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MUNICIPAL 

HANDBOOK 


CITY OF TORONTO 


1936 

Government 

Publications 


COMPUTED BY THE CITY CLERK 



TORONTO 








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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
University of Toronto 


https://archive.org/details/municipalhandboo00toro_1 


The Great Reign of His Late 
Majesty King George V closed in 
peaceful sleep at Sandringham 
House. It was the twenty-sixth year 
of King George’s reign through an 
eventful period of world history, 
during which he won the love and 
respect of his millions of subjects in 
the far-flung British Empire. 

Toronto’s Big Ben tolled as news 
was flashed from London. 

The Empire-wide Celebration in 
1935 of the 25th Anniversary of King 
George’s accession was striking evi¬ 
dence of the strong ties binding the 
Throne and the British Common¬ 
wealth of Nations. 

Toronto alike with the Empire 
mourns the loss of a noble and be¬ 
loved Sovereign who labored un¬ 
selfishly for the good of his people 
and for the welfare of the human 
race. 

The reign of a great King has 
ended: his memory will ever be held 
in universal love and veneration by 
his people. 







3n jfWemortam 


His Late Majesty 
King George V 
Born June 3rd, 1865 
Succeeded to Throne May 6th, 1910 
Died January 20th, 1936, 
at 6.55 p.m., E.S.T. 





His Majesty 
King Edward VIII 


Permission of 
Hay Wrightson, 
Londan. Fng. 



KING EDWARD VIII 

K ING EDWARD Vin, our new King, was 
born at White Lodge, in Richmond 
Park, a modest Royal estate near the Thames, 
June 23rd, 1894. As the eldest son of the 
then Duke and Duchess of York, from his 
birth he has been an heir to the British 
Throne. 

At his christening three weeks later by the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, he was held in 
the arms of Queen Victoria and given seven 
Christian names—Edward, Albert, Christian, 
George, Andrew, Patrick, David. He was 
baptized Edward, for his grandfather, Albert 
after his great-grandfather who had been 
the Consort of Victoria, Christian after the 
King of Denmark; his other four names 
representing the patron saints of England, 
Scotland, Ireland and Wales. 

King Edward VHI is the first bachelor to 
succeed to the Throne since William IV, and 
is the first British Monarch since George H, 
at the battle of Dettingen in 1743, to take 
part in armed conflict. He served with the 
Canadian Contingent during 1918 and was on 


1 


o 


King Edward VIII —Continued 

the staff of the late Sir Arthur Currie at the 
time of the Armistice, and for some months 
subsequent to it. 

As the former Prince of Wales, King Ed¬ 
ward VIII visited every corner of the British 
Empire and knows every part under the new 
conditions that have arisen since the Great 
War. In thirteen years of travel he has visit¬ 
ed 46 countries and covered a distance of 
300,000 miles. Everywhere during his pere¬ 
grinations throughout the world he was 
acclaimed by cheering multitudes as The 
Prince Charming. The contacts he has made 
have forged new links of friendship between 
the English speaking peoples of the world. 

Since the war he has naturally been the 
leader in all ex-soldier movements. As head 
of the great Toe H, each year, at the annual 
celebration he relights the Torch of Remem¬ 
brance, a light continually kept burning in 
a London church, as a memorial of England’s 
part in the Great War. 

His Majesty, as the Prince of Wales, has 
visited Toronto officially twice, viz., in the 
years 1919 and 1927. In 1927 His Royal High¬ 
ness, in company with His Royal Highness 


3 


King Edward VIII —Continued 

Prince George, opened the new eastern en¬ 
trance to the Canadian National Exhibition 
Grounds, and in consequence these gates 
were named The Princes’ Gates, in honour 
of this visit. 

Our new King has been the idol of millions 
of people throughout the world and the love 
and admiration of all races and creeds ac¬ 
companies him as he assumes his grave 
responsibility. He ascends the Throne with 
a wider knowledge of human nature than 
any of his predecessors. 

His Majesty in his first broadcast message 
to his people throughout the Empire declared 
himself as follows: 

“I am better known to most of you as the 
Prince of Wales—as a man who, during the 
war and since, has had the opportunity of 
getting to know the people of nearly every 
country of the world, under all conditions 
and circumstances. 

“And although I speak to you as the King, 
I am still the same man who has had that 
experience, and whose constant effort it will 
be to continue to promote the well-being of 


4 


King Edward VIII —Continued 

his fellow men. May the future bring peace 
and understanding throughout the world, 
prosperity and happiness to British people, 
and may we be worthy of the heritage which 
is ours.” 



Samuel McBride 

Mayor, 1936 

























TORONTO 
Past and Present 

T HE history of Toronto dates back almost 
three hundred years ago when the first 
French adventurers were guided by their 
friendly Indians to the “place of meeting” 
which is the Indian name for Toronto. It was 
undoubtedly a centre of trade early in the 
eighteenth century, becoming important 
enough to be made a fortified post in 1749- 
1750 when the French built a fort and named 
it Fort Rouille, after the Colonial Minister at 
that time. In the war between the French 
and English the fort was burned in order to 
prevent English occupation in 1759. 

Governor Simcoe chose the site of the City 
in 1793, for the Capital of the Province of 
Upper Canada. He resolved to set up a 
special two-roomed tent or canvas house 
which he had previously brought from Eng¬ 
land, as the nucleus of the new Capital, and 
to establish himself with his family during 
the summer. He changed the name to York 
in honour of the Duke of York, son of the 


5 


6 


Toronto—Past and Present— Continued 

then King George III. The town was occu¬ 
pied by the United States’ forces in 1813, at 
which time the Legislative Assembly Build¬ 
ings and Archives were burned. Self govern¬ 
ment was granted in 1817 and in 1834, the 
population having increased to 9,000, it was 
incorporated as the City of Toronto. (Date 
of incorporation, March 6th, 1834.) 

In 1842, just eight years after incorporation 
as a City, Charles Dickens wrote this most 
illuminating description of Toronto. “The 
town itself is full of life and motion, bustle, 
business and improvement. The streets are 
well paved and lighted with gas; the houses 
are large and good; the shops excellent, many 
of them having a display of goods in their 
windows such as may be seen in thriving 
towns in England, and some which would 
do no discredit to the metropolis itself. There 
is a good stone prison here, and there are, 
besides, a handsome church, a court house, 
public offices, many commodious private resi¬ 
dences and a Government observatory for 
noting and recording the magnetic varia¬ 
tions.” 

From such a sturdy beginning Toronto has 
developed into a great modem cosmopolitan 


I 


Toronto—Past and Present— Continued 

City in the front rank of the really impor¬ 
tant commercial, industrial and travel centres 
of the North American Continent. 

The atmosphere of Toronto is certainly 
singular for, from the spiritual emanation of 
three-quarters of a million people and the 
pioneer development, arises the foundation of 
its great institutions, known throughout the 
world for their character and reputation for 
sound intrinsic values. It is the home of the 
University of Toronto, the largest University 
in the British Empire, the world’s greatest 
annual fair, the Canadian National Exhibi¬ 
tion, and Canada’s premier annual Agricul¬ 
tural, Live Stock and Horse Show, the Royal 
Winter Fair. It is the Head Office of five of 
Canada’s ten chartered banks, as well as of 
many financial institutions. It has a great 
industrial and commercial capacity and fosters 
as municipal undertakings a street railway 
and motor coach service second to none on 
the Continent, an extensive street lighting 
system, a water works system, and a harbour 
development that is the most modem and up- 
to-date on the Great Lakes. 

Toronto has many distinctions but its im¬ 
portance as a manufacturing centre leads all 


8 


Toronto—Past and Present— Continued 

the rest. If one follows a line drawn from 
Canada’s southern boundary through this 
City, and continuing directly to the north, 
it will about evenly divide the Canadian 
population, so that Toronto is in a position 
not only to serve a population of 1,500,000 
within its tributary retail trading area, but 
its manufacturing and commercial institu¬ 
tions can compete conveniently for trade both 
in the East and in the West. Toronto has 
water communication to many important 
centres, to tide water and to more than half 
the way across the Continent. In its century 
of growth and in every respect, Toronto has 
become great among the cities of the world. 
It is one of the few really great cities not 
built either on or at the mouth of a great 
river. 

The Government of the City is carried on 
under the provisions of The Municipal Act 
passed by the Government of the Province 
of Ontario. It is vested in a Municipal 
Council, consisting of the Mayor and four 
members forming the Board of Control (all 
five being elected annually by the citizens 
at large) and eighteen Aldermen elected 
annually from the nine Wards into which 


9 


Toronto—Past and Present— Continued 

the City is divided (two Aldermen being 
elected from each Ward). The Council, as 
a whole, is the legislative body of the Muni¬ 
cipality and carries on its legislative work 
through Standing Committees, viz.: Commit¬ 
tee on Works, Committee on Property, Com¬ 
mittee on Parks and Exhibitions, and Com¬ 
mittee on Legislation. The Board of Control 
is the executive body and as such is respon¬ 
sible for the preparation of the annual Esti¬ 
mates or Budget and the supervision of 
matters relating to finance, the appointment 
of officials, the carrying on of public works 
authorized by the Council, and the general 
administration of the affairs of the City, ex¬ 
cept as to the Department of Education and 
Police, the first being under the control of a 
Board of Education elected by the citizens 
annually, and the latter under a Board of 
Commissioners of Police, which consists of 
the Mayor for the time being, one County 
Court Judge and one Magistrate. 

The present City Hall was opened on Sep¬ 
tember 18th, 1899, and cost only $2,500,000 
although it has a floor space of 5.4 acres. 

The City of Toronto is situated on the 
northern shore of Lake Ontario nearly due 



10 


Toronto—Past and Present— Continued 

north from the mouth of the Niagara River. 
It lies in latitude 43° 39' 10" north, longitude 
79° 23' west. The minimum and maximum 
elevations of Toronto are 245 feet and 610 
feet respectively, the elevation of the City 
Hall being 295 feet. 


11 


Mayors of Toronto 

1834— William Lyon Mackenzie. 

1835— Robert Baldwin Sullivan. 

1836— Thomas D. Morrison. 

1837— George Gumett. 

1838— John Powell. 

1839— John Powell. 

1840— John Powell. 

1841— George Monro. 

1842— Hon. Henry Sherwood. 

1843— Hon. Henry Sherwood. 

1844— Hon. Henry Sherwood. 

1845— William Henry Boulton. 

1846— William Henry Boulton. 

1847— William Henry Boulton. 

1848— George Gumett. 

1849— George Gumett. 

1850— George Gumett. 

1851— John George Bowes. 

1852— John George Bowes. 

1853— John George Bowes. 

j Joshua George Beard. 
1854 j John Beverley Robinson, 

1855— George William Allan. 

1856— John Beverley Robinson. 


President. 


12 


1857—John Hutchinson. 

^William Henry Boulton. 
1858 jDayjd Breckenridge Read. 

1859—Adam Wilson. 

^Adam Wilson. 

1860 j John Carr, President 

1861— John George Bowes. 

1862— John George Bowes. 

1863— John George Bowes. 

1864— Francis H. Medcalf. 

1865— Francis H. Medcalf. 

1866— Francis H. Medcalf. 

1867— James E. Smith. 

1868— James E. Smith. 

1869— Samuel Bickerton Harman. 

^Samuel Bickerton Harman. 
1870 |D’Arcy Boulton, President. 

1871— Joseph Sheard. 

1872— Joseph Sheard. 

1873— Alexander Manning. 

1874— Francis H. Medcalf. 

^Francis H. Medcalf. 

^ ^ | John Baxter, President. 

1876—Angus Morrison. 

^ Angus Morrison. 

) Patrick G. Close, President. 


13 


1878— Angus Morrison. 

1879— James Beaty, Jr. 

1880— James Beaty, Jr. 

1881— William Barclay McMurrich. 

1882— William Barclay McMurrich. 

1883— Arthur Radcliffe Boswell. 

1884— Arthur Radcliffe Boswell. 

1885— Alexander Manning. 

1886— William Holmes Howland. 

1887— William Holmes Howland. 

1888— Edward Frederick Clarke. 

jggg_^Edward Frederick Clarke. 

| John McMillan, President. 

1890— Edward Frederick Clarke. 

1891— Edward Frederick Clarke. 

1892— Robert John Fleming. 

1893— Robert John Fleming. 

1894— Warring Kennedy. 

^Warring Kennedy. 

^ ^ | John Shaw, President. 

1896—Robert John Fleming. 

{ Robert John Fleming. 

John Shaw. 

1898—John Shaw. 

1899—John Shaw. 

1900—Ernest Albert Macdonald. 


14 


1901— Oliver A. Howland. 

1902— Oliver A. Howland. 

1903— Thomas Urquhart. 

1904— Thomas Urquhart. 

1905— Thomas Urquhart. 

1906— Emerson Coatsworth. 

1907— Emerson Coatsworth. 

1908— Joseph Oliver. 

ioaq _(Joseph Oliver. 

)John J. Ward, President. 

(George Reginald Geary. 
)John J. Ward, President, 
j (George Reginald Geary. 

) Francis S. Spence, President. 

( George Reginald Geary. 

1912— \ Horatio C. Hocken. 

[ Thomas L. Church, President. 

1913— Horatio C. Hocken. 

1914— Horatio C. Hocken. 

1915— Thomas Langton Church. 

1916— Thomas Langton Church. 

1917— Thomas Langton Church. 

1918— Thomas Langton Church. 

1919— Thomas Langton Church. 

1920— Thomas Langton Church. 

1921— Thomas Langton Church. 


15 


1922— Charles Alfred Maguire. 

1923— Charles Alfred Maguire. 

1924— William W. Hiltz. 

1925— Thomas Foster. 

1926— Thomas Foster. 

1927— Thomas Foster. 

(Samuel McBride. 

1 QOQ_ J 

^Joseph Gibbons, President. 

1929— Samuel McBride. 

1930— Bert S. Wemp. 

1931— William J. Stewart. 

1932— William J. Stewart. 

1933— William J. Stewart. 

(William J. Stewart. 

1034_ ) 

[ J. George Ramsden, President. 

F ames Simpson. 

^Samuel McBride, President. 

(Samuel McBride. 

1 QQfi_ J 

/William D. Robbins, President 


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R. H. Saunders.372 Bay St..Wa. 4426 100 Burnside Dr..La. 6329 

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Daylight Saving Time commences Sunday, April 25th, and ends Sunday, Septem¬ 
ber 27th, 1936. 

18-19 









20 


City Council, 1936 —Continued 
Service Record 
John R. Beamish— 

Alderman, Ward No. 2, 1916, 1917, 1918, 
1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1926, 1927, 
1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 
1935, 1936. 

Ernest Bray— 

Alderman, Ward No. 8, 1930, 1931, 1932, 

1933, 1934, 1935, 1936. 

Fred J. Conboy— 

Alderman, Ward No. 6, 1935, 1936. 

Ralph C. Day— 

Alderman, Ward No. 1, 1931, 1932, 1933, 

1934, 

Controller, 1935, 1936. 

Wm. G. Ellis— 

Alderman, Ward No. 9, 1932, 1933, 1934, 

1935, 1936. 

George H. Gardiner— 

Alderman, Ward No. 7, 1934, 1935, 1936. 

Frederick Hamilton— 

Alderman, Ward No. 5, 1929, 1930, 1931, 
1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936. 


21 


City Council, 1936 —Continued 
Walter A. Howell— 

Alderman, Ward No. 8, 1926, 1927, 1928, 
1929, 1930, 1932, 1935, 1936. 

Frank M. Johnston— 

Alderman, Ward No. 1, 1918, 1919, 1920, 
1921, 1922, 1929, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 
1935, 1936. 

John B. Laidlaw— 

Alderman, Ward No. 3, 1934, 1935, 1936. 
Robert R. Leslie— 

Alderman, Ward No. 5, 1930, 1931, 1932, 
1935, 1936. 

Donald C. MacGregor— 

Alderman, Ward No. 6, 1916, 1917, 1919, 
1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1930, 1931, 1932, 

1933, 1934, 1935, 1936. 

Controller, 1925, 1926, 1927. 

Samuel McBride— 

Alderman, Ward No. 3, 1905, 1906, 1907, 
1908, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 
1916. 

Ward No. 4, 1924, 1925. 

Controller, 1918, 1919, 1926, 1932, 1933, 

1934, 1935f 

Mayor, 1928, 1929, 1936. 



22 


City Council, 1936 —Continued 

John D. McNish— 

Alderman, Ward No. 9, 1935, 1936. 

Nathan Phillips—- 

Alderman, Ward No. 4, 1924, 1925, 1926, 
1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 
1934, 1935, 1936. 

Adelaide M. Plumptre— 

Alderman, Ward No. 2, 1936. 

J. George Hamsden— 

Alderman, Ward No. 3, 1903, 1904, 1915, 
1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1925, 1926, 1930. 
Controller, 1920, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 

1936. 

William D. Robbins— 

Alderman, Ward No. 1, 1912, 1913, 1914, 
1915, 1916, 1917, 1923. 

Controller, 1918, 1919, 1925, 1928, 1930, 
1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1935. 

Robert H. Saunders— 

Alderman, Ward No. 4, 1935, 1936. 

John S. Simmons— 

Alderman, Ward No. 3, 1935, 1936. 


23 


City Council, 1936 —Continued 

William A. Summerville— 

Alderman, Ward No. 1, 1922, 1923, 1924, 
1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1935, 1936. 
Controller, 1929, 1930. 

William J. Wadsworth— 

Alderman, Ward No. 7, 1927, 1928, 1929, 
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933. 

Controller, 1935, 1936. 

Frank G. I. WTietter— 

Alderman, Ward No. 7, 1914, 1916, 1917, 
1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 
1928, *1929, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 
1936. 

(*Appointed Controller by Council for 
portion of year 1929, vice Joseph Gibbons, 
resigned.) 



24 


Board of Control and Standing Committees 
of the Council for the Year 1936 


Board of Control 

Samuel McBride (Mayor), Chairman; Con¬ 
trollers—W. D. Robbins ( Vice-Chair¬ 
man ), Ralph C. Day, J. George Ramsden 
and William J. Wadsworth. 

Secretary at City Clerk’s Office. 

Meets every Wednesday, and on Tuesday 
preceding regular meeting of Council at 
10 a.m. Deputations will be heard on 
Wednesdays at 11 a.m. 


Committees 

Works. —Alderman Summerville, Chairman; 
Controller Day, Aldermen Ellis, Howell, 
Leslie, MacGregor, Plumptre, Saunders, 
Simmons and Whetter. 

Secretary at Works Department. 

Meets every alternate Thursday at 2.30 p.m. 

Property. —Alderman Hamilton, Chairman; 
Controller Ramsden, Aldermen Beamish, 
Bray, Conboy, Gardiner, Johnston, Laid- 
law, McNish and Phillips. 




25 


Standing Committees, 1936 —Continued 

Secretary at City Clerk’s Office. 

Meets every alternate Thursday at 2 p.m. 

Parks and Exhibitions. —Alderman Saunders, 
Chairman; Controller Wadsworth, Aider- 
men Conboy, Gardiner, Howell, Leslie, 
Ellis, Plumptre, Simmons and Summer¬ 
ville. 

Secretary at City Clerk’s Office. 

Meets every alternate Friday at 3 p.m. 

Legislation. —Alderman Beamish, Chairman; 
Controller Robbins, Aldermen Bray, 
Hamilton, Johnston, Laidlaw, MacGregor, 
McNish, Phillips and Whetter. 

Secretary at City Clerk’s Office. 

Meets at call of Chairman. 

Local Board of Health. —Alderman Whetter, 
Chairman; Controller Ramsden, Aider- 
men Conboy and Johnston, and the 
Medical Officer of Health. 

Secretary at City Clerk’s Office. 

Meets every alternate Tuesday at 2.36 p.m. 


26 


City Council Representatives on Hospitals 
and Other Boards for the Year 1936 

Canadian National Exhibition Associa¬ 
tion. — His Worship Mayor McBride, 
Aldermen Bray, Gardiner, Howell, John¬ 
ston, Leslie, McNish and Simmons. 

Industrial Schools Association. —Aldermen 
Ellis and Howell. 

Public Library Board. — Controller Day, 
Thomas W. Banton, Norman B. Gash, 
K.C., and Dr. Henry Glendinning. 

Toronto General Hospital.— Aldermen Bray, 
Gardiner, Laidlaw, MacGregor and Phil¬ 
lips. 

Toronto Western Hospital. — Aldermen 
Gardiner and Leslie. 

St. Michael’s Hospital.— Alderman Beamish. 

Women’s College Hospital.— Alderman Ham¬ 
ilton. 

Toronto East General Hospital. —Aldermen 
Howell and Summerville. 

Art Gallery. —Aldermen Bray, Gardiner, 
Laidlaw, Phillips and Plumptre. 


27 


Children’s Aid Society.— 

Controller Robbins. 

Massey Music Hall.— 

His Worship Mayor McBride. 

Toronto Housing Company.— 

Alderman McNish. 

Toronto Hospital for Consumptives.— Aider- 
men Ellis, Hamilton, Laidlaw, Phillips, 
Plumptre and Saunders. 

Toronto Branch, Canadian Red Cross 
Society.— Aldermen Leslie and Whetter. 

House of Industry. — Aldermen Beamish, 
Howell and Simmons. 

Toronto Industrial Commission.— 

His Worship Mayor McBride. 


28 


Court of Revision 

W. Assheton Smith, Commissioner. 

The Assessment Rolls are returned and the 
Court sits to hear appeals against the general 
assessment of the City upon the following 


lays. 

Date for 

Date of Commencing 

Ward 

Return of Roll 

Court of Revision 

7 

March 17 th 

April 14th 

8 

March 28th 

April 30th 

1 

April 21st 

May 20th 

6 

May 23rd 

June 22nd 

2 

May 30th 

July 13th 

5 

July 3rd 

July 27th 

9 

July 10th 

August 14th 

4 

July 25th 

August 31st 

3 

August 8th 

September 24th 


Appeals must be filed within ten days after 
the return of the Assessment Roll, as stated 
on the notice of assessment, and should be 
lodged with the Assessment Commissioner. 

The Court also sits from time to time 
throughout the year to hear appeals in re¬ 
spect of local improvement works, vacancy 
allowances and business tax adjustments. 

The City Clerk is the Clerk of the Court. 


29 


Civic Departments 

Mayor’s Office. —Room No. 207, Second 
Floor, City Hall. Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 

Samuel McBride, Mayor, 335 Inglewood 
Drive. Telephone, Hyland 7784. Summer 
Residence, Telephone, Adelaide 8045. 

F. C. Hamilton, Executive Secretary, 24 Hed- 
dington Ave. Telephone, Hyland 8116. 

City Clerk’s Office. —Room No. 209, Second 
Floor, City Hall. Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 

J. W. Somers, O.B.E., City Clerk, 29 Foxbar 
Road. Telephone, Midway 1943. 

A. E. Smart, Deputy City Clerk, 48 Pacific 
Ave. Telephone, Junction 0955. 

J. B. Sherring, Secretary, Board of Control, 
320 Durie Street. Telephone, Lyndhurst 
1389. 

City Treasurer’s Office. —Room No. 104, 
First Floor, City Hall. Telephone, Ade¬ 
laide 7171. 


30 


Civic Departments— Continued 

Geo. Wilson, Commissioner of Finance and 
City Treasurer, 260 Russell Hill Road 
Telephone, Midway 5255. 


Harry Rebum, Deputy City Treasurer, 134 
Dinnick Crescent. Telephone, Mohawk 
1200. 

City Auditor’s Office. —Room No. 1108, 
Temple Building. Telephone, Adelaide 
7315-6. 

Sholto C. Scott, City Auditor, 200 St. Clair 
Ave West. Telephone, Midway 4776. 

H. W. Percy, Deputy City Auditor, 486 Glen- 
lake Avenue. Telephone, Lyndhurst 
4233. 

Law Department. —Room No. 208, Second 
Floor, City Hall. Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 

C. M. Colquhoun, K.C., City Solicitor and 
Counsel to the Corporation, 57 High Park 
Avenue. Telephone. Junction 1054. 


31 


Civic Departments— Continued 

W. G. Angus, Deputy City Solicitor, 127 
Highboume Road. Telephone, Hyland 
9122. 

Works Department.— Room No. 10 (Head 
Office), Ground Floor, City Hall. Tele¬ 
phone, Adelaide 7171. 

R. C. Harris, Commissioner of Works, 10 
Neville Park Blvd. Telephone, Howard 
6440. 

George G. Powell, Deputy City Engineer, 129 
Springhurst Avenue. Telephone Lake¬ 
side 4652. 

Assessment Department.— Room No. 202. 
Second Floor, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 

W. Geo. Farley, Assessment Commissioner, 
390 St. Clements Avenue. Telephone, 
Hudson 0489. 

Harry Nixon, Deputy Assessment Commis¬ 
sioner, 42 Thorncliffe Avenue. Tele¬ 
phone, Gerrard 5707. 



32 


Civic Departments— Continued 

Department of City Planning and City 
Surveying. — Third Floor, West Side, 
Room 333, City Hall. Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 

Tracy D. leMay, Commissioner of City Plan¬ 
ning and City Surveyor, 170 Glencaim 
Avenue. Telephone, Hudson 0447. 

Department of Property.— Room No. 14, 
Ground Floor, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 

Graham D. Bland, Commissioner of Property, 
51 Hilton Avenue. Telephone, Lakeside 
9447. 

J. H. Woods, Deputy Property Commissioner, 
97 Hogarth Avenue. Telephone, Gerrard 
1270. 

Street Cleaning Department. —Ground Floor, 
West Corridor, City Registry Office Build¬ 
ing, 90 Albert Street. Telephone, Elgin 
8369. 

H. D. Bradley, Street Commissioner, 204 
Waverley Road. Telephone, Howard 
9088. 


33 


Civic Departments— Continued 

Grant E. Taylor, Deputy Street Commis¬ 
sioner, 21 Coldstream Avenue. Tele¬ 
phone, Hudson 2507. 

Department of Buildings.— Room No. 18, 
Ground Floor, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 

Kenneth S. Gillies, Commissioner of Build¬ 
ings, 53 Walmsley Boulevard. Telephone, 
Hyland 2493. 

Philip M. Thompson, Deputy Commissioner 
of Buildings, 27 South Drive. Telephone, 
Randolph 1733. 

Parks Department. —Room No. 15, Ground 
Floor, City Hall. Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 

Charles E. Chambers, Commissioner of 
Parks, 67 Lakeshore Boulevard. Tele¬ 
phone, Lakeside 4829. 

Health Department. —Room No. 312, Third 
Floor, City Hall. Telephones, Adelaide 
7171 and 9714. 

Gordon P. Jackson, M.B., Medical Officer of 
Health, 135 Tyndall Avenue. Telephone, 
Lakeside 0417. 


34 


Civic Departments— Continued 

L. A. Pequegnat, M.B., Deputy Medical Officer 
of Health, 131 Lascelles Blvd. Telephone. 
Hyland 8223. 

Public Welfare Department. —Stewart Build¬ 
ing, 149 College Street. Telephone, 
Waverley 1082. 

A. W. Laver, Commissioner of Public Wel¬ 
fare, 53 Lawrence Crescent. Telephone, 
Hudson 1549. 

Thomas E. Heron, Deputy Commissioner of 
Public Welfare, 44 Collegeview Avenue. 
Telephone, Hudson 4773. 

Toronto Municipal Abattoir. —At the foot of 
Tecumseth St. Telephone, Waverley 
9214. 

Earl E. Hunt, Commissioner of Toronto 
Municipal Abattoir, 17 Kelway Blvd. 
Telephone, Hudson 8313. 

Magistrates’ Courts and Offices. —Ground 
and First Floors, City Hall, north-east 
comer. (Entrance from James and 
Albert Streets.) Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 


35 


Civic Departments— Continued 

Daniel O’Connell, Senior Magistrate, 127 
South Drive. Telephone, Midway 8820. 

James Edmund Jones, Magistrate, 181 Daw- 
lish Avenue. Telephone, Mohawk 1810. 

Robert J. Browne, Magistrate, 232 Heath 
Street East. Telephone, Hyland 1213. 

Thomas J. W. O’Connor, Magistrate, Apart¬ 
ment 2, 608 Jarvis St. Telephone, Ran¬ 
dolph 4438. 

Arthur L. Tinker, Magistrate’s Court Clerk 
and Deputy Magistrate, 371 Eglinton 
Avenue East. Telephone, Hyland 0958. 

Benjamin B. Jackson, Deputy Magistrate’s 
Court Clerk, 18 Crestview Road. Tele¬ 
phone, Hudson 1039. 

Norman Borins, Justice of the Peace Receiv¬ 
ing Complaints, 53 Beatrice St. Tele¬ 
phone, Melrose 3603. 

J. A. Marshall, Justice of the Peace Receiv¬ 
ing Complaints, 39 Holly St. Telephone, 
Hudson 2716. 

Police Headquarters. —Stewart Building, 149 
College Street. Telephone, Adelaide 2121 


36 


Civic Departments —Continued 
Board of Commissioners of Police 

Samuel McBride, Mayor, Chairman. 

His Honour Judge W. T. J. Lee, 70 Lyndhurst 
Avenue. Telephone, Midway 4950. 

His Worship Frank Denton, 16 Killamey 
Road. Telephone, Hyland 5621. 

Secretary 

J. Palmer Kent, Room 210, City Hall. Tele¬ 
phone, Adelaide 7171. 

Officers 

Brig.-Gen. Denis C. Draper, Chief Constable. 
Telephone, Adelaide 2121. 

George S. Guthrie, Deputy Chief Constable, 
405 Armadale Avenue. Telephone, Lynd¬ 
hurst 1486. 

City Jail.— Gerrard Street, east of Don 
River. Telephone, Gladstone 2496. 

H. G. Denning Governor. Residence tele¬ 
phone, Gerrard 4585. 

Walter L. Rayfield, Deputy Governor. 

Municipal Farm. —LangstafTe P.O., G. Hedley 
Basher, Superintendent. Telephone, Hud¬ 
son 0052. 


37 


Civic Departments— Continued 

Superintendent of City Hall Buildings.— 
Frederick A. Workman. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 49 Buckingham Avenue. 

Telephone, Mohawk 2661. 

Fire Department.— Headquarters, Adelaide 
Street Fire Hall. Telephone Nos.: Office, 
Adelaide 3579; Fire Halls, Adelaide 2138; 
Fire Alarm, Adelaide 2133. 

Officers 

George Sinclair, Chief of Department, 35 
Withrow Avenue. Telephone, Gladstone 
2903. 

Duncan McLean, Deputy Chief, 39 Triller 
Avenue. Telephone, Lakeside 6151. 




38 


Court and Judicial Officers 

County Court Judges’ Chambers. —Room No. 
107, First Floor, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 

James Parker, Senior Judge, 15 St. Leonard’s 
Avenue. Telephone, Hudson 5676. 

Daniel O’Connell, Junior Judge, 127 South 
Drive. Telephone, Midway 8820. 

William T. J. Lee, Junior Judge, 70 Lynd- 
hurst Avenue. Telephone, Midway 4950. 

J. Arthur Jackson, Junior Judge, 141 Indian 
Road. Telephone, Lombard 0577. 

Frank M. Field, Junior Judge, Military 
Institute, 426 University Avenue. Tele¬ 
phones, Adelaide 3983 and Adelaide 7070 
(City Hall). 

Ian McL. Macdonell, Junior Judge, 15 
Ormsby Crescent. Telephone, Hudson 

1547. 

T. Herbert Barton, Junior Judge, 22 Wych- 
wood Park. Telephone, Lakeside 1743. 

Albert E. Honeywell, Junior Judge, 60 Daw- 
lish Avenue. Telephone, Hudson 2294. 

Archibald Perkins, Judges’ Secretary. Tele¬ 
phone, Adelaide 7171. 


39 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 

John Tytler, Surrogate Court Judge, 73 
Braemore Gardens. Telephone, Lakeside 
9916. 

Sheriffs’ Offices. —Rooms Nos. 113 and 114, 
First Floor, City Hall. Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 

A. M. Gorrie, Sheriff, City of Toronto and 
County of York, 118 Glen Road. Tele¬ 
phone, Randolph 5339. 

Arthur H. Collings, Deputy City Sheriff, 161 
Indian Road. Telephone Lombard 7155. 

County Court Clerk’s Office. —Room No. 
109, First Floor, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 

Arthur S. Winchester, County Court Clerk, 
42 Chudleigh Avenue. Telephone, Hud¬ 
son 8282. 

Surrogate Court Registrar’s Office. —Room 
No. Ill, First Floor, City Hall. Tele¬ 
phone, Adelaide 7171. 

Arthur S. Winchester, Surrogate Court 
Registrar, 42 Chudleigh Avenue. Tele¬ 
phone Hudson 8282. 

Clerk of the Peace Office.— Room No. 13, 
Ground Floor, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 


40 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 

Herbert E. Irwin, K.C., Clerk of the Peace, 
332 Palmerston Boulevard. Telephone, 
Kingsdale 2482. 

Assize Court Office. —Room No. 219, Second 
Floor, City Hall. Telephone Adelaide 
7171. 

Patrick Donnelly, Assistant Registrar. Resi¬ 
dence, 133 Maclennan Ave. Telephone, 
Midway 2660. 

Non-Jury Court Office. —Room No. 217, 
Second Floor, City Hall. Telephone, Ade¬ 
laide 7171. W. J. Davies and F. W. Scott, 
Non-Jury Clerks. 

Admiralty Court, Ontario Admiralty Dis¬ 
trict. —Judge Frank M. Field. Chambers, 
Room No. 112, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 

Admiralty Court, Registrar’s Office.— Room 
No. 110, First Floor, City Hall. Tele¬ 
phone, Adelaide 9605. 

William J. McWhinney, Registrar, 355 Wal- 
mer Road. Telephone Randolph 2943. 

First Division Court Clerk's Office.— Room 
No. 316, Third Floor, City Hall. Tele¬ 
phone, Adelaide 7171. 


41 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 

Frank G. J. McDonagh, Clerk, 21 Glenholme 
Avenue. Telephone, Melrose 4438. 

Tenth Division Court Clerk’s Office. —Room 
No. 317, Third Floor, City Hall. Tele¬ 
phone, Adelaide 7171. 

Edward R. Dewart, Clerk, 5 Doncliffe Drive, 
Telephone, Hudson 8836. 

Crown Attorney’s Office.— Room No. 102, 
First Floor, City Hall. Telephone, 
Adelaide 7171. 

James W. McFadden, K.C., Crown Attorney, 
408 St. Edmunds Apts. Telephone, Mid¬ 
way 6472. 

W. O. Gibson, K.C., Assistant Crown At¬ 
torney, 78 Oriole Road. Telephone, 
Hyland 8963. 

C. Frank Moore, K.C., Assistant Crown 
Attorney, 89 Rosemount Avenue, Weston, 
Ont. Telephone, Junction 6172. 

Frederick I. Malone, Assistant Crown At¬ 
torney, 190 St. George Street. Telephone, 
Kingsdale 3342. 



42 


Court and Judicial Officers —Continued 

C. L. Snyder, Assistant Crown Attorney, 22 
St. Thomas St. Telephone, Randolph 
5141. 

Family Court and Officers. —Registry Office 
Building, 90 Albert Street. Telephones, 
Adelaide 0700 and 0709. 

H. S. Mott, Judge, 27 Austin Crescent. Tele¬ 
phone, Lakeside 5852. 

Richard S. Hosking, Deputy Judge, 164 
Brookdale Avenue. Telephone, Hudson 
1180. 

City Registry Office.— Corner Albert and 
Chestnut Streets. Telephone, Adelaide 
4943. 

W. J. C. McCrea, Acting Registrar, 65 Benla- 
mond Ave. Telephone, Grover 4382. 

Charles R. Deacon, K.C., Master of Titles. 
60 Rosehill Avenue. Telephone, Kings- 
dale 9177. 

Chief Coroner. —Dr. M. M. Crawford, 1254 
Avenue Road. Telephone, Hudson 2424. 

Office, Coroner’s Building— 86 Lombard St. 
Telephones, Adelaide 6465-6466. 


SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF DEBENTUREfDEBTS AND SINKING FUNDS 

31st DECEMBER, 1935 


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SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF DEBENTURE DEBTS AND SINKING FUNDS, 

31st DECEMBER, 1935 —Continued 


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Grand Total.I $180,683,301 79 I $25,796,158 52 I $154,887,143 27 

^Deduct. **Instalment Debentures only. fMet by Special Levies. ffMet by Direct Payment 
^rom respective Commissions. 

















































45 


Estimates of the City of Toronto for the 
Year Ending 31st December, 1936. 

(Including Re-Votes) 

DEBT CHARGES 

Education: 

Schools—Public .$1,131,822 

“ High . 327,536 

Commercial . 151,504 

“ Technical . 294,633 


$1,905,495 


General: 

City and County Buildings $ 14,993 

Fire Halls and Equipment 86,441 

Garbage Disposal. 65,371 

Highways in City. 1,164,926 

Highways outside City 169,616 

Hospital and charitable grants 120,959 

Hospitals, Municipal 46,000 

Industrial Farms. 21,704 

Libraries, Public. 54,705 

Local Improvements— 

City’s Share. 1,813,237 

Local Improvement rates on ex¬ 
empt and City-owned property 193,000 

Main Sewers . 744,268 

Markets . 8,641 

Miscellaneous . 113,769 






















46 


Estimates— Continued 


Parks and Playgrounds .$ 539,342 

Police Stations . 34,393 

Registry Office—City . 29,264 

Unemployment Relief—Direct . 1,440,324 


$6,660,953 


Special Services Affecting 
General Taxation 

Abattoir (partially self-sustain¬ 
ing) .$ 19,060 

Canadian National Exhibition . 323,760 

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair .... 155,557 

City-owned Radial Railways (in 

liquidation) . 222,966 

Housing (partially self-sustaining) 64,015 

Island Ferry Service (under T.T.C. 

operation) . 27,755 

Waterworks (self-sustaining) . 1,830,700 

$2,643,913 


Self-Sustaining Services Not 
Affecting Taxation: 

Local Improvements—Ratepayers’ 

share .$2,189,434 

Toronto Hydro-Electric System 2,503,264 


















47 


Estimates —Continued 

Transportation System .$2,934,232 

$7,626,930 

Less: Ratepayers’ share of L.I. 

Rates on exempt and city- 


owned property . 193,000 

$7,433,930 

Total Debt Charges .$18,644,291 


APPROPRIATIONS 

(Including Re-Votes ) 

Debts charges, General (see pages 

43 and 44) .$6,660,952.51 

For taxes uncollectable, vacancy 
and other allowances, losses, 
etc. 300,859.00 


CITY COUNCIL 
General 

Council Remuneration: 


Mayor .$10,872 

Controllers . 19,250 

Alderman . 21,272 


$51,394 
















48 


Estimates— Continued 

Mayor’s Office—Salaries .$ 8,855 

Mayor’s Office—Office Supplies, etc. 1,500 

Auto Service (City Garage) . 14,450 

Sundries (Council) . 6,500 

Travelling expenses of Council, etc. 500 

Receptions, entertainments, etc. 10,000 

Entertaining Junior Champions of 
Amateur Sports . 1,500 

Special Items 


Memorial Service re death of King 

George V.$ 2,000 

Armistice Day Service . 1,200 

Royal Commission re Police Investi¬ 
gation . 18,000 


Special Grants 

Amalgamated Veterans’ Association 


(1866) .,.$ 150 

Canadian Military Institute . 754 

Canadian National Institute for the 

Blind . 10,000 

Canadian Red Cross Society . 3,500 














49 


Estimates —Continu ed 

Canadian Social Hygiene Council.... 5,000 

Catholic Charities Federation . 15,009 

Dominion Day Regatta . 500 

Jewish Federation of Charities . 11,500 

National Trades and Labor Day 

Committee . 125 

Navy League of Canada, Ontario 

Division . 500 

Ontario Rifle Association . 250 

Ontario Municipal Association (fees) 200 

Ontario Municipal Electrical Asso¬ 
ciation (fees) . 100 

Poppy Day Fund . 2,500 

Toronto Humane Society . 1,500 

Toronto Flying Club . 2,500 

Toronto Convention and Tourist 

Association . 5,000 

Toronto Kennel Club . 100 

Trades and Labor Council — Labor 

Day . 250 

Veterans’ Club Houses, re local im¬ 
provements and school rates . 1,950 

ASSESSMENT DEPARTMENT 

Salaries .$ 247,058 

Office supplies, auto service, etc. 20,469 


















50 


Estimates— Continued 

CITY PLANNING AND SURVEYING 
DEPARTMENT 


Salaries .$ 49,812 

Office Supplies . 3,280 

CITY AUDIT DEPARTMENT 

Salaries .$ 98,505 

Office Supplies, etc. 2,700 

Rental of Office Space . 3,000 

Expenses in Checking Detailed 
Estimates . 5,775 


CITY CLERK’S DEPARTMENT 


Salaries .$ 47,122 

Advertising . 3,500 

Printing . 9,500 

Office supplies and sundries . 2,900 

Election expenses . 54,240 

Preparing collectors’ rolls . 19,735 

Preparing vital statistics . 4,055 

Auto Service, City Garage . 750 

Stenographer, Board of Control and 
clerical assistants for Welfare 
work in Mayor’s office and Board 
of Control office, etc. 4,620 

















51 


Estimates —Continued 
COURT OF REVISION 


Salary of Commissioner .$ 5,313 

LAW DEPARTMENT 
General 

Salaries .$ 60,450 

Law costs, counsel fees, etc. 7,000 

Law costs, re business and income 

tax collection suits . 100 

Rental of office space . 3,750 

Expenses of Fair Wage Officer . 50 


Commission on Claims 

Compensation for injuries or dam¬ 
ages sustained through defective 
sidewalks, streets, etc., and law 
costs incidental thereto . 20,000 

TELEPHONE EXCHANGE 
Salaries .$ 7,527 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT 
General Office 

Salaries .$ 119,318 

Office supplies, equipment and sun¬ 
dries . 12,000 

Auto service—City Garage . 2,842 

Cheque Writer, Accounting Machine 
and Protectograph 


1,835 














52 


Estimates— Continued 
Tax Office 

Salaries . 162,784 

Office supplies, equipment and sun¬ 
dries . 22,338 

License Office 

Salaries . 10,607 

Office supplies, equipment and sun¬ 
dries . 6,755 

PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Administration $ 165,176 

House of Industry 28,500 

Charitable and Institutional grants 155,367 

Administration — Unemployment 
Relief 335,662 

Unemployment Relief—Non-Admit - 

table Items . 50,000 

Unemployment Relief — One-fifth 

estimated cost of Direct Relief, 1936 585,340 

Statutory 

Children’s Aid Societies . 310,000 

Hospitals . 1,270,000 

Mothers’ Allowance Commission . 510,000 

Old Age Pensions . 233,000 

Ontario Training Schools . 19,000 

Women’s Refuges . 4,500 

Industrial Schools . 6,400 

















53 


Estimates— Continued 

DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS 

Salaries .$ 116,988 

Office supplies and sundries . 3,622 

Auto Service, City Garage . 5,899 

Insurance . 25 

GENERAL COURTS AND INQUESTS 

City and York County joint civil 

justice .$ 90,000 

City and York County joint crim¬ 
inal justice . 42,000 

Crown witnesses . 10,000 

Certificates of lunacy . 2,500 

Miscellaneous . 14,000 

Inquests . 20,000 

Judge’s Secretary .. 1,752 


$180,252 

JUVENILE COURT 

Salaries .$ 34,900 

Sundries . 2,500 

MAGISTRATES’ COURT 

Salaries .$ 58,553 

Court Stenographers’ Fees . 6,000 

Office supplies, equipment and 
sundries . 3,500 





















54 


Estimates —Co nt ivued 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Maintenance 

Salaries .$1,406,478 

Clothing (uniform) . 15,569 

Supplies and repairs . 30,100 

Fuel, light and water . 19,243 

Fire alarm telegraph . 2,000 

Insurance, fire, liability, etc. 8,806 

Office supplies and sundries . 1,375 

Fire hose and sundry equipment 3,866 

Salary, hospital care and treatment 
of injured firemen . 5,376 

Water Supply for Fire Protection 

General supply .$ 992,800 

High pressure system maintenance.... 36,475 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
General 

General administration $ 48,649 

Medical, dental and quarantine ser¬ 
vice . 251,010 

Public health nursing . 240,866 

Laboratory service . 32,673 

Isolation Hospital service . 135,452 

Food control service . 64,589 

Sanitation service . 90,054 

Out-Patient service . 107,865 




















55 


Estimates— Continued 

PARKS DEPARTMENT 
Maintenance 

Allan Gardens .$ 26,860 

Band Concerts . 5,560 

Bathing and Checking Stations . 10,407 

‘Exhibition Park . 74,224 

Forestry Section . 58,973 

General Administration . 86,238 

High Park . 44,807 

Insurance . 6,625 

Island Park . 45,000 

Mechanical Section . 9,594 

Reservoir Park . 18,818 

Rinks and Slides . 84,093 

Riverdale Park . 38,692 

Riverdale Zoo . 34,627 

Sundry Parks . 303,207 

Supervised Playgrounds . 141,036 

Workmen’s Compensation . 4,000 


$992,761 

‘Less 50% applicable to Canadian 
National Exhibition under Special 
Services . 37,112 


$955,649 
























56 


Estimates —Continued 
Improvement Account 

Beaches Athletic Field .$ 1,030 

Eglinton Park . 1,467 

Island Park . 14,657 

Small’s Pond . 6,525 

Trinity Park . 1,492 

Special Items 

Ward’s Island Hotel—Renovation .... 756 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Maintenance 

Salaries . $2,084,470 

Clothing and equipment . 31.569 

Miscellaneous . 34,525 

Mounted Police . 8,011 

Signal service . 8,278 

Traffic and automatic signals . 9,277 

Motor vehicles and bicycles . 55,323 

Fuel, light and water . 16,570 

Stationery, etc. 10,200 

PROPERTY DEPARTMENT 
General 

General administration — Salaries, 
auto service and office supplies ... $ 86,462 

City Hall—Maintenance and upkeep 159,031 


















57 


Estimates —Continued 

Firehalls—Furnishings, repairs, etc. 9,300 

Police Stations—Repairs, etc. 5,000 

Health Department properties— 

Repairs . 1,000 

Detention Home . 8,935 

Registry Office . 26,736 

Public Lavatories . 52,518 

Harrison Baths . 20,592 

O’Neill Baths . 7,073 

St. Lawrence Market . 21,126 

St. Patrick’s Market . 2,498 

Weigh Scales . 8,397 

Insurance .. 19,500 

Public Halls . 1,609 

Tower Clocks . 2,090 

City properties (rented)—Repairs 22,468 

Workmen’s Compensation . 1,700 

Stewart Building, No. 149 College 

Street, Maintenance . 36,073 

Police and Fire Depts. Garage 6,120 

Administration of Justice 

Industrial Farms . 100,518 

Jail . 72,137 

Public Lighting 

Lighting streets, parks, etc. 541,959 





















58 


Estimates —Continued 
STREET CLEANING DEPARTMENT 

Administration .$ 63,953 

Street cleaning . 339,210 

Refuse collection . 771,981 

Refuse disposal . 219,854 

Stables . 98,419 

Garage . 70,650 

Insurance . 10,000 

Shop . 38,206 

Plant . 40,000 

Workmen’s Compensation . 12,700 

WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Roadway Section 

General roadway repairs .$ 112,398 

Asphalt repairs . 207,976 

Concrete sidewalk repairs . 49,532 

Snow cleaning maintenance . 52,000 

Weed cutting . 965 

House numbering . 1,399 

Area and sign division . 17,759 

Rental of yard sites . 390 

Cindering grades, etc. 24,000 

Special Items: Felstead Avenue— 
Construction of culvert . 545 






















59 


Estimates— Continued 

Sewer Section 

Sewage disposal and pumping 

stations . 152,195 

Reclaiming sludge areas . 28,269 

Inspection, flushing, etc. 69,156 

Emergency sewer repairs . 12,315 

Private drain repairs, chargeable to 

City . 18,225 

Special Items 

Woodbine Ave. P.S. — Replacement 

of pump . 6,052 

McRoberts and Northland Ave. — 

Sewer privileges . 776 

Garrison Creek sewer rehabilitation 8,278 

Railway and Bridge Section 

Bridge repairs and maintenance . 33,090 

Level crossings . 37,325 

Sundries 

Auto service, City Garage . 11,651 

Insurance . 9,800 

Workmen’s Compensation . 15,818 

Street drinking fountains — Water 
supply . 16,486 















60 


Estimates— Continued 

MUNICIPAL ABATTOIR 
Maintenance 

General administration .$ 15,985 

Cold storage . 4,269 

Killing floor and cooler . 26,138 

Boiler room . 27,400 

Handling of by-products . 21,808 

Cattle yard . 6,535 

Insurance . 1,250 

Special Items 

Painting Abattoir, inside and out .... 485 

Repairs to roof and cornices . 1,378 

Repairs to beef coolers . 985 

Retiring Allowances and Grants . 1,000 

Debt Charges 

Interest . 13,473.89 

Sinking Fund . 4,902.92 

Instalment . 683.01 

WATERWORKS— 

WORKS DEPARTMENT SECTION 
Pumping Stations and Water Supply 

Filtration plant maintenance .$ 225,160 

John Street pumping station . 337,966 

High level pumping station . 125,131 


















61 


Estimates— Continued 

Riverdale pumping station . 20,136 

East Toronto pumping station . 13,429 

Island water supply . 7,170 

Reservoirs . 5,091 

Chlorination and elimination of taste 49,258 

Intakes and buoys . 5,614 

Rental of water lots . 2,338 

Marine plant . 20,688 

Distribution 

Supervision and maintenance of 
mains, hydrants, services, meters, 

etc. 358,846 

New meters—Replacements . 12,105 

New hydrants and valves 814 

Rental of site — Western Mainten¬ 
ance Station . 2,600 

Special Items 

6" drain connections to valve 
chambers . 1,384 

Sundries 

Insurance . 15,700 

Workmen’s Compensation . 4,682 
















62 


Estimates— Continued 
Waterworks Revenue Office—Treasury 


Department 

Salaries . 113,566 

Office supplies, equipment and sun¬ 
dries . 7,500 

Auto service, City Garage . 2,586 


Waterworks Retiring Allowances and 
Grants 


Works Department . 22,195 

Treasury Department . 3,744 

Waterworks Debt Charges 

Interest .1,195,230.99 

Sinking Fund . 117,168.00 

Instalment . 518,300.96 


CANADIAN NATIONAL EXHIBITION 


Maintenance of buildings (including 

Insurance) .$58,963.00 

Maintenance of Exhibition grounds 

applicable to C.N.E. (50%) . 37,112.00 

Casual rental expenses of buildings, 

etc. 1,432.00 

6 water main—Exhibition Midway . 1,974.00 













63 


Estimates— Continued 
Debt Charges 


Interest .132,035.77 

Sinking Fund . 6,283.53 

Instalment .185,440.25 


ROYAL AGRICULTURAL WINTER 
FAIR 

Live Stock Arena (Coliseum) 


Maintenance and upkeep .$ 8,542.00 

Insurance . 2,667.00 


Debt Charges 

Interest . 71,185.90 

Instalment . 84,371.60 

ISLAND FERRY SERVICE 
(Under T.T.C. Operation) 

Net deficit to be borne by City 

(Including Debt Charges) . 43,000.00 

CITY-OWNED RADIAL RAILWAYS 
(Under T.T.C. Operation) 

Net deficit to be borne by City 

(Debt Charges) .$222,965.58 











64 


Estimates— Continued 

TORONTO HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS 
City’s liability on guaranteed bonds $1,120,510 

HOUSING COMMISSION 
Debt Charges 

Interest .$ 17,115 

Instalment . 47,000 

AT LARGE 
Financial Items 

Federal Government Stamp Tax $ 11,000 

Bankers’ charges for redemption of 


coupons . 7,000 

Exchange . 85,000 

Interest . 164,000 

Hospitals — Special grants re Mtce. 

Deficits . 52,193 

Retiring Allowances and Grants 

Assessment Department . 2,132 

City Clerk’s Department . 624 

Department of Buildings . 624 

Health Department . 8,736 

Law Department . 624 

Mayor’s Office . 624 

Parks Department . 12,400 

Police Department . 260 

















65 


Estimates— Continued 

Property Department . 15,064 

Street Cleaning Department . 80,000 

Telephone Exchange . 624 

Treasury Department—General . 4,368 

Works Department—General . 17,460 

Firemen’s Benefit Fund . 27,300 

Firemen’s Widows’ and Orphans’ 

Death Benefits . 1,680 

Police Benefit Fund . 10,000 

Police Benefit Fund By-lay 13273 . 143,941 

Toronto and York Highways Commission 
Amount payable by City—General 37,000 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners 

Annual charges on reclamation im¬ 
provements . 92,588 

Life Saving Service 

Maintenance and equipment, includ¬ 
ing salaries . 67,402 

Transportation Track Allowance 
Pavement repairs . 78,882 













66 


Estimates —Continued 


Miscellaneous Items 

Art Gallery of Toronto—Grant . 30,000 

Registry Office—Office supplies and 

re-writing records . 1,600 

Land Titles Office Deficit . 2,000 

Snow Cleaning — City Unimproved 

Properties . 870 

University of Toronto—Endowment 6,000 

Workmen’s Compensation Board — 

Expense Assessment (R.S.O., 1914, 

Chap. 25, Sec. 103 . 3,000 

Toronto Humane Society, re Dog 
Catching and Operation of Pound 5,300 

Toronto Industrial Commission 12,500 


PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Maintenance . 


$ 464,034 


BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Maintenance 


Public Schools .$5,300,723 

Collegiate Institutes 1,197,516 

Technical Schools . 920,833 

High Schools of Commerce . 561,664 

General Administration 412,165 














67 


Estimates— Continued 

SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
Maintenance .$ 389,557 

Debt Charges on Debentures Issued 
by Separate School Board 

Interest and Principal on deben¬ 


tures . 203,324 

Estimated Total Expenditure $40,435,624.26 










68 


GENERAL REVENUE OTHER THAN 

TAXATION 

Administration of Justice 

Juvenile Court fees .$ 100 

Court fines and fees . 220,000 

Government and County Share re 

Courts . 60,000 

General Licenses . 250,000 

Beverage Rooms —City’s Share from 
Provincial Gov’t. 35,000 

General Rentals from City Property, 

etc. 

Business Property . 131,000 

Island . 59,000 

Markets . 33,000 

Residential Property . 42,000 

Sundry . 20,000 

Sewer connections . 16,000 

Sundry Parks . 18,000 

H.E.P.C. Sub-Station Site (Strachan 

Ave.) . 1,200 

Mortgage Tax Revenue . 10,000 

Sundry 

Miscellaneous, including unclaimed 
amounts written off . 5,000 

















69 


Revenue— Continued 
Financial Items 

Taxation percentages in excess of 

discounts .$ 650,000 

Completed Local Improvements ad¬ 
justments reserve . 39,000 

Consumers’ Gas Company . 1,500 

Department of Buildings 

Plan Examining Fees . 16,000 

Dry cleaning licenses . 6,600 

Elevator Licenses . 6,200 

Fire escape inspection fees . 500 

Audit Department 

Audit fees from outside boards . 6,600 

City Planning and Surveying 
Department 

Frontage tax . 100 

Survey fees . 2,500 

Sale of Maps . 150 

City Clerk 


Marriage license fees 


3,500 














70 


Revenue— Continued 


Health Department 

Isolation Hospital fees .$ 10,000 

Miscellaneous fees . 500 

Provincial Grants re Health Ser¬ 
vices . 2,500 

Law Department 

Conveyancing fees . 1,800 

Parks Department 

Bathing and checking fees . 5,500 

Miscellaneous . 1,500 

Police Department 

Miscellaneous . 3,000 

Property Department 

Public Bath fees . 7,700 

Industrial farms . 20,000 

Miscellaneous . 1,000 

Weigh house fees . 6,900 

Detention Home . 300 

Administration of Justice Govern¬ 
ment and County share . 45,000 















71 


Revenue— Continued 

Street Cleaning Department 

Removal of waste from factories .$ 750 

Miscellaneous . 500 

Treasury Department 

Official fees . 2,000 

Redemption of coupons . 3,600 

Tax sale commission . 5,500 

Miscellaneous . 1,000 

Works Department 

Gasoline standard rentals . 6,250 

Street areas . 43,500 

Electric sign inspection . 24,300 

Bond fees . 750 

Sewage Treatment Revenue . 4,900 

General Rotary Accts. Adjustment... 70,000 

Municipal Abattoir 

Killing floor, cooler and cold storage 
charges, space rental, profit from 
sale of by-products, etc. 110,000 

Toronto Housing Commission 

Interest and principal on properties 
sold 


55,000 















72 


Revenue— Continued 
Waterworks 

Water rates from public .$2,975,000 

Water supply for civic departments 66,600 

Water supply for fire protection. 992,800 

Rentals from miscellaneous property 3,600 

Canadian National Exhibition 

Operating surplus, including amount 

to meet debt charges . 205,000 

Casual rentals—Space, chairs, etc. 1,500 

Ontario Government Building, pay¬ 
ment by Province of Ontario to¬ 
wards cost . 50,000 

New Stables, Exhibition Park . 26,000 

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair 

Live Stock Arena (Coliseum) rent 

from C.N.E. 12,000 

Live Stock Arena (Coliseum), 

sundry . 4,000 

Live Stock Arena (Annex) . 70,000 

Provincial Reimbursement re Abolition of 
Municipal Income Tax 

City’s Share . 834,121 

Board of Education Share . 358,480 

Separate School Board Share . 19,466 

I 













Revenue —Continued 


REVENUE FROM TAXATION 
General Tax . 24.35 $22,120,458.64 

School Tax 

Public School Supporters .. 10.50 9,763,275.00 
Separate “ “ .. 15.05 750,427.00 

$32,634,160.64 


Taxation . 

Estimated Total Revenue 


$40,319,427.64 









74 


Parliamentary Election Returns 
House of Commons 

Result of Voting, October 14th, 1935 
Broadview : 

Thomas Langton Church 11,380 

Harold P. Snelgrove . 7,527 

Graham Spry . 5,167 

John C. MacCorkindale . 3,793 

Danforth : 

Joseph Henry Harris . 9,231 

Norman Wilks . 4,521 

M. Stanley Elliott . 3,855 

Thomas W. Learie . 3,416 

Davenport: 

John Ritchie MacNichol . 10,919 

John P. Travers . 7,675 

John William Bruce . 4,766 

W. Harvey Brown . 4,216 

Eglinton: 

Richard Langton Baker . 13,786 

Eger ton Lovering . 9,574 

A. Carman Douglas . 5,868 

Ben. H. Spence . 2,474 


















75 


Parliamentary Election Returns— 


Continued 

Greenwood: 

Denton Massey . 11,183 

Ernest Bray . 6,969 

Bertram Elijah Leavens . 4,813 

George Springfield Hougham . 4,720 

High Park: 

Alexander James Anderson . 10,949 

James Chalmers McRuer . 8,357 

Minerva Ellen Reid . 4,396 

Donat Marc LeBourdais . 3,574 

Parkdale: 

David Spence . 9,619 

John Leslie Prentice . 7,761 

Clinton A. Hurlbut . 3,576 

Rose Henderson . 3,249 

Rosedale: 

Harry Gladstone Clarke 9,491 

George Alexander Urquhart . 8,306 

William Dennison . 2,765 

Egbert Madden “Bert” Watts . 2,277 

Samuel Scarlett . 733 

St. Paul’s: 

Douglas Gooderham Ross . 10,852 

Salter A. Hayden . 10,322 

James Robertson . 2,713 

Edward Bigelow Joliffe 2,628 






















76 


Parliamentary Election Returns— 
Continued 

Spadina : 

Samuel Factor . 14,768 

Nathan Phillips . 10,047 

Joseph B. Salsberg . 3,646 

D. A. Balfour . 3,432 

Jacob Romer . 1,866 

Trinity : 

Hugh John Plaxton . 10,472 

Honourable G. Reginald Geary . 9,607 

William Alexander Gunn . 3,266 

Carlo Lamberti . 1,801 

Norman Freed . 1,470 

Members of the Senate of Canada who 
Reside in or near Toronto 

Right Hon. Arthur Meighen, P.C. 

Honourable Sir Allen Aylesworth, P.C., K.C., 
K.C.M.G. 

Honourable Horatio C. Hocken. 

Honourable A. H. Macdonell, C.M.G. 
Honourable Wm. H. McGuire. 

Honourable J. Houston Spence, K.C. 
Honourable Frank P. O’Connor. 












77 


Parliamentary Election Returns— 
Continued 

Ontario Legislature 
Result of Voting, June 19th, 1934 

Beaches: 

Thomas A. Murphy . 7,822 

Malcolm S. Elliott . 4,946 

Norman Wilks . 4,859 

Bellwoods: 

Arthur W. Roebuck . 9,339 

Thomas H. Bell . 5,366 

Mrs. Joshua Smith . 1,133 

Mrs. Alice Buck . 1,091 

Bracondale: 

Arthur R. Nesbitt . 6,452 

Ernest C. Bogart . 6,163 

Rose Henderson . 2,734 

Thomas Sims . 312 

William J. White . 39 

Dovercourt: 

William Duckworth . 9,266 

James M. Dalrymple . 8,856 

Thomas Cruden . 4,192 

James Reid . 216 


















78 


Parliamentary Election Returns— 
Continued 

Egl inton: 

Harold J. Kirby . 12,556 

A. Coulter McLean . 10.891 

George A. Little .-. 3,287 

John McGonnell . 158 

Raymond F. Mack . 107 

High Park: 

William A. Baird . 8,934 

James G. Culnan . 7.941 

Donat M. LeBourdais . 4.327 

Parkdale: 

William H. Price . 10.087 

John L. Prentice . 9,875 

William B. Robinson . 3,906 

River dale: 

Robert A. Allen . 10,898 

George Oakley . 10,363 

Edward Farrell . 1,025 

St. Andrew: 

John J. Glass . 6.055 

E. Frederick Singer . 4.684 

Meyer Klig . 2,030 

Claude Pearce . 1,392 

John N. Day . 188 





















79 


Parliamentary Election Returns— 
Continued 

St. David: 

Wilfrid Heighington . 6,751 

Patrick Donnelly . 5,656 

Frank Regan . 4,260 

St. George: 

Ian T. Strachan . 8,296 

Henry C. Scholfield . 7,870 

W. C. Grant . 1,862 

J. J. Carrick ... 210 

St. Patrick: 

F. Fraser Hunter . 5,704 

Edward J. Murphy . 5,686 

(Recount) 

Woodbine: 

Goldwin C. Elgie . 9,334 

Frank N. Walker . 7,144 

Frederick C. Copp . 5,666 

William E. Turley . 205 















80 


Municipal Elections 
Result of Voting, January 1st, 1936 

For Mayor 

Samuel McBride . 48,978 

Harry W. Hunt . 43,381 

James Simpson . 32,777 

For Controllers 

(Names in Italics declared Elected ) 

Ralph Carrette Day . 68,617 

William J. Wadsworth . 63,159 

J. George Ramsden . 52,391 

William D. Rohhins . 51,789 

Joseph E. Thompson . 31,650 

Ben. J. Miller . 30,554 

Timothy Buck . 20,975 

Harry Bradley . 4,993 

For Aldermen 

(Names in Italics declared Elected) 
Ward No. 1: 

William A. Summerville . 9,673 

Frank M. Johnston . 9,335 

Harry Bell . 2,830 
















81 


Municipal Election Returns —Continued 

Ward No. 2: 

Adelaide M. Plumptre . 4,203 

John R. Beamish . 4,114 

Allan Austin Lamport . 2,942 

William Dennison . 1,992 

Percy W. Bishop . 1,882 

George F. Lewis . 713 

Thomas James . 412 

Lewis E. Jones . 171 

Ward No. 3: 

John B. Laidlaw . 3,795 

John S. Simmons . 3,713 

Albert Victor Gardiner . 2,675 

Ward No. 4: 

Robert H. Saunders . 4,941 

Nathan Phillips . 4,811 

H. M. Goodman . 2,466 

Joseph B. Salsberg . 2,343 

Max Federman . 816 

S. C. Schiller . 225 



















82 


Municipal Election Returns —Continued 
Ward No. 5: 

Fred Hamilton . 7,211 

Robert Rodger Leslie . 5,621 

Ward Markle . 3,010 

Clifford E. Blackburn . 2,088 

Stewart Smith . 1,967 

James M. Conner . 1,718 

Thomas E. Black . 1,210 

Charles Kerr . 1,057 

Valentine F. Burda . 240 

L. L. Jarvis . 163 

Ward No. 6: 

Fred J. Conboy . 12,885 

Donald C. MacGregor . 7,520 

William Miller . 4,605 

William V. Muir . 3,536 

Richard Gordon Jones . 1,967 

Harry Stephenson . 1,661 

Bertram Tipping . 1,030 

Robert Harding . 373 

Ward No. 7: 

George H. Gardiner . 6,786 

Frank G. I. Whetter . 4,928 

Charles Rountree . 3,898 

Russell G. Thompson . 1.464 
























83 


Municipal Election Returns —Continued 


Ward No. 8: 

Ernest Bray . 9,291 

Walter A. Howell . 8,338 

Fred Margrave Baker . 7,823 

Bert E. Leavens . 2,508 

Philip A. Hughes . 682 

Ward No. 9: 

J. D. McNish . 8,479 

William G. Ellis . 8,353 

Ross Sheppard . 5,665 

Charles E. Reeves . 1,548 

Alfred E. Burgess . 1,005 


Change in Date of Municipal Elections 

Hereafter the Municipal Elections will be 
held on the first Monday in December and 
the Nomination Day on the Friday preceding 
the last Monday in November, in each year; 
Polling hours, 12 o’clock noon until 9 p.m. 
(This year Nomination Day will be Friday, 
November 27th, and the Municipal Elections 
will be held on Monday, December 7th.) 












84 


Board of Education Elections 
Result of Voting, January 1st, 1936 
(Names in Italics declared Elected ) 

Ward No. 1: 

Gordon W. Armstrong . 6,362 

Edmund T. Guest . 6,360 

Gordon J. Millen . 5,593 

Alfred Hambleton . 1,030 

Ward No. 2: 

S. Tupper Bigelow . 3,871 

Frank O. Tidy . 3,607 

J. Roy Cadwell . 2,457 

Anne Smith .;. 1,546 

Frank E. Ward . 1,174 

Ward No. 3: 

W. R. Shaw .:. 3,283 

Margaret MacKenzie . 2,288 

Fred W. Bartrem . 2,042 

Robert B. Gray . 1,063 

Ward No. 4: 

Hugh A. Ross . 4,495 

Ida L. Siegel . 3,023 

Isador Markus . 2,651 

John Weir ... 2,347 



















85 


Board of Education —Continued 

Ward No. 5: 

Rose Henderson . 8,021 

Charles M. Carrie . 7,075 

Annie S. Buller . 2,275 

Ward No. 6: 

Magnus A. Brillinger . 11,671 

George Meredith Orr . 10,163 

Alice C. Buck . 3,911 

Ward No. 7: 

William H. Butt . 5,369 

Minerva E. Reid . 4,634 

Allan B. Rice . 3,228 

Gordon Tanner . 1,231 

Ward No. 8: 

John H. Downing . 7,913 

Frank N. Walker . 6,581 

Hazel Davidson . 5,821 

Robert T. Thomson . 1,974 

Lillie Herlick . 1,920 

















86 


Board of Education — Continued 
Ward No. 9: 


Harrison B. Spaulding . 9,108 

William L. Wallace . 7,809 

J. Isabel Ross . 3,964 


Change in Date of Elections for the Board 
of Education 

Hereafter the Elections for Members of the 
Board of Education will be held on the first 
Monday in December and the Nomination 
Day on the Friday preceding the last Monday 
in November, in each year; Polling hours, 
12 o’clock noon until 9 p.m. (This year 
Nomination Day will be Friday, November 
27th, and the Elections will be held on 
Monday, December 7th.) 





87 


Area of City and Street Statistics 

Area of the City, not including portion of 
land covered by water, is about 34 square 
miles. 

Miles of streets, 575.07. 

Miles of lanes (approximately), 157.83. 

Roadway Mileage: 

Asphalt . 369.68 

Asphalt block . 1.11 

Asphaltic concrete . 19.90 

Bitulithic . 111.41 

Brick . 25.13 

Macadam (including tar macadam) 2.88 

Rocmac macadam . 3.10 

Wooden block (treated) .42 

Stone and scoria block 2.84 

Concrete (other than lanes) :. 5.34 

Tarvia .38 


Total paved streets (94%) . 542.17 

Paved lanes, mostly concrete . 43.00 

Unimproved roadways . 32.90 

Sidewalks, Sewers, etc.: 

Sidewalk mileage 906.910 

Sewer mileage . 761.95 


















88 


Area of City and Street Statistics— Cont. 


(Sewage is all treated and averages 
daily 69,271,000 gallons.) 

Water main mileage . 723.62 

Gas main mileage . 760.00 

Street railway single track mileage 
on streets only. (All Toronto Trans¬ 
portation Commission) . 202.81 





89 


Births, Marriages and Deaths 

The number of births, marriages and deaths 
in the City of Toronto during the year 1935, 
as shown by the Registration returns, is as 


follows: 

Births . 11,912 

Marriages . 6,445 

Deaths . 7,150 


All births and marriages must be regis¬ 
tered at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall 
(Room 21A), within thirty days from the 
occurrence thereof. 

Number of marriage licenses issued by the 
City Clerk in the year 1935, 6,030. 

Deaths must be registered at the same 
office or at any police station before a permit 
to bury can issue. 

Physicians attending are required to send 
in notices of births, and parents or occupants 
of dwellings where births occur are required 
to register same. 

Clergymen officiating are required to regis¬ 
ter marriages. 

Physicians attending are required to cer¬ 
tify as to deaths. 

Neglect or failure to send in notice in either 
case renders parties liable to a fine not ex¬ 
ceeding $10 and costs. 





90 


Marriage licenses issued during office 
hours. Office, Room, No. 21, Ground Floor, 
City Hall, west side. Telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 


Public Health 

The Administrative Offices of the Depart¬ 
ment of Public Health are located on the 
Third Floor, City Hall; telephone, Adelaide 
7171. 

District Offices 

The Divisions of Medical Services and 
Public Health Nursing discharge their func¬ 
tions of city-wide health services through 8 
District Offices, each under the joint direc¬ 
tion of a District Medical Officer and District 
Superintendent of Nurses. District Offices 
are located strategically from west to east 


over the City as follows: 

Runnymede—354 Keele St. Junction 8959 

Parkdale—53 Argyle St. Melrose 5709 

Hillcrest—643 Markham St. Melrose 8035 

Yorkville—135 Davenport Rd., Kingsdale 4369 

University—408 Huron St. Randolph 3116 

Moss Park—18 Gifford St. Midway 8681 

Riverdale—281 Broadview Ave., Hargrave 2185 
Scarboro—299 Main St. Grover 1144 








91 


Public Health— Continued 

Toronto continues to enjoy an excellent 
record of health. The average general death 
rate during the past two years has been 
slightly over 10 per 1,000 population. For 
1935 it was 10.4, while in the previous year 
it reached a low for all time at 10.1. The 
present rate is 12 per cent below those which 
obtained in years as late as 1928 and 1929. 
conveying, for one thing, that close to 
1,000 more of our citizens would have failed 
to survive the year 1935, had quite recent 
rates continued to prevail. 

Toronto’s lowest infant death rate was that 
of 54.2 per 1,000 living births recorded for 
1934. During 1935, a comparatively low rate 
of 55.6 was experienced. Compared with the 
years 1932 and 1933, the rate at the present 
time is down almost 14 per cent. Health 
departments generally pride themselves—and 
so they may—in low infant mortality. The 
latter is probably still the most sensitive 
single index of the effectiveness of the newer 
public health. It portrays, as nothing else 
can, the inherent values of teaching and 
demonstration in the matter of personal care 
and hygiene, inasmuch as success in preserv¬ 
ing tender, early life attests to the funda¬ 
mental solidarity of the effort. 


92 


Public Health— Continued 

The death rate for tuberculosis remains low 
for a city the size of Toronto. The best rate 
ever recorded was one of 40.8 per 100,000 
population and this was duplicated in 1934. 
The figure for 1935 stands at the slightly 
higher point of 42.0. In retrospect, the tuber¬ 
culosis rate is now less than one-third of 
what it was in 1910; since 1930 a reduction 
of 30 per cent has been effected in mortality 
from this disease. 

The diphtheria record for 1935 shows 46 
cases with 8 fatalities. While it does not 
compare with the enviable record established 
in 1934, it must be considered a very favour¬ 
able experience for a city of well over 600,000 
population. Comparing the records for 1934 
and 1935, the former was a feat which may 
not be paralleled for many a year, the latter 
in reality a variation within a control or im¬ 
munization programme not yet as complete 
as it can be. Notwithstanding, we stand at 
present on a level far reduced from that of 
not many years back, as, for example, that of 
1929, when 1,022 cases were reported with 64 
deaths. 

Several other noteworthy features are con¬ 
tained in the statistics of the year 1935. One 


93 


Public Health— Continued 

might draw attention to a six per cent drop in 
the maternal death rate from 6.1 per 1,000 
living births in 1934, to one of 5.7. The cus¬ 
tomary small mortality from typhoid — 2 
deaths within the year—is sustained and 
indicates that this disease has become excep¬ 
tionally well controlled. The close of the 
year marked the completion of a three-year 
period in which not a single case of smallpox 
has been reported. 

Toronto’s birth rate declined in 1935 to a 
new low, 16.6 per 1,000 population. For com¬ 
parative purposes, the 1930 rate may be cited, 
22 . 0 . 

The total health picture of the City con¬ 
tinues on a high plane. The Department of 
Public Health does not take the credit alone. 
Private physicians, public officials, and wel¬ 
fare groups have joined hands in the noble 
objective of health conservation and health 
promotion, and their efforts, as is quite 
apparent, have not been in vain. 

Civic Ambulances 
Telephone: Adelaide 6465. 

The Civic Ambulance Service, under the 
control of the Department of Public Health, 


94 


Public Health —Continued 

is located at the Coroner’s Building, 86 Lom¬ 
bard Street. 

A limited service is provided, restricted in 
scope to answering calls of an emergent 
nature such as street accidents and similar 
happenings; the transportation of non-emer- 
gent cases to a public hospital when the hos¬ 
pital maintenance of such person is to be at 
public expense, i.e., a City Order case, and 
the transportation of all cases of communic¬ 
able disease. Separate ambulances and staffs 
are provided for the respective services 
mentioned. 

All calls of whatever nature should be 
directed to the Coroner’s Building, telephone 
Adelaide 6465, where the attendant on duty 
will allocate the call if it is within the above 
categories, or otherwise advise the enquirer 
if service cannot be given. 

In case of accident, the patient, if of adult 
age and conscious, has the right to select the 
hospital or other destination within the City 
to which it is desired to be taken. In the 
case of children, or those in an unconscious 
condition, the medical attendant will under¬ 
take direction of the ambulance. In the 


95 


Public Health— Continued 

absence of such attendant this duty then 
devolves on Police Officer present. 

In cases where a person is found dead and 

a physician has not been in immediate 
attendance, the Coroner’s Office, 86 Lombard 
Street—telephone Adelaide 6466—should be 
called without delay. 

Public Hospitals 

The Public Hospitals in the City are 
located as follows: 

Toronto General Hospital, 101 College St. 
St. Michael’s Hospital, 30 Bond St. 

Sick Children’s Hospital, 67 College St. 
Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St. 

Grace Hospital, College and Huron Sts. 

St. John’s Hospital, 28 Major St. 

St. Joseph’s Hospital, 1830 Queen St. W. 
Women’s College Hospital, 74 Grenville St. 
Salvation Army Women’s Hospital, 133 
Bloor St. East. 

Toronto East General Hospital, Coxwell and 
Sammon Avenues (East York). 

Mt. Sinai Hospital, 100 Yorkville Ave. 
Wellesley Hospital, Homewood Place. 
Lockwood Clinic Hospital, 300 Bloor St. E. 
Mothercraft Centre, 84 Wellesley St. 


96 


Public Health —Continued 

Other Hospitals and Institutions 

Isolation Hospital, Gerrard St. East and St. 
Matthews Road. 

Toronto Hospital for Consumptives, Button- 
wood Avenue (Mt. Dennis). 

I.O.D.E. Preventorium, Sheldrake Blvd. 
Hospital for Incurables, 130 Dunn Ave. 
Mercy Hospital for Incurables, 58 Sackville 
St. 

Home for Incurable Children, 278 Bloor St. 
East. 

Ontario Hospital for Insane, 999 Queen St. 
West. 

Psychiatric Hospital, Surrey Place. 

Hillcrest Convalescent Home, Bathurst St. 
and Davenport Rd. 


97 


Population— As Returned by Assessors 


1834 .. 9,254 

1844 . 18,420 

1854 . 38,480 

1864 . 45,156 

1874 . 68.678 

1884 . 105,211 

1894 . 174,309 

1904 . 226,365 

1914 . 470,151 

1915 . 463,705 

1916 . 460,526 

1917 . 473,829 

1918 . 489,681 

1919 . 499,295 

1920 . 512,822 

1921 . 522,942 

1922 . 529,215 

1923 . 536,913 

1924 . 542,417 

1925 . 549,429 

1926 . 556,691 

1927 . 569,899 

1928 . 585,628 

























98 


Population —Continued 

1929 . 606,370 

1930 . 621,596 

1931 . 627,231 

1932 . 626,674 

1933 . 623,562 

1934 . 629,285 

1935 . 638,271 

Population, 1935, by Wards 

Ward No. 1 . 73,168 

“ “ 2 60,847 

“ “ 3 41,405 

“ “ 4 67,393 

“ “ 5 89,174 

“ “ 6 112,988 

“ “ 7 47,407 

“ “ 8 82,559 

“ “ 9 63,330 


Total 


638,271 

























99 


Assessment of City 


1890 

$ 136,887,328 

Tax 

Rate on $ 

14V2 mills 

Tax for City 

and School 

Purposes 

$ 2,084,866 

1895 

146,382,412 

1644 

a 

2,378,707 

1900 

124,992,959 

191/2 

a 

2,437,362 

1905 

149,159,206 

19 

a 

2,834,025 

1910 

269,866,219 

171/2 

u 

4,721,189 

1915 

565,132,579 

*23 

a 

12,982,209 

1920 

639,678,791 

301/2 

a 

19,471,099 

1921 

696,535,003 

33 

a 

23,076,988 

1922 

775,578,483 

32.35 

a 

24,003,992 

1923 

823,367,569 

30.8 

a 

24,333,813 

1924 

848,839,246 

30 

a 

24,414,972 

1925 

873,329,523 

29.85 

a 

24,969,845 

1926 

886,638,980 

29.60 

it 

25,166,367 

1927 

908,786,236 

31.80 

a 

27,599,758 

1928 

922,717,572 

31.80 

a 

28,029,718 

1929 

967,371,437 

31.50 

u 

29,189,589 

1930 

1,011,970,429 

31.80 

it 

30,882,166 

1931 

1,048,377,649 

33.60 

a 

33,799,075 



100 


Assessment of City —Continued 


1932 1,061,652,753 33.90 mills 

1933 1,048,279,655 33.40 “ 

1934.. . 1,026,062,674 33 

1935 ... 1,015,409,940 34.15 “ 

1936.. . 979,697,947 34.85 “ 


$34,530,040 

33,620,067 

32,487,269 

33,224,833 

32,633,800 


Note.— The amount of taxes raised as above 
set forth may not balance with the amount 
found by calculating the mill rate on the 
assessment for any given year. The differ¬ 
ence arises from the fact that a portion of the 
assessment is liable for school rates only. 

*This rate includes the Provincial War Tax 
of one mill on the dollar. 


Payment of Taxes 

Taxes for 1936 are payable as follows: 
1st Instalment, May 15th. 

2nd Instalment, July 15th. 

3rd Instalment, September 15th. 


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Municipal Board). 









Annexations to City Since 1834 —Continued 


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Glebe, North of Danforth Avenue .May 1st, 1914 (Ont. Railway and Municipal 

Board). 

Mount Pleasant .June 27th, 1914 (Ont. Railway and 

Municipal Board). 










Municipal Board). 








Annexations to City Since 1834 — Continued 


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107 


Consumer’s Gas Company 

The Consumers’ Gas Company was incor¬ 
porated on March 23rd, 1848, for the purpose 
of suppling the City of Toronto with gas. 

Schedule of Rates 

The schedule of rates charged for gas in 
Toronto is as follows: 

First 10,000 cubic feet per month 

8c. net per 100 cubic feet. 

Next 90,000 cubic feet per month 

7V2C. net per 100 cubic feet. 

Next 400,000 cubic feet per month 

7c. net per 100 cubic feet. 

Next 500,000 cubic feet per month 

6 V 2 C. net per 100 cubic feet. 

Over 1,000,000 cubic feet per month 

6c. net per 100 cubic feet. 

Service charge 50c. per month. 

Board of Directors 

Arthur Hewitt, President; A. H. Campbell, 
Vice-President; Colonel J. F. Michie, L. 


108 


Consumers’ Gas— Continued 

Goldman, F. G. Osier, T. H. Wood, A. R. 
Auld, T. Bradshaw, C. S. Macdonald and His 
Worship the Mayor. 

Officers 

Arthur Hewitt, General Manager. 

Edward J. Tucker, Assistant General Man¬ 
ager and Secretary. 

Offices 

19 Toronto Street. 

Telephone, Adelaide 9221. 


109 

Weather Records 

The following information is supplied by 
the Director of the Meteorological Office, 
John Patterson, M.A., F.R.S.C. 


Year 

Average 

Temperature 

Lowest 
Temperature 
during year 

Highest 
Temperature 
during year 

Winter 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Summer 

July Aug. 

Year’s 

Average 

Date 

Below 

Zero 

Date 

Above 

Zero 

1903 

24.6 

65.8 

45.6 

Dec. 28 

9.7 

July 8 

91.5 

1904 

14.6 

65.6 

42.2 

Jan. 

4 

15.1 

July 18 

93.0 

1905 

17.0 

68.2 

44.5 

Feb. 

4 

8.2 

July 19 

92.1 

1906 

26.4 

70.3 

46.3 

Feb. 

2 

12.1 

July 22 

92.1 

1907 

20.1 

66.9 

44.1 

Jan. 

24 

10.0 

July 16 

88.8 

1908 

21.3 

68.5 

46.3 

Feb. 

4 

17.4 

July 30 

91.5 

1909 

26.5 

68.4 

46.1 

Feb. 

1 

8.7 

Aug. 25 

94.0 

1910 

23.2 

69.4 

46.4 

Feb. 

6 

10.2 

June 22 

93.4 

1911 

25.7 

70.4 

47.7 

Jan. 

16 

1.7 

July 3 

103.2 

1912 

16.5 

66.8 

44.8 

Feb. 

10 

18.8 

Sept. 10 

92.7 

1913 

26.0 

69.4 

47.9 

Mar. 

7 

2.2 

July 1 

95.0 

1914 

20.5 

69.3 

46.0 

Jan. 

13 

22.0 

July 11 

93.0 

1915 

24.8 

67.3 

46.8 

Jan. 

22 

1.0 

Aug. 16 

87.5 

1916 

24.5 

74.0 

46.4 

Feb. 

21 

9.3 

July 30 

100.2 

1917 

19.9 

69.1 

43.2 

Dec. 

29 

17.0 

July 30 

98.0 

1918 

17.2 

70.3 

46.0 

Feb. 

5 

20.2 

Aug. 13 

102.2 

1919 

28.8 

70.6 

48.3 

Dec. 

17 

7.2 

July 4 

98.2 

1920 

16.8 

68.1 

45.9 

Jan. 

31 

17.8 

June 10 

92.8 

1921 

28.2 

73.0 

49.9 

Jan. 

18 

5.0 

July 5 

98.4 

1922 

24.8 

69.3 

48.1 

Feb. 

17 

7.0 

Aug. 16 

93.0 

1923 

20.8 

67.4 

45.6 

Jan. 

17 

12.0 

June 24 

95.6 

1924 

21.8 

67.1 

44.7 

Jan. 

27 

6.2 

Aug. 31 

89.1 

1925 

23.9 

68.1 

45.8 

Dec. 

27 

13.8 

June 6 

94.6 

1926 

22.9 

68.2 

43.8 

Jan. 

29 

5.2 

July 8 

91.3 

1927 

24.2 

66.9 

46.8 

Jan. 

26 

17.2 

June 30 

95.0 

1928 

24.6 

70.2 

46.6 

Feb. 

25 

4.2 

July 8 

90.0 

1929 

22.5 

67.0 

46.0 

Feb. 

20 

2.7 

Sept. 3 

94.3 

1930 

24.8 

69.6 

47.6 

Feb. 

6 

5.8 

Aug. 4 

95.0 

1931 

25.7 

71.5 

49.4 

Feb. 

1 

6.4 

July 1 

98.4 

1932 

32.4 

68.6 

47.8 

Dec. 

16 

*2.0 

Aug. 31 

94.8 

1933 

29.8 

71.0 

47.5 

Dec. 

29 

21.6 

July 10 

98.0 

1934 

18.0 

68.5 

45.7 

Feb. 

8 

21.2 

June 2 

94.0 

1935 

21.6 

71.9 

46.1 

Jan. 

27 

11.2 

July 19 

92.8 


* Above zero. 



























110 


Weather Records— Continued 
1840-1935 

Warmest day, 3rd July, 1911. Mean tem¬ 
perature, 91.3 degrees. 

Highest registered temperature, 103.2 degrees 
on the 3rd July, 1911. 

Coldest day, 8th February, 1934. Mean tem¬ 
perature of 16.0 degrees below zero. 

Lowest registered temperature, 26.5 degrees 
below zero on 10th January, 1859. 

Warmest year, 1921, mean temperature, 49.9 
degrees. 

Coldest year, 1875, mean temperature, 40.6. 

Heaviest day rain, 3.88 inches on 27th July, 
1897. 

Heaviest day snow, 16.2 inches on March 28th, 
1876. 

Heaviest fall of snow in any winter, 123.5 
inches in 1869-70. 

Least fall of snow in any winter, 25.7 inches 
in 1932-33. 


Ill 


Parks and Playgrounds 

The park system of Toronto, comprising 
2,242.95 acres, had its beginning in the dedi¬ 
cation by the late Jesse Ketchum to the Vil¬ 
lage of Yorkville in 1856 of the area known 
as Ketchum Park, and which came into pos¬ 
session of the City upon the annexation of 
Yorkville to the City in 1883. Since that time 
many park areas have been deeded to the 
City by the Crown, or donated by private 
citizens, and in all 1,006.41 acres have been so 
acquired, in addition to which 1,236.54 acres 

of park and playground lands have been 
purchased by the City. Much of this develop¬ 
ment has taken place in the past twenty-five 
years, during which time 909 acres of lands 
have been acquired. 

One hundred and six park and playground 
areas are comprised in the park system, 
twenty - nine children’s supervised play¬ 
grounds are operated within the system, in 
addition to which twenty-nine are operated 
by the Parks Department upon school 
grounds. 

The zoological collections at Riverdale Park, 
High Park and the Island comprise a great 
variety of domestic and foreign animals and 
birds. The animals number 216 in 79 differ- 


112 


Parks and Playgrounds— Continued 

ent species; birds comprising 179 species 
number 731. Many of the most valuable of 
these have been donated to the City. 

The trees upon the streets of the City, as 
well as those in the parks, are under the 
care of the Parks Department. During the 
past year 1,961 trees were planted upon the 
streets; 2,061 were removed; 17,688 were 
pruned; and 48,408 were sprayed. 

The Exhibition Buildings and Grounds, in 
which the Canadian National Exhibition is 
held annually, are maintained by the City 
through the Parks Department. 

The parks and playgrounds of the City, 
with the area of each, are as follows: — 


Park Area 

Alexander Park . 6.8 acres 

Allan Gardens . 10.1 

Avenue Hoad Squares . 1.19 

Baird Park . 2.5 

Beaches Park . 24.37 “ 

Beaty Boulevard . .83 “ 

Bellevue Square . 1.15 “ 

Bellwoods Park . 6.54 “ 

Beresford Park . 1.45 “ 

Bickford Ravine ... 15.0 “ 

Carlton Park Playground . 2.0 














Parks and Playgrounds— Continued 


Park Area 

Cawthra Playground . .47 

City Hall Square . 1.02 

Clarence Square . 1.63 

Connaught Park . 2.0 

Cottingham Square . 1.7 

Craigleigh Gardens . 10.05 

Davenport Square . 1.18 

Davisville Park . 5.5 

Dentonia Park . 73.11 

Dovercourt Park . 6.1 

Dufferin Grove . 8.61 

Dundas Parkette . .08 

Dundas and Victoria Circle . .005 

Earlscourt Park . 32.04 

East Lynn Park . 2.7 

East Riverdale Recreation 

Centre .8 

East Toronto Athletic Field . 5.61 

Eglinton Park . 22.0 

Exhibition Park . 215.7 

Fairmount Park . 3.1 

Glebe Manor Square . 1.09 

Glenlake Square .07 

Glen Stewart Park . 11.0 

Grange Park . 5.86 

Greenwood Park . 15.5 

Hanlan Memorial Park 17.06 




























Parks and Playgrounds— Continued 


Park Area 

Hanlan’s Point . 13.9 

High Park (Land) . 353.7 

High Park (Water) . 53.1 

Hillcrest Park . 5.32 

Humber Boulevard . 129.25 

Humberview Park . 2.7 

Indian Valley Crescent . .37 

Island Park (Land) . 225.41 

Island Park (Water) . 106.03 

John Dunn Playground . 3.0 

Kendal Square . 1.22 

Kenilworth Boulevard . .37 

Ketchum Park . 4.34 

Kew Gardens . 20.93 

King and River Circle . .045 

Lakeshore Boulevard . 64.47 

Lakeshore Park . 41.0 

Lawrence Park . 14.0 

Leslie Grove . 1.8 

Library Grounds . 1.9 

Lytton Park . 2.1 

MacGregor Playground . 3.02 

Maher Avenue Circle . .19 

Monarch Park . 12.5 

Moncur Playground . .8 

Moorevale Park . 3.3 

Morse Street Recreation Centre .74 




























115 


Parks and Playgrounds— Continued 


Park 

Area 


Moss Park . 

1.2 

44 

Moss Park Recreation Centre ... 

1.98 

44 

Mount Royal Square 

.14 

44 

Muir Memorial Garden . 

2.7 

44 

McCormick Recreation Centre .. 

2.65 

44 

Neville Park Circle . 

.28 

44 

Norwood Park 

4.0 

44 

Oakmount Park . 

5.5 

44 

Old Fort . 

19.7 

44 

Osier Playground . 

.83 

44 

O’Neill Playground . 

1.29 

44 

Pape Avenue Recreation Centre 

2.25 

44 

Park School Playground . 

.51 

44 

Perth Square . 

1.79 

44 

Playter Gardens . 

.61 

44 

Prince Edward Viaduct Park- 



ettes . 

9.5 

44 

Queen’s Park . 

37.2 

44 

Ramsden Park . 

9.9 

44 

Regent Park 

3.16 

44 

Reservoir Park . 

43.98 

44 

Riverdale Park . 

108.67 

44 

Rosedale Park . 

7.27 

44 

Rosedale Ravines . 

37.33 

44 

Runnymede Park . 

4.2 

44 

St. Alban’s Square . 

.23 

44 

St. Andrew’s Playground . 

1.34 

44 

























116 


Parks and Playgrounds— Continued 


Park 

St. Clair Reservoir Park . 

St. Clair Viaduct Lands . 

Sherwood Park . 

Small’s Pond Lands . 

Spadina Road Park 

Stanley Park . 

Sunnybrook Park 
Trinity Park 

Vermont Park . 

Victoria Memorial Square 
Wadsworth Park 
Walmer Road Circle 
Wanless Neighborhood Park 
Wells Hill Park 

Whitney Park . 

Willowvale Park . 

Withrow Park . 


Area 


21.1 

it 

6.4 

(C 

38.86 

a 

3.4 

a 

.86 

u 

9.0 

u 

181.65 

a 

31.06 

a 

2.0 

a 

2.46 

a 

4.36 

a 

.11 

a 

7.92 

a 

4.05 

it 

.82 

a 

19.74 

a 

19.53 

a 


Total land area 2,083.82 acres 

Total water area 159.13 


Total 


2,242.95 acres 


























117 

Parks and Playgrounds —Continued 

Comprised in the parks are the following 
recreation features: 

Equipped playgrounds . 58 

Baseball fields . 73 

Cricket fields . 13 

Football fields . 40 

Lacrosse fields . 8 

Quoiting grounds (13 courts). 2 

Horseshoe pitches (41 courts) . 7 

Tennis courts . 309 

Bowling greens . 37 

Skating rinks . 70 

Hockey rinks . 66 

Toboggan slides . 8 

Curling rinks . 1 

Bathing stations . 7 

Boating stations . 1 

Fieldhouses . 60 

Picnic areas (accommodation for over 100 
persons each) . 104 



















118 


Toronto Municipal Abattoir 

This service was inaugurated August 4th, 
1914, as a public slaughtering establisment 
with cold storage (high and low tempera¬ 
ture) accommodation. It is essentially to the 
greatest extent a public health institution, 
and while the fact of its existence may per¬ 
haps at times have had a tendency to regu¬ 
late the price of meats, the purpose of its 
establishment was to concentrate the slaugh¬ 
tering of food animals within the City, so 
that the evils attendant upon the operation of 
small slaughter houses might be eliminated. 

Slaughter House Records, 1935 

Number 

Slaughtered 


Cattle . 22,184 

Calves .f 15,927 

Sheep and Lambs . 25,266 

Hogs . 9,041 


Total . 72,418 


Earl E. Hunt, Abattoir Commissioner. 

Office 

Foot of Tecumseth St., Toronto 2. 
Telephone—Waverley 9214. 









119 


Department of Buildings 

The Department of Buildings has charge 
of the following: 

1. The examination of Plans, and issuing 
of Permits for all buildings. 

2. The licensing of Passenger Elevators. 

3. The licensing of Dry Cleaning, and 
Sponging and Pressing establishments. 

4. The preparation of plans and specifica¬ 
tions and the supervision of erection of 
Civic Buildings. 

During the past year 33 licenses were issued 
for the operation of Dry Cleaning Plants and 
609 licenses were issued for Sponging and 
Pressing Establishments. 

Licenses were granted for the operation of 
1,229 Passenger Elevators. 


Building Statistics for Ten Years 


Year 

Permits 

Issued 

Buildings 

Erected 

Value of 
Buildings 
Erected 

1925. 

9,020 

11,190 

$25,797,196 

1926. 

8,473 

9,923 

26,029,584 

1927. 

9,159 

11,271 

31,274,876 

1928. 

9,208 

11,302 

51,607,188 

1929. 

8,731 

10,682 

47,698,654 

1930. 

7,812 

9,925 

32,130,589 

1931. 

6,832 

8,646 

21,995,313 

1932. 

4,969 

5,686 

8,013,550 

1933. 

4,060 

4,450 

4,482,090 

1934. 

4,656 

5,283 

7,378,772 

1935. 

4,467 

5,157 

9,905,455 























120 

Local Improvement Works 

When the owners of property on any street 
or lane desire a pavement, sidewalk, curbing, 
grading, sewer or water main, or when the 
property owners in any locality desire the 
opening, widening, extension or diversion of 
any street or lane, application should be 
made to the Department of Works for a form 
of petition to the Council for the work or 
improvement. The petition issued by the De¬ 
partment contains an estimate of the cost of 
the work and the estimated rate of assess¬ 
ment per foot frontage. When the petition 
has been signed by two-thirds in number of 
the owners representing one-half in value of 
the lots liable to be specially assessed, the 
Council may, with the approval of the On¬ 
tario Municipal Board, proceed with the work 
and subsequently assess the cost against the 
lots abutting directly on the work. 

If it is found, when the petition is pre¬ 
sented, that the names of two-thirds in num¬ 
ber of the property owners representing 
one-half in value of the property have not 
been obtained, and if the Council neverthe¬ 
less determines, on the recommendation of 
the Commissioner of Works, that the work is 
necessary and in the public interest, it may, 
with the approval of the Ontario Municipal 
Board, direct that the work be proceeded 


121 


Local Improvement Works— Continued 
with unless a majority of the interested prop¬ 
erty owners, representing at least one-half in 
value of the property to be assessed, petition 
against it within one month after the Council 
has given notice of its intention to proceed 
therewith. The foregoing procedure, which is 
called the “initiative” procedure, may also be 
followed on the recommendation of the Com¬ 
missioner of Works, or on the joint recom¬ 
mendation of the Commissioners of Works 
and Assessment in the case of certain works, 
when there has been no petition for the 
improvement. 

Under authority of section 8 of the Local 
Improvement Act, the Council, if it deems a 
work necessary in the public interest, may, 
with the approval of the Ontario Municipal 
Board, proceed therewith, notwithstanding 
any petition to the Council opposed thereto. 
The vote of the Council to proceed with the 
work must be a two-thirds vote of the whole 
Council. 

Where the work is a trunk sewer, trunk 
water main, or the opening, widening, ex¬ 
tending, diverting or grading of a street, the 
Council may by a three-fourths vote of the 
whole Council assume part of the cost and 
assess part of the cost against abutting lands 
and also lands benefited by the work. 


122 


Water Works Stations and Equipment 

(Under the supervision of R. C. Harris, 
Commissioner of Works.) 

John Street Pumping Station, foot of John 
Street, on Waterfront. 

General Service 

Nos. 6 and 7 engines, each 15,000,000 gals, 
capacity, 24 hours (steam). 

Nos. 8, 9 and 10 engines, each 24,000,000 gals, 
capacity, 24 hours. 

4 electrically-driven pumps, each 20,000,000 
gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

2 electrically-driven pumps, each 15,000,000 
gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

High Pressure Fire Service 

2 steam turbine-driven centrifugal pumps, 
each 5,000,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

1 steam turbine-driven centrifugal pump of 
10,000,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

East Toronto Pumping Station, Gerrard St. 

1 engine, 3,500,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours 
(steam). 

1 engine, 1,000,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours 
(steam). 


123 


Water Works —Continued 

Riverdale Pumping Station, Broadview Ave. 

1 electrically-driven pump of 10,000,000 gals. 

capacity, 24 hours. 

2 electrically-driven pumps, each of 5,000,000 

gals, capacity, 24 hours. 


High Level Pumping Station, Poplar Plains 
Road. 

2 engines, each 5,000,000 gals, capacity, 24 
hours (steam). 

1 engine, 7,500,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours 
(steam). 

1 engine, 8,500,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours 

(steam). 

2 engines, each 20,000,000 gals, capacity, 24 

hours (steam). 

1 engine, 25,000,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours 

(steam). 

2 electrically-driven pumps, each 24,000,000 

gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

2 electrically-driven pumps, each 10,000,000 
gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

4 electrically-driven pumps, each 7,000,000 
gals, capacity, 24 hours. 


124 


Water Works — Continued 
Island Filtration Plant Pumping Station 
Filter Service 

1 engine-driven centrifugal pump, 50,000,000 

gals, capacity, 24 hours (steam). 

2 electrically-driven pumps, each of 18,000,000 

gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

1 electrically-driven pump, 9,000,000 gals, 
capacity, 24 hours. 

3 electrically-driven pumps, each of 36,000,000 

gals, capacity, 24 hours. 

1 electrically-driven pump of 40,000,000 gals, 
capacity, 24 hours. 

Island Domestic Service 

1 engine, 1,000,000 gals, capacity, 24 hours 
(steam). 

1 electrically-driven pump, 1,500,000 gals, 
capacity, 24 hours (summer use). 

1 steam or electrically-driven pump, 4,000,000 
gals, capacity, 24 hours (summer use). 

Water Works Statistics 


No. of hydrants . 8,049 

No. of hydrants (high pressure 
system) . 279 




125 


Water Works —Continued 

No. of water main stop valves 9,941 

No. of water main check valves 319 

Water consumed in 1935 (im¬ 
perial gallons) . 27,305,320,000 

Average daily consumption in 

imperial gallons (1935) . 74,810,000 

Average daily consumption per 
capita (based upon population 
of 638,271) in imperial gallons 

(1935) . Ill 

Maximum consumption for one 
day in imperial gallons (July 
31, 1933) . 114,770,000 


Water Rates 
Payment of Rates 

Water rates are payable as follows: 
General Rates 

District No. 1 .—Being all that part of the 
City east of the Don River; rates payable 
half-yearly on or before each last day in 
April and October. 

District No. 2 .—From the Don River to and 
including Yonge Street; rates payable half- 
yearly on or before each last day of May and 

November. 






126 


Water Works —Continued 

District No. 3. —From, but not including, 
Yonge Street, to and including Bathurst 
Street; rates payable half-yearly on or before 
each last day in January and July. 

District No. 4. —From, but not including, 
Bathurst Street to and including Dufferin 
Street; rates payable half-yearly on or before 
each last day in February and August. 

District No. 5. —From, but not including, 
Dufferin Street to west City limits; rates 
payable half-yearly on or before each last 
day in March and September. 

Meter Rates 

Payable quarterly, on or before January 
31st, April 30th, July 31st and October 31st. 

A discount of 10 per cent, is allowed upon 
all rates, except for water supplied on the 
Island, or found being used without permis¬ 
sion, when payment is made on or before the 
above-mentioned dates. 

Schedule “A ”—General Rates 

Scale of general water rates for dwellings, 
$2.00 per annum, the lowest rate, for four 
rooms and under, and 65c per room for five 
rooms and over. 


127 


Water Works— Continued 

Boarding and lodging-houses shall be 
charged $1.00 per room. 

All conveniences in connection with dwell¬ 
ing and other houses are chargeable in addi¬ 
tion to the foregoing rates, and when two 
or more families occupy one house, the con¬ 
veniences shall be charged additional rates 
for each family. 

Special and Additional Rates 


Per 

Basins or other taps with sinks: Annum 

In private dwellings, each . $ 1.25 

In other than private dwellings, each 2.50 

Baths: 

In private dwellings, each . 1.25 


In other than private dwellings, each 2.50 
Urinals: 

In private dwellings, self acting, each 1.50 


Other than self-acting, each . 6.25 

In other than private dwellings, self¬ 
acting, each . 3.00 

Other than self-acting, each . 12.50 

Water Closets: 

In private dwellings, self-closing, each 2.00 
Other than self-closing, each . 6.50 








128 


Water Works— Continued 
In other than private dwellings, self- 


closing, each . 4.00 

Other than self-closing, each . 13.00 


W.C.’s used in common by two or 
more houses shall be charged for 
at the rate of one to each house. 


Laundry: 

Private: 

For pair of tubs . 1.25 

For single additional tubs .75 

Other than private: 

For each tub . 1.25 

Employing 3 hands and under . 5.00 

Employing 4 or 5 hands . 8.00 

Employing 6 or 7 hands . 11.00 

Employing over 7 hands . 13.00 

Stables: 

Private: 

For each horse . 1.25 

Each vehicle .75 

For automobiles, each .75 

Other than private: 

For each horse . 2.00 

Each vehicle 1.25 

For automobiles, each . 1.25 

















129 


Water Works —Continued 
Lawns and Gardens: 

500 square feet and under per season $ 1.00 

Above 500 and up to 1,000 per season 1.25 

Each additional 1,000 or portion 
thereof, per season . ; .50 

Lawn sprinklers or other devices not 
held by hand, in addition to above 5.00 

Schedule “B”—Meter Rates 

13% cents per 1,000 gallons, except that 
no meter rate shall be less than $2.00 net per 
quarter year. 

For water supplied for use outside the City 
limits, 37V£> cents per 1,000 gallons. Minimum 
net rate per quarter, $4.00. 

Schedule “C”—Island Rates 

The rates for the season shall be the same 
as are charged under Schedule “A” hereof, 
except that the minimum rates for domestic 
purposes, per family, shall be $6.25. 

The rates for water supplied by meter 
measurement shall be 18% cents per 1,000 
gallons, except that the minimum amount 
payable by persons using meters shall be 
$6.25. 



130 


Water Works— Continued 
Special Rates 

Bakers, Barbers, Building and Construction 
Works, Caretakers in Buildings, Churches, 
Fire Protection, Flushing Drains, Forges, 
Fountains, Gas Engines, Milk Vats, Pavement 
or Roadway Construction, Restaurants, Steam 
Engines, Schools (other than public), 
Trenches, Warehouses, Washing Windows. 
Washing Machines, or other Water Motors, 
etc. 


Information 

Full information may be obtained regard¬ 
ing tariff rates at Room 103, Main Floor; and 
for metered accounts, Room 304 Third Floor, 
City Hall. 


131 


Fire Department 

The Fire Department consists of one Chief 
of Department, one Deputy Chief, two Pla¬ 
toon Chiefs, one Secretary, one Physician, 
one Accountant, one Record Clerk, one 
Stenographer, fourteen District Chiefs, one 
Superintendent Fire Alarm Telegraph, three 
Linemen, four Fire Alarm Telegraph Opera¬ 
tors, forty-nine Captains, seventy Lieutenants, 
one Mechanical Superintendent, seven Helper 
Mechanics, five hundred and nine (all grades) 
Firemen, seven Fire Prevention Inspectors, 
one Storekeeper, four Telephone Operators, 
and one Janitor, making a total of six hun¬ 
dred and seventy-eight officers and men. 

The Department operates under the two- 
platoon system, operating in two shifts—8 
a.m. to 6 p.m., and 6 p.m. to 8 a.m., changing 
every Sunday, one crew working full twenty- 
four hours. In addition, each member is 
allowed one day off each week and fifteen 
days’ annual vacation with pay. If in service 
over ten years the annual vacation is three 
weeks. Each member is supplied with uni¬ 
form clothing by the City. 

There is in the Department in service: 

21 800-gallon motor pumpers. 


132 


Fire Department— Continued 

7 Motor aerial turn-table hook and ladder 
trucks and portable water towers com¬ 
bined. 

12 Motor city service ladder trucks. 

12 Combination chemical and hose motor 
cars. 

2 High pressure hose trucks. 

1 Motor salvage truck. 

2 Supply trucks. 

2 Repair trucks. 

1 Gasoline supply truck. 

1 Fire Alarm Telegraph emergency truck. 
11 Automobiles. 

1 Fire Tug, capacity 1,000 imperial gallons. 
1 200-gal. hand-drawn gasoline pumper. 
70,900 feet 2^-inch fire hose. 

6,650 “ 31/2 “ high pressure hose. 

20,000 “ 2 “ fire hose. 

Cost of fire-fighting plant and equipment 
(exclusive of land and buildings) is $890,- 
939.00. 

Cost of Fire Alarm Signal plant, $269,385.00. 

Value of buildings and land occupied by 
same, $1,309,918. 


133 


Fire Department —Continued 
Location of Fire Stations 


Headquarters, Adelaide Street near York 
Street. Telephone Adelaide 3040. 


No. 

2 

Station Richmond and Portland Sts. 

it 

3 

it 

10-12 Grosvenor Street. 

tt 

4 

a 

Berkeley St., cor. Duke St. 

it 

5 

tt 

110 Lombard Street. 

it 

7 

a 

470 Dundas St. East. 

U 

8 

tt 

College St., cor. Bellevue Ave. 

tt 

9 

tt 

16 Ossington Avenue. 

it 

10 

a 

34 Yorkville Avenue. 

tt 

11 

u 

Rose Ave., cor. Howard St. 

it 

12 

a 

Gerrard St. & Carlaw Ave. 

« 

13 

tt 

1917 Dundas St. West. 

tt 

14 

a 

754 Ossington Avenue. 

a 

15 

a 

Cowan Ave., near Queen St. 

a 

17 

a 

1907 Queen St. East. 

a 

19 

a 

386 Perth Avenue. 

a 

20 

tt 

358 Keele Street. 

tt 

21 

tt 

69 Ford Street. 

tt 

22 

a 

87 Main Street. 

a 

23 

u 

234 Howland Avenue. 

tt 

24 

tt 

Balmoral Ave. at Yonge St. 

a 

25 


61 Hendricks Avenue. 

it 

26 

a 

492 Greenwood Avenue. 

a 

27 

tt 

106 Ascot Avenue. 

tt 

28 

a 

16 Montgomery Avenue. 


134 


Fire Department— Continued 


a 

29 

it 

College St., cor. Bellevue. 

ii 

30 

ii 

Ashbridge Bay district. 

ii 

31 

a 

Macgregor Avenue an 




Runnymede Road. 

a 

32 

ii 

Exhibition Park. 

(i 

33 

it 

Manitou Rd., Centre Island. 

a 

34 

ii 

Yonge and Wanless. 


Garage—Ordnance St., Off Strachan Ave. 
Statistics Respecting Fires in 1935 


Total Alarms . 3,966 

False Alarms . 525 

Number of fires extinguished by 

water . c . 1,858 

Number of fires extinguished by 

other means . 552 

Miscellaneous Calls . 

Damage to buildings .$ 366,616 

Damage to contents . 415,531 

Total fire loss . 782,147 

Insurance on property damaged 4,548,141 
Number of Fire Alarm Signal Boxes 571 

Number of High Pressure Signal 

Boxes. 52 

Inspections by Fire Prevention 
Bureau during the year 32,493 

Fires reported to arson squad 28 














135 


Fire Department —Continued 


Number of persons rescued . 52 

Number of persons given first aid .... 86 

Number of Firemen injured . 53 

Number of Firemen killed . 0 

Number of citizens killed . 9 

Number of times gas masks used. 35 

Number times Inhalator used . 25 

Feet of hose used . 295,556 

Feet of ladder raised . 35,412 

Feet of covers spread . 109,687 


Analysis of Fire Losses 

1,011 under $ 500 loss 

69 between $ 501 and $ 1,000 

108 “ $ 1,001 and $ 10,000 

6 “ $10,001 and $ 30,000 

2 “ $30,001 and $ 50,000 

3 “ $50,001 and $100,000 











136 


Police Department 

The strength of the Force is at present 962 
men, distributed as follows:—One Chief Con¬ 
stable, one Deputy Chief Constable, one In¬ 
spector of Detectives, eighteen Inspectors, 
thirty-four Sergeants, fifty-six Patrol Ser¬ 
geants, thirty - one Detective - Sergeants, 
twenty Detectives, twenty-three Acting 
Detectives, and seven hundred and seventy- 
seven Constables. 


Police Statistics for 1935 


Number apprehended or summoned: 

Males . 88,908 

Females . 10,422 



99,330 

Accidental deaths . 

97 

Number of inquests . 

65 

Number of lost children . 

921 

Number of licenses issued . 

66,471 

Revenue therefrom 

.$ 240,305.17 

Value of property reported 

to 

Police as lost or stolen . 

1,417,552.10 

Value of property recovered ... 

. 1,034,993.10 












137 


Police Department — Continued 
Location of Stations 

Police Headquarters, Stewart Building', 149 
College St. Telephone, Adelaide 2121. 

No. 1 Station—Court Street. 

No. 2 Station—Dundas Street West, south 
side, near Bay Street. 

No. 3 Station — Claremont Street, near 
Queen Street. 

No. 4 Station—Dundas Street East, near 
Parliament Street. 

No. 5 Station—Davenport Road and New 
Street. 

No. 6 Station — Queen Street and Cowan 
Avenue. 

No. 7 Station—Ossington Avenue, north of 
Bloor Street. 

No. 8 Station — Pape Avenue, north of 
Queen Street. 

No. 9 Station—Keele Street, south of Dun¬ 
das Street. 

No. 10 Station — Main St. and Swan wick, 
East Toronto. 


138 


Police Department— Continued 

No. 11 Station — London and Markham 
Streets. 

No. 12 Station — Yonge Street and Mont¬ 
gomery Avenue (North Toronto). 

Central Police Garage, Ordnance St. and 
Strachan Avenue. 

All accidents occurring on the public streets 
should be reported promptly to the Police 
Department. 

Police Telephone, general Nos., Adelaide 
2120-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9, 2117, 2119, 2160, 2194, 
from which connection is made with all 
stations. 


139 


License Fees 

Amount 
Per Annum 

Auctioneers . $100.00 

Bailiffs . 100.00 

Barbers . 1.00 

Billiards and pool, first table . 20.00 

Billiards and pool, each extra table .... 10.00 

Bagatelle, each table . 10.00 

Bicycles . .50 

Bowling alleys, first two beds . 20.00 

Bowling alleys, each additional bed .... 5.00 

Butchers . 1.00 

Bicycle liveries . 5.00 

Bill posters . 1.00 

Bill distributors . 1.00 

Cabs, one-horse . 4.00 

Cabs, two-horse . 6.00 

Cabs—autos—seating six . 6.00 

Cab drivers . 1.00 

Carters, one-horse . 2.00 

Carters, two-horse . 4.00 

Cigarettes, cigars and tobacco, or 

cigarettes only . 25.00 

Cigars and tobaccos, or cigars only .... 5.00 

Coal and coke . 5.00 

Concert halls, seating capacity 600 and 
over . 100.00 






















140 


License Fees —Continued 

Concert halls, seating capacity over 

200, but not exceeding 600 . 40.00 

Concert halls, seating capacity under 
200 . $ 20.00 

Dog, male, if only one is kept . 2.00 

Each additional male dog . 4.00 

Dog, female, if only one is kept . 4.00 

Each additional female dog .'... 6.00 

Dog, female, spayed, if certificate of 

veterinary surgeon produced . 2.00 

Dog kennels . 10.00 

Electrician (Journeyman) . 1.00 

Electrician (Contractor) . 10.00 

Electrician (Company) . 15.00 

Express, two-horse vehicle . 4,00 

Express, one-horse vehicle . 2.00 

Express—Auto . 4.00 

Ferry boats, capacity over 100 . 50.00 

Ferry boats, capacity under 100 . 25.00 

Fresh fish . 1.00 

Garages (public), 5-car capacity . 5.00 

Garages (public), 5 to 10-car capacity 10.00 
Garages (public), more than 10-car 

capacity . 15.00 

Garage repair shop only . 5.00 

Garage where gasoline or oils are 

stored or kept for sale . 5.00 























141 


License Fees —Continued 

Gasoline curb tank . 5.00 

Automobile Service Station . 10.00 

Intelligence offices for servants and 
help . 10.00 

Jitneys, for each passenger capacity .... 1.00 

Ladies’ Hairdressing establishments .... 1.00 

Lending Library . $ 2.00 

Lunch counters, capacity over 50 . 10.00 

Lunch counters, capacity under 50 . 5.00 

Laundries . 20.00 

Laundry agents . 5.00 

Massagists . 10.00 

Milk vendors, each place . 1.00 

Milk, for each vehicle used for sale or 

delivery of . 1.00 

Moving picture shows, seating over 

600 . 100.00 

Moving picture shows, seating under 

600 . 50.00 

Miniature golf . 50.00 

Pawnbrokers . 60.00 

Plumbers (Master) . 10.00 

Plumbers (Journeyman) . 1.00 

Pedlars, general, with vehicle, pushed 

or drawn . 15.00 

Pedlars, horse and wagon, fish only .... 5.00 

Pedlars, hand barrow, fish only . 1.00 





















142 


License Fees —Continued 

Pedlars, on foot, carrying goods for 
sale . 1.00 

Pedlars, on foot, with large creel or 
basket with fruit not grown in 
Canada . 10.00 

Petty chapman . .10 

Refreshment or reception rooms, 

capacity under 50 . $ 5.00 

Roller skating rinks . 50.00 

Roller coasters . 25.00 

Switch-back or toboggan slides . 25.00 

Shooting gallery . 10.00 

Second-hand or junk shops . 20.00 

Second-hand book shops . 2.00 

Slot machines, first machine . 5.00 

Slot machines, each additional machine .50 

Tally-ho coach . 10.00 

Tally-ho coach, electric . 10.00 

Theatres . 100.00 

Teamsters, two-horse . 4.00 

Teamsters, one-horse . 2.00 

Tobacco only . 1.00 

Transient Traders . 250.00 

Other trading persons not on Assess¬ 
ment Roll . 100.00 

Farmers selling produce of own 
farm . 5.00 






















143 


License Fees— Continued 

Victualling houses, capacity over 50 10.00 

Victualling houses, capacity under 50 5.00 

Circus, menageries, wild west show, 

animal show, dog and pony show, 

or show of any kind whatsoever 
travelling with 1 to 10 cars, per 

day . $ 25.00 

with from 11 to 20 cars, per day 50.00 

with from 21 to 30 cars, per day 100.00 

with from 31 to 50 cars, per day 200.00 
with from 51 cars and upwards, 

per day . 500.00 

and for each side show, per day . 25.00 

Exhibitions of pictures, paintings, 
statuary or works of art, for each 

day a fee of .. 1.00 

Dancing, for each day a fee of . 5.00 

Menageries, for each day a fee of . 5.00 

Natural or artificial curiosities, for 

each day a fee of . 5.00 

Rag collector . 1.00 

Rope walking . 5.00 

Sparring and boxing . 5.00 

Sleight-of-hand . 5.00 

Legerdemain, juggling or other like 

tricks . 5.00 

Tableaux . 5.00 















144 


License Fees— Continued 

Wonderful animals or freaks of 

nature . 5.00 

Tumbling or other gymnastic per¬ 
formances . $ 5.00 

Wax works . 5.00 

Wild animals or hippodrome . 5.00 

Any machine or mechanical device 
kept for hire or profit not otherwise 

provided for . 10.00 

Any entertainment where admission 
fee is charged (per annum), not 
otherwise provided for, if held in 

any place not licensed . 50.00 

Performance of troops or company of 
of actors, musicians, each, and not 
performing in licensed places, each 

performance . ... . 10.00 

Any person who keeps for hire or 
profit any exhibition and exhibits 
the same elsewhere than in a 
theatre, music hall, or any other 
licensed place, per day 


5.00 










145 


Taxicab Tariff 

Extracts from By-law No. 183, as amended 
by By-law No. 184 of the Board of 
Commissioners of Police for the 
City of Toronto. 

Tariff for all cabs other than “zone” cabs. 
Section 41. 

The rates or fares to be charged by the 
owners or drivers of cabs or motor vehicles 
used for hire, excepting zone cabs, for the 
conveyance of passengers, either wholly 
within the city or to any other point not 
more than three miles beyond its limits, shall 
be exactly as shown in Schedule “A” to this 
By-law, and no higher or lower amount than 
that contained in said Schedule shall be 
charged or payable. 


Schedule “A”. 

One to four passengers for the first IV 2 

miles or fraction thereof . $ .50 

For each additional V 2 mile or fraction 

thereof ....10 

For each additional passenger in excess 

of four for the whole journey .20 

Baggage, for each trunk .20 


Hand baggage free if carried inside vehicle. 






146 


Taxicab Tariff— Continued 


— or — 


Not less Not more 



than 

than 

For the first hour or any 
part thereof . 

$2.00 

$ 3.00 

For each individual 15 min¬ 
utes . 

.50 

.75 

For each passenger in ex¬ 
cess of four, per hour . 

.25 

.75 

Sight-seeing coach or omni¬ 
bus — each passenger per 
hour . 

.50 

1.00 

Ambulance, for any journey 
within the City . 


5.00 

Funeral hearse . 


10.00 


Hotel omnibus, for each 

passenger . .25 

Drive-self cab, 5-passenger 
cars, including oil and gas, 
per mile . .20 

Drive-self cab, 7-passenger 
cars, including oil and gas, 
per mile 


.25 












147 


Taxicab Tariff— Continued 
Tariff for “Zone” Cabs 

Section 42. 

The rates or fares to be charged by the 
owners or drivers of zone cabs, except when 
engaged on a time basis, shall be computed 
from the point where the passenger or pas¬ 
sengers enter the cab to each point where 
the passenger or passengers direct the cab 
to proceed on the plan divided into zones 
shown as Schedule “B” and forming part of 
this By-law as follows: 


For first two zones only joined verti¬ 
cally, horizontally or diagonally, or 
to any part thereof . $ .50 

For each additional vertical or hori¬ 
zontal zone line crossed .25 

For each return trip entirely within any 
one zone .75 






148 


Schedule "B” 

For the first two zones joined 
vertically, horizontally or di¬ 
agonally or to any part there¬ 
of . 50c 

For each additional vertical 
or horizontal line crossed, 25c 











































149 




































150 


Tariff for Hire of Express Wagons and 

Trucks 

Section 23 of By-law 146 of the Board of 
Commissioners of Police for the City of 
Toronto provides for the following tariff: 

Class “A” 

Vehicles used for moving furniture, house¬ 
hold goods and general merchandise: 

Rate per Rate per 


hour half hour 

For a 1-ton motor truck. $2.00 $1.25 

For a 2-ton motor truck. 2.50 1.75 

For a 3-ton motor truck. 3.00 2.25 

For a 4-ton motor truck. 3.50 2.50 

For a 5-ton motor truck. 4.00 2.75 

For a 1-horse wagon. 1.10 .65 

For a 2-horse wagon. 2.00 1.10 


Where any of the foregoing vehicles is en¬ 
gaged any time over a full hour or hours for 
additional time if less than one-half hour, 
one-half hour rate to be charged; if over 
one-half hour, full hour rate to be charged. 

The above charges to commence from the 
time the vehicle leaves the office, warehouse 
or stand to take up load and to continue until 
its return thereto. 








151 


Express Tariff— Continued 
Class “B” 

Vehicles used for moving wood, coal, brick, 
snow, sand, gravel, earth and other coarse 

material: 

Rate per Rate per 


hour half hour 

For 1-ton truck . $2.00 $1.25 

For 2-ton truck . 2.50 1.75 

For 3-ton truck . 3.00 2.25 

For 4-ton truck . 3.50 2.50 

For 5-ton truck . 4.00 2.75 

For a 1-horse wagon .85 . 

For a 2-horse wagon . 1.10 . 


Provided in the case of a 2-horse wagon 
that not less than one and one-half cubic 
yards of earth or its equivalent in other 
material is carried on the wagon. 

For a wagon or vehicle drawn by one 
horse, eighty-five cents for every hour or 
fraction thereof. 

The above rates may be increased by fifty 
per cent, for any hour in which the vehicle 
is employed between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. 

Any person hiring any of the vehicles here¬ 
tofore mentioned and neglecting or refusing 
to pay therefor the rates mentioned, shall be 
liable to the penalty set forth in Section 24 
of this By-law. 










152 


Board of Education 

The Board of Education consists of eighteen 
members, two elected from each of the nine 
wards, and two appointed representatives of 
the Separate School Board. 

Election Day—Date of 
(See page 86) 

The membership at present is as follows: 

Ward No. 1 .... Edmund T. Guest. 

Gordon W. Armstrong. 

“ “ 2 S. Tupper Bigelow. 

Frank O. Tidy. 

“ “3 W. Reg. Shaw. 

Mrs. Norman A. M. 
MacKenzie. 

“ “ 4 Mrs. Ida L. Siegel. 

Hugh A. Ross. 

“ “ 5.C. M. Carrie. 

Mrs. R. Henderson. 

“ “ 6 M. A. Brillinger. 

George M. Orr. 

“ “ 7.Wm. H. Butt. 

Miss Minerva E. Reid. 







153 


Board of Education— Continued 

“ “ 8.Frank N. Walker. 

J. H. Downing. 

“ “ 9.H. B. Spaulding. 

W. L. Wallace. 

Separate School representatives — 

E. F. Henderson. Arthur Kelly. 

Officers of the Board 
H. B. Spaulding, Ph.D., Chairman. 

C. H. R. Fuller, BA..Sc., Business Administra¬ 
tor and Secretary-Treasurer. 

C. C. Goldring, M.A., D.Paed., Superintendent 
of Schools and Chief Inspector, Public 


Schools. 

E. Percival Brown, K.C., Solicitor. 

School Statistics, 1935 

Number of Teachers on Public 

School Staff . 2,027 

Number of Kindergarten Teachers 

on Public School Staff . 161 

Number of Teachers on Collegiate 
Institute Staff— 

Day Schools . 327 

Night Schools . 80 

Number of Teachers on Central, 


Danforth, Western Technical and 








154 


School Statistics —Continued 

Northern Vocational School 
Staffs— 

Day School . 320 

Night School . 335 

Jarvis School for Boys, Edith L. 

Groves and Bolton Ave. School 

for Girls . 51 

Number of Teachers, High Schools 
of Commerce— 

Day Schools . 172 

Night Schools . 128 

Number of pupils registered in 
Public Schools, including 

Kindergarten . 82,220 

Average daily attendance, Public 

Schools and Kindergartens . 72,888 

Attendance, Collegiates— 

Day . 9,867 

Night . 318 

Attendance, Technical Schools— 

Day . 5477 

Night . 8,180 

Jarvis School for Boys— 

Day . 547 

Night ... 59 

Bolton Ave. School for Girls . 211 

Edith L. Groves School for Girls .... 267 
















155 


School Statistics— Continued 

Attendance, Schools of Commerce— 

Day . 4,546 

Night . 4,288 

Value of Public Schools Property: 

Sites and equipment .$20,924,815 

Value of Collegiate Institutes 
property: Sites and equipment 6,303,907 

Value of Schools of Commerce 
property: Sites and equipment 2,945,291 

Value of Administration Building 
and site . 702,158 

Value of Technical Schools ** 
property: Sites and equipment .... 5,906,358 

Total Value of property sites and 

equipment . 36,782,529 

Number of Collegiates . 9 

“ Technical Schools . 4 

High Schools of 
Commerce . 4 

Public Schools, includ¬ 
ing Homes, etc. 100 

Jarvis School for Boys . 1 

Edith L. Groves School for Girls .... 1 

Bolton Ave. School for Girls . 1 













Penny Bank 
For Schools 

Inaugurated April 1st, 1905. 

The Penny Bank operates in the Schools 
with the approval of the Board of Education 
Deposits are made each Tuesday morning in 
the class room. Withdrawals can be made 
by school children at the Head Office of the 
Bank, corner of Orde and McCaul Streets, 
between the hours of 3.30 p.m. and 5 p.m., 
except Saturdays, and by parents from 10 
a.m. until 5 p.m. Banking hours on Satur¬ 
days from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. 

There are over 87,000 open accounts in 
Toronto and suburbs with a total balance on 
deposit of over $647,000. About 35% of the 
pupils make deposits every Tuesday morning. 
A large number of classes have 100% of the 
enrolment operating accounts in the Penny 
Bank. 

Hon. President—Lt.-Col. H. D. Lockhart 
Gordon, D.S.O. 

President—M. A. Mackenzie, M.A. 

Managing Director—H. B. Scandrett. 

Assistant Manager — Elizabeth Armstrong. 
Telephone, Adelaide 0828. 


157 


Separate School Board 


The Board at present is composed of 
eighteen Trustees, elected by Wards, for a 
term of two years, one Trustee in each Ward 
retiring annually. The membership at present 
is: 

Mr. J. Gerald Kelly, Chairman. 


Separate School Board 


D. A. Balfour 
Joseph Bouvier 
F. Coates 
J. G. Culnan 
W. J. Daly 
M. J. Duggan 
R. F. Fitzpatrick 
Rt. Rev. J. L. Hand 
B. E. Harrison 


Rev. C. W. James 
Mr. E. K. Kelly 
Mr. J. Gerald Kelly 
Rev. Gerald Kirby 
Rev. J. J. McGrand 
Wm. B. McHenry 
Rev. M. F. Mogan 
N. F. A. Scandiffio 
Hercule Trudelle 


Officers of the Board 

R. F. Fitzpatrick .Treasurer. 

E. F. Henderson .Secretary and 

Business Agent. 

James E. Day, K.C.Solicitor. 

W. J. Lee, B.A.Senior Inspector. 

Rev. Brother Jarlath ..Supervisor of Schools. 




158 


Separate School Board— Continued 

Office of Board 
477 Jarvis Street. 
Telephones. Midway 2403, 2404. 


School Statistics, 1935 

Number of teachers . 348 

Number of registered pupils . 16,003 

Average daily attendance . 13,142 

Value of Separate School 
property .$3,689,509.75 

Number of Separate Schools . 40 







159 


Public Libraries 

The management and control of the Public 
Library of the City with its several branches 
are vested in a Board of Management, 
appointed pursuant to the provisions of the 
Act respecting Public Libraries and Art 
Schools (Chap. 202, R.S.O. 1914), and com¬ 
posed of the Mayor of the City and eight 
others, three of whom are appointed by the 
City Council, three by the Board of Educa¬ 
tion, and two by the Separate (Catholic) 
School Board. The persons appointed by the 
City Council and the Board of Education hold 
office for three years, and those by the 
Separate School Board for two years. These 
members retire in rotation at the end of their 
respective terms on the 31st of January. 

The Board holds its regular meetings on 
the second Tuesday of each month, and the 
Libraries and Finance Committee meets on 
the next preceding Thursday. 

The Libraries are maintained by an annual 
appropriation from the tax rates, under 
legislative enactment, of an amount not to 
exceed fifty cents per capita of the popula¬ 
tion of the City as shown in the returns of 
the Assessment Department. This appropria- 


160 


Public Libraries —Continued 

tion is obligatory, but by a vote of a majority 
of the members of the Council present and 
voting the appropriation may be increased to 
an amount not exceeding one dollar per 
capita. 

Board of Management of 1936 

Mrs. Richard Davidson, Chairman, 

63 St. George Street, 

(Representing Board of Education). 

Controller Ralph C. Day, 

City Hall, 

(Rep. Mayor S. McBride). 

Mr. Thos. W. Banton, 

250 Merton St., 

(Rep. City Council). 

Dr. Henry Glendinning, 

387 Bloor St., E., 

(Rep. City Council). 

Hon. Mr. Justice Kelly, LL.D., 

Osgoode Hall, 

(Rep. Separate School Board). 

His Honour Judge W. T. J. Lee, K.C., B.C.L., 
70 Lyndhurst Ave., 

(Rep. Separate School Board). 


161 


Public Libraries— Continued 

Norman B. Gash, K.C., LL.B., 

85 Spadina Road, 

(Rep. City Council). 

Mr. John Turnbull, 

44 Rosedale Road, 

(Rep. Board of Education). 

Mr. J. C. M. MacBeth, B.A., K.C., 

152 Springhurst Ave., 

(Rep. Board of Education). 

Chief Librarian, George H. Locke, M.A., LL.D. 
Dep. Chief Librarian, C. R. Sanderson, B.Sc. 

Sec’y.-Treasurer . Edward S. Caswell 

The Administration Offices are located in 
the Central Library Building, corner College 
and St. George Sts. Telephone (switchboard), 
Kingsdale 1152. 

The Downtown Circulating Library is at 
No. 42 Adelaide Street West. 

The Reference Library and the Central 
Circulating Library are located in the main 
Library building, situated at the corner of St. 
George and College streets. Immediately 
north of this building there is a well- 
equipped Boys’ and Girls’ Library in the 
Boys’ and Girls’ House. There are sixteen 
Branch Libraries and Stations in several 
Schools and Settlements. 



162 


Public Libraries— Continued 

The cost of the main building at College 
and St. George streets, and of the Branches 
on Yorkville Avenue, Queen Street West, 
Annette Street, Broadview Avenue, Ronces- 
valles Avenue, Bathurst Street and Queen 
Street East was met by funds provided by 
the late Andrew Carnegie. Sites and build¬ 
ings for the other branch libraries were 
secured by special appropriations from the 
City. 

The Reference Library is open from 10 a.m. 
to 9.30 p.m.; the Central Circulating Library 
and the regional branches (Dovercourt anl 
Riverdale), 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; the remaining 
branch libraries from 2 to 9 p.m., but closing 
on Wednesdays. The Boys’ and Girls’ 
Library, on St. George Street, opens at 
10 a.m. and closes at 6 p.m. 

The main building includes, in addition to 
the administrative offices and the Reference 
and Circulating Divisions, the Central Read¬ 
ing Room, with an ample supply of the lead¬ 
ing Canadian, British and American news¬ 
papers and magazines; the Music Library, a 
popular branch of the lending system; the 
Reference collection of the bound volumes of 
the Canadian, British and American patent 


163 


Public Libraries —Continued 

specifications; a valuable collection of Gov¬ 
ernment documents, and a Bureau of Clip¬ 
pings, these gathered from current periodicals 
for reference purposes. 

In the Circulating portion of the main 
building are also housed the Kipling Room, 
with its special collection of books for boys 
and girls of High School age, and the John 
Ross Robertson Collection of engravings, 
prints and paintings illustrative of early life 
in Canada (the largest and most valuable 
collection of Canadian prints in existence). 
This room is open to the public daily without 
charge. 

Library Statistics, 1935 
Value of Libraries, including build¬ 


ings and grounds, about .$1,617,964 

Adult books issued for home read¬ 
ing . 2,910,152 

Reference books used . 313,140 

Boys’ and Girls’ books used . 1,023,404 

Books and pamphlets added . 61,172 

Total number of books and pamph¬ 
lets in the Libraries . 574,236 








164 


Canadian National Exhibition 

From August 28th to September 12th the 
Canadian National Exhibition will observe its 
fifty-eighth consecutive year of operation. 
Actually this “Show Window of the Nations” 
dates back to slightly before the dawn of the 
nineteenth century, having had its inception 
in 1792. In those early days of Upper 
Canada’s history when governmental head¬ 
quarters were at Niagara there was formed 
the Niagara Agricultural Society under the 
patronage of Governor Simcoe. Except for a 
brief period following the War of 1812, the 
Canadian National Exhibition has been car¬ 
ried on, under one name or another, but 
always progressing and today it is admittedly 
the greatest of the world’s annual expositions. 

Founded on agriculture and planned for 
the “encouragement of agriculture, industry 
and the arts”, it has rendered a service to 
Canada the value of which is inestimable. As 
the Exhibition grew and expanded it em¬ 
braced the countries of the British Empire 
and finally many of the leading industrial 
and agricultural countries of the world. 

In order that the benefits and advantages 
of the annual fair might be more readily 
available to a greater number of the pioneers 
of the rapidly growing Upper Canada it be- 


165 


Canadian National Exhibition— Continued 

came an itinerant institution held at various 
points throughout the now province of 
Ontario. In 1801 it was held at London. That 
was the foundation of a provincial organiza¬ 
tion. The fair subsequently was held at 
Kingston, Cobourg, Niagara, Brockville, York 
and elsewhere. In 1879 it became the Toronto 
Industrial Exhibition. Not until 1912 did it 
become the Canadian National Exhibition. 

Its progress since the turn of the present 
century has become truly remarkable and it 
has advanced steadily until its investment in 
land, buildings and plant equipment totals 
$21,000,000. The Canadian National Exhibi¬ 
tion now embraces agriculture, industry, 
education, pageantry, science, art, recreation, 
music, fashions, travel, sport, engineering, 
etc., etc. 

The Board of Directors consists of the 
Mayor of the City of Toronto and seven 
members of the City Council, together with 
eight representatives of the manufacturing 
interests and art and eight representatives of 
agriculture, all of whom are elected at the 
annual meeting from among the membership 
of the association, which latter comprises one 
hundred and forty organizations of various 
kinds. 


166 


Canadian National Exhibition — Continued, 

The Minister of Agriculture of the Province 
of Ontario is also (ex-officio) a member of 
the Board of Directors. In addition, the past 
presidents of the association are life directors. 
The 1936 board is as follows: 

Honorary President 
Colonel F. H. Deacon. 

President 
Alfred Rogers. 

Vice-Presidents 

George Brigden. 

John Westren. 

Life Directors 

George H. Gooderham, T. A. Russell, Robert 
Fleming, Thomas Bradshaw, Sam Harris, 
Colonel F. H. Deacon. 

Directors 

Section “A” representing the City Council: 
His Worship Mayor Sam McBride, Aldermen 
Ernest Bray, G. H. Gardiner, W. A. Howell, 
F. M. Johnston, Robert Leslie, J. D. McNish, 
J. S. Simmons. 


167 


Canadian National Exhibition— Continued 

Section “B” representing Manufacturers: 

George Brigden, John Firstbrook, E. J. Frey- 
seng, H. W. Hunt, John Millar, Morden Neil- 
son, J. A. Scythes, John Westren. 

Section “C” representing Agriculture: 

Thomas Bartrem, W. A. Dryden, T. W. Dug¬ 
gan, J. M. Gardhouse, Lionel Godson, Dr. 
R. M. Jenkins, A. A. Macdonald, Alfred 
Rogers. 


Executive Staff 

General Manager . Elwood A. Hughes 

Secretary-Treasurer . T. Gordon Dalglish 

General Offices—7th Floor, Lumsden Bldg., 
Yonge and Adelaide Streets, Toronto. 
Telephone—Elgin 4291, connecting all depart¬ 
ments. 

Days of the Exhibition, 1936 

Friday, Aug. 28 .Opening Day. 

Saturday, Aug. 29 .Warriors’ Day. 

Monday, Aug. 31 .Children’s Day. 

Tuesday, Sept. 1 .Automotive Day. 

Wednesday, Sept. 2 . Retail Merchants’ and 

Service Clubs’ Day. 

Thursday, Sept. 3 .Women’s and Music 

Day. 

Press Day. 


Friday, Sept. 4 










168 


Canadian National Exhibition— Continued 

Saturday, Sept. 5 .Manufacturers’, Ath¬ 

letic and Floral Day. 

Monday, Sept. 7 .Labor Day. 

Tuesday, Sept. 8 .International Day. 

Wednesday, Sept. 9 ....Agriculturists’ Day. 

Thursday, Sept. 10 Transportation and 

Commercial Travel¬ 
lers’ Day. 

Friday, Sept. 11 .Live Stock Review 

Day. 

Saturday, Sept. 12 .Citizens’ Day. 


Exhibition Statistics 



Prizes 


Year 

Paid 

Attendance 

1883 . 

. $ 23,138 

171,756 

1893 . 

. 31.232 

267,192 

1903 . 

. 37,515 

527,329 

1913 . 

. 47,606 

1,009,000 

1923 . 

. 84,400 

1,493,000 

1924 . 

. 92,300 

1,519,000 

1925 . 

. 97,000 

1,491,300 

1926 . 

. 105,400 

1,573,000 

1927 . 

. 130.000 

1,870,000 

1928 . 

. 138,300 

2,039,000 

1929 . 

. 151,200 

1,974,000 

1930 

. 129,600 

1,687,000 




















169 


Canadian National Exhibition— Continued 


1931 . 122,800 1,657,000 

1932 . 107,600 1,439,000 

1933 . 94,100 1,420,000 

1934 . 90,686 1,503,000 

1935 . 90,201 1,651,000 


Grounds and Buildings 


Exhibition Park contains permanent build¬ 
ings which are accounted the world over as 
masterpieces of exposition architecture. 
Those comprising the main group are con¬ 
structed of steel, stone, concrete and brick, 
and are truly worthy of the high standard 
attained by the exhibition they house. 
Amongst the larger buildings are: the Food 
Products, the Coliseum, the Automotive, 
Electrical and Engineering, Horse Palace and 
the Province of Ontario. In 1927, at the cost 
of $1,400,000, the live stock exhibit buildings 
were erected as an annex to the Coliseum. 
A new Engineering and Electrical building 
was provided in 1928 at the cost of $600,000. 
and in 1929 the automotive interests were 
housed for the first time in a magnificent 
million-dollar building. The great horse 
Pavilion was erected in 1931 at a cost of one 
million dollars. 







170 


Canadian National Exhibition— Continued 

The current year saw the erection of an 
ultra-modern bandshell, for which the sum 
of $50,000 was appropriated. This structure 
combines all the new developments in the 
field of acoustics, lighting, and materials for 
the purpose. The finest bands of Europe and 
America will be heard from time to time, and 
the bandshell will be used for concert, opera¬ 
tic and other attractions. 


171 


Royal Agricultural Winter Fair 
Association 

The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair—a 
Canadian institution having nation-wide im¬ 
port—has grown steadily in importance and 
scope since it was established 14 years ago. 
In 1935 it was dedicated as “The King’s Year” 
to his late Majesty King George V. It is in¬ 
teresting to note that live stock from King 
Edward VIII’s ranch in Alberta have been 
exhibited at the Royal for many years. 

The Royal Coliseum is the pivotal arena 
around which the other magnificent buildings 
are grouped, covering some 25 acres of floor 
space. Immediately after the first Fair in 
November, 1922, support from exhibitors from 
every part of Canada was so enthusiastic that 
more extensive accommodation became im¬ 
perative. The erection in 1927 of the live¬ 
stock buildings to house the cattle, sheep and 
swine was the first step in expansion, and, in 
1931, the original building plan was rounded 
out by the completion of the magnificent 
Equerry Building, having box and open stalls 
for 1,200 horses. There is, in all, penning for 
2,000 cattle, 2,000 sheep and 1,500 swine, be¬ 
sides about 8,000 head of poultry. 


172 


Royal Agricultural Fair— Continued 

The Fair is the fulfilment of the vision of 
many a far-sighted agriculturalist. At a 
meeting of agriculturists and others inter¬ 
ested, held in Toronto in February, 1918, a 
committee was formed to take up the pro¬ 
posal of a national livestock show for Canada. 
In October, 1919, it was decided to hold the 
Fair in Toronto, and a charter was obtained 
from the Ontario Government to form an 
“Agricultural Winter Fair Association”. Sub¬ 
sequently, His late Majesty, by charter, 
graciously granted the use of the word 
“Royal” in connection with both Association 
and Fair. 

Almost from the first the Royal proved its 
merits and won a recognized place in the 
higher realm of Canada’s agricultural schemes 
of development and national expansion. 
To-day the Royal Winter Fair stands in a 
position of unique pre-eminence among agri¬ 
cultural exhibitions on this continent. The 
assembly of so much variety combined with 
high excellence under one roof and into one 
organization gives the Royal at Toronto a 
distinctiveness not matched anywhere else. 

The list of presidents of the Royal Agri¬ 
cultural Winter Fair Association to date is: 


173 


Royal Agricultural Fair —Continued 

W. A. Dryden, 1919 to 1923. 

E. M. Carroll, 1924 to 1926. 

D. O. Bull, 1927 to 1929. 

Alfred Rogers, 1930 and 1931. 

Col. Harry McGee, 1932 to 1936. 

At the 1935 Fair, held on November 20-28, 
there were over 15,000 entries, including 1,400 
from the United States and the participation 
of military officer riders from the Irish Free 
State, Chile, France, Holland, the United 
States and Canada. The total prize money 
paid was roundly $80,000. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Hon. President 
Col. Harry McGee, Toronto. 

President 

Gordon F. Perry, Toronto. 

Vice-President 
F. C. Fletcher, Toronto. 

Manager 

A. P. Westervelt, Toronto. 

Treasurer 

T. C. Mussen, Toronto. 


174 


Royal Agricultural Fair— Continued 

General Offices 
217 Bay Street. 

Telephone, Waverley 3081. 

Executive Committee 

Gordon F. Perry (President); F. C. Fletcher 
(Vice-President); J. E. Brethour, Burford, 
Ont.; Duncan O. Bull, Brampton, Ont.; E. M. 
Carroll, Toronto; C. E. Chambers, Toronto; 
W. A. Dryden, Brooklin, Ont.; Hon. E. S. 
Little, London, Ont.; Lt.-Col. Robert McEwen, 
London, Ont.; Col. Harry McGee, Toronto; 
J. A. Northey, Toronto; Alfred Rogers, To¬ 
ronto; Walter L. Scott, Sutton West, Ont.; 
P. L. Whytock, Toronto; and George Wilson, 
Toronto. 


1936 DATES: NOV. 18-26. 



175 


Toronto and York Roads Commission 

(Appointed under 5 Geo. V., Chap. 17) 

This Commission consists of five persons, 
two appointed by the County Council of 
York and two appointed by the City Council 
of Toronto, and a fifth to be appointed by 
the four elected members or the Lieut.- 
Governor in Council. Its duty is the im¬ 
provement and maintenance of main subur¬ 
ban roads to be determined upon by the 
Commission. The cost is to be borne by the 
City, the County and the Ontario Govern¬ 
ment in the following proportions: 25 per 
cent, by the City, 25 per cent, by the County, 
and 50 per cent, by the Ontario Government. 
The members and officers of the Commission 
are as follows: 


Commissioners 

E. G. Farr, Chairman, Weston, Ontario. 

Hon. Frank P. O’Connor, Vice-Chairman, 
Toronto. 

David Spence, M.P., 13 O’Hara Avenue, To¬ 
ronto. 

Wm. Croft, 255 Glencaim Avenue, Toronto. 

J. Ray Price, Humber Bay, Ontario. 


176 


Toronto and York Roads Commission— 
Continued 


Secretary 

R. W. Phillips, County Building, 57 Adelaide 
St. E., Toronto. 


Treasurer 

W. W. Gardhouse, County Building, 57 Ade¬ 
laide St. E., Toronto. 

Chief Engineer 

H. C. Rose, County Building, 57 Adelaide 
St. E., Toronto. 


177 


The Toronto Harbour Commissioners 

The Toronto Harbour Commissioners com¬ 
menced active operations in 1914, and, in co¬ 
operation with the City Council and Dominion 
Government by Agreement and Order-in- 
Council, have transformed the Harbour from 
a state of inadequacy into one of the most 
modem and up-to-date harbours on the 
Great Lakes. It can accommodate the largest 
vessels passing through the Welland Ship 
Canal, and now ranks third in cargo ton¬ 
nage among Canadian Lake and Sea Ports. 

In addition to deepening the Harbour and 
constructing 42,500 lineal feet of wharves, the 
majority of which are provided with navi¬ 
gable depth ranging from 22 feet to 26 feet, 
the Commissioners have created two water¬ 
front industrial areas out of lands covered by 
water and non-revenue producing in 1915. 
These areas have direct access to rail and 
water transportation and are served by 30 
miles of Commissioners’ railway tracks, wide 
paved streets and hydro-electric power at 
cost; there is also perfect co-ordination of 
rail, water and highway transportation. 

The Dominion Government and the Har¬ 
bour Commissioners are now constructing a 
Marginal Way Pier, 1,264 feet long and 778 


178 


The Toronto Harbour Commissioners— Cont’d 

feet wide, with a slip 200 feet wide on each 
side; they are also jointly completing the 
unfinished walls on the north-west side of 
the Ship Channel. When completed this 
work will provide 3,000 lineal feet additional 
berthing space and 26 acres of industrial 
lands, applications for the lease of which 
have already been received. 

The elevator capacity of Toronto Harbour 
has been increased to 4,750,000 bushels by the 
erection of a 2,000,000-bushel addition to the 
elevator of the Toronto Elevators Limited; it 
was commenced in July and completed by 
the middle of November, 1935. 

The area of the lands sold, leased or occu¬ 
pied now totals 479 acres, on which are 
located 88 establishments, which have in¬ 
vested upwards of $38,000,000 in land, build¬ 
ings and equipment. 

The value of Harbour lands leased and sold 
from 1926 to 1935, inclusive, averages approxi¬ 
mately $990,500.00 per year. 


Assessed value of occupied Harbour properties, 1935 . $20,064,266 

Assessed value of all Harbour properties, 1912 . 1,976.804 


179 


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- 890,103 

From 1918 to 1935, inclusive, debentures of the Commissioners have 

been redeemed by Sinking Fund payments totalling . 5,548,000 












180 


The Toronto Harbour Commissioners— Cont’d 

The net general and local improvement 
taxes paid by The Toronto Harbour Commis¬ 
sioners on Harbour lands total $1,553,411, and 


are as follows: 

Local 
Improve - 

Year General ment Total 

1912 to 1934 $132,318 $1,221,237 $1,353,555 

1935 16,202 183,654 199,856 


Total $148,520 $1,404,891 $1,553,411 

During the last few years waterborne 
traffic has been marked by a phenomenal ex¬ 
pansion which is directly attributable to the 
Harbour facilities, which provide adequate 
accommodation to the largest vessels plying 
on the Great Lakes. 

Below is the waterborne trade of the Har¬ 
bour from 1911 to 1935: 


Year 

Tons 

Year 

Tons 

1911 

. 330,767 

1932 

. 2,270,445 

1921 

248,363 

1933 

. 2,500.100 

1931 

2,121,066 

1934 

. 3,125,144 



1935 

. 3,020,132 


The annual savings accruing to the citizens 
as a result of the establishment of modern 
waterfront facilities by the Commissioners for 













181 


The Toronto Harbour Commissioners— Cont’d 

commodities such as coal, coke, oils, etc., is at 
least equivalent to the bond interest charges 
of the Commissioners. 

At the Western Section between Dowling 
Avenue and the Humber River 217 acres have 
been reclaimed. It is known as Sunnyside 
Beach, and contains a bathing pavilion with 
accommodation for 7,700 bathers at one time; 
adjoining this is a swimming pool 300 feet 
long by 75 feet wide, with a depth grading 
from 21/2 feet. It has a capacity of 750,000 
gallons. There are also amusement devices, 
games, rides, boating, canoeing, dancing and 
refreshments. 

The waterfront properties at Toronto are 
served by a cross-town through traffic high¬ 
way from the Humber River on the west to 
Leslie Street on the east, a distance of seven 
miles, with a minimum pavement width of 
50 feet. 

Commissioners 

J. E. Ganong, Chairman, 1 Clarendon Ave. 
George W. Porter, 317 Strathmore Blvd. 

P. J. Mulqueen, 197 Rosedale Heights Drive. 
B. J. Miller, 314 Rosewell Ave. 

Thomas Rennie, 10 North Sherboume St. 


182 


Toronto Harbour Commissioners— Continued 

Officers 

E. L. Cousins, C.E., General Manager. 

F. R. Scandrett, Secretary. 

J. R. Wainwright, Chief Engineer. 

F. J. Marigold, Harbour Master. 

Office 

Administration Building, Harbour and Bay 
Streets. Telephone, Elgin 1451. 

Sunnyside Beach. Telephone, Lakeside 0357. 


183 


Toronto Transportation Commission 

The Toronto Transportation Commission 
was incorporated by an Act of the Ontario 
Legislature assented to June 4th, 1920. The 
Act of Incorporation is 10-11 Geo. V, 1920, 
Chap. 144, which may be briefly summarized 
as follows: 

(1) The Commission consists of three mem¬ 
bers, appointed by the City Council to serve 
for three years, and to be paid such salary 
or other remunerations as may be fixed by 
Council. 

(2) No member of the City Council is 
eligible for appointment as a member of the 
Commission. 

(3) The Commission is entrusted with the 
control, maintenance, operation and manage¬ 
ment of: 

» 

(a) The Toronto Railway Company upon 
its acquisition by the City. 

(b) The Civic Lines. 

(c) Any other street railways that the 
City may from time to time acquire. 


184 


Toronto Transportation Commission— 
Continued 

(4) The City may at any time entrust to 
the Commission the construction, control, 
maintenance, operation and management of 
lines of motor buses, or subways, or of tubes, 
or of any method of underground or local 
overhead transportation. (This was done by 
By-law No. 8564.) 

(5) To consider generally all matters re¬ 
lating to local transportation in the City of 
Toronto. 

(6) To construct, control, maintain, oper¬ 
ate and manage new lines of street railway. 

(7) To fix such tolls and fares so that the 
revenue of the Commission shall be sufficient 
to make all transportation facilities under 
its control and management self-sustaining 
after providing for such maintenance, re¬ 
newals, depreciation and d|bt charges as it 
shall think proper. 

(8) To requisition the City for money 
necessary to carry out its powers and duties. 
But nothing contained in the Act of Incor¬ 
poration shall divest the Council of its 
authority with reference to providing money 
for such purposes. 


185 


Toronto Transportation Commission— 
Continued 

(9) The Commission to furnish the City 
annually an Operating and Financial State¬ 
ment, and keep its books at all times open 
for inspection by the Audit Department of 
the City. 

The fares chargeable by the Commission 
are as follows: 

Fares for Adults: 

Four tickets for 25 cents; cash fare, 10 
cents. 

Fares for Children: 

(a) Not in arms and not over 51 inches 
in height: cash, three cents; ten 
tickets for 25 cents. 

(b) School Children’s tickets: School 
Children’s tickets are sold at the rate 
of seven for 25 cents, and are for the 
use of all school children under 16 
years of age. The tickets are good 
only going to and from school, be¬ 
tween the hours of 8 a.m. and 4.30 
p.m., and are not valid on Saturdays, 
Sundays or on other days when 
schools are closed. 


186 


Toronto Transportation Commission— 
Continued 

Free transportation privileges on the street 
cars are provided to the members of the 
Amputations Association of the Great War 
and to blind people in Toronto receiving 
passes through the Canadian National Insti¬ 
tute for the Blind. 

Free transfers are issued between all street 
cars within the City limits and between street 
cars and “feeder” buses within the City 
limits. 

To protect the City’s huge investment and 
its rights to control public transportation in 
its streets, the City authorized the Commis¬ 
sion’s acquirement of control of the principal 
motor coach routes radiating from the City 
and of motor coach sight-seeing services in 
the City. These services and other special 
motor coach and motor launch services are 
operated by the Commission under the name 
of Gray Coach Lines, Limited. With its 
routes extending from the United States bor¬ 
der at Niagara Falls and Buffalo to Toronto 
and thence to Muskoka Lakes and other 
northern Ontario resorts, Gray Coach Lines’ 
motor coach services have made Toronto the 
hub of highway travel and have developed a 


187 


Toronto Transportation Commission— 
Continued 

profitable tourist business for Toronto. Com¬ 
plete information in reference to the services 
of Gray Coach Lines and connecting motor 
coach services to all points in Canada and the 
United States is available at the Motor Coach 
Terminal, 602 Bay Street, or by telephoning 
ADelaide 4221. 

Several municipalities adjacent to Toronto 
have arranged to have their local public 
transportation services managed by the 
Toronto Transportation Commission. This 
arrangement is advantageous to these muni¬ 
cipalities and does not impose any financial 
responsibility on Toronto or on the Commis¬ 
sion. These include street railway services 
in York Township, Weston, and the munici¬ 
palities between Toronto and Richmond Hill 
on north Yonge Street; and bus services in 
York Township, Forest Hill Village, Leaside 
and East York Township. 

The Toronto Island Ferries, now owned by 
the City of Toronto, have been managed by 
the Transportation Commission since Feb¬ 
ruary, 1927. Passenger and freight service is 
supplied by a fleet of ferry boats and freight 
craft between the mainland and the three 


188 


Toronto Transportation Commission— 

Continued 

Islands—Centre Island. Hanlan’s Point and 
Ward’s Island. The one-way trip to any of 
these points is made in approximately fifteen 
minutes. 

The ferry service is managed by the Com¬ 
mission under an agreement with the City. 
The finances of this service are entirely 
separate from those of the other services 
managed by the Commission under its Act 
of Incorporation. 

The rates of fare are the same on the fer¬ 
ries as on the City street car system, the 
same tickets being good on either service, 
but no transfer tickets are issued between 
the ferries and the street cars. 

This is the fifteenth year of the Commis¬ 
sion’s operation of various transportation 
services. In the essential quality of Safety 
the Commission has a notable record. Well 
over three and a half billions of passengers 
have travelled on the street cars, buses, motor 
coaches, ferries and motor launches operated 
by the Commission. Not one passenger has 
been fatally injured. 

The Commission operates 886 electric street 
cars and 96 electric service cars. These travel 


189 


Toronto Transportation Commission— 

Continued 

a distance of approximately 22,000,000 miles in 
service during a year. The 187 buses and 
motor coaches travel 5,500,000 miles yearly. 
The fleet of six ferry boats carry nearly 
2,000,000 passengers during the Summer. 
Approximately 3,000 people are regularly em¬ 
ployed by the Commission. 

The Commissioners are as follows: 

Wm. C. McBrien, Chairman. 

S. J. McMaster, Vice-Chairman. 

F. L. Hubbard, Commissioner. 


David W. Harvey, General Manager. 

Offices: 35 Yonge Street, Telephone Waver- 
ley 7611. 



190 


Toronto Hydro-Electric System 

The Toronto Hydro-Electric System is 
owned by the City of Toronto, and is oper¬ 
ated for it by the Toronto Electric Commis¬ 
sioners. 

The Toronto Electric Commissioners, cre¬ 
ated under Provincial Statutes (1 Geo. V, 
Chap. 119, Sec. 6), are empowered to carry 
out the provisions of the Public Utilities Act 
of Ontario (R.S.O., 1927, Chap. 249) in so far 
as such Act applies to the City of Toronto. 

The present members and officers are: 

Commissioners 

Joseph Gibbons (Chairman). 

Kenneth A. Christie (Vice-Chairman). 

Samuel McBride (Mayor). 

Officers 

E. M. Ashworth, General Manager. 

H. J. MacTavish, Secretary. 

Offices 

14 Carlton Street: Telephone Ad. 2261. 

The Toronto Hydro-Electric System is one 
of the largest municipally owned distribution 
systems in the world, and distributes power 
at unusually low rates. 


191 


Toronto Hydro-Electric System — Continued 

The following statistics, based on the opera¬ 
tions during 1935, are of interest. 

Kilowatt-hours sold 923,456,250 

Connected load . 1,119,629 H.P. 

Peak load . 311,602 H.P. 

Total Revenue . $12,750,000.00* 

Number of consumers at Dec. 

31, 1935 .,. 186,230 

Total System-owned Assets at 

Dec. 31, 1935 . $46,900,000.00* 

Net bonded debt at Dec. 31, 

1935 . $16,954,756.95 

System-owned Assets exceed 

liabilities by . $28,250,000.00* 

Equity in H.E.P.C. Sinking 

Fund . $12,600,000.00* 

*Estimated. 

Light and Power Rates 

(This schedule does not include rates for 
service outside the City Limits.) 

Residence Service 

Alternating - Current—25 cycles—120 volts. 

Three cents per 100 square feet floor area, 
per month. (Minimum 1,000 sq. ft.; maxi¬ 
mum, 3,000 sq. ft.) plus two cents per Kilo¬ 
watt hour up to equivalent of 3 K.W. hours 











192 


Toronto Hydro-Electric System — Continued 

per 100 sq. ft. floor area charged; 1 cent per 
K.W. hour for additional consumption. 
Prompt payment discount, 10 per cent. Mini¬ 
mum bill, 75c (net) per month. 

Direct Current—120-240 Volts with storage 
battery reserve. 

Six cents per Kilowatt hour for first 5 K.W. 
hours per room per month. Four cents per 
K.W. hour for next 4 K.W. hours per room 
per month. Two cents per K.W. hour for 
additional consumption. Penalty of V 2 C per 
K.W. hour if bill is not paid by last discount 
day. Minimum bill, $1.00 per month. 

Commercial Lighting Service 

Alternating Current—25 Cycles—120 Volts. 

Billing Demand—100 per cent. Installed 
Capacity. 

Four cents per Kilowatt hour for equiva¬ 
lent of first 70 hours’ monthly use of billing 
demand. Two cents per K.W. hour for 
equivalent of next 70 hours’ monthly use of 
billing demand. One cent per K.W. hour for 
additional consumption. Prompt payment 
discount, 10 per cent. Minimum bill, 75c 
(net) per killowatt of billing demand per 
month. 


193 


Toronto Hydro-Electric System— Continued 

Direct Current—120-240 Volts with storage 
battery reserve. Billing Demand—90 per 
cent. Installed Capacity. 

Six cents per Kilowatt hour for equivalent 
of first 75 hours monthly use of billing de¬ 
mand. Two cents per K.W. hour for addi¬ 
tional consumption. Penalty of V 2 C per K.W 
hour if bill is not paid by last discount day. 
Minimum bill. $1.00 per Kilowatt of billing 
demand for month. 

Power Service 

Alternating Current—25 Cycles—3-Phase— 
550 Volts. Billing Demand—by Meter or 
100 per cent. Installed Capacity. 

Alternating Current—25 Cycles—3-Phase— 
208 Volts (See Note). 

Monthly Service Charge—$1.67 per Kilo¬ 
watt for the first TV 2 K.W. of billing demand 
and $1.34 per Kilowatt for all additional 
(equivalent to $1.25 per horsepower for the 
first 10 horsepower of billing demand and 
$1.00 per horsepower for all additional). 

Energy Charge— IV 2 cents per K.W. hour 
for equivalent of the first 50 hours monthly 
use of the billing demand. Three-quarter- 




194 


Toronto Hydro-Electric System — Continued 

cent per K.W. hour for equivalent of the 
second 50 hours monthly use of the billing 
demand. Thirty-three one-hundredths of a 
cent (.33) per K.W. hour for all remaining 
consumption. Prompt payment discount, 10 
per cent. 

Direct Current—120-240 Volts with storage 
battery reserve. 

(Where demand is under 100 horsepower, 
billing demand on installed capacity basis, 
i.e., First 10 H.P. at 100 per cent, of installed 
capacity. Next 10 H.P. at 90 per cent, of 
installed capacity. Remainder at 60 per cent 
of installed capacity. Where demand is over 
100 H.P., billing demand may be determined 
by meter.) 

Monthly Service Charge—$2.01 per Kilo¬ 
watt of billing demand (equivalent to $1.50 
per horsepower of billing demand). 

Energy Charge— 2 V 2 cents per K.W. hour 
for equivalent of the first 50 hours monthly 
use of the Billing Demand. IV 2 cents per 
K.W. hour for equivalent of the second 50 
hours monthly use of the billing demand. 
One cent per K.W. hour for all remaining 
consumption. Penalty of V 4 cent per K.W. 
hour if bill is not paid by last discount day. 




195 


Toronto Hydro-Electric System— Continued 

Note 

Direct Current Service is supplied in a 
restricted down-town area only. 

208-Volt Three-Phase 25-Cycle Current is 
supplied in areas where 4-wire A.C. network 
is installed. 

Rates for special classes of service, such 
as Flat Rate Water Heaters, Hall Lighting, 
Sign Lighting, etc., may be obtained on 
application. 


196 


Toronto Industrial Commission 

The Toronto Industrial Commission was in¬ 
corporated by Letters Patent under the On¬ 
tario Companies Act on 28th of December, 
1928, and began active operations on the 13th 
of March, 1929. The Commission’s objects 
are to secure industries for and aid industries 
in the City of Toronto and surrounding terri¬ 
tory and to give publicity to the advantages 
of the Toronto area for business and manu¬ 
facturing purposes. 

During 1935 the Commission co-operated 
with eighteen companies of outside origin, 
thirteen of which established their own fac¬ 
tories in Toronto and five whose products 
are being made by existing Toronto firms. 

Since it began operations a total of 144 
industrial companies have established in 
Toronto and suburbs. They have invested 
over $5,500,000 in plant and equipment, are 
employing more than 3,000 people, and are 
occupying more than 1,500,000 square feet of 
floor space. 

The Commission recently completed ap¬ 
proximately seven years of service in fur¬ 
thering the industrial development of the 
Toronto area. During that time it has co- 


197 


Toronto Industrial Commission— Continued 

operated with and given assistance to 122 
new industrial firms which have established 
manufacturing plants in Toronto and its in¬ 
dustrial suburbs. In addition, it has assisted 
22 outside concerns in making arrangements 
to have their products manufactured here. 

These new industrial developments in the 
Toronto area have resulted in the investment 
of more than $5,604,000 in plant and equip¬ 
ment; the direct employment of some 3,272 
persons, receiving in salaries and wages more 
than $3,250,000 annually; the occupancy of 
nearly 1,700,000 square feet of floor space, 
and the production of approximately 100 
different products previously not made in 
Canada. 

The Commission also has given assistance 
to many existing Toronto industries, co¬ 
operating with them in expansion plans, in 
securing new lines to manufacture, and in 
providing them with market and distribution 
data with regard to both domestic and export 
trade, and information on numerous other 
subjects, including sources of equipment and 
materials. 

The Commission is the official Industrial 
Commission for the City of Toronto, with the 


198 


Toronto Industrial Commission— Continued 

Mayor of the City of Toronto as its Honorary 
President. Its Board of Directors is made up 
of representatives nominated by the City 
Council, the Board of Trade of the City of 
Toronto, the Toronto Branch of the Canadian 
Manufacturers’ Association, the Toronto 
Hydro-Electric System, the Toronto Trans¬ 
portation Commission, the Toronto Harbour 
Commissioners and the Canadian National 
Exhibition Association. 

Officers 

Honorary President 
Samuel McBride, Mayor of Toronto. 

President 
C. L. Burton. 

Vice-Presidents 

A. B. Cooper, John A. Tory, F. E. Waterman. 
Board of Directors 

One nominated by Toronto City Council: 
Mayor Samuel McBride. 

Six nominated by the Board of Trade of 
the City of Toronto as follows: R. C. Berkin- 
shaw, General Manager, Goodyear Tire & 





199 


Toronto Industrial Commission— Continued 

Rubber Co., Ltd.; J. H. Brace, General Man¬ 
ager, Bell Telephone Co. of Canada, Ltd.; 
C. L. Burton, President, The Robert Simpson 
Co. Ltd.; Harry McGee, Vice-President, The 
T. Eaton Co. Ltd.; F. D. Tolchard, General 
Manager, Toronto Board of Trade; John A. 
Tory, Supervisor, Sun Life Assurance Co. 

Three nominated by the Toronto Branch of 
the Canadian Manufacturers’ Association as 
follows: A. B. Cooper, General Manager, 
Ferranti Electric, Ltd.; A. Ross Robertson, 
Manager, Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd.; F. E 
Waterman, General Manager, Toronto Brick 
Co. Ltd. 

And the following four, representing public 
bodies in the City of Toronto: E. M. Ash¬ 
worth, General Manager, Toronto Hydro- 
Electric System; J. E. Ganong, Chairman, 
Toronto Harbour Commissioners; D. W. Har¬ 
vey, General Manager, Toronto Transporta¬ 
tion Commission; Elwood A. Hughes, General 
Manager, Canadian National Exhibition Asso¬ 
ciation. 

H. B. Keenleyside, 

General Manager and Secretary, 

Canada Permanent Building, 320 Bay St. 

Telephone—Waverley 1616. 






200 


Ontario Municipal Board 

Eric W. Cross, M.A., Chairman. 

W. M. Brodie, Vice-Chairman. 

H. L. Cummings, Commissioner. 

M. B. Sanderson, Acting Secretary. 

Offices—Parliament Buildings. 

Telephone—AD. 1211. 

Toronto Old Age Pensions Board 

(Appointed under Old Age Pensions Act, 
Ontario, 1929.) 

The Board consists of five persons appointed 
annually by the City Council. Its duty is to 
receive all applications for Old Age Pensions 
made by residents of the City of Toronto, and 
after giving consideration to same to forward 
them, with their recommendations, to the Old 
i\ge Pensions Commission of Ontario. 

The members of the Board are as follows: 

John O’Connor, Chairman. 

C. M. Carrie, Vice-Chairman. 

Mrs. W. L. McFarland. 

John Dillon. 

A. W. Laver, Commissioner of Public 
Welfare. 




201 


Toronto Old Age Pensions Board— Continued 

Secretary—Bert Merson. 

Office—Department of Public Welfare, 
Old Age Pensions Division, Stew¬ 
art Building, 149 College Street^ 
Toronto. 

The actual number of Toronto residents 
receiving Old Age Pensions at December 
31st, 1935, was 10,177. The amount paid out 
in Pensions during 1935 was $2,147,722.55, the 
City of Toronto’s share at 10 per cent, being 
$214,772.25. 

In addition, the City is required to provide 
office space, equipment, staff, etc., and these 
for administration purposes are attached to 
the Department of Public Welfare. 





202 


Mothers’ Allowances Toronto Board 

(Appointed in pursuance of the Mothers’ 

Allowances Act, R.S.O., 1927, Chap. 280.) 

The Local Board consists of six persons 
appointed by the Ontario Government, two 
being chosen by the City Council and the 
remaining members by the Minister of Pub¬ 
lic Welfare on the recommendation of the 
Ontario Commission. 

Its functions are to receive and consider 
applications for allowances under the Act 
made by residents of the City of Toronto and 
to recommend to the Ontario Mothers’ 
Allowances Commission the payment of 
allowances to those considered eligible. 

A monthly allowance may be paid towards 
the dependent children of a mother with at 
least one child under sixteen years of age in 
her care, who is 

(a) a widow, (b) or a mother with a 
totally and permanently incapacitated hus¬ 
band, (c) or a deserted mother, whose hus- ! 
band has not been heard of for at least three 
years, (d) or a foster mother, who is married 
or unmarried and has resident with her one 
or more orphan children and has not 




203 


Mothers’ Allowances Toronto Board 
Continued 

adequate means to care properly for them 
without the assistance of an allowance. In 
all cases the applicant must be a British sub¬ 
ject by birth or naturalization or is the widow 
or wife of a British subject and has resided 
in the Province of Ontario for at least two 
years. 

The Members of the Toronto Board are as 
follows: 

Miss Florence Boland, Chairman. 

E. J. Linington, Vice-Chairman. 

Miss Elizabeth Bush. 

Zeph Hilton. 

Mrs. Angus Gordon. 

Col. A. E. Kirkpatrick. 

Mark Cohen. 

Miss Marjorie Logan, Secretary. 

Office—Stewart Building, 149 College 
Street, Toronto. Telephone— 

Waverley 1082, Local 27. 



204 


Mothers' Allowances Toronto Board 
Continued 

Number of beneficiaries on Toronto 
Pay List December 31st, 1935 . 2,001 

Number of beneficiaries on Toronto 
Pay List part of year and later 


eliminated . 141 

Total . 2,142 

Amount paid by the City of Toronto 

(which is 50% of total) .$397,759.00 







205 


The Ontario Municipal Association 

This organization, composed of dele¬ 
gates appointed by different municipalities 
throughout the Province of Ontario, has 
been formed for the purpose of discussing 
important municipal topics and of prompting 
desirable municipal legislation. The dele¬ 
gates are either members or officers of muni¬ 
cipal councils. 

The annual meetings are held in Toronto, 
usually during Exhibition time. 

The officers for the year 1935 are: 

President — George Hurst, Chief Income 
Branch, Assessment Dept., Toronto, Ont.; 
Vice-Presidents—J. P. Ryan, Brantford; 
Wm. Jelly, Clerk, Leeds and Grenville 
Counties; W. R. Allely, Lindsay; H. 
Hopper, Hamilton; A. Belanger, Ottawa, 
and past presidents of the Association. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Horace L. Brittain, 
New Wellington Building, 137 Wellington 
St. West. Telephone, Elgin 1904. 


206 


Board of Trade 

The Board of Trade was incorporated under 
an Act of the Parliament of Canada in 1845. 

The Board to-day is one of the largest 
commercial organizations in the Empire, and 
functions through a Council of eighteen 
elected members, nine committees, and ten 
trade branches, and has direct representation 
on commercial and welfare organizations. 

Officers, 1936 
President 

T. Frank Matthews. 

1st Vice-President 
J. J. Gibbons. 

2nd Vice-President 
A. N. Mitchell. 

Treasurer 

Col. K. R. Marshall. 

Council 

R. C. Berkinshaw, J. H. Brace, H. D. 
Burns, H. B. Clemes, Jas. S. Duncan, D. H 
Gibson, Col. B. O. Hooper, Frank Kennedy, 
Ivor R. Lewis, D. R. Michener, Jas. Y. Mur- 


207 


Board of Trade —Continued 

doch, K.C., W. Frank Prendergast, Lt.-Col. 
C. M. Ruttan, P. E. F. Smily, K.C., Norman 
C. Urquhart. 

General Manager and Secretary 
F. D. Tolohard. 


Transportation Adviser 
T. Marshall. 

Offices—King Edward Hotel, King Street 
East. Telephone, Elgin 9161. 


208 


Canadian Manufacturers’ Association 

Incorporated under an Act passed by the 
Parliament of Canada in 1902 (2 Edward VII, 
Chap. 48). 


Officers, 1936 
President 

W. S. Morden, K.C., Canada Talc Co., 
Limited, Toronto, Ont. 

First Vice-President 

B. W. Coghlin, B. J. Coghlin Co., Limited, 
Montreal, Que. 

Second Vice-President 

F. C. Brown, Canada Western Cordage Co., 
Limited, Vancouver, B.C. 

Association Officials 
General Manager, J. E. Walsh. 

General Secretary, J. T. Stirrett. 

Manager, Tariff Dept., J. R. K. Bristol. 

Offices—1404 Bank of Hamilton Building, 
Telephone, Adelaide 7261. 

Ontario Division, C.M.A. 

Chairman, Henry Barrett, Dominion Woollens 
and Worsteds, Limited, Peterborough, Ont. 
Secretary, J. M. McIntosh. 


209 


Canadian Manufacturers’ Ass’n —Continued 

Toronto Branch, C.M.A. 

Chairman, W. C. Kettlewell, Chas. Bush, 
Limited, Toronto, Ont. 

Secretary—J. M. McIntosh. 

Manufacturing Statistics 


Number of establishments . 2,604 

Number of employees . 75,645 

Capital invested .$388,995,096 

Salaries and wages (annual) .$ 80,855,883 

Value of products (annual) .$308,983,639 







210 


Toronto Convention and Tourist Association 
Incorporated 

This Association was organized in the year 
1926 for the purpose of increasing tourist 
traffic and securing Conventions for the City 
of Toronto. 


Officers 


Hon. President, Samuel McBride. 

(Mayor). 

President, Colonel Harry McGee. 

Vice-Presidents, P. Kirby Hunt and 
Colonel C. M. Ruttan. 
Secretary-Treasurer, E. R. Powell. 

Executive Office—Hotel Waverley, Spadina 
Avenue. Telephones, Midway 9401—Ran¬ 
dolph 2141. 

Statistical Information 


Conventions favoring Toronto 


1926 

1935 


103 

315 


Tourist Traffic into Toronto 


1926 

1935 


744,525 

1,974,929 







211 


Central Council of Ratepayers* 
Associations 

Officers, 1936 

Hon. Pres., Dr. Jas. Cotton, 620 Spadina Ave., 
Kingsdale 7505. 

Pres., H. H. Quance, 365 Shaw St., Lombard 
9470. 

Rec. Secretary, Alex. Rhind, 65 Bellefair 
Ave., Howard 9880. 

Cor. Secretary, Mrs. Jas. Cotton, 620 Spadina 
Ave., Kingsdale 7723. 

Treasurer, Mr. C. Wallis, 346 Brunswick Ave., 
Kingsdale 6968. 

Legal Advisor, Mr. J. S. Duggan, 45 Rich¬ 
mond St. West, Elgin 4179. 


Ward Eight Central Executive Council 

Comprising Twenty Ward Associations 
Representing 

Ratepayers. 

Service Clubs. 

Business Men. 

Veterans. 

Political. 

Sporting Associations and Clubs. 


212 


Officers 

President—Alex. Rhind. 

Treasurer—James Labbett. 

Secretary—Chris W. Halls, 140 Hammersmith 
Ave. 

Telephone, Grover 0120. 


Toronto Publicity Board 

Business Men’s Associations 

President—Walter Hershman, 2662 Danforth 
Ave. Telephone, Grover 2600. 

Secretary—John Walshe, 221 Naim Ave. 
Telephone, Kenwood 2624. 


213 


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1935 

500,253,837 

414,964,180 

458,539,254 

412,700,462 

559,668,057 

548,909,308 

451,638,760 

423,838,530 

413,276,810 

466,752,590 

554,921,955 

514,601,338 

$5,720,065,081 

1934 

489,650,581 

400,108,922 

472,397,729 

457,713,450 

511,655,936 

441,101,409 

439,476,933 

420,443,023 

459,219,333 

528,422,913 

492,526,147 

530,806,053 

$5,643,522,459 

1933 

332,861,078 

328,426,618 

305,793,875 

318,660,718 

442,110,122 

499,150,381 

567,975,330 

398,219,652 

394,738,474 

466,610,943 

469,342,195 

392,641,658 

$4,916,531,044 

1932 

336.321,389 

337,092,125 

323,087,611 

342,938,447 

327,725,304 

325,662,661 

357,637,032 

319,620,837 

344,558,927 

349,130,648 

360,867,463 

347,068,056 

$4,071,710,500 

1931 

489,377,943 

417,575,527 

458,038,353 

492,247,017 

538,977,036 

440,613,678 

392,277,146 

356,214,976 

376,107,699 

406,641,790 

379,854,789 

386,969,465 

$5,134,895,419 





































214 


The Toronto Humane Society 

The Toronto Humane Society gives a 
twenty-four hour service, 365 days of the 
year for the relief of suffering animals. An 
average of 350 telephone calls per day are 
received, and during 1935 a total of 21,730 
calls were made by the Society’s trucks, dur¬ 
ing which 10,334 dogs and 19,284 cats were 
brought to shelter. 6,686 Emergency calls 
(sick and injured animals) were responded 
to and 2,916 complaints regarding cruelty 
were investigated. 

Constant inspection is maintained over the 
conditions under which animals for human 
consumption are handled and killed. During 
1935 this entailed the examination of 55,239 
cattle, sheep, swine and poultry. The trans¬ 
portation of food, animals and birds is fre¬ 
quently carried on with great cruelty and it 
is an important part of the Society’s work to 
keep constant watch on those engaged in this 
work and thousands of pamphlets are dis¬ 
tributed to drivers of cattle trucks and those 
engaged in transportation of animals, giving 
advice as to the most humane way of doing 
the work. 

Humane education of children is one of the 
most vital departments of the Society’s work, 


215 


The Toronto Humane Society— Continued 

as it is a well-known fact that a child who is 
taught kindness to animals will not go far 
wrong in his behaviour towards his fellow 
men. 

The Society exists to help all animals that 
are suffering, that are wounded, lost, deserted, 
hungry or that must be mercifully put to 
death. 

President—Lieut.-Col. R. S. Timmis, D.S.O. 
Managing Director—J. M. Wilson. 
Headquarters and Kennels—11 St. Albans 
Street. Telephone, Kingsdale 1191.' 


216 


INDEX 

- PAGE 

Abattoir (Toronto Municipal) . 34, 118 

Abattoir, Estimates . 60 

Accidents, what to do in case of. 94 

Administration of Justice, Estimates.... 57 

Admiralty Court Registrar’s Office. 40 

Aldermen, addresses of . 16 

Aldermen, vote cast for . 80 

Aldermen, record of service . 20 

Ambulance service . 93 

Annexations to City, dates of . 101 

Appropriations . 47 

Area of City . 87 

Art Gallery, City Council represen¬ 
tatives on . 26 

Assessment Department . 31 

Assessment Department, estimates . 49 

Assessment of City, Statement of . 99 

Automobile tariff . 145 

Birth Registration .. 89 

Board of Control, members and meet¬ 
ings . 24 

Board of Control, record of service . 20 

Board of Education, members and 

officials . 152 

Board of Education, election returns. 84 

Board of Education, estimates . 66 
























217 


PAGE 

Board of Police Commissioners . 36 

Board of Trade, Officers and Council.... 206 

Building Statistics . 119 

Buildings, Department of . 33, 119 

Buildings, Department of, estimates . 53 

Business Men’s Associations—Toronto 
Publicity Board . 212 

Canadian Manufacturers’ Association. .. 208 

Canadian National Exhibition, City 

Council representatives on . 26 

Canadian National Exhibition . 164 

Canadian National Exhibition, estimates 

(see also Exhibition) .. 62, 72 

Cartage tariff . 150 

Central Council of Ratepayers’ Associ¬ 
ations . 211 

Central Executive Council (Ward 8) .... 211 

Chief Coroner’s Office . 42 

Children’s Aid Society, City Council 

representatives on . 27 

Children’s Court and Offices . 42 

City, annexations to . 101 

City, area of . 87 

City Architect’s Office (see Buildings, 

Department of) . 

City Auditor’s Office . 30 

City Audit Department, estimates . 50 




















218 


PAGE 

City Clerk’s Office . 29 

City Clerk’s Department, estimates 50 

City Council, members, with addresses 16 
City Council, representatives on Hos¬ 
pitals and other Boards . 26, 27 

City Council, remuneration of . 47 

City Council, service record of members 20 

City Council, days of meetings . 19 

City Debt, statement of . 43 

City Hall, superintendent of . 37 

City Jail . 36 

City Planning and City Surveying, 

Department of . 32 

City Planning and Surveying Depart¬ 
ment, estimates . 50 

City Registry Office . 42 

City Solicitor’s Office (see Law Depart¬ 
ment) . 

City Treasurer’s Office . 29 

City Treasurer’s Department, estimates 51 

Civic Departments . 29 

Civic Estimates . 45 

Clearing House Statistics (Toronto). 213 

Clerk of Assize Offices . 40 

Clerk of the Peace Office . 39 

Committees, members and meetings . 24 

Consumers’ Gas Company . 107 

Controllers, addresses . 16 























219 


PAGE 

Controllers, vote cast for . 80 

Controllers, record of service . 20 

Convention and Tourist Association . 210 

Coroner’s Building . 42 

County Court Clerk’s Office . 39 

County Court Judge’s Chambers . 38 

Court and Judicial Officers . 38 

Court of Revision, estimates . 51 

Court of Revision, sittings of . 28 

Crown-Attorney’s Office . 41 

Daylight Saving—Dates of . 19 

Death Rate . 91 

Death Registration . 89 

Debenture Debt, statement of . 43, 44 

Debt Charges in Estimates . 45 

Division Court Clerk’s Offices . 40, 41 

Dominion Election, votes cast at . 74 

Election Day . 83 

Electric Light and Power, rates for. 191 

Estimates . 45 

Express Wagon Tariff . 150 

Exhibition: 

City Council representatives on . 26 

List of Directors and Officers.166, 167 

Days to be open . 167 

Statistics respecting . 168 




























220 


PAGE 

Family Court and Officers . 42 

Ferry Operation . 187 

Fire Department Personnel and Equip¬ 
ment .37, 131 

Fire Department, estimates . 54 

Fire Stations, location of . 133 

Fires, statistics of . 134 

Gas, rates for . 107 

Gas Main Mileage . 88 

General Courts and Inquests, estimates 

of . 53 

Grants, special . 48 

Governor of Jail . 36 

Harbour Commissioners (Toronto) . 177 

Harbour Commissioners, estimates . 64, 65 

Health Department . 33 

Health Department, estimates . 54 

Health Statistics . 91 

Hospitals, list of . 95 

House of Industry, City Council repre¬ 
sentatives on . 27 

Housing Commission, estimates . 64 

Humane Society . 214 

Hydro-Electric System (Toronto) . 190 

Income Tax, Provincial reimbursement 
re abolition of . 72 
























221 


PAGE 

Industrial Commission (Toronto) . 196 

Industrial Schools Association, City 

Council representatives on . 26 

Island Ferry Service, estimates . 63 

Island Water Rates . 129 

Judges, County Court . 38 

Juvenile Court and Offices (see Family 

Court) . 

Juvenile Court, estimates . 53 

King Edward VIII . Frontispiece 

King George V . Frontispiece 

Lane Mileage .. 87 

Law Department . 30 

Law Department, estimates . 51 

Legislation Committee, members and 

meetings . 25 

Library, public . 159 

License Fees, schedule of . 139 

Licenses, Fines and Fees, revenue from 68 

Life Saving Service, estimates . 65 

Light and Power Rates . 191 

Lighting, estimates . 57 

Local Board of Health, members and 

meetings . 25 

Local Improvement Works . 120 
























222 


PAGE 

Magistrates . 35 

Magistrates’ Courts and Offices . 34 

Magistrates’ Courts, estimates . 53 

Manufacturers’ Association (Canadian) 208 

Manufacturing Statistics . 209 

Marriage License Issuer, office of . 90 

Marriage Registration . 89 

Master of Titles . 42 

Massey Music Hall, City Council repre¬ 
sentatives on . 27 

Mayor’s Office, estimates of . 48 

Mayor, vote cast for . 80 

Mayor, record of service . 21 

Mayor’s Office . 29 

Mayors, list of . 11 

Men’s Farm (Langstaff P.O.) . 36 

Mothers’ Allowances, Toronto Board 202 

Motor Coach Service 186 

Municipal Abattoir (Toronto) . 34, 118 

Municipal Abattoir, estimates . 60 

Municipal Elections, change in date of 83 

Municipal Election Returns 80 

Municipal Farm . 36 

Nomination Day . 83 

Ontario Election, votes cast at . 77 

Ontario Municipal Association . 205 

Ontario Municipal Board 200 


























223 


PAGE 

Parks and Exhibitions Committee, 
members and meetings . 25 

Parks and Playgrounds . Ill 

Parks Department . 33 

Parks Department, estimates . 55 

Parliamentary Election Returns . 74 

Pavement Mileage . 87 

Penny Bank for Public School Pupils . 156 

Pensions Board (Toronto Old Age) . 200 

Pension Allowances and Grants . 64 

Petitions for Local Improvements . 120 

Playground Areas . 112 

Police Commissioners—Board of . 36 

Police Court, estimates . 53 

Police Officers . 36 

Police Department . 35, 36, 136 

Police Department, estimates . 56 

Police Stations, location of . 137 

Police Statistics . 136 

Population, statement of . 97 

Power and Light Rates . 191 

Property Committee, members and 

meetings . 24 

Property Department . 32 

Property Department, estimates . 56 

Public Buildings, estimates . 57 

Public Health . 90 


























224 


PAGE 

Public Library Board, matters relating 

to . 159 

City Council representatives on 26 

Public Libraries, estimates . 66 

Public Welfare Department . 34 

Public Welfare Department, estimates 52 

Radial Railway (City owned), esti¬ 
mates . 63 

Ratepayers’ Associations, Central 

Council . 211 

Recreation and Playgrounds, number 

of . 112 

Red Cross Society (Toronto Branch) 

City Council representatives on . 27 

Registry Office (City) . 42 

Retiring Allowances and Grants, esti¬ 
mates . 64 

Revenue from Taxation . 73 

Revenue, General, other than Taxation 68 

Roadway mileage . 87 

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair . 171 

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, esti¬ 
mates . 63, 72 

St. Michael’s Hospital, City Council 

representatives on . 26 

School, estimates . 66 


















225 


PAGE 

School Statistics (Public) . 153 

School Statistics (Separate) . 158 

School Penny Bank . 156 

Senators (Toronto) . 76 

Separate School Board, members and 

officials . 157 

Separate Schools, estimates . 67 

Sewer mileage . 87 

Sheriff’s Offices . 39 

Sidewalk mileage . 87 

Sight-seeing tours . 186 

Sinking Fund, statement of . 43 

Standing Committees, members of . 24 

Street Cleaning Department . 32 

Street Cleaning Department, estimates 58 

Street mileage . 87 

Street Railway Fares . 185 

Street Railway track mileage . 88 

Surrogate Court Registrar’s Office . 39 

Taxation, statement of . 99 

Taxes, dates for payment . 100 

Taxicab tariff . 145 

Taxicab, Zone map . 148-149 

Telephone Exchange, estimates . 51 

Toronto—Historical sketch of . 5 

Toronto and York Roads Commission 65, 175 

























226 


PAGE 

Toronto Branch, Canadian Red Cross 
Society, City Council representatives 
on . 27 

Toronto East General Hospital, City 

Council representatives on . 26 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners (see 
Harbour) . 

Toronto and York Highways Commis¬ 
sion, estimates . 65 

Toronto Clearing House . 213 

Toronto General Hospital, City Council 
representatives on . v . 26 

Toronto Hospital for Consumptives, 

City Council representatives on . 27 

Toronto Housing Company, City Coun¬ 
cil representatives on . 27 

Toronto Humane Society . 214 

Toronto Industrial Commission . 27, 196 

Toronto Old Age Pension Board 200 

Toronto Publicity Board . 212 

Toronto Western Hospital, City Council 

representatives on 26 

Tourist and Convention Association 210 

Transportation Commission (Toronto) 183 

Transportation track allowance, esti¬ 
mates . 65 

Trucks (Motor) Tariff 150 

















227 

PAGE 

Vital Statistics . 89 

Watermain mileage . 88 

Water Rates, schedule of . 126 

Water Rates, dates of payment of . 125 

Water Rates, revenue from . 72 

Water Works stations and equipment.... 122 

Water Works, estimates . 60 

Weather Records . 109 

Women’s College Hospital, City Council 

representatives on . 26 

Works Committee, members and meet¬ 
ings . 24 

Works Department . 31 

Works Department, estimates . 58 


York Roads Commission 


65, 175 

















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