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VoL. XXV. No. 41. 


BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 1906 


Price Three Cents. 


MISSIN6 STUDEHT FOUND. 


Ferreira, '09, Missing Since November 7, 
Found on Sailing Vessel. 

Cesar Ferreira, the wealthy young 
South American Tech student who 
disappeared November 7, was found 
last Friday by the Pinkerton agency 
to have left Havana on a sailing 
vessel for his home in Montevidio, 
December 4. 

Ferreira left his room on Novem- 
ber 7, saying nothing to his room- 
mate as to where he was going. As 
he took nothing with him, leaving 
his room in its usual condition, no 
one paid any attention - to his ab- 
sence for several days. Then the 
Boston police were notified and im- 
mediately started a search for the 
missing man. 

Ferreira after leaving here went 
to New York, where he sailed for 
Havana. No cause for his departure 
has been assigned. His parents 
were alarmed by it and consulted 
the Pinkertons. 


SURGEONS REPORT OR FOOTBALL. 

In a recent article by Dr. F. H. 
Nichols and Dr. Homer B. Smith, 
surgeons who had charge of the 
Harvard squad during this last 
season, the following conclusions are 
stated after a discussion extending 
over sevei’al pages relative to in- 
juries received by the players during 
the season : 

1. The number, severity and 
permanence of the injuries received 
in playing football are very much 
greater than generally is credited or 
believed. 

2. The greater number of the in- 
juries come in the “pile,” and not 
in the open plays, although serious 
injuries are received in the open. 

3. The proportion of injuries re- 
ceived in games and in practice is 
about the same. 

4. A large percentage of the in- 
juries is unavoidable. 

3. The percentage of injuries is 
incomparably greater in football 
than in any other of the major sports. 

6. The game does not develop 
the best type of men physically, be- 
cause, too great prominence is given 
to weight without corresponding 
nervous energy. 

7. Constant medical supervision 
of the game is a necessity and not a 
luxury, although it is a question if a 
game, requiring the constant attend- 
ance of two trained surgeons, is 
played under desirable conditions. 

8. The percentage of injury is 
much, too great for any mere sport 

9;.- Leaving out all other objec- 
tions to the game, ethical and practi- 
cal, the conditions under which the 
game is played should be so modi- 
fied as to diminish to a very great 
degree the number of physical in- 
juries. 


The baseball squads at most of 
Ihe colleges and universities have. 
started; 3 «ihter practice. 


GALLED TD PORTD RIGD. 


Mr. Rolfe Goes to Island to Engage in 
Sugar industry. 

G. W. Rolfe, instructor in Sugar 
Analysis, has gone to Porto Rico, 
where he is to take charge of a 
sugar plantation on the Constanoia 
Estate. This estate is not far from 
the plantation where he was at work 
two years ago. 

Last year the plantation produced 
about 4,000,000 pounds of sugar, but 
as it is believed that the production 
can be much greater under different 
management, the owners have setit 
for Mr. Rolfe to take charge of the 
plantation during the coming sugar 
season^ to see if he can not find 
some way of increasing the output. 

During the three or four months 
that he will be away, A. G. Wood- 
man will take charge of his work at 
the Institute. 


Y. M. C. A. MASS MEETING. 

Fred B. Smith, Secretary of the 
International Y. M. C. A., spoke at a 
mass meeting held Friday in Hunt- 
ington Hall. His subject was “Profit 
and Loss.” Dean Merrill presided. 
Mr. Smith said that in the audience 
there were a large number of men 
who were going to fail utterly for 
no other reason than a warping of 
their moral foundations. 

He told of the unflattering ideas 
which the people of foreign coun- 
tries hold, and too often have a right 
to hold about Americans and Ameri- 
can politics. 

Mr. Smith concluded by telling 
the men that they were laying in 
college their moral foundations for 
life and for eternity 


MRS. RICHARDS TO SPEAK. 


Mrs. Ellen H. Richards is to visit 
Cornell University from Jan. 12 to 
Jan. 19, to speak to the students of 
the Agricultural Department on 
“ Sanitation, with Particular Refer- 
ence to that of the Country Home.” 

Mrs. Richards is also to speak at 
the Women’s Educational and In- 
dustrial Union Jan. 20, 27, and Feb. 
3 and 10. She will speak on “Home 
Economics from the Standpoint of a 
School Teacher.” 

COLLEGE NOTES. 

The date for the annual relay car- 
nival of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania has been set for April 28, 
1906. The contest will be held at 
Franklin Field, as usual, and the 
leading colleges, preparatory, and 
high schools of the country will be 
invited to enter teams. 

At the annual winter meeting of 
the New York Alumni of Phillips 
Andover a call was made for $300,- 
000 for a working fund, to be used 
to increase teachers’ salaries, provide 
necessary apparatus for laboratories 
and meetgeneral incidental expenses 
. not.Qtherwise'-proTJded for. 


DISPUTES LE6AGY TD TECH. 


Legacy of Nearly $70 000 in Favor of 
Tech Disputed. 

Today, in the Suffolk Probate 
Court, Judge Grant continues the 
hearing begun last Friday, of the 
contest over the will of Frank IT. 
Cilly. Testator died October 5 from 
gas poisoning, leaving a $70,000 
estate mainly to the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, of which he 
was a graduate. The allowance of 
the instrument is opposed by a 
brother, Harry E. Cilly, on the 
ground that at the time it was exe- 
cuted testator was of unsound mind 
and unfitted to affix his signature to 
such a paper. Contestant testified 
to testator’s peculiarities. 


NEW CLUB FORMED. 

The final meeting for completing 
the organization of the Mechanics 
Arts High School Club was held at 
the Union, Friday evening at 7.30. 
Mr. O. G. Fales, ’07, as temporary 
chairman, called tiie meeting to 
order. Then followed the reading 
and ratification of the constitution, 
after which the election ol officers 
took place, resulting in the election 
of the following; E. O. Hiller, Asst, 
in Mech. Eng., President; O. G. F.ales, 
’07, Vice-President; R. B. Weiler, 
’08, Secretary - Treasurer ; W. J. 
Cady,. ’06, A. F. Stevenson, ’07, M. 

S. Osborne, :08, and J. W. Nicker- 
son, ’09, Executive Committee. 

At the conclusion of bnsiness an 
informal hour was spent, during 
which refreshments were served. 


SOCIETY OF ARTS. 


The 617th regular meeting of the 
Society of Arts will be held at the 
Institute, room 22, Walker Building, 
corner Boylston and Clarendon 
Streets, on Thursday, Jan. 11, 1906, 
at eight p.Jt. 

Professor Alexander F. Chamber- 
lain of Clark University will address 
the Society on the subject of 
“ American Indian Art and Its Folk- 
Lore.” Members are requested to 
invite friends interested in the sub- 
ject. 

AM. INST. ELEC. ENG. TO MEET. 


There will be a meeting of the 
Boston branch of the American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers on 
Wednesday, January 10, in 6 Lowell 
at 8 o’clock. 

There will be no regular paper 
read, but an informal discussion on 
“The Fire Risk in the Modern Elec- 
tric Station.” The discussion will 
be started by Prof. W. L. Puffer 
and will be followed by Messrs. E. 
V. French, H, O. Locount and S. 
Hosmer. 

The subject announced is of great 
and increasing importance and a full 
attendance is desired of Institute 
members who will enter into the 
discussion. Members are expected 
to invite guests. 


CALENDAR. 

Monday, January 8. 

1.00 p.M. Freshman Class Meeting 

in Huntington Hail. 

4.00 P.M. Trials for 1008 Relay Te.am 

at the Gym. 

8.00 p.M. Third of Series of Lowell 

Institute lectures <in “The 
Scientific Prineipli's Underly- 
ing tile Art of Painting,’’ in 
Huntington Hall. 

Tuksd.vy, January 0. 

0.30 p.M. instructors’ Club Dinner 
at the 'I’ech Union. 

8.00 Chess Match, Tech vs. 

Jamaica Plain, at the Boston 
Che.ss (iliib’s Rooms, 

8.00 p.ji. Third of Series of Lowell 
institute Lectures on “ Tlie 
Devolofinient of Shakespeare 
as a Dramatist,’’ in Hunting- 
ton lliill. 

Wednksuay, JANU.tnv 10. 

800 P.Ji. Musical Club’s (auicert at 
the Colonial Club, Dorchester. 

8.00 p.m. Anniiai Cia.ss Cliainjjioti- 
ship Meet at the Gym. 


FACULTY NOTICES. 


Dyn. Elec. Mach — 'I’liere will be 
a one hour examination on Friday, 
Jan. 12, for Course I, third year. 

Third Year. Heat References. — • 

Watson, Book II ; Chapter I entire. 
Chap. II., entire. Chap. III., omit 
sections 22’2, 224, 230, 234. Chap, 
IV., omit sections 239, 240, 241. 
Chap. V., omit. Chap. VI., omit 
all after section 251. 

For a reference work on Pyrom- 
etry, see “High Temp. Meas.,” Le 
Chatelier, in Physical Libiary. Most 
important portion is the “Introduc- 
tion” and paragraphs headed “ Prin- 
ciple,” under each chapter. 

For further general references see 
Preston’s “Theory of Heat” (Phys- 
ical Library). Is is important to 
bear in mind tliat the general prin- 
ciples and phenomena diseussed in 
the lectures are, in the opinion of 
the examiner at least, of much more 
importance than eitlier the details of 
apparatus or intricate malberaatical 
deductions. C. L, Norton, 

NOTICES. 

n. I. T. A. A. — Winners of first 
and second places in the Freshman- 
Sophomore Dual Meet may get their 
cups by applying at the Cage. 

Instructors. — The Instructors’ 
Club will hold a dinner at the Union 
tomorrow evening. Mr. W. Lyman 
Underwood will talk on “In the 
Woods with an Indian.” 

1908 Relay Team. — Trials for the 
1908 Relay Team entered in the 
Annual Indoor Class Meet will he 
held at 4 f.m. today at the Gym, 
All middle and long distance men 
out. 

1908 Class Canes. — All men who 
want canes must make a deposit of 
$1.00 to a member of the committee 
before Wednesday. 

F. H. McGuigan. 

P. B, Barrett, 

H. W. Wellington, 


BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, JANTJART 8, 1906 


^bllshed every Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
ituing the college year (from September to June)i 
by etttdente of the Massachusetts Institute ot 
Technology. 


Fntered Recond-clnS 5 matter October 6 | 
1904f at Che post office at BosCod, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 


In charge of Ibis issue: 


E. W. JAMBS, 1907 


Monday, January 8, 1906. 


WILLUU A. NICHOLS, rSINTSR, 70S 6UUUBR ST,, REAR 

Tlie Chapel was a little previous. 
Friday was far too warni for a Hot 
Scotch. 

Owing to the fire in the Chapel 
last Friday, Mac will start his annual 
fire sale of Tech Pi-ofessor’s books at 
noon today. 

Jnst before this issue went to 
press, Tub Tkch received the fol- 
lowing letter from the 
By Hockey Team manage- 

l^equest. ment in regard to an 
article published in the 
issue of January 5 : 

To THE EDITOR ; 

I wish you to rectify the misstate- 
ments made in your Friday editorial 
concerning the Hockey Team. Any 
Statement tliat I had announced 
games in New York or during 
Christmas week is entirely false, as 
no such games had been arranged. 

I also wish that you would state 
that the manager did all that was 
possible about a rink and did it as 
early as October. No official dates 
were given to any “Tech” man. 
Trusting that these corrections will 
appear in Monday’s issue. I am 
B. K. Sharp 
m'n'g'r Hockey Team. 

■ On Dec. 18 The Tech published 
the schedule of the Hockey Team, 
which read, in part : “ Dec. 29. St. 
Nicholas II. T. at St. Nicholas rink, i 
New York. Dec. 30, Knickerbocker 
H. T. at St. Nicholas Rink, New 
York.” The representative of The 
Tech was given this schedule by a 
reporter of one of the daily news- 
papers, who had himself received it 
from the manager of the Hockey 
Team. It makes no difference to 
whom the “official dates” were given. 

On Wednesday, December 13, at 
least three of the Boston daily news- 
'papers informed the public that the 
Manager of the Technology Hockey 
Team had arranged a series of games 
to he played in New York during 
Christmas week. This fact was very 
much enlarged upon and given great 
prominence, because of this marked 
recognition of the Hookey Team by 
the two leading New York Hockey 
Teams. 

Now that it has developed that no 
such games were ever arranged, as 
the Manager himself acknowledges, 
The Tech can not see the object of 
the above letter, when we stop to 
consider that great discredit has 
been reflected upon Technology ath- 
letics by such inaccurate statements, 
no matter where * published or to 
whom given. 

The fact that the management 
made efforts to obtain a rink “ as 


early as October ” and had not con- 
cluded the arrangements up to the 
time that the last issue went to press 
seems direct confirmation of opinions 
expressed last Friday in The Tech. 

As has been announced before. 
The Tech wishes to have matters of 
interest and importance discussed 
through its communica- 
Abuse of tion columns. This is 
Communi' necessary in every com- 
cation raunity, but in none is it 

Privilege. more essential than in a 
college or university 
where diversified interests and 
activities give opportunity for the 
development of a myriad of ideas. 
Every decision of the Institute 
authorities — and tliere have been 
matters of serious import to decide 
lately, and will be in the future — 
will be favorable or averse to our 
undergraduate interests according to 
the interest wliicli students take in 
them. Whatever a man has to say, 
he has a rightful claim to a voice in 
the columns of The Tech, provided 
alwaj's that the ideas set forth are 
reasonable and the argument is one 
which has for its object the welfare 
of Technology or its students. 

' We refer particularly to the large 
number of absurd personal discus- 
sions which have lately been sent 
in. These seem to be merely an 
outlet for the inventions of men who 
desire to amuse the readers with un- 
important and improbable subjects. 
A man who hands in such an article 
as a communication is abusing the 
privilege extended to the student 
body as a whole ; he tends to dis- 
courage those who would hand in 
' opinions of importance and thereby 
works an injury to the Institute. 

When The Tsch asks for your 
opinions, the request is rather for 
new ideas, or the expression of 
opinions hitherto unknown. The 
expression of an opinion takes but 
little time, and while the remarks 
may be of interest to but a very few, 
on the other hand they may disclose 
subjects of general importance. If 
any student has a grievance let him 
present it for consideration, if he 
has a word of praise it is his duty 
to express it. By such a free dis- 
cussion of Institute affairs, the writer 
will profit by his own effort and 
Technology will profit by the result, 
while the paper endeavoring fully to 
represent undergraduate opinion 
will be more useful to its readers and 
to the college which it represents. 


■THE GIRLS ARE EOHD OF THESE ’ 


KNOW, MAY WEAR 



TbcIi Emblems 

Greatest Variety 
Lowest Prices 


I BENT & BUSH 

!5 SCHOOL ST. BOSTON, MASS. 

GEO. H. EELIS CO 

3 ^rmters 

No. 272 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Phone, 1549 


FAIL and WINTER STYLES 

NOW OPfeN FOR INSPECTION 
SUITS TO ME ASUR ES25to $40 

C. A. PATTEN & CO., Merctiaiit Tailors 

345 Washingrton Street* ^Boston 


(3 a Ivi n's 

ConoerpatOTiP 

Cor, Boylston and Fairfield Sts. 
124 Tremoni Street 


Decorations for Weddings 
and Receptions. Dinner- 
table and Ballroom deco- 


rations 


Plans and Estimates Furnished 
on Application. 

All Goods Required by 
Students at 

Maclachlan's 

502 Boylston St. 

Drawing Instruments and Materials, etc. 
Fountain Pens, Text-books 


THE MAN WHO DOSEN’T 


FOWNES CLOVES 


THE MAN WHO DOES 
KNOW IS STIRM TO 


===== HATS = 

For Ail Occasions and of Every Description 

HALL & HANC0O1 

420 Washington Street^ Boston, Mass 

3 Doors from Summer St, North 

COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

Huntington Ave. and Exeter St. 

PATRONAGE OF ‘*TEGK” STUDENTS SOLICITED IN OUR CAFE AND LUNCH ROOM 

The attention of Secretaries and Banquet Committees of Dining Clubs, Societies, 
Dodges, etc , is called to the fact that the Copley ’ Square Hotel has exceptionally 
good facilities for serving Breakfasts, Luncheons or Dinners and will cater especially 

Amos H Whipple, Proprietor 

Oak Grove Creamery Company, 

DAIRY L.UNCH ROOM. 

445 BOYLSTON STREET, COR. BERKELEY 

SANDWICHES OP ALL KINDS, SOUPS, TEA, COPPBE, AND REOULAR DAIRY LUNCH 
Our menu consists of a careful selection of t&e most appetizing 
and seasonable viands the marhet affords. Our unique combin- 
ation breakfast plan is proving a most popular feature. 

$5.50 Check for $5.00. Pure Milk and Cream. 

Music: Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5.45 — 7-45 P.M. 

STONE 6 WEBSTER 

.r_> 

Electdcal Erperts 
anb Engineers 

84 STATE ST.. BOSTON, MASS. 





3 


BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 1906 


Noyes Bros. 

The Sale will open Monday, January 1st 


Which will include Men's Shirts, Pajamas, 

Hosiery, Underwear, Blanket Wrappers, 

Storm Coats, Steamer Rugfs, House Coats, Neckwear, Fancy Vests, 
Flannel Suits, Golf Cluhs, Sweaters, Caps, Golf Bag;s, Handkerchiefs^ 
Sleeve Studs, Cravat Pins, Umbrellas. Ladies' Model Waists, Belts, 
Neckwear, Stocks, Sweaters. Kimonas, Lounging Wraps and Corsets, 

1-3 to 1-2 Usual Pricfi. Noyes Bros. /iostonfu.S.A. 

AT THE THEATRES. 


January 
Sale of 
Odd Lots 


LANDERS’ 

Lunch and Coffee House 

SPECIAL. ROOM POR LMOIBS 
25 Years' Experience 

20 Kunfington Avenue, near Copley Sq. 

BACK BAY, BOSTON 

▲ finely-appointed room for ladies 

fitted up with very latest improvements, with 
our usual £rst-cl&ss service. New room is in 
rear. 


We take pleasure in catering to our Tech 
patrons, and hope for a continuance of their 
trade. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 

Eighth Annual 
Special Sale of Full Dress 

For the next six weeks we will make 
you a Double Breasted Frock or Full 
Dress Suit, silk lined, as low as $40, 
or a Tuxedo, or Dinner Suit, silk lined, 
at $30. 

BURKE & CO. Tailors 

843 Washington St. 10 City Hall Ave. 

BOSTON 

1246 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 


— THE — 

GARRISON HALL CAFE 

Solicits the Patronage of 

TECH STUDENTS 


Cuisine and Service Excellent 


GEORGE R. HOWARD 

T. J. SOUTHWELL. 
Stationer and Newsdealer 

Circulating Library Laundry Agency 
Lad cs* and Qentlemen'a Furnishings 

66 HUNTINGTON AVENUE, BOSTON 

Near cor. of Irvington 5treet 

PRIEST'S DINING ROOMS 

102 DARTMOUTH STREET 

Under New Management 

N. W. TAYLOR & SON Prop. 

Morse & Henderson 

Importing 

Tailors 

Rooms 14 and 15 Telophone, 
Boylston Building Oxford, 99 

Single Suit Patterns and Trousers 
Patterns that cannot be seen in 
any other tailoring establishment 

SUITS $30 and Upwards , . 
OVERCOATS $30 and Upward 


Tremont Theatre. 

The second week of “ The Gal- 
loper ” at the Tremont Theatre 
starts off auspiciously tonight. The 
success of Raymond Hitchcock in 
the new Richard Harding Davis 
farce is a certainly. The audiences 
have well-nigh tested the capacity 
of the theatre at every performance. 
Both star and principals receive re- 
peated curtain calls after each act, 
and Mr. Hitchcock has been obliged 
to address his audience at every 
performance. A Hitchcock curtain 
speech is in itself almost worth the 
price of admission. The Boston 
press has enthusiastically endorsed 
the play, the star, the company and 
the production, and it is doubtful if 
a more generally successful farce 
has been presented in a Boston 
theatre in years. For a genuine 
evening’s entertainment the admoni- 
tion is go and see Hitchcock in “The 
Galloper.” 


Castle Square Theatre. 

The success of “ Oliver Twist,” 
the Dickens drama which has been 
running during the past week at the 
Castle Square Theatre, compels the 
management to announce the con- 
tinuance of this play for one more 
week. The new version of the story 
as a four-act drama by Mr. Comyns 
Carr, written especially for Mr. 
Beerbohii Tree, has delighted Castle 
Square audiences of large numbers, 
and enters tonight most promisingly 
on its second and last week. 


WRIGHT & DITSON 

Tennis Racket 

Championship 

Tennis Bali 

Base Ball Goods, Foot Ball 
Goods, Field Hockey, Golf, 
Archery, Croquet, Basket 
Ball, Ice Skates, Bathing 
Suits. Jerseys, Sweaters, trade 
Everything pertaining to 
Athletic Sports. Rules for 
all games. Send for Oata- 
logue. 

WRIGHT & DITSON, 

344 Washington St., Boston 

133S Hass Ave.. Harvard Sq. 
CAHBBtDes. 


Columbia College students re- 
cently hissed President Butler’s 
name at a public meeting, lowered 
the college flag to half-mast, and 
issued the Columbia Spectator with 
mourning borders, all on account of 
President Butler’s opposition to 
athletics at Columbia. The next 
utterance of President Butler on the 
subject was to the effect that it was 
not his intention to suppress ath- 
letics, but to provide contests for all 
students in.stead of for a few especi- 
ally trained ones. 


Insure Your Face 

against irritation. Keep it 
smooth and healthy by 
always using 

WILLIAMS’ |«tTc”£ 


WILLIAM A. NICHOLS 

Books, Periodicals, Catalogues 
Commercial and Society Work 

Telephone 1 380 Main 

208 Summer Street (rear) 
Boston, Mass. 


T. DEXTER JOHNSON GO. 

Dealers In High Grade 

Groceries, Teas and Coffees, 
Creamery Butter, Eges, efc. 

Choice Family Wines and Liquors. 
Leading Brands of Cigars. 

.Telephone, Back Bay 570. 

90 Massachusetts Avenue, 
Boston. 


ALBERT RUFF 

DEALER IN 

Provisions, Poultry and Gams 

Fruit and Vegetables, Hot House Products 

751 Boylston St., and Fairfield Sta, Boston 

Telephone, Back Bay 1764 & 1765 

W. M. ROWAN 

• THE TECH BARBER" 

Westminster Hotel . , St. jamesAve. 

SPECIAL TO STUDENTS 
HAIR CUT 25 CENTS SHAVE 15 CENTS 

WILLIAM B. LIBBY 


The Garden Press 


16 Arlington St., Boston, Mass. 

Teleplione 528-3 Back Bay. 

THE BRUNSWM 


Boylston and Clarendon Sts., BOSTON. 
(Adjoining Copley Square) 



Conducted on both the American and European 
Plans. 

AMOS BARNES, Proprietor. 
HERBERT H. BARNES, Manager. 

YOU CAN OBTAIN 

FIRST-GtASS BOARD 

AT 

Saint Botolph Street 

Twenty-oneMeals S4.50 Fourteen Meals $A.50 

Learn Telegraphy and R.R. Accounting. 

§50 to §100 per month salary assured our gxrad 
uates uuder bond. You don't pay us until you 
have a position. Largest system of telegraph 
seliools in America. Endorsed by all r^lway 
officials. OPERATORS ALWAYS IN DEMLAND. 
Ladies also admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buflalo, N. Y„ Atlanta, Ga., La 
Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., San Francisco, 


SMULLEN&CO. 

61 Summer Street 

cor, Chauncy Street 

One Block from Washington St. 
Telephone, Oxford 2860 


Successors to'Qeo. H. Lane, formerly 
of 18 Boylston Street 


We are making special winter 
prices on Suits and Overcoats at 
this time. Dress or Tuxedo Suit, 
silk-lined throughout, $45.00 

Overcoat, - - . . $30.00 


AND YOUIMO 
20 SCHOOL STREET 


PATENT LEATHER 
DRBSS PUMPS 

I 


DULL LEATHER 
HEAVY SOLES 

$ 5.00 


















BPSl^O^f,. 2^A?S., MO$TjPA.Y, JANUARY g, ,19.06 


I 


Served either Hot or Cold 


at our Fountain 


COPLEY SgUARE 
Cor. Boyiston and Clarendon Streets 


This is a Food Drink used by 
Havvaiians. A pleasant, delicate, 
cooked, highly nutritious, nat- 
ural food agreeable to the most 
fastidious. 


NOTICE. 


T. METCALF & GO. 


CF.HOVEY&CO, 


Men's Furnishing Goods, 

Custom Made Shirts a Specialty. 

33 Summer Street CTT IVT 

Avon Street I 5 US I U iN • 


ROWING BEGINS AT HARVARD. 


Established 1874 

DURGIN, PARK & CO. 

Market Dining Rooms 

3(i North Market and 31 Clinton Streets 


BOSTON 
OPEN PROM S A.M. TO^ 7 P.M. 


Scott 


DANCING CLASS 


<£D Co. Llth 


Our “all ready ’* clothing for men 
is representative of the very best in 
tailoring. 

While it is “ all ready ” to wear 
it is made according to the exacting 

Rotates of those most critical. If 
you wish to pay much more for 
work) fabric and fashion no better 
-^go to a good tailor, but remember 
Ujis, w'e save you the everlasting 
“try ons.” 


A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE 
DEVOTED TO THE 
INTERESTS OF THE 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE 
OF TECHNOLOGY 


IScw Model Paddocks 

•30 *35 *50 


Medium and Heavy-Weights 


Qua Club Check Suits 

* 2 f 5 *30 *35 *40 

Our fit is according to the way 
you’re built, not according to the 
way you ought to be built. 


375 Washington St. opp. Franklin 


— 1JIE BACK JAY IWKBH— ^ A R O’ S 

State Street Trust Go.i 

130 MASSWSETTS tVt ■ Mem, 

Is coBventently locuted for persons residins I TT J. S4 ^ 

In or near the Back Boy and the Penway , £rt*3TCTtltty £^3,p€1* 

Calling Cards 


Interest Allowed on Deposits of $3.00 and over J 


SAFE DEPOSIT DOXE8 TO RENT 


Original Designs Highest Grade Work 


READING NOTICE. 


En try- books for the Ann ual Indoor 
Class Championship Games to be 
held Wednesday, Jan. 10, are posted 
in Rogers Corridor and in the Gym- 
nasium, and it is jlesired that these 
entries be as full as possible. 


Positive information has been 
obtained regarding the whereabouts 
of the Alteneder instruments, 
marked Earl Howell Reed, .Tr., 
which were taken from the third 
year architectural drawing room 
about a month ago. Unless they 
are returned at once to the Cage,” 
the owner will take steps toward 
recovery and prosecution. 

Earl H. Reed, Jr. 


Boston Linen Boston Bond 
Bunker Hill 

Writing Paper and Envelopes 
Photo Albums 
Blank Books 


EVERYTHING IN STATIONERY 


In response to the first call for 
Freshman crew candidates, 60 men 
have reported at the University Boat 
Club. The candidates will be divi- 
ded into small squads, and the most 
experienced men will be placed tem- 
porarily in the first squad. Regular 
practice will begin Monday, Jan. 8, 
under the direction of Coach Wray, 
and will continue until the river 
opens in the spring. 


Tutoring for conditions in all 
entrance subjects except Science. 

W. B. Waterman, 

214 Boylston Street. 


SAMUEL WARD GO. 
57-63 Franklin Street 

BOSXOIM 



theatre attractions 


MR. A. J. SHEAFE 

Announced tbe Opening of his 

SCHOOL OF DANCING 


AT THE HUNTINGTON CHAMBERS 



P BZanehe WaUh. 

HOLLIS. — John Drew in De Lancey.*' 
COLONIAL.— Edna Mav. 

TREMONT. — Raymond Hitchcock. 
BOSTON.— Jefferson DeAnsells in **Pantana.' 
n A JESTIC.— Dockstader’s Minstrels. 
CASTLE SQUARE.-" Oliver Twist." 


Private lessons by appointment, either at 
studio or residences. 

Classes ’ii Huntington Chambers Hall 
Mr. sheafe is a member of the American 
National Association of Masters of Dancing'. 


firnniri/ tickets j- jt 
llClinitlk all theatres 


345a Washington Street, Boston 


Copley Square 
Telephone 

2329, 2330 and 2331 Back Bay 


MrH. L, J. Chandler's clasfi in dancing for be 
ginners Tuesday evenings, Odd Fellows Hall» 
2076 Massaobusetta Ave., Cambridge. Private 
lessons by appointment. Best of reference. 


Telephone 617>5 Camb. Residence 40 Inman 
Street, Cambridge. 


The Technology Review 


MACULLAR 

PARKER 

COMPANY 



Spreads and Banquets 


A SPECIALTY 
Call for Estimates 


Publixhed by the Association of Class 
Secretaries 

83 Newbury .Street, Boston 

The Review aims to develop closer 
relations among Institute men, and to 
stimulate their interest in the work of 
the College. 

It is in no sense an engineering 
magazine, but deals broadly with the 
problems of Technological Education 
and the responsibilities of the profes- 
sional man. 


There is something about our 
clothing which gives it a decided 
and attractive individuality — per- 
haps the combination of style, fit, 
shaping, patterns — all these count 
in the appearance of a garment 
Our new Fall lines are now on our 
counters and this is a good time to 
purchase while the stock is fresh 
and all siees represented. We call 
special attention to the handsome 
patterns in suits for young men. 


M. J. SEILER, Caterer 

i 15 DARTMOUTH STREET 


TECH STUDENTS 


Given special attention in the treatment of 
Bald Heads, Fallir'j Hair, Dandruff,, 
Eczema, and all diseases otskinand scal^. 
manicuring. 


S. ELLA PAUL, Dermatologist, 

Room SIS Huntington Chambers. 


$16 to $40 


Subscription, Onb Dollar a Year 
Single Copies, Thirty-Eive Cents 


Made In Our Workahops eu the PremUes 


400 WASHINGTON STREET 


MISS EVERETT 

Stenography, 

Typewriting, 

Duplicating 

486 Boylston St keom 3 'Phone 21846 B .B. 




Introduced and 
Sold Solely by 


407 to 411 
Washinfiton St.