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Published by 

THE JUNIOR CLASS 
MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 

Middlebury, Vermont 

Editor-in-Chief 

SHIRLEY J. SYRETT 

Business Manager 

R. ELAINE PHILLIPPI 




■ 






AUDDLEBU 


The Junior Class dedicates the 1948 KALEIDOSCOPE 
to the Middlebury men who have served with the fighting 
forces of our country. We welcome those who are here for 
the first time and those who are returning to the campus. 
We cannot say that with their arrival college life has slipped 
into a prewar normalcy; that will never be possible, for the 
new field house will stand as a constant reminder of the 
darker days that changed all college life on all campuses. 
We can only say that it is good to have them back; they 
are helping to create a postwar atmosphere which is remi- 
niscent of what college was like before 1941. Their revival 
of varsity teams, of fraternities, their participation in clubs, 
in publications, in discussions has given a new vitality to 
all that is "Middlebury." 


'S 


VETERANS 



FOREWORD 

Even now, as we follow the paths of those before 
us, as we visualize new ones of our own, we begin 
to cherish memories of our college life. There are 
the thoughts of warm friendships and noble ideals, 
the impressions of a college during war and peace. 
These, this book seeks to preserve for you, the 
Junior Class, that you may recall in future hours 
the pleasures, the interests, the life that was yours 
at Middlebury. 







Painter 











Forest 


\WT% 







man 



Not since the early "forties” had Fresh- 
man Week made an appearance in Septem- 
ber. On the evening of the twenty-third, 
the Class of 19 50 first assembled as a group 
at the Playhouse. College life had begun. 
A reception for the new students and their 
advisors followed the meeting. Tuesday 
brought a lecture on the use of the library, 
preliminary examinations, and a Student 
Union reception for the women. The Moun- 
tain Club’s Freshman Outing, with scaven- 
ger hunts and games, took place the follow- 
ing day at the Women’s Athletic Field. 
Thursday night Dr. Stratton addressed the 
class at Mead Chapel, and on Friday movies 
of life at Middlebury were presented, Carni- 
val, graduation, and "sugaring off.” "Midd 
Kite” on Saturday evening climaxed Fresh- 
man Week. The first stage of orientation 
was over! 



No Pipe Courses for Us 



H a ii Jy \ntrodu ct ion s 



A Long M idd Yell! 


w 




omecomun. 


/ 


The first Homecoming week-end since 
1942 was observed this fall with the spirited 
return of over two hundred alumni to "the 
college on the hill.” An exuberant keynote 
was set by the fraternity house decorations 
and continued throughout the Trinity foot- 
ball game, informal gym dance, and buffet 
luncheon which the visiting graduates at- 
tended. The week-end also marked the official 
opening of the Memorial Fund Drive. 



"When Did You Arrive ?” 


EIGHTEEN 





The alumni organizations sponsored no 
class reunions at the first postwar com- 
mencement, but the week-end was open to 
all alumni. Plans were discussed for the Me- 
morial Fund Drive by the executive com- 
mittee. Portraits of Dr. John M. Thomas, 
Dr. Paul D. Moody, and Dean Eleanor S. 
Ross were unveiled and placed on display. 
The reunion barbecue and the President’s 
reception highlighted the week-end. 



The Way to Their Hearts 



Activities Hate Begun 


Is It Worth the Wait? 


NINETEEN 


■ 




Refreshment Stampede 


A Striking Pair 


T W E N T Y 






Atulic KOI 

DANCING FEET 


Shortly after classes began in the fall, 
Middlebury’s social life began in earnest. 
Almost every Saturday night from Home- 
coming week-end till June the numerous 
organizations on campus sponsored the 
popular gym dances at the high school or 
McCullough. Couples danced to records or 
the music of the incomparable Black 
Panthers. 

Especially memorable were the Forum- 
sponsored souvenir dance, the Frosh Hop 
which followed the U.V.M. game, and the 
annual Mountain Club square dance. And 
then there was Carnival and the long- 
awaited Klondike Rush. In the more so- 
phisticated manner were the Sailing Club 
Formal, the Sophomore Stardust and the 
unforgettable Carnival Ball. Supplement- 
ing all these were those dances held in the 
fraternity houses, at the Inn, Gilford Li- 
brary and the homey atmosphere of Dog 
Team. 



An Informal at Gifford 



Foo's "Hey Barbareeba ” 


TWENTY - ONE 




* 



WINTER 


Can This Be MiiU? 



Their "All” for Their Majes/ies 


With Mim Wade and Roy Kinsey deftly 
managing the festivities as co-chairmen of 
Midd’s sixteenth annual Winter Carnival, 
this all important week-end hit a new high 
despite the noticeable paucity of snow. 
After the Blue Shirts* victorious hockey 
game against U.V.M., Polly Hodder and 
Art Pepin took the sceptre in hand at the 
Coronation Ice Show and thenceforth 
reigned over the events which commenced 
with the laugh-provoking show, ''George 

The Winners— U. N. H. 




CARNIVAL 



Ski Pants anil Informality Reign 





Washington Slept Here.” The skiing events 
were run off with our fabulous Queen cap- 
turing the women’s honors and New Hamp- 
shire winning the men’s combined events 
title. Raymond Scott and his orchestra pre- 
sided over the formal Ball in sentimental 
style, and the lively assortment of tunes 
provided by the Black Panthers at the Klon- 
dike Ski Bowl informal dance caught up the 
whole spirit of Carnival in a sparkling 
finale. 



Polly and Pep 





Jjn AlcLtck 


CULTURE 


r 'Lct There Be Frustration ” 


rr D:J You Mean to Say?” 


The responsibility for world harmony, 
the general theme of the 1947 Culture Con- 
ference, was the topic around which three 
panels of discussion revolved. On Saturday 
morning, March 8, President Stratton de- 
livered an opening address which was fol- 
lowed by the keynote speech of Dr. David 
L. Thomson of McGill University. Dr. 
Thomson served as moderator for all of the 
sessions. Edgar A. Mowrer, syndicated 
columnist and an expert on international 
affairs, and Charles W. Lightbody, historian, 
writer, and lecturer, each presented pre- 
pared talks. After these had been delivered, 
the audience and panel members participated 
in a debate of the issues brought forth in 
the speeches. 

The second of the round table discussions 
began on Saturday afternoon with speeches 
by Leon Gay, the treasurer of Gay Brothers 
Company in Cavendish, Vermont; W. I. 


Newstetter, dean of the School of Applied 
Social Science at the University of Pitts- 
burgh; and G. Holmes Perkins, a member 
of the faculty of Harvard College, and an 
expert on regional planning and housing. An 
informal reception was held in Forest Hall 
on Saturday evening. To this gathering stu- 
dents were invited to meet and ask ques- 
tions of the speakers. 

Preceded by a dinner in Forest Hall for 
all of the participants, the concluding panel 
met on Sunday afternoon and heard talks 



'Theze bi/tzi 


CONFERENCE 


by Dr. Robert R. Brooks, dean of Williams 
College and an expert in the field of labor 
relations; and William Muehl, youngest 
member of the faculty at the Yale Divinity 
School. 

An outstanding feature of the entire con- 
ference was the maintenance of the discus- 
sion on a plane of the practical, for as it 
has so often been stressed, it is of far greater 
importance in the light of present day 
affairs to consider the "how” rather than 
the "why” of world harmony. 



"Where Is Christianity in Business ?” 



REV MUEHL 


DR THOMSON 


LEON GAY 


EDGAR MOURE R 


OP L IGHTBODf 


BROOKS 





1 

fc — - 



-—rrz 




After the Exercises 



The one hundred and forty-sixth com- 
mencement of Middlebury College was held 
on June 17, 1946, in Mead Memorial Chapel. 
Opening with a processional and invocation 
by Reverend Jenkins, the graduation exer- 








COMMENCEMENT 


cises were climaxed by an address delivered 
by Henning Webb Prcntis, Jr., a well-known 
figure in the business world. President Strat- 
ton conferred degrees upon the senior class, 
thus completing the ceremonies. For the Lust Time 




J 









The Educational Aspect 



"Come over and see me when you have 
a spare moment.” "How about a short, 
snappy game of bridge before supper?” How 
familiar to us all! Yet spare time in Mid- 
dlebury is actually non-existent, unless it be 
but the absence of work that must be done. 
In our own peculiar ways we must merely 
rationalize for each moment of relaxation 



Helping the Younger Generation 
THIRTY 


Easy Come — Easy Go 



SPARE TIME 


we take. So it is that an afternoon planned 
for intense academic pursuits can degenerate 
into a quick dash downtown for a sundae 
at Rexall’s, relaxing to music in the rec 
room, or a terrific bull session on life in 
general. None of us can remember a day 
when we’ve had nothing to do, but all of us 
can remember days when we’ve done nothing. 



It Happens to the Best 



THIRTY- ONE 








PRESIDENT STRATTON 


Dr. Samuel S. Stratton became the 
eleventh president of Middlcbury College 
on January 1, 1943, and since then has suc- 
cessfully guided the College through the 
difficult war and postwar period. He re- 
ceived his A.B. degree at Dartmouth Col- 
lege and was awarded his M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees at Harvard University. Later he 
was a member of the Harvard faculty as 
Associate Professor of Economics in the 
Graduate School of Business Administra- 


tion. During the war, on leave of absence 
from Harvard, Dr. Stratton served as Di- 
rector of the Priorities Review Division of 
the War Production Board and later, on 
the New England Regional War Labor 
Board. Among the books of which he is 
co-author are: "Problems in Corporation 
Finance," "Economics of the Iron and Steel 
Industry," "Financial Instruments and In- 
stitutions," and "Price Research in the 
Steel and Petroleum Industry " 





CORPORATION AND TRUSTEES 


SAMUEL S. STRATTON, ph.d., ll.d. 

Middlebury, Vt. 

President of the College 

JOHN E. WEEKS, a.m., ll.d. 

Middlebury, Vt. 

President of the Corporation ; Ex-Governor of 
Vermont 

EGBERT C. HADLEY, a.b., b.s. 

Southport, Conn. 

Chairman of the Board ; Engineer, Remington Arms 
Company 

GEORGE H. V. ALLEN, c.n. 

Fair Haven, Vt. 

Secretary and Treasurer of the Corporation 

REDFIELD PROCTOR, m.s., ll.d. 

Proctor, Vt. 

President, Vermont Marble Company 

hall p. McCullough, ll.b. 

New York, N. Y. 

Lawyer, Dai is, Polk , Ward well, Gardiner (5 Reed 

ALBERT H. WIGGIN, ll.d. 

New York, N. Y. 

ELBERT S. BRIGHAM, m.s., ll.d. 

Montpelier, Vt. 

President, National Life Insurance Company 

CARLTON H. SIMMONS, b.s. 

Boston, Mass. 

£. M. Newton & Co. 

JOSEPH P. KASPER, b.s. 

New York. N. Y. 

President, Associated Merchandising Corporation 

FRED P. LANG, b.s. 

New York, N. Y. 

Broker, F. P. Lang & Co. 

WALTER H. CLEARY, ll.d. 

Newport, Vt. 

Chief Superior fudge, State of Vermont 

HORACE S. FORD 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Treasurer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 




LEON S. GAY, ph.b. 

Cavendish, Vt. 

Treasurer, Gay Brothers Company 

JAY J. FRITZ, b.s. 

Quarryville, Pa. 

ELBERT C. COLE, m.s., ph.d. 

Williamstown, Mass. 

Professor, Williams College 

REID L. CARR, a.b., ll.d. 

New York, N. Y. 

President, Columbian Carbon Company 

DR. STEWART ROSS, a.b., m.d. f.a.c.s. 

Rutland, Vt. 

Physician and Surgeon 

HAROLD E. HOLLISTER, a.b. 

Rye, N. Y. 

District Superintendent of Schools, Neu York State 
Education Department 

HUGH O. THAYER, b.s. 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

Derelopment Department, E. I. duPont deN emours 
& Co Wilmington, Del. 

LINWOOD B. LAW, b.s. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Manager, Tax and Legislative Department, Buffalo 
Chamber of Commerce 

MOSES G. HUBBARD, JR., a.b., ll.b. 

Utica, N. Y. 

Lawyer, Brown, Hubbard, Felt, Ryan & Fuller 

WILLIAM H. EDMUNDS, a.b., ll.b. 

Burlington, Vt. 

Lawyer, Austin & Edmunds 

ROBERT I). HOPE, ll.b. 

Middlebury, Vt. 

Assistant Treasurer of the Corporation 

HELEN G. MacKAY, b.s. 

Middlebury, Vt. 

Assistant Secretary of the Corporation 


THIRTY- FIVE 


VICE-PRESIDENT AND DEANS 


Dr. Freeman received his A.B., M.A., 
Ph.D. degrees and Phi Beta Kappa award 
at Harvard. He began teaching as an in- 
structor at Brown University in 1923. He 
came to Middlebury in 192 5 to become 
Dean of the French School and professor of 
French. He became Vice-President of Mid- 
dlebury in 1 940, after one year as Acting 
President. In 1945 he left Middlebury to 
spend a year with the United States Army 
in France as Chief of the Liberal Arts Sec- 
tion at the Biarritz-American University, 
but returned here to resume his positions 
in 1946. That same year he was appointed 
Director of Middlebury’s Summer Language 
Schools. 



Vice-P res id e nt I : ree m u n 


Mrs. Woodward came to Middlebury 
after three years as Dean of the Child Edu- 
cation Foundation in New York. A gradu- 
ate of the University of California, she re- 
ceived her Master’s degree from Radcliffe 
College where she served on the adminis- 
trative staff before becoming a member of 
the teaching staff at Barnard College. 


W. Storrs Lee became Dean of the College 
this year, after one year as Acting Dean. 
He received his A.B. degree at Middlebury, 
and attended Oxford. He was Editor of 
the Middlebury College Press from 1930 
until he left in 1941 to serve as Commander 
in the U.S.N.R. 



T H 1 R T Y • S I X 


HOUSE MOTHERS 


MISS ELIZABETH BAKER 

Forest East 

MISS LEA ZOE BINAND 

Chateau 

MISS EVELYN L. COSBY 

Hillside 

MISS SARAH M. CURTIS 

Assistant, Hepburn 

MISS IDA V. GIBSON 

Homestead 

MRS. MARIAN M. GRIGGS 

Forest West 

MISS NICOLE HERRMANN 

Assist a tit. Chateau 


MRS. EMILIA de L’HOMMEDIEU 

Wright House 


MISS MARY JOHNSON 

Assistant, Painter 


MISS FLEDA H. MARTIN 

Bat tell 


MRS. GERTRUDE PETERSON 

Hepburn 


MISS MAXINE J. SHURTZ 

Painter 

MISS RUTH WOOD TEMPLE 

Pearsons 



Second row — Shurtz, Mar fin, Curtis, Johnson 
Front row — Gibson, Temple, Griegs, Peterson 


THIRTY- SEVEN 


ADMINISTRATION 




Miss Baker 



Miss Cooke 



Mrs. Faycr 



Mr. French 






ELIZABETH W. BAKER 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College (1943); Library and Resident Chaperone, 
Mount Holyoke ( 1938-1943); Red Cross Overseas Assistant Field Director 
(1943-1946); Social Director of Women’s College, Head of Forest Hall, 
Counsellor of Freshman Women, Middlebury College (1946- ). 

ALICE E. COOKE 

A.B. Middlebury College ( 1935 ), M.A. New York University ( 1939); 
Director of Admissions, Dean of Freshmen, Women’s College of Middlebury 
( 1945- ). Sigma Kappa, Pi Lambda Theta. 

MARGARET W. FAYER 

A.B. University of California (1930), B.S. Columbia University (1931); 
Beverly Hills Public Library (1932-1938); Fullerton Junior College Library 
( 1938-1939); Michigan State College Library (1942); Acting Editor, 
Middlebury College ( 1943-1945); Librarian ( 1945- ). Delta Zcta. 

IRWIN K. FRENCH 

Bentley School of Accounting and Finance (1926); Assistant Auditor 
(1922-1926); Public Accountant (1926-1930); Babson Institute of Busi- 
ness Administration (1930-1943 ); Business Manager, Middlebury College 
(1944- ). 

SAMUEL GUARNACCIA 

A.B. Middlebury College ( 1930), M.A. ( 1936); Instructor Spanish and 
Italian, Middlebury College (1940-1944); USNR, Lieutenant (1944-1946); 
Instructor Spanish and Italian, Middlebury (February, 1946-June, 1946), 
Assistant Professor (September, 1946- ); Acting Director of Admis- 
sions and Personnel (1946- ); Acting Alumni Secretary (1946- ); 

Junior Varsity Football Coach (1946- ); Kappa Delta Rho. 

ROBERT E>. HOPE 

Norwich University (1906-1907); Middlebury College (1907-1908); LL.B. 
Lincoln Jefferson University (1914); Vermont State Bar (1914); Assistant 
Treasurer, Middlebury College (1914- ). Delta Kappa Epsilon. 




Mr. Hope 






m 


THIRTY- EIGHT 




■ 


OFFICERS 


GEORGE H. HUBAN 

B.S. Boston University (1938); Press Bureau Director, Middlebury College 
(1940-1941); U.S.A. Infantry, Captain ( 1941-1945 ); Director of Pub- 
lications and Publicity, Middlebury College ( 1945- ). 


LOIS D. O’NEILL 

A.B. Swarthmore College ( 1942); Editorial Department, Neu York Times 
( 1942); News Editor, Paso Robles Press ( 1943); Social Director of Men’s 
College, Middlebury College (1946- ). Phi Beta Kappa. 


JORDAN R. SCOBIE 

Lit.B. Princeton University (1918); Registrar, Middlebury College 
(1942- ). 


RUTH W. TEMPLE 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College (1907); Secretary to Dean of Women, 
Middlebury College (1922-1923); Assistant Dean of Women (1923- ). 


BARBARA A. WELLS 

A.B. Middlebury College (1941), A.M. Middlebury College ( 1943); In- 
structor, Skidmore College (1943-1946); Alumnae Secretary and Director 
of the Women’s College Placement Office, Middlebury College (1946- ). 


RAYMOND H. WHITE 


A.B. Yale University ( 1905), A.M. (1906); Instructor Latin, Middlebury 
College (1909-1911), Assistant Professor (1911-1920), Professor (1920- 
); Dean of Faculty (1909- ). Phi Beta Kappa. 



Mr. White 



Miss Wells 



Mr. Hu ban 



Mrs. O'Neill 



THIRTY-NINE 







Snake Dance Ritual The Music Makers 

A Panther Victory Down With Vermont 


George: B.D.O.C. 


Music for the Team 


The Old Midd You-know-what 


FORTY 




Mr. Andrews 



Mr. Bagu 



Mr. Ballou 


JOHN T. ANDREWS 

A.B. Amherst College (1927), A.M. Harvard Uni- 
versity (1929); Associate Professor Philosophy. Mid- 
dlebury College (1936- ). Phi Delta Theta. 

SERGIO BAGU 

A.M. University of Buenos Aires ( 1936); Lecturer, 
University of Buenos Aires and University of La 
Plata, Argentina (1936-1942); Visiting Professor, 
University of Illinois (1943); Professor Spanish, Mid- 
dlebury College (1946- ). 


DONALD H. BALLOU 

B.A. Yale University (1928), M. A. Harvard Univer- 
sity (1931), Ph.D. (1934); Assistant Professor Mathe- 
matics, Middlebury College (1942- ). Phi Beta 

Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi. 



Mr. Bedford Mr. Beers 


H. WARD BEDFORD 

A.B. F.arlham College (1927), Mus.B. Westminster 
Choir School ( 1933), A.M. University of Pittsburgh 
( 1936); Instructor Music, Middlebury College (1936- 
1 938); Assistant Professor Music and Fine Arts ( 193 8- 
1940); Associate Professor Music (1940- ). 


DOUGLAS S. BEERS 

A.B. Yale University (1919), A.M. (1921), Ph.D. 
( 1925 ); Instructor English, Middlebury College 
( 1925-1926), Assistant Professor (1926-1927), Asso- 
ciate Professor (1927-1928), Professor (1928- ). 


LEA BINAND 

Brevet Superieur; Assistant Professor of French, Mid- 
dlebury College (1929- ). 


CLAUDE L. BOURCIER 

Baccalaurcat; Licence-es-I.ettres; Diplome d’etudes su- 
perieures; Agregatios des lettres, Middlebury French 
Summer School ( 1936-1942); Assistant Professor 
French, Middlebury College (1937-1939). Associate 
Professor (1939- ). 



Miss Binand Mr. Bourcier 




Mr. Boulter 



Mr. A. Broun 


Mr. R. Brown 



JOHN G. BOWKER 

B.S., Tufts College (1924), Ed.M. Harvard (1930); 
Instructor Mathematics, Middlcbury College (1926- 
1928), Assistant Professor (1928-1938), Associate 
Professor (1938-1944), Professor (1944- ). 

ARTHUR M. BROWN 

A.B. Williams College (1907); Professor Physical 
Education, Director Athletics, Middlebury College 
(1918- ). Phi Sigma Kappa. 

RICHARD L. BROWN 

A.B. Bowdoin College (1929), A.M. Harvard Uni- 
versity (1930); Instructor English, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1931-1937), Assistant Professor (1937-1940), 
Associate Professor (1940- ). Delta Upsilon. 


PRUDENCE F. BUSSEY 

Mus.B. Oberlin ( 1923 ); Instructor Music, Middlebury 
College ( 1923-1930), Assistant Professor (1930- 
1936); Special Study and Instructor Theory, Oberlin 
(1937-1938); Instructor Voice, Theory and History 
of Music, National Park Junior College (1938-1939); 
Instructor Voice, Susquehanna University ( 1939- 
1943); Instructor Piano and Voice, Monticello Col- 
lege (1944-1945); Instructor Music, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1946- ); A.A.G.O. Pi Kappa Lambda. 

FRANK W. CADY 

A. B. Middlebury College ( 1899), A.M. (1903), 

B. Litt., Oxford University (1908); Registrar, Mid- 

dlebury College (1909-1913); Assistant Professor 
English (1909-1917), Professor (1917- ). Delta 

Upsilon, Phi Beta Kappa. 

ALAN CARTER 

Studied with Scipioni Guidi, Leopold Aniv; Mannus 
Music School, New York; Conservatory at Cologne; 
Academy at Munich; studied at Paris with Leon 
Nauwinck; debut in Paris (1929); studied conduct- 
ing with Willem Van Hoogstraten; member of Kon- 
zertgellshaft Orchestra, Cologne (1924-1925); formed 
and played in Cremona String Quartet; organizer and 
conductor of Vermont State Symphony ( 1 93 5- ); 

Instructor Music, Middlebury College ( 1938-1942); 
Captain A.U.S. (1942-1944); Assistant Professor Mu- 
sic, Middlcbury College (1944- ); Director of 

Middlebury College Composers Conference (1946). 

LAURE CHIROL 

B.A. Notre Dame des Arts ( 1939), M.A. Notre Dame 
des Arts (1940); University of Strasbourg (1941- 
1943); Instructor, Middlebury College (1946- ). 





Mrs. Bussey 


Mr. Cady 



Mr. Carter 


Miss Chirol 










Mr. Cline 



Mr. Cook Miss Co sky 


ALLEN i\l. CLINE 

A.B. University of Michigan (1904), A.M. ( 1905 ), 
Ph.D. (1907); Professor History, College of the 
Pacific, San Jose, California (1909-1920), Dean 
(191 8-1920); History Lecturer, Stanford University 
(1914-1918); Professor History, Middlebury College 
(1920- ). 


REGINALD L. COOK 

A.B. Middlebury College (1924), A.M. ( 1926), B.A. 
Oxford University (1929); Instructor English and 
American Literature, Middlebury College (1929- 
1931), Associate Professor ( 193 1-1932). Professor 
( 1932- ); Director Breadloaf School of English 

( 1945- ). Kappa Delta Rho, Phi Beta Kappa. 


EVELYN L. COSBY 

B.S. University of Richmond (1942), Ph.D. in Bio- 
chemistry, Cornell University (1945); Instructor 
Chemistry, Middlebury College ( 1945- ). Beta 

Beta Beta, Sigma Delta Epsilon, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta 
Kappa, Virginia Academy of Science. 



J. PERLEY DAVISON 

A.B. Tufts College (1919), A.M. (1920); Teacher’s 
Fellowship, University of Minnesota (1920-1921); 
Harvard University Graduate (1921-1922); Assistant 
Professor History, Middlebury College ( 1923-1931 ), 
Associate Professor (1931- ). 


MISCHA H. FAYER 

A.B. University of Minnesota (1926), M.A. ( 1928); 
Head Department of Language and Literature, State 
Teachers College, North Dakota (1929-1942); In- 
structor German and French, Fullerton Junior College 
( 1938-1939, on leave); Instructor Russian, Michigan 
State College (1942-1943); Assistant Professor Rus- 
sian, Middlebury College ( 1945- ); Ph.D. Colum- 

bia University (1945); Director Russian Summer 
School (1 Q 45); Chairman Methodology Committee, 
American Association of Teachers of Slavonic and 
Eastern European Languages. Lambda Alpha Psi. 


HARRY M. FIFE 

A.B. McGill University (1921), A.M. Harvard Uni- 
versity (1922); Fellowship, Chicago University ( 1923- 
1925); Associate Professor Economics, Middlebury 
College ( 1925-1926), Professor (1926- ). 


IDA V, GIBSON 

B.S. Skidmore College (1919), A.M. Columbia Uni- 
versity ( 1925 ); Instructor Home Economics, Middle- 
bury College ( 1933-1939), Assistant Professor (1939- 
1944), Associate Professor (1944- ). 



Mr. Davison 


Mr. Faycr 


Mr. Fife 


Miss Gibson 






Mr. Harvest 



Mr. Harris 



Mr. Hazel tine 


GRANT H. HARNEST 

A. B. Knox College ( 1939), M.S. Middlebury College 
(1941), Ph.D. University of Virginia (1946); In- 
structor Chemistry, Middlebury College ( 1943-1945 ), 

Assistant Professor (1946- ). Sigma Xi, Alpha 

Chi Sigma. 

ROBERT L. HARRIS 

B. S. Syracuse University (1939), M.S. Rensselaer 

Polytechnic Institute ( 1939), Ph.D. Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute (1942); Assistant Professor Chem- 
istry, Middlebury College (1946- ). Alpha Chi 

Sigma, Sigma Chi Sigma, Phi Lambda Epsilon, Sigma 
Xi. 

BURT A. HAZELTINE 

B.S. Tufts ( 1 91 3 ), A. M. Columbia University (1931); 
Professor Mathematics, Middlebury College (1924- 
). Delta Tau Delta. 



Mr. Healy Mr. Heinrichs 


ARTHUR K. D. HEALY 

A.B. Princeton University (1924); Fontainebleau 
School of Fine Arts (1925); M.F.A. Princeton Uni- 
versity (1926); Artist in Residence, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1943- ). Delta Kappa Epsilon. 


WALDO H. HEINRICHS 

B.Sc. Denison University (1913), M.A. Columbia 
University (1926); Instructor Contemporary Civiliza- 
tion, Middlebury College ( 1934-193 5 ). Associate Pro- 
fessor (1936-193 7), Professor (1938- ). Beta 

Theta Pi. 

NICOLE HERRMANN 

B.A. University dc Montpellier, France (1942); Free 
French School (1943); M.A. Bryn Mawr College 
(1946); Instructor, Middlebury College (1946- ). 


HAROLD B. HITCHCOCK 

A.B. Williams College (1926), A.M. Harvard Univer- 
sity (1932), Ph.D. ( 1938); Instructor Zoology, Uni- 
versity of Western Ontario (193 8-1941), Assistant 
Professor (1941-1943); Assistant Professor Biology, 
Middlebury College ( 1943- ). Gamma Alpha, 

Phi Delta Theta. 



Miss Herrmann Mr. Hitchcock 


m 






A. JOHN HOLDEN, JR. 

S.B. Harvard University (1923), Ed.M. Harvard 
Graduate School of Education (1929), Ed.D. Teachers 
College, Columbia (1943); Associate Professor Edu- 
cation, Middlcbury College (1943- ). 


FRANK E. HOWARD 

A.B. Michigan State Teacher’s College (1907), A.M. 
Clark University (1910), Ph.D. (1912); Assistant 
Professor Education, Middlebury College (1915- 
1920); Professor Psychology (1920-1922); Professor 
Pedagogy (1922-1923); Professor Psychology 3nd 
Education (192 3- ). Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Phi 

Kappa. 

JOHN R. ILLICK 

A.B. Syracuse University (1940), M.A. Syracuse Uni- 
versity (1941), A.M. Harvard University (1943); 
Civilian Public Service (1944-1946); Instructor Ge- 
ography, Middlebury College (1946- ). Sigma 

Xi, Associate; Theta Alpha. 


MARSHALL JENKINS 

A.B. Grand Island College (1931), B.D. Andover 
Newton Theological School (1934); Minister of Union 
Church in Watertown, Massachusetts (193 5-1944); 
Graduate Student, Columbia University (1942-1943); 
Candidate for Ed.D., Harvard University (1943); 
Chaplain and Associate Professor Religion and Psy- 
chology, Middlebury College (1944- ). 


WILLIAM T. JEROME, III 

B.A. Colgate University (1941); Yale Law School 
(1941-1942); I. A. Harvard School of Business Ad- 
ministration (1943); U.S. Army (1943-1946); M.B.A. 
Harvard School of Business Administration (1946); 
Instructor Economics, Middlebury College (1946- 
). Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Beta Kappa. 


WEBSTER J. JONES 

A.B. Denison University ( 1945); Instructor Physics, 
Middlebury College (1946- ). Kappa Sigma, 

O.D.K., Blue Key. 


JOHN J. KELLY 

B.S. Middlebury College (1931), M.A. ( 1932); In- 
structor of Physical Education ( 193 5-1943), (1946- 

); Lieutenant U.S.N.R. (1943-1946). Beta 

Kappa, Theta Chi. 



Mr. Jerome 


Mr. Jones 


Mr. Jenkins 


Mr. Kelly 





CLARA B. KNAPP 

A.B. Syracuse University (1899), A.M. (1909); 
Assistant Professor Home Economics, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1922-1925), Professor (1925- ). Phi Beta 

Kappa. 

MARY M. LEE 

A.B. University of California (1927); Instructor 
Physical Education, Middlebury College (1942-1944), 
1946- ). Phi Beta Kappa. 


LAWRENCE B. LEIGHTON 

A.B. Bowdoin College (1929), M.A. Harvard Univer- 
sity ( 1 933); Assistant Professor of Contemporary 
Civilization, Middlebury College (1944); Lecturer in 
History, Assistant Professor Classics, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1944-1945); Assistant Professor Contemporary 
Civilization (1946- ). Theta Delta Chi, Phi Beta 

Kappa. 


EMILIA DE L’HOMMEDIEU 

Bachillerato, Bogota, Colombia; Studied at Columbia 
University and University of California; Instructor 
and Director of "Cesa Hispana,” University of Cali- 
fornia (1932-1936); Instructor Spanish, Middlebury 
College ( 1 944- ) . 


WILLIAM F. MADDEN 

A.B. Ohio University (1936), M.A. Syracuse Univer- 
sity (1940); Assistant Professor Psychology, Middle- 
bury College (1940-1942); U.S.N.R. (1942-1946); 
Assistant Professor Psychology (1946- ). Theta 

Chi, Sigma Xi, Psychi. 


ROSE E. MARTIN 

A.B. New York State Teachers College (1916), A.M. 
Middlebury College (1929); Instructor Spanish, Mid- 
dlebury College (1929-193 1 ), Assistant Professor 
( 1 93 1 -1 942) , Associate Professor (1942- ). Sigma 

Delta Pi. 


HOWARD M. MUNFORD 

B.S. Middlebury College ( 1934), M.A. Middlebury 
College, Brcadloaf School of English ( 1939); Grad- 
uate Student Harvard University (1938-1941); In- 
structor Clark School ( 1934-1938); Instructor Ameri- 
can Literature, Middlebury College (1941-1943), As- 
sistant Professor American Literature (1946- ). 

Chi Psi. 



Mrs. Jc VHommedieu 




Mr. Nelson 


Mr. Neuse 


Mr. Putt 




WALTER J. NELSON 

B.S. Middlcbury College ( 1932); U.S.N.R., Lieutenant 
Commander (1942-1946); Assistant Director of Ath- 
letics, Football Coach. Hockey Coach, Golf Coach, 
Middlebury College (1946- ). Delta Kappa Ep- 

silon. 

WERNER NEUSE 

Prussian State Exam, University of Berlin (1921); 
Ph.D. University of Giessen ( 1930); Associate Pro- 
fessor German, Middlebury College (1932-1942), Pro- 
fessor (1942- ), Dean German School (1933- 

DONALD I. PATT 

A.B. Bowdoin ( 1938), A.M. Columbia University 
(1940), Ph.D. Brown University (1946), Graduate 
Assistant; Instructor Biology, Middlebury College 
(1946-„ ). Sigma Nu, Sigma Xi. 


PERLEY C. PERKINS 

A.B. University of New Hampshire (1922), A.M. 
(1923); Instructor English, Middlebury College 
( 1923-1925); Assistant Professor and Coach of Debate 
(1930- ). Theta Chi. 


WILLIAM A. PHILLIPS 

A.B. Wesleyan University (1931), M.A. Wesleyan 
University ( 1932); Graduate Assistant Wesleyan Uni- 
versity ( 193 1-1932); Assistant Professor Chemistry, 
Middlebury College (1946- ). Delta Tau Delta. 


JAMES S. PRENTICE 

B.A. Queens University (1920), M.A. (1927); Pro- 
fessor of Economics, Hislop College, Nagpur, India 
(1920-1926); Assistant Professor Economics. Queens 
University ( 1927-1928); Professor Economics, Defi- 
ance College (1928-1930); Instructor Economics, 
University of Chicago ( 1930-193 1 ); Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics, Middlebury College ( 193 1-1937), 
Associate Professor (1937- ). 


FRED PRIESTLEY 

A.B. Bates College (1939); Graduate Study, Bates 
College and Breadloaf School of English (1940- 
); Instructor English, Middlebury College 
(1946- ). 



Mr. Perkins 



Mr. Phillips Mr. Prentice 





Mr. Priestley 


1 





Mr. Rafuse 



Mr. Rodgers 



Miss Rose tear 


ROBERT W. RAFUSE 

A.B. Colgate University (1934), A.M. University of 
Illinois ( 1935), Ph.D. (1937); Instructor Political 
Science, Middlebury College (1941-1942), Assistant 
Professor (1942- ). 


PAUL C. RODGERS, JR. 

A.B. Harvard University (1924), A.M. Columbia 
University (1946); Instructor English, Middlebury 
College (1946- ). 


MARY S. ROSEVEAR 

B.S. Syracuse University (1920); Instructor Physical 
Education for Women, Middlebury College (1924- 
1937), Assistant Professor (1937-1939), Associate 
Professor (1939- ). 



BRUNO M. SCHMIDT 

B.A. Williams ( 1922), M.A. Yale ( 1925 ); Instructor 
Geology, Middlebury College ( 192 5-19 29), Assistant 
Professor (1929-1931), Associate Professor (1931- 

RUSSELL G. SHOLES 

A.B. Washington University (1922), A.M. (1923); 
Assistant Professor Biology, Middlebury College (1927- 
1928); Associate Professor Sociology ( 1928-1936), 
Professor ( 1936- Theta Chi, Pi Kappa Mu. 


MAXINE J. SHURTZ 

B.S., Miami University (1942); Special Study, Sum- 
mer Session, Mount Union College (1942); M.S. Wel- 
lesley College ( 1943); Instructor Physical Education 
for Women, Middlebury College ( 1943- ). Sigma 

Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi. 


PHELPS N. SWETT 

B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1907), 
A.M. Clark University (1925); Assistant Professor 
Mathematics, Middlebury College (1909-191 1 ); As- 
sistant Professor Engineering (1911-1918), Professor 
( 1918-1922); Professor Engineering and Geology 
( 1922-1925); Professor Geography and Engineering 
( 1925- ). Phi Gamma Delta. 



Mr. Schmidt 


Mr. Sholes 


Miss Shurtz 


Mr. Surtt 




Mr. Volkert 



Mr. Voter 


Mr. Webster 



ERIE T. VOLKERT 

A.B. Lawrence College ( 193 5 ); National Collegiate 
Players (1935 ); A.M. Northwestern University 
(1939); Instructor Speech and Drama, Middlebury 
College (1941-1942), Assistant Professor (1942- 
); Breadloaf School of English (1946). Phi 
Delta Theta. 

PERLEY C. VOTER 

A.B. Bowdoin (1909), M.A. Harvard (1911); In- 
structor Chemistry, Middlebury College (1912-1913), 
Assistant Professor (1913-1919), Professor (1919- 
). Delta Upsilon, Alpha Chi Sigma. 


REX N. WEBSTER 

A.B. Butler University ( 1933), Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 
(1938); Instructor Biology, Middlebury College 
(1938-1939), Assistant Professor (1939-1945), Asso- 
ciate Professor (1945- ). Delta Tau Delta, Gam- 

ma Alpha, Sigma Xi. 


HERMANN WIEDERHOLD 

Colleges at Duesseldorf and Darmstadt ( 193 1-1933); 
M.A. Boston University (193 5 ), Ph.D. Boston Uni- 
versity (1941); Instructor German, University of 
Connecticut (1941); Instructor German and Sociolo- 
gy, Baker University (1941-1942); U.S. Army Intel- 
ligence (1942-1945); Instructor Sociology, Middle- 
bury College (1946- ). 

BENJAMIN F. WISSLER 

B.S. Muhlenberg College (1926); Instructor, Muhlen- 
berg College (1927-1930); M.A. Columbia University 
( 1932); Instructor Mathematics and Physics, Middle- 
bury College (1930-1936), Assistant Professor (1936- 
1937), Associate Professor (1937-1942), Professor 
(1942-.. ). Phi Kappa Tau. 


EVA C. WUNDERLICH 

Ph.D. University of Halle ( 1925); Professor, Girls 
College, Madchen Gymnasium, Berlin ( 192 5-1933); 
Visiting Professor, New School for Social Research, 
N. Y. C. (1934-1935); taught German and Greek, 
Bennington College (193 5-1946); Middlebury College 
Summer School of German (1946); Instructor Ger- 
man, Middlebury College (1946- ). 



FIFTY 



WALTER T. BOGART 


JOHN CHALMERS 


A.B. University of California (1930), M.A. Stanford 
University (1931); Instructor Political Science, Stan- 
ford University (1934-1937); Instructor Political 
Science, Middlebury College (1937-1938), Assistant 
Professor (1938-1939), Associate Professor (1939- 
). 


JUAN A. CENTENO 

A.B. Institute de San Isidre (1920), M.D. University 
of Madrid (1927); Associate Professor Spanish, Mid- 
dlebury College ( 193 1 -1933), Professor ( 1933- ); 

Dean of Spanish School ( 1932- ..... ). Sigma Delta Pi. 


B.A. Middlebury College ( 1938), Ph.D. Cornell Uni- 
versity ( 1943); Instructor Economics, Cornell Uni- 
versity (1939-1943); Assistant Professor Economics, 

Middlebury College (1946- ). Delta Kappa 

Epsilon. 


CHARLES K. McKEON 

B.A. Amherst College (1934), M.A. University of 
Virginia (1936), Ph.D. Columbia University (1946); 
Assistant Professor Philosophy, University of Idaho 
(1942-1946); Assistant Professor Philosophy, Middle- 
bury College (1946- ). Chi Phi. 



F I F T Y - O N E 




A Pamc Between T rays 
Pet re at Work 
Another Pin Dropped 


Photography Club 
Dinner at the Homestead 
Supper with the Waiters 


F I F T Y - T W O 


. 



CLASS OF 1950 




Leon McKinley Adkins, Jr. 
Wendel Howard Agne 
Alfred Lester Allen 
John Farley Allen 
Carlton Edgar Anderson 
Richard Harding Bailey 
Daniel Protheroe Baker 
Donald Hale Baker 
Francis Dillon Baldwin 
Donn Jon Barclay 
Richard Edward Barnett 
Casimiro Barquin 
Charles Edward Barrett 
Norman Ryder Bates 
Patricia Anne Bauer 
Joseph Adrien Beaudoin 
James Stuart Beck 
Herbert Becnhouwer 
Don Alexander Belden, Jr. 

Peter Clift Benedict 
Arthur Vincent Bennett, Jr. 
Priscilla Munson Bennett (Mrs.) 
Robert Stephen Bennitt 
Jean Galloway Blanchard 
John George Bolos 
Frances Edwin Bostelmann 
Arthur Rowland Boucher 
Richard Hyde Bowen 
Katharine Diane Brehm 








7. Meeker, A. Pepin, f. Nugent 
Missing — /. Sheehan 




Harold Thomas Brew, Jr. 
Evelyn Alice Britc 
Richmond Douglas Broulcttc 
Elinore Stanley Brown 
Hans Rudolf Bruynes 
Brenda Argyle Bullock 
John Holmes Burckes 
Albert Truman Butterfield 
George Robert Buttrick 
Mary Virginia Calhoun 
David Warren Campbell 
Marilyn Sias Campbell 
Betty Cappers 
William David Carey 
Eloisc Belle Carleton 
Carolyn Elizabeth Carlton 
Kendall Philip Carlson 
Elizabeth Natalie Carroll 
Roger Franklin Casavant 
Charles George Castle 
Albert Henry Caswell 
Richard Lawrence Champlin 
Beverley Anne Clark 
John Wheeler Clarkson, Jr. 
Dorita Powell Clofine 
Patricia Anne Cloutier 
Richard Cobden 
Bernard Cohen 
Charles Leon Cole 



V. Field, social chairman; M. Marvin , president; M. Stearns, vice- 
president; F. George, secretary 
M issing — F. Bost el matin 





. 


FIFTY-FIVE 




Kenneth Meeker Coleburn, Jr. 
George Spero Conomikes 
Gordon Loren Cook 
John Vincent Corbisiero 
Robert Burton Corcoran 
Robert Merrill Corwell 
Barbara Jean Crathern 
Albert George Craz, Jr. 
William Joseph Cunningham 
Curtis Cushman 
Jlufus Packard Cushman, III 
David Dale 

John Sebastian D’Aquila 
John Kimball Dean 
Joan Katherine Delamater 
William Farnham Dewey, Jr. 
Thomas MacDowell Divoll 
Josephine Mills Dodge 
Frederick Stephen Donaldson 
Samuel Ruxton Donnellon 
Allan Rudolph Dragone 
DeWitt Clinton Drohat 
Claire Rockwood Dufault 
Thomas Edward Duff 
Gerald Wilson Fibers 
Homer Buxton Ellis, Jr. 
George Foster Ellison 
Sylvia Morrison Ellsworth 
Lawrence Russell Eustis 
Wallace Andrew Faber. Jr. 
Frank John Facini, Jr. 

Orra Andrews Ferguson 
Barbara Ann Ferris 
Grace Valerie Field 
William Hervey Fincke 
John Hitchcock Fitzpatrick 
Eleanor Ann Flett 
Margaret Marie Fohring 
Judson Ford 

Anthony Vincent Fraioli 
Thomas Ettore Fraioli 
Warren Lindsay Frost 
Allan Winslow Furber 
Richard Kent Gardner 
Arthur August Gebhardt 
Faye Harriet George 
William Gerschman 

The Gang at Hepburn 


Charles Gies 
Betty Marie Glenn 
Bailey Goodell 
Margaret Gordon 
Ward Albert Goss 
Doris Woodruff Gould 
Homer Abraham Gray, Jr. 
William Herbert Greene 
Stephanie Boyce Griffin 
Donald Kay Grose 
Theodore Eugene Guglin 
Bruce Butler Guillan 
Ann Marie Gulton 
Richard Burgner Hackett 
Lura Elaine Hallett 
John Flalnon Halpin 
Thomas Francis Halpin 
Donald Odeen Hammerberg 
John Blair Hamre 
Robert Warren Handrahan 
Frederick Edmond Hannon 
Virginia Hardy 
Robert Wilbur Harley 
Ray Edward Harter, Jr. 
Raymond Vernon Hartshorn 
Richard Small I Iascltinc 
John Alfred Henderson 
John Bradford Henty 
Robert William Herdman 
Donald Hovey Hill, Jr. 
Parker Wilkie Hirtle 
Ann Elizabeth Hisey 
Richard Christian Hoffmann 
Frances Eveline Holden 
Robert John Homkey 
Robert Clement Hope 
John Raymond Howard 
Richard Bragg Hunt 
Robert Graham Hunt 
Ernest Lyman Hunter, Jr. 
Forest Mack Hunter 
Phyllis Adele Hurley 
Earle Leighton Hutchinson 
Bradford Warren Ingalls 
Robert Caswell Jackson 
Martin Warren Johnson 
Stephen Henry Judson 
Thomas Merrill June 


Paul Gifford Kailey 
James Karney 
Sidney Garner Kay, Jr. 

George Vincent Kearney 
Eleanor Bernice Kenerson 
Joan Mildred Kent 
Jean Kirsch 
Peter Lambert Knight 
Jeanne Carolyn Kraemer 
Barbara Anne Kraft 
Frederick William Kroeck, Jr. 
Gedeon Aime LaCroix 
Joel John Lamere, Jr. 

Ralph William Larson 
Louise Georgia Laveric 
Donald Leigh, Jr. 

Marvin Roye Levin 
Bard Edward Lindeman 
William David Lippa 
James Blanchard Luke 
Victor Stirling Luke, Jr. 

Robert Peter McCarthy 
James Harvey McCormack 
Julian Fairman MacDonald 
Janet Elizabeth McIntosh 
Joseph Elliott McKenzie 
William John McKinley, Jr. 

Emily Vaughn McLaughlin 
Irene King McLoughlin 
Margaret Culbertson McNair 
William Joseph McNamara 
Harry Allen Mapes, Jr. 

James Lawrence Marchese, Jr. 
Stephen James Markham 
John Bertram Marshall 
Harvey Thompson Martin, Jr. 
Robert Stoughton Martin 
Marilyn Ann Marvin 
Samuel Masters 
Linwood Law Meacham 
William Maxfield Meacham, Jr. 
Cornelius Irving Meeker 
Crandall Melvin, Jr. 

Richard Randolph Metcalf 
Thomas Watlington Metcalf 
Joan Metzger 
Adolph Erich Meyer, Jr. 

And at the Chat 


■ 


Anne Elizabeth Meyer 
John Charles Miller 
William Elliot Miller 
Tony Joseph Monaco 
Lynn Lucius Moore 
Charles Reynolds Morris 
William John Morrissey 
John Edward Mulcahy 
Edward William Mulligan 
John Richard Mulroy, Jr. 
Jane Murdoch 
Francis Vincent Murray 
Andrew Irving Namm 
Frederick Francis Neuberger 
James Frank Newman 
Raymond James Nihan 
Ray Smith Noonan, Jr. 
Theodore John Novak 
James Raymond Nugent 
Debora Elizabeth Nye 
Paul Edward Okarski 
Edward Aloysius O’Neill 
Virginia Hazel Orrall 
Everett Gordon Painter 
Robert Monroe Parker 
Kathryn Anne Pauley 
John Whitmore Paulson 
Murray Russell Pearlstein 
Sally Todd Peek 
David Leslie Pcet 
Katherine Ackerman Pell 
Andrew Gordon Pepin 
Allen Edgar Perry 
Rudolph John Peterson 
Earl Grant Pike 
Philip Wayland Porter 
Priscilla Virginia Powell 
Joan Barclay Pratt 
Walker Kyle Prescott 
Edward Lovell Price 
Richard James Price 
William Floyt Price 
Lois June Rapp 
Robert Mackenzie Rauner 
Hope Redington 
Karl Gardner Reed 
Donald Carlton Rcifel 

Beer Party 


Eugenia Napier Rcinbrecht 
Leonard Alexander Rice 
Natalie Thayer Richards 
Thomas Daniel Richardson 
Oliver Rickson 
Charles Joseph Riley 
Virginia Lee Ringo 
Jean White Rittcnhouse, Jr. 
Joan Marie Ritter 
John Samuel Roberts, Jr. 

John Martin Roddy 
Roberts Mason Rocmer 
Nancy Lee Rose 
Orrin Everette Ross, Jr. 
David Graham Ryan 
Howard Allan Sackett 
William Arthur Sagar 
Walter Thomas Savage 
Hazel Marilyn Savary 
Bernard Franklin Schlesinger 
Robert George Shadick 
Robert Hopper Shahan 
James Shapiro 
David John Shaw 
James Patrick Sheehan 
Richard Singer Shenier 
Anna Sherwood 
George Alfred Shumway, Jr. 
Kenneth Jerauld Simendinger 
Jean Simmons 
Donald Barrie Simon 
Mayer Simon 
Paul Albert Skuddcr 
William Slade, III 
Henry Boynton Smith 
Jacque Kolb Snyder 
John Jerome Sowles 
Peter Spatz 
Kenneth Avery Sperry 
Margaret Ann Stearns 
William Lowell Stearns, Jr. 
Robert Louis Stevenson 
Janet Mildred Stokes 
Richard Hallock Stokes 
Harry Robert Swanson, Jr. 
Harold Butler Tatro, Jr. 
Margaret Ann Teachout 


George Edward Terncr 
Marie Jane Tcrpcning 
Che Alison Tewksbury 
Robert Eugene Trimmer 
Robert Marshal Trombley 
John Dickenson Trucsdale 
Thomas Philson Turnbull 
Marianne Bohland Ughetta 
Vera Elizabeth Ulrich 
Lawrence Henry Vadnais, Jr. 
Janet Craigie Valentine 
John Henry Valentine, Jr. 
Stanley Henry Vegors, Jr. 
Ferdinand Carmino Vetare 
Tatiana Virrick 
Nancy Barbara Vogt 
Barry Quentin Walker 
James Grant Walker 
David Dunsmore Wallace 
William Osborn Wallace 
Jean Thorpe Walsh 
Nancy Marie Warman 
Whitney Mathews Washburn 
Stephen Townsend Welch 
Barbara Lou Wesselmann 
Harold James WFiite 
Robert Paul Whitestone 
Daniel Wright Whitfield 
Dexter Conwell Whittinghill. Jr. 
Edwin Chester Williams, Jr. 
William Augustus Williams 
John Alfred Willison 
Robert James Wilson 
Clara Stewart Wing 
Barbara Upson Wood 
Priscilla Ann Wood 
Edwin Morris Works 
Virginia Charlene Worley 
Charles Robert Wright 
Leigh Richard Wright 
Raymond Lynde Wright 
Patricia Wulp 
Frank James Wurm 
Susan Barbara Zatz 
Donald Selleck Zaumseil 
Ernest George Zimmerman, Jr. 


A rtistically Inclined 








A. Seixas, H. RicharJson, C. Paksta, P. Deane 


President — CHARLES PETER PUKSTA 
V ice-P res id e n t — 

HAROLD WILLIAM RICHARDSON 

Secretary — 

PHILIP GARDINER DEANE 
T re usurer — ROBERT EARLE SEIXAS 



■ 


President — PRISCILLA TH WAITS 
V ice -Presiden /—ELAINE ARRINGTON 
Secretary — BARBARA MYERS 
T reasurer — BARBARA KNAPP 
Social Chairman — 

Patricia McFarland 



Second row — B. Knapp, P. McFarland 
Front row — B. Myers, P. Th waits, E. Arrington 



FIFTY-NINE 


■ 




Jean Elisabeth Abcrle 

Elizabeth Eloise Chappell 

James Allen Gilbert 

Rachel Louise Adkins 

Douglas Graham Christie 

Barbara Girard 

Patricia Allen 

Mildred Elizabeth Clarke 

Michael Glowa 

Elizabeth Angravc Andrews 

Mary Whitney Cole 

William Harlow Goldthwaite 

Douglas Holcombe Armstrong 

Janet Elizabeth Corrcll 

Harold Martin Gore, Jr. 

Elaine Wood Arrington 

James Edward Coursey 

William Turner Goucrt, Jr. 

Mary Herrick Ashworth 

Marilyn Crawford 

Ruth Emelyn Grotz 

Jane Davis Baker 

Leslie Troian Cunniff 

Catherine Felicia Grusauski 

Penelope Dean Baker 

Janet Chichester Curry 

Charles Frank Hall 

Jack Barlow 

Priscilla Jane Davis 

Janice Louise Hand 

James Adolf Barlow, Jr. 

Ruth Louise Davis 

Norma Jean Hansen 

Harold Paul Barnes 

Betty May Dean 

Alice Cleaver Hardie 

Richard Arthur Barnes 

Philip Gardner Deane 

Robert Francis Harris 

Georgia Bittman Barth 

Frederick Anthony Deep 

Phyllis Jane Hatch 

John Emmett Barry 

Bennie Theodore DeSalvo 

Helen Hawkes 

Donald Grinnell Bates 

Robert Holland Dossin 

Mary Elizabeth Hemeon 

James Joseph Beach, Jr. 

Margaret Drysdale 

Donald Hector Henderson 

Lorraine Estelle Bean 

Virginia Ward Duffy 

Edith Remsen Hendrickson 

Nancy Mary Becker 

Virginia Harlow Dunn 

Thaddcus William Hentz 

Doris Katherine Beers 

Ruth Hyatt Durland 

Rosemarie Agnes Hermann 

Rebecca Josephine Bel isle 

Beverly Elaine Dutton 

Nancy Jean Herron 

Elizabeth Jane Bigelow 

Barbara Philbrook Earling 

Frank Bronson Hickox, Jr. 

Barbara Bishop 

Gene Prescott Edgar 

Marion Cornelia Higley 

Eleanor Marie Blanc 

Roswell Thomas Edwards, Jr. 

Helen Sue Hill 

Frederick Richard Blue 

JoAnne Elliott 

Philip Wilson Hoffmire 

Annemaric Boessenkool 

Ann Ely 

Jean Dodds Holmberg 

Howard King Boone 

Theodore Harding Fairbanks 

Margaret Ann Flolt 

Robert Gerard Boucher 

Ada Louise Fankhauser 

Mary Elizabeth Hosford 

John Francis Bours 

Gabriel Farrell, Jr. 

Wallace Spencer Hubbard 

Dorothy Virginia Britton 

Harry Moore Fife 

Evelyn Marie Hurd 

Phyllis Lucille Brown 

William David Finn 

Helen Jeanne Hutchinson 

Barbara Ann Buckley 

Neils Harwood Fischer 

Alan Franklin Jakeman 

Donald Henry Burn 

Ben Warner Fisher 

Charles Alexander James 

Barbara Janet Burris 

Mary Carlton Fisher 

Elaine Patricia Jennings 

Jean Ruth Caldwell 

Clifton Haskett Forbush, Jr. 

Constance Agnes Johnson 

Peter John Cassimatis 

Barbara Ann Fraleigh 

Margery Ruth Johnson 

Henry Wright Caswell 

John Drummond Freese 

Richard Sanborn Johnson 

Stewart George Chapin 

Willard Harold Galvin 

Woodford McDowell Garrigus 

Cleone Thorn Jones 

Hang on, Willie! 

Louise Marjorie Gerlitz 

On the Ft 




Norman Earl Joslin 

Frances Mary Miner 

Edwin Marion Kania 

Judith Ann Mitchell 

Florence Audrey Karl 

Raymond Arthur Moore 

Genevieve Karmazyn 

Dorothy Lester Morse 

Phoebe Consalus Kasper 

Marilyn Jeanne Mulholland 

Joan Elizabeth Keller 

Marjorie Irene Mullen 

Constance Kelly 

Barbara Tiers Myers 

Joan Kenyon 

Forrest Guilford Myrick 

Helen Elizabeth Kline 

Dorcas Randall Neal 

Barbara Louise Knapp 

Priscilla Ruth Noyes 

June Frances Knaut 

Wiltrude Emma Oberreit 

Maurice James Lahue 

Beatrice Erma Oetjen 

Lorcna Mathews Laing 

Jean Ruppel Parker 

Duncan Keith Law 

Gordon Condit Perine 

Ernest Arthur Lawson 

Patricia Avis Perkins 

Virginia White Lee 

Margaret Nancy Lester 

Stanwood Lewis Perkins 

Leonard Leving, III 

Alice Marie Pinault 

Clement Biddle Lewis, Jr. 

Judith Mabel Potter 

Walter Henry Lillyman, Jr. 

Margaret Jean Prentice 

Joan King Lincnthal 

Harold Albia Provoncha 

Betty , May Linsley 

Charles Peter Puksta 

Anita Marie Liptak 

Doris Jean Quercn 

Jane Margaret Livsey 

Cynthia Joan Locklin 

Alma Lois Quirk 

Merilyn Lodge 

John Mathew Quirk 

John Samuel MacMurtry 

Therese Aline Racette 

Marilyn Abigail MacKenzie 

Mary Ellen Raine 

Richard Hudder MacNamara 

Terri Tupper Ralph 

Mary Patricia McFarland 

Robert Henry Reed 

Barbara McGuire 

Olaf Donald Remmler 

Virginia Cragwick Main 

Jean Retallick 

Cynthia Jane Mallory 

William John Rice 

Carson Willis Manchester 

Harold William Richardson 

Thomas Heed Mariner 

Patricia Ann Riley 

Yvonne Marion Mase 

Eugene Westover Robinson 

Margery Ward Mehl 

Louis Francis Rosso 

Addison Hoyt Merrick 

William Alfred Roston 

Harriet Ann Miller 

John Wilfred Rumbold 

Jane Alice Miller 

Barbara Ann Schobinger 
Patricia Jane Schryver 

lu the Spotlight 

Jean Eleanor Scroggie 


Mary Case Seacord 
Robert Earle Seixas 
John Edward Shahr.n, Jr. 

George Nickel! Slides 
Robert Justin Simpson, Jr. 

Jean Millicent Sloan 
Caroline Elizabeth Smith 
Janet Carol Smith 
Jean Louise Smith 
June Emclinc Smith 
Walter StnloflF 
Audrey Marie Stevens 
Marguerite Isabelle S'.cvcns 
Merton Harry Stevens 
Rachel Stryker 
Jane Terrell Talmadge 
Ellen Taussig 
Anne Marie Te'guc 
David Edmund Thompson 
Priscilla Alden Thwaits 
Richard Sherman Tuttle 
Irene Hermine Ulmer 
Elizabeth Amelia Van Splinter 
Lawrence Mathew Walheim 
David Washburn 
Robert Arthur Watson 
Dorothy Helen Weil 
Caroline Wheeler 
Robert Pearson Whittier 
Pauline Louise Wilkins 
Lawrence Francis Willard 
Lura Louise Williams 
Robert Griffing Williams 
Edwina Browne Woodman 
June Ethel Yeakel 
Agatha Maverick Young 
John Stanley Zukowski 

That Drummer Man 



CLASS 



President 

RICHARD W. BUONERBA 

Vice-President 

PAUL J. VYRROS 


Secretary 

EVAN B. LITTLEFIELD 

T reasurer 

RICHARD H. FULTON 


R. Fulton, P. Vyrros , R. Buonerba, E. Littlefield 



The Class of *48, the most heterogeneous 
assortment of people in Midd’s lengthy 
career. Ours is a unique distinction. We 
come from the graduating classes of so 
many high schools, of so many years. Some 
of us have spent three successive years here, 
some of us have been unable to, some of us 
have attended one, two or halt a dozen col- 
leges before coming to Midd. 

Yet we are the Class of *48. Our mem- 
ories of our years here will vary almost un- 
believably in detail, but the pattern will 
always remain the same. Newness and un- 
familiarity, the process of becoming ad- 
justed, of becoming a part of Midd, of 
learning her traditions, popular and un- 
popular, this was freshman year. The con- 
viction that you did belong, the vague 
stirrings of a sensation of superiority, this 


S 1 XT Y-TWO 



OF 


’48 


President 

PATRICIA SALMON 

Vice-President 

MARGARET DAVIES 

Secretary 

LORETTE LAPOLICE 
T reasurer 

GLORIA PILINI 

Social Chairman 

KAYE STURGES 



Second row — G. Pilini, K. Sturges 
Front rote — M. Dunes, P. Salmon , L. Lapolicc 


was sophomore year. The realization that 
you are an upperclassman, the satisfaction 
derived from additional privileges, the in- 
creased amount of work, this is junior year. 

A few of us remember the civilian exodus 
from the hill, the coming of the navy, and 
acceleration. More of us remember a class 
dance that was plantation-like in theme, 
stepsinging won by the freshman class, and 
the embarkation of the navy. Even more 
of us remember the get-acquainted coffee, 
the Mardi Gras, and the rc-establishment 
of a large men’s college. We all remember 
the return to a sort of normality with the 
strange balance between the two colleges, 
the resumption of pre-war social, athletic, 
and extra-curricular life. 

All this we are trying to recall .... 



SIXTY-THREE 



JEANNETTE HASCALL ABBOTT 

Jay Topsfield, Massachusetts, b. March 27, 
1927. Term 5, transfer. Major, French. 
Clubs: Mountain 3; French 3; Chorus 3; 
Forum 3. 



JEAN MARGARET ALLAN 

Jean Plainvillc, Connecticut, b. November 29, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Tennis 
2; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 1.2; Mountain 
Club 1,2,3; Chorus 1,3; Tone 2; Forum 1,2. 


MARIAN LOUISE ALLIN 

Mary Lou Lynbrook, New York. b. Novem- 
ber 1 5, 1926. Term 5. Major, Home Eco- 
nomics. Panhellenic Council 2,3; Tennis 1; 
Volleyball 1; Forum 1. AHA. 


ROBERT NIELS ANDERSEN 

Bob Troy, New York. b. August 12, 1921. 
Term 4, transfer. Major, Sociology. Moun- 
tain Club 2; Choir 2; Tone 2; Sophomore 
Dance Com.; W. C. Skating Com. 2. 


FLAVIA JANE ANDERSON 

Flaiia Plainfield, New Jersey, b. October 14, 
1926. Term 5. Major, English and Sociology. 
Panhellenic Council 3; Mountain Club 1,2; 
Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3. AK. 


MURRAY ARONOW1TZ 

Murray Elmhurst, New York. b. July 8, 
1 923. Term 4. Major, Biology. Alchemists 
Club 2,3. 


ELEANOR JANE BARKER 

£. J. Crestwood, New York. b. September 
18, 1926. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Rid- 
ing 3; Chorus 1,2; Tone 1,2; Forum 1,2,3. 


BARBARA LUCILLE BEDFORD 

Bobbie Rochester, New York. b. November 
20, 1926. Term 5. Major, Home Economics. 
Volleyball 1; Mountain Club 1,2,3, Tempo- 
rary Skyline 1; Chorus 1; Forum 1,2; W. C. 
Social Com. 2,3; Sophomore Dance Com. 
II IFF. 




■ 



GEORGE BOLESLAW BENEDICT 

George Seabrook, New Hampshire, b. January 
23, 1922. Term 5, transfer. Major, French. 

Clubs: Mountain 1; French 1; Russian 1. 

NATELLE BENSON 

Nat Manchester Depot, Vermont, b. Octo- 
ber 21, 1926. Term 5. Major, American 
Literature. 


PHYLLIS LILLIAN BERDOLT 

Phyl Long Island City, New York. b. Janu- 
ary 10, 1927. Term S. Major, English. Bas- 
ketball 2; Badminton 1; Volleyball 3; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Yacht 2,3; Chorus 1; Forum 
1,2,3. -K. 


CONSTANCE OLGA BERGERSEN 

Connie Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts, b. July 
19, 1926. Term 5. Major, French. Modern 
Dance 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2; French 1,2,3; 
Chorus 1; Forum 1; Dean’s List 1. 



JOAN LOUISE BIGGS 

Biggsic Chappaqua, New York. b. October 
13, 1926. Term 5. Major, French and World 
Affairs. Women’s Assembly 1,2,3; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2; French 1,2,3; Humanities 1,2,3; 
Chorus 1; S.A.A. 1,2,3, Vice-President 3; 
Chapel Com. 1. 


JEAN B1RKENSTF.IN 

Birkic Chicago, Illinois, b. April 23, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, Political Science. Chorus I; 
Debating 2; Tone 2,3; Star Gazers 2; S.A.A. 
1,2,3, Chairman Anti-Discrimination Com. 3. 


HENRY BLOCH, JR. 

Hank Scarsdale, New York. b. January 11, 
1927. Term 4. Major, Economics. Men’s 
Assembly 1; J.V. Basketball 1; Campus Tryout 
1,2; Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Mountain Club 
1,2; Dean’s List 1; W. C. Transportation Com. 

I. X*. 


WILLIAM VENN BOYD 

Bill Montreal, Quebec, Canada, b. January 
29, 1926. Term 5. Major, Mathematics. 

Players 2,3; W. C. Publicity Com. 3. 24>E. 



BEVERLY BRECK BOYNTON 



Bev Tenafly, New Jersey, b. September 10, 
1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Women’s Assembly 1,2; Tennis 1,2; Hockey 
1,2,3; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 2,3; Skiing 
1,2; Baseball 2; Volleyball 1,2,3; Campus Try- 
out 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, Temporary Sky- 
line 2; Yacht 3; Star Gazers 2,3; W. C. Pub- 
licity Com. 3; Chairman Freshman Dance Pub- 
licity Com.; Chairman W. C. Rally Com. 2. 
11B<I>. 


BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BRADLEY, JR. 

Ben Waterbury, Connecticut. b. July 19, 
1923. Term 5. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Moun- 
tain Club 1,2,3; Choir 1,2,3; Band 1,2,3; 
Orchestra 1,2; Tone 1,2; Players 1,2; W. C. 
Play Com. 2A. 


HELEN MILDRED BRAY 

Helen Springfield, Massachusetts, b. February 
26, 1927. Term 3. Major, Economics. Rid- 
ing 3; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Forum 2,3. HB‘1*. 


ELIZABETH FOSS BREDENBERG 

Liz Champlain, New York. b. April 9, 1927. 
Term 3. Major, Political Science. Basketball 
1; Badminton 2; Skiing 1; Campus Tryout 
1,2; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Choir 3; Chorus 1; 
W. C. Skating Com. 2; W. C. Food Com. 
2,3. AHA. 


ROBERT DAVIS BROWN 

Bob Larchmont, New' York. b. April 30, 
1923. Term 5. Major, Physics (M.I.T. Plan). 
Basketball 2,3; Baseball 3; "M” Club 2,3; 
Mountain Club 1,2,3; W. C. Police Com. 1. 
A2<f>. 


ROWENA CATHERINE BROWN 

Ronnie Brookline, Massachusetts, b. Novem- 
ber 10, 1926. Term 5. transfer. Major, 

Political Science. Tennis 2; Badminton 2; 
Campus Tryout 2; Clubs: Mountain 2,3; 
French 2; Chorus 2; Tone 2; Forum 2,3; 
S.A.A. 2,3. KK T. 


ARTHUR CHARLTON BUF.TTNER 

Art Floral Park, New York. b. March 19, 
1923. Term 5. Major, English. Freshman 
Football; Track 1; "M” Club 1; Campus Try- 
out 1 ; Interfraternity-Panhellenic Dance Com. 
3; Intramurals 1,2,3. OX. 


RICHARD WALTER BUONERBA 

Dick South Norwalk, Connecticut, b. Octo- 
ber 18, 1 923. Term 5. Major, French. Foot- 
ball 2,3; "M” Club 2,3; Choir 2; Black 
Panthers 3; Class President 3. A2<I\ 





■ 


RUTH CATHERINE BURGESS 

Rut hie North Weymouth, Massachusetts, b. 
May 8, 1926. Term 5. Major, Home Eco- 
nomics. Campus Tryout 1; Mountain Club 
1,2; Forum 1,2; W. C. Food Com. 2. 




JEAN ELEANOR BURKHOLDER 

Jean Lancaster, Pennsylvania, b. August 17, 
1926. Term 5. Major, English. Campus 
Tryout 1; Chorus 1,3; Literary Club 2; Tone 
3; Forum 1,2,3; Interfaith 1; S.A.A. 1; Dean’s 
List 2. 


ANN HARRIET BUSHNELL 

Nancy Ossining, New York. b. January 18, 
1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Badminton 1,2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Flying 
2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Interfaith 3; S.A.A. 1,2,3; 
Sophomore Dance Com.; W. C. Ball 3. 


RONALD WILLIAM BUTTERFIELD 

Ronny Plymouth, Massachusetts, b. June 27, 
192S. Term 5. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Men’s 
Assembly 3. 


CHARLES ALEXANDER BUTTS, JR. 

Charlie Woburn, Massachusetts, b. June 11, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Economics. Men’s 
Assembly 3; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Temporary 
Skyline 1; Skyline 2,3; Co-chairman W. C. 
Trails and Equipment Com. 2; W. C. Sports 
Com. 3; Class Vice-President 1. AT. 



CAMILLE HELENE BUZBY 

Buz San Juan, Puerto Rico. b. May 19, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, American Literature. Tennis 
1,2; Hockey 1,2,3; Basketball 2; Badminton 2; 
Skiing 1,2; Baseball 1,2; Modern Dance 2; Vol- 
leyball 1,2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 
1,2,3; Spanish 1,2,3; Yacht 2,3; Flying 3; Star 
Gazers 2,3, Co-chairman 2; Forum 1,2,3; 
S.A.A. 2; Chairman W. C. Frolic Com. 1,2; 
Sophomore Dance Com. II B3>. 



ANN BRADFORD CADMUS 

Caddie New Canaan, Connecticut, b. Septem- 
ber 21, 1927. Term 5. Major, Economics. 
Choir 2,3; Chorus 1; Orchestra 1; W. C. Ball 
Com. 3; Campus Tryout 1. KKE. 


RUTH ANITA CALDRONEY 

Caldroncy Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, b. 
March 7. 1927. Term S. Major, Mathematics. 
Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Star 
Gazers 2; S.A.A. 1,2. 








HENRY LORD CADY 

Hank Manchester, New Hampshire, b. July 
6, 1921. Term 7. Major, Fine Arts. Men’s 
Assembly 3; Choir 2,3,4; Tone 2. A A <t>. 


JAMES RALPH CAMPBELL 

Jim Wickford, Rhode Island, b. February 24, 
1 925. Term 5. Major, Prc-Med. Mountain 
Club 3; Black Panthers 2; Band 1,2,3. 


VIRGINIA ANNE CARABILLO 

Toni Wappingers Falls, New York. b. March 
26, 1926. Term 5. Major, English and 

American Literature. Clubs: Mountain 1 ; Lit- 
erary 1,2,3; Forum 2,3; Interfaith 3; S.A.A. 
1,2; Campus Tryout 1; "Directions” Business 
Staff 1; Culture Conference General Com. 3; 
W. C. Poster Com. 3; Sophomore Dance 
Com. KA. 


JULIET HARRINGTON 

Julie Washington, D. C. b. June 27, 1926. 
Term 5, transfer. Major, Geology. Basket- 
ball 2; Badminton 2; Skiing 2, Ski Patrol 3; 
Clubs: Mountain 2,3; Skyline 3; Yacht 3; 
Chorus 2,3; Forum 2,3; W. C. Skating Com. 
2; W. C. Sports Com. 3. 


JOHN RICHARD CARPENTER 

Dick Spencer, Indiana, b. September 2, 192 3. 
Term 4. Major, Economics. Basketball Assist- 
ant Manager 3. AKE. 


JOHN FREDERIC CARTER 

John Maplewood, New Jersey, b. October 31, 
1924. Term 4. Major, Economics. Intra- 
murals 1,2; Mountain Club 1,2; Band 1,2; 
Neutral Program and House Com. 2; W. C. 
Publicity Com. 2. 


RICHARD HARLOW CASWELL 

Dick Middlebury, Vermont. b. May 25, 
1923. Term 5. Major, History. Mountain 
Club 1,2. 2<FE. 



JULIUS BURGESS CHAMBERS 

J.B. Freeport, New York. b. December 26, 
1923. Term 4. Major, Pre-Med. Intramurals 
3. AKE. 



NANCY MILLARD CHEESMAN 

Cheesic Providence, Rhode Island, b. March 
29, 1926. Term 5. Major, American Litera- 
ture. Women’s Assembly 2; Tennis 1; Modern 
Dance 1,2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 
1,2,3; Yacht 3; Skyline Tryout 1; Chorus 1; 
Star Gazers 2,3; Dean’s List 1; W. C. Ticket 
Com. 2,3; Freshman and Sophomore Dance 
Com. AAA. 



LEONARD CHERNUS 

Lenny Newark, New Jersey. b. June 19, 
1926. Term 5, transfer. Major, M.I.T. Plan. 
"1 Remember Mama” 3; Co-chairman Dog 
Team Social Com. 3. 


VIRGINIA EDNA CIUFFREDA 

Ch/ckie New Rochelle, New York. b. August 
5, 1 926. Term 3. Major, Spanish. Modern 
Dance 3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Spanish 1,2, 
Vice-President 3; Chorus 1; Forum 1,2,3; 
Humanities 3; Interfaith 1,2; Star Gazers 2; 
W. C. Social Com. 2; W. C. Sculpture Com. 3; 
Freshman Dance Com. 


ANNE MARGARET CLARKE 

Bub Hamilton, Bermuda, b. May 4, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, French. Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3; Debating 3; Tone 1; Players 1,2,3; 
S.A.A. 1. 


SEBASTIAN SANTINO COCOLA 

Coc Hartford, Connecticut, b. September 6, 
1 925. Term 4. Major, Chemistry. J.V. Foot- 
ball 1; Mountain Club 2; Orchestra 1. KAP. 


PATRICIA VOLIN COLE 

Pat Lincoln University, Pennsylvania. b. 
August 17, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. 
Basketball 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,3; Yacht 3; 
Chorus 1; Forum 1,3. 2K. 


ELIZABETH ANNE COLLADAY 

Betty Hamden, Connecticut, b. August 22, 
1926. Term 5. Major, English. Badminton 1; 
Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 1,2,3; Chorus 
1; Tone 3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. I; W. C. 
Ticket Com. 3; Freshman and Sophomore 
Dance Com. 


ELEUFTHERIA XENOPHON CONSTANT 

Leffic Newport, Rhode Island, b. December 
20, 1926. Term 5. Major, Fine Arts. Riding 
2,3; Clubs: Literary 1,2; French 1,2,3; German 
2,3; Humanities 3; Choir 3; Orchestra 1,2,3; 
Tone 1,2,3, President 3; Vermont State Sym- 
phony 1,2. 


* 






MARTHA SUE COOKE 

Sue Kansas City, Missouri, b. July 27, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, Sociology. Women’s Assembly 
2,3, Vice-President 3; Student Life Com. 3, 
Secretary 3; Basketball 2; Volleyball 1,2; 
Kalf.idosc.opu Tryout 1,2, Managing Editor 3; 
French Club 1,2,3; Forum 1,3; S.A.A. 1,2; 
Freshman and Sophomore Dance Com.; Co- 
chairman W. C. Frolic Com. 2; W. C. Pro- 
gram Com. 3. n B4>. 



MARGARET ADAMS CURTIS 

Peg Calais, Vermont, b. February 13, 1927. 
Term 3. Major, English. Tennis 2; Skiing 
1,2,3, Ski Team 1,2; Baseball 2; Clubs: Moun- 
tain 1,2,3; Flying 2,3; Star Gazers 2,3; 
W. C. First Aid Com. 1,2,3. AAA. 


DOROTHY LORING DAGGETT 

Dot Larchmont, New York. b. February 27, 
1927. Term 4. Major, Sociology. Archery 
1,2; Campus Tryout 1; Mountain Club 1,2; 
Chorus 2; Tone I; Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 1,2. 



ROSALIE HARRIS DANIELS 

Rosalie Poughkeepsie, New York. b. Novem- 
ber 23, 1926. Term 5. Major. Psychology. 
Mountain Club 1,2,3; Tone 2,3; Forum 1; 
S.A.A. 1; W. C. Social Com. 2,3. 


SHIRLEY ELAINE DAVIDSON 

Irish Hamburg, New York. b. February 5, 
1926. Term 5. Major, French and World 
Affairs. Tennis 1,2; Basketball 1,2; Badmin- 
ton 2; Volleyball 1,2; Clubs: Mountain 3; 
Debating 2; French 2,3; German 1,2,3; Chorus 
1; Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 1,2; Dean’s List 1; 
W. C. Social Com. 3. 


MARGARET MERIWETHER DAVIES 

Marge Congers, New York. b. October 10, 
1926. Term 3. Major, Political Science. Bad- 
minton 2; Volleyball 1,2; Mountain Club 1,2,3; 
Choir 3; Chorus 1,2; Forum 1,2; Star Gazers 
2,3; Class Vice-President 3; W. C. Skating 
Com. 1,2. AZA. 


ALICE VICTORIA DEININGF.R 

Al West Orange, New Jersey, b. October 11, 
1926. Term 3. Major, Mathematics. Women’s 
Assembly 2,3; Badminton 2; Volleyball 1,3; 
Choir 2,3; Chorus 1. KA. 



ROBERT HOLLAND DOSSIN 

Bob Newington, Connecticut, b. November 
18, 1923. Term 6. Major, Biology and Psy- 
chology. Intramurals 1. KAP. 





ii 


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PATRICIA PHELPS DOW 

Pat Reading, Massachusetts. b. March 7, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Drama. Modern 
Dance 2,3; Campus Tryout I, Staff 1; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2; Literary 3; Chorus 1; Forum 
1,2; Tone 3; Players 2,3. 




MARILYN AIKEN DRAKE 

Marilyn Winchester, Massachusetts, b. Octo- 
ber 2, 1926. Term 5. Major, English and 
American Literature. Women’s Assembly 2; 
Mountain Club 3, Governing Board 3, Skyline 
2; Choir 2; Chorus 1; Orchestra 3; Forum 
1,3, Secretary 1; S.A.A. 3; W. C. Equipment 
Com. 2. 


JANE LOUDON DRUMMOND 

Janie Oneida, New York. b. September 7, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Sociology. Women's 
Assembly 2; Hockey 1,2,3; Basketball 1,2; 
Badminton 2; Volleyball 2,3, All-Midd 2; 
Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Mountain Club 1,2; 
Choir 3; Chorus 1; Orchestra 1,2.3; Forum 
1,2,3; Dean’s List 2; Sophomore Dance Com.; 
W. C. Poster Com. 3. KKT. 


ROBERT SHARPE DUSTIN 

Dusty Randolph, Vermont, b. September 29, 
1926. Term 4. Major, Economics. 


JANET GRACE EDWARDS 

Jannrc Rochester, New York. b. June 9, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, English. Clubs: Mountain 
1,2; Literary 2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Interfaith 
2,3; Star Gazers 2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3. 


ALICE MAY ELTING 

Al New York, New York. b. June 2, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, Political Science. Kaleido- 
scope Tryout 2; "Agenda” Staff 1; Choir 3; 
Chorus 1,2; French Club 1,2,3; Tone 1,2,3; 
Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3; W. C. Ball Com. 2. 


HELEN JEANNE EPP 

Eppie Maplewood, New Jersey, b. January 
II, 1927. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Tennis 1; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 1; Vol- 
leyball 1,2; Mountain Club 1,2,3, Skyline 2,3, 
Secretary 3; Forum 1,2,3, Treasurer 3. Aj£A. 


FRANCES FARWELL 

Fran Milton, Massachusetts, b. June 4, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, Spanish. Campus Tryout 1; 
Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 2,3; Spanish 
1,2,3; Chorus 2; Forum 1; Star Gazers 3; 
S.A.A. 2,3; Dean’s List 1,2; W. C. Publicity 
Com. 1. AAA. 






SHIRLF.Y HARRISON FEYRER 

Shir l Englewood, New Jersey, b. February 
10, 1926. Term 3. Major, English. Campus 
Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 
2,3; Yacht 3; Forum 1,2; Lodge 1,2; W. C. 
Skating Com. 3. 




SALLY ANNE FINLEY 

Sally Shaker Heights, Ohio. b. November 27, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Women’s Assembly 2,3; Volleyball 3; Campus 
Tryout 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; International 
Relations 3; Chorus 2; Forum 1,2,3; Humani- 
ties 3; S.A.A. 2,3; Dean’s List 1,2; W. C. 
Publicity Com. 2. LIR<I\ 


NIELS HARWOOD FISCHER 

Niels Pelham, New York. b. January 30, 
1927. Term 4. Major, Mathematics. Moun- 
tain Club 2,3; Players 2,3; S.A.A. 2,3. 8X. 


SALLY LUCIA FISHER 

Sally Bronxville, New York. b. August 7, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Tennis 
1,2; Hockey 3; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 2; 
Baseball 1,2; Volleyball 1,2,3, Manager 3; 
Mountain Club 1,2,3; Interfaith 1,3; Choir 3; 
Chorus 1,2; Forum 1,2,3; Co-leader Stepsing- 
ing 1; Dean’s List 2. *£M. 


ELEANOR MAE FLANAGAN 

Ellie Bronxville, New York. b. June 28, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Biology. Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 2; Tone 2; Star 
Gazers 2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Chorus 1; Dean’s 
List 1,2; W. C. Skating Com. 1; W. C. Ball 
Com. 3; "Male Animal” Com. 1; Sophomore 
Dance Com. 


HONORE liOWLEY FLATLEY 

Nona Lynbrook, New York. b. October 27, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Mathematics. Women’s 
Assembly 1; Campus Business Staff Tryout 1; 
Forum 1; Acting Class President 2. KKI\ 


MARY CHILTON FORBES 

Mary Newton Centre, Massachusetts, b. July 
2, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. Women’s 
Assembly 3; Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 1,2,3; Chorus 1; 
Tone 2; Forum 1,2,3; W. C. Social Com. 3. 


IRIS JOAN FORST 

Iris Brooklyn, New York. b. December 8, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Sociology. Women’s 
Assembly 1,2,3; "Agenda" Staff 2,3; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Debating 2,3; Literary 1; 
Tone 2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Humanities 3; Inter- 
faith 2,3; Yacht 3; S.A.A. 1,2,3, Chairman 
Polls Com. 3; Players 3; W. C. Ticket Com. 3; 
Dean’s List 2. 



ii 


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ALLAN LACHLAN FREW 

Wbitey Yonkers, New York. b. September 
30, 1926. Term 4. Major, Physical Education. 

Men’s Assembly 3; Basketball 1; Football 2; 

"M” Club 2,3; Mountain Club 1,2,3, Tempo- 
rary Skyline 1; Lodge Com. 1,2; Chairman 
W. C. Transportation Com. 3; Ski Patrol 3. 

AT. 

JULIA ANN FRIEND 

Judy Middletown, New York. b. November 
26, 192 3. Term 5. Major, English. Basket- 
ball 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Yacht 3; Chorus 
1; Band 3; Forum 1,2,3; W. C. Skating Com. 
3. 2K. 


JOSEPH FREDERICK FUCHS, JR. 

Bncky Port Chester, New York. b. June 29, 
1923. Term 5. Major, Prc-Med. Men’s As- 
sembly 1,2; Interfraternity Council 3; J.V. 
Football 1,2; W. C. Publicity Com. 3; Sopho- 
more Dance Com. AT. 


HAROLD JACK GEIKEN 

Jack Dayton, Ohio. b. July 29, 1924. Term 
4. Major, Physical Education. Basketball 2; 
Track 2. AKE. 


HENRY WATERMAN GEORGE 

Hank Bellerose, New York. b. May 12, 1924. 
Term 3. Major, History. Basketball 3; Moun- 
tain Club 1,2; Intramurals 1,2,3. 


DANIEL ROBERT GILBERT 

Dan Niagara Falls, New York. b. August 
5, 1924. Term 4. Major, Political Science. 
Mountain Club 1,2; Choir 2; Black Panthers 
1; Band 1,2, Manager 2; Orchestra 1; W. C. 
Sculpture Com. 2; Intramurals 1,2. 24>E. 


JANET IRENE GOELTZ 

Jan Pelham, New York. b. September 2, 

1926. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Hockey 
2,3; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 1,2; Baseball 2; 
Volleyball 1,2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 

Chorus 1,2; Forum 1,2,3; Humanities 3; Inter- 
faith 1,2,3; Culture Conference General Com. 

3; W. C. Food Com. 1,2; W. C. Social Com. 3. 

ASA. 

GLORIA ANN GREENLEY 

George Brooklyn, New York. b. March 24, 
1927. Term 3. Major, American Literature. 
Student Union Secretary 3; Campus Business 
Tryout 1; "Directions” Business Staff 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3, Temporary Skyline 2; Literary 
1,2,3; French 1,3; International Relations 3; 
Humanities 3; Players 1,2,3; Class Social Chair- 
man 2; W. C. Ticket Com. 2; Charter Com. 3; 
Co-chairman W. C. Program Com. 3; Dean’s 
List 1,2. KKr. 




T 




MILDRED MARY GREIS 

Scotty Springfield, Massachusetts, b. July 14, 
1926. Term 5, transfer. Major, American Lit- 
erature. Clubs: Mountain 3; Yacht 3; Russian 
3; Forum 3. 


ANNE GRIMSHAW 

Anne Auburn, Indiana. b. July 2 8, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, French. Riding 2,3; Choir 
2,3; Chorus 1; Clubs: French 1,2,3; Russian 
2,3; Tone 2,3; Humanities 3; Dean’s List 2; 
Sophomore Dance Com. 


ELAINE ANITA GUNDACKER 

Elaine New Dorp, New York. b. September 
19, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. Panhel- 
lenic Council 3; Modern Dance 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 1,2; Forum 1; Hu- 
manities 1; S.A.A. 1. KA. 


FLETCHER ERIC GUSTAFSON 

Gns Proctor, Vermont. b. May 29, 192 3. 
Term 4. Major, Economics. Hockey 2; *'M” 
Club 1; Kaleidoscope Tryout 2. KAP. 


BERT ROBERT HAAS 

Bert New York, New York. b. November 24, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Economics. Intra- 
murals 1,2,3; Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Choir 
1.2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 1,2,3; 
Players 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2; Freshman Dance 
Com. X*. 


JOHN MARTIN HALE 

Jack Bound Brook, New Jersey, b. July 7, 
1922. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Fencing 1,2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Debating 
1,2,3; S.A.A. 2,3; International Relations 3; 
Culture Conference General Com. 3. 


JERALD D. HALL, JR. 

Jerry Weston, Connecticut, b. September 26, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Political Science. Men’s 
Assembly 1; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Tone 1; 
Players 2; S.A.A. 2,3, Chairman Discussion 
Com. 3; Class Secretary 1. 


CATHERINE HANDY 

Catby Cataumet, Massachusetts, b. April 19, 
1927. Term 5. Major, English. Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2; Literary 2,3; French 1; S.A.A. 
2; Forum 1,2,3; Chorus 1; W. C. Social Com. 
3; Wolsey Prize 2. 












JEAN ANN HARBISON 

Harby Trinidad, Colorado, b. December 2 5, 
1925. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Campus Tryout 1,2; "Agenda” Staff 1,2, Edi- 
tor 3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2; Literary 1,2,3; 
German 1,2; Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 1,2,3; Sopho- 
more Discussion Group. 


MARY SHERWOOD HARPER 

Molly Moylan, Pennsylvania. b. May 13, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Sociology. Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Star Gazers 2,3; Chorus 1,2,3; 
Tone 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3. 


HELEN BARBARA HARVAN 

Bobbie Linden, New Jersey, b. August 13, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Women’s Assembly 1; Basketball 2,3; Badmin- 
ton 1,2; Volleyball 2,3; Kaleidoscope Tryout 
2; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 

1 , 2 . KX 


NORMAN WILLIAM HASSINGER 

Norm Middlebury, Vermont. b. May 16, 
1923. Term 5. Major, French. French 
Club 2. 


HOWARD OBER HAWLEY 

Crash Middlebury, Vermont. b. March 29, 
1923. Term 5. Major, Biology. Interfrater- 
nity Council 3; Campus Tryout 1; Clubs: 
Mountain 1; Debating 1; Literary 1; Alchem- 
ists 3. 2) A. 


BARBARA HEMENWAY 

Barb Leonia, New Jersey. b. September 7, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Tennis 1,2; Skiing 1; Baseball 2; Volleyball 
1,2; Campus Tryout 1; Chorus 2; Forum 1,2,3; 
Mountain Club 1,2,3, Star Gazers 2; W. C. 
Ball Com. 3; Freshman and Sophomore Dance 
Com. KKP. 


ESTHER PAULINE HENDERSON 

Penny Glens Falls, New York. b. May 27, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Political Science. Bad- 
minton 1,2; Skiing 1; Campus Tryout 1, 
Business Staff 2,3, Assistant Business Manager 
3; Mountain Club 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2; Forum 
1,2,3; Chorus 1; W. C. Klondike Rush Com. 
1 ; W. C. Ticker Com. 3 ; Sophomore Discus- 
sion Group; Freshman and Sophomore Dance 
Com. ASA. 


ELEANORE CHRISTINE HERCHET 

Ellie Roselle Park, New Jersey, b. January 8, 
1927. Term 5. Major, German. Basketball 1; 
Badminton 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2; French 
1,2,3; German 1,2,3; Forum 2; Chorus 1,2. 




HELEN LOUISE HICKS 

Butch Manhasset, New York. b. June 8, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Home Economics. 
Women’s Assembly 1,3; Judicial Council 2; 
Hockey 1; basketball 2; Mountain Club 1,2,3; 
S.A.A. 1; Chorus 1; Forum 1,2; Culture Con- 
ference General Com. 2, Policy Com. 3; W. C. 
Ball Com. 2,3; Dean’s List 1,2. IIB^. 


MARY JEAN HICKS 

Mike Rockville Centre, New York. b. August 
20, 1927. Term 5, transfer. Major, English. 
Women’s Assembly 2,3; Campus Tryout 2, 
Staff 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 2,3, Skyline Try- 
out; Yacht 3; W. C. Frolic Com. 2; W. C. 
Social Com. 3. 


ROBERT HOLDSWORTH HOAGLUND 

Hoagy Worcester, Massachusetts, b. Decem- 
ber 18, 1924. Term 4. Major, Political Sci- 
ence. Track 1; Campus Tryout 1; Debating 
2 . 


MARVIN GLENN HOLDEN 

Mari West Townshend, Vermont, b. Septem- 
ber 7, 192 5. Term 5. Major, English. Moun- 
tain Club 1; Choir 1,2; Star Gazers 2. 


CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH HOOSE 

Char Amenia, New York. b. June 26, 1926. 
Term 5. Major. English. Kaleidoscope Try- 
out 2; "Agenda” Staff 2,3; Clubs: Literary 
1.2; Yacht 3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3; 
Chorus 1. 2K. 


LILAH HORN 

Lee Maplewood, New Jersey. b. April 14, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Women’s 
Assembly 2; "Agenda” Staff 2; Chorus 1; 
Spanish Club 1,2,3; Tone 3; Forum 1,2,3; 
S.A.A. 1,2,3; Dean’s List 1; W. C. Ticket Com. 
1 ; "A Word to the Whys,” Editor 2. 


AUDREY RUTH HORSCH 

Drey South Weymouth, Massachusetts. b. 
March 20, 1927. Term 5. Major, Mathe- 
matics. Mountain Club 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1. AHA. 


EDWIN CLARENCE HUBBARD 

£./ North Adams, Massachusetts, b. April 6, 
1922. Term 5. Major, Pre-Med. Clubs: 
Mountain 2,3; Alchemists 3; Yacht 3; Co- 
chairman Sophomore Dance Decorations Com.; 
Intramurals 2,3. X'P. 




* 


■ 



JANET HOLTON HUBBARD 

fan Rochester, Vermont, b. January 20, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, French. French Club 2,3; 
Chorus 1,2; Choir 3; Forum 2; W. C. Ball 
Com. 3; Dean’s List 1. ASA. 


WADE ALLEN HUBER 

Waifc Watcrbury, Connecticut. b. June 7, 
1926. Term 4. Major, Chemistry. Base- 
ball 2. 2A. 


JEAN GIHON HUEY 

Jeanie Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, b. January 
25, 1927. Term 5. Major, English. Women’s 
Assembly 1,2; Tennis 1,2; Hockey 2; Basket- 
ball 2; Campus Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3; Choir 2,3; Chorus 1; Forum 1,2,3; 
Players Tryout 1; S.A.A. 2; W. C. Ski Com. 
1; W. C. Ball Com. 2; Sophomore Dance 
Com. TIB*. 


ANN LOUISE JOHNSON 

Johnnie Syracuse, New York. b. December 
1, 1926. Term 5. Major, Economics. Bad- 
minton 1; Volleyball 1,2; "Agenda” Staff 3; 
Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, International Relations 
3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 3; Dean’s List 1. 


OLIVE ANNE JOHNSON 

Johnnie Waterville, Connecticut, b. May 30, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Home Economics. 
Women’s Assembly 1; Basketball 1; Volleyball 
2; Campus Tryout 2; German Club 1,2. 


THOMAS MARIMON JOHNSON 

Tom Camden, New York. b. February 22, 
1922. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Interfraternity Council 3; Campus Tryout 1, 
Staff 2; Sophomore Dance Com. 2 A. 


WILLIAM ROGERS JOHNSON 

Bill Hartford, Connecticut, b. February 22, 
1923. Term 4. Major, Economics. Campus 
Tryout 1,2, Assistant Business Manager 2; 
Kaleidoscope Tryout 1,2; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2; Yacht 2; W. C. Program Com. 2; Intra- 
murals 1,2. AT. 


FREDERICK BERNARD JOHNSTON 

Fred Manchester, Vermont, b. May 14, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, History. Men’s Assembly 2; 
Campus Tryout 2; Intramural Baseball 1,2,3; 
Mountain Club 1,2,3. X^. 






MARY HELEN JOHNSTON 

Mary Newton, Massachusetts, b. April 30, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Russian and World 
Affairs. Tennis 1,2; Volleyball 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3, Skyline 3; Literary 1,2,3; Rus- 
sian 2,3, President 3; Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 2,3; 
W. C. Rally 2; W. C. Trails and Equipment 3. 


CARL DEXTER JOLIVETTE 

Carl North Bennington, Vermont, b. August 
3 1, 1924. Term 4, transfer. Major, M.I.T. 
Plan. Basketball 2. AKE. 


DORIS LOUISE JONES 

Do Allendale, New Jersey, b. November 29, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Fine Arts. Skiing 1,2; 
Riding 1,2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2; Flying 2,3; 
Star Gazers 2; Chorus 1. KA. 


MARCIA JORDAN 

Mania Ridgewood, New Jersey, b. Novem- 
ber 18, 1927. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Clubs: 
Mountain 1; Literary 2; Spanish 3; German 
2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Star Gazers 3; Chorus 1; 
Sophomore Dance Com. 


CAROLYN ELIZABETH KANEN 

Lyn Ridgewood, New Jersey, b. September 9, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Spanish 2,3; Forum 1,2; 
S.A.A. 1,2,3; Chorus 1. 


ROBERT LEWIS KAUFMAN 

Bob Haverstraw, New York. b. March 5, 
1927. Term 4. Major, F'conomics. Players 
2; S.A.A. 2. UX. 


GERTRUDE ANN KEEFE 

Keefie Rensselaer, New York. b. September 4, 
1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Women’s Assembly 1; Tennis 1,2; Hockey 
1,2,3; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 2; Skiing 1,2; 
Baseball 2; Volleyball 1,2,3; Modern Dance 
1,2,3; Campus Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3, Skyline 2,3; French 3; Russian 2,3; For- 
um 1,2; Star Gazers 2; S.A.A. 1; W. C. Trails 
and Equipment Com. 2,3; W. C. Ball Com. 1. 


ROBERT EDWIN KELLOGG 

Bob Danbury, Connecticut, b. June 23, 1919. 
Term 5. Major, Economics. Campus Tryout 
1, Staff 1,2; Mountain Club 1,2. AT. 










ROBERT WILLIAM KELLOGG 

Bob Katonah, New York. b. December 18, 
1920. Term 5. Major, World Affairs. Moun- 
tain Club 1,2; Choir 2,3; Band 1,2,3, Major 2, 
Manager 3; Orchestra 1. 2 A. 


VIRGINIA MARIE KNUDSEN 

Gnu W'est Hartford, Connecticut, b. April 
6, 1927. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Women’s Assembly 1,2; Basketball 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; International Relations 3, 
President 3; Choir 3; Chorus 1,2; Forum 1.2,3; 
S.A.A. 2,3; Campus Tryout 1, Staff 1; Mortar 
Board Cup 2; Dean’s List 1,2; Cheering Squad 
3; W. C. Ball Com. 1,3; W\ C. Publicity Com. 
2; Sophomore Discussion Group. AAA. 


JACK FRANK KOFOED 

Jack Pelham, New York. b. June 24, 1926. 
Term 3. Major, Economics. Black Panthers 
2; Band 2; French Club 1; S.A.A. 3. OX. 


JANET CARO KOHLER 

Jan Hughesville, Pennsylvania, b. January 23, 
192 5. Term 5. Major, Chemistry. Basket- 
ball 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Alchemists 2,3; 
Forum 1,2,3; Tone 1; W'. C. Foods Com. 3. 


JOHN EARL KRANTZ 
Jack Middlebury, Vermont, b. June 9, 1924. 
Term 5. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Mountain Club 
1,2,3, Temporary Skyline I, Skyline 2,3; Choir 


JOSEPHINE FRANCES KRAUPNER 

Jo Fran New York, New York. b. October 
11, 1927. Term 5. Major, French. Clubs: 
Mountain I; Literary 2; French 1,2,3; Tone 2; 
Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 2. 



LORETTE MARIE LAPOLICE 
Lorrie Northficld, Vermont, b. February 10, 
1926. Term 5. Major, French and W'orld 
Affairs. Women’s Assembly 2; Clubs: Moun- 
tain 1,2,3; Modern Dance 1; French 1,2,3; 
Chorus 1; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3; Class 
Secretary 3; W'. C. Social Com. 2; W. C. Ball 
Com. 3; Freshman and Sophomore Dance Com. 
II B<I\ 


JOHNSTONE ROWLAND LAW 

Jack New Britain, Connecticut, b. October 
28, 1921. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Hockey 2,3; Campus Tryout 2, Staff 2,3, As- 
sistant Editor 3; Clubs: Mountain 2,3; Yacht 
2; Intramurals 2,3. —‘EE. 




w 




NANCY MURCHISON LEACH 

Lcachic New fane, Vermont, b. June 1 5, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, Sociology. Riding 2; Campus 
Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 
2,3; German 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3; 
W. C. Klondike Rush Com. 1,3. 




MARY LEE 

Mary Topeka, Kansas. b. June 26, 1924. 
Term 5, transfer. Major, Sociology. Mountain 
Club 3; Choir 3; Chorus 3; Tone 3; Forum 
3. AT. 


MARGERY AMY LEHMANN 

Bunny Flushing, New York. b. April 3, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, English. Volleyball 1; Cam- 
pus Tryout 1; Mountain Club 1,2,3; S.A.A. 
2; Forum 1,2; Players 1,2,3; W.C. Ball Com. 
1,3; Sophomore Dance Com.; W . C. Skating 
Com. 1. 


AUDREY JANE LELAND 

Auif Chatham, New Jersey, b. December 18, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish and Fine Arts; 
Clubs: Mountain 1,2; Literary 3; Spanish 1,2,3; 
S.A.A. 1; Dean’s List 2; W. C. Skating Com. 
1. *FM. 


JOAN THERESE L’EPISCOPO 

Joanic Brooklyn, New York. b. September 
30, 1927. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Bad- 
minton 1,2; Baseball 2; Volleyball 3; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,3; Literary 2; Chorus 2; Tone 2; 
S.A.A. 1; Forum 1,2. AAA. 


JOSEPH BERNARD L’EPISCOPO 

Joe Brooklyn, New York. b. May 8, 192 5. 
Term 5. Major, Political Science. Skiing 2, 
Manager 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, Governing 
Board 2, Skyline 2,3; Flying 2,3; Blue Key 
2,3, Treasurer 2; Freshman Dance Com. Co- 
chairman W. C. Trails and Equipment Com. 1; 
Co-chairman W. C. Skiing Com. 2; Lodge Com. 
2; Intramurals 1,2. XM'. 


CLEMENT BIDDLE LEWIS, JR. 

Clem Riverton, New Jersey, b. June 6, 1923. 
Term 4. Major, Economics. Campus Tryout 
1; Track 3; Photography Club 3; Cheerleading 
1,3. A2$. 


JUDITH RUTH LITTLE 

Judy Waterbury, Connecticut, b. September 
27, 1926. Term 5. Major, American Litera- 
ture. Riding 2; Modern Dance 1; Volleyball 
3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 3; Yacht 3; 
Star Gazers 2,3; Chorus 1; Tone 2; Forum 
1,2,3; W. C. Frolic Com. 1,2; W. C. Ball 
Com. 3. KKF. 





EVAN BRADFORD LITTLEFIELD 

Ev Bryantville, Massachusetts, b. January 2, 
1925. Term 5. Major, Mathematics and 
Physics. Interfraternity Council 2,3; J.V. 
Football 1; Mountain Club 1; Choir 3; Class 
Secretary 3. 


ALLANAH IRENE MacINNIS 

Lonnie Larchmont, New York. b. April 29, 
1926. Term 5. Major, French. Clubs: Moun- 
tain 1,2,3, French 2,3, German 3; Tone 1; 
Forum 1,2,3; Chorus 1; S.A.A. 1,2,3; W. C. 
Refreshment Com. 1 ; Sophomore Dance; Dean’s 
List 1,2. 


PATRICIA ELIZABETH McCABE 

Tricia Arlington, Vermont, b. January 29, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Mountain Club 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Star Gazers 
2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3; Tone 2; \V. C. Refreshment 
Com. 1; W. C. Police Patrol 2; W. C. Skating 
Com. 3; Sophomore Dance. 


DONALD BALL McGUIRE, JR. 

Mac Middletown, New York. b. January 18, 
1924. Term 4. Major, Economics. J.V. 
Football 1; Track 2; Choir 3; Men’s Assembly 
1; Interfraternity Council 3; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 1; "Fraternities at Middlebury,” Editor 
2; Blue Key 2,3. X'P. 


ANN RONNI McKENNEY 

Ronni Deerfield, Massachusetts. b. January 
16, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. Campus 
Tryout 1, Staff 2,3, Assistant Editor 3; Moun- 
tain Club 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; W. C. Publicity 
Com. 1. ASA. 


SUSAN MARY McWILLIAMS 

Sue Beverly, Massachusetts, b. August 17, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 1,2; French 3; Span- 
ish 3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2. 


LUCILLE AUDREY MAFFUCCI 

Lu Lynbrook, New York. b. February 17, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Clubs: Lit- 
erary 1; Spanish 1,2; Yacht 2; Tone 1; Forum 
1,2; S.A.A. 1. 


PATRICIA ANN MALONE 

Vat Maplewood, New Jersey, b. June 5, 1926. 
Term S. Major, Sociology. Women’s Assem- 
bly 3; Basketball 1; Volleyball 1,2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Spanish 3; Forum 2, Chair- 
man T.B. Fund, Piano Lessons 2; Humanities 
2; S.A.A. 1,2,3; Dean’s List 1,2; W. C. P-Rade 
Com. 1; W. C. Klondike Rush Com. 2; W. C. 
Program Com. 3. 









SHIRLEY RUTH MARCH 

Marcey Washington, D. C. b. July 14, 1926. 

Term 5. Major, English and Drama. Modern 
Dance 1, Group 2,3, Choreography 2,3, Vice- 
President 3; Clubs: Literary 1,2; Mountain 
1,2,3; Spanish 1; Chorus 2; Interfaith 2; 

Players 1,2,3; W. C. Skating Com. 1. KA. 

LLOYD BOARDMAN MARSHALL 

Lloyd W’akeficld, Massachusetts, b. June 28, 
1 923. Term 5. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Base- 
ball 1; Mountain Club 1; Humanities 3; Dean’s 
List i.:. A2*. 


PATRICIA JEAN MARTIN 

Pat Middletown, Connecticut, b. September 
2, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. Modern 
Dance 3; Clubs: Literary 2, Tone 2, Yacht 3; 

Forum 1,2,3. 

ROBERT HAMMETT MASON 

Bob Ridgewood, New Jersey, b. July 9, 1924. 
Term 3. Major, Economics. Track 2; "M” 
Club 2,3; Cross Country Track 1,3,4, Captain 
4, Manager 4; Clubs: Flying 2; Yacht 2,3, 
Vice-Commodore 2,3; Photography 3, Presi- 
dent 3; Mountain 1,2,3, Skyline 3; W. C. 
Sports Com. 1; W. C. Cabin and Trails Com. 
3; Co-chairman Scullions’ Ball 2; Co-chairman 
Sophomore Dance Ticket Com. 2; Co-chairman 
Yacht Club Formal 3. X'P. 


MARGARET KATHERINE MATULIS 

Peg Broad Brook, Connecticut. b. May 7, 
1926. Term 5. Major, English. Campus 
Tryout 1, Staff 2, Assistant Editor 2,3; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Flying 2,3, Secretary-Treasurer 
2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Interfaith 1; S.A.A. 2; 
W. C. Ticket Com. 3; Scullions’ Ball Com. 2; 
Co-chairman Flying Club Dance 2; Panhellenic 
Scholarship 2. 2K. 


DORIS JANE MAURER 

Perry Hawthorne, New York. b. August 8, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Women’s 
Assembly 1,2; Hockey 1,2,3, Manager 3; 
Basketball 1,2; Badminton 2; Baseball 1,2; 
Volleyball 1,2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, Tem- 
porary Skyline 2; Spanish 3; Forum 1,2; 
Chorus 1; W. C. Social Com. 2; W. C. Food 
Com. 3; W. C. P-Rade Com. 1. ASA. 


DONALD THOMSON MEANS 

Don North Asbury Park, New Jersey, b. Feb- 
ruary 12, 1918. Term 5. Major, Russian. 
Basketball 2; Baseball 1; Clubs: Mountain 1; 
Russian 2. AKE. 


MARION OSBORN MFRRIMAN 

Bobbie Providence, Rhode Island, b. July 14, 
1926. Term 5, transfer. Major, Biology. 
Women’s Assembly 3^ Clubs: Mountain 2,3, 
Temporary Skyline 3; Yacht 3; W. C. Trails 
and Equipment Com. 2; Co-chairman W. C. 
Police and Transportation Com. 3; Ski Team 2. 



GEORGE TRACY MERRITT 

Bus New Haven, Vermont, b. September 13, 
1925. Term 5. Major, Fine Arts. Mountain 
Club 1,2,3; Choir 1,2,3; Black Panthers 1,2; 
Orchestra 1 ; Players 3. 



EUGENE HARMON MILLER 

Gene Chateaugay, New York. b. January 31, 
1927. Term 4. Major, American Literature. 
Basketball 1; Football 1; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3, Literary 3. AKE. 


KENNETH THOMAS MOORE 

Ken Middlcbury, Vermont, b. July 27, 1922. 
Term 5. Major, Economics. Interfraternity 
Council 3, Secretary-Treasurer 3; Flockey 3; 
J.V. Football 1; Track 1,3; "M” Club 3; 
Cam (ins Staff 2,3; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Black 
Panthers 1; W. C. Advertising Com. 2; Class 
Social Chairman 2; Freshman Dance Com. 
AKE. 


VERNA LOUISE MORRIS 

Louise North Chelmsford, Massachusetts, b. 
April 4, 1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish. 

Clubs: Literary 1,2; Spanish 3; German 3; 
Yacht 2; Forum 1,2. 


BARBARA MORSS 

Bidge Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, b. Au- 
gust 2 5, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. 

Women’s Assembly 1,2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, 
Skyline 2,3, Governing Board 3; Yacht 2,3; 
Chorus 1; Forum 3; Players 2,3; Sophomore 
Discussion Group. 


JEANNE LOUISE MORTON 

Jeannie Jacksonville, Florida, b. May 3, 1 926. 
Term 5. Major, English. Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3; Literary 1,2,3; Spanish 3; Forum 1,2,3. 


RUTH CARPENTER MURPHY 

Murph Waban, Massachusetts, b. July 20, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Economics. Kaleido- 
scope Tryout 1; "Agenda” Staff 2,3; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2; French 1,2,3; Tone 2; Forum 
1,2; S.A.A. 1,2,3, Chairman Contacts Com. 
2,3; W. C. Food Com. 2,3; Culture Confer- 
ence General Com. 2; W. C. Ball Com. 2; 
Freshman Dance Com. 


ISABEL ANN MYERS 

Ann Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, b. December 
29, 1927. Term 5. Major, English and Ger- 
man. Campus Tryout 1, Staff 1; Kaleido- 
scope Tryout 1,2; "Directions" Business Co- 
manager 1, Manager 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,3; 
Literary 1,2,3; French 3; German 1,2,3; Forum 
1,2,3; Humanities 3; Dean’s List 1,2. 



■ 





MARY CORINNE NAGLE 

Corrinc Ballston Spa, New York. b. January 
26, 1926. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Women’s Assembly 3; Campus Tryout 1; 
Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3; Literary 1; International Relations 3; 
Chorus 2; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1; Sophomore 
Dance Com.; W. C. Ticket Com. 3. KKF. 


FRANCIS IGNATIUS NASH 

Frank North Bennington, Vermont, b. Feb- 
ruary 1, 1923. Term 5. Major, American 
Literature. Hockey 2,3, Assistant Manager 2, 
Manager 3; "M” Club 3; Intramurals 3; 

Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; ’’Directions” 3; 

Clubs: Mountain 1,2; Literary 3; W. C. Police 
Com. 2. 

NANCY NEAL 

Ganger Walton, New' York. b. January 12, 
1927. Term 5. Major, History. Tennis 1,2 
Basketball 1,2; Badminton 1,2; Baseball 2 
Volleyball 2,3; Kaleidoscope Tryout 1,2 
Mountain Club 1,2,3; Forum 1,2; S.A.A 
1,2. KA. 


MERRITT BERNARD NEIL 

Barney Pittsford, Vermont. b. March 21, 

1923. Term 5, transfer. Major, Psychology. 

-A. 

WALTER JOHN NELSON 

N els Ozone Park, New York. b. January 30, 
1926. Term 5. Major, History. Basketball 
2; Intramurals 2,3; W. C. Decoration Com. 1; 
Freshman Dance Com.; Chairman Sophomore 
Dance Refreshment Com.; Class President 2; 
Class Secretary 1. XSP. 


GEORGE CHESTER NEWCOMB 

George Fleischmanns, New York. b. May 1, 

1924. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Campus Tryout 1,2; Kaleidoscope Tryout 1; 
Mountain Club 1,2,3; Band 1,2; Debating 2,3; 

Players 1; S.A.A. 3; Interfaith 2; Culture 
Conference General Com. 3; W. C. Ticket 
Com. 3. AZ‘J>. 

IRMGARD NIERHAUS 

lrmie Scarsdale, New York. b. November 22, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Women’s 
Assembly 3; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 1,2; 
Volleyball 1,2; Kaleidoscope Business Tryout 
2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 1,2; Span- 
ish 3; German 1,2; Forum 1,2; Interfaith 
1,2,3; Players 1,2,3, Historian 2,3; S.A.A. 
1; Class Secretary 1,2; W. C. Klondike Rush 
Com. 3; Freshman and Sophomore Dance Com. 

ELIZABETH CHESTER ORDWAY 

Polly Newton Center, Massachusetts, b. Octo- 
ber 18, 1927. Term 5. Major, English. 

Women’s Assembly 3; Campus Tryout 1, Staff 
2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2, Skyline Tryout 1; 
Literary 1,2; Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 1,2; W. C. 

Ball Com. 2; Dean’s List 2. 








DAVID MF.KEEL OTIS 

Dare Burlington, Vermont. b. August 13, 
1923. Term 3. Major, Political Science. Cam- 
pus Tryout 1,2, Staff 2; S.A.A. 2. IvAP. 


ROBERT EARL OUTMAN, JR. 

Bob New York, New York. b. December 20, 
1923. Term 4. Major, Mathematics. Fresh- 
man Football 1; Mountain Club 1. A A. 


DORIS ANN PALM 

Do Mount Vernon, New York. b. March 28. 
1927. Term 3. Major, Political Science. 
Women’s Assembly 1; Basketball 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Star Gazers 2,3; International 
Relations 3; Forum 2; Players 1,2,3; W. C. 
Skating Com. 1,2; Chairman W. C. Play Com. 
3; Freshman Dance Com. AAA. 


BERNARD ALDEN PALMER 

Bernard Norwich, Vermont, b. May 1 3, 1923. 
Term 5. Major, French. Choir 1,2,3; Clubs: 
French 2, Play 2, Chorale Frangais 2,3; Ger- 
man 2,3; Dean’s List 1. 


ELAINE EMMA PANKOPF 

Pankopf Rutherford, New Jersey, b. April 
1 1, 1927. Term 5. Major, English. Choir 
2,3; Chorus 1; Tone 2,3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 
1; Literary Club 1,2; Dean’s List 2. 



JACKSON BURNHAM PARKER 

Jack Auburndale, Massachusetts, b. April 10, 
1923. Term 3. Major, Economics. Track 2; 
Intramurals 2. AZ<I\ 


JOHN BISHOP PARKER. 

Jack East River, Connecticut, b. December 
10, 1921. Term 3. Major, Psychology. Cam- 
pus Tryout 2,3; Tone 1; Yacht Club 2,3. DX. 


CARL ULYSIS PARKINSON 

Parky Ozone Park, New York. b. September 
17, 192 3. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 

ex. 






DORIS JEAN PASCH 

Dot Queens Village, New York. b. July 30, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Sociology. Women’s 
Assembly 1; Basketball 1,2; Volleyball 1,2; 
Mountain Club 1,2. — K. 


SARAH LOUISE PECK 

Sally Middlebury, Vermont. b. June 25, 
1927. Term 5. Major, English. Basketball 
2; Baseball 2; Volleyball 1; Mountain Club 
1,2,3; Choir 2,3; Chorus 1; Tone 2; Forum 
1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2; Freshman and Sophomore 
Dance Com.; W. C. Ball Com. 2. AAA. 


WILLIAM ALBERT PERKINS 

Bill Newport, Rhode Island, b. October 13, 
1926. Term 5. Major, English. Mountain 
Club 1,2,3; Choir 1,2; Orchestra 1,2,3; Tone 1. 


RUTH ELAINE PHILLIPPI 

Phil Lancaster, Pennsylvania, b. August 21, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Women’s 
Assembly 2; Riding 2; Modern Dance 2; Vol- 
leyball 2; Kaleidoscope Tryout 2, Business 
Manager 3; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Choir 3; 
Chorus 1,2; Forum 1,2,3, Vice-President 3; 
Players 2,3; S.A.A. 1; Dean’s List 1; Chairman 
Big-Little Sister Com.; Sophomore Dance Com.; 
W. C. Skating Com. 1; W. C. Ticket Com. 2; 
W. C. Play Com. 3. 


SCOTT TODD PIKE 

Scott Boston, Massachusetts. b. June 18, 
1923. Term 5. Major, English. AT. 


GLORIA CATHERINE PILINI 

Glor Montpelier, Vermont, b. September 10, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Home Economics. 
Women’s Assembly 1; Mountain Club 1,2,3; 
Chorus 1; Forum 1,2; Players Tryout 1,2,3; 
Class Treasurer 3; Sophomore Dance Com. 


LOUISE CHRISTINE PLANCK 

Chris Hamden, Connecticut. b. June 10, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish. Modern 
Dance 1,2; Volleyball 3; Campus Business Try- 
out 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,3; French 1,3; Span- 
ish 2,3; German 1,2; S.A.A. 1; W. C. Skating 
Com. 1,3; Sophomore Dance Com.; Sophomore 
Discussion Group; Dean’s List 2. 


JANE MARGARET POTTER 

Jane Ventnor City, New Jersey, b. March 17, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Campus 
Business Tryout 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1; In- 
ternational Relations 3; Forum 2,3; Star Gazers 
3; Dean’s List 1; Sophomore Discussion Group. 












ROBERT HOWE PRATT 

Bob Larchmont, New York. b. January 3, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Mathematics. Clubs: 
Mountain 3, Humanities 2; Intramurals 1. 


PATRICIA JEANNE PRENDERGAST 

Piit Great Neck, New York. b. August 28, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Women’s 
Assembly 2; Tennis 2; Badminton 1; Chorus 
1,3; Tone 1,2; Forum 1,2; W. C. Klondike 
Rush Com. 3. 


KATHERINE A. RAPP 

Kathy Allentown, Pennsylvania, b. Novem- 
ber 17, 1927. Term 5. Major, Mathematics. 
Badminton 1; Campus Business Tryout 1; 
Kaleidoscope Business Tryout 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Alchemists 2,3; Yacht 3; 
Chorus 1; Interfaith 1.2,3, Secretary 3; Play- 
ers 1,2,3, Point Chairman 3; Dean’s List 1,2; 
W. C. Play 1; W. C. Social Com. 2; W. C. 
Ball Com. 2. 


BOBBY JO READ 

Jo Knoxville, Tennessee, b. October 12, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, Spanish. 


JANET AVIS REED 

lane/ Buffalo, New York. b. November 3, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Spanish and World 
Affairs. Agenda” Staff 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3; Spanish 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3. 


ELIZABETH PERKINS REID 

RciJie Bedford, Quebec, b. December 4, 192 8. 
Term 5. Major, Psychology. Women’s Assem- 
bly 2; Tennis 2,3; Hockey 1,2,3; Basketball 2; 
Badminton 2; Skiing 1.2, Ski Patrol 3; Baseball 
2; Volleyball 1.2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, 
Temporary Skyline 2; French 1.2; Yacht 2,3; 
Forum 1,2,3; Star Gazers 2,3; Chairman Fresh- 
man Dance Publicity Com.; Chairman W. C. 
Poster Com. 3. IIB4>. 


NORMA LOIS REINICKER 
Ronni Haddonfield, New Jersey, b. February 
2, 1927. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Women’s Assembly 3; Badminton 1; Campus 
Tryout 1,2; Kaleidoscope Tryout 1; Moun- 
tain Club 1,2,3; Chorus 1; Forum 1,2,3, 
Chairman Hospital Com. 3; W. C. Food Com. 
2; W. C. Ticket Com. 3. AAA. 


LIVIA KARIN REMMLER 

Li vie Maspeth, New York. b. September 22, 
1926. Term 5. Major, German. Baseball 2; 
Modern Dance 3; Volleyball 1; Kaleidoscope 
Tryout 2; Chorus 1; Forum 2; Clubs: Moun- 
tain 1,2,3; French 2,3; German 1,2,3. 






w 


HARRY GLENN REMINGTON, JR. 

Glenn Bennington, Vermont, b. February 24, 
1924. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Men’s Assembly 2; Fencing 1,2; Campus Try- 
out 1. X*. 

ELIZABETH CASS REYNOLDS 

Betty Scarsdale, New York. b. December 11, 

1926. Term S. Major, Home Economics. 

Tennis 1,2; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 2; Vol- 
leyball 1,2; Choir 2,3; Chorus 1; Tone 2,3; 

Forum 1,2,3; Clubs: Interfaith 1; Mountain 
1,2,3; German 1,2; Yacht 2,3. 

JANET LORING RICE 

Kicie West Hartford, Connecticut, b. De- 
cember 1 1, 1926. Term 5. Major, Mathe- 
matics. Women’s Assembly 1,2; Hockey 1,2,3; 
Badminton 1,2; Baseball 1; Volleyball 1,2; 
Kaleidoscope Business Tryout 1; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3, Skyline Tryout 1; Choir 3; 
Chorus 1,2; Literary 1,2; Forum 1,2,3; Star 
Gazers 2,3; S.A.A. 1,2, Secretary-Treasurer 2; 
W. C. Social Com. 2,3; W. C. Ticket Com. 1; 
Class Treasurer 1; Freshman and Sophomore 
Dance Com. AAA. 

NANCY LOUISE RICHARDSON 

Nan Marlborough, New Hampshire, b. Octo- 
ber 7, 1926. Term 5. Major, Mathematics. 

Hockey 2; Basketball 2,3; Campus Tryout 1; 
Kaleidoscope Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3; Literary 1; Tone 1; Choir 3; Chorus 
1,2; Orchestra 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2; 
Vermont Symphony 1,2; Freshman and Sopho- 
more Dance Com.; W. C. Food Com. 2; Chair- 
man Forum Dance 3. KK1\ 

NATALIE ISABEL RICHMOND 

Nat Kew Gardens, New York. b. September 
8, 1926. Term S. Major, French. Volley- 
ball 1; Campus Tryout 1; Chorus 1,2; Tone 2; 
Forum 1,2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 
1,2,3; Yacht 3; Dean’s List 1. 2K. 

ROSALIE RITTENHOUSE 

Koz Norristown, Pennsylvania, b. November 
4, 1926. Term 5. Major, Psychology and So- 
ciology. Choir 2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Russian Club 
2, President 2; Chorus 1. AAA. 

BETTY LEE ROBBINS 

Lee Teaneck, New Jersey. b. September 8, 
1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Women’s Assembly 1,2; Badminton 1,2; Base- 
ball 1,2; Archery 2; Volleyball 1,2,3; Skiing 
1,2; Campus Tryout 1,2; “Agenda” Staff 3; 
Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 3; Tone 2; 
Russian 1,2; Forum 2,3; Chairman Sophomore 
Dance Publicity Com.; Dean’s List 2. -K. 

JEAN EDNA ROBBINS 

Jean Hartford, Connecticut. b. April 12, 

1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 

Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 2,3; German 
1,2; Choir 3; Chorus 1,2. 




BARBARA JANE ROEMF.R 

Bobbie East Orange, New Jersey, b. August 
1, 1926. Term 3. Major, Spanish. Basketball 
1; Badminton 1; Chorus 1,3; Tone 2; Forum 1; 
Clubs: Mountain 1,3; Spanish 3; W. C. Klon- 
dike Rush Com. 3. 


FELIX GEORGE ROHATYN 

Felix New York, New York. b. May 29, 
1928. Term 5. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Men’s 
Assembly 1; Tennis 1,2; Basketball, Assistant 
Manager 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2; French 1,2; 
S.A.A. 1; Dean’s List 1. AS#. 


DAVID HUNT ROLLASON 

Date Ipswich, Massachusetts, b. October 30, 
192 3. Term 4. Major, Economics. Mountain 
Club 1,3; Choir 1. 


JEAN SEMPLE ROLLASON (MRS.) 

Jean Verona, New Jersey, b. October 3, 1926. 
Term 3, transfer. Major, Economics. 


SHIRLEY ANNE ROOT 

Shirley Ridgewood, New Jersey, b. April 3, 
1926. Term 3. Major, Spanish. Modern 
Dance 3; Volleyball 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3; Spanish 2,3; Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 1,2; 
Freshman Dance Com. 


DAVID LLOYD ROWELL 

Date Hampden Highlands, Maine, b. Decem- 
ber 29, 1923. Term 4. Major, Spanish. Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2; Orchestra 1,2; French 1,2, 
Vice-President 2; Spanish 2; Black Panthers 
2. KAP. 


ANN WINSH1P RYDER 

Ann Brockton, Massachusetts, b. January 30, 
1927. Term 3. Major, American Flistory. 
Chorus 1,2,3; Forum 1,2; Yacht Club 2,3; 
Star Gazers 2,3; Dean’s List 1,2. 


PATRICIA SALMON 

Pete Stanhope, New Jersey, b. February 11, 
1926. Term 3, transfer. Major, Political 
Science. W. A. A. Council 3, Vice-President 
3; Hockey 2,3; Basketball 2,3; Skiing 2,3; 
Volleyball 3; Campus Tryout 2, Staff 3; 
Clubs: Mountain 2,3, Temporary Skyline 3; 
Yacht 2,3; Class President 3. 





JANE ANNE SAURMAN 

Anne Clearwater, Florida, b. October 7, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, American Literature. Cam- 
pus Tryout 1 , Staff 2,3; Kaleidoscope Tryout 
2; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Star Gazers 2,3; 
W. C. Ticket Com. 3. AAA. 


BARBARA ROSE SAYRE 

Bobbie Thetford, Vermont. b. August 28, 
192 5. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Moun- 
tain Club 1,2, Skyline Tryout 1; Forum 1,2; 
Star Gazers 2; Sophomore Dance Com.; W. C. 
Food Com. 2. 4>M. 




RUTH ANN SCOTT 

Ruth Ann Cumberland, Maryland, b. Janu- 
ary 10, 1927. Term 4, transfer. Major, 

English. 


HENRY CHARLES SCHNEIKER 

Henry New York, New York. Term 6. 
Major, M.I.T. Plan. Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 
German 1,2; Class Treasurer 2. 


GLENNA ELAINE SEELY 

Glenna Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts. b. 
July 23, 1926. Term 5. Major, English and 
American Literature. Kaleidoscope Tryout 
1,2, Assistant Editor 3; Clubs: Mountain 1; 
Literary 1,2,3, Secretary 2; Forum 2; Inter- 
faith 3; W. C. Poster Com. 3; Sophomore 
Dance Com. AAA. 


JoANNE SELLECK 

SW Alexandria, Virginia, b. March 30, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, Home Economics. Women’s 
Assembly 3; Assistant Manager W.A.A. Cabin 
3; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 1,2; Hockey 3; 
Skiing 1; Volleyball 1,2,3; Mountain Club 
1,2; Dean’s List 2. KKT. 


CAROLA ANN SHELLEY 

Carol Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, b. Novem- 
ber 23, 1927. Term 5, transfer. Major, Psy- 
chology. Tone 3; Forum 3; Interfaith 3; 
Yacht Club 3. 



JOAN LEE SHERMAN 

Jo Pelham, New York. b. June 1, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, Home Economics. Women’s 
Assembly 1; Basketball, All-Midd 1,2; Vol- 
leyball 1,2,3; Mountain Club 1; W. C. Ticket 
Com. 3; Class Social Chairman 1. nB4>. 




MARTHA ANN SHERMAN 

Martha Weston, Massachusetts. b. January 
6, 1927. Term S. Major, Physics. German 
Club 1,2; Tone 3; Interfaith 1; Star Gazers 3; 
S.A.A. 3; Dean’s List 1; Sophomore Discussion 
Group. 



GRAHAM LOW SHOVELTON 

Gram Oswego, New York. b. October 19, 
1 923. Term 5. Major, Political Science. Base- 
ball 1; Campus Tryout 1; Mountain Club 1; 
Debating 1,3; Intramurals 1,2,3. 2 A. 


MARY ELLEN SHUTTLEWORTH 

Shutt Warren, Massachusetts. b. June 4, 
1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Women’s Assembly 3; Chorus 1,2; Forum 1,2; 
W. C. Ticket Com. 3 ; Sophomore Dance Com. 


LIONEL SLATER 

Slats Los Angeles, California. b. June 6, 
1922. Term 4. Major, Psychology. Moun- 
tain Club 2. A2<I\ 


JANET SMALL 

Jan Lewiston, Maine, b. September 8, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, Sociology. Campus Tryout 
1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; German 1,2,3; Yacht 
2,3; Band 3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2; Players 
Tryout 1,2,3; W. C. Frolic Com. 1. 2K. 


SYLVIA ANNE SMEAD 

Smeadte Greenfield, Massachusetts, b. Septem- 
ber 6, 1927. Term 5. Major, Mathematics. 
Volleyball 1,3; Mountain Club 1; Forum 1,2,3; 
Star Gazers 2,3; S.A.A. 1; Sophomore Dance 
Com. 


BARBARA JOAN SMITH 

Barb Fairfield, Connecticut, b. April IS, 1927. 
Term S. Major, Dietetics. Mountain Club 1; 
Chorus 2; Tone 2; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2; 
W. C. Food Com. 3; Sophomore Dance Com. 


JACQUELINE FEAKINS SMITH 

Jackie Morris Plains, New Jersey, b. Febru- 
ary 23, 1927. Term S. Major, Psychology. 
Basketball 2; Badminton 1,2; Skiing 1; Volley- 
ball 1,2, Manager 2; Mountain Club 1,2,3; 
Forum 2,3; Interfaith 3; Players 3; S.A.A. 2; 
W. C. Ball Com. 1. 






LAWRENCE McINTIRE SMITH 

Larry Pittsford, Vermont, b. June 24, 192 5. 
Term 5. Major, Economics. Campus Tryout 
1; Mountain Club 1,2,3; 'T Remember Mama” 

3. ex. 


KATHRYN MADINE SOWLES 

Ky Randolph, Vermont, b. March 5, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, Sociology. Archery 1; Rid- 
ing 2; Cam pm Tryout 1; Kaleidoscope Try- 
out 1,2; Mountain Club 1,2,3; Chorus 1; 
Band 3; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 1,2,3; Sopho- 
more Dance Com. 2K. 




KATHERINE HELEN SPAULDING 

Kit Caldwell, New Jersey, b. August 8, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, Chemistry. Women’s Assem- 
bly 1; Badminton 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 
Alchemists 2,3, Secretary-Treasurer 3; Forum 
1,2,3; S.A.A. 1; W. C.Ball Com. 2. IIB#. 


JOAN ANN SPROSS 

Spross Poughkeepsie, New' York. b. Septem- 
ber 26, 1926. Term 5. Major, Political Sci- 
ence. Volleyball 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 
Yacht 3; Yacht Club Dance Com. 3; Forum 
1,2; Sophomore Dance Com. IIB < I > . 


DAVID THEODORE STAGG 

Dave Syracuse, New' York. b. March 20, 
1921. Term 4. Major, Economics. Athletic 
Council 3; Skiing 1; Yacht Club 2,3, Commo- 
dore 3. X*. 


MARYA ALICE STEELE 

Bushic Newtonville, Massachusetts, b. May 
24, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. Skiing 
1; Riding 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,3; Literary 1; 
Yacht 1,2; S.A.A. I; Chorus 1,2,3; Forum 3; 
"Death Takes a Holiday,” Props Com.; Yacht 
Club Dance Com. 3. 2K. 


ADELE MADELINE STEMMLER 

Stcmmic Queens Village, New' York. b. July 
1, 1927. Term 5. Major, American Litera- 
ture. Women’s Assembly 3; Hockey 2,3; Bas- 
ketball 1,2; Badminton 2; Baseball 2; Volley- 
ball 2,3; Campus Tryout 1, Staff 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3, Temporary Skyline 2; Yacht 
3; Star Gazers 2,3; W. C. Publicity Com. 2,3. 
II 1M\ 





i 



MARGUERITE GRETE STERN 

Margo Kcw Gardens, New York. b. Febru- 
ary 23, 1928. Term 5. Major, French. Bas- 
ketball I; Riding 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 

French 1,2,3, Play 2; German 1,2,3; Russian 
2,3, Secretary 3; Tone 2; Forum 1,3; Humani- 
ties 2,3; S.A.A. 1.2; Sophomore Dance Com. 

DONALD BLAKE STILLMAN 

Don Newtonville, Massachusetts. b. April 
10, 1923. Term 3. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Base- 
ball 1; Track, Manager 3; Intramurals 1,2; 
Mountain Club 1,2. A24>. 



FRED BENSON STORFER 

Fred Bronx ville. New York. b. March 27, 

1927. Term 6. Major, Economics. Men’s 
Assembly 1; Tennis 3; Golf 3; "Agenda” Staff 
2; Orchestra 3; Tone 1,2; Clubs: Literary 1,2; 
Alchemists 3. 

CYNTHIA ROSE STROUT 

Cynic Walpole, Massachusetts, b. December 
27, 1926. Term 3. Major, French. Women’s 
Assembly 2; Hockey 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, 
Skyline 3; French 1,2; Yacht 2,3; Chorus 2; 
Forum 1 ; Co-chairman W. C. Skating Com. 
2,3; Dean’s List 2; Sophomore Discussion 
Group. 

KAYE IMOGENE STURGES 

Si urge East Orange, New Jersey, b. October 
30, 1927. Term 5. Major, Political Science. 
Panhellenic Council 2,3; Modern Dance 2; 
Campus Business Tryout 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 
1,2,3, Temporary Skyline 2; German 1,2; 

Chorus 1; S.A.A. 1,2; W. C. Social Com. 2; 

W. C. Ball Com. 3; Freshman and Sophomore 
Dance Com.; Freshman Outing Program Com.; 

Class Social Chairman 3; Cheering Squad 3. 

AAA. 

JEAN TOWNLEY SWENSON 

Stern Wellesley Farms, Massachusetts, b. May 
15, 1927. Term 3. Major, American Litera- 
ture. Badminton 1,2,3; Campus Tryout 2, 
Staff 2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Literary 
1,2,3; Forum 2; W. C. Publicity Com. 2; 
W. C. Program Com. 3; Dean’s List 2. KA. 

SHIRLEY JEAN SYRETT 

Sy Devon, Connecticut, b. October 1, 1926. 

Term 3. Major, Spanish. Tennis 1; Hockey 
1,2,3; Basketball 1,2; Badminton 1,2; Volley- 
ball 1,2,3; Kaleidoscope Tryout 1,2, Editor 
3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, Skyline 2,3; Spanish 
3; Star Gazers 2; Chorus 1,2; Forum 1,2; 

Dean’s List 1,2; W. C. Ball Com. 1,2; W. C. 
Klondike Rush Com. 3; Freshman and Sopho- 
more Dance Com.; Sophomore Discussion 
Group. ASA. 

GLORIA GRACE TANNER 

Glo North Bergen, New Jersey, b. June 13, 
1927. Term 3. Major, French. Basketball 
1,2,3; Volleyball 1,2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 
French 2,3; Chorus 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; Inter- 
faith 1. #M. 



I 



MARY ELIZABETH TAYLOR 

Betty Hartford, Connecticut, b. January 30, 
1926. Term S. Major, American Literature. 
Campus Tryout I; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 
Literary 3; German 1,2; Forum 1,2,3; Hu- 
manities 3; Interfaith 3; S.A.A. 2. 


ELSE JUNE THEISEN 

Else Great Neck, New York. b. June 22, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Chemistry. Bad- 
minton 2; Volleyball I; Mountain Club 1,2,3; 
Chorus 1,2; Tone 1,2; Forum 1,2,3. 


LAURENCE CASSIUS THOMPSON, JR. 

Larry Manchester, New Hampshire, b. March 
11, 1926. Term 4. Major, French. Clubs: 
French 1,2; Spanish 1,2; Dean’s List 1,2. 


HELEN ALDEN THWAITS 

TweeJie Manhasset, New York. b. July 10, 
1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Women’s Assembly 3; Panhellenic Council 3; 
Basketball 2; Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Moun- 
tain Club 1,2,3; Chorus 1; Yacht Club 2,3; 
Culture Conference General Com. 2, Policy 
Com. 3; Freshman and Sophomore Dance Com. 
KKT. 


SHIRLEY ANN TISDALE 

Tiz South Orange, New Jersey, b. August 17, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Badmin- 
ton 2; Riding 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2; French 
1; Star Gazers 2,3; Forum 2,3; Players 1,2,3; 
Sophomore Dance Com.; W. C. Play Com. 2; 
W. C. Ball Com. 3. 


EDITH TITUS 

Skcet New Rochelle, New York. b. March 
29, 1927. Term 5. Major, Psychology. 

Women’s Assembly 2; Hockey 2,3; Skiing 1,2; 
Volleyball 1,2,3; Riding 1,3, Manager 3; Cam- 
pus Tryout I, Staff 2, Assistant Business Man- 
ager 3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Russian 2; 
Forum 1,2,3; Dean’s List 2; Freshman and 
Sophomore Dance Com. KK1. 


ROBERT WEARE TODD 

ToJJy Melrose, Massachusetts, b. June 29, 
1927. Term 3. Major, Chemistry. Mountain 
Club 1,2,3; Players 3. — 


JACKLYN ESTELLE TOUSSAINT 

Lyn Berlin, New Hampshire. b. February 
7, 1926. Term 5. Major, French. Women’s 
Assembly 3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 
1,2,3; Yacht 3; Chorus 1; Forum 1,2; S.A.A. 
1,2; W. C. Ticket Com. 3; French Club 
Play 2. 





■ 



JOAN TYLER 

Joanttie Wilmington, Delaware, b. May 25, 
1926. Term 5. Major, American Literature. 
Women’s Assembly 1,2; Baseball 2; Modern 
Dance 1; "Directions” Business Staff 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2; Literary 1,2,3, President 3; 
Forum 1,2,3; Sophomore Dance Com.; W. C. 
Skating Com. 1,2,3; Dean’s List 1,2. 


ELIZABETH VAN ALLEN 

Liz Swanton, Vermont, b. February 9, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, Sociology. Basketball 1,2,3, 
All-Midd 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; Chorus 1; 
Tone 2,3; Forum 2,3; Star Gazers 2,3; W. C. 
Ticket Com. 1. 


MARY-FRANCES VAN CLEVE 

Frannie Dayton, Ohio. b. April 13, 1927. 
Term 5. Major, French. Clubs: Modern Dance 
1; Mountain 1; Choir 2,3; Chorus 1; French 
3; Tone 1; Players 2,3; W. C. Skating Com. 1; 
"I Remember Mama” 3. 


JAMES BELCHER VAN WART 

Jim Wilbraham, Massachusetts, b. December 
6, 192 5. Term 4. Major, Political Science. 
Basketball 2, Assistant Manager 2; Mountain 
Club 1,2, Skyline Tryout 2; Players 1,2. AT. 


BARBARA LOUISE VEHLING 

Vt’hl Glen Rock, New Jersey, b. September 
26, 1926. Term 5. Major, English. Basket- 
ball 1; Modern Dance 2,3; Volleyball 1; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3, Temporary Skyline 2; Lit- 
erary 2,3; Forum 1,2,3. KA. 


MIRIAM BENNETT WADE 

Mint Natick, Massachusetts, b. July 14, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, American Literature. Women’s 
Assembly 1,2; Tennis 1,2; Hockey 3; Badmin- 
ton 1,2; Skiing 1,2; Modern Dance 1,2; Vol- 
leyball 3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, Skyline 2,3; 
French 1,2,3; Yacht 2,3; Chorus 1; Players 
1,2,3; Star Gazers Co-president 2,3; S.A.A. I; 
W. C. Ticket Com. 2; Co-chairman W. C. 3; 
Chairman Sophomore Dance. AAA. 


ELIZABETH ROSE WALDO 

Bess Rome, New York. b. March 1 1, 1927. 
Term 5, transfer. Major, Sociology. Bas- 
ketball 2,3; Riding 2; KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 
2; Clubs: Mountain 2,3; Forum 2,3; Yacht 
2,3; W. C. Poster Com. 3; Sophomore Dance 
Com. 


IRENE FANNY WALLERSTEIN 

Wally Great Neck, New York. b. August 
22, 1927. Term 5. Major, German. Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2; French 1,3; German 1,2,3, 
Treasurer 3; S.A.A. 1,2. 





m 



ann mcmillan walthall 

Ann Kansas City, Missouri, b. October 18, 
1927. Term 5. Major, English. Women’s 
Assembly 1; Judicial Council 3; Riding 1,2; 
Campus Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 1; Chorus 
1; Forum 1,2,3; Star Gazers 2,3. KKI\ 



STEWART WASHBURN 

Stu Salem, Massachusetts. b. September 5, 
1 9 2 S . Term 5. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Basket- 
ball 2; J.V. Football 3; Track 2. AKE. 


LAWRENCE MOORE WASHINGTON 

Larry Bloomfield, Connecticut, b. November 
5, 1925. Term 4. Major, German. German 
Club 2; Dean’s List 2. 


NANCY WE ALE 

Nan New Rochelle, New York. b. July 26, 
1926. Term 5. Major, English. Badminton 
1; Volleyball 1; Kaleidoscope Tryout 1,2; 
Mountain Club 1,3; Choir 3; Chorus 1; Or- 
chestra 1,2,3; Forum 1,2,3; W. C. Social Com. 
2,3; Sophomore Dance Com. AAA. 


HELEN LARSON WEBB (MRS.) 

Dolly Middlebury, Vermont, b. January 27, 
1 92 5. Term 5, transfer. Major, History. 


JOHN CAMBRIDGE WEBB 

Johnny Beacon, New York. b. March 29, 
1924. Term 5. Major, Economics. Cross 
Country 1; Mountain Club 1. AT. 


JEAN CATHRYN WEBSTER 

Jeannie Rochester, New York. b. October 4, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Biology. Women’s 
Assembly 1; Chapel Com. 3; Tennis 2; Bas- 
ketball 1; Volleyball 1; Kaleidoscope Busi- 
ness Tryout 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, Tem- 
porary Skyline 2; French 2; Yacht 2; Star 
Gazers 2,3; Chorus 1; Forum 1,2,3; Players 
1,2,3, Secretary-Treasurer 3; Class Treasurer 
2; Freshman and Sophomore Dance Com.; 
W. C. Ball Com. 2,3. nB<I>. 


SELMA JEAN WEISS 

Sel Poughkeepsie, New York. b. July 2 5, 
1926. Term 5. Major, French. Women’s 
Assembly 2; Clubs: Mountain 1; French 1,2,3, 
Secretary-Treasurer 3; Chorus 2; Forum 1,2,3; 
S.A.A. i,2. 



■ 





CORRENE JANE WESCOTT 

Corry Poultney, Vermont, b. November 17, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Psychology. Kaleido- 
scope Tryout 1,2, Associate Editor 3; Tone 2; 
Philosophy Club 1,2,3; W. C. Food Com. 3. 
-K. 




JANE DORIS WHAMER 

Wbatner Schenectady, New York. b. Febru- 
ary 24, 1927. Term 5, transfer. Major, 

Political Science and Sociology. Basketball 2; 
Volleyball 2; Mountain Club 2,3; Tone 2,3; 
Forum 2,3; S.A.A. 2,3; W. C. Ticket Com. 3. 


CAROLYN WOODS WIDEGREN 

Carolyn Worcester, Massachusetts. b. July- 
28, 1927. Term 5. Major, Home Economics. 
Basketball 1,3; Campus Tryout 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2,3; Chorus 1; Band 3; Forum 2,3; 
Star Gazers 2; W. C. Program Com. 2; W. C. 
Food Com. 3. 


FRANK ANDREW WILBUR 

Frank Grafton, Vermont, b. March 29, 1923. 
Term 3. Major, American Literature. Black 
Panthers 1,2,3; Literary Club 2; Tone 1; 
Chime Ringer 3. 


WALTER DANIEL WILDE, JR. 

Walt Wcstboro, Massachusetts. b. January 
22, 1926. Term 4. Major, M.I.T. Plan. 


EDITH PINCKNEY WILLIAMS 

Pinckey Maplewood, New Jersey. b. April 
20, 1926. Term 3. Major, Biology. Women’s 
Assembly 1,2; Campus Tryout 2, Staff 2.3; 
Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; French 1; Literary 2; 
Orchestra 1,2.3; Tone 2; Forum 1,2,3; Star 
Gazers 2,3. KK1\ 


MARGARET MILNE WILLIAMS 

Billie New York, New York. b. October 6, 
1927. Term 5. Major, Pre-Med. Campus 
Tryout 1, Staff 2,3, Assistant Business Man- 
ager 3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; German 1,2; 
Chorus 1; Forum 1,2,3; S.A.A. 2,3. 'EM. 


FRANK SHAVER WILLIAMSON, JR. 

Frank Wilbraham, Massachusetts, b. Decem- 
ber 12, 1926. Term 5. Major, Physics. 

Clubs: Mountain 1,2; French 1, German 1,2; 
Tone 1; Dean’s List 1,2. OX. 



WILLIAM LYON WILSON 



Bill Suffield. Connecticut, b. March 4, 1923. 
Term 6. Major, English. Mountain Club 1, 
2,3; Choir 3; W. C. Klondike Rush Com. I; 
College Movie Photographer 1,2,3; Dramatics 
1,3; Intramurals 2,3. DX. 


RUTH EVELYN WIMMER 

Wimpy West Hartford, Connecticut, b. March 
6, 1927. Term 5. Major, Mathematics. Ten- 
nis 1; Baseball 2; Volleyball 1; Campus Busi- 
ness Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3, Skyline 
Tryout 1; German I; Chorus 1,2,3; Forum 
2,3; Star Gazers 2; W. C. Ticket Com. 3. 
A a A. 


JEANNETTE ADELINE WINANS 




Jen Greenwich, Connecticut, b. September 
14, 1926. Term 5. Major, Fine Arts. Panhel- 
Ienic Council 3; Hockey 2; Modern Dance :. 
Group 2,3, Choreography 2; Volleyball 1; 
Campus Tryout 1; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; 
Choir 2,3; Spanish 3; Tone 1,2,3; Forum 2,3; 
Chairman Song Album Com. 3; S.A.A. 1; Song 
Leader 1,2,3. ‘I’M. 


RICHARD CHARLES WOLFF 

Dick Westfield, New Jersey, b. January 21, 
1924. Term 4, transfer. Major, Chemistry. 
Clubs: Mountain 2; Alchemists 2; Kaleido- 
scope Tryout 2; W. C. Police Com. 2. A XX. 


SPENCER VICTOR WRIGHT 

Spence Cornwall, Vermont, b. July 1 3, 1923. 
Term 4. Major, Economics. Hockey Tryout 
1; J.V. Football 2; W. C. First Aid Com. 1. 
AKE. 



A 


NINETY - EIGHT 





JOHN ALANSON ARNOLD. JR. 


ROBERT GREEN CHADWICK 


Johnny Evanston, Illinois, b. August 7, 1924. Term 
5. Major, Mathematics. Football, Assistant Manager. 
AKE. 


WAYNE GRAY AUSTIN 

Wayne Addison, Vermont, b. November 23, 1926. 
Term 4. Major, History. 

JOSEPH HARRISON BAILEY 

Tink. Ashburnham, Massachusetts, b. September 9, 
1924. Term 5. Major, History. Skiing 1,2,3. — ‘FE. 

FRANCIS WILLIAM BORST 

Bill Williston Park, New York. b. February 13, 
1926. Term 4. Major, Economics. Baseball 1; 
Mountain Club 1,2; W. C. Ball Com. 3. 


NANCY ELEANOR BREED 

Sunny Newtonville, Massachusetts. b. November 
19, 1926. Term 5. Major, Drama. Modern Dance 
3; Mountain Club 1,2; Chorus 1; Tone 1,3; Forum 
1,2,3; Players 2,3. 


HERBERT JORDAN BRONFR 

Herb Washington, D. C. b. January 10, 1928. 

Term 4. Major, Economics and Political Science. 
Basketball, Manager 2; Baseball 1; J.V. Football 2; 
Football 1; Mountain Club 2; S.A.A. 1; Dean’s 
List I; W. C. Ticket Com. 1,2; Chairman Freshman 
Dance. AT. 


LAWRENCE FELLOW CANNING 

Larry St. Johnsbury, Vermont, b. March 6, 1922. 
Term 4. Major, Mathematics. AT. 


Bob Montpelier, Vermont, b. September 25, 1923. 
Term 4. Major, Physics. Mountain Club 1,2; Band 
2; Orchestra 2. OX. 


HADDEN CLARK 

Nemo White Plains, New York. b. March 15, 
1926. Term 5. Major, Chemistry. Men’s As- 
sembly 3; Interfraternity Council 1; Mountain Club 
1; Black Panthers 1,2,3; Orchestra 1. AKE. 

PAUL VINCENTE COSTELLO 

Paul Scarsdalc, New York. b. April 16, 1926. Term 
4. Major, American Literature. Men’s Assembly 1. 

JOHN MICHAEL DINEEN 

Jack Springfield, Massachusetts. b. December 15, 
1924. Term 5. Major, Economics. Baseball 2; Foot- 
ball 1,2,3; Intramurals 1,2. AKE. 


ALAN ERIC ERICKSON 

Al Watertown, Massachusetts, b. February 6, 1928. 
Term 4. Major, Psychology. Orchestra 2. OX. 


PETER FAGG 

Pete Chappaqua, New York. b. September 26, 1928. 
Term 4. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Men’s Assembly 2; 
J.V. Basketball 1; Campus Tryout 1; Mountain Club 
1,2; Star Gazers 1,2; Interfaith 1,2; S.A.A. 2; Dean’s 
List 1,2; Sophmorc Dance Com.; W. C. Sports Com. 
I. AT. 


BARBARA JOAN FAIRBANKS 

Barb Briarcliff, New York. b. July 24, 1927. Term 
4, transfer. Major, Fine Arts. Tennis 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 2,3, Skyline Tryout 2; French 2; Forum 2. 


NINETY-NINE 


JOSEPH CARROLL FITZGERALD 


JOSEPH PETER HALL, JR. 


Fitz Baltimore, Maryland, b. April 20, 192 5. Term 
4. Major, Pre-Med. Men’s Assembly 3; Mountain 
Club 1,2,3. 


FRANCIS PIERCE FOSTER 

Frank Bangor, Maine, b. May 3, 1926. Term 5. 
Major, Economics. Mountain Club 1. KAP. 


DONALD EDWIN FOWLER 

Don Bangor, Maine, b. March 16, 1924. Term 4. 
Major, Mathematics. Mountain Club 1,2. —A. 


ROBERT ALLEN FULLER 

Bob Wilmington. Delaware, b. September 16, 1924. 
Term 4. Major, Psychology. Interfraternity Council 
2; Mountain Club 1,2; S.A.A. 1; Freshman Dance 
Com.; Intramurals 1,2. OX. 


ROBERT STEPHEN GOELL 

Bob Cedarhurst, New Jersey, b. May 27, 1928. 

Term 4. Major, Economics. Men’s Assembly 1 ; 
Tennis 2; Debating 2. 


FRANKLYN WILLIAM GUBITZ 

Bud Glens Falls, New York. b. March 18, 1926. 
Term 4. Major, Chemistry. X^E. 


ALFRED PLATT HAFT, JR. 

Al New York, New York. b. November 23, 1927. 
Term 4. Major, English. Clubs: Mountain 1; Literary 
2; French 1,2. OX. 


Joe Staten Island, New York. b. February 5, 1926. 
Term, 4. Major, Chemistry. Clubs: Star Gazers 2; 
Alchemists 2. OX. 


DANIEL TUTTLE HEDDEN 

Dan Norwalk, Connecticut, b. July l, 1923. Term 
4. Major, M.I.T. Plan. Interfraternity Council 1; 
Skiing 2; Track 1; Clubs: Mountain I. Temporary 
Skyline 1; Flying 1,2; President 1,2. OX. 


FOX BLISS HOLDEN 

Fox Poughkeepsie, New York. b. February 9, 1923. 
Term 5. Major, English. Frencing 1,2; Literary 
Club 2. 2 A. 


ERNEST LeROY HUNT 

Roy Uxbridge, Massachusetts, b. September 20, 
1922. Term 4. Major, Mathematics. *^T. 


EDWARD TOWNSEND HUTCHINSON 

Ftutch Glens Falls, New York. June 24, 1925. 
Term 4. Major, Chemistry. X^E. 


ARTHUR STODDARD JOHNSON, III 

StoJJie Framingham Centre, Massachusetts, b. Au- 
fust 22, 1926. Term 4. Major, Political Science. 
Track 2; Mountain Club 1,2; W. C. Trails and 
Cabins Com. 1,2,3; Ski Patrol 3. A2<1>. 


ROBERT KENNETH JONES 

Bob Claremont, New Hampshire, b. July 24, 1924. 
Term 5. Major, Geology. 


ONE HUNDRED 


ROBERT HAMILTON KASPER 


GLADSTONE BASSETT MARCHAND 


Joe Scarsdale, New York. b. December 21, 1922. 
Term 5. Major, Economics. AKE. 


WILLIAM GREGG KERR 

Bill Medina, New York. b. January 24, 1923. Term 
4. Major, History. Baseball 2; S.A.A. 2. A§B. 


JOHN EDWARD LeBARON 

Jack Woodstock, Vermont, b. September 8, 1923. 
Term 4. Major, Mathematics. Track 2. K2. 


THOMAS LF.ITCH LYALL 

Tom New York, New York. b. March 20, 1926. 
Term 5. Major, Biochemistry. 


RICHARD EDWARD MacNEILL 

Dick Middleboro, Massachusetts. b. August 19, 
1925. Term 5. Major, Pre-Med. Baseball 1. AT. 


FREDERICK JEROME McGARRY 

Fred Rutland, Vermont, b. August 22, 1927. Term 
4. Major, Physics. Men’s Assembly 1; Intramurals 
1; Physics Club 1, President 1; Class Secretary 1; 
Freshman Dance Com. 24>E. 


DONALD HARRY MADDOCK 

Don Rossford, Ohio. b. September 13, 192 5. Term 
4. Major, Psychology. Men’s Assembly 2. 


Stony Healdsburg, California, b. January 9, 1916. 
Term 5. Major, Geology. 


ULYSSES CHESTER MOCAS 

Moc Nashua, New Hampshire, b. June 20, 1925. 
Term 4. Major, Economics. Football 2. — <EE. 


DAN CROWLEY MUESSEL 

Dan South Bend, Indiana, b. April 1, 1926. Term 
4. Major, none. Men’s Assembly 2; Mountain Club 
2 . 


KEITH STICKLER MUNTZ 

Keit/j Cleveland, Ohio. b. February 28, 1928. Term 
4. Major, Chemistry and Biology. Flying Club 2. 
2 A. 


BARTLEY BONFIELD NOURSE 

Bart Worcester, Massachusetts, b. May 12, 1 92 5. 
Term 4. Major, Economics. Skiing 1, Assistant Man- 
ager 1; Mountain Club 1. 24>E. 


EZRA MEECH PARKER 

Z eke Coronado, California, b. October 10, 1922. 
Term 4. Major, Russian. 


CHARLES WEEKS PIERCE 

Chuck Middlebury, Vermont, b. July 4, 1922. Term 
4. Major, English. Men’s Assembly 2; Hockey 1,2; 
Black Panthers 1,2; Band 1. 24»E. 


ONE HUNDRED ONE 



JULIAN ALBERT POLLAK, JR. 


MARTIN CADY SCHMIDT 


Dooley Cincinnati, Ohio. b. September 15, 1921. 
Term 4. Major, Political Science. Campus Tryout 
1 ; Sophomore Dance Com. 


CHARLES HAROLD POPE, JR. 

Chuck Newark, New Jersey, b. June 3, 1924. Term 
4. Major, Biology. Men’s Assembly 2; Baseball, As- 
sistant Manager 2; Campus Tryout 2, Staff 2; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2, Temporary Skyline 2; Flying 2; Band 
1; W. C. Ball Com. 2. X<EE. 


ALLAN ELWOOD ROBERTSON 

Al Middlcbury, Vermont, b. December 15, 1921. 
Term 5. Major, Pre-Med. ARE. 


RICHARD RAY ROBINSON 

Dick Watertown, New York. b. July 6, 1923. Term 
5. Major, Mathematics. AT. 


SANDERS DAVID ROSENBERG 

Sandy Brooklyn, New York. b. December 21, 1926. 
Term 4. Major, Chemistry. 


MORTON YONTS SAND 

Mor t Middlebury, Vermont. b. August 4, 1924. 

Term 4. Major, Psychology. 


DIMITRI SAZONOFF 

Dim mi New York, New York. b. May 30, 1921. 
Term 4. Major, French. French Club 1,2. 


Marty Evanston, Illinois, b. March 12, 1923. Term 
4. Major, English. X'P. 


CHRISTIAN STEGE SCHREIBER 

Chris Salem, New York. b. August 6, 1928. Term 
4. Major, Political Science. Clubs: Mountain 1,2; 
German 1,2; S.A.A. 2. 


JOHN WARBURTON SECORD 

John Watertown, Massachusetts, b. July 26, 1920. 
Term 4. Major, English. 


DAVID EDWIN SMITH 

Dare White River Junction, Vermont, b. May 5, 
1926. Term 4. Major, English. X V I / . 


EDWARD NAUMER SMITH 

Ed Ossinger, New York. b. May 23, 1921. Term 
5. Major, none. . 


NORMAN LEONARD SMITH 

Norman New York, New York. b. July 1, 1926. 
Term 4. Major, Spanish. Clubs: Mountain 2; Span- 
ish 2. 


HENRY BRUCE STAHL 

Burge Larch mont. New York. b. September 17, 
1924. Term 4. Major, Economics. Hockey 1; 
Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Mountain Club 1,2; Choir 
1,2,3; S.A.A. 2. 


ONE HUNDRED T W O 


CHARLES STEPHEN STEWART, JR. 


RICHARD BERNARD WANDERER 


Chuck Cooperstown, New York. b. December 19, 
1924. Term 4. Major, History. Clubs: Mountain 2; 
Russian 2; Choir 2. 


JAMES EDMUND SULLIVAN, JR. 

Sully Longmeadow, Massachusetts, b. December 22, 
1922. Term 4. Major, Chemistry. Alchemists Club 
2. AKE. 


WALTER JAMES TOLSON 

Dan Washington, D. C. b. February 19, 1927. Term 
4. Major, Mathematics. 


LESLIE LIONEL VanDINE 

Lcs Stratford, Connecticut, b. June 10, 1919. Term 
4. Major, Philosophy. 


WILLIAM HENRY von DRF.ELE, JR. 

Dan Roselle, New Jersey, b. August 6, 1924. Term 
4. Major, English. Campus Tryout 1, Staff 1,2; 
Clubs: Mountain 1; French 1; Orchestra 1. OX. 


Dick Woodside, New York. b. November 9, 1928. 
Term 4. Major, Chemistry. Choir 2; Clubs: Moun- 
tain 2,3; Players 2; S.A.A. I; W. C. Skating Com. 
1. 2A. 


GEORGE WALTER WEBB 

Walt Worcester, Massachusetts. b. February 24, 
1923. Term 5. Major, French. Mountain Club 1. 
OX. 


GEORGE RICHARD WESTIN 

Dick Rutland, Vermont, b. August 18, 1921. Term 
4. Major, Economics. 


THOMAS JOSEPH WHALEN 

Tom Lynn, Massachusetts, b. December 11, 1923. 
Term 4. Major, Political Science. Basketball 1; 
Baseball 1; Football Manager 1. AKE. 


LARZER PERCY ZIFF 

Larry Holyoke, Massachusetts, b. October 2, 1927. 
Term 4. Major, English. Basketball 1; Football 1; 
"M” Club 1,2; Debacing 1,2; S.A.A. 1,2, Chairman 
Discussion Com. 1,2; Class Vice-President 1; Chapel 
Com. 1; W. C. Program Com. 2. 


ONE HUNDRED THREE 





CLASS OF 1947 


F. Williams , G. Booth , D. Stcbbins, A. Rathbun 


President 

GEORGE HAROLD BOOTH 

Vice-President 

DAVID THAYER STEBBINS 

Secretary 

ALVIN ACKLIN RATHBUN 

T re usurer 

FREDERICK DeFORREST WILLIAMS 


ONE HUNDRED FOUR 


President 




BARBARA BATES 

Vice-President 

DORIS VAUGHN 

Secretary 

ELIZABETH HORNADAY 

T reasnrer 

JANE VALENTINE 

Social Chairman 

ADRIENNE NORTHAM 








WILL JOHNSTON BANGS 

Will White Plains, New York. b. October 
7, 1923. Term 6. Major, Political Science. 
Men’s Assembly 1; Track 1,2,3; Mountain 
Club 1,2, Temporary Skyline 2; Choir 2; 
W. C. Social Com. 1,2. AT. 


JAMES BELL BRUCKS 

Jim New York, New York. b. July 29, 
192 5. Term 6. Major, Economics. 


ERIC OTTO BUNZEL 

Eric Forest Hills, New York. b. September 
20, 1926. Term 6. Major, Economics. Choir 
1,2,3; Clubs: Mountain 1,2,3; German 1,2; 
Blue Key 3; W. C. Ski Com. 1,2, Co-chairman 
3; Chapel Com. 2. 


PRESCOTT RHODES CARR 

Pres Sherbrooke, Quebec, b. April 27, 1925. 
Term 7. Major, Chemistry. Interfraternity 
Council 3; Basketball 3; "M” Club 3; Clubs: 
Mountain 1,2, Temporary Skyline 3, Skyline 
4, Treasurer 4; Band 1; Alchemists 1,4, Presi- 
dent 4; Class Secretary 3; W. C. Sports Com. 
1; W. C. First Aid 3; Co-chairman Sophomore 
Dance; Intramurals 1,3,4; Campus Tryout 1. 


MILON HILTON CLUFF 

Mil/ Dedham, Massachusetts, b. October 26, 
1923. Term 6. Major, Mathematics. Moun- 
tain Club 1,2,3; Orchestra 1,2,3; Tone 1,2, 
Vice-President 2; Dean’s List 1; Kellogg Latin 
English Prize 2. OX. 


DANIEL MONROE COLYER 

Dan West Palm Beach, Florida. b. March 
26, 1924. Term 6. Major, Economics. J.V. 
Football 1, Football 2; "M” Club 2; Blue Key 
2,3. AZ4>. 


CARL ELBERT CONGDON, JR. 

Carl Orrville, Ohio. b. August 13, 1920. 
Term 8. Major, Economics. Mountain Club 
1,2; Band 1,2; S.A.A. 4. OX. 


EDWARD FRANCIS COOKE 

Cooke North Quincy, Massachusetts. b. 
January 14, 1923. Term 7. Major, Political 
Science. Basketball 1,2,3; J.V. Football 1; 
Football 2; "M” Club 2,3,4; Baseball Manager 
3; Campus Tryout 1, Sports Editor 3; Blue 
Key 2,3,4. AT. 









A 




JOHN CHASE DAWSON 

Jack. Rochester, New York. b. August 5, 
1926. Term 6. Major, Economics and Politi- 
cal Science. Mountain Club 1,2; Choir 1,2,3; 
Players 1,2,3; W. C. Play Com. 2. A2$. 



WILLIAM SCHAUFFLF.R DODD 

Bill Stamford, Connecticut, b. August 15, 
1921. Term 6. Major, Economics. Men’s 
Assembly 3; Mountain Club 1,2. A24». 


EDWARD MICHAEL FLAHERTY 

EJ Waterbury, Connecticut. b. September 
1 5, 1923. Term 7. Major, English. Inter- 
fraternity Council 2; Spanish Club 1; Players 
1,2. 2A. 


DONALD YOUNG GILMORE 

Don Boston, Massachusetts, b. September 1 4, 
1926. Term 7. Major, Political Science. 
Men’s Assembly 3; Athletic Council 4; Base- 
ball 1; Football 1,2; Track 3,4, Captain 4; 
"M” Club 3,4; Mountain Club 1,2; Players 
1,2; S.A.A. 2,3,4, President 4; Blue Key 3,4; 
Junior Dance Com. A 2$. 


EVERETT KELSEY HICKS 

Ev Manhasset, New York. b. June 1 5, 1923. 
Term 7. Major, English. Campus Tryout 1, 
Staff 2; Mountain Club 1,2, 3, 4, Temporary 
Skyline 2; Tone 2; Choir 2,3,4; Dean’s List 1; 
Culture Conference Policy Com. 3; Co-chair- 
man W. C. Ball Com. 3; Co-chairman W. C. 
Program Com. 4. DX. 


FREDERICK RICHARD GOODRIDGE 

FreJ Craftsbury, Vermont, b. July 5, 1922. 
Term 7. Major, Economics. Mountain Club 
1,2,3; "Cherry Orchard” 3. 


ARTHUR LINCOLN GOODRICH 

Art Middletown, Connecticut, b. March 17, 
1924. Term 6. Major, Biology. Track 2,3; 
Cross Country 1,3; Mountain Club 1,2,3, Sky- 
line 2,3; W. C. Trails Com. 3. 0X. 


CRANSTON HORR HOWE 

Cran Poultney, Vermont. b. October 31, 
1922. Term 7. Major, Political Science. 
Campus Tryout 1; Clubs; Mountain 1,2, 3, 4; 
Literary 3,4; Yacht 4; Debating 1,2; W. C. 
Publicity Com. 2; Culture Conference Com. 
4; Intramurals 1.2,4. AT. 




f 




INGER MARIE KOLLE 

Mia Oslo, Norway, b. December 6, 1925. 
Term 7, transfer. Major, German. Forum 4; 
Clubs: Mountain 4; French 4; German 4; 
W. C. First Aid and Police Com. 3. 


ROBERT JAMES LUSENA 

Bob Fitchburg, Massachusetts. b. February 
6, 1913. Term 7. Major, French. Clubs: 
Spanish 4; German 4. 


PETER QUACKENBUSH McKEE 

Pete Peterborough, New Hampshire, b. No- 
vember 24, 1923. Term 6. Major, Physics. 
Interfraternity Council 2,3; Football 2; Skiing 
1; *'M” Club 2,3; Intramurals 1,2,3; Culture 
Conference Policy Com. 3. — ‘FE. 


RICHARD DUNCAN McKENZIE 

Dick Brookline, Massachusetts, b. September 
13, 1921. Term 6. Major, Psychology and 
Sociology. Men’s Assembly 3; J.V. Football 
3; Mountain Club 3; Co-chairman Sophomore 
Dance Publicity Com.; Co-chairman W. C. 
Publicity Com. 3. AKE. 


RONALD MAXWELL-WILLESON 

Max Newton, Massachusetts, b. March 24, 
1926. Term 5. Major, English. Campus 
Staff 3; Mountain Club 2. X'P. 


EDWARD LEWIS MENUT 

Ed Snyder, New' York. b. August 1, 1921. 
Term 7. Major, Political Science. Choir 
3,4. KAP. 


JOHN ARVID MORIARITY 

Jack Queens Village, New York. b. Septem- 
ber 8, 1923. Term 7. Major, Psychology. 
Men’s Assembly 4; Freshman Basketball; Track 
Assistant Manager 1; Fencing 1; Mountain 
Club 1,2; Campus Tryout 2. Business Tryout 
1; W. C. Police Com. 1; W. C. Klondike Rush 
Com. 3; W. C. Poster Com. 4. KAP. 


CHARLES JENNISON PARKER 

C.J. White Plains, New r York. b. May 10, 
1924. Term 7. Major; Political Science and 
Economics. Men’s Assembly 4; Campus Try- 
out 1, Staff 2; Clubs: Mountain 1,2, 3,4; 
Spanish 1; Flying 4; Debating 1,2, 3,4; Players 
1; S.A.A. 2,4; W. C. Trails Com. 4; Culture 
Conference Com. 3,4. A-4>. 






DANIEL JOSEPH PETRIZZI 

Dun Rye, New York. b. May 18, 1920. 
Term 6. Major, French. Interfraternity 
Council 3,4; Golf 2,3; Clubs: Mountain I; 
French 1,3,4; Spanish 1,3,4; Dean’s List 2; 
Choir 3,4. 0X. 


CARROLL MILTON PIKE, JR. 

Milt Stowe, Vermont. b. July 29, 1923. 

Term 7. Major, Economics. Skiing 1,2, 3, 4, 
Manager 4; Kaleidoscope Tryout 2; Moun- 
tain Club 2,3,4, Temporary Skyline 3,4; Choir 
3,4; Interfaith 3; Chapel Com. 4; "Everyman” 
2; Cheering Squad 2,4. AT. 


HARMON HASTINGS PLUMB 

Aitchic Mexico, New York. b. July 10, 1924. 
Term 7. Major, Physics. Hockey 3; Choir 
2; Mountain Club 1,2; Scullion’s Ball Com. 2; 
Intramurals 2,3; Junior Marshal. A2$. 


RICHARD JESSUP SALISBURY 

Sully Madison, New Jersey, b. August 11, 
1924. Term 7. Major, Political Science and 
Economics. Basketball, Assistant Manager 1.2, 
Manager 3; "M” Club 3,4; Mountain Club 
1,2,3; Black Panthers 2,3, Leader 3; Band 3; 
Dean’s List 1,2; W. C. Klondike Rush Com. 3. 
AKE. 


CECIL HERBERT STEEN 

Cecc Greenville, Mississippi, b. May 1 1, 1923. 
Term 7. Major, Economics. Men’s Assembly 
2; Student Life Com. 2; Mountain Club 2,3,4; 
Black Panthers 1,2,3, Leader 3, Business Man- 
ager 4; Blue Key 3,4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Navy Formal Com. 1,2; Navy Band Director 
1,2; Chairman Navy Social Com. 2; Sopho- 
more and Junior Dance Com. AKE. 


PAUL JOHN VYRROS 

Paul Manchester, New Hampshire, b. April 
16, 1919. Term 7. Major, French. Men’s 
Assembly 3,4; Track 3; Cross Country 3; 
Freshman Football; Blue Key 3,4. 


WILBUR FRANCIS WEEKS 

Bill Harwinton, Connecticut, b. September 
14, 1924. Term 6, transfer. Major, Political 
Science. Men’s Assembly 3; Interfraternity 
Council 3,4; "Agenda” Staff 3; Mountain Club 
3,4; S.A.A. 3; Chapel Com. 3,4. X^E. 



A 




Edward Everett Adams 
Armand Albert Annunziata 
Ann Afton Argyle 
Margaret Dexter Armstrong 
Alice Lucy Ashley 
Marion Jeannette Atkins 
Niel Patterson Atkins 
Shirley Ayres 
Will Johnston Bangs 
Morton Maurice Bass 
Barbara Janet Bates 
John Henry Bauermeister 
Beverly Grace Beach 
Kenneth Richard Beckwith 
Mary English Bloomsburgh 
Marion Florence Bodine 
George Harold Booth 
Lois Ethel Brigham 
James Bell Brucks 
Kathleen Kavanaugh Brittain 


Ruth Ann Britton 
June Evelyn Brookman 
Marilyn Ruth Bruhn 
Joanne Eleanor Buckcridge 
Eric Otto Bunzel 
Phyllis Marie Burke 
Jane Loveridge Burrows 
Henry Lord Cady 
Mary Catherine Cameron 
Elinor Sue Carr 
Prescott Rhodes Carr 
Ellen Chalmers 
Willard Winter Chase 
Helen Tiffany Clark 
Raymond Shelton Clark 
Milon Hilton Clutf 
Daniel Monroe Colyer 
Carl Elbert Congdon, Jr. 
Edward Francis Cooke 
Edith Cookish 


Mary Corcoran 
Thomas Francis Cruess 
Jeannette Edith Cunningham 
Donna Louise Curtis 
Charlotte Ann Davis 
Jean Davis 

Joanne Chapman Davis 
John Chase Dawson 
Dorothy Anne deCanizares 
Hugh John Delaiti 
Alice Irene DeLorenzo 
William Schauftler Dodd 
Dorothy Anne Domina 
Betsy Sargent Drake 
Marion Flloise Durkee 
Emilio Philip Ferrari 
Nancy Jane Finley 
Nancy Fitz 

Edward Michael Flaherty 
Elizabeth Elliot Flandreau 



M 


Bu eke ridge 

Mortar Board President 




Edward Dennis Flemming 
James Raymond Fluckiger 
Rodman Avery Frank 
Robert Freeman Fulton 
Richard Harry Fulton 
Elizabeth Galloway 
Suzanne Adelaide Gard 
Evelyn Louise Gardner 
Alice Elaine Gavagan 
Nancy Gerard 
Donald Young Gilmore 
Lawrence Alton Glazier 
Eunice Anne Goodfellow 
Arthur Lincoln Goodrich 
Frederick Richard Goodridgc 
Edith Marion Gordon 
John Edson Gordon 
George Harrison Grant 
Kathryn May Gray 
Mary Adeline Gray 


Jean Gunther 
Edwin Donald Gustafson 
Francis George Guth 
Phyllis Marion Hacklev 
James Walton Ham 
Mary Elizabeth Hamilton 
Mortimer Franklin Harman, Jr. 
George Westebbe Hartung 
George Edwin Hartz, Jr. 

Martha Wright Harvey 
Jean Serge Hebert 
Phyllis Crowell Hewson 
John Alfred Heywood 
Everett Kelsey Hicks 
Virginia Mary Hodder 
Richard Estes Holbrook 
William Clarence Holland, Jr. 
Elizabeth Ann Holmgren 
Laura-Lee Hopkins 
Elizabeth Tucker Hornaday 


Cranston Horr Howe 
Phyllis Elizabeth Howland 
Eugene Plinius Hubbard 
Ruth Marilyn Hulett 
Rose Frances Hull 
John Kenneth Jackson 
Peter Saxe Jennison 
Audrey Jewell 
Emerson Grey Johnstone 
Allan Herbert Kelley 
Arthur Joseph Kelley 
Burton King 
Floralie Jane King 
Roy Henry Kinsey 
Charles Hopkins Kitchell 
Inger Marie Kolle 
Annaliese Margarete Koster 
Janet Kraft 
Alice Marilyn Leach 
Carolyn Worden Leach 






Dorothy Ann Lindemann 
Betty-Jean Long 
Robert James Lusena 
Margaret MacCormick 
Sarah McCullough 
John Joseph McGarry 
Peter Quackenbush McKee 
Richard Duncan McKenzie 
Jean Hooker Mace 
Elizabeth Fay MacGill 
Muriel Ellen Mack 
Anne Lewis Macomber 
Joseph Henry Mann, Jr. 
Anna Delphine Marden 
Hugh Hammond Mathews 
Gordon Edwin Mathews 
Herbert Paul Mayer 
Charles Truman Meilleur 
Edward Lewis Menut 
Evan Mills Miller 


George Lucien Montagno 
Robert Pierce Mooney 
John Arvid Moriarity 
Bonny Jean Morse 
William David Neale 
Alice Hopeful Neef 
Marjory Ann Nelson 
Lulubcl Treat Newton 
William Rudy Niederhauer, Jr. 
Adrienne Charlotte Northam 
James Bartley Nourse 
Jacqueline Helen Ord 
Barbara Jean Parker 
Charles Jennison Parker 
Harold Plummer Parker 
Henry Owen Parry 
Sidney Arthur Patchett 
Arthur Dennis Pepin 
Daniel Joseph Petrizzi 
Betty Webber Pickles 


Grace Evelyn Pierce 
Carroll Milton Pike, Jr. 

Mary McKee Pitz 
Harman Hastings Plumb 
Catherine MacDonald Pomeroy 
Albert Barclay Pryibil 
Alvin Acklin Rathbun 
Nancy Ann Rathgeb 
Doris Virginia Reynolds 
Rosemary Trasa Roddy 
Janet Elizabeth Rogers 
Walter Cummings Rogers 
Ernestine Louise Rolls 
Alfred James Rulfo 
Ray Sacher 

Bernard Henry Sagman 
Richard Jessup Salisbury 
Robert Joseph Sambone 
Jacob Anthony Samenfink 
Henry Charles Schneiker 



Pepin 

Football Captain 


Rogers 

Players President 


Sacher 

Mountain Club President 


ft 




Charles Andrews Scott 
David Calvin Seeley 
Joan Carol Seidenman 
Laurence Mather Selleck 
Seabury Tuttle Short, Jr. 
Mary Jacqueline Simon 
Natalie Jeanne Simpson 
Comstock Small 
Albert Charles Smith, Jr. 
Alexander Jessup Smith, Jr. 
Doris Mary Smith 
Joan Clare Smith 
Lois Elizabeth Southgate 
Emily Cushing Standish 
Suzanne Powe Staub 
Barbara Jane Stearns 
David Thayer Stebbins 
Cecil Herbert Steen 
Mary Ann Stevens 
Fred Benson Storfer 


Virginia Leslie Stowell 
Anita Helen Strassel 
Jane Hedden Strayer 
George Hay Stuart, Jr. 

Nancy Carroll Surtees 
Frances Elizabeth Swain 
Helen Isabel Swan 
Jean Kathryn Taggart 
Dorothy Clark Tarr 
Herbert Wilks Taylor 
Alice Satterthwaite Thorn 
Philip Douglas Towsley 
Thomas Harold Turner 
Earl Hastings Upharn 
Jane Ruth Valentine 
Mary Catherine Van Aken 
Frederic Franklyn Van de Water 
Doris Elizabeth Vaughn 
Barbara Verdicchio 
Betty Ruth Virtue 


Helen Barton Wachs 
Robert Louis Walker 
Esther Louise Walsh 
Joyce Carol Walsh 
Wilbur Francis Weeks 
Edward Carver Welles 
Charlotte Nims Whitney 
Druzilla Bradford Williams 
Frederick DcForrest Williams 
Marjorie Jane Williams 
Valerie Constance Williams 
Robin Dana Willits 
William Lyon Wilson 
Martin Seymour Wittlin 
Alan Wolfley 
Leah Gertrude Young 
Mildred Elizabeth Young 
Howard Van Name Young, Jr. 
Robert Warren Zaumscil 




Chief Justice ( 1945-46 ) 
Thorn 


Williams 

Men’s Undergraduate Speaker 


Wolfley 

,f Cam pus” Sports Editor 















Homecoming Day had a dual significance 
for Middlebury College this year, for it 
marked not only the welcoming of alumni, 
but also the opening of the Memorial Fund 
Drive to raise $700,000 for the erection of 
a fieldhouse to commemorate the fifty- 
seven Middlebury men who lost their lives 
in World War II. Designed by specialists 
in college architecture to complement the 
buildings already on campus, the fieldhouse 
will be located between Sigma Phi Epsilon 
and Porter Field. Part of the money col- 
lected will be set aside as a maintenance en- 
dowment for the building. 

As the campaign began, a new addition 
was made to the familiar sights on the Mid- 
dlebury campus. It was a towering replica 
of Gamaliel Painter’s cane, its purpose being 
to serve as a barometer of the progress 
toward the $700,000 goal. We watched 
with interest the blue of the cane become 


gradually obscured by the white mercury, 
an indicator which evidenced the support 
the drive was receiving from Middlebury 
students and graduates. 

The drive, spearheaded by Campaign Di- 
rector Edgar J. Wiley T3, was so carefully 
planned and executed that every Middlebury 
student and graduate was individually can- 
vassed. State and area chairmen were in 
charge of volunteer workers who visited 
alumni and potential donors. A committee 
of twenty-five students under the direction 
of Frederick D. Williams ’47, Sidney A. 
Patchett ’47, and Nancy Fitz ’47, co- 
chairmen, led the drive on campus. 

Thanks to the untiring efforts of the fac- 
ulty, alumni, and student Memorial Fund 
Drive committee members, Middlebury will 
soon boast a fieldhouse which will provide 
improved athletic facilities for future Mid- 
dlebury students. 


ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 



MEN’S ASSEMBLY 


w 


Men’s Assembly, the core of the Men’s 
Undergraduate Association, plays a very 
active part in the life of the college. Its 
purpose as the central body of the Associa- 
tion is to preserve and regulate the tradi- 
tions of Middlebury; to encourage and 
stimulate participation in student activities; 
to provide a suitable medium for the ex- 
pression of student opinion; and to make sure 
that all organizations on the men’s campus 
will be under the direct control of the 
undergraduate men, subject to the provi- 
sions of the constitution and the regulation 
of the college. 

The Men’s Assembly affords an important 
part of the training in citizenship provided 
by student self-government. It handles 
all college matters which are not under the 
administration’s jurisdiction and acts as a 
liaison between the administration and the 
members of the undergraduate body. 

This year the Men’s Assembly has agreed 
to meet at least twice a semester with the 
Women’s Assembly to discuss affairs per- 
taining to both colleges, thus insuring 
closer co-operation between the two or- 
ganizations. 



D. Thompson, R. Kinsey, F. Williams , R. Watson 





O N E HUNDRED T W E N T V 


WOMEN’S ASSEMBLY 




Second row — S. Carr , S. Cooke, G. Greettley 
front row — P. H odder, A. Neef 


Women’s Assembly, composed of one- 
tenth of the Women’s College, is the gov- 
erning body of Student Union. Representa- 
tives are apportioned by dormitories accord- 
ing to the number of women from each 
class living in each house. Meetings are held 
once a month, and house presidents report 
the results of discussions at house meetings. 
Thus the governing body and the students 
are drawn closer together. 

Among the amendments added to the 
constitution this year was the lengthening 
of the term for house president from one 
term to two. Alice Ashley represented the 
Women’s Assembly at the first convention 
of the National Student Organization in 
Chicago. The purpose of this organization 
is to unite student opinion on student prob- 
lems. Women’s Assembly was host this 
spring to the annual Regional Convention 
of Women’s Student Governments, an or- 
ganization which promotes understanding 
between the colleges and aids in solving 
various problems. 

The officers for 1946-47 were Virginia 
Hodder, president; Sue Cooke, vice-presi- 
dent; Alice Neef, chief justice; Gloria 
Grecnley, secretary; and Sue Carr, treasurer. 


ONE HUNDRED TWENTY- ONE 


STUDENT LIFE 



S. Cooke, Dean Lee, P. Hodder, R. Kinsey, Dean Woodward , F. Williams 
Missing — President Stratton 


The extra-curricular activities which 
are so much a part of the life of every 
Middlebury student owe much of their 
existence to Student Life, a group composed 
of representatives from both the adminis- 
tration and the student body which co- 
ordinates and regulates the activities of stu- 
dent organizations. The Committee has 
created a Calendar Committee, consisting 
of the social directors of the two colleges, 
with the heads of the student bodies as 
members ex-officio, which takes care of and 
correlates the social events for the year. 

The members include the President of 
the College, the Dean of Women, the Dean 
of Men, the Social Directors of the Men’s 
and Women’s Colleges, the President of 
Men’s Undergraduate Association, the 
Speaker of Men’s Assembly, the President of 
Student Union, and a representative from 
Student Union. 

The Committee exercises its prime re- 
sponsibility by approving, at informal meet- 


ings, submitted charters and constitutions 
of new organizations and plans for pending 
social functions. This year, however, the 
group was relieved of its duty of approving 
the applications of special social events after 
the social calendar has been accepted for the 
year; these applications now go directly 
to the deans. Acting also in an advisory 
capacity, Student Life alters any conflicts 
that may arise in the social calendar, dis- 
cusses various problems pertaining to the 
Men’s and Women’s Colleges, and considers 
suggestions and criticisms from the stu- 
dent body. In addition, Student Life is try- 
ing to space and distribute social functions 
as well as to organize the social calendar in 
order to provide something for everyone to 
do on Saturday nights. 

This year the Men’s and Women’s As- 
semblies, acting under the suggestion of 
the Student Life Committee, have reviewed 
the constitutions of all organizations and 
placed them in the office of the Dean of 
Men. 


ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 


Skyline, the legislative body of the 
Mountain Club, consists of twelve members 
of each of the upper three classes. Each 
fall freshmen and transfers may try out 
for Skyline membership. The tryout period 
lasts until spring when a written examina- 
tion is given. Examination material is given 
in a series of lectures covering the funda- 
mentals of First Aid, hiking, club organiza- 
tion, and the terrain of local mountains to 
which the club sponsors hikes. All of the 
tryouts work on the trails, and the women 
tryouts make sandwiches for the Sunday 
hikes. After the test, twenty tryouts are 
chosen to be members of Temporary Skyline 
for the next year on the basis of the test 
results and the performance of their duties. 
The following winter twelve of these mem- 
bers are elected to Permanent Skyline, again 
on the basis of their interest and work. From 
this body are chosen each year the Carnival 
Co-chairmen and the Governing Board 
which directs the Mountain Club policies. 
The president for 1946-1947 was Ray 
Sacher. 


SKYLINE 




Third rou' — Thorny Keefei Butts, Mason, Reed, Kruger, DeSalvo, Williams, Hackley 
Second row — Johnston, /. Smith, Syrett, B. Drake , Salmon, Blanc , Corcoran, Bates, Lester, M erriman, 

Lindemann 

Front row • — Carr, Kinsey, Standish, Cameron, Sacher, llodder, M. Drake, VEpiscopo, Short 


ONE HUNDRED T W E N T Y - T H R E E 


ATHLETIC COUNCIL 


The Athletic Council is the organization 
which determines the general athletic policy 
of the Men’s College. It is composed of the 
Director of Athletics, five faculty members, 
varsity sport captains, the President of the 
Undergraduate Association, and one mem- 
ber of the alumni. Managers of the various 
sports may attend the monthly meetings of 
the Council, but have no vote. Professor 
Reginald L. Cook has been president of the 
Council for the past year, and the position 
of director of athletics has been filled, ably 
as usual, by Professor Arthur M. Brown. 


The Council has jurisdiction over all in- 
tercollegiate, intramural, and interclass 
sports, and its primary objective is the pro- 
motion, as well as the regulation, of all these 
competitive athletic activities. 

The Athletic Council pursues its objec- 
tives by the exercise of certain functions 
and duties which include, among other 
powers, the approval of the election of the 
captains and managers of college sports, 
the formulation of rules governing intra- 
mural activities, and the awarding of in- 
signia to eligible students for participation 
in college sports. 



ONE HUNDRED TWENTY- FOUR 


W. A. A 


COUNCIL 






Second row — M. Mack, J. Gunther 
front row — L. Hopkins, Mm Rose tear, P. Salmon 
Missing — P. Perkins 



The W.A.A. Council is the governing 
board for the Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion. At its meetings, which are held on 
an average of three times a month, the 
members formulate plans and policies for 
W.A.A.; they elect managers of sports and 
arrange for special activities such as dances, 
bridge parties and the Playdays with U.V.M. 

From the two hundred or more members 
of W.A.A. the Council is chosen each 
spring. The officers of the organization 
automatically become members of the Coun- 
cil. This year Laura-Lee Hopkins was 
elected president and, as such, called and 
presided over the meetings. Patricia Sal- 
mon, as vice-president, was in charge of the 
point system and with the treasurer, Muriel 
Mack, sponsored the membership drive. 
Patricia Perkins was elected secretary, and 
Jean Gunther was chosen head of the 
W.A.A. Cabin. Miss Rosevear again acted 
as advisor to the Council. 

Among the projects for the 1947 season 
was a posture contest to be held in the 
spring. A square dance was also planned 
for the spring season. 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY- FIVE 


INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Second rote — D. Petrizzi, E. Lawson, F. Van de Water, T. Johnson , E. Littlefield, J. Fuchs 
Front row — W. Weeks, A. Pepin, K. Moore, K. Kinsey , E. Adams, H. Parker, P. McKee 



K. Moore, secretary; R. Kinsey, president; 
E. Adams, treasurer 


The Inter-Fraternity Council, which 
serves to correlate and insure maximum co- 
operation among the fraternities, has devoted 
most of its activities in the past year to the 
problems of rushing and co-operative food 
buying. 

This year the Council developed a new 
plan of rushing which will be continued 
next year. The plan, an "open” policy 
eliminating the formality and restrictions of 
a silence period, was designed to encourage 
and stimulate the freshman-fraternity ac- 
quaintances. 

Last spring the Council recommended 
and organized a co-operative buying system 
which has since been turned over to the 
fraternity managers’ control. This will aid 
those fraternities whose buying power alone 
could not achieve the necessary level to 
insure adequate supply. 

This year’s Council has expressed its de- 
sire for strong co-operation which may be 
evidenced by its action in several indi- 
vidual cases where Council rules were 
amended or disregarded to provide certain 
fraternities with the rights necessary to 
build all the houses on campus up to an 
average and further promote membership. 


ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 



PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 


Pan-Hellenic Council, composed of a 
junior and a senior representative from each 
sorority, is the governing board for all 
sororities represented on the campus. It 
attempts to advance intersorority relations, 
to coordinate their activities, and to discuss 
and solve the various problems of sorority 
government. 

Annually the Council gives a Pan-Hellen- 
ic tea, at which a survey of sorority life 
is presented to all freshmen and transfers. 
Rushees meet the members of each sorority 
at open houses and parties held in the so- 
rority rooms. At the close of a previously 
designated period, each candidate lists her 
preferences and new members are chosen 
from the lists. 

Each year the Council confers a scholar- 
ship on a sophomore woman selected as the 
most generally outstanding member of her 
class in regard to scholarship, leadership, 
and character. It also promotes scholastic 
achievement by awarding a scholastic cup 
to the sorority with the highest average. 

Pan-Hellenic’s projects for this year were 
a revision of rushing rules and the intro- 
duction of intersorority athletic competi- 
tions. 



M. Hamilton, president; N . Surtees, secretary 



Second row — Little, Buzby, Winans, St urges, Anderson 
Front row — Nelson, Surtees, Hamilton, deCanizares, Gordon 
Missing — Davis, Allin, Gund acker 


ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN 




KALEIDOSCOPE 


The day before classes began in September 
the staff of the 1948 Kaleidoscope had its 
first fall meeting. At that time the plans 
which had been made the preceeding spring 
for the annual Junior Class publication 
began to go into effect. 

Shirley Syrett, as Editor-in-Chief, was 
in complete charge of the book, and all 
members of the staff were accountable to 
her. The Associate Editor, Correne Wes- 
cott, was responsible for all pictures. She 
worked with the photographers, arranging 
schedules and carrying them out. Glenna 
Seely, the Assistant Editor, was responsible 
for both the written material in the book 
and the training of the editorial tryouts. 
The Managing Editor, Sue Cooke, worked 
with the whole staff, acting as a sort of 
liaison. Elaine Phillippi, as Business Man- 
ager, planned the whole budget so that the 
Kaleidoscope would pay for itself, and 
trained the business tryouts who secured 
contracts for advertising. 

The tryouts for the editorial staff deserve 
the credit for most of the written material 
in the book. Besides preparing this in- 
formation, a written test and the prepara- 
tion of a yearbook dummy were required 
of them as part of their training. 

Due to the increased enrollment in the 
college this year, a change was made in the 
junior and senior sections of the book. To 
avoid as much confusion as possible next 
year, men and women in term four when 
the college year began were included in the 
junior section since they would be juniors 
when the book came out. The persons in 
this term who were not pictured were given 
space for personal writeups because they 
will not be included in next year’s book. 
Instead of individual writeups for the en- 
tire senior class, the staff has included pic- 
tures and writeups of those persons in terms 
six, seven and eight who, due to the war, 
have never appeared in the yearbook. Term 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTY 



f \i 



jjf* -1 

1 i i 

I vJU 

'f; ' 93 * 

■ 

HU 7 1 


Second row — S. Cooke , E. Pbillipfti 
Front row — G. Seely , S. Syrett , C. Wescott 


numbers listed are those listed with the 
deans at the beginning of the year. 

The staff thanks all those who, after 
having expressed a desire to work on the 
book, were of so much assistance to them 
in their work. 







CAMPUS 



The M iddlebury Campus, has been edited 
by a student-trained and operated staff as 
a weekly publication of the college since 
1913. Previous to that year the paper was 
circulated under the title of rhe Under- 
graduate, which was initiated in 1830. 

During the past few years, the staff of 
the Campus has been necessarily limited be- 
cause of wartime irregularities, but this 
year more students than ever are taking an 
active interest in the workings of the paper. 
Because of increased enthusiasm shown by 
the large numbers of editorial and business 
staff tryouts, it has been necessary to ini- 
tiate some new posts on the staff. The 
latest additions to Campus positions include 
those of co-editors, associate business man- 
agers, and sports editor. 

The aims of the Campus staff are pointed 
toward accurate coverage of college news, 
efficient business handling and impartial 
presentation of student opinion, especially 
through the new "Free Speech” column. A 
new addition to the weekly columns is 
"Moo” Mack’s "Belleboard,” a take-off on 
Alan Wolfley’s "Billboard.” The Campus 
has lately increased in both size and circula- 


tion, and each issue contains a full page of ^ 

Midd’s sports news. j 

Members of the Campus progress an- X 

nually up the executive ladder via lectures, j] 

exams and elections. Staff writers learn the | 

tricks of fact and feature writing as well 

as the responsibilities of editing the paper. I 

Freshman editorial tryouts learn about heads, j| 

proofs and journalistic style; junior assist- ? 

ant editors write major stories, and, by a 1 

system of rotation, take charge of layouts 1 

and supervise the printing at Burlington. I 

Business staff activity includes mailing, de- I 

livering, collecting and laying out ads. I 

Senior Board’s six salaried positions for | 

1945-1946 were: Editor-in-Chief, Janet | 

Kraft; Business Manager, Delphinc Marden; 

Managing Editor, Nancy Surtees; Associate 3 

Editor, Joanne Buckeridge; Advertising 
Manager, Evelyn Gardner; and Circulation 

Manager, Doris Vaughn. Elections were g 

held in December of 1946 to determine the ^ 

new Senior Board. The retiring members £ 

were replaced by Muriel Mack and Mar- 

garet Matulis, Co-Editors; Edith Titus, 2 

Business Manager; Anne Saurman, Manag- ? 

ing Editor; Annaliese Koster, Advertising £ 

Manager; and John Rumbold, Sports Editor. J 


A. Saurman , M. Matulis, M. Mark, E. Titus 
Missing — L. A. Koster, J. Rumbold 





ONE HUNDRED THIRTY - ONE 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE PLAYERS 



/. Nierhaus, J. Webster, j. Rogers, president, K. Rupp 
Missing — S. Greenley , E. Flaherty 


” The Cherry Orchard ” 


The Middlebury College Players, under 
the direction of Mr. Volkert, for years have 
succeeded in maintaining the reputation 
which they have established as one of the 
outstanding organizations on campus. 

To become a member of the Players a 
student must accumulate one hundred and 
fifty points which are earned through work 
at the Playhouse. Points must be accumu- 
lated in two or more types of work, so that 
the prospective Player will have a wider 
range of experience. 

This year, in particular, the Players have 
produced a number of excellent dramas, all 
of which have been "sellouts.” In the 
spring of 1946, Chekhov’s "The Cherry 
Orchard” was presented as the commence- 
ment drama, and no sooner had college 
opened in the fall than work was begun 
on one of the largest and most difficult pro- 
ductions ever presented at Middlebury, "I 
Remember Mama,” which involved, among 
other things, two revolving stages, now 
permanent fixtures at the Playhouse. Car- 
nival time found the Players ready with 




another hit, the Kaufman and Hart comedy, 
"George Washington Slept Here." It played 
to a capacity audience which enjoyed the 
performance thoroughly and which agreed 
that it was among the highlights of Carni- 
val week-end. 

In addition to the larger productions, of 
which there are usually two or three a year, 
the Players present several one-act plays 
which are produced and directed entirely by 
the students, either as part of their work 
in Mr. Volkert’s class in acting and direct- 
ing, or simply as Playhouse productions. 

The Players have endorsed a plan whereby 
the college works with the high school in 
the dramatic field. Each year at least three 
one-act plays are presented at the high 
school. These plays are directed, produced 
and managed completely by the Players. 
The plays are cast from the high school stu- 
dents who try out for parts in the produc- 
tions. One of these plays is chosen to be 
presented again at a regional contest. In 
February of this year the three plays pro- 
duced were "The Leap Year Bride," 
"Brothers in Arms," and "Jade." 

The Players have always composed one 
of the most popular campus organizations 
and have provided boundless opportunities 



M. V. adds a Word 



"l Remember Mama” 


for all who wish to do theatrical work of 
any sort, regardless of talent. The great 
variety of plays produced each year, trage- 
dies and comedies, modern and period 
dramas, offers many types of roles from 
which students may choose, hor those who 
do not care to tread the boards, however, 
but are more interested in the technical end 
of play production, the only requisites are 
a willingness to work and the desire to have 
a good time. A would-be stagehand has 
only to present himself at the Playhouse 
and he will find a variety of interesting 
work from which to choose, such as light- 
ing, make-up, costumes, properties, set con- 
struction, or publicity. From usher to stage 
manager, everyone has a share in a produc- 
tion, and few fail to feel a thrill of pride 
when they see the results on "opening 
night." Students who wish to continue 
theatrical work after college find Playhouse 
experience invaluable. 


ONE HUNDRED THIRTY - THREE 



w 


WOMEN’S FORUM 



Any Clothes for Thrift Shop? 


Social welfare work is an important ac- 
tivity anywhere, and on the Middlebury 
campus it centers around the Women’s 
Forum. This organization, guided by its 
president, Edith Gordon, has continued this 
year to offer its services to the community 
and the college in numerous ways. 

One of the largest groups on the Women’s 
campus, it is called upon to sponsor the im- 
portant national welfare drives of the Red 
Cross and Community Fund on behalf of 
the student body. A new activity this 
year, replacing previous support to the 
United Nations Relief and Rebalilitation 
Association, has been co-operation with the 
American Friends’ Service Committee. 
Through this agency one of the Forum 
committees, headed by Mary Gray, has sent 
monthly boxes overseas to the people of 
Holland and Finland. The boxes contain 
food and other articles scarce in these 
countries. 

More extensive social work is carried out 
closer to home through the management of 



Second row — }. Webster , B. Morss, /. Carrington , D. Vaughn , /. Winans , E. Pbillippi, J. Scroggie , M. Bodine 
Front rou — /. Valentine , A. Northani, M. Gray, V. Duffy , N. Kernickcr, B. Col l ad ay 


ONE HUNDRED THIRTY - FOUR 



Spring Story Hour 


Second row — /. Epp, B. Horn ad ay 
Front row — E. Gordon , president, E. Phil lip pi 
Missing — D. Vaughn, D. Neal 


the Middlebury Community House and the 
Thrift Shop, and also in the nearby town of 
Ripton. The Community House, always 
open to the townspeople, is directed by Mrs. 
Wiley who is taking Miss Dean’s place dur- 
ing her leave of absence. Forum members 
assist Mrs. Wiley in hostess work and en- 
tertainment for the children in the form of 
stories, games, dancing instruction, and mu- 
sic lessons. The Thursday afternoon Story 
Ffour is a pleasant diversion to both the col- 
lege girls and the Middlebury children. 

Doris Vaughn holds the important job 
of directing Thrift Shop activities. Clothes 
are collected in the college dormitories and 
are sold very inexpensively in the shop down- 
town, after being mended and cleaned. The 
proceeds from this financial and social en- 
terprise help to augment the club’s ability 
to offer assistance to the needy townspeople 
in providing them with clothing, food, 
medicine, and other requirements. 

A portion of the treasury is used to help 
support the Town Recreation Fund and to 
maintain a small boy in the Kurn Hattin 


Home of New England. Forum members 
help out at Porter Hospital in assisting and 
relieving nurses, and manage Girl Scout and 
Brownie groups. Elizabeth Hornaday, the 
Social Service chairman, has the job of co- 
ordinating and directing this local welfare 
work. 

The children up at Ripton are provided 
with instruction, after school hours, in arts 
and crafts. Work is done in the school- 
house there. Again this year Christmas 
brought them a large Forum party in the 
Ripton Town Flail, where a group of girls 
entertained with songs and a colorful 
pageant of the Christmas story. The spirit 
of the holiday was supplied by a decorated 
tree, gifts for each child, and Mr. French 
dressed up as Santa Claus. 

The Women’s Forum is also the sponsor 
of some exclusive college drives. Calendars 
and town-maps are sold annually, and this 
year, under the chairmanship of Jeannette 
Winans, the club has managed the sale of a 
college album of records done by the Mid- 
dlebury Choir. 


ONE HUNDRED THIRTY- FIVE 


r 


S. A. A. 



Kerensky at MiJJlebury 


The Student Action Assembly, founded 
a few years ago by a group of Middlebury 
students interested in political affairs, has 
proved successful in stimulating student 
thought and action. Among its activities is 
the publication of the "Agenda,” which ex- 
presses student and faculty opinion on im- 
portant issues. This year it is produced in 
conjunction with the University of Ver- 
mont and Bennington College. Panel dis- 
cussions are held with student, faculty and 
outside speakers on current subjects. Radio 
programs are presented over a Burlington 
station. This year, in co-operation with the 
International Relations Club, S.A.A. spon- 
sored the well-known speaker, Alexander 
Kerensky. An International Relief Com- 
mittee raised funds for the World Student 
Service Fund. The Anti-discrimination 
Committee conducted programs on the Fair 
Employment Practices Commission. 

S.A.A. is a local chapter of the United 
States Student Assembly and has partici- 
pated in projects and programs undertaken 
by the national organization. The Middle- 
bury group was represented at the spring 
convention. 



/. Hutchinson, D. Gilmore, /. Biggs 


ONE HUNDRED T H I R T Y - S I X 


DEBATE 







Under the direction of Professor Perkins 
and the management of Margaret Arm- 
strong, the enlarged Middlebury Debate 
Team meets annually with several of the 
eastern colleges. Because of separate men’s 
and women’s teams, the schedule, which in- 
cludes the University of Vermont, Dart- 
mouth, and McGill, has been expanded con- 
siderably. 

With the purpose of developing the 
ability to properly evaluate and correlate 
facts, and to present them in cogent and 
logical arguments, the teams have made 
great strides in attaining a knowledge of 
social, political, and economic conditions as 
a part of the preparation for debate. 

Questions of national and international 
importance, the co-existence of communism 
and capitalism in a peaceful world, the ex- 
tension of government controls, and the 
disposal of Atomic Energy patents, are but 
a few of the topics that challenge the 
group. This year, as a new feature, the 
teams gave a series of radio debates, which 
emphasized simplicity and clarification of 
issues of public interest. 



Third row — R. Edwards , C. Parker 
Second row — P. Hull, G. Newcomb 
Front row — M. Armstrong , /. Forst 
Missing — N. Rathgeb, D. Clofine, D. Nye, J. Hale 




ONE HUNDRED THIRTY. SEVEN 


HUMANITIES 



Second rou‘ — M. Van Aken, M. MacCormick, president 
Front rou ' — /. Buckeridge, /. Goeltz 


INTER-FAITH 

By a free exchange of religious ideas and 
beliefs, members of Inter-Faith seek for 
spiritual truth that will enable them to find 
richer meaning for their lives. Topics such 
as "God and Evolution" constitute the basis 
of many thoughtful and helpful discussions. 
Inter-religious understanding is sought 
through factual presentations of the beliefs 
and practices of the world’s organized re- 
ligions. Outside speakers are obtained from 
time to time. 

Inter-Faith’s program of service has in- 
cluded raising funds for the Piney Wood’s 
School, a negro school in Mississippi, the 
establishing and teaching of religious classes 
in Ripton and West Salisbury on weekdays, 
and the presentation of the Christmas story 
in pageant form at the Ripton Christmas 
Party. 

The president for 1946 and 1947 was 
M. Catherine Van Aken. The faculty ad- 
visor is Dr. Stephen A. Freeman. 


Humanities was born out of the general 
enthusiasm that greeted the first Middle- 
bury Culture Conference in 1943. Many 
students felt that more time should be spent 
in profitable discussions of current prob- 
lems. As a result of this widespread opin- 
ion, Humanities was first organized. It is 
not just a college group but is a community 
organization as well. Students, professors, 
and townspeople are all invited to attend 
its informal panels. 

The group is composed of two represen- 
tatives from each organization on campus. 
This year its theme has been "Is Modern 
Man Obsolete?’’ It stressed man’s moral 
backwardness in contrast to his scientific 
advancement. 

Humanities, advised by Professor Claude 
Bourcier, also arranges the schedule for club 
meetings in order to co-ordinate and relate 
the clubs’ programs to each other. The 
president for 1946 and 1947 was Margaret 
MacCormick. 



Second roiv — M. Van Aken, /. N it r bans, K. Rapp 
Front rou * — B. Oetjen, J. Goeltz 


ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 


LITERARY CLUB 



J. Seidenman, L. Gerlitz, J. Tyler 
Missing — L. Robbins 


ALCHEMISTS CLUB 

Under the capable leadership of Ann 
Argyle and Prescott Carr, presidents of 
1946 and 1947 respectively, the Alchemists 
Club has gone far in the promotion of its 
purpose, which is the stimulation of interest 
in the ever-widening fields of chemistry, 
and the improvement of the standards of 
its members as better chemists. 

At various meetings throughout the year 
several outside speakers have been heard dis- 
cussing developments in the chemical field, 
and movies have been shown for the benefit 
of the members and the broadening of 
their knowledge. The annual show, which 
was produced by the club’s faculty mem- 
bers as well as the students, also helped to 
make this one of the club’s most successful 
years. 

The Alchemists Club is pleased to an- 
nounce that it is now in the process of 
becoming a member of the American Chemi- 
cal Society. 


Under the leadership of Joan Tyler as 
president, the Literary Club assembles twice 
a month to listen to guest speakers, to dis- 
cuss literature and the art of writing, and 
to read and criticize poetry and short stories 
submitted by members of the Club. 

The Club is now sponsoring the monthly 
Abernethy Readings held in the Aberncthy 
Wing of the Library. A committee under 
the direction of Louise Gerlitz is responsible 
for selecting the readers and arranging the 
dates. Guests on the program for 1946- 
1947 have included Mr. Volkert, Mr. Cook, 
Dr. Beers and Miss Martin. 

Directions , the bi-annual literary 1 maga- 
zine of the college containing work done 
by undergraduates, is produced by a staff 
composed of members of the faculty of the 
American Literature and English Depart- 
ments and students chosen from the Literary 
Club. 



Fourth rou' — Gordon , Gale, Pope, Storfer, Toi/d, Hall, Robinson 
Third rou- — Theism , Argyle, Ayres , Simon, Van Aken, Rolls , Pitz 
Hackley , Staub 

Second row — Hubbard, Mr. Harris, Mr. Phillips, Strassel, Carr, 
Spaulding, Mr. Voter , Miss Cosby, Mr. H artiest 
Front row — Kohler, Rapp, Grotz, Elliott 


ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE 


w 



MOUNTAIN CLUB 


The Pause That Refreshes 


Where's the T ruck? 


Middlebury’s answer to every outdoor en- 
thusiast lies in the ever popular and ener- 
getic Mountain Club, headed this year by 
Ray Sacher. Founded in 1931 to encourage 
outdoor activities not provided for by the 
Athletic Council, the Mountain Club is one 
of the largest and most popular of the extra- 
curricular organizations at Middlebury and 
has an active and enthusiastic membership 
numbering more than half the student 
body. Much of the social life at Middle- 
bury centers about its hikes and outings. 
The club utilizes much of Middlebury’s 
31,000 acre mountain campus in the East 
Range of the Green Mountains. 

Freshmen are invited to membership by 
literature sent to their homes, and early in- 
troduced in a delightfully informal "get- 
together” known as the Freshman Outing. 
There they participate in games, singing, 
supper, and a scavenger hunt. 

Highlighting autumn were hikes to Si- 
lent Cliff, Mount Pico, and Lake Pleiad. 


Sunday mornings found Mountain Club 
trucks behind Battcll Cottage waiting for 
the hikers to assemble. Once the hikers 
were in the mountains they were led in the 
climbing by the blue-shirted members of 
Skyline. Moving indoors, the club held an 
informal dance this year in the McCullough 
Gymnasium. 

With the first snowfall Mountain Club 
made possible almost daily trips to Bread- 
loaf for the ski enthusiasts. As a result of 
the improved area on this mountain, Middle- 



O N E HUNDRED FORTY 



Sunning at Pleiad 


bury’s skiing facilities were unequaled and 
unsurpassed by any other eastern college. 
The Breadloaf facilities included two new 
tows, novice slopes as well as slopes which 
offered opportunities for more advanced 


skiers. In addition to the daily trips, week- 
end outings were made to surrounding 
mountains. 

The climax of the skiing season was 
Winter Carnival, run and sponsored by the 
Mountain Club. The long weekend from 
Thursday until Sunday was under the co- 
chairmanship of Miriam Wade and Roy 
Kinsey. It included the return of the coro- 
nation as a feature of the ice show, a play, 
Coronation Ball with music by Raymond 
Scott, Klondike Rush, hockey game, three 
days of four event intercollegiate skiing 
and spectacular jumping. Added attrac- 
tions were snow sculptures, ski movies and 
Sunday brunch. 

The tapping of the maple trees, an old 
New England custom, opened the spring 
season for the Mountain Club as well as 
for the Vermont farmers. 

The Middlebury Mountain Club, which 
has always been a member of the Inter- 
Collegiate Outing Club Association, played 
host this spring to the annual IOCA Con- 
ference at which over thirty colleges were 
represented. 



P. Carr , M. Wade, ). Epp, R. Sachet , president, M. Drake, B. Morss, S. Short 


ONE HUNDRED FORTY - ONE 





Third row — Stahl , Remmler , Petrizzi, Wilbur, Cady , Stewart , Chase, Mariner, Littlefield, Gilbert 
Second row — Van Cl eve, Karmazyn, Weale, Chappell, Peck, Winans, Knndscn, Cadmus, Rittenhouse , Curtis Clarke, Grimshaw, 

Huey 

Front rote — Hutchinson, Lee, Teague, Robbins, Goodfellow, Biting, Pankopf, Hubbard, Bredenberg, Rice 


THE CHOIRS 


01 




f 1*1*1 |. * \ 

$ r jl t x * * » i i 



^ ♦ 


Third row — Palmer, Gustafson, Bradley, Short, Dawson, MacMurtry, Pike, Andersen, Sacher, Flam, Hartz, Merritt 
Second row — Robinson, Yeakel , Armstrong, Phillippi, Harvey , Deininger, Fisher, Gordon, Davies, Kroeck 
Front rou — Thorn, Swann, Reynolds, Richardson, Drummond, Constant, Curry, Neal, MacCormtck, Flornaday 


ONE HUNDRED F O R T Y - T W O 




This year the College Choir of ninety 
men and women, selected from the sopho- 
more, junior and senior classes, was the 
largest it has ever been. The choir was 
divided into two groups, each to sing on 
alternate chapel days, but during the second 
semester the choirs combined and appeared 
each Sunday as a single group. 

Under the direction of Mr. Bedford, a 
group from the choir recorded some of the 
favorite college songs; the inspiring "Bene- 
diction” was one of the numbers included. 

In addition to their regular Sunday ap- 
pearances the choir presented the annual 
Christmas and Easter programs, the latter 
two being given with the Freshman Choir. 
In May the presentation of the Bach D Minor 
Mass with four guest soloists won added and 
well -deserved applause. 


Under the able direction of Mr. Bedford, 
a group of mixed voices, the Freshman 
Choir, meets every Friday night to rehearse 
for chapel programs. The group is com- 
posed of all those not in the College Choir 
who are interested in singing. 

Its first appearance was at the annual 
Christmas service in Mead Memorial Chapel. 
At that time the choir’s presentation of 
Christmas music met with such approval 
that they were asked to participate in the 
Easter program. 

The Women’s Chorus, organized in 1919, 
merged with the Men’s Glee Club in 1939 
and from that group the first College Choir 
was selected. Since 1939 the group re- 
maining each year has been known as the 
Freshman Choir; its main purpose is to 
prepare for selection by the College Choir. 


FRESHMAN CHOIR 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY- THREE 



Strutting Their Stuff 

band panthers 


Reorganized this year by manager Rob- 
ert W. Kellogg, the prewar manager, the 
Middlebury band, first organized in 1910, 
was again active on the campus. Although 
small in number, the band, under the capable 
direction and supervision of Mr. Alan Car- 
ter and Mr. George Low, had a most suc- 
cessful year; its popularity was marked by 
its reception at gym rallies and football 
games. 

In dress uniform of cap and cape, the 
new band made its debut during the Alumni 
Homecoming week-end. Philip Hull, the 
drum-major, led the band through its prac- 
tice marches out on the Women’s Athletic 
Field. They practiced in the rainy Ver- 
mont fall, but their reward was the great 
approval with which they were received at 
the University of Vermont-Middlcbury 
game. 


Under the leadership of “Foo” Mathews 
the Black Panthers have been “the talk of 
the town.” Starting in the fall with thir- 
teen pieces, the band was cut down when 
“Nemo” Clark and “Foo” left to study ar- 
rangement. 

“Ceece” Steen and Bob Seixas, business 
managers, boastful of the * Panthers suc- 
cess, proudly point to the new jackets, pub- 
lic address system and bookings. They held 
engagements for the Saturday night gym 
dances, the Dartmouth Green-Key Week- 
end, and a return to Dartmouth for the 
Winter Carnival. 

In part, the success is credited to the 
“five-sax” section. The two tenor and alto 
saxophones have been augmented by a bari- 
tone “sax” for the first time. Also for the 
first time, the Panthers have a male vo- 
calist, baritone Dick Buonerba. 



Middlebury's Own Panthers 








E. Cons /an/, S. Staub, A. Grim show 
Missing — /. Hutchinson 


Tone is an organization which endeavors 
to stimulate an interest and participation in 
music by students. A series of informal 
and enjoyable meetings were planned under 
the guidance of Mr. Alan Carter and pre- 
sided over by Eleuftheria Constant. 

Tone presented programs which included 
all types of music. An all-Gershwin pro- 
gram and a program of modern French mu- 
sic were two of the year’s highlights. Both 
classical and modern music, including jazz, 
were sometimes planned for the same pro- 
gram. Many records were chosen by popu- 
lar request. 

Tone’s special projects included the pres- 
entation of several daily chapel programs 
during the year and the sponsoring of all 
concerts given by the college orchestra. 
Tone also worked in conjunction with Hu- 
manities and aided other clubs with their 
musical performances. 


Under the able direction of its conductor, 
Mr. Alan Carter, the college orchestra, com- 
posed of students who enjoy and have an 
active interest in good music, studies sym- 
phonic works in preparation for programs 
during the year. Among this year’s per- 
formances were an exchange concert with 
Radcliffe College and a program at Middle- 
bury featuring Margaret Armstrong as so- 
loist. 

An addition to this organization is the 
Chamber Music Group. Besides presenting 
programs of chamber music in the Music 
Studio, it furnished the musical setting for 
the Faculty Frolic. 

Closely connected with the Little Sym- 
phony is the Vermont State Symphony Or- 
chestra, which meets regularly for rehearsals 
on Sunday afternoons in the college gym- 
nasium. This year seven Middlcbury stu- 
dents participated in the concerts given 
throughout the state. 

ORCHESTRA 


f 

A Practice Session 


TONE 


ONE HUNDRED FORTY - FIVE 


SPANISH CLUB 



f. Atkins, £. McGill , V. Ciufireda 
Missing — N. Surtees 


FRENCH CLUB 

The French Club was organized to bring 
the flavor of the French language and cul- 
ture to those students interested in France 
and taking advanced French courses. 

Monthly meetings, conducted entirely in 
French, are under the supervision of the 
faculty of the French Department. Nu- 
merous worthwhile programs have been en- 
joyed by its members, among them an " In- 
formation Please,” a French movie, a French 
play, and, as the highlight of the year, the 
French Club Ball, held in the Grand Salon 
of the Chateau. 

The club also sponsored an exhibit of 
famous French paintings of the sixteenth 
through the nineteenth centuries, and con- 
tinued its practice of conducting an annual 
clothing drive to aid the needy people of 
France. 

Mary Stevens was president for the year 
1946-1947; David Rowell, vice-president; 
and Selma Weiss, secretary- treasurer. 


The Spanish Club, open to advanced 
Spanish students, was organized in order to 
promote a better understanding of the 
Spanish speaking nations and thus to pro- 
vide a broader interest in the language. 

Meeting once a month, its programs are 
varied, sometimes arranged and presented 
by the members themselves and other times 
by outside guests who arc invited to par- 
ticipate. This season Dean Woodward gave 
an informal talk on the impressions she 
gathered from a recent trip through the 
Central American countries. Her discus- 
sion proved extremely interesting. 

The group held a Christmas party before 
the holidays and is now planning a Spanish 
Fiesta program to be given sometime in the 
spring. The year’s activities will be cul- 
minated by a picnic at Breadloaf. Miss 
Martin is the club advisor. 



S. Weiss, D. Kouell, M. Stevens 


ONE HUNDRED FORTY - SIX 


GERMAN CLUB 


Since the reorganization of the German 
Club and the formation of a new constitu- 
tion in the spring of 1945, regular meet- 
ings have been held in Forest Rec. All stu- 
dents of German are eligible to join the club 
proper for the beneficial experience it affords 
in comprehension and conversation, whether 
they are beginning or advanced students. 
’’Die Kleine Gruppe” is an organization 
within the club exclusively for those taking 
advanced courses in German. 

Under the direction of Fraulein Wunder- 
lich, the club members have engaged in 
many varied activities. German songs and 
dances have been learned by the club which 
now numbers more than forty members. 
The group has been introduced to German 
folk life and customs through movies and 
discussions. 



A. Grimsbau, M. Stern , G. Keefe, M. Johnston 



C. Leach , M. Kolle, 1. Wallerstein, H. Suann 
Missing — W. Niederauer 


RUSSIAN CLUB 

The Russian Club has grown in member- 
ship almost three-fold since its founding in 
the spring of 194 5, when Student Life ap- 
proved its charter. The activities of the 
club, under the enthusiastic direction of 
Dr. Mischa Fayer of the Russian Depart- 
ment, were planned to acquaint the mem- 
bers with the customs and culture of Rus- 
sian life, and to promote and further 
friendly relations with the U.S.S.R. Mem- 
bership is open to all Russian students, 
whether elementary or advanced. Although 
Russian is not spoken exclusively, enough 
of it is spoken to afford the members worth- 
while practice in conversation. 

The club celebrated the Christmas season 
by singing Christmas carols in Russian and 
conducting a treasure hunt using Russian 
terms. Members of the club also con- 
tributed songs and dances for student enter- 
tainment in the "Faculty Frolic" which was 
held in January. 

ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN 


FLYING CLUB 



D. Hidden, president ; M. M atnlis, secretary-treasurer 


STAR GAZERS 

Star Gazers is one of the newly chartered 
organizations on campus. Students who 
have an interest in the wonders of the sky 
have had an opportunity to share their ap- 
preciation and widen their knowledge at 
the club meetings. Both faculty and stu- 
dents alike have greeted the Star Gazers with 
a great deal of enthusiasm, as the large 
number of club members will testify. 

A newly equipped observatory and a new 
telescope in front of Warner Science Build- 
ing has aided members in fulfilling the pur- 
pose of the club, which is to gain a more 
extensive knowledge of the stars. 

The club has enjoyed various social ac- 
tivities throughout the year and has heard 
several talks by outside speakers as well as 
by Professor Wissler, the faculty advisor. 


The main purpose of the Flying Club has 
been to provide a more inexpensive means 
of flying for students. The organization, 
begun in 1945 by Bob Rowley and Dan 
Hedden, has doubled its membership and 
the number of available airports in the past 
year. Use of the Middlebury airport has 
supplemented that of Rock’s at Bristol. 
Skis were used this winter to enable the 
fliers to spend more time in the air. 

An Intercollegiate Flying Meet was held 
last spring at Northampton, Massachusetts, 
with Smith and several other New England 
colleges. The Flying Club hopes to act as 
host this year to the second postwar meet. 

This year Professor Wissler, the club 
advisor, displayed true interest in the ac- 
tivities of the organization by obtaining his 
flier’s license. 



M. Wade , C. Buzby 


ONE HUNDRED FORTY- EIGHT 


SAILING CLUB 


A suitable place to carry on the activities 
of the very popular Sailing Club was hard 
to find, but through the co-operation of 
Mr. Chase, owner of the ficole Champlain, 
the club was extended the privilege of using 
the camp boats. During the fall and spring 
classes were held in sailing and racing tactics. 

Club activities were many, and the ninety 
members showed much enthusiasm in mak- 
ing the club a success. Selected crews were 
sent to the spring and fall regattas, and a 
formal was held. This year sailing was 
recognized by the Athletic Council as a 
minor sport. 



Second roil' — D. Stagg, R. Mason, president 
Front row — L. Hopkins, E. Standish 


CHEERLEADERS 



Second row — D. W hit tin ghill, C. Wright, M. Pike, C. Lewis, J. Mann 
Front row — L. Hopkins, C. Higley, J. Huey, M. Crawford, K. Sturges , V. Knudsen 


ONE HUNDRED F O R T Y - N I N E 









* 


COACHES 


The staff of coaches in the athletic de- 
partment is headed by Professor Arthur M. 
Brown, who not only is the Director of 
Athletics, but also the coach of the track, 
cross-country and relay teams. In addition 
to these duties he handles the financial mat- 
ters of the department. 

"Duke” Nelson, who returned to Middle- 
bury in May 1946 to become the Assistant 
Director of Athletics, is the coach of the 
varsity football, hockey and golf teams. 
He is aided in football by the assistant coach, 
Richard S. Ciccolella, who also directs the 
varsity basketball and baseball. Professor 
Guarnaccia and Mr. Chalmers directed 
junior varsity football in 1946. 

Mr. John "Red” Kelly, instructor of 
physical education, has charge of intra- 
mural sports. 

Robert "Bobo” Sheehan now coaches the 
ski team with which he once skied. At the 
Snow Bowl on Breadloaf, \Joe” Jones gives 
skiing lessons and coaches the women’s 
team. 




Coaches Ciccolella, Nelson, Broun 


ONE HUNDRED F I F T Y - T W O 



CROSS-COUNTRY 



Middlcbury’s cross-country team, di- 
rected by Coach Brown, had its first meet 
with Amherst, and lost 22-3 5. In the sec- 
ond meet, with Bates, Middlebury had a 
perfect score, capturing the first seven 
places, and followed up this triumph with 
victories over Wesleyan, 31-26; Union, 
29-26; concluding with a 41-18 victory 
over University of Vermont, giving Middle- 
bury the state cross-country crown. 

Outstanding was James Newman who 
finished first in all five meets, and broke the 
Wesleyan and Middlebury course records. 



Hal Conics Through 


* 


FOOTBALL 


Walter "Duke” Nelson, Middlebury 1932, 
came back to his alma mater in 1946 as 
coach of football. From the Men’s College, 
which had a record enrollment of over six 
hundred, he built up a team which, though 
young and inexperienced, ended the season 
as football champions of the state of Ver- 
mont. 

Under Nelson’s tutelage, the team im- 
proved with each succeeding game. The 
season opened against Williams, at Wil- 
liamstown, where the Panthers were de- 
feated 12-6. Following this was the Home- 
coming game, when Trinity defeated Mid- 
dlebury 28-7. Middlebury lost the next 
two games to Wesleyan and St. Lawrence 
by scores of 26-0 and 20-13 respectively. 

The Panthers, captained by Arthur Pepin, 
at last began to "click.” Norwich was the 
first opponent to go down in defeat. The 
score was 12-0. The next week Union was 
defeated by the Middlebury team by a score 
of 18-13. The climax of the season came 
with the thrilling game against Middle- 
bury’s traditional rival, the University of 
Vermont, which ended in a 12-12 tie. 



Holding the Catamounts 



■ 





JV FOOTBALL 



Over forty candidates, some with pre- 
vious prep or high school experience, but 
most of them green and untested, reported 
to Coaches Sam Guarnaccia and John 
Chalmers for junior varsity football prac- 
tice. This squad was faced with a five- 
game schedule, and after losing its first 
three games, it came through with the 
Vermont JV Football Championship. 

The season opened against the Williams 
College Freshmen, at Williamstown, where 
Middlebury lost 19-0. In the second game 
at St. Michael’s, the Junior Panthers faced 
a varsity team and held them to a 0-0 tie. 
A bigger and heavier Kimball Union Acad- 
emy team gave Middlebury its third defeat, 
by a score of 32-6. 

The last two games were victories for 
the JV team. The Norwich JV’s were de- 
feated 13-0, and the season ended with a 
decisive 19-0 victory over the University 
of Vermont JV’s. 


U. V. M. Turns the End 





HOCKEY 

The Middlebury hockey team, coached 
by "Duke” Nelson and captained by Kyle 
Prescott, had a very successful season, hav- 
ing won seven, tied one, and lost only two 
games. Of these two losses, one was to a 
more practiced team, Hamilton, by the 
score of 2-8. The other loss was to Nor- 
wich, 4-5, and was vindicated later the 
same week when Norwich went down in an 
easy 9-5 defeat. St. Michael’s and Cham- 
plain were each defeated twice by the 
Panthers; St. Mike’s by 5-2 and 8-2, and 
Champlain 9-2 and 7-1. Williams lost a 
close game, 4-3, and U.V.M. tied one at 
3-3, and lost one 10-1. 



Nice Stii e 



BASKETBALL 



Under the Basket 


The 1947 basketball team profited, as did 
other athletic teams of Middlebury Col- 
lege, by the return of the veterans to the 
campus. From over sixty tryouts at the 
beginning of the season, Coach Ciccolclla 
was able to organize a first-rate varsity 
squad. The team encountered stiff opposi- 
tion on the court, playing a schedule against 
teams rumored to be very fast. However, 
the boys played good basketball, and at the 
halfway mark in the season, had won two 
games, beating McGill and St. Michael’s, 
and lost four, to R.P.I., Williams, Clarkson, 
and St. Lawrence. Herb Broner and Dick 
Blue were chosen as co-assistant managers 
of the Midd team. 

An active JV team was organized, 
showing great promise, though they had 
only played three games when the Kalei- 
doscope went to press. 

An energetic intramural basketball round 
robin was under way with the traditional 
competition between the fraternities making 
these games some of the most exciting at 
Middlebury. The tall Chi Psi team had an 
edge over the others in the first game, but the 
outcome of a league of this sort is never sure 
until the end. 



The Williams Game 


Whalen Off the Floor 


ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT 




In or out ? 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY- NINE 








SKIING 


The Upward Trudge 


The men’s ski team has represented Mid- 
dlebury well in the eastern ski meets this 
year. The team, strengthened by the return 
of many veteran skiers, has shown promise 


The Slalom Behind Him 



leky in Action 


ONE HUNDRED SIXTY 






of being one of the most powerful squads 
in the East. In their first meet, the Sno- 
Bird meet at Lake Placid, the Middmen had 
everything but the luck necessary to come 
out on top, losing to St. Lawrence by only 
six-tenths of a point. At our own Carni- 
val, the skiers again were hampered by bad 
luck. Lack of co-operation from the 
weatherman made skiing conditions hazard- 
ous, and because of this, the performances 
of the skiers were unpredictable. Middle- 
bury placed third behind New Hampshire 
and Dartmouth in spite of a number of 
mishaps suffered by team members, includ- 
ing the pre-Carnival injury of Captain 
Harry Fife. However, in spite of these set- 
backs, this experienced team, well-coached 
by "Bobo” Sheehan, is determined to show 
its four-event strength by placing well up 
in the remaining meets of the season. 



O N E HUNDRED S I X T Y - O N E 





SKI PATROL 


A new addition this year to the many 
organizations on the Midd campus was the 
Ski Patrol, which proved highly successful 
during the winter months. With the pre- 
vention of accidents as its prime objective, 
the Ski Patrol urges ski courtesy and helps 
insure safety by zoning and marking the 
dangerous areas of the slope, filling in sitz 
marks, and generally supervising the ski 
areas. The care and evacuation of ski 
casualties is the second way in which the 
Patrol serves. 

Credit for the Patrol’s formation and de- 
velopment falls to Robert Reed, its leader, 
to Joseph Jones, who worked with Mr. Reed, 
and to Coach John Kelly who gave the 
First Aid instruction. The idea of a ski 
patrol was suggested last year by some 
literature sent by Mr. Harold M. Gore, di- 
rector of the National Ski Patrol, Eastern 




To the Rescue 


division. No tangible advances were made 
on the idea until this year when Mr. Reed 
and Mr. Jones decided to form a ski patrol 
with a First Aid Committee for Carnival 
in mind. 

Thirty hours of First Aid with emphasis 
on ski accidents, ski equipment and cloth- 
ing, a knowledge of splints, bandages and 
instruction in the handling of toboggans 
and their accessories were decided upon as 
the necessary training for tryouts. Mr. 
French, in charge of the finance and man- 
agement of college skiing, realized the neces- 
sity of such a patrol in view of the greatly 
increased participation in skiing at Middle- 
bury and volunteered his guidance. With 
this authorization and with the equipment 
promised by Mr. French, the Ski Patrol was 
able to get under way. 

Throughout the ski events during Carni- 
val weekend the Ski Patrol did a noteworthy 
job on the Breadloaf trails, attempting to 
control and evacuate the accidents that 
could so easily occur. The patrol, which 
is to be carried on from year to year, main- 
taining a constant number of members, now 
consists of forty persons. 


Corning Up Breadloaf Tow 





TRACK 



Although handicapped by a shortage of 
material. Coach Arthur M. Brown suc- 
ceeded in turning out an extremely well- 
rounded and evenly-balanced outdoor track 
squad in the spring of 1946. The season 
was characterized throughout by hard work 
and driving spirit on the part of the mem- 
bers of the entire squad. 

The schedule of track meets was neces- 
sarily brief, inasmuch as 1946 was the first 
postwar track season. The initial contest 
in which the squad participated was the 
annual meet of the Eastern Intercollegiate 
Athletic Association which was held at 
Worcester. In this meet Rob Willits, Roy 
Kinsey and Don Gilmore succeeded in scor- 
ing for Midd. The squad’s next encounter 
was with Trinity in a very closely contested 
dual meet here at Middlebury. The meet 
was decided in favor of Middlebury by the 
closing event, the broad jump, in which 
Den Gilmore took first place. Out-manned 
and out-classed by a superior R.P.I. team, 
the Midd squad was defeated in its third 
and final encounter of the all-too-short sea- 
son. 

Because the 1946 track team, which was 
captained by Hal Parker, was such an 
evenly-balanced unit, each of its members 
is deserving of part of the credit for Middlc- 
bury’s good showing during the season. 

ONE HUNDRED SIXTY - THREE 


* 



GOLF 



The varsity golf team for the 1946 season 
was composed of four men, Roland Boucher, 
Robert Boucher, Charles Scott, and Alan 
Wolfley (Scott and Wolfley were both letter 
winners in prewar days). 

Midd’s best showing for the season was 
in the dual match victories over St. Law- 
rence and Clarkson. The team also placed 
high in the open tournaments where it mat 
up with some stiff competition. The 
record was especially outstanding consider- 
ing the lack of golfing facilities in Middle- 
bury and the fact that practices were made 
difficult by bad weather previous to the 
matches. 

In spite of the loss of Chuck Scott the 
prospects for this coming season are very 
hopeful, and a number of promising men 
have indicated their interest in the team. 


Among those attending the first meeting, in 
addition to last year’s standbys, were Ray 
Nihan, Art Gebhardt, Jim Marchese, Art 
Pepin, and Don Bates. 

"Duke” Nelson, who is a good golfer in 
his own right, will be in charge of the team, 
and the schedule which has been arranged 
includes matches against such teams as 
Dartmouth, Williams, Yale, and R.P.I. 
Present snow and the inevitable spring thaw 
will probably hamper good golfing condi- 
tions, but, weather permitting, the team 
should really shine if it can get in some 
heavy practice before spring vacation. The 
early workout will necessitate trips to the 
Rutland course; however, it is hoped that 
before too long the college golf course will 
be in good enough shape to allow practice. 


ONE HUNDRED SIXTY- FOUR 


TENNIS 


The 1946 tennis squad, under the able 
tutelage of Coach Cornwall, emerged from 
its seven highly contested matches with as 
admirable a record as it has usually been 
able to point to in seasons past. The rac- 
queteers were re-organized in the spring of 
1946 for the first time since the war. Build- 
ing a new team took a great deal of work 
and co-operation on the part of the squad 
and the coach. However, the season’s rec- 
ord of five wins and two defeats attests to 
their success. Incidentally, their record 
might have been even better if three addi- 
tional games had not been cancelled due to 
rain. 

Three former lettermen, Ad Merrick, Al 
Rice, and Seab Short formed the nucleus 
about which the team was built. Indis- 
pensable also to the team’s success were Phil 


Turnbull, Bob Goell, Gordie Mathews, Ev 
Miller, Harry Richardson, Felix Rohatyn, 
and Fred Storfer. 

In the season’s opener, Midd was trampled 
by a strong Williams team, 9-0. The out- 
look brightened considerably when the net- 
men took the measure of St. Mike’s in a 
home and home series both by scores of 7-2. 
This was followed up by a 6-3 defeat of 
U.V.M. on the home courts. The winning 
streak was snapped at three straight by 
Clarkson, 6-3. However, the Panthers 
came up with two smashing victories against 
St. Lawrence, 6-2, and Vermont, 9-0, to 
end the season. 

As a result of four clean sweeps of 
U.V.M. and St. Michael’s, Midd walked off 
with the Vermont State Tennis Champion- 
ship. 



ONE HUNDRED SIXTY - FIVE 


BASEBALL 



Captain-elect Cruess 


Middlebury’s 1946 baseball team, the 
first postwar nine, won only four of its 
eleven games. However, by registering 
three of these triumphs in Vermont state 
competition, the Midd team succeeded in 
gaining a tie for the state championship. 

Coach “Red” Kelly’s squad was handi- 
capped greatly by a lack of talented and 
experienced ball players. The wintry condi- 
tion of the playing field during the early 
weeks of the season and the subsequent late 
start with which the Panthers began train- 
ing hindered the early development of the 
rather “green” squad. However, plenty of 
hard work and the traditional Midd fighting 
spirit made up, to some degree, for these 
deficiencies, and was responsible for bring- 
ing about a constant improvement in the 
team throughout the season. The develop- 
ment of the team was evidenced by the fact 
that after having been trounced soundly 
by Norwich and Vermont early in the 
season, the Midd nine came back to register 
triumphs in their second encounter with 
these teams, the victory over Vermont being 
a well-played 5-0 shutout. 



ONE HUNDRED S I X T Y - S I X 


< 





Che Che Winds Ub 


The nucleus of Midd’s 1946 pitching 
staff was composed of Wiemann, Trimmer, 
Fife, and Leigh, while Cruess and Valentine 
alternated behind the plate. First base was 
adequately covered by LaCroix, while sec- 
ond base was played by the versatile Bar- 
quin. The third base and shortstop posi- 
tions were held down by Barry and Means 
respectively. The regular outfield berths 
were filled by Liehr, in left field, Price in 
center, and Robertson in right. 

Captain George Wiemann was by far the 
outstanding player on the Midd nine during 
the 1946 season. George, in his role of 
moundsman, was credited with all of the 
victories that his team registered. In addi- 
tion to his 5-0 shutout of the U.V.M. Cata- 
mounts, he returned the winner in Midd’s 
13-11 and 4-2 triumphs over St. Michael’s, 
and the 9-4 victory over Norwich. 

With a year’s experience to its credit and 
an increased supply of playing material 
availab'e, the Midd nine should be a much 
improved ball club in 1947. Leading his 
team from behind the p’ate will be Captain 
Tommy Cruess. 





At the Plate 


ONE HUNDRED S I X T Y - S E V E N 


BOARD TRACK RELAY 


w 



A Pause During Practice 


Middlebury’s mile relay team made a fine 
showing during the 1947 indoor track sea- 
son. Composed of George Hartz, as lead- 
off man, Hal Parker, Al Dragone, and Dave 
Stebbins, with Will Bangs as an alternate, 
the team participated in three major indoor 
track meets. The Midd runners were vic- 
torious in their group in the Knights of 
Columbus meet in Boston, triumphing over 
Boston University, Massachusetts State Col- 
lege, and Springfield. The team placed 
third in its group in the Millrose Games in 
New York, nosing out Amherst, and placed 
third again in the Boston Athletic Associa- 
tion Meet in Boston. 





ONE HUNDRED SIXTY- EIGHT 




INTRAMURALS 


After a wartime lull, intramural sports, 
participated in by almost ninety per cent of 
the men’s college, began in the fall of 1946. 
The Alpha Sigs clinched the touch football 
title with DKE runner-up. Theta Chi won 
over Chi Psi to secure the volleyball trophy. 
Tennis finals were rained out, but the win- 
ner of the Merrick-Rice match will play 
Felix Rohatyn in the spring finals. Marty 
Wittlin won the handball title. 

The Alpha Sigs are now ahead in the 
intramural and varsity-intramural trophy 
races with Chi Psi and DKE runners-up in 
each respectively. 



Practice Before the Game 



Wolftey, Rum bold 
Kelly , Seixas 


ONE HUNDRED S I X T Y - N 1 N E 




ARCHERY 




Take Aim 

TENNIS 

Under the management of Edith Gordon 
’47, the All-Women’s College Tennis 
Tournament took place in spite of unpre- 
dictable spring weather. A great many 
matches had to be defaulted, and as a result, 
few people were able to receive W.A.A. 
credit. 

The people that turned out were deter- 
mined, nevertheless, to see that the tourna- 
ment would be completed. Even during 
the harried hours between final exams 
players could be found still battling for 
the desirable title. 

The finals were played during the last 
few days of the college year. Betsy Drake 
’47, came through with the title, and Ca- 
mille Busby ’48, was runner-up. 

The warm fall of 1946, which ran well 
into October, brought out a good number 
of tennis enthusiasts. It is hoped that the 
weather will be more favorable this spring 
so that all those interested may have a 
chance to enter the tournament. 


During the archery season last year, Old 
Man Weather was up to his old tricks again, 
preventing a great deal of participation in 
this sport. Although archery classes were 
held whenever it was possible, W.A.A. did 
not sponsor a tournament. 

In order to receive W.A.A. credit for 
archery, a person must play for fifteen 
hours, and then she is expected to enter the 
tournament. Archers sign up for hours at 
the beginning of each season and the tourna- 
ment is played after all of the practice hours 
have been completed. In the last tourna- 
ment held, Muriel Mack ’47 was the winner. 

The Physical Education Department is 
eager to use the new equipment which has 
been recently purchased. We’ll surely know 
it’s spring again when Miss Shurtz has the 
tractor taken out and has the Women’s 
Athletic Field rolled. 


Pre-season Warm-up 


ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY 



RIDING 

There is a great deal of enthusiasm among 
the members of the Women’s College for 
riding, and during the fall and spring, when 
the weather is sunny, groups of riders can 
be seen taking to the trails almost any after- 
noon. 

The W.A.A. Council has, in the past, 
offered credit to all women interested in 
riding who have ridden twelve hours. How- 
ever, this year it has not done so, and 
no definite plans have as yet been made for 
the organization of a riding club, although 
there are many who are anxious to have one. 

The facilities for riders are quite ade- 
quate. There are stables very near the 
campus, and there are any number of beauti- 
ful bridle paths and trails. Providing the 
weather is favorable, W.A.A. hopes to spon- 
sor a horse show in the near future. 



Goalie Makes Good 



HOCKEY 

Hockey is one of the favorite sports of 
the Women’s College, and although it is 
usually considered a fall sport, the college 
teams also play in the spring. In good 
weather, games are held nearly every after- 
noon on the field located between the Cha- 
teau and Forest Hall. The manager of the 
hockey team this year was Doris Maurer. 

Each class has its own teams, and from 
the first teams of each are chosen the players 
for the All-Midd team. This year, the All- 
Midd players were: class of ’47, Ann Ar- 
gyle, Laura-Lee Hopkins, Alice Thorn; 
class of ’48, Beverly Boynton, Camille 
Buzby, Doris Maurer, Elizabeth Reid, Edith 
Titus; class of ’49, Patricia McFarland, 
Patricia Schryver; class of ’50, Lois Rapp. 

Two round robin tournaments were 
planned but the second had to be canceled 
because of rain. The first was played, how- 
ever, and won by the sophomores. 


ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY - ONE 


BASKETBALL 



Tense Moment 


The basketball season in 1946, under the 
management of Gloria Antolini, was marked 
by the new system of A and B tourna- 
ments. Inter-class team competition re- 
sulted in the top four teams, one from each 
class, playing in tournament A. This was 
won by the seniors, whose captain was Mary 
Jane Sellcck. Tournament B included all 
other of the original teams and was won 
by the sophomore team number two, cap- 
tained by Jean Huey. The All-Midd team 
chosen from the participants included as 
forwards: Elizabeth Van Allen, *48, Patri- 
cia Perkins and Margaret Drysdale, ’49; and 
as guards, Patricia Salmon and Joan Sher- 
man, ’48, and Lura Williams, *49. 


VOLLEYBALL 


Competition in volleyball, this year under 
the management of Sally Fisher, was or- 
ganized into the usual round robin tourna- 
ment. There were eight teams from which, 
after the usual practices and games, the 
junior team number three won. They were 
led by JoAnne Selleck, the captain. Runner- 
up was the sophomore team six, under Pa- 
tricia Perkins; third place was taken by 
team number one of the seniors, captained 
by Jean Gunther. From the seniors there 
were three chosen for the All-Midd team: 
Jeannette Cunningham, Jean Gunther and 
Virginia Hodder. The class of 1948 was 
represented by Camille Buzby, Patricia Sal- 
mon and JoAnne Selleck; the sophomore 
class by Patricia Schryver and Carol 
Wheeler. Highlight of the season was the 
Play Day held in conjunction with the Uni- 
versity of Vermont. 



Set-up 


ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY- TWO 



SKIING 



With veteran skiers Polly Hodder, Peg 
Curtis and Nat Benson ably assisted by 
the skills of Rose Hull, Pete Salmon, Mary 
Cameron, Lee Robbins, Jean Smith and 
Bobbie Merriman, the women’s ski team 
showed promise of a good season this win- 
ter. The team traveled with Coach "Joe” 
Jones to numerous intercollegiate competi- 
tions, among which was the second annual 
College Women’s Meet at Manchester. The 
Middlebury team won this event in 1946. 

Middlebury first saw their women skiers 
at the Winter Carnival. At that time Polly 
Hodder swept down the slalom and down- 
hill courses to win the annual meet for 
Middlebury. Her fine scores were backed 
by the good showing made by the other 
three women representing the team, Nat 
Benson, Peg Curtis and Bobbie Merriman. 


Before Taking the Downhill 

ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY - THREE 




BADMINTON 


The badminton season was one of the 
few spring sports that was not affected by 
the poor weather last spring. Under the 
excellent management of Dorothy Linde- 
mann, badminton started with a program 
of three practices a week in the gym. This 
popular activity managed to take the spot- 
light after basketball hours had been com- 
pletely chalked up. The turnout for the 
tournament was unusually large, with 
about fifty players participating in the 
sport. During the closely battled semi- 
finals, doubles were played with the Men’s 
College, in which the women made a good 
showing. The competition in the elimination 
tournament was hot and heavy all the way. 
Finalists Terri Ralph and Sally Fisher had 
both been undefeated until they met each 
other on the court. When the scores were 
finally tabulated Terri Ralph had won the 
laurels and the cup for 1946. 



Champ Terri 


SOFTBALL 


Spring always brings to mind thoughts 
of baseball and softball and at the same 
time a desire to participate in one of the 
two similar games. Softball for the 
Women’s College consisted of vigorous 
competition between dormitory teams in 
the 1946 season. Even though the players 
did not receive W.A.A. credit, the tourna- 
ments were well attended. Dorm spirit ran 
especially high in Hepburn and Painter 


Halls, these two dormitories having turned 
out the largest number of players. How- 
ever, the tournament was incomplete be- 
cause of the usual rainy spring weather. 
The total number of games played was 
about six. Two games were played at a 
time on the field between Forest Hall and 
the Chateau. Jacqueline Ord acted as 
manager for the all-too-short season. 


ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FOUR 




MODERN DANCE 




being an officially recognized organization, 
rehearsals were started for the annual 
Christmas production. This year it was put 
on in conjunction with the College Players. 

A number of portraits were unusually 
interpreted and followed by a sensitive ren- 
dition of the miraculous French story — 
"The Juggler of Notre Dame." Jeannette 
Winans, executing the part of the juggler 
with sprightliness and superb understand- 
ing, was supported by the fine work of the 
club at large. All choreography for both 
of these productions was developed by the 
girls themselves. 

Plans for the rest of the year include a 
trip to New York where the Group will 
visit the Y.W.H.A. and there present a 
program in co-operation with the dance 
groups of several other colleges. Only then 
will work commence on the spring produc- 
tion, which is always thought of as the 
climax of the modern dance season- Thus is 
the appreciation of dance forms perpetuated 
on the campus of Middlebury. 

Self -expression 


The stimulating reception given by the 
student body to the Modern Dance Club’s 
1946 spring production was well remem- 
bered this fall as the club got under way 
again with new enthusiasm. The firm 
leadership of Mrs. Lee, who resumed her 
position as the club’s advisor after several 
year’s absence, and of Mrs. Madden, who 
did the honors on the accompaniment and 
lent much helpful advice, was responsible 
for this excellent spirit. Moreover, the 
club’s staff officers had planned a challeng- 
ing program of activity. Finally, with the 
admission of three new members to the 
Group and a material enlargement of the 
club, the dance season was under way. 

With the purpose of awakening student 
interest and making money for the future 
purchasing of costumes, the entire club pro- 
duced a short program showing basic dance 
directions and including several brief inter- 
pretations of records. Then, with an added 
sense of security which resulted from at 
long last having a written constitution and 


M. Stevens, secretary ; S. March, vice-president; 
B. Myers, president 







MORTAR BOARD 



Second rote — M. MacCorniick, secretary; J. Kraft, Ii. Gordon 
Front rou — E. Carr, rice-president; E. Walsh, president; 

J. Buckeridge; L. Hopkins, treasurer 


Mortar Board is a national honorary so- 
ciety of senior women who, at the end of 
their junior year, are chosen for their scho- 
lastic achievement, capable leadership and 
effective participation in college activities. 

After its annual fall book sale, Mortar 
Board sponsored the Freshman Outing and 
gave a Christmas supper party for the 
house directors. Later it presented a paper 
on sororities to the freshman women. 

Membership in Mortar Board is a great 
responsibility, for, to fill the aims of the 
society, members must maintain a high 
standard of scholarship, encourage fellow- 
ship, leadership and service on the women’s 
campus, and, in short, develop finer college 
women. 


WAUBANAKEE 

Membership in Waubanakee is the high- 
est honorary award that an undergraduate 
from the Men’s College can receive. The 
society, founded in 1911, is self-perpetuat- 
ing and will be as long as a man in his 
junior year has fulfilled the requirements 
to the satisfaction of the senior members. 
Character, scholarship, personality, leader- 
ship and extra-curricular activities are 
among the factors considered in choosing 
"papooses.” The quota of nine has not been 
filled since 1919. 

The organization’s insignia is a gold 
tomahawk pin which symbolizes progress 
not only in what the members have gained 
from college, but in the contributions they 
have made to the college. 

O N E H U N D R E 13 S E V ENT Y - EIGHT 



A. Pepin , D. Stcbbins 
Missing — Paul Dar:s 



Second row — R. Sacher, A. Pepin, H. Parker , F. Williams , J. L'Episcopo, P. Vyrros, D. Gilmore, D. Stebbins 
Front row — E. Bnnzel . T. Turner , C. Steen, secretary-treasurer; T. Cruess, president; E. Cooke, S. Short 


BLUE KEY 

Blue Key is an honorary society for Mid- 
dlebury men who have a high academic 
rating, a notable record in extra-curricular 
activities, and who have been outstanding 
in attainment for Middlebury. Membership, 
determined each May, is limited to twenty- 
five men from the sophomore, junior and 
senior classes; the organization now num- 
bers twenty-three. 

Among the functions of the society are 
the training of freshman men, the selling 
of freshman caps and rules, the purchasing 
of athletic awards for championship teams 
and the management of athletic rallies. 
Each term Blue Key sponsors one dance. 
Its most important duty however, is to up- 
hold the "Midd Spirit.” 


"M” CLUB 

"M” Club, founded in 1926, is an or- 
ganization on campus which exists solely 
to honor those undergraduate or alumni men 
who have won the letter "M” in the major 
sports: football, baseball, hockey, basket- 
ball, track and skiing. All managers of 
varsity teams, of intramural sports and 
freshman football automatically become 
members as soon as they receive their em- 
blems. It is an honorary organization and 
its primary purpose is to foster recognition 
of Middlebury’s athletic accomplishments. 

Members display their M M” sweaters on 
various occasions throughout the year to en- 
courage freshman men to acquire the sym- 
bol of athletic prowess. The organization 
now numbers over one hundred members. 


Second row — Buonerba, Mason, Stebbins , Hcntz, Carr , Cooke, Nelson 
Front row — Pepin, Stevens , Gilmore, Parker, Cruess, Gustafson, Zaumseil, Salisbury 





PHI BETA KAPPA 


The Phi Beta Kappa Society, the oldest 
Greek letter fraternity, was founded in the 
Raleigh Tavern at William and Mary, Wil- 
liamsburg, Virginia, on December 5, 1776. 
The Middlebury Chapter, the Beta of Ver- 
mont, received its charter August 7, 1868. 

Members of the senior class who are of 
good character, and who have attained an 
average rank of eighty-nine per cent for 
six terms at Middlebury, or of eighty-seven 
and a half per cent for eight terms at Mid- 
dlebury, are eligible for membership. No 
more than fifteen per cent of the class in 
both colleges may be members of the so- 
ciety. The quota has never been filled. 

Students graduating from Middlebury 
who have transferred from other colleges 
are not ineligible. If they have completed 
six terms at Middlebury with an average 


grade of eighty-nine per cent or above, or 
have completed four terms at Middlebury 
with an average grade of ninety per cent or 
above, they may be considered for member- 
ship. 

Dr. Freeman is president of the chapter; 
Professor Cook is vice-president; Professor 
White is secretary-treasurer. The chapter 
has occasional meetings during the year. It 
is a tradition of the chapter to have a 
dinner with a speaker at the Inn on Com- 
mencement Sunday noon. 

Last June, at the commencement exer- 
cises, Gloria A. Antolini, Marian E. Fisher, 
Barbara L. Grigg, and Jane M. Laux were 
elected to the society. In December Betty 
R. Virtue and Nancy C. Surtees were elected 
to the chapter on the basis of six terms 
work. 



E. Virtue, N. Surtees 


ONE HUNDRED E I G I! T Y 








“-fkouJ. oil ALPHA SIGMA PHI 



Back row — Coursey, Allen, Lewis, Cassimatis , Slater, Stillman, R. Brown, Wolff, Mapes, Cruz, Hentz, Knight, 

MacMurtry, Mariner, Mathews, Hickcox 

Third roie — Ham, Pearlstein, Muessel, Edwards, Stewart, Vyrros, Dawson, Hunter, Dale, Miller, Judson , Colyer, Bolos, 

Chase, Newcomb, Gilbert 

Second row — Dodd, Cruess, J. Parker, Grant, Booth, president; Littlefield , C. J. Parker, H. Parker, Gilmore, Stevens 
First row — Plumb, Bunzel, McCormack, Buom'rba, Johnson, Peet, Rohatyn, Marshall, Joslin 

Missing — Dai is, Barrett 






1 


"ALPHA XI DELTA, kail to tU 



Third row — Hill , Ulmer , Bredenber g, Davies, Ord, Horsch, Neal , Gerlitz, Curry, Elliott 
Second row — Livsey, Epp, Pickles, Dean, Chappell , Mace, Wrmmcr , McKenney, Henderson , Mulholland 
Front row — Goeltz, Dai is, Taggart, Hubbard, Bruhn, president; Syrett, Allht, Maurer , Rolls, Hackley 



Working for Water 


1 


Off to Fife's Cabin 




m 


‘Peat a tkt Ud r o/j old CHI PSI" 



Back row — Wittlin, Divoll, Bourn, T. Martin, Price , E. Hubbard, Works, W. Hubbard, L'Episcopo, Johnson, 
Blue, C. Reed, McKinley. Jackson , R. Reed, Kama, Turnbull 
Fourth row — Bennitt, W. Wallace, Nihan, Bloch, Freese, Drohat, Stokes, Dean, Bates, Maxwell-W illeson, Adkins, 
Westin, Carlson, D. Wallace, Beldon, Mason, Rumbold 
Third row — Small, Stewart, Schmidt , Wolfley , Mooney, McGuire, Mann, Walker, Flemming, King 
Second row — Porter, Cushman, R. Martin, Stagg, DeLancy, Flaas, Welch, Zimmerman, Remington 
First row — Smith , Nelson, Benedict, F acini, Stevenson, Neubergcr, Walker, Kruger 
Missing — Rice, Barnes, Burn 





1 



Third row — Keller, Wealc , Kit ten house. Cole, Knudsen , Peck , Reinickcr, Saurman 
Second row — Crawford , Curtis , Duffy, Seely, Higley, Knout, Kelly, L’Episcopo, Wade 
Front rote — Tyler, Palm, Walsh , Corcoran, Hamilton, president; Hopkins, Brigham, Rice, Sturgcs 



Kitchen Life with DELTA DELTA DELTA 



■{-) band oj btotketi In 


D. K. E. 



Back row — Galvin, Breu , Guglin, Anderson , D. Xaumseil, Hemphill, Clark, Kasper, Arnold , Hubbard , Wilson, 
Fisher, A. G. Pepin, J olivette. Chambers, Johnson, Donnellon 
Third row — Sheehan, De Salvo , Sackett, Ingalls, Scut ter, Whitestone, M. Johnson, Geiken, But trick, Henty , 
Wright, Simpson, Gore, McKenzie, Rie, Whittier, Marchese, Duff, Mulroy 
Second row — W as/jburn, Patchett, R. Xaumseil , Steen, Williams, A. D. Pepin, Sco.'t, Salisbury, Moore, Turner, Means 
First row' — Robertson, Carpenter, Ryan, Ferine 4 Conomikes, Seixas, Morris, Sullivan 
Missing — Fitzpatrick 





An ” Angelic ” Pose 




Dow'n Fraternity Row 




V >un/i fat DELTA, U fat UPSILON 



Back roti' — La mere, Hammerberg , Anderson, Perry, Faber, Van Wart, Allen, Newman, Harmon, Kinsey, Hendrix, 

E. Smith, MacNcill, Thompson, Nugent 

Fourth row — Shahan, Webb, Armstrong, Henderson, Whittinghill , Roemer, Bangs, Myrick, Krantz, S. Pike, Spatz, 
Broner, Forbush , A. J. Smith, Gustafson, Bates, R. Robinson, Painter 
Third row — A. C. Smith, Upham, Cooke, Short, Stebbins , president; Richardson, C. Pike, Ferrari, Frank, Howe, 

Carr 

Second row — Prescott, Lillym&rt, Fuchs, Frew, Butts, Fagg, Petrie , Johnson, Canning 
First row — VaJnais, Metcalf, Hunt, Shumway, Kroeck, Parker, E. Robinson 
Missing — Noursc , Kellogg, Willets, Ness, Fitzgerald , Green 






w 


KAPPA DELTA wind 5 ate h Lou/inj 



Third roiv — Feyrer, Carabillo, Broun , Simpson, Grun Jacket, Deininger j Baker , Mackenzie, Mullen, Mace 
Second rou> — Smith, March, Octjen, Davis, Racctte, Jones, Harvan , Neal, Beers, Caldwell 
Front row — dcCanizares MacCormick, Valentine, Brookman, Bodine, Northern, president ; Swenson, Williams, Gavagan 



Out to Sea 



t 


* 


"K. D. R. 



Back row — Barnes , Rauner, Butterfield , Ca savant, Beach , D. H. Baker, Murray , Watson, D. P. Baker, Puksta, 

Riley, R . Hunt 

Third row—R. B. Hunt, Shaw, Zukowski, Gies, Sambone, Hoffman, Morrissey, Peterson, Williams , Gustafson, 

Kearney, Vetare, Frioli 

Second row — Otis, Moriarity, Menut, Dawson, Rowell, Kelley, president ; Neale, Hebert, Adams, Iulton, Brucks 

First row — Cocola, D’Aquilla, Foster, Reifel 

Missing — Beenhouuer, McKenzie, Roddy, Price, Markham, Hoff mire, Fraioli, LcBaron, Ingalls, Beck, Savage 



r 






Third row — /. Smith , Hewson, Broun , Cadmus , Queren, L. Williams, Walthall, Selleck, Flatley, Jones, Titus 
Second row — Knapp, Arrington, Hemenway , Surtees, Drummond , Fisher, Grecnley, Britton, H. Thwaits, Allen, 

E. Williams, J. Smith 

Front row — Davis, Nagle, Little, Vaughn, Carr, president; Richardson, P. Thu aits, Holmgren 



Ready for Carnival Fun 




A Kappa Get-together 


. 






w 



Second row — Woodman, Bocssen-kool, Ashworth , Whians, Tanner, Liptak, Mitchell 
Front row — Mai'Gill, Williams , Beach, Mack, president ; Newton, Bates 
Missing — Lei and, Sayre, Fisher 




On the Steps of Forest 


Together m Sunshine or Snow 






chlnj dilncj. 


PI BETA PHI 


Fourth row — Kenyon , Phillippi, Buzby, Drysdale, Adkins , Spaulding, Spross, Sherman , Flicks, S. Finley, Webster, 
Third row — Bedford, Schryi er, Bray, Scroggie, McFarland , Holt, Holmgren, Reid, Yeakel, Cooke, Boynton 
Second row — Morse, Chalmers, N. Finley , Hornaday, Gordon, president; Pomeroy, Fitz, Burke 
Front row — Stemmier, Huey, Hosford, La police 


Regard ez — Mrs. Pete 


St 




fust Posing 



r 



Third row — Soules, Clarkson, Quirk, Williams, Hull, Perkins, McNamara, Wanderer, Fowler, Out man 
Second row — Schreiber, Huber, Neil, Hartshorn, Tierney , Hartung , Muntz, Shovel ton , Baidu in 
Front row — Johnson, Holden, Hawley, Kellogg, Pryibil, Glowa, Bradley, Lawson 



The Energetic Type 




SIGMA KAPPA aitl 



Fourth row — Girard , Cole, Hausen, Whcelcr t Pasch, Steele, Berdolt , Durland 
Third row — Hoose, Matnlis, Friend, Sowles, Robbins , Taussig , Lee, Anderson, Nelson, Young 
Second row — Pitz, Pierce, Reynolds, Young, Dai is, president; Stevens, Strayer, Gunther 
Front row — Fankhauser, Small, Parker, VanSplintcr, Teague, Wescott 



The "Big Wigs” Roughing It 




-lie. iamb led till the SIG EPS jot him 


ou/n 



Back row — Barclay, Boyd, Williams, Boone, R. Boucher, Simon, Christie, J. McGarry, R. Caswell, Truesdale, 

Meeker, Miller, Cushman , D. Law, Guillan 

Third row — Dustin, J. Luke, LaCroix, Howard, Lindemann, F. McGarry, Gold thuaite, Chapin, Merrick, V. Luke, 
Valentine, Ethers, Hutchinson, Mocas, Cole, Todd 

Second row — Barry, Harris, J. Law, Weeks, Nourse, McKee, president; Pope, Deane, Hoagland, H. Caswell 
First row — Gubitz, Dragone, Mulcahy, Barquin, Frost, Annunziata, Ellis, Stearns 
Missing — Bailey, A. R. Boucher, Fife, Gilbert, Henderson, Shahan, Bond, Butterfield, Corbisiero, MacNamara, 

Pierce, Walheim 



Construction Crew 




Fourth row — Mayer , J. Parker , Fischer , Goodrich , Parkinson, Williamson, Rathbun, von Dreelc, George, Kofoed 
Third row — Barlow , Petrizzi, Fuller, Ellison, Kaufman, Larson, Whitfield, Caswell, Remmler, Wilson, Wilcox, 

B net trier 

Second row — Congdon , Meilleur, Atkins, Erickson, Cluff, Van de Water, president ; Flicks, Hedden, Donaldson, 

Washburn 

Front row — Hall, Price, Smith, Campbell 
Missing — Niederauer, Glazier, Chadwick, Gordon 



The Home of " Bugs Bunny' 



STEP SINGING 



Under Jen's Direction 


Fare well to the Seniors 



Did you ever wonder, what there is about it? 

It’s hard to put in words, but you’d hate to 
do without it. 

You’re up in the mountains so high 

You reach up for a piece of the sky, 

And when you shake hands with a sunbeam 
you’ll know 

Why you love Middlebury. 

Did you ever wonder, how it all became 

Something that will last, that will always 
stay the same? 

A serenade rising, when all else is still, 

The wind sweeping the top of the hill 

With chapel bells ringing you can't help 
but know 

Why you love Middlebury. 

C 'Ta.tnivtzt 'Time. 

When it’s Carnival time, 

Winter Carnival time. 


Take me back, take me back to 
the college on the hill, 

At Carnival time. 

When an icing of snow 
Has pierced the campus I know, 
How I’ll be yearning to go 
Back at Carnival, Carnival Time. 

I’ll remember it all, 

Klondike Rush and the Ball; 

How the Panther of Blue showed us 
All what he could do. 

At Carnival time. 

Once again I’ll climb the hill. 

Hear the bells when all is still, 
When it’s Winter Carnival time. 



The curtain of night has sheltered sunset’s 
glow, 

While moonlight casts its silhouette below. 
No sound is heard to break the silence deep; 
God will keep His watch while Middlebury 
sleeps. 


ONE HUNDRED NINETY - EIGHT 





nou/ 



m en 


t 


As the end of the work on the 1948 Kaleidoscope draws near, we pause to reflect upon the 
events of the past months. Among recollections of long hours of work and numerous problems 
are the memories of pleasant contacts and new acquaintances. For them, and for the privileges 
of putting out this book, we are grateful. 

For the efforts of each of the following, which were deeply appreciated, may we extend a 
sincere thanks: 

The staff members and sophomore tryouts for their faithful work. 

Miss Barbara Drury and later Mr. Gleason of the Worcester Engraving Company for their 
assistance in planning and engraving. 

The Free Press Printing Company, especially Mr. Harry Blodgett and Mr. Russell Farnsworth, 
for their advice concerning production of the book. 

The Kingsport Press and Mr. Nelson for execution of the cover. 

Sargent Studio, particularly Mr. Irving Green and Miss Patricia Ray, for their services. 

The College Press Office — Mr. George Huban for his assistance and contributions to the book, 
and Mr. John Street for his co-operation. 

Mr. Irwin French and Mr. Robert Summers for assistance with financial aspects. 

Nancy Bushnell, Betty Lee Robbins, and Richard Haseltine for all art work. 

Mr. Gove, Leon Adkins, John Carter, John Clarkson, Richard Haseltine, Thomas Mariner, 
Robert Mason, Olaf Remmler, Lionel Slater, and especially Lawrence Willard, for their willing 
and invaluable contributions of photographs. 

F. Anderson, B. Boynton, A. Cadmus, T. Carabillo, M. Davies, A. Deininger, J. Drummond, 
A. Elting, J. Friend, J. Goeltz, C. Hoose, L. Horn, V. Knudsen, I. Nierhaus, J. Rice, A. Stemm- 
ier, J. Swenson, M. Taylor, and J. Whamer of the junior class, and S. Short and P. Turnbull, 
who aided the staff. 

The entire student body for being punctual for appointments and for candid pictures. 

We hope that despite curtailment of some features in the book due to present conditions still 
reflecting war-time influences you will be pleased by this Kaleidoscope. 


Shirley Syrltt. 


ONE HUNDRED NINETY- NINE 


GREEN MOUNTAIN -fktWCLUi INC. 

MIDDLEBURY AIRPORT 

Student Instruction 
Private Flying 

Basic Ground School 

Primary Flying School 



Special rates for Aeronautics Department of Middlebury College and 

Flying Club. 

Approved by Civil Aeronautics Administration and Vermont Aeronautics 

Commission. 

Approved by Veterans Administration for Flight Training under Public 

Law 346. 


Charles H. Kitc.hell ’47 
Chairman of the Board 

Allan H. Kelley ’47 
T reasurer 


L. M. Selleck ’47 

President 

John A. Heywood ’47 

Secretary 





ARE YOU? 


It’s a wonderful habit, but one 
that must be acquired when a 
man begins his earning years. Open 
a savings account somewhere. We 
will be very pleased to have you 
open it with us. 

The 

MARBLE SAVINGS BANK 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 

Member of the 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE 
CORP. 


FOLEY’S 

Launderers - Dry Cleaners 
Linen Suppliers 

Rutland, Vermont 


PARK DRUG STORE 

Next To The National Bank 

Tel. 108-W Middlebury, Vt. 


Compliments 


of a 

Friend 


TWO HUNDRED ONE 


Shepard & Hamelle 

ESTABLISHED 1864 

MEN’S CLOTHING 

and 

FURNISHINGS 

32 Church St. Burlington, Vt. 

PHONE 1980 

★ 

RUTLAND COUNTY 
NATIONAL BANK 


"IN THE HEART OF THE 

GREEN MOUNTAINS” 

Dick’s Taxi 

★ 

TEL. 213-R 



MEMBER OF 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP. 

You 


Can't 

Top 

oS 

o x 

For 

Delicious Dinners 

And 

After Date Snacks 

OPEN DAILY 9:00 a. m. - 1:00 a. m. 

1 mile South of Middlebury on Route 7 


TWO HUNDRED TWO 


PLAY SPORT 

RECREATION 



With Rod or Gun 
With Golf Club 
or Tennis Racket 
are the only tonics 
which will insure at 
50 clear-eyed pep of 
good old College 
Days. 


YOU’LL FIND EQUIPMENT FOR ALL OF THESE — 
EVERYTHING FOR THE SPORTSMAN 

at 



^Sports 

Equipment 
Company 

36 - -40 Center Street 

RUTLAND .VERMONT 


TWO HUNDRED THREE 


HAYES & CARNEY, INC. 

MEN’S 

CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 

127 Church St. BURLINGTON, VT. Telephone 1798 


'Diamovictb 



SCIENTIFICALLY GRADED 
COST NO MORE THAN 
ORDINARY DIAMONDS 


Modern science makes it easy for you to be assured 
of superior quality and value in a diamond. As 
Registered Jewelers, we safeguard your purchase 
by grading diamonds with scientific instruments. 

F. J. PRESTON & SON Inc 

IT UPPER CHURCH STREET 

- Burlington, Vermont — 



THE 

Rutland 

Daily 

Herald 


Associated Press Member 


THE PARK DINER 

MIDDLEBURY, VT. 

It’s the place to go after the show, 

The place that’s right day or night! 

STEAKS OUR SPECIALTY, DINNERS, SNACKS 

OPEN 6.00 A. M. TO 1.00 A. M. 


TWO HUNDRED FOUR 


ABRAMS’ DEPARTMENT STORE 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

Latest Style 

in 

SPORTSWEAR and SHOES 

for 

The Entire Campus 


MONTPELIER TAVERN 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

Dining Room Coffee Shop 

Eagle Room 

Private dining room for special parties 


FOR THE BEST FOOD IN TOWN 

A T THE 

MOST REASONABLE PRICES 


Come to 

Lockwood Restaurant 

M. L. PRENNER, Prop. 


T W () HUNDRED FIVE 


M I N N EA POL IS H ON E V W ELL 

Mercoid, Penn 
Perfex Controls 


Anchor Stokers 


Pacific, United States 
National, Kohler 
Boilers and Radiation 



Deming Pumps 


Gates Belts 


Herman Nelson 
Unit Heaters 


Shepard Water Heaters 


Spang Steel P:pe 


CANNEY-PLUE, INC. 


W holesalers 

PLUMBING and HEATING SUPPLIES 

74 RIVER STREET 
Rutland Phone 509-510 


Phone 127-W 
Agent for 

BUICK and CHEVROLET CARS 

GENERAL REPAIRING 
ACCESSORIES and SUPPLIES 

QartmelVs (far age 

JAMES R. CARTMELL, Pro/,. 

MIDDLEBURY, VT. 


Compliments of 

A. C. TABER CO. 

Paint Store 

Gift Counter 

MIDDLEBURY 


MODERN 

Linen and Laundry Service, Inc. 

Burlington, Vermont 


TWO HUNDRED SIX 



The L. H. Ufford Co. 

ROOFING CONTRACTORS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

Slate, Asphalt Shingle, Tar and Gravel or Built Up Asphalt Roofs 
Skylights and General Sheet Metal Work 
Rock Wool Insulation 
Modene Paint 

Bellows Falls, Vermont 


The MAUN SELL COMPANY 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

THE WORLD’S FINEST OFFICE MACHINES AND EQUIPMENT, SERVING 
UNDER ONE MANAGEMENT, VERMONT AND WESTERN NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Representatives for 

Audograph 

Marchant Calculator 
Underwood Typewriter 
S uNDSTRAND ADDER 

Elliott-Fisher Accounting Machines 
G. F. Steel Furniture 
Mosler Safes and Vaults, Doors 
VISIrecord 

Bonnar-Vawter Continuous and Multiple-Part Forms 

EACH DEPARTMENT HEAD A SPECIALIST IN HIS FIELD 

FACTORY TRAINED EXPERT SERVICE TECHNICIANS 

Repairing Overhauling Rebuilding 


TWO HUNDRED S E V E N 



TWO HUNDRED EIGHT 



44 PORTLAND STREET, WORCESTER 8, MASSACHUSETTS 


TWO HUNDRED NINE 



SWANSON’S RESTAURANT 


"ON THE ROAD TO COLLEGE” 

Wishes You Success On Your Final Examinations 

OPEN DAILY 6.00 A. M. to 5.00 P. M. 


CHARLES G. CASTLE 
Jeweler 


BARTER’S MUSIC STORE 

" Everything in the Music Line” 


46 Center Street 

TEL. 1886 

RUTLAND, VT. 


Lazarus Dept. Store 


Best Wishes 


Middlebury, Vermont 


CAMPUS THEATRE 


Batchelder & Snyder Co., Inc. 

PACKERS-PRODUCERS OF FINE FOODS 
BLACKSTONE, NORTH & NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 13, MASS. 


TWO HUNDRED TEN 



Compliments of 

W. H. WAITE, Inc. 

M1DDLEBURY, VT. 

BRUSH g LAPHAM Inc. 

Ford Sales and Service 

Westinghouse Appliances 

Case Farm Machinery 

Route 7 Phone 284-W 

MIDDLE BURY 

F. B. Ho 

Jewelers and 

7 CENTER STREET 

ward Co. 

Silversmiths 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 

Headquarters for 

LATEST RECORDINGS 

STATIONERY and BOOKS 

RICH’S 61 Main Street 

Flowers for All Occasions 



National Bank of 

FLOWERS BY WIRE 

Middlebury, Vermont 

PHONE 2620 



1831 - 1947 

Qove the Colorist 

MEMBER OF F. D. I. C. 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



TWO H U N I) H E D E L E V E N 




TWO HUNDRED TWELVE 




Smith Bros. 

BODY & FENDER WORKS 

Automobile Painting - Body & Fender Work 
Washing - Polishing - Waxing 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Telephone 404-M 12 Washington Street 

MIDDLEBURY, VT. 


Compliments of 
Sears, Roebuck and Co. 

Burlington, Vermont 


Compliments of 

THE 

GREY SHOP 

MIDDLEBURY 


Shop at Sears and Save 


The Women's College Shop 


Burlington Grocery Company 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT 
I. G. A. SUPPLY DEPOT 

I. G. A. Are Home Owned Independent Stores 


Palmer’s Dairy 

PASTEURIZED MILK and CREAM 
TEL. 229-J EAST MIDDLEBURY, VT. 


TWO HUNDRED THIRTEEN 




MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 
BOOK STORE 


KAPPEAS 


Where the College Croud Meets 


FOUNTAIN SERVICE 


Fresh Daily, 
Homebaked Pies 
and Cakes 


Dorm Deliveries 
Call 589 


TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN 



MCAULIFFE’S 

Books - Stationery 
Office Supplies 
Artist Supplies - Toys 

BURLINGTON, VT. 

BAILEY’S MUSIC ROOMS 

"Everything In Music” 

RECORDS - RADIOS - PIANOS 
SHEET MUSIC 

86 Church St. 
BURLINGTON, VT. 

Phone 238 


ABERNETHY CLARKSON 
WRIGHT INC. 

Vermont's Foremost Department Store 

2 Church Street 
BURLINGTON, VT. 

Compliments of 

STRONG HARDWARE CO. 

Main Street 
Burlington, Vermont 


BEST WISHES 

From the “Mr. Friendly” Company 

Make certain that your future plans include a program of 
financial security through adequate insurance protection. 


American Mutual Liability Insurance Company 

142 Berkeley Street Boston, Mass. 

Branch Office 

215 College Street Burlington, Vt. 

Telephone 2444 

Where so much protection can he bought for so little 


NELSON COAL COMPANY 

Shippers of 

Anthracite and Bituminous Coal 

WEST PAWLET, VERMONT 


T W O HUNDRED FIFTEEN 


Compliments of 



GEE’S 

RADIO ELECTRIC SHOP 

Dealer in 

STROMBERG-CARLSON, EMERSON 
MOTOROLA and 
STEWART WARNER RADIOS 

Repair Service on All Makes of Radios 

Shannon Street Phone 411 



Our Mai! Order Deparment 

If you live at a distance, our long 
established mail order department will 
give careful attention to your orders. 

s. s. pierce co. 

Boston 


C. G. COLE & SON 

Florist 

Flowers for All Occasions 
MIDDLEBURY PHONE 27 -W 


Compliments 

of 

A Friend 


TWO HUNDRED SIXTEEN 



Compliments of 

THE HUBBARD AGENCY 

Webster -Thomas Co. 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

217 State St., Boston, Mass. 

Phone 281 -W Middlebury, Vt. 

Packers ami Distributors 


MATCHLESS BRAND 

HOTEL MANGER 

FOOD 

at 


NORTH STATION 

★ 

It’s Modern, Spacious, Convenient 


SINGLE, $3.30 - $3.50 

Purveyors to 

MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 

DOUBLE, $4.40 - $6.60 

Air Conditioned Dining Rooms 

W. D. LAUNDRIE 

Serving New England For Over Sixty Years 

DOUBLE G. BLUE ORCHID 

brand G. GIOVINO & CO. brand 

Fruit - Wholesale 

Grocers - Produce 

◄ 


19-21 COMMERCIAL ST., and 64 SOUTH MARKET ST. 

TEL. LAF. 5050 

ESTABLISHED 1884 


TWO HUNDRED SEVENTEEN 



H. N. HARTWELL & SON, INC. 


Park Square Building 
Boston, Massachusetts 




WHOLESALE 

ANTHRACITE and BITUMINOUS COAL 
Domestic OIL Fuel 


CHAMPLAIN VALLEY FRUIT COMPANY, INC. 

WHOLESALERS 

FRUITS VEGETABLES BEVERAGES 

COMMERCIAL FREEZER STORAGE 
BIRDS EYE FROSTED FOODS 

BURLINGTON RUTLAND 

Phone 1230 Phone 895 

1231 896 

1232 


THE LANE PRESS 

fttlntezi 


TWO HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 


AtlclclUlmly ()nn 

"Vermont’s Finest Colonial lint” 

WILLIAM HEARNE, Manager 

DINING ROOM 

Steaks — Fish — Chops — Fowl 

Excellent Cuisine — Reasonable Prices 
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00 a. m. — Lunch 12 - 2 p. m. 
Dinner 6:00 - 8:00 p. m. 

Coffee Shop 
Gift Shop 


Compliments of 

The TRUMBULL ASSOCIATES, Inc. 

10 Lebanon Street 

HANOVER, N. H. 

Contractors and Builders 


two hundred nineteen 


Once again 


the KALEIDOSCOPE reflefts the life and spirit 

of Middlebury College 



Complete photographic service by 

Sargent Studio 

154 Boylston St., Boston 

Photography * Design * Technical Assistance 


TWO HUNDRED TWENTY