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s 

362.9786 
V3MA 
1986 
1 












Rehabilitative Services Division 

Visual Services Division 



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STATE 



STATE DOCUMENTS COLLECTION 

NIAR 1 B 1987 

MONTANA STATE LIBRARY 

1515 E. 6th AVE. 
HELENA, MONTANA 59620 



P L A 



1 «9»Q<£3 i^DDENDLJM 



Montana State Library 



3 0864 1005 0381 5 



STATE OF MONTANA 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICES 

REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 

VISUAL SERVICES DIVISION 



REHABILITATION FACILITIES PLAN 
1986 ADDENDUM 



BY 

MARGARET A. BULLOCK. ADMINISTRATOR 

REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 
VISUAL SERVICES DIVISION 



HELENA MONTANA 
DECEMBER 1986 



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This document is available by contacting 
Rehabilitative/Visual Services divisions. 
Box 4210. Helena mt 59604. It is also 
distributed through the Montana State 
Library at isis E 6Th Ave. Helena MT. 



DISCRIMINATION PROHIBITED 



All programs described in this publication comply with Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as 
amended and the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

IVIontana State Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/montanastateplan1986mont 



FOREWARD 



The 1986 Addendum of the Montana State Plan for Rehabilitation facilities is a 
public document intended to be utilized in guiding and influencing the estab- 
lishment and improvement of rehabilitation facilities within the state. 
"Rehabilitation Facility" in Montana means: 



The facility or host organization is legally constituted and the 
legal charter, constitution or official statement or purpose implies 
or directly states it provides rehabilitation services. 



The major or primary purpose of the organization is to rehabilitate 
persons. 



The organization is able to provide multiple services in an inte- 
grated and individualized manner. 



It is anticipated that the organization will provide during the 
program year an official program which will be purchased under the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 



In this Addendum attention will be paid only to rehabilitation facilities with 
which the Rehabilitative Services and Visual Services Divisions have a special 
investment, that is, specifically the rehabilitation work oriented facilities 
and the rehabilitation medically oriented facility indicated on the enclosed 
map. Because the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division of the Department of Insti- 
tutions is specifically involved in halfway house establishment, program 
maintenance and certifying as well as the granting of federal funds to such 
facilities. The Rehabilitative and Visual Services Divisions relate to such 
facilities only as vendors and occasionally as consultants in the certifying 
of such. 



This fourteenth annual Addendum will modify the original Montana State Plan 
for Rehabilitation Facilities and Workshops published in 1968. 

In accordance with the guidelines attached to the Commissioner's letter 68-41, 
dated June 18, 1968, and Program Instruction RSA-PI85-02, this Addendum is 
designed to maintain the "State Plan" as a current and effective tool in 
notifying the population of Montana of two (2) things: 1) the high quality of 
rehabilitation facility services available to all individuals possessing 
physical and/ or mental disabilities that are vocationally handicapping, and 2) 



the Rehabilitative and Visual Services Division's intent to support either 
directly via grants or indirectly through the purchase of vocational 
evaluation and work adjustment services in what they consider to be the only 
key and necessary rehabilitation facilities in Montana. Those particular 
facilities are discussed in this state Facility Plan Addendum. It is hoped 
that this Addendum will fulfill these purposes and that the handicapped people 
of Montana will benefit from the much needed services provided by these 
rehabilitation facilities, not only via the Rehabilitative Services and Visual 
Services Divisions, but under the auspices of other agencies also capable of 
singular and/or cooperative involvement in the purchase of services necessary 
for rehabilitation. 




/kA^UsJ^c/U/j'ily^ 



Margaret BurlUock, Administrator 
Rehabilitative Services Division 
Visual Services Division 



HISTORY OF THE 



MONTANA REHABILITATION FACILITIES PROGRAM 



A brief overview of the development of the rehabilitation facilities program 
in Montana will bring the reader into focus with the present situation. 

In 1966, in accordance with the 1965 amendments, an administrative staff 
position was approved for a person designated to plan, establish standards, 
and assure effective development and utilization of rehabilitation facilities 
within the state. In Montana, as in most states, the Rehabilitation 
Facilities Specialist was appointed to this position for the specific purpose 
of working with rehabilitation facilities. 

In 1966, an application was submitted to the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare, Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, for a Statewide 
Planning Grant. A Planning Director was hired, and a final report was 
submitted in 1968. The original Montana State Plan for Rehabilitation 
Facilities and Workshops was written as a result of the findings of the 
Statewide Planning surveys and was also published in 1968. The initial 
planning process for the State plan was set up in four (4) phases identified 
as follows: 1) preparatory activities, 2) inventory and utilization of 
rehabilitation facilities, 3) determination of needs, and 4) continuing 
activities. These phases are reflected in the publication of the original 
Facilities Plan in 1968, and continue to be ongoing as reflected in the 
subsequent annual addenda. 

1971 marked the beginning of a reorganization of Montana's state agencies. 
Due to such a movement, the Facilities Specialist responsibilities fell within 
the realm of the newly organized Special Projects Bureau administered by the 
Chief of Special Projects. Thus, in addition to being accountable for special 
projects and programs for the state rehabilitation agency, the Chief of that 
Bureau is responsible for being attentive to the state's needs in terms of the 
establishment, utilization, development, and improvement of rehabilitation 
facilities. 



TRENDS AND PLANNING RELATIONSHIPS 

As a result of the Executive Reorganization Act of 1971 (Senate Bill 274) 
consolidation and coordination of agencies, and more importantly, of purpose, 
have taken place. Reflections of such are the attempts at planning and 
organization by state agencies for rehabilitation facilities. 

In January, 1972, a number of state agencies and others considered to be human 
resource agencies were invited by the Rehabilitative Services Division to 
participate in a two and one-half {2h) day seminar to discuss methods of 
financing rehabilitation work facilities in Montana, utilizing cooperation 
between various state-federal programs and the private sector, as well as 



purchase-of -service arrangements. Agencies and programs in attendance were 
the Rehabilitative Services Division (RSD) , the Social Assistance Field 
Division, WIN, Social Security, Vocational Education, Montana Association for 
Retarded Citizens, Veterans Administration, Model Cities, Mental Health, Aging 
Services Division, Eastern Montana College Rehabilitation Counseling Program, 
Aftercare Division, State Department of Piiblic Instruction, Special Education, 
Governor's Manpower Planning, Medical Services, Regional Office Rehabilitation 
Services, Disability Determination Bureau, Crime Control Commission, Facility 
Directors and Board Members from Helena, Billings, Butte, and Eastern Montana. 
Some of these agency names have changed during continuing state reorganization 
efforts. The concepts of block funding and set-aside allocations to these 
facilities were considered. An Action Committee was formulated to implement 
the findings of the seminar. 

The rehabilitation work facility directors left the seminar with the charge to 
market their products to all appropriate agencies in attendance and others. 
As its participation on the Action Committee, the Rehabilitative Services 
Division did survey its counselors (purchasers of services) on rehabilitation 
work facility usage to determine the feasibility of block funding. It was 
determined to be impractical at that time or for fiscal years 1973 and 1974, 
Since then, block funding has been implemented once. Unless the RSD Regional 
Office opinion of such changes to one (1) of proponent, block funding will not 
be utilized again. 

During fiscal year 1974, the Developmental Disabilities (DD) authority was 
transferred from the Department of Institutions to the Department of Social 
and Rehabilitation Services. This deinstitutionalization movement was the 
beginning of a totally separate service system and philosophy of service 
delivery for Montana's developmentally disabled, especially, the mentally 
retarded. Six (6) of the eight (8) rehabilitation facilities reflected in 
this plan were expanded as a result of the Purchase of Service Contracts on 
behalf of the DD Adult population. Two (2) facilities were newly established. 
Such a move has provided for more community utilization of rehabilitation 
facilities on behalf of the developmentally disabled, now the largest users of 
such facilities. 

The effects of 1974 legislation were felt by rehabilitation facilities, and 
new legislation, pro-these facilities, initiated the following activities: 



A certification procedure, utilizing the survey and accreditation 
procedure of the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation 
Facilities (CARF) . 



II. A $200,000 Extended Employment Program. 



III. The negotiation of state contracts for the purchase of products not 
exceeding five thousand dollars ($5,000) with sheltered workshops 
and work activity centers without complying with competitive bid 
practices. 



These three (3) products of the 1974 legislature were a result of the efforts 
of the newly organized Montana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities 
(MARF) . Since the 1974 legislative session, the history of the rehabilitation 
facility movement in Montana has been contained in the implementation of 
federal and state facility legislation and in the well organized efforts of 
MARF. 

Facility certification after CARF accreditation has been ongoing for twelve 
(12) years. The eight (8) recognized rehabilitation facilities have been 
certified. The current policy of the Rehabilitation and Visual Services 
Divisions regarding facility accreditation and certification is stated in 
Attachment A. 

The Extended Employment Program in Montana was initiated as a result of lobby 
efforts by the rehabilitation facility directors and concerned parents and 
guardians of individuals who could benefit from these services. The policy 
describing the program intent for Extended Employment is contained in 
Attachment B. 

This particular program was appropriated $200,000 for implementation. The 
first year of the program $75,000 of the $200,000 was given to the Develop- 
mental Disabilities Program to pay for extended employment services for only 
the Developmentally Disabled. The remaining $125,000 was spent for such 
services on behalf of disabled individuals who did not qualify for any other 
funding source. Approximately fifty (50) disabled individuals in five (5) 
facilities benefitted from the services the first year. The second year of 
the program the total $200,000 was set aside for all disabilities (other than 
Title XX eligible Developmentally Disabled individuals) needing the services. 
Approximately seventy-five (75) individuals in six (6) facilities benefitted 
from the service. Again in fiscal year 1977, seventy-five (75) individuals in 
six (6) facilities benefitted from the Extended Employment Service. Sixty- 
five (65) individuals in seven (7) facilities were recipients of Extended 
Employment Services in state fiscal year 1978, and sixty (60) individuals were 
Extended Employment recipients in state fiscal year 1979. Sixty-three (63) 
people benefited from Extended Employment in 1980. In 1981, fifty-seven (57) 
people benefited from Extended Employment Services. Also in 1981, the Legis- 
lature approved continuation of the program with an increase of $15,000 a 
year, making the annual appropriation $215,000 for state fiscal year 1982 and 
$230,000 for 1983. That level of funding was maintained in 1984, and in 1985. 
The 1985 Legislature increased that appropriation to $289,200 for 1986, and 
$298,768 for 1987. 

During fiscal year 1975 an application was initiated to provide each of six 
(6) rehabilitation facilities with Innovation and Expansion (I s E) funds to 
hire a placement specialist to do job development, job placement and follow-up 
for the facility clients, with an emphasis on the severely disabled. That 
application was funded and the project began July 1, 1975. During the first 
year of that project, the facility job placement staff placed one hundred 
sixty-three (163) handicapped people, of which sixty-four percent (64%) were 
severely disabled. One hundred eleven (111) handicapped people (75 severely 
disabled) were placed the second year of the project. One hundred twenty 
(120) individuals benefitted from the job development, job placement and 
follow-up services during the third and final year of this project. A similar 
I s E project was initiated October 1, 1978, but in two (2) new rehabilitation 
facilities. . 



six (6) of the rehab facilities involved in the original I S E job placement 
grant are now under contract to the Rehabilitative Services Division to 
continue the provision of job development, job placement and follow-up 
activities on behalf of vocational rehabilitation clients. Those five (5) job 
placement efforts netted one hundred ninety-three (193) 22 ' s for the state 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1979. Another special placement effort was 
initiated on a fee for service basis at a sixth rehabilitation facility. The 
six (6) special placement efforts netted one hundred two (102) 25 's for the 
state fiscal year ending June 30, 1980. 1981 netted one hundred fifty (150) 
placements. One hundred sixty-one (161) placements (73 severely disabled) 
were made in 1982, one hundred sixty-three (163) in 1983, one hundred fifty- 
five (155) in 1984, and one hundred forty-nine (149) in 1985. In 1986 the 
Placement Specialists accomplished one hundred fifty-four (154) job 
placements. 

Also, during fiscal year 1976 all eight (8) rehabilitation facilities 
initiated program evaluation within their facilities to begin the measurement 
of overall program effectiveness and administration. Via these systems, data 
has been and will continue to be provided annually to the Rehabilitative and 
Visual Services Divisions in a Management Information System (MIS) . This data 
allows the Divisions to make knowledgeable decisions regarding facility usage 
and funding. See Attachment C. That bill was amended in the 1985 Legislative 
Session to simplify purchasing procedures. 

While the facility legislation eliminating the necessity for competitive 
bidding on state agency purchases up to $5,000 has been on the books since 
1974, the use of this possibility by the state has not been broad based. 
Because of inactivity in this area, MARF was a lobbying force for state "set 
aside" legislation during the 1977 session. The legislature did pass a bill 
requiring state department and other political subdivisions of the state to 
purchase products and services from sheltered workshops and work activity 
centers. This bill has been signed into law, and procedures for implementa- 
tion do exist. 



MONTANA'S FACILITY PROGRAM 



I. REHABILITATION FACILITY ADVISORY COUNCILS 

Due to the dictates of Executive Reorganization, no Rehabilitation 
Facility Advisory Council existed for four (4) fiscal years, nor could 
exist until created by the Director of the Social and Rehabilitation 
Services Department, or the Governor, or officials of an executive 
department (other than a department head), and in the later case, only if 
federal law or regulations required the creation of a facility advisory 
council as a condition for the receipt of federal facility funds. 

However, during fiscal year 1976 an Advisory Council for the Rehabilita- 
tive Services Division and one for the Visual Services Division were 
appointed by the Governor. These two (2) Councils for the Divisions are 
advisory in all phases of the vocational rehabilitation program, and 
include among their members representation from the Montana Association 
of Rehabilitation Facilities (MARF) , a non-profit organization organized 
to stimulate and offer assistance to its member agencies. Their efforts 
to provide quality habilitation and rehabilitation for handicapped 
individuals regardless of age, race, color or sex; and representation 
from a Part B Independent Living Center. Thus, they are advisory to the 
rehabilitation facility movement in Montana. As advisor to the facility 
movement, the role of the Councils is as follows: 



Purpose 

Represent public and private interests as they pertain to rehabilitation 
facility planning. 

Serve in an advisory capacity to the rehabilitation agency facility 
staff. 

Advise and assist in the development of a continuing State Plan for 
Rehabilitation Facilities within Montana. 



Function 

The focus of council concern will be the present and future rehabilita- 
tion facility needs of the disabled people in Montana. 

The Councils will advise on: 

Current status of rehabilitation facilities in Montana (See Attach- 
ment C - 1981 - RSD Council Resolution) . 

Immediate and long-range needs of Montana rehabilitation facilities. 



Requirements and standards for continuing program to evaluate such 
needs. 

The effectiveness of programs developed to meet these needs. 

The Advisory Councils, in addition, will be concerned with the following: 

Sources of information to the planning staff as to problem areas of 
rehabilitation service deficiency. 

Methods of maintaining quality service and effective utilization of 
centers. 

Upgrading and expanding existing facilities prior to new develop- 
ment. 

Rehabilitation facility need based on population, geography, and 
disability factors. 

Development of a priority list for rehabilitation facilities. 

Methods of implementation of final recommendations to solve current 
needs. 

Independent living rehabilitation. 



II. MONTANA'S FACILITIES PROGRAM 

The state VR agency facility specialist in Montana is a generalist who 
performs the following diverse functions in addition to wearing many 
other hats. 

The facilities specialist must know and be able to explain to others the 
general philosophy, practices, and procedures of vocational rehabilita- 
tion and of the state agency for which he or she works . The audience 
will include state agency personnel, facilities staff and board members, 
consumer groups, and other interested groups or individuals. 

The facilities specialist must be able to recognize and analyze needs for 
services, to strengthen successful existing patterns of services 
delivery, and to develop new ones. After informing other vocational 
rehabilitation personnel and facilities directors of unmet needs, the 
specialist serves as a consultant in the development of new ways and 
means to meet these needs. 

As a consultant, the facilities specialist interprets federal and state 
guidelines for the wide variety of grant programs available to 
rehabilitation facilities and workshops. The specialist provides 
assistance to applicants in the preparation of grant applications and 
recommends approval or rejection of applications. Also, the specialist 
administers and monitors ongoing grant programs to insure that federal 
and state requirements are adhered to and that the goals and objectives 
of grant projects are met. 



The facilities specialist acts as liaison between the two (2) most 
important elements in the delivery of direct services to clients — the 
rehabilitation counselor and the facility or workshop — insuring both that 
the counselor is aware of the services offered by the facility and that 
those services meet the needs of clients referred to it. 

At any given time, the rehabilitation facilities specialist is involved 
in public relations, is a consultant, an analyst, a researcher, an 
administrator, an arbitrator, a coordinator of multifaceted and diverse 
programs. Whichever function he or she is performing; however, all 
activities are directed toward meeting the service needs of handicapped 
and severely handicapped persons. 

Also, a VR counselor in each service delivery area is a facility liaison 
counselor providing the primary network of communication between the 
state agency and the facilities. 

III. FACILITIES NEEDS STUDIES 

A. Establishment: 

1. Purpose and estimated cost. See Administrative Rules of 
Montana (Attachment D) . 

2. Montana's legislature did not budget establishment costs for 
Montana's VR program. 

B. Construction: 

1. Purpose, area, kind, estimated cost - See Administrative Rules 
of Montana (Attachment D) . 

C. Facilities and Services to Groups: 

1. Purpose, area and estimated cost. See Administrative Rules of 
Montana (Attachment E) . 

2. Montana has one (1) Services to Groups Grant for $2,400 to 
provide reader services to blind and learning disabled 
students. 

D. Technical Assistance - If federal technical assistance dollars were 
available, the majority of Montana rehabilitation facilities would 
be most interested in such to help develop new business ventures and 
to assist with strategic short term and long term planning. 

E. Other RSA Grants - Two private non-profit independent living centers 
receive Part B funds. On August 1, 1985, Montana VR advertised the 
availability of Part A monies. In 1986, Montana's umbrella 
Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services applied for and was 
awarded approximately $430,000 a year over a five (5) year period to 
do supported work. 



other Funding Resources - Montana VR is a program operator for 
Montana's Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) authority. As a 
program operator it has referred and received services from 
rehabilitation facilities for eleven percent (11%) of its JTPA 
clients. 

Montana VR is the recipient of state funds (with no available 
federal match) known as VR - Extended Employment dollars (see 
Attachment B) . These dollars are funnelled to the seven (7) larger 
rehabilitation facilities to pay for work activity or sheltered 
employment services on VR clients rehabilitated into sheltered 
employment. 



IV. GOAL OF MONTANA'S FACILITY PROGRAM 

The goal of rehabilitation facility planning continues to be the develop- 
ment and expansion of such facilities and programs in Montana that will 
provide the most and best rehabilitation services to the greatest number 
of handicapped. 

The concerns in making a judgement on requests for funding development 
and expansion are the need for what is requested and the needs of already 
existing programs. In other words, a discrete decision is called for 
that will promote the quality of the already existing facilities. 

The priority regarding Montana's rehabilitation facilities is the 
strengthening and expansion of the eight (8) current quality facilities 
to their highest level of achievement in service provision. 



Four (4) ways of achieving this priority are: 

1. The inclusion of facility staff in as many RSD/VSD staff 
development sessions as appropriate. This has been and will 
continue to be an ongoing policy. 

2. The specific provision of some state and/or regional in service 
tailored to facility staff needs. 

3. The provision of facility technical assistance (TA) under both 
the Federal TA and the proposed State TA programs. 

4. The awarding of limited grants when the need is well justified. 



RSD3/b 



Page 1 of 2 



BILLINGS WORKSHOP, INC. 

200 South 24th Street 

Billings, MT 59101 

(406) 248-9115 



The Billings Workshop, Inc., is a private non-profit corporation which has 
been providing habilitation and rehabilitation to the disabled since January, 
1971. It is governed by a twelve (12) member Board of Directors. A well 
qualified staff of twenty-seven (27) persons provide the following services: 



WORK ADJUSTMENT TRAINING 

This is an individualized training program of developing good worker habits 
while the client is engaged in real work, producing marketable products and 
services in an actual work setting, supported by vocational counseling and 
classroom activities. 

Clients referred for this service should be considered competitively employ- 
able in the near future. 

Services in this program include training in general appearance, attendance 
and punctuality, worker attitude, worker characteristics, work performance, 
work quantity and work quality. Client progress in these areas is evaluated 
in individual monthly staffing sessions. The client also is exposed to a 
variety of work environments in Community Work Sites, woodworking, small 
assembly or janitorial areas. For these persons lacking occupational goals, 
vocational exploration activities are offered. As the client becomes competi- 
tively employable, he is referred for job seeking skills training through Job 
Club in preparation for placement. After a client is placed, a one (1) year 
follow-up is provided to ensure successful placement. 



EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT 

This service is designed for those persons who are not considered to be 
competitively employable in the near future. A wider spectrum of services is 
offered to these clients, ranging from training in such areas as personal 
hygiene, functional academics, appropriate inter-personal communication and 
behaviors to skill training in the real work production area. 

Progress of these clients is reviewed at least quarterly in individual 
staffing sessions. If a client exhibits proficiency in all levels of 
evaluation, he may be referred to the Work Adjustment Program, and then 
prepared for Job Placement. 



Page 2 of 2 



BILLINGS WORKSHOP, INC. 
(Continued) 



VOCATIONAL EVALUATION 

Vocational Evaluation is a diagnostic service designed to assess a person's 
work potential and work related behavior. The evaluation process uses a 
standard but comprehensive system which includes the Valpar Work Coitponent 
Series, JEVS job samples, dexterity tests, the Singer-Graflex System and 
supplemental psychometric tests. Clients referred to this service come from 
the Rehabilitative Services Division, Workers' Compensation, School Districts, 
as well as occasional referrals from Vo-Tech, the Veterans' Administration, 
private insurance carriers and attorneys. 



JOB READINESS/PLACEMENT AND FOLLOW-UP 

This service is offered to persons who need assistance in selecting an occupa- 
tion, learning how to find and how to keep a job. Following formal training, 
the client begins the job search with the assistance of the Job Placement 
Specialist. The counselor provides a one (1) year follow-up on clients after 
they have been placed on a job to ensure successful placement. 



CERTIFICATION AND LICENSING 

The facility complies with local fire, safety and health codes and is 
certified by the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, accredited 
by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities and approved 
by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. . 



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Page 1 of 4 



BUTTE SHELTERED WORKSHOP, INC. 

207 South Montana Street 
Butte, Montana 59701 
(406) 



The Butte Sheltered Workshop is a private, non-profit corporation that has 
been serving handicapped people twenty-three (23) years. The Workshop is 
governed by a Board of Directors and services are provided by a forty-two (42) 
member staff. 

The primary goal of the Butte Sheltered Workshop is to provide vocational 
adjustment, social adjustment, sheltered employment and residential services 
to mentally and physically disabled individuals, in order to maximize their 
independent living capabilities and to obtain an earned income. The Workshop 
is CARF accredited in Vocational Evaluation, Work Adjustment Training, Work 
Services, Activity Services, and Residential Services. 

The services provided by the Workshop are briefly described below: 



VOCATIONAL EVALUATION 

A five (5) day program which explores and assesses an individual's interests, 
skills and abilities. This is done through the use of work samples (including 
the Singer-Graf lex and Valpar Systems), psychometric tests, interviews and 
actual work tryouts, both within the Agency and outside job sites. 

At the conclusion of the evaluation, the Vocational Evaluator's observations 
and recommendations are reported to both the evaluee and his referring 
counselor. The report addresses the evaluee 's feasibility for employment, his 
vocational assets and limitations and the steps needed to ready him for 
competitive employment. 

The Vocational Evaluation Department also offers a one (1) day Career- 
Exploration Program. This utilizes the Montana Career Information System 
which allows the client to explore careers available in Montana, their 
descriptions and requirements, number of positions available and the outlook 
for growth for each career. Career Exploration also informs the client where 
to obtain the necessary training or schooling. 



EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT 

Extended employment provides work experience and pre-vocational training for 
those clients who are not ready for competitive employment. Individual 
instruction in various work skills, proper behavior on the job, appropriate 
grooming and hygiene, and academic skills are provided to the clients in this 
program. 



Page 2 of 4 



BUTTE SHELTERED WORKSHOP, INC. 
(Continued) 



The combination of work training and pre-vocational training is designed to 
enhance the client's employability and maximize their earnings in a sheltered 
environment . 



WORK ADJUSTMENT TRAINING 

Work Adjustment is an orientation to the world of work. It is a treatment 
training process using work in assisting the individual in understanding the 
meaning, value and demands of work. The ultimate goal is the return of the 
individual to the competitive labor market. 

Counseling and behavior modification techniques are also utilized in helping 
the client attain his/her goals. 

The client, in Work Adjustment Training, works in the production areas of the 
Workshop, on sub-contract or manufacturing. They are paid based on their 
productivity. 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICES 

The Workshop provides residential services through two (2) licensed Community 
Group Homes and a licensed Transitional Living Apartment Building. 

These residential services provide supervision and training in self-help and 
community life skills. 



PRE-VOCATIONAL SKILLS 

The Pre-Vocational Skills Program is designed as a Social Adjustment Program, 
providing the client social skills, academic skills, functional living skills 
and work activity skills, which will enable the individual to achieve social 
independence, decrease dependency and increase productivity. 

The program utilizes group and individual instruction in such areas as 

grooming and hygiene, coin recognition and money management, basic math and 

time-telling, language skills, personal safety, shopping and community 
awareness. 

The clients work on miscellaneous contracts and salable arts and crafts 
products which develop their work skills. 



Page 3 of 4 



BUTTE SHELTERED WORKSHOP, INC. 
(Continued) 



Physical fitness and recreational opportunities are an integral part of the 
program. The client may participate in bowling and a weekly physical fitness 
class. 

The Pre-Vocational Skills Program addresses the specific needs and educational 
deficiency of each person enrolled in the program. 



INTENSE ADULT HABILITATION 

The Intense Adult Habilitation Program provides training to profoundly 
multiple handicapped adults in basic self-help skills, such as toileting, 
feeding and mobility. Training is also provided in hygiene, beginning 
academics, communication including sign language, and participation in 
recreational and social adjustment activities. The program's goal is for the 
client to achieve his or her optimum level of independence with eventual 
graduation to the Pre-Vocational Skills Program. The staff to client ration 
is 1 to 1.5. 



FOOD SERVICE TRAINING 

The purpose of the Food Service Program is to instruct handicapped men and 
women in food service areas, such as: kitchen helpers; salad girls/boys; 
steam table helpers; pot scrubbers; chef's helpers and in kitchen maintenance. 

The program is designed to provide actual situations as realistic as possible, 
that a client would find in restaurants, hospitals and institutions. It 
provides on-the-job training as they assist in preparing a meal a day for 
approximately ninety (90) people. 



DILLON SPECIAL RESOURCES 

The Butte Sheltered Workshop operates a Satellite Day Activity Program and a 
Group Home in Dillon, Montana, called Dillon Special Resources. 

The Dillon Program has a Work Activity Center that serves fifteen (15) 

developmentally disabled adults. The program also operates a group home that 

serves eight (8) adults, and an Independent Living Skills Program that 
services four (4) adults. 



Page 4 of 4 



BUTTE SHELTERED WORKSHOP, INC. 
(Continued) 



FUNDING 

Funding of the Workshop is by the Rehabilitation Services Division, Develop- 
mental Disabilities Division, Private Rehabilitation Agencies, United Way, 
donations, federal and state grants and production income. 

The Workshop is located at 207 and 209 South Montana Street and the 
Residential Living Centers at 1001 Galena, 221 North Excelsior and 701 Hobson. 
The NISH Work Center is located at 17 East Galena. 



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Page 1 of 3 



EASTERN MONTANA INDUSTRIES 

Box 759 
Miles City, Montana 59301 
(406) 232-3740 



During the fifteenth (15th) year of its operation, this private, non-profit 
facility is offering the following services system: 



WORK ACTIVITIES CENTER 

The Work Activities Center provides a sheltered setting in which the severely 
disabled can receive vocational training and work experience. Clients receive 
training in basic work skills and in skills specific to the various production 
areas of the workshop. Although the primary training emphasis of the program 
is vocational, supplemental training is provided in the areas of Functional 
Academics and Independent Living Skills. Special Education Services are 
available to clients in the sixteen (16) to twenty-two (22) age range. 



TRAINING CENTER 

The Training Center is designed to teach prerequisite skills needed for entry 
into other areas of the Work Activities Center. A wide variety of training is 
available, including basic self-care skills, pre-vocational and basic 
vocational skills. Functional academic training is also a component of the 
Training Center. 

The Training Center acts as an intake and orientation unit for the majority of 
new WAC clients. The Training Center also services as the base for staff 
development. New employees spend a week her going through the EMI Training 
Mode 1 . 



WORK ADJUSTMENT TRAINING 

Work Adjustment Training (WAT) focuses on the client's acquisition of Positive 
Worker Traits, such as: punctuality; attendance; good personal hygiene; 
cooperativeness; high quality and quantity of work, and positive work 
attitudes. This emphasis will help the client adapt to any work setting 
because these traits are common to all work environments. Additionally, WAT 
clients receive classroom training in Job Seeking Skills, and the World of 
Work. Adult BAsic Education and Drivers' Education are also available to 
clients in this program. 



Page 2 of 3 



EASTERN MONTANA INDUSTRIES 
(Continued) 



Work Adjustment Training is a part of EMI ' s VECA Program (Vocational 
Evaluation, Career Awareness) . VECA is not located within the main EMI 
facility, but is headquartered in a building convenient to the downtown area. 



VOCATIONAL EVALUATION 

This program is a Work Sample Evaluation System. This process assesses the 
client's productive potential through simulated work stations. Clients are 
exposed to a number of simulated job tasks they might encounter on a job, such 
as in reasoning, judgement, and overall organizational ability. The client is 
then rated on attitude, speech, quality, dependability and punctuality. An 
attempt is made to realistically assess the vocational potential of each 
client. This program remains mobile in order to serve a primarily rural 
population and covers an area encompassing over ninety thousand (90,000) 
square miles. 

Vocational Evaluation is the other component of EMI's VECA Program. 



TRANSPORTATION 

Transportation Services are available to all individuals participating in any 
program at Eastern Montana Industries, for the purposes of, but not limited 
to, transportation to and from the facility, medical and dental appointments, 
and any ancillary services provided for in the resident community. 



GROUP HOME 

The four (4) group homes are a seven (7) day a week, full-time program. The 
trainers are involved in the training of clients in personal care skills, 
self-help skills, and community living skills. Training includes areas such 
as dressing, grooming, bathing, cooking, laundering, money management and 
recreation. The emphasis of the home is to individualize the program to aid 
the client in acquiring the skills necessary to become an active, integral 
member of a home living situation. Three (3) of the homes serve adult clients 
and one (1) of these homes is primarily designed for the physically handi- 
capped. The fourth (4th) home, which is barrier free, is for children. 



Page 3 of 3 



EASTERN MONTANA INDUSTRIES 
(Continued) 



INDEPENDENT LIVING 

Independent Living Training is available to clients who are capable of living 
in the community with minimal guidance. They receive training designed to 
promote their independence in daily living skills such as cooking, hygiene, 
budgeting, and use of checking accounts. Sex education is also a component of 
Independent Living Training. Most clients in this program live in their own 
apartments and are visiting on an "as needed" basis by the trainer. 



***** 






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Page 1 of 2 



MISSOULA OPPORTUNITY WORKSHOP 

1005 Marshall Street 

Missoula, Montana 59801 

(406) 721-2930 



Opportunity Workshop has existed in Missoula since its initial establishment 
in 1955. Through the years, the organization has evolved into the current 
non-profit corporation providing vocationally oriented training and employment 
services to approximately eight-five (85) to ninety (90) handicapped adults 
per day. The corporation is governed by a Board of Directors representing a 
variety of professions, businesses, industries, and interests in the local 
community and is dedicated to the provision of quality services. 



STAFF 

The twenty-six staff of Opportunity Workshop have experience and education in 
a variety of backgrounds with an emphasis on the use of a very systematic 
orientation to client training designed to accomplish clearly specified client 
goals and objectives within projected time frames. 



GOALS 

The organizational missions are: 

1. To maximize the client's economic independence; 

2. To maximize the client's (re)habilitation (their vocational and 
social independence; 

3. To facilitate deinstitutionalization and prevent client return to 
the institution. 



The three (3) program departments designed to collectively accomplish our 
mission are: 

1. VOCATIONAL SERVICES CENTER GOAL : To place the client in either a 
competitive or semi -supervised employment situation. 

2. SHELTERED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM GOAL ; To provide long-term work and 
work-related training services. 

3 . WORK ACTIVITY PROGRAM GOAL : To provide long-term work and/or 
activity training. 



Page 2 of 2 



MISSOULA OPPORTUNITY WORKSHOP 
(Continued) 



SERVICES PROVIDED 

Vocational Services Center 

1. Work Adjustment Training 

2. Extended Employment 

3. Job Placement 

4. Job Skill Training 

5 . Outreach/Independent Living Training 

6. Referral Services 

Sheltered Employment Program 

1 . Remunerative Work 

2 . Work Oriented Training 

a. Safety 

b. Work Performance Skills 

c. Specific Job Skills 

3. Referral Services 

Work Activity Program 

1. Remunerative Work 

2. Work Oriented Training 

a. Safety 

b. Work Performance Skills 

c. Specific Job Skills 

3 . Non-Work Oriented Training 

a. Communication 

b. Functional Academics 

c. Self-Help 

d. Pre-Vocational 

e. Community Living 

4. Referral Services 

***** 



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Page 1 of 3 



NORTHERN ROCKY M0U17TAIN EASTER SEAL SOCIETY 

4400 Central Avenue 

Great Falls, Montana 59405 

(406) 761-3680 



The Easter Seal Adult Training Center is a training facility serving persons 
who are developmentally disabled (mentally retarded, epileptic, autistic and 
cerebral palsy) , physically disabled, emotionally disabled, and vocationally 
disabled. The program is funded in part by a contract between the Easter 
Seal/Goodwill Industries of Montana, Inc., and the State of Montana Department 
of Social and Rehabilitation Services (SRS) . Easter Seal/Goodwill Industries 
of Montana, Inc., is the program vendor with Adult Training being a Division 
of Easter Seal Goodwill's statewide services. Other funding is provided 
through Easter Seal/Goodwill contributed income, income generated in the Adult 
Training commercial area and other sources. 

The Adult Training Center is responsible to the Easter Seal/Goodwill 
Industries Board of Directors and to the local Adult Training Advisory Board. 
The adult Training Center itself is administered by one (1) Director and 
forty-three (43) other staff, consisting of one (1) Program Director; one (1) 
Director of Manufacturing and Sales; two (2) Job Placement Specialists; five 
(5) Program Managers, six (6) Program Aides; one (1) Work Adjustment Super- 
visor; one (1) Evaluator; sixteen (16) Production Supervisors; two (2) Supple- 
mental Services Trainers; one (1) Commercial Coordinator; one (1) Administra- 
tive Assistance; one (1) Chief Engineer; and one (1) Custodial Assistant. 
Other staff provided by the Easter Seal Society for use by the Adult Training 
Center are: one (1) Personnel Officer and one (1) Accountant. 



PROGRAM AND PROGRESS REPORTS 

The mission of the Adult Training Center is to provide pre-vocational 
training, life skills training, work activity, vocational assessment, work 
adjustment, extended employment, placement services and chronic pain manage- 
ment services to vocationally handicapped adults who are physically and/or 
mentally disabled in order to maximize the individual's vocational potential 
and earned income ability. Furthermore, the purpose is to maintain respon- 
siveness to the current and future needs of handicapped individuals. 

Referrals to the Adult Training Center may come through a variety of agencies, 
including: The Montana Department of SRS, School District and others. A 
community wide needs assessment team is responsible to finally determine the 
most appropriate program services for the client. A facility screening 
committee assists in initiating the services. 



Page 2 of 3 



NORTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAIN EASTER SEAL SOCIETY 
(Continued) 



WORK ACTIVITY PROGRAM 

The goal of the Work Activity Program is to provide extended training, pre- 
vocational and work oriented production training, and supportive services to 
vocationally handicapped adults who are physically and/or mentally disabled in 
order to maximize their earnings while in a sheltered or semi-sheltered 
environment and their capabilities to progress into a less restrictive 
training or employment environment. 

As appropriate, clients are exposed to real work situations, with varying 
degrees of supervision, in order to provide training and specific work skills, 
work attitudes and behaviors appropriate to a work setting. Clients also 
participate in an individual supportive service program designed to remediate 
deficiencies in a wide range of work related skills such as money recognition 
and use, time-telling, hygiene and basic health, safety and job seeking 
skills. 



VOCATIONAL SERVICES PROGRAM (CAREER DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES) 

1. Evaluation and planning is designed to assist injured and handicapped 
workers and to develop appropriate vocational goals. Real and simulated 
work tasks and a variety of diagnostic assessments supplemented by 
medical, social, educational, vocational, and psychological data are 
utilized to assess specific and general skills and abilities, aptitudes 
and interests, personality and temperament, values and attitudes, motiva- 
tions and needs, physical capacity and work tolerance, educatability and 
trainability, social skills, work habits and employ ability. 

A recent addition to evaluation services is Mobile Evaluation serving 
central Montana and the North Highline. Mobile Evaluation includes all 
of the above testing. 

2. Work Adjustment Training is a short-term training program designed to 
increase physical and/or emotional tolerances for work pressure, build 
self-confidence, develop acceptable work habits and attitudes, provide 
work experience, work history, work records and teach job seeking skills. 
Assignment to a variety of work stations and individual counseling are 
utilized. 

3. Extended Sheltered Employment provides employment in a sheltered environ- 
ment to improve work tolerance, productivity and general quality of life. 



Page 3 of 3 



NORTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAIN EASTER SEAL SOCIETY 
(Continued) 



4. Career Development and Placement provides job development services as 
well as counseling to develop an individualized placement plan, career 
exploration, placement support and follow-up services. 

5. Chronic Pain Management Services. Outpatient, community-based services 
designed to help individuals gain control of pain and reduce dependence 
on medications. 



***** 



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Page 1 of 1 



FLATHEAD INDUSTRIES FOR THE HANDICAPPED 

305 Third Avenue East 

Kalispell, Montana 59901 

(406) 755-7656 



Flathead Industries for the Handicapped (FIFTH) is a CARF accredited non- 
profit, community based program, whose purpose is to provide habilitation and 
rehabilitation services, including living skill and employment skill training, 
residential and supportive services to handicapped adults and children in 
order to enhance their integration into the community and to assist them in 
obtaining an earned income. It is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors, 
and is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation 
Facilities (CAJIF) . 

Flathead Industries was incorporated in December, 1973, and at that time 
assumed form the Flathead Association for Retarded Citizens the responsibility 
of establishing community-based programs for the developmentally disabled in 
Flathead County. In May, 1974, a full-time Work Activity Program for Adults 
was established using recycling operations as a means of providing training 
and employment. In November, 1974, the Work Training Center was opened and 
began offering a wide range of training, recreation, social development and 
work experiences for the developmentally disabled. The FIFTH Thrift Store was 
opened in December, 1976, and offers sales of donated merchandise including 
clothing, furniture, appliances and other household items. 

Over the years a variety of vocational and residential programs and services 
have been established in order to provide a comprehensive range of services to 
all handicapped individuals in the Flathead Valley. A mobile recycling unit 
was established to serve the communities of Whitefish and Columbia Falls. The 
semi-independent and independent living skills and programs were expanded in 
1982 to include supervised housing and support services for handicapped adults 
residing within the community. 

Vocational Training Programs and services presently offered include: Work 
Activity; Sheltered Employment; Vocational Evaluation; Work Adjustment 
Training; Extended Employment; Job Placement; Basic Skills Training; Semi- 
Independent Living Skills Training; Residential Services; Respite Care and 
Transportation. Services are made available through third-party sponsorship. 
Funds are presently made available for client services through the use of 
federal and state monies and contractual arrangements with the Developmental 
Disabilities and Rehabilitative/Visual Services Divisions of the Department of 
Social and Rehabilitation Services (SRS) . 

Flathead Industries is twenty-five percent (25%) self-supported by means of 
production income and community donations. Services and employment are 
provided to all handicapped individuals, without regard to race, color, creed, 
sex or handicapping condition. 

Referrals are reviewed and acted upon by the Needs Assessment/Area Screening 
Committee which meets on a monthly basis. Individuals or families requesting 
services may do so through the DD Case Manager or local Rehabilitation 
Services Counselor. 



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Page 1 of 5 



HELENA INDUSTRIES, INC. 

1325 Helena Avenue 

Helena, Montana 59601 

(406) 442-8632 



Helena Industries, Inc. , is located in Helena, Montana with its main offices 
at 1325 Helena Avenue. The main building houses Administrative Offices, the 
Vocational Evaluation Unit, Mailing Contracts Shop, Wood Products, and Needle 
Trades Manufacturing. The Wood Palletized Shipping Container Manufacturing 
Plant is located at 1820 Lyndale Avenue; and the Food Service Training Program 
at the Montana State Capitol Building and Mountain Bell State Headquarters' 
Building at 560 North Park in Helena. The facility is a private non-profit 
corporation governed by a volunteer Board of Directors. 

The purpose of Helena Industries, as stated in the Agency's Articles of Incor- 
poration, it to: "Provide work oriented, work rehabilitation facility with a 
controlled working environment and individual vocational goals which utilize 
work experience and related services for assisting handicapped persons to 
progress toward normal living and productive vocational status". 

The following is a description of all program offerings at Helena Industries, 
Inc. : 



VOCATIONAL EVALUATION 

The purpose of the Vocational Evaluation Program is to assist vocationally 
disabled individuals develop realistic occupational goals based on their 
abilities and interests. The Evaluation and Career Development Center is 
located in a separate building, away from the other programs offered by the 
Agency, providing a quiet atmosphere for the individuals being tested. All 
tests are administered by qualified vocational evaluators who utilize the 
Phoenix Ability Survey System and Valpar Evaluation System, as well as a 
variety of work samples developed by the Evaluation staff. Psychological, 
interest inventories and personality assessments are also used as an intricate 
part of the vocational evaluation process. 

The length of time a person spends being vocationally evaluated depends on 
their abilities, as well as the specific questions the referring counselor 
needs answered. The average length of time for a vocational evaluation is 
three (3) days. 



WORK ADJUSTMENT TRAINING 

The purpose of the Work Adjustment Training Program is to offer disabled 
adults intensive training in the development of behaviors and attitudes that 



Page 2 of 5 



HELENA INDUSTRIES, INC. 
(Continued) 



are needed to succeed in competitive employment. Through the utilization of 
four (4) production and two (2) service areas, the Work Adjustment Training 
Counselor and Production Supervisors develop and implement individual programs 
for improving such things as stamina, work speed, attitudes towards work, 
grooming and punctuality. 

The length of time a person spends in Work Adjustment Training ranges from one 
(1) to six (6) months, depending on the individual's needs. The average 
length of time an individual spends in the program is fifteen (15) weeks. 



HOME PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT TRAINING 



The purpose of the Home Personal Adjustment Training Program is to give 
disabled individuals the skills necessary to live independently in the 
communi ty . 

The program, which is an integral part of Work Adjustment Training, begins 
with a Home Personal Adjustment Training Evaluation. This evaluation is 
designed to assess the person's current independent living skill level and 
determine their ability to succeed in the program. The evaluation also deter- 
mines the specific skill areas which will be emphasized during the training. 

The Home Personal Adjustment Trainers find residential placements for program 
participants based on their functioning level and needs. The program includes 
training in such areas as development of social skills, personal hygiene, home 
management, leisure time activities, community resources, nutrition, meal 
preparation and budgeting. Training is accomplished through group sessions 
and home visitations by the trainers during evening hours. 

The Home Personal Adjustment Training Evaluation is one (1) week in length and 
the time spent in the actual program is from one (1) to six (6) months 
depending on the individual's needs. The average length of time a person 
spends in the program is fifteen (15) weeks. 



JOB PLACEMENT 

The purpose of the Job Placement Program is to assist disabled individuals 
find and maintain competitive employment. The Job Placement Specialist 
conducts job readiness classes for individuals determined as ready for place- 
ment. Classes cover such areas as grooming, job interview skills and how to 
complete an employment application. When a person is referred for placement, 
one (1) or both of the following methods might be used to assist them is 
making the transition into competitive employment: 



Page 3 of 5 



HELENA INDUSTRIES, INC. 
(Continued) 



- Work Experience (WE) is utilized for individuals who appear to be 
ready for employment but need to be evaluated in an actual community 
work environment. This temporary placement may or may not lead to 
permanent employment. The disabled person's wages are included as 
part of the fee charges for this service. 

On-the-Job Training (OJT) is utilized for individuals with the 
expectation that they will be hired by the business, state or 
federal agency where they are receiving their On-the-Job Training. 
The participating employer usually pays a percentage of the disabled 
person's OJT wages. 

An important component of the Job Placement Program is follow-up. The Place- 
ment Specialist has extensive contact with the individuals placed to assure 
that they are given every opportunity to succeed on the job. If problems 
occur, trainers are provided by Helena Industries to assist the person and the 
enployer. 



VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT 

The purpose of the Vocational Rehabilitation Extended Employment Program is to 
provide work training to severely emotionally and physically disabled indi- 
viduals, enabling them to achieve their maximum level of independence in 
vocational areas and to increase their skills and abilities in an extended 
employment setting. Individuals served by this program are those who are 
deemed ineligible for the Developmentally Disabled Extended Employment 
Program. 

Persons served by this program are those requiring more than six (6) months of 
Work Adjustment Training. The ultimate objective of the Extended Employment 
Program is to aid the disabled individual in acquiring those skills which 
would make them competitively employable. 

Individuals participating in Extended Employment remain in the program until 
such a time as they can emotionally and physically handle the demands of 
competitive employment. When this occurs, they are referred to Work Adjust- 
ment Training or Job Placement. 



DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT 

The purpose of the Developmentally Disabled Extended Program is to provide 
work training and other supportive services to developmentally disabled 
clients, enabling them to achieve their maximum level of independence in 
social and vocational areas, to increase their earnings in sheltered employ- 
ment and to prepare them for possible competitive employment. 



Page 4 of 5 



HELENA INDUSTRIES, INC. 
(Continued) 



Developmen tally disabled persons are defined as being either epileptic, 
mentally retarded, cerebral palsied, or any other nervous disorder that has to 
be treated like the above. The disorder must occur before the age of eighteen 
(18). 

The program emphasis is on counseling, the development of acceptable behaviors 
and work attitudes. Experiences are spread out over a longer period of time, 
but are still aimed at aiding the client in acquiring those skills necessary 
for competitive employment. 

While in DD Extended Employment, clients receive concentrated assistance in 
dealing with pressure and stress situations which interfere with their daily 
functioning on a work and social level. 

Persons participating in the DD Extended Employment Program remain in the 
program until such a time as they can emotionally and physically handle the 
rigors of competitive employment. When this occurs, they are transferred to 
Work Adjustment Training for placement in the community. 

In order to assist the individual in the DD Extended Employment Program to 
reach their vocational goal, formal individual program plans outlining 
specific objectives are developed and utilized. 



BASIC EDUCATION AND SKILL TRAINING (BEST) 



The purpose of the Basic Education and Skill Training Program is to increase 
the skill level of individuals in the Extended Employment Programs and make it 
possible for them to succeed in the production area they are assigned to. The 
program utilizes detailed individual programming specifically designed to 
assist the participants become more productive extended production employees. 

All individual programs are of a vocational nature and tasks the participants 
perform closely resemble work that is done in the production areas. Other 
activities include instruction in such areas as personal grooming and hygiene, 
development of appropriate work behaviors and speech and occupational therapy. 



VOCATIONAL PLACEMENT AND JOB TRAINING 

The purpose of Vocational Placement and Job Training is to place develop- 
mentally disabled clients on competitive jobs in the community and provide 
supportive services as long as necessary to allow the client to succeed on the 
job. Supportive services are provided by a Job Coach Trainer and include 
direct training on the job and sufficient follow-along on a regular and 
on-call basis for as long as needed to the client and employer. 



Page 5 of 5 



HELENA INDUSTRIES, INC. 
(Continued) 



Other supportive services include coordinating services in the community, 
providing transportation, arranging for job modification and adaptive equip- 
ment and assisting the client arrange his/her schedule so there is opportunity 
for socialization with peers and friends. 



SUPPORTIVE PROGRAM SERVICES 

Helena Industries utilizes support services within the community to provide 
such services as psychological testing, audiological testing, speech therapy, 
physical therapy and nursing services- In addition, staff members at Helena 
Industries teach classes in such areas as assertiveness training, use of 
measuring devices, basic mathematics, grooming and personal hygiene and meal 
preparation. 



CONTRACTS AND MANUFACTURING 

Helena Industries' sub-contracts, prime manufacturing and service contracts 
provide a work base for the handicapped adults which enable staff to measure 
their performance against industrial standards. Utilizing modern production 
equipment and methods, a variety of work is available, thus appealing to 
handicapped individuals with a wide range of capabilities. The emphasis in 
all Helena Industries' production areas is on productivity and quality of 
work. 



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Page 1 of 3 



MISSOULA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL REHABILITATION CENTER 

2827 Fort Missoula Road 

Missoula, Montana 59801 

(406) 728-4100 



Missoula Community Hospital Rehabilitation Center provides comprehensive 
rehabilitation services that meet current professional standards for the 
purpose of restoring and maximizing the person's ability to function 
physically, mentally, emotionally, and vocationally, while maintaining 
self-respect, dignity and family integrity. 

Under the direction of the psychiatrist, a physician who specializes in 
Physical Rehabilitation Medicine, an interdisciplinary team approach is 
employed to provide diagnostic, therapeutic, educational and support services. 
Team members may include physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech 
and hearing therapists, psychologists, rehabilitation nurses, nutrition 
services, medical social workers, therapeutic recreational therapists and 
staff from Summit Independent Living Center, vocational services and home 
health. 

The Center is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for 
Rehabilitation Facilities and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of 
hospitals. 

Services are not denied for reason of age, sex, race, nationality, creed or 
inability to pay. Implementation of a treatment plan depends upon the 
following: 

1. Disability and/or handicapping condition; 

2. Adequate medical information; 

3. Completion of appropriate evaluation; 

4. Demonstration of potential or ability to participate in and exhibit 
measurable progress form a Center Program. 

Typical patients include those who have been disabled from spinal cord injury, 
brain injury, cerebral vascular accident, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, 
muscular dystrophy, arthritis, major multiple trauma, fractured femur, ampu- 
tations and other neuromuscular disorders. 

The Missoula Community Hospital Rehabilitation Center is funded by fee-for- 
service, memorials, donations and grants. 



Page 2 of 3 



MISSOULA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL REHABILITATION CENTER 

(Continued) 



CVA/SPINAL INJURY/BRAIN INJURY 

Specifically designed to address the needs of individuals who have incurred 
injury to the brain or spinal cord, each program provides comprehensive 
evaluations, therapeutic treatments and supportive services and follow-up to 
maximize independent functioning and aid the person and their families to 
reintegrate into their community. 



TREATMENT ORIENTED PAIN PROGRAM 

The Treatment Oriented Pain Program is a four (4) to eight (8) week in-patient 
program aimed at retraining patients and their families in the more effective 
management of chronic pain and its related problems. The central goal is to 
foster less disabled life styles for the individuals involved. The inter- 
disciplinary rehabilitation treatment team includes: physicians; psycholo- 
gists; social workers; nurses; dieticians; physical/occupational/recreational 
therapists; and vocational evaluation specialists. 



ADDITIONAL SERVICES AVAILABLE 
HOME HEALTH 
Home Health Services are now provided by Mountain West Home Health, Inc. 

INDEPENDENT LIVING 

Summit coordinates evaluation, training and resource referral efforts related 
to increasing skill levels in independent living. Specific services available 
include assessment and training in daily living skills, psychological assess- 
ment and counseling, and referral to residence and transportation services. 



CASE MANAGEt'lENT SERVICES FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISABLED 

This service is funded under the Home and Community Services Program of the 
Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services. It provides management of 
clients who are physically disabled and Medicaid recipients. 



Page 3 of 3 



MISSOULA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL REHABILITATION CENTER 

(Continued) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICES 

Assessments of vocational aptitudes and development of feasible plans are 
provided through individualized evaluations, which may utilize psychometric 
testing, work samples and/or job site experience. Vocational counseling and 
opportunities for career exploration are components of each assessment. Job 
placement activities may encompass interviews, assistance with resume develop- 
ment, job seekers support group, development of on-the-job training sites and 
direct job placement. Job analysis and consultation are also available. 



WORK CAPACITY EVALUATION/WORK HARDENING PROGRAM 
(Information from Enclosure A) 



DRIVER'S TRAINING PROGRAM 

Occupational therapy staff, certified in evaluation and training handicapped 
individuals in driving skills, coordinate this program. Testing includes 
assessment of visual-spatial abilities, functional skill levels and recom- 
mendations of adaptive equipment necessary. 



COGNITIVE REMEDIATION CLINIC 

This Clinic is designed to meet the special needs of a growing traumatically 
brain injured population. The Clinic provides consultation, evaluation, and 
cognitive remediation treatment for a select population of head injured 
persons with the aim of maximizing their functioning in family, community and 
vocational rules and thereby minimize the need for institutionalization. 



CLINICS AVAILABLE 

Amputee 

Myelodyplasia 

Muscular Dystrophy 

Pediatric Cardiology 

Diagnostic Pain Clinic 

Genetics Clinic 

Multiple Sclerosis Clinic 



RSD3/b 



ENCLOSURE-A 



WORK CAPACITY EVALUATION / WORK HARDENING PROGRAM 



Individuals who have experienced injury or illness resulting in Icnq 
term inactivity frequently have a decrease in physical skills ar.a 
general endurance. The Work Program facilitates an efficient yet 
safer return to the labor market by first assessing physical capacity 
(tolerance) levels then, when warranted, gradually increasing pnysical 
demands required of the individual as he/she performs work tasl 5 
simulating the day-long demands of proposed occupations. Staff 
include occupational therapists, physical therapists, vocational 
counselors and placement specialists with medical advice provided by a 
physiatrist. As possible and as needed, as improvement is made 
attempts will be made to coordinate work experience at community 
sites. Body mechanics training, equipment adaptations and folicw 
along assistance are important components of the program along with 
the individualized program to increase physical functioning to meet or 
match job demands. 



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ATTACHMENT A 



REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 46.6.903 

Sub-Chapter 9 
Standards For Facilities and Providers of Services 

46.6.901 GENERAL PURPOSES OF STANDARDS FOR VENDORS 

(1) It is the policy of the department to use, whenever 
feasible, facilities which are accredited or approved by an 
appropriate public authority or professional organization. 
Where this is not possible, the facilities selected, whether 
public or private, are those that appear upon investigation to 
be the best adapted to render the specific services required. 
Facilities will be chosen based upon the professional and 
technical qualifications of personnel, adequacy of equipment, 
and scope and quality of services rendered. (History: Sec. 
53-7-102, 53-7-203 and 53-7-302 KCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-102, 
53-7-103, 53-7-203, 53-7-302 and 53-7-303 MCA; NEW, Eff. 
1/3/77; AMD, 1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.902 DEFINITIONS IS HEREBY REPEALED (History: Sec. 
53-7-102 and 53-7-203 MCA; IMP , Sec. 53-7-102 MCA; NEW , Eff. 
1/3/77; REP, 1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.903 REHABILITATION FJ^CILITIES STANDARDS 

(1) Services will not be purchased for clients by the 
department from a rehabilitation facility until certification 
or provisional certification is attained from the department 
by that facility. 

(2) The department will accept as its standards for 
vocational rehabilitation" facilities thp. stanri;irHQ of the 
commission of accreditation of rehabilitation facilities 

(CARF) or for those facilities serving blind persons the 
standards of the national accrediting council (NAC) or of 
CARF. These standards will be applied to any rehabilitation 
facility where the department provides funding or purchases 
services or where the department has formal cooperative 
agreements. 

(3) If certification is denied, the facility will be 
notified of the reasons for such decision thirty (30) days in 
advance of the date on v;hich no more services will be 
purchased or grants awarded by the department. 

(4) Facilities accredited by CARF or NAC will be 
adjudged to be certified. 

(5) Duration of certification. 

(a) The department will provide full certification upon 
receipt from the facility of records and reports attesting to 
its CARF or NAC accreditation. The tenure of the certifica- 
tion by the department shall be one year. The department may 
provide for provisional certification of a facility as pro- 
vided for in subsection (7) . 



NEXT PAGE IS 46-405 
ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-401 



REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 46.6.903 



(b) The department, upon being apprised of any source of 
material change in the facility's functioning in terms of the 
standards or in terms of the failure of the facility to pro- 
vide such records and reports as requested by the department, 
may review the facility's certification and may modify its 
certification decision. At the discretion of the department, 
such review may include an onsite visit. 

(6) Provisional certification: 

(a) The department may in its discretion provisionally 
certify a new facility during the first 6 months of its opera- 
tion. At the termination of the tenure of provisional certi- 
fication, the facility must meet the requirements for full 
certification. Findings of the department's facility staff 
will be summarized in a written report to the facility. If 
non-certification is the result of the site survey, another 
survey can be requested on a date six months subsequent to the 
date of the prior survey. 

(b) The department may in its discretion provide an 
existing facility with a provisional six (6) month certifica- 
tion if that facility fails to meet CARF or NAC accreditation. 
No facility will be utilized beyond the six (6) month provi- 
sional certification unless CARF or NAC accreditation is 
received and the facility certified. The department may 
extend provisional certification where the lack of CARF or NAC 
accreditation is due to the failure of CARF or NAC to act. 

(c) In order for a facility to receive provisional cer- 
tification, the department must be provided with records, 
reports, and documents attesting to the facility's level of 
compliance v/ith CARF or NAC standards. Evidence must be shown 
of the ability to meet CARF or NAC compliance within a 6 m'onth 
period. 

(7) CARF or NAC accreditation need not be required as 
the applicable standards for those types of facilities listed 
in AW-l 46.6.908 or in ARM 46.9.507. For facilities or serv- 
ices not listed in ARM 46.6.908 or ARM 46.6.907 and not 
typically subject to CARF or NAC accreditation, the departm.ent 
will approve their utilization by clients if the facility or 
service is licensed by the department or other state agency, 
and such licensing is determined by the department to provide 
adequate standards. 

(8) Out-of-state-facilities : Only those out-of-state 
rehabilitation facilities accredited by CARF or NAC will be 
utilized by the department. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 
and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-103, 53-7-203, 
53-7-302 and 53-7-303 MCA; NEW, Eff. 6/4/77; AMD, 1984 MAR, p. 
511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 



L 



ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-405 



c 



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46.6.904 SOCIAL AND 

REHABILITATION SEP.VICES 

46.6.904 TUTORIAL TRAINING (1) The standards for selec- 
tion of tutors will be based upon adequate training and exper- 
ience in- the field in which the instruction is to be given. 
Such standards will be, as far as possible, in conformity with 
standards of certification set by the state board of education 
for instructors in the regular fields of education or voca- 
tional educaxiion. (History: Sec. 53-7-102 MCA; IMP , Sec. 
53-7-102 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77.) 

46.6.905 ON-THE-JOB TRAINING (1) The standards for 
selection of facilities for on-the-job training are based 
primarily upon the ability of the facility to provide instruc- 
tional service by an individual who has trade competency and 
experience in training workers in the operations to be per- 
formed. Other factors are adequate equipment and instruc- 
tional material, provision for a plan of graduated progress in 
the job 'to be learned, and an efficiently organized instruc- 
tional schedule. (History: Sec. 53-7-102 MCA; IMP , Sec. 
53-7-102 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77.) 

4 6.6.90 6 ENFORCEMENT OF STANDARDS (1) The department 
periodically will evaluate the quality of services provided to 
department clients by rehabilitation facilities. This will be 
accomplished through personal visitations by representatives 
of the department, by written reports, by consultation with 
official accrediting agencies, and through other effective 
means. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; 
IMP , Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-103, 53-7-203, 53-7-302 and 53-7-303 
MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AMD '. 1984 MAR, p. =111 ,. Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.907 STANDARDS FOR SPECIFIC TYPES OF PROVIDERS 
(1) The department for the purposes of providing voca- 
tional rehabilitation services v/ill insure that appropriate 
licensing and service standards are met by providers. 

(a) Medical diagnosis and medical treatment may be 
provided only by physicians licensed to practice medicine and 
surgery and otherwise qualified by training and experience to 
perform the specific services required. 

(b) Physical or occupational therapy may be provided 
only by therapists who are registered or have graduated from a 
school for the training of therapists generally accepted by 
the profession, and who are licensed by the state. 

(c) Nursing services may be provided only by registered 
nurses or persons who are eligible to be registered. 

(d) Dental diagnosis and dental treatment may be 
provided only by dentists who are licensed to practice dental 
surgery, and otherwise qualified by training and experience to 
perform the specific dental service required. 

(e) Optometry services may be provided only by licensed 
optometrists. 

46-406 3/31/84 ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 



L 



REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 46.6.908 



(f) Osteopathic services may be provided only by medi- 
cally licensed osteopaths. 

(g)- Prosthetic services may be provided by prosthetists 
certified by the American board for certification of the 
prosthetic and orthopedic appliance industry, inc. In the 
event there are not prosthetists available who meet such 
standards, the department will utilize the services of those 
prosthetists who are acceptable to other public and private 
agencies . 

(h) Speech and hearing services may be provided only by 
therapists certified by the American speech and hearing 
association as clinical competent and/or who are licensed by 
the state of Montana. 

(i) Psychological services may be provided only by 
psychologists who are licensed to practice psychology in 
Montana or employed as a psychologist for an institution, 
academic institution, governmental agency or research labora- 
tory provided these persons are performing the duties for 
v;hich they were employed by these organizations. 

(2) The department will determine which of the medical 
services required are specialty services. Medical services 
determined to be specialty services will be rendered only by 
physicians found by the department to be specialists quali- 
fied to perform the particular specialty service required. In 
providing specialty medical service, the department will use 
medical specialists who hold certificates of the American 
medical specialty board, where such boards have been estab- 
lished, or physicians who '"have established eligibility to 
examination by such boards; or, when no physicians are avail- 
able in one of these fields who meet either of the above 
standards, other qualified physicians, approved by the depart- 
ment's medical consultant, are used. 

(3) The department has established and will maintain 
standards for selection of training personnel who are quali- 
fied to conduct and carry out satisfactory instructional 
services as relates to the specific training needed. (His- 
tory: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 
53-7-102, 53-7-103, 53-7-203, 53-7-302 and 53-7-303 MCA; NEW , 
Eff. 1/3/77; AMD, 1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

4 6.6.908 STANDARDS FOR MEDICAL AND SCHOOL FACILITIES 
(1) Medical and academic services may be provided to 
clients only in facilities which meet the following standards: 
(a) Hospitals . approved by the joint commission on 
accreditation of hospitals, having more than 100 beds, 
well-developed surgical and specialty services, medical social 
services, and therapy departments. Preference will be given 
to hospitals affording residence training in the specialty in 
v/hich treatment is sought. In the event that it is neither 
feasible nor economical in individual cases to use such a 

NEXT PAGE IS 4 6-413 
ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-407 



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REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 4 6.6.1101 

hospital, other hospitals may be used if equipped to give 
quality service as needed, and if approved by the department's 
medical -consultant. 

(b) Clinics operated by a state agency or licensed by 
the state. 

(c) Schools, colleges, or training institutions fully 
accredited by the official accrediting agency within the state 
wherein the facility is located. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 
53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-103, 
53-7-203, 53-7-302 and 53-7-303 MCA; NEW, 1984 MAR, p. 511, 
Eff. 3/30/84.) 

Sub-Chapter 10 

Rates of Payment 

46. "6. 1001 ESTABLISHMENT OF RATES OF PAYMENT IS HEREBY 
REPEALED (History: Sec. 53-7-102 and 53-7-203 MCA; IMP , 

Sec. 53-7-102 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; REP, 1984 MiAR, p. 511, 

Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.1002 RATES OF PAYMENT OF SPECIFIC TYPES OF SERV- 
ICES IG HEREBY REPEALED (History: Sec. 53-7-102 and 

53-7-203 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-102 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; REP, 
1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.1003 HOSPITALIZATION IS HEREBY REPEALED (History: 
Sec. 53-7-102 and 53-7-203 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-102 MCA; NEW , 
Eff. 1/3/77; REP, 1-984 MAR\. n. 511, F-ff. 3/30/84.) 

Sub-Chapter 11 

Confidential Information 

46.6.1101 CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION (1) The confiden- 
tiality of client information will be assured in accordance 
with federal and state statutes and rules and with depart- 
mental policy. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 and 
53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-103, 53-7-203, 53-7-302 
and 53-7-303 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AMD, 1984 MAR, p. 511, 
Eff. 3/30/84.) 



NEXT PAGE IS 46-423 
ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-413 



^•v*-.f. 



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REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 46.6.1201 



Sub-Chapter 12 

- ■ Administrative Review of Agency Action 
and Fair Hearing 

4 6.6.1201 HEARINGS ON APPLICANT'S APPEALS (1) An 
applicant for, or recipient of, vocational rehabilitation 
services who is dissatisfied with any department action with 
regard to the furnishing or denial of services, will be 
advised of his right to file a request for an administrative 
reviev/ of that action and right to a fair hearing if he is 
dissatisfied with the outcome of the administrative review. 
The administrative review shall be conducted by the adminis- 
trator of vocational rehabilitative services or designee. 

(2) The fair hearing shall be conducted in accordance 
with the. fair hearing rules of the department as provided for 
in ARM 46.2.201 through 46.2.214. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 
53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-103, 
53-7-203, 53-7-302 and 53-7-303 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AMD , 
1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 



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ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-4 23 



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ATTACHMENT B 



REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 4.6.6.1304 

Sub-Chapter 13 

Extended Employment Program 

46.6.1301 DEFINITIONS IS HEREBY REPEALED (History: 
Sec. 53-7-102 and 53-7-203 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; NEVJ, 
Eff. 1/3/77; REP, 1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

4 6.6.1302 OBJECTIVES OF THE NONVOCATIONAL EXTENDED 
EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (1) The ob;]ectives of the nonvoca- 
tional extended employment program are: 

(a) to facilitate the development of appropriate employ- 
ment positions in community-based facilities to be utilized by 
persons determined by the department to be in need of nonvoca- 
tional extended employment; 

(b) to encourage community placem.ent of currently insti- 
tutionalized persons by developing community-based, nonvoca- 
tional extended em.ployment positions; 

(c) to provide opportunities for severely handicapped 
persons who cannot be readily absorbed in the competitive 
market to participate in nonvocational extended employment 
programs in Montana. 

(2) The nonvocational extended employm^ent program though 
administered by vocational rehabilitation services is not a 
vocational rehabilitation program. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 
53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; NEW, Eff. 
1/3/77; AMD, 1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.1303 FUNCTIONS QT COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION IS 
HEREBY REPEALED (History: Sec. 53-7-102 and 53-7—203 

MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; REP, 1984 MAR, 
p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.1304 RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THE NONVOCATIONAL EXTENDED 
EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM FUNCTIONS (1) Vocational rehabilita- 
tion services is administratively responsible for: 

(a) administration of the nonvocational extended employ- 
ment program including: 

(i) allocation of monies to sheltered workshops and 
work activity centers; 

(ii) payment of monies to sheltered workshops and work 
activity centers; 

(iii) evaluation of the results of the payments in rela- 
tion to program goals. 

(b) assuring that all clients referred for extended 
employm.ent are evaluated and a determination is made as to 
whether they are appropriate for placement in extended employ- 
ment; 

. (c) referring appropriate clients to certified sheltered 
workshops and work activity centers; 

ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-429 



c 



e 



46,6. 1305 SOCIAL AND 

REHABILITATION SERVICES 

(d) assisting in periodically re-evaluating clients who 
have been terminated from extended employment to assess their 
ability to profit from the vocational rehabilitation program, 
and to open such cases as may be able to benefit; 

(2) Supportive services required by persons in the 
extended employment program will be arranged by the designated 
representatives of the community services and developmental 
disabilities divisions. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 
and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; 
AMD, 1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.13 05 EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEES (1) A multi- 
agency committee shall be established at each sheltered work- 
shop and work activity center participating in the nonvoca- 
tional extended employment program. Each coirmittee shall have 
representatives from the facility, the community services 
division, vocational rehabilitative services, and the develop- 
mental disabilities division. The rehabilitative facilities 
specialist shall be an ad hoc member of the corrjnittee. 

(2) The purposes of the nonvocational extended employ- 
ment comjnittees are: 

(a) to screen referrals for appropriateness of certifi- 
cation to the extended employment program. The rehabilitative 
facilities specialist should be consulted if there is any 
question as to appropriateness of a given facility for a given 
client; 

(b) to certify handic'apped persons for an extended 
employment slot, in a particular sheltered workshop or work 
activity center; 

(c) to identify client, goals. The client should be 
involved actively in this process. A written plan should be 
developed for each client and must be a part of the facility 
file, social service file, and the vocational rehabilitative 
services file; 

(d) to monitor, coordinate, or provide services to 
extended employment clients; 

(i) The assigned social service v/orker will provide 
casework and supportive services. 

(ii) The vocational rehabilitation counselor will period- 
ically ascertain client readiness for vocational rehabilita- 
tion programs. 

(iii) The facility member will represent all facility 
functions. 

(iv) The training and contract manager of the develop- 
mental disabilities division will arrange for appropriate 
developmental disability services. 

(e) to de-certify clients: 

(i) when the absences of a client are too frequent for 
one to be gaining from the extended employment experiences; 
(ii) when a client is deceased; 
(iii) when a client moves from the area; 

46-430 3/31/84 ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 






c 



REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 46.6.1308 



(iv) v;hen a client desires to leave that program; or 
(v) when a client reaches a level of productivity at 
which he- is no longer eligible for the program. 

(f) to determine when and how long slots should be held 
open for an absent client; and 

(g) to assess at least every six months the status of 
the client enrolled in extended employment slots to determine 
their progress, develop new goals, and otherwise review the 
written plan. The assessment will be in writing with copies 
in the facility files and in the appropriate department case 
records. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; 
IMP , Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AMD,. 1984 MAR, p. 
511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.1306 FACILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NONVOCATIONAL 
EXTEIJDED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (1) A nonvocational extend- 
ed employment slot which remains vacant for a period of 60 
days will, at the discretion of the department, be subject to 
removal from the facility's slot allocation. 

(2) A facility which is unable to provide consistent 
services, minimally six hours per day five days per week, to 
extended employment clients is subject to a reduction of the 
facilities slot allocation at the discretion of the 
department . 

(3) Should the services of a facility which provides 
extended employment services fall below minimum standards, the 
department will notify the facility in writing of the 
deficiencies and state a specific period of time not to exceed 
six (6) months for corrective actions. Should mryerti-^'e 
measures not be made, the facility v/ill lose all allocated 
slots of the extended employment program. 

(4) Facilities are required to notify the department 
when a client has been absent from a program for three 
consecutive work days. The facility is responsible for 
informing the department of the reason for the absence. 
Department personnel have the authority to excuse or not 
excuse the absences. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 and 
53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AWD, 
1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.1307 APPOINTMENT OF EXTENDED EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEE 
IS HEREBY REPEALED (History: Sec. 53-7-102 and 53-7-203 

MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; REP , 1984 MAR, 
p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 

46.6.1308 ORGANIZATION OF COMJ^ITTEE IS HEREBY REPEALE D 
(History: Sec. 53-7-102 and 53-7-203 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 

MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; REP, 1984 KiAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 



ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-431 



c 



c 



c 



46.6, 1309 SOCIAL AND 

REHABILITATION SERVICES 

4 6.6.1309 DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR NONVOCATIONAL 
EXTENDED SLOTS (1) The nonvocational extended employ- 
ment committee shall develop and maintain a prioritized 
waiting list from which candidates shall be drawn when vacan- 
cies occur; such prioritized list shall be developed along the 
lines of the criteria described in subsection (3) . 

(2) All referrals must iiave undergone a comprehensive 
work evaluation by vocational rehabilitation services. 

(3) Criteria for determining those persons to be certi- 
fied into the nonvocational extended employment program shall 
be as follows: 

(a) A person in order to receive consideration for 
certification into the program must be severely handicapped. 

(b) Priority should be given to those referrals who have 
been institutionalized in state institutions and who have been 
rehabilitated to the point of readiness for nonvocational ex- 
tended employment. Lower priority shall be given to those 
referrals who have not been institutionalized but who are 
adjudged to be candidates for institutionalization if not 
provided extended employment. 

(c) Priority shall be given to "obviously low" producers 
as compared with those who are only "marginally" productive. 
"Obviously low" producers are identified as being up to 50 
percent productive when compared with normal non-handicapped 
workers. "Marginal" producers range betv/een 50-75 percent 
productivity and are to be paid that percentage of the pre- 
vailing wage. Workers classified as over 75 percent will 
generally not be certified for the nonvocational extended 
employment program as they -'are productive enough to contribute 
their share of the overhead and they are approaching the point 
of readiness for competitive employment. 

(i) Productivity level will be determined in the evalu- 
ation process. 

(d) the vocational rehabilitation program must be the 
first source of training opportunities to be considered for 
any person, age 16 or over, whose condition of physical, 
mental or emotional health substantially prevent him from 
holding regular employment. 

(i) Emotional problems include the standard psychiatric 
classifications of psychoneuroses or psychosis. To qualify in 
these categories there must be substantial evidence that the 
maladaptive behavior has been of sufficiently long duration to 
constitute a pattern of behavior and is not merely a situa- 
tional reaction to crisis. There must also be supporting 
evidence to indicate that the behavior has substantially 
prevented the person from holding regular employment. 

(e) Those persons eligible for services for develop- 
mentally disabled persons provided by the department must 
fully utilize those services before they may be considered for 
eligibility for extended employment services. 

46-432 3/31/84 ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 



c 



REHABILITATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 46.6.1401 



(4) Whenever the extended employment coirjnittee is unable 
to arrive at a decision concerning certification, the commit- 
tee v;ill- submit the matter to the division administrator with 
relevant materials for a final decision. (History: Sec. 
53-7-102, 53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7-203 MCA; 



NEW, 


Eff. 
46.6 


1/3/7- 
.1310 


'; kl-]D, 19 84 
PRIORITIES 


IIA.R, p. 511, Eff. 3 
IS HEREBY REPEALED 


/30/84.) 

(History : 

MCA; NEW, 

HEREBY REI 


Sec. 


53-7-1C2 and 53-7-203 MCA; IMP, Sec. 53-7- 
1/3/77; REP, 1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84 

46.6.1311 FINANCIAL NEED REQUIREMENT 


203 
.) 

IS 


Eff. 
'EALED 


(History : 
MCA; NEV7, 
511, Eff. 


Sec. 53-7-10 
19 80 MAR p. 
3/30/84.) 


2 and 53-7-203 MCA; 
594, Eff. 2/15/80; 


IMP 
REP 


, Sec. 
_, 1984 


53-7-203 
MAR , p . 



c 



Sub-Chapter 14 

Kidney Dialysis - Transplant Program 

46.6.1401 PROGRAJ-1 FOR NON-VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 
CLIFNTS SUFFERING FROM CHRONIC END STAGE RENAL DISEASE 
IS HEREBY REPEALED (History: Sec. 53-2-201 MCA; IMP , 

Sec. 53-6-202 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AMD, 1980 MAR p. 593, Eff. 

2/15/80; REP, 1983 MAR, p. 503, Eff. 5/13/83.) 

Sub-Chapters 15 through 24 reserved 



C 



NEXT PAGE IS 46-439 
ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF MONTANA 3/31/84 46-433 



attachment c 

The Rehabilitative and Visual Services Divisions do not have the 
need of the resources to support, (either directly via grants or 
indirectly through the purchase of services listed below) other 
than the following eight rehabilitation facilities at the follow- 
ing addresses. 

Billings Workshop 

200 So 24TH 

Billings MT 59101 

Phone 243-9115 

Services Purchased: VE,WAT,VR-EE 

Eastern Montana Industries 

Box 636 

Miles City MT 59301 

PhONE: 232-3740 

Services Purchased: VE, WAT, VR-EE 

Helena Industries Flathead Industries 

1325 Helena Avenue 305 Third Ave East 

Helena MT 59601 Kalispell MT 59901 

PHONE: 442-8632 PhONE : 755-7676 

Services Purchased: VE, WAT, VR-EE Services Purchased: VE, WAT, 

VR-EE 

Easter Seal Adult Training Center Missoula Rehabilitation Center 
4400 Central Avenue Evaluation Unit 

Great Falls MT 59401 Professional Village 

PhONE: 727-3151 515 KENSINGTON 2A 

Services Purchased: VE, WAT, VR-EE Missoula MT 59301 

PhONE: 728-0820 

BuTTE Workshop Services Purchased: VE 

207 South Montana 
Butte MT 59701 

PhONE: 723-6501 

Services Purchased: VE, WAT, VR-EE 

Missoula Opportunity Workshop 
1005 Marshall 
Missoula MT 59801 

PhONE: 543-3596 

Services Purchased: WAT, VR-EE 



This policy deals only with the treee (3) services of VE (Vocational 
Evaluation). WAT (Work Adjustment Training) and VR-EE (Vocational 
Rehabilitation Extended Employment) 



ATTACHMENT D 



Sub-Chapter 6 

Establishment of Rehabilitation Facilities 

4 6.6.601 LEGAL AUTHORITY (1) At this time the depart- 
me.nt neither owns nor operates its own rehabilitation 
facility, nor does it plan to. It does, however, contract 
v/ith other facilities for services and it does make some of 
its funds available to public or other nonprofit agencies for 

4 6.6.60 6 CONTROL OF EXPENDITURES (1) V.'h&re assistance 
is given to a public or a private nonprofit entity for the 
establishment of a rehabilitation facility, the department 
will exercise controls to see that funds are expended for the 
purposes intended. The facility v;ill be supervised, including 
records, accounts and expenditures, through the use of 
reports, on-site visitations and other inspections by 
department representatives. 

(2) VJhere financial assistance is given to a public or a 
private nonprofit entity for the establishment of a facility, 
funds will be expended by that entity in accordance with 
procedures and standards equivalent to those applicable to the 
department in making direct expenditures for similar purposes. 

(3) The department will supervise all grants to ensure 
that grant conditions are met. (History: ■ Sec. 53-7-102, 
53-7-203 and 53-7-302 MCA; IMP , Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-103, 
53-7-203, 53-7-3C2 and 53-7-303 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AMD , 
1984 MAR, p. 511, Eff. 3/30/84.) 



ATTACHMENT E 



Sub-Chapter 7 ' 
Special Services 



4 6. S. 701 GROUP SERVICES PROGRAM (1) 



The departnent 
for services and 
be expected to 
of a group of 



provides a program of financial assistance 

modifications to facilities v;hich may 

contribute substantially to the rehabilitation 

handicapped persons some of whom are currently or potentially 

clients of vocational rehabilitation services. 

(2) A service should not be developed or facility 
modified solely for the purpose of directly benefiting any one 
handicapped person. 

(3) Preference will be given to services or facilities 
with the potential of benefiting the largest number of 
handicapped persons at a minimum cost to the department. 

(4) These funds will be only utilized: 

(a) to resolve a one-time problem, such as exists in the 
removal of architectural barriers or the purchase of equip- 
ment; and 

(b) to provide ' transportation and 
materials. (History: Sec. 53-7-102, 53-7-203 
MCA; IMP, Sec. ■ 53-7-102, 53-7-103, 53-7-2C3, 
53-7-303 MCA; NEW, Eff. 1/3/77; AMD, 1984 MAR, 
3/30/84.) 

Rules 2 through 4 reserved 



instructional 
and 53-7-302 
53-7-302 and 
p. 511, Eff. 



ADMINISTRATIVE RULES OF IIONTANA 



3/31/84 



46-381 



jr<X