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FROM THE CEO 



WINDS OF CHANGE 

A Strategic Plan for the Los Angeles County Arboretum 



?tum and all of Los Angeles. It will 
t the Arboi 



With gusts up to 80 mph, the winds of December 1st 
toppled scores of trees, many of which were among the firs 

generation planted at the Arboretum. Thanks to generous will update its mid-20th Century 

community support (please see page 6 for opportunities to irrigation infrastructure. We will reduc. 

donate), we now begin the largest tree planting campaign in our turf and demonstrate water wise and attractive lawn 

decades, and envision the wonderful new specimens that will alternatives. We will continue to offer the latest information 

delight our children and grandchildren. Indeed, the work of for home gardeners and landscape professionals focused 

Xr:^^^^^^^^ onl^n^^^^^^^^^ 

Importantly, we were looking ahead before the storm. 

Over the past year, we reached out to 1,800 people— CELEBRATING AND PRESERVING 

members, volunteers, students, teachers, and many others— O U R H E R I TAG E 

asking their help in shaping the Arboretum's future through The Arboretum is a place of history told through landmark 

a new strategic plan. The end result is a shared vision for structures and venerable trees and landscapes. Most 

enhancing the three dimensions of the Arboretum that are remarkable is the story of the Baldwin Ranch: home to estate 

most important to our community gardens, expansive farming, and some of the finest horses of 
the day. In addition to providing increased care for our 19th 



THE ARBORETUM EXPERIENCE 

? Arbo) 

lorable experiences of discov( 
he over 300,000 who visit eac 

iriching your experience with new ways t JJeTihe"'"" ■ '''' information on the Arboretum's strategic pla, 

.return, from new adventure tours to smart phone anns. "''"^^ ^^..arboretum.org and cli 

1 15.000 students con: 



You let us know that the Arboretum r.... ..... ""'7 ^"Tf'.Z "'u^'T' °" '"''^^ " '"^'"^ 

s, rrom tiand-held technologies to expanded tours with 



bo much is already underway. In these pages you 
will learn of restoration of our Rose Garden, stewardship 
management for our Engelmann oaks, and a new Garden for 
All Seasons. And of course, there will be r 
ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP you to participate in our progress. In s 



)ls is another goal. Also look for newly designed 
i signs for finding your way, and additional place: 
and enjoy. 



and sustainable ^""^"""^ ^ ""^'^ ^"^^^ ^^^""^^ ^^"^ the Los An 

.r,ti.. fnr .V,. Arboretum. I thank you for vour sunnort 



THE LOS ANGELES ARBORETUM FOUNDATION 

Founded in 1948, the Foundation 2012 board of trustees 

has provided new gardens, extensive education Pr^sUem ^^"'"'''^^^ ^^^o^ge ^ 

programs, and puhUcations serving Shelley D. Harter Renate C 

Southern California. Today, the Foundation leads a t ^'f "^'"^ 

Janice A. Sharp, Ph.D 

broad community of members, volunteers 
and donors in establishing the support needed to 



n Creight: 



realize the Arboretum's potential c 

garden and educational t 



r public 



(II Young Bang) 
Carolyn D. Benne 



Joseph S. Eisele 
Burks L. Hamner 
Honorary Trustee 
Jane R. Herrmann 



Mark Ledbetter 

Virginia Lincoln 

Nancy M. McDonald 

Phillip Miller 

G. Arnold Mulder, 

M.D. 



Kenneth D. Hill, Ph.D Donivee T. : 



Judy M. Horton 
H. Clay Kellogg 



Sho C. Ta: 
GaryTho 



txenerai Information 626-821-3222 Peacock Cafe 

l^f^^^^^'-'^'P 626-821-3233 Site Rentals 

Development 626-821-3237 Group Tours 

Arboretum Library 626-821-3213 Class Registration 

cZ TcT.U 626-821-3239 Wedding! 

Garden & Gift Shop 626-447-8751 Wedding Photography"' 




On the cover: Rose Garden. Photo by Frank McDonough 



WWW.ARBORETUM.ORG 3 




! A GARDEN FESTIVAI 

MISS OUR NEW SPRING EVENT-MAY 4-6 



ne uarden festival is a great way to celebrate the spring 
irdening season with one stop shopping and entertainment, 
row your Arboretum experience and explorations with a 
eekend of festivities that will include: 

► Introduction of the newly designed Garden for All Seasons 

► Exhibit of local sculptors and installation artists 

► Sale of unique and exotic plants 

• Marketplace of garden accessories and tools 

» Garden Chats, demonstrations and meet the experts 

' Entertainment 

' Food trucks and specialty vendors 



SPECIAL FRIDAY EVENING HOURS 

Friday, May 4, 5-8pm 

Members: $5 adults, $1 children; 
Nonmembers: $10 adults. $2 children 
Experience the Arboretum in a different light w 
first opportunity for purchase of specialty plant 
marketplace offerings. 

GROW! A GARDEN FESTIVAL 

Saturday-Sunday, May 5-6; 9am-4:30pm; San 
entry for members only 

Members free; Nonmembers, $8 for adults; $6 sen 
full-time students: $3 children 5-12; Details will s, 
available at www.arboretum.org. 
Bring your own wagon, carts and wheelbarrow 



DESIGNING A GARDEN to npn\/ 




ecology, , 



2 garden 



t and social 



Amy Korn and Matt Randolph of kornrandolph. inc. lane 
Pasadena designed the new Garden for All Seasons as a demo: 
small scale, water-efficient cultivation of vegetables and fruit; 
opens May 4, there will be a state-of-the-art water harvesting 
grape arbors and even a chicken coop. Known for combining c 
sensibility, Matt, a landscape architect, and Amy, principal designer have a garden 
design portfolio that includes the Getty Villa in Malibu, The Huntington Library's 
Desert Garden master plan in San Marino, the Rancho Los Alamitos restoration ' 
Long Beach, and Caltech s Linde. Robinson Laboratory for Global Environmental" 
Science. The husband and wife team discuss how they created a design that is 
responsive to both the Arboretum site and the people who experience it. 



"■'^R ALL SEASONS 



If you had only three words to describe 
>^ his garden, what would they he in 
order of importance? 
Amy: Inspiring, productive and 

'Ughtful. 

Would you elaborate on each of the 
three descriptors and describe where in 
the garden we'll see examples of each 
of the concepts? 

Amy: The garden is designed to be 

gardens of all sizes on how they may 
adapt small to large portions of their 
property to include edible plants and 
energy and water-efficient systems. 

A small garden can be productive in 
the ways of water harvesting and reuse, 
solar energy and food-producing plant 
material. 

A technology-based, efficient and 
economical garden can still be designed 
in a thoughtful and aesthetic way. 



: GARDEN MAGAZINE 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 



EARTH DREAMS: ART EMERGES IN THE GARDENS 



At a time of tremendous environmental change, art in 
natural settings can express some of our deepest yearnings 
for the future of this Earth. With increasing distance betweei 



Dian; 



■amble, 



iwe drf 



.. Acre 



hope for a sustainable future becomes a global aspiration. 
The works of Earth Dreams reach for this more positive 
environmental future. 

James Hill precisely reveals beauty in nature in 
his dynamic and candidly energized metal forms. Fred 
Rose carves solid eucalyptus logs and bamboo material, 
from Arboretum trees, into boat shapes and organic grid 
structures that borrow language from the surrounding plan 

multiple exquisitely protracted Cycladic figurines. 



nglyr 



nfigures plumbing 



ng tre 



andr 



Patrick E. forms steel and glass to mimic nature as well to 
create a solar butterfly. As part of Bill Fillmore's recycled 
noise series, he brilliantly forms distinctive bell-like 
assemblages of steel, glass, stone, and wood. Patrick Crabb 
deconstructs nature and creates a sense of mystery and 
discovery in his vibrantly-unique clay compositions. Pam 
Burgess serenely alters the milieu by utilizing natural 

The exhibition, curated by Cream Gallery's Juliet Rosati 
Bello, opens at the Garden Festival. There will be a special 
opportunity to meet the artists Friday evening. May 4. 



Matt, you have described the garden 
as an update of old- fashioned 
water harvesting and conservation 
techniques. What do you mean by that? 
Matt: The idea of water conservation, 
collection and reuse has been around 
for thousands of years. We are 
utilizing modern technology such as 
solar panels, solar pumps, efficient 

Is this garden designed to have 
teaching moments for both children 
and adults? 

Amy: Yes. Almost every location in the 

or learn from by individual observation 
or small groups, adults and children 
alike. There is an improved outdoor 
classroom located adjacent to the 
peafowl exclosure. 



What are those lessons? 

Amy: We can produce healthy foods in 

small spaces efficiently and by varied 

As an example, an idyllic aquatic pond 
located in the garden demonstrates 
that a water feature does not have to 
waste potable water. As designed for 
the Garden for All Seasons, this feature 
collects and holds harvested water then 
re-circulates it through the bubbling 
pond, which aerates and cleanses the 
water through the bubbler and aquatic 
plant material before refilling the 
cistern connected to the system. This 
eliminates the need to add chemicals 
to the cistern to keep the water clean. 
Some of this water is used to irrigate 
the edible material grown in the 

How do the chickens fit in? 
Matt: Chickens contribute to 
the sustainable aspects of a food 
production garden by providing 



How do you protect the plants from 
foraging peafowl? 
Amy: Plants that peafowl tend to 
harm will be grown in raised beds 
in the peafowl exclosure. Plants in 
the exclosure will be selected by the 

trees and many other producing species 
that are unappealing to peafowl. 

Complete this sentence: We consider 
our garden successful if visitors leave 
with.... 

number of practices, systems, materials 

To reach kornrandolph inc., visit 
www.kornrandoIph.com or call 
626-564-0259. # 



A NEW GENERATION OF TREES 



look a little different since the worst 
windstorm in decades ripped through 
the garden on December 1st. Where 
tree canopies once created vast pools of 
shade, sunlight now bathes the areas — 
almost as if Mother Nature is putting a 
spotlight on all the empty spaces where 

"The tragedy was the wind," 
observed Timothy Phillips, the 
Arboretum's Superintendent. "The 
winds have come and gone." 

A silver lining can be found in all of 



this. "We c 



ithe 



of the future," CEO Richard Scl 
said. "Now is the time to enhar 
beauty of our gardens and prov 




nd dai 



:o restore the garden, 
destroyed 326 trees 
;ed more than 700 other 
specimens, which now need restorative 
pruning. "We have found that there 
is a lot of variation as far as what has 

said James E. Henrich, Curator of 
Living Collections at the Arboretum. 
"It's definitely not a case of the exotics 
being the weaker species." 

The 10-acre Australian section 
was hardest hit with 40 trees lost. 
The Prehistoric Forest, fig collection 
and Grace Kallam Perennial Garden 
all sustained considerable damage. 
A 140-year-old blue gum eucalyptus, 
one of three in the historic area, is 
gone. The Engelmann oaks, however, 
survived with relatively little damage. 

While palm fronds and other tree 
and plant debris rained down into 
the lake and areas around the historic 
structure the Queen Anne Cottage, 

Clockwise from top left: Less than 
24 hours after the windstorm, the 
Arboretum staff was assessing the 
damage and starting the cleanup. 
Top: Jill Morganelli, left, and Celina 
Nacpil 

Taking a break: David Okihara. Joe 
Valenzuela, Theresa Richau, Glenn 
Klevdal, Angela Carranza. Irma Reddig 
and Rafael Cano Jr. 
Below left: Volunteers Nicholas 
Coughlin, Bette Shotwell and Marsha 

who helped to clear the grounds so the 



Hugo Reid Adobe, kiys and Santa Anita 
Depot all came through unscathed by 
the winds. Only the Coach Barn lost a 
few roof shingles, according to Mitchell 
Hearns Bishop, Curator of Historical 
Collections at the Arboretum. 

Thanks to workers from multiple 
public agencies, as well as dedicated 
Arboretum staff and volunteers, the 
grounds reopened to visitors by late 
December. The Gift Shop, Arboretum 
Library and Peacock Cafe remained 
open during the cleanup. 

"We are deeply grateful to the 
many members and friends of the 
Arboretum who, within days after 
the storm, began contributing toward 
planting the next generation of 

come," said CEO Schulhof. "We invite 
the entire community to participate 
by making a gift to the Arboretum 
Tree Fund." 0 



TREE FUND 

If you would like to contribute 
to the Arboretum Tree Fund, 

"Support," or mail a check payable 
to the Los Angeles Arboretum 
Foundation. Please add "Tree Fund' 
on your donation. Thank you! 



Los Angeles Arboret 
301 N. Baldwin Ave. 
Arcadia, CA 91007 



1 Foundatic 



ARBORETUM AND BOTANIC GARDEN MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2012 



RENOVATING THE ARBORETUM LIBRARY 



Good news for the 122,000 who use Arboretum Library 
resources each year! The building will undergo a $1.25 
million renovation that will add a convivial reading room 

and the public, a children's area, exhibit space, state-of-the- 

The improvements, funded by Proposition U money, will 
mean that the library will temporarily relocate to the Bamboo 
Room when the renovation begins. So we'll be packing up the 
collection of over 20,000 books, 1,000 periodical titles, plant 
and seed catalogs, photographs and slide collections, and 
ephemera. Fortunately we won't have to move the rare books 
because the Good Family Foundation already helped create 



allfoi 



ating a visual and physical connectio 
between the building and the surrounding landscape by 
adding windows and an entrance on the west. This will 
integrate the library into the existing gardens and patio. 

Inside, the renovation will improve all the work spac( 
and integrate library reference and botanical consultatior 
into the public space. There will be a leisure reading area, 
Wi-Fi, computer terminals, an area for quiet study, a 
children's area, space for exhibits and a book sales area. Ir 
addition, there will be other updates in security, electrical 
and plumbing. 

With these changes, the library will be able to better 
fulfill its mission to collect, manage and make its materia 
accessible. The changes will also better enable us to educa 
and engage the Southern California community, Arboreti. 

local history related to the Arboretum and its land. 9 
—Susan Eubank is Arboretum Librarian. 




THE LIBRARY IS POWERED BY VOLUNTEERS 

:^urin, LaVonne Barnes, and Jea 



We are so grateful to the 
wonderful group of library volunteer 
They help with all the tasks behind 
the seer 
Wolken 



t make a library 



nd Bill Ramsey work with 

book repairs. Rayma Harrison, a 
retired Caltech librarian, catalogs 
books into our onhne catalog and 
untangles the cataloging "cans of 
worms" brilhantly. Christine Hsiao 
does interlibrary loans, all the tricky 
book labeling challenges, and is the 
retired champion processor, meaning 



spine labels 
new books a 



Erdman have taken up that torch to 
keep the processing moving. 

Mary Jane Macy and Marge 
Hullinger generally help with resorting 
the children books, shifting the main 
book stacks, shelving, sorting piles 
of ephemera, comparing donations 
to the collection, etc. Margaret Byrne 
is our used book specialist and prices 
all the surplus materials. Paul Martin 
and Elisabeth Eubank volunteer at our 

We also are privileged to have 
a rotating group of new library 

Thomas Dickey, Kristin Abfaham, 
Tanya Koukeyan, Daniel Blitz and 
Ashley Sparks are honing their skills 



o serve libraries in the future. Their 
lelp keeps the library open six days 
week, Tuesday-Sunday. With this 
:st you can get a glimmer of all the 
ctivity that makes a library. 



WWW.ARB0RETUM.ORG 7 





GOING GREEN TOGETHER! 

LOS ANGELES ENVIRONMENTAL 

EDUCATION FAIR 

Saturday, March 10; 9am - 4pm 

Children, families and educators all are invited to celebrate nature with a day 
of activities and workshops. You will learn how to help make the world a little 
greener! We'll have live entertainment, music, exhibits, food, plus: 
% Urban homestead workshops on fruit tree grafting, home composting, 

container gardening 
% Nature Quest and Gardeners' Workout to get moving outdoors 
% Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots annual Celebration of Service 
% Special appearances by Busy Buzzy Bee who loves to read; Hoppy the 

Grasshopper, the bouncy bug who loves to move, and Dot the Ladybug, a 



FAMILY BIRD WALKS 

First Saturday of each month; Sam; Meet 

Free with admission; members free 
The walks are open to all ages (children mui 
all levels of bird knowledge. Bring yoi 
and join our experienced birder and r 
watching our fine-feathered friends. 



LET'S GET 
MOVING! 

Whether dancing with drum; 
hopping like a kangaroo along a 
trail or scouring the grounds for 
cool stuff, kids are getting a good 
workout with family programs sp 

Let's Move! at the Arboretum. Across the country families are 
getting involved in Lets Move!, First Lady Michelle Obama's 

Let's Move! was introduced to children with dancing and 
drumming at the Arboretum's annual meeting in September. 
Now you'll see families with maps in hand, following the 
Serpent Trail through the Australian plant collection and 
looking for animals— animal drawings on rocks— to mimic 
their movements. Other special hikes include The Hunt for 
Cool Stuff and Extreme Arboretum. Maps are available at 
www.arboretum.org, click "Kids & Families." 

To promote healthy eating, we feature a seasonal 
vegetable or fruit with recipes online. The Peacock Cafe has 
added a special menu for children. Parents can attend classes 
to learn how to grow their own healthy food at home. 0 




More Let's Move! activities are coming. Mark your calendar 
for these events: 

LET'S MOVE! ADVENTURE HUNTS 

Saturday, January 14 

LET'S MOVE! ACTIVITIES AT LOS ANGELES 
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION FAIR 

Saturday, March 10 



KIDS' KORNER AT GROW! A 

Saturday -Sunday. May 5-6 

LOS ANGELES ARBORETUM AND BOTANIC GARDEN MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2012 



I GARDEN FESTIVAL 



NATURE CAMP AT THE ARBORETUM 

For details, contact Ted Tegart at ted.tegart@arboretum.org or call 626-821-5897. 




SPRING NATURE ART CAMP: 
ART INSPIRED BY NATURE 

MONDAY-FRIDAY, APRIL 2-6 

Using natural materials found at the Arboretum, campers ages 5 to 10 
will create amazing works of art. 

FULL DAY: 9a.m-3:30^m; $275 members; $300 non-members; 

10% sibling discount; T-shirt included 

HALF DAY: 9am-Noon; 12:30-3:30pm; $140 members; 

$150 non-members; 10% sibling discount; T-shirt included 

DAILY: $60 members; $65 non-members 

EXTENDED CARE AVAILABLE: 

Mornings: $25 members; $30 non-members; 

Afternoons: $30 members; $35 non-members 



SUMMER NATURE CAMP 

BEGINS JUNE 11-SIGN UP NOW! 

Children ages 5 to 10 always enjoy summer days at the Arboretum. 
The one- week camps, Monday through Friday, are full of adventure, 
discovery and fun. 



5-22 



FULL DAY: 9am-3:30pm; $300 members; $335 non-mer 

10% sibling discount; T-shirt included 

HALF DAY: 9am-Noon; 12:30 -3:30pm; $150 members 

$168 non-members; 10% sibling discount; T-shirt included 

EXTENDED CARE AVAILABLE: 

Mornings: $25 members; $30 non-members; 

Afternoons: $30 members; $35 non-members 




WELLS FARGO SUPPORTS 
OUR SCHOOL PROGRAMS 

We express our great appreciation to Wells Fargo for generously 
supporting many of the over 15,000 students visiting the Arboretum 
each year. The recent Wells Fargo grant will support transportation costs 
for classrooms that lack funding for field trips. It also enables Arboretum 
educators to provide schools with new learning activities to enhance 
their visit. We thank Wells Fargo for helping kids from across greater 
Los Angeles discover the wonders of the Arboretum! 



WWW.ARBORETUM.ORG 9 




10 LOS ANGELES ARBORETUM AND BOTANIC GARDEN MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2012 



Left: The Arboretum's "Old-Fashior^ed Rose Garden. 
Above: Detail of the original plans for the garden. 

cottage. The rose garden and its surrounding citrus grove 

the late 19th Century enthusiasm for roses in Southern 
Cahfornia. 

The Rose Garden itself is intended as a feast for 
the senses. The scent of roses in the spring mingling 
with blooming lemons, grapefruit and oranges is indeed 
intoxicating. Visually, the colors of the roses and the intense 
greens in contrast with the whiteness of the structures and 
Coach Barn are quite striking. 

The shape of the turf inset in the garden is quite 
unusual. It resembles the Vajra scepter found in Tibetan 
Buddhism, a ritual object associated with the god Indra 
which symbolizes a lightning bolt and also represents 
male energy and is usually paired with the ghanta or bell, 
a symbol of female energy. Whether or not this is what 
Huntsman-Trout intended is unknown but his education and 
sophistication were such that he was probably familiar with 
the symbol. 

Huntsman-Trout also was known for his skill and 
sensitivity in creating outdoor rooms and living spaces in his 
gardens. The arrangement of the Rose Garden lends itself to 
weddings since the exedras and arbors at either end function 
very well as altars or stages. The garden has certainly proved 
popular as an open-air wedding chapel. 

The association of the rose with love is an ancient one 
and is well known but roses also play an important role in 
medicine and the cuUnary arts. By no means confined to 
European cultures, they were prized in the ancient Islamic 
world and Asia, the influence of the roses that came from 
China to the West cannot be overstated. A popular local rose 
that flourished at Rancho Santa Anita in the Baldwin Era was 
the 'Gold of Ophir", or 'Fortune's Double Yellow', brought by 
British botanist Robert Fortune from China. It was a flop 
in the climate of the British Isles but flourishes in the San 



Gabriel Valley and was popular in the Victorian era. Today 
Robert Fortune is best known for making it possible for the 

monopoly on the production of tea. 

Vistas also were important to Huntsman-Trout and 
we owe many of the Arboretum's fine scenic views to his 
landscape designs. Standing in the newly restored Victorian 
Rose Garden, we see the barn against the magnificent 
backdrop of San Gabriel Mountains and the Arboretum's 
ancient Mexican fan palms and eucalyptus. We are very 
fortunate to benefit from Huntsman-Trout's legacy. 0 

—Mitchell Hearns Bishop is Curator of Historical Collections at 



Edward Huntsman-Trout 




Jenny Trout. Born as Edward Trout Huntsman, he 





Hugo Reid Adobe, Queen Anne Cottage and Coach Barn 

WHEN THEY WERE RESTORED IN THE EARLY 1960s. 

HE DIED IN 1974. — M.H.B. 



WWW,ARBORETUM.ORG 11 




12 LOS ANGELES ARBORETUM AND BOTANIC GARDEN MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2012 



Natural regeneration has been observed to be poor 
within most Engelmann oak populations. No conclusive 
reason is known but it seems to coincide with the 
introduction of grazing from sheep and cattle by early 
European settlers. Livestock compact soil and their browsi 
habits have a considerable negative impact on acorn survi^ 
(both fallen and on the tree), as well as on lower tree 
canopies. Another detriment to the overall tree populatior 
residential and commercial development by humans. 

Successful regeneration of the Engelmann oak, often 
called the Pasadena oak or mesa oak, ultimately relies on 
three critical issues: acorn production, acorn germination 
and seedling/sapling establishment. 

Acorn production on Tallac Knoll was extremely 
bountiful in 2010 and winter precipitation was nearly dou 
the average annual rate, resulting in thousands of naturalb 
germinating acorns under the canopy of our grove. 

Engelmann oak acorns don't need to be buried in soil 
to germinate. When germinating, the embryonic root and 
shoot emerge out of the acorn and deeply into the soil 
which may make it well adapted to exposed habitats and 
bare ground. This unusual germination mechanism does n 
occur in coast live oak but does occur in other white oaks. 

Germination generally occurs in early winter. The 
greatest percentage of germination occurs within the 



s mark locations of spontaneous seedlings beneath 
s on Tallac Knoll Left: Some of the nearly 700 
oak seedlings being watered in the nursery. 




Landscape considerations 



Living Among the Oaks a 



just outside tree drip lines. They typically don't germinate 
more than 1 meter from the drip lines where the soil water 
content is lower. Seedlings require some amount of sunlight 
for long-term survival and this need increases with sapling 
age. Interestingly, Engelmann oak acorns have a higher 
tolerance to moisture stress during germination than do 

On Tallac Knoll, about 3,600 irrigation flags document 
the locations of naturally occurring seedlings. Selected 
seedlings will be caged and given special care to aid their 

addition, nearly 1,200 acorns were harvested from our 
trees and planted in the nursery to provide a supplemental 
seedling population that will be planted out this winter. In 
addition, the weedy understory will ultimately be replaced 
with native species to create a more natural ecosystem. 

The Engelmann oak grove is one of the highlights of the 
Arboretum. Plant enthusiasts planning a visit should make 
an effort to include this naturally occurring population in 
their tour, especially during winter and spring. We encourage 
periodic visits to see our slow, but methodical progress 
toward a stable grove of Engelmann oak trees for future 
generations. # 



—James E. Henrich is Cur 



r of Living Collections at the 



WWW.ARBORETUM.ORG 13 



NG THE TABLE 




THE MARKET ON HOLLY WITH 
MARY PAT BRANDMEYER 

Wednesday, January 11; 3-5pm 

There's a lot of culinary buzz about The Market on Holly, 
a one stop for eat-in or take-out tasty gourmet foods as 
well as hand-picked specialty items. Chef and co-owner 
Mary Pat Brandmeyer says she likes to make food that people 



XANH BISTRO AND CHEF/OWNER HALEY NGUYEN 

Wednesday, February 8; 3-5pm 

This class will feature dishes from the Vietnamese menu 
of Xanh Bistro in Westminster's Little Saigon. Chef Haley 
Nguyen uses quality ingredients with the freshest herbs and 
vegetables. From the appetizers and small-plates to entrees 



ZOV'S BISTRO & BAKERY WITH OWNER/ 
CHEF ZOV KARAMARDIAN 

Wednesday. March 14; 3-5pm 

The bistro and bakery in Tustin has become a culinary 
mstitution since it opened in 1987. Chef Zov's food is 
contemporary with lots of eastern Mediterranean influence. 
Over the years, the concept has continued to grow with 

cookbooks: Zov: Recipes and Memories from the Heart and Simply 
Zov— Rustic classics with a Mediterranean Twist, www.zovs.com 

PRESERVES, JAMS AND JELLIES WITH 
ALEXANDRA POER SHERIDAN AND BARBARA POER 

Wednesday, April 11; 3-5pm 

Here's the class you've been asking for given by a terrific 
mother-daughter duo, Alexandra Poer Sheridan, caterer 
extraordinaire, and Barbara Poer. We have enjoyed Alexandra's 
classes over the years, and now you will see how she came by 
her skills. Barbara Poer is one of the best home cooks around. 



Alicia^ 



ire $45 for 



RSDAY GARDEN TALKS WITH LILI SINGER 



WINTER SESSION 



NATIVE PLANTS: GARDENING I 



with Carol Bornstein 

COCHINEAL, CACTUS, CANE AND 
CUCUMBERS: THE ETHNOBOTANY 
OF THREE PLANTS AND AN 
INSECT 
January 19 

with Mitchell Hearns Bishop 



GARDENING WITH CHILDREN 
January 26 

with Rosalind Creasy 

PLANT COMBINATIONS 
February 2 

with Mark Bartos 



>er class. Reservations or you may pay at the 

LUSH LANDSCAPES/LITTLE WATER 
February 16 
with Richard Hayden 
FIELD TRIP: A VENTURA ( 
EXCURSION 
February 23; lOam-lpm 

MANDARIN MADNESS AND 
TANGERINE TASTING 
March 1 

with Jim Churchill and/or Lisa Bre 



LOS ANGELES ARBORETUM 



MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2012 



THEY'RE PLAYING OUR SONG 



MICHAEL FEINSTEIN 
IN CONCERT 

Saturday, July 21 



LA DOLCE VITA 



GERSHWIN ON THE GREEN 



Saturday, September 8 



vr 



WELCOME TO MARVIN HAMLISCH 
THE PASADENA POPS! 



Mark your calendars for June 16 when award-winning 
Marvin Hamlisch and the Pasadena POPS present the first 

Arboretum. The four concerts will be a popular musical 
journey, featuring music from the Great American Songbook, 
light classics, Broadway and Hollywood hits, and Hamlisch's 
own list of acclaimed credits. Every evening will be filled with 
backstage stories, intimate moments, and great fun. 

"Having worked with many members of the Pasadena 
Symphony and POPS over the decades, I am delighted to 



ng the joy we have shared ii 



udio and to showcase 



To purchase tickets for the concerts, visit 
w.pasadenasymphony-pops.org or call 626-793-7172. 
)oretum members receive a 10% discount off of regulai 



MORE THURSDAY GARDEN TALKS^ 



SPRING SESSION 



KEEPING PLANTS IN CONTAINERS 
March 15 

with Steve Gerischer 

LIVING IN THE GARDEN, 
CALIFORNIA STYLE 
March 22 



; Palm Room; $100 for the series. $20 per class. Reservations or you may pay a 
ch are self-driven and require pre -registration. 

LIFE IN THE RED HILLS: 

A GARDEN JOURNEY 

April 5 

NATIVE LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
FOR HOME GARDENERS 
April 12 



FIELD TRIP: SILVER LAKE 
FARMS, SILVER LAKE, AND 
BONUS GARDEN, ECHO PARK 
April 19; lOam-lpm 



FIELD TRIP: EARL BURNS 
MILLER JAPANESE GARDEN, 
CAL STATE LONG BEACH, AN 
RANCHO LOS ALAMITOS, 
LONG BEACH 
April 26; 9:30am-lpm 

REBLOOM: 
GARDENERS' DELIGHT, 
MOTHER NATURE'S CURSE 
May 3 

with John Schoustra 



WWW.ARBORETUM.ORG 15 



f JANUAR 



AT THE ARBORETUM 



BAIKO-EN BONSAI KENKYUKAI 
SHOW AND SALE 

Saturday - Sunday, January 14 - 15; 
10am-4:30pm; Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
The Baiko-En Bonsai Kenkyukai 
Society will present the only show of 
deciduous, miniaturized trees in the 
United States. This exhibit will feature 
Japanese graybark elms, ginkgo, 
zelkova and maple trees in their 



COMPULSIVE GARDENERS 

Fridays, January 6 - February 24 

CLASS FULL 

ROSE PRUNING 

Saturday, January 7; 9am-Noon; 
Palm Room 

525 members; $30 nonmembers 
Instructor: Jill Morganelli 
January is a big month for roses; 
proper pruning and soil building wil 
determine the health and beauty of 



• SQUARE FOOT GARDENING 
WORKSHOP 

Saturday, January 21; lOam-lpm; 



Recommended reading: All New Square 
Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew, 
available in the Arboretum Garden & 
Gift Shop and Arboretum Library. 



FRESH: CELEBRATING THE 
TABLE THE MARKET ON HOLLY 
WITH MARY PAT BRANDMEYER 

Wednesday, January 11; 3-5pm 

See page 14 for details. 



• A LET'S MOVE! PROGRAM 



e guide as we 



BOOKWORMS: A FREE 

STORYTELLING PROGRAM: 

IT BLOOMS EVERY YEAR: ALOES 

Wednesday, January 4; 10am 
Wednesday, January 18; 10am 
Saturday, January 21; 2pm 
Main Entrance 

Enjoy plant and nature stories and a 

• ARBORETUM ADVENTURES: 
LET'S MOVE! ADVENTURE HUNTS 

Saturday, January 14; lOam-Noon; 
Meet in the Rc 

Free with admis 
Join your adve 

explore the ArL „^ 

space is limited to 25. Children of all 
ages are welcome! 

KIDSART AT THE ARBORETUM 

Saturdays, January 21 - March 24; 
Noon-lpm; l:15-2:15pm; 2:30-3:30pm 

$155 per session; To register call KidsArt 
at 818-248-2764 
KidsArt teaches drawing so that 
students have the opportunity to learn 
fundamental skills. Students learn 
how to "see" in a new way. KidsArt 
teaches students how to measure with 



• FAMILY FUN CLASSES: 
SURVIVOR: THE TROPICS 

Saturday, January 28; lOam-Noon; 
Meet in the Rotunda 

$12 per family for members; 
$14 per family for nonmembers; 
Pre-registration required. 
Your family is vacationing in the 
tropics having a fun filled adventure 
when suddenly you and your family 
have been separate 



USING COLORED PENCILS IN 
BOTANICAL ART 

Tuesdays, January 10, 17, 24, 31; 
10am-2pm (includes one-half hour 
for lunch/3.5 hours of class) 

$255 members; $275 non-members 



nth 



IKEBANA 

Fridays, January 13 - March 2 
ADVANCED: 9:30-ll:30am 
BASIC: ll:00am-12:30pm 
Bamboo Room 

$72 members; $87 nonmembers; 
$32 materials fee payable instructors 
Instructors: Reiko Kawamura and 
Yumiko Kikkawa 
Learn about Japanese cultural 
traditions in these popular worksho] 
while practicing the techniques of 
Moribana, Heika and landscape 



PLANT INFORMATION: 
SPRING BULBS FOR SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA GARDENS 

Wednesday, January 4; l:30-3pm; 
Plant Information Office 

Instructor: Frank McDonough 
Free with admission; members free 
The first Wednesday of each month, 
the Arboretum's plant information 
consultant Frank McDonough will 
cover different gardening topics 
and share the most interesting and 

Plant Information Department. 

READING THE WESTERN 
LANDSCAPE BOOK CLUB: 
WHEN THE KILLING'S DONE 
BY T. CORAGHESSAN BOYLE 

Saturday, January 7; 2pm; 
Arboretum Library 

Free with admission; members free 
The Arboretum Library's book club 




• yoga in the garden 

Thursdays, January 5, 12, 19, 2( 
9:30-10:45am 

$30 members: $35 nonmembers 
Instructor: Candyce Columbus 
Improve flexibility, balance and 
strength in the open air surrounc 
the beauty of nature in the Arbor 



3 Balta] 



The class will focus on techniques, 
:omposkion and color mixing. All 



FEBRUAR 



AT THE ARBORETUM 



MUSHROOM FAIR 

Sunday, February 12; 9am-5pm; 
Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
The Los Angeles Mycological Soci 
Annual Wild Mushroom Fair will 
feature a special guest speaker an 
exhibits of wild mushrooms. The 
will include demonstrations on how 
to grow mushrooms and cook them. 
Professional mycologists will be on 

be vendors selling mushroom-theme 
books, posters, kits, T-shirts and art 
related objects. 

ORCHID SHOW & SALE 

Saturday-Sunday, February 25 - 26; 
10am-5pm; Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
The San Gabriel Valley branch of 
the Cymbidium Society of America 
presents cymbidium hybrids, plant 
displays and orchids for sale and CSA 



MUSHROOM IDENTIFICATION 

Saturday, February 4; lOam-Noon 

$25 members; $30 nonmembers 
Instructor: Jerrold Turney, Ph.D. 



PARK FACILITIES (A MT. SAN 
ANTONIO COLLEGE CLASS 
HELD AT THE ARBORETUM) 

Mondays, February 27 - June 12 
6-lOpm; Palm Room 

$30 payable to the Arboretum; 
$75 payable to Mt. SAC 
Instructor: Eric Johnson 



nil le; 



aboui 



the management and operation of 
different types of park facilities, 
including the management of 
sports fields, recreation centers, 
campgrounds, aquatic facilities and 
golf courses. This is a for-credit 
class (3 units) offered through 
Mt. San Antonio College. Students 
must register through Mt. SAC 
iwww.mtsac.edu) before the class 
begins. For information, call Mt. SAC 
at 909-594-5611, X4540. 



FRESH: CELEBRATING THE 
TABLE XANH BISTRO CHEF/ 
OWNER HALEY NGUYEN 

Wednesday, February 8; 3-5pm 

See page 14 for details. 



BOOKWORMS: A FREE 
STORYTELLING PROGRAM 
LET US HAVE LETTUCE: 
WINTER GARDENING 

Wednesday, February 1; lOam 
Wednesday, February 15; 10am 
Saturday, February 18; 2pm 
Main Entrance 

See page 16 for details. 

• ARBORETUM ADVENTURES: 
ALOE WALK 

Saturday, February 4; lOam-Noon; 



i;ith admission; 



exploration of the Arboretum. Each 
adventure is new and exciting with 
a different theme relating to nature. 
Come early as space is limited to 25. 
Children of all ages are welcome! 

FAMILY FUN CLASSES: 
NATURE INSTALLATIONS 

Saturday, February 18; lOam-Noon; 
Rotunda 

$12 per family for members; $14 per 

required. Please call 626-821-4623 or 
626-821-5897. 

Do you like to get creative in the 
great outdoors? Ever wonder how we 
can make the artistic process more 

the work of artist Andy Goldsworthy! 



PLEIN AIR PAINTING 

Sunday, February 5; l-4pm 

$60 members; $75 nonmembers 
Instructor: Marion Eisenmann 
Bring your watercolors, and learn ho 

while expressing your own style as y 
experiment with different watercolo 
techniques. Open to both beginners 
and advanced students. 



USING COLORED PENCILS IN 
BOTANICAL ART 

Tuesdays, February 7, 14, 21, 28; 
10am-2pm (includes one-half hour 
for lunch; 3.5 hours of class) 

$255 members: $275 nonmembers 
Instructor: Cristina Baltayian 
The class will focus on techniques, 
composition and color mixing. All 



ART WORKSHOP 

Mondays, February 13 - April 2; 
9:30-ll:30am; Oak Room 

$35 members; $42 nonmembers 
This is a self-directed workshop (no 
official instructor) that provides a 
supportive, encouraging environment 
for those who wish to pursue their 



PLANT INFORMATION: 
OVERVIEW OF WATER 
HARVESTING AND 
SUSTAINABILITY 

Wednesday, February 1; l:30-3pm; 
Plant Information Office 

Free with garden admission; members fre 

READING THE WESTERN 
LANDSCAPE BOOK CLUB: 
AMONG FRIENDS 
BY M.F.K. FISHER 

Wednesday, February 1; 7pm; 
Arboretum Library 

Free with admission; members free 
See page 16 for details. 



• YOGA IN THE GARDEN 

Thursdays, February 2, 9, 16, 23; 
9:30-10:45am 

$30 members; $35 nonmembers 
Instructor: Candyce Columbus 
See page 16 for details. 



# A LET'S MOVE! PROGRAM 



MARCH 



AT THE ARBORETUM 



MONROVIA ROCK HOUNDS 
SHOW AND SALE 

Saturday-Sunday, March 3-4; 
9am-4:30pm; Ayres Hall 



jewelry will be displayed at this 
gem and mineral show. Door pi 
and a grand prize drawing on S 
at 4pm. 

• LOS ANGELES 
ENVIRONMENTAL 
EDUCATION FAIR 

Saturday, March 10; 
9am-4pm; Ayres Hall 

See page 8 for details. 

• THE GREAT TOMATO 
SALE AND TALK 

Wednesday, March 21; 10am-] 
Palm Room 

Free with admission; members fre 

Tomato Guru: Steve Goto 

Back by popular demand for an 

with Steve Goto who will unvei: 
Top Tomato Picks for 2012. Lea 
the tricks to successful planting 



ORCHID BASICS 

Saturday, March 10; lOam-Noon; 
Palm Room 

$25 members; $30 nonmembers 
Instructor: Marc Hall 
Marc Hall, a California Certified 
Nurseryman, will cover all the basic 
techniques of growing orchids: use c 



nd ho 



this 



FRESH: CELEBRATING THE 
TABLE: ZOV'S BISTRO & 
BAKERY WITH OWNER/CHEF 
ZOV KARAMARDIAN 

Wednesday, March 14; 3-5pm 

See page 14 for details. 



• ARBORETUM ADVENTURES: 
SPRING FLOWER EXPLORATION 

Saturday, March 3; lOam-Noon; 
Rotunda 

Free with admission; members free 
Join your adventure guide as we 



BOOKWORMS: A FREE 
STORYTELLING PROGRAM: 
FLITTING FROM FLOWER TO 
FLOWER: POLLINATORS 

Wednesday, March 7; 10am 
Saturday, March 17; 2pm 
Wednesday, March 21; 10am 
Main Entrance 

Free with admission; members free 
See page 16 for details. 



PLEIN AIR PAINTING 

Sunday, March 4; l-4pm 

$60 members; $75 nonmembers 
Instructor: Marion Eisenmann 
See page 17 for details. 

USING COLORED PENCILS I 
BOTANICAL ART 

Tuesdays, March 6. 13, 20, 27; 
10am-2pm (includes one-half hoi 
lunch/3.5 hours of class) 

$255 members; $275 nonmembers 
Instructor: Cristina Baltayian 
See page 17 for details. 

IKEBANA 

March 16-May 4 
ADVANCED: 9:30-ll:30am 
BASIC: ll:00am-12:30pm 

See page 16 for details. 



SPRING IRIS AND BULB 
SHOW AND SALE 

Saturday - Sunday, March 31 - 
April 1; 9am-4:30 pm; Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
Tall bearded, small bearded and aril- 



bred 



FAMILY FUN CLASSES: 
BIRD FEEDER 

Saturday, March 24; lOam-Noon; 
Rotunda 

$12 per family for members; $14 per 




• ORGANIC FRUIT AND 
VEGETABLE GARDENING 

Saturday, March 3; 12-4pm; 
Bamboo Room 



READING THE WESTERN 
LANDSCAPE BOOK CLUB: 
REFUGE 

BY TERRY TEMPEST WILLIAMS 

Wednesday, March 7; 7pm; 
Arboretum Library 

Free with admission; members free 
See page 16 for details. 

PLANT INFORMATION: 

FIELD TRIP TO RANCHO SANTA 

ANA BOTANIC GARDEN 

Wednesday. March 7; l:30-3pm 

Participants must arrange their own 



$30 members; $35 nonmembei 
Instructor: Candyce Columbus 
See page 16 for details. 



• A LET'S MOVE! PROGRAM 



APRIL 



AT THE ARBORETUM 



IKEBANA INTERNATIONAL 
SHOW AND SALE 

Saturday, April 14; llam-4pm; 
Sunday, April 15; 9am-4 pm 

Free with admission; members free 

Ikebana will be represented from 



STOP, DROP, & ROLL: TRICKS! 
AT THE ARBORETUM 

Mondays, April 16 -May 14; 
7pm -8pm; South Bauer Lawn 

$120 general registration; $100 
Arboretum members and PHS; $60 
Arboretum and PHS volunteers; 



Regis 



This 



•ngHotUr, 



.155. 



sofa 



designed to help you communi 
with your canine companion a 
him/her some fun and useful i 
the process. We will continue t 
you solidify the skills you lean 
Basic Obedience and introduce 
advanced tricks which include 
roll over, take a bow, crawl, anc 



KOREAN STONE EXHIBIT 

Saturday - Sunday, April 21 - 22; 
9am-4pm; Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
For centuries, Asian scholars have 
contemplated natural, found stones for 
creative inspiration and meditation. 
This exhibit consists of water-polished 
and wind-blasted stones from rivers, 
beaches and deserts in North America. 

ROSE SHOW AND SALE 

Saturday, April 28; l-5pm; 
Sunday, April 29; 10am-3pm; 
Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
The Pacific Rose Society will present 
grandifloras, hybrid teas, floribundas, 
miniatures and new and old varieties. 

cultural care. Shrubs of miniature and 

wiUbe on sale both days. 



MORE BACKYARD CHICKENS 
AND BEES 

Saturday, April 14; 9:30am-12:30pir 
Palm Room 

$25 members; $30 nonmembers 

Instructor: John Lyons 

Learn all the basics about chicken 



;, feedir 



disea< 



)rganic 



1 about bees and 



of the beec 



• FAMILY FUN CLASSES: 
BUTTERFLY BRIGADE 

Saturday, April 21; lOam-Noon; 
Rotunda 

$12 per family for members; $14 pei 



family n 



lembers; Pre 



registrc 



• SQUARE FOOT GARDENING 
WORKSHOP 

Saturday: April 21; lOam-lpm; 
Garden for All Seasons & Education 
Greenhouse 

$25 members; $30 nonmembers 
Instructor: Jo Ann Carey 
See page 16 for details. 



FRESH: CELEBRATING THE 
TABLE: PRESERVES, JAMS AND 
JELLIES WITH ALEXANDRA POER 
SHERIDAN & BARBARA POER 

Wednesday, April 11; 3-5pm 

See page 14 for details. 



BOOKWORMS: A FREE 
STORYTELLING PROGRAM: 
IT'S BLUE, IT SHIMMERS, IT'S A 
PEACOCK 

Wednesday, April 4; 10am; 
Wednesday, April 18; 10am; 
Saturday, April 28; 2pm; 
Main Entrance 

Free with admission; members free 
See page 16 for details. 

m ARBORETUM ADVENTURES: 
GREAT BUG HUNT 

Saturday, April 7; lOam-Noon; 
Rotunda 

$12 per family for members; $14 per 
family fornon-members 
Pre-registration required. Please call 
626-821-4623 or 626-821-5897. 
See page 16 for details. 

KIDSART AT THE ARBORETUM 

Saturdays, April 7 - June 16 
Noon-lpm; l:15-2:15pm; 2:30- 
3:30pm 

$155 per session; To register call KidsArt 
at 818-248-2764 
See page 16 for details. 



■ed. Please call 626-821-4623 o: 
626-821-5897 
See page 18 for details. 



ART WORKSHOP 

Mondays, April 9 - May 28; 
9:30-ll:30am; Oak Room 

$35 members; $42 non-memb, 



See, 



?17f 



PLEIN AIR PAINTING 

Sunday, April 15; l-4pm 

$60 for members: $75 for nonmembers 
Instructor: Marion Eisenmann 
See page 17 for details. 



PLANT INFORMATION: 
USING COLOR THEORY 
AND PSYCHOLOGY IN 
YOUR LANDSCAPE 

Wednesday, April 4; l:30-3pm; 
Plant Information Office 

Free with admission; members free 

READING THE WESTERN 
LANDSCAPE BOOK CLUB: 
THE LOG FROM THE SEA OF 
CORTEZ BY JOHN STEINBECK 

Saturday, April 14; 2pm; 



• YOGA IN THE GARDEN 

Thursdays, April 5, 12, 19, 26; 
9:30-10:45am 



• A LET'S MOVE! PROGRAM 



MAY 



AT THE ARBORETUM 



TRIED AND TRUE WAYS ON 
SAVING WATER IN YOUR 
GARDEN 

Saturday, May 26; 9:30am-12:30pm; 



BOOKWORMS: A FREE 
STORYTELLING PROGRAM: 
EAT: THE EDIBLE GARDEN 

Wednesday, May 2; 10am 
Saturday, May 12; 2pm 
Wednesday, May 16; 10am 



MOTHER'S DAY GERANIUM 
SHOW 

Saturday-Sunday, May 12 - 13; 
9am-4pm; Ayres Hall 

Brought to you by International 
Geranium Society, Los Angeles 



SS""* ANNUAL EPIPHYLLUM 
SHOW AND SALE 

Saturday - Sunday, May 19 - 20; 
9am-4pm; Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
Treat yourself to an enjoyable time 
viewing these unusual and gorgeous 
flowers. Besides cut flowers, the show 
includes epiphyllum pictures, flower 
arrangements, plants and related 
epiphytic plants. 

SANTA ANITA BONSAI SHOW 

Saturday - Sunday. May 26 - 28; 
9:30am-5pm; Ayres Hall 

Free with admission; members free 
The Santa Anita Bonsai Society will 
display trees trained to look like 



tgian 



nil be 



E COTTAGE 



THE QUEEN M 
OPEN HOUSE 

Sunday, May 27; 10am-3pm 

Free with admission; members free 
The cottage, with its marble terrace 
Victorian furnishings and treasure: 
provides a charming opportunity 
for the whole family to enjoy. 
Docent-led tours throughout the 
day. The companion Coach Barn an 
Train Depot also will be open. No 



talk on saving water in the garden 
and other sustainable practices. He 
will help you see the science behind 
the fashion so you can make good 
decisions for saving money and 

HaynesLandscaping.com 



• ARBORETUM ADVENTURES: 
FUN IN THE ROSE GARDEN 

Saturday, May 5; lOam-Noon; 
Rotunda 

See page 16 for details 

FAMILY FUN CLASSES: 
ANCIENT CAVE PAINTINGS 

Saturday, Mayl9; lOam-Noon; 
Rotunda 

$12 per family for members; $14 per 
family for non-members; Pre-registration 
required Please call 626-821-4623 or 
626-821-5897. 

Did you know that the oldest known 
paintings were created 35,000 years 
ago? Cave and rock paintings can be 
found all over the world, including 
Southern California, and give us 

living long before us. Mix up your 
own paint using natural pigments and 
create your own ancient (or modern) 
narrative, using symbols, patterns and 
primitive representations on a variety 



READING THE WESTERN 
LANDSCAPE BOOK CLUB; 
THE BOOK OF DEAD BIRD 
BY GAYLE BRANDEIS 

Wednesday, May 2; 7pm; 
Arboretum Library 

Free with admission; members free 



See 



^16 for 



PLANT INFORMATION: 
UNUSUAL, UNDER- 
APPRECIATED AND 
UNKNOWN PLANTS 

Wednesday, May 2; l:30-3pm; 
Plant Information Office 

Free with admission; members free 



• YOGA IN THE GARDEN 

Thursdays, May 3, 10, 17, 24; 
9:30-10:45am 

$30 members; $35 nonmemhers 
Instructor: Candyce Columbus 
See page 16 for details. 



• A LET'S MOVE! PROGRAM 



JUNE 



AT THE ARBORETUM 



Ayres Hall 

At the Southern California 
Hemerocallis and Amaryllis Society's 
annual show, you'll see daylilies in 
shades of yellow, red, white, salmon, 
orange, and bi-colors. The show will 
feature educational displays and 
demonstrations. Plants will be for sal 



INTERMEDIATE OBEDIENCE AT 
THE ARBORETUM 

Mondays, June 4-July 7; 
7pm-8pm; Event lawn 

$120 General Registration; $100 
Arboretum members and PHS adopters; 
$60 Arboretum PHS and volunteers; 

or^call the Behavior and Training Hotline, 
626-792-7151, ext. 155. 
This five-week course allows you 
and your dog to progress in your 

includes improved leash walking^ 
"leave it", sending your dog to bed, 
sitting for petting, prolonged stays, 
and establishing a more reliable recall. 
Opportunities will be given for you 
and your pet to train with higher levels 



ofdis 



and dis 



FERN AND EXOTIC PLANT 
SHOW AND SALE 

Saturday - Sunday, June 9 - 10; 
9am-4:30 pm; Ayres Hall 

The show will display more than 60 
varieties of ferns plus over 70 varieties 
of other plants, rare species and 
collectibles. Orchids, bromeliads, cacti, 
cycads, terrarium plants, begonias and 
tree ferns will be among the exotic 
plants featured. 



PASADENA POPS: THEY'RE 
PLAYING OUR SONG WITH 
LUCIE ARNAZ AND 
ROBERT KLEIN 

Saturday, June 16; 5:30pm picnic 
7:30pm concert 

To purchase tickets for the concerts, 
www.pasadenasymphony-pops.or 
call 626-793-7172. Arboretum mem 
receive a 10% discount off of regular 

See page 15 for details. 



• ORGANIC FRUIT AND 
VEGETABLE GARDENING 

Saturday, June 2; Noon-4pm; 
Bamboo Room 

$25 members; $30 nonmembers 
Instructor: Jill Morganelli 

vegetables organically in your hom 
garden! Vegetable gardens enhancf 



ifun 



of a 

•ity for all ages. This cl; 
seasonal production a 
iriety of topics. 



$25 members; $30 nonmembers 
Instructor: Steve Gerischer 
Come and learn about do-it-yoi 
techniques to create an Earth-f 
landscape that uses less water . 



BOOKWORMS: A FREE 
STORYTELLING PROGRAM: 
SCALES AND SHELLS 

Wednesday, June 6; 10am; 
Saturday, June 9; 2pm; 
Wednesday, June 20; 10am; 



IKEBANA 

Fridays, June 1 - July 20; 
ADVANCED: 9:30-ll:30am 
BASIC: ll:00am-12:30pm 
Bamboo Room 

$72 members/$87 non-members; 
$32 materials fee payable directly t 

Instructors: Reiko Kawamura & 
Kikkawa 

See page 16 for details. 

ART WORKSHOP 

Mondays, June 4-JuIy 23; 
9:30-ll:30am; Oak Room 

$35 members; $42 non-members 
See page 17 for details. 



PLANT INFORMATION: 
HOW TO PLAN AND PLANT 
A NON-ALLERGENIC GARDEN 

Wednesday, June 4; l:30-3pm; 
Plant Information Office 

READING THE WESTERN 
LANDSCAPE BOOK CLUB: 
W/SDOM SITS IN PLACES 
BY KEITH H. BASSO 

Wednesday, June 6; 7pm; 
Arboretum Library 

Free with admission; members free 
See page 16 for details. 



• YOGA IN THE GARDEN 

Thursdays, June 7, 14, 21, 28; 
9:30-10:45am 

$30 members; $35 non-members 
Instructor: Candyce Columbus 
See page 16 for details. 



Main En 



mbersfree 



SUMMER NATURE CAMP 

SESSION 1: June 11 -15 
SESSION 2: June 18-22 
SESSION 3: June 25-29 

See page 9 for details. 



• A LET'S MOVE! PROGRAM 




For history buffs Joe Eisele and his 10-year-old son, 
Sam, coming to the Arboretum is like stepping into a time 
machine. Their house sits on land that was once part of 
Lucky Baldwin's Rancho Santa Anita. From their backyard 
they can view a significant portion of the garden. Joe and 
Diana became aware of the Arboretum "because it's in 
our backyard" soon after they moved to California from 
Minnesota six years ago. 

Sam recalls the first time he visited the Hugo Reid 
Adobe when he was four and asked his Mom, Diana, "Where 
is all the furniture?" Like any good neighbor, he and his dad 
have lent a helping hand to the Arboretum, assisting the 
restoration of the kiys, reed shelters built by native Tongva 
Indians who were the earhest known inhabitants of the land. 



"After Diana became involved at the Arboretum with the 
field trip program for K-to-12 students," Joe says, "I decided 
to get involved as well." Today, Diana is the volunteer chair of 
the school tours telephone reservations. She loves to see urban 
children enjoying their visits and the wildlife. Diana recalls 
one child saying "This is better than Disneyland!" and another 
exclaiming, "I'm gonna ask my mom and dad to bring me here 
again." 

Joe recently began his second three-year term as a trustee 
of the Los Angeles Arboretum Foundation, When it comes 
to the landscape and grounds, Sam may know it the best 
having spent every summer at Nature Camp since he was in 
first grade. His 15-year-old sister Alex, a swimmer, loves the 
Arboretum's water features especially the Meyberg Waterfall 
and Baldwin Lake. 

The family enjoys sharing the garden with family and 
friends. "The Arboretum is a tremendous attraction for our 
guests, who visit from out of the area," Joe says, "It shows 
the beauty and diversity of California." His must-see stop 
for visitors is the Queen Anne Cottage. Diana's is the orchid 
greenhouse. Both have Tallac Knoll next on their tour list. 

"We truly believe the Arboretum is an unknown jewel 
within Los Angeles," Joe says. "I hope everyone has a chance to 
enjoy it as much as we do." 0 



FALL FRIENDRAISERS 

the gardens on two beautiful Sundays in October to celebrate 
the launch of the new Arboretum Benefactors membership 
society. Gilbert Resendez, Board President, introduced the 
guests to this exciting new opportunity to support one of 

hand the wonderful improvements that are taking place 
at the Arboretum when they boarded a tram and took a 
private excursion up to Tallac Knoll. Richard Schulhof, CEO, 
provided a guided walk and talk of the secrets and surprises 
to be found on the knoll; including the opportunity to smell 



Above: (from left) Mr. and Mrs. Yoshio Fujwka, Richard 
Schulhof and Margaux Viera. George and Marcia Good 
relax at the cafe. 

fruit of the wampi tree. The Fall Friendraisers were a terrific 
launch for the new Arboretum Benefactors and a great 
opportunity to share the beauty and history of the gardens 
ivith both long-time and new friends. 0 



and events, as well as on purchases at the Garden and Gift Shop, and a 
www.arboretum.org, or call 626-821-3233. 

MEMORIALS & TRIBUTES 

Support the Arboretum with a special gift for a loved one. You can cele 
To give a gift of a commemorative bench or tree in the garden as a mer 



mcial advantages for you and your family by making an estate gift plan that includes the Los Angeles 
ation, a tax-exempt charity. By notifying us that you are including the Arboretum in your estate gift plai 
/ill. life insurance or trust, you will become a member of the Samuel Ayres Legacy Society 
ion. please call 626-821-3232. 



22 LOS ANGELES ARBORETUM AND BOTANIC GARDEN MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 



The I Arboretum 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN 




GARDEN & GIFT SHOP 

OPEN DAILY FROM 9AM - 4:30PM