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CAliSNJDAB. 


LAST GAM^TOMORROW. 

Varsity Plays Dartmouth.— 1908 and 1909 

Decide Class Championship. 

The Technology basketball season 
wilt end tomorrow evening with two 
games, the Varsity vs. Dartmouth, 
and the Sophomores vs. the Fresh- 
men. Both games will be exciting 
and interesting. The Banjo Club 
will play selections between the 
halves of both games. 

The Dartmouth team is one of the 
best college teams in the country 
this season, and as they do not play 
Harvard, this is the only opportunity 
that Bostonians will have to see 
their work. They won from Yale 
last Saturday evening by a score of 
4B to 14. The Technology team 
met Dartmouth on December 16, 
and lost by a score of 30 to 2. As 
this was Tech’s fourth game, how- 
ever, and the team was not in the 
best form, no comparative state- 
ments can be made. The team work 
has improved wonderfully as a whole 
since that time, as the results of the 
recent games with Worcester Poly- 
tech and with Holy Cross show. 
The Tech men can be counted upon 
to give a good account of themselves, 
provided there is a good cheering 
section present to applaud good play- 
ing and to urge them on at critical 
moments. 

The Sophomores will probably 
get the better of the Freshmen in 
the Class Championship game, as 
most of the former team are mem- 
bers of the Second Varsity. More- 
over, so few men have come out for 
the Freshman team that it has be- 
come doubtful whether that class 
will have a team. There is still 
time to get up a fast five, and, as 
the Sophomores are not experts, a 
^ood game should be the result. 
Cheering sections will do much to 
decide the issue of the class game, 
and as this effort is for the Class 
Championship in basketball and no 
empty honor, a large attendance is 
expected. 

1907 ATTENTION. 

Your attention is called to the fact 
that class dues are payable on or 
before March 15. These dues are 
necessary to settle the debts con- 
tracted last year by the Athletic 
teams, and to pay for the ballots 
used in Class and Prom Committee 
elections. The following are author- 
ized to collect dues in the different 
courses ; Course I, XI, G. S. Gould; 
II, D. G. Robbins; III, L. C. Hamp- 
ton; IV, F. G. Dempwolf; V, F. C. 
Elder; VI, F. E. Goodnow; VII, 
VIII, F. S. McGregor; X, E. H. 
Packard; XIII, H. S. Wonson. 

G. A Gkiffis, Treas., 1907. 

TECH CLUB MEETING. 

Mr. Percival Lowell will address 
the Club on the seventh evening of 
the season, Thursday, March 8, at 
7.45 P.M., giving an illustrated talk 
on “ Mars,” Preceding the address 
there will be a business meeting. 


NEW ROWING PLANS. 

Races at Poughkeepsie Maybe Shortened 
to Three Miles. 

In connection with Coach Court- 
ney’s suggestion that the race for 
Varsity eights at Poughkeepsie this 
season be shortened from four miles 
to three, which was made shortly 
after the races last summer, Coach 
Goodwin, of Columbia, has now also 
come out in favor of this shortening 
of the distance for the Varsity race. 
In a recent interview in which he 
was discussing the advisability of 
introducing a quadruple sculling 
race on the program at Poughkeep- 
sie, he said in part concerning the 
shortening of the Varsity race : 

“If some change is to be made 
why not make the distance of the 
Varsity race three miles, instead of 
four? That is a change that all 
would welcome. The fourth mile 
of a rowing race is nothing but tor- 
ture. Most races are won or lost at 
three miles, and the fourth mile is 
nothing but a test of the nerve of 
the men who are rowing. 

. “ I believe that it is this fourth 
mile that makes rowing races danger- 
ous to the men who are taking part 
in them. The added strain is just a 
little bit more than they can bear. 
It is for this extra mile that we have 
to put in all that long season of 
rowing. 

“ I believe that rowing would be 
less drudgery and more real sport if 
there were three mile Varsity boat 
races. Apparently it is because Ox- 
ford and Cambridge row four mile 
races that they are the vogue in this 
country.” 

In addition to Mr. Courtney and 
Mr. Goodwin, Coach Dempsey, of 
Georgetown, has also spoken strongly 
in favor of the three mile course for 
Varsity eights. The three colleges 
forming the Intercollegiate Rowing 
Association are Cornell, Columbia 
and Pennsylvania — the other three 
crews, Georgetown, Wisconsin, and 
Syracuse, row at Poughkeepsie on 
invitation of the first three. 

Since two of the three colleges in 
power, Cornell and Columbia, have 
come out in favor of the three mile 
course, it looks now as though this 
might become a reality. It is not 
thought that Coach Ellis Ward, of 
Pennsylvania, is opposed to short- 
ening the course. As this topic nas 
been taken up again the action of 
tlie hoard of stewards will be looked 
forward to with interest, 

LECTURE ON SHODDY. 

The 620th regular meeting of the 
Society of Arts will be held in 22 
Walker on Thursday evening, 
March 8, at eight o’clock. Mr. 
Henry G. Kittredge, editor of the 
Textile American, will address the 
Society on the subject of “ Shoddy : 
The History of a Woolen Rag.” 
The lecture will be illustrated by 
lantern slides. Members are re- 
quested to invite friends interested 
in the subject. 


LECTURE OlUVOLUTION. 

Interesting Address by Dr. Qraebau, ’96, 

on Paleontology. 

Dr, A. W. Graebau, Technology, 
’96, of the University of Columbia, 
gave an interesting lecture yester- 
day afternoon in 6 Lowell on “Evo- 
lution,” In the short time available 
he merely showed the methods of 
development, saying that the theory 
is so well recognized today that it 
needs no pi’oof. Evolution may be 
defined as the development of one 
form of life from a lower form. The 
title of Darwin’s famous work, 
“Origin of Species,” which first 
systematically exploited the modern 
idea of this great subject, has led to 
prolonged disputes as to the scope 
of the term “species.” The present 
opinion is, however, that in this con- 
nection species are not recognized 
by nature and really do not exist, 
being merely arbitrary divisions 
made by man. In the broadest 
sense, it is the individual and not 
the species which is to be studied. 

In the investigation of the origin 
of the plant or animal individual it 
is necessary to consider the millions 
of forms of lower life of prehistoric 
ages which have long since become 
extinct, as it is these forms which 
must be regarded as the ancestors of 
the modern phases of life. This 
subject falls within the domain of 
the paleontologist, for it is in fossils 
that the infinitely slow progression 
of life forms appears. 

Every man has passed through the 
characteristics of his immediate 
ancestors no matter how briefly. 
The course of successive generations 
has been divided into more and 
more stages, always growing shorter 
and sometimes finally becoming ex- 
tinct. It is called acceleration when 
the number i;nd complexity of the 
stages increase and retardation when 
they decrease. The gist of the 
second law is that in passing through 
development every form of life keeps 
on in some one line until turned 
aside by an outside force. 

Dr, Graebau closed bis lecture by 
exhibiting various lantern slides of 
photographs of fossils, confirming 
ills preceding dissertations by call- 
ing attention to their various stages 
of development, 

SPECIAL GLEE CLUB TRIALS. 

There will be special Glee Club 
trials Thursday, March 8, at 4 p.w., 
in the club, rooms at the Boston 
Y. M. O. A. The present member- 
ship of the club is eighteen and 
there should he thirty- five men to 
sing, positions being open for seven- 
seen more men. 

1907 KOMMERS. 

Tlieie will be a meeting of the 
1907 Kommera committee in the 
general library at 1 o’clock Friday, 
March 9, — R. E. Keyes, chairman, 
Fales, Bancroft, Coffin, Bryant, 
Packard, toastmaster. 


WEDNESDAY, MAKCH 7. 

4.00 p.M. Rehearsal of Tech Show 
Chorus at the Union. 

4.00 P.M. Glee Club Rehearsal at 
tho Boston Y. M. C. A. 

4.00 p.M. Techniqtie ’08 Electoral 

Committee Ballots due at the 
Cage. 

7.30 p.M. Mechanical Engineering 

Society Meeting at the Union. 

Tiiuksdat, Mabch 8, 

1.00 p.M. Freshman Class Meeting 

in Huntington Hall. 

1.30 p.M, Weekly T. M. C. A. Meet- 

ing in Parish Hall, Trinity 
Church. 

4.00 p.M. Rehearsal of Tech Show 

Principals at the Union. 

4.00 p.m. Glee Club Rehearsal and 
Special Trials at the Boston 

Y. M. C. A. 

4.00 p.M. Banjo Club Rehearsal in 

33 Rogers, 

6.30 p.M. Junior Class Dinner at the 

Tech Union. 

7.45 p.M. Technology Club Meeting 
at the Club’s Rooms. 

8.00 p.M. Basketball, Tech vs. Dart- 

mouth, Sophomore vs. Fresh- 
men, at the Gym. 

8.00 p.M. Society of Arts Meeting 

in 22 Walker. 

Friday, March 9. 

4.00 p.M. Tech Show Chorus Re- 

hearsal at the Tech Union. 

4.00 P.M. Mandolin Club Rehearsal 
in 31 Rogers. 

6.30 P.M. Walker Club Dinner at 
the Technology Clnb. 

7..S0 p.M. Mining Engineering So- 
ciety Meeting at the Tech 
Union. 


NOTICES. 

Freshmen. — There will be an im- 
portant meeting of the Freshman 
Class in Huntington Hall, Thursday 
at one o’clock. 

nining Eng. Society. — The Min- 
ing Engineering Society will meet 
Friday evening, March 9, at the 
Union at 7.30. Mr. E, G. Ackeson 
will address the Society on “Dis- 
covery and Invention.” 

Y. M. C. A. — At the regular 
weekly meeting of the Y. M. C. A, 
Thursday noon in Trinity Hall, the 
Rev. W. G. Puddefoot will speak on 
Frontier Work. There will be 
special music at this meeting. 

Civic Club. — The next meeting of 
the Civic Club will be hold at the 
Tech Union on Monday, March 12, at 
eight o’clock. The subject to be 
discussed is : “ Resolved, That the 
Defects in American Municipal Gov- 
ernment are Due to Our Republican 
Form of Government.” 

Senior Portfolio,— Owing to the 
large ru.sh of men during the latter 
pai’t of February it was found im- 
possible to accommodate all those 
desiring sittings before March iO. 
The photographer lias therefore con- 
sented to extend the time limit a 
few days. All those who have not 
as yet attended to this matter are 
requested to do so at once, in order 
not to delay furtlier the setting up 
of the sheets in alphabetical order. 

Louis Mksm hit, for Committe. 



2 


BOSTON, MASS.. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1906 



Publisbed every Monday* Wednesday and Friday 
during tbe college year (from September to Jane), 
by students of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 


Entered as second-class matter October 6, 
1904* at the post olhce at Boston, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress of March 3, 1870. 

In charge of this issue: E. W. JAMES, 1907 

; Wednesday, March t, 1906. 

I We regret to announce the resig- 
nation d£ Mr. H, D. Bounetliean, ’08, 
jfrom.the Business Staff of The Tech. 

I - 

; The new book by President 
Pritchett, “ What is Religion ? and 
iOther Student Questions,” concern- 
: ing which some refer- 

Or. ence was made in these 

Pritchett’s columns in advance of 

iNew Book, its publication, is now 

] out. Reaching us at the 

Inearing of the end of his incumbency 
bf the presidency of the Institute it 
has unusual significance. 

I The book is a small one, consist- 
jing of five talks' made by President 
j Pritchett to as many classes of stii- 
jdents since his coming here six 
‘years ago. The first of these talks, 
“ What is Truth ? ” is a reprint from 
i Outlook. At the time of its publi- 
cation in that periodical it attracted 
: much attention, and many will be 
glad to have it in this |)ermanent 
i form. The other four talks deal 
i more particularly with religion and 
j its significance to tbe student of 
1 science. They bear the titles of 
j What is Religion ?” “ The Science 
; of Religion,” “The Significance of 
{ Prayer,” and “Ought a Religious 
1 Man to Join a Church ? ” Perhaps 
the most significant thing about 
these talks o'n religion is the fact, 
that they are constructive rather 
‘ than destructive, notwithstanding 
the frank admission that, to most 
students of science the so-called 
orthodox i-eligious belief is practi- 
cally impossible. These talks, while 
dealing with the most difficult of 
subjects, are models of direct and 


many splendid things which he has 
done for the Institute and which 
have brought both him and the 
Institute into the public eye, his 
greatest work has undoubtedly been 
that which he has accomplished with 
the student body itself. His constant 
endeavor lias been tbe enrichment 
of tbe life of the student. What 
would be tbe student life today with- 
out the Tech Union, Field Day, the 
Tech Show, the Tech Song Book 
and tbe Technology Chambers ? The 
graduate of ten years ago finds it 
difficult to realize that so great a 
change in the social life and spirit 
could possibly have been effected in 
tbe short period since his student 
days. 

We all of us regret most keenly 
that Dr. Pritchett is to leave tbe 
Institute, notwithstanding the fact 
that he goes to take up what may 
prove, perhaps, an even greater 
work ; and we think we voice the 
seniiment of every student in the 
Institute in saying that this little 
book, with its dedication to us whose 
welfare and interests have lain near- 
est his heart, comes as a personal 
message which we shall all gratefully 
cherish in the days to come. 


\ “THE GISZ.S AKE FOHD OF THESE '> 


Tsch Emblems 

Greatest Variety 
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CITY TRUST CO. 

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Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 

Phieip Stockton, President. 

C. F Adams, ad, Vice-President. 
Gborgb W. Grant, Treasnrer. 
George S. Mumeord, Secretary. 
P. D. Haughton, Asst. Secretary. 

Your Deposit Account is invited. 


PACH BROS. 

■Pbotofivapbs 

SPECIAL RATES TO TECH MEN 

1181 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. 

Next to Beck Hall • - - Gainbrldge 

TEL. 734-3 CAMBRIDGE 

MISS EVERETT 

stenography. 

Typewriting, 

Duplicating 

486 BoyUton St. ((oom 3 'Phone 21846 0 .8, 


HIGH GRADE SHOES FOR COLLEGE MEN 

EXCI,US1VE MODKI.S 
SHOWN ONLY BY 



LENT SERVICES. 

AVeekday services daily in Trinity 
Church at 9.30 a.m. (except on 
Wednesday when the service will 
be at 11), and at 5 p.m., with ad- 
dresses on Wednesday, Thursday, 
and Friday. Sunday services : Holy 
Communion at 9 a.m., morning ser- 
vice and sermon at 10.30, service 
and sermon at 4 p.m., and evening 
service, with special preachers, at S. 
Music hy vested choir of men. Sit- 
tings free. All Tech men cordially 
welcome. 


INVENTOR. 

The Technical Magazine for all 
Technology Stodcnts. Something 
different from all those you have 
seen. Instructive, and written by 
men of authority in their special 
lines. Contributors are Prof. Geo. 

Haven, M. 1. T. Mechanism, 
W, F. Hilli brand. Analytical Chem- 
istry, the T elautograph, elc. 5 cts. 
at newsstands, 50 cts. per year. 

INVENTORS' EXCHANGE, 
88 Broad St., Boston, Mass.' 


THE HENRY H. TUTTLE CO., BOSTON 


M A T S 

For All Occasions and of Every Description 

HALL & HANCOCK 

420 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

3 Doors from Summer St., North 


COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 


Huntin 0 ton Ave. and Exeter St. 

PATRONAGE OF ‘TECH" STUDENTS SOLICITED IN OUR CAFE AND LUNCH ROOM 

The attention of Secretaries and Banquet Committees of Dining Clubs, Societies. 
Lodges, etc , is called to the fact that the Copley Square Hotel has exceptionally 
good facilities for serving Breakfasts, Luncheons or Dinners and. will cater especially 

to this trade. AmOS H, Whipple, Proptictot 


lucid statement. And those of us 
who were fortunate enough to hear 
‘ any of them are glad that the per- 
sonal and even chatty style which is 
characteristic of all Dr. Pritchett’s 
talks has been retained in the printed 
forin. Perhaps the most significant 
feature of this little book to tliose 
' of us who are students at the Insti- 
, tute is its dedication. 

To 

The students ichose friendship and 
fellowship form the i»sp>i- 
ration of a college 
J?reside>it' s 
Life. 

It is well understood by those who 
know Dr. Pritchett well, that his 
chief regret in leaving the Institute 
is the severing of his relations with 
the students, with whom, ever since 
" his first coming to the Institute, liis 
relations have been most friendly 
and cordial. N'otwiUistanding tlie 


Fownes Gloves 

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AND ALL GOOD DEAL- 
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Thick Lather 

creamy and lasting, is tlie 
kind you need. You’ll find 
it in the old reliable 

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lEIectrical Experts 
anb Engineers 

84 STATE ST.. BOSTON. MASS. 








BOSTON, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1906 


3 


Newman 
the Shoeman 

Will give Students 

10% 

Newman’s Shoes are for 
sale only at 

15 Beacon St«^ Boston 


Shoes Made to Order and 
First Class Repairing . . 

WORK SHOP ON THE PREMISES 



SHIRTS 

FOR BUSINESS S).OOto7.25 

FOR DRESS < - S2.00 to 12.75 

OUTING SHIRTS - $ 1 .50 to < 5.00 

Shirts 

for Oolf, Tennis, Polo, Hunting, Boating 

Oxfords, Percales and Madras 
$1.60 to 4.50 
Corded linen and Batiste 
$5.76 to 7.25 

Scotch, English and French Flannel 
$3.60 to 7.76 
Pongee, English and China Silk 

$7.60 to 15.00 

TkT r% Washington and 

lyOVCS Bros, Summer Streets 
Boston, U. S. A. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


Eighth Annual 
Special Sale of Pull Dress 

For the next six weeks we will make 
you a Double Breasted Frock or Full 
Dress Suit, silk lined, as low as $40, 
or a Tuxedo, or Dinner Suit, silk lined, 
at $30. 


BURKE & CO. Tailors 

843 Washington St. 10 City Hall Ave. 

BOSTON 

1246 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 


The Improved 

BOSTON 
GARTER 

The Standard 
for Gentlemen 

ALWAYS EASY 

The Name " BOSTON f 
GARTER" is stamped' 
on every loop. 




CUSHION 
BUTTON 

CLASP 

Lies fiat to the leg — never r 
slips,Tears nor Unfastens* 
Sold Evervuihcre. 

Sample pnirf S>ik 50o. { 
Cotton S.’it'. Mnllccl 
on iCLieifitot price*. 
0«D. Proat Od. 
Bobtoii,iSIua$.,li.S.A. 

Pair Warranted 


Morse & Henderson 

Importing 

Tailors' 


Boom 14 and 15 Telephone, 
Boylston Building Oxford, 39 


Single Suit Patterns and Trousers 
Patterns that cannot be seen in 
any other tailoring establishment 


SUITS $30 and Upwards 
OVERCOATS $30 and Upwards 


NOTICE. 


Sophomores. — The Technique 
Electoral Committee ballots are due 
today at 4 p.m. See that you return 
them to the Cage before that time. 
There are still about twenty-five 
ballots at the Cage which have not 
been called for. Any member of 
the Class who has not yet received 
a ballot should call for it at once. 


OHIO CLUB DINNER. 


The Ohio Club held a very suc- 
cessful informal dinner at the Union 
Monday night, at which there were 
fourteen members present.. Prof. 
Talbot interested the men greatly 
with a description of his trip to 
Ohio. Mr. Bushnell also spoke. 


WALKER CLUB TO DINE. 

The Walker Club will give a 
dinner at 6.30 o’clock next Friday 
evening at the Technology Club. 
Mr. Isaac W. Litchfield, ’85, a mem- 
ber of the Technology Fund Com- 
mittee, will speak. Every under- 
graduate, as well as every active 
alumni member, is urged to attend 
and also to bring a guest. 


SENIOR MARRIES. 

li. R. Heuter, ’06, of Waltham 
was married last Tuesday in Provi- 
dence to Miss Levina S. Blakney. 
The home of the bride is in Bedford 
but she has recently been living in 
Boston. The wedding came as a 
surprise to the groom’s friends. 


L. P. HOLLANDER CO. 

NBVJ SPRING FASHIONS 
IN MEN’S CLOTHING . . 

NOW IN STOCK 

Largest Assortment of Fine Goods in the City 

208 BOYIvSTON ST., BOSTON. 


CHARLES B. WOOLLEY 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer In 

Beef Pork, Mutton, Veal and Poultry 

ALSO FRUIT and VEOETABLES OF ALL KINDS 

Stalls 25, 27, 29 and 31 WasMngfon Market Connected by Telephone BOSTON 

COES AMD YOUIMG 

SCHOOL STREET BOOT SHOP 

ORIGINATORS OF STYLE FOR COLLEGE SHOES 

COES AND YOUNG, 20 SCHOOL STREET, BOSTON 


WILLIAM A. NICHOLS 
ftrintcr 

Books, Periodicals, Catalogues 
Commercial and Society Work 

Telephone 1380 Main 
208 Summer Street (rear) 
Boston, Mass. 


— THE — 

GARRISON HALL CAFE 

Solicits the Patronage of 

TECH STUDENTS 

Cuisine and Service Excellent 

GEORGE R. HOWARD 


—THE BACK BAY BRANCH— 

OF THE 

State Street Trust Ge. 

130 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. 

s conveniently located for persons residing 
In or near the Back Bay and the Fenway 


Interest Allowed on Deposits of $300 and over 


SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES TO RENT 


W. M. ROWAN 

"THE TECH BARBER' 

Westminster Hotel . . St. )ames Ave. 

SPECIAL TO STUDENTS 
HAIR CUT 2S CENTS SHAVE IS CENTS 

T. J. SOUTHWELL 
Stationer and Newsdealer 

Circulating Library Laundry Agency 
Lad es* and Oentiemen^s Furnishings 

66 HUNTINGTON AVENUE, BOSTON 

Near cor. of Irvington Street 


T.E. Moseley & Co. 

CORRECT STYLES IN 
HIGH AND LOW CUT 

FOR — 

Fall and Winter Wear 



Prices, $3. 50 to 58.50 


GYM SHOES, $1.75 AND $2.25 

145 Tremont St. 

Between Tempie PI. and West St. 
BOSTON 

10 Per Cent Discount to Tech 

DR. W. J. CURRIER 

DEIMTIST 

OFFICE HOURS S TO A 

90 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Refers by permission to Prof. T. Bartlett 

Learn Telegraphy and R.R. Acceunfing. 

SBO to 8100 iier month salarv assnrert our grad 
nates under fiond. Yon don’t iiay us iiiitirvon 
have a position. Largest evsteiii of telearaph 
schools in America. Entlorsed h.v all riiilway 
oflicjals. OPERATORS ALWAYS I.\ D KMAXD. 
Ladies also admitted. Write for catalogue. 
MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 
Cinoinnati, 0„ liulTalo, N. Y., Ai laiita, Ga.. La 
Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., San Prancisoo, 
Cal. ’ 

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TAILORS 

51 Summer Street 

cor, Chauncy Street 

One Block from Washington St. 
Telephone, Oxford 2860 

Successors to Geo. H. Lane, formerly 
of 18 Boylston Street 

Our Entire Spring and Summer Slock Now 
Complete 

“ PRICES POPULAR ” 
“QUALITY UNSURPASSED” 

AntisipaUng a busy season we would request 
the privilege ot an eariy call, Ciooils ordered 
now can be delivered at any future time. 








BOSTON, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1906 


P O I 

Served either Hot or Cold 
at our Fountain 


COPLEY SQUARE 
Cor. Boyiston and Clarendon Streets 



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COR.TREMOWT. 


This 18 a Food Drink used by 
Hawaiians. A pleasant, delicate, 
cooked, highly nutritious, nat- ' 

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oral food agreeable to the most colonial.- P rank Daniels m sergeant Bme. 
fastidious. TREMONT.— Leslie Carter In •> Adrea.” 


llftcatre HttraciionB The Boylston Florists 


T. METCALF & GO. 


C.F.HOVEY&CO. 

Men' s Furnishing Goods. 

Custom Made Shirts a Specialty. 

33 Summer Street IJ/^CTP/^IVT 
42 Avon Street Dv/3 I V/IX a 


TREMONT. — ■ Leslie Carter In Adrea.” 
BOSTON.— ” Pearl and the Pumpkin.” 
HAJESTIC — ” Mlzpab.” 

CASTLE SQUARE.- “The Fatal Card.” 


HERRICK 


TICKETS Blue Prints by Electric Lights 


ALL THEATRES 


and Drafting Supplies 


M.™ a specially. Tei.phonr'’''’^ I L. MAKEPEACE 

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I can offer vou a larger and more complete 
•asortment tnan can be Been elsewbere, and at 
bwer prices for the same qualities. Look in 
and examine tny prices before placitigyour 
order. Coif Breeches, {tiding Breeches, and 
l>rc8e Suits a Special^, 

DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS 


Uecb Pin 

{fraternity Pins and Seals 
Steins ano /Bebais 

FREDERICK T. WIDMER, 
suocesBor Henij Gullti & Son, 


Tech Chambers 

DORMITORY 
FOR STUDENTS 

IRVINGTON and ST. BOTOlPH ST. 

BOSTON, MASS. 


The Old Corner Bookstore, 

Incorporated. 

27-29 Bromfield Street, 
Boston, ass. 

“LOWEST PRICES.” 



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Mmii 





)o^Eys 

dbocolate iSonbons. 

“Name un Every Piece.” 

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RETAIL STORE, 418 Washington Street 

LANDERS’ 

Lunch and Coffee House 

special, eoom for lmdies 

2s Yeara* Experience 

20 Huntington Avenue, near Copleif Sq. 

BACK BAY, BOSTON 

$5.50 FOR $5.00 

Wc have laan^rated a comroutatlon meal 
ticket especially for STUDEItTS 


TRINITY 

COURT 


2 STUART 
STREET 


REGULAR MEALS 20c. and 25c. 

Table d’hote for 35c. 

Served from 5 30 to 8 p.m. 

MR. A. J. SHEAFE 

Announces the Opening of hia 

SCHOOL OF DANCING 

AT THE HUNTINOTON CHAMBERS 

Private lessons by appoititment, either at 
studio or residences. 

Classes in Huntington Chambers Hall 
Mr. Sheafe is a member of the American 
National Association of Masters of Dancing* 

PRESTON’S GOFEEE HOUSE 

1036 BOYLSTON STREET 

NEAR MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 

TECH TRADE SOLICITED 


Hotel Westminster 

COPLEY SQUARE 
BOSTON - - MASS. 


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