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metroNEWS 




Jed time Stewart is 
amang many Calgarians 
that potentially waft 
up to 16 months to see 
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JENNIFER FRJE!iFN.FOR METSO 


-> 


TAKEANUMBER 

The long and painful wait for a specialist 

metroNEWS 


Beware the rise 
of day homes 


SAFETY 

Worker says some 
popupsopen to 
make ends meet 

Jeremy 
Sfmes 

For Metro | Cal gary 

A Calgary day home worker is urging 
parents to take extra precautions when 
selecting a care provider for their tots, 
as hundreds of popup day homes have 
littered the city since the economic 
downturn. 

Viviana Pacheco. who's been operating 
a day home for more than 12 years and 
is a member of many day-home groups, 
says she estimates about three new day 
homes per community have popped up, 
resulting in hundreds, city-wide since the 
economy worsened. 

The issue with more popup day homes, 
Pacheco said, is that they Largely offer a 
cheap,yet inexperienced fix for families 
who can't afford higher prices. Many 
people out of work also open up shop in 
hopes of making a quick dollar, she added. 

“They offer these great prices and many 
Lb ink it's easy, it's not easy," said Pacheco. 


who operates a private day home. “And 
then things happen and many aren't 
prepared to handle it.* 

Private day homes have also made 
headlines; recently with deaths and al¬ 
leged sex assaults. But Pacheco, who has 
also operated her day home as licensed, 
cautioned that bad seeds exist in both lots. 

The problem, in part, lies with unedu¬ 
cated providers who are only in it for the 
short term until they can make money 
differently. Pacheco said. 

The government doesn't keep a record 
of private day homes in Alberta, though 
there are 1:992 licensed day homes in 
the province, 

To improve the system, Pacheco said 
the government should reinstate its free 
online. Level 1 training program for 
people looking to open a private home, 
'the program, now offered at How Valley 
College, covers what Pacheco described 
as “the essentials.” 

“Some private homes don't have that 
education you used to be able to easily 
get,” she said. "It's basic stuff that can get 
people through those frustrating days.’ 1 

When interviewing day-home provid¬ 
ers, parents should ask how long the 
caregiver plans to be in business and 
how long the day home has been offer¬ 
ing the service, Pacheco said. 



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ay-or-go campaign enters the home stretch. World 



A1 berta Education is looking at adding codi ng skills to the new education cun ic ulum. aaroh cwaiha/metco 

Coding a new curriculum 


0 


EDUCATION 

Computer 
pros explain 
programming 
benefits 


Aaron 

Chatha 

Metro | Calgary 

On Wednesday, Education Minis¬ 
ter David Eggeo announced ma¬ 
jor overhauls to the K-L2 school 
curriculum over the next six 
yean — and he indicEited coding 


and programming may be added 
to student education. 

"J love it. Calgary needs to 
be a leader in this trend," said 
Tony Grimes, organizer of the 
Pixels and Pints tech meet-up 
events. "The big gain is greater 
gender diversity in the tech¬ 
nology sector Little girls don't 
know they're not supposed to 
like computers, ihe sooner we 
get to them the better.” 

Eggen said the new curricu¬ 
lum will involve a large public 
consultation, meaning coding 
may not be added in fora num¬ 
ber of years — but that doesn't 
mean kids who Eire in school 
now can't still leam vital skills 


for the future. 

Getting ahead of the classroom 

,L In the same way we leEim 
English, Math and Science to 
estEiblish a knowledge baseline, 
programming has become a 
fundEnmentEil skill to excel in 
the digital age." said Kylie Tbh, 
founder of Chic Geek. 

She recommends younger 
kids log into a web app called 
Scratch, to play around with 
coding to create games and 
simple apps. 

Scratch is a free programming 
language developed by MU to 
help students leEim basic skills. 

They can move on to pro¬ 


grammable hardware, like 
Makey Makey. Little Bits or the 
very popular Kaspberry Pi, which 
has been used by experienced 
pros to create anything from 
alarm clocks to virtual gaming 
machines. 

Tor older students, she recom¬ 
mends learning HTML and CSS. 

“Ids an easy web language we 
internet with everyday," she said. 

Calgary entrepreneur Dario 
Hudon-Verrelli said the city hits 
a wide range of meet-up events, 


many opening and welcome, to 
help diverse age groups leam 
and get a helping hand from 
experienced coders. Those in¬ 
clude the aforementioned Chic 
Geek and Pixels and Tints—and 
MoMoYYC. a mobile app. 

“from its ability to leach 
critical thinking and problem 
solving, to its creative potential, 
coding's multi-faceted potential 
for child development shonid 
place it at the forefront of edu¬ 
cational resources," he SEiid. 


CRIME 

Officials to 
fly in family 
of doctor 

f Jeremy 
Simes 

For Metro ; Calgary 

Alberta's acupuncture college 
and the Chinese consulate gen¬ 
eral are working to fly over 
the family of a slain Calgary 
clinic owner so they can moum 
their loss. 

On Thursday around 2:35 
p.m,, police were called to the 
Perpetual Wellness Chinese 
Medical Centre, located inside 
a mall at 1623 Centre Street 
North, finding clinic owner 
Dr. Tiejun Huang dead and an¬ 
other two people with non-life 
threatening injuries. 

Police said Huang was al¬ 
legedly stabbed by Jin C£mg 
Huang, who has been charged 
with one count of first-degree 
murder. At the time of the in¬ 
cident. the accused had been 
co-operative and calm with po¬ 
lice. The victim and the accused 
aren’t related, police said. 

On Sunday, Paul Hu, regis¬ 
trar with the College and As¬ 
sociation of Acupuncturists of 
Alberta, said Tiejun had been 
in good standing with the or¬ 
ganization, Lind was well known 
for his knowledge in traditional 
Chinese medicine. 

A woman, who police said 
had been in a relationship with 
the clinic owner, had also re¬ 
ceived minor injuries during 
Thursday's daylight knife at¬ 
tack. 

Police said the accused is ex¬ 
pected to appear in court on 
Monday, adding the incident 
marks Calgaiy s 1 Uh homicide 
this year. 



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metrSNEWS Calgary 


Monday, June 20,2016 3 



THINGS TO WATCH AT CITY HALL ON MONDAY 

Calgary city council has a busy day ahead of it Monday as its ~Q - - 

members work through a number of proposed bylaw changes. Y, M«t?o"ic* gf .ry 

We've narrowed down five of the more interesting ones — but 

you can always check out the entire agenda online if that's your kind of thing. 


OCalgary T ransit 
Zero-Based 
Review 

The latest zero-based review of a city 
service — Calgary Transit — is going 
before councillors. T his one has been 
controversial because it recommends 
contracting out certain janitorial! 
services, and unions representing 
worker have gotten wind of the plan. 
Unions are asking workers to show 
up at the meeting to make sure their 
faces are seen. 


Q Green LineCity 
Centre Alignment 

This has been added to the agenda at 
the last minute, and may not even be 
dealt with if two-thirds of council don't 
agree to its addition. The report from 
administration is asking council to keep 
pushing forward with land acquisitions. 
Administration is also asking for a 
September deadline to come up with 
a final necommendatFon for the Green 
Line route through the downtown. That 
could mean well know by the fa I if 
the Green Line will run underground 
downtown. 



T -— 

■J 




V 



|_)A "J k C r ' : 

u-rtH - I •' 

I nl"* L X t 


O Returning 


The city's long-serving returning 
officer, Barbara Clifford, has given 
notice of the retirement after 26 years 
in the position. Clifford oversaw eight 
municipal elections in that time, but 
she wont be sticking around for next 
year's election, he city is amending 
bylaws to appoint the city clerk as the 
new returning officer. 



O Payday Loans 

Council is set to pass a bylaw that 
gives city inspectors greater oversight 
of payday loan institutions. Once 
enacted, all payday loan offices in the 
city wil have to post information on 
debt counselling at their entrance and 
in any office where transactions are 
done. Employees will also be required 
to verbally explain info from these signs 
to each customer. 



\ 

O Skate Ramps 

Coun. Evan Woolley launched a plian 
to a low for backyard skate ramps 
of a certain size to be built without 
a permit. His plan made it past the 
council committee on Community and 
Protective Services. The question is, 
will Woolfey be able to land the bylaw 
changes or will they be slammed by a 
majority of council at the last minute? 


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Makers build local movement 


ACCESSIBILITY 

Engineer helps 
improve lives 
of people living 
with disabilities 



Jennifer 

Fnesen 

For Metro | Calgary 


It was an average night with an 
extraordinary outcome. 

In December 2014, fresh off 
his final exams. Richard Lushai 
began scrolling through You¬ 
Tube channels. It wasn’t long 
before he stumbled across a 
video by Tikkun Olam Makers 
(TOM), an international not- 
for-profit movement that uses 
design, engineering and tech- 
noltrgy to solve problems for 
people in need. 

“I was thinking, this is per¬ 
fect, 1 * he said. 

“Because they have to take 
on a person’s challenge, it's go¬ 
ing to make a real impact and 
they're going to see that impact 
within a very short time. That 
was a complete game changer.” 

Before the night was over, 
the mechanical engineering 
technology student hatched a 
plan to bring the maker move¬ 
ment to Calgary. 

After securing some funding 
and pairing four innovative 
design teams with four people 
with disabilities, Lushai set the 
event to take place at the 2015 
Maker Fa ire at Telus Spark. For 
72 hours straight, the teams 
built the mechanisms to help 

o TELL US 

Do you know a Calgary Hero? 
Tell us by email ing calletters@ 
metro news,ca 



You hoed lo 
understand that 
what you do 
matte r$, 

Richard Lushai 


Richard Lushai brought the global Tikkun Olam Makers event to Calgary in 2015 and is currently setting up for this year's make-a-thon in August, jennihea rRic&EmviMLrfto 


o 


It's a highly audacious thing to 
say 'change the world.' It's kind of 
crazy because the world is very 
big and you're a tiny person, but 

audacity iS required. Richard Lushai 


those in need overcome their 
challenges. 

From building a wheelchair 
that can traverse the snow for 
a three-yeai-old girl with Rhett 
Syndrome, to designing a lift 
for a woman with Parkinson’s 
Disease so she could sit up in 
bed. the makers worked directly 
beside the person living with 
the disability. 

The 2015 event in Calgary 
was organized by the youngest 
TOM organizers in the world, 
with the smallest (and least 
experienced] team made up of 


students. But Lushai has never 
been one to shy away from a 
challenge, and by the end of t he 
72-hours, two of the projects 
succeeded in solving their sub¬ 
jects’ accessibility issue. 

“On a community level... it 
shows those young students 
that; what you do makes a dif¬ 
ference, it makes an impact 
— you can change the world,” 
said Lushai. 

"It's a highly audacious thing 
to say ’change the world.’ It's 
kind of crazy because the world 
is very big aod you're a tiny per¬ 


son. but audacity is required. 
And you need to understand 
that what you do matters” 

This year, the second annual 
TOM Calgary make-a-thon is 
set for August 26, 27 and 2S 
at hCB Manufacturing Ltd. in 
Cochrane. And, while they have 
more experienced makers on 
the roster, the student element 
will remain. 

Lushai hopes to have 10 
teams organized this year, a 
feat he said would not be pos¬ 
sible without his dedicated 
teammates. 


.All of their time is volun¬ 
teered for the not-for-profit, 
but Lushai said that after they 
see the solutions work for the 
people in need, “that makes it 
all worth it” 

“It's actually a responsibil¬ 
ity,” he said. 


“You know bow to solve 
these problems, and this per¬ 
son needs that solution. So the 
need is there, the person who 
can solve the problem is there 
— we just need to bring them 
together. When that happens, 
it’s very exciting." 





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metr®NEWS Calgary 


Monday, June 20,2016 


5 


Father's 

SunDay 



Jeremy 

Sirties 

For Metro i Calgary 


Dads were relaxed 
at Prince's Island 
Park this Father's 
Day, enjoying the beautiful weather 
with their families. Here's how some of 
them spent the day. 


DATA MINING 




null, .1 

..... ■ ... ■ .* 

.i-ifi -TV 


From left; Shreye, 
Betsy.. Shryka and , 
* dad, Normal, 



The Bar gas 


Nermal Barg as got up early for 
church before heading to the 
park with his family to snap 
photos. 

But he also received 
two lovely cards from his 
daughters, Shryka and Shreye, 
to celebrate the family's third 
Father's Day. 


""They were very nice.,'" 
IVermal said. 'It's a special 
day. They greeted me in the 
morning and said. 'Happy 
Father's Day.'" 

Shryka said her dad makes 
her pretty happy. 

"He gives me gifts," she said 
with a smile. 



The Hays 

Tim Hays' second 
Father's Day was 
a bit more active 
the one last year. 

"We just saw 
these kites and 
figured we would 
try them, but it's 
a little tricky," he 
said, noting the 
wind was a bit 
too gusty, 

"It's nice to spend some time together," he said, 
always get the chance to do this." 


'We don't 


AUL PHOTOS JtfttM T SJMtld 



From left 
Lucia, 
Evandro, 
and son 
Lohan 


The Longo-Miqueltios 

Evandro Longo-Miqueltio and 
his family were ce ebrating 
their sixth Father's Day 
together on Sunday, when 
they were about to walk along 
the river. 

"We really like to come 
here," he said. "It's just nice 
to be together." 

Longo-Miqueltio's wife, 
Lucia, said Father's Day means 
a lot to her, 

"There is knowledge, 
learning, love and having a 
good time," she said. 

Longo-Miqueltioson, Lohan. 
said his dad >s extremely 
important. "I like him," he said. 


City doing Moneyball- style financial analytics 



Brodie 

Thomas 

Metro | Calgary 


It may sound like just another 
business catchphrase. but the 
city of Calgary's auditing depart¬ 
ment has already started ‘data 
mining/ and it hopes to grow 
the practice. 

City auditor Katharine Palmer 
gave a brief introduction on the 
new practice allied Data Ana¬ 
lytics in her first quarter report 


to the city's audit committee. 
The city has reams of financial 
data being produced at till times. 

"As we collect a lot more data, 
we need better ways of being 
able to analyse it," said Palmer. 

Using specialized software, city 
auditors can write scripts that 
watch for problems or anomalies 
in a way that a human auditor 
never could. 

“ You can look at whole popu¬ 
lation instead of samples, which 
audits usually do," she said. 

As an example. Palmer ex¬ 


plained they might write a script 
that looks for duplicated pay¬ 
ments to vendors — a common 
problem. 

“This isn't stjmething dramat¬ 
ically different than others have 
done in the past but it is a more 
efficient way to get a wider view 
of what’s going on in an organ¬ 
ization," she said. 

Since December 2015, city 
staff have crafted 25 different 
scripts to look for problems or 
irregularities. 

Palmer said the program right 


© 


(Data mining) is a 
more efficient way 
to get a wider view. 

Katharine Palmer 


now is focusing on financial data, 
but she sees no reason why the 
same program s and practices 
couldn't be adapted toot her data 
coming into the city. 




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6 Monday, June 20,2016 


Calgary 


>NEWS 


Fear keeps minorities from gym 



The PSA, called First Step, has been viewed more than 500,000 online. ccwftTEsr cm walk. 


VIDEO 

Cardiologist 
says women 
in hi jab feel 
judged 

|S Aaron 
U* Chatha 

Metro | Calgary 

Ur. AnmoJ Kapoor feels loo 
many visible minority' women 
are concerned about discrimin¬ 
ation, lo the point where it’s 
affecting their physical health. 

He was first clued in through 
conversations with his pa dents, 
many said they were afraid to 
even enter a gym —especially 
those wearing a hijab. 

“They think people might 
look at them differently — they 
feel judged," Kapoor said. "They 
were afraid because they don’t 
now bow people w r onld react, 
should they enter a gym.” 

He was especially touched 
when talking to a member of 
his staff. Ameena. 

Ameena’s sister once made 
it as Far as the entrance of a 
gym, before changing her mind 


and turning back. 

So, with the help of a group 
of local videographers, he cast 
Ameena in a PSA about the 
issue.. 


The aim of the video, about a 
woman entering a gym wearing 
a hijab, is about encouraging 
women to take that First step. 

“We have to give a voice to 


these women,"' said Kapoor. 
“Let them know, don’t hesi¬ 
tate, don’t be afraid, get out, 
people will help you and sup¬ 
port you." 


As a trained cardiologist. Ka¬ 
poor has seen these issue hold 
back women who already have 
heart disease and need to live a 
healthier, more active lifestyle. 


0 

If we*re all the 
same inside, why 
do we have to feel 
discriminated 
against because 
of how we look 
outside. 

Dr, A nmol Kapoor 

“I’ve seen Muslim hearts, 
Sikh hearts. Hindu hearts. 
Hearts of every religion. They 
all look the same to me. Same 
chambers, same valves,” he 
said. 

“If we’re all the same in¬ 
side. why do we have to feel 
discriminated against because 
of how we look outside." 

T he video, called hirst Step, 
has racked up more than 
500,000 view's on YouTube, 
far more than Kapoor ever 
predicted. 

“It’s amazing. We didn’t 
know it would be so well re¬ 
ceived,” he said. 

He hopes it will have a 
positive effect and empower 
women. 



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metr NFWS Calgary 


Woman has long 
wait for specialist 


HEALTH 

Hospitals, 
family doctor 
couldn’t do 
much to help 

Jeremy 

5irnes 

For Metro | Calgary 

Jeunnle Stewart burst into tears 
Tuesday after learning there 
wasn’t much the Peter Lougheed 
Hospital could da to ease swell¬ 
ing in her ankle. 

Stewart, who's been recently 
experiencing swelling in her 
ankle and finger, is among many 
■Calgarians possibly waiting 
months to see a rheumatolo¬ 
gist. a specialist who treats pain 
disorders affecting joints. 

According to Alberta Health 
Services (AHS), patients can 
wait 12 lo 16 months to see a 
rheu matologist if they are con¬ 
sidered moderate or routine. 
Patients who are considered 
to be in urgent need can wait 



JeannieStewart says she 
didn't have the greatest 
experience with a doctor at 
the Peter Lougheed when he 
assessed her swollen ankle. 

JLNNIFLK fKI bStH/hOK ML I HO 

about one month. 

Prior to setting up a referral 
with her family doctor, itewait 
said she rushed to the Peter 
Lougheed last week after ex¬ 
periencing excruciating pain 
due to swelling in her ankle. 

“1 was starting to feel not 
quite pins-and-needles. but it 
was at that point just before 
the pins-and-needles," she said. 


‘T just wanted to make sure the 
swelling wasn’t compromising 
anything." 

She said she waited about 
three hours in emergency to see 
a physician and, by the time the 
doctor addressed the swelling, 
she said he told her all he could 
do was a joint aspiration — a 
procedure that uses a syringe 
to drain fluid from joints — as 
there were no rheumatologists 
on hand. 

Stewart said she declined the 
joint aspiration because it failed 
to alleviate pain in her finger 
when she had the procedure 
done about two weeks ago. 

AH£ said it has partnerships 
with local Primary Care .Net¬ 
works to provide care to pa¬ 
tients with arthritis in the com¬ 
munity, as it’s an extremely 
broad diagnosis and can largely 
be safely managed by family 
physicians. 

But Stewart said she wishes 
the hospital could have been 
more helpful by offering more 
than just the joint aspiration, 
adding her experience with the 
doctor wasn’t the best. 



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8 Monday, June 20,2016 


Calgary 


‘NEWS 


Fort Mac celebrates its newest citizen 



Eli Danny Roy Mercer was born Friday morning, supplied 


WILDFIRES 

City wclcome$ 
first baby born 
since evacuation 

Alex 

Boyd 

Metro | Edmonton 


The first baby has been born 
in Fort Mo Murray's hospital 
since the city was evacuated 


in early May. Eli Danny Roy 
Mercer was born Friday mor¬ 
ning at the Northern Lights 
Regional Health Centre weigh¬ 
ing 6 pounds. 7 ounces. 

Eli is the second child for 
Melissa Taylor and Steven Mer¬ 
cer, who say they're grateful he 
•could be born in their home 
community. 

"It was the deciding factor 
for us to come home, knowing 
that the hospital was back up 
and running,* I'aylor said, in 




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a press release from Alberta 
Health Services. “I didn't want 
to have my baby anywhere 
else." 

Juanita Pilgrim, manager 
of the maternity/child unit, 
said the birth marks a return 
to normal for hospital staff. 

“We're all caregivers, it's 
what we do. We’re so glad to 
be back doing our jobs and 
able to support moms in labour 
and help bring babies into the 
world. Fort Me Murray is our 


home too,” she said, in the 
same release. 

Emergency services at the 
hospital resumed on June 1, 
and core regional health-care 
services, like obstetrical, pedi¬ 
atric and inpatient psychiatry 
services, followed two weeks 
later. 

The hospital will return to 
providing full comprehensive 
services next week, and will 
start bringing long term care 
patients back on June 23. 



Rena Kozak performs under her stage name. Child Actress. 

CGORf E£Y fiLNA KOZAK 


SLED ISLAND 

Kozak's Child now 
maturing with age 


R Aaron 

O Chat ha 

Metro|Calgary 

It's been four year's since Sled 
Island performer Rena Kozak 
started her solo music pro¬ 
ject. called Child Actress — 
although she's been making 
music on some level for about 
2Q years. 

Unfortunately, the push to 
take more control over her 
sound has a tragic beginning. 
Jn 2012, Kozak’s boyfriend 
died. 

Kozak had always been a 
songwriter, but only then de¬ 
rided to put it all together. 

“After Chris died, it was 
like, I wanted to have total 
control over the project," she 
said. “And 1 had the resources 
to have that control." 

When she's not working 
on her own music, sound still 
plays a very' big part of her life. 
Kozak works as an audio en¬ 
gineer. recording live concerts, 
events and bands. 

For Child Actress, Kozak also 


played and recorded all the in- 
strunients. Although she works 
with a band, she still manages 
to retain creative control over 
her ideas. 

She describes her music as 
pop. with a bit of post punk 
with a little retro dance pop 
thrown in — because The 
Cure is one of her biggest in¬ 
fluences. 

“Which is sort of an em¬ 
barrassing influence to say, 
becau se everybody says t hat 
she laughed. “But, it sort of 
comes out 80s pop sounding 
no matter what I do.* 

Kozak will perform in the 
Sled Island festival, which 
starts on June 22. The five-day 
music and arts festival brings 
together more than 250 bands, 
comedians, film makers and 
artists and takes place in doz¬ 
ens ofvenues throughout the 
city. 

Kozak will be playing the Lo¬ 
cal 510 at 6:30 p.m. on Thurs¬ 
day, June 23,. 

To see the full festival line¬ 
up and schedule, visit sledis- 
land.com. 



I wanted to have total control 
over the project, 

Rena Kozak 





























































































































metrSNEWS Canada 


Monday, June 20,2016 9 


LOBTQ 

Pride prom creates safe space for students 


School may be out. but Alisa 
Atchison has one more art pro¬ 
ject lo complete. The 14-year- 
old from Surrey, B.C., will be 
spending her 5rsi weekend of 
the summer making a butterfly- 
themed musk to wear to her 
school district's firs t-ever Pride 
prom. 

“1 always thought that butter- 
flies were really free ... and 
they’re beautiful,” she said. T 
want to be free and beautiful 
as well." 

Guildford Park Secondary 


School's gay-straight alliance is 
hosting the inaugural district- 
wide dance on Monday evening 
to give LGBTQ students from 
different high schools a chance 
to meet, have fan and feel sup¬ 
ported. 

"Bach student is on their own 
path and in a different place 
when it comes to self-accept¬ 
ance, or being out or not... and 
I think creating that safe space 
where you can just be who you 
a re, whoe ve r t hat is, is really, 
really important," said Guildford 


Park teacher Heather Kelley. 

The idea for a dance came 
from students who fell LGETQ 
youth do not have enough op¬ 
portunities to connect. 

Typical dances and events, 
which are exclusive to stu¬ 
dents from the same school, 
can feel limiting to queer stu¬ 
dents whose network of friends 
extends beyond school borders, 
Kelley said. 

Having a district-wide event 
gets rid of the barrier and allows 
students to bring their dates and 


friends from other schools. And 
that includes students outside 
the LG ETQ community. 

Yu Takahashi, 14, who vol¬ 
unteered to make decorations 
for the event, said she got in¬ 
volved because she sees herself 
as an ally. 

“If I don't respect them or 
just reject them, they’re go¬ 
ing to feel uncomfortable and 
I don’t feel that's right for this 
school or this community'.” 
Takahashi said. 
thecanac an press 



Alisa Atchison, 14, says she hopes Surrey's first Pride prom 
encourages more students to support their peers who 
identify as LGBTQ. linda GtvtrASHnHt Canadian press 


Scrutiny for 
pension plan 


HETIREMENT 

Feds seeking 
to expand 
program 

Kent Peterson would forgive 
anyone who might think he‘s 
got nothing to worry about 
when it comes to his retire¬ 
ment — or. for thELt matter, 
what happens to the Canada 
Pension Plan. 

After all, the 27-year-old 
hEts a unionized, full-time job 
with the Saskatchewan fed¬ 
eration of Labour. Most folks 
would likely assume he hEts 
a robust workplace pension 
plan to help him save for his 
golden years. 

bxcept he doesn’t. 

“I'm relying solely on the 
CPP, H Peterson admitted in 
an interview. “I'veenvisioned 
my retirement, and it's not 
hEippy and rosy, to be honest 
with you." 

Peterson wiII be watching 
the outcome of meetings Sun¬ 
day night and Monday as the 
country's finance ministers try 
to hammer out a preliminary 

$45 B 

Total contributions to the 
Canada Pension Plan in 
2015 

5.3M 

Total CPP beneficiaries in 
2015 

$ 19.97 

Maximum monthly benefit 
payout in 1967 


agreement on an expanded 
Canada Pension Plan — one 
that's likely to include higher 
benefits and an increase in 
the premiums that come off 
the paycheques of workers. 

One central issue: whether 
to impose an across-the-board 
change on all workers and 
employers, or to more select¬ 
ively target those Canadian 
workers w r ho are the least 
likely to save. 

Federal research has sug¬ 
gested the latter group tends 
lo be under the age of 30, 
earns between $55,000 and 
$75,000, and either doesn't 
save enough or lacks access 
ton workplace pension plan. 

The federal and provin¬ 
cial governments are look¬ 
ing at a possible increase in 
the $55,000 cap on annual 
maximum pensionable earn¬ 
ings, which would result in 
both higher premiums Eind 
increased pension benefits. 

Don Drummond, a pro¬ 
fessor of policy studies at 
Queen’s University in Kings¬ 
ton, Ont,. said he believes the 
current cap is too low r . 

TdE CAN ADIAN PRESS 

$38.7 

Total benefits paid out to 
eligible Canadians in 2015 

$ 1,09250 

Maximutn monthly benefit 
payout in 2016 

$1.3B 

Cost to operate CPP in 
2015 



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10 Monday, June 20,2016 


WORLD REFUGEE DAY 



1* Turkey 
2* Pakistan 
3* Lebanon 

4. Iran 

5. Ethiopia 

6. Jordan 


&WHICS: AhOfttS PUrNAJMETKO 

















metr^NEws world refugee day 


Monday, June 20,2016 


11 


That number is the highest since the Second World War, despite a slowing rate of increase, a new report from the 
United Nations Refugee Agency says. If the entire population of refugees and migrants were a country, it would 
be the 21st largest in the world, the report says. The numbers, and the stories of those affected around the world, 
paint a harrowing picture, metro 


CHILDREN 

98,400 

This is the number of unaccom¬ 
panied or separated children. This 
was the highest number on record 
since UNCHR started collecting 
such data in 2006. 



The percent of the displaced 
popula tion in 2015 that were 
children below 18 years old 


On average 24 people 
were displaced from their 
homes every minute in 
2015 




Ifara and Ismael 


Rule - a Daesh survivor 


Centra] African refugee Ifara 
Antoinette. 41. attempts to 
comfort her one-year-old baby 
boy Ismael shortly after he was 
tested for signs of malnutri¬ 
tion. Thousands of refugees 
from the Central African 
Republic are gathered in an 
encampment on the banks of 
the Oubangi Kiver in Gbangara 
spontaneous site in Lqiiateur 
province, the Democratic Re¬ 
public of Congo. &. SOKOL: UNHCR 



Rule, a Yazidi woman who was 
kidnapped by Daesh, pictured 
in a northern Iraq camp. She 
and her two grandchildren 
were released in January 2015. 
Her j. 5-year-old daughter is 
still being held, and is believed, 
to have been taken to be sold 
in Kaqqa, Syria. She raised her 
daughter as a single mother, 
after her husband's death in 
the Iran-Iraq war 34 years ago. 

A. MCCONNELLi 1 Ll '■JMCR 




Haqmal the young scholar 


ibis is Haqmal (centre), a 
six-year-old returnee from 
Pakistan, and his friends. He 
attends the Ansarui-Momineen 
School in. Kabul District, Af¬ 


ghanistan, Haqmal says he loves 
school. “Writing is my very best: 
subject." he says. “1 love cricket.: 
I used to play cricket ail the 
time in Pakistan." unucm : 


Ziad — struggling to stay warm 

Syrian refugee. Ziad, 45. and 



his children. Tarek, 6, Mus¬ 
tafa, 7, and Hamzi. 3, look 
out from their shelter while 
Hying to find warmth, in the 
Rekaa Valley, Lebanon. “We 


live in this tent out of neces¬ 
sity," Ziad said of the tent's 
conditions ...We are trying 
to keep warm but as you can 
see we don't even hEive wood 

tO bum." UNHCR: 



Maribeth 
the dancer 


When Maribeth Palacios was 
seven years old. armed guards 
kilted her mother and sister. 
She fled and has never re¬ 
turned to her home town. She 
now works as a cook and trad¬ 
itional dance teacher in Flor¬ 
ida. HELENA CKRlS~ENSEM,m HCfl 



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12 


Monday, June 20,2016 


World 


‘NEWS 


UK readies for referendum 



Liberat Democrats leader Tim Farron greets supporters after arriving in the Liberal Democrat 
Vote Remain campaign bus, campaigning to avoid a Brexit in the EU referendum, during a launch 
in east London on Sunday, affvgetyy images 


EUROPEAN UNION 

Campaign 
resumes after 
Labour ME Jo 
Cox’s murder 

Britain’s long and difficult refer¬ 
endum campaign hits resumed 
in earnest after a three-day halt 
caused by the killing of Labour 
Party lawmaker}o Cox in a braz¬ 
en knife and gun attack. 

The death has cast a pall over 
the referendum set for Thursday, 
and its impact on the eventual 
results — if any — is unclear. 

The campaign tone was 
perhaps a bit more moderate 
Sunday as both sides in the 
bruising battle over whether 
Britain should remain a mem¬ 
ber of the 23-nation European 
Union seemed to take a more 
civil approach. 

The content remained the 
same: the "remain^ camp pre¬ 
dicts economic doom if Britain 
leaves the EU while the “‘leave’ 1 
campaign warns of the perils 
of uncontrolled immigration 
unless Britain strikes out on 
its own. 

Prime Minister David Cam¬ 


eron. leading the "remain"' cam¬ 
paign, invoked Cox's memory 
as a contrast to the values of 
some of the " leave 1 ” campaign¬ 
ers, singling out UK Independ¬ 
ence Party chief Nigel Parage 
for taking a negative approach. 

In a newspaper column, he 
said Cox — who favoured EU 
membership, and wanted Brit¬ 


ain to do more to help Syrian 
refugees — offered a hopeful 
vision for Britain while Parage 
wants to divide the country, 
not unite it. 

"Are we going to choose Ni¬ 
gel Parage's vision — one which 
takes Britain backwards; divides 
rather than unites: and ques¬ 
tions the motives of anyone who 


takes a different view. Or will 
we. instead, choose the tolerant, 
liberal Britain: a country that 
doesn’t hkime its problems on 
other groups of people." he said. 

With the resumption of cam¬ 
paigning, including a London 
rally featuring former Mayor 
Boris Johnson, a popular “leave" 
figure, fresh attention was 


© BALLOT BOX 

Britain goes to the polls 
on June 23 to vote to 
leave Or remain in the 
European Union in a 
referendum. 


focused on a poster unveiled 
by Parage’s supporters hours 
before Cox was killed. 

Ihe poster showed a long line 
of immigrants fleeing poverty 
and warfare in the Middle East 
and elsewhere trudging across 
Europe with a warning in cap¬ 
ital letters that said: BREAKING 
POINT, In smaller type, it ac¬ 
cused the EU of failing Britain. 

I he poster has been cited by 
politicians and commentators 
as a prime example of how jar¬ 
ring the tone of the referendum 
campaign has become. 

treasury Chief George Os¬ 
borne Sunday called it “rile" and 
compared it to Nazi propaganda 
of the 1930s. 

Even Justice Secretary Michael 
Gove, a prominent leader of die 
“leave” campaign, decried the 
poster. He said he “shuddered" 
when he saw it 

rut ASSOCiAtED PRESS 


CONTROVERSY 

: To leave, 
•or not to 

• leave 

I WHY 15 BRITAIN CON51D 

. EKING LEAVING THE EU? 

• Britain joined the bloc in 

« 1973, but many Britons feel 

• their island nation — a former 
« imperial power with strong 

« ties to the United States — is 

• fundamentally different to its 
« European neighbours. Anti-El) 
, Britons resent everything front 
« fishing quotas to fruit sizes 

, being decided in Brussels. 

• WHY DO SOME BRITONS 
, WANT TO STAY? 

, Supporters say Britain's econ- 
« omy and security are en- 
, hauced by EU membership. 

« They argue that membership 
« makes it much easier for Erit- 

• ish companies both large and 
, small to import and export 

« goods to other member coun- 
4 tries with minimum hassle. 

\ WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? 

• The referendum’s outcome 
, is hard to predict — Britain 
« hasn't had a referendum on 
4 Europe since 1975.. Opinion 

ft polls were notoriously inaccur- 
4 ate about Britain’s 2015 elec- 
i tion, and vary widely. 




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metr NFWs world 


Monday, June 20,2016 13 



Meklha Thomas, 7, signs one of the 49 crosses at a makeshift 
memorial outside Orlando Regional Medical Center on Sunday. 
The crosses were erected by an Illinois man to honour each of 
the victi ms in the Pu Ise ma ssacre. 

JOE. aURBANK/OfiUUttO SENTINEL VIA TH£ ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Survivors 
worry about 
what’s next 


ORLANDO S HO OTING 

As funerals 
wrap up, grief 
and anger 
remain 

A week has passed since the 
Orlando nightclub shooting 
that killed 43 club patrons 
and the funeral processions 
are wrapping up. but survivors 
andl victims' families say they 
realize the nightmare will live 
on long after the world's atten¬ 
tion fades. 

Jeannette McCoy made it out 
of the Pulse nightclub alive on 
June 12 as gunman Omar Ma- 
teen continued a shooting that 
also wounded and maimed 53 
others before he died in a hail 
of police gunfire. 

McCoy said the love and sup¬ 
port can only do so much to 
help, it's a temporary balm, she 
said, and she worried that while 
life may return to normal for 
some people after the world's 
attention moves on. it won't 
for Orlando's LCffJ' commu nity. 

“All of this has been so 
traumatizing.” she said. "The 
way that our community has 
been impacted, it's just so un¬ 
fortunate. We have so many 
wonderful lives that have been 
lost. Wheal we look at all these 
crosses, and all these faces, all 
these stories, it hurts. It hurts 
so much." 

On Saturday, across from 


Cathedral Church of St. Luke, 
where Christopher Andrew 
Leinonen's Funeral was held, 
hundreds lined the street hold¬ 
ing "We Support You” and other 
signs. 

Brandon Wolf was with the 
32-year-old Leinonen and shoot¬ 
ing victim Juan Ramon Guer¬ 
rero at Pulse. The 27-yearcld 
Wolf managed to make it out 
alive. 

He says Leinonen, whom he 
called Drew, changed his life, 
and eased his pain when he 
was hurting. 

"He looked me in the eyes 
that night and did what Drew 
always did. he said, 't love you,' 
Wolf said. "That is Drew's last¬ 
ing message to us. '1 love you."* 

© 

When we look at 
all these crosses, 
and all these faces, 
all these stories, it 
hurts. 

Survivor Jeannette McCoy 

Investigators are still inter¬ 
viewing witnesses, and look¬ 
ing to learn more about Ma- 
teen and others who knew him 
well. A lawyer for the Council 
of Arne rica n-J slamic Re lations 
said that the FBI on Friday inter¬ 
viewed a man who worshipped 
at the same mosque as Mateen. 

rHE ASSOCIATED PRESS 


ACROSS THE 19.5. 

Pride events proceed with extra security 


People in wheelchairs, walking 
on stilts and riding rainbow- 
decorated motorcycles turned 
out for gay pride events over 
the weekend, including partici¬ 
pants in a Denver parade who 
carried posters of the names or 
faces of the victims who died 
in last weekend's attack on a 
nightclub in Honda. 

About 2 ,000 people took part 
in Denver's PrideFest parade 
through town to Civic Center 
Park on Sunday as hundreds 
lined sidewalks. Crowds esti¬ 



EmW'h itwell. 14, joins the 
PrideFest rally in Boise, Idaho, 
on Saturday, the associated press 


mated at several hundred thou¬ 
sand attended a two-day festival 
in front of Denver's city hall. 

Security was tight at events 
over the weekend. In Denver, 
authorities set up security fen¬ 
ces. bag checks, and police rode 
Segway scooters and walked 
with bomb-sniffing dogs. 

Organizer Debra Pollock said 
in past years, the festival area 
was fenced in overnight, and 
when parade-goers arrived, 
they threw open the fences 
and people swarmed in For dan- 


ciLigand other performances. 

"This year, they have to go 
through security,” Pollock said. 

Other festivals and parades 
went ahead Saturday under in¬ 
creased security in cities such 
as Chicago, Columbus. Ohio, 
and Providence. Rhode Island. 

No serious problems were 
reported at gay pride events 
across the country, but the 
mood For many people was 
sombre. A small number oF 
anti-gay protesters also showed 
up. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 



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Canadian sawmills 
at risk as deal fades 



Sawmills across Canada could shut down if the U.5. imposes a 
duties on softwood I u ruber, an a na lyst says, the Canadian races 


TRADE 

Analyst sees 
U.S. imposing 
at least 25 % 
duty on lumber 

Canadian jobs and sawmills 
across the country are increas¬ 
ingly at risk because of fading 
prospects they will avoid a new 
round of U.S. duties on import¬ 
ed softwood lumber, according 
to an industry analyst. 

KBC CapiEal Markets analyst 
Paul Quinn says he expects the 
United States will impose duties 
of at least 25 per cent in mid- 


2017 and that will put pres¬ 
sure on Canadian producers. 
“There'll be mills shut right 
across Canada because nobody's 
making the kind of money that 


they’d have to pay in the dut¬ 
ies." Quinn said. 

He expects five mills to he 
affected in British Columbia. 
Quebec-based producer Reso¬ 


lute forest Products said jobs 
would also be at risk if Canada 
accepts a U.S. proposal that 
would put a 24 per cent quota 
on Canadian imports, 

"We don’t have a big enough 
market in Canada to sell our 
product and so what ends up 
happening is there is a greater 
risk of capacity having to be 
closed," said spokesman Beth 
Kursman. 

The company, which oper¬ 
ates about 20 sawmills in Can¬ 
ada, believes the Federal gov¬ 
ernment should push for free 
trade because Quebec's forestry 
system is now market-based 
and Ontario subsides are in¬ 
consequential. tut CANADIAN PRESS 


CLOTHING 

Japan's Uniqlo eyes the top apparel spot 



Uniqlo Canada COO Yasuhiro Hayashi says Toronto is the 
perfect launch pad for the brand in Canada, torstar newsservice 


I wo Uniqlo stores are slated to 
open in Toronto this fall, one 
at Toronto Eaton Centre (TEC) 
and one at Ybrkdale Shopping 
Centre. Dates have not been set, 
but construction is well under 
way on the two spaces. 

The stores will carry a full 
line of Uniqlo products, includ¬ 
ing men’s, women's and chil¬ 
dren swear. 

Toronto is the perfect launch 
pad for the brand in Canada, 
says Yasuhiro Hayashi, Lniqlo's 
chief operating officer in Can¬ 
ada, citing research conducted 
by the company. It's multicul¬ 
tural, multi-ethnic and fashion- 
minded, he adds. 

“in Toronto, everyone has 
th eir own style," he says. 
“People are tiying to express 
themselves, whereas 20-30 years 
ago, they wanted to look like 
someone in a magazine,” says 
Hayashi. It’s good newt for 
Uniqlo, which wants to pro¬ 


vide basics to build upon. 

The stores were announced 
last winter as Target was circ¬ 
ling the drain in Canada, after 
entering the market with an 
ambitious 124 locations. 

At 2^,000 square feet and 
24,000 square feet respectively, 
the Uniqlo stores are five times 


the size of the tvluji store that 
opened nearby in .November 
2014 to hoards of shoppers 
waiting patiently for the op¬ 
portunity to spend their money' 
on Japanese minimalist home- 
wares. 

But the stores are much 
smaller than the neighbour¬ 


ing competitor it hopes to one 
day beat. H&M, which operates 
across 57,000 square feet at TEC. 

Uniqlo's parent company, 
last Retailing* has declared it 
wants to become the world's 
leading global apparel com¬ 
pany. According to its own data, 
it is currently in fourth place, 
behind Inditex (Zara), based in 
Spain, Hennes & Mauritz (HSMji 
in Sweden and Limited Brands 
in the U.S., which operates a 
stable of brands including Vic¬ 
toria’s Secret. 

Almost uniquely, Uniqlo does 
not target a particular market. 
There is no talk of millennial 5 
or gen L or boomers or lack of 
them during the short lunch¬ 
eon meeting. 

Uniqlo clothes are meant to 
be worn by everyone. Uniqlo 
collaborates with designers and 
celebrities to produce limited 
edition collections. 
torstar newsservice 


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AIR PLAINES 

Boeing working on deal 
with Iran worth billions 


Tals notice that on the 26lh day of June, 2016 at 5:30 A,M., at 
Calgary Family Court, Courtroom # 301 . 6 Q 1 - 5 th Street SUIT, 
Calvary, Alberta, a heariisg will take place. 

A. Diktat, undai :h Chi d Youth and family tnliaxemenl Ad vn II make anapfUunlcn ler: 
Permanent Gicnd Unship Order; ul y::ur l hid Lot on 'Seplembur 3rd 2013. 

II win La speak id tHi iratter In «sui, ytu VlUi I append- in court on Ihti ddta. foe do 
haw tte liglil Id ::h represented by a lawyer. II you do not attend n patron or by a lawyer, 
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Contract: Jackie Ellice; tearing Bainei; Danis Ira Eggirik 

Canary tegtOfy Child and Family Services 
' Fliurie; (403) 257-3976 


Boeing Co. is negotiating a deni 
to sell 100 airplanes to Iran, 
stale-run media reported Sun¬ 
day, a sale potentially worth 
billions that would mark the 
first major entry of an Amer¬ 
ican company into the Islamic 
Republic after last year’s nu¬ 
clear deal. 

Chicago-based Boeing de¬ 
clined to discuss details of 
the talks or the figure of 100 
planes, attributed to Ali Abed- 
zadeh. the head of Iran's Civil 
Aviation Organization. 

Regulatory hurdles and U.S. 


sanctions that remain in place 
after the nuclear agreement 
could complicate the deal. De¬ 
spite efforts by the U.S. State 
Department to encourage trade 
to Iran, many American firms 
remain worried about the legal 
and political ramifications of 
any agreements with the coun¬ 
try. 

The state-run IRAN news¬ 
paper quoted Abed zade has say¬ 
ing negotiations took “several 
stages" and final figures and 
terms had yet to be reached. 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 






























VIEWS 


Your essential daily news 


URBAN ETIQUETTE ELLEN VANSTONE 



Dear Elleh, 

I am a cautious cyclist 
and obey all the rules of the 
road. But l recently nearly got 
doored when a cab pulled 
into the bike lane and the 
passenger opened the door 
to get out I stopped in time, 
with my front wheel touch¬ 
ing the inside of the car door. 
The passenger was surprised 
but nobody got hurt. I was 
in a mild state of shock and 
kept going without saying 
anything. Then I heard tlhe 
cyclist behind me pull up and 
start screaming and swear¬ 
ing at the cab. which was 
also upsetting. My question 
is: Should 3 have said some¬ 
thing? How do you effectively 
and politely tell the offending 
motorist what's what? 

Signed, 

Cathy 

Dear Cathy, 

You letter makes me love 
Canada, for where else could a 
law-abiding citizen be as upset 
about public profanity as with 
almost being killed? 

The fact is, getting doored is 
extremely upsetting, but it can 
also be shocking and some¬ 
times physically dangerous for 
the car driver or passenger— 
which am give some satisfac¬ 
tion to some of us. In general, 
in Ihe aftermath of near-dooi- 
ing, you needn't feel bad about 
riding ulf without saying any¬ 
thing, There are precious few 
times in life when a person 
is entirely in the right and 
entitled (o some sharp words 
with someone who is entirely 
in the wrung, but if in the mo¬ 
ment you choose for whatever 
situational spiritual or emo¬ 
tional reason to believe that 
the door-opening party has 
experienced a highly teach¬ 
able moment and is unlikely 
to repeat the mistake, with 
or without a verbal dressing- 
down from you, you're certain¬ 
ly within your rights to invoke 
the no-harm-no-foul principle. 

But close shaves with cab¬ 
bies might require extra cor- 


THE QUESTION 

While cycling, I almost got doored by 
a passenger in a cab. I decided not to 
say anything, but the cyclist behind 
me went ballistic on my behalf. Should 
I have engaged the offenders? How 
does one do that politely? 



rv'a 

o 


recti re action. Cab drivers, of 
all people, ought to know the 
hazards cyclists are subject to, 
And, as drivers responsible for 
the safety of their passengers, 
they should always check the 
curb lane fur two-wheeled traf¬ 
fic before allowing their char¬ 
ges to exit. As lor those who 
fail in this regard, even to the 
point of"pulling into a dedkat- 
ed. delineated bike lane to dis¬ 
gorge a human being into the 
paths of hurtling cyclists — 
Well, screaming and swearing 
are unlikely to educate such 
selfish, oblivious boobs, but I 
wouldn't blame Liny upset cyc¬ 
list for trying anyway. 

1 myself prefer to inflict a 
different kind of torture to 
offending drivers. .Any time a 
car cuts me off, nearly doors 
me err startles me with honk¬ 
ing, 1 deliver a long, extremely 
polite lecture, in very simple 
language, as if 3 were speak¬ 
ing to an exceptionally stupid 


alien from a planet without 
bicycles. 1 find this to be a 
relaxing exercise that always- 
helps to take the edge off my 
anxiety’ after someone has al¬ 
most killed me. 

Sometimes the exercise is 
more exercising than relaxing, 
as when, in order to deliver 
my helpful lecture, I have to 
chase the car tor a block or 
two, then circle around to the 
front of the vehicle to trap 
them at a light, or block the 
driver door if they’ve pulled 
over to park. Once, when I was 
younger arid fitter. I chased 
a pickup truck for at least a 
kilometre, and managed to 
catch up and confront the 
driver as he was getting out 
of his vehicle. Boy was he sur- 
prised- In fact, when I politely 
started to ask him why he'd 
almost run me over, he started 
screaming and swearing at 
me. Actually, as he started to 
advance on me, i t was lucky 


©An, Cfl^i Ho 


I was still on my bike so T 
could ride away before he had 
time to teach me on foot or 
get back into his over-amped 
truck and chase me. 

Looking back, I now see 
that risking my life a second 
time in a bid to educate a 
driver might not have been 
the wisest thing, And 3 prob¬ 
ably contributed to his almost 
running over any number of 
cyclists after that. 

Actually, Cathy. I think your 
riding off without a word was 
the right thing to do. Thank¬ 
fully, the majority of drivers 
are careful and responsible 
around cyclists these days, so 
when you encounter a bad 
one, it's probably best to leave 
quietly and i n one piece while 
you still can, 


Need advice? 
Email Ellen: 

scens@metionsws.ca 


Monday, June 20,2016 


ROSEMARY 
WESTWOOD 

Even by the standards 
of jargon, 'deep dive' 
is as shallow as it gets 



Finance Minister Bill Morneau, 
rest assured, has this housing 
marking crisis under control. 
You can tell by his evocative 
language. 

"We're making sure that we 
have a deep dive into the in¬ 
formation to ensure that any 
considerations we have for 
change are evidence-based" 
he said this week. 

Deep diving is now de 
rigueur, it's en vogue, it's 
reached new heights. In 
the space of a day of radio 
broadcasting, one reporter 
noted medical students tak¬ 
ing a deep dive into HIV and 
AIDS policy and a listener to a 
call-in show talked of a deep 
dive in post-secondary fund¬ 
ing. And the New York Times 
published a recent "Deep 
Dive Into Benjamin Zander's 
'Shining Eyes."'' 

Everywhere you look, 
people are strapping on 
the intellectual scuba gear. 
Online slang dictionaries 
peg the earliest metaphoric, 
non-aquatic use of the term 
to 2009. Katherine Barber, 
founding editor in chief of 
Canadian Oxford Dictionary, 
hadn't yet had the pleasure of 
encountering this slang when 
I called her up last week, but 
it didn't take too long to con¬ 
firm its soaring status. 

"Yes, it is increasing in 
frequency in use," she said r 
after consulting the Corpus 
of Contemporary American 
English. "It is a buzzword, 
isn't itf' 

Most of the recent men¬ 
tions were from news reports, 
she noted, though we both 


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agreed it sounded like a 
business term (run amok, I 
added). 

And, of course, it's appar¬ 
ently already over. 

The business website The 
Muse dubbed it a word to 
stop using way back in 2013: 
"Do you need a wetsuit for 
that? Why use such a meta¬ 
phorical phrase when you 
could just say you'll investi¬ 
gate something?" 

My thoughts exactly. Deep 
diving reeks of trying too 
hard to sound down with the 
lingo, and already sounds 
cliche, in this era of quick hits 
and hot takes, to promise a 
"deep dive" is to immediately 
raise suspicion about the 
dive's true depth. What are 
you doing the rest of the 
lime, Mr, Morneau? Shallow 
diving with a snorkel? 

Barber is kinder to deep 
diving than am I. "it's very 
evocative, right? You have 
an image of your head of the 
scuba diver going way, way 
down to the bottom of the 
ocean to look at things." 

Of course, she's right. A 
deep dive is far more cine¬ 
matic than a close look, It 
might work in a boardroom, 
where people are always circ¬ 
ling back, working on a go- 
forward basis and executing 
act ionebles. But as language 
that's supposed to assure me 
we?e serious about address¬ 
ing the 37 per cent jump in 
Vancouver home prices in 
just the last year, for ex¬ 
ample? 

id rather, Morneau, that 
you simply investigate. 


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LIFE 



b 


Yourcssc iitial daily news 


Meet Anvitha Vijay, 9, Apple's youngest developer. She learned coding at age 7 from YouTube 


Workout for fighting White Walkers 



Train er Dalton Wong, seen left with Kit H ari ngton of Game of Thrones, took reporter Jonathan Forani {above) through a Game of 
Thrones workout, tgrstar news service 


HEALTH 

Game of 
Thrones trainer 
offers tips for 
staying fit 

Kit Hari ngton T trainer knows 
nothing of jon S now. 

That's because celebrity fit¬ 
ness expert Dalton Wong doesn't 
watch Game ofThrones, the HBQ 
drama starring his client. 

Though several actors from 
the pop-alar fantasy epic work out 
at the Victoria B.C.-bred trainer's 
U.K. studio, 'twenty Ttoo 'IrainLng, 
Wong doesn't tare whether they 
defeat the White Walkers or "‘al¬ 
ways pay their debts." 

"People ask me a lot of ques¬ 
tions about (the show), and I 
truthfully say k J don't know,"" 
he says. 

Wong is concerned about 
whether his Game of Thrones 
clients choose vodka-water or a 
pint of beer at their next A-lister 
party. Choosing the former is 
among the many fitness and 
nutrition tips Wong lays out in 
his new book The feelgood Plan 
(Sterling Epicure: £24.95), writ¬ 
ten with bis client Kate FalthfuU- 
WiUiams, a health and fitness 
writer, and featuring a forward 
by Academy Award-winner and 
Wong's client Jennifer Lawrence. 

What inspired your new 
book? 

It’s 20 years of what I've been 
doing, teaching people how 
to live a healthy lifestyle. Why 
people like Kit (Haringtori) like 
coming to see me is I teach 
them those other things that 


people don’t really talk about 
— Like how to go to an A-lister 
party, how to go to the pub. 
how to drink, how to go out 

W hat s a celeb tip for going 
out? 

When you go to a pub. don't 
drink pints, drink bottled beer. 

Why is that? 

It's portion control. Most 
diet books tell you “Don’t 
drink and don’t eat choco¬ 
late." Lome on. these guys are 
Hollywood stars. They want to 
go and have fun. My thing is 
to tell them: here's w r hal you 


can and can’t have, go out and 
have flm. make sure you're 
back to work and back to the 
gym. With that approach, 
you'll still look good and you’ll 
still feel amazing. 

What arc some celebrity rules 
for eating out? 

For them, if they're going out 
drinking, 1 never let them go 
out on an empty stomach. If 
they're going out to eat and 
they're drinking, they will 
probably eat a tittle bit less so 
they can have a bit more fun. 

If they're going out drinking, 
they would have clear spirits 


like vodka rather than whisky 
or rye. 

Is that the celebrity drink of 
Choke? 

It’s just really low calorie, 
What J like to tell people is 
if you're out and you hive 
something very clear, no one 
can tell ififs sparkling water 
Or not. 

[.etc talk loot! and the gym, 
C;ui you ruin :i workout with 
a piy.va? 

Yeah, Or you go to the gym 
and you haven’t eulen any¬ 
thing beforehand (mimics 


struggling to lift weights) — 
it’s pointless. Lots of people 
put so much emphasis on the 
exercise and not about the 
food, 

Should you cut before you go 
to the gym? 

It depends. 1 don't. I can have a 
green drink and a coHee. and 1 
don't. That's just my personal 
preference and I don't lilt very 
heavy weights. Ifyou want to 
lift heavy weights you do need 
some fuel in thill gas lank. 

Bui it’s not using Red Bull or 
(energy supplement) creatine. 

TQRSTAR NEWS SERVICE 


o THE MOVES 

Reporter Jonathan Korani 
met with Wong to try what 
the Star has dubbed the 
Game of Thrones workout 
he designed for Han ngton. 
The routine features plenty 
of torso-twistmg, similar 
to movements Harington 
might have to do on the 
show. 

Here are a few of the 
exercises: 


■ Bridge lift 

On your back, with feet 
flat on the ground, Inga in 
a 9Q-degree angle, lift the 
hips up towards the ceiling 
until the body is straight. 
Repeat this motion for one 
minute, then hold it in rhe 
bridge position for one 
minute. 

I> Side to side 

Then, with feet and back 
flat on the ground, legs in 
a 90-degree angie. keep 
the knees together and 
move them sloe to side 
all the way to the ground 
on the left and then the 
right. Repeat this motion 10 
times, 

■ Lunge walks 

Crouched down, hands or 
the floor., with the left leg 
ahead and the right leg 
behind, push the left kree 
out., stretching the groin. 
Step forward with the right 
leg, pushing out the knee 
with your right elbow. Do 10 
steps. 



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metrSLIFE Money 


17 



MONEY MATTERS 

Frugal living 
helped one 
Vaz-Oxlade fan 
buy her home 

"o^ii /V 

Vaz-Oxlade \ . 

For Metro Ga Jfl 

One of the pleasures of going 
on a book tour is the people 
I get to meet. 

Let me introduce you to 
June who 1 met on my re¬ 
cent trip for my latest book. 
Money Talks.. (Jane isn't her 
real name, you know that.) 

So Jane walked up to me, 
eyes sparkling, a huge grin 
on her fate. "You saved my 
life!" she says very matter- 
of-factly. 

“You exaggerate," t grinned 
at her. 


do it? 

“The first thing l did was 
quit smoking/ replied Jane. 

“1 watched you flush that 
guy's cigarettes down the 
toilet a bunch of times and 
then I did it/ 
jane saved just over 57,000 
in two years just doing this. 

“I opened up a savings 
account and called it 'Not 
Smoking 1 and every week 
I moved the equivalent of 
what would have gone up in 
smoke into savings/ 

What else did Jane do? 
She started to carpool with 


a couple of friends. 

“And I started making my 
trips really count by doing 
all my errands at once. 

“E figure l was saving about 
$25 a week in gas alone never 
mind the maintenance on 
my car/ 

Then when Jane's car pay¬ 
ment ended, she channeled 
the money from the car pay¬ 
ment into her savings. 

“1 was spending 5372.27 a 
month on my car loan. So l 
opened up another account 
ELnd called it 'Car Savings' and 
ended up with 59.450 in it/ 

Were there any downsides 
to her rabid savings plan? 


Yup. T here wasn't a lot of 
going out. And because she 
took in a student as a roomie, 
there also wasn’t a lot of pri¬ 
vacy. Was it worth it? 

“It sure was. My roommate 
saved me S400 a month on 
my rent. And I saved about 
3270 a month on entertain¬ 
ing myself and my daughter, 
Julia, at home." 

‘'Let me guess/ 1 said, “an¬ 
other savings account." 

“Yes ma’am/ said jane. 

“How much?" 


“56,830." 

“You're still a long way of 
S40K," said !. 

“Not so long" said Jane. “I 
had some help." 

“Mom and Dad?" 1 asked. 

“Everyone 1 know," she 
laughed. “1 told anyone who 
would normally give me a 
present for my birthday or 
for Christmas to give me 520 
instead to help me get the 
best present ever: a home 
of my own." 

Another account? 

Yup. 

“I have wonderful parents 
who really wanted to help. 
My father had a huge gar¬ 
age sale and added it 
to my House Savings 
account." 

How much? $ 1,200 in 
two years. Nice family 
and friends! 

“Haw'd you come up 
with the rest?" 

“The usual: I only 
shopped for Julia in 

second hand stores and 
didn't buy very much for 
myself. 

I brown-bagged it at work, 
switched from coffee to tea 
and stopped buying books 
and renting movies. We 
spend every Saturday at the 
library. It’s entertainment 
and we get to bring home 
stuff." 

“Well done," I said, 

“Thanks," she smiled. -I 
couldn't have done it with¬ 
out you." 

Actually, she could have, 
but I was glad to have helped. 

For more money advice, visit 
Gail ^ website at gailvazoxlade. 
com 


"Only a little," she smiled 
back at me. “Because of you 
I saved S40.000 in two 
years so 1 could buy a 
home/ 

“Wow!" I said, very 
impressed. “How'd you 



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Monday, June 20,2016 


id 




YOU CAN DO THIS WELDER 


'Overall, welding is an artistic trade' 


WHY I LIKE MY JOB 

Emily Vickers, 26, Pipe Welder/ 
Welding Inspector at Westlake In¬ 
dustries, Burlington, 0nt, 

I always knew I wouldn't have a traditional 
job, and when J stalled welding I thought, 
"Ibis is itr 

At the age of 22,1 researched where the 
jobs were before 1 decided what L wanted to 
be. i decided to enrol in a year-long weld¬ 
ing course at a private trade school. 1 had 
never worked with tools before, but the 
program helped me prepare for govern¬ 
ment-regulated tests in structural beam 
welding mid simple piping. 

•Currently, I am responsible for welding 
process piping for stainless, carbon and 
chrome pipelines. It is my duty to make 
sure all pipes ate rigged and welded seam¬ 
lessly to be deetned safe for Lise in the field. 

[ see more women getting into the weld¬ 
ing industry each year, which J find very 
exciting. In my experience, women often 
have a better eye for detail and, dare J say, 
make the better welder. The job can be 
physically demanding, but that doesn’t 
mean that women are incapable. 

Overall, welding is an artistic trade. I 
enjoy my job because at the end of the day 
I can look baclk and say, "1 built that.' But 
I’m no starving artist; J was able to walk 
away from my apprenticeship debt-free, 
with money in the bank. I am buying my 
first home this week! 



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THE BASICS; Welder 

$ 51,193 

_ A _ 

$51/193: Median salary 
of welders in Canada. An 
apprentice wifi start at a lower 
rate but gradually earn more as 
they pursue their journeyperson 
certification. Advanced welders 
can make upwards of $85,000. 



The amount of growth 
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A combination of over three years of work 
experience and post-secondary certification is 
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an apprenticeship following a one-year weld¬ 
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WHERE YOU CAN GO 

Certified welders can expect to find work in 
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Since so many professional industries rely on 
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metrsi lI K Entertainment 


Monday, June 20,2016 19 



JOHANNA SCHNELLER 
WHAT I'M WATCHING 


Women still can't 
get angry onscreen 


We love breakups because 
happy couples are boring 



EFeyonce and Jay Z attend Game 6 of the 2016 N BA Finals between the Cleveland Cavaliers and 
the Golden State Warriors on Thursday in Cleveland, Ohio, jason miller/csctty images 


THE SHOW: Full Frontal With 
Samantha Bee 

THE MOMENT: The "righteous" 
anger 

Less than 48 hours after the 
mass shooting in Orlando. Fla., 
that left 49 dead, host Sam Bee 
stands onstage, wearing a black 
leather jacket and vibrating with 
emotion. “The standard operat¬ 
ing procedure is that you deliver 
some well-meaning words about 
how love wins," she says. “F— it. 
1 am too angry for that H 

She shows a dip of Florida 
Senator Marco Rubio. “This 
could have happened anywhere 
in the world,” he says. '‘Unfortu¬ 
nately, today it was Orlando's 
turn." 

“Orlando's turn?" Bee sput¬ 
ters. “Mass shootings are so nor¬ 
malized now that we're taking 
turns'? ... Can't we get semi¬ 
automatic assault rifles out of 
the hands of civilians"? ... The 
ones that mow down a room full 
of people in seconds'? Yes, J do 
want to take those guns away" 

The seven-minute monologue 


immediately went viral, hi the 
week since it aired, many hailed 
Bee as the necessary successor 
to Jon Stewart. Others called her 
“too angry'.” Interestingly, both 
groups used the same language: 
words like furious, blistering, 
visceral: phrases like "guttural 
scream" and “righteous rage” 
One commentator wrote that 
the monologue "broke open the 
idea that a person j especially a 
woman) cannot be emotional 
and analytical at the same time." 

The reaction drives home 
the point that it's still taboo 
for a woman to show anger on¬ 
screen. Even in 2016, women are 
expected to accommodate, as¬ 
suage, phicate. Those who don't 
smile get accused of “resting 
bitch face." Bee proves that, of 
course, women can do anything, 
but the most subversive thing 
they can do is show anger. 


Johanna Sthneiler is a media 
connoisseur who zeroes in on 
pop-culture moments. She ap¬ 
pears Monday t hrough Thursday. 


RELATIONS HIPS 

For celebrities, 
splitting up 
can be a good 
earecr move 

from Beyonce turning a sup¬ 
posedly souring marriage into 
Lemonade to Michael Strahan 
making Kelly Rip a lose the will 
to Live!, the breakup business 
is booming in Hollywood. 

Everywhere, it seems, stars 
are separating in slow-motion, 
Recently', we’ve seen the typ¬ 
ical ruptured relationships 
(Taylor Swift and Calvin Har¬ 
ris. Demi Lovato and Wi Inner 
V'alderrama), professional part¬ 
nerships gone sour (Castle's 
Nathan billion and Stana Katie, 
Shtrahan/Edpaj and bust-ups that 
blur the line between the two 
I tizzy and Sharon Osbourne’s 
crazy train finally pulling into 
the station). Even Marvel mov¬ 
ies are obsessed with super¬ 
heroes breaking up. 

When it comes to separa¬ 
tions, we're insatiable — and 
celebrities are onto lis. Where 
once it seemed only fringe ce¬ 
lebrities were willing to openly 
leverage personal stuff for pub¬ 
licity, now it seems even stars 
at the apex of the A-list feed 
fans a steady diet of dirt. Never 
before have famous people 
worked so hard to persuade 
us thEit their personal lives are 
just as disastrous as our own. 

Consider Justin Bieber and 
Helena Gomez, whose January 
2013 breakup inspired more 


hits than the Blue Jays bullpen. 
By what we're sure was a total 
coincidence, each ex released 
a chart-topping, heartbreak- 
laden album within a month of 
one another last fall and they 
dropped new videos within 
days of each other earlier this 
month. 

All this feels intentional. But 
how much celebrity disclosure 
is persona] and how much is 
strategic? 

“As a publicist, my job is 


to get and keep clients in the 
news so that they remain top 
of mind and relevant,” said 
Ginger Bert rand , owner and 
principal publicist of Gab Com¬ 
munications, who has worked 
with Hugh Jackman and Mandy 
Moore. 

Perhaps stability just bores 
us. Was anyone particularly 
stoked for the first Swift al¬ 
bum crafted in domestic bliss, 
with songs |presumably ) about 
Netflix binges and staying in 


Saturdays? Remember how in- 
tolerable Jim and Pam became 
on The Office? 

“Even in a TV series, they're 
going to kill off happy couples, 
divorce them or find a way to 
get yon back in that compel¬ 
ling narrative,” said Mount 
Saint Vincent University profes¬ 
sor Robert Wade Kenny. "The 
media Heis a great interest in 
this because when couples are 
boring, the media is boring." 

TORSTAR HtWS SERVICE 



The reaction to Samantha Bee's recent monologue shows it's 
still taboo for a woman to show anger onscreen. getty images 



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Andy Murray claimed a record fifth title at Queen's Club Sunday as he recovered from a set and 3-0 down to beat Milos Raonic 6-7 (5), 6-4,6-3 


LeBron’s legend taller 
than ever after Game 7 



Lc-Bron James lifts the Larry O'Brien Trophy on Sunday night in Oakland. 

LiKA SHAWK5ETTY IMAGES 


NBA FINALS 

Mr. Everything 
leads Cleveland 
to long-awaited 
championship 

LeBron James and his relentless, 
fiever-count-thenvoiit Cavaliers 
pulled off an improbable MBA 
finals comeback, and Cleveland 
is title town again at long lasL 

James delivered on a prom¬ 
ise from two years ago to bring 
a championship to his native 
northeast Ohio, and he and the 
Cavs became the first team to 
rally from a 3-1 finals deficit by 
beating the defending champion 
Golden State Warriors 93-S9 
on Sunday night to end a 52- 
year major sports championship 
drought ill Clev elan d 

James almost single-handed¬ 
ly carried the Cavs back into 
this series and finished with 
27 points, 11 assists and 11 re¬ 
bounds as the Cavs captured 
their first championship in fran¬ 
chise history and gave their city 
its first major sports winner 
since the Browns won the NFL 
title in 1964. 

"CLEVELAND! This is for you!" 
James bellowed in his post- 
game interview before being 
announced as finals MVP. 

An emotional James fell to 
the floor when this one ended 
with a second win in six days on 


GAME In Oakland 



Golden State's imposing home 
floor. Only seconds earlier, he 
went down in pain with 10.6 
seconds left after being fouled 
by Draymond Green while go¬ 
ing fora dunk, then came hack 
out to make the second of two 
free throws. 

Kyrie Irving scored 26 points 
to cap his brilliant finals, includ¬ 
ing a three-pointer over MVP Ste¬ 
phen Curry with 53 seconds left. 

Green had 32 points, 15 re¬ 
bounds and nine assists, but 
the Warriors' record-setting 
season ended without the only 
prize this close-knit "Strength 
In Numbers" crew cared about 
from way back in the beginning 
— through the record 24-0 start 
as Coach of the Year Steve Kerr 
was out, Curry 's second consecu¬ 
tive MVP campaign, and the 73 
regular-season wins to break the 
1995-96 Chicago Bulls' mark. 

They might always be remem¬ 
bered as one of the best teams 
ever that couldn't dose it out. 

tHE ASSOCIATED PRESS 


HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA 

Sources: Ron to swap 
back in for Strombo 


NASCAR 

Hornish down to 
business at Xfinity 


George Btroumboulopoulos 
won't return as host of Hock¬ 
ey Night in Canada next sea¬ 
son, sources tell lbrstarNews 
Service. 

His replacement will be the 
man he replaced. Industry in¬ 
siders say Ron Mac Lean it ex¬ 
pected to return to the show’s 
No. 1 seat just two seasons after 
Stroumboulopoulos was hired 
with much fanfare in the wake 
of Rogers' S5.2-billion acquisi¬ 
tion of NHL broadcasting rights. 
Prior to that. MacLean occupied 


the job from 1986 
until 2014. 

The ouster of 
Btrou mb ou lop- 
ou] os marks a 
strategic about- 
face for Rogers, 
which sublicenses 
Hockey Night in 
Canada to CBC. 
Ron Maclean 
told the Canadian Press Sunday 
night that "nothing's official" 

TOR5TAR NEWS SERVICER 
THE CANADIAN PRESS 


0 IN BRIEF 

Stroman's st niggles 
continue as Jays fall DoO's 

In a duel between prolific 
offensive teams, the 
Blue Jays were unable to 
overcome a disappointing 
outing for Marcus Stroman. 

The Baltimore Orioles 
amassed e season- high 19 
hits against Stroman and 
five relievers,, and the Jays 
wasted homer& by Troy 
TulowiUki and ftevon Travis 
in an 11-6 loss Sunday. 

Stroman (6-3) gave up 
seven runs and 10 hits in 
3-2/3 innings. 

!HE ASSOCIATED KRESS 


Bam Hornish Jr. won three Indy- 
Car championships and tin In¬ 
dianapolis 500 before fading into 
obscurity as a NASCAK driver. 

Sunday's win in Iowa will un¬ 
doubtedly rank among his most 
memorable moments. 

Hornish, just six days after ac¬ 
cepting an offer to race for the 
first time in 2016 in the vaunted 
No. IS car for Joe Gibbs Racing, 
led 1S3 of 250 laps for a domin¬ 
ant win at the NASCAR Xfinity 
race at Iowa Speedway. 

Hornish picked up his first 


win in two years, 
which also came at 
Iowa's 0.875-mile 
oval. But Sunday 
was the first time 
Hornish's three 
children were able 
to see him win, fit¬ 
tingly on father's 
Day. 

“I can't tell you what this 
means to me. 1 worked so hard 
to try to get a win when l had my 
kids here," Hornish said. 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 



George 

Stroumb- 

oulopoulos 

GETTY IMAGES 



Sam 

Hornislt Jr. 

GETTY IMAGES 


U,S. OPEN 

Dustin 
has day 
in the sun 


Dusti n Johnson settled the score 
Sunday in the U.S. Open. 

Johnson atoned for his past 
mishaps in the majors by show¬ 
ing he had the smarts to handle 
the toughest test in golf even 
while playing the final two hours 
without knowing where he stood 
when the USGA questioned 
whether he should be penalized 
one stroke for his ball moving 
on the fifth green. 

Johnson said it 
didn't. The USGA 
said it would wait 
until after the 
round to decide, 

America's most 
powerful golfer 
took matters into 
his own hands at 
Qakmont, capping 
off a chaotic and confusing final 
round by stuffing his approach 
into five feet for a birdie that 
made the penalty a moot point. 

The USGA ended up penal¬ 
izing him. turning that 68 into 
a 1-under 69. The score was ir¬ 
relevant. He won by three shots. 

finally^ he's a major winner. 

Johnson scooped lip iflrmonth 
son 'latum into his arms on fath¬ 
er's Day and raised the silver 
trophy for all to see. 

“I’ve been here a bunch of 
times and haven't quite got it 
done." Johnson said. “But today, 
1 did. And it feels really good." 

He saluted a Pittsburgh crowd 
that was on his side even amid 
all the uncertainty. The grand¬ 
stands were raucous, with one 
fan shouting, "What's the call, 
US GAT At the trophy presenta¬ 
tion, when box Sports announcer 
Joe Buck brought up the penalty 
situation, the crowd booed. 

“1 just tried to focus on what 
J was doing, not worrying about 
the penalty stroke," Johnson said. 
“Just playing golf from here to 
the house." 

He slammed the door at the 
end —a 10-foot par save on the 
16th hole to keep his lead at two 
shots, a solid par on the 17th as 
Shane Lowry was self-destructing 
behind him, and a shot into the 
18th that plopped down near the 
pin and settled five feet away 
for birdie. 

“Might be one of the best shots 
I’ve ever hit under the circum¬ 
stances ."Johnson said. 

He finished at 4-under 276, 
the lowest winning score in nine 
U.S. Opens at Oakmonl. 

THE ASSOCIATED >*RESS 



Dustin 

Johnson 

GETTY IMAGES 



















metr# sports 


Monday, June 20,2016 21 


Historic win keeps Albanian hopes alive 


EURO# 

-' > 


GROUP STAGE 


First major 
victory may see 
minnows make 
the last 16 

U's going’ to be ei long three days 
for Albania as the smnll Balkan 
country wails to find out if it 's to 
qualify for the knockout stages 
of the European Championship. 

Albania kept its hopes of 
qualifying for the round of 16 
alive with a 1-0 victory over Ro¬ 
mania on Sunday, a result that 


eliminated its opponent. 

The result meant Albania, 
playing in its first major tour¬ 
nament. went above Romania 
in the group rankings into 
third place with three points, 
and still in with a chance to 
make the round of 16. Armando 
Sadiku scored the sole goal in 
the nuitch and Albania's first in 
an international competition in 
the 43rd minute with a heEider. 

“it was historical for 
us to reach the European 
Championship's final stages, 
and finally we have won the 
three points," Albania cen¬ 
tre bEick Arlind Ajeti said via 
a translator. “We have made 
history. 1 ’ 


In Lyon 


Ajeti and the Albania team 
will have to wait until the 
group stage of Euro 2016 
finishes on Wednesday before it 
finds out whether it will be one 
of the four third-place teams to 
make it through to the next 
round. Albania’s future in the 





competition depends on what 
happens over the coming days 
but coach Giovanni De Biasi said 
his team will be preparing as 
though it has a match to play 
either on Eriday or Saturday. 

“If we stay in the tourna¬ 
ment we will be tumble to other 
teams." he said via a translator. 

In Paris. France and Switz¬ 
erland settled for a 0-0 draw. 

France was the stronger side 
and squandered several scor¬ 
ing chances, which it also did 
against Romania and Albania. 

The result ended up suiting 
both, with fiance taking first 
place in Group A and the Swiss 
advancing in second place. 

THE ASSOCIATED FfiESS 


Armando Sadiku scored Albania's first-ever European 
Championship final goat on Sunday against Romania, jeff 

PACWOUD/AFP^ETTV IMAGtS 








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22 Monday, June 20,2016 


metres play 


r RECIPE Slow Cooker Pulled Fork 


CROSSWORD Canada Across and Down BY KELLY ANN BUCHANAN 



Cert Marsh & l > 
Laura Keogh %T 0 ft 

For Metro Canada 

Don't put yOur stow cooker 
away for the Summer — noth¬ 
ing keeps your kitchen cooler. 

1 his retipc yields Enough pOrk 
for two d inners. Read tomor¬ 
row for Lhe Followup recipe! 
Ready in 

Rrep Lime: 30 minutes 
Cook time: B hours 3D minutes 
Makes a to io servings 

Ingredients 

-13 to Jib. boneless pork 
shoulder blade roast 
* Y, Oup brown sugar 

- a iso salt 

■ A tsp thi!i powder 

*2 tap dried mustard powder 

-1 tap ground cumin 

-1 tap garlic pOwdter 

-1 tsp ground black pepper 

- 1/2 tsp cinnamon 

-1/4 tsp ground nutmeg 

- 2 tsp vegetable oil 

- 1/2 cup apple cider vinega r 
-1/2 cup Orange juice 

- 3 I bsp tomato paste 

- 6 brioche bunS 


powder, dried mustard powder, 
cumin, garlic powder, black pep¬ 
per, cinnamon and nut meg. Rub 
the spice mix over the pork. 

2. Heat Lhe vegetable oil m a 
large skillet over medium heat: 
add the pork and brown all sides 
for about ID m inutes. Remove 
the pork from the skillet and 

set aside on a plate. 

3. Add 3/4 cup (185 ml} waLer to 
Lhe ski let and wfusk anLo the drip¬ 
pings. Transfer the liquid from the 
pan intoyO-ur slow cooker. Add 
the vinegar, juice, tomato paste 
and remaining 2 1 bsp (3D ml) of 
brown Sugar to the Slow cooker 
arid whisi. Add the pork and cov¬ 
er, cook on low for a hours. 

4. J the liquid does not fully 
cover yOur shoulder you'll need 
to turn it at the hall way poinL 
Remove the pork and transfer 
to a cutting hoard. Pour the li- 
giisd into a Dutch man over low 
heat to keep it warm, 

5. Shred the pork, using two 
forks, or roughly chop. Add the 
shrsc ried meat to the Dutch 
oven and combine wrth sauce. 
Taste and season with Ealt. 


Directions 

1. In a small bowl, combine 2 
I bsp of brown Sugar, salt, Chi: 


FOR: MORE MEAL IDEAS* VISIT 
5WE ET POTATQCH R ON ICLE ELC OM 


J 


ACROSS 

1, Caesar’s 202 
5. "Meatballs* (1979) star 
...his mitral ^ sharers 
a. Visibly stunned 

13. Vases 

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of the day) 

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brother 

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10L ReaverTail or Na¬ 
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21. Gateau _ 

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23 Its new and is re¬ 
garded us one of Lhe 
top courses in the 
world by V54 -Across: 

? wds, 

25. Tidies, say 
27. Even if. briefly 
2d. City in California 
30. One of Canadas 
acting Ryans 
35 l Celebration 

36. Soam 

37. Additional 

38. Tackle boy item 
41. Serious Skincare 
entiepreneur. Jen¬ 
nifer (Sylvester 
Stallone'S wife) 

43. Popular tree 

44. __ with nature 
AS. Ntolson Can¬ 
adian: 3 wds. 

50, Actress Ms, Ling 

53. Architect Mr. 
Saarinen 

54. Game on the green 
publication: 7 wds-. 

56. Television upot, 
diem 2 wds. 

56. Irish souvenir 
59. John Keats, 
for one 



60. Weight al¬ 
lowance 

61, AnrianL Dead 
Sea la nd 

65. M r. Autry'3 
65 Canonized Mile. 
64. Ballpark ftgg, 

Down 

1 Hen 


2. ’Gladiator (2000) 
sun Russell 

3. Nova Scotia... 
fr23-Acrass' western 
shores locale on Cape 
Breton Island 

4. KT Tunstall's "Sud¬ 
denly _" 

5. Comments-m- 
snippets 


6. California city, 
San^ 

1 . DOrOthy _ (Can¬ 
adian IO whom Bryan 
■Adams' song The 
Best Wes Vet to- Come" 
is dedicated) 

8. Director Mr. Lee 

9. Bennifer mov 
ic of 2003 


10. Robert Fiost poem, 
_ _Tiwd« 

H. l-onl flourish 
12. "Hay there..." li¬ 
brary sounds 
14._ salad fPic- 
nicefeh} 

16. Must scratch, 
mustscratch.,, 

20. Qur na¬ 


tional hwy, 

24. Half of Eng¬ 
land's cap. 

26. Bible book, e.g. 

28. Tripled lat¬ 
ter meaning 'realty 
loud' in music 
29.1909 David Byrne 
album:Memo' 

60. Seoul's locale 
[acronym] 

31.11s capital is 
Muscat 

37. Hippy's neck¬ 
laces: 2 wds, 

35 Sott&_fAnti- 
perspirant brand) 

34. QtL hock¬ 
ey playci 
36. Consoles 

39. She'd opposite 

40. 

Bran^of ■knowledge 
suffix 

41. Dog sniffing the 
kibbles bag mean¬ 
ing: 2 wds. 

42. Ms. Loughlin 
44. Farlier 

45 Obscure 

46. Writer Charles' 
bookish surname 

47. Mr. Shimerman 
or "Star trek: Deep 
Space Nine" 

48. Racket 
49- Rjffinese 

51. Tie type 

52. List components 

55. Lea Michele's 
old show 

57. Firtdfipt. ranks 


# IT'S ALL IN THESTARS Your daily horoscope by Francis Drake 


CONCEPTIS SUDOKU . 


Every row, column and box contains 1-9 


T Arl« March 21 - April 20 
It's impossible to meet the demands 
of home and family as well as the 
demands of your job and youi 
Career today because of the Full 
Moon. Just cope as best you can. 

Taurus April 21 - May 21 
This is an accident-prone day for 
your sign because of lhe high emo¬ 
tions due to the Full Moon today. 
The key to avoiding an accident 
$5 to slay mellow a nd ca Irn. 

fl Gemini May 22 - June 21 
Disputes about money, shared 
property and inheritances might 
arise today. Wart a lew days, and 
this conflict will dimmish con¬ 
siderably. (Full Moon today.) 


0 Cancel' June 22 - July 23 
Today the only Full Moon opposite 
your sign all years taking place, 
f his is why rotations with partners 
and dose Friends are so testy and 
challenging! Mums the word. 

Lw July 24 - Aug. 23 
Be easygoing and understand¬ 
ing with co-workers loday, be¬ 
cause today's Full Moon -energy 
puts everyone on edge. A little 
patience can go a long way. 

nr Virgo Aug. 24 -5ept. 23 
Parents should be patient with 
their kids today because of the 
Full Moon energy. Meanwhile, 
this same advice applies to ro¬ 
mantic partners. Oh yeah. 


mim Libra Sept, 24 - Oct, 23 
A family member might make 
demands on your lime today; 
n evertheless, you have to focus 
on work. This is a tough choice, 
end you have to make it. 

Scorpio Oct. 24 - Nov, 22 
Travel plans might be stressed 
People a i eon edge because 
of the Full Moon today. Avoid 
controversial subjects like pol¬ 
itics, religion and racial issues. 

/ Sagittarius Nov. 23 - Dec, 21 
This is not a good day to address 
financial disputes or arguments 
about inhenlances and shared pi op 
Oily. WaiL until Lhc Full Moon is Ovu;. 
{Even tomorrow i£ a bEtter day.) 


J eapricurn Doc, 22- Jan, 20 
Today the only Full Moon ip yo-ur 
sign all year is taking place. The 
is wliy you feel so much emo¬ 
tion within you! Take caution 
about overreacting with others. 

"■w Aquarius. Jan, 21 - Fob, 19 
6e pa ti ent w ith co-workers a nd 
clients loday, because every¬ 
one can feel the Full Moon 
energy. Tomorrow is a much 
easier day. Just coast today. 

H Pisces 

Feb. 20 - March 20 
Romantic partners might be at odds 
today because of the Full Moon 
energy. However, even friends 
might have disputes. Stay mel¬ 
low, beoauEe this is so temporary. 




6 






3 

1 




5 

7 

4 

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8 

9 




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Tell us how you 
really feel. 

Join our online reader panel and help make your Metro even better. m et rone ws ,ca/pa nel 






















































































































































































































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