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THE TECH 

VoL. XXVI. No. 55 BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, MARCH 4, 1907 Prick Thrke Cents 


TECH LOSES TO MAINE. 


TRACK MEETS CANCELLED. 


’98 AND ’D8 KOMMERS. 

Prof. Winslow Gives New Definition of 
"Tech Spirit.” 

’98 and ’08 started a new cus- 
tom in great style Saturday even- 
ing at their Kommers at the Union. 
Ninety men were pre.sent, twenty- 
two ot them being ’98 men and five 
members of the University of 
Maine basketball team. Prof. C. 
K. A. Winslow, secretary of 1898, 
and H. T. Gerrish, president of 
1908, acted as toastmasters. 

The speakers were Professor 
Winslow, A. A. Packard, H. S. 
Coburn, W. H. Godfrey, W. 11 . 
Putnam, and F. B. Perry of the 
Class of 1898, and G. T. Glover 
and Kurt Vonnegut of the Class 
of 1908. 

During the dinner a telegram 
was sent to the Northwestern 
Alumni Association which was 
holding a dinner at the University 
Club, Chicago. The telegram 
said : “ ’08 and ’98 dining at Tech 
Union pause before their sixtli 
beer to .send greetings.” 

Prof. Winslow gave a new 
definition for Tech spirit in his 
speech. He said that the Tech 
Spirit is the scientific spirit which 
no one but scientists and engineers 
possess. The scientist feels that 
there are certain facts concerning 
the world, and he learns these 
facts so as to control the world. 
The world is a fact and far from 
being ignored must be studied. 

It used to be a fact that the 
talkers and thinkers ran the world 
but now the scientists and engi- 
neers, who know facts and go by 
them, are coming into power. 
These men are working to make 
the world reasonable. 

“At Yale,” said Prof. Winslow, 
“they have a custom of standing 
up and saying ' For God, for 
Country aiid for Yale.’ It is a 
fine thing, but I think we can have 
a better motive for our life, ‘For 
Truth, for Service, and for Tech- 
nology.’ ” 

TEXANS CELEBRATE. 

The Texas Club met at the 
Union Friday evening to celebrate 
the first Texas holiday, March 2, 
the day ou which Texas declared 
herself independent of Mexico. 
After enjoying one of the best 
dinners ever served at the Union 
the Texans spent the evening in 
talking on subjects dear to them, 
and in singing Southern songs and 
having a jolly good time. 


BASEBALL IN JAPAN. 

Again the word comes across 
the water from far-away Japan to 
the effect that college baseball is 
more than retaining its hold upon 
the Japanese youth. Not 011I3’ 
have the big schools taken it up 
with success, but the small boys, 
in a truly American manner, are 
utilizing back yards and vacant 
lots. The game of one old cat is 
undoubtedly in vogue, although 
the dispatches do not mention it 
explicitlj', and the j'oungsters are 
already looking forward to future 
’varsity honors. The great Ameri- 
can game appears to have invaded 
Japan more successfully than any 
other couiitry.it has moved against 
up to the present date. 


After Making 16 to I Score in Three 
Minutes Tech is Defeated 36 to 31. 


Tufts and Holy Cross Refuse to Meet 
Tech in Indoor Contests. 


CALENDAR. 

^lOND.w, March 4. 

1. 00 p.M. Meeting of the Board of 

Editors of The Tiwh in 30 
Rogers. 

4.00 P.M. Prof. Swain’s Reading in 

II Eng. B. 

4.00 P.si. Meeting to form Debating 

Club in 26 Rogers. 

4.00 P.M. Banjo Chib Rehearsal in 
33 Rogers. 

4.00 P.M. Mandolin Club Rehear- 

sal in 31 Rogers. 

,( 15 p M. Tech Show Chorus Re- 
hearsal at the Union. 

Tuesday, March 5. 

2.30 p.M. Tech Show Principals Re- 
Jicarsa) at the Union. 

5.00 I’.M. Basketiiall, Tech vs. Dart- 

mouth, at the Gym. 

Wkdne.sday, March 6. 

4.15 P.M. Tech Show Chorus Re- 
« liearsal at the Union. 


FACULTY NOTICE, 

First Year English. — The previous 
notice of transferring Mr. Batche- 
lor’s division of sections 3, 4 and 
II from 23 and 23 Eowtll to 27 
Rogers, refers to the class reciting 
Wednesday at 10 and Friday 
at 12. 

NOTICES. 

Found. — A watch and lob. Owner 
may obtain same b}' applying to 
Bursar Rand. 

Ohio Club. — The second dinner of 
the Ohio Club will be held at the 
Union at 6 o’clock, March 14. 
Tickets seventy- five cents. 

Secretaries. — All lists of clubs and 
organizations to appear in 7 >r//- 
ii!q 7 tc, ’o< 9 , must be left at the Cage 
for F. FI. McGuigun before the end 
of the week. 

Missouri Club. — The Missouri Club 
will hold a dinner at the Union 
Frida}', March 8, at G. 30 P.M. All 
men who have at any time been in 
Missouri are eligible to inember- 
.“hip and are requested to inform 
the secretar}', A. F. Herold, ’og, 
at once. 


1905 DINES. 

At the annual dinner of the 
Class of ’ 05 , M assach usetts I ust it lUe 
of Technology, held Friday night 
at the Bellevue, the interesting 
fact was brought out that the 
aggregate monthly earnings of the 
thirty-three men present amounied 
to 553270. One man reported that 
he was earning over $200 a month, 
four had an income of over $150 
and five over 51125. As the men 
are only two years out of college 
their earnings were considered a 
lucky omen for the future. 

G, B. Perkins spoke sliortlj' on 
the work of the 1905 Boston Club. 
H. A. Wentworth, the vice-secre- 
tarj', was toastmaster in the ab- 
sence of Secretarj- R. H, W. Lord. 


The Williams-Brown basketball 
game which was called off on ac- 
count of the scarlet fever scare at 
Williams, is to be played after 
March 9, the date on which both 
schedules run out. The scare 
isn’t as bad as it has been painted, 
and the Williams authorities ex- 
pect no more trouble. 


Technology lost to the Univer- 
sity of Maine basketball team 
Saturday' evening at the Gj'm, 36 
to 31- Tech started off with a 
rush in the first half and in a few 
minutes had scored eight baskets 
while Maine was getting one point. 
Maine braced then while Tech 
look a slump and the “clown East’’ 
men pulled out winners. 

Tech displayed the best kind of 
team play during the first three 
minutes of the game. The ball 
went from one hand to another and 
into the basket with the regularity 
of clock work. Tech’s slumps 
came along then and in the rest of 
the half the visitors scored seven 
baskets while Tech was getting 
four. 

In the second half Tech played 
even slower while the Maine men 
mixed things in a lively manner 
and by excellent team play and 
accurate shooting tied the score 
and then won out. 

Pierce played a star game for 
Tech while he was on the floor. 
He and Cahill threw eleven of 
Tech’s fifteen baskets. Scales 
was Maine’s best man as he threw 
six baskets, Morton was knocked 
unconscious in the second half 
during a mixup with Kinnear but 
was able to continue the game 
after a few minutes rest. 

Tomorrow evening the Institute 
five will meet the championship 
Dartmouth team at the Gym. 
Tickets are now on sale, and no 
lover of the game should miss this’ 
opportunity of seeing the strongest 
college team in the East play. 

The summary'; 

TKCH. MAINE. 

KJmiear (Capt.), l.f. Morton 

Caliill, r.f. l.g., Stuart (Capt.) 

Pierce (Gregory), c- c., Black 

Campbell (Nichols), l.g. r.f , Scales 
Wentworth ,r.g. 1 . f*, F rench{WardsworLh 

Score — Maine 36, Tech 31. Goals 
from floor — Kinnear 2, Pierce 5, Cahill 
6, P'reuch z, Scales 6, Black 2, Went- 
worth 2, Stuart 2, Morton 2, Wadsworth 
3. Goals on free tries — Scales 2, Cahill. 
P'ree tries missed — Scales. Pouls called 
—Kinnear, Wcutworth, Scales, Nichols. 
Referee — Whitmore, first half; Totmaji, 
second half. Timers — Mahan and 
Southard. Time — 20 minute halves. 
Attendance — 200. 


EAST vs, WEST. 

An interesting comparison of the 
average statistics of the develop- 
ment of western and eastern col- 
lege men has been drawn by Dr. 
George A. May, physical exam- 
iner at the University of Michigan, 
who has taken Michigan and Yale 
as colleges representative of the 
sections; while the average number 
of smokers at Yale is 43-74 per cent 
as against 33.95 per cent at Mich- 
igan, where the students are older, 
the average lung capacity at Yale 
is the greater, standing at 249 
cubic inches, while Michigan’s is 
236 cubic inches. Dr. May ascribes 
this difference to the fact that more 
attention is given to physical train- 
ing at the preparatory schools in 
the east. The other statistics fol- 
low: Michigan — Age 19 years 4 
mouths; height 67.7 inches; yveight 
138.51 pounds. Yale — Age 18 
years 10 month; height 67.80 
inches; weight 137.75 pounds. 


Holy Cross has cancelled the 
meet with the Institute scheduled 
for the first week in March at the 
Gy'ui, and Tufts has refused to go 
on the floor against Tech in either 
a dual or triangular meet. The 
Holy Cross meet was definitely 
arranged and Manager Tobin had 
secured the necessary officials, so 
the announcement that the Worces- 
ter boys had called the meet off 
came as a great surprise. The 
reason given was that a number of 
the best rimiiers on the Floly 
Cross team had been put 011 pro- 
bation at the mid-year exams. 
Holy Cross also attempted to with- 
draw the relay team from the 
B, A. A. 

Tufts had asked for a dual meet 
some time in February, but owiug 
to the length of the spring season. 
Manager Tobin did not wish two 
dual indoor meets. He pioposed 
a triangular meet between Tufts, 
Holy Cross, and Tech, and every'- 
thing seemed favorable for the 
meet early in March. When Holy 
Cross cancelled the dual contest, it 
was thought that Tufts would be 
perfectly willing to meet Tech 
alone. Greatly to Tobin’s surprise 
he received iu answer to his in- 
quiry an announcement that Tufts 
would not run against Tech, either 
this year, or in the imiiiediale 
future. The trouble seems to be 
due to personal ill feeling between 
the leading authority iu athletics 
at Tufts and someone connected 
with the Institute track team. 

This leaves the track team in a 
quandary for an indoor meet. At 
the present time an attempt is 
being made to arrange a dual in- 
door meet with Harvard. If this 
goe.s through it "will indeed be an 
attraction, as Harvard has not met 
Tech ou the boards for a number 
of years. 

'The spring season is fully settled . 
The contracts for the dual mee' 
with Brown at Tech Field, and (or 
the meet with the University of 
Maine at Orouo, have been signed. 
Besides the Maine trip, the track 
team will also go to Worcester for 
the Intercollegiate meet. 

1909 ELECTORAL COMMITTEE. 

The results of the elections for 
the igog Technique Electoral Com- 
mittee areas follows; R. H. Allen, 
Belden, Bundy, Critchett, Dicker- 
man, Emerson, Finnie, Fiagg, 
Godfrey, Gram, Hutchinson, Jen- 
kins, Keeney, Kellogg, W. J. 
Kelly, W. W. King, Koppitz, 
Kurtzmaun, Miss Longyear, Lord, 
Miss Luscomb, Moses, Scharff, 
Taite, Whitaker. 


Despite the fact that the Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Association re- 
fused to pa.ss a rule barring Fresh- 
men from the Intercollegiate games 
next May, the University of Penn- 
sylvania will not enter any first 
y'ear men in the meet. The 
Quakers have a nmnber of promis- 
ing Freshmen athletes and were 
counting ou them to win poiuts for 
the red and blue in the staclinni; 
but Dr. E. F. Smith, provost of 
the university, has put a damper 
on the scheme. 





o 


BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, MARCH 4, 1907 


THE TECH 

PubUshed every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 
during the college year (from September to June ), 
by students of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 


Entered ?iS second-class matter October 6, 
IQ04, at the post office at Boston, Mass., under 

the Act. of Congress of March 3. JS79. 


Editorial Staff. 

M, E- Dennv, 1903, EUitor-jii-nhiej 

W. F. UOLKE J K . 190S, .Vanagtm liilUor 

L, . H. KiKG, 1909 A. K. M1TCHEI.I., 1909 

M. R. SCHAKFI', 1909 A. G. KBLI.OGR, I909 

R. E. HUrelllNSGN, 1909 


News Staff, 

P. R. POWEI.L. igoS 

H. W. Hooi-E, igo8 H. I. Pearl. 1910 
F. B. Hooker, Jr., 1910 D. C. McMurtrie, 1910 

Business Staff. 

R. W. PARLiN, 1907 Business Manuffsr 

p. B Loro. 1909 G. A. II.iYXES. 1909 


OFFICE hours: 

Editor-in-chief, 30 Rogers 
Toes., Wed. Sot., lo-Il. Thu.. Fri., re-i. 

Business Manager i — ^ Daily 

Managing Editor, News bureau.. .S.30-9 Daily 

Bditor-in-Charge, News Bureau 

Tuesday and Tbursd.iy .1-5. Saturday lo-ii 


! Confrfhtifions are requested from all under- 
graduates, atuuini ando,fflrers<jf in,struction. 
Jda anouumous mannscriBt can be accepted. 
■ All communications regarding sithscriE- 
(loiis or advertisements should he addressed 
to the Business Manager. 


Subscription. - - *1.50 per year in advance. 

Single Copies 3 Cents. 


In ciiarge of this issue: M. R.SCHARFK, 1909 


Monday, March 4< 1907. 


President Roosevelt in bis .speech 

at the Harvard Union gladdened 
the hearts ol a great many Harvard 
men with his defence of football. 
His stand, that in so much as pre- 
paratory schools have proven able 
to keep the game clean and above 
criticism the colleges should be 
able to do likewise, should be food 
for a great deal of thought. He 
would have the college authorities 
interfere when interference is nec- 
essary, ‘‘making this interference 
as little officious as possible, and 
yet as rigorous as is necessary to 
achieve the end," aud would above 
all else never abolish a game be- 
cause it is a rough form of athletics. 
The President has shown a tend- 
ency to meet on an equal ba.sis 
rather than .to try to lead under- 
graduate opinion. He talked at 
Cambridge not only to the students 
hut to the Faculty and the gradu- 
ates as well, and he hit the nail on 
the head. 

It is the graduate who makes 
business of the undergraduates’ 
play that causes most of the trouble 
in college athletics. Left to itself 
the preparatory school instinct of 
fair play and sportsmanship will 
not wear itself out in four years 
of college life unless it is ground 
down by the objectionable " offici- 
oitsness ’’ of older men who wish 
to lead in a field that has loiigj 
since been closed to them. The 
President realizes that the young 
men who are having their play- 
spell know how to conduct that 
play as well as the men who are 
having work-spell know how to 
C 9 iiduct that work. He is willing 
to meet the college athlete and the 
younger men of the college world 
on that basis, giving them the ad- 
vantage of what he knows of plaj’^ 
and its influence on after life. He 
didn’t carry the " big ’stick ’’ with 
him to Cambridge, at least to use 


on Harvard athletics, because he 
realized that you caii’f club Ameri- 
can boys into being honorable in 
their sports. They are that by 
instinct already. — Bosfou Herald. 



PHotog'rapHer 

100 Treanoiit Street 

Special Prices to Students of the Institute of 
Technology 


COMMUNICATIONS. 

The Edltoredo tiot hold themselves resjmn. 
fiible /or Opinions expressed bij correspond- 
ents. - .. 

To The Editor of The Tech: 
zjjop Tcchtiique is sure of a safe 
cruise, if the crew ' that will man 
the good ship work with the same 
unselfish motives that have so far 
inspired those who assisted in its 
lamicliiug. Hitherto the arrauge- 
meuts for the election of the Elec- 
toral Committee have been made 

by the class itself, but this year it 

appears that in the rush of modern 
times, such a method has become 
obsolete, and some kind person or 
persons unknown, have unselfishly 
taken upon themseh-es this ardu- 
ous task of arranging for the elec- 
tion. The facts that no one has 
the right to make such arrange- 
ments, without class sanctioji, and 
that thej' are spending class funds 
without authorization, dwindle 
into insignificance wtieii compared 
with the uobilitj' of the under- 
taking of lifting this burden from 
the shoulders of their busy class- 
mates. 

That these benefactors have not 
disclosed their identity argues well 
for their modesty, as they undoubt- 
edly fear that should tSiey become 
known, they would undoubtedly 
be overwbelmned bj' the praise 
their class would be sure to bestow 
in payment for this act, which is 
almo.st beyond all praise. 

H. L- Sherman. 


To The Editor op The Tech: 
From the editorial in Wednes- 
daj' morning’s Tech it is evident 
that the object of the debating and 
current events club to be formed is 
misunderstood. The object of this 
club is not to encroach upon the 
Civic Club. The organizers of 
this club before deciding to or- 
ganize a new club tried to see if 
it would be po.ssible to gain their 
object by joining the Civdc Club. 
They found that the Civic Club, 
although still existing nominally, 

(Contitui^d on Page 3.) 


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COMMUNICATIONS. 

{Continued from Pnge2j 
had not shown aiij' signs of activity, 
to the student body at large dur- 
ing this year at least. If the club 
held any meetings or debates they 
were not made generally known. 
Thinking, therefore, that it was 
not possible to gain the object in 
view by joining the Civic Club, the 
organizers oi this club decided to 
attempt an entirely new organiza- 
tion. The object will be to pro- 
mote debating, and keep its mem- 
bers ill touch with the current 
events of the country. If the Civic 
Club still maintains any activity, 
the organizers of the new club will 
be pleased to join the Civic Club, 
realizing the fact that there is not 
room for two siicli clubs in the In- 
stitute, and the better plan would 
be to join the club already estab- 
lished, rather than join a new one. 

Natii.vx R.vx.sohofu. 

To THE Editor of thf; Tkch : 

Through the courtesy of one of 
the editors of The Tech the ’09 
Technique Election Committee has 
been informed in advance of the 
criticism appearing elsewhere in 
this issue on its methods of proced- 
ure, and take this opportunity to 
answer them. 

To prevent any misunderstand- 
ing on the part of the members of 
the Class of ’09 the committee out- 
lines its action in the following 
paragraph. As to the committee 
assuming any authority, as the 
correspondent charges, il can be 
said that the committee was regu- 


larly appointed by the- President of 
the Class, who acts as its chair- 
man. The charge of secreejf is 
refuted by the signatures beneath 
this article. 

The correspondent intimates 
that he believes that the proceed- 
ings of the committee were irregu- 
lar. It is impossible to answer 
any such general charges through 
the columns of Tine Tiecii, but it is 
needless to say that the committee 
will report its proceedings to the 
next class meeting, where all 
objects can be aired, and perhaps 
in better taste than through these 
columns. 

A. L. Moses, Chairman. 

A. L. DlCKliKJIAX. 

B. E- Hutchinsox. 

G. I. Ejiersox. 

H. Whitaker. 


The colleges of Western Penn- 
sylvania and West A’irginia hav^e 
organized a league for the promo- 
tion of clean atldetics. The bj'- 
laws and rules and regulations are 
little different from those in vogue 
in the eastern universities. The 
one year rule, drastic measures 
against professionalism and the 
other regulations have been copied. 
The meeting, however, adoiited 
an original idea for legislation 
against summer ball players, de- 
barring them from participation in 
college athletics foi' the next year 
after the offence is committed. 
Washington and Jefferson balked 
on the one year rule, and after a 
long discussion, this matter was 
taken under advisement by the 
executive committee. 


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now tn 

Special Prices made for 

early orders. 

BURKE & CO. Tailors 

18 School Street 843 Washington Street 

BOSTON 

1246 Mass. Ave., Harvard Sq., Cambridge 


TECHNOLOGY CHAMBERS 

IRVINGTON and ST. BOTOLPH STREETS 


BILLIARD AND POOL PARLOR 


Public Bowling Alleys for Ladies and 
Gentlemen, Private Parties Solicited 

Telephone, Back Bay 22036 




4 


BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, MARCH 4, 1907 


Spring and Summer, 1907 

S PRING and SUMMER FABRICS are 
now ready for your iospection at our 
rooms* Thanking^ you W past favors 
we earnestly solicit your continued patron^ 
age* Hirly orders desired* 

MORSE & HENDERSON 

7a/7ors--— “ 

RcM>ms 14 and 15 Telephone Oxford, 99 

18 BOYLSTON ST.. BOSTON. MASS. 


Try our 8 x 10 Bromide Enlarge- 
ments made from Films or Plates 
25 cents each, 5 for $1.00 ...... 

F. T. KING & CO. 

51 BromfieU Street Boston, Mass. 

Dealers in Anti-Trust Photographic Supplies 



ST. BOTOLPH ST. 

First 'Glass Board 

M. E. PRIDHAM 


POOLE'S ORCHESTRA 

ISO TREMONT STREET 
Tel, 2821-1. Oxford 


The only place to dine 
^ is at the ^ 



352 MASSACKUSETfS AVENUg 
BOSTON) 

[461 Columbus Avenue 


THE OLD COLONY PRESS 
#rintcrsf 

Books, Periodicals, Catalogues 
Commercial and Society Work 


Photog'raplier for Tech ’06 

NOTH AN 


384 Boylston Street 


and 3 ParK Street 


STUDENTS' ATTENTION 

XHE AVEIMUE OAF" El 

is the Only Place tOoEat in the Back Bay. Music every 
night from 6 (to 8. (Special attention (paid to Students. 

Wm. Pink & Co. 

471 Columbus Ave., near W. Newton St. 

P.S. Open from 6 A. nit. to 12 P.M. 


J,'.Sr£: TYPEWRITERS 

Rebuilt machines with new t’lates, type, ribboos, etc., $28 to $35, Guaranteed, 

Machines almost new at low prices. Rented, Repaired, Exchanged. 

THE TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE, 


J. e. McCOLGAN, Mgr. 


Tel. Id6, Main 


WILLIAM B. LIBBY 

THE GARDEN PRESS 

Fine Mercantile^ Book and Job Printing 

J6 Arlington Street - BOSTON 

Telephone 528*3 BacK Bay 



NOTE 

BOOKS 


omol 


HOLLIS ST REET THEATRE. 

Maxine Elliott’s greatest success 
as a star has beeii won in “Her 
Great Match” by Clyde Fitch, and 
a notable engagement is assured 
her at the Hollis Street Theatre. 
It is well remembered what - a 
triumph she won as Jo Sheldon and 
her admirers will be delighted at 
having this opportunity to renew 
pleasant acquaiiitanpes. Miss 
Elliott has just returned from a 
triumphant engagement extending 
to the Pacific coast, and in every 
city “Her Great Match” has been 
endorsed. 

COLONIAL THEATRE. 

Everybody likes a dashing comic 
opera production and that is why 
“The Grand Mogul” has scored 
such an unqualified success at the 
Colonial Theatre. It is one of, the 
biggest hits of the season, and all 
declare that Frank Pixley aud 
Gustave Euders have united on a 
delightful comic opera, while Klaw 
and Erlanger have staged it with 
that magnificence for which their 
plays have always been noted. 
Frank Moulau is just in his ele- 
ment as the star comedian and 
Maude Eilliaii Berri makes a dash- 
ing prima donna to win the musical 
honors. 


PARK THEA TRE. 

Hattie Williams has had three 
weeks of unqualified success with 
“The Eittle Cherub” at the Park 
Theatre and every student in town 
has been there to laugh over the 
drolleries of the bright musical 
comedy. It has repeated here the 
big hit that it scored in New York 
at the opening of the season and 
the park Theatre is proving far too 
small to hold all those who wish to 
enjoy this lovely production. Miss 
Williams is a new star but she is 
already a favorite and a notable 
engagement is assured for “The 
Eittle Cherub” in Boston. 


NEW CLASSIFICATION OF ROCKS. 


€bcatre attractions. 

BOSTON.— " Way Down East." 
COLONIAt.— “ The Grand Mogul.” 
CASTLE SQUARE.—" The Eternal City. 
GLOBE.—" Girls Will Be Girl.” 
HOLLIS.— “ Her Great Match.” 
MAJESTIC.— Ermeti Hovelli. 

PARK.— "The Little Cherub.” 
TREMONT. — Mr. Mantel! in Sbakspere. 


HpDDIf 17 TICKETS 0* 
llcnAiwIi all theatres 

Copley Square 
Telephone 

2329, 2330 and 2331 Back Bay 



FOR SALE BY 


Telephone 1380 Main 

152 PURCHASE STREET 
Boston, Mass. 

BtEVATOB 


MAKER, TO WEiH^RER. 
*THE_ 



$300 Ha.t 


412 WASHINGTON ST. 
SPRING STYLES 


Boston 


THE BRUNSWICK 

Boylston and Clarendon Sts., BOSTON 

(Adjoining' Copley Senare) 



Conducted on both the American and European 
Plans. 


AMOS BARNES, Proprietor. 
HERBERT H. BARNES, M>nas». 


At a meeting of the Geological 
Journal Club held Friday, M. W. 
Hayward, ’ 06 , reviewed a paper on 
the texture of igneous rocks, by 
Cross, Pirrson, Iddings, and Wash- 
ington. The authors present a 
scheme for classifying rocks with 
regard to “Crystallinity, Granu- 
larity, and Fabric,” and propose a 
number of new technical terms to 
designate various modifications. 

W. T. de Steigner reviewed a 
paper by M. R. Campbell on cer- 
tain rock folds in Arkansas. Prof. 
Jaggar explained a number of 
difficult points to those present. 


Professor William T. Sedgwick 
presents, in the current number of 
Scienee, a deeply interesting article 
on “The Expansion of Physiol- 
ogy.” 


READING NOTICES. 

Tutoring in Mathematics and 
Science. E. Q. Adams, Cage, 


POSITIONS OPEN 

for 1907 technical graduates in all 
branches of engineering and general 
technical rvork. Openings also for men 
wishing to take up teaching. Write us 
today. 

HAPCOODS 

The National Organization of Brain Brokers 

Broadway & Duane Street, New York 


PACH BROS. 

lC»boto 0 rapbs 

SPECIAL RATES TO TECH MEN 

1181 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. 

Neit to Beck Hall • * < Cambriilge 

TEL. 734-3 CAMBRIDGE 

AH Goods Required by 
dtudents at i— 

Maclachlan’s 

502 Boylston St. 

Drawing Instruments and Materials^ etc 
Fountain Pens, Text-books 

$5.50 FOR $5.00 

Wb have inaugurated a commutatloo meal 
ticket especially for STUDENTS 

Petit Luncli 

REGULAR MEALS 20c. and 25c. 

Table d’hote for 3Sc. 

Served from 5.30 to 8 p.m. 


F. W. BARRY, BEALE & CO. 

STATIONERS 

1F8-110 Washington cor. Elm St., Boston 


Fine Athletic Goods 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Basket Bail 
Hockey Sticks 
Hockey Skates 
Skating Shoes 
Sweaters Jerseys 

and all kinds of 

ATHLETIC CLOTHING 
and Athletic Imjilements 

Catalogue Free to any address 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

Boston and Cambridge, Mass. 

Chicago, 111. Providence, R. I. 



Lamson & Hubbard 



HATS 

FURS 


LAMSON & HUBBARD 


229 Washington St. 
92 Bedford Street 

BOSTON, MASS.