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since 1 1905 


VOL. m^cLK 



Campus 


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MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1964 


NO. 6 


'I Won't Vote!' 


80 Percent of Faculty 
Votes Democrat in Poll 


Over 80 per cent of the col 
lege faculty will support the 
Democratic ticket in Tuesday’s 
presidential election according 
to a poll taken by THE CAM¬ 
PUS last week. 

Of the 78 faculty members 
responding. 63 will vote for 
Johnson, five support Goldwa 
ter, five will vote for others 
(one for Robert Kennedy), 
three are undecided, and two 


Browne to Give 
Concert Sunday 

Playing his own compositions 
as well as more well-known 
works, pianist - composer Rob¬ 
ert Browne will present a con¬ 
cert Sunday evening at 8:15 in 
Mead Chajjel, 

An assistant in the music de¬ 
partment, Browne will per¬ 
form on the harpsichord, piano 
and organ. Admission to the 
concert is free. 

Browne will open the program 
with two fantasias for harpsi¬ 
chord selected from the Fitz- 
W'illiam Virginal Book. Contin¬ 
uing with a .scries of pieces 
showing development of the 
fantasia from the sixteenth to 
the nineteenth century, he will 
play a chromatic fantasy and 
fugue by Bach, a fantasy and 
fugue in C by Mozart, and a 
fantasia in F minor by Chopin, 
all for piano. 

Tire second half of the pro¬ 
gram will be devoted to original 
compositions by Browne, in¬ 
cluding three noctures and “A 
Louisiana Suite" for piano and 
three grand marches for the 
organ. 



will not vote at all. 

The poll indicated that the 
Republicans have lost some fac¬ 
ulty suport this year. Seven- 
t»cn faculty members who us¬ 
ually vote Republican are vot¬ 
ing Democratic this year. None 
of the 45 usual Democrats are 
switching. 

Several professors wrote per¬ 
tinent comments on the candi¬ 
dates. A non-voter wrote, "un¬ 
fortunately, one is reduced to 
voting for either a snake charm¬ 
ing politician or an ultra-right 
fanatic. One is reduced to eith¬ 
er rationaiization or to im¬ 
potence.” 

Another, condescendingly, is 

voting for Johnson, though he I In recognition of outstanding acadenaic achieve- ' 
would prefer to vote for "Mar- 1 ment, three senior women were initiated into the ' 
garet Chase Smith, if she was ' Middlebury chapter of Phi Beta Kappa Sunday, 
running ... or almost anyone Eloise Carlton, Carolyn Cas-, .Armstrong. 

” jsaday and Elizabeth Fink were I Prfrfessor Paul Cubeta. presi- 

A second non-voter said, : called forward in Sunday's j dent of the Middiebury chapter, 
"Tile choice is so bad. I'm not ; chapel service to receive their I presided at the Parents’ Week¬ 
voting this year." keys from President James I 


NEW PHI BETA KAPPA members, initiated in Mead 
Chapel .Sunday morning, are, left to right, Carolyn Cassaday, 
Eloise Carlton, and Elizabeth Fink. Photo by Westin 

Three Senior Women Receive Keys 
During Phi Beta Kappa Ceremony 


‘Freedom Fast’ 
Rejeeted Here 
On Three Counts 

Director of Dining Halls and 
Dormitory Operations Gordon 
Bridges this week rejected a 
"Fast for Freedom," proposed 
by Middlebury’s Civil Rights 
Group. 

Under the proposed plan, stu¬ 
dents eating in Proctor Hall 
could have abstained from the 
evening meal, Nov. 19. The cost 
of the meal would then have 
been donated to a national 
rights campaign, according to 
Rights Group president Edward 
Weissman ’65. 

Bridges vetoed the plan on 
three counts: 

(1) It is not the policy of 
the college to make donations, 
and a decision to do so would 
be the responsibility of tho 


SLC Will Consider 
Student Exchange Idea 

Three proposals of major sig¬ 
nificance will come before the 
Student Life Committee Wednes¬ 
day. First on the agenda is a 
resolution, presented by the Ci-I ninrtelephone toes "in 


dents, ' 

Also scheduled for considera¬ 
tion by the SLC is a Student As¬ 
sociation proposal to install an 


end ceremony. 

Students are elected to Phi 
Beta Kappa by a committee of 
12 faculty members, previously 
named to the society. The com¬ 
mittee bases its selection pri¬ 
marily on scholastic achieve¬ 
ment, requiring an average of 89 
or bolter after three years or 
an average of 87 or better for 
four years. 


vil Rights Group under the lead 
ership of Edward Weissman ’65, 


the women’s dormitories and to 

evaluate the communications 
to initiate an exchange Program functions for 


with Southern Negro colleges 
If api>roved the exchange pro¬ 
gram would send four men and 
four women from Middlebury to 
a selected institution for one 
semester; the college would re¬ 
ciprocate with eight of its stu- 


Porter Hospital Board of Trustees 
Receives Large Vote of Support 


300 college students attend¬ 
ed an open meeting last Wed¬ 
nesday in the Middlebury Col¬ 
lege Field House in which 1550 
citizens of Addison County vot¬ 
ed three to one to support Por¬ 
ter Hospital trustees in their re- 
fu.sal to reinstate a local doc- 


Frosh Primary 
Reduces Field 

Climaxing a two-week period 
of petition.s and campaigning, 
twelve students competing for 
freshman class offices will face 
their i)eer.s on tlie ballot sheets 
tomorrow. 

Tlic throe men vying for tlie 
presidency of the class, as cho¬ 
sen Monday in a primary elec¬ 
tion. are Jack Krucsi, Sandy 
Spaulding and John Sawyer. 
Viee-presidential hopefuls are 
Carol Andeinson, Tobi Gray and 
Susan Walker. 

Norma Bryant. Ann Haviland 
tCunlinucd on Page 4» 


tor. The physician has been for¬ 
bidden to practice in the hospi¬ 
tal since 1963. 

'In February, 1963, Dr. Rich¬ 
ard Woodard was suspended by 
the trustees from the medical 
staff of Porter for allegedly 
"failing to abide by the rules, 
regulations and by-laws of the 
hospital.” 

The purpose of last week’s 
meeting was to elect four new 
trustees, who would, by their 
election, decide the fate of the 
barred physician 

Woodard’s supporters, com¬ 
prising a "Citizens’ Commit¬ 
tee," backed their own four 
nominees for the positions. Tlio 
opjTosing group, not in favor of 
reinstating Wxiodard, supported 
four incumbents. 

County citizens voted three to 
one to support the ctiunty hos¬ 
pital group that liad ousted 
W<'odard. 

Woodard has taken his case 
1o court, and, in a law suit now 
under consideration, is seeking 
reinstatement to the hospital 
staff. 


Blood Drive 
Set Nov. 4 

It’s no big thing. A pinrt of 
blood is the standard contribu¬ 
tion for students participating in 
during open hours. According | annual Red Cross Blood 


faculty and faculty - student con¬ 
tact. 

The SA is also proposing some 
changes in the fraternity sign- 
out system as it now operates 


to the proposed modification, 
visiting women would still be 
required to sign in, but not out. 
A statement as to the exact pro¬ 
visions of the social rules during 
visiting hours, as set forth last 
spring, would be posted in the 
vicinity of the sign-in book. 


Drive scheduled for Wednesday 
from 11 • 5 in McCullough Gym. 

The record donation of 288 
pints may well be surpassed this 
year according to Chairman Ca¬ 
therine Zawistoski ’66. 

Refreshments will be served 
to participants. 


(2) Proctor meals are plan¬ 
ned on a broad budget over 
the semester, accounting for 
absenteeism, so there would be 
no specific amount to donate; 

(3) Students aged 18-22 burn 
up a lot of energy and need 

I three meals a day. 

Students at colleges through- 
I out the country have agreed to 
forego the evening meal Nov. 
19. A similar fast for Freedom 
was used to raise funds for 
needy Mississippi families last 
June. 

As an alternative, Weissman 
has outlined, a plan under 
which a table would be set up 
in the Crest Room, and students 
would be asked to donate their 
coffee money. 

Other current activities of 
the Rights Group include send¬ 
ing a delegation to a Civil 
Rights Convention this weekend 
in New York City. 

The National Student Move¬ 
ment is sponsoring the three-day 
session. 

Weissman also indicated that 
the group is attempting to bring 
the touring company of In 
WhHe .America to Middlebury 
for a rights conference in the 
spring. 


Diversification Sought 


By ALAN MAGARY 
Executve Editor 

With the coming of the "Ne¬ 
gro Revolution," colleges and 
universities throughout the 
United States grew self-consci¬ 
ous about lack of diversification 
in their student bodies. Geo¬ 
graphical distribution was no 
longer enough — students must 
be of differing cultural and ra¬ 
cial backgrounds as well. 

Colleges then began to seek 
top Negro students. How has 
Middlebury fared in the result¬ 
ing "competition" for Negroes? 

In .Tddition to a possible se¬ 
mester exchange program with 
a southern Negro college, pro¬ 
posed last week by the Civil 
Rights Group, the College con¬ 
tinues to .seek regular four-year 
students. The problem, however, 


Recruiting^ Top 
Negroes Difficult 


is not simply attracting any 
Negro applicants, according to 
Director of Admissions Fred 
Neuberger. Middlebury must 
seek qualified high school grad 
uates. 

Any exchange program or 
stepped-up recruiting of Negro 
students, said Doan of the Col 
lege Thomas Reynolds recently 
"miisl be done in a manner that 
is consistent with our own cdu 
cational policies." 

Competition for the presently 
small number of talented Negro 
high school graduates, Neuber 
gcr said last week, is the same 


as competition for "SOO-pound 
fullbacks." 

"The admissions staff is tak¬ 
ing every opportunity we have 
to talk to Negro students," he 
said, "but we aren’t given 
that many opportunities." 

He said the College may fol¬ 
low up on the students who go 
through "A Better Cliance” 
(ABCI program of catch-up tu¬ 
toring for eight weeks during 
the summer at Dartmouth. 

ABC, sponsored by the Rock¬ 
efeller Fund and Dartmoutli, is 
designed to close the gap be¬ 
tween college standards and 
educationally disadvantaged 
Negroes. This summer, 44 Ne¬ 
groes, conditionally accepted 
at such preparatory schools as 
Choate and Groton, went 
(Continued on Page 3) 








THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2», 1%4 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 2 


Tillmghast Relates Pomp, 
Display of Cambridge Life 


The New York Times has said it. The Herald 
Tribune has said it and just this week Middle- 
bury’s faculty said it too. Repeatedly urged to 
state its position THE CAMPUS can do nothing 
but concur with the nation’s news media and edu¬ 
cators; “We’re for Johnson.’’ 

As in the case with these authorities however, 
the choice is more of a reaction against the Re¬ 
publican nomineer than for the Democratic candi¬ 
date. 

Barry Goldwater has consistently opposed 
“must” legislation under both Republican and 
Democratic administrations. His vote against the 
the urgently needed National Education Act and 
the all-important test-ban treaty hardly demon¬ 
strate an intelligent concern for the welfare and 
protection of the American people. 

Lyndon Johnson, ''ough far from a dynamic 
and stimulating leader, must at least command 
the repect of the electorate. For though his highly 
political career remains subject to scrutiny, 
his effective use of power cannot be denied. Con¬ 
gressional action on the civil rights bill, the tax 
cut and the war against poverty all attest to the 
strength of his leadership. On the most signifi¬ 
cant issue of the campaign, peace, it is clear that 
Johnson will neither endanger the national se¬ 
curity nor needlessly flirt with the perils of nu¬ 
clear w-ar. 

There is little need to dwell on the relative 
merits of the vice-presidential nominees. Years of 
dedicated and effective service define the talents 
of the capable and energetic liberal, Hubert 
,Humphrey better than the words of any college 
editor. And who is William Miller? 

Adding its lone voice to the clamor raised 
by journals throughout the country THE CAMPUS 
offers its endorsement confident that the local 
conservatives will not be led to a last minute 
stampede. But this column is one additional pro¬ 
test for those millions of frustrated Americans 
forced to choose the lesser of two evils in 1964. 


Pan! on Tillinghast, asso¬ 
ciate profes'-or of history, 
spent last ye n Cambridge, 
England doi research. L 

By PARDON TILLINGHAST 
Associato Pi '“'"ssor of History 
In Englar. .3 in Ruanda 
Urundi, things are never quite 
what they seem. What Cam¬ 
bridge seenv to be is an island 
of quaintnr ~s in a belching tor¬ 
rent of traffic. The traffic is 
real enough; it is the quaint¬ 
ness that requires scrutiny. 
The buildings appear ageless: 
actually they are quite modern, 
very few of them being older 
than the 15th century. 

The whole city has a market- 
town, almost rural flavor, much 
improved by the cows on the 
Backs, grazing across the river 
from the fine Gothic pile of 
King’s Chapel. The sight of a 
Proctor’s “bulldog” in his 
bowler, chasing an undergrad 
out after dark without his gown 
(“Sir, are you a member of 
/this University?’’) is enough 
to make any American drool. 
How medieval; how charming! 

The reality is a trifle dif¬ 
ferent; but how different is a 
carefully concealed matter. In 
English academic circles, the 
answer to any question ordin¬ 
arily is, “Well, that really de¬ 
pends on how one defines one’s 
terms, doesn’t it?’’. How many 
colleges has Cambridge? — 
Twenty-three — more or less. 
How many faculty? — Depends 
on how you count them. O. K , 
how long does a student usual- 


PARUON E. TILLINGHAST, associate professor of lils- 
tory, returned this fall after a year’s stay in England. He 
writes here of life at Cambridge University. 


ly stay? — To answer that I 
have to know what he’s reading, 
of course. All right, how many 
Bubjects does the average stu¬ 
dent read? — It varies. Dam¬ 
mit, then, how do I go about 
getting these questions answer¬ 
ed? — Haven’t a clue. Old 


Man. 

Inside the colleges, the main 
daily social event is dinner. 
Undergrads are still expected, 
each term, to eat a certain 
number of dinners in college. 
Dons are not required to, but 
for them the meals are free, 
so no great pressure need be 
used. If one is eating with the 
dons, one foregathers in the 
Combination Room, invariably 
beautifully panelled, with dim 
lights striking off oak wainscot¬ 
ing and mahogany chairs. The 
college 1 ate at still had the 
crossed keys of St. Peter on 
every chair, though it has not 
been on speaking tenns with 
the Papacy for several cen¬ 
turies. 

((Continued on Page 7) 


Education 


At first glance a proposal by the Civil Rights 
Group to increase the Negro enrollment on cam¬ 
pus appears to be merely another instance of stu¬ 
dent concern for a social issue. But the favorable 
hearing given the recommendation by the Ad¬ 
ministration underlines the organization’s claim 
that inter-racial communication has a place in 
education at Middlebury. 

Diversity in background entails a correspond¬ 
ing diversity of ideas, acting as an intellectual 
leav-en in college life. Isolated from the im¬ 
poverished areas of north and south the Middle¬ 
bury student has been limited to contacts with 
members of given social, economic, and geogra¬ 
phic groups. The homogeneity in economic back¬ 
grounds is matched by a comparable lack of di¬ 
versity in racial types; only a handful of Ne¬ 
groes have enrolled at Middlebury in the last dec¬ 
ade. 

Consequently the college has been urged to 
recruit talented Negroes, just as it searches for 
qualified foreign scholars. Many New England 
colleges and universities have already embarked 
on extensive recruitment campaigns. In addition, 
several schools have instituted exchange programs 
with southern Negro colleges. 

The success of these measures has been en¬ 
thusiastically reported. At Mt. Holyoke College, 
a two week exchange was recently extended to a 
full semester program. 

An exchange of ideas between students from 
different colleges and racial groups must cer¬ 
tainly become a part of higher education at Mid¬ 
dlebury. 


To The Editor 


men join houses and the reasons 
for which these same consist¬ 
ently come away the losers in 
academic competition. 

Personally, 1 fcol the problem 
lies not so much w'ith the sys¬ 
tem as with a good deal of its 
members — coddled by many of 
their own faculty, blunted by 
many of their own cf>hort.s, and 
hidden, often, from their own 
selves. 

.Mlehael K. Ilejiney ’66 
Member, Sifrma Epsilon 
Frat«‘rnlty 
October Z6, 19(14 


To the Editor: 

Re; Last week’s article, “Do 
Greeks in Houses Suffer Grades 
Grief?’’ 

While I have long felt that 
the so-called “anti-intellectual’’ 
influences supposedly extant in 
fraternity situations have been 
somewhat over-blamed, neither 
does the statement, “Fraternity 
influence on students does not 
appear to be of great signifi¬ 
cance," convey my own inter¬ 
pretation of my paper’s find¬ 
ings. 

It is perfectly valid, I think, 
to assume that fraternity “re¬ 
sidence” (and not “influence,’’ 
as the article quoted) does not 
affect a significant change in 
the average fraternity man’.s 
grades, as «ppos€“d to that 
same “average man’s” grades, 
during dormitory resldemre. 
But were that “average man’’ 
never to have joined a fra¬ 
ternity, what then? 

Overall, it seems most signi¬ 
ficant to me to note the peren¬ 
nially superior, academic per¬ 
formances of Independent men 
as against those performance.? 
of fraternity men, “average” 
or otherwiffe. 

To be .sure, the situation is 
entirely too complex to be taken 
in by any one person’s observa¬ 
tions, yet I cannot help think¬ 
ing that there may be some 
sort of correlation (one prob¬ 
ably unavailable to empirical 
testing) between the reason.? 
for which some Middlebury 


Ann.strong Gets 
Vermont Higher 
Ediieatlon Post 


Dr. James I. Armstrong, 
president of the College, was 
elected president of the Ver- 
jP mont Higher Education Council 
Blast week. He succeeds Dr. Ri- 
g chard J. Dundas, president of 
^ Castleton .State College, 
vl Voting were 18 members of 
this grouj), comprised of the 
E heads of all of the state’s col- 
£. leges and universities, at the 
,;7 council's annual meeting at 
t Castleton .Slate College. I’resi- 
S dent Armstrong was also re- 
F elected to a three-year term on 
»I the Higher Education Facilities 
Commission In Vermont. 

m During the meeting the Coun- 
r cil moved to form a committee 
\ to correspond with the U. S 
1 Senate and House committees 
on education and with the V<-r- 
P monl delegation. The commlt- 
7 tec would bo concerned with 
I lihe need for federal aid to 
. higher educational inslitutions. 

The Council's next meeting 
I will take place on the Middlc- 
^ bury campus next October. 


Unrealistic 


To the Editor: 

We have been doepl.v im¬ 
pressed by the emotional coji- 
cern that many .Middlebury stu-j 
dents have displayed towards 
the northern invasion of the 
Civil Rights movement in the 
South, Their spirit ha.s certain¬ 
ly indicated an unselfish desire 
to be counted among the lead-' 
ors of world democracy. j 

However, we feel that in 
many ways their efforts, as 


THE 

CAMPUS 






The student newspaper ol Middlebury College paibllshed every 
Thursday In the College j'oftr. except otflclal CoUege holidays. 

Second-class postage paid at Middlebury, Vermont. Subecrlptlon 
ra te: S.S 00 per year. 

Etl»tocial and business offloes In Prootor Hall, MldtUebury CoUege, 
Middlebury, Vewnont. Tfilephones: DUdley 8-2813 and 8-7229. 

Opl.i....ns exprersed on tho editorial page do not necessiwlly re¬ 
flect the official position of the College. Signed columns, letters 
and aruoJe? are the reaponsibllltjr of tlie witter. 

B. TOLLKY. JR.. ’65 

AUm M. TOOKSR. '65 . 

H McKIM STEELE . 


- Edltor-Ln-Chlef 

Bust ness Manager 
Faculty AdTl8'»r 







TIlimSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1964 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 3 


Conference Topic Death of God; 
^Honest to God^ Sets a Background 

Hy BOB BAMN Christ. If we profes’S a trust in If one is serious about his 

Tlie religion conference No- Christ or a deep curiosity to dis- belief in God while being equal- 
vember 12 - 14 will deal with cover Christ, then wo are con- concerned for living responsi- 
the death of God. As a backdrop cerned whether Bishop Robin- bly in secular society, then one 
for this theme, pre-conference son is too radical or not enough. <;annot ignore a conflict which 
discussions will center on Dr. Sympathetic to Humanists hits as deep as this into tl.e soul. 

John A. Robinson’s challenging j,, discussions between Chris- heai t, ground, or whal- 

.• II . i-i T, I ■ ^ver term charactenzes one s 

book Honest to f«oa. turns and humarusts Dr. Robin- 

. r... ... , I • I. T ir 4 i . ultimate concern. 

"The one thing of which I am son finds himself sympathetic to 

fairly sure is tUiat. in retrospect, tlie humanist ])oint of view. Roibinson deals with this 

it (the book) will he seen to have 'J'herefore. he proposes to take conflict by first examining tra- 
erred in not being nearly radi- a close look at the "religious ditional views of Chrisitanity 
cal enough." Thus Bishop frame" of Christianity to see if then re-examining them 

Robinson concludes his preface, the humanistic aiiproach to life . ^com the positions of theolo- 
Were he to talk of the injustice is closer to what he can hold as gians. Robinson often cites and 
or justice of, say, capital pun- "truth.” j enlarges on Tillichs views of 

ishment, we might take an ob- He cites a conflict both inside I ground of all being 


al questions. By the end of the 
book has the author finally de¬ 
cided on a Christianity whose 
"basic recipe" is "the mixture 
as before," or has his quest led 
him into another mixture? 

1 What about another recipe? 
j What is Robinson’s view of God? 

I of Christ? Does this view tend 
relentlessly toward humanism 
and agnosticism or does it, as 
’ Robinson would like, lead to the 
I kernel of truth in Christianity 
that speaks to man "come of 
age”? 

Beware of getting carried 
i away with Robinson’s intellec- 


I tualism and schoiarslap (or get¬ 
ting lost in his seeming ambl- 
Iguity and confusion.) Con.sider 
also the orthodox and ev *n fun- 
damontalst approach. Afier all, 
the idea of Christianity fading 
out "however revitalized ’ is a 
strong indictment on 19(54 years 
of a “basic recipe.” 

I To return — "the one thing of 
I which I am fairly sure is that, 
in retrospect, it will be seen to 
have erred in not being nearly 
I radical enough.” Will it? Read 
it, think about it, discuss, and 
then decide w'here you stand. 


or justice of, say, capital pun- 
ishnuTit, we might take an ob¬ 
jective view of his position and 


and outside of the Church be- 


of religion as man’s ultimate 


Negro Admissions . . . 


say in conclusion, "Ah, yes, the j tween "those whose basic recipe concern. 

Bishop has set foiih cogent ar- (for being Christian) is the Tradition Shaken 

gumenls," or some equally in- mixture as before (however re- trying to resolve the dilem- 

different, hasty comment. vitalized) and those (either ^cjw to view God, the 

Ifowever, Dr. Robinson is Christian or humanisti who feel Rishop leans a little heavily on 
striking at a deeper level than compelled above all to be honest i "^RRch s effort to shake the 
the institutions of man; he is wherev’er it may lead them.” foundations of traditional views, 
challenging man himself, more This is the major concern of the Rc says, ". . . you must forget 
specifically in connection with book. everydhing you have learned 

-— -----about God, perhaps even the 

_ ^ A -m m m word itself." In an article that 

Negro Admissions. . . app^red m th, London Obso,. 

O |ver in April, 1963, Our Image 

(Continued From Rage 1) has participated since 1958 Ac-i“^ Must Go, Robinson is 

thi oudh tho proerom. These Asslstan, Adminis- T”'of 

stndencs will laler. presumobly. . ^ 

be seeknin ndmisslon to eol. that cannot be trea.ed lightly. Is 

mors, NSSFNS referred a to- this heresy or isn’t it? 

in explaining the difficulties i Negroes to Middlebury controversy stemming 

in attracting qualified Negroes. | from the book and the arUcle 

Ncuberger pointed out that no j applied, and they has created no small flurry of 

Negro men had applied for ad- I public response. A book. The 

mission to the class of 1967, I situation will improve. Honest to God Debate, edited by 

and only “three or four w’omen, ^''^^^erger commented, wdien a D. L. Edwards, has assembled 

■ ^ ., better secondary education is letters, book reviews and an- 

, , given to all students. This will other chapter by Robinson. The 

1 C on y orma program now piirnp^at,, Middlcbury’s problem book is over twice as long as 
existing at Middlebury, Neuber- . ,, ,, I 

... , . „ • . of competing with Harvard, .Honest to God. 

gor said, is tho African Schol- v i ^ „ 

, . „ , „ I Yale, and Swarthmore for Ne- Questions Raised 

arship Program of American ■ , , 1 ^ . 

1! citi <A«^PAiTt rw • I acnoLars. Robinsons work poses sever- 


students will later, presumably, 
be seeking admission to col¬ 
lege. 

in explaining the difficulties i 


Negro men had applied for ad¬ 
mission to the class of 1967, 
and only "three or four w’omcn, 
if that." 


existing at Middlebury, Neuber- 


gor said, is tho African Schol- v i ^ 

I Yale, and Swarthmore for Ne- 
arship Program of American ■ „ , , 


Universities (ASPAU). One 
African student each year en¬ 
ters Middlebury through ASP¬ 
AU, 

Even in this jirogram. he not¬ 
ed, not all applicants arc con¬ 
sidered qualified. In 1961 and 
again last year, the admissions 
office did not feel the two ap¬ 
plicants wore qualified. 

American Negro students 
are sometimes reft'rrcd by the 
National Scholarship Service 
and Fund for Negro .Students, a I 
program in which Middlebury j 


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NEW 

I.\ TIIF NOM-AinF.H 

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Middle Power, Education: Past and 
Future, The Dilemma ot tho Canadian 
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“Pomp and Circumstance: C. P. 
Snow’' by Robert Ada ms: An appraisal 
ol Sir Charles’ writings, his new booh, 
Corridors ol Power, and his contribu¬ 
tion to the two-cultures dialogue. 

“Labor's Mutinous Mariners” by 
A. H. Raskin: A report on the rivalry 
betvwuon Joseph Curran ot tho National 
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Hall ot the Seafarers Inter- 
national Union. ^ 

Every month the •A 

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Your Home Improvement Center 
Middlebury, Vermont 


338 - 2468 


388 - 2721 


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AT 

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Route ijr.'IO 


Cornwall, Vermont 


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BLUEBERRY HILL? 

For dinner? You should, you know. It’s the loveliest. Take 
your girl. Take your parents on parents' weekend. Lace 
tablecloths. Candles. — You’ll be pampered (that’s a switch!) 
As Ogden Nash says; 

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And my taste-buds reuniniscently thrill, 

Though from simple to fancy the menu varies, 

TTie cordon is always as bleo at the borriea” 

Please phone. We’re little and we don't like to be crowded. 
10% discount to Midd students. 


Deans Announce Tri-School Pact 


THE CAMPUS reprints as a 
public service the following 
memorandum to the Middlebury 
student body from Dean of 
Women Elizabeth Kelly and 
Dean of Men Frederic Swift. 
"TO; ALL MIDDLEBURY 
STUDENTS 

The Presidents of UVM. Nor¬ 
wich and Middlebury have joint¬ 
ly subscribed to a policy con¬ 
cerning student behavior at fall 
football weekends. This policy 
includes the following state¬ 
ments: 

‘We are agreed that pride 
in .^tma Mater, college spi¬ 
rit and friendly rivalry be¬ 
tween colleges are healthy 
and desirable and should be 
encouraged; however, wc 
are also agreed that the 
damage of property, cither 
on a rival campus or else¬ 


where, is not a proper mani¬ 
festation of s< hool spirit. 
We condemn such actions, 
and any student who is ap¬ 
prehended may expect to 
be subjected to disciplinary 
action. 

‘We also wish to announce 
al this time that the posses¬ 
sion or consumption of alco¬ 
holic beverages is not per¬ 
mitted at football games 
held under the auspices of 
the colleges we represent.’ 

In view of this policy, any 
Middlebury student apprehend¬ 
ed in connection with any act 
involving willful destruction of 
property on a rival campus or 
elsewhere or consumption of 
alcoholic beverages at football 
games will be subject to dis¬ 
ciplinary action including su¬ 
spension from College” 


DON'T BE 


LEFT 


BEHIND 


VOTE RIGHT 

GOLDWATER '64 


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Then use 

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Oct. 29, 30, 31st 

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PAGE 4 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2», 19«4 


To The Editor... 


(Continued frcwn Page 2) 
strations will not solve this 
problem. At the same time that 
they serve to increase aware¬ 
ness towards the plight of the 
American Negro, they also in¬ 
tensify animosities among 
Southern whites. We do not be¬ 
lieve that a community can be 
corrected of its outlook if it is 
to be constantly irritated by the 
activities of groups who do not 
understand the forces which 
brought the problem into exis¬ 
tence in the first place. How 
can a Northerner, who has nev¬ 
er been adequately exposed to 
the social and environmental 
conditions in the South, even 
pretend to resolve a solution to 
the difficulty? 


RULE BROS. 
SERVICE STATION 

60 North Pleasant St. 

MIddlebury 
Flying “A” Products 
Auto Repairs Welding 

Trucks and Scouts 
388-4935 


We suggest that any person 
who is interested in Civil 
Rights, first examine carefully 
the situaWon from both sides of 
the fence before he participates 
in any demonstrations or acti¬ 
vities which tend to anger the 
Southern mind and unneces¬ 
sarily damage our prestige 
abroad. When people ester a 
•uuse of such importance with¬ 
out fully considering the social 
and political implications of 
their efforts, they inevitably 
open themselves to well-founded 
criticism and. by so doing, im¬ 
prove the status of their oppon¬ 
ents' arguments. 

Bill Kleh ’67 
Jack Dickison ’67 
October 25. 1964 


/ Dissent 

To the Editor: 

I dissent. 

Last Wednesday at the hospi¬ 
tal meeting, certain members 
of the college administration 
used their influence and power 
on students to disenfranchise 
them. The facts are simple. 
Both Dean Kelly and Dean 
Swift made it quite clear to me 
and the people I was with that 
we, as students, should not have 


NEW 

CREWEL EMBROIDERY KITS 


been there. It was suggested to 
me by Dean Swift that I not 
vote. 

There is no cause for the 
above-mentioned actions. Some 
students were there to observe 
an example of "direct demo¬ 
cracy," some were there out of 
curiosity, some were there be¬ 
cause of an interest and knowl¬ 
edge of the issues involved in 
the meeting. Certainly, it can¬ 
not be argued that the students 
have no interest in what goes 
on at Porter Hospital, since it 
is the hospital for the students 
as well as for residents of Ad¬ 
dison County. 

I have no w’ay of knowing the 
personal opinions of Dean Kel¬ 
ly and Dean Swift on the issue 
at the meeting. Yet. I cannot 
remove the feeling that their ac¬ 
tions were motivated by a feel¬ 
ing that students would vote the 
"wrong way. I was permitted 
to vote as I feel within the 
category of those who could 
vote. I did vote, and am very 
upset that the two deans felt 
that students should not vote. 

In short, this was not the prov¬ 
ince of ' these two people. I 
deem it an insult to my intelli¬ 
gence and tenacity to be treated 
as an errant child. There is no 
excuse for the actions of the 
two deans last Wednesday night 
— to myself and to the other 
students who were there. 

I dissent and would have 
done with this business of ad- I 
ministration censorship of st«- I 
dent activities. j 

Edward J. Weissman ’65 

October 25, 1964 


Brown Pool: Down By 
The Old Midd Stream 


COLLEGE TOWN SHOP TIorus 


YARNS & GIFTS 

CARTMELL 
Sales & Service 

Commercial Refrigeration 
Household Appliances 

QUESNEL’S LAUNDRY 

SHIRT SERVICE 


EMILO’S IGA 

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OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT 



By KRISTINA NILSON 

£ I Last year brought 'tilic first big 
splash at the Brown Lagoon, 
and since then a whole new At¬ 
lantis has sprung into being. 

Every day the faithful, at an 
average of 23 each open hour, 

* flock to this inner sanctum to 
’ dive, butterfly, and gambol in 
^ its soothing waters. They burst 
’ regularly from the confining li¬ 
brary walls, even from the Starr 
hive, to recharge their shrivcl- 

■ ed minds in the blue asylum 
across the path. 

• During exams the pool is a 
^ popular refuge to relieve sizzl- 

■ ing brains and to assume the 

■ intellectual state of a jellyfish. 

‘ Most students, however, are 
1 drawn daily by the pure invi- 
‘ goration and joy of sprinting 
I through the w'aters or floating 
’ dreamily away from the bur- 
: dens of land. 

Each noon hour, the faculty 
too can forget student-provoked 
exasperations and build up new 
strength in these springs. 

To enter the pool's dorrualn, 
one must follow certain proce¬ 
dures. Every student must be 
medically approved for swim¬ 
ming and present his I. D. card 
at the Issue Counter. Guests 
are allowed during the after- 
I noon and evening open hours on 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Each student may have two 
adult guests (over sixteen years 
old). 

Even parents and alumni can 
enjoy the pool on weekend open 
hours on Homecoming, Parents' ^ 
Weekend, and Commencement 
by showing their registration 
cards. 

Enthusiasm in this watery 
universe recently reached a 
peak in the new Fifty Mile Club 
sponsored by the Rod Cross. In 
this program to improve general 
physical fitness and stamina, in¬ 
dividuals agree to sw’im fifty 
miles, one quarter mile or eigh¬ 
teen laps at a time, in any 
stroke. 

During the first three miles, 
any number of rests are allow¬ 
ed. After that, however, each 
eighteen laps must be accom¬ 
plished without any toe-drag- 
I ging. Progress records, verified 
by the lifeguards, are entered 
on a large chart, and a certifi¬ 
cate is awarded for each ten 
miles. The chief goal is to in¬ 
crease .stamina by swimming a 
certain distance daily at one's 
personal speed. 


So far. twenty-six swimmers, 
both students and faculty, have 
entered tlie program. Tliere is 
now fl panther in Middlebury’s 
tank, and people are swimming 
fifty miles to prove it. 

The aquatic realm also has a 
trained patrol to preserve the 
order and sccHiity of its deep. 
Each of the 18 guards, headed 
by Roth Tall '65, has his Water 
Safety InstriKJtor's Certificate 
and a sturdy background of 
pool and beach guarding exper¬ 
ience. There arc always two 
guards in constant vigilance. 

To join the ranks of qualified 
guards, wth an eye to summer 
employment, many students are 
taking advantage of the Red 
Cross Senior Life Saving and 
the Water Safety Instructor's 
courses offered by the depart¬ 
ments of Physical Education. 

A flock of naiads, the Syn¬ 
chronized Swim Club, also fro¬ 
lics in the depths of the pool. 
About 15 women carefully po¬ 
lish their skills, develop indivi¬ 
dual techniques and experiment 
with new stunts in performing 
as a group. Eventually they hope 
to build up a water ballet of in¬ 
tricate floating patterns and 
synchronized routines. 

The Arthur M. Brown Swim- 
rrung Pool, in its second year of 
existence, has become a bustling 
j world of activity, offering chal¬ 
lenge, enjoyment, and relaxa¬ 
tion to all in its invigorating wa¬ 
ters. 


Laundromat 


Bakery Lane 


3S8-2842 


OTiapburp Jinn 


Now on its winter schedule 
of serving dinner 

A. Sunday 12:30 - 2:00 & 5:30 - 8:00 

5 Mon., & Wed. thru Sat. 6:00-8:30 


Closed Tuesdays 


THIS LIBEL 
ISYOIIK - 
inSlIRilIBE 

When you see this label on your 
prescription you know that it 
contains the finest quality drugs 
compounded with painstaking 
care by skilled, highly trained 
pharmKists. It is your guarantee 
of full protection. 




Vermont Drug Co. 

The Rexall Store 
Main St., MIddlebury 


OTIS 

BARBER SHOP 

Two Barber» 

No Wait 


‘Stimulus’ Sales 
Begin Next Week 

The fall publication of Stimu¬ 
lus will reach .sludents early 
next week, announced Jeffrey 
Alderman '65, the magazine's 
editor-in-chief. 

The issue conrtains five major 
articles, including one relating 
Associated Press coverage of 
the assassination of President 
Kennedy. 

With expansion of advertising 
and publicity, circulation has 
been improved beyond past 
years. The journal has secured 
100 subscriptions from parents. 

Frosh Vote . . . 

(Continued From Page 1) 
and Wendy Olinder are compet¬ 
ing for the office of secretary. 
Class treasurer candidates In¬ 
clude Jim Barnes, Jim Clyde 
and Pedro Kami. 

In the primary elections Mon¬ 
day 348 freshmen voted out of 
a class total of 380. Those vot¬ 
ing represented 91 percent of 
their class 


KRUESI 

PRESIDENT 

F^^sident you have to look up to** 

.Sponsored by Citizens for Kruesi 


BEN FRANKLIN 

YOUR COMPLETE 
VARIETY STORE 


Next to the Campus Theater 


Middlebury 


Vermont 








THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1904 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 5 


Gubernatorial Aspirant 
C/iarges Incumbent llofj 
With ^Selling’ Gov’t. Jobs 

By PETFR IIKFRON 



DR. DONALD M. MKISKL 


Vespers Sermon 
To Be Delivered 
By Presbyterian 

The Rev. Dr. Donald M&isel, 
eminent Presbyterian Kiler^y- 
man, will speak on "The Origi¬ 
nal Backlash" at Sunday’s Ves¬ 
per Service at 4:45 p. m. 

A well known preacher and 
lecturer, Dr. Meisel is minister 
of the P’irst Presbyterian 
Church, Princeton, N. J., a con¬ 
gregation founded in the 17.50's. 
The present church building, 
built in 1836, is located on the 
campus of Princeton University. 

A graduate of Macalester 
College and Princeton Theologi¬ 
cal Seminary, Dr. Meisel was 
awarded the Ph D. degree from 
the University of Edinburgh, 
Scotland. 

Dr. Meisel has played a lead¬ 
ing role in the ecumenical move¬ 
ment through local and state 
church councils. 


Starr Open House | 

Starr Hall will host an open 
house Saturday from 4 to 6 
p. m. 

Tlie Freshmen Council has 
organized the affair and ruled 
that no alcoholic beverages may 
be served and that all doors 
must remain open. 


The second U. S. satellite, 
V'anguard 1. is expected to or¬ 
bit 1000 years. 


EMILO’S IGA 
HOT PIZZA TO GO 

COME SEE SID 


President 

Middlebury Young Republicans 

"Offices of public trust have 
been bought and sold under the 
Hoff Administration,” charged 
Lt. Governor Ralph A. Foote, 
Republican nominee for gover¬ 
nor last Wednesday. The next 
day, Foote released copies of de¬ 
positions from two Vermont 
Democrats alleging that the 
Hoff Administration sold a Post 
Office route man’s job for $2000. 

Political "experts," both ama¬ 
teur and professional, Republi¬ 
can and Democrat, have since 
then tried to assess the impact 
of this new Republican strategy. 

'The scandals of the Johnson 
Administration, some Republi¬ 
cans feel, will offer Foote an 
opportunity to blame the Demo¬ 
cratic Party for besmirching 
Vermont's reputation. Foote has 
said that in the more than one 
hundred years of Republican 
rule, no such situation arose. 

To the diargcs of smear, one 
Foote campaign worker stated, 
“To have a smear, you need a 


rumor campaign; Lt. Governor 
F’cxjte has openly substantiated 
all of his charges. Anyhow, since 
when has it been a smear to de¬ 
mand honesty in government?” 

The press has met the charge 
with mixed reactions, 'fhe Rut¬ 
land Herald, which has endorsed 
Foote, ran a story headlined 
"Foote Backs Down." The Bur¬ 
lington Free Press treated Lt. 
Governor Foote’s charge more 
kindly, but editorialized against 
the idea that only the Demo¬ 
crats used such tactics. After 
an explanation of the “patron¬ 
age system," the paper stated 
that Governor Hoff could not 
disclaim ultimate responsibility. 

Democrats feaj that Governor 
Hoff's initial series of contradic¬ 
tory statements and his final 
declaration of non-involvement 
in federal appointments has hurt 
their parly's chances in Novem¬ 
ber. Governor Hoff himself re¬ 
fused to predict victory when 
he was on "Meet "Hie Press" 
Sunday night. 

Republicans are split on the 
issue. Some feel that Lt. Gov- 


ELECT 

Ladybird Baker Jenkins 


The Middlebury Restaurant 

Specializing in American & Italian Foods 

Lasagna Served each Friday Evening 


Chicken Cucciatorc with Spaghetti every 
Saturday and Sunday Evening or 

Any Evening by Request. Phone one day in advance. 



‘‘Murdochs of Middlebury” 


VILLAGE AND COUNTRY 
PROPERTIES 


CONSULTANTS & BROKERS 
SINCE 1942 

Green Ml. Place Tel. 388-2100 



STUDENTS & FRIENDS: 

**The Christian 
And 

Civil Disobedience** 

SUNDAY, NOV. 1 
3 P. M. 

222 Proctor Hall 


Timely Bible-related 
diM'UKsionN led by 
Alvin Jennings, Minister 
of the t'.hureh of Christ, 
Burlington, Vt. 


SEE US FOR 

THANKSGIVING 


RESERVATIONS FOR 
THE TRIP HOME 





FISHER TRAVEL SERVICE 

Main Street Middlebury, Vt. 

Phone DU 8-2362 Office Hours 9 - 12, 1 - 5 


Saturdays By Appointment Only 


ornor Foote’s new strategy may 
I have cost him the election, Oth- 
jers, like the local county afti- 
jcial interviewed, feel that most 
pcH^ple had their minds made up 
before the story broke and that 
the charge will not have any ef¬ 
fect. There are also many who 
are happy that the Republicans 
finally have an issue to cap¬ 
ture headlines. The Republican 
Party is feeling financial pains 
this year and is naturally de¬ 
lighted to have a chance to get 
free publicity for its candidate. 

Most Vermont voters agree 
that the Foote charge should be 
invsistigated, especially with the 


subsequent claim by Khe former 
Democratic Postmaster of St. 
Ijohnsbury that he was asked to 
“kick back" seven per cent of 
his $6900 salary to the Demo¬ 
cratic State Committee. 'What 
pleases Republicans is that they 
had no knowledge of this episodo 
until the Free Press printed tho 
story last Saturday. 

The big question still remainsi 
what effect will the corruption 
charge have on the gubernator¬ 
ial election? 

Both Democrats and Republi¬ 
can hope for the best, but only 
November 3 wiU hold the an¬ 
swer. 


O’BRYAN’S SUNOCO SERVICE 


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TUNE-UPS 


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Phone 9415 


MIDDLEBURY 
BEEF SUPPLY 

QUALITY MEATS 
holesale & Retail 

JOAN BAEZ 
IS “IN” 

HER NEW ALBUM 
HAS JUST COME IN. 

- GET IT FAST - 

FHE VERMONT BOOK SHOP 








6 the campus, MIDDLEB URY, VERMON T_THURSnAY, OCTOBER 29, 1964 

Panthers Down RPI 30-6, 4-0 



Coast Guard Falls 3-0, 
Norwich Game Last Test 


McKay’s Run 
I'lirills CroM'd: 
Norwich Next 


By non HINTKUMAIKR 

In last week’s soccer action, The Panthers ex¬ 
tended their winninj^ streak to six games, rolling^up a 
4-0 victory over host RPI and downing U. S. Coast 
Guard, 3 - 6. 

The Coast Guard frame, view- Nicholson helped out on one Koal 
ed by a capacity Parents’ Week- apiece. 

end crowd, saw Midd Rain its statistics In this game 

fourth shutout of the season, measure of Midd's doin- 

its third in a row. inance. The Panthers outsbot 

Dave Nicholson passed to nieir Engineer rivals 4i) to U. 


nv KARl, LINDHOLM 

An estimated 3600 jjarents and 
u'ldergraduates observed Mid- 
dlobury's football heroes parlay 
a bruising ground-gaining ma¬ 
chine with a .'Stingy defense to' 
ocerpower R. P. 1. last Sat- 
mday. 30 - 6 The victory 
liiouglu the Panther's record to 
three wins and two losses. 

Fred Beams once again stole 
tne offensive show as he tallied 
tv.o touchdowns and four con¬ 
versions while picking up over 
a hundred yards on the ground. 
Rugged linebackers Nick Van 
Nes and Dave Terry were the 
defensive standouts, 

Middlcbury notched its first 
score t*arly in the game on a 
thirteen yard pass from quar¬ 
terback McKay to junior end 
Ji-ff Demong. On this first pe¬ 
riod drive and on subsequent 
■scoring thrusts, the Panther in¬ 
terior of Matheke. Davis, Gid- 
dmgs. Coffin and Kingman coii- 
.sistently opened gaping holes 
ill the Engineer forward wall 
allowing backs Ford, Van Nes 
and Beams to spend much of 
t leir afternoon harassing the 
energy secondary. 

This first half included some 
of the most exciting action on ' 
the Panther gridiron calendai 
» date. It saw three touchdowns \ 
(two by Beamsi. a safety and ' 
•an eighty-one yard pass inter- 
<K*ption by Jeff McKa.v, as ’ 
Middiebury completely domi- , 


Ck)-captain .A1 Reilly heads for the 
Photo by Ragsdale 


BAtK I.N ACTION 
end zone. 


Cadets Big, 
Quick, Deep 


up the third Midd TD. The sen¬ 
ior signal-caller electrified the 
crowd zig-zagging down the 
field fixim his own seven yard 
line to the R. P. I. twelve. It 
was McKay's fifth aerial theft 
of the season. 

Co-Captain A1 Reilly round¬ 
ed out the Panther scoring ear¬ 
ly in the third period when he 
capped a long drive with a pret¬ 
ty eighteen-yard scoring sprint 
down the sidelines. 


THIS WEEK, WATCH FOR 


. . . Norwich backs Campano, 
number 20, Nolan, number 23, 
and Wehrwcin, number 24. Tony 
Campano is a 5’ 5”, 165 lb. scat- 
back who needs only a glimpse 
of daylight to escape through 
an enemy line. Wingback Nolan 
is probably the best pass re¬ 
ceiver in the state. Gary Wehr- 
wein has been dangerous all 
fall, despite an ankle injury. 
Possibly the best Norwich club 
since the 1940’s. the Cadets last 
week gave UVM's Catamounts 
their biggest scare this season. 
Vermont scored in the final two 
minutes to win 21-17. 

And yet, enigmatically. Nor¬ 
wich has lost to Coast Guard 
G3-17>, and had difficulty de¬ 
feating St. Lawrence (7-6) and 
Maine Maritime (6-0). Hhe 
Coast Guard loss seems re¬ 
markable, as Otto Graham's 
team fell Saturday to WPI 13- 
0, and has also been beaten by 
Amherst and Wesleyan. 

On paper, Norwich looks too 
big and too deep for Middle- 
bury. To stop them, Giddings 
and hi.s line crow will have to 
surpass the heroics of tlie Bates 
game. 


cholson at 14:42. The second 
stanza saw Roger Herrmann hit 
the mark at 6:03, and Dick ide 
wrapped up Midd’s scoring at 
the 15:27 mark in the third pe¬ 
riod. Ide had two assists al.so, 
w'hile Mike Heaney and Dave 


STATISTICS 


S P E E D Y LEl-T-WING 
Dave Nicholson carries the 
ball against Hi‘I. 

Photo by Ragsdalo 


1st Downs 
■yards Rushing 
Fwd Pa.sses 
Yards Paji.-.ing 
Pusses Inter, by 
Punts 

Fvi moles 
Penaltic.s 


LATE BULLETIN 

In their final niaU'h of thet 
season 'Mlddlebury’s soc¬ 
cer eleven edged Norwich 3- 
2 at Northfield yesterday. 
The victory gave the team 
its best season’s record, k- 
1, and set a new high for 
eonserutive wins at 7. As a 
result of yesterday’s contest 
the squad is in prime con- 
t('ntion for the NC.A.A Na¬ 
tional College Soccer Cham¬ 
pionship, according to 
Coach Joe Morronc. 


STATISTICS 

Middlebury 0|>|>oncnU 


■'' " " Inside Story ■ 

Where Credit Is Due 


wins 

gools 

fiavus 


77 127 

GOAI.S ASSISTS 


Idc 

Nlchdlaon 

HIckncLl 

OhaKaulorl 

Marks 

Nicolosl 

Herrmiiim 

Kovner 

Moore 

Carey 

Heaney 

Uoymond 


I... — . by Joe McLaughlin . . .. 

It is a cliche amonf^ sports writers to describe 
fviotball linemen as “unsung” or defensive experts 
i(.i. any sport as unheralded; it is a cliche because it 
G so often true. A^ain, it bears repeating. 

The Middlebury football roster includes 18 line¬ 
men. Four of these ei^^hteen — co-captain Dave Gid- 
dia^s John Kinf^man, Jeff Demonj;, and Fran Love 
— lettered last year. Love, of course, has been out of 
aolion since the opening minutes at Williams. 

Because “Duke" had so few experienced linemen 
leturning this year, he has been forced to play his 
lettermen, along with senior end Grant Matheke, 
nearly GO minutes of every game. In most of its 
games, this year, Middlebury’s forward wall has 
i.-een oul-weighod and out-numbered. 

Superhuman efforts by the GO-minute men, along 
V. it'h Dave Terry's fine tackling, saved the Bates 
game. Credit is also due guard Jimmy Davis, who al¬ 
ternates with Terry, on offense, and sophomores John 
Coffin and Richie Roller, who have played well 
against bigger and more experienced adversaries. 


found themselves on the DKE 
3-y:ud line as fifth down came. 
Zowio coolly Uu-cw from llio 
pocket to Smith and the score 
was 20 - 19 DKE, DTO needed 
this extra point. They got it as 
Rogers grabbed Zowie’s bullet 
I)a.ss, 

DTO kicked off and DKE had 
control of the ball with a tie 
.score and only three play.s left 
in the game. After two plays 
had moved the ball to the DKE 
40-yard line, Heaton threw a 
pa.ss to Morse in the center, 
then ran by ns Morse alertly 
flipped the ball back to the 
quarterback. On this last play 
of the game Heaton broke 
downficld with only Cnnant and 
Zawisto.ski in front of him. 

As Zowic finally had to leave 
Conant open in order to go aft¬ 
er Heaton, the DKE quarter¬ 
back fired to Conant in tho 
•end zone. Despite a great de¬ 
fensive effort by DTO's Walker, 
the game ended as Conant fell 
witii the six points that account¬ 
ed tor a 26 - 20 win. 


By DICK CONANT 

The touch football season is 
almost behind us as we go to 
press. As of Monday DKE was 
the only undefeated team in 
either league, having defeated 
DTO in a battle of unbeaten ti¬ 
tans. 

If DKE can knock off once- 
beaten (by DTO) Sig Ep, the 
Dekes will bo champions; if Sig 
Ep upsets the Dekes, then .SE 
and ATO (whoops!) will be tied 
for first place with 9 - 1 reC' 
ords, with DKE in third with 
an 8 - 1 record. 

However, the game of the 
season was the DTO - DKE 
fight for sole possession of the 
top rank. 

It was nfjt until well into the 
fourth quarter that either team 
could put up a sustained drive, 
but then Heaton dropped back 
and hit Myatt 40 yards down- 
field. As DTO defender.? closed 
in, Myatt flipped to Whipple for 
the touchdown. 

DTO fought back though and 




By ALE.X TAYEDR 

The Middlebury freshman foot¬ 
ball team lost its second game 
of the season to a good Nor¬ 
wich squad P'’riday, 12 - 9, 
As usual, the frosh were out¬ 
numbered, as Norwich boasted 
nearly twice as many men, Tho 
Panther cubs managed to lead 
the visitors for three periods, 
but fatigue set in in the second 
half, when they were victimiz¬ 
ed by two scores. Both point- 
after attempts were unsuccess- 


Glance at the soccer statistics on this page. You 
won’t fin(i there the names Hall, Webbe, Maker, Ste¬ 
vens, Easton, or Sumner. Yet these six, along with 
Heaney, Kovner and Reymond, are, at the least, 
js responsible lor the success of the present soccer 
season as the linemen who have scored. With goalie 
Bayard Russ, the.y just might form the best defensive 
;y»ecer unit in the East. 

In eight games this year, Middlebury has allowed 
sev’en goals, three of w'liich were penalty kicks. Four 
times, the Panthers have shut out the opposition. 
Against St. Michaels, Russ was required to make 
K) saves; against RPI, he had five. 

Particularly outstanding has been the play of 
Dick Hail, Jed Maker, and Davis Webbe. Hall runs 
like Nicholson — all the time and very fast — while 
confident Jed Maker makes playing defense look aw¬ 
ful l.V easy. It has been noted that the only time that 
Jed smiles during a game is when an enemy wing is 
cari^ying against him. All-American Davis Webbe 
was out-standing against Coast Guard on Saturday. 


The freshmen play their last 
game of the season this Satur¬ 
day against Williams, in Wil- 
liamstown. 





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29 , 1964 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 7 


Play Proclaimed a Flop — 
Inadequate^ Dreary Script 


By RCKIER OLIVER 

William Saroyan’s My Heart’s 
In the is a terrible 

play. It fails miserably to ac¬ 
complish any of its Koals, if in¬ 
deed it is aiminR toward any¬ 
thing. The Players tried admir¬ 
ably to make something out of 
this mushy mess of a script but 
were for the most part unsuc¬ 
cessful Iti lending any credibili¬ 
ty to an extremely th’.n plot. 

When Saroyan tries to be ten¬ 
der and moving, h-' becomes 
sticky and sentimei uj. When 
he tries to voice his opinions 
against war or .show the great 


contrast between the poet’s 
creativity and the destruction 
of battle, the weakness of both j 
Characters and the presentation 
of his point considerably injure 
that point. Saroyan’s major 
failure, however, is the plot, 
which is weak and often non¬ 
existent. 

Director Calhertne Scimcca 
’65 attempted to give some in¬ 
terest to the rather dull script, 
but the script was too much of 
an obstacle even for the most 
experienced director to com¬ 
pletely overcome. Staging was 
frequently imaginative, giving 


Tillinghast In England... 


(Continued from Page 2) 

Everyone wears an academic 
gown. Everyone? Well, every¬ 
one who has a degree from Ox¬ 
ford. Cambridge, or Trinity Col¬ 
lege, Dublin. There are, of 
course, other degree-granting 
institutkins, and gn^al attempts 
are made to be as kind to their 
off-spring as is possible under 
the circumstaiioes. It was point¬ 
ed out to me once, in a rare mo- 
nient of utter candor, that when 
1 wag introduced ag “Doctor.” 
this was a matter of politeneis 
rather tlian strict accuracy. 
My fine red Harvard gown ri'et- 
cd at home unused. After all, 
who WAS JoJin Harvard before 
he went to Emmanuel College? 

Dinner Ritual 

The headwaiter shortly ap¬ 
pears, in proper cutaway, and 
the last sherry fiends’ no.ses 
disappear in their glasses. The 
Master of the college finds the 
most distinguished guest pres¬ 
ent. and takes him in to din¬ 
ner. The others follow In order 
of precedence, a winding line 
of sombre dignity in the candle¬ 
light. 

The high table is ready, be¬ 
neath the portraits of llie great 
men of the college: Lancas¬ 
trians, cautious Tud^ir stales- j 
men, grave Caroline Divines, 
haughty 18th century grandees. 
A gong strikes, and from the 
minstrels’ gallery comes the 
ancient grace: Dens est Caritas 

The students, below the salt, 
pitch into the beef, jiotatoes 
and carrots noisily; the dons, 
at the high table, finish «>ne 
course after another, each with 
its appropriate wine, in a more 
decormi.s wn.v. The.v are also 
talking, Init in a different key. 
ns in the novels of Sir Charles 
Snow. The mood, though, is less 
cutthninl than in Snow’s novels, 
nnd the topics range all round 
the world, even though they us¬ 
ually come hark to resl, as is 
only proper. In the affairs of 
Cambridge. 

.’>Iooil Changes 

Later, the pmeession returns j 
to the rombination Hoorn, in 


strict order. Now the gowns 
and a good deal of the formali¬ 
ty are laid aside. ’The table 
groans with bananas, pears, 
dates; with port, claret and 
hock. Each bottle passe.s along 
until it is empty, and another 
at once appears. No one is in 
his cups, no one bellows or 
shakes his fist or turns the co¬ 
lor of beetroot. The arguments 
are cooly slated and usually 
calmly received. In .some col¬ 
leges, as the snuff box makes 
its round, there is some dis¬ 
cussion as to whether it is bet¬ 
ter form to .sneeze slightly or 
not at all. 

The 18th century, one says. 
Men of infinite leisure, surely; 
Gibbon's dons in their deep (if 
far from dull) potations. Of 
course, nothing of the sort is 
going on. Tile dons at any Eng¬ 
lish university are grossly over¬ 
worked men, trying as are the 
rest of us, to keep up with the 
students on one hand and pub¬ 
lished lor publishable) research 
on the other. Their courtesy to 
me was, in the circumstances, 
astonishing, 

Cambridge is not what it 
seems; but it takes a little time 
to notice the drive and pressure 
and love of all it stands for be¬ 
hind the veil of leisured insou¬ 
ciance. May the place live for¬ 
ever, It probably will. 

CLASSIFIED 

W.int Ads and For Aalr 
nolirrs may Iw iiisrricd in this 
rnlimin b.r students and fac¬ 
ulty fur two cents a ward. Cias- 
slfled must be submitted to 
TIIK t.Wfl’LS III flee Sunday 
nlRht prior to week's Issue. 

SKYDIVING SI NDAY! 
at Orange, IHass. We still 
have ntoiit; if iiiU'resU'd 
call Don Hraiiiard at I’KT 
or Terry riierlaiilt Giffurd 
51li, lirforr Friday. 


FOR SALE 

27 Ciihie Feet of Clear Blue Sky 
That Fell Last Thursday Night 
Oulu This C'ninpiis 
Must Be Kept Kefrigeralt'd 
Will Sell in Smaller Plet-ea 
Turn Reefe Box 861 


evidence that Miss Scimeca has 
talen a director and should 

be g iiioVher chance with a 

betlt piay. 

Til': bright point of the eve¬ 
ning provided by David 

Wot u hiB performance as 
Joh the poet’s young son. 
He was the only member of the 
ca.‘ ible to carry off his role 
cle inle the script’s inadequa- 
ci. s. 

Wood seemed determined to 
have a good time and entertain 
the audience in spite of the 
dreadful script. Relaxed and 
natural in his role, he was the 
only believable part of the en¬ 
tire evening. In capturing the 
essence of youthful fancy and 
freshness. Wood brought a few 
happy moments to an otherwise 
dreary evening. 

As Johnny's father, the poet, 
Tom Bullard did not seem as at 
case on stage as Wood. He 
seemed hindered, if not thwart¬ 
ed, by the accent he attempt¬ 
ed to employ One never real¬ 
ly knew what kind of an accent 
it was, since it svas neither clear 
nor consistent. There also 
.seemed to be a lack of motiva¬ 
tion behind the role, but this is 
probably more Saroyan’s fault 
than Bullard’s Of all the char¬ 
acters in the play, his was the 
hardest to swallow, although 
none of them went down easily. 

Peter Beardsley as Jasper 
•McGregor, the man with his 

Have Your Car Serviced At 

PROVONCHA‘S 
ESSO STATION 

‘•>Ioose’’ Provoncha, Prop. 


WRMC 

750 



! STUDENTS ! 

THRIFTY CHECKING ACCOUNTS 

•SI’KC IAI, MII>n COLLEGE CHECK BOOKS 

Chittenden County Trust Co. 

ADDISON COUNTY DIVISION 
MEMBER F. D. 1 . C. 


\Vr«‘k of Oct. 

eilS news wi'i'kU.iy 

5. 7, 

8, lU, and 11 ] 

days 

at 5, 7, 8, and 

7-8 

Thursday 

Bryan 

8-10 

Starr 

10-11 

Uiiffuin 

11-1 

Weber 

2-4 

Friday 

Starr 

4-5:30 

Coutt* 

5:30-7 

DlniuT Concert 

7-8 

Murdock 

8-10 

Plant 

10-11 

Dave Cook 

11-1 

Harlow 

I 15 

Satnrdiiy 

Football (KPl. 1 

8-? 

Wild Weekend 

2-5.30 

Sunday 

Opera 

5 :.10-7 

Dinner Concert 

7-8 

McDonough (SI 

8-10 

Harlow 

11-1 

Elliott 

2-4 

Monday 

Ohambera 

4-5 30 

Harlow 

5 30-7 

Dinner Concert 

7-8 

Wright 

8-10 

Michaels 

U)-ll 

Rob Cook 

11-1 

Lund 

2-4 

Tuesday 

Andrews 

4-5:30 

O'Connell 

S 30-7 

Dinner Concert 

7-8 

Jackson 

8-10 

Howden 

10-11 

Conant 

11-1 

Blllott 

2-4 

Wednesday 

Starr 

4-5:30 

Thompson 

5:30-7 

Dinner Cortcert 

7-8 

NkihMngiile 

8-10 

Mlchitels 

10-11 

Dave Cook 

11-1 

Carter 

2-4 

Thursday 

Balllu 

4-5 30 

Nightingale 

S :30-7 

Dinner Concert 


WINNERS last year in the “traditional’’ Greek Sing, 
Delta Kappa F^psilon’s pledge tla.ss was not quite good 
enougn to beat fii’st place Delta Epsilon last Friday in Mead 
Chapel. Photo by Wheelright. 

heart in the highlands, had very ' and had some effectiveness. Be¬ 
little to work with and could not cause it did not. it was very 
bring off the central role. Had J difficult to sustain interest in 
this part been creditable, the | the events taking place on th»' 
play might have taken shape Wright stage. 


1 ou Will appreciate the luxury 
of the Dollar Haircut in Middle- 
bury^s newest and most modern 
Barber Shop. 

rOM S BAUBEK SHOP 

NEXT TO DORIA'S 

“THAT BIG BAND SOUND” 

FOR LISTENING — YES 

FOR DANCING — MOSTLY 

THE VERMONTERS 

You enjoyed our music (we hope) at the 
A. M. B. Dance. Please call us again soon. 
CONTACT: DILLON BALDWIN 
PHONE: 2965 

Seven Piece: $135 Eight Piece; $150 

FLETCHER’S 
MOTORCYCLE SHOP 

EAST .MIDDLEBURY 

BIKES FROM $239 to $1219 

NORTON — Dl CATI — ZUNDAPP 



THE DOG TEAM 

is the best way 
to start your year. 

What is Middlebury without 

THE DOG TEAM 

LUNCH 12 - 1:.30 CLOSED MONDAYS 
DINNER 5:30 • 8:00 







PAGE 8 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1904 



Wmm 


Robinson develops in the book 
are not at aW “strikingly new” 
but are instead tlie translation 
of the works of such theologians 
as Dietrich Bonhocffer, Rudolph 
Bultniann and Paul Tillich into 
an English context. 

Carol Hoffman and Earl Ball, 
both ’65, co-chairmen of this 
year's Religion Conference, urge 
students interested in participat¬ 
ing in Professor Tillinghast’s 
discussion to read Tillich’s and 
Ayer's Dynamics of Faith and 
Language, Truth, and Logic. 


riirce Bogey Films S<lieduled; 
'Maltese Faleoii' Starts Tonight 


Pre-Religion Conference 
Discussion Set Nov. 5 


Saturday at 7 p. m. Admission 
is 75 cents. 

The late Bogart lives on in 
the three films to be presented 
in Munroe 303: The Maltese Fa- 
con, The Big SUh‘p and t’a- 
sablanca. 

The Maltese Falcon, set for 
tonight, gave ''Bogey" much of 
his initial fame. Under the di¬ 
rection of John Huston, he pro¬ 
duced one of the outstanding 
performances of his career. 

Tomorrow's feature The Big 
Sleep is described as ”... a 
stiff cocktail, the ingredients of 
which are nymphomania and 
drug addiction, which Bogart 
drinks in with furtive glances 
filtered through cigarette smoke 
drifting from beneath a large 
slouch hat.” 

Casablant'a, scheduled for 
Saturday, is a film of ]>olitical 
intrigue. This is Bogart at his 
sneering, bitter, cloak-and-dag¬ 
ger best. 


Humphrey Bogart, subject of 
past adulation and recently a 
Cambridge craze, is coming to 
Middlebury. 

Three Bogart films will be 
featured in Cinema 65’s "A 
Humphrey Bogart Festival,” 
scheduled for tonight through 


Tillinghast of the history de¬ 
partment. The Religion Confer¬ 
ence itself is scheduled for 
November 12 - 14. 

According to Professor Till¬ 
inghast, Bishop Robinson, of 
the traditionally conservative 
Church of England, postulates 
in his book that God is neither 
“up there” nor "out there,” but 
rather “in the midst of us” and 
that He is best felt in our rela¬ 
tions with each other. 

The great popularity of Hon¬ 
est to God has been a surprise 
to theologians. Mr. Tillinghast 
said, since the concepts Bishop 


A discussion of the contro¬ 
versial best-seller Honest to 
God will preview issues to be 
examined in the upcoaning Mid¬ 
dlebury Religion Conference. 

The pre-conference inquiry, 
set for November 5 at 7:30 p. m. 
in Prootor Lounge, will be mod- 
•rated by Professor Pardon E. 


Urge Seniors 
To Complete 
Applications 


Mt. Whitney was the highest 
mountain in the U. S. at 14,405 
feet, until the admission of 
Alaska as a state. Whitney is 
now the 15th highest with Alas¬ 
ka having 14 peaks higher. 


ORIA’S 


Seniors planning to enter grad¬ 
uate school should complete 
their applications as soon as 
their first-semester transcripts 
are complete, Gordon Perine, 
director of alumni placement, 
advised Monday. 

Seniors should also watch for 
registration deadlines for vari¬ 
ous graduate examinations. 

Deadline for the Graduate 
Record Examination is Fri¬ 
day. The test will be administer¬ 
ed November 21 at Hanover, N. 
H., and in Burlington. 

Those registered for the test 
for graduate study in business 
can take the examination No¬ 
vember 7 <it either Albany, N. 
Y., or Hanover. Tire next test, 
for which students must regis¬ 
ter by January 23, will be ad¬ 
ministered February 6. 

Saturday is the deadline for 
the law school test, which will 
be given November 14 at Han¬ 
over. 


Make the White House a Light House 
Wipe out creeping Socialism, immor¬ 
ality, and deficit spending. 

Boot Johnson — Vote Goldwater 


CAMPUS 


THEATRE 
MIDDLEBURY, VT, 
DU 8-4S41 


HURS.-SAT. OCT. 29-31 

f Siam' 

r ^ mwmtomrnmm 


Leonard DAvignon*s 


I Young Repubs 
I To Ginduet Poll 


ESSO STATION 


VW SERVICE 

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 
FOREIGN CARS 
GENERAL REPAIRS 


As millions of Americans 
flock to the’poll.s Tuesday. Mid¬ 
dlebury students will express 
their politcal preferences in a 
poll sponsored by the Young Re¬ 
publican Club. 

Balloting is scheduled for 9 
a. m. to 4 p. m. in the Proctor 
Hall cloakroom. 

Results will be given to Lynn 
Bottum, chairman of the Ver¬ 
mont State Young Republicans. 
He will then tabulate polls from 
all groups in the state and sub¬ 
mit them (to the Associated 
Press in Montpelier. 

Members of the student club, 
under the direction of Mr. 
Franke, head of the Citizens’ 
Committee for Goldwater, also 
plan to form a motorcade to 
pass out election literature in 
Addison County. 


MnOvl'BOlfME.ooMt 

V EdwMCUMWSON 

^1 igM»n>«acrsi 

7 & 9:10 P.M. 

Mat. Sat. 1:30 P.M. 
Everybody will tell his 

Neighbor- 

This is a Blues Chaser 
Loaded with Laughs 


PHONE 388-9414 

RT. 7 SO. — MIDDLEBURY, VT 


SUN.-THURS. NOV. l-l 

Michael Callen 

Barbara Eden — Dean Jones 


BOG Suiiiiiier 
Talks Slated 


Veterans of the Crossroads 
Africa and Experiment in In¬ 
ternational Living programs 
will share their experiences 
with other Middlebury students 
in a discussion Wednesday. 

Sponsored by the Recreation 
Committee of the Board of 
Governors, the discussion is 
designed to “acquaint students 
with procedures for application” 
to sumitier programs. 

Students leading the discus¬ 
sion will be Susan Emrich, Eli¬ 
zabeth Fink, both '65, Margaret 
Greenfield, Ann Parker and 
Charlotte Stetson, all '66, rep¬ 
resenting the Experiment in 
International Living. Richard 
Ide, Lawrence Mack and How¬ 
ard Tolley, all '65, will repre¬ 
sent Crossroads Africa. , 


MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


AFTER THE 
NORWICH GAME 


their new loves / 


Young Doctors at work and 
play make for absorbing 
Entertainment. 

7 A 9:05 P.M. 


Soph Loses 
Privileses 


Why not meet here, dine 
and review the game, 
play by play? 


WED.-THURS. NOV. 4-5 

He wanted to help those 
who didn’t know how to 
, help themselves 
7 A 9:10 P.M. 

A RARE MOTION PICTURE. .. 
BRILIANT PERFORMANCE! 

“LIFE” 

Marcello 

Mastroianni 


A sophomore apprehended 
driving an unregistered motor¬ 
cycle on campus has been de¬ 
nied registration privileges for 
his junior year. 

According to Chief Justice 
Richard Ide '65, the student has 
also been forbidden to operate 
any motor vehicle, his or anoth¬ 
er’s. until the second semester 
of his junior yea.r. This is the 
fourth such case to come before 
the Council this year. 

A senior was fined seven dol¬ 
lars for driving an unregistered 
car. 

Chief Justice Ide noted that an 
inordinate number of parking 
tickets have been issued to Mid¬ 
dlebury students this fall. He 
suggests that drivers be famil¬ 
iar with the parking regulations 
in the .Student Handbook. 


Late Evening Dining until 10 

(except Sundays) 

Sunday Night 
Buffet — $3.50 


WE ARE OPEN UNTIL 12 P.M. SUNDAY THRU 


THURSDAY, 1 A.M. FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 


Compliments 


The 

ORGANIZER 


Barber Shop 


Renato Anne 
Salvatori Girardot 


Folro 

Lulli 



IjL 

L^LlJ 



□ 

rr ^