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THE TECH 

Voi,. XXVII. No. 70 BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, APRIL 13, 1908 Price Three Cents 


SENIORS WIN FROM JUNIORS BY SMALL MARGIN 
IN ROT CONTEST AT ANNUAL SPRING GAMES. 


PERFORMANCES WERE GOOD IN SPITE OF HIGH WIND. 


Close Competition Prevailed Throughout. Some Hard Races in the Middle 
Distance Runs- Kid Race a Feature. 


SENIORS TO DECIDE TODAY 
IMPORTANT GLASS MATTERS. 

MEETING AT ONE O'CLOCK. 

Speakers at Class Day Exercises Were 
Elected Last Friday. 


Elections for the Class Day exfereiscs, 
held at a meeting of the Class Day Com- 
mittee last Friday, resulted as follows: 
— orator, J. G. Reid; gift orator, G. 
T. Glover; class prophet, B. L. Gimson; 
historian and statistician, Kurt Vonne- 
gutj presentation orator, F. II. Mc- 
Guigan. 

A meeting of the senior class will be 
held at 1 o’clock today in Huntington 
Hall to decide whether the notices sent 
out from the faculty in regard to de- 



B. L. Gimson, 

Class Day Prophet. 

grees should be distributed after the 
annual dinner, as in other years. At 
a meeting Friday, witli 50 present, the 
majority decided that this feature of 
the dinner be done away with, but the 
meeting today is being held in order 
that a larger number might express 
their opinions. 

Another question to be deeided is 
whether the dinner shall be held on 
Thursday or Friday evening, of Senior 
‘Week. In former years the dinner has 
been held on Thursday because the 
alumni reception came on Friday, but 
this year there is to he no reception. 

If the class votes not to have the 
notices sent down to the dinner, each 
man will receive his notice through the 
mail. The Class Day Committee desires 
a large attendance at the meeting today. 


TECH STUNTS THE BEST. 


Tech Night is Most Successful of 
Hippodrome's Run. 


With Andrew Nicholas ltebori 1907 as 
ring master, the stunts of the Teeli con- 
tingent at' the Hippodrome Friday night 
were more than equal to the regular 
features, which were enjoyed to a great- 
er or leas extent by the most apprecia- 
tive audience the Boston Hippodrome 
has so far had. 

In the grand entree came first the 
architects with Stiles 0. Clements, the 
southern wonder, on Fussy Maud. 12. 
M. Price and C. J. Brown formed the 
nucleus for two diminutive horses that 
pranced around the arena and then en- 
tered into a race with the mule for the 
exit. The mule, of course, won. J. A. 
McGinnis, not unlike the Proteus of old, 
assumed the shape of a dragon. The 
costumes were lent for the occasion by 
tne Copley Society. 

“We Stand for the Old Stein Song” 
formed the main strain of the architec- 
tural show. Apparently overflowing 
with foam, a huge stein made out of 

(Continued on page 2.) 


There was some terrific competition 
in the annual spring track meet Satur- 
day at the Field. In most of the races 
the llnishes wore very close and the 
contest between the four classes was 
the hottest known in years. 

After a very even and hard fought 
contest the seniors won from the juniors 
by hut two-thirds of a point. Tire 
scores rolled up by the two classes were 
45 and 44 1-3 points respectively. To 
add to the general interest caused by 
such a close finish tire sophomores 
tagged but a little way behind with a 
tally of 38 to their credit and .the 
freshman made 23 points, tins largest 
score made for many years by an en- 
tering class in the spring meet. 

Taking into consideration the high 
wind which swept down the back 
stretch and impeded the runners the 
performances were on the whole ex- 
ceptionally good. The weather condi- 
tions were adverse in every way. Early 
in the afternoon a rain had blown up 
and it left the start of thu two-twenty 
wet and in such a soft condition that 
it could not be used and it necessi- 
tated running the long dash and the 
low hurdle race on the curve. 

The wind also helped to make the 
running of the meet hard by blowing 
over tile hurdles as fast as they .could 
be put up, making, it impossible to 
run the races over the sticks in any 
normal manner. The expedient that 
was resorted to was to utilize the vast 
number of small boys that swarmed over 
the field to hold up the harriers, and 
by stationing a hoy between each pair 
they were kept in their proper position. 
The sigiit of the vows of boys on the 
track during the progress of the race 
was a novel one. 

Undoubtedly one of the features of 
the meet was the race that was held at 
the conclusion of the regular track 
events, which was open to all the small 
boys of the neighborhood under a cer- 
tain size. The number that appeared 
on the mark was too large to count 
but there were six rows of contestants 
across the track at the start. The race 
looked like a veritable migration in- 
stead of a track event. The boy who 
won the race, a lad of ten years, was 
awarded a prize of one dollar collected 
by subscription. 

The racing throughout the meet *was 
very good. The best of it was soon 
in the half mile when White, the fresh- 
man distance man and Gimson, the 
track team veteran met in a battle 
royal. All the way •around the two 
laps of the track both of the men kept 
close together but in the home stretch 
White drew away from Gimson and won 
in a hair raising finish. 

Probably the best performance of the 
meet was made by Salisbury who won 
first place in the quarter outdistancing 
a field of stars, and making the very 
fast time, in the teeth of tire wind, of 
50 seconds. The best that Blackburn 
could get was second place and lie 
landed this only with considerable dif- 
ficulty. Cumings, a sophomore who has 
recently showed a groat deal of promise 
came third and Lockett of the same 
class was fourth. 

The century dash had the expected 
outcome when Gram defended his title 
as the star of the sprinting squad by 
winning the event. There was consid- 
erable surprise, however, over the fact 
that Blackburn defeated Seligman the 
freshman flyer in the race for second 
place. 

Mills made excellent time in the 
mile, and ran a very well judged and 
heady race from the crack of the gun 
to the tape. He finished in first place 
with a good margin to spare. 

A large number of contestants ap- 
peared on the mark for the two mile 
run but before the end of the race they 
had dwindled considerably, but four 
men finishing. At the start Howland 


began to draw away from the crowd 
and he was closely followed by Macken- 
zie, the freshman. These two soon 
opened up a good lead and raced most 
of the way, Howland setting the pace 
and breaking the wind. In the last lap 
though he showed Ills reserve strength 
and came down tiie home stretch well 
in advance of his running mate. Ste- 
phenson and ESlis had a hard fight for 
tiie other two places. The former 
finally won out. 

Remarkable work was done by Seho- 
binger in tiie broad jump. In that event 
lie was assisted to a great extent by a 
strong wind behind his back so that 
Iris performance is not as significant as 
it might be under different conditions. 
Iiis jump of 21 feet 9 3-4 nelies, how- 
ever, is thoroughly first class. 

To Fernstvom must go the credit of 
being tlio largest point winner of tiie 
meet though he made most of his scores 
in events in which there was not partic- 
ular keen competition. He won botli 
hurdle races and secured a second in 
the furlong dash. Gram and Seho- 
binger were the other individual stars, 
each having ten points apiece to his 
credit. 

A great mistake was made by the 
management in not providing for the 
proper policing of the grounds. This 
will be taken care of in the oilier meets 
this season. 

Summary of events: — 

100 yard dash. 

First Heat — Won liy C. W. Gram 
1909; 11. W. Blackburn 1908, second; 
W. (J. Salisbury 1911, third; Time 
103-os. 

Second Heat — Won by K. D. Fern- 
strom 1910; W. J. Seligman 1911, sec- 
ond; 11. Lockett 1910, third; Time 
10 3-5s. 

Final Heat— Won by C. W. Gram 
1009; It. W. Blackburn 1908, second; W. 
0. Seligman 1011, third; W. C. Salisbury 
3 5)1 1, fourth; Time 10 4-5s. 

220-vard dash. 

Won byy O. W. Gram 1909; K. D. 
Fernstvom 1910, second; H. Lockett 
1910. third; A. A. Gould 1910, fourth. 
Time 24 l-5s. 

440-yard dash. 

Won hv W. 0. Salisbury 1911; H. W. 
Blackburn 1908, second; G.B. Cumings 

1910, third; II. Lockett 1910, fourth. 
Time, 5Gs. 

880-yard run. 

Won by P. D. White 1911; B. L. 
Gimson 1908, second; II. H, Howland 
1908, third; C. L. Bateheider 1909, 
fourth. Time 2m. Us. 

One Mile Run. 

Won by L. O. Mills 1910; J. F. Mac- 
Cartliy 1909, second; C. P. Eldrcd 1911, 
third; AX'. T. MaeCreadie 1911, fourth. 
Time 4m. 63 3-5s. 

Two Mile Run. 

Won by II. H. Howland 190S; J. D. 
Mackenzie 1911, second: J. N. Ste- 

phenson 1909, third; R. Ellis 1909, 
fourth. Time llni. Ss. 

120 yard high Hurdles. 

Won by K. D. Fernstvom 1910; F. F. 
Bel! 1910, second; G. B, Cumings 1910, 
third; J. B. Walcott 1911, fourth. Time 
17 3 -5s, 

220 yard low hurdles, j 

Won by K. D. Fernstvom 1910; G, 
B. Cumings 1910, second; R. II. Gould 

1911, third; C. P. Kerr 1911, fourth. 
Time 29 3-5s. 

Running High Jump. 

Won by R. H. Allen 19M, height 5 
ft. 9 in.; H. A. Rapoiye 1908. second, 
height 5 ft. 8 in.; E. Stuart 1910, third, 
height 5 .. 7 in.; F. Moore 1909, F. D. 
Stewart 1010, and A. R. Nagle 1910 
tied for fourth at 5 ft. 4 in. 

Discus Throw. 

Won by L. D. Nisbet 1909, 103 ft. 6 
in.; M. E. Allen 19C®, second, 93 ft. 3 
in, ; R. H. Nichols 1909, third. 91 ft. ; 
W. Morrison 1908, fourth, 90 ft. 0 in, 

(Continued on page 3.) 


1910 TECHNIQUE ELECTION 
BRINGS OUT SMALL VOTE. 


BARELY HALF OF CLASS VOTES. 


Fitzwater Gels Big Plurality with 
Saul Second. 


JOHN MOXCEY FITZWATER 
TOM WYNNE SAUL 
KARL DICKSON FERNSTROM 
HAROLD LOCKETT 
FORRESTER BARSTOW AVERY 
CURTIS CHRISTOPHER WEBB 
DOUGL AS CRAWFORD McMURTRIE 
WILLIAM HOWARD DUFFIELD 
CLIFFORD CHASE HIELD 
HAROLD DEXTER BILLINGS 
FRANK FREDERICK BELL 
CHARLES EATON CREECY 
JOHN AVERY JR 
HAROLD CROSBY MANSON 
PHILIP DUNBAR TERRY 
GEORGE STONE EMERSON 
RICHARD FREDERIC GOODWIN JR 
BERGEN REYNOLDS 
ARTHUR ROSENGARTEN NAGLE 
FREDERICK ALOYSUIS HURLEY 
HENRY REED ELWELL 
ALLEN ADAMS GOULD 
JOHN HAMILTON RUCKMAN 
FRANK DOUGLAS STEWART 
WILLIAM JOHN 0’HEARN 


As a ^general rule the expected hap- 
pened ill the elections lor the 1010 Tech- 
nique Electoral Committee. In some 
isolated cases the position of men on 
the list was a surprise, but tiie mem- 
bership of the committee as a whole 
coincided exactly with the general ex- 
pectation. 

The number of votes received by the 
men on the committee were: 

J. M. Fitzwater, 14G; T. W. Saul, 103; 
K. D. Fernstvom, 40; H. Lockett, 89; F. 

B. Avery 74; C. C. Webb, 73; D. C. 
McMuvtvie, 70; W. H. Duflield, GC; C. 

C. Iiiekl GO; II. F. Billings, 03; F. F. 
Bell, 02; C. E. Crcecy, 59; J. Avery 
Jr.. 53; H. C. Manson, 60; P. D. Terry, 
48; G. S. Emerson, 47 ; It. F. 
Goodwin Jr., 47; B. Reynolds, 4G; 
A. It. Nagle, 45; F. A. Hurley, 
44; H. R. Elwell, 41; A. A. Gould, 
41; J. H. Ruckmann, 39; F. D. Stewart, 
39; W. J. O'Hearn, 39. 

The following received over 25 votes; 
J. S. Sneddon 37; R. S. Brever 36; H. 
1. Pearl 35; jR. S. Bieknell 35; G. F. 
Salisbury 34; J. R. Cox 33; L. T. 
Hemmenway 32; L. Kaibach 32; N. S, 
Seeley 31; D. Clapp 29; A. K. Adams 
28; W. D. Everett 28; G. M, Roads 28; 
W. M. Schofield 28; M. W. Tilden 28; 
M. S. Chapin 27; P. Hart 2G; and C. 
C. Dudley 25. 

Very few of the class turned in bal- 
lots for the committee, only 173 voles 
being cast. This in the face of the tact 
that 340 ballots were sent on is rather 
remarkable. 

The committee will meet Tuesday in 
33 Rogers at 4 o’clock to elect officers. 
The committee in charge of the election 
was T. w: Saul, J. G. Tripp, H. Lockett, 
A. R. Nagle, and P. D. Terry. 


SEATS HELD TILL WEDNESDAY. 


Wednesday, 2 P. M., is the extent of 
time allowed for those who have re- 
served seats for the Show and not paid 
for them. They will not he held any 
longer. It has been found necessary 
to change the date given on the in- 
struction slip, and all seats must be 
paid for before this time. No seats can 
be held for anyone, and those who come 
after this date will have to take what 
is left. There is not much left as the 
house is sold out with the exception 
of a few second balcony scats and so 
all who have applied for seats and have 
hot secured them must get them at 
once. 





2 


BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, APRIL 13, 1908 


THE TECH 

Published every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 
during the college year by students of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 


Entered as second-class matter October 6, 
1904. at the post office at Boston, Mass., under 
the Act. of Congress of March 3. 1879. 


All communications regarding advertise- 
ments should be addressed to the Business 
Manager. Regarding subscriptions address 
the Circulation Manager . 

• abac rip t ion - - - $1.50 per year in advance. 

Single Copies 3 Cents. 

Subscriptions within the Boston Postal 
District and outside of United States must he 
accompanied by postage. 

Printed by Old Colony Press, Boston. 


Monday, April 13, 1908. 


TIME OF SENIOR DINNER. 

For the last two or three years it 
lias been customary to have the names 
of those men who have received degrees 
announced at the senior dinner. 

This custom has added interest and 
excitement to the dinner and has been 
very pleasant for the men who received 
degrees. However, for the unfortunate 
few who do not receive degrees the ex- 
perience seems unncecessarily painful. 
To have the lucky names read out leav- 
ing the others conspicuous in their mis- 
fortune is rubbing in something which 
the unlucky men probably do not care 
to think too much about. 

Also to some extent it breaks up the 
unity of the class. Those who will not 
graduate feel very much left .out of 
things and their discomfort more than 
counterbalances the pleasure of the suc- 
cessful men. At the senior dinner ev- 
erything should he as free from worry 
■as possible and all 11)08 men should get 
together for a last good time regard- 
loss of any thought of degrees. 

Ho it would seem better not to have 
the list of graduates read out' at the 
dinner and further it would seifrn best 
to have the dinner a day or two be- 
fore the award of degrees is announced. 
1908 wants a class dinner with all mem- 
bers of the class on equal footing. This 
is only possible in a dinner held before 
tlie list of lucky graduates is announced 
so that there will be no line of any 
kind drawn between men so long as 
they all belong to the class of 1908. 


SENIOR RESOLUTIONS. 


Whereas, The Almighty God hag 
chosen to remove Arthur Clinton Rich- 
mond from our ranks, and 
Whereas, The members of the Class of 
1908 of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology feel a deep sorrow in the 
loss of one who, by his earnest work 
and his quiet friendly manner, lias won 
the esteem of all, therefore be it 

Resolved, That by the decease of our 
classmate the Institute has lost a val- 
uable exponent of its ideas, and .the 
class lias lost a friend and helper; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That we hereby extend our 
sincere sympathy to the bereaved fam- 
ily; and he it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions he spread on the minutes of the 
class and that they be published in 
The Tech. 

For the Class, 

J. S. BARNES, 

A. G. PLACE, 

E. 1. WILLIAMS, 
MAURICE E. ALLEN. 


FIRST PRACTICE OF YEAR. 


Twenty' men' went” out for the first 
target practice of the year at Wake- 
field, Saturday, but a very high and un- 
steady wind made good scores impos- 
sible. All shooting was done at 200 
yds. and most of the men sat or laid 
down. About fifteen shots apiece were 
allowed. 

"The following went out: W. N. 

..row 1910, T. C. Meiriinan 1909, H. R. 
Wilbur 1910, members of the Rifle Club; 
lind H. E. Babbitt 1911, R. M. Barton 
1911, W. H. Coburn I9ll, H. M. Davis 
■1911, K. D. Francis 1911, W. B. Ives 
1910, V. P. Klapaos 1911, H. S. Lord 
1911; D. F. Manoney 1911, A. Metz 1911, 
FT. Nieol 1908, F. Ryder 1911, F. G. 
Smith 1911, E. N. Symmes 1911,' D. 
Tuck 1911, A. K. Wardwell 1911, E. J. 
Whitcomb 1911. 


TECH STUNTS. 


(Continued from page 1 .) 
an old barrel by E. I. Williams was 
earned around the arena by Roderick 
Barnes and Williams, who was covered 
by a yellow hat 36 inches in height. 
Teddy Roosevelt was also in the parade, 
substantiated by M. L. Bullard of 
Course II. 

H. S. Hazen, W. F. Dolke, and V. E. 
Seibert were the bearers of a float on 
which was placed a head on a platter. 
Some imprudent ones say it was an 
cfligy of Prof. Swain by the civil engi- 
neers, who have always been down 05 
‘■Coarse Foremen.*’ The rest of the 
course were carrying, attached to T- 
squares, appropriate phrases on the 
Stein Song, Course I men, and the ten 
separate letters of the word "avclti- 
toets.” 

The ballet of the butterflies was 
ended with the formation of a huge T, 
after which came the Tech stunts prop- 
er. li. S. Gott 1909 and H. O. Jenkins 
1910, after removing a dozen vests, were 
blindfolded and let loose to fan the air 
and innocent bystanders with boxing 
gloves. 

In the great re'ay race the teddy 
bear of the freshmen and the lemon of 
the sophomores were carried around the 
track ten times by the thinly-clad 
track -suited racers covered more or less 
successfully by costumes of many hues. 
Among the freshmen were R. H. Gould 
and N. W. Prentiss in feminine bathing 
suits: L. G. G'azier ns a pirate bold; 
L. G. Odell, like a true Irishman, in 
bright green. Among the sophomores 
were D. C. McMurtrie in a wild cos- 
tume. H. Lockett in a cadet uniform, 
and L. O. Mills as a Scotchman who 
could not forget his cigar even in the 
heat of the contest. 

F. I). Stewart for the Sophs and IV. 
J. Seligman for the fresliies collapsed on 
the line at the same time. 

The freshman hand and the Course A 
men did not take part, as not enough 
showed up. 


TECH SHOW 

No Seats Reserved After Wednesday. 

Get the Seat yon applied for before 

APRIL 15, 2 P.M. 


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SENIORS WIN. 

(Continued from page 1.) 

Running Broad Jump. 

Won by G. Behobinger 1908, 21 ft. 9 
3-4 in.; J. A. Christie 1909, second, 19 
ft. 9 1-2 in.; T. W. Orr 1908, third, 19 
ft. 7 ill.; W. Morrison 1908, fourth, 19 
ft. 2 1-2 in. 

Pole Vault. 

Won by G. Senobingor 1908, 10 ft. 0 
in.: T. W. Orr 1908, second, 10 ft. 4 in.; 
W. 1). Allen 1911, third, 10 ft. 

Shot Put. 

Won by P. Moore 1909, 34 ft. 11 1-4 
in.; F. J. Friedman 1908, second, 33 ft. 
2 3-4 in.; W. Morrison 1908, third, 32 
ft. 10 1-2 ill.; J. H. Ruckllian 1910, 
fourth, 32 ft. 

Hammer Throw. 

Won by M. Flagg 1909, 09 ft. 9 in.; 
F. A. Hurton 1910, second, 91 ft. (i 1-2 
ill.; M. R. ScharfV 1900, third, S7 ft. 5 
in.; W. Morrison ] HUS, fourth, 85 ft. 11 
in. -<*. 

Summary of Points. 

1908 1909 1910 1911 

100-yard dash 3 5 . . 3 

220-yard dash .... 5 6 

440-yard dash . . 3 . . 3 5 

880-yard run ... 5 1 . . 5 

One mile run 3 5 3 

Two mile run ... 5 3 . . 3 

120-yaril hurdles ... . . 10 1 

220-yard hurdles ... . . 8 3 

High jump 3 5 1-3 2 2-3 .. 

Broad jump . . . . S 3 

Pole Vault 8 . - ■ • 2 

Shot put 3 5 1 

Hammer throw .1 7 3 

Discus throw ... 1 7 

Totals 4o 44 1-3 38 25 

Officials: — Referee, Dean A. E. Bur- 

ton; judges at finish. Major John Bige- 
low, R. S. Franklin 1903, G. T. Glover 
190S, J. S. Barnes 1908; timers, F. M. 
Kanaly. W. C. Towne. R. W. Ferris 
1908: starter, Joseph J. McNamara; 

field judges. 0. Turner 1908, C. W. 
Whitmore 1908. H. R. Callaway 1908: 
Measurers, 0. W. Bradford 1908; J. 1C. 
Barnard 1910; scorer. Ft. W. Hoole 1908; 
clerk of course. D. C. McMurtrie 1910. 


FRESHMEN LOSE TO LA SALLE. 


Poor Fielding and Umpiring Responsible. 


In a closely contested game, the re- 
sult of which was not decided until the 
ninth inning, hist Saturday afternoon, 
the freshmen lost to La Sal lo High 
School at Waltham, score 10 to 7. 
I he game was repieto with errors on 
both sides on account of the high wind 
and poor condition of the field. Mc- 
Laughlin and Parker showed up best 
lor mil. wmle Shanley and Cahill ex- 
celled tor La Salle. The line-up of the 


respective teams was as 
-McLaughlin 2b. p, 

Seliatz If 

Osborne cl 

Parker ss 

Williams c 

Odell lh 

Wood 3h 

Cowee p., 2b 

DeFtoiiiv. i f 


follows: 

. . .Rooney if. 

. . .Connely ef. 
. . . Forster ss. 
, . . .Bowen If. 
Mulvevhill 3b. 
..Shanley lb. 
. . McKenzie p. 

Cahill c. 

Coniiernoy 21). 


FRESHMEN LOSE TO VOLKMAN. 


NEWTON HIGH MEN ELECT. 


At a meeting of the Newton High 
School Club Friday the following of- 
ficers were elected: president. K. G. 
Cliipman 1907 ; vice-president, F. M. 
Green 1909 : secretary-treasurer, C. H. 
White 1909. D. K. Bu’lens 1909 and 
J. C. Fuller 1911 were appointed to act 
with the officers in arranging for a 
dinner. 


Because of the superior playing of 
their opponents the freshmen lost to 
Volkman Friday, 10-6. 1911 outhatted 

the Back Bay school boys by seven hits 
but clean, accurate playing by the Yolk- 
in an team kept Tech from scoring. 

The summary : 

Innings .... 123450789 

Volkman 2 3 0 2 1 0 2 0 x— 10 

Tech 1911 0 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 0—6 

Batteries: Konnard and Fitzpatrick, 
and Bhrigley: Blum, Cowee, llcFlorez 

and Williams. 


The Technology Review 

A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE 
DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF 
THE MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE 
OF TECHNOLOGY 

AND 

PUBLISHED BY THE ASSOCIATION 
OF CLASS SECRETARIES 
S 3 Newbury Street, Boston 

The Review aims to develop closer relations 
among Institute men and to stimulate their in- 
terest in the work of the College. Iti in no 
sense an engineering magazine, but deal* 
broadly with the problems of Technological 
Education and the responsibilities of the pro- 
fessional man. 

THE REVIEW i8 published during Janu- 
ary t April , July t and October. Communica- 
tions should be addressed to The TECS - 
NOLOO r REVIEW , 83 Newbury St Boston. 

Subscription, One Dollar a Year 
Single Copies, Thirty-Five Cents 

Volumes I., III., IV., V., VI., VII., VIII., and 
IX., finely bound in half morocco, are ready for 
delivery at $ 2.25 each, or will be exchanged 
for unbound sets, provided they are in good 
condition, at $i.25 each. (If sent by mail, 30 
cents extra.) 



CHAMBERLAIN 

|i * TC BEACONSFIELDS $3.00 
nn I V REVELATIONS $2.00 

TWO STORES 

63 7 Washington St., corner Boyiston St. 
663 Washington St., opposite Beach St. 


NOTICES. 


1908. — Senior Class meeting in Hun- 
tington Hall today at 1 P. M. 


CLASS HAY. — Committee meeting to- 
day at 4.30 in Rogers 26. Picture will 
be" taken at Not man's Wednesday at 1 
P. M. 


MANDOLIN CLOU.— Special re- 

hearsal Monday at 4 P. M. with Mr. 
Lansing. Important that all should be 
present. 


CHALLKXGE. — The Juniors of Course 
III hereby challenge the juniors of 
Course X or of any other course, to a 
game of base ball, to be played any time 
in the next two weeks. Arrangements 
mav be made at any time in 32 Walker. 


MAKER, TO WEARER 

kTHE. 



Halt 

412 WASHINGTON ST. RoSTON 
SPRING STYLES 



lARROWl 

CLUPEGO SHRUNK , | 

. Quarter Sizes. 15o each, 2 for 25c. j 
1 CLUETT. PEABODY & CO. 
Makers o£ Cluott and Monarch Shirte j 


TYPEWRITERS 

LARGEST STOCK LOWEST PRICES 

Easy monthly payments Renting and Repairing 

GUTTER-TOWER CO. 

234 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 


HERRICK 


ALL THEATRES 

Copley Square 
Telephone 

2329, 2330 and 2331 Back Bay 


jA jA Floral Designs a Specialty J* JA 
Flowers and Plants at Reasonable Prices 

FINE, The Florist 


202 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 

- ■ Telephone, 1521-3 Back Bay 

Freaft Violets Three Times a Day 


TECH MEN 

Especially Catered for 
at 

33 ST. BOTOLPH ST. 

A. Q. Cotton 


T. d. SOUTHWELL 
Stationer and Newsdealer 

Circulating Library Laundry Agency 
Ladles* and (Jentlemen’s Furnishings 

66 HUNTINGTON AVENUE, BOSTON 

Near cor. of Irvington Street 

DINING ROOM 

ST. BftTOLPH STREET 

Popular Prices. Special Attention 
.to “Tech Men,*' Try our Course 
Lunch 25c. _ , 

V-. ‘ W. H. PR1DHAM 


23 


DAVID W. EDWARDS, Jr. 

Cailor 

420 Boyiston Street, - Boston 

Telephone, Back Bay 3535-3 


Spring Opening in Men 's Wear 

Shirts, Neckwear, Hosiery and Underwear 

PLAZA OUTFITTERS 

431 COLUMBUS AVE., next to Hotel Plaza 


THE STUDENT’S DRUB STORE 

UNDER GOPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

. We make a special effort to merit 
the patronage of our student 
friends 

Oon’tforgettheaddratt — undar Copley Square Hotel 



DAVID J. FOX 

Matter anfc Maberfcasfeer 

LAUNDRY RETURNED IN T£N HOURS 

Up-to-date Novelties in Men's Furnishings 

Corner CHANDLER & DARTMOUTH STS. 

Special attention to Tech A fen 


LANDER’S 

Lunch and Coffee House 

23 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

20 Huntington Avenue, near Copley Square 

ALSO AT' 46 HIGH STREET 
r£LEf»HO»r G319-1 back bay BOSTON 


W. M. ROWAN 

“THE TECH BARBER ‘ 

Westminster Hotel . . St. James Ave 

SPECIAL TO STUDENTS 
HAIR CUT 25 CENTS SHAVE IS CENTS 


! 1 

; a 
i t 

: t 

















4 


BOSTON, MASS., MONDAY, APRIL 13, 1908 


ON THE BUSINESS BATTLE FIELD 

You should arm yourself with the best instruments 
of battle of the highest perfection. Our engravings 
and illustrations make your VICTORY SURE. If 
you don’t want to retreat call at the address below. 


Massachusetts Engraving Co. 

ENGRAVERS AND ILLUSTRATORS 

Telephone, Hay. J724-1725 104 HANOVER ST., CITY 


CALENDAR. 


Monday, April 13. 

1.00 P. M. Class of 1908 Meets in 

Huntington Hall. 

1.30 P. M. Glee Club Rehearses in 26 

Rogers. 

2.30 P. M. Northampton Show Tickets 

Must he Taken. ". 

3.00 P.M. Track Team Practices at 

the Field. 

4.00 P.M. Tech dhow Chorus Re- 

hearses at the Union. 

4.00 P. M. Mr. Brock’s Bible Class 

Meets in 5 Eng. B. 


H all a 

ANCOGK 

SPRING HATS 

THE STANDARD OF STYLE AND EXCELLENCE 

420 WASHINGTON ST. 

THE GURNEY NATIONAL 

IS THE MODERN 

===== E L- E V A, “T O R== 

For Passenger and Freight Service 
EXCELS ALL OTHERS IN SAFETY, RELIABILITY AND ECONOMY 

W. s. TUBMAN, Agent 

20 CENTRAL STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 


SMULLEN & CO. 

51 SUMMER ST. 

bailors 

SPEGIAL INDUCEMENTS 

TO TECH STUDENTS 



HIGGINS’ 



Drawing-Inks 
Eternal Writing-Ink 
Engrossing-Ink 
Taurine Mucilage 
Photo-Mounter 
Drawing-Board Paste 
Liquid Paste 
Office Paste 
Vegetable Glue, Etc. 
Are the Finest and Best Inks and 
Adhesives. Emancipate yourself 
from the use of corrosive and ill* 
smelling inks and adhesives and 
adopt the Higgins Inks and Ad- 
hesives. They will be a revelation 
to you, they are 00 sweet, clean, 
and well put up. 

At Dealers Generally. 

CHAS. M. HIGGINS & CO., Mfgre 
Branches: Chicago, London 
371 Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N.V. 


4.15 P.M. Mandolin Club Rehearses in 
31 Rogers. 

4.30 P. M. Class Day Committee Meets 

in 26 Roger's. 

6.45 P. M. Rev. W. H. Van Allen’s 
Bible Class Meets at the Authors’ 
Club. 

Tuesday, April 14. 

3.00 P. M. Track Team Reports at the 

Field. 

4.00 P. M. Tech Show Principals Re- 

hearse at the Union, 

4.15 P. M. Banjo Club Rehearses in 33 
Rogers. 

6.30 P. M. M. A. H. S. Club Dines at 

the Union. 

Wednesday, April 15. 


OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY 

53 State Street, BOSTON 

===== Electric and Hydraulic Elevators ======= 

ESCALATORS (Moving Stairways) 

PRESCOTT’S BACK BAY EXPRESS 

10 First-Class Teams. Baggage Transferred to all Stations. 

Two Men on Every Team. Furniture Packed and Moved. 

Freight Work of all kinds Promptly Attended To ; Special teams furnished for any kind of work 

32 COURT STREET Telephone, 978 Back Bay 34 ST. JAMES AVE. 


EUGENE DIETZGEN CO. 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO, SAN FRANCISCO, 
NEW ORLEANS, TORONTO. 


1.00 P. M. Class Hay Committee Pic- 

ture Taken at Notman’s. 

3.00 P. M. Track Team Practices at the 

Field. 

4.00 P. M. Tech Show Chorus Re- 

hearses at the Union. 


All Goods Required by 

Students at ^ 


College 

Clothes 


OUR BOSTON AGENTS 

LEDDER & PR0BST 

387 Washington St. 

STOCK A FULL LINE OF OUR GOODS 


SOMETHING NEW 

MULTIPLEX SLIDE RULE 


HOTEL CUMBERLAND 


S. W. Cor. Broadway at 54th St , NEW YORK 
Near 50th St. Subway Station and 53d St. Elevated 

KEPT BY A COLLEGE MAN 



idea! Location Near Theaters, Shops, and Central Park 
New, Modern, and Absolutely Fireproof 

Transient rates, $2.50 with bath and up 
All outside rooms Send for booklet 

HARRY P. STIMSON R. J. BINGHAM 

Formerly with Formerly with 

Hotel Imperial Hotel Woodward 


N OTICE S. 

TECH SHOW, — Northampton seata 
will not be held after today at 2.30. 


M. A. II. S. Club.- — Third annual din- 
ner tomorrow evening at 6.30 at the 
Union. Tickets fifty cents. 


CLASSIFIED ADS. 

Advertisements of thi 9 kind under different 
classifications are inserted at the rate of live 
cents a line, averaging six words to a line, pay- 
able in advance. 


WANTED. — 500 more subscriptions to 
Technique 11)09. 

LOST. — A first year math. book. 
Finder please return to the Cage for 
Richard H. Ranger. 

Men who desire summer work at 
$2.50 per day, leave note for Woodruff 
at the Cage. ATTEND TO THIS NOW. 

FOR SALE. — A dress suit in good 
condition at half cost, for a man 6 
feet, weighing 150 lbs. Address A. M. 
C. Cage. 

FOR SALE. — Dress suit, comparative- 
ly new, custom made, size — coat 34 in., 
trousers 30x32 in. Price, $15.00. Ad- 
dress M. F. P., The Tech, 30 Rogers. . 

CAMERA FOR SALE.— A Century 
4x5 camera with unusual good iens, for 
sale. Exchange for Eastman Folding 
Kodak will be considered. Address Box 
24, the Cage. 

FOR SALE, — Indian motorcycle, new 
last September, run only 312 miles; guar- 
anteed in perfect condition. $145 cash, 
cost $210. For further particulars leave 
note at cage for T. F. W. Meyer. 

FOR SALE. — Technique 1909 has a 
few subscriptions to the Engineering 
Record, the Street Railway Journal, 
and the Electrical World, which will be 
sold at $2.50 as long as they last. Reg- 
ular price $3,00. 


Maclachlan’s 

502 Boylston St* 

Drawing Instruments and Materials, etc. 
Fountain Pens, Text-books 


BUSINESS 

SUITS 

TO-ORDER 

$25 to $45 

DRESS SUITS 

$45 to $60 

L.F.BRIDGHAM 

Merchant Tailor 

2 5 Years* Experience 

18 Boylston Street 

Room 55 
Dreu Suits To Let 


Many new and exclusive 
styles for young men, 
hand tailored by the best 
craftsmen. 


A SHUMAN & CO. 


THE OLD COLONY PRESS 
printer# 

Books, Periodicals, Catalogues 
Commercial and Society Work 

Telephone 1380 Main 

152 PURCHASE STREET 
Boston, Mass. 

ELEVATOft 


TICKETS FOR TECHNIQUE RUSH 

ROGERS CORRIDOR 9:00 A.M. AND 1:00-2:00 P.M 


BOSTON 


Hotel Westminster 


COPLEY SQUARE 

BOSTON 

Charles A. Gleason C. Norris Whiting 


MORSE & HENDERSON 
Pallors 

4 

18 BOYLSTON STREET 

Rooms J4-J5 


Telephone Oxford 99 


BOSTON