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362.9786 
V3MA 
i 1979-80 



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STATE OF MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICES 

* REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION * 



REHABILITATION FACILITIES PLAN 
1979-80 ADDENDUM 

For The Establishment And Improvement Of 

REHABILITATION WORK-ORIENTED FACILITIES 
REHABILITATION MEDICALLY ORIENTED CENTERS 



by 



Walter R. Donaldson, Administrator 
Rehabilitative Services Division 



Helena, Montana 
October, 1979 



Montana Stale Library 



3 0864 1005 0376 5 



DISCRIMINATION PROHIBITED — 

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states: 

"No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of 
race, color, or national origin, be excluded from parti- 
cipation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected 
to discrimination under any program or activity receiving 
Federal financial assistance." 

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 states: 

"No otherwise qualified handicapped individual in the 
United States, as defined in section 7 (6), shall, solely 
be reason of his handicap, be excluded from the partici- 
pation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to 
discrimination under any program or activity receiving 
Federal financial assistance." 

Therefore, all programs and activities receiving financial assistance 

from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare must be operated 

in compliance with these Iftws. 



FORiWARD 

The 1978-79 Addendum of the Montana State Plan for Rehabilitation 
Facilities is a public document intended to be utilized in 
guiding and influencing the establishment and improvement 
of rehabilitation facilities within the state. "Rehabilitation 
Facility" in Montana means: 

1. The facility or host organization is legally 
constituted and the legal charter, constitution 
or official statement of purpose implies 

or directly states it provides rehabili- 
tation services. 

2. The major or primary purpose of the 
organization is to rehabilitate persons. 

3. The organization is able to provide multiple 
services in an integrated and individualized 
manner. 

4. It is anticipated that the organization 
will provide during the program year an 
official program which will be purchased 
under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 

In this Addendum attention will be paid only to rehabilitation 
facilities with which the Rehabilitative Services Division has a 
special investment, that is specifically the rehabilitation work 
oriented facilities and the rehabilitation medically oriented facility 
indicated on the enclosed map. Because the Addictive Diseases 
Bureau of the Department of Institutions is specifically involved 
in halfway house establishment, program maintenance and 
certifying as well as the granting of federal funds to such 
facilities, the Rehabilitative Services Division relates to 
such facilities only as vendors and occasionally as consultants 
in the certifying of such. 

This tenth annual Addendum will modify the original Montana 
State Plan for Rehabilitation Facilities and Workshops published 
in 1968. 



In accordance with the guidelines attached to the Commissioner's 
letter 68-41, dates June 18, 1968, this Addendum is designed to 
maintain the "State Plan" as a current and effective tool in 
notifying the population of Montana of two things: (1) the 
high quality rehabilitation facility services available to all 
individuals possessing physical and/or mental disabilities that 
are vocationally handicapping, and (2) the Rehabilitative Services 
Division's intent to support either directly via grants or in- 
directly through the purchase of vocational evaluation and work 
adjustment services what it considers to be the only key and 
necessary rehabilitation facilities in Montana. (See Appendix 
C) Those particular facilities are discussed in this state 
Facility Plan Addendum. It is hoped that this Addendum will 
fulfill these purposes and that the handicapped people of Montana 
will benefit from the much-needed services provided by these 
rehabilitation facilities, not only via the Rehabilitative 
Services Division, but under the auspices of other agencies 
also capable of singular and/or cooperative involvement in the 
purchase of services necessary for rehabilitation. 



^U. R. Donaldson 



C ' 

Administrator 

Rehabilitative Services Division 



HI ST OR X 

OF THE 

MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES PROGRAM 

A brief overview of the development of the rehabilitation 
facilities program in Montana will bring the reader into focus 
with the present situation. 

In 1966, in accordance with the 1965 amendments, an 
administrative staff position was approved for a person designated 
to plan, establish standards, and assure effective development 
and utilization of rehabilitation facilities within the state. 
In Montana, 'as in most states, the Rehabilitation Facilities 
Specialist was appointed to this position for the specific 
purpose of working with rehabilitation facil ities. 

In 1966, an application was submitted to the Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare, Vocational Rehabilitation 
Administration, for a Statewide Planning Grant. A Planning 
Director was hired, and a final report was submitted in 1968. 
The original Montana State Plan for Rehabilitation Facilities 
And Workshops was written as a result of the findings of the 
Statewide Planning surveys and was also published in 1968. 
The initial planning process for the State Plan was set up 
in four phases identified as follows: (1) preparatory activities, 

(2) inventory and utilization of rehabilitation facilities, 

(3) determination of needs, and (4) continuing activities. 
These phases are reflected in the publication of the original 
Facilities Plan in 1968, and continue to be ongoing as 
reflected in the subsequent annual addenda. 

1971 marked the beginning of a reorganization of state 
agencies. Due to such a movement, the Facilities Specialist 
responsibilities fell within the realm of the newly organized 
Special Projects Bureau administered by the Chief of Special 
Projects. Thus, in addition to being accountable for special 
projects and programs for the state rehabilitation agency, 
the Chief of that Bureau is responsible for being attentive 
to the state's needs in terms of the establishment, utilization, 
development, and improvement of rehabilitation facilities. 

TRENDS AND PLANNING RELATIONSHIPS 

As a result of the Executive Reorganization Act of 1971 
(Senate Bill 274) consolidation and coordination of agencies, 
and more importantly, of purpose, have taken place. Reflections 
of such are the attempts at planning and organization by state 
agencies for rehabilitation facilities. 



In January, 1972, a number of state agencies and others 
considered to be human resource agencies were invited by the 
Rehabilitative Services Division to participate in a two and 
one-half day seminar to discuss methods of financing rehabili- 
tation work facilities in Montana, utilizing cooperation between 
various state-federal programs and the private sector, as well 
as purchase-of-service arrangements. Agencies and programs 
in attendance were the Rehabilitative Services Division (RSD), 
the Social Assistance Field Division, WIN, Social Security, 
Vocational Education, Montana Association for Retarded Citizens, 
Veterans Administration, Model Cities, Mental Health, Aging 
Services Division, Eastern Montana College Rehabilitation 
Counseling Program, Aftercare Division, State Department of 
Public Instruction, Special Education, Governor's Manpower 
Planning, Medical Services, Regional Office Rehabilitation 
Services, Disability Determination Bureau, Crime Control 
Commission, Facility Directors and Board Members from Helena, 
Billings, Butte, and Eastern Montana. Some of these agency 
names have changed during continuing state reorganization 
efforts. The concepts of block funding and set-aside 
allocations to these facilities were considered. An Action 
Committee was formulated to implement the findings of the 
seminar. 

The rehabilitation work facility directors left the seminar 
with the charge to market their products to all appropriate 
agencies in attendance and others. As its participation on 
the Action Committee, the Rehabilitative Services Division 
did survey its counselors (purchasers of services) on 
rehabilitation work facility usage to determine the feasibility 
of block funding. It was determined to be impractical at that 
time or for fiscal years 1973 and 1974. Since then block funding 
has been implemented once. Unless the RSA Regional 
Office opinion of such, changes to one of proponent, block 
funding will not be utilized again. 

During fiscal year 1974 the Developmental Disabilities (DD) 
authority was transferred from the Department of Institutions 
to the Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services. Such 
a move has provided for more community utilization of 
rehabilitation facilities on behalf of the developmental ly 
disabled, now the largest users of such facilities. 

The effects of 1974 legislation were felt by rehabilitation 
facilities, and new legislation, pro-these facilities, initiated 
the following activities: 

I. A certification procedure, utilizing the survey 
and accreditation procedure of the Commission 
on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). 

II. A $200,000 Extended Employment Program. 

III. The negotiation of state contracts for the 

purchase of products not exceeding five thousand 
dollars ($5,000) with sheltered workshops and 
work activity centers without complying with 
competitive bid practices. 



These three (3) products of the 1974 legislature were a 
result of the efforts of the newly organized Montana Association 
of Rehabilitation Facilities (MARF). Since that 1974 legislative 
session, the history of the rehabilitation facility movement 
in Montana has been contained in the implementation of federal 
and state facility legislation and in the well organized efforts 
of MARF. 

Facility certification after CARF accreditation has been 
ongoing for five (5) years. The eight (8) recognized rehabilitation 
facilities have been certified. The current policy regarding 
facility accreditation and certification is stated in Appendix A, 

The Extended Employment Program in Montana was initiated 
as a result of lobby efforts by the rehabilitation facility 
directors and concerned parents and guardians of individuals 
who could benefit from these services. The policy describing 
the program intent for Extended Employment is contained in 
Appendix B. 

This particular program was appropriated $200,000.00 for 
implementation. The first year of the program, $75,000.00 of 
the $200,000.00 was given to the Developmental Disabilities 
Program to pay for extended employment services for only the 
Developmental ly Disabled. The remaining $125,000.00 was spent 
for such services on behalf of disabled indi\/iduals who did not 
qualify for any other funding source to support them in Extended 
Employment. Approximately 50 disabled individuals in five (5) 
facilities benefited from the services the first year. The 
second year of the program, the total $200,000.00 was set aside 
for all disabilities (other than Title XX eligible Developmentally 
Disabled individuals) needing the services. Approximately 75 
individuals in six (6) facilities benefited from the service. 
Again in fiscal year 1977, 75 individuals in six (6) facilities 
benefits from the Extended Employment service. 65 individuals in 
seven (7) facilities were recipients of Extended Employment 
Services in state fiscal year 1978 and 60 individuals were 
Extended Employment recipients in state fiscal year 1979. 
This program will be considered again for continuation by the 
1981 state legislature. 

During fiscal year 1975 an application was initiated to 
provide each of six (6) rehabilitation facilities with Innovation 
and Expansion (I & E) funds to hire a placement specialist to do 
job development, job placement and followup for the facility 
clients, with an emphasis on the severely disabled. That application 
was funded and the project began July 1, 1975. During the first 
year of that project, the facility job placement staff placed 
163 handicapped people, of which 64% were severely disabled. 
Ill handicapped people (75 severely disabled) were placed the 
second year of the project. 120 individuals benefited from the 
job development, job placement and followup services during the 
third and final year of this project. A similar I & E project 
was initiated October 1, 1978 but in two new rehabilitation 
facilities. 



Three of the older rehab facilities involved in the-original 
I & E job placement grant are now under contract to the Rehabili- 
tative Services Division to continue the provision of job 
development, job placement and followup activities on behalf of 
vocational rehabilitation clients. Those five job placement 
efforts have netted 193 placements for the state fiscal ending 
June 30, 1979. 

Also, during fiscal year 1976 all eight rehabilitation 
facilities initiated program evaluation within their facilities 
to begin the measurement of overall program effectiveness and 
administration. Via these systems, data has been and will 
continue to be provided quarterly to the Rehabilitative Services 
Division in a recently revised Management Information System 
(MIS) format (Attachment D). The newly revised format is 
Attachment D. This data allows the Division to make knowledgeable 
decisions regarding facility usage and funding. 

While the facility legislation eliminating the necessity 
for competitive bidding on state agency purchases up to $5,000.00 
has been on the books since 1974, the use of this possibility 
by the state has not been broad based. Because of inactivity 
in this area, MARF was a lobbying force for state "set-aside" 
legislation during the 1977 session. The legislature did pass 
a bill requiring state department and other political subdivisions 
of the state to purchase products and services from sheltered 
workshops and work activity centers. This bill has been signed 
into law, and procedures for implementation do exist. Still 
necessary for implementation are the critical components of money 
and then manpower. 



REHABILITATION FACILITY ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Due to the dictates of Executive Reorganization, no 
Rehabilitation Facility Advisory Council existed for four (4) 
fiscal years, nor could exist until created by the Director 
of the Social and Rehabilitation Services Department, or the 
Governor, or officials of an executive department (other than 
a department head), and in the latter case, only if federal law 
or regulations require the creation of a facility advisory council 
as a condition for the receipt of federal facility funds. 

However, during fiscal year 1976 an Advisory Council for 
the Rehabilitation Services Division was appointed by the Governor. 
This Council (with a MARF representative as a member) for the 
Division is advisory in all phases of the vocational rehabilitation 
program. Thus, it is advisory to the rehabilitation facility 
movement in Montana. As advisor to the facility movement, the 
role of the Council is as follows: 

I. Purpose 

A. Represent public and private interests as 
they pertain to rehabilitation facility 
planning. 

B. Serve in an advisory capacity to the rehabili- 
tation agency facility staff. 

C. Advise ar,d assist in the develooment of a 
continuing State Plan for Rehabilitation 
Facilities within Montana. 

II. Function 

A. The focus of council concern will be the 
present and future rehabilitation facility 
needs of the disabled people in Montana. 

B. The Council will advise on: 

1. Current status of rehabilitation 
facilities in Montana. (See 
Attachment C - 1976 Council 
Resolution) 

2. Immediate and long-range needs 
of Montana rehabilitation 
facilities. 



3. Requirements and standards 
for continuing program to 
evaluate such needs. 

4. The effectiveness of programs 
developed to meet these needs. 

The Advisory Council, in addition, will be 
concerned with the following: 

1. Sources of information to the 
planning staff as to problem 
areas of rehabilitation service 
deficiency. 

2. Methods of maintaining quality 
service and effective utilization 
of centers. 

3. Upgrading and expanding existing 
facilities prior to new development. 

4. Rehabilitation facility need 
based on population, geography, 
and disability factors. 

5. Development of a priority list 
for rehabilitation facilities. 

6. Methods of implementation of 
final recommendations to solve 
current needs. 











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BILLINGS SHELTERED WORKSHOP 

3116 First Avenue North 
Billings, MT 59102 

The Billings Sheltered Workshop, Inc., is a private, non-profit 
corporation which has been providing habilitation and rehabilitation 
to the disabled since January, 1971. It is governed by a nine (9) 
member Board of Directors. A well-qualified staff of 24 persons 
provide the following services. 

Work Adjustment Training 

This is an individualized training program of developing 
good worker habits while the client is engaged in real work, 
producing marketable products and services in an actual work 
setting, supported by vocational counseling and classroom activities. 

Clients referred for this service should be considered 
competitively employable in the near future. 

Services in this program include training in general appearance, 
attendance and punctuality, worker attitude, worker characteristics, 
work performance, work quantity and work quality. Client progress 
in these areas is evaluated in individual monthly staffing 
sessions. The client also is exposed to a variety of work 
environments in the auto detail, woodworking, needle trades or 
janitorial areas. For persons lacking occupational goals, 
vocational exploration activities are offered. As the client 
becomes competitively employable, he is referred for job seeking 
skills training in preparation for placement. After a client 
is placed, a one-year follow-up is provided to ensure successful 
placement. 

Extended Employment 

This service is designed for those persons who are not considered 
to be competitively employable in the near future. A wider spectrum 
of services is offered to these clients, ranging from training 
in such areas as personal hygiene, functional academics, appropriate 
interpersonal communication and behaviors to skill training in 
the real -work production area. 

Progress of these clients is reviewed quarterly in individual 
staffing sessions. 

Vocational Evaluation 

Vocational Evaluation is a diagnostic service designed to 
assess a person's work potential and work-related behavior. The 
evaluation process uses a standard but comprehensive system which 
includes the Valpar Work Component Series, JEVS job samples, 
dexterity tests, the Singer-Graflex system and supplemental 
psychometric tests. Clients referred to this service come from 
the Rehabilitative Services Division, School District #2, as well 
as occasional referrals from the Worker's Compensation Division, 
Vo-Tech, the Veterans' Administration and private insurance carriers. 



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BUTTE SHELTERED WORKSHOP 

207 S. Montana Street 
Butte, MT 59701 



The Butte Sheltered Workshop is a private, non-profit corp- 
oration that has been providing services for handicapped people 
for over twelve years. The Workshop is governed by a twenty-one 
member board of directors. The services are carried out by a 
nineteen member staff, composed of an executive director, voca- 
tional evaluator, client services coordinator, contracts manager, 
vocational training supervisor, executive secretary, three depart- 
ment supervisors, assistant supervisor, food service instructor, 
four special ed teachers, and four clerical personnel. 

Programs 

The existing program of services offered by the Workshop 
consists of the following: (1) vocational evaluation, (2) work 
adjustment training, (3) food service training, (4) extended em- 
ployment, and (5) prevocational skills training. 

Vocational Evaluation 

The purposes of the evaluation phase of the Workshop are 
as follows: 

1. To assess a person's functioning. 

2. To assess his/her potential functioning. 

3. To determine if potential functioning, when 
obtained, will be adequate for employment. 

4. To determine the remediation procedures that will 
enable the person to move toward his/her potential 
functioning. 

5. To determine, from the attitude patterning, 
the type of employment for which the client 
is best suited. 

Various methods are used in the evaluation process, such as; 
work samples (available via the Singer Graflex and Valpar 
systems), psychometric tests, interviews and actual work try- 
outs, both within the agency and also on outside job slots. 

Work Adjustment 

Work adjustment is a training/treatment process utilizing 
individual and group work, or work related activities, to 
assist individuals in understanding the meaning, value and 
demands of work; to modify or develop functional capacities, as 
required, in order to assist individuals toward their optimum 
level of vocational development. 



13 



Food Service Training 

The purpose of the food service program is to instruct handicapped 
men and women in food service areas, such as, kitchen helpers, 
salad girls/boys, steam table helpers, pot scrubbers, chef's 
helpers and in kitchen maintenance. 

The clients are trained in the following aspects of food 
service: 

1. Personal hygiene and the importance of good grooming. 

2. Rules of conduct, relationship with other 
employees and employers. 

3. Safety rules. 

4. Job opportunities. 

5. Care and use of equipment, stationary pieces, small 
appliances, and hand tools. 

6. Sanitation in food handling. 

7. Food preparation, salads, beverages, 
vegetables, baked products, desserts, 
soups, and etc. 

8. Methods of service, table setting, etc. 

9. Kitchen maintenance, dish washing, cleaning 
of all equipment, floors, tables, etc. 

The type of instructional methods to be used are demonstration, 
for the most part, accompanied by observation and instruction, 
supervised job instruction, repetition, audio-visual materials 
and, if feasible, some printed instruction. 

The program is designed to provide actual situations as 
realistic as possible, that a client would find in restaurants, 
hospitals, and institutions. It provides on-the-job training 
as they assist in preparing one meal a day for approximately 
50 people. 

Extended Employment 

Extended Employment provides an opportunity for those clients 
who are not ready for competitive employment to improve their 
work skills. Examples of the work that clients perform in the 
extended employment program are: packaging of nuts and bolts, 
which includes weighing, sorting, counting, labeling, assembling, 
stapling, folding, and etc. There is also the fabrication of 
redwood planters and other products made of wood. Sewing, arts 
and crafts, and miscellaneous contracts provide a wide variety 
of paid work experience for these people in the work activities area. 



14 



Functional Living Skills 

This phase of the service provided by the Workshop, gives 
the clients training in those skills, other than specific vocational 
skills that are necessary to decrease dependency. General vocational 
prerequisite skills are taught, as well as, basic personal care, 
cooking, budgeting, shopping, self help techniques, with regard 
to obtaining assistance from agencies, such as, banks, hospitals 
or social services departments. Community awareness is provided 
through this program, in the form of tours and excursions which 
broaden the experiences of the clients and give them Information 
on where to look for other services. 

Placement 

Preparation of clients for competitive employment is attained 
through the programs described above. At the point when a client 
has achieved the majority of skills for a job, he/she is referred 
to the placement department where a suitable job can be found 
for him/her. 

The Butte Sheltered Workshop has received excellent cooperation 
from the Southwestern Regional Mental Health Clinic and Easter 
Seal Center, School District #1 Special Ed Department, and other 
local agencies in a joint effort to provide the best possible 
service for the handicapped. 

The Workshop is certified by the U.S. Department of Labor, 
to provide evaluation and training services and work activities. 
The commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities 
has given the Workshop a three-year accreditation. 

Funding 

Funding of the Workshop is by the Rehabilitative Services 
Division, Developmental Disabilities Division, United Way, donations 
and federal and state grants. 



15 



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EASTERN MONTANA INDUSTRIES 

P.O. Box 636 
Miles City, MT 59301 

During the eighth year of its operation, this private, non-profit 
facility is offering the following service system. 

Work Activities Center 

The Work Activities Center provides for Vocational Training, 
Independent Living Skills Training, and Vocational Training in a 
wide variety of skills. Vocational Training is the primary emphasis 
of the program but it is supplemented by Independent Living Skills 
Training and Intensive Training. 

Intensive Training Unit 

The Intensive Training Unit (ITU) was created in late FY '77 
to meet individual training needs for skills prerequisite to entry 
to one of the other programs or advancement to another step of training. 
An extremely wide variety of programs are available to all Work 
Activity Clients (WAC), ranging from basic self-care skills, 
elementary on-task behavior, to functional academic training. The 
ITU also acts as an intake and orientation program for new WAC clients. 
Each newly enrolled client spends his or her first two weeks to a 
month at EMI in the ITU where precise observation and evaluation 
are used to develop the Individualized Habilitation Plan. 

Independent Living Skills Training 

Independent Living Skills Training covers the whole gamut of 
skill training. Basically, this is broken into two areas; Self- 
Management Skills and Communication Skills. Self-Management Skills 
include: Food preparation, budgeting and money management, time 
telling, grooming, socialization, recreation, laundry, use and upkeep 
of kitchen appliances, house cleaning, telephone usage, traffic sign 
recognition, and general hygiene skills. 

Communication Skills include speech, language, writing, and 
reading. 

Speech Pathology 

The Speech Pathologists work with a multi-disciplinary team, 
providing diagnostic and therapeutic services to speech and/or 
language impaired clients. The full-range of services, involving 
the development of home programs, teacher and guardian conferences, 
audiological screening, and in-service training are available. 



17 



Work Adjustment Training 

Work Adjustment Training (WAT) takes the form of teaching "Positive 
Worker Traits" rather than concentrating on developing specific 
vocational skills. The training focuses more on the client's acquisition 
of Positive Worker Traits such as: punctuality, attendance, good personal 
hygiene, cooperativeness, high quality and quantity of work, and positive 
work attitudes. This emphasis will help the client adapt to any work 
setting because these traits are common to all work environments. 
Additionally, WAT clients are placed in competitive job situations, 
and receive classroom training in Job Seeking Skills, World of Work, 
and when appropriate. Adult Basic Education and Drivers Education 
are also available to clients in this program. 

Job Placement 

The Job Placement Program at Eastern Montana Industries is a 
program of Vocational Training and training in job seeking and job 
survival skills for the handicapped. The goal of this program 
is the placement of handicapped individuals in competitive employment 
and ultimately their assimilation into the main-stream of everyday 
life. 

Vocational Evaluation Program 

This program is a Work Sample Evaluation System. This process 
assesses the client's productive potential through simulated work 
stations. Clients are exposed to a number of simulated job tasks 
they might encounter on a job, which range in complexity from 
simple assembly through complex tasks which require reasoning, 
judgment, and overall organizational ability. The client is then 
rated on attitude, speed, quality, dependability, and punctuality. 
This process determines physical skills, and areas of job interests. 
An attempt is made to realistically assess the vocational 
potential of each client. This program remains mobile in order to 
serve clients in their home towns, and covers an area encompassing 
over 90,000 square miles. 

Group Home Program 

The Group Home is a seven day a week, full-time program involving 
two full time Group Home Operators and a Relief Group Home Operator. 
The operators are involved in the training of eight clients in 
personal care skills, self-help skills, and community living skills. 
Training includes areas such as dressing, grooming, bathing, cooking, 
laundering, money management, use of community services such as 
transportation and recreation. Again, the emphasis of the home 
is to individualize the program to aid the client in acquiring the 
skills necessary to become an active, integral member of a home 
living situation. 

Transportation 

Transportation services are available to all individuals 
participating in any program at Eastern Montana Industries, for the 
purposes of, but not limited to, transportation to and from the 
facility, medical and dental appointments, and any ancillary 
services provided for in the resident community. 



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EASTER SEAL ADULT TRAINING CENTER 

4400 Central Avenue 
Great Falls, MT 59401 

The Easter Seal Adult Training Center is a training facility 
serving developmental ly disabled, (the mentally retarded, epileptic 
and cerebral palsied), physically disabled, and emotionally disabled 
adults. The program is funded in part by a contract between the 
Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults of Montana, Inc. 
and the State of Montana, Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services 
(SRS). The Easter Seal Society is the program vendor with 
Adult Training being a division of Easter Seal's statewide services. 
Other funding is provided through Easter Seal contributed income, 
local school district service fees, income generated in the Adult 
Training Commercial Area and other sources. 

The Adult Training Center is responsible to the Easter Seal 
Society Board of Directors and to the local Adult Training Advisory 
Board. The Adult Training Center itself is administered by one 
Director and 30 other staff consisting of: Three Division Directors, 
one Director of Manufacturing and Sales, one Job Placement Specialist, 
four (4) Department Managers, nine (9) Production Supervisors, 
five (5) Supplemental Service Trainers, one Assistant Supervisor, 
one Clerk-Trainee, one Administrative Assistant, one Secretary, 
one Bookkeeper, a Chief Engineer, and one Custodial Assistant. 
Other staff provided by the Easter Seal Society for use by the 
Adult Training Center are: One (1) personnel officer, and one (1) 
accountant. 

Program and Progress Reports 

The mission of the Adult Training Center is to provide community- 
based vocational development, placement and supportive services to 
vocationally handicapped adults who are physically and/or mentally 
disabled in order to maximize the individual's vocational potential 
and earned income ability. It is further the mission to maintain 
responsiveness to the current and future needs of handicapped 
individuals. Referrals to the Adult Training Center may come through 
a variety of agencies including: The Montana Department of SRS, 
School District, and others. The community-wide needs assessment 
team is responsible to finally determine the most appropriate program 
of services for the client. A facility screening committee assists 
in initiating the service. 

Work Activity Program 

The goal of the Work Activity Program is to provide extended 
training in pre-vocational , work oriented production training and 
supportive services to vocationally handicapped adults who are 
physically and/or mentally disabled in order to maximize their 
earnings while in a sheltered or semi-sheltered work environment 
and their capabilities to progress into a less restrictive training 
or employment environment. 



20 



As appropriate, clients are exposed to real work situations 
with varying degrees of supervision in order to provide training in 
specific work skills, work attitudes and behaviors appropriate to 
a work setting. Clients also participate in an individualized 
supportive service program designed to remediate deficiencies in 
a wide range of work related skills such as money recognition and 
use, time telling, hygiene and basic health, safety and job seeking 
skills. 

Work Adjustment 

The goal of the Work Adjustment Program is to provide short-term 
work habit training, job seeking skills training, career development 
and placement to vocationally handicapped adults who are physically and/or 
mentally disabled in order to maximize their earned income ability. 

This program exposes clients to real or near real work situations 
in order to teach specific work habits such as punctuality, accurate 
direction following, attendance to task and appropriate employee/employer 
and co-worker relationships. Personal and work adjustment classes 
are also emphasized in order to develop appropriate personal 
work habits and attitudesand remediate deficiencies in specific 
work related skill areas such as money management, safety practices, 
basic health and job seeking skills. 

Placement services are available for clients ready for competitive 
employment or further training. Follow-up services are provided for a 
minimum of 60 days after placement. 



21 



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o 



FLATHEAD INDUSTRIES FOR THE HANDICAPPED 

305 Third Avenue East 
Kali spell, MT 59901 

Flathead Industries for the Handicapped (FIFTH) is a 
community-based, private, non-profit corporation whose purpose 
is to provide habilitation and rehabilitation services, including 
living skill and employment skill training, residential and 
supportive services to handicapped adults and children in order 
to enhance their integration into the community and to assist 
them in obtaining an earned income. 

Flathead Industries operates it's programs under the principles 
of normalization and seeks to assist all clients in their efforts 
to attain their maximum potential in the least restrictive setting 
available. The emphasis of instruction and training is placed 
upon the individual needs of each client. Individual needs 
are assessed and prioritized by Flathead Industries staff and 
the Individual Habilitation Planning (IHP) team. Each habilitation 
plan contains long-term and short-term goals for each instructional 
or training component. Instruction is provided in accordance 
with the Individual Habilitation Plan (IHP), and Individual 
Program Plans (IPP's) and informal training goals are developed 
accordingly. Programs are reviewed at least quarterly and clients 
move in a step-by-step fashion, as they meet specific graduation 
(entrance/exit) criteria within each program. 

Specific Day Services and programs provided by Flathead 
Industries include the following: 

Day Services 

A. Employment Skills Training 

1. Prevocation Skills : Work performance, quality of work, 
quantity of work, job-coping skills, job attitude, work 
tolerance, punctuality, attendance, use of time 
clock, following instructions, staying on task, 
working under supervision, assembly, packaging, 

and obtaining employment. 

2. Work Activity : Involvement in real work tasks 
designed to provide vocational training which 
will assist the handicapped individual in 
realizing his/her greatest potential and 
movement into the least restrictive setting 
available. Actual work tasks may include 
assembly, packaging, rag-cutting, sanding, 
thrift store production worker, recycling 
center worker, retail sales, customer service, 
janitorial work tasks, etc... Clients involved 
in work activity are reimbursed with pay in 
accordance with Department of Labor guidelines. 



23 



There are two stages of Work Activity 
training. Stage I clients consist of those 
individuals who are lower-functioning and 
require greater emphasis on prevocational 
skills training. They receive their training 
at the Work Training Center. Stage II clients 
consist of those individuals who have met the 
entrance criteria for Stage II, and consequently 
require a lesser degree of emphasis on pre- 
vocational skills. More focus is placed on 
real work skills. This training normally 
takes place at our Thrift Store and Recycling 
Center operations. 

B. Basic Skills Training 

1. Basic Education Skills : Reading, writing, 
basic math, time-telling, money concepts, 
sexual development and personal hygiene, 
attending skills. 

2. Community Life Skills: Money and financial 
management, budgeting, nutrition, social 
behaviors, self-care, communication: use of 
telephone, meal planning and preparation, 
community mobility. 

3. Other Skil 1 s : Assertiveness training; motor 
skills development, recreation, hobbies, 

use of leisure time, and recreational field 
outings. 

C. Semi -Independent Living Skills Training 

1. Direct Client Training: Includes formal and 
informal training provided by out-reach 
trainers as well as instructional staff at 
the Work Training Center. The primary 
focus of training includes the following: 
meal planning and cooking, domestic skills, 
self-help and self-care skills, use of 
community resources, community mobility, 
budgeting, and finances, home and community 
safety, social skills, use of leisure time, 
shopping and use of telephone. 

2. Service Coordination : Includes all staff 
efforts in assisting each individual 
client in his/her effort to locate, obtain 
and maintain the necessary professional 
and community services which might support 
their continued stay in lesser restrictive 
residential environment. 



24 



3. Resource and Support : This refers to those 
staff functions which are not direct client 
training or service coordination functions. 
Included here are: IHP meetings, staff 
meetings, staff training, record-keeping, 
parent contact, transportation, counseling, 
locating residential alternatives and recreation. 

Residential Services 

A. Adult Group Homes 

1. Daily Living Skills Training : Includes formal 
and informal training in self-help, self-care, 
grooming and hygiene, care of clothing, 
domestic skills, personal identification, 
domestic skills, home safety and first aid, 
meal planning and cooking, use of household 
appliances, money management, shopping, 

use of telephone, community mobility and 
awareness. 

2. Social/Recreation Skills Training : Includes 
formal and informal training in personal 
care, etiquette, recreation, hobbies, use 

of leisure time and interaction with peers. 

B. Childrens' Group Home 

1. Daily Living Skills Training : Includes formal 
and informal training in self-help, self-care, 
hygiene and grooming, self-feeding, toileting, 
interaction with peers, domestic skills, 
socialization and recreation. 

2. Basic Skil Is Training : Includes attending 
skills, sensory motor skill developnent 
and functional communication. 

Other Services 

A. Respite Care - These services include in-home and out-of-home 
care for developmental ly disabled persons for temporary periods 

of time in order to relieve natural home and foster home parents. 
The emphasis of this program is to assist in the identification 
of families in need of service, and consequent utilization 
of services. 

B. Transportation - Flathead Industries does not provide 
a transportation service for its present client population. 
However, it does presently provide this service for one client 
who resides in an outlying area. The purpose of providing 
this service is to insure a client's involvement in a work 
activity training program for developmental ly disabled adults. 
Flathead Industries recognizes the need to provide transportation 
services to those handicapped individuals in outlying areas. 
However, expansion of this service is contingent upon additional 
funding resources. 



25 



Flathead Industries' programs and services are provided 
at the following locations: 



Work Training Center 
305 3rd Avenue East 
Kali spell , Montana 59901 
PH: 755-7656 

Semi-Ind. Living Apartments 
330 5th Avenue East 
Kali spell, Montana 59901 
PH: 257-6076 



Recycling Center 
56 3rd Avenue W.N. 
Kal i spell , Montana 
PH: 755-3280 



59901 



FIFTH Thrift Store 
55 4th Avenue W.N. 
Kali spell , Montana 59901 
PH: 755-3842 

Winterhawk Group Home 
168 Lawrence Lane 
Kalisoell , Montana 59901 
PH: 755-9792 

Childrens' Group Home 
202 Kirsten Drive 
Kali spell , Montana 59901 
PH: 257-5092 



Sponsored Group Homes: 



Loutherback Group Home 
538 5th Avenue East 
Kali spell , Montana 59901 
PH: 257-3469 
Service Provider: 
Shirley Loutherback 

Schweigert Group Home 

423 6th Avenue West 

Kali spell, Montana 59901 

PH: 257-4173 

Service Provider: 

Flo Schweigert 

The following Vocational Rehabilitation Services are 
offered: 

A. Vocational Evaluation 

On December 5, 1977 Flathead Industries began providing 
Vocational Evaluation services to clients of the Montana 
Rehabilitative Services Division. The program is presently 
being funded by a Section 110 grant through the Division on 
a 20% match basis, and is located at 55 4th Avenue W.N. 
in Kal i spell . 

Vocational Evaluation can be defined as a systematic 
process that utilizes real or simulated work as the focal 
point for determing an individual's work skills and work 
potential. It incorporates medical, psychological, social, 
vocational, cultural, educational and economic data to 
assist clients in their vocational development. Vocational 
Evaluation is a comprehensive assessment of an individual's 
work skills, abilities, attitudes, behaviors, interests 
and needs; and provides guidance to promote self-understanding 
and assist in vocational decision-making, and recommendations 
to further vocational development. Evaluation planning is 
individualized to specific referral questions and the client's 
abilities, needs and goals. Results are then applied to the 
client's living environment and optimum functioning potential. 



26 



The services provided through Vocational Evaluation 
are aimed at persons between the ages of 16 and 65 who 
have a disability which presents a vocational handicap, 
and who appear to demonstrate some vocational potential. 
Vocational Evaluation may also be a useful tool in determining 
an individual's vocational potential, need for special 
services, or for habilitation planning. 

B. Work Adjustment Training 

Vocational Rehabilitation clients, who undergo a vocational 
evaluation can be referred for Work Adjustment Training, 
based on evaluation recommendations and the D.V.R. counselor's 
discretion. The WAT program is designed for those clients 
who have specific deficits which interfere with their ability 
to obtain and/or maintain competitive employment. Work 
Adjustment generally lasts from 3 to 6 months, and is designed 
to eliminate these deficits and teach needed competencies. 
Clients are individually assessed as to their need for each 
service component. 

Each Work Adjustment Client is scheduled for a combination 
of the above service components, based on his/her needs. 
The services in which the client participates, change as do 
clients needs. As Work Adjustment Training nears termination, 
and the client becomes work-ready for competitive employment, 
the emphasis shifts toward placement. Placement efforts 
are coordinated with the D.V.R. counselor and the Montana 
State Job Service. Flathead Industries staff and/or the 
client contact potential employers to aid in placement. 
Also, the Want Ads are screened daily for potential jobs. 

C. Extended Employment 

In contrast with Work Adjustment Training, Extended 
Employment is designed for clients who require longer term 
sheltered employment and cannot become adequately competent 
for competitive employment within six months. Extended 
Employment provides sheltered employment slots primarily 
for those people who don't qualify for Developmental Disabilities 
(Title XX) funding. 

All of the services listed for Work Adjustment Training 
are available to Extended Employment clients when appropriate, 
but goals tend to be at a more basic level. In addition, 
social/recreational classes and activities are provided, 
as these clients tend to function less independently during 
their free time. 



27 



D. Job Development, Job Placement, and Job Follow-Up Program 

The purpose of Placement Services is to assist Vocational 
Rehabilitation clients in obtaining competitive employment 
appropriate to their interests, aptitudes and handicapping 
conditions. This includes developing employment opportunities 
in the community, providing job seeking and job keeping skills 
training to clients, career counseling, and providing follow 
up services after the client is placed into employment. 
On-the-job training, as sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation, 
is also coordinated as a part of the job placement service. 

Job development requires regular, systematic communication 
with potential employers in the community. This includes 
but is not limited to the following: 1) informing the 
employer of the advantages of hiring the handicapped 2) 
communicating the philosophy and objectives of Flathead 
Industries' training programs as well as the rehabilitation 
process, and 3) identifying available jobs, including the 
specific skills and aptitudes required for successful 
performance in each position. The placement process is 
built on the foundation of good job development and positive 
communication with the business community. The process is 
basically a matter of matching a client with a suitable 
job. A review of the client's vocational evaluation and 
other pertinent referral information enables the placement 
specialist, working with the client and referral agent, to 
develop a placement plan. Specific training in job-seeking 
skills and on-the-job training are both available if 
required and are coordinated as a part of all placement 
services. After a client has been employed, the placement 
specialist continues regular contact with the client and the 
employer, assisting with adjustment problems as they become 
apparent. Follow-up services, including formal written 
reports on client progress, continue for one-year. Written 
reports are filed with Vocational Rehabilitation at 2 weeks, 
2 months, six months and after one year from the time of 
initial placement. By maintaining supportive contact for at 
least one year, the placement specialist is available to assist 
in the process of upgrading a client in his job. Through 
the "post employment" program sponsored by Vocational 
Rehabilitation, on-the-job training is available to prepare 
a client for higher paying, more responsible positions. 

E. Community Living Skills Outreach Training Project 

The Community Living Skills (CLS) Outreach Training 
Project represents an attempt to provide qualitative, "hands 
on", training and assistance to handicapped individuals 
within the community in which they reside. It is specifically 
geared toward those individuals who are entering, re-entering 
or nearing readiness for entry into competitive or sheltered 
employment, and who are in need of outreach assistance in 
order to maintain themselves either in their job or within 
the community as a whole. 



28 



Specific areas of training will include orientation and 
training in any one or more of the following: 

Community Mobility and Awareness 

Meal Planning and Cooking 

Nutrition 

Hygiene & Grooming 

Identification and Utilization of Resources 

Budgeting and Money Management 

Effective and Responsible Use of Leisure Time 



29 



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HELENA REHABILITATION INDUSTRIES 

1325 Helena Avenue 
Helena, MT 59601 

Helena Rehabilitation Industries is located in Helena, Montana 
with it's main offices at 1325 Helena Avenue, a wood products 
manufacturing plant at 1820 Lyndale and a Shoe Repair Training 
Center at 1421 Helena Avenue. 

The facility is a private, non-profit corporation administered 
by a Board of Directors. 

The overall mission, or goal, of Helena Rehabilitation Industries 
is to assist intellectually, emotionally, physically, socially, 
educationally and vocationally handicapped persons achieve their 
maxinu- level of economic, physical and social independence 
througn the provision of evaluation, employabil ity development, 
extended employment, placement and other related support services. 
In order to accomplish the agency's mission, Helena Rehabilitation 
Industries has a staff of 35 persons who bring to the clients 
served over 115 years of related education beyond high school 
and a combined total of approximately 181 years of experience 
in working with handicapped persons. 

The following is a description of all program offerings 
at Helena Rehabilitation Industries. 

I. Vocational Evaluation and Career Development 

The goal of the Vocational Evaluation Program at Helena 
Rehabilitation Industries is to help the client select an 
occupation appropriate to his needs and to outline the steps 
by which this occupation can be achieved. 

This program uses a battery of occupational ly-oriented 
tests which assess an individual's achievement levels, mental 
ability, aptitudes, dexterities and other skills as these relate 
to the world of work. With such instruments, general occupational 
strengths and weaknesses can be ascertained. The Hester Evaluation 
System and selected work samples from the Singer and Valpar systems 
are then administered to pinpoint the job families in which the 
client would have the greatest chance to succeed. Accompanying 
the testing and the job samples are observations of behavior 
that predict the client's performance in the occupations simulated 
by job samples. This includes observations of the client's 
organizational skills, ability to take instruction and criticism, 
and other skills required to successfully obtain and hold a job. 

Vocational evaluation takes 5 to 10 days to complete, 
depending on the abilities of the person being evaluated. Upon 
completion of the evaluation, an exit interview between the client 
and evaluator is held. The general and specific employment 
strengths and weaknesses are discussed and, upon approval of 
the client, and the referring Vocational Rehabilitation counselor, 
recommendations are made as to the vocational goals the client 
should pursue. In the written evaluation report a series of program 
goals are established to effect removal of employment hinderances, 
if any, in order to obtain employment in the area recommended by 
the evaluation staff. 



31 



The types of individuals served in the Vocational "Evaluation 
Program may have one or a combination of several disabilities 
which affect employment potential, including physical, mental, 
and/or emotional handicaps. 

II . Work Adjustment Training 

The goal of the Work Adjustment Training Program at Helena 
Rehabilitation Industries is to assist mentally, physically, 
educationally and socially handicapped persons in the development 
of positive attitudes and behaviors in order that they may obtain 
suitable competitive employment. 

The above goal is accomplished through a combination of 
counseling, educational services and actual work in manufacturing 
and/or contract shops. Each client is aided in establishing 
attainable vocational goals relative to the findings of their 
vocational evaluation and their own personal objectives. 

After their performance in a work setting has been observed 
and a conference is held with the client, a formal, individual 
plan or contract is drawn up to assist the client in overcoming 
those skill deficits which impede them from becoming competitively 
employable. 

Specific work related skills which are dealt with include: 
attendance, attitude toward criticism, co-workers, and supervision, 
quantity and quality of work, academic skills, personal assessments, 
confidence and community adjustments as they apply to the client's 
vocational goal. 

Clients of Helena Rehabilitation Industries are placed in 
work adjustment for one of two reasons: (1) their employment 
hinderances can be overcome in one to six months, (2) to evaluate 
whether they would be better served in other programs. 

Ill . Shoe Repair Training Program 

The goal of the Shoe Repair Training Program is to provide 
the trainee with the necessary skills to become competitively 
employed in the area of shoe and boot repair. 

The program is a 16 week long pre-apprenticeship training 
program of intensive training in all phases of shoe repairing. 
Upon completion of the program the trainee is competent in the 
basic fundamentals and procedures of shoe repair, thus entering 
employment as a productive employee and a real asset to the shoe 
repair industry. All training is conducted using up-to-date 
equipment and textbooks and involves work on actual shoes. 

In order to succeed in the Shoe Repair Training Program, a 
person should possess the following skills and abilities. Dexterity 
to use hand and power tools well, average reading ability, the 
ability to follow complex, progressive instructions, average 
mechanical comprehension, ability to meet the public, ability to 
make change and handle money, and the ability to use measuring 
instruments. 



32 



IV. Job Placement Services 

The goal of the Job Placement Program at Helena Rehabilitation 
Industries, is to place in competitive employment those clients 
who have reached the necessary skill level. 

In order to reach this goal, the Job Placement Specialist 

has developed a variety of contracts with business and industry 

in the Helena area who employ clients as direct hires, or will 

agree to give them on-the-job training. 

The Placement Program provides the clients with counseling 
while on the job and regularly schedules follow-up visits to the 
business to check on the progress clients are making. 

The Program also features job readiness classes and job 
application and interview classes in order to better prepare 
clients for competitive employment. 

V. Home Personal Adjustment Training 

The goal of the Home Personal Adjustment Training Program 
at Helena Rehabilitation Industries is to provide outreach 
training to the physically, emotionally, mentally, and socially 
handicapped persons for the development of basic community living 
skills. These skill areas include personal grooming, home 
management, shopping, cooking, budget management and socialization. 

The above goal is accomplished through a combination of 
counseling, one-on-one instruction and actual community performance, 
all under the supervision of the outreach trainer. 

After each client is observed in a living setting, an 
individual program plan is developed to assist the client in 
overcoming those skill deficits which impede their living 
independently in the community. 

Clients are placed in the Home Personal Adjustment Training 
Program when they lack the skills necessary for independent 
living in the community. 

VI. V. R. Extended Employment 

The goal of the VR Extended Program, at Helena Rehabilitation 
Industries, is to provide work training and other supportive services 
to the more severely mentally and physically handicapped client, 
enabling them to achieve their maximum level of independence in 
social and vocational areas, to increase their earnings in sheltered 
employment and to prepare them for possible competitive employment. 

Persons served by this program are those determined to 
require more than six months of work adjustment training and who 
have not been diagnosed as developmental ly disabled, thus are 
ineligible for Title XX services. 



33 



The program emphasis is on counseling, the development of 
acceptable behaviors, and work attitudes. Experiences are spread 
out over a longer period of time, but are still aimed at aiding 
the client in acquiring those skills necessary for competitive 
employment. 

While in VR Extended Employment, clients receive concentrated 
assistance in dealing with pressure and stress situations which 
interfere with their daily functioning on a work and social 
level . 

Persons participating in the VR Extended Employment Program 
remain in the program until such a time as they can emotionally 
and physically handle the rigors of competitive employment. 
When this occurs, they are transferred to work adjustment training 
for placement outside the agency. 

In order to assist the individual in the VR Extended Program 
to reach their vocational goal, a formal, individual program 
plan outlining specific objectives is developed and utilized. 

VII. Title XX Extended Employment 

The goal of the Title XX Extended Program, at Helena 
Rehabilitation Industries, is to provide work training and 
other supportive services to the more severely mentally and 
physically handicapped client, enabling them to achieve their 
maximum level of independence in social and vocational areas, 
to increase their earnings in sheltered employment and to prepare 
them for possible competitive employment. 

Individuals served by this program are Developmental ly Disabled 
persons as defined by being either epileptic, mentally retarded, 
cerebral palsied, or any other nervous disorder that has to be 
treated like the above. The disorder must occur before age 18. 

The program emphasis is on counseling, the development of 
acceptable behaviors, and work attitudes. Experiences are 
spread out over a longer period of time, but are still aimed at 
aiding the client in acquiring those skills necessary for 
competitive employment. 

While in Title XX Extended Employment, clients receive 
concentrated assistance in dealing with pressure and stress 
situations which interfere with their daily functioning on a 
work and social 1 evel . 

Persons participating in the Title XX Extended Employment 
Program remain in the program until such a time as they can 
emotionally and physically handle the rigors of competitive 
employment. When this occurs, they are transferred to work 
adjustment for placement outside the agency. 



34 



In order to assist the individual in the Title XX Extended 
Employment Program to reach their vocational goal, a formal, 
individual program plan outlining specific objectives is developed 
and utilized. 

VIII. Basic Education and Skill Training (BEST) 

The goal of the Basic Education and Skill Training Program, 
at Helena Rehabilitation Industries, is to prepare and/or 
increase the skill level for lower functioning adults entering 
Helena Rehabilitation Industries Extended Employment Programs. 

This program utilizes a close client-staff ratio which 
emphasizes detailed individual programming and behavioral change 
techniques specifically designed to assist the participants 
in the program to become more productive sheltered employees. 

All individual programs are of a vocational nature, and the 
tasks the participants perform closely resemble tasks that are 
done on the work floor. Other activities that take place in the 
program are such things as instruction in personal grooming and 
hygiene, development of appropriate work behaviors, speech therapy 
and occupational therapy. 

IX. Special Work Adjustment 

The goal of the Special Work Adjustment Training Program, 
at Helena Rehabilitation Industries, is to provide trainable 
mentally retarded special education students of the local school 
district with a comprehensive program of education, work development 
and related services to enable them to transfer to other vocational 
and rehabilitative programs. 

The program involves the students in three general areas: 
academics, home-living skills and pre-vocational skills. The 
program includes some basic academics, (functional reading and 
math), housekeeping and cooking skills, personal hygiene and 
grooming, and arts and crafts. Actual work in the shops at 
Helena Rehabilitation Industries is also provided to the students. 

The program is totally individualized and based on the 
individual needs and abilities of the students served, in order 
to prepare the students to be semi-independent in their living 
skills and vocational placement. 

X. Other Supportive Program Services 

Helena Rehabilitation Industries has agreements with other 
agencies to provide such services as audiological testing, 
speech therapy, physical therapy and nursing services. 

In addition, staff members at Helena Rehabilitation Industries 
teach classes in such areas as assertiveness training, use of 
measuring devices, basic mathematics and grooming and personal 
hygiene. 



35 



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MISSOULA REHABILITATION CENTER 

2829 Fort Missoula Road 
Missoula, MT 59801 

The Missoula Rehabilitation Center is a non-profit organization 
whose purpose is to make available rehabilitation services for 
those who are handicapped by accident, disease, or other disabling 
entities regardless of age, race, creed, color, or ability to pay. 
The Rehabilitation Center serves outpatients from Missoula and other 
areas of the State of Montana. It serves inpatients from the 
adjacent Community Hospital. The Center is accredited by the 
Commission on Accreditation for Rehabilitation Facilities. 

Typical patients include those who have been disabled from 
cerebral vascular accident, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, 
muscular dystrophy, arthritis, Parkinson's disease, cancer, 
respiratory disease, surgery, amputations, accidents, and other 
neuromuscular disorders. 

The goal of the Rehabilitation Center is to provide evaluation 
and treatment to handicapped individuals, helping them to return 
to society as physically responsible as their disabilities will 
allow. 

The Rehabilitation Center is funded by fee-for-service, 
memorials, donations, and grants. 

The services provided by the Rehabilitation Center are: 

1. Physical Therapy - Physical abilities are evaluated 
and treated in this department. Types of 
treatment: 

a. Hydrotherapy 

1 . Steam packs 

2. Whirlpool 

3. Hubbard tub 

b. Modalities 

1. Infra-red 

2. Ultra-sound 

3. Diathermy 

4. Electrical stimulation including 
transcutaneous muscle stimulation 

5. Traction - cervical and pelvic 

6. Gait training 

7. Exercise for strengthening muscles 

8. Training in use of prosthesis 

9. Bio-feedback 

10. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography 

c. Evaluations 

1. Neuromuscular Evaluation 

2. Range of Motion 

3. Daily living skills 

d. Home Programs 



37 



2. Occupational Therapy - Patients work on increasing range 

of motion, muscle power, physical coordination and mobility 
through an activity program. The Occupational therapists 
help prepare the patient for integration with family, 
job, and community by training in activities to increase: 

a. Competence in self -care 

1. dressing, feeding and grooming 

b. Independence in home care 

1. homemaking skills, adaptive equipment 

c. Psychosocial adjustment 

1. perceptual training 

2. training in memory, attention span 

3. developing interests and motor skills 
through crafts, recreation and hobbies 

4. to increase feelings of accomplishment 
and motivation 

d. Work tolerance 

e. Job preparedness 

1. Testing and training by interest and 
skil Is 

3. Speech - The speech pathologist is concerned with problems 
and disorders of human communication as manifested 

in speech, language, and hearing. Services are provided 
to both children and adults in the form of diagnostic 
assessment, appropriate referral, and therapeutic inter- 
vention. The diagnostic evaluation included identifying 
and defining the problem, and specifying the possible 
etiology or causes. Following the evaluation the patient 
may be referred to another professional, for example, 
an otolaryngologist for a voice disorder, or for therapy. 
In some instances, therapy may not be recommended. 

Communication disorders which may benefit from therapy 
include: 

a. Articulation - omission, distortion, or 
substitution of sounds. 

b. Language - difficulty finding and using words, 
poor sentence structure, or difficulty in following 
verbal instructions. 

c. Fluency - (stuttering) speech which contains 
repetitions, hesitations, and other dysf luencies. 

d. Voice - consistently hoarse, breathy, or harsh. 



38 



Therapeutic intervention is often necessary in the case 
of patients who have suffered from strokes, head injuries, 
hearing losses, etc. 

Other responsibilities held by the Center speech department 
are attending patient staffings, staff meetings, and 
providing in-service training. 

4. Audiology - An audiologist is a professional who deals 
with the prevention, detection, and rehabilitation of 
communicative disorders which are associated with hearing 
impairments. A person of any age may be served. 

Audiological services which can be provided by this 
Center include the following: 

1. Audiological evaluation of problem cases 
encountered in routine audiometric 
measurements. 

2. Differential diagnosis of middle ear 
disorders. 

3. Distinction between sensori and neural hearing 
loss. 

4. Assessment of non-organic hearing loss. 

5. Hearing aid evaluations and dispensing. 

6. Detection of auditory disorders in the 
Central Auditory Nervous System. 

7. Hearing screening and Hearing Conservation 
Programs. 

8. Consultation and rehabilitative services. 

5. Psychology - Testing and counseling is provided by a 
Ph.D. Psychologist. 

6. Placement Specialist - The main concern of this depart- 
ment is integration of the handicapped back into society. 
He works with various agencies in locating employment, 
planning educational programs, and investigating 
re-training. Many of the handicapped persons referred 

to the Rehabilitation Center are evaluated by a Team 
consisting of a physician, physical therapist, 
audiologist, and clinical psychologist. The results 
of these evaluations are pulled together by the placement 
specialist to be used in future planning programs with 
the handicapped. The placement specialist contacts 
employers for possible placements. He maintains a list 
of job openings as possible placements for handicaps 
seeking employment. He sponsors weekly workshops for 
those needing job seeking skills. 



39 



7. Program Coordinator - The Program Coordinator -is responsible 
for: 

a. obtaining a medical - social history 

b. conducting staffings on patients 

c. putting together reports and sharing them with 
other agencies 

d. planning and coordinating patient care with 
other team members, and other agencies 

e. planning discharges in cooperation with 
the family and participating team members 

f. communicating treatment and plans to 
physicians and families 

g. home visits and follow-up to ensure 
integration of patient into family 
and community 

h. directs the CNS program (Central Nervous 
System) 

8. Social Worker - Performs counseling duties and assists 
patients and families in dealing with the social/ 
financial problems associated with disabilities. Is a 
liaison between the patient and the community in 
ensuring continued care of the patient. Assists 
other team members in discharge planning. Makes 
referrals to appropriate medical and social agencies. 
Assists in financial assessment. 

9. Physiatrist - Licensed physician, with special training 
in rehabilitation is available to direct the rehabili- 
tation program of the severely disabled. 

10. Student Program 

a. Pre-physical therapy students from University 
of Montana for clinical practice 

b. Occupational therapy students from Colorado 
State for clinical practice 

c. Practicum for social welfare students from 
the University of Montana 

d. Observation for St. Patrick's School of Nursing 
students 

e. Clinical Practice for Speech Pathology 
students from University of Montana 



40 



n. Consultants - Are available through the University of 
Montana's psychology, communication sciences and dis- 
orders, sociology and health departments when needed. 

12. Work Evaluation Unit - Work evaluation is a method 
used to determine the employability of patients unable 
to compete in the job market due to some limitation, 
whether physical, psychological, or developmental. 
Upon entering the unit, the patient is given a series 
of work samples which are graded and evaluated to 
determine his functioning ability and potential. 

His interests and skills are also explored. 

13. Transportation - The Rehabilitation Center provides 
a van with a lift to transport patients to and from 
the Center for treatment if there is no way the 
patient can supply his own transportation. 

14. Volunteer Program - An active volunteer program at 
the Rehabilitation Center is provided to patients to 
give them supportive experiences outside the Rehabili- 
tation setting. 



CI inics 



1. Crippled Children's Clinic: A rehabilitation team 
consisting of the medical director, physical therapist, 
occupational therapist, speech pathologists, audiolo- 
gist, and consulting medical specialists examine and 
evaluate handicapped children who have been referred 

to the Center. 

2. Amputee CI inic : A team consisting of an orthopedic 
surgeon, physical therapist, occupational therapist, 
orthotists, prosthetists, and other interested people 
conduct a clinic once a month to evaluate and prescribe 
for amputees. Recommendations are made by the team 

as to the type of prosthesis needed by the amputee. 
A follow-up is done on each amputee to appraise the 
fit and the use of the prosthesis. 

3. Pain CI inic : The main thrust of this clinic is to 
evaluate and treat patients with chronic pain. An 
orthopedists, anesthesiologist, neurosurgeon, clinical 
psychologist, and any other professional personnel 
needed to make up the clinic team. 



41 



5. Rehabilitation Committee : This committee meets once 
a month to evaluate and rehabilitate injured workmen 
back to employment and society. This committee is 
made up of an orthopedist, clinical psychologist, 
physical therapist, rehabilitation counselor, workers' 
compensation representatives, and insurance carriers. 
The committee considers referrals from individual 
committee members for evaluation at the Rehabilitation 
Center. An evaluation is done by an orthopedist, 
clinical psychologist, physical therapist, and 
occupational therapist with recommendations made to 
the worker and the committee. A follow-up conference 
with the worker is scheduled following the evaluation. 
The placement specialist in cooperation with the 
vocational rehabilitation counselor tries to fine 
suitable re-employment, re-training, or a school 
situation to fit the needs of the worker. 

6. Spinal Cord Injured Clinic and Program : A rehabili- 
tation team including a Physiatrist, physical therapist, 
occupational therapist, rehabilitation nurse, psychologist, 
and a social worker are available to evaluate the problems 
of the spinal cord injury in a clinic setting. 
Recommendations are made and treatment provided. Acute 
care is available in the adjoining community hospital. 
After stabilization of medical problems, the Missoula 
Community Nursing and Rehabilitation Facility offer 

a complete rehabilitation unit specifically designed 
for the spinal cord injured. Treatment is delivered 
by the Rehabilitation Center's professional staff. 

7. Home Health Program : Members of the rehabilitation 
team will provide treatments in the home setting 

for those patients who are unable to come to the Center 
for care. 

8. In Patient Care : Hospitilization" is provided by the 
Missoula Community Hospital, which adjoins the Rehabili- 
tation Center, for those individuals who require acute 
medical care. 

The Missoula Community Nursing and Rehabilitation Facility 
located near the Rehabilitation Center provided living accommodations 
and nursing service for these patients whose medical condition 
is stabilized and need the services of the rehabilitation team. 
Transportation is provided by a specially equipped van to the 
Rehabilitation Center. 



42 



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MISSOULA OPPORTUNITY WORKSHOP 

1005 Marshall Street 
Missoula, MT 59801 

Opportunity Workshop has existed in various forms in Missoula 
since its initial establishment in 1955. Through the years the 
organization has evolved into the current non-profit corporation 
providing vocationally oriented training services to approximately 
55 handicapped adults per day. The corporation is governed by a 
board of directors representing a variety of professions, businesses, 
industries and interests in the local community and is dedicated 
to the provision of quality services. 

Staff 

The 17 staff at Opportunity Workshop have experiences in a variety 
of backgrounds with an emphasis on the use of very systematic 
, training orientation designed to accomplish clearly specified 
client goals and objectives within projected time frames. Thirteen 
of the 17 staff work directly and actively with clients involved 
in a 6 hour work training day. 

Goals 

The two primary goals of the organization: The maximization of 
client economic independence and habilitation (using and contributing 
to the community) are accomplished with the cooperation and financial 
assistance of both the Rehabilitation Services Division and 
Developmental Disabilities Division of the Department of Social and 
Rehabilitation Services of the State of Montana as well as United 
Way of Missoula County. 

Clients 

Clients receiving services are 18 years of age and older and 
might have cerebral palsy, epilepsy, physical or medical handicaps 
or be mentally retarded. The emphasis however is on enhancing 
the positive qualities which the person might have while assisting 
the individual in overcoming any skill deficits. 

Opportunity Workshop provides training services within the 
following 6 program areas: 

1. Work Activity Program 

a. basic skills 

b. self-care skills 

c. interpersonal and communication skills 

d. functional academic skills 

e. attendance skills 

f. safety skills 

g. vocational skills 



44 



2. Work Adjustment Program 

Training services within this program area are designed 
to increase the quality and strength of a variety of work- 
related behaviors such as following instructions, cooperation 
with supervisors and fellow workers, working independently, 
correcting one's own errors and so forth. 

3. Placement Program 

Once the client has demonstrated sufficient success 
within the work adjustment phase, that person proceeds into 
the next component of the placement sequence: the client is 
assisted in acquiring competitive employment within the 
community. Training services would focus on job finding 
skills, completing an application and interview, as well as 
on-site follow-up after placement as required by the 
individual client. 

4. Outreach Program 

Services provided by staff at Opportunity Workshop within 
this area include assistance in locating suitable living 
arrangements, transportation, leisure activities or other 
activities which support successful placement in the 
community as a competitive and contributing employee. 

5. Extended Employment 

For those individuals who are not ready to enter into 
a program directed at competitive employment situations. 
Opportunity Workshop offers employment in a variety of 
sheltered work areas. A wide range of work skills are 
taught within this program while simultaneously enabling 
the client to earn a wage. 

6. Transportation 

For clients living within the Missoula area, transportation 
is provided between the residence and the facility. 



45 



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in 



PLANNING ACTIVITIES 

The goal of rehabilitation facility planning continues to 
be the development and expansion of such facilities and 
programs in Montana that will provide the most and best 
rehabilitation services to the greatest number of handicapped. 

The Rehabilitative Services Division's Special Projects 
Bureau continues to receive many requests for federal funds 
to establish or expand rehabilitation facilities. The concerns 
in making a judgment on such requests are the need for what 
is requested and the needs of already existing orograms. 
In other words, a discrete decision is called for that will 
promote the quality of the already existing facilities. 

The priority regarding Montana's rehabilitation facilities 
is the strengthening and expansion of the eight (8) current 
quality facilities to their highest level of achievement 
in service provision. 

Four (4) ways of achieving this priority are: 

1. The inclusion of facility staff in as many RSD 
staff development sessions as appropriate. 
This has been and will continue to be an 
ongoing pol icy. 

2. The specific provision of some state and/or 
regional in service tailored to facility 
staff needs. 

3. The provision of facility technical assistance 
(TA) under both the Federal TA and the 
proposed State TA programs. 

4. The awarding of limited grants when the 
need is well justified. 

In addition, the Rehabilitative Services Division will 
maintain close relationships with all planning and funding 
agencies so that cooperative projects and joint funding 
can continue to be implemented to increase services to all 
disabled individuals in Montana. 



47 



Appendix A 

Standards for Facilities and Providers of Serv'ices 
GENERAL PURPOSES OF STANDARDS 

(1) The State Division has established and will maintain 
standards for the selection of facilities and personnel 
utilized in providing services to handicapped 
individuals that will assure a high quality of 
service. 

(2) Types of Facilities. 

(a) It is the policy of the State Division to use 
whenever feasible, facilities which are accredited or 
approved by an appropriate public authority or 
professional organization. Where this is not possible, 
the facilities selected, whether public or private, 
are those that appear upon investigation to be the 
best adapted to render the specific services required. 
Main factors in the selection of facilities in all 
cases are the professional and technical qualifications 
of personnel, adequacy of equipment, and scope and quality 
of services rendered. 

(3) Standards for Hospitals. 

(a) The State Division will give preference to hospitals 
approved by the Joint Commission on Accreditation 
of Hospitals, and which have more than 100 beds, with 
well developed surgical and specialty services, medical 
social services, and therapy departments. Preference 
is also given to hospitals affording residence training 
in the specialty in which treatment is sought. In 
the event that it is neither feasible nor economical 
in individual cases to use such hospitals, other 
hospitals will be used when equipped to give quality 
service as needed, and when approved by the Medical 
Consultant. 

(4) Standards for Clinics. 

(a) Wherever feasible the State Division will utilize 
well organized clinics offering services of high quality, 
and operating under or approved by an official State 
Agency. 

(5) Schools and other Training Institutions. 

(a) The State Division will utilize only those schools, 
colleges, and other training institutions which are 
fully accredited by the Office of the Superintendent 
of Public Instruction or other official accrediting 
agency within the State wherein the facility is located. 



48 



Appendix A 



DEFINITIONS 



(1) Rehabilitation Facility: Defined in Section 1361.1 

of the Federal Register as a facility which is operated 
for the primary purpose of providing vocational 
rehabilitation services to handicapped individuals 
and which provides, singly or in combination, one or 
more of the following services for handicapped 
individuals. 

(a) Vocational rehabilitation services which 
shall include under one management, 
medical, psychological, social and 
vocational services. 

(b) Testing, fitting, or training in the use 
of prothetic and orthotic devices. 

(c) Prevocational conditioning or recreational 
therapy. 

(d) Physical and occupational therapy. 

(e) Speech and hearing therapy. 

(f) Psychological and social services. 

(g) Evaluation of rehabilitation potential. 

(h) Personal and work adjustment. 

(i) Vocational training with a view 
toward career advancement in 
combination with other rehabilitation 
services). 

(j) Evaluation or control of specific 
disabilities. 

(k) Orientation and mobility services and 
other adjustment services to the blind. 

(1) Transitional or extended employment for those handicapped 
individuals who cannot be readily absorbed in the 
competitive labor market; provided, that all medical 
and related health services must be prescribed by, 
or under the formal supervision of, persons licensed 
to prescribe or supervise the provision of such services 
in the state. 



49 



Appendix A 

(2) Vocational (Work) Evaluation: A comprehensive process 
that systematically utilizes work, real or simulated, 
as the focal point for assessment and vocational 
exploration, the purpose of which is to assist individuals 
in vocational development. Vocational (Work) Evaluation 
incorporates medical, psychological, social, vocational, 
educational, cultural, and economic data in the attain- 
ment of the goals of the evaluation process. 

(3) Work Adjustment: Work adjustment is a treatment/ 
training process utilizing individual and group work, 
or work related activities, to assist individuals 

in understanding the meaning, value and demands of 
work; to modify or develop attitudes, personal 
characteristics, and work behavior; and to develop 
functional capacities, as required, in order to 
assist individuals towards their optimum level of 
vocational development. 

(a) Each facility providing work adjustment service 
for Rehabilitative Services Division clients will 

be required to submit a description of their work 
adjustment program to the State Rehabilitative Services 
Division office for approval prior to its acceptance 
of work adjustment fees. In addition, work adjustment 
will be authorized for a period of only three months 
at one time. At the end of the three months a report 
on the necessity of continuing work adjustment will 
be required from appropriate facility staff. 

(b) Work adjustment may NEVER precede vocational 
evaluation, and a vocational evaluation is always 
a prerequisite to work adjustment. Only if these 
two rules are followed by the facility, can work 
adjustment be authorized for Rehabilitative Services 
Division clients. 

(4) Sheltered Workshop: Sheltered Workshop is an institution 
conducted not for profit, but for the purpose of carrying 
out a recognized program of rehabilitation for handicapped 
workers, and/or providing such individuals with remunerative 
employment for an indefinite period of time to 
individuals who cannot meet the standards of the 
competitive labor market. Some individuals, however, 

may develop sufficient productive skill and adjustments 
which would enable them to move out of the facility 
into the competitive labor market. Rehabilitation 
services play a supportive role to successful employment 
in the facility. 

(5) Day Activity Center: A facility provides the initial 
phase of treatment for individuals both within the 
community and those discharged from the institution 
who are medically determined to be severely handicapped 
(mentally or physically). Its emphasis is in the 
provision of all, one, or some of the following 
services: 



50 



Appendix A 

(a) Personal health and hygiene - encourage and 
train for proper care of body, use and selection 
of clothes, dietary considerations, basic safety 
knowledge. 

(b) Social skills and attitudes - encourage and 
train socially acceptable manners relating to table 
manners, social, group and heterosexual contacts, 
value and use of money, methods and customs regarding 
the use of the telephone and use of public 
transportation, encourage and train for conduct relating 
to self, property and person of others, role of 

social institutions, individuals and group customs. 

(c) Leisure time and recreational activities - encourage 
and train in the use of public recreational activities, 
churches, privately sponsored community programs, 

other social agencies, and home and individual leisure 
activities. 

REHABILITATION FACILITIES 

(1) The Division will accept as its standards the standards 
of the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation 
Facilities (CARF). These standards will be applied 

to any rehabilitation facility where the Division 
provides funding or purchases services or where the 
Division has formal cooperative agreements. Facilities 
accredited by CARF will be adjudged to be certified. 

(2) If certification is denied, the facility will be 
notified of the reason/reasons for such decision 
thirty (30) days in advance of the date on which no 
more services will be purchased by the Rehabilitative 
Services Division nor grants awarded by same. The 
Fair Hearing Process will be an available resource 

to facilities. (See Sub-Chapter 2 of Chapter 2 of 
these Montana Administrative Codes for the Fair 
Hearing Process). 

(3) Facilities are encouraged to apply for CARF accreditation. 
The fee for only the first CARF accreditation survey 

per facility may be reimbursed by the Rehabilitative 
Services Division, with the balance of operating 
costs to be paid by the facility. Any subseouent 
accreditation survey fees will have to be paid for 
by the facility itself. 

(4) Applications of Standards 

(a) Any rehabilitation facility selling a service 

to the Rehabilitative Services Division must have 

been certified by said Division as minimally meeting 

CARF standards. No facility will be utilized beyond 

12 month provisional certification without CARF 

accreditation being demonstrated at the end of those 

12 months. A delay in the CARF decision making process 

will be tolerated if it continues beyond the 12 month period. 



51 



Appendix A 

(b) Grants will be considered only for those facilities 
possessing either provisional certification or 
CARF accreditation. Facilities seeking construction 
grants must also meet minimum standards described 
in Part 1362 of the Federal Register, Volume 40, 
No. 228. 

(5) Duration of certification. 

(a) The Rehabilitative Services Division will 
provide full certification upon receipt from the 
facility of records and reports attesting to its 
CARF accreditation. The tenure of the certification 
by the Rehabilitative Services Division shall be 
one year. The Division may in individual cases 

and at its sole discretion, provide a provisional 
certification of the facility for up to six (6) 
months in tenure based upon records and reports; 
requests for an additional 6 months will be granted 
upon adequate information the facility is attempting 
to meet CARF accreditation. 

(b) Arts and Crafts - encourage the crafting of 
items by individual clients for their own pleasure 
and satisfaction and not for sale. 

(6) Work Activities Center: Such a facility "shall mean a 
workshop, or a physically separated department of a 
workshop having an identifiable program, separate super- 
vision and records, planned and designed exclusively 
to provide therapeutic activities for handicapped workers 
whose physical or mental impairment is so severe as to 
make their productive capacity inconsequential. Therapeutic 
activities include custodial activities (such as activities 
where the focus is on teaching the basic skills of 
living), and any purposeful activity so long as work 
or production is not the main purpose. No sheltered 
workshop or separate department thereof fehall qualify 
as a work activities center if the average productivity 
per handicapped worker is *$1 ,650.50 or more per year 
as measured by dividing the total annual earned income 
of the work program less the cost of purchased materials 
used, by the average number of clients in the work program 
or, if wage payments are primarily at piece rates, the 
average annual labor rate per client is *$1,175.00 
or more as measured by dividing the total annual wages 
of the clients by the average number of clients in the 
work program. These figures are subject to change in 
the minimum wage law implemented by the U.S. Department 
of Labor. (The average number of clients shall be 
determined by taking the average of the total number 
of clients in the work program on the last day of each 
quarter in the previous fiscal year, provided such 
average is representative of the average number of 
clients employed during the entire year). 

*As of January 1 , 1980 



52 



Appendix A 



No individual worker whose productivity substantially 
exceeds this average shall be employed at less than the 
statutory minimum wage under a work activities center 
certificate. (A handicapped worker, whose productivity 
substantially exceeds the average, may be certificated 
under 29 C.F.R., Part 524 in rare and unusual cases 
where necessary to avoid extreme hardship, if he is unable 
to earn the statutory minimum because of his handicap, 
and if his production and earnings are included in the 
averages provided in this paragraph). Where information 
is not available for a year, a temporary certificate 
for not more than six (6) months may be issued based 
on the limited information available if it is represented 
that the center expects and has good reason to believe 
that the conditions hereinabove specified will be satisfied 
when one year's data are available. Information to be 
considered will include the severity of disability 
of the handicapped workers employed, or other pertinent 
factors (29 C.F.R., Part 525). 

(7) Speech Pathology: Primary emphasis of the facility is 
speech pathology, supported by appropriate audiological , 
medical, social and/or vocational adjustment services. 

(8) Audiology: Primary emphasis of the facility is audiology, 
supported by appropriate speech pathology, medical, 
social and/or vocational adjustment services. 

(b) It shall be an expressed condition of the Rehabili- 
tative Services Division certification that they, upon 
being apprised of any source of material change in the 
facility's functioning in terms of the standards or in 
terms of the failure of the facility to provide such 
records and reports as requested by the Rehabilitative 
Services Division, may review the facility's certification 
and may modify its certification decision. At the dis- 
cretion of the Rehabilitative Services Division, such 
review may include an onsite visit. Certification 

by the state is not a guarantee of grants nor of 
purchases of services by the Rehabilitative Services 
Division. 

(c) New Facilities - The Rehabilitative Services Division 
may in individual cases, at its own discretion, provisionally 
certify a new facility during the first year of its 
operation. At the termination of the tenure of provisional 
certification, the facility must meet the requirements 

for full certification. Findings of the Division's 
facility staff will be summarized in a written report 
to the facility. If non-certification is the result 
of the site survey, another survey can be requested 
on a date six months subsequent to the date of the 
prior survey, and services will not be purchased by the 
Rehabilitative Services Division, nor grants of money 
even considered until such provisional certification 
is attained. 



53 



Appendix A 



(9) Provisional Certification -- Minimum Requirements 

(a) In order to receive provisional certification, 

the Rehabilitative Services Division must be provided 

with records, reports, and documents attesting to the 

facility's level of compliance with CARF standards for 

extension beyond 6 months. Evidence must be shown 

of the ability to meet CARF compliance within a 12 month 

period. 

(10) Exclusion and Exceptions 

(a) In general, the policy of the Division will be to 
include rather than exclude services and facilities 
from these rules and regulations. Exclusion will be 
approved by the Division Administrator. Examples of 
exclusion are: 

(i) Group homes. 

(ii) Hospitals, (not purporting to be a rehabilitation 
facility) schools and other training institutions, 
on-the-job training when such training is carried 
out in regular commercial or industrial enterprises 
and not supervised by an organizational entity 
meeting the definition of "Rehabilitation Facility.' 
(iii) Halfway houses. 

(b) The above are presently being licensed by other 
appropriate state agencies, and this Division will 
accept their certification. 

(11) Out-of-state Facilities: Only those out-of-state rehabili- 
tation facilities accredited by CARF will be occasionally 
utilized by the Rehabilitative Services Division. 



54 



Appendix B 
Extended Employment Program 



DEFINITIONS 



(1) Severely handicapped person: A person who has a 
physical or mental impairment which requires multiple 
services over an extended period of time and results 
from amputation, blindness, cancer, cerebral palsy, 
cystic fibrosis, deafness, heart disease, hemiplegia, 
respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, 
mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, 
neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), 
paraplegia, quadriplegia and other spinal cord conditions, 
renal failure and any other disability, specified by 

the department in regulations it shall prescribe; 

and/or a person who, because of lack of social competence, 

mobility, experience, skills, training, or other successful 

characteristics, is in need of sheltered employment 

or work activity services in a protective setting. 

(2) Physical or ment?»l disability: A physical or mental 
condition which materially limits, contributes to 
limiting, or if not corrected, will probably result 

in limiting any individual's activities or functioning. 

(3) Sheltered workshops: A charitable organization or 
institution conducted not for profit, but for the 
purpose of carrying out a recognized program of 
rehabilitation for handicapped workers, and/or 
providing such individuals with remunerative employment 
or other occupational rehabilitating activity of an 
educational or therapeutic nature - and which is 
certified by the Rehabilitative Services Division. 

(4) Work activity center: A physically separated department 
of a workshop having an identifiable program, separate 
supervision and records, planned and designed exclusively 
to provide therapeutic activities for handicapped 
workers whose physical or mental impairment is so 

severe as to make their productive capacity inconsequential, 
Therapeutic activities include custodial activities 
(such as activities where the focus is on teaching 
the basic skills of living), and any purposeful 
activity so long as work or production is not the 
main purpose - and which is certified by the Rehabili- 
tative Services Division. 



OBJECTIVES 



(1) The objectives of this program as identified by the 
Rehabilitative Services Division are: 

(a) The creation of additional employee work stations. 

(b) The provision of alternate types of care for 
current institutional population. 



55 



Appendix B 



(c) The provision of opportunity for severely. disabled 
persons (who cannot be readily absorbed in the 
competitive market) to participate in Sheltered 
Workshop and Work Activity Center programs in Montana. 

FUNCTIONS OF COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 

(1) The two main functions of the Community Services 
Division in this program are: 

(a) Providing casework services related to the 
service goal of keeping the subsidized individual 
on the job during the prolonged workshop experience 
plus aiding in the preparation of him/her for 
advancement from the workshop situation. 

(i) The workshop personnel and Rehabilitative 
Services Division staff, having extensive 
experience with problems facing this group of 
people, will be planning resources in developing 
appropriate supportive service by which the 
service goal may be attained. 

(ii) The social service worker is responsible for 
aiding the procurement of adequate housing, 
if necessary; arranging transportation for 
health or employment needs; day care, when 
appropriate; developing appropriate resources 
relating to money management, dress, deportment 
on the job; as well as offering individual 
or group counseling as needed, 

(b) Community Services Division will assign a 
representative to the Extended Employment Committee 
for each facility. 

FUNCTIONS OF REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 

(1) The Rehabilitative Services Division has five main 
functions: 

(a) To administer the extended program including: 
(i) Allocation of extended monies to workshops. 

(ii) Payment of extended monies to workshops. 

(iii) Evaluation of the results of the extended 
payments related to subsidy program goals. 

(b) To participate with Community Services Division 
and the workshops and Work Activity Centers to assure 
that all clients referred for extended employment 
have been evaluated and determined to be appropriate 
for placement in sheltered employment. 



56 



Appendix B 



(c) To refer appropriate clients to certified workshops 
and Work Activity Centers, particularly those who are 
joint Community Services Division and Rehabilitative 
Services Division clients. 

(d) To assist in periodically re-evaluating clients 
who are closed in sheltered employment to assess 
their ability to profit from further Rehabilitative 
Services Division services, and to reopen such cases 
as may be able to benefit. 

(e) Supportive services required by individuals in 
the Extended Employment Program will be arranged by 
members representing Social Services or by the 
community worker. 

(i) Rehabilitative Services Division must be the 
first source of training opportunities to be 
considered for any individual, age 16 or over, 
who is not legally blind but whose condition 
is of a physical, mental or emotional nature. 

(ii) Emotional problems include the standard psychiatric 
classifications of mental retardation, 
psychoneurosis, or psychosis. To qualify in 
these categories there must be substantial 
evidence that the maladaptive behavior has 
been of sufficiently long duration to constitute 
a pattern of behavior and is not merely a 
situational reaction to crisis. There must 
also be supporting evidence to indicate that the 
behavior has substantially prevented the person 
from holding regular, suitable jobs. Included 
as eligible for Rehabilitative Services Division 
training or rehabilitation services are those 
people who have been functioning but substantially 
below the capability they may attain through 
Rehabilitative Services Division services. 

EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEES 

(1) Guidelines 

(a) A multi-agency committee shall be established 
at each sheltered workshop and Work Activity Center 
participating in the legislatively approved extended 
program. Each committee shall have representatives 
from the facility. Social Services, and Rehabilitative 
Services Division (the Vocational Rehabilitation 
Facility Liaison Counselor and the Regional 
Developmental Disabilities Community Worker). The 
Rehabilitative Facilities Specialist is always 
an ad hoc member of the Committee and shall vote 
to break ties. 



57 



Appendix B 



(2) The purposes of the Extended Employment Committees are: 

(a) To screen referrals for appropriateness of 
certification to the extended program. The Rehabili- 
tative Facilities Specialist should be consulted if 
there is any question as to appropriateness of a 
given workshop for a given client. 

(b) To certify disabled persons to extended slot, 
in a particular workshop or Work Activity Center. 

(c) To identify client goals. The client should 
be involved actively in the process of determining 
his appropriateness for sheltered employment under 
this program. Goals should be set with the clients, 
not just for the client and each client should know 
what he can expect from this program and what he must 
put into the program. A written plan should be developed 
for each client and must be a part of the workshop, 
Social Service file, and the Rehabilitative Services 
Division file. 

(3) To monitor, coordinate, or provide services to 
extended clients: 

(a) Community Services Division social service 
worker should provide casework services. 

(b) Rehabilitative Services Division counselor 
should periodically ascertain client readiness for 
additional Vocational Rehabilitation services. 

(c) Workshop member should represent all workshop 
functions. 

(d) Community workers should provide purchase of 
service functions. 

(4) To de-certify clients: 

(a) When the absences of clients are too frequent 
for them to be gaining from workshop experiences. 

(b) When clients are deceased. 

(c) When clients move from area. 

(d) When clients can't tolerate the program. 

(e) When client reaches a level of productivity 
which no longer requires program. 

(5) To determine when and how long slots should be held 
open for absent enrollee. 



58 



Appendix B 



(6) To assess at least every six months the status of 
the client enrolled in extended slots to determine 
their progress, develop new goals, and otherwise 
review the written plan. The assessment should be 
committed to writing with a copy in the workshop 
files and in the Social Service and in the Vocational 
Rehabilitation case records. 

RULES FOR EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM 

(1) A client extended slot which remains vacant for a 
period of 60 days will be subject to removal from the 
facilities slot allocation at the discretion of the 
Administrator of the Rehabilitative Services Division. 

(2) A facility which is unable to provide consistent services 
minimally six hours per day five days per week, to 
extended clients, is subject to a reduction of the 
facilities slot allocation at the discretion of the 
Administrator of the Rehabilitative Services Division. 

(3) Should the services of a facility which provides 
extended services to clients of the Rehabilitative 
Services Division fall below minimum standards, 
the facility will be notified in writing of the 
deficiencies and be given a specific period of time 
to make corrections. Should corrective measures 
not be made, the facility will be subject to lose 

all allocated slots of the Extended Employment Program. 

(4) Facilities are required to notify the Rehabilitative 
Services Division Facility Liaison Counselor when 

a client has been absent from the program for three 
consecutive work days. The facility is responsible 
for informing the specified Rehabilitative Services 
Division personnel of the reason for the absence. 
The Rehabilitative Services Division personnel has 
the authority to excuse, or not excuse the absences. 
This fact will be viewed as one of the followups 
by the Rehabilitative Services Division Counselor. 

APPOINTMENT OF EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEE 

(1) County directors assign a social worker as liaison 
to a particular workshop. 

(2) Rehabilitative Services Division District Supervisors 
assign Community Workers and liaison Vocational 
Rehabilitation counselors to a particular workshop. 

(3) Each workshop director identifies a nominee to the 
committee--usually the director or professional 
staff member. 



59 



Appendix B 



(4) The Rehabilitative Services Division Facilitie-s 
Specialist will be an ad hoc committee member and 
will assist the workshop director to get the committee 
started and help solve any organizational problems 
that might develop. 

ORGANIZATION OF COMMITTEE 

(1) Each committee will elect a chairman of its choice. 
While the workshop representative would seem a 
logical choice to chair the committee, the members 
may appoint someone else. 

(2) Each committee will meet as needed to carry out its 
purposes. Larger workshops with greater numbers of 
extended work stations may find it necessary to meet 
quite regularly while smaller workshop committees 

may meet infrequently beyond initiation of the program. 

(3) Each committee will keep minutes of its meetings 

and keep such minutes on file at the workshop. Minutes 
should identify, for each referral, the reasons 
for acceptance or rejection into the program and 
the recommended client goals. 

(4) Three of the four committee members must be present 
to conduct business. 

(5) The committee should make a concerted effort in 
decision making and not certify a client into the 
program who does not meet the approval of each member. 
However, an occasional impasse may occur. In the 
event that a decision is not possible, decisions 

will be appealed to the Chief of the Special 
Projects Bureau. 

DETERMINING CERTIFICATION INTO EXTENDED SLOTS 

(1) Criteria for determining which clients are certified 
into extended slots shall be as follows: 

(a) All referrals must have undergone a comprehensive 
work evaluation by Rehabilitative Services Division 
which is the referral resource. 

(b) The caseworker shall make a determination as to 
whether the referral is a recipient of Supplemental 
Security Income or Medical Assistance. Priority 
will be given to this group who would be entitled 

to Purchase of Service using federal funds from 
Family and Adult Services. However, Rehabilitative 
Services Division will fund subsidy slots using 
unmatched monies where clients meet remaining criteria. 



60 



Appendix B 



(c) Institutional History: Priority should be given 
also to those referrals who have been institutionalized 
in state institutions and who have been rehabilitated 
to the point of readiness for sheltered employment. 
Slightly lower priority shall be given to those 
referrals who have not been institutionalized but 

who are adjudged to be candidates for institutionalization 
if not provided sheltered employment. 

(d) Productivity Level: Since the purpose of this 
program is to provide sheltered employment for the 
severely disabled, the committee shall give greater 
weight to "obviously low" producers as compared 
with those who are only "marginally" productive. 
"Obviously low" producers are identified as being 
up to 50 percent productive (when compared with 
normal non-handicapped workers). "Marginal" producers 
would range between 50-75 percent productivity and be 
paid that percentage of the prevailing wage. These 
individuals usually "earn their own way" to a great 
extent and the workshop requires relatively little 
financial support outside of product sales. Workers 
classified as over 75 percent shall not be certified 
to the extended program as they are productive enough 
to contribute their share of the overhead and they 
are approaching the point of readiness for competitive 
employment. 

(i) Productivity level would be determined in the 
evaluation process. 

(ii) An amount considered necessary to subsidize 

the net loss of a workshop serving this client 
population will be determined by each facility 
and used as the payment required. 

(e) The Extended Committee shall develop and maintain 
a prioritized "waiting list" from which candidates 
shall be drawn when vacancies occur; such prioritized 
list shall be developed along the lines of the 
criteria described in these guidelines. 



PRIORITIES 



(1) Applicants entitled to Social Services who are 

Developmentally Disabled must utilize funds available 
through the Purchase of Service Program. Other 
applicants entitled to Social Services and not 
eligible for Purchase of Service should be the first 
priority for Extended Employment. 



61 



Appendix C 



Resolution: 

The Rehabilitative Services Division does not have the need or 
the resources to support other than the following eight rehabilitation 
facilities and any of their potential satellites: 



Billings Sheltered Workshop 
3116 First Avenue North 
Billings, MT 59102 
Phone: 248-9115 



Missoula Rehabilitation Center 
2829 Fort Missoula Road 
Missoula, MT 59801 
Phone: 728-3570 



Eastern Montana Industries 
P.O. Box 636 
Miles City, MT 59301 
Phone: 232-3740 



Butte Sheltered Workshoo 
207 South Montana 
Butte, MT 59701 
Phone: 723-6501 



Helena Rehabilitation Industries 
1325 Helena Avenue 
Helena, MT 59601 
Phone: 442-8632 



Missoula Opportunity Workshop 

1005 Marshall 

Missoula, MT 59801 

Phone: 721-2930 543-7956 



Easter Seal Adult Training Center 
4400 Central Avenue 
Great Falls, MT 59401 
Phone: 727-3151 



Flathead Industries for 
305 Third Avenue East 
Kali spell, MT 59901 
Phone: 755-7656 



the Handicapped 



62 



APPENDIX D 



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM 



PROGRAM EVALUATION REPORT 



MONTANA REHABILITATION SERVICES DIVISION 



REVISED: OCTOBER 1979 



63 



rWJAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM 
Program Evaluation Project 
MONTANA REHABILITATION SERVICES DIVISION 
October 1979 



I. Introduction 



In conjunction with the development and installation of the program evaluation systems 
in the rehabilitation facilities, a Management Information System (MIS) has also been 
developed and installed. 

The data items which follow will be used to obtain common information from all 
rehabilitation facilities serving clients from the Rehabilitation Services Division (RSD), 
They will be compatible with and will supplement the data that will be produced by 
each facility's Program Evaluation System. The (MIS) data will enable the state RSD 
to combine data across all facilities with similar programs and to make certain 
comparisons between facilities and their programs. 

II. Specifications 

1. Data will only be required on programs serving RSD sponsored clients. 
For programs serving both RSD clients and others, such as Developmental 
Disabilities, the MIS reports should include only those sponsored by RSD. 

2. Installation of the MIS will take place at the same time that the Program 
Evaluation Systems are installed in each facility. 

3. Reports will be prepared by the facility and presented to RSD on a 
quarterly basis. 

4. Data will be supplied by each facility in aggregate form for the current 
quarter and cumulatively from the beginning of each fiscal year. 

5. Each facility will be responsible for its, own data collection and processing. 

6. MIS data will be reported by type of program. The same program types will 
be used as in the Program Evaluation System. 

7. The MIS will include the following categories of data items: 

A. Referral to Program Start 

B. Program Start to Termination 

C. Program Benefits 

D. Program Efficiency 

E. Client Characteristics 

8. RSD will prepare statewide summaries using the MIS data and distribute 
them to all facilities. 



Revised October 1979 



64 



9. Summary of MIS Reporting Requirements 

A. Vocational Evaluation Programs 
Form 1 - Program Activity Report 

Form 2 - Vocational Evaluation: Results Report 

Form 5 - Vocational Evaluation: Client Characteristics Report 

Col. 1 - All losses before program start 
Col . 2 - All completers 
Col. 3 - All non-completors 

B. Work Adjustment, Skill Training and Placement Programs 

Form 1 - Program Activity Report 

Form 3 - Work Adjustment, Skill Training: 
Results Report 

Form 6 - Work Adjustment, Skill Training: 
Client Characteristics Report 

Col. 1 - All losses before program start 

Col. 2 - Clients closed in vocational benefit category 

or transferred 
Col. 3 - Clients transferred or closed with no vocational 

benefit 

C. Extended Employment Programs 
Form 1 - Program Activity Report 

Form 4 - Extended Employment: Results Report 

Form 7 - Extended Employment: Client Characteristics Report 

Col. 1 - All losses before program start 

Col. 2 - Clients closed in competitive employment 

Col. 3 - All other closures 

Form 8 - Extended Employment: Characteristics of Current Clients 
Report. This report is to be submitted twice a year, end 
of July and end of December. 

(Sample forms are included following the instructions for each form.) 

Ill . Program Activity Report (MIS Form 1) 

Section A. Referral to Program Start 

This set of data items covers the period from date of referral by RSD to the 
date of actual program start. It will be necessary that referrals are defined 
in the same way by each facility and that the date of referral is clearly 
identifiable for each client. 

N.B. Any statistics representing Visual Services Division clients should be 
asterisked or especially noted on the form on which they appear. 

65 



(luv. IU/79) 
MIS FORM 1 



Facility: 



Reporting Quarter: 



STATE OF MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Rehabilitative Services Division 

PROGRAINI ACTI^VI^TY REPORT 

MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 

Date: 



Cumulative Period: 




COMMENTS; 



66 



Enter the name and program type of each program at the top of the form. If 
there are more than 4 programs, use another page. Note: do not total data 
across programs. 

1. Referrals Received . The number of referrals received from RSD, 
official referral form and/or written information about the client. 
A referral can be verbal followed by a written referral format, or 
it can be strictly a written format. It is preferably the latter. 

2. Waiting List . The total number of clients that have been referred 
and who have not yet started at the end of the reporting quarter. 
Next, account for this total number in the following categories. 

a. Referred, no action. Those referrals for whom no decision 
regarding acceptance has yet been made. This includes persons 
not yet seen for screening. 

Do not compute b. Accepted, no residence. Referrals that have been accepted but 
a cumulative have not yet started primarily because of lack of suitable 
for item 2a, housing for the clients. 



b or c. 



c. Accepted, all others. All other referrals that have been 
accepted but have not yet started - for any reason. This 
includes those who may have been scheduled to start some- 
time in the future. 

3. Losses . The number of clients who had been referred for whom it 
was determined that they will not start the program. All referrals 
will eventually be reported either as a "loss" or as a "program 
start", but not necessarily in the same quarter. 

4. Program Starts . The number of clients who received any evaluation or 
treatment services following acceptance for services. This would 
include any clients who started regardless of the length of time in 
the program. 

5. Start Lag . The average (mean) number of working days between referral 
and program start for those clients that started, Item #4. If the 
average has been affected by some clients who were on the waiting 
list a very long time, add an explanatory note below under "Comments". 
In counting working days, exclude days clients were laid off "in shop" 
work and include holidays. 

6. Loss Percent . This would be expressed as a percentage determined by 
dividing the number of losses by the number of program starts plus 
losses. For example: if a program started 20 clients during a 
quarter and had 5 losses, the loss percent would be 5 f 20 + 5 = 
5/25 = 20%. 

7. Waiting More Than 4 Weeks. The number of clients that have been on 
the waiting list (referred but not yet started) more than 4 weeks at 
the end of the reporting quarter. Do not compute a cumulative for 
this item. 

Section B. Program Start to Termination 

This set of data items covers the time period from program start to termination by the 
facility, during which -services are provided. This will usually be the same as the 

period covered by RSD authorization. 

67 



1. Capacity . The number of "slots", or clients who can be served from 
RSD at any one time. This figure is normally determined when the 
Facility budget is calculated. If the program serves people from other 
referral sources, the capacity reported here may be less than that of 
the total program, particularly if some of that total capacity is set 
aside or committed to other referral sources. Do not compute a cumu- 
lative for this item. 

2. Absenteeism Rate . The hours or days or weeks (use only one form of 
time period in calculating) the rehab client was expected to be 
participating in the particular program and wasn't. If facility staff 
expect client to be in program so many days or hours or weeks for 
active participation in that program that quarter, then the number of 
hours or days or weeks he/she was not there divided by the total number 
of days or hours or weeks he/she was expected to be there equals the 
absenteeism rate . Whichever time frame you use (hours, days or weeks) 
poses no problem because absenteeism is expressed as a percentage. 
Formal suspensions are not counted in absenteeism. Example: 6 clients 
scheduled for 60 working days of quarter = 360 scheduled days. Due to 
absenteeism, they showed only 320 days. Thus: 320 f 360 = 89% of time 
present, 100% - 89% = 11% absenteeism. 

3. Terminations. The number of clients terminated, i.e., no longer under 
authorization during the reporting period. 

4. Util ization Rate . This would be expressed as a percentage, determined by 
dividing the average daily or weekly number of clients scheduled from 
RSD by the capacity. This does not take into account absenteeism. 
Example: 6 RSD clients per day are scheduled for vocational evaluation 
for a week. The facility voc eval capacity for RSD clients is 10 per 
day, for a week. Thus: 6 clients x 5 days = 30 client days, 10 clients 

x 5 days = 50 client days. 30 client days present = gQo. utilization Rate 

50 client days scheduled 

5. Unused Capacity . An estimated number of new clients that could have been 
started that quarter but were not. If the utilization rate was 100% or 
more, the facility would report "0". This should take into account program 
length. 

IV. Vocational Evaluation: Results Report (MIS Form 2) 

Section A. Program Results 

The items in this section apply to the clients closed by a facility from a 
Vocational Evaluation Program. " Closures " are reported here rather than 
"Terminations ". Most clients will be closed within 30 days of termination 
when the feedback regarding acceptance of evaluation recommendations shoulu 
be available. That is, a closure exists when facility staff receive the 
feedback (after 30 days) that their recommendations are accepted. 

The recommendation numbers 1-6 are for the major recommendation made for each 
clientcompleting the program. Each client will be reported in one major 
recommendation category, even though additional recommendations have been 
made. For example, if a client is recommended for competitive employment 
with a backup or secondary recommendation for sheltered work, he would be 
tallied here only under the competitive employment recommendation. Report the 
type of recommendation made on a client in the same quarter you report 
whether or not the recommendation was accepted. 



68 



FORM r,rt -RSt)-sr-i4 
Irev. 10/79) 
MIS FORM 2 



STATE or MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL R< REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Rehabilitative Services Division 



Y29^II2!!^L EVALUATION: RESULTS REPORT 

MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 



Facility: 



Reporting Quarter: 
Program Title: 



Date: 



Cumulative Period: 



A. PROGRAM RESULTS 


THIS QUARTER 


CUMULATIVE 


No. 


Percent 


No. 


Percent 


1. Placement for competitive employment recommended 










2. Skill training, OJT, college or secondary school 
recommended 










3. Extended employment, unpaid family worker or home- 
maker recommended or homebound 










4. Work adjustment services recommended 










5. Not feasible — non-vocational services recommended 










6. Not feasible — no services recommended 










7. Evaluation not completed — no vocational 
recommendations 










8. Total closures (Sum of 1-7) 










9. Clients for whom major recommendations accepted 










V///////////////////^^^^^^^ 


%^^^^^ 


mm^mm'. 


w///Mm 


Y/MW/M 


B, Program Efficiency 

1. Average number program days, all clients closed 










2. Average cost to RSD per client completing program 
(A - 1-6 above) 











COMMENTS: 



69 



1. Competitive Employment Recommended . Full or part time unsubsidized 
employment at least at minimum wage is recommended. Include here 
clients for whom placement assistance in competitive employment is 
recommended. If you are recommending job seeking skills training, 
use this category. 

2. Skill Training, OJT, College or Secondary School is Recommended . 

3. Extended Employment, Unpaid Family Worker or Homemaker is Recommended . 

4. Work Adjustment Services Recommended . This includes all types of 
programs where the emphasis is on improving client work behavior. 
This is normally a longer time period than voc eval , but usually 
not as long as VR-Extended Employment. 

5. Not Feasible: Other Non-Vocational Services Recommended . Clients 
who are determined to be not feasible for vocational rehabilitation 
but for whom non-vocational services not already being received are 
recommended (e.g., Social Security disability benefits, treatment 
for emotional problems, etc.). 

6. Not Feasible, No Services Recommended . Clients determined to be not 
feasible for vocational rehabilitation and no new services are recommended 
(e.g., client is to return home for continued family care). 

7. Evaluation Not Completed, No Vocational Recommendations . Clients who 
did not participate in the program long enough for any of the above 
recommendations to be made. 

8. Total Closures . The sum of Items #1-7 above. 

9. Major Recommendations Accepted. The clients on whom major recommendations 
have been made and the feedback from the referring counselors indicate 

that these recommendations have been accepted. That is, the recommendations 
have either been carried out (e.g., client has started the recommended 
work adjustment services), or the recommendations have been included in 
the client's Individual Written Rehabilitation Plan (IWRP). Calculate 
the percentage of accepted recommendations only on those clients for 
whom such information is available from the referring counselors. If 
there are some cases for whom this information is not available, add a 
note under "Comments" indicating the number of clients, which counselors 
are involved and what efforts were made to get the information. 

How are recommendations accepted? 

1. Sharing of the IWRP with the facility. 

2. Special feedback form from RSD counselor to facility. 

3. Assessment Needs Committee Meeting. 

4. Exit interview with client, RSD counselor and facility staff. 

The definition of an accepted recommendation for a particular facility 
should be made available to all RSD counselors. 



70 



Section B. Program Efficiency for Vocational Evaluation Program . 

1. Average Number Program Days . This average is for all program closures 
Item #8 above. If the average is particularly affected by a few clients 
who dropped out very early or who were extended, you may want to add a 
note under "Comments". 

2. Average Cost to RSD Per Client Completing Program. This is calculated by 
dividing the total fees for all clients closed (or the total RSD grant 
for the reporting period) by the number of clients who had completed the 
program (Items #1-6). Example: 25 clients were closed during the quarter, 
the total fee was $7,500, and 20 clients are reported as completing the 
program (5 non-completors) , the average cost to RSD would be $7,500 i 

20 = $375.00. 

V. Work Adjustment, Skill Training, Results Report (MIS Form 3) 

Complete one of these forms for each program of these types. 

Section A. Program Benefits 

The items in this section summarize the vocational benefits achieved by clients 
at the time of closure by the facility. The term "closure" is used rather than 
"termination" to take into account that many clients may not be reported as 
having or not having achieved some vocational benefit until some time after 
they are no longer receiving services: for example, waiting 60 days before 
closing a client on a job. All clients closed in #A1, 2, 3, 7 or 8 must be 
in that status at least 60 days. All clients must be closed within 90 days 
of termination unless the person has entered a Status 26 category but has not 
yet been in that status 60 days. These may be held open up to an additional 
60 days. 

1. Full Time Competitive Employment . Permanent, unsubsidized, at least 
30 hours per week, earning at least minimum wage. 

2. Part-Time, Seasonal or Temporary Employment . Unsubsidized, less than 
30 hours per week and/or not expected to be available for at least 6 
months. 

3. Sheltered Work/Work Activity . Full time or part-time consistent with 
DOL certificate criteria. 

4. On-The-Job Training . Formal arrangement where client receives training 
along with employment. Expectation is that employment will continue 
beyond OJT. Facilities may choose to wait with these clients until they 
have been employed 60 days beyond the OJT period and count them in Item 
#1 above. 

5. Accepted for Full Time Secondary School or College . Clients may be 
counted in this category upon acceptance by the institution. 

6. Accepted for Vocational or Skill Training . This could refer to accep- 
tance by any manpower training program in another facility. 

7. Homemaker. 



71 



FUHrj SHf;-nSD-SP-15 

Irov. n/7J) 
MIS FORM 3 



STATE OF MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Rehabilitative Services Division 

WORK ADJUSTMENT , SKILL TRAINING ; RESULTS REPORT 

MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 



FacHity: 



Date: 



Reporting Quarter: 
Program Title: 



Cumulative Period: 
Program Type: 





THIS QUARTER 1 CUMULATIVE 


A. PROGRAM BENEFITS 
> 


No. 


Percent No. 


Percent 


1. FULL-TIME COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT 










2. PART-TIME, SEASONAL OR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT 










3. SHELTERED WORK /WORK ACTIVITY 










4. ON-THE-JOB TRAINING 










5. ACCEPTED FOR FULL-TIME SECONDARY SCHOOL OR COLLEGE 










6. ACCEPTED FOR VOCATIONAL OR SKILL TRAINING 








7. HOMEMAKER 










8. UNPAID FAMILY WORKER 




^ 




9. TOTAL (SUM OF 1-8) 










10. TRANSFER TO OTHER VOCATIONAL PROGRAM (OTHER THAN 
N03. 1-J, 










11. NONE OF THE ABOVE BENEFITS 










12. TOTAL CLOSURES (9 + 10 + 11 = 12) 




1 




13. AVERAGE GROSS WEEKLY EARNINGS IN FULL-TIME 
COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT 


$ 1 s 


14. AVERAGE GROSS Vi^cr.^; dA.^^^INGS IN PART-TIME, 
SEASONAL OR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT 


s s 


15. AVERAGE GROSS WEEKLY EARNINGS IN SHELTERED WORK 


$ s 


B. PROGRAM EFFICIENCY 

1. AVERAGE NUMBER PROGRAM WEEKS, ALL CLIENTS CLOSED 




2. AVERAGE COST TO RSD . (ITEM 9 ABOVE) 


$ Is 
iJ 



COMMENTS: 



72 



VI 



8. Unpaid Family Worker . 

9. Total #1-8. This is the total number of persons achieving any vocational 
benefit, all Status 26 and potential Status 26 closures. 

10. Transfer. Clients transferred to and accepted by other vocational 
programs. This refers to a transfer to a vocational program other 
than #1-8. 

11. Noneof the Above Benefits . Total number of persons closed from each 
program who do not achieve any of the listed vocational benefits. 

12. Total Closures . The sum of #9, 10 and 11. 

13. Average Gross Weekly Earnings. Clients closed in full time competitive 
employment. 

14. Average Gross Weekly Earnings. Clients closed in part-time, seasonal 
or temporary employment. 

15. Average Gross Weekly Earnings. Clients closed in sheltered employment. 

Section B. Program Efficiency 

1. Average Number of Program Weeks . Clients closed in each of the closure 
categories listed above (A 1-12). Time in program includes from the date 
of program start to the date of termination or start of employment, less 
any time formally suspended from the program. 

2. Average Cost (To RSD) Per Client . Closed in any Status 26 or potential 
Status 26 category listed above (A 1-9). The average cost includes the 
fee for all clients closed regardless of benefit achieved. Example: if 
10 clients were closed in a program and the total fee for those 10 clients 
was $6,000 and 5 of those clients were in Status 26 categories, 5 in other 
categories, the average cost would be $6,000 -f 5 = $1,200. 

Extended Employment: Results Report (MIS Form 4) 

Section A. Program Benefits 

The items in this section apply to clients closed by a facility from an 
Extended Employment Program and those clients remaining in the facility. 
All clients must be reported as program closures within 90 days of termi- 
nation unless they have entered employment but have not been working 60 
days. They then may be held open up to an additional 60 days before program 
closure. 



1. Competitive Employment. Full or part-time, permanent, unsubsidized 
employment at least at minimum wage. 

2. Transfer to Other Vocational Program or Skill Training . Clients that 
have been transferred to and accepted by other vocational programs 
(such as Work Adjustment Training) or skill training at the same 
facility or at other resource. 



73 



FOniCI SRS- RSD-SP-16 
li.!v. 1P;7n) 
MIS FORM 4 



STATE OK MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Rehabilitative Services Division 



EXTENDED EMPLOYiNlENT: {RESULTS REPORT 

MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 



Facility: 



Date: 



Reporting Quarter: 
Program Title: 



Cumulative Period: 



THIS QUARTER 



CUMULATIVE 



A. PROGRAJVl BENEFITS 



NUMBER PERCENT 



NUMBER PERCENT 



1. Competitive employment 



2. Transfer to other vocational program or skill training 



3. Closed, placed into Status 00 



4. Closed, not available for review and reevaluation 



5. TOTAL (sum of 1-4) 




6. Mamtained in facility or workshop employment following admin- 
istrative review 



7. Average gross weekly earnings, clients in competitive employment 



8. Average weekly earnings, all clients in extended employment 



B. PROGRAM EFFICIENCY 



1. Average number months, clients closed in competitive employ- 
ment or transferred (Items 1 and 2 above) 



2. Average monthly program cost to RSD per client in extended 
employment 



COMMENTS: 



74 



3. Closed, placed into Status 00 . Clients who have been placed into 
referral status by the state agency during the reporting quarter. 

4. Closed, not available for review and reevaluation . In effect, this is 
all other closures, for any reason (e.q., died, moved, returned home, 
etc. ). 

5. TOTAL ■ The sum of items #1-4 above. Note: Ordinarily, a client would 
not fall into more than one of the above categories. If it does occur, 
please explain under "Comments", 

6. Maintained in facility or workshop employment following administrative 
review . The number of persons who had an administrative review this 
reporting quarter and who remain in workshop employment. This includes 
those reported in Item #6 above. It does not include anyone remaining 
in the facility who did not have an administrative review this quarter. 

For the cumulative figure, indicate the total number of persons remaining 
in workshop employment who had had an administrative review at any time 
during the current fiscal year. 

7. Average Gross Weekly Earnings in Competitive Employment . This is calcu- 
lated for the clients reported in Item #1 above. 

8. Average Weekly Earnings All Clients in Extended Employment . This is 
calculated for all clients who were in extended employment during the 
reporting period, regardless of whether or not they have had an admin- 
istrative review. 

Section B. Program Efficiency 

1. Average Number Months, Clients Closed in Competitive Employment or 
Transferred (Items Al and 2 above). Time in program includes from the 
date of program start to the date of termination, less any time formally 
suspended from the program. 

2. Average Monthly Program Cost to RSD Per Client in Extended Employment . 
This is calculated by dividing the total RSD fees or grant for the 
reporting period by the number of client months. Example: if the RSD 
fees totaled $13,500, and there were 15 clients involved 3 months each 
during the quarter, the average cost would be $13,500 t 45 = $300 per 
client month. 



75 



CLIENT CHARACTERISTICS REPORTS 

These reports ask for information on those key client characteristics or 
descriptors that will be used in the monitoring of the types of clients 
served and in interpreting the results achieved. 

Leave spaces blank if there are no clients to report for a particular item. 
Include % of total only when the numbers are reasonably large, at least 10- 
15 clients total. 

Items #1-12 are primary disability categories. Each client can be tallied in 
only one of these 12 categories. Do not tally secondary disabilities. Check 
to be sure Items 1-12 added together equal the total reported at the top. A 
client diagnosis is available on the medical, possessed by the referring RSD 
counselor. 

1. Blind 

2. Visually Impaired 

3. Deaf 

4. Hard-of-Hearing 

5. Mentally 111 

6. Mentally Retarded, Not Developmental ly Disabled 

7. Cerebral Palsy, Not Developmental ly Disabled 

8. Epilepsy, Not Developmental ly Disabled 

9. Developmental ly Disabled 

(a) Mentally Retarded 

(b) Cerebral Palsy 

(c) Epilepsy 

10. Character and Personality Disorders 

11. Addictive Disorders 

12. Other Orthopedic or Medically Disabled 

13. Multiply Disabled - Client has more than one of the above disabilities, 
a secondary disability exists. 

*14. Severely Disabled 

15. Never Worked: Part-Time, Full-Time, Competitive or Sheltered, Prior to 
Program Entry. 

16. Minorities (Black, Native American, Oriental, Spanish Surname) 

17. Age under 18 

18. Age 18-21 

19. Age 22-54 

20. Age 55 and over 

21. No High School Diploma or Equivalency 

22. History of Special Education 

23. Received Public Support. Worker's Compensation, Medicaid, Medicare, 
Title XX, SSDI, AFDC, GA, at The Time of Referral or During the Program 

24. History of Institutionalization (MR, MI, Chemical Dependency, Corrections) 

*The term "severely disabled" means the disability which requires multiple 
services over an extended period of time and results from amputation, blind- 
ness, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, heart disease, 
hemiplegia, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular 
dystrophy, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), paraplegia, 
quadriplegia and other spinal cord conditions, renal failure, respiratory or 
pulmonary dysfunction, and any other disability specified by the Secretary in 
regulations he shall prescribe. 

N.B. This determination of "severely disabled" is made by the vocational 
rehabilitation counselor. 



76 



VII. Vocational Evaluation: Client Characteristics RejDort (MIS Form 5) 

Column 1 is to be used for indicating the characteristics of all clients reported as 
Losses Before Program Start. (If this information is not available because the clients 
have not yet been seen for intake purposes you may want to note that under "Comments".) 

Column 2 is to be used for clients who are reported as Evaluation Program Completors, 
those for whom recommendations have been made. Be sure that this report includes only 
those people reported on the "Vocational Evaluation: Results Report". Do not report 
persons here that may have just recently completed Evaluation but for whom the 
acceptance of recommendations is not yet known. 

Column 3 is to be used for clients who are reported as Non-Completors, that is, the 
evaluation was not completed, no recommendations were made. 

VIII. Work Adjustment, Skill Training, Placement: Client Characteristics Report 
(MIS Form 6) 

Column 1 is to be used for the characteristics of all clients reported as Losses Before 
Program Start. If this information is not available because the clients have not yet 
been seen for intake purposes you may want to note that under "Comments". 

Column 2 is to be used for all clients reported as closed in a vocational benefit 
category (Item #9) on the Results Report. 

Column 3 is to be used for all clients reported as transfers to other vocational 
program (Item #10) or no vocational benefit (Item #11). 

IX. Extended Employment: Client Characteristics Report (MIS Form 7) 

Column 1 is to be used for the characteristics of all clients reported as Losses 
Before Program Start. 

Column 2 is to be used for clients reported as closed in Competitive Employment 
(Item #1) or Transferred (Item #2) on the Results Report. 

Column 3 is to be used for all clients closed from Extended Employment for other than 
employment or transfer (Items #3 and #4) on the Results report. Note the additional 
characteristics items which further describe the Mentally Retarded clients in Items 
6 and 9: 

25. Educable MR 

26. Trainable MR 

X. Extended Employment: Characteristics of Current Clients Report (MIS Form 8) 

This report form is to be submitted twice a year, at the end of July and the end of 
December to describe the characteristics of clients currently in extended employment. 
Include all those persons who are considered to be currently enrolled in that program. 
Note the additional characteristic items: 

25. Educable MR 

26. Trainable MR 

27. In Extended Employment less than one year. Clients who have been 

in extended employment at this facility less than one year (1-51 weeks). 

28. In Extended Employment one to two years (52-103 weeks). 

29. In Extended Employment two years or more (104 or more weeks). 



77 



(r-v. ICV-'JI 
MIS FORM 5 



MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 
Rehabilitative Services Division 

EVALUATION PROGRAM: CUENT CHARACTERISTICS REPORT 
MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 



Facility: 

Reporting Quarter: 
Program Title: 



Date: 



Cumulative Period: 



CHARACTERISTICS 


COLUMN 1 
LOSSES 


COLUMN 2 
PROGRAM COMPLETORS 


COLUMN 3 
NON-COMPLETORS 


NOTE: (Nos. 1 - 12 Primary dis- 
ability onlyj 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULATIVE 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULATIVE 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULATIVE 


NO. I 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 1 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


TOTAL NO. OF PERSONS 


























1. Blind 


























2. Visually Impaired 


























3. Deaf 


























4. Hard of Hearing 


























5. Mentally III 


























6. Mentally Retarded, not Develop- 
mentally Disabled 


























7. Cerebral Palsy, not Development- 
ally Disabled 


























8. Epilepsy, not Develop. Disabled 


























9. Developmentally Disabled 




























a. Mentally Retarded 


























b. Cerebral Palsy 


























c. Epilepsy 


























10. Character & Personality Disorders 


























11. Addictive Disorders 


























12. Other Orthopedic or Medically 
Disabled 


























13. Mulitply Disabled (more than one 
of the above) 


























14. Severely Disabled 


























15. Never worked 


























16. Minorities 


























17. Age under 18 


























18. Age 18-21 


























19. Age 22 -54 


























20. Ac5 ^5 and ov.:r 


























21. No High School Diploma or 
equivalency 


























22. Special Education ' 


























23. Received public support 


























24. History of institutionalization 



























COMMENTS: 



78 



sns nsD-5P-i8 

(icv. 10/79) 
MIS FORM 6 



STATE OF MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Rehabilitative Services Division 



WORK ADJUSTMENT . SKILL TRAINING ; CLIENT CHARACTERISTICS REPORT 

MONTANA REHABILITATON FACILITIES - MIS 



Facility: 



Date: 



Reporting Quarter: 
Program Type: 



Cumulative Period: 



CHARACTERISTICS 


COLUMN 1 
LOSSES 


COLUMN 2 
VOCATIONAL BENEFIT 


COLUMN 3 

TRANSFERRED. NO 

VOCATIONAL BENEFIT 


NOTE: (Nos. 1-12 Primary Dis-- 
abiiity only) 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULATIVE 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULATIVE 


THIS OTR. 


CUMULATIVE 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


TOTAL NO. OF PERSONS 


























1. Blind 


























2. Visually impaired 


























3. Deaf 


























4. Hard of hearing 


























5. Mentally ill 


























6. Mentally Retarded, not Develop- 
mentally Disabled 


























7. Cerebral Palsy, not Develop- 
mentally Disabled 


























8. Epilepsy, not Develop. Disabled 


























9. Developmentally Disabled: 




























a. Mentally Retarded 


























b. Cerebral Palsy 


























c. Epilepsy 


























10. Character & Personal. Disorders 


























11. Addictive Disorders 


























12. Other Orthopedic or Medically 
Disabled 


























1 IT ^■■!';.::|v r> v'p.j (more than 
one or i,.c .^c\iei 


























14. Severely Disabled 


























15. Never worked 


























16. Minorities 


























17. Age under 18 


























18. Age 18-21 


























19. Age 22 -54 


























20. Age 55 and over 


























21. No High School Diploma or 
equivalency 


























22. Special Education 


























23. Received public support 


























24. History of institutionalization 



























COMMENTS: 



79 



snr>-nso-sp- 19 

(rnv. 10//'J) 
MIS FORM 7 



MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 
Rehabilitative Services Division 

EXTENDED E\irLOYMENT: CLIENT CHARACTERISTICS REPORT 
MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 



Facility: 

Reporting Quarter: 
Program Title: 



Date: 



Cumulative Period: 



CHARACTERISTICS 


COLUMN 1 
LOSSES 


COLUMN 2 

COMPETITIVE EMPLOY. 

OR TRANSFERRED 


COLUMN 3 
ALL OTHER CLOSURES 


NOTE: (Nos. 1-12 Primary disability 
only) > 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULAT. 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULAT. 


THIS QTR. 


CUMULAT. 


NO. 


% 1 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


TOTAL NO. OF PERSONS 


























1. Blind 


























2. Visually Impaired 


























3. Deaf 


























4. Hard of Hearing 


























5. Mentally 111 


























6. Mentally Retarded, not Dev. Disab. 


























7. Cerebral Palsy, not Devel. Disabled 


























8. Epilepsy, not Develop. Disabled 


























9. Dovelopmentallv Disabled; 




























a. Mentally Retarded 


























b. Cerebral Palsy 


























c. Epilepsy 


























10. Character & personality Disorders 


























11. Addictive Disorders 


























12. OihPf Orthopedic or Medically Disnbled 


























13. Multiply Disabled (more than one 
of the above) 


























14. Severely Disabled 


























15. Never worked 


























16. Minorities 


























17. Ago under 18 


























18. Age 18-21 


























19. Age 22 -54 


























20. Age 55 and over 


























21. No High School diploma or Equiv. 


























22. Special Education 


























23. Received public support 






















' 


24. History of institutionalization 


























25. Educable Mentally Retarded 


























26. Trainable Mentally Retarded 




















1 








COMMENTS: 



80 



'sns-Rr.u-s"-zo 

MIS Ft)RM 8 



STATE or- MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Rehabilitative Services Division 



EXTENDED EMPLOYMEiNT: CIJAIIACTERISTICS OF CURIjENT CLIENTS REPORT 

MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 



Facility: 



Program Title; 



Date: 



Reporting Period: 



CLIENTS CURRENTLY REMAINING IN EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT 


CHARACTERISTICS (Nos. 1-12 Primary disability only) 


NUMBER 


% OF TOTAL 


TOTAL NUMBER OF PERSONS 




100% 


1. Blind* 






2. Visually Impaired 






3. Deaf 






4. Hard of Hearing 






5. Mentally III 






6. Mentally Retarded, not Developmentally Disabled 






7. Cerebral Palsy, not Developmentally Disabled 






8. Epilepsy, not Developmentally Disabled 






9. Developmentally Disabled: 








a. Mentally Retarded 






b. Cerebral Palsy 






c. Epilepsy 






10. Character and Personality Disorders 






11. Addictive Disorders 






12. Other Orthopedic or Medically Disabled 






13. Multiply Disabled (more than one of the above) 






14. Severely Disabled 






15. Never worked 






16. Minorities 






17. Age under 18 






18. Age 18 -21 






19. Age 22 • 54 






20. Age 55 and over 






21. No Mich School Diploma or Equivalency 






22. Special Education 






23. Received public support 






24. History of institutionalization 






25. Educable Mentally Retarded 






26. Trainable Mentally Retarded 






27. In extended employment less than one year 






28. In extended employment one to two years 






29. In extended employment two years or more 







COMMENTS: 



81 



SRS •HSD-Sf-21 
'irov. 10//g| 
MIS FORM 10 



STATE OF MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Rehabilitative Services Division 



J0I5 PLACEMENT : CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS REPORT 
MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES - MIS 



Facility: 



Program Title: 



Date: 



Reporting Period: 



CLIENTS STARTING A JOB THIS QUARTER 


CHARACTERISTICS (Nos. 1 ■ 12 - Primary disability only) 


NUMBER 


% OF TOTAL 


TOTAL NUMBER OF PERSONS 




100% 


1. Blind 






2. Visually Impaired 






3. Deaf 






4. Hard of Hearing 






5. Mentally III 






6. Mentally Retarded, not Developmentally Disabled 






7. Cerebral Palsy, not Developmentally Disabled 






8. Epilepsy, not Developmentally Disabled 






9. Developmentally Disabled: 






a. Mentally Retarded 






b. Cerebral Palsy 






c. Epilepsy 






10. Ciiaracter & Personality Disorders 






11. Addictive Disorders 






12. Other Orthopedic or Medically Disabled 






13. Multiply Disabled (more than one of the above) 






14. Severely Disabled 






15. Never worked 






16. Minorities 






17. Age under 18 






18. Age 18-21 






19. Age 22 -54 






20. Age 55 and over 






^i- -■ :■ -c:: :.. . . i' .■ ■ ' . ■ 






22. Special Education 






23. Received public support 






24. History of institutionalization 






25. Educable Mentally Retarded 






26. Trainable Mentally Retarded 






27. In extended employment less than one year 






28. In extended employment one to two years 






29. In extended eriiployment two years or more 







COMMENTS: 



82 



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