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THE ORCHID KEIIFA 




Cattleya Pketkrsii Westonbirt var. (see page 357). 



THE 

ORCHID REVIEW 



gUi £Uu*tvaUb l-Houtljhj gkutrnal 
DEVOTED TO ORCH1DOLOL 



VOLUME XX 
1912 



Gardu 

KLEW : 
FRANK LESLIE & CO., 12, 
LONDON AGENT 
MARSHALL BROTHERS, LTD.. 47, 

■••» ''i. Gardi;: 



Lt.-Col. Sir GEORGE L. HOLFORD, 



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Z4u5V 

Vol. XX., No. 229. THE JANUARY, 1912. 

ORCHID REVIEW 

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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



JANUARY, 1912. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

"What's in a name? A Cypripedium under any other name does not 
appeal to me. I have lots of them in my collection, but no Paphio- 
pedilums." Thus writes a correspondent, whose name we are not at 
liberty to mention, and it is only one of a series of protests that have 
reached us against the adoption of the late Prof. Pfitzer's name of 
Paphiopedilum for the Old World Tropical Cypripediums. So numerous 
and persistent have these protests been that we think the time has come 
for putting a summary of the whole case on record. 

Objections to the use of the name Paphiopedilum have been many and 
various, and we cannot say that all are the result of mere prejudice against 
a change of name which the progress of knowledge may show to be 
necessary. Cypripedium, it is urged, is much too firmly established to be 
set aside, and nothing less than this is involved by the change, for even the 
hardy species, to which the name properly belongs, are in future to be 
called Cypripedilum, because of some grammatical error in the original 
1 of the name, a change which moreover completely alters the 
>n, though adding but a single letter. After mors than a 
century of uninterrupted use it is too late to make such an alteration, even 
if grammatically correct. It is not permitted by the law of priority. 
Again, if it be admitted that the Old W r orld Tropical species form a 
distinct genus, there is an earlier name than Paphiopedilum, which latter 
should never have been given, and which under the law of priority cannot 
legitimately be upheld. A third point, that horticulturists have steadily 
refused to recognise the change, whether owing to prejudice or not, is held 
to be not only justified by the two considerations just mentioned, but also 



it forth 


er ha 


ive bee 




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that 


Pfitzer 


originally 


based his 


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SeJeni 


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ifolia 


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iich 


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Americar 


1 species), 


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2 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 1912. 

fluctuating between a three-celled and a one-celled condition, and then 
went on to speak of P. insigne and P. Spicerianum, two well-known 
Asiatic species. Other species were subsequently added, and on a strong 
protest being made against the union of the Asiatic and the American 
species, Pfitzer divided his genus into two sections. Ccelopedilum and 
Phragmopedilum. Meantime the late Count Kerchove had changed all 
Pfitzer" s Paphiopedilums into Paphiopedium, in order to secure uniformity 
in spelling, and the present writer followed suit by separating the section 
Phragmopedilum. but changing the name to Phragmipedium, also in the 
interests of uniformity — the name Uropedium, which had the right of 
.priority, being untenable, because based upon a monstrosity. Strictly 
speaking, Pfitzer's name should have been retained for these American 
species, which would have made it possible to apply an existing name to the 
Asiatic species. But the fact is that Rafinesque's work, mentioned 
.below, is almost inaccessible, and the point was overlooked. 



Three generic names had long been in existence for the Tropical Asiatic 
Cypripediums when Paphiopedilum was created, though they had been 
generally overlooked, and are not even mentioned in the Genera Plantarum. 
They were established by Rafinesque, in 1836, in his Flora Tellunana, a 
work now very scarce. They are Cordula, based upon Cypripedium insigne, 
Wall., Stimegas, on C. venustum, Wall., and Menephora, on a tessellated- 
leaved species of doubtful identity ; and although, as originally proposed, 
they cannot be held to designate valid genera, the names are available in 
the event of a new name being required. Of these, Cordula* (" a nymph ") 
is by far the most suitable, and it can claim a long priority over 
Paphiopedilum. 

Of the generic distinctness of the Tropical Asiatic Cypripediums there 
can be no doubt. As long ago as 1842 Lindley remarked : " There is 
something in the habit of the Indian Lady's slippers so peculiar that it was 
for a long time thought that they would be found to possess characters to 



.atula, Boxallii, 1 

callosa, Chamb- -. oncolor, Curtisii, Dayana, Di 

Fairrieana, glanduligera, glaucophylla, Godefroy<e, Gratrixiana, Haynaldiana, hi 
Hookers, javanica, Lawrenceana, Lowiaaa, Mastersiana, nigrita, nivea, 
philippinensis, prastans, purpurata, Rothschildiana, Sanderiana, Spicerian 
superbiens, tonsa, venusta. V . olascens, and virens ; with t 

hybrids, C. Fraakeana, Kimballiana, Littleana, Petri, Shipwayaj, and siamensis, 
bear corresponding specific names under Paphiopedilum.— R.A.R. 



January, ,912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 3 

separate them." It is a thousand pities that he failed to discover this 
character. What endless heartburnings it might have prevented ! The 
plants kept their secret for over half a century, but at length it was 
discovered that in this group the sepals are imbricate in the bud, the 
lateral sepals enfolding the dorsal one, while in Cypripedium they are 
valvate (See O.R., iv. p. 331). The character is well seen on cutting a bud 
across. The fact is the tribe Cypripediese contains four distinct and well- 
marked genera ; (1) the original Cypripedium of Linnaeus; (2) Selenipedium, 
Rchb. f., comprising three tall reed-like or Sobralia-like plants (not known 
to be in cultivation), but not the plants so-called in gardens; which latter 
are the Selenipedia acaulia coriifolia on which (3) Paphiopedilum was 
primarily based by Pfitzer, and to which it had better be limited — the 
earlier Uropedium being inadmissible, and Phragmipedium a creation of 
later date— and (4) the Tropical Asiatic species now ranked under 
Paphiopedilum, probably because the earlier name was overlooked. Their 
characters have already been given. 

The group has been unfortunate as regards its nomenclature ever since 
the original mistake of Linnaeus. He gave Cypripedium as derived from 
Venus and podion, explaining the latter as the equivalent of the Latin calceus 
(a shoe). It is therefore certain that he intended to commemorate the 
slipper of Venus, and should have written "pediton" instead of "podion," 
the latter being the Greek for a foot. The late Sir J. D. Hooker once 
remarked that the simplest way out of the difficulty would be to write 
Cypripodium, the only objection being the aesthetic one that, considering 
the shape of the lip in this genus, the compliment to the goddess's foot 
was not a flattering one. The word " calceus " was probably overlooked, 
but it leaves no doubt as to what was intended by Linnaeus, which only 
makes the latter's further mistake of writing " Cypripedium " the more 
regrettable, for pedion is the Greek for a plain. As it is, we suppose that 
the law of priority and popular prejudice will compel us to go on writing 
Cypripedium to the end of time, at the same time explaining to all and 
sundry that it means Venus's slipper. Perhaps in time we shall even come 
to believe it. 

As to Paphiopedilum, its career has been a stormy one, and we have 
repeatedly been told that horticulturists will never use it, owing to its 
incurable ugliness. It may be so, but the fact that there is a much older 
name, which does not suffer from this defect, supplies a much stronger 
argument. We may hope that Cordula will meet a better fate, but we 



4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 1912. 

EVENTS OF 1911. 
We may now attempt a brief survey of the events of the past year, and if 
there is one feature more than another which has marked its progress it has 
been the steady accession of hybrids of sterling merit. Scarcely a meeting, 
now passes without some addition to the list, and the number tends to 
increase as time goes on. The fortnightly meetings of the R.H.S. have, 
with few exceptions, produced magnificent displays of Orchids, while the 
great annual Show at the Temple was an unqualified success. The Summer 
Show, formerly held at Holland House, was on this occasion transferred to 
Olympia, and was confessedly somewhat of an experiment, owing to doubts 
about the suitability of the building for such a Show. The trade again 
made a brilliant display, but owing to a spell of very hot weather and the 
absence of shading, the exhibits did not stand as well as usual. The 
meetings of the Manchester Orchid Society have also produced several fine 
displays, and a keen competition for the numerous prizes offered. The new 
North of England Horticultural Society has also held several successful 
meetings. A great International Horticultural Exhibition was held in May 
at Florence, when some fine Orchids were exhibited, though the majority 
were from England and Belgium. 

Novelties. 
Novelties among imported Orchids have not been numerous, though a 
few interesting things have made their appearance, and among them the 
chaste Vanda Kimballiana alba, for which Messrs. Mansell and Hatcher 
received an Award of Merit, and Pleione precox alba, which flowered at 
Kew. Oncidium Muelleri gained a First-class Certificate for Messrs. 
Sander & Sons at the Temple Show, but it is believed to be a form of O. 
corynephorum, Lindl. O. Claesii flowered for the first time in cultivation 
in the collection of Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., gaining an Award of Merit. 
Among the less showy things, some interesting novelties have appeared, as 
Brassia Forgetiana and Sievkingia peruviana, from Messrs. Sander & Sons, 
and the pretty little natural hybrid Cochlioda Floryi, which flowered with 
Mr. H. A. Tracy ; besides a few others, which we must pass over. 
Hybrids. 
On coming to this department, we find such a host of showy things that 
it becomes embarrassing to make a selection. We may commence with the 
two additional generic hybrids that have appeared, namely, Adioda St.- 
Fuscien, from M. Henri Graire, and Odontocidium Fowleri, which was ex- 
hibited by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. Among Odontiodas we find the striking 
O. Cupid, in which Odontoglossum ramosissimum and Cochlioda Noetzliana 
have been united, the handsome O. Boltonii and O. rosefieldiensis, O. 
Floryi, O. Jessopiae, O. ornata, and O. Papilio; while Oncidioda has 



has now appeared, in T. Gouldii, raised from T. suavis and T. fia^rans by 
Messrs. Charlesworth, which received an Award of Merit : while Coelogyne 
burfordiensis, raised in the collection of Sir Trevor Lawrence. Mart., in.m 
C. pandurata and C. aspersa, gained a similar award. Odontoglossum 
produced two striking hybrids from O. maculatum ami (). Wiganianum in 
O. Harwoodii, and the still showier Shrubbery variety, both of which were 
distinguished hy the award of First-class Certificates, while O. Jeanette, 
another of Messrs. Charlesworth's hybrids, derived from (). Rossi i ruhescens 
and O. amabile, obtained a similar award. These are additional com- 
binations between the Mexican and Colombian Odontoglossums, and 
■remarkably handsome. Accessions to the ranks of secondary hybrids have 
been both numerous and beautiful, and in several cases the parentage has 
been lost or unrecorded. In fact, the progress in this genus has been so 
great that hybrid Odontoglossums are rapidly becoming florists' flowers. 
Similar remarks might be applied to several other popular genera in which 
rapid progress is being made. In fact, hybridisation and selection are 
changing the nature of our collections in a way scarcely dreamed of a 

Certificated Orchids. 
First-class Certificates were awarded by the R.H.S. to thirty-eight 
'Orchids, and these were mostly hybrids, the exceptions being Dendrobium 
Victoria-Regina and Oncidium Muelleri. An analysis of the list shows 
■eleven Odontoglossums, Odontiodaand Lzeliocattleya six each, Cypripedium 
five, Cattleya and Brassocattleya two, with single examples of Calanthe, 
Dendrobium, Miltonia, Oncidium, Sophrocattleya and Sophrocatlaelia. 
Those which received Awards of Merit number sixty, and here again Odonto- 
glossum heads the list, with thirteen, followed by Cypripedium with ten, 
Cattleya and Laeliocattleya six each, Odontioda five, Cymbidium four, 
Brassocattleya, Miltonia and Trichopilia two each, while Catasetum, Coelo- 
gyne, Diacattleya, Epidendrum, Gongora, Houlletia, Oncidioda, Onci- 
dium, Sophrocatlaelia and Vanda, each contributed a single example, 
Several of these plants have been figured in our pages. Sixteen Cultural 
Commendations were given to plants showing a high standard of culture, 
and a Certificate of Appreciation was given to the interesting Odontocidium 
Fowleri. Eight Botanical Certificates were also given early in the year, 
but this award was afterwards transferred to the Scientific Committee. A 
Jarge number of awards were given by the Manchester Orchid Society, but 
we have not attempted an analysis. 

Nomenclature. 
The question of Nomenclature has received great attention during the 
year, owing to the issue of the Report of the R.H.S. Committee appointed 



6 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 19.2. 

to consider the question of Multigeneric Hybrids, and of the Rules of Horti- 
cultural Nomenclature adopted by the International Congress of Horti- 
culture held at Brussels, both of which have appeared in our pages (pp. 7, 
130). There is also an interesting series of replies from the R.H.S. to ques- 
tions submitted to it by the International Congress (p. 322). It may be 
added that the rules for the nomenclature of multigeneric hybrids were 
applied for the first time in our February issue, when Vuylstekeara insignis 
was described. 

Other interesting events 
which we may recall are the proving of the parentage of five natural hybrids, 
Lselia Crawshayana (p. 47), Lseliocattleya amanda (p. 216), L.-c. elegans 
(pp. 262, 319), L.-c. Verelii (p. 316, fig. 43), and Cattleya sororia (p. 349) ; 
the discovery of the habitat of Cymbidium Tracyanum (p. 39), and the publi- 
cation of three instalments of the supplement to the Orchid Stud-book (pp. 33, 
74, 228). 

Losses during the Year. 
Among famous Orchidists who have passed away during the year we may 
recall Dr. Ha rn Bolus, F.L.S., who did so much for Cape Orchidology 
and more recently Mr. James Douglas, and Sir Joseph Hooker, whose 
obituary notices appear in the present issue. 

The Coming Year 
promises some innovations. The dropping of such an important function 
as the Temple Show is an event that cannot be passed over unnoticed, but 
its place is to be taken by the great International Horticultural Exhibition 
to be held at Chelsea during the last week in May, from which so much is 
expected. It may provide a surprise, and we may hope that it will prove an 
unqualified success. Other surprises may be furnished by our hybridists, 
but prophecy is dangerous, and we will conclude by wishing our readers 
A Happy Xew Year, and increasing prosperity to their collections. 



L.elia leucoptera. — An interesting natural hybrid has just flowered 
at Kew. It may be remembered that over four years ago some notes on 
the Mexican Lselias, by M. Juan Balme, appeared in these pages (O.R., 
xv. pp. 302, 303). Some time later a small plant, which it was suggested 
was a natural hybrid of L. furfuracea, was sent by post. It has now 
produced a two-flowered scape, and agrees well with L. leucoptera, Rolfe 
(L. Crawshayana var. leucoptera, Rchb. f.), now believed to be a natural 
hybrid between L. furfuracea and L. albida, which M. Balme has found 
growing together in the State of Oaxaca. The flowers are light purple, 
larger than those of L. albida, with rather more of the L. furfuracea shape. 
It originally appeared in 1884 in the establishment of Mr. A. A. Peeters, St. 
Gilles, Brussels, and is still very rare. R.A.R. 



January, ,9,2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 7 

CYPRIPEDES ON LIMESTONE. 

I am pleased to find that my little paper has induced an observer to record 
facts. Mr. Lyon is far too generous in his praise. He is probably unable 
to consult a complete set of the Orchid Review, and, therefore, does not 
realise that, to a very large extent, I merely collected the observations of 
others. I am particularly glad that Mr. Lyon records a difference between 
the growth of plants in limestone and those in mortar, as it is further 
evidence of the need of attention to apparently trifling differences. I can- 
not, I am afraid, agree with Mr. Lyon when he says, " how little after all 
we can utilise a knowledge of plant environment." We cannot put a whole 
limestone cliff in an Orchid house, and we do not always get such a 
generous allowance of sunshine as Mr. Lyon describes, but we can construct 
crevices in limestone suitable for plants to root in, and we can make more 
use, if need be, of the sunshine we have. There should be no great difficulty 
in reproducing, at any rate partially, the conditions under which Cypri- 
pedium philippinense and C. Haynaldianum grow naturally, without 
damaging the plants. I believe that with very little trouble we could come 
much nearer to natural conditions with benefit to the plants. All growers of 
Cypripedes should be grateful to Mr. Lyon for the facts he has recorded, 
but we are still short of information, and I hope he will be able to give 

nue Orchid growing I intended, as an advance 
> try the effect of an artificial breeze, produced 
by a rotary fan, on the plants. The house would generally have to be shut 
up while the fan was at work in case cold draughts were produced by 
drawing in air through the ventilators. There are probably few Orchids 
that live in a still and stagnant atmosphere naturally, and as a breeze sup- 
plies the plants with passive exercise by moving the leaves it must have an 
effect ; probably a beneficial one. 

Many Orchids, too, come from districts where there are frequent thunder- 
storms. Every flash of lightning produces a quantity of various oxides of 
nitrogen. These oxides when nearly formed are in an extremely active 
state, and ready to form compounds with various matters with which they 
come in contact. The same oxides (incorrectly called ozone) could be 
produced in an Orchid house by a suitable electrical machine, such as a 
Wimshurst. A house might be shut up for half an hour while the machine 
produced a miniature thunderstorm. If the thunderstorm were followed 
up by a very fine spray, continued for some time, a large part of these 
nitrogen oxides would be dissolved by the spray and carried down on to the 
plants, probably with nourishing and other beneficial effects. I wanted to 
try this experiment three years ago but had not the time. Of course these 



3 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, .912. 

■electrical discharge? in an Orchid house might have other effects on the 
plants, such as those noted in Sir Oliver Lodge's experiments, but my 
theory was derived purely from the chemical and manurial side of the 

When any species of Cypripede is found growing commonly with another 
plant (as C. philippinense and dwarf Polypodium observed by Mr. Lyon), 
I think it would be well worth while trying to grow both in the same pot. 
In several cases where weeds have been growing in the same pots with 
Orchids I have noticed that the Orchids seemed to benefit by the presence 
of the weeds, and to lose by their removal. I am inclined to think that 
the presence of a natural neighbour in the same pot with an Orchid might 
tend to produce more stable conditions in the compost and its contained 
.air. and possibly other good results. Miles Johnston. 



ORCHIDS: A DELIGHTFUL HOBBY. 

It has occurred to me that your readers might be interested to know some- 
thing of the results of a very crude amateur, after the careful perusal of your 
monthly paper (from which so much valuable information has been 
obtained). It was some two years ago that I casually came across a copy 
of the Orchid Review, and which I think was the spark that kindled the fire 
■of enthusiasm to try my hand at growing a few Orchids. Having a small 
greenhouse, measuring about iSft. by 7ft., I forthwith gave it a general 
clean up and began straight away with a few Cypripediums. Having got 
these it began to dawn upon me that I had undertaken a task which required 
a lot of time. However, I persevered, and soon added more plants, and 
to-day my little house contains some 135 Orchids, including Cypripediums, 
Odontoglossums, Cattleyas, Laelias, Vandas, Oncidiums, Cymbidiums, 
Dendrobiums, Calanthes, Masdevdlias, Ccelogynes, &c, arranged for light 
and warmth according to their requirements, and at the moment I have 
47 plants in bloom or bud, many of which are the second time of flowering 
with me, and gardeners tell me the collection is exceedingly healthy. No 
doubt it is a mixed one, but all seem to do well. Now as regards time. 
&c, in attending to the plants, you will gather what it is when I tell you 
I am away at my business 12 to 14 hours every day of the week, and keep 
no gardener, because I cannot afford or have enough work for one. More- 
over, my little greenhouse is built between two dwelling-houses, and 
consequently does not get a lot of sun, but to me it is as balm after a busy 
day to look over my plants, and with little expense or time the pleasure 
of showing our friends the result of our little labour is great, even if there 
is not room for more than one at a time in the house. 

The Nook, Edward Clement. 

Ashford Road, Maidstone. 



CYPRIPEDIUM LORD WOLMER, WESTONBIRT VAR. 



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as e 


xhi 


bik 


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Cypri] 


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Lc 


»rd 1 




Fig. i. Cvpkipedium Lord Wolmhr, Westoxbirt var. 

of excellent shape, and the dorsal sepal very broad, white, with a green 
base, a broad purple median band, and numerous small purple spots, which 
are very regularly arranged, while the lower sepal is very large and similar 
in colour. The petals and lip are very broad, the former having an undulate 



upper 



, while the colour is gn I. veined and £ 



■what spotted with brown. 1 hree species i 



io THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 191 z. 

insigne, Spicerianum, and Boxallii. The two former when intercrossed 
yielded C. Leeanum, and this with Boxallii gave C. Euryades, which again 
united with Leeanum produced the present hybrid. An analysis of parentage 
would give C. insigne and C. Spicerianum f each, and C. Boxallii \. It is 

being effected in these useful winter-flowering Orchids. 

OBITUARY. 

James Douglas, V.M.H.— It is with deep regret that we have to announce 
the sudden death, at the age of 74, of Mr. James Douglas, V.M.H., the well- 
known florist and nurseryman of Great Bookham, Surrey, which took place 
on November 24th, after an operation. Mr. Douglas was so well known as 

Orchidist, but he has always taken a great interest in Orchids, and was a 
highly successful grower and exhibitor at the metropolitan shows during the 
long period that he was gardener to F. Whitbourn, Esq., of Great Gearies, 
Ilford, and at a time when large specimens were popular. He also took up 
the work of hybridising Orchids, and continued it to the last, though chiefly 

Laeliocattleya Gottoiana, having flowered seedlings in 1900 which he had. 
raised from Cattleya Warned 2 and Laelia tenebrosa 4 . It had originally 
appeared in 1891, in the collection of E. Gotto, Esq., The Logs, Hampstead 
Heath, when its origin was a mystery, though it was obviously a natural 
hybrid. Its history has been given in these pages (i. p. 338 ; viii. p. 358).. 
He was also the raiser of the hybrids Cypripedium Charles Canham and 
C. Mrs. Canham, which flowered in 1887, the parentage being, respectively, 
C. superbiens X villosum and the reverse cross, also of Laelia Briseis (har- 
pophylla ? X purpurata <?), which flowered in 1897. We do not 
remember any special account of his work with Orchids, but he was a great 
admirer of them, and among the works of his fine horticultural library a 
complete set of the Orchid Review held an honoured place. For many years 
he was a member of the Council of the R.H.S., and on bis retirement was 
awarded the Victoria Medal of Honour for his services to Horticulture. He 
was a member of the Floral and Scientific Committees up to the last. His 

journal, have been fully dealt with in the horticultural press. He was 
interred at Leatherhead, on Wednesday, November 29th. 

Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker, o.m.— This distinguished botanist 
passed away at his residence at Sunningdale on December 10th last, in his 
95th year, and the world of science has lost one of its greatest ornaments. 
Born at Halesworth, Suffolk, on June 20th, 1817, and educated at Glasgow 
University, where his father, Sir William Hooker, was Regius Professor of 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



Botany, he took the degree of m.d. in 
appointed assistant surgeon and natural 
under Sir James Ross. After a four ye; 
which he accumulated a valuable series of 
published a series of six fine quarto < 
Antarctica, Flora Xova'-Zclandia, and Flo 
the Himalayas, spending three years in 
of that remarkable region, and making exl 
the expedition, including details of the Or 



being shortly afterwards 
the Antarctic Expedition 



es, under the titles, Fl 
smania. In 1847 he visi 
ing the geography and fl 
e collections. The storj 
ife of the region, is told 




Gardens, 



•lumes which were published in 
2r he was appointed Assistant Director of the Royal Botanic 
and on his father's death, in 1865, succeeded to the 
Directorship, which he held for twenty years. In i860 he visited Syria 
and Palestine, and in 1871 undertook an expedition to the mountains of 
Morocco, in company with Mr. John Ball, f.r.s., and Mr. George Maw, 
while in 1877 he made a botanical tour in the Rocky Mountains of North 
America, in company with the late Dr. Asa Gray. In 1873 he was elected 



i2 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 1912. 

President of the Royal Society, an office which he held for five years. His 
numerous books and papers must be passed over, but we must not omit the 
monumental Flora of British India, of which so many Orders were worked 
up by himself, and among them the Orchidaceas, including some 116 genera 
and nearly 1300 species. His other contributions to Orchidology were 
great, for he worked up the Orchids of Ceylon and of New Zealand, while 
the number of Orchids figured in the Botanical Magazine during his long 
editorship, from 1865 to 1904, must have been very great. As long ago as 
1854 he published an important paper on the structure and fertilisation of 
Listera, and there are several references to his work in Darwin's Fertilisation 
of Orchids. His scientific work extended over an ordinary lifetime, and, 
incredible as it may appear, he was a Fellow of the Linnean Society for 
over 69 years. His powers of observation and generalisation were 
remarkable, and his industry almost amounted to a passion, and never 
deserted him to the last. The world of science has lost an acknowledged 

endeared him to all who came in contact with him. Sir Joseph Hooker 
was the recipient of many academic honours, and of medals from the Royal, 
Linnean, and Geographical Societies, and from the Society of Arts. He was 
made C.B. in 1869, K.C.S.I. in 1877, G.C.S.I. in 1897, and on his ninetieth 
birthday he received the Order of Merit. He was interred at Kew Parish 
Church on Friday, December 15th, when a large number of his old 
colleagues and representatives of the learned societies were present. For 
the loan of the block we are indebted to the courtesy of the proprietors of 
the Gardeners' Magazine. 

Blotched Odontoglossums. — A Mower of an interesting Odonto- 
glossum has been sent from the collection of John S. Moss, Esq., 
Wintershill, Bishops Waltham, which the sender well remarks could only 
have been called a blotched crispum had it appeared among imported 
plants. It is from the batch of seedlings mentioned at p. 234 of our last 
volume as obtained from O. crispum X bellatulum, and thus is three- 
fourths derived from the former, O. bellatulum having been derived from O. 
crispum X tripudians. It serves as a further confirmation of the fact that 
what have long been called blotched crispums are compound hybrids 
between O. crispum and the species with which it grows, and from further 
intercrossings, doubtless continued through countless generation-. It 
cannot be said, however, that the form sent is absolutely identical with 
any wild form, for O. tripudians is not known to grow with O. crispum, 
and a careful comparison reveals slight differences from anything we 
remember to have seen among imported plants. We should like to see 
the species intercrossed which grow together in a wild state. R.A.R. 



January, 1912.] THE 


ORCHID REVIEW. 


13 


CYPRIPEDIUM NELLIE AND ITS PARENTS. 


The annexed illustration represents the brightly-coloured Cypripedium 


Nellie (fig. 4), with its parents, C. tonsum (fig. 3), and C. Charlesworthii 


(fig. 5). The flowers were sent from the collection of 0. 0. Wrigley, Esq., 


Bridge Hall, Bury, by 






Mr. Rogers, who re- 


. 




marked that the former 


g 




seedling, but agreed well 


, 




with others from a batch 


MK^ 




worthii that had already 


T 




flowered, but wassuperior 


y 




in every respect. The 






two parents were en- 




.is- 


closed for comparison, 




* 


and as an examination 
left no room for doubt of 


-i&ji^^^r 


i 


their relationship, the 




I 


photograph here repro- 




/ \ 


duced was taken by Mr. 




- 


R. T. Rolfe. It is in- 




-f 


teresting to see the way 




' 


the characters of the 




- 


parents have been com- 






bined. The dorsal sepal 


Jit 


t 


is rose - coloured, but 


fw 




darker at the base and 


2r 


- 


more distinctly veined 


^aJlw^ 




than in C. Charles- 


Mj^ 


g 


worthii, while the 


, «>*** 




apiculus of C. tonsum is 


^^m~ 


E 


well shown. The petals 


% 


u 


and lip are fairly inter- 


B 




mediate in shape, but 


^, 




the former is darker than 




£ 


in either parent, with 






indistinct traces of spots. The staminode is most like C. tonsum, 


but with a trace ot the porcelain white colour, which forms such a striking 


feature in C. Charlesworthii. A curious fact was detected in comparing 


the three flowers. C. tonsum 


takes its specific name (" shorn ") fro 





i 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 19" 

absence of hairs on the upper margin of the petals, but the peculiarity does 
not extend to the lower margin, which is closely set with minute short hairs. 
This character was noticed in the hybrid, and a closer examination showed 
that it was also present in C. tonsum. C. Nellie, as thus seen, is a very 
bright and attractive hybrid, with a marked resemblance to C. Charles- 
worthii in the colour of the dorsal sepal. The leaf is tessellated about as 
strongly as in C. Harrisianum. The figures, of course, are greatly reduced. 



This totally unseasonable weather is most detrimental to the welfare of our 
plants, and the only point which can be urged in its favour is, that less 
artificial heating need be maintained. An average temperature of 48 Fahr. 
by night and 53 by day is ample, and this can now be easily maintained 
without the need of large fires. At this season of the year little air can 
generally be given, but during this spell of mild weather, plenty can be 
admitted. The house should always be sufficiently ventilated to prevent it 
feeling at all stuffy. All growing plants must be kept damp, but as they do 
not dry quickly now, less will be needed than in cold frosty weather. A 
safe rule for beginners may be thus expressed :— 

Water all plants in active growth every two or three days, those in spike 
or flower daily, but those at rest only once weekly. When watering a plant, 
always remember to give enough to moisten the whole compost, not merely 
sufficient to wet the surface, as the moss above will not give a clear indica. 
tion of the compost about the plant's roots beneath. Beginners often lose 
plants because an appearance of adequate dampness is given by the surface 
soil, whilst the roots below are dust dry. During this dull weather, overhead 
syringing is best dispensed with. 

This is now a good time to thoroughly clean the inside of the houses, 
wash pots, sponge leaves, and remove all dead and decayed bulbs and roots. 
I am a strong advocate of syringing between the pots once a week through- 
out the year with liquid insecticide, especially directing it between the cross 
pieces of the staging, for prevention is better than cure. It need not be 
remarked that the spray must not be allowed to lodge on the leaves, but 
should be done just over the level of the wood-work. 

The operation of potting can now be started. All autumn-flowering 
Cypripediums which are needing a shift should now receive attention. 
Carefully remove them from the old pot, trim all dead roots off, remove 
decayed leaves, and separate the portions which are crowded in the centre. 
Fill the fresh pot one-third full of clean crocks, and on these set the plant, 
so placing the various portions that they have room to develop in all direc- 



January, i 9 za.j THE ORCHID REVIEW. 15 

tions. For compost, use a mixture of good fibrous loam, crushed crocks 
and a little sphagnum moss. This should be used in a damp state and the 
plants potted firmly. Give little water until a firm hold has been taken in 
the new soil. 

This house should now be exceedingly gay, with Cypripediums of the 
insigne class, nitens, villosum, and their countless hybrids. Many Onci- 
diums and Odontoglossums should be in bloom, or throwing up their spikes. 

Epidendrum vitellinum majus should be still a bright member of the 
-collection, together with Cymbidium Lowianum, Odontioda Vuylstekeae, 
and others, too numerous to mention. 

Odontioda Craveniana. — This is an exceedingly pretty hybrid between 
Cochlioda Ncetzliana and Odontoglossum cordatum. The flowers are of 
good size, and freely borne on long arching spikes, usually in the late spring, 
and keep several weeks in beauty. The sepals and petals are of a deep red 
colour, no trace of other tints being visible. The lip, however, is creamy 
white in front, changing to a salmon red, with a brilliant yellow crest. In 
growth, in the manner in which the flower spikes are produced, and also in 
respect to their shape, this hybrid most resembles the seed-parent. 

Cypripedium insigne Sander.e.— This is one of the most beautiful 
forms in existence, and is an albino or yellow variety of the species. Fortu- 
nately the plant is a free grower, and produces in the winter months its 
handsome flowers, which, if kept cool and shaded, frequently last from ten to 
twelve weeks in beauty. It is dearer than the ordinary species, but is well 
worth the additional cost, and is one of the easiest and most accommodat- 
ing Orchids to cultivate. The petals are of a clear lemon, the dorsal sepal 
also of the same colour, with a few minute brown specks, and a broad white 
margin, and the under sepal apple green. The pouch is also of a clear 
lemon. This fine variety is particularly constant, and is even largely grown 
by those who are not lovers of this class generally. Like the species, it can 
•be grown in a greenhouse or vinery. 

L^ELIA GOULDIANA. 

Some time ago Messrs. Sander & Sons obtained an importation of Laslia 
Gouldiana, a fact which occasioned surprise, owing to the belief that it is 
a natural hybrid. Now that the plants are beginning to flower there is no 
doubt about their identity. Some three years ago, when describing the 
collection of Sir George L. Holford, Westonbirt, allusion was made to 
"a very interesting seedling from Lselia anceps ? and L. autumnalis $ , 
which it is supposed may prove to be a home-raised L. Gouldiana " (O.R., 
xvi. p. 356). We did not see the flowers, but afterwards learnt that some 
-of the plants had been acquired by Messrs. James Cypher & Son, who have 



i6 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, i 9 i 2r 

now kindly forwarded a three-flowered inflorescence for comparison. There 
has always been a doubt about the origin of L. Gouldiana, which was much 
strengthened when M. Juan Balme told us that L. autumnalis and L. 
anceps grew in very different districts {O.R., xv. p. 302). We can now say 
that Mr. Alexander's seedling is not L. Gouldiana, Rchb. f., and we have 
not seen anything quite like it before. It is more like L. autumnalis in 
general shape, with a distinct approach to L. anceps in the shape of the 
segments, in the presence of some reduced anceps-like veining on the disc 
of the lip, and in its longer bracts. It is paler in colour than L. Gouldiana. 
It may be called L. Alexanderi, in recognition of Mr. Alexander's praise- 
worthy attempt to solve a puzzling problem. As for L. Gouldiana, we 
suppose it must be a distinct local species, and we think the time has 
now come when its mysterious habitat might be stated. Habitat is always 
an important factor in tracing the origin of natural hybrids, unless they 
come out of some definite importation. R.A.R. 



Cyrtopodium punctatum at home. — I send you a photograph of 
Cyrtopodium punctatum, taken in situ. It will be observed that the plants 
are at rest, having shed their foliage. They occur in great masses in the low 
hills on the Pacific side of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, relatively a dry 
zone, with about 40 inches of rain ; the wet season being short, not over 
four months. The elevation is 1000 feet above sea level, and the surround- 
ing vegetation affords an indication of the climatic conditions.— J. C„ 
Harvey, Vera Cruz, Mexico. 

[The photograph shows several very fine clumps of this Orchid growing 
on a sloping rocky bank, with the remains of some old flower scapes, while 
close by are clumps of Agaves, with some bushes behind. They evidently 
make a brilliant display when in full bloom. It mav seem remarkable to* 
find Orchids growing in association with such well-known succulent plants 
as Agaves, but a good many species inhabit regions having a dry season,, 
and as a class they are much more variable in their requirements than is 
often recognised. — Ed., 



Epidendrum vitellinum. — A photograph showing a fine clump of 
Epidendrum vitellinum, in remarkably well-cultivated examples, is sent by 
O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bridge Hall, Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers). The plants are 
pictures of health, and carry numerous spikes, about twice as long as 
the leaves, and some of them branched. Mr. Wrigley remarks : " They 
have been in the collection since 1905, and they are all much better grown 
than they have been previously." Epidendrum vitellinum is a highly 
decorative plant, and when well grown its brilliantly-coloured spikes make 
a most brilliant display. 



January, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

DENDROBIUM VICTORIAR-EGINA. 




It bore upwards of thirty spikes of its very distinct violet-blue flowers 
The species was described in 1897, by Loher (Gard. Chron., 1897, i. p. 399), 
being dedicated to her late Majesty Queen Victoria. It was remarked : 
onderful Dendrobiums, both for its 
ering, and one that will soon be a- 



18 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January 1912- 

great favourite with Orchid collectors. It grows at an altitude not lower 
than 2000 metres (6500 ft.), and the temperate house suits it best. Its 
branching stems produce great numbers of richly dark blue and white 
blossoms borne in trusses, and lasting in bloom for several weeks. The 
flowers are over an inch in diameter ; the sepals and petals at the base are 
white, with a great blue blotch at the edges ; the lip ovate-oblong and of the 
same colour." Some plants were sold by Messrs. Protheroe and Morris 
at about the same time, and soon flowered, for on August 10th one of them 
received an Award of Merit from the R.H.S., when exhibited by T. 
Statter, Esq., Stand Hall, Manchester. For some time a difficulty was 
experienced in cultivating it, probably because the necessity for cool treat- 
ment was not fully realised, but after some experiments it was found that 
the roof of the Odontoglossum house was the most suitable place for 
it, and in such a position the plant figured has long been grown. In 
such a position, too, was grown the remarkable specimen for which 
Richard Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch, received a Cultural Commendation 
at the Temple Show in 1909 (O.R., xvii. pp. 182, 205), and at Harefield 
Hall, Wilmslow, we have also seen a number of plants growing and 
flowering freely suspended from the roof of the Odontoglossum house. It 
is now known to be a native of the province of Benguet, in Northern 
Luzon, having since been collected by Elmer, on Mt. Santo Tomas. It 
also occurs on Mt. Halcon, in the Island of Mindoro, where it was collected 
by Merrill, in dense wet mossy forests at 8000 feet elevation, and by 
Merritt at 6500 feet. The latter mountain is described as having a 
remarkably humid climate, the rainy season continuing for practically nine 
months of the year, from May to January without interruption, while the 
remaining three months are by no means free from precipitation. From 
these facts one can readily understand why this beautiful species requires a 
cool mcist climate for its successful culture. For the loan of the block we 
are indebted to the courtesy of the Editor of the Journal of Horticulture. 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR JANUARY. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
The cultivator will now be looking forward to longer days, when his plants 
will once more be starting into growth, and at no season of the year are they 
more interesting to the persons responsible for their well-being. The 
general winter treatment must be continued for the present month, and the 
principal work to occupy our attention will be to maintain 



(especially should cold weather prevail)— to provide suitable atmospheric 
conditions in the houses, avoiding extremes of all kinds, and making no 
attempt to force growth ; also to get our plants into a state of cleanliness, 
ready for when the busy season of potting arrives. 



J* 


NUARY, , 9 I2 


•] 


THE 


ORl 


HID 




TEMPERA! 


URES.- 


—To those wl 


10 ma; 


J* 


.nuary, I no 


w repeat them : 


— 






Cool house 


j: day, 


50" to ; 


55°, w 


ith sur 




Intermedin 


tte hou 


se: day, 


60 tc 


> 65°, 1 




Cattleya ai 


id Mex 


ican hoi 


ise: d 


ay. 60 r 



East Indian house: day, 65 to 70 , with sun. 75 1 ; night, 65**. 
In speaking of temperatures, these figures are only given as a guide, and 
no harm will occur if they vary one or two degrees either way. I think it is 
impossible to keep houses at a fixed figure in all kinds of weather. 

Ventilation is essential on all favourable occasions. I am a firm 
believer in fresh air for our plants, as 1 believe a stuffy stagnant atmosphere 
most injurious. Discrimination, however, must be used in the admission of 
air, so that no plant is placed in a draught, as draughts are most injurious. 

Atmospheric moisture must be regulated according to the weather 
conditions. If much fire heat has to be used, more moisture is required to 
counteract it, but the great thing to avoid is a house over-laden with 
moisture, and a low temperature. On entering a house that is in such a 
state, one feels as if suddenly wrapped in a cold wet blanket. 

Watering. — During the spell of wet sunless weather we have just passed 
through, the watering of our plants has required much attention. The 
greatest mistake possible at this season, is that of affording too much water 
at the root. It not only does the plant much harm, but destroys the com- 
post, and with it the roots. To my mind the greatest responsibility rests 
on those who are entrusted with the watering of valuable plants. Should 
there be any doubts as to a plant requiring water, pass it over until you are 
thoroughly convinced it requires it. Again, much damage may be caused by 
some plant receiving an insufficient supply of water, and the would-be 
successful Orchid grower must learn from experience. Intelligence bestowed 
on the watering of our plants, is the great secret of successful cultivation. 
There are always some inmates of the various houses that should have water 
all the year round, of course in moderate quantities during the dull winter 
months. In applying water always take care to sa 
am not a believer in dribbling w^ater on the top, wh 
the roots, especially if the compost has by any means got over-dry. 

Odontoglossums. — Many of these will now be pushing up their flower 
spikes, which, as soon as they are long enough, should be neatly staked up. 
The plants should be examined from time to time for slugs, which devour 
spikes, and thereby spoil the whole season's work. In the Cool house many 
things are just starting into growth, and will soon be ready for repotting, 
but do not hurry them. The principal work in the Cool house will be in 
keeping the atmosphere in a sweet and healthy condition. 



2o THE ORCHID REVIEW. (January, i 9 i*. 

Cypripediums of the winter-flowering section will now be at their best r 
and perhaps no class of plants has been improved by the hand of the hybridist 
to the extent that this family has. For winter flowering they are indispens- 
able. At this season they should have all the light possible, and as they 
pass out of bloom may be repotted, should they require it. These early 
potted plants make good seed beds for those seeds which ripen during next 
and the following month. The compost I recommend is as follows : Two- 
parts best fibrous peat, one part polypodium fibre, and one part fibrous loam, 
with a liberal mixture of sphagnum moss. All the earthy particles should 
be taken from the peat and polypodium fibre. Keep those newly potted on 
the dry side until the roots are seen to be moving through the compost. The 
others must have water whenever they require it. Those that are throwing; 
up their flower spikes must not be allowed to suffer for want of water, or 
the flowers will be small, and many will perhaps be malformed. 

Miltonias will now be growing strongly, and may have water whenever 
they require it, taking care that the compost gets dry between each operation. 
Watch carefully for thrip, which is very partial to these plants, especially if 
grown too warm, and should it once get a foothold it is most difficult to 
eradicate. Fumigating at intervals as a preventative is what I would 
recommend, rather than having to eradicate this persistent pest afterwards. 
Miltonias at this season thrive best in a cool part of the Intermediate house, 
and with us are exposed to all the light possible. 

Insects.— Speaking of insect pests, I think we may safely say that 
where a plant is constantly attacked by some pest we can rely upon it that 
we have not that plant in its natural conditions. It is either too hot, too- 
cold, or too dry, or there is something wrong with the treatment. 

Dendrobiums.— Plants of this genus that are resting in a Cool house 
must not be allowed to shrivel for want of water, neither should they have 
an excess, only just enough should be given to keep them plump and their 
leaves fresh and green. Those on which the flower buds are well 
advanced may now be placed in a slightly warmer house, but must on no 
account be hurried, or the whole crop of flowers may be lost and the plants 
rushed into premature growth. If plants are treated as advised, this family 
will follow the Cypripediums that are now in full flower, and sustain the 
interest until the early flowering Cattleyas are in bloom. 

L.elia anceps and its varieties are now in full bloom, and the plants 
should be kept moderately dry, but in no case should they be allowed to 
suffer, as I often think the miserable condition one sometimes finds these 
plants in, is du 2 to their receiving too little water when in flower, and being 
allowed to shrivel, at the same time losing their roots. 

Cattleyas that are growing, such as C. Warneri and others, may have 
water whenever they require it, and should be placed in the warmest and 



January, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 2. 

lightest position in the house. Hybrid Cattleyas, Lseliocattleyas, Brasso- 
cattleyas, and any of this family that are pushing new roots, may be repotted 
if they require it. In Cattleya culture I think the great mistake is made of 
allowing the plants to remain in the same receptacle too long, often after the 
compost is thoroughly decayed. The compost I recommend for this family 
is as follows: Two parts best peat fibre, one part Ai fibre, one part 
polypodium fibre, one part osmunda fibre, and two parts clean, hand-picked 
sphagnum moss, all thoroughly mixed together. The plants should be 



potted firmly, 


and staked in such a man 


ner that they do not 


rock about in 


the pot or pan 


in which they are grown. 






CCELOGYNE 


: cristata and its varieti* 


2s are now pushing up 


1 their spikes at 


the cool end 


f the Intermediate house, 


and must not be all 


owed to suffer 


for want of v 


rater. C. pandurata, C. 


Massangeana, and > 


other varieties 


must have wat 


:er according to their condition ; those comme 


ncing to grow 


may have it ' 


whenever the compost is 


dry, but for those at 


rest much less 


will suffice. 








Calanthes, as they pass out of flow. 


er, should be placed ii 


i a nice, warm, 


■dry situation 1 


to rest, until they start 


to grow in the sprin ; 


g. Great care 


should be take 


n that the temperature dc 


»es not fall too low, 


as these plants 



resent being rested in too low a temperature, especially if at all damp. 

General Remarks. — Should the open weather continue, a good supply 
of sphagnum moss should be acquired, so that when the busy season arrives 
no delay may be experienced for the want of it. Forethought at this season 
will save much time and worry at a later period. In nothing is it more 
true that a good start makes a successful ending than in Orchid growing, 
and I trust each one of our readers may reap success in every way during 
the coming year. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
At the meeting held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Westminster, on 
November 21st, there was an exceptionally fine display of Orchids, 
including ten medal groups, while several striking novelties were shown, 
and five First-class Certificates, four Awards of Merit, and three Cultural 
Commendations were given. 

Orchid Committee present: J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Harry J. 
Veitch, R. G. Thwaites, F. J. Hanbury, W. Thompson, F. M. Ogilvie, 
A. A. McBean, T. Armstrong, J. Charlesworth, J. Cypher, W. H. Hatcher, 
J. E. Shill, H. G. Alexander, A. Dye, W. H. White, Gurney Wilson, J. 
Wilson Potter, W. Bolton, W. Cobb, J. S. Moss, C. J. Lucas, and de 
Barri Crawshay. 



22 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 1912, 

The Duke of Marlborough, Blenheim Palace for. Mr. Hunter), was 
awarded a Gold Medal for a magnificent group, composed chiefly of finely- 
grown Vanda ccerulea, together with many fine plants of Cypripedium 
insigne Sanderae, one bearing forty flowers, and other varieties of insigne,. 
C. Baron Schroder, C. Lord Blandford, Cattleya labiata Blenheim var., 
and others. 

H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney (gr. Mr. G. E. Day), staged a 
fine group, including many Cattleya labiata, Iris, and others, Laeliocattleya 
Felicity, Goodson's var., L.-c. .Egina, Decia and Statteriana, Odontioda 
Seymourii, Odontoglossums, and many good Cypripedium insigne Sanderae 
(Silver Flora Medal). 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford (gr. Mr. W. H. 
White), showed the handsome Zygopetalum Ballii, and three others 
(see Awards). 

Captain J. Laycock, Wiseton Hall, Bawtry (gr. Mr. G. W. Musk), sent 
Laeliocattleya Greenwoodii, Laycock's var., a very fine form. 

Lady Audley Neeld, Grittleton, Chippenham, sent Cypripedium 
grittletonense (Stevensii X Curtisii), and C. Fascination (Fascinator X 
insigne Harefield Hall var.). 

C. J. Phillips, Esq., Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Bucknell), sent Brassocattleya 
Maroniae Glebe var., a large and handsome form. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. W. Hopkins), 
sent Cattleya labiata The Queen, a beautiful white form, tinged with 
purple on the front of the lip (see also Awards). 

Mrs. S. F. Whitlaw, Amerden, Taplow, Bucks, sent Cypripedium 
amerdense, a hybrid of unknown parentage. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a fine group, con- 
taining many plants of Epidendrum vitellinum, a brilliant series of Cattleyas 
and Lasliocattlcvas, Miltonia Roezlii alba, M. Warscewiczii, Vanda Sanderi- 
ana and ccerulea, Odontioda Bohnhoriae, Zygopetalum Murrayanum, Cypri- 
pedium Marias (aureum Surprise X insigne Sanderianum), Germaine 
Opoix, and many others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a fine group of Cypripe- 
diums, including many forms of C. insigne and C. Leeanum, with C.Thalia, 
C. Leeano-Swinburnei, and many other brilliant hybrids (Silver Flora 
Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged an excellent group, including 
a batch of home-raised Cattleya Hardyana, and others, Laeliocattleya 
Sapphirata (L.-c. Canhamiana X C maxima), L.-c. Minnie (L.-c. exoniensis 
X C. Dowiana aurea), with many familiar kinds, a fine series of Cypripe- 
diums, including C. Arthurianum-Sanderae, with yellow markings, C. Pris- 
cilla (exul x insigne Harefield Hall var.), Oncidium Lanceanum, the rare 



■ios ; 


jura | 


-rand 


e aureum 


, Cat 


tleya 


Pee 


ters, ( 


3. H; 


irdyana, i 


md others 


Hill 


Park 


, stag 


ed a gooc 




ip of 




panic 


ulata. 


Masdeval 


ha ca 


lura, 


Mi 


Itonia 


. vexi 


llaria Le( 


3 poldi 


i M. 




.ilea, a 


nd others (Silve 


r Banksian 



ary, 191 2.] THE 0RC1 

rcesus, Lycaste Balliae, lone pi 



Messrs. H assail ,v Co., South-ate, stag 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywan 
group of Cypripediums, with 
Schofieldiana crossed with C 
(Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co 
Cattleyas ami Cypripediums. u 
Epidendrum fragrans and coc 
Roezlii, Brassocattleya Maronia 
Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a fine group including 
Cattleya Fabia and others, some good Cypripediums, Odontoglossum Harry- 
anum, some good O. crispum, a dark blue Vanda coerulea, and a fine 
Brassocattleya, for which see Awards (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, showed a group of the pretty 
white Calanthe Harrisii, with Cypripedium X James O'Brien (insigne 
Harefield Hall var. X Mons de Curte), most like the former (Bronze 
Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Edgar & Co., Woodford, Essex, exhibited a Cypripedium 
insigne with very dark spotting. 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, Yorks, showed a fine plant of 
Angraecum Kotschyi, growing on a section of trunk, and bearing two 

M. Maurice Mertens, Ghent, showed Miltonia Hyeana, M. vexillaria 
Leopoldii, and a few other interesting things. 

FlRST-CLASS C ERTIFICATES. 

Brassocattleya Digryano-Mossi.e Holford's var. (B. Digbyana 
X C. Mossiae Reineckiana). — A very large white form, having a broad, well- 
expanded lip, with a greenish primrose disc, and some rosy markings at the 
base. Exhibited by Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt 
(gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander). 

Cypripedium Chapmaxii Westonbirt var. (bellatulum x Curtisii).— 
A remarkably fine form, having the flower tinged and heavily spotted with 
puple on a cream white ground. Exhibited by Lt.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 



THE ORCHID REVIE] 



L.ELIOCATTLEYA PRINCE OF 


• Orange (L.-c. Hippolyta X C. Dowiana 


irea). — An extremely handsom 


e hybrid, with bright chrome yellow sepals 


id petals, and a deep rut 


>y crimson lip. Exhibited by Sir G. L 


olford, K.C.V.O. 





Odontoglossum Chione (parentage unrecorded).— A magnificent 
flower, having bright purple sepals and petals, with some white markings at 
the base and apex, and a white lip spotted with purple at the base. Exhibited 
by W. R. Lee, Esq., Plumpton Hall, Manchester (gr. Mr. Woodhouse). 

Odontoglossum Thais (parentage unrecorded).— A very handsome 
-crispum-like hybrid, having the sepals and petals heavily blotched with 
purple and margined with white, while the apex of the broad lip is of the 
latter colour. Exhibited by \V. R. Lee, Esq. 
Awards of Merit. 

Brassocattleya Leucothoe (B. nodosa X C. Schrcedera).— A rather 
dwarf hybrid, having well-shaped, nearly pure white flowers. Exhibited by 
Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean. 

Cypripedium elatior, Shrubbery var. (Leeanum X Baron Schroder). 
—A very pretty hybrid, having the dorsal sepal white, heavily spotted with 
purple, and the petals and lip greenish marked with brown. " Exhibited by 
F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., The Shrubbery, Oxford (gr. Mr. W. Balmforth). 

Eeliocattleya Denganii (L.-c. Cappei x C. Dowiana), a beautiful 
hybrid, having the sepals and petals yellow, tinged with coppery red, and the 
lip glowing ruby crimson. Exhibited by Francis Wellesley, Esq. 

L^liocattleya W. J. Biggs (parentage unknown).— A handsome 
hybrid, having bronzy yellow sepals and petals, and a claret-coloured, 
crimped lip. Exhibited by W. J. Biggs, Esq., Browning Road, Enfield. 
Cultural Commendations. 

Three very finely-grown and profusely flowered specimens. To Mr. W. H 
White, Orchid grower to Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart. 

At the meeting held on December 5th there was a very fine display of 
Orchids, including no fewer than eleven medal groups, the other awards 

Orchid Committee present: J. Gurney F^lerjLJ! (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Sir Jeremiah Column Bart Harrv 
Veitch, F. J. Hanbury, R. G. Thwaites, W. Waters Butler T Armstrong 

C. H. Curtis, W. Cobb, J. Charlesworth, J. Cypher, J. E. Shill, XX'. H 
Hatcher, H. G. Alexander, W. P. Bound, A. Dye, W. H White T Wilson 
Potter, W. Bolton, Gurney Wilson, J. S. Moss, and R. Brooman White 

J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis) 
staged a choice group, including the beautiful Odontoglossum Smithii' 



January, i 9 i 2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 25 

Cypripedium Ville de Paris, Tityus superbum, Fowlerianum, triumphans, 
bingleyense, and some well-grown examples of C. Leeanum J. Gurney 
Fouler (Silver Flora Medal), 

F. Bostock, Esq., Springfield, Northampton, sent two good forms of 
Cypripedium Actseus. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., V.M.H., Gatton Park (gr. Mr. J. Collier), 
sent Cypripedium insigne Gatton Park var., a fine form of the giganteum type. 

Mrs. Norman Cookson, Oakwood, Wylam-on-Tyne (gr. Mr. H. J. 
Chapman), sent Odontoglossum crispum Chapmaniae, a handsomely 
blotched seedling form, Calanthe Chapmanii rosea, and Cypripedium 
Leeanum Gratrixia;. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), showed Cattleya 
armainvillierensis alba. 

Lt.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford, Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander), sent 
Cypripedium Nydia (Niobe Westonbirt var. X Charlesianum), a very fine 
thing, having a rose-coloured dorsal sepal margined with white (see Awards). 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. VV. Hopkins), sent 
Brassocattleya Hyese Westonbirt var., Cattleya St. George, a beautifully 
coloured flower, Ladiocattleya epicasta var. The Premier, a fine form, with 
blush white sepals and petals, and Cypripedium Mrs. Francis Wellesley. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a fine group, 
including Cattleyas, Lseliocattleyas, and Cypripediums, with some good 
Vanda ccerulea and Amesiana, Odontoglossum Goodsonii, Odontioda 
Cassiope, Calanthe Veitchii alba, Cymbidium tigrinum, Sophrocatlalia 
Pandora, and two others, which secured Awards (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, staged a fine group, in- 
cluding Cypripedium Bassano X Fairrieanum, a richly-coloured hybrid, with 
many populai kinds, Cattleya Trianae X Aclandias, C. guttata X Dowiana 
and C. Maromi X Dowiana, with Indian yellow sepals and petals, and 
some rosy veining on the lip, a fine blood red Odontioda from C. Noetzliana 
and O. Rolfeae, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. James Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a very fine group of 
Cypripedium insigne varieties, with many good C. Leeanum, C. Priam 
magnificum, and other hybrids, some fine Dendrobium Phalasnopsis, 
Cattleyas, and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a brilliant group, in- 
cluding some good Odontoglossums, Cypripediums, Laeliocattleyas and 
Cattleyas, the forms of C. Fabia and C. Luegas being very fine ; also Sophro- 
cattlaelia Marathon var. Helen, a handsome copper-red flower, having a 
ruby crimson lip, veined with yellow in the throat (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a fine group, containing many 
excellent hybrid Cypripediums, and among them C. Niobe superbum, C. 



26 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, .912. 

fulshawense, C. Troilus, Sander's var., the fine C. Leeanum Gratrixije, 
and a number of fine Cattleyas and Lseliocattleyas (Silver Flora Medal)!- 
Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, staged a select group, including 
some good Cypripedium insigne, Leeanum, Niobe, and Thalia, Ladio- 
cattleyas, &c, also Odontoglossum Aurora (Rossii rubescens X Lambeaui- 
anum), a very handsome thing, having lilac sepals and petals, blotched, 
with claret-purple, and a rose-purple lip, with bright yellow crest (Silver 
Flora Medal). 

Messrs. W. B. Hartland & Sons, Cork, sent a good group of Cypripedium. 
insigne Sanders, C.i. Harefield Hall var., and others, with a few Laelio- 
cattleyas and Odontoglossum crispum (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a bright group, 
including Houlletia Brocklehurstiana, Dendrobium Phalsenopsis, Cycnoches 
chlorochilon, Cymbidium Tracyanum, Vanda coerulea, and numerous 
Cattleyas, with a number of fine Oncidium vartcosum a't the back (Silver 
Banksian Medal). 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, staged a few good 
Cypnpediums, including C. Baron Schroder with nine flowers C Minos 
Youngii, Gaston Bultel, triumphans, Tityus, Leeanum, &c (Bronz- 
Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, Yorks, sent Cypripedium Thalia 
Mrs. Francis Wellesley, C. Leeanum giganteum with five flowers, and 
some good C. Actaeus, with spikes of a fine pure white Dendrobium 
Phalsenopsis, and of Calanthe vestita rubro-oculata eigantea (Bronze- 
Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, sent Cattleya St. Gilles, two good 
forms of C. Aliciae, Laeliocattleya Rubens, and others. 

Miss Walters Anson, The Studio, Broadway, Streatham, sent a fine 
display of coloured drawings of Orchids of high artistic merit. ' 
First-class Certificate. 
Sophrocattleya Lottie Muller (C. Peetersii X S.-c. Nydia) -A 
very large and brilliantly-coloured hybrid, having broad bright rose sepals 
and petals, becoming paler at the base, and a ruby-crimson velvety lip 
with some yellow veining in the throat. Exhibited by Messrs. Charles- 



West 



yades).— A large 



insigne Har. 



some flower, most like the former parent in 
general character, and having a very broad white dorsal sepal with a 
greenish yellow base, spotted with purple, and the petals and lip yellow 

SSS h purple - brown - Exhibited hy Lt - co1 - sir <w 



January, i 9 r 2 .J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 2? 

Trichopilia Gouldii (suavis X fragrans).— A distinct and pretty 
hybrid, having fragrant flowers, most like those of the former parent, with 
the sepals and petals silvery white, spotted with rose in the middle, and 
the lip white spotted with rose. Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 

MANCHESTER AND NORTH OF ENGLAND ORCHID. 

At the meeting held on November 16th, the members of Committee 
present were :— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the chair), R. Ashworth, 
J. Bamber, W. R. Lee, C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, J. C. Cowan, 
J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Hey wood (gr. Mr. Woodhouse), exhibited a group of 
plants to which a Silver-gilt Medal was awarded, containing very choice forms 
of Odontoglossums, Cattleyas and Cypripediums. Special mention must be 
made of Odontoglossums Chione, Antiope, and Hermione. The Cattleyas 
included Portia var. Imperator, Myrrha Lee's var., Iris var. Corisanda, 
labiatas in variety, and C. Dowiana aurea, with Ladiocattleya Clive, 
Plumpton Hall var., Cypripediums and Dendrobium Phalamopsis. 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), also exhibited a 
splendid group, and was awarded a Silver-gilt Medal, an especial feature 
being the numerous varieties of Cypripedium insigne. The Leeanum 
varieties were well represented, with good forms of Actseus Cringlewood 
var., Thalia var. Mrs. F. Wellesley, Corneyanum Ward's var., triumphans 
Ward's var., Priam and aureum. Cattleyas included C. labiata and Iris, 
and there were plants of Oncidium tigrinum and Lycaste Skinneri alba. 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), again staged a magnificent 
exhibit of over 250 plants, the Cypripedium insigne varieties being too 
numerous to particularise, and comprising all the yellow varieties known in 
cultivation, and were really splendid. In the Leeanum section were line 
examples of Clinkaberryanum, magnificum, giganteum, Winnianum and 
others, with miscellaneous subjects. A Special Vote of Thanks was accorded. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for a nice group, including Cattleyas labiata Mrs. J. McCartney, 
Luegse, Mrs. J. W. Whiteley, Bowringiana McCartney's var., Lselio 
cattleyas bletchleyensis, Decia, Lady Rothschild, luminosa and J. McCart- 
ney, Cypripediums Shillianum, nitens and others, with plants of Oncidium 
fiexuosum and varicosum Rogersii. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clay ton-le- Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), staged a 
very pretty group of Cypripediums, including some well-grown C. insigne 
Harefiekl Hall var., Sanders and Ballise, Actseus magnificum, aureum and 
revolutum, Mancunium, Leeanum giganteum, Minos, Walton Grange var., 
eboriacum, Arthurianum and Adrastus Marie (Silver Medal). 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 



28 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 191 2. 

Bronze Medal for a group of Cypripediums, including C. insigne Sanderae 
and citrinum, triumphans, Niobe superbum, villosum, Cecilia, Leeanum 
Prospero, Maudiae and others. 

G. H. Peace, Esq., Monton Grange (gr. Mr. C. Mace), was also awarded 
a Bronze Medal for a group of Cypripediums, the insigne section being well 
represented by plants of Sanderae, Laura Kimball, Dorothy, Berryanum, 
Chantinii Lindenii, tunbridgense and Lancastrian. There were also C. 
Leeanum Staffordianum and magnificum, C. Memnon, Monton Grange 
var., and C. Euryades aureum. 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), staged a wonderful 
plant of Odontoglossum ardentissimum var. Johnsonii, carrying two spikes 
of flowers, each 34 -inches across, Cattleya Aurora-Borealis, and three white 
forms, C. labiata alba Holden's var., C. Princess Mary (Warned alba X 
Dowiana alba) and C. Holdeniae (Schrcederae alba X Warned alba). 

R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), staged Cypripedium 
Pearl Beauty (Milo X nitens Charlcsworthii). 

R. L. Overton, Esq., Neston, Cheshire (gr. Mr. Arrowsmith), had a 
wonderful Cypripedium Overtonii (fulshawense X Leeanum Corona). 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, were awarded a Silver Medal for 
a group, principally Cypripediums, varieties of insigne, Leeanum, and others. 
Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a miscellaneous group, 
to which a Silver Medal was awarded, Cattleyas and Cypripediums being 
well represented, with Oncidiums oblongatum,trulliferum, varicosum Rogersii, 
the rare varicosum concolor, Vanda coerulea and Cattleya Fabia gigantea. 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, were awarded a Silver Medal for a 
meritorious group of Cattleya labiata varieties, and hybrids of the Iris 
section, with a few choice Cypripediums. 

Mr. John Robson, Altrincham, staged a few yellow varieties of Cypripe- 
dium insigne, and C. Leeanum Clinkaberryanum X Memnon giganteum. 

Mr. W. Shackleton, Great Horton, Bradford, staged Cypripedium Niobe 
superbum, C. Memnon var. Queen Alexandra, and an unnamed seedling. 

Mr. H. Arthur, Blackburn, staged Oncidium Forbesii, var. nigrum a 
very dark form, Cymbidium erythrostylum and Cypripedium Baron 
Schroder. 

First-class Certificates. 
Cattleya Fabia var. Imperator, from W. R. Lee, Esq., a fine distinct 
flower with aurea lines in the lip ; Cattleya labiata var. Virgo purissima, a 
large white flower with pale yellow markings in the throat ; Odontoglos^m 
Chione, a wonderful flower, having solid chocolate-coloured segments, tipped 
with white, and the lip broad and flat ; all from the same exhibitor. 

Odontoglossum ardentissimum, var. Johnsonii, from J. J. Holden, Esq. 
■carrying two spikes of magnificent flowers, each 31-inches across. 



January, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

Cypripedium Overtc 
Overton, Esq., a large 1 

Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Portia var. Imperator, a large round flower, 4 inches across, of 
good even colour; Laeliocattleya Clive, Plumpton Hall var., a massive 
flower ; Cattleya labiata Genevieve, a white flower with faint markings on 
the lip; Cattleya Iris var. Corisanda (bicolor Grossii X Dowiana), a very 
fine variety; Cattleya Myrrha, Lee's var., a very large flower; Odonto- 
glossum Antiope, an unusual colour in the markings ; O. Hermione, very 
distinct, and of good form; Cypripedium Arthurianum var. Sanderse, 
(Arthurianum X insigne Sandene), showing the parentage on both sides; C. 
Charlesianum var. Prometheus, very fine ; all from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium Pearl Beauty (Milo X nitens-Charlesworthii), a well- 
balanced flower of good colour, from R. le Doux, Esq. 

Cattleya labiata alba, Holden's var., a distinct but rather small flower ; 
Cattleya Holdenice (Schroedera alba X Warned alba), a nice flower, having 
the lip tipped with pink, and yellow in the throat ; C. Princess Mary 
(Warneri alba X Dowiana alba), a good variety, showing the Dowiana 
markings in the lip, but rather light in colour ; all from J. J. Holden, Esq. 

Cypripedium Mancunium (Harrisianum superbum X Leeanum), from 
Rev. J. Crombleholme, a very good form. 

Cypripedium Actaeus, Cringlewood var., from Z. A. Ward, Esq., a very 
noble flower of good form. 

Cattleya Fabia gigantea, from Messrs. Stuart Low& Co., of magnificent 
shape and good even colour. 

Cattleya labiata, from Hassall&Co., a seedling of good form and colour. 

At the meeting held on November 30th, 1911, the members of Committee- 
present were:— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the chair), R. Ashworth, W. R. 
Lee, C. Parker, H. Thorp, A. Warburton, Z. A. Ward, J. Cypher, J. Evans, 
W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Woodhouse), was awarded a Silver- 
gilt Medal for a miscellaneous group, amongst which were noticed some 
well-grown plants of Cypripediums insigne Sanderse, i. Harefield Hall 
var., i. Bonhofianum, triumphans, and Mrs. Francis Wellesley, with other 
fine things mentioned under awards. 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), was also awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for an effective display, including Cattleya labiata alba 
Amesiae, and several other albinos : a fine plant of C. Portia (for which a 
Cultural Commendation and Bronze Medal were awarded to the gardener), 
Cypripediums Thalia Mrs. F. Wellesley, Maudiae, Baron Schroder, Farrie- 
annm, Vera, Corneyanum, Miltonia Unica and Oncidium Forbesii. 



3° THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 1912. 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), staged a nice group, 
to which a Silver Medal was awarded, including Cattleya Portia, Ward's 
var., Lgeliocattleya luminosa aurifera, Cypripedium Euryades var. Jasper; 
a magnificent plant of Odontoglossum Charlesworthii, Ward's var., carry- 
ing a branched spike 6ft. long, Lycaste Skinneri alba, and Oncidium tigrinum. 
Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 
Silver Medal for a fine group, including Odontoglossums in variety, notice- 
able among them being a fine plant of O. ardentissimum xanthotes, O. 
eximium Rutherfordianum, Cattleya labiata and hybrids, Cypripediums 
Chorltonii, insigne Sanders, and citrinum, Leeanum in variety, Sophro- 
cattleya Doris, several plants of Oncidium tigrinum, and a batch of Epiden- 
drum vitellinum majus. (See Awards). 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), staged a 
group of Cypripediums, varieties of insigne and Leeanum, Harrisianum 
superbum, bingleyense, Sallieri, Earl of Tankerville, Niobe, Milo, nitens, 
and Eismannianum, a Bronze Medal being awarded. 

A. Warbu'rton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish), was also awarded 
a Bronze Medal for a group of Cypripediums, the insigne section being 
represented by fine examples of Harefield Hall var., King Edward VII* 
Clara Measures, Berryanum and Bonhofianum, with C. Leeanum Clinka- 
berryanum, C. Thalia giganteum and Mrs. F. Wellesley, and C. Floradora. 
J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was awarded a Bronze 
Medal for a mixed group of Cattleyas and Lsliocattleyas, Cypripediums 
insigne Harefield Hall var., i. Sanders, tixallense, Arthurianum, Milo, 
Youngis, and several plants of Oncidium varicosum Rogersii. 

G. H. Peace, Esq., Monton Grange (gr. Mr. Mace), staged a nice group 
of Cypripediums, to which a Bronze Medal was awarded, including C 
insigne Sanders, Harefield Hall, Sanderianum, Schofieldianum, and Queen 
Alexandra, C. Leeanum giganteum, Staffordianum, Corona and Mrs. Ardern's 
var., C. Ville de Paris, C. Kitty, and Cymbidium erythrostylum 

Wm. Thompson, Esq., Walton Grange (gr. Mr. Stevens), was awarded 
a B ronzeJ Medal for a small but interesting wrnun wi.,,*;., r ■ ,• 

Leiesum, b roup, including Cyprj 
Ham-Leeanum, Golden Gem, Queen Alexandra, and a number of the 
sweet-scented Oncidium cheirophorum (see Awards). 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), staged some verv fine 
albinos, Cattleya labiata alba and Queen Maud, with ol 






R. leDoux, Esq. West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), staged Cvpripedu 
leen Alexandra, and C. Actsus Drewett's var. (See Aw F 

H. Thorp, Esq., Middleton, staged Cypripediums insigne Sanders 

ill, and Mrs. F. Wellesley. b Zanders, 

(To be continued.) 



January, r 9 i 2 .J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 31 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 
Two pretty seedling Cattleyas are sent from the collection of M. J. Ginot, 
St. Etienne, France. C. Marstersonis alba (Harrisoniana X labiata) is a 
pretty white variety. C. Annelias (Parthenia X chocoensis alba) is fairlv 
intermediate between the parents, and has white flowers, with the disc of 
the lip yellow, and some pink veining in front. Both arc seedlings 
flowering for the first time, and should develop into good things. 

Flowers of Cypripedium Actaeus and its variety Olive are sent from the 
•collectfon of Sir Benjamin Scott, Linden House, Stanwix, Carlisle. The 
former is the well-known greenish type, but the latter has the lower half of 
the dorsal sepal well spotted with purple, forming a very striking contrast 
and rendering the flower very attractive. 

Cypripedium Alcibiades quadricolor (Leeanum giganteum X Mons. de 
■Curte) is a very fine seedling from the collection of O. O. Wrigley, Esq., 
Bridge Hall, Bury. The dorsal sepal is very broadly margined with white, 
and the centre light brown, with a darker, median band. Vanda ccerulea 
albidula is a pretty white variety, with some blue veining on the lip. 

A flower of Laeliocattleya Ethelae (L.-c. corbeillensis X C. bicolor) is 
sent from the collection of E. F. Clark, Esq., Evershott, Dorchester. It has 
rosy sepals and petals, and the lip has rather small rounded side lobes, and 
a dark purple front lobe. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

Two meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the 
Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during January, 
1912, on the 9th and 23rd, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the 



Meetings of the Manchester and North of England Orchid Society will 
ibe held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on January nth and 25th, 1912 
The Committee meets at noon, and the exhibits are open to the inspection 
from i to 4 p.m. The following meeting will be held on February Sth. 

Autumn Orchid Show.— The Council of the R.H.S. has appointed a 
Sub-Committee, consisting of Mr. Gurney Fowler (Chairman), Mr. J. 
■O'Brien (hon. sec), Lt.-Col. Sir George Holford, K.C.V.O., Mr. Gurney 
Wilson, and Mr. John Cypher, to consider the arrangements for the Orchid 
Show to be held on November 5th and 6th, 1912. It met on Tuesday, 
November 21st, 1911, and considered some of the chief points necessary to 
ensure a good and effective display, and more especially to secure the co- 
operation of Orchidists in the provinces. Suggestions for the most 
important classes were made. 



32 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [January, 191^ 

Ghent Quinquennial. — We have received the provisional programme 
and schedule of the 17th International Horticultural Exhibition to be held 
at Ghent at the end of April, 1913, under the patronage of His Majesty 
the King of the Belgians. Classes 22 to 106 are devoted to Orchids, and 
should produce a very fine display. 

ORCHID PORTRAITS. 
Calanthe Angela.— Journ. Hart., 1911, ii. p. 535, with fig. 
CALANTHE Chapmanii. —Journ. Hort., 1911, ii. p. 535, with fig. 
Calanthe Clivk.— Journ. Hort., 1911, ii. p. 535, with fig. 
Calanthe Veitchii.— Journ. Hort., 1911, ii. p. 535, with fig. 

CCELOGYNE CRISTATA.— Jciim. Hort., IQII, ii. p. 533, with fig. 

Ccelogyne Dayana.— Journ. Hort., 191 1, ii, p. 532, with fig. 

Cymbidium Lowianum.-Jom^k. Hort., 191 1, ii. p. 533, with fig. 

Cypripedium Chapmanii Westonbirt var.— Card. Chron., 1911, ii. 
p. 431, fig. 174. 

Cypripedium Draco.— Gard. Mag., 191 1, pp. 913, 923, with fig. 

Cypripedium Lawrenceanum.— Journ. Hort., 1911, ii. p. 545, with fig. 

Cypripedium Lord Wolmer Westonbirt var.— Gard. Mag., 191 i r 
pp. 963, 974, with fig. 

Dendrobium Ainsworthil— Journ. Hort., 1911, ii. p. 577, with fig. 

Dendrobium xobile nobilius.— Journ. Hort., 1911, ii. p. 533, with fig. 

L^liocattleya Nella. — Gard. Chron., 1911, ii. pp. 474, 475, fig. 190; 
Gard. Mag., 191 1, pp. 963, 973, with fig. 

Lycaste Skinnerl— Journ. Hort., 191 1, ii. p. 533 with fig. 

Miltonia vexillaria.— Journ. Hort., 191 1, ii. p. 533, with fig. 

Odontoglossum Chione.— Gard. Chron., 191 1, ii. p. 411, fig. 167. 

Vanda Sanderiana. — Journ. Hort., 191 1, ii. pp. 504, 505, with fig. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

[Orchids are named and questions answered here as far as possible. Correspondents are 



We hope that our readers will appreciate the improved appearance of th< 
Review in the | a been effected by the selection of an art 

much superior qua Hustrations An; 

was used last year, but not of quite the substance desired, for a difficulty > 
experienced in obtaining one of the nee* - reasine the weio-1 

difficulty has now been surmounted. 5 



lanks. H.G.A., A.H., R.V.S. 

.voidably postponed through pressure on our space. 

ve S H Ug ^ st ir s v som w f r hich we hope to act u p° n shortl y- 



Vol XX., No. 230.' 



FEBRUARY, 1912. 



ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 



- " 

a and Secondary hybrids 

Odontoglossum Delhi 

On hid Sot, 5.in<] News 

Orchid Portraits 4 

Orchids : a delightful hobby 



Annum — See Ov 



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e fortnightly fresh consignments of the best 

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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 



ollection of Sir Wi 
i and Cattleya Ac 
ihape, but larger ar 



We have lately been much exercised about the problem of variation 
among secondary hybrids, but the report of a recent lecture reminds us of 
another phase of the question. Variation, we are told, can no longer be 
regarded as an indefinite phenomenon. We must dismiss from our minds 
all preconceptions as to how evolution has proceeded, and as to the part 
played by utility of structure, and study the properties of animals and 
plants exactly as we should those of inorganic -tinctures. The doctrine 
that the degree of fixity of a specific character is a measure of its utility to 
the organism can no longer be held. The theory of natural selection is 
said to fail exactly at the point where it is most wanted to help us. namely, 
the meaning of specific differences. All this it seems has been discovered 
through the study of variation and heredity by means of Mendelian 






THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Februar 

arrived at, but we have 



maintained that Mendelism was nothing but a method of work. Formerly 
we used to read of the Mendelian Law of Dominance, Law of Gametic 
Purity, &c, and it was said that the great problem of the future was not so 
much the origin of species as the origin of unit characters. Then came the 
announcement that all that Mendel discovered was the Law of Segregation 
—which is simply the familiar dissociation of mixed specific characters in 
hybrids under another name. Mendelism seems to be on a sort of 
inclined plane, and when it has reached the bottom of the slope it will 
probably show us some of the steps by which species have arisen through 
progressive development under the operation of natural selection, or the 
survival of the fittest. 



From the doctrine that the degree of fixity of a character- 
word specific— is not a measure of its utility to the 



-we will omit 
organism we 






completely dissent. Nothing succeeds 

struggle for existence useful variations are those most likely to be preserved" 
and handed on to succeeding generations. In fact a character originally 
arising as a mere variation may in turn become a specific character, 
ultimately attaining generic and even ordinal significance. It is the history 
of evolution. 

If we must give an example in proof of the assertion, let us take the 
rostellum of an Orchid. As Darwin well pointed out, no such organ exists 
in other plants. It performs the double function of secretin^ a vi id 
substance which glues the pollinia to the visiting insect, and of preventing 
the pollinia from falling on to the stigma of the same flower But it is only 
a modified stigma which has lost its original function, and the viscid 
matter, which dries almost instantly on exposure to the air is onl v a 
modification of the viscid matter of the stigma, which remains moist for a 
long period. It is confined to the suborder Monandry and may be said to 
have arisen as an adaptation with the development of that 



tipes of the pollii 



i of the rostellum is cut off to form the sti] 
the process being effected by the formation of a zone 
analagous to that by which a leaf is disarticulated and thrown off" 



And the rostellnm has progressed to a marvellous degree of diversity 
the different groups. At first a merely secretive organ, it has become 
pouch-hke body, enclosing the glands of the pollima in Orchis; a doui 
pouch in Ophrys; a profoundly threedobed body in Habenaria, in whi 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 35 

the side lobes are much prolonged and form channels to carry the slender 
caudicles of the pollinia ; a large disc with two cartilaginous arms in 
Disperis ; while in the male flower of Catasetum it has developed two 
sensitive antennae, to announce the arrival of an instinct, and cause the 
expulsion of the pollinia at the right moment — a female organ assumiug a 
special function in a male flower. Could specialisation much further go ? 

The rostellum is a good example of a successful, because useful, 
adaptation, but it is only one of a series. Take away the adaptations from 
an epiphytic Orchid, and there is nothing left. And species are adaptation. 

CULTURE OF CATTLEYA WARSCEWICZII. 

Referring to the question of the successful treatment of this lovely species 
(vol. xix. pp. 271, 325), I should like to relate my successful experience. 
Having under my charge a good many of the shy-flowering type, I tried 
every known method, without being able to produce flowers, so determined 
to try a perfectly new and different treatment. To prevent the plants from 
being watered or sprayed by other hands, I selected some of the strongest 
and most vigorous plants, which are said to be the shyest-flowering type, 
and put them into my seedling house. The plants had not flowered before, 
even in their home, and were at rest. The seedling house is shaded by 
tiffany blinds as long as the sun is shining, from early morning until the sun 
goes down. The temperature ranges between 73 F. at night to 78 F. by 
-day, and considerably more with sun heat. In this house, of course, very 
■little ventilation is given, and the air is completely charged with moisture. 
I kept the plants on the dry side, spraying the leaves, bulbs and surface of 
the compost very lightly three to five times a day, according to the weather. 
I carried on this treatment until the new growths were four inches long, and 
then began to water the compost, affording more water as the growths 
developed. After this treatment the result was marvellous, and each new 
bulb produced two to five flowers. I have repeated this method with equal 

to grow the plants so shady. In my opinion, the most important thing is to 
keep the plants dry until the new growth is about four inches long, but 
prevent shrivelling by spraying frequently. It is a canon in horticulture 
that vigorous growing plants are not so free in producing flowers and fruits 
as starved ones, and working on this starving principle is the reason of my 

Importers and collectors say that the shy-flowering type grows under 
trees, near or on the ground, mostly in a shady position, and most growers 
believe this to be the cause of failure. They therefore grow them in full 
sun, and I am sure in most cases without producing flowers. I have seen 



36 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, i 9 m. 

many plants in different places in Europe treated in this way, and I have 
treated a few dozen plants after this method myself, with the loss of a good 
many plants, but without seeing flowers. I was therefore almost certain 
that this was not the correct treatment. In taking the matter up seriously,. 
I found that where the shy-flowering type of C. gigas grows it is mostly 
shady, therefore moist, and it is certain that in the moisture the leaves from 
the trees decay quickly, nourishing the plants more than necessary. This 
may have been the condition for thousands of years, and I believe it is why 

Robert Blossfeld, 
Potsdam. Manager to C. F. Karthaus. 

FERTILISATION AND SECONDARY HYBRIDS. 

The remarkable variation so frequently seen among secondary hybrids is 
now thoroughly familiar to hybridists, but new cases are constantly causing 
surprise, especially to beginners and those who purchase a few unflowered 
seedlings. A correspondent asks us to describe exactly what takes place in 
hybridising, as it might help toexplain some of the things which at present 
appear incredible, and as the old question of the '-'false" hybrids of 
Zygopetalum Mackayi has cropped up again (p. 40) we may attempt to kill 
two birds with one stone and begin at the very beginning. . 



1 Orchid flo^ 



then cut across the ovules will be found to be i 



rudimentary state, consisting merely of minute papillae projecting from the 
surface of the placentas, and the remarkable thing is that unless the flower 
is pollinated they remain in this condition until the flower withers and falls 
away, sometimes weeks after it first opened. If the ovary of most ordinary 
plants be opened at the same period the ovules will be found fully developed, 
and capable of being fertilised immediately. 

In the rudimentary state that the ovules are in when an Orchid flower 
expands they are absolutely incapable of fertilisation. They must first 
grow into the mature condition, and for this some stimulus is necessary. It 
is supplied by the application of suitable pollen to the stigmas, and the 
subsequent growth of the pollen tubes. The effect of pollination is quickly 
visible. In a few hours the floral segments become flaccid, and show signs 
of withering, and shortly afterwards the column begins to thicken and its 
wings to close in on the stigma. The pollinia now begin to disintegrate 
forming with the secretion from the stigma a gelatinous mass, that fills up 
the stigmatic cavity. Microscopic examination shows that the pollinia are 
breaking up into the compound four-celled granules characteristic of the 
Order, and from these the four pollen tubes are already protrubing. They 
then elongate and push their way down the loose tissue of the style in 



February, i y 1 2.] THE ORCHID R 


EVIEW. 37 


countless numbers. Meantime the ova: 


ry steadily thickens, and the 


placentae and ovules gradually develop, ur 


itil they reach the mature stage 


seen in many ordinary flowers at the mom< 


mt of expansion. Then only is 


fertilisation effected. 




Dr. Hildebrandt found that the period « 


•lapsing between pollination and 


fertilisation in Phaius grandifolius was 


about two months, and in 


Dendrobium nobile and Cypripedium insig 


ne four months, while in Orchis 


and other European terrestrial Orchids th 


e process was complete in eight 


to fourteen days. In the case of Cattleyi 


a Mossiae, Mr. Veitch found the 


period to be about three months. Prior 


to fertilisation the pollen tubes 



have penetrated the ovary in countless numbers, and lay along the 
placental and among the ovules, which are rapidly undergoing the change 
of form that indicate maturity. This stage being reached, the pollen tubes 
enter the micropyle of the ovule and impregnation takes place, the effect of 
which is to cause the ovules to develop into seeds. 

It is a remarkable fact that the pollen of quite distinct genera of Orchids 
will cause the development of the ovules without subsequently effecting 
fertilisation, and this is believed to be the reason why the capsules of some 
crosses decay or open prematurely and contain nothing but " chaff." It has 
been shown that the young capsule is at least partly formed before 
fertilisation is effected, and should the latter not take place— from whatever 
cause — the ovules fail to develop into seeds. 

This brings us to the numerous "false'" hybrids of Zygopetalum, and 
the question arises whether in these cases fertilisation takes place or not. 
Pollination from the most diverse general of Orchids serves to cause the 
development of the ovary and ovules, and the latter further develop into 
seeds, which, however, only reproduce the mother plant, and thus are not true 
hybrids. It is not known how far the diverse pollen tubes develop, nor yet 
whether they enter the micropyle of the ovule and effect fertilisation. The 
latter case would indicate complete maternal dominance. On the contrary, 
should fertilisation not take place the inference would be that the stimulus 
of pollination had not ceased with maturation of the ovules, but that they 
had developed further into parthenogenetic buds, capable of reproducing the 
species. With other species of Zygopetalum true intermediate hybrids are 
produced, also with Colax, showing that J . The same 

must probably be said in the case of Chondrorhyncha, for Chondropetalum 
Fletcheri is not identical with the Zygopetalum, though closely resembling 
it. It is said that the result is the same when the Chondrorhyncha is 
the seed parent, and if this is really the case the evidence is conclusive. 
Clear evidence of such a case of paternal dominance would be remarkable, 
and we should like to see the cross repeated. In no other case, so far as we 
■can learn, has the reverse cross been successful, but evidence is wanting as 



*8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 1912. 

to what reverse crosses have been made, and we should like to see a few 
careful experiments carried ont. 

A plausible explanation of the " false " hybrids of Zygopetalum would be 
that it was a case of self-fertilisation, but this idea may be dismissed, for 
the experiments have been made, and repeated, by expert hybridists, always 
with the same result— and without pollination no capsules are produced. 
But microscopic examination would show whether fertilisation takes place 
or not, and such an experiment as that made by Mr. Veitch in the case 
of Cattleya Mossiae would settle the matter. If about fifty flowers of 
Zygopetalum were taken, half self-fertilised, and half crossed with 
Odontoglossum crispum— after their own pollinia had been carefully 
removed — and their subsequent development traced, by their periodic 
removal and microscopic examination, it would be possible to ascertain 
what really takes place. A smaller number of flowers would serve if all 
developed properly, for a weekly examination from the seventh or eighth 
week would suffice until the critical period arrived, some few weeks later. 
It would be a very interesting experiment and should settle the matter 
definitely. R. A . R . 

(To be concluded). 

THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 

By C. Alwyx Harrison, F.R.H.S. 
Cool House. 
The plants in this structure will need almost identical treatment to that 
set forth last month. More water and ventilation may be given, however, 
if mild weather prevails. If cold winds are experienced be careful not to 
open the roof ventilators on the exposed side of the house. Should the 
collection be situated in the vicinity of a large town, where fogs frequently 
occur, the roof glass must be well cleansed after each visitation, and during 
the fog itself the ventilators should be kept closed. The chief duties of the 
cultivator will be to see that all growing plants receive a fair amount of 
water, that those resting be kept drier, and at the coolest end of the house, 
and that the leaves be kept clean by repeated sponging. Tepid rain water 
should be used for this purpose. This is also a suitable season for washing 
the pots and for cleansing the inside glass. 

Some of the later-flowering Cypripediums should be ready for potting, 
and the method to be followed and the best compost were explained in my 
last month's article. If some plants do not need any repotting, it will then 
be best to leave them until another season. I cannot say that I am an 
advocate of top-dressing, for replacing the old surface soil by fresh renders 
it difficult to see the condition of that below, and whilst the surface compost 
may appear quite moist, that underneath may be dust dry, or vice-versa. 



February, 1912,] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 39 

Many of the winter-flowering Oncidiums will now need a fresh compost, 
and, as mentioned some months back, I strongly advise an annual change 
of soil. For compost use polypodium fibre, sphagnum moss, and well- 
rotted oak leaves, in equal parts. Mix the whole well together and use in a 
damp state. These plants should be accommodated at the warmest end of 
the house, and only given sufficient water to keep them just moist, until 
it is seen that a fresh start ha-i been made. The undermentioned should 
be ready for the above treatment : O. crispum, Forbesii, Gardneri, 
Marshallianum, tigrinum and varicosum. 

I do not advise the repotting of Odontoglossums just yet, but will 
discuss this point next month. 

Cattleya House, 

During this and the following month an average temperature of 55 to 
6o° Fahr. should be maintained, allowing the thermometer to run up to 
68° or 70 with sun heat. At night from 58 to 6f should be the correct 
degree of warmth. Ventilate as freely as the external atmosphere and 
internal heat of the house will allow. Usually a little bottom air can 
be admitted from 9 a.m. till 3.30 p.m. The amount of humidity in the 
house must be regulated by the amount of fire heat employed. Always 
maintain enough atmospheric moisture to prevent the house from feeling 
stuffy. A dry heat, combined with a little fresh air, is worse than a damp 
close atmosphere. Damp down once about noon, on the path, stages and 
amongst the pots. A nice moisture should thereby be created, but it is 
yet too early to syringe the plants themselves. Water all plants growing 
and in bud whenever the compost appears dry, but all at rest or just 

Cattleya Mossing Warned, late Trianae, Ladia purpurata, and spring 
flowering Ladiocattleyas, should be placed well up to the light. Personally 
I prefer a shelf near the roof glass for such, providing it is within 
easy reach of inspection. Dendrobiums which have their flower buds 
showing must only be watered sparingly, otherwise the blooms will turn 
to growths. On no account try to force them, unless it be one or two 
for some particular reason. If so treated, you must not expect a good 
display the following season. Any Vanda cosrulea which are in bud 
must be given all possible light, otherwise the blossoms will become 
small and colourless. 

Odontoglossum Rossii.— This is a pretty dwarf species, which is 
nevertheless of great beauty, and produces its flowers very freely during this 
and the following month. The plant only attains the height of five inches, 
but sends up a short flower scape, bearing several large and delicately 
tinted blossoms. The sepals are heavily barred with bright chestnut 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Vmoiva**, 191*. 

.c, and the lip large, prettily frilled, and of a pale 
ks as one of the cheapest Orchids, and is worthy of 



HYBRIDISATION OF ZYGOPETALUM MACKAYI. 
OWING to the curious phenomenon of this Orchid producing only '■' false*' 
hybrids when crossed with Lycaste, Odontoglossum and Phaius, it may be 
interesting to mention a remark made to me which opens up the possibility 
of obtaining real hybrids from a second generation. It is said that when 
beardless and bearded wheats were intercrossed, the hybrids produced were 
all beardless, but when these were again crossed with one of the parents, 
the offspring were fairly intermediate between the two. I suggest that 
Zygopetalum Mackayi be crossed, both ways, with Odontoglossum crispum, 
and the resulting seedlings, when in flower, be united again with the 
Odontoglossum parent. It seems possible that real hybrids, showing 
distinct traces of the Odontoglossum, might thus be obtained. I may add 
that, as a preliminary step, I have crossed Zygopetalum Mackayi with 
Odontoglossum crispum, Oncidium flexuosum and O. tigrinum. 

C. Alwyn Harrison. 

opportune time, as the Zygopetalum is now in bloom. We do not 
remember if this particular experiment has been tried with Odontoglossum, 
but it is said to have been carried out with Laelia anceps, the result of a 
second cross being still Zygopetalum, pure and simple {O.R., xi. p. 4). 
Such a result is mysterious, to say the least, and the time seems ripe for 
some experiments upon rather different lines. Zygopetalum is now 
reported to have been crossed with at least seven different genera, the 
resulting seedlings amounting to several hundreds, but in no case could the 
influence of the pollen parent be detected. We should like to see all these 
crosses reversed, and Zygopetalum pollen is common enough. It is said that 
such crosses refuse to take, but we do not know how far the experiment has 
been carried out. The secondary cross suggested by Mr. Harrison could be 
made at once, for at the R.H.S. meeting held on January gth, Messrs. 
James Veitch & Sons exhibited a batch of Zygopetalums that ought to 
have been hybrids with Odontoglossum crispum, but, as usual, there was 
no trace of the latter. We have a suspicion that in such cases fertilisation 
proper does not take place at all, a point which is alluded to on another 
page. We believe that in some of the above cases Zygopetalum inter- 
medium was used, not the original Z. Mackayi (Bot. Mag., t. 2748), for 
which the former often does duty in gardens. The mistake arose when 
Lindley figured what he called Eulophia Mackaiana in the Botanical 
Register (t. 1433), with Zygopetalum Mackayi, Hook., as a synonym.— Ed.] . 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



MR. HARRY J. VEITCH, F.L.S., V.M.H. 

Harry J. Veitch, F.L.S., V.M.H. , head of the firm of Messrs 
.& Sons, Royal Exotic Nursery, Chelsea— the pioneers of On 
tion— to whom it will be remembered our last volume was d< 
Veitch, who was born at Exeter, came to Chelsea with his 




took over the busint 

lis career with the fin 
in 1865 was admitted to partnership, assuming the management fiv 
s later, on the death of his elder brother, John Gould Veitch. It wa 
before Mr. Veitch left Exeter that Mr. Dominy began to hybridis 



42 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 19 12. 

Orchids, and in October, 1856, the firm startled Dr. Lindley with the flowers 
of their first hybrid — Calanthe Dominii — which drew from the latter the 
remark, "Why, you will drive the botanists mad" — a prophecy happily 
unfulfilled. From that early beginning the business of raising Orchids from 
seed has gradually grown into an immense industry, and it may be said that 
the subject of our notice has watched, and in part guided, its development 
from the outset. He has also been its historian, for at the Orchid 
Conference, held in May, 1885, he gave the firm's experience — extending 
over a period of nearly thirty years — in a very interesting paper {Jouvn.. 
Roy. Hort. Soc, n. s. vii. pp. 22-48, t. 1-5). We need not dwell on the 
matter further, for the history of the question is given in detail in our first 
volume. Somewhat later he read an interesting paper before the Linnean 
Society, " On the Fertilisation of Cattleya Mossise " (Jouru. Linn. Soc, 
xxiv. pp. 395-4o6, figs. 1- 14). 

As an importer of Orchids Mr. Harry Veitch has a long experience, for 
the achievements in this department of Chesterton, Endres, Gustav Wallis, 
Kalbreyer, Burbidge, Curtis and Burke were made under his own manage- 
ment. Importations of various kinds were constantly being received, of 
which only a few can be mentioned. Chesterton was the first to send home 
the beautiful Miltonia vcxillaria alive, and he also was the introducer of 
Masdevallia Harryana and Chondrorhyncha Chestertonii. Endres sent the 
chaste Cattleya Skinneri alba. To Gustav Wallis we owe Epidendrum 
Wallisii, Masdevallia Wallisii, Cypripedium Haynaldianum and C.Argus;, 
and to Davis, Masdevallia Davisii and M. Barlaeana. Burbidge sent home 
Cypripedium Lawrenceanum and Phalsenopsis Mariae, and Curtis Ccelogyne 
Dayana, Cypripedium Curtisii and tonsum, while Burke was the discoverer 
of Coelogyne Veitchii. The introduction of Cattleya Bowringiana also 
belongs to this period. The numbers of other plants are outside our 
province. We must also mention the excellent Manual of Orchidaceous. 
Plants produced under Mr. Veitch's management. 

Space fails us to tell of Mr. Veitth's numerous other activities. He has 
been a member of the Council of the R.H.S. since 1S87, and took an active 
part in providing the Society with its fine Hall in Vincent Square. He is 
a Vice-Chairman of the Orchid Committee, and as Chairman and Treasurer 
of the Gardeners' Royal Benevolent Institution he has rendered invaluable 
assistance to a very excellent cause. Mr. Veitch is the worthy upholder of 
an honoured name, and the esteem and affection in which he is held by the 
horticultural world are widely known. The services that his firm have 
rendered to horticulture for over half a century can hardly be estimated. 
It may be remarked that some eleven years ago Mr. Veitch relinquished 
the active management in favour of his nephew, Mr. James Herbert 
Veitch, but before the latter's death, over four years ago, he resumed his 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 43 

old position, and our readers will join us in wishing him health and 
strength to carry it on for many years to come. 

Our figure is from a photograph of the subscription portrait in oils 
which was presented to the Council of the Royal Horticultural Society in 
January, 1910, a replica being also presented to Mrs. Veitch. 

ORCHIDS: A DELIGHTFUL HOBBY. 

We have received from Mr. Edward Clements, the author of the note given 
at page 8 of our last issue, an interesting photograph of the house described 
by him. He writes : "I am sending you herewith a photograph of the 
interior of my small house, taken this afternoon at three o'clock. I thought 
it would serve to give vou some idea of what the house is like, although the 
photograph, being so small, and in monochrome, does not show the flowers 
up much. I wish you could see the house just now. With a hand lens 
you may be able to identify Cattleyas, Cypripediums, Odontoglossums, 
Lselias (in bud), Vanda ccerulea, Cymbidium Tracyanum with twelve 
flowers, and Zygopetalum Mackayi. The Phalsenopsis at the far end is in 
spike, but does not show in the photograph ; it is hanging from the roof. 
I should like to say how particularly helpful I have found the monthly 
Calendar of Operations in the Review." 

The photograph gives a good idea of the interior of the house, and 
shows that the plants are in thriving condition, and producing a good 
display of bloom.— Ed. 

THE GENUS XYLOBIUM. 

Xylobium is a small American genus of Orchids, allied to Bifrenaria, several 
species of which are occasionally met with in gardens. They have very 
similar, elliptic or lanceolate, strongly plicate leaves, and the flowers are borne 
in short erect or spreading spikes or racemes. Curiously enough, they have 
generally been referred to Maxillaria, though so different in habit. About 
twenty-five species are known, of which X. squalens, the original species 
(Bot. Mats., t. 2955), and X. leontoglossum (B.M., t. 7085) are frequently 
seen in cultivation. A few others are occasionally met with, chiefly in 
botanical collections. There are six species of Xylobium which are at 
present referred to Maxillaria, namely X. Coelia (Maxillaria Ccelia, Rchb. f. 
Warscz.), a native of Venezuela; X. hypocritum (M. hypocrite, Rchb. 
f.), a Brazilian plant, which is figured in Gartenflora (t. 1053, fig. 2) ; X. 
miliacea (M. miliacea, Rchb. f.), a Bolivian species; X. ornatum (M. 
ornata, Klotzsch), a native of Peru; X. truxillense (M. truxillensis, Rchb. 
f.), a Venezuelan plant ; and X. undulatum (M. undulata, Ruiz Pavon), 
a native of Peru. Most of these have not appeared in cultivation. 

R. A R. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



ODONTOGLOSSUM DELHI. 
This is a remarkably handsome hybrid from the collection of J. J. Holden, 
Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. R.Johnson), which received a First-class Certifi- 
cate from the Manchester Orchid Society on January 12th last. Its parents 
are Odontoglossum crispum augustum and O. eximium, and the annexed 
figure, from a photograph by Mr. F. W. Rolfe, shows that the best characters 
of its distinguished parents have been retained. The flower is of excellent 
shape, and the segments are very broad, while the prevailing colour may be 
.described as rich claret-purple. The petals are \ 




^ell crisped, 
Ie the apex 

veil defined 



the base. The lip 
nd the crest is heavily blotched with purple, 
ite. The sepals are rather broader than the petals, 
colour, except that the white margin is not quite 
. Johnson, in sending the flower (with another very 
month), remarks that 
being plenty of flower 
» the preceding remark- 



handsome thing which will be dealt v 
Orchids have done very well there this wir 
in each department, and he attributes this 
ably fine summer. 

It would be interesting to know what any other seedlings from the 
same cross were like, for the great diversity among secondary hybrids 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 45 

from the same capsule has been frequently commented upon, and this 

when the parents contain the same original species— perhaps in somewhat 
different proportions. The beautiful Odontoglossum egregium var. Madame 
Jules Hye de Crom [O.K., xvi. p. 209, fig. 27) may be cited as an 
example. It is said to have been derived from O. Yuylstekei and (). armain- 



ned as florists' flowe 



run predict, but we have not nearly reached it yet. 

VANDA CHARLESWORTHII. 

L nts, in the establishment of M.Charles Maron, Brunoy, 
lower has been sent for identification. It is fairly inter- 



appeared in the 
importa 



and was exhibited at a meeting at M 



Chester, in 1894, being shortly afterwards described in these pages on a 
second plant flowering with Messrs. Hugh Low cS; Co. (ii. pp. 182, 322). 
Two or three other plants have since appeared in other establishments 
under similar circumstances. We strongly suspect that Vanda amoena may 
be a form of the same, for the resemblance to V. coerulea is great, and the 
other supposed parent, V. Roxburgh!!, grows far away. Two other natural 
hybrid Vandas have been described, namely. V. Moorei, from V. coerulea 
and V Kimballiana (0. R., v. p. 329), and V. confusa, supposed to be 
derived from V. ca3rulescens and V. parviflora (0. R., x. p. 196). 



46 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 1912. 

ORCHIDS OF PANAMA. 

Under the title " Rambles in Panama and Jamaica " an old correspondent, 
Dr. J. F. Shafer, of Stockton, California, U.S.A., has published some 
interesting notes of a visit to Panama and Jamaica (Joum. Bot. Soc. W. 
Pennsylvania, i. pp. tg-22), from which, through the author's kindness, 
we are able to give some extracts. The trip was made for the purpose of 
becoming better acquainted with the Orchids of these countries, and of 
securing living specimens for his collection. Sailing from New York on 
February 4th, 1911, and touching at Cuba and Jamaica, the author reached 
Colon, Panama, on February 12th, after a delightful voyage of over 2000 
miles. He then proceeded by train to the City of Panama, and after some 
days spent in examining the big Canal works, he made an excursion into 
the jungle, where in a valley near the Camacho Dam he found his first 
Orchid, a species of Notylia, also several Epidendrums and a Catasetum. 

On the Rio Pedro Miguel nature seemed to be in a quiescent state, and 
it is remarked that even in the tropics, where conditions are always 
favourable for growth, a period of rest appears as essential to the existence 
of plant life as the long period of repose enforced upon vegetation in our 
temperate zone. It was, therefore, the proper season for collecting 
Orchids, which should never be disturbed during active growth. 

On the bank of the river grew a large tree, which, viewed from below, 
appeared to be a veritable botanical garden. On the large branches, as 
well as on the trunk, grew immense masses of Oncidium ampliatum. 
Many of the plants were pushing up their spikes, while a few were already 
in full bloom, the massive panicles of bright yellow flowers outrivalling 
in size and beauty any inflorescene of this desirable Orchid ever seen in 
cultivation. Growing among the Orchids were large masses of Tillsandsias 
of various species, numerous species of ferns, Cactus, Philodendrons, mosses, 

On another tree, farther up stream, were found large masses of Sobralia 
in bud, and several species of Pleurothallis, Stelis and several other 
Orchids, the genera of which cannot be determined until flowers appear. 

Along the Chagres River many Epidendrums were found, and an 
occasional plant of the Dove Orchid, Peristeria elata ; also a few plants 
of Camaridium ochroleucum. Other genera collected in this locality were 
Dichsea, Maxillaria, Trichopilia and Brassavola. 

During an excursion to the ruins of Old Panama, on the Pacific coast, 
many interesting Orchids were collected. Growing on small trees, often 
within reach from the ground, were the most perfect specimens of 
Oncidium Cebolleta I have ever seen. On the same tree were unusually 
large plants of Notylia in endless numbers. On a large tree washed by 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

the sea at high tide, I found a large mass of Catasetum macrocarpui 
bearing enormous seed pods, fully eight inches in length. The walls of ; 
old church, dating from about 1520, about twenty-five feet high, we 
thickly covered with a most interesting growth of plants, of which a fi 

Cebolleta being the only Orchid observed. 

Some notes on the Orchids of Jamaica may be deferred until o 



LiELIA GOULDIANA. 
It is rumoured that the recently-imported plants of Laelia Gouldiana (see 
page 15), did not come from a wild habitat, but from some native garden, 
and that the actual habitat is not known. We should much like to have 
the information confirmed. That the natives cultivate the Mexican 
Laelias is well known, and M. Juan Balme recently informed us that 
L. anceps is in all parts cultivated in the Indian gardens on the trees and 
Opuntias. Nothing was stated as to the source of the original plants of 
L. Gouldiana, and it would be interesting to know if any records exist. If 
really a garden plant, the question arises how was it originally obtained ? 
and as to this it seems useless to speculate. A native might bring in a 
handsome form, as this is, and cultivate it, without troubling about its 
■origin, and in time come to possess a stock, and on this view it might still 
be of hybrid origin. The broad petals and the rich colour suggest an 
affinity with L. furfuracea, a species probably lost to cultivation, and which 
is said to grow with L. autumnalis in the State of Michoacan. Reichenbach 
originally remarked of L. Gouldiana: " If it is a hybrid, as L. Crawshayana 
may also be, you must think of L. autumnalis, and perhaps of L. anceps, 
as possible parents, by reason of the grand colours. And why is it not a 
species, when the nearest allies have such very slight characters? And as 
a species may have a very wide area, perhaps this L. Gouldiana may be a 
variety of L. Crawshayana." The latter view has not been confirmed, 
.and it would be interesting to clear up the origin of this mysterious plant. 



Species and hybrids.— It may seem curious that there should be no 
:rtain means of distinguishing species from hybrids, unless the latter are 
iperfect in some of their organs, which not infrequently happens through 

ut among Orchids hybrids are often not only apparently as perfect, but 
so as fertile as their parents, a fact which illustrates the difficulty of 
entifying a natural hybrid from examination only, unless the importation 
• the native country is known. It is not always that they possess 
laracters intermediate between two well-known species. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Fkkri-arv, 

CYPRIPEDIUM SAN-ACT^US, WESTFIELD VAR. 



The annexed figure represents i 
Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfie 
Merit from the R.H.S. on Januan 
San-Actaeus, Westfield var. It 
raised by Messrs. James Veitch 






of 



g, which received an Award of 
under the name of Cypripedium 
i have been a solitary seedling, 
rom C. insigne Harefield Hall 




the figure, which is from a photograph by Mr. F. W. Rolfe, but was 
inadvertently too much reduced in size. For some time it was known as 
C. etoniense, and has been so recorded, but the Orchid Committee changed 
the name as above. C. San-Actaeus was raised in the collection of the 
late Norman C. Cookson, Esq., from C. insigne Sanderae and C. Act&us, 
and received the R.H.S. Award of Merit in January, 1905. 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

ONCIDIUM KRAMERIANUM. 




Fig. IO. ONCIDIUM KRA 


IERIANUM. 


interest in all who see it. It is of easy cultur 


e. and should be vvi 


by all possessing a house capable of maintai 


ling the required 


average temperature of 60 deg. in winter and e 


Lrly spring, with a p 


rise during summer, suits this Orchid admira 


)lv, and it should 


light position at the warmest corner of the he 


use. It rarely rest 


"0- ttot. Garde 





5 o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 1912. 

sequently must never be allowed to become dry, though only enough water 
to keep the compost damp is required. Only pure rain water should be 
used, and from October to April this should be tepid. Frequent root 
disturbance is harmful, but when re-potting becomes a necessity the plant 
should be carefully removed from the old receptacle and placed in a pan of 
fresh soil. This should consist of osmunda fibre, with sphagnum moss, 
finely chopped, and a little oak leaf dust obtained by rubbing well decayed 
oak leaves through a fine sieve. Little shade is needed throughout the 
year, only sufficient to prevent the leaves from becoming scalded by the sun. 
When a flower is faded the spike should not be cut, for fresh flowers are 
produced on the old spike. It is unwise, however, to let the plant produce 
more than three flowers on each spike, as it prevents the new growth from 
getting proper nourishment. The leaves should be sponged once a week, 
and when in bloom the plant must never be subjected to too low a tem- 
perature. Oncidium Kramerianum is closely allied to O. Papilio, from 
which it differs, however, in having knotted flower spikes, and the blossoms 
are larger and more highly coloured. It would be interesting to know if 
any seedlings have been raised from this Orchid, for from personal 
experience it does not seem to cross readily. 

C. Alwyn Harrison. 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR FEBRUARY. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
Although up to the present we have not experienced any severe weather, 
we may do so now at any time, and it is therefore desirable to keep every- 
thing as far as possible at rest, not pushing anything into growth, for fear 
it may receive a severe check. The temperatures for this month should 
remain as advised for January, except that a rise of a few degrees may be 
allowed with sun heat, and with it an increased amount of atmospheric 
moisture will be necessary to subdue the dryness that comes from an over- 
heated atmosphere. Great attention will be necessary in the ventilation of 
the houses, as, after such dull weather as we have lately had, a great deal of 
harm can be done by a spell of clear frosty weather accompanied by bright 
sunshine, if the house is allowed to go too long without ventilation. 

Potting. — There are many plants that may now be potted, so I think 
perhaps it would be useful to make a few remarks on the subject. The 
potting of plants, to my mind, does not consist in merely putting a plant 
into a pot or pan, and pressing so much compost around it to hold it in 
position, but every family of plants should be studied, so to speak, so that 
the compost should be of the right kind, and of the degree of firmness that 
the plant requires. Orchids are like other plants, they vary as regards the 
amount of energy their roots possess, and some are capable of pushing 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 51 

through more solid substances than others. No plant should have the 
compost placed so lightly around it that it acts like a sponge, holding a 
great deal of water for a time and then quickly drying up. Each plant should 
be potted in such a manner that the compost is of an even texture all round 
it, and just as firm, and no firmer, than its roots are capable of pushing 
through. The potting of plants should be pushed on as much as possible, 
as the more that we can do at this early season the more time remains for 
those that follow after. I am a great advocate for a nice sweet rooting 
medium for all Orchids, and if the compost is at all decayed or sour I do 
not hesitate to repot it into new. The water conditions afterwards is the 
great thing that needs attention. Do not give the plant one drop more 
than is necessary, but do not let it get into that over-drv condition, when 
water will not properly penetrate. 

we have to make a compromise, and that is why I recommend the different 
fibres now in use. Polypodium is a very fine soft fibre which many plants 
appreciate, while osmunda and Ai fibre add toughness, which many of the 
strong rooting Cattleyas, Lseliocattleyas, and Brassocattleyas revel in. 
Oak leaves, to my mind, are more or less a stimulant, and must be used 
judiciously. The plants will soon speak for themselves, and my advice to 
all cultivators is that, if successful with any particular plant, they should 
still proceed on their own lines. All composts should be of the best 
procurable of their several kinds. 

Cypripediums of the insigne family may be repotted as they pass out of 
flower, should they require it. The compost I find them to succeed best in 
is as follows : One part of good fibrous peat ; one part polypodium fibre, 
half a part of loam fibre, and sphagnum moss. I get finer and better flowers 
from this compost than from any other. Any of the green-leaved section 
may have attention in the same way, as they pass out of flower, should they 
need it. Those of the tessellated-leaved section, such as C. Lawrenceanum, 
Dayanum, and others, are better without the loam. For C. bellatulum 
concolor, and niveum, I use a compost of equal parts of each of the above. 

Dendkobiums of the nobile section are fast pushing up their flowers, 
and, if not already done, should be cleaned, and put in their flowering 
quarters. A temperature of about 6o° will suit them admirably. D. Wardi- 
anum will succeed under the same conditions, but in no case must they 

LiELiA anceps and its allies bloom at a season when flowers are doubly 
valuable, owing to the blank between the flowering periods of C. labiata and 
C. Trianse and Percivaliana. They are now passing out of bloom, and may 
be repotted or repanned— should they require it— as soon as new roots are 



52 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 1912. 

seen to be pushing from the base of the bulb. The compost I recommend 
for them:' is as follows : Two parts osmunda and peat fibre, one part Ai fibre 
rand sphagnum moss, all well mixed together. In potting large plants of this 
[ family it is desirable to turn the leading growths towards the centre of the 
pot or pan. Make the compost moderately firm, and secure the plant by 
the aid of stakes to prevent rocking, as a rocking plant can never take root- 
hold properly. 

Masdevallia tovarensis will commence to grow as soon as the flowers 
are over, and this is a good time to repot. I prefer growing the smaller 
Masdevallias in shallow pans, and for want of room I always suspend them. 
The compost I use is an equal part of peat, polypodium fibre, osmunda fibre, 
and clean sphagnum moss, with a fair sprinkling of half-decayed leaves, 
rubbed through a half-inch sieve. The compost should not be placed too 
tightly around them, but pressed in just sufficient to make the plants firm, 
and hold them in position. Species of the Chimera section, which com- 
prise M. bella, Chimaera, Chestertonii, and many others, may also have 
attention if they are in need of it. These plants must be placed in shallow 



teak-wood baskets, as theii 


r flowers are produced from spikes which often 


come from the bottom of 


the plant. Any of the stronger-growing kinds, 


such as M. Harryana, Ve 


itchiana, and ignea, that were left over in the 


autumn, and now require, 


a shift, may be done at this season using the above 


compost, with the additior 


1 of a little fibrous loam. Great care should be 


taken that the plants after 


being repotted neither suffer for the want of water 


nor through excess of it. 




Oncidiums of the win 


ter-flowering varieties may be repotted as they 



commence to grow and make roots from the new bulbs. The compost 
recommended for Miltonias last month will answer their requirements 
except that a larger proportion of leaves may be used. Oncidiums of the 
macranthum section should have their spikes carefully trained round stakes, 
or in some other way, where they can be carefully watched for slugs, which 
are very partial to them, and indeed to the plants generally. These' plants 
delight in an abundance of water until their flowers are fully developed. 

Fhal^nopsis.— These lovely winter-blooming Orchids are now 
practically over for the season, and will enjoy a short rest of about a 
eks' duration before commencing to grow again. They 



should therefore 



leave 


s, which 


should r 


email 


1 perfectly pli 


time 


possible, 


as they 


are 


theme 


lin stren 


use v 


arious rec 


;eptacles 


to ph 


ice th< 


jm in, sc 


other 


s cylinder 


s, but I 


am of 


opini< 


3n that ; 


they 


are grovv 


■n in shallow 




or even 


growing these 


plants si 


ispended. 





upport the large, fleshy 
healthy for the longest 
e plant. Many growers 
jring teakwood baskets, 



ts should 


be grown in 


deal of 


interest, and 


nore sho< 


xy species. 


oked for, 


the different 


found to 


be present. 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REV IK 

BULBOPHYLLUMS and ClRRHOPETALUMS may 

receptacles as soon as they commence to make new- 
recommended for Miltonias. These interesting pi 
every collection, as their quaint flowers arouse a gr< 

Pests of all descriptions must be continually 
remedies being brought into action whenever they ; 

shade the Cool houses, and to put shading over such plants as Aerides. 
Phalaenopsis. Angnecums, Cvpripcdiums. Zy^opetahims. and others that 
are likely to have their leaves disfigured by the sun's ravs : also anv plants 
which have recently been repotted. Here we do not find it necessary to 
bring shading into general use until the beginning of March, but it is 
desirable to have everything put into proper order by the time it will be 
required, so I would recommend that these matters have attention at once. 
I do not recommend painting the glass, but prefer blinds (lath roller for 
preference) to any of the so-called mixtures for painting on the glass. It is 
advisable, however, that the ends and sides of the houses should be painted. 
General remarks.— It should be the aim of every cultivator at this 
season to keep his plants as quiet as possible, not to push them into growth, 
as we are not yet out of the winter. Growth will be much finer, more- 
solid, and better in every way if developed under the extra light from the 
sun, and consolidated as made. I would urge my readers to study the 
smallest details, even the crocking of the pots and pans, as it is by this 
means that success is attained. Watering the plants must be done 
judiciously and with caution, bearing in mind that it is easier to make the 
compost too wet than it is to get it dry again. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
A MEETING of the Committees was held at the Royal Horticultural Hall. 
Vincent Square, Westminster, on December 19th, 1911, when the exhibits 
were limited to plants submitted for awards. Some very interesting 
Orchids were shown, and the awards consisted of two First-class 
Certificates and four Awards of Merit. 

Orchid Committee present: Harry J. Veitch, Esq. (in the Chair), ami- 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (Hon. Sec), J. Gurney Fowler, C. J. Lucas, W. Bolton. 
A. Dye, H. G. Alexander, J. E. Shill, W. H. Hatcher, J. Charlesworth, T. 
Armstrong. A. McBean, F. J. Hanbury, Gurney Wilson, and C. H. Curtis. 
First-class Certificates. 

Cypripedium Royal Sovereign (Hera robustum X Urania var. 
Martin Cahuzac). — A very distinct and handsome hybrid, having the dorsal 



54 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 191 2. 

sepal very regularly dotted and feathered with claret-purple on a white 
ground, the markings becoming darker towards the base, while the lip and 
petals are mahogany red, the latter with some darker spotting. Six species 
are concerned in the parentage, C. Argus, Boxallii, Charlesworthii, insigne, 
Lawrenceanum, and Spicerianum. Exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons. 

L^liocattleya Nella (L.-c. Dominiana langleyensis X C. labiata). 
— A very handsome hybrid, like a fine C. labiata in shape, with much 
intensified colour. The sepals and petals are bright rose, with lighter 
veining, and the lip glowing ruby red, with some yellow lines in the throat. 
Exhibited by Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea. 
Awards of Merit. 

Cypripedium Actteus var. Durbar (insigne Harefield Hall var. X 
Leeanum giganteum). — A fine form, having a large white dorsal sepal, with 
yellowish green base, and a number of large sepia brown blotches, while 
the petals and very broad lip are yellow, tinged with sepia brown. 
Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath. 

Cypripedium insigne Gatton Park var. (insigne Harefield Hall var. 
X i. montanum).— A large and handsome form, most like the former in 
general character, but the dorsal sepal flatter and the markings darker. 
Exhibited by Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., V.M.H., Gatton Park, Reigate 
(gr. Mr. J. Collier). 

Cypripedium Lord Wolmer, Westonbirt var. (Leeanum X 
Euryades leopardinum).— A very large and handsome variety, which is 
figured at page 9 of our last issue. Exhibited by Sir George L. Holford, 
K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander). 

Odontoglossum crispum Alcyone.— A handsome form, bearing a spike 
of fourteen flowers, the ground colour being white, blotched with purple 
on the sepals, and a cluster of small purple spots on the petals. Exhibited 
by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis). 

A number of other interesting things were shown, as follows :- 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., sent a plant of the brilliant Odontioda 
Diana. 

The Hon. Lady Neeld, Grittleton (gr. Mr. Pitts), sent Cattleya Venus 
var. Lady Neeld. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. W. Hopkins), 
showed the handsome Brassocatlselia Veitchii and Lasliocattleya Rubens, 
Westfield var. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, sent Cypripedium Troilus var. 
Invincible, a very large and handsome form. 

Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, sent Cypripedium Snowdon, a 
light yellow flower, and a line form of C. Clonia. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, sent a fine plant of the 



February, i 9I2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 55 

distinct and striking Oncidium anthocrene, bearing scapes about four feet 
long, Laeliocattleya Myrrha var. flavescens, and Odontioda Cooksoniae 
venustum, a bright red form. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, sent Cypripedium The 
Nizam (Helen II. X insigne Harefield Hall var.), having cream yellow 
flowers spotted with purple : C. The Gaekwar (Ceres Fascinator X 
Leeanum), in which the influence of C. hirsutissimum re-appears very 
strongly; C. Beryl, West Point var., C. Samuel Gratrix, C. Napoleon, and 
C. The Maharajah. 

Messrs. Stuart Low cv Co., Bush Hill Park, sent Vanda Amesiana 
albens, a nearly white form. 

Mr. H. A. Tracy, Twickenham, sent Lseliocattleya Floryi (L.-c. Violetta, 
X C. Triange), having blush white sepals and petals, with the front lobe of 
the lip violet-purple, and Cypripedium villosum, Tracy's var. 

At the first meeting of the new year, held on January 9th, there was a 
very fine display of Orchids, including ten medal groups, and the awards 
consisted of one First-class Certificate, eight Awards of Merit, and one 
Cultural Commendation. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (Hon. Sec), W. Bolton, Gurney Wilson. Harry J. 
Veitch, J. Wilson Potter, R. Brooman White, de Barri Crawshay. W. H. 
White, A. Dye, H. G. Alexander, J. E. Shill, W. H. Hatcher, J. Cypher, 
W. P. Bound, W. Cobb, J. Charlesworth, A. A. McBean, T. Armstrong, 

F. J. Hanbury, C. H. Curtis, J. S. Moss, and Stuart H. Low. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park. Reigate (gr. Mr. J. Collier), 
staged an interesting group, containing some fine forms of Lseliocattleya 
epicasta, Dendrobium superbiens violaceum, Phaiocalanthe Colmania 
rosea, and others (Silver Backsian Medal-. 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), sent 
Laelia anceps Schrcederae rosefieldiensis and L. a. S. Seuenacca, two finely- 
coloured forms. 

F. J. Hanbury, Esq., Brockhurst, East Grinstead, sent Cypripedium 
J. F. Alcock, a hybrid of C. insigne Wallacei. 

G. Hanbury, Esq., Blythewood, Burnham (gr. Mr. Branson), sent fine 
plants of Calanthe vestita rubro-oculata and luteo-oculata. 

Lieut. -Col. Sir G. L. Holford, Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander), 
sent Cypripedium Bronzino (parentage unrecorded), having a bronzy rose 
dorsal sepal margined with white, and bronzy yellow sepals and petals, C. 
nitens- Leeanum aureum, and Cattleya Peetersii Westonbirt var. (labiata 

G. G. Whitelegge X Hardyana alba), a beautiful white flower, with deep 
rose lip, veined with yellow at the base. 



5* THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 191 2. 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O. Burford (gr. Mr. W. H. White), 

sent Cypripedium Hera, Burford var., C. Eurybiades (Euryades X 
Alcibiades), C. semilunare, with lunate white margin to the dorsal sepal, 
and a well-flowered plant of Maxillaria arachnites. 

Earl Stanhope, Chevening Park (gr. Mr. Sutton), showed Calanthe 
vestita grandiflora. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. W. Hopkins), sent 
Cypripedium Little Gem, C. memoria Mostynii, a fine yellow flower with 
the upper half of the dorsal sepal white, and a few other good things. 

Messrs. Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, staged a fine group, 
including Odontioda Bradshawiae, Odontoglossum eximium, amabile, and 
others, some well-flowered plants of Masdevallia Schroederiana, Calanthe 
bella, and some good C. Harrisii, fine forms of Cypripedium Leeanum, 
and other good things (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, sent a fine group, including the 
chaste Calanthe Harrisii, Lycaste lasioglossa, Masdevallia bockingensis, 
Cattleya Dusseldorfii Undine, and other good Cattleyas, with a lot of choice 
Cypripediums, including C. Leeanum Clinkaberryanum with seven flowers 
(Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a fine and varied 
group, including the charming Cattleya Percivaliana alba, C. Triana alba, 
and C. Raphaelias alba, Oncidium varicosum concolor, Saccolabium 
bellinum, Laeliocattleya Cappei, Masdevallia polysticta and others, Sophro- 
cattleya Saxa, Dendrobium superbiens, Listrostachys arcuata, some good 
Cypripediums, with Calanthe Veitchii and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

ssrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent a fine lot of Lalia anceps 



Schroederae, a very richly-coloured form, bearii 






L. a. Chamberlainiana, and others, some good Odontoglossums, Odontioda 
Charles worthii, Sophrocattleva Thwaitesii, with some Calanthes and 
Cypripediums (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a very fine group, including 
many good examples of Laeliocattleya Cappei, Lalia anceps, Phalanopsis 
amabihs and Stuartiana, Mormodes Lawrenceanum, Cymbidium Holford- 
ianum, C. Ballianum. Od<>nto<d<>^iim- Cvnrinedinm r-,",, it c a 
yellow tinted form, C. Golden Oriole (ins.gne Sandenanum x Dreadnought) 
a fine yellow form with the upper half of the dorsal sepal white, and a few 
light purple lines up the middle, the rare Sievkimna suavis and snm. nth^r 



Peruvian Orchids (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, staged a fine group, the ce, 
containing some good plants of Zygopetalum intermedium, with Odoi 
glossum crispum, Cypripedium Iolanthe, man 
and other insigne forms and hybric 



February, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. ,-; 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a choice group, 
including Odontioda Schrcederi (O. Bradshawise X Odontoglossum crispum), 
a very pretty novelty, having bright red flowers, with white tips to the 
segments, and a yellow crest to the lip, l_aeliocattleya bella alba, L.-c. 
Andromeda, L.-c. Ariel, Cattleya Octavia, and a number of good Odonto- 
glossums (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, sent a pretty white 
form of Dendrobium Phalamopsis, Buibophvlluin siamensr. and several 
choice Cypnpediums (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a pretty group of Mnsdevallias. 
Cattleyas, and Odontoglossums (Bronze Banksian Medal). 
First-class Certificate. 

L^eliocattleya bella alba (L. purpurata X C. labiata). — A fine 
plant, bearing a spike of six flowers, with pure white sepals and petals, and 
a rich crimson-purple lip, with some yellow lines in the throat. Exhibited 
by Baron Bruno Schroder, Englefield Green (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill). 
Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Maggie Raphael alba Orchidhurst var. (Trianae alba X 
Dowiana). — A charming form, with pure white sepals and petals, and a rich 
magenta crimson lip veined with yellow. Exhibited by Messrs. Armstrong 
and Brown. 

fine hybrid, having broad green sepals and petals, lined with red, and 
the lip cream white spotted with red-brown. Exhibited by de Barri 
Crawshay, Esq. 

Cypripedium Catiline (Mrs. Wm. Mostyn X Leonidas superbum.)— 
A fine hybrid, having the upper third of the dorsal sepal white, and the 
rest veined and suffused with rose-purple, the petals and lip beini; honey 
yellow tinged with brown. Exhibited by the Duke of Marlborough, 
Blenheim Palace (gr. Mr. Hunter). 

Cypripedium jucundum (Alcibiades X Veronica).— A beautiful hybrid, 
having a pure white dorsal sepal, with row? of purple dots and a small 
green area at the base, and the lip and petals cream white, tinged With 
purple, the latter bearing some small purple dots. Exhibited by Messrs. 
Sander and Sons. 

Cypripedium nitens-Beeckmanii (nitens X Beeckmanii). — A striking 
hybrid, having a large white dorsal sepal, with claret crimson spots and a 
green base, while the broad petals and lip are yellow tinged with reddish 
brown. Exhibited by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., S. Woodford (gr. Mr. 
J. Davis). 

Cypripedium San-Act.eus Westfield var.— A very beautiful hybrid, 
having a large white dorsal sepal, copiously blotched with purple-brown, 



58 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 1912 

and the base tinged with yellowish green, while the petals and lip are 
yellow suffused with brown. Exhibited by Francis Wellesley, Esq. 

L^liocattleya Mrs. W. Hopkins (L.-c. Haroldiana X L. Iona 
nigricans). — A handsome hybrid, having the sepals and petals flame- 
coloured, flecked with rose, and the lip glowing violet-purple. Exhibited 
by Francis Wellesley, Esq. 

Odontoglossum crispum Queen of the Morn.— A very handsome 
white flower flushed with lilac-rose. Exhibited by Walter Cobb, Esq., 
Normanhurst, Rusper (gr. Mr. C. J. Salter). 

Cultural Commendation. 

Dendrobium speciosum var. nitidum. — A noble specimen, with many 
flower spikes. To Mr. J. Collier, gardener to Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart. 

MANCHESTER AND NORTH OF ENGLAND ORCHID. 

Meeting of November 30th, 1911 {concluded from page 30). 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, were awarded a Silver Medal 
for a group, composed principally of Cypripediums, the insignes being well 
represented in Harefield Hall var., Bohnhofianum, Sanders and Sanderi- 
anum, with C. Leeanum Coronag, iganteum, magnificum, virginale, Cypher's 
var., and C. Lathamianum. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, were awarded a Silver Medal 
for Cypripedium insigne and Leeanum in variety, Diomede Reeling's var., 
villosum var. Brilliant, Charlesworthii var. Beauty, Thalia Mrs. F. Wellesley 
and Mary Beatrice (See Awards.) 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged Cypripedium Thalia var. 
splendens, Gratrixiae and Alabaster. 

Mr. D. McLeod, Chorlton-cum- Hardy, staged Cypripedium Actaeus 
revolutum, triumphans, vexillarium, Zena, Cravenianum, and several 
seedlings (See Awards). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged several nice Cattleyas, C. 
Rhoda being very fine, and a good plant of Cypripedium Priam. 

Mr. H. Arthur, Blackburn, staged Cypripedium insigne Laura Kimball, 
Sanderae,Chantinii Lindenii,and Aberdeen, with C. Arthurianum pulchellum. 
First-class Certificates. 

Odontoglossum crispum var. Briseis, a good round, heavily blotched 



flower, and O. Thais, another of the 



hybrids 



parentage, from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cattleya Roehrsiana Ashworth's var., a large well-set flower, of good 
colour, and C. Gildenii (Hardyana X Maggie Raphael), a beautiful hybrid, 
from R. Ash worth, Esq. 

Cypripedium Our King (insigne Harefield Hall var. x Niobe), a fine 
bold flower, the former parent predominating, from Wm. Thompson, Esq. 



February, 191 2.) THE ORCHID REVIEW. 59 

Odontoglossum Bronze Dragon, one of the most beautiful Odonto- 
glossoms yet seen, flowers 3* inches across, coloured all over a delightful 
shade of crushed strawberry; and Cattleya labiata albescens, a tine albino, 
from J. J. Holden, Esq. 

Awards of Merit. 

Odontoglossum Harmaches and O. Lais, two novel hybrids of almost 
indescribable shades of colour : Miltonia Leopoldii nobilior, a fine flower of 
good colour; Cattleya labiata Virgin Queen, and Ladia pnestans Snow 
Queen, from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Odontoglossum crispum Rosemont. a well formed evenly marked 
flower, O. eximium var. Nubian, very deep in colour, and Vanda ccerulea 
alba, flowers rather small, segments pure white, and lip a beautiful blue, 
from R. Ashworth, Esq. 

Cypripedium Corneyanum var. Marie Louise, C. Alcibiades Ward's var. 
and C. James Renwick (insigne Harefield Hall var. X Actaeus), a large well 
marked flower, from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cypripedium Bonar Law (J. Howes X Actaus). a very neat flower, 
showing both parents, from Colonel Rutherford, M.P. 

Ladiocattleya Captain Starkie (L.-c. Eudora X C. labiata), a fine flower, 
of good even colour, from J. McCartney, Esq. 

Cypripedium hybrid, a good form of unknown parentage, from Wm. 
Thompson, Esq. 

Cattleya O'Brieniana alba, a rare and beautiful albino, from J. J. 
Holden. Esq. 

Odontoglossum Dora var. Mrs. H. B. Irving (Lambeauianum X Pescatorei 
Duchess of Westminster), a fine, well-coloured flower ; Cattleya Mrs. Frank 
Hurndell (Trianse X Iris), a nice variety: and Sophroladia Miss Edith 
d'Abrew (S.-l. heatonensis X C. Iris), from R. le Doux, Esq. 

Cypripedium Leeanum var. Mona, a very fine flower, from H. J. 
Bromilow, Esq. 

Cypripedium Mrs. Alice Walmsley (parentage unknown), a dark flower 
of good shape, with a white band all round the dorsal sepal, from James 
Walmsley, Esq. 

Cypripedium Hitchinsiae giganteum and magnificum, both fine forms, 
from Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons. 

Cypripedium Seymouria (Leeanum Clinkaberryanum X Farrieanum), a 
fine bold flower, from Mr. D. McLeod. 

At the meeting held on December 14th, 1911, the members of Committee 
present were :— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the chair), R. Ashworth, W. R. 
Lee, C. Parker, H. Thorp, A. Warburton, Z. A. Ward, J. C. Cowan, J. 
Cypher, W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary), 



6o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, i 9 ta. 

W. R. Lee. Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Woodhouse), was awarded a Silver- 
gilt Medal for a very effective group of Cattleyas, Odontoglossums, 
Cypripedium insigne Harefield Hall var. and Sanders, C. Leeanum 
Clinkaberryanum, Corona, and Reeling's var., with C. Minos Youngii, 
Priam, Bianca, Thalia Mrs. F. Wellesley, Laeliocattleya Doreen, and others. 
Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), received a Silver 
Medal for a pleasing group, including Odontoglossums in variety, Cattleyas 
Mantimi, Miss Williams, and others, Cypripedium insigne in variety, 
including Ring Edward VII., C. Leeanum Clinkaberryanum and giganteum, 
Lycaste Skinneri alba, and a few Calanthes. 

R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for a choice group of Cypripediums, containing Dora Jameson, Miss 
Gladys Lederer, Marlfieldii, Minos Youngii, Queen Alexandra, Euryades 
New Hall Hey var., Priam magnificum, Actaeus Drewett's var., Thalia 
Mrs. F. Wellesley, insigne Berryanum, and Leeanum Clinkaberryanum. 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for a very pretty mixed group, composed of Odontoglossum crispum. 
cirrhosum var. sanguineum, and several hybrids, Cypripedium Pica, Actasus 
Drewett's var., Euryades, Vanda ccerulea alba, Oncidium Forbesii, Calanthe 
William Murray, and others. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), received a Silver 
Medal for a very effective group, including Odontoglossum percultum 
Beardwood var., amabile var. Rosedrop, Cypripediums and Cattleyas in 
variety, with a number of Epidendrum vitellinum majus. 

A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish), was awarded a 
Silver Medal for a group of choice and well-grown Odontoglossums. Cypri- 
pedium insigne Sanderianum, Gladys, Harefield Hall var., Sanders, several 
C. Hitchinsiae, and Dendrobium Phalsenopsis Schroedreianum album. 

F. A. Hindley, Esq., Bradford, received a Silver Medal for a nice group 
of Cypripediums, including C. Leeanum, Corona and giganteum, C. Lord 
Ivor, Fairrieanum, Mons. de Curte, Thalia Mrs. F. Wellesley, Germaine 
Opoix, and Minos Youngii. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), was awarded 
a Bronze Medal for a small group of Cypripediums, including a fine plant of 
C. Baron Schroder, with six flowers, C. Arthurianum, Leeanum Clinkaberry- 
anum and giganteum, several varieties of C. insigne, Miss Louisa Fowler and 
villosum auriferum. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was awarded a Bronze 
Medal for a mixed group, including Cypripedium insigne Harefield Hall var., 
Sanderae, Sanderianum, and Schofieldianum, C. Leeanum in variety, C 
Hitchinsiae, Vanda ccerulea, Lycaste Skinneri alba, and Laelia anceps. 

G. H. Peace, Esq., Monton Grange (gr. Mr. Mace), received a Bronze 



I'khruarv, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 61 

Medal for a small -roup of Cypripediums, the most noticeable being Thai. a 
giganteum, villosum auriferum, Leeanum Corona and Reeling's var.. 

Park var., nitens Prince Olaf, and aureum viride. 

H. J. Bromilow, Esq., Rann Lea (gr. Mr. M organ), sent Cypripedium 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), sent Cypripedium 
Actaeus var. Queen Alexandra, Laeliocattleya epicasta, Cattleya Hildegardr, 
and the albino C. labiata Princess Victoria and Empress. 

J. Leemann, Esq., Heaton Mersey (gr. Mr. Smith), sent Cypripedium 
Actaeus Drewett's var., and C. Neptune. 

J. H. Craven, Esq., Keighley (gr. Mr. Corney), staged Cypripedium 
Euryades splendens, Boltonii, a fine seedling Euryades X insigne Ha.vfield 
Hall var., and a good C. Leeanum. 

H. Thorp, Esq., Rhodes, sent a nice plant of Cypripedium Leeanum 
giganteum. 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, were awarded a Silver Medal 
for a splendid group of Cypripedium-. including C. Leeanum giganteum. 
with 21 good flowers, C. insigne Oddity, Kathleen Corser, syhlletense 
giganteum, and Mrs. F. Sander, with C. Cynthia, Clio, Leeanum Prospero, 
Archimedes, Niobe superbum, Arthurianum, and others. 

Mr. Ed. V. Low. Haywards Heath, received a Silver Medal for a group 
of Cypripediums, magnificent plants, carrying up to 5 and 6 flowers on each, 
and including insigne Sanderae and Harefield Hall var., Thalia giganteum 
and West Point var., Leeanum Corona and Clinkaberryanum, villosum 
auriferum, Baron Schroder, triumphans and Tracyanum. A Cultural 
Commendation was granted to a specimen of C. Minos Youngii. 

The Liverpool Orchid Company, Gateacre. were awarded a Silver 
Medal for a mixed group of Odontoglossums in variety, Cattleyas and 
hybrids, including fine varieties of C. Portia, with Cypripedium triumphans, 
Charlesworthii, insigne Sanderas, and several forms of Leeanum. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged some choice Cypripediums, 
including the fine Leeanum Gratrixias, Actaeus, brugense, Troilus superbum 
and Invincible, Leeanum Hercules and Golden Glory, Euryades SandeCs 
var., and zebrinum. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a very fine form 
of Odontoglossum eximium and Cypripedium Hitchinsiae Westonbirt var. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, staged Cypripediums Leeanum 
Corona, keighleyense, Bellona and a seedling. 

Mr. D. McLeod sent a choice collection of cut flowers of Cypripediums. 
First-class Certificates. 

Cypripedium Faire Maud (Fairrieanum x Maudiae), a very pretty 



62 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, 1912. 

flower, showing the parentage on both sides, and C. Pallas Athena 
(Elmireanum X ^son giganteum), a noble flower, from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium Reginald Young (Elmireanum X insigne Harefield Hall 
var.), a good large well marked flower, from H. J. Bromilow, Esq. 
Awards of Merit. 

Cypripedium Juno var. Hebencea, a very good variety, from J. J. 
Holden, Esq. 

Odontoglossum eximium Plumpton Hall var., a good well coloured 
round flower, and Cattleya Trianae var. Britannia, a magnificent flower, 
with well-set broad lip and deep colour, from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium Mrs. Mabel Waring (insigne Harefield Hall var. X 
Troilus), a fine flower in the way of C. Dreadnought, from R. le Doux, Esq. 

Cypripedium Leeanum var. Frederick Arnold, a good form, with large 
round well spotted dorsal sepal, from F. A. Hindley, Esq. 

Brassocatlselia Wotan (B.-c Leemanniee X L.-c. callistoglossa), a truly 
noble flower, the Leemannise parent predominating, from J. Leemann, Esq. 

Odontoglossum crispum var. Reine Blanche, a very fine round flower, 
3^ inches across, from R. Ashworth, Esq. 

Odontoglossum Ruby King, a good flower, of almost solid colour, with 
dark lip, a very distinct variety, from A. Warburton, Esq. 

Cypripedium viridissimum (villosum auriferum X aureum virginale), a 
bright flower, following auriferum in form and habit of growth, from Mr. W. 
Shackleton. 

Exhibitors are requested to note that in the staging of competitive 
groups cut flowers and fronds of ferns will not be allowed. All plants 
exhibited at the meetings to be shewn to the best advantage, and all paper 
to be removed from flowers. From this date to February 22nd inclusive, 
the meetings will close at 3.30 p.m. 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

Several interesting and beautiful Orchids are sent from the collection of 
J. J. Neale, Esq., Penarth, by Mr. Haddon. They include a three- 
flowered spike of the charming Masdevallia tovarensis, with M. Veitchiana, 
triangularis, polysticta and melanopus, the handsome Maxillaria venusta, 
M. grandiflora, and M. variabilis, Restrepia maculata, Sophronitis grandi- 
flora and its very distinct hybrid Epiphronitis Veitchii, a spike of the 
brilliant Cochlioda vulcanica, the clear yellow Laeliocattleya Lydia, L.-c. 
Nysa, Epidendrum polybulbon and odoratissimum, Listrostachys vesicata, 
Angraecum superbum, Dendrobium Dearei, Brassavola nodosa, Acampe 
pachyglossa, with winter-flowering Cattleyas, Cypripedium Rossetti, C. 
insigne Sanderae and Harefield Hall var., and a few others. They serve to 
show what a varied selection is in bloom in the collection at mid-winter. 



February, i 9 1 2.] THE O R C 11 ID R E VIEW. 63 

A flower of the pretty little Laeliocattleya Amelia, in which the 
characters of Ladia cinnabarina and Cattleya intermedia are well combined, 
is sent from the collection of Henry R. Sterrett, Esq., Houslow. It is 
from a seedling plant, and is not yet fully developed. Mr. Sterrett remarks 
that he has now a plant of Cypripedium tonsum in flower bearing a twin- 
flowered scape, and the dorsal sepal is flushed with rose, a somewhat 
unusual character. 

A flower of a fine hybrid Cypripedium is sent by Messrs. James Veitch 
& Sons, Langley. Slough, which has been produced by a small plant 
derived from C. Leeanum Clinkaberryanum X Arthurianum. It is fairly 
intermediate in general character, but on the whole most resembles the 
Leeanum parent in shape. The dorsal sepal is large, very densely dotted 
with brown on a green ground, and the margin white, while the base of the 
broad, undulate petals is also much spotted. It should develop into a fine 
thing. There are two hybrids from C. Leeanum and Arthurianum, namely, 
C. Mary Lee, which received an Award of Merit from the R.H.S. in 
November, 1893, and C. Jamesonianum, which flowered in 1896. 

Another fine flower is sent from the collection of O. O. Wrigley, Esq.. 
Bridge Hall, Bury, by Mr. Rogers, who remarks that it was derived from 
Cypripedium Sallieri virens (a seedling raised in the collection) and C. 
Euryades, Low's var. It has taken much of the C. villosum shape, and 
has a bright emerald green dorsal sepal, margined with white, and bearing 
some large brown blotches on the disc, while the base of the petals is also 
spotted, and the lip bright brown. 



ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

Two meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the Royal 
Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during February, on the 
6th and 20th, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual hour, 12 
o'clock noon. The Annual General Meeting will be held on February 13th, 
but there will be no Show or meeting of the Committee on this date. 

The Manchester and North of England Orchid Society will hold meet- 
ings at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on February 8th and 22nd. The 
Committee meets at noon, and the exhibits are open to inspection of 
members and the public from 1 to 3.30 p.m. 

The International Horticultural Exhibition.— His Majesty King 
George V. has announced to the Directors of the Royal International 
Horticultural Exhibition, through Lt.-Col. Sir George Holford, K.C.V.O., 
his intention to open the Royal International Horticultural Exhibition on 
May 22nd, at 12 noon. 



64 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [February, .912- 

Honour for Col. Prain.— Lt.-Col. David Prain, CLE., F.R.S., 
Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, has heen appointed Com- 
panion of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George. 

Entries for the Royal International Horticultural Exhibition, to be held 
in the grounds of the Royal Hospital, Chelsea, from May 22nd to 30th, are 
said to have been so numerous that a great deal of additional tent accommo- 
dation is required. It is estimated that the exhibits of Orchids from all 
parts of the world will require a tent 300 feet long by 70 feet wide. 

ORCHID PORTRAITS. 

Brassocattleva Maroni^e. — Garden, igi2, p. 21, with fig. 
Calanthe Cooksonle.— Journ. Hort., 1912, i. p. 71, with fig. 
Cymbidium Schlegeli.— Gard. Mag., 1912, pp. 79, 80, with fig. 
Cypripedium Charlesworthii.— Journ. Hurt.. 1912, i. p. 49, with fig. 
Cypripedium Leeanum giganteum. — Joum. Hort., 1912, i. p. 29, 
with fig. 

Cypripedium Nellie.- Journ. Hort, 1912, i. p. 49, with fig. 
Cypripedium spectabile.— Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 18, fig. 13. 
Cypripedium tonsum. — Journ. Hort., 1912, i. p. 49, with fig. 
Disa lugens.— Bot. Mag., t. 8415. 

L.EEIOCATTLEYA BELLA ALBA, DELL VAR. — Gard. Mag., iqi2, pp. 36, 

45, with fig. 

L.eliocattlkya Mrs. W. Hopkins.— Gard. Mag., 1912, pp. 23, 36, 

L.eliocattlkya Prince of Orange.— Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 5, with fig. 
Odontoglossum Thais.— Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 6, with fig. 
Zygopetalum Mackayi — Journ. Hort., 1912, i. p. 3, with fig. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

[Orchids are named and questions answered here as far as possible. Correspondents are 
requested to give the native a untry or parentage of plants sent. An ADDRESSED postcard must be 



will be < 


halt with in the bod : 


■of the work 




A.J 


.K.-Dendrobium 


speciosum, 




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ii, which has appeared on two 






H.- Bulbophvllum 






Photographs received. 


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A- 



Vol. XX., No. 231. u "~" THE MARCH, 1912. 

ORCHID REVIEW 



Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, 



Amateur's Collection 
Answers to Correspondents 
Calendar of Operations for Marcr 
Chondropetalum Fletcheri ... 
Fertilisation and Secondary hybr 



Our Note Book 
R. H. S. Orchid 
Societies— 



... 68 Zygopetalum Mackayi var. Charlesworthii 

Odontoglossum crispum, sporting in ... ~\ 

Orchid Notes and News 95 I Chondropetalum Fletcheri 

Orchid Portraits * 96 j Odontoglossum armainvillierense var. 

Orchids in season 78 | Johnsonii 

Orchids of Jamaica 76 Zygopetalum Mackayi var. Charlesworthii 

PRICE SIXPENCE MONTHLY. Post Frkk 7/- per Annum— See Overleaf 

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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

The question of Orchid Awards cropped up again at the Annual General 
Meeting of the R.H.S. A Fellow pointed out that the First-class Certifi- 
cate was seldom given to what were called "florists' flowers," and then 
generally after an Award of Merit had been obtained first. But with regard 
to Orchids it was different, for out of forty-five First-class Certificates 
awarded last year, thirty-seven were given to Orchids, and he drew the 
inference that there was something amiss in relation to the awards given by 
the different Committees. We should rather regard it as affording an indi- 
cation of the enormous progress that is being made in the improvement of 
these beautiful plants, and considering the constant stream of novelties of 
sterling merit that appear at the meetings the wonder is that the number 
of those awards is not greater. 

A reference to Plant Nomenclature appears in the Report of the Council 
of the R.H.S. for ign. The Rules adopted by the Brussels Horticultural 
Congress having been published, the Standing Committee are requested to 
adopt them in the Society's work. Fellows, and especially Exhibitors, 
are asked to make themselves familiar with these rules for naming their 
plants, and to act on their guidance, as by so doing they will materially 
help to clear up that confusion and duplication of names which, not only 
causes so much difficulty in horticultural work, but is also productive of not 
a little disappointment and soreness to buyers. 

We hope that both Committees and Exhibitors will bear the point in 
mind, for much of the confusion could be avoided if a little more care was 
taken at the outset. For example, Mr. Crawshay writes to point out that 
the hvbrid between Odontoglossum crispum and O. eximium, which was 
recently certificated by the Manchester Orchid Society, under the name of 
O. Delhi, and is figured at page 44 of our last issue, was certificated by 
them a few months earlier as O. Orpheus, while at the Temple Show in 
1910 the same hybrid was certificated by the R.H.S. as O. Promereus. 
The latter name, however, is erroneous, and requires to be amended to- 



'66 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, ,912, 

O. promerens (deserving). The mistake arose through a misreading of the 
■ entry. He finally remarks that both 0. Orpheus and 0. Delhi should be 
relegated to their place as synonyms or varieties of 0. promerens. The 
change, we believe, is in accordance with the Rules of Nomenclature, 
which permit the correction of an obvious mistake. 

A matter which we regard with considerable misgiving is the growing 
number of hybrids of unrecorded parentage which are now receiving certifi- 
cates, and the difficulty of afterwards referring them to their correct posi- 
tion. Some of them— we would not say all — are only varieties of existing 
hybrids, and we are assured that some which have been certificated under 
.distinct names are seedlings out of the same capsule, but so remarkably 
diverse that they cannot well be brought under the same name. It is the 
history of Cypripedium aureum over again, but the fact that in that case 
the parentage was known enabled the difficulty to be got over. Had the 
parentage been lost some of them would never have been referred to their 
true position. When some of the seedlings from the same capsule resemble 
other hybrids more than their own brothers and sisters one begins to realise 
the importance of keeping records. And it is this more than anything else 
which is causing hybrids of complex parentage to be dealt with as florists' 
flowers. 

Our notes on the great Cypripedium question (page 1) have elicited some 
interesting replies, and one correspondent, who is particularly glad to find 
that the necessity no longer exists of using the name Paphiopedilum for the 
Asiatic species, and who admits the reasonableness of the view that the 
four genera are distinct botanically, asks whether it is not possible for 
garden purposes to continue the use of the familiar name Cypripedium for 
the whole of the cultivated species, leaving botanists to take their own 
course in their botanical writings. He suggests that this would be the 
simplest way out of the difficulty. It may be so, and if horticulturists should 
in the future feel that another Tower of Babel is being set up it will prob- 
ably be no more difficult to accept the change then than it is now. The 
name Cypripedium seems as great a favourite in gardens as the plants, and 
the loss of the one equal to the banishment of the other. Perhaps if the 
hardy species were as generally cultivated as the tropical ones, and all were 
grown in the same house, the difficulty would not arise, for the two groups 
are as distinct as are Pleione and Ccelogyne, which brings us to another 



March, , 9l2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 67 

remarking that it was not the law of -Paul Priority" that caused the 
untimely end of Paphiopedilum, but just common sense, a fine virtue which 
kept the name Cypripedium in general use. He also says that we shall 
never see Cordula employed in the place of Cypripedium. But such a 
•change was never proposed, for their still remain thirty species of Cypri- 
pedium— or Cypripedilum, if one were permitted to write the word correctly. 
Perhaps, if someone were to name a genus, or species, after our critic, 
; a single letter which changed the whole meaning of the name, his 






night be expressed differently. 



all the essential facts ofthe article, at the same time indulging in a general 
•charge of juggling— - Botanists have juggled with Pleione and Ccelogyne, 
Cattleya Iabiata and its varieties," &c— which we would remind him is 



impression of the matter under 



•calculated to give his reade 
-discussion, to say the very least. 

A correspondent writes to us from abroad suggesting that we should 
devote more space to the biological side of Orchidology, remarking that 
there are many matters which are ofthe greatest interest and even import- 
ance to cultivators, for example, Fungus-cooperation in Orchid roots, and 
the peculiar conditions under which certain Orchids grow, a knowledge 
of which is useful in their successful culture. Also notes of the Orchids of 
different countries, when papers respecting them appear in botanical 
journals. And he suggests that space for this might be found by curtailing 
to some extent the reports of the different Shows, in which there appears 
to be a great deal of repetition, from group to group and from meeting to 
meeting. One even wearies of reading that the most beautiful of Orchids 
appeared in half the groups at any particular Show. 

We may point out in reply that the reports are already enormously 
condensed, and that nearly all the meetings are Shows nowadays. One 
■cannot compress an account of some of the fine groups which appear into 
half a dozen lines without omitting most of the detail, though this often has 
to be done, and as a matter of fact new hybrids frequently appear at meetings 
which, for a variety of reasons, are not recorded. A great deal of interest 
is taken in these reports, and probably exhibitors think that the limit of 
•compression has already been reached in some cases. The suggestions, 
however, shall not be lost sight of, and articles of the kind mentioned 
are constantly appearing in our pages. 



By an unfortunate e 


rror, at page 35, the prii 


iter made us speak of the 


arrival of an "instinct 


:," when "insect" was 


intended. And the last 


.-sentence should read, "j 


\nd species are adaptatio 


ns." 



68 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

MRS. G. B. WILSON'S COLLECTION. 

Under the title " Fortunate is the Orchid Hunter Who Emerges from the 
Jungle Alive," the New York Daily Tribune, in its issue of January 28th 
last, publishes an illustrated article on the fine Orchid Collection of Mrs. 
G. B. Wilson, of Philadelphia, the illustrations including a photograph of 
Mrs. Wilson, of her residence and block of Orchid houses, the interior of a 
Cypripedium house, of three Orchids from the collection, and of two phases 
of Orchid collecting in South America. It contains some interesting and 
amusing details, but is rather the work of the newspaper correspondent than 
of the expert in Orchidology. For example, he says : — " In one of the East 
Indian houses is a specimen of the Pha.lsenopsis, or great white moth Orchid,. 
called the Harrietta. It is the only example of this hybrid plant in 
existence, and is priceless." This appears to be the one figured as " an 
Orchid for which Mrs. Wilson refused $2000," but the figure represents a 
small plant of Phalaenopsis Aphrodite or P. amabilis with five flowers, not 
the unique P. Harriettse, raised by Messrs. Veitch, from P. amabilis and 
P. violacea, which was obtained at the sale of the Corning collection. This 
is apparently the "Orchid variety that is the envy and wonder of enthusiasts 
the world over," and which "lovers of this rare flower come from all 
countries to examine and admire." 

The history of Cypripedium Fairrieanum is graphic. " Many years ago 
this wonderful Orchid was discovered by an English collector in India. He 
brought four of the plants to England, and they caused a sensation there 
among collectors. The finder was urged to tell where he had discovered 
this beautiful Orchid, but no inducement could make him betray the hiding 
place of the treasure. All four of the plants he had brought to England 
died, but the discoverer kept his secret, always intending to go back to 
India and gather more specimens. Death intervened, and the secret of the 
hiding place of the rare Orchid was lost. For more than forty years the 
search for the plant was kept up assiduously, Orchid hunters examining every 
nook and corner of the country where specimens might be lurking. No one 
found a single specimen. At last a prize of a thousand pounds (S5000) was 
offered by English horticulturists to any person who might rediscover the 
variety. Under the stimulus of this reward the waning energies of the 
hunters became galvanised into renewed activity, and at last, about six 
years ago, a collector won the prize, rinding the plant in the interior of 
India, near the Burmese border. There are only two specimens in this 
country. They are priceless." 

The stories of Orchid collecting are full of moving incidents, by land 
and water, but we cannot follow them through their picturesque details. An 
account of the collection would be interesting. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 






During this and the following month an average temperature of 55 to 6o° 
Fahr. should be maintained during the day, but with sun heat the 
thermometer may be allowed to run up higher with decided benefit to the 
inmates, providing it be accompanied by plenty of atmospheric moisture. 
At night 55 Fahr. should be maintained, with as little variation as possible. 
More air can now be admitted, but cold windy days present much difficulty 
to the cultivator. Cold draughts must be avoided, and it will generally be 
found advisable only to open ventilators on the shady side of the house. 

The general remarks upon watering in last month's article should be 
followed. Damping down may be done more frequently now, owing to the 
increased warmth. Shading is usually not yet needed, but should the sun 
shine with force directly upon the plants the blind may be lowered for a few 
hours, but I am a firm believer in plenty of light for Cool Orchids. 

Odontoglossums can now be repotted, if they need it, and this operation 
may be performed at any time between now and the middle of October, but 
winter potting requires much careful after-treatment. The only time when 
this may be done is when the new lead is about an inch in length. Remove 
the plant from the old receptacle and shake off the crocks and sour soil. 
The fresh pot should then be filled three parts full of clean broken 
potsherds, and the plant placed on these, and well to one side, so as to 
allow of future growth being made. For compost use a mixture of osmunda 
and polypodium fibres, some sphagnum moss and a handful of well-rotted 
oak leaves. Before placing the plant in the new pot cut away all dead 
roots, decayed bulbs and leaves. Be careful to have the base of the 
pseudobulbs on a level with the rim of the pot, or at least only slightly 
below. After the operation of repotting, the plants must be kept drier until 
a fresh start is made. Should any Odontiodas be possessed, these may be 
treated in the same manner, only no oak leaves should be employed in the 

Epidendrum vitellinum majus may need fresh soil, and should receive 
similar treatment. Place this plant well above the rim of the pot, or it may 
easily rot. 

Cattleya House. 

The average temperatures for this month should be as follows : 65 to 
75 Fahr. by day, the latter figure with sun heat, and 60 to 65 Fahr. by 
night. For the inmates of this house the degree of warmth maintained at 
night, and on sunless days, should be as even as possible. Owing to higher 
temperatures being maintained in this house than in the preceding, less air 



7o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

can naturally be admitted, but the atmosphere of the house should always- 
feel fresh, and this end may be attained by opening the bottom ventilators- 
whenever the thermometer registers slightly above the lowest figure for the 
day (65 Fahr.). When the sun warms the air about midday, the roof 
ventilators can generally be opened slightly, and the amount of air thus 
given can be gradually increased in proportion as the thermometer rises- 
The house should be well damped down, once at 9.30 and again at 3 p.m. 
Paths, staging and pots should be thoroughly wetted, but do not yet syringe 
the plants overhead. Providing plenty of atmospheric moisture be 
maintained, the plants in this structure will require less water at the roots 
than those of the Cool house. 

The main occupants of this house will be Cattleyas, Laelias, and their 
many hybrids. At this season water all growing plants about three times a 
week, those in flower and bud usually four times, but once a week will be 
ample for any which are dormant. If cold and dull weather prevail, twice 
a week will often suffice for both growing and flowering plants. If you are 
in doubt as to whether an Orchid needs water or not, leave it until the 
next time, and, as remarked last month on watering Cool house Orchids, 
always give enough at each application to thoroughly wet the whole compost. 

Vanda ccerulea, Angrsecum sesquipedale, and other Vandeous Orchids 
possessing no pseudobulbs must have more water, if in full growth about 
three times weekly. 

Dendrobiums passing out of flower may receive water as advised for 
Cattleyas. If any need repotting, this should be attended to at once. 
Knock the plants out of the old pots, cut off all dead roots, and all weak 
bulbs may be removed. Three old bulbs can be left to support the new 
growth, but above this number they tend to exhaust nourishment from the 
fresh lead, and consequently are detrimental. For compost use a mixture 
of osmunda fibre and sphagnum moss, and be careful not to bury the plant 
too deeply, nor to pot it too lightly, so that it sways about. A few sticks 
tied to the pseudobulbs may be employed to hasten a good hold being 
taken on the compost. 

Suggested Additions. 

Odontoglossum Wilckeanum.— For an Amateur's Cool house, this 
magnificent hybrid ranks as one of the best. Occurring wild, and having 
also been raised by hand, it can consequently be procured at a com- 
paratively low price. The flowers are of good size, and freely borne on long 
arching spikes. The sepals and petals are usually cream or yellow, but, in 
all cases, more or less blotched with reddish brown. The lip is similarly 
coloured, with a handsome crest. There are numerous fine varieties of this 
Orchid. 

Sophkonitis grandiflora.— This little gem is almost too well known 



March, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 7« 

to need description, but in case any reader's collection should lack a plant, a 
short description may be opportune. It is a dwarf grower, seldom exceeding 
four inches in height, and produces solitary blooms, about one and a half 
inches in diameter and of a beautiful vermilion hue. The lip is also stained 
with yellow. A point in favour of this brilliant Orchid is that it is usually 
in bloom from October till March or April. 

Angr.ecum sesquipedale. — No collection should lack a representative 
of this singular and beautiful Orchid. It should be given a position at the 
warmest end of the house, where, even when not in bloom, its handsome 
leaves add an air of distinctiveness to the collection. On account of the shape 
of the blossoms, this plant is often known as the "Comet Orchid." They 
are large, ivory white, and thick in texture. The quaintness of the flower lies 
in the long spur, which sometimes reaches a foot in length. December 
and January is the usual season of blossoming, and the plant is not difficult 
to grow in a suitable house. 

SPORTING IN ODONTOGLOSSUM CRISPUM. 

A remarkable freak or sport of Odontoglossum crispum has appeared in 
the collection of W. Waters Butler, Esq., Southfield, Edgbaston. Mr. 
Butler writes that a plant of O. crispum var. Gracie has produced a good 
spike, bearing two kinds of flowers in about equal proportions, and a flower 
of each kind is sent, showing a remarkable diversity of character. O. 
crispum Gracie has a clear white ground colour, with clusters of four to 
six round cinnabar-brown spots about the centre of the segments. The 
latter are rather broad and undulate, the whole flower being unmistakably 
of the Velez type. In the sport the markings on the sepals are broken up 
into very numerous spots and dots, which extend almost from the base to 
the apex, those of the other segments remaining normal, giving the flower 
a very distinct and remarkable appearance. The question naturally arises 
as to the cause of this sporting, and here speculation only is possible, but 
we should suggest it to be a case of partial reversion. It is generally agreed 
that the so-called "spotted crispums " are of hybrid origin, and the shape 
and general details of the present variety suggest an affinity with, and 
possibly a descent from O. Fascinator. Indeed forms occur in the Velez 
district which one hardly knows whether to refer to the polymorphic O. 
Adrianse, to O. Fascinator, or to O. crispum itself, and these perplexing 
intermediate forms, in which the influence of O. Hunnewellianum is more or 
less apparent, suggest crossing and recrossing through countless generations. 
The tendency to sport among hybrids is well-known, and it will be 
interesting to watch the subsequent behaviour of this particular plant. We 
would suggest that a flower should be self-fertilised, as further evidence of 
reversion might appear among the seedlings.— R. A. R. 



72 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1913. 

ZYGOPETALUM MACKAYI VAR. CHARLESWORTHII. 

A very beautiful albino Mas exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., 
Haywards Heath, at the R.H.S. meeting held on January 23rd last, under 
the name of Zygopetalum Mackayi var. Charleswortbii, to which an Award 
cf Merit was giv.en. The sepals aud petals are very p; 




Zygopetalum Mackayi var. Charlesworthii. 
lip pure white ; both the brown markings of the former and the purple of 
the latter being completely absent. It was imported from Brazil. The 
species was described some 85 years ago, and we believe this to be the first 
albino which has appeared. The photograph here reproduced was kindly 
sent by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 



March, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 73 

CHONDROPETALUM FLETCHERI. 

The " false" hybrids of Zygopetalum were mentioned last month (page 37), 
also the remarkable Chondropetalum Fletcheri, and it may be interesting to 
reproduce the portrait of the latter in connection with that of the albino of 
Zygopetalum Mackayi given on the preceding page. The record is that 
this hybrid was raised from Z. Mackayi and Chondrorhyncha Chestertonii, 
.but we believe that the Zygopetalum parent was actually Z. intermedium, a 




larger-flowered species which has generally usurped the name of Z. Mackayi 
in gardens. It will be seen that the Chrondrorhyncha character, both of 
habit and flower, is lost, or at all events very successfully hidden, yet the 
Zygopetalum parent has not been actually reproduced, showing that some 
modifying influence has been at work, and thus it may be called a case of 
■dominance. The loss of the characteristic blue markings of the lip is, 
however, the most obvious difference. Several very interesting biological 



74 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

problems are involved in the behavior of this remarkable plant, as may be 
seen in an article in our last volume (pp. 70, 71), and we should particularly 
like to see the cross repeated, making the Chrondrorhyncha the seed parent, 
also to see the hybrid again crossed with the pollen of Chondrorhyncha 
Chestertonii. 

R.H.S. ORCHID COMMITTEE. 

The following constitute the Orchid Committee of the Royal Horticultural 
Society for the current year. New members are indicated thus* :— 

Fowler, J. Gurney, Glebelands, South Woodford, Chairman. 

Veitch, Harry J., V.M.H., F.L.S., 34, Redcliffe Gardens, S.W.,. 
Vice-Chairman. 

Holford, Lieut.-Col. Sir George, K.C.V.O., CLE., Westonbirt r 
Tetbury, Glos., Vice-Chairman. 

Colman, Sir Jeremiah, Bart., V.M.H., Gatton Park, Reigate, Vice- 
Chairman. 

O'Brien, James, V.M.H., Marian, Harrow-on-the-Hill, Hon. Secretary, 

Alexander, H. G., Westonbirt Gardens, Tetbury. 

Armstrong, T., Sandhurst Park, Tunbridge Wells. 

Ashworth, Elijah, Harefield Hall, Wilmslow, Cheshire. 

Bolton, W., Wilderspool, Warrington. 

Bound, W. P., 112, Station Road, Redhill. 

Brooman-White, R., Arddarroch, Garelochhead, N.B. 

Butler, W. Waters, Southfield, Norfolk Road, Edgbaston 

Chapman, H. J., Oakwood Gardens, Wylam-on-Tyne. 

Charlesworth, J., Lyoth House, Ha } wards Heath. 

Cobb, W., Normanhurst, Rusper, Horsham. 

Cookson, Clive, Oakwood, Wylam-on-Tyne. 

Crawshay, de Barri, Rosefield, Sevenoaks. 

Curtis, C. H., 2, Adelaide Road, Brentford, Middlesex. 

Cypher, James, V.M.H., Queen's Road, Cheltenham. 

Dye, A., Tring Park Gardens, Tring. 

Hanbury, F. J., F.L.S., Brockhurst, East Grinstead. 

Hatcher, W. H., Rawdon, Leeds. 

Low, Stuart H., Bush Hill Park, Enfield. 

Lucas, C. J., Warnham Court, Horsham. 

McBean, A. A., Cooksbridge, Sussex. 

Moore, Sir F. W., M.A., V.M.H., R. Bot. Gdns., Glasnevin, Dublin. 

Moore, G. F., Chardwar, Bourton-on-the- Water, Glos. 
•Moss, J. S., Waltham Cross. 
Ogilvie, F. Menteith, 72, Woodstock Road, Oxford. 
Potter, J. Wilson, 219, Ashley Gardens, S.W. 



March, ,912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 75 

*Rolfe, R. A., A.L.S., 12, Lawn Crescent, Kew. 
Sander, F., V.M.H., St. Albans. 
Shill, J. E., The Dell, Englefield Green. 
Thompson, W., Walton Grange, Stone, Staffs. 
THWAITES, R. G., 23, Christchurch Road, Streatham, S.W. 
WHITE, W. H., Burford Lodge Gardens, Dorking. 
Wilson, Gurney, F.L.S., Glenthorne, Hay wards Heath. 

FERTILISATION AND SECONDARY HYBRIDS. 

{Concluded from page $8). 
Having shown the effect of pollination on the development of the ovary 
and ovules of an Orchid, and its essential distinctness from the process of 
Fertilisation, we may now consider some of the phenomena of hybridisation. 
Hybrids are the result of uniting individuals belonging to distinct species, 
and are generally more or less intermediate between their two parents, and ■ 
distinct from both. Species may be said to reproduce themselves true from 
seed — at all events as far as their specific characters are concerned — and this 
is because the two parents are alike, which sufficiently explains why the term 
hybridisation cannot properly be applied to the union of forms of the same 
species. Hybridisation implies the union of the unlike, and the production 
of forms distinct from either parent, hence the term " False hybrid" when 
only one parent — generally the mother — is reproduced. 

Hybrids, therefore, combine two distinct ancestries, and the result is a 
compromise ; an organism more or less intermediate between the parents, 
or at least combining their characters in a variety of ways. Where the 
parents are nearly allied the hybrid can generally be described as inter- 
mediate, but when very distinct species are crossed the mosaic character is 
usually more apparent. In such cases the hybrid may resemble one parent 
in certain features and the second parent in others, especially if one of them, 
possesses some anomalous character, as in the case of Cattleya citrina, 
for example. If the two parents possess distinct hairs or other 
epidermal appendages, the two kinds may sometimes be found side by side 
in the hybrid. But among primary hybrids, in whatever way the com- 
promise is effected, the batch of seedlings, or even successive batches raised 
from the same two species, are generally fairly uniform in character, so that 
their common origin is easily recognised. 

In the case of secondary and more complex hybrids a very different con- 
dition of things is seen. A great amount of variation is now apparent, and 
seedlings out of the same capsule are often so diverse that one might sus- 
pect some of them to have come from different crosses. If two species, 
A and B, are intercrossed, and the hybrid AB be then united with a third 
species, C, some of the resulting seedlings will resemble the hybrid AC, and 



76 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

• others BC (assuming these hybrids to have also been raised), while others 
will show varying combinations of the characters of the three original 
species, as in the well-known case of Cypripedium aureum. Reversion now 
becomes more or less apparent, some of the forms most resembling their 
grandparents, as was remarked by Mr. Seden of Laeliocattleya fausta, the 
first secondary hybrid raised by him. When primary hybrids are self- 
fertilised partial reversion to the original parent species is also seen, as in 
the case of Epidendrum kewense. In the case of a hybrid recrossed with 
one of its original parents partial, if not complete reversion, is not at all 
uncommon, and it is believed that this is the cause of the many anomalous 
features seen in imported Odontoglossum crispum, in some of which what 
has been termed the " remains of hybridity " are apparent. Parallel cases 
have already appeared among artificially-raised Odontoglossums. 

The phenomena of diversity among secondary and more complex hybrids 
are due to the dissociation of mixed or hybrid character, as the result of 
incompatibility. A hybrid is a mosaic, and its reproductive cells, pollen and 
ovules, are not uniform in composition like those of species, but contain the 
hereditary influences of the original parent species in varying proportions. 
If dissociation were complete and similar cells united to form the new indi- 
vidual, the result would be complete reversion to that particular parent. 
Complete reversion, however, seldom takes place— at all events in a single 
generation— but partial reversion is one of the commonest phenomena 
among secondary hybrids, and it arises from dissociation in the sexual cells 
which unite to form the new generation. It will thus be seen that there is 
no possible method of controlling this development and of securing uniformly 
good results. The only method is to select the best possible parents for 
each succeeding generation, avoiding combinations of diverse characters 
which experience has shown leads to undesirable results. There is no royal 

ORCHIDS OF JAMAICA. 

An account of the Orchids met with by Dr. Shafer in his recent trip to 
Panama was given last month (pp. 46, 47). On leaving Panama he 
crossed to the Island of Jamaica, where he also found a number of 
interesting Orchids. During a drive to Castleton Gardens, near Kingston, 
several plants of Oncidium luridum were obtained from trees growing by 
the roadside. On the steep slopes bordering the road, half hidden among 
tall grasses and ferns, several plants of Bletia purpurea (verecunda) and a 
single specimen of Habenaria monorrhiza were found, and, farther on, near 
'■ Castleton, on a shady hillside, a few plants of the dark purple Bletia florida 
(Shepherdii), the only other Bletia found on the island. 

Near Spanish Town, on low land near the coast, Broughtonia sanguinea 



March, 191 2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 77 

grows in abundance. The only other species of this genus known, B. 
domingensis, is confined to a limited area in the mountains above New 
Castle. Both are very desirable Orchids, the former having crimson- 
coloured flowers, the latter rosy lilac, blended with white. 

A week was spent in collecting at the Cinchona plantations, at 5,000 
feet altitude, and this place is fourteen miles by mountain trail from Gordon 
Town. Soon after leaving Gordon Town the first Orchids were found, 
Epidendrum cochleatum was the most common, often found on rocks, 
stony banks, and trees. E. fragrans was also abundant, and often in full 
bloom. The tall and stately E. verrucosum was also found in bloom. 
This is a bulbless Orchid with reed-like stems often four or five feet in 
height. The long diffuse panicles of yellowish green flowers, while not 
showy, were highly interesting. On the banks of the Yallahs River, 
growing on small trees, were found several fine plants of Oncidium luridum 
and Epidendrum difforme, usually known as E. umbellatum. From the 
Yallahs River it is a climb of 2,500 feet to Cinchona. Along the trail 
numerous Orchids were found, including a fine specimen of Schomburgkia 
Lyonsii, Isochilus linearis, and several species of Pleurothallis and Stelis. 

From Cinchona several long excursions were made, including a tramp 
through the noted tree-fern forest. Epidendrums were common along 
these mountain trails, and many were collected, including E. ramosum, 
also Lepanthes divaricata and Dichaea glauca. Several stately plants of 
Phaius grandifolius were found growing in the rich humus on shady banks. 
This Orchid was introduced many years ago from China, its native habitat, 
and has become completely naturalised. It is now found in almost all 
parts of the island. 

Among the Orchids of Jamaica the most beautiful are: Laslia 
monophylla, Schomburgkia Lyonsii, Broughtonia domingensis, Oncidium 
luridum, O. leuchochilum, O. pulchellum, and Arpophyllum giganteum. 
There are many peculiar facts regarding the Orchids of Jamaica of special 
interest to the student of plant distribution, and also problems relating to 
the origin of species that merit the attention of the Evolutionist. 

The paper concludes with a short summary of the Orchids of Jamaica, 
from the recently published Flora. Of the sixty-one genera found on the 
island, twenty-eight are represented by a single species each. Of these the 
most interesting are: Laslia, Schomburgkia, Hormidium, Tetramicra, 
Calanthe, Phaius, Eulophia, Govenia, Lycaste, Trichopilia, Zygopetalum, 
and Harrisella. The last is named in honour of Mr. William Harris, who 
has contributed so much to our knowledge of the Orchids of Jamaica. One 
genus, Homalopetalum, is indigenous. Of the 194 species, seventy-three 
are not found elsewhere. Of the genus Lepanthes there are nineteen^ 
species, of which seventeen are endemic. These are small alpine plants, 



73 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

and doubtless had their origin on this island. Of the 121 species not 
limited to the island, eighty-two species are found in Cuba. But this, it is 
remarked, can scarcely justify the theory of a former land- connection, for 
the sea lying between these islands has a depth of over 16,000 feet. To the 
west and south the depth of water exceeds 12,000 feet. The island 
presents every indication of volcanic formation, the underlying rocks being 
of igneous origin. The affinities with Cuba and other islands, as well as 
with Mexico and Central America, may be accounted for without postulating 
a former land-connection. Doubtless the large number of endemic plants 
may be attributed to the influence of isolation in preserving and elaborating 
the results of variation. 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

A spray of a fine form of Odontoglossum Thompsonianum (Edwardii X 
crispum) is sent from the collection of W. Waters Butler, Esq., Southfield, 
Edgbaston. The flowers are almost uniformly deep brownish purple, with 
the usual yellow crest, while the segments are very undulate and the petals 
somewhat toothed. 

Cattleya Butleri.— When this striking hybrid between Cattleya 
citrina and C. Schilleriana was described, at page 368 of our last volume, 
we requested to know what the plant was like. Mr. Butler writes : " The 
plant is of erect habit, and the bulbs and leaves very similar to C. citrina, 
but more of the colour of C. Schilleriana." It would appear that the 
pendulous habit of C. citrina is not reproduced in its hybrids. 

A flower of a handsome hybrid Cypripedium, called C. Dr. Milligan, 
is sent from the collection of O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bridge Hall, Bury, by 
Mr. Rogers, together with flowers of its two parents, C. nitens and C. 
Euryades, Low's var. It well combines the characters of the two parents, 
but is a decided improvement, having very large and distinct dark brown 
blotches on the dorsal sepal, which has a green ground and a white 
margin. The petals are brownish green, with many small brown spots at 
the base, and the lip is bright brown in front. Both shape and colour are 
good, and, as it it is only a small plant in a 3 i inch pot, it should develop 
into a fine thing when it becomes strong. 

A six-flowered spike of Odontoglossum Electra is sent from the 
collection of E. F. Clark, Esq., Evershot, Dorset. It was raised from O. 
Andersonianum crossed with the pollen of O. triumphans, the cross being 



March, 1903, and is the first 
ollection. It is most like O. 



oglossum 
, especially in the lip, but the 



sepals and petals are narrower, and well blotched with brown on a deep 
yellow ground. Mr. Clark has one other plant, but a good many of the 
seedlings died. 



March, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 79 

A flower of a good pink form of Cymbidiam insigne, with the sepals 
and petals closely and minutely dotted at the base, is sent from the 
•collection of Mrs. Ardern, Bonis Hall, Prestbury. It is said to have been 
in the collection a good many years, but has not flowered previously. 

A curious abnormal flower of Dendrobium nobile is sent from the 
collection of Edward Clements, Esq., Maidstone. The lip is absent, and 
the lateral sepals united into one, and thus the flower is dimerous with two 
petals and two opposite sepals. It is probably accidental, as other flowers 
on the stem are normal. 

A flower of Cypripedium Romulus is sent from the collection of G. 
Hamilton-Smith, Esq., Finchley, by Mr. Coningsby, in which the lateral 
sepals are free and diverging. It is a seedling flowering for the first time, 
and whether the peculiarity will be constant remains to be seen. There is 
also a spike of the hybrid O. amabile Queen Alexandra crossed with a fine 
spotted crispum, which has reverted to what may be termed an ordinary 
rosy crispum. The batch has already shown great diversity, and forms 
•were noted at pp. 159, 190, of our last volume. A spike of Dendrobium 
Kingianum album and a good dark form of Cymbidium Tracyanum are 

A sweetly-scented and very pretty form of Odontoglossum Pescatorei is 
•sent from the collection of J. B. H. Goodden, Esq., West Coker, Yeovil. 
There is a large purple blotch on the base of each sepal, and a small spot 
in the centre of each petal. It is said to have been more spotted last year. 
Another plant in the collection is also fragrant. 

Odontoglossum elegantius. — It is interesting to note that the 
natural hybrid Odontoglossum elegantius, Rchb. f., has been raised 
artificially by Messrs. Sander & Sons, from O. Lindleyanum and O. 
Pescatorei. The plant was exhibited by them at the R.H.S. meeting held 
on February 22nd last. The flower is cream-coloured, with a light red- 
brown blotch at the base of each segment, and a similar blotch in front of 
the crest of the lip. It is an interesting confirmation.— R. A. R. 

Listrostachys bistorta. — A plant introduced by Messrs. Mansell 
.& Hatcher, Rawdon, E. Yorks, has been sent to Kew for determination, 
and proves to be identical with Listrostachys bistorta, Rolfe (Fl. Trop. 
Afr., vii. p. 155), originally described from Lagos, and thus extends the 
area of the species somewhat. There was originally a little doubt as to 
whether the remarkable twist in the spur was a normal character, but it is 
also present in the recently introduced plant. The species is allied to the 
South African L. arcuata Rchb. f., but has longer, less fleshy leaves, and 
smaller flowers, with the remarkable bend in the spur, which recalls the 
appearance of a looper caterpillar. The species was originally described as 
Angrsecum bistortum (Rolfe in Ketp Bulletin, 1893, p. 65).— R.A.R. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



[Ma 



ODONTOGLOSSUM ARMAINVILLIERENSE VAR. JOHNSONII. 

The annexed figure represents a flower of a very beautiful Odontoglossum 
from the collection of J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport, which received a 
First-class Certificate from the Manchester and North of England Orchid 
Society on November 16th last. The spike was again exhibited on 
January ioth, after which part of it was sent to us by Mr. R. Johnson,, 
after whom the variety is named. The parentage is said to be O. 
Pescatorei giganteum X O. cnspum Franz Masereel, and there is a marked 
resemblance to the latter in the arrangement of the markings, particularly 
in what has been termed the eye-brow like band near the upper and lower 
margin of the petals, as may be seen by comparison with the figure of the 




Fig. 13. Odontoglossu 



nth volu 



gcod i 



VAR. JOHNSONII. 

The colour is, however, 
O. Pescatorei. It is a 
:r 3I inches from tip to tip 
shape, and the breadth of 



latter at page thirteen of our se 

much more purple, due to the 

remarkably fine variety, the flower 

of the petals, while all the segmen 

the clear white margins, and the large white area of the front lobe of the lip, 

throws the purple markings up to greal advantage. It is one of the finest 

varieties of O. armainvillierense that we have seen. The photograph here 

reproduced was taken by Mr. F. W. Rolfe, and shows the flower under 

natural size, while the dorsal sepal is somewhat foreshortened, owing to the 

flower having become a little flaccid when the photograph was taken, and 

thus curved forward a little. 



March, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 8i 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR MARCH. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
With the lengthening days, and the increased amount of light and sun- 
shine, our plants will become active, and commence to push their growth 
rapidly. 

Temperatures now should range a few degrees higher all round than 
those given in the January number, and, with the increased heat, additional 
atmospheric moisture must be given. A humid atmosphere may now be 
maintained in all the houses, as everything will now be commencing to 
grow, therefore damping down twice or three times a day, according to the 
outside conditions, will not be too much. 

Watering at this season requires a great amount of care and attention 
on the cultivator's part, as much damage to the roots may be done by the 
compost being in an over-saturated condition for any length of time. He 
must use a certain amount of discrimination in supplying and withholding 
water, first making sure that the compost is dry enough, and then giving a 
good soaking. 

Ventilation during this month requires more care and attention, 
perhaps, than in any other during the year. It is often very difficult to 
ventilate a house as one would like, especially with a cold north-east wind 
blowing, and the sun shining brightly at intervals. Nevertheless, air must 
be admitted on all favourable occasions from one source or the other. 
Fresh air is life to plants, but, in its admission to our houses, we must be 
careful that no draughts are caused, or much mischief will be done. 

Stoking. — Those in charge of the stoking of the fires during this month 
have also a very trying time, as the outside conditions vary often from one 
extreme to the other. A fair amount of artificial warmth will still be 
required at night, but during the day the less the better, especially should 
the sun be shining— just sufficient to maintain the temperature. In all 
cases extreme fluctuations of temperature must be avoided. 

Shading will now come into general use, but must not be applied to 
excess, or the plants will become weak and spindly. After the wet, dull 
winter we have passed through, the leaves and bulbs of the plants are tender, 
and they must be inured to the light and heat of the sun gradually. Sun- 
shine, in many cases, paralyses plants, especially those that delight in 
shady positions, and these should never be allowed in strong sunshine. 

Thunias will be commencing to grow, and must be repotted before the 
new shoots commence to push forth their roots. The compost I recommend 
for them is half peat and half loam, from which all the fine particles have 
been taken, mixed with some sphagnum moss, and dried cow manure. The 
pots must be well drained, as they require an abundant supply of water 



84 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

when in full growth, and they must not be potted too firmly. Thunias 
enjoy a sunny position in the warmest house, placed well up to the glass, 
and exposed to the light, and water must be very sparingly applied to them 
until the flower spike appears at the apex of the newly-made bulbs. The 
growths may be potted up singly, or made up into specimens, according to 
the requirements of the cultivator. When in full growth, an occasional 
watering with weak manure water will be beneficial. These plants may be 
propagated by taking off portions of the old pseudobulbs, cutting them 
into lengths, and inserting them as ordinary cuttings in pots of coarse 
silver sand. When they commence to grow, and to push out roots, they may 
be potted up in small pots in the usual way. The cuttings should be 
placed in a warm propagating case, or they will succeed under a bell glass, 
placed in the warmest house, and protected from strong sunshine. 

Calanthes of the deciduous section will need repotting during the 
present month, and are best done when the new growths are a few inches 
high and about to push forth new roots. The treatment as regards compost 
temperatures and watering of Thunias will answer the requirements of 
Calanthes, with the exception that the latter will not stand the strong rays 
of the sun like the former, therefore must have protection. The bulbs, 
before they are placed in their pots, should be thoroughly examined for a 
small species of scale which often infests them, and which, it is needless to 
say, must be removed. The pots must be thoroughly clean, and the 
compost nicely warmed, before the bulbs are potted. The plants must be 
grown from the beginning to the end without a check. In these deciduous 
plants it is during the early stages of growth that discretion is needed, for 
if over-watered before the roots are well hold of the compost failure is 
assured. Calanthes are most useful and decorative Orchids, and worth all 
the pains and trouble to bring them to perfection, but, unfortunately, they 
will not stand fogs. 

Phaius is another genus of terrestial Orchids which will succeed in the 
same compost, and under the same conditions as regards watering and 
temperatures. Many of them will succeed in an ordinary plant stove, and 
make fine specimens, bearing handsome foliage and strong spikes of flowers. 
After the plants have ceased to flower, and the new growths are sufficiently 
advanced and about to produce new roots, any necessary repotting may 
have attention. They should be grown in fairly large, well-drained pots, 
and the plants should be potted below the rim of the pots, like ordinary 
plants. During the time they are in full growth they delight in an abundant 
supply of water at the roots, and must be shaded from strong sunshine. 

Peristeria elata may be treated as a Phaius, growing it under the 
same conditions and resting it in a nearly dry condition in a house ranging 
from 55 to 6o° during the winter months. The foliage of these plants is 



March, ,912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. H 

subject to attacks of scale, thrip, and other pests, which must not be 
allowed to gain a foothold. 

Pleiones.— Such sorts as P. maculata, lagenaria, and Wallichiana are 
growing vigorously, therefore will require more water at the root. These 
plants being subject to attacks of red spider, a very light spraying 
under their leaves will be beneficial from time to time, but on no account 
must water be allowed to enter the centre of the growths. Such sorts as 
P. humilis and any of the late-flowering section, having now passed out of 
bloom and commenced to grow, may have attention as regards repotting, 
should it be necessary, using the same compost as for Cypripediums. 

Miltonia VEXILLARIA will now be growing vigorously, and will requiiv 
a plentiful supply of water at the roots, and towards the end of the month 
may be placed at the warm end of the Cool house, or the cool end of the 
Intermediate house — either will answer their requirements. I find the 
flower spikes are finer, the flowers larger, the colour richer, and the plants 
better in every way when grown in a practically even temperature the whole 
year round. M. Roezlii, M. Bleuana, and other hybrids may now be 
removed from the warmest house to a moist shady position in the Inter- 
mediate house. Thrip and other insect pests which are very troublesome 
to Miltonias must be kept in check. 

CATTLEYAS. — C. Percivaliana and C. Trianse, as they pass out of flower 
and begin to push new roots, may have attention as regards repotting, 
should it be necessary, using the same compost as for Lselia anceps 
recommended last month. There are many other Cattleyas of the C. 
labiata section and numerous hybrids, which also may have attention in the 
same way, should they require it. It is most difficult to say when any 
particular Cattleya or Laeliocattleya should have attention, but if new 
roots are about to push forth from the rhizome, the cultivator need not 
hesitate in the least. Should the plant or plants then require new compost 
give it to them. There is only a very small part of the year in which we are 
not potting some one or the other of the members of this glorious family. 

Cypripediums must be potted as they pass out of flower, using the 
compost as advised for the C. insigne family in last month's Calendar. 
The more of this family that can be done now the better able are we to 
devote time and attention to other subjects which need them during the 
busy season of the next three or four months. 

Ccelogyne CRiSTATA and its varieties will now be in full bloom, and 
well-flowered plants of this beautiful old species are not easily surpassed. 
When the plants pass out of flower they should be rested in the Inter- 
mediate house until the new growths are seen to be starting from the base 
of the pseudobulbs, when they may be watered in the usual manner. After 
carrying a very heavy crop of flowers, the bulbs of these plants will often 



8 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

shrivel, but an excessive amount of water should not be given them with 
the idea of making them plump again. This often means the loss of the 
whole of the roots, and the plants are then in a very bad way. 

Dendrobiums will now be making a great show, especially if they are 
grown in quantity, and will fill up the blank made as regards flowers, by 
the Cypripediums passing out of bloom. Bring them on slowly, and do not 
attempt to force them, as the flowers will be finer and the new growths 
stronger, if allowed to take their time. 

General remarks. — Since writing my last we have had, in some places, 
rather a severe spell of cold weather, just to remind us not to be in too 
great a hurry to push our plants into growth. My advice still is to keep 
everything as quiet as possible, and not to unduly raise the temperatures or 
hasten the growth of any plants. The growths will be finer, more 
consolidated, and better in every way if made later, when the sun has 
more influence and power. Insect and other pests must be diligently 
searched for and eradicated as far as possible. In conclusion, let me say 
take time by the forelock, and push on all work that can be safely carried 
out before the rush of the busy season arrives. 



SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
A meeting was held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, 
Westminster, on January 23rd last, when there was a very fine display of 
Orchids, including nine medal groups, while one First-class Certificate, five 
Awards of Merit, and one Cultural Commendation were also given. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, Gurney Wilson, F. J. 
Hanbury, W T . Cobb, G. F. Moore, T. Armstrong, A. A. McBean, J. Charles- 
worth, J. Cypher, W. P. Bound, J. E. Shill, H. G. Alexander, A. Dye, W. 
H. White, J. Wilson Potter, W. Bolton, J. S. Moss, de Bani Crawshay, 
and Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart. 

Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford, Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander), 
was awarded a Lindley Medal for a choice group of well-grown Orchids, 
including Laelia anceps G. D. Owen and L. a. Amesiae, each with nine 
spikes, L. autumnalis alba with four spikes, Laeliocattleya Cappei, Weston- 
birt var., with a spike of thirteen flowers, and Vanda Watsonii with seven 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park, Reigate (gr. Mr. J. Collier), 
sent a beautiful group of Laelia anceps, including the varieties Dawsonii, 
Sanderiana, Hilliana rosefieldiensis, white with the front lobe of the lip 
pink, and the fine Gatton Park var., with plants of the charming Phaio- 
calanthe Colmanii (Silver Flora Medal . 



March, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 85 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), sent 
Zygopetalum brachypetalum Crawshayanum, Odontoglossum Yula 
(Adrianae X Lambeauianum), and O. harvengtense Crawshayanum, a very 
fine home-raised form. 

H. S. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney (gr. Mr. G. E. Day), sent 
Odontioda Cooksoniae Royal Scarlet, Odontoglossum Ceres, Goodson's var., 
and Laeliocattleya Wellsiana, Goodson's variety. 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford (gr. Mr. W. H. 
White), sent a plant of Zygopetalum brachypetalum. 

Sir W. Marriott, Down House, Blandford, sent a curious hybrid between 
Laelia anceps Sanderiana and Cattleya Aclandise, having a pale pink flower 
most like that of the Laelia parent. 

C. J. Phillips, Esq., The Glebe, Sevenoaks, sent Cymbidium Pauwelsii, 
Phillip's var., having the front lobe of the lip bright red. 

Pantia Ralli, Esq., Ashtead Park, Epsom, sent Lycaste Balliae, 
Cymbidium grandiflorum, and the white form of Cattleya Trianae. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield. Woking (gr. Mr. W. Hopkins), 
sent Cypripedium Thalia The Baron (insigne Sanderae X Baron Schroder), 
a heavily blotched form, and C. King Emperor, a hybrid of C. Beeckmanii. 

Sir Julius Wernher, Luton Hoo (gr. Mr. Metcalfe), sent Calanthe Vulcan, 
with deep magenta-rose flowers. 

Messrs. Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, staged a fine group of 
Laeliocattleyas, Cypripediums, some beautiful examples of Cattleya Maggie 
Raphael alba Orchidhurst var., some fine specimens of Masdevallia 
tovarensis, Scbroederiana, and other good things (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a group of choice 
Orchids, including a fine Odontoglossum crispum xanthotes, O. hibernicum, 
Stanhopea Shuttleworthii, the brilliant Odontioda Diana, Cattleya Octavia, 
and the beautiful Laeliocattleya bell a alba (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. James Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a fine group of 
Cypripediums, including C. Mrs. Du Cane Godman (Mrs. Wm. Mostyn X 
insigne), a fine thing, having a large white dorsal sepal blotched with 
purple, C. Beeckmanii, Venus, Thompsonii, forms of C. Leeanum, aureum, 
Actseus, and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a fine group of 
Calanthe Veitchii, Cattleyas, Laeliocattleyas, Odontoglossums, Angraecum 
citratum, A. superbum, Sarcopodium cymbidioides, &c (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a very fine group, including 
many beautiful Odontoglossums, Odontiodas, Phalaenopsis, Oncidium 
Jamesonii, bearing many bright yellow normal and abnormal flowers, 
Cymbidium erythrostylum, and numerous other interesting things (Silver 
Flora Medal), 



86 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, staged a small group of 
choice things, including Cypripedium Laconia (Leeanum X Sallieriaureum), 
a fine greenish yellow flower, with a faint purple band on the dorsal sepal 
and a white apex, C. Ulysses (Mrs. Wm. Mostyn X Thompsonii), a well- 
coloured flower, C. Waterloo, and C. Actseus langleyense (Silver Banksian 
Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent some good examples of 
Odontoglossum crispum, white forms of Laelia anceps, Cattleya Maggie 
Raphael alba, a specimen of C. chocoensis alba, Sophrocattleya Blackii, 
Cypripediums, Brassocattleyas, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, sent a few good Odontoglossums, 
Lycaste Skinned, Cattleya Octavia, and C. Blackii (Gaskelliana alba X 
Mendelii alba), and others. 

Mr. W. A. Manda, St. Albans, sent some forms of Cattleya Tnana. 

Messrs. James Veitch & Son, Chelsea, sent Cypripedium Idina (insigne 
Harefield Hall var. X Countess of Carnarvon), C. Actaeus langleyense, and 
the prettily spotted Odontoglossum Doris. 

First-class Certificate. 

Cypripedium Nora (Mons. de Curte X aureum CEdippe).— A large and 
beautifully shaped flower, having the dorsal sepal rose-coloured, heavily 
lined with deep purple above, and more feathered towards the white margin, 
while the petals and lip are yellow tinged with brown. Exhibited by Lieut. - 
Col. Sir G. L. Holford, K.C.V.O. 

Awards of Merit. 

Cymbidium Schlegelii (insigne x Wiganianum).— A striking thing, 
much resembling the former in habit, but with larger flowers, slightly 
blotched with purple on the sepals and petals, and the lip undulate and 
blotched with red. Exhibited by Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean. 

Cypripedium Duke of Marlborough (parentage unknown).— Dorsal 
sepal white with a dark middle line, and some purple spotting above the 
green base, while the petals and lip are yellow tinged with brown. Exhibited 
by the Duke of Marlborough, Blenheim Palace (gr. Mr. Hunter). 

L.eliocattleya amabilis (L.-c. Fascinator X C. Lueddemanniana 
Stanleyi).— A beautiful pure white flower, with some clear purple veining on 
the lip. Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 

Zygocolax Charlesworthii, Cobb's var. (Colax jugosus x Zygopetalum 
Perrenoudii).— A large light-coloured form, having white flowers barred 
with violet on the sepals and petals, and blotched with deep violet on the 
lip. Exhibited by Walter Cobb, Esq., Rusper (gr. Mr. C. J. Salter). 

Zygopetalum Mackayi Charlesworthii.— A beautiful albino of the 
species, having pale green sepals and petals, and a pure white lip. Exhibited 
by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. (see p. 72, fig. 11). 



March, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 87 

Cultural Commendation. 

Calanthe William Murray.— Some exceptionally well-grown spikes, 

about four feet in length, and profusely flowered. To Mr. Branson, gr. to 

George Hanbury, Esq., Blythewood, Burnham. 

At the meeting held on February 6th, the Orchids showed a great falling 
off, no doubt owing to the. severe frost of the previous week, but five medal 
groups were shown, and the awards consisted of one First-class Certificate 
and one Award of Merit. 

Orchid Committee present :— J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, R. Brooman White, 
W. Bolton, Walter Cobb, Gurney Wilson, W. H. White, A. Dye, H. G. 
Alexander, J. E. Shill, W. H. Hatcher, J. Cypher, T. Armstrong, 
A. A. McBean, C. H. Curtis, F. J. Hanbury, R. A. Rolfe, and Sir Jeremiah 
Colman, Bart. 

Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. 
Alexander), sent a fine plant of the brilliant Sophrocatlaelia Marathon var. 
Vesuvius, bearing a six-flowered spike, and Cypripedium Helen II., 
Holford's var. 

J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis), 
sent Odontoglossum crispum Olive, a home-raised seedling, having the 
flower heavily blotched with red-brown. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., V.M.H., Gatton Park, Reigate (gr. Mr. J. 
Collier), showed Odontoglossum Collieri (Phoebe X armainvillierense), a 
richly-coloured hybrid, with acuminate segments, heavily marked with ruby 
purple except at the base and apex. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. W. Hopkins), sent 
Brassocattleya Wellesleya (C. Mossiae Wageneri X B. glauca), a pretty 
white flower, with the disc of the lip yellow, Cypripedium Wellesleyae, 
C. memoria Mostynii superbum, and C. Duchess of Argyll (Druryi X Leea- 
num giganteum), a handsome thing, with well-blotched dorsal sepal. 

Messrs. W. B. Hartland & Sons, Ardcairn, Ballintemple, Cork, staged 
a fine group of Cypripediums and Odontoglossums, the former including 
some good C. Leeanum, Mrs. Wm. Mostyn, insigne Sanderianum, callosum 
Sanderas and others, while the latter contained the mauve purple O. Groganii, 
naevium, loochristiense and about a dozen remarkably dissimilar hybrids, 
obtained from O. Rolfeae X Vuylstekei, including forms with both white 
and yellow ground colour, and a great variation in the amount of brown and 
purple spotting (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a choice group, 
including a beautiful Odontoglossum crispum xanthotes (O. c. Charles- 
worthii X O. c. Cooksoniae), with very round flowers, and deep yellow 



SS THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

blotches, Vanda teres alba, the rare Catasetum Randii, Odontioda Charles- 
worthii and O. Bradshawiae (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, sent forms of Laelia anceps, 
Masdevallia triangularis, Hincksiana and Schrcederiana, Laeliocattleya 
callistoglossa, Cypripedium Bridgesii, Alcibiades, Beeckmanii, aureum 
Hyeanum, Vandyke, and others (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, sent a good Gomeza crispa 
with three spikes, a well-flowered Oncidium cheirophorum, Vanda Amesiana, 
Masdevallia tovarensis, Pleurothallis Roezlii with ten spikes, Saccolabium 
bellinum, Dendrochilum glumaceum, and a few good Cypripediums, Calan- 
thes and Odontoglossums (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent Cymbidium Veitchii, 
Odontioda Charlesworthii, white and coloured forms of Laslia anceps, 
Odontoglossum crispum, Cattleya Trianae, C. chocoensis alba, Lycaste 
Skinneri, and a well-coloured Brassocatlaelia from L.-c. Eudora splendens 
X B. Digbyana (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, sent Lycaste Skinneri alba, Odonto- 
glossum percultum, O. Lawrenceanum, O. Solon (Adrianse X armain- 
villierense), and three Cypripediums. 

Mr. W. A. Manda, St. Albans, sent Cattleya Trianae, American Beauty, 
with a broad purple band at the apex of the petals, and two others. 

Messrs. Tracy, Twickenham, sent the rare Oncidium anthocrene. 

A few Orchid drawings were included in a group of paintings of garden 
plants exhibited by Miss Ivy Massee, Kew Gardens (Silver Flora Medal). 
First-class Certificate. 

Odontoglossum Merlin (parentage unknown). — A beautiful white 
flower, of round shape, with clusters of brown blotches on the centre of the 
sepals and petals. The spikes bore thirteen beautiful flowers. Exhibited 
by Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O. 
Award of Merit. 

Odontoglossum memoria Lily Neumann (parentage unknown).— A 
handsome hybrid, having the lower two-thirds of the segments claret-purple, 
with a few white lines, and the upper part white tinged with rose. Exhibited 
by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. 

MANCHESTER AND NORTH OF ENGLAND ORCHID. 

At the meeting held on December 28th, 191 1, the members of Com- 
mittee present were :— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), R. Ashworth 
C. Parker, Z. A. Ward, J. C. Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Holmes, 
A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), staged a group, principally 
Cypripediums of good quality, including C. Antinous, Minos Youngii, Priam 



March, 1912. THE ORCHID REVIEW. 89 

Niobe, Thalia, C. Leeanum Clinkaberryanum, Reeling's var., and Corona, 
C. insigne Sanderae, Sanderianum, and Harefield Hall var. (Silver Medal). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), staged a group of 
Odontoglossums and Cypripediums ; among the former being some well- 
grown plants of O. Harryanum and triumphans, Vuylstekei, Jasper and 
Wilckeanum, Ward's var. ; while the latter included C. Prince Edward of 
York, fulshawense, Boadicea var. Pica, Alcibiades, Ward's var., Priam, 
triumphans, and some Leeanums (Silver Medal). 

R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), exhibited Odonto- 
glossum Mde. Adelina Patti, a fine blotched hybrid, with Cypripedium 
Thalia giganteum, Euryades, New Hall Hey var., Mrs. Mabel Waring, 
Thalia Mrs. F. Wellesley, Minos Youngii, W. F. Hurndall, and others. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), staged fine plants 
of Laelia anceps, Odontoglossum crispum and some hybrids, Odontioda 
Graireana, Lycaste Skinneri alba, Cypripediums, &c. (Silver Medal). 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), staged Odontoglossums 
in variety, Cattleya Maggie Raphael alba, Miltonia Bleuana, Oncidium 
Forbesii, with Cypripedium fulshawense, insigne Harefield Hall var. and 
Leeanum Corona (Silver Medal). 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), sent Laelia anceps alba 
Worthington's var., Laeliocattleya Cappei, Cattleya Henrietta, Angraecum 
sesquipedale, with Cypripedium Cassandra, callosum, Minos Youngii, and 
Sir Redvers Buller (Silver Medal). 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le- Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), staged 
several varieties of Cypripedium insigne, Leeanum Clinkaberryanum, Minos 
Youngii, Miss Amy Moore, George Moore, and Swinburnei magnificum 
(Bronze Medal). 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), staged about twenty plants 
of Vanda ccerulea, and a Cultural Commendation with Bronze Medal was 
granted to the gardener. 

S. Gratrix, Esq., Whalley Range (gr. Mr. Brown), sent Cypripedium 
Mary Beatrice, and others mentioned under Awards. 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), sent Cypripedium 
Sunrise and Queen Alexandra. 

H. J. Bromilow, Esq., Rann Lea (gr. Mr. Morgan), staged the unique 
and beautiful Cypripedium Bromilowiae. 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged an excellent exhibit of 
Cypripediums, including Mrs. Wm. Mostyn, Charlesianum, Miss Louisa 
Fowler, Euryades, Minos Youngii, with some good Leeanum and insigne 
varieties (Silver Medal). 

Mr. J. Evans, Congleton, sent several plants of Cattleya Maggie 
Raphael alba, Leelia anceps alba Worthington's var., Cypripedium 



go THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 191*. 

Beeckmanii, Leoniae Gratrixiae, Euryades New Hall Hey var., Actaeu? 
langleyense, and Germaine Opoix Westfield var. (Silver Medal). 

The Liverpool Orchid Co., Gateacre, sent a small group of Cypripediums, 
including several fine hybrids of the Leeanum section, insigne Harefield 
Hall var. and Brooksiae, Empress, Allanianum and Daphne. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, staged Cypripedium Tityus, 
Mrs. Tautz, Excelsior, and a seedling. 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a fine variety of Odontoglossum 
crispum without markings. 

Mr. W. Shackleton, Great Horton, staged three fine hybrid Odonto- 



Odontoglossum crispum Anami, a fine variety, with heavily blotched 
segments ; O. c. xanthotes Golden Gem, with yellow markings on segments 
and lip ; and Cypripedium Helen II., Westonbirt var. ; from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium Royal Sovereign (Hera robustum X Urania var. Martin 
Cahnzac), a magnificent flower, the large dorsal sepal being almost covered 
with purple spots ; and C. Helen II., Westonbirt var. ; from S. Gratrix, Esq. 
Awards of Merit. 

Cypripedium Magog (Adrastus X Euryades splendens), a well-built 
flower, from S. Gratrix Esq. 

Cypripedium Aurora Borealis, a fine flower with large round dorsal 
sepal ; from J. J. Holden, Esq. 

Cypripedium Bernal Bagshaw (Alcibiades X Standard), a fine well- 
marked flower ; C. Hazel Vicars (Lord Ossulston X Actaeus langleyense), 
also very fine, and C. Dora Jameson, from R. le Doux, Esq. 

Cypripedium Actaeus ashlandense Nos. 1 and 2, from the same parents, 
but very different in the markings, No. 1 carrying spots on the dorsal, like 
the Harefield Hall var., the other almost without, following the Leeanum 
parent ; and Odontoglossum ^Esopus, parentage unknown, of almost solid 
plum colour, with nearly white tips to sepals and petals; from R. 
Ashworth, Esq. 

Lselia anceps Holmesii, a very fine variety of the Chamberlainiana 
type ; from J. McCartney, Esq. 

At the meeting held on January 12th, 1912, the members of Committee 
present were : Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), R. Ashworth, W. R. 
Lee, C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, J. C. Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, 
W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), staged a remarkably 
fine group, consisting principally of Odontoglossums, hybrids predominating, 
and choice Cypripediums too numerous to mention (Silver-gilt Medal). 



March, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 9» 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), staged a very nice group, 
containing Miltonia Bleuana Pitt's var., with Cattleyas, Odontoglossums, 
and many choice Cypripediums (Silver Medal). 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), staged a nice 
miscellaneous group, including Odontoglossums in variety, Cypripediums, 
Miltonias of the vexillaria section, Cymbidium Tracyanum, Cattleya 
quadricolor virginalis, and Epidendrum vitellinum majus (Silver Medal). 

W. J. Hargreaves, Esq., Burnley, staged a group of choice Cypripediums, 
including C. Mrs. Francis Wellesley, Florence Hargreaves, Marjorie 
Hargreaves, Leeanum Clinkaberryanum, and giganteum, insigne 
Statterianum, Bruno, Spicerianum, and Evelyn Ames (Silver Medal). 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), staged a mixed group, 
including Cattleya Maggie Raphael alba, Laelia anceps Sanderiana, Lycaste 
Skinneri alba, Phalsenopsis amabilis, with Cypripediums and Calanthes in 
variety (Silver Medal). 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), staged a 
small but pretty group, including Cypripedium Baron Schroder, Thalia var. 
Mrs. F. Wellesley, Mons. de Curte, J. W. Howes, Geo. Moore, Madame Jules 
Hye, Allanianum, and insigne King Edward VII. (Bronze Medal). 

G. H. Peace, Esq., Monton Grange (gr. Mr. C. Mace), staged a group 
of Cypripediums, including Venus Rann Lea var., aureum Lambianum, 
Amy Moore, insigne heatonense, Leeanum immaculatum, Thompsonii, 
Allanianum, and others (Bronze Medal). 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), was awarded a Vote of 
Thanks for a collection of Cypripedium Earl of Tankerville, Mson giganteum, 
Minos Youngii, Hindeanum, Beeckmanii, keighleyense Invincible, and 
others, all in excellent condition. 

S. Gratrix, Esq., Whalley Range (gr. Mr. Brown), staged Cypripedium 
Prince Albert, and the pretty Dendrobium Phalaenopsis hololeucum. 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), staged Cypripedium 
Leeanum John Holden, Odontoglossum Minnehaha, and a cut spike of the 
beautiful O. ardentissimum Johnsonii. 

H. J. Bromilow, Esq., Rann Lea (gr. Mr. Morgan), staged Cypripedium 
Reginald Young and two seedlings. 

J. H. Craven, Esq., Keighley (gr. Mr. Corney), staged Odontoglossum 
seedlings of O. crispum Luciani parentage, and a nice variety of Odontioda. 
R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), sent Cypripedium 
beechense superbum. 

H. Thorp, Esq., Middleton, sent Cypripedium St. Albans. 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a nice group of choice 
Cypripediums, with Lselia anceps HilHana and Amesiana, and Calanthe 
Harrisii and Sandhurstiana. 



02 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 1912. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged Cypripedium Golden Oriole, 
a large-flowered Odontoglossum crispum, and a nice blotched hybrid. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged a tine Cattleya Trianae, with 
Cypripedium Curtmanii magnificum and C. Beryl West Point var. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, sent Cypripedium venustum 
Measuresianum and C. Euterpe. 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged Odontoglossum amabile, 
laudatum, Aireworth, and Cattleya Aubergham, a fine dark variety. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a fine Cattleya 
Trianae alba, a fine blotched Odontoglossum crispum, O. Dora, Doris, and 
Cypripedium leyburnense. 

Mr. W. Shackleton, Great Horton, staged Odontoglossum Vuylstekei, 
O. Rossii with sepals spotted to the tips, O. seedling, and a nice var. of 
Cypripedium Leeanum. 

Mr. D. McLeod, Chorlton-cum- Hardy, staged Cypripedium Euryades, 
New Hall Hey var., and a collection of cut flowers. 
First-class Certificates. 

Laeliocattleya Myrrha grandis (Gottoiana X Dowiana Rosita), a fine 
flower, with well-lined lip ; Cypripedium Actseus var. Durbar, a large round 
flower ; Odontoglossum crispum xanthotes var. perfectum, a beautiful 
variety, with lemon yellow markings ; from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Odontoglossum Delhi (crispum augustum X eximium) ; from J. J. 
Holden, Esq. (figured at p. 44). 

Odontoglossum crispum xanthotes Gratrixiae, having well-shaped 
flowers with bright yellow markings; from S. Gratrix, Esq. 
Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Maggie Raphael var. pulcherrima, with pale markings on lip, 
and Odontoglossum Milky Way, marked all over with delicate spots ; from 
W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium Jasper (Alcibiades x Hitchinsiae), a fine large flower ; and 
Odontoglossum Eric, with deep purple blotches ; from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cypripedium seedling (hirsutissimum X aureum Hyeanum), a fine, well- 
balanced flower ; from S. Gratrix, Esq. 

Cypripedium Actaeus major (Leeanum giganteum x insigne Harefield 
Hall var.) ; a well-shaped flower from Col. J. Rutherford, M.P. 

Cypripedium caudatum Sanderae, a nice variety, with petals a foot in 
length ; and C. jucundum, a very noble flower ; from Messrs. Sander & Sons. 

Sophrocattleya Saxa, Low's var., a beautiful salmon pink flower, with 
yellow throat and bright lines on lip ; from Messrs. Stuart Low & Co. 

Cypripedium Lion (Mrs. Wm. Mostyn x Euryades), a very fine round 
well-marked flower; from Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, 



March, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. M 

At the meeting held on Thursday, January 25th, 1912, the members of 
Committee present were : — Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), R. Ash- 
worth, W. R. Lee, C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, J. C. Cowan, 
J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, F. K. Sander, 
and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), staged a group of fine 
plants, including Odontoglossums, Cypripedium Queen Alexandra, trium- 
phans, Ville de Paris, Fascinator, Helen II., Sunrise, Rossetti, Marjorie, 
Lee's van, and others (Silver-gilt Medal). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), staged a choice 
group, composed principally of well-grown Odontoglossum crispum 
Luciani and White's var., O. amabile, Fascinator, Emperor, and spectabile, 
with Cypripediums, Dendrobium splendidissimum, and others (Silver-gilt 
Medal). 

S. Gratrix, Esq., Whalley Range (gr. Mr. Brown), staged a small group of 
choice plants, including Cypripedium Curtmanii West Point var., aureum 
Surprise, Mrs. F. Sander, alportense, Odontoglossum crispum Ethel, 
Cattleya Trianae Mary Gratrix, and others (Silver Medal). 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), staged a mixed 
group, in which Odontoglossums were well represented, O. Canary and 
O. Rossii being very fine. It also included many choice Cypripediums 
(Silver Medal). 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), staged a varied group, 
including Lselia anceps Stella and Sanderiana, several varieties of Cattleya 
Trianae, Laeliocattleya Gottoiana, Brassocattleyas, and Cypripediums 
(Silver Medal). 

W.J. Hargreaves, Esq., Burnley, staged a nice group of Cypripediums, 
including C. Minos Youngii, Thalia, Velma, Leeanum superbum, aureum 
Hyeanum, and virginale nitens, Euryades, New Hall Hey var., and others 
(Bronze Medal). 

G. H. Peace, Esq., Monton Grange (gr. Mr. C. Mace), staged a small 
group, including Cypripedium aureum Hyeanum, virginale and Q2dippe, 
C. Leeanum Clinkaberryanum, C. villosum, Odontoglossum spectabile and 
Pescatorei (Bronze Medal). 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), staged a 
small group, including Cypripedium Priam, aureum virginale, Beeckmanii, 
T. B. Haywood, Pollettianum, Statterianum, Richmanii, and varieties of 
insigne (Bronze Medal). 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), was awarded a Vote of 
Thanks for a small group of very choice Lycaste Skinneri alba, Purple 
Emperor, Robin and Glory, with Cypripedium Beeckmanii, Thompsonii, 
aureum CEdippe, Leeanum Purity, Beryl, and several unnamed seedlings. 



94 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, 191 2 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), staged Odontoglossum 
crispum Holdenii, Cypripedium Chapmanii, E. N. Holden, and others. 

J. H. Craven, Esq., Keighley (gr. Mr. Corney), staged Odontoglossum 
crispum var. Battle of Waterloo, and some crispum seedlings, with Odon- 
tioda Corneyana. 

H. J. Bromilow, Esq., Rann Lea (gr. Mr. Morgan), staged Cypri- 
pedium Lord Wolmer, Euryades, New Hall Hey var., and a fine seedling 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), sent Cypripedium Earl 
of Tankerville. 

F. A. Hindley, Esq., Bradford, sent Cypripedium Hindleyanum. 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a group of choice 
Cypripediums, C. aureum Hyeanum and Surprise, Actaeus Sybil, Mrs. 
Godman, Boltonii, Alcibiades superbum, Thompsonii, Mrs. Wm. Mostyn, 
Minos Youngii, and Leeanum Clinkaberryanum being amongst the best 
(Silver Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, sent OdontiodaWilsonii, 
and Laeliocattleya Myra, with yellow sepals and petals. 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged some fine Odontoglossum 
Lambeauianum, armainvillierense, eximium and Aireworth, with Cattleya 
Blackii. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, sent two seedling Cypripedium 
Beeckmanii. 

Mr. J. Evans, Congleton, sent Cypripedium Venus and Odontoglossum 



Mr. \V. Shackleton, Bradford, sent a stray seedling Cypripedium. 
First-class Certificates. 

Odontoglossum Harmac (crispum Graireanum x Vuylstekei), a fine 
deep claret-purple flower, margined with white; O. Miranda, rose, with 
brownish lines and spots, Sophrocattleya Wellesleya; Lee's var., a rich 
scarlet flower, four inches across ; from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium Alcibiades, Gratrix's var. a gigantic flower, with the dorsal 
sepal over three inches across; from S. Gratrix, Esq.. A Silver Medal 
was also awarded. 

Awards of Merit. 

Cypripedium Lady Dillon magnificum (nitens Ball's var. X Mrs. Wm. 
Mostyn) ; from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium Black Knight (Mrs. Wm. Mostyn x Thompsonii), and C. 
Princess Wilhelmina (Sallied aureum x Leeanum giganteum) ; from S. 
Gratrix, Esq. 

Odontoglossum Prince Edward, Ward's var., O. crispum Eric, and O. 
ardentissimum Norman ; from Z. A. Ward. Esq. 



March, i 9 i 2 .j THE ORCHID REVIEW. 95 

Odontoglossum crispum Luci-Masereel (Luciani X Franz Masereel), 

and Brassocattleya Rutherfordii (Gaskelliana alba X B. Veitchii Queen 

Alexandra) ; from Col. Rutherford, M.P. 

Cattleya Purity (Warneri alba X intermedia alba), and Odontoglossum 

King George V. ; from J. J. Holden, Esq. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

Two meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the Royal 
Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during March, on the 
5th and igth, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual hour, 12 
o'clock noon. The following meeting will be held on April 2nd. 

We note with interest that the Society's Summer Show will this year be 
held at Holland House, Kensington, on July 2nd, 3rd, and 4th ; also that, 
in order to demonstrate the value of hybrid Orchids as autumn-flowering 
plants, an exhibition will be held at the Horticultural Hall, Westminster, 
on November 5th and 6th. Cups and Medals are offered as prizes, and 
particulars will be announced later. A Conference on Orchids will be held 
in connection with the November exhibition. 

The Manchester and North of England Orchid Society will hold meetings 
at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on March 7th and 21st. The Com- 
mittee meets at noon, and the exhibits are open to inspection of members 
and the public from 1 to 4 p.m. The following meeting will be held on 
April 4th. 

Royal International Horticultural Exhibition. — At the request 
of M. Louis Gentil, Editor of the Tribune Horticole, Brussels, the Belgian 
State Railway, and the South-Eastern and Chatham Railway Companies 
have agreed to issue cheap tickets (50 per cent, under the usual price), to 
Belgian visitors to the London International Show in May next. These 
tickets will be issued from all the leading towns of Belgium direct to 
London, via Ostend or Calais, from May 18th up to May 26th, and will be 
available for fourteen days. 

The Secretary of the North of England Horticultural Society writes that 
at its Annual Meeting, held on January 17th last, a resolution was 
unanimously passed "that Members of the R.H.S. Council and Committees 
be Hon. Members of the N.E.H.S. Council and Committees." 
- At the Annual Meeting of the R.H.S. held on February 13th, the 
President, Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., announced that the Victoria Medal 
of Horticulture had been awarded to Lt.-Col. D. Prain, F.R.S., Director of 
the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and to Mr. E. H. Wilson, who has 
introduced so many interesting Chinese plants to our gardens. 



t>t> THE ORCHID REVIEW. [March, igii 

ORCHID PORTRAITS. 

Cattleya labiata. — Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 159, with fig. 

Cattleya Maggie Raphael alba Orchidhurst var.— Gard. Chron., 
1912, i. p. 75, fig. 35. 

Cymbidium Schlegelii. — Garden, 1912, p. 68, with fig. 

Cypripedium Lord Wolmer.-/omto. Hort., 1912, i. pp. 114, 115, 
with fig. 

Cypripedium Venus, Oakwood var.— Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 89, 
with fig. 

Dendrobium densiflorum.— Journ. Hort., 1912, i. p. 100, with 
suppl. fig. 

Epidendrum Stallforthianum, Kranzl. — Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 
114, fig. 49. 

Habenaria conopsea.— Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 68, fig. 34. 

L^elia anceps var. G. D. Owen.— Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 61, fig. 33. 

Odontoglossum memoria Lily Neumann. — Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 
99, lig. 45 ; Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 133, with fig. ; Journ. Hort., 1912, i. p. 
157, with fig. 

Odontoglossum Merlin. — Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 92, fig. 40 ; 
Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 107, with fig. 

Stanhopea peruviana, Rolfe.— Bot. Mag., t. 8417. 

Zygopetalum Mackayi var. Charlesworthii.— Gard. Chron., 1912, 
i. p. 83, fig. i7 . 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

requested to giv, - s se„t. An addiussh) pattern I mMi U 



> when the plant becomes strong. Cattleya Gaskelliana x Laelia Iona should develop 
inio a good thing. The Odontoglossum is O. purum, Rchb. f. 

C.F.K.— A flower of a hybrid Phakenopsis has been received without any information. 
A.H.— Flower quite undeveloped, and the record had better be deferred. 
J.F.S.— 1. Oncidium (8 Pulvinatae) sp. ; 2. Lockhartia micrantha, Rchb. f. ; 3. 
The two that were omitted of the earlier sending are: 1 Probably 
Tnchopiha oicophylax, Rchb. f. : 2. Xylobium hypocritum, Rolfe. 

Catalogue Received.— Descriptive List of Orchids from Mr. E. V. Low, Vale 
Bridge, Haywards Heath, containing a good selection of species and hybrids. 

: Agricultural and Horticultural Association, 92, Long Acre, 

Gardening for 1912, price 2d. 



Vol. XX., No. 232. THK APRIL, 1912 

ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 



Amateur's Collection 

Anguloa Clowesii 

Anguloa virginalis 

Answers to Correspondents 
Brassocattleya Veitchii, Hertford's var. 
Calendar of Operations for April . . . 
Mischobulbum scapigerum 

Orchid Notes and News 

Orchid Portraits 

Orchids in season 

Plant Hybrids i 

Royal International Horticultural Exhi 



Manchester and I s 

North of England 
Royal Horticultural 



Illustrations. 

Anguloa Clowesii 

Brassocattleya Veitchii, Holford's var. ... 

Cypripedium Chamberlainianum 

Cypripedium niveum 

Cypripedium Suttoniae 

PRICE SIXPENCE MONTHLY. Post Fur 7/- per Annum— See Overleaf. 

SANDER & SONS. 



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from our own freehold lands, situated in the best Osmunda producing territory 
of the United States of America. Price per bushel, 2/6 ; per bag, 8/6. 

ROYAL WARRANT ^R SJJW Jff HOLDERS TO THE KING. 

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ONCE TRIED BY AN ORCHID GROWER IS ALWAYS USED. 

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their Patrons and Friends to pay them 
of inspection at their New Establishment, 



Finest Trade Collection of Orchids In Europe. 

A Conveyance will be at the Railway Station to 
meet Visitors, upon notification being kindly given. 

Continental Branch-RUE GERARD, BRUSSELS. 

Catalogue Post Free. Telegrams r-Charlesworths, Haywards Heath. 

Please Address— Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, Sussex. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

We called attention at page 65 to a remark in the Report of the Council of 
the R.H.S. in which exhibitors and others are recommended to follow the 
Rules of Horticulture adopted by the Brussels Horticultural Congress, and 
we are glad to see the advice carried into practice in the last issue of the 
R.H.S. Journal. At page 249 of the proceedings we find the name of 
Sophrocattlaelia used, instead of the clumsy old name Sophro-Lselio-Cattleya. 
The former name was adopted from our own pages, and we think should 
be written Sophrocatlaelia, in accordance with the original spelling (O.R., 
viii. p. 354), and with the list of generic hybrids (O.R., xvi. p. 82) which was 
utilised when the list adopted in the said Rules was drawn up. The slip 
may have occurred through association with Brassocattlaelia, but this was 
originally written Brassocatlaslia (O.R., vi. p. 46), and both we think should 
be written with a single "t", in accordance with the original idea, which 
was to compound a short euphonious name from the names of the parent 
genera, in harmony with the scheme of the late Dr. Maxwell T. Masters 
when compounding the name Philageria. 

We hope that others will now fall into line, but we notice in the reports 
of the very last meeting of the R.H.S. the names Brasso-Cattleya, Laelio- 
Cattleya, and Brasso-Laelio-Cattleya, none of which are in accordance with 
the Rules under discussion, while the last-named is a complete innovation 
from every point of view. It is highly desirable that uniformity of practice 
should be secured, and even if it requires an effort to get used to the new 
rules the attempt should be made. 

The Field of February 10th says : " We have on more than one occasion 
protested against the absurdly long, discordant names given by fanciers to 
Orchids. Here, for example, is one which has been branded on to a most 
beautiful Cattleya shown by Sir George Holford. It was certainly the most 
admired plant in the Show until its name was sought, and then the 
majority cried shame. Imagine any ordinary flower lover being told that 
the only name this Orchid had was Sophrolaeliocattleya Marathon Vesuvius I 



9« THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, ,912. 

Yet Cattleya Vesuvius would serve all practical purposes, and we have a 
right to expect all horticulturists to be practical." But we may remind the 
Field that the plant is not a Cattleya, and it is not very practical to call a 
plant what it is not. It is a hybrid between a Sophrola^lia and a Cattleya, 
and the Rules of Horticultural Nomenclature adopted by the Brussels Con. 
gress require that all such plants shall be called Sophrocatlselia (not Sophro- 
lseliocattleya). The proper name of the plant is Sophrocatlslia Marathon 
var. Vesuvius, it being only a variety of the very variable Sophrocatladia 
Marathon (Sophrolaelia Psyche X Cattleya Frederickise), which appeared 
nearly four years ago. Is the Field prepared to ignore history in this 
fashion? and tb inflict on us two erroneous names over a single plant? 
The Field must look up the new rules. 

A remarkably fine Odontoglossum received a First-class Certificate at 
the last R.H.S. meeting under the name of O. crispum Samuel Gratrix. It 
is described as follows : " A grand variety, presumably a home-raised seed- 
ling from some finely blotched O. crispum. In shape it is one of the best 
shown. The sepals and petals are equally broad and beautifully marked 
with light violet colour. The large crisped labellum is white with some 
reddish purple blotches in front of the yellow crest." There can be no 
-doubt about its beauty, but why should it be necessary to presume about its 
parentage ? It ought to be known whether it is a home-raised seedling or 
not, and if so it ought to be possible to say something about its origin. We 
are getting far too many Odontoglossums of " unknown" and "unrecorded" 
parentage, and we have received another protest against the looseness with 
which records are now being kept, coupled with some strong language which 
we do not care to repeat. Our correspondent wishes us to make a strong 
appeal for some particulars of the origin of these doubtful forms, and we 
agree with him that there is no need to hide so much light under a bushel. 

It is interesting to note that another plant of the rare and striking 
Neomoorea irrorata was exhibited at the last R.H.S. meeting, by Messrs. 
Charlesworth & Co. Several plants of it are now known, but it is not 
often seen in bloom. It was originally described over twenty years ago 
from a single plant which appeared at Glasnevin, and a figure afterwards 
appeared at t. 7265 of the Botanical Magazine. It was also given as the 
frontispiece of our twelfth volume. 

Within two months we shall be in the midst of the great International 
Horticultural Exhibition, to be held in the grounds of the Royal Hospital, 
Chelsea, from May 22nd to 30th. The schedule shows that thirty-two 
classes have been set apart for Orchids. The usual showy groups are well 



April, 191 2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 09 

provided for, and there are classes for British Orchids ; hardy terrestrial 
Orchids, British excluded ; for Orchids of Botanical interest, not necessarily 
in flower; and, what should be specially interesting in view of recent 
developments, a class for Cochlioda hybrids. Some particulars were given 
at page 125 of our last volume, and we anticipate a very brilliant display, 
including some important continental exhibits. We hope that the Show 
may be favoured with fine weather, and that the event may prove a brilliant 
success. Since the above was written we have received an important 
communication, which appears on another pagej . 

PLANT HYBRIDS. 

Notes of a lecture given at a meeting of the Kew Gardeners' Mutual Improvement 

Society held on February 19th, 191 2, by Mr. R. Allen Rolfe, A.L.S. 
A hybrid is the result of crossing one species by another, the offspring 
being more or less intermediate between the two parents, or at least 
■combining their characters. The object of hybridisation is to raise new 
and improved races of garden plants by combining the characters of distinct 
species or transferring desirable qualities. The earliest artificial hybrid 
recorded was raised by Thomas Fairchild, by crossing a Carnation with the 
pollen of a Sweet William, as recorded by Bradley in 1717, some forty 
years before Kolreuter began his long series of experiments. The practice 
of hybridising became general during the latter half of the eighteenth 
•century, and has now been carried into almost every branch of horticulture, 
having become a very important industry, and the number of hybrids 
now in gardens is estimated at several thousands. But hybridisation has 
probably been practiced, consciously or unconsciously, for ages, for it is 
said that in the time of the Roman Empire Rose growers used to dust their 
flowers with pollen from another kind, and a similar process was probably 
adopted by early breeders of Tulips, Auriculas, &c, who made great secret 
of their methods. We have also the fact that the Chinese and Japanese 
have been raising various races of garden plants for centuries, though we 
.have very meagre accounts of their methods. 

Even before the sexuality of plants was known the advantage of planting 
different kinds together when new varieties were desired was recognised, and 
it was supposed that there was a subtle transfusion of qualities from one to 
the other. It is now, of course, understood that these varieties arose through 
interchange of pollen by insect agency, and one of the surprises of recent 
years has been the large number of spontaneous or natural hybrids in 
■existence, sometimes quite unsuspected until some hybridist happens to 
.raise the same thing artificially. 

The late Mr. C. Wolley Dod carried on a very interesting experiment 
.at Edge Hall, Cheshire. Hybridisation was not practiced, but for years 



IO o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 19.2. 

he never allowed a seedling to be destroyed in his herbaceous borders until 
its identity was known. In this way all spontaneous hybrid seedlings had 
a chance of developing. The result was the appearance of a large number 
of hybrids of the most diverse genera, even including a hybrid between the 
Madeiran Orchis foliosa and one of our European kinds, and all by the 
interchange of pollen by insect agency. 

In the same way hybrids often occur in a state of nature where allied 
species grow intermixed. An enormous number of such plants are now 
known, though for a very long time botanists refused to recognise their 
existence, generally describing them as distinct species or as varieties of 
one or the other parent. Examples are common in Rosa, Salix, Epilobium, 
and numerous other genera, and in some cases have given rise to quite 
amusing discussions as to their identity. Among Orchids we may mention 
Odontoglossum, Cattleya, Dendrobium, Vanda, and even crosses between 
distinct genera, as Cattleya and Lselia, Cattleya and Brassavola, and 
between Orchis and Serapias and two or three other European genera. 
Hybridisation is largely a question of opportunity, and when species that 
will hybridise happen to grow together an interchange of pollen is sure to 
be effected by insect agency, and spontaneous or natural hybrids are the 
result. Such plants may often be recognised by their compound or 
intermediate character. 

The term hybridisation is often loosely applied to cross-fertilisation 
generally, but should strictly be limited to cases where the two parents 
belong to distinct species or are themselves true hybrids, for the term 
hybrid implies the union of organisms that have different properties and 
characters, and is something deeper than the mere cross-fertilisation of 
forms or varieties of the same species. 

Hybridisation consists in the application of the pollen of one species to 
the stigma of another, and the subsequent growth of the pollen tubes down 
the tissue of the style, and the fertilisation of the ovules ; the process 
resulting in the union of two organisms having distinct ancestries, and thus 
showing intermediate characters or a combination of characters derived 
from the diverse parents. Hybrids from nearly-allied species usually 
exhibit a blend of the parental characters, but in those from widely- 
separated species one often finds a combination, the characters of one or 
the other parent being very marked in certain organs, and thus it is some- 
times possible to trace the parentage unmistakably. In some cases the 
resemblance to one of the parents is very marked, the other being only 
traced with difficulty, a phenomenon to which the term dominance has 
been applied. It has probably some definate relation to the ancestry of the 
parents organisms, and may be considered as a form of reversion. 

In the case of what are termed false hybrids the dominance is so 



April, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 101 

complete that the offspring entirely resemble the seed parent, as in the 
well-known case of Zygopetalum Mackayi when crossed with various 
genera, the cause of which is not understood, though there is at least the 
presumption that hybridisation proper may not have taken place, but that 
the ovules have developed parthenogenetically. In others, however, the 
resemblance is to the pollen parent, as in Epiphronitis Veitchii (Sophronitis 
grandiflora X Epidendrum radicans), which is almost identical with a 
dwarf Epidendrum in character, yet cannot be obtained from the reverse 
cross. As regards colour hybrids are often intermediate, but in some cases 
a mixture of the colours of the two parents is seen. A hybrid may be 
termed a mosaic in which every character of the two parents is represented 
in some form or another. Mixed characters are often found in hybrids 
where the parents have distinct kinds of hairs or other surface appendages, 
the two kinds often being found side by side in the hybrid. 

There are hybrids of almost every degree of complexity. Primary 
hybrids are those directly obtained by crossing distinct species, and these 
are generally pretty uniform in character. Secondary, and more complex 
hybrids, on the contrary, even from the same capsule, often show a very 
wide range of variation. The cause of this can be traced to the fundament- 
ally different nature of the reproductive cells in the two cases. In the case 
of species the reproductive cells — pollen and ovules — are uniform in 
character, but in that of hybrids the case is very different. Dissociation, 
through incompatibility of the original specific elements, has already taken 
place, the result being that the reproductive cells are not uniform in 
character, but represent the original specific elements in varying propor- 
tions, and thus the offspring of secondary crosses often shows the widest 
possible range of variation. This was remarked by Mr. Seden in the case 
of Laeliocattleya fausta, the first secondary hybrid Orchid raised, when he 
told the late Mr. John Day that some of the seedlings most resembled their 
parents and some their grandparents. 

When hybrids are fertile, as is very often the case among plants, they 
can be further intercrossed, and in this way there are hybrids in existence 
derived from three, four, five, and even six species, and the difficulty of 
identifying some of them can easily be imagined. In fact these complex 
hybrids often show a considerable amount of reversion, and if a hybrid, AB, 
is crossed with a third species, C, one may expect to find among the off- 
spring forms approaching the hybrids AC and BC, owing to dissociation of 
the characters of the hybrid AB before uniting with C. Such plants are 
very difficult to identify when they occur wild, as was illustrated among 
forms of the remarkable Cypnpedium aureum, and the fact shows the 
importance of keeping careful records, for it is not always possible to 
identify a hybrid from external appearance and in the absence of its history. 



102 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Apkil, 1912. 

The mosaic character of hybrids is often illustrated in curious ways. A 
hybrid reproduced by self-fertilisation may show a wide amount of diversity 
among the offspring, owing to dissociation of the original specific characters, 
as in the case of Epidendrum kewense, or again by the appearance of 
"rogues," as they are called in horticultural practice. Dissociation may 
also occur in other ways. For example, Cypripedium Dauthieri, a form of 
C. Harrisianum, after long culture sported into a striped form, which was 
described by Reichenbach as variety Rossianum. Later on, this again pro- 
duced a chlorotic form, or what is sometimes termed an albino, which was 
named variety Poggio Gherardo, from its place of origin, and this in turn 
sported to a curious harlequin-coloured form which was called variety Janet 
Ross, after the lady in whose collection it appeared. In another collection 
C. Dauthieri sported into what was called C. Dauthieri var. The Albino, 
while the original C. Harrisianum has sported into a green form called var' 
virescens. It is probable that what is termed " sporting " generally is due 
to the same cause, for it is usually seen among plants that have a mixed 

Graft hybrids, of which the curious Cytisus Adami is a familiar example, 
may be regarded as to some extent analagous with sexual hybrids, for they 
arise from new tissue formed at the junction between the stock and scion, 
and are due to blending of the two diverse ancestries. Moreover, dissocia- 
tion of specific character also occurs, though not quite in the same way as is 
seen among sexual hybrids. It may be noted, however, that it has not yet 
been found possible to raise forms identical with graft hybrids by sexual pro- 
cess, but this may arise from mechanical difficulties connected with fertilis- 
ation, for when once united the diverse protoplasms are capable of living, 
together. 

The difficulty, sometimes amounting to impossibility, of hybridising 
certain plants arises in many cases from mechanical limitations, as is well 
illustrated by reciprocal crosses. Epiphronitis Veitchii can only be raised 
with Sophronitis as the seed bearer, and although several other generic 
hybrids have been raised with Epidendrum radicans as the pollen parent it 
has never been possible to obtain the reverse cross. Repeated efforts have 
been made to fertilise this Epidendrum with the pollen of Cattleya and 
Laelia, but always without success, and the difficulty is evidently of a 
mechanical nature. 

Mechanical limitations may be of several kinds, and one which is very 
clearly indicated in the behaviour of reciprocal crosses is connected with 
the relative length of the styles of the two parents. Sophronitis grandiflora 
is not a good pollen parent, because of the short pollen tubes it develops 
Messrs. Charlesworth once showed me a ripe capsule of a Cattleya 
fertilised with the Sophronitis, which had only matured seeds at the apex 



April, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 103 

This was shown by dividing the capsule longitudinally, the fertilised seeds 
being marked by their quite different colour. All the lower part contained 
colourless empty chaff, and was now cut off and thrown away. On the 
other hand, Brassavola Digbyana is not a good seed parent, because of its 
very long beak above the ovary, and when so used one generally only finds 
good seeds at the apex of the capsule. Cochlioda Ncetzliana is a good seed 
parent, but its pollen usually fails to fertilise Odontogtosmm, where the 
pollen tubes have a much longer column to traverse. The cause of such 
cases is clear, but it is believed that other limitations are connected with 
the relative sizes of the pollen tubes and the micropyle of the ovule, the 
former sometimes being too large to enter. This could only be demon- 
strated by microscopical examination. A third set of limitations is con- 
nected with the time required for the development of the ovules and pollen 
tubes after pollination. 

The latter reveals a very remarkable condition of things. An Orchid 
flower is not mature on expansion, as in the case of a lily, as may be seen 
by cutting the ovary across, when the ovules are seen to be very minute 
and altogether undeveloped. Their development lags behind in a perfectly 
normal way, and only proceeds after and as the result of pollination, which 
introduces a totally new phase in the process of fertilisation. The result 
of pollination is immediately seen in the discoloration and withering of the 
floral segments and the thickening of the column. The pollen tubes now 
commence their growth down the tissue of the style, while the ovaries 
grow and mature. Both processes require a considerable time for their 
completion, varying from a week or ten days, in the case of the European 
terrestrial Orchids, to about three months in that of Cattleya Mossiae, which 
latter has been worked out by Mr. Harry J. Veitch in an elaborate paper. 

This development of rhe pollen tubes and ovules proceeds together, and 
when both are mature and fertilisation is effected — the capsule by this time 
appearing about half grown— the ovules then develop into seeds in the 
usual way. Now it is obvious that if plants were crossed whose pollen and 
ovules matured at relatively very different periods, fertilisation might fail 
because the pollen tubes matured before or after the ovules were ready, and 
thus fail at the critical period. It is often remarked that capsules go off 
when only half developed, or open somewhat later, and are found to 
contain nothing but chaff, and the cause of this is evidently due to the 
fact that fertilisation has not been effected. Pollination and fertilisation 
are totally different processes, and the stimulus to the development of the 
ovules may be given by many different kinds of pollen, which are after- 
wards utterly incapable of effecting their fertilisation. 

Hybridisation and selection have been among the most potent causes 
of improvement of garden plants. One can hardly turn anywhere without 



io 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 1912. 

seeing the enormous progress that has been made, and among the most 
diverse groups. Among Orchids, which were once considered to be beyond 
the powers of the hybridist, but now constitute one of his favourite groups, 
we may mention Odontoglossum, Cypripedium, Calanthe, and Cattleya as 
illustrations. Hybridisation not only gives rise directly to new and highly 
decorative forms, but it also gives a stimulus to variation, and thus provides 
the materials on which selection can work. Some garden plants have been 
improved without hybridisation, but in such cases the first steps have 
usually been extremely slow, owing to the slight tendency to vary, but 
when this fixity of character has been broken by a few judicious crosses the 
rate of progress has been enormously accelerated. This tendency to vary 
is one of the most marked features of hybrids, so much so that when 
fine hvbrid has been obtaii 




, and a process of selection has to be carried on, often fo 
generations, before its characters become fixed. 

The lecture was illustrated by plants in flower of Cypripedium Suttonia 
and its two parents, C. niveum and C. Chamberlainianum (figured above), 
by drawings of some of the Orchids mentioned, and by specimens of 
numerous ordinary garden plants and their parents. Illustrations drawn 
from the latter have been omitted from these notes. The lecture was 
followed by an interesting discussion, in which many phases of hybridisa- 
tion and its bearing on the evolution of garden plants were touched upon. 



l, 19 1 2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

ANGULOA CLOWESII. 
, annexed figure represents a plant of the striking Angnloa Cl< 
etimes known as the tulip Orchid, on account of its shape and 
)\v colour. The species has been known in cultivation for 
nty years, having been originally introduced by M. J. Lindei 




flowered in the collection of the 
Manchester, in March, 1844. It w; 
xxx. Misc. p. 66), and afterwards fig 
gentleman in whose colle 



st flowered. Linde 



'°6 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 1912-. 

he first detected it near the village of Jaji, in the province of Merida, in 
1842, but it was afterwards gathered by Schlim near Ocana, and by Purdie 
at Santa Martha. It is said to extend along both sides of the eastern 
Cordillera from Santa Martha to Bogota, being abundant in some localities. 
It is interesting to note that A. Ruckeri and A. virginalis also appeared in 
M. Linden's original importation, the latter being the plant so long 
cultivated under the name of A. uniflora, but not the original A. uniflora, 
Ruiz and Pavon, with which A. eburnea, Williams, is now known to be 
identical. A. Clowesii var. eburnea, Veitch {Man. Orch. PL, ix. p. 100) is- 
also the same species. The plant of A. Clowesii here figured was grown at 
Kew, and the photograph reproduced was taken by Mr. C. P. Raffill. 

Some fine specimens of Anguloa Clowesii have occasionally been seen, 
A noble specimen from the collection of Major Joicey, Sunningdale Park, 
was recorded at page 232 of our tenth volume. It was grown in a 14-inch 
pot, and bore thirty-three flowers. It had been grown on by Mr. Thorne 
from a plant which eight years before received a First-class Certificate from. 
the R.H.S., when in a 6-inch pot. The appearance of this plant recalled 
a still finer specimen from the collection of O. O. Wrigley, Esq., to which 
a Veitch Memorial Medal was awarded at Manchester in 1878. This is 
said to have been fully three feet across, and to have borne nearly fifty of 
its rich golden cups, a truly noble specimen and an example of good culture 
which has seldom been surpassed, for it had been grown on from one or 
two bulbs. 



ANGULOA VIRGINALIS. 
i the plant which has been cultivated for so long a period 



of Anguloa uniflora, but which 



ago pointed 



was not the original A. uniflora of Ruiz & Pavon (O.K., xvii. pp. 316, 317). 
The species was introduced by M. J. Linden, and flowered in the collection 
of Mr. G. Barker, Springfield, Birmingham, in April, 1844, when Lindley 
unfortunately identified and figured it under the name of A. uniflora (Bot. 
Reg., xxx. t. 60). The name A. virginalis appeared in 1851 {Card. Chron., 
1851, p. 392), with the record that plants were sold at Stevens' Rooms at £z 
to £3, 5 s - each. The plants may have been distributed by M.J. Linden, for 
the name appears on the tickets of his collector Schlim, who obtained 
plants at about 5000 feet altitude near Ocana, and the dried specimens 
agree completely with those previously collected by Linden. Soon 
afterwards plants of the same species collected by Warscewicz, near 
Quindios, were offered for sale, and one of these-a rosy spotted form- 
was figured in the Botanical Magazine (t. 4807) as A. uniflora. This latter 
agrees with A. Turned, Williams (Orch. Grow. Man.., ed. 6, p. 133), but is 
only a form of A. virginalis, Linden, which is described on the same page. 



April, 1,91a.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 107 

Jameson also collected plants at 7000 feet altitude in the province of Loxa, 
and remarks that it "produces a flower which, from some fancied' 
resemblance to a bull's head, has received the name of el Torito " (Hook. 
Loud. Jouru. Bot., ii. p. 658). The species is widely diffused, from 
Venezuela to Ecuador and North Peru, and is easily distinguished from 
A. uniflora, Ruiz & Pavon (A. eburnea, Williams), by its smaller less 
globose flowers. The colour varies from ivory white and unspotted to 
blush heavily spotted with pink.— R. A. R. 

ROYAL INTERNATIONAL HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION. 

(Official). 
THE ORCHIDS. 
As the time for holding this great exhibition draws near, it becomes possible 
to get some idea of the exhibits that will be displayed in the different 
sections. The scope of the schedule is so wide that provision is made for 
no fewer than 428 classes ; many of them of a character to test the capacity 
of the most redoubtable exhibitor. The Orchid classes number thirty-two, 
and the entries show that there will be competition in most of them. 

There are two entries in the amateurs' class for the best and most varied 
group of Orchids, arranged in a space not exceeding 500 square feet. 
These exhibits will occupy 1,000 square feet, and there are two valuable 
cups to be awarded to the competitors. In the nurserymen's class for 
similar groups there are are four entries for Sir George Holford's Cup; 
there will therefore be nearly 2,000 square feet of Orchids in this class. 

Those who profess to despise hybrid Orchids in favour of the natural 
species and their varieties will be interested in Class 68, in which nurserymen 
will compete for the best and most varied group of species, and varieties of 
species, arranged in spaces net exceeding 200 square feet. Liberal 
provision, however, is made for the showy hybrids, which are due to 
patient and skilful cross-breeding, carried out in British and foreign hot- 
houses, Baron Bruno Schroder's presentation cup being offered for the best 
group of hybrids occupying a space of 200 square feet. 

There is one entry in an open class for a group of the resplendent 
Lselias, Cattleyas, and Brassavolas— varieties and hybrids— in a space of 
100 square feet ; this exhibit will be amongst the most showy. More 
numerous entries are forthcoming in a class for the same type of plants 
where the specimens are limited to twenty-five, and again where the number 
must not exceed twelve. The effect of the scarlet Cochlioda Ncetzliana is 
manifest in the more brightly-coloured hybrids of Odontoglossum, and it 
is hoped that the exhibit will show what genera and species have been 
crossed with this gay little gem. Such information would be valuable, not 
merely to specialists, but to all interested gardeners. 



i°8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 1912 

Then there are classes for specimen Orchids in collections of 100 
specimens, and others in which the specimens are limited to fifty, twelve, 
and six. There will be keen competition for the Silver Cup offered for the 
best specimen Orchid in the show. One exhibitor will contribute a group 
of Orchids in which the interest is botanical rather than decorative. The 
visitor will here be able to see the wonderful forms and devices exhibited 
by the different flowers, illustrating the numerous ways by which the 
important process of fertilisation is brought about, necessary for the 
perpetuation of the species. 

We have as yet referred only to competitive Orchids, but these will not 
exhaust the exhibits of these marvellous flowers, for some of the most able 
amateurs and nurserymen will confine their efforts to exhibiting honorary 
collections. For instance, Sir George Holford, K.C.V.O., CLE., is 
expected to exhibit the largest group of Orchids an amateur has ever shown 
in this or any other country, and the excellent quality of the plants may be 
judged by previous exhibits from the Westonbirt collection. 

It is a notable fact that in the Orchid section the number of entries 
from foreign Orchidists is very nearly one-half the number received from 
Britain. The exhibitors of Orchids are as follow :— 

Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, Kent. 

Birchenall, J., Alderley Edge. 

Charlesworth, Messrs., Haywards Heath. 

Colman, Sir Jeremiah, Gatton Park, Reigate. 

Cypher, J. & Sons, Cheltenham. 

Dixon, Harry, Spencer Park Nursery, Wandsworth Common. 

Evans, J., Manor House, Key Green, Congleton. 

Fowler, J. Gurney, South Woodford. 

Hassall & Co., Southgate, N. 

Holford, Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L., Tetbury, Glos. 

James, Mrs. Willie, West Dean. 

Cowans, Ltd., Gateacre, Liverpool. 

Low, Stuart, & Co., Enfield. 

Low, E. V., Haywards Heath. 

MacCartney, J. Bolton. 

Maxsell & Hatcher, Rawdon, Leeds. 

Ogilvie, F. Menteith, Oxford. 

Ralli, P., Epsom. 

Raphael, C. F., Shenley. 

Roberts, J., Rotherham. 

Robson, J., Altrincham. 

Rothschild, Lionel de, Acton, W. Sander & Sons, St. Albans. 

Rutherford, Col. J., Blackburn. Wellesley, F., Woking 



April, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 109- 

Foreign Exhibitors. 

Arends, Mons. G., Nurseryman, Ronsdorf, Barmen. 

Dietrich, E., Chateau du Val Duchesse, Bruxelles. 

Graire, Mons., 5, Rue St. Fuscien, Amiens. 

Jules, C. Hye de Crom, 8, Coupure, Gand. 

Lambeau, F., Rue du Fosse aux Loups, 39, Bruxelles. 

MANDA, W. A., South Orange, New York. 

Maron et Fils, Brunoy, France. 

Muller, Abeken, G. H., Scheseningen. 

Peeters, A. A. et Fils, Ancienne Chaussee de Meysse, Laeken^ 
Bruxelles. 

Regel, Dr. E., Botanic Garden, St. Petersburgh. 

Vincke, A. H. & L., Scheepsdaele, Bruges. 

Vuylsteke, Ch., Loochristi, Gand. 
This great exhibition will take place in the spacious grounds adjoining 
the Royal Hospital, Chelsea. His Majesty the King will open the exhibition 
in person at noon on May 22nd, and it will remain open until May 30th. 

Invitations have just been issued to upwards of 350 specialists in every 
branch of horticulture to officiate as jurors at this great show. In awarding 
the prizes, British judges in every group will have the assistance of one or 
more foreign colleagues. R. Hooper Pearson, Hon. Press Secretary. 

THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 

By C. Alwyn Harrison, F.R.H.S. 
Cool House. 
Slightly higher temperatures may be maintained this month than were 
advised in the March article, and with this increase in warmth, more air 
may be admitted, both through the top and bottom ventilators. It should 
be always carefully borne in mind that the occupants of a Cool Orchid 
house delight in pure fresh air, and as much as possible should be given 
throughout the year, although regulating the quantity admitted, so as not 
to allow the thermometer to register below the required height. 

A few general notes on the watering of cool Orchids may be of value to 
the beginner. From now until the beginning of June, all plants which are 
in active growth, or in bud or flower, will require a good dose about three 
times a week, but for those which are at rest, twice a week is sufficient. Of 
course, the above hints must only be regarded as a rough guide, and less 
than the quantity suggested above will be needed if April prove cold and 
rainy. If hne and warm, fire heat may be dispensed with in this house at 
the latter end of the month, but should cold and dull weather continue, 
artificial heating should still be employed. 



i*° THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 1912. 

Ada aurantiaca, Cymbidium Lovvianum, and many Odontoglossums 
should now make this house very gay, and if any plants of the second 
named Orchid need repotting, it should be performed after the flower 
spikes have been removed. When repotting Cymbidium Lowianum, or in 
fact any species or hybrid of that genus, plenty of pot room should be 
afforded, as they do not like frequent root disturbance. Place them well 
to one side in the new pot so as to allow for further growth, and set the 
base of the bulbs slightly above the rim of the pot. For compost, use a 
mixture of good yellow friable loam, sphagnum moss and osmunda fibre. 
These should be used in a damp state, and the plant made very firm. 

Tie up flower spikes of Odontoglossums when they have attained the 
length of a few inches, as they are less liable then to be broken off. Pieces 
of cotton wool should be wrapped round the base of these to prevent theu 
being eaten by slugs, for which this pest shows much relish. These wet 
days we are now experiencing can be profitably utilized by sponging the 
leaves of the Orchids, washing the pots and staging, and in cutting off dead 
leaves. Sophronitis grandiflora will have finished flowering, and can be 
repotted, for which use a mixture of chopped Osmunda fibre and sphagnum 
moss. Oncidiums Marshallianum and macranthum, if developing their 
flower spikes, should be stood well up to the light. Shade the house only 
when the sun shines directly upon it. 

Cattleya House. 
As the weather is warmer, and the sun is gaining more power, it will be 
a matter of ease to maintain the temperatures which were advised last 
month, at the same time affording more air. The general rules for watering 
given in my last article, are also applicable at the present time, but I do 
not yet like using shading for this house, unless the sun is extremely 
powerful. The usual inmates of a Cattleya house are sun-loving subjects, 
and to attempt to cultivate them in gloomy surroundings always ends in 
failure. I may here remark that the plants in this house should never be 
grown so close together as may be done in a cool house. There should be a 
free circulation of air all round the pots containing Cattleyas, Ladias, &c. 

This is now a very good time to obtain some imported plants of Dendro- 
biums and Vanda ccerulea, large quantities of both, having arrived this year. 
When a few plants have been received, they should be potted only in crocks, 
and kept just damp or lightly sprayed overhead until a start has been made! 
A little compost can then be given, removing the topmost crocks. I am 
not in favour of suspending the plants head downwards under the staging, a 
mode of culture often practised. From several experiments, I find tha\ they 
start equally well if potted in crocks, and grown in a rational way. Should 
any established plants of Vanda ccerulea, Angramms, Aerides or similar 
Orchid require fresh moss, now is the best time to top-dress them. 



THE ORCHID RK\ II-W. 



Any Cattleyas, Lftlias. or their man 


y hybrids, which have passed out 


of flower may be repotted now, if requi 


red. Trim the plants with care, 


and do not set them too low in the new p 


>ot. The base of the bulbs should 


be half an inch above the rim of the pot. 


For soil use a mixture of Ai fibre 


and osmnnda, with a few heads of sphagn 


urn moss. Use these ingredients 


in a damp state, and pot moderat.lv linn 


ly. Any seedlings requiring a shift 



should be done now, before the weather gets too warm, otherwise they are 
apt to receive a check. Maintain a damp atmosphere in the house now on- 
wards until October sets in, as this is the period of maximum growth. 
Suggested Additions. 

Cattleya Harrisoniana.— For an amateur's collection this is a very 
suitable subject, being of easy culture and remarkably free flowering. The 
blossoms are smaller than in many other members of this genus, but 
are borne in large clusters, and well matured pseudobulbs bear from five 
to ten flowers. The sepals and petals are rosy lilac, and the lip white with 
a yellow disc. It lasts many days in perfection, and is of good constitution. 
■Cattleya Loddigesii is very similar to the above, and is also suitable for an 
amateur's house. 

Odontoglossum Adrians. — This is a very pretty hybrid between 
O. crispum and Hunnewellianum, which first appeared as a natural hybrid. 
It is very variable, the ground colour of the sepals and petals being some- 
times white, but often of various shades of yellow, in nearly all cases 
spotted with reddish brown. It is a cheap Orchid and remarkably 
floriferous ; healthy, well-grown plants- often carrying fifty or more of its 

Odontoglossum hellemense var. Butleri— A four-flowered 
inflorescence of a handsome hybrid is sent from the collection of W. 
Waters Butler, Esq., Southfield, Edgbaston. It was purchased as a 
seedling, and until it flowered there was a little uncertainty as to which of 
two specified crosses it came from, but now the parentage can be given as 
O. loochristiense Vuylstekeanum X O. crispum Rossendale (the other cross 
being out of the question), and thus it is a variety of O. hellemense, which 
may be named as above. The details of the lip and its union to the base 
of the column strongly recall O. triumphans, except that the ground colour 
is more white. The sepals are bright red-brown, with a nearly white apex 
and a narrow margin of the same colour, while the petals are about twice 
as broad, well toothed and acuminate at the apex, and the colour deep red- 
brown, with the apex and a broad clearly-defined margin white. There is 
also a prominent white blotch at the base of the petals and dorsal sepal. 
The lip is yellow blotched with brown, and the column deep red-brown 
•at the back, with broad, deeply-toothed wings. 



ii2 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 1912. 

BRASSOCATTLEYA VEITCHII, HOLFORD'S VARIETY. 
The annexed figure represents a very beautiful Brassocattleya, from the 
collection of Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. 
Mr. H. G. Alexander), which received a First-class Certificate from the 
R.H.S. on November 21st last. Its parents are Brassavola Digbyana and 
Cattleya Mossiae Reineckeana, and the albinism of the latter has been 



^ 



. 



well fringed. 



8. Brassocatt 
5 hybrid to a gre 
. The flower is 



'A VEITCHII, HOLFORD'S VAK. 

xtent, the ground colour of the flower 
;e disc to the lip, and a few rosy mark- 
sxcellent shape, and the lip broad and 
companion to the chaste white Brasso- 



April, 1912.) THE ORCHID REVIEW. 113 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR APRIL. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
The temperatures of the different houses may now be raised five degrees 
higher than the figures given in the January number, except in the case of 
the Cool house, which should be kept as near the same figures as possible. 
As regards temperatures, no harm will occur with slight variations, but 
drastic ones are most harmful. 

Watering.— With the brighter days our plants will take more water, 
but it will have to be applied with discretion, and the remarks made last 
month, under this heading, still apply. 

Ventilation, with a milder outside temperature, can be more liberal, 
and I am a firm believer in fresh air for our plants, therefore every 
opportunity should be taken of admitting it. It must, however, be done 
judiciously, and with caution. 

Shading, during this often fickle month, will demand great attention, 
as, after the very dull and wet season which we have passed through, the 
plants will not be able to withstand much strong sunshine. They must be 
gradually inured to the increased light, so that the young leaves are capable of 
withstanding it, and so that the new growths are consolidated and 
strengthened as they are made. 

Cypripediums that have passed out of bloom, and require repotting, 
should be attended to as soon as possible, so that their growing season 
may not be unduly curtailed. As soon as they are all finished, it is 
advisable to overhaul and thoroughly clean them before putting them in 
their summer quarters. Each plant should have room to develop its 
growth, as, with proper care and attention, they should not require 
overhauling again till the autumn. 

Ccelogyne cristata and its varieties which have been resting, 
according to my remarks last month, will now be making new growths and 
new roots, and, if necessary, they should be repotted. Any plants that are 
in good condition should not be interfered with, as this Coelogyne resents 
being disturbed at the root to a very great degree, and often suffers 
considerably. The compost I recommend for them consists of equal 
portions of peat, osmunda, loam fibre, and sphagnum moss, well mixed 
together. Other species of Coelogyne which may also have attention at 
this season, should they require it, are C. flaccida, C. conferta, C. elata, 
C. speciosa, C. Micholitzii, C. corrugata, and. others. The whole of these 
delight in an Intermediate house temperature, and, when well established, an 
abundant supply of water at the roots. C. Dayana, C. asperata and others 
which are showing for flower, may have more water at the root. 

Cattleyas, Delias and Ljsliocattleyas.— As these beautiful Orchids 



ii 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 191 a. 

pass out of flower and are seen to be making new roots, they may be 
repotted, if the compost in which they are growing is exhausted, or the 
plant requires a larger receptacle. Those plants which flowered during the 
winter months should have attention as soon as it is observed that they are 
beginning to push new roots. C. Lawrenceana, pushing up its flower 
spikes, should be kept in a fairly dry position, and only given enough water 
to keep the compost moist, and prevent the bulbs from shrivelling. After 
the flowers have faded, and the plant is seen to be pushing roots, it may 
have attention. This plant, when at rest, requires a warm, light position. 
If placed in a humid, cold atmosphere, the leaves turn black, and the bulbs 
decay. The present is a good season to repot any seedlings of either of the 
above families, as they get nicely established before the hot weather is 

L.elia anceps and its varieties that require repotting should be finished 
as soon as possible, as they require a long season of growth, and take some 
little time to re-establish themselves after being disturbed. 

Dendrobiums. — For some time past the members of this large family 
of Orchids have been a prominent feature in our houses. Many of the 
earliest plants to flower are now developing their new growths, which will 
produce new roots when they attain a few inches in height. This is the 
best season to supply fresh rooting material to any requiring it. They may 
be grown in either pots, pans, or baskets, according to their character, and 
a suitable compost consists of equal portions of peat, polypodium and 
osmunda fibres, and sphagnum moss. The pots and pans must be well 
drained, and no water should be given until the new roots are seen to be 
pushing through the compost. The plants may be slightly sprayed over- 
head on bright days, but this must be done with discretion, as if the water 
is allowed to lodge in the young growth it will decay, which is a great 
check to the plant. 

Catasetums, Cycnoches, and Mormodes. — As soon as the young 
growths are seen to be pushing from the base of the pseudobulbs of any 
member of either of the above families they should be repotted. They are 
best done annually, and a suitable compost is the one used for Cattleyas. 
The pots must be well drained, and the plant potted moderately firmly, and 
the long, heavy pseudobulbs neatly tied to a stake to keep them secure. 
For some time after repotting no water will be required, providing the 
compost is moist when they are done, as should it become wet there is 
great danger of losing the young growths. The plants should be grown 
close to the glass in the warmest house, and when in active growth they 
require a liberal supply of water. The plants should be rested with the 
Dendrobiums, and only have sufficient water to prevent the pseudobulbs 
from shrivelling. 



THE ORCHID REVIE] 



Odontoglossums.— Any 


plants of Odontoglossum crispum or its 


hybrids which require repoi 


tting, from any cause, may have attention 


when their young growths a 


re a few inches long, and about to push roots. 


Plants repotted at this sea 


son must have extra attention as regards 


watering and shading. 0. c 


:itrosmum, having been resting in the cool 


Intermediate house, will nov 


v be pushing up its flower spikes from the 


centre of its young growths 


, and the plants so doing may be given more 


water, but no water must be allowed to enter the young growth, or much 



Oncidiums. — O. varicosum, and other late-flowering species, will now 
be starting into growth, and when young roots are observed to be pushing 
from their base fresh rooting material should be given to any that may 
require it. They will succeed in the same compost as Odontoglossums, but 
a more liberal supply of half-decayed oak leaves may be given to them. 
O. Marshallianum, O. concolor and others now developing flower spikes 
require a moderate supply of water at the roots. Oncidiums, when in full 
growth, and nicely rooted in the compost, delight in abundance of moisture 
at the root and in the atmosphere. Like all Orchids, they must be watered 
with care, until the new roots are well established in the compost. 

Aerides, Saccolabiums, and AngR/ECUMs that require new compost 
should be attended to at once, for, with the increased amount of daylight 
and sun heat, they will rapidly push forth new roots, and as the growing 
points of these are very tender, and easily broken, it is advisable to get 
them done before there is any danger of this occurring. Place them in 
well-drained pots, using a compost of equal portions of osmunda fibre and 
sphagnum moss. 

Renanthera Imschootiana, now pushing up its flower spikes, may 
have a more liberal supply of water to the roots. This plant succeeds 
best when grown near the glass in an Intermediate house, and delights in a 
supply of fresh air at all times. 

Miltonia vexillaria, now pushing up its flower spikes, must not be 
allowed to suffer for want of water at the root, neither should the plants 
receive it in such quantities as to destroy the young roots pushing from the 
base of the half-made pseudobulb. Any flower spikes entrapped between 
the leaves, by the leaves adhering to each other, should be carefully 
liberated, or else they will become distorted, and, in many cases, break 
themselves in two. M. Bleuana and other hybrids of M. vexillaria have 
rather an irregular flowering period, and where a quantity of plants are 
grown there will nearly always be some in flower, or showing for flower, 
The conditions advised for M. vexillaria will answer their requirements, 
with the exception that they like a little more warmth. Thrip and other 
pests, which are very persistent in attacking these plants at this season of 



n6 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 1912 

the year, must be eradicated, as if allowed to get established the foliage 
will be seriously damaged. 

General remarks.— If the ends and the sides of the houses have not 
already been shaded, no time must be lost in doing this, as the sun will now 
have great power. Keep the glass of the houses scrupulously clean, so that 
all the light possible may be admitted. Watch carefully for thrip, which, at 
this season especially, will often put in an appearance. All other pests, of 
whatever description, must continually be sought for. In all branches of 
plant cultivation every means possible should be taken in preserving the 
foliage in a clean and healthy condition. Work will come on apace this 
month, and we shall find our time fully occupied in attending to the wants 
of the different plants as regards potting, cleaning, and other things which 
occur to us as cultivators. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
A meeting was held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, 
Westminster, on February 20th, when there was a remarkably fine display 
of Orchids, including ten medal groups, three Awards of Merit and one 
Cultural Commendation being also given. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, Gurney Wilson, J. S. Moss, 
Stuart Low, R. G. Thwaites, T. Armstrong, A. A. McBean, J. Charles- 
worth, J. Cypher, J. E. Shill, W. H. Hatcher, C. H. Curtis, W. P. Bound, 
A. Dye, W. H. White, R. Brooman White, W. Bolton, de Barri Crawshay, 
C. J. Lucas, H. G. Alexander, R. A. Rolfe, Sir George L. Holford, and Sir 
Jeremiah Colman. 

Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. 
Alexander), staged a magnificent group, to which the Society's Gold Medal 
was awarded. It contained a very fine series of Lselia anceps, especially 
the white varieties, including Dawsonii with eight spikes and alba with nine, 
some fine forms of Cattleya Trianae, C. Percivaliana alba and Charles- 
worthii, C. chocoensis alba Westonbirt var., some fine dark Cattleya 
Raphaelise and others, the clear yellow and white Cypripedium Actseus 
Undine, and many other fine Cypripediums, Lsliocattleya Tigris, Weston- 
birt var. (L. Cowanii X L.-c. Dominiana), and many other finely grown 
Lseliocattleyas, some excellent Brassocattleyas, Sophrocatla;lia Dana; 
Holford's var., Sophrolaelia lteta Orpetiana, Sophrocattleya Chamberlainii, 
Miltonia Bleuana, Oncidium splendidum, Vanda Watsonii and Amesiana, 
Odontioda Devossiana, Odontoglossum crispum Peacock, with a spike of 
thirteen handsomely blotched flowers, the beautiful O. armainvillierense 
xanthotes, and others too numerous to mention. 



April, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. ti) 

Sir Julius Wernher, Bart., Luton Hoo (gr. Mr. Metcalfe), received a 
Silver Banksian Medal for a group of finely grown Calanthe Regnieri and 
C. Baron Schroder. 

Walter Cobb, Esq., Normanhurst, Rusper (gr. Mr. C. J. Salter), sent a 
good form of Odontoglossum blandum, Cattleya Trianse Cobbii, Cypri- 
pedium Euryades Cobb's var., with two dorsal sepals, Odontioda 
Bradshawiae Cobb's var., and Sophrolselia Psyche. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park (gr. Mr. J. Collier), sent the 
rare Bulbophyllum nigripetalum, Dendrobium Lady Colman, D. Golden 
Ray, and D. Margery Tyrrel Giles. 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), sent 
Odontoglossum Valeria (Edwardii X Vuylstekei), O. Galba (sceptrum X 
armainvilierense), with sceptrum-like lip, O. Voluminia (spectabile X 
Vuylstekei), and O. Xerxes (Vuylstekei X illustre), a very richly-coloured 
flower of good shape. 

F. Ducane Godman, Esq., Horsham, sent Odontoglossum Godmanii 
(Rolfese X Edwardii). 

H. Jennings, Esq., Marlowes, Hemel Hempstead, sent Cypripedium 
Winnifred Jennings, a large dark-coloured flower. 

Sir F. W. Moore, Royal Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, sent a fine spike of 
Ccelogyne venusta. 

The Hon. Lady Neeld, Grittleton (gr. Mr. J. Pitts), showed Odonto- 
glossum Fascination (Fascinator X Ossulstonii), a richly-coloured flower. 

W. R. St. Quintin, Esq., Scampston Hall, Rillington (gr. Mr. F. C. 
Puddle), sent a pretty white form of Dendrobium Cybele. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a very choice 
group, including a dozen plants of the beautiful Odontoglossum armain- 
villierense xanthotes, and about twice as many brilliant Odontiodas, with 
Miltonioda Ajax, Odontoglossum Rossii X armainvillierense, a very pretty 
hybrid, a fine O. Wilckeanum, some good Cattleya Tnanae, C. Suzanne 
Hye de Crom, some good Brassocattleyas, and other fine things (Silver- 
gilt Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, staged a fine group, in 
which the beautiful Cattleya Raphaelise alba was well represented, with 
forms of C. Trianse, the bright yellow Lseliocattleya Ernestii, L.-c. Myra 
and others, Cymbidium insigne, some good white Laelia anceps, Sophro- 
nitis grandiflora, Dendrobium semulum, D. nobile virginale, Bulbophyllum 
galbinum, Odontoglossum Rolfeas and some fine forms of O. armainvil- 
lierense, Odontiodas, Cypripedium Venus, Orchidhurst var., Masdevallia 
Schrcederiana, and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. James Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a fine group of 
Cypripediums, Calanthes, Dendrobiums, Sophronitis grandiflora, Masdevallia 



m and others, Ionopsis p; 


iniculata, 


ithera Imschootiana, a fine 


Agraecum 


a, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 




ibridge, staged a fine group, 


in which 


well represented, with sc 


>me good 


them flowering when 3 i ] 


years old, 


Sophrocatlselia Marathon, 


Cattleya 


nd some good Cypripediur 


ns (Silver 



n8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, i 9 t*. 

macrura and others, some good Lselia anceps, Odontoglossum Vuylstekei 
and McNabianum, Lycaste Skinneri alba, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged a fine group, including some 
good Odontoglossums, Cypripediums, Brassocattleyas, Lselia anceps, 
Dendrobiums, Oncidium cheirophoi 
some good Trichopilia suavis, Ren; 
sesquipedale, Phalasnopsis Schilleria 
Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Coo 
white forms of Laelia anceps wen 
Odontoglossums, Odontiodas, one < 
Cymbidium eburneum, C. Veitchii 
chocoensis alba, Lycaste Skinneri, 
Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a very effective group, includ- 
ing many fine Phalaenopsis Schilleriana, Cypripedium caudatum Sanderae, 
Dendrobium superbiens, D. velutinum, Pleurothallis Roezlii, a home-raised 
Odontoglossum elegantius, Cattleya Trianaa, Laeliocattleyas, Saccolabium 
violaceum Harrisonianum, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, sent a small group of 
good things, including Cymbidium insigne with five spikes, Lycaste 
Skinneri Emperor, Cypripedium aureum Surprise, C. Simonii, The Mousme 
(insigne Harefield Hall var. X Leeanum Clinkaberryanum), a very fine 
thing, and others (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, E. Yorks, sent an interesting little 
group, including a fine Phalaenopsis Schilleriana, Vanda Moorei, Cirrho- 
petalum picturatum, some good Odontoglossums, Angraecum citratum, 
Listrostachys bistorta, Ionopsis paniculata, Laeliocattleyas, &c. (Silver 
Banksian Medal). 

Mr. W. A. Manda, St. Albans, sent Cattleya Schrcederae aurantiaca and 
three good forms of Cattleya Trianae. 

Mr. H. A. Tracy, Twickenham, sent Odontoglossum Pescatorei Floryi, 
a pretty form, with red-purple spots near the base of the segments. It is 
said to have come out of the same batch as O. P. Sanderae. 

Calanthe Baron Schroder var. albiflora.— A fine form, with pure 
white sepals and petals, and a rose-pink lip with a darker centre. The 
plant bore two very fine spikes. Exhibited by Baron Bruno Schroder, The 
Dell, Englefield Green (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill). 

Cattleya Brenda (Dusseldorfii Undine X Gaskelliana alba).— A fine 
white flower, most like the former in shape, but larger and with all the 
segments broader. Exhibited by Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O. 

Odontoglossum Vulcan (crispum X Vuylstekei). — A very fine hybrid, 



April, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. tic) 

with light yellow flowers, much blotched with red-brown. The plant also 
carried two fine seed capsules. Exhibited by de Barri Crawshay, Esq. 
Cultural Commendation. 
Lycaste Balli^e.— To Mr. F. J. Thorne, gardener to Mrs. W. J. Joicey, 
Sunningdale Park, for a fine plant with over thirty flowers. It has been 
grown on from a small piece. 

At the meeting held on March 5th there was a very fine display of 
Orchids, including eight Medal groups, other awards consisting of two 
Cultural Commendations, and two Awards of Merit. 

Orchid Committee present: J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), 
and Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, Gurney Wilson, 
Stuart Low, R. A. Rolfe, R. G. Thwaites, T. Armstrong, A. A. McBean, 
W. Cobb, J. E. Shill, J. Charlesworth, H. G. Alexander, J. Cypher, W. H. 
Hatcher, W. P. Bound, A. Dye, Clive Cookson, W. H. White, C. J. Lucas, 
J. S. Moss, Lieut. -Col. Sir George L. Holford, de Barri Crawshay, and Sir 
Jeremiah Colman, Bart. 

Lieut-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westbonbirt (gr. Mr. H. 
G. Alexander), staged a magnificent group, to which a Gold Medal was 
awarded. It contained a fine lot of Cattleya Triante varieties, C. 
Dusseldorfii Undine, C. Brenda, a fine albino raised from the latter, and 

C. Gaskelliana alba, many beautiful white forms of Laelia anceps, a fine 
series of Laeliocattleyas and Brassocattleyas, some good Phalaenopsis 
Schilleriana, one spike bearing as many as eighty-four flowers, many 
beautiful Odontoglossums, Sophrocatlaelia Medeia, Sophrolaslia Psyche 
with fifteen flowers, Oncidium cucullatum, Ccelogyne sparsa, Dendrobiums, 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park, Reigate (gr. Mr. J. Collier), 
sent a number of well-grown Dendrobiums, including the beautiful D. Lady 
Colman, three examples of D. Golden Ray, D. Cybele, Gatton Park var., 

D. Rubens, and others (Silver Banksian Medal). 

J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis), 
sent Cattleya Schroederse var. Louisa, a pretty pink form with a crimson 
blotch on the lip. 

H. F. Goodson, Esq., Putney (gr. Mr. G. H. Day), sent Odontoglossum 
armainvillierense Dayanum, a pretty claret-purple form, with white margins 
and tips to the segments, Odontioda Diana, Goodson's var., and several 
others. 

M. Comte Joseph de Hemptinne, St. Denis-Westrem, Belgium, sent 
Cattleya Trianae alba Edelweiss, a large and beautiful albino. 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford, (gr. Mr. White), sent 
a fine specimen of Cymbidium Colmanise. Edenside var., with several spikes. 



i26 THE OkCIilD REVIEW. [April, i 9 u. 

The Duke of Marlborough, Blenheim (gr. Mr. G. Hunter), sent a pretty 
hybrid between Cattleya Harrisise and Lselia purpurata. 

The Hon. Lady Neeld, Grittleton, sent Odontoglossum percultum var. 
Carmania, a large white flower spotted with purple. 

F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., The Shrubbery, Oxford (gr. Mr. W. Balmforth), 
showed Cypripedium Euryades rubrum, and a pretty hybrid between 
Odontoglossum cirrhosum and O. armainvillierense. 

Messrs. Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, staged a very fine group 
of over thirty-five feet frontage, including a beautiful series of Dendrobiums, 
the best being D. nobile virginale magnificum and D. n. Armstrongise, 
Brassocattleyas, Odontoglossums and Cypripediums, Miltonia Bleuana, 
Cymbidium Ballianum, Armstrong's var., Masdevallias, &c. (Silver-gilt 
Flora Medal). 

Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, staged a fine group, including 
Brassocattleyas, Odontoglossums, Cypripediums, Laaliocattleya Orama 
(Dominiana X bletchleyensis) and others, Cattleya Trianae Courtauldiana, 
the brilliant Odontioda Diana, and a pan of the pretty little Disa sagittalis 
(Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. James Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a fine group of 
Cypripediums, Odontoglossums, Zygopetalum crinitum, Angraecum 
citratum, the rare Masdevallia gargantua, Cymbidium Ballianum, 
Odontiodas, Lycastes, and others (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a fine group, containing several 
well-grown Angraecum sesquipedale, Cattleya Frederickiae, and C. Mendelii 
Diana, Odontoglossum armainvillierense, O. eximium, O. Cooksoniae, 
several Miltonia Warscewiczii, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged an interesting group, includ- 
ing some good Cattleya Schrcederae and Trianae, Cymbidium insigne, 
Renanthera Imschootiana, Phalaenopsis Schilleriana, Dendrobiums, Poly- 
stachya paniculata and Laurentii, Ccelogyne pandurata, &c. (Silver Banksian 
Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a fine group, including some 
good Cattleya Trianae, the rare Houlletia Sanderi, Odontoglossums, Cypri- 
pediums, Maxillaria picta, a well-bloomed Ccelogyne flaccida, Dendrobium 
velutinum, Renanthera Imschootiana, Eulophia lurida, Trichosma suavis, &c. 
(Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a select group, 
including Brassocattleya Veitchii Queen Alexandra, Laeliocat tleya Ixion 
(C. Octavia X L.-c. Myra), Miltonia Bleuana nobilior, Cattleya Trianae alba, 
C. Octavia, some good Odontoglossums, and others. 

Messrs. W. B. Hartland & Sons, Cork, sent a small group of Cattleyas, 
Cypripediums, Cymbidiums and Odontoglossums, particularly interesting 



April, igt^.l THE ORCHID REVIEW. m 

among the latter being O. Brayanum (Groganise X Harryanum), a reddish 
purple flower with whitish margins and tips to the segments. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, showed Odontoglossum 
The Premier (parentage unrecorded), a finely blotched flower. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent the pretty Dendrobium 
amethystoglossum and a few Odontoglossums. 
Awards of Merit. 

Dendrobium Golden Ray var. superbum (Othello var. Colmania; X 
signatum aureum). — A very fine form, having buttercup yellow flowers 
tipped with rose, and a claret-coloured disc to the lip. Exhibited by Sir 
Jeremiah Colman, Bart. 

Odontoglossum Jasper (crispum X amabile).— A very pretty hybrid, 
regularly spotted with reddish purple on a pale pink ground. Exhibited by 
John S. Moss, Esq., Wintershill, Bishops Waltham (gr. Mr. Kench). 
Cultural Commendations. 

Angr.ecum sesquipedale. — A very fine specimen, bearing twelve 
expanded flowers and five buds. To Mr. J. Carpenter, gardener to F. C. 
Stoop, Esq., West Hall, Byfleet. 

Cymbidium grandiflorum.— A strong specimen, bearing two fine 
flower-spikes. To Mr. J. Collier, gardener to Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart. 

MANCHESTER AND NORTH OF ENGLAND ORCHID. 

At the meeting held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on February 8th, 
the members of Committee present were: — Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the 
Chair), R. Ashworth, W. R. Lee, C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, J. C. 
Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, 
W. Stevens, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), staged a fine group, 
composed principally of well-grown Odontoglossums, with a few good 
Cypripediums, and a nice variety of Lycaste Skinneri (Silver-gilt Medal). 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), staged a nice group of 
choice Odontoglossums, Miltonia Bleuana, Dendrobiums, Brassocattleya 
Maronii, and Cypripediums, C. Troilus var. Cravenianum being very fine 
(Silver-gilt Medal). 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), staged a nice group of 
Odontoglossums, Dendrobiums, Cattleya Trianse, Miltonia Bleuana, 
Lycaste aromatica, and the choice Cymbidium Holfordianum (Silver Medal). 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), staged a group 
of Cypripediums and Odontoglossums, including some very nice blotched 
O. crispum, O. c. Luci-Masereel, and some nice plants of O. Rossii majus 
(Silver Medal). 

A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish), staged a choice 



122 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, 1912. 

group of Odontoglossums and Cypripediums, making a fine display (Silver 
Medal). 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), staged a 
small group of Cypripediums and Odontoglossum crispum (Bronze Medal). 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), staged a group of Cattleya 
Holmesii and Trianae, Lselia anceps, Laeliocattleya Cranstounii, Dendro- 
bium nobile Balliae, Calanthe Wm. Murray, and Cypripediums (Bronze 
Medal). 

W. J. Hargreaves, Esq., Burnley, staged a small group of choice Cypri- 
pediums (Bronze Medal). 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), sent a fine, well- 
flowered plant of Lycaste Mary Gratrix. 

G. H. Peace, Esq., Monton Grange (gr. Mr. Mace), staged Odonto- 
glossum Phoebe Monton Grange var., with a fine branched spike. 

H. Thorp, Esq., Rhodes, sent a variety of Cypripedium insigne. 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a nice mixed group, 
including Laelia anceps Barkeri and Sanderiana, Brassavola Digbyana, 
Brassocattleya Maronii, Cattleyas, Laeliocattleyas, Cypripediums, and 
Calanthes (Silver Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a nice group, including 
Cattleya Trianae vivicans and Corona, Brassocattleya Fournieri picturata, 
B.-c. Sirius, and some good Cypripediums (Silver Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a few good Odontoglossums, 
Cypripedium aureum The Pearl, and Lycaste Skinneri alba. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, staged a few good Odonto- 
glossums. 

Mr. W. Shackleton, Great Horton, staged three plants of Odonto- 
glossum crispum, one very fine variety having large white flowers. 
First-class Certificates. 

Odontoglossum percultum var. purpurascens, a fine round flower of solid 
bronze purple colour, edged with white ; from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Odontioda Bradshawiae, Warburton's var. ; from A. Warburton, Esq. 
Awards of Merit. 

Odontoglossum crispum Euterpe, a nice variety, and bright in colour ; 
from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Odontoglossum Wilckeanum var. Jasper, a fine large flower, O. Adrians 
var. Vulcan, a dark-spotted variety, and O. Jasper; from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cypripedium birkdalense (insigne Sanderianum X Thalia magnificum), 
a fine flower, showing both parents; from J. J. Holden, Esq. 

Cypripedium Hercules (Vandyke X Sultana), C. Draco (insigne X 
Euryades), and C. Nubia (Niobe, Westonbirt var. x Thompsonii), all fine 
3 ; from Wm. Thompson, Esq. 



April, 1912-] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 1*3 

Odontoglossum orphanum, a brilliantly-coloured form of unknown 
parentage, from R. Ashworth, Esq. 

Cypripedium Lucernale (chrysotoxum X Euryades splendens), a very 
fine, well spotted form ; from A. Warburton, Esq. 

The meeting held on Thursday, February 22nd, was a joint meeting with 
the North of England Horticultural Society, the following gentlemen con- 
stituting the Committee on the occasion : — Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the 
chair), Messrs. J. Bamber, C. Parker, W. Thompson, A. Warburton, Z. A. 
Ward, W. Bolton, J. C. Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Hatcher, W. 
Holmes, A. McBean, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, F. K. Sander, W. Stevens 
and H. Arthur (Secretary), with the Rev. J. Bernard Hall, Secretary of the 
N.O.E.H.S. 

The proposal to hold a joint meeting met with great success, there being 
no fewer than 20 groups staged, and 26 exhibitors in all. Medals, Certifi- 
cates and Diplomas were awarded by both Societies ; the list of awards 
made by the N.O.E.H.S. will appear in the next Journal issued by them. 

The Lancashire County Trophy, a magnificent piece of silver, raised by 
subscription in the county, to be competed for at the International Show in 
London, in May, 1912, was on exhibition, and was very much admired. 
The following awards were made by the Orchid Society's Committee: — 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 
Gold Medal for what was generally acknowledged to be the finest group of 
mixed Orchids that has hitherto been seen in the room, the Odontoglossums 
being splendidly grown. It included O. excellens, amabile, vars., Mrs. 
Whitmoyer and Edith, Lawrenceanum, loochristiense splendens, ardentissi- 
mum ; Odontiodas Wardii, heatonense, and Goodsonii ; Lycastes in variety, 
Dendrobiums Wardianum and splendidissimum, Phaius grandifolius, Brassia 
verrucosa and Cymbidium Lowianum. 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), was also awarded a Gold 
Medal for the finest exhibit of Lycaste Skinneri ever seen in the district, 
about 50 being staged, all fine well-grown plants, carrying some marvellous 
flowers — alba, with 31 flowers and buds, Loveliness, Rainbow, ingens, 
Glory, rosea, Goliath, delicatissima, Hecate, virginalis, and Beauty, with 
L. lasioglossa, Ballise, Tunstillii, and Imschootiana. 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for a nice mixed group, including Odontoglossum crispum and 
hybrids, Cypripediums in variety, and some good examples of the brilliant 
Sophronitis grandiflora. 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for a group, consisting principally of Odontoglossums, Lalio- 
cattleyas, Cypripediums and Dendrobiums. 



i 2 6 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April 1912- 

Dendrobium Othello, West Point var. ; from S. Gratrix, Esq. 

Cypripedium Archimedes nigrum ; from A. Warburton, Esq. 

Brassolselia Leeana (L.-c. Hyeana splendens X B.-c. heatonensis), and 
Brassocattleya Pocahontas albens ; from Messrs. Cypher & Sons. 

Sophrocatlselia Marathon var. Salome ; from Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean. 

Cypripedium Simonii var. The Mousme ; from Mr. E. V. Low. 

The following awards were made by the Orchid Committee at the 
combined meeting held at Manchester on March 22nd last : — 

Gold Medals to Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), 
and to O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers). 

Silver-gilt Medals to Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath ; 
Messrs. W. A. Manda, St. Albans, and Messrs. McBean, Cooksbridge. 

Silver Medals to R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden) ; 
Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham; S. Gratrix, Esq., Walley Range 
(gr. Mr. Brown) ; W. J. Hargreaves, Esq., Burnley ; R. le Doux, Esq., West 
Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher) ; W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch) ; 
Mr. E. V. Low, Haywards Heath ; Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield : J. 
McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes); W. Thompson, Esq., Stone (gr. 
Mr. Stevens), and A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish). 

Bronze Medals to Rev. J. Crombleholme, CI ayton-le- Moors (gr. Mr. 
Marshall); the Liverpool Orchid Co., Gateacre; Mr. J. Evans, Congleton ; 
Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), and Messrs. A. J. 
Keeling & Sons, Bradford. 

Votes of Thanks to J. H. Craven, Esq., Keighley (gr. Mr. Corney) ; J. J. 
Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson) ; Mr. D. McLeod, Chorlton- 
cum-Hardy ; Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans and Mr. W. Shackleton, 
Great Horton. 

First-class Certificates to Cypripedium unnamed (Thompsonii X 
Rupert), from W. Thompson, Esq. ; Zygopetalum Mackayi Charlesworthii 
and Odontioda Cooksonii, from Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 

Awards of Merit to Odontoglossum Zulu, O. Confidence, and Odontioda 
keighleyense, Ward's var., from Z. A. Ward, Esq. ; Odontoglossum amabile, 
Ashworth's var., Nubian and illustrissimum, both from R. Ashworth, Esq. ; 
Laeliocattleya amabilis and Odontoglossum Lambeauianum Holden's var. ; 
from J. J. Holden, Esq. ; Dendrobium Othello, West Point var., from S. 
Gratrix, Esq. ; Cypripedium Archimedes nigrum, from A. Warburton, Esq. ; 
Brassocatlselia Leeana (L-c. Hyeana X B.-c. heatonensis), and Brasso- 
cattleya Pocohontas albens, from Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons; Sophrocatlselia 
Marathon var. Salome, from Messrs. McBean ; and Cypripedium Simonii 
var. The Mousme, from Mr, E. V. Low. 



April, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 127 

MISCHOBULBUM SCAPIGERUM. 

Nearly half a century ago a very pretty little terrestrial Orchid, which had 
been obtained by Messrs. Hugh Low and Co., Clapton, from Borneo, was 
figured in the Botanical Magazine (t. 5390), under the name of 
Nephelaphyllum scapigerum, Hook, f., the author pointing out that it 
differed much from its congeners in the anticous position of the labellum, 
the conical mentum, and the bright colouring of the flower. Nothing 
further seems to be known about the plant, and it would be interesting to 
reintroduce it. It is now referred by Schlechter to his new genus 
Mischobulbum, under the name of M. scapigerum, together with four other 
species, which have previously been included in Nephelaphyllum and 
Tainia. They are most like the former in habit, but the flowers are larger, 
and the lip is without a spur. There are two others which belong to the 
same genus, the species being as follows : — 

M. cordifolium, Schlechter in Fedde Beih. Repert. Sp. Xov., i. p. 98. 
Tainia cordifolia, Hook. f. in Hook. Ic. Plant., t. 1N61. — Native of Formosa. 

M. grandiflorum, Rolfe. Nephelaphyllum grandiflorum, King & 
Pantl. in Ann. Roy. Bot. Card. Calc, viii. p. 104, t. 144 (not of Hook, f.).— 
Native of Sikkim. 

M. lancifolium, Schlechter, I.e., p. 99.— Native of New Guinea. 

M. macranthum, Rolfe. Tainia macrantha, Hook. f. in Hook. Ic. Plant., 
t. i860.— Native of South China. 

M. papuanum, Schlechter, I.e., p. 98.— Native of New Guinea. 

M. scapigerum, Schlechter, I.e., p. 98. Nephelaphyllum scapigerum, 
Hook f. in Bot. Mag., t. 5390. — Native of Borneo. 

M. Wrayanum, Rolfe. Ipsea ? Wrayana, Hook. f. in FL Brit. Ind., v. 
p. 812 ; Hook. Ic. Plant., t. 2085. Nephelaphyllum grandiflorum, Hook. f. 
Fl. Brit. Ind., vi. p. 192; Ann. Roy. Bot. Gard. Calc., v. p. 23, t. 34. 
Tainia atropurpurea, Ridl. in Jouvn. Linn. Soc, xxxii. p. 315; Mat. Fl. 
Malay Penins., i. p. 115.— Native of Perak. R. A. Rolfe. 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 
Three very interesting flowers are sent from the collection of J. J. 
Holden, Esq., Auburn House, Southport, by Mr. R. Johnson. Cypripedium 
Alcibiades Illustrious is very fine, the dorsal sepal measuring over three 
inches across. C. auburnense (Euryades X Leeanum is a fine thing, in 
which the characters of C. villosum are most apparent in the petals, lip, 
and staminode, while the dorsal sepal is ovate-orbicular, white, with a 
rather small green base, on which are numerous brown spots, while beyond 
this, on the white area, are many small purple dots, leaving a pure white 
margin, half an inch broad. The third is a very curious flower of the 



"8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [April, i 9 n. 

beautiful C. Euryades, New Hall Hey var., with two dorsal sepals, and one 
of the anthers replaced by a flat petal-like body, two inches long by nearly 
an inch broad. This additional body is a petaloid staminode, and though 
petal-like in shape it is lip-like in texture and colour. Mr. Johnson remarks 
that all the other flowers on the plant are normal. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

Three meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the 
Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during April, on 
the 2nd, 16th and 30th, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual 
hour, 12 o'clock noon. 

The Manchester and North of England Horticultural Society will hold 
meetings at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on April 4th and 18th. The 
Committee meets at noon, and the exhibits are open to inspection of 
members and the public from 1 to 4 p.m. The following meeting is fixed 
for May 2nd. 

ORCHID PORTRAITS. 

Brassocattleya Wellesley,e.— Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 135, fig. 55. 

Cattleya Brenda. — Gard. Chron., 1912, i. pp. 126, 155, fig. 65. 

Ccelogyne CRiSTATA.— Journ. Hort., 1912, i. p. 253, with fig. 

Lycaste Balli^e.— Gard. Mag., p. 219, with fig. 

Odontoglossum crispum Samuel Gratrix.— Gard. Chron., i. p. 197, 
fig. 85. 

Odontoglossum Jasper.— Gard. Chron., 1912, i. pp. 196, 197, fig. 84. 

Odontoglossum Queen of Gatton.— Gard. Mag., pp. 231, 247, 
with fig. 

Odontoglossum Vulcan Crawshayanum. — Gard. Mag., pp. 165, 171, 
with fig. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

requested to give t tent. An addressed • 

thould be used). Subjects oj special interest 

W. U.~ Luliocattleyaburbagensis 1 L;ilia purpurata X C. granulosa), and Cypripedium 

C.R.— Saccolabium cerinum, Rchb. f. 

R.B. — Many thanks for the list. We will report on both matters shortly. 

H.G.— Sophrolaelia Gratrixias (S. grandiflora X L. tenebrosa). 

G.H.H.— . txt month. 

T.K.— Cattleya Dupreana is the name of the hybrid between C. Warneri and C. 
Warscewiczii. We do not know the name you mention. 

Photographs receive- ; , F. A. 

Erratum.— By some inexplicable mistake, the address of Dr. J. F. Shafer was given, 
at page 46, as Stockton, California. It should have been Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Catalogue received.— Illustrated Orchid Catalogue of T. Pauwels & Co., Meirelbeke, 



Vol. XX., No. 



ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 



Acriopsis Ridleyi 



Amateurs Collection 


134 




.. 132 


Answers to Correspondents 








Calendar of Operations for May 








Dendrobium superbum 








Eulophiella, the genus 








False hybrids ... 




North of England Horticultural 


.. : S 8 


Inheritance of Albinism in Orchids 


13' 


Royal Horticultural 




La?lia Gortonii 








Neomoorea irrorata 


150 






Odontoglossum Brayanum : a study ir 








dominance 


133 


Dendrobium superbum 




Odontoglossums from Walton Orange .. 
i and News 


140 


Eulophiella Elisabeths 




'59 


Eulophiella Peetersiana 


.. 138 


Orchid Portraits 




Neomoorea irrorata 


.. 150 




136 Odontoglossum Rossii immaculatum 


.. 157 


PRICE SIXPENCE MONTHLY. 


Post Free 7/- per Annum— See Overle 


ir. 



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OSMUNDA REGALIS FIBRE 

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BY APPOINTMENT TO 3g|ffiB*Sa? HIS MAJESTY THE KING " 

Messrs. WILLIAM BULL S SONS' 

ORCHID EXHIBITION 

Private View, Monday the 13th May, by Cards of Invitation. 
The Exhibition will remain open to the Public until 
— Saturday the 18th May, 10 to 6 o'clock, in — 

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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

l list of entries of Orchid exhibits for the coming Royal Internationa 
ticultural Exhibition, as published at pp. 108, log of 



affords 


a pl< 


sasurable i 


mticipation of what the { 


jreat show should b 


e like, i 


the fate 


- are 


propitious 


. We know what many 


of the exhibitors art 




of at o 




eat spring 


; shows, and this is no 


ordinary occasion, 


so tha 


somethi 


ng special is z 


mticipated. The competitive classes will 


afford : 


pleasing 




ety, and tl 


lere will be plenty of rooi 


n for grouping for e 


ffect, s< 


that the 




ho prefer 


this mode of display w 


ill have plenty of 5 


; cope fo 


their er 


lergy 


. We am 


:icipate something specia 


1 in the way of cult 




in the < 


:lasst 


s for Ode 


•ntoglossums and for hyb 


rids between Cochli 


oda anc 


allied genera 


. But we 


will not carry anticipate 


3n further, for the si 


how wil 


soon be 


hen 


e, and we 


: can only hope that th- 


2 weather will be a 


s fine a: 


usual or 


i Ten 


aple Show 


week, and that the grea 


t event will be a h 


indmarJ 


for some 


- >" eai 


rs to come 


. Next month we hope 1 


:o give full details. 





Hybrids are increasing so rapidly that we seem to be in perpetual 
difficulties with respect to their nomenclature. At the R.H.S. meeting held 
on April 2nd, a very handsome Odontoglossum of unknown parentage, 
called His Majesty, came before the Orchid Committee, and was awarded a 
First-class Certificate. After the meeting a few members examined it more 
closely, and came to the conclusion that it was a form of O. mirum (crispum 
X Wilckeanum). On afterwards comparing the records the writer 
discovered that the name was applied four years earlier to a different plant 
(see O.R.. xvi. p. 143). It is there recorded that at a meeting of the 
Manchester Orchid Society held on April 1st, 1908, "a fine Odontoglossum, 
named His Majesty, probably a hybrid between O. amabile and O. 
ardentissimum, created great interest, and gained a well-deserved First- 
class Certificate. It was a flower of excellent shape and substance, with a 
big solid blotch of rich claret on the sepals, petals, and lip." It was 
exhibited by Messrs. Charfesworth & Co., and it is said to have afterwards 
passed into the collection of Mrs. Gratrix, of Whalley Range. This clearlv 
does not agree with the one recently certificated, which latter we have 



23o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

recorded at page 154 under the name of Odontoglossum mirum var. His 
Majesty. 

A good many Odontoglossums of unrecorded parentage have been 
•certificated of late, and it is a pity that more of them cannot be fitted into 
their proper place. There is not the necessary time for this at an ordinary 
committee meeting, so that when a certificate is given the name under 
which the plant is exhibited is generally adopted, unless, indeed, some 
member notices the mistake and is able to rectify it at once. But, 
fortunately, such names can be amended later, should the necessity for it 
arise, and it will be seen from a note at page 158 that the Manchester 
Orchid Society has adopted the name of Odontoglossum promerens for the 
hybrid between O. crispum and eximium, in preference to O. Orpheus and O. 
Delhi, in accordance with the notes at pp. 65, 66 of our March issue. The 
latter names can, of course, stand as varietal names, and we fancy that 
other varieties of O. promerens will appear when the process of fitting 
hybrids of unrecorded parentage into their proper places is carried a little 

A remarkable Odontoglossum appeared at the last meeting of the 
R.H.S., with a spike so tall that it had to be stood on the floor to enable 
members to get a good look at it — over six feet we believe was the official 
measurement. And its name was nearly as long as the spike — six words, 
to be precise. And this was only the specific name. In course of time 
varietal names will require to be added — for we know how prone hybrid 
Odontoglossums are to vary — and we tremble for the result. But we would 
ask in all seriousness, Is this sort of thing really necessary ? We have 
a code of Rules of Horticultural Nomenclature, drawn up by a body in 
which the R.H.S. was officially represented, and we have the advice of the 
Council to its Committees to adopt the said code in carrying out the 
Society's work. Again, in answer to the question, "Should the specific 
name of a hybrid be expressed as a single word, or may it contain more 
words ? " We have the Society's own reply—we are going to set it up in 
capital letters — "These specific names should consist of a single 
word." In the case under discussion we believe a Cultural Commendation 
was given to the plant — not to the name— and we wonder how the fact will 
be recorded in the Society's Journal. We intend to adopt the Council's 
advice in the matter. 

In the above remarks we are not alluding to varietal names, respecting 
which the code of rules states : " Names of varieties should be expressed 
whenever possible in a single word ; it is, however, permissible to employ 



May, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 131 

three words as a maximum." This legalises names consisting of five words, 
for there is always the generic and specific names in addition, but we much 
prefer the old system, which gave us such names as Dendrobium nobile 
virginale and Cypripedium Leeanum giganteum, which are quite long enough 
for ordinary use. It is not necessary to write Dendrobium nobile var. 
-virginale, for the varietal name is understood. A system has now grown up 
by which the abbreviation " var." is not only used regularly, but is further 
transferred to the end of the name, as Dendrobium nobile Smith's var., or 
D. nobile Bleak House var. This sometimes leads to a further innovation, 
which is now bothering a correspondent, namely, the insertion of a comma 
between the specific and varietal names ; for example Cattleya Flora, 
Smith's var. Of course, the meaning is not quite the same without 
the comma, and one can hardly transpose the word var. into its natural 

We are also asked the meaning of such a phrase as Dendrobium nobile 
virginale Smith's var. Our correspondent always thought that the word 
virginale indicated the varietal name, but now we appear to have varieties 
■of varieties. He also calls attention to a record in our pages that Awards 
of Merit were given to what we will call " Dendrobium nobile Smith's 
var. Olympian and virginale, both from," &c, and he asks, " Whatever 
does it mean ? " We do not know. We gave the record as it reached us. 
Our correspondent concludes by asking, Where are we going ? Perhaps 
someone will oblige with an answer. 

INHERITANCE OF ALBINISM IN ORCHIDS. 

The question of the inheritance of albinism in Orchids has been discussed 
in these pages on several occasions, and now further evidence is to hand. 
Messrs. A. A. Peeters & fils, Laeken-Bruxelles, send a seedling plant, 
derived from Cypripedium Lawrenceanum Hyeanum x niveum, which has 
reverted to typical C. Aphrodite. The dorsal sepal is over two inches 
broad, white, veined and dotted with light red-purple, the veins becoming 
green at the extreme base, while the petals have a slight greenish suffusion, 
and are dotted with red-purple, and the lip and staminode are suffused with 
light purple. The leaves are beautifully marbled, and the scape is covered 
with dark hairs. Although an attractive hybrid, M. Peeters is naturally 
disappointed that it is not an albino. The plant has been presented to the 
Kew Collection. 

The second flower is sent from the collection of F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., 
The Shrubbery, Oxford, by Mr. W. Balmforth, who writes as follows :— 
" The cross is C. niveum Ajax X Lawrenceanum Gratrixianum. It has 
interested us because our first attempt at raising a white Antigone through 



132 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

niveum X Lawrenceanum Hyeanum was a complete failure, all being- 
coloured like an ordinary Antigone. Why we should get a flower much 
nearer an albino through Lawrenceanum Gratrixianum seems to us a 
mystery. There is no possibility of the seeds or plants having been mixed, 
the present cross having been sown over three years later than the first." 
This plant was exhibited at the R.H.S. meeting held on April 2nd last as C. 
Antigone album, the purple tint then being less developed, and the flower sent 
is the upper one of two borne by the scape. It is more like C. niveum in shape 
than the one from M. Peeters, and maybe described as greenish white, with 
light green veins, but there is a slight purple tinge and a few minute purple 
dots towards the apex of the petals, also a purple tinge on the staminode^ 
so that it is not an albino, though it has much less purple than the typical C. 
Aphrodite. C. L. Gratrixianum, it may be added, approaches C. L. 
Hyeanum, except that it has a little purple suffusion towards the margin of 
the dorsal sepal and apex of the petals. 

As regards C. Lawrenceanum Hyeanum X niveum, raised by M. 
Peeters, and the reverse cross raised by Mr. Balmforth, they are cases of 
reversion, of which a good many are now on record, but the other case is 
difficult to account for. It will be interesting to see what other seedlings 
from the same batch are like. As regards the name, it may be remarked that 
the original C. Aphrodite was raised by Messrs. Veitch from C. niveum X 
Lawrenceanum, and C. Antigone at a later date from the reverse cross. 

R. A. R. 

OSMUNDA FIBRE: WANTED A NAME! 

There has always, to my mind, been a lack of a fitting name for the 
Osmunda root-fibre as used in Orchid culture, one that is definite and 
descriptive and at the same time contained in one word. In correspondence 
recently with Professor L. H. Bailey, of Cornell University, he suggests 
the name " Osmundine," which will mean, " belonging to Osmunda," and 
this seems fitting. In the new edition of the American Cyclopedia of 
Horticulture which is now being prepared, the word Osmundine will be 
used throughout, and this will doubtless pave the way for its universal 
adoption here. Might it not be well for you to consider the adoption of 
this suggestion among British Orchid growers. The root-fibre as seen in 
commerce is usually the product of two species of Osmunda, O. Clay- 
toniana (interrupta) and O. cinnamomea, as these two ferns grow on drier 
uplands. O. regalis is essentially a plant of the swamps, the roots often 
submerged, and never making as large stools. The fibre, moreover, is apt 
to become more or less sour and unsuitable for epiphytal Orchids. We 
therefore feel the need of a good name that will be suitable alike for 
cultivators and the trade generally. Through correspondence in past 



volumes of the 


! Orchid Review, the w 


the introductic 


m and s 


ise of Osmui 


suggestion for 


your coi 


isideration. 


[This opens 


a rather 


larger questi 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 133 

r feels in a measure responsible for 
.fibre abroad, hence the present 
E. O. Orpet. 
Is the fibre of Osmunda regalis 
to be excluded as unworthy of the new name ? And we have Polvpodium 
.fibre. If abbreviation is desirable it might be carried further, for the phrase 
"potted in osmunda," or " polypodium," would be understood. — En. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM BRAYANUM: A STUDY IN DOMINANCE. 
A very interesting Odontoglossum was exhibited at the K.II.S. meeting 
held on March 5th last, by Messrs. \Y. }). Hartland & Sons, Cork, under 
the name of Odontoglossum 1 '.rayanuni. with the record of parentage, O. 

anum, and much like it in general shape, the sepals and petals being 
reddish purple, tipped with light yellow, and the lip pandurate, white in 
front, and maroon purple behind, with a yellow spiny crest. So slight was 
the evidence of O. Groganias [Uroskinneri X Edwardii) that we asked Mr. 
Treseder the history of the cross. He replied that O. Groganias was the 
seed bearer, and O. Harryanum the pollen parent, and that there was not 
the slightest possibility of error, for they had only a single capsule on 
O. Groganias, from which many seedlings were obtained, though a number 
-of them were eaten, and ultimately only three survived. We have thus a 
case of paternal dominance, but we should not be at all surprised to find 
the other two seedlings considerably different when they flower. O. Gro- 
ganiae was obtained from O. Uroskinneri 2 and O. Edwardii 3 , the two 
belonging to very distinct sections, and it is interesting to note that in this 
case the hybrid took nearly the shape of the seed parent and the colour of 
the pollen parent, the shape of the one and the colour of the other being 
dominant, though both were slightly modified in detail. 

O. Groganiae was raised in the collection of J. H. Grogan, Esq., 
Slaney Park, Wicklow, and its history, as given by the raiser, is very 
interesting. He remarks : — " In the spring of 1904 I had a fine spike 
of 36 buds on a very fine variety of O. Uroskinneri. I fertilised every 
one of these flowers as it came out with the best pollen I could obtain at the 
time, and not one of them would take. When I came to the last flower the 
only pollen I had available was from a good variety of O. Edwardii, and 
this I used, not in the least expecting to get a pod, as I have found that 
Edwardii pollen is practically useless. To my astonishment a fine seed-pod 
developed, and in due time the seed ripened, germinated, and the little 
plants throve apace, with the present result. The plant exhibited had an 
inflorescence of 58 flowers and buds, and this on the first bulb from the 
:seed bulb. I believe Uroskinneri hybrids have a bad name, but these are 



i 3 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912-. 

tremendous growers. I have one that made up the seed bulb as big as a 
fair-sized hen's egg. It is like the seed parent in its character of opening a 
few blooms at a time, but each individual flower lasts for weeks in perfection. 
I have since then fertilised dozens of Uroskinneri flowers but failed to get a 
pod, and the only plants that I have succeeded in getting seed-pods on by 
Edwardii have been Cochlioda Ncetzliana, and I have a nice lot of seedlings 
of these. I don't know that it would have made much difference to the 
flower had the cross been the other way round, but it certainly would have 
been easier to have got it, as O. Edwardii seems to set seed pods and 
produce good seed with nearly anything." 

We believe that the O. Groganise used by Messrs. Hartland was one of 
these particular plants, and bearing in mind the well-known variability of 
secondary hybrids we shall hope to see flowers of the other two seedlings 
when they appear. R- A. R. 



THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 
By C. Alwyn Harrison, F.R.H.S. 
Cool House. 
Now that the sun gains more power, the blinds should be used whenever it 
shines upon the roof glass, and, therefore, the shading is generally required 
from about 10.30 till two, or even a little later on exceptionally sunny days 
towards the end of the month. No fire heat will be needed now, unless 
unseasonable weather be experienced. The top and bottom ventilators can 
be opened earlier than during last month. Always bear in mind that fresh 
air is of the utmost importance to these Cool house Orchids, and the house 
should never feel stuffy when entered at any time. The general advice 
upon watering given in last month's article may still be acted upon, but a 
slight spray over the leaves should now be practised twice daily, usually 
about 9 a.m., and before the house is shut up for the night. Of course, all 
the pipes, stagings, and path must be kept well damped now onwards, and 
usually this damping down should be done about nine, at midday, and 
again about 3.30 p.m. 

Lycaste Skinneri has now finished flowering, and, if requiring it, may 
be repotted. Remove the plant with great care from the old pot, and, after 
trimming off all dead and decayed roots and pseudobulbs, place it in a fresh 
pot, two-thirds full of clean broken crocks. For soil, use a mixture of 
osmunda fibre, peat, and loam — a good yellow fibrous loam for preference. 
Mix these ingredients together, and use in a damp state. This Orchid does 
not like frequent root disturbance, and so should be set well to one side in 
the fresh pot, to allow for further development. Bifrenaria Harrisoniae may 
also receive similar treatment. Water all newly-potted carefully until it is- 
seen that they have obtained a firm hold of the compost. 



May, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

The house should now be very gay with Odontoglossum erispum ; 
the many hybrids. Many of the latter can now be procured in 
unflowered size, and afford a vast store of interest for their growers. 
any exceptionally choice varieties are possessed, and it is desired to mere 
the stock, sever the rhizome clean through with a sharp knife, two pseu 
bulbs behind the last-made growth. This severed portion will very of 
emit fresh roots and produce a fresh bulb, and when this is observed to 
the case, it should be removed and potted up singly. Any of the lo 
spiked Oncidiums, such as Marshallianum, macranthum, oblongati 
sarcodes, and Wentworthianum, also Odontoglossum hastilabium ; 



and. for a beginner, the following rules may serve as a guide, but sin 
not be absolutely carried out to the letter. From now onwards all pi 
in bud and full growth should receive a good dose of water every alter 
day, but those just, starting every three days, and any which are rest 
rather less frequently. The staging, path and pots should be kept 
saturated with moisture at all times, which will probably 
damping three times a day. The plants must also be sprayed over their 
leaves once in the morning and again about 3 p.m. Give all possible air 
which can be admitted without lowering the temperature below 65° Fahr. 
Fire heat W'll now usually only be needed to maintain an even degree of 
65 Fahr. during the night, and may be dispensed with during the day. 
Shading should be lowered only as long as the sun is shining with its full 
force upon the roof glass. 

Any Dendrobiums which have now finished flowering, such as crassinode, 
nobile, or its many varieties, and Wardianum, may receive attention or be 
repotted. Always use pots which are small in proportion to the size of the 
plant, and repotting, in fact, is only needed about every other year, merely 
to renew the compost, as a larger pot is rarely required, for when all dead 
bulbs and roots are removed, the same-sized receptacle can be again 
employed, but on no account use the same pot. Make the plants moderately 
firm, and do not place them too low in the pot ; the rhizomes should be 
about |-inch below the rim of the pot. For compost use a mixture of 
osmunda fibre, polypodium fibre, sphagnum moss, and oak leaves. 

Many handsome hybrids of Cattleya and Laelia should now be 
making a fine display, together with forms of those two tine species, C. 
Mendelii and C. Mossiae. Renanthera Imschootiana should now be in 
flower, and must be sprayed over the leaves once every day, taking care not 
to touch the flowers. 



*36 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

ORCHIDS FROM STREATHAM. 

At the R.H.S. meeting held on April 2nd last a brilliant little group of 
Odontiodas was exhibited from the collection of R. G. Thwaites, Esq., 
Chessington, Streatham (gr. Mr. J. M. Black). Flowers of several of these 
charming little plants have now been sent, the majority being hybrids of 
Cochlioda Noetzliana, a plant which is rapidly making history. They 
include the richly-coloured Odontioda Charlesworthii ; two forms of O. 
Bradshawiae, both having a few yellow markings on the sepals and petals, 
and more pale yellow on the lip; O. Cecilia (C. Noetzliana X Odonto- 
glossum Wiganianum), with uniformly red sepals and petals and a little 
yellow on the lip ; O. Zephyr (C. Noetzliana X O. Wilckeanum), a bright 
orange-scarlet flower with some yellow markings on the segments ; a form 
of O. Boltonii (C. Noetzliana X O. Vuylstekei), with somewhat elongated, 
very undulate bright red sepals and petals and a buff-coloured lip ; and two 
forms of O. Cooksonise, out of the same pod, one having uniformly bright 
orange-scarlet flowers, the other having a whitish ground, irregularly 
blotched with scarlet all over, and forming a very striking contrast. Two 
novelties are described at the end of this note. There is also a form of 
O. chelseiensis (C. vulcanica X O. crispum), with a prettily blotched form 
of Odontoglossum armainvillierense, a uniformly-coloured form of O. 
Thompsonianum, and a hybrid from O. Fascinator X armainvillierense, 
having the flowers very heavily blotched with red-brown on a white 
ground ; the whole forming a very charming series. 

raised from C. Noetzliana crossed with the pollen of O. Rolfeae. It is most 
like O. Charlesworthii, but is rather brighter in colour, owing to the reduced 
amount of O. Harryanum present. The crest is yellow, but otherwise the 
flower is uniformly coloured throughout. The column wings are rather 
larger than in O. Charlesworthii, and the flowers at present rather smaller. 
Odontioda Sanders. — A handsome form, derived from C. Noetzliana 
and O. percultum. The inflorescense is very compact, and the flowers 
round and full, slightly convex, and of a uniform bright scarlet, with the 
crest yellow. It is a very promising acquisition. 

THE GENUS EULOPHIELLA. 

Another species of the remarkable genus Eulophiella has appeared in 
cultivation, plants of E. Hamelinii, Rolfe, being offered by Messrs. T. 
Pauwels & Co., Meirelbeke, Ghent. The species has long been imperfectly 
known, having been briefly described about twelve years ago from a drawing 
by M. L. Hamelin {O.R., viii. p. 197). This shows a panicle of about 
.thirty flowers, with somewhat acuminate white sepals and petals, and a 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



Is at the base. 




It succeeds well when gi 
•moderately light position i 
shown in the figure. Tl 
"behind, and the crest of the li 
Madagascar, and was originally 



ri \v< 



a fibrous compcst, and suspended in a 
n house. The method of culture is well 
rs are white, suffused with lurid purple 

bright yellow. The plant is a native ot 
ntroduced by Messrs. Linden, Brussels, 



and j described and figured in Lindenia (t. 325). 



i 3 8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

Ghent Quinquennial Exhibition in 1893, and was described as probably the 
most remarkable exhibit in the whole show. It is believed to grow naturally 
on tree fern stems. A single plant is said to have been sent to Messrs. 
Linden, with an importation of Angraecum sesquipedale and Grammangis 
Ellisii. It was afterwards figured in the Botanical Magazine (t. 7387), from 
a subsequent importation, whose history has been given in the early 
volumes of this work. A plant of this species in the collection of Dr. 
Hodgkinson, The Grange, Wilmslow, bore a capsule some years ago, which 
was described as porcelain-colour with purple angles. 

Eulophiella Peetersiana (fig. 20) appeared unexpectedly in 1897, 
when plants, which had been obtained from M. Mocquerys* were offered for 
sale by M. Peeters, of Brussels {O.R., v. p. 67). Shortly afterwards it was 
described (Kranzl. in Card. Chron., 1897, i. p. 182). In March of the 
following year it flowered for the first time in Europe, in the collection of 
Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., Burford, Dorking, and the inflorescence was 
exhibited at a meeting of the R.II.S. held on April 12th, and received a 
First-class Certificate (O.R., v. pp. 104, 156). This is the plant figured 
on the opposite page, from a painting by Macfarlane. The same plant was 
also figured in the Botanical Magazine (tt. 7612, 7613). It is much larger 
than E. Elisabethse, and the flowers are very large, and purple in colour, 
with an orange yellow disc to the lip, surrounded by a white area within 
the purple margin. 

In 1899 a very interesting article, by Mr. A. E. P. Griessen, appeared 
under the title, "Unrecorded discovery of Eulophiella Peetersiana {O.R., 
vii. p. 258). He remarks: "A friend of mine, who is well known in the 
Orchid world, thought of sending a collector to explore completely the Isle 
of Nattes, and before finally arranging matters it occurred to him to look 
through some of the collections of the Jardin des Plantes Herbarium at 
Paris, when he found, not without great surprise, a well-preserved specimen 
of Eulophiella Peetersiana, which had laid in the Herbarium for the last 
fifty years, and was still unidentified. The exact locality is indicated, so 
that there can be no doubt about the facts. This clearly shows the 
importance of preserving collections of dried specimens, though they should 
not remain for half-a-century without being looked over to see what they 

He also gives the history of its introduction : " M. Mocquerys, who was 
previously a collector for M. Godefroy Lebeuf, of Paris, made an agreement 
with M. Peeters, of Brussels, and left Europe for Sainte Marie de 
Madagascar, without anticipating the discovery of such a magnificent plant 
as the one now under notice, and it is surprising what a number of collectors 
have for the last two centuries passed and stayed for a certain time in these 
regions without having previously noticed the most common plant of the 



THE ORCHlh Rl-\ll- 




mo THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

which is supposed to be still undetermined, bearing rather large white 
flowers, and on the coast of Madagascar just opposite Sainte Marie he 
found again E. Elisabethse — another definite and interesting fact." We 
rsuspect that the other species alluded to may be E. Hamelinii, though we 
have no definite record of its habitat. 

It has since been stated that E. Peetersiana grows on the stems and 
branches of Pandanus. The species has now flowered in several collections, 
and among them at Kew, where there is a fine plant. It is very handsome 
when in flower, though rather troublesome to deal with, on account of its 
size. The leaves are three to four feet long, by nearly six inches broad, and 
the spike ultimately attains a height of live to six feet. It may be added 
that some time as:o the Glasnevin plant bore a capsule, as the result of 
crossing with the pollen of E. Elisabeths obtained from Kew, but we have 
not heard whether seedlin-s were obtained. R. A. R. 



ODONTOGLOSSUMS FROM WALTON GRANGE. 

A beautiful series of Odontoglossums is sent from the collection of 
W. Thompson, Esq., Walton Grange, Stone, by Mr. W. Stevens. 
Particularly interesting are three forms of O. crispum X Wilckeanum, which 
must be referred to O. mirum, though we should have called them 
blotched forms of O. crispum had they appeared among imported plants. 
They vary somewhat in shape and in the details of the lip, but all have white 
ground colour, with copious blotches. We regard them as proving the 
origin of one set of " blotched crispums " beyond dispute. There are five 
diverse forms of O. Pescatorei X Ossulstonii, having broad lips most like 
the former in shape, and four have the segments heavily blotched all over 
with purple, but the fifth is white, with much fewer purple spots, recalling 
a blotched Pescatorei. O. Pescatorei X armainvillierense is a large flower, 
heavily blotched with purple on a white ground, a really charming thing. 
O. crispum X Vuylstekei has broad, somewhat acuminate, white sepals and 
petals, very heavily blotched with claret purple, and the lip broadly margined 
with white. O. Ossulstonii X eximium has rather elongated claret purple 
segments, with a few obscure whitish splashes, and the lip has a small white 
apex and a yellow crest. O. spectabile X Vuylstekei, though somewhat 
similar in colour, has much broader segments, and the petals are toothed. 
O. Adrianse X Ossulstonii is a charming round flower, with white ground- 
colour, copiously blotched with red-purple. There are three forms of O. 
cirrhosum X Ossulstonii, all most like the former in shape, and the two 
smaller copiously blotched with red-brown, while the other is most like O. 
cirrhosum in colour, but has broader segments, especially the lip. O. 
excellens eugenes X Harryanum recalls a form ofO. Rolfeae, of which latter 
a very fine form is also enclosed. A form of O. amabile (spectabile X 



May, < 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 141 

crispum Stevenii) recalls a giant Rtickerianum. having n>sy sepals, and 
only a few spots on the petals and white lip. Two forms of O. warnhamensc 
(Pescatorei X Hallii) vary greatly in size, and the best is a really charming 
thing. There is also a good blotched crispum that should be taken care of 
a fine form of O. Phoebe, a fine dark O. Charlesworthii (triumphans X 
Harryanum). a form of O. Clytie, and two charming forms of O. 
Lambeauianum (crispum X armainvillierense). Three others are of 
doubtful parentage, two being seedlings of O. Adrianse with the flowers 
copiously blotched with dark purple. They may be forms of O. Solon 
(Adrians X armainvillierense). A beautiful yellow hybrid, with a few brown 
spots on the sepals, was obtained from a yellowish flower of crispum shape 
crossed with a deep yellow form, probably loochristiense, for the triumphans 
column wings are unmistakable. Lastly there is a sulphur yellow seedling 
of crispum shape, but, unfortunately, of doubtful parentage, which should be 
taken care of. Mr. Stevens also includes a ten-flowered spike of a good 
typical O. crispum that has been in the collection for forty-two years, a very 

FALSE HYBRIDS. 

I have been much interested in reading the remarks on false hybrids in 
Orchids in the Orchid Review for February (pp. 37, 38). Last summer I visited 
Dr. Jacques Loeb in his Laboratory at Woods Hole, and he showed me 
drawings of hybrid Echinoderm larva;, remarking that when the cross was 
made between very diverse forms, the resulting larvae were always 
exclusively of the maternal type. It simply came to this, that the sperm 
cell produced two kinds of effect upon the egg, one causing it to develop, 
the other transmitting the parental qualities. The first event could very 
well happen without the other, and hence " false hybrids." Dr. Loeb has 
a most illuminating account of the general facts, with a chemical discussion, 
in a paper " On the Chemical Character of the Process of Fertilisation and 
its bearing upon the theory of Life Phenomena," issued as an advance print 
from the Proceedings of the Seventh International Zoological Congress, 
and published at Cambridge, Mass. I think Loeb's conclusions would be 
of great interest to Orchid breeders, and would, perhaps, suggest some good 
experiments. Loeb suggests, among other things, that the chemistry of 
the processes of germination in seeds is essentially analogous to that of 
fertilisation (he uses fertilisation here only for the processes involved in 
growth and development, without reference to the transmission of 
characters). As it appears that an enzyme develops in seeds which, with 
free oxygen, assists the process of germination, it seems barely possible that 
an extract of germinating seeds, or seeds about to germinate, when applied 
to an unfertilised flower of the same species, would set up developmental 



M2 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

process. Such an experiment would not be difficult to make, and little 
time and trouble would be lost if nothing came of it. 

Loeb further describes his experiments in "artificial parthenogenesis," 
which are well known and which undoubtedly seem to confirm the other 
ideas mentioned above. Theo. D. A. Cockerell. 

University of Colorado, 
Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A. 

Messrs. Peeters, Brussels, write, in connection with the same question, 
that they pollinated Zygopetalum Mackayi with Odontoglossum crispum, 
and the resulting seedlings were identical with Zygopetalum Mackayi. 
These were again pollinated with O. crispum, but the second generation 
was again indistinguishable from the Zygopetalum. They, however, did 
not remove the pollinia of the seed bearer, so that one cannot be certain as 
to what really took place. Mr. J. S. Moss, however, states that he has 
repeated the process a third time, always first carefully removing the pollen 
from the seed bearer, and the result was still indistinguishable from the 
Zygopetalum. 

Mr. Cockerell's note throws much light on the suggestion that in such 
cases fertilisation proper does not take place — that the alien pollen tubes do 
not enter the mycropyle of the ovule — hence no transmission of characters, 
but that the ovules are developed parthogenetically as the result of the 
stimulus of pollination. Such a result is not due to dominance as usually 
understood, and it emphasises the importance of cases of so-called paternal 
dominance. R. A. R. 

LiELIA GORTONII. 

Mr. C. Warren, Mickleham, Dorking, writes :--" I should like to ask your 
opinion on an Orchidaceous plant which has been rather puzzling me. It 
is known as Laelia Gortonii, and I have looked at all the books of reference 
within my sphere, and do not find it noted in any volume of the Orchid 
Review, nor in Watson's Book of Orchids. It is a strong-growing plant, with 
round pseudobulbs, which become furrowed after the first season, which are 
about an inch high, and bear a single leaf, or on strong growths two may be 
present. The leaves are from four to seven inches long, and lanceolate. 
For the last four years I have had plants under this name in my charge, and 
have never been fortunate enough to flower them. I am beginning to wonder 
if I have confused it with Lselia Groganii, which is a hybrid between La;lia 
flava and L. crispa. I hope you will be kind enough to clear me up this 
mystery." 

A similar note was sent to the Journal of Horticulture, and " W.B." 
replies, that the first and only time he saw a plant under this name was in 
1904, when on a visit to Mr. Rothschild's collection at Tring Park. His 



May, .912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 143 

notes only record the name ; no parentage or description being given, for 
the plant was not in flower. Since then the Tring collection has been dis- 
persed. Not knowing the parentage, it is difficult to say what cultural 
treatment it requires, but judging from the notes by Mr. Warren, he thinks 
it is hardly strong enough to produce a scape. 

We believe that the Tring plant came to Kew, where it still maintains 
its reputation of refusing to flower. It is believed to be a Brazilian species 
introduced by Dr. Gorton, at one time in business at Maida Vale, but has 
never been described. It apparently belongs to the L. crispilabia group. 
We hope that some one will succeed in flowering it and setting its mysterious 
origin at rest. R.A.R. 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

A flower of the remarkable Odontoglossum Memoria King Edward VII., 
to which a First-class Certificate was given by the Manchester Orchid 
Society on March gth last, is sent from the collection of J. J. Holden, Esq., 
Southport, by Mr. R. Johnson, who remarks that it was purchased as a 
seedling of unknown parentage, and is now flowering for the second time. 
The flower measures 3! inches from tip to tip of the petals, which latter are 
•over ii inches across, and well toothed, with one great solid claret-purple 
blotch, a little white at the base, and a white apex and margin. The sepals 
are similar in colour, but have rather less white, and the pandurate lip has 
a large violet-purple blotch in front of the yellow crest, the apex being 
white. The column wings are rather broad and slightly toothed. It is a 
magnificent thing. 

A flower of a remarkable peloriate form of Odontoglossum crispum is 
sent from the collection of Walter Cobb, Esq., Normanhurst, Rusper. The 
lip is broadly triangular in shape, and pure white, the crest being reduced 
to a pair of narrow purple lines at the base, with a tinge of yellow between 
them. The petals are broad, and white, and the sepals have two or three 
purple spots near the base. Three or four flowers were peloriate, but the 
rest were normal, so that the scape had a very striking appearance. 

A distinct and curious hybrid Odontoglossum has been sent from the 
collection of Sidney F. Jackson, Esq., Danehurst, Epsom, but unfortunately 
the parentage is not known. The characters of O. triumphans, however, 
are written large over the column wings and lip, and there can be no doubt 
that it or one of its hybrids was one of the parents. The flower is yellow, 
with a strong suffusion of rose and some minute dots on the sepals, and a 
paler suffusion in the petals. The lip is broad, with a large red-brown blotch 
in front of the crest. One cross was made from O. loochristiense with a 
pink crispum, having some small spots in the petals, and this may repre- 
sent the parentage. 



\Yi 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Mav 

DENDROBIUM SUPERBUM. 
are now able to give an example of Orchid growing in the tropic: 
exed figure representing some finely-flowered plants of Dendn 



the 



lidad. For t 



superbum, which have been grown at Port of Spain, Tri 
photograph we are indebted to Felix L. Anduze, Esq., who writes as 
f ol l ows; _" To-day I have much pleasure in enclosing a small photo taken 
by myself of Dendrobium superbum. The plants have been in bloom for 
the last.three weeks, and are still quite fresh, and there were 513 flowers open 
when photographed, with a few more to open. These plants have been 
growing under a mango tree for a number of years, on the property of one 




\V. I 



in,! 



Dendrobiums to Mower well, even D. nobile, which hardly eve 
here." Probably D. superbum, being a Malayan species, is bettei 
to the climate of Trinidad than D. nobiie, which likes a cool 
maturing its growth. We would suggest that I). Ainsworthii 
varieties, being half derived from D. aureum, also in part Malaya 
succeed in the climate of Port of Spain. We should like to kn 
Phalamopsis succeeds there. 



May, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. U5 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR MAY. 
By J. T. Barker, The West Hill, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
In each department plants will now be making new growth, and even- 
encouragement should be given them to buildup and mature such growth 

peratures should now be strictly adhered to, whenever the outside conditions 
are mild and genial, but should a spell of cold inclement weather prevail a 
few degrees lower will be better than an abnormal amount of tire heat. 

Cool house: Night, 55 to 6o° ; Day, 6o°, or as cool as possible. 

Intermediate houses: Night, 65° to 70 ; Day, 70° to 8o°. 

Warm houses : Night, 75 ; Day, 75° to 85°. 

amount of discretion, according to the outside conditions. 

Cool-house Orchids are soon injured by excessive heat, which many 
found out during the abnormal heat of last summer, and therefore they 
must be kept as cool as possible. 

Ventilation.— Durin» excessively hot weather the ventilation of the 
Cool-house will need a great deal of attention, as the humidity of the 
atmosphere must be maintained, which is not an easy matter, especially if 

judicious use of the blrnds. The top ventilators may be left open during 
the night, when the moisture in the atmosphere will be very beneficial to the 



pests. Spraying and syringing may be indulged in frequently on fine 

cold damp days, if done at all, it must be done with great caution. 

plant at the root that does not require it only decays the compost, which 
may in the end destroy the roots of the plant. 

not be made up. The sooner these plants get established in the new com- 
post the better, as a well established plant produces a larger crop of better 
flowers, than one only half established. 

Cattleyas, LjELIAS, LwELIOCattleyas, and others of this family that 



146 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, .912. 

are now pushing up their flowers within the sheaths, should be thoroughly 
cleaned and the flowering growths neatly staked up. A house should, if 
possible, be devoted entirely to plants in flower, where a slightly lower 
temperature and a drier atmosphere may be maintained, which will be the 
means of the flowers lasting longer, and afford more enjoyment to those 
who wish to inspect them. Push on with the repotting of any of this family 
which may require it, on the lines laid down last month. Where a collec- 
tion of species and hybrids of this most beautiful group is grown, something 
or other will nearly always be in the condition when repotting will be bene- 
ficial. To successfully cultivate these plants, I am fully convinced that 
they must have a sweet rooting medium, and many deteriorate through the 
compost being allowed to get into a decayed condition. 

Dendrobiums. — The evergreen species which flower at about this 
season comprise such beautiful and attractive plants, as D. densiflorum, 
Farmed, thrysiflorum, moschatum, Dalhousieanum, fimbriatum, 
chrysotoxum, Bronckartii, and several others. All are free-growing 
plants that can be accommodated in an ordinary plant stove during the 
summer months, whilst making their growths, and rested during the winter 
in a warm greenhouse, where the temperature does not go below 55 . 
These plants usually commence developing their new growths and flower 
spikes simultaneously, and by the time the flowers are past the young 
growths are somewhat advanced in making roots from their base. At this 
stage any necessary repotting should be attended to. They all may be 
cultivated in pots, and require a position where they get plenty of light, and 
only require protection from the direct rays of the sun during the hottest 
part of the day. 

Dendrobium Phal^nopsis, and other species of this section, may also 
have attention in the same way, providing the young growths are seen to 
be pushing new roots. These plar 
pans, as the best results are obtain 
rooting space. The compost as adv 
answer their requirements. The usual precautions as regards watering 
newly-potted plants must be adhered to. 

Dendrobium formosum is a very useful Orchid where there is a great 
demand for choice white flowers in the autumn. The plants which are now 
commencing to grow should be treated as advised for D. Phalamopsis. 
Both species delight in plenty of heat and light when in full growth, and an 
abundant supply of moisture both at the root and in the atmosphere. D. 
infundibulum and its variety Jamesianum are also -rowing and making new 
roots, and may be repotted should they require it. This species succeeds 
grown in the same way as the preceding, with the exception that it delights 
in a cool intermediate temperature instead of a warm one. 



should al 


ways be grown in shalk 


when the 


y are restricted as regar 


d last mo 


nth for Dendrobiums w 



May, 1912.I THE ORCHID REVIEW. H7 

Anguloas.— The species of Anguloa should be potted either immediately 

plants succeed in the same compost as the green-leaved Cypripediums, and 
any that are in need of new rooting material may now have attention. A 
shady position in tin- Cool Intermediate house will answer their requirements 

Lycastes.— Lycaste Skinneri and its varieties that are starting int.) 
growth should be repotted, if necessary, also other plants of the same genus. 
They will succeed in the same compost and under the same conditions as 
Anguloas, and should be potted in the same manner (much as an ordinary 
stove plant), leaving a good space on the surface for holding water. 
Although moisture-loving plants, they must not be given much water during 
the early stages of growth. 

Zygopetalums.— The various members of this genus, supply a desirable 
colour amongst Orchid flowers, their blooms being, for the most part, of 
some shade of blue or violet. Z. Perrenoudii is one of the best. They are 
now producing their flower spikes, simultaneously with the young growths. 
It is not advisable to allow the spikes to remain upon the plants for a very 
long period, and as soon as the Mowers lose their lustre, it is best to remove 
them. Any plants needing fresh rooting material should receive attention', 
as new roots soon push from the base of the new growths. Zygopetalums 
are impatient of root disturbance, and should not be repotted unless it is 
absolutely necessary. They will succeed in the same compost as the green- 
leaved Cypripediums, and should be grown in a shady position in the 
Intermediate house. 

Odontoglossums of the grande and Insleayi section require a slightly 
higher temperature than that provided for O. crispum. They are best 
grown during the winter months at the coolest end of the Intermediate 
house, and kept comparatively dry, but during the summer at the warmest 
end of the Odontoglossum house. Many of these Mexican Odontoglossums 

pushing from the new growths they may have attention as regards repotting, 
should they require it. They will succeed in the same compost as other 
Odontoglossums. This class of Odontoglossum, having thicker leaves, 
will withstand more sunlight than the thin-leaved ones, and, therefore, 
should not be densely shaded, but the other extreme must also be avoided. 
Cymbidiums that require repotting may now be done. Such species as 
C. eburneum, Lowianum, and others, with the increasing number of hybrids, 
will thrive at the cool end of the Intermediate house, where they must be 
shaded from direct sunshine. They will succeed in a compost made up of 
equal parts of fibrous peat and loam, with a fair quantity of sphagnum 
moss and coarse silver sand. They should be potted moderately firmly, 
and much like an ordinary plant. C. Devonianum is distinct in its habit 



148 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, i 9l2 . 

and mode of flowering, producing pendant flowering racemes in the way of 
a Stanhopea, therefore should be cultivated in shallow teak wood baskets, 
using a compost as for Cattleyas. The taller species are best grown in 
ordinary flower pots, and the dwarfer growers, such as C. tigrinum, in 
shallow pans suspended from the roof. During hot weather their 
surroundings should be kept constantly moist by light syringings. 

Ccelogyne pandurata, should it require repotting, may have attention 
as it passes out of bloom, using the same compost as advised for C. cristata 
last month. 

Vanda ccerulea is an Orchid which a great many are not as successful 
with as they would wish, and the present is a good time to repot any that 
may require it. The compost I recommend consists of equal parts of 
osmunda fibre, sphagnum moss, and half-decayed oak leaves. Pot the 
plants moderately firmly, and water carefully until the new roots are well 
established in the fresh compost. This species needs very little shade, and 
must have a supply of fresh air at all seasons, and when in full growth will 
stand a fairly high temperature, providing air is accompanied with it. I 
find a warm Intermediate house is suitable to grow it in, and when at rest 
they must be exposed to all the light possible, and be kept fairly dry. 

Oncidiums, as they pass out of flower and commence to grow, may 
have attention as regards repotting, using a compost as for Odontoglossums, 
with a more liberal supply of half-decayed oak leaves. After repotting 
they may be thoroughly cleaned and returned to their respective houses, 
according to their requirements. 

General Remarks.— This is, perhaps, the busiest month in the whole 
year to the Orchid cultivator, as work will, in many cases, seem to come on 
much faster than it can be got through, but perseverance will do wonders. 
In repotting, try to catch every plant at the proper time, so that the check 
it receives is as slight as possible, as time lost can never be regained. 
Continue to exercise the greatest diligence in the eradication of all pests, 
and be scrupulous and thorough in attending to the wants of the plants, 
all the houses, and under 






SOCIETIES. 



Royal Horticultural. 
A meeting was held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Squai 
Westminster, on March 19th, when there was a good display of Orchic 
including seven medal groups, but only three subjects figured in the list 
Awards. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), a 
Messrs. Jas. O'Brien (hon. sec), Gurney Wilson, F. M. Ogilvie 



May, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. H9 

Armstrong, A. A. McBean, W. Cobb, J. Charlesworth, J. E. Shill, H. G. 
Alexander, A. Dye, W. H. White, J. Wilson Potter, J. S. Moss, W. Bolton, 
de Barri Crawshay, C. J. Lucas, Stuart Low, and Harry J. Veitch. 

H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney (gr. Mr. G. E. Day), staged a 
fine group, including a selection of Phaius Norman and P. Martha, Laelio- 
cattleya Charlesworthii, Cymbidiums, Cypripediums, Odontioda Chatles- 
worthii, and a number of good OdontOglossums (Silver Flora Medal). 

G. Hamilton-Smith, Esq., Killoran, Finchley (gr. Mr. Coningsby) sent 
a good selection of Lycaste Skinneri, including the very fine variety Mrs. 
G. Hamilton-Smith, and some well-grown specimens of Cyinbidium 
eburneum, Balliae, Veitchii, insigne, and Lowgrinum (Silver Banksian 
Medal). 

G. M. Bird, Esq., Manor House, West Wickham (gr. Mr. Redden), 
showed Odontoglossum crispum Luciani. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park, Reigate (gr. Mr. J. Collier), 
sent a very choice group, including Odontioda gattonensis with a spike of 
forty-five flowers, a very fine O. Bradshawiae with two spikes, the best bearing 
fifty-four flowers, Odontoglossum Japonais, the rare Maxillaria sanguinea, 
Megaclinium falcatum, Bulbophyllum mandibulare, and B. barbigerum. 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), 
showed Odontioda bella (Cochlioda Noetzliana X Odontoglossum 
bellatulum), with deep red flowers, a home -raised form of Odontoglossum 
excellens, and a fine form of Cyinbidium insigne. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), sent 
Odontioda Cooksoniae var. Eric, a bright scarlet form, and Odonto- 
glossum crispum Clarissa. 

J. H. Hill, Esq., Burgess Hill, Sussex, showed Dendrobium Austinii var. 
J. H. Hill, a richly-coloured form. 

Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. 
Alexander), sent Lseliocattleya Alpha, Westonbirt var. (L.-c. Ernestii X 
C. Schroederse, a pretty pale yellow form. 

S. Larkin, Esq., Ridgeways, Haslemere, sent Lseliocattleya Endymion, 
a richly-coloured form. 

H. T. Pitt, Esq., Rosslyn, Stamford Hill (gr. Mr. Thurgood), sent 
Cymbidium Lowgrinum and C. Lady Colman, Rosslyn var. 

J. T. Bennett-Poe, Esq., Holmewood, Cheshunt (gr. Mr. Downes), sent 
Cymbidium Colmanige, Holmewood var., and a spike of C. Lowianum, 
Woodhall's var. with a spike of twenty-two flowers. 

R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Chessington, Streatham Hill (gr. Mr. J. M. 
Black), showed the deep red Sophrocatlaelia Atrens gloriosa, and Odontioda 
Sanderae, Black's var., a bright scarlet form. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Hayvvards Heath, staged a choice group, 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. May, 




Fig. 22. Neomoore. 



including a plant of the remarkable Neomoorea irrorata with a fine spike, 
the rare Angrsecum Germinyanum, a well-bloomed A. citratum, Cattleya 



May, i 9 ta.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 151 

Trianse alba, and others, Lseliocattleya Nelthorpe Beauclerk, some good 
Odontiodas, and a number of finely-flowered Odontoglossums, mostly 
hybrids (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander cS: Sons, St. Albans, staged a fine group, including a lot 
of Dendrobium Wardianum in the centre, D. delicatulum, Renanthera 
Imschootiana, Cattleya Olaf var. venusta, a pretty white flower with the 
front of the lip rose-purple, some good C. Trianae, Schrcederae and Vulcan, 

some good Odontoglossums and Brassocattleyas (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, sent a good group, including two 
well-bloomed Angraecum sesquipedale, Cypripedium Maudise, Brassocattleya 
Veitchii, Masdevallia bella, Sophronitis grandiflora, Cattleya amethys- 
toglossa and Trianae, with some good Odontoglossums (Silver Banksian 
Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged a bright group, including 
Cattleyas, Laeliocattleyas. Cypripediums. Odontoglossums, Odontiodas, the 
rare Sophronitis violacea, Cymbidium eburneum and insigne, Dendrobium 
Jamesianum, Oncidium splendidum and sarcodes, the rare Polystachya 
paniculata, and Brassocatlselia Cooksonii enfieldensis (B.-l. Gratrixiae X C. 
Dowiana), having coppery orange sepals and petals and a ruby-coloured lip 
(Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a select group, includ- 
ing Laeliocattleya Euripides (L.-c. Goldcrest X L.-c. Myra), a very pretty 
cowslip yellow hybrid, some good Odontoglossum crispum, O. armain- 
villierense and var. xanthotes, O. apterum, &c, with a noble specimen of 
O. Phcebe, bearing three large branched spikes, in the centre (Silver 
Banksian Medal). 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, sent some good Dendro- 
bium chessingtonense, Cypripedium aureum Surprise, and Cattleya 
Lueddemanniana Stanleyi. 

M. Maurice Mertens, Ghent, sent a few good Odontoglossums and 
Odontiodas. 

Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, sent a fine hybrid between Lgelia 
purpurata aud Laeliocattleya bella, having pale lilac sepals and petals and a 
broad ruby-purple lip. 

Mr. C. F. Waters, Deanlands Nursery, Balcombe, sent a good light 
form of Cattleya Schrcedera;, and Lycaste Skinneri, Waters' var., a richly- 
coloured form. 

First-class Certificate. 

Odontoglossum crispum Samuel Gratrix.— A very fine variety, 
having remarkably broad segments, with a zone of light violet blotches, 
quite confluent on the petals, and the lip blotched with reddish purple in 



'52 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

front of the yellow crest. Exhibited by S. Gratrix, Esq., Whalley Range, 
Manchester (gr. Mr. Brown). 

Award of Merit. 

Cattleya Dirce, Westonbirt var. (Vulcan x Warscewiczii).— A 
very handsome hybrid, most like the former in shape, with rosy lilac sepals 
and petals, and the !ip darker with claret purple veining. Exhibited by 
Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Hoiford, K.C.V.O. 

Cultural Commendation. 

Sophronitis grandiflora. — A very fine specimen, bearing nearly 100 
flowers. To Mr. H. G. Alexander, Orchid grower to Lt.-Col. Sir George 
L. Hoiford, K.C,V.O. 

At the meeting held on April 2nd there was a very fine display of 
Orchids, including six medal groups, other awards being three First-class 
Certificates and five Awards of Merit. 

Orchid Committee present :— J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, Gurney Wilson, R. A. Rolfe, 
R. G. Thwaites, F. Sander, F. M. Ogilvie, T. Armstrong, A. A. McBean, 
J. Charlesworth, W. H. Hatcher, J. E. Shill, A. Dye, H. G. Alexander, 
W. H. White, J. Wilson Potter, Clive Cookson, W. Bolton, C. J. Lucas, 
R. Brooman White, de Barn Crawshay, and J. S. Moss. 

R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Chessington, Streatham (gr. Mr. J. M. Black), 
staged a very brilliant little -roup of about a dozen Odontiodas (which are 
noted on another page), with a few pretty forms of Odontoglossum armain- 
villierense (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Mrs. Norman Cookson, Oakwood, Wylam-on-Tyne (gr. Mr. H. J. 
Chapman), sent Odontoglossum crispum nigrum, with very dark spots, and 
O. percultum pallidum, a light-coloured variety. 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), sent a 
richly-coloured form of Odontoglossum Lambeauianum. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford, sent Lycaste Skinneri alba. 
Lieut. -Col. Sir George L. Hoiford, Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander), 

sent Cattleya Olaf, a pretty light-coloured hybrid. 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., Burford (gr. Mr. W. H. White), sent a 
pretty group of yellow-flowered Dendrobiums, with Masdevallia Arminii, 
caudata, Courtauldiana, Shuttryana Chamberlainii, leontoglossa, Gelenyana, 
ignea, Henrietta;, and others. 

Arthur Legge, Esq., Homefield, Worthing (gr. Mr. Rolfe), sent four 
very promising seedling Dendrobiums, one from D. nobile nobilius X D. n. 
elegans being most like the former in size and colour, while D. Arthur 
Legge (D. n. elegans X ?) was a beautiful light-coloured form. 

F. M. Ogilvie, Esq.. The Shrubbery, Oxford (gr. Mr. Balmforth), showed 



May, i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 153 

a white form of Cypripedium Aphrodite, C. Winnifred Hollington, a very 
fine Miltonia Bleuana rosea, and Brassocattleya Cliftonii magnifica. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. Hopkins), sent 
Cattleya Trianae F. MacBean, a fine blush pink form, with the front lobe of 
the lip magenta purple. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a very fine group, containing 
many good Cattleya Schrcederae and Trianae, two batches of Rmanthera 
Imschootiana, Dendrobium nobile, Wardianum, and aggregatum, Odonto- 
glossums, Odontiodas, Laeliocatttevas, Acanthophippium svlhctenso, 
Gongora truncata, Trichopilia Hennisii, &c, with a magnificant plant of 
Miltonia St. Andre in the centre (Silver-gilt Flora Medal), 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Hay wards Heath, sent a choice group, 

panicle of eleven side branches and forty-seven flowers, a fine O. Rolfese, 

nebulosum, Odontioda Felicia (O. heatonensis X Odontoglossum 
Ossulstonii). a beautiful spotted hybrid, a hue O. Yuvlstekeae with six side 



and concolor, Dendrobium chrysotoxum with ten spikes, D. Brymerianum, 

lurida, Polystachya paniculata, Lycaste Ballise, Laeliocattleya luminosa X 
Ernestii, a pretty yellow flower with red-purple front lobe to the lip, and 
others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall& Co., Southgate, sent a good group, including Cattleya 
Triana Backhouseana, with a purple feather on the petals, some good C. 
Schrcederse, Cymbidium eburneum, Odontoglossum percultum, Odontioda 
Cooksonias, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent a good form of Odonto- 
glossum crispum, armainvillierense xanthotes, and Phcebe, Phaius Norman, 
Zygopetalum Perrenoudii, Cattleya Mossiae and C. Schroederae, some good 
Odontioda Bradshawiae and Charlesworthii (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, sent a good specimen of 
Coelogyne pandurata, and a fine hybrid between Cypripedium Prewettii and 
C. Germaine Opoix, with very broad green dorsal sepal, blotched with brown. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Hay wards Heath, sent the beautiful 
Cattleya Lueddemanniana Stanley!, C. Trianae Empress of India, white 
with light violet front to the lip, and C. Schrcederae The Kaiser, a blush 
white form with orange-coloured throat to the lip. 



*54 THE ORCHID REVIEW, [May, 1912. 

First-class Certificates. 

Cymbidium Pauwelsii, The Dell var. (Lowianum X insigne).— A 
fine form, bearing a spike of twenty cream white flowers, faintly lined with 
purple, and some purple blotching on the lip. Exhibited by Baron Bruno 
Schroder, The Dell, Egham (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill). 

L^liocattleya McBeaniana (L. anceps Schrcederiana X Cattleya 
Schroederae).— A very fine flower, with broad blush white sepals and petals, 
and the lip white, with rose-purple front lobe, the side lobes margined with 
rose, and the disc yellow. Exhibited by Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean. 

L.eliocattleya Trimyra (Cattleya Trianas X Lselia Myra).— A rich 
orange-coloured hybrid. — Exhibited by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart. 



Cypr 




EM R. 


OGE 


:k Sander (Godefroyae X glaucophyllum).— A pretty 


cream w 


hite tl 


lower, 


bet 


uitifully lined and 


vei 


I1C.1. 


and the lip spotted with 


claret-pu 


rple. 


Exh 


ibit 


ed by Messrs. Sar 


ider 


& Sc 


,ns. 


L.el: 


[OCAT 


TLEYA 


B 


OYLEI, VEITCH'S 




. (L. 


anceps Schrcederiana X 


C. Trian 


ae).— 


A chai 


rmi 


ng form, having r. 


Dse 1 


>ink - 


;epals and pt^tals, and the 


lip rich 


purpl 


e will 


1 a 


bright yellow di 


isc. 


Exh 


ibited by Messrs. James 


Veitch & 
















L.ELI 


OCAT' 


FLEYA 


Oi 


rama (Dorainians 


1 X 


bletchleyensis).— A very fine 


hybrid, h 


avin ( s 


: purp] 


le-r 


ose sepals and pet 


als, 


and 


a dark claret-purple lip, 


with twc 


1 dec] 


p yell 


3W 


eyes in the thro 


at. 


Exh 


ibited by Messrs. James 


Veitch & 


iZ; 




2 


)Xi.E. Cobb's var 


u!g 


»ited 


tzliana X Odontoglossum 
by Walter Cobb, Esq., 




rnrst, 


Rusp 


sr ( 


gr. Mr. C J. Salt 


er). 






Odon 


togd 




Ml 


[RUM VAR. HIS M 


[AJE: 


•,TV.- 


-A very fine form, having 


cream w 




Bower 




veil blotched wit 


b ch 


ocoh 


ite-purple. Exhibited by 


Lieut.-C( 


>1. Sii 


-Geor 


ge 


L. Hoi ford, K.Cd 


V.O, 







Manchester and North of England Orchid. 

At the meeting held on March 7th, the members of Committee present 
were:— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chain, Messrs. R. Ashworth, J. 
Bamber, C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, J. C. Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, 
W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for a group of well-grown Odontoglossums, Odontioda 
Cooksoniae and Goodsoniae, and Cypripediums. 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for some fine Odontoglossums, Dendrobium Wardianum album, D. 
atroviolaceum, and Cypripediums. 



Mav, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. *55 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), received a Silver 
Medal for a nice mixed group, including Odontoglossum Jasper. Beard- 
wood var. and others, the rare Cymbidium Sanders, Ladiocattleya eallisto- 
glossa, Cattleya Trianae alba, and others, with a few Cypripediums. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was also awarded a Silver 
Medal for a group composed principally of Cattleya Trianae, Cypripedium 
nitens, His Majesty, with others, and the pretty Ladia tlava. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), had a small 
but effective group of Odontoglossums and Cypripediums. nicely arranged 
with ferns and small palms. 

A. Warburton. Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish), was awarded a 

ianum, Thompsonii and Archimedes nigrum, with Cattleyas Schroederae, 
White Queen, and others. 

O. O. Wriglev, Esq., Burv (gr. Mr. Rogers), staged Phalaenopsis grandi- 
flora, Dendrobiumprimulinum, Cypripediums Beryl. Beeckmanii, Invincible, 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), sent Cypripedium Our 

H. Thorp, Esq., Rhodes, staged Cypripedium aureum Surprise. 
Messrs J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, were awarded a Silver Medal for 
a nice mixed group of Dendrobiums, Cattleya Trian* alba. L ^^ 

} Me^r P /sander H^ns, St. Albans, were awarded a Silver Medal for a 
mixed group of Cypripediums, Lycaste Tunstillii and hybrida, Brassocattleya 
lan-levensis Cymbidium eburneo-Lowianum, and Renanthera coccinea. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged Odontoglossum 
Dora, eximium, Doris, Ossulstonii and Phaedra, Odontioda heatonensis, and 
Bradshawiae. . ^ Maudiae 

Cattleya Trianae, Odontoglossum Ianthe, and O. aid, ''^""'[^^^^^^ 

crispum and three blotched hybrids. 

Messrs V 1 Keelin, & Son, Bradford staged Cattleya Mobe, 

Den M r r . ^^^T^^^ Cattle - TriM 5 Hil ^ eld 

var., Cypripedium Lady Gay. and Odontoglossum Vuylstekei X Harryanum. 

Odontoglossum MenKriT^Edwaid VII. (parentage unknown) A 
fine large flower, of solid colour, with the tips of the segments white ; from 



J. J. Holden, Esq. 



x 56 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Cappei (Trianae X Schroederae) ; from J. J. Holden, Esq. 

Odontoglossum triumphans, Ward's van; from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cypripediam Carola (Euryades splendens X Thompsonii) ; from. Wm. 
Thompson, Esq. 

At the meeting held on Thursday, March 21st, the members of Committee 
present were:— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), Messrs. C. Parker, 
H. Thorp, A. Warburton, Z. A. Ward, J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Holmes, 
A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for a well-staged group, Odontoglossums predominating, 
the choice hybrids making a fine diversity of colour, with Odontiodas, 
Cypripedium aureum virginale, Euryades magnincum and Miltonia 
Warscewiczii. 

S. Gratrix, Esq., Whalley Range (gr. Mr. Brown), was also awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for an excellent group, including Cattleya Trianae alba, 
C. Schroederae, Dendrobium Wardianum, nobile virginale, Rubens, Harold, 
Cybele, Owenianum, Schneiderianum, and Cooksonii, and a fine plant of 
Odontoglossum crispum, Leonard Perfect, and others, making a fine display. 
W. R. Lee, Esq., Hey wood (gr. Mr. Branch), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for an effective group, principally Dendrobium Wardianum, Rubens, 
Ainsworthii, Cooksonii, atroviolaceum, and Brymerianum, with a fine form 
of Cattleya Schroederae, Brassocattleya langleyensis var. Bradshawiae, &c. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 
Silver Medal for a nice group, including Odontoglossums of the crispum 
section, white and spotted, several good forms of O. Rossii, Pescatorei, and 
Cervantesii, Cattleya Trianae alba, Brassocattleya Warned, &c. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was also awarded a 
Silver Medal for a nice group, including Cattleya Schroederae Diadem, alba, 
and Model, several good forms of C. Trianae, C. Parthenia Prince of Wales 
Laeliocattleya Hypatia, Laelia flava, and others. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), was 
awarded a Bronze Medal for a small group of Odontoglossum crispum in 
variety, Cypripedium villexul, concolor, Actaeus Gratrixiae, hirsutissimum, 
aureum virginale and Leopoldianum, Mortonii albens, and Lathamianum 
Rex. 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), staged a plant of Lycaste 
Skinneri alba, with twenty-six flowers fully open, Odontoglossum crispum, 
several Cypripedium villosum, and a few plants of Laelia Jongheana. 

A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden, staged Cypripedium Mrs. Cary-Batten. 
C Parker, Esq., Preston, staged a plant of Cypripedium Harrisander. 



May, 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



H. Thorp, Esq., Middleton, staged Cypripedium Flamingo, Hera, and 
Dendrobium Cybele nobilior. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons. St. Albans, staged Odontioda Charlesworthii, 
Odontoglossum eximium var. Flambeau, and several hybrids from O. 
crispum Graireanum. 

Messrs. Charlesworth >\: Co., Haywards Heath, staged Odontoglossum 
Dora, illustrissimum, Jasper, and Odontioda Bradshawise. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, staged Dendrobium Rubens 



.J 



Fig. 21. Odontoglossum Rossii immaculatum .sec p. 158). 
grandiflorum, D. Ainsworthii intertextum, Miltonia Rcezlii, and a nice forn 
of Odontoglossum crispum. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged Brassocattleya Maronii an< 
a few good Cattleyas. 

First-class Certificates. 

Odontioda Charlesworthii Ward's var.— Flowers not very large bu 
intense dark crimson all over ; from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Odontioda Schroederi var. Leeana.— Flowers three inches across, ver 
round and bright colour ; tips of sepals, petals and lip of a lighter shade 
from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cymbidium Parishii Sander* Rutherford's var.— Flowers pure white 
with purple markings on the lip ; from Col. J. Rutherford, M.P. 



J 5 8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, i 9 i 2 . 

Awards of Merit. 

Lycaste Susan.— A natural hybrid; from Mrs. Gratrix, Whalley Range. 

Odontoglossum amabile vars. Monarch, Darkness, and Beauty; O. 
crispum var. Ethel ; Odontioda splendens (O. gloriosum x C. Ncetzliana) ; 
and Cypripedium The Chairman (Fairrieanum x Goultenianum) ; from 
Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cattleya Suzanne Hye, Gratrix's var., and Cypripedium Prince Albert 
var. Alport Derby ; from S. Gratrix, Esq. 

Laeliocattleya bella alba var. Leeana, Odontoglossum Cobbia, and 
Dendrobium nobile var. Leeanum ; from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cymbidium Pauwelsii (Lowianum concolor x insigne) ; from Col. 
J. Rutherford, M.P. 

Odontoglossum Rossii var. immaculatum ; from H. Arthur, Esq. (See 
figure on preceding page). 

Cattleya Schrcederge enfieldiensis ; from Messrs. Stuart Low & Co. 
Cultural Certificate and Bronze Medal. 

To Mr. Brown, gr. to S. Gratrix, Esq., for a plant of Odontoglossum 
crispum var. Samuel Gratrix, carrying a magnificent spike. 

N.B.— The plant of Odontoglossum Delhi (F.-c. C.) exhibited by J. J. 
Holden, Esq., Southport, on January nth, 1912, has been entered on the 
records of the Society as O. promerens var. Delhi. 

North of England Horticultural. 
At the meeting held at Bradford on March 14th, the following awards were 
made by the Orchid Committee :— 

Large Silver Medals to J. F. Craven, Esq., Keighley (gr. Mr. F. W. 
Craven), J. Hartley, Esq., Morley (gr. Mr. W. Coupe), and Mr. W. 
Shackleton, Bradford. 

Silver Medals to N. Galloway, Esq., Bradford, Messrs. A. J. Keeling & 
Sons, Bradford, and Messrs, Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon. 

Bronze Medal to Mr. E. V. Low, Haywards Heath. 

Vote of Thanks to the Rev. T. Gurney Little, West Ayton (gr. Mr. G. 
Howden). 

First-class Diplomas to Dendrobium Cybele album, from W. H. St. 
Quintin, Esq. (gr. Mr. F. C. Puddle), and Odontioda eboriaca, from J. H. 
Craven, Esq. 

Second-class Diplomas to Dendrobium chessingtonense and D. nobile, 
Thwaites var., both from J. Hartley, Esq. 

By some inexplicable mistake the date of the last meeting was given at 
page 126 as March 22nd. It should have been February 22nd. 



i 9 "0 THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

lext meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society \ 
Horticultural Hall Westminster, on May rath 



The M 


Manchester and 


North of 


Lallan 


d Orchid 


Sneietv 


will hold 


meetings a 


t the Coal Exchange, Mane 


:hester. 


on May 211 


d audi 


6th. The 


Committee 


i meets at noon, 


and the exl 


ribits ai 


v open to 


inspecti 


on from 1 


to 4 p.m. 


There will be nc 


) meeting c 


>n May 


30th. owing 


: to the: 


great Show 


in London 


, the date being 


altered to J 


nne 6t! 




e last 


meeting of 


the Society's year will be held at the 


! usual 1 


lour, and tl 


le Annr: 


,al Meeting 


at 3 p.m. 














The gr< 


sat event of the r 


nonth is th 


e Roya 


J Internal 


Dual H 


orticultural 


Exhibition 


, to be held in th 


e grounds 


of the Royal Hospital, Ch 


elsea, from 


May 22nd 


to 30th. The 


Show will 


1 be op 


ened at noc 


n on M 


ay 22nd by 


His Majesi 


ty the King. An 


official ace 


;ount oi 


"the Orchic 


1 Laurie: 


3 was given 


in our last 


issue, and exhib 


itors are re 


minded 


that Wedt 


lesday. 


May 1st, is 


the latest 
occasioned 


date for making 


weather, s. 


2 ason,c 


r withdraw 
•r other cau 


als whi 


ch may be 


The V 


ienna Horticultu 


ral Society 


f is arr 


anging a 1 


o-day e 


xcursion to 


London for the Internatio 


nal Exhib 


ition. 


The party 


will St: 


art on May 


22nd, and 


will proceed str; 


light to London. 


In additie 


m to \ 


•isiting the 


Exhibition 


, visits will also 


be made 


to the 


principal c 


mrseric: 


;, Kew, the 


R.H.S. ga 


rdens at Wisley, 


Hampton 


Court, 


and other 


places. 


On the 



return journey, a halt will be made at Rotterdam, and a day or two spent 
in Holland and Belgium, the programme terminating at Frankfort-on- 
Main, after a visit to the celebrated Palm garden in that city. A party is 
also coming from the United States. 

The Birmingham Botanical and Horticultural Society have decided to 
hold two Flower Shows during the present summer, at the Botanical 
Gardens, Edgbaston. The first will be held on June 12th (Orchids and 
early Summer flowers) and the second on July 17th (Roses and Midsummer 
flowers). Honorary Exhibits will be welcomed. Particulars may be 
obtained from the Hon. Secretaries, Botanical Gardens, Edgbaston. 

At the Doncaster meeting of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, 
to be held from July 3rd to 6th, 1912, prizes of £10, £5, and £3 are offered 
for a Collection of Orchids, arranged for effect on a stage 100 feet square, 
with a Gold Medal in addition to the best exhibit. Palms, ferns, or other 
suitable foliage plants may be used to give effect to the exhibit. Entries 
to be sent to Mr. Peter Blair, Trentham Gardens, before Friday, May 31st. 



i6o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [May, 1912. 

ACRIOPSIS RIDLEYI. 

This species has hitherto only been known from a single specimen, which 
was found on a pepper post at Bukit Mandai, in the Island of Singapore, 
and Mr. N. N. Ridley, the discoverer, remarked : " It had, I think, been 
planted there, having been found in the jungle close by when the forest was 
felled to make the pepper gardens." It was described by Sir Joseph Hooker 
(PL Brit, hid., vi. p. 79) from a drawing sent by Mr. Ridley. It is 
interesting to record that a plant has now appeared in the collection of Sir 
Trevor Lawrence, Bart., at Burford, it having been received from Dr. 
Schlechter as A. javanicum. There were two plants, and when they 
flowered one of them proved different, hence materials were sent to Kew for 
determination, when one was found to agree with the drawing of A. Ridleyi. 
It is not known when the plants were collected. R. A. R. 



Cymbidium ebukneum (specimen plant). -Jouni. Hort., 1912, i. p. 231, 
with fig. 

Cypripedium spectabile.— Garden, 1912, p. 131, with fig. 
Ljbliocattleya McBeaniana.— Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 237, hg. 107. 
Odontoglossum crispum Saga. — Gard. Chron., 1912, i. p. 267, fig. 125. 

SCHOMBURGKIA LUEDDEMANNIANA, Prill. — Bot. Mag., t. 8427. 

Vanda Watsoni.— Garden, 1912, p. no, with fig. 

ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

>,;■;. "•■'■". ".■■" - .'. ■ ■..-.■ . 

W.C.S.— The flower from Ladiocattleya callistoglossa x Cattleya Mendelii is excellent, 
both in shape and colour. The Odontoglossum sent is a form of O. Lambeauianum. O. 
J.Li) mai s is supposed to have the same parentage, but the colour and markings are different, 
and the point requires confirmation. 

P.B.— Oncidium luridum. Lindl. 

E.E.C. — Odontoglossum Rossii majus, a large flowered form of the species. The 
Cypripedium may have been from C. Leeanum X Schlesingerianum, as suggested, but it is 
of little value unless it improves greatly. 

J.F.S.— We suggest that the stray seedling be allowed to flower again to see if the 
deformity is repeated. We cannot suggest the parentage in this state, unless it be a form 
of Lasliocattleya Nysa. 

Catalogue RECEIVED.— We have received the Descriptive and Pri.-cd Catalogue 
.ssuedby Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, containing a fine series of species 
and hybrids. It is illustrated by nine !.»< •>.- the following 

Orchids, each of which received the award of a First-class Certiti. ate from the R.H.S. in 
191 1 :— Cattleya Rhoda illui tfontioda Kuterpe, Odonto- 

glossum Harwoodii, and Shrubbery van, O. Jeanette, O Ossulstonii Shrubbery var., 
Sophrocattleya Lottie Midler, and Sophrocatlaelia Jeanette. 

We have received from the Agricultural and Ho ttion, Ltd., 92, Long 

Acre, London. All Garden Books, Carnations, by the late James 

Douglas, F.R.H.S., and Poppies, by George Gordon, V.M.H. Price one penny, and well 



Vol. XX, No. 234. 



JUNE, 1912. 



ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 



Aerides japonicum 
Amateur's Collectioi 
Answers to Correspondents 



Orchid Exhibition, Messrs. W. Bull & Sons' 

Orchid Notes and News 

Orchid Portraits 

the Royal Society's Conversa- 

Our Note Book 

PRICE SIXPENCE MONTHLY. 



Royal International Horticultural Exhibi- 

Sir Harry J. Ve'itch '.'.'. '.'.'. '.'.'. ','.'. 

Societies- 
North of England 



Royal Horticultural 
Stanhopea grandiflora a 
Yuylstekeara Hyeana 



91 ! Odontoglossum crispum Perfect Gem 

73 J Odontoglossum crispum Solum 

61 i Odontoglossum warnhamense var. Stevensii 
Post Free 7/- per Annum — See Overleaf. 



SANDER & SONS. 



e fortnightly fresh consignments of the best 

OSMUNDA REGALIS FIBRE 



freehold lands, 
lited States of An 



in the best Osmunda producing territory- 
Price per bushel, 2/6 ; per bag, 8/6. 



APPOINTMENT TO 



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WORLD-RENOWNED ORCHIDS. 
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ORCHID RAISERS, GROWERS, 
IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS, 

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Finest Trade Collection of Orchids in Europe. 



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Please Address— Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, Sussex. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

The event of the month is the long anticipated Royal International 
Horticultural Exhibition, which at the moment of writing is in progress in 
the grounds of the Royal Hospital, Chelsea. The Orchids — with which 
alone we are concerned — are by common consent the great feature of the 
exhibition, the magnificent group staged by Sir George L. Holford, to which 
His Majesty the King's Cup was awarded, as the most meritorious exhibit 
in the Show, never having been equalled anywhere. The extensive groups 
staged by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., and by Messrs. Sander & Sons, are 
in advance of anything before attempted by them, and other trade firms 
made a special effort to eclipse their previous records. The competitive 
groups staged by F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., and Sir Jeremiah Colman, were also 
superb, and a few very choice groups came from abroad, the result being 
such a display as has never before been seen at any exhibition. 



There is nothing with which it can be compared except the Temple 
Shows of recent years, for the Orchid Conference of 1885, which produced 
such a fine display, is too remote, and a world of progress has been made 
since the last great International Exhibition was held in London in 1866— 
forty-six years ago. Hybridisation was then in its infancy ; and the 
number of hybrid Orchids that had flowered could almost have been counted 
on the fingers of both hands. Incredible as it may seem, the first hybrid 
Cypripedium had not then reached the flowering stage. To-day we are in 
the Hybrid Age, and a glance round the Exhibition will show how much we 
owe to the persistent efforts of the hybridist ; in fact, in some of the more 
popular genera the hybrids far outnumber the species. Such progress has 
well been termed a revolution, and we may cite an example in Odonto- 
glossum, which for so long defied the efforts of the hybridist, while the 
union of Odontoglossum with Cochlioda has given in the hybrid genus 
Odontioda a new and brilliant race to our gardens.. The latter were 
represented literally in hundreds, and no more striking horticultural 
development has been witnessed during recent years. 



i6 2 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912. 

But in spite of the magnificent display of Orchids we confess to a 
feeling of disappointment in the number of unfilled classes, for which 
ample material was available. Some of the exhibitors appear to have 
limited their efforts to making one splendid display, with the result that a 
few of the groups were too big. It was too much like a Temple Show 
on an enlarged scale— except that there was plenty of room to move about. 
We had hoped that the numerous valuable prizes offered would have 
produced a good competition, but for some mysterious reason this was not 
the case. Whether the competitive classes were generally too big or the 
period of the Show too long— on both of which we heard opinions ex- 
pressed — we cannot say, but even the classes for such popular subjects as 
Odontoglossums and for Cochlioda hybrids were, as far as we could 
ascertain, blank, in spite of the quantities in which these plants were 
shown. Even where there was competition some of the groups in the 
same class were not staged together, while in other cases different groups, 
even by the same exhibitor, were staged without any appreciable dividing 
line, making it very difficult to identify and compare them. Even the Jury 
must have felt the difficulty, for one or two groups were missed altogether, 
as was commented on after the Show opened. As for the schedule the 
only one that we could obtain indicated, not the groups actually present, 
or even entered, but only those that might have been there. It was 
consequently useless. 

We are not alone in suggesting that some of the groups were too big, 
for the opinion was expressed by one of the most successful exhibitors, 
who very aptly remarked that there was such an amount of individuality in 
Orchids that the detail was lost in the over-large groups staged. We had 
hoped to see a good competition in several special classes, and some 
examples of good culture, but these classes were largely ignored. A few 
such groups were present, but the majority of the really fine plants were 
lost in a mass of miscellaneous things arranged solely for effect. 

As regards tasteful arrangement within the groups themselves the effect 
generally was excellent, also the quality and culture of the exhibits, but it 
is matter for regret that exhibitors, and especially amateurs, did not enter 
into a more spirited competition in the competitive classes, in which so 
many valuable prizes were offered. So much for a few general impressions, 
for the details themselves we must refer readers to the special report of 
the Show. In this we have endeavoured to follow the Schedule of Prizes 
as far as possible, but owing to the large number of blanks, and the great 
preponderance of miscellaneous groups staged not for competition, the idea 
has been difficult to carry out. 



June, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 163 

THE ROYAL INTERNATIONAL HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION. 

The Royal International Horticultural Exhibition, which was opened by 
their Majesties the King and Queen at midday on Wednesday, May 22nd, 
in the grounds of the Royal Hospital, Chelsea, brought together a 
magnificent display of Orchids, the like of which has never been seen 
before. As previously announced, thirty-three classes were set apart for 
Orchids, and entries were received from a large number of exhibitors, 
British and foreign, the majority of whom put in an appearance. 

A special tent was erected for the Orchids, 250 feet long by 70 feet 
broad, with hot water pipes beneath the stages to prevent an undue fall of 
temperature, and electric lighting was installed throughout, so that the 
exhibits could be examined till closing time, ten p.m. A broad stage was 
erected down the centre of the Orchid tent, with two side stages and an 
additional stage at one end. A few stove plants encroached upon part of 
the side stages, but otherwise this area was entirely devoted to Orchids, and 
the general effect was brilliant in the extreme. 

For the best and most varied group staged by an amateur in a space not 
exceeding 500 square feet, the first prize, consisting of Messrs. Sander & 
Sons' Cup and £10, was won by F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., The Shrubbery, 
Oxford, with a magnificent group, which had been very tastefully arranged 
by Mr. Balmforth. It contained a beautiful series of Odontoglossum 
crispum varieties aggregating some 300 spikes, and including three of the 
best forms of O. c. xanthotes, known as hololeucum, Charlesworthii, and 
Snow Queen, with a number of handsomely-blotched forms, O. Harwoodii, 
Shrubbery var., O. Uroskinneri album, and other species and hybrids, about 
three dozen brilliant Odontiodas, a little cluster of O. Charlesworthii, and 
a form of O. Diana being very fine, some thirty plants of Dendrobium 
Thwaitesae with about 1500 of its richly-coloured flowers, some fifty well- 
grown Laeliocattleya Canhamiana, and other handsome Laeliocattleyas, 
Brassocatlaelia Veitchii, a series of Brassocattleyas, including the beautiful 
B.-c. Veitchii var. Queen Alexandra, thirty fine plants of the chaste 
Cattleya Dusseldorfii Undine, many fine C. Mossiae, Mendelii, and others, 
Phalaenopsis amabilis and Lueddemanniana, Thunias, Epidendrums, a fine 
series of albino Cypripediums, including about 150 flowers of C. callosum 
Sanderae, with many C. Lawrenceanum Hyeanum and C. Maudiae, some 
fine Miltonias, Trichopilia Backhouseana, and others too numerous to 
particularise. Some of the leading forms were massed together, and the 
colours contrasted in a very effective way, the plants being staged in a 
setting of delicate ferns. 

The second prize in the same class, Messrs. Charlesworth & Co.'s Cup 
and £7, was won by Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park (gr. Mr. 



i6 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912. 

Collier), with another very fine group, the centre of which consisted of a 
batch of brilliant Odontiodas, including forms of 0. Bradshawiae, Vuylstekeae, 
heatonensis, Papilio, chelseiensis, gattonensis, and several others. Of O. 
Bradshawiae there were twenty-six plants, bearing forty-six spikes, and over 
one thousand flowers, and these are said to have all been raised from one 
seed pod in 1906 ; one plant bore two branched spikes and over a hundred 
flowers. These were interspersed with Odontoglossums, which extended 
out on either side into a very effective arrangement, the forms of O. 
crispum being very numerous and beautiful, and many other species and 
hybrids were well shown. The Cattleyas also formed a fine series, and 
together with forms of Laelia purpurata, Laeliocattleyas, some beautiful 
Miltonias, Dendrobiums— among which two hybrids of D. regium were very 
interesting— some brilliant Masdevallias, Cymbidiums, Brassodiacrium 
Colmanii, Diacattleya Colmaniae, Zygopetalum rostratum, Coelogyne 
Dayana, Parishii, aspersa, and tomentosa, with representatives of many 
other genera, the whole being remarkably well-grown and forming a most 
effective display. 

In a corresponding class for Nurserymen, the second prize, W. Duncan 
Tucker's Cup, was awarded to Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, E. 
Yorks, for a very fine group, arranged in the form of three rounded banks, 
with two intervening dells, the latter being filled with a mass of the brilliant 
Renanthera Imschootiana, with feathery sprays of Phalaenopsis amabilis 
Rimestadiana above. The banks were composed of masses of brilliant 
Cattleyas, Lasliocattleyas, Brassocattleyas, Odontoglossums, some well- 
flowered Vanda teres, Cypripediums, Odontiodas, Anguloa Ruckeri, Cirrho- 
petalum Collettii, Cypripedium niveum, bellatulum and Druryi, Miltonia 
vexillaria, Masdevallias, &c, with some graceful Oncidium Marshallianum 
and Cymbidium Lowianum behind. One of the gems of this group was 
Odontioda Cleopatra (O. Lairessei X C. Ncetzliana), having light-coloured 
acuminate sepals and petals, tinged with violet at the margins, and blotched 
with deep chocolate red. 

In the Nurserymens class for the best and most varied group of species 
and varieties, not exceeding 200 square feet, the first prize, a Gold Medal, 
was won by Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, with a brilliant group, the 
centre being made up of Renanthera Imschootiana, with numerous Cattleya 
Mossiae and Mendelii, C. Skinneri alba, Cypripediums, Epidendrum 
ionosmum, Oncidium Marshallianum, Coelogyne pandurata, Vanda teres, 
Miltonia vexillaria, Laelia purpurata, numerous species of Odontoglossum, 
Dendrobiums, and a number of interesting botanical Orchids. 

The second prize, a Silver Cup, went to Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, 
Cheltenham, for a brilliant group, containing fine examples of Cattleya 
Mossiae. Skinneri, and others, Laelia purpurata, Dendrobium nobile, 



June, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 165 

Jamesianum, and thyrsiflorum, Miltonia vexillaria, a well-flowered Masde- 
vallia tovarensis, a good plant of the rare M. rosea, Vanda teres and var. 
gigantea, Phakenopsis amabilis and numerous other good things. 

A corresponding class for Amateurs was blank. 

In the Nurserymens class for the best and most varied group of hybrids 
raised by the exhibitor, in a space not exceeding 200 square feet, the first 
prize, Baron Bruno Schroder's Cup, was won by Messrs. Armstrong & 
Brown, Tunbridge Wells, with a magnificent group, including many good 
forms of Laeliocattleya Fascinator and Aphrodite, L.-c. calhstoglnssa 
ignescens, two fine L.-c. Hyeana, L.-c. Canhamiana alba and Rex, a series 
of Laelia cinnabarina hybrids, some good Cattleyas, some fine Cymbidiums 
and Odontoglossum Edwardii crosses behind, with many other Odonto- 
glossums in the centre, and a varied and brilliant series of Odontiodas in 
front. The group was also very effectively arranged. 

A Silver Cup, offered as a second prize, was won by Messrs. James 
Cypher & Sons, whose group contained some fine Laeliocattleya Fascinator, 
Hyeana, Wellsiana, Baden-Powell ; Laelia cinnabrosa, a number of Brass- 
avola Digbyana hybrids, Cypripediums, Cattleya Dietrichiana, and various 
other fine things. 

A corresponding class for Amateurs produced no exhibit. 

In a class for twenty-five Lselias, Cattleyas, and Brassavolas, their 
varieties and hybrids, the only exhibitor was M. Ch. Maron, Brunoy, 
France, to whom the first prize, a Silver-gilt Medal, was awarded, the group 



ng BrassocattU 






Maronii, B.-c. striata, Laeliocattleya Yellow Prince, L.-c. Canhamiana alba, 
L.-c. Boylei var. Kerchoviae, L.-c. Greenwoodii, L.-c. Henrietta (L.-c. 
Greenwoodii X C. Lueddemanniana), a good intermediate form, Epilaelia 
distincta (L. harpophylla X E. atropurpureum, with three racemes, and 
several other good things. 

For the best twelve plants of the same there were two exhibitors, the 
second prize, a Silver Medal, being awarded to J. McCartney, Esq., Hey 
House, Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), whose exhibit contained Cattleya Mossi* 
and var. Reineckeana, C. Frederickiae, C. Dusseldorfii Undine, Laelia 
purpurata Russelliana, L cinnabrosa, Laeliocattleya Canhamiana, Brasso- 
cattleya Veitchii, and others. 

The third prize went to Mr. W. A. Manda, St. Albans, for forms of the 
popular species of Cattleya. 

Two similar classes were set apart for groups of 100 square feet in extent, 
one of them for white varieties, but did not produce a single exhibit. 

In the class for 100 Orchids in not less than twenty-five species, 
varieties, or hybrids, the first prize, a Gold Medal, was won by Messrs. 
Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, conspicuous in this group being 



166 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912. 

some fine Cymbidium Lowianum, Coelogyne pandurata, Cattleya Skinneri 
alba and others, Phalaenopsis amabilis Rimestadiana, Miltonia vexillaria, 
Odontoglossum crispum Solum, and other fine things, the staging being 
also carried out with excellent effect. 

In an Amateur's class for fifty Orchids in not less than twenty-five 
species, varieties or hybrids, the first prize of a Gold Medal went to M. 
Firmin Lambeau, Brussels, for a very choice group, including the hand- 
some Odontioda Coronation, with a spike of twenty flowers, O. Ajax, having 
bright red flowers margined with white on the lip, O. Bradshawiae Vogel- 
sang, with a rosy suffusion and dark red blotches on the sepals and petals, 
Cochlioda Noetzliana, Miltonia Hyeana Vogelsang and maxima, M. 
vexillaria Sanderiana and others, and some handsome Cattleyas, Lselio- 
cattleyas and Odontoglossums. 

In a corresponding class for Nurserymen the Gold Medal was won by 
Mr. H. Dixon, Spencer Park Nursery, Wandsworth Common, his group 
containing a beautiful specimen of Oncidium phymatochilum, O. Marshalli- 
anum, Dendrobium Jamesianum, D. thyrsinorum and D. nobile virginale, 
Coelogyne pandurata, Cattleya Dusseldorfii Undine, Brassocattleya Mariae, 
Lasliocattleya Canhamiana, Phalaenopsis amabilis, Maxillaria Sanderiana, 
Cypripedium bellatulum, and others, Odontioda Diana, Charlesworthii and 
Bradshawiae, Odontoglossum hastilabium and other good Odontoglossums. 

The second prize, a Silver Cup, was won by Mr. W. A. Manda, St. 
Albans, with a good and varied group. 

For a group of Orchids of botanical interest, not necessarily in flower, in 
a space not exceeding twenty square feet, the first prize, a Silver-gilt Medal, 
was won by Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park (gr. Mr. J. Collier;, 
with a very interesting collection, in which we noted the remarkable Bulbo- 
phyllum virescens, in bud, B. inflatum with five spikes, B. macranthum, 
nigripetalum, mirum, erythrostachyum and tremulum, Eulophia 
Saundersiana, Lockhartia robusta, Nephelaphyllum pulchrum, Nanodes 
Medusae, Eria pannea, Masdevallia Courtauldiana, xipheres, calura, 
Chimaera, simula, O'Brieniana, and others, the rare Chondrorhyncha 
Lendyana, Ponera juncifolia, Microstylis commelynifolia, and others too 
numerous to particularise. It may be remarked here that the two groups 
staged from the Gatton collection contained about 112 different kinds and 
an aggregate of over 530 plants. 

In the class for Ornamental foliaged Orchids, not necessarily in flower, 
in a space not exceeding 100 square feet, the only exhibit was ten plants of 
a remarkable Habenaria hybrid, derived from H. carnea X militaris, shown 
by M. A. Regnier, Fontenay-sous-bois, France, to which the third prize of a 
Silver Medal was awarded. It is more robust than H. militaris, with hand- 
somely marked leaves, and the flowers were flesh-coloured in the one plant 



June, i 9 . 2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 167 

in bloom. We were afterwards told that other plants, showing a remark- 
able variation in colour, were shown somewhere in the French section, 
where they were quite overlooked. 

For the best twelve specimen Orchids, the second prize, a Silver Cup, 
was awarded to E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), 
his group containing Lycaste Skinneri alba, a white form of Lalia pur- 
purata, Odontoglossum Uroskinneri, some good Odontoglossum crispum, 
Miltoniavexillaria, Lseliocattleyas, &c. 

For the best six specimen Orchids the second prize, a Silver Cup, was 
awarded to Mr. W. A. Manda, St. Albans, for some well-flowered 
Cattleyas. 

For a specimen Orchid, Mr. W. A. Manda, St. Albans was first with a 
good Cattleya Warscewiczii, bearing six racemes, and J. McCartney, Esq., 
Bolton, second, with Oncidium sphacelatum, bearing five fine inflorescences. 

Among New Plants three classes were devoted to Orchids, and in that 
for one Orchid species in flower, Mr. W. A. Manda was successful with 
Cymbidium Mandaianum, a striking thing, which, however, we are unable 
to distinguish from C. FAnsonii, figured at page 109 of our eighth volume. 

For a new variety of a species Mr. W. A, Manda was first with Cattleya 
Mendelii var., and second with what was called C. gigas Mandaiana, but 
which, from some yellow veining in the throat of the lip, we should refer to 
a form of C. Hardyana. 

In the class for anew hybrid in flower there were two or three exhibits, 
but we could not ascertain if any prizes had been allotted. 

Messrs. Wm. Bull and Sons offered three Silver Cups, for the best 
Odontioda, the best hybrid Odontoglossum, and the best hybrid Cattleya, 
exhibited by amateurs, and these were awarded to M. Firmin Lambeau, for 
Odontioda Coronation, to J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., for Odontoglossum 
illustre egregium, with rich claret-purple flowers, and to Lt.-Col. Sir 
George L. Holford, for Cattleya Dirce magnifica, a very brightly-coloured 
form, with a purple flame at the apex of the petals. 

We have mentioned two or three of the competitive classes in which no 
exhibitors put in an appearance, and it may be interesting to complete the 
list. They further include Dendrobiums, Odontoglossum species and 
varieties, and Odontoglossum hybrids, 200 square feet each ; Cypripediums, 
Miltonias, and the Vanda group, 100 feet each ; Masdevallias and Disas, 
50 feet each ; and Cochlioda hybrids, British Orchids, and Other Hardy 
Terrestrial Orchids, without limit. In these classes numerous Gold and 
Silver Medals and Cups were offered as prizes, and the absence of com- 
petition probably indicates that the groups were too big, a point which 
schedule makers should bear in mind in the future. 

Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander) ? 



i6S THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 19. * 

staged a magnificent group, which occupied the entire stage at the end of 
the Orchid Tent, some 1100 feet in extent, to which His Majesty The King's 
Cup, for the most meritorious exhibit in the Show (irrespective of class) 
was awarded. Such a group has never been seen before. The plants were 
remarkably well grown, and the arrangement was most artistic, with some 
noble palms behind. At the back were some fine specimens of Oncidium 
Marshallianum and other tall subjects, and towards the sides were many 
noble specimens of Dendrobiums, crowded with flowers, some good 
Cymbidiums, many Renanthera Imschootiana, and Phalsenopsis amabilis 
Rimestadiana with about fifty spikes. The centre consisted largely of an 
extensive series of Cattleyas, Lielia purpurata, Laeliocattleyas, Cypri- 
pediums, and Odontoglossums, with some charming Sophronitis hybrids, 
many beautiful Miltontas, Brassocattleyas, Odontiodas, some brilliant 
Masdevallias, and numerous dwarfer things in front. Among the Cattleyas 
we noted about two dozen forms of Cattleya Mossiae, including the beautiful 
white varieties Wageneri and Reineckeana, C. Skinneri alba with 80 flowers, 
the brilliant C. S. Temple's var. with 50, a series of the chaste C. 
Dusseldorfii Undine and other beautiful hybrids, and among noteworthy 
Lsliocattleyas were Gatton Glory with three spikes and twenty-three 
flowers, Goldcrest, Lustre, many plants of Canhamiana, Bedouin (L. 



purpurat; 






any others. A good form of Brassavcla Digbyana was 
included, surrounded by some twenty of its hybrids, which made an 
imposing display, one called The King having remarkably large and 
brilliantly-coloured flowers, while the brilliant B.-c. Veitchii Westonbirt 
var. and the white variety Queen Alexandra made an effective contrast. 
The Odontoglossums were very numerous and beautiful, the forms of O. 
crispum including about 300 spikes, and the Odontiodas and Miltonias were 
noteworthy, the latter including the choicest varieties of M. vexillaria, in 
well-bloomed examples. Other noteworthy things were the brilliant 
Sophrocatlslia Marathon var. Vesuvius, Vanda teres gigantea, beautiful 
examples of Dendrobium pulchellum aureum, Cymbidium Alexanderi and 
the rare C. Parishii Sanderse, among a fine series of Cymbidiums. The 
group was remarkable in every respect, and afforded a high tribute to the 
cultural skill of Mr. Alexander, who, in the words of Sir George L. Holford 
at the Jury luncheon, had grown and staged every plant in the collection, 
with the help of his assistants. M. Jules Hye's Cup, originally offered for 
Masdevallias, and a large Gold Medal were also awarded to this superb 
group, with the Yorkshire East Riding Cup for Orchids and Amaryllis. 

J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis), 
staged a °roup of Orchids, in a beautiful collection of Selaginellas, every 
plant being isolated on a carpet of green. There were many plants of 



Junk, 1912.] 




THE ORCHID 


RE 


VIEW. 




169 


Odontoglossun 


1 crisp 


urn, among 1 


which a 


fine 


O. c. Solum 


. with 


its remark- 


able purple lip 




fig. 24), stood out p 


romi 


nently, also 


O.c. 


moortebeek- 


iense, 0. illu! 


5tre v; 


ir. Europa 


and e^ 


rregii 


im, O. am 


abUe, 


0. Aliceae, 


Phalsenopsis amabilis 


, Rimestadia 


na, Cyr 


nbidi 


urn Woodha 


msian 


urn Fowler's 


van, C. Low! 


ia nil m 


concolor, and sev 


end 


beautiful Odontiodas. The 


Hertfordshire 


Cup 


was also a 


L warded 


to 


this group 


of Orchids and 


Selaginellas. 
















Leopold de 


! Roth 


schild, Esq. 


., Gunn 


ersbury Park (g 


r. Mr 


. Reynolds), 




Solum (see above). 

was awarded a Gold Medal for a magnificent group of Vanda teres, bearing 
an aggregate of over 700 spikes, and tastefully arranged with white 
Odontoglossum crispum, graceful foliage plants and ferns. The plants are 
grown in large boxes. The Isle of Wight Cup was also awarded for Orchids 

M. Chas. Dietrich, Brussels, was awarded a Large Silver Cup for a 
choice group of Cattleyas, Lasliocattleyas, Odontiodas, Odontoglossums 



170 THE ORCHID kEVlEW. [June, i 9 i«. 

Miltonias, &c, particularly noteworthy being Odontioda Maeterlinck, with 
about three dozen flowers, and a few blotched Odontoglossume. 

M. H. Graire, Amiens, France, was awarded a Silver-gilt Medal for a 
small but very interesting collection of Odontiodas and Odontoglossums, 
noteworthy among them being Odontioda ignea, keighleyensis, St. Fuscien, 
and Seuenacca, the curious Adioda St. Fuscien, the prettily blotched 
Odontoglossum armainvillierense X Fascinator, O. Arlequin, O. Fletcheri 
and others. 

M. Jules Hye de Crom, Ghent, sent a few choice things, including 
Miltonia Jules Hye de Crom and other Miltonias, some pretty Odontiodas, 
and an attractive hybrid derived from Odontonia Lairessese and Cochlioda 
Ncetzliana (see page 171). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a remarkable 
group, 700 square feet in extent, with an undulating surface, and literally 
full of choice things from end to end. There was a fine conical bank of 
Odontiodas in the centre, with some Phalanopsis amabilis Rimestadiana 
behind, and a row of Trichopilia Backhouseana in front, while on either 
side were a wealth of Odontoglossums in over fifty distinct kinds, a most 
beautiful set of Cattleyas, Laelias, Ladiocattleyas and Brassocattleyas, 
many beautiful Miltonias, Oncidiums, Cymbidiums, Dendrobiums, Cypripe- 
diums, Phaius, Vandas, Renanthera Imschootiana, and others, aggregating 
some 300 different kinds. The Odontiodas formed a beautiful series, in- 
cluding twenty-five distinct kinds, many of them in quantity, three of the 
more remarkable being Queen Mary, Chantecleer, and Coronation, while 
the hybrid Odontoglossums contained a wealth of beauty and numerous 
very choice forms. We noted also a fine plant of Neomoorea irrorata, 
Eulophiella Elisabethse and a light form of Peetersiana, which has got into 
cultivation under the name of E. Hamelinii, the brilliant Miltonioda Ajax, 
a cluster of Epiphronitis Veitchii, Miltonia Roezlii alba, Satyrium 
coriifolium, and Uropedium Lindenii, and others too numerous to mention. 
Sir George Holford's Cup, originally offered for the best and most varied 
group of Hybrids staged by a Nurseryman, in a space not exceeding 200 
square feet, and a large Gold Medal were awarded to this magnificent 
group. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans & Bruges, staged another splendid 
group, 700 square feet in extent, to which a Large Gold Medal, a Special 
Silver Cup, and the Wiltshire Cup (a Rose Bowl) were awarded. Some of 
the taller things were arranged in bold banks, with a nearly flat arrange- 
ment in front, studded with choice specimens in a background of moss. 
Cattleyas and Laeliocattleyas were very numerous and effective, while 
Phalsenopsis amabilis, Renanthera Imschootiana, Odontoglossums and 
Miltonias were used with great effect, and the Odontiodas formed a bright 



June, 191a.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. ^ 

picture in front. Other interesting things were Cyrtopodium punctatum, 
Vanda teres, V. Denisoniana, Aerides expansum, three promising 
Odontiodas, Pleurothallis platyrhachis, Cypripedium Sladdenii, Catasetum 
tenebrosum, Miltonia festiva, Chondrorhyncha Chestertonii, Ccelogyne 
integerrima, Epidendrum Stamfordianum and many others. 

Messrs. Peeters & fils, Brussels, were awarded a Large Silver Cup for a 
group of well-grown Renanthera Imschootiana, and a fine lot of hybrid 
Miltonias derived from M. vexillaria memoria G. D. Owen and M. Bleuana, 
flowering for the first time, and other interesting things. 

Mr. S. Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, was awarded a small Silver 
Cup for a bright little group, including some good Odontoglossums, 
Ccelogyne veratrifolia, Dendrobium luteolum and chlorops, Disa Luna, 
some good Cattleyas and Miltonias, Phalaenopsis amabilis, Odontioda 
loochristiensis, several interesting Masdevallias, cS:c. 

M. Ch. Vuylsteke, Loochristi, Ghent, was awarded a Silver-gilt Medal 
for a choice group of about a dozen Odontiodas and hybrid Odontoglossums, 
O. eximium excelsior being almost solid claret purple, and O. Aiglon a very 
large white flower with a zone of very large dark blotches on the segments, 
while O. Favourite and O. illustre exquisitum were also noteworthy. 

Mr. J. Birchenall, Alderley Edge, was awarded a Silver Medal for a 
small group of Cattleya Mendelii, Mossiae and others, including a large and 
delicately-coloured hybrid between C. Schroeders and C. Mendelii, with 
some light purple in front of the yellow throat of the lip. 

Messrs. James Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, were awarded the 

Gloucestershire Cup for Orchids (see competitive groups) and Stove plants. 

A large Gold Medal was awarded to Messrs. Wm. Duncan Tucker & 

Sons, Ltd., Cannon Street, London, for an Orchid House, fitted with all 

the latest improvements. 

Vuylstekeara Hyeana.— A striking hybrid derived from Odontonia 
Lairesse* and Cochlioda Ncetzliana was exhibited by M. Jules Hye de 
Crom at the Royal International Horticultural Exhibition, and being derived 
from Cochlioda, Miltonia, and Odontoglossum, must be referred to the 
hybrid genus Vuylstekeara (see page 60 of our last volume). The plant 
bore a branched panicle of flowers, most like those of the Odontonia parent, 
but the lip smaller and more like that of the Cochlioda in shape. The 
flowers are blotched with salmon-red, on a paler ground, the disc of the lip 
yellow, and the apex white, with a transverse white line behind the 
apex. ' We are informed that the original Vuylstekeara insignis was based 
on an erroneous record, the parents being Miltonia vexillaria and 
Cochlioda Ncetzliana, hence the plant becomes a synonym of Miltonioda 
Harwoodii. 



i7± THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, igii. 

STANHOPEA GRANDIFLORA AND S. BUCEPHALUS. 

An interesting Stanhopea has just flowered in the collection of Sir Frank 
Crisp, Friar Park, Henley, which is apparently identical with Stanhopea 
grandiflora, Rchb. f. (not S. grandiflora, Lindl., which is a form of the 
earlier S. eburnea, Lindl.). It has a very confused history. In 1805 a 
plant, which was said to grow on the stem of old trees in shady woods near 
Cuenca, in Ecuador, was described and figured by Humboldt & Bonpland 
(PL Mquinoct., i. p. 94, t. 27) under the name of Epidendrum grandiflorum, 
and ten years later it was transferred to Anguloa, as A. grandiflora, Kunth 
(H. B. et K. Nov. Gen. et Sp., i.p. 343). It is a species of Stanhopea, but 
the inflorescence is shown as erect, and proceeding from* the apex of the 
pseudobulb, both characters obviously erroneous — probably the artist had 
to draw an unfamiliar plant from fragmentary dried specimens. In 1832, 
Lindley referred the plant to Stanhopea insignis, Frost [Gen. &Sp. Orch. PL, 
p. 157), but eleven years later transferred it to S. Bucephalus, Lindl. (Hot. 
Reg., 1843, sub. t. 44). Reichenbach, in 1856, called it Stanhopea grandi- 
flora (Walp. Ann., vi. p. 587), enumerating S. Bucephalus, Lindl., as a 
synonym, and giving a variety Jenischiana, based upon S. Jenischiana, 
Kramer (Rchb. f. in Bot. Zeit., 1852, p. 934), a Panama plant. This, how- 
ever, was a mixture, for a sketch of S. Bucephalus, Lindl., is preserved in 
Lindley's Herbarium, and is labelled " Mexico, Pavon, in hb. Lambert," 
and the Lambert H> rbarium was afterwards purchased by the British 
Museum, where the original specimen still exists, labelled by Pavon him- 
self, " Maxillaria de Mexico." It is very distinct from the Ecuador plant. 
Lindley afterwards described and figured as S. Bucephalus (Bot. Reg., 1843, 
sub. t. 54 ; 1844. t. 24), a plant that had flowered with the Horticultural 
Society, stating that it was introduced by Hartweg, who found it near 
Quito. This, again, is different from Humboldt's plant, though it agrees 
with that of Pavon, which casts a doubt upon the Quito habitat assigned to 
it by Lindley. Curiously enough, the Mexican habitat has been omitted 
from all subsequent records. The late Mr. F. C. Lehmann collected at the 
original locality, Cuenca, a Stanhopea, which he correctly identified as S. 
grandiflora, Rchb. f., and also made a painting of a single flower. Lindley's 
Herbarium also contains a coloured drawing, with analysis, of what is 
clearly the same thing, though the source is not indicated, and we can only 
presume that it came from some garden. The unknown sender suggested 
it to be a new species, bnt Lindley briefly wrote on it " oculata," which is 
quite erroneous. Now that the plant has again appeared it seems desirable 
to clear up the confusion. In S. Bucephalus the hypochil of the lip is 
elongated and much narrowed towards the base, as in the well known S. 
oculata, Lindl., while in S. grandiflora this organ is pandurate-oblong, and 



June,i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. m 

not narrowed at the base. The latter species is nearer to S. Wardii, Lodd., 
but the hypochil is relatively broader. The sepals and petals are buff 
yellow, with ring-like red-purple spots, and the column and lip are whitish, 
with purple spots, the latter having a pair of oblong eye-like spots at the 
base of the hypochil. It is remarkable that the identity of the plant should 
have remained unknown for over a centurv. K- A. K. 



ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

A fine form of Cattleya Mossise is sent from the collection of Mrs. Fielden, 
Grimston Park, Tadcaster, by Mr. G. P. Bound. It is one out of a batch 
of over fifty plants received direct from Venezuela last September. About 
two dozen of the plants are said to be showing for flower. 

A flower of a fine form of Miltonia vexillaria is sent from the collection 
of Edward Clements, Esq,, of Maidstone, also a form of the handsome 
Odontoglossum spectabile (crispum X Harryanum), from a spike of 
thirteen flowers. Both are very useful plants for an amateur's small 
collection. 

A good form of Odontoglossum Clytie is sent from the collection of W. 
Waters Butler, Esq., Edgbaston. It is from a seedling of O. Edwardii 
X O. Pescatorei Mrs. R. G. Thwaites, and is now flowering for the 

A pretty hybrid from Laelia purpurata X flava is sent from the collection 
of V. G. Stapleton, Esq., Stamford, by Mr. C. Vickers. It is a form 
of Lielia Stathers. A flower of a good form of Cattleya Mossise is 
also sent. 

A distinct form of, Odontoglossum triumphans, with rather short much 
spotted segments, is sent by Mr. A. Hutchinson, The Gardens, Ashford, 
Kent. The species varies considerably in shape and colour. 

Sir Harry J. Veitch.— We learn with pleasure that His Majesty the 
King has conferred the honour of knighthood on Mr. Harry J. Veitch, head 
of the firm of Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, and our readers will 
join us in hearty congratulations on this recognition of a life-long and _ 
honourable service to horticulture. Sir Harry is the only surviving member 
of the Executive Committee of the International Horticultural Exhibition, 
held, in London in May, 1866, and he has been one of the most active 
members of the present one, and the Chairman of the Sehedule Committee. 
It will be remembered that the last volume of the Orchid Review was 
dedicated to Sir Harry, and that a portrait and biography appeared in our 
February issue (pp. 41-43)- Long may he and Lady Veitch be spared to 
enjoy this well-merited honour. 



J 74 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912. 

AERIDES JAPONICUM. 

A flower has been sent for determination of this very distinct and 
interesting Orchid, with a request for its history. It is a native of Japan, 
whence it was originally introduced in 1862 by M. J. Linden. It was 
described in the following year (Linden & Rchb. f. in Hamb. Gart. Zeit., 
1863, p. 210), the authors describing it as allied to A. radicosum, A. Rich. 
It is interesting to note that at the International Exhibition held in London 
t obtained the first prize for a new Orchid shown for the first time 






figured in the Botanical Magazx 



(t. 5798), when Sir Joseph Hooker remarked : " The presence of Aeride 
so high a northern latitude in Japan is a remarkable fact in Botanical 
Geography, as testifying to the warmth of the southern coasts of that 
Archipelago, and to the extension of a Malayan type of vegetation to so 
high a parallel." According to Franchet & Savatier it grows on shrubs in 
the hilly district of Kiusiu, and in other places. It is one of the smallest 
species in the genus, which, perhaps, indicates the climatic influence of its 
northern latitude. It is also one of the few species of the Aerides group 
that can be successfully grown in the Odontoglossum house. Out of 
flower it looks more like a small Phalaenopsis amabilis than an Aerides. It 
bears short lax racemes of seven to ten fragrant flowers, which are of a 
pale greenish white, sometimes barred with brown on the lateral sepals, 
and the lip white, with a purple keel and numerous purple blotches on the 
front lobe. It succeeds well in a shallow pan or basket suspended from 
the roof of the Cool house. r A. R. 

THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 
By C. Alwyn Harrison, F.R.H.S. 
Cool House. 
The treatment required by the inmates of this house will be much the same 
as advised in my last month's article. The amount of water, however, 
needed by all plants in full growth and in flower, will be considerably more 
than has yet been required this season. Look over the entire stock of 
Orchids daily, and to all which are active give a good dose. Damping will 
be needed in the morning, at noon, and again at three in the afternoon. As 
the sun has increased in force, the blinds will now have to be lowered earlier 
and raised later than stated for last month. Keep the temperature as low 
as possible during the day, but maintain a moist even temperature of 65° 
Fahr. at night. The plants will need spraying over their leaves in the 
morning, and again when the house is damped and shut up in the evening. 

Any hybrids of Odontoglossum which are starting into growth can°be 
repotted if they require it, using the compost advised in previous articles. 



Junk, .9,2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. , 7S 

O. grande will now have completed its long season of rest, and must be 
repotted as soon as the new lead is from one to two inches in length. Use 
pots of suitable size, crocked two-thirds of their depth, and for compost use 
a mixture of two parts osmunda fibre to one part each of oak leaves and 
sphagnum moss. Be careful to use only pure oak leaves, not oak leaf 
soil. Until a good start has been made in the new compost, afford little 
water to these, or to any newly-potted Orchid. 
Cattleya House. 
In this house identical methods of culture are needed as advised for last 
month, and therefore they need not be repeated. Providing that a nice 
growing atmosphere be maintained, the temperature, by day, however, may 
be allowed to run up higher than stated for last month, but the thermometer 
should not rise above 70 Fahr. at night. 

Any plants of Cattleya Mossise, or any hybrids which have finished 
flowering and require fresh soil, can now be repotted. I am not an advocate 
of keeping the plants in over large receptacles, by reason of retaining the 
old bulbs. It will be found best, when repotting a plant, to cut away the 
older pseudobulbs, retaining only three to support the lead. 

When so treated the plants can usually be accommodated in the same 
sized pots as those they previously occupied. On no account use the same 
pot. For compost use a mixture of osmunda fibre and a few heads of moss. 
These Orchids must only be watered sparingly until they have made a good 
start. Providing that the atmosphere is moist they will take no harm. 
Stanhopeas are interesting plants, and although the flowers are fugacious, 
yet are handsome. These are now sending their flower scapes from the 
base of the baskets, and should receive copious supplies of water daily. 
Be careful not to allow the flowers to become damp, or they will easily rot. 
Suggested Additions. 
Cattleya Mossi^e. — For an Amateur's Intermediate house there is no 
more suitable Orchid than this, and, being a free-growing species of great 
beauty and floriferousness, should be grown in every collection. The 
blooms are produced in May and June, and last several weeks in perfection. 
There are many varieties, ranging in colour from the pure white Wageneri 
to the richly-coloured form Sylvia Altman, the latter a garden-raised 
variety. The flowers of the type are large, the sepals and petals being lilac, 
the lip deep violet, with an orange throat and golden veins, and beautifully 
frilled at the edges. 

Odontoglossum tigrinum. — This is a handsome hybrid, of 
comparatively early raising, and can consequently be procured at a 
moderate price. Owing to one of its parents being O. Harryanum, it has 
a good constitution, and being, moreover, free-flowering, renders it very 
suitable f _>r inclusion in an Amateur's Cool house. The blossoms are oi 



i7<5 THE ORCHID REVIEW. (June, 1912. 

good size and shape, and continue upwards of three weeks in perfection. 
The sepals and petals are golden yellow, blotched with chocolate, and the 
lip cream, with purple veins. 

MESSRS. WILLIAM BULL & SONS' ORCHID EXHIBITION. 
Last year, it will be remembered, Messrs. William Bull & Sons organised 
a Show of Orchids and other plants to celebrate the Jubilee of their estab- 
lishment, and this year another exhibition has been held, which opened on 
May 13th, and produced a fine display. There were many forms of the 
well-known popular species, with numerous hybrids, particularly of 
Odontoglossum, with which the firm have been very successful. We were 
much struck with a batch of seedlings of O. crispum, obtained by crossing 
the blotched varieties Alpha and Franz Masereel, and showing a remarkable 
range of variation. Some were handsomely blotched, in others the colour 
covered the greater part of the segments except at the apex and margin, 
while others were ordinary white forms, one, however, having a large lip 
very heavily blotched with red-purple, and only an occasional spot on the 
other segments. We may be able to say something about some of these 
later. There were also four striking forms derived from the varieties General 
Roberts and Black Prince, varying much in shape and detail, but the 
blotches had retained the remarkable blackish purple colouring of the latter, 
while the lip showed unmistakably the influence of O. Hunnewellianum, 
which is clearly involved in the ancestry. Many other species and hybrids 
were also well represented, with numerous plants of Lseliocattleya Baden- 
Powell, of which a large batch has been raised, some of the buff-coloured 
hybrids, among which a batch from C. Schroederai and L.-c. warnhamense 
showed a remarkable range of variation, forms of Cattleya Mossia, Mendelii 
and Schroederae, and other well-known plants of the season, interspersed 
with suitable foliage plants and making a very effective display. 

Passing into the houses behind we were able to see the earlier stages of 
the work, from the tiniest seedlings upwards, house after house being filled 
with plants in all stages. Various Odontoglossums were in bloom, 
including hybrids of O. Edwardii, interesting batches from O. Pescatorei 
and luteopurpureum, O. armainvillierense and spectabile, O. crispum and 
armainvillier. nse, and forms of O. Fascinator, with some good Odontioda 
chelseiensis, Vuylstekeae and Diana, but want of space prevents us going 
into further details. 

The work of hybridising is being carried on with energy by Mr. Lakin, 
and many promising crosses were pointed out. Incidentally it may be 
remarked that some trouble has been experienced with the well-known fly 
that lays its eggs in the compost, and is so destructive to young seedlings, 
but it is found that it can be kept in check. by occasional fumigating. 



June, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. ij 

ODONTOGLOSSUM WARNHAMENSE VAR. STEVENSII. 

The annexed figure represents a very charming form of Odontoglossui 
warnhamense (Pescatorei X Hallii), from the collection of W. Thompsoi 
Esq., Walton Grange, Stone, and is reproduced from a photograph by M 
F. W. Rolfe, the flower being one of the series described at page 141 of 01 
last issue. It is represented natural size. The hybrid shows the charactei 
of its parents very clearly, the shape and markings of the sepals and petal 




hi-. 



recalling O. Hallii very strongly, while the clear white lip and handsomely 
spotted petals give an air of distinction to the flower. The very spiny 
crest of the lip most resembles that of O. Hallii, but the column wings are 
broad and much less toothed. The ground colour of the flower is white, 
and the markings chocolate brown. It is dedicated to Mr. W. Stevens, who 
has so long had the care of this fine collection. O. warnhamense was 
originally raised in the collection of C. J. Lucas, Esq., Warnham Court, 
Horsham, and flowered for the first time in 1905, when it was described 
at page 157 of our thirteenth volume. O. Phaedra is a later name for the 



i7« THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Junk, 1912. 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR JUNE. 
By J. T. Barker, The West Hill, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
The general conditions as regards temperatures, watering, ventilation, and 
atmospheric moisture laid down last month are also suitable for the present 
one. It should always be borne in mind that the hotter and drier the 
outside conditions the more humidity should be maintained within the 

Cypripedium seedlings, as they get large enough to handle, should be 
pricked off into three to four-inch pots, ten plants in the smaller up to 
twenty in the larger size being sufficient. The sooner all seedlings have 
a separate existence the better, as they not only make more progress, but 
they can be treated individually, which is impossible whilst growing upon 
the surface o[ the compost in which another plant is growing. As a 
compost for these very small plants I find nothing more suitable than peat 
fibre and live sphagnum moss, in equal portions, the compost being pressed 
moderately firmly into well-drained pots, the surface clipped off nice and 
level, and the plants placed in the compost with a small pointed stick. 
After the seedlings have been pricked off they must be watered with great 
caution, and water must be applied through a very fine rose or a sprayer. 
They must be protected from the direct rays of the sun ; otherwise they 
should be grown in a fairly light position, and where there is no danger of 
their becoming drawn. 

Cool Dendrobiums. — Besides the different sections of these useful 
plants which we have previously mentioned there is yet another, namely, 
those which succeed in a Cool house. Such species as D. Kingianum and 
var. album, D. speciosum and var. Hillii, D. teretifolium, D. glomeratum, 
D. japonicum, D. Victoria-Regina, and several others thrive under the 
conditions which prevail in this house. Any of these plants that are now 
starting to grow may have fresh rooting material afforded them if they re- 
quire it. The compost recommended for Dendrobiums in previous numbers 
will answer their requirements. They may be grown in shallow pans and 
suspended in a light position. D. teretifolium is best accommodated on a 
teak wood raft, with a little of the compost packed between the bars and 
under the base of the plant, the raft being suspended in such a manner that 
the foliage hangs down naturally. D. Victoria-Regina does better in a 
more shady position, and may be grown in shallow teak wood baskets, in a 
compost in which living sphagnum moss preponderates. These cool 
Dendrobiums require, when growing freely, a liberal supply of water at the 
roots, but must be kept on the dry side after their growths are completed. 
Many of the stronger growers may be kept quite dry ; in fact if they are not 
rested sufficiently they produce few flowers. 



June, 19 12.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 179 

Dendrobiums.— The young growths of the deciduous and semi- 
deciduous Dendrobiums, as they develop, should be looped up to the 
suspenders, as if they are allowed to hang over the sides of the receptacles 
in which they are growing they are easily broken or damaged, and by these 
means air and light is enabled to circulate more freely amongst them. 
When the roots have penetrated the compost, and the growth is 
vigorous, the water supply must be increased. 

Cattleyas.— Strong plants of C. Warscewiczii (gigas), C. Dowiana, 
and C. D. aurea, whether showing flower sheaths in the young growths or 
not, should be grown in as light a position as possible, being elevated close 
to the roof glass of the house, giving them plenty of water at the roots 
whenever they become dry. The potting of these plants is best deferred 
until they have flowered, and the new pseudobulbs are fully developed and 
are seen to be pushing new roots from their base. Take every opportunity 
of repotting any plants that are in need of it, whenever they are seen to be 
in the proper condition, namely, when making new roots from their base. 
Many a sickly plant is brought into a robust condition by closely observing 
its manner of growth, and carefully giving new compost just at the right 
time. It is quite safe to take any of these plants in hand whenever they 
are seen to be making new roots. 

L^lias. — Such well-known Orchids as L. autumnalis, and var. alba, L. 
albida, L. Gouldiana, and others that have been resting and are now 
starting into growth, should be suspended at once in a light position in the 
Mexican or Intermediate house, and afforded a plentiful supply of water 
while the growths are developing. Any necessary repotting may be done 
at this season, using the same compost as for L. anceps. They will succeed 
in shallow pans or teak wood baskets. 

Thunias.— As the flowers of the different species commence to open, it 
is advisable to remove the plants to a cooler structure, and it will generally 
be found that those which open in the cooler atmosphere last longer than 
if kept in the Warm house. 

Oncidiums.— Any plants of O. ampliatum and its variety majus that 
have passed out of flower should be induced to take a rest by being placed 
in a cool Intermediate house, and only sufficient water should be given to 
keep the leaves fresh and the bulbs plump. As soon as growth 
recommences the plants should again be returned to the warmer atmosphere 
of the East Indian house. Any O. leucochilum that have been flowering 
in the Intermediate house should, immediately their spikes are over, be 
placed in the Cool house to rest. The pseudobulbs of this and several 
•other Oncidiums often shrivel to a considerable extent when carrying strong 
branching flower spikes, but with care and attention they soon return to 
their normal condition, when growth recommences. Keep the plants cool 



180 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912. 

while at rest, and do not afford heavy waterings until the roots are seen to 
be moving. 

Brazilian Oncidiums. — There are several other Oncidiums, such as 
O. Marshallianum, crispum, concolor, praetextum, in fact all the Brazilian 
species, are liable to become exhausted by flowering. Therefore the spikes 
should be removed from delicate plants as soon as they appear, and on 
strong plants it is a wise precaution to remove the spikes when the flowers 
are fully developed and have been open a reasonable time. With a season's 
rest, other conditions being favourable, they will regain their strength. In 
the cultivation of Oncidiums, perhaps, present-day Orchid cultivators have 
made less progress than with any other section that comes under their care. 

Sophronitis grandiflora, having passed out of flower, will now be 
growing freely at the warm end of the Cool house, and may have new 
material given to the roots should it be requisite, using the Cattleya 
compost. They are best grown in shallow pans suspended from the roof. 

Calanthes. — The deciduous Calanthes that have become well rooted 
may have more water at the roots, but those that have not made so much 
progress must still have it applied to them with discrimination, as an excess 
at this season ends in disaster. Care should be taken that the water given 
these plants is always of the same temperature as the atmosphere of the 
house in which they are growing. 

Vanda teres. — This charming Orchid is now in bloom, and as soon as 
the flowering period is over growth begins, when the work of repotting may 
receive attention. In growing this plant it is advisable to fasten the stems 
to teak, or some other hard wood stakes, to which the clinging roots may 
attach themselves. The stakes must be fixed firmly in the pots, which 
latter must be two-thirds filled with crocks for drainage, the remainder 
being clean sphagnum moss, pressed firmly, as compost. The stakes 
should be of sufficient length to allow for eighteen inches or so of growth. 
They can either be placed singly in pots or otherwise. When several are 
placed in one pot to make specimens sufficient space should be allowed 
between them to allow of a free circulation of air and sunlight. Where 
sufficient plants are grown it is a good practice to plunge the pots in a bed 
of live sphagnum moss, so they appear to be planted out. This Orchid 
will stand as much sun heat, light, and moisture, both at the root and in 
the atmosphere, as any plant ; therefore the position chosen for the plants 
should be one where they are fully exposed to the sun's rays, and be close 
up to the glass in a house that can be closed early in the afternoon, 
sufficiently to raise the temperature to 90° or ioo° It is quite an aerial- 
rooting species, and very seldom are many live roots found in the pots r 
whilst those that are clinging to the stakes absolutely revel in the strong 
heat and sunshine. On bright days the plants should be frequently 



June, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 181 

syringed overhead to keep the foliage clean and healthy. When growth is 
completed, the temperature and the atmospheric moisture should be 
gradually reduced, and only sufficient water given them from time to time 
to prevent the leaves from suffering. During winter the plants are best rested 
in a Cattleya house temperature. 

Vanda Hookeriana, and its hybrid Miss Joaquim, with plants of similar 
nature, as Renanthera coccinea, will thrive under similar treatment. 

General remarks.— This month, like last, will be a busy one. Push 
on with the potting of all plants as they become ready, as time lost at this 
season can never be regained. The whole secret of plant cultivation 
depends on doing the right thing at the right period. The cleaning of 
plants must have attention at all times, as it not only improves their 
appearance but also their constitutions. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
A meeting was held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, 
Westminster, on April 16th, when there was a fine display of Orchids, 
including eight medal groups, other awards being one First-class Certificate, 
two Awards of Merit, and one Cultural Commendation. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, Gurney Wilson, F. 
Sander, H. G. Alexander, H. J. Chapman, T. Armstrong, J. Charlesworth, 
W. H. Hatcher, J. E. Shill, W. P. Bound, A. Dye, W. H. White, F. 
Peeters, J. Wilson Potter, J. S. Moss, F. J. Hanbury, J. Cypher, C. J. 
Lucas, Stuart Low, R. G. Thwaites, and R. A. Rolfe. 

Mrs. Norman Cookson, Oakwood, Wylam (gr. Mr. H. J. Chapman), 
staged a beautiful group, including examples of Odontioda Cooksoniae, 
Odontoglossum crispum Leonard Perfect, a few good blotched seedlings 
of O. crispum, raised in the collection, O. splendidissimum, O. Pescatorei, 
forms of O. armainvillierense, O. Titania, O. percultum, and numerous 
other good things. 

J. T. Bennett-Poe, Esq., Holmewood, Cheshunt (gr. Mr. Downes), sent 
a fine spike of the richly-coloured Cymbidium Lowianum Holmewood var. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park (gr. Mr. J. Collier), showed a 
good example of Odontioda gattonensis, bearing a spike of fourteen scarlet 
flowers with a few yellow markings. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), showed 
Cattleya Schrcederae alba Borlases var., a beautiful albino. 

J. Gurney Fowler Esq., S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis), sent two fine 
forms of Cattleya Schrcederae. 

F. D. Godman, Esq., South Lodge, Horsham, sent three pots of Pleione 



i82 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 19 i*. 

yunnanensis, with ten beautiful flowers, two forms of Odontoglossum 
Godmanii and Laeliocattleya Endymion (luminosa X callistoglossa). 

M. Firmin Lambeau, Brussels, sent Miltonia Hyeana Vogelsang, a very 
large white variety. 

H. T. Pitt, Esq., Rosslyn, Stamford Hill (gr. Mr. Thurgood), sent 
Laeliocattleya Rosslyn (L. Boothiana X C. Lawrenceana), Cypripedium 
Curtophyllum (Curtisii X glaucophyllum), two good Odontoglossums, &c. 

Baron Bruno Schroder, The Dell (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill), sent a fine 
Cattleya Schrcederae Empress, bearing three spikes, the best with five 
flowers, and the colour pink, with an orange-coloured throat to the lip. 

A. Warren, Esq., The Cedars, Epsom (gr. Mr. A. Bridges), exhibited a 
pretty white Aerides, apparently A. pallidum (see O.R., xix. p. 231). 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. Hopkins), sent 
Laeliocattleya Mrs. Henriques, a richly-coloured hybrid, and others. 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a fine group of Cattleyas, 
Ladia purpurata, Odontoglossums, Masdevallias, Miltonia flavescens, 
Oncidium concolor, Restrepia elegans, &c. Cypripedium Rothschildianum 
X Charlesworthii and Laeliocattleya Hyeana X Brassocattleya langley- 
ensis were two interesting novelties (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a showy group of Cattleyas, 
Renanthera Imschootiana, Trichopilia Backhouseana, Odontioda Zephyr, 
Cymbidiums, Epidendrum Stamfordianum, Laeliocattleya Olivia, L.-c. 
Ballii, cS:c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a fine group, including many 
showy Dendrobiums, a series of Cattleya Schrcederae, C. guatemalensis, 
Trichopilia Hennisii, Odontoglossums, Brassocattleya Cordelia, Laelio- 
cattleya rigida (C. Lawrenceana X L. superbiens), L.-c. Cora var. ignea, 
Megaclinium maximum, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, sent a choice group, 
including Brassocatlaelia Joan (C. Octavia X B.-l. Gratrixiae), a pretty 
yellow flower with some rich veining in front of the fringed lip, Sophro- 
catlaelia Marathon, and a number of beautiful Odontoglossums, Laelio- 
cattleyas, and Odontiodas (Silver Banksian Medal). 

The Liverpool Horticultural Co., Gateacre, staged a fine group of Laelio- 
cattleya Ballii, with Cattleya intermedia alba, Lawrenceana, Thayeriana, 
and Dusseldorfii (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged a fine group of Dendrobiums, 
Oncidium sarcodes and concolor, Cymbidium Devonianum, Odontoglossum 
Edwardii and Groganiae, Schomburgkia undulata, and other interesting 
things (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a nice group of 
Cattleya Mendelii, Schrcederae, and Mossiae, Odontoglossum tripudians X 



June, i 9 i 2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. :8 3 

Harryanum, O. Solon, and a handsomely blotched O. armainvillk-rense. 
with Odontioda Charlesworthii and Lambeauiana (Silver Banksian Medal). 

M. Florent Claes, Brussels, sent Odontoglossum Pescatorei Mouche 
d'Or, with orange yellow crest to the lip, and some good Cattleya 
Schrcederae and Mendelii. 

Messrs. A. A. Peeters & tils, Brussels, showed Miltonia vexillaria Jurval, 
a pretty pink form, with brownish yellow blotch on the lip. 

Mr. C. F. Waters, Deanlands Nursery, Balcombe, sent a few good 
forms of Cattleya Mendelii. 

First-class Certificate. 

Odontoglossum crispum Saga. — A beautiful variety, bearing a compact 
spike of seventeen Mowers, with very broad white segments, about two- 
thirds covered with red-purple blotches. Exhibited by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq, 

Cattleya Mendelii Thule.— A pretty white form with a slight blush 
tint on the lip. Exhibited by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. 

L,eliocattleya Bertram (Hopkinsii X Cappei).— A rich golden yellow 
hybrid, with some reddish veining on the petals, and the lip deep ruby red. 
Exhibited by Francis Wellesley, Esq. 

Cultural Commendation. 

Odontoglossum Hyeanum duteopurpureum X Harryanum). — To Mr. 
W. J. Stables, gardener to de Barri Crawshay, Esq., for a strong plant 
with a spike over six feet high, bearing twenty-one flowers and buds. 

At the meeting held on April 30th the Orchid exhibits were less 
numerous, but included seven medal groups, the only other awards being 
two First-class Certificates. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, de Barri Crawshay, Gurney 
Wilson, W. Thompson, Stuart Low, R. G. Thwaites, J. S. Moss, F. J. 
Hanbury, F. M. Ogilvie, T. Armstrong, A. A. McBean, W. Cobb, J. 
Cypher, J. Charlesworth, W. H. Hatcher, J. Wilson Potter, W. P. Bound, 
J. E. Shill, H. G. Alexander, A. Dye, W. H. White, W. Bolton, J. S. Moss, 
and R. Brooman White. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park (gr. Mr. J. Collier), sent a 
plant of the handsome Sarcopodium Lyonsii. 

J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis), 
sent Cymbidium tigrinum, and Odontioda Royal Gem (Odontioda 
Vuylstekeas X Odontoglossum armainvillierense), bearing pretty white and 
lilac flowers spotted with red. 

S. Gratrix, Esq., Whalley Range, Manchester (gr. Mr. Brown), sent 
Odontoglossum crispum Mary Gratrix, a beautiful white form. 



*8 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912. 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford (gr. Mr. White), sent 
Brassocatlaelia Triune (L.-c. Hyeana X B.-c langleyensis), a fine pale lilac 
flower with some purple markings on the lip. 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Plumpton Hall, Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), sent 
•Odontioda Leeana (C. Noetzliana X O. spectabile), a fine deep red form. 

F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., Oxford (gr. Mr. Balmforth), sent Odontoglossum 
Lambeauianum Valerie, a good dark form, and Cypripedium Mary Beatrice. 

F. P. Walker, Esq., Putney (gr. Mr. Macgregor), showed Odontoglossum 
Royal Purple, having deep violet-purple flowers with a white front to the lip. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. Hopkins), sent 
•Cattleya Mendelii Chief Justice, C. Mossiae Lady Northcliffe, and the richly- 
coloured Lsliocattleya Henriquesiana. 

S. Heilbut, Esq., Holyport, Maidenhead, showed home-grown pods of 
Vanilla planifolia. 

Mr. S. Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, staged a very fine group, 
including some excellent forms of Odontoglossum crispum, O. Pescatorei, 
eximium and percultum, several Odontioda loochristiensis (C. Noetzliana X 
O. gloriosum), Charlesworthii and Bradshawia;, the rare Trichopilia 
oicophylax, T. Backhouseana, Cattleya Schroedera: and Mendelii, 
Cymbidium eburneum, a bright yellow Mormodes, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charleswofth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a choice group, 
including Lseliocattleya Pelias (L.-c. Fascinator X C. Warned alba), blush 
white with purple markings on the lip, and some fine L.-c. Balliae, 
Wellsiana and Dominiana, Gongora atropurpurea and Tracyana, several 
finely-coloured Odontoglossum Aireworth, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a good group of 
•Odontoglossums and Odontiodas, several Brassocatlselia Triune (B.-c. 
langleyensis X L.-c. Hyeana), Lseliocattleya Ballii and Fascinator, 
Brassocattleya Maroniae, and others (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged a bright group of Cattleyas, 
Renanthera Imschootiana, Dendrobium crystallinum album, Jamesianum, 
Donnesise, and others, Cymbidium Devonianum and Schrcederi, Oncidium 
concolor and ampliatum, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a bright group of 
Cattleya Mossiae, Schroederae and Skinned, Lycaste gigantea, Laelio- 
cattleya highburiensis, Cymbidium Devonianum, Odontoglossums, 
-Odontiodas, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a good group of Cattleyas, 
Trichopilia Hennisii, Oncidium pulchellum and phymatochilum, Odonto- 
glossum Fowlerianum, Brassocattleya vestalis, Bifrenaria Harrisoniie 
pubigera, Rodriguezia venusta, Polystachya bracteosa, Dendrobium 
albosanguineum, cariniferum, lituiflorum, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 



June, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 185 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a select group, including good 
forms of Odontoglossum Jasper, eximium, and others, Miltonia Roezlii, 
M. vexillaria Cobbiana, the fine Trichopilia Backhouseana, Dendrobium 
Bronckartii, &c. (Silver Banksian Medal). 

First-class Certificates. 

Cattleya Schrceder^ Glebelands var.— A very pretty blush pink 
form, with a remarkably large orange-coloured disc to the lip. Exhibited 
by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. 

Odontoglossum Uroskinneri Burford var.— A remarkably large 
and richly-coloured form, having the lip nearly two inches across. 
Exhibited by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart. 

On May 14th the proximity of the great International Show doubtless 
affected the exhibits, but six medal groups of Orchids were shown, and 
three other awards were made by the Orchid Committee, who were present 
as follows: J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), Messrs. J. O'Brien 
<hon. sec), Harry J. Veitch, Gurney Wilson, R. Brooman White, W. 
Bolton, de Barri Crawshay, W. H. White, A. Dye, H. G. Alexander, J. E. 
Shill, W. H. Hatcher, J. Cypher, W. Cobb, A. A. McBean, T. Armstrong, 
R. G. Thwaites, F. J. Hanbury, C. J. Lucas, J. Wilson Potter, C. Cookson, 
and Sir F. W. Moore. 

H. T. Pitt, Esq., Rosslyn, Stamford Hill (gr. Mr. Thurgood), received 
a Silver Flora Medal for a choice group, including some good plants of 
Masdevallia muscosa, several fine varieties of Miltonia vexillaria, 
Chondrorhyncha Chestertonii, Odontioda Bradshawias, and Charlesworthii, 
the latter raised in the collection, Ccelogyne pandurata and Dayana, 
Anguloa Clowesii, Dendrobium Dearei, Brassia maculata and Law- 
renceana, with a few good Oncidiums, Cypripediums, and Odontoglossums, 
the latter including some good home-raised O. Edwardii crosses. 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), was 
awarded a Silver Banksian Medal for a choice group of seedlings raised in 
the collection, including Odontoglossum Honolulu (Hunnewellianum X 
harvengtense), yellow, regularly spotted with brown, O. Volutella (elegans 
X Vuylstekei), white with dark brown blotches, and O. Valeria (Edwardii 
X Vuylstekei), with chocolate purple flowers, while a bright little cluster of 
Odontiodas contained an interesting novelty in O. Carmen (C. Ncetzliana 
X O. nebulosum), most like the latter parent in shape, and having pale 
red sepals and petals, and a whitish lip tinged with salmon colour. 

R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Chessington, Streatham (gr. Mr. Black), also 
received a Silver Banksian Medal for a group of good Odontiodas, Odonto- 
glossum Clytie, crispum, and others, Diacattleya Sanderae, Lseliocattleya 
Fascinator, and some good Brassocattleyas. 



186 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912, 

Mrs. Norman Cookson, Oak wood, Wylam (gr. Mr. H. J. Chapman), 
sent Odontoglossum Solon var. Roland, and a finely blotched O. crispum. 

Mr. S. Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, staged a fine group,, 
including Cattleya Mossiae and Mendelii, C. intermedia Parthenia, C. 
Skinned alba, C. dolosa, some good Laeliocattleyas. Laslia purpurata, and 
Odontoglossum crispum, Restrepia guttulata and trichoglossa, Masdeval- 
lias, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a good group of Odonto- 
glossums, Odontioda Charlesworthii and chelseiensis, Cypripedium niveum, 
and Cattleya Mossiae, with plants of the charming little Oncidium pulchellum 
in front (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a choice group of 
Odontoglossum crispum, Odontioda Charlesworthii, and some good Cattleya 
Mossiae and Mendelii (Silver Banksian Medal). 

First-class Certificate. 
Cypripedium Woodhamsianum Fowler's var. (Veitchii x Lowianum). 
—A very fine form, having apricot-yellow flowers with faint bronzy lines, 
and the front of the lip chestnut-red with some spots on the side lobes. 
Exhibited by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis). 
Award of Merit. 
Ljjliocattleya Apollo (C. Schrcederae x L.-c. warnhamiensis).— A 
very pretty flower, having pale nankeen yellow sepals and petals, and the 
hp pink in front, with some rosy veining, and the disc orange-coloured. Ex- 
hibited by C. J. Lucas, Esq., Warnham Court, Horsham (gr. Mr. Duncan). 
Cultural Commendation. 
Dendrobium Loddigesii.— To Mr. W. H. White, Orchid grower to 
Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., Burford, for a fine plant of this pretty little 
Chinese species, which is the D. pulchellum of Loddiges, but not the 
original one of Roxburgh. 

MANCHESTER AND NORTH OF ENGLAND ORCHID. 

At the meeting held on Thursday, April 4 th, the members of Committee 
present were :— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), Messrs. R. Ashworth 

C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, J. Evans, W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, 

D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary). Owing to the restricted railway 
service, the exhibits were not so numerous as usual. 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), staged a nice group, 
to which a Silver-gilt Medal was awarded. It contained some very fine 
Odontoglossums Vuylstekei, Ossulstonii, Wilckeanum (in variety), Ander- 
sonianum, triumphans, Odontiodas, Cymbidium Lowianum and var. 
concolor, Cattleya highburiensis, and Dendrobium chrysotoxum. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 



June, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 187 

Silver Medal for a nice group, including Cymbidium Parishii Sanderae 
Rutherford's var., two forms of Gottianum, eburneum, Cattleyas of the 
Trianae and Mendelii section, Laeliocattleya highburiensis, Odontoglossum 
Queen Alexandra, Lambeauianum, Rossianae, and several spotted seedlings. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), was 
awarded a Silver Medal for a group, a nice batch of Cypripedium bellatulum 
being a feature; with C. exul, villexul, Olivi 1 Hall's var., gigas magnificum, 
Minos Youngii, and a few plants of Odontoglossum crispum. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was also awarded a Silver 
Medal for a nice group, including Cattleya Empress Frederick var. King 
Edward, C. Schroederae alba, and others, Laeliocattleya Powellii, Dendro- 
bium Wardianum and infundibulum, with a few Cypripediums. 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood, sent Cattleya Schroederae var. Arduth, and 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), sent Cattleya Suzanne 
Hye de Crom, Brassocattleya Bradshawiae, and Laeliocattleya Archie Niell. 

A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden, staged Odontoglossum ardentissimum 
album, and O. Wilckeanum Vuylstekeanum. 

S. Gratrix, Esq., Whalley Range, sent Laeliocattleya Dominiana West 
Point var. 

Mr. J. Birchenall, Alderley Edge, sent Lycaste costata var. sulphurea, 
Bifrenaria Harrisoniae violacea, and two forms of Odontoglossum Adrianae. 

Mr. J. Evans, Congleton, sent a very fine Odontoglossum. 
First-class Certificates. 

Cattleya Osiris (Enid superba X Octave Doin), a magnificent flower, 
like a giant Hardyana, of good form and colour, and Odontoglossum 
ardentissimum var. plumptonense, a very round flower, of almost solid 
colour, with white margin round the segments ; from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Odontoglossum Prince of Wales (Wilckeanum X Harryanum).— A 
magnificent flower of rich solid colour, four inches across, with a broad flat 
lip ; from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cymbidium Pauwelsii (Lowianum concolor X insigne), having creamy 
white flowers with colour in the lip ; from Col. J. Rutherford, M.P. 
Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Trianae var. Iris, and C. Schrcederae var. (Enone; from W. R. 
Lee, Esq. 

Brassocattleya Maggie (C. Warneri alba X B. Digbyana) and C. 
Schrcederae var. Luminos ; from J. J. Holden, Esq. 

Odontoglossum Telemachus (parentage unknown); from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Odontoglossum crispum var. Madouxianum ; from A. Warburton, Esq. 

Cattleya Trianae var. Ada le Doux ; from R. le Doux, Esq. 



*88 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, i 9 i 2 

At the meeting held on April 18th, the members of Committee present 
were :— Messrs. Z. A. Ward (in the ChanO, R. Ashworth, J. Bamber, 
C. Parker, H. Thorp, A. Warburton, J. C. Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, 
W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, F. K. Sander, and H. Arthur 
(Secretary). 

Silver-gilt Medals were awarded to Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. 
Mr. Weatherby), and to R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), 
for very fine miscellaneous groups, in both of which Odontoglossums formed 
a prominent feature. 

Silver Medals were given to Col. J. Rutherford, Blackburn (gr. Mr. 
Lupton) ; J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes) ; Messrs. J. Cypher 
& Sons, Cheltenham ; and the Liverpool Orchid Co., for excellent groups. 

A Bronze Medal was awarded to A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. 
Mr. Dalgleish), for a small group of choice Odontoglossums and Odontiodas. 
Other interesting exhibits came from O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bridge Hall, 
Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers) ; Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford ; Messrs 
Stuart Low & Co., Enfield ; Messrs. Hassall cS: Co., Southgate ; Mr. W. 
Shackleton, Bradford ; and Mr. J. Evans, Congleton. 
First-class Certificates. 
Odontoglossum crispum xanthotes Lady of the Snow, one of the best 
albinos yet seen in the North of England ; a well-grown plant, carrying a 
fine spike of over a dozen good flowers ; from R. Ashworth, Esq. 

Odontoglossum eximium var. xanthotes, another beautiful albino, with 
very round flowers, having pale orange spots on the sepals, petals, and lip ; 
from A. Warburton, Esq. 

Awards of Merit. 
Odontioda Hyeana var Willie, Odontoglossum crispum var. George, and 
O. The Moor (luteo-purpureum X Harryanum), a brilliantly-coloured 
flower ; from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Odontoglossum crispum Leeanum Ashlands var., and Odontioda Diana 
Ashworth's var. (O. amabile X C. Noetzliana) ; from R. Ashworth, Esq. 
Odontoglossum eximium, The Premier ; from J. J. Holden, Esq. 
Sophrocatlaelia Sandhaghe (C. Enid X S.-l. heatonensis), and Brasso- 
cattleya Cliftonii Leemann's var. (B.-c. Veitchii x C. Trianas Uplands 
var.) ; from J. Leemann, Esq. 

At the meeting held on May 2nd the members of Committee present 
were : Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), Messrs. C. Parker, H. Thorp, 
A. Warburton, Z. A. Ward, J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Holmes, A. J. 
Keeling, D. McLeod, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

A Silver-gilt Medal was awarded to Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. 
Mr. Weatherby), for a fine group of Odontoglossums andOdontiodas. 



June, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 189 

Silver Medals were awarded to Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. 
Mr. Lupton) ; J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes) ; and H. 
Thorp, Esq., Rhodes, for good miscellaneous groups. 

Other interesting groups and exhibits came from O. O. Wrigley, Esq., 
Bridge Hall, Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers) ; J.J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. 
Johnson) ; A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish) ; Rev. J. 
Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall) ; Messrs. J. Cypher & 
Sons, Cheltenham ; Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath ; Messrs. 
Keeling & Sons, Bradford ; Mr. W. Shackleton. Great Horton, Bradford ; 
and Mr. D. McLeod, Chorlton-cum-Hardy. 

First-class Certificates. 




a nice even blotch on the 


sepals 


and petals (a Silver Meds 


awarded) ; from A. Warburl 


on, Es< 


3. (See fig. 26). 


Brassocattleya Maggie (' 


C. War 


neri alba X B. Digbyana) ; 


form, almost white ; from J. 


J. Hole 


len, Esq. 



Odontoglossum Hilda (amabile X Rolfea), and O. amabile Wardii ; 
from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Odontoglossum eximium Rutherfordianum ; from Col. J. Rutherford, M.P. 

Cypripedium Greyi claytoniense (Godefroyae X niveum) ; from the 
Rev. J. Crombleholme. 



i9o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 19 12. 

AN ORCHID CONFERENCE. 

We have already announced that a special Orchid Show will be held by the 
Royal Horticultural Society on November 5th and 6th next, in the Society's 
Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, to demonstrate the growing importance 
of Orchids as autumn-flowering plants. Conjointly with the Show a 
Conference will be held in the Lecture Room on the second day, from 11 to 
1 and from 2 to 4, and those interested are invited to prepare scientific or 
practical papers on the particular branches of the subject in which they 
happen to be most interested. As it will be impossible in the few hours of 
the Conference to hear all the papers, it will be advantageous to select those 
only which lend themselves most readily to discussion. The others, 
particularly those of a more or less technical nature, should be taken " as 
read," but all papers will be published in due course in the Society's 
Journal. Papers and discussions are invited on the following or other 
suitable subjects : — 

The early history of fertilisation and hybridisation, dealing more 
especially with any points not generally known or published. 

The germination, and early stages of growth, of the seed. 

Method of sowing ; possible germination without the presence of fungus. 

Points of good cultivation. Quick methods of growing, time being an 
important factor. 

The selection of plants possessing qualities which, though not very 
decorative in themselves, might be utilised in breeding for producing favour- 
able results in the next generation. 

The ideal flower. What are its essential points ? 

What are the limits of hybridisation and cross fertilisation ? 

The production of albino varieties and others of a definite colour, as, 
for instance, a yellow Cattleya or a blue spring-flowering Odontoglossum. 

In what direction should Orchid growers look for improvement ? Have 
we reached a suitable limit in size, in colour, or in the amount of flower an 
individual plant will produce ? 

Is the amount of heat necessary for some hybrids prejudicial to their 
general cultivation ? Is it, for example, possible or worth while trying to 
create a cooler-growing section of Lseliocattleya, &c, by the use of parents 
of cool-growing species, such as Laslia Jongheana and La^lia pumila ? 

The wonderful results obtained from the use of certain species in 
hybridisation. 

The cultivation of difficult species might with advantage be discussed, 
as, for example, Vanda coerulea and V. Sanderiana. 

It is not proposed to touch on nomenclature and the scientific classi- 
fication of species. 



June, i 9 i2,] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 191 

ORCHIDS AT THE ROYAL SOCIETY'S CONVERSAZIONE. 

At the Conversazione of the Royal Society, held at Burlington House, 
Piccadilly, on May 8th last, there was an interesting exhibit of hybrid 
Odontoglossums and allies, with their parents, by Mr. R. Allen Rolfe, A.L.S. 
The flowers were shown in two shallow glass-covered cases, and arranged 
in such a way that each hybrid was placed between its two parents, so as to 
admit of ready comparison, and bring out the intermediate characters. 
The series comprised the following : — 

Odontioda Charlesworthii (Cochlioda Ncetzliana X Odontoglossum 
Harryanum). 

Odontonia Lairesseae (Odontoglossum crispum X Miltonia Warscewiczii). 

Odontoglossum Charlesworthii (triumphans X Harryanum). 

Odontoglossum excellens (nobile X triumphans). 

Odontoglossum Rolfeae (nobile X Harryanum). 

Odontoglossum Thompsonianum (Edwardii X crispum). 

Odontoglossum Ossulstonii X nobile (with both parents). 

The latter is a secondary hybrid, of which three forms were exhibited to 
show the variation of secondary hybrids from the same capsule. 

The flowers exhibited were from the collection of W. Thompson, Esq., 
Stone ; R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Streatham ; and Messrs. Charlesworth & 
Co., Haywards Heath, who had kindly sent them for the purpose of the 
-exhibit. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

Two meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the Royal 
Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during June, on the 4th 
and 18th, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual hour, 12 
o'clock noon. 

The Society's Summer Show will be held at Holland House, Kensington, 
ou Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, July 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. The 
Orchid Committee will meet at 10.30 a.m., and the exhibition opens at 
noon. Silver Cups and Medals will be awarded according to Merit, and 
the Sixty Guinea Coronation Challenge Cup will be awarded to the most 
meritorious exhibit in the Show (excluding the winners of the two previous 

A meeting of the Manchester Orchid Society will be held at the 
Coal Exchange, Manchester, on June 6th, at the usual hour, and the 
Annual General meeting will be held at 3 p.m. on the same date. This 
-completes the Society's year, and further arrangements will shortly be 



i 9 2 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [June, 1912, 

Fertilisation of Arachnanthe Lowii. — M. Schwarz, Chef de Culture 
at Ferrieres-en-Brie, Seine et Marne, has succeeded in self- fertilising both 
the orange-coloured and the red-blotched flowers of this remarkable plant, 
and also succeeded in cross-fertilising them, both ways, and the capsules 
are now developing. It will be interesting to watch the development of the 
seedlings of this remarkable plant. — Joum. Soc. Nai. Hort.Fv., 1912, p. 146. 

ORCHID PORTRAITS. 

Angr^cum sesquipedale. — Joum. Hort., 1912, i. pp. 393, ,394, with fig. 

Brassocattleya Digbyano-Mossle Westonbirt var.— Gard. Chron., 
May 25, 1912, Suppl., p. vii., fig. 3 ; Joum. Hort., 191 2, i. p. 464, with fig. 

Cymbidium Woodhamsianum (" Woodhamensis ") Fowler's var.— 
Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 391, with fig. 

Cypripedium Royal George.— G a rd. Mag., 1912, p. 379, with fig. 

Cypripedium Royal Sovereign. — Card. Mag., kjii, p. 357, with fig. 

Dendrobium Apollo albens.— Gard. Chron., May 25, 1912, Suppl., 
p. viii., fig. 4. 



. -Card. Chron., 1912, i. p. 31 
Canhamiana.— Gard. Chron., 


2, tig. 154. 
May 25, 1912, Suppl. r 


Gladiator.— Gard. Chron., 


May 25, 1912, Suppl. r 


Helius.— Gard. Chron., 1912 
Salome.— Gard. Chron., Ma; 


. i- P- 333. ng- i65- 

y 25, 1912, Suppl., p. x., 


:en Mary.— Gard. Mag., Ma; 

912, p. 263, with fig. 

i Armstrong^.— Gard. Ma 


/ 25, 1912, Suppl., p. 28,. 
>g., 1912, pp. 378, 379, 


1 Uroskinneri Burford va 


R. — Gard. Chron., 1912, 



with fig. : Garden, 

Odontoglossu 
with fig. 

Odontoglossu 
i. p. 307, fig- 153- 

ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

[Orckids are named and questions answered here as far as possible. Corresp, 

"/■;■■ ■-■ - ; ;-^ ; • -■ ■ 

villi be" dealt with in the body oftkewor".} * " Car ** ""' ' ' "** ' " *" S ° 

R. k. : YV .\\ .I>. ; E. r .C. — Held over until next month owing to pressure on c 
W.B.- We do not recognise the Cattleya. It looks like a hybrid, but you dc 

whether it is an imported plant or not. 

Photograph- H.G.A. ; W.B. & Sons. 

E.O. — Possibly the reference to Osmunda regalis fibre was only an infere 

being the familiar species here, but we have never heard of its native fibre be 
> rare, and very local. We hive a strong plant, but it does not 

: •■'•"- ; - -.■■.■-.::.-■. 

_ Catalogue RECEIVED.— We have received the Classified and Descriptive ] 
v Jersey, containing 



Vol. XX., No. 235. u THE JULY, 191 2 . 

ORCHID REVIEW 



Edited by R. ALLEN 



Answers to Correspondents 
Calendar of Operations for July 

Evolution of the Orchidacere 204 tion 

Hybridist 199 ' Societies— 

Odontioda Rolfei 199 Manchester and N 

Odontoma St. Alban 199 Orchid 

Laeliocattleya Britannia ... 200 R . HorticuUural 



Oncidium phymatochilum 201 

ids 199 

Orchid Notes and News 223 

Orchid Portraits - 224 Laeliocattlc 

Orchids at Burford 202 Miltoma v< 

Orchids, Chinese 223 Oncidium; 

PRICE SIXPENCE MONTHLY. Post Free 7 - 



:shire Gala 



SANDER Sc SONS. 



fortnightly fresh consignments of the best 

OSMUMDA FIBRE 

,wn freehold lands, situated in the best Osmunda producing territory 
: United States of America. Price per bushel, 2/6 ; per bag, 8/6. 



BY APPOINTMENT 



William Bull & Sons 

WORLD- RENOWN ED ORCHIDS. 

HYBRIDS K CREKT SPECIALITY. 



Catalogue free on application. 
-S ROAD, CHELSEA, LONDON. 



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meet Visitors, upon notification being kindly given. 

Continental Branch-RUE GERARD, BRUSSELS. 

Telephone No. 50 Haywards Heath. Telegrams t— Charlesworths Ha ds H tb 

Please Address-CHARLEswoRTH & Co., Haywards Heath, Sussex. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



THE ROYAL INTERNATIONAL HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION. 

upon the plants entered for Certificates at the Royal International Show, 
the certificates taking the same status as those awarded at the usual K.H.S. 

members to be notified individually, and that some of them were not aware 
of it until afterwards. The following members of the Orchid Committee 
were present : Baron Bruno Schroder (Chairman), J. O'Brien (Hon. Sec). 
W. Bolton, H. J. Chapman, R. G. Thwaites, F. J. Hanbury, G. F. Moore, 
W. H. White, H. G. Alexander, J. Charlesworth, J. E. Shill, R. A. Rolfe, 
E. Ashworth, W. Thompson, J. Cypher, W. Cobb, and S. H. Low, with 
A. A. Peeters, Dr. J. Troyanowsky, Prince A. Metschersky, and H. Graire 
(visitors). Fourteen First-class Certificates and thirteen Awards of Merit 
were given as follows :— 

First-class Certificates. 
Bras^ocattleya The King (parentage unrecorded).- -A hybrid with 
enormous flowers of excellent shape, deep rose-coloured sepals and petals, 
and a yellow throat to the lip, with a rather darker suffusion in front and 
some purple lines at the base. Exhibited by Lieut. -Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 
Cattleya DlRCE MAGNIFICA (Vulcan X Warscewiczii).-A very hand- 
some form, having deep rose-purple sepals and petals, with a crimson- 
purple suffused blotch near the apex, and a crimson-purple lip lined with 
yellow at the base. Exhibited by Lieut. -Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 

Cattleya Mendelii Queen Mary.— A very beautiful variety, having 
white sepals and petals, and a delicate rosy suffusion in front of the yellow 
disc of the lip. Exhibited by Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 

Dendrokium Dalhousieanum luteum.— A charming sulphur-yellow 
variety, with a pair of bright purple blotches at the base of the lip. 
Exhibited by Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 

L.elia purpurata Schrceder.e. — A very pretty varietv. having nearly 
white sepals and petals, and some violet veins on the lip. Exhibited by 
Baron Bruno Schroder, The Dell, Egham (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill). 



194 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 1912. 

LjELiocattleya Lustre var. Lavingo (L.-c. callistoglossa X C. 
Lueddemanniana).— A very beautiful variety, having bright rose-pink sepals 
and petals, and the front of the lip crimson-purple, with some yellow lines in 
the throat. Exhibited by Lieut. -Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 

Miltonia Hyeana var. Vogelsang.— A large and beautiful white 
variety, with a bright yellow blotch at the base of the lip and a trace of 
rose-purple. Exhibited by M. Firmin Lambeau, Brussels. 

Miltonia Jules Hye de Crom (parentage unrecorded).— A very 
beautiful hybrid, having white flowers, with a rosy tinge at the base of the 
petals, and a large butterfly-like crimson-purple blotch at the base of the 
lip. Exhibited by M. Jules Hye de Crom, Ghent. 

Odontioda Queen Mary (Odontioda Vuylstekeae X Odontoglossum 
eximium). — A very brilliant hybrid, of excellent shape, having scarlet-red 
flowers with a pale rosy margin, and a distinct whitish line right round the 
petals near the margin, while the strongly three-lobed lip is yellowish, 
spotted with crimson, and with a large crimson blotch in front of the 
yellow disc. Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 

Odontioda Mrs. F. M. Ogilvie (Odontoglossum amabile Royal 
George X Odontioda Vuylstekeae).— A very beautiful flower, having creamy- 
white ground colour, heavily blotched with salmon-red. Exhibited by F. 
M. Ogilvie, Esq. 

Odontoglossum amabile Duke of Portland.— A large and handsome 
variety, having violet-purple flowers of excellent shape, with a pale margin. 
Exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons. 

Odontoglossum eximium Excelsior.— A beautiful variety, having 
solid claret purple blotches on a clear white ground colour. Exhibited by 
M. Ch. Vuylsteke, Ghent. 

Odontoglossum eximium var. King George V.— A very fine and 
handsome form, having broad sepals and petals, with solid violet-purple 
blotches and a distinct white outer margin, the lip being white with a large 
blotch in the centre. Exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons. 

Odontoglossum Her Majesty (parentage unrecorded).— A fine hybrid, 
having the flowers copiously blotched with claret-purple and margined with 
white. Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 
Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Mossi.e Madame Jules Hye.-A remarkably large variety, 
with rich crimson lip. Exhibited by M. Firmin Lambeau, Brussels. 

L^liocattleya Gladiator (C. Mossi* x L.-c. callistoglossa).-A 
handsome hybrid, with deep rosy lilac sepals and petals, and a rich crimson 
lip lined with yellow at the base. Exhibited by Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. 
Holford. 

L.eliocattleya Lustre var. Buddha.-A charming variety, having 



Julv, r 9 i2.j THE ORCHID REVIEW. . 

the sepals and petals delicately suffused with lilac, and a rich purple 1 
of remarkable breadth, with darker veining, and the throat and base lint 
with yellow and white. Exhibited by Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 

L/Eliocattleya Ulysses (L.-c. Fascinator X C. Mossise Reineckeaiu 
—A beautiful hybrid, having white flowers of great substance, and son 
purple suffusion on each side of the yellow disc. Exhibited by Lieut.-Co 
Sir G. L. Holford. 



preceding, from the same exhibitor. 
Odontioda Rradshawi.e var. L 



an. — A very brillu 



form, of excellent shape and substance, the plant carrying three fine 
racemes. Exhibited by Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart. 

Odontioda Bradshawle var. Vogelsang.— A fine variety, handsomely 
blotched with scarlet-red on a light ground. Exhibited by M. Firmin 
Lambeau. 

Odontioda Chantecleer (C. Ncetzliana X Odontioda Cooksoni*).— 
A fine hybrid, bearing compact racemes of rounded brilliant scarlet-red 
flowers, with a bright yellow disc and some paler lines in front. Exhibited 
by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 

Odontoglossum amabile Princess Mary.— A beautiful hybrid, having 
large white flowers, heavily blotched and spotted with purple towards the 
centre. Exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons. 

Odontoglossum ardentissimum var. Carmen.-A handsome form, 
bearing a spike of about twenty flowers, with large rose-purple blotches on 
a clear white ground. Exhibited by F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., Oxford. 

Odontoglossum crispum James McNab.-A fine form, copiously 
blotched with red-purple on a white ground. Exhibited by Messrs. Sander 

Odontoglossum majesticum var. [vmis Whitton (eximium X 
percultum).— A very large and handsome form, having the sepals and petals 
rich purple margined with white, and some rich purple veining on the lip. 
Exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons. 

Zvgopetalum Armstrongs (Mackayi X rostratum).— A distinct and 
handsome hybrid, having purple sepals margined with green, and the lip 
rather elongated, and violet-purple at the base, becoming red-purple in the 
middle and much paler at the margin. Exhibited by Messrs. Armstrong & 
Brown, Tunbridge Wells. 

Owing to pressure on our space the foregoing had to be omitted last 
of the groups had to be severely cut down, 



- half . 



suppressed. 



:ent group staged by Messrs, Sander < 
of Aerides Houlletianum, A. Lobbii, 



196 nin okcmb kzviEW. r}™*.*^*- 

crispum Warned, Phalsenopsis tetraspis and speciosa, Vanda limbata, some 
rare Angraecums, Acinetas, Sranhopeas, Dendrobium Goldiei, and Sanders, 
some good plants of Disa Luna, Lycaste tricolor, L. spectabilis (Skinneri X 
aromatica), Vanilla planifolia in fruit, Cymbidium tigrinum with six spikes, 
over fifty hybrid Odontoglossums, forty different Cypripediums, and about 
twenty brilliant Odontiodas, while the Miltonias, Cattleyas, Brassocattleyas, 
Laeliocattleyas, hybrid Phaius, and other showy Orchids were magnificent. 
There were also four charming little Odontonias, all derived from Miltonia 
Warscewiczii as the seed parent, as follows : O. ornata (Odontoglossum 
Wilckeanum $ ), a large dark-coloured form, O. decora (O. Adrians $ ), a 
smaller well-spotted form, O. Lselia Sander (O. amabile <?), and O. Roger 
Sander (O. percultum 3 ). They should develop into good things when the 
plants become strong. 

THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 
By C. Alwyn Harrison, F.R.H.S. 
Cool House. 
Now that the sun gains more power, the blinds should be used whenever it 
shines upon the roof glass, and, therefore, the shading is generally required 
from about 10.30 till two, or even a little later, on exceptionally sunny days 
towards the end of the month. No fire heat will be needed now, unless 
unseasonable weather be experienced. The top and bottom ventilators can 
be opened earlier than during last month. Always bear in mind that fresh 
air is of the utmost importance to these Cool house Orchids, and the house 
should never feel stuffy when entered at any time. The general advice 
upon watering given in last month's article may still be acted upon, but a 
slight spray over the leaves should now be practised twice daily, usually 
about 9 a.m., and before the house is shut up for the night. Of course, all 
the pipes, staging, and paths must be kept well damped now onwards, and 
usually this damping down should be done about nine, at midday, and 
again about 3.30 p.m. 

Lycaste Skinneri has now finished flowering, and, if requiring it, may 
be repotted. Remove the plant with great care from the old pot, and,' after 
trimming off all dead and decayed roots and pseudobulbs, place it in a fresh 
pot, two-thirds full of clean broken crocks. For soil,' use a mixture of 
osmunda fibre, peat, and loam-a good yellow fibrous loam for preference. 



; these ingredients together, and 1 



This Orchid does 



not like frequent root disturbance, and so should be s 
the fresh pot, to allow for futher development. Bifrenaria Harrisoni* may 
also receive similar treatment. Water all newly-potted carefully until it is 
seen that they have obtained a firm hold of the compost. 



July, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



197 



The house should now be very gay with Odontoglossum crispum and 
the many hybrids. Many of the latter can now be procured in an 
unflowered size, and afford a vast store of interest for their growers. If 
any exceptionally choice varieties are possessed, and it is desired to increase 
the stock, sever the rhizome clean through with a sharp knife, two pseudo- 
bulbs behind the last-made growth. This severed portion will very often 
emit fresh roots and produce a fresh bulb, and when this is observed to be 
the case, it should be removed and potted up singly. Any of the long- 
spiked Oncidiums, such as Marshallianum, macranthum, oblongatum, 
sarcodes, and Wentworthianum, also Odontoglossum hastilabium, and 
Edwardii, if in bud, should now be given quantities of water daily, other- 
wise their multitudinous flowers may fail to expand to their full beauty. 
Cattleya House. 

Water must now be given more freely to all the inmates of this house, 
and, for a beginner, the following rules may serve as a guide, but should 
not be absolutely carried out to the letter. From now onwards all plants 
in bud and full growth should receive a good dose of water every alternate 
day, but those just starting every three days, and any which are resting, 
frequently. The staging, path and pots should be kept well 



ir.it^d 



obably 



damping three times a day. The plants must also be sprayed over their 
leaves once in the morning and again about 3 p.m. Give all possible air 
which can be admitted without lowering the temperature below 65° Fahr. 
Fire heat will now usually only be needed to maintain an even degree of 
65 Fahr. during the night and may be dispensed with during the day. 
Shading should be lowered only as long as the sun is shining with its full 
force upon the roof glass. 

Any Dendrobiums which have now finished flowering, such as crassinode, 
nobile, or its many varieties, and Wardianum, may receive attention or be 
repotted. Always use pots that are small in proportion to the size of the 
plant, and repotting, in fact, is only needed about every other year, merely 
to renew the compost, as a larger pot is rarely required, as when all dead 
bulbs and roots are removed, the same-sized receptacle can be again 
employed, but on no account use the same pot. Make the plants moderately 
firm, and do not place them too low in the pot ; the rhizomes should be 
about £-inch below the rim of the pot. For compost use a mixture of 
osmunda fibre, polypodium fibre, sphagnum moss, and oak leaves. 

Many handsome hybrids of Cattleya and Ladia should now be 
making a fine display, together with forms of those two fine species, C. 
Mendelii and C. Mossiae. Renanthera Imschootiana should now be in 
flower, and must be sprayed over the leaves once every day, taking care not 
to touch the flowers. 



■ 1,8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 1912. 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

A very interesting hybrid from Cattleya Mendelii and C. Mossise has been 
sent from the collection of F. G. Thwaites, Esq., Streatham, by Mr. 
Black. The cross was made in Australia, in the collection of R. M. Poole, 
Esq., who sent some of the seed to us, and Mr. Thwaites kindly undertook 
the task of growing it (O.R., xv. p. 229). One of the seedlings has now 
produced its first scape, which has been sent to us. The flowers are fairly 
intermediate in character, having lilac rose sepals and petals, and a prettily 
undulate lip, most recalling C. Mossiae in colour. There is a large amount 
of orange yellow in the throat, and some crimson-purple in front and down 
the disc, with numerous radiating whitish lines, and a broad pale margin. 
The flowers are at present smaller than in each of its handsome parents, 
but it should develop into a good thing when the plant becomes 

A flower of the beautiful Odontoglossum splendidissimum is sent from 
the collection of Mrs. Norman Cookson, Oakwood, Wylam. It has much 
of the O. Pescatorei shape, and is heavily blotched with deep violet-purple, 
there being one very large blotch on each petal and two on the sepals. Its 
descent is thus described by Mr. Chapman. A flower of O. crispum 
Cooksonianum was crossed with O. Pescatorei Veitchianum yielding a good 
form of O. armainvillierense, spotted chiefly on the sepals. This was again 
crossed with O. Pescatorei Veitchianum, with the result above mentioned. 
Mr. Chapman thinks that a third cross with the same would practically 
result in O. Pescatorei Veitchianum. 

Three forms of a pretty hybrid called Lasliocattleya Uftona, and derived 
from Laelia purpurata X Laeliocattleya highburiensis, are sent from the 
collection of E. F. Clark, Esq., Evershot, Dorset. They are most like 
the purpurata parent in shape, and have rather elongated rosy lilac sepals 
and petals, while two of them have the front half of the lip intense crimson- 
purple, the throat deep yellow, and the base somewhat veined with red- 
purple on a pale ground, and the third has a paler lip, shading off to lilac 
in front. The cross was made in May, 1902. A fourth flower has orange 
buff sepals and petals, with a little purple suffusion and veining, and the 
lip much like the two first mentioned. It came up with the preceding lot, 
but Mr. Clark suggests that it may possibly have come from C. Warneri X 
L. cinnabrosa, of which he raised a few seedlings about a month later. We 
cannot trace the Warneri influence, and think the first cross more likely. 
The L. cinnabarina character is very pronounced, but highburiensis and 
cinnabrosa are both half cinnabarina. A fifth flower is suggested as 
probably a form of L. Lucia (C. Mendelii X L. cinnabarina), and has rich 
orange yellow sepals and petals, the base of the lip lighter buff, and the 
front lobe rich purple-crimson. They form an interesting little group. 



July, i 9 ia.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 199 

Two interesting flowers are sent from the establishment of M. C. F. 
Karthaus, Potsdam, by Mr. R. Blossfeld. Cattleya Seligerse (Whitei 
X Adonis) is a small seedling flowering for the first time, and should 
develop into a fine thing. It is very richly coloured, and has a deeply 
three-lobed, purple-crimson lip. It is dedicated to Mrs. W. Seliger, 
Hartford, Conn., U.S.A., an enthusiastic lady amateur. The other 
is a form of C. Norma (C. armainvillierensis X Mossise), and is very 
promising. 



THE HYBRIDIST. 

Odontonia St. Alban.— A flower of the handsome Odontonia St. Alban 
(Miltonia Warscewiczii X Odontoglossum Pescatorei), which received an 
Award of Merit from the R.H.S. on June 18th last, is sent by Messrs. 
Sander & Sons, St. Albans. It bears a considerable resemblance to O. 
Lairesseae, but the flowers are slightly smaller, and have much of the neat 
shape of the Pescatorei parent. The ground colour is white, with brownish 
purple blotches on all the segments, and the lip is very broadly pandurate, 
and clear white in front, with a few purple marginal dots, there being also a 
pale zone round the bright yellow crest. The column is spotted with 
purple, and the wings are entire. The plant bore about twenty flowers, 
and will evidently produce a large panicle when it becomes strong. 

Odontioda Rolfei.— A curious little Odontioda, raised in the collection 
of R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Streatham, from Cochlioda vulcanica ? and 
Odontoglossum Hunnewellianum $ , and exhibited at the R.H.S. meeting 
held on June 18th last. The flowers are most like the Cochlioda parent in 
shape, and the sepals and petals are of a peculiar purple brown, with a few 
pale yellow markings on the latter. The lip is three-lobed, nearly free from 
the column, with some purple blotches on the front lobe, a few purple dots 
on the side lobes, and the crest whitish. The column wings are broad and 
minutely denticulate. 

Ophrys hybrids.— At the meeting of the Societe Nationale d' Horti- 
culture de France, held on March 28th last, some Ophrys hybrids were 
exhibited by M. G. Camus. They had been obtained by M. F. Denis, 
Balaruc-les-Bains, by crossing Ophrys tenthredinfera with the pollen of O. 
aranifera, and were quite intermediate between the parents. They are 
believed to be the first Ophrys hybrids raised artificially, though a number 
of natural hybrids have been recognised, and among them this particular 
one, which has been found in three localities in Italy, and is known as O. 
Grampinii (Cortesi in Ann. di Bot. i. pp. 359, 360, fig. C). He also 
exhibited examples of O. bombyliflora from M. Denis.— Jouvn. Soc. Nat, 
Hort. Frqnce, 1912, p. 186, 



oo THE ORCHID REVIEW. [. 

L/ELIOCATTLEYA BRITANNIA. 
Phi: annexed figure represents the magnificent Lseliocattleya 

. hybrid derived from L.-c. Canhamiana X C. Warscewicz 
eproduced from a photograph which has been kindly forwarded 1 
:ol. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., in whose collection it was 




the photograph, . W1 

magnificent group staged at iw 

Britannia was originally raised by Messrs. Sander 

exhibited it at a meeting of the R.H.S. in Septemb 



July, i 9 i 2 .] 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



ONCIDIUM PHYMATOCHILUM. 

A fixe specimen of Onciditim phymatochilum was exhibited by Mr. H. 
Dixon, Spencer Park Nursery, Wandsworth Common, in his Gold Medal 
group at the recent Royal International Horticultural Exhibition, which 
we have pleasure in figuring from a photograph sent by Mr. Dixon. The 
species was described by Lindley in 1858 {Paxt. Ft. Card., i. pp. 78 88. 





*£ T* ^^*m&* 

3^ 



with fig.), when the author remarked: "Unde 
uncommon in gardens, a charming Orchid, suppos 
from Mexico, with erect, narrow, somewhat pani 
flowers, having a snow white lip. Three years s 
Messrs. Loddiges, and the late Mr. Clowes, 
remarkable for the great extension of the lateral s 



this name is now not 
i to have been obtained 



received it from 



202 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, , 9 , 2 . 

and because of their green colour spotted with chocolate brown, they have 
much the appearance of belonging to some Brassia. The lip is pure white, 
with yellow tubercles and a few stains of the same colour near the base." 
Soon afterwards Reichenbach sent Lindley a few flowers, remarking "All 
gardeners of Hamburgh insist that it came from Brazil" {Lindl. Fol. Orch., 
Oncid., p. 54), and the point seems to have been confirmed a few years later, 
when the species was figured in Pescatorea (t. 35), this plant, which 
flowered in the collection of M. Jean van Volxem, having been sent by 
M. Pinel, from Novo Friburgo, Brazil, at the beginning of 1853. R. A. R. 

ORCHIDS AT BURFORD. 

A visit to Burford is always an interesting experience, and the members 
of the Jury of the Royal International Horticultural Exhibition, with many 
lady and other friends, who were the guests of Sir Trevor and Lady 
Lawrence on Saturday, June 25th, spent a very enjoyable afternoon in their 
delightful garden under Box Hill, when many members of the party spent 
a^ considerable time in examining the numerous interesting features of Sir 
Trevor's famous collection of Orchids. Some of us recalled a similar 
delightful experience on the occasion of the last Hybridisation Conference 
six years ago (O.R., xiv. pp. 270-272), but being nine weeks earlier in the 
year there was quite a different set of things in bloom. As before, every 
plant was in its own appropriate situation, where it had been grown, and 
how much more interesting they appear than when collected together and 
mixed up, warm, intermediate, and cool, just to make a show. Truly the 
absence of a Show house has its compensating advantages. Our notes, as 
before, follow no particular order, the plants being mentioned just as we 
found them, but the rarities naturally received the most attention. The 
more familiar showy things were too numerous to record in detail. 

In the Odontoglossum house, which we first entered, we noted the fine 
plant of Dendrobium Victoria- Regina, bearing a large number of its striking 
violet-blue flowers, and there can be no doubt that this is the proper place 
in which to grow the species, for it is known to come from a high elevation 
in the Philippines. The curious D. thyrsiflorum Galliceanum was also 
bearing six fine racemes. Lycaste Dyeriana was bearing three of its light 
green flowers, its pendulous habit and glaucous leaves being also very 
distinct features. There was also a good plant of Oncidium Massangei, the 
very distinct O. candidum, Odontoglossum ramos-Edwardii, bearing a 
panicle of flowers, and a fine lot of O. crispum, including some good 
spotted varieties. These, however, we shall pass over, merely noting that 
O. c. purpurascens, with its beautifully crisped and purple-tinted flowers, 
was one of the most charming. 

The next house contained an interesting lot of things in bloom, including 



July, i 9 ia.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 203 

the rare Cymbidium virescens, Angraecum Scottianum, Renanthera 
Imschootiana, Cirrhopetalum Collettii, the rare Bulbophyllum ortho- 
glossum and B. Dearei, Ansellia gigantea, Calanthe veratrifolia and C. 
japonica, Oncidium pumilum, Saccolabium ampullaceum, a very fine and 
distinct form of Dendrobium Devonianum, and a fine plant of Epicattleya 
radiato-Bowringiana, the flowers largely combining the shape of the 
Epidendrum with the colour of the Cattleya parent. 

Passing into another house we noted a fine specimen of Cirrhopetalum 
Cumingii, bearing numerous umbels of its pretty purple flowers, a good 
example of Bulbophyllum barbigerum, its feathery lips oscillating up and 
down with every breath of air, the handsome Dendrobium illustre, some 
fine Thunias, the rare Eria ferruginea, and other interesting things, while 
an adjacent house contained a well-bloomed plant of the rare Dendrobium 
Loddigesii, one of the most charming of the Chinese species. 

A Warm house, which we next entered, contained many interesting and 
beautiful things, among which we noted Dendrobium Parishii and the rare 
D. superbum Huttonii, the handsome D. formoso-Lowii, the curious D. 
crumenatum, whose flowers last but a single day, and on closing hang down 
like dead birds suspended from the branches, hence the name " Pigeon 
Orchid" by which it is known at Singapore. Bulbophyllum was repre- 
sented by B. calamarium, B. nudiscapum, and B. polyblepharon, all with 
feathery lips, with two or three others, and the rare little Cirrhopetalum 
elegantulum was also in bloom, together with Holothrix Schlechteriana, a 
very curious South African Orchid, the remarkable Bonatea speciosa, 
Aerides Fieldingii, Podochilus lutescens, a Malayan Orchid, hardly ever 
seen in cultivation, a species of Cadetia, and many interesting Cypripediums, 
species and hybrids. 

Passing into another house we found some plants of the beautiful 
Odontoglossum citrosmum in bloom, including a pretty white form, Epiden- 
drum aromaticum and atropurpureum, Ccelogyne burfordiensis, a striking 
hybrid between C. aspersa and C. pandurata, with a few Phalsenopsis. 

In an Intermediate house were seme good plants of Disa Luna, a well- 
flowered Dendrobium teretifolium, the rare Brassia Keiliana, Restrepia 
elegans, Oncidium leucochilum, Odontoglossum Uroskinneri, Epidendrum 
leucochilum and dellense, the very rare Australian Dendrobium lichen- 
astrum, and Maxillaria Sanderiana, while some good Miltonia Bleuana and 
vexillaria were among the plants noted. 

In a Cattleya house a lot of familiar Cattleyas and Laeliocattleyas were 
in bloom, a plant of L.-c. Ballii with three very fine racemes being most 
effective. Here were also plants of Maxillaria venusta aud others, 
Dendrobium Annas and albosanguineum, Sobralia Colmanise, the brilliant 
Epiphronitis Veitchii, ^nd other interesting species and hybrids, while in 



2o 4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 1912. 

another house were the bright yellow Ipsea speciosa and the curious 
Megaclinium triste. 

In the Masdevallia house many interesting species were in bloom, 
including M. Arminii, Wageneri, and the pendulous M. deorsa, the curious 
little M. simula, M. ephippium, and many others, a touch of colour being 
given by plants of M. ignea, Courtauldiana, Henrietta, and the handsome 
M. Shuttryana var. Chamberlainii. Here were also plants of the curious 
Pleurothallis platystachys and the gnat-like P. macroblepharis, Restrepia 
trichoglossa, Scaphosepalum pulvinare, Theodorea gomezoides, with a 
number of other interesting things. 

We have limited our notes to the rarer and more noteworthy of the 
plants seen in bloom at the time of our visit ; without such a limitation they 
might have been enormously extended, for the collection is one of the 
richest in the country, and the number of rare species and varieties it 
contains would form a large Catalogue, while the hybrids, including 
those raised at Burford, are also numerous. But we cannot conclude 
without mentioning the examples of good culture everywhere apparent, 
and the good condition of the collection generally, which testifies to the 
skill and attention brought to bear on it by Mr. White and his assistants. 
Some of their successes we know to be the result of many experiments, 
as is inevitable in such a varied collection. Lastly, we desire to thank 
Sir Trevor and Lady Lawrence for a very enjoyable afternoon. 

EVOLUTION OF THE ORCHIDACEiE. 

(Continued from vol. xix. page 292^. 
The great subtribe Sarcanthese forms the culminating point of the Vandeae, 
and completes our review of the genera, for Bentham's one other subtribe, 
Notyliese, is now broken up and the genera referred elsewhere. Sarcantheas 
forms a very natural group, and is thus defined by Bentham. The chief 
character of this subtribe is vegetative. The genera are all epiphytal and 
never pseudobulbous. The stem or caudex, corresponding to the rhizome 
of the preceding subtribes, creeps and bears adventitious roots, at least at 
the base, and often for its whole length. It is usually clothed with scarious 
or closely appressed leaf-sheaths ; the leaves themselves are more or less 
distichous, fleshy, or coriaceous, very rarely thin, never plicate. In some 
cases the end of the caudex or its branches becomes erect or pendulous, 
without roots and with more closely distichous small leaves. In a few 
genera these leafy stems are crowded on a very short creeping rhizome, or 
in a few species the whole stem or rhizome is very short, with a dense tuft of 
roots, and only one or two leaves, or none at all. The peduncles are always 
lateral, either evidently axillary or apparently leaf-opposed, or breaking 
irregularly through the leaf-sheaths. The aowers are generally racemose 



Julv, i 9 »*.] THE OkCHW REVIEW. *o 5 

or paniculate, but occasionally solitary on the peduncles. Bentham included 
thirty-two genera in the Sarcanthea;, but Lockhartia, Centropetalum, and 
Pachyphyllum are now excluded, while a few have since been described, and 
it is estimated that the group now contains about forty genera and upwards 
of 500 species. The majority of the genera are Indo-Malayan, a few 
reaching Australia, but Angraecum, Listrostachys, Mystacidium, yEonia, 
Cryptopus, and Aeranthes, are African and Mascarene, while Dendrophylax 
and Cryptocentrum are tropical American. 

Although the group, as a whole, is very well-defined, it is difficult to 
subdivide naturally, and much difference of opinion exists as to the limits 
of some of the genera, owing to the diversity of floral structure. Bentham 
subdivided the group into three series, founded on the presence or absence 
of a mentum to the perianth or of a spur to the lip, though he pointed out 
that the distinction was not always well marked. 

In the group having neither a foot to the column nor a spur to the lip 
Bentham placed the four following genera : Luisia, ranging from North 
India and Japan to New Caledonia, and having about 15 species, with terete 
leaves, and quaintly-shaped flowers ; Cottonia, now limited to the South 
Indian C. macrostachya, Wight, with a paniculate inflorescence and a beetle- 
shaped lip ; Stauropsis, ranging from India and China to New Guinea, and 
now including about twelve species, with rather fleshy flowers, arranged in 
spikes or panicles; and Arachnanthe, an Indo-Malayan genus of about ten 
species, in which the lip is articulated to the base of the column. It 
contains the remarkable Arachnanthe Lowii, which bears two differently- 
coloured kinds of flowers, the object of which still remains a mystery. 
Esmeralda, Rchb. f., based on Vanda Cathcartii, Lindl., was included 
in Arachnanthe by Bentham, and the two agree in having an articulated 
lip. Diploprora, Hook, f., has since been separated from Cottonia on 
account of its different habit and structure. It contains a single species, 
ranging from India and South China to Ceylon. 

Bentham's next group was characterised by having a short foot to the 
column, to which the sepals are adnate at the base, and the lip either 
spurless or with a spur remote from the base. Seven genera were included ; 
Phalsenopsis, with about forty species, mostly Malayan ; Doritis, with about 
six species, natives of India and Malaya; Rhynchostylis, with two or 
three species, of similar distribution ; Sarcochilus, with over 100 species, 
and ranging from North India to Australia and the Pacific Islands; 
Trichoglottis, now including about twenty Malayan species ; Aerides, with 
about forty species, ranging from North India and Japan to New Guinea ; 
and Aeranthes, an interesting Mascarene genus now containing about eight 
species. Sarcochilus was extended to include several other genera which 
had been recognised by Lindley, Blume and others, and which, it is 



*° 6 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, ,912. 

generally admitted, are distinct, but very few of them are known in 
cultivation, and we cannot go into them in detail. Two or three small 
genera have since been described. A large number of Malayan repre- 
sentatives of the group are still very imperfectly known. 

The rest of the Sarcantheae are characterised by having a footless 
column, and the lip variously saccate or spurred. Eighteen genera were 
recognised by Bentham, of which twelve are Asiatic, four African and two 
American. Most of the genera are well known in gardens, and in some 
cases large numbers of species have been discovered since Bentham's time, 
and these are taken account of in the following notes. 

The Asiatic genera are as follows : Renanthera, with about ten Indo- 
Malayan species, and mostly brightly-coloured flowers, as seen in R. 
coccinea and the well-known R. Imschootiana ; Vanda, ranging from India 
and South China to North Australia, and containing about forty species, 
many of which are familiar in gardens ; Saccolabium, with a pretty similar 
distribution, and containing about 120 species, several of which are 
cultivated : Acampe, a genus of about fifteen species, mostly Indo-Malayan, 
with two or three outlying species in Tropical Africa and a few others in 
Madagascar; Sarcanthus, chiefly Indo-Malayan and Chinese, with about 
seventy species ; Cleisostoma, Indo-Malayan, and Australian, with about 
sixty species; Ornithochilus, an Indo-Chinese monotype; Taenio- 
phyllum, a remarkable genus of about forty Indian, Malayan, and 
Polynesian species, nearly allied to Saccolabium but characterised by their 
leafless habitj Diplocentrum, with two or three Indian species, and much 
resembling Saccolabium, but characterised by the double spur, and three 
or four other very small genera which are unknown or rarely seen in 
cultivation. The species abound in the great Malayan region, and many 
have recently been described. 

The African genera are as follows: Angraecum, widely diffused in Africa 
and the Mascarene Islands, with an outlying Philippine representative and 
another in China and Japan, and containing about 100 species, several 
being well known in cultivation ; Listrostachys, African and Mascarene, 
and containing about eighty species; Mystacidium, with about fifty 
species, and an outlying representative in Ceylon ; ^onia, with about five 
species, found in Madagascar and Mauritius, and Cryptopus, containing but 
a single Mascarene species. 

The two American genera are Campylocentrum, ranging from South 
Mexico to South Brazil and Paraquay, and containing about thirty species, 
and Dendrophylax, a leafless Angraecum-like genus of five species found in 
the West Indies and Florida. One species of the latter, D. funalis was 
formerly referred to Angraecum, and is figured in the Botanical Magatdm 
under the name of A. funale (t. 4295). 



July, I9 , 2 .j THE OkCHlD kEVlEW. 207 

This completes our sketch of the different groups of this remarkable 

family of plants, and it now remains to indicate the progressive sequence of 

the different organs, and some of the steps by which they have reached their 

present degree of complexity. This must be left for a concluding chapter. 

R. A. Rolfe. 

(To be continued). 

THE R.H.S. AND THE ROYAL INTERNATIONAL 
HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION. 

The following correspondence has taken place between Sir Trevor Lawrence, 
President of the Royal Horticultural Society, and Mr. J. Gurney Fowler, 
Chairman of the Board of Directors of the International Exhibition : — 
Royal Horticultural Society, 

Westminster, S.W., 

June 5 th, 1912. 
Dear Mr. Gurney Fowler, — The Council of this Society, at their 
meeting yesterday, requested me to convey to you and your colleagues on 
the direction of the Royal International Horticultural Exhibition their 
hearty congratulations on the signal success with which the exhibition has 
been carried out. The Council's own experience makes them fully aware 
of the long-continued and unremitting labours attending exhibitions on even 
a much smaller scale ; and the success which has crowned your efforts 
cannot fail to be most gratifying to all concerned, and to reflect great credit 
on them. It is the universal opinion that a more complete and compre- 
hensive, a better arranged, and more beautiful and instructive exhibition 
has never been seen in any country. No wonder, then, that it has received 
the fullest and most unstinted praise and admiration from their Majesties 
the King and Queen downwards. 

The Council, moreover, are glad to understand that the financial results 
will probably show a satisfactory surplus and relieve the guarantors from 
all liability. 

I am, yours very truly, 

Trevor Lawrence, President. 
J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. 

Glebelands, S. Woodford, Essex, 

June 7th, 1912. 
Royal International Horticultural Exhibition. 
Dear Sir Trevor Lawrence, — Your letter of the 5th inst. has been 
received by me with the very greatest pleasure, and this pleasure will also, I 
am sure, be felt by all my colleagues on the Board when I communicate its 



*° 8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 19, i. 

For some two years now we have been, as you know, preparing for this 
exhibition, and it has caused to many of us much work, trouble, and, above 
all, anxiety. Now that is a thing of the past, a great load of responsibility, 
both financial and otherwise, has been lifted from us, and we are able to 
return to our ordinary work with the satisfactory feeling that our efforts 
have met with your Society's appreciation, also with that of their Majesties 
the King and Queen and of the general public, and have resulted also, as 
you say, in a signal success. 

This fact is an all-sufficient recompense for our many labours, and I 
hope most sincerely that the exhibition will result in the advancement of 
horticulture in all its branches. This has been, and is, my constant 
endeavour. 

It is early yet to talk about the financial results, but, so far as we can 
see, there is little likelihood of any call upon the guarantors, by whose 
generous support we were so greatly encouraged and assisted. We look 
forward to having eventually a considerable sum in hand to distribute to 
gardening charities or otherwise as we may be advised. 

Thanking you for your letter, believe me to remain, 
Yours most sincerely, 

J. Gurney Fowler, Chairman. 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart. 



EPIDENDRUM TRIPUNCTATUM. 



i very rare and interesting Epidendru 






a plant having been sent to Kew for determination by Mr. S. Flory, Orchid 
Nursery, Twickenham. It is said to have appeared in an importation of 
Cattleya citrina. It was originally described by Lindley, in 1841 (Bot. Reg., 
xxvii., Misc. p. 66), from a plant which flowered in the collection of R. 
Harrison, Esq., Aigburth, near Liverpool. It is a member of the Encyclium 
section, and was placed in a small group called by Lindley Holochila, on 
account of the entire or nearly entire lip. The pseudobulbs are clustered, 
and bear at the apex one or two linear leaves, some four to seven inches 
long, and short, one or two-flowered inflorescences. The flowers are about 
i| inches across, and have rather narrow greenish-yellow sepals and petals, 
and an obovate-elhptic, obscurely three-lobed white lip, which is slightly 
adnate to the base of the purple column. The column bears a short obtuse 
apiculus, and two small wings, each being tipped with orange-yellow 
giving the appearance of three small spots, in allusion to which the specific 
name was given. According to Reichenbach plants of it were afterwards 
introduced from Mexico by Messrs. Backhouse & Son, York in 1881 (Gard 
Chron., 1881, ii. p. 38). Mr. Flory's plant agrees exactly with the original 
type in the Lindley Herbarium. Its re-appearance is interesting.— R.A.R. 



i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

MILTONIA VEXILLARIA VAR. SNOWFLAKE. 




The annexed figure represents the very beautiful specimen of Miltonia 
vexillaria var. Snowflake, which was exhibited by Lt.-Col. Sir George L. 



2io THE ORCHID REVIEW. LJ ULY » I 9 12 - 

Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt, at the R.H.S. meeting held on June 4th 
last, and to which a First-class Certificate was given, also a Cultural 
Commendation to Mr. Alexander. The specimen bore thirteen spikes and 
an aggregate of 73 flowers, which are pure white, with some light yellow 
markings at the base of the lip, It is indeed a charming specimen, as can 
be seen from the illustration, for which we are indebted to the Editor of 
the Journal of Horticulture. The variety received an Award of Merit two 
years ago {O.R., xviii. p. 218). 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR JULY. 
By J. T. Barker, The West Hill Gardens, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
The conditions of temperatures, watering, ventilation, and atmospheric 
moisture laid down last month, and fully described in May, are also 
applicable to the present one. Owing to a period of dull, wet, and sunless 
weather, we have had to keep a certain amount of heat in the pipes in 
all the houses, with the exception of the Odontoglossum house. This 
is always necessary, as a damp stagnant atmosphere is harmful at any 

Cypripediums. — The wami-gnnving species of this genus, which 
comprise C. Rothschildianum, C. Stonei, C. Sanderianum, and other 
similar kinds, with the hybrids raised from them, require the temperature 

present is a most suitable time to undertake a general overhauling of the 
plants, with a view to the providing of new rooting material to the 
specimens that are in need of it. The drainage must be perfect, and the 
compost as advised for the winter-flowering varieties, will satisfy their 
requirements. As each variety of these useful plants passes out of flower, 
it should be taken in hand, and when all are done, thoroughly cleaned, and 
put in a position where they can be shaded from strong sunshine. Water 
may be given directly after the repotting, to settle the compost around the 

the new roots are moving through the compost. When established, copious 
supplies must be given, especially when in active growth. Light sprayings 
overhead with soft, tepid water, when the weather is favourable, are 
beneficial. Cypripediums thrive in plenty of atmospheric moisture, and 
are very rarely attacked with thrip and other insect pests where it is 
supplied, although, where the opposite conditions prevail, they are then to 
be found in legions. C. Lawrenceanum, and its variety Hyeanum, C. 
callosum and its variety Sanderae, grow better at the warm end of the 
Intermediate house, but care must be taken that the position is not too dry. 
C. bellatulum. — The C. bellatuluin section is one which a great many 
people fail to grow successfully, and retain in a healthy condition over a 



July, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 211 

series of years. The plants succeed best when grown close up to the roof 
glass, where they are free from drip, and out of the way of the syringe, and 
a warm, moist atmosphere is necessary to their well being. During the 
growing season they must have liberal supplies of water at the root, but 
during the winter, when they are at rest, much less will suffice, although 
they must not be allowed to suffer for the want of it even then. Watering 
overhead is not to be recommended, and, in most cases, is decidedly 
harmful. The most suitable time for repotting these plants is soon after 
the plants have passed out of flower, but disturbance at the roots should 
not take place unless the condition of the compost and drainage make this 
necessary. For compost use a mixture similar to that advised above, but a 
little more loam fibre may be added. 

Cattleyas and L.elias.— The flowers of these most beautiful Orchids 
may now be enjoyed the whole year round, and among the late spring and 
early summer-flowering species and hybrids are some of the most lovely 
kinds imaginable. Plants that have flowered and have since enjoyed a 
short period of rest, will now be showing signs of activity, either by making 
fresh roots or growths. The condition of these plants at the roots should 
be ascertained, and if any are in need of fresh rooting material it should be 
supplied to them before the new roots and growths get very far advanced, 
thus avoiding injury to either. The method of repotting this class of plants 
has been explained in previous numbers, and there is no need to repeat it, 
and the same remarks apply also to compost for them. The whole of this 
family should be potted moderately firmly, as when this is done the compost 
lasts much longer, and the water passes through much better than it does 
when they are potted loosely. Late summer and autumn-flowering Cattleyas 
are now growing freely, and some are forming their pseudobulbs, and must 
have liberal treatment. The majority of these plants produce their flower 
spikes before the season's growths are completed, therefore they should not 
be allowed to suffer for want of water at the roots until the newly-made 
pseudobulbs are fully developed. Newly-potted plants require careful 
watering, only just sufficient water to keep the new materials in a moist 
condition being necessary. 

Leftotes bicolor. — At the present time the plants of this pretty terete- 
leaved species are making fresh roots, and repotting may be done, if necessary. 
It succeeds suspended in the Cattleya house, and is best grown in shallow 
pans, in the same kind of compost as Cattleyas, and the plants should be 
potted quite firmly. During active growth the plants must have liberal 
supplies of water, but when growth is completed the amount should be 
gradually reduced, and during the resting season only sufficient to keep the 
plant from shrivelling should be given. 

Catasetums and Cycnoches thoroughly enjoy the warmth of the sun, 



2" THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, i 9 iz. 

and as much light as it is possible to afford them without scorching the 
young foliage. Both species are now rooting freely and making considerable 
progress with their new growth in the warmest house. They require to be 
examined every day, so that the best rooted plants, and those which are 
pushing up flower spikes, may be supplied with water whenever they require 
it. Water should not be allowed to lodge in the centres of the young 
growths, and the whole plant should be carefully examined from time to 
time for insect pests. 

Phaius.— The different sorts of Phaius, species and hybrids, may at this 
season be repotted if they are in need of it. They will root well, and grow 
satisfactorily in the compost as advised for Calanthes, and they may be 
potted in the same manner. During their season of growth a decidedly 
moist atmosphere should be maintained by damping between the pots and 
stages several times daily. Should the points of the leaves become black, 
more air should be given, and the amount of moisture should be reduced. 

Trichopilias.— T. suavis, and its lovely variety alba, also T. Back- 
houseana, T. marginata, and several others, will now be forming new 
growths, and when these are about to push roots is the best time to do any 
repotting. They are best grown in the Intermediate or Cattleya house, 
suspended from the roof, where they can be shaded from the sun. They 
will succeed in the same compost as Odontoglossums, grown in baskets or 
shallow pans, and it is always advisable to be careful in the matter of 
watering, as, should they get an over supply, it is liable to cause the 
pseudobulbs to become badly spotted, which frequently means the loss of 
the plant. Care should be taken with the whole of this genus that the 
roots are kept in a sweet and healthy condition, therefore, if the compost is 
at all decayed it should be renewed at the proper period. These Orchids 

THUNIAS, by this time, will have finished blooming, and should be 
removed to a sunny and airy house, and any that have not bloomed may 
have the apex of the growths pulled out. They must have water whenever 
they require it, and an occasional watering with weak liquid manure will be 
beneficial. They should be syringed on bright days to prevent attacks of 
red spider, which is very partial to them at this season, and they should on 
no account be put away to take care of themselves. As soon as the whole 
of the leaves fall away water can be entirely withheld. 

PHALiENOPSls.— Plants which were repotted early in the season will by 
now be well established and rooting freely in the new compost, therefore 
they may have an increased supply of moisture at the roots, but care must 
be taken that it is not overdone. Every inducement should be given the 
plants to make their growths quickly, and, at the same time, that growth 
must be consolidated as it is made. The house should be ventilated freely, 



July, , 9 . 2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

•whenever the weather and outs 

■may be closed and the blinds di 

•to shine on the roof. A moist humid atmosphere must be maintained at 

all times during the growing season, but overhead spraying or syringing is 

not to be recommended, as, if done injudiciously, much harm can accrue. 

Palumhina Candida grows and blooms freely when suspended in shallow 
pans in the Intermediate house. 

Masdevallia tovarensis.— This pure white Masdevallia, with the 
others which were potted in the spring, will now have recovered from their 
disturbance, and be making new leaves. They may have water afforded 
them whenever they become dry, but care should be taken that they 
become so between each application. A moderately shady position answers 
their requirements much better than a more exposed one, and plants grow 
stronger in the former than the lattei position. 

Odontoglossums.— O. grande, O. Insleayi, and O. Schlieperianum are 
all easy Orchids to grow, and require a temperature a little above the Cool 
house, and are best accommodated in a cool Intermediate house. They 
are a little irregular in their blooming season, especially the two latter, but 
■if the plants are healthy and strong they are usually at their best about this 
season, and the blossoms, if kept dry, remain in perfection for a consider- 
able time, and no harm will accrue by allowing the flowers to remain on 
the plants. The young growths are produced early in summer, according 
to the different species, but new roots are not produced until the growths 
have become a considerable size, and have begun to form pseudobulbs. 
The older roots being active, the plants may, if necessary, be repotted when 
the young growths are a few inches high. When repotting is necessary, it 
should be done thoroughly, all the old sour material being carefully removed 
from the roots, and the plants replaced in a compost as previously advised 
for other Odontoglossums. As these Odontoglossums have thick fleshy 
■ roots, the compost should be used in a rough condition, and not pressed too 
firmly. Like all other newly-potted plants, water must be supplied carefully 
for some time, and none must be allowed to lodge in the young growths, or 
:they may damp off. During active growth they appreciate a liberal supply 
of water right up to the time when they have completed their pseudobulbs, 
and then sufficient must be given them to prevent shrivelling. These 
■Odontoglossums delight in a light position with a free circulation of air at 
all times, but must be shaded from strong sunshine. Insects are very fond 
of them, especially woodlice and small snails, also the different species of 
scale, therefore preventive measures must be taken. 

O. CITROSMUM will succeed under the same conditions as those 
previously mentioned, except that this is best grown suspended, and the 
.Others succeed best grown in pots on the stage. All the species of this 



2i4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 1912, 

section of Odontoglossum resent being disturbed at the root, and, therefore, 
every means possible should be taken to induce the plants to re-establish 
themselves quickly. They should have new rooting material afforded them, 
if necessary, immediately they have passed out of flower. 

General remarks. — The work for the month will be a great deal like- 
that of the previous one. Potting, watering, and the cleaning of the plants 
always take up much time, and the ventilation and shading of the houses 
and the maintenance of the proper temperatures, with a sufficiency of 
atmospheric moisture, will comprise the general routine of work. In every- 
thing taken in hand let it be done thoroughly, as, to be effectual, it must be 
done well. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
A meeting was held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, 
Westminster, on June 4th, when there was a very fine display of Orchids, 
including ten medal groups, other awards being one First-class Certificate, 
four Awards of Merit, and two Cultural Commendations. 

Orchid Committee present: Sir Harry J. Veitch (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. Gurney Wilson, R. G. Thwaites, F. Sander, F. J. Hanbury, A. A. 
McBean, Walter Cobb, J. Cypher, W. H. Hatcher, J. E. Shill, H. G, 
Alexander, A. Dye, W. H. White, J. Wilson Potter, W. Bolton, de Barri 
Crawshay, and C. J. Lucas. 

Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. 
Alexander), staged a remarkably fine group of specimen plants, to which 
a Gold Medal was awarded. It contained eight fine specimens of Miltonia 
vexillaria Empress Augusta Victoria, bearing an aggregate of 225 flowers, 
and other profusely-flowered forms, a good Oncidium divaricatum, some 
well-flowered specimens of Dendrobium Euterpe, chrysotoxum and 
capillipes, Cattleya Warscewiczii with five fine spikes, C. Mossia; Wageneri 
Westonbirt var., and some fine C. Mendelii, good examples of Laeliocattleya 
Canhamiana with twenty-five and thirty flowers, L.-c. Martinetii The 
Prince, a magnificent variety, L.-c. Aphrodite, L.-c. luminosa Canary Bird,, 
and Odontoglossum armainvillierense xanthotes Westonbirt var. 

H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney (gr. Mr. G. Day), was 
awarded a Silver-gilt Flora Medal for a fine group, including some excellent 
varieties of Miltonia vexillaria, the fine Brassocatladia Veitchii, Cattleya 
Mendelii H. A. Tracy, Odontiodas, Masdevallias, Odontoglossum Goodsonii 
with a spike of twelve flowers, O. eximium Leopoldii, O. Lambeauianunv 
St. David, the remarkable O. crispum Lady Jane, and other good forms of 
O. crispum. 

W. Waters Butler, Esq., Southfield, Norfolk Road, Edgbaston (gr. Mit 



July, i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. aiS 

Jones), exhibited a good form of Laeliocattleya luminosa, having amber 
yellow flowers with some purple veining on the lip, and Cattleya Mendelii 
The Queen, having seven pure white flowers with a pale rose tinge on the 
front of the lip. 

Walter Cobb, Esq., Normanhurst, Rusper (gr. Mr. Salter), sent 
Odontoglossum Leonard Cobb, bearing a spike of eleven flowers, hand- 
somely blotched with claret purple. 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), 
exhibited Odontioda Carmen (C. Ncetzliana X O. apterum), the handsome 
O. rosefieldiensis with four spikes and thirty-four tlowers, O. Devossiana 
with a fine panicle, and a good plant of Odontoglossum Leonidas (Cook- 

E. de Quincey, Esq., Oakwood, Chislehurst (gr. Mr. G. B. Lees), sent a 
good form of Odontoglossum Fascinator. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a fine group, 
the centre being made up of Phalaenopsis amabilis and brilliant Odontiodas, 
other noteworthy things being Sobralia Cliftonii, some good examples 
of Trichopilia Backhouseana, Bulbophyllum virescens, Laeliocattleya 
Aphrodite, Canhamiana, and Fascinator, some good Miltonias, Cattleya 
Mossise Wageneri and a 'beautiful series of Odontoglossum hybrids (Silver 
Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, also staged a very fine group, 
including a beautiful Cattleya Mendelii alba, some good examples of Laelia 
purpurata, Dendrobium superbiens, Oncidium macranthum, Thunia 
Veitchii, many beautiful Odontoglossums and Odontiodas, Maxillaria 
Sanderiana, Ornithocephalus grandiflorus, and others (Silver Flora Medal)- 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a choice group, including 
Anguloa Clowesii, Cattleya Mendelii, C. Warscewiczii, and some good C. 
Mossise, noteworthy among the latter being C. M. Reineckeana vestalis 
(Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. cS: A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a pretty group, 
including some good Miltonia vexillaria, the rare M. Phalaenopsis, M. 
Bleuana, and a good hybrid between M. Bleuana and M. Hyeana (Silver 
Banksian Medal). 

Mr. S. Fbry, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, staged an interesting little 
group, including some good forms of Cattleya Mossiae and Mendelii, Disa 
Luna, Liparis Ugandse, and some good Odonto-lossums and Dendrobiums 
(Bronze Banksian Medal). 

Mr. A. W. Jensen, Lindfield, Haywards Heath, staged a small group of 
Cattleya Mossiae, Mendelii, and Odontoglossum crispum (Bronze Banksian 
Medal). 

The Liverpool Orchid Nursery Co., Gateacre, staged a pretty group, 



21 & THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 1912- 

including Laeliocattleya Dominiana, L.-c. Cowanii (L. cinnabrosa X C. 
Mossiae), and a pretty hybrid between C. Mendelii and L. Jongheana 
(Bronze Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged a pretty little group, including 
Dendrobium thyrsiflorum and pulchellum, Vanda teres, Renanthera 
Imschootiana, Laeliocattleya Canhamiana, Cattleya Mossiae, Miltonia 
vexillaria, and Cypripediam Maudiae (Bronze Banksian Medal). 
First-class Certificate. 

Miltonia vexillaria Snowflake. — A large and very beautiful white 
variety.— Exhibited by Lieut.-Col. Sir George L. Holford. 
Awards of Merit. 

Dendrobium Goldiel— A handsome Australian plant, bearing terminal 
spikes of deep rose-purple flowers.— Exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA Aphrodite Cowan's var.— A very fine form, having 
white flowers and the front of the lip purple.— Exhibited by the Liverpool 
Orchid Nursery Co. 

Odontoglossum Lambeauianum Princess Mary.— A beautiful white 
variety, with violet-purple blotches on the lip.— Exhibited by H. F. 

Odontoglossum Th 
nineteen flowers, handso 
C. G. Phillips, Esq., The Glebe, Sev 



Glebe v. 


\R. — A line hybrid bearing a spike of 


- blotchec 


I with reddish purple.— Exhibited by 




aoaks (gr. Mr. R. J. Bucknell). 




MMENDATIONS. 


-To Mess 


>rs. Armstrong 8c Brown, Tunbridge 


'earing a 


spike of sixteen flowers. 


MiWIAKF 


:.— To Mr. H. G. Alexander, gr. to 


Holford, 


for a beautiful specimen, bearing 


jateofse> 


-enty-three flowers (See p. 209, fig. 29). 



tmrteen spikes and an agg 

At the meeting held on June iSth there was a moderate display of 
Orchids, including six medal groups, other awards consisting of two 
First-class Certificates and three Awards of Merit. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., in the Chair, and 
Messrs. R. A. Rolfe, Gurney Wilson, J. Wilson Potter, F. Sander, 
F. J. Hanbury, T. Armstrong, A. McBean, \\\ Cobb, J. Charlesworth, 
J. E. Shill. H. G. Alexander, W. P. Bound, Arthur Dye, W. H. White,' 
Clive Cookson, W. Bolton, C. J. Lucas, Stuart H. Low, J. S. Moss', 
C. H. Curtis, and de Barri Crawshay. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), staged 
a good group, including Cattleya Mossiae, Mendelii, and Warscewiczii, 
Laeliocattleya Aphrodite Borlases var., with white sepals and petals, and 
a very dark lip, Odontoglossum hibernicum, good forms of O. eximium, 



July, ,912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. »7 

O. Aireworth, and several other handsome things (Silver Flora Medal). 

R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Streatham (gr. Mr. J. M. Black), staged a very 
pretty group of plants, mostly raised in the collection, including about 
thirty Odontiodas, the majority being scarlet, with a richly-coloured form 
-of O. Thwaitesii, and O. Rolfei, a curious hybrid from C. vulcanica and 
O. Hunnewellianum, nine seedlings of Cattleya Mossiae Wageneri which 
have come true from seed, a few Miltonia vexillaria, Odontoglossum Clytie, 
three promising seedlings from Odontoglossum Vuylstekei X Rolfeae, 
■O. percultum X Vuylstekei, and O. armainvillierense X crispum Boltonii, 
with a few others (Silver Flora Medal). 

W. Waters Butler,. Esq., Southfield, Edgbaston (gr. Mr. Jones), sent 
Lseliocattleya Martinetii Southfield var. (L. tenebrosa X C. Mossiae 
Reineckeana), a very pretty form, having lemon yellow sepals and petals, 
and a light coloured lip, with some purple in the throat. 

H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney (gr. Mr. Day), sent Odonto- 
glossum Eleanor, Odontoglossum crispo-Wiganianum, a bright yellow 
flower, O. percultum Clarksonii, a fine form, heavily blotched with claret- 
purple, and two nice plants of Odontoglossum Goodsonias. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a very fine group, including 
some handsome plants of Cattleya Warscewiczii Sanderiana, the beautiful 
white C. Madame Myra Peeters, and C. Mossiae Wageneri, some good 
forms of Laeliocattleya Canhamiana, Martinetii, Fascinator, and L.-c. 
Kathleen Grey (L. tenebrosa X L.-c. Canhamiana), Dendrobium regium, 
Goldiei, Dearei, and Sanderae, with a well-flowered Lycaste peruviana, 
Ccelogyne aspersa alba, a very beautiful albino with cream white flowers, 
some good forms of Miltonia vexillaria, the variety Sanderae, with M. v. 
chelseiensis for one parent, having the sepals and petals tinged with purple, 
good plants of Anguloa Ruckeri and virginalis, forms of Eulophia squalida, 
Oncidium pulchellum, Epidendrum patens, Odontoglossum cirrhosum X 
armainvillierense, a charming thing, Sarcopodium cymbidioides, and many 
other good things (Silver-gilt Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a good group, 
including plants of Oncidium macranthum, leucochilum, and others, 
Odontoglossum Williamsianum, Dendrobium densiflorum and D. formosum, 
Miltonia vexillaria and Bleuana, Renanthera Imschootiana, Odontioda 
Bradshawiae and Charlesworthii, Laelia tenebrosa, Brassolaelia Jessopii, 
Epidendrum pentotes, Laeliocattleya Haroldiana and Martinetii, Cattleya 
Warscewiczii, and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a very interesting 
little group, including the rare Vanda Charlesworthii, Cleisostoma cras- 
silolium, Odontoglossum citrosmum and a beautiful example of O. c. 
.roseum, some good Trichopilia tortilis, one having thirteen flowers, 



2i8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, t 9 iz. 

Dendrobium Sanderae and Dearei, Cattleya Mossia Wageneri and C. 
Warscewiczii, Oncidium auriferum, Bulbophyllum Lobbii, and others- 
(Bronze Banksian Medal). 

The Liverpool Horticultural Co., Gateacre, staged an interesting groups- 
including some good Cypripedium bellatulum, Laeliocattleya Canhamiana r 
forms of the variable L.-c. Cowanii, and a richly coloured hybrid from L. 
Jongheana and C. Schilleriana (Bronze Banksian Medal). 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Haywards Heath, staged an interesting 
group, including Ccelogyne burfordiensis, Brassocattleya Corona (C. 
Schilleriana X B. Digbyana), with a strongly three-lobed and deeply fringed 
lip, which is regularly lined with brown, Laelia xanthina X Cattleya 
intermedia alba, Oncidium Mantinii Low's var., the chaste Cattleya 
Harrisoniana alba, and some other good Cattleyas. 

Mr. W. A. Manda, St. Albans, sent a plant called Cattleya gigas- 
Mandaiana, but from some yellow veining in the lip, we consider it to be a 
form of Cattleya Hardyana. 

M. A. Mertens, Ghent, sent a few Odontiodas and Odontoglossums. 
First-class Certificates. 

L.eliocattleya Baroness Emma (L.-c. eximia X C. Hardyana).— A 
magnificent hybrid, the flower being large and of excellent shape, and. 
having blush white sepals and petals, tinged with pink, and the lip very 
broad, rich purple-crimson in front, and the throat whitish yellow, with 
purple lines. Exhibited by Baron Bruno Schroder, The Dell, Egham (gr. 
Mr. J. K. Shill). 

Odontioda Cooksoni^e Fowler's var. (C. Ncetzliana X O. armain- 
villierense). — A remarkably fine and handsome hybrid, having broad 
crimson red sepals and petals, narrowly margined with white, and the lip 
crimson with a broader white margin, the crest light yellow, and the front 
lobe white. Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 
Awards of Merit. 

Ljeliocattleya Ganymede Southfield var. (L. Latona X C, 
Schroederae).— A neat and brilliantly-coloured flower, having bright chrome 
yellow sepals and petals and an undulate ruby crimson lip. Exhibited by 
W. Waters Butler, Esq. 

Miltonia Bleuana Rising Sun.— A large and beautiful white variety, 
with a brownish orange ray-like blotch at the base of the lip. Exhibited by 
Baron Bruno Schroder. 

Odontonia St.-Alban (Miltonia Warscewiczii x Odontoglossurrr 
Pescatorei).— A striking hybrid, bearing a panicle of flowers, most like the 
Miltonia parent in general character, but modified in shape, and the sepals 
and petals reddish purple, margined with white, while the broad, rounded 
lip is similar in colour. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



A meeting was held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on Thursday, 
May 16th, when the members of Committee present were : Rev. J. Cromble- 
holme (in the Chair), Messrs. R. Ashworth, J. Bamber, C. Parker, H. Thorp, 
Z. A. Ward, J. C. Cowan, J. Evans, W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, 
and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish), was awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for a choice group of Odontoglossums, varieties and 
hybrids, including O. crispum var. Perfection, Hopher, Kathleen, and 
Golden Queen, O. ardentissimum, O. eximium, and Odontioda Cooksoniae. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 
Silver Medal for a choice group, including several varieties of Cattleya 
Mendelii, C. Skinneri, C. S. alba, C. intermedia alba, Brassocattleya 
Maronii, Brassocatlaelia Purity, Laeliocattleya Fascinator, and others. 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 
Silver Medal for a meritorious group of well-grown Odontoglossums,. 
including several good varieties of O. crispum, hybrids of O. Harryanum, 
O. triumphans, and others, being very fine and too numerous to mention. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was awarded a Silver 
Medal for a nice exhibit of Cattleyas, including C. Mendelii Excelsior and 
Grahame White, C. Mossiae in variety, with C. Dowiana aurea, C. 
Schrcederae, and a good plant of Miltonia Bleuana. 

H. Thorp, Esq., Rhodes, was awarded a Silver Medal for a group, 
composed principally of Odontoglossums of the crispum section, and several 
plants of Laelia purpurata alba and Cattleya Skinneri. 

J. J. Holden, Esq., Southport (gr. Mr. Johnson), staged Cattleya 
Dusseldorfii var. Undine, Brassocattleya Marie, and Odontoglossum Archie 
Neill. 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Plumpton Hall, sent Cattleya Mossiae Reineckeana, 
and two other good things which are mentioned under Awards. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), sent 
Cypripedium Muriel Hollington and C. Wottonii carminosum. 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, were awarded a Silver Medal for a 
choice group, Odontoglossum crispum, with O. Rolfeae, and other hybrids, 
Laeliocattleya Fascinator Olivia, several good forms of Cattleya Mossiae, C. 
Walkeriana, Odontioda Charlesworthii, O. chelseiensis, and several plants 
of the pretty Oncidium pulchellum. 

Messrs. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, staged Oncidium curtum and 
pulchellum, with three good forms of Cypripedium bellatulum. 

Mr. J. Birchenall, Alderley Edge, staged forms of Cattleya Mossiae and 
Mendelii. 

Mr. J. Evans, Congleton, sent varieties of Cattleya Mossiae. 



22o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 1912. 

First-class Certificate. 

Brassocattleya Veitchii var. Luptonii (C. Mossise Reineckeana X B. 
Digbyana), a huge flower of even colour and well balanced; from Col. 
J. Rutherford, M.P. 

Awards of Merit. 

Brassocatlselia beardwoodensis (L. c. Violetta X B. Digbyana) ; from 
Col. J. Rutherford. 

Odontoglossum Wilckeanum var. plumptonense, and Cypripedium 
Annie Measures var. Diabolus ; both from W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Cypripedium hortonense (Victor X Beeckmanii) ; from F. A. Hindley, 
Esq., Bradford. 

At the meeting held on Thursday, June 6th, the members of the 
Committee present were :— Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), Messrs. 
R. Ashworth, J. Bamber, J. C. Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, W. Holmes, 
A. J. Keeling, D. McLeod, C. Parker, F. K. Sander, Z. A. Ward, A. 
Warburton, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

Owing to the short time at the disposal of the Committee, the Annual 
Meeting being announced to commence at 2.30, only a brief reference to 
the exhibits can be made, which were as follows : — 

Silver-gilt Medals were awarded to Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Beard- 
wood, Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton) ; A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden 
(gr. Mr. Dalgleish) ; and Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards 
Heath. 

Silver Medals to Mrs. Wood, Glossop (gr. Mr. Gould) ; Z. A. Ward, Esq., 
Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby) ; J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. 
Mr. Holmes) ; Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate ; and the Liverpool 
•Orchid & Nursery Co. (Cowans), Gateacre. 

Votes of Thanks to O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury ; W. R. Lee, Esq., 
Heywood ; R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby ; and Mr. J. Birchenall, Alderley 
Edge. 

First-class Certificate. 

Odontoglossum Queen Mary (Vuylstekei X eximium) ; from W. R. 

Awards of Merit. 

Odontoglossum crispum White Star and O. c. White Queen ; from 
W. R. Lee, Esq. 

Aerides Houlletianum magnificum ; from Mrs. Wood. 

Laeliocattleya Martinetii var. John Lupton ; from Col. J. Rutherford, 
M.P. 

Cattleya Cowanii magnifica Marlfield var. and Odontoglossum Mrs. 
Carlisle ; from R. le Doux, Esq. 



July, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 221 

At the Annual Meeting the Balance Sheet was adopted. The Rev. J. 
Crombleholme was re-appointed Chairman, with Z. A. Ward, Esq., Vice- 
Chairman ; R. Ashworth, Esq., Hon. Treasurer ; H. Thorp, Esq., Hon. 
Auditor ; and H. Arthur, Secretary. A Committee was elected, and a 
President, along with a number of Vice-Presidents were invited. The 
prizes were presented to the successful exhibitors as follows : — 

Robson's Gold Cup (presented by the Exors. of the late Mr. John 
Robson) to W. R. Lee, Esq. (gr. Mr. Branch). 

W. R. Lee's Silver Trophy to Z. A. Ward, Esq. (gr. Mr. Weatherby). 

W. R. Lee's Gold Medal to J. McCartney, Esq. (gr. Mr. Holmes). 

Cypher's Gold Medal (presented by Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons), to 
Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

"Sander" Prizes, Mr. Lupton (gr. to Col. J. Rutherford, M.P.), and 
Mr. Weatherby (gr. to Z. A. Ward, Esq.), equal Firsts, and Mr. Holmes 
(gr. to J. McCartney, Esq.), Third. 

Ed. V. Low's Silver Vase, to J. J. Holden, Esq. (gr. Mr. Johnson). 

Stuart Low's Prizes, to J. McCartney, Esq. (gr. Mr. Holmes). 

Society's Gold Medal (Amateurs), to G. H. Peace, Esq., Monton Grange 
(gr. Mr. Mace) ; Silver-gilt, to A. Warburton, Esq. (gr. Mr. Dalgleish) ; 
Gold Medal (Amateur without gardener), to W. J. Hargreaves, Esq., 
Burnley: Silver-gilt, to F. A. Hindley, Esq., Bradford; Silver, to H. 
Arthur, Esq. 

A Gold Medal (given by a member of the Society) was presented to the 
Rev. J. Crombleholme, for his meritorious exhibits during the session. 

Several Prizes were offered for competition during the coming session, 
due notice of which will be given. 



few cases have they been excelled. 

The principal class was for a table 12 feet by 5 feet, arranged for effect, 
the inclusion of cut blooms in glasses or baskets being permitted, the object 
being to produce an effective display. The first prize was awarded to a 
mc t ff t : and pleasing display put up by Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, 
Cheltenham, which contained a wide range of decorative Orchids, such as 
Brassia verrucosa, Oncidiums, Odontoglossums, Cattleyas, Lffiliocattleyas, 
Miltonias, and many other species. Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher was placed 
second, with a most pleasing arrangement of plants alone, no attempt 
being made to add to its effectiveness by the addition of cut flowers. 
Renanthera Imschootiana was intermingled with white Odontoglossums, 
Cattleya Warscewiczii, C. Mossia, Lseliocattleyas, Miltonias, and 



222 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 1912. 

Oncidiums, beside many other species, and made a most attractive 
exhibit, which would have taken the first prize at a great many shows in 
the country. Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, were awarded the third 
prize, exhibiting Cattleya Mossiae in great variety, with Odontioda Charles- 
worthii, Cypripedium niveum, and many other species in good form. 

In a class for ten Orchids (open), Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons were again 
placed first, with fine examples of Cypripedium Curtisii, Phalamopsis 
amabilis Rimestadiana, Vanda teres, Laeliocattleya Aphrodite, Miltonia 
vexillaria, and others. The second prize in this class was awarded to W. 
P. Burkinshaw, Esq., Hessle, Hull (gr. Mr. J. T. Barker), with fine 
examples of Laeliocattleya Fascinator, Laelia tenebrosa Walton Grange 
var., Cattleya Warscewiczii, Miltonia vexillaria, and others. Messrs. 
Hassall & Co. were placed third, and amongst the plants exhibited was a 
fine Odontoglossum Thompsonianum. 

The competition in the class for six Orchids (open) was exceptionally 
keen, Mr. Burkinshaw in this case being placed first, with fine specimens of 
Renanthera Imschootiana, Cypripedium Shillianum, Cattleya Mossiae, 
Laeliocattleya Fascinator, Miltonia vexillaria, especially good, and others. 
Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons were placed second, their best plants being 
Laeliocattleya Canhamiana, L.-c. Kraenzlinii, Cattleya Whitei, and 
Renanthera Imschootiana. The third prize here again fell to Messrs. 
Hassall & Co. 

In a class for three Orchids (open), the first prize was again awarded to 
Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, who had Laeliocattleya Aphrodite, very fine, 
Mr. Burkinshaw being placed second, with Cattleya Mossiae Reineckeana 
and intertexta alba as his best plants. Messrs. Hassall here again were 
third. 

In a class for a single specimen of a New or Rare Orchid, Mr. Burkin- 
shaw was placed first for his beautiful Miltonia Bleuana Hessle variety, with 
two spikes; Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons being. placed second with a fine 
form of Odontoglossum percultum. 

The whole of the first prizes, confined to amateurs or gentlemen's 
gardeners, in three classes, namely, for six, three, and single specimens were 
awarded to Mr. Burkinshaw, whose single specimen was a fine plant and 
variety of Cattleya Mossiae alba. 

Amongst the non-competitive exhibits Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. 
Albans, were awarded the Gold Medal for a fine group of Orchids, composed 
of Laeliocattleyas in variety, Cattleya Warscewiczii Sanderiana (very fine), 
C. Mossiae Wageneri, Dendrobium Dearei, D. superbiens, and many others', 
Miltonia vexillaria Lambeauiana being a fine specimen of this chaste 
Miltonia. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, were awarded a Large 



July, i 9 i 2) ] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 223 

Silver-gilt Medal for a choice selection of Orchids, in which Laeliocattleya 
Canhamiana alba, L.-c. Cecilia, Cattleya Mossiae Wageneri, C. M. 
Reineckeana, and Odontoglossum Aireworth were most conspicuous. 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, E. Yorks, were awarded a Silver- 
gilt Medal for a choice group, which included many fine varieties of Laelio- 
cattleya Martinetii, L.-c. Eudora, Odontoglossums, Cattleyas, and 
Cypripediums. 

Mr. J. E. Sadler, Newbury, showed Odontoglossums and Odontiodas in 
a setting of ferns, for which he was awarded a Silver Medal. 

CHINESE ORCHIDS. 

A recent issue of Notes from the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, contains, 
under the title " Piantse Chinenses Forrestianae," an account of the Orchids 
•discovered and collected by Mr. G. Forrest during his first exploration of 
Yunnan and Thibet in 1904, 1905, and 1906, by Dr. Schlechter (v. pp. 93. 
113, with nine plates). There are twenty-nine genera and about sixty- 
eight species, the majority being terrestrial, and chiefly of botanical interest. 
r species are described and figured, namely, Herminium ophioglos- 
i diplonema, diceras, and Forrestii, Neottia 
grandiflora, Pleione Forrestii, Microstylis yunnanensis, Calanthe undulata, 
and Bulleya yunnanensis, the latter a curious new genus near to Pholidota 
but differing in having a spurred lip. Habenaria comes first in point of 
numbers with eight species, while Herminium has seven, Cypripedilum six, 
and Orchis and Pleione each five, the rest being smaller, and sixteen genera 
are only represented by a single species. The enumeration is from dried 
specimens collected by Mr. Forrest. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

The great Summer Show of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held on 
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, July 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, in the 
grounds of Holland House, Kensington. Silver Cups and Medals will be 

Orchid Committee will meet at 10.30 a.m. 

Two other meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held 
-during July at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, 
on the 16th and 30th, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual 

The next meeting of the Manchester and North of England Orchid 
Society will be held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on July nth. The 
Committee meets at noon, and the exhibits are open to inspection of 
members and the public from 1 to 4 p.m. 



224 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [July, 191 z. 

Sir David Prain.— We note with pleasure that His Majesty the Kin- 
has conferred the honour of knighthood on Lt.-Col. David Prain, F.R.S., 
who has for the past seven years been Director of the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Kew, and whose name is well known in connection with Indian 
Orchidology. 

ORCHID PORTRAITS. 



Milto: 
Milto: 



smm Her Majesty.-^/,/. Mag., 1912, p. 425, with fig. 
ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS. 






lin, and perhaps an old 



I Orchids arc exhibited v. huh t 
i should be glad 



cross that maybe overlooked, especi 
r-i ^ corres P c ' ncient suggests that an account of the different fungus diseases to which 
Orchids are subject, and the best method of combating them, would be interesting. We 
quite agree, and should be glad if readers would send examples of any oi 



.nd we will 
Photographs recc 



Vol. XX., No. 236.^ 



AUGUST, 1912. 



ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 



Amateur's Collection 
Answers to Corresponds 
f Operations f. 



Lffiliocattleya Lustre v 



Contents. 



238 1 Orchids of Formosa .. 

256 R.H.S. Shov 

242 I Saccolabium fragrans '. 

225 Manchester and North of England Orchid : 

24; Royal Horticultural : 

2,4 Theco stele alata : 

241 Variation of Secondary Hybrids : 



Ophrys hybrids 
Orchid Notes and 
Orchid Portraits 



Orchids in season 

PRICE SIXPENCE MONTHLY. 



seedling 

Odontoglo 





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SONS. 


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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



Our last paper completed the review of the different groups of Orchids, 
and it now remains to show some of the steps by which they have reached 
their present development. On this we can obtain no help from geology, 
the only fossils suspected to belong to the Order being of entirely doubtful 
origin. We are thus limited to the evidence obtained from existing form?. 
which is fortunately extensive. We have seen that the two principal 
characters, the aggregation of the pollen grains into pollinia and the 
modification of one of the three stigmas into a rostellum, are not universal 
characters, being absent from the suborder Diandra, so that the Order is 
less isolated than might at first appear. 

Taking existing Orchids as a guide we may safely infer that the 
ancestral representatives of the Order were terrestrial monocotyledons, 
with an inferior, three-celled ovary, numerous minute seeds, having a 
reticulated seed-coat and rudimentary embryo, and the stamens and pistils 
not yet aggregated into a column. The flowers were, doubtless, fertilised by 
insects, which, on visiting the former, would become dusted with the pollen 
grains from the anthers, as in the case of other entomophilous monocoty- 



ledons. We may lis J Orchids vn 



i great 



tropical forest region. The characters mentioned are found in the Malaya 
genus Neuwiedia, the most primitive of existing Orchids. The species of 

leaves, and an erect spike of yellow or white flowers, with a nearly regular 
connivent perianth, and three linear or oblong anthers, borne on one side 
of the flower, free pollen grains, and a slender, nearly free style. 

From this point we can trace the progressive modifications of structure 
until the culminating point of development is reached. Taking the first 
tribe Apostasieae we find the third stamen of Neuwiedia reduced to a linear 
staminode in Apostasia, and totally suppressed in Adactylus, both being 
accompanied by a change in the shape of the inflorescence. In Cypri- 
pediese we find the same essential type, but the perianth has now become 
irregular, the lip modified into a pouch-shaped body the third stamen into 



226 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912. 

a shield-shaped staminode, occupying a definite position with respect to the 
lip, the anthers shortened, and the pollen grains cohering into two sticky 
masses, situated just over two lateral openings of the lip; all these being 
adaptations to fertilisation by bees, as already described. The tribe 
Cypripedieae contains four genera, two of which have retained the three- 
celled ovary of Apostasieae, and, curiously enough, both are Tropical 
American, while the other two have become one-celled by the loss of the 
three partitions, one being tropical Asiatic, the other widely diffused through 
the northern hemisphere. Thus, with a unity of type, in the suborder 
Diandr* we find a division into two well-marked tribes, with progressive 
modifications of structure, an extended geographical diffusion, and definite 
climatic adaptations. 

In the meantime another and more successful type of variation had 
arisen, probably from some early form which had lost the three-celled 
•ovary. In this, five of the stamens were destined to play a subordinate 
part, one only remaining fertile, and that the median one of the outer 
whorl, homologous with the staminode of the Diandrae. And with it arose 
a totally new organ, the rostellum, modified from the third stigmatic lobe, 
on the opposite side of the flower, its function being to secrete some viscid 
matter causing the pollen grains to adhere to the insect visitor, and thus 
prevent their loss during its flight to another flower. Correllated with this 
development we find the early stages of the union of the pollen grains — 
which were to witness such an enormous development later on — and the 

them adaptations securing greater economy of the pollen grains by 
preventing waste. The anther is operculate, and the filament reduced to a 
mere hinge. Here, also, is found a use for the abortive stamens, three of 
which seem to have been suppressed in the Diandrae, the other two in the 
Cypripedieae uniting with the median petal to form a lip, while in the 
Apostasieae they were suppressed, the lip being undifferentiated. 

The union of the two lateral stamens of the outer whorl to form the lip 
has been continued throughout the Monandrae, while the two corresponding 



stamens of the inner w 


horl 1 


lave been 


vanoush 


■ developed 


n the sides of 


the column, opposite tc 


1 the 


anther, as 


; wings c 


>r teeth, as , 


circumstances 


required, doubtless playing 


their part 


in keepi 


ng the anth< 


^r in position 


and in guiding the visiti 


ng ins 


ects along 


the requ 


ired path. 


The presence 


of the remaining stame 


d -th< 


t median ( 


me of the 


: inner whorl 


— is generally 


to be sought among the 


crests 


: of the lip 


. This t 


ype of struc 


ture has been 


progressively modified ; 


il »ng 


divergent 


branches 


; and constit! 


Jtes the great 


suborder Monandrae. 












In the earliest and si 


mples 


t type of 


the- Mom 


indrae, as in 


Pogonia, we 


find the pollen powdery 


, but « 


ixaminatic 


»n shows 


them to be 1 


mited in fours 



August, i 9 r*.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 227 

(tetrads), owing to the fact that at the last division of the pollen cells 
complete separation of cells does not take place, and this represents the 
first stage of their union into pollinia. This powdery pollen is characteristic 
of the early genera of the tribe Neottiese, but soon we find a further develop- 
ment, in the union of the compound grains (tetrads) into little packets, 
each united to a central axis by a short stalk— composed of modified pollen 
grains— forming the sectile type of pollinia. Correllated with this develop- 
ment we find the viscus secreted by the rostellum hardened into a little 
gland, to which the sectile club-shaped pollinia are attached. The gland 
still remains sticky at its extremity, and thus adheres to the body of the 
visiting insect, and is carried away bodily. 

Among the higher types of Neottieae we find further development of the 
rostellum, to prevent the pollinia from falling on to the stigma of the same 
flower, as in Vanilla, of various special developments of the lip and column, 
as in the Diuridese, and such complex modifications as the sensitive lip of 
Pterostylis, and others previously mentioned, all of which are adaptations 
to secure cross-feitilisation by particular insects, and to exclude other 
insects which would plunder the flowers without effecting the desired end. 
We also find many other modifications of floral structure, all directed to 
the same purpose. 

Corresponding vegetative developments among the Neottieae are found, 
but are far less numerous than those seen in the epiphytic section of the 
Order. The plants are still terrestrial, and the great majority of them of 
the general type seen in the well-known genus Spiranthes. We find, how- 
ever, modifications in the fleshy roots of the Spiranthes group ; the more 
or less tuberiferous development of the rhizome of Diurideae ; the climbing 
stems of Vanilla, which often ascend to the tops of the tallest trees ; in the 
fleshy leaves of the last-named genus ; in the handsomely variegated leaves 
of Ancectochilus and a few other genera, the functions of which are 
obscure; and in the suppression of the leaves in one section of Vanilla, the 
function of nutrition being carried on by the chlorophyll in the stems. 
We have also the remarkable development of a leafless saprophytic habit, as 
in Neottia, Epipogon, Galeola, and a few others which grow upon decaying 
vegetable matter. 

Modifications in other characters could be pointed out, as the fleshy 
fruits and rounded crustaceous seeds of Vanilla, and the broadly winged 
seeds of Galeola, all of which are adaptations to particular methods of 
existence. The Neotti< : moist and shady situations, and 

are most abundant in warm regions, becoming much less numerous in 
temperate climates. 

Another stage of development is seen in the Ophrydeae, which much 
resemble the Neottieae in habit, while the structure of the pollinia is very 



228 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 19 12. 

similar to that of the more specialised genera of the same tribe. The 
anther has now become completely adnate to the top of the column, and the 
position of the caudicle and gland basal, changes which are clearly cor- 
related with the specialised structure of the anther, which has been already 
described. A great development of the rostelium is seen in the Ophrydese. 
In Orchis and Ophrys the glands of the pollinia are enclosed in membranous 
rostellar pouches, which rupture the moment the rostelium is touched by an 
insect inserting its proboscis into the spur of the lip, and the viscid 
glands are at once firmly attached to its head. In Habenaria and its allies 
the rostelium is three-lobed, and the side lobes are elongated into narrow 
channels, which form carriers for the slender caudicles of the pollinia ; while 
in the subtribes Disese and Coryciese it is also of a highly complex nature, 
and is intimately associated with the removal of the pollinia by insects. 

Other complexities, such as the extension of the stigma into two clavate 
processes in Habenaria and Bonatea, the division of the petals in the same, 
the modifications of the perianth, the various forms of cohesion between its 
members, the double spur of Satyrium, the union of the lip and column in 
the Corycieae, the lateral expansion of the connective of the anther in 
Diplomeris, and others, by which the anther is so profoundly divided as to 
have been mistaken for two ; these and other modifications have already 
been pointed out. 

The vegetative developments of the Ophrydeae are much fewer than in 
the Neottiese. They are terrestrial plants, mostly with a general resem- 
blance to the familiar genus Orchis. The rhizome usually forms a distinct 
tuber, from which the next year's growth is produced, after which the old 
tuber shrivels up and disappears. The stem is simple, leafy at the base or 
throughout, and bears a simple terminal spike or raceme, which dies down 
after ripening its seed. With the exception of Habenaria, which is widely 
diffused through the tropics, the majority are natives of subtropical or tem- 
perate countries, with a marked climatic difference between the seasons, to 
which their deciduous character may be attributed. Even the tropical 
representatives, including the large and widely diffused genus Habenaria, 
are often found where there are marked climatic variations between the 
seasons, due to periodicity in the rainfall. R. A. Rolfe. 

{To be concluded). 



DENDROBIUM MONOPHYLLUM. 
A plant of this distinct and remarkable Australian species was exhibited at 
the recent Holland House Show by Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton 
Park. It is a native of Queensland and New South Wales, and was 
described by F. Mueller, in 1859 (Fragm. Phyt. Austral., i. p. 189), from 
specimens collected at Moreton Bay by W. Hill. It had been collected in 



August, 191 2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 229 

the same locality by Allan Cunningham in 1824, and again in 1828, and 
was enumerated by him in a list of Australian epiphytes, under the name of 
Dendrobium tortile (Lindl. Bot. Reg., 1839, Misc. p. 33), a fact apparently 
unknown to Mueller when describing the plant as D. monophyllum. A 
fine figure of it was given by Fitzgerald (Austral. Orch.. i. pt. 6, t. 9), the 
author remarking : " It is generally to be found on ' oak trees ' (Casuarina), 
high up among the branches, and forming dense clumps which resemble 
lily of the valley." Cunningham found it "on the upper branches of the 
loftiest trees of Flindersia australis, 100 feet high, in shaded woods." It is 
somewhat like a Bulbophyllum in habit, having stout, woody rhizomes, 
with oblong pseudobulbs, an inch or more long, terminated by an oblong 
leaf or occasionally a pair, and erect racemes of about nine to fifteen 
greenish yellow flowers, nearly half an inch long. The racemes are rather 
one-sided, and both these and the leaves are some four to six inches long. 
The species was cultivated at Kevv in 1871, but of late years has been lost 
sight of. As regards the earlier name of D. tortile — which probably refers 
to the twisting of the pedicels to one side of the raceme — it cannot now 
supersede D. monophyllum, for no description was published, and later on 
Lindley described an Indian plant as D. tortile, though, when doing so, 
he probably overlooked Cunningham's name. The re-appearance of this 
rare Australian species in cultivation is interesting. R.A.R. 

SACCOLABIUM FRAGRANS. 

A most remarkable little Orchid has re-appeared in cultivation. A tiny 
plant in a two-inch pot was put into my hands at the recent Holland House 
Show by M. F. Peeters, Brussels, with the remark that he obtained it from 
Upper Burma with Vanda ccerulea. Examination with a lens showed that 
it was a species of Saccolabium, but I did not remember having seen such a 
thing alive before. The plant was kindly given for the Kew collection, and 
after a little search I identified it with a drawing of Saccolabium fragrans 
made by the Rev. C. S. Parish in Moulmein. This drawing is labelled : 
" Moulmein, May 14th, 1873. Fragrant with the smell of violets. Strange 
to say, although this little plant grows close to my back door, i.e., in a sort 
of nullah just behind my house, I lived twenty years in the house before 
lighting upon it. ' Quo minime credas gurgite piscis inest.' " It was 
described in the following vear (Par. & Rchb. f. in Journ. Bot., 1874, p. 
197), and eight years later it appeared in cultivation, when an amusing note 
was written by Reichenbach (Gard. Chron., 1882, ii. p. 134) : After speaking 
of its discovery by the Rev. C. S. Parish, he remarked : 

" A single plant of this curiosity was gathered on May 14th, 1873, by 
the last-named excellent Orchidist, and — horribile dicta— at a very short 
distance from the house in which he lived, I believe, eighteen years 



23° THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 19 12. 

after having passed the spot, perhaps, some thousand times. The dwarf 
had a most powerful smell of violets, and its appearance appeared an 
unsolvable riddle. It was a beloved pet of the Rev. C S. Parish. And 
now the very same plant has appeared in the big town, with Mr. B. S. 
Williams. I obtained the gem as a present, and during several weeks I 
had the finest perfume of violets as soon as we had warm weather. Mr. 
Consul Kienast admired the plant with me. Ah ! we should no longer 
want those old-fashioned violet?, provided we had a large stock of 
Saccolabium fragrans. But how came it at those places ? Nothing easier 
than to spin out an explanation theoretically, fantastically. Some millions 
of years ago— no, that will not do !— since Rev. C. S. Parish, whose days 
may still be numerous, to the happiness of his friends, lived only eighteen 
years in Burma. Well, some years before leaving, Mr. Parish had his 
elephants near his door, laden with baskets of Saccolabium giganteum. 
Now, seeds of Saccolabium fragrans fell on a wall, or a little plant of it fell 
down, and one of the brown servants felt some pity for the dwarf, and put 
it on a wall to surprise its master. Mr. B. S. Williams imported the lovely 
gem with some Saccolabium giganteum, and it is to be hoped that Rev. C. 
S. Parish may now feel satisfied to know how the plant came into his hands." 
The stem is very short, and bears a few oblong acute very rugose 
leaves, about half an inch long, dark green above and dull purple beneath, 
and very short racemes of small purple flowers, the segments of which are 
white at the base. The lip is pandurate-lanceolate in shape, longer than 
the other segments, and the spur is broadly clavate, and borne at right 
angles to the limb. Such a plant would easily be overlooked, and is 
probably not so rare as has been supposed. 

R.A.R. 



THE R.H.S. ORCHID SHOW AND CONFERENCE. 

The following is the Schedule of the Special Show of autumn-blooming 
Orchids to be held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, West- 
minster, on November 5th and 6th next, in connection with the Orchid 
Conference of which particulars were given at page 190. There are thirty- 
two classes, as follows : — 

1. Effectively arranged group of Orchids.— Open. 

2. The same.— Amateurs. 

3. Group of Orchids arranged in a space not exceeding 150 square 
feet. — Amateurs. 

4. The same.— Nurserymen. 

5. Group of Orchids arranged in a space not exceeding 100 square 
teet. — Amateurs. 

6. The same. — Nurserymen. 



, i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. *3» 

Group of Cattleya, Laelia, and Brassavola, species, hybrids, and 

The same.— Amateurs. 

The same.— Nurserymen. 

Group of Cypripediums, species, hybrids, and varieties. — Amateurs- 

Group of not more than 50 plants of Vanda ccerulea. — Open. 
Twelve plants of Vanda ccerulea. — Amateurs. 
The same. — Nurserymen. 



17. Group of Odontoglossums and Odontiodas, species, hybrids, and 
varieties.-Open. 

19. Group of Calanthes, species, hybrids, and varieties. — Amateurs. 

22. Three specimen Orchids. — Amateurs. 

23. Six specimen Orchids. — Amateurs. 

24. 25, 26. The same as the three preceding classes.— Nurserymen. 

27. Collection of Orchids of Botanical interest : those with coloured 
or variegated foliage need not necessarily be in flower. — Amateurs. 

28. The same.— Nurserymen. 

The four following classes are restricted to Growers residing in or north 
of Montgomeryshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire. Derbyshire, Leicestershire, 
Rutlandshire, and Lincolnshire:— 

29. Group of Orchids.— Open. 

30. Group of Cypripediums, species, hybrids, and varieties. — Open. 

31. The same.— Amateurs. 

32. Specimen Orchid. — Open. 

Cups and Medals will be awarded by the Council after the report of the 
Judges. 

Exhibits should be tastefully arranged with palms or foliage plants, the 
pots being concealed as far as possible with natural moss or fern. 

Where one definite species is asked for, or an exact number of plants is 
stated, as (e.g. in Class 12) other Orchids may be added for decoration, but 
the class will be judged solely on the merits of the species or number of 
plants named in the Schedule and not on the added plants. 

All entries must be made on or before Tuesday, October 22nd, on special 
entry forms, to be obtained from the Secretary, from whom all particulars 
may be obtained. 

Further particulars will shortly be announced. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



VARIATION OF ODONTOGLOSSUM CRISPUM SEEDLINGS. 

The annexed figure represents a very interesting case of variation among 




seedlings of Odontoglossum crispum from the same capsule, and is repro- 
duced from a photograph kindly sent to us by Messrs. William Bull & Sons, 



August, 1912.I THE ORCHID REVIEW. 233 

Chelsea. A batch of seedlings was obtained by crossing O. crispum 
Alphonso with pollen of O. c. Franz Masereel, and the six forms here figured 
are the most distinct that were in flower together last May, and the senders 
remark that there were no further variations of a noticeable kind besides 
those photographed. O. crispum Franz Masereel is a well-known and very 
handsome form, whose portrait is here reproduced (fig. 31), and O. c. 
Alphonso is described as a very good spotted variety — it was inadvertently 
called O. c. Alpha at page 176, when a note on the subject was given. The 
seedlings show a remarkable range of variation, but some of the detail is 
lost owing to the great amount of reduction in the photograph. The 




seedling in the upper left hand corner shows a single blotch on each of the 
sepals and petals, forming a central zone, and many small spots on the lip. 
To the right of it is one having a number of round spots on each segment, 
varying from two to five, and irregularly arranged. In the upper right 
hand corner is a form in which the sepals and petals of three of the five 
flowers are unspotted, while the other two have a minute spot on one of 
the sepals. The lip of this form bears from one to five minute spots. The 
lower left hand figure shows a form in which the blotches are large and 
irregular, covering about half the area of the segments, while the next to 
the right has the blotches rather more confluent, leaving a broad white 
margin to the sepals and petals. In the lower right hand form the spots on 
the sepals and petals are rather more broken up than in No. I, while those 
on the lip are larger and more confluent. In this form we seem to trace a 



234 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912. 

clear resemblance to certain forms of 0. Wilckeanum in the shape and 
markings of the flower, affording evidence in support of the theory that 
blotched forms of O. crispum have a hybrid ancestry. As regards shape, 
the photograph speaks for itself, but we cannot say much about colour in 
the absence of living flowers. Some of the forms, however, show evidence 
of a rosy suffusion. The figure affords a graphic illustration of the variation 
of seedlings from the same capsule when the parents are of mixed ancestry, 
and one of the plants affords a very clear case of reversion. But there were 
also a number of ordinary white forms, and those are not shown in the 
photograph. One other form had the lip copiously blotched with red-purple, 
and only an occasional blotch on the other segments. Some of the seed- 
lings should develop into good things when the plants become strong. 



VARIATION AMONG SECONDARY HYBRIDS 

Two forms of a very distinct and interesting hybrid were sent some t 
ago from the collection of Sir Trevor Lawrence, Hart., Burford, Dork 
by Mr. W. H. White, who writes as follows: " Knowing that you 
scientifically interested in peculiarities of Orchids, Sir Trevor desire's in 
send the two enclosed spikes to you. It is from a cross between La 
cattleya Adolphus and Cattleya Harrisoniana, and we have had numei 
distinct varieties among them, but the most marked peculiaritv is that s< 
of the spikes are about two feet in length, and have only about tl 
flowers at the end of the spike, sometimes only one or two, while others 
dwarf, about seven or eight inches, with three, four, five, and six flow 
also that several spikes have formed a dwarf kind of leaf about midi 
between the flowers and the apex of the pseudobulb. We think the yel 
one enclosed is rather pretty." 

The two forms sent are remarkablv diverse and their com 
would never have been guessed. One has deep -olden vellow flower-; 
a very broad maroon-crimson margin round the expanded f-u 1 ' -'f 
lip, and a little purple suffusion at* the apex of the column." ' 'I he' -can, 
elongated, and the flowers have much resemblance to those of L 
Adolphus (L. cinnabarina X C. Aclandia) in shape. The other In 
short scape, and shows more of the C. Harrisoniana influence, though' 
flowers are only about half as large. The sepals and petals are h 
purple, with a distinct yellow tinge, and the lip is yellow, with a v 
crenulate, and not expanded front lobe, slightly suffused with yellow at 
shT n ^ thG VGming ° f thC dlSC the inHuenCG ° f C " Harri soniana * clea 

The diversity of the length of the scapes we should attribute to revers 



complete. Laelia cinnabarii 



elongated scape, while 



August, i 9 i2.j THE ORCHID REVIEW. 235 

those of Cattleya Aclandise and C. Harrisoniana are comparatively short. 
The number of flowers, perhaps, cannot be ascertained until the seedlings 
have reached their full development, but the same influence seems to be 
at work, for Cattleya Aclandise has solitary flowers, while the other two 
species haw several flowers on a raceme. The other peculiarity mentioned 
is probably due to a leaf-like development of one of the bract-like sheaths 
which may often be seen on the scapes, and tins seems to be an abnormal 
development. It can only be called a reversion in the sense that bracts 
and sheaths are themselves reduced leaves. 

Various hypotheses, more or less plausible, have been put forward to 
account for the remarkable phenomena seen anion- secondary hybrids, but 
we believe that a satisfactory explanation can be crystallised into the simple 
phrase, 

The sole difference between species and hybrids is one of ancestry. The 
characters of a species have become rixed through having followed the 
same cycle of development through numerous successive generations, during 
which the various organs have gradually adapted themselves to the 

gradually eliminated useless developments, and a balance or condition of 
harmony has been established between the different parts, the significance 
of which may be summed up in the phrase that species reproduce them- 
selves true from seed. An infinity of characters are involved in the 
development of an individual of any given species, and the amount of 
agreement or diversity between individuals of different species depends upon 
their relationship, and the different phases through which they have passed 
since diverging from the common starting point. 

A hybrid is an individual obtained by the intercrossing of distinct species, 
hence it combines different hereditary tendencies according to the degree of 
relationship between the parents. Hybrids combine more or less conflicting 
elements, and the degree of incompatibility existing between these diverse 
elements is necessarily increased as the gap between the parents widens 
and a greater number of differences are involved. Owing to this incom- 
patability the development of the hybrid is more or less a struggle for 
ascendancy between the discordant elements, and some idea of the nature 
of the resulting compromise can generally be seen on comparing the 
characters of the hybrid with those of its parents. Of course there are 
numerous additional minute and internal characters which cannot be traced 
by superficial examination. 

A hybrid is, therefore, a mosaic, combining more or less dissimilar factors 
or tendencies, and when it comes to form its reproductive cells — pollen and 
ovules— dissociation of the mixed elements takes place. The characters of 



236 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912. 

the original parents are thus represented in the reproductive cells of the 
offspring in varying proportions, and as the character of the new individual 
depends upon that of the reproductive cells which unite to form it, and many 
individuals are often produced by a single cross, the result is the wide range 
oi variation and varying amount of reversion now so familiar among 
secondary hybrids. Primary hybrids do not vary in this way because 
derived directly from species, which form reproductive cells of uniform 
character. R.A.R. 

ORCHIDS OF FORMOSA. 

An interesting article on " The Flora of Formosa " has just appeared from 
the pen of Mr. H. J. Elwes, who has returned from a two months' trip in 
the island {Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. pp. 25, 26). The island lies within the 
tropics, and consists of a mountainous backbone rising at two points to 
over 12,000 feet elevation, and falling on the east side in very high and 
steep cliffs to the sea. The flora of the plains, lower hills, and of parts of 
the central mountain range is fairly well known, the most recent list, by 
Mr. Kawakami, Government Botanist, containing about 2700 species, but a 
great part of the interior, and especially of the high mountain range in the 
north, known to Europeans as Mount Sylvia, is unknown or but little 
explored, because the aborigines are so hostile that no one can go into the 
•country without great risk of being killed, head-hunting being the favourite 
pursuit of some of these tribes from time immemorial. The Japanese since 
their occupation of the country in 1895, have done an immense deal to 
civilise the country, and the plains are safer to travel in than are some 
parts of Europe, but it is impossible to visit many districts, and Mr. Elwes 
was disappointed in his hope of reaching really new ground. Yet a 
considerable collection of plants was made, and Mr. Elwes remarks : " I 
have little doubt that my companion, Mr. W. R. Price, who intends to 
remain during the whole summer and autumn in the island, will enrich Kew 
with the finest set of Formosa plants that has yet come to Europe." We 
may extract the following interesting notes about the Orchids of Formosa : — 

"Orchids are, in some districts, plentiful, and more than 100 species 
are found in the island ; but by far the greater number are inconspicuous, 
and of more interest to the botanist than to the gardener. The only really 
fine species is Phalaenopsis Aphrodite, which was formerly common at the 
south end of the island, but which is now becoming quite rare in accessible 
districts, as it is collected for sale by the natives. At the time I was there, 
in February, it was in full flower, though the weather, considering the 
iatitude, was very windy and cold (50 to 6o°) at night. 

" In the Arisan forest, at 6000 to 7000 feet, are quantities of a 
Dendrobium with long, thin pseudobulbs, which are collected for some 



August, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 237 

medicinal use by the Chinese. I saw several other Dendrobes, one with 
whitish flowers, resembling D. crepidatum, and a variety of D. nobile in 
the mountains of the north. I also saw a fine variety of Phaius grandifolius, 
cultivated in gardens, and a beautiful white Calanthe, with flowers twice as 
large as those of C. veratrifolia, of which it may be a variety. Among 
the most remarkable plants is a Vanilla, supposed by the Japanese 
botanists to be a variety of Vanda Griffithii, which we found at about 
2000 feet in the north, growing over the trunk of Libocedrus, and having 
thick, fleshy leaves and stems, ten to fifteen feet long, with pink and 
green flowers " 

THECOSTELE ALATA. 
This very interesting Orchid has been submitted to Kew for determination 
from the collection of the Hon. N. C. Rothschild, Ashton Wold, Oundle, 
with the record that it was imported from Borneo. It was originally 
described by Roxburgh, in 1814, as a native of the forests of Chittagong, 
under the name of Cymbidium alatum (Hort. Bengal., p. 63 : Fl. Ind., 
iii. p. 459), and an original drawing is preserved at Kew. In 185- a Javan 
plant, which had been collected by Zollinger, was described by Reichenbach 
as a new genus, under the name of Thecostele Zollingeri (Bonpiandia, v. 
p. 37), and later it was found in Moulmein by Parish, who sent plants to 
Messrs. Hugh Low & Co., Clapton, with whom it flowered (Rchb. f. Xen. 
Orch., ii. p. 133, t. 147). Then it was collected in Borneo by Mottley, and 
later by two or three other collectors. It was ultimately discovered that 
these two plants were identical, and it was then enumerated under the 
name of Thecostele alata (Par. & Rchb. f. in Trans. Linn. Soc, xxx. p. 135, 
t. 29), on the principle of retaining the oldest specific name. It is much 
like a Bulbophyllum in habit, having clusters of ovoid one-leaved 
pseudobulbs, and the flowers are borne in drooping racemes, and are much 
spotted with purple on a whitish ground. From the structure of the 
pollinia, column wings and lip, the genus is evidently allied to Acriopsis. 

Four other species of the genus are now known, as follows: — 

T. Maingayi, Hook./. FL Brit. Ind., vi. p. 20 ; Hook. Ic. Plant, t. 2 118. 
— Native of Malacca. 

T. QUINQUEFIDA, Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind.} vi. p. 20; Hook. Ic. Plant., 
t. 21 19.— Native of Malacca. 

T. WRAYI. Collabium Wrayi, Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind., v. p. 784 ; Hook. 
Ic. Plant., t. 2065. T. maculosa, Ridl. in Trans. Linn. Soc, ser. 2, ii. p. 374. 
— Native of the Malay Peninsula. 

T. secunda, Ridl. injourn. Linn. Soc, xxxi. p. 299 : Mater. Fl. Malay 
Renins., i. p. 190. — Native of the Malay Peninsula and Borneo. 

R. A. Rolfe. 



238 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912. 

THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 
By C. Alwyn Harrison, f.r.h.s. 
Cool House. 
As we are now experiencing- very hot weather, every effort must be made to 
keep the house cool and damp at all times. The rules for damping and 
watering given last month should still be followed, and a close inspection of 
every plant daily will be necessary. It will be found a great asset towards 
maintaining a cool atmosphere inside the house if the blinds are so 
arranged that a free current of air can circulate between them and the roof 
glass. This point may seem a needless expense to a novice, but the marked 
difference in the temperature of a house so fitted, with one where the 
blinds lay fiat upon the roof glass, can easily be discerned. Shade should 
be given from 9.30 a.m. until 3.30 p.m., or even later, if the house be so 
placed that it gets all the sun from midday onwards. If the atmosphere is 
allowed to get dry at any time, thrips will make their appearance. 
Immediately any are observed, fumigate in the evening, removing all 
plants which are in flower. Afford all possible ventilation, both during the 
day and at night. 

About this season, many local shows are held, and a group of Orchids is 
always a pleasing and often novel exhibit. Amateurs who put up small or 
large collections know how extremely useful the large branching spikes of 
Oncidiums and the Odontoglossum Edwardii hybrids are for a background. 
There are now many of the latter in existence, and most are cheap and soon 
grow into large specimens. Many, however, are inferior as to the size of 
the individual blooms, and the four undermentioned rank as the best: O. 
Clytie (Edwardii X Pescatorei), O. Dixoniae (Edwardii X luteopurpureum), 
O. Harrisonii (Edwardii X triumphans), and O. Thompsonianum 
(Edwardii X crispum). In all of them the O. Edwardii character 

Cattleya House. 

Here, again, the methods of culture described in my last month's 
article are needed, no radical changes being necessary until the close of the 
following month. There is one point, however, in Cattleya culture which 
may now be added. About four p.m. pull up the blinds and damp the 
house and stagings thoroughly, close all the ventilators, and leave the 
house thus till six p.m. Then give some air, and water any plants which 
would get too dry if left until the morning. I find that this method of 
culture considerably helps the plants to ripen their bulbs, and assists others 
which are in a different state of growth to push fresh roots, or to develop 
their new pseudobulbs. 

Vanda ccerulea should be remossed if this operation is necessary, this 



August, .912,] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 239 

month or the end of April being the best time. Be careful not to injure 
any of the aerial roots in the process, for, although thick, these are very 
brittle. Many should now be showing spikes, and must be well supplied 
with pure rain water, and sprayed overhead in the early morning. 

Any Stanhopeas which have finished flowering, and require fresh baskets, 
should now be attended to. Do not put any crocks in the bottom of the 
new receptacle, for they push their flower scapes down between their roots, 
and often from the bottom of the baskets. For compost, use a mixture of 
osmunda fibre and good fibrous peat, in equal parts, with some heads of 
living sphagnum moss. Keep them damp overhead, but do not give much 
water direct to the plants until they be°in to take hold of the new compost. 

This is now the usual blossoming season of many of the hybrids of 
Cattleya Warscewiczii (gigas) and Dowiana aurea, also of Laelia cinnabarina 
and purpurata, and amongst the best undoubtedly must be included C. 
Hardyana, C. Pittiaa, C. Rothschildiana, C. Octave Doin, Ladiocattleya 
Phoebe, L.-c. Hypatia, L.-c. G. S. Ball, and L.-c. eximia. Next month 
several important details will be dealt with. 

SugCxESTed Additions. 

Odoxtioda Vuylsteke^e. — This was the first member of this gorgeous 
bigeneric race which reached a flowering stage, and caused a great sensation 
on its appearance a few years ago. Since then many beautiful forms have 
appeared, of which Lady Colman, Crawshayana, and Marjorie Statham are 
the best. The typical variety has sepals and petals of a creamy white, 
almost wholly covered with scarlet blotches, and the lip yellow with red 
markings. This fine hybrid can now be procured at moderate cost, and 
together with O. Bradshawia; (O.R., xix. 135) and Charlesworthii, form a 
good selection for an amateur's Cool house. Odontioda Vuylsteke* is a 
hybrid between Cochlioda Noetzliana and Odontoglossum Pescatorei. 

ORCHID SPOT. 

We have received from a correspondent a leaf of Ladiocattleya rubens, 
which has decayed rapidly, the sender remarking that it has "gone off 
within the last ten days, beginning at the point and eating down a little 
each day." The house is said to have been shaded from all direct sunshine. 
We cannot detect the presence of any fungus mycelium, nor yet of any 
mechanical injury to the leaf itself, for the epidermis is uninjured, hence we 
suspect it to be some form of the disease known as Orchid spot, which is 
usually of a local character, and is often attributed to cold drip from the 
roof, particularly during the winter months. We should like to know if 
the remaining leaves on the plant remain healthy, also if other plants in 
the house are affected. We think that some cultural defect is generally 
the cause of this malady. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



;al 



LiELIOCATTLEYA LUSTRE VAR. LAVINGO. 

The annexed figure represents the beautiful Lseliocattleya Lustre var. 
Lavingo, which was exhibited by Lieut. -Col. Sir George L. Holford, 
K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander), at the recent Royal 
International Horticultural Exhibition, and to which a First-class 
Certificate was given, as recorded at page 194. It was derived from Lselio- 
cattleya callistoglossa X Cattleya Lueddemanniana, and as the first-named 
is descended from C. Warscewiczii and Laelia purpurata no more promising 




Fig. 32. La 



Li <y 



Lavin-.;o. 



combination could be imagined. The hybrid is of excellent shape, and the 
petals are broad, beautifully decurved, and of a bright rose-purple colour, 
while the lip is strongly undulate, and rich purple-crimson in front, with 
some paler colour between the veins, and some yellow and darker lines in 
the throat. The shape of the petals and lip, most recalls Cattleya 
Lueddemanniana. The photograph was taken by Mr. F. Waldock. On 
the opposite page is figured another seedling from the same capsule, affording 
a good example of the now well-known variation of secondary hybrids. 



August, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 241 

L/ELIOCATTLEYA LUSTRE VAR. BUDDHA. 

This is a second handsome variety of Laeliocattleya Lustre from the 
collection of Sir George L. Holford, which received an Award of Merit at 
the recent Royal International Horticultural Exhibition. Its history in 
other respects is identical with that of the one figured on the preceding 
page, with which it affords a very effective contrast. It has a broader, 
much more expanded lip, with some yellow on the sides of the throat, 
recalling Cattleya Warscewiczii in this respect. The sepals and petals are 




Fig- 53- La 



Lustre var. Bud 



also relatively more elongated and less decurved, and thus are more like those 
of the Laeliocattleya parent. The colour of the sepals and petals is rosy 
lilac, and that of the lip rich purple-crimson, with some light mottling and 
darker veining in front, some dark purple veining down the throat, and 
some white and yellow at the sides. Both are very handsome, and so 
diverse in general character that they might have passed as distinct hybrids 
without evidence of their origin. Another example of diversity in seedlings 
from the same capsule in Odontoglossum crispum is given on page 232. 



Hz THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912. 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR AUGUST. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill Gardens, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
The summer temperatures, as given in the May number, must still be 
maintained, and the remarks there made respecting watering, ventilation, 
and atmospheric moisture still hold good. 

The weather we have recently experienced has not been to the liking of 
heat-loving Orchids, and while it lasts it is advisable to keep a certain 
amount of heat in the pipes in all the warm houses, which will allow of a 
certain amount of air being given to them at all times. I am strongly of 
the opinion that many failures in the cultivation of Orchids is attributable 
to a stagnant atmosphere and faulty ventilation. 

The Odontoglossum house must still be kept as cool as possible, and 
during the continuance of wet, cold, and sunless weather ample ventilation 
be given, but should a spell of hot and dry weather prevail the top 



:itilat< >rs must be used > 



i copious dampings must be give 



Cattleyas, L.eliocattleyas, and allied subjects should be potted as 
previously advised whenever they get into the proper condition and are in 
need of it. Wherever these are grown in quantity there will be some that 
require attention, and with us very few weeks pass without some of these 
plants being repotted. To keep them in good health the compost must at 
all times be maintained in a sweet and healthy condition. 

Sophronitis grandiflora.— Plants of this species, now commencing 
to grow, may require repotting. They are best grown in shallow pans, 
which must be well drained, and suspended from the roof of the Cool house'. 
A thin layer of compost is all they need to root into. A similar compost to 
that used for Cattleyas will answer their requirements, but it is advisable 
to use it in smaller pieces, as this subject is a Cattleya in miniature. 
Water must be sparingly given until the flower buds appear, when the 
quantity can be increased. 

Sophrocattleyas and Sophrol^lias naturally require similar treat- 
■ several of them are beginning to grow, so that any necessary 



repotting should be done a 



) be pushing from 



the base of the pseudobulbs. These plants succeed in the same mat( 
Cattleyas, and are best grown suspended in a light and cool position in the 
Cattleya house. Plants that have not yet commenced to grow must be 
kept on the dry side, but on no account must they be allowed to suffer for 
want of water. These hybrids require very careful handling, as many of 
them have a very delicate constitution, and must be watered carefully at all 
times, as the leaves and growths will decay if the compost gets into a 
saturated condition. They comprise some of the most brilliant and highly- 
coloured flowers imaginable. 



August, , 9 i 2 .j THE ORCHID REVIEW. ui 

Epiphronitis Veitchii.— At the present time these plants are producing 

a number of aerial shoots from the flowering growths. Such growths should 
now be taken from the parent plant and potted several together, when they 
will form nice little specimens. This, like Sophronitis, is best grown in 
shallow pans, and delights in a fairly moist position, near the glass in the 
Cattleya house. It will succeed in the same compost as the Sophro- 
cattleyas. 

Dendrobiums of the nobile and Wardianum section must be examined 
ards the end of the month, and any that have completed their growth 



must be i 
held, 



> cooler ana aner quarters, but water must not be with- 
they be placed in too low a temperature. A temperature 
of about 6o°, with plenty of light and air, will answer their requirements 
for a few weeks to come. Dendrobiums that are growing freely must have 
liberal treatment, and every encouragement should be given to enable them 
to build up their growths as quickly as possible, whichever section they 
belong to. 

Calanthes in full growth may now have liberal supplies of water, and 
those which have tilled their pots with roots may be watered occasionally 
with weak liquid manure, but care must be taken that it is not over strong. 
These plants will now need plenty of heat, moisture, light, and air, and 
should be placed as near the roof glass as possible. The later-flowering 
section, such as C. Regmeri, must still be watered with discretion, especially 
if the roots have not reached the sides of the pots. 

Miltonia vexillaria.— Plants of this species which produced their 
flowers early in the season are now commencing to grow actively, and those 
in need of fresh rooting material should receive attention as soon as new 
roots are seen to be pushing from the base of the new growth. This month 
and next I consider to be the best time of the year to repot the early summer- 
flowering varieties of this most useful species. The autumn-flowering 
varieties, such as Leopoldii, superba, and rubella are best deferred until the 
spring. Being surface rooters, they are best grown in half pots or deep 
pans, and will succeed in a compost made up of equal parts of peat, osmunda 
and polypodium fibre, sphagnum moss, and clean sifted half-decayed oak 
Dughly mixed together. Water must be sparingly applied to 



them 



roots are seen to be entering the new compost freely. A 
3ist position in the Intermediate house, where they can be shaded from 
ong sunshine, will answer their requirements. 
Miltonia Bleuana and M. Hyeana are hybrids of M. vexillaria, and 
-plants need similar treatment, except that the position given should be 
little warmer. I grow them all in the same house, the hybrids at the 
rm end and M. vexillaria at the cool. The reason is that M. Roezlii, 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912- 

Owing to the large quantity of water these plants require when 
in full growth, they are best repotted every season, and, therefore, the plants 
must be placed in moderate- sized pans. 

COCHLIODAS and their hybrids.— Plants of Cochlioda Ncetzliana, C. 
valcanica, and C. sanguinea may also be repotted in the same kind of 
compost as that used for Miltonia vexillaria. A light position in the 
Odontoglossum house will suit them at all seasons. These plants, when 
crossed with the different Odontoglossums, have given us the beautiful 
Odontiodas, and those who saw the effect of these delightful Orchids in the 
various groups at the recent International Exhibition may well ask the 
question, What will they eventually become ? Although of such recent 

conditions as the parents. The plants are rather erratic in their time of 
growing and flowering, and, therefore, whenever it is seen that the new 
growth is about to push new roots, it is advisable to repot the plant, if it 
requires it. As these plants have very tine wiry roots, the compost should 

should be pressed firmly into the pots, and the plants must not be allowed 
to suffer for want of water at any time. Small pots or pans should only be 
used, as over-potting is most detrimental, the plants being unable to push 
through a thick body of compost. 

Trichopilias, sometimes called Pilumnas, are a most beautiful and 
easily-grown family of Orchids. T. nobilis and T. fragrans are two 
charming autumn-flowering Orchids which may be purchased cheaply, and 
are easily procurable. They flower profusely, and the flowers are very 
fragrant, and have lasting qualities when cut. They succeed and grow 
freely in a cool Intermediate house, suspended close to the roof, and are 
best accommodated in half pots, which should be well drained. They will 
also do well in the same compost as Miltonia vexillaria. They should 
receive copious supplies of water during their season of growth, but when 
the growths are developed and matured only sufficient moisture to keep the 
pseudobulbs plump and the roots in a sound healthy condition is necessary, 
T. suavis, T. marginata, T. Backhouseana, and any others that have 
flowered, and are pushing new growths, may be repotted, should it be 
necessary, whenever the young growths are about to push new roots. 

Pleiones.— In the Cattleya house the Pleiones will now be completing 
their new growths, and, therefore, will need more light and ventilation. 
Give them sufficient water to keep the compost moist, there being no 
necessity to dry them to induce them to flower. The cool-growing varieties, 
as P. humilis and P. Hookeriana, will require liberal and frequent supplies 
of water until their growths are completed. The position most suitable to 
them is one close to the roof ventilators of the Cool house. 



August, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 245 

Odontoglossums.— Two little favourite Odontoglossums, namely, O. 
Rossii and O. Cervantesii, may have now any necessary attention as 
regards repotting. They prefer small pans, and should not be pulled to 
pieces more than is necessary to make them into shapely masses when 
repotting takes place. The whole of this family may be gone through as 
they get into the desired condition. The compost recommended for 
Miltonias, will answer their requirements. Odontoglossum hybrids have 
reached such numbers, and such complicated parentage, that it is obvious 
that many of them require some thought and judgment to satisfy their little 
peculiarities, which I cannot attempt to give in detail, so I advise every 
grower to carefully observe how his plants succeed under the different 
conditions they are placed in, by these means he will be able to satisfy the 
requirements of the most fastidious. 

General remarks.— The present month affords a suitable time for the 
overhauling of the heating apparatus, and putting the same in good working 
order for the winter. A careful examination should be made of all joints, 
and any that leak must be made good. The valves and air taps should also 
be examined and put in thorough working order. Boilers that are old and 
worn should be replaced with new ones while the weather is favourable for 
such work, being then done without much risk of injury to the plants. 
Faulty boilers generally break down when the weather is severe, and then 
there is always a risk of considerable harm being done to the plants. 

The usual routine of cleaning, potting, &c, will comprise the principal 
work for the month. Towards the end of the month a general preparation 
must be made for putting the different plants into their winter quarters, and 
the glass should be thoroughly cleansed to admit as much light as possible 
during the dark days of winter. 

THE HOLLAND HOUSE SHOW. 

The Summer Show of the Royal Horticultural Society was held at Holland 
House, Kensington, on July 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, and brought together a very 
fine display. The number of visitors was also very large at the outset, when 
the weather was bright and fine, though later on the attendance was limited 
by incessant rain. The Orchids on this occasion were mostly staged in one 
of the side tents, and included several very fine groups. The awards 
consisted of two Gold and five other Medals, two Silver Cups, three First- 
class Certificates, four Awards of Merit, and one Certificate of Appreciation, 
while two other Medals were given partly for Orchids. 

Orchid Committee present : Sir Harry J. Veitch (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., W. Waters 
Butler, A. McBean, Clive Cookson, W. Thompson, G. F. Moore. H. G. 
Alexander, E. Ashworth, R. G. Thwaites, W. P. Bound, T. Armstrong, 



246 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 191 2. 

Stuart Low, Walter Cobb, R. A. Rolfe, J. Wilson Potter, Gurney Wilson, 
W. H. Hatcher, W. Bolton, and H. J. Chapman. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park (gr. Mr. J. Collier), staged a 
large and very beautiful group, to which a Gold Medal was awarded. It 
contained many good Lseliocattleyas, Odontoglossums and Odontiodas, one 
brilliant scarlet form of Odontioda Bradshawiae bearing four spikes, the 
best having six branches and forty flowers, O. Papilio, examples of Cochlioda 
Ncetzliana, Dendrobium Victoria-Regina, the brilliant scarlet D. arachnites, 
and the rare z\ustralian D. monophyllum, Oncidium macranthum, Bulbo- 
phyllum grandiflorum with five flowers, Cirrhopetalum pulchrum, Maxillaria 
vexillaria radiata, Angraecum Eichlerianum, Anguloa virginalis, Odonto- 
glossum Phcebe, O. armainvillierense xant otes, and O. crispum, Brassia 
keiliana and longissima, Broughtonia sanguinea, Cattleya Rex, C. 
Harrisoniana alba, C. Mossiae Wageneri, Epidendrum alatum, Sobralia 
xanthroleuca, Eulophia euglossa, Cypripedium superbiens, Nanodes 
Medusae, Ladiocattleya Sunrise and Phcebe, Masdevallia melanoxantha, M. 
calura, M. Doris, and various other interesting and showy Orchids of the 
season. The group was very effectively arranged. 

J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis), 
staged some fine Orchids in a background of Selaginellas, the latter 
containing most of the commonly cultivated species. The Orchids included 
a fine specimen of Anguloa Cliftonii with three flowers, Cattleya Mossias 
Wageneri, C. M. Arnoldiana, C. Warscewiczii, three fine plants of 
Cypripedium callo-Rothschildianum, Odontonia Lairessese, Odontioda 
loochristiensis, some good forms of Odontoglossum crispum and Pescatorei, 
a well-blotched O. amabile X eximium, O. percultum, O. armainvillierense 
with a branched spike of about fifty flowers, and a very fine O. a. xanthotes, 
with a few others. A Gold Medal was awarded for Orchids and 
Selaginellas. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), received 
a Silver Cup for a fine group of Cattleyas, Lael iocattleyas Odonto- 

Aphrodite, L.-c. Cowanii, Cattleya Mossiae, two plants of C. M. Wageneri 
C. Mendelii, C. Thurgoodiana, Lselia tenebrosa, Odontiod;i Charlesworthii 
a number of blotched Odontoglossums, forms of O. crispum and others 

Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford, K.C.Y.O.. Westonbirt (gr Mr H G 
Alexander), sent a few beautiful specimens, including the richlv-coloured 
Cattleya Warscewiczii Othello, and the variety Frau Melanie Bevrodt 
having white sepals and petals and a bright rose-coloured lip. Two'other 
fine things are mentioned under Awards. 

J. S. Moss, Esq., Wintershill, Bishops Waltham (gr. Mr. Kench), sent 
a pretty hybrid from Odontoglossum crispum and O. Othello. 



August, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 247 

F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., The Shrubbery, Oxford (gr. Mr. W. Balmforth), 
sent a richly-coloured Odontioda Lambeauiana, Odontoma Lairesseae with 
a fine panicle, and a beautiful specimen of Odontoglossum crispum. 

Messrs. Charles worth & Co., Hay wards Heath, staged a magnificent 
group, to which a Gold Medal was awarded. The centre consisted of 
about sixty fine examples of Phalsenopsis amabilis Rimestadiana, round 
which were arranged a lot of the brilliant Epidendrum vitellinum, and a 
curved line of Brassavola Digbyana, bearing a dozen flowers, with 
Miltonias and other dwarf things along the front. The group also contained 
many excellent Odontoglossums, including O. citrosmum roseum, fine 
forms of O. eximium, O. Harryanum, O. Scottii (oakwoodiense X armain- 
villierense), white, with a large red-brown blotch on the sepals and lip, 
forms of O. crispum, percultum, Lambeauianum, hibernicum, armain- 
villierense, Jasper, and others, good examples cf Vanda coerulea, the rare 
V. Charlesworthii, Anguloa Ruckeri, some good Renanthera Imschootiana, 
Odontioda Latona (Odontoglossum spectabile X Odontioda Bradshawise), 
a richly-coloured form with darker blotches, O. rosefieldiensis, Bradshawiaa, 
and Charlesworthii, Aerides japonicum and expansum, Sobralia macrantha 
alba, Oncidium macranthum, a fine plant of O. Claesii, some good O. 
Lanceanum, Peristeria elata, a specimen of Cryptophoranthus Dayanus 
crowded with flowers, Brassocattleya Leemanniae, fine examples of 
Oncidioda Charlesworthii, Cybele, and Penelope, specimens of Epidendrum 
prismatocarpum, good examples of Cochlioda Ncetzliana, Gongora 
leucochila, a handsome Cypripedium Edithae, C. caudatum and the 
anomalous form known as Uropedium Lindenii, Masdevallias, Maxillaria 
tenuifolia, Dendrobium Dearei, a fine Cattleya Mossiae Wageneri, C. 
Germania, and other good Cattleyas, with some brilliant Laeliocattleyas, 
noteworthy among them being L.-c. Ceres var. Princess Mary, bearing 
a spike of eight brilliant yellow flowers with ruby red lip, with many good 
examples of Miltonia vexillaria, Bleuana and Hyeana, and others. 

Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, included a lot of good Orchids 
in the centre of a magnificent group of Stove and Greenhouse plants, to 
which a Gold Medal was awarded. The Orchids included many beautiful 
examples of Odontoglossums and Laeliocattleyas, noteworthy among the 
latter being some good L.-c. Canhamiana and its varieties alba and Rex, 
also L.-c. Python, a bright yellow form with crimson lip, Cattleya Mossiae 
Wageneri with five blooms, C. Warscewiczii Sanderiana, Dendrobium 
Dearei, Vanda ccerulea, Disa Luna, Oncidium leucochilum and praetextum, 
Odontioda Lambeauiana, Bradshawiae, and Thwaitesii, Promenaea xanthina, 
Phaius Norman, and other showy things. 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, E. Yorks, received a Silver Cup 
for a very fine and artistically arranged group, in the form of an undulating 



2*8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 191 2. 

bank, including a brilliant series of Lseliocattleyas, among which L.-c. 
bletchleyensis var. King George was conspicuous by its large and finely 
shaped flowers, with bronzy rose sepals and petals, and claret-coloured lip 
with darker veining, also L.-c. Martinetii, and many fine L.-c. Canhamiana, 
some good Miltonias, including the beautiful white variety Lambeauiana 
with a nine-flowered spike, M. Bleuana var. laekenensis, Cattleya 
Dupreana, C. Felicity (Vulcan x Dowiana aurea), some good C. Mossise 
and Warscewiczii, Ccelogyne pandurata and Dayana, a few good 
Dendrobium Lowii, revolutum, Dearei, and Sanders, Masdevallia 
ephippium, Cirrhopetalum pulchrum, Cypripedium Chas. J. Catt 
(Godefroyse leucochilum X Chamberlainianum), a very prettily spotted 
flower, C. Volonteanum, Epidendrum nemorale, Oncidium pumilum, and 
Gardneri, Trichopilia Backhouseana, Promenaea xanthotes, a fine plant of 
Renanthera Imschootiana, Vanda coerulea, Odontioda Cupid, Charles- 
worthii, Leeana, and others, Physosiphon Loddigesii, many fine Odonto- 
glossum crispum, O. spectabile, O. Williamsianum, O. hastilabium, 
Brassolaelia Helen, Brassocattleya Leemanniae, Rhynchostylis retusa, and 
other good things. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged a large and interesting group, 
including some fine Cattleyas, noteworthy among them being C. Mendelii 
alba. C. Mossia: Queen Mary, C. M. Reineckeana, and some good C. 
Warscewiczii, Vanda teres, Miltonia Warscewiczii and vexillaria, Acineta 
Humboldtii, Ccelogyne aspersa, Oncidium sarcodes, pulvinatum, Kramer- 
ianum, macranthum, and pulchellum, Epidendrum trachychilum, 
Bulbophyllum Dayanum, B. galbinum, the rare Gongora bufonia, 
Cirrhaea viridipurpurea, Promenaea xanthina, Scuticaria Hadwenii, 
Angraecum Scottii, Lama tenebrosa Walton Grange var., Lycaste Deppei' 
Chysis Sedenii, Cypripedium bellatulum and niveum, Masdevallia 
campyloglossa, calura, simula, trichaete, Dendrobium Dearei, thyrsiflorum, 
formosum, and aurantiacum, Cochlioda sanguinea, Odontoglossum 
cordatum, Williamsianum, platychilum, and others, Miltonia Bleuana, 
M. vexillaria, M. Roezlii alba, and other interesting things (Silver-gilt 
Flora Medal). 5 

Mr. H. Dixon, Spencer Park Nursery, Wandsworth, staged a good 
group, including examples of Odontoglossum illustrissimum Solon 
laudatum, and Fascinator, Odontioda loochristiensis and Diana, Cattleya 
Vvarscewiczn and C. Mossi* Wageneri, with some good Laeliocattleya 
Cowami and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

. Mr. S. Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, staged a very interesting 
group, including examples of Anguloa Clowesii, Bollea Lalindei Brassa 
vola Digbyana and Perrinii, Lycaste Deppei, Epidendrum radiatum 
Lama purpurata, Polystachya pubescens, Pleurothallis Scapha Bulbo- 



August, i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 249 

phyllum saurocephalum, three plants of Cochlioda Floryi, Cypripedium 
Curtisii, C. callosum Sanderse and C. niveum, Microstylis commelynifolia, 
Odontoglossum Clytie, O. crispum, Cattleya Mossiae, C. Mendelii, and 
others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Mr. W. J. Biggs, North Enfield, showed Cattleya Mossiae alba Bigg's 
var., a very fine albino, with broad segments. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Hayvvards Heath, sent a small group, 
including Cattleya Mossiae Reineckeana, C. M. Wageneri Vale Bridge var., 
C. Madame Myra Peeters, C. Dietrichiana, Coelogyne pandurata, Cypri- 
pedium callosum Sanders and C. FAnsonii, Laliocattleya Norba, 
Bulbophyllum Lobbii, and a few others. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent Cattleya Warscewiczii 
Gladiator, a richly-coloured form, and Maxillaria vexillaria rotunda, a 
finely-shaped variety. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, sent a small group, including Bollea 
Lalindei, Catasetum tenebrosum, Ancistrochilus Thomsonianus, Epiden- 
drum auritum, Trichoglottis philippinensis, a good example of Dendrobium 
regium, Miltonia Bleuana, a fine M. vexillaria Lambeauiana with four 
spikes, Laeliocattleya Isabel Sander (C. Mossifc Reineckeana X L.-c. 
Canhamiana Rex), having white sepals and petals and a richly-coloured lip, 
L.-c. Martinetii Vesuvius, L.-c. Ceres, and the richly-coloured Odontioda 
Bradshawiae var. Ruby. 

Silver Lixdley Medal. 
Cattleya Warscewiczii var. Lowii.— A remarkably fine specimen, 
bearing six racemes and an aggregate of twenty-two very richly-coloured 
flowers. The plant had already received a First-class Certificate, and the 
above award was given to mark the excellent culture. Exhibited by Lieut.- 
Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O. 

First-class Certificates. 
Cattleya Artemis (Iris X Gaskelliana).— A charming flower of 
excellent shape, with rose-pink sepals and petals, and the lip intense ruby- 
crimson in front, with purple-red lines on the yellow disc of the lip. 
Exhibited by Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 

Cattleya Dupreana The Dell var. (Warned X Warscewiczii).— A 
remarkably fine form of this handsome hybrid, having bright rose sepals 
and petals, and the lip deep ruby crimson in front, with a bright yellow- 
disc. Exhibited by Baron Bruno Schroder, The Dell, Egham (gr. Mr. J. 
E. Shill). 

Miltonia Hyeaxa var. Le Conquerant (vexillaria X Bleuana).— A 
very beautiful white form, flushed with rosy lilac at the base of the petals, 
and having a deep purple butterfly-like blotch at the base of the lip. 
Exhibited by M. Jules Hye de Crom, Ghent (gr. M. Coen). 



250 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912 

Awards of Merit. 
Brassocattleya Marion (parentage unrecorded).— A beautiful hybrid, 
having blush pink sepals and petals, and the broad lip darker, well fringed, 
and flaked with purple on the front lobe. Exhibited by Messrs. James 
Veitch & Sons. 

Cattleya Thurgoodiana var. Apollo (Hardyana X Lueddemanniana). 
—A handsome form, with rose-purple sepals and petals, and the front lobe 
of the lip deep purple-crimson. Exhibited by Messrs. Stuart Low & Co. 

L.eliocattleya rubens var. The Kaiser (L. pumila X C. Hardyana). 
—A brilliantly-coloured form, having large and well-shaped blooms, with 
bright rose-coloured sepals and petals, and the lip dark purple with a deep 
yellow disc. Exhibited by E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford. 

Odontoglossum percultum var. King George (armainvillierense X 
Rolfeae).— A large and handsome form, having the flowers white, copiously 
blotched with purple. Exhibited by F. M. Ogilvie, Esq., The Shrubbery, 
Oxford (gr. Mr. W. Balmforth). 

Certificate of Appreciation. 
Odontonia Edna (Miltonia Warscewiczii X Odontoglossum Wilcke- 
anum). — A striking form, most like the former in shape, and bearing a 
branched spike of flowers, blotched with orange-brown on the sepals and 
petals, Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
A meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society was held at the Royal 
Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, on July 16th, when the 
feature of the meeting was a magnificent albino of Cattleya Warscewiczii, 
exhibited by M. Firmin Lambeau (see Awards). 

Orchid Committee present: J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), W. Bolton, J. Wilson Potter, C. H. Curtis, 
A. Dye, H. G. Alexander, J. E. Shill, W. H. Hatcher, J. Charlesworth, 
T. Armstrong, F. Sander, W. Thompson, Gurney Wilson, W. H. White, 
Stuart Low, and F. J. Hanbury. 

R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Chessington, Streatham (gr. Mr. Black), received 
a Silver Banksian Medal for a choice group of Orchids, including good 
examples of Lasliocattleya rubens and Ingramii, the white Miltonia vexillaria 
Queen Alexandra, Odontoglossum Rolfeae and Harryanum, and some fine 
forms of Odontioda Thwaitesii and Charlesworthii. 

F. J. Hanbury, Esq., Brockhurst, East Grinstead, showed Brassocattleya 
Faith (Brassavola Perrinii X Cattleya Leopoldii), an interesting novelty, 
most like the former in shape, and having pale green sepals and petals, 
marked with purple, and a blush white lip with some rose-coloured spots. 



August, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 251 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford (gr. Mr. W. H. White), 

showed Laeliocattleya Adolph-Harrisoniae (L.-c. Adolphus X Harrisoniana), 

having cream-white flowers spotted with purple, and Eria rhynchostyloides, 
bearing three spikes of flowers. 

Baron Bruno Schroder, The Dell, Egham (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill), showed 
Cattleya Hardyana, The Dell var., a very large and richly-coloured form. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a fine group, including 
examples of Cattleya Mendelii, Dendrobium fimbriatum oculatum, Dalhous- 
leanum, and bicameratum, Oncidium macranthum and others, a fine plant 
of Bulbophyllum Ericssonii, Ccelogyne aspersa, Stanhopea tigrina, Disa 
grandiflora, Phalsenopsis Aphrodite, Brassia verrucosa, Miltonia Bleuana, 
and some good Odontoglossums, Odontiodas and Masdevallias (Silver 
Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, sent a few choice things, 
including Dendrobium amethystoglossum with two spikes, Eulophia 
guineensis, and Habenaria Susanna. 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, sent good examples of Cattleya 
Thurgoodiana and Laeliocattleya rubens. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, showed Odontoglossum crispum 
Formidable, a very fine white form, tinged with rose, and bearing an occa- 
sional spot on the segments and a brown blotch on the lip. 

First-class Certificate and Gold Medal. 
Cattleya Warscewiczii alba Firmin Lambeau. — A very beautiful 
variety, having pure white flowers, with a pale yellow disc to the lip. 
Exhibited by M. Firmin Lambeau, Brussels (gr. M. de Munter). 
Awards of Merit. 
Odontoglossum Epicaste (Clytie x crispum).— A striking form, 
having dark chocolate flowers, with rosy tips and margins to the segments, 
and the crest ot the lip yellow. Exhibited by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co. 
Zvgopetalum Brewii (Perrenoudii x rostratum).— A showy thing, 
having green sepals and petals tinged with purple, and the lip rosy carmine, 
with a broad white margin, and a blue crest. Exhibited by Messrs. 
Charlesworth & Co. 

At the 

Commendation. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Sir Harry J. Veitch, Sir Jeremiah Colman, 
J. Charlesworth, W. H. Hatcher, J. E. Shill, A. Dye, W. H. White, Gurney 
Wilson, de Barri Crawshay, F. J. Hanbury, R. G. Thvvaites, F. Sander, 
T. Armstrong, and C. J. Lucas. 



252 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, 1912. 

H. T. Pitt, Esq., Rosslyn, Stamford Hill (gr. Mr. Thurgood), 
received a Silver Flora Medal for a choice group, including three good 
specimens of the beautiful Cattleya Warscewiczii Frau Melanie Beyrodt, 
C. Dowiana aurea, C. Source d'Or (Forbesii X Pittiana), Angracum 
Scottianum, Bulbophyllum barbigerum, Odontioda Charlesworthii, Chon- 
drorhyncha Chestertonii, Brassolaelia Helen, Cypripedium Maudiae, C. 
Richmanii, and others. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), received a 
Silver Banksian Medal for a select group, including Vanda Sanderiana 
Borlases var., a large and richly-coloured form, Odontioda Cooksoniae with 
two spikes, Odontoglossum Harryanum, O. armainvillierense with a six- 
branched spike, the charming O. a. xanthotes, and Cattleya Rex with 

De Barri Crawshay, Esq., Rosefield, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Stables), sent 
Odontoglossum Ethelreda (Edwardii x triumphans), a reddish chocolate 
flower with a pink margin to the lip, and a fine form of O. Jasper. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a fine group, in- 
cluding examples of Dendrobium Dalhousieanum and Falconeri, Vanda 
ccerulea, Disa grandiflora, Cycnoches maculatum, Brassocattleya Maroniaj, 
Masdevallia vexillaria Lambeauiana and Queen Alexandra, Cattleya 
Warscewiczii granulosa and Thurgoodiana, Masdevallia simula, calura and 
peristeria, Odontoglossum Uroskinneri album and others, Renanthera 
Imschootiana, Oncidium macranthum, varicosum, &c. (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a choice group, 
including a fine specimen of Grammangis Ellisil, Brassavola Digbyana, 
Miltonia vexillaria superba, Dendrobium filiforme, Bulbophyllum sauro- 
cephalum, Stanhopea oculata, Habenaria Susannae, Cattleya Warscewiczii, 
and Odontioda Madeline, the latter a handsome deep red form, with much 
light veining all round the lip (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a choice group, inclu- 
ding some finely grown Cochlioda Ncetzliana, Cattleya Gaskelliana alba, 
C. Hardyana, Miltonia vexillaria superba, Odontioda Charlesworthii and 
Diana, Dendrobium Dearei, and some good hybrid Odontoglossums (Silver 
Banksian Medal). 

Mr. S. Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, staged a select group, in- 
cluding Warscewiczella discolor, a good Anguloa uniflora, Bulbophyllum 
cocoinum with three spikes, Maxillaria rufescens, and a good Cattleya Gas- 
kelliana alba (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, sent Lseliocattleya Mauretania 
(Martinetii X Canhamiana), a beautiful novelty, having blush-white sepals 
and petals, tinged and veined with lilac, and a violet-purple lip with a 
paler margin. 



August, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 253 

^ Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, sent Brassocattleya Thetis 
(B. Digbyana X C. Aclandia), having greenish sepals and petals, and a 
broad lip suffused with rose on the front lobe. 

Cultural Commendation. 
Cypripedium W. R. Lee (superbiens X Rothschildianum),-To Mr. 
W. H. White, Orchid grower to Sir Trevor Lawrence, K.C.V.O., Burford, 
for a finely-grown specimen, bearing five spikes and thirteen flowers. 

Manchester and North of England Orchid. 
The first meeting of the 1912-1913 Session was held at the Coal Exchange, 
Manchester, on Thursday, July nth, 1912, the members of Committee 
present being: Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), Messrs. R. Ashworth, 
H. Thorp, J. C. Cowan, D. McLeod, J. Bamber, C. Parker, Z. A. Ward V 
J. Keeling, W. Holmes, A. Warburton, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), was awarded a Large 
Silver Medal for a mixed group of Odontoglossums in variety, including O. 
cnspum xanthotes, armainvillierense, and several fine seedlings ; Miltonia 
vexillaria Sunbeam and Fairy Queen, Cypripedium niveum, Godefroy*, 
and callosum Sanders, Cattleya Gaskelliana and Mendelii, and the rare 
Oncidium abortivum. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 
Silver Medal for a group of Cattleya Gaskelliana, including alba, C. Mendelii 
Duchess of York, C. gigas, C. Maronii, Ladiocattleya callistoglossa, 
Epidendrum vitellinum, and Odontoglossum Masereelianum. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton, was awarded a Silver Medal for a group, 
composed principally of Cattleya Gaskelliana, including delicata and alba, 
several forms of C. gigas, Miltonia vexillaria, the variety chelseiensis being 
good, and Oncidium Papilio. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le- Moors, was awarded a Bronze Medal 
for a group of Cypripediums, including Curtisii giganteum, Stanley 
Rogerson, tixallense, Gowerianum, Burtonii, Lawrenceanum, and Argus X 
Mastursianum. 

R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), staged Cattleya 
Thurgoodiana Marlfield var. and Lasliocattleya Pauline. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged Cypripedium 
Alfred Sladden, and Odontoglossum Lambeauianum, O. amabile X 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, staged Miltonia Hyeana, M. 
vexillaria Queen Alexandra alba, and Cattleya Thurgoodiana grandis. 
First-class Certificate. 

Laeliocattleya callistoglossa splendens Marlfield var., a large well-set 
flower with brilliantly-coloured lip ; exhibited by R. le Doux, Esq. 



THE ORCHID RJ 



Odontoglossum Miss Arline King qxirentage unknown >. and Laeliocattleya 
Purple Queen (L.-c. Iona X C. granulosa) ; both from R. le Doux, Esq. 
Cattleya Gaskelliana delicata; from J. McCartney, Esq. 
Sophrolaelia Leda (L. pumila X S.-J. Gratrixiae) : from Messrs. Stuart 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

Three interesting flowers are sent from the collection of G. Hamilton- 
Smith, Esq., Finchley, by Mr. Coningsby. A dark-coloured seedling, from 
Cattleya Schilleriana X C. Warscewiczii, is a form of C. Edwardii {Orchid 
Stud-Book, p. 54). It is most like the former in shape, but has broader, 
red-purple segments, with some darker spots, and a deeply three-lobed, 
rich purple lip. Another is a seedling from C. granulosa aurea X Ladia 
xanthina, and is a form of Laeliocattleya Robinii (0. S.-B., p. 112). It is 
most like the Cattleya parent in shape, and has very light greenish sepals 
and petals, as are also the side lobes of the deeply three-lobed lip, while the 
obovate, stalked front lobe is light purple. It is very distinct and pretty. 
The third is C. Rex, from a raceme of three flowers. 

A flower of a brightly-coloured and very promising seedling is sent from 
the establishment of Mr. C. Karthaus, Potsdam, Germany, by Mr. R. 
Blossfeld. It was derived from Laeliocattleya elegans X Cattleya Trianae. 
It is most like the latter in shape, and rosy purple in colour, with a nearly 
entire lip. Flowers of another seedling are sent whose parents are no v . 
known, but it is suggested that they may have been Cattleya velutina and 
C. Leopoldii. They are most like the former in general character, and the 
short rounded side lobes of the lip are quite in agreement, but the segments 
are more elongated, and the front lobe of the lip considerably broader, so 
that such a parentage seems extremely likely. The colour had rather faded 
when the flower reached us. 

A flower of Brassocattleya Thetis (Brassavola Digbyana X Cattleya 
Aclandise), which was exhibited at the last R.H.S. meeting, is sent by 
Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea. The sepals and petals are most 
like the Cattleya parent in shape, but are not widely expanded, as in that, 
and their colour is light yellowish green, with a tinge of brown, and souk: 
narrow brownish lines on the sepals. The lip is distinctly three-lobed, with 
ample rounded white side lobes, a light yellow disc, and a broad, slightly 
fringed, rose-pink front lobe, which is rather deeply notched at the apex. 

A curious flower of a seedling is sent from the collection of E. F. Clark, 
Esq., Evershot, Dorset. It was obtained by crossing Ladia cinnabarina 
with the pollen of Laeliocattleya Ballii, and thus is three-fourths derived 
from the latter, to which it bears a considerable resemblance. It has, how- 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 255 

r hp, and much paler sepals and petals. A second 
J of doubtful parentage is also sent, which has much 
of the L. cinnabarina character, both in the shape and colour of the flower, 
and in having long reddish pseudobulbs. It may be a form of Lasliocattleva 
Oliver! (O.R., xvi. p. 187). 

OPHRYS HYBRIDS. 

With reference to the Ophrys hybrids noted at page 199, M. Fernand 
Denis, Balaruc-les-Bains, the raiser, writes: "Of the twenty-three 
hybrids obtained from O. tenthredinifera X aranifera sixteen have 
flowered." He also sends a copy of the Revue Horticole containing an 
account of the hybrid, by M. Camus, with figures (pp. 226, 227, fig. 72). M. 
Denis also states that he has this year flowered three artificial hybrids 
between Ophrys lutea and O. aranifera, which differ from O. quadriloba, 
described by M. Camus, and which the latter considers to be a natural 
hybrid between these two species. He hopes that when the plants flower 
next year the question may be definitely settled. With respect to Ophrys 
bombyhflora, which is rare in France, and which had not previously been 
recorded from the province of Herault, he remarks that he found a colony 
of about a hundred plants in a wild state, and in the same locality he found 
Ophrys litigiosa var. virescens, Camus, which is new to the Department. 
We hope that M. Denis will continue his experiments with Ophrys, and 
we particularly wish that he would raise a batch of seedlings from O. 
arachnites and O. aranifera. In making this suggestion we have in mind 
the remarkable series of O. aranifera (so-called) figured by M. Barla. 

R. A. R. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

Two meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the 
Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during August, on 
the 13th and 27th, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual 
hour, 12 o'clock noon. 

The first meeting of the 1912-1913 Session of the Manchester and 
North of England Orchid Society will be held at the Coal Exchange, 
Manchester, on August 22nd. The Committee meets at noon, and the 
exhibits are open to inspection of members and the public from 1 to 4 p.m. 

The following are the Competitions for the coming year :— 

The President's Cup (S. Gratrix, Esq.), and a prize to the Gardener, 
for groups and individual plants. 

O. O. Wrigley's Gold Medal, and a Silver-gilt Medal to the Gardener, 
for Cypripediums. 



256 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [August, ,912. 

Z. A. Ward's Gold Medal, and a prize to the Gardener, for Lselias, 
Cattleyas, and their hybrids. 

Cypher's Gold Medal, for general excellence, and Sander prizes, for 
groups. 



ORCHID PORTRAITS. 

Cattleya Artemis.— Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. p. 65, fig. 31. 

Cattleya gigas Low's var.— Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 512, with fig. 

Cattleya Warscewiczii alba Firmin Lambeau.— Gard. Mag., 1912, 
PP- 549. 562, with fig. 

Cypripedium Lawrenceanum (a group ol).—Journ. Hort., 1912. ii. p 
81, with fig. 

Dendrobium Apollo albens.-#«>. Hort. Beige, July 15th, 1912 
Suppl., with fig. 

L.eliocattleva Baroness Emma. —Gard. Chron., 1912. ii. p. 23, fig. 10 

L^liocattleya Fascinator-Mossle.— Rev. Hort. Beige, July 15th 
19 1 2, Suppl. with fig. 

L.eliocattleya Lustre var. Buddha.— Rev. Hort. Beige, July 15th 
1912, Suppl., with fig. 

L.eliocattleya rubens The Kaiser.— Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. pp. 17 
5i, fig- 25. 

Odontoglossum amabile Westonbirt var.— Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. p 
42, fig. 20. 

Odontoglossum Pescatorei Chaklesworthil— Rev. Hort. Beige 
July 15th, 1912, Suppl. with fig. 

Odontoma Edna.— Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. pp. 17, 36, fig. 18. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



R. B— Cattleya Leopoldii. The original C. 
W. C— Maxillaria tenuifolia. 



page 144 was inserted upside doi 



De B. C. ; A. A. McB. ; F. H. M. 



Lond™ ^cVnl^L^TJ^ ^"cultural and Horticultural Association, 92, Long Acre, 
\l^^ C Sm^r^ Ind0 ° r GarJenS ' * T - W " SanderS ' Sa Price one 



Vol. XX., No. 237/ THE SEPTEMBER, i 9 i 2 . 

ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 
Contents. 

Amateur's Collection 270 1 Orchid Notes and News X 

Answers to Correspondents 28S g | 

Calendar of Operations for September ... 274 Orchids in season " ?R e 

um Baronin Schey 265 Our Note Book *£ 



Cypripediu 



Pollen, us< 



Dendrobium nobile Rappartianum ... 27^ 
Evolution of the Orchidaceae 260 Societies- 
Exporting Orchids by post 269 Birmingham Botanical and H 



Quinquennial 259 Manchester and North oV England Orchid 282 

Royal Horticultural 277 



Hybridist 

_ Oncidioda Cook; 

hys O'Brienian 

Odontoglossum, leaf spot of 267 Dendrobium 



)ntoglossum, leaf spot of 
PRICE SIXPENCE MONTHLY. Post 



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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

In recent issues we have published the programme of the Special Orchk 
Show and Conference to be held by the Royal Horticultural Society 01 
November 5th and 6th next (pp. 190, 230), and we hope that our reader: 
will do their best to make the event a success. The Orchid Conferena 
held in 1885 was one of the most successful events in the Society's history 
and although twenty-seven years have since elapsed, some of us have still i 
vivid recollection of the magnificent show of Orchids brought together or 
that occasion. The event took place in May, which is probably the mosi 
suitable time of year for an Orchid Show, but since that period there has 
been such an enormous accession of autumn-flowering Orchids, chiefly from 
the hands of the hybridist, that there is all the materials for a magnificent 
display. We may also mention in this connection the re-discovery of the 
two " lost Orchids," Cattleya labiata and Cypripedium Fairrieanum, for 
both are autumn flowers, which have produced a series of very useful and 
beautiful hybrids. It would have bt 
classes for these two species and the 
for such an addition, as the arrange 
the matter here, and intend to put ii 
practical suggestion. 

It will have been noticed that there is a series of very interesting com- 
petitive classes, and some of them quite small, so that we hope to see them 
better utilised than in the case of the recent International Horticultural 
Exhibition, which was one of the most disappointing features of a magnifi- 
cent Show. Everyone seemed to have devoted their energies to staging 
miscellaneous groups for effect, and the result was that special classes, 
including those for culture, were almost neglected. At the coming Show 
there are a few classes for effectively-arranged groups of Orchids, but we 
hope they will not completely overshadow the rest of the Exhibition, 
especially as others are provided for definite subjects and for specimen 
plants. The special class for northern growers should attract some of those 
who live at a distance from London. The Conference itself should provide 





ting to have had additional 


r hybrids, 


and there may still be time 


aents are 1 


™t complete. We mention 


forward i 


n the proper quarter as a 



^ 8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 19.2. 

numerous subjects for discussion, and we anticipate a particularly interest- 
It has not escaped the observation of some of our critical correspondents 
that two distinct names for a new hybrid between Odontoglossum Edwardii 
and O. triumphans appeared in our last issue, namely, O. Harrisonii (p. 238) 
and O. Ethelreda (p. 252), and the event has led to an interesting corres- 
pondence. It appears that O. Harrisonii flowered in December last, but for 
some reason was not then recorded, and at the R.H.S. meeting held on July 
30th last, the same hybrid appeared under the name of O. Ethelreda, and 
secured slightly earlier publication in the report of the meeting. Thus 
O. Ethelreda should be adopted as the correct name, by virtue of its earlier 
publication. A correspondent remarks : " It matters not how lorn* you 
keep a plant in your private knowledge under a name ; it is when it is first 
shown or published that it assumes its name. Before then it is unknown, 
except to the raiser, and if he keeps it private that is his fault." But it is 
not enough to show the plant, he must also see that it is clearly recorded, 
or he may have the misfortune to see his name superseded by some later 
production which happens to catch the reporter's eye ; of which examples 
could easily be pointed out. It might be added that the name must also 
be in correct form, a detail which does not affect the present case. And 
now, having established the sacred principle of priority of publication we 
shall hope to see it applied to cases where it is not a matter of days, bu't of 
months, and even years earlier that certain names were published which 
are still generally ignored. 

Another question that has been raised concerns the genus Vuvlstekeara, 
which, it is said, "cannot be recognised, because based upon an error, 
consequently there is no such trigeneric hybrid in existence— at all events' 
none that has yet bloomed." It is true that the genus was originally based 
upon an erroneous record, but the other objections do not apply, for a 
striking hybrid derived from Odontoma Lairessea and Cochlioda Ncetzliana 
was exhibited by M. Jules Hye de Cram at the recent Royal International 
Horticultural Exhibition, and was fully recorded and described at page 171 
of our June issue. And as the rule requires that the name of a trigeneric 
hybrid shall include all hybrids between the three genera in whatever way 
the combination was effected, the name Vuylstekeara will stand for the 
later production. Vuylstekeara insignis will become a synonym of 
as we have already shown, but Vuylstekeara Hyeana 
" ! " drawn up by the Committee appointed by 
is, and as the said rule was adopted by the 
Brussels Congress, and incorporated in the Rules of Horticultural Nomen- 



Septbmbkr, .912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 259 

clature, the name will stand, dating from June of the present year. To 
propose a new name now for the hybrids between Cochlioda, Miltonia, and 
Odontoglossum would only be to stultify the Committee's work, which is 
unthinkable. 

A particularly interesting article appears on another page with respect 
to a disease of Orchids. There has been a widely-spread belief among 
Orchidists that what is known as Orchid Spot is caused by a parasitic fungus, 
but experts have frequently failed to detect its presence, and have attributed 
the spot to some mechanical injury, especially to a chill caused by cold 
drip from the roof, which injures the leaf tissue?, the decaying tissue then 
being attacked by certain fungi which live upon decaying vegetable matter, 
but which are incapable of injuring healthy leaves. It now appears that 
scepticism has been carried too far, and that a fungus has been introduced 
from Columbia, with Odontoglossum crispum, which lives upon the under 
surface of the leaves, and is capable, if neglected, of spreading and doing 
much mischief. We believe that some damaged Odontoglossum leaves 
were sent to us a few years ago, but that we failed to detect the presence of 
a fungus, perhaps through being too much affected with the prevailing 
scepticism, though we fancy that only the black spots remained, through 
the leaves either having been sponged or the mycelium otherwise rubbed off 
the surface. Now that the presence of the fungus in British collections has 
been definitely proved, it will be interesting to see whether it has become 
generally distributed. Fortunately, it appears possible to control it or 
stamp it out by sanitary treatment, but growers should be on their guard, 
or it may cause much damage before they are aware of its presence. 

The Ghent Quinquennial Show.— We have received the schedule 
of prizes of the seventeenth Quinquennial International Horticultural 
Exhibition to be held at Ghent from April 26th to May 4th next, also a 
plan and elevation of the Exhibition buildings. Section 2 is devoted to 
Orchids, and contains 89 classes, including groups, for amateurs and 
nurserymen, new species and hybrids, genera and groups of allied genera, 
specimens remarkable for culture and floriferousness, and single specimens 
of all the leading kinds. An extensive series of medals and other prizes are 
offered. Gold Medals, value 100 and 50 francs, are offered for collections 
demonstrating the favourable influence of symbiotic fungi in the germin- 
ation of Orchids ; and the same to Nurserymen for the greatest number of 
hybrids raised in their establishments, with their parents. The Jury 
will be, as usual, of international standing, excluding persons living in 
the City of Ghent. Full particulars may be obtained from the Secretary, 
Ghent. 



26o THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

EVOLUTION OF THE ORCHIDACE^E. 

(Concluded from page 228). 
We now come to the great subdivision of the Order in which the pollen 
grains have become agglutinated together into waxy masses, and in which 
the epiphytic habit is developed, the latter character, however, not 
universally, for many genera of both the Epidendrese and Vandea? are 
terrestrial, hence the epiphytic habit was probably a later development. 
The waxy condition of the pollinia may be regarded as a direct adaptation 
to prevent waste as Orchids became increasingly dependent upon insects 
for their fertilisation, and it probably arose quite independently of the 
sectile condition of the pollinia, which is another adaptation to secure the 
same end. In a few primitive types it is sometimes difficult to say where 
the powdery pollen ends and the waxy condition begins. The fundamental 
difference between the two is that in the latter the contents of each pollen 
sac remain cemented together in a waxy mass, and as the one apparently 
passed directly into the other we need not be surprised at the existence of 
a few types in which the character has not become fixed. Another 
evidence of a primitive state of development in Epidendreae is seen in the 
unspecialised rostellum, which performs the simple function of a secretory 
organ, producing a viscid substance for the purpose of gluing the pollinia to 
the body of the visiting insect. 

There appears to be almost a transition between the Arethuseae and the 
Epidendreae, but we soon find a wide degree of diversity, both in structure 
and habit. One marked structural difference is that in the Epidendrese 
the two anther-cells are often subdivided by longitudinal and transverse 
partitions, giving four and eight pollen masses, or occasionally— by an 
irregular development— six, instead of the original two, though they usually 
cohere together by the viscid secretion from the rostellum. Sometimes the 
pollinia are produced into caudicles at the base, as in many of the Laelieas. 



Another marked structu 



elopment 



the column, bearing the lip at its apex, a characte 
ith an articulated or mobile lip, and evidently bearing a definite 
relation to the visits of the fertilising insect. The foot represents a further 



lilateral extension of the column, affectir 



1 petal and 



the stamens which unite with it to form the lip. This extension frequ 
affects the lateral sepals, which are then borne from the sides of the foot, 
forming a chin or sometimes a spur-like body, called the mentum, as in 
Dendrobium, or the lateral sepals may be carried up to the apex of the foot, 
as in Drymoda and Monomeria. Other structural developments that mi^ht 
be mentioned are the union of the sepals into a tube, as in Masdevallia and 
Cryptochilus, that of the lip with the column, as in Calanthe and 



September, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 261 

Epidendrum, and various others which were mentioned in reviewing the 
different groups. 

It is in the vegetative characters, and especially in the assumption of an 
epiphytic habit, that the most striking development appears in the Epiden- 
dreae. Epiphytes were derived from terrestrial forest plants, and the key to 
their evolution is found in the perpetual struggle to reach the light with- 
out the expenditure of the material necessary to raise a terrestrial plant 
to an adequately lighted spot, and in the successful adoption of a xerophilous 
habit. The least modified types of the Epidendreae are still terrestrial ; 
others live in moist shady crevices of bark low down on the tree trunks, 
while the more specialised ones live in drier but better lighted situations 
higher up the trees, or sometimes on rocks or other places where suitable 
conditions are found. The presence of epiphytes indicates the existence of 
a warm moist climate, or at least of an adequate supply of moisture during 
the season of active growth, for numerous devices have been adopted to 
carry them successfully through periods of drought. 

One of the earliest stages in the adoption of an epiphytic habit is seen 
when the subterranean or prostrate stem of a terrestrial Orchid begins to 
ascend the tree trunks, where a plentiful supply of moisture or accumula- 
tions of decaying vegetable matter rendered the change possible, and this was 
quickly followed by the production of aerial roots, with a modification of the 
root-bark into a grey protective covering, formed of air cells, and known as 
velamen. Then came the production of lateral branches— in this case 
known as secondary stems — bearing the leaves and becoming variously 
thickened into fleshy pseudobulbs, forming store-houses for water and other 
nutritive substances, to enable them to tide over periods of drought, when 
vegetative activity is more or less suspended. In some cases these secondary 
stems are scarcely thickened at all, as in Pleurothallis ; in others they are 
so excessively short as to appear absent, as in Masdevallia, or the amount 
of thickening may vary enormously in detail, and may affect one or several 
adjacent internodes, as may be seen on comparing such well-known and 
diverse types as Dendrobium, Bulbophyllum and Cattleya. Or they may 
become hollowed, forming receptacles for ants, as in Diacrium and Schom- 
burgkia, the presence of the ants keeping cockroaches and other predacious 
insects in check, the plants thus providing a home for the ants in return for 
very effective services rendered. 

Modifications of foliar structure are seen in the articulated leaves of many 
genera, an adaptation securing the fall of the leaf, when no longer of service, 
and when its presence might be injurious by preventing the access of light. 
The leaves may also become fleshy, affording a storehouse for water, as in 
the Pleurothallis and Cattleya groups. 

Some of the characters which we have just considered reach a still 



262 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1913. 

higher phase of development in the great subdivision Vandese, in which the 
culminating point of development of the Orchidaceas is reached. The 
essential character of the Vandeae lies in the character of the rostellum 
and pollinary apparatus. Here the rostellum has more than a secretory 
function, for it supplies also a stipes which serves to connect the viscid 
gland with the pollinia, and the line of separation of the stipes from the rest 
of the rostellum is by a zone of hyaline tissue, ultimately forming a line of 
disarticulation similar to that by which a leaf is thrown off at its fall in 
autumn. The stipes of the Vandeae must not be confused with the 
caudicles of other groups, for it is a part of the female whorl of the flower, 
while the caudicles belong to the male whorl, and are, in fact, pollinary 
appendages formed of modified pollen grains. The union between the stipes 
of the rostellum and the pollinia takes place about the time that the flower 
reaches maturity and prepares to open. Calanthe and some other genera 
of Epidendreae were referred to Vandeae before this distinction was properly 
understood, while lone and a few others have since been transferred there 
because of a stipes-like appendage to the pollinia. But this view of the 
origin of the stipes in lone requires confirmation, for in other respects the 
genus is so close to Bulbophyllum as to have been actually referred to it. 
It is also nearly allied to Acrochaene and Monomeria, which, with a few 
others, have been regarded as in a transition state between the two tribes, 
though the so-called stipes is apparently caudicular in origin. 

The genera of Vandeae have already been briefly outlined, and we need 
only recall the highly complex nature of the flowers in some of the higher 
genera, as in Stanhopea and Coryanthes, the remarkable structure and 
mode of fertilisation having been fully described (O.R., xviii. p. 323) ; in the 
remarkable genera Catasetum and Cycnoches, in some of which the sexes 
are so diverse as to have been referred to different genera ; in the various 
genera of Oncidieae, some of which are highly specialised, and of which we 
may mention Comparettia, in which the lateral sepals are extended into a 
long spur, which includes two spur-like horns produced from the lip, the 
still more complex Cryptocentrum ; and, lastly, in some of the genera of 
Sarcantheae, which show various complexities, as the double spur of 
Diplocentrum, the divided pollinary appendages of Mystacidium, and the 
diversely-coloured flowers of Arachnanthe Lowii, the cause of which remains 
a mystery. 

In vegetative characters the Vandeae exhibit a further advance in 
complexity. The terrestrial genera are now in a great minority, and there 
nber of true epiphytes— those that grow directly 



upon the bark of trees, rather t 



3 of vegeta 



among the branches, and push out long aerial roots, which serve the double 
purpose of securing a firm hold for the plant and of absorbing liquid food 



SEPThMBKB, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 263 

for its nourishment. These aerial roots wind round the branches, often 
extending for yards, and clinging so tightly to the bark as to mould them- 
selves to every little inequality, and often ultimately hang free in the air, 

form of pseudobulbs, of very various shapes, in others the only means of 
storage is the thick, leathery leaves, in which evaporation is reduced to a 
minimum ; both being contrivances by which moisture is retained through 
seasons of drought. The Sarcantheae rely entirely upon their leaves for 
storage purposes, there being a complete absence of pseudobulbs through- 
out the group. Here also another remarkable development is seen, some 
of the genera being able to exist without leaves, as Taeniophyllum and 
Chiloschista in India and Malaya, Dendrophylax and certain species of 
Campylocentrum in Tropical America, and some of the Angracums in 
Africa and Madagascar— the all-essential chlorophyll being in these cases 
developed in the roots. If we compare such an Orchid as Dendrophylax 
funalis, organ by organ, with the primitive Neuwidia, we might wonder 
1 t 1 ters the two possess in common, yet, as we have already seen, 

they are connected by a long chain of intermediates, through which every 
intermediate phase of progressive development can be traced. 

We have now seen that Orchids have been developed along two distinct 

increasing degree of complexity, and, secondly, by adaptations to an 
epiphytal mode of existence, with the necessary modifications of the organs 
of absorption and nutrition, and a diversified set of provisions for storing 
water against seasonal periods of drought. 

These considerations necessitate our attaching a supreme value to the 
organs of fertilisation in any natural system of classification, and this leads 
to a brief reference to the system of classification by vegetative characters 
proposed by the late Professor Pfitzer. After separating the Ophrydese, 
which were made to follow the Diandra;— where they are certainly out of 
place — the next primary division adopted was that into Sympodiales and 
Monopodiales, according to whether the inflorescence was terminal or 
lateral. In the Sympodiales the growth is terminated by an inflorescence, 
after which a new lateral shoot is produced, but in the Monopodiales the 
stems continue to grow for a number of years at the apex, and the 
inflorescence is lateral. But Pfitzer himself admits that the monopodial 
type is not monophylitic, and remarks that the monopodial Huntleyinse are 
very near the sympodial Zygopetalinae, and may have been derived from 
them. Bentham, indeed, included Huntleya under Zygopetalum, which is, 
perhaps, an extreme view. The fact is the monopodial mode of growth 
only came in after the adoption of an epiphytic habit. It is a purely 



264 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1912. 

vegetative character, and cuts across whole groups of affinities, and we are 
therefore fully justified in assigning it to a subordinate position. 

The enormous number of minute seeds produced by Orchids, and the 
imperfect embryo, with the absence of nutritive tissue, or endosperm, are 
characters that invite remark, and are evidently connected with their method 
of existence. The seeds become increasingly numerous in the higher groups 
— in the case of Cycnoches chlorochilon it is estimated that the progeny 
of a single capsule, if they all grew, would equal the population of London 
—and in the case of epiphytes the small proportion of seeds that are likely 
to find a suitable resting-place would naturally result in their production in 
vast profusion, and this in turn would lead to modifications in the economy 
of fertilisation. A large amount of pollen is necessary for the impregnation 
of the almost innumerable seeds, and the various modifications which were 
preserved, because useful to the plant, would naturally be correlated together. 

Another correlated and apparently unique character is seen in the 
immaturity of the ovary and ovules when the flowers expand, these only 
being developed after and as a result ot pollination, fertilisation proper 
being delayed until a considerably later period. It is a kind of conservation 
of energy until the chain of events which leads to the production of the 
seeds is set in motion, and points to a cause which has operated from a 
remote period in the past. The long time that the flowers often remain 
open in the absence of pollination, and their quick withering after that 
event, is an arrangement that would tend to synchronise the flowering of 
the species with the appearance of its insect visitors, and the habit of 
certain Orchids of producing solitary or few flowers at intervals, and in 
strict succession, on the same inflorescence is evidently connected with the 
uncertainty of insect visits, so that if any given flower should fail to be 
pollinated others would follow to take its place. This character is well 
known in the Sarcochilus group and in Bulbophyllum section Intervallata. 

We have now seen that Orchids have been derived from more primitive 
monocotyledons, possessing fifteen floral organs, arranged in five whorls of 
three each, and that the profound changes that they have undergone are 
the result of varying degrees of cohesion, suppression, and modification of 
parts, these being adaptations to fertilisation by insects, under which a 
high degree of irregularity has been attained. And, as monocotyledons 
are now believed to have been derived from dicotyledonous ancestors, we 
may assign to Orchids a position of the highest rank among members 
of the vegetable kingdom, both by claims of long descent and by complexity 
of structure. Their beauty and interest are universally admitted, and thus 
we are fully justified in regarding them as the aristocrats of the vegetable 
WOrld ' R. A. Rolfe. 



September, 191 2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 265 

CYPRIPEDIUM BARONIN SCHEY. 

The annexed figure represents a very pretty and delicately-coloured hybrid 
which has been raised at the Palmengarten-Gesellschaft, Frankfurt a Maine, 
Germany, from Cypripedium superciliare crossed with the pollen of C. 
Fairrieanum. A flower has been kindly sent by Herr Director Siebert, 
together with two photographs taken by Mr. Miethe, the larger of which 




Fig. 34. Cypripedium Baronin Schey. 
represents the flower exactly three-fourths natural size. We have combined 
the two in the present figure. The cross was made in December, 1907, and 
about twenty seedlings resulted, one of which flowered in July last, as here 
shown. The foliage is said to be mottled much in the same way as in C. 
vexillarium, but the plant seems to be of more robust growth. The scape, 



266 




THE 


ORCHID 


REV 


IEW. [I 


it will be seen, is j 


tbout 


: twice 


as long as th. 


2 leave 


:s, and prodi 


which bear a ve 


ry g< 


tneral 


resemblance 


to C. 


vexillarium 


dorsal sepal is n 


early 


orbici 


ilar, very un 


dulate 


, and some 


the sides, and m< 


sasur 


es two 


inches across 


;, its « 


:olour being 


flushed with light 


: purple at 


the sides, anc 


1 vein* 


>d with a ra 


the veins passing 


J int 


o yell 


►wish green 


at the 


base, whih 



d two flowers, 
i shape. The 
at re flexed at 
vhite, slightly 
ather darker tint, 

closely ciliate with minute white hairs. The petals are closely veined with 
yellowish green, and bear a number of minute blackish purple dots, while 
the margin is undulate, flushed with purple, and ciliate with long blackish 
hairs. The lip is suffused with purple brown in front, and the staminode is 
broadly rounded, with three prominent teeth in front, and strongly 
reticulated with green. The flowers will probably improve in size when the 
seedling becomes stronger. C. superciliare is a hybrid between C. barbatum 
and C. superbiens, both of which have been crossed with C. Fairrieanum, 
yielding respectively C. vexillarium and C. Edwardii, and the present hybrid 
may be described as fairly intermediate between the two latter. 

YELLOW VARIETIES OF L^LIA TENEBROSA. 

Two beautiful yellow varieties of Ladia tenebrosa have been sent from the 
collection of A. Warburton, Esq., Vine House, Haslingden (gr. Mr. 
Dalgleish), namely the Walton Grange variety and Victor Warburton, to 
show how very distinct they are. Mr. Warburton remarks that they were 
shown in London some years ago and were reported as both the same 
variety, which is certainly not the case. Now that he has succeeded in 
getting them in bloom together he has had them painted, and has sent a 
flower of each that their difference may be recorded. 

The WALTON Grange vak. appeared nearly twenty years ago, in the 
collection of W. Thompson, Esq., Walton Grange, Stone, and received a 
First-class Certificate from the R.H.S. on August 8th, 189 ^ when its 
characters were recorded (O.R., i. pp. 268, 2S7). The flower now sent by 
Mr. Warburton has the sepals and petals bright canary yellow, the petals 
measuring 4 inches long by i* inches broad, and rather reflexed at the 
margins, and the lip 3 | inches long, with a white base and apex, and the 
throat dark purple, with some purple veining which extends almost to the 
white margin. The flower is from an authentic plant, and agrees well with 
others that we have previously seen. 

Var. Victor Warburton appeared in the collection of A. Warburton, 
Esq., Vine House, Haslingden, about four years later, and received a First- 
class Certificate from the Manchester and North of England Orchid Society 
on July 1st, 1897 (O.R., v. p. 252). It also received an Award of Merit from 
the R.H.S. on June 27th, 1899 (O.R., vii. p. 250). The flower now sent has 
clear apricot-yellow sepals and petals, the latter measuring 3* inches long 



September, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 267 

by if inches broad, while the lip measures 3J inches long, and the base 
and apex are white, with some clear red-purple in the throat, sharply defined 
below, and not extending far into the white area above. The lip and petals 
are broader and much shorter than in the preceding variety, and the petals 
are flatter and more expanded, while the purple in the throat is much lighter 
in colour, and covers a smaller area, leaving more white at the much reflexed 
apex. The two are really very distinct, both in shape and colour, and the 
differences can be appreciated when one can compare them side by side. 

The Walton Grange variety has been used for hybridising, being the 
seed parent of the beautiful Ladiocattleya luminosa aurea, raised in the 
collection of Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., which received a 
First-class Certificate from the R.H.S. in October, 1911 (O.R., xix. p. 342', 
in which the yellow colour of the sepals and petals has been largely per- 
petuated, with an improved shape, owing to the influence of Cattleva 



LEAF SPOT OF ODONTOGLOSSUM. 

I am interested in your remarks about Orchid Spot in the last issue of the 
Orchid Review (page 239). I have only a house of Odontoglossums here, 
where I grow some 500 plants, and I have noticed during the last two 
months that several of them have behaved like your correspondent's La?lio- 
cattleyas. I observe that, in my case, the spot always occurs on one of the 
old leaves— none of the new growths nor the leaves on the last bulb being 
affected. My house has sunshine from the East and South (shaded, of 
course, with blinds), and I ventilate freely, both top and bottom. I thought 
it might be caused by overwatering during the recent hot days, so I am 
keeping them now on the dry side, but I am also wondering whether we 
are about to find that we can have too much osmunda fibre in the potting 
material, which, in the second year, decays so much that it is practically 
reduced to a mould, and unless we repot annually we shall have trouble, as 
we did years ago when using too much Belgian leaf-soil. I send you three of 
the diseased leaves, and may say that I have about twenty-five plants affected. 
Hove, Sussex. H. Nye. 

It has often been remarked that the spot disease of Orchids is due to 
some cultural defect, but in the case ox Odontoglossums it is sometimes 
caused by a definite parasitic fungus. About six years ago, when I was at 
Burford, there was a disease among the Odontoglossums, which affected 
the leaves, forming black blotches on the under surface, but it only 
appeared spasmodically, and was easily kept in check by cutting off the 
worst infected leaves and sponging any others on which small blotches 
appeared. I sent some affected leaves to an expert, who had done soma 



ab * THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1912. 

good work as a pathologist, and he reported that the mischief was caused 
by a parasitic fungus. This fungus passes into the intercellular spaces of 
the leaves by way of the stomata, and uses up the protoplasm. It then 
turns to the process of reproduction, and throws out spore-bearing threads 
through the stomata, and the green colouring matter then disappears in a 
-circular patch, which ultimately becomes black. The grower now sees 
that something is wrong, and if an examination is made with a low-power 
microscope the little propagating bodies can be seen at the end of small 
branchlets. It is at this stage that the disease is most infectious, and these 
minute bodies are easily conveyed from leaf to leaf, where they germinate 
and form new centres of infection. 

In 1908 I was working in the collection at Leyswood, Groombridge, 
Sussex, and suddenly nearly every plant in two medium-sized houses was 
attacked, and the disease soon showed the amount of damage it was 
capable of doing by the quantity of leaves that went off in the fortnight or 
so which it took to cope with it. During this time drastic measures were 
taken ; the leaves were well sponged, and the very bad cut off and burnt ; the 
pots, stages, walls, &c, were well scrubbed, and the latter lime-washed ; 
the houses were also damped periodically with strong soot water, and the 
plants sprayed with weak soot water about twice a week. By these 
diligent and strenuous methods the pest was kept in hand and eventually 
eradicated. 

Since then I have had some experience with the same thing at Kew, 
and, with the help of a friendly amateur grower, have conducted some 
experiments on plants attacked by the same fungus in his collection. The 
first was to ascertain whether it could be made to thrive on plants of any 
other genus of Orchids, the testing plants being Oncidium macranthum, 
O. serratum, and Ada aurantiaca, but on none of them did the disease make 
its appearance. By the same method it was easy to get leaves infected on 
any of the Odontoglossums of the crispum set that were used. It also 
seems partial to Odontiodas, which, of course, are half derived from 
Odontoglossum. The disease appears to be confined to the older leaves. 
Kew - Cyril Warren. 

This disease was first observed in 1892 on the leaves of Odontoglossum 
crispum growing at Versailles. Infected leaves were sent by M. Ed. 
Andre, Editor of the Revue Horticole, to the Laboratory of Plant Pathology 
at Paris, and in the following year a report by MM. Prillieux and 
Delacroix was published in the Bulletin de la Societe Mycologique de France, 
stating that the disease was caused by a new fungus, Cercospora Odonto- 
glossi, which was then described and figured (1893, p. 270, 1. 13, fig. 2). The 
disease was doubtless introduced from Colombia with Odontoglossum 



September, 1912,] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 269 

crispum, and has probably occurred in many collections, but such cases 
appear to have escaped record. I have examined microscopically leaves of 
Odontoglossum sent to the Editor by Mr. Nye, and also those of a plant in 
the Kew collection, and find them badly infected with this fungus. 

The first sign of the disease is tl h colour of the leaves to a 

sickly yellowish green. This is soon followed by the appearance, here and 
there, on the lower surface of the leaf , of olive-green, ill-defined blotches, 
each covered with a delicate floccose mould, which is later coated with a 
fine greyish powder. 

A section through the leaf at a disease point shows the brown shrivelled 
tissue permeated by mycelium— at first colourless but when older changing 
to a pale brownish green. From this mycelium clusters of erect, sinuous, 
sometimes branched conidiophores are formed, which burst through the 
epidermis of the leaf and produce, at the tips of their branches, long narrow 
tapering conidia, at first continuous but at maturity becoming' two or three 
chambered. These conidia are set free in great numbers and form the 
greyish powder previously mentioned. Each under favourable conditions 
is capable of infecting a new plant. 

Only the older leaves appear to be attacked, but when once the disease 
has obtained a foothold it kills the leaves in rapid succession. 

Infected plants should be isolated where practicable, and all the badly 
diseased leaves removed and burnt, the remainder being sponged at intervals 
with a weak solution of copper sulphate. Where the disease in rampant 
such drastic measures as those used bv Mr. Warren may be emploved. 

F. W. Rolfe. 

EXPORTING ORCHIDS BY POST. 

We have received from Baron R. Kawada, Tokyo, Japan, a photograph 
showing a very ingenious method of packing Orchids for long distances by 
post, which has been adopted by Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, of Cooks- 
bridge, by which the handsome Cymbidium Schlegelii and other hybrid 
Cymbidiums have been sent to Japan via Siberia. Three boxes "were 
sent, on March 27th, 28th, and April 1st, each containing two plants, and, 
in spite of the early date, Baron Kawada remarks that they arrived in perfect 
condition, not a sheath or leaf having changed its natural colour, and every 
root was fresh. The box is lined with cotton wool, and the surface papered, 
which protects the plant from cold. The pots are firmly fixed, one at each 
end of the box, and there is an oblique longitudinal partition, forming 
cavities in which the leaves are carefully inserted, without any further 
wrappings, the longer ones being carefully curved over. Ventilation is 
ingeniously contrived by means of holes covered with gauze, and protected 
with cotton wool inside so as to moderate the cold air before reaching the 



2 7 o THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 191a. 

plants. The photograph shows one of the boxes with the lid turned back 
before the plants were removed, and the leaves appear to be in perfect 
condition. Baron Kawada expresses the highest satisfaction with the 
transaction, and hopes that others will avail themselves of such an excellent 



THE AMATEURS COLLECTION. 
By C. Alwyn Harrison, f.r.h.s. 
Cool House. 
Although fire heat is not usually needed until the end of this month, yet, 
Should the present inclement weather continue, it will doubtless be needed 
now on damp and chilly nights, for on no account must all ventilation be 
withheld early in the afternoon, in order to retain enough heat in the house 
for the night and save lighting a fire. But artificial heating should not be 
employed unless really required, for it would tend to make the plants 
delicate, whereas they should, from now onwards, be hardened off, to enable 
them to withstand the coming winter months— a trying and unnatural 
season for all Oichids. Give more light, by only lowering the shading from 
midday till two p.m., and then only if the sun is strong. Damping down 
should now be limited to three times daily, at eight a.m., at midday, and, if 
necessary, at three p.m. Be careful not to overwater any Orchid, and, as a 
general rule, the following may serve as a rough guide. Water all growing 
and flowering plants every other day, and those at rest every four* or five 
days. Admit as much air as possible, as this will help growing plants to 
ripen their pseudobulbs, well-matured growths being the precursors of 
strong flower spikes. 

This month is an ideal one for the general overhauling of the house, and 
the stagings should be cleared of all plants, every corner of the house and 
between the laths of the staging should be syringed with a strong insecticide, 
the glass well scrubbed inside and out, especially on the latter, to remove 
the liquid shading or other deposit, the ashes or coke under the staging 
raked over, and all pots and pans well cleaned. Then re-arrange the plants", 
at the same time cutting away and destroying any decayed pseudobulbs or 
decayed leaves. 

As regards positions, I would refer my readers to the article for March, 
191 1, but a few of the main suggestions may be repeated, Odontiodas, small 
seedlings, and any Odontoglossums with the undermentioned as parents— 
Harryanum, amabile, Edwardii, Hallii, Uroskinneri— at the warmest end of 
the house, and Cypripedium insigne, villosum, Odontoglossum crispum, and 
Pescatorei at the coolest end. The house should be gay with many of the 
early autumn Odontoglossums, such as Alwyn, Crawshayanum, Hallio- 
triumphans, Charlesworthii, Maris, Goodsonii and many others. 



ORCHID RE VIE] 



plants carefully graded according to their requirements of heat and light. 
Place all Cattleya hybrids with the following as panmts a: th,- warmest end: 
C. Dowiana aurea, Warscewic;ai (gigas). maxima. Skiuu.-ri, Mldorad... 

their growth, they must be moved to the coolest end to rest. 

Be sure to remove all the liquid shading from off the roof glass, and the 
blinds will no longer be needed, as all possible light will be necessary to 

under the Cool house, and watering in the same proportion. Admit as 
much air as is consistent with maintaining the correct temperature, i.e., by 
day 65-75 Fahr. and 60-65' Fahr. at night. Many beautiful Orchids should 
now be in full bloom, particularly Cattleyas Dowiana aurea, Empress 
Frederick, Warscewiczii (gigas), Harrisoniana, Minucia, and others. 

Except for a brief three weeks, the sunshine this year has been by no 
means sufficient for Cattleyas, and I fear in some districts some of the 
winter-flowering C. Triana will be weak. We generally regard August as 
a month in which cloudless sun will mature the bulbs of such Cattleyas as 
Percivaliana and Trianas. 

Having been successful of late with the raising of seedlings of Cattleyas 
in a greenhouse, I shall explain my method of culture in next month's 
article, together with the special culture of certain shy-flowering but 
beautiful Cattleyas. 



OBITUARY. 

F. M. Burton.— A veteran Orchidist passed away on May 16th last in 
the person of Mr. F. M. Burton, F.L.S., F.G.S., Highlield, Gainsborough, 
at the age of S3. He had been an Orchid grower for about thirty years, 
and a subscriber to the Orchid Review and an occasional correspondent from 
the commencement until about a year ago, when age and failing health 
necessitated his relinquishing a favourite pursuit. He was greatly inter- 
ested in hybridisation, and raised a good number of Cypripediums, though 
generally to find that they had previously flowered elsewhere, as in the case 
of C. Burtoni and C. highfieldense. But he was more fortunate with a 
handsome Epidendrum raised from E. ibaguense and E. O'Brienianum, 
which was described in these pages in 1899, under the name of E. Burtoni 



272 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 191*. 

(O.R., vii. pp. j$, 135), and of which we received six splendid inflorescences 
four years later , showing great variation in colour (O.R., xi. p. 134). He 
had also a fine collection of herbaceous and hardy plants, including many 
which he had himself collected during his travels. 

THE HYBRIDIST. 

Oncidioda Cooksoni^e.— We have received from Mr. H. J. Chapman, 
gardener to Mrs. Norman Cookson, Oakwood, Wylam-on-Tyne, a flower of 
a very striking hybrid derived from Cochlioda Noetzliana crossed with the 
pollen of Oncidium macranthum. The plant is very small, and at present 
only bears a spike of three flowers. The flower sent most resembles the 
Cochlioda parent, both in shape and colour, but is much enlarged, 
measuring just over two inches from tip to tip of the petals, while the 
influence of the Oncidium parent is distinctly seen in the shape of the 
sepals and petals, in the crest of the lip, and in the way the column 
diverges from the base of the lip. The sepals and petals are uniformly deep 
crimson in colour, and the front lobe of the lip rather paler, with a light 
apex and a deeper yellow crest. As regards shape, we may add that the 
segments are spreading or slightly reflexed ; the dorsal sepal broadly 
elliptical, and the lateral pair rather longer and shortly stalked; the petals 
larger and more ovate, and the lip strongly three-lobed, with spreading 
oblong side lobes and a broader front lobe. The crest of the lip consists of 
seven acute teeth, and the column wings are broadly auriculate. It is a 
remarkable hybrid, and should develop into a handsome thing when the 
plant becomes strong. 

Use of Mixed Pollen.— We have been asked whether the use of 
mixed pollen, that is pollen derived from different varieties of the same 
species, is likely to result in an increased amount of variation in the result- 
ing batch of seedlings. It is difficult to say absolutely, but it is at least 
possible that increased variation might result. If the pollen tubes descended 
the tissues of the styles together, and each fertilised a few ovules, which 
subsequently matured and germinated, one would expect to obtain the 
same varieties as if the seeds were borne by different capsules on the same 
plant. But it is by no means certain that events would follow the desired 
course, and in any case one would have to preserve every seedling from the 
batch in order to ensure every possible variation. On the whole we should 
deprecate such experiments, at all events from a practical standpoint, and 
should prefer that every cross should be undertaken separately, and with 
some definite object in view. The use of pollen from different species would 
be still more uncertain, and from the difficulty of subsequently identifying 
the seedlings is to be strongly deprecated. 



September, i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 273 

DENDROBIUM NOBILE RAPPARTIANUM. 

The Orchids which succeed best under the conditions I can offer are 
undoubtedly Dendrobiums of the nobile section, and my collection includes 
most of the best varieties. I send you a photograph of one which is little 
known, and, in my estimation, is one of the most beautiful of them all, both 
from its distinctive shape and exquisite colouring. It first appeared in the 
collection of Mr. D. Rappart, of Liscard, who was fortunate enough to- 
flower several Orchids which were unique, and which still exist under his 
name. Dendrobium nobile Rappartianum received an Award of Merit from 
the Manchester Orchid Committee when it was first shown, and my friend 




vhich I have assiduously propagated since, and 
a recent show of the local Horticultural Society, when a f 
magnificently flowered, was exhibited by a well-known Liverpool amateur, 
I thought I had " a corner " in its possession. The flower photographed is 
five inches across without spreading, but is, perhaps, abnormally large 
because it is a single one. It is waxy white, except the tips of the petals 
and the unusuallv large dark blotch on the lip. 

Francis H. Moore. 
Royal Infirmary, Liverpool. 



274 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1912. 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill Gardens, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
The temperatures and the general treatment advised in previous numbers 
must still be adhered to, owing to the large amount of dull sunless weather 
we have experienced. In the warm houses it will still be advisable to 
ventilate more freely and maintain the temperatures with additional fire heat, 
owing to the amount of humidity in the outside atmosphere. By these 
means it will be found that the plants will build up and solidify their 
growths, which will enable them to pass through the winter much better 
than would otherwise be the case. 

Shading, on bright days, must be used, to prevent scorching, but in no 
case should the blinds be brought into use more than is necessary. I 
should always be kept in mind that light, air, and heat are essential to 
plant culture in their proper proportions, especially under the artificial 
conditions of glass houses. 

Damping down, as the days shorten, must be done less frequently, 
)f moisture in the outside atmosphere, but a 
srature must be maintained in all departments, 
ivoided, a hot, dry atmosphere is as harmful as 





ording to 


he am 


mc 


ist, genial c 


rowing 


T'i 


00 cold one 






Cool House.—! 


in, 


lates of this 


depart 



ecent weather has been to the liking of the 
, and any which suffered from the excessive heat 
f last year have by this time fully recovered. No warmth from the hot 
:ater pipes should be required during this month. Keep the temperature 
3 low as possible during bright weather, and ventilate freely, both night 
nd day, on all favourable occasions. 



Wvil K 






evaporation will be much less than in clear sunny weather, and, 1 
the plants will require less water, and great discretion should be exercised. 
No plant should have water applied unless it requires it. I am firmly 
convinced that more errors are made with the watering of our plants than 
with anything else. 

Cypripediums will now be pushing up their flower spikes, and these 
should be neatly tied to stakes to prevent their becoming twisted, as it is 
with great difficulty they are got into a perpendicular position if allowed to 
hang over the sides of the pots. Plants of the summer-flowering section, 
such as C. I'Ansonii, C. Schillianum, C. J. H. Veitch, and others of this 
class, as they pass out of bloom, may be repotted, should 
This class of Cypripedium is most useful, and forms a very desirable s 

CATTLEYAS, L.ELIAS, AND THEIR HYBRIDS. — During this month 



September, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. » 7S 

effort should be made to repot as many as possible of this class of plants 
that may require it, as they attain the desired condition, for the sooner they 
are established in the new material the better. Cattleya Warscewiezii 

the present month, and no plant that I know pays better for any attention 

Miltonias.— Plants of Miltonia vexillaria, and its hybrids, that were 
not repotted as advised last month, should be done as they reach the 
desired condition. 

Dendrobiums.— The plants of this genus must be -one through at 
intervals, and those that have matured their growth removed to cooler and 
lighter quarters, as advised last month. The amount of moisture, both at 
the roots and in the atmosphere, must be considerably reduced, but 
absolute dryness of the rooting material must be strictlv guarded against. 
It is essential that these plants should be exposed to plenty of light and air 
to consolidate their growths. Plants that are still growing should have 
every inducement given them to complete their growths as quickly as 

Phabenopsis are fast pushing up their flower spikes, and this is an 
advantage, e-pecially where autumn fogs are prevalent, as these have a 
pernicious effect on these beautiful flowers. The plants must not be allowed 

removed the supply must be ample, after which much less will suffice. D. 
formosum, having finished growing, is about to expand its lovely white 
flowers. It blooms at a season when Orchid flowers are scarce, and is 
doubly useful on this account, so that it should be grown freely wherever 
its requirements can be satisfied. The treatment required at this season is 
precisely the same as advised for D. Phalaenopsis. Evergreen Dendrobiums 
such as D. Farmeri, D. thyrsiflorum, cSx., are now in full growth, and when 
they have reached maturity they should receive similar treatment to that 
afforded to the deciduous species of this useful family of plants. 

Odontoglossims.— At the present time there are large numbers of 
■Odontoglossums, both species and hybrids, that have started well into 
growth, and where these plants are cultivated largely it is advisable to 
■commence to repot them as early in this month as possible, taking the 
earliest plants first, and following on with the others as they become ready. 
The compost advised for Miltonias last month will answer their require- 
ments, but they should be potted a little firmer than the former. Should 
the weather be bright the plants must be carefully shaded until they 
become re-established. They must have as much fresh air as possible 
especially when the outside temperature exceeds 50°, and the atmosphere is 
humid. Should, however, the outside conditions be hot and dry, it will be 



276 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, lgla . 

advisable to dispense with the top ventilators during the day-time, and 
bring them into use during the night. Any excess of water to the newly- 
potted plants must be strictly guarded against, but a greater degree of 
humidity in the atmosphere may be maintained to prevent the compos 

Pleion.es -Plants which have now completed their growth for the 
season, may be exposed to more light and air as the leaves turn yellow. The 
water supply must also be considerably reduced, the compost being only 
kept moist, to encourage the flowering growths. P. humilis being still in 
full growth must have water afforded it, whenever it becomes dry. 

Oncidiums that are pushing up their flower spikes should be placed in 
a light position, where they may receive a fair amount of air. O. ornithor- 
rhynchum, and others, which have been growing in the Cool house, will be- 
better taken into the Intermediate house for the winter months' Such 
species as O. Forbesii, O. varicosum, and other Brazilian species, as their 
flower spikes become long enough, should be neatly tied up to stakes, and 
be carefully watched for slugs, which are very fond of the young tender 
spikes. After flowering they should be rested, as these plants delight in a 
long, decided rest, but should not be allowed to shrivel. 

Masdevallias.— We have now reached the season of the year, when 
members of this interesting genus will need attention. Such species as 
M. ignea, M. Harryana, M. Lindenii, M. Veitchii, and many others which 
have passed out of bloom, should they require new rooting material, are best 
potted at this season of the year. For a compost I use the following : One 
part each of osmunda fibre, peat fibre, polypodium fibre, and sphagnum 
moss, mixed well together. The strong growers may have a small quantity 
of loam fibre, from which all the earthy particles have been removed, mixed 
with the compost. The compost should be made moderately firm and the 
base of the plant should be kept on a level with the rim of the pot. Care 
must be taken that the pots are not too large. As Masdevallias require an 
abundant supply of root moisture when in full growth, the drainage must 
be perfect. M. Chimera, and the different species which make up this 
section, with M. tovarensis and others which flower during the winter 
months, should have the potting delayed until February, when they will be 
pushing new roots, and are therefore in 
The black spots so frequently 
able to an excessive supply of moisture in the atmosphere, and atthe roots, 
and a low cold temperature. Yellow thrip is the pest which attacks these 
plants, and if allowed a foothold will also soon disfigure the foliage. 

Habenarias,— H. carnea and H. Suzannae, as they pass out of bloom, 
should be given a complete rest, and being deciduous they require no water 



after the growth has died down 



ake, however, to hasten thi< 



September, .912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 277 

■process by withholding water altogether as soon as the flowers fade, and 
they should have water from time to time to enable the growth to ripen 
naturally. When the growths fall away, they should be placed in a light 
position in the Cattleya house, where no water will reach them. In the 
spring, when thev commence to grow, they must be repotted, and returned 
•to the Warm house. 

Vanda ccerulea is now in its beauty, and, if all that has been written 
about this refractory subject could be gathered together, it would be inter- 
esting to learn the many methods adopted to grow this plant successfully 
and otherwise. I find them succeed well when grown with the Mexican 
Lselias, and elevated quite close up to the glass, giving them plenty of heat, 
light, moisture, and air when in full growth, and a long rest after flowering 
is completed. 

Angr.ecums. — These plants, with Saccolabiums, Aerides, Vandas, and 
other inmates of the Warm house, will now require slightly less water, both 
atmospherically and at the roots. Should they get an over supply of water 
at the roots at this season, or meet with a check through any other cause, 
an unnecessary loss of foliage may occur. The plants should be gradually 
inured to more light and air on all favourable opportunities. 

General Remarks.— We have now passed through the best part of the 

fortable for the winter months, placing each plant in suitable quarters 
according to their various requirements, and at the same time making them 
and their surroundings thoroughly clean. It is also wise at this season to 
thoroughly examine the roofs of the houses for cracked squares of glass, 
which should be removed, and new ones put in, as they are apt to cause 
drip-, which may mean the loss of a valuable plant. Attention to detail is 
of the greatest importance to all plant cultivators, and according to the 
amount of assiduity displayed so will be their success. 

SOCIETIES. 

A meeting of this Society was held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, 
Vincent Square, Westminster, on August ijth last, when the display of 
Orchids was rather small, but included some choice things, and the awards 
■consisted of two First-class Certificates, four x\wards of Merit, one Cultural 
Commendation, and one Medal. 

Orchid Committee present: J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Sir Harry J. Veitch, Gurney Wilson, 
W. Bolton, W. H. White, A. Dye, H. G. Alexander, J. E. Shill, W. P. 
Bound, W. H. Hatcher, W. Cobb, T. Armstrong, A. A. McBean, and W. 
Thompson. 



2 7 8 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1912. 

The President, Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford (gr. Mr. 
W. H. White, staged a small group of rare things, including a fine specimen 
of the orange-scarlet Ladia monophylla, Dendrobium glomeratum with over 
sixty of its bright rose-purple flowers, a plant of the interesting little 
Theodorea gomezoides bearing ten spikes, a good plant of Bulbophyllum 
odoratissimum, with another Bulbophyllum of doubtful identity, and 
examples of Odontioda Thwaitesii and Brassocattleya Joan. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), received a 
Silver Bauksian Medal for a group of rinely-gr<>wn plants, including Cattieya 
Venus var. Golden Glory, a brilliantly-coloured form, Lseliocattleya 
Colmaniana, L.-c. Feronia superba, a finely-shaped form, Odontioda 
Thwaitesii Davidson's var., a very large flower, with claret-coloured sepals- 
and petals and a lilac-purple lip, two forms of O. SchiaeTri. differing 111 
colour, O. Ruby, Odontoglossum Pamela, and a few others. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a choice group, 
including the distinct and striking Stanhopea convoluta, Listrostachys 
Chailluana, a good Vanda Sanderiana, a well-flowered Dendrochilum 
filiforme, Oncidium luridum guttatum, Cypripedium Maudiae, C. Rossetti, 
and other hybrids, noteworthy among them being Oncidioda cinnabarina, 
an interesting hybrid from Cochlioda Ncetzliana and Oncidium monachicum, 
and having rather small cinnabar red flowers, with stalked segments, 
approaching those of the Oncidium in shape. 

Mr. S. Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, staged a small group, 
including Cattieya Gaskelliana alba, the rare Brazilian Oncidium Croesus, 
Dendrobium regium, a large form of Brassolaelia Helen, and a richly- 
coloured Lseliocattleya. 

First-class Certificates. 
L.eliocattleya Glaucus (L. purpurata X L.-c. rubens).— A very 
fine hybrid, of dwarf habit, and bearing finely-shaped flowers most like 
those of the Ladiocattleya parent, the sepals and petals being bright rosy 
mauve, with darker veining, and the lip very deep ruby red, with a bright 
yellow disc. Exhibited by Lieut-Col. Sir G. L. Holford, K.C.V.O., 
Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander). 

L.eliocattleya Godmanii (C. Iris X L.-c. callistoglossa).— A large 
and distinct hybrid, of excellent shape, having broad, deep purple-rose sepals 
and petals, and a large ruby crimson lip with a yellow disc. Exhibited by 
F. Ducane Godman, Esq., South Lodge, Horsham. 
Awards of Merit. 
Brassocattleya Ilene (C. Dowiana x B.-c. Maroniae). — A very fine 
hybrid, having well-shaped flowers, with rose-coloured sepals and petals, 
and a bright rose-coloured, fringed lip, with a yellow disc, rayed with purple 
at the base. Exhibited by Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, Chelsea. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



bright chrome yellow sepals and petals, and a claret purple lip, 



rgin. inhibited 

Odontoglossum Emi'KKss Eugenie (parentage unrecorded).- 



,-Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 
S Eugenie (pan 
and beautiful hybrid having waxy white sepals and petals, witn a mauve 

purplish blue spots in front of the yellow crest. It may be a secondarj 
hybrid of O. Rolfeae. Exhibited by E. H. Davidson, Esq. 

and attractive hybrid, most like O. cirrhosum in shape, but with shorter, 
broader segments, blackish purple in colour, with pale tips and a small 
white base to the petals, while the lip is more chocolate-coloured, with a 
pale tip and a yellow disc. Exhibited by Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, 
Cooksbridge. 

Cattleya Tacitus (Grossii x Germania superba).— To Mr. H. G. 
Alexander, gr. to Lieut. -Col. Sir G. L. Holford, for a remarkably strong 
plant, the last growth being four feet long, and bearing a very fine spike of 

At the meeting held on Au 
and the award list contained 
Cultural Commendation. 

Orchid Committee present: J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), W. Bolton, Gurney Wilson, de B. Crawshay, 
A. Dye," H. G. Alexander, J. E. Shill, \V. H. Hatcher, W. Cobb, A. A. 
McBean, T. Armstrong, F. J. Hanbury, Stuart H. Low, R. A. Rolfe, Sir 
Jeremiah Colman. and Sir Harry J. Veitch. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Tvvyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), staged a very 
fine group, to which a Silver-gilt Flora Medal was awarded. It contained 
some specially well-grown Odontoglossums, including O. Rolfeae with three 
immense branched spikes, forming quite a picture, O. spectabile with two 
spikes, each four feet long, O. percultum, O. Ceres Davidson's var., O. 
Nathaniel, having well-shaped flowers, the sepals and petals almost solid 
claret-purple, margined with lilac, and the lip with a much broader white 
margin, O. armainvillierense, good forms of Cattleya Fabia, C. Dowiana 
aurea, C. Adula, C. Rothschiidiana Borlasses var., having white flowers 
with a yellow throat to the lip and some purple veining on the front lobe, 
Laeliocattleya Colmaniana Borlases var., a fine dark form, and Sophro- 
cattleya Pandora, with a fine crimson flower. 

H. T. Pitt, Esq., Rosslyn, Stamford Hill (gr. Mr. Thurgood), received a 



2iSo THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1912. 

Silver Banksian Medal for a fine group, including Cattleya Dowiana aurea, 
C. Clarkiae, C. suavior, two distinct forms of C. Source d'Or, L«liocattleya 
Dehc.a (C. Harrisoniana alba X L.-c. Constance Wigan), a charming white 
flower with yellow disc to the lip, L.-c. Argus (C. intricata X L.-c- 
Ingramii), Brassia brachiata and longissima, Angracum Scottianum, Chon- 
drorhyncha fimbriata, Bulbophyllum barbigerum, Odontoglossums, Miltonia 
vexillaria rubella, Cypripedium Maudiae, Neptune, Wottonii, Fascinator, 
Richmanii, Felicity, Baron Schroder var. ardens, and others. 

J. S. Bergheim, Esq., Belsize Court, Hampstead (gr. Mr. H. A. Pa-e) 
sent a remarkable Bulbophyllum, allied to B. calamarium, having a broad', 
very hairy brown hp, and whitish sepals, which exude pearl-like drops of 
liquid from the back. 

J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. Mr. J. Davis), 
sent a very fine plant of Cypripedium Daisy Barclay (Godefroyie leucochilum 
X Rothschildianum), bearing a three-flowered inflorescence, the flowers 
heavily blotched with purple brown on a cream-yellow ground. 

J.J. Neale, Esq., Lynwood, Penarth (gr. Mr. H. Haddon), sent Epiden- 
drum laterale, a curious little plant bearing two spikes of green flowers from 
— ' ■ growths, as in E. Stamfordianum 



Messrs. Sander t 



. staged a fine group, includii 



plant of Bulbophyllum vire 
B. galbinum, B. cylindraceum, B. congoense, Catasetum m^kVum^ome 
good forms ot Laeliocattleya Walter Gott. L.-c. Welleslevae (C Wars- 
cewiczn x L.-c. Martinetii), L.-c. Fabia (L.-c. bletchlevensis X elegans) 
forms of Cattleya Rothschildiana, C. nobilior (granulosa x Warneri) ' 
Brassocattleya Maroniae, and other good things (Silver Flora Medal) 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a small and very 
choice group, includmg a remarkably fine specimen of Houlletia Wallisii, 
bearing four spikes of yellow flowers spotted with brown a very fine plant of 
Aerides Lawrence, var. Sandenana with three spikes, Polycycnis muscifera 
with two fine spikes, Cattleya Gaskelliana alba, Angracum falcatum, Ccelia 
macrostachya, a fine plant of Miltonia Schrcederiana with three spikes, M. 
Cogmauxiae, Calanthe violacea, two plants pf Pescatorea Roezlii one bear 



flowers c 

(Silver Banksian Medal). 

good 



er short scapes, Mormodes luxatum, Laeliocattleya 
Banksian Medal). 



Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bash Hill Park, Enfield, 
group, including a very fine specimen of Laelia crispa witl 
number of Dendrobium Phalaenops.s, some good Scidium ^aXZ 
mcurvum and longipes, Anguloa Ruckeri, Catasetum callosum, Physosiph^ 
Loddigesn, Odontioda Charlesworthii Bifrenaria tetra-o L 

leucantha, Cypripedium Juno, Odontoglossum Rolfea, Cattlevas^ 
Laehocattleyas (Silver Banksian Medal). 



September, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 281 

Messrs. Armstrong & Brown, Tunbridge Wells, showed Cypripedium 
memoria Alma Gevaert (Lawrenceanum Hyeanum X Maudiae), a very finely 
shaped flower, with broad dorsal sepal and spreading somewhat curved petals, 
the colour being wholly white and green, as in the parents, also C. Clara 
Armstrong (Germaine Opoix X Prewettii), a finely-shaped flower, most 
like the former parent, but hardly so bright in colour. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Westgate Hill, Bradford, staged a pretty 
little group, including four plants of Vanda ccerulea, the rare Eria 
rhynchostyloides, Cattleya Harrisoniana violacea, Cypripedium Ultor, C. A. 
de Lairesse, and C. Charlesworthii. They also exhibited examples of 
Smith's Pollen -preserving Tubes. 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, E. Yorks, sent plants of 
Trichopilia laxa, Acineta densa, and Brassia caudata. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent a fine plant of Cochlioda 
Noetzliana, Maxillaria grandiflora with seven flowers, a good Vanda 
Sanderiana, two fine plants of Oncidium Mantinii, three plants of Cattleya 
Dowiana aurea, C. Iris, Odontioda Charlesworthii, and a few good Odonto- 
glossums. 

Awards of Merit. 
ANGILBCUM O'Briexiaxum.— An interesting species from Western 
Uganda, with broad coriaceous leaves, and bearing five drooping racemes of 
white flowers, with recurved acute segments, and a curved spur, tipped with 
yellowish brown. Exhibited by J. S. Bergheim, Esq., Belsize Court, 
Hampstead. 

L/ELIOcattleya amabile Borlases VAR. (C. Lueddemanniana X L.-c. 
Fascinator).— A large and handsome flower, with broad blush white sepals 
and petals, and a crimson-purple lip with a yellow throat. Exhibited by 
E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford. 

L.eliocattleva Golden Fleece (L.-c. Golden Gem X C. Dowiana 
aurea).— A beautiful deep golden yellow flower, with the disc and side lobes 
of the lip reddish crimson, with golden veining, and the front lobe buff 
yellow. Exhibited by Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., 
Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. G. Alexander). 

Odontioda Euterpe Davidson's var. (O. Uroskinneri X C. 
Noetzliana).— A striking hybrid, bearing a fine inflorescence of deep bronzy 
crimson flowers, with a whitish zone inside the margin of the broad front 
lobe. Exhibited by E. H. Davidson, Esq. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM Helene (parentage unrecorded). — A fine hybrid, 
bearing an inflorescence of seven flowers, heavily blotched with claret 
colour. Exhibited by E. H. Davidson, Esq. 

Cultural Commendation. 
Cattleya Euphrasia Westoxdirtyar. isuperba X Warscewiczii).— To 



282 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, .912 

Mr. H. G. Alexander, Orchid grower to Lt.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford, or a 
very strong plant, bearing an inflorescence of ten richly-coloured flowers. 
with a deep golden throat to the lip. 

BIRMINGHAM BOTANICAL AND HORTICULTURAL. 

A show of Orchids and Early Summer Flowers was held at the Birming- 
ham Botanical Gardens, Edgbaston, on June 12th last, when a number of 
hne Orchids were exhibited. 

W. Waters Butler, Esq., Southfield, Edgbaston (gr. Mr. Jones), received 
a Gold Medal for a large and elegantly-arranged group of Orchids, including 
some good varieties of Cattleya Mendelii and Mossiae, well-flowered examples 
of Miltonia vexillaria Empress Victoria Augusta, M. v. gigantea, M. v. 
alba and M. Bleuana, some choice forms of Odontoglossum crispum, O. 
eximium E. C. Ro^erson, O. Pescatorei Grand Duchess, O. ardentissimum 
concinnum, Lseliocattleya Dora magnifica, L.-c. Canhamiana vars. Rex and 
Iolanthe, and other good forms, with plants of Vanda suavis, some well- 
flowered Cymbidiums, and Phalsenopsis amabilis Rimestadiana in the 
centre. A First-class Certificate was given to Lasliocattleya Martinetii 
Southfield var., a very beautiful form, having rich bronzy yellow sepals 
and petals, and a rich purple undulate lip. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, received a Silver-gilt Medal 
for a very fine group, including a beautiful series of Miltonia vexillaria 
varieties, Cattleya Mossise and Mendelii, Lseliocattleyas, Ccelogyne 
pandurata, Odontioda Charlesworthii, many finely flowered examples of 
Odontoglossum crispum, Oncidiums, Renanthera Imschootiana, and others. 
Awards of Merit were given to Miltonia radiata and M. Hypatia. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Hay wards Heath, received a Silver 
Medal for a fine group, including Cattleya Mossiae alba Leonora, a fine 
C. Skinned alba, C. Fascinator, two well-bloomed Lselia purpurata Lowise, 
Laliocattleya Macfarlanei, Peristeriaelata, Ccelogyne pandurata, Renanthera 
Imschootiana, Dendrobium Phalaenopsis, Cypripedium callosum Sanderee, 
C. Lawrenceanum Hyeanum, C. Godefroyge leucochilum, C. Euryades 
splendens, and others. An Award of Merit was given to Cypripedium 
Goweri magnificum Schofield's var., a very fine form. 

A meeting of this Society was held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on 
Thursday, August 22nd, 1912, when the members of Committee present 
were : Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), Messrs. J. C. Cowan, J. Evans, 
W. Hatcher, W. Holmes, J. Lupton, D. McLeod, Z. A. Ward, A. 
Warburton, and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 



September, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 283 

Silver Medal for a nice group, composed of Cattleyas of the Iris section, in 
several varieties, C. Harrisoniana, C. Atalanta and C. Adula var. Maronii. 
Cypripedium Daisy Barclay, Rossetti, A. de Lairesse, tixallense, Zethus, 
Lord Derby, and Transvaal. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), was 
also awarded a Silver Medal for a group of Cypripediums, including 
radiosum, Dayanum, argenteum, Harrisianum superbum, callo-Roths- 
childianum, Transvaal, Lord Ossulston var. cherubicum, Rossetti, Niobe 
Westonbirt var., Charlesvvorthii, Baron Schroder, Lord Ossulston Cromblc- 
holme's var., and Morganise burfordiense. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), staged a group, composed 
principally of Cattleyas and Laeliocattleyas, the most noticeable being C. 
Gaskelliana, Ashtonii, Mrs. Pitt, Harrisoniana, Leopoldii, L.-c. Henry 
Greenwood, callistoglossa, Aphrodite, Herman Holmes, and Cypripedium 
Donald McCartney, a Silver Medal being awarded. 

Eric H. Davidson, Esq., Twyford, Berks (gr. Mr. Cooper), staged a 
nice group, to which a Silver Medal was awarded. It included Cattleya 
Adula var. exquisita, Germania, Eva, Fabia, Gaskelliana alba, Laelic- 
cattleya Sandhage, Odontoglossum Jasper Davidson's var., O. Harryanum, 
and Sophrolaelia heatonense. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 
Bronze Medal for a group, consisting of a nice collection of Epidendrum 
vitellinum, Odontoglossum Queen Alexandra and Andersonianum, Oncidium 
tigrinum, Cattleya Gaskelliana, Laelia tenebrosa Walton Grange var. X 
C. Maronii, and Cypripedium Maudins. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Hay wards Heath, were awarded a Silver 
Medal for a group, including Cattleya Gaskelliana alba and Iris, Laelio- 
cattleya Pelias, amabile, Ivernia, eximia, Odontoglossum ardentissimum, 
Odontioda Charlesworthii, Epidendrum vitellinum, Habenaria Susanna, 
Platyclinis filiformis, a good Pescatorea Rcezlii superba, and Cypripedium 
Fletcherianum. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, were also awarded a Silver 
Medal for a mixed group, including Cypripedium Neptune, Ultor, Shillianum 
superbum, callo-Rothschildianum, Princess, Mrs. F. L. Ames, Penelope, 
triumphans, and the pretty C. philippinense, Vanda ccerulea, Odontoglossum 
grande, Cattleya Harrisoniana, and Coelogyne corrugata. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged Cypripedium Franconia, 
Lady Wimborne, Lord Rothschild, Cattleya Atalanta Sander's var. r 
Wincqxiana, Lgeliocattleya Radium, Britannia, Fabia, Gottoiana, and 
Brassocattleya Maronise. 

First-class Certificate. 

Cattleya Ashtonii (Harrisoniana X gigas), a very good form, with a 



a8i THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1912. 

round flower of good even colour, and the lip nicely marked ; exhibited by 
Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Awards of Merit. 

Cypripedium leyburnense magnificum, and Frau Ida Brandt ; exhibited 
by the Rev. J. Crombleholme. 

Cattieya Iris var. rubra, Odontoglossum Empress Eugenie (parentage 
unrecorded), Odontioda Thwaitesii Davidson's var., and O. Schroederi 
Davidson's var. ; exhibited by Eric H. Davidson, Esq. 

Cypripedium Hassallii (bingleyense X Charlesworthii) ; exhibited by 
Messrs. Hassall & Co. 

LISTROSTACHYS O'BRIENIANA. 

In June, 1892. Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, exhibited an Orchid at a 
meeting of the R.H.S. under the name of Angraecum O'Brienianum, which 
was briefly recorded as "a thick leaved species of the Chailluanum class." 
Nothing further seems to have been recorded about it, and it is doubtful 
what has become of the original. It is recorded in the Index Kcicensis 
(Suppl. i. p. 28) as Angraecum O'Brienianum, Hort. Sand., Card. Chron., 
1892, i. 812, nomen (Quid ?) Hab. ? Another plant was exhibited at the 
meeting of the R.H.S. held on August 27th last, from the collection of 
J. S. Bergheim, Esq., Belsize Court, Hampstead, which Mr. J. O'Brien 
recognises as identical with that originally exhibited by Messrs. Sander. 
It was a fine plant, bearing five racemes, and received an Award of Merit. 
It is a Listrostachys, nearly allied to L. Sedenii, Rchb. f., but with 
distinctly broader leaves, these being coriaceous, shortly bilobed at the 
apex, and measuring 6 to 7J inches long by r| inches broad. The flowers 

aromatic fragrance. The segments are recurved, acute from a broad base, 
and about f inch long, and the curved tapering spur is i\ inches long, with 
a brownish yellow apex. This plant was imported from Western Uganda. 
The habitat of Messrs. Sander's plant is unknown, but they had a collector 
on the Congo at about this period, and although they are not certain they 
think it probably came from there. It is interesting to be able to clear up 
the identity of the plant. R. A. Rolfe. 

A CURIOUS CYPRIPEDIUM CROSS. 

An event which may interest readers of the Orchid Review happened last 
winter in my collection. Some few years ago I crossed a flower of an 
exceptionally broad-petalled Cypripedium Spicerianum with one of the 
yellow varieties of C. insigne, C. i. Youngianum. Some eight plants were 
reared, and until this year all produced spotted flowers of the usual C. 
Eeeanum character, and of no particular merit. Last winter the remaining 



September, .9.2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 285 

plant — the weakest one — bloomed, and produced a flower which was, 
apparently, a pure C. Spicerianum. The foliage is identical with that of 
the other seedlings, and much narrower than those of the C. Spicerianum 
parent. Francis H. Moore. 

Royal Infirmary, Liverpool. 
[We should like to see a flower of this plant when it blooms again, as 
the case seems anomalous. Assuming that the parents were both pure 
varieties of their respective parents, and that no Spicerianum pollen reached 
the stigma of the flower that produced the seed, this Spicerianum-like 
flower should be a form of C. Leeanum, however anomalous its characters, 
for it should be half-derived from C. insigne. One cannot attribute it to 
reversion, because C. i. Youngianum is not a form of C. Leeanum. If an 
unfertilised ovule of C. Spicerianum had developed parthenogenetically, as 
has been suspected in the case of Zygopetalum crossed with Odontoglossum, 
the case would be explained, but it has yet to be proved that such a thing 
takes place. Has any other reader had a similar experience ?— Ed. 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

A fine form of Lseliocattleya Bryan (Lselia crispa 2 X Cattleya 
Gaskelliana <? ) is sent from the collection of E. F. Clark, Esq., Evershot, 
Dorset. The cross was made in September, 1902, and it is said that the 
pollen of three varieties of the Cattleya were used, but whether this would 
lead to an increased amount of variation in the progeny remains to be seen. 
The flowers sent are fairly typical, having lilac-purple sepals and petals, 
and a deep purple well-crisped lip, with a reddish orange suffusion in the 
throat, but not so much veining as in some other hybrids of Laelia crispa. 
Lseliocattleya Bryan was originally raised in the collection of the late Mr. 
Norman C. Cookson. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

Two meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the Royal 
Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during September, on 
the 10th and 24th, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual 
hour, 12 o'clock noon. 

ic H. Davidson, 



The next meeting of the Manchester and North of England Orch 
Society will be held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on September jt 
The Committee meets at noon, and the exhibits are open to inspection 
members and the public from 1 to 4 p.m. The following meeting will 
held on October 3rd. 



286 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 191*. 

The following prizes are offered for the coming year, in addition to 
those mentioned at pp. 255, 256 : — 

Davidson's Silver Trophy, for Odontoglossums, to include species, 
varieties, and hybrids, also Miltonia vexillaria and M. Roezlii, with all 
varieties or hybrids obtained from them. Odontiodas, i.e., any form of 
Odontoglossum crossed with Cochlioda or Mesospinidium, will be included 
in this competition. This trophy is presented by Mr. Eric H. Davidson, 
Twyford, Berks., and is to be won by the Amateur who gains the largest 
number of points during the Session. A prize of two guineas will be 
awarded to the gardener of the winner. 

Sander Prizes.— A first prize of three guineas, second prize of two 
guineas, and third prize of one guinea to the gardener exhibiting the 
greatest number of groups during the Session. These prizes are presented 
bv Messrs. Sander A Sons. St. Albans. 

Society's Prizes.— The Society offers a Gold Medal, Silver-gilt Medal, 
and Silver Medal for the Amateur who (not engaged in other competitions) 
gains respectively the highest, second highest, and third highest number of 
points from July nth, 1012, to May 1st, 1913. 

Similar awards, under similar conditions, will be made to Amateurs who 
grow Orchids without the aid of a gardener; a minimum of 25 points to 
qualify for the Gold Medal. 

The usual Medals will be awarded for occasional groups where not 
engaged in other competitions. A group to consist of not less than twelve 

We have received a photograph of a fine house of Odontoglossums in the 
establishment of Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge. It shows a 
beautiful series of white and spotted forms of O. crispum. The house is one 
of three, each 100 feet by 16 feet, and the photograph was taken in May 
last. The Establishment has long been celebrated for the excellent culture 
of these beautiful plants. 

We have received a photograph of a handsome Bouquet of Orchids 
grown at Rosefield, Sevenoaks, Kent, and piesented to Her Majesty the 
Queen by Mr. de Barri Crawshay on their Majesties The King and Queen 
visiting Hirwain on June 27th, 1912. The bouquet is composed of 
Odontoglossums and Asparagus. 

R.H.S. Scientific Committee.— The following references to Orchids 
exhibited at the meetings of the Committee are taken from the Official 
Report (continued from vol. xix., p. 375) : — 

December 5th, 1911 : Double Odontoglossum crispum. — Mr. Gurnev 
Wilson, on behalf of Mr. Jensen, showed a double flower of Odontoglossum 



September, i 9 i 2 .J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 287 

crispum. The two outer whorls were normal, but the stamens had 
apparently developed and become petaloid. The plant showed the same 
peculiarity each year. 

January gth, 1912 : — 

Malformed Cypripedium.— Mr. Gurney Wilson showed flowers of a 
Cypripedium seedling without a labellum, from Messrs. James Veitch & 
Sons, which each year produced similar ones. The labellum was repre- 
sented by a minute spike only. 

Odontonia Firminii.— Mr. J. O'Brien, V.M.H., drew attention to a 
bigeneric hybrid shown by M. Firmin Lambeau under this name. Its 
parentage was alleged to be Odontoglossum crispum X Miltonia vexillaria, 
but some doubt was felt as to whether one parent may not have been 
Miltonia Phalaenopsis, on account of the colouring and form of the flower. 
The Committee expressed a desire to see further seedlings of the cross and 
for further information regarding it. 

Scelochilus VARIEGATUS.— Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., showed this 
uncommon species, and on the motion of Mr. J. T. Bennett-Poe, seconded 
by Mr. Holmes, a Botanical Certificate was unanimously awarded. 

February 6th, 1912 : — 

Abnormal Cattleya.— Mr. W. A. Manda, of St. Albans, sent a 
Cattleya bearing several flowers, every one of which was abnormal, some 
much more markedly than others. 

Catasetum Randil— Mr. Rolfe drew attention to a Catasetu'm shown 
by Messrs. Charlesworth, which he recognised as Catasetum Randii, Rolfe 



(Bvt. Mag., t. 7470, where both n 
species differs from C. barbatun 



• shown), 
ving the t 



the lip shortly truncate and broken up into many short filaments, n 
forming a single horn-like tooth. It is a native of the Amazons. 

February 20th : Coelogyxe venusta.— Sir Frederick Moore, Glasnevi 



nflorescence of this i 



:ing species. 



On the motion of Mr. O'Brien, seconded by Mr. Shea, it w 
nd the award of a Botanical Certificate 



March 



showed this species 



from S. Africa under the name of D. caulescens, to which it is allied, 
received a Botanical Certificate in 1890. Messrs. Veitch also showed a 
malformed Cypripedium Fairrieanum, in which the scape was almost 
entirely suppressed. 

March 19th: Mrs. Taylor, of Bowerdene, Henley-on-Thames, sent two 
abnormal flowers from a newly-imported plant of Dendrobium Wardianum 
giganteum. In one of them two stamens of the outer whorl had developed 
and became petaloid, and bore pollen sacs on their inner edges near the 
base. In the other the column bore at its apex three stamens, the usual one 



288 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [September, 1912. 

fully, the other two partially developed, and three lips one inside the other, 
but the two inner and progressively smaller ones arising slightly to the 
right and left respectively of the normal one. Mr. J. Gurney Fowler sent 
an Odontoglossum with four symmetrically disposed outer perianth pieces, 
six inner perianth pieces, including two lips, and two normal columns, side 
by side. The ovary also was double, but fused into one. 

April 2nd: Scuomburgkia Lueddemannii, Prill.— Sir Frederick 
Moore sent a flowering spike of this uncommon species, figured in the 
Dot. Mag., t. 8427. Some discussion arose regarding its distinctness from 
S. undulata, but the Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, to whom 
it was referred, says it is distinguished from that species by a bright yellow 
crest to the lip and other differences. It appears to have been lost sight of 
since 1862, and even now its habitat is unknown. S. undulata has been 
figured several times (see Lindl. Bot. Reg., xxx*. t. 53; Will. Orch. Alb., 
v. t. 335 ; Warn. Scl. Orch., ii. t. 21 ; Cogn. Did. Ic. Orch., Schomb. t. 2), 
and always without the yellow disc. 

April 16th: Tasmanian Orchids.— Mr. Odell showed, on behalf of 
Mr. Andrew Kingsmill, an interesting series of coloured photographs of 
Tasmanian Orchids, representing the following terrestrial genera : — 
Pterostyhs, Chiloglottis, Caladenia, Diuris, Calochilus, Dipodium, 
Glossodia and Thelymitra. 



var. — Card. Mag., 1912, p. 
3, with tig. 

Cattleya Mossi^e var. A. Dimmock. — Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. pp. 97, 
I, fig. 38. 

Cattleya Warscewiczii Low's var..— Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. p. 86, 
:• 33- 

Cypripedium bellatulum.— Gard. Mag., 1912, p. 593, with fig. 

Odontioda Madeline.— Gard, Chron., 1912, ii. pp. 101, 102, fig. 42. 

Odontoglossum crispum BubIble-bee. — Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. p. 128, 
:• 57- 

Stanhopea oculata.— Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. p. 121, fig. 54. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



-.-E.R.. C.i 
1 Ml Hulb = 



Vol. XX., No. 238. 


THE OCTOBER, 1912. 


ORCHID REVIEW 


Edited by R. 


ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 








Contents. 


Amateur's Collection 


.'296 


Orchid Notes and News 318 


Answers to Correspondents 


• :f° 


Orchid Portraits 320 


Bulbophyllum Gentilii 




Orchids at Kew 315 


Calendar of Operations for October 
Catasetum fimbriatum 


.. 501 


Orchids in season 318 


■ 29s 


Our Note Book 289 


Catasetum splendens 


. 292 


Podophyllum, the genus 300 


Dendrobium rosellum 


. 295 




Dendrobium Imthurnii 


• 3 ! 4 


Glasgow&West of Scotland Horticultural 313 


Epiphytes and Ants 

False Hybrids 

Hybridist 




Manchester and North of England Orchid 312 


■ =94 


Royal Horticultural 306 


3 caudata 






9 torcipata 


• J.05 








Cycnoches maculatum 315 


Obituary— J. S. Bergheim 

Odontoglossum seedlings 




Listrostachys caudata 297 


. 317 Listrostachys forcipata 305 


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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

The flowering of a hybrid between Oncidium macranthum and Cochlioda 
Noetzliana, under the name of Oncidioda Cooksonias, as recorded at page 
272, is an interesting event, and it will be very curious to see what the plant 
develops into when it becomes strong. We may assume that the in- 
florescence will be more or less twining in character, but one wonders 
whether it will extend to several yards in length, and have to be trained 
round and round the plant on stakes, as is often seen in the Oncidium 
parent. We have no Oncidium of this class with crimson flowers, and as 
those of the hybrid are necessarily considerably reduced in size it will be 
interesting to see if it can again be crossed with the Oncidium. 

Hybridists seem to provide us with a constant series of surprises, and 
any meeting of the R.H.S. may produce some interesting novelty. At the 
last meeting there was a very striking hybrid between Odontoglossum 
Rossii rubescens and O. Queen Alexandra, under the name of O. 
Woodroffeae, which gained a First-class Certificate. It had much of 
the character of O. Smithii, another fine O. Rossii hybrid, and will form 
a charming companion for it. There was also a beautiful hybrid between 
O. crispum and O. apterum, called O. Neptune, in which the characters 
of the two parents had combined well, gaining for the plant an Award 
of Merit; while a similar award went to Odontioda Margarita, derived 
from the very distinct Mexican Odontoglossum madrense and Cochlioda 
Noetzliana, and this was remarkable in having a light orange blotch at the 
base of each segment. The two latter were from M. Henri Graire, of St. 
Fuscien, who has already given us several very interesting novelties. 

At the previous meeting there was a surprise of another kind, in the 
shape of a fine new Dendrobium from the Philippines, which gained a First- 
class Certificate. It was briefly described under the name of D. Schuetzei, 
Rolfe, last year {O.K., xix. p. 224), when imported by Messrs. Sander, but 
now it has flowered with them, and promises to be a striking acquisition. 
Its dwarf habit and large white flowers recall D. formosum rather than D. 



29° THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Octobkr, 1912. 

Dearei, to which it was originally compared, though the shape of the spur 
and a green blotch near the base indicates a near affinity with the latter. 
It seems to have a strong constitution, but has not yet had time to get fully 
established. Not long ago the beautiful Dendrobium Sander* was 
imported by the same firm, and it is evident that the supply of novelties 
from abroad is not exhausted yet. 

Some magnificent examples of cultural skill have also appeared at recent 
meetings, which suggests that increased attention is being paid to this 
important detail. The specimen of Vanda coerulea four feet high, and 
bearing seventy-four leaves and two spikes, the best with nineteen flowers, 
for which Messrs. Sander & Sons received a Cultural Commendation on 
September 10th, was a fine sight, and the sturdy plant of the same from 
Lady Werner's collection, which gained a similar award a fortnight later, 
was also magnificent, bearing a spike of fifteen flowers, some of them five 
inches across, and of the most brilliant colour imaginable. And yet Vanda 
coerulea is often regarded as a difficult plant to grow. Then there was 
the magnificent specimen of Cypripedium Lord Derby from Baron Bruno 
Schroder's collection, bearing fourteen spikes and forty flowers, which also 
gained a Cultural Commendation at the last meeting. Such specimens 
are not grown in a day, and it is only by good cultivation that the best 
qualities of an Orchid are brought out. A good many other Cultural 
Commendations have been awarded this season, and it is interesting to see 



such recognition of what, after all, is the 
Orchidology. 



nportant departi 



An open letter from " Progressive " to the Council of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society, which appears in the Journal of Horticulture (p. 306) 
affords matter for reflection. » As a regular frequenter," he remarks, " of 
the fortnightly shows of the Royal Horticultural Society, it has often struck 
me of late that some move should be made by those in authority to 
encourage further the hybridising and cross-breeding of plants. The shows 
have attained to a certain pitch of perfection, their like cannot probably be 
found in the world, but there is still something lacking. The very perfection 
of the groups in the manner of staging and quality may, after a time, 






■thing 



encouraging the production of noveltie 
individual and specific plants stand the chance of an Award of Merit 
First-class Certificate in the Committee-room, but my complaint is more 
regard to the groups that are displayed in the' Hall. On several occasic 
I have seen the much sought-for Gold Medal awarded to otherwise vi 
fine exhibits which have not contained a single real novelty. . . . 



October, i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 291 

will surely be conceded that an exhibitor's own handiwork should receive 
a little more recognition than appears to obtain at present. I would 
venture the suggestion that a special medal be struck and awarded to groups 
in which all, or a considerable portion, of the things shown are of the 
authenticated raising of the exhibitor, and I trust that this proposal may 
receive the consideration of the Council of the R.H.S. As things are at 
present a hybridist has his opportunity of gaining an Award of Merit or (in 
very rare instances) a First-class Certificate for an individual subject placed 
before the Committee, and, if he perseveres, and is fairly successful, he may, 
perhaps, at the age of seventy-five or thereabouts, obtain the coveted 
V.M.H., and I think the time has now come when some further form of 
encouragement should be offered to induce people to take up and labour 
at this beneficient science. To encourage and foster to the utmost in its 
power work of this kind is surely one of the principal objects for which the 
Royal Horticultural Society exists. A step in the right direction I have 
indicated will cost the Society nothing, and will be an immense stimulus 
to a number of people who are at present just amusing their spare moments. 
The chance of some tangible recognition of their labour will cause them to 
take up the subject in real earnest, and the result will tend to strengthen 
and popularise the very good work that the Royal Horticultural Society 
has done and is doing." 

There may be something in the suggestion, but we cannot think that 
''Progressive" has paid much attention to Orchids during his frequent 
visits to these meetings. Judging by the constant stream of novelties 
exhibited, we should not describe such achievements as the work of a 
number of people who are just amusing their spare mi 



appea 



to stand much in need of s 



A communication respecting the Odontoglossum disease whose history 
was given at pp. 267-269 suggests a little misconception as to its develop- 
ment. Cercospora Odontoglossi is a perfectly definite organism, which 
develops from a spore, and passes through a regular cycle of existence, 
ultimately producing a crop of spores for a new generation, and unless 
these spores are present it cannot possibly develop. It is not a question of 
good or bad culture; the under surface of the leaf of a well-cultivated 
Odontoglossum crispum furnishes just as good a seed bed for its develop- 
ment as a badly-cultivated one, and, of course, every injury to an Odonto- 
glossum leaf must not be attributed to the presence of the Cercospora. It 
is something to have definitely identified the organism, and it would now 
be interesting to trace the phases of its life history. Orchidists, however, 
will probably be more concerned how to get rid of it than to cultivate it. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OBITUARY. 



J. S. Bergheim.— We regret to record the death, on September ioth last, 
as the result of an accident, of Mr. J. S. Bergheim, Belsize Court, Hamp- 
stead, the possessor of a very interesting collection of Orchids and other 
plants. Three days previously Mr. and Mrs. Bergheim were travelling in 
their motor car on the Ripley Road, when, in attempting to avoid a cart, 
the car ran on to a bank and was overturned. Mr. Bergheim sustained a 
fractured skull and other injuries, and Mrs. Bergheim a severe shock. 
They were taken to the Guildford Cottage Hospital, were Mr. Bergheim, 
who was in his seventieth year, died on September ioth without regaining 
consciousness. Mrs. Bergheim is recovering satisfactorily and the chauffeur 
escaped almost unhurt. Mr. Bergheim, who was largely interested in oil- 
fields, was a keen naturalist and a lover of plants, and his Orchid collection 
contained both the usual showy and botanical kinds, some of which he had 
himself collected during a series of trips to various foreign parts, in which 
he was accompanied by Mrs. Bergheim. A very interesting note on a 
batch of seedling Catasetums may be found at page 318 of our last volume, 
these being from a plant of C. macrocarpum which was brought from 
Trinidad a few months previously with a small collection of native Orchids. 
Mr. Bergheim was present at the R.H.S. meeting on August 27th, when he 
exhibited a plant of Listrostachys O'Brieniana (p. 284), which received an 
Award of Merit, and the remarkable Bulbophyllum Gentilii, which is 
noted at page 314. 

CATASETUM SPLENDENS. 
A spike of a handsome Catasetum has been sent by Mr. Wilhelm Hennis, 
Orchid Importer, of Hildesheim, Hanover, with the information that it was 
imported as C. Bungerothii from the lower part of Colombia, near 
Venezuela, whence the rivers run towards the Orinoco. It is a form of 
the remarkably polymorphic C. splendens, Cogn., believed to be a natural 
hybrid between C. Bungerothii and C. macrocarpum, whose history has 
already been given in detail (O.R., ii. pp. 355-357 ; iii. pp . 43 , 85, 86)/ The 
form sent by Mr. Hennis approaches C. splendens var. Alicia {Lindenia, 
x. t. 457) in colour, but the lip is much less open ; in fact the shape is 
nearer that of C. macrocarpum var. Lindenii {I.e., t. 442), which is now 
believed to be a form of C. splendens. The latter created rather a sensa- 
tion when it appeared some eighteen years ago, and as other plants 
imported by Mr. Hennis are showing for flower it will be interesting to see 



if history repeats itself. Mr. Hennis also states that he has 
Cycnoches from the same locality, which have not flowered 1 
hope to hear more about them. 



nported < 



October, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 293 

NOVELTIES. 

A number of new Orchids which flowered in various collections have been 
described since our last notes appeared (O.R., xviii. pp. 69, 70), and may 

Bulbophvllum nigrescens, Rolfe.— A Siamese species, collected near 
Chengmai, by Dr. Alexander Kerr, which flowered in the Trinity College 
Botanic Gardens, Dublin, in May, 1909. It is allied to B. secundum, 
Hook, f., but has flowers twice as large, the sepals lined and dotted with 
blackish purple on a yellowish green ground, and the petals and lip 
blackish purple, the latter with a green area at the base.— Kew Bulletin, 
1910, p. 158. 

Megaclinium lutescens, Rolfe.— Sent from the Gold Coast by Mr. 
Band, and flowered at Kew in November, 1909. It is allied to M. 
minutum, Rolfe, and has honey yellow flowers.— Kew Bull. 1910, p. 158. 

PHAIUS Cooperi, Rolfe.— A striking species, allied to P. callosus, 
Blume. It flowered in the collection of Mr. A. J. Hollington, Forty Hill, 
Enfield, and was purchased by Messrs. Sander & Sons, who exhibited it at 
a meeting of the R.H.S. in January, 1910, when it received a Botanical 
Certificate. Its habitat is supposed to be Malayan. The sepals and petals 
are bright red-brown in front, and pale yellow behind, and the lip is white 
at first, soon changing to light yellow, with a few red-brown blotches in the 
throat. It is dedicated to Mr. E. Cooper, one of Messrs. Sander's foremen. 
—Kew. Bull., 1910, p. 159. 

Lissochilus Andersonii, Rolfe.— A West African species, sent from 
Aburi, on the Gold Coast, by Mr. J. Anderson, and flowered at Kew in 
April, 1910. The sepals and petals are very pale greenish or sulphur 
yellow, and the lip white, with from five to seven light purple verrucose 
keels on the disc— Kew Bull., 1910, p. 159. 

Lvcaste peruviana, Rolfe.— A Peruvian species, introduced by Messrs. 
Sander & Sons, through their collector, M. Forget, and flowered at St. 
Albans, in May, 1910. It is allied to L. Barringtonise, Lindl., and has 
light tawny brown sepals and petals, becoming paler at the base, and 
a nearly white fringed lip.— Kew Bull., 1910, p. 160. 

Anguloa Cliftonii, Rolfe. — A striking Colombian species, introduced 
by Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, and flowered in the 
collection of Mr. J. Talbot Clifton, Lytham Hall, Lanes. The sepals and 
petals are lemon yellow, with a dark lurid purple base, and some transverse 
lines and reticulations above, and the lip is brownish yellow with a few 
brown spots. It differs from all other species of the genus in having a 
saccate base to the lip.— Kew Bull., 1910, p. 160. 

Stanhopea elegantula, Rolfe.— An ally of S. saccata, Batem., which 



294 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 1912. 

was received with a small collection of miscellaneous Orchids from Mrs, 
Birdwood, Dalkeith House, Twickenham, in 1907, and flowered at Kew in 
April, 1910. The flowers are primrose yellow, with the base of the petals 
and hypochil of the lip orange, sparsely dotted with brown. The habitat is 
unknown.— Kew Bull., 1910, p. 161. 

Listrostachys imbricata, Rolfe.— Sent from the Gold Coast by 
Mr. J. Anderson, in 1907, and flowered at Kew in February, 1910. It is a 
dwarf plant, with equitant leaves, a short inflorescence clothed with 
inbricating bracts, and small white flowers. — Kew Bull., 1910, p. 161. 

Bulbophyllum trifarium, Rolfe.— A Madagascar species from the 
collection of Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., Burford, Dorking, where it has 
flowered periodically since May, 1897. The flowers are borne in three rows 
on the inflorescence, and are dull lurid purple, with numerous minute 
darker dots on the sepals. — Kew Bull., 19 10, p. 2S0. 

Cynorchis Morlandii, Rolfe.— A terrestrial Orchid, introduced from 
the Island of Pemba, in the Mozambique district, by Mr. G. E. Morland, 
and flowered at Kew in May, 1910. It is allied to C. fastigiata, Lindl., 
and has lilac-coloured flowers, becoming greenish-white on the disc of the 
lip, and at the base of the other segments.— Kew Bull., 1910, p, 283. 

Lycaste lata, Rolfe.— A Peruvian species, allied to L. Barringtonise, 
Lindl., and having the sepals and apex of the petals green, and the rest of 
the flower white. It was introduced by M. Forget, and flowered with 
Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, in November, 1910.— Kew Bull., 1910, 
P- 370. 

Oncidium Ballii, Rolfe.— A species of the Cimiciferum section, which 
flowered in the collection of Mr. G. Shorland Ball, Burton, Westmorland, 
in October, 1908, and afterwards at Kew, from a plant presented by Mr. 
Ball. The inflorescence is compact, and the flowers are small, bright 
yellow, with brown markings on the lower part of the sepals and petals, 
and the base of the lip dark shining brown.— Kew Bull., 1910, p. 371. 

Sigmatostalix peruviana, Rolfe.— Introduced by Messrs. Sander & 
Sons through their collector M. Forget, and flowered in their establishment 
at St. Albans in November, 1910. It is allied to S. aurosanguinea, Rchb. f., 
and has straw-coloured sepals and petals, with a dark band at the base of 
the dorsal sepal and petals, and the lip light yellow with a shining orange- 
yellow crest.— Kew Bull., 1910, p. 371. 

False hybrids.— At page 255 a note appeared about a seedling from 
the collection of E. F. Clark, Esq., Evershot, Dorset, which resembled 
Lselia cinnabarina both in habit and flowers. Mr. Clark now suggests that 
it may be a false hybrid. About eleven years ago we published a note on 
a seedling said to have been obtained as a cross between Laelia cinnabarina 



October, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 295 

(O.R.. ix. p. 225). Thinking that the C. citrina influence might be more 
apparent in the second generation, Mr. Clark crossed the plant with some 
C. citrina pollen, and obtained several seedlings resembling the Lselia 
parent in the foliage, but eventually all but one died. It was thought that 
this also was lost, but Mr. Clark now suggests that it is just possible that 
one survived and produced the flower mentioned. The cross might be 
repeated, for C. citrina has produced true hybrids in other cases. 

CATASETUM FIMBRIATUM, 

The female flowers of Catasetum fimbriatum, Lindl., have again appeared, 
this time in the establishment of Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywaids 
Heath, on a plant which had been obtained from a lady friend, Miss Bethel, 
who found it at Posedas, on the River Parana, in Paraguay. A few weeks 
ago a female flower from this plant was sent to Kew, which was not 
identiried, the females of several species being very much alike. A little 
later, however, an inflorescence from the same plant was sent, bearing a 
flower of each sex, with a third bloom in an intermediate condition, when 
the species was at once identified. The female of this species was first 
recorded in September, 1891, when a plant from the collection of 
\V. J. Wright, Esq., of Denmark Hill, which had been obtained from 
Monte Video, was exhibited at a meeting of the R.H.S., bearing two male 
and two female flowers on the same inflorescence (Gard. Chron., 1891, 
ii. p. 310). It obtained a Botanical Certificate, and the inflorescence is 
now preserved at Kew. The history of the species was given four years 
ago {O.R., xvi. p. 283), and a very interesting note about its habitat from 
the pen of Mr. H. Gurney Aggs (I.e., p. 335), describing the circumstances 
under which he met with it at the great Iguaza Falls, South Brazil. 

Dendrobium rosellum.— A Bornean Dendrobium belonging to the 
section Aporum has just flowered in the collection of the Hon. N. C. 
Rothschild, Ashton Wold, Oundle, possibly for the first time in Europe. 
The species was described by Mr. H.N. Ridley, Director cf the Singapore 
Botanic Garden, in 1896 (Journ. Linn. Soc, xxxi. p. 269), from materials 
collected at Selabat, Borneo, by Haviland, who found the plant on the 
trunk of a fallen tree. It is nearly allied to D. Serra, Lindl., but has 
larger, rose-coloured, not white, flowers, and a differently-shaped lip. The 
species has since been collected in Gunoner Panti, Johore, in the Malay 
Peninsula. The plant above mentioned was sent to Kew for determination, 
with two other species of the Aporum section, which proved to be D. Serra, 
Lindl., and D. eulophotum, Lindl. All had been imported from Borneo 
with various other species. R. A. R. 



= 96 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 1912. 

THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 
By C. Alwyn Harrison, f.r.h.s. 
Cool House. 
With the beginning of this month, winter treatment must come into 
operation, and fire heat must be employed regularly at night, and even 
during the day should cold and damp weather be experienced. One of the 
main factors in the successful culture of Orchids is to maintain an even and 
regular temperature throughout, and an average of 55 to 6o° Fahr. by day 
and 50 to 55 by night must be adhered to as closely as possible. Now 
that most Orchids have finished their growth, and are preparing to rest, an 
abundance of fresh air must be admitted. No shade will now be required, 
and all the liquid shading which was applied to the roof glass early in the 
summer, must be washed off. Damping down will be needed twice a day, 
at 9.30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Water will be needed in restricted quantity now 
that the cooler weather has set in, and the following may be taken as a 
rough guide. To all plants in bud and full growth give a good dose every 
other day, and to those at rest every four or five days. 

It is now fairly gay in the Cool house, for the hybridist has produced 
many magnificent autumn-flowering Odontoglossums. Give any of these 
all the light possible, for if kept in too gloomy surroundings the buds will 
turn yellow and drop off. 

Cattleya House. 

Watering and damping will be needed as advised for the Cool house. 
An average temperature of 6o° to 70 Fahr. by day and 58 to 63 by night 
indicates the degree of warmth now necessary for the inmates of this house. 
Do not repot any Cattleyas unless they need it, as I am firmly convinced 
that May and June are the best months for potting all members of this class, 
exception being made of those which bloom during these months. Sponge 
the leaves of all these Orchids with tepid rain water every fortnight, and 
keep a thorough watch for scale and thrip. For scale, the affected parts 
should be sponged with methylated spirit, and for thrip fumigation must be 
resorted to. 

Several autumn-flowering Cattleyas should now be out or in sheath, 
namely, C. labiata, C. Dowiana aurea, C. Harrisoniana, and a number of 
hybrids partly derived from these species. It should be remarked that 
whenever the flowers are seen to be pushing up the base of the sheath, 
water should be cautiously applied until the blooms are half-way up, for, if 
too much water be given during the early stages, the blossoms are liable to 
damp off. Vanda ccerulea and Kimballiana, with some of the Brazilian 
Miltonias and Oncidiums, are also gay at this season, and some of the 
autumn-flowering Cypripediums are beginning to open. 



<Vh 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



207 



LISTROSTACHYS CAUDATa, 
The annexed figure represents a plant of the remarkable Listrostachys 
■caudata which has just flowered at Kew. The species is a native of West 
Tropical Africa, and was originally described by Lindley in 1836, under the 
name of Angrsecum caudatum {Bot. Reg., t. 1844), the author describing it 




Fig. 36. Listkost 



. 



LoddU 



remarkable new species imported from Sierra Leone by 
of Hackney, in whose establishment it had flowered 
autumn previous. It had been grown on a block of wood in their si 
epiphytes. Lindley pointed out the unusually elongated spur, me 



298 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, ,9.2. 

nine inches long, as a curious feature, recalling Habenaria longicauda and 
Agraecum sesquipedale, and remarked: "For what wise purpose these 
extraordinary appendages may have been designed by Nature Ave may well 
be unable to imagine." Somewhat later it was figured in the Botanical 
Magazine (t. 4370), from a plant in the Clowes collection, which had been 
bequeathed to Kew. The species was afterwards collected on the Brass 
River, a tributary of the Niger, by Barter, a dried specimen collected by him 
bearing eight flowers. It is now known as Listrostachys caudata, having been 
transferred to Listrostachys by Reichenbach, in 1864 (Walp. Ann., vi. p. 
907), on account of the double stipes of the pollinia. In 1886 a plant was 
exhibited at a meeting of the R.H.S. bearing a ten-flowered inflorescence,, 
and such a plant is shown in a painting in Rcichcnbachia (ser. 1. li. p. 41, t. 
67). It is a very striking plant, its long twisted spurs giving it a remarkable 
appearance. The sepals, petals, and spur are brownish green in colour, 
and the limb of the lip white. It flowers regularly during late summer and 
autumn. The species is rare in gardens, but not difficult to cultivate 
under proper conditions. It should be grown in the Warm house, in a 
constantly moist atmosphere of 75 to 8o° in summer, and 6o° to 65 in 
winter, during which latter period less water is required. The Kew plant 
is grown on a block, and has four growths, two of which are now flowering. 
The photograph, taken by Mr. F. W. Rolfe, represents the plant about one- 
third natural size. The insect which fertilises the flowers is, we believe, 
unknown, but it is probably some large moth or butterfly, in which connection 
the following paragraph from Darwin will be read with interest :— 



■Til,: 



cum sesquipedale, of which the large six-rayed flo 



stars formed of snow-white wax, have excited the admiration of travellers in 
Madagascar, must not be passed over. A green, whip-like nectary of 
astonishing length hangs down beneath the labellum. In several flowers 
sent me by Mr. Bateman I found the nectaries eleven and a-half inches 
long, with only the lower inch and a-half filled with nectar. What can be 
the use, it may be asked, of a nectary of such disproportionate length ? We 
shall, I think, see that the fertilisation of the plant depends on this length, 
and on nectar being contained only within the lower and attenuated 
extremity. It is, however, surprising that any insect should be able to 
reach the nectar. Our English Sphinxes have proboscides as long as their 
bodies ; but in Madagascar there must be moths with proboscides capable 
of extension to a length of between ten and eleven inches ! This belief of 
mine has been ridiculed by some entomologists, but we now know from 
Fritz Miiller that there is a Sphinx-like moth in South Brazil which has a 
proboscis of nearly sufficient length, for when dried it was between ten and 
eleven inches long. When not protruded it is coiled up into a spiral of at 
least twenty windings." 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



EPIPHYTES AND ANTS. 



An article entitled " Symbiosis of Ants and Plants," by Mr. H. N. Ridley, 
F.R.S., Director of the Singapore Botanic Gardens, recently appeared in 
the Annals of Botany, and under the heading "Relations of Ants to 
Epiphytes," we find some interesting remarks on the conditions under which 
certain epiphytic Orchids grow in the tropics. 

Ants, Mr. Ridley remarks, play a considerable part in many cases in the 
growth of epiphytes, and especially in Orchids. All trees do not bear 
epiphytes. On some of those with smooth bark or with longitudinally 
grooved bark epiphytes are seldom if ever to be found. Whether a tree 
does or does not bear epiphytes depends on the flow of rain down the 
branches and stem. Where in smooth-barked trees like Macaranga the 
rain flows quickly off, vegetable debris and spores cannot rest, and no 
epiphytes are borne. A notch in the bark of one of these may, however, 
retain a little soil, and epiphytes then usually appear. Lichens are 
abundant on these smooth-barked trees, and usually absent from rough- 
barked ones. Ficus Benjamina is a smooth-barked tree, but liable to cracks 
or other injuries, so that it carries epiphytes readily in parts. The boughs 
are covered with lichens, and where they are more or less vertical, with a 
strong slope, nothing more grows on the upper side where the great rush of 
rain-water takes place. On the sides where water more slowly trickles off r 
mosses and Algae starting from a crack in the bark commence growing. 
As they increase in growth they retain more and more of the debris, and 
may cover a considerable patch. In doing so they kill out the lichens. 

When the patch is large enough, ferns or phanerogamous plants appear. 
The roots of the Orchids and creeping rhizomes of the ferns retain the 
vegetable debris washed down and blown by the wind, and the plants 
increase until the bough may be covered with epiphytes. 

As soon as the Orchids commence to grow, or even before, the ants 
begin to use the spot as a suitable one for their nests. The Pigeon-Orchid 
(Dendrobium crumenatum) is one very attractive to ants. It emits slender 
white roots so as to form a cage at the stem base, which is quickly occupied 
by a species of ant, a Dolichoderus. This ant brings a quantity of soil and 
piles it up, and fills in the spaces between the roots beneath which it 
makes the nest. The earth thus brought up supplies food to the plant and 
also serves to keep the roots cool and moist. The old nests, as time goes 
on, accumulate on the tree boughs till quite a quantity of soil is supplied to 
the roots of the various epiphytes. 

I do not find that all the great number of epiphytic plants on our trees 
are supplied in this way with nutriment, but undoubtedly it is one of the 
factors of the great development of epiphytes in the Eastern Tropics. 



3 oo THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 1912. 

Occasionally termites add a supply of soil to the epiphyte garden. In 
Arenga saccharifera and other palms of which the leaf-bases remain on the 
trunk, the termites tunnel out the leaf-bases and replace the destroyed 
tissue with mud, which remains in after the termites have left. Through 
this mud such plants as Davallia solida push their rhizomes and utilize the 
soil brought up. Ants, too, carry this soil further up the trees to form 
their nests beneath the Orchids, &c. 

There are, however, no special modifications to induce the ants to nest 
among and around the roots of the Orchids and other such plants, unless 
the emission of the roots from the base of the stems in Dendrobiums in such 
a form that it is convenient for the ants can be said to be one. But, 
especially from observing young plants, I am of opinion that the nesting of 
the ants among the roots is distinctly advantageous, seedlings not infested 
by ants being weaker and suffering more from drought. 



THE GENUS PODOPHYLLUM. 

Posephyllum pauciflorum, Ridl., is a curious Malayan Orchid that was 
originally described as Agrostophyllum pauciflorum, Hook, f., and after- 
wards transferred to Eria, as E. minutifiora, Ridl. Schlechter has now 
reduced it to the Javan Lectandra parviflora, J. J. Smith, and added two 
new species from New Guinea. But Lectandra was not published until 
several months later than Posephyllum, and an examination of authentic 
examples of the two species shows that the Javan plant is specifically 
distinct from that of the Malayan Peninsula. Posephyllum is nearly allied 
to Appendicula, and has a very similar habit, but differs in having eight 
pollen masses. The flowers are small, and are borne in very short auxiliary 
racemes. Four species are at present known, as shown in the following 
enumeration : — 

P. pauciflorum, Rid!. Mater. Fl. Malay Renins., p. 109. Agrostophyllum 
pauciflorum, Hook. f. Fl. Brit, hid., v. p. 824 ; Hook. Ic. PL, t. 2097. 
Eria minutifiora, Ridl. in Journ. Linn. Soc, xxxii. p. 297.— Native of 
Johore, Pahang and Perak, in the Malayan Peninsula. 

P. parviflora, Rolfe. Lectandra parviflora, J. J. Sm. in Bull. Dep. 
Agric. Necrl. hid., xiii. p. 55, with tab. L. pauciflora, Schlechter in Fedde 
Repert. Sp. Nov., Beih. i. p. 363.— Native of Java. 

P. podochiloides, Rolfe. Eria podochiloides, Schlechter in K. Sclmm. 
et. Lauterb. Nachtr. Fl. Deutsch. Sild-See, p. 182. Trichotosia podochiloides, 
Kranzl. in Engl. Pflanrenr., iv. Orch.-Dendr. ii. p. 136. Lectandra 
podochiloides, Schlechter in Fedde Repert. Sp. Nov., Beih. p. 364.— Native 
of New Guinea. 

P. tenuipes, Rolfe. Lectandra tenuipes, Schlecter in Fedde Repert. 
Sp. Nov., Beih. p. 365.- Native of New Guinea. R. A. Rolfe. 



October, 1912,] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 3°* 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR OCTOBER. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill Gardens, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
Owing to the continuation of the wet, cold, sunless weather it will be 
advisable to maintain the temperatures a little above the usual winter 
figures given below, for some of the plants are rather late in completing, 
their growths, and this will assist them to develop and finish more rapidly 
than would otherwise be the case. The weather, and the outside conditions 
generally, have been as bad as they can possibly be for the cultivation of 
Orchids which delight in heat and light, but for Cool house Orchids they 
have been all that can be desired, which is in striking contrast with those 
of last year, when everything favoured the heat-loving Orchids to the 
detriment of the Cool section. 

We may now at any time expect frost, and very cold nights, and every 
care must be taken to maintain the temperatures somewhere near the 
proper figures, for, if allowed to fall too low, much harm will accrue, 
especially with so many of the growths in a soft and unconsolidated con- 
dition. As the growths complete themselves it will be wise to gradually 
reduce the temperatures to the minimum degree. 

Temperatures.— During this and next month the atmospheric 
temperatures at night should be as follows : — 

East Indian house, 65 to 70 . 

Cattleya and Mexican house, 6o° to 65 . 

Intermediate house, 58 to 62 . 

Odontoglossum house, 55 to 6o°. 

Should extremely cold weather prevail, a slight fall in the temperature, 
if not allowed to remain for too long a time, will do no harm, provided the 
atmosphere is kept in a dry condition. Fluctuations in temperature, how- 
ever, must be guarded against as much as possible, and no pains should be 
spared in maintaining them at their proper figures. 

Shading. — The shading on all the houses may now be removed, as- 
light is of the greatest importance in the ripening progress of all plants, yet 
this factor is often neglected. Plants fully exposed to the light during the 
times when there is no danger of scorching, produce their flowers more 
freely, and are less susceptible to the effects of errors of treatment in other 
ways. It is particularly important, after a season like the present one, 
when the growths of so many of our plants have been made under adverse 
conditions as regards heat and light, that they should receive all the light 
possible. And there is great danger of plants whose growths are not 
properly ripened meetmg with some checks during the winter, which may 
do them considerable harm. 

Atmospheric moisture must now be applied with greater moderation. 



3°* THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 1912. 

than has been previously advised, as should the supply be excessive great 
harm may accrue. Rather err in keeping the atmosphere on the dry side 
than in a saturated condition, especially if the outside conditions are cold 
and wet. 

Ventilation.— Owing to the amount of moisture in the atmosphere 
-outside, air should be admitted in all departments whenever the conditions 
are favourable, but it must be given with discretion, and draughts must be 
avoided. 

Watering.— We have now reached the season of the year when the 
watering of Orchids becomes a study, and no plant should have water 
applied to it unless absolutely necessary, and then it should have sufficient 
to thoroughly moisten the compost. No hard and fast rule can be laid 
down, as individual plants vary considerably, and every effort should be 
made to understand their requirements. 

Dendrobiums that have finished their growth should be thoroughly 
cleaned and placed in their winter quarters in the resting house, where 
they should receive all the light possible, and only sufficient water to prevent 
shrivelling. 

Deciduous Calanthes.— Plants of C. Veitchii, C. Bryan, C. William 
Murray, and other hybrids of the vestita section, are now showing their flower 
spikes from the base of the newly-made pseudobulbs. The plants should 
be afforded ample space and as much light as possible, and water should be 
applied to them whenever they become dry. The later-flowering varieties 
of the C. Regnieri section are also making up their new bulbs, and still 
need abundance of water at the roots, with an occasional watering with 
liquid manure. As the flowers begin to expand the atmosphere must be 
kept drier than when the plants were in full growth. The temperature at 
night should not be allowed to fall below 65 until the flowers are expanded, 
when they may be placed in a house a few degrees lower, where the flowers 
will last considerably longer than they would in a high temperature. 

Thunias.— Owing to the sunless season, these plants have not yet lost 
their leaves, although having been in their resting quarters for some 



onsiderable time. Whilst the foli 



5 green the pla 



be supplied with water at the root whenever they become dry. It is also a 
good plan to syringe the plants occasionally, especially the undersides of 
the leaves, to keep them free from red spider and other insect pests, which 
are sometimes troublesome. 

Oncidiums.— In the Cool house, several species of Oncidium, such as 
O. crispum, O. Forbesii, O. varicosum, and others, will be developing 
flower spikes and preparing to bloom. It is very easy for these plants to 
exhaust themselves so much by overflowering that they are useless 
afterwards. To prevent this, the spikes should be removed from weakly 



October, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



3° 3 



plants as soon as they are observed to be pushing up, and on the strongest 
plants as soon as all the flowers are open. 

Vandas.— In the Cattleya house such plants as V. Kimballiana and V. 
Watsonii are developing their flower spikes, and should have water applied 
to them until the flowers are open sufficient to keep the sphagnum in a 
growing condition, but after the flower spikes are cut, or faded, very little 
water is needed to keep their terete leaves plump. V. tricolor, V. suavis, 
and others of this section which have lost some of their lower leaves, may 
be repotted at this season, when they soon recover from the ordeal and 
-quickly re-establish themselves. 

Cymbiuiums. — Strong healthy plants of Cymbidium Tracyanum, C. 
Lowianum, C. insigne, and many hybrids that are now showing flower 
spikes should have plenty of water at the root, others which are not yet 
showing should be kept rather dry for some little time longer, otherwise 
growth will commence and the plants fail to bloom. 

Cypripediums will now be pushing up their flower spikes, and these 
should be neatly tied up to small green stakes of suitable lengths, as advised 
last month. C. superbiens (Veitchii), as it passes out of bloom, should be 
repotted, should this be necessary. This plant succeeds best grown in the 
Cattleya house in a partially shaded position, potted in a compost as 
advised for other tessellated-leaved Cypripediums. 

Disas.— The tuberous roots of these most attractive terrestrial Orchids 
are best repotted at this season, just as the new growths push up from the 
sides of the old flower spikes. The pots must be well drained, using a 
compost of equal portions of fibrous peat, osmunda fibre, and sphagnum 
moss, with a fair sprinkling of half-decayed leaves and coarse silver sand, 
or, better still, powdered sand stone, all mixed thoroughly well together. 
After repotting, one watering should be given to settle the compost around 
them, and then for some time spraying once or twice a day, or even more, 
according to the outside conditions, will suffice to keep them moist. The 
house in which they are growing must be freely ventilated, with only 
sufficient heat to keep frost away from them in cold weather. They delight 
in a cool, moist airy position at all times. 

Miltonias.— Miltonia spectabilis and its varieties Moreliana and 
atrorubans, with M. Clowesii and M. Regnellii, are interesting members of 
this genus for flowering during late summer and early autumn. After the 
plants have bloomed, and the pseudobulbs have finished growing, the 
supply of moisture at the roots should be gradually reduced, and the 
rooting material kept on the dry side until growth becomes again active in 
the new year. M. Roezlii, and its variety alba, with any late-flowering 
plants of M. vexillaria, or its hybrids, may still be repotted, should they 
require it, when the new growths are in a desirable condition. The whole 



3°4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 19 12. 

of these plants should now be placed in their winter quarters, at the warm 
end of the Intermediate house, and water applied to them only when 

Odontoglossums.— O. grande, O. Insleayi and O. Schlieperianum are 
what are generally called the autumn-flowering section. These species are 
amongst the easiest Odontoglossums to cultivate, therefore they are often 
seen in a good condition in places where one hardly expects to find them. 
They are best accommodated in the Intermediate house, at the coolest end. 
When in full growth the plants must have liberal supplies of water at the 
roots, but after flowering, and during their period of rest, only sufficient 
moisture is needed to keep the pseudobulbs plump, and the roots and 
foliage in a healthy condition. The repotting of the O. crispum section 
must be pushed on with as the plants attain the desired condition. Plants 
pushing up spikes should be placed in such a position that they may obtain 
all the light possible, and every care should be taken to prevent slugs and 
other pests from reaching them. Flowers of these very beautiful plants are 
most valuable during the winter months. 

Cattleyas, L^elias and LvELlocATTLEYAS may still have attention as 
regards repotting, providing they are in the desired condition, namely 
pushing new roots. The cultivator sometimes has to decide between two 
evils, namely, repotting a plant at an unsuitable time or allowing it to 
remain in a half decomposed compost ; my advice in cases of this descrip- 
tion is to repot, but of course some little discretion is necessary. Ladia 
anceps and its varieties are now pushing up their flower spikes rapidly and 
must still have generous treatment. The spikes should be carefully and 
neatly staked up, and should be tied in such a position that their tips do 
not touch the roof glass. Laelia pumila, in fact all the Laelias which have 
been placed in the Cool house for the summer months, had better now be 
placed in a light position in the Intermediate house, and liberal supplies of 
water at the root will be necessary until they have finished flowering and 
the growths are completed, when the plants may be repotted, should they 
require it. They succeed best in shallow pans, suspended from the roof, 
and a compost as advised for Cattleyas will answer their requirements. 

General Remarks.— Every opportunity should be taken to push on 
with necessary work, which at this season is very pressing. The potting 
and cleaning of the plants takes up much time, chat is if they are done 
thoroughly, as it must be, to be effectual. The sloven makes no headway 
in anything, and work that is only half done had better be left alone'. 
The placing of our plants in their winter quarters is one of the main things 
which will occupy our time during the present month, and every effort 
should be made to eradicate the insect and other pests which trouble us 
at this season. 



October, i 9 t2.j THE ORCHID REVIEW. 30$ 

LISTROSTACHYS FORCIPATA. 

The genus Listrostachys is remarkably polymorphic, and the species here 
figured is so different from L. caudata, figured on page 297, that one might 
wonder what could be the connection between them. In both, however, 
the pollinia are attached by separate stipites t<> a single basal -land, forming 




a distinguishing character from Angraecum, with its single stipes. The two 
species, though so widely different in appearance, are united by a chain of 
intermediate forms, showing the greatest diversity both in habit and floral 
structure. Listrostachys forcipata was described by Kranzlin in 1894 
{Engl, fahrb., xix. p. 254), from dried specimens collected bv Preuss in the 



3°6 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, i 9 ii. 

primeval forest west of Buea, in the Cameroons, at 4200 feet elevation. It 
was said to be one of the smallest species in the genus, much resembling 
Oncidium iridifolium in habit. In February, 1902, a plant flowered at Kew 
which had been received in the previous year from Buea, and was identified 
with L. forcipata (O.R., x. p. 72). This plant has frequently flowered since, 
and is here figured natural size, from a photograph by Mr. F. W. Rolfe. 
The plant bears about six fleshy equitant leaves, and two short racemes with 
about twelve and thirteen flowers. The latter are of a peculiar semipellucid 
white, right down to the base of the slender pedicels, with a green column. 
The spur is about half an inch long, suddenly clavate from the apex and 
then slightly bilobed or forcipate, in reference to which the specific name 
is given. A plant was exhibited at a meeting of the Scientific Committee 
of the K.H.S. in August, 1908, by the late Mr. James Douglas, and received 
a Botanical Certificate (O.R., xvi. p. 276). It is a very distinct and pretty 
little plant, and quite easily grown in a small pan, suspended from the roof 
of the Warm house, and carefully watered. R. A. R. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
At the fortnightly meeting held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent 
Square, Westminster, on September 10th, there was a good display of 
Orchids, including the fine new Dendrobium Schuetzei, and the awards 
consisted of two First-class Certificates, two Awards of Merit, one Cultural 
Commendation, and one Medal. 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), 
and Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), R. Brooman White, W. Bolton, W. H. 
White, Arthur Dye, J. E. Shill, J. Cypher, W. H. Hatcher, W. P. Bound, 
W. Cobb, J. Charlesworth, A. McBean, F. J. Hanbury, W. Thompson, 
Stuart Low, Gurney Wilson, and Sir Harry J. Veitch. 

H. T. Pitt, Esq., Rosslyn, Stamford Hill, N. (gr. Mr. Thurgood), 
staged a fine group of Orchids with a ground-work of Adiantum, to which 
a Silver Flora Medal was awarded. It contained numerous good Cattleyas, 
noteworthy among them being forms of C. Gaskelliana, suavior, Source 
d'Or, Armstrong!*, and Gertrude Pitt (Mossise X Pittise), Laliocattleya 
Nysa, Hector, Henry Greenwood, and rubiginosa (L. Boothiana X C. 
Schilleriana), Cypripedium Wottonii, Masdevallia Doris, Brassocattleyas, 
some fine Odontioda Charlesworthii, Odontoglossum crispum King of 
Britain, a handsomely blotched variety, forms of O. Hyeanum, and others. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), sent a 
small choice group, including Odontoglossum Aurora (Rossii X 
Lambeauianum), bearing an erect spike of nine large white flowers, tinged 
with lilac and spotted with dark purple on the sepals and petals, O. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



crispum Louis, a B 


.ne wh 


ite flowei 


r with a 


. large 


a fine Odontioda 


Chad 


esworthii 


, with 


anotht 


unknown parentag 


e, Cattleya Cy 


bele Sanderae, 


Iris X L.-c. Ophir; 


), a bri 


ghtyello 


w Howe 


:r, with 


with yellow, and others. 








H. F. Goodson, 


Esq., 


Fairlawi 


i. Putm 


sv (gr. 


handsome Cattleya 


Khod 


a Fairla 




, C. At 


rose-coloured form, 


Laeli* 


ocattleya 


Elva 


var. St. 



Brassocattleyas. (See also Awards). 

His Grace The Duke of Marlborough, Blenheim Palace, Woodstock 
(gr. iVIr. Hunter), sent Laeliocattleya eximia Blenheim var. '(C. Warneri 
alba X purpurata alba), white with purple veining on the lip, L.-c. Phoenix 
Blenheim var. (L.-c. Greenwoodii X C. Hardyana), a richly-coloured 
form, Vanda ccerulea blenheimensis, a very fine form, richly tessellated 
with blue on a lighter ground, and a hybrid Cypripedium. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. W. Hopkins), sent 
Laeliocattleya Mrs. Donald MacMaster (C. Dowiana aurea X L.-c. 
luminosa), a very fine hybrid, most like the Cattleya parent in shape, and 
the sepals and petals yellow, suffused and veined with rosy red, while the 
lip is rosy crimson, with yellow lines at the base and some darker lines on 
the disc. 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Hay wards Heath, staged an interesting 
little group, including a richly-coloured Cattleya Circe, a white form of 
Lasliocattleya eximia, Brassocattleya Maronias, a well-flowered Maxillaria 
nigrescens, Vanda Kimballiana, Dendrobium Dearei, Cypripedium 
leyburnense magnificum, and the pretty orange-coloured La;lia monophylla. 

Mr. Sydney Flory, Tracy's Nursery, Twickenham, staged a small choice 
group, including a fine plant of Pescatorea Klabochorum, Zygopetalum 
maxillare, the rare Dendrobium Maccarthiae, a good Cattleya Pittiana, 
Cypripedium Curtisii with eight flowers, C. Kubele grandis, C. beechense, 
C. Lord Ossulston, C Massaianum, C. James H. Veitch, and two good 
Odontoglossums. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a pretty little group, 
including good specimens of Oncidium macranthum, varicosum and 
incurvum, some good Dendrobium Phalaenopsis, Renanthera Imschootiana, 
Cattleya Dowiana aurea and Harrisoniana, Brassocattleya Maroniae, Laelio- 
cattleya Henry Greenwood, Stanhopea graveolens, and the striking 
Cirrhopetalum appendiculatum. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, showed Cattleya Adula 
excelsa, a very fine form, having bronzy yellow sepals and petals and a 
rose-purple lip, C. Thurgoodiana var. Model, a finely-shaped and richly- 
coloured flower, and two hybrid Odontoglossums. 



308 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, i 9 ii. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a choice group, including a 
fine specimen of Arachnanthe Lowii, bearing three fine pendulous spikes, 
Coelogyne brunnea, and the rare C. Micholitzii, Lsliocattleya venusta 
(L.-c. Schilleriana x Aphrodite), a pretty white flower, with a purple 
feather on the petals and a rich purple lip, L.-c. Fred Gott (L.-c. 
Martinetii X C. bicolor), a rosy-coloured flower with purple lip, L.-c. 
Phcenix (L.-c. Greenwoodii X C. Dowiana aurea), and a Stanhopea of the 
Wardii group. (See also Awards). 

First-class Certificates. 

Dendrobium Schuetzei (Rolfe).— A very handsome Philippine species 
allied to D. Sanderae, but having shorter, stouter pseudobulbs, about nine 
to twelve inches long, and a spike of four or five large pure white flowers, 
with a small emerald green disc to the lip and a few dark spots at the base. 
Exhibited by Messrs, Sander & Sons. 

L.eliocattleya memoria H. A. Tracy (L.-c. Canhamiana x Hardyana). 
—A remarkably fine hybrid, showing much of the character of the Cattleya 
parent, and having the sepals tinged with rosy lilac, the recurved undulate 
petals rose, with a paler margin, and the broad undulate lip intense purple 
crimson, with some yellow veining on the disc and a yellow area on each 
side of the throat. Exhibited by H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney 
(gr. Mr. G. E. Day). 

Awards of Merit. 

L.eliocattleya St.-Gothard Glebe var. (L.-c. Gottoiana X C. 
Hardyana).— A very large and handsome form, most like the Cattleya 
parent, and having the sepals and petals tinged and marbled with rosy lilac, 
and the lip deep ruby red with a yellow disc. Exhibited by C. J. Phillips, 
Esq., The Glebe, Sevenoaks. 

Odontioda Devossiana Fowler's var. (O. Edwardii x C. Noetzliana). 
—A brilliantly-coloured form, bearing branched panicles of red-purple 
flowers, with undulate sepals and petals, and a bright yellow crest to the 
lip. Exhibited by J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Glebelands, S. Woodford (gr. 
Mr. J. Davis). 

Cultural Commendation. 

Vanda CCERULEA.— To Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, for a 
remarkably line specimen, four feet in height, and bearing seventy-four 
leaves and two fine spikes, one with ten the other with nineteen large and 
well-coloured flowers. 

At the meeting held on September 24th there was a fine display of 
Orchids, including several promising novelties, and the awards consisted 
of three Medals, one First-class Certificate, five Awards of Merit, and two 
Cultural Commendations. 



October, i 9I2 .J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 309 

Orchid Committee present : J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), and 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), C. J. Lucas, Gurney Wilson, J. Wilson 
Potter, R. A. Rolfe, R. G. Thwaites, F. Sander, F. J. Hanbury, C. H. 
Curtis, T. Armstrong, A. A. McBean, Walter Cobb, J. Charlesworth, W. 
H. Hatcher, Arthur Dye, J. E. Shill, W. H. White, Sir Harry J. Veitch, 
W. Bolton, R. Brooman White, J. S. Moss, and de Barri Crawshay. 

Lady Wernher, Luton Hoo, Beds. (gr. Mr. A. W. Metcalfe), received a 
Silver Flora Medal for a very fine group, including about twenty well-grown 
plants of Dendrobium formosum, and eight handsome Vanda ccerulea, with 
good examples of Lseliocattleya Dominiana, bletchleyensis, Walter Gott, 
Marquis de Wavrin, and Cattleya Adula, making a fine display. 

E. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), staged a 
pretty little group, including seven plants of Cattleya Dowiana aurea, with 
examples of C. Adula, Lasliocattleya Golden Oriole Borlases var., having 
bright salmon-red sepals and petals, and a dark crimson lip, with some yellow 
veining in the throat, and Sophrocattleya Dora (Cattleya Dowiana Rosita 
X Sophrocattleya Cleopatra), a promising hybrid, having broad orange- 
brown sepals and petals, and a crimson lip, with two yellow blotches in the 
throat. A Vote of Thanks was accorded. 

Mrs. Norman Cookson, Oakwood, Wylam (gr. Mr. H. J. Chapman), 
sent a beautiful hybrid Cypripedium, raised by G. F. Moore, Esq., between 
C. Argus Mcensii and C. Fairrieanum, having a cream white flower, tinted 
and dotted with purple. It is a form of C. luxembergense. 

F. J. Hanbury, Esq., Brockhurst, East Grinstead, showed Cypripedium 
Winifred Hollington Brockhurst var. (callosum Sanderse X niveum), a 
pretty light-coloured form, but very distinctly flushed with pink, though 
lighter in colour than the type. He also sent what we believe to be a form 
of C. longwoodiense (Charlesworthii X Leeanum), having a white dorsal 
sepal, with a small green base bearing a few brown spots. 

C. J. Phillips, Esq., The Glebe, Sevenoaks, sent Cattleya Fabia Glebe 
var., a very fine form, having bright rose-purple sepals and petals, and a 
deep purple-crimson lip, with some yellow veining in the throat. 

Baron Bruno Schroder, The Dell, Englefield Green (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill), 
sent a good plant of Brassocattleya Maroniaj bearing three spikes and six 
flowers. 

Francis Wellesley, Esq., Westfield, Woking (gr. Mr. W. Hopkins), sent 
Lseliocattleya Mrs. Phayre var. magnificum (C. Dowiana X L.-c. Norba), a 
promising hybrid, bearing an inflorescence of three flowers, having deep 
yellow sepals and petals, and an open rosy red lip, with some yellow veining 
in the throat. 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a fine group of Cattleyas and 
Laeliocattleyas, prominent among them being C. Nestor (Harrisoniana X 



3 IG THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 1912. 

Iris), having rosy purple sepals and petals, and a three-lobed lip, with small 
yellowish side lobes and disc, and the front lobe shading off to purple at the 
margin, some good forms of C. labiata, Thurgoodiana, Minucia, and 
iridescens, Laeliocattleya Walter Gott, and another fine hybrid from Lalia 
lobata and Cattleya Dowiana, having rosy sepals and petals, and a darker 
lip, with some whitish veining in the throat (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a very fine group, 
including some good examples of Oncidium varicosum Rogersii and 
incurvum, Anguloa virginalis Turneri, Odontoglossum Uroskinneri album, 
grande and Rolfeae, Vanda Kimballiana, Laelia Dayana var. delicata, with 
lilac-coloured sepals and petals, and the front of the lip of a peculiar slaty 
purple, with some similar lines on the disc, Masdevallia calura, some good 
forms of Dendrobium Phalaenopsis, a fine plant of Houlletia Brocklehurst- 
lana, with a very strong spike, and some good forms of Cattleya Harrison- 
iana, C. Dowiana aurea, C. Hardyana enfieldiensis, a large and richly- 
coloured form, a pretty blush white form of Cattleya Gaskelliana, with a 
small rosy blotch in front of the yellow disc of the lip, also forms of C. 
Iris, Adula, Warscewiczii, Euphrasia and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a choice little 
group, including a plant of Cycnoches maculatum with one male and one 
female inflorescence, the latter bearing two flowers, an example of C. 
Egertonianum with a male inflorescence, Trichopilia nobilis alba, a pretty 
white form without the usual yellow disc to the lip, Eria longispicata, 
Brassocattleya Maroniae, Oncidium bicallosum, Laeliocattleya Colmaniana, 
and good forms of Cattleya Chamberlainiana, Rhoda, Sirius, Hybla and 

Mr. H. Dixon, Spencer Park Nursery, Wandsworth, sent Miltonia 
Regnellii and var. citrina. 

Mr. Sydney Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, sent the pretty 
Cypripedium Faire-Maud, a good form of C. beechense, and a form of 
Odontoglossum crispum with spotted sepals. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a small group, 
including good plants of Dendrobium Sander* and Dearei, Odontioda 
Bradshawiae and Charlesworthii, Cymbidium erythrostylum, and good 
examples of Odontoglossum crispum, with a few hybrids. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, sent Cattleya nobilis var. nobilior 
(Warneri x granulosa), a very beautiful form, having broad sepals and 
petals, veined and mottled with rose on a lighter ground, and a deeply 
three-lobed rose-purple lip; also a plant of Cirrhopetalum miniatum 
(Rolfe), a native of Annam, having slender vermilion-coloured flowers, with 
tawny yellow hairs on the margin of the dorsal sepal and petals. 

Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, sent a plant of Brassocattleya 



Octobkr, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. $ij 

Ilene rosea (C. Dowiana aurea x B.-c. Maroniae), out of the same batch 
as the one that received an Award of Merit a few weeks earlier (p. 178), but 
much more like the pollen parent in general character. 
First-class Certificate. 
Odontoglossum Woodroffe^: (O. Rossii rubescens x Queen 
Alexandra).— A remarkably handsome hybrid, having very dark brown 
sepals and petals, with a few narrow transverse light yellow lines, and the 
large elliptic-oblong front lobe of the lip uniform rose-purple, with a yellow 
disc, and a yellow somewhat toothed crest. Exhibited by E. H. Davidson, 
Esq., Twyford. 

Cattleya Lord Rothschild var. albescens (C. Gaskelliana x C 
Dowiana aurea). — A beautiful form with blush-white sepals and petals, and 
the lip rose-pink, with a paler margin and much yellow veining on the disc. 
Exhibited by Messrs. J. 6c A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge. 

L^liocattleya Hastediana Glebe var. (L.-c. Greenwoodii x C. 
Dowiana aurea). — A handsome hybrid, having very rich rose-purple sepals 
and petals, and an intense purple-crimson, very undulate lip, with a little 
yellow veining in the throat. Exhibited by C. J. Phillips, Esq., The Glebe, 

Odontioda Margarita (O. madrense x C. Ncetzliana).— A very 
charming hybrid, bearing a raceme of eleven flowers, fairly intermediate in 
size and shape, and the sepals and petals having a large orange-brown 
basal blotch and a pink margin, while the front lobe of the lip is pink, with 
a smaller orange blotch in front of the yellow crest. Exhibited by M. 
Henri Graire, St. Fuscien, France (gr. M. de Voss). 

Odontoglossum Neptune (crispum X apterum).— A beautiful hybrid, 
bearing two very round white flowers, with many red-brown dots on the 
sepals and petals, and a large red-brown blotch on the lip in front of the 
yellow crest. The column wings are very small. Exhibited by M. Henri 
Graire, St. Fuscien. 

Zygopetalum maxillare Sanderiana. — A very charming form, with 
the front lobe of the lip white, the crest purple, and the sepals and petals 
green, with a few brown markings. The plant bore four spikes of flowers. 
Exhibited by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford, Dorking 
(gr. Mr. W. H. White). 

Cultural Commendations. 

Cypripedium Lord Derby.— To Mr. J. E. Shill, gardener to Baron 
Bruno Schroder, The Dell, Englefield Green, for a magnificently-grown 
specimen, bearing fourteen racemes, the majority with three flowers. 

Vanda C03RULEA Luton Hoo var.— To Mr. A. W. Metcalfe, gardener 
to Lady Wernher, Luton Hoo ? Beds., for a finely grown plant, bearing an 



3'2 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 1912. 

inflorescence of fifteen very large flowers, some of them measuring five 
inches across, and richly tessellated with deep blue on a paler ground. 

Manchester and North of England Orchid. 
At the meeting held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on September 
5th last, the members of Committee present were : Rev. J. Crombleholme 
(in the Chair), Messrs. R. Ashworth, J. Bamber, J. C. Cowan, J. Evans, 
W. H. Hatcher, W. Holmes, A. J. Keeling, J. Lupton, D. McLeod, W. 
Morgan, C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, A. Warburton and H Arthur 
(Secretary). 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for an excellent group of well-grown plants of varieties of 
Cattleya Iris, some carrying six and seven flowers, a Cultural Certificate in 
two instances being awarded to the gardener. The named varieties were : 
Jasper, George, Mrs. Ward, and Willie (A.M.). There were also Cattleya 
Venus (Iris X aurea) (F.-c.C), C. Vulcan var. Louisa (A.M.), C. Pittiana 
Ward's var., C. iridescens Ward's var., C. Maroniae, and C. Dusseldorfii 
var. Undine, Cypripedium Daisy Barclay Ward's var. and C. Zethus, with 
Oncidium incurvum and O. tigrinum. 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Gilden), was also awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for a nice mixed group, including Odontoglossum Blue 
Peter, ardentissimum, grande, several good forms of O. crispum, Odontioda 
Thwaitesii, Miltonia vexillaria Leopoldii, M. Bleuana gigantea and rosea, 
Cattleya Hardyana and Iris, Lasliocattleya Henry Greenwood, with 
Cypripedium Fairrieanum, vexillarium, bellatulum, concolor, Transvaal, 
Rossetti, Victoria, Massaianum, Model (A.M.), and Daisy Barclay. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was awarded a Large 
Silver Medal for a group of Cattleyas, including C. Van Dyck, Harrisoniana, 
Iris var. latifolia, Hardyana, Princess Patricia, with Lseliocattleya Cappei] 
callistoglossa, and a few Odontoglossum hybrids, and forms of O. crispum.' 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 
Silver Medal for a small group of Cattleya Gaskelliana and Iris, Cypri- 
pedium Maudias and Rossetti, Odontoglossum Rossii majus, O. grande, and 
several spotted hybrids, also Miltonia spectabilis Moreliana. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), staged a 
nice group of Cypripediums, including C. Charlesworthii, memoria 
Douglasii, bingleyense Under Fell var., Lumsdenii, venocentrum, Baron 
Schroder, Niobe Westonbirt var., Hitchinsiaj, and Sir Redvers Buller, a 
Silver Medal being awarded. 

E.H. Davidson, Esq., Twyford, Berks, staged a group of very choice 
plants, to which a large Silver Medal was awarded. It contained Cattleya 
Adula var. gloriosa (A.M.), O'Brieniana alba, Roupelliana Davidson's var,, 



October, , 9 , 2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 313 

Euphrasia Davidson's var., Pocahontas alba, Laeliocattleya Constance var. 
Rainbow (A.M.), Odontoglossum crispum var. Louis (A.M.), percultum 
Borlases var. (A.M.), Ceres Davidson's var. (A.M.), Harryanum, and 
crispum, with Odontioda Euterpe (A.M.), and O. Charlesworthii. 

Mr. J. Evans, Congleton, was awarded a Silver Medal for a nice group, 
including Cattleya Lord Rothschild, C. Fabia, a good Laeliocattleya G. 
Woodhams, Brassocattleya Pluto, B.-c. Empress of Russia, Cypripedium 
Mary Beatrice, the richly-coloured C. Lawrenceanum hackbridgense, and 
C. Leonias Ward's var. 

The Liverpool Orchid & Nursery Co. (Cowan's), Gateacre, were awarded 
a Silver Medal for a group, comprising Laelia crispa, Cattleya Thayeriana, 
Laeliocattleya Massangeana, Cypripedium Rossetti, triumphans, Rap- 
partianum, Charlesworthii, A. de Lairesse, C. Cooksonise, and Vanda 
Kimballiana. 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Enfield, Middlesex, staged a nice mixed 
group, to which a Silver Medal was awarded. It contained Brassocattleya 
Maronii, Brassolaelia Helen, Odontoglossum Uroskinneri album, O. grande, 
Odontioda Charlesworthii, Anguloa Ruckeri superba, Bifrenaria tetragona, 
and Renanthera Imschootiana, with Oncidium incurvum and O. varicosum 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, staged several Odontoglossum 
hybrids, Cypripedium Maudiae, C. Fairrieanum, Rappartianum, C. A. de 
Lairesse, and C. gigas Corndean Hall var. 

Mr. W. Shackleton, Great Horton, exhibited a fine form of Odonto- 
glossum crispum and Cypripedium T. B. Hayward X Charlesworthii. 

Glasgow and West of Scotland Horticultural. 
At the Centenary Show of this Society held at Bunhouse Grounds, Glasgow, 
on September 4th, 5th, and 6th, a few choice Orchids were exhibited. 

The first prizes in the two classes for Orchids were won by W. 
Mackay, Esq., Ascog, Bute (gr. Mr. D. Halliday), with some good plants. 

Some fine Orchids were also staged in the class for a group of 
miscellaneous plants arranged on the ground, in a space of 15 feet by 10 
feet, for which the first prize and a Veitch Memorial Medal was won by 
Sir Wilfrid Lawson, Bart., Brayton Hall, Carlisle (gr. Mr. A. Knight). 

Among non-competitive exhibits to which awards were made we note 
that a Gold Medal was given to Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Chelsea, for 
a fine group of Orchids and Stove Plants, and a First-class Certificate of 
Merit to Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, for a small collection of choice 
Orchids. 

A number of awards were also made by a deputation from the R.H.S., 
and among them a Gold Medal to Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, for Orchids, 



3 '4 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, i 9 ti. 

BULBOPHYLLUM GENTILII. 
There is a remarkable Tropical African Bulbophyllum in cultivation, of 
the B. calamarium group, that has the character of producing viscid pearl- 
like drops of nectar— for it is quite sweet— from the back of the dorsal 
sepal. It is allied to B. calamarium, Lindl., and has indeed been 
distributed under that name. It flowered with M.A. Van Imschoot, Mont- 
St-Amand, Ghent, as long ago as September, 1894, and was believed to be 
new, though it was not described. In September, 1903, a plant flowered at 
Kew which had been sent from the Congo by M. Louis Gentil, in 1898, 
and was described under the name of B. Gentilii (Rolfe in Gard. Chron., 
1904, ii. p. 266). More recently a plant flowered in the collection of Sir 
Trevor Lawrence, Bart., at Burford, which had been sent from West Africa 
by Sir Trevor's son, Captain Lawrence, and at the R.H.S. meeting held on 
August 27th last, another plant was exhibited by J. S. Bergheim, Esq., 
Belsize Court, Hampstead. There are also at Kew dried specimens of the 
species that were collected in the Cameroons by Zenker (n. 832, 2690), and 
distributed from Berlin under the name of B. calamarium, Lindl. The 
species is allied to B. calamarium, Lindl., (Bot. Reg., 1843, Misc. p. 70)— 
which was based upon a plant collected in Sierra Leone by Colonel Fielding 
—but has stouter scapes and much larger concave bracts. Flowers of B. 
Gentilii have been figured by De Wildeman (Ann. Mm. Congo., Bot. ser. 5, 
ni.p. 181, t. 35, fig. 1-6). They are straw-coloured, with purple markings, 
and the lip is covered with spreading or reflexed dark brown hairs. The 
pseudobulbs are strongly tetragonous, the leaves solitary, oblong, and 6 to 
7 inches long, the scapes stout, nearly two feet long, and the bracts 
numerous, large and concave. In 1896 a species was described under the 
name of B. pha:opogon, Schlechter (Engl. Jahrb., xxxviii. p. 157), but from 
the description I do not know how to separate it. This was based on 
specimens collected in the Cameroons, near Nyoke (Schlechter, n. 15791), 
and between Victoria and Kriegsschiffhasen (Winkler, n. 14 a). Two or 
2 other species of the B. calamarium group have been described but are 






ROLFE. 



Dendkobium Imthurnii, Rolfe.-A distinct species of the D. veratri- 
fohum group, which is figured in the last issue of the Botanical Magazine 
(U 8452). It was discovered in the Island of Efate, one of the New 
Hebrides, by Sir Everard im Thurn, late Governor of Fiji and High 
Commissioner of the Western Pacific, who sent a living plant to Kew, 
where it flowered recently. The stems are sometimes over four feet high! 
and the flowers are borne in elongated racemes, the colour being white, 
with lilac stripes on the side lobes of the lip. 



THE ORCHID RK\'IE\\\ 



ORCHIDS AT KEW. 

Among the numerous Orchids now or recently in flower at Kew, the genus 
Cycnoches is specially worthy of mention. A fine plant of C. maculatum 
has again produced a male and female inflorescence on either side of the 
same pseudobulb, and this remarkable diversity is a never failing source of 




male and female flowers). 

interest. A second plant produced only male inflorescences. C. 
pentadactylon, which blooms periodically, is now bearing a female flower, 
which is markedly different from that of C. maculatum in having more 
reflexed segments with some dark brown bars at the base, and a white lip. 



$&, THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, 1912. 

And quite recently two plants of C. chlorochilon have both produced female 
flowers, which in this case chiefly differ from the males in the short, stout 
ovary and column, the latter with broad triangular wings, and in the more 
fleshy perianth segments. The allied genus Catasetum has also been 
represented in force. A plant of C. Darwinianum has borne a mixed 
inflorescence, of three male flowers and one female, with another in a 
transition state. The difference between the sexes in this case is very 
remarkable, both in shape, colour, and in the fact that the flowers of the 
two sexes are reversed, the lip of the female, as usual in this genus, being 
uppermost. Other species which produced male inflorescences only are C. 
Russellianum, tabulare, Hookeri, luridum, Trulla, fimbriatum, the natural 
hybrid C. splendens, and several C. marcrocarpum and maculatum. 

Several Stanhopeas have flowered freely, and among them the rare S. 
anfracta and the very distinct S. convoluta may be mentioned. Another 
interesting ally is Sievkingia peruviana, which has produced several spikes, 
a fine example of Acineta Barkeri, two plants of Dendrobium Johannis, the 
striking Listrostachys caudata (which is figured on page 297), and several 
other interesting things. 

Cattleyas and Laeliocattleyas have made a fine display, and near by is a 
plant of the rare Epidendrum Ruckeraa with ten spikes, good examples of 
Vanda Kimballiana, Oncidium pubes, varicosum, incurvum, and others, 
with a good plant of the rare Brazilian Maxillaria leucaimata, bearing 
several flowers. 

In the Cool house there are three fine specimens of Miltonia Candida, 
with five, seven, and thirteen racemes, and with good examples of jjf. 
spectabilis Moreliana, M. Regnellii, M. Cogniauxis and its variety bicolor, 
and M. St. Andre make a very pleasing display. A large plant of 
Cryptophoranthus Dayanus has been literally covered with flowers. There 
are also plants of the charming little Laelia monophylla, Lycaste leucantha, 
Odontioda Graireana, a fine O. Charlesworthii, Odontoglossum Harryanum, 
forms and hybrids of O. crispum, Cypripedium Rossetti with seven flowers! 
and several examples of C. Fairrieanum, C. Charlesworthii, and C insigne 
Sanderae, making a good display. 

In the Cypripedium house are good examples of C. Baron Schroder, C. 
Franconia, C. Harrisianum virescens, C. Grace*, a charming little 
hybrid between C. Boxallii and C. niveum, another pretty hybrid 
in which the character of C. Rothschildianum and C. Charlesworthii are 
well combined, and a number of more familiar forms. Theie are also 
plants of Vanda Sanderiana, Phalasnopsis denticulata, Saccolabium 
acutifolium, Acampe rhodesiaca and A. papillosa, Bulbophyllum inflatum 
with three spikes, the rare B. saltatorium, Cirrhopetalum Mastersianum, 
Ancectochilus setaceus, and others. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



ODONTOGLOSSUM SEEDLINGS. 
A correspondent, who is anxious to raise some Odontoglossum seedlings, 
complains that he cannot get the seeds to germinate, and requests a few 
notes on the subject. It is not clear what is the cause of his failure, but it 
repeats the history and experience of the early raisers, whose first efforts 
were so fruitless that it became almost a proverb that Odontoglossums 
could not be raised from seed. The seeds either failed to germinate at all 
or else refused to progress beyond the globule stage. The difficulty no 
longer exists in many collections, and the following, which has been 
suggested to our correspondent by letter, may be useful to other 
beginners. 

Capsules are easily produced, and the seeds are generally good, a point 
which may quickly be ascertained by examination under a lens. If they 
appear thick in the centre they may be sown with confidence. A few seeds 
should be scattered on the surface of the compost of selected plants in 
different positions in the house, their position being marked, and these 
should now be shaded from direct sunshine, and the compost never allowed 
to become dry. A few more seeds may be added at intervals of a few 
weeks. If a house is available with a slightly warmer temperature one or 
two plants should be placed there, as a rather warmer and moister 
atmosphere is essential at this stage. The seeds should now gradually 
become green, develop into green globules, and produce a few root hairs 
and a minute leaf, and ultimately the first true root, when they may be 
carefully pricked off with a pointed stick to pots of prepared compost and 
treated as young seedlings generally. 

THE HYBRIDIST. 

Brassocatl.elia Morna— A large and handsome hybrid, raised by Mr. 
Briscoe, in the establishment of Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, at Langley, 
from La:liocattleya bletchleyensis X Brassocattleya Maronise. The flower 
measures over seven inches across, and the sepals and petals are tinged 
with rosy lilac, while the lip is very broad, and rosy purple in front, with a 
fringed margin, and paler behind, with the disc of the lip yellow. It is said 
to be similar to Brassocattleya Ilene (C. Dowiana aurea X B.-c. Maroniae) 
in shape, but much paler in colour. 

L.eliocattleya Ettrick. — A large and richly-coloured hybrid, raised 
in the same establishment as the preceding, from L.-c. bletchleyensis X C. 
Dowiana aurea. The sepals and petals are broad, and rosy purple in 
colour, and the very broad lip intense purple crimson, with a yellow area 
and some yellow veining on the sides of the throat. The influence of C. 
Dowiana aurea is very marked in this fine hybrid. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 
A few interesting Orchids are sent from the collection of E. F. Clark, Esq... 
Evershot, Dorset. A flower of Odontioda Bradshawise is a good light 
scarlet form, bought as an un flowered seedling from the Chessington 
collection. It has produced a long spike, and the flower sent is over 2f 
inches across, so that it should develop into a fine thing. A flower from 
Laelia tenebrosa X L. Diana— itself a seedling from L. Dayana X 
purpurata— is most like L. Diana in shape, and has rosy-purple sepals and 
petals, and a three-lobed, very dark purple lip. It also is very promising. 
The third flower was supposed to be from Cattleya Dormaniana X Lselia 
Dayana, but is not identical with Laeliocattleya porphyrites, so that the 
cross remains a little doubtful. The flower is much larger than m either 
parent, the sepals and petals bright purple, and the lip very deeply three- 
lobed, with a much darker stalked front lobe. It should be taken care of, 
and the question of parentage must be left for the present, as an alternative' 
parentage has been snggested. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 
Two meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society will be held at the Royal 
Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, during October, on 
the 8th and 22nd, when the Orchid Committee will meet at the usual 
hour, 12 o'clock noon. 

The succeeding meeting will be the Special Show of Autumn-flowering 
Orchids on November 5th and 6th, with a Conference on the second day, 
of which particulars were given at page 190. Respecting the latter the 
following additional information has just reached us :— 

The Conference will be held in the Lecture Room of the Royal 
Horticultural Society, Vincent Square, Westminster, on Wednesday, 
November 6th, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., when Mr. J. Gurney Fowler, the 
Treasurer of the Society, will occupy the Chair. Luncheon will be 
obtainable on the premises. 

The following papers have been promised :— 

1. Some Epiphytal Orchids, by Mr. H. G. Alexander. 

2. The Physiology of Fertilisation, by Professor Keeble. 

3. The application of Genetics to Orchid Breeding, by Major C. C. 
Hurst. 

4. Albinism in Orchids, by Mr. R. G. Thwaites. 

As the seating accommodation of the Lecture Room is limited, seats 
should be secured beforehand by application to the Secretary, R.H.S., 



October, 19. 2 .] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 3»9 

Vincent Square, Westminster, S.W., who will be pleased to forward reserve 
seat tickets to those applying for them as far as the accommodation will 
allow. W. Wilks, Secretary, R.H.S. 

Meetings of the Manchester and North of England Orchid Society will 
be held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on October 3rd and 17th. The 
Committee meets at noon, and the exhibits are open to inspection of 
members and the public from 1 to 4 p.m. The following meeting will be 
held on November 7th. 

R.H.S. Scientific Committee : -The following references to Orchids 
exhibited at the meetings of the Committee are taken from the Official 
Report (continued from page 288) : — 

April 30th, 1912 : Albino form of Orchis mascula.— Mr, Gurney 
Wilson showed an albino form of Orchis mascula collected by him in a 
field in mid-Sussex. 

May 14th : Hybrid Orchid.— Mr. J. O'Brien showed from Mr. E. F. 
Clark, of Evershot, Dorset, a flower of an Orchid raised by crossing 
Laelia cinnabarina and Lasliocattleya X G. S. Ball. The latter is a hybrid 
between Laelia cinnabarina and Cattleya Schrceder*. The flower was an 
improved Laelia cinnabarina, larger and more open in the lip, but four of the 
pollen masses were large and four not quite so large, thus differing from 
both Laelia and Cattleya. Mr. Clark proposed to name the hybrid 
Lasliocattleya Cinnabal. 

June 4th : Odontioda Carmen.— Mr. de Barri Crawshay sent this 
hybrid between Cochlioda Ncetzliana and Odontoglossum nebulosum, 
showing characteristics of both parents. Hybrids with the latter plant as 
one of the parents are scarce, and a Certificate of Appreciation was 
unanimously recommended to Mr. Crawshay. 

Jul} 1 6tn :— 

Eria Rhynchostyloides.— A Botanical Certificate was unanimously 
recommended to this beautiful, though small-flowered Orchid, native of 
Java, exhibited by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart, V.M.H. 

Certificate of Appreciation.— A Certificate of Appreciation was 
recommended to Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, on the 
suggestion of the Orchid Committee, for work done in raising Odontonia 
Edna, exhibited at the Holland House Show. 

July 30th : Hybrid Orchid.— Mr. O'Brien drew attention to a hybrid 
Orchid, Brassocattleya Thetis, shown by Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons. It was 
raised between Brassavola Digbyana and Cattleya Aclandiae, but 
practically all the spotting of the latter species had been eliminated 
by the cross. 

August 27th : Epidendrum laterals.— Mr. O'Brien showed for 



* 2Q THE ORCHID REVIEW. [October, .912. 

Mr. Neale, Penarth, a plant of Epidendrum laterale (Central America), 
and remarked that the inflorescence is produced on a rudimentary 
pseudobulb, as in E. Stamfordianum (probably the only similar case), a 
peculiarity that seems to show that the normal mode of flowering is from 
the base of the mature pseudobulb. A Botanical Certificate was awarded to 
this plant on the proposition of Mr. O'Brien. 

September 24th : Cirrhopetalum miniatum.— Mr. Rolfe drew attention 
to a Cirrhopetalum exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, as 
having been introduced from Annam with Dendrobium Bronckartii. It 
strongly recalled C. gracillimum, Rolfe, especially in its caudate, almost 
thread-like lateral sepals, and in the strongly ciliate dorsal sepal and 
petals, but differed in having vermilion-coloured flowers with the hairs of 
the dorsal sepal and petals yellow. His first knowledge of the plant was 
in September, 1910, when it was sent to Kew for determination from the 
Royal Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, with the information that it had been 
purchased from Messrs. Sander & Sons as a plant imported with 
Dendrobium Bronckartii. It was then named and described as Cirrho- 
petalum miniatum, Rolfe. Afterwards a painting was received from M. 
Maurice Valcke, a collector for Messrs. T. Pauwels & Co., Meirelbeke, 
Belgium, who stated that he met with the plant at Haut Laos, between 
Siam and Cochin China. 

ORCHID PORTRAITS. 

Dendrobium Imthurnii, Rolfe.— Bo*. Mag., t. 8452. 

Dendrobium Schuetzei, Rolfe.— Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. pp. 218, 
229, fig. 102. 

L.eliocattleva memoria H. A. TRACY.-Gard. Chron., 1912, ii. pp. 
218, 242, fig. 107. Cattleya memoria H. A. Tracy.— Gatd. Mag., 1912, 
p. 711, with fig. 

Zvgopetalum BREWH.^-/cwr«. Hort., 1912, ii. p. 279, with fig. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

JiF..S.-i. Oncidium ! 



Photograph received, with thanks.— T.C., C.P.i 

W.C.S.— The note is unavoidably postponed. 

J.W.— Phalaenopsis spot, probably caused by drip from the r 



Rappartianum figured 



F. H. 



i through the tj 



it the flower of Dendrobium nobile var. 
inches across, not five, as stated. The 



ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 



Calendar of Operations for November ... 325 America ... 

Catasetum tabulare var- rhinophorum ... 323 Vanda Sandenana... 

Cycnoches chlorochilon : female flower ... 329 

Cycnoches densiflorum 331 Ii 1 titrations 

Dendrobium Schuetzei 337 

Disas 334 Cal d ward VII 

Lissochilus Grantii 322 Cycnoches chlorochilon : female flower ... 

Orchid Notes, and News 351 Dendrobium Schuetzei 

Orchid Portraits ... 352 Disa grandiflora 

Orchids in season 350 Disa kewensis 

Our Note Book 321 Disa langleyensis 

North of England 35° Di,a Veitchii 

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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

Last month, in connection with a suggestion by "Progressive," we 
referred to the constant stream of novelties that appear at the R.H.S. 
meetings. Since then no fewer than five First-class Certificates and ten 
Awards of Merit have been given by the Orchid Committee, and these, with 
a single exception, to plants of hybrid origin. We need not enumerate 
them, as full details appear in the report of the meetings, but it would 
appear that our hybridists have been "amusing their spare moments" to 
considerable purpose. 

One of the recipients of a First-class Certificate gave some trouble 
with respect to its nomenclature. It was a hybrid between Cattleya Fabia 
alba and C. Warscewiczii var. Frau Melanie Beyrodt, and was exhibited 
under the name of C. Harrisiana. This was considered as being too 
similar to existing names, and the Award was made subject to a suitable 
name being given by the exhibitor. The question was'also referred to the 
Scientific Committee, who suggested that it would be more convenient if 
vernacular names were chosen in such cases, generally from the classics, 
and they recommend that in this instance the exhibitor should be asked to 






i- 



It is interesting to note that both parents of the hybrid under discussion 
have white sepals and petals, and that the character is repeated in the 
offspring, a fact of importance in connection with the raising of albino 
hybrids, which is one of the subjects to be discussed at the coming 
Conference. The lip is coloured, as in the case of the parents, so that 
everything has worked out according to expectation, which is not always 
the case when albinos are crossed together. 

Another possible nomenclature question is involved in this particular 
case. If the ordinary coloured forms of C. Fabia and C. Warscewiczii 
were crossed together, coloured offspring would naturally result, but they 
would be forms of the same hybrid, so that the specific name chosen should 



_ 3 22 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 1912. 

be capable of a wider application should occasion require. And there may 
yet be coloured reversions among this particular batch of seedlings. It 
will then be an interesting point for discussion as to which is the type and 
which the variety, as in the case of the coloured form of Cypripedium 
Maudise which was submitted to us some time ago. The question of a 
varietal name, however, may be left until a coloured variety appears. The 
specific name is now the important consideration, and it should be a 
single name, in accordance with the rules governing specific names, so 
that varietal names can be added afterwards, as required. 

On two or three occasions we have been urged to prepare a General 
Index to the Orchid Review, and the question is again raised in connection 
with the completion of our twentieth volume by the issue of the next or 
December number. It is suggested that such an Index would be a boon to 
Orchidists, and would not be difficult to prepare. We may admit both the 
utility of the suggested work and the appropriateness of the period, but 
another point is not so clear, for the amount of time and labour required for 
the undertaking would be very considerable. The matter would have to be 
compiled afresh, for no amalgamation of existing indices would meet the case, 
and it would be necessary to make a selection of the most important matter, 
so as to keep the thing within reasonable limits. We are giving the matter 
serious consideration, and should be glad to receive further suggestions 
from our readers, as the practicability of the work depends upon the amount 
of support received. We hope to be able to refer to the matter more 
definitely next month. 

LISSOCHILUS GRANTII. 

Lissochilus is a large and polymorphic African genus of terrestrial Orchids 
which is, perhaps, best known in gardens through the large and handsome 
L. giganteus, which has flowered in several collections. Several other 
species are occasionally met with, and among them the South African L. 
Krebsii, whose yellow and brown flowers are very attractive. An ally of 
the latter has just flowered in the collection of James Bush, Esq., Cardiff, 
which agrees well with L. Grantii, Rchb. f. {Trans. Linn. Soc, xxix. p. 153), 
a species described from dried specimens collected by Messrs. Speke & 
Grant in December, i860, during their expedition to the sources of the 
Nile. It was found near water at 4700 feet elevation on the Robeho 
Mountains, Usagara, German East Africa. The plant which has flowered 
with Mr. Bush was obtained from the Kisumu district, British East Africa. 
The scape is about three feet high, and the raceme is six inches long, and 
bears fourteen flowers, having an expanse of ij inches. The sepals are 
.spreading, brownish green in colour, and the petals nearly orbicular, over 



November, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

half inch across, bright yellow behind and cream yellow in front. The lip 
is three-lobed, and the front lobe, which is sharply reflexed at the sides, so 
as to appear laterally flattened, is light yellow, while the side lobes are 
triangular-oblong, cream-coloured, with slate-coloured stripes below, and 
tinged with brown above. The spur is broadly conical, with a narrow red- 
purple apex about a line long. The inflorescence is rather more compact 
and the flowers smaller than in L. Krebsii. R. a. R. 

CATASETUM TABULARE VAR. RHINOPHORUM. 

A fine plant of this distinct and striking Catasetum was exhibited at the 
R.H.S. meeting held on October 22nd, by Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. 
Albans. It originally appeared with Mr. William Bull, over thirty years 
ago, and was described by Reichenbach (Card. Chron., :88o, ii. p. 558). 
It was said to differ from the type in having the old surface of the callus 
broken up into innumerable irregular transverse toothed lamella, of white 
colour, with spots of burnt sienna, thus making one think of a file— hence 
the name. In the original form the callus is white and smooth. 



THE CULTIVATION OF VANDA COZRULEA AND V. 
SANDERIANA IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA. 

I have often wondered why the beautiful Vanda ccerulea is not more grown 
in private and commercial establishments, for its culture is quite simple 
if people would only try to do the right thing at the right time with 
their plants. I remember that in England we used to grow this species in 
baskets, in a mixture of charcoal and good living sphagnum moss, and after 
the plants had flowered they were kept rather on the dry side for about six 
weeks or longer, but were never allowed to shrivel. After this resting 
period the old compost was taken away from the roots and renewed every 
year with fresh material. The plants were suspended from the roof of the 
Cattleya house, and were watered with rain water to keep the sphagnum 
moss growing round the roots of the plants. The side ventilators, below 
the hot water pipes, were left open a little at night to keep a constant 
circulation of air round the plants, but not enough to allow a cold draught 
through the house at any time. Top ventilation was also used on very hot 
days in summer— this was in the South of England— and the plants were 
not heavily shaded. In the winter the shading was entirely removed for 
some weeks, and the temperature was kept at about 58^ by night and 65 by 
day, or more by sun heat. The house was mostly closed in the afternoon 
at about 3.30, or later on hot days, according to the weather outside. Even 
temperatures and careful watering are two of the main points in growing 
this lovely Orchid. 



324 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 191 2. 

In America the plant is not so difficult to cultivate as in England, for 
we get more light and sunshine throughout the year. It is wonderful to 
see how the plants will improve in America under different climatic 
conditions. Vandas are not shaded so heavily here as they are in England, 
although the plants get more light naturally. 

I think that if I were growing Orchids in England again I should try to 
do away with as much shading as possible, and only have just thin blinds, 
that is, of course, for the Warm house Orchids. My method of growing 
Vanda ccerulea in America has been different from what it was in England, 
for most of them have been grown in pots and pans, with from one to two 
inches of crocks for drainage. Some were grown in osmunda fibre and 
some in polypodium fibre, and both potted as firmly as one could press in 
this material. There are very few places where a house is devoted to this 
plant alone, so that most of them are grown in the Cattleya house, as near 
the glass as possible. The ventilators should be opened as soon as the 
temperature rises above 68°, and as it goes down again in the afternoon to 
65 or 70 close up the house, and the temperature will run up to 80 ,. 
or more by sun heat. The house should be damped down at closing time 
according to the weather outside. 

I have found it a good plan to damp down with manure-water two or 
three time a week, chiefly when the plants are making their roots, and then 
discontinue it for a time. When watering the plants I give them a good 
soaking, and then let them get dry right through before watering them 
again. I may state that I never spray Vanda ccerulea overhead, as it is 
sometimes the cause of rot in the crown of the plant. 

Vanda Sanderiana is, without a doubt, one of the most lovely Orchids 
in cultivation, and the plant will do well if potted very firmly in osmunda 
fibre or polypodium fibre alone, with from two to three inches of crocks for 
drainage. Just before the plants are starting to make roots I have found 
to be the best time to pot them. They should be sprayed overhead two or 
three times a day on bright days, and should be grown in the Stove, or in 
a house that will not drop below 62 F. at night and 67 by day, or more 
with sun heat. As soon as the temperature rises above this, ventilation 
should be put on the houses, according to the weather outside. My method 
of watering the plants when growing them in osmunda fibre or polypodium 
fibre is to give them a good soaking and then let them get dry right through 
before watering them again, as the potting material will last for two or 
three years if the plants are watered at the right time. I find that they do 
much better in pots and pans, and they should be placed as near the glass- 
as possible, but should not be in a draught at any time. The house should 
be ventilated from the top and from the sides below the hot water pipes. The 
houses are mostly shaded with lime-wash here, or with a thin coat of white 



November, 19.2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 3 

lead, but I think it is better still to have thin blinds, for one is able to gi' 
the plants more light. I have also damped down with manure-water tv 
•or three times a week, when closing the house in the afternoon, at the tin 
when the plants are making new roots, and then discontinuing it for a fe 
weeks. This Vanda, like many other Orchids, flowers very freely 
California, on account of the bright weather throughout the year. 

San Mateo, W. E. Eglington. 

California, U.S.A. 



CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR NOVEMBER. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill Gardens, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
From now onwards until the end of the year the figures given last month 
as regards the temperatures for the different departments will be applicable. 
Should cold or severe weather prevail a slight decrease will do no harm, 
provided there is no excess of atmospheric moisture. Owing to the 
delightful change in the weather of the last few weeks, and the increase in 
the amount of light the plants have received, they are ripening their 
growths and finishing much better than at one time seemed probable. 
The importance of light, especially at this season of the year, is not 
realised to the extent it ought to be, therefore the glass of the houses 
should be kept as clean as possible. I am aware that in smoky districts 
around our large cities this is more easily said than done, but if plants are 
to be grown satisfactorily the matter must be persevered with. The old 
axiom, nothing without pains, is applicable to all these small trifles which 

Atmospheric moisture.— The remarks made last month respecting 
this essential item in our practice still hold good, and the same applies to 
the ventilation of the houses. I am a great advocate for fresh air in the 
cultivation of Orchids, as I am firmly convinced that plants that are grown 
under these conditions are more capable of withstanding slight hardships 
than those that are coddled up without a breath of fresh air. Coddling in 
the cultivation of all plants is harmful, and Orchids are no exception. 
Undoubtedly many have been killed with kindness. 

Watering, to my mind, is the greatest item in our practice, and as the 
days shorten must have the greatest attention. At this season of the year 
no plant should have water applied to it unless it absolutely requires it, as 
many a plant receives its death-blow by the indiscriminate use of the water 
pot at this season. Too much wet is as harmful as too little. On the 
other hand, plants that like a dry rest must not be allowed to shrivel at any 
time, as shrivelling is debilitating. One should try to strike the happy 

Dexdkobiums of the evergreen section which have completed their 



3 26 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 191*. 

growths, such as D. thyrsiflorum, D. densiflorum, and others of this class 
may be taken into the resting house and placed at the warmest end. They 
should not be kept so dry as those of the D. nobile section. The house in 
which these plants are rested should not at any time fall below 55 , or much 
harm may accrue. 

L^lia anceps, with its numerous varieties, should be thoroughly 
cleaned, the spikes neatly staked, and the plants placed in their flowering 
quarters, in a position where they will receive all the light possible, as they 
enjoy an abundance of light at all times. They may receive water at the 
roots whenever they become dry, but overhead syringing or spraying must 
now be discontinued. I do not advocate the use of the syringe during the 
winter months, as, owing to the water getting into the centres of young 
growths, it can easily be carried to excess, and much harm may be the 
result. 

Angr,ecums.— Angraecum sesquipedale is the best known species of this 
interesting genus, and there are two varieties, one that flowers during the 
summer, and the other late in the autumn. These plants require the 
warmth of the East Indian house all the year round, and a reasonable 
amount of atmospheric moisture should be retained about them at all 
seasons. They must not be allowed to remain dry for any length of time, 
but should have water whenever the sphagnum moss in which they are 
growing becomes white for want of moisture. When growing in' this 
material, and with free drainage, there is little danger of over-watering, but 
if a more substantial compost, composed of peat or osmunda fibre is used, 
special care must be taken, because of the risk of the foliage being affected with 
black spots. These conditions will also answer the requirements of any of 
the large-growing Angraecums, such as A. eburneum, A. Veitchii, and 
others of this class. There are other Angraecums, of the smaller-flowered 
section, which bloom during winter and early spring, and require the same 
conditions as regards heat and moisture. The miniature kinds are best 
suspended within a reasonable distance of the roof glass, and thev succeed 
m shallow pans or baskets in a compost of sphagnum moss. Careful 
watering is necessary at all times, and a close observation must be 
kept for thrip, scale, and other insect pests, which quickly disfigure the 
leaves of these rather delicate plants. A. Sanderianum, I find, succeeds 
best grown down on the stage in a fairly humid position. 

PHAL^NOPSis.-The fine clear weather of the last few weeks has proved 
very beneficial to the plants of this genus, especially after the great 
amount of wet, cold, and sunless weather we have 'experienced this 
season. Shading, even in this department, should now be dispensed 
with, and the division occupied with these plants should on all 
suitable occasions be well ventilated in order to consolidate the newly-made 



November, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 3*7 

leaves as much as possible. Water must be given with discretion, as the- 
leaves and roots are very sensitive, and susceptible to injury. The plants 
should have water applied to the roots whenever they become dry, as if 
allowed to remain dry for any length of time the health of the plants will 
be impaired, and the proper development of the flower spikes now pushing 
up will be hindered. Care should be taken that the water used is of the 
same temperature as the house in which they are growing. 

Aerides. — There are other inmates of the East Indian house that 
require careful treatment at this season. I refer to the various species of 
Aerides, Saccolabium, Rhynchostylis and their allies. They will now have 
completed their growths, and as root action ceases, the green tips of the 
roots become sealed over. When this occurs careful waterings are 
necessary, in fact only sufficient water will be required for some little time- 
to keep the leaves plump and in a normal condition. 

Odontoglossums.— Plants of O. Uroskinneri, O. bictoniense, and 
others that are growing fast and pushing forth roots from the base of their 
growths may be potted if necessary, and it is essential that the potting 
material should be thoroughly porous. These plants having thick fleshy 
roots, they should not be potted too firmly, and they are best placed at the 
driest and warmest end of the house. 

Cypripediums.— Plants of the winter-flowering section, as the flower 
spikes become long enough, should be neatly staked, cleaned, &c, as 
advised last month, so that when in bloom there is no unnecessary moving 
the plants about, which may cause injury by rubbing and other means. 
The summer-flowering Cypripediums, now in full growth, must have water 
supplied to them whenever they become dry at the roots. The majority of 
these are lovers of heat, and are best grown in the warmest house, in a 
position which is fairly humid. A dry parched atmosphere is detrimental to 
Cypripediums at any time, and, being specially favourable to that formidable 
pest, thrip, must be avoided. Any plants of the Selenipedium section that 
require potting may be done at this season, using a compost as advised for 
the green-leaved members of this popular genus. The usual precautions 
must be taken in applying water to the newly-potted plants. 

Cattleyas and LvELIOCattleyas.— Thanks to the hybridist, it is now 
possible to have these lovely flowers the whole year round, and they are 
invaluable for decorative purposes. They are unquestionably the most 
showy and desirable of Orchids for blooming during the autumn and winter 
seasons. Among the species now in flower are the lovely C. Dowiana 
aurea, C. labiata, and C. Bowringiana, while the hybrids which flower at 
this season are numerous, and differ enough in colour and form to satisfy 
the most fastidious, and everyone may gratify their individual taste. Many 
hybrid Cattleyas have the advantage of many of the species as regards the 



328 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, i 9 , 2 . 

length of time their flowers last in perfection, but it should be borne in 
mind that these large heavy flowers are very exhausting to the plants, 
therefore they should be cut after being open for a reasonable length of 
time. Many growers fail to realise this point, and often wonder why their 
plants deteriorate, especially after carrying a heavy crop of bloom. After 
the flowering stage is past the plants should be placed in a position where 
plenty of light and air can reach them, and have sufficient water to keep 
the roots and pseudobulbs healthy. They may still be repotted provided 
they are in the desired condition, namely, pushing forth new roots, the only 
danger being that of the plant becoming too wet before the roots get into 
the new compost. 

Masdevallias.— Those plants that were potted at the end of August or 
beginning of September will now be rooting freely and making fresh growth, 
but they must still be watered sparingly, as should the compost be over- 
watered at this season the plants will lose their roots and take some time 
to recuperate. The black markings often seen on the leaves of Masdevallias 
are due to overwatering or an excess of moisture in the atmosphere. These 
plants deserve a more extended culture than they receive at the present time, 
especially the brilliantly-coloured ones. M. tovarensis is now developing 
its lovely spikes of pure white flowers, and if they have not already been 
moved from their summer quarters in the Cool house no time should be 
lost in placing them at the coolest end of an Intermediate house, where the 
flowers will develop more freely and last for a considerable time in full 
beauty It is advisable to remove the old flower spikes when the flowers 
have faded, although, if allowed to remain, they will produce flowers again 
next season, but this being rather exhausting to the plants is not to be 
recommended. 

Oncidiums that have been grown in a cool temperature and are pushing 
up their spikes, such as O. varicosum and O. Forbesii, will be the better 
for a little more warmth, which will assist them in developing their flowers. 
There is a danger of the buds turning yellow and dropping off if allowed to 
remain in a low temperature. 

General REMARKS.-Cieanliness being one of the greatest aids to good 
"h m u f VGrything at this season ' when ^her work is not so pressing, 
should be done to make the plants, houses, &c ., as clean as possible. 
Where room is limited this means an enormous amount of work, but this is 
the season of the year to attack insects and other pests. The principle 
item to be observed during the present month is the temperatures of the 
d.fferent houses, which must be maintained by careful stoking of the fires, 
as for some time now the health of our plants will greatly depend upon the 
manner this operation is performed. Excessive fluctuations are dangerous, 
therefore every care should be taken that no excess is permitted 



ember, iy, 2 .J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 3*9 

CYCNOCHES CHLOROCHILON: FEMALE FLOWER. 

annexed figure represents a female flower of Cycnoches chlorochilon 
:h recently appeared in the Kew collection, and is reproduced, natural 
from a photograph taken by Mr. C. P. Raffill. Although the species 
i as long ago as 1838, the female was r 
: appeared in the collection of M. Houz* 




Fig. .,9. Cvc 



Mons, Belgium, on a plant imported from Caraccas, and somewhat . later 
with Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans (Rolfe in Card. Chron., 1891, ii. p. 
69). In both cases the female only was borne, though males appeared on 
other plants from the same importation. Shortly afterwards, however, both 
sexes appeared on a plant in M. Houzeau's collection (Rolfe, /. c, p. 394). 
The difference between the sexes was pointed out as follows: The male is 



33° THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Novembkr, 1912. 

the form so long known in gardens, with slender column and pollinia 
normally developed ; the female is distinctly larger and more fleshy than 
the male, and has broader sepals and petals. The ovary is more than twice 
as thick as the pedicel of the male flower, and more strongly grooved, and 
the column is scarcely half as long, but at least four times as thick. There 
are, of course, no pollinia, but a well-developed stigma, with a pair of large 
fleshy incurved wings on either side. The colour of the flowers is identical 
in the two sexes. 

These characters stand in striking contrast with such a species as C. 
maculatum, which is figured at page 315, where the male flowers are much 
smaller and more membranous than the females, and the lip is reduced to a 
rounded disc with a number of marginal teeth. This dimorphism is still 
more marked in C. densiflorum, which is figured on the opposite page, 
where the difference between the sexes are so great that nothing short of 
their production upon the same plant would be accepted as evidence of 
their specific identity. In this connection we may recall the amusing 
history of C. Egertonianum (O.R., 
was such a source of bewildermen 
hopelessly confused with C. ventricosum. 

C. chlorochilon was originally discovered by Moritz, who sent specimens 
in 1836 from Maracaybo, Venezuela, to the Berlin Museum, from which 
the species was described by Klotzach two years later {Allg. Gartenz., vi. 
p. 225). Shortly afterwards it was imported from Demerara by Messrs. 
Loddiges, in whose nursery it flowered for the first time in England, when 
it was figured by Lindley [Scrt. Orch., t. 16). It is now one of the best- 
known species in the genus, and is widely cultivated. 

C. chlorochilon is further remarkable for the enormous number of seeds 

millions, a number far in excess of that known in any other Orchid. In 
other words, the progeny of a single flower, such as the one now figured, if 
all the seeds came up, would be about equal to the population of London. 
This capsule was from an imported plant obtained from Messrs. Hugh Low 
cv Co. {O.K., xvii. p. 168). 

called Eucycnoches, in which the perianth of the two sexes is alike, or 
nearly so, and the other, called Heterantha, in which it is very diverse, 
especially in the shape of the lip. C. chlorochilon belongs to Eucycnoches, 
together with C. ventricosum, C. Loddigesii, and three others of which the 
female is still unknown. C. maculatum and C. densiflorum belong to 
Heteranthae, which contains ten species, in seven of which both sexes are 
now known. For the history of this remarkable genus and a revision of 
the species, see O.K., xvii. pp. 269-274. R A R 



November, .912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 33» 

CYCNOCHES DENSIFLORUM. 

This striking species is a native of Colombia, and was collected by Mr. J. 
Birchenall at Simacota, near the River Opon, among some species of 
Mormodes. It flowered with Messrs. Hugh. Low & Co., in November, 
1908, when the annexed photograph was taken, and was soon afterwards 
described (Rolfe in Kew. Bull., 1909, p. 64). The plant passed into the 




collection ot the Rev. J. C. B. Fletcher, Mundham Vicarage, Chichester. 

The sepals and petals are light green, with some brown spots in the males 

and the lip white in both < 

in the figure, but we may add that 

single female flower proved slightly heav 



332 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Novembh.r, 191 2. 

THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 

By C. Alwyn Harrison, F.R.H.S. 
Cool House. 
This month marks the starting point of winter treatment of Orchids, for, 
with few exceptions, the same cultural details may be continued till the 
following April. Writing some time before this appears in print, it is 
impossible to state exactly how much air and water should be given to the 
plants, but should the weather prove seasonable, carry out as far is practic- 
able, the undermentioned rules for the various cultural operations :— 

Throughout this and the following month, maintain an average tempera- 
ture of 55 to 6o° Fahr. by day, and 50 to 55 by night. Too much 
emphasis cannot be laid upon keeping an even degree of warmth at all 
times, fluctuations of temperature being most injurious. Damping and 
watering should be done as advised in my last month's article, but should 
either severe weather or much rain set in, be careful not to have the house 
cold and damp, as this causes spot on the leaves, and other fungoid dis- 
eases. It should be borne in mind that it is better to have the temperature 
a few degrees below the prescribed height in inclement weather, and only 
damp down lightly, than to close the ventilators early in the day, and thereby 
maintain the stated degree of warmth. Fresh air must always be admitted 
throughout the year, for Orchids derive much nourishment from this, and in 
greater proportion than other plants. The roof glass should always be 
washed after a fog, for all possible light is of vital importance to these Cool- 
house Orchids. 

Should thrip be troublesome, and the usual method of checking it prove 
unavailing, sprinkle some sulphur on the hot water pipes, but where this is 
practised, all Orchids in bud and flower must first be removed, as the fumes 
injure them. During the usually damp weather now prevailing slugs are 
again active, and careful watch must be kept to prevent them from eating 
the young roots and flower spikes. A few fresh lettuce leaves laid on the 
staging offers great attraction to these pests, and cotton wool wrapt round 
the base of a spike prevents their reaching it, but the wool must be kept dry 
or it ceases to be of any use. 

Odontoglossum grande should now be making a lovely show at the 
warmest end of this house, whilst some of the earlier winter-blooming 
Odontoglossuuxs are now opening their blossoms. There is no doubt that 
Odontoglossum crispum is the most useful Orchid for an amateur's 
collection, for one can see varieties of this plant in flower at any season of 
the year, and its long arching spikes of white and tinted blossoms are 
extremely graceful and continue long in perfection. Some of its hybrids 
also flower at this season. 



November, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 333 

Cattleya House. 

As far as is practicable the thermometer should not be allowed to descend 
below 58 Fahr., for many Cattleyas and members of the allied genera are 
in full growth, and need heat to ripen their bulbs in lieu of the brat of the 
sun, which is obtained by those which complete their growth by the end of 
September. There is little doubt that sunlight is of the greatest value to 
this class of plants, and this fact is clearly borne out in an examination of 
the size of bulbs made by imported plants, and of those grown in the United 
States, where a greater proportion of sunlight is obtained. The damping 
down of this house and the watering of its inmates should be done as 
advised last month. There is little to be done now beyond maintaining the 
specified temperature, and creating a moist buoyant atmosphere. 

Unless temperatures above 6o° Fahr. by day and 55 at night can be 
successfully maintained, I should strongly advise amateurs to avoid Cattleya 
chocoensis, Eldorado, gigas, Dowiana, Hardyana. maxima, Skinnen, and 
Brassavola Digbyana, as these require a higher temperature to bring them 
to perfection, and nothing is more disheartening than to grow Orchids 
which are unsuitable, and which merely exist, and never make bulbs fit to 
flower. Weak plants of Cattleya, particularly of C. Mossise and Trianae, 
are not worth house room, for they take years to develop properly, but 
strong sound pieces of these two species are excellent for amateurs' 
collections. 

Vanda coerulea is now at rest, and should receive merely enough water 
to prevent the leaves from shrivelling. Dendrobiums are still growing, and 
should be kept at the warmest end of the house, where they may be well 
syringed. When growth is completed they should be removed to a cooler 
house, and be kept comparatively dry, to ensure a good rest. 
Suggested Additions. 

L.eliocattleya Nvsa.— This is undoubtedly one of the finest autumn- 
flowering hybrids yet produced, and being of comparatively early raising, 
can be procured at a moderate price. For an amateur's collection it is 
invaluable, since it is free-flowering and of robust constitution. The 
blossoms are of a large size and pleasingly perfumed, the sepals and petals 
being pale lilac and the lip deep purple with golden veining in the throat. 
Its parents are Cattleya Warscewiczii and Laelia crispa, and all the varieties 

Oncidium crispum.— This is a pretty Cool-house species, and worthy 
of inclusion in every collection. Strong healthy plants are reasonable in 
price, and bear long branching flower spikes, the individual blossoms of 
which are of various shades of yellow and brown, and retain their beauty 
for several weeks. There have recently been importations of this tine 
species, and such plants should by now be breaking well. 



334 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 1912. 

ONCIDIUM TIGRINUM AS A PARENT. 

At the present time, when Orchids are raised from seed with such striking 
success, it seems strange that comparatively little use has been made of 
the above species, but it is one of the easiest to obtain crosses from, and 
owing to its broad lip, should impart distinctive shape to hybrids derived 
from it. So far the only recorded hybrid from it seems to be O. hybridum 
(O.R., xviii. p. 8), the first garden-raised Oncidium, of which O. lamelli- 
gerum is the other parent. O. tigrinum being a great favourite, I have at 
various times made crosses with it, having obtained healthy seedlings when 
uniting with it Odontoglossum crispum, Harryanum and Wilckeanum, 
also Cochlioda Noetzliana. Last week I crossed it with Miltonia spectabilis 
var. Moreliana, and the cross appears to have taken. It is, however, a 

the 



curious fact that I have never been succes 
parent, its pollen never seeming to have ar 
stigma of the various Odontoglossa. It \ 
whether other seedlings of this species are ii 


sful in using it as the mi 
iy effect when placed on t 
vould be interesting to kn< 
i existence, and especially 

C. Alwyn Harrison. 


.-^ 




D1SAS. 




Although upwards of 100 species of Disa 


are known to botanists, the 



e only about half-a-dozen in cultivation, for no one has up to the present 
en able to grow successfully the grassy-leaved section, of which D. 
aminifolia may be cited as an example, or such a^ D. crassicornis 

The three species generally met with are D. grandiflora, D. racemosa, 
d D. tripetaloides, while D. sagittal is and D. polygonoides are also to be 
in occasionally. From the three former several hybrids have been raised, 



D 


, Veitchii, 


race 


mosa 


x 


gra 


ndiflor; 




1), 


kewensis 


. gra 


n lifl 




X t 


ripetalt 


►ides. 


D. 


langleye. 


isis, 


racen 




a X 


tripets 


iloide 


1). 


Premier, 


trip* 


;taloi( 


les 


X 







D. Luna, racemosa X Veitchii. 

D. Clio, grandiflora X Veitchii. 
The hybrids, especially D. Veitchii and D. Luna, prove more 
cultivation than the species, but we believe that if their want' 
carefully studied all might be grown with a certain amount of' 
the following notes we shall endeavour to set out a method 



by whit 



th D. Veitchii and other hybrids, nowe 



plants as D. 






November. 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 335 

Potting. — First of all we would draw attention to repotting, which 
many growers say should be done in February, but the writer has found 
that this is too late, and in the culture of Disas we must remember that they 
have no resting period. The best plan to adopt is to repot immediately 
after the flower scapes are removed, taking away all decayed material or 
potting on without any disturbance where the soil is a mass of roots. 
Ordinary flower pots are chosen, and filled one-fourth of their depth with 
drainage, when they are ready to receive the base of the plant. The 
rooting medium should consist of the best fibrous loam one-half, sifting out 
all the fine particles, one-fourth good peat, and the remainder made up of 
chopped sphagnum moss, with a few handfuls of finely-crushed crocks or 
charcoal, to render the whole mixture porous. That excellent material, 
osmunda fibre, so highly prized by Cattleya specialists, has been tried, but 
we do not think it decays fast enough for such subjects as Disas. Hard 
potting is not recommended, but they must be made firm, and the soil 
can be brought up level with the rim of the receptacle. 

Watering.— Perhaps the most important factor is watering, particularly 
after being disturbed. For several weeks the compost ought only to be 
kept moist, but when giving water sufficient must be applied to wet the 
whole of the ball, or the plants will suffer, because roots soon find their 
way down among the drainage. As spring approaches, and root action 
becomes more vigorous, the amount of moisture must be increased, and at 
no time ought they to be kept dry at the roots. 

The Growing Quarters.— It has been stated that Disas can be grown 
with Cape Heaths, and I do not contradict the statement, but the coolest 
end of the Odontoglossum house will suit them admirably, provided there 
is ample top ventilation immediately over the plants. Fresh air should be 
admitted, both winter and summer, excepting in frosty weather and during 
cold winds, and even then it may be possible to open the ventilator on the 
leeward side of the house. 

Shading is necessary, but a thinner canvas should be employed than is 
usually selected for Odontoglossums, and a gentle spray overhead will prove 
very beneficial during dry and hot weather. 

Thrip will sometimes prove very troublesome, but the house must 
never be vapourised, or the tips of the leaves will turn brown and decay. 
An alternative method is to dip the plants in a weak solution of" XL all,'" or 
some other reliable insecticide. Do net on any account exceed the 
instructions given on the bottle, but preferably a little under the strength 
prescribed. Orchidist. 



the principal Disas mentioned in 
), the earliest hybrid of the group 



336 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [Novembbr, x^st, 

was raised by Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, and flowered in June, 1891, 
when it received a First-class Certificate from the R.H.S. It flowered in 
twenty-one months from the time the seed was sown. D. kewensis (fig. 43) 
was raised at Kew, and the first seedling was only eighteen months old when 
it flowered. D. langleyensis (fig. 44) was raised by Messrs. Veitch, and 
flowered in May, 1894, when it received an Award of Merit from the R.H.S. 




Kew at about the same time. D. Premier (fig. 4 1 ) 
and flowered in October, 1893, when it received a 
First-class Certificate from the R.H.S. Two of the parents are also 
included, D. grandiflora (fig. 42), and D. tripetaloides (fig. 46), the other, 
D. racemosa, was not available when the photograph was taken. D. Luna 
and D. Clio are also not included. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW 



DENDROBIUM SCHUETZEI 

nnexed figure represents the beautiful Dendrobiu 



' 



/ 



a Philippine speck 
for which they reo 



troduced bv Messi 



33§ THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 1912. 

tember 10th last (p. 308). The photograph, for which we are indebted to 
Messrs. Sander, represents the plant as exhibited. The species was intro- 
duced over a year ago, and was briefly described at page 224 of our last 
volume. It is an ally of D. Dearei and D. Sandene, but is dwarfer and 
more compact in habit, with stouter pseudobulbs. The segments are also 
much broader, as shown in the figure. The colour is pure white, with an 
emerald green blotch in the throat, and a few dark spots at the base. In 
its large white flowers it resembles the well-known D. formosum, which 



also belongs to 


ft will p. 


-obably 


It should 
succeed in 


prove 

ider 


the s 


uabl 


e h 


"tmetral 


D. Dearei and 


D. Sandei 


*• 












R.A.R. 






SOCIETIES. 
















Royal 


HORTICULI 


URAL 










At the meetii 


lg held at 


the R« 


3yal Hortic 


uhur, 


d Hal 


1, V 


incc 


jnt Square, 


Westminster, ( 


>n Octobe 


r 8th la; 


it, there wa« 


?a fir 


ie displ 




fO 


rchids from 


numerous exhil 


Mtors, and 


. the av 


vards consis 


te 1 l 


>f six 1 


mrd; 


ds, 


one First- 


class Certificate 


1, and four 


Award 


! of Merit. 












Orchid Con 


miittee pr< 


.sent: j 


f. Gumey F 




", Esq. 


(in t 


:he< 


Chair), and 


Messrs. J. O'Br 


ien (hon. < 


sec.), R. 


A.Rolfe.J. 


Wils 


on Pot 




W. 


Thompson, 


R. G. Thwaite- 


5 ,F.J. H; 


mbury, 




ng, A 


. McB 


can, 


c. 


H. Curtis, 


J. Charleswortl 


1, J. Cypl 


ler, W. 


P. Bound, 


J. i; 


. Shill, 


H - 


G. 


Alexander, 


Arthur Dye, Y\ 


r. H. Whj 


te, Gui 


■ney Wilson 


. WW 


Ham E 


Jolto 


n,J 


. S. Moss, 


de B. Crawsha; 


y, Sir Har 


ry J. Ve 


dtch, and S 


irjer 


emiah Coh 




, Bart. 



I-:. H. Davidson, Esq., Borlases, Twyford (gr. Mr. Cooper), received a 
Silver Flora Medal for a fine group of Orchids, including many good forms of 
Cattleya labiata, one, called Davidson's var. being very richly coloured, 
and having the front of the lip uniformly claret-purple, a beautiful form of 
C. Fabia with white sepals and petals and a richly-coloured lip, C. St. 
Gothard, Laeliocattleya Virginia (L. purpurata alba x C. Harrisoniana 
alba), Sophrocattleya Leda, Oncidium varicosum, Odontoglossum Eric, a 
very dark claiet-purple flower, and other good things. 

H. T. Pitt, Esq., Rosslyn, Stamford Hdl (gr. Mr. Thurgood), also 
received a Silver Flora Medal for an interesting group, including Odonto- 
glossum grande, Odontioda Charlesworthii, Ladia monophvlla, Brasso- 
cattleya Pittiana (C. Mrs. W.J. Whiteley X B.-c. heatonensis), a pretty 
rosy-lilac hybrid, the rare Houlletia Brocklehurstiana, Cypripedium Baron 
Schroder, Miltonia vexillaria, Cattleya suavior, C. Dusseldorfii var. Undin ■, 
C. Hardyana alba, C, intermedia, Fabia, Mantinii, Iris, some good Ladio- 
cattleyas, txc. 

F. Ducane Godman, Esq., Horsham, sent Laeliocattleya Godmanii var. 
Aurora, a handsome thing. 



N'OVK 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, I'm 
awarded a Silver Flora Medal for a fine 
handsome Cattleya Iris var. King Mdwai 
flowers, C. Hardyana Herbert Goodson, 
and a richly-coloured lip, C. fulvescens, C 
Veitchii, Laeliocattleya bletchlevensis. L.- 



r. E. Day), was 
Qg the large and 

?pals and petals, 




ig. 48. Cattleya Iris vak. King Edward vii. 

icita (C. Dowiana Rosita x L.-c. laminosa), Sophrocatlaelia 

le white form with some brown spots on the sepals, and others 
1. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. 
r), sent Laeliocattleya Berthe Fournier var. Fascinator (L.-c. 
Dowiana aurea), bearing six large and richly coloured flowers, 



34° THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 191 j. 

L.-c. Priam (C. Harrisoniana X L.-c. callistoglossa), a very pretty hybrid, 
bearing a spike of six light-coloured flowers most resembling the former 
parent, and the handsome Cypripedium Draco Holford's var. 

M. Firmin Lambeau, Brussels, sent the handsome Catasetum splendens 
var. imperiale, bearing a spike of flowers with ivory white sepals and petals, 
and the greater part of the lip reddish purple. 

Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., K.C.V.O., Burford (gr. Mr. W. H. White), 
sent a plant of Cypripedium Rolfei Peeter's var., bearing a spike of two 
handsome flowers. 

His Grace The Duke of Marlborough, Blenheim Palace, Woodstock (gr. 
Mr. G. Hunter), sent Cypripedium Jessie (Charlesworthii X Fairrieanum), 
a distinct and pretty hybrid of intermediate character, having the dorsal 
sepal veined and reticulated with purple on a light rosy ground, and the 
staminode also showing some of the Charlesworthii influence. 

R. G. Mocatta, Esq., Addlestone (gr. Mr. Stevenson), sent Odonto- 
glossum Jasper Woburn var., a very good form. 

C. J. Phillips, Esq., The Glebe, Sevenoaks, sent Oneidium Forbesii 
grandiflorum, bearing a remarkably large flower, Laeliocattleya Ophir Glebe 
var., and a few good Odontoglossums. 

Pantia Ralli, Esq., Ashtead Park, Epsom, sent a good form of Cattleya 
Dowiana aurea. 

W. Thompson, Esq., Walton Grange, Stone (gr. Mr. Stevens), showed 
a well-spotted form of Odontoglossum Neriss.a (naevium X crispum), and 
Cypripedium Our (.hieen, a very handsome hybrid. 

R. G. Thwaites, Esq., Chessington, Streatham (gr. Mr. J. M. Black), sent 
Odontioda Leeana, two O. Devossiana, Odontoglossum percultum, and 
some good forms of Cattleya Fabia. 

E. Towson, Esq., Ellerdale, St. Albans, showed Cypripedium Ellerdale 
(bingleyense X insigne Harefield Hall var.). 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a very Hue group, including 
the handsome Laeliocattleya Britannia (C. Warscewiczii X L.-c. 
Canhamiana), L.-c. Fred. Gott, L.-c. La-France, the handsome Cattleya 
Fabia Rex, with white sepals and petals and a richly-coloured lip, C. 
fulvescens, C. Isis (Ella X Hardyana), a pretty rose-coloured: flower with 
ruby-crimson lip and two yellow blotches in the throat,- some good C. 
Iris, C. Hardyana Royal Sovereign, C. Freya (Mantinii X Dowiana aurea), 
Cirrhopetatum Micholirzii, Cycnoches stelliferum, bearing two long spikes 
of green male flowers, Oneidium Forbesii, O. Marshallianum magnificum, 
Brassocatlaelia Astarte (L.-c. Martinetii X D. Digbyana), some good 
Brassocattleyas, Catasetum Russellianum, Epidendrum auritum, Sacco- 
iabium acutifolium, Dendrobium superbiens, Cvpripedium Chapmanii, and 
others (Silver-gilt Flora Medal). 



N .VK 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a fine group, 
including some good examples of Oncidium varicosum and others, 
Dendrobium Phalsenopsis, D. formosum, some good forms of Cattleya 
labiata, C. O'Brieniana alba, C. Iris, C. Gaskelliana Hodgkinsonii, C. Mrs. 
Pitt, C. Caducia, the pretty little Sophrolaslia Gratrixiae, Pleione lagenaria, 
Stenoglottis longifolia, Miltonia Bleuana, and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. James Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a good group, 
including a fine Cattleya Euphrasia with five flowers on a spike, C. 
Mantinii nobilior, C, suavior, Miltonia vexillaria Leopoldii, Cypripedium 
Gaston Bultel, Felicity, Maudias, Niobe superbum, Sir Redvers Buller, &c. 
(Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, sent a few choice 
Orchids, including Dendrobium Sanders, a pretty hybrid between 
Odontoglossum Rossii and O. Wilckeanum, Laliocattleya Colmamana, 
Cattleya Fabia alba, and Stanhopea Shuttleworthii. 

Mr. Sidney Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, sent two plants of 
Warscewiczella marginata and Pescatorea Dayana rhodacra, having rose- 
coloured tips to the segments. 

M. Chas. Maron, Brunoy, France, sent Brassocattleya Olympia iC 
Solfaterre X B.-c. Leemannise), a pretty light yellow hybrid, Cattleya Fabia 
alba, and C. Marguerite Maron (Eldorado alba X labiata Cooksoni*), with 
white sepals and petals, and a bright purple blotch on the lip in front of the 
yellow disc. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, sent Odontioda Graireana, O. 
Diana, some good forms of Odontoglossum crispum, Cattleya Rothschildiana 
albescens, and others. 

First-class Certificate 



Cattleya hybrid (Fabia alba 



Warscewiczii Frau Melanie Beyrodt). 



—A very handsome thing, most like the former parent, and having white 
sepals and petals, and the lip ruby-purple in front, with some yellow veimng 
in the throat. Exhibited by C. J. Phillips, Esq., The Glebe, Sevenoaks. 
(The award was made subject to a suitable name being given). 
Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Hardyana var. Herbert Goodson.— A beautiful variety, 
having white sepals and petals, and a dark crimson-purple lip, with some 
yellow lines at the base. Exhibited by H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, 
Putney. . . 

Cattleya Mrs. Pitt Charlesworth's var. (Harnsomana X Dowiana 
aurea).-A handsome form, having bright rose-coloured flowers with some 
yellow markings on the lip. Exhibited by R. le Doux, Esq., Marlfield, 
West Derby. 

Miltonia Harwoodii (C. Ncetzliana : 



allaria).— A beautiful 



342 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, i^i*. 

hybrid, bearing an erect spike of eight bright pink flowers, most like the 
Miltonia parent in shape. Exhibited by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., 
K.C.V.O. 

Odontioda Charlesworthii Orchid Dene var. (C. Ncetzliana X O. 
Harryanum). — A handsome form, having large deep crimson flowers, with a 
yellow crest to the lip. Exhibited by J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge. 

At the meeting held on October 22nd there was a magnificent display of 
Orchids, and the awards consisted of four Eirst-class Certificates, six Awards 
of Merit, and six medals. 

Orchid Committee present: J. Gurney Fowler, Esq. (in the Chair), 
Messrs. J. O'Brien (hon. sec), Gurney Wilson, J. Wilson Potter, R. G. 
Thwaites, F. J. Hanbury, T. Armstrong, A. McBean, C. H. Curtis, W. 
Bolton, W. Cobb, J. Charlesworth, J. Cypher, W. H. Hatcher, J. E. Shill, 
H. G. Alexander, A. Dye, W. H. White, C. J. Lucas, Stuart Low, R. 
Brooman White, J. S. Moss, de Barri Crawshay, and Sir Jeremiah Colman, 
Bart. 

Baron Bruno Schroder, The Dell, Englefield Green (gr. Mr. J. E. Shill), 
staged a small group of finely-grown Orchids, to which a Silver Flora Medal 
was awarded. It contained a fine Cattleya Dowiana aurea, with clear 
yellow sepals and petals, two plants of C. D. alba, with white sepals and 
petals and a very richly-coloured lip, C. Corona (Hardyana X Mantimi). a 
richly-coloured Laeliocattleya George Woodhams (L. purpurata X C. 
Hardyana), and the white and green Cypripediums Alma Gevaert. 

H. F. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney (gr. Mr. G. E. Day), received a 
Silver Banksian Medal for a good group, including Sophrocattleya eximia. 
S.-c. Atreus, Sophrolrelia Irene, with bright orange-coloured flowers, and a 
few other Sophronitis crosses, Cattleya suavior, C. Maggie Raphael 
Goodson's var., a large and richly-coloured form, a few good Laeliocattleyas, 
Brassocattleya Veitchii Queen Alexandra, and a few plants of Odonto- 
glossum crispum, and others. 

Walter Cobb, Esq., Normanhurst, Rusper (gr. Mr. C. J. Salter), sent a 
handsome plant of Zygopetalum Charlesworthii Cobb's var., Laeliocattleya 
Mrs. Temple, and Cattleya Fabia Cobb's var.. a richly-coloured form. 

Lieut.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, K.C.V.O., Westonbirt (gr. Mr. H. 
G. Alexander), sent Cattleya Mercutio (Harrisoniana X Lord Rothschild), 
a very pretty hybrid, bearing a spike of four flowers, most like C. 
Harrisoniana in colour but considerably enlarged. 

R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), sent Cattleya Ena 
Marlfield var. (Hardyana X bicolor). 

C. J. Phillips, Esq., The Glebe, Sevenoaks (gr. Mr. Bucknell), sent 
Cattleya Basil (Mantinii X Enid), C. Dowiana aurea Glebe var., with clear 



November, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 343 

Bola (L.-c. callisto-lossa X C. labiata), a large and richly-coloured form. 

Messrs. James Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, staged a group of choice 
Cypripediums, noteworthy among them being C. Fairrieanum, C. Sir 
Redvers Buller, C. insigne Sanderae and Harefield Hall var., some good 
Dendrobium Phalamopsis, U. formosum giganteum, Cattleya Fabia, C. 
Dietrichiana, Miltonia vexillaria Leopoldii, Odontoglossum crispum, the 
rare Houlletia Brocklehurstiana, Masdevallia bockingensis, and others 
(Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, staged a very fine group, 
including forms of Cattleya labiata, maxima, Iris. Fabia, and others, a 
richly-coloured Laeliocattleya Dominiana, Oncidium varicosum Rogersii 
and O. v. Lindenii, Odontoglossum Rolfese and amabile, Vanda ccerulea, a 
fine lot of Dendrobium formosum and D. Phahenopsis, Miltonia vexillaria 
Leopoldii, a good plant of Laelia Perrinii, Houlletia Brocklehurstiana, 
Epidendrum osmanthum, and others (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Sander cS: Sons, St. Albans, staged a very line group including 
some good forms of Cattleya Fabia, labiata, Hardyana, Iris, Portia, 
conspicua, Davisii, nobilis, Robert de Wavrin, Dido (Bowringiana X Iris), 
and other brilliant Cattleyas, Laeliocattleya Nysa, Astoriae, Cypripedium 
Chapmanii, C. Goldfinch, and others, Ccelogyne fuliginosa, Burlingtonia 
decora, Catasetum maculatum, the rare C. Christyanum, C. discolor, and a 
fine example of C. tabulare var. rhinophorum (Silver Flora Medal). 

Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southgate, staged a very interesting group, 
including good forms of Cattleya labiata, Fabia, Hardyana, Mantinii, and 
Peetersii, two very distinct forms of C. Sylvia (Fabia alba X Dowiana aurea) 
from the same seed pod, one having light yellow sepals and petals, the other 
white, and both having a crimson lip veined with yellow, C Hassallii 
(Empress Frederick X labiata), a very pretty hybrid, some good Laelio- 
cattleyas, and the rare Bulbophyllum comosum (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, staged a few choice 
things, including a line plant of Angraecum Dubuyssonii with a spray of ten 
flowers, the richly-coloured Oncidium varicosum Lindenii, some good forms 
of Cattleya Mantinii, Portia, and Hardyana, C. Fauna (Hardyana X 
Chamberlainiana), having the sepals and petals prettily mottled with orange 
and salmon colour, and the lip rich crimson, with some yellow veining on 
the side lobes, a handsome Laeliocattleya from L.-c. callistoglossa X C. 
Mantinii, bearing six flowers, most like an improved edition of the latter, 
L.-c. Arachne, the rare Oncidium splendidum aureum, Cypripedium 
beechense, C. Gaston Bultel, Sophrocatlaelia Leda, some good Odonto- 
glossum grande, and others. 

Mr, E. H. Davidson, Orchid Dene, Twyford, sent a few choice things, 



344 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, , 9 i 2 . 

including Cattleya Mantinii Fowler's var., a very dark form, C. labiata alba, 
a charming albino, Laeliocattleya Orion var. J. Lakin (L.-c. Haroldiana X 
C Dovviana aurea), a beautiful form, having pale yellow spreading sepals 
and petals, slightly freckled with rose, and a deep rose-coloured lip with 
some yellow vetoing, Sophrocatlaelia Sibyl, a richly-coloured form, &c. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Hay wards Heath, sent Cattleya labiata 
Lady Duff, a good white form with a tinge of blush on the lip, and C. 1. 
The Sultan, white with a purple blotch on the front of the lip. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, staged a small group, including 
Sophrocatlaelia Helen (S.-l. heatonensis X L.-c. Gottoiana), a handsome 
hybrid, having deep rose-coloured flowers shaded with violet,' and a ruby- 
coloured lip, Cattleya Fabiata (Portia X Fabia), and C. Rothschildiana 
albens, a pretty light variety. 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, E. Yorks, sent a plant of the 
quaint Cirrhopetalum refractum, bearing three fine racemes, Oncidium 
ornithorrhynchum album, and a fine plant of the Colombian Oncidium 
panduriferum (Rolfe) with two spikes. 

First-class Certificates. 

Brassocattleya Veitchii The Dell var. (C. Mosshe Wageneri x B. 
Digbyana).— A very large and beautiful white variety, with a primrose yellow 
disc to the well-fringed lip. Exhibited by Baron Bruno Schroder. 

Cattleya labiata Opal.— A charming white variety, with a yellow 
disc to the lip, and some clear pink veining in front. The plant bore four 
flowers. Exhibited by Baron Bruno Schroder. 

Cymbidium Doris (Tracyanum x insigne).— A handsome hybrid, 
bearing an erect spike of ten flowers, most like the latter in general 
character, and having light yellow sepals and petals closely veined with red, 
and the lip spotted with red-brown on the front lobe, and veined with the 
same colour on the^side lobes. Exhibited by J. & A. A. McBean. 

Cypripedium Pallas-Athene (parentage unrecorded).— A very large 
and handsome hybrid, much like C. insigne Harefield Hall var. in general 
character, and having the dorsal sepal white above and green below, with 
some dark purple spots. Exhibited by W. R. Lee, Esq., Plurnpton Hall, 
Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch). 

Awards of Merit. 

Cattleya Comet var. Princess \Uuv 



i yak. rRi.NCESS mary (Warneri alba x Dowis 
^ very beautiful hybrid, having white sepals and 
nuch yellow veining, and some purple markings n. 



als, and the lip with 
the base. Exhibited 
by Pantia Ralli, Esq., Ashtead Park, Epsom. 

Goodson's var.— A large and handsome 



Cattley 



form, having light rose-coloured sepal: 






:i:::n. 



Exhibited by H. F. Goods. 



, and the lip crimson, with 



November, i 9 1 ?.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 345 

L^liocattleya de Hemptinne (L.-c. ronselensis X C. Dowiana 
aurea). — A handsome hybrid, having orange-yellow flowers, tinged and 
veined with red on the lip. Exhibited by Count Joseph de Hemptinne, St. 
Denis, Ghent. 

L,eliocattleya Golden Oriole Holford's var. (L.-c. Charles- 
worthii X C. Dowiana aurea). — A handsome hybrid, having large oraage- 
red flowers, and a ruby-crimson lip with a yellow disc and similar veiriing 
on the side lobes. Exhibited by Lieut.-Col. Sir G. L. Holford. 

Sophrocatl^lia Menippe var. H. F. Goodson.— A handsome hybrid, 
having rich reddish mauve flowers with a darker crimson lip. Exhibited by 
H. F. Goodson, Esq. 

Sophrocatl/ELIa Sandhage (C. Enid X S.-l. heatonensis).— A large 
and handsome hybrid, most like a Cattleya in shape, having deep rose- 
coloured sepals and petals, and a very dark ruby-crimson lip. Exhibited 
by Mr. E. H. Davidson, Orchid Dene, Twyford. 

Manchester and North of England Orchid. 
At the meeting held at the Coal Exchange, Manchester, on October 3rd, 
the members of Committee present were : Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the 
Chair), Messrs. R. Ashworth, J. Bamber, H. G. Bennett, J. Butterworth, 
J. C. Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, J. Hanmer, W. J. Hargreaves, Dr. 
Hartley, W. H. Hatcher, W. Holmes, J. Lupton, D. McLeod, C. Parker, 
F. K. Sander, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, A. Warburton, and H. Arthur 
(Secretary). 

W. R. Lee, Esq., Heywood (gr. Mr. Branch), was awarded a Large 
Silver-gilt Medal for a beautiful group of plants, including Dendrobium 
Phalaenopsis Schroederianum in great variety, D. Dearei, a number of 
Cattleya Dowiana aurea, C. Rosicrucian, several Odontoglossum grande, 
Cypripedium Maudiae, Rossetti Bianca, Boltonii, Actaeus langleyense, 
Gaston Bultel, Leeanum magnificum, and Brassocattleya Ajax. 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 
Silver-gilt Medal for a group, composed principally of Cattleyas of the Iris 
section, several distinct varieties being observed, with C. conspicua, Mrs. 
Pitt, Pittiana, Armstrongiae, Johnsonii, iridescens var. cuprea, Miss 
Williams, Cypripedium insigne Sanderae, Hitchinsiae, and Leonias. 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Branch), staged a pretty group, 
to which a Large Silver Medal was awarded. It contained fine examples of 
Cattleya Iris, Hardyana, Robiana, Odontoglossum crispum xanthotes 
Charlesworthii, Uroskinneri, Eleanor, and grande, Cypripedium Boltonii, 
Rossetti, Venus, Corneyanum, Memnon, Maudias, Lord Ossulston, and 
Cymbidium erythrostylum. 

Col, J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr, C. Lupton), wag 



346 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, .912. 

awarded a Large Silver Medal for a nice mixed group of Cattleyas of the 
Iris section, C. Gaskelliana, C. G. alba, Cypripedium Chorltonii, Maudias, 
Rossetti, Epidendrum vitellinum, Odontoglossum Rossii albens, Odontioda 
Grarieana, Cymbidium Tracyanum, and Miltonia spectablis Moreliana. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton -le- Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), was awarded 
a Silver Medal for a well-arranged group of Cypripediums, including C. 
Baron Schroder, Sir Redvers Buller, Milo, Chas. Richman, Hitchinsiae, 
Lord Ossulston, Maudiae, insigne Sanderae, Rossetti, Actaeus aureum, and 
insigne Chantinii Lindenii. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), was also awarded a 
Silver Medal for a group composed of Cattleya Miss Williams, Lord 
Rothschild, Harrisoniana Hey House var., Princess Patricia, Miss Williams 
var. vernalis, Laeliocattleya callistoglossa, and Cypripedium Shillianum. 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), staged Cypripedium 
Maudiae (six plants), Odontoglossum grande (six plants), including var. 
aureum, Vanda ccerulea (four plants, one very brilliant in colour), 
Epidendrum vitellinum (six plants), and Cattleyas, including armain- 
villierensis with gigantic flowers. 

R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), staged Cattleya 
Gottoiana Marlfield var., and C. Mrs. Pitt Charlesworth's var. 

Messsrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham, were awarded a Silver Medal 
for a group of Cypripedium Arthurianum triumphans, Niobe superbum, Sir 
Redvers Buller, Maudiae, Fairrieanum, insigne Sanderae, and i. Ernestii, 
Cattleya Mantinii nobilior, labiata, Odontoglossum grande, and Vanda 
Kimballiana. 

Mr. J. Evans, Congleton, was also awarded a Silver Medal for a group 
of Cattleyas Armstrongiae, Harrisoniana alba, Adula, Fabia, Thurgoodiana, 
gigas, Iris, Brassocattleya heatonensis, Odontoglossum crispum, a good 
round flower, also a blotched variety, and an Odontioda hybrid. 

Messrs. A. J. Keeling & Sons, Bradford, were also awarded a Silver 
Medal for a mixed group, including Oncidium Forbesii, Cypripedium 
insigne Harefield Hall var. and others, Miltonia Bluntii Lubbersiana, 
Bulbophyllum maculosum, Odontoglossum bictonense album, and the rare 
Neobenthamia gracilis. 

Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a nice group, including 
Odontoglossum Cobra, Phoebe, amabile var. Jewel, Cypripedium Man- 
hattan, Baron Schroder, Victory, Chapmanii, splendidum, Cattleya Adula, 
Davisii gigantea, Sunshine Sander's var., and Laeliocattleya Phoenix. 

Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, staged some good forms of 
Cypripedium Charlesworthii, one gaining an Award. 



Messrs. Hassall & Co., Southg 
Warscewiczii. 



of Cattleya 



November, i 9 i2.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 347 

Mr. W. Shackleton, Great Horton, staged a good form of Cypripedium 
Charlesworthii, a fine Odontoglossum crispum, Miltonia spectabilis 
Moreliana, and Cypripedium Clinkaberryanum X Lavertonianum. 

Mr. J. E. Sadler, Newbury, sent two good Odontoglossum crispum. 
First-class Certificates. 

Cattleya Lord Rothschild Marlfield var., a fine flower of good even 
colour, with a well-lined lip, C. Lord Rothschild alba var. Dr. John 
Utting, a good form, with white sepals and petals, and a brilliantly- 
coloured lip, both from R. le Doux, Esq. 

Awards of Merit. 

Odontoglossum Ada Barclay and Cypripedium Domingo de Larranaga 
(nitens X Standard), both from R. le Doux, Esq. 

Lseliocattleya luminosa aurea (L. tenebrosa Walton Grange var. X C. 
Dowiana aurea), L.-c. Golden Oriole (L.-c. Charlesworthii X C. Dowiana 
aurea), Cypripedium bellatulum var. majesticum, Cattleya Apex (Enid X 
Mendelii), all from R. Ashworth, Esq. 

Cattleya Germania Ward's var., from Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cypripedium Troilus West Point var. (nitens X insigne Harefield Hall 
var.), from S. Gratrix, Esq. 

Cypripedium Charlesworthii var. rawdonense, from Messrs. Mansell cS: 
Hatcher, Ltd. 

First-class Botanical Certificate. 
Cymbidium lancifolium, from Mr. H. Arthur. 

At the meeting held on October 17th, the members of Committee present 
were: Rev. J. Crombleholme (in the Chair), Messrs. J. Bamber, J. C. 
Cowan, J. Cypher, J. Evans, Dr. Hartley, W. Holmes, J. Lupton, D. 
McLeod, H. Morgan, C. Parker, H. Thorp, Z. A. Ward, A. Warburton, 
and H. Arthur (Secretary). 

Mrs. A. K. Wood, Glossop (gr. Mr. Gould), was awarded a Silver-gilt 
Medal for a fine group of well-grown plants, including Cattleya labiata in 
variety, Fabia, Lord Rothschild, Mantinii, Lseliocattleya Wilfred, Aphrodite, 
Gottoiana, Golden Oriole, Cypripedium nitens, insigne vars. Sanderae, Balliae, 
and Cobbianum, Vanda ccerulea, and Pilumna nobilis. 

Z. A. Ward, Esq., Northenden (gr. Mr. Weatherby), was awarded a 
Large Silver Medal for a group, including Cattleya Fabia, Ella, Miss 
Williams, Cypripedium insigne vars. Sanderae (30 plants), Harefield Hall 
var., Perfection, Prince of W r ales, Laura Kimball, Dorothy, and Cringlewood 
var., Thalia Mrs. F. Wellesley, Actaeus, fulshawense, Maudiae, and the 
pretty Oncidium ornithorrhynchum album. 

A. Warburton, Esq., Haslingden (gr. Mr. Dalgleish), was awarded a 
Large Silver-gilt Medal for a pretty group, including Cattleya Dowiana 



348 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 1912. 

aurea and Rosita, Fabia ardentissima, F. alba Vine House var., Maronii, 
labiata in variety, Cypripedium Maudise, Miss Louisa Fowler, Mrs. F. 
Wellesley, insigne rotundifolium, Prospero majus, Adam, Lord Ossulston, 
Bertie, Leeanum Corona, and L. magnificum. 

R. Ashworth, Esq., Newchurch (gr. Mr. Branch), staged a fine group, to 
which a Large Silver Medal was awarded. It contained Cattleyas in variety, 
including Roehrsiana var. bella, labiata alba var. Wellmani, Fabia 
sanguinea, Armstrongiae, Brassocattleya heatonensis and Lemannise, 
Odontoglossum crispum Mme. Linden, secundum, amabile and Waverley, 
Miltonia vexillaria Leopoldii, Cypripedium insigne Sanderse, Actaeus 
Drewett's var., Queen Alexandra, Corneyanum, and Oncidium Forbesii 
splendens. 

Col. J. Rutherford, M.P., Blackburn (gr. Mr. Lupton), was awarded a 
Large Silver Medal for a group, composed principally of Cattleya labiata in 
variety, C. Mantinii nobilior, C. Dowiana aurea, Brassocattleya Leemannis 
aurea, Laeliocattleya Dominiana langleyensis and Nysa, Odontoglossum 
crispum and Pescatorei, Odontioda Grarieana Beardwood var., 
Cypripedium Maudiae, Niobe, and Epidendrum vitellinum. 

J. McCartney, Esq., Bolton (gr. Mr. Holmes), staged a group, to which 
a Large Silver Medal was awarded. It contained Cattleya labiata, Dowiana 
and var. aurea, Empress Frederick var. King Edward VII. , highburiensis 
var. Mary McCartney, Armstrongiae, Laeliocattleya callistoglossa, J. 
McCartney, and Cypripedium Lord Derby and Donald. 

Rev. J. Crombleholme, Clayton-le-Moors (gr. Mr. Marshall), was 
awarded a Silver Medal for a nice group of Cypripediums, including Actseus 
revolutum, aureum, and magnificum, Hitchinsise vivicans and Perfection, 
insigne Sanders, Leeanum giganteum, Chas. Richman, Baron Schroder, 
triumphans, and Sanacderae Cookson's var. 

O. O. Wrigley, Esq., Bury (gr. Mr. Rogers), staged an interesting 
exhibit, consisting of thirty-two plants of Cypripedium Maudiae, including 
twelve plants of the variety magnificum, and over thirty plants of 
Epidendrum vitellinum autumnalis. 

William Thompson, Esq., Walton Grange (gr. Mr. Howes), staged 
Cypripedium Pyrrha, Arthurianum Walton Grange var., Charlesworthii 
Temeraire, Actaeus Bianca, and Odontoglossum aspersoides. 

R. le Doux, Esq., West Derby (gr. Mr. Fletcher), staged Cattleya 
Hardyana le Doux's var., exquisitum, and the handsome Brassocattleya 
Lemanniae Marlfield var. 

H. H. Bolton, Esq,, Newchurch (gr. Mr. Eastwood), staged Odonto- 
glossum Thompsonianum Heightside var. 

Messrs. J. Cypher & Sons, Cheltenham were awarded a Large Silver 
Medal for a nice group, including Cattleya Bowringiana atroviolacea and 



November, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 349 

Mantinii nobilior, Cypripedium insigne Harefield Hall var., Sanderae, 
Bohnhofianum, and Laura Kimball, Leeanum Corona, Gaston Bultel, Sir 
Redvers Buller, bingleyense, Felicity, andDendrobium formosum giganteum. 
Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Haywards Heath, were awarded a Large 
Silver Medal for a group, including Cattleya Fabia alba, Nestor, F. W. 
Wigan, Lseliocattleya Hera and Nortia, Brassocattleya 



Alexandra, Cypripedii 



ultel, Baron Schroder, 



well-shaped pi 
Pitt Ch; 



: Harefield Hall var., Odontoglossum cordatum and Jasper. 
Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, staged a small group, including 
Cattleyas Hardyana, Peetersii, Fabia, Ella, nobilis, Atalanta, conspicua. 
Ljeliocattleya Walter Gott and Hon. Mrs. Astor, with Cypripedium dulce, 
Earl of Plymouth, leucoxanthum Cunninghamii, and Saccolabium 
acutifolium. A Silver Medal was awarded. 

Mr. J. Evans, Congleton, staged a small group, to which a Silver Medal 
was awarded. It contained Cattleyas in variety, including Enid, Fabia, 
■and Hardyana, several forms of Odontoglossum crispum, one being nicely 
blotched, and Cypripedium Germaine Opoix. 

Mr. E. H. Davidson, Twyford, Berks, sent Cattleya Hardyana, and 
other fine things, which received Awards. 

First-class Certificates. 

Cattleya Ena Marlfield var. (bicolor X Massaiana), a large flower with 

bronzy segments and well coloured lip ; C. labiata Madam le Doux, having 

suffused with colour in the lip, and C. Mrs. 

nly one of the best forms seen, with large 

__nd flowers of a brilliant colour. All from R. le Doux, Esq. 

Cattleya Enid Ward's var., a large well-set flower of even colour, with 
a well-veined lip. From Z. A. Ward, Esq. 

Cypripedium Our Queen (Leeanum X Stevensii), a well-shaped flower, 
with apple-green lip, and the segments bronzy yellow and nicely marked. 
From Wm. Thompson, Esq., Walton Grange. 

Cattleya labiata var. Queen of Spain, a good flower, having white sepals 
and petals, the lip slightly flushed with colour, and an orange throat, C. 
Enid Orchid Dene var. (Mossiae X gigas), a well-set flower, of even colour, 
and the lip well veined; Brassocattleya heatonensis var. virginale (B. 
Digbyana X C Hardyana alba), havifig creamy sepals and petals, and a 
lar"e round fringed lip, LaeliocattIeya<Colmanise Orchid Dene var. (L.-c. 
Jnistoglossa X°C. Dowiana aurea), of good shape, and the lip large and 
deep velvety crimson in colour. All from Mr. E. H. Davidson. 
Cattleya Basil. From Mrs. A. K. Wood, Glossop. 

Awards of Merit. 
Odontoglossum scintillans (Rossii rubescens X Wilckeanum princeps). 
From Wm. Thompson, Esq. 



*5° THE ORCHID REVIEW. [November, 1912. 

Cattleya Portia magnifica, a fine form. From Mr. E. H. Davidson. 

Owing to the increase of exhibits, it is desired by the Committee that 
Exhibitors hand a list of the plants staged by them at each meeting to the 
Secretary, so as to assist him in making out the report. 

North of England Horticultural. 
At the monthly meeting held at the Corn Exchange, Leeds, on October 
17th and iSth, some very interesting Orchids were exhibited, and the 
Orchid Committee made the following Awards :— 

A Gold Medal was awarded to Messrs. Mansell & Hatcher, Rawdon, 
Leeds, for a large group of Orchids. 

A Silver-gilt Medal to W. H. St. Quintin, Esq., Scampston Hall, York 
(gr. Mr. F. C. Puddle), who showed an interesting collection of seedling 
Cattleyas. 

Bronze Medals to Mr. W. Shackleton, Bradford, for a small group ; and 
J. H. Craven, Esq., The Beeches, Keighley(gr. Mr. F. W. Cornev), for a 
collection. 

Novelties. 
First-class Diplomas to Cattleya The Bride, shown by W. H. St. 
Quintin, Esq., and Cypripedium Boltonii, shown by J. H. Craven, Esq. 

Second-class Diplomas to Ueliocattleya scampstonensis, showed by W. 
H. St. Quintin, Esq., and Cypripedium Charlesworthii, shown by Mr W 
H. Shackleton. J 

A Challenge Cup, value 80 guineas, was offered for the best exhibit in 
the Show, and was won by j. Pickersgill, Esq., Leeds (gr. Mr. Donoghue), 
for a l arg e miscellaneous group of plants, including some good Cattlevas 
and Oncidiums. A Gold Medal was also awarded. 

ORCHIDS IN SEASON. 

A handsome form of Laeliocattleya Barbarossa is sent from the establish- 
ment of Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Lan-Icv, Bucks, by Mr T A. 
Briscoe. It was raised from L.-c. callistoglossa crossed with Cattleya 
Irian*, and bears a considerable resemblance to the original form raised by 
Lt.-Col. Sir George L. Holford, of which a flower was sent to us (OR 
xv. p. 375 ) The sepals and petals of Messrs. Veitch's plant are rosy lilac',' 
the !Ct1rln e CT e P ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ mten3e ^ Ur P le - Cnmson > and 
A flower of a handsome hybrid Cypripedium, derived from C nitens 
magnihcum X Thompsonianum, is sent from the collection of O. O. 
VVngley, Esq., Bridge Hall, Bury, by Mr. Rogers. The dorsal sepal is 






spotted with purple on a white ground, and a broad purpl. 



band extends nearly to the apex. The petals are uniformly red-brown, and 



November, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 35* 

the lip rather lighter in colour. The influence of C. Spicerianum is very 
marked in the staminode and dorsal sepal, and of C. villosum in the richly 
coloured shining petals, but the insigne spotting is more copious than would 
have been expected. 

A flower of a handsome hybrid, derived from Cypripedium insigne 
Sander* X Chamberlainianum, is sent from the collection of Mrs. Ardern, 
Bonis Hall, Prestbury, Macclesfield, by Mr. A. Oliver. It has a much 
more yellow ground colour than the typical C. Fowlerae, and the sepals and 
petals are closely spotted with brown. 

ORCHID NOTES AND NEWS. 

The next meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society is the Special Show of 
Autumn-flowering Orchids to be held at the Royal Horticultural Hall, 
Vincent Square, Westminster, on Tuesday and Wednesday, November 5th 
and 6th, of which particulars were given at pages 190, 318. The Orchid 
judging commences at 10 a.m. on November 5th, and the Orchid Committee 
meets at 11.30 a.m. The schedule of prizes was published at page 230 of 
our August issue. The Conference on the second day will be held from n 
to 1 o'clock and from 2 to 4 in the afternoon. 





A second 


meeting 


will 


be hel( 


1 at t 




ticultur 


al I 


fall, on 


N. 


avember 19I 


;h, when 


the 


Orchid 


Comi 


nittee will mei 


st at th. 


2 usr 


lal hour, 




o'clock noo 


n. The 


follo> 


wing m 


' 


will be held 01 


a Decei 


nber 


3rd. 




Two meeti 


rags of th 


e Ma 


ncheste 


r and 


North of Engl 


and On 


:hid 


Society 


wi 


11 be held at 


the Coa 


1 Exc 


:hange, 


Mane 


;hester, during 


Noven 


iber, 


on the 


7t 


h and 28th. 


The Co 


mm it 


;tee meets at 


noon, and the 


exhibits 


are 


open to 




embers and the publi 


c froi 


n 1 to . 


4 P- m 


The follow! 


ing meeting 


will be 


he 


:ld on Decen 


iber 7th. 


. A 


special 


meeti 


ng will also be held 


n Thursday, 


N". 


ovember 141 


th, in th 


e To 


wn Ha 


11, Ma 


nchestcr, in c< 


mjuncti 


on v 


vith the 



nthemum Show of the Royal Botanical Horticultural Society of 
ester. All members desiring to exhibit must notify the Secretary 
er than November 7th of the space required, so that satisfactory 



At a meeting of the Carlisle and Cumberland Horticultural Society, held 
on September 4th and 5th last, a Silver Medal was awarded to Sir Benjamin 
Scott, Mayor of Carlisle, for a fine group of Orchids. 

Mr. Albert C. Smith has been appointed Manager of the firm of C. F. 
Karthaus, Potsdam, Germany, in place of Mr. Blossfeld. Mr. Smith has been 
with the firm for two years as foreman. Previously he was with Messrs. James 
Veitch cc Sons, at Langley. afterwards with the late Baron Schroder, The 
Dell, Englefield Green, and then with Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans. 



35* ttiE OkCtilb REVIEW. [November, i 9 ta. 

R.H.S. Scientific Committee: The following references to Orchids 
exhibited at the meetings of the Committee are taken from the Official 
Report (continued from page 320 :— 

October 8th, 1912 :— 

Bulbophyllum Gentilii.— Mr. O'Brien showed, on behalf of Sir 
Frederick Moore, a specimen of Bulbophyllum Gentilii, Rolfe (see Orchid 
Review, October, 1912, p. 314). This species has the nectar glands placed 
on the upper side of the dorsal sepal. It has been confounded with B. 
Calamaria (Bot. Mag., 4088), and the two species are mixed in herbaria. 

Nomenclature of Orchid hybrid.— The Committee considered the 
question of the nomenclature of a hybrid Orchid referred to it by the R.H.S. 
Council. The alleged parentage was Cattleya Fabia alba (C. labiate X C. 
Dowiana aurea), X C. Warscewiczii var. Frau Melanie Beyrodt, and the 
name suggested for the seedling was C. Harrisiana. The Committee 
considered that this name transgressed the recommendations of the Vienna 
Botanical Congress regarding plant names in that it was too much like 
existing names in the same genus, thereby tending to confusion (e.g., Cattleya 
Harnsoniana, C. Harrisii and C. Harrisiae) ; the name was, therefore, not 
tenable. Further, they thought that although Art. xii. of the Rules of 
Horticultural Nomenclature (Journ. R.H.S., xxxvii. p. 151), permitted the 
use of names of Latin form (with sign of hybridity), for such cross-bred 
plants as this, it would be more convenient if vernacular names were 
chosen, generally from the classics. In the instance under consideration, 
the Committee recommended that the exhibitor should be asked to choose 



ORCHID PORTRAITS. 

Cypripedium Mrs. BosToc K .-/o«r/i. Hort., 1912, ii. p. 323, with fig. 

Cypripedium Pallas Athene.— Gard.^Mag., 1912, pp 811 82 
with fig. ^ J ' 

Odontioda Lambeauiana Westonbirt ywi.—Gard. Chron., 1912, i 
p. 285, with coloured plate. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



i of flu 

B., Medellin.— The flower sent is Cvc 
supposing 



■■> desired (abr 

llbe^dealt with in the body of the work.] '" 

.—The flower sent is Cypripedium Roezlii, Rchb. f 



mfla7hetwp?„Ti " ow t ers f a " lved completely decayed; and mouldy. ~ Please 
?^^*££~* ° f bIOttm ^ ^ llke dried S P"- ^hey can. 
a A nowe~r There " * "^ f ° rm ° f Vanda CCEruIea with a blue % W ^ should lil 
Received with thanks. -G.H.M., G.P.P., E.F.C.-Next month. 



Vol XX No. 240: THE DECEMBER, 1912. 

ORCHID REVIEW 

Edited by R. ALLEN ROLFE, A.L.S. 



; Collectio 



:ster and North of England Orchid 



Answers to Correspondents 37^ Royal Horticultural S ty'sMvm 

Calendar of Operations for December -.302 Autumn-flowering Orchids ... 

Cattleya Peetersii Westonbirt var. •■•357 Westonbirt, Some Rarities at 

Cypripedium Franchetii 35^ 



Odontoglossums from Edgbasl 

Orchid Conference 

Orchid Notes and News 

Orchid Portraits 

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THE ORCHID REVIEW. 

Vol. XX.l DECEMBER, 1912. No. 240. 



OUR NOTE BOOK. 

The Special Show of Autumn-flowering Orchids held by the R.H.S. on 
November 5th and 6th last was a magnificent success, and brought together 
such a display of Orchids as has not previously been seen in the month of 
November. The groups staged, both by amateurs and the trade, were 
excellent, but the magnificent group of Vanda ccerulea, of Cattleyas and 
allies, and of Cypripediums staged by Sir George L. Holford will long be 
remembered for their excellence. The award in the two former classes of 
Silver-gilt Lindley Medals for excellence of culture, in addition to the Gold 
Medals offered, was a fitting tribute to the cultural skill of Mr. H. G. 
Alexander, whose abilities in this department are so well known. The 
group of Cypripediums gained the Davidson Cup. The arrangement of 
the show was also a great improvement on the long straight lines of 
ordinary meetings, and the diagonal and circular stands on which individual 
groups were staged was both novel and picturesque. Particulars of the 
competition are given in our report. 

There were, as usual, a number of unfilled classes, and perhaps the 
season was unsuitable for a group of Odontoglossums and Odontiodas. On 
the other hand, so many hybrids of the two " lost Orchids," Cattleya labiata 
and Cypripedium Fairrieanum, were scattered about the Hall that it is a 
matter for regret that special classes were not provided for them. Perhaps 
it can be arranged in the future, as a general desire was expressed for a 
repetition of the fixture. 

The Conference on the second day was also very successful, four 
important papers being read. Part of it is reported on another page, but 
the pressure on our space, caused by the annual Index, has necessitated 
the postponement of the greater part until next month, together with other 
reports and important papers. 

With the present issue the Orchid Review completes its twentieth 
volume, and to commemorate the event our January issue will be an 



354 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [December, i 9 i 2 . 

enlarged and special number. Some other developments are in 
contemplation, as we desire to make the work representative of every 
phase of Orchidology. In this we invite the co-operation of all lovers and 
growers of Orchids, and we hope to receive their continued support and 
interest. The proposal to prepare a General Index to the twenty volumes, 
on the lines mentioned last month (p. 322), has brought us several letters 
of approval, and it is interesting to find that an American reader has 
prepared a Card Index of cultural details for his own use. We have 
decided to prepare a General Index, and will give particulars when the 
matter is further matured. Meantime we invite suggestions from our readers. 

THE ORCHID CONFERENCE. 

The Orchid Conference was held in the Lecture Room at the Royal 
Horticultural Hall, Westminster, on Wednesday, November 6th, before a 
good attendance, J. Gurney Fowler, Esq., Treasurer of the Society, in the 
Chair. In opening the proceedings, at 11 a.m., the Chairman alluded to 
the magnificent show of autumn-flowering Orchids in the Hall, and 
remarked that the proposal to hold a Conference in connection with it had 
been well received, and the present meeting was the result, four important 
subjects being down for discussion. 

The first paper was by Prof. F. Keeble, M.A., F.L.S., on the Physiology 
of Fertilisation. The subject was illustrated by a number of lantern slides 
showing phases of the result of pollination, and the lecturer remarked on 
the series of events following the application of the pollen to the stigma, 
and in the case of Orchids the considerable time that elapsed before 
fertilisation was effected. Pollination supplied a stimulus to development 
of the ovules, the pollen tubes grew down the tissue of the style, and 
ultimately the nuclei of the male and female cells fused together, forming a 
single cell, or zygote, which then matured as a seed, and gave rise to the 
future plant. It was formerly thought that the ovule could not develop 
without the influence of the male element, but it was now known that 
many plants can produce seed without fertilisation, the process being known 
as parthenogenesis. Zygopetalum Mackayi had been pollinated by Odonto- 
glossum and various other Orchids, but the resulting seedlings showed no 
hybrid character at all, which suggested a stimulative influence only. 
The influence of pollination might be threefold— (1) fertilisation ; (2) 
Stimulation ; and (3) chemical. 

In the subsequent discussion, Mr. J. O'Brien mentioned how the 
application of mineral dust to the stigma of Miltonia Russelliana was 
sufficient to make the segments of the flower wither, and mentioned a 
statement by the late Consul Lehmann that the commoner varieties of 
Colombian Odontoglossums found growing in exposed places were some- 



December, 1912.J THE ORCHID REVIEW. 355 

limes laden with seed capsules, while choice varieties growing in shady 
places seldom seeded. It might be due to dust blown on the stigma. 

Mr. R, A. Rolfe wished that someone would conduct a series of 
experiments with Zygopetalum Mackayi in the same way that Mr. Veitch 
did with Cattleya Mossiae. It would then be possible to see whether the 
pollen tubes reached the ovules. He thought not, for the seedlings were 
always pure Zygopetalums, and he believed they were simply developed 
from parthogenetic buds as a result of the stimulus of pollination. 

Mr. Thwaites raised the question whether two or more distinct hybrids 
could be produced from the same seed pod. He thought it had been done. 
The lecturer replied that he thought it possible, and Mr. Crawshay stated 
that he fertilised Odontoglossum Harryanum with both crispum and 
Lambeauianum, and obtained both O. crispo- Harryanum and O. rose- 
fieldiense. Sir Harry J. Veitch said his experience was that if the pollen of 
several species were used only one took effect. Mr. Hatcher spoke of 
•using the pollen of both Miltonia vexillaria and an Odontoglossum on 
another Odontoglossum, and the seedlings were different from ordinary 
Odontoglossums. Messrs. J. M. Black, Gurney Wilson, F. J. Hanbury, 
and A. A. McBean also spoke. 

ODONTOGLOSSUMS FROM EDGBASTON. 

Some time ago an inflorescence of a handsome hybrid Odontoglossum was 
sent from the collection of W. Waters Butler, Esq., Southfield, Edgbaston, 
which is described at page ill under the name of O. hellemense var. 
Butleri. The seedling was purchased unflowered, and there was a little 
uncertainty as to which of two specified crosses it came from, but we 
thought that the flower indicated O. loochristiense Vuylstekeanum X O. 
crispum Rossendale. Mr. Butler afterwards sent paintings, by Miss 
Roberts, of flowers from both crosses, with a note on their history. The 
seedling sent to us was the second to flower out of a batch of five, three of 
which have now bloomed, and, Mr. Butler remarks, only varied slightly in 
form and colour. The first he had painted, and the painting now sent 
agrees well with the description already given. The plants were purchased 
at the Elmswood sale, at which also Mr. Butler secured five other seedlings 
in one lot, two of which have now flowered, and are said to have been very 
similar. A painting of one of them is also sent, and it shows very broad 
white sepals and petals, the latter well toothed, with eight to ten rounded, 
somewhat confluent cinnamon brown spots, and a round lip with a large 
cinnamon blotch in front of the crest. Mr. Butler states that this batch 
was purchased with the record above given, and as there is a distinct 
resemblance to O. triumphans in the shape of the lip we now think, with 
the two paintings now before us, that this one must be a form of O. 



356 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [December, 1912. 

hellemense. The other record was O. crispum Rossendale X O. 
Wilckeanum Alexandras, which would yield a form of O. mirum, and 
there is a certain resemblance to O. luteopurpurem in the shape and 
markings of the lip. As already mentioned, there was originally a little 
uncertainty, but the additional materials have thrown a new light on the 
matter. O. crispum Rossendale received an Award of Merit from the 
R.H.S. in March, 1904, and was described as a white form tinged with 
purple, and having large red-brown blotches on the lower halves of the 
segments {O.R., xii. p. 115). It appears to be one parent of both the above 
hybrids. O. Wilckeanum Alexandras received a First-class Certificate at 
Manchester in the January previous (I.e., p. 54). 



THE AMATEUR'S COLLECTION. 

By C. Alwyn Harrison, f.r.h.s. 

The main points to be observed in the culture of the inmates of this house 
are to maintain an even temperature and a moist atmosphere. Beyond 
paying strict attention to these points, there is little to be done in the 
Orchid house from now until the beginning of February. The leaves of all 
plants should be frequently washed with clear tepid rain water, and the 
pots occasionally scrubbed, but these matters are only of secondary 
importance, and do not come under the daily routine of Orchid house work. 
If possible, admit fresh air every day, even if the ventilators can only be 
opened for a short time. The thermometer should never descend below 
45 Fahr., unless exceptionally cold weather prevails. Should it fall below 
the prescribed degree, no water must be given to any plant until the correct 
degree of warmth is again reached. 

Keep a sharp look-out for slugs, which are active during the autumn 
months, for many hybrid Odontoglossums will be in spike. It is doubtful 
whether the hybridist has produced anything more useful and beautiful 
than the winter-flowering Odontoglossum hybrids. Many of these can now 
be procured at reasonable prices, and their value for decorative purposes at 
a time when bloom is scarce can hardly be over-estimated. I should 
strongly advise amateurs to purchase hybrids in which Odontoglossum 



Harryanum is in some way concerned 1 



l parent. This is a very vigorous- 



growing Orchid, and imparts a strong constitution to all its progeny. Some 
of the best hybrids in which this Orchid is either a primary or secondary 
parent are O. amabile, Charlesworthii, Crawshayanum, Leo, Othello. 
Rolfeae, spectabile, and Wattianum. 

Cattleya House. 
There is likewise little to be done during the present and subsequent 
months in this house, beyond the daily details of watering and heating, 



December, 1912] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 357 

which were fully described in last month's article. If possible, let 50 
Fahr. be the minimum temperature registered at night, with a rise of from 
five to ten degrees during the day. General cleansing operations can be 
carried out in this house when required, but unless an immense stock of 
plants be possessed, this will be the matter of a few hours only. 

Remove any Cattleyas which are in sheath and any Orchids in bud to 
the warmest end of the house, where their blossoms will expand more 
freely. Cattleya Percivaliana and C. Trianae will probably be showing 
flowers at the base of the sheath. Be careful not to over-water them, or 
the buds will turn black and the sheath become blind. Laelia anceps will 
be making a good display now, and is invaluable in every collection, owing 
to its free-blooming character, coupled with the fact that it is easy to grow. 
I cannot, however, recommend any of its hybrids for growing in a small 
amateur's collection, for there are many superior crosses which are more 
suitable, by reason of the increased size of their flowers. 

The flower spikes on many Dendrobiums will now be visible, more 
especially on D. Wardianum, crassinode, and nobile. Leave the plants 
still at the coolest end of the house, and do not give much water until the 
formation of flower buds is distinctly visible, for, under the influence of 
increased heat and moisture, these will, during their earlier stages, be liable 
to turn to growths. 

Vanda ccerulea should be kept almost dry at the roots, otherwise the 
dreaded spot will make its appearance. Should any of this be present, the 
affected leaves must be cut away, close to the brown spotting, and some 
slaked lime rubbed in. 

CATTLEYA PEETERSII WESTONBIRT VAR. 

(See Frontispiece). 
The Frontispiece to the present volume consists of a fine specimen of the 
beautiful Cattleya Peetersii Weston birt var., to which a First-class 
Certificate was given by the R.H.S. on November 5th last. The plant bore 
six flowers, having pure white sepals and petals, and a rich purple-crimson 
lip, margined with white, and with some bright yell 
and sides of the throat. A plant was exhibited at a 
on January 9th last, when the parentage was gn 
Whitelegge x C. Hardyana alba ; and the colour 
with a deep rose lip, veined with yellow at the 
parent is well known as one of the finest whites in 
bright purple blotch on the front of the lip. C. Ha 
sepals and petals and a richly-coloured lip, and thus 
much the character that might have been expected. 



reining on ti- 


ie disc 


ding of the R.H.S. 


as C. labiata 


G. G. 


recorded as 


white, 


; The C. 


labiata 


tence, with 1 


1 large 


ma alba has 


white 


hybrid has 


pretty 


is a gem of tl 


he first 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



[Decemb: 



fortunate enough 
living plants of it 
these flowered in 
columns, July Sth, 
the Arnold Arbon 
graphic illustratioi 



CYPRIPEDIUM FRANCHETII. 

A new Mocassin Flower (Cypripedium Franchetii)," Mr, 
tes in the American Journal, Horticulture (1912, p. 145), 
ny last expedition (1910) for the Arnold Arboretum, I was. 
to succeed in introducing from the Tibetan borderland 
iree new and beautiful hardy Cypripediums. Two of 
the spring of last year and were illustrated in these 
1911. The third species flowered early in June, 1912, in 
itum. As will be seen from the accompanying photo- 




Fig- 49- 



M 1-i:an 



Rolfe. 



trench botanist, the late Monsieur A. Franchet, in a general way resembles 
the Siberian C. macranthum, differing chiefly in its more hairy foliage and 
certain technical details. Like its allies, C. luteum and C. tibeticum, this 
new-comer promises to succeed under cultivation, and should prove a 
welcome addition to gardens. All three are natives of upland regions, and 
require a moist, shady situation, and a compost rich in decaying leaves." 

Through the kindness of the Editor of Horticulture we are able to 
reproduce the figure of this interesting Cypripedium, and will now give its 



Dhckmbbr, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 359 

history, as promised to Mr. Wilson some time ago. The name Cypripediura 
macranthum seems to have been extended so as to cover a small group of 
allied species which are somewhat difficult to determine from dried 
specimens. These are C. tibeticum, King {Bot. Mag., t. 8070), C. 
himalaicum, Rolfe {King and Pantl. Orch. Sikkim, viii. t. 448), the Japanese 
C. speciosum, Rolfe (Bot. Mag., t. 8386), and the present one, which was 
partly included by Franchet (Joum. de Bot., 1894, p. 233), followed by the 
writer (Joum. Linn. Soc, xxxvi. p. 66). In a dried state C. Franchetii is 
easily separated from C. macranthum by its more copiously villous stems, 
a character also found in the yellow-flowered C. luteum, Franch., to which 
two fruiting specimens of C. Franchetii were also wrongly referred, until, in 
company with Mr. Wilson, a more careful comparison of the characters and 
habitat of the two species was made. It has also been partly confused with 
C. fasciolatum, Franch., for when the latter was described (Joum. de Bot., 
1894, p. 232), the author remarked that the species occurred in two forms, 
one having very large flowers and a globose lip (this being the type), the 
other smaller flowers. The latter belongs to C. Franchetii. Both are 
included under No. 922 of a collection made by Farges in the district of Tchen- 
keou-tin, at about 7300 feet elevation. The following are the localities of 
specimens of C. Franchetii, Rolfe, preserved at Kew: China: Prov. 
Szechuen, woods of Heou-pin, near Tchen-keou, Farges, 134* 5°9> and 922 
in part; Prov. Hupeh; Fang and Hsingshan, Henry, 5391 E; Fang, 
7000 ft., Henry, 6740; Western Hupeh, Wilson, 1884. R. A. Rolfe. 

XYLOBIUM BRACTESCENS. 

A distinct and striking Xylobium was exhibited by Messrs. Sander & Sons, 
St. Albans, at the R.H.S. meeting held on November 5th and 6th last. It 
is believed to have been sent from Peru by M. Forget, and on comparison 
it proves identical with one which flowered in the garden of the 
Horticultural Society in October, 1842, when it was described by Lindley 
under the name of Maxillaria bractescens (Bot. Reg., 1842, Misc., p. 84). 
It had been sent from Loxa by Hartweg. At that period Xylobium was 
regarded as a section of Maxillaria, but it differs so markedly in its strongly 
plicate leaves and racemose inflorescence that its distinctness has long been 
recognised, and the species has recently been transferred to Xylobium by 
Kranzlin {Orchis, ii. p. 129). It is one of the largest species in the genus, 
the plant exhibited by Messrs. Sander bearing a scape 2\ feet high, with a 
raceme of eighteen flowers. The sepals and petals are rather over an inch 
long, and greenish yellow in colour, while the lip is obscurely three-lobed, 
and bears seven to nine strongly undulate fleshy keels, which are reddish 
brown in colour. The species is remarkable for its long narrow bracts, from 
i£ to 2 inches long, in reference to which the name was given. — R. A. R. 



360 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [December, 1912. 

SOME RARITIES AT WESTONBIRT. 

At the present time there is a grand lot of Orchids in flower in Sir George 
Holford's collection at Westonbirt. The beautiful Vanda ccerulea (some 
fine examples of which were shown at the R.H.S. Show on November 5th 
and 6th) present a fine sight with their long spikes of large blue flowers. 
The display of Cypripediums is wonderful, and the good things among this 
genus are far too numerous here to note. There are some splendid 
Cattleyas in flower, notably a quantity of C. Fabia (labiata X Dowiana 
aurea), which also made a brilliant display in London. Beside the above- 
mentioned there are some rare species in flower which are worthy of note. 
The beautiful Oncidium Jonesianum, with its thick pendulous leaves and 
creamy white flowers blotched with brown on the sepals and petals, is not 
often met with now. Some well-grown plants of Vanda Watsonii, with 
three and four spikes on each, make a fine display. A remarkably strong 
plant of Phalaanopsis violacea Clifton's var. with its sweet-scented flowers 
at once attracts attention, the one disadvantage with this beautiful species 
is that the inflorescence is always short. Phalaenopsis Esmeralda was also 
in flower. The rare Stauropsis lissochiloides must be mentioned, and the 
latter is probably one of the oldest plants in the collection. H. L. S. 

LOWIARA INSIGNIS. 

A ykiw interesting trigeneric hybrid was exhibited by Messrs. Stuart Low 
& Co., Bush Hill Park, at the R.H.S. meeting held on November 19th, of 
which a flower has been kindly sent to us. It was obtained from 
Sophronitis grandiflora 5 and Brassolaelia Helen S, and is thus derived 
from the three genera Brassavola, Laslia, and Sophronitis, and must be 
dealt with according to the Rule for naming multigeneric hybrids. " Future 
multigeneric hybrids (containing three or more genera) should be given a 
purely conventional name consisting of the name of some person eminent 
as a student or grower of Orchids, terminated by the suffix ' ara.' " We 
therefore propose to call it Lowiara insignis. The name of Low has 
occupied an honoured place in the annals of Orchidology for much more 
than half-a-century. The plant exhibited had a dwarf, sturdy habit, short 
one-leaved pseudobulbs, and a two-flowered inflorescence. The flowers 
show much of the Sophronitis character, but the sepals are not widely 
spreading. The sepals and petals are 2\ inches long, the latter nearly i£ 
inches broad, and the colour dark rosy salmon. The lip is two inches long, 
and entire, with an undulate crenulate margin, and the colour rose-purple 
with a yellowish white throat. The column is broad, whitish, and over half 
an inch long. Lowiara will include hybrids between Brassavolaand Sophro- 
ladia, and any future combination of the three genera named. R. A. R. 



December, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 361 

DIAL^ELIA VEITCHII AND ITS PARENTS. 

The annexed figures represent the interesting hybrid Dialaelia Veitchii 
{fig. 50) with its two parents, Diacrium bicornutum (fig. 51) and Lalia cin- 
nabarina (fig. 52), which a few months ago were in bloom together in the 
Kew Collection, when the photograph here reproduced was taken by Mr. 
C. P. Kafflll. Dialaelia Veitchii was raised by Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, 
Chelsea, and received a Botanical Certificate from the Scientific Com- 
mittee of the R.H.S. in March, 1905,0.1 the occasion of its flowering for 
the first time (O.R., xiii. pp. 115, 116). The plant bore an inflorescence 




very graphic record of the ch; 

hybrid most resembles the 

though there is a marked modification in the sti 

segments are pale buff when the flower expands, 

. few dark spots on the yellow disc of the lip. 
1 has pure white flowers, with light purple dots on the lip, 



362 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [December, 1912, 

the Laelia is cinnabar-orange. In habit, too, the hybrid most resembles the 
Diacrium parent. It will be noticed that the Laelia flower was taken from 
a different print, but all are from the same negative. White and orange 
are well known to be difficult to photograph together, and the Laslia flower 
was taken from a rather lighter print, the outline of the flower being rather 
clearer. It is interesting to note that we have now four generic combina- 
tions with Diacrium, namely, Dialaelia, Diacattleya, Diacatlaelia, and 
Epidiacrmm. The three latter were raised in the collection of Sir Jeremiah 
Colman, Bart., Gatton Park, Reigate. 

CALENDAR OF OPERATIONS FOR DECEMBER. 

By J. T. Barker, The West Hill Gardens, Hessle, E. Yorks. 
We have again reached the season of the year when, owing to climatic 
conditions, things generally are as bad as possible for the cultivation of 
Orchids. What with fogs, dark and short days, an outside atmosphere 
heavily charged with moisture, and a very low temperature, all of which 
are detrimental to the plants, the cultivator has enough to contend with. 
Daylight is now a scarce commodity, and, therefore, it is necessary that 
the plants should receive every particle of light possible. 

The remarks made last month as regards temperatures, watering,- 
ventilation, and atmospheric moisture still hold good, and no pains should 
be considered too great to satisfy the wants of the plants at this season. 
The painstaking thoughtful grower will always be in advance of the slip- 
shod one, who leaves so many things to chance, and I often think that the 
plants themselves appreciate the cultivator who anticipates their require- 
ments some time beforehand. 

Although the past season has been far from an ideal one, owing to the 
lack of light and sunshine, the plants have made much finer growth than at 
one time seemed possible. The growths not being so fully matured as after 
the bright weather of last summer, care must be taken that no serious 
fluctuations of temperature are allowed, or much harm may accrue. 

species of these beautiful plants are in flower, but owing to the strides made 
by the hybridist, it is now possible to have bigeneric Laeliocattleyas the 
whole year round, and the great diversity in shape and colour of their 
flowers makes them most interesting and for gorgeous colouring unsurpass- 
able. With C. labiata and its varieties over, C. Percivaliana and C. 
Trianse will be the next species to flower, and those plants that are already 
showing flower buds in their sheaths should be placed in the lightest 
position available, and have water afforded them whenever they become 
dry. These remarks also apply to the whole of this family, both species 
and hybrids, that are in a similar condition. 



December, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 3^ 

Among Cattleyas that bloom late in the spring may be mentioned C. 
Warned. Plants of this species will now be showing signs of activity, both 
new growths and roots pushing freely. They should be placed in a position 
well up to the light, and, like the preceding, have water applied to them 
whenever the compost becomes dry. There are other plants in the Cattleya 
house which are in various stages of growth, including Laelia crispa, L. 
purpurata, and L. tenebrosa, which must be watered with discretion. 

L-Elia HARPOPHYLLA, whilst in full growth, will require plentiful 
supplies of water, but when growth is completed and the flowers are past 
much less will suffice, and the plants should be induced to rest by placing 
them under cooler conditions. 

Sophrocattleyas. — Under this head can be placed all those hybrids 
which have been obtained by intercrossing Sophronitis with species of 
Cattleya, Laelia, and the hybrid Laeliocattleyas. These numerous forms 
have flowers of most vivid colour, which bloom at different seasons of the 
year, and a collection of these plants will rarely be without one or more in 
flower. Those which have recently bloomed and are commencing to grow 
and pushing new roots may be repotted if they require it, using a compost 
as for Cattleyas. The majority of them succeed in a light, warm position 
in the Intermediate house. They must be judiciously watered at all times, 
as the young growths decay and turn black if the compost is watered, 
indiscriminately. These plants are best grown suspended where no water 
from the syringe can reach them, as overhead waterings to them is highly 
injurious, but water at the roots must be given when necessary. 

Cypkipediums.— Members of this genus belonging to the cooler section 
are amongst the most important Orchids flowering at this season, and it is 
very questionable whether greater strides have been made with any class of 
plants in recent years than with these. There are varieties at the present 
day of great beauty, and when it is taken into consideration their lasting 
qualities, and the ease with which they are grown, it is no wonder that they 
are so popular. To those who reside near our large commercial centres 
they are indispensable, being capable of withstanding fogs better than most 
plants. Cypripediums are never inactive at any season of the year, there- 
fore should never be allowed to remain dry at the root for any length ot 
time, or much injury may accrue. During the winter months much less 
water will suffice, both at the roots and in the atmosphere, than the plants 
require when in full growth. When in flower they are best grouped by 
themselves, being more effective than when placed with other Orchids. 
The plants should be carefully examined from time to time for thrip, which, 
if allowed to get a foothold, will soon disfigure the foliage, and make the 
plants quite unsatisfactory. Plants infested with parasites cannot thrive,, 
and the mischief soon spreads. 



364 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [December, i 9 i 2 . 

Calanthes of the deciduous section, as they pass out of flower, should 
.be placed in their resting quarters, and this should not be an out-of-the- 
way position, which generally means out of mind as well. They should be 
placed in a light position on a shelf where no water is likely to come in 
contact with them. A temperature of about 55 is a most suitable one to 
rest them in, and no great fluctuations should be allowed, The late- 
flowering varieties, such as C. Regnieri, Sanderiana, Williamsii, and the 
hybrids which flower in the New Year should receive every encouragement 
to develop their flower spikes. When the flowers are over they may be 
treated in the same manner as the preceding. 

Miltonia vexillaria and its hybrids at the present time need careful 
treatment, for, although in full growth, they must not be saturated with 
water, and only have it afforded them when they become dry. In a saturated 
compost they lose their roots, and rarely if ever fully recover. The plants 
should occupy a light position in a house where a minimum temperature of 
55 is maintained at night, with a slightly higher temperature by day. The 
plants should be examined occasionally to ascertain if the leaves are folded 
-together, and, if so, they must be carefully liberated, or the growths may 
become deformed. This generally occurs with weak or delicate plants. 
Epidendrum vitellinum.— The late autumn-flowering varietv of this 



eful Orchid 



useful subject, i 



precisely the same conditions as the original species. It delights i 



vhere a cool 






Y\ hilst in full growth, up to the time the pseudobulbs are fully developed, 
it requires copious supplies of water at the roots, but after flowering and 
during ks resting season only sufficient is necessary to keep the pseudo- 
bulbs plump and the roots and leaves healthy. 

Trichopilias.— The lovely white Trichopilia fragrans is now in bloom, 
and its delightfully-scented flowers are suitable for any purpose. These 
plants require slightly more warmth during the winter months than is 
generally afforded to Odontoglossums, therefore, at this season, they are 
better accommodated at the coolest end of the cool Intermediate 'house. 



bloom, and 1 



growth commences, a moderate supply 



water at the roots is all that is necessary. Those species which flower 
earlier in the year, such as T. suavis, T. coccinea, T. tortilis, T. Back- 
houseana, and others have now made up their growths, and must have only 
sufficient water to keep them from shrivelling. Trichopilias are best potted 
when new growth commences, using a compost similar to that for Odonto- 
glossums. They delight in a light position, but direct sunshine is most 
harmful. 

VANDAS.— Vanda teres and V. Hookeriana require different 



from others of this famil 



have now completed 1 



December, i 9 i 2 ,] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 365 

growth, and the points of the roots are sealed over, which is one of their 
peculiarities as soon as they have finished their season's growth. These 
Orchids require a long season of rest, and, owing to their terete leaves, are 
able to withstand drought. During their period of inactivity water should 
only be afforded in sufficient quantities to prevent much shrivelling of their 
peculiar foliage. The temperature of a warm Cattleya house will suit them 
admirably whilst at rest. V. Amesiana, V. Watsonii, and V. Kimballiana 
are very distinct and beautiful Vandas which are now in flower or pushing 
up their flower spikes, and, as winter-blooming subjects, are most useful and 
beautiful. After the flowers are over the plants should be rested for a brief 
period, when little water at the root is required. Shrivelling must be 
prevented, and this, in any Orchid, is very weakening and most harmful. 

Zygopetalums that are now growing freely may have water applied to 
them whenever they become dry, and the stronger growers, if the pots are 
full of roots, may have an occasional watering with weak liquid manure. 
As the plants pass out of bloom they may be repotted, should it be 
necessary, using a similar compost to that for the green-leaved 
Cypripediums. The majority of these plants succeed under Intermediate 
house conditions, but Z. Roeblingianum succeeds best under the warm, 
moist conditions of the East Indian house, whilst those miniatures, 
Promensea citrina and P. stapelioides, thrive when suspended from the roof 
of the Cool house. 

Oncidiums.— Among the Oncidiums the dwarf yellow-flowered O. 
cheirophorum is now in bloom. Like all Oncidiums it must not be over- 
burdened with compost about the roots, a very thin layer being all that is 
required. This charming plant succeeds when grown in the Intermediate 
house, but opens its flowers more freely if removed to a light position in the 
East Indian house. It resents much water at any season, and should never 
be watered overhead. The old sweet-scented O. tigrinum is also in bloom, 
and, when well-grown, is one of the showiest of the whole family. This 
plant succeeds in the Cool Intermediate house, and after flowering must be 
induced to rest, when only sufficient water must be given to keep the 
pseudobulbs plump. 

General Remarks.— The general cleaning of the houses and their 
contents comprises the principal work for the present month. No time 
should be lost in this most essential matter, as, with the New Year, other 
work is soon pressing upon us, and unless taken in hand as soon as possible 
some of it does not get done with that thoroughness that it deserves. At 
this season pests of all description should be exterminated as nearly as 
possible, and every effort must be made to prevent their subsequent increase. 
I am firmly convinced that more Orchids suffer from this cause than from- 
any other, and with this I will close my remarks for the vear. 



■366 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [December, 1912. 

SOCIETIES. 

Royal Horticultural. 
The long-anticipated show of autumn-flowering Orchids was held at the 
Royal Horticultural Hall, Vincent Square, Westminster, on November 5th 
and 6th, and resulted in a magnificent display, over half the Hall being 
required tor its accommodation. A pleasing alteration was made in the 
arrangement, the long tables in the body of the Hall being largely replaced 
by square tables, diagonally arranged, each allotted to individual exhibitors. 
The Show on this occasion was entirely competitive, and although a good 
many classes were blank, no fewer than twenty-four Cups and Medals were 
awarded by the Judges, while the Orchid Committee gave six First-class 
Certificates and ten Awards of Merit. 

The Judges were arranged in four sections, and their names were as 
follows : H. G. Alexander, T. Armstrong, W. Bolton, W. Waters Butler, 
H. J. Chapman, W. Cobb, Sir Jeremiah Colman, de Barri Crawshay, C. H.' 
Curtis, J. Gurney Fowler, F. J. Hanbury, W. H. Hatcher, A. A. McBean, 
G. F. Moore, J. O'Brien, R. A. Rolfe, J. E. Shill, R. G. Thwaites, Sir 
Harry J. Veitch, W. H. White, and Gurney Wilson. 

In Class 1, for an effectively-arranged group of Orchids, open to all, 
there were two competitors, Messrs. Charlesworth & Co., Hayvvards Heath' 
and Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, each gaining a Gold Medal. 

Messrs. Charlesworth's group, which occupied half the staging on the 
left-hand side of the Hall and had a frontage of about thirty feet was 
brilliant in the extreme. The centre was composed of a large mass of 
Epidendrum vitellinum, in which were dotted 
charming Odontoglossum armaim 
effect. On either side was a fine 
Portia, C. Venus var. Princess, and others, Laliocattleya bella albaT -c' 
Neleus var. Sunset (L.-c. Ophir x C. Iris), with orange-yellow sepa'ls and 
petals, and a crimson lip with some yellow veining on the disc, and many 
-others, Brassocattleya Maria,, Vanda ccerulea, Odontoglossum grande 
aureum, O. Aireworth, and other blotched forms, Trichosma suavis 
Masdevallia Shuttryana, well-flowered examples of Oncidioda Charles- 
worthn, a lot of Cypripedium insigne Sander*, and hybrids, two good 
examples of Cycnoches chlorochilon, Oncidium tigrinum, some good O 
vancosum Rogersii behind, clusters of O. Forbesii at each end, and others.' 
Messrs Sander's group occupied the stage to the left of the entrance, 
and was of about equal extent, and very effectively arranged in the form of 
three elevations with two intervening dells, the latter consisting largely of 
■Cypnpediums and among them good examples of insigne Sander*, and 
Hareheld Hall var., Leeanum, Richmanii, Maudi*, Fairneanum, Niobe, 






December, 1912.] THE ORCHID REVIEW. 367 

and others, and very pretty clusters of Pleione lagenaria and precox in 
front. The centre and ends consisted largely of brilliant Cattleyas and 
Laeliocattleyas, and included some excellent C. labiata and C. Fabia, C. 
Fabia His Majesty, with white sepals and petals, good forms of C. 
Hardyana, C. Ashtonii, and Mrs. Pitt, the beautiful white C. Muellen 
(intermedia alba X Peetersiae), Laeliocattleya Decia, Rothschildise, and 
Priam, Brassocattleya Maroniae, Thorntonii, and Euterpe, Vanda 
Kimballiana, Oncidium bicallosum, excavatum, micropogon, the rare O. 
■cardiochilum, Maxillaria picta, some good forms of Dendrobium Goldiei, 
Dearei, and Sanderae, Xylobium bractescens, some scarlet Odontiodas, 
Odontoglossum Neptune, O. amabile, and other fine things. 

Class 2, for a similar group limited to Amateurs, attracted no entries. 

In Class 3, for a group of Orchids arranged in a space not exceeding 150 
•square feet (Amateurs), there were three competitors, and the first prize, a 
■Gold Medal, was won by G. F. Moore, Esq., Chard war, Bourton-on-the- 
Water (gr. Mr. Page), with a splendid group, arranged in undulating fashion, 
the elevated parts containing a beautiful series of Dendrobium Phalaenopsis, 
showing much variation, and including the pure white var. hololeucum, the 
blush Miss Louisa Deane, and some richly-coloured forms, with some good 
•Oncidium varicosum behind, and the front containing a lot of Cypripedium 
Maudiae and insigne Sanderae, the charming C. Argo-Fairrieanum, Thalia, 
Boltonii, Evenor, Nandii, Gaston Bultel, W. Lloyd, The Baron, Actaeus 
Bianca, Baron Schroder, &c, with some brilliant Laeliocattleyas, Cattleya 
labiata, Fabia, Portia, and Mantinii, and a fringe of Laelia pumila in front. 

Sir Jeremiah Colman, Bart., Gatton Park, Reigate (gr. Mr. Collier), 
•won the second prize, a Large Silver Cup. his group being well undulated, 
and including in the centre a lot of Cattleya Portia coerulea, C. labiata 
•ccerulea, C. Chloris, Parthenia Peetersii, and others, Laeliocattleya 
Rothschildiae, Ophir, and other good forms, the graceful Brassia longissima, 
■some good Dendrobium Phalaenopsis, superbiens, Vanda ccerulea, Laelio- 
■cattleyas, a prettily spotted Brassocattleya, Odontoglossum Thompsonianurn, 
and others, Pleione maculata, Phaius Ashworthianus, Calanthe Harrisii, 
Odontioda Bohnhofiae, some good Cypripedium insigne Sanderae, Spicer- 
ianum, and many other fine things. 

H. S. Goodson, Esq., Fairlawn, Putney (gr. Mr. G. E. Day), was third, 
gaining a Small Silver Cup for a very attractive group, containing many good 
■Cattleyas and Laeliocattleyas, conspicuous among them being C. Mrs. Pitt 
Goodson's var., C. labiata, amabile, and suavior, Laeliocattleya Decia, 
St. Gothard, Goodsonii, Odontoglossum crispum Primrose, grande, 
Harryanum, eximium, Odontioda Zephyr, Cypripedium triumphans, and 
many others. The centre consisted of about seven brightly-coloured 
Sophrocattleyas, with a lot of Cypripedium insigne Sanderae on each side. 



368 THE ORCHID REVIEW. [December, 1912, 

In Class 4, for a group of Orchids arranged in a space not exceeding 
150 feet (Nurserymen), Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, gained 
a Gold Medal for a brilliant group, arranged in a circular mound, with four 
ornamental vases, elevated on pedestals and filled with Vanda ccerulea r 
Oncidium varicosum, and Dendrobium Phalaenopsis. In the body of the 
group were many good D. formosum, Cattleya Fabia, white and coloured 
forms of C. labiata, C. Dowiana aurea, Williamsiae, Lseliocattleya 
Dominiana, luminosa, Eudora, Oncidium incurvum, and Forbesii, Brasso^" 
cattleya Veitchii and Maronia?, Cymbidium erythrostylum, Houlletia 
Brocklehurstiana, Epidendrum vitellinum, Vanda Kimballiana, Dendro- 
chilum Cobbianum, Odontioda Zephyr, Odontoglossum Thompsonianum r 
Dendrobium Phalaenopsis hololeucum, and many others. 

In Class 5, for a group of Orchids arranged in a group not exceeding ioo- 
feet (Amateurs), there were two competitors, the Silver Cup being won by 
E. R. Ashton, Esq., Broadlands, Tunbridge Wells (gr. Mr. A. Young), the 
group containing some good Cattleya labiata, Portia, Dowiana aurea r 
Prince Albert, C. Fabia alba, C. Luegse Broadlands var., Laeliocattleya. 
Jason, Beryl, callistoglossa, Colmaniana, Canhamiana, Beacon, Statteriana,. 
and a richly-coloured hybrid from L.-c. luminosa X C. Dowiana aurea,. 
Brassocattleya Thorntonii and Maronii, Laelia pumila, Sophrocattleya 
Chamberlainii, Dendrobium formosum, Oncidium Forbesii, Epidendrum 
vitellinum, Odontoglossum Williamsianum, Jasper, grande, and others. 

F. Ducane Godman, Esq., South Lodge, Horsham (gr. Mr. G. Giles),. 
gained the second prize, a Silver Flora Medal, for a very pretty group r 
containing eleven beautiful specimens of Oncidium cheirophorum in front r 
and behind them two plants of O. ornithorrhynchum and four of the variety 
album, O. varicosum, examples of Vanda coernlea, Epidendrum vitellinum r 
Laeliocattleya Nysa, Endymion, Godmanii, bletchleyensis, Odontoglossum 
grande, Pleione lagenaria, Cattleya Fabia, Mantinii, Dowiana aurea,. 
Cypripedium Arthurianum with ten flowers, some fine C. insigne Sander^,. 
C. i. Aberdeen, Baron Schroder, Germaine Opoix, and others. 

Class 6 was a corresponding class for Nurserymen, in which there was- 
a keen competition, no fewer than seven prizes being awarded. 

Messrs. J. & A. A. McBean, Cooksbridge, took premier honours, gaining, 
a Silver Cup for a charming group, in which several plants of individual kinds- 
were mostly clustered together, producing a very fine effect. We noted 
two well-bloomed Vanda Sanderiana, some good Cattleya Dowiana aurea, 
labiata, Fabia, Luegae, Fabiata, Bowringiana, Dendrobium Dearei and 
Sanderae, Odontioda Charlesworthii and St. Fuscien, some well-grown 
Odontoglossum crispum, Epidendrum vitellinum, Cymbidium Dons, and- 
an interesting hybrid between C. elegans and giganteum, with a very fine- 
lot of Cypripedium insigne Sanderae in the foreground, and others. 



THE ORCHID REVIEW. 



Messrs. James Cypher 


& Sons 


, Chelter 


»ilver-gilt Flora Medal for : 


a very fir 


ie group, 


3endrobium Phalaenopsis i 


ind form 


osum, E| 



nice lot of Masdevallia tovarensis, Phaius Ashworthianus, Miltonia Candida, 
Bulbophyllum crassipes, Angraecum distichum, Restrepia maculata, Lttlia 
tenebrosa and pumila, Odontoglossum Pescatorei and othei Odonto- 
glossums, Dendrobium Cobbianum, Cypripediums, and other good things. 

Mr. E. V. Low, Vale Bridge, Hayvvards Heath, was third, gaining a Silver 
Flora Medal for a fine group, containing the chaste Cattleya labia ta alba 
and La Vierge, with fixe others bavin- white sepals and petals, including 
the prettily veined R. I. Measures 7 var., G. G. Whitelegge, Daphne, Le 
President, and W. R. Lee, the latter with eight flowers, C. Dusseldorfii 
Undine, Laeliocattleya Decia alba, L.-c. epicasta Vale Bridge var., 
Cymbidium erythrostylum, Odontoglossum grande aureum Wigan's var., a 
fine lot of Cypripedium insigne Sanderae, Germaine Opoix, Thalia West 
Point var., Sir Redvers Duller, and others. 

Mr. H. Dixon, Spencer Park Nursery, Wandsworth Common, received 
a Silver Banksian Medal for an interesting group, including some good 
Oncidium varicosum, Epidendrum vitellinum, Vanda ccerulea, Cattleya 
Fabia and var. alba, C. F. W. Wigan X Iris, a pretty bronzy yellow hybrid* 
with a red-purple, three-lobed lip, veined with yellow on the disc, some 
good Odontoglossums, Cypripedium insigne Sanderae, Arthurianum, &c. 

Mr. S. W. Flory, Orchid Nursery, Twickenham, received a Silver