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THE TECH 

VOL. XXIX. NO. 121. BOSTON, MASS., TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1910 PRICE OnFceNT 


PROF. SWAIN TO LECTURE 
REFORE CIVIL ENG. SOCIETY 

Prominent Consulting Engineer 
And Alumnus Will Talk On 
Professional Ethics 

This afternoon at 4.15 the Civil En- 
gineering Society will hold a meeting 
in Room 6, Lowell Building. Professor 
George F. Swain of the Graduate 
School of Civil Engineering at Harvard 
University will give an address on Pro- 
fessional Ethics. 

Professor Swain graduated from M. 
1. T. in the class of J.887 and after this 
left for Germany, where he studied for 
three years in some of the large univer- 
sities. Returning to the Institute he 
became instructor in Structures and 
Hydraulics. In 1888 he was put in 
charge of the departments of Civil and 
Sanitary Engineering, in which office 
he remained until June, 1909, when he 
was called to fill a similar place at 
Harvard. He is a member of the Am. 
Soc. C. E., the Boston Soc. C. E., the 
Society for tbe Promotion of Engineer- 
ing Education, and other societies, hav- 
ing held offices of high honor in all. 
Besides this he is the author of a large 
number of scientific books and reports. 

However, the greatest reputation of 
Prof. Swain lies in his work as con- 
sulting engineer, since heis one of the 
most successful and best known in the 
country. Due to his wide experience in 
this work, he is eminently well fitted to 
speak on the subject which he has 
chosen, “Professional Ethics." As yet 
the Civil Engineer has no formulated 
code of ethics such, for example, as the 
Architects have recently adopted. The 
engineer lias to follow the “unwritten 
law,” which is quite plain as regards 
some matters, such as advertising 'one’s 
business other than by business cards, 
but becomes more complicated in other 
matters. This is a subject, therefore, 
which it is very essential for a young 
engineer just graduating from college 

to know, but one which is not included 
in the curriculum. It need scarcely be 
urged, therefore, that every one at- 
tend, and hear of this important sub- 
ject from one of the Institute’s most 
prominent alumni. 


ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Meeting To Decide Awards For 
Athletic Honors 

The Advisory Council, at a meeting 
last evening, voted that the winners of 
first-class places in the Dual Track 
Meet between the Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes should be awarded tbe 
numerals of their class. It was also 
decided that the insignia should not bn 
awarded to tbe members of this year’s 
’varsity basket-ball team. 


Approximately 1450 men are engaged 
in some form of athletic activity at 
Yale, either in the major or minor 
sports, according to figures compiled at 
the university for the year 1909-1910. 
The statistics include the academic and 
scientific departments and the graduate 
schools. Detailed figures show a pre- 
ponderance of academic men in the vari- 
ous' sports. 


Yale should have an exceptionally 
strong golf team this spring with R. G. 
Gardner, the national champion, as one 
of its makeup. 


WIRELESS SOCIETY 

TO BE REPRESENTE3 

Wireless Clubs In All Eastern 
Gnlleges To Form New 
Association 

James H. Ellis 1912 and Herbert L. 
Woehling 1912, were elected yesterday 
at the meeting to the Wireless Society 
as representatives to the meeting of the 
Intercollegiate Wireless Association to 
be held at Philadelphia, Pa., on April 
!)th. At this time representatives from 
all the wireless clubs in the Eastern col- 
leges will meet for the organization of 
the Intercollegiate Wireless Association. 
The object of this new move is for the 
betterment of college interest in wire- 
less telegraphy; the “Wireless Club” of 
the University of Pennsylvania takes 
the initiative. The meeting is held un- 
der the auspices of the “Wireless Club” 
in Houston Hall, 34th and Spruce 
Streets, at 2 o’clock on Saturday, April 
9th. 

The meeting of the Wireless Society 
was held in 11 Eng. B yesterday after- 
noon, Pres. E. B. Moore 1912 presiding. 
L. W. Cooper 1912, chairman of the 
aerial committee, reported that the 
spreaders have been completed and the 
design and computation of the aerial 
have been finished, E, H. Guilford 1912 
of the pole committee reported that the 
base and all eye-bolts were in place. 
The 35-foot pole which is to be erected 
oil the top of the Pierce building had 
been taken to the roof where it will be 
given a number of coats of paint and 
placed in position. E. M. Syinms 1911 
was elected chairman of a committee to 
consult with the United Wireless Tele- 
graph Company and the Government on 
interference and general eo-operatioil. 


GHEM. SOCIETY TO MEET 


All Men To Appear At Dinner 
In Their Laboratory Coats 

It lias just been learned that the 
Chemical Society is secretly planning a 
great time and will burst forth during 
April “in all its glory.” A dinner is to 
he given at which all sorts of stunts 
are to be performed and a general good 
time made possible. All persons at- 
tending are requested to wear their 
laboratory coats. Watch the bulletin 
boards and the Tech for further an- 
nouncements. 

It was shown at the last meeting 
that much time was consumed in dis- 
cussing business at the beginning of 
the evening, therefore it has been de- 
cided to hold a business meeting some 
afternoon at four or five o’clock to take 
up any points which have come up since 
the last meeting, and also to try to set- 
tle the matter in regard to the Amend- 
ment proposed by the Institute Com- 
mittee. The executive committee of 
the Chemical Society has considered 
this amendment and will report upon 
it at that time. A notice will be posted 
as soon as i time is found which will 
accommodate the largest number. As 
this is a matter of great importance the 
executive committee asks all men to 
watch for the announcement of this 
special meeting. 


For tno Pennsylvania relay meet to 
be held on Franklin Field April 30, the 
management has already more entries 
than those of last year, when 66 colleges 
and 150 schools entered at least four 
men each. 


LECTURE ON GYROSCOPE 
AT HUNTINGTON HALL 

Mr. Elmer A. Sperry Will Ad- 
dress Society Of Arts On 
His Specialty 

Since top-spinning has become a sub- 
ject of scientific research instead of a 
childish amusement, technical lectures 
upon this subject have been frequent, 
but practically nothing has been done 
to popularize the subject, that is, to 
make it intelligible to the layman. For 
this reason tire next meeting of the So- 
ciety of Arts will be of special inter- 
est, for the speaker at this meeting will 
be Mr. Elmer A. Sperry of New York 
City. He will speak upon the subject 
of “The Gyroscope and its Practical 
Application in Steadying Ships, Mono- 
rail Locomotion, Aerial Flight, and as 
a Mariner’s Compass.” The meeting 
will take place next Wednesday evening 
at 8 o’clock, in Huntington Hall. 

Mr. Sperry will illustrate his lecture 
with operating apparatus and lantern 
slides. The uses of the gyrostat in mon- 
orail cars, steamships, and in directing 
torpedoes will be illustrated by working 
models, and the principle of the gyro- 
scope will be fully explained. The fun- 
damental element of precession will be 
developed and illustrated experiment- 
ally. As an engineer, Mr. Sperry has 
made special research along the lines of 
gyroscopic reactions. He spent four 
months abroad last year investigating 
this ssubject. 


MUSICAL CLUB CONCERT 

Successful Performances Given 
At Lynn 

Another successful concert was ren- 
dered by the Tech Musical Clubs at 
Lynn last night. Over a thousand per- 
sons attended and received the efforts of 
the performers enthusiastically. 

The old stand-bys of the Clubs met at 
a fashionable down-town hotel and were 
taken to Lynn in a “special.” The 
usual Tech spirit was ever present and 
the ride seemed shortened by music. 

After the second number of the pro- 
gramme, Miss Dorothy G. Harris ac- 
companied Sir. L, Harris on the organ, 
the latter playing the violin. To a 
hearty encore to “Reverie,” Vieuxtemps, 
another selection was given. Both pieces 
were charmingly carried through and 
credit is due the musicians taking part. 

At the close of the concert the usual 
M. 1. T. yell was given and a car took 
the men back to Boston to pursue their 
studies. 

Following is the programme: 

Part I — The Glee Club (a) “Cardinal 
and Grey,” Moody, ’07, (b) “Take Me 
Back to Tech,” Litchfield, ’87 ; 2. The 
Mandolin Club — “Pied Piper” Selec- 
tions, Cline; eneore, “Yankee Dandy.” 
3. The Banjo Club — “Rose Tree March,” 
Eno; encore, “Onion Rag.” 4. Mando- 
lin Club Sextet — Selection. 5. The Glee 
Club — “The Stein Song,” Bullard, ’87; 
eneore, “Bill of Fare.” C. Mr. A. G. 
Wilson — Vocal Selection. 7. The Banjo 
Club — “Chines American March,” 
Lampe. 8. The Mandolin Club — “Me- 
teor March,” Rice. 9. Combined Man- 
dolin and Glee Clubs — “Dear Old M. I. 
T.,” Wonson, ’07. 


Cooke, the Princeton sprinter, who 
won the 60-yard dash at the New York 
A. C. games Tuesday night, is a corker, 
and will have to be watched this spring. 


CONDITIONS IN UNION 

SNOW IMPROVEMENT 

There Are Never More Than 
Three Or Four Men Who 
Wear Hats There 

Conditions n the Union tiave im- 
proved! This is the opinion of the 
House Committee, who, after months 
of energetic 'York have noted a change 
for the better concerning tbe matter 
of men removing their hats when in the 
Union. Actual count each noon has 
shown that there are at noon hour al- 
ways three, sometimes five, wearing 
hats in the Union. With regard to the 
smashing of chairs and other furniture, 
this continues to be a favorite pastime 
for some on rainy afternoons. One man 
has paid up for three chairs which he 
has broken recently, and the committee 
hopes that this is an example that will 
be followed by others who have of- 
fm-ded in a simi’ar manner. 

The committee has recently added the 
American Magazine to the number al- 
ready provided. As to the matter of 
the exchanges which used to be in the 
Union, a notice has been posted for 
some t ; me requesting those who wished 
certain ones continued, to leave a note 
in the House Committee box to that 
effect. As only seven notes were re- 
ceived, and of these, four were from men 
the “Tech” staff, it was thought inad- 
visable to continue them at all. 

A suggestion box lias been provided 
in the Union and everyone who has any 
suggestions which would be of use to 
the committee, are requested to leave 
them there. 

The following men comprise the com- 
mittee: Sunday, K. Goto 1911; Mon- 
day, G. C. George 1911; Tuesday, O. D. 
Powell 1911; Wednesday, L. 0. Hart 
1913; Thursday, IT. F. Dolliver 1911; 
Friday, G. M. Donbinger 1913; Satur- 
day, Malcolm Lewis 1913; Chairman, 
IT. M. Davis 1911. 


An organization at the University of 
Virginia, known as the Seven Club, is 
said to be employing Black Hand meth- 
ods to further its cause. Notices 
printed in red ink on black paper have 
been posted on the wall of the “topic” 
office, threatening the editor with das- 
tardly punishment if he publishes arti- 
cles detrimental to their interests. 


CALENDAR. 

Tuesday, March 22. 

4.00— Cross Country practice at Field. 

4.00 — Crew practice. 

4.00 — Si ow rehearsal. 

4.15 — Civil Engineering Society, 6 Low- 

ell. Prof. Swain on “Business 
Fit ics.” 

4.30 — 1013 Baseball Practice, Field. 

8.00— Cosmopolitan Club Reception to 

Pres. Maclaurin, 480 Boylstoii 
St., Wednesday, March 23. 

4.00 — Crew Practice. 

4.15 — Institute Com. and Business 

Mgrs. 

•1.15- --I twn. Team Practice. 

Thursday, March -24. 

4.00 — Cross Country Practice at Field. 

Friday, March 25. 

4.00 — Crew Practice. 

4.15 — Gym. Team Practice. 

4.30 — 1913 Baseball Practice, Field. 

3.00 — Union Entertainment. 

Saturday, March 26. 

2.14 — Hare and Hounds at North Sta- 
tion forWakefield. 

2.30 — Combined Show Rehearsal. 

3.00 — Crew Practice. 


THE TECH, BOSTON, MASS., TUESDAY, MARCH 2 2, igio. 


THE TECH 

Published dally, except Sunday, during 
the college year by students at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 


Entered as second-class matter, Sept. 29, 
1909, at the post office at Boston, Maas., 
under the Act of Congress of March 8, 
1879 . 

B. H. Banger 1911 Gen. Mgr. 

News Board. 

A. L. Fabens 1910 Editor-in-Chief 

L. Bosenatein 1910 Inst. Editor 

G. M. Keith 1912 Society Editor 

E. B. Moore 1912 Gen. News iMitor 

L G. Fitzherbert 1911 . .Athletic Editor 


Business Board. 

D. N. Frazier 1911 Business Mgr. 

H. Merrill 1912 Adv. Mgr. 

A. W. Yereance 1911 ..Circulation Mgr. 

B. S. Rankin 1913, Editor in charge. 

Office 42 Trinity Place. 

Telephone, Back Bay 2184. 

All communications should be addressed 
to the proper departments. 

Subscriptions $1.60 per year In advance. 
Single copies 1 cent. 

Subscriptions within the Boston Postal 
District and outside of the United States 
must be accompanied by postage at the 

rate of one cent a copy. 

Printed by Puritan Linotype, Boston, Mas*. 

BOSTON, MASS., MARCH 22, 1910. 

Hook-Night saw the culmination of a 
spirit that lias very unfortunately been 
growing up around the Union— to get 
as near the improper as possible with- 
out getting exactly on tile side of in- 
decency. This ill the eyes of a few 
seems to be the highest intellectual at- 
tainment in the art of being clever and 
witty. 

Fortunately the one-third of the In- 
stitute body which was present last 
Friday night unreservedly allowed its 
disapproval of this doubtful style. It 
is up to the few dealers in this low 
wit to take the hint. Remember that 
everything of this nature reflects not 
only on the character of the individual 
but actually places a brand on the cha- 
racter of the whole Institute, past, pres- 
ent, and future. 

Remembev not only our contempora- 
ries but also our predecessors who have 
by 1 their great work after graduation 
placed high the name of the Institute. 

Is it in our province to undo what 
they have done? 


the negative teams representing each of 
tlie colleges debating at home. Harvard 
met Princeton’s affirmative team at 
Banders Theatre, Cambridge, while the 
former’s affirmative team will meet Yale 
at New Haven. 


New Haven, March 22. — To attend 
the stated meeting of the Yale corpora- 
tion of which he is a fellow, President 
Taft came here yesterday, combining 
the trip with a further visit eastward 
to Providence ■ Inter in the day for the 
purpose of addressing a gathering at 
Providence. 


Boston, March 22. — The detailing of 
Capt. Ainsley C. Armstrong of police 
headquarters for special service in the 
customs division of the treasury depart- 
ment, at the request of the secretary of 
the treasury and the President, has re- 
vived the rumors that a thorough inves- 
tigation of the Boston custom house is 
contemplated. 


BACK BAY BRANCH 

State Street Trust Co. 

130 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE, BOSTON 


Credits interest monthly on accounts of $300 and over. 


MAIN OFFICE: 38 STATE STREET 


Boston, March 22. — Two representa- 
tives of the city of Now York are in 
Boston investigating the bath depart- 
ment with a view to getting ideas for 
that city. They come under directions 
from Mayor Gaynor, whom they quote 
as saying that Boston excels the coun- 
try in the matter of providing bathing 
facilities. 


New York, March 22. — The Shuberts 
announced yesterday that a corporation, 
had been organized between the New 
York Hippodrome Company, consisting 
of the Shuberts and Mess rs. Chese- 
brough and Black, and some western 
capital, for the purpose of building du- 
plicates of the New York Hippodrome 
in Boston and Chicago. 


Boston, March 22. — With the an- 
nouncement that Mayor Fitzgerald is 
going to make war on the political ene- 
mies who were lined up against him«^ 
in the last municipal campaign' comes 
the information that he is making alli- 
ances with friendly Republicans, proba- 
bly to the end of building up a non- 
partisan organization for work in the 
coming congressional campaigns. 


Albany, March 22. — The great inter- 
national contest between President Taft 
and Earl Grey, Governor-General of 
Canada, will be pulled off at Beverly, 
Mass., this summer. 



COMPETITION FOR A COPY OF TECHNIQUE 19x1 

The man handing in the greatest number of these cou- 
pons by April 13 will receive a copy of TECHNIQUE 1911 


Name 


No man connected with The Tech may compete 


With the inspection trip to Lawrence 
the Electrical Engineering Department 
takes an important step towards a 
more complete development of their 
graduates. 

The benefits to be derived from a town 
of industrial plants will be greatly 
increased by the wiser selections of 
older men and tlie better opportunities 
offered since these will be conducted as 
an official part of the Institute. 

The Electrical Engineering society 
has conducted many excellent trips. 
However, it is not to be denied that 
tlie presence of an experienced man, an 
instructor familiar with tlie industry, 
will lend greatly to the understanding. 
In the trips of the professional society, 
the superficial knowledge of the more 
fluent leaders is too evident. 

On the surface many institutions 
present really the same features. It is 
the opportunity of the instructor in 
these trips to show how this or that 
problem was met, what this machine 
does or iiow the product is handled. 

There have been many excursions in 
the past on which the men looked and 
wondered. They were kindly received, 
yet their guide was conversant enough 
with their standpoint to siiow them the 
things they wanted. He knew well 
what they thought the most interesting 
and passed them the compliments of 
supposing they could follow him along 
lines in which they had had no training. 

This example of progress could well 
be copied ill the other professional so- 
cieties and departments. Co-operation 
will not mean elimination. 


GENERAL NEWS 


TELEGRAPH NEWS OF THE 
MORNING. 

WEATHER REPORT. 

Washington, D. C. — March 22. — Fore- 
cast for Boston and vicinity — Fair and 
warmer; light west to southwest winds. 


Cambridge, March 22. — Last night 
the second triangular debate between 
Harvard, Yale and Princeton was held, 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Washington, March 22. — The census 
cotton report shows the crop of 1909 
to be 10,363,240 bales, counting round 
as h 'lf-bules and including linters, com- 
pared with 13,432,131 for 1908. Cotton 
estimated by ginners as remaining to 
be ginned and included in the statistics 
for 1909 is 49,488 hales.' 


MEN’S FURNISHING DEPARTMENT 

MEN’S PURE SILK KNITTED 
FOUR-IN-HANDS, 

PLAIN AND NOVELTY WEAVES. 

$1.00 $1.50 $2.00 $2.50 $3.00 $3.50 

C. F. HOVEY, 33 Summer Street 


London, March 22. — The tariff negoti- 
ations between the United States and 
Canada were tlie subject of questions 
in the House of Commons yesterday, 
certain members desiring to know 
whether the government proposed to as- 
sist Canada, “in view of the American 
threats to penalize Canadian imports 
and the danger of a tariff war.” Pre- 
mier Asquith stated that the Canadian 
government had been made fully aware 
tht the good offices of he British gov- 
ernment and of Ambassador Bryce were 
at their disposal, but he declined to dis- 
cuss the matter further in view of tlie 
negotiations that were pending. 


FOREIGN. 

Rome, March 22. — The Italian cabinet 
resigned yesterday. Tlie retirement oi 
the ministry which was formed 011 Dec. 
10, 1909, with Baron Sidney Sonnino as 
premier was due to the realization that 
the government’s mercantile marine 
subsidies measure was doomed to defeat. 


GLOVES 


Ask foT the best and see 
how quick they’ll bring 
you 

FOWNES 


1 


BOSTON, MASS. 


BOSTON 
OPERA HOUSE 

Henry Russell, Managing Director. 


GRAND OPERA AT POPULAR 
PRICES. 


inursday, March 23, 
at 8.00 P. M. 

Mefistofele 


Mmes. Nielson, Dereyne, Glaes- 
sens, Leveroni; MM. Constantino, 
Mardones, Vanni, Stroesco. Cond. 
Conti. 


Prices 50 c., Jt.co, 81 . 50 , 82 . 00 . 


Mason & Hamlin Pianos Used. 


HOTEL CUMBERLAND 

Broadway at 54th Street, New York. 
Near 50th St. Subway Slation and 63d 
Street Elevated 


KEPT BY A COLLEGE MAN 



New and Fireproof 

Rates Reasonable. $2.50 with bath and 
up. Send for booklet. 

HARRY P. STIMSON 
Formerly with Hotel Imperial 


SMULLEN & CO. 


TAILORS 


Cl SUMMER ST., cor. Chauncey St. 

Highest Grades . : Popular Prices 








THE TECH, BOSTON, MASS., TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1910. 


TECH MEN 60 TO HARVARD 

Prof. Pearson Entertains De- 
bating Society 

Last night Prof. Pearson escorted ail 
but one of the members of his debating 
class to the realms of Harvard to at- 
tend there the debate between Harvard 
and Princeton. This debate was one of 
the three in the new scheme of triangu- 
lar debates between Harvard, Yale and 
Princeton. Eacli school has two teams 
in the field presenting the opposite 
sides of the same question to the oppos- 
ing schools at one and the same time. 

The decision went to the Harvard 
team. 

After the debate the Tech debating 
class adjourned to The Union, where 
Prof. Pearson arranged for a Welsh 
Tarebit supper, which was disposed of, 
while the manner in which the debate 
had been carried off was discussed. 


S{)hinjc 
C TiisJWlloo' 

Two and ThreaDohars— 


COLLEGE HEWS 


The Johns Hopkins University is to 
have an independent baseball team. The 
athletic association lias refused to rec- 
ognize or give any aid to the national 
sport. 


The Intercollegiate Wrestling Associ- 
ation will hold its annual meet at Phil- 
adelphia Saturday. Princeton appears 
to have the best chance to win the title, 
as Cornell, which was looked upon to 
win a few weeks ago, lost to the Tigers 
last Saturday. 


Eddie K. Merrihew, the Harvard 
quarter-miler, in his relay, as a member 
of the Boston Athletic Association team 
against Harry Gissing, New York’s peer- 
less runner, was credited by Charles 
Dieges with running the last quarter in 
an even 50 seconds. 


One of the runners on the Penn fresh- 
man team which will compete in the 
freshman relay race at the Penn relay 
carnival will be Mercer, the former 
George schoolboy, who is kn own by the 
track followers chiefly because of his 
ability to vault over 12 feet and clear 
close to 23 feet in the running broad 
jump. He has shown as good as 51 sec- 
onds for the quarter, and that is why 
Murphy is picking him to represent 
Penn’s opening class. 


One-twentieth of the students at the 
University of Pennsylvania are from 
foreign countries. 



INFALLIBLE CORRECTNESS OF GRADING. 

UNEQUALLED FOR PURITY, SMOOTHNESS, DURABILITY. 



DRAWING PENCILS IN 16 DEGREES, F3CM 63 TO 8H. 

THE FINEST IN EXISTENCE. 

A- W. FABER, 51 DICKERSON ST„ NEWARK, N. J. 







(I 20 for 15 ets. j) 



HPRACK events. Splendid day. Air 
^invigorating. Pretty girls. Well- 
dressed men. Everything in tune. 

And— Fatima Cigarettes. 

A blend of fine Turkish 
tobacco. Their taste is irild 
and mellow. 

Made of perfectly mellowed 
tobacco, and there are twenty ex- 
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THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



rp HE Label in a 



SHIRT 


is your guarantee 
that everything in 
the shirt is right. 
All you have to look 
for is the pattern you 
like. $1.50 and more 

In white or in color. 
Cluett, Peabody & Co, 

MAKERS 


Winter Garb 

FOR GENTLEMEN 
Highest Order of Tailoring, yet 
Ready to Slip Into. 

Suit or Overcoat 

Formerly $25 to $50 

Now Reduced $18 to $35 

FINEST OF FURNISHINGS, 
ALSO REDUCED 

Ely Meyer & M. C. Simon 

T. Henry Clarkson, Manager. 
WASHINGTON AND 
FRANKLIN STREETS. 



WANTED-A RIDER AGENT 


IN EACH TOWN 

and district to 
.. . _ _ ride and exhibit a 
Our agents everywhere are 


cample Latest Model “Banker” bicycle furnished by us, 

~aking money fast. IVrite J or full Particulars and special 

NO MONEt KEQU1KED until you receive and approve of your bicycle. We ship 


to anyone, anywhere in the U, S, without (t cent deposit in ad va n ck7pre pay freight, and 
allow TEN DAYS* FREE ! TRIAL, during which time you may ride the bicycle and 


put it to any test you .wish. If you are then “not perfectly satisfied or~ do not 'wish ' to 
keep the bicycle ship it back to us at our expense an A you will not be out one cent . 
FACTORY PRIP.F<k We furnish the highest grade bicycles it is possible to make 
r*iu ivn ,■ rnivLtj at one small profit above actual factory cost. You save $io 
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VAII UNI I RP ACTnNIQIIPn whe , n you receive our beautiful catalogue and 
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than any other factory. We are satisfied with $i.oo profit above factory cost, 
BICYCLE DEALERS, you can sell our bicycles under your own name plate at 
jour Offers filled the day received. 


SECOND HAND BICYCLES. We do not rci 

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ignilarly handle second band bicycles, but 
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fi A ACTED DDAVrC single wheels, imported roller chains and pedals, parts, 
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repairs and 



§0 HEDGETHORN PUNCTURE-PROOF M 
SELF-HEALING TIRES A sa " pt£ PMB 


The regular retail price of these tires is 
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set l you a sample pair for $4 .80 ( cash w ith order $4. 55). 

KO MORE TROUBLE FROM PUNCTURES 

NAILS, Tacks or Glass will not let the 
air out. Sixty thousand pairs sold last year. 

Over two hundred thousand pairs now in use, 
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to prevent rim cutting. This 
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advertising purposes we are making a specfal'factory price to * EASY HIDING, 
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We will allow a cash discount of 5 per cent (thereby making the price #4.55 per pair) if you 
send FULL CASH WITH ORDER and enclose this advertisement. You run no risk in 
sending us an order as the tires may be returned at OUR expense if for any reason they are 
not satisfactory on examination. We are perfectly reliable and money sent to us is as safe as in a 
bank. If you order a pair of these tires, you will find that they will ride easier, run faster, 
wear better, last longer and look finer than any tire you have ever used or seen at any price. We 
know that you will be so well pleased that when yon want a bicycle you will give us your order. 
We want you to send us a trial order at once, hence this remarkable tire offer. 

gp ym| SlFrn T/Oirc don’t buy any kind at any price until you send for a pair of 
■ W Mwm, ri f m IffCO Hedgethorn Puncture-Proof tires 011 approval and trial at 
the special introductory price quoted above; or write for our big Tire aud Sundry Catalogue which 
describes and quotes all makes and kinds of tires at about half the usual prices. 
n#| ifHi* IT but write US a postal today. DO NOT THINK. OF BUYING a bicycle 

ffvVa wTMmtM or a pair of tires from anyone until you know the new aud wonderful 
offers we are making. It only costs a postal to learn everything. Write it NOW. 

J. L. MEAD CYCLE COMPANY, CHICAGO, ILL 


All Goods Required by 
Students at 

f 



cnian s 


502 Boylston St. 

drawing Instruments and Materials, etc. 
Fountain Pens. Text-Books 


“The Girls Are Fond of These* 



Tech Emblems 

Greatest Variety 

Lowest Price* 


BENT 6 BUSH 

15 Fchool Street BOSTON 


: WINCHESTER 


SMOKELESS POWDER SHOTGUN SHELLS 

There are more “Leader” and “Repeater” loaded shells used 
than any other brand. Their superior shooting is the reason 
why. For pattern, penetration and uniformity they are 
unequalled. They hold all important records and trophies. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR THE RED W BRAND. 







THE TECH, BOSTON, MASS., TUESDAY, MARCH 22, igio. 


A. G. Spalding & Bros. 


— THE— 

Spalding 

TRADE-MARK 



is known 
throughout the 
world as a 

Guarantee 
of Quality 


are the largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

OFFICIAL 

EQUIPMENT 

FOR ALL 
ATHLETIC 
SPORTS AND 
PASTIMES 

If you are inter* 
ested in athletic 
sports you should 
have a copy of the 
Spalding Catalogue. 
It's a complete en- | 
cyclopedia of 
WHAT’S NEW IN 
SPORT and is sent 
free on request 


ISAAC LOCKE & CO 

97, 99 & 101 Faneuil Hall Market 
Wholesale & Retail Dealers in 
FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND 
HOTHOUSE PRODUCTS 




OOD 

30 to 50 percent. Discount to Students 
on 

EYEGLASSES AND SPECTACLES 
Liberal Discount on Other Lines. 
STANDARD LENS CO. 

372 Boylston St., Room 45 
Represented in Tech by 
C. R. Perry (Cage). 




Lunch and Coffee House, 

20 HUNTINGTON AVENUE, 
NEAR COPLEY SQUARE, 

327 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. 

TeL 3rgs-r Back Bay BOSTON 


Preston’s 
Coffee House 

Open A11 Night. 

1036 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 
Telephone 2206-1 B. B. 


BOSTON DAIRY 
LUNCH 

COR. BERKELEY & BOYLSTON STS. 

Specials Every Day. 

All Home Cooking. Moderate Prices. 
Cigars ana Cigarettes. 


STONE & WEBSTER 


CHARLES A. STONE, ’88 EDWIN S. WEBSTER, ’88 

RUSSELL ROBB, ’88 ELIOT WADSWORTH HENRY G. BRADLEE, 'gi 

Securities of Public Service Corporations 

Under the Management of our Organization 

STONE & WEBSTER STONE & WEBSTER 

MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION ENGINEERING CORPORATION 


GENERAL MANAGERS OF PUBLIC 
SERVICE CORPORATIONS 


CONSTRUCTING ENGINEERS 


NOTICES 


A. a SPALDING & BROS. 

134*126 Nassau St. 23-33 West 42d SL 
NEW YORK 


THE STUDENTS’ UnUG STORE 

Under Copley Square Hotel. 

We make a special effort to merit the 
patronage of our student friends. Don’t 
forget the address under the Copley 
Square Hotel. 



By Vote of the Faculty — The exercises 
of the Institute will be suspended on 
Friday, Saturday, Monday and Tues- 
day, April 15th, 16th, 18th and 19th, 
1910.. 

A. Li. MERRILL, 

March 18, 1910. Secretary. 

HARDWARE SHOW. 

Through the courtesy of the manage- 
ment of the exhibition of the New Eng- 
land Hardware Dealers’ Association, 
tickets of admittance may be received 
on apply ing for them at the informa- 
tion desk in the Registrar’s Office. 

WALTER HUMPHREYS, 
Registrar. 

1911— CHIPPING AND FILLING 

AND FORGING 

Exercises in Forging for Course II, 
Sections 2 and 3, and in Chipping and 
Filling for Section 1, will begin on 
Wednesday, March 30th. 

Exercises in Chipping and Filling for 
Course Xm will begin on Thursday, 
March 31st. 

WALTER HUMPHREYS, j 
Registrar. 

I 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

March 21, 1910. 

Each applicant for a scholarship (ex- 
cept a State scholarship) for the ensu- ! 
ing year should hand in his application 
blank at the Registrar’s Office, and leave 
his name before April 4th on a special 
card enclosed in an envelope, in Profes- 
sor Dewey’s box in the Registrar’s Office. 
(Blanks and cards may be obtained at 


FLOWERS 

For All Occasions at Most Reasonable 


the Registrar’s Office. ) Applications 
dated since January 1st need not be 
duplicated, but the applicant should no- 
tify Profesor Dewey in writing if he 
desires to apply for a scholarship grant 
for next year. 

With the name state the class, course 
and all free hours for consultation. Each 
applicant will be notified through the 
“Cage” in regard to date selected for 
consultation. Students applying, there- 
fore, should inquire at the “Cage” for 
mail. 

STATE SCHOLARSHIPS.— Applica- 
tions should be made to the Secretary 
of the State Board of Education on 
blanks to be furnished at the State 
House. 

While the State Board of Education 
has full control of the award of the 
State scholarships, it is customary to 
submit all applications to the Faculty 
for endorsement as to standing, and for 
such advice as other data in the posses- 
sion of the Faculty may warant. For 
this reason, while the Scholarship Com- 
mittee has no authority to request con- 
ference or further information from ap- 
plicants for State scholarships, it will 
always be glad to receive and consider 
all information that may be furnished. 
In any case, students intending to apply 
for State scholarships are requested to 
notify the Registrar to that effect. 

WALTER HUMPHREYS, 

Registrar. 

Cross Country candidates report at 
Tech Field Monday, Tuesday and 
Thursday; Saturdays, take Hare and 
Hounds runs. 

CIVIL ENG. SOCIETY MEETING. 

Tuesday, March 22, at 4.15 ±'. M., in 
Room 6, Lowell Bldg. Prof. Geo. F. 
Swain will speak on “PROFESSIONAL 
ETHICS.” 


1910. 

Ballots for the Senior Class Day 
Committee have been mailed to all Sen- 
iors who are takin three-fourths of their 
subjects with the Senior Class, and who 
have paid their class dues. Ballots 
must be turned in at the Cage before 
4.15 P. M. Thursday, March 24, 1910. 


All men who expect. to try for Fresh- 
man outdoor track should report from 
now on at Tech Field for Practice, 

Wm. KATJZENBERGER, Mgr. 

Ail men having keys to lockers at the 
Field are requested to give their names 
and locker numbers to the care-taker 
since the list has been lost. 

Pennsylvania Club Dinner postponed 
to Thursday, March 24. Dr. Sharp of 
Brookline to speak. 

A beautiful mandolin for sale. $10.00 
cash. Inquire G. M. K., The Tech. 

Dress suit in perfect condition for 
sale. Price $16.00. Will fit a man 
about five-foot-eight. Inquire R. H. F., 
The Tech. 

Overcoat and watch lound in 25A 
Lowell Building. Please apply at Burs- 
.aris Office. 

A lady would like anything in the 
mending line to do at her home. Apply 
Business Manager. 


! Tech Show I 

& s 

All men who are in any doubt as to 
whether they have been denied the right 
to obtain seats for Tech Show 1910 by 
application in accordance with the rul- 
ing last year should communicate with 
the management at once in order to be 
sure of recieving an application blank. 


By going through the season unde- 
feated, the Yale swimmers captured 
both the swiming and the water polo 
championships, and by scoring the 
greatest number of points in the .inter- 
collegiate meet earned also -the special 
trophy. The team championships were 
completed in a series of dual meets, each 
team in the league having five on its 
schedule. Pennsylvania took four vic- 
tories with one defeat, a close second to 
Yale, with Princton third. 


J. NEWMAN & SONS CORP’N 

24 TREMONT STREET 
Special Discount to Tech Students 


Rent Automobiles 

from the 

MOTOR CAR RENTING CO. 

TeL Oxford 2520 
Motor Mart Garage, Room ro 


Charles Jacobson 

Custom Tailor 

We also do Naphtha or Steam 
Cleansing, also Monthly Pressing 

III MASSACHUSETTS AYE., 
NEWBURY BUILDING 
Telephone 2161-3 Back Bay 


SPRING STYLES NOW READY. 



ROSES 


OLD COLONY TRUST COMPANY 

Capital and Surplus, $7,500,000.00 

Main Office, Court Street 

Branch Office, Temple Place 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AT BOTH 
OFFICES 


124 Tremont St., opp. Park St. Churv. 
Telephone Oxford 1737 
Conservatories: 

Boylston and Fairfield Sts., Back Bay 
Telephone Back Bay 2323 
Established 1850 


Qfl Daily 2 and 8 
utioilo dlj. Tel. Tremont 5 

The John Craig Stock Company 
MARRIAGh. OF KITTY. 

Pnces 13c., 25c., 50c., 75c. 
Down-town Ticket Office, 15 Winter St. 


J. C LITTLEFIELD 

JK HIGH CLASS 

prices that are 

DRESS CLOTHES A SPECIALTY, 
xa Beacon Street, Boston