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Mosyakin, S.L., L.M. Shultz & G.V. Boiko. 2017. Types of sagebrush updated (Artemisia subg. Tridentatae, Asteraceae): 
miscellaneous comments and additional specimens from the Besser and Turczaninov memorial herbaria (KW). Phytoneuron 
2017-25: 1-20. Published 6 April 2017. ISSN 2153 733X 

TYPES OF SAGEBRUSH UPDATED 
{ARTEMISIA SUBG. TRIDENTATAE, ASTERACEAE): 
MISCELLANEOUS COMMENTS AND ADDITIONAL SPECIMENS FROM 
THE BESSER AND TURCZANINOV MEMORIAL HERBARIA (KW) 

Sergei L. Mosyakin 

M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany 
National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine 
2 Tereshchenkivska Street 
Kiev (Kyiv), 01004 Ukraine 
inst @ botany, kiev.ua 

Leila M. Shultz 

Department of Wildland Resources, NR 329 
Utah State University 
Logan, Utah 84322-5230, USA 
l.shultz@usu.edu 

Ganna V. Boiko 
M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany 
National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine 
2 Tereshchenkivska Street 
Kiev (Kyiv), 01004 Ukraine 
bav22@ukr.net 

ABSTRACT 

Corrections and additions are provided for the existing typifications of plant names in Artemisia 
subg. Tridentatae. In particular, second-step lectotypifications are proposed for the names Artemisia 
trifida Nutt., nom. illeg. (A. tripartita Rydb., the currently accepted replacement name), A. fischeriana 
Besser (= A. californica Lessing, the currently accepted name), and A. pedatifida Nutt. For several 
nomenclatural types of names listed in earlier publications as "holotypes," the type designations are 
corrected to lectotypes (Art. 9.9. of ICN). Newly discovered authentic specimens (mostly isolectotypes) of 
several names in the group are listed and discussed, mainly based on specimens deposited in the Besser 
and Turczaninov memorial herbaria at the National Herbarium of Ukraine (KW). The Turczaninov 
herbarium is particularly rich in Nuttall's specimens, which are often better represented and better 
preserved than corresponding specimens available from BM, GH, K, PH, and some other major herbaria. 


Artemisia L. subg. Tridentatae (Rydb.) McArthur (Asteraceae), containing sagebrush species, 
is a morphologically, geographically and phylogenetically well outlined group restricted exclusively 
(or mainly?) to North America, which was recently treated taxonomically by Shultz (2006b, 2009). 
Recent molecular phylogenetic studies confirmed a rather isolated position of the group within the 
genus (Kornkven et al. 1998, 1999; Torrell et al. 1999; Watson et al. 2002; Valles et al. 2003; Sanz et 
al. 2008; Garcia et al. 2011a) but also demonstrated that it is phylogenetically rooted in Artemisia 
subg. Artemisia in its current rather wide circumscription. It was also confirmed (Valles et al. 2003; 
Sanz et al. 2008; Garcia et al. 2011a) that the previously recognized genera Picrothamnus Nutt, and 
Sphaeromeria Nutt, (see Nuttall 1841; Holmgren et al. 1976; Cronquist 1994; Shultz 2006a, 2006b; 
Lowrey & Shultz 2006 etc.) should be included in it. New nomenclatural combinations in Artemisia 
have been already proposed for the majority of taxa earlier included in Sphaeromeria (Garcia et al. 
2011b). Since the "A. tridentata clade" is phylogenetically sister to Artemisia subg. Artemisia sect. 
Artemisia sensu lato, the sectional rank for "sagebrushes" is probably justified, or, alternatively, some 
other clades should be recognized as subgenera, if the subgeneric rank is retained for the 
"A. tridentata clade." Further changes in infrageneric taxonomy of the genus seem to be inevitable. 






However, pending further research, for convenience here we refer to that group as "subg. 
Tridentatae," in the circumscription accepted by Shultz (2006b, 2009), with addition of some taxa, as 
suggested by Garcia et al. (2011b). 

The data on types of names of most taxa of that subgenus (in its traditional circumscription) 
were summarized by Shultz (2009), and earlier by Cronquist (1994). However, for some names, 
corrections and sometimes second-step lectotypifications were needed. 

In the course of the preparation of the present note we consulted the available databases of 
scanned herbarium specimens (mainly JSTOR Global Plants 2017-onward) and, most importantly, 
the vast collections of historical herbarium specimens of Artemisia deposited in the memorial herbaria 
of Besser and Turczaninov in the National Herbarium of Ukraine (KW, Herbarium of the M.G. 
Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; here and below the 
herbarium acronyms are given following Thiers 2017-onward). 

Willibald [in some sources Wilibald] Swibert Joseph Gottlieb von Besser (1784-1842; in 
Russian sometimes mentioned as BH.i.m6a.ibn Tottjih6obhh Eeccep), an Austrian-born botanist who 
worked mainly in Kremenets and Kiev (formerly the Russian Empire, now Ukraine), was one of early 
monographers of Artemisia who published several important contributions on taxonomy of the genus 
(Besser 1829, 1832, 1834a, 1834b, 1835) and also contributed to the treatment of Artemisia in de 
Candolle's Prodromus... (Candolle "1837," published 1838). Many of his taxa are still widely 
recognized in standard floras and manuals (Poljakov 1961; Korobkov 1992; Krasnoborov 1997; Ling 
et al. 2011; Shultz 2006b etc.; see also IPNI 2017-onward). Nikolai (Nicolai or Nicholas) 
Stepanovich Turczaninov (1796-1863; Hmcojian CTcnaHOBun TypnamiHOB in Russian; also 
sometimes transliterated as Turczaninow, Turchaninov, Turtschaninow, or Turtschaninoff) was a 
devoted plant collector and taxonomist who exchanged plant specimens with many contemporary 
botanists and accumulated a large herbarium of more than 150 000 specimens (probably much more 
than 170 000 specimens, if we consider specimens placed on the same sheet or in the same 
folder/envelope). Main collections of these two botanists are deposited in KW as two memorial 
herbaria kept separately from other KW collections, while their duplicate specimens are also available 
from many other herbaria (Jain 1970; Stafleu & Cowan 1976, 1986; Myakushko 1976; Marchant 
1990; Krytzka & Mosyakin 2002; Shiyan 2011 etc.). 

Both these historical collections are amazingly rich in types from all parts of the world; many 
types (especially those of taxa described by Turczaninov himself) have been already identified, 
scanned and databased (see JSTOR Global Plants 2017-onward), but many other type specimens still 
remain in these general collections, awaiting proper identification and further research. In particular, 
the Turczaninov herbarium contains numerous North American specimens collected by Thomas 
Nuttall (1786-1859), but complete inventory of these specimens has not been done yet. Nuttall's 
original collections are mainly deposited in BM and PH, with additional specimens or duplicates in 
GH, K, MO, NY, OXF, and some other herbaria (see Stafleu & Cowan 1981). 

Type specimens of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae : corrections and second-step lectotypifications 

The taxa are listed below following the treatment by Shultz (2009). If necessary, notes on 
their corrected typification are provided. 

ARTEMISIA CANA Pursh, FI. Amer. Sept. 2: 521. 1814. Seriphidium canum (Pursh) W.A. Weber, 

Phytologia 55: 7. 1984. TYPE: According to the protologue: "On the Missouri. M. Lewis. 

Aug.-Oct. v. s. in herb. Lewis." As cited by Shultz (2009: 37): "U.S.A.: "on the bluffs of the 

Missouri River," M. Lewis 60 (lectotype, here designated: PH-LC 19)." LECTOTYPE: PH-LC 

19 (PH00043165), designated by Cronquist (1994), corrected and verified by Reveal et al. 




Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 3 


(1999), and accepted by Shultz (2009); image available from JSTOR Global Plants (2017— 
onward). 

Artemisia columbiensis Nutt., Gen. N. Amer. PI. 2: 142. 1818. TYPE: According to the protologue 
(Nuttall 1818: 142): "On the arid and saline hills which border the Missouri and the lesser 
streams, commencing about 30 miles below White River; and continuing to the Mountains (or 
Northern Andes), it occurs still more abundantly on the barren plains of the Columbia river 
<...>. It is the plant which was known to the party of Lewis and Clarke by the name of "Wild 
Sage," and appears to be A. cana of Pursh. FI. Am. 2. p. 521." As cited by Shultz (2009: 38): 
"U.S.A.: "on arid & saline hills that border the Missouri & lesser streams, commencing ca. 30 
miles below the White River (plant called 'wild sage' by Lewis & Clark)," [1811], T. Nuttall 
s.n. (holotype: PH!)." LECTOTYPE: Nuttall, s.n. PH00008343, designated by Shultz (2009, 
as "holotype"); image available from JSTOR Global Plants (2017-onward). 

In her treatment Shultz (2009: 37) cited as the type of Artemisia cana the specimen "Lewis 60 
(lectotype, here designated: PH-LC 19!)". In fact, the lectotype was designated by Cronquist (1994: 
162) who, however, cited it as the "holotype" (an error correctable under Art. 9.9 of ICN: McNeill et 
al. 2012), and with a wrong collection number (6 instead of 60, evidently a technical error). These 
errors were corrected by Reveal et al. (1999: 10), who properly termed this specimen as the lectotype 
and commented that it was collected "near the mouth of the Cheyenne River in Stanley Co., South 
Dakota". Several historical collections of A. cana in the memorial herbaria of Besser and 
Turczaninov (KW) do not represent original material used by Pursh (1814). 

In his protologue of A. columbiensis, Nuttall (1818) cited numerous localities in the western 
part of the USA (see above). Any specimens (known or still unidentified) collected and identified by 
Nuttall and matching these localities are technically syntypes. Since Nuttall did not indicate (directly 
or indirectly) any specimen as the type and we cannot exclude the existence of additional specimens 
(syntypes), the specimen PH00008343 should be treated as the lectotype designated by Shultz (2009). 
No authentic specimens identified as A. columbiensis were found at KW. 

ARTEMISIA TRIPARTITA Rydb., Mem. New York Bot. Gard. 1: 432. 1900. Seriphidium tripartitum 
(Rydb.) W.A. Weber, Phytologia 55: 8. 1984. Artemisia trifida Nutt., Trans. Amer. Philos. 
Soc., n. s., 7: 398. 1841, nomilleg., non Turez. 1832. Artemisia tridentata Nutt, subsp. trifida 
H.M. Hall & Clements, Publ. Carnegie Inst. Wash. 326: 137. 1923. Artemisia tridentata 
Nutt. var. trifida (H.M. Hall & Clements) McMinn, Man. Calif. Shrubs: 608. 1939. TYPE: 
According to the protologue (Nuttall 1841: 398): "Plains of the Rocky Mountains and 
Oregon." As cited by Shultz (2009: 46): "Plains of the Rocky Mts.," [probably Idaho, 1834], 
T. Nuttall s.n (holotype: BM!; isotypes: PH!, GH!)." LECTOTYPE (here designated, second- 
step lectotypification): Plains of the Columbia & R. Mts., Nuttall s.n. BM000810854, image 
available from JSTOR Global Plants (2017-onward); isolectotypes: GH00002743, 
KW001002845 and KW001002846 (Figure 1), PH00025116. 

Artemisia tripartita is the replacement name proposed by Rydberg (1900) instead of the 
illegitimate name A. trifida Nutt. (Nuttall 1841). Consequently (Art. 7.4 of ICN. McNeill et al. 2012), 
it has the same type as the replaced name. Both Cronquist (1994) and Shultz (2009) cited Nuttall's 
specimen from BM as the "holotype". However, in the protologue there is no indication of any 
particular specimen as the type. Thus, all specimens of the same origin deposited in various herbaria 
are technically syntypes, and the selection of a lectotype was necessary. The designation of the 
specimen from BM as the "holotype" should be thus corrected to the lectotype (Art. 9.9 of ICN. 
McNeill et al. 2012). However, there are three specimens (BM000810853, BM000810854, 
BM000810855) mounted on the same sheet in BM, and two of them (BM000810854 and 
BM000810855) were collected by Nuttall and belong to original material of A. trifida (and 


Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 4 


BM000810855 belongs to Nuttal's variety "|3 *rigida", see below). Consequently, Cronquist (1994) 
and Shultz (2009) did the first-step lectotypification. Here we propose the second-step 
lectotypification and designate the specimen BM000810854 ("Plains of the Columbia & R. Mts." 
collected by Nuttall) as the lectotype. 

The specimens from PH, GH, and the newly discovered duplicates from KW (see below) can 
be thus treated as isolectotypes. There are two Nuttall's specimen in the Turczaninov herbarium at 
KW: "Art. trifida Nutt. Nuttall. R. Mts." (KW001002846) and "Artemisia trifida. Oregon. R. Mts." 
(KW001002845; handwriting by Nuttall), both on the same sheet with KW001002847 (" Artemisia 
trifida |3. * rigida", see below) (Figure 1). These specimens are represented by plant fragments 
(probably parts of more complete specimens?), provided to Turczaninov either directly by Nuttall or 
by some other person. 

The name Artemisia tridentata subsp. trifida H.M. Hall & Clements (1923) is sometimes 
cited with the authorship "(Nutt.) H.M. Hall & Clements" (see, for example, Shultz 2009: 46). 
However, since the name A. trifida Nutt, is illegitimate, the subspecies name should be treated as a 
new replacement name authored by Hall & Clements, with the same type as the illegitimate species 
name (Art. 58.1 of ICN: McNeill et al. 2012). The authorship of the variety, A. tridentata var. trifida, 
should be thus cited as "(H.M. Hall & Clements) McMinn". 

ARTEMISIA RIGIDA (Nutt.) A. Gray, Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts 19: 49. 1883. Artemisia trifida Nutt, 
var. rigida Nutt., Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s., 7: 398. 1841. Seriphidium rigidum (Nutt.) 
W.A. Weber, Phytologia 55: 8. 1984. TYPE: According to the protologue (Nuttall 1841: 
398): "From the plains of Lewis' River, in the Rocky Mountains, I have a variety, |3. * rigida, 
in which the leaves are shining and silky, rigidly three-forked and acute, but of this I have no 
flowers. It is, perhaps, a distinct species." As cited by Shultz (2009: 51): "U.S.A. 
[presumably Washington]: "plains of the Lewis [Snake] River" [presumably 1834], T. Nuttall 
s.n. (holotype: BM!; isotype: PH!)." LECTOTYPE: Lewis River, Nuttalls.n., BM000810855, 
designated by Cronquist (1994, as "holotype") and verified by Shultz (2009, as "holotype"); 
image available from JSTOR Global Plants (2017-onward); isolectotypes: BM000810855 
(?), GH00002743, KW001002847 (?) (Figure 1), PH00025116. 

The specimen from BM listed by Cronquist (1994) and Shultz (2009) as the "holotype" is in 
fact the lectotype (Art. 9.9 of ICN McNeill et al. 2012). Additional specimens are available from PH 
(PH00025116) and GH (GH00002743), both verified by Shultz as "isotypes" (in fact, isolectotypes) 
of A. trifida var. rigida (see JSTOR Global Plants 2017-onward). A specimen "Artemisia trifida |3 
* rigida. R. Mts. [Rocky Mountains], Nuttall" recently found in the Turczaninov herbarium (KW 
KW001002847; Figure 1) is also most probably an isolectotype. 

ARTEMISIA ARBUSCULA Nutt., Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s., 7: 398. 1841. Seriphidium 
arbusculum (Nutt.) W.A. Weber, Phytologia 55: 7. 1984. TYPE: According to the 

protologue (Nuttall 1841: 398): "On the arid plains of Upper California, on Lewis' River." As 
cited by Shultz (2009: 54): "U.S.A., [presumably Washington]: "arid plains of the Lewis 
[Snake] River" [presumably 1834], T. Nuttall s.n. (holotype: BM!; isotypes: PH!, GH!, K!)." 
LECTOTYPE: BM001025660, designated by Cronquist (1994, as "holotype") and verified by 
Shultz (2009, as "holotype"); image available from JSTOR Global Plants (2017-onward); 
isolectotypes: GH00002691, K000942175, KW001002848 (?) (Figure 2), KW001002849 
(Figure 2), PH00025095. 

As with some other type designations discussed above, the "holotype" cited by Cronquist 
(1994: 160) and Shultz (2009: 54) is in fact the lectotype, and the specimens from PH (PH00025095), 



Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 5 


GH (GH00002691) and K (K000942175) mentioned by Shultz (2009) are thus isolectotypes (images 
available from JSTOR Global Plants 2017-onward). Two additional authentic specimens were found 
in the Turczaninov collection at KW: "Artemisia arbuscula. Nuttall. R. Mts." (KW001002848) and 
"Artemisia arbuscula Nutt. Nuttall. Lewis River. U. Cal. [Upper California]" (KW001002849) 
(Figure 2). At least the second specimen from KW can be reliably considered an isolectotype. 

ARTEMISIA TRIDENTATA Nutt., Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s., 7: 398. 1841. Seriphidium 

tridentatum (Nutt.) W.A. Weber, Phytologia 55: 8. 1984. TYPE: According to the protologue 
(Nuttall 1841: 398): "Plains of the Oregon, and Lewis' River." As cited by Shultz (2009: 75): 
"U.S.A.: "plains of the Columbia River" [probably in Oregon or Washington, 1834 or 1835], 
T. Nuttall s.n. (lectotype, designated by Cronquist, 1994: PH!)." LECTOTYPE (designated by 
Schultz 2009: 75): PH00004399, see below; image available from JSTOR Global Plants 
(2017-onward); isolectotypes: BM001025663, GH00002740, KW001002841 (Figure 3). 

Shultz (2009: 75) listed the specimen from PH as the lectotype designated by Cronquist 
(1994: 158). However, when considering the type of Artemisia tridentata, Cronquist (1994: 158) 
mentioned two specimens (" Nuttall , plains of the Oregon; represented at BM!, PH!") and commented 
that "[t]he PH specimen is clearly the variety to which the name has traditionally been applied; the 
BM specimen is ambiguous and might belong to the phase here called var. wyomingensis.” Since 
Cronquist did not explicitly indicate a specimen from either PH (PH00004399) or BM 
(BM001025663) as the type (lectotype), in our opinion, effective lectotypification of the name has 
been done by Shultz (2009). The image of an additional isolectotype (GH00002740) is available 
online (JSTOR Global Plants 2017-onward). There is one additional authentic Nuttall's specimen of 
A. tridentata in the Turczaninov collection at KW: "Artemisia tridentata Nuttall. Oregon. R. Mts. 
[Rocky Mountains], Nuttall" (KW001002841), which can be treated as an isolectotype (Figure 3). 

ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA Lessing, Linnaea 6: 523. 1831. Crossostephium californicum (Lessing) 
Rydb., N. Amer. FI. 34(3): 243. 1914. TYPE: According to the protologue (Lessing 1831: 
523): "Ill. de Chamisso in California (v. sp. s. <»)." As cited by Shultz (2009: 97): "U.S.A. 
California: San Francisco [1816], Chamisso s.n. (holotype: HAL!; isotypes: GH!)." 
LECTOTYPE: HAL0105121, designated by Shultz (2009, as "holotype"; see below); image 
available from JSTOR Global Plants (2017-onward); isolectotypes: GH00002698, 
KW001000941 (Figure 4), LE00018144. 

Artemisia fischeriana Besser, Tent. Abrotanis: 21. 1832 (preprint from Nouv. Mem. Soc. Imp. 

Naturalistes Moscou); Besser, Nouv. Mem. Soc. Imp. Naturalistes Moscou 3: 21. 1834. 
TYPE: According to the protologue (Besser 1832: 21): "Ad sinum S. Francisci Californiae in 
planitie, unde ab amicissimo Eschscholtzio: praetera in herbarii clarissimi Fischeri Directoris 
horti botanici Imperatorii Petropolitani etc et D ns Fleischeri (v. sp. s.)." As cited by Shultz 
(2009: 97): "U.S.A. California: San Francisco Bay, Eschscholtz s.n. (holotype: KW!)." 
LECTOTYPE (here designated, second-step lectotypification; see below): KW001000943 
(Figure 5); isolectotypes: KW001000942 (Figure 6), KW001000938 (Figure 7). 

Artemisia foliosa Nutt., Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s., 7: 397. 1841. Crossostephium foliosum 
(Nutt.) Rydb., N. Amer. FI. 34(3): 243. 1914. TYPE: According to the protologue (Nuttall 
1841: 397): "Common round Monterrey, in Upper California." As cited by Shultz (2009: 97): 
"U.S.A. California: Monterey [1834], T. Nuttall s.n. (holotype: PH!)." LECTOTYPE: 
PH00025097, designated by Shultz (2009, as "holotype"); image available from JSTOR 
Global Plants (2017-onward); isolectotypes: GH00002701 (?), KW001002842 (Figure 8). 
Artemisia abrotanoides Nutt., Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s., 7: 399. 1841, nom. illeg., non Jacq. ex 
DC. 1838. — TYPE: According to the protologue (Nuttall 1841: 399): "Near St. Barbara, 
Upper California." As cited by Shultz (2009: 97): "U.S.A. California: near Santa Barbara, 




[1836], T. Nuttall s.n. (holotype: BM!)." Probable HOLOTYPE: BM, digital image not traced 

(assuming there is only one original specimen; Art. 9.1 of ICN). 

Both Cronquist (1994) and Shultz (2009) listed a specimen from HAL as the "holotype" of 
Artemisia californica. However, since several collections of Ludolf Karl Adelbert von Chamisso 
(1781-1838) made at San Francisco Bay exist in several herbaria (GH00002698, LE00018144 - 
listed in the JSTOR Global Plants database as "San Tranurco", which is evidently a misspelling of 
San Francisco, etc.), the HAL specimen (HAL0105121) should be regarded the lectotype (Art. 9.9 of 
ICN: McNeill et al. 2012). There is one additional specimen in the Besser herbarium at KW, which is 
also an isolectotype: "Artemisia californica Lessing. San Francisco Californiae. A. Chamisso. E Herb, 
reg. Berol. 40" (KW001000941). The provenance note ("E Herb. reg. Berol. 40") indicates that the 
specimen was received by Besser in 1840 from the Berlin herbarium (now B); it was Besser's usual 
practice to indicate the origin of his specimens in that way (see Mosyakin et al. 2017). An additional 
curatorial label with the typographically printed heading "Herbarium Universitatis S“ Vladimiri" 
(Herbarium of St. Vladimir University of Kiev) has the handwritten inscription "Herbarium Besseri". 
The specimen BM001025667 listed in the online database (JSTOR Global Plants 2017-onward) as 
the "type of Artemisia californica" was collected by Nuttall and thus is not part of the original 
material. 

Shultz (2009) listed a specimen from KW as the "holotype" of Artemisia fischeriana Besser. 
However, in the Besser collection at KW there are several original specimens (mounted on three 
sheets) collected by Johann Friedrich Gustav von Eschscholtz (1793-1831) and his co-collector (see 
below) in San Francisco Bay and annotated by Besser as A. fischeriana. Consequently, the second- 
step lectotypification was needed. Thus, we designate here the specimen KW001000943 as the 
lectotype (Figure 5). This specimen consists of two plant fragments (both most probably representing 
parts of the same plant, or definitely parts of the same collection) and has the small label 
"Californien" with an additional inscription by Besser "Esch. 31", where "Esch." means Eschscholtz 
and "31" is the year (1831) of provenance. There are two additional labels, one with a complete 
handwritten description of the new taxon made by Besser, with the name "Fischeriana" and the 
geographical origin ("Ad Sin. S. Francisci Californ. Esch. Hbr. Fisch.") written on the top. "Hbr. 
Fisch." indicates that the specimen has been received by Besser from Fischer's herbarium. Since the 
species epithet commemorates the German-born Russian botanist Friedrich Ernst Ludwig von Fischer 
(1782-1854; also known in Russian as cbeflop EornaHOBun cDmnep), it is an additional argument in 
favor of selecting this specimen as the lectotype. A small envelope with loose fragments of 
inflorescences glued in the lower right part of the sheet has the name "Artemisia. A. californica" 
written by some unidentified person. 

The second specimen (KW001000942, Figure 6) is represented by a rather large terminal 
fertile branch, with the original label in German: "Bei Californien, [one word illegible; probably 
"basin"?] Port St. Francisco. Esch. 1831". The provenance note ("Esch. 1831") added by Besser 
indicates that the plant was collected or provided by Eschscholtz and received by Besser in 1831. 

Another sheet has two specimens (Figure 7). The first one (KW001000939) is represented by 
a terminal branch and has the label "Artemisia Fischeriana mihi. S'. Francisco. Hb. Acad. Imp. Sc. 
Choris". This specimen was collected by Louis (also Ludovik or Ludwig) Choris (1795-1828), a 
German-Ukrainian painter and explorer, a co-collector of Eschscholtz and Chamisso, who also 
participated in the expedition onboard the ship Rurik (also Rurick or Ryurik, Pjopim in Russian) 
during 1815-1818 under the command of Otto von Kotzebue and spent October 1816 in San 
Francisco Bay (Kotzebue 1821; Choris 1822, 1913). The specimen was received by Besser from the 
herbarium of the Imperial Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg (now mainly part of LE). The 
second specimen (KW001000938, on the same sheet with KW001000939) has two fragments of 
terminal branches and the label " Remittenda . Ad Sinum S. Francisci Californiae. Eschscholtz". The 



two cited specimens (KW001000942 and KW001000938) collected by Eschscholtz in San Francisco 
can be considered isolectotypes. Some additional isolectotypes can be expected in other German and 
Russian herbaria. 

When preparing his treatment, Besser (1832, 1834) probably was unaware of the new species 
Artemisia californica already described by Lessing (1831) just one year before, and thus he published 
his description of the new species A. fischeriana, which is in fact conspecific with A. californica. As 
discussed earlier (Mosyakin et al. 2017), the preprint (Besser 1832) of Besser's treatment (Besser 
1834a) was published already in 1832, only shortly after the publication of the work by Lessing. 

The specimen from PH (PH00025097) listed by Shultz (2009) as the "holotype" of Artemisia 
foliosa Nutt, should be considered the lectotype (Art. 9.9 of ICN McNeill et al. 2012) because of the 
existence of several other original specimens (syntypes). In particular, we found in the Turczaninov 
collection at KW an additional isolectotype with the following label: "Artemisia * foliosa. Monterrey. 
U. California. Nuttall" (KW001002842, Figure 8). This specimen has an additional label, 
"Artemisias. R. Mts. Nuttall," which was probably originally supplied by Nuttall with several other 
specimens or their fragments. A specimen from GH with the label "Monterrey" (GH00002701) is 
most probably also a fragment of some other original specimen (isolectotype?). 

No authentic specimens annotated as Artemisia abrotanoides have been found at KW. 

Some taxa not treated by Shultz (2009) but now included in Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 

As mentioned above, molecular phylogenetic studies (see Garcia et al. 2011a, 2011b and 
references therein) demonstrated that several additional species of Artemisia and all species earlier 
placed of Sphaeromeria and Picrothamnus should be included in Artemisia subg. Tridentatae. We 
found in the Turczaninov herbarium at KW several authentic specimens of A. pedatifida Nutt., 
Sphaeromeria argentea Nutt., and S. capitata Nutt, collected and annotated by Nuttall. These taxa 
were not included in the taxonomic monograph by Shultz (2009). Nomenclatural notes on 
A. pedatifida are provided below. 

ARTEMISIA PEDATIFIDA Nutt., Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s., 7: 399. 1841. TYPE: According to 
the protologue (Nuttall 1841: 399): "Arid plains of Lewis' River, Rocky Mountains." As 
cited by Shultz (2009: 110): "U.S.A. Idaho: "arid plains of Lewis [Snake] River," T. Nuttall 
s.n. (holotype: GH!)." LECTOTYPE (here designated, second-step lectotypification, see 
below): Arid plains of Lewis' River, Nuttall, s.n. GH00002722,; image available from JSTOR 
Global Plants (2017-onward); isolectotypes: GH00002723, K000942263, KW001002850 and 
KW001002851 (Figure 9), PH00004387. 

Shultz (2009: 29) preferred to keep this species in Artemisia subg. Dracunculus Besser but 
listed it among "Excluded species" and provided the type information (see above). However, there 
are at least two original specimens in GH and several more in other herbaria, and thus the designation 
of a "holotype" by Shultz (2009) can be regarded as a first-step lectotypification. The second-step 
lectotypification is proposed here. Images of additional specimens (isolectotypes) from GH, K, and 
PH are available from JSTOR Global Plants (2017-onward). 

We found in the Turczaninov herbarium at KW two additional specimens (isolectotypes, on 
the same sheet) collected by Nuttall: "Artemisia pedatifida. Nuttall. R. Mts." (KW001002851) and 
"Artemisiapedatifida. Lewis River [handwriting by Nuttall]" (KW001002850) (Figure 9). 

Nuttall's species earlier placed in Sphaeromeria and now transferred to Artemisia will be 
discussed in detail in a separate article. 



Conclusions 

Our analysis of the existing type designations of selected names of taxa now placed in 
Artemisia subg. Tridentatae resulted in several corrections (mostly according to Art. 9.9 of ICN: 
McNeill et al. 2012) and second-step lectotypifications. Additional authentic specimens collected by 
Nuttall, Eschscholtz, and Chamisso (taxa described by Nuttall, Besser, and Lessing, respectively) 
have been identified in the National Herbarium of Ukraine, KW (Besser and Turczaninov memorial 
collections). 

Finally, we would like to draw attention of researchers working on taxa described by Nuttall, 
as well as those interested in the history of early botanical exploration of North America, to numerous 
Nuttall's herbarium specimens deposited in the Turczaninov memorial herbarium at KW. Amazingly, 
some specimens from KW are even better represented and better preserved than corresponding 
specimens available from such herbaria as BM, GH, K, PH, etc. In some cases these additional KW 
specimens can be very useful for establishing the true identity of some taxa. For example, Mosyakin 
(1995, 2003) was able to restore the neglected name Corispermum americanum (Nutt.) Nutt. 
(Chenopodiaceae) after studying a few fruits (crucially important for identification of Corispermum 
species) available on the isolectotype of this species at KW, while no fruits were available from the 
lectotype at PH. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

We are grateful to Svitlana I. Antonenko (M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany of the National 
Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, KW) for scanning the herbarium specimens from KW, and to 
Natalia M. Shiyan (Head Curator of KW; M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany of the National 
Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) and Alisa V. Shumilova (Curatorial Assistant, KW) for facilitating 
our herbarium research. Thanks are due to Guy Nesom for his editorial work on the manuscript. 

James L. Reveal (1941-2015) provided in 2008 his nomenclatural comments on an earlier 
version of the manuscript prepared by Leila M. Shultz (published article: Shultz 2009); some of his 
comments guided our herbarium search, and his expertise was extremely valuable. 

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Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae \2 



Figure 1. Isolectotypes of Artemisia trifida Nutt. (KW001002845, upper right; KW001002846, upper left) and 
possible isolectotype of A. trifida var. rigida Nutt. (KWOO1002847, bottom). 








Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 13 



Figure 2. Isolectotype (KW001002849, bottom) and possible isolectotype (KW001002848, top) of Artemisia 
arbuscula Nutt. 





Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae \\ 



Figure 3. Isolectotype of Artemisia tridentata Nutt. (KW001002841). 





Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 15 



Figure 4. Isolectotype of Artemisia califomica Lessing (KW001000941). 












Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 16 







Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 17 



Figure 6. Isolectotype of Artemisia fischeriana Besser (KWOO1000942). 










Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 18 



Figure 7. Isolectotype of Artemisia fischeriana Besser (KW001000938, left) and a historical specimen 
collected by L. Choris (KW001000939, right). 








Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 19 



Figure 8. Isolectotype of Artemisia foliosa Nutt. (KW001002842). 







Mosyakin et al. Types of Artemisia subg. Tridentatae 20 


llllll l l i p 



■Bl Bllfl 


Figure 9. Isolectotypes of Artemisia pedatifida Nutt. (KW001002850 and KW001002851).