of the city survey. (In his 

Town planning in practice, 1909, etc., p. 140- 

153. illus., diagr.) 

For examples of city plan reports containing 
particular reference to surveys, see especially 
in the list on p. 43, those for New York, Bir- 
mingham, Flint, Fall River, and Springfield 
(Mass.). The final report for Springfield is to 
contain an elaborate exposition of technique. 

Topographical Surveys 

820 Folwell, A. P. City surveying. (In 
his Municipal engineering practice, 1916, p. 
212-260. illus., plans, diagr.) 

A brief summary of mapping methods. 
x Forecasting the future of a city. (American 
City, Aug. 1922; vol. 27, p. 152.) 

On the value of Telephone Company 
maps. 



78 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Topographical Surveys (cont.) 

Grinnalds, J. C. Advantages of a topo- 
graphic map in city planning and zoning. (In 
Proceedings of American Society for Munic- 
ipal Improvements, 1921, p. 212-218.) 
- Condensed in American City, Oct., Nov. 
1921; vol. 25, p. 280-282, 373-375. map. 

Also in Good Roads, Nov. 30, 1921 ; vol. 
61, p. 243-245, 250, 252. 

Mitchell, H. C. A topographic survey of a 
large city. (American City, Feb. 1916; vol. 
14, p. 127-130. illus., map.) 
Cincinnati. 

Nelles, D. H. The making of topographical 
maps of cities and towns, the first step in 
town planning. Ottawa, 1921. 40 p. maps, 
diagr. (Geodetic Survey of Canada. Publica- 
tion no. 9.) 

Pollock, J. R. The topographic survey and 
its relation to city engineering work. (Ameri- 
can City, Feb. 1922; vol. 26, p. 118-120. 
maps.) 

Shirley, J. W. The value of a topographical 
survey in planning a street system. (Ameri- 
can City, June 1915; vol. 12, p. 477-479. 
plan.) 

Major Shirley had charge of the Balti- 
more survey which has often served as a 
standard. 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Instructions to surveyors for 
the preparation of topographical maps, scales 
200 feet to an inch and 40 feet to an inch. 
(In its Report of the United States Housing 
Corporation, 1919, vol. 2, Appendix 5, p. 
447-448.) 

Among cities reported to have complete 
topographical surveys may be noted: Balti- 
more (see Shirley article above) ; Washington; 
Philadelphia; Cincinnati, Dayton, and Akron 
Ohio; Flint and Jackson, Mich. ; Worcester, 
Mass.; etc. 

See also 834 for technique of presenting 
survey maps. 

Social Surveys 

822 Aronovici, C. The social survey. 
Philadelphia, The Harper Press, 1916. 255 p. 
illus. (Bureaji for Social Research of the 
Seybert Institution.) 

Blackmar, F. W., and . W. Burgess. 
Lawrence social survey. A study under the 
direction of the Dept. of Sociology, Univer- 



sity of Kansas. Topeka, State Printer, 1917. 
122 p. Includes city planning. 

Curtis, F. R. The collection of social survey 
material. Chicago, American Library Asso- 
ciation Publishing Board, 1915. 15 p. 

Harrison, S. M. Social conditions in an 
American city, a summary of the findings of 
the Springfield (111.) survey. New York, 
Russell Sage Foundation, 1920. 439 p. 
illus., maps, plans. 

Potter, Z. L., comp. The social survey: a 
bibliography. Revised to Dec. 1915. New 
York, Russell Sage Foundation, Department 
of Surveys and Exhibits, 1915. 16 p. 

As examples of social surveys for American 
cities, there may be noted: Pittsburgh, which 
dealt mainly with labor problems; Spring- 
field (111.), which dealt mainly with institu- 
tions; and Cleveland, which treated the 
people and their problems. For an example of 
the Cleveland Foundation Surveys, see 1495. 

Baker, M. N. A sanitary survey a check 
list for planning such a survey. (American 
City, Jan. 1913; vol. 8, p. 13-16.) 

A paper read before the Conference of 
Sanitary Officers of the State of New 
York, 1912. 

Horwood, M. P. Public health surveys, 
what they are; how to make them; how to 
use them. With a foreword by W. T. Sedg- 
wick and an introduction by G. C. Whipple. 
New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1921. 403 p. 
illus. 

Munson, W. L. The sanitary survey as a 
check on community health. (American 
City, Mar. 1921; vol. 24, p. 228-230. charts.) 

For discussion of housing survey technique, 
see 815, Plan of New York, Purdy and Hey- 
decker report. Notable examples of housing 
surveys are Newark (Ford, see p. 44 of this 
Manual), Providence (Ihlder), St. Paul 
(Aronovici), Chicago (Chicago School of 
Civics and Philanthropy), and the original 
tenement house survey of New York City 
(De Forest and Veiller). The survey work of 
the California Commission of Immigration 
and Housing is also notable. 

Playground and Recreation Association of 
America. Suggestions for recreational survey. 
Mimeographed sheets. 

Technical methods explained. Sheets 
now available from Association, 1923. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



79 



For examples of technique of recreation 
surveys, see 816, Plan of New York, above, 
1495, Haynes and Davies (Cleveland). De- 
tailed information will be found in the publi- 
cations of the Russell Sage Foundation Dept. 
of Recreation, and Playground and Recrea-v 
tion Association of America. Notable ex- 
amples of recreation surveys are for Washing- 
ton, Scranton, Cleveland, Springfield (111.), 
Buffalo, etc. 

Legal Surveys 

824 Bassett, E. M. The survey of the 
legal status of a specific city in relation to 
city planning. (In Proceedings of the 5th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1913, 
p. 46-62.) 

The City of New York. 

Legal sections worthy of special note may 
be found in the following city plan reports:' 
Chicago, 1909 (W. L. Fisher); Minneapolis, 
1917 (A. W. Crawford); Bridgeport, 1916, 
and Akron, Ohio, 1919 (F. B. Williams, Akron 
also published separately); Hamilton, Ohio, 
1920 (A. Bettman); Fall River, Mass., 1922 
(F. Shurtleff). 

For legal survey of New York region, see 
815, Plan of New York. 

Industrial Surveys 

826 Goodrich, E. P. An industrial survey 
of St. Louis. (In Proceedings of 10th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1918, 
p. 6-14.) 

Hatch, W. What is an industrial survey? 
(American City, Nov. 1915; vol. 13, p. 385- 
386.) 

Hebble, C. R. Cincinnati's industrial sur- 
vey. (American City, Dec. 1914; vol. 11, 
p. 487-489. map.) 

Holdsworth, J. T. Report of the economic 
survey of Pittsburgh. Published by the City 
Council of Pittsburgh, 1912. 229 p. Out of 
print. 

Hoover, A. P. Industrial surveys for war- 
time city planning. (American Citv, May 
1918; vol. 18, p. 475, 477.) 

Pepler, G. L. The civic survey preparatory 
to zoning with particular reference to indus- 
try. (Garden Cities and Town Planning, 
Feb. 1921; vol. 11, p. 36-39.) 

Outlines data to be assembled. 

For a comprehensive outline of an eco- 
nomic survey, see 815, Plan of New York, 
Stewart report. 



Methods of Presenting Data 

832 Brinton, W. C. Graphic methods for 
presenting facts. New York, Engineering 
Magazine Co., 1914. 371 p. 257 charts, diagr. 
(Works Management Library.) 
Mulvihill, F. J. Distribution o f population 
graphically presented as a basis for city plan- 
ning. (American City, Feb. 1919; vol. 20, 
p. 159-161. illus.) 

834 New York (City) Board of Estimate 
and Apportionment. Maps of the city of 
New York. (In its Report of the Chief Engi- 
neer, 1914, p. 58-65.) 

Plan of New York and its Environs. Maps 
and diagrams showing present conditions, 
New York and its environs, Mar. 1923. Pre- 
pared by the Physical Survey. New York, 
1923. 39 p. 

N. P. Lewis, director of Physical Survey. 
836 Robertson, W. The relief map its 
advantages as a demonstrator. (American 
City, Nov. 1914; vol. 11, p. 419, 421, 423; 
with photo of model of Niagara Falls and 
vicinity.) 

Among the well-known relief models of 
cities may be mentioned: Boston Metropol- 
itan District (in Harvard University Museum) 
described in illustrated pamphlet by G. C. 
Curtis, sculptor, issued by Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, 1900; Washington, city as it 
existed and Park Commission Plan (in New 
National Museum), illustrated in Park Com- 
mission Report, 1902; Pittsburgh District 
(for Chamber of Commerce, 1904), illustrated 
in Pittsburgh Flood Commission Report, 
1912; Cincinnati (at University of Cincin- 
nati), illustrated in Arnold report on Cin- 
cinnati Interurban Electric Railway Terminal 
System, 1912; Baltimore Harbor (for Balti- 
more Port Development Commission). 

The booklet issued by Howell's Microcosm 
(Washington, D. C., now the Robertson Co.) 
describes various city relief models which that 
company has made. 

Aerial Surveys 

839 Adams, T. Aerial photography. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, Sept. 1920; 
vol. 10, p. 198-199. illus.) 

Fairchild, S. M. Aerial photography. 
(Current Affairs, Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce, Mar. 20, 1922; vol. 12, no. 44, p. 10, 
33,34. illus.) 

By President of Fairchild Aerial Corpora- 
tion, responsible for the well-known 
aerial map of New York City. 



80 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Aerial Surveys (cont.) 

Hayler, G. W. The aeroplane and city 
planning, the advantages of viewing cities 
from above. (American City, Dec. 1920; 
vol. 23, p. 575-579. illus.) 

Ives, H. E. Pictorial and technical uses; 
Exploration and mapping. (In his Airplane 
photography, Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott 
Co., 1920, p. 388-413. illus.) 

Jones, F. E. Aerial photography mapping 
developed for municipal and other engineering 
services. (Engineering News-Record, Oct. 13, 
1921; vol. 87, p. 596-599, illus., diagr.) 

Lewis, N. P. A new aid in city planning: 
aerial photography. (American City, Mar. 
1922; vol. 26, p. 209-212. illus., map.) 
Also reprinted. 

Mertie, J. B. Present status of photo- 
graphic mapping from the air. (Engineering 
News-Record, May 22, 1919; vol. 82, p. 996- 
999.) 

Mosaic maps of cities. (American City, 
Sept. 1922; vol. 27, p. 253-255. illus.) 

National Conference on City Planning. 
The use of aerial photography in city planning 
work. Committee report, by E. P. Goodrich, 
A. W. Crawford, and H. B. Brainerd. (In 
Proceedings of its 13th conference, 1921, p. 
176-182.) 

Nelles, D. H. Topographic survey of Lon- 
don, Ontario, and the use of aerial maps. 
(Journal of Town Planning Institute of Can- 
ada, June-Aug. 1921 ; vol. 1, no. 4-5, p. 24-25.) 

Richards, C. H. Los Angeles mapped from 
air to aid traffic studies. (Engineering News- 
Record, June 8, 1922; vol. 88, p. 961-963. illus.) 

Smith, G. S. Uses of aerial photographs in 
map making. (Engineering News-Record, 
Feb. 2, 1922; vol. 88, p. 194-196. map.) 

In support of aerial surveys. (Ibid., 

May 4, 1922; vol. 88, p. 746-747. illus., 
diagr.) 

Wood, E. A. Aeroplane map used by city 
planners in Dallas. (American City, March 
1921; vol. 24, p. 251-252. illus.) 

Presentation of City Plans 

860 Ford, G. B. Town planning reports 
and the graphic representation of statistics. 
(In Town planning Institute London, Papers 
and discussions, 1919-20; vol. 6, p. 95-98; 
with discussion, p. 99-102.) 

Abstract in Engineering and Contracting, 
July 7, 1920; vol. 54, p. 20-21; etc. 



See also 800, U. S. Bureau of Industrial 
Housing, for both text and illustrations used 
in presenting the town plans prepared by the 
Bureau. 

862 For examples of typical city planning 
reports, comprehensive and special, prepared 
for American cities, see p. 43. Many of these 
are notable for their illustrations including 
photographs, plans, and drawings prepared to 
present the city plan effectively. Except Mr. 
Ford's paper, above, little has been written on 
the technique of presentation in this field. 

868 Comey,A. C. Brockton city planning 
procedure program, Aug. 1917. (In Brockton, 
Mass., City Planning Board, Annual report, 
1918, folded table, opp. p. 4.) 

Technical Advisory Corporation. Esti- 
mated cost of improvements recommended 
for consideration at stated intervals from 
1922 to 1972. (In its City plan for East Orange, 
1922, p. 75, and diagram showing relationship 
between net bonding limit and cost of pro- 
posed improvements, p. 76.) 

869 Cost of city planning studies. (In 
Proceedings of 14th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1922, p. 211.) 

See also 1696, and p. 51, Municipal Appro- 
priations for City Planning. 

Construction. Municipal Engineering 

860 Folwell, A. P. Municipal engineering 
practice. New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1916. 
422 p. illus., plans, diagr. 

A convenient and comprehensive work. 

Whinery, S. Municipal public works, their 
inception, construction, and management. 
New York, Macmillan Co., 1903. 241 p. 
Still of value because it presents the engi- 
neering legal viewpoint. 

See also special subjects: Streets, etc. 

Technical Procedure in Special Fields 

""" 870 Bennett, E. H. Zoning Chicago. 

(National Municipal Review, Mar. 1922; 

vol. 11, p. 69-71.) 

Discusses the technical procedure in- 
volved in surveys and plans. 

Ford, G. B. Simplifying zoning: exempli- 
fied in the completed ordinances for Mans- 
field, Ohio, and East Orange, N. J. (Ameri- 
can City, Apr. 1921; vol. 24, p. 383-386.) 






MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



81 



New York (City) Commission on Building 
Districts and Restrictions. The zoning sur- 
vey. (In its Final Report, 1916, Appendix II, 
p. 47-50. maps.) 

Summary with numerous illustrations of 

technical methods employed. 
Swan, H. S. Making the New York zoning 
ordinance better. (Architectural Forum, 
Oct. 1921; vol. 35, p. 125-126, 127-130.) 

Discusses improvements in form of maps 

and classification of districts. 



Hubbard, H. V. Some preliminary con- 
siderations in Government industrial war 
housing. (Landscape Architecture, July 1918; 
vol. 8, p. 157-168. illus., plans.) 

Preliminary technical procedure. 
Shurtleff, A. A. The development of a 
street plan for an industrial housing project. 
(Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1919; vol. 9, 
p. 67-75. plans.) 

The Crane development at Bridgeport, 

of which Mr. Shurtleff was town planner. 

Wood, N. M. Housing project schedule. 

(Architectural Record, Feb. 1919; vol. 45, 

p. 118-122.) 

Form adopted and used by U. S. Shipping 
Board Housing Division illustrated and 
explained. The schedule is for tabulating 
information to answer questions at all 
stages of the project. 

For technical procedure in Industrial Hous- 
ing, see also 800, Knowles, and U. S. 



For technical procedure in Reconstruction 
work after the war, see 1293. 

For technical procedure in Camp and Can- 
tonment planning, see 5311. 

Cooperation and Functions of Specialists 

876 Adams, T. Architects and land- 
scape architects as town planners. (Journal 
of the American Institute of Architects, Apr. 
1922; vol. 10, p. 101-103.) 

Architects and city planning. (Ibid., 

June, Aug., Oct. 1922; vol. 10, p. 201-202, 
245-246, 328-330.) 

The engineer's place in town planning. 

(Canadian Engineer, Apr. 7, 1921 ; vol. 83, p. 
363-364.) 

Alvord, J. W. What part the engineer 
played in Government housing. Report of 
chief engineer of the United States Housing 
Corporation. (Engineering News-Record, 
Jan. 16, 1919; vol. 82, p. 147-148.) 



NS - Brigham, H. R. The realtor and the com- 
munity. (American City, Feb. 1923; vol. 28, 
p. 147-148.) 

Describes civic work of National Asso- 
ciation of Real Estate Boards and its 
members. See also 513. 

Child, S. The landscape architect and the 
city engineer. (American City, Feb. 1912; 
vol. 6, p. 464-469. illus.) 

Conference of delegates, from national or- 
ganizations to consider city planning coopera- 
tion. (In Proceedings of 7th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1915, p. 231-237.) 

Eliot, C. W. The landscape architect as the 
ally of the sanitarian. (City Plan, Mar. 1915; 
vol. 1, p. 2-4.) 

-- .The lawyer as a city planning adviser. 
(American City, Sept. 1915; vol. 13, p. 172- 
173.) 

Lewis, N. P. The opportunities and re- 
sponsibilities of the municipal engineer. (In 
his Planning of the modern city, 2d rev. ed., 
1923, p. 412-421.) 

A later statement of the subject previ- 
ously covered by Mr. Lewis in the City 
Plan, Oct. 1915. 

Moore, C. Lessons of the Chicago World's 
Fair; an interview with the late D. H. Burn- 
ham. (Architectural Record, Jan. 1913; 
vol. 33, p. 34-44. illus.) 

The cooperation of artists in civic enter- 
prises is further brought out in Mr. 
Moore's book on Burnham. See 205. 

Norton, G. H. The engineer and city plan- 
ning. (In Proceedings of American Society of 
Civil Engineers, Mar. 1923; vol. 49, p. 561- 
565.) 

Shurtleff, F. The landscape architect in 
city planning; a speech before American 
Society of Landscape Architects, Boston, 
1915. (Landscape Architecture, Apr. 1915; 
vol. 5, p. 143-147.) 

Swain, G. F. The attitude of the engineer 
toward city planning. (In Proceedings of 
4th National Conference on City Planning, 
1912, p. 30-34.) 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. General instructions to com- 
mittee of designers. (In its Report of the 
United States Housing Corporation, 1919, 
vol. 2, p. 444^46.) 

Outlines functions and cooperation of 
members of committees. 



82 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Codperation and Functions of Specialists (cont.) 
Unwin, R. Housing: the architects' con- 
tribution. (Journal of the Royal Institute of 
British Architects, Jan. 1919; vol. 26, p. 49- 
59; with discussion, p. 60-63. illus., plans.) 
Read before the R. I. B. A. Describes 
the function of the architect in the use of 
imagination in design. 

Professional Charges and Examinations 

878 La barexne des honoraires de 1'urban- 
iste. (La Cite, Jan. 1921; Vol. 2, p. 56-62.) 

Professional charges, proposed for Belgium. 
Further article in same magazine, Oct. 1921; 
vol. 2, p. 243-249, and editorial: L'urbanisme 
et les pouvoirs publics, p. 240-242. 

Town Planning Institute (British). Pro- 
fessional practice as to charges, prepared by 
the Council for the guidance of members of 
the Institute. (In its Papers and discussions, 
1920-21; vol. 7, no. 9, p. 136-138.) 

A similar notice with reference to housing 
schemes was published in the back of 
volume 5, for 1918-19. 
The American City Planning Institute has 
no similar publication. 

879 Town Planning Institute (British). 
Town Planning Institute examinations with 
instructions to candidates and syllabus of 
subjects, Dec. 1916. (In its Papers and dis- 
cussions, 1916-17, vol. 3, 12 pages in back of 
volume.) 

Competitions 

880 Town Planning Institute (British). 
Regulations of the Town Planning Institute 
for town planning competitions. (In its 
Papers and discussions, 1916-17; vol. 3, 4 
pages in back of volume.) 

Theoretical 

City planning study [held by National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1913]. Data; Re- 
port of committee; Statistical statement; 
Discussion; Detailed comment; List of par- 
ticipants. (In its 5th Proceedings, 1913, 
p. 163-211, with reproductions of plans.) 

Also published complete as special supple- 
ment to Landscape Architecture, Apr. 1913; 
vol. 3, no. 3. 

- Prize-winning plans for laying out a quarter 
section of urban land Chicago City Club 
competition, 1913. (American City, Apr. 
1913; vol. 8, p. 421-427. plans.) 

The plans were later published in book 
form. See 3000, Yeomans. 



International 

Hayler, G. W. International city planning. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, May 
1912, N. s. vol. 2, p. 115-116.) 

Competitions for Australian Capital and 

for Montevideo. 

CANBERRA. Australia. Federal Capital 
Designs Board. Federal Capital City. The 
Parliament of Australia, 1912. 15 p. illus., 
plans. 

Federal Capital Design Adoption 

Board Report, 1912. 2 p. plan. 

[Editorials on Federal capital of Australia.] 
(Town Planning Review, Oct. 1912; vol. 3, 
p. 165-167 and plate 79 Jan. 1913; vol. 3, 
p. 221-222, and plate 94, 287-288 Apr. 1914; 
vol. 5, p. 66 and plate 26.) 

The plans for Australia's new capital city. 
(American City, July 1912; vol. 7, p. 9-12. 
illus., plan.) 

DELHI. Delhi Town Planning Committee. 
Reports, 1st, 2d, and final. Printed in India, 
1913; 3vols. maps. 

The new capital city at Delhi. Edi- 
torial. (Town Planning Review, Oct. 1913; 
vol. 4, p. 185-187. plan.) 

DUBLIN. Civic Exhibition, Dublin, Ireland, 
1914. Information, conditions and particu- 
lars for guidance in the preparation of com- 
petitive designs for the town plan of Dublin. 
10 p. 

Nolen, J. Greater Dublin com- 
petitive designs for the town plan of Dublin, 
Ireland. (Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1917; 
vol. 7, p. 73-77, illus., plans.) 

Abercroxnbie, P., and S. and A. Kelly. 

Dublin of the future, the new town plan. 
London, Hodder & Stoughton, [1922]. 60 p. 
illus., plans. 

The scheme awarded first prize, brought 
up to date. 

ZURICH. Schlussbericht iiber den Inter- 
nationalen Wettbewerb f iir einen Bebauungs- 
plan der Stadt Zurich und ihrer Vororte. 
Durchgefuhrt 1915-1918 unter der Leitung 
der Stadt. Bauverwaltung I. Zurich, Jean 
Frey, 1919. 76 p. illus., plans. 

PARIS. Seine (Dept.) Direction de 1'Exten- 
sion de Paris. Programme du concours 
ouvert pour I'^tablissement du plan d'am6- 
nagement et d'extension de Paris (Loi du 14 
mars, 1919). Paris, Imprimerie Chaix. 1919. 
24 p. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



83 



Accompanying the program were copies 
of laws relating to sanitation, expropria- 
tion, historic monuments, etc. 
'^Program translated by F. B. Williams in 
National Municipal Review, Jan. 1920; vol. 
9, p. 49-50. 

PARIS. Greber, J. The public competition 
for the rearrangement and embellishment of 
Paris. (Park International, Sept. 1920; vol. 
1, p. 109-120. illus., plans.) 

Hammarstrand, N. The Greater 

Paris competition. I. The problem. II. The 
results. (Journal of the American Institute of 
Architects, Sept., Oct. 1920; vol. 8, p. 331-335, 
339-340, 365-370. plans.) 

Honore, F. Paris dans cinquante ans. 

(L'lllustration, 3 avril 1920; no. 4022, p. 196- 
198; 1 mai, 1920; no. 4026, p. 269-272. 
plans.) 

Notes on Competition for Greater Paris. 

Le Plan d'ame'nagement et d'extension 

de Paris several articles. (La Vie Urbaine, 
1920, p. 29-111. plans.) 

CHAUNY. Hersey, P. An interallied 
architectural competition: a model city to be 
built. (American City, Apr. 1919; vol. 20, 
p. 373.) 

City of Chauny, France. The competi- 
tion was instituted by La Renaissance 
des Cites (Paris), which issued competi- 
tion program, data, etc. See also 6100. 

Holliday, A. C. The rebuilding of 

Chauny. (Town Planning Review, July 1921 ; 
vol. 9, p. 101-104. plan.) 

Review of competition and winning 
scheme of M. Rey. 

BELGRADE. Dervaux, A. Le plan de Bel- 
grade. (L' Architecture, Paris, June 25, 1922; 
vol. 35, p. 207. plan.) 

First prize plan by MM. Auburtin, 
Parenty, Naville et Chauquet, in inter- 
national competition. 



STUDY AND TEACHING 

For a list of colleges, universities, and technical 
schools in the United States offering instruction 
in city planning, see p. 47. 

900 Geddes, P. Education for town plan- 
ning, and the need of civics. (In his Cities in 
evolution, 1915, p. 295-312.) 

The subsequent chapter describes Pro- 
fessor Geddes' personal endeavors and 
his Edinburgh Outlook Tower. 



Mawson, T. H. Civic design, its study 
and technology. (In his Civic art, 1911, p. 9- 
18.) 

Nolen, J. Professional training and experi- 
ence. (In his New ideals in the planning of 
cities, towns, and villages, 1919, p. 111-113.) 
A previous statement by Mr. Nolen ap- 
peared in the City Plan, Aug. 1917. 

**- Williams, F. B. City planning instruction 
in urban schools and colleges. (American 
City, Mar. 1917; vol. 16, p. 248-250.) 

936 Berrington, A. Town planning at the 
university. (Journal of the Town Planning 
Institute of Canada, Apr. 1922; vol. 1, no. 9, 
p. 12-14.) 

The field of study defined by Professor 
Berrington of Toronto. 

946 Geddes, P. Travel and its lessons for 
citizenship. (In his Cities in evolution, 1915, 
p. 161-175.) 

947 Circulars descriptive of city-planning 
study tours were issued before the war by the 
International Civic Bureau (New York), 1912 
and 1913, American Civic Association (Wash- 
ington), 1913, and Garden Cities and Town 
Planning Association (London) and Deutsche 
Gartenstadt-Gesellschaft (Berlin) for several 
years. Note especially descriptions of the 
study tours found in the periodical Garden 
Cities and Town Planning. 

960 Partial list of educational institutions 
[in the U. S.] where city planning receives 
attention. (In Proceedings of 14th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1922, p. 211.) 

See also p. 47 of this Manual. 

961 University lectures on town planning 
in various Canadian universities [given by 
T. Adams and W. D. Cromarty]. (Journal of 
the Town Planning Institute of Canada, Apr. 
1921; vol. 1, no. 3, p. 8-9.) 

Discussion also in Ibid., June- Aug., no. 4-5, 
p. 3, 7-8. 

978 [Courses of instruction in city plan- 
ning in Russia, 1911-16 and Civic Museums, 
etc., 1918.] (La Vie Urbaine, Dec. 15, 1921; 
vol. 3, p. 421, 423.) 

Stout, Sir R. The university, colleges, and 
schools; their responsibility in relation to the 
inculcation of town planning principles. (In 
Proceedings of 1st New Zealand Town Plan- 
ning Conference and Exhibition, 1919, p. 258- 
262; with discussion and reports, p. 262-274.) 
Opportunities in New Zealand. 



84 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



SPECIAL SCHOOLS 

980 Kimball, T. Town planning courses 
at the School of Landscape Architecture, Har- 
vard University. (Journal of Town Planning 
Institute of Canada, Feb. 1921; vol. 1, p. 11- 
12.) 

Pray, J. S. The Department of Landscape 
Architecture in Harvard University. (Land- 
scape Architecture, Jan. 1911; vol. 1, p. 53- 
70.) 

Brief account of School to 1922 in Har- 
vard Alumni Bulletin, Mar. 30, 1922. 
See also p. 47 of this Manual. 

Robinson, C. M. City-planning course at 
the University of Illinois. (Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Apr/1913; vol. 3, p. 97-100.) 

982 Adshead, S. D. The School of Civic 
Design at Liverpool University. (Landscape 
Architecture, Apr. 1911; vol. 1, p. 105-109.) 

Town planning for London University. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, Nov. 
1914; N.S., vol. 4, p. 258-260.) 

984 Ecole Superieure d'art Public. Pro- 
gramme des cours. 1917-18. [and bulletin 
L'Art public.] 

Brief account of school given in Town Plan- 
ning Review, Apr. 1918; vol. 7, p. 283-284 
and in Landscape Architecture, July 1918; 
vol. 8, p. 198-199. 

Sellier, H. La creation de Penseignement 
de 1'urbanisme en France. (La Vie Urbaine, 



1920; p. 149-160.) Also reprinted. Supple- 
mentary statements of organization, program 
of courses, etc., of ficole des Hautes Etudes 
Urbaines, Paris, p. 161-191. 

986 K. Technische Hochschule, Berlin, 
see 180. 

Nolen, J. Diisseldorf's college for city 
planners and city administrators. (Landscape 
Architecture, Jan. 1912; vol. 2, p. 58-59.) 

998 Cours d'urbanisme et de munici- 
palisme, L'Institut des Hautes Etudes de 
Belgique. (La Cit6, Feb.-Mar. 1921 ; vol. 2, 
p. 94-96.) 

Description of courses. 

Swaelmen, L. van der. Cours d'urbanisme 
et de municipalisme organises a 1'Institut des 
Hautes fitudes de Belgique par 1' Union des 
Villes et Communes beiges avec le concours 
de la Socie"te" des Urbanistes beiges. Lec.on 
d'ouverture des cours. (Le Mouvement Com- 
munal, July-Aug. 1921; nos. 7-8, p. 132-136.) 

A Danish town planning laboratory, Dansk 
Byplan Laboratorium, Copenhagen. (Hous- 
ing Betterment, Jan. 1922; vol. 11, p. 47.) 

Justiz, F. C. Preliminares de ciencia 
municipal urbanismo. Discorso inaugural 
del curso acad&nico de 1922 a 1923, Universi- 
dad de la Habafia. Habafia, 1922. 102 p. 

Also notice in Revista Municipal, Oct. 1, 
1922; vol. 17, p. 244. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



85 



COMPOSITION OF CITY PLANS. PLANNING. REPLANNING 



THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF 
DESIGN 

1200 The comprehensive treatise in Eng- 
lish on the theory and principles" of town plan- 
ning design is Unwin's Town Planning in 
Practice. See 260. 

Adshead, S. D. Imagination in town plan- 
ning. (In Town Planning Institute, London, 
Papers and discussions, 1922-23; vol. 9, p. 2- 
9; with discussion, p. 10-13.) 

City development and extension. (In 
Royal Institute of British Architects, Town 
planning conference, London, 1910, p. 245- 
312. illus., plans.) 

Papers by Raymond Unwin, Augustin 
Rey, W. E. Riley, J. Stiibben. 

A very interesting series of four plans show- 
ing the progress in the development of city 
plans, 1871-1921, may be found in the annual 
report of the Philadelphia Bureau of Surveys 
for 1921. 

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS 

1206 Ashbee, C. R. Where the great city 

stands; a study in the new civics. London, 

Essex House Press, 1917. 165 p. illus., plans. 

A full discussion of this book is contained 

in an article: Esthetics in Reconstruction, 

by T. Kimball in Landscape Architecture, 

Oct. 1918. 

Branford, V., and P. Geddes. The coming 
polity: a study in reconstruction. London, 
Williams &Norgate, 191 7. 264 p. (The Mak- 
ing of the Future Series.) 

Fassett, C. M. Assets of the ideal city. 
New York, Crowell Co., 1922. 177 p. 

Advance selections in American City, 
Apr. 1921. 

Geddes, P. Cities in evolution; an intro- 
duction to the town planning movement and 
to the study of civics. London, Williams & 
Norgate, 1915. 409 p. illus., plans. 

Howe, F. C. European cities at work. 
New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1913. 
370 p. illus., plan. 

Hungerford, E. The personality of Ameri- 
can cities. New York, McBride, Nast & Co., 
1913. 344 p. illus. 

McVey, F. L. The making of a town. 
Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co., 1913. 221 p. 



Pollock, H. M., and W. S. Morgan. Modern 
cities; progress of the awakening for their 
betterment here and in Europe. New York, 
Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1913. 418 p. illus., 
plans. 

Zueblin, C. American municipal progress, 
new and rev. ed. New York, Macmillan Co., 
1916. 522 p. illus. (Social Science Textbooks.) 
First ed., 1902. 

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS 

Social Considerations 

1210 Ackerman, F. L. Where goes the 
city planning movement? (Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects, Dec. 1919, 
Jan., Mar., Aug., Oct. 1920; vol. 7, p. 518- 
520; vol. 8, p. 15-18, 108-110, 284-287, 351- 
354.) 

A series of articles vehemently decrying, 
from the social viewpoint, the present 
tendencies of American city planning. 
Adams, T. City planning and city building. 
(Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, June 1921; vol. 9, p. 195-197.) 

A review of Mr. Ackerman's standpoint 
as stated in the above series of articles. 
Cauchon, N. Why is town planning? 
(Journal of Town Planning Institute of 
Canada, Nov. 1922; vol. 1, no. 12, p. 1-3.) 
Address at Ontario Town Planning and 
Housing Association Convention. 

Hubbard, C. Some social aspects of town 
planning. (In Town Planning Institute, 
London, Papers and discussions, 1918-19, 
vol. 5, p. 105-108; with discussion, p. 109- 
112.) 

Lanchester, H. V. The ethics of town plan- 
ning. (Town Planning Review, Oct. 1916; 
vol. 7, p. 18-27, and plates 7-10.) 

Lasker, B. " Bolshevik cities," an unde- 
livered speech at the llth National Confer- 
ence on City Planning. (Survey, June 14, 
1919; vol. 42, p. 423-425.) 

Unwalled towns. (Survey, Mar. 1920; 

vol. 43, p. 675-680, 718. illus.) 

Tendencies toward social segregation to 
be guarded against in town planning and 
zoning. See also 1600, Cheney, for a 
reply. 



86 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Special Considerations (cont.) 

Marquis, F. J. Some sociological aspects 
of town planning. (Town Planning Review, 
Apr. 1910; vol. 1, p. 66-71.) 

Marsh, B. C. City planning in justice to 
the working population. (Charities, Feb. 1, 
1908; vol. 19, p. 1514-1518.) 
Mumford, L M see 1424. 
Robinson, C. M M see 250. Mr. Robinson's 
writings have a strong appreciation of social 
values. Cf . his The Call of the City, San Fran- 
cisco, Paul Elder & Co., 1908. 

Unwin, R. Homes for human beings. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, Sept. 
1919; vol. 9, p. 163-165. illus.) 

Part of the introductory lecture giVen at 
the Alhambra Theatre, London, on the 
occasion of the first Cinematograph Ex- 
hibition of housing pictures on May 22, 
1919. 

> The overgrown city. (Survey, Oct. 15, 

1922; vol. 49, p. 85-86. illus.) 

The real social basis for the composition 
of a city plan. 

Williams, W. City planning in flesh and 
blood. (National Municipal Review, Sept. 
1919; vol. 8, p. 466-^71.) 

The public welfare movement in Cleve- 
land as a background for " city planning 
in brick and stone." 

See also several articles listed under 1600 
discussing social aspects of zoning. 

Economic Considerations 

1225 Batterson, E. S. Town promotion 
and city planning. (American City, Mar. 
1911; vol. 4, p. 119-120.) 

Brunner, A. W. The business side of city 
planning; a condensation of an address be- 
fore American Civic Association. (National 
Municipal Review, Apr. 1912; vol. 1, p. 236- 
240.) 

Davidge, W. R. Town planning in relation 
to the community. (Garden Cities and Town 
Planning, Dec. 1914; vol. 4, p. 269-271.) 

Ford, G. B. City planning and real estate; 
from a paper read at conference between Fine 
Arts Federation of New York and representa- 
tives of the real estate organizations of New 
York. New York, The Civic Press, 1915. 
[2 p.] (American City Pamphlet no. 127.) 

City planning and municipal economy. 

(In 7th Yearbook of City Managers' Associ- 
ation, 1921, p. 124-128.) 



Lewis, N. P. The economic value of a city 
plan. (In his Planning of the modern city, 
1916 and 1923, p. 175-185. illus., plans.) 

McFarland. J. H. The relation of city plan- 
ning to business. (In Proceedings of 9th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1917, 
p. 155-167.) 

The economic considerations in city plan- 
ning are brought out strikingly in the Stewart 
report for the Plan of New York. See 816. 

See also 1563 ff., 1570, 4016. 

Esthetic Considerations 

1236 Ackennan, F. L. The architectural 
side of city planning. (In Proceedings of 7th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1915, 
p. 107-120.) 

On the fundamental basis of civic art. 

Adshead, S. D. Town planning and amen- 
ities. (Town Planning Review, July 1914; 
vol. 5, p. 86-90.) 

Art and life, and the building and decora- 
tion of cities: a series of lectures by members 
of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society, 
delivered at the fifth exhibition of the So- 
ciety in 1896. London, Rivington, Percival 
& Co., 1897. 260 p. 

Brinckmann, A. E. Deutsche Stadtbau- 
kunst in der Vergangenheit. Frankfurt a. 
M., H. Keller, 1911. 160 p. illus., plans. 
Rev. enl. ed. 1921. 

Mainly on the esthetic aspects. 

Buls, C. Esth6tique des villes. Bruxelles, 
E. Bruylant, 1893. 41 p. illus. 

Translated in part in Municipal Affairs, 
Dec. 1899; vol. 3, p. 732-741. 

Esthetique des villes; rapport. (In 

Belgium. Commission Royales des Monu- 
ments et des Sites, Resum6 des proces-ver- 
baux, 1914, p. 265-292.) 

Carrere, J. M. City improvement from the 
artistic standpoint, 1908. 19 p. illus., plan. 
(Municipal Art Society of Hartford, Conn. 
Bulletin no. 7.) 

Chandler, H. P. The attitude of the law 
toward beauty: evidence that courts are 
giving aesthetic values more and more con- 
sideration and that the police power is gradu- 
ally being developed in reference to them. 
(American Bar Association Journal, Aug. 
1922; vol. 8, p. 470-474.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



87 



Edwards, A. T. On the influence of town 
planning upon architectural style. (Town 
Planning Review, Jan. 1915; vol. 5, p. 268- 
278.) 

Ford, G. B. Planning the attractive town. 
(In Proceedings of 13th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1921, p. 195-203.) 

Hegemann and Peets, see 3456. 

Henrici, K. Beitrage zur praktischen 
Aesthetik im Stadtebau. Eine Sammlung 
von Vortragen und Aufsatzen. Munchen, 
G. D. W. Callwey, [1904]. 278 p. illus., 
plans. 

Mawson, T. H. Civic art. See 260. 

The need for imagination in town plan- 
ning. (Town Planning Institute, London, 
Papers and Discussions, 1920-21; vol. 7, 
p. 23-30; with discussion, p. 33-34.) 

Town and country, a comparison; 

The aesthetics of civic art. (In his Civic art, 
1911, p. 21-50. illus., plans.) 

Nolen, J. The place of the beautiful in the 
city plan some everyday examples. (In 
Proceedings of 14th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1922, p. 133-147. plates.) 
Also reprinted. 

Olmsted, F. L. The limits of city beautifi- 
cation a reply to an inquiry. (American 
City, May 1910; vol. 2, p. 209-212.) 

Schmidkunz, H. Optisches im Stadtebau. 
(Stadtebau, July, Aug. 1909; vol. 6, p. 85-87, 
104-106.) 

Swaelmen, L. van der. Le probleme 
esthetique dans la vie municipale; Comment 
le poser, au moins, afin de le resoudre un jour, 
peut-6tre? (In Congres International et Ex- 
position Compared des Villes, Ghent, 1913, 
Rapport, 1914, s. i., p. 193-197.) 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. The housing project: its 
general appearance. (In its Report of the 
United States Housing Corporation, 1919, 
vol. 2, p. 71-74.) 

Unwin, R. Of formal and informal beauty. 
(In his Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 115-139. 
illus., plans.) 

Williams, F. B. Planning for the promotion 
of beauty. (In his Law of city planning and 
zoning, 1922, p. 381-442.) 



Zimmermann, M. G. Kunstlerische Lehren 
aus der Geschichte des Stadtebaus. Berlin, 
W. Ernst & Sohn, 1909. 26 p. illus., plan. 
(Stadtebauliche Vortrage, Bd. 2, Heft 5.) 

See also 2290, 3466, 3700ff., 3830ff., 4000ff. 

1242 Unwin, R. Of civic art as the ex- 
pression of civic life. (In his Town planning, 
1909, etc., p. 2-14. illus., plans.) 

1246 Eberlein, H. D. Aviation and civic 
improvements. (American Homes and Gar- 
dens, Sept. 1912; vol. 9, p. 304-307. illus.) 

Effect on civic design of considering view 

of city from the air. 

See also 839. 

1266 Lamb, F. S. Civic treatment of 
color. (Municipal Affairs, Mar. 1898; vol. 2, 
p. 110-122. illus.) 

Ricardo, H. Of color in the architecture of 
cities. (In Art and life, and the building and 
decoration of cities, 1897, p. 213-260.) 

Zimmermann, M. J. Die Farbe im Stadt- 
bild. Berlin, W. Ernst & Sohn, 1915. 40 p. 
illus. (Stadtebauliche Vortrage, Bd. 8, Heft 1.) 

Historic Considerations 

1272 Lanchester, H. V. Tradition and 
city development. (Town Planning Review, 
Jan. 1915; vol. 5, p. 260-261.) 

1274 Elgood, F. M. "Character," its 
application in town planning schemes. (In 
Town Planning Institute, London, Papers 
and discussions, 1918-19, vol. 5, p. 79-83; 
with discussion, p. 84-88.) 

Henrici, K. Der Individualismus im 
Stadtebau. (In his Beitrage zur praktischen 
Aesthetik im Stadtebau, 1904, p. 58-84. 
illus., plans,.) 

1276 Blunck, E. Denkmalpflege und 
Stadtebau. Berlin, W. Ernst & Sohn, 1913. 
40 p. illus., plans. (Stadtebauliche Vor- 
trage, Bd. 6, Heft 2.) 

Brown, G. B. Town planning and the 
preservation of ancient features. (In Royal 
Institute of British Architects, Town plan- 
ning conference, London, 1910, p. 187-199.) 

Gurlitt, C. Conservation du coeur d'an- 
ciennes villes. Traduction d'une conference 
faite a Salzburg; suivie de: La conservation 
du coeur de la ville de Bruxelles, note de Ch. 
Buls. 24 p. (Bruxelles, R6vue beige Tekhne, 
Oct. 1912.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Historic Considerations (cont.) 

Williamson, W. H. Recording history in 

landscape. (Landscape Architecture, Jan. 

1921; vol. 11, p. 86-89. illus., plan.) 

The design of the state capitol grounds, 
Bismark, N. D., as a memorial compre- 
hending state history and landscape 
forms. 

There should be noted also the reports of 
such national societies as the American Scenic 
and Historic Preservation Society, National 
Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural 
Beauty (British), Socie"te" pour la Protection 
des Paysages de France, the Rheinische 
Verein fur Denkmalpflege und Heimatschutz, 
etc.; and such national commissions as the 
French Commission des Monuments His- 
toriques and the Belgian Commission Royale 
des Monuments et des Sites. 



1279 Olmsted, F. L., Sr. The disuse of 
older landscape words and terms. (Land- 
scape Architecture, Oct. 1920; vol. 11, p. 15- 
18.) 

Selected from his unpublished papers as 
suggestive for place names. 
Place names for California. (Land- 
scape Architecture, Oct. 1922; vol. 13, p. 40- 
42.) 

A letter from F. L. Olmsted, Sr., to those 
undertaking the laying out of the Berke- 
ley neighborhood in 1864. 

1290 Cities of the future. (In Royal 
Institute of British Architects, Town plan- 
ning conference, London, 1910, p. 337-400. 
plans.) 

Predictions by representatives from vari- 
ous countries. 

Lasker,B. " Bolshevik cities." See 1210. 
See also 1424, 1426, 5360. 

War Memorials 

1292 American Federation of Arts. War 
memorials. (2 circulars.) Washington, [The 
Federation], Feb. 24, Jan. 2, 1919. 

Boston Society of Architects, and Boston 
Society of Landscape Architects. War memo- 
rials. Boston, [1920]. 14 p. illus. 

Brockway, A. L. Observations on types of 
memorials. (American Architect, Apr. 9, 
1919; vol. 115, p. 511-514.) 

Budden, L. B., see 6100. 



Cheney, C. H. The war memorial shall 
we make it something worth while? (Archi- 
tect and Engineer of California, Dec. 1918; 
vol. 55, p. 39-46. illus., plans.) 

Civic centers as war memorials; statement 
prepared by the Bureau of Memorial Build- 
ings of the War Camp Community Service. 
(American City, Oct. 1919; vol. 21, p. 330- 
334. illus.) 

Cornelius, C. O. War memorials. Part I, 
Community houses for towns and small cities; 
Part II, Community buildings for large cities; 
Part III, Monumental memorials. (Archi- 
tectural Record, Dec. 1919, Jan., Feb. 1920; 
vol. 46, p. 535-555, vol. 47, p. 39-57, 119- 
131. illus., plans.) 

Crawford, A. W., and J. H. McFarland. 
The location and design of war memorials. 
8 p. (American Civic Association Bulletin, 
Series II, no. 14, May 1919.) 

Faxon, R. B. Roadside planting as a 
memorial to our soldiers and sailors. (Ameri- 
can Forestry, Feb. 1919; vol. 25, p. 864-867. 
illus.) 

Jackson, H. E. Community buildings as 
soldiers' memorials. 12 p. (U. S. Department 
of the Interior. Bureau of Education. Com- 
munity Center Circular no. 2, Jan. 1919.) 

Memorials of the world war. (Community 
Leadership, published by American City 
Bureau, Jan.-Feb. 1923; vol. 4, no. 1, p. 1.) 
List of various types already undertaken 
in the United States. 

Moore, C. War memorials. (Architecture, 
Feb. 1920; vol. 41, p. 38-41.) 

An address delivered at the Metropolitan 
Museum, New York, Dec. 21, 1919. 

Municipal Art Society of New York City. 
War memorials. [New York, The Society, 
1919.] 22 p. illus. (Bulletin no. 17.) 

National Committee on Memorial Build- 
ings, New York. [Bulletins on community 
houses as war memorials, nos. 1-4.] 1919. 

Articles also in American City, Jan. 1919; 
vol. 20, p. 27-35, by E. R. Shippen. And in 
National Municipal Review, Mar. 1919; 
vol. 8 p. 129-135, by A. S. Bard. 

The new town of Lens, Saskatchewan. 
(Journal of Town Planning Institute of 
Canada, Oct. 1921; vol. 1, no. 6, p. 1-2. 
plan. Also article by Dr. E. Deville, p. 8.) 
Proposed as a memorial. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



89 



Nolen, J. The town plan as a basis for a 
war memorial. (American City, Mar. 1920; 
vol. 22, p. 293-295.) 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Parks as memorials. 
[Address before American Federation of Arts, 
War Memorial Session, May 1919.] (Ameri- 
can Magazine of Art, Sept. 1919; vol. 10, p. 
415HU9.) 

Also in Parks and Recreation, July 1919; 
vol. 2, p. 23-31. illus. 

Pack, C. L. Memorial trees. Washington, 
American Forestry Association, [1919]. 8 p. 
illus., diagr. 

Steele, F. Worthy memorials of the great 
war. (Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1920; 
vol. 10, p. 57-64.) 

U. S. National Commission of Fine Arts. 
War memorials; suggestions as to the forms 
of memorials and the methods of obtaining 
designers. Washington, Jan. 2, 1919. 3 p. 

Memorials of the Great War. (In its 

9th Report, 1919-1921, p. 67-80. illus.) 

Chapter on American cemeteries in 
Europe, p. 39-66. 

Weitenkampf, F. War memorials; a list of 
references in the New York Public Library. 
Reprinted from the Bulletin of the New York 
Public Library of Aug. 1919. 10 p. 

Also in Architectural Record, Sept. 1919; 
vol. 46, p. 278-285. 

Wilcox, A. Plan to enlarge the state reser- 
vation at Niagara and establish the New York 
state memorial riverways and reserves. (In 
Proceeding of llth National Conference on 
City Planning, 1919, p. 152-158.) 

Williams, E. T. War memorial towns. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, Nov. 
1919; vol. 9, p. 211-212.) 

Reconstruction, after War 

1293 Newman, B. J. Reconstruction and 
rehabilitation work in Europe. (American 
City, Sept. 1917; vol. 17, p. 232-235.) 

Chart showing suggested organization of 
reconstruction unit. 

Chart also reproduced, with note, in Survey, 
Oct. 6, 1917; vol. 39, p. 22-23. 

Belgium 

Schellekens, O. L'Am6nagement des 
villes Termonde Renaissante. Gand, W. 
Siffer, 1919. 234 p. 

Emphasizes esthetic aspects with special 
reference to reconstruction of Termonde. 
Author is member of Commission Royale 
des Monuments et des Sites. 



Societe des Urbanistes Beiges. Rapport 
presente" a M. le Ministre des Affaires Econo- 
miques par la Societe", concernant 1'institution 
eventuelle d'un Conseil Superieur de la Recon- 
struction. (La Cit6, Feb.-Mar. 1921; vol. 2, 
p. 87-89.) 

Swaelmen, L. van der., see 260. 

L'Union des Villes (beiges) et PExposition 
de la Reconstruction. [Proceedings.] (La 
Cite, special Exposition number, Oct.-Nov., 
1919; vol. 1, p. 57-92. illus., plans.) 

See also 40. 

France 

American Industrial Commission to France. 
Report to the American Manufacturers Ex- 
port Association. Sept.-Oct. 1916. [New 
York], Published 1917. 256 p. illus., plans. 
Ch. 18, City Planning; Ch. 21, Devas- 
tated regions. George B. Ford repre- 
sented city-planning interests on the 
Commission. 

Agache, D. A. Nos agglomerations 
rurales; comment lesamenager; etude mono- 
graphique analytique, compared d'un con- 
cours de plans de bourgs et villages. Paris, 
Librairie de la Construction Moderne, [1918]. 
236 p. illus., plans. 

Agache, D. A., Auburtin, and E. Redont. 
Comment reconstruire nos cites detruites; 
notions d'urbanisme s'appliquant aux villes, 
bourgs et villages. Paris, A. Coliii, 1915. 
257 p. 

Association Generate des Hygienistes et 
Techniciens Municipaux, Paris. Exposition 
de la cit6 reconstitute, esthetique et hygiene; 
rapport general par Louis Gaultier. Paris, 
Imprimerie Centrale de la Bourse, 1917. 
611 p. illus., plans. 

Auburtin, J. M., and H. Blanchard. La cite" 
de demain dans les regions devastees. Paris, 
A. Colin, 1917. 317 p. 

Ford, G. B. Out of the ruins. New York, 
Century Co., 1919. 275 p. plates, maps. 

On the devastation in France and pro- 
gress in reconstruction. 
Articles by Mr. Ford outlining subsequent 
progress appeared as follows: in American 
City, Mar. 1920; vol. 22, p. 217-221; Land- 
scape Architecture, Apr. 1920; vol. 10, p. 114- 
120; Journal of the American Institute of 
Architects, Sept. 1920; vol. 8, p. 336-337 
(Rheims); Survey, May 7, 1921; vol. 46, p. 
173-180. 
. See also 250. 



90 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Reconstruction, after War (cont.) 

Geddes, P. The Paris Exhibition of the 
Reconstituted City, 1916. (National Munic- 
ipal Review, July 1917; vol. 6, p. 457-462.) 

Kimball, T. City-planning problems in the 
reconstruction of French towns. (Landscape 
Architecture, Jan. 1918; vol. 8, p. 53-68.) 
Includes bibliography. Subsequent arti- 
cles, in the same magazine: July 1918, 
Jan. 1919, Apr. 1920. 

Renaissance des Cites, Paris. [Various 
publications, including Le village modele 
(Pinon) and numerous technical leaflets, 
1918-20.] 

The center of propaganda for scientific 
reconstruction. See notice in Ford book 
above. 

Rosenthal, L. Villes et villages francais 
apres la guerre; amenagement, restauration, 
embellissement, extension. Paris, Payot & 
Cie, 1918. 288 p. 

Of interest as a popularized presentation 
of the subject for the French general 
reader. 

Storey, C. J. La cite reconstitute an 
exposition on the replanning and reorganiza- 
tion of the devastated regions in France. 
(American City, Sept. 1916; vol. 15, p. 252- 
254. illus.) 

Great Britain and Canada 

Adams, T. Reconstruction in Great Britain. 

(National Municipal Review, Mar. 1919; 

vol. 8, p. 118-125.) 

Rochester Reconstruction Conference 
address. Includes housing problems. 

Returned soldiers and land settle- 
ment; The problem of the returned soldiers 
and social re-adjustment after the war; Ap- 
pendix E. Land settlement and after-war 
employment problems. (In his Rural plan- 
ning and development, Canada, 1917, p. 207- 
216, 247-249, 268-270.) 

Great Britain. Ministry of Reconstruction. 
Reconstruction problems. A series of pam- 
phlets. London, 1918-19. No. 25. Town 
planning. 20 p. 

These popular pamphlets accompanied a 
series of exhaustive technical reports, of 
which those on Electric Power Supply, 
Housing, and Land are of especial in- 
terest. 
See also 6600 ff. 



Kimball, T. Our British allies and recon- 
struction; a review of some recent writings. 
(Landscape Architecture, July 1918; vol. 8, 
p. 169-174.) 

United States 

A motive and a method for American re- 
construction. (American City, Nov. 1918; 
vol. 19, p. 347-352.) 

Program for community action in U. S. 
to further reconstruction, developed by 
joint committee of American City and 
National Municipal League. 

Municipal Reference Library Notes, New 
York. Municipal reconstruction number; 
with bibliography. Nov. 13, 1918; vol. 5, 
no. 11. 

Three cities should be noted for their pub- 
lished reconstruction programs: 

Chicago. Reconstruction program of the 
Chicago Plan Commission. Dec. 1918. 

Rochester. A municipal reconstruction 
program. Rochester Bureau of Municipal 
Research. Oct. 1918. 

St. Louis after the war. The City Plan 
Commission. With an introduction by Win- 
ston Churchill. 1918. 



FUNDAMENTAL DATA 
CIVIC SURVEYS 

1300 Abercrombie, P. The civic survey 
in general education. (Garden Cities and 
Town Planning, Feb. 1921; vol. 11, p. 31-34.) 

Also in Town Planning Review, July 1921 ; 
vol. 9, p. 105-110.) 

Adshead, S. D. The practical utility of 
civic survey. (Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning, Feb. 1921; vol. 11, p. 34-35.) 

Aronovici, C. The city plan. (In his 
Social survey, 1916, p. 34-43.) 

Outlines social factors to be considered 
in city planning. 

Fleure, H. J. The regional survey, prepar- 
atory to town planning. (In Town Planning 
Institute, London, Papers and discussions, 
1917-18, vol. 4, p. 31-38; with discussion, 
p. 39-43.) 

Ford, G. B. The city scientific. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 5th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1913, p. 31-41 ; with discussion, p. 
41-45.) 

Need for surveys and nature of funda- 
mental data. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



91 



Geddes, P. Beginnings of a survey of Edin- 
burgh. Reprint from The Scottish Geographi- 
cal Magazine, 1919, vol. 35, p. 281-315, as 
Monograph supplement no. 1 of The Socio- 
logical Review, plan, diagrs. ("Edin- 
burgh" number.) 

Regional and city surveys as affording 

policy and theory for town planning and city 
design. (In Town Planning Institute, Lon- 
don, Papers and discussions, 1921-22, vol. 7, 
no. 9, p. 119-127; with discussion, p. 128-131.) 

The survey of cities; City survey for 

town planning purposes. (In his Cities in 
evolution, 1915, p. 329-358.) 

Gross, M. Recent results in the social and 
civic survey movement; and The survey as an 
implement of democracy. (National Munic- 
ipal Review, Jan. 1918, Nov. 1918; vol. 7, 
p. 48-53,566-574.) 

La Farge, C. G. Regional surveys their 
aim and importance in war and peace. 
(Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, Aug. 1918; vol. 6, p. 402-404.) 

An address before the Home Registra- 
tion Service Committee of the State 
Council of Defense, Aug. 5, 1918, at 
Chicago. 

Olmsted, F. L. A city planning program. 
(In Proceedings of 5th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1913, p. 1-16.) 

Also in Journal of American Institute of 
Architects, June 1913; vol. 1, p. 231-239. 

Plan of New York, see 816. 

Pray, J. S. The survey for a city plan. 
(In Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference 
of Mayors and other city officials of the State 
of New York, 1914, p. 154-170; with dis- 
cussion.) 

Also published in Landscape Architecture, 
Oct. 1914; vol. 5, p. 5-14. 

Unwin, R. Civic survey, a city's control of 
its growth. [Substance of a paper read at the 
Civic Survey Conference, Dec. 17, 1920.] 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, Mar. 
1921; vol. 11, p. 59-62.) 

See also 815 ff ., where information on Tech- 
nical methods of preparing surveys may be 
found. 

CLIMATE, TOPOGRAPHY, ETC. 

1320 Manning, W. H. The Billerica town 
plan. (Landscape Architecture, Apr. 1913; 
vol. 3, p. 108-118. plans.) 



Also published in Billerica (monthly), 1912- 
1913. vol. 1-2. 

An example of data on natural conditions 
assembled for the planning of a small 
town. Mr. Manning's Plan for Birming- 
ham, Ala., gives the same type of sur- 
vey data for a great manufacturing re- 
gion. 

The reports, surveys, and maps prepared 
by the U. S. Geological Survey and the 
U. S. Coast Survey, and the soil surveys 
of the Dept. of Agriculture are of special 
interest. 

1330 Kassner, C. Die meteorologischen 
Grundlagen des Stadtebaues. Berlin, W. 
Ernst & Sohn, 1910. 26 p. illus. (Stadte- 
bauliche Vortrage, Bd. 3, Heft 6.) 

Salisbury, R. D. Climate. (In his Physi- 
ography, New York, Henry Holt & Co., 1913, 
p. 676-705. diagr.) 

The publications of the U. S. Weather 
Bureau should be noted. 

1334 Mead,D.W. Hydrology, the funda- 
mental basis of hydraulic engineering. New 
York, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1919. 647 p. 
illus., diagr. 

Rainfall data. 

Frequency of excessive rainfalls; data 
compiled by U. S. Housing Corporation from 
records of the Weather Bureau showing 
average frequency of rainfall at various high 
rates. (Municipal Journal, New York, Sept. 
14, 1918; vol. 45, p. 204-206. diagr.) 

1340 Avebury, Sir J. L. Of local divi- 
sions and the sites of towns. (In his Scenery 
of England, New York, Macmillan Co., 1902, 
p. 478-487. illus., diagr.) 

Hurd, R. M. Location of cities; Ground 
plan of cities. (In his Principles of city land 
values, 1903, p. 22-36. plans.) 

Robinson, C. M. The site of the city. (In 
his Improvement of towns and cities, 1913, 
etc., p. 1-17.) 

1356 Among the American cities where 
the problems caused by hills have received 
special attention in city planning may be 
mentioned San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Cin- 
cinnati, Providence, Seattle, Tacoma, Port- 
and (Ore.), Omaha, St. Paul, and Montreal. 



92 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



POPULATION. GROWTH OF CITIES. SOCIAL 

CONDITIONS. HOUSING. PUBLIC HEALTH 

AND SAFETY 

1400 Dwellings in the United States and 
percentage of home ownership in cities over 
100,000, compiled from Reports of the Bureau 
of Census by the Division of Building and 
Housing of the Bureau of Standards. (Na- 
tional Real Estate Journal, Feb. 27, 1922; 
vol. 23, p. 29.) 

Manning, W. H. A summary of munic- 
ipal activities; various data of cities of over 
100,000 population. (American City, Apr. 
1917; vol. 16, p. 333-339. diagr.) 

Similar information appeared in the re- 
port for Birmingham, Ala., by the senior 
Manning. 

Population of first 100 cities in U. S. in 
order of their rank showing the gain from 1910 
to 1920, as given out by the U. S. Bureau of 
the Census. (American City, Nov. 1920; 
vol. 23, p. 511.) 

Rossiter, W. S. Increase of population in 
the United States, 1910-1920. A study of 
changes in the population of divisions, states, 
counties, and rural and urban areas, and in 
sex, color, and nativity at the Fourteenth 
Census. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 
1922. 255 p. diagr. (Census Monographs, I.) 

U. S. Bureau of the Census. Fourteenth 
census of the United States: 1920. 

Vol. I, Population: Number and distribu- 
tion of inhabitants, contains sections on 
cities and their suburbs, metropolitan dis- 
tricts and methods of defining districts. 

Vol. IV, Population: Occupation statistics 
(in course of publication). 

Vol. IX, Manufactures: Report for states 
with statistics for principal cities, now avail- 
able in state bulletin form. 

Bulletins, issued 1922. 

Color or race, nativity and parentage. 
Dwellings and families. 
Ownership of homes. 

General statistics of cities: 1916, in- 
cluding statistics of parks, playgrounds, 
museums, and art galleries, zoological collec- 
tions, music and entertainments, swimming 
pools and bathing beaches, and other features 
of the recreation service. Washington, Govt. 
Printing Office, 1917. 88 p. maps, tables, 
diagr. 



Whipple, G. C. Vital statistics. 2d ed. 

New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1923. 579 p. 

diagr. 

Chapter VI. Prediction of future popu- 
lation, p. 199-236. The first ed., 1919, 
does not contain this chapter. 

Growth of Cities and Decentralization 

1424 Bonnier, L. La population de Paris 
en mouvement, 1800-1961 ; contribution aux 
Etudes de la Commission d'Extension de cette 
ville. (La Vie Urbanie, Mar.-June 1919; 
vol. 1, p. 7-76. illus., plans.) 
-Conurbations. (Survey, Oct. 15, 1922; 
vol. 49, p. 94. map.) 

Kurd, R. M. Forces creating cities. (In 
his Principles of city land values, 1903, p. 19- 
21.) 

Maunier, R. L'origine et la fonction 
e"conomique des villes [e"tude de morphologic 
sociale]. Paris, V. Giard & E. Briere, 1910. 
325 p. (Bibliotheque Sociologique Inter- 
nationale XLII.) 

Mumford, L. The heritage of the cities 
movement in America; an historical survey. 
(Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, Aug. 1919; vol. 7. p. 349-354.) 

Thesis that, in growth of American cities, 
development of civic life hitherto ne- 
glected should be basis for real municipal 
planning. 

^"Reclus, E. The evolution of cities. (Con- 
temporary Review, Feb. 1895; vol. 67, p. 
246-264.) 

Stein, C. S. The future of our big cities. 
(Journal of American Institute of Architects, 
Jan. 1923; vol. 11, p. 24-25.) 

On the inordinate growth and congestion 
of New York and London. 

Weber, A. F. The growth of cities in the 
nineteenth century: a study in statistics. 
New York, Macmillan Co., 1899. 495 p. 
(Columbia University Studies in History, 
Economics, and Public Law, vol. 11.) 

The significance of recent city growth; 

the era of small industrial centers. (Annals 
of the American Academy of Political and 
Social Science, March 1904; vol. 23, p. 223- 
236.) 

^Wilcox, D. F. City growth; The problem 
of great cities. (In his Great cities in Amer- 
ica, New York, Macmillan Co., 1910, p. 402- 
416.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



93 



1425 Causes of congestion of population; 
The prevention and relief of congestion a 
series of papers. (In Proceedings of 2d Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1910, 
p. 33-112.) 

See also 1677. 

Residential and Industrial Decentralization 
Satellite Towns 

1426 Aronovici, C. Suburban develop- 
ment. (In American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, Housing and town plan- 
ning, 1914, p. 234-238.) 

Ford, J. Residential and industrial de- 
centralization. (In Nolen, J., ed., City plan- 
ning, 1916, p. 333-352. plans.) 

Garden City Association, London. Housing 
in town and country. Being a report of a con- 
ference held in London, Mar. 16, 1906. With 
an introduction by Thomas Adams. London, 
The Association, [1906]. 80 p. illus. 

On city vs. country, with arguments for 

decentralization. 

Ihlder, J. The city plan and living and 
working conditions. A general outline of the 
subject. (In Proceedings of 13th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1921, p. 6-21.) 
Also reprinted. 

A plea for decentralization and for plan- 
ning in regional units. 

Kessler, G. E. Cincinnati's problem of 
centralization and decentralization. (In 
Proceedings of 12th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1920, p. 32-35.) 

Nolen, J. Modern city planning principles 
applied to a small community: Mariemont, 
a new town in the Cincinnati district. (Na- 
tional Real Estate Journal, Mar. 26, 1923; 
vol. 24, no. 7, p. 21-27. illus., plan.) Also 
reprinted. 

Statement prepared in collaboration with 
Sylvester Baxter. Article on Mariemont 
also in American City, Oct. 1922. 

Onniston, E. The public control of the 
location towns. (Garden of Cities and Town 
Planning, Feb. 1919; vol. 9, p. 23-30.) Re- 
printed from the Economic Journal, Dec. 1918. 
On decentralization. 

Reade, C. C. Aeroplanes and town plan- 
ning. (Garden Cities and Town Planning, 
Dec. 1912; N. s. vol. 2, p. 265-269.) 

The effect of aerial transportation in the 

decentralization of cities. 



Taylor, G. R. Satellite towns. See 6320. 

Unwin, R. "Distribution." (In Town 
Planning Institute, Papers and discussions, 
London, 1920-21; vol. 7, no. 4, p. 37-45; 
with discussion, p. 46-51.) 

New problems in town planning. 

(Garden Cities and Town Planning, May 
1920; vol. 10, p. 108-113.) 

Many substantial arguments for decen- 
tralization will be found in the Garden City 
publications, see 5360. See also 1600, Zoning; 
1660, Industrial districts; 1677, Density of 
development; 6100, Regional planning. 



Cost of Living 

1428 Cost of living in the United States 
family income. (Monthly Labor Review, 
U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Dec. 1919; 
vol. 9, p. 1693-1705. tables.) 

Hudson, R. M. How to determine cost of 
living in an industrial community. (Indus- 
trial Management, Sept. 1918; vol. 56, p. 185- 
191. tables.) 

King, C. L. Lower living costs in cities, a 
constructive programme for urban efficiency, 
New York, D. A^ppleton and Co., 1915. 355 p. 
(National Municipal League Series.) 

Deals largely with means of reducing 
food distribution costs, but treats other 
factors briefly. 

Lane, F. V. Z., and J. Nolen. City plan- 
ning and distribution costs. (Annals of the 
American Academy of Political and Social 
Science, Nov. 1913; vol. 50, p. 240-246.) 

Suggests means for reducing the cost of 

living. 

Massachusetts. Commission on the Neces- 
saries of Life. Report. Boston, State Printers, 
Feb. 1920. 182 p. diagr. 

National Industrial Conference Board, 
Changes in cost of living, July 1914-Nov. 
1922. Published Dec. 1922. 37 p. (Research 
report no. 57.) 

Waissar, I. The principles of port develop- 
ment and their relation to the cost of living. 
(Port of New York, Aug. 1922; vol. 1, no. 8, 
p. 27-28.) 



94 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Housing 

1430 Aronovici, C. Housing and the 
housing problem. Chicago, A. C. McClurg & 
Co., 1920. 163 p. (National Social Science 
Series.) 

Housing betterment, a journal of housing 
advance, issued quarterly by the National 
Housing Association. New York, vol. 1, no. 1, 
Feb. 1912-date. 

An invaluable source of news and current 

publications. 

National Conference on Housing. Housing 
problems in America. Proceedings of the 
National Conference on Housing, lst-8th. 
1911-1920. Svols. 

Contains papers on all phases of the 

housing problem. 

Veiller, L. Housing reform, a hand-book 
for practical use in American cities. New 
York, Charities Publication Committee, 1910. 
213 p. (Russell Sage Foundation publica- 
tions.) 

For his Model Housing Law, see 1703. 

Wood, E. E. The housing of the unskilled 
wage earner. New York, Macmillan Co., 
1919. 305 p. 

A very useful compendium. 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Selected bibliography of in- 
dustrial housing in America and Great Britain 
during and after the war. (In its Report of 
United States Housing Corporation, vol. 2, 
1919, appendix, p. i-xix.) Also pre-printed. 

This should be supplemented by current 

titles in Housing Betterment. 



Adams, T. Industry, homes, and archi- 
tecture. (Journal of American Institute of 
Architects, Dec. 1919, May 1920; vol. 7, 
p. 512-518, vol. 8, p. 173-177.) 

State control of land development essen- 
tial basis for right housing. 

American Academy of Political and Social 
Science. Housing and town planning. See 
265. 

Contains papers on housing from various 
angles. Note paper by A. W. Crawford, 
The interrelation of housing and city 
planning, p. 162-171. 

Clarke, J. J. The housing problem: its 
history, growth, legislation and procedure. 
London, Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, 1920. 544 p. 



A comprehensive review, with full infor- 
mation for the preparation of schemes 
under the British Housing, Town Plan- 
ning, etc. Act of 1919. 

Eberstadt, R. Handbuch des Wohnungs- 
wesens und der Wohnungsfrage. 4. (revised) 
Auflage. Jena, G. Fischer, 1920. 735 p. 
illus., plans. 1st ed., 1910. 

The authoritative German work, with 

numerous bibliographies. 

Ford, J. Fundamentals of housing reform. 
From the Smithsonian Report for 1913, p. 
741-754. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 
1914. (Publication 2311.) 

Brief article in American City, May 1913; 
vol. 8, p. 473-480. Also reprinted. 

Hoover, H. Constructive forces in the 
solution of the housing problem. (United 
States Commerce Reports, July 16, 1921; 
no. 164, p. 273-278:) 

Address before the National Association 
of Real Estate Boards, Chicago, July 15, 
1921. An earlier address by Mr. Hoover 
before the American Institute of Archi- 
tects was published in the National Real 
Estate Journal, May 23, 1921. 

The housing famine: how to end it. A 
triangular debate between J. J. Murphy, Mrs. 
E. E. Wood, and F. L. Ackerman. New York, 
E. P. Button & Co., 1920. 246 p. 

Knowles, M. Industrial housing. See 1697. 

Magnusson, L. Housing and the land 
problem. (U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
Monthly Review, May 1918; vol. 6, p. 1316- 
1325.) 

Discusses aspects of the land problem in 
housing by industrial corporations, by 
copartnership companies and by govern- 
ment aid or ownership. 

The national housing problem: a sym- 
posium, by Messrs. Purdy, Gries, Wagner, 
Haldeman, Reppert, Pirnie, Stevenson, Robin- 
son, Bassett, Ham, and Ihlder. (In Proceed- 
ings of the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, Feb. 1922; vol. 48, p. 195-257; with 
discussion p. 258-263.) 

Nolen, J. A good home for every wage- 
earner; an address delivered at the 12th 
annual convention of the American Civic 
Association. 23 p. (American Civic Associa- 
tion, Series II, no. 9, Apr. 1917.) 

Contains list of housing developments. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



95 



Sellier, H. Le crise du logement et 1'inter- 
vention publique en matiere d'habitation 
populaire dans 1'agglomeration parisienne. 
Paris, Editions de POffice public d'Habita- 
tions a bon marche du Dept. de la Seine, 1921. 
1250 p. illus., plans. 

Includes a review of European housing. 

Whitaker, C. H., and others. The housing 
problem in war and in peace. Washington, 
D. C., Journal of the American Institute of 
Architects, 1918. 116 p. illus., plates, plans. 
With special reference to British and 
American war-time problems. Contains 
papers by F. L. Ackerman, R. S. Childs, 
and Mrs. E. E. W T ood. Much of the ma- 
terial was reprinted from the Journal, 
from Sept. 1917 to Feb. 1918. 

See also 1697, Planning of low cost residen- 
tial districts; 1703, Tenement districts; 3633 
Low cost houses; 3644, Tenement houses. 

Governmental Housing and Governmental Aid 
United States 

1431 Ackerman, F. L. Government hous- 
ing federal, state, municipal is it desir- 
able? (In Proceedings of 7th National Con- 
ference on Housing, Housing problems in 
America, 1918, p. 70-81; with discussion, 
p. 292-296.) 

Adams, T. Housing and social reconstruc- 
tion. (In Ibid., p. 3-37.) 

Mr. Adams discusses American after-war 
housing problems and concludes by ad- 
vocating a governmental housing pro- 
gram in which the Federal Government 
is the advisory agency and the states and 
municipalities the constructive agencies. 
Abridged in Landscape Architecture, Jan. 
1919. 

Child, S. How the United States can help 
build homes. (National Municipal Review, 
Jan. 1921; vol. 10, p. 16-22.) 

Childs, R. S. What will become of the 
government housing? The Government's 
principal permanent housing projects. (Na- 
tional Municipal Review, Jan. 1919; vol. 8, 
p. 48-52.) 

Includes a descriptive list of the govern- 
ment's housing projects and advocates 
future cooperative ownership. A similar 
article by Mr. Childs appeared in the 
Survey for Feb. 1, 1919, advocating a 
permanent Housing Bureau. 



James, H. Lessons from government ex- 
perience in housing. (National Municipal 
Review, Aug. 1921; vol. 11, p. 427-433.) 
An address before the National Confer- 
ence on Social Work. 

Newman, B. J. Government housing in 
practice; The government urged to build 
homes; Government housing a failure. (Hous- 
ing Betterment, Dec. 1921; vol. 10, p. 305- 
314.) 

Olmsted, F. L., see 1697. 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Report of the United States 
Housing Corporation. Vol. 1. Washington, 
Govt. Printing Office, 1920. 391 p. illus. 

Edited by James Ford, summarizing the 
work of all divisions. 
For Vol. 2, see 1697. 

U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Govern- 
ment aid to home owning and housing of 
working people in foreign countries. Wash- 
ington, Govt. Printing Office, 1915. 451 p. 
(Bulletin, whole no. 158; miscellaneous series 
no. 8.) 

U. S. Shipping Board, see 1697. 

War housing. Papers by F. L. Olmsted, 
L. Purdy, L. Veiller, and discussion. (In 
Proceedings of 10th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1918, p. 86-124.) 

For the work promoting good housing 
carried on by the U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
through the Division of Building and Housing, 
see p. 15 of this Manual. 

Great Britain and Canada 
Childs, R. S. The new garden cities of Eng- 
land. (Outlook, Mar. 6, 1918; vol. 118, p. 
364-366.) 

Also reprinted by Committee on New 
Industrial Towns. Article describes new 
war towns and makes comparisons with 
American conditions. 

Culpin, E. G. The remarkable application 
of town-planning principles to the war-time 
necessities of England. (Journal of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects, Apr. 1917; vol. 5, 
p. 157-159.) 

Reiss, R. L. The home I want. London, 
Hodder & Stoughton, 1919. 175 p. illus. 
Dealt with the main facts of the British 
government situation in regard to hous- 
ing and town planning. 



96 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Governmental Housing, etc. (cont.) 

Veiller, L. How England is meeting the 
housing shortage. (Housing Betterment, Sept. 
1920; vol. 9, no. 3, entire number. Note es- 
pecially p. 292-303.) 

Brought up to date in subsequent issues 
of Housing Betterment. 
For the technical reports on the British 
war housing developments, see 1697. 

Canada. Orders in Council. Housing 
project of federal government. Orders in 
Council with reference to the granting of a 
loan of $25,000,000 for the erection of dwell- 
ings, the constitution of the Cabinet Com- 
mittee on Housing and the general principles 
regarding provincial housing schemes. Ottawa, 
Mar. 1919. 15 p. 

Explained in Town Planning and Conser- 
vation of Life. Apr.-June 1920; vol. 6, p. 25- 
27,39-40. illus., plans. 

Adams, T. Housing development as a 
post-war problem in Canada. (In Proceed- 
ings of 46th Annual Conference of Social 
Work, 1919, p. 241-246; with discussion, 
p. 247.) 

Discussion of governmental aid in 
Canada under the above order-in-council. 

Ontario. Bureau of Municipal Affairs. 
Report re housing, including act, rules and 
regulations, housing standards, provisions to 
be considered, and forms. Toronto, 1919. 
134 p. ... 

Supersedes report of Ontario Housing 
Committee. Followed by later reports. 
See ako 1697. 



1432 An experiment in housing by a state 
government in the United States is described 
in the reports of the Massachusetts Home- 
stead Commission (discontinued 1919). North 
Dakota passed a home building law in 1919 
criticized in the Journal of the American 
Institute of Architects, May 1919, p. 224-225. 

Municipal and cooperative housing law in. 
Wisconsin. (Monthly Labor Review, U. S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Sept. 1919; vol. 
9, p. 959-961.) 

Also in American City, Feb. 1920; vol. 22, 
p. 156-157. 

Municipal housing. (Housing Betterment, 
May 1920; vol. 9, p. 135-137.) 

Legal opinion on lack of powers of munic- 
ipalities in regard to constructing houses, 
with special reference to New York. 



Williams, F. B. Must we await constitu- 
tional amendments before cities can engage 
in housing? (American City, Feb. 1919; 
vol. 20, p. 185-187.) 

The experience of Europe cited as an 
adequate precedent for the United States. 

For information on municipal housing in 
Europe, see 1430, Clark, Eberstadt, and 
Sellier. The housing in Great Britain and 
Canada under the Housing Acts (see above) is 
done through local authorities. The Toronto 
system of municipal guarantee of bonds of a 
limited dividend company should be espe- 
cially noted. 

Housing by Employers, Limited-Dividend and 
Cooperative Companies 

1433 Magnusson, L. Housing by em- 
ployers in the United States. Washington, 
Govt. Printing Office, 1920. 283 p. illus. 
(U. S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics, Bulletin no. 263, miscel. series.) 

1433.5 Waldo, F. L. Good housing that 
pays: a study of the aims and accomplish- 
ment of the Octavia Hill Association, 1896- 
1917. Philadelphia, Harper Press, 1917. 
126 p. illus., plans. 

The outstanding example of limited- 
dividend company housing. 

1434 Adams, T. Partner-ownership build- 
ing societies. (Conservation of Life, Oct. 
1919; vol. 5, p. 69-79. illus.) 

With special reference to their applica- 
tion to America. 

Comey, A. C. Co-partnership for housing 
in America. (In American Academy of 
Political and Social Science, Housing and 
town planning, 1914, p. 140-147.) Also 
reprinted. 

Improved housing finance the co- 
partnership plan. (American City, Dec. 1913; 
vol. 9, p. 521-523.) 

MacDougall, E. A. Cooperative housing. 
(In Proceedings of 8th National Conference 
on Housing, Housing problems in America, 
1920, p. 46-55.) 

On cooperative housing in apartments, as 
illustrated by Jackson Heights of the 
Queensboro Corporation. 

Purdy, L. Own your own town. (In Ibid., 
7th Conference, 1918, p. 273-284; with dis- 
cussion, p. 324.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



97 



Swan, H. S. Co-partnership in England, a 
review of the British movement for group 
ownership of small homes. (Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects, April 1918; 
vol. 6, p. 183-189.) 

Contains a bibliography. 

Vivian, H. Co-partnership housing in 
Great Britain. (American City, May 1914; 
vol. 10, p. 433-439. illus.) 

A convenient summary by a leader of the 
movement, the author of several earlier 
publications on the subject. 
See also 1663. 

1434.9 Comey, A. C. New mortgages for 
old. (National Municipal Review, Dec. 1920; 
vol. 9, p. 777-780.) 

An outline of a proposed Federal Mort- 
gage Bank to finance home building. 

Gries, J. M. The home buyer and his 
problems. (National Real Estate Journal, 
Nov. 6, 1922; vol. 23, no. 23, p. 41-^3.) 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce. How to own 
your home: a primer. Prepared by the Divi- 
sion of Building and Housing, 1923. In press. 

Industrial Conditions 

1437 Allen, L. H. Cost and value of good 
housing to our industrial life. (In Proceed- 
ings of 7th National Conference on Housing, 
Housing problems in America, 1918, p. 175- 
191.) 

The workman's home: its influence 

upon production in the factory and labor 
turn-over. (Journal of American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers, June 1918; vol. 40, 
p. 453-458.) 

Chase, J. C. Effect of proper housing on 
labor turnover. (Automotive Industries, 
June 18, 1918, p. 1126-1127.) 

Result of questionnaire conducted by the 
Norton Co., Indian Hill, Worcester. 

Fisher, B. Good housing as a reducer of 
labor turnover. (In Proceedings of 7th Na- 
tional Conference on Housing, Housing prob- 
lems in America, 1918, p. 147-174.) 

Ihlder, J. Housing and transportation 
problems in relation to labor placement. (In 
Annals of the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, Jan. 1919; vol. 81, p. 51- 
55.) 

Good city planning shown to be essential 
to the kind of living conditions that at- 
tract labor and reduce labor turnover. 



1438 Davidge, W. R. Town planning and 
unemployment emergency measures. (In 
Town Planning Institute, London, Papers and 
discussions, 1921-22, vol. 8, p. 23-27; with 
discussion, p. 28-33.) 

President's Conference on Unemployment. 
Report . . . Sept. 26 to Oct. 13, 1921. Wash- 
ington, Govt. Printing Office, 1921. 178 p. 
Public works recommended. 

Food Supply and Markets 

1443 American Academy of Political and 
Social Science. Reducing the cost of food dis- 
tribution. (In its Annals, Nov. 1913; vol. 50, 
whole no. 139. 306 p.) 

A collection of articles treating the sub- 
ject from all points of view. 

Black, Mrs. E. Communal benefits from 
the public control of terminal markets. (In 
Ibid., July 1913; vol. 48, p. 149-153.) 

A terminal market system, New 

York's most urgent need. Some observations, 
comments and comparisons of European 
markets. By member of the Advisory Board 
of the New York Terminal Market Commis- 
sion. [New York, The Willett Press, 1912.] 
31 p. illus., plans. 

Boston City Planning Board. A summary 
of the market situation in Boston. Prelimi- 
nary report of the Market Advisory Com- 
mittee, June 1915. Boston, 1916. 175 p. 
diagr. 

Contains bibliography. 

Chicago Municipal Markets Commission. 
Preliminary report of the Commission ap- 
pointed by Mayor Harrison to make a com- 
prehensive study and report on the subject 
of municipal markets and other agencies 
tending to bring the producer and consumer 
in closer contact. Chicago, 1914, 54 p. 

Folwell, A. P. Municipal markets. (In 
his Municipal engineering practice, 1916. 
p. 365-373. illus.) 

Report of committee on public mar- 
kets. (In Proceedings of American Society 
for Municipal Improvements, 1919, p. 1-7.) 

Ford, G. B. The market of the near future ; 
ideal plan for a system of wholesale and retail 
city markets. (Housewives League Magazine, 
Sept. 1913; vol. 2, p. 6-12. illus., plans.) 

Jefferson, L. P. The community market. 
22 p. illus. (Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Extension Bulletin no. 21, Apr. 1918.) 
Contains bibliography. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Food Supply and Markets (cont.) 
King, C. L., see 1428. 

Marks, M. M. Reports on market system 
for New York City and on open markets 
established in Manhattan. Board of Estimate 
and Apportionment, Committee on Markets. 
Published by Borough of Manhattan, 1915. 
121 p. illus. 

Merchants Association of New York. Re- 
port of the food problem committee. 2d ed. 
Api. 1918. 39 p. tables. 

Analyzed with relation to factors of 
transportation, distributing centers, etc. 

Miller, C. C. Municipal terminal markets. 
Address before Second Pan American Scien- 
tific Congress, 1915-1916. (In its Proceed- 
ings; and also in Journal of National Insti- 
tute of Social Sciences, New York, July 1916; 
vol. 2, p. 140-154.) Also reprinted. 

Saving one hundred and fifty million 

a year in expert marketing. (Craftsman, Nov. 
1915; vol. 29, p. 125-131. illus.) 

Wholesale terminal markets. A new 

idea in public markets for American munic- 
ipalities a symposium of marketing ideas 
in leading European cities. (American City, 
Apr. 1913; vol. 8, p. 355-363. illus., plan.) 

New York (City) Market Commission. Re- 
port of the Mayor's Market Commission of 
New York City, Dec. 1913. 311 p. plans. 
C. C. Miller, Chairman. Contains bibli- 
ography. 

Public Health and Safety 
1445 Adams, T. Town planning in rela- 
tion to public safety. (Conservation of Life, 
Oct. 1918; vol. 4, p. 88-94.) 

Also in Engineering News-Record, Sept. 
26, 1918; vol. 81, p. 572-574, revised by Bar- 
land Bartholomew with special application 
to St. Louis. 

Ball, C. B. The health value of city zoning. 

(National Real Estate Journal, April 10, 1922; 

vol. 23, p. 20-25. illus.) 

Rewritten from an address before the 
American Public Health Association. 

Ford, J. Bad housing and ill health. 
(Monthly Labor Review, U. S. Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, July 1919; vol. 9, p. 243- 
248.) 

Address delivered before the National 

Conference of Social Work. 



Fremantle, F. E. Public health and the 
garden city movement. (Garden Cities and 
Town Planning, Sept. 1914; N.S., vol. 4, 
p. 207-210.) 

Olmsted, F. L. Town and city planning. 
(In Proceedings of Second Pan American 
Scientific Congress, Dec. 27, 1915-Jan, 8, 
1916; p. 377-384.) 

With special reference to public health. 

Purdom, C. B. Health in the garden city. 
(In his The Garden City, 1913, p. 176-182.) 

Ravenel, M. P., ed. A half century of 
public health. Jubilee historical volume of 
the American Public Health Association. 
New York, The Association, 1921. 461 p. 
plates. 

Presents historical aspect of public 
health in U. S., including: Water purifi- 
fication by G. C. Whipple; Housing, by 
L. Veiller, etc. 

Robertson, J. Housing and the public 
health. New York, Funk & Wagnalls Co., 
[1920]. 159 p. diagr. (English Public Health 
Series.) 

Rosenau, M. J. Preventive medicine and 
hygiene. 4th ed. New York, D. Appleton & 
Co., 1921. 1527 p. diagr. 

Section III. Public health measures and 

methods, p. 459-520. 

Section IX-X. Refuse disposal; Sewage 

disposal, by G. C. Whipple, p. 1191- 

1224. 

Whipple, G. C. See also his State Sanita- 
tion, vol. 1, containing report of Massachu- 
setts Sanitary Commission, 1850, considered 
by him the most important sanitary document 
ever published. 

Wynne-Roberts, R. O. Town and regional 
planning in relation to sanitation. (Canadian 
Engineer, Sept. 19, 1922; vol. 43, p. 371-374.) 

For street lighting as promoting public 
safety, see 2310, especially Anderson. 

1447 Godfrey, H. Air. (In his The 
health of the city, Boston, Houghton Mifflin 
Co., 1910, p. 1-29.) 

A popular summary of the dangers of its 
pollution. 

For a thorough discussion of sunlight in 
cities, see 3470, Orientation of buildings. 

1449 Flagg, S. B. City smoke ordinances 
and smoke abatement. Washington, Govt. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Printing Office, 1912. 55 p. (U. S. Bureau 
of Mines, Bulletin no. 49.) 

Information concerning the status of 
smoke abatement in the United States 
and what are believed to be the better 
methods for its accomplishment. 
Hood, O. P. Gains against the nuisances. 
III. Smoke. (National Municipal Review, 
March 1923; vol. 12, p. 111-113.) 

McBain, H. L. Expanding the police 
power smoke and billboards. (In his 
American city progress and the law, 1918, 
p. 58-91.) 

McClelland, E. H. Bibliography of smoke 
and smoke prevention. Pittsburgh, 1913. 
164 p. (Mellon Institute of Industrial Re- 
search and School of Specific Industries. 
Smoke investigation. Bulletin no. 2.) 

Meller, H. B. Some features of smoke regu- 
lation in Pittsburgh. (Municipal and County 
Engineering, Oct. 1920; p. 125-128.) 

Gives figures as to annual loss per capita 
because of smoke nuisance in Pittsburgh. 
Simon, E. D., and M. Fitzgerald. The 
smokeless city, with a preface by Lord 
Newton, chairman of the Departmental Com- 
mittee on smoke abatement. London, Long- 
mans, Green & Co., 1922. 82 p. illus. 

Discusses the smoke nuisance from do- 
mestic chimneys (drawing statistics 
largely from Manchester, England), and 
suggests remedies, including central 
heating systems. 

Smoke nuisance, by F. L. Olmsted, H. P. 
Kelsey and the officers of the American Civic 
Association, Washington, 1911. 56 p. illus. 
(American Civic Association, Dept. of Nui- 
sances Publications, Series 2, no. 1.) 

For Chicago report on smoke abatement, 
see reference on p. 44 of this Manual. 

1460 Rablin, J. R. Dust prevention by 
the use of palliatives. (In Blanchard, A. H., 
ed., American highway engineers' handbook, 
1919, p. 747-765; with bibliography.) 

1451 Godfrey, H. The city's noise. (In 
his The health of the city, 1910, p. 231-262.) 
Nance, W. O. Gains against the nuisances. 
II. Noise and public health. (National 
Municipal Review, Oct. 1922; vol. 11, p. 
326-332.) 

Spooner, H. J. Health problems involved 
in noise and fatigue. Reprinted from The 
Nation's Health, Feb. and Mar. 1922; vol. 4, 
nos. 2 and 3. 8 p. 



1452 Hardenbergh, W. A. Mosquito 
control for the municipality. (Municipal 
Journal, New York, Oct. 18, 1919; vol. 47, 
p. 236-240. illus.) 

Hardenburg, W. E. Mosquito eradication. 
New York, McGraw Hill Co., 1922. 248 p. 
illus. 

Pierce, W. D. Mosquito control; methods 
developed at army camps and by progressive 
communities. (American City, June 1919; 
vol. 20, p. 560-564. illus.) 

1454 American Society of Civil Engineers. 
Final report of the special committee on 
floods and flood prevention; with discussion. 
(In Transactions of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, Dec. 1917, p. 1218-1310. 
Paper no. 1400.) 

Knowles, M. Floods and coordinated river 
planning. (Engineering News-Record, Apr. 
20, 1922; vol. 88, p. 658.) 

Several unpublished papers by Mr. 
Knowles deal with this subject. 

Pittsburgh Flood Commission. References 
to flood literature. (In its Report, 1912, p. 
397-432.) 

Water-Supply and Disposal of Wastes 
See also 1445 above, and 2880 ff. 

1456 Fuller, G. W. How to improve or 
conserve your public water supply. (Ameri- 
can City, June 1913; vol. 8, p. 609-612.) 
An authoritative summary. 

Hazen, A. Clean water and how to get it. 
2d rev. and enl. ed., New York, John Wiley 
& Sons, 1914. 196 p. plates. 

Leavitt, C. W. Water supplies and the part 
they play in city and county planning. 
(American City, May 1914; vol. 10, p. 422- 
426. illus.) 

Saville, C. M. Water supply and the city 
plan. (In Nolen, J., ed., City planning, 1916, 
p. 181-200. illus.) 

Turneaure, F. E., and H. L. Russell. Public 
water-supplies: requirements, resources, and 
the construction of works. 2d ed. New York, 
John Wiley & Sons, 1908- 808 p. illus. 

1464 Metcalf, L., and H. P. Eddy. 

Sewerage and sewage disposal, a text book. 

1st ed. New York, McGraw Hill Book Co., 

1922. 598 p. illus., plans, diagr. 

An abridgment of the three-volume work 
by the same authors: American Sewerage 
Practice. 



100 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Water-Supply and Disposal of Wastes (cont.) 

1472 Abercrombie, P. The relation be- 
tween town planning and the work of public 
cleansing a paper read at the Annual 
Conference of Cleansing Superintendents at 
Sheffield, June 1920. (Town Planning Re- 
view, Dec. 1920; vol. 8, p. 183-192. plans.) 
The airangement of low-cost dwellings 
in relation to the removal of wastes. 

Hering, R., and S. A. Greeley. Collection 
and disposal of municipal refuse. 1st ed. New 
York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1921. 653 p. 
illus., diagr. 

1474 Soper, G. A. Modern methods of 
street cleaning. New York, Engineering 
News Publishing Co., 1909. 201 p. illus. 
Still an authoritative reference. 

1476 Snow removal plans of states within 
the snow belt. (American City, Dec. 1920; 
vol. 23, p. 583-588. illus., map.) 

Richards, H. S. Methods of snow disposal 
(In Proceedings of American Society for 
Municipal Improvements, 1920, p. 1-9.) 

Fire Prevention 

1478 Blauvelt, A. Debarment of city 
conflagrations. Paper before American So- 
ciety of Mechanical Engineers. Reprinted 
from Quarterly of National Fire Protection 
Association, Boston, July 1914. 16 p. 

Contains a diagram showing a central 
district of fire-resistive buildings in the 
shape of a Maltese cross. 

Freitag, J. K. Fire prevention and fire 
protection, as applied to building construc- 
tion. 2d rev. ed. New York, John Wiley & 
Sons, 1921. 1038 p. illus., diagr. 

Includes statistics of fires and fire losses. 

National Board of Fire Underwriters. 
Standard schedule for grading cities and 
towns of the United States with reference to 
their fire defenses and physical conditions. 
Adopted Dec. 14, 1916. New York, [1917]. 
80 p. 

Committee on Fire Prevention. [Re- 
ports on special cities.] 

For example: Baltimore, Boston, and 
Buffalo, 1916. 

Starrett, W. A. How to plan for fire pro- 
tection in congested districts. (American 
City, Oct. 1914; vol. 11, p. 298-302.) 



Wentworth, F. H. How the conflagration 
hazard may be reduced. (Fire and Water 
Engineering, Oct. 31, 1917; vol. 62, p. 329- 
330.) 

Supports the Maltese cross idea (see 

above). 

Public Recreation 

1495 Addams, Jane. Recreation as a 
public function in urban communities. (Amer- 
ean Journal of Sociology, Mar. 1912; vol. 17, 
p. 615-619.) 

Collier, J. City planning and the problem 
of recreation. (In American Academy of 
Political and Social Science, Housing and 
town planning, 1914, p. 208-215.) 

Edwards, R. H. Public recreation. Madi- 
son, University of Wisconsin, Extension Di- 
vision, 1912. 217 p. 

Treats the field and aims of public recre- 
ation. 

A field of service: providing recreation a 
public responsibility: statement of work of 
Playground and Recreation Association of 
America and Community Service. (Parks and 
Recreation, Jan.-Feb. 1922; vol. 5, p. 225- 
227.) 

Note cooperation suggested by American 
Institute of Park Executives. 

Fisk, A. A. Public recreation; how fur- 
nished and how supported. (Parks and 
Recreation, Oct. 1918; vol. 2, no. 1, p. 11-13. 
illus.) 

Hanmer and Brunner. Recreation legisla- 
tion. See 4060. 

Haynes, R., and S. P. Davies. Public 
provision for recreation [in Cleveland]. 
Cleveland Foundation Committee, 1920. 
198 p. illus., maps. (One of the 7 sections of 
the report of the Recreation Survey of Cleve- 
land.) 

A standard for general reference. 

Knight, H. R., and M. P. Williams. Sources 
of information on play and recreation, rev. 
and enl. ed. New York, Russell Sage Foun- 
dation, 1920. 48 p. 

Supersedes edition of 1915, by Hanmer 

and Knight. 

McBain, H. L. Municipal recreation. (In 
his American city progress and the law, 1918, 
p. 203-227.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



101 



McFarland, J. H. The human side of city 
planning. (In Proceedings of Second Pan 
American Scientific Congress, Dec. 27, 1915- 
Jan. 8 1916, p. 385-387.) 
Planning for recreation. 

Playground and Recreation Association of 
America and Community Service. Com- 
munity recreation: suggestions for recreation 
and community recreation workers. New 
York, Dec. 1919. 122 p. 

A useful summary of what community 
recreation is and how it works. 

Richards, J. R. Recreational agencies. 
(Playground, Oct. 1916; vol. 10, p. 244- 
252.) 

The publications of the Playground and 
Recreation Association of America, Commun- 
ity Service (Inc.), and Dept. of Recreation, 
Russell Sage Foundation should be consulted 
for information on various phases of public 
recreation. 

See also 4000 ff., Parks and playgrounds. 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE CONDITIONS 

1500 Shurtleff, F., and F. L. Olmsted. 

Carrying out the city plan, the practical ap- 
plication of American law in the execution of 
city plans. New York, Survey Associates, 
1914. 349 p. (Russell Sage Foundation.) 

Williams, F. B. Planning administration 
in Italy, Sweden and Germany; in England, 
Canada and France; in the United States. 
(In his Law of city planning and zoning, 1922, 
p. 443-605.) 

A brief paper by Mr. Williams: Some 
aspects of city planning administration 
in Europe, is given in the Proceedings of 
the National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1915. 

1520 Bradford, E. S. Commission govern- 
ment and city planning; paper before Na- 
tional Municipal League, 1912. (American 
City, Aug. 1912; vol. 7, p. 113-116.) 

Gilbert, A. B. American cities; their 
methods of business. New York, Macmillan 
Co., 1918. 240 p. 

Gilbert son, H. S. The political background 
for city planning. (American City, May 
1915; vol. 12, p. 394-397.) 

Munro, W. B. Municipal government and 
administration. New York, Macmillan Co., 
1923. In press. 

Includes chapter on city planning. 



Principles and methods of municipal 

administration. New York, Macmillan Co., 
1916. 491 p., illus., plans. 

Note especially: City planning, p. 30-73, 

and Streets, p. 74-121. 

Federal, State, and Metropolitan Authorities 

1521 Adams, T. The planning of land in 
relation to social problems. (In Proceedings 
of American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments, 1919, p. 351-362. map.) 

Defines scope of planning work for federal 
state, regional, and local authorities. 
State, city, and town planning. (In 

Proceedings of 8th National Conference on 

City Planning, 1916, p. 119-146. illus.) Also 

reprinted. 

Inhibition permission compulsion. 

(American City, Apr. 1916; vol. 14, p. 325- 

327.) 

States arguments for obligatory planning 
of urban areas as proposed in England. 

1522 Adams, T. The beginnings of town 
planning in Canada. (In Proceedings of 8th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1916, 
p. 222-230; with discussion, p. 230-241.) 

On governmental promotion of town 
planning. The reports of the Canadian 
Commission of Conservation (discon- 
tinued 1921) should be consulted for the 
history of this work. After that date, 
work transferred to National Parks 
Branch of Dept. of Interior. (See note in 
Journal of Town Planning Institute of 
Canada, Oct. 1921.) 

Reiss, R. L. The housing and town-plan- 
ning department of the Ministry of Health. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, June 
1919; vol. 9, p. 109-113. chart.) 

The annual reports of the Ministry of 
Health (1st, 1919-20) contain a section 
on town planning. 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce. For an account 
of the services in promoting city planning 
rendered by the Division of Building and 
Housing, see p. 15 of this Manual. 

1523 Pennsylvania. State Bureau of 
Municipalities. Lohman, K. B. State-aid in 
city planning: Pennsylvania's pioneer move- 
ment fosters park development. (Park Inter- 
national, Sept. 1920; vol. 1, p. 156-158.) 

Woodward, J. F. State aid for Penn- 
sylvania municipalities. (American City, 
June 1922; vol. 26, p. 576-578. plans.) 



102 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Federal, State, Metropolitan Authorities (cont.) 
Massachusetts. Dept. of Public Welfare. 
Report of the Division of Housing and Town 
Planning. 1920. 

This first report gives (p. 7-8) a brief 
account of the organization of the Divi- 
sion, which superseded the Massachusetts 
Homestead Commission (abolished 1919. 
See its published annual reports.) 
Manitoba. Stoughton, A. A. The town 
planning comptroller and his work Mani- 
toba appoints town planning comptroller. 
(Journal of Town Planning Institute of 
Canada, Oct. 1921 ; vol. 1, no. 6, p. 8-10.) 

1524 Wisconsin has a law creating county 
rural planning committees, and in Ohio (Apr. 
1923), regional planning commissions may be 
created. Massachusetts (May 1923) has a 
metropolitan planning authority (see 1526, 
Boston). Legislation is being sought for the 
Pittsburgh and Los Angeles county authorities. 
1625 Boston Chamber of Commerce. 
Committee on Municipal and Metropolitan 
Affairs and Committee on Public Utilities. 
Metropolitan planning and development in 
Boston and its environs. 1922. 32 p. plans, 
diagr. 

Bill creating a Metropolitan Planning 
Division in the Metropolitan District 
Commission signed May 17, 1923. 
Donley, W. M. Main highways in metro- 
politan districts, construction, maintenance, 
and control. (In Proceedings of 13th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1921, 
p. 134-136.) 

On the need of a central authority. 
Gundlach, J. H. A city's control of out- 
lying districts; abstract of address before 
League of American Municipalities. (Ameri- 
can City, May 1911; vol. 4, p. 224-226.) 

Hooker, G. E. City planning and political 
areas. (National Municipal Review, May 
1917; vol. 6, p. 337-345.) 

Condensed in American City, Feb. 1917; 
vol. 16, p. 122-125. 

Knowles, M. The metropolitan district 
idea. Reprint of report to the Essex Border 
Utilities Commission, Ontario, Canada. Pitts- 
burgh, 1919. 27 p. 

Massachusetts. Metropolitan District Com- 
mission. Report of the commission to the 
Massachusetts legislature. 1896. Boston, 
Wright & Potter, State Printers, 1896. 100 p. 
Appendix on forei? municipal extensions. 



Woolston, H. B. Municipal zones; a 
study of the legal powers of cities beyond 
their incorporated limits. (National Muni- 
cipal Review, July 1914; vol. 3, p. 465-473.) 

See also 6100, Regional planning. 

Municipal Departments and Commissions 

1536 Baker, M. N. City planning. (In 
Woodruff, C. R., ed., A new municipal pro- 
gram, 1919, p. 218-227.) 

Discusses the most efficient city planning 
agency for the American municipality 
under present conditions, with special 
reference to its place in the commission- 
manager form of government and ex- 
plains the sections on city planning of 
National Municipal League Model City 
Charter appended (p. 360-362). 

McGee, W. A. The organization and 
functions of a city planning commission. (In 
Proceedings of 5th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1913, p. 73-85; with discus- 
sion, p. 85-92.) 

Condensed in American City, June 1913; 
vol. 8, p. 581-583. 

National Conference on City Planning. 
Committee on Administrative Procedure. 
Tabulation of results of questionnaire on the 
constitution and powers of a city planning 
authority. (In Proceedings of 7th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1915, p. 274- 
299.) 

Whitten, R. H. The constitution and 
powers of a city planning authority. (In 
Ibid., p. 135-143; with discussion, p. 155-197.) 

Also in City Plan, June 1915; vol. 1, p. 7- 
12. 

See also 714 and 1600. 

Art Commissions 

1638 Crawford, A. W. Art commissions: 
the increasing usefulness and value of city 
art juries in matters of public adornment. 
(American Review of Reviews, July 1921; 
vol. 64, p. 61-67. illus.) 

The value of art commissions in city 

planning. (In Proceedings of 14th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1922, p. 148- 

158.) 

The difference between the functions of the 
city art commission and a city plan commis- 
sion. Discussion led by F. T. Bigger. (In 
Ibid., 1917, p. 228-236.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



103 



Ford, G. B. Art commissions and city 
planning. (American City, Feb. 1914; vol. 
10, p. 117-118.) 

Municipal art commissions. (In U. S. 
Bureau of Manufactures, Municipal art com- 
missions and street lighting in European 
cities, 1910, Special consular reports, vol. 42, 
pt. 1, p. 5-13.) 

National Conference of Art Commissions. 
Art commissions, city and state; suggestions 
as to their organization and scope. Report of 
a committee appointed at a conference of 
members of art commissions, Dec. 1913. 
23 p. 

New York (City). Laws relating to art 
commissions. Printed for the Art Commis- 
sion of the City of New York, May 1914. 
53 p. 

Of special interest are the published reports 
of the National Commission of Fine Arts 
(Washington), of the Philadelphia Art Jury, 
and the New York (City) Art Commission. 

Relation of Municipality to Public Utilities 

1541 Williams, F. B. Public utilities. (In 
his Law of city planning and zoning, 1922, 
p. 161-170.) 

Wilcox, D. F. The city's part in the de- 
velopment and control of public utilities. 
(New Jersey Municipalities, Mar. 1918; vol. 
2, p. 69-70, 88-90.) 

ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL CONDITIONS 

1550 For a comprehensive outline of the 
economic data necessary for city planning see 
Stewart report in Plan of New York Progress 
Report, 815. 

Urban Land 

1563 Adams, T. Municipal and real 
estate finance in Canada. The need of town 
planning to arrest growing financial difficul- 
ties in cities and towns. Canada, Commission 
of Conservation, 1921. 15 p. 

Should governments conscript land 

or regulate its use? (Conservation of Life, 
July 1918; vol. 4, p. 59-61.) 

" In both the cities and the rural dis- 
tricts it should be made illegal in future 
for any person to acquire a title to any 
area of land except for use." 
See also 1430. 



Cadbury, G., Jr. [Municipal ownership of 
land.] (In his Town planning, with special 
reference to the Birmingham schemes, 1915, 
p. 140-146.) 

Committee on New Industrial Towns, New 
York City. Publications (most of which were 
reprinted by the Committee), as follows: 

The unearned increment in Gary, by R. M. 
Haig. (Political Science Quarterly, Mar. 
1917.) 

The new garden cities of England, by R. S. 
Childs. (Outlook, Mar. 6, 1918.) 

How shall the Government dispose of its 
industrial housing, by R. S. Childs. (Reprint 
of article entitled: Group ownership of hous- 
ing, New Republic, Mar. 30, 1918.) 

A self -owning town. A report to Mr. F. P. 
Palen, Vice-President Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, regarding 
"A co-partnership scheme for Hilton." 

Copartnership in England, by H. S. Swan. 
(Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, Apr. 1918.) 

The unearned increment in Lackawanna, by 
H. S. Swan. (National Municipal Review, 
Mar. 1919.) 

A memorandum to the Steel Corporation: 
a plan for the conservation of future incre- 
ments of land values at Ojibway and for con- 
version of the same into additional revenues 
for community purposes. [1919.] 

A series of syndicated articles Self-owning 
Towns of Tomorrow appeared in the press 
under the auspices of this committee. 

Gray, G. H. The land question as related 
to city planning and housing. (Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects, Oct. 1921; 
vol. 9, p. 330-337.) 

Ako in Engineering and Contracting, 
Dec. 28, 1921; vol. 56, p. 590-593. 

Howe, F. C. Municipal real estate policies 
of German cities. (In Proceedings of 3d 
National Conference on City Planning, 1911, 
p. 14-26.) 

Hurd, R. M. Principles of city land values. 
New York, The Record and Guide, 1903. 
159 p. illus., plans. Also later impressions. 

Out of print. 

Magnusson, L. Housing and the land 
problem. (U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
Monthly Review, May 1918; vol. 6, p. 26&- 
277.) 



104 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Urban Land (cont.) 

Purdy, L. Own your own town. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 7th National Conference on Hous- 
ing, Housing problems in America, 1918, p. 
273-284; with discussion by R. S. Childs, p. 
324-325.) 

An earlier article on self -owning towns by 
Mr. Purdy was published in the Annals 
of the American Academy of Political and 
Social Science for July 1918. 

A symposium on the municipal ownership 
of land. (Town Planning Review, Jan. 1913; 
vol. 3, p. 232-239.) 

Town planning and land purchase; Mr. T. 
C. Horsfall on Germany's experience: How to 
keep rents low. (Garden Cities and Town 
Planning, Mar. 1908; N.S., vol. 3, p. 27-28.) 

Unwin, R. The relation of land values and 
town planning. (In American Academy of 
Political and Social Science, Housing and 
town planning, 1914, p. 17-24.) 

Town planning in relation to land 

values. (In Town Planning Institute, Lon- 
don, Papers and discussions, 1914-15; vol. 1, 
p. xii-xvii.) 

Ako in Town Planning Review, July 1914; 
vol. 5, p. 107-114. 

Zangerle, J. A. Rules and principles with 
land and building values controlling the 1917 
" Community Assessment " of Cuyahoga 
County (Cleveland, Ohio). 34 p. + maps. 
Of particular interest for its outline of a 
fair method of assessing real property, 
with schedules and illustrations of build- 
ing types. 

The courses in " Land Economics " at the 
University of Wisconsin should be noted. 

Taxation in Relation to Development 

1668 Adams, T. Town planning in relation 
to land taxation: cities should have agri- 
cultural zones examples of Canadian cities. 
(National Municipal Review, Mar. 1919; 
vol. 8, p. 109-113.) 

Pels, J. Taxation, housing, and town 
planning. (Landscape Architecture, Oct. 
1913; vol. 4, p. 1-11.) 

Paper given at International Congress, 
Ghent, 1913 (see 40) and published in its 
Proceedings. 

Howe, F. C. Municipal taxation and its 
effect on town planning, city building, and 



the housing question. (In Proceedings of 2d 
National Conference on City Planning, 1910, 
p. 87-95.) 

Huntington, C. W. Enclaves of single tax, 
being a compendium of the legal documents 
involved together with historical description. 
Published by Fiske Warren, Harvard, Mass., 
1921. 150 p. plan. 

Marsh, B. C. Industry and city planning. 
(Town Development, Aug. 1915; vol. 15, 
p. 115-116.) 

Present system of taxation as hampering 

industry. 

Preliminary to housing reform. (New Re- 
public, June 7, 1919; vol. 19, p. 170-171.) 
Proposing special taxation of unimproved 
land in cities. 

Purdy, L. Exemption from taxation and 
other subsidies. (In Proceedings of 8th Na- 
tional Conference on Housing, Housing Prob- 
lems in America, 1920, p. 3-18; with discus- 
sion by R. E. Simon, p. 227-234.) 

Swan, H. S. How much are land and 
buildings taxed? (American City, May 1919; 
vol. 20, p. 433-434.) 

Facts based upon survey made by writer 
of cities having over 30,000 population. 

Taxation and housing. Papers by C. B. 
Fillebrown and E. R. A. Seligman. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 4th National Conference on Hous- 
ing, Housing Problems in America, 1915, 
p. 92-108; with discussion, p. 109-112.) 

Wilcox, D. F. Taxation of real estate val- 
ues and its effect on housing. (In American 
Academy of Political and Social Science, 
Housing and town planning, 1914, p. 34-40.) 

Financing of Municipal Improvements 

1670 Adams, T. How to carry out the 
town plan at least cost a discussion. (In 
Proceedings of 9th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1917, p. 258-263.) 

Crawford, A. W. Certain aspects of city 
financing and city planning. (In Proceedings 
of 6th National Conference on City Planning, 
1914, p. 54-67; with discussion, principally 
on bond issues, p. 67-83.) 

Also in National Municipal Review, July 
1914; vol. 3, p. 474-483. 

Godward, A. C. Financing park acqui- 
sitions and improvements. (Parks and Recre- 
ation, May-June 1922; vol. 5, p. 501-503.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



105 



Lewis, N. P. Financing a city plan. (In 
his Planning of the modern city, 2d rev. ed., 
1923, p. 367-396.) 

Financing of highway improvements. 

(In Blanchard, A. H., ed., American highway 
engineers' handbook, 1919, p. 1485-1514.) 

Paying the bills for city planning. 

Paying the bills for city planning from a 
Boston viewpoint, by J. A. Gallivan. (In 
Proceedings of 4th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1912, p. 43-68; with discus- 
sion on both papers, p. 68-83.) 

Lewis paper condensed in American City, 
July 1912; vol. 7, p. 31-35. 

Methods of taxation of land and municipal 
ownership in Continental countries. (In 
U. S. 61st Congress. Senate Document 422, 
City planning, 1909, p. 41-48.) 

Purdy, L. Condemnation, assessments, 
and taxation in relation to city planning. (In 
Proceedings of 3d National Conference on 
City Planning, 1911, p. 118-125; with dis- 
cussion, p. 125-130.) 

St. Paul Association of Public and Business 
Affairs. Report of the special committee of 
the city planning subdivision on methods for 
paying the costs of acquiring and improving 
parks, parkways and boulevards. [1920.] 
Mimeographed. 17 p. 

Tabulation of practice in American 
cities. 

Summarized in National Municipal Re- 
view, Apr. 1920; vol. 9, p. 239. 

Shurtleff, F. City financing and city plan- 
ning. (In Nolen, J., ed., City planning, 1916, 
p. 387-403.) 

Swan, H. S. The administrative and finan- 
cial machinery for carrying out the city plan. 
(American City, June 1922; vol. 26, p. 579- 
582. illus., plans.) 

Williams, F. B. City planning finance. 
(In his Law of city planning and zoning, 1922, 
p. 357-379.) 



1680 Doell, C. E. Financing neighbor- 
hood playgrounds by special assessment. 
(Parks and Recreation, May-June 1922; 
vol. 5, p. 503-506. diagr.) 

How will our cities pay for future improve- 
ments and public services? (American City, 
Dec. 1918, Jan. 1919; vol. 19, p. 451-455, vol. 
20, p. 43-47.) 

Gives present practice in special assess- 
ments in different states. 

Kessler, G. E. Actual distribution of the 
cost of Kansas City parks and boulevards. 
(In Proceedings of 5th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1913, p. 140-147; with 
introduction by F. L. Olmsted, Jr., p. 138-139, 
and discussion, p. 147-162.) 

Condensed in American City, June 1913; 
vol. 8, p. 575-581. illus., plan. 

National Municipal League. Committee 
on Sources of Revenue. Special assessments: 
assessments for benefit as a means of financing 
municipal improvements. (National Muni- 
cipal Review, Feb. 1922; vol. 11, p. 43-58.) 

Purdy, L. The assessment of real estate. 
Supplement to National Municipal Review, 
Sept. 1919; vol. 8, no. 7, p. 511-527. 

Shurtleff, F. The distribution of the cost of 
land acquirement. (In his Carrying out the 
city plan, 1914, p. 52-102.) 

1695 Appropriations for plans commis- 
sions. (City Plan, Aug. 1917; vol. 3, no. 2, 
p. 7-9.) 

Appropriations for city planning commis- 
sions. (American City, Nov. 1920; vol. 23, 
p. 482.) 

Some of the largest U. S. cities. 

Shurtleff, F. Municipal appropriations for 
city planning in 1920. (In Kimball, T., ed., 
Municipal accomplishment in city planning, 
1920, p. 77-78.) 

For up-to-date-information, see p. 51 of 
this Manual. 



106 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



ZONING: SUBDIVISION OF CITY AREA INTO FUNCTIONAL DISTRICTS 

For zoning laws and court decisions, see 765. 



1600 Bassett, E. M. Zoning. Rev. ed. 
National Municipal League, Technical pam- 
phlet series no. 5, 1922. p. 315-341. 

The most important general treatise on 
the subject, containing a statement of 
principles, program of action, legal basis, 
and bibliography, completely revised 
from the first edition of May 1920, Sup- 
plement to National Municipal Review. 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce. Zoning, a se- 
lected bibliography. Preliminary ed., Apr. 10, 
1922. Mimeographed. 12 p. 

Prepared for Secretary Hoover's Ad- 
visory Committee on Zoning by T. 
Kimball. 

A Zoning primer, by the Advisory 

Committee on Zoning, appointed by Secretary 
Hoover. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 
1922. 7 p. illus. 

For the membership of the Committee, 

see p. 16 of this Manual. 

Division of Building and Housing. 

Zoning progress in the United States: State 
laws and municipal ordinances, Jan. 1923. 
Mimeographed. 8 p. 

For an account of the work of this Divi- 
sion, see p. 15 of this Manual. 



Ackerman, F. L. Preliminary to city 
planning zoning. (Journal of the American 
Institute of Architects, Jan. 1920; vol. 8, 
p. 15-18.) 

A protest against zoning under our 
present system of land development. 

Adams, T. Efficient industry and whole- 
some housing true aims of zoning. (American 
City, March 1921; vol. 24, p. 287, 289.) 

For Mr. Adams' discussion of the use of 
the term zoning, see 300. 

American City Bureau. The remarkable 
spread of zoning in American cities. (Ameri- 
can City, Dec. 1921; vol. 25, p. 456-458.) 
A list of cities having zoning ordinances 
enacted or in preparation, prepared from 
lists by Messrs. Cheney, Hinckley, and 
Ball. For zoning ordinances enacted 
since 1921, see article by M. T. Voorhees 
in Engineering News Record, Sept. 28, 
1922, and U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
mimeographed list of Jan. 1923. 



American Civic Association. Zoning as an 
element in city planning, and for protection 
of property values, public safety, and public 
health, by L. Purdy, H. Bartholomew, E. M. 
Bassett, A. W. Crawford, H. S. Swan. 48 p. 
(Series II, no. 15, June 30, 1920.) 

Atlanta City Planning Commission. The 
Atlanta zone plan. Report outlining a ten- 
tative zone plan for Atlanta, by R. H. 
Whitten, consultant, 1922. 18 p. illus. 

" What zoning is and does," p. 5-8. 
With the illustrations taken from the 
Cleveland report, this report forms one 
of the strongest arguments for zoning 
yet issued. See also 1619. 

Ball, C. B. City zoning. (Health, Feb. 
1922; vol. 2, p. 26-28. illus.) Also repi-inied. 
Contains " Zoning facts boiled down," 
originally published in Bulletin of 
Chicago School of Sanitarv Instruction, 
Dec. 24, 1921. 

A flight of zoning steps. Steps to 

take in zoning your city. (Housing Better- 
ment, Nov. 1922; vol. 11, p. 394.) 

The health value of city zoning. (Na- 
tional Real Estate Journal, Apr. 10, 1922; 
vol. 23, p. 20-25.) 

Rewritten from an address before the 
American Public Health Association. 

The need and nature of city zoning; 

an address delivered at the fourth annual con- 
vention of the Real Estate Association of 
Illinois. (Ibid., Feb. 14, 1921; vol. 22, no. 4, 
p. 16-17.) 

Bartholomew, H. Zoning experiences in 
many cities. (Ibid., Mar. 1, 1920; vol. 21, no. 
5, p. 19-22.) 

Zoning in the location of public parks. 

(Park International, July 1920; vol. 1, p. 56- 
59. illus.) 

Bassett, E. M. Zoning versus private re- 
strictions. (National Real Estate Journal, 
Jan. 2, 1922; vol. 23, no. 1, p. 26.) 
Prevention of blighted districts. 

Baumeister, R. Gruppirung von Bezirken 
mit verschiedener Bestimmung. (In his 
Stadt-Erweiterungen, 1876, p. 79-86.) 
The historic reference on zoning. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



107 



Cheney, C. H. How zoning standardizes 
values. (National Real Estate Journal, Nov. 
1919; vol. 20, no. 4, p. 21-21, illus.) 

Procedure for zoning or districting of 

cities. 16 p. (California Conference on City 
Planning, Bulletin no. 2, Sept. 1917.) 

Contains: Reasons for zoning, by na- 
tional authorities. 

Removing social barriers by zoning. 

(Survey, May 22, 1920; vol. 44, p. 275-278. 
illus., plan.) 

A reply to the Lasker article of Mar. 6, 
1920, with restatement by Mr. Lasker, 
p. 278-279. 

Chicago Citizens' Zone Plan Conference. 
Report of Proceedings, Dec. 16 and 17, 1919. 
Chicago, Printed by Union League Club. 
94 p. Out of print. 

Contains a series of addresses on various 
aspects of the subject by leading au- 
thorities to convince Chicago of the 
value of zoning. 

Chicago Real Estate Board, see 3480. 
Comey, A. C. The value of zoning to 
business. (Current Affairs, Boston Chamber 
of Commerce, Feb. 12, 1923; vol. 13, no. 39, 
p. 6-7, 13. illus.) Also reprinted. 

Ford, G. B. New York City building zone 

resolution, restricting the height and use of 

buildings and prescribing the minimum sizes 

of their yards and courts, with explanatory 

notes that will be helpful to owners, builders, 

and architects. Revised for second edition. 

New York, New York Title and Mortgage 

Company, 1920. 29 p. + maps, illus., diagr. 

An interesting example of a local zoning 

handbook. 

Zoning is so logical and reasonable 

that it must come sooner or later it is in- 
evitable. Paper and discussion at 14th An- 
nual Convention of National Association of 
Real Estate Boards. (National Real Estate 
Jour., Sept. 26, 1921; vol. 22, no. 20, p. 41-45.) 
Grinnalds, J. C. [Series of articles on Zon- 
ing and its advantages.] (Municipal Journal, 
Baltimore, beginning Oct. 8, 1920.) 

Hal d em an, B. A. The relation of zoning to 
the housing problem. (In Proceedings of the 
American Societv of Civil Engineers, Feb. 
1922; vol. 48, p. 213-218.) 

States economic, social, etc., advantages. 
Hurd, R. M. Directions of growth; Dis- 
tribution of utilities. (In his Principles of 
city land values, 1903, p. 56-88. illus., plans.) 



Ihlder, J. City zoning is sound business. 
(Nation's Business, Nov. 1922, p. 19-20.) 

Also reprinted. 

The proposed zoning ordinance for 

Philadelphia. A letter to the Real Estate 
Board from the Philadelphia Housing Asso- 
ciation. [1920.] 11 p. 

Advantages of zoning to developers of 
real estate suggested by questions and 
comparisons. 

Lasker, B. Unwalled towns. (Survey, 
March 6, 1920; vol. 43, p. 675-680, 718. 
illus.) 

Suggests that social barriers might be 
raised by zoning. For Mr. Cheney's 
reply to this article, see above. 

McFarland, J. H. City housekeeping: 
protection to the home investor through 
zoning. (Parks and Recreation, Mar.-Apr. 
1922; vol. 5, p. 346-348.) 

National Conference on City Planning. 
Proceedings 4th, 1912, p. 173-188: The 
control of municipal development by the 
" zone system " and its application in the 
United States, by B. A. Haldeman; with dis- 
cussion, p. 188-191. (Also condensed in 
American City, Sept. 1912.) 

6th, 1914, p. 92-111: Protecting resi- 
dential districts, by L. Veiller; with discus- 
sion, p. 111-132. (Also published separately 
by National Housing Association.) 

8th, 1916, p. 147-158: Districting by 

municipal regulation, by L. Veiller; with 
discussion, p. 158-176. p. 177-183: District- 
ing through private effort, by A. S. Taylor. 

9th, 1917, p. 168-169: Districting and 

zoning of cities, introductory remarks, by 
Henry D. Ashley, p. 170-182: Districting 
and zoning of cities, by Lawson Purdy. 
p. 183-194: Districting progress and pro- 
cedure in California, by C. H. Cheney. 
p. 195-198: Building heights in Washington, 
D. C., by R. B. Watrous. p. 199-214: 
Constitutional limitations on city planning 
powers, by E. M. Bassett; with discussion, 
p. 214-227, 289-298. (Bassett paper also 
published separately by City of New York.) 

10th, 1918, p. 34-39: The zoning of 

residence sections, by R. H. Whitten; with 
discussion, p. 39-46. p. 47-55: Industrial 
zoning in practice, by H. S. Swan; with dis- 
cussion, p. 55-71. (Swan paper condensed in 
American City, July 1918.) 



108 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Zoning, etc. (cont.) 

National Conference on City Planning. 
Proceedings llth, 1919, p. 159-161: Resi- 
dential zoning, introductory statement, by A. 
C. Comey. p. 162-185: Zoning in practice, 
by C. H. Cheney; with discussion, p. 185- 
194. (Cheney article also in National Muni- 
cipal Review, Jan. 1920; vol. 9, p. 31-43.) 

12th, 1920, p. 133-138: Zoning from 

the viewpoint of the lender on real estate 
mortgages, by W. L. Ulmer. p. 139-141: 
The need of zoning in Cincinnati, by B. Mar- 
quette; with discussion, p. 142-147. p. 148 
-153: Recent court decisions on zoning, by 
A. Bettman. 

13th, 1921, p. 22-30: Zoning and liv- 
ing conditions, by R. H. Whitten. p. 31-42: 
The effect of zoning upon living conditions, by 
H. S. Swan. p. 43-48: How zoning affects 
living conditions, by G. B. Ford; with dis- 
cussion, p. 59-69, 151-154. p. 155-161: The 
Pittsburgh zoning ordinance, by J. M. Clark. 

14th, 1922, p. 159-173: The question 

box. 

15th, 1923, see 766, Bassett. 

New York (City) Heights of Buildings 
Commission. Report to the Committee on 
the height, size and arrangement of buildings 
of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment 
of the city of New York. Dec. 23, 1913. 295 
p. illus. 

Comprehensive information on zoning to 
1913 in Europe and America, compiled 
for the promotion of zoning in New 
York. An historic document. 

Commission on Building Districts 

and Restrictions. Final report, June 2, 1916. 
New York, Board of Estimate and Appor- 
tionment Committee on the City Plan, 1916. 
100 p. illus., plans. 

A compendious record of New York 
procedure, and a valuable work of refer- 
ence on zoning. 

Nichols, J. C. Zoning, the realtor's part in 
planning " the city efficient " out of which 
grows " the city beautiful." Paper and dis- 
cussion at 14th annual convention of National 
Association of Real Estate Boards. (Na- 
tional Real Estate Journal, Oct. 10, 1921; 
vol. 22, p. 36-40.) 

Purdy, L. The zoning of cities. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 6th National Conference on Hous- 
ing, Housing problems in America, 1917, p. 
214-228.) 



Rankin, E. S M see 2860. 

Rider, H. A. Bibliography on residential 
and industrial districts in cities. (Special 
Libraries, Jan. 1916; vol. 7, p. 2-7.) 

'""iBwan, H. S. Does your city keep its gas 
range in the parlor and its piano in the kit- 
chen? How a zoning law, administered at 
nominal expense, will promote orderliness in 
community development, help real estate and 
benefit the entire city. (American City, Apr. 
1920; vol. 22, p. 339-344. illus.) 

Unwin, R. Zoning proposals. (Town Plan- 
ning Institute, London, Papers and discus- 
sions, 1921-22, vol. 8, p. 115-123; with dis- 
cussion, p. 124-133.) 

Voorhees, M. T. Zoning progress in the 
United States. (Engineering News-Record, 
Sept. 28, 1922; vol. 89, p. 519; and editorial, 
p. 501.) 

Whitten, R. H. Regional zoning. See 6100. 

Zoning or districting of cities; papers and 
discussions at first meeting of American City 
Planning Institute held in New York City, 
Nov. 24. (City Plan, Dec. 1917; vol. 3, 
no. 3, p. 1-12.) 

For pamphlets issued against proposed 
zoning ordinances, note especially Philadel- 
phia and Detroit. 

For legislation and court decisions relating 
to zoning, see 766. 

For technical procedure in the preparation 
of surveys and plans for zoning, see 870. 

For articles on the effect of the New York 
zoning regulations on the form of high build- 
ings, see 3466. 

Special Problems 

1613 Coolidge, J. R., Jr. The problem of 
the blighted district. (In Proceedings of 4th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1912, 
p. 100-106; with discussion, p. 106-115.) 

Cunliffe, N. Blighted districts in St. Louis. 
(In Proceedings of 10th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1918, p. 72-74; with dis- 
cussion, 74-75.) 

Goodrich, E. P. War housing by rejuvenat- 
ing blighted districts. (Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Apr. 1918, vol. 8; p. 125-132.) 

Great Britain. Committee on Unhealthy 
Areas, see 1704. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



109 



Re-planning and re-development in existing 
centres; two papers by W. T. Lancashire and 
H. V. Lanchester. (In Town Planning Insti- 
tute, London, Papers and discussions, 1914- 
15, p. 89-105; with discussion, p. 106-111. 
illus., plan.) 

Summarized in Municipal Journal, London, 
Apr. 23, 1915; vol. 24, p. 379-380. 

Stanton, W. C. Blighted districts in Phila- 
delphia. (In Proceedings of 10th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1918, p. 76-85.) 

1617 Adams, T. Reconstruction and 
redevelopment at Halifax. Extract from 
preliminary report to Commission of Con- 
servation. (Conservation of Life, Jan. 1918, 
vol. 4, p. 22-24.) 

Later article, Ibid,, p. 82-88. illus., plans. 

Crane, J. L., Jr. How Halifax was rebuilt. 
(Municipal and County Engineering, Sept. 
1921; vol. 61, p. 102, 104. illus.) 

Kelsey, F. W. Constantinople's burnt 
areas provide unique opportunity for large- 
scale replanning. (American City, July 1922; 
vol. 27, p. 1-4. illus., plan.) 

Ross, G. A. Planning problems of indus- 
trial cities The Halifax disaster and rehous- 
ing. (In Proceedings of llth National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1919, p. 32-46.) 

Williams, F. B. Replanning Salonika after 
the great fire. (National Municipal Review, 
May 1922; vol. 11, p. 149-150.) 

Planning reports after fires were prepared 
for San Francisco (1905) and Baltimore 
(1906, etc.). 

1619 The Atlanta zoning plan. (Survey, 
Apr. 22, 1922; vol. 48, p. 114-115. illus.) 
A discussion of the racial districts pro- 
vided in the plan. 

Race segregation ordinances. (American 
City, Sept. 1918; vol. 19, p. 237.) 

The unmaking of a myth: Chicago's race 
riots: an analysis and a program. (Survey, 
Oct. 1922; vol. 49, p. 46-49. maps.) 
Signed B. L. 

Administrative Centers. Community Centers 

1627 Lewis, N. P. Common sense of 
civic centers. (In Proceedings of llth Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1919, 
p. 195-205.) 

Main and subsidiary administrative 
centers a part of the city plan. 



Abstracts also in American City, July 1919; 
vol. 21, p. 6; and Engineering News-Record, 
June 5, 1919; vol. 82, p. 1099. 

Robinson, C. M. The administrative 
centre. (In his Modern civic art, 1918, etc., 
p. 81-98. illus.) 

Unwin, R. Of centres and enclosed places. 
(In his Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 175-234. 
illus., plans.) 

Discusses the location of centers of town 
life. 

Warner, J. de W. Civic centers. (Muni- 
cipal Affairs, Mar. 1902; vol. 6, p. 1-23. 
plans.) 

A brief historical review. 



Simkhovitch, M. K. Toward a neighbor- 
hood program. (Survey, Dec. 28, 1918; vol. 
41, p. 394-395.) 

On working out an organization of city 
neighborhood life, with central services. 

Ward, E. J. The social center, New York, 
D. Appleton & Co., 1917. 359 p. (National 
Municipal League Series.) First impression, 
1913. 

Suggestive as to the functions of a cen- 
ter for community life. 

For information on architectural grouping 
of public buildings in civic centers, see 3700 ff. 
See also 3575. 

Business Districts 

1630 Baxter, S. Covered ways for a 
business district. (In Proceedings of 2d Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1910, 
p. 149-152.) 

Bright, J. I. Urban congestion a study 
of its causes and suggestions for its eradica- 
tion. (American Architect, May 25, 1921; 
vol. 119, p. 581-583.) 

Describes a proposal for the central 
business district of Philadelphia. 

Kurd, R. M. Currents of travel [business 
districts]. (In his Principles of city land 
values, 1903, p. 89-96. map.) 

With especial reference to retail business. 

Robinson, C. M. Street plan of business 
district; Architecture in business district; 
Furnishings of the street; Adorning with 
fountains and sculpture. (In his Modern 
civic art, 1918, etc., p. 99-183. illus., plans.) 



110 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Business Districts (cont.) 

For special studies of business districts, see 
city planning reports (including those on 
transportation) for Pittsburgh, Chicago, 
Boston, Philadelphia, Dallas, and especially 
New York. 

For discussion of problems arising from 
high buildings, see 3480; for problems of 
traffic congestion, see 2076. 

See also 2161, Arcades; 2230, Business 
streets; 2420, Interurban terminals. 

1631 Bassett, E. M. Zoning protects the 
small storekeeper. (Municipal Journal, Bal- 
timore, Mar. 24, 1922; vol. 10, no. 6, p. 5.) 

Farr, A. A plea for better business centers 
in our suburban towns. (Architect and En- 
gineer of California, Dec. 1918; vol. 55, 
p. 81-85. illus., plans.) 

Heyworth, J. O. Business and beauty 
combined in a small town civic center. 
(American City, Town and County Edition, 
July 1919; vol. 21, p. 26-27. illus., plan.) 

Huddleston, G. The business centres of 
garden cities. (Garden Cities and Town 
Planning, Mar. 1912; N.S. vol. 2, p. 64-68. 
plan.) 

Industrial Districts 

1650 Bennett, E. H. Planning for distri- 
bution of industries. (In American Academy 
of Political and Social Science, Housing and 
town planning, 1914, p. 216-221.) 

Chapin, H. F. A unique industrial center 
the midway district of St. Paul and Minne- 
apolis. (American City, Jan. 1917; vol. 16, 
p. 20-22. illus., map.) 

Ford, J. Residential and industrial de- 
centralization. See 1426. 

Gaunt, We H. Town planning with refer- 
ence to factory development and the distri- 
bution of goods. (Town Planning Institute, 
London, Papers and discussions, 1919-20; 
vol. 6, p. 81-88. plan; with discussion, p. 
90-94.) 

Hoover, A. P. Industrial city planning, a 
vital need for present and future commercial 
development. (Architecture and Building, 
Mar. 1918; vol. 50, p. 21-24.) 

The industrial terminal and its rela- 
tion to the city plan. (In Proceedings of 9th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1917, 
p. 28-42.) 



Also in City Plan, Apr. 1917; vol. 3, no. 1, 
p. 4-11. 

Joy, S. S. The central manufacturing dis- 
trict, Chicago. I. General features of opera- 
tion. (Architectural Forum, Apr. 1921; 
vol. 34, p. 123-128. illus., plan.) 

Marsh, B. C. Industry and city planning. 
See 1668. 

Pratt, E. E. Relief [of congestion] through 
proper distribution of factories. (In Proceed- 
ings of 2d National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1910, p. 107-112.) 

Swan, H. S. Industrial zoning in practice. 
(In Proceedings of 10th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1918, p. 47-55; with dis- 
cussion, p. 55-71.) 

Also in American Architect, Apr. 2, 1919; 
vol. 115, p. 500-503; and Municipal Journal, 
New York, Sept. 14, 1918; vol. 45, p. 206- 
208. 

Toronto Harbor Commissioners. A district 
created for manufacturers. Toronto, 1915. 
31 p. illus., map. 

One of the objects of the creation of the 
Commissioners in 1911 was the develop- 
ment and administration of the Toronto 
Harbor Industrial District. 

Wadsworth, G. R. Railroads and indus- 
trial districts. (In Nolen, J., ed., City plan- 
ning, 1916, p. 264-278. illus., plans.) 

The city planning reports of St. Louis, 
Philadelphia, and Newark might be espe- 
cially mentioned for suggestions on the de- 
velopment of new industrial districts. 

See also 1426, 5350. 

Residential Districts 

1675 Robinson, C. M. Street plotting 
among the homes; On great avenues; On 
minor residential streets; Among the tene- 
ments. (In his Modern civic art, 1918, etc., 
p. 185-268. illus.) 

Veiller, L. Protecting residential districts. 
(In Proceedings of 6th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1914, p. 92-111; with dis- 
cussion, p. 111-132.) Also reprinted. 
An early discussion of the subject. 

Whitten, R. H. The zoning of residence 
sections. (In Proceedings of 10th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1918, p. 34-39; 
with discussion, p. 39-46.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 111 



1677 Cartwright, F. B. Population den- 
sity as a basis for housing regulations. Inten- 
sive Rochester study indicates that improved 
transit, industrial decentralization, zoning 
and other current changes render dense tene- 
ment populations unnecessary in most cities. 
(Engineering News-Record, Aug. 25, 1921; 
vol. 87, p. 318-322. illus.) 

Marsh, B. C. Can land be overloaded? 
(In American Academy of Political and Social 
Science, Housing and town planning, 1914, 
p. 54-58.) 

Newman, B. J. Congestion and rents. (In 
Ibid., p. 59-67.) 

Unwin, R. Nothing gained by overcrowd- 
ing! How the garden city type of develop- 
ment may benefit both owner and occupier. 
London, Garden Cities and Town Planning 
Association, 1918. 23 p. illus., plans. 

Foreword to third edition, 1918, by the 
Marquis of Salisbury First published, 
1912. 

Se* also 14MB. 

1685 Atterbury, G. Model towns in 
America. (Scribner's Magazine, July 1912; 
vol. 53, p. 19-35. illus., plans.) 

Also reprinted as National Housing Asso- 
ciation Publication no. 17. 

On residential " garden " suburbs. 

Cheney, C. H. A great city planning 
project on the Pacific coast Palos Verdes. 
(American City, July 1922; vol. 27, p. 47.) 
An area of 25 sq. miles to be developed 
as a residential suburb of Los Angeles. 

City planning study. See 880. 

Olmsted, F. L. Planning residential subdi- 
visions. (In Proceedings of llth National 
Conference on City Planning, 1919, p. 1-21.) 

Abstract in Municipal and County Engi- 
neering, Oct. 1919; vol. 57, p. 161-164. 

Prize-winning plans. See 880. 

Rading, A. The garden village, a new 
method of developing suburban land, trans- 
lated by F. B. Williams. (National Municipal 
Review, Apr. 1923; vol. 12, p. 168-171. plan.) 

Triggs, H. I. Town expansion. (In his 
Town planning, 1909, p. 170-210. plans.) 
On the development of residential 
suburbs. 

Unwin, R. Of site planning and residential 
roads. (In his Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 
289-318. illus., plans.) 



Williams, C. H. How to get garden sub- 
urbs in America. (In Proceedings of 5th Na- 
tional Conference on Housing, Housing 
problems in America, 1916, p. 102-110; with 
discussion by A. C. Comey, A. W. Crawford, 
and others, p. 295-310.) 

See also 2365, for relation of transit to 
suburban development; 3380, for methods of 
land subdivision. 

1695 A series of articles on the older 
" high-class " residential suburbs appeared in 
House and Garden as follows: 

Llewellyn Park, West Orange, N. J., The 
first American suburban community, by S. 
Swift; June 1903; vol. 3, p. 327-335. 
Community life at Rochelle Park, by S. 
Swift; May 1904; vol. 5, p. 235-243. 
Lake Forest, the beautiful suburb of Chi- 
cago, by A. H. Granger; June 1904; vol. 5, 
p. 265-275. 

Community life in Tuxedo, by S. Swift; 
Aug. 1905; vol. 8, p. 61-71. 

Examples of printed booklets descriptive of 
"high-class" residential developments are: 
Roland Park and Guilford, Baltimore; Coun- 
try Club District, Kansas City, Mo. ; Forest 
Hills Gardens, L. I.; Brendonwood, Indian- 
apolis; Ottawa Hills, Toledo; Euclid Golf 
and Shaker Heights, Cleveland; Colony Hills, 
Springfield, Mass.; etc. 

Low-cost Residential Districts 

1697 American City Planning Institute. 
Town planning lessons from government 
housing operations. Philadelphia, 1919. 24 p. 
Contents: Housing operations of Emer- 
gency Fleet Corporation, by B. A. Halde- 
man; United States Housing Corpora- 
tion, by F. L. Olmsted; Summary by 
J. Nolen. Discussion. 

Architectural Review (Boston), vol. 6, 1918, 
contained a series of illustrated articles on 
land developments for industrial housing. 

Comey, A. C. Billerica garden suburb. 

(Landscape Architecture, July 1914; vol. 4, 

p. 145-149. plan.) 

An attempt to develop a low-cost suburb 
on the co-partnership principle. 

Crawford, A. W. Standards set by the new 
federal war suburbs and war cities. 24 p. 
illus., plans. (American Civic Association, 
Series II, no. 12, Oct. 1918.) 



112 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Low-cost Residential Districts (cont.) 

Davison, R. L. List of low-cost housing 
developments in the United States. (In 
Nolen, J., More houses for Bridgeport; report 
to Chamber of Commerce, 1916, Appendix B, 
p. 47-57.) 

Goodrich, E. P., see 1613. 

Knowles, M. Industrial housing, with dis- 
cussion of accompanying activities; such as 
town planning street systems develop- 
ment of utility services and related engi- 
neering and construction features. New York, 
McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1920. 408 p. illus., 
plans. 

Magnusson, L. A modern industrial sub- 
urb. (U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
Monthly Review, Apr. 1918; vol. 6, p. 729- 
753. illus., plans.) Also reprinted. 

Morgan Park, Duluth, Minn. Pages 
735-739 deal with the treatment of labor 
camps. 

Nolen, J. The industrial village. New 
York, National Housing Association, Sept. 
1918. 22 p. plans. (Publication no. 50.) 
Similar articles on industrial village plan- 
ning appeared earlier in 1918 in his pam- 
phlet entitled: Industrial housing 
better homes for less money; and in the 
Architectural Forum for Apr. 1918. 
Six typical developments designed by 
Mr. Nolen are used as illustrations in 
both pamphlets. 

Land subdivision and its effect upon 

housing. (In 4th National Conference on 
Housing, Housing problems in America, 1915, 
p. 33-52; with discussion, p. 53-64.) 

A discussion of low-cost districts. The 
data used were assembled by a Com- 
mittee of the National Conference on 
City Planning (see 3380). 

Mariemont. See 1426. 

Olmsted, F. L. Lessons from the housing 
developments of the United States Housing 
Corporation. (Monthly Labor Review, U. S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 1919; vol. 8, 
p. 27-38.) Also reprinted. 

By the Chief Town Planner of the Cor- 
poration. 

Ontario. Bureau of Municipal Affairs. 
Report re housing for 1919, including reports 
of officials, statements as to operations of 
housing commissions, plans, etc. Toronto, 
Govt. Printer, 1920. 140 p. illus., plans. 



Purdy, L. Better homes with more profit. 
(In Proceedings of 14th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1922, p. 186-190.) 
A plea for more open development. 

Recent government housing developments. 
Yorkship Village, Camden, N. J., by E. D. 
Litchfield; Atlantic Heights at Portsmouth, 
N. H., by W. H. Kilham; Union Park Gar- 
dens, Wilmington, Del., by E. G. Perrot. (In 
Proceedings of 7th National Conference on 
Housing, Housing problems in America, 1918, 
p. 82-117.) 

Seine (Dept.) Office Public d'habitations a 
bon marche. La constitution de 1'Onice des 
habitations a bon march6 du dSpartement de 
la Seine. Son action et ses travaux du 10 
juillet 1916 au 31 decembre 1918. Paris, 
[1918]. 195 p. plans. 

Followed by a series of reports with plans 
of the garden suburb developments about 
Paris. 

Southern Pine Association (New Orleans). 
Homes for workmen. A presentation of lead- 
ing examples of industrial community de- 
velopment. New Orleans, The Association, 
[1919]. 249 p. illus., plans. 

Successful examples of low cost housing in 
England and the United States, including the 
new suburb of Flint, Michigan, Gidea Park, 
England, and a " Check List " of American 
housing developments. (Architectural Re- 
view, Apr. 1917; vol. 5, no. 4.) 

Thompson, F. L. Site planning in practice; 
an investigation of the principles of housing 
estate development . . . with a foreword by 
Raymond Unwin. London, H. Frowde and 
Hodder & Stoughton, [1923]. 258 p. illus., 
plans. (Oxford Technical Publications.) 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Report of the United States 
Housing Corporation, Vol. 2. Houses, site- 
planning, utilities. Washington, Govt. Print- 
ing Office, 1919. 524 + 19 p. illus., plans. 
Edited by H. V. Hubbard. A compen- 
dium of information on low-cost resi- 
dential districts. The photographs of 
completed developments are mainly in 
Vol. 1 (see 1431). 

U. S. Shipping Board. Housing the ship- 
builders. Constructed during the war, under 
the direction of the United States Shipping 
Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, Passen- 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



113 



ger Transportation and Housing Division. 

Philadelphia, Pa., 1920. 57 p. illus., plans. 
Some photographs of completed develop- 
ments are shown. 

Veiller, L. Industrial housing develop- 
ments in America [a series of illustrated arti- 
cles]. (Architectural Record, Mar.-Aug. 1918; 
vol. 43.) 

Walpole, Mass., Town Planning Com- 
mittee. Housing. (In its Town planning for 
small communities, 1917, p. 149-231. illus., 
plans.) 

Deals with land developments for low- 
cost housing. 

Whitaker, C. H., ed., see 1430. 

Wright, H. Platting city areas for small 
houses. 1920. 16 p. illus. (Supplement to 
Journal of American Institute of Architects, 
Aug. 1920.) 

See also 1430 ff., 3380, 3633, 5360. 

1703 Ackerman, F. L. The building of 
Manhattan. (Journal of American Institute 
of Architects, Apr. 1922; vol. 10, p. 114-120. 
illus., plans.) 

Three periods of tenement house building 
compared as to density of development. 

Veiller, L. A model housing law. Rev. ed. 
New York, Russell Sage Foundation, 1920. 
430 p. illus., plans. 

Relates mainly to tenement houses. 

1704 Bacon, A. F. Heading off the slums. 
Why housing laws are necessary. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 7th National Conference on 
Housing, Housing problems in America, 1918, 
p. 251-265.) 

Cram, R. A. Scrapping the slum. (In 
Ibid., p. 242-250; with discussion by T. 
Adams, p. 312-319.) 

Great Britain. Ministry of Health. Un- 
healthy Areas Committee. Second and final 
report of the committee appointed by the 
Minister of Health to consider and advise on 
the principles to be followed in dealing with 
unhealthy areas. London, H. M. Stationery 
Office, 1921. 24 p. 



Unhealthy areas and town planning. (Town 
Planning Review, Mar. 1921; vol. 9, p. 47- 
49.) 

On the need for a general survey and plan 
before reconstruction of slum areas. 

Veiller, L. Slumless America. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 12th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1920, p. 154-161.) 

Also in National Municipal Review, Aug. 
1920; vol. 9, p. 493-498. 

Agricultural Areas 

1715 Adams, T. Reserving productive 
areas within and around cities, a proposal to 
substitute agricultural wedges for zones. 
(Journal of American Institute of Architects, 
Oct. 1921; vol. 9, p. 316-319. diagr.) 

Bright, J. I. The plan for Coconut Grove, 
Florida. Foreword by Thomas Adams. 
(Journal of American Institute of Architects, 
Apr. 1921; vol. 9, p. 110-127. illus., plans.) 
Proposes a " productive park strip." 

Child, S. The agricultural belts of garden 
cities. (Town Planning Institute, London, 
Papers and discussions, 1920-21, vol. 7, p. 
104-105.) 

Eve, Sir T. The agricultural belts of gar- 
den cities. (In Ibid., p. 55-58; with discussion, 
p. 59-67.) 

Purdom, C. B. What is an agricultural belt? 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, Apr. 
1921; vol. 11, p. 85-87.) 

A comment on Sir Tristram Eve's paper. 
(Ibid., p. 82-84.) 

See also 6360; and 6100, especially Comey 
and Whitten. 

Boundaries and Approaches 

1746 Robinson, C. M. The water ap- 
proach; The land approach. (In his Modern 
civic art, 1918, etc., p. 39-58; 59-80. illus.) 

Unwin, R. Of boundaries and approaches. 
(In his Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 154-174. 
illus.) 

See also 1716, 2460 ff., 2560 ff., 4040, etc. 



114 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



PLATTING: SUBDIVISION OF CITY AREA INTO STREETS AND BLOCKS 

For platting legislation, see 770. 



1800 Lewis, N. P. Planning of streets and 
street systems. (In Blanchard, A. H., ed., 
American highway engineers' handbook, 1919, 
p. 363-418. illus., plans; with bibliography.) 
Principles of platting condensed for en- 
gineers. 

The street system. (In his Planning 

of the modern city, 1916 and 1923, p. 86-129. 
illus., plans.) 

Robinson, C. M. City planning, with 
special reference to the planning of streets 
and lots. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 
1916. 344 p. illus., plans. 

Discusses types of street platting in rela- 
tion to uses of districts. 



Haldeman, B. A. The street layout. (In 
American Academy of Political and Social 
Science, Housing and town planning, 1914, 
p. 182-191.) 

Kurd, R. M. Ground plan of cities. (In 
his Principles of city land values, 1903, p. 33- 
55. illus., plans.) 

Types of plats in relation to development. 

Lewis, N. P. The planning of undeveloped 
city areas. (In Proceedings of 2d National 
Conference on City Planning, 1910, p. 115- 
124.) 

Report of sub-committee on local sub- 
divisions. (In Proceedings of American So- 
ciety for Municipal Improvements, 1921, 
p. 176-195; with discussion, p. 193-195.) 



Practical street construction, see 2050. Con- 
tains several chapters related to Platting. 

Shirley, J. W. The problem of extending 
the city plan. (In Proceedings of 2d National 
Conference on City Planning, 1910, p. 164- 
171.) 

Condensed in American City, Oct. 1910; voh 
3, p. 193-194. 

Shurtleff, A. A. Bees and men as com- 
munity planners. Based on a paper read by 
the author at the Winnipeg town planning 
conference. (Landscape Architecture, October 
1921; vol. 12, p. 40-45.) 

An analogy for gridiron planning. 

The public street systems of the cities 

and towns about Boston in relation to private 
street schemes. (In Proceedings of 4th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1912, p. 
1 16-137. With papers on Newton and Water- 
town and discussion.) 

Based on Mr. Shurtleff's studies pub- 
lished in Report of the Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Improvements Commis- 
sion, 1909, which contained an interest- 
ing series of comparative plans. See also 
his article on the same subject in Land- 
scape Architecture, Jan. 1911. 

See also 1200 ff., Composition of city plans; 
2050, Streets; 3000, Blocks and lots; 5200 ff., 
Types of city plans. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



115 



ELEMENTS OF CITY PLANS 



CHANNELS OF TRANSPORTATION 

2000 American Society for Municipal Im- 
provements. Committee on Traffic and 
Transportation. Annual reports, published 
in Proceedings. Note especially 1920 and 
1921. 

Arnold, B. J. City transportation: sub- 
ways and railroad terminals. (Journal of 
Western Society of Engineers, Apr. 1914; 
vol. 19, p. 325-368.) 

Great Britain. Royal Commission on Lon- 
don Traffic. Report of the Royal Commission 
appointed to inquire into and report upon the 
means of locomotion and transport in London. 
London, Wyman & Sons, 1905-06. 8 vols. 
illus., maps, plans. 

An historic document on urban transpor- 
tation. 

Haldeman, B. A. Main thoroughfares and 
street railways. (In Nolen, J. ed., City plan- 
ning, 1916, p. 279-313. illus., plans.) 

Lewis, N. P. Transportation and the city 
plan. (In Proceedings of American Society 
for Municipal Improvements, 1920, p. 74-81.) 

. The transportation system. (In his 

The planning of the modern city, 1916 and 
1923, p. 54-85. illus., plans, cross-sections.) 

Lyford, W. H. Cooperation vs. competition 
between motor truck and railroad trans- 
portation. (Good Roads, Nov. 22, 29, 1922; 
vol. 63, p. 181-183, 185-187 of Nov. 29.) 
Waterways, railroads, and rapid transit. 

Maltbie, M. R. Transportation and city 
planning. (In Proceedings of 5th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1913, p. 105- 
119. Introduction by B. J. Arnold, p. 103- 
104, and discussion, p. 119-137.) 

Condensed in American City, June 1913; 
vol. 8, p. 586-590. 

Pride, G. H. The interrelationship of 
highways, railways and waterways. (Good 
Roads, Mar. 22, 1919; vol. 17, p. 127-128.) 
Paper at Annual Convention, American 
Road Builders' Association, 1919. 



STREETS, ROADS, FOOTWAYS 

2060 Blanchard, A. H., ed. American high- 
way engineers' handbook. 1st ed. New York, 
John Wiley & Sons, 1919. 1658 p. illus., 
plans. 

Section on Planning of streets, by N. P. 

Lewis, see 1800. 

Bosanquet, R. C. Greek and Roman towns. 
I. Streets. (Town Planning Review, Jan. 
1915; vol. 5, p. 286-293. illus., plans.) 

Lewis, N. P., see 1800, 2068, 2076, etc. 

Munro, W. B. Streets. (In his Principles 
and methods of municipal administration, 
1916, p. 74-121.) 

Olmsted, Vaux and Co. Observations on 
the progress of improvements in street plans. 
With special reference to the park-way pro- 
posed to be laid out in Brooklyn. Brooklyn, 
I. Van Anden, 1868. 30 p. 

From the Report of the Brooklyn Park 

Commissioners, 1868. 

Pollock, H. M., and W. S. Morgan. City 
streets and some splendid types. (In their 
Modern cities, 1913, p. 66-84.) 

Practical street construction: planning 
streets and designing and constructing the 
details of street surface, subsurface and super- 
surface structures. Reprinted from a series of 
articles which appeared in Municipal Journal 
during the year 1916. New York, Municipal 
Journal and Engineer, 1916. 248 p. illus., 
plans, cross-sections. 

The Municipal Journal is now called 
Public Works. 

Robinson, C. M. City planning, with 
special reference to the planning of streets and 
lots. See 1800. 

Superseded his Width and Arrangement 

of Streets, 1911. 

The evolution of the street. (House 

and Garden, Nov., Dec. 1903, Jan., Feb. 1904; 
vol. 4, p. 216-221, 263-268, vol. 5, p. 14-21, 
57-62. illus.) 

Historical article with examples from 

Europe and America. 



116 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Streets, Roads, Footways (cont.) 

Robinson, C. M. The sociology of a street 
layout. (In American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, Housing and town plan- 
ning, 1914, p. 192-199.) 

Stiibben, J. Verschiedene Strassenarten; 
Langen- und Querschnitte; Strassen von be- 
sonderer Art; Strassenkreuzungen, Strassen- 
erweiterungen und Strassenvennittelungen. 
(In his Der Stadtebau, 1907, p. 62-147. illus., 
plans.) 

Triggs, H. I. The planning of streets. (In 
his Town planning, 1909, p. 213-270. illus., 
plans.) 

U. S. Bureau of Foreign Commerce. 
Streets and highways in foreign countries. 
Reports from the consuls of the United States 
on streets and highways in their several dis- 
tricts. Issued from the Bureau of Statistics, 
Department of State, Washington, 1891. 
592 p. illus. (Special consular reports, 
vol. 3.) 

Unwin, R. Of the arrangement of main 
roads, their treatment and planting; Of site 
planning and residential roads. (In his Town 
planning in practice, 1909, etc., p. 235-318. 
illus., plans.) 

For photographs of streets of all types, see 
especially files of the American City and Good 
Roads (New York). 

2056 Burnap, G. Street nomenclature in 
city planning. (Architectural Record, June 
1922; vol. 51, p. 535-537.) 

The Dundalk Co. (Edward H. Bouton, 
President.) A competition in street-naming. 
(Landscape Architecture, July 1918; vol. 8, 
p. 190-192. plan.) 

Results described in Landscape Architec- 
ture, Apr. 1919; vol. 9, p. 125-128. 

Husted, A. M. System in naming and 
marking streets. (American City, Feb. 1922; 
vol. 26, p. 176. illus.) 

2056.5 Folwell, A. P. House numbering. 
(In his Municipal engineering practice, 1916, 
p. 279-284.) 

Shay, G. D. Street renumbering in Utica, 
N. Y. (American City, May 1921; vol. 24, 
p. 459-^60. maps.) 



Motor Transportation as affecting 
Street Plans 

2058 Adshead, S. D. The lay-out of 
roads in relation to requirements. (Town 
Planning Review, Jan. 1916; vol. 6, p. 163- 
170.) 

Discusses some controversial points in 
relation to motor traffic. 

Goodrich, E. P. The design of the street 
system in relation to vehicular traffic. (In 
Proceedings of 14th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1922, p. 84-103; with discus- 
sion, p. 123-132.) 

The urban auto problem. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 12th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1920, p. 76-88; with discussion, 
p. 88-106.) 

Also in National Municipal Review, July 
1920; vol. 9, p. 435-443. 

Harger, W. G. Effects of motor operation 
costs on highway location and grade design 
summarized. (Engineering News-Record, 
Feb. 3, 1921; vol. 86, p. 201-203. diagr.) 

Lay, C. D. Notes on the influence of auto- 
mobiles on town, country, and estate planning. 
(Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1920; vol. 10, 
p. 89-95. illus., plans.) 

Lewis, N. P. The automobile and the city 
plan. (In Proceedings of 8th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1916, p. 35-56; 
with discussion, p. 68-90.) 

Also in City Plan, June 1916; vol. 2, no. 
2, p. 2-11. Summarized in American City, 
July 1916; vol. 15, p. 79-81. 

Schaeff er, A. The conservation of existing 
facilities for the relief of traffic congestion. 
(Municipal Engineers' Journal, New York, 
third quarterly issue, 1922; vol. 8, paper 132, 
p. 1-26. illus., plans; with discussion, p. 26- 
35.) 

A study of New York problems, relating 
traffic congestion to zoning, rapid transit, 
and housing. 

Legislation 
Including Setbacks and Street Widening 

2070 Boston Chamber of Commerce. Re- 
port on city planning in relation to the street 
system in the Boston Metropolitan District. 
Statement from the Committee on City Plan- 
ning transmitting a report prepared by F. 
Shurtleff. Boston, Mar. 1914. 19 p. 
A legal report. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



117 



Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agri- 
culture. The law of the roadside; How to 
protect our landscape; Electric lines in public 
ways; Shade trees in public ways; Insect 
pests; Trespass to real estate. 2d ed. [Bos- 
ton, G. H. Ellis Co.], 1911. 95 p. 

Although out of date, this compilation is 
still of interest, and suggestive of what 
might be done in any state. 

An ordinance for economical and systematic 
street development, Philadelphia. (Ameri- 
can City, Sept. 1915; vol. 13, p. 224-225.) 
Incorporates the " Elastic " street prin- 
ciple. 

Olmsted Brothers. Parkway laws. (In 
their Report on a proposed parkway system 
for Essex County, New Jersey, 1915, p. 15- 

37.) 

Prichard, C. B. Legal aspects of traffic 
control. (In Proceedings of 13th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1921, p. 137- 
154.) 

Simpson, J. Liability of municipalities for 
fixed obstructions in streets. (Public Works, 
Feb. 28, 1920; vol. 48, p. 143-144.) 

Toronto Civic Guild. Draft bill for de- 
ferred street widenings, with observations. 
[Toronto, Ont., 1922.] 15 p. 

Note on power to establish building lines 
granted by passage of act in Journal of Town 
Planning Institute of Canada, June 1922; 
vol. 1, no. 10, p. 3-4. 

Williams, F. B. Streets setbacks traf- 
fic regulations. (In his Law of city planning 
and zoning, 1922, p. 173-190.) 

SeeakolWff., 770. 

2073 Brookline, Mass., Planning Board. 
Building lines. (In its Annual report, 1915, 
p. 5-9. illus.) 

Also in Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1916; 
vol. 7, p. 22-26. illus. 

For a record of building lines established 
to Jan. 1, 1921, see its Annual report for 
1920. 

Building lines. Acts of New Jersey, Chap- 
ter 215, 1917. (City Plan, Aug. 1917; vol. 3, 
no. 2, p. 12.) 

Establishment of building lines for aesthetic 
purposes . . . citing case of Windsor, Conn., 



" 111 Atlantic 354." (Harvard Law Review, 
Feb. 1921; vol. 34, p. 433-434.) 

Cleveland City Plan Commission. The 
building line ordinance. [1920.] 4 p. illus. 

Flint, Mich. An ordinance to establish 
building lines. Approved Jan. 4, 1922. [7 p.] 
(Ordinance no. 301.) 

Locke, W. J. Set back lines, power to 
establish them from a legal standpoint 
opinions of legal authorities and courts. 
(Municipal Journal, New York, Dec. 21, 1918; 
vol. 45, p. 487-488.) 

From Pacific Municipalities, the official 
organ of the League of California Muni- 
cipalities. 

New York (City) Board of Estimate and 
Apportionment. Committee on the City Plan. 
Establishment of setbacks or court yards in 
the City of New York. 1917. 15 p. illus. 

Olmsted, F. L. Building lines in the first 
ward of New Haven. (In Report of New 
Haven Civic Improvement Commission, 1910, 
p. 133-138.) 

Also published separately, 1913. 

Set-back lines as an aid to better and 
cheaper layouts. (American City, Feb. 1917; 
vol. 16, p. 144-148. cross-sections.) 

Shurtleff, F. Building lines. (In Proceed- 
ings of the Fourth Annual City and Town 
Planning Conference of Massachusetts Plan- 
ning Boards, 1916, p. 21-24; with discussion, 
p. 24-29.) 

For front yards or setbacks as area provi- 
sions in zoning regulations, see 1600, Zoning. 



2074 Lewis, N. P. Street widening to meet 
traffic demands. (In Proceedings of 9th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1917, p. 
43-59; with discussion, p. 67-78.) 

Also condensed in City Plan, Aug. 1917; vol. 
3, no. 2, p. 9-11; and Good Roads, May 26, 
1917; vol. 13, p. 309-313. 

Methods of widening, with examples. 

Rey, A. A. Street widening in close built 
areas by successive stages. (Town Planning 
Review, Apr. 1914; vol. 5, p. 39-46. illus.) 

Robinson, C. M. Various methods of 
street widening. (In his City planning, 1916, 
p. 265-276. illus.) 

See also 2105, Street width. 



118 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Street Traffic 

2076 Eno, W. P. The science of highway 
traffic regulation, 1899-1920. New York, 
Brentano's, Apr. 1920. 100 p. illus., plans, 
diagr. 

The authoritative work on the subject. 
Contains bibliography of numerous use- 
ful special articles by the writer and 
others; and " General Highway Traffic 
Regulations," a standard traffic act, also 
issued separately, revised to Mar. 1923. 

American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments. Traffic and transportation regula- 
tions: tentative recommendation presented 
by a Committee, Oct. 1922. (Good Roads, 
Oct. 25, 1922; vol. 63, p. 147-148.) 

Covers policies to be adopted by the So- 
ciety in 1923 regarding weights of motor 
trucks, sign-posting, safety zones, vehic- 
ular and pedestrian traffic regulations, 
etc. 

Fixmer, H. J. Road design and regulation 
of traffic. (Engineering and Contracting. 
Apr. 2, 1919; vol. 51, p. 328-331. illus.) 
Tables showing relation between road- 
way-width and width and speed of self- 
propelled vehicles, etc. 

Gillespie, J. The automobile and street 
traffic. (In Proceedings of 8th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1916, p. 57-67.) 

Lewis, N. P. Street traffic. (In his The 
planning of the modern city, 1916 and 1923, 
p. 200-219. illus., plans.) 

Mehren, E. J. Practical regulation of high- 
way transport. (Engineering News-Record, 
May 25, 1922; vol. 88, p. 871-873.) 

Address before Highway Transport Ses- 
sion of the Chamber of Commerce of the 
U. S. A., Washington, 1922. 

Swan, H. S. Speeding up traffic at street 
intersections. Slow ups and hold ups at in- 
tersecting streets one of chief causes of auto- 
mobile congestion relief measures outlined 
traffic survey a prerequisite. (Engineering 
News-Record, Mar. 1, 1923; vol. 90, p. 400- 
404. diagr.) Also reprinted. 

Talbert, C. M. An " accident map " and 
its uses. (American City, May 1918; vol. 18, 
p. 430-432. maps.) 

Comparative " accident " and traffic 
maps as an aid to study of needed street 
revisions. 



Unwin, R. America revisited A city 
planner's impressions. (American City, Apr. 
1923; vol. 28, p. 334-336. diagr.) 

Comparison of American and European 
traffic conditions. 

Whitten, R. H. Unchoking our congested 
streets. (American City, Oct. 1920; vol. 23, 
p. 351-354. illus.) 

The pamphlets issued by the National 
Automobile Chamber of Commerce (New 
York City) are useful for reference in this 
connection. 

For discussion of relation of street traffic 
accidents to street lighting, see 2310. 

See also 2000, Great Britain, for mass of in- 
formation on street traffic assembled by the 
Royal Commission on London Traffic. 

2076.1 Goodsell, D. B. Traffic census; 
its application to the design of roadways, 
selection of pavements, and traffic regulations, 
(Good Roads, Feb. 17, 1917; vol. 51, p. 118- 
120; with bibliography.) 

See also 2120, article by Crosby. 

Herrold, G. H. Diagram for analyzing city 
traffic used by City Planning Board, St. Paul, 
Minn. (Engineering News-Record, July 7, 
1921; vol. 87, p. 33. diagr.) 

Highway traffic committee (of New Jersey 
State Association of County Engineers) urges 
advance planning. Answers to questionnaire 
indicate need for standardization of traffic 
census methods and results. (Engineering 
News-Record, Feb. 24, 1921; vol. 86, p. 338- 
340. diagr.) 

Johnson, A. N. The traffic census and its 
use in deciding road width. (Public Roads, 
July 1921; vol. 4, no. 3, p. 6-9, 23. diagr.) 

. Traffic counts in various states .. 

Brief description of the progress made in traf- 
fic censuses classifications adopted. (Good 
Roads, Jan. 12, 19, 26, Feb. 2, 1921; voL 
21, p. 14, 16-17, 22-23, 38, 48, 63, 79.) 

From a paper before annual convention 
of American Association of State High- 
way Officials, Washington, D. C., 1920. 

2076.2 Sohier, W. D. Motor vehicles and 
the highways. (Public Roads, Oct-Nov. 1919 ;. 
vol. 2, no. 18-19, p. 39-41.) 

Regulation of size and weight necessi- 
tated by excessive road costs. 
Tomlin, R. K., Jr. The trend of motor- 
vehicle legislation, digest of laws of the 48 
states relating to license fees and regulation 
of weights, dimensions and speeds of passen- 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



119 



ger automobiles and motor trucks. (Engineer- 
ing News-Record. Sept. 1, 1921; vol. 87, 
p. 354-365. tables.) 

Would regulate size, weight and speed of 
motor trucks. (Good Roads, June 7, 1922; 
vol. 62, p. 319-320.) 

Summary of action proposed at National 
Highway Traffic Association convention, 
New York, 1922. 

2076.3 Eno. Standard traffic act. See 
2076. 

Shirley, H. G. Relation of the proposed 
uniform vehicle law to municipal traffic regu- 
lations. (In Proceedings of the American 
Society for Municipal Improvements, 1920, 
p. 107-111.) 

Abstract in Good Roads, Nov. 3, 1920; 
vol. 20, p. 215, 218. Editorial note, p. 217. 
The proposed law was issued in pamphlet 
form, Jan. 20, 1920, by the Joint Com- 
mittee on Uniform Vehicle Laws, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Swan, H. S. Automobile control, city 
planning and traffic regulation. Limits of car 
operation in relation to speed and road ca- 
pacity demand better street plans and traffic 
rules. (Engineering News-Record, Feb. 22, 
1923; vol. 90, p. 351-353. diagr.) 

See also 2128, Safety isles and zones; 2135, 
Street intersections; 2309, Street traffic signs 
and signals. 



McConaghie, J. R. The use of paint on 
roads to direct traffic. I. How painted lanes 
and safety zones protect the pedestrian. II. 
How it aids in simplifying the parking prob- 
lem; types of paints employed and method 
of application. (Good Roads, Aug. 9-16, 
1922; vol. 63, p. 47^9, 54, 56-58, 62. illus.) 

Nye, G. H. Is the road surface the proper 
place for direction signs? (American City, 
Nov. 1922; vol. 27, no. 5, p. 434-436. diagr.) 



2076.4 Eno, W. P. Adequate ranking and 
parking facilities. Paper before National 
Highway Traffic Association, 1922. Reprinted 
from Motor Travel, Oct. 1922, revised to 
Mar. 15, 1923. 2 p. diagr. 

Swan, H. S. Our city thoroughfares 
shall they be highways or garages? A con- 
sideration of the parking problem. (Ameri- 
can City, Dec. 1922; vol. 27, p. 496-500. 
illus., plan.) 



Also in National Real Estate Journal, July 
3, 1922; and Building and Building Manage- 
ment, May 29, 1922; and in Motor World, 
Sept. 27, 1922. 

Young, H. E. Day and night storage and 
parking of automobiles. Paper read at 15th 
National Conference on City Planning, May 
1, 1923. To be published in the Conference 
Proceedings. 

See also 2128. 

Street Design 

2080 American Society of Municipal Im- 
provements. Report of the committee on 
sidewalks and street design. (In Transac- 
tions of the Society, 1917, vol. 24, p. 38-43.) 
Proposals for standard practice. 
S. Sammelman, chairman of the com- 
mittee. 

Blanchard, A. H., ed., see 2060. 

Hirst, A. R. Safety and beauty as factors 
in road design and construction. (Good 
Roads. Mar. 8, 1922; vol. 62, p. 137-142, 
144.) 

Paper at annual convention of American 
Association of State Highway Officials. 

Ideal section of Lincoln Highway to be com- 
pleted June 15. (Good Roads, May 9, 1923; 
vol. 64, p. 182.) 

Lincoln Highway Association. An " ideal 
section " on the Lincoln Highway; a tabula- 
tion, with summary and comments, of the 
replies received in response to the Lincoln 
Highway Association's questionnaire regard- 
ing plans and specifications for an Ideal Sec- 
tion. Detroit, The Association, [1920]. 16 p. 

Thompson, G. W. Design features of 
Lincoln Highway, " ideal section." (Engi- 
neering News-Record, June 15, 1922; vol. 88, 
p. 982-986. illus., cross-section.) 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Tentative instructions to de- 
signers for street improvements of industrial 
housing developments. (In its Report of the 
United States Housing Corporation, 1919, 
vol. 2, p. 464-470; with engineering drawings 
nos. 2-5.) 

Unwin, R. Roads and streets. (Town 
Planning Review, Apr. 1914; vol. 5, p. 31-38. 
illus., plans.) 

Discusses especially the esthetic aspects 

of street design. 



120 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Street Design (cont.) 

2086 Breed, H. E. Status of highway 

curves and recommended practice to increase 

safety of traffic. (Good Roads, May 31, 1922 ; 

vol. 62, p. 298-299.) 

Committee report at annual meeting of 
National Highway Traffic Association. 

Caparn, H. A. Value of the curve in street 
architecture. (Architectural Record, Mar. 
1905; vol. 17, p. 231-236. illus.) 

2090 For references on orientation of 
streets, see Building orientation, 3470. 

2100 Street grades. (In Practical street 
construction, see 2050, p. 190-217.) 

2103 Augur, T. B., see 3065. 

Bigger, F. Hillside streets require special 
treatment in city planning. (American City, 
Oct. 1922; vol. 27, p. 329-330. diagr.) 

Pittsburgh. 

Improving hillside streets. (Municipal 
Journal, New York, Feb. 22, 1919; vol. 46, 
p. 150-151. illus.) 

Two-level streets, switchbacks, and 
sunken roadways used on San Francisco 
streets. 

O'Shaughnessy, M. M. Cutting a hill out 
of the heart of a city. (American City, May 
1920; vol. 22, p. 478-481. illus.) 
Rincon Hill, San Francisco. 

Rappaport, P. A. Steigende Strassen. Eine 
Studie zum deutschen Stadtebau. Berlin, 
E. Wasmuth, 1911. 55 p. illus., plans. 

For treatment of steep gradients, see City 
planning reports for Pittsburgh (1910 and 
1921), Seattle (1911), Providence (1912), San 
Francisco (1905 and 1913), Portland, Ore. 
(1921), St. Paul (1922). 

Street Widths 

2106 Application of the elastic principle 
to street widening in Philadelphia. (Ameri- 
can City, July 1915; vol. 12, p. 41. cross- 
sections.) 

On standard cross-sections. 

Brodie, J. A. Wide roads for cities. (In 
Town Planning Institute, London, Papers 
and discussions, 1914-15; vol. 1, p. xviii- 
xxii.) 

Also in Municipal Journal, London, Oct. 30, 
1914; vol. 23, p. 1209-1210; and in Town 
Planning Review, Jan. 1915; vol. 5, p. 294- 
299. 



Citizens Committee on City Plan of Pitts- 
burgh. Developing the plan tabulation of 
the major streets. (In its Major street plan 
for Pittsburgh, 1921, p. 39-60. illus.) 

" Lines-of -traffic " principle for Pitts- 
burgh street widths (later officially 
adopted). 

Elastic and garden streets in Philadelphia. 
(Municipal Journal, New York, Nov. 23, 
1918; vol. 45, p. 412.) 

" Elastic " streets. Discussion led by B. A. 
Haldeman. (In Proceedings of 9th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1917, p. 263- 

268.) 

Fixmer, H. J. Roadway and sidewalk 
widths bearing on city planning. (Good 
Roads, July 13, 1921; vol. 61, p. 15-18, 24. 
illus.) 

Report of National Committee on widths 
of roadways and sidewalks in municipal- 
ities, presented at annual convention of 
National Highway Traffic Association, 
Detroit, 1921. 
See also 2076. 

Haldeman, B. A. Rules of practice for the 
establishment of street widths and their sub- 
divisions. (Canadian Engineer, Oct. 23, 1919; 
vol. 37, p. 409-410.) 

Unrevised draft of paper before American 

City Planning Institute. 

Hoffman, R. Width of roadways for differ- 
ent classes of streets. (In Proceedings of 
American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments, 1920, p. 112-117.) 

Abstract in Good Roads, Dec. 1, 1920; 
vol. 20, p. 258-260; and Public Works, Dec. 
11, 1920; vol. 49, p. 549-550. 

A review of earlier ideas in the light of 
increasing sizes and numbers of motor 
vehicles. 

Johnson, A. N., see 2076.1. 

Nolen, J. Standardized street widths. (In 
Proceedings of 3d National Conference on 
City Planning, 1911, p. 198-206.) 

Robinson, C. M., see 2050. 

Smith, H. C. Traffic capacity and width of 
highways outside municipalities. (Good 
Roads, May 31, 1922; vol. 62, p. 300, 302.) 
Committee report at annual meeting of 
National Highway Traffic Association. 

Thompson, F. L. Width and allocation of 
space in roads. (In Town Planning Institute, 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



121 



London, Papers and discussions, 1915-16; 
vol. 2, p. 115-126; with discussion, p. 127- 
132. cross-sections.) 

Also in American City, June 1916; vol. 14, 
p. 557-564. cross-sections. 

Tillson, G. W. Effect of car tracks upon 
traffic capacity of roadways. (American City, 
Mar. 1920; vol. 22, p. 279, 281, 283, 285.) 

See also 2384. 

2116 Bigger, F. Utility and beauty ver- 
sus extravagance in street planning. (Ameri- 
can City, Apr. 1923; vol. 28, p. 345-346. 
illus.) 

The advantages of parking shown by a 
Pittsburgh example. 

Discussion on grass margins. (Town Plan- 
ning Institute, London, Papers and discus- 
sions, 1920-21; vol. 7, p. 108-114.) 
_.. Gabelman, F. Roadway and lawn space 
widths and maintenance of boulevards and 
streets in Kansas City, Mo. (American City, 
Oct. 1912; vol. 7, p. 350-352. illus., cross- 
sections.) 

City Parks Association of Philadelphia. 
[List of] Highways in Philadelphia which are 
planned with double or triple roadways sepa- 
rated by planting strips [and list of neighbor- 
hood squares]. (In its Annual report, 1917,, 
vol. 29, p. 36-37.) 

Robinson, C. M. [Discussion of various 
types of street parking] and The development 
of residential streets. (In his City planning, 
1916, p. 199-203, 209-226. illus.) 

Photographs of different types of street 
parking may be found especially in the files of 
American City and Good Roads and in the 
volume of proceedings of the Housing and 
Town Planning Conference, 1911, of the 
(British) Institution of Municipal and County 
Engineers, plates 15-25 at back of volume. 

For suggestions as to parking of irrigation 
ditches in streets, see Olmsted report for 
Boulder, Colo., 4383. 

See also 1685 fif., Residential districts; 2206, 
Boulevards and parkways; 2235, Residential 
streets; 4875 ff., Street planting. 

Multi-level Streets 

2119 Chicago Plan Commission. Re- 
claim South Water Street for all the people . . . 
Chicago, Nov. 1917. 55 p. illus., plans. 

A proposal for a two-level waterfront 
highway. See the commission's further 
pamphlet, " South Water Street facts," 
1922. 



Combs, P. S. Double deck street and side- 
walks for congested Chicago. (Engineering 
News-Record, Dec. 30, 1920; vol. 85, p. 
1293.) 

Traffic classified for purposes of studying 
the problem. 

Expressways proposed to relieve N. Y. 
traffic congestion C. W. Leavitt suggests 
elevated vehicular routes Amos Schaeffer 
analyzes cost of plan. (Engineering News- 
Record, Mar. 31, 1921; vol. 86, p. 547.) 

The Park Avenue viaduct, New York City. 

(Architecture, Jan. 1919; vol. 39, p. 41-44. 

illus., plans, cross-sections.) 

Cf . article by H. W. Levy from engineer- 
ing point of view in Engineering News- 
Record, July 11, 1918. 

Streich, W. F. A plan for multiplying the 
utility of business thoroughfares. (American 
City, Mar. 1913; vol. 8, p. 275-276. illus.) 

A proposal for a multi-level street for 

Detroit. 

Suplee, H. H. A five-storied street; an 
effective and practical plan for handling the 
congested traffic in great cities. (Gassier 's 
Magazine, June 1913; vol. 43, p. 57-60. illus.) 

* s Wacker, C. H. Creating a world famous 
street. Argument of Chairman of Chicago 
Plan Commission in behalf of widening and 
extending Michigan Avenue, before Board of 
Local Improvements of City of Chicago, May 
1913. 57 p. plans, cross-sections, etc. 

Detailed report on a two-level street. 
Brief article on project in American City, 
Dec. 1914; vol. 11, p. 453^55. illus. 

Webster, G. S. Subterranean street plan- 
ning. (In American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, Housing and town plan- 
ning, 1914, p. 206-207.) 

Proposals for two-level streets by con- 
struction of passenger and freight sub- 
terranean ways. 

Pavements 

2120 Agg, T. R. The construction of 
roads and pavements. 2d rev. ed. New York, 
McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1920. 463 p. illus., 
diagr. 

American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments. Proceedings. Several sections of the 
annual proceedings of this society are devoted 
to reports, special studies, and standard speci- 
fications for pavements. 



122 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Pavements (cont.) 

Blanchard, A. H. Street surfaces and the 
city plan. (City Plan, Jan. 1916: vol. 1, no. 1, 
p. 3-8.) 

ed. American highway engineers' 

handbook, 1919. See 2060. 

Contains extensive sections on pave- 
ments. 

, and H. B. Drowne. Textbook on high- 
way engineering. New York, John Wiley & 
Sons, 1914. 762 p. illus. 

A standard work of reference on pave- 
ments. 

Crosby, W. W. The traffic census and its 
bearing on the selection of pavements. (In 
Proceedings of American Society for Municipal 
Improvements, 1915, p. 308-312.) 

See also 2076.1, article by Goodsell. 

Knowles, M. Streets and pavements 
classification of streets pavement design 
type and materials of pavements accessory- 
structures. (In his Industrial housing, 1920, 
p. 118-149. illus., tables, sections.) 

Routh, J. W. Street classification as an 
aid to pavement design. (Municipal Journal, 
New York, Sept. 6, 1919; vol. 47, p. 148- 
149.) 

Digest of opinions of municipal engi- 
neers. 

Tillson, G. W. The street surface. (In 
Proceedings of 3d National Conference on 
City Planning, 1911, p. 207-215.) 

See also files of Good Roads, Public Roads 
(issued by U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau 
of Public Roads, May 1918- Jan. 1922), Public 
Works, Municipal and County Engineering, 
etc. 

Special Problems 

2128 Adshead, S. D. Refuges and pro- 
tection posts. (Town Planning Review, 
Oct. 1914; vol. 5, p. 225-226. illus.) 

Boulevards with safety isles in Marshall- 
town, Iowa. (American City, Dec. 1915; vol. 
13, p. 523.) 

Folwell, A. P. Isles of safety. (In his 
Municipal engineering practice, 1916, p. 159- 
162. illus., plan.) 

Martin, J. A. An improved safety zone 
[Detroit]. (American City, May 1923; vol. 28, 
p. 452-453. illus., diagr.) 



National Highway Traffic Association. 
Safety zones and parking regulations. Re- 
port of the National Committee on relative 
efficiency of different types of car stop safety 
zones and their relation to parking and rank- 
ing regulations, presented at the annual con- 
vention, Detroit, 1921. (Good Roads, July 27, 
1921; vol. 61, p. 41-42, 46.) 

2136 Farrier, C. W. Traffic storage at 
congested street crossings. Local widening of 
streets provides space where deviating traffic 
waits outside the lines of through traffic. (En- 
gineering News-Record, Nov. 16, 1922; vol. 
89, p. 845-846. diagr.) 

Olmsted, F. L. Street traffic studies. 
(Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1910; vol. 1, 
p. 1-8. illus.) 

As affecting the planning of street inter- 
sections. 

Stiibben, J. Strassenkreuzungen, Strassen- 
erweiterungen und Strassenvermittelungen. 
(In his Der Stadtebau, 1907, p. 127-147. 
plans.) 

Triggs, H. I. [Street intersections.] (In 
his Town Planning, 1909, p. 148-162. illus., 
plans.) 

Unwin, R. [Street intersections.] (In his 
Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 237-253. illus.) 

Whitten, R. H. Plan for corner cut-offs on 
city streets to secure greater safety. (Ameri- 
can City, Sept. 1920; vol. 23, p. 259-260. 
diagr.) 

2169 Atwater, P. Sidewalks public or 
private? (Community Leadership, pub- 
lished by American City Bureau, July 1921; 
vol. 2, no. 7, p. 6-7. illus.) 

Experience in Minneapolis. 
City Parks Association of Philadelphia. 
Sidewalk uglification. (In its 27th annual 
report, 1915, p. 57-64. illus.) 

See also later reports of this Association 

and 7th annual report of Philadelphia 

Art Jury, 1917. 

Hunt, F. A practical detail of city planning 
Street widening in old New York an object 
lesson in Europe as well as America. (Ameri- 
can City, Nov. 1912; vol. 7, p. 411-415. 
illus.) 

An account of the removal of sidewalk 
encroachments in New York. 

Street obstructions; Pavement obstruc- 
tions. (In Practical street construction, see 
2060, p. 92-101, 233-242.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



123 



Wheaton, W. Removing sidewalk en- 
croachments in Albany. (American City, 
Apr. 1916; vol. 14, p. 346-347. illus.) 

The final report of the New York Commis- 
sion on Building Districts and Restrictions, 
1916 (see 1600) contains numerous illustra- 
tions of encroachments. 

2161 Anderson, W. J., and R. P. Spiers. 
The colonnaded streets. (In their The archi- 
tecture of Greece and Rome, London, B. T. 
Batsford, 1902, p. 163-166. illus.) 

Baxter, S. Covered ways for a business 
district. (In Proceedings of 2d National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1910, p. 149-152.) 

Also in American City, Sept. 1910; vol. 3, 
p. 127-129. 

Bosanquet, R. C. Broadways and colon- 
nades in Greek and Roman towns. (Town 
Planning Review, Jan. 1915; vol. 5, p. 287- 
289. plan.) 

Hegemann, W., and E. Peets. Street ar- 
cades and colonnades. (In their American 
Vitruvius, 1922, p. 186-197. illus.) 

Maltbie, M. R. Arcades and their useful- 
ness in the modern city plan. (House and 
Garden, May 1914; vol. 5, p. 252-257. 
illus.) 

Stiibben, J. Passengen und Galerien. (In 
his Der Stadtebau, 1907, p. 65-67. plans.) 

Turtle, A. S. Arcades to relieve street 
traffic New York City. (Engineering 
News-Record, April 19, 1923; vol. 90, p. 710- 
711. illus., plans.) 

Extract from his report made March 28 
to the Mayor from the Board of Estimate 
and Apportionment of New York City. 

Whitten, R. H. The use of sidewalk ar- 
cades in street widenings. (American City, 
Nov. 1920; vol. 23, p. 537, 539. plan.) 
Proposals for Cleveland. 

Major Traffic Streets and Squares 

2170 Cheney, C. H. Traffic street plan 
and boulevard system adopted for Portland, 
Oregon. (American City, July 1921 ; vol. 25, 
p. 47-51. diagr.) 

Donley, W. M. Main highways in metro- 
politan districts, construction, maintenance, 
and control. (In Proceedings of 13th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1921, p. 134- 
136.) 

Pittsburgh Metropolitan District and 
Allegheny County. 



Hailman, J. D. A major street plan for 
Pittsburgh. (In Proceedings of 13th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1921, 
p. 120-133.) 

Henard, E. fitudes sur les transformations 
de Paris. Fascicule 6 La Circulation dans 
les villes modernes. L'Automobilisme et les 
Voies rayonnantes de Paris. Paris, Librairies- 
Imprimeries Reunies, 1905. p. 185-236. plans. 

Lewis, N. P. Linking country roads to city 
streets. (American Contractor, Mar. 15, 
1919; vol. 40, p. 25-26.) 

Address at annual convention, American 
Road Builders' Association, New York, 
1919. 

Trunk highways and city thorough- 
fares. (In Proceedings of 12th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1920, p. 107-117.) 
See also 1800. 

Practical street construction, see 2050. 
Note especially p. 26-44, 51-66. 

Robinson, C. M. The location of main 
traffic streets; The width and development of 
main traffic streets. (In his City planning, 
1916, p. 90-126. illus., plans, cross-section.) 

Traffic ways (Kansas City, Mo.), by C. 
Hill). The relation of traffic ways to parks 
and boulevards, by W. H. Dunn. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 9th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1917, p. 60-67; with discussion, 
p. 67-78. plan.) 

Triggs, H. I. The circulation of traffic. 
(In his Town planning, 1909, p. 120-169. 
diagr., plans.) 

Unwin, R. Of the arrangement of main 
roads, their treatment and planting. (In 
his Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 235-288. 
illus., plans, cross-sections.) 

Whitten, R. H. Principles of design for a 
complete system of city thorofares. (Ameri- 
can City, Oct. 1918; vol. 19, p. 257-261. illus.) 

Thoroughfare plan and program for 

Cleveland, Ohio. (Engineering News-Record, 
Mar. 3, 1921 ; vol. 86, p. 382-386. plan, diagr.) 

Note particularly the special city planning 
reports on major street plans for Pittsburgh 
(1910 and 1921), St. Louis (1917), Cleveland 
(1921), Portland, Ore. (1921), a,nd Utica 
(1921). 

2188 Church, T. A. Tunnel streets at 
San Francisco. (Municipal Journal, New 
York, June 3, 1915; vol. 38, p. 767-768.) 



124 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Major Traffic Streets and Squares (cont.) 

Holland, C. M. Linking New York and 
New Jersey: the isolation of these two states 
from each other to be overcome by new vehicle 
tunnels. (American City, Mar. 1921 ; vol. 24, 
p. 231-232. plan.) 

Situation summarized by T. A. Adams, 
chairman, New Jersey Interstate Bridge 
and Tunnel Commission in Port of New 
York, Mar. 1922. 

2197 Shurtleff, A. A. Squares at traffic 
centres. (In Report of Massachusetts Metro- 
politan Improvements Commission, 1909, 
p. 206-210. plans.) 

Traffic control and its application to 

the redesign of Copley Square, Boston. 
(Stone & Webster, Public Service Journal, 
Mar. 1915; vol. 16, p. 178-185. illus., plans.) 
Also reprinted. Revised in Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Jan. 1916; vol. 6, p. 61-71. 

Stiibben, J. Verkehrsplatze. (In his 
Der Stadtebau, 1907, p. 147-155. plans.) 
See also 2076, 2136. 

Parkways, Boulevards, and Pleasure 
Roads 

2205 Brodie, J. A., see 2106. 

Buchholz, W. Acquirement of Kansas 
City park and boulevard system and its effect 
on real estate values. (In Proceedings of 9th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1917, 
p. 96-105.) 

Downer, J. The Bronx River Parkway. 
(In Proceedings of 9th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1917, p. 91-95. illus.) 

See further the series of published reports 
of the Bronx Parkway Commission. 

Fairmount Park Art Association. The 
Fairmount Parkway, a pictorial record of 
development from its first incorporation in 
the city plan in 1904 to the completion of the 
main drive from city hall to Fairmount Park 
in 1919. Philadelphia, The Association, 1919. 
[30 p.] illus., plans. 

Geiger, C. W. Boulevards of San Fran- 
cisco, California; notes on the history and 
construction of the scenic drives in and near 
the golden gate city. (Good Roads, Jan. 4, 
1919; vol. 17, p. 1-3.) 

Mawson, T. H. Boulevards, parkways, 
avenues and plantations. (In his Civic art, 
1911, p. 147-158. illus., cross-sections.) 



Olmsted Brothers. Classes of parkways. 
(In their Report on a proposed parkway sys- 
tem for Essex County, New Jersey, June 4, 
1915; p. 3-15. cross-section.) By J. C. 
Olmsted. 

Also in Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1915; 
vol. 6, p. 37-48; and in Park and Cemetery, 
Oct. 1915; vol. 25, p. 231-233. 

Robinson, C. M. On great avenues; Park- 
ways. (In his Modern civic art, 1918, etc., 
p. 206-227. 307-320. illus.) 

Public reservations other than the 

streets. (In his City planning, 1916, p. 182- 
208. illus., plans.) 

St. Louis City Plan Commission. Central 
traffic-parkway of St. Louis report, Feb. 9, 
1915. 39 p. illus., plans. 

For information on boulevards and park- 
ways see especially material on Paris, Vienna, 
Berlin, Diisseldorf, Washington, Boston, and 
Kansas City. 

2212 Eliot, C. W., 2d. The influence of the 
automobile on the design of park roads. 
(Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1922; vol. 13, 
p. 27-37. diagr.) 

Prepared as paper in the Harvard Uni- 
versity School of Landscape Architecture. 

2213 Bridle paths in parks. (Parks and 
Recreation, Jan. 1921; vol. 4, p. 148.) 

Dinsmore, W. Bridle paths in city parks. 
(Park International, Nov. 1920; vol. 1, p. 
245-249. illus.) 

Local Business Streets and Squares 

2230 Boston Chamber of Commerce. 
Street traffic in the city of Boston. A study 
made under the direction of the Governing 
Board of the Under Forty Division, Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, Boston, 1914. 61 p. 
and plans. 

An example of the problems of local 
business streets, as well as of thorough- 
fares. 

Fifth Avenue Association, New York. Note 
especially its little periodical The Avenue de- 
voted to the interests of this famous shopping 
street. 

A "model" business street. (American 
City, Feb. 1912; vol. 6, p. 492-493.) 

Summarizes suggestion of T. F. Anderson 
in New Boston, Sept. 1911, for the build- 
ing of a model street. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 125 



Hurd, R. M. Currents of travel. (In his 
Principles of city land values, 1903, p. 89-96.) 
Discusses streets for retail shopping. 

Parker, Barry. [Arrangement of shops 
about courts.] (In his Report on Oporto, 
Portugal, 1916, p. 9-16. plans. Printed in 
English at Garden City Press, Letchworth.) 
Discusses also colonnades. 

See also 2161. 

2233 Fair, A. A plea for better business 
centers in our suburban towns. (Architect 
and Engineer, Dec. 1918; vol. 55, p. 81-85. 
illus., plan.) 

The example of Lake Forest, 111. 
See also 1627, 1630. 

2234 MacDonald, M. Return of the 
market place: how it helps the housewife to 
buy direct from the farmer. (Craftsman, 
Nov. 1913; vol. 25, p. 131-142. illus.) 

Rappaport, P. A. Die Entwicklung des 
deutschen Marktplatzes. Berlin, W. Ernst & 
Sohn, 1914. 64 p. illus., plans. (Stadte- 
bauliche Vortrage, Bd. 7, Heft 3.) 

See also 1443. 

Residential Streets and Squares 

2235 Bouton, E. H. ' Local and minor 
streets. (In Nolen, J. ed., City planning, 
1916, p. 88-102. plans, cross-section.) 

Davis, T. J. Ornamental street entrance 
designs for suburban districts. (American 
City, Apr. 1916; vol. 14, p. 351-355. illus.) 
Examples from Southern California. 

Robinson, C. M. The narrowing of minor 
residence streets as affecting tenant and 
owner. (In Proceedings of 3d National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1911, p. 188-197.) 

The platting of minor residence streets 

for high-class districts; The platting of minor 
streets for humble homes; The development 
of residential streets. (In his City planning, 
1916, p. 127-162, 209-226. illus., plans.) 

Unwin, R. Of site planning and residential 
roads. (In his Town planning in practice, 
1909, etc., p. 289-318. illus., plans.) 

See also 1676 ff. 

2238 Cecil, E. Squares. (In her London 
parks and gardens, London, A. Constable & 
Co., 1907, p. 217-241. illus.) 

Noyes, J. The " places " of St. Louis; an 
effective development of residential streets 



with building restrictions. (American City, 
Mar. 1915; vol. 12, p. 206-208. illus.) 

Philadelphia Bureau of Surveys. Neigh- 
borhood squares and garden streets. (In its 
Annual report, 1915, p. 3-9. plans.) 

Sherer, S. L. The " places " of St. Louis, 
a form of suburban community peculiar to 
the World's Fair City. (House and Garden, 
Apr. 1904; vol. 5, p. 187-191. illus., plans.) 

Shurtleff, A. A. Squares in residential sec- 
tions. (In Report of Massachusetts Metro- 
politan Improvements Commission, 1909, 
plans opp. p. 210.) 

Stiibben, J. Cit6s, Courts, Buildings. (In 
his Der Stadtebau, 1907, p. 64-65. plans.) 

Alleys 

2242 Adams, T. Alleys part of report 
on Ojibway plans. (Conservation of Life, 
Canada, Oct. 1918; vol. 14, p. 77-78.) 

Bacon, Mrs. A. F. Alleys. (In Proceed- 
ings of 1st National Conference on Housing, 
Housing Problems in America, 1911, p. 39-46; 
with discussion, p. 136-140.) 

Ball, C. B. The alley problem. (In Ibid., 
4th Conference, 1915, p. 131-140; with dis- 
cussion, p. 141-148.) 

Also in National Real Estate Journal, 
Oct. 15, 1915; vol. 12, p. 284-288. 

Hornbostel, H., and others. The alleys. 
(In their Comprehensive plan of Johnstown, 
report to City Planning Commission and the 
City Council of Johnstown, Pa., 1917, p. 69- 
79. illus.) 

Howell, W. A. Advantages and disadvan- 
tages of alley systems in large cities. (In 
Proceedings of American Society of Municipal 
Improvements, 1909; vol. 16 p. 187-193.) 

The provision of secondary access to houses. 
(Housing, Aug. 30, 1919; vol. 1, p. 56-57. 
plans.) 

Robinson, C. M. [Arguments for and 
against the inclusion of alleys in high-class 
residential subdivisions.] (In his City plan- 
ning, 1916, p. 144-146.) 

Also other references to alleys, passim. 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing, etc. 

Alleys. (In its Report of the United States 
Housing Corporation, vol. 2, 1919, p. 78.) 

Illustrated by lay-out plans given in the 

report. 



126 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Alleys (cont.) 

Veiller, L. Buildings in relation to street 
and site. (In Proceedings of 3d National 
Conference on City Planning, 1911, p. 80-117.) 
Partly on alleys. 

Among cities which have alley systems may 
be mentioned especially Baltimore, Washing- 
ton, Louisville, Savannah, Detroit, and 
Chicago. 

Footways. Sidewalks 

2260 Robinson, C. M. The development 
of residential streets. (In his City planning, 
1916, p. 209-226. illus.) 

Lays especial emphasis on sidewalks and 

paths in residential districts. 

2252 Blanchard, A. H., and H. B. Drowne. 

Sidewalks, curbs, and gutters. (In their 
Text book on highway engineering, 1914, 
p. 669-685. illus., cross-sections.) 

Brooke, M. Sidewalks. (In Blanchard, 
A. H., ed., American highway engineers' 
handbook, 1919, p. 1367-1382. illus.; with 
bibliography, p. 1394-1395.) 

Firmer, H. J., see 2106. 

Folwell, A. P. The street cross-section; 
Sidewalks, curbs, and gutters. (In his 
Municipal engineering practice, 1916, p. 81- 
90, 120-137. illus., plan.) 

Grimes, J. L. The relation of sidewalks to 
shade tree planting. (American City, May 
1913; vol. 8, p. 499-501. illus.) 

For other references related to this sub- 
ject, see 2116 and 4875 ff. 

[Paris seriously considering moving side- 
walks.] (American City, Mar. 1922; vol. 26, 
p. 281.) 

Sidewalks, etc. (In Practical street con- 
struction, see 2060, p. 114-124, 165-175, 223- 
232. illus.) 

Standard specifications for concrete side- 
walks will be found in the report of the United 
States Housing Corporation, vol. 2, and in 
the Proceedings of the American Society for 
Municipal Improvements, 1919 and 1920. 

See also 2105, for the sidewalk as a unit in 
planning street widths. 

2253 Boecklin, W. Constructing auto- 
mobile ramps and runways. (Country Life, 
in America, Oct. 1922; vol. 42, p. 78, 80, 82. 
illus., plans.) 

Across sidewalks. 



Street crossings and driveways private 
driveways across sidewalks. (Municipal 
Journal and Engineer, Jan. 12, 1910; vol. 28, 
p. 54-55. illus., plans.) 

Letter from F. L. Olmsted pursuant to 
this article, Ibid., Feb. 9, p. 209. 

2266 Olmsted, F. L. Notes upon the 
sizes of steps required for comfort. (Land- 
scape Architecture, Jan. 1911; vol. 1, p. 84- 
90. diagr.) 

Steps up San Francisco sidewalks. (Muni- 
cipal Journal, New York, Feb. 8, 1919; vol. 46, 
p. 108. illus.) 

Brief note on an interesting treatment 

of steep gradients. 

Street Furniture 

2290 Adshead, S. D. Utilitarian furnish- 
ings. (Town Planning Review, Oct. 1913; 
vol. 4, p. 192-194. illus.) 

Folwell, A. P. Minor street details. (In 
his Municipal engineering practice, 1916, 
p. 156-176. illus.) 

Kohler, J. H. Up-to-date business streets. 
(American City, Jan. 1919; vol. 20, p. 56-57. 
illus.) 

An account of the improved furnishing of 

streets in Allentown, Pa. 

McFarland, J. H. Furnishing the streets 
in suburban communities. (Suburban Life, 
Feb. 1911; vol. 12, p. 94-95. illus.) Also 
reprinted. 

Pavement obstructions [and street fur- 
niture]. (In Practical street construction, see 
2060, illus.) 

Also in Municipal Journal, New York, 
Sept. 14, 1916; vol. 41, p. 313-316. 

Robinson, C. M. Furnishings of the street. 
(In his Modern civic art, 1918, etc., p. 138- 
165. illus.) 

Making utilities beautiful. (In his 

Improvements of town and cities, 1913, etc., 
p. 94-112.) 

Mr. Robinson's improvement reports 
listed in his bibliography (see 205) con- 
tain many valuable suggestions on street 
furnishings. 

Schopfer, J. The furnishing of a city, 
(Architectural Record, Jan. 1903; vol. 13. 
p. 42-48. illus.) 

See also 3820 ff. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



127 



2292 Broderick, J. A. Types of street- 
name signs New York and Boston. (Amer- 
ican City, Apr. 1914; vol. 10, p. 344-345. 
illus.) 

Folwell, A. P. Street name signs. (In his 
Municipal engineering practice, 1916, p. 284- 
296. illus.) 

Marking city streets. (American City, 
Feb. 1914; vol. 10, p. 124-126. illus.) 

Municipal Art Society of Hartford. Street 
name plates. Hartford, Conn., The Society, 
1909. 33 p. illus. (Bulletin no. 12.) 

Spencer, N. S. Street signs and fixtures. 
(Municipal Affairs, Sept. 1901; vol. 5, p. 726- 
737. illus.) 

Wallis, R. S. Street-name signs. Ames, 
Iowa, Engineering Extension Dept., 1916. 
47 p. illus. (Technical Service Bulletin 20, 
Official publication of Iowa State College, 
Mar. 10, 1916; vol. 14, no. 30.) 

Partially reprinted in Municipal Journal, 
New York, July 27, 1916; vol. 41, p. 93-97. 

Where should name signs be located at 
street intersections? An analysis and a sug- 
gested rational way of locating street signs. 
(American City, Apr. 1920; vol. 22, p. 380- 
381. diagr.) 

2292.5 Highway signs and markers. (In 
Highways green book, published by American 
Automobile Association, 1921, p. 401-412. 
illus.) 

Standard signs for all highways Uniform 
signs that speak directly, clearly, and dis- 
tinctly are needed thruout this country. 
(American City, Town and County Edition, 
May 1919; vol. 20, p. 417-422. illus.) 

Standardized road signs in England: Min- 
istry of Transport adopts new warning signs 
for use throughout England, Scotland, and 
Wales. (American City, Oct. 1921; vol. 25, 
p. 303-305. illus.) 

2309 Byers, C. A. Electric-lighted islands 
at bad curve. (American City, Nov. 1921; 
vol. 25, p. 390. illus.) 

Faber, D. C. The use of traffic signs. 
Ames, Iowa, Engineering Extension Dept., 
1916. 12 p. illus., diagr. (Technical Service 
Bulletin 17, Official publication of Iowa State 
College, Dec. 20, 1916; vol. 15, no. 22.) 

Gillespie, J. Street traffic zones and sig- 
nals. (American City, Nov. 1916; vol. 15, 
p. 542-545. illus., diagr.) 



New bronze traffic towers for Fifth Ave- 
nue presented by Fifth Avenue Associa- 
tion. (American City, Feb. 1923; vol. 28, 
p. 173. illus.) 

Drawing of this winning design given on 
p. 71 of Ibid., Jan. 1922. 
The permanent traffic guide: is it a protec- 
tion or a menace? (American City, Mar. 
1919; vol. 20, p. 260-262. illus.) 

Street traffic signals. (Municipal Journal, 
New York, Nov. 4, 1915; vol. 39, p. 697. 
illus.) 

Cleveland system. 
See also 2076.3, 2292.5. 

Street Lighting 

2310 Adshead, S. D. Lamp standards. 
(Town Planning Review, Jan. 1914; vol. 4, 
p. 292-296. illus.) 

Allen, W. C. Notable development in orna- 
mental street lighting. (American City, Apr. 
1914; vol. 10, p. 365-368. illus.) 

From an article in General Electric, Re- 
view, Mar. 1914, relating to the new 
lighting system in Washington, D. C. 
American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments. Report of committee on street light- 
ing. (In its Proceedings, 1920, p. 44-50. 
illus., diagr.) 

Includes summary of Cleveland traffic- 
accident survey and discusses relation of 
accidents to lighting. 

. [Reports and papers on street light- 
ing.] (In its Proceedings, 1921, see index.} 

Anderson, E. A., and O. F. Haas. Illumi- 
nation and traffic accidents. (Good Roads, 
Nov. 2, 1921; vol. 61, p. 209-212, 214. illus.) 
Paper at annual convention of Illumi- 
nating Engineering Society, 1921. A 
similar paper by Mr. Anderson was given 
before the American Society for Munic- 
ipal Improvements, 1921, and reprinted 
as Bulletin 46, National Lamp Works of 
the General Electric Co., May 5, 1922. 
Cameron, A. D. Developments in electric 
street lighting units. (American City, Feb. 
1920; vol. 22, p. 135-137. illus.) 

Condensed from paper at the annual con- 
vention of the Illuminating Engineering 
Society. 

Danley, P. Y. Modern systems of street 
lighting combine beauty and utility. (Ameri- 
can City, Oct. 1919; vol. 21, p. 309-313. 
illus.) 



128 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Street Lighting (cont.) 

Folwell, A. P. Street lighting. (In his 
Municipal engineering practice, 1916, p. 261- 
279. illus.) 

Martin, K. G. Street lights and poles. De- 
velopment of lighting standards special 
designs for different districts. (Municipal 
Journal, New York, June 25, 1914; vol. 36, 
p. 934-935. illus.) 

Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association. 
Report on street illumination, July 1921. 
Mimeographed. [10 p. + plates.] 

Contains an interesting analysis of the 

problem. 

Principles and design of exterior illumina- 
tion. Three lectures, by L. Bell and E. N. 
Wrightington. (In Lectures on illuminating 
engineering delivered at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1910, Baltimore, 1911, vol. 2, p. 795- 
884. illus.) 

On both electric and gas lighting. Espe- 
cially valuable. 

Rose, S. L. E. and H. E. Butler. Modern 
electric street lighting: a discussion of incan- 
descent and arc lamps from the standpoint of 
illumination. (American City, Mar. 1918; 
vol. 18, p. 241-246. illus., diagr.) 

Ryan, W. D'A. History of illumination 
with special reference to the lighting of the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition and modern street 
lighting practice. (In Proceedings of Ameri- 
can Society for Municipal Improvements, 
1919, p. 324-347. illus.) 

A comprehensive review of the subject. 

Willoughby, A. A. Street lighting at 
the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. 
(American City, Mar. 1915; vol. 12, p. 252- 
254. illus.) 

Wood, L. A. S. The adequate and attrac- 
tive lighting of city streets. (American City, 
Dec. 1921, Jan. 1922; vol. 25, p. 465-468, 
vol. 26, p. 3-5. illus.) 

From a paper presented before American 
Society for Municipal Improvements. 

Systematic street lighting surveys such as 
that conducted by the Commission of Public 
Works, Milwaukee (Supplementary report, 
1916), are of special interest. 

Catalogues such as those of the Smyser- 
Royer Co., manufacturers of the lighting 
standards for Roland Park, Baltimore, Md., 
are useful for reference. 



2320 Robinson, C. M. Temporary and 
occasional decoration. (In his Modern civic 
art, 1918, etc., p. 355-375. illus.) 



STREET RAILROADS AND 
RAPID TRANSIT 

2350 American Academy of Political and 
Social Science. Electric railway transporta- 
tion. Philadelphia, 1911. 244 p. (In its 
Annals, Jan. 1911; vol. 37, no. 1. Whole no. 
122.)] 

Arnold, B. J., see 2000, and reports for San 
Francisco (see p. 44), Pittsburgh, Providence, 
Kansas City, etc. 

Bibbins, J. R. City building and transpor- 
tation. (Electric Railway Journal, May 22, 
1920; vol. 55, p. 1061-1062.) 

Abstract of paper given in full in Journal 
of Western Society of Engineers, Aug. 20, 
1920. 

Brinckerhoff, H. M. The effect of transpor- 
tation upon the distribution of population in 
large cities. (In Proceedings of 13th National 
Conference on City Planning, 1921, p. 49-59; 
with discussion, p. 59-69.) 

Functions of rapid transit lines in 

cities. (Engineering News-Record, Dec. 23, 
1920; vol. 85, p. 1235-1239. illus., diagr. 
See also editorial note, p. 1211.) 

Chicago Municipal Reference Library. A 
study of rapid transit in seven cities. Pre- 
pared under the direction of T. K. Long. 1914. 
26 p. (Municipal Reference Bulletin no. 3.) 

Davies, J. V. The effect of rapid transit on 
the city plan. (In Nolen, J., ed., City plan- 
ning, 1916, p. 314-332. illus., cross-section.) 

Provision for future rapid transit: 

subway, elevated or open cut, and their influ- 
ence on the city plan. (In Proceedings of 
6th National Conference on City Planning, 
1914, p. 194-211; with discussion, p. 228- 
264.) 

Also reprinted. 

Great Britain. Select Committee on Trans- 
port. [Metropolitan Area.] Report, together 
with the proceedings of the Committee, 
minutes of evidence, and appendices. London, 
H. M. Stationery Office, 1919. 446 p. 

A collection of evidence on tubes, tram- 
ways, and busses. See also 2000, Great 
Britain. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



129 



Massachusetts. Street Railway Investi- 
gation Committee. Report on the problems 
relating to the street railways of the Com- 
monwealth. Pursuant to chapter 129 of the 
Resolves of 1917. Boston, State Printers, 
1918. 423 p. illus., maps. (Senate Docu- 
ment no. 300.) 

National Municipal League. A correct 
public policy toward the street railway prob- 
lem; a report of the Committee on Public 
Utilities in which all previous reports are sum- 
marized and the unsolved elements of the 
problems listed. (National Municipal Re- 
view, Supplement, Apr. 1920; vol. 9, p. 251- 
267.) 

Parsons, Barclay, & Klapp, see reports for 
Cleveland, Detroit, etc. 

Philadelphia Transit Commissioner. Rapid 
transit in American cities. (In his Report, 
July 1913; vol. 1, p. 119-137. maps in vol. 2.) 

Raschig, F. L. Cincinnati's rapid transit 
system and the city plan. (In Proceedings of 
the 12th National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1920, p. 36-42.) 

Ridgway, R. Subways for city transporta- 
tion. (In Proceedings of American Society 
for Municipal Improvements, 1921, p. 339- 
357. illus.) 

St. Louis City Plan Commission. The St. 
Louis transit system, present and future: re- 
port of St. Louis City Plan Commission, 
Harland Bartholomew, Engineer, to Board 
of Public Service. 1920. 36 p. maps, diagr. 
Example of report as one of a related 
series of city plan studies. 

Turner, D. L. The fundamentals of tran- 
sit planning for cities. (In Proceedings of 
14th National Conference on City Planning, 
1922, p. 104-123; with discussion, p. 123-132.) 
Also reprinted. 

Wilcox, D. F. Problems of reconstruction 
with respect to urban transportation. (Na- 
tional Municipal Review, Jan. 1919; vol. 8, 
p. 33-48.) 

From paper before National Municipal 
League Conference, Rochester, 1918. 
Abridged in American City, Dec. 1918; 
vol. 19, p. 440-444. 

The surface street railway as a factor 

in modern life. (In his Municipal franchises, 
New York, Engineering News Publishing Co., 
1911; vol. 2, p. 3-33.) 



Note published reports on transit systems 
and street railroads for the following cities: 
Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Kansas 
City (Mo.), New York, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh, Providence, San Francisco, and St. 
Louis (see above). The titles and dates of 
these reports are given in Municipal Accom- 
plishment, etc., see 0. 

2355 Fox, J. P. Relation between transit 
and housing. (In American Academy of 
Political and Social Science, Housing and 
town planning, 1914, p. 154-161.) 

Hurd, R. M. [Effect of transit on land de- 
velopment.] (In his Principles of city land 
values, 1903, p. 94-96.) 

Jackson, W. Zone fares for street railways : 
their relation to housing congestion and com- 
pany finances. (National Municipal Review, 
Nov. 1920; vol. 9, p. 705-711.) 

Whitten, R. H. Zone fares and city plan- 
ning. (Electric Railway Journal, Nov. 1, 
1919; vol. 54, p. 831.) 

Summary of testimony before League of 

Municipalities. 

Wright, H. C. Rapid transit in relation to 
housing. (In Proceedings of 2d National 
Conference on City Planning, 1910, p. 125- 
135.) 

Transit and housing. (In Proceed- 
ings of 3d National Conference on Housing, 
Housing Problems in America, 1913, p. 68-74; 
with discussion, p. 173-183.) 

Condensed in American City, Jan. 1914; 
vol. 10, p. 51-53. 

Motor Busses in Relation to Transit 

2358 Clark, H. C. Bus competition with 
electric railways in larger cities. A study of 
conditions in 100 largest cities in United 
States revealing attitude of public toward 
competitive local transportation systems. 
(Aera, Apr. 1923; vol. 10, p. 1101-1117.) 

Fulton, R. E. The motor-bus vs. the street 
car. (Good Roads, Nov. 19, 1919; vol. 18, 
p. 223-224. illus.) 

Jackson, W. Motor-busses will aid better 
city development. (American City, July 
1920; vol. 23, p. 49-52. illus.) 

The place of the motor bus. (Na- 
tional Municipal Review, Nov. 1922; vol. 11, 
p. 368-372.) 



130 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Motor Busses in Relation to Transit (cont.) 

Keegan, G., and F. T. Wood. Transporta- 
tion facilities of London and Paris, as of 
October 1913. [New York, 1915.] 126 p. 
illus. 

Lane, F. Van Z. Relation of the motor bus 
to urban development. (American City, 
May 1914; vol. 10, p. 462-466. illus.) 

McCollum, J. A. Utility of the motor bus 
and municipal problems pertaining to its oper- 
ation. (In Proceedings of 6th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1914, p. 212-228; 
with discussion, p. 228-264.) Also reprinted. 

Simmon, K. A. Trackless transportation 
versus rail transportation. (Electric Railway 
Journal, Feb. 11, 1922; vol. 59, p. 233-236.) 
Discusses the trolley, auto bus and track- 
less trolley. 

Car-tracks, Stations, and Terminals 

2382 Robinson, C. M. [Advantages of the 
separate right-of-way for street railroads.] 
(In his City planning, 1916, p. 112-114. 
illus.) 

2384 Folwell, A. P. Street railways. (In 
his Municipal engineering practice, 1916, 
p. 176-189. illus.) 

Track arrangement. 

Tillson, G. W. Car tracks. (In Blanchard, 
A. H., ed., American highway engineers' hand- 
book, 1919, p. 1277-1301. diagr., cross-sec- 
tions; with bibliography, p. 1316-1318.) 

See also 2105. 

2406 Nilsson, O. A. A study of rapid 
transit station design. (Engineering News- 
Record, Oct. 28, Nov. 4, 1920; vol. 85, p. 
824-829, 894-899.) 

2420 Cincinnati double-deck terminal for 
electric lines. (Ibid., Aug. 10, 1922; vol. 89, 
p. 218-223. illus., plans.) 

Damon, G. A. Interurban passenger termi- 
nals. (In Proceedings of 9th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1917, p. 3-16; with 
discussion, p. 21-27, and p. 253-258, on the 
location of the interurban station as related 
to the retail district.) 

See also paper by Mr. Damon to be pub- 
lished in Conference Proceedings for 1923. 

Fox, J. P. Subsurface terminals for street 
cars open to criticism. (American City, Nov. 
1919; vol. 21, p. 419-422. plans.) 



Discusses the Cleveland Rapid Transit 
report in relation to the experience of 
other American cities in putting surface 
street car lines under ground. 
Schreiber, M. Public Service Terminal, 
Newark, N. J. (In Proceedings of 9th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1917; 
vol. 9, p. 17-27.) 



RAILROADS 

2450 American Institute of Architects. 

The relations of railways to city development. 

Papers read before the Institute, Washington, 

1909. Published by the Board of Directors, 

Glenn Brown, ed. [1910.] 79 p. illus., plans. 

The first paper by F. A. Delano was also 

published in the Engineering Record, 

Dec. 18, 1909. 

Arnold, B. J. Influences affecting [railroad] 
terminal problem. (In his Report on the re- 
arrangement and development of the steam 
railroad terminals of the city of Chicago, sub- 
mitted to the Citizen's Terminal Plan Com- 
mittee of Chicago, Nov. 18, 1913, p. 53-56.) 

Baldwin, W. Terminal problems in the 
city plan of Cincinnati. (In Proceedings of 
12th National Conference on City Planning, 
1920, p. 60-70; with discussion, p. 70-75.) 
History of a typical situation. 

Chicago Railway Terminal Commission. 
Preliminary report, submitted to City Coun- 
cil Committee on Railway Terminals. Mar. 
29, 1915. 144 p. diagr., maps. 

Contains account of trip to study 
European terminals. 

Lay, C. D. The railway problem as a town 
planner sees it. (Landscape Architecture, 
July 1921; vol. 11, p. 191-199.) 

Fort, E. J. The steam railroad in relation 
to the city plan. (In Proceedings of llth 
National Conference on City Planning, 1919; 
vol. 11, p. 52-60; with discussion, 60-76.) 

Condensed in Engineering News-Record, 
June 5, 1919; vol. 82, p. 1099. 

National Conference on City Planning. 
Unification of railroad lines and service in 
cities. Report of committee of investigation. 
(In Proceedings of 12th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1920, p. 56-59.) Also re- 
printed. 

Also in National Municipal Review, June 
1920; vol. 9, p. 351-353. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



131 



St. Louis Engineers Committee. Report 
[on] St. Louis-East St. Louis railroad termi- 
nals. St. Louis, C. H. Smith & Co., consulting 
engineers, 1922. 378 p. plans. 

Wadsworth, G. R. Railroads the frame- 
work of the city plan. The problem and its 
study. (In Proceedings of 2d National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1910, p. 140-146.) 

Railroads and industrial districts. (In 

Nolen, J., ed., City planning, 1916, p. 264- 
278. illus., plans.) 

Wallace, J. F. Report of Chicago Railway 
Terminal Commission submitted to the Mayor 
and City Council, Mar. 1921. [Chicago, The 
Commission, 1921.] 33 p. plates, plans. 

Reviews progress in dealing with a very 
difficult situation. 

Wilgus, W. J. Relation of the railroad 
terminal problem to city planning. (Engi- 
neering News-Record, May 6, 1920; vol. 84, 
p. 901-902. diagr.) 

Paper based on studies for National Con- 
ference on City Planning. 
Also in Engineering and Contracting, 
May 19, 1920; and Railway Age, Apr. 30, 
1920. 

Electrification 

2457 Chicago Association of Commerce. 
Committee of Investigation on Smoke Abate- 
ment and Electrification of Railway Termi- 
nals. The electrification of steam railroads 
a review. (In its Report, Chicago, Rand, 
McNally & Co., 1915, p. 630-697. maps.) 

The electrification of the New York Cen- 
tral and its effect on property values. Dis- 
cussion led by L. Purdy. (In Proceedings of 
9th National Conference on City Planning, 
1917, p. 236-253.) 

Grand Central development seen as great 
civic center. (Engineering News-Record, 
Sept. 9, 1920; vol. 85, p. 496-504. illus.) 
Also reprinted. 

Of special interest as showing effect of 
electrification of terminals. 

Rights of Way. Stations and Grounds 

2460 Lee, I. L. Making the railroad gate- 
ways of the citv attractive. (American City, 
Sept. 1922; vol. 27, p. 221-224. illus.) 

Pray, J. S. Railroad grounds; a study of 
their design, planting and relation to com- 
munity. (Parks and Recreation, July-Dec. 
1921; vol. 4, p. 332-338, vol. 5, p. 68-74, 156- 
164. illus., plans.) Also reprinted. 



Robinson, C. M. The land approach. (In 
his Modern civic art, 1918, etc., p. 59-80. 
illus.) 

2480 Analysis of principles affecting pas- 
senger station design. (Engineering News- 
Record, Mar. 29, 1923; vol. 90, p. 574.) 

Abstract of a report submitted by the 
Committee on Yards and Terminals to 
the annual convention of the American 
Railway Engineering Association, Chi- 
cago, Mar. 1923. 

Architectural beauty in the civic gateway 
of today. (Craftsman, Apr. 1915; vol. 23, 
p. 78-91, 117-118. illus.) 
Stations of various types. 

Crossland, J. The placing, design, and 
arrangement of railway terminals. (In Town 
Planning Institute, London, Papers and dis- 
cussions, 1915-16; vol. 2, p. 29-43; with 
discussion, p. 44-47. illus., plans.) 

Dunn, S. O. The problem of the modern 
terminal. (Scribner's, Oct. 1912; vol. 52, 
p. 416-442. illus.) 

Elliott, H. Modern city gates. (Archi- 
tectural Review, May 1912; N.S. vol. 1, 
p. 49-55. illus.) 

On railroad terminal stations. 

Richardson, W. S. The terminal the 
gate of the city. (Scribner's Magazine, Oct. 
1912; vol. 52, p. 401-416. illus.) 

2486 Robinson, C. M. The square before 
the railroad station. (House and Garden, 
Aug. 1902; vol. 2, p. 377-386. illus., plan.) 

2487 McFarland, J. H. How to improve 
railroad stations and their surroundings. 
(American City, Nov. 1913; vol. 9, p. 440- 
444. illus.) 

Robinson, C. M. Suburban station grounds. 
(House and Garden, Apr. 1904; vol. 5, 
p. 182-187. illus., plans.) Also reprinted. 

Seavey, F. C. Railroad-gardening. (In 
Bailey's Standard cyclopedia of horticulture, 
1916; vol. 5, p. 2898-2903. illus., plans.) 

Simonds, O. C. The grounds of railway 
stations and rights of ways. (In his Land- 
scape gardening, 1920, p. 224-231. plan.) 

Waugh, F. A. Railroad station grounds. 
(In his Landscape gardening, 1922, p. 170- 
177. illus., plans.) 

Rural railway station grounds. (Amer- 
ican City, Town and County Edition, May 
1915; vol. 12, p. 378-380. plans.) 



132 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Freight Terminals 

2495 Amberg, E., and W. H. Allen. How 
delivery zones will reduce freight traffic. 
(American City, Sept. 1918; vol. 19, p. 179- 
180. maps.) 

Droege, J. A. Freight terminals and trains ; 
including a revision of yards and terminals. 
New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1912. 
465 p. illus. 

Kimball, G. H. Unified terminal operation 

held essential to economy. (Engineering 

News-Record, May 26, 1921; vol. 86, p. 893.) 

Abstract of paper before Buffalo Section, 

American Society of Civil Engineers. 

Loree, L. F. Terminal depots and adjuncts. 
(In his Railroad freight transportation, New 
York, D. Appleton & Co., 1922, p. 34-62.) 

Elimination of Grade Crossings 

2510 California. Railroad Commission. 
Engineering department. Report on railroad 
grade crossing elimination and passenger and 
freight terminals in Los Angeles. San Fran- 
cisco, 1920. 587 p. illus., maps, diagr. 
Contains useful compiled information. 

Detroit Dept. of Public Works. Abstract 
of laws governing grade separation in various 
states division of cost. (In its Report on 
grade separation, prepared by Division of 
Grade Separation and Bridges, 1918, p. 53- 
57.) 

Philadelphia Dept. of Public Works. South 
Philadelphia: the abolishment of grade cros- 
sings and the creation of opportunities for 
commercial and industrial development. 
Philadelphia, 1913. 72 p. illus., plan. 

A comprehensive scheme related to the 
city plan and port development. 

St. Louis Public Library. Grade crossing 
elimination in American cities. (Monthly 
Bulletin of the Municipal Reference Branch, 
July 1913; p. 156-174.) 

Swan, H. S., and G. W. Tuttle. Separa- 
tion of street and railroad grades, Paterson, 
N. J. A report of the City Plan Commission. 
Paterson, 1922. 29 p. illus., plans, cross- 
sections. 

Contains useful series of photographs of 

viaduct crossings. 

Syracuse, N. Y., Grade Crossing Commis- 
sion. Report on grade crossing elimination in 
the city of Syracuse; findings of the Grade 



Crossing Commission and report of B. J. 

Arnold, consulting engineer, 1917. 101 p. 

illus., maps, plans. 

Of particular interest on account of the 
well-known grade crossing situation in 
Syracuse. 

Wagner, S. T. Railroad grade crossing 
elimination. (American City, Nov. 1920; 
vol. 23, p. 479-482. illus., diagr.) 

Reprinted from J. E. Aldred Lectures on 
Engineering Practice, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1919-20. 

Watson, M. W. Grade crossing elimination 
procedure: summary of laws, methods of 
carrying on work and distribution of the cost 
in several states. (Good Roads, Jan. 18 } 1919; 
vol. 17, p. 22-24.) 

From paper at annual meeting of the 
American Association of State Highway 
Officials, Chicago, 1918. 

Wiley, R. The proper engineering treat- 
ment of necessary railroad grade crossings. 
(Ibid., Dec. 21, 1918; vol. 16, p. 241-243.) 
Paper at annual meeting of American 
Association of State Highway Officials, 
Chicago, 1918. 

Also abridged in: American City, Town and 
County Edition, Dec. 1918; vol. 19, p. 451- 
453. illus. 



WATERWAYS AND COMMERCIAL 
WATERFRONTS 

2550 American Association of Port Au- 
thorities. Selected bibliography on ports and 
harbors and their administration, laws, fi- 
nance, equipment and engineering. Com- 
piled by W. J. Barney, Secretary. New York, 
1916. 144 p. 

A valuable bibliography, containing a 
large number of references to ports of the 
United States, as well as to foreign ports. 

MacElwee, R. S. Ports and terminal facil- 
ities. New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 
1918. 315 p. illus., plans. 
Contains bibliography. 

U. S. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce. Ports of the United States. Re- 
port on terminal facilities, commerce, port 
charges, and administration at sixty-eight 
selected ports, by G. M. Jones, commercial 
agent. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 
1916. 431 p. maps. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



133 



Baltimore Port Development Commission. 
The port development plan of Baltimore. 
(Municipal Journal, Baltimore, Apr. 7, 1922; 
vol. 10, no. 7, p. 2-10. illus., plan.) 
Full report published, 1922. 

Clapp, E. J. The port of Boston; a study 
and a solution of the traffic and operating 
problems of Boston, and its place in the com- 
petition of the North Atlantic seaports. New 
Haven, Yale University Press, 1916. 402 p. 
illus., maps, plans. 

The port of Hamburg. New Haven, 

Yale University Press, 1911. 220 p. illus., 
plan. 

A comprehensive study. 

Fitzgerald, D. Docks. (In Report of 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Improvements 
Commission, 1909, p. 155-186. illus., plans.) 
Includes account of European docks, as 
well as plans for Boston port develop- 
ment. 

Ford, F. L. A study of some representative 
European ports in the summer of 1909. (In 
Report of Connecticut Rivers and Harbors 
Commission, 1911, p. 23-71. illus., plans.) 

Gahn, H. C. Lake ports; presented at the 
convention of the National Association of 
Port Authorities, at Baltimore, Sept. 10, 1914. 
29 p. illus., plans. (Cleveland River and 
Harbor Commission.) 

Goode, J. P. The development of com- 
mercial ports. I. What the ports of Europe 
are doing. II. Chicago's commercial oppor- 
tunity. (In Report of the Chicago Harbor 
Commission, 1909, p. 61-161. illus., plans.) 
Also published separately. 

Goodrich, E. P. Navigable waters. (In 
Nolen, J. ed. t City planning, 1916, p. 227-263. 
illus., plans.) 

Gourlay, R. S. Basic principles of water- 
front development as illustrated by plans of 
Toronto Harbor Commissioners. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 6th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1914, p. 17-31; with discussion, 
p. 31-53. plan.) 

Follows: Toronto waterfront development, 
1912-1920, report of Toronto Harbor 
Commission. 

Greiner, J. E. The port and the munic- 
ipality. (In Proceedings of American Society 
for Municipal Improvements, 1921, p. 358- 
363.) 



New York, New Jersey Port and Harbor 
Development Commission. Joint report with 
comprehensive plan and recommendations. 
Albany, State Printers, 1920. 495 p. illus., 
plans, diagr. 

A compendium of information. The Port 
of New York Authority Report of Dec.21, 
1921 was based on this plan. 

Philadelphia Dept. of Public Works, see 
2510. 

Seattle Municipal Plans Commission. Port 
of Seattle. (In its Plan of Seattle, submitting 
report of V. G. Bogue, engineer, 1911, p. 61- 
110. illus., plans.) 
A valuable report. 

Stamford, C. W. Report on the physical 
characteristics of European seaports, 1911. 
47 p. illus., plans. (New York City Dept. of 
Docks and Ferries, no. 9a.) 

Tomkins, C. Seaport congestion and its 
relation to transportation and terminal facil- 
ities. (In Proceedings of 2d National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1910, p. 136-139.) 

The waterfront and the city plan. (In 

American Academy of Political and Social 
Science, Housing and Town Planning, 1914, 
p. 222-227.) 

U. S. Dept. of State. European waterways. 
Reports of consular officers of the United 
States located in Germany, Austria Hungary, 
France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, on 
river and harbor improvements in their re- 
spective districts. Washington, 1909. 138 p. 
(National Waterways Commission, Document 
no. 7.) 

U. S. Shipping Board. Port and harbor 
facilities commission. English port facilities, 
by F. T. Chambers. Washington, Govt. Print- 
ing Office, 1919. 387 p. maps, tables. 

The water terminal problem. Papers by 
G. E. Hooker, G. C. Sikes, C. Tomkins, J. F. 
Hasskarl, T. E. Gibbon, A. P. Fleming, and 
O. F. Lackey. (In Proceedings of 3d Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1911, 
p. 131-183.) 

Whitham, P. P. The port terminal factor 
of municipal planning; from a paper pre- 
sented at convention of League of Washing- 
ton Municipalities. (American City, Dec. 
1916; vol. 15, p. 631-638. illus., plans.) 

Other papers by the same author are 
listed in the bibliography of the American 
Association of Port Authorities. 



134 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Waterways, etc. (cont.) 

The annual reports and booklets of the port 
commissions or authorities of Baltimore, New 
Orleans, Los Angeles, Seattle, etc., and the 
reports of the London Port Authority on the 
development of the port of London, should be 
noted. 

See also 4370, Recreational waterfronts. 

2555 Nimmons, G. C. Modern industrial 
plants: Part 5. The great army supply bases 
and quartermasters' terminals of the United 
States Government constructed along the 
eastern coast for war purposes. (Architectural 
Record, Mar. 1919; vol. 45, p. 262-282. 
illus., plans.) 

Inland Waterways 

2580 Bell, J. F. River transportation in 
city planning. (In Proceedings of 13th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1921, 
p. 96-101.) 

Nettlefold, J. S. Garden cities and canals. 
London, St. Catherine Press, 1914. 220 p. 



Inland waterway reform proposed for 
Great Britain. 

Roy, S. J. Waterways and city planning. 
(In Proceedings of 10th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1918; vol. 10, p. 160-163.) 

St. Louis City Plan Commission. St. Louis 
river front: Municipal terminals for boats and 
railroads. Conferences of governors and dele- 
gates from river cities. Reports of City Plan 
Commission, 1913-1915. 62 p. plan. 

Scherzer, A. H. The relation of rivers to 
city plans. (American City. Sept. 1912; vol.7, 
p. 219-221. illus.) 

U. S. National Waterways Commission, 
see 6620. 

Free Ports 

2729 How free port would increase foreign 
trade; interesting and instructive discussion 
of the relation of *' market ports " to world 
commerce here and abroad. (Greater New 
York, Apr. 12, 1915; vol. 4, no. 15, p. 5-8.) 

McGuirk, A. What free zones mean to the 
United States, a statement by the President 
of the National Free Zone Association. 
(Municipal Journal, Baltimore, Sept. 12, 
1919; vol. 7, no. 17, p. 6, 7.) 

The National Free Zone Association is 
created. (Greater New York, July 7, 1919; 
vol. 8, p. 1-10.) 



Detailed account of meeting and organ- 
ization. 

Page, T. W. Why we need free ports. 
(Saturday Evening Post, Feb. 4, 1922; p. 21, 
45-46. illus.) 

What is a free port? What are their advan- 
tages? Shall Baltimore be a free port? 
(Municipal Journal, Baltimore, July 11, 1919; 
vol. 7, no. 13, p. 1.) 



AERIAL TRANSPORTATION 
TERMINALS 

2796 Aerial station at Syracuse. (In 

Syracuse City Planning Commission, City 

planning for Syracuse, 1919, p. 29-31. illus.) 

An example of provision for air terminals 

in a city plan. 

Black, A. How to lay out and build an air- 
plane landing field. (Engineering News- 
Record, Sept. 28, 1922; vol. 89, p. 504-507. 
plans.) 

The municipal air terminal. (National 

Municipal Review, Mar. 1923; vol. 12, p. 123 
-126.) 

Municipal landing fields for air service: 
statement of the War Department's policy. 
(American City, July 1919; vol. 21, p. 20-23. 
illus.) 

Municipally-owned landing fields. (Engi- 
neering News-Record, Aug. 28, 1919; vol. 83, 
p. 413.) 

For air service. 

Wheat, G. S. ed. Municipal landing fields 
and air ports, with chapters by the chief of the 
army air service, the director of naval avia- 
tion, and their officers in charge of landing 
field operations. New York, G. P. Putnam's 
Sons, 1920. 96 p. illus., map, diagrs. 



CONDUITS AND WIRES 
SUBSURFACE UTILITIES 

2850 Blanchard, A. H., and H. B. Drowne. 
Pipe systems. (In their Textbook on high- 
way engineering, 1914, p. 636-642. plan.) 

Dumond, L. A. Lessons from European 
practice in locating public utility structures. 
(American City, July 1915; vol. 13, p. 1-6. 
cross-sections.) 

Chicago Commission on Down-Town Mu- 
nicipal Improvements. Progress report on 
relief for sub-surface congestion in the down- 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



135 



town Chicago streets. Alvord & Burdick, En- 
gineers. L. A. Dumond, Secretary-Engineer 
for Commission. Dec. 31, 1914. 58 p. plans, 
cross-sections. 

Valuable appendices on European and 
American practice in the accommodation 
of public utility pipes and conduits. 

Knowles, M. Cost of utilities and street 
improvements as affected by the size of resi- 
dence lots. (Canadian Engineer, Oct. 23, 
1919; vol. 37, p. 404, 409.) 

Unrevised draft of paper before American 

City Planning Institute. 

Industrial housing. See 1697. 

Note chapters on water-supply, sewerage 

and drainage, and gas and electric service. 

New York (City) Board of Estimate and 

Apportionment. Report of [Nelson P. Lewis] 

Chief Engineer, giving results of an inspection 

of pipe subways in European cities. Oct. 4, 

1910. 21 p. 

Rankin, E. S. The relation of zoning to the 
work of the city engineer. (In Proceedings of 
the American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments, 1920, p. 70-72.) 

Economies effected by zoning in pave- 
ments, water supply and sewerage sys- 
tems. 

Also abstracted in several engineering maga- 
zines, including Engineering News-Record, 
Nov. 4, 1920; vol. 85, p. 884. 

Tillson, G. W. Subsurface work. (In 
Blanchard, A. H., ed. American highway en- 
gineers' handbook, 1919, p. 1301-1316; with 
bibliography, p. 1316-1318.) 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Tentative instructions to en- 
gineering designers for sewerage, sewage 
treatment, drainage, gas, electricity, and 
street improvements of industrial housing de- 
velopments. (In its Report of the United 
States Housing Corporation, 1919, vol. 2, p. 
449-492. illus.) 

Webster, G. S. Subsurface structures. (In 
Proceedings of 3d National Conference on 
City Planning, 1911, p. 216-228.) 

Water-supply Distribution and Sewerage 
Systems 

2880 Hazen, A. Water supply; Sewerage; 
Irrigation. (In Merriman, M., ed. American 
civil engineers' handbook, 1920, p. 1190-1284. 
diagr.) 



Williams, G. S., and A. Hazen. Hydraulic 
tables, the elements of gagings and the friction 
of water flowing in pipes, aqueducts, sewers, 
etc., as determined by the Hazen and Williams 
formula and the flow of water over sharp- 
edged and irregular weirs, and the quantity 
discharged, as determined by Bazin's formula 
and experimental investigations upon large 
models. 3d rev. ed. New York, John Wiley 
& Sons, 1920. 115 p. 

2885 Flinn, A. D., R. S. Weston, and C. L. 
Bogert. Waterworks handbook. New York, 
McGraw Hill Book Co., 1916. 824 p. illus., 
diagr. 

Turneaure, F. E., and H. L. Russell. Works 
for the distribution of water. (In their Public 
water supplies, 1908, p. 551-795. illus.) 

2890 Babbitt, H.E. Sewerage and sewage 
treatment. New York, John Wiley & Sons, 
1922. 531 p. illus. 

Folwell,A.P. Sewerage. 9th ed. New York, 
John Wiley & Sons, 1923. 479 p. illus., 
diagr. 

Includes latest methods of sewage treat- 
ment. 

Homer, W. W. Effect of city zoning on 
sewerage system design and cost. (Engineer- 
ing News-Record, Feb. 21, 1918; vol. 80, p. 
368-369.) 

Metcalf, L., and H. P. Eddy. Sewerage and 
sewage disposal; a textbook. 1st ed. New 
York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1922. 598 p. 
illus., maps, diagr. 

An abridgment of the three-volume work 
by the same authors: American Sewerage 
Practice. 

Central Heating Systems 

2902 Butler, J. C. The central heating 
plant a public utility. (American City, 
Jan. 1922; vol. 26, p. 47-49. illus.) 

As carried on in Chicago by the Illinois 

Maintenance Company. 

Community heating of dwellings; economy 
cleanliness and convenience of central station 
heating as compared with house furnaces 
heating as the prime object and electric 
current as the by-product. (Municipal 
Journal, New York, Apr. 5, 1919; vol. 46, 
p. 249-252.) 



136 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Central Heating Systems (cont.) 

Martenis, J. V. Central station heating 
with special reference to Minnesota. (Ameri- 
can City, Aug. 1916; vol. 15, p. 164-167. 
illus.) 

White, J. C. Central station heating; its 
economic features with reference to commu- 
nity service. Washington, Govt. Printing Of- 
fice, 1918. 23 p. diagr. (U. S. Dept. of In- 
terior Bureau of Mines. Technical Paper 191 .) 

Electric Wires 

2916 Burnand, G. C. Distribution and 
wiring as applied to town planning. (Elec- 
trician, London, Apr. 8, 1921; vol. 86, p. 428- 
429.) 

Goob, C. F. Electrical conduits of Balti- 
more. (In Proceedings of American Society 
for Municipal Improvements, 1921, p. 4&-S4.) 
Experience of Baltimore in electric distri- 
bution systems. 

2922 Rhodes, S. A. Gains against the 
nuisances. I. Overhead wire construction. 
(National Municipal Review, Sept. 1922; 
vol. 11, p. 262-265.) 

Bostwick, A. L. Overhead wires in streets; 
removal of wires and poles from streets, with 
special reference to the prohibition of new 
overhead construction. (Municipal Journal, 
New York, June 8, 1916; vol. 40, p. 793-794.) 

Carhart, A. H. The tree versus the public 
utility wire. (American City, Town and 
County Edition, May 1917; vol. 16, p. 464- 
470. illus.) 

Electric Power Supply 

2926 Federal water power projects up to 
Dec. 1921. (Engineering News-Record, Jan. 5, 
1922; vol. 88, p. 24-26.) 

Extract from annual report of the Federal 
Water Power Commission, Dec. 1921. 

Great Britain. Ministry of Reconstruction. 
Coal Conservation Committee. Final report. 
London, H. M. Stationery Office, 1918. 
89 p. tables, maps. 

Advisory council. Report of the com- 
mittee of chairmen on electric power supply. 
London, H. M. Stationery Office, 1919. 8 p. 

Wells, J. P. Hydroelectric power for 
American cities. (American City, Mar. 1921 ; 
vol. 24, p. 295, 297.) 



BLOCKS AND LOTS 
LAND SUBDIVISION 

3000 Hurd, R. M. Ground plan of cities. 
(In his Principles of city land values, 1903, 
p. 33-55. illus., plans.) 

Discusses lot units as basis for plats. 

Lewis, N. P., see 1800. 

Nolen, J. The subdivision of land. (In 
his City planning, 1916, p. 19-47. plans, 
diagr.) 

Contains bibliography. 

Robinson, C. M. City planning, with 
special reference to the planning of streets and 
lots. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1916. 
344 p. illus., plans. 

Note especially p. 127-226. 

For references to figures of block sizes, 

see index, p. 332. 

For Platting in its larger aspects, see 1800, 
and for Platting legislation, 770. 

3014 Bouton, E. H. The financial effect 
of good planning in land subdivision. (City 
Plan, Oct. 1916; vol. 2, no. 3, p. 8-10.) 

Nichols, J. C. Financial effect of good plan- 
ning in land subdivision. (In Proceedings of 
8th National Conference on City Planning, 
1916, p. 91-106; with discussion, p. 106-118.) 

Restrictions 

3020 Bassett, E. M. Zoning versus pri- 
vate restrictions. (National Real Estate 
Journal, Jan. 2, 1922; vol. 23, p. 26.) 

Also in other periodicals. 
Taylor, A. S. Districting through private 
effort. (In Proceedings of 8th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1916, p. 177-183.) 
On restrictions in deeds for residential 
subdivisions. 

The published restrictions for the following 
residential developments should be espe- 
cially noted: Guilford (Roland Park Co.), 
Baltimore; Forest Hills Gardens (Sage 
Foundation Homes Co.), L. I.; Country Club 
District (J. C. Nichols), Kansas City, Mo.; 
Brendonwood (Charles S. Lewis), Indianapolis; 
Shaker Heights (Shaker Heights Improve- 
ment Co.), Cleveland; Colony Hills (Colony 
Hills Trust), Springfield, Mass.; Larchwood 
(F. W. Nonis Co.), Cambridge, Mass.; Chat- 
ham Fields (William E. Harmon & Co.), 
Chicago; and Goodyear Heights (Goodyear 
Tire & Rubber Co.), Akron, O. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



137 



Special Problems 

3065 Augur, T. B. Street cross-sections, 
side grading and house location on steep 
slopes in low-cost housing developments. 
(Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1920; vol. 11, 
p. 25-38. cross-sections.) 

Lloyd, T. A. Town planning in Wales 
with special reference to the development of 
hilly sites. (In Town Planning Institute, 
London, Papers and discussions, 1916-17; 
vol. 3, p. 15-27; with discussion, p. 28-32. 
plan, cross-section.) 

Olmsted, F. L. Steep hillsides. (In his 
Pittsburgh main thoroughfares and the down- 
town district, 1911, p. 109-112. illus.) 

3089 Colton, A. W. Turtle Bay Gardens, 

New York City. (Architectural Record, 

Dec. 1920; vol. 48, no. 6, p. 467-493. illus.) 

An example of the utilization of the 

block interior. Another description will 

be found in the National Real Estate 

Journal, Aug. 29, 1921. 

Herding, F. J. Block interior parks. (Park 
International, Mar. 1921; vol. 2, p. 116-125. 
illus., plans.) 

3304 Olmsted, F. L., Sr. On dooryard 
fences in village streets. (Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Oct. 1920; vol. 11, p. 13-15.) 
Selected from the Olmsted Papers. 

Residential Subdivision 

3380 Hubbard, H. V., and T. Kimball. 
Land subdivision for residential purposes. 
(In their Introduction to the study of land- 
scape design, 1917, p. 275-294. plans.) 

Also in Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1917; 
vol. 8, p. 23-43. 

National Conference on City Planning. 
City planning study, 1913. See 880. 

National Conference on City Planning. 
The "best methods of land subdivision " : Re- 
ports of Conference Committee, Local Com- 
mittees, paper by P. A. Harsch and discussion 
by J. Nolen and others. (In Proceedings of 
7th National Conference on City Planning, 
1915, p. 42-106, 247-273.) 

Discussion by E. P. Goodrich in City Plan, 
Oct. 1915; vol. 1, no. 3, p. 7-11. plan. 

National Association of Real Estate Boards. 
Subdivision gist of a conference on this 
subject at the 14th annual convention in 



Chicago. Part I, by E. W. Chaille, W. Ze- 
losky, W. Britigan; with discussion. Part 
II, by J. C. Nichols. (National Real Estate 
Journal, Sept. 26, Oct. 24, 1921; vol. 22, 
no. 20, p. 46-50, no. 22, p. 37-39.) 

Nichols, J. C. Real estate subdivisions: 
the best manner of handling them. 15 p. 
(American Civic Association, Dept. of City 
Making. Ser. II, no. 5, Nov. 1912 and Feb. 
1916.) 

Olmsted, F. L. Land subdivision from the 
point of view of a development company. 
(In Proceedings of 4th National Conference 
on Housing, Housing problems in America, 
1915, p. 158-174. table.) 

Also in Real Estate Magazine, Oct. 1915; 
vol. 6, p. 43-50. 

Pepler, G. L. Economics of town planning 
in relation to land development. (In Town 
Planning Institute, London, Papers and dis- 
cussions, 1914-15; vol. 1, p. 63-68; with dis- 
cussion, p. 69-77.) 

Robinson, C. M. Platting of minor resi- 
dence streets for high-class districts; Platting 
of minor streets for humble homes; Lot 
platting for humble homes and factory re- 
moval. (In his City planning, 1916, p. 127- 
181. illus., plans.) 

Thompson, L. Site planning in practice. 
See 1697. 

Unwin, R. Of site planning and residential 
roads; Of plots and the spacing and placing 
of buildings and fences; Of cooperation in site 
planning and how common enjoyment bene- 
fits the individual. (In his Town planning, 
1909, etc., p. 289-360, 375-386. illus., plans.) 

Wright, H. The commercial value of land 
platting for a definite use, Part II. (National 
Real Estate Journal, August 15, 1921 ; vol. 22, 
no. 17, p. 16-18; illus., plan.) 

Yeomans, A. B., ed. City residential land 
development: studies in planning. Competi- 
tive plans for subdividing a typical quarter 
section of land in the outskirts of Chicago. 
Chicago, University of Chicago Press, [1916]. 
138 p. illus.j plans. 

See also 1675 ff ., Residential districts. 

The files of the National Real Estate Journal 
contain descriptions of individual subdivi- 
sions, both high and low cost, in various 
parts of the country. 



138 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Residential Subdivision (cont.) 

3395 Cadbury, G., Jr. Gardens and allot- 
ments. (In his Town planning, with special 
reference to the Birmingham schemes, 1915, 
p. 113-121.) 

A brief summary of British experience in 

providing space for gardens. 

Comey, A. C. Lot and block units for 
homes of moderate price. (Canadian Engineer, 
Oct. 23, 1919; vol. 37, p. 425-426.) 

Unrevised draft of paper before American 
City Planning Institute. 
Also in Municipal and County Engineering, 
Jan. 1920; vol. 58, p. 30, 32. 

Ford, J. Lot units and housing. (In his 
Housing report to City Plan Commission of 
Newark, N. J., 1913, p. 68-72.) 

Nolen, J. The effect of land subdivision 
upon housing and public health. (In Pro- 
ceedings of second Pan American Scientific 
Congress, Dec. 27, 1915-Jan. 8, 1916, p. 387- 
393.) 

Contains bibliography. 

. Land subdivision and its effect upon 

housing, and discussion by L. J. Ninde. (In 
Proceedings of 4th National Conference on 
Housing, Housing problems in America, 1915, 
p. 33-52; with discussion, p. 53-64.) 
Includes tabulation of lot sizes, etc. 

Also in National Real Estate Journal, 
Oct. 15, 1915; vol. 12, p. 259-268. 

Ontario. Housing Committee. Report on 
the treatment of the surroundings of the small 
home, including (1) The subdivision of land 
for industrial housing and (2) The layout of 
the individual lot. Toronto, Govt. Printer, 
1919. 35 p. illus., plans. 

Pamphlet prepared by H. B. and L. A. 

Dunington-Grubb, for Ontario Housing 

Committee. 

St. Louis City Plan Commission. Land 
subdivision in relation to the housing prob- 
lem ; with sketch plans of economical lay-outs, 
by H. Wright. (In its Housing problems in 
St. Louis, 1920, p. 47-50. plan.) 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. The housing project; some 
considerations as to costs and types of de- 
velopment. (In its Report of the United 
States Housing Corporation, 1919, vol. 2, 
p. 75-80) 

Tables 7-11, p. 406-434, should also be 

consulted. 



Veiller, L. A model housing law. 2d rev. 
ed. New York, Russell Sage Foundation, 1920. 
430 p. illus., plans. 

Contains numerous references to sizes of 
blocks and lots mainly for tenement 
houses. 

See also 1697, Low-cost residential dis- 
tricts. 

STRUCTURES 

For structures in connection with transportation, see 
2000 S. 

3415 The architectural side of city plan- 
ning. Papers by F. L. Ackerman, A. A. 
Stoughton, and G. B. Ford. (In Proceedings 
of the 7th National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1915, p. 107-134.) 

Baxter, S. Art in public works: aque- 
ducts, water-towers, power-houses, reservoirs, 
bridges. (Century, Oct. 1902; vol. 64, p. 912- 
921. illus.) 

Edwards, A. T. On the influence of town 

planning upon architectural style. (Town 

Plan'g Review, Jan. 1915; vol. 5, p. 268-278.) 

In relation to the various structures 

which compose the city. 

BUILDINGS 

Esthetic Aspects 

3465 Bourne, F. A. Harmony in the 
character of the surburban street. (House 
Beautiful, Feb. 1918; vol. 43, p. 138-139, 
174-175. illus.) 

Edwards, A. T. On monotony in street 
architecture. (Town Planning Review, May 
1922; vol. 9, p. 239-246. illus.) 

Ferriss, H. Civic architecture of the im- 
mediate future. (Arts and Decoration, Nov. 
1922; vol. 18, p. 12-13. illus.) 

The article first appeared in the New 

York Times Supplement. 
Hegemann, W., and E. Peets. The Ameri- 
can Vitruvius: an architects' handbook of 
civic art. New York, Architectural Book Pub- 
lishing Co., 1922. 298 p. illus., plans. 

A folio picture-book. 

Henard, E. fitudes sur les transformations 
de Paris. Fascicule 2 Les alignements 
brises. La question des fortifications et le 
boulevard de Grande-Ceinture. Paris, Li- 
brairies-Imprimeries Reunies, 1903. p. 27-58. 
illus., plans. 

Proposes a novel relation of buildings to 

street to produce a more open and gay 

appearance. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



139 



Parker, B. Horizontality and verticality in 
the architectural treatment of town planning 
schemes. (In Town Planning Institute, Lon- 
don, Papers and discussion, 1915-16; vol. 2, 
p. 133-144; with discussion, p. 145-150. 
illus.) 

Robinson, C. M. Improvement of street 
facades; Architectural development; Archi- 
tectural obligations. (In his Improvement of 
towns and cities, 1913, etc., p. 96-99, 186- 
215.) 

Taut, B. Die Stadtkrone, mit Beitragen 
von P. Scheerbart, E. Baron, A. Behne. Jena, 
E. Diederichs, 1919. 143 p. illus., plans. 

On effects to be gained by composition of 

buildings in the city. 

Reviewed in the Survey, Feb. 14, 1920. 

Unwin, R. Of buildings, and how the va- 
riety of each must be dominated by the har- 
mony of the whole. (In his Town planning, 
1909, etc., p. 360-374. illus., plan.) 

Watson, A. M. The comparative desira- 
bility of the formal or irregular treatment of 
street architecture in large cities. (Journal 
of Royal Institute of British Architects, Series 
3, Feb. 9, 1901; vol. 8, p. 137-147.) 

See also 6100, for " regional " architecture. 



Boyd, J. T., Jr. The New York zoning 
resolution and its influence upon design. 
(Architectural Record, Sept. 1920; vol. 48, 
p. 193-217. illus., plans.) 

Embury, A., II. New York's new architec- 
ture: the effect of the zoning law on high 
buildings. (Architectural Forum, Oct. 1921; 
vol. 35, p. 119-124. illus., diagr.) 

Hastings, T. The zoning regulations in 
New York. (American Architect, Oct. 13, 
1920; vol. 118, p. 461-463. plan.) 

Pond, I. K. Zoning and the architecture of 
high buildings. (Architectural Forum, Oct. 
1921; vol. 35, p. 131-134. illus.) 

Legislation 

3460 Atterbury, G. Unwise building laws 
written and unwritten. (In 8th National 
Conference on Housing, Housing problems in 
America, 1920, p. 87-94; with discussion, 
p. 260-264.) 

Bonnier, L. Notice sur les architectures 
obligatoires dans la ville de Paris. (In Royal 



Institute of British Architects, Town planning 
conference, London, 1910, p. 208-231. illus., 
plan.) 

Caparn, H. A. Public regulation of private 
buildings. (Landscape Architecture, Apr. 
1918; vol. 8, p. 133-140.) 

Address before the American Civic Asso- 
ciation, St. Louis, 1917. 

Emerson, W. The necessity for official con- 
trol over architecture in our towns and cities. 
(Journal of Royal Institute of British Archi- 
tects, 1900, Congress supplement to vol. 7, 
p. 1-14.) 

Hasting, T. Utilitarianism or art? Paris 
building restrictions are vaunted by an Amer- 
ican architect. (La France, Feb. 1921 ; vol. 5, 
p. 208-209, 224. illus.) 

Killam, C. W. The relation of a state-wide 
building code to housing and town planning. 
(Architectural Quarterly of Harvard Uni- 
versity, Dec. 1913; vol. 2, p. 29-35.) 

National Board of Fire Underwriters. 

Building code recommended. 4th rev. ed. 

reprint, 1920. 326 p. illus., diagr. 

Supplemented by work of Building Code 
Committee of U. S. Dept. of Commerce. 

. Dwelling houses: a code of sugges- 
tions for construction and fire protection. 
1st ed., 1916. 115 p. illus., diagr. 

Later suggestions in Code issued by U. S. 
Dept. of Commerce, 1923, in which Na- 
tional Board of Fire Underwirters co- 
operated. 

Robinson, C. M. [Regulation of appear- 
ance of buildings.] (In his Improvement of 
towns and cities, 1913, etc., p. 63-70.) 

Unwin, R. Of building bye-laws. (In his 
Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 386^03. plans.) 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce. Advisory Com- 
mittee on Building Codes. Recommended 
minimum requirements for small house con- 
struction. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 
1923. 108 p. illus., diagr. 

Comment on report in preliminary form 
may be found in Housing Betterment, 
Nov. 1922. 

Veiller, L. Model building codes and hous- 
ing laws. (In 7th yearbook of City Man- 
agers' Association, 1921, p. 169-178.) 

See also his Model Housing Law, 3644. 

See also 765, Zoning legislation; 1600, 
Zoning; 3475, Building heights. 



140 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Arrangement. Height 

3470 Atkinson, W. The orientation of 
buildings; or, Planning for sunlight. New 
York, John Wiley & Sons, 1912. 139 p. illus., 
plans. 

Includes a chapter on the orientation of 
streets. 

Edwards, A. T. Sunlight in streets. (Town 
Planning Review, Apr. 1920, Mar. 1921; 
vol. 8, p. 93-98, vol. 9, p. 27-36. illus., 
diagr. 

Rey, A. A. La ville salubre de 1'avenir: 
principes scientifiques d'orientation des voies 
publiques et des habitations. (In Congres In- 
ternational et Exposition comparee des Villes, 
Ghent, 1913, Rapport, 1914, s. i., p. 217-224.) 

Also published (in English) in Town Plan- 
ning Review, July 1915 and in Planning sun- 
light cities, by Swan and Tuttle in American 
Architect, Mar. 19, 1919. 

Seymour, H. L. Sunlight engineering: its 
relation to housing and town planning. (Sci- 
entific American Monthly, Oct. 1920; vol. 2, 
p. 106-108.) 

Abridgement of a paper in Journal of the 
Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, 
May 1920. 

Swan, H. S., and G. W. Tuttle. Planning 
buildings for daylight. (Architectural Forum, 
Nov. 1918; vol. 29, p. 117-124. illus., diagr.) 

Planning sunlight cities. (American 

Architect; Mar. 19, 1919; vol. 115, p. 427- 
441. illus., diagr.) Also reprinted. 

Contains extensive tables. Article revised 

and enlarged from American City article, 

1917. 

3476 New York (City) Heights of Build- 
ings Commission. Report to the Committee 
on the height, size and arrangement of build- 
ings of the Board of Estimate and Apportion- 
ment of the City of New York, Dec. 23, 1913. 
295 p. illus., plans. 

Contains valuable appendices covering 

European practice. 

The historic work on the subject. 

Veiller, L. Buildings in relation to street 
and site. (In Proceedings of 3d National 
Conference on City Planning, 1911, p. 80-117; 
with discussion.) 

3480 Akron, O., City Planning Commis- 
sion. Limitation of height of buildings. 
Mar. 1922. 16 p. 

An argument for low buildings. 



Chicago Real Estate Board. Studies on 
building height limitations in large cities with 
special reference to conditions in Chicago. 
Proceedings of an investigation of building 
height limitations conducted under the 
auspices of the Zoning Committee of the 
Chicago Real Estate Board, compiled by 
C. M. Nichols. Chicago, The Chicago Real 
Estate Board Library, 1923. 299 p. illus., 
maps. 

The most useful up-to-date study of the 
subject, fairly presenting all sides. 

Holliday, A. C. Restrictions governing 
city development. I. Building heights for 
monumental and commercial structures. 
(Town Planning Review, July 1921; vol. 9, 
p. 77-98. illus.) 

See also 1600, Zoning. 

3489 Adams, T. The " art atmosphere " 
of New York and the relation of the sky- 
scraper to town planning. (Town Planning 
Review, July 1911; vol. 2, p. 139-146. illus.) 

Allen, V. D. Regulating the height of 
buildings disadvantages of skyscrapers. 
(Architect and Engineer, Oct. 1919; vol. 59, 
p. 70-72.) 

Paper before the Cleveland Engineering 

Society. 

Nimmons, G. C. The passing of the sky 
scraper. (Journal of American Institute of 
Architects, Nov. 1922; vol. 1, p. 356-361.) 

Shows its economic disadvantages. 

See also his testimony in Chicago Real 

Estate Board volume above. 

Buildings for Special Uses 

3660 Hurd, R. M. Types of buildings. 
(In his Principles of city land values, 1903, 
p. 97-121. illus.) 

Public and Semi-Public Buildings 
Including Schools and Community Centers 

3663 Bennett, E. H. Public buildings and 
quasi-public buildings. (In Nolen, J., ed., 
City planning, 1916, p. 103-116. illus., plan.) 

Day, F. M. The location of public build- 
ings in parks and other open spaces. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 3d National Conference on City 
Planning, 1911, p. 53-69; with discussion, 
p. 69-79.) 

Ellis, C. Federal buildings as a basis for 
city beautifying. (American City, Oct. 1910; 
vol. 3, p. 187-192. illus.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



141 



Flagg, E. Public buildings. (In Proceed- 
ings of 3d National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1911, p. 42-52.) 

Greeley, W. R. Memorial town halls in 
New England. (Architectural Forum, Sept. 
1922; vol. 37, p. 125-130 + plates 41-49. 
illus., plans.) 

Lewis, N. P. Public buildings and civic 
centers. (In his The planning of the modern 
city, 1916 and 1923, p. 149-174. illus., plans.) 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Landscape in connec- 
tion with public buildings in Washington. 
(American Architect, Jan. 19, 1901; vol. 71, 
p. 19-21.) 

See also 3700, Grouping of buildings. 

3570 Buraap, G., and E. M. Parrett. 
School distribution and areas in the city plan. 
(Architectural Record, Nov. 1922; vol. 52, 
p. 371-385. illus., plans.) 

Calvert, A. C. Public schools in the new 
war cities; the unit system provides for 
future growth. (American City, Nov. 1918, 
p. 360-362. plans.) 

Cooper, F. I. Standardization of school- 
house planning and construction. (American 
Architect, Aug. 21, 1918; vol. 141, p. 241-245. 
illus.) 

Haynes, R., and S. P. Davies. School com- 
munity centers [Cleveland]. (In their Public 
provision for recreation, 1920, p. 85-112. 
maps.) 

Jackson, H. E. A community center: 
What it is and how to organize it. Washing- 
ton, Govt. Printing Office, 1918. 52 p. 
(U. S. Bureau of Education, Bulletin, 1918, 
no. 11.) Also published in book form by 
Macmillan Co., New York. 

On the theory of the use of the school 
building as the " community capitol." 

Strayer, G. D. The school building pro- 
gram an important part of the city plan. (In 
Proceedings of 14th National Conference on 
City Planning, 1922, p. 46-53; with discus- 
sion, p. 53-64.) Also reprinted 

The authoritative paper on the subject. 

3675 Comey, A. C., Neighborhood centers. 
(In Nolen, J., ed., City planning, 1916, p. 117- 
138. plans.) 

Community Service. Community buildings 
for industrial towns. New York, Dec. 1921. 
94 p. illus., plans. 



Kimball, F. The social center: Part 1, 
Commercial and cooperative enterprises. 
Part 2, Philanthropic enterprises. Part 3, 
Civic enterprises. (Architectural Record, 
May, June, July, 1919; vol. 45, p. 417-440, 
526-543; vol. 46, p. 29-46. illus., plans.) 

May, C. C. A post-war construction pro- 
gram: the building bureau of the International 
Committee of the Y. M. C. A. (Architectural 
Record, Mar., Apr. 1919; vol. 45, p. 217-241, 
325-342. illus., plans.) 

The articles include neighborhood build- 
ings suitable for industrial communities 
and boys' Y. M. C. A. buildings for 
cities. 

Nason, W. C. Plans of rural community 
buildings. Washington, 1921. (U. S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Farmers' Bulletin 1173. illus., 
plans.) 

Supplemented by Bulletin 1192 on organ- 
ization methods. 

Whitney, A. L. Clubs, gymnasiums, and 
recreation grounds for employees. (U. S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Review, 
Nov. 1917; vol. 5, p. 201-212.) 

Wilson, S. The community house; an 
element in reconstruction. (American City, 
Dec. 1918; vol. 19, p. 467-470.) 

See also several references to community 
buildings as war memorials under 1292; and 
see also 4318, Recreation center playgrounds. 

3585 Foster, P. W. The modern hospital 
in the city plan. (The Modern Hospital, 
Mar. 1923; vol. 20, p. 205-209. illus., plans.) 

3590 Pray, J. S. The treatment of church 
exteriors. (In Reports of papers presented at 
the third convention of the Religious Educa- 
tion Association in Boston, 1905, Dept. XVII, 
Bulletin no. 2, p. 407-411.) 

A paper for the Department of religious 

art and music. 

Wolff, F. Uber die Stellung der Kirchen 
im Stadtplan. (Stadtebau, Feb. 1904; vol. 
1, p. 23-25. plans.) 

Commercial and Industrial Buildings 

3595 American Architect. Special num- 
bers devoted to industrial buildings: Mar. 
22, 1916, Feb. 21, 1917, and Feb. 27, 1918; 
vol. 109, no. 2100, vol. Ill, no. 2148, vol. 113, 
no. 2201. 



142 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Commercial and Industrial Buildings (cont.) 

Brickbuilder, Sept. 1916; vol. 25, no. 9. 
Special number on manufacturing and indus- 
trial buildings, including illustrations of repre- 
sentative buildings of Eastern and Middle 
Western states. 

Nimmons, G. C. Modern industrial plants 
series of 8 articles. (Architectural Record, 
Nov. 1918- June 1919; vol. 44-45. illus., 
plans.) 

3600 Boyd, J. T., Jr. The newer Fifth 
Avenue retail shop fronts, an American con- 
tribution to modern art. (Architectural 
Record, June 1921; vol. 49, p. 458-487. illus.) 

Embury, A., II. Make your town attractive 
distinctive shops. (House Beautiful, Aug. 
1915; vol. 38, p. 76-78. illus.) 

Harmonizing the shop with its environ- 
ment: Kansas City " Country Club Dis- 
trict " shops. (National Real Estate Journal, 
May 9, 1921; vol. 22, no. 10, p. 28-29. illus.) 

Lasker, B. The shop in the suburb. (Gar- 
den Cities and Town Planning, Mar. 1913; 
vol. 3, p. 83-84.) 

Wheatley, H. B. Old London shop fronts. 
(Country Life, London, Nov. 14, 1908; vol. 
24, p. 653-656. illus.) 

3616 Communal kitchens for new town 
planning; should the Government insist on 
their inclusion in the coming schemes? 
(Municipal Journal, London, Oct. 4, 1918; 
vol. 27, p. 993. Editorial note, p. 990.) 

There are numerous other brief items on 
community kitchens in the file of the 
Municipal Journal for 1918. 

Residences. Low-cost Houses 

United States 

3633 Architects 1 Small House Service 
Bureau. How to plan, finance and build your 
home. Published for the Southern Pine Asso- 
ciation, New Orleans, by the Architects 
Small House Service Bureau of Minnesota, 
[1920]. 155 p. illus., plans. 

. Items from the annual report of the 

president, (Journal of American Institute of 
Architects, Mar. 1923; vol. 11, p. 117-118.) 

Hamlin, W. A. Low-cost cottage construc- 
tion in America; a study based on the housing 
collection in the Harvard Social Museum. 
Cambridge, 1917. 30 p. illus., plans. (Pub- 
lications of the Department of Social Ethics 
in Harvard University, Number 7.) 



Contains list of principal low-cost cottage 
housing enterprises in the United States. 

Sherman, L. K. The cost of housing. A 
comparison of building costs in 1913 and 1919 
based on a 6-room dwelling, following experi- 
ence of United States Housing Corporation. 
(American Contractor, Jan. 17, 1920; vol. 41, 
no. 3, p. 31-35. illus., plans, tables.) 

Southern Pine Association. Homes for 
workmen. A presentation of leading examples 
of industrial community development. New 
Orleans, The Association, [1919]. 250 p. 
illus., plans. 

A useful compilation of articles (most of 
them reprints) by well-known writers on 
housing, including many typical house 
plans. 

Successful examples of low-cost housing in 
England and the United States, including the 
new suburb of Flint, Mich., Gidea Park, Eng- 
land, and a " Check List " (by Davison) of 
American housing developments. (Archi- 
tectural Review, Apr. 1917; vol. 5, no. 4, 
whole number, illus., plans.) 

U. S. Bureau of Industrial Housing and 
Transportation. Standards recommended for 
permanent industrial housing developments. 
Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 1918. 
15 p. 

For full report of the United States Housing 
Corporation, containing house-plans, etc., 
see 1697. 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce. Advisory Com- 
mittee on Building Code. Recommended 
minimum requirements for small building 
construction. See 3460. 

U. S. Shipping Board. Passenger Trans- 
portation and Housing Division. Types of 
housing for shipbuilders constructed as a war 
necessity under the direction of Passenger 
Transportation and Housing Division, Emer- 
gency Fleet Corporation. 1919. 125 plates, 
plans. 

Vefller, L. The government's standards for 
war housing; Part 2 in series of articles: In- 
dustrial housing developments in America. 
(Architectural Record, Apr. 1918; vol. 43, 
p. 344-359.) 

For additional references on types of 
houses erected by the United States for hous- 
ing war workers, see 1697, U. S., and extensive 
bibliography in report of United States Hous- 
ing Corporation, 1919. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



143 



Great Britain 

Great Britain. Local Government Boards 
for England and Wales, and Scotland. Report 
of the Committee appointed by the President 
of the Local Government Board and the Secre- 
tary for Scotland to consider questions of 
building construction in connection with the 
provision of dwellings for the working classes 
in England, Wales, and Scotland and re- 
port upon methods of securing economy, and 
despatch in the provision of such dwellings. 
London, H. M. Stationery Office, 1918. 97 p. 
illus. plans. (Cd.9191.) 

Known as the "Tudor-Walters" report 
and deals with the town planning aspect 
as well as house construction. Mr. Ray- 
mond Unwin is largely responsible for the 
technical conclusions set forth. The re- 
port is called by the Garden Cities and 
Town Planning Magazine " the most im- 
portant (British) Government publica- 
tion on housing that has yet appeared." 
It was reviewed by Mr. H. R. Aldridge, 
Secretary of the National Housing and 
Town Planning Council in the Municipal 
Journal, London, Nov. 15 and 22, 1918. 

Great Britain. Ministry of Health. Type 
plans and elevations of houses designed by 
the Ministry of Health in connection with 
state-aided housing schemes. London, H. M. 
Stationery Office, 1920. [45 plates.] 

Thompson, F. L., and E. G. Allen. The 
town plan and the house; an opportunity for 
national economy. London, The Garden 
Cities and Town Planning Association [1916?]. 
41 p. illus., plans, diagr. 

Emphasizes the relation of the individual 
house to the whole scheme. 
See also 1430 ff., 1697, 6360. 

3639 Byers, C. A. The community court, 
its practical and artistic possibilities. (Touch- 
stone, Apr. 1918; vol. 3, p. 58-59, 93-95. 
illus.) 

Inexpensive dwellings in California. 

Dana, R. H., Jr. The group house its 
advantages and possibilities: the mania for 
the detached house. (In 7th National Con- 
ference on Housing, Housing problems in 
America, 1918, p. 201-210; with discussion, 
p. 303-311.) 

Ako article in American Architect, Jan. 29, 
1919; and Architectural Review, Feb. 1920, 
under same title. 



3641 Boyd, J. T. Garden apartments in 
cities. (Architectural Record, July, Aug. 
1920; vol. 48, p. 52-74, 121-135. illus., 
plans.) 

Newman, B. J. Shall we encourage or dis- 
courage the apartment house? (In 5th 
National Conference on Housing, Housing 
problems in America, 1916, p. 153-166; with 
discussion, p. 328-348.) 

3644 Ackerman, F. L. The Phelps- 
Stokes Fund tenement house competition. 
(Journal of American Institute of Architects, 
Mar. 1922; vol. 10, p. 76-82. plans.) 

Hall, P. F. The menace of the three-decker. 
(In 5th National Conference on Housing, 
Housing problems in America, 1916, p. 133- 
152; with discussion, p. 321-327.) 

Housing conditions. Program of archi- 
tectural competition for the remodeling of a 
New York City tenement block under the 
auspices of Joint Legislative Committee on 
Housing and the Reconstruction Commission 
of the State of New York, Mar. 26, 1920. (In 
New York State Reconstruction Commission, 
Report on the housing situation, 1920, p. 77- 
94.) 

Price, G. M. Tenement-house inspector. 
2d rev. ed. New York, Chief Publishing Co., 
1910. 287 p. 

Standards of municipal inspection, useful 
for a housing survey. 

Smith, H. A. Garden apartments for in- 
dustrial workers. (American Architect, May 
22, 1918; vol. 113, p. 686-689. illus., plans.) 

Thomas, A. J. Is it advisable to remodel 
slum tenements? (Architectural Record, 
Nov. 1920; vol. 48, p. 417-426. illus., plans; 
with discussion by R. D. Kohn, p. 425-426.) 

Veiller, L. A model housing law. 2drev.ed. 
New York, Russell Sage Foundation, 1920. 
430 p. illus., plans. 

An important work. Refers mainly to 

tenement houses. 

Minor Buildings 
For park buildings, including bandstands, see 4055. 

3676 Adshead, S. D. Shelters. (Town 
Planning Review, July 1914; vol. 5, p. 139- 
140. illus., plan.) 

3677 Armstrong, D. B. Public comfort 
stations: their economy and sanitation. 
(American City, Aug. 1914; vol. 11, p. 94- 
102. illus.) 



144 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Minor Buildings (cont.) 

Cosgrove, J. J. A comfort station as a 
public utility. (Ibid., Feb. 1917; vol. 16, p. 
180-181, 183. illus., plan.) 

Ford, F. L. Monograph on public comfort 
stations. (In 4th annual report of Hartford 
Commission on the City Plan, 1911, p. 13-76. 
illus.) 

Gerhard, W. P. Public comfort stations. 
(American City, May 1916; vol. 14, p. 449- 
457. illus., plan, cross-sections.) Also reprinted. 

Simons, G. W., Jr. More public conven- 
ience stations needed. (Ibid., Nov. 1920; vol. 
23, p. 471-475. illus.) 

3686 Lowe, L. Service stations as an 
asset to the city. (American City, Aug. 1921 ; 
vol. 25, p. 151, 153. illus.) 

Automobile service stations. 

[Note on Berkeley, Calif, ordinance on 
location of gasoline and oil stations.] (G arden 
Cities and Town Planning, Dec. 1922; vol. 12, 
p. 198.) 

Building Groups. Monumental Squares 
Civic Centers 

3700. Brinckmann, A. E. Platz und Mon- 
ument. Untersuchungen zur Geschichte und 
Asthetik der Stadtbaukunst in neuerer Zeit. 
Berlin, E. Wasmuth, 1908. 175 p. illus., 
plans. 

Brunner, A. W. The civic center. A 
paper before the American Civic Association. 
(National Municipal Review, Jan. 1923; 
vol. 12, p. 16-19.) 

Cleveland, O., Board of Supervision for 
Public Buildings and Grounds. The group 
plan of the public buildings of the City of 
Cleveland. New York, 1903. [17 p.] illus., 
maps, diagr. 

Report by Messrs. Burnham, Carrere, 
and Brunner, containing a number of 
illustrations of foreign examples. 
Plan explained by Mr. Brunner in Proceed- 
ings of 8th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1916, p. 14-24. 

Fisher, T. M. The Denver civic center. 

(Architectural Record, Mar. 1923; vol. 53, 

p. 189-201. illus., plan.) 

Several articles on this civic center have 
appeared in Municipal Facts, published 
by the city of Denver. 



Ford, F. L. comp. The grouping of public 
buildings. Hartford, Conn., 1904. 85 p. 
illus., plans. (Publications of the Municipal 
Art Society of Hartford, Conn., Bulletin no. 2.) 

Githens, A. M. The group-plan. (Brick- 
builder, July, Sept. 1906; vol. 15, p. 134-138, 
179-182. illus., plans.) 

On the theory of building grouping. 

Gaudet, J. L' architecture et les voies pub- 
liques: places monumentales. (In his file- 
ments et th^orie de 1' architecture, Paris, 
Librarie de la Construction Moderne, 1909; 
vol. 4, p. 49-70. illus., plans.) 

Hegemann, W., and E. Peets. The Ameri- 
can Vitruvius, see 3465. 

Discusses grouping of buildings with 
historical examples. 

Lewis, N. P. Public buildings and civic 
centers. (In his The planning of the modern 
city, 1916 and 1923, p. 149-174. illus., plans.) 

See also his paper before National Confer- 
ence on City Planning, 1627. 

Mawson, T. H. Civic centres. (In his 
Civic art, 1911, p. 97-111. illus., plans.) 

Municipal art at its best group at Spring- 
field, Mass. (Parks and Recreation, Nov.- 
Dec. 1922; vol. 6, p. 115-116. illus.) 

Price, M. Capitol Park, Harrisburg, Pa., 
A. W. Brunner, architect. (Architectural 
Record, Apr. 1923; vol. 53, p. 286-306. 
illus., plans.) 

Reid, J., Jr. The San Francisco civic 
center. (Journal of American Institute of 
Architects, Aug. 1916; vol. 4, p. 334-336 + 
plate opp. 319. illus., plan.) 

A more recent description appeared in 
American City, Dec. 1918. 

Sitte, C. Der Stadtebau nach seinen 
kiinstlerischen Grundsatzen. Ein Beitrag zur 
Losung moderner Fragen der Architektur und 
monumentalen Plastik unter besonderer Be- 
ziehung auf Wien. See 260. 

Unwin, R. Of centres and enclosed places. 
(In his Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 175-236. 
illus., plans.) 

Zueblin, C. Civic centers. (In his Ameri- 
can municipal progress, 1916, p. 345-348.) 
Contains bibliography. 

Note the Park Commission Plan for Wash- 
ington, 1902 (see list on p. 43), and further the 
Public Buildings Commission report, 1918 
(65th Congress, 2d session, Senate Document 
no. 155.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



145 



The reports on grouping of public buildings 
for St. Louis and Milwaukee (both 1919) 
should be especially noted, prepared in con- 
nection with comprehensive plans by muni- 
cipal authorities. 



Brain erd, H. B. Neighborhood center: 
group plan for Brooklyn Civic Center, Cleve- 
land. (Parks and Recreation, July 1921; 
vol. 4, p. 297-299. plan.) 

Based on report of Cleveland City Plan 

Commission, Oct. 1920. 

Damon, G. A. How to handle " Four 
Corners " ; architects offer ideas for neighbor- 
hood centers. (American City, Oct. 1914; 
vol. 11, p. 331-332. plans.) 

Competition held under auspices of 
Throop College of Technology, Pasadena, 
Calif. 

Greeley, W. R. Village centres of old New 
England. Concord and Newburyport present 
interesting types. (House Beautiful, Jan. 
1920; vol. 47, p. 20-21. illus., maps.) 

Muller, A. F. Community centers for 
email cities; economic and esthetic necessities 
of our modern communities. (American City, 
Town and County Edition, July 1915; vol. 13, 
p. 7-9. illus., plan.) 

Waugh, F. A. Civic centers. (In his Rural 
improvement, 1914, p. 83-101. illus., plans.) 
See also 1627, 3563. 

3722 Abercrombie, P. The university in 
relation to the planning of the city. (In 
Papers and discussions of the Town Planning 
Institute, London, 1922-23; vol. 9, p. 33-50; 
with discussion p. 51-54. illus., plans.) 

Geddes, P. The proposed University for 
Central India. A reprint from Town Plan- 
ning towards City Development, a report to the 
Durbar of Indore. Indore, 1918. 73 p. 

The full report in 2 vols. was published 

by B. T. Batsford, London. 

3724 Budden, L. B. The relation of ex- 
position planning to civic design. (Town 
Planning Review, Jan. 1916; vol. 6, p. 153- 
162 + plates 34-44. illus., plans.) 

The books and articles on the World's 
Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893, and 
the Panama-Pacific Exposition, San Fran- 
cisco, 1915, should be used for views and 
descriptions of these two expositions, both 
especially significant to city planning. 



BRIDGES 

3740 Artistic value of water fronts and 
bridges in city building. (Fine Arts Journal, 
Nov. 1914; vol. 31, p. 524-534. illus.) 

Bournon, F. La Seine, ses quais et ses 
ponts. (In his La voie publique et son decor, 
1909, p. 77-92. illus.) 

Bragdon, C. Abstract thoughts on con- 
crete bridges. (Architectural Record, Jan. 
1923; vol. 53, p. 3-10. illus.) 

The relation of the structural and esthetic 

elements in bridge design. 

Cambridge Bridge Commission. Report 
upon the construction of Cambridge Bridge. 
Boston, City Printing Dept., 1909. 363 p. 
illus., plans. 

Delaware River Bridge Joint Commission 
(Pennsylvania and New Jersey). Report on 
the bridge over the Delaware River connect- 
ing Philadelphia, Pa., and Camden, N. J. 
Report of June 9, 1921. 25 p. + 19 plates of 
plans, cross-sections, etc. 

Treats of the city planning considerations 
entering into its location and design. 

Gaudet, J. Les ponts. (In his filements et 
theorie de 1' architecture, 1909, vol. 4, p. 71- 
87. illus.) 

Lindenthal, G. Some thoughts on long- 
span bridge design. (Engineering News- 
Record, Nov. 24, 1921; vol. 87, p. 861-864.) 
By the builder of the Hell Gate bridge, 
with special reference to the proposals for 
the Delaware River bridge. 

Symons, T. W., and F. L. Olmsted, Jr. The 

city and the Allegheny River bridges. Pitts- 
burgh Civic Commission, 1910. 37 p. illus. 

Also published in Pittsburgh main thorough- 
fares and the down-town district, p. 133-165. 
illus. 

Tyrrell, H. G. Artistic bridge design. A 
systematic treatise on the design of modern 
bridges according to aesthetic principles. 
Chicago, M. C. Clark Publishing Co., 1912. 
294 p. illus. 

See also his History of Bridge Engineering. 

Esthetic treatment of city bridges. 

(American City, Nov. 1913; vol. 9, p. 404- 
411. illus.) 

Waddell, J. A. L. Esthetics in bridge 
design. (American City, Town and County 
Edition, Mar. 1918; vol. 18, p. 209-214. 
illus.) 



146 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Bridges (cont.) 

Valuable references on bridges in relation 
to the city plan may frequently be found in 
local city plan reports. The discussion in the 
Pittsburgh and Portland (Ore.) major street 
plan reports (see list on p. 43 ff.) should be 
especially noted. 

Minor Structures 

See also 2290 ff., Street furniture. 

3820 Adshead, S. D. The decoration and 
furnishing of the city, nos. I-XV. (Town 
Planning Review, Apr. 1911-Oct. 1914; 
vol.2 vol.5, illus.) 

These articles are entered under indi- 
vidual subjects in this list. 

Baxter, S. Art in the street. (Century, 
Mar. 1906; N.S., vol. 49, p. 697-705. illus.) 

Bournon, F. La voie publique et son d6cor ; 
colonnes, tours, portes, obelisques, fontaines, 
statues, etc. Paris, H. Laurens, 1909. 232 p. 
illus. (Les richesses d'art de la ville de Paris.) 

Mawson, T. H. Public monuments and 
street equipment. (In his Civic art, 1911, 
p. 125-144. illus., plans.) 

Monuments, Statuary, and Fountains 

3830 Abercrombie, P. Modern use of 
great monuments. (Congres International et 
Exposition compare'e des Villes, Ghent, 1913, 
Rapport, 1914, s.i., p. 225-227.) 

Adshead, S. D. Monumental arches. 
(Town Planning Review, Apr. 1911; vol. 2, 
p. 17-21. illus.) 

Monumental columns. (Ibid., July 

1911; vol. 2, p. 95-98. illus.) 

Monumental memorials and town 

planning. (In Town Planning Institute, 
London, Papers and discussions, 1916-17; 
vol. 3, p. 67-85; with discussion p. 86-87. 
illus.) 

Includes war memorials. 

Obelisks. (Town Planning Review, 

Oct. 1911; vol. 2, p. 197-199.) 

Bournon, F. Portes et arcs triomphaux. 
Barrieres. (In his La voie publique et son 
decor, 1909, p. 143-154. illus.) 

Guadet, J. Monuments comm&noratifs. 
(In his Moments et the"orie de 1' architecture, 
1909, vol. 4, p. 3-30. illus.) 



New York (City) Art Commission. Cata- 
logue of the works of art belonging to the 
City of New York. Vol. 2, prepared and 
issued by the Commission, 1920. 113 p. 
illus. 

Contains numerous photographs of mon- 
uments. 

U. S. National Commission of Fine Arts. 
Annual reports. 1911 to date. 

Weaver, L. Memorials & monuments, old 
and new: two hundred subjects chosen from 
seven centuries. London, " Country Life"; 
New York, C. Scribner's Sons, 1915. 479 p. 
illus. 

Includes outdoor memorials. 

See also 1292, War memorials. 

3840 Adams, H. The relation of sculp- 
ture to parks and buildings. (Journal of 
American Institute of Architects, Apr. 1913; 
vol. 1, p. 161-165.) 

Condensed in American City, Mar. 1913; 
vol. 8, p. 287-288. 

Adshead, S. D. Statuary. (Town Plan- 
ning Review, Oct. 1912; vol. 3, p. 171-175. 
illus.) 

Statuary: the single figure and the 

group. (Ibid., Jan. 1913; vol. 3, p. 240-243. 
illus.) 

Equestrian statues. (Ibid., Apr. 1913; 

vol. 4, p. 3-6. illus.) 

Allegorical sculpture. (Ibid., July 

1913; vol. 4, p. 95-97. illus.) 

Bitter, K. Municipal sculpture. (Munic- 
ipal Affairs, Mar. 1898; vol. 2, p. 73-97. 
illus.) 

Bush-Brown, H. K. Sculpture in parks. 
(Park International, July 1920; vol. 1, p. 65- 
66.) 

Caparn, H. A. Statuary in informal set- 
tings. (Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1910; 
vol. 1, p. 22-30. illus.) 

New York (City) Dept. of Public Parks. 
Report of the Committee on the subject of 
Statues on Central Park. (In its Document 
46, for the year enoling Apr. 30, 1873, p. 3-10.) 

States the principles for the placing of 

statuary in parks. 

Robinson, C. M. Adorning with fountains 
and sculpture. (In his Modern civic art, 
1918, etc., 166-183. illus.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



147 



Robinson, C. M. The function and placing 
of sculpture. (In his Improvement of towns 
and cities, 1913, etc., p. 216-236.) 

Ruckstuhl, F. W. The proper functions of 
open-air statuary. (House and Garden, Oct. 
1902; vol. 2, p. 481-494. illus.) 

3845 Adshead, S. D. Fountains. (Town 
Planning Review, Apr., July 1912; vol. 3, 
p. 19-22, 114-117. illus.) 

Borrmann, R. Monumentale Wasser- 
kunstanlagen im Stadtebau des Altertums 
und der neueren Zeit. Berlin, W. Ernst & 
Sohn, 1910. 28 p. illus., plans. (Stadte- 
bauliche Vortrage, Bd. 3, Heft 5.) 

Eyre, W. Memorials in parks Foun- 
tains. (Park International, May 1921; vol. 2, 
p. 244-247. illus.) 

Swift, S. Ornamental movement of water 
in city streets. (House and Garden, Apr., 
May, Sept. 1902; vol. 2, p. 150-162, 205-213, 
417^28. illus.) 

3855 Adshead, S. D. Clock monuments. 
(Town Planning Review, Jan. 1912; vol. 2, 
p. 303-304. illus.) 

3857 Walker, C. H. Memorials in parks 
Flagpoles. (Park International, Jan. 1921 ; 
vol. 2, p. 53-56. illus.) 

3860 Adshead, S. D. Tall lighting stand- 
ards, masts and car poles. (Town Planning 
Review, Apr. 1914; vol. 5, p. 47-48. illus.) 

Billboards 

3880 Caparn, H. A. A billboard cate- 
chism. (Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1919; 
vol. 9, p. 76-78.) 

Crawford, A. W. Important advances 
toward eradicating the billboard nuisance. 
32 p. (American Civic Association, Series II, 
no. 13, Mar. 20, 1919. 2d rev. ed., Mar. 
15, 1920.) 

The American Civic Association is com- 
piling (1923) up-to-date information on 
the billboard situation. 

Removing posters in Philadelphia 

and suburbs; billboards not tolerated by 
Garden Club of America; Billboards and 
zoning in the new Pennsylvania constitution. 
(Civic Comment, American Civic Association, 
Sept. 1920; no. 5, p. 14-15.) 

Civic League of St. Louis. Billboard adver- 
tising in St. Louis. Report of the Signs and 
Billboards Committee, St. Louis, 1910. 40 p. 
illus. 



Fosdick, R. B. Big billboards in big cities; 
address before American Civic Association, 
1912. (American City, Dec. 1912; vol. 7, 
p. 511-517. illus.) 

Based on his report to Mayor of New 

York, 1912. 

McBain, H. L. Expanding the police 
power smoke and billboards. (In his Ameri- 
can city progress and the law, 1918, p. 58-91.) 

Maltbie, M. R. Advertising signs and art. 
(Municipal Affairs, Sept. 1901; vol. 5, p. 738- 
753.) 

Massachusetts. Dept. of Public Works. 
Division of Highways. Rules for the regula- 
tion of advertising signs and devices within 
the public view. Boston, Dec. 30, 1920. 4 p. 

Massachusetts. Laws. Special report rela- 
tive to the regulation of billboard and other 
advertising devices on public ways, in public 
places and on private property within pub- 
lic view, Feb. 1920. 34 p. Boston, State 
Printers, 1920. (Massachusetts General Court, 
1920, House Document 1315.) 

Millard, E. L. Billboard control to date. 
(National Municipal Review, Dec. 1922; 
vol. 11, p. 409-411.) 

What chambers of commerce and 

realtors can do to help abate the billboard 
nuisance. (American City, March 1920; 
vol. 22, p. 276-278.) 

Municipal Art Society of New York. The 
bill-board blight, what to do about it. New 
York, 1922. 22 p. illus. (Bulletin no. 22, Mar. 
1922.) 

Summarized in American City, May 1922; 
vol. 26, p. 463-465 . illus. 

National Highways Association. Council of 
National Advisers. Division of Municipal Art. 
The bill-board nuisance in New York City. 
[Washington, Mar. 1916.] 8 p. illus. (Pam- 
phlet no. 1.) 

New York (City) Mayor's Billboard Ad- 
vertising Commission. Report, Aug. 1, 1913. 
151 p. illus. 

Second printing 1915. 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Public advertising. 
Boston, Rockwell & Churchill Press, 1900. 
lip. (In Proceedings of American Park and 
Outdoor Art Association, vol. 4, part 1.) 

Robinson, C. M. The advertisement prob- 
lem. (In his Improvement of towns and 
cities, 1913, etc., p. 76-93.) 



148 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Billboards (cont.) 

Simpson, J. Billboard regulation: court 
decisions in various states as to extent of 
municipality's power to regulate erection and 
maintenance of billboards on private property. 
(Municipal Journal, New York, Dec. 23, 1915; 
vol. 39, p. 949-951.) 

Springfield, Mass., City Planning Commis- 
sion. A report on billboard advertising in 
Springfield. [1915. 47 p.] illus. 

Williams, F. B. Outdoor advertising. (In 
his Law of city planning and zoning, 1922, 
p. 407-422.) 

PUBLIC OPEN SPACES 

(Public and Quasi-public, other than for Traffic) 

4000 American Civic Association. What 
everybody should know about parks The 
American Civic Association's park primer. 
[Washington, 1922. 4 p.] 

Definitions of types of parks. 
American Academy of Political and Social 
Science. Public recreation facilities. Phila- 
delphia, 1910. 266 p. illus., plans. (Annals, 
vol. 35, no. 2.) 

Of historic interest. 

American Association of Park Superin- 
tendents. Bulletin. Superseded by The bi- 
monthly Parks and Recreation, q. v. The 
name of the Association has been changed to 
American Institute of Park Executives. 

American Park and Outdoor Art Associa- 
tion. [Addresses and proceedings.] 1897- 
1904; vols. 1-7. illus. 

Contains papers and addresses on parks 
by leading advocates. Of historic im- 
portance. 

The files of Garden and Forest, weekly, 
1888-1897, contain many earlier articles 
on parks and public open spaces. 
Eliot, C. W. Charles Eliot, landscape archi- 
tect. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 
1902. 770 p. illus., plans. 

Chapters 17-19, 21, 23-28, 30-32, 34-39, 
relate especially to public open spaces. 
Hubbard, H. V., see 4040. 
Olmsted, F. L., Jr. The landscape treat- 
ment of parks. (In Bailey's Standard cyclo- 
pedia of horticulture, 1916, vol. 4, p. 1801- 
1807. plans and table of statistics.) 

Brief definitions of the types of public 
parks. 



Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Parks as war memorials. 
See 1292. 

Parks and Recreation. Official publication 
of American Institute of Park Executives and 
American Park Society. Minot, N. D.; vol. 
1, no. 1, Oct. 1917, to date, illus. Bi-monthly. 

Robinson, C. M. Open spaces; Parkways; 
Distribution and location of parks; Park de- 
velopment. (In his Modern civic art, 1918, 
etc., p. 287-354. illus.) 

Parks and drives; " Squares " and 

playgrounds. (In his Improvement of towns 
and cities, 1913, etc., p. 152-185.) 

U. S. Bureau of the Census. General sta- 
tistics of cities, 1916: including statistics of 
parks, playgrounds, museums and art gal- 
leries, zoological collections, music and enter- 
tainments, swimming pools and bathing 
beaches, and other features of the recreation 
service. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 
1917. 88 p. diagr., maps. 

Chubb, L. W. Town planning schemes 
and open spaces. (In Town Planning Institute, 
London, Papers and discussions, 1915-16; 
vol. 2, p. 71-82; with discussion, p. 83-90.) 

Holmes, B. Open spaces, gardens and 
recreation grounds. (In Royal Institute of 
British Architects, Town planning confer- 
ence, London, 1910, p. 478^93; with dis- 
cussion, p. 493-498.) 

History of public park movement in 
England. 

Mawson, T. H. Civic art; studies in town 
planning, parks, boulevards, and open spaces. 
London, B. T. Batsford, 1911. 375 p. illus., 
plans. 

Alphand, J. C. A. Les promenades de Paris. 
Histoire description des embellissements 
depenses de creation et d'entretien des Bois de 
Boulogne et de Vincennes, Champs-Elysees 
pares squares boulevards places plan- 
t6es. fitude sur 1'art des jardins et arboretum. 
Paris, J. Rothschild, 1867-1873. 246 p. text 
with illus. and atlas. 

The monumental work on the subject. 
Koch, H. Gartenkunst im Stadtebau. 
Berlin, E. Wasmuth, 1914. 256 p. illus., 
plans. 2d rev. ed., 1921. 318 p. 

A summary of recent park planning by 

this author appeared in Architectural 

Record, May 1922. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



149 



4016 Buchholz, W. Acquirement of Kan- 
sas City park and boulevard system and its 
effect on real estate values. (In Proceedings 
of 9th National Conference on City Planning, 
1917, p. 96-105.) 

Crawford, A. W. Parks as value stabilizers 
and value creators. (In Cleveland Metro* 
politan Park District, Annual report, 1920, 
p. 9-19. illus.) 

Also in Park International, Mar. 1921; 
vol. 2, p. 165-167. 

Minneapolis cited as example. 

Harmon, W. E. Influence of playgrounds 
and small parks on suburban development. 
(Amer. City, June 1911; vol. 4, p. 268-270.) 

Madison (Wis.) Park and Pleasure Drive 
Association. Directors. Madison parks as a 
municipal investment. Report of a citizens' 
committee, Mar. 11, 1909. 20 p. 

Nolen, J. Some examples of the influence 
of public parks in increasing city land values. 
(In his General plan of a park and playground 
system for New London, Conn., 1913, p. 28- 
41.) 

Also in Landscape Architecture, July 1913; 
vol. 3, p. 166-175. 

PARKS AND PARK SYSTEMS 

4040 Bartholomew, H. Zoning in the 
location of public parks. (Park International, 
July 1920; vol. 1, p. 56-59. illus.) 

Boston. Parkman Fund Committee. Re- 
port of the special committee appointed by 
Mayor Peters on the expenditure of the Park- 
man Fund income. Boston, City Printer, 1921. 
73 p. plates. (Document 103, 1921.) 

Analyses the essential elements of a park 
system. The committee included several 
members of the American Society of 
Landscape Architects and American City 
Planning Institute. 

Hubbard, H. V. Parks and playgrounds, 
their requirements and distribution as ele- 
ments in the city plan. (In Proceedings of 
14th National Conference on City Planning, 
1922, p. 1-33; with discussion by Messrs. 
Hanmer, Leland, and others, p. 33-45.) 

Paper also in Landscape Architecture, July 
1922; vol. 12, p. 240-264. diagr. 

The authoritative up-to-date summary of 
the subject. 

Kessler, G. E. Kansas City park system 
and its effect on the city plan. (In Proceed- 
ings of 9th National Conference on City 
Planning, 1917, p. 106-116.) 



Manning, W. H. Park systems and recrea- 
tion grounds. (In Proceedings of 8th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1916, 
p. 242-248.) 

Mawson, T. H. Park systems. (In his 
Civic art, 1911, p. 79-94. illus., plans.) 

Nolen, J. Park systems. (In his City 
planning, 1916, p. 159-180. plans.) 

Olmsted, F. L., Sr. Parks, parkways and 
pleasure grounds. (Engineering Magazine, 
1895; vol. 9, p. 253-260.) 

Also in Garden and Forest, May 15, 22, 
1895; vol. 8, p. 192, 202-203; and reprinted 
in Charles Eliot, landscape architect, 1902, 
p. 441-451. 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. The metropolitan park 
system of Boston. (In Transactions of Amer- 
ican Society of Landsdape Architects, 1899- 
1908, p. 56-65.) 

Olmsted, J. C. The Boston park system. 
(In Ibid., p. 42-55. map.) 

Olmsted Brothers. [Organization of a 
park system.] (In their Report on a proposed 
park system for Dayton, O., 1911, p. 6-12.) 

Parker, G. A. Report of Committee on 
park development and maintenance. (In 
Proceedings of American Society of Municipal 
Improvements, 1914, p. 216-227.) 
The basis for a park system. 

Philadelphia Allied Organizations. The 
existing and proposed outer park systems of 
American cities. Report, written by A. W. 
Crawford and F. M. Day. [Harrisburg, Pa., 
Mt. Pleasant Press, 1905.] 61 p. plans. 
Of historic interest. 

Sheridan, L. V. American park systems. 
(In Proceedings of American Society of 
Municipal Improvements, 1916, p. 162-180.) 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, see 4000. 

A number of park system reports for 
American cities will be found in the lists in 
Municipal Accomplishment (see 0) by such 
landscape architects as Olmsted Brothers 
(note especially Baltimore and Washington), 
G. E. Kessler, W. H. Manning and John 
Nolen. The annual and special park reports 
for Minneapolis, Wilmington (Del.), Louis- 
ville, Essex County and Hudson County, 
N. J., and for Chicago South and West Park 
Commissions should also be especially con- 
sulted. The Denver outer park system is 
described in Municipal Facts, the official city 
newspaper. 



150 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Legislation and Administration 

4060 Hanmer, L. F., and A. H. Brunner. 
Recreation legislation, rev. ed. New York, 
Russell Sage Foundation, Dept. of Recreation, 
Oct. 1915. 99 p. 

Includes laws creating administrative 
agencies. Revision in progress. 
4052 Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Park depart- 
ment organization. (Landscape Architecture, 
July 1914; vol. 4, p. 150-166.) 

Park Equipment 

4065 Burnap, G. Seats in public parks; 
Park utilities. (In his Parks, their design, 
equipment and use, 1916, p. 252-277, p. 296- 
313. illus.) 

Elliott, E. L. Park lighting. (American 
City, Apr. 1911; vol. 4, p. 169-172. illus.) 

Farrier, E. For wholesome recreation: 
public parks and Community Service co- 
operate for public benefit. (Parks and Recre- 
ation, Nov.-Dec. 1921; vol. 5, p. 130-135. 
illus.) 

On park equipment to promote popular 
use. 

Mawson, T. H. The adornment and equip- 
ment of public parks. (In his Civic art, 1911, 
p. 185-206. illus., plans.) 

Park furniture. (Park International, July 
1920; vol. 1, p. 83-86. plates, plans.) 

Peaslee, H. W. Park architecture. (Park 
International, 1920-1921; vol. 1-2. illus.) 

1. Bathing establishments, July 1920; 

vol. 1, p. 25-34. 

2. Field houses, Sept., p. 128-137. 

3. Lodges, Nov., p. 225-233. 

4. Refectories, Jan. 1922; vol. 2, p. 23-33. 

5. Greenhouses, Mar., p. 135-147. 

6. Boathouses, May, p. 231-237. 
Waugh, F. A. Outdoor theaters: the 

design, construction and use of open-air 
auditoriums. Boston, R. G. Badger Co., 1917. 
151 p. illus. 

Contains bibliography. 

Welch, W. A. Park transportation. (Park 
International, May 1921; vol. 2, p. 225-230. 
illus.) 

For articles on statuary in parks, see 3840. 

4057 American Association of Park Super- 
intendents. Concessions and privileges in 
public parks; a summary of methods of oper- 
ation in various American cities with com- 
ments by members. Seattle, 1915. 32 p. 
(Bulletin no. 12.) 



4058 Lyle, W. T. Parks and park engi- 
neering. New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1916. 
130 p. illus., map. 

LANDSCAPE PARKS AND RESERVATIONS 

4100 Boston. Parkman Fund Committee 
report, see 4000. 
Eliot, C., see 4000. 

Jensen, L. P. Value of parks to posterity. 
Popular education and individual training 
must supplement conservation. (Parks and 
Recreation, Sept.-Oct. 1921; vol. 5, no. 1, 
p. 21-25.) 

Address at annual convention of Ameri- 
can Association of Park Superintendents 
urging education of public to arrest 
destruction of native vegetation in land- 
scape parks. 

Olmsted, F. L., Sr. Public parks: being 
two papers read before the American Social 
Science Association in 1870 and 1880, en- 
titled, respectively, Public parks and the en- 
largement of towns, and, A consideration of 
the justifying value of a public park. Brook- 
line, [Privately printed], 1902. 114 p. 

The two papers were originally printed in 
1870 and 1881. 

See further especially reports on Central 
Park, N. Y., Prospect Park, Brooklyn, and 
Franklin Park, Boston. The Franklin Park 
report by F. L. Olmsted, Sr., is the historic 
exposition of the design of a large landscape 
park. The forthcoming Vol. 2 of the Olmsted 
Papers (Vol. 1, Early Years, in series Forty 
Years of Landscape Architecture, New York, 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1922) is a monograph on 
the design and development of Central Park 
(Olmsted & Vaux). 

Olmsted, J. C. The true purpose of a large 
public park. (In 1st Report of American 
Park and Outdoor Art Association, 1897, 
p. 11-17.) 

Condensed in Garden and Forest, June 2, 
1897; vol. 10, p. 212-213. 

For the preservation of landscape parks 
from encroachment of public buildings, see 
also 3563, Day. 

For county and regional reservations, e.g. 
Palisades Interstate Park, see 6100. 

See further publications of American Scenic 
and Historic Preservation Society j National 
Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Na- 
tural Beauty (London), and similar societies 
in other countries. (C/. 1276.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



151 



4127 Hubbard, H. V., and T. Kimball. 

Landscape parks and reservations. (In their 
Introduction to the study of landscape design, 
1917, p. 295-323. illus., plan.) 
Design considerations. 

Lay, C. D. Park design and the preserva- 
tion of the park idea. (Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Jan. 1921; vol. 11, p. 76-83.) 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Playgrounds in parks 
from the designer's standpoint. (In Proceed- 
ings of American Association of Park Superin- 
tendents, 1916, p. 30-32; with discussion, 
p. 32-49.) 

Also published in: Park and Cemetery, 
Oct. 1916; vol. 26, p. 243-244; in American 
City, Nov. 1916; vol. 15, p. 506-508; and in 
Landscape Architecture, Apr. 1917; vol. 3, p. 
122-127. 

Parsons, S. Public parks. (In his The art 
of landscape architecture, New York, G. P. 
Putnam's Sons, 1915, p. 264-304. illus.) 

Shurtleff, A. A. The effect of automobiles 
on the design of parks. (Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Apr. 1921; vol. 11, p. 111-114. plans.) 
See also Eliot article, 2212. 

FOREST AND WATER-SUPPLY RESERVATIONS 

4160 Municipal forests in the United 
States: areas of watershed, park and strictly 
forest tracts listed. (American City, April 
1921; vol. 24, p. 352-354.) 

Arranged by states and towns, with indi- 
cation of type of area. 

4162 Carhart, A. H. Where city and na- 
tion unite to act as summer hosts: municipal 
camps in national forests. (Playground, 
Sept. 1920; vol. 14, p. 342-346.) 

From American City, May 1920; vol. 22, 
p. 499-501. 

Notable example of recreational use of 
forests. 

Hubbard, G. A. The municipal forest in 
Fitchburg, Mass. (American City, Feb. 1921; 
vol. 24, p. 121-124. illus.) 

See also forthcoming article on this sub- 
ject in American Forestry, summer, 1923. 

Reinburg, P. The county forest that sur- 
rounds Chicago. (American City, Aug. 1920; 
vol. 23, p. 143-144. illus.) 

See further the reports of the Board of 
Forest Preserve Commissioners of Cook 
County, 111. 



Reynolds, H. A. Why Massachusetts 
needs town forests. Boston, Massachusetts 
Forestry Association, Oct. 1921. 16 p. illus. 
(Bulletin 132.) 

A summary to that date, widely re- 
printed, by the secretary of the Associa- 
tion. Revision in progress. Recent news 
summarized by the same author in 
American Forestry, summer, 1923. Massa- 
chusetts has been the center of the town 
forest movement. 

Simmons, J. R. Community forests. (In 
New York State Conservation Commission, 
Reforestation Conference, Albany, Nov. 1922, 
published 1923, p. 35-39. illus.) 

By the Secretary-Forester, New York 
State Forestry Association, now promot- 
ing community forests for the state. 

Walpole, Mass., Town Planning Com- 
mittee. Town forests. (In its Town plan- 
ning for small communities, 1917, p. 101-124. 
illus.) 

4166 Ayres, P. W. Reforestation on 
water-sheds. (Journal of the New England 
Waterworks Association, June 1923. In 
press.) 

Saville, T. The relation of water to for- 
estry. (American City, Sept. 1920; vol. 23, 
p. 287-292. illus.) 

Abridged in Public Works, vol. 49, p. 188- 
191. 

4168 American Waterworks Association. 
Report of city planning committee. (Ameri- 
can Waterworks Association Journal, Mar. 
1918; vol. 5, p. 1-9. illus.) 

On the development of land about pump- 
ing stations and reservoirs. 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. The relation of reser- 
voirs to parks. Boston, Rockwell & Churchill 
Press, 1899. 32 p. illus., plans. (American 
Park and Outdoor Art Association, Paper 
32.) 

Also in Engineering Record, 1900; vol. 41, 
p. 173-177. 

Saville, C. M. Reservoirs. (In Nolen, J., 
ed., City planning, 1916, p. 187-199. illus.) 

Sproles, A. J. Esthetics and the water 
department. (American City, Oct. 1916; 
vol. 15; p. 438-439. illus.) 



152 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



SMALL PARKS. COMMONS 

4260 Burnap, G. Parks, their design, 

equipment and use. Philadelphia, J. B. Lip- 

pincott Co., 1916. 328 p. illus. 

Refers primarily to small intown parks. 
Note especially the chapter on " Passing- 
through " parks. Some of the chapters 
appeared in advance in American City, 
1915. 
Mawson, T. H. [Gardens and open spaces.] 

(In his Civic art, 1911, p. 111-122. illus., 

plans.) 



Grecley, W. R. Village centers in old New 
England. (House Beautiful, May 1919; 
vol. 45, p. 280-282. illus., plan.) 
Lexington Common. 

Waugh, F. A. Civic centers Commons. 
(In his Rural improvement, 1914, p. 83-101. 
illus., plans.) 

The town common. (American City, 

Town and County Edition, Aug. 1916; vol. 
15, p. 128-132. illus., plans.) 

Town common. (In his Landscape 

gardening, New York, John Wiley & Sons, 
1922, p. 182-192. plans.) 

SQUARES 
General 

4266 Baxter, S. Public squares in city 
and village. (Century Magazine, Apr. 1906; 
N.S. vol. 49, p. 860-870. illus.) 

Genzmer, F. Die Ausstattung von Stras- 
sen und Platzen. Berlin, W. Ernst & Sohn, 
1910. 59 p. illus., plans. (Stadtebauliche 
Vortrage, Bd. 3, Heft 2.) 

Hegemann, W., and E. Peets. The Ameri- 
can Vitruvius. See 3466. 

Henard, R. Les jardins et les squares. 
Paris, H. Laurens, 1911. 276 p. illus., plans. 
(Les richesses d'art de la ville de Paris.) 

Newton, T. M. Public squares. (American 
Architect, Feb. 3, 10, 24, Mar. 3, 24, 1894; 
vol. 43, p. 52-54, 64-67, 87-89, 101-104, 137- 
138. plans.) 

The planning of cities and public spaces. I, 
by J. W. Simpson, illus. II, by A. B. Pite. 
(Journal of Royal Institute of British Archi- 
tects, Series 3, Apr. 8, 1905; vol. 12, p. 341- 
371; with discussion.) 

Mr. Simpson's paper also in House and 
Garden, June 1906; vol. 9, p. 281-289. illus., 
plans. 



Robinson, C. M. The treatment of city 
squares. (House and Garden, June, July, Aug. 
1902; vol. 2, p. 252-261, 300-307, 377-386. 
illus., plans.) 

Sitte, C. Der Stadtebau. See 3700. 

Triggs, H. I. The planning of squares and 
open spaces. (In his Town planning, 1909, 
p. 271-327. illus., plans.) 

Same matter in paper reprinted from Journal 
of Royal Institute of British Architects, 
Series 3, Nov. 20, 1909; vol. 17, p. 41-70. 

Unwin, R. Of centres and enclosed places. 
(In his Town planning, 1909, etc., p. 175- 
234. illus., plans.) 

See also 2197, 2234, 2238, 2486, 3700, 4260, 
for special types of squares. 

BOTANICAL GARDENS, ZOOS, AND 
FAIR GROUNDS 

4266 Gager, C. S. Botanic garden. (In 
Bailey's Standard cyclopedia of horticulture, 
vol. 1, 1914, p. 526-532. illus., plan.) 

National Botanic Garden. Acquirement of 
Mount Hamilton tract will assure garden 
worthy of name. (Parks and Recreation, Jan. 
1921; vol. 4, p. 95-100. illus.) 

Park aspect of New York botanical gardens. 
(Park and Cemetery, Dec. 1916; vol. 26, p. 
294-295. illus.) 

4270 Failles, C. A. The value of a zoo in 
a city park. (Parks and Recreation, Apr. 
1918; vol. 1, no. 3, p. 3-6. illus.) 

Merkel, H. W. Animals in public parks. 
(Ibid., July 1920; vol. 3, no. 4, p. 5-11. illus.) 

The New York idea of a zoological 

park. (American City, Oct. 1913; vol. 9, 
p. 298-302. illus.) 

Peaslee, H. W. Zoological gardens. (Ar- 
chitectural Record, Apr. 1922; vol. 51, p. 360- 
370. illus.) 

Shurtleff, A. A. Boston zoological park. 
(Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1912; vol. 3, 
p. 1-14. illus., plans.) 
In Franklin Park. 

Zoological parks, 1916. (In U. S. Bureau 
of the Census, General statistics of cities, 
1916, Table 14, p. 80-81.) 

Text discussion of this table, p. 34. 

Information on the zoos of Philadelphia, 
Detroit, Chicago (Forest Preserve, Cook 
County), Madison, Milwaukee, St. Louis, 
Kansas City, Denver, Seattle, etc., may be 
found in park reports and in the files of Parks 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



153 



and Recreation, which has a regular depart- 
ment conducted by H. W. Merkel, devoted to 
the subject of zoological exhibits. 

4295 Pearse, Robinson, and Sprague. 
Your fair and its possibilities; a few thoughts 
for the consideration of fair officials. [Des 
Moines, 1920.] 16 p. illus., plans. 

Pennsylvania State Fair Commission. Re- 
port and plans for an agricultural fair and in- 
dustrial exposition for the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. Prepared according to the 
provisions of the Act of the General Assembly, 
no. 443, 1921. 16 p. illus., plans. 

Pearse, Robinson and Sprague, designers. 

Ramsey, L. W. The county and district 
fair. (Landscape Architecture, July 1920; 
vol. 10, p. 201-205. plans.) 

PLAYGROUNDS 

4300 Curtis, H. S. The practical conduct 
of play. New York, Macmillan Co., 1915. 
330 p. illus. 

Chapter 3-7 on construction and equip- 
ment of playgrounds. Playground plant- 
ing discussed by the author in American 
City, Feb. 1915. 

Dawson, J. F. Conflicting opinions as to 
control body of public playgrounds. (Parks 
and Recreation, Jan.-Feb. 1922; vol. 5, 
p. 312-313.) 

De Groot, E. B. Recreation facilities in 
public parks providing facilities for differ- 
ent kinds of playground interests. (American 
City, Jan. 1914; vol. 10j p. 9-15. illus.) 

Address before American Association of 
Park Superintendents giving experience 
of Chicago. 

Farrier, E. Utilizing the city's waste 
spaces for recreation. (Park International, 
May 1921; vol. 2, p. 248-253. illus.) 

Use of vacant lots, back yards, old ceme- 
teries, docks, etc. 

Haynes, R. How much playground space 
does a city need? (American City, Mar. 1917 ; 
vol. 16, p. 241-247. illus.) 

Hubbard, H. V. The size and distribution 
of playgrounds and similar recreation facil- 
ities in American cities. (In Proceedings of 
6th National Conference on City Planning, 
1914, p. 265-287; with discussion, p. 287- 
304.) Also reprinted and condensed in 
several magazines. 

Superseded by Mr. Hubbard's 1922 paper 
on Parks and Playgrounds, see 4040. 



Lay, C. D. Playground design. (Land- 
scape Architecture, Jan. 1912; vol. 2, p. 63- 
65. plans.) 

Lee, J. Play and playgrounds. [32 p.] illus. 
(American Civic Association. Dept. of Public 
Recreation, Dept. leaflet no. 11, July 1906.) 
Also reprinted. 

Olmsted, F. L., Jr. Playgrounds in parks 
from the designer's standpoint. See 4127. 

The Playground. New York, The Play- 
ground and Recreation Association of Amer- 
ica; vol. 1, Apr. 1907, to date, illus. Monthly. 

The files contain articles on all phases of 

playground management and equipment. 

Current volumes contain reports of the 

Association. 

Playground and Recreation Association of 
America. Proceedings of 1st to 3d Annual 
Playground Congress, Playground Association 
of America, 1907-1909. 3 vols. illus., plans. 
Proceedings continued in The Playground, in- 
cluding " yearbook " number, containing 
compiled statistics. (Dec. 1, 1921 to Nov. 30, 
1922, in Playground, Mar. 1923.) 

Layout and equipment of play- 
grounds. New York, The Association, 1921. 
60 p. plans. 

The up-to-date authoritative publication. 

Robinson, C. M. Landscape gardening for 
playgrounds. (In Proceedings of the 2d 
Annual Playground Congress, 1908, p. 64-71. 
illus.) Also reprinted. 



Citizens Committee on City Plan of Pitts- 
burgh. Pittsburgh playgrounds, being the first 
portion of a report upon the recreation system: 
a part of the Pittsburgh Plan ; prepared by the 
Citizens Committee on City Plan of Pitts- 
burgh. Pittsburgh, 1920. 40 p. illus., plans. 
Also popular edition. 

A notable example. See also Cleveland 
Recreation Survey, 1495 (Haynes). 

4315 American Park Institute. Report of 
the committee on playgrounds and recreation. 
(Parks and Recreation, Sept.-Oct. 1921; vol. 
5, p. 42^3.) 

Includes questionnaire (and results) con- 
cerning value of certain playground ap- 
paratus and golf courses. 

Regarding apparatus. (Playground, Dec. 
1917; vol. 11, p. 463-465.) 

Result of study of playgrounds in 26 
cities. 



154 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Recreation Center and School Playgrounds 

4318 Chicago. South Park Commission- 
ers. Annual reports, 1875 to date. 

The Chicago South Parks are the pro- 
totypes of the recreation center play- 
ground in America. Accounts by J. R. 
Richards, in Playground, June 1916, and 
Park and Cemetery, Nov. 1916. 

West Chicago Park Commissioners. 

Recreation centers, playgrounds and swim- 
ming pools of the West Chicago Park Com- 
missioners. Issued on the occasion of the 50th 
anniversary of the organization of the West 
Park Board. Chicago, 1919. 80 p. illus., 
plans. 

Contains a statement of the facilities of 
each of the five fully equipped recreation 
centers in the West Chicago park system. 
Curtis, H. S. The neighborhood center; 
the proper relationship of the public school to 
playgrounds and small parks. (American 
City, July, Aug. 1912; vol. 7, p. 14-17, 133- 
137. illus.) 
See also 3575, Recreation center buildings. 

4319 Curtis, H. S. The reorganized 
school playground. 23 p. (U. S. Bureau of 
Education, Bulletin, 1912, no. 16, whole no. 
488.) 

A revised ed. with illus. is whole no. 550 

(1913, no. 40.) 

The school playground of American 

cities; Play at the rural school; The play- 
grounds of Gary . (In his Education through 
play, New York, Macmillan Co., 1915, p. 113- 
178. illus.) 

Gregg, J. W. The landscape development 
of school grounds. (American City, Jan. 
1916; vol. 14, p. 36-38.) 

As playgrounds, as well as for effect. 

Nash, J. B. Recreation under public super- 
vision. 4 p. (Bulletin of Oakland, Calif., 
Recreation Department, 1919. illus.) 

The National Conference on City Plan- 
ning considers Oakland school play- 
grounds of especial interest. 

Ramsdell, C. H. School ground planning 
as a community asset. Reprint from Ameri- 
can School Board Journal, Apr. 1920; 8 p. 
illus., plans. 

Russell Sage Foundation. Dept. of Recre- 
ation. Making municipal funds go further 
through a co-ordination of school and park 
developments. New York, 1920. folder, plans. 



Special Sports 

4347 Gerhard, W. P. Public bath houses 
and swimming pools. (American City, Nov. 
1914; vol. 11, p. 357-367. illus., plan.) Also 
reprinted as American City Pamphlet no. 120. 

Hinman, J. J., Jr. The swimming pool. 
Reprinted from American Physical Education 
Review, Dec. 1920; vol. 25. 17 p. 

Open air swimming pools in Wisconsin 
cities. (American City, July 1917; vol. 17, 
p. 11-13. illus.) 

4360 Smith, H. D. Report on trip to 
Princeton, College of City of New York, Yale, 
and Harvard for the purpose of inspecting the 
stadia at those universities. (American Archi- 
tect, July 21-Aug. 25, 1920; vol. 118, p. 94- 
96, 124-126, 160-164, 221-224, 260-262. 
illus.) 

Stadiums. (Playground, Dec. 1917 ; vol. 11, 
p. 448-453.) 

With table of American stadiums to that 
date. 

Toronto Bureau of Municipal Research. 
Municipal stadiums. 6 p. (Citizen Control 
of Citizen's Business, White Paper no. 36, 
Feb. 21, 1920.) 

Contains table giving areas and cost per 

seat. 

4369 American Association of Park Super- 
intendents. Municipal golf. St. Louis, 1917. 
13 p. illus. (Bulletin no. 13.) 

Bendelow, T. Municipal golf some sug- 
gestions for instituting and supervising it. 
(American City, July 1916; vol. 15, p. 1-8. 
illus., plans.) 

Comey, A. C. Municipal golf. (Landscape 
Architecture, Oct. 1920; vol. 11, p. 19-22.) 

Duncan, J. W. Golf in public parks. 
(American City, Nov. 1921; vol. 25, p. 376- 
378. illus.) 

Fisk, A. A. Construction and maintenance 
of municipal golf courses. (Playground, Feb., 
Apr., May, 1921; vol. 14, p. 652-658, vol. 15, 
p. 8-12, opp. p. 92, 168-175, 177-178. illus. 
plans.) 

Municipal golf links. (National Municipal 
Review, Jan. 1923; vol. 12, p. 49.) 
17 cities in the United States. 



Davis, D. F. Municipal lawn tennis in- 
creasingly popular. (American City, May 
1923; vol. 28, p. 506-507.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



155 



RECREATIONAL WATERFRONTS. 
WATER PARKS 

4370 Baxter, S. Seaside pleasure-grounds 
for cities. (Scribner's Magazine, June 1898; 
vol. 23, p. 676-687. illus.) 

Bennett, E. H. The beginning of the lake 
front improvement in Chicago. (American 
City, Mar. 1917; vol. 16, p. 231-233. illus., 
plan.) 

Gourlay, R. S. Basic principles of water- 
front development, Toronto. See 2550. 

Howard, J. G. Waterside avenues. (House 
and Garden, Oct. 1904; vol. 6, p. 164-172. 
illus.) 

Kansas City, Mo., Board of Park Commis- 
sioners. Special report for the Blue Valley 
Parkway, Mar. 1912. 46 p. illus., plans. 

Contains valuable illustrations of inland 

water parks. 

Lanagan, F. R. The continuation of the 
river front improvement in Albany. (Ameri- 
can City, Aug. 1920; vol. 23, p. 201, 203, 205. 
illus.) 

Recreational combined with commercial 

use. 

Miller, L. W. River front embankments. 
(In American Academy of Political and Social 
Science, Housing and town planning, 1914, 
p. 254-258.) 

Newlands, F. G. The treatment of water- 
fronts. (Journal of American Institute of 
Architects, Apr. 1916; vol. 4, p. 154-159. 
illus.) 

Also in U. S. Congress, 64th, 1st session. 
Senate Document 362. Central heating, light- 
ing, and power plant, 1916. Part 3, p. 39-42. 

Robinson, C. M., see 1745. 

Shurtleff, A. A. Non-navigable waters. 
(In Nolen, J., ed., City planning, 1916, p. 
201-226. illus., plans; with bibliography.) 
On recreational development. 

Smith, F. A. C. Municipal recreation on 
inland waterfronts; types of shore develop- 
ment and recreation possible for cities pos- 
sessing a river or a lake. (American City, 
Apr. 1915; vol. 12, p. 291-298. illus.) 

Swift, S. Why not better sea fronts? 
That many American towns having beaches 
may be easily beautified is shown by improve- 
ments successfully carried out here and 
abroad. (Indoors and Out, June 1906; vol. 
2, p. 112-118. illus.) 



Welch, W. A. Public reservation of river 
fronts as part of the regional plan. (In Pro- 
ceedings of llth National Conference on City 
Planning, 1919; p. 147-151.) 

On the Palisades Interstate Park. 

Wilcox, A. Public reservation of river 
fronts as part of a regional plan of develop- 
ment. Plan to enlarge the state reservation 
at Niagara and establish the New York State 
memorial river ways and reserves. (In Pro- 
ceedings of llth National Conference on City 
Planning, 1919, p. 152-158.) 

Williams, F. B. The water-front. (In his 
Law of city planning and zoning, 1922, p. 170- 
172.) 

The land-under-water and foreshore re- 
port by Mr. Williams for the Plan of 
New York is mentioned in its Progress 
Report, Feb. 1923 (see 815), p. 66. 
See further material contained in special 
and general city-planning reports for river, 
lake, or coast cities, mentioned in Municipal 
Accomplishment (see 0), notably Boston, 
Chicago, and Detroit; and further material 
on foreign cities notably Hamburg and those 
on the Rhine and Mediterranean, and some 
of the cities of South America, such as Rio de 
Janeiro and Buenos Ayres. 

4383 Downer, J. The Bronx River Park- 
way. (In Proceedings of 9th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1917, p. 91-95. 
illus.) 

See also the published annual reports of the 
Bronx River Parkway Commission, contain- 
ing striking views of the river before and after 
improvement. 

Olmsted, F. L. City planning needs of 
Kansas City with special reference to the 
treatment of water courses. (In Proceedings 
of 9th National Conference on City Planning, 
1917, p. 79-90.) 

Waterways and related park oppor- 
tunities. (In his Improvement of Boulder, 
Colorado, 1910, p. 56-80.) 

On the park treatment of creeks and 
irrigation ditches. 

TOURIST CAMPS 

4460 American Institute of Park Execu- 
tives. Camps for tourists. (Playground, 
Dec. 1921; vol. 15, p. 560-561.) 

Reports of discussion at convention. 
Mentioned also in Parks and Recreation, 
Sept.-Oct., 1921, p. 9. 



156 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Tourist Camps (cont.) 

Elliott, E. C. The case against the tourist 
camp. (American City, Jan. 1923; vol. 28, 
p. 77, 79.) 

Gregg, J. W. The automobile camping 

ground; a new element in park design. 

(American City, June 1919; vol. 20, p. 585, 

587, 589. illus.) 
Essential features of public camp 

grounds. (Community Leadership, June 

1921, p. 6. illus., plan.) 

Also contains Representative tourist 
camping grounds list compiled by 
American City Bureau, p. 6-7. 

Simmons, C. A. How a city welcomes 
motor tourists. (American City, July 1920; 
vol. 23, no. 1, p. 95-97. illus.) 

The tourist camp asset or liability? 
(American City, Apr. 1923; vol. 28, p. 383- 
385. illus.) 

Wallis, R. S. Auto-tourist camps. (Na- 
tional Municipal Review, Apr. 1923; vol. 12, 
p. 180-185.) 

Tourist camps. Ames, Iowa, Engi- 
neering Extension Dept., 1923. 83 p. illus., 
plans. (Bulletin 56. Official publication of 
Iowa State College, Feb. 7, 1923; vol. 21, 
no. 36.) 

CEMETERIES 

4880 The cemetery handbook, a manual 
of useful information on cemetery develop- 
ment and management. Chicago, Allied Arts 
Publishing Co., [1921.] 589 p. illus., plans. 
Articles largely from Park and Cemetery, 
arranged to cover the subject. Contains: 
Organizing and Developing a Modern 
Cemetery, by Hare & Hare. 
Cromarty, W. D. Cemeteries of yesterday 
and today; their location and layout in rela- 
tion to the city plan. (In Proceedings of 
Association of American Cemetery Superin- 
tendents, 1920, p. 29-31. 

Also in Park and Cemetery, Feb. 1921; 
vol. 30, p. 320-321. 

Phillips, T. G. Cemeteries in connection 
with city planning. (In Proceedings of Asso- 
ciation of American Cemetery Superintend- 
ents, 1921, p. 17-21.) 

U. S. National Commission of Fine Arts. 
American cemeteries in Europe. (In its 9th 
Report, 1919-1921, p. 39-66. illus., plans.) 
Significant for underlying esthetic prin- 
ciples of cemetery design. 



VEGETATION. CITY PLANTING 

4800 Koch, H. Gartenkunst im Stadte- 
bau. See 4000. 

Nolen, J. Trees and other public plantings. 
(Landscape Architecture, Apr. 1920; vol. 10, 
p. 129-136.) 

A useful brief summary. 

Robinson, C. M. Possibilities of gardening. 
(In his Improvement of towns and cities, 
1913, etc., p. 132-151.) 

Legislation 

4820 Akron, O., City Planning Commis- 
sion. Rules and regulations governing the 
platting of land adopted June 15, 1920. 

Street tree planting specifications, p. 10- 

12. 

Ellis, D. H. Planting of trees along high- 
ways. (Parks and Recreation, Apr. 1920; 
vol. 3, no. 3, p. 20-21.) 

Compiled notes of laws. 

Massachusetts Forestry Association. 
Shade-tree laws of Massachusetts. Boston, 
June 1915. 32 p. 

Michigan. State laws governing the pro- 
tection and planting of street trees. East 
Lansing, Mich., 1920. 8 p. (Michigan Agri- 
cultural College, Circular no. 41.) 

Law noted in Park and Cemetery, June 
1920. 

Model street tree ordinance recently 
adopted by Racine, Wis. (Parks and Recre- 
ation, Apr. 1918; vol. 1, no. 3, p. 62-64.) 

Newark, N. J. An ordinance relating to 
the protection, regulation, and control of shade 
trees and city parks in the City of Newark, 
N. J. Approved, 1911. Newark, Shade Tree 
Committee. 15 p. 

STREET AND ROADSIDE PLANTING 

4876 Holsworth, W. C. Park areas in 
city streets: comprehensive planning neces- 
sary for good street planting. (Parks and 
Recreation, Nov.-Dec. 1921; vol. 5, p. 117- 
120.) 

Simonds, O. C. Landscape gardening in its 
relation to roadside planting. (Journal of the 
International Garden Club, June 1918; vol. 2, 
p. 187-201. illus.) 

Waugh, F. A. The public road our great 
national park. (House Beautiful, June 1920; 
vol. 47, p. 508-509, 528. illus.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



157 



Waugh, F.A., and P. H. Elwood. Street and 
roadside planting. 4 p. illus., plans. (Facts 
for Farmers, Mass. Agricultural College, Ex- 
tension Service, vol. 6, no. 5, Jan. 1916.) 

Also in American City, Town and County 
Edition, June 1916; vol. 14, p. 571-574. 
illus., plans. 

See also 2116, Parking of streets. 

Street Trees 

4886 Bannwart, C. The movement for 
city street trees a survey. (National 
Municipal Review, Apr. 1915; vol. 4, p. 238- 
244.) 

Trees for city planting. (American 

City, Nov. 1921; vol. 25, p. 367-370. illus.) 

The best species of trees for city streets. 
Opinions from city foresters and shade tree 
commissioners in ten representative cities. 
(American City, Mar. 1912; vol. 6, p. 565- 
569. illus.) 

Bennem, J. G. Importance of well-shaded 
city streets. (American City, Jan. 1918; 
vol. 18, p. 69, 71, 73, 75. illus.) 

Chicago. Special Park Commission. Trees 
and lawns for the streets, by J. H. Prost. 
Chicago, Apr. 1914. 29 p. illus. (Pamphlet 
no. 6.) 

An example of a stimulus to civic im- 
provement. 

Cox, L. D. A street tree system for New 
York City, Borough of Manhattan. 89 p. 
illus., plans. (Syracuse University, New 
York State College of Forestry Bulletin, vol. 
16, no. 8, Mar. 1916.) 

Trees for adverse city conditions; from 

New York Report. (Park and Cemetery, 
Aug. 1916; vol. 26, p. 170-172. illus.) 

Fernow, B. E. The care of trees in lawn, 
street and park, with a list of trees and shrubs 
for decorative use. New York, Henry Holt 
& Co., 1910. 392 p. illus. (American Nature 
Series.) 

Francis, H. R. Roadside trees; discussing 
their existing conditions and values and recom- 
mending their future management for New 
York State. 16 p. (Syracuse University, 
New York State College of Forestry, Circular 
no. 17, vol. 17, no. 7, Mar. 1919.) 

Suggestions for proper procedure in 

systematic street tree planting for towns and 
cities of New York. 56 p. illus. (Syracuse 
University, New York State College of 
Forestry Bulletin, vol. 15, no. 4, Mar. 1915.) 



Grimes, J. L., see 2252. 

Mulford, F. L. Planting and care of street 
trees. 35 p. illus. (U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Farmers' Bulletin 1209, Aug. 1921.) 

Contains list of publications of Dept. of 
Agriculture relating to insect pests. 

Trees for town and city streets. 40 p. 

illus. (U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Farmers' 
Bulletin 1208, issued Mar. 1922, rev. June 
1922.) 

Nolen, J., see 4800. 

Peets, E. Street trees in the built-up dis- 
tricts of large cities. (Landscape Architec- 
ture, Oct. 1915; vol. 6, p. 15-31.) 

Phillips, T. G. City tree planting. The 
selection, planting, and care of trees along 
city thoroughfares. Detroit, 1910. Revised, 
1914. 25 p. plans. (Detroit City Plan and 
Improvement Commission, Report no. 1.) 

Also in American City, Sept., Oct. 1910; 
vol. 3, p. 131-135, 179-183. illus. 

Pierce, W. D. Insect pests must be con- 
sidered in city planning and planting. (Amer- 
ican City, June 1922; vol. 26, p. 607, 609.) 
For references on insect pests, see Mul- 
ford, ante. 

Robinson, C. M. The tree's importance. 
(In his Improvement of towns and cities, 
1913, etc., p. 113-131.) 

Solotaroff, W. The city's duty to its trees. 
(American City, Mar., Apr. 1911; vol. 4, 
p. 131-134, 166-168. illus.) 

With special reference to East Orange, 
N.J. 

Municipal control of shade trees; from 

an address before American Civic Association, 
1911. (American City, Feb. 1912; vol. 6, 
p. 489-490.) 

Shade-trees in towns and cities; their 

selection, planting and care as applied to the 
art of street decoration; their diseases and 
remedies; their municipal control and super- 
vision. New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1911. 
287 p. illus. 

A standard work, embodying the experi- 
ence of the author in East Orange, N. J. 

Waugh, F. A. Native trees in city streets. 
(American City, May 1921; vol. 24, p. 497. 
illus.) 

See further annual reports of Shade Tree 
Commissions of East Orange and Newark, 
N.J. 



158 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Street Trees (cont.) 

4893 Adshead, S. D. Trees. (Town 
Planning Review, Jan. 1915; vol. 5, p. 300- 
306. illus.) 

European use for street and boulevard 

planting. 

Mawson, T. H. Boulevards, parkways, 
avenues and plantations. (In his Civic art, 
1911, p. 147-158. illus., plans.) 

LOT PLANTING 

4900 A California city beautiful cam- 
paign. (American City, Feb. 1917; vol. 16, 
p. 168-169. illus.) 

Whittier garden contest. 

Geyer, O. R. Cleaning and beautifying a 
city. (American City, Apr. 1917; vol. 16, 
p. 365-368. illus.) 

" The famous yard and garden contests 
of Davenport, Iowa." 

Iowa State College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts. Yard and garden contest, by 
C. L. Fitch. Ames, Iowa, Mar. 1915. 16 p. 
illus. (Agricultural Extension Dept., Bulletin 
no. 32.) 

Home, yard, and garden contests, by 

'R. J. Pearse. Mar. 1916. 15 p. illus. (Ibid., 
no. 38.) 

Rose and shrubbery planting week in 
Dallas. (American City, Mar. 1917; vol. 16, 
p. 284-285. illus.) 

Woodbury, C. G. The yard improvement 
contest in Lafayette, Ind. (American City, 
Mar. 1915; vol. 12, p. 221-227. illus.) 

Woodward, R. B. Making the " Flower 
City " (Rochester, N. Y.) justify its name. 
(American City, Apr. 1916; vol. 14, p. 375- 
378. illus.) 

Chamber of Commerce yard improve- 
ment campaign. 

Note such bulletins as those issued by the 
Chicago Special Park Commission on Gar- 
dens, Apr. 1915, and by the Commission for 
Beautifying The City of Norfolk, Va., on 
Lawns and on "What, where, when, and 
how to plant." 



The bulletins published by the U. S. Dept. 
of Agriculture and State departments or agri- 
cultural experiment stations to promote yard 
planting may also be consulted. 

4905 Making idle land work; successful 
experience of local organizations. (American 
City, Feb. 1916; vol. 14, p. 131-134. illus.) 
On vacant lot gardens. 

For vacant lot gardens, see especially lit- 
erature relating to work in New York, 
Newark, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Detroit, 
Indianapolis, Des Moines, Minneapolis, etc. 

4907 Jarvis, C. D. Gardening in elemen- 
tary city schools. Washington, Govt. Print- 
ing Office, 1916. 74 p. illus. (U. S. Bureau 
of Education, Bulletin no. 40.) 

See also the publications of the School 
Garden Association of America, 121 East 
51st St., New York City. 

BUILDING DECORATION 

4910 Budd, K. C. Plant decoration. 
(Municipal Affairs, Sept. 1901; vol. 5, p. 685- 
695. illus.) 

4914 Boecklin, W. Shrubs for the city 
house front. (House Beautiful, Feb. 1915; 
vol. 37, p. 72-74. illus.) 

Boyer, J. The window gardens of Paris. 
(House and Garden, July 1909; vol. 16, p. 8- 
10.) 

Chicago Association of Commerce. Flower 
boxes for Chicago. [Chicago, 1914.] 9 p. 
illus. 

A publication issued in connection with 
a campaign for decorating the city 
streets. 

The summer hanging gardens of the city: 
their planting and care. (Craftsman, May 
1915; vol. 28, p. 156-162. illus.) 

Sutcliffe, A. C. City gardens at doorway 
and window. (House Beautiful, Nov. 1916; 
vol. 40, p. 348-349. illus.) 



For the planting of railroad grounds, see 
2460 ff.; of parks and playgrounds, see 4000 ff. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



159 



TYPES OF CITY PLANS 



5200 Fleure, H. J. Some types of cities 
in temperate Europe. (Geographical Re- 
view, Dec. 1920; vol. 10, p. 357-374. illus., 
maps.) 

Hurd, R. M. Ground plan of cities. (In 
his Principles of city land values, 1903, p. 33- 
55. illus., plans.) 

Nolen, J. Types of city plans. (American 
Architect, Feb. 18, 1920; vol. 117, p. 213-215. 
plans, diagr.) 

Pedrini, A. Le citta, i borghi, le ville. 
Le citta operaie. L'estetica e 1'igiene. (In 
his La citta moderna, Milano, U. Hoepli, 1905, 
p. 182-213. plans.) 

Stiibben, J. Moderne Beispiele ganzer 
Stadtbauplane. (In his Der Stadtebau, 1907, 
p. 335-349. plans.) 

Triggs, H. I. Types of ancient and modern 
towns. (In his Town Planning, 1990, p. 85- 
119. plans.) 

Unwin, R. Of the individuality of towns, 
with a slight sketch of the ancient art of town 
planning. (In his Town Planning, 1909, etc., 
p. 15-114. illus., plans.) 

See also 210 ff. 



TYPES DISTINGUISHED BY 
DOMINANT FUNCTION 

Capital Cities 

5305 Brown, F. C. A proposed new sum- 
mer capital and national center for the United 
States of America. (Architectural Review, 
Apr. 1918; vol. 6, p. 47-54. illus., plans.) 

A federal district for Ottawa. (Journal of 
the Town Planning Institute of Canada, 
Apr. 1922; vol. 1, no. 9, p. 3-6. plan.) 

The London Society. London of the future, 
by the London Society under the editorship 
of Sir Aston Webb. London, T. Fisher Un- 
win, Ltd., also New York, E. P. Dutton, 1921. 
286 p. illus. 

U. S. National Commission of Fine Arts. 
Ninth report, July 1, 1919-June 30, 1921. 
Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 1921. 
135 p. illus., plans. 

Contains a summary of progress of the 
Park Commission Plan for the develop- 
ment of our National Capital (also re- 



printed). The issues of the National Geo- 
graphic Magazine for Mar. 1915, and May 
1923 contain articles on the Plan by ex- 
President Taft, Charles Moore, and 
others. 
For material on governmental cities, see 

especially 880, competitions for capitals of 

Australia and India and for Paris. 

For the World capital proposed, see 5550, 

Anderson and Otlet. 

War Camp Cities 

5311 Fuller, G. W. Lessons from experi- 
ence with emergency construction work . (En- 
gineering and Contracting, June 26, 1918; 
vol. 49, p. 643-644.) 

Extract from long paper presented before 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 

Ihlder, J. Wooden cities; the National 
Army cantonments; an illustration of the 
value of thinking before acting. (National 
Municipal Review, Mar. 1918; vol. 7, p. 139- 
145.) 

Knowles, M. Cantonment construction. 
(In Proceedings of Engineers' Society of 
Western Pennsylvania, 1918-19; vol. 34, 
p. 191-225. illus., plans.) Also reprinted. 

Manning, W. H. Planning the canton- 
ments; the work of the American Society of 
Landscape Architects in their design. (Ameri- 
can City, Apr. 1918; vol. 18, p. 331-336. 
illus., plans.) 

Pray, J. S. Planning the cantonments. 
(Landscape Architecture, Oct. 1917; vol. 8, 
p. 1-17. illus., plans.) 

Sheridan, L. V. Planning a war canton- 
ment Camp Pike. (In Proceedings of 10th 
National Conference on City Planning, 1918, 
p. 125-144; with discussion, p. 144-147.) 

U. S. Army. Construction Division. Na- 
tional Army cantonments; plans and photo- 
graphs, June 1918, a compilation of plans of 
the sixteen National Army cantonments, to- 
gether with photographs showing typical 
buildings and their construction, selected 
from progress photographs sent from the 
various cantonments. Prepared under the 
direction of George Gibbs, Jr., Major, Q.M.C. 
Washington, Construction Division, War De- 
partment, [1918]. 94 p. 



160 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



War Camp Cities (cont.) 

U. S. Army. Construction Division. Sec- 
tion C Engineering Division Manual, 1918. 
Washington, Consolidated Supply Co., Prin- 
ters, 1919. 117 p. + 153 plates, illus., plans. 
Embodies experiences in war emergency 
construction. See also the Annual report 
of the Division for 1918. 

Industrial Cities 

6320 Lewis, N. P. The industrial town 
or district. (In his Planning of the modern 
city, 1916 and 1923, p. 186-199. illus., plans.) 

Manning, W. H. Plan of Birmingham, 
Ala. See 6100. 

An important study of an industrial 
region. 

Nolen, J. The industrial village. New 
York, National Housing Association, Sept. 
1918. 22 p. plans. (Publication no. 50.) 
See also Mr. Nolen's Mariemont, 1426. 

Ontario. Bureau of Municipal Affairs. Re- 
port re housing for 1921, including town plan- 
ning of the town of Kapuskasing. Toronto, 
1922. 27 p. plans. 

Government cooperation in the develop- 
ment of a model industrial town. Descrip- 
tion by consulting town planner A. V. 
Hall in Journal of Town Planning Insti- 
tute of Canada, June 1922. 

Planning and building new towns in Can- 
ada: Kipawa. (Conservation of Life, Jan. 
1919; vol. 5, p. 10-16. illus., plans.) 

Planning problems of industrial cities: 
Niagara Falls as an illustration, by J. Nolen; 
The Halifax disaster and rehousing, by G. A. 
Ross; A plan for the Birmingham, Alabama, 
district, by W. H. Manning. (In Proceedings 
of 10th National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1919, p. 22-51.) 

Shuman, I. Kingsport (Tenn.) an unusual 
city, built to make business for a railroad. 
(American City, May 1920: vol. 22, p. 471- 
473.) 

A new industrial town designed by John 

Nolen. 

Taylor, G. R. Satellite cities; a study of 
industrial suburbs. New York, D. Appleton 
& Co., 1915. 233 p. illus., plans. (National 
Municipal League series.) 

The matter appeared originally as a 
series of articles in the Survey, 1912-1913. 



See also 1426, Decentralization; 1660, In- 
dustrial districts; 1697, Low-cost residential 
districts, including Industrial housing; and 
6360, Garden cities. 

Mining Towns and Labor Camps 

6322 Black, R. U. The planning of a new 
town. (American City, Apr. 1920; vol. 22, 
p. 383-386. illus., plan.) 

Dawson, Colo. 

Morrow, I. F. Two town planning projects 
in Arizona, Herding and Boyd, architects. 
Design for mining town near Jerome; town 
plan for Clarkdale. (Architect and Engineer, 
Dec. 1920; vol. 63, p. 47-87. illus., plans.) 

The new mining community of Tyrone, 
N. M., now building for the Burro Mt. branch 
of the Phelps Dodge Corporation, B. G. Good- 
hue, architect. (Architectural Review, Apr. 
1918; vol. 6, p. 59-62. illus., plans.) 

White, J. H. Houses for mining towns. 
Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 1914. 
64 p. illus. (U. S. Bureau of Mines, Bulletin 
87.) 

6323 California. Commission of Immi- 
gration and Housing. Advisory pamphlet on 
camp sanitation and housing. San Francisco, 
The Commission, 1919. 79 p. illus., plans. 

Labor camp planning. 

Construction camps model towns on Miami 
Flood Works; villages of homes, with schools, 
community halls, markets, water mains, lights 
and sewers, house workmen at the five large 
dams being built. (Engineering News-Record, 
Sept. 26, 1918; vol. 81, p. 575-578. illus., 
plans.) 

Sanitation of rural workmen's areas with 
special reference to housing. (In U. S. Public 
Health Reports, Sept. 6, 1918; vol. 33, p. 
1477-1507. illus., plans.) 

See also 1697, Magnusson. 

Health Resorts 

6333 Atkinson, R. Bath, a planned city. 
(Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, Mar. 1923; vol. 11, p. 95-109. illus., 
plan.) 

Cockrill, J. W. The development of 
British watering places after the war. (In 
Town Planning Institute, London, Papers and 
discussions, 1917-18, vol. 4, p. 45-52; with 
discussion, p. 53-59.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



161 



Hot Springs, Ark. (In American Institute 
of Architects, City planning progress, 1917, 
p. 75-76. illus.) 

Description of American Thermae Co. 
project for making a great bath resort, 
with view of Geo. B. Post & Sons lay-out. 

Lasker, B. The wand of Manitou: the de- 
velopment of a great health resort, by public 
enterprise [Saratoga Springs]. (Survey, June 
5, 1920; vol. 44, p. 329-336. illus.) 

Richardson, A. E. The development of 
Cheltenham in the early nineteenth century. 
(Town Planning Review, April 1916; vol. 6, 
p. 226-232. illus.) 

Swiss Society for Balneology and Climatol- 
ogy, ed. Swiss spas, mineral waters, baths, 
climatic resorts and sanatoria of Switzerland. 
Zurich, Publishing Office, Swiss Exporter, 
Ltd., Tourist Department, 1921. 318 p. 
illus., map. 

Garden Villages for Disabled Ex-service Men 

6349 Draper, W. Village settlements for 
disabled ex-service men. (Garden Cities and 
Town Planning, Oct. 1917; vol. 7, p. 48-52.) 

Mawson, T. H. An imperial obligation: 
industrial villages for partially disabled 
soldiers and sailors. London, Grant Richards, 
Ltd., 1917. 124 p. illus., plans. 

Reviewed in Landscape Architecture, Oct. 
1918; vol. 9, p. 32-34. 

Afforestation and the partially dis- 
abled, a sequel to An imperial obligation: in- 
dustrial villages for partially disabled soldiers, 
sailors, and flying men. London, Grant 
Richards, Ltd., 1917. 46 p. illus., plan. 
(Concrete Example Series) 

Renewed in Landscape Architecture, Oct. 
1918; vol. 9, p. 38-39. 

Memorial industrial village. (Journal of 
the Town Planning Institute of Canada, Feb. 
1922; vol. 1, no. 8, p. 3-6. plans.) 

Garden Cities 

6360 Abercrombie, P. Modern town 
planning in England. A comparative review 
of " Garden City " schemes in England. 
(Town Planning Review, Apr., July 1910; 
vol. 1, p. 18-38, 111-128. illus., plans.) 

Still useful for reference on the beginnings 
of the movement. 

Adams, T. Community development in 
wartime. (Landscape Architecture, Apr. 
1918; vol. 8, p. 109-124.) 

Offers the garden city as a solution. 



Adams, T. The value of the agricultural belt 
to garden cities. (Garden Cities and Town 
Planning, June 1921; vol. 11, p. 143-145.) 

See also Adams and other articles on 

agricultural belts, 1715. 

Chambers, Sir T. G. How to get garden 
cities established throughout the world. 
(Ibid., June 1922; vol. 12, p. 97-99.) 

London's first satellite town; an 

account of the garden city at Welwyn. (Ibid., 
May 1920; vol. 10, p. 95-99; 4 p. supplement, 
illus.) 

Culpin, E. G. The garden city and the 
manufacturer. (Ibid., Feb. 1915; vol. 5, p. 
30-38. illus.) 

The garden city movement up-to-date, 

1914. London, Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning Association. 82 p. illus., plans. 

Still the latest edition of annual publica- 
tions of the same title. Not revised since 
the War. 

The lesson of Letchworth. (Garden 

Cities and Town Planning, Dec. 1917; vol. 7, 
p. 66-69.) 

Deutsche Gartenstadt-Gesellschaft. Die 
deutsche Gartenstadtbewegung. Zusammen- 
fassende Darstellung iiber den heutigen Stand 
der Bewegung. Berlin-Schlachtensee, Die Ge- 
sellschaft, 1911. 112 p. illus., plans. 

History and examples of German Garden 
cities. Should be supplemented by files 
of periodical published by the Society 
and of the periodical Stddtebau. A mani- 
festo on garden city policy in Germany 
by the Society is translated in Garden 
Cities and Town Planning, July 1920. 

Garden Cities and Town Planning (Maga- 
zine), see 2. 

Special numbers should be particularly 
noted: 

Second Garden City (Welwyn), Oct. 1919; 

vol. 9, no. 10. 

Satellite towns, May 1920; vol. 10, no. 5. 
Letchworth Garden City, Aug. 1920; vol. 
10, no. 8. 

Garden Cities and Town Planning Associ- 
ation. The development of garden cities; 
memorandum drafted to give expression to 
the conclusions of the Council of the Garden 
Cities and Town Planning Association in con- 
ference at Welwyn. (Garden Cities and Town 
Planning, Dec. 1921; vol. 11, p. 267-268.) 



162 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Garden Cities (cont.) 

Howard, E. Garden cities of tomorrow 
(being the second edition of: To-morrow; a 
peaceful path to real reform). London, S. 
Sonnenschein & Co., 1902. 167 p. illus. 
This book began the " Garden City 
Movement." 

Morrison, H. A new London: labour's 
view of the satellite towns. Paper given at 
Satellite Town Conference, Feb. 21, 1920. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, May 
1920; vol. 10, p. 99-105.) 

Nettlefold, J. S. Garden cities and canals. 
See 2580. 

New definition of Garden City agreed upon 
by Garden Cities and Town Planning Asso- 
ciation. (Housing Betterment, June 1921; 
vol. 10, p. 207.) 

New towns after the war; an argument for 
garden cities by New Townsmen. London, 
J. M. Dent & Sons, Ltd., 1918, 84 p. 

Notes that a National Garden Cities 
Committee was formed to advocate the 
building of new towns, with committee 
headquarters at the Garden Cities and 
Town Planning Association. 

Purdom, C. B. The Garden City; a study 
in the development of a modern town. Lon- 
don, J. M. Dent & Sons, 1913. 329 p. illus., 



Letchworth, England, the first garden 
city. 

The garden city principle; notes of a 

lecture given to the Oxford Housing Lecture 
School, at Balliol College, Oxford. (Garden 
Cities and Town Planning, June- July 1919; 
vol. 9, p. 104-108, 123-127.) 

ed. Town theory and practice, by 

W. R. Lethaby, George L. Pepler, Sir The- 
odore G. Chambers, Raymond Unwin, R. L. 
Reiss, edited with an introduction by C. B. 
Purdom. London, Benn Brothers, 1921. 
139 p. maps, plans, diagr. 

An up-to-date and thorough exposition of 
the garden city by leading proponents. 

Unwin, R. New problems in town planning. 
(Garden Cities and Town Planning, May 
1920; vol. 10, p. 108-113.) 
The garden city solution. 

Welwyn garden city. (Jfeid., Aug. 1921; 
vol. 11, p. 192-195. illus., plan.) 



Adaptation to America 

Adams, T. An American garden city. 
Paper delivered at convention of American 
Civic Association, 1920. (National Municipal 
Review, January 1921; vol. 24, p. 31-38.) 

Bright, J. I. Housing and community plan- 
ning: The plan for Coconut Grove, Florida. 
Foreword by T. Adams, report by J. I. 
Bright. (Journal of the American Institute 
of Architects, Apr. 1921; vol. 9, p. 110-127. 
illus., maps, plans.) 

See also Montoliu Fairhope plan under 

5660. 

Comey, A. C., see 6100. 

Hooker, G. E. Garden cities. (In Pro- 
ceedings of 3d National Conference on Hous- 
ing, Housing Problems in America, 1913, 
vol. 3, p. 13-28; with discussion, p. 89-100.) 

Also in Journal of American Institute of 
Architects, Feb. 1914; vol. 2, p. 80-91. illus. 

U. S. Congress, 64th, 2d Session. Senate. 
Garden city movement; hearing before the 
subcommittee of the Committee on Agricul- 
ture and Forestry, Feb. 9, 1917. Washington, 
Govt. Printing Office, 1917. 53 p. 

Evidence largely by R. B. Watrous and 

W. T. Love of Lomax, 111. 

Veiller, L. Are great cities a menace? The 
garden city as a way out. (Architectural 
Record, Feb. 1922; vol. 51, p. 175-184. illus.) 

Also reprinted as National Housing Asso- 
ciation Publication no. 57, Feb. 1922. 

Whitten, R. H., see 6100. 

Ideal Types 

6660 Abercrombie, P. Ideal cities. No. 1. 
Christianopolis. No. 2. Victoria. (Town Plan- 
ning Review, Apr. 1920, Mar. 1921; vol. 8, 
p. 99-104, vol. 9, p. 15-20. illus., plans.) 

Andersen, H. C. Creation of a world 
centre of communication. E. M. H6brard, 
architect. Paris, 1913. 128 + 102 p. illus., 
plans. 

Limited edition de luxe. 

Chambless, E. Roadtown. New York, 
Roadtown Press, [1910]. 172 p. 

A theoretical scheme for an ideal town. 

Cram, R. A. Walled towns. Boston, 
Marshall Jones Co., 1919. 105 p. 

A social ideal for the correction of modern 
industrial civilization, with a description 
of the physical town. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



163 



The greatest city. (Survey, Feb. 11, 1922; 
vol. 47, p. 764-765.) 

On the projects by Henry Ford and 
Roger Babson for ideal industrial and 
economic centers. 

Hughes, W. R., ed. New town; a proposal 
in agricultural, industrial, educational, civic, 
and social reconstruction. Edited for the 
New Town Council. London, J. M. Dent & 
Sons, 1919. 141 p. 

Huntington, C. W. Enclaves of single tax, 
being a compendium of the legal documents 
involved together with a historical descrip- 
tion. Published by Fiske Warren, Harvard, 
Mass., 1921. 150 p. plan. 

On the principles of single-tax colonies 
with examples. Contains Montoliu plan 
for Fairhope. 

Model towns and communities. (Garden 
City, 1906, N. s., vol. 1.) 

Plato's Republic, Owen's proposed model 
town of " Harmony. (Feb. p. 16-18. illus.) 

Model town of James Silk Buckingham. 
(Mar., p. 33. illus.) 

The influence of Carlyle, Ruskin and Emer- 
son. (May, p. 76-80.) 

Early cooperative communities in the 
United States. (July, p. 130-131.) 

Montoliu, C. Fairhope (a single-tax colony) 
a town-planning scheme for its develop- 
ment into an organic city. (American City, 
Apr. 1921; vol. 24, p. 355-359. plan.) 

Also in Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning, July 1921; vol. 11, p. 162-166. illus., 
plan. 

Otlet, P. The foundations of world so- 
ciety, and the need for an intellectual and 
civic centre of International reconstruction. 
(Survey, Feb. 1, 1919; vol. 41, p. 598-601.) 
Proposed international city as adminis- 
trative center of League of Nations and 
international intellectual interests; after 
Andersen plan. 

Roveda, P. "The city of the sun." (Amer- 
ican City, Aug. 1917; vol. 17, p. 118-121. 
plans.) 

Based on a system of circles with radi- 
ating lots, and intended to solve the 
housing problem. 

Verne, J. An ideal city. (House Beautiful, 
Feb. 1923; vol. 53, p. 160, 208.) 



Wood, E. E. The Spanish linear city. 
(Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, May 1921; vol. 9, p. 169-174. illus.) 
Summary of project on which several 
publications from the press of the " Ciu- 
dad Lineal," Madrid, were issued. 



TYPES DISTINGUISHED BY SIZE 

6605 Adshead, S. D. The development 
of the English village. (Town Planning Re- 
view, Apr. 1919; vol. 8, p. 37-46.) 

Changeur, A. La protection du village. 
(In Congres International et Exposition com- 
paree des Villes, Ghent, 1913, Rapport, 1914, 
s.i., p. 205-210.) 

Douglass, H. P. The little town; espe- 
cially in its rural relationships. New York, 
Macmillan Co., 1919. 258 p. illus., plans. 

Farwell, P. T. Village improvement. New 
York, Sturgis & Walton Co., 1913. 362 p. 
illus., plans. (The Farmer's Practical Li- 
brary.) 

Kuhn, W. Kleinsiedlungen aus Frideri- 
zianischer Zeit. Stuttgart, Wilhelm Meyer- 
Ilschen, 1918. 142 p. illus., plans. (Deut- 
scher Bund Heimatschutz urid Vereinigung 
fur Deutsche Siedlung und Wanderung.) 

Ripley, H. G. The village that ought to be. 
(House Beautiful, Mar. 1922; vol. 51, p. 193- 
196.) 

Walpole, Mass., Town Planning Com- 
mittee. Town planning for small commun- 
ities. New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1917. 
492 p. illus., plans. 



Waugh, F. A. A comparison of town 
(Landscape Architecture, July 1921; vol. 11, 
p. 161-166. 

On village planning in New England. 

Rural improvement; the principles of 

civic art applied to rural conditions, including 
village improvement and the betterment of 
the open country. New York, Orange Judd 
Co., 1914. 265 p. illus., plans. 

5610 Dealey, G. B. Planning the small 
cities. (In Proceedings of 9th National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1917; vol. 9, p. 
128-132.) 



164 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Types distinguished by Size (cont.) 

Hayler, G. W. Town planning actualities, 
some recently executed improvement schemes 
in American small towns. (American Review 
of Reviews, Dec. 1920; vol. 62, p. 633-637. 
illus., plan.) Also reprinted. 

Nolen, J. Examples of city planning in 
small places. (In Proceedings of 9th Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning, 1917, 
vol. 9, p. 117-127.) 

Planning problems of smaller cities 

in the United States. (In Ibid., 8th Confer- 
ence, 1916, p. 184-198; with short papers by 



J. W. Shirley and A. C. Comey, and discussion 
p. 199-221.) 

Replanning small cities; six typical 

studies. New York, B. Huebsch, 1912. 218 p. 
illus., plans. 

Shirley, J. W. Planning the smaller city: 
street systems including transit problems. 
(In Proceedings of 8th National Conference 
on City Planning, 1916, vol. 8, 199-214.) 

6620 For literature relating to the prob- 
lems of great cities, see especially 1424, Growth 
of cities; 1600 ff., Zoning and districts; 2076, 
Street traffic; 3476 ff., Building heights. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



165 



REGIONAL PLANNING 



6100 Adams, T. Regional and town plan- 
ning. (In Proceedings of llth National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1919, p. 77-102.) 

Also published as: The regional survey as 
the basis for the regional plan, and the regional 
plan as the basis for the town plan, in Land- 
scape Architecture, July 1919; vol. 9, p. 173- 
179. Extracts in Engineering News-Record, 
June 5, 1919, and American City, July 1919. 

Regional surveys in relation to munic- 
ipal planning. (Engineering News-Record, 
Aug. 4, 1921; vol. 87, p. 201-202.) 

From paper before American Society of 
Municipal Improvements, see 1521. 

Budden, L. B., see 1292. 

Comey, A. C. Regional planning theory, a 
reply to the British challenge. Cambridge, 
Mass., The Author, 1923. 18 p. diagr. 

A substitute for the garden city theory. 

Also in Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1923; 
vol. 13, p. 81-96. 

Donald, W. J. Regional planning in mo- 
tion. (In Proceedings of llth National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1919, p. 103-114.) 

Fleure, H. J. The regional survey prepara- 
tory to town planning. (In Town Planning 
Institute, London, Papers and discussions, 
1917-18, vol. 4, p. 31-38; with discussion, 
p. 39-43.) 

Ford, G. B. Regional and metropolitan 
planning, principles, methods, cooperation. 
(Prepared for the National Conference on 
City Planning, Baltimore, Apr. 30, 1923.) 
[32 p.] Also to be published in the Conference 
Proceedings. 

Geddes, P., and G. Slater. Ideas at war. 
London, Williams & Norgate, 1917. 256 p. 
(Vol. 2 of The Making of the Future Series, 
ed. by Geddes and Branford.) 

Regionalism as the hope of reconstruc- 
tion. The French origins of the move- 
ment explained. 

Ihlder, John. The city plan and living and 
working conditions. See 1426. 
Planning in regional terms. 

Knowles, M. Engineering problems of 
regional planning. (In Proceedings of llth 
National Conference on City Planning, 1919, 
p. 115-138.) Also reprinted. 



Abstracts in Engineering News-Record, 

June 12, 1919; vol. 82, p. 1173-1175; and 

American City, Aug. 1919; vol. 21, p. 116- 
118.) 

La Farge, C. G., see 1300. 

Lewis, N. P. The environs of the city. (In 
his The planning of the modern city, 1923, 
p. 296-308. illus., plans.) 

. Regional planning. (In Proceedings 

of American Society of Civil Engineers, Mar. 
1923; vol. 49, p. 554-560.) 

National Conference on City Planning. 
Report on regional planning prepared by B. A. 
Haldeman for the Committee on Regional 
Planning. (In its 12th Proceedings, 1920, 
p. 118-128; with discussion, p. 128-132.) 

Regional planning: Sewerage and 

water supply Niagara Frontier, by T. W. 
Barrally; Public reservation of river fronts 
as part of the regional plan, by W. A. Welch; 
and Public reservation of river fronts as part 
of a regional plan of development, by A. Wil- 
cox. (In Proceedings of llth National Con- 
ference on City Planning, 1919, p. 139-158.) 

Ross, J., see 6300, Development surveys. 

Whitten, R. Regional zoning. Paper read 
at 15th National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, May 1, 1923. To be published in the 
Conference Proceedings. 

An important and practical contribution. 
Proper growth of cities to be handled by 
a series of satellite towns with " open- 
development strips." 

See also 1426, Decentralization; and 1525, 
Metropolitan districts. 

American 

Fesler, M. Metropolitan planning for 
Chicago and environs. Conferences of villages 
and cities about Chicago called by City Club. 
(American City, Apr. 1923; vol. 28, p. 377- 
378.) 

Grinnalds, J. C. A state bureau for re- 
gional and town planning, including a boule- 
vard between Baltimore and Washington. 
(Municipal Journal, Baltimore, Feb. 10, 1922; 
vol. 10, no. 3, p. 1-2.) 



166 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Regional Planning (cont.) 

Joint committees to prepare enabling legis- 
lation for Allegheny County Planning Com- 
mission. (Progress, Pittsburgh, Mar. 1922; 
vol. 2, p. 1-2.) 

* Kelsey, F. W. The first county park sys- 
tem. A complete history of the inception and 
development of the Essex County parks of 
New Jersey. New York, J. S. Ogilvie Pub- 
lishing Co., 1905. 300 p. illus., map. 

Brief account in Annals of American 
Academy of Political and Social Science, 
Mar. 1910. 

Knowles, M. Report upon metropolitan 
water and sewerage systems to the Essex 
Border Utilities Commission, Ontario. Wind- 
sor, Ont., The Record Printing Co., Ltd., 1917. 
108 p. maps, diagr. 

MacKaye, B. An Appalachian trail, a 
project in regional planning. (Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects, Oct. 1921; 
vol. 9, p. 325-330. map.) 

Manning, W. H. Warren H. Manning's 
city plan of Birmingham. Published by sub- 
scription, Birmingham, Ala., 1919. 47 p. 
illus., maps. 

Described by the author in Proceedings of 
the llth National Conference on City Plan- 
ning, 1919, vol. 11, p. 47-51. 

New York, New Jersey Port and Harbor 
Development Commission. Joint report with 
comprehensive plan and recommendations. 
Albany, J. B. Lyon Co., 1920. 495 p. illus., 
plans, diagr. 

A monumental regional document. 

Ohio and Massachusetts enact legislation 
for regional planning. (American City, June 
1923; vol. 28, p. 613-614,) 

Pennsylvania. Bureau of Municipalities. 
Report and plans for the extension and im- 
provement of the city plan of the city of 
Wilkes-Barre and neighboring municipalities, 
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Prepared in 
response to requests of the Mayor, Council, 
City Planning Commission and Chamber of 
Commerce. June 1, 1921. 84 p. illus., plans. 
(B. A. Haldernan, Chief, Division of City 
Planning and Municipal Engineering.) 

Plan of New York and its environs. The 
meeting of May 10, 1922. New York, Russell 
Sage Foundation, 1922. [25 p.] 

The most important regional study yet 
undertaken in the United States. (For 
Progress Report, 1923, see 815.) 



Notices appeared in Engineering News- 
Record, May 18, 1922; American City, June 
1922; and Housing Betterment, Nov. 1922. 

Regional Planning Conference of Los 
Angeles County, Calif. Conclusions at Glen- 
dale, Sept. 16, 1922. Interlocking specifica- 
tion for the regional plan, Los Angeles County. 
(Published by Secretary, City Hall, Los 
Angeles.) 8 p. plan. 

Reinberg, P. County forests for citizens. 
(American City, May 1917; vol. 16, p. 519, 
521, 523, 525. illus.) 

Cook County Forest Preserve District, 
Illinois. 

Webster, G. S. What comprehensive plan 
should be provided for the areas adjacent to 
the Delaware River, between Philadelphia 
and Wilmington? (City Plan, Apr. 1918; 
vol. 3, no. 4, p. 14-20.) 

Whitnall, C. B. By regional planning the 
Milwaukee of tomorrow conserves nature's 
attributes. (Parks and Recreation, Mar.- 
Apr. 1923; vol. 6, p. 278-285. illus., plan.) 

The Boston Metropolitan Park reports be- 
ginning 1893 are important regional docu- 
ments and also the Boston Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage reports from 1890 and 
1895. The present Metropolitan District 
Commission reports continue these files. 

The Municipal Plan Commission's Plan of 
Seattle by V. G. Bogue, 1911, is considered the 
earliest American city plan report based on a 
regional area (T. Adams). During the War, 
regional surveys were made for the Indiana 
steel towns and a beginning made for the 
Philadelphia region. The Pennsylvania State 
Bureau of Municipalities, Division of Town 
Planning, made a demonstration survey of the 
Wilkes-Barre region (see above). Very inter- 
esting regional planning provisions are in- 
cluded in the proposed Nausau County (New 
York) charter. 

English 

Abercrombie, P., and T. H. Johnson. The 
Doncaster regional planning scheme. Report 
prepared for the Joint Committee, together 
with an appendix on coal subsidence, by 
J. Humble. London, University Press of 
Liverpool, 1922. 93 p. illus., plans. 
An important and thorough report. 

Fawcett, C. B. Provinces of England, a 
study of some geographical aspects of devolu- 
tion. London, Williams & Norgate, 1919. 296 
p. maps. (The Making of the Future Series.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



167 



Great Britain. Ministry of Health. Report 
of the South Wales Regional Survey Com- 
mittee. London, H. M. Stationery Office, 
1921. 80 p. maps. 

Discussed by E. L. Chappell and others in 
Town Planning Institute, London, Papers and 
discussions, 1920-21, vol. 7, p. 69-85; and 
Garden Cities and Town Planning, Dec. 1921 ; 
vol. 11, p. 247-277. maps. 

Housing, published by British Ministry of 
Health. Special number, devoted to regional 
planning. July 5, 1920; vol. 1, p. 349-363. 

London Society. London of the future. 
See 5305. 

Plans for the London region. A later note 
on London regional planning will be 
found in Garden Cities and Town Plan- 
ning, July- Aug. 1922. 
Manchester and District Joint Town Plan- 
ning Advisory Committee. A record of the 
town planning exhibition. See 40. 

The most important collected informa- 
tion on British regional planning. 

French and Belgian 

De Vuyst, M. P. L'esthetique rurale. (In 
Congres International et Exposition Corn- 
paree des Villes, Ghent, 1913, Rapport, 1914, 
s. i., p. 27-34.) 

By an official of the Belgian Ministry of 
Agriculture, in regard to the preservation 
of regional characters. 



The exhibition of regional architecture in 
the invaded provinces of France, held at Paris 
during Jan. and Feb., 1917. (Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects, Mar. 1917; 
vol. 5, p. 107-114. illus.) 

A translation from the preface to pro- 
gram of the Exposition, with selected 
reproductions of material exhibited. 

Exposition de 1' architecture regionale dans 
les provinces envahies, 1917. Conferences et 
compte-rendu, Paris, [Societ4 des Architectes 
Dipl6mes par le Gouvernement], 1917. 100 p. 
illus., plans. 

France. Ministere de 1'Instruction Pub- 
lique et des Beaux-Arts. Fermes et habita- 
tions rurales: projets primes au Concours 
ouvert entre les architectes frangais. Paris, 
Librairie Gene"rale de PArchitecture et des 
Arts De'coratifs, 1918. [20 p. + 100 plates.] 
3 portfolios. 

Farm designs based on regional character- 
istics. Discussed in Journal of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects, Oct. 1918. 

Jaussely, L. Les cites devastees par la 
guerre, etudes de reconstitution. I. Un con- 
cours de plan de ville. La reconstitution de 
Chauny et de sa region. (La Vie Urbaine, 
Mars-Juin 1919; vol. 1, p. 109-144. map.) 

See also 1293, Reconstruction, after war. 



168 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



RURAL PLANNING 

Including LAND SETTLEMENT 



6300 Adams, T. Rural planning and de- 
velopment; a study of rural conditions and 
problems in Canada. Ottawa, Commission of 
Conservation, 1917. 281 p. illus., plans, 
maps. Out of print. 

The most important work on rural plan- 
ning. See note in American City, Nov. 
1917, p. 409-410. 

Adshead, S. D. Town planning and the 
rural problem. (Town Planning Review, Jan. 
1914; vol. 4, p. 276-286.) 

Aust, F. A. Country planning in Wis- 
consin. (Journal of the Town Planning 
Institute of Canada, Feb. 1922; vol. 1, no. 8, 
p. 8-9.) 

Carver, T. N. The organization of a rural 
community. Reprint from Yearbook of U. S. 
Department of Agriculture for 1914. Wash- 
ington, Govt. Printing Office, 1915. 58 p. 
Social and economic aspects. 

Collins, J. H. Motor transportation for 
rural districts. 32 p. illus. (U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, Bulletin no. 770. Jan. 29, 1919.) 

Community Service, Inc. Rural and small 
community recreation, suggestions for utiliz- 
ing the resources of rural communities; how 
it is being done. New York, Dec. 1920. 139 p. 

Curtis, H. S. Play and recreation for the 
open country. Boston, Ginn & Co., 1914. 
265 p. illus. 

Gives suggestions for improvement of 
home and school grounds for recreation, 
and for rural playground equipment. 

Dana, S. T. Forestry and community de- 
velopment. 1918. 35 p. illus. (U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, Forest Service, 
Bulletin no. 638.) 

Development surveys: rural and financial. 
Part 1. Suggestions towards a national policy 
for agriculture, by M. Hardy; Part 2. A re- 
gional economy based on regional surveys, by 
J. Ross; Part 3. Mental reactions, by S. 
Branford. (Sociological Review, Manchester, 
Eng., Autumn, 1920; vol. 12, p. 82-101.) 

Douglass, H. P. The little town, especially 
in its rural relationships. New York, Mac- 
millan Co., 1919. 258 p. illus., maps, plans. 



Flint, K. R. B., see 644. 
Friends of Our Native Landscape. First 
annual meeting of Wisconsin Branch of 
Friends of Our Native Landscape. (Park and 
Cemetery, July 1920; vol. 30, p. 148.) 

For the improvement of the countryside. 
Kimball, T. Some references on rural plan- 
ning and development. (American City, June 
1921; vol. 24, p. 584-586.) 

With a list of organizations interested in 
promoting rural planning and improve- 
ment. 

Manning, W. H. The Billerica town plan. 
(Landscape Architecture, Apr. 1913; vol. 3, 
p. 108-118. plans.) 

An example of a village plan based on 
thorough surveys. 

Town sites on government reclama- 
tion projects. (Landscape Architecture, Apr. 
1914; vol. 4, p. 117-123. plans.) 

Mobilizing the rural community. (Ameri- 
can City, Town and County Edition, Dec. 
1918; vol. 19, p. 458-462. charts.) 

Based on a pamphlet issued by Mass. 
Agricultural College Extension Service. 
Nason, W. C. Plans of rural community 
buildings. 38 p. illus., plans. (U. S. Dept. 
of Agriculture, Farmers' Bulletin no. 1173, 
Jan. 1921.) 

Rural planning: the social aspects. 

(U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Farmers' Bulle- 
tin no. 1325. July 1923. In press.} 

Norton, S. V. Interrelationship of highway 
transport and back-to-the-farm movement. 
(Good Roads, May 19, 1920; vol. 17, p. 254- 
256, 258.) 

Peake, H. The regrouping of rural popu- 
lation. (Town Planning Review, Mar. 1918; 
vol. 7, p. 243-250.) 

Simonds, O. C. Landscape-gardening. 
New York, Macmillan Co., 1920. 338 p. 
illus., plans. (Rural Science Series.) 

With especial reference to problems of 
rural districts. 

U. S. Reclamation Service. Plan of rural 
community center, Accession no. 18533, 1920. 
1 sheet. 

Shows subdivision of town site. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



169 



Waugh, F. A. Country planning. (Ameri- 
can City, Town and County Edition, July 
1915; vol. 13, p. 14-15.) 

Country planning. 13 p. (American 

Civic Association, Committee on Country 
Planning. Series II, no. 8, Jan. 1916.) 

The opportunity of the country 

village. (House Beautiful, Oct. 1920; vol.48, 
p. 276-277, 312. illus.) 

Rural improvement; the principles of 

civic art applied to rural conditions, including 
village improvement and the betterment of 
the open country. New York, Orange Judd 
Co., 1914. 265 p. illus. 

The American Country Life Association 
(1849 Grand Central Terminal Bldg., New 
York City) includes country planning in its 
program and publishes annual papers and 
proceedings beginning 1919 and Country Life 
Bulletin. 



LAND SETTLEMENT 

6400 Adams, T. Proposed farm city in 

Pender County, North Carolina, a report to 

Farm Cities Cooperation, Jan. 1921. 23 p. 

(Farm Cities Corporation, Publication no. 2.) 

See also the Corporation's descriptive 

booklet with plan by Mr. Nolen. 

Rural planning. See 1293, 6300. 

Contains several chapters on land settle- 
ment. 

Australian Town Planning Conference and 
Exhibition, 2d. Proceedings, 1918. See 40. 
Several papers on land settlement prob- 
lems included. 

Black, J. D. Theories of land settlement. 
(National Real Estate Journal, Mar. 1, 1920; 
vol. 21, no. 5, p. 5-9.) 

California. Commission of Immigration 
and Housing. Report of large landholdings 
in Southern California. Sacramento, State 
Printing Office, 1919. 43 p. 

. State Land Settlement Board. Farm 

allotments and farm laborers' allotments, in 
the Durham State Land Settlement, Butte 
County, Calif. Sacramento, State Printing 
Office, 1910. 10 p. plan, table. Rev ed., 
1918. 

Discussions of the Durham colony ap- 
peared in the Engineering News-Record 
for Dec. 5, 1918, and Jan. 30, 1919, in- 



cluding Dr. Mead's reply to critics. An 
account also appeared in Survey, Sept. 21, 
1918, and the Monthly Labor Review 
( U. S. Dept. of Labor) for Oct. 1919. 

Calkins, M. C. Colonization projects in 
Wisconsin. (Survey, Jan. 1, 1921; vol. 45, 
p. 480-485. illus.) 

Ely, R. T. Private and public colonization. 
(National Real Estate Journal, Mar. 12, 1923; 
vol. 24, no. 6, p. 46-49.) 

Faast, B. F. Rural planning and coloni- 
zation. Reprinted from National Real Estate 
Journal, Aug. 1918. 15 p. illus., plans. 

Paper before National Association of 
Real Estate Boards, St. Louis, June 1918. 

Farm Cities Corporation of America. [De- 
scriptive booklet.] 16 p. illus., plans. 

Contains plan of proposed farm city, 
Pender Co., N. C., by John Nolen. 

Harvard University, School of Landscape 
Architecture Library. Some references on 
land settlement. (Landscape Architecture, 
Jan. 1919; vol. 9, p. 110-112.) 

Howe, F. C. The land and the soldier. 
New York, C. Scribner's Sons, 1919. 196 p. 

MacRae, H. Vitalizing the nation and con- 
serving human units through the develop- 
ment of agricultural communities. Reprinted 
from National Industries and the Federal 
Government, vol. 63 of the Annals of the 
American Academy of Political and Social 
Science. Philadelphia, 1916. 9 p. (Publication 
no. 978.) 

Mawson, T. H., see 5349. 

Mead, E. How California is helping people 
own farms and rural homes. 28 p. illus. 
(University of California, College of Agricul- 
ture, Agricultural Experiment Station, Cir- 
cular no. 221, Aug. 1920.) 

Describes the Durham, Calif., Colony. 

Helping men own farms, a practical 

discussion of governmental aid in land settle- 
ment. New York, Macmillan Co., 1920. 
228 p. illus. 

The important American work on the 

subject. 

Summary of soldier settlements in 

English-speaking countries. Washington, 
Govt. Printing Office, 1918. 28 p. (U. S. 
Department of the Interior. Reclamation 
Service.) 



170 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

Lar>d Settlement (cont.) World's Work for Nov. 1918. The Recla- 

Soldier colonies. (Town Planning and mation Service also published other 

Conservation of Life. July-Sept. 1920; vol. 6, pamphlets on soldier settlements. 

p. 53-57. illus.) Waller, A. G. Conditions in New Zealand: 

U. S. Reclamation Service. Work and The land and settlement laws; Part III of 

homes for our fighting men. Washington, article, Town Planning in New Zealand. 

Govt. Printing Office, 1919. 24 p. (Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 

These proposals were described in the tects, Dec. 1918; vol. 6, p. 573-576. tables.) 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



171 



STATE PLANNING 



6500 Comey, A. C. A state plan for Mas- 
sachusetts. (City Plan, March 1915; vol. 1, 
no. 1, p. 5-8.) 

Includes reference to state survey ma- 
terial collected by W. H. Manning for 
Panama-Pacific Exposition, 1915. 

Woodruff, G. A state plan. Address de- 
livered at a dinner tendered by the Illinois 
Commercial Secretaries' Association to the 
members of the Illinois Legislature at Spring- 
field (111.) Mar. 30, 1921. 1 sheet. 



State Highways 

6610 U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. Re- 
port of a study of the California highway 
system by the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads 
to the California Highway Commission and 
Highway Engineer. 1920. 277 p. illus., 
maps, diagr. 

Outstanding features reviewed in Public 
Roads, Apr. 1921. "The California 
study is the most comprehensive study of 
results obtained through the develop- 
ment of a State highway system that has 
yet been undertaken." 

Eldridge, M. O., G. G. Clark, and A. L. 
Luedke. State highway management, con- 
trol and procedure. (Public Roads, Aug. 
1918-Feb. 1919; vol. 1, no. 4, p. 36-52, no. 
5, p. 24-48, no. 6-8, p. 44-48, no. 9, p. 59- 
64, no. 10, p. 29-102. diagr.) 

Hirst, A. R. Laying out, marking, and 
maintaining a state trunk highway system. 
(Public Roads, Jan. 1919; vol. 1, no. 9, p. 

27-32.) 

Experience of Wisconsin. 



State Forests 

6570 Crane, J. L. Reforestation progress 
in Pennsylvania. (American City, Oct. 1920; 
vol. 23, p. 403-406. illus., diagr.) 



McDonald, A. New York's forest problem. 
(New York Forestry, quarterly magazine of 
New York State Forestry Association, first 
quarter, 1923; vol. 9, no. 1, p. 3-8. illus.) 

Massachusetts Forestry Association. Why 
Massachusetts should have state forests. 
Boston, The Association, [1919]. 23 p. (Bul- 
letin no. 125.) 

See also earlier address by the Secretary, 

Mr. Reynolds. 

Reynolds, H. A. State forests for Massa- 
chusetts. (Landscape Architecture, Apr. 
1914; vol. 4, p. 107-116.) 

Address before the American Society of 

Landscape Architects. 



State Parks 

6680 Caparn, H. A. State parks. Special 
Supplement to National Municipal Review, 
Nov. 1921; vol. 10, p. 581-600. 

Connecticut State Park progress. (Park 
and Cemetery, July 1921; vol. 31, p. 137-139. 
illus.) 

Summary of fourth biennial report of 
Connecticut State Park Commission, 
George A. Parker, Secretary. 

Friends of Our Native Landscape. Pro- 
posed park areas in the state of Illinois, a 
report with recommendations. Chicago, 
Friends of Our Native Landscape, [1922]. 
120 p. illus. 

Preface by Jens Jensen. 

Lieber, R. Industrial importance of state 
parks. (Park and Cemetery, July 1921; 
vol. 31, p. 133-137. illus.) 

Address before National Park Confer- 
ence, Des Moines, by the State Director 
of Conservation of Indiana, especially 
known for its Turkey Run State Park. 

McFarland, J. H. State parks their size 
and character. (Parks and Recreation, May- 
June 1922; vol. 5, p. 471-473.) 

Address at National Conference on State 

Parks. 



172 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



New York State Association. Committee 
on State Park Plan. A state park plan for 
New York, with a proposal for the new park 
bond issue. Dec. 1922. 83 p. illus., plans. 

Pettis, C. R. New York state parks and 
reservations. Albany, State of New York 
Conservation Commission, 1919. 15 p. illus. 
(Recreation Circular 1.) 

Welch, W. A. State and national parks. 
(Parks and Recreation, Sept.-Oct. 1922; 
vol. 6, p. 18-21.) 



Address at Minneapolis convention, 
American Institute of Park Executives, 
by the Superintendent of the Palisades 
Interstate Park. 

A permanent National Conference on State 
Parks is being formed following the 3d Con- 
ference at Turkey Run State Park, Indiana, 
May 1923, and its file of Proceedings are in 
course of publication. A regular department 
including this subject appears in Parks and 
Recreation, bi-monthly. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



173 



NATIONAL PLANNING 

" The time has arrived in our national development when ve must have a de6nite national program in the 
development of our great engineering problems. Our rail and water transport, our water supplies for irriga- 
tion, our reclamation, the provision of future fuel resources, the development and distribution of electrical 
power, all cry out for some broad-visioned national guidance. We must create a national engineering sense 
of provision for the nation as a whole." Herbert Hoover. 



6600 Manning, W. H. A national plan 
study brief. Special supplement to Land- 
scape Architecture, July 1923. 24 p. maps. 
The most important publication on the 
subject, being a brief digest of an unpub- 
lished study, with typical survey maps 
selected from a large number assembled 
or prepared by the author. Contains a 
foreword by the late Franklin K. Lane, 
Secretary of the Interior. 



Abercrombie, P. The basis of reconstruc- 
tion; the need for a regional survey of na- 
tional resources. (Town Planning Review, 
Apr. 1918; vol. 7, p. 203-210.) 

Ackerman, F. L. American reconstruction 
problems: nation planning. (Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects, Nov. 1918; 
vol. 6, p. 506-509.) 

Address at the National Municipal 
League Conference, Rochester, Nov. 1918. 
Also in National Municipal Review, Jan. 
1919; vol.8, p. 15-25. 

Adams, T. Rural planning and develop- 
ment. See 6300. 

Hoover, Herbert. National policy on engi- 
neering problems. Presidential address before 
American Institute of Mining and Metallur- 
gical Engineers, Minneapolis, Aug. 1920. 
(Engineering News-Record, Sept. 16, 1920; 
vol. 85, p. 544-545.) 

Address from which the quotation at the 
head of the section was taken. 

Kehr, C. Nation plan a basis for coordi- 
nated national development, preliminary dis- 
cussion. Washington, 1920. 75 p. 



Contains also pamphlet reprinted from 
Journal of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, Jan. 1920, Nation Plans, by the 
same author. 

A national housing policy. II. A na- 
tional survey and garden cities. (Garden 
Cities and Town Planning, May 1921; vol. 11, 
p. 107-111.) 

One of a series of articles in this volume 
on housing in national terms. 

Swaelmen, L. van der. Le probleme rural 
et le probleme national. (In his Pr&iminaires 
d'art civique mis en relation avec le " cas 
clinique" de la Belgique, 1916, p. 89-138. 
illus.) 

Towards a national survey. (Housing, 
issued by the British Ministry of Health, 
Nov. 22, 1920-Apr. 1921; vol. 2, nos. 36-44.) 

A series of articles on the various regions 
into which the Kingdom was divided for 
purposes of the housing survey. 



Among the publications of the national 
bureaus of the United States there should be 
mentioned especially those of the Bureau of 
Public Roads, Bureau of Soils, Geological 
Survey, Coast and Geodetic Survey, Reclam- 
ation Service, Forest Service, National Park 
Service, Bureau of Mines, etc. The publica- 
tions of National Commissions such as the 
Federal Water Power Commission, National 
Waterways Commission, National Forest 
Reservation Commission (for protection of 
navigable streams), etc., should also be fol- 
lowed. 



174 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



National Highways 

6610 Bement, A. F. Lincoln Highway 
nears tenth birthday. (Good Roads, Mar. 21, 
1923; vol. 64, p. 107-109, 116.) 

An account of our leading national road 
by the vice-president of the Lincoln 
Highway Association. 

Drowne, H. B. Planning of roads and road 
systems. (In Blanchard, A. H., edL, American 
highway engineers' handbook, 1919, p. 331- 
362; with bibliography.) 

State and national roads. 

MacDonald, T. H. Our national highway 
problems. (Good Roads, Feb. 16, 1921; 
vol. 21, p. 97-99, 105-106.) 

Paper at annual convention of American 
Road Builders' Association, 1921. 

Mehren, E. J. A national highway policy 
and plan: a plea for the selection, construc- 
tion, and maintenance by the Federal Govern- 
ment of a National highway system that shall 
fully embrace the entire country. (American 
City, Town and County Edition, Jan. 1919; 
vol. 20, p. 1-5.) 

From an address before the Joint High- 
way Congress at Chicago, Dec. 11, 1918. 

Also in Engineering News-Record, Dec. 19, 
1918; vol. 81, p. 1112-1117. 

Organized highway routes of national and 
interstate importance. (In Highways Green 
Book, 1921, p. 420-423.) 

Shirley, H. G. The classification of high- 
ways: advantages of improved roads neces- 
sity for classification of country's highways. 
(Good Roads, Sept. 24, 1919; vol. 18, p. 149- 
151. illus.) 

A national scheme through cooperation 
of Federal Government, states, and coun- 
ties. From paper before North Carolina 
Good Roads Association, 1919, by the 
Secretary of the Federal Highway 
Council. 

Waugh, F. A. The public road our great 
national park. (House Beautiful, June 1920; 
vol. 47, p. 508-509, 528. illus.) 



Williams, S. M. National highway system 
and its relation to traffic and transportation. 
(In Proceedings of American Society for 
Municipal Improvements, 1919, p. 541-551; 
with discussion, p. 551-553.) 



Railroads and Waterways 

6620 Fawcett, C. B. Provinces of Eng- 
land. See 6100. 

Includes suggestions for national coordi- 
nation of railroads and of water-supply. 

Lay, C. D. The railroad problem See 
2450. 

U. S. National Waterways Commission. 
Final report. Washington, Govt. Printing 
Oflice, 1912. 579 p. tables. (62d Congress 
2d Session, Senate Document no. 469.) 

Appendix IX: A comparison of American 
and European waterways with special 
reference to the factors influencing the 
development of water transportation, by 
E. O. Merchant, p. 471-579. 

The articles on the inland waterways of 
New York State in the recent files of the bul- 
letin of the Merchants' Association of New 
York, Greater New York, should be noted. 

The Library of Congress Division of Bibli- 
ography prepared a list of references on inland 
waterways of the United States, Feb. 15, 
1918 (unpublished). 



CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

6640 The foundations of national pros- 
perity; studies in the conservation of perma- 
nent national resources, by R. T. Ely, R. H. 
Hess, C. K. Leith, and T. N. Carver. New 
York, Macmillan Co., 1917. 378 p. 

National Conservation Commission. Re- 
port, Feb. 1909, with accompanying papers. 
Ed. by Henry Gannett. Washington, Govt. 
Printing OflSce, 1909. 3 vols. (U. S. 60th 
Congress, 2d session. Senate Document 
no 676.) 

Van Hise, C. R. The conservation of na- 
tural resources in the United States. New 
York, Macmillan Co., 1922. 413 p. plates, 
maps. First impression, 1910. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



175 



Reclamation 

6660 Bissell, C. A. Progress in national 
land reclamation in the United States. From 
the Smithsonian Report for 1919, p. 497-522. 
Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 1921. 

Swanton, W. I. The U. S. Reclamation 
Service: progress of government irrigation 
projects in the West. (The Constructor, Nov. 
1922; N. s. vol. 4, no. 11, p. 15-17. illus., 
map.) 

Twenty years of reclamation June 17, 1902- 
June 17, 1922. (Reclamation Record, June, 
July 1922; vol. 13, p 127-137, 157-167. map, 
diagr.) 

Ako note in Engineering News-Record, 
Aug. 3, 1922, vol. 89, p. 172-173. 

U. S. Reclamation Service. Irrigation 
projects of the U. S. Reclamation Service. 
National Reclamation of Arid Lands. Revised 
to Nov 1, 1920. Washington, Govt. Printing 
Office, 1920. 40 p. illus. 

Weymouth, F. E. Twenty years work of the 
Reclamation Service. (Pacific Builder and 
Engineer, Jan. 26, 1923; vol. 29, no. 4, p. 12.) 



Power Supply 

6660 Federal water power projects up to 
Dec. 1921. Extract from annual report of 
Federal Water Power Commission. (Engi- 
neering News-Record, Jan. 5, 1920; vol. 88, 
p. 24-26.) 

Table of hydro-electric power plants 

under way. 

Great Britain. Ministry of Reconstruction. 

Coal Conservation Committee. Final report. 

London, H. M. Stationery Office, 1918. 89 p. 

maps. (Parliament Papers, Cd. 9084.) 

A report on national development of 
electric power supply. See also 2926. 



Water-Supply 

6665 National control of watersheds: 
possibility of state intervention: the annual 
meeting of the British Waterworks Associa- 
tion. (Municipal Journal, London, July 4, 
1919; vol. 28, p. 659-660.) 



National Forests 

6670 Boerker, R. H. D. Our national 
forests. A short popular account of the work 
of the United States Forest Service on the 
national forests. New York, Macmillan Co., 
1919. 238 p. illus., map. 

Carhart, A. H. Landscape architecture and 
the one hundred fifty-two national forests. 
(Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1921; vol. 11, 
p. 57-62. illus.) 

Greeley, W. B. Country planning and 
national forests. (National Municipal Re- 
view, Apr. 1921; vol. 10, p. 211-215.) 

Pinchot, G. The economic significance of 
forestry. (North American Review, Feb. 
1921; vol. 213, p. 157-167.) 
A national policy. 

U. S. Forest Service. [Annual reports and 
special circulars relating to individual forests.] 

Waugh, F. A. Landscape engineering in the 
national forests. Washington, Govt. Printing 
Office, 1918. 38 p. maps, diagr. (U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service.) 

Recreation uses on the national forests. 

Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 1918. 
43 p. illus. (U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Forest Service.) 

Zon, R. Forests and water in the light of 
scientific investigation. (In Final report of 
U. S. National Waterways Commission, 1912, 
p. 203-302.) 

Contains extensive bibliography. 



National Parks 

6680 Champion, G. The Dominion parks : 
what Canada is doing for the benefit and en- 
joyment of her people. (Parks and Recrea- 
tion, July 1921; vol. 4, p. 280-289. illus.) 

McFarland, J. H. Parks and the public. 

(Parks and Recreation, Sept.-Oct. 1922; 

vol. 6, p. 12-14.) 

From paper read before American Civic 
Association. Municipal, State and Na- 
tional parks correlated into an ideal 
system. 



176 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



National Parks (cont.) 

Mather, S. T. Progress in the develop- 
ment of the national parks. Washington, 
Govt. Printing Office, 1916. 39 p. map. 

(Department of the Interior, Office of the 
Secretary.) 

Mische, E. T. National park attitude 
needs defining and national planning sug- 
gested. (Parks and Recreation, Jan.-Feb. 
1922; vol. 5, p. 207-208.) 

Accompanied by series of statements pre- 
senting all phases of the controversy over 
commercial utilization of the natural re- 
sources within park areas. 

Muir, John. Our national parks. Boston, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1901. 382 p. illus., 
map. 

The standard early work on the appre- 
ciation of the parks. 

National Park Conference. Proceedings, 
1911-1917. Published by the U. S. Dept. of 
the Interior. Washington, Govt. Printing 
Office, 1912-1917. 4 vols. 

Meetings held in 1911, 1912, 1915, and 
1917. See also Resolutions at Des Moines 
below. 



Our national parks: a conference. Ad- 
dresses and letters presented at meeting of 
American Society of Landscape Architects, 
Boston, Feb. 1916. (Landscape Architecture, 
Apr. 1916; vol 6, p. 101-123. illus., map.) 
Contains statement by F. L. Olmsted on 
the distinction between national parks 
and national forests. 

Punchard, C. P. " Hands off the national 
parks." (Landscape Architecture, Jan. 1921; 
vol. 11, p. 53-57.) 

Turner, A. M. First principles [initial 
article] Department of National, State, and 
Provincial parks]. (Parks and Recreation, 
Jan.-Feb. 1922; vol. 5, p. 291-295.) 
A regular feature of the magazine. 

[Resolutions at the] National Parks Con- 
ference, Des Moines, Jan. 1921. (National 
Municipal Review, Mar. 1921; vol. 10, p. 200- 
201.) 

Yard, R. S. The book of the national 
parks. New York, C. Scribner's Sons, 1919. 
420 p. illus., maps. 

By the Secretary of the National Parks 

Association. 



SUBJECT INDEX TO BIBLIOGRAPHY 

References are to classification numbers, which will be found in sequential order, following the outline 
in Pray and Kimball, City Planning; a Comprehensive Analysis. 



Acre, Number of houses to, see Zoning, 
1600; Density of development, Resi- 
dental, 1677. 

"Adickes, Lex," see Replotting, 728. 

Administration, 1500 ff. 

Administrative agencies, Legislation cre- 
ating, 714. 

Administrative centers, 1627. 

Administrative surveys, 824. See also 
Municipal government. 

Advertising, Outdoor, see Billboards, 3880. 

Advertising columns, etc., see Street fur- 
niture, 2290. 

Advisers, City planning, see City planning 
Practitioners, 875. 

Aerial surveys, 839. 

Aerial transportation terminals, 2795. 

Agricultural colonies, see Rural planning, 
6300 ff. 

Agricultural districts and belts, see Dis- 
tricts, Agricultural, 1715; Garden cities, 
5350. 

Air, in cities, 1447. 

Airplanes, see Aerial surveys; Aviation. 

Alleys, 2242. 

Allotment gardens, see Districts, Agricul- 
tural, 1715; Garden cities, 5350. 

Ancient history of city planning, 215. 

Apartment houses, 3641. See also Housing; 
Zoning. 

Approaches, see City entrances, 1745. 

Appropriations, Municipal, for city plan- 
ning, 1595. See also p. 51 f. 

Arcades, 2161. 

Arches, Monumental, 3830. 

Architects, in city planning, 875. 

Art, Civic, see City Planning Esthetic 
considerations, 1235 ff.; Street furniture, 
2290 ff.; Public buildings, 3563; Civic 
centers, 3700; Decorative structures, 
Civic, 3820 ff.; Parks, 4000 ff. ; Planting, 
4800 ff.; etc. 



Art commissions, 1538. 

Assessment, 1580. 

Athletic fields, see Playgrounds, 4300 ff. 

Automobile camping grounds, see Camps, 
Tourist, 4460. 

Automobile service stations, 3685. 

Automobiles, see Motor transportation as 
affecting street plans, 2058; Street traffic, 
2076; Parking, 2076.4; Park roads, 2212. 

Avenues, see Streets, 2050 ff. 

Aviation, effect on city appearance, 1246. 

Aviation landing fields, 2795. 



B 

Bandstands, 4137. 

Bathing beaches, see Waterfronts, Recre- 
ational, 4370 ff. 
Baths, Public, 3580. 
Beauty, in cities, see City planning 

Esthetic considerations, 1235 ff. 
Belt line railroads, see Railroads, 2450 ff. 
Belts, Agricultural or Forest, see Districts, 

Agricultural, 1715; Forests, Municipal, 

4160. 

Benefit assessments, see Assessment, 1580. 
Bibliography, 0. 
Billboards, 3880. 
Biography of city planners, 205. 
Block, Houses in, see Houses, Row, 3639. 
Block interiors, 3089. 
Blocks and lots, 3000 ff. See also Housing; 

Land subdivision; Platting; Zoning. 
Bond issues, see City planning Financial 

considerations, 1570 ff. 
Botanical gardens, 4265. 
Boulevards, 2205. 
Boundaries, Lot, 3304. 
Boundary areas of city, 1745. See also 

Regional planning, 6100. 
Bridges, 3740. 
Bridle paths, 2213. 
Building groups, 3700 ff . 



178 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Building laws, 3460. See also Buildings 
Height; Housing; Setbacks; Zoning. 

Building lines, see Setbacks, 2073. 

Building restrictions, see Setbacks, 2073; 
Restrictions, Real property, 3020; Build- 
ing laws, 3460. 

Buildings, in cities, 3440 ff . 

Esthetic aspects, 3455. 

Form, 3475. 

Height, 3480. 

Legislation, see Building laws, 3460. 

Orientation, 3470. 

Plant decoration, 4910. 

Relation to lot area, see Form, 3475; 
Zoning, 1600. 

Relation to streets, see Setbacks, 2073. 
Buildings, in parks, see Public buildings, 

3563; Parks Buildings, 4055. 

Buildings, Commercial, 3600. 

Buildings, Industrial, 3595. 

Buildings, Public, 3563. 

Buildings, Recreation, see Recreation cen- 
ters, 3575; Parks Buildings, 4055. 

Burned districts, 1617. 

Business buildings, 3600. 

Business districts, 1630 f . 

Business squares, 2233. 

Business streets (local), 2230. 

Busses, see Motor busses, 2358. 



Campaigns, Publicity, for city planning, 
540 ff. 

Camps, Labor, 5323. 

Camps, Military, 5311. 

Camps, Tourist, 4460. 

Canals, 2580. 

Cantonments, 5311. 

Capital cities, 5305. 

Car tracks, see Street-railroads, 2350 ff. 

Cemeteries, 4480. 

Central heating, see Heating Central 
station systems, 2902. 

Chambers of commerce, promoting city 
planning, 515. 

Changes in character of districts, see Dis- 
tricts, Blighted, 1613. 

Charges, Professional, see City planning 
Practitioners, 878. 

Churches, 3590. 



Cities Growth, 1424. 

- Types, 5200 ff . 
Cities, Ancient, 215. 
Cities, Capital, 5305. 
Cities, Future, 1290. 
Cities, Garden, 5350. 
Cities, Ideal, 5550. 
Cities, Industrial, 5320. See also Districts, 

Industrial; Districts, Residential, Low 

cost; Housing, Industrial. 
Cities, Large, 5620. 
Cities, Mediaeval, 225. 
Cities, Mining, 5322. 

Cities, New, see Decentralization, Residen- 
tial and industrial, 1426; Garden cities, 

5350; Cities, Ideal, 5550. 
Cities, Satellite, see Decentralization, 1426. 
Cities, Small, 5610. See also Villages. 
City boundaries, 1745. 
City entrances, 1745. See also Railroads; 

Waterfronts. 

City forestry, see Planting, in cities, 4800 ff. 
City gates, see City planning History, 

210 ff. 

City halls, see Public buildings, 3563 ff. 
City managers, see Municipal government, 

1520. 
City planning (general), 250. 

Addresses, lectures, etc., 265 f . ; 540 ff. 

Administration, 1500 ff. 

Bibliography, 0. 

Biography, 205. 

Charges, see Practitioners, 878. 

Classification, 254. 

Commissions, 1535; Legislation cre- 
ating, 714. 

Composition of plan, 1200 ff . 

Congresses, Conferences, 40. 

Construction and maintenance, see 
Municipal engineering, 860. 

Consultants, see Practitioners, 875. 

Cost of plans, 859. See also City 
planning Financial considerations. 

Data, 1300. See also Surveys. 

Definition, 310. 

Economic considerations, 1225; 1550ff. 

Educational campaigns, 540. 

Encyclopedias, 190. 

Essays, see Addresses, etc., 265 f.; 
540 ff. 

Esthetic considerations, 1235 ff. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



179 



City planning Ethical considerations, 1210. 

Examinations (professional), see 
Practitioners, Examinations, 879. 

Exhibitions, 40 ff. 

Experts, see Practitioners, 875. 

Financial considerations, 1570. 

Future considerations, 1290. See also 
City planning Social considerations; 
Decentralization, Residential and in- 
dustrial. 

Governmental control, 1521 ff. 

Historic considerations, 1270 ff. 
- History, 210 ff . 

Hygenic considerations, see Public 
health, 1445 ff. 

In the United States, see p. 24 f., p. 
43 ff. 

In foreign countries, see p. 26 ff. 

Lectures, 265; 540 ff. 

Legislation, 700 ff. See also Building 
laws; Eminent domain; Excess con- 
demnation; Parks Legislation; 
Platting Legislation ; Setbacks ; 
Streets Legislation ; Zonin g Leg- 
islation. 

Name, 300. 

Periodicals, 2 ff . See also p. 20 ff. 

Physical considerations, 1320. 

Practitioners, 322; 875 ff. 

Programs for execution, 858. 

Publicity, 540 ff . 

Replanning, 1200 ff.; 1613. See also 
Reconstruction, after war. 

Reports, 852. 

Representation of city plans, 850 ff. 

Social considerations, 1210. 

Societies, 21 ff. See also p. 17 ff. 

State bureaus, 1523. 

Study and teaching, 900 ff . See also 
p. 47 ff. 

Study tours, 947. 

Technical procedure, 800 ff . 

Types of plans, 5200 ff. 
City planning movement, 500 ff . 

City surveys, see Surveys, Civic, 815;1300. 

City walls, see City planning History, 
210 ff. 

Civic art, see Cross-references under Art, 
Civic. 

Civic centers, 1627; 3700 ff. See also Pub- 
lic buildings. 



Civic design, see City planning Compo- 
sition of plan, 1200 ff. 

Civic improvement, see City planning 
movement, 500 ff. 

Civic surveys, 815; 1300 ff. 

Classification of city planning, 254. 

Climate, 1330 ff . 

Clock monuments, 3855. 

Colleges, see City planning Study and 
teaching, 900 ff.; Universities, relation 
to city plan, 3722. 

Colonnades, Street, see Arcades, 2161. 

Color, in cities, 1256. 

Columns, Monumental, 3830. 

Comfort stations, see Public comfort sta- 
tions, 3677. 

Commercial buildings, 3600. 

Commercial districts, see Districts, Busi- 
ness, 1630. 

Commercial waterfronts, 2550 ff. 

Commissions, see City planning Com- 
missions, 714; 1535; Art commissions, 
1538. 

Commons, 4250. 

Community centers, 1627. See also Recre- 
ation centers. 

Competitions, 880. 

Composition of city plans, 1200 ff. 

Condemnation proceedings, see Eminent 
domain, 722. 

Conduits, see Subsurface utilities, 2850 ff. 

Conferences on city planning, 40. See also 
City planning Societies. 

Congestion of population, 1425. 

Congestion of traffic, see Street traffic, 2076. 

Conservation of natural resources, 6640. 

Construction, Municipal, see Municipal en- 
gineering, 860. 

Consultants on city planning, see City 
planning Practitioners, 875. 

Convenience stations, see Public comfort 
stations, 3677. 

Cooperation of practitioners, see City plan- 
ning Practitioners, 875. 

Cooperative or co-partnership housing, 
1434. 

Cost and standard of living, 1428. 

Cost of city plans, 859; 1595. See also 
p. 51 f . 

Cottages, see Houses, Low-cost, 3633. 



180 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Country planning, see Rural planning, 
6300; National planning, 6600. 

County planning, see Regional planning, 
6100. 

Courses, Professional, in city planning, see 
City planning Study and teaching, 
900 ff. 

Court decisions, on city planning and zon- 
ing, see City planning Legislation, 
700 ff. 

Courts, see Squares, Residential, 2233; 
Block interiors, 3089; Buildings Form, 
3475. 

Crossings, see Streets Crossings, 2128; 
Railroads Crossings, 2510. 



D 

Data for city planning, 1300 ff. See also 
Surveys, Civic. 

Decentralization, Residential and indus- 
trial , 1 426 . See also Districts , Industrial ; 
Garden cities. 

Decorative structures, Civic, 3830 ff. 

Defensive works in city plans, see City 
planning History, 210 ff . 

Density of development, Residential, 1677. 

Design in city planning, see City planning 
-Technical procedure, 800 ff.; City 
planning Composition of plan, 1200. 

Destroyed cities (by war), see Reconstruc- 
tion, after war, 1293. 

Districting, see Zoning, 765; 1600. 

Districts, Agricultural, 1715. 

Districts, Blighted, 1613. 

Districts, Business, 1630. See also Build- 
ings Height; Street traffic. 

Districts, Industrial, 1650. See also Cities, 
Industrial; Garden cities; Surveys, 
Industrial. 

Districts, Metropolitan, 1525. 

Districts, Racial, 1619. 

Districts, Residential, 1675 ff. See also 
Land subdivision. 

Districts, Residential, Suburban, 1685. 

Districts, Shopping, see Districts, Business, 
1630; Shopping centers, 1631. 

Districts, Tenement, 1703. 

Docks, see Waterfronts, Commercial, 2550ff. 

Drainage, see Public health, 1452; Sub- 
surface utilities, 2880 ff. 



Driveways, across sidewalks, 2253. 
Dust prevention, 1450. See also Pave- 
ments. 

E 

Economic considerations in city planning, 

1225; 1550 ff. 
Economic surveys, 826. 
Educational buildings, see Schools, Public, 

3570; Universities, 3722. 
Educational campaigns for city planning, 

see City planning Publicity, 540. 
Electric power supply, 2926; 6660. 
Electric service distribution, 2915. 
Electric wires, 2915. 
Electrification of railroads, 2457. 
Elements of city plans, 2000 ff . 
Elevated railroads, see Rapid transit, 

2350 ff. 

Eminent domain, 722 ff. 
Encroachments on streets, 2159. 
Encyclopedias, 190. 
Engineering, Municipal, 860. 
Engineers, in city planning, 875. 
Entrances, City, 1745. 
Essays (brief statements) on city planning, 

270. 
Estate development, see Land subdivision, 

3380. 
Esthetic considerations in city planning, 

1235 ff. 
Examinations in city planning see City 

planning Practitioners, 879. 
Excess condemnation, 724. 
Exhibitions of city planning, 40 ff . ; 540 ff . 
Experts, City planning, see City planning 

Practitioners, 875. 
Expositions, 3724. 

Expropriation, see Eminent domain, 722. 
"Extension work" in civic improvement, 

546. 
Extensions of cities, see Platting, 1800. 



Fair grounds, 4295. 

Federal bureaus for promoting city plan- 
ning, 1522. 

Finance, City planning, see City planning 
Financial considerations, 1570 ff. 

Fire prevention, 1478. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



181 



Fire stations, see Public buildings, 3563 ff. 
Fires, Replanning after, 1617. 
Flagstaffs, 3857. 

Flats, see Houses, Apartment, 3641. 
Flood protection, 1454. 
Food supply and distribution, 1443. 
Footways, 2250 ff. See also Arcades. 
Forests, Municipal, 4160. 
Forests, National, 6670. 
Forests, State, 6570. 
Fountains, Civic, 3845. 
Free ports, 2729. 
Freight terminals, 2495. 
Furniture, Street and park, see Street fur- 
niture, 2290 ff.; Park furniture, 4055. 
Future of cities, 1290. 

G 

Galleries, Pipe, see Subsurface utilities, 

2850 ff . 

Galleries, Street, see Arcades, 2161. 
Garages, Public, location, see Zoning, 765; 

1600. 
Garbage disposal, see Waste disposal, 

1460 ff . 

Garden cities, 5350. 
Garden squares, 4250. 
Garden suburbs, see Districts, Residential, 

Suburban, 1685; Garden cities, 5350. 
Garden villages, see Garden cities, 5350; 

Villages, 5605. 
Gardens, in cities, 4900 ff. 
Gardens, Allotment, see Districts, Agri- 
cultural, 1715; Garden cities, 5350. 
Gardens, Botanical, 4265. 
Gardens, School, 4907. 
Gardens, Vacant-lot, 4905. 
Gardens, Zoological, 4270. 
Gas distribution, see Subsurface utilities, 

2850 ff . 
Gasoline stations, see Automobile service 

stations, 3485. 
Gates, City, see City planning History, 

210 ff. 

Golf courses, Municipal, 4369. 
Governmental control of city planning, 

1521 ff. 

Governmental housing, 1431. 
Grade crossings, see Railroads Crossings, 

2510. 



H 

Harbor development, see Waterfronts, 

Commercial, 2550 ff. 
Health, Public, 1445 ff. 
Health resorts, 5333. 
Health surveys, 822. 

Heating Central station systems, 2902. 
Height of buildings, 3480. 
Highways, National, 6610. 
Highways, State, 6510. 
Hills, in cities, 1356. 
Hillside development, 3065. See also 

Steep gradients. 
Historic considerations in city planning, 

1270 ff. See also Reconstruction, after 

war. 

History of city planning, 210 ff. 
Home ownership, 1434.9. 
Hospitals, 3585. 
Houses, number to acre, see Zoning, 1600; 

Density of development, Residential, 

1677. 

Types, 3633 ff. See also Housing; 
Zoning. 

Houses, Apartment, 3641. < 

Houses, Low cost (including detached 

houses), 3633. 
Houses, Row, 3639. 
Houses, Tenement, 3644. 
Housing, 1430 ff. See also Houses. 

Technical procedure, 870. 
Housing, Cooperative, 1434. 

Housing, Co-partnership, see Housing, Co- 
operative, 1434. 

Housing, Employers', 1433. 

Housing, Governmental, 1431. 

Housing, Industrial, see Housing, 1430; 
Districts, Residential, Low cost, 1697; 
Cities, Industrial, 5320. 

Housing, Municipal, 1432. 

Housing surveys, 822. 

Hygienic considerations in city planning, 
see Public health, 1445 ff. 



Ideal cities, 5550. 

Improvement, Civic, see City planning 

movement, 500 ff . 
Individuality of cities, 1274. 
Industrial cities, 5320. 



182 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Industrial conditions, 1437 f. 

Industrial decentralization, see Decentrali- 
zation, Residential and industrial, 1426; 
Districts, Industrial, 1650. 

Industrial districts, 1650. 

Industrial housing, see Housing, 1430; etc. 

Industrial surveys, 826; 1559. 

Industrial terminals, see Districts, In- 
dustrial, 1650; Railroads Terminals, 
2450 ff . 

Industrial villages, see Districts, Residen- 
tial, Low-cost, 1697; Cities, Industrial, 
5320. 

Inland waterways, 2580; 6620. 

Interurban street-railroads, see Street- 
railroads, 2350 ff. 

Isles of safety, 2128. See also Street fur- 
niture. 



Jitneys, see Motor busses, 2358. 



Labor camps, 5323. 
Labor turnover, 1437. 
Land Condemnation, see Eminent do- 
main, 722. 

Redistribution, see Replotting, 728. 

Use, 1563. See also Zoning. 
Land, Rural, see Rural planning, 6300 ff . 
Land, Urban, 1563 ff . 

Land restrictions, see Restrictions, Real 
property, 3020. 

Land settlement, 6400. 

Land subdivision, 3000 ff . See also Plat- 
ting. 

Land values, 1563 ff. 

Landscape architects, in city planning, 875. 

Landscape improvement, see Billboards, 
3880; Public open spaces, 4000 ff.; Plant- 
ing, in cities, 4800 ff.; Rural planning, 
6300. 

Landscape parks and reservations, 4100 ff . 

Lantern slides, see City planning Pub- 
licity, 540 ff.; and p. 38 f. 

Law of city planning, see City planning 
Legislation, 700 ff. 

Laws, relating to city planning, see City 
planning Legislation, 700 ff. 

Lawyers, in city planning, 875. 



Lectures on city planning, see City plan- 
ning Addresses, lectures, etc., 270; 
City planning Publicity, 540 ff . 

Legal surveys, 824; 1505. 

Legislation, 700 ff. See also subhead legis- 
lation under Streets, Parks, etc. 

Levees, see Flood protection, 1454. 

Light, in cities, see Buildings Orienta- 
tion, 3470. 

Lighting, see Street lighting, 2310. 

Living, Cost and standard of, 1428. 

Living conditions, see Housing, 1430 ff. 

Lot boundaries, 3304. 

Lot planting, see Yard improvement, 
4900 ff . 

Lots, see Blocks and lots, 3000 ff. 



M 

Manufacturing districts, see Districts, In- 
dustrial, 1650. 

Maps, Aerial, 839. 

Maps, City (official), see Platting Legis- 
lation, 770. 

Maps, Data, 834. 

Maps, Relief, 836. 

Maps, Topographical, 820. 

Market squares, 2234. 

Markets, 1443. 

Mediaeval history of city planning, 225. 

Memorials, see War memorials, 1292; Mon- 
uments, Civic, 3830. 

Metropolitan districts, 1525. See also Re- 
gional planning. 

Military camps, 5311. 

Military considerations in city planning, 
see City planning History, 210 ff. 

Mining cities, 5322. 

Model cities, see Garden cities, 5350; Cities, 
Ideal, 5550. 

Models (of cities or city plans), 836. 

Monumental squares, 3700. 

Monuments, Civic, 3830. 

Monuments, Historic Preservation, 1276 

Mosquito prevention, 1452. 

Motor busses, 2358. 

Motor traffic, see Street traffic, 2076. 

Motor transportation as affecting street 
plans, 2058. 

Motor vehicles, see Street traffic, 2076. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



183 



Moving of cities, see Reconstruction, after 
war, 1293. 

Moving pictures (in publicity campaigns), 
543. 

Municipal administration, 1520. 

Municipal art, see Cross-references under 
Art, Civic. 

Municipal engineering, 860. See also 
Bridges; Sewerage; Streets; Water- 
supply; etc. 

Municipal engineers, in city planning, 875. 

Municipal finance, 1570 ff. 

Municipal forests, 4160. 

Municipal government, 1520. 

Municipal housing, 1432. 

N 

Names, Place, 1279. 

Names, Street, 2056. 

National bureaus for promoting city plan- 
ning, 1522. 

National forests, 6670. 

National highways, 6610. 

National parks, 6680. 

National planning, 6600 ff. 

National roads, see National highways, 
6610. 

Natural resources, see Surveys, Civic, 
1300 ff ; National planning, 6600 ff. 

Neighborhood centers, see Community 
centers, 1627; Recreation centers, 3575; 
4318. 

Neighborhood parks, 4250. 

New cities, see Decentralization, 1426; Gar- 
den cities, 5350; Cities, Ideal, 5550. 

New districts, see Platting, 1800; Districts, 
Residential, Suburban, 1685; Regional 
planning, 6100. 

Noise prevention, 1451. 

Nuisances, 1449 ff. 



Open spaces, Public, 4000 ff. See also 

Parks, National; Parks, State. 
Organizations promoting city planning, see 

City planning movement, 500 ff.; and 

p. 17 ff. 
Orientation, of streets, buildings, etc., see 

Buildings Orientation, 3470. 



Outdoor recreation areas, see Public open 

spaces, 4000 ff. 
Overhead wires Removal, 2922. 



Park furniture, 4055. 

Park systems, 4040. 

Parking of automobiles, 2076.4. 

Parking of streets, see Streets Parking, 

2116; Parkways, 2205; Streets - 

Planting, 4875 ff. 
Parks, 4000 ff. See also Parks, National; 

Parks, State. 

Administration, 4052. 

Buildings, 4055. 

Concessions, 4057. 

Construction and maintenance, 4058. 

Design, 4127. 

Effect on land values, 4016. 

Encroachments, see Public buildings, 
3563. 

Finance, see City planning Finan- 
cial considerations, 1570 ff. 

Legislation, 4050. 

Periodicals, see p. 20 ff . 

Societies, see p. 17 ff. 

Parks, in block interiors, see Block in- 
teriors, 3089. 

Parks, County, see Park systems, 4040; 
Regional planning, 6100. 

Parks, Landscape, 4100 ff. 

Parks, Memorial, see War memorials, 1293. 

Parks, Metropolitan, see Park systems, 
4040; Regional planning, 6100. 

Parks, Municipal, see Parks, 4000 ff. 

Parks, National, 6680. 

Parks, Neighborhood, 4250. See also 
Recreation centers. 

Parks, Small, see Parks, Neighborhood, 
4250. 

Parks, State, 6580. 

Parks, Water, see Waterfronts, Recrea- 
ational, 4370 ff. 

Parkways, 2205. See also Parks. 

Pavements, 2120. 

Periodicals on city planning, 2 ff. See also 
p. 20 ff. 

Photographic maps, Aerial, 839. 

Piers, Recreation, see Waterfronts, Recre- 
ational, 4370 ff. 



184 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Piers, Waterfront, see Waterfronts, Com- 
mercial, 2550 ff. 

Pipes and pipe subways, see Subsurface 
utilities, 2850 ff . 

Place names, 1279. 

"Places," see Streets, Residential, 2238. 

Plans, City, see City planning. 

Planting, in cities, 4800 ff. See also Parks. 

Platting, 1800. See also Land subdivision. 

Legislation, 770. 
Playgrounds, 4300 ff. 

Equipment, 4315. 

Playgrounds, in block interiors, see Block 

interiors, 3089. 
Playgrounds, School, 4319. 
Plazas, see Squares, 4400 ff . 
Pole lines, see Street-railroads, 2350 ff; 

Wires, 2850 ff . 

Pools, Public swimming, 4347. 
Population, 1400 ff. 

Ports, see Waterfronts, Commercial, 2550 ff . 
Ports, Free, 2729. 

Power supply, Electric, 2926; 6660. 
Practice, Professional, of city planning, 

see City planning Practitioners, 800 ff. 
Preservation of historic features in cities, 

see City planning Historic considera- 
tions, 1270 ff. 
Preservation of scenery, see Parks and 

reservations, 4000ff.; Parks, State, 6580; 

Parks, National, 6680. 
Professions engaged in city planning, see 

City planning Practitioners, 875. 
Promenades, see Boulevards, 2205; Squares, 

Garden, 4250; Waterfronts, Recrea- 
tional, 4370. 
Property, Private, regulation, see Zoning, 

765; 1600. 

Property, Public, acquisition, 722 ff. 
Property restrictions, see Restrictions, Real 

property, 3020. 
Public baths, 3580. 
Public buildings, 3563. See also Civic 

centers. 

Public comfort stations, 3677. 
Public health, 1445 ff. 
Public open spaces, 4000 ff . 
Public recreation, 1495. 
Public reservations, 4000 ff. 
Public safety, 1445 ff . 



Public schools, 3570. 

Teaching of city planning in, 548. 
Public utility corporations, 1541. 

Public utility societies (for housing), see 

Housing, Cooperative, 1434. 
Public works, see Elements of city plans, 

2000 ff. 
Publicity campaigns, 540 ff . 

R 

Racial districts, 1619. 
Railroads, 2450 ff . See also National plan- 
ning. 

Crossings, including grade separation, 
2510. 

Electrification, 2457. 

Grounds, including planting, 2460; 
2487. 

Station squares, 2486. 

Stations, 2480 ff. 

Terminals, 2450 ff . 

Railroads, Elevated, see Rapid transit, 

2350 ff . 

Railroads, Street, see Rapid transit, 2350 ff. 
Rain and rainfall, 1334. 
Rapid transit, 2350 ff . 
Real property, 1563 ff. 

Restrictions, 3020. 
Realtors, in city planning, 875. 
Reclamation of land, National, 6650. 
Reconstructipn, after war, 1293. 
Recreation, Public, 1495. See also Parks; 

Playgrounds; Recreation centers; Water 
fronts, Recreational. 

Recreation centers, 3575; 4318. 

Recreation surveys, 822. 

Recreational waterfronts, 4370 ff. 

Redistribution of land, see Replotting, 728. 

Refuse disposal, see Waste disposal, 1460 ff. 

Regional planning, 6100. See also Metro- 
politan districts; Rural planning. 

Regional planning agencies, 1524. 

Regional surveys, see Surveys, Civic, 815; 
1300; Regional planning, 6100. 

Relief models, 836. 

Relocation of cities, see Reconstruction, 
after war, 1293. 

Replanning, see Replotting, 728; Recon- 
struction, after war, 1293; City planning 

Replanning, 1200 ff.; 1613. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



185 



Replotting, 728. 

Reports, City planning, 852. 

Representation of city plans, 850 ff. 

Reservations, Public, 4000 ff. 

Reservoirs, 4168. 

Residential blocks and lots, 3380 ff. 

Residential cities, see Garden cities, 5350; 
etc. 

Residential decentralization, see Decentrali- 
zation, Residential and industrial, 1426; 
Districts, Residential, 1675 ff. 

Residential districts, 1675 ff. 

Residential squares, 2238. 

Residential streets, 2235. 

Resorts, Health, 5333. 

Restrictions, Real property, 3020. See also 
Building laws; Zoning. 

Rivers, see Waterfronts, Commercial, 2580; 
Waterfronts, Recreational, 4370 ff. 

Road signs, 2292.5. See also Street name- 
plates. 

Roads, see Streets, 2050 ff. 

Roads, National, 6610. 

Roads, State, 6510. 

Roadside planting, see Streets Planting, 
4875 ff . 

Rubbish disposal, see Waste disposal, 
1460 ff. 

Rural planning, 6300 ff . 

S 

Safety, Public, 1445. 
Safety isles and zones, 2128. See also 

Street furniture; Street traffic. 
Sanitary surveys, 822. 
Sanitation, see Public health, 1445 ff. 
Satellite towns, see Decentralization, Resi- 
dential and industrial, 1426. 
Scenic reservations, see Landscape parks 

and reservations, 4100; Parks, National, 

6680. 

School gardens, 4907. 
School playgrounds, 4319. 
Schools, Professional, of city planning, see 

City planning Study and teaching, 

900 ff. 
Schools, Public, study and teaching of city 

planning in, 548. 

Buildings, 3570. 

Grounds, see Playgrounds, School, 
4319. 



Seashore reservations, see Waterfronts, 

Recreational, 4370 ff. 
Service stations, Automobile, 3685. 
Setbacks, 2073. 
Sewage treatment, see Waste disposal, 

1460 ff.; Sewerage, 2890. 
Sewerage, 2890. See also Public health. 
Shopping centers, 1631. 
Shops, 3600. 
Shore parks, see Waterfronts, Recreational, 

4370 ff . 
Sidewalks, 2252. 

Encroachments, see Streets En- 
croachments, 2159. 

Signs, Advertising, see Billboards, 3880. 
Signs, Roads, 2292.5. 
Single tax, 1568. 
Site-planning, see Districts, Residential, 

1675 ff.; Land subdivision, 3380 ff. 
Skylines, City, see City planning Es- 
thetic considerations, 1235ff.; Buildings, 

in cities, 3455. 
Skyscrapers, 3489. 
Slums, 1704. See also Tenement-houses; 

Zone condemnation. 
Small cities, 5610. 
Smoke prevention, 1449. 
Snow and snowfall, see Climate, 1330 ff. 
Snow removal, see Waste disposal, 1460 ff. 
Social centers, see Community centers, 

1627; Recreation centers, 4318. 
Social considerations in city planning, 1210; 

1400 ff . 

Social surveys, 822; 1400 ff. 
Societies, City planning, 21 ff. See also 

p. 17 ff. 

Soil surveys, 1320. 

Specialists in city planning, see City plan- 
ning Practitioners, 875. 
Sports, Areas for, see Playgrounds, 4300 ff. 
Squares (general), 4255. 
Squares, Business, 2233. 
Squares, Garden, 4250. 
Squares, Market, 2234. 
Squares, Monumental, 3700. 
Squares, Residential, 2238. 
Squares, Station, 2486. 
Squares, Traffic, 2197. See also Street 

traffic; Streets Intersection. 
Stadiums, 4360. 



186 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



Standard of living, see Cost and standard 
of living, 1428. 

State bureaus of city planning, 1523. 

State forests, 6570. 

State highways, 6510. 

State housing, see Housing, Governmental, 
1431. 

State parks, 6580. 

State planning, 6500 ff. 

State roads, see State highways, 6510. 

Stations, Railroad, 2480 ff. 

Statistics, of cities, 1400. 

Statuary, Civic, 3840. See also Art com- 
missions. 

Steep gradients, 2103. See also Hillside de- 
velopment. 

Steps, 2256. 

Street cleaning, see Waste disposal, 1460 ff. 

Street decoration for festivals, etc., 2320. 

Street furniture, 2290 ff . See also Decora- 
tive structures, Civic; Park furniture. 

Street lighting, 2310. 

Street nameplates, 2292. 

Street names, 2056. 

Street railroads, see Rapid transit, 2350 ff. 

Street systems, see Platting, 1800; Streets, 
2050 ff . 

Street traffic, 2076. 

Street traffic censuses, 2076.1. 

Street traffic regulation, 2076.3. See also 
Safety isles and zones. 

Street trees, 4885. 

Streets, 2050 ff. 

Cross-section, width, etc., 2105. 

Crossings, 2128 f . 

Design, 2080 ff. 

Encroachments, 2159. 

Gradient, 2100 f . 

Intersection, 2135. See also Street 
traffic. 

Legislation, 2070. See also Eminent 
domain. 

Names, 2056. 

Numbering, 2056.5. 

Orientation, see Buildings Orien- 
tation, 3470. 

Parking, 2116. See also Parkways; 
Streets Planting. 

Planting, 4875 ff . 



Streets Widening, 2070. See also Emi- 
nent domain. 

Width, 2105. 

Streets, Business (local), 2230. 

Streets, Covered, see Arcades, 2161. 

Streets, Hillside 2103. See also Hillside de- 
velopment. 

Streets, Major, see Streets, Traffic, 2170. 

Streets, Residential, 2235. 

Streets, Steep, see Steep gradients, 2103; 
Hillside development, 3065. 

Streets, Traffic, 2170. 

Streets, Two-level, 2119. 

Structures, 3415 ff. See also Streets; etc. 

Study of city planning in professional 
schools, 900 ff.; in public schools, 548. 

Subdivision of land, see Land subdivision, 
3000 ff. 

Subsurface utilities, 2850 ff. See also 
Sewerage; Water supply; etc. 

Suburbs, see Decentralization, Residential 
and industrial, 1426; Districts, Indus- 
trial, 1650; Districts, Residential, Subur- 
ban, 1685, Garden cities, 5350. 

Subways, see Rapid transit, 2350 ff . 

Subways, Pipe, see Subsurface utilities, 
2850 ff . 

Sunlight, see Buildings Orientation, 3470. 

Surveys, Administrative, 824. See also 
Municipal government. 

Surveys, Aerial, 839. 

Surveys, Civic, 1300 ff. 

Technical procedure, 815 ff. 
Surveys, Economic, 826. 
Surveys, Health, 822. 
Surveys, Housing, 822. 
Surveys, Industrial, 826; 1559. 
Surveys, Legal, 824; 1500 ff. 
Surveys, National, 6600 ff. 
Surveys, Physical, 820; 1300 ff . 
Surveys, Recreation, 822; 1495. 
Surveys, Regional, 6100. 
Surveys, Rural, 6300. 
Surveys, Sanitary, 822. 
Surveys, Social, 822; 1400 ff. 
Surveys, Soil, 1320. 

Surveys, State, 6500 ff . 
Surveys, Topographical, 820. 
Surveys, Tree, see Trees, Street, 4885. 
Swimming pools, Public, 4347. 



MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 



187 



Taxation, 1568. 

Teaching of city planning in professional 
schools, 900 ff . ; in public schools, 548. 

Technical procedure in city planning, 800 ff . 

Tenement districts, 1703. 

Tenement houses, 3644. 

Tennis courts, Municipal, 4369. 

Terminals, see Markets, 1443; Street-rail- 
roads Terminals, 2420; Railroads 
Terminals, 2450 ff.; Waterfronts, Com- 
mercial, 2550 ff.; Aerial transportation 
terminals, 2795. 

Terminals, Industrial, see Districts, Indus- 
trial, 1650. 

Terms, Use of, 300. 

Theatres, Outdoor, 4055. 

Theory of city planning, 1200 ff. 

Thoroughfares, see Streets, Traffic, 2170. 

Topographical considerations, in city plan- 
ning, 1320ff. 

Topographical maps, 820. 

Tours for study of city planning, 947. 

Town planning, see City planning. 

Towns, see Cities, Villages. 

Township planning, see Rural planning, 
6300. 

Traffic, Motor, see Motor transportation as 
affecting street plans, 2058; Street 
traffic, 2076. 

Traffic, Street, 2076. 

Traffic regulation, see Street traffic regula- 
tion, 2076.3. 

Traffic squares, 2197. 

Traffic streets, 2170. 

Transit, see Rapid transit, 2350 ff . 

Transportation, 2000 ff . 

Trees, Street, 4885. 

Tunnels, see Rapid transit, 2350 ff ; Sub- 
surface utilities, 2850 ff. 

Tunnels, Vehicular, 2188. 

Types of city plans, 5200 ff . 

U 

Undeveloped land, see Platting, 770; 1800; 
Districts, Agricultural, 1715; Land sub- 
division, 3000 ff.; Regional planning, 
6100. 



Unearned increment, see Land, Urban, 

1563 ff. 
Unemployment, Public improvements as 

relief, 1438. 

Universities, relation to city plan, 3722. 
Universities, teaching of city planning, 

900 ff . See also p. 47 ff. 



Vacant-lot gardens, 4905. 

Values, Land, 1563. 

Vegetation, in cities, see Planting, in cities, 
4800 ff . 

Vehicles, see Street traffic, 2076. 

Vehicular tunnels, 2188. 

Villages, 5605. 

"Villages," Industrial, see Districts, Resi- 
dential, Low cost, 1697; Cities, Indus- 
trial, 5320. 

Villages for disabled ex-service men, 5349. 

Vistas, in cities, see City planning Es- 
thetic considerations, 1235 ff. 



W 

Walks, see Footways, 2250 ff. 

Walls, City, see City planning History, 
210 ff. 

War, Reconstruction after, 1293. 

War, Villages for soldiers and sailors dis- 
abled in, 5349. 

War housing, see Housing, Governmental, 
1431. 

War memorials, 1292. 

Waste disposal, 1460 ff . 

Water, in cities, see Waterfronts, Commer- 
cial, 2550 ff.; Fountains, Civic, 3845; 
Waterfronts, Recreational, 4370 ff. 

Water distribution, 2885. 

Water parks, see Waterfronts, Recreational, 
4370 ff . 

Water-supply, 1456; 2885. See also Nat- 
ional planning. 

Water-supply reservations, 4165. 

Waterfronts, Commercial, 2550 ff. 

Waterfronts, Recreational, 4370 ff. 

Watering places, see Health resorts, 5333. 

Waterways, Inland, 2580; 6620. 

Window gardens, 4914. 



188 MANUAL OF INFORMATION ON CITY PLANNING 

Winds, as consideration in city planning, 2 

see Climate, 1330 ff.; Zoning, 1600. 

Wires, 2850 ff . Zone condemnation, 728. 

Wires, Overhead Removal, 2922. Zoning, 1600. 

Legislation, 765. 

Technical procedure, 870. 
Yard improvement, 4900 ff. Zoological parks, 4270.