Skip to main content

Full text of "MUNICIPAL HANDBOOK, 1960"

See other formats


GOV 

DOC. 










Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
University of Toronto 


https://archive.org/details/municipalhandboo00toro_23 


Government 

Publication! 


LIBRARY 

733051 ) 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 











CITY OF TORONTO 

'' 


1960 


^Municipal 

J4anaboolc 


COMPILED BY 

C. EDGAR NORRIS 

CITY CLERK 


nw 

fi l(!l CITY HALL BUSINESS HOURS 

I<£>o Monday to Friday—8.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 
Offices are closed all day Saturday 


PUBLIC HOLIDAYS IN TORONTO, 1960 

(a) New Year’s Day January 1 

(a) Good Friday....April 15 

(a) Easter Monday April 18 

(a) Victoria Day and 

Queen’s Birthday May 23 

(a) Dominion Day.July 1 

(b) Civic Holiday.August 1 

(a) Labour Day September 5 

(a) Thanksgiving Day October 10 

(a) Remembrance Day November 11 

(a) Christmas Day December 26 

(a) New Year's Day.January 2, 1961 

(a) Statutory holiday fixed by the Government of 
Canada. 

( b) Public holiday proclaimed by the City Council. 


Daylight Saving Time 1960 

Commences at 2 a.m., Sunday, April 24th, and 
Terminates at 2 a.m., Sunday, October 30th. 


EMERGENCY TELEPHONE CALLS 

Residents in Metropolitan Toronto may call 
EM. 1-1111 for the following Emergency 
Calls— 

FIRE POLICE AMBULANCE 

CIVIL DEFENCE 

HARBOUR POLICE (Life Saving Service) 


2 













FOREWORD 


This Municipal Handbook is compiled annually 
under the direction of the Council of the Corpora¬ 
tion of the City of Toronto to furnish the citizens 
of Toronto, and others, with official information 
relative to the administration of the City. It is 
presented in' the hope that its perusal may 
stimulate and encourage the citizens generally 
to take a greater interest in the communal life 
of their City and in good municipal government, 
which, in the last analysis, is the basis of sound 
democratic government. 

For the convenience of readers a municipal 
directory containing the names of members of 
Council, committees, boards and commissions, 
heads of departments, Metropolitan Council and 
committees, etc., has been included on coloured 
paper at the back of the handbook. 

A compilation of statistics on Toronto has been 
included on pages 279 to 291. Information 
pertaining to the Municipality of Metropolitan 
Toronto may be found on pages 240 to 253 
and 329 to 334. 


C. EDGAR NORRIS, 

City Clerk. 


Toronto, May 31, 1960. 


3 



MAYOR’S 

CHAIN OF OFFICE 

Presented to the City of 
1950 , 


Toronto on March 6 
by the representatives of 
nineteen Toronto business 
firms who had successfully 
survived more than one hundred 
years of competition and are still 
active and vigorous in business 
and in industry in the City of 
Toronto. In presenting the Chain 
of Office the representatives of 
the business firms requested that 
it be worn by the Mayor, for the 
time being, on all occasions in 
which he appears in his official 
capacity, as a mark of their 
pride in the City in which they 
live and in recognition of the 
i great responsibilities and , 
I great dignity which are k 
E attached to the office M 
of Chief Magistrate M 
2^k of the City of Mr 
Toronto. 





Civic Welcome to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and 
H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh, City Hall, June 29, 
1959. Mayor Nathan Phillips, Q.C., escorting Her 
Majesty to the platform. 













THE MAYOR OF TORONTO 
NATHAN PHILLIPS, Q.C 


Mayor Nathan Phillips, Q.C., son of the late Jacob 
Joseph and Mary Phillips, of Cornwall, Ontario, was born 
in Brockville, Ontario, on November 7th, 1 892. His maternal 
and paternal grand-parents immigrated to Canada almost 
a century ago, the former settling in the County of Glengarry, 
where the Mayor’s mother was born, and the latter settling 
in Ottawa. He received his early education in the Cornwall 
Public School and Collegiate, and on his 16th birthday, 
he was articled as a student at law. In 1 91 3, he graduated 
from Osgoode Hall as a Barrister-at-Law, and he has 
practised his profession in Toronto ever since. In 1 929, he 
was created a King’s Counsel. He was first elected to the 
Toronto City Council in 1924 as an Alderman for Ward 4, 
and served in that capacity for 28 consecutive years. In 
1955 he was elected Mayor and re-elected in 1956. 
Again in the years 1 957 and 1959 he was re-elected for 
two-year terms and is now serving his 6th year as Mayor 
and 34th year as a member of the Toronto City Council. 

Mayor Phillips married Esther Lyons, daughter of the 
late Jacob H. and Amelia Lyons, in 1917, and they have 
two children, Madeline (Mrs. Arthur G. Brodey of Sarnia), 
and Howard A. Phillips, Q.C., of Toronto, and eight grand¬ 
children. The latter are Michael Phillips Brodey, Jo-Ann 
Brodey, Gerald Lyons Brodey, John David Phillips, Linda 
Ruth Phillips, Jeffrey Mohr Phillips, James Grant Phillips 
and Lois Sandra Phillips. 


6 










MRS. JEAN D. NEWMAN, B.A. 
President of the Council and Vice- 
Chairman, Board of Control 

WM. R. ALLEN, Controller 



■ 




DONALD D. SUMMERVILLE, Controller 

WILLIAM DENNISON, Controller 






ALDERMEN 





KENNETH 
WATERS 
Ward 1 


MRS. MARGARET 
CAMPBELL, Q.C. 
Ward 2 


FRANCIS 
CHAMBERS, Q.C. 
Ward 4 


FRED 
BEAVIS 
Ward 1 



WILLIAM L. 
ARCHER 
Ward 3 



HERBERT 
ORLIFFE, Q.C. 
Ward 4 


MRS. MAY 
BIRCHARD 
Ward 2 


CHARLES 
TIDY 
Ward 3 


PHILIP G. 
GIVENS 
Ward 5 










ALDERMEN 





HAROLD 
MENZIES 
Ward 5 


W. FRANK 
CLIFTON 
Ward 6 


MRS. MAY 
ROBINSON 
Ward 6 



WM. C. 

DAVIDSON, Q.C. 
Ward 7 



MRS. MARY 
TEMPLE 
Ward 7 



ALEX 

HODGINS 
Ward 8 





ALBERT G. 
CRANHAM 
Ward 8 


FRANK L. 
NASH, Q.C. 
Ward 9 


KENNETH 
OSTRANDER 
Ward 9 







C. EDGAR NORRIS 
City Clerk 


12 







TORONTO IS A CHANGING CITY 


Its planners call it, “The Changing City”. And 
the great transition will continue in 1960 as 
civic government and private enterprise search 
for civic betterment . . . for new cultural out¬ 
lets . . . for adequate dwellings and for elbow 
room to allow for expansion of the city’s 
thriving commercial and industrial economy. 

Change will come partly to conform with 
Toronto’s role as the cultural heart of Metro¬ 
politan Toronto, partly to meet the new 
“cosmopolitan flavor” of Toronto. 

The theme for 1 960 will be CHANGE. And 
wherever one looks, one will find it. 

He will find it on the Civic Square where 
plans are being rushed to completion for the 
construction of the new City Hall, the ultra¬ 
modern seat of government and the focal point 
of community activity. 

City Council will approve these plans in 
1960; tenders will be prepared and the day of 
the historic decision to proceed with physical 
work will have arrived. 

This will touch off a chain reaction. 

The University Avenue Armouries will be razed 
and Metropolitan Toronto will erect a new 
court house on the site. 


13 


Toronto is a Changing City —Continued 


Stirred by government stimulation and private 
enterprise, the block on the south side of Queen 
Street, between Bay and York, will be re¬ 
developed. 

And after months of preparation, work will 
begin on the redevelopment of Moss Park. 

Even more dramatic will be the changes on 
University Avenue resulting from the construc¬ 
tion of the first stage of the east-west subway. 
As work proceeds, detours and temporary 
restrictions will make both the motorist and 
pedestrian aware of changes in the very heart 
of Toronto. 

A few blocks away, at Yonge and Front 
Streets, the long-awaited O’Keefe Civic Centre 
will have been opened, giving Toronto one of 
the finest auditoria on the continent. 

And while changes are actually being made, 
others will be in the planning stages. 

A special committee will take a close look 
at the waterfront, earmarking areas for industry 
and for play. Another committee, made up 
of the community’s top business leaders, will 
study redevelopment of the downtown area 
with a view to making it a better place in 
which to work and shop. 


14 


Toronto is a Changing City —Continued 

This year is election year and because Toronto 
voters decided to extend the civic franchise to 
all citizens, 21 years of age and older, more 
persons this year will be qualified to mark 
ballots than ever before. 

While Toronto looks forward with anticipation 
to 1960 and the years ahead, it also looks 
back with pride. 

It looks back to 1959, a significant year 
because it was the city’s 125th anniversary, 
enriched by the efforts of service clubs who, 
in co-operation with City Council, took part in a 
gala birthday dinner. 

It looks back, too, to that June day when 
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and Prince 
Philip stood on the bunting-draped platform 
outside City Hall and acknowledged the cheers 
of thousands of loyal subjects. 

And it was in 1 959 that the bulldozers and 
steamshovels bit into University Avenue, herald¬ 
ing the start of work on the east-west subway, 
the largest project ever undertaken by a 
Canadian municipality. 

Projects started in 1959 and carried on in 
1960 are not only symbols of change. They 
also represent the deep and abiding faith which 
Toronto holds in its future. 


15 











TORONTO’S NEW CITY HALL 


Toronto’s new City Hall and Civic Square 
moved closer to realization during 1 959. 

The now world-famous design was selected 
in April, 1958, as the winner of an international 
competition which attracted entries from 520 
architects from 42 countries. 

The winning design was that of Viljo Rewell 
of Helsinki, Finland, and his associates, Heikki 
Castren, Bengt Lundsten and Seppo Valjus. 

In April, 1959, City Council signed an agree¬ 
ment with the architect and his Toronto associates, 
John B. Parkin and John C. Parkin, to carry 
out the architectural commission. 

In November, 1959, the architects were 
authorized to proceed with the second stage of 
the project, including the preparation of working 
drawings and specifications to permit the calling 
of tenders early in 1961. 

With its combination of striking building 
design and generous provision for landscaped 
open space, the new City Hall and Square is 
expected to spark the redevelopment of land 
on all its sides and become a focal point of 
civic pride and interest. 

The Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto will 
share with the City of Toronto as joint occupants 
of the new building. 

17 

-<— Toronto's Proposed New City Hall 

Council Chamber Middle Centre 





Toronto’s New City Hall —Continued 


Here are some architectural and statistical 

highlights of the project: 

* The southern half of the 1 1-acre site is 
devoted to the Civic Square, which includes a 
pool reflecting both the old and new City 
Hails. From the Square there are two main 
entrances to the Hall: one, the public entrance 
into a large, round room where public business 
is transacted; and two, the ramped ceremonial 
entrance to the Council chamber. A three- 
storey podium covers the northern half of 
the site, containing the offices most generally 
used by the public, such as tax payment, 
City and County registry, land titles office, 
libraries, etc. 

• The saucer-shaped Council chamber is 
planned to accommodate the Mayor or Chair¬ 
man, distinguished guests, the Clerk, 30 
elected representatives, 20 Department 
Heads and the Press. There will also be 
public seating for 310 persons and provision 
for televising. Surrounding the unit is a 
gallery from which a good view of the Square 
and surrounding buildings can be obtained. 


18 


Toronto’s New City Hall —Continued 


• The two curved towers accommodating the 
various City and Metropolitan Departments 
rise from the podium on either side of the 
Council Chamber. The west tower consists 
of 20 floors, rising to a height of 240 feet, 
and the east tower, 26 floors, 300 feet above 
the podium. 

• Calculated cost of the project (1959) is 
$24,400,000, plus the architects’ fee. Esti¬ 
mated time for construction: three and a half 
to four years, from the time building is started. 


19 



CENTENARY OF THE QUEEN S OWN 
RIFLES OF CANADA 

OnT26th April, 1960, The Queen’s Own 
Rifles of Canada, one of Toronto’s oldest and 
most famous Militia Regiments, celebrates its 
one hundredth birthday. There have been no 
breaks in the continuity; no history or battle 
honours have been acquired by perpetuating 
disbanded militia units. Thus the occasion is 
unique, not only in the history of Toronto, but 
of Canada. 

The Queen’s Own carries no colours, dresses 
modestly in rifle green and adheres strictly 
to rifle tradition. What is “rifle tradition”? In 
the language of philosophy it is the military 
“essence” separated from the military “acci¬ 
dents”. To illustrate the “essence” it may be 
sufficient to note that rifle regiments were the 
first to encourage individual initiative as op¬ 
posed to robot-like mass movement; were the 


20 


Centenary of The Queen’s Own Rifles 

of Canada —Continued 

first to appreciate the value of concealment and 
dispersion, and were the first to apply generally 
the basic question, “What use is this in war?” 

It is of no small significance that the connota¬ 
tion of “rifles" is indelibly associated with 
Canada. The general descriptive term for our 
early militia was “rifles". The rifle philosophy 
appeals equally well to English-Canadian and 
French-Canadian. The term is historical and 
cohesive; the survival value is there. 

Merely existing for a hundred years does 
not make a regiment great. What makes it 
great is its record of service, both in peace and 
war; and the type of man to whom it appealed. 
From the beginning the history of Canada and 
the history of The Queen’s Own Rifles have been 
closely linked. Whenever the call came, the 
greenjackets were there. On some occasions 
there was no fighting. The St. Alban’s Raid, 
1864, and the Red River Expedition, 1870, are 
examples. More often though blood was shed; 
witness the Fenian Raids, 1866; the North-West 
Rebellion, 1885; the South African War, 1899- 
1900; World War I, 1914-1918; and World 
War II, 1939-1945. No matter how the con¬ 
tribution is summed up—in casualties, in the 
number who served, in battalions raised, in 


21 


Centenary of The Queen’s Own Rifles 
of Canada —Continued 

honours and awards—there is no regiment in 
Canada with a record remotely comparable 
to that of The Queen’s Own. 

Contributions to Toronto civic welfare started 
early. The regiment was called out in 1 8 75 
on the occasion of the Pilgrimage Riots; and 
in 1901 on the occasion of a strike on the street 
railway. On many occasions the medical sec¬ 
tion of The Queen’s Own was used and when 
special constables were required the Chief 
Magistrate expedited the matter by swearing 
in a hundred or so riflemen. It should be re¬ 
membered, too, that, in the days of old, the 
Church Parades, Inspections, Shooting Matches 
and Field Days were attended by thousands 
of citizens. The tie between the city and the 
regiment was very close. 

To list a fraction of the well known men who 
served would fill a book; but a representative 
sampling will make the point. The army is 
represented by Lt.-Gen. Sir W. D. Otter; the 
church by The Rt. Rev. F. H. Wilkinson, Bishop 
of Toronto; the judiciary by Sir William Mulock, 
Chief Justice of Ontario; the state by Governor- 
General Vincent Massey; finance by Sir Henry 
Pellatt; the university by Professor G. H. Needier 
—the list is unending. 


22 


Centenary of The Queen’s Own Rifles 

of Canada —Continued 

Today the regiment is represented by two 
battalions in the regular army, the reserve 
battalion in Toronto and the regimental depot 
at Calgary. Thus, stronger than ever and with 
a pardonable pride in past achievements, The 
Queen’s Own looks confidently towards the 
future. 

To celebrate this Centenary, Field Marshal 
Montgomery attended The Rifles Ball at the 
Royal York Hotel on April 29th. On the follow¬ 
ing day he proposed the toast to the Regiment 
at the 1 00th Anniversary Dinner, and on Sunday, 
May 1st took the Salute at the March Past 
following the Church Service at St. Paul’s Church. 

There was also a commemoration service at 
the Cenotaph in front of the City Hall at noon 
on the Anniversary date, April 26th. 


23 











THE O’KEEFE CENTRE FOR THE 
PERFORMING ARTS 


Toronto’s newest landmark, the O’Keefe 
Centre, is a large entertainment centre rising 
at the corner of Front and Yonge Streets, 
equipped to house musical comedies, revues, 
ballet, opera, drama, symphony, jazz concerts. 
Scheduled to open in the Autumn of 1960, 
O’Keefe Centre is the result of five years of 
planning and construction, an answer to Toronto’s 
need for an arts centre appropriate to a city 
of a million and a half population. 

Following the tradition of the brewing industry 
—notably in Britain and Europe—of fostering 
the arts, the O’Keefe Brewing Company has 
built the O’Keefe Centre, a non-profit enterprise, 
at a cost of $12,000,000. Its conception is 
both practical and aesthetic. Functionally, it is 
situated at the core of downtown Toronto, close 
to the Union Station and the subway, near to 
the hotels and shopping centres, bounded on 
south, north and east by parking areas. Its 
design is unmistakably theatre, distinguished by 
an emphasis on line and colour which gives 
the structure a grace and lightness completely 
interpretive of its purpose. 

Beyond the wide entrance is the main foyer 
running the width of the building and opening 
into spacious lounge areas which flank the 

25 

■4 — O'Keefe Centre — Corner Yonge and Front Streets 


O’Keefe Centre —Continued 


auditorium on three levels. Dominating the 
main foyer is an 100-foot mural painted by 
Canadian artist, R. York Wilson, R.C.A., O.S.A., 
a panorama of the Seven Lively Arts through 
the ages. 

The auditorium has a 1,000 seat balcony 
and a 2,200 seat main floor which is steeply 
raked. It is so designed that no patron is 
further than 124 feet from the stage. The 
house can be reduced to 1,100 seats by the 
drawing of an acoustic curtain in front of the 
balcony for more intimate productions. 

Everything has been done for the enjoyment 
of the patron. The entire building is air- 
conditioned and the seats in the auditorium, 
which are patterned after the Royal Festival 
Hall, in London, England, provide the greatest 
possible comfort. 

Stage floor area is 128 by 60 feet with a 
60 by 30 foot proscenium which can be reduced 
to 36 by 18 feet. Extensive stage receiving 
area, stage office and service elevator flank 
the stage on one side; dressing rooms and 
rehearsal hall on the other. 

The building has been constructed to exclude 
extraneous noises and provide the most favour¬ 
able acoustic conditions. Sound reinforcement 


26 


O’Keefe Centre —Continued 


systems are available whenever required. One 
of the unique features of the auditorium itself 
is the construction of the side walls consisting 
of sliding wood panels, which operate on a 
system of reflection and absorption. Their 
position controls the quality of sound through 
the range of a single human voice to a full 
orchestra. 

A mechanically elevated orchestra pit has 
space for fifty musicians. When larger orches¬ 
tras are required, the pit can be enlarged to 
accommodate an additional forty musicians on 
a level behind the orchestra pit and below the 
fore-stage. The orchestra pit also can be 
raised to form a twelve foot extension to the 
stage itself, or, at auditorium level, an extension 
of the auditorium, seating an extra 83 patrons. 
For orchestral performances on stage, a speci¬ 
ally designed acoustic shell can be lowered 
into position on stage to project sound into 
the auditorium. 

Backstage facilities provide a rehearsal hall 
built to stage scale, eight star dressing rooms 
and green room adjacent to the stage. Dres¬ 
sing rooms for 100 chorus members are situated 
one floor above stage level. Locker rooms and 
rehearsal rooms for orchestra members lie 
below stage level. 


27 


O’Keefe Centre —Continued 


The most up to date lighting is being installed 
to service every type of production . . . drama, 
films, concerts, ballet, opera and television. 
Stage lighting can be pre-set for as many as 
ten scenes through automatic control. 

Another unique aspect of the theatre is its 
equipment for radio and television broadcast¬ 
ing. Control and announcer rooms have been 
located in strategic places overlooking both 
stage and rehearsal areas. 

These are but a few of the features of 
O’Keefe Centre, core of Toronto’s entertain¬ 
ment life as the new City Hall will be the core 
of its political life. It is a mark of the coming 
of age of Canada’s large metropolis that Mayor 
Nathan Phillips should acknowledge the O’Keefe 
Centre in these terms:— 

“The O’Keefe Centre will provide pre¬ 
cisely the type of facility I have been calling 
for in Toronto. We have a population of 
many tastes, and all of them, I believe, want 
the best in entertainment and culture. Cer¬ 
tainly, this structure with its many unique 
features will meet these requirements whether 
they be for musical hits or symphony, jazz or 
opera, drama or ballet. I thank Mr. E. P. 
Taylor and his associates for providing this 
public-spirited, practical and much needed 
facility for the people of Toronto”. 


28 


GIFTS RECEIVED BY THE CORPORATION 


The following is a list of gifts and bequests 
received by the Corporation. This includes 
parks and playgrounds, recreational facilities 
and equipment of a permanent nature, also 
funds received and held in trust by the Cor¬ 
poration for a specified purpose. In the case 
of the trust funds the annual earnings only are 
expended for the purpose indicated. 

A list is also included of persons and organiza¬ 
tions making an annual donation to the Corpora¬ 
tion to provide trophies, prizes and gifts for 
children participating in the recreational pro¬ 
gram of the Department of Parks and Recreation. 

in addition to the gifts listed, the Corporation 
receives from public spirited citizens from time 
to time donations for various other purposes. 

Name of Donor and Gift Year 

John S. Howard 

High Park, 120 acres 1873 

Ontario Industrial Loan 

Bellwoods Park, 4.12 acres 1882 

Brown Memorial Fund 

For maintenance of memorial to the 

Honourable the late George Brown 1887 

J. P. Clark 

Carlton Park, 1.37 acres 1891 


29 




Name of Donor and Gift Year 


Cathedral of St. Alban The Martyr 

St. Albans Square, A 84 acres 1891 

Volunteer Memorial Fund 

For maintenance of memorial to the 
memory of Volunteers who lost their 
lives in the Fenian Raid 1868 1903 

Professor Goldwin Smith 

Grange Park, 5.86 acres 1910 

South African Volunteer Monument Fund 1915 

W. H. Cawthra 

Cawthra Playground, .47 acres 1922 

David Moncur 

Moncur AAemorial Park, .736 acres 1922 

Toronto Manor Estates Ltd. 

Glebe Manor Square, .89 acres 1922 

Mrs. Susie M. D. Massey 

Dentonia Park, 60 acres 1926 

F. G. Osier 

Craigleigh Gardens, 1 1 acres 1 926 

J. D. O’Connell Picnic Fund 

To provide outings and Christmas 

gifts for city orphans 1 927 

College Heights Association 

Peter Pan Statue, Avenue Road Sq. 1928 

H. H. Williams 

Fountain, Avenue Road Square 1929 


30 




Name of Donor and Gift Year 


Robert Burns Memorial Fund 

For maintenance of Robert Burns 

Memorial 1930 

Henry C. Stevens Fund 

To provide seats in parks 1935 

George H. Wallace 

Lawlor Ave. Playground, .42 acres 1 937 

Beaches Business Mens Association 

Memorial Fountain, Kew Gardens 1945 

Wm. T. Harris Estate 

Woodgreen Park, 25.937 acres 1951 

Beaches Lions Club 

Wading Pool, Kew Gardens 1953 

Fred S. Orpen 

Wading Pool, Dufferin Park 1954 

Beaches Lions Club 

Playground equipment, Kew Gardens 1954 
Mrs. Madge Hogarth 

Wading Pool, Moss Park 1956 

Kinsmen Club, East Toronto 

Playground equipment Moncur 

Playground 1956 

Mrs. Miriam Nightingale 

Drinking Fountain, High Park 1 957 

Mrs. Madge Hogarth 

Wading Pool, Pape Avenue 1 957 


31 




Name of Donor and Gift Year 


Beaches Lions Club 

Wading Pool, Woodbine Park 1958 

James Nicholson Bequest 

For the purchase of park benches and 

seats 1959 

C. F. Basil Tippet 

Wading Pool, Willowdale Park 1959 

R. W. McClain 

Rosetta McClain Park, 4.5 acres 1959 

City of Tokyo 

2,000 Japanese Cherry Trees 1959 

Ernest David Lott 

Ornamental drinking fountain 1960 


32 




List of persons and organizations making an 
annual donation to provide trophies, prizes and 
gifts for children participating in the recrea¬ 
tional program of the Department of Parks 
and Recreation. 

Canada Dry Ltd. 

Canadian Legion, Branch 66 

Fraternal Order of Eagles, Aerie No. 231 1 

Mr. Frank Dearlove 

Kinsmen Club, Toronto Central 

Kinsmen Club, West Toronto 

Mr. Allan J. Lawrence, M.P.P. 

Lions Club Central 

Hon. Roland J. Michener, Q.C., M.P. 

Mr. Earl W. Morris 
Moss Park Old Boys 
Parkdale Lions 
Mr. Harry J. Price, M.P.P. 

Mr. H. Stern 

Regent Park Old Boys 

Mr. George Taylor 

Ward 2 Businessmen's Association 

Hon. David J. Walker, Q.C., M.P, 

Mr. B. Walton 

Mr. George Wilson 

Hon. John Yaremko, Q.C., M.P.P. 


33 


CITY OF TORONTO 
AWARD OF MERIT 


On September 10, 1956, City Council 

established a policy of presenting Awards of 
Merit, in the form of a suitably inscribed 
medallion to persons who have attained dis¬ 
tinction and renown in various fields of en¬ 
deavour and to carry out this policy, City 
Council appointed a Committee representing 
various interests including music, education, 
community, business, labour, sports and press. 

In accordance with recommendations made 
by the Committee, Civic Awards of Merit have 
been presented by City Council to citizens for 
distinguished service as follows: 

Year of 

Award Name 

1958 Rt. Hon. Vincent Massey, P.C., C.H., 
Governor General of Canada 

1958 Charles H. Best, C.B.E., M.A., M.D., D.Sc. 

1958 Sigmund Samuel, LL.D. 

1958 Hon. Sidney E. Smith, Q.C., M.A., LL.D., 
D.C.L., D.Litt., F.R.S.C. 

1958 Healey Willan, Mus.D., LL.D., F.R.C.O. 

1 959 Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen, P.C., Q.C., B.A. 


34 




Year of 

Award Name 

1959 Lady Flora McCrea Eaton, LL.D. 

1959 Robert A. Laidlaw, LL.D. 

1959 Harry Isaac Price 

1959 Dr. Alexander Young Jackson 

1959 Leonard W. Brockington, C.M.G., Q.C., 
LL.D., D.C.L. 

1959 Hon. John Keiller Mackay, D.S.O., V.D., 
Q.C., LL.D., D.C.L., Lieutenant-Gover¬ 
nor, Province of Ontario. 

1959 Bessie Touzel 

1959 Edwin John Pratt, C.M.G., M.A., Ph.D., 

F.R.S.C., D.Litt., D.C.L., LL.D. 

1959 Waiter Lockhart Gordon, F.C.A. 

Prior to the appointment of the Committee, 
Awards of Merit were presented to Miss Marilyn 
Bell and Mr. Clifford Lumsdon, for their achieve¬ 
ments in marathon swimming. 


35 





Third from left — Frederick G. Gardiner Expressway leading to 
City from the west around Humber Bay. 







MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 
AND ELECTIONS 


The Government of the City of Toronto is 
vested in a Municipal Council under the pro¬ 
visions of The Municipal Act passed by the 
Government of the Province of Ontario. 

The Council is composed of the Mayor and 
four members of the Board of Control, elected 
by the voters at large, and eighteen Aldermen, 
elected from the nine wards into which the City 
is divided, two from each ward, making a total 
membership of 23. 

Legislation enacted at the 1 956 session of the 
Ontario Legislature provides that in the City of 
Toronto and the twelve area municipalities of 
Metropolitan Toronto, meetings of electors for 
the nomination of candidates for council and 
for any local board, any members of which are 
to be elected by ballot by the electors, shall be 
held in the year 1 956 and in every second year 
thereafter on the second Monday preceding the 
first Monday in December, that election day 
shall be the first Monday in December and the 
polls shall be open between 10.00 o’clock a.m. 
and 8.00 o’clock p.m. It also provides that 
before the first day of November during the 
year in which the election is to be held that a 
by-law shall be passed naming the place or 
places and time or times at which the nomina¬ 
tion meeting or meetings shall be held and that 
the members of council and of such local boards 


37 


Municipal Government —Continued 

shall hold office for a two-year term and until 
their successors are elected and the new council 
or board is organized. 

The Council, as a whole, is the legis¬ 
lative body of the Municipality and carries on 
its work through the Board of Control and the 
following Standing Committees, viz.: Committee 
on Public Works, Committee on Buildings and 
Development, Committee on Parks and Exhibi¬ 
tions, and Committee on Public Welfare, Fire 
and Legislation. 

The Board of Control is the executive 
body of Council and, as such, is responsible for 
the preparation of the annual estimates, the 
regulation and supervision of all matters re¬ 
lating to finances and expenditures, the con¬ 
sideration and revision of all by-laws and 
agreements that may be authorized by the 
Council; the supervision and control of all books, 
documents, vouchers and securities belonging to 
the Corporation; the renting or leasing of any 
property belonging to the Corporation; the pre¬ 
paration of specifications, calling for tenders 
and the awarding of all contracts for works, 
materials and supplies required by the Corpora¬ 
tion; the nomination to Council of heads of 
departments in case of a vacancy; the carrying 
on of public works authorized by Council and 
the general administration of the affairs of the 


38 


Municipal Government —Continued 

City, except as to the Department of Education 
which is under the control of the Board of 
Education elected by the voters biennially 
(similar to Council, two members elected from 
each of the nine wards in the City), 

The Council, without a two-thirds vote, cannot 
reverse or vary the action of the Board of 
Control in respect to tenders, when the effect 
of such vote would be to increase the cost of the 
work, or to award the contract to a tenderer 
other than the one to whom the Board has 
awarded it. The Municipal Act also provides 
that the Council shall not appropriate or expend 
any sum not provided for in the Estimates, or a 
supplementary Estimate approved and certified 
by the Board of Control without a two-thirds 
vote of Council. The Board of Control is 
vested with power to dismiss or suspend any 
Head of Department and forthwith report same 
to Council, and such official cannot be re¬ 
appointed or re-instated, without a two-thirds 
vote of Council. The Heads of Departments, 
under the provision of a by-law, have full power 
to dismiss, suspend or demote any subordinate 
officer, clerk or employee. 

All reports of Committees are submitted first 
to the Board of Control, and then transmitted by 
that body to the City Council together with 
recommendations regarding any amendments as 
the Board may deem advisable. 


39 


Municipal Government— Continued 

The Local Board of Health is a statutory 
body and not a Committee of Council. It derives 
its authority under the provisions of The Public 
Health Act. By an amendment to the said Act 
in 1943 it is provided that, in a city having a 
population of 100,000 or over, according to 
the enumeration of the assessors for the last pre¬ 
ceding year, the Council may by by-law provide 
that the local board shall consist of the Mayor, 
the Medical Officer of Health and five resident 
ratepayers, at least two of whom shall not be 
members of the Council, who shall be appointed 
annually by the Council at its first meeting in 
every year. 

Pursuant to the foregoing statutory authority, 
City Council on January 10, 1944, passed By¬ 
law No. 16064, which provides that the Local 
Board of Health of the City of Toronto shall 
consist of the Mayor, the Medical Officer of 
Health and five resident ratepayers, at least 
two of whom shall not be members of the 
Council, who shall be appointed annually by 
the Council at its first meeting in every year. 
Three of the five resident ratepayers appointed 
by the City Council, this year, were elected 
representatives, namely, Alderman Menzies, 
chairman; Alderman Ostrander, and Alderman 
Tidy, the other two resident ratepayers ap¬ 
pointed being Dr. E. A. Linell and Dr. C. C. 
Goldring. 


40 


Municipal Government —Continued 

The City Council, on December 10, 1945, on 
the recommendation of the Local Board of 
Health, approved of the establishment of a 
policy, that one of the five members to be 
appointed to the Local Board of Health by the 
City Council, shall be a nominee of the Academy 
of Medicine. 

The function of the Board is to give direction 
to the enforcement of the provisions of The 
Public Health Act and regulations, and of all 
civic by-laws of health import. 

INFORMATION RELATING TO 
MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS 

VOTERS’ LISTS 

The names of persons entitled to vote at 
Municipal Elections are entered on either the 
Municipal Voters' List compiled in accordance 
with the Voters’ List Act, 1951, as amended, or 
on the Resident Voters’ List prepared according 
to the Act providing for the extension of the 
Municipal Franchise. 

Every person shall be entitled to be entered 
on the Municipal Voters’ List who is, 

(a) of the full age of 21 years; 

(b) a British Subject by birth or naturalization; 

(c) not disqualified under The Municipal Act 
or otherwise by law prohibited from 
voting, and 


41 


Municipal Elections —Continued 

(d) rated or entitled to be rated for an 
amount of $400 on the last revised Assess¬ 
ment Roll of the City of Toronto, for land 
held in his or her own right as owner or 
tenant or who is the wife or husband of 
the person so rated or entitled to be 
rated for land as owner or tenant. 

{To be rated as a tenant of a domestic establishment 
it is necessary to occupy two or more rooms in which 
the occupants usually sleep and prepare and serve 
meals.) 

Every person shall be entitled to be entered 
on the Resident Voters’ List who, 

(a) is of the full age of 2 1 years on or before 
the 1st day of October in the year in 
which the Resident Voters’ List is prepared; 

(b) is a British Subject by birth or naturaliza¬ 
tion; 

(c) has resided in the municipality for the last 
twelve months next preceding the 1st day 
of January of the year in which the 
Resident Voters’ List is to be prepared; 

(d) is not entitled to be entered on the Voters’ 
List prepared under the Voters’ List Act, 
1951, and 

(e) is not disqualified under any Act or other¬ 
wise prohibited by law from voting. 

{Persons entered on the Resident's Voters' List are 
not entitled to vote for the Trustees to be elected to the 
School Boards.) 


42 


Municipal Elections —Continued 

The City Clerk, pursuant to the Voters’ List Act, 
causes to be inserted, once a week for three 
weeks in such daily newspapers published in 
the City as may be directed by the Judge, notice 
calling upon persons who are aware of errors 
or omissions in the Lists, or of any change by 
reason of death or removal of any person named 
therein, or of any person who has acquired the 
necessary qualifications as a voter since the 
return of final revision of the Assessment Roll 
for any Ward, to give notice of the same. The 
notice in the newspapers names a time and place 
at which the Judge will hold a Court for revising 
the Lists for the whole city. 

The notice given in the newspapers about the 
first of October in each year, as to the posting 
of the Voters’ Lists by the City Clerk, is the 
citizen’s last and final opportunity to have his 
name added to the Voters’ List. Fourteen days 
are allowed in which to examine the List and, if 
the same is not correct, to enter an appeal to 
have same corrected in accordance with the 
facts. It is the paramount duty of citizens to 
see that their name is included in the Voters’ 
List, and also to exercise their municipal fran¬ 
chise on Election Day, as a means of furthering 
the good government of their particular muni¬ 
cipality. 


43 


Municipal Elections —Continued 
VOTING ON QUESTIONS AND BY-LAWS 

The persons qualified to vote on a money by¬ 
law shall be those persons shown on the Voters’ 
List as (1) owners; (2) tenants whose lease 
extends for the time for which the debt is to be 
created or in which the money to be raised by 
the proposed by-law is payable, or for at least 
twenty-one years, and who have by the lease 
covenanted to pay all municipal taxes in respect 
of the property, other than local improvement 
rates, provided they make and file with the 
City Clerk not later than the tenth day before 
the day appointed for taking the vote, a de¬ 
claration under the Canada Evidence Act, so 
stating; (3) the nominee of a corporation 
assessed upon the last revised roll as owner or 
lessee of property provided the said corpora¬ 
tion, not later than the tenth day before the 
time appointed for taking the vote, files with 
the Clerk an appointment in writing of a person 
to vote as its nominee and on its behalf. 

In a city divided into wards, a voter shall be 
entitled to vote on a money by-law in each ward 
in which he has prescribed qualification, but 
shall not be entitled to vote more than once on 
any other by-law or on any question submitted 
to the electors, unless it is otherwise provided 
by the Act, by-law or other authority under 
which the vote is taken. 


44 


Municipal Elections —Continued 

QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED TO BE 
ELECTED AS A MEMBER OF 
CITY COUNCIL 

Section 55 of The Municipal Act provides, in 
part, as follows: 

(1) Every person shall be qualified to be 

elected a member of the council of a 

local municipality, who,— 

(a) is a householder residing in the muni¬ 
cipality, or is rated on the last revised 
assessment roll of the municipality for 
land held in his own right for an 
amount sufficient to entitle him to be 
entered on the voters’ list and resides 
in or within five miles of the muni¬ 
cipality or is the wife of a house¬ 
holder and who resides in or within 
five miles of the municipality; 

(b) is entered on the last revised voters’ 
list as qualified to vote at municipal 
elections; 

(c) is a British Subject and has taken the 
oath of allegiance (Form 2A); 

(d) is of the full age of twenty-one years, 
and 

(e) is not disqualified under this or any 
other Act. 


45 


Municipal Elections —Continued 

QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED TO BE 
ELECTED A TRUSTEE OF THE 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Any ratepayer entered on the last revised 
Assessment Roll as a Public School supporter for 
the City of Toronto or who is the husband or 
wife of a person assessed as actual owner or 
tenant of lands in the said City for an amount 
sufficient to entitle him or her to vote at muni¬ 
cipal elections who is a British Subject and who 
resides in the municipality or within five miles 
of its boundaries and who is of the full age of 
twenty-one years and not disqualified may be 
elected a trustee of the Board of Education. 

The Public Schools Act provides that for every 
ward into which an urban municipality is divided 
there shall be two trustees. 

ELECTION OF TRUSTEES 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Every person named in the last revised voters’ 
list as being entitled to vote at municipal elec¬ 
tions shall be entitled to vote at the election for 
trustees, Board of Education for the City of 
Toronto, excepting persons who are assessed as 
supporters of separate schools and persons who 
are entered on such voters’ list by reason of 
being the wife or husband of a person assessed 
as a supporter of separate schools. 


46 


Municipal Elections —Continued 

In Toronto, the several meetings for the 
nomination of candidates for trustees, Board of 
Education, are held in each of the nine respective 
wards in the City at the same time and place as 
the meeting for the nomination of municipal 
candidates for the office of Alderman, and the 
elections are conducted in the same manner and 
at the same time as municipal elections. 

MUNICIPAL ELECTION STATISTICS 

Number entered on 1959 Voters’ List 

Owners. 152,448 

Tenants and Municipal Franchise 

Voters. 1 85,097 


Total Number Names on Voters’ List 337,545 

Percentage and No. of Electors Voting 


Year 

Per cent. 

No. 

1950 

46.55 

176,255 

1951 

46.79 

177,371 

1952 

42.89 

160,508 

1953 

35.1 1 

127,881 

1954 

30.24 

106,230 

1955 

35.45 

122,087 

1956 

31.31 

104,721 

1957 

29.6 

98,308 

1959-60 

31.3 

105,601 


47 






Municipal Elections— Continued 

PERCENTAGE OF ELECTORS VOTING 
BY WARDS 


Ward 

1957 

1959 


% 

% 

1 

29 

29.4 

2 

28 

30.8 

3 

24.5 

27.8 

4 

24.4 

27.1 

5 

25.6 

30.9 

6 

28.1 

27.2 

7 

30.6 

31.7 

8 

31.1 

33.4 

9 

40.4 

40.4 


29.6% 

31.3% 


MAYORS OF TORONTO 

Note: From 1 834 to 1 858 and from 1 867 to 
1873, inclusive, the Mayor was chosen by 
Council from among its membership; and from 
1 859 to 1 866, inclusive, and from 1 874 onward, 
the Mayor was elected by general vote. 

Mayors Chosen by Council 

1834 William Lyon Mackenzie. 

1835 Robert Baldwin Sullivan. 


48 














Mayors of Toronto —Continued 

1836 Thomas D. Morrison. 

1 837 George Gurnett. 

1838-1840 John Powell. 

1841 George Munro. 

1842-1844 Hon. Henry Sherwood. 
1845-1847 William Henry Boulton. 
1848-1850 George Gurnett. 

1851—1853 John George Bowes. 

1 854 Joshua George Beard. 

John Beverly Robinson, President. 

1 855 George William Allan. 

1856 John Beverly Robinson. 

1857 John Hutchinson. 

1 858 William Henry Boulton. 

David Breckenridge Read. 

Mayors Elected by General Vote 
1859 Adam Wilson. 

1 860 Adam Wilson. 

John Carr, President. 

1861-1863 John George Bowes. 

1 864-1 866 Francis H. Medcalf. 

Mayors Chosen by Council 
1867—1868 James E. Smith. 

1 869 Samuel Bickerton Harman. 

1 870 Samuel Bickerton Harman. 

D’Arcy Boulton, President. 
1871-1872 Joseph Sheard. 

1873 Alexander Manning. 

Mayors Elected by General Vote 
1 874 Francis H. Medcalf. 


49 



Mayors of Toronto —Continued 

1875 Francis H. Medcalf. 

John Baxter, President. 

1876 Angus Morrison. 

1 877 Angus Morrison. 

Patrick G. Close, President. 

1878 Angus Morrison. 

1879-1880 James Beaty, Jr. 

1881-1882 William Barclay McMurrich. 
1883-1884 Arthur Radcliffe Boswell. 

1 885 Alexander Manning. 

1886-1887 William Holmes Howland. 

1888 Edward Frederick Clarke. 

1889 Edward Frederick Clarke. 

John McMillan, President. 

1890-1891 Edward Frederick Clarke. 

1 892—1 893 Robert John Fleming. 

1894 Warring Kennedy. 

1895 Warring Kennedy. 

John Shaw, President. 

1 896 Robert John Fleming. 

1 897 Robert John Fleming. 

John Shaw. 

1898-1899 John Shaw. 

1900 Ernest Albert Macdonald. 
1901-1902 Oliver A. Howland. 
1903-1905 Thomas Urquhart. 
1906-1907 Emerson Coatsworth. 

1908 Joseph Oliver. 

1 909 Joseph Oliver. 

John J. Ward, President. 


50 


Mayors of Toronto— Continued 

1910 George Reginald Geary. 

John J. Ward, President. 

1911 George Reginald Geary. 

Francis S. Spence, President. 

George Reginald Geary. 

1912 ^Horatio C. Hocken. 

Thomas L. Church, President. 

^Appointed Mayor October 21, 1912, vice 
G. R. Geary, resigned. 

1913—1914 Horatio C. Hocken. 

1915—1921 Thomas Langton Church. 
1922—1923 Charles Alfred Maguire. 

1924 William W. Hiltz. 

1925-1927 Thomas Foster. 

1928 Samuel McBride. 

Joseph Gibbons, President. 

1929 Samuel McBride. 

1930 Bert S. Wemp. 

1931-1 934 William J. Stewart. 

J. Geo. Ramsden, President (1 934) 
1 935 James Simpson. 

Samuel McBride, President. 

1 936 Samuel McBride. 

*Wi!liam D. Robbins, President, 
^Appointed Mayor November 14, 1936, vice 
Samuel McBride, deceased. 

1937 William D. Robbins. 

Ralph C. Day, President. 

1 938-1 940 Ralph C. Day. 

Wm. J. Wadsworth, President 
(1938), 


51 


Mayors of Toronto —Continued 


1941-1944 


Fred J. Conboy. 

Lewis Duncan, President (1943). 
Robert H. Saunders, President 
(1944). 


Robert H. Saunders. 

David A. Balfour, President 
(1945). 

*Hiram E. McCallum, President 
(1946-1948). 

I fNathan Phillips (1948). 

^Appointed Mayor February 23, 1948, vice 
Robert H. Saunders, resigned. 

fAppointed President March 9, 1948, vice 
Hiram E. McCallum, appointed Mayor. 

1949-1951 Hiram E. McCallum. 

John M. Innes, President. 

Allan A. Lamport. 

1952—1954 *Leslie H. Saunders, President. 

l^tFord G. Brand, President. 
^Appointed Mayor June 28, 1954, vice 
Allan A. Lamport, resigned. 

fAppointed President June 28, 1954, vice 
Leslie H. Saunders, appointed Mayor. 

Nathan Phillips, Q.C. 

Ford G. Brand, President 
1955-1960 (1955-1956). 

Mrs. Jean D. Newman, B.A., 
President (1957-1960). 


52 


SERVICE RECORD 
OF MEMBERS OF COUNCIL 

William R. Allan— 

Alderman, Ward 1, 1950-1955 (incL). 
Controller, 1956-1960 (incl.). 

William L. Archer— 

Alderman, Ward 3, 1959-1960. 

Fred Beavis—- 

Alderman, Ward 1, 1957-1960 (incl.). 

May Birchard (Mrs.)— 

Alderman, Ward 2, 1946, 1957-1960 (incl.). 
Margaret Campbell, Q.C. (Mrs.)— 

Alderman, Ward 2, 1959-1960. 

Francis Chambers, Q.C.— 

Alderman, Ward 4, 1951-1953, 1956-1960 
(incl.). 

W. Frank Clifton— 

Alderman, Ward 6, 1947-1949, 1953-1960 
(incl.). 

Albert G. Cranham— 

Alderman, Ward 8, 1956-1960 (incl.). 
William C. Davidson, Q.C.—- 

Alderman, Ward 7, 1926, 1942, *1948, 
1950-1960 (incl.). 

*Effective March 1, vice Edward C. Roelofson, 
resigned. 

William Dennison— 

Alderman, Ward 2, 1941, 1943, 1953-1958 
(incl.). 

Controller, 1959-1960. 

Philip G. Givens— 

Alderman, Ward 5, 1952-1960 (incl.). 


53 


Service Record —Continued 


Alex, Hodgins— 

Alderman, Ward 8, 1951-1955 (incl.), 1959- 
1960. 

Harold Menzies— 

Alderman, Ward 5, 1956-1960 (incl.). 

Frank L. Nash, Q.C.— 

Alderman, Ward 9, 1949-1951, 1956-1960 
(incl.). 

jean D. Newman, B.A. (Mrs.)— 

Alderman, Ward 9, 1955-1956 (incl.). 
Controller, 1957-1960 (incl.). 

Herbert Orliffe, Q.C.— 

Alderman, Ward 4, 1954-1960 (incl.). 
Kenneth Ostrander—- 

Alderman, Ward 9, 1957-1960 (incl.). 
Nathan Phillips, Q.C.— 

Alderman, Ward 4, 1924-1951 (incl.). 
Mayor, 1955-1960 (incl.). 

May Robinson (Mrs.)— 

Alderman, Ward 6, 1952-1960 (incl.). 

Donald D. Summerville— 

Alderman, Ward 8, 1955-1958 (incl.). 
Controller, 1959-1960. 

Mary Temple (Mrs.)—- 

Alderman, Ward 7, 1959-1960. 

Charles Tidy—- 

Alderman, Ward 3, 1959-1960. 

Kenneth G. Waters— 

Alderman, Ward 1, 1953-1960 (incl.). 


54 


POPULATION — AS RETURNED BY 
ASSESSMENT COMMISSIONER 


1834 Act of Incorporation_ 9,254 

March 6, 1934 

1934 Centennial Year 629,285 

POPULATION—LAST TEN YEARS 

1950 . 667,487 

1951 . 653,499 

(1951 Dominion Census 675,754) 

1952 . 667,364 

1953 . 665,502 

1954 . 682,415 

1955 . 681,857 

1956 . 643,791 

(1956 Dominion Census 667,706) 

1957 658,250 

1958 . 658,420 

1959 653,404 

POPULATION, 1959 —BY WARDS 

Ward 1 71,160 

Ward 2. 63,859 

Ward 3 40,348 

Ward 4 63,563 

Ward 5 90,151 

Ward 6 120,578 

Ward 7 51,114 

Ward 8 81,905 

Ward 9 70,635 

Public Utilities 91 


55 




































GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 
Seat of Government—Ottawa 

Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief: 

His Excellency The Honourable Maj.-Gen. 
George P. Vanier, D.S.O., M.C., C.D. 

Prime Minister and President of the Queen’s 
Privy Council for Canada: 

The Right Honourable John G. Diefenbaker, 
P.C., LL.B., LL.D., D.C.L., Q.C. 

Members of the Senate Residing 
in or near Toronto 

(Listed according to Seniority) 

The Honourable Salter A. Hayden, Q.C., 

140 Heath Street West. 

The Honourable William R. Davies, 

5 Hawthorne Gardens. 

The Honourable G. Peter Campbell, Q.C., 

39 Deer Park Crescent. 

The Honourable Arthur W. Roebuck, Q.C., 

35 Inglewood Drive. 

The Honourable Allan L. Woodrow, 

240 Oriole Parkway. 

The Honourable David A. Croll, Q.C., 

1 603 Bathurst Street. 

The Honourable Thomas D’Arcy Leonard, 

10 Meredith Crescent. 

The Honourable Wm. R. Brunt, 

1 1 Hilltop Road. 

The Honourable Joseph A. Sullivan, 

1 1 Mason Boulevard. 


56 


HOUSE OF COMMONS, CANADA 
Toronto and District Members 


Broadview 

Hon. George Harris Hees 

Danforth 

Robert Hardy Small 

Davenport 

M. Douglas Morton 

Eglinton - 

Hon. Donald Methuen 
Fleming, Q.C. 

Greenwood - 

Hon. J. M. Macdonnell 

High Park 

John W. Kucherepa, M.D. 

Parkdale 

Arthur Maloney 

Rosedale 

David J. Walker 

St. Paul’s 

Hon. D. Rolland Michener, 
Q.C 

Spadina 

Charles E. Rea 

Trinity 

Paul T. Hellyer 

York East 

Robert Henry McGregor 

York North 

C. A. Cathers 

York South 

William G. Beech 

York West 

John B. Hamilton, Q.C. 

York Centre - 

F. C. Stinson 

York-Humber 

Margaret Aitken 

York-Scarborough 

Frank C. McGee 


57 


PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 
Executive Council 

Lieutenant-Governor —- The Honourable John 
Keiller Mackay, D.S.O., V.D., Q.C., D.C.L., LL.D. 

Prime Minister and President of the Council — 
Hon. Leslie M. Frost, Q.C., LL.D., D.C.L. 

Provincial Treasurer — Hon. James N. Allan. 

Minister of Highways — Hon. Frederick M. Cass, 
Q.C. 

Attorney-General — 

Hon. A. Kelso Roberts, Q.C., LL.D. 

Minister of Municipal Affairs —- 

Hon. William K. Warrender, Q.C., LL.B. 

Minister of Labour—Hon. Charles Daley. 

Provincial Secretary, Registrar and Minister of 
Transport— Hon. John Yaremko, Q.C. 

Minister of Public Welfare — Hon. Louis P. 
Cecile, Q.C., LL.D. 

Minister of Public Works — Hon. Ray Connell. 

Minister of Travel and Publicity — 

Hon. Bryan L. Cathcart. 

Minister of Lands and Forests — 

Hon. J. W. Spooner. 


58 


Province of Ontario —Continued 
Executive Council 

Minister of Health — 

Hon. Matthew B. Dymond, M.D. 

Minister of Reform Institutions — 

Hon. George C. Wardrope. 

Minister of Education — 

Hon. John P. Robarts, Q.C. 

Minister of Agriculture — 

Hon. William A. Goodfellow. 

Minister of Mines—- 

Hon. James A. Maloney, Q.C. 

Minister of Planning and Development — 
Hon. William M. Nickle, Q.C. 

Minister of Energy Resources and 2nd Vice 
Chairman, H.E.P.C.— 

Hon. Robert Macaulay, Q.C. 

Minister without Portfolio—-Hon. John Root. 

Minister without Portfolio —• 

Hon. Wm. J. Dunlop, B.A., B.Paed., LL.D. 


59 


Province of Ontario —Continued 

Legislative Assembly of Ontario 
Toronto and York Members 

Beaches.Collings, Wm.H.(P.C) 

Bellwoods Yaremko, Hon. John R. (P.C.) 

Bracondale.Gould, Joseph (L.) 

Dovercourt. Thompson, Andrew E. (L.) 

Eglinton. Dunlop, Hon. Wm. J. (P.C.) 

High Park. Cowling, Alfred H. (P.C.) 

Parkdale .Trotter, James (L.) 

Riverdale Macaulay, Hon. Robert (P.C.) 

St. Andrew Grossman, Allan (P.C.) 

St. David Price, H. J. (P.C.) 

St. George Lawrence, Allan F. (P.C) 

St. Patrick Roberts, Hon. Kelso A. (P.C.) 

Woodbine Bryden, Kenneth (C.C.F.) 

York Centre Singer, Vernon M. (L.) 

York East Beckett, Hollis E. (P.C.) 

York-Humber Lewis, W. Bev. (P.C.) 

York North Mackenzie, A. Alexander (P.C.) 
York-Scarborough Sutton, Richard E. (P.C.) 
York South MacDonald, Donald C. (C.C.F.) 

York West Rowntree, H. Leslie (P.C.) 


60 
























MAYOR’S DEPARTMENT 


The Mayor being the chief Executive Officer 
of the Corporation, his office assumes a very 
important place in the organization of the Civic 
Administration and is under the direction of the 
Executive Assistant. 

His Worship as the Head of the City Council 
and Chairman of the Board of Control (the 
Executive body of the City Government) is 
responsible for the direction and control of all 
Civic Departments in the Municipal Corporation. 
To assist in accomplishing this, and to relieve 
the Mayor of many of the duties in this respect, 
the Executive Assistant has authority, under 
appointment of Council, to maintain a measure 
of supervision over the Departments in order to 
secure co-ordination and co-operation, and, for 
this purpose, to convene meetings of the various 
Department Heads. He is authorized to act on 
behalf of the Mayor on any matters pertaining 
to Civic business. 

The functions of the Mayor’s Department are 
varied and important. It exercises general sup¬ 
ervision over all Civic Departments, and, on the 
other hand, is the focal point of contact with the 
ratepayers and citizens generally. The main¬ 
taining of public relations and keeping the pub¬ 
lic informed on matters of Civic policy and 
importance, come within the purview of the 
Mayor and his office. One popular means of 


61 


Mayor’s Department —Continued 

doing this is through the Mayor’s weekly radio 
broadcast “The Mayor Reports to the People”. 

The Mayor is, by virtue of his office, a member 
of a number of Boards and Commissions, in¬ 
cluding among others,— 

All Standing and Special Civic Committees 
(Ex-Officio), 

The Local Board of Health, 

The Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto 
Council and Executive, 

The Metropolitan Board of Commissioners of 
Police, 

The Toronto Electric Commissioners, 

The City of Toronto and Metropolitan Toronto 
Planning Boards, 

The Canadian National Exhibition (Board of 
Directors), 

The Metropolitan Toronto Convention and 
Visitor Association 
(Honorary Vice-President), 

The Consumers’ Gas Company (Board of 
Directors). 

Close liaison is maintained with the Canadian 
Federation of Mayors and Municipalities and 
the Ontario Association of Mayors and Reeves; 
the Mayor being a member of the National 
Executive and the National Advisory Board of 
the former organization, and President of the 
latter organization. 


62 


Mayor’s Department —Continued 


Close contact is also maintained with the 
Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto and the 
Executive Assistant is Chairman of the Com¬ 
mittee of Department Heads on Metropolitan 
Matters, responsible for negotiating the service 
agreement between the two Municipalities. 

The Mayor’s Department has certain statutory 
duties with regard to consideration and issuance 
of hundreds of permits for raffles and draws 
under the Criminal Code and is charged with 
issuance of permits under the Children’s Pro¬ 
tection Act. 

TORONTO MUNICIPAL ABATTOIR 

This Department is primarily a public health 
institution, in that it provides a service to the 
public for the slaughter of food animals under 
rigid sanitary conditions, supervised by the 
Federal Department of Agriculture. 

Its four buildings, located at the foot of 
Tecumseth Street on the Canadian National 
Railway, provide livestock pens for the shelter 
and care of approximately 1,000 animals while 
awaiting slaughter. The main buildings contain 
six slaughter beds, a casing room, rendering 
department, dressed meat coolers, hide room, 
boiler and engine rooms for a large refrigera¬ 
tion plant, and office accommodation. There 


63 


Toronto Municipal Abattoir— Continued 


is also a public cold storage warehouse where 
food products in small or large quantities may 


be stored. 


Slaughter House 

Record 1959 

Cattle 

64,064 

Calves 

18,632 

Sheep and Lambs 

4,057 

Hogs 

20,872 


107,625 


64 









DEPARTMENT OF AUDIT 


The statutory duties of the City Auditor are 
set out in the City of Toronto Act of 1 909, Sec¬ 
tion 2, The Municipal Act, R.S.O. 1 950, Chapter 
243, Sections 245 to 249, The Department of 
Municipal Affairs Act, R.S.O. 1950, Chapter 96, 
Section 9, and Duties and Instructions to Muni¬ 
cipal Auditors issued by the Department of 
Municipal Affairs. 

These duties comprise:— 

The audit of the books and accounts of the 
City, comprising the centralized accounts of the 
Treasury Department, including its waterworks 
and other taxation revenue divisions and, also, 
the various operating and service departments 
of the Corporation, upon which it is required to 
prepare an annual report and certify the 
accounts to the ratepayers, which report is 
deposited with the Provincial Department of 
Municipal Affairs, together with reports on the 
undermentioned affiliated civic bodies. All 
such reports are sent to the Board of Control 
and forwarded by the Board to City Council. 

The audit of the books and accounts of 
affiliate civic bodies, these being: 

1 1 Boards and Commissions, 

10 Bodies with agency or other operational 
functions, 

2 Pension Funds for civic employees, 


65 


Department of Audit —Continued 
1 Hospital, 

The Funded Debt of the City, 

1 5 Day Care and Nursery Centres, as well as 
all charitable organizations to which the 
City pays per diem rates or makes 
grants thereto, including those for 
which accounts are rendered to the 
Provincial Department of Welfare for 
grants towards the cost of relief and 
welfare services. 

The certification of all financial statements in 
connection with any of the foregoing City or 
outside bodies which any Department of the 
Provincial Government require to be certified 
by the City Auditor. 

As provided for by the City of Toronto Act of 
1909, the prepayment audit of invoices and 
paysheets of the City Departments, which are 
examined for the purpose of ascertaining that 
payments comply with the statutes, the by-laws 
of the City Council and the reports of Board of 
Control, and that funds have been provided 
therefor either in the annua! estimates or in 
supplementary appropriations or in the money 
by-laws; and in connection with cheques drawn 
by the City Treasurer in their payment, the 
countersigning of these cheques. 


66 


DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS 
AND DEVELOPMENT 


The Department of Buildings and Develop¬ 
ment has charge of the following: 

1. The examination of Plans, and issuing of 
permits for all buildings; Heating and 
Plumbing installations. 

2. The licensing of Passenger Elevators. 

3. The licensing of Dry Cleaning Plants, Press 
Shops and Receiving Depots. 

4. The inspection and supervision of all 
Signs, Canopies and Fire Escapes over 
Public Property. 

5 . The inspection of new and existing build¬ 
ings for compliance with the Building By¬ 
law and Standard of Housing By-law. 

6. The enforcement of the Zoning and Res¬ 
trictive By-laws. 

7. The enforcement of the Fence By-law. 

During the past year 1 1 1 licenses were issued 
for the operation of Dry Cleaning Plants. 1 1 4 
licenses were issued for Dry Cleaning Plant 
Branches and 307 licenses were issued for dry 
cleaning depots. 276 licenses were issued for 
Spotting and Stain Removing establishments 
including Fur Cleaning firms. 


67 


Department of Buildings —Continued 


5,668 permits were issued in 1959 for build¬ 
ings erected or altered at a cost of $106,561,- 

674. 

Licenses were granted for the operation of 
1,626 Passenger Elevators. 


Total Revenue for the Year 1959 

Sign Inspection Fees.$ 48,958.82 

Elevator Licenses and Permits 1 6,640,00 

Dry Cleaning Licenses 17,380.00 

Fire Escape Inspection Fees.. 2,845.00 

Canopy Encroachment Fees 9,792.78 

Plan Examination Fees. 161,403.77 

Miscellaneous. 65.00 

Heating 2,073.00 

Plumbing 6,476.00 

Total .$265,634.37 


68 













BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FOR THE 
PAST THIRTY YEARS 


Year 

No. of 
Permits 
Issued 

No. of 
Structures 
Erected 

Value 

$ 

1930 

7,812 

9,925 

30,095,589 

1931 

6,832 

8,646 

19,009,985 

1932 

4,969 

5,686 

6,919,550 

1933 

4,060 

4,450 

4,282,090 

1934 

4,656 

5,283 

7,378,772 

1935 

4,467 

5,175 

9,905,455 

1936 

4,635 

5,501 

8,1 14,799 

1937 

5,217 

5,969 

1 1,238,900 

1938 

4,875 

5,645 

8,494,340 

1939 

5,667 

6,280 

10,285,707 

1940 

5,146 

5,935 

10,592,743 

1941 

4,802 

5,416 

9,136,405 

1942 

3,434 

3,656 

7,660,940 

1943 

3,235 

3,573 

6,218,410 

1944 

3,388 

3,665 

7,714,193 

1945 

4,615 

4,839 

12,782,152 

1946 

1 1,242 

12,936 

22,232,626 

1947 

9,130 

10,192 

32,330,835 

1948 

6,1 10 

6,823 

32,292,837 

1949 

8,679 

9,823 

36,483,147 

1950 

1 1,526 

12,476 

55,251,801 

1951 

8,731 

9,441 

47,109,215 

1952 

8,254 

9,061 

43,721,487 

1953 

8,791 

9,362 

80,754,632 

1954 

8,079 

8,406 

86,204,086 

1955 

8,487 

8,908 

76,395,91 1 

1956 

7,512 

7,591 

87,472,264 

1957 

7,160 

7,429 

121,067,582 

1958 

5,878 

6,174 

108,934,620 

1959 

5,668 

5,872 

106,561,674 















DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY CLERK 


The Municipal Act requires the Council of the 
Municipality to appoint a Clerk, and the duties 
required to be performed by the Clerk are set 
out in various statutes. The City Clerk is the 
Secretary to the City Council and he is required 
to record all resolutions, decisions and other 
proceedings of the Council. He also has charge 
of all original by-laws passed by the Council. 

The City Clerk’s Department comprises an 
Administrative Division, an Elections and Court 
of Revision Division, and a Records Unit. 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION 

The Administrative Division comprises three 
units: Secretariat to the Board of Control and 
Committees of Council, Clerical and Public 
Information Sections. 

The secretarial staff look after all the secre¬ 
tarial requirements of the Board of Control, 
Standing Committees of the Council, the Local 
Board of Health and Special Committees. They 
record the decisions of these respective bodies 
in minute form; write the communications carrying 
the directives of these bodies; prepare the 
Reports for consideration of City Council and 
prepare the agendas of the meetings and submit 
communications and other material for con¬ 
sideration by these Boards and Committee? 


70 


Department of the City Clerk —Continued 

The staff of this Division will also compile 
progress reports from information received from 
the Civic Departments on the activities of the 
Departments, which reports will be supplied to 
the Members of Council. 

Public Information Section 

The Public Information Section assists in 
arranging public receptions, presentations and 
other social functions; assists elected officials in 
the preparation of non-political public addresses 
when requested; edits and places all City adver¬ 
tising; receives and distributes all mail and 
material addressed to the City Clerk’s Depart¬ 
ment; provides general information to and 
receives complaints from the public; and per¬ 
forms related work as assigned. 

Clerical Section 

The Clerical Section records births, marriages 
and deaths and issues marriage licenses; pro¬ 
vides stenographic and clerical staff as required 
to the Controllers, Aldermen and the divisions 
of the Department; operates a central mailing 
depot for the benefit of all departments; pro¬ 
vides quick printing and reproduction service to 
the various divisions of the Department and to 
the other administrative departments of the City 
by means of Multilith and Xerography processes. 


71 


Department of the City Clerk —Continued 

Records Unit 

The Records Unit will operate under an 
archivist who will be responsible to the City 
Clerk and will establish and maintain, in col¬ 
laboration with other civic departments, records 
retention and destruction policies and pro¬ 
cedures and determine with respect to records 
where they will be kept, how they will be kept, 
if they can be destroyed, when they can be 
destroyed, how they will be destroyed, who may 
refer to them and what procedures will be 
followed in issuing them from, and ensuring 
their return to their repositories. 

This Unit also will maintain a complete, cross- 
referenced index of all records maintained by 
the City indicating their physical location; main¬ 
tain a records storage unit or archives in which 
will be kept all non-current records not required 
in the operation of civic departments until they 
are destroyed or permanently stored; records 
that are to be permanently stored; and records 
of historical value. 

In addition, this Division will prepare, in con¬ 
junction with the Organization and Methods 
Division, a manual of policies, procedures and 
methods of records management for distribution 
to all departments. 


72 


Department of the City Clerk —Continued 

ELECTIONS AND COURT OF REVISION 
DIVISION 

This Division maintains the official assessment 
rolls and gives effect to the decisions of the 
Courts of Revision therein; supplies clerks to the 
Court of Revision and to the sittings of he 
County Judge on assessment appeals and voters’ 
list appeals; prepares official lists from the 
assessment rolls; receives applications to the 
Court of Revision for rebate of taxes on account 
of vacancy and business tax adjustments, and 
gives effect to the decisions of the Court on 
these matters; checks and reports on local 
improvement petitions and prepares all local 
improvement notices for publication; and assists 
in administering civic elections, including estab¬ 
lishing polling subdivisions, arranging for polling 
places, obtaining ballots and other forms and 
hiring deputy returning officers and poll clerks, 

BIRTHS, MARRIAGE AND DEATHS 

All births must be registered at the Depart¬ 
ment of the City Clerk, Registration Office, 
Room 317, City Hall, within thirty days from 
the occurrence thereof. 

Birth, Marriage or Death Certificates may be 
obtained only from the Registrar-General, 70 
Lombard Street, Toronto, EM. 3-121 1. 


73 


Births, Marriages and Deaths —Continued 

Oflficer-in-charge—F. A. Goodyer, EM. 6-841 1, 

Local 227. (After closing hours, in case of 

emergency only, telephone LE. 6-8530.) 

Physicians in attendance are required to send 
in notices of births; parents or occupants of 
dwellings where births occur are required to 
register same. 

Deaths must be registered at the Department 
or at any police station, before a permit to bury 
can be issued. 

Neglect or failure to send in notices in either 
case renders parties liable to a fine not exceed¬ 
ing ten dollars and costs. 

A Birth Certificate or other evidence filed with 
an application for a Marriage License is not 
returnable. 

Births, Marriages and Deaths 
Vital Statistics for Past Five Years 


Marriage 

Licenses 


Year 

Births 

Issued 

Deaths 

1959 

27,780 

9,714 

8,756 

1958 

27,no 

9,884 

8,609 

1957 

27,540 

9,950 

8,622 

1956 

27,087 

9,779 

8,645 

1955 

27,763 

9,530 

8,374 


Stillbirths (1959). 342 


74 



Births, Marriages and Deaths— Continued 
Marriage Licenses 

Marriages Licenses issued during office hours 
at Department of the City Clerk, Marriage 
License Office, Room 3 1 6, City Hall, EM. 6-841 1, 
Local 226. 

Unless a marriage is solemnized within three 
months from the date of issue of the Marriage 
License, the License lapses without any provision 
for an extension of time. No rebate or refund 
of the fee for a Marriage License is permissible 
in any circumstances. 

When neither applicant has his or her usual 
place of abode in the Province of Ontario, the 
Assistant Provincial Secretary, Parliament Build¬ 
ings, Toronto, must be communicated with 
respecting the necessary evidence required in 
such cases; or with respect to special authoriza¬ 
tion. 

Compliance with certain regulations is re¬ 
quired in the case of an applicant who is 
divorced and the divorce took place outside the 
Dominion of Canada; a copy of such regulations 
may be obtained from the Deputy Provincial 
Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 


75 


FIRE DEPARTMENT 


The strength of the Department is 1,210, all 
ranks, made up of: 1 Chief, 1 Deputy Chief, 1 
Executive Assistant, 6 Platoon Chiefs, 36 District 
Chiefs, 212 Captains, 943 Firefighters, 1 Auto¬ 
motive Mechanic, 8 Clerks, 1 Physician, and 1 
Caretaker. 

The Department is organized on the 2-platoon 
42-hour week system and the two shifts change 
over every Sunday, one shift working 24 hours. 
The day shift works 10 hours; the night shift 
1 4 hours. 

First line fire apparatus distributed throughout 
the City in 28 firehalls, consist of 28 Pumpers; 
1 Hose Wagon; 2 High Pressure Monitors; 16 
Aerial Ladder Trucks; 1 Squad Truck , and 1 
Fire Boat. 

The Toronto Fire Department is now equipped 
with a 2-way radio system and at the present 
time, it has 42 radio units, 14 of which are on 
the Officers’ cars and 38 on trucks This type 
of communication has greatly facilitated depart¬ 
ment fire-fighting operations and it now assumes 
its place alongside the telephone and fire alarm 
telegraph. It is the plan of the Fire Department 
to equip all first-line apparatus with radio. 
Besides the radio units, the Department has its 
radio transmitter at Fire Alarm Headquarters 
and a 200-foot mast tower located at Balmoral 
Avenue fire station. 


76 


Fire Department —Continued 


In 1959 the Department took delivery of one 
100-foot all steel aerial ladder truck. 

Statistics Respecting Fires in 1959 


Total alarms of fires... 7,643 

Number of building fires. 2,810 

Number of automobile fires. 673 

Inspections by Fire Prevention Bureau ... 66,914 

Suspicious fires investigated. 146 

Formal enquiries. 6 

Charges laid. 10 

Convictions. 10 

Acquittals. 0 

Charges withdrawn (committed to 

mental hospital). 0 

Number of citizens died from result of 

fire. 19 

Citizens rescued. 54 

First Aid rendered. 144 

Times inhalators used. 482 

Lives saved by Department inhalators.. 375 

Firemen injured. 145 

Firemen injured and remained on duty 345 


Toronto’s Home Fire Inspection 
Programme 

On Tuesday, May 5, 1959, the Toronto Fire 
Department resumed the Home Fire Inspection 
Programme aimed at reducing the number of 
dwelling fires in the City by assisting house¬ 
holders to recognize fire hazards in their homes. 


77 
















Fire Department —Continued 

The Uniformed Firefighters carrying out these 
inspections are from the nearest fire station in 
the district, and they maintain constant contact 
with Central Control, by way of their radio- 
equipped apparatus, so that they may be dis¬ 
patched to a fire which might occur in the district, 

The inspections are carried out only with the 
consent of the householder and cover the base¬ 
ment and yard area. If the householder so 
desires, the entire home may be inspected for 
fire hazards. 

Home Fire Inspection Programmes are a very 
effective means of reducing fire fatalities and 
losses in other large cities throughout North 
America. The sincere efforts of the Firefighters, 
coupled with the excellent co-operation already 
received from the citizens, indicate that the 
same results will be accomplished in Toronto. 

Dwelling fires were down 5.9% in 1959 as 
compared to 1958. 

The 1960 Home Fire Inspection Programme 
will commence on Tuesday, May 3rd, this year. 

Summary of Dwelling Fire Inspections 

for,1959 

May 5th to October 31st 


Not home. 1 2,1 80 

Refused admittance. 399 

Inspections carried out. 27,424 

Total calls made. 40,003 


78 







Fire Department— Continued 
Hazards Noted on Above Inspections 


Rubbish not taken care of properly. 1,033 

Oily rags/mops stored improperly 51 

Ashes not in metal containers. 96 

Flammable liquids not properly stored 707 

Defective chimneys. 513 

Defective stoves/furnaces/smoke pipes.. 91 1 

Combustibles too close to stove/furnace 

smoke pipes. 1,529 

Fuse boxes overfused. 8,262 

Unsafe outlet box/switch/wiring. 1,905 

Extension cord wiring excessive/defective 3,950 

Fuel oil leaking . 9 

Natural Gas leaking. 2 

818 householders who were not home at the 
time of the original visit, called the Department 
to request the inspection of their property, and 
these were carried out. 


79 











DEPARTMENT OF 
PARKS AND RECREATION 


The Department functions under direction of 
the Commissioner of Parks and Recreation and 
the Committee on Parks and Exhibitions. 

Departmental activities are diversified and 
consist of the development and maintenance of 
park lands, including horticulture; a complete 
Forestry Programme for the propagation, cul¬ 
tivation and maintenance of all trees located 
in public parks and on City-owned Streets and 
Boulevards; the operation of Natural Ice Rinks; 
a public recreation programme, comprised of 
playgrounds, community centres, field recrea¬ 
tion, artificial ice rinks and swimming pools. 
These facilities are administered through a 
Parks Division, a Recreation Division, and, a 
General Administration office and four area 
offices and are serviced by a Maintenance 
Section. 

Parks Maintenance and Development 

Parks Division—Parks Section 

This Section is engaged in the propagation, 
growing, pHanting and displaying of all horti¬ 
cultural material for the parks system throughout 
the City and for the maintenance and develop¬ 
ment of park lands. One of the most modern 
greenhouses in Canada is in operation in High 
Park where an estimated three-quarters of a 
million plants are produced annually to supply 


80 



Alexander Muir Memorial Gardens f rom Yonge Street 


Department of Parks and Recreation 

—Continued 

the large number of outdoor flower beds and 
gardens and the material required for con¬ 
tinuous exhibit in show houses which are located 
in Allan Gardens. 

Rehabilitation of the Parks System and 
acquisition of new properties for park purposes 
was continued during 1 959 . St. James’ 
Cathedral grounds were acquired during 1959 
which will provide a much needed sitting*ouf 
park in the downtown area; development of 


81 







Department of Parks and Recreation 

—Continued 

this property will be completed in 1960. Re¬ 
development and beautification programmes 
were carried out at various other park locations, 
namely, Exhibition Park, High Park, Lake Shore 
Boulevard, Cassels Avenue Park, Sunnyside Park, 
Love Crescent Lands, Perth Square, Rosetta 
McClain Memorial Park, Fred Hamilton Play¬ 
ground, McCormick Park, Davisville Park, 
Eastern Beaches Park, Jean Sibelius Park and 
Queen’s Park. 

Forestry Section 

This Section operates under direction of the 
Director of Parks and is supervised by a quali¬ 
fied Arborist. During the past four years a 
long-term reforestation project has been imple¬ 
mented with the planting during 1959 of 4,495 
trees on City streets and in parks. For the most 
part these trees are of the decorative or 
flowering types that will not conflict with private 
property services. The total of 836 trees were 
removed for various reasons in conformity with 
the policy of City Council, while approximately 
24,400 were pruned in parks and an estimated 
200 miles of City streets. The programme com¬ 
menced in 1958 to combat and prevent the 
spread of the Dutch Elm Disease was continued 
in 1959 with the spraying of 4,91 1 trees. 


82 


Department of Parks and Recreation 

—Continued 

Maintenance Section 

This Section while under the jurisdiction of 
the Director of Parks performs Maintenance 
services for both the Parks and Recreation 
divisions and is supervised by a Maintenance 
Superintendent. The operations of this section 
are of a varied nature and include such work 
as maintenance, repair and installation of water 
services, drains and electrical services in parks 
and recreation areas, maintenance and repair 
of machinery and equipment in artificial ice 
rinks and swimming pools, painting signs and 
playground apparatus and equipment, erection 
and dismantling of natural ice rink installations, 
etc. 

Public Recreation 

During 1959, swimming, as a recreational 
pursuit, reached a new high in popularity and 
the City of Toronto endeavoured to provide 
its citizens every possible opportunity to attain 
the physical condition and skill necessary for 
the full enjoyment of this activity. Equal oppor¬ 
tunity was provided for all to find fun and 
relaxation in safe, healthful participation, in 
clean wholesome environment and surroundings 
under capable qualified supervision. 

A year round programme utilizing indoor and 
outdoor pools for winter and summer activities 


83 



Eglinton Park Swimming Pool 

Department of Parks and Recreation 

—Continued 

provided thousands of persons both children 
and adults opportunity to participate in the 
“Learn to Swim” classes and become proficient 
swimmers. Classes were also conducted in 
Water Safety, Competitive Swimming, Diving, 
Ornamental Swimming and Water Polo. As 
well as this specialized programme ample time 
was provided for recreational swimming, free 
play and for persons who just wanted a plunge 
to refresh themselves. 

The Winter Programme had a registration of 
9,122 persons with an attendance of 98,274. 


84 









Department of Parks and Recreation 

■—Continued 

The Summer Programme included the opening 
of two new picturesque outdoor bathing pools 
of modern design increasing the number of out¬ 
door pools to five. These pools had a total 
attendance of 444,395 persons last summer. 
Included in this number were 13,059 who 
attended the “Learn to Swim’ classes which 
are conducted free of charge at each pool 
under the direction of competent instructors. 
Competitive swimming clubs were allowed the 
use of these pools, free of charge, for training 
purposes and swimming meets. To assure 
maximum use of the pools and that no child 
was excluded a policy that all children under 
60 inches in height were to be allowed free 
admission into the outdoor pools during week¬ 
days was introduced in 1959. 

The Wading Pools which are opened during 
the summer months in forty locations throughout 
the City, allowed 557,729 children under the 
age of ten to refresh themselves and have fun 
under constant supervision. 

The life of our community was enriched in 
1959 by the presentation of 57 concerts in 
various parks through the City. This programme 
referred to as the Toronto Summer Music 
Festival brought over 200,000 persons outdoors 
to enjoy concerts, free of charge, which were of 


85 


Department of Parks and Recreation 

—Continued 

sufficient variety that they had appeal for all 
music lovers regardless of taste. The pro¬ 
gramme included Symphony, Light Orchestral, 
Band, Jazz, Ethnic and Organ Concerts. 

Community Centres, Summer and Winter Play¬ 
grounds, Gym classes, Recreation Centres, 
Skating Rinks and many other programmes and 
facilities that contribute to the broad and com¬ 
prehensive recreation service available to all 
citizens regardless of age, race or creed, all 
had their most successful year indicating that 
people are aware of the need for recreation 
and the many dividends in health, physical and 
mental fitness, happiness and good citizenship 
that can result from participation in recreational 
activities. 


86 


PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 


The Personnel Department administers a 
centralized personnel operation embracing all 
Civic Departments including the Fire Department. 
The Department commenced operations in 1945 
under authority of the Personnel By-law No. 
16337. 

The Department is charged with the responsi¬ 
bility for recruitment of all personnel for all 
Civic Departments and for this purpose maintains 
a central registry of applicants from outside 
the Civic Service upon which to draw recruits. 
Contact is maintained with the National Employ¬ 
ment Service, the Unemployment Insurance 
Commission, Schools and the University as 
normal recruiting fields and, in addition, adver¬ 
tisements are placed in the Daily Press, Journals, 
etc. 

It is the policy of the Corporation to fill 
vacancies in promotional positions from within 
the Civic Service where qualified personnel is 
available and in this connection the Department 
administers a comprehensive merit system of 
promotion, involving advertisements within the 
Civic Service, preparation of lists of eligible 
applicants, conducting written, oral and practical 
examinations where applicable and referral of 
eligible names to the various Civic Departments. 
In cases where qualified personnel is not ob- 


87 


Personnel Department —Continued 

tained in this manner, recruitment from outside 
the Civic Service is then undertaken. 

The Department maintains a control of the 
Establishment of Strength for the Permanent 
Service of all Civic Departments and the Com¬ 
missioner authorizes Temporary Staff as may 
be required over and above such Permanent 
Staff for seasonal peak loads. 

A full time Director of Labour Relations in the 
Department is responsible to the Commissioner 
for handling all matters coming within the scope 
of all Bargaining Agreements, such as negotia¬ 
tions, grievances, interpretations, etc. 

The Commissioner is charged with the respon¬ 
sibility for making all recommendations to the 
Administration regarding appointments, promo¬ 
tions, adjustments, reclassifications, etc., and 
any changes in working conditions and fringe 
benefits for all employees covered by Union 
Bargaining Agreements and for all employees 
not covered by such Agreements except in 
respect to Heads and Deputy Heads of Depart¬ 
ments. 

Workmen’s Compensation, Accident Preven¬ 
tion and Safety Programmes, Unemployment 
Insurance matters, Classification and Pay Plans, 
Medical Examination appointments, comparison 


88 


Personnel Department —Continued 


Surveys of Wages, working conditions and 
fringe benefits of Municipalities and Private 
Industry, all form part of the normal activity 
of this Department, 

Authorized personnel Establishment of the 
Department in 1959—18 personnel. 


CITY PROPERTY DEPARTMENT 

The City Property Department consists of a 
Maintenance Division, an Architectural Division 
and a Services Division, and operates under 
the direction of the Commissioner of City Pro¬ 
perty. The Department is virtually the landlord 
for the City. 

DUTIES 

The duties of the City Property Department 
are: 

1. Provides operating space and related 
services to civic departments. 

2. Rents city-owned properties not required 
for civic operations. 

3. Provides caretaking and building operation 
staffs. 


89 


City Property Department —Continued 


4. Operates public weigh scales and lava¬ 
tories (except parks lavatories). 

5 . Provides uniform standards and pro¬ 
grammes of maintenance for all city- 
owned properties. 

6. Provides construction, alteration, mainten¬ 
ance and repair services for civic buildings 
and furniture. 

7. Operates central building trade shops. 

8. Estimates building construction and altera¬ 
tion costs. 

9. Prepares minor building plans and speci¬ 
fications. 

10. Recommends architects for the design of 
new civic buildings. 

11. Directs outside architects in the design of 
new civic buildings. 

1 2. Calls, analyzes and recommends the accep¬ 
tance of building construction tenders. 

13. Supervises construction of buildings for the 
City by independent contractors. 


90 


City Property Department —Continued 

CASA LOMA 
(Castle on the Hill) 

TORONTO S UNIQUE TOURIST ATTRACTION 

Casa Loma was the “dream castle” of Sir 
Henry Pellatt and was brought to realization 
from sketches and data gathered by him during 
frequent visits to England and Europe. Details 
of beautiful windows, stately towers and ex¬ 
quisite fireplaces which appealed strongly to 
his taste were accumulated and their finest 
features incorporated into the plans of Casa 
Loma, the designing and erection of which was 
placed in the hands of the late E. J. Lennox, 
an eminent architect of Toronto. 

Casa Loma took over three years to builds 
being brought to its present state about 1914. 
The great towering stables were first com¬ 
pleted. The foundations of Casa Loma certainly 
had to be “well and truly laid”, of great depth 
and strength, in order to carry the colossal 
superstructure with its weight of massive stone 
walls, tiled roofs, stately chimneys and rugged 
lofty towers. 

Sir Henry originally had in mind that Casa 
Loma would eventually be used as a military 
and historical museum. For that reason the 
interior was built of masonry and the main floor 
of reinforced concrete covered with teakwood, 


91 


City Property Department —Continued 


in order to take the heaviest military equipment, 
while the basement with twenty-foot ceilings 
was made large enough to drill a regiment. 
Here an immense swimming pool was provided, 
also a shooting gallery, and refrigerators large 
enough to hold sides of beef or carcasses of 
venison, for deer in those days still roamed the 
woods adjacent to Casa Loma. 

For years Casa Loma stood like some haunted 
mansion with locked doors and ghostly empti¬ 
ness. People daily saw it silhouetted against 
the sky and wondered what lay behind those 
massive walls Few ever entered the stately 
castle with its baronial towers like battlements 
guarding the heights. After Sir Henry Pellatt 
retired to other quarters the City of Toronto 
came into possession of Casa Loma and the great 
edifice lay closed for many years, the City 
receiving no revenue from this extensive pro¬ 
perty. The Kiwanis Club of West Toronto, 
however, saw the possibility of utilizing it as a 
tourists attraction and arrangements were made 
to try out the idea, the City to receive a fixed 
percentage of the gate receipts. The plan 
proved an immediate success, with the attend¬ 
ance increasing each year, until Casa Loma 
became one of the greatest tourist attractions 
in Canada. Hundreds of thousands of visitors 
from the United States and other countries 


92 


City Property Department —Continued 

passed through the portals of Casa Loma as 
the fame of this marvellous edifice was widely 
spread. 

The Kiwanis Club of West Toronto has now 
leased Casa Loma for a term of years which 
has encouraged it to put many of the rooms in 
their original state* walls and ceilings have 
been painted, the marvellous floors refinished 
and heating equipment installed so that the 
Castle is now open throughout the year. 

The successful administration of Casa Loma 
provides a sum equal to nominal taxes each 
year plus many intangible values for the City 
of Toronto and enables the Kiwanis Club of 
West Toronto to carry on an extensive pro¬ 
gramme for the benefit of young Canadians 
and to lend its support to various charitable 
and patriotic needs. Over 150,000 people 
visit Casa Loma each year. 

Congratulations are continually being ex¬ 
pressed to the Kiwanis Club of West Toronto 
for providing youth with such a delightful recrea¬ 
tional centre operated under its careful super¬ 
vision. 

Capital mprovements, exclusive of money 
contributed by the club on external replace¬ 
ments, amounted to approximately $ 1 65,000.00, 

Yearly operating costs amountto $256,800.00. 


93 



ST. LAWRENCE HALL 

(Located in the North St. Lawrence 
Market Building, King Street East) 

The cultural traditions of St. Lawrence Hall 
commenced in 1851 continue. This historic 
Concert Hall that accommodated appreciative 
audiences to assemble to hear Jenny Lind and 
other artists of yesteryear, now draws students 
of Ballet and therefrom the success of the 
National Ballet Guild emanates. 

The City of Toronto has been glad to share 
in the success of this organization by placing 
at their disposal these facilities, and compli¬ 
ments the public-minded citizens who so whole¬ 
heartedly support ballet in Toronto. 





DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH 


Toronto citizens enjoy a high standard of 
health services due in large measure to the 
City’s provision of an extensive programme 
essential for the practical application of modern 
public health procedures. 

The Department of Public Health is under 
direction of the Medical Officer of Health who 
is responsible to the Local Board of Health for 
the carrying out of provisions of the Public 
Health Act and Regulations of the Province of 
Ontario and certain other Acts relating to health 
matters and of the public health and sanitary 
by-laws of the City, and of all measures put 
forth to prevent disease and conserve and pro¬ 
mote health, as authorized by the Board of 
Health and City Council. 

The Department operates through its Head 
Office Divisions, each under the direction of a 
responsible head, and eight district health 
offices, each unit consisting of one full-time 
District Medical Officer and a District Superin¬ 
tendent of Nurses, a staff of nurses and other 
personnel and designed to meet expeditiously 
and conveniently the public health service and 
health educational needs of the community. 

The comprehensive set-up of basic depart¬ 
mental activities includes school medical and 
dental services, mental health, immunization and 
vaccination services, infant and maternal wel- 


95 

National Ballet of Canada Summer School 
St. Lawrence Hall 


Department of Public Health —Continued 

fare, health education, communicable disease 
control including venereal disease and tuber¬ 
culosis prevention, public health nursing, hospital 
health services, food and milk control, general 
sanitation, ambulance services, enforcement of 
the Lodging House By-law, and the provision 
of medical examination service for applicants 
for civic employment (excluding fire and police) 
and the necessary examination of civic em¬ 
ployees upon application for retirement by 
reason of disability. 

A completely co-ordinated programme of 
medical, dental and nursing services is regularly 
maintained in the primary and secondary schools 
of the City, both public and separate, with 
combined enrolment of well over 100,000, 
while adequate facilities for physical examina¬ 
tions, health education and immunization are 
afforded the infant and pre-school population 
in centres strategically located throughout the 
City. 

Supplementing the aforementioned regularly 
scheduled services are a number of services of 
a specialized category, some of which are 
generously assisted by Federal Health Grants. 
These include the Preventive Orthodontic Ser¬ 
vice Clinic, Hearing Conservation Service, Car¬ 
diac Survey and Registry, Nutrition Education 


96 


Department of Public Health —Continued 

and a pre-school preventive dental programme 
with participation by the Toronto Academy of 
Dentistry and the Toronto East Dental Associa¬ 
tion. A “Pilot Home Care Programme’ under 
the direction of the Medical Officer of Health 
and in collaboration with the Social Planning 
Council of Metropolitan Toronto is now in its 
third year. Its objective is to develop the co¬ 
ordination of a full range of service through 
one administration agency in order to provide 
better and more continuous care to select 
patients in their own homes, using the service 
of existing agencies in the community. 

The City’s expenditure on public health 
service in the interests of the health of its 
citizens amounted to more than two and one- 
half million dollars in 1959 representing $3.99 
per capita on the basis of an assessment 
population of 653,404. 

Health indices have shown such marked re¬ 
ductions over the years that the improvements 
have exceeded the most optimistic forecast 
which might have been made at the beginning 
of the last half century as reflected in part by 
the average age at death of Toronto citizens, 
which now stands at 66 years as opposed to 
only 35 years in 1910. 


97 


Department of Public Health —Continued 
HEALTH INDICES 

CITY OF TORONTO 
1910-1959 



STATISTICAL SERVICES 

The accompanying graph illustrates the effec¬ 
tiveness of public health measures in the control 
of certain communicable diseases and in re¬ 
ducing infant, maternal and tuberculosis mor¬ 
tality. Smallpox has vanished and typhoid 
fever and diphtheria are now rare. The City 
has been virtually free from diphtheria in three 
of the past four years. There have been no 
deaths from scarlet fever in seven years or 
from whooping cough in four years. The decade 
just closed, 1950-1959, is marked by such 


98 



































































Department of Public Health —Continued 


attainments as an 80 per cent reduction in 
tuberculosis mortality, a further decline of more 
than 30 per cent in deaths of infants, and well 
over a two-thirds reduction in the loss of mothers 
from causes associated with childbirth, the 
virtual elimination of deaths from the major 
communicable diseases, and the gratifying 
results attending use of vaccine in the prevention 
of poliomyelitis. 


City Hall adult clinic for Polio Protection 









Department of Public Health —Continued 

Complete statistics and summaries pertaining 
to the activities of the Department of Public 
Health are available in the form of regularly 
prepared monthly and annual reports. 

Public health goes far beyond official effort 
of the work of the Municipal Department. In 
a word it is the sum total of all effort which is 
put forth to prevent disease and to conserve 
and promote health. To this end the Department 
of Public Health freely and with appreciation 
acknowledges the splendid co-operation and 
assistance it enjoys from the medical profession, 
health and welfare groups, and not the least 
from the citizens themselves. 

DISTRICT HEALTH OFFICES 

Runnymede—2907A Dundas Street West, 

RO. 6-2359. 

Parkdale—1266 Queen Street West, 

LE. 1-5709. 

Hillcrest—352 Christie Street, LE. 1-3521. 
Yorkville—2398 Yonge Street, HU. 5-0429. 
University—229 College Street, WA. 1-5104. 

Moss Park—430 Broadview Avenue, 

HO. 1-9241. 

Riverdale—430 Broadview Avenue, 

HO. 1-9241. 

East End—299 Main Street, OX. 4-1 144. 


100 


Department of Public Health —Continued 
CIVIC AMBULANCES 
Telephones: EM. 3-5678, EM. 3-5679 

The Civic Ambulance Service, under the 
control of the Department of Public Health, is 
located at the Coroner’s Building, 86 Lombard 
Street. 

Service is provided covering public emer¬ 
gency calls, such as accidents of all kinds, the 
indigent sick, and the transportation of all 
cases of communicable disease. All calls 
should be directed to the Ambulance Head¬ 
quarters, Lombard Street (see telephone num¬ 
bers above), when the attendant will allocate 
the calls or advise the inquirer if service cannot 
be given. 

A full 24-hour service is provided through the 
facilities of Central Headquarters. The west 
station operates on a 24-hour basis and the 
east station from 8.00 a.m. to midnight, seven 
days a week. To offset delays caused by 
rush-hour traffic an additional northerly post, 
manned from Central Headquarters, is placed 
in operation during the period 1 2.00 noon to 
8.00 p.m. Monday through Friday. For effi¬ 
ciency all ambulances are in direct communica¬ 
tion with police radio dispatchers, while direct 
line telephone communication is maintained 


101 


Department of Public Health —Continued 

between Police and City Ambulance Head¬ 
quarters, These arrangements ensure a prompt 
response to all requests for emergency service. 

PUBLIC HOSPITALS 

The Public Hospitals in the City are located 
as follows: 

Toronto General Hospital—-101 College Street. 

Toronto General Hospital, Wellesley Division, 
160 Wellesley Street East. 

St. Michael’s Hospital—30 Bond Street. 

Hospital for Sick Children—555 University 
Avenue. 

Toronto Western Hospital—399 Bathurst Street. 
St. Joseph’s Hospital—1 830 Queen Street West. 
Women’s College Hospital—76 Grenville Street. 
Salvation Army Grace Hospital—-650 Church 
Street. 

Toronto East General Hospital—Goxwell and 
Sammon Avenues, East York. 

New Mount Sinai Hospital—550 University 
Avenue. 

Princess Margaret Hospital—500 Sherbourne 
Street. 


102 


Department of Public Health —Continued 

Lockwood Clinic Hospital—-300 Bloor Street 
East. 

Mothercraft Centre—49 Clarendon Avenue. 

OTHER HOSPITALS AND INSTITUTIONS 

Riverdale Hospital—Gerrard Street East and 
St. Matthews Road. 

Toronto Hospital for Tuberculosis—Weston, Ont. 

Queen Elizabeth Hospital for Incurables—130 
Dunn Avenue. 

Our Lady of Mercy Hospital—100 Sunnyside 
Avenue. 

Runnymede Hospital (for the chronically ill)— 
274 St. John’s Road. 

Home for Incurable Children—278 Bloor Street 
East. 

Ontario Hospital—999 Queen Street West. 

Hillcrest Convalescent Hospital—47 Austin Ter¬ 
race. 

Hospital for Convalescent Children, I.O.D.E.—- 
43 Sheldrake Bivd. 

Lambert Lodge (Home for the Aged)—350-390 
Christie Street. 

Sunnybrook Hospital (D.V.A.)—Bayview Ave. 


103 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 


The Department of Public Welfare is respon¬ 
sible for carrying out municipal responsibility 
in the administration of public welfare pro¬ 
grammes provided under Provincial legislation 
or as a matter of Civic policy. 

MAIN FUNCTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Public Assistance and Welfare Services 
to Families and Individuals 

To applicants considered eligible after in¬ 
vestigation, general assistance is granted on 
a temporary basis, or on a regular basis, for 
the period of time deemed necessary, and in 
accordance with the provisions of the General 
Welfare Assistance Act and Regulations. Gen¬ 
eral assistance is issued by cheque, payable to 
recipients. 

Supplementary Assistance is granted to re¬ 
cipients of Old Age Security (with Medical 
Assistance), Old Age Assistance, Blind Persons’ 
Allowances, and Disabled Persons’ Allowances, 
who are living in the community and considered 
eligible in accordance with civic policy. 

Under The General Welfare Assistance Act 
and subject to the approval of the Department 
of Public Health, patients discharged from 
Sanatoria for convalescent care in the com¬ 
munity are eligible for Post Sanatorium Allow¬ 
ances. The Department is responsible for the 


104 


Department of Public Welfare— Continued 

issuance of the financial assistance deemed 
necessary under the programme. 

The admittable items of expenditures con¬ 
tained in the above Act for General Assistance, 
Supplementary Assistance, the Post Sanatorium 
Allowances, are shared by the Federal and 
Provincial Governments (80 per cent) and the 
municipality (20 per cent). 

The Department maintains a Rehabilitation 
Unit which helps partially unemployable re¬ 
cipients of General Assistance to locate work 
suitable to their particular abilities, and also 
arranges for retraining courses for those re¬ 
cipients who can benefit from such service, in 
order to re-establish them in gainful employ¬ 
ment. 

A specialized service is rendered by the 
Deserted Wives Unit to mothers with dependent 
children who have found it necessary to apply 
for relief assistance because of the desertion 
and/or non-support of their husbands. The 
Unit assists these mothers to take the required 
legal action through the Juvenile and Family 
Court of Metropolitan Toronto, in an effort to 
secure financial support under The Deserted 
Wives’ and Children's Maintenance Act. 

General Assistance programmes providing 
for direct relief or other assistance to families 
and individuals in the community, together with 


105 


Department of Public Welfare —Continued 

the necessary services, are administered through 
the East, Centra! and West District Welfare 
Offices, including the sub-offices. Provision is 
made within the Department for meeting serious 
emergency situations occurring out of regular 
office hours. 

Services to Indigent Homeless Men 

Assistance to indigent homeless men is avail¬ 
able through the Single Men’s Services. Home¬ 
less men who are residents of the City of Toronto 
and who are unemployable because of health 
reasons, may be placed in Seaton House, which 
is an Institution providing this type of care for 
250 men. The new Men’s Hostel is also located 
in the same building and provides temporary 
accommodation during the winter months for 
unemployed employable homeless men including 
transients. 

Voluntary Maintenance 

The Department makes payments from grants 
authorized by the Civic Administration to various 
private welfare organizations and charitable 
institutions caring for children and indigent 
aged persons, and to other organizations ren¬ 
dering valuable service to the municipality. 
Payment of maintenance is made on a per 
capita per diem basis. The other grants are 
paid by lump sum, quarterly or annually. 


106 


Department of Public Welfare —Continued 

Nutrition 

An advisory service is provided by the Nutri¬ 
tionist Consultant to recipients of general 
assistance regarding the most advantageous 
spending of their relief allowances. The Con¬ 
sultant also prepares the menus for all meals 
served in the Nursery and Day Care Centres 
operated by the Department and acts in an 
advisory capacity respecting the preparation 
and serving of the food. A Food Services 
Supervisor is responsible for nutrition matters 
in connection with services to indigent homeless 
men in Seaton House and the Men's Hostel, 

Hospitalization 

The Department investigates and reports to 
the Metropolitan Department of Welfare and 
Housing as to the residence and indigency of 
persons living within the City of Toronto who 
have no hospital insurance under the Ontario 
Hospital Services Commission Act, and for whom 
application is made for Hospital Orders under 
The Public Hospitals Act. The Department 
authorizes payment of the municipal share of 
hospital maintenance for eligible patients under 
The Psychiatric Hospitals Act. 

Funerals and Burials for Indigents 

As authorized by civic policy, funeral directors 
under contract with the Department provide fhe 


107 


Department of Public Welfare —Continued 

necessary services in connection with the funerals 
and the burial of indigent persons where there 
are no bona fide friends or relatives who are 
financially able to assume the resoonsibility. 

Care of the Aged and Infirm 

The Department administers a Private Nursing 
Homes programme for the care of aged or 
infirm patients who in the opinion of the Medical 
Consultant can be satisfactorily cared for in 
this way. The Province shares 80 per cent of 
the expenditures up to $80 per patient per 
month for approved cases under The General 
Welfare Assistance Act. 

The Department completes applications on 
behalf of Toronto residents for admission to a 
Home for the Aged under The Homes for the 
Aged Act, and forwards same to the Metro¬ 
politan Department of Welfare and Housing 
for approval. 

The Homemakers and Nurses Services Act, 1958 

Under The Homemakers and Nurses Services 
Act, 1958, provision is made for payment of 
homemakers and home nursing services on 
behalf of eligible cases with the Provincial 
Government sharing the expenditures equally 
with the municipality as specified in the Regula¬ 
tions. 


108 


Department of Public Welfare —Continued 
Nursery Centres 

Under The Day Nurseries Act, the Department 
operates eight Nursery Centres which provide 
day care for pre-school children whose mothers 
are required to work outside their homes, and 
for other needy cases. 

The Provincial Government participates finan¬ 
cially up to one-half of the operating expendi¬ 
tures. These centres accommodate 415 children. 

In addition, three private Day Nurseries, with 
combined accommodation for 142 children, are 
sponsored by the municipality, under The Day 
Nurseries Act, and are given financial support 
by the City and the Provincial Government in 
accordance therewith. 

Day Care Centres 

Under authority of the Civic Administration, 
the Department operates four Day Care Centres 
to provide supervision before and after school 
and nutritious noon meals for younger school- 
age children of working mothers. These Centres 
accommodate 158 children. 

Housing 

The Housing Unit deals with emergency situa¬ 
tions with respect to housing accommodation, 
particularly for relief recipients who are in dire 
need of shelter and renders necessary services 
in cases of fires, lockouts and evictions. 


109 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 


The general services performed by this 
Department, under the administration of the 
Commissioner of Public Works are many and 
varied, and include the development of a long 
term overall maintenance programme for the 
Department, the compilation of schedules, co¬ 
ordination, and supply of analysis and cost 
reports on all Departmental projects, the issu¬ 
ance of all permits affecting City roadways, 
water mains and sewers; the design, construc¬ 
tion, maintenance and inspection of public 
facilities such as sidewalks, roadways, sewers, 
water mains, bridges, subways and lanes; the 
removal of snow and the placement of abrasives 
on highways, the collection and disposal of ashes 
and household waste material; the installation 
and maintenance of traffic control equipment 
and signs to improve the flow of traffic on City 
streets; the surveying of lands for acquisition 
and disposal of City property, and technical 
surveys for the design of public facilities; and 
the allocation and maintenance of vehicles and 
major equipment for all City Departments with 
the exception of the Fire Department. 

The organization is comprised of the following 
seven divisions, each under the control of a 
Director and responsible for the undermentioned 
Departmental functions: 


no 


Department of Public Works —Continued 

Planning and Control Division 

1. Development of a long-term maintenance 
programme for the Department. 

2. Compilation of schedules for the projects of 
the Department and the co-ordination of 
the flow of information with regard to the 
projects. 

3. Maintenance of records of the projects and 
of the public facilities that come under the 
jurisdiction of the Public Works Department. 

4. Supplying any analysis and reports on costs 
which would have to be done internally by 
the Department. 

5. Requisitioning of personnel for the Depart¬ 
ment and maintenance of the necessary per¬ 
sonnel records within the Department. 

6. Issue of all permits for activities affecting 
City roadways, land within the street allow¬ 
ances, watermains and sewers. 

Engineering Division 

1. Design of all public facilities such as streets, 
lanes, sewers, watermains and bridges. 

2. Design of incinerators and other plants re¬ 
quired by the Department. 

3. Supervision of the construction of these public 
facilities and plants. 


Department of Public Works —Continued 

4. Negotiation with the railways and with the 
Board of Transport Commissioners on pro¬ 
jects in which the City is involved jointly with 
one or more railways. 

5 . Regular technical inspection of bridges and 
subways. 

6. Supply of drafting services for engineering 
design and for survey requirements. 

7. Maintenance of plans required both by the 
City and by the Public Utilities Co-ordinating 
Committee. 


Surveying Division 

1. To make legal boundary searches and de¬ 
scriptions and legal boundary surveys upon 
request. 

2. To assist the Legal Department and the Real 
Estate Division in arbitrations and actions 
involving real property and on questions of 
property or title boundaries upon request. 

3. To make technical surveys to develop 
physical-condition layouts and contours and 
to supply other information required to 
design and lay out projects. 

4. To make technical surveys to determine the 
progress on projects. 

5. To make surveys as requested by the build¬ 
ing regulation division to check on the loca- 


112 


Department of Public Works —Continued 

tion of buildings. These surveys would also 
be made to check buildings for encroach¬ 
ments and to establish survey reference 
points. 

6. The preparation of plans illustrating the 
results of all types of surveys. 

7. The preparation, maintenance and revision 
of the maps showing the street and park 
systems, the maps required in connection 
with the zoning by-law, maps and plans 
showing the location of the public facilities 
under the control of the Department of 
Public Works. 

Operations Division 

1. Construction, inspection, maintenance and 
repair of public facilities such as streets, 
lanes, sewers, watermains and bridges. 

2. Maintenance of four sewage-pumping sta¬ 
tions. 

3. Connection and disconnection of private 
water services and drains. 

4. Repair and cleaning of sewers and water- 
distribution facilities. 

5. Operation of emergency waterworks ser¬ 
vices. 

6. Patrol of public facilities to guard against 
unauthorized use. 


113 


Department of Public Works —Continued 

7. Operation of the asphalt plant and a central 
shop. 

Streets Division 

1. Collection and disposal of household waste 
material, ashes, and rubbish. 

2. Operation and maintenance of refuse dis¬ 
posal plants. 

3. Mechanical sweeping, flushing and hand- 
broom sweeping of public thoroughfares. 

4. Removal of snow and placement of abrasives 
on public highways. 

5. Application of oil on unimproved roadways. 

6. Operation of plant to produce leaf mould. 

Equipment Division 

1. To develop, for each class of equipment 
serviced, preventive-maintenance schedules 
that are adequate for the safe, reliable and 
efficient operation of all cars, trucks and 
important pieces of equipment used by the 
City, and are consistent with minimum costs. 

2. To perform necessary repairs and replace¬ 
ments. 

3. To allocate cars, trucks and other vehicles 
and equipment to the various users in the 
City organizations on a basis that will pro¬ 
vide for their most effective use. 


114 


Department of Public Works —Continued 

4. To supplement the City’s own equipment 
with cars, trucks and equipment hired from 
outside sources when it is economical to do 
so. 

5. To train drivers of cars and trucks and the 
operators of the various types of special 
equipment. 

6. To analyze and make use of cost records as 
a basis for equipment selection and main¬ 
tenance policies. 

7. To co-ordinate the planning of long-term 
needs for equipment. 

Traffic Division 

1. To recommend regulations and legislation 
as well as facilities designed to assist the 
flow of traffic. 

2. To supply and maintain signs, pavement 
markings, parking meters, etc. 

3. To co-operate with the Metropolitan Police 
Commission, the Toronto Transit Commission 
and other interested bodies in traffic 
matters. 

4. To control street lighting in conjunction with 
the Toronto Hydro-Electric Commission. 

5 . To deal with complaints relating to traffic. 

6. To carry out long-term planning of traffic- 
control activities. 


115 


CITY OF TORONTO PLANNING BOARD 

RESPONSIBILITY AND ORGANIZATION 


The City of Toronto Planning Board is an 
advisory body to City Council, appointed by 
Council in accordance with the provisions of 
Provincial legislation (The Planning Act). Its 
job is to advise Council as to the best means of 
attaining and preserving a high standard of 
civic development, from the viewpoint of both 
civic design and organizational efficiency. 

The Board consists of nine unpaid members, 
including the Mayor, ex officio. Appointments 
are for staggered three-year terms and are 
subject to approval by the Ontario Minister of 
Planning and Development. 

The Board’s duties are prescribed in general 
terms in Section 10 of The Planning Act, as 
follows: 

Every planning board shall investigate and survey 
the physical, social and economic conditions in relation 
to the development of the planning area and may per¬ 
form such other duties of a planning nature as may 
be referred to it by any council having jurisdiction in 
the planning area, and without limiting the generality 
of the foregoing it shall, 

(a) prepare maps, drawings, texts, statistical in¬ 
formation and all other material necessary for 
the study, explanation and solution of problems 
or matters affecting the development of the 
planning area; 


116 


City of Toronto Planning Board 

—Continued 

( b ) hold public meetings and publish information 
for the purpose of obtaining the participation 
and co-operation of the inhabitants of the 
planning area in determining the solution of 
problems or matters affecting the development 
of the planning area; 

(c ) consult with any local board having jurisdiction 
within the planning area; 

(d) prepare a plan for the planning area suitable 
for adoption as the official plan thereof and 
forward it to the councils of the municipalities 
affected thereby, and recommend such plan 
to the council of the designated municipality 
for adoption; 

(e) recommend from time to time to the councils of 
the municipalities in the planning area the 
implementation of any of the features of the 
official plan of the planning area; 

(/) review the official plan from time to time and 
recommend amendments thereto to the council 
of the designated municipality for adoption. 

In addition to these rather general legislative 
directives, the Board depends on instructions 
from City Council and on the services of a full¬ 
time staff headed by the Commissioner of 
Planning to carry out its functions. Requests 
for planning studies and reports are received 
from the various committees of Council, from 


117 


City of Toronto Planning Board 

—Continued 

the Board of Control and from other civic bodies. 
The Planning Board meets once a month to deal 
with reports and recommendations prepared 
by the planning staff concerning zoning and 
official plan changes and other matters. 

The responsibility for making general plans 
for the co-ordination of civic development 
throughout the Metropolitan Toronto area is 
that of the Metropolitan Toronto Planning Board, 
which also functions under the provisions of The 
Planning Act. The legislation enacted by the 
Province in 1953 establishing the Municipality 
of Metropolitan Toronto further defines the 
scope and purpose of the Official Plan for the 
Metropolitan Toronto Planning Area as includ¬ 
ing: land uses and “consideration generally of 
industrial, agricultural, residential and com¬ 
mercial areas”; ways of communication; sanita¬ 
tion; green belts and park areas; and public 
transportation. A draft Official Plan for the 
Metropolitan Toronto Planning Area was com¬ 
pleted early in 1960 and is currently being 
studied by the various local, Provincial and 
Federal Government agencies concerned. 

As the urban heart of the Metropolitan area, 
the City of Toronto has its own unique charac¬ 
teristics and problems. The intensity, competi- 


City of Toronto Planning Board 

—Continued 

tiveness, and rapidly changing nature of land 
uses in this highly developed central area 
necessitate continuous study to promote sensible 
and equitable investment of public funds in 
those facilities serving business, industry and the 
private citizen. Final responsibility for the 
planning and execution of highway improve¬ 
ments, slum clearance and redevelopment pro¬ 
jects, public housing, and park acquisition and 
maintenance—to mention only some of the more 
conspicuous fields of municipal enterprise— 
rests, of course, with City Council and with the 
various executive departments, commissions and 
other agencies of local government, as does 
also the responsibility for the administration and 
enforcement of civic by-laws. 

A general statement of intention as to civic 
development is contained in the City’s own 
official plan registered in 1 949. This document 
outlines a programme of civic improvements 
over a period of from 20 to 30 years. How¬ 
ever, the rapid growth of Metropolitan Toronto 
has necessitated re-examination of the City’s 
functions within the Metro framework. This 
work has been undertaken by the Long-Range 
Division, one of the three main groups in which 
the Board’s staff is organized, and will lead 
ultimately to revision of the City’s Official Plan. 


119 


City of Toronto Planning Board— Continued 


To facilitate planning studies, the City has 
been divided into 25 census-based planning 
districts, as follows: 



A preliminary statement on the Official Plan 
based on these studies was prepared during 
1959 and published early in 1960. Entitled 
“The Changing City”, this 50-page booklet 
attempts to set out for the information of the 
public the major planning issues facing the City 
over the next 20 years. Meanwhile, the Division 
is continuing its programme of district appraisals, 
which has so far resulted in the production of a 

























City of Toronto Planning Board— Continued 

detailed report on the Annex Area. Studies 
of the Rosedale and Deer Park areas are now 
under way and, as in the case of the Annex 
Study, will form the documentary basis for 
zoning and official plan amendments. 

PROJECTS 

Since the City is already built up, physical 
improvements must be largely in the form of re¬ 
development and renewal, whether publicly, 
privately or jointly undertaken. The main work 
of the Projects Division is in connection with re¬ 
development schemes, both in the downtown 
area and elsewhere in the City. 

During 1959, negotiations were completed 
with Provincial and Federal authorities enabling 
the City to proceed with acquisition and clear¬ 
ance of ten acres of slum properties in the Moss 
Park Redevelopment Area. A number of 
possible housing layouts for the area were 
developed by the architectural staff of the 
division, together with studies as to limited 
dividend financing of the construction project 
and a report on streets and easements. An 
information leaflet entitled “You and Rede¬ 
velopment” was prepared and distributed to 
residents of the area. 

Late in 1959, the Planning Board was asked 
by City Council to review and bring up to date 


121 


City of Toronto Planning Board— Continued 


proposals for redevelopment of the Alexandra 
Park Area—the second blighted area proposed 
for redevelopment in the Urban Renewal Study 
of 1 956—and to initiate preliminary discussions 
with Federal and Provincial officials. 

The scale and distinctive design of Toronto’s 
proposed new City Hall have focussed attention 
on the downtown area, and particularly, on the 
provision of an attractive setting for the City 
Hall and Civic Square. The block along the 
south side of Queen Street facing the City Hall 
has been designated a redevelopment area 
and the sum of $1 million set aside in the City’s 
budget towards expropriation of these proper¬ 
ties for sale or lease back to private developers. 
Draft tender documents have been prepared 
for the properties involved, together with illus¬ 
trated proposals for the rebuilding of the block 
as a single architectural unit complementing the 
City Hall and Square. In 1959, the division 
also produced a Synopsis of the City Hall and 
Square Competition, containing a pictorial sum¬ 
mary of the eight finalists in the competition, 
including the winning design of Viljo Rewell and 
his associates, Heikki Castren, Bengt Lundsten 
and Seppo Valjus. Copies of the publication 
were distributed to the more than 500 com¬ 
petitors from 42 countries who submitted designs 
and to other interested individuals and agencies. 


City of Toronto Planning Board— Continued 

CURRENT WORK 

The City’s Official Plan, and more particularly, 
the Zoning By-law, are among the legal means 
the City has of exercising some control over 
day-to-day development activity in the interests 
of civic efficiency and the maintenance of mini¬ 
mum standards of building design and land¬ 
scaping. 

Proposals involving amendments to the Offi¬ 
cial Plan and/or the Zoning By-law are 
regularly referred by City Council to the 
Planning Board, as well as to the City Solicitor 
and the Commissioner of Buildings and Develop¬ 
ment, for investigation and report. During 
1959, the Current Operations Division of the 
Planning Board reported to Council on over 
100 such proposals. This work involves the 
use and maintenance of up-to-date maps and 
other records as a basis for providing prompt 
and accurate information to Council and to the 
public. In addition, the Division is obliged from 
time to time to undertake more extensive studies 
in connection with larger scale development 
proposals affecting both public and private 
interests. Recently, these have included studies 
and negotiations with various agencies concern¬ 
ing off-street parking requirements for the 
City’s four major hospitals and for the University 
of Toronto; waterfront development and lake- 


1 23 


City of Toronto Planning Board— Continued 

shore pollution; the reservation of ravine park- 
lands; the economic role and prospects of the 
St. Lawrence Market; the effects of industrial 
plant expansion on surrounding or neighbouring 
residential areas; and other matters. 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

To a considerable extent, the Planning Board 
operates as a Civic information agency. This 
function is carried on by the planning office in 
various ways, including the publication of re¬ 
ports, the preparation of models, sketches and 
other visual material illustrating civic develop¬ 
ment proposals, and assistance in the organiza¬ 
tion of public meetings. 

Reports of general interest published by the 
Board and available to the public include: 

The Changing City 

The Pedestrian in Downtown Toronto 

Urban Renewal: Short Statement 

Residential Zoning 

A Guide to the New Residential Zoning 
Standards 

The South Side of the Civic Square 

Plan for the Annex 


124 


City of Toronto Planning Board— Continued 

In addition, the Board has undertaken the 
preparation of maps covering the City at a 
scale of 200 feet to one inch. These maps 
show buildings, streets and natural features and 
are on sale at the Office of the City Clerk, at 
$5.00 each. The following map shows the part 
of the City covered by each sheet. 



Key Map of Survey showing Physical Features 
of the City. 


125 










































THE RUNNYMEDE HOSPITAL 


The Runnymede Hospital, situated at the 
corner of Runnymede and St. John’s Roads in 
West Toronto, was officially opened as a public 
hospital for the chronically ill on October 17th, 
1945. It is sponsored by the civic administra¬ 
tion, but operated independently by a Board 
of Directors of which Mr. Edward C. Roelofson 
is President. 

The hospital accommodates 130 patients, 55 
male and 75 female, and since the first patients 
were admitted on November 2nd, 1945, a total 
of some 950 has received treatment and care. 
It was the first hospital of its kind to be estab¬ 
lished in Toronto by the civic administration 
and to be financed from public funds. On its 
Board of Directors are six City members, the 
Mayor, the City Solicitor, the Commissioner of 
Public Welfare, a Controller and Alderman 
appointed annually by the Council, and the 
Solicitor for the hospital. In addition to these 
six are fourteen directors elected annually. 

The hospital building was formerly the Strath- 
cona School, and is an outstanding example of 
successful remodelling. Improvements have 
been made throughout the years, and were 
made possible, mainly, by financial assistance 
from Provincial and Federal grants. Beginning 
January 1st, 1959, the hospital was approved 
by The Ontario Hospital Services Commission 


126 


Runnymede Hospital —Continued 

to participate in the hospital insurance plan. As 
a result, operating costs for insured persons are 
paid by the Commission. 

The Chiefs of Medicine in each of the seven 
genera! hospitals in Toronto act as Honorary 
Consultants to the medical staff, and a close 
relationship is maintained with the general 
hospitals in investigation and treatment of 
patients. 

The medical staff in Runnymede Hospital con¬ 
sists of a chief medical specialist and three 
attending physicians. If treatment indicated is 
other than can be provided on the premises, the 
patient’s transfer is arranged to a general 
hospital. For this reason and others it is required 
that admission of patients be arranged through 
general hospitals where adequate investigation 
and diagnosis can be made. 

In the rehabilitation and re-establishment pro¬ 
gramme, the various staff members play their 
part as a team, doctors, nurses, occupational and 
physical therapists. And at the present time, 
assistance in re-establishment is being given 
by the Public Health Nursing Division, City of 
Toronto. Other City Departments which provide 
services or assistance are the Dental Division, 
Department of Health, Toronto Public Library, 
Department of Public Welfare, Department of 


127 


Runnymede Hospital —Continued 

Buildings and Development and Department of 
Parks and Recreation. 

The aim of the hospital continues to be to 
keep abreast of modern trends and develop¬ 
ments, to constantly improve the care of the 
chronically ill in Toronto, and to give leadership 
in providing beneficial hospital treatment with 
emphasis on rehabilitation or maximum degree 
of improvement. 

THE TORONTO HARBOUR 
COMMISSIONERS 

A modern and efficient port has been created, 
utilizing the sheltered harbour of Toronto Bay. 
Twelve miles of excellent berthage handles the 
many lake and ocean vessels that make Toronto 
a port of call. 

The development that has taken place com¬ 
menced in 1911 following the creation of the 
port authority known as The Toronto Harbour 
Commissioners. Incorporation of the new ad¬ 
ministration was made by Federal Act of Parlia¬ 
ment which authorizes the appointment of five 
Commissioners—three by the Council of the City 
of Toronto—one by the Government of Canada, 
and one by the Government of Canada upon 
the recommendation of the Board of Trade of 
Metropolitan Toronto. Office is for a three- 


128 


Toronto Harbour Commissioners — Cont. 

year period with members serving without re¬ 
muneration and being eligible for reappoint¬ 
ment. 

The port is the gateway to Canada’s richest 
area with the country’s largest concentration of 
industry and population contained within a 
hundred-mile radius centred by the rapidly 
expanding Toronto area. Excellent rail, road 
and air services supplement the waterborne 
transportation and provide swift movement of 
goods to and from the entire hinterland served 
by the Port. 

Throughout the years that growth and pro¬ 
gress have taken place, the City of Toronto and 
the Government of Canada have co-operated 
freely with the port authority in carrying out 
their projects. To finance the necessary work 
and in accordance with the powers granted 
them, the Commissioners from time to time issued 
bonds which were guaranteed as to principal 
and interest by the City. This assistance was 
required up to 1951 when the port operations 
were to the point where revenue and available 
capital monies were sufficient to not only meet 
operating charges but also to fulfil all obliga¬ 
tions with regard to interest and bond retire¬ 
ment. This latter payment amounted to $936,- 
104.00 in 1959. The Federal Government, 
during the initial construction period and since 


1 29 


Toronto Harbour Commissioners — Cont. 

then, has constructed various pier and channel 
walls as well as carrying out certain dredging 
operations. 

Construction of new piers and waterways 
entailed the filling of useless marshlands and 
the extending of the city shore line. Upon the 
new land masses thus formed, industrial concerns 
located due to many advantages, combined with 
the accessibility to waterborne transportation. 
During 1 959 businesses operating on the water¬ 
front paid directly to the City $4,924,921.00 in 
taxes, making a total over the years since in¬ 
corporation of approximately $51,282,048.00. 
This is a tangible result of the port operation 
that can be readily assessed but in addition are 
the intangibles of additional payrolls, trans¬ 
portation charges, fees, capital expenditures, 
and many others that cannot be overlooked. 

The opening of the new St. Lawrence Seaway 
system in 1 959 commenced a new era for the 
Port of Toronto and the City it serves. Ocean 
vessels of over 500 feet in length became a 
common sight along the waterfront. Cargoes 
of sugar from Mauritius, automobiles from 
Europe, and steel from the United Kingdom 
moved into the area, while exports of soya 
bean meal and scrap metal moved to foreign 
markets. In addition to these single type car- 
goes,*the entire direct overseas business took a 


130 


Toronto Harbour Commissioners — Cont, 

tremendous upsurge with almost a 200 per cent 
increase taking place. With the expeditious 
handling of ships and cargo, the result was that 
the port gained a reputation of being the finest 
on the Great Lakes. 

A Municipal Airport located at Toronto Island 
is one of the ten busiest airports in Canada. It 
has a seaplane base in addition to land run¬ 
ways. It is administered by the Toronto Harbour 
Commissioners for and at the expense of the 
City. The same arrangement is in force with 
regard to the Toronto Harbour Police. This 
Marine Police Force, equipped with speedboats 
and lifeboats, patrols the more than 40 miles of 
waterways that exist in the harbour limits. 


THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF TORONTO 

The Housing Authority of Toronto was estab¬ 
lished under provision of The City of Toronto 
Act, 1947, and By-law 16933. Although the 
original By-law was passed specifically for the 
development of the Regent Park (North) Housing 
Project, the City may entrust the Housing 
Authority with the construction, maintenance, 
control, operation and management of any 
housing project as defined by The Planning 
Act, 1946; any emergency housing project; any 
low-rental housing project; any slum clearance 


131 


Housing Authority of Toronto— Continued 

project; or any other housing project which the 
Corporation has undertaken or may undertake 
under its powers. 

As the City’s agent in all housing matters, 
the Housing Authority is now responsible for 
five distinct yet related operations: 

1. The construction, maintenance, operation and 
management of Regent Park (North) Housing 
Project. 

2. The maintenance, operation and manage¬ 
ment of Miscellaneous Housing. 

3. The construction, maintenance, operation and 
management of new or renovated housing 
financed under the Charter of the City of 
Toronto Limited Dividend Housing Corpora¬ 
tion Limited. 

4. The operation and management of a Housing 
Registry. 

5 . The relocation of families living in areas 
scheduled for redevelopment. 

REGENT PARK (NORTH) HOUSING PROJECT 

Canada’s first experiment in slum clearance 
occupies an area in cowntown Toronto of 42 ] /2 
acres and comprises six city blocks. Most of 
the 628 houses previously on the site were in 


1 32 


Housing Authority of Toronto —Continued 

poor condition, as were the commercial and 
industrial buildings. However, each of the 822 
families living in the area as of July 1 5, 1 947, 
the date of expropriation, was offered accom¬ 
modation in the project as progressive con¬ 
struction made it available. Many took advant¬ 
age of this offer and some 400 of the original 
families continue to live in Regent Park (North). 

With the completion in April, 1959, of the 
William C. Dies Building, the project reached a 
total of 1,397 units consisting of: 


Bachelor - 

31 units 

1 bedroom 

1 90 units 

2 bedroom 

562 units 

3 bedroom 

498 units 

4 bedroom 

82 units 

5 bedroom 

34 units 

Total - 

1,397 units 


These units are located in 56 row houses; 16 
three-storey buildings; 6 six-storey buildings; 
1 eight-storey building and the Administration 
Building (1 4 units). 

New Building for Diminishing Families 

This building is named after Mr. William C. 
Dies, an original member of the Housing 


133 


Housing Authority of Toronto —Continued 

Authority and its present Chairman, in recogni¬ 
tion of his invaluable service in the field of 
Public Housing. It was designed to solve a diffi¬ 
culty which had not been foreseen when the 
project was first planned. With the passage 
of time, many families have dwindled in size, 
leaving only the parents, or, as in some cases, 
a widow or widower. Because of the paucity 
of single bedroom apartments many of these 
“diminishing families” were occupying more 
space than necessary, thus depriving others of 
accommodation. Unwilling to thrust these tenants 
out, the Authority has built this eight-storey 
apartment building to accommodate them. On 
the north and south side of every floor com¬ 
munal balconies provide pleasant places for 
friendly visiting. On the main floor two large 
lounging rooms with facilities for serving refresh¬ 
ments are available for use by members of 
the Regent Park (North) “community”. The 
Authority is grateful to the Garden Club of 
Toronto for its generous gift of detailed land¬ 
scaping plans for a garden for the use of the 
senior citizens living in the project. Protected 
by bordering shrubbery from over-exuberant 
youngsters, the not-so-young chat together, 
engage in games of shuffleboard ... or, if 
they prefer, watch . . . and sometimes help . . . 
the garden grow. 


134 


Housing Authority of Toronto Continued 

Recreation 

Other recreational facilities in Regent Park 
(North) include: a full-sized gymnasium complete 
with stage, public address system and “hi-fi” 
equipment; a games room (also located in the 
Administration Building); four craftrooms (in the 
basement of one of the three-storey apartment 
buildings); three “Tiny-Tot” Playgrounds, the 
one in the west section having access to the 
basement of the William C. Dies Building for 
indoor play; two baseball diamonds; paved 
areas for basketball, volleyball, etc. Super¬ 
vision of these activities is provided by the 
City’s Department of Parks and Recreation, 
which also gives leadership to the older citizens 
who have frequent parties and social gatherings 
in the lounge rooms of the William C. Dies 
Building. 

The Old Boys’ Association, an active tenant 
organization, provides additional recreational 
activities, including sports and games for the 
young fry. From funds which it has raised it 
has donated equipment and materials to the 
lounge rooms also. 

Financing 

Prior to the National Housing Act of 1954, 
Federal and Provincial legislation permitted 
comparatively restricted financial assistance for 


135 


Housing Authority of Toronto —Continued 

public housing. Therefore, the City in 1946 
had no choice but to make a sizeable invest¬ 
ment in Regent Park (North), an investment, 
however, which will be amortized within thirty 
years, leaving the City sole owner of some 
1,400 dwelling units on A2Vi acres of valuable, 
centrally located land. These units now yield 
an annual operating surplus of more than 
$250,000.00. Savings due to the resultant 
decrease in fire protection, incidence of crime, 
welfare costs, delinquency charges, etc., are 
incalculable. In addition, the payment of full 
property tax (over $300,000.00 in 1959) 
contrasts strikingly with the $36,000.00 derived 
from the area prior to its redevelopment. It 
would seem that the City has made a wise 
investment in Regent Park (North), not only in 
terms of dollars and cents, but in the im¬ 
measurable yet priceless terms of human wel¬ 
fare. 


Rentals 

All rentals in Regent Park (North) are geared 
to income or “ability to pay’’. 

MISCELLANEOUS HOUSING 

On February 1, 1960, the Authority had 
under its jurisdiction approximately 100 units 
situated on sites scattered throughout the City. 


136 


Housing Authority of Toronto— Continued 

These included No. 301 Broadview Avenue, 
a residential home for some seventeen older 
citizens. This house was purchased by the City 
of Toronto as part of a general plan of re¬ 
habilitation for the Riverdale District. Having 
renovated and converted the house for multiple 
occupancy, the Housing Authority of Toronto 
accepted the offer of St. Matthew’s Parish to 
furnish and operate it. The Parish has furnished 
the house, with the help of various individuals 
and firms, as well as a substantial grant from 
the Atkinson Foundation and all the contents 
(except the stove and refrigerator) have been 
provided at no cost to the City. The house is 
administered by a special committee set up by 
the Parish. Accommodation is provided for at 
least 1 6 residents and a housekeeper, the basic 
fee being $67.00 per month for room and 
board (Old Age Pensioners may receive a 
$20.00 monthly supplement if necessary). The 
only restriction in the choice of applicants is that 
they must be in reasonably good health upon 
admission. This is a “Pilot Project”, in that it 
represents an experiment in the sharing of 
responsibility and effort between a public and 
a private body. 


137 


Housing Authority of Toronto —Continued 

CITY OF TORONTO LIMITED DIVIDEND 
HOUSING CORPORATION LIMITED 


In order to take advantage of financial assist¬ 
ance offered by the Federal Government by 
way of mortgage loans to Limited Dividend 
Companies for the purpose of providing addi¬ 
tional housing, the five members of the Housing 
Authority are constituted Directors of the City 
of Toronto Limited Dividend Housing Corpora¬ 
tion Limited. The first project erected under 
the Charter of this Company is a small-scale 
development utilizing a parcel of City-owned 
land on Phin Avenue. “Phin Park” consists of 
one three-storey apartment building containing 
24 one-bedroom suites, and ten row houses in 
two groups of five, with four bedrooms each, 
for a total of 34 housing units. This project 
was fully occupied on August 1, 1959. 


McCormick Park Apartments, a six-storey 
building on Dundas Street West, was ready for 
occupancy in the spring of 1960. Its 106 
suites consisted of: 


Bachelor - 

1 bedroom 

2 bedroom 

3 bedroom 


1 4 units 
28 units 
38 units 
26 units 


Total 


1 06 units 


138 






Greenwood Park Apartments — Dundas Street East 


Other projects utilizing City-owned land are 
at various stages of planning and construction. 
Greenwood Park Apartments on Dundas Street 
East, consisting of 81 suites, will be completed 
by early 1961, as should three other smaller 
developments: 25 apartments in a six-storey 
building at Wayland Avenue and Gerrard 
Street East; 25 apartments in another six-storey 
building on Seaton Street (previously the site 
of a hostel for men); 33 “maisonnettes” and 
apartments on Norway Avenue. 

Negotiations are under way for construction 
on lands at Shaw and Dundas Streets, at Queen 
Street East and Eastern Avenue, and on other 
spot sites. 


HOUSING REGISTRY 

Owing to the continuing need of families 
for adequate housing at rents they can afford, 


1 39 





Housing Authority of Toronto —Continued 

City Council, on May 12, 1958, instructed 
the Housing Authority to establish a central 
“Housing Registry” at which landlords may list 
accommodation available at reasonable rents, 
and would-be tenants may apply. Utilizing the 
Authority’s staff and office facilities at 415 
Gerrard Street East, the Housing Registry 
became fully operative in October, 1958. It 
has shown healthy and steady growth. 

As a result of these operations, 331 families 
have been placed in accommodations listed, 
and 1,851 prospective tenants were given con¬ 
tacts or “leads” to locate suitable low-rental 
housing. 

In the Spring of 1960 the Housing Registry 
was temporarily moved to an office in the Moss 
Park Redevelopment Area so that, in addition 
to its regular duties, it might assist the Housing 
Authority in carrying out its obligations as Re¬ 
location Agent for the City during the acquisition 
and demolition of the area. 


140 


THE PARKING AUTHORITY OF TORONTO 


The Parking Authority of Toronto was estab¬ 
lished under provision of The City of Toronto 
Act, 1952, and By-law 18680. It is charged 
with the responsibility of construction, main¬ 
tenance, operation, and management of muni¬ 
cipal off-street parking facilities, providing 
accommodation at reasonable and economic 
rates. The Parking Authority is composed of 
three commissioners who are appointed for 
terms of three years. Each commissioner must 
be a taxpaying citizen of Toronto. In June, 
1958, the original members, Mr. Ralph C. Day, 
Chairman; Lieut.-Col. J. F. Ellis, M.B.E., and Mr. 
Alfred Ward, were re-appointed for a further 
three-year term. 

The Authority is required to be self-sustaining. 
It is not permitted to hold title to its fixed assets 
even when purchased out of the Authority’s 
own funds. All fixed assets are held in the 
name of the City of Toronto and values thereof 
are shown on the City Treasurer’s books as well 
as The Parking Authority’s books. The Authority 
is required to pay all normal business and real 
estate taxes. For instance, in 1959, the 
Authority paid to the City Treasurer $507,- 
235.00. 

Operations commenced during the latter part 
of 1952, and at the time of writing there are 
35 municipal surface carparks and 4 municipal 


141 


Parking Authority of Toronto —Continued 

garages providing 7,318 off-street spaces. 

The Authority’s first garage, located at Queen 
and Victoria Streets, was opened to the public 
in April, 1956, and at that time provided self¬ 
lock parking for some 435 cars. An additional 
level was added during 1958 which increased 
the capacity of this very popular garage to 
532 cars. 

During the latter part of 1 957 the Authority 
brought into operation two mechanical parking 
garages, one situated at Temperance Street, the 
other at Dundas Square. The mechanical garage 
at Temperance Street provides parking for 396 
cars, while the smaller version of the mechanical 
garage at Dundas Square can accommodate 
288 cars. The mechanical garages are quite 
novel in design being able to park the car 
without either the owner or the Authority’s per¬ 
sonnel handling the vehicle at all. The Authority, 
with these two installation, has pioneered a 
completely new concept in parking. 

The fourth garage is the Civic Square Under¬ 
ground Garage. This was constructed at a cost 
of just over $3,000,000.00, considerably below 
the budgetted estimate of $3,625,000.00. The 
Authority is extremely gratified with the grow¬ 
ing popularity of this underground parking 
venture which provides some 1,266 spaces. This 


142 


Parking Authority of Toronto —Continued 

garage was opened on July 21st, 1958, by His 
Worship Mayor Nathan Phillips, Q.C. In the 
early stages the patronage was light but during 
the Christmas shopping period the Underground 
Garage parked in excess of 4,200 cars a day 
on numerous occasions. Since that time, in spite 
of the seasonally slack parking months, the 
Underground Garage has maintained a satis¬ 
factory level of parkers’ use. It was originally 
thought that a 900-car extension would be made 
to this garage when the new City Hall was 
constructed. However, the Parking Authority 
now feels that due to parking trends this addi¬ 
tion should be at least 1,000 cars, and the 
Authority is planning for this amount. 

During its short history, the Authority has 
introduced many innovations in its parking 
methods. Possibly one with which the public is 
well familiar is its method of indicating its off- 

street parking facilities by means of the 

sign with a directional arrow. The Authority is 
anxious to have this symbol adopted by other 
municipalities to indicate their facilities and by 
such means the symbol may well become a 
standard for high quality, off-street parking. 

As has been indicated in Annual Reports, 
there are extensive plans for the future. Right 
at the moment there is on hand the extension 



143 


Parking Authority of Toronto —Continued 

of the parking facility in the Yonge-Eglinton 
district. This is quite novel inasmuch as the 
Authority is going to operate two carparks on 
the same site. This will result in a considerable 
saving on the venture. The Authority is en¬ 
deavouring to establish a parking garage and 
combined office building to be located in up¬ 
town Toronto at Yonge and Bloor Streets. This 
is the forerunner of many projects to provide 
parking by the full utilization of lands in areas 
where it is presently not economically feasible 
to do so. During 1960 the Authority plans to 
establish several neighbourhood parking lots. 
On top of these immediate extensions to its 
operations, the Authority has long-term plans 
for garages on several of the present surface 
carparks. These, together with new surface 
lots, will bring the total number of Authority 
off-street parking spaces to over 15,000 within 
the next five years. 

The Parking Authority of Toronto is proud to 
be able to serve the citizens of Toronto and the 
City’s motoring visitors. It will always endeavour 
to maintain its parking facilities at a standard 
second to none. 


144 


TORONTO PUBLIC LIBRARIES 


The Toronto Public Libraries, now in their 76th 
year, include the Reference Library and the 
Central Circulating Library in the main building 
at College and St. George Streets; the Boys 
and Girls House at 40 St. George Street, the 
Music Library at Avenue Road and St. Clair, 
and twenty branches throughout the City. 

The Reference Library, when the $350,000 
addition is completed in the Spring, will include 
the General Reference Division; the Hallam 
Room of Business and Technology; the Metro¬ 
politan Bibliographical Centre; the Baldwin 
Room of manuscripts and rare Canadiana; the 
Toronto Room of pictures, maps, bound news¬ 
papers, architectural plans and other materials 
relating to the City of Toronto, past, present and 
future; the Map Collection, and the Fine Art 
Section, including reference and circulating 
books on fine art, the Picture Loan Collection 
and the non-Toronto pictures from the John Ross 
Robertson Collection and the other historical 
collections of the Library. 

The resources of the Reference Library in¬ 
clude some 237,634 volumes (books, pamphlets. 
Government documents, etc.) as well as leading 
Canadian, British and American newspapers 
and magazines, and a “Current File” of clip¬ 
pings. The Hallam Room has a variety of 
special services for business and industry, in- 


145 


Public Libraries— Continued 

eluding a large collection of patent specifica¬ 
tions, trade directories, trade journals and a 
corporation file. In the Picture Loan Collection, 
there are over 492,000 pictures. During the 
past year, the Reference Division served some 
290,000 persons, as well as answering over 
42,000 telephone inquiries. 

The Centra! Circulating Library has the largest 
collection of circulating books in the City, and 
includes the Kipling Room for boys and girls 
of High School age. In the main building also, 
are an auditorium and exhibition gallery. 

Boys’ and Girls’ House next door has a well- 
equipped children’s library, a Little Theatre 
for story hours, puppet shows and other 
gatherings, and also houses the famous Osborne 
Collection of Early Children’s Books, 1 566-1910. 

The Music Library in the Howard Ferguson 
House, 559 Avenue Road, provides a complete 
service including books and periodicals about 
music and musicians, sheet music, bound scores 
and records. There are over 23,000 volumes 
(books and scores), and some 1,500 records in 
the circulating collection. Over 2,500 reference 
records may be played in the Listening Room 
with the use of turntables and ear-phones. 

The Foreign Literature Collection of over 
20,000 volumes is spread throughout the 


146 


Public Libra ries —Continued 

branches, but any particular book may be 
obtained on request through any branch or 
from the Foreign Literature Centre at Queen 
and Lisgar Streets. 

The various sections of the City are served 
by twenty branch libraries. Sixteen of these 
have both adult and boys and girls sections. Two 
(Downtown and Queen and Lisgar Branches) 
have adult sections only. The remaining two 
(Manning and Regent Park) are just for boys and 
girls. In addition, the Toronto Public Libraries 
administer smaller libraries in 30 schools; hospital 
libraries in eight hospitals; and deposit libraries 
in eleven Homes for the Aged, in Humewood 
House, the Mercer Reformatory for Women, 
the Metropolitan Toronto Jail, the Second Mile 
Club (High Park Branch) and William E. Coutts 
Co. Ltd. 

The management and control of the Public 
Libraries of the City are vested in the Toronto 
Public Library Board, appointed pursuant to the 
Public Libraries Act (Chap. 283, R.S.O. 1937) 
and composed of the Mayor of the City (or a 
member of the City Council appointed by him 
as his representative) and eight others: three 
appointed by the City Council, three by the 
Board of Education, and two by the Separate 
(Catholic) School Board. The persons appointed 
by the City Council and the Board of Education 


147 


Public Libraries —Continued 


hold office for three years, and those by the 
Separate School Board for two years. These 
members retire in rotation at the end of their 
respective terms on the 31st of January. 

The Board holds its regular meeting on the 
second Wednesday of each month. 

The Libraries are maintained by an annual 
appropriation from the tax rate, under legis¬ 
lative enactment, of an amount not to exceed 
fifty cents per capita of the population of the 
City as shown in the returns of the Metropolitan 
Toronto Assessment Department. This appro¬ 
priation is obligatory, but on a vote of a majority 
of the members of the Council present and voting 
the appropriation may be increased to any 
amount the Council may approve. 


LIBRARY STATISTICS, 1959 
Value of Libraries, including build¬ 


ings and grounds, about.$3,977,917 

Adult books issued for home 

reading . 2,279,299 

Reference books used 308,227 

Boys and girls books used 1,891,869 

Total number of books and 

pamphlets in the Libraries 938,835 


148 







CANADIAN NATIONAL EXHIBITION 


Visitors to Ontario often ask, “What is the 
Canadian National Exhibition?” Few, if any, 
natives would ask the question because they 
have been brought up on “The Ex”. The visitor, 
if he persists in his query, will get as many 
answers as the number of times he repeats the 
question. More than two million nine hundred 
thousand people pass through the many gates 
of Toronto’s Exhibition Park during the sixteen 
days of the Canadian National Exhibition each 
year, and each carries away a different im¬ 
pression. 

If the visitor is perplexed by the number of 
different answers which he receives to his ques¬ 
tion, “What is the Canadian National Exhibi¬ 
tion?” it is because it is many things to many 
people. The Park, the buildings, the exhibits, 
the sports, are but hollow shells without the 
crowds. To every member of each day’s crowd, 
the Ex is something different. It is a subjective 
creature, which leaves contrasting memory pic¬ 
tures for each age, each member of the family. 

It is a family affair with the escorting parents 
often wishing they were young enough to see it 
through their children’s eyes, but at the same 
time visiting the thousands of exhibits which 
show them what is new in Canada. Many years 
ago, it was described as the “Show Window of 
the Nation”. 


149 


Canadian National Exhibition —Continued 

Visitors still come to see what is new. In the 
past they have seen the first electric railway in 
Canada, the early electric lights, the introduc¬ 
tion of X-ray, new street cars, trains and air¬ 
craft; rayons and nylons had their first Canadian 
public showing there and many other record 
firsts were set. 

Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame continues to 
draw crowds of visitors interested in sports 
greats of the past and present. 

In 1 958 the International Hockey Hall of Fame 
was officially linked with Canada’s Sports Hall 
of Fame and is housed in the same building. 

In 1959 the International Air Show was again 
held during the Canadian National Exhibition. 
This feature proved very popular with the 
thousands of visitors attending the last three 
days of the Exhibition. 

Another feature of 1 959 was “Lake Fair Day’’ 
which featured water sports of all kinds including 
water-skiers, racing shells, canoe tilting, displays 
by Royal Navy Frogmen, etc. 

The greatest of the world’s annual expositions 
has for its setting a magnificent park not far 
from the centre of downtown Toronto. Com¬ 
prising 350 acres with a frontage of a mile and 
a half on Lake Ontario it is a triumph of the 
landscape gardener’s art. It is shaded by old 

150 


Princess Margaret Fountain — Exhibition Park 















Canadian National Exhibition —Continued 


trees, traversed by miles of paved boulevards 
and includes all the public services and utilities 
of a well ordered city with the exception of 
overnight accommodation. 

The tourist revels in the great variety of enter¬ 
tainment features—the $3,500,000.00 Grand¬ 
stand with seating accommodation for more 
than 24,000 persons, is the centre of various 
forms of entertainment. Hundreds of performers 
on a 350-foot stage with scenic lighting effects 
of unequalled brilliance and magnitude have 
earned international acclaim for the annual 
presentation. The pyrotechnic finale is a scene 
of variety and beauty. Music of foreign bands, 
sports afloat and ashore, and a mile-long Mid¬ 
way make an enjoyable and profitable 
holiday. 

Industry, education, science, music, travel, 
fashions, sports, and engineering are presented 
in concentrated form. Agriculture is still a basic 
part of this great show window of Canada. 
Cattle, sheep, swine, poultry, grain and vege¬ 
tables are on display and outstanding examples 
of the farmer’s efforts are exhibited in com¬ 
petition one with the other for National awards. 
Canada’s National Horse Show takes several 
days to complete the classes and in 1959 three 
separate and distinct dog shows were held 
during the fourteen days. 

152 

Display of Naval and Mercantile ships off Exhibition 
waterfront during C.N.E. 1959 —>. 














Canadian National Exhibition —Continued 

To celebrate the opening of the St. Lawrence 
Seaway in 1959, the greatest display of fight¬ 
ing ships in Canada’s history was seen in Lake 
Ontario off the CNE Breakwater -ships from 
many foreign countries took part in this great 
celebration and thousands of sailors from many 
countries and from both fighting ships and 
merchantmen enjoyed shore leave at the 
Exhibition. In no way could they have secured 
a broader picture of Canada than at the CNE. 

Something for everyone is certainly a state¬ 
ment truly descriptive of the Canadian National 
Exhibition. 

To accommodate its many visitors two extra 
days were added in 1958. This year, the 
Canadian National Exhibition will open on 
Wednesday, August 24th, and continue until 
Saturday, September 10th (excluding Sundays). 


154 


THE ROYAL AGRICULTURAL WINTER FAIR 
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 


The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, held each 
November at Toronto, was brought into exist¬ 
ence by the Association which was formed in 
1919 to promote higher agriculture through an 
annual competitive exhibition of farm products. 
The “Royal” now holds an esteemed position on 
this continent because of its wide scope, its 
international aspect, its variety of exhibits and 
high standards. 

The membership is composed of representa¬ 
tives of agricultural bodies from every part of 
Canada as well as the Dominion and Provincial 
Governments and the City of Toronto. 

Prior to the opening of the first Fair in 1922 
His Majesty, the late King George V, graciously 
chose to grant the Association a Royal Charter, 
thus the word “Royal” in the title. 

Seventeen annual shows had been held be¬ 
fore the outbreak of the war in September, 
1939, caused their suspension until 1946. 
Entries were close to 16,000 in 1959 and the 
quality higher than ever before. The attend¬ 
ance was good. All of which leads to the 
conclusion that the value of this annual institution 
is heartily appreciated by both agriculturalists 
and the general public. Plans for the 32nd 


155 


Royal Winter Fair —Continued 

show are well under way—the dates are 
November 1 1 th to 19th, 1960. 

The “Royal” has 26 acres under one roof, 
with accommodation for 1,200 horses, 2,250 
cattle, 1,000 swine, 1,200 sheep and goats and 
4,000 poultry and pet stock as well as display 
space. In all 15,000 head of livestock and 
poultry can be accommodated. In 1 959, $ 1 45,- 
000.00 prize money was offered. The following 
prize lists are issued during the Summer to a 
total of about 25,000 copies and will be mailed 
on request: Horse Show; Livestock; Seed, Grain 
and Hay; Poultry, Pigeons and Pet Stock; Dairy 
Products; Floriculture; Fruit and Vegetables; 
Junior Activities. 

The following description of the “Royal” ap¬ 
peared in the Family Herald: “The ‘Royal’ has 
a wonderful livestock show—perhaps the finest 
in the world. But livestock alone could never 
make it the convention hall of the nation. . . . 
No other single event proclaims our arrival (at 
nationhood) so magnificently or makes our 
essential unity so evident. . . . The ‘Royal’ is 
indeed the mecca of Canadian stockmen—and 
many Americans as well. Once they have 
trodden its tanbark they become true believers, 
ready to make any necessary sacrifices to re¬ 
turn again and again. . . . Even a third or 


156 


Royal Winter Fair —Continued 


fourth prize at the ‘Royal’ is worth a tremendous 
amount in advertising. . . . Canada’s ‘Royal’ 
is a tremendous force for the improvement of 
Canadian agriculture. ... So they come to the 
Fair from the farm and the city, from public 
schools and high schools, some for educational 
reasons, some for business and some—well just 
for fun. Seems as though the ‘Royal’ has found 
the perfect combination to attract young folks 
to the Fair. There is something to interest every¬ 
one—-and that something is a worthwhile experi¬ 
ence. The ‘Royal’ is a fascinating classroom.” 

The administrative offices of the Royal Agri¬ 
cultural Winter Fair are located in the Coliseum, 
Exhibition Park, Toronto. 


TELEPHONE SERVICE IN TORONTO 

In 1 959, the demand for telephone service in 
Toronto, which has more telephones in propor¬ 
tion to its population than any other city in 
Canada, continued at a remarkable rate. Some 
38,000 telephones were added in the locai 
calling area, making a total of 758,184. It is 
estimated that 42,500 will be added during 
1 960 and that the people who live in Greater 
Toronto will place more than 6,500,000 tele¬ 
phone calls each day. 


157 


Telephone Service —-Continued 

Keeping pace with demand, the Bell Tele¬ 
phone Company of Canada invested more than 
$34,000,000 in Greater Toronto and its sur¬ 
rounding communities during 1959 on the 
expansion and improvement of local service. 
This rapid growth is expected to continue in 
1960 with a budget of nearly $33,000,000 
for this area. 

Year-end reports on Direct Distance Dialing, 
inaugurated in Toronto in May, 1958, indicate 
a daily average of 45,912 long distance calls 
dialed directly by Toronto area customers—up 
more than 8,000 over 1958. During 1959, 
cities like New York, Cleveland, Chicago, 
Rochester, Pittsburg and Boston were added 
to the growing list of places that can be called 
direct from Toronto. 

During 1960 this list will be greatly increased 
as all places ready for customer dialing in the 
United States will be able to be dialed direct 
from Toronto. Also during the year a number 
of additional points in the Company’s territory 
in Ontario and Quebec, including North Bay, 
Kingston, Sudbury, Quebec City and London, 
as well as a number of other points across 
Canada will have customer dialing service. 

Ninety per cent of the streets in the city 
proper are free of telephone poles and over- 


1 58 


Telephone Service —Continued 

head wires, and in 1959, 248,895 additional 
miles of wire in underground cable were placed 
under Toronto streets to meet expanding re¬ 
quirements. Three new telephone buildings 
and three additions to existing buildings were 
completed during the year in Toronto and 
suburbs—and five other buildings and exten¬ 
sions were started, scheduled for 1960 com¬ 
pletion. Work continues on a 1 0-storey building 
on Eglinton Avenue, to house long distance units, 
directory and sales departments and other 
administrative offices. Date of completion is 
expected to be early in 1961. 

President of the Bell Telephone Company of 
Canada is Thomas W. Eadie, with headquarters 
in Montreal. 

Dr. W. H. Cruickshank, vice-president and 
general manager, Toronto Area, and C. E. 
Watson, vice-president and general manager. 
Western Area, are both located in Toronto. 

Directors of the Company living in Toronto 
are Henry Borden, C.M.G., Q.C., and Robert A, 
Laidlaw. 

Headquarters for the Company’s Toronto and 
Western Areas are located at 393 University 
Avenue. 


159 


THE CONSUMERS’ GAS COMPANY 


The Consumers’ Gas Company is now in its 
1 12th year of service, supplying the citizens 
of the Toronto area with gas for residential, 
commercial and industrial use. Natural Gas, 
used throughout the system, comes from Western 
Canada. 

Some 1,400 Company employees serve the 
Metropolitan Toronto area. During 1959 the 
Company paid approximately $600,000 in 
property taxes to the Metropolitan communities. 

In 1959 residential usage of Natural Gas 
was 10,893,744,000 cubic feet, commercial 
1,982,472,000 cubic feet and industrial 4,922,- 
015,000 cubic feet. Competitive rates for any 
application may be obtained from the Company 
or any accredited dealer. 

The Company’s Industrial and Development 
Division at 1 9 Toronto Street is very active in 
promoting the Metropolitan Toronto area to 
industries who are interested in locating in 
Canada. 

The Blue Flame Room, the Company's attrac¬ 
tive, modern auditorium at General Office, 19 
Toronto Street, is available to groups and 
organizations. This room and its facilities are 
provided as a FREE community service to Metro¬ 
politan Toronto citizens. 


160 


Consumers’ Gas Company —Continued 
Board of Directors 

A. L. Bishop, President; O. L. Jones, Vice- 
President and General Manager; M. Geary, 
Assistant Secretary and Assistant Treasurer; 
W. C. Laidlaw; J. A. Northey; Rolph R. Corson; 
G. E. Creber; Honourable Senator G. P. Camp¬ 
bell, Q.C., LL.D.; J. K. MacDonald; A. Ross Poyntz; 
Wm. H. Zimmerman; His Worship the Mayor of 
Toronto, Nathan Phillips, Q.C. 

General Offices—19 Toronto Street, EMpire 
2-5858. 

TORONTO HYDRO-ELECTRIC SYSTEM 

The Toronto Hydro-Electric System is owned 
by the City of Toronto, and operated by the 
Toronto Electric Commissioners. It is one of the 
largest municipally-owned distribution systems 
in the world, and distributes power at unusually 
low rates. 

ALTERNATING CURRENT LIGHT AND POWER 
RATES RESIDENCE SERVICE 

Alternating Current—60 cycle—1 20 volts. 
Energy Charge: 

Two cents per kilowatt-hour for the first 
60 kilowatt-hours’ use per month. 

One and four-tenths cents per kilowatt-hour 
for all additional consumption. 


161 


Hydro-Electric System —Continued 

Prompt payment discount 10 per cent. 
Minimum monthly bill—75c. (net). 

COMMERCIAL LIGHTING SERVICE 

Alternating Current—60 cycle—1 20 volts. 

Billing Demand—by meter or 100 per cent 
Installed Capacity. 

Monthly Demand Charge: 

Eight and one-half cents per 1 00 watts of 
Installed Capacity or Billing Demand. 
Minimum Demand—500 watts. 

Energy Charge: 

Two and one-tenth cents per kilowatt-hour 
for equivalent of first 1 00 hours’ monthly 
use of Billing Demand. 

Seven-tenths cent per kilowatt-hour for all 
additional consumption. 

Prompt payment discount 10 per cent. 
Minimum monthly bill 75c. (net). 

POWER SERVICE 

Alternating Current—-60 cycle—3 phase—550 
volts. 

Billing Demand—-by meter or 100 per cent 
Installed Capacity. Alternating Current— 
60 cycle—-3 phase—208 volts (see note). 
Monthly Demand Charge: 

One dollar and ten cents per killowatt of 
Installed Capacity or Billing Demand. 


162 


Hydro-Electric System —Continued 
Energy Charge: 

Two and one-tenth cents per kilowatt-hour 
for equivalent of the first 50 hours’ 
monthly use of the Billing Demand. 

One and four-tenths cents per kilowatt- 
hour for equivalent of the second 50 
hours’ monthly use of the Billing Demand. 

Thirty-eight one-hundredths cent per kilo¬ 
watt-hour for all additional consumption. 

Prompt payment discount—10 per cent. 


TYPICAL FLAT RATE 

WATER 

HEATER 

MONTHLY 

RATES 



Gross 

Net 

500 watt 

$3.30 

$2.97 

600 watt 

3.70 

3.33 

800 watt 

4.50 

4.05 

1 000 watt 

5.60 

5.04 

1 200 watt 

6.40 

5.76 

Rates for other sizes on request. 


NO CHARGE FOR INSTALLATION, 
SERVICE, REPLACEMENT OR REMOVAL 

Note:—Alternating Current—60 cycles—3- 
phase—208 volts Service is supplied in areas 
where 4-wire A.C. network is installed. 

Rates for special classes of service, such as 
Hall Lighting, Sign Lighting, etc., may be ob¬ 
tained on application. 


163 







TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION 


The Toronto Transit Commission is responsible 
for the operation of all local public transporta¬ 
tion within the Metropolitan Toronto area with 
the exception of railways and taxis. 

The present Commission was incorporated by 
the same Act of the Ontario Legislature which, 
on January 1st, 1954, joined Toronto and its 12 
neighbouring suburban municipalities into the 
new Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto. On 
that date the Toronto Transit Commission 
assumed all the duties and obligations of its 
predecessor, the Toronto Transportation Com¬ 
mission, which had served the City of Toronto 
since 1920. At the same time the financial 
responsibility of the Commission, which previ¬ 
ously extended only to the Toronto city limits—- 
an area of 35 square miles—was enlarged to 
cover the Metropolitan area of 240 square 
miles, an area approximately 25 miles wide 
and 1 0 miles deep. 

The Toronto Transit Commission consists of 
five members, all residents and ratepayers of 
Metropolitan Toronto, who are appointed by the 
Metropolitan Council for terms of five years and 
salaries of the Commissioners are fixed by the 
Council. No member of the Metropolitan 
Council or of the council of an area municipality 
is eligible for appointment to the Commission. 


164 


Toronto Transit Commission —Continued 

Toronto can well be proud of its transportation 
system for it enjoys an almost world-wide repu¬ 
tation as one of the finest publicly owned 
transit systems anywhere. 290,200,000 pas¬ 
sengers were carried and over 47,000,000 
miles were operated over its routes in 1959. 

The Commission’s fleet of 2,000 safe, modern 
passenger vehicles includes street cars, trolley 
coaches, motor buses and coaches, and subway 
cars. 

In addition to its urban and suburban services 
the Commission, through its subsidiary company, 
Gray Coach Lines Limited, operates a network 
of interurban motor coach routes in central and 
southern Ontario. With its routes extending 
from the United States border at Niagara Falls 
and BuflFalo to Sudbury, North Bay, the Muskoka 
Lakes and other Ontario vacation resorts, Gray 
Coach Lines’ services have helped to make 
Toronto a hub of highway travel and have 
helped to develop a profitable tourist business 
for the City. Special sight-seeing and charter 
coach services are also provided by Gray 
Coach Lines. 

The Toronto Island Ferries are owned and 
operated by the Commission. During all but the 
most severe winter months passenger and freight 
service is supplied by a fleet of 3 ferry boats 


165 


Toronto Transit Commission —Continued 

and other freight craft between the mainland 
and the three islands—Centre Island, Hanlan’s 
Point and Ward’s Island. In the winter months, 
service is maintained for permanent island resi¬ 
dents by means of ice-breaking tugs. 


THE SUBWAY SYSTEM 

The Toronto Transit Commission officially 
opened its 4.6 mile Yonge Street Subway on 
March 30th, 1954. It is part of the services 
in the central fare zone of the Metropolitan 
system and free transfers are issued to and 
accepted from the connecting surface routes. 

Built in four years at a total cost of $64,000,- 
000 including rolling stock, the line connects the 
downtown district with the north end of the City. 
Running under or near Yonge Street between 
Union Station and Eglinton Avenue, the subway 
is now providing fast, efficient, traffic-free trans¬ 
portation for up to 32,000 passengers per hour. 
A two-minute service is operated during peak 
hours. The Commission owns a total of 140 
subway cars. With a planned capacity of 
40,000 passengers per hour, the subway is the 
backbone of the Commission’s transit system 
and it makes connections with 27 street car, 
trolley coach and motor bus routes. 


166 


Toronto Transit Commission —Continued 

While the subway is of tremendous benefit to 
those who use it, it is also helpful to many 
thousands of people who may not use public 
transportation. It has contributed to the relief 
of downtown traffic congestion. It has greatly 
improved real estate values along its route and, 
because of this, it has led to increased business 
and property assessments in the areas it serves. 

Ten Mile Extension Now Under Construction 

Faced with the necessity of relieving traffic 
congestion on Bloor Street, Toronto’s principal 
east-west artery, and anticipating tremendous 
population growth in suburban areas tributary 
to the Bloor Street car line, Metropolitan Toronto 
and the Toronto Transit Commission have joined 
hands in the construction of the Bloor-Danforth- 
University Subway. Construction was started 
in September, 1959, and is being carried out 
in three major stages extending over a 10-year 
period. Work has been planned so that each 
stage can be placed into operation as it is 
completed. 

The first stage is the University line which 
joins with and extends the Yonge Street subway 
from Union subway station along Front Street 
and north on University Avenue to Bloor. Con¬ 
struction work is in progress on this stage and 
is scheduled for completion in January ,1963. 


167 


Toronto Transit Commission —Continued 

The second construction stage will be started 
early in 1963. It extends along Danforth 
Avenue and Bloor Street from Greenwood 
Avenue to the University line and includes 
construction of Greenwood yard and shops. 
Completion date is set for 1966. The third 
stage of the subway is the west leg of the route, 
along Bloor Street from University to Keele Street 
and also the easterly portion from Greenwood 
to Woodbine Avenue. These will be started 
in January, 1 967, and should be completed by 
the end of 1 969. 

When completed, Toronto’s new subway will 
be 10 miles long, have 25 stations and will 
carry about 345,000 passengers a day. About 
1 Vl miles will be tunnelled, Vi mile will be in open 
cut and the remaining 8 miles will be in concrete 
blocks underground. The total cost of the sub¬ 
way is estimated at $200,000,000 and is 
being shared by Metropolitan Toronto and the 
Toronto Transit Commission. 

THE BOARD OF TRADE OF 
METROPOLITAN TORONTO 

The Board of Trade of the City of Toronto was 
founded in 1 844 and was incorporated by an 
Act of the Legislature of the late Provinces of 
Canada in 1845. By an Act of the Federal 
Parliament passed in 1958, the Board’s en- 


168 


Board of Trade —Continued 

larged scope was recognized in a change of 
name to The Board of Trade of Metropolitan 
Toronto. Its principal objects are: 

(a) To promote and/or support such mea¬ 
sures as, upon due consideration, are 
deemed calculated to advance and 
render prosperous the lawful trade and 
commerce and to foster the economic 
and social welfare of the Municipality of 
Metropolitan Toronto in particular and 
of the Province of Ontario and of the 
Dominion of Canada in general. 

(b) To advance in all lawful ways the com¬ 
mercial interests of the members of the 
Board generally and to secure the ad¬ 
vantages to be obtained by mutual co¬ 
operation. 

The Board is one of the largest commercial 
organizations in the British Commonwealth and 
its membership of close to nine thousand repre¬ 
sents virtually every branch of trade, industry, 
finance and the professions. Its affairs are 
conducted by a Council of twenty-four elected 
members and a number of Standing and Special 
Committees, all served by a trained permanent 
staff. The Committees comprise specially quali¬ 
fied members in the many fields of the Board’s 
interests, and the Board acts at the municipal, 
provincial and federal levels of administration 


169 


Board of Trade— Continued 


on the decision of the Council based upon 
Committee studies. 

Affiliated with the Board are fourteen Trade 
Branches. These are bodies of members in 
various classes of business to which the Board 
renders secretarial, treasury and related ad¬ 
ministrative services. Most of them are of sub¬ 
stantial size and importance. 

Also associated with the Board is the Board 
of Trade Club, which holds weekly dinner- 
meetings from October to April, and the Toronto 
Junior Board of Trade, which is a service, train¬ 
ing and social organization of young business¬ 
men between the ages of eighteen and thirty- 
five. Membership in each of these groups is 
close to six hundred. 

In addition to its work in its own broad fields 
of interest, the Board has direct representation 
on many public and private bodies concerned 
with commercial, social and cultural develop¬ 
ment in the Toronto area. 

The Board occupies the three top floors of 
the new Board of Trade Building, 1 1 Adelaide 
Street West, where, in addition to its adminis¬ 
trative offices and meeting rooms, lounge and 
dining facilities and other club services are 
provided for the use of members. 


170 


CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS’ 
ASSOCIATION 


The Canadian Manufacturers’ Association is a 
voluntary non-profit, non-political organization 
of manufacturers in every line of industry, 
located in more than 600 communities stretching 
from Newfoundland to British Columbia, who 
are joined together to consider and to take 
action on their common problems. It has grown 
to its present size from a handful of manufac¬ 
turing pioneers who founded it in December, 
1871, in the City of Toronto. 

The guiding principles of the C.M.A. are simple 
and straightforward. Its aims and objects are 
to promote the interests of Canada’s industries 
and their employees, to further the interests of 
Canadian manufacturers and exporters, and to 
render such services and assistance to the mem¬ 
bers of the Association and to manufacturers 
and exporters generally as the Association shall 
from time to time deem advisable. 

The C.M.A. co-operates constantly with fed¬ 
eral, provincial and municipal governments, 
commissions, boards, and organizations repre¬ 
senting other occupations, in measures intended 
to promote the welfare and prosperity of the 
people of Canada. 

In short, the aim of the C.M.A. is the develop¬ 
ment of the welfare and prosperity of Canadian 
industry and thus, indirectly, the well-being of 
every Canadian. 


171 


METROPOLITAN TORONTO 
CONVENTION AND VISITOR 
ASSOCIATION 

Founded in 1926, this Association serves as a 
Sales-Service and Public Relations Agency for 
Metropolitan Toronto in the increasingly impor¬ 
tant Convention and Visitor Industry. Its mem¬ 
bership embraces almost every segment of the 
Commercial and Industrial interests in the Metro¬ 
politan area. It is governed and financed by 
the memberships of important business organiza¬ 
tions with the co-operation of a grant from the 
Metropolitan Council. 

During 1958, 466 Conventions were served, 
233,215 pieces of Association literature dis¬ 
tributed, and a total of 53,750 mail enquires 
were processed by the Association office. Many 
helpful services are provided to groups meeting 
in Toronto, during the planning stages, and also 
while the Conventions are actually in progress. 

Toronto today is classified as the sixth Con¬ 
vention city on the Continent and with the new 
hotels in operation no time has been lost in 
endeavouring to promote some of the largest 
international Conventions ever to come to 
Canada. 

For the convenience of visitors arriving by 
motor car, the Association operates two Informa¬ 
tion and Service offices at the East and West 
approaches to the Metropolitan area. 


172 


TORONTO INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION, 
METROPOLITAN 


The Commission’s objectives are to secure 
industries for, and aid industries in, the City of 
Toronto and surrounding territory and to give 
publicity to the advantages of the Toronto Area 
for business and manufacturing purposes. 

It maintains comprehensive data concerning 
available industrial properties, accepts no com¬ 
missions or fees, preserves confidential relations 
with its correspondents, invites suggestions as 
to names of companies, which might advan¬ 
tageously locate in the Toronto Area, and has 
a staff of qualified engineers in industrial, econ¬ 
omic and statistical research. 

Since the Commission commenced operations 
in 1929, it has co-operated in the establishment 
of 541 industrial developments for the Toronto 
Area, representing a capital investment of 
$470,000,000.00. They already provide 
direct employment for 46,000 persons—a figure 
greater than the manufacturing employment in 
most Ontario cities. These companies in 1 959 
paid to the municipalities of the Toronto Area 
for taxes and hydro power a total of over 
$ 10 , 000 , 000 . 00 . 


173 


TORONTO CIVIC HISTORICAL 
COMMITTEE 


The Toronto Civic Historical Committee was 
established by City Council in 1949 for the 
purpose of supervising and controlling, on be¬ 
half of the Corporation of the City of Toronto, 
all matters of an historical nature within the 
municipality. The Committee is composed of 
two elected representatives, and fifteen private 
citizens, all of whom are appointed by City 
Council. 

Foremost among the Committee’s responsi¬ 
bilities is the restoration and development of 
Fort York and its operation as an educational 
and tourist site. The Fort is open to the public 
from May 15 to October 31 each year, and 
provides a series of displays designed to show 
the early military life of the City. Visitors are 
conducted through the premises by competent 
guides, a small admission charge being made to 
defray expenses. Educational tours for school 
classes or groups sponsored by charitable 
organizations are available at no charge. Some 
10,000 school children in organized classes are 
accommodated annually. The Fort Guard, 
which is equipped and trained in the manner of 
the York Militia during the War of 1812-14, 
parades daily. Souvenirs, Canadian handi¬ 
crafts, and refreshments are sold through a 
canteen which is operated on the premises 
under the management of the Committee. 


174 



— By J. D. Kelly — Confederation Life Collection. 

General Salute by the Queen's Rangers at the 
Proclamation of Queen Victoria's Coronation, 

Fort York, June 28, 1838. 

In 1953, the Historical Committee prepared 
and published a booklet entitled “Historic 
Toronto”, which describes the City’s beginnings, 
and a number of its places of historical interest. 
The booklet is sold at Fort York and other 
historic sites. A booklet entitled “Fort York” 
which gives the history of the Fort and the Battle 
of York, is also published and sold by the 
Committee. 

The Committee has recently undertaken the 
restoration of the Officers’ Quarters, the only 
remaining building of Stanley Barracks, Exhibi¬ 
tion Park, built by the Royal Engineers in 1841. 
The building is an excellent example of British 


175 



Military architecture of the early 19th century 
and is one of the few of its kind left in Canada. 
The work of restoration is being accurately and 
carefully done and any necessary modern instal¬ 
lations are concealed. 

As Fort York already performs the function 
of a Military Museum, it was decided to 
establish in Stanley Barracks “The Marine 
Museum of Upper Canada" designed to tell 
the history of the waterways of Central Canada 
from the days of the fur trade to the present 
time. The Marine Museum was officially in¬ 
augurated on August 26, 1959, by Admiral of 
the Fleet, Earl Mountbatten of Burma who has 
consented to be its patron. It is planned to 
open the museum on a permanent basis in the 
spring of 1960. 

The Committee is concerned with the preserva¬ 
tion and marking of sites of historical interest 
throughout the City, and is also interested in 
assisting other organizations with the develop¬ 
ment and promotion of local historical museums. 
It is the Committee’s aim to co-ordinate the 
development of existing sites so that, ultimately, 
a comprehensive picture of the history of Toronto 
may be presented. 

During the past year, the Committee prepared 
a survey of local museums as a guide for future 
planning and as a means of ensuring that the 
museum potential within the City is exploited 
as fully as possible. 


176 


THE TORONTO MENDELSSOHN CHOIR 


Meredith G. Glassco, President 

Frederick Silvester, Conductor 

W. Morley Smith, Q.C., Secretary-Treasurer 

The Toronto Mendelssohn Choir is perhaps 
the oldest musical organization in Canada. 
Founded in 1 894 by Dr. A. S. Vogt, it has pre¬ 
sented great choral works not only in Toronto 
but in many large cities in the United States 
and during the last fifteen years has been very 
frequently engaged by Canadian Broadcasting 
Corporation for coast-to-coast broadcasts of 
its programmes. 

Its annual performance of Handel’s “Messiah” 
in Massey Hall is considered to be among the 
finest presentation of this work in the world. 
It has also recorded this work as well as Bach’s, 
“St. Matthew Passion”, and there has been and 
continues to be a very considerable sale of 
these recordings not only in Canada and the 
United States but also in Great Britain and 
various other countries. 

In 1 954 the Choir with the Toronto Symphony 
Orchestra presented these two works in Carnegie 
Hall, New York. This was the Choir’s fifth visit 
to that City. 

Every season the Choir presents outstanding 
performances of great choral works with famous 


177 


Toronto Mendelssohn Choir —Continued 

soloists and a symphony orchestra in addition 
to its presentation of the “Messiah”, either in 
its own concerts at Massey Hall or as ‘guests 
artist’ on other programmes. 

The Choir has had only four conductors during 
its long history; Dr. Vogt who founded it in 
1894; Dr. H. A. Fricker from 1917 to 1942; 
Sir Ernest MacMillan from 1942 to 1957 and 
Frederick Silvester, the present Conductor, who 
was appointed in 1 957. 

Owing to pressure of other duties, Mr. Sil¬ 
vester is retiring at the end of June, 1 960, and 
Mr. Walter Susskind has been appointed 
Conductor for the 1960-61 Season with Mr. 
John Sidgwick as Chorus Master. 

THE TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

The Toronto Symphony Orchestra, conducted 
by Walter Susskind, is recognized as one of the 
ten leading orchestras of the North American 
Continent, and is the hub of the musical life of 
Toronto. 

Its season consists of almost eighty concerts 
which include twelve pair of Tuesday-Wednes¬ 
day series subscription concerts which attract 
world famous artists to this city to appear as 
guest soloists with the orchestra; a series of 


178 


Toronto Symphony Orchestra —Continued 

twenty-six Sunday afternoon Pop Concerts; sev¬ 
eral evening concerts for Secondary School 
Students, and a number of afternoon concerts 
for school children; all presented in Massey Hall. 
In addition to these concerts the T.S.O. plays a 
number of concerts each year in other cities in 
Canada and the United States: Detroit, Buffalo, 
Kitchener, Peterborough, Hamilton, Kingston, to 
name a few. These visits of Toronto’s famous 
orchestra do much to enhance the prestige of 
this city and to display the cultural stature of 
Canada. 

The operating budget of the T.S.O. for the 
1958-59 season has been set at $385,000.00 
and the expected earned income is estimated at 
$210,000.00, leaving a balance of $175,- 
000.00 to be raised through donations. This 
percentage of earned income to expenditures 
is the highest of any comparable orchestra on 
this continent. Necessary funds are obtained 
through the work of the Board of Directors, the 
fabulous energy and unique activities of the 
Women’s Committee of the Toronto Symphony 
Orchestra Association, through donations from 
business firms and individuals, and an annual 
grant from Metropolitan Toronto. 

The Toronto Symphony Orchestra has a long 
and colourful history. In 1906 Mr. Frank Wels- 
man and Dr. Edward Fisher organized an orches- 


179 


Toronto Symphony Orchestra— Continued 

tra which became the T.S.O. In 1918 operations 
were suspended, and in 1922 Dr. Luigi von 
Kunitz organized an orchestra which he devel¬ 
oped into an outstanding organization although 
concerts were presented at 5.00 p.m. due to the 
fact that the leading musicians were only avail¬ 
able at that time between their engagements at 
the theatres and movie houses. 

Upon the death of Dr. von Kunitz in 1931 Sir 
Ernest MacMillan was appointed conductor and 
a series of evening concerts was established as 
the new talking films made the musicians avail¬ 
able in the evening. After serving the orchestra 
for 25 years, Sir Ernest retired in 1956 and the 
internationally famous conductor, Walter Suss- 
kind, was appointed. 

Born in Prague, Walter Susskind was conduct¬ 
ing at the Prague German Opera House when 
he was twenty. During the war he toured 
twenty-six countries as a concert pianist finally 
making his home in England where he became 
conductor of the Carl Rosa and Sadler’s Wells 
Opera Companies. He guest conducted the 
leading British orchestras and became conductor 
of the Scottish National Orchestra, and later 
conductor of the Victoria Symphony in Mel¬ 
bourne, Australia. During all this time he made 
regular tours as guest conductor of most of the 
leading orchestras of the world. Since coming 


180 


Toronto Symphony Orchestra —Continued 

to Toronto he has continued to travel extensively 
as guest conductor, presenting concerts with 
famous orchestras in concert halls, radio studios 
and recording sessions. 

THE ART GALLERY OF TORONTO 

317 DUNDAS STREET WEST 

In 1900 when a public-spirited committee 
under Sir Edmund Walker took the first steps 
toward the incorporation of a Toronto gallery, 
the “Toronto Art Museum’’ as it was then known, 
had no land, no building, and no collection. 
Until 1918 when The Art Gallery of Toronto 
opened its first three galleries it had to rely on 
the generosity of public institutions and the 
kindness of private collectors to enable it to 
hold exhibitions. 

Now, although the Gallery continues to bor¬ 
row works from other collections to assemble 
special exhibitions like the Venetian and British 
shows, it is also asked to lend paintings for the 
exhibition of other galleries. 

The size and prestige of the collection has 
increased yearly through the gradual addition 
of paintings and sculpture by gift or purchase. 
Every item in the collection has been given or 
purchased with funds donated by private 
citizens and corporations. Thus the Gallery 


181 


The Art Gallery of Toronto —Continued 


continues its effort to keep pace with the ex¬ 
panding city and to be a cultural stimulus for 
citizens and visitors alike. 

In 1911 the generous bequest of The Grange 
by Mrs. Goldwin Smith gave the young in¬ 
stitution its building site. In 1918 the first 
galleries were completed and since then the 
building has grown in stages to its present state. 

The collection, too, had its beginnings in 1911 
when an arrangement was made with the 
Canadian National Exhibition to receive on long¬ 
term loan works of art acquired by that associa¬ 
tion. Today the visitor will find painting and 
sculpture ranging from Old Masters of the 14th 
century to young painters of today. A walk 
through the galleries will reward the visitor who 
enjoys Tintoretto, Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gains¬ 
borough, Reynolds, Degas, Renoir, William 
Ronald and Jimmy Ernst. 

Naturally the Gallery has an important col¬ 
lection of Canadian work. Perhaps the best 
known examples are The West Wind, by Tom 
Thomson, and North Shore, Lake Superior, by 
Lawren Harris. For the lover of contemporary 
art, there are representative foreign and Cana¬ 
dian works, including paintings by Riopelle, 
Buffet, Afro, Sutherland, Augustus John and 
sculpture by Henry Moore and Jacques Lipchitz. 


182 



Dutch Painting — The Golden Age. 

Jan Steen family viewing Steen's “Family Group" 
at The Art Gallery of Toronto. 

In addition to donations from private citizens 
and corporations, the Gallery’s work has been 
helped by grants from the Metropolitan Council. 
By agreement with the City of Toronto, the 
Gallery’s grounds have been made into a public 
park, maintained by the City, and admission 
to the Gallery is free on weekends and holidays. 
In consideration of this, the City makes an 
annual payment to the Gallery. 

On Wednesday Open Nights, lectures, films, 
demonstrations and tours of the exhibitions 


183 







The Art Gallery of Toronto —Continued 

stimulate the adult visitor. Regular school 
tours introduce the Gallery’s collection and 
facilities to nearly 30,000 of the City’s children 
every year. 

Annual membership in the Gallery is open 
to everyone for a small yearly fee. The interest 
and support of its 4,800 members makes the 
Gallery a vigorous and influential voice in 
Toronto’s public life. 

THE NATIONAL BALLET OF CANADA 

The headquarters, residential school and 
offices of The National Ballet of Canada are 
located in Toronto. The internationally-famous 
company was founded in 1951 and had its first 
performance in this city in November of that 
year. Now a permanent, year-round organiza¬ 
tion with its own scenic, wardrobe and business 
departments, the National Ballet has performed 
to more than 1,500,000 paying customers in 
three countries besides the millions more who 
have seen it on television networks in Canada 
and the United States. 

Artistic Director Celia Franca founded also a 
summer school which, in the 19th-century St. 
Lawrence Hall, attracts annually hundreds of 
dance students and teachers from all parts of 
the continent. 

In September, 1959, the National Ballet 


184 




National Ballet of Canada. 

Scene from “ Winter Night". 

School, for residential and day students was 
started at 111 Maitland Street. Academic 
studies as well as ballet training are given in the 
school, unique on this continent. 

The wardrobe department is located in the 
residential school at Maitland Street where 
ballet training only also is available for non- 
academic students. 

Seventeen original Canadian works, many 
with specially-commissioned music, are included 
in the company’s repertoire of more than 40 
ballets. it is the only company in North 


185 



The National Ballet of Canada —Continued 

America with four of the great classics (“Swan 
Lake”, “The Nutcracker”, “Coppelia”, “Giselle”) 
in their entirety. Distinguished European and 
American choreographers also are represented, 
including Antony Tudor, Frederick Ashton, Walter 
Gore, John Cranko and Andree Howard. 

Head Office of the Company is 73 Adelaide 
Street West. From here, liaison with branches 
of The National Ballet Guild of Canada is car¬ 
ried on. The company arranges its own book¬ 
ings inside Canada. Outside this country en¬ 
gagements are arranged through the William 
Morris Agency, 1 740 Broadway, New York City. 

Artistic adviser is Kay Ambrose, noted author, 
artist, designer and lecturer. Ballet Mistress is 
Betty Oliphant; Musical Director, George Crum; 
Company Notator (Labanotation), Lucille Mc¬ 
Clure; General Manager, Carman B. Guild. 

The National Ballet Guild of Canada was 
established formally by Letters Patent, October 
27, 1951. Its purpose was to create and main¬ 
tain a professional ballet company in and for 
Canada which would strive for the highest 
standard of performance and offer to talented 
young Canadians and to other associated artists 
the opportunity for a ballet career in Canada. 
Guild branches are in Toronto, London (Ont.). 
Windsor, Belleville, Hamilton, Montreal, Calgary, 
Edmonton, Quebec and other cities. 


186 


CANADIAN OPERA COMPANY 


The Canadian Opera Company, formerly the 
Opera Festival Association of Toronto, now in 
its eleventh season, was formed in 1 950, and 
is responsible for developing the first repertory 
opera company on a professional basis in 
Canada. 

With headquarters at 135A Avenue Road, 
the Company and its Chamber Opera Group 
have produced and performed a total of thirty 
different operatic works. 

Their repertory includes the operas of Mozart, 
Verdi, Puccini, Mennoti, Gounod, Smetana, Bizet, 
Rossini, Massenet, Humperdinck, Wolf-Ferrari, 
Pergolese, Offenbach, J. Strauss Jr., Lehar, and 
Rodgers and Hammerstein. 

The Chamber Opera Group recently com¬ 
pleted a tour of forty-one cities of Canada, 
covering nine provinces with Rossini’s Barber of 
Seville. 

Besides this touring group, the Canadian 
Opera Company have an annual engagement 
at the Royal Alexandra Theatre here in Toronto, 
where they perform three new works, for a 
two-week season or more. 

Herman Geiger-Torel, who has made a tre¬ 
mendous impact on the development of opera 
in Canada, is general director and provides 


187 


Canadian Opera Company— Continued 

employment for Canadian voices in their own 
country. With few exceptions of prominent 
guest artists, the opera’s outstanding group of 
operatic voices are either Canadian by birth 
or by residence. 

President of the board is Floyd S. Chalmers 
and Vice-President is Frank McEachren. 

The Company is aided by a capable and 
energetic women’s committee, headed by Mrs. 
John Godfrey who is president. This group is 
particularly interested in the ticket sale and in 
the opportunities provided to Canadian profes¬ 
sional singers, students and graduates of the 
Royal Conservatory of Music. They also serve 
on the board of directors of the Company. 

THE METROPOLITAN TORONTO 
TRAFFIC CONFERENCE 

The Metropolitan Toronto Traffic Conference 
was formed in January, 1959, by the amalga¬ 
mation of the Traffic Advisory Board and the 
Toronto and District Traffic Conference (origin¬ 
ally appointed by the City in 1 930.) 

The Conference provides a forum in which 
technical officials responsible for the movement 
and safety of vehicular and pedestrian traffic 
meet with representatives of private organiza- 


188 


Traffic Conference —Continued 


tions having an interest in traffic matters, to 
reconcile views, co-ordinate actions and advise 
Metropolitan Council, City Council and all local 
Metropolitan municipal councils on proposed 
traffic by-laws, amendments and matters of 
policy affecting pedestrian and vehicular traffic. 

Twenty private organizations are represented 
on the Conference: the Automotive Transport 
Association of Ontario, the Association of Private 
Motor Carriers and Affiliates, the Toronto Cart¬ 
age Association, the Canadian National and the 
Canadian Pacific Express Companies, Garage 
Interests, the Toronto Parking Association, the 
Toronto Automobile Dealers Association, the 
Canadian Industrial Traffic League (Ontario Divi¬ 
sion), the Ontario Motor League, the Ontario 
Safety League, the Oil Heating Association, the 
Ontario Association of Professional Engineers, 
the Toronto and District Labour Council, the Can¬ 
adian Manufacturers’ Association, the Greater 
Toronto Business Men’s Association, the Down¬ 
town Business Men’s Association, the Yonge- 
Bloor-Bay Association, the Retail Merchants’ 
Association of Canada, the Toronto Real Estate 
Board, and the Toronto Board of Trade. Also 
represented are six Boards of Education, the 
Metropolitan Department of Roads, the Metro¬ 
politan Traffic Engineer,theMetropolitan Toronto 
Police Department, the City of Toronto Public 


189 



Traffic Conference —Continued 

Works Department and Traffic Division, the 
Metropolitan Roads and Traffic Committee, the 
Committee on Public Works, the Toronto Transit 
Commission, the Parking Authority of Toronto, 
the Toronto Harbour Commissioners, the Metro¬ 
politan Toronto Planning Board, the Metropolitan 
Toronto Traffic Safety Council and the traffic 
co-ordinators from the Townships of Etobicoke, 
North York and Scarborough. 

The Conference meets bi-weekly throughout 
the year on alternate Wednesdays in the 
premises of the Metropolitan Toronto Board of 
Trade. The place of meeting and secretarial 
services are provided by the Board without cost 
and the Conference members serve without 
remuneration. 

FORMER MEMBERS’ ASSOCIATION OF 
TORONTO CITY COUNCILS 

Honorary Presidents—Thomas N. Phelan, 

Q.C.; W. J. Stewart, C.B.E., C.D., M.P.P. 

Immediate Past President — George Duthie. 

Acting President — Robert A. Allen. 

Second Vice-President — Jack Bennett. 

Acting Sec.-Treas.—Edward Roelofson. 

Director of Publicity — Robt. G. Dibble. 

Directors — Garnet Archibald; Geo. Granell; 


190 


Former Members 1 Association —Continued 

John J. Glass; J. D. McNish, Q.C.; H. E. McCallum; 
Wm. Davidson, Q.C.; Charles M. Carrie; Arthur 
Frost, M.P.P.; Harold Fishleigh, M.P.P.; Alfred 
Cowling, M.P.P.; Leonard M. Reilly, C. A. Walton. 

ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO MAYORS 
AND REEVES 

The main objective of the Association of 
Ontario Mayors and Reeves has been, and is, to 
make representations for the adjustment of the 
municipal tax structure and the municipal posi¬ 
tion in relation to the Provincial and Federal 
Governments, so that municipal revenues will 
be used solely for basic and proper municipal 
services. 

Over the past number of years, the Associa¬ 
tion has given full study to the major aspects 
of municipal financing and has submitted the 
results of such study in representations to the 
Provincial Government and the Federal Govern¬ 
ment, where applicable, for the correction of 
the inequitable situation at the municipal level. 
Since 1943 some 36 comprehensive briefs have 
been submitted. 

OFFICERS 

President—Mayor Nathan Phillips, Q.C., of 
Toronto. 

Acting Executive Secretary and Treasurer—- 
M. J. Gordon, Room 209, City Hall, Toronto. 


191 


BUREAU OF MUNICIPAL RESEARCH 


The Bureau was founded in 1914 by a group 
of public spirited citizens to promote better 
government. 

The Bureau is governed by a voluntary Council 
of leaders in commerce, industry and the pro¬ 
fessions. It is staffed by experts on government 
finance and administration. For the past forty- 
five years, the Bureau has operated under 
provincial charter as an independent non-profit 
organization serving the community and its local 
government by providing a continuing non¬ 
partisan study and constructive criticism of civic 
affairs. 

Through its regular bulletin “Civic Affairs’’ 
and the press coverage given to its reports and 
recommendations and through the work of its 
members and staff in addressing public gather¬ 
ings, taking part in radio and television panels, 
and serving on official and informal civic com¬ 
mittees, the Bureau acts as a reliable source of 
information, unbiased commentary, and research 
co-operation. 

Membership is open to individuals, to business 
and professional firms, and to associations and 
organizations who wish to join with others in 
promoting an active programme for civic better¬ 
ment in Greater Toronto. The Bureau’s publi¬ 
cations go to its subscribers, to government 


92 


Bureau of MunicipaS Research Continued 

officials and to the press. Its information ser¬ 
vices on municipal finance and administration 
in Toronto and across Canada are readily avail¬ 
able to the members and the general public. 


THE ONTARIO MUNICIPAL ASSOCIATION 

This Association was founded in the year 1 899 
to serve all Ontario municipalities, urban and 
rural, and is the senior municipal association in 
the province. It is the only organization to in¬ 
clude in its membership both elected repre¬ 
sentatives and appointed officials. 

Before each session of the Legislature the 
Executive of the Association meets with the 
Provincial Cabinet and with individual Ministers 
to discuss the resolutions developed by member 
municipalities at the annual convention. In this 
way, improvements in municipal legislation are 
effectively promoted. 

As an annual service to members a complete 
breakdown of municipal salary levels in repre¬ 
sentative municipalities throughout Ontario is 
mailed in January each year. In addition, sur¬ 
veys on matters of municipal interest are carried 
out free for members on request at any time. 

The annual convention is held over a period 


193 


Ontario Municipal Association —Continued 

of four days towards the end of the summer at a 
time and place decided by the Executive. The 
1959 convention marked the conclusion of the 
Association’s Diamond Jubilee Year. The Sixty- 
first Annual Convention will be held at St. 
Catharines from Sunday, August 28th, to Wed¬ 
nesday, August 31st, inclusive. 

At the time of the 1 959 convention in Sudbury 
the membership stood at 283. Approximately 
77% of the total population of Ontario is repre¬ 
sented by the present membership drawn only 
from local municipalities. If the additional 
population represented by the 26 County mem¬ 
bers and by Metropolitan Toronto is included, 
membership represents over 90% of the total 
population of Ontario. 

OFFICERS, 1959-1960 

President—Mrs. Grace Hartman, Controller, 
Sudbury. 

Vice-Presidents—J. W. C. Langmuir, Mayor, 
Brockville; H. Pierce, City Parks Board, Brant¬ 
ford; William R. Allen, Controller, Toronto; 
O. W. Larry, Clerk-Treasurer, Trenton; W. D. 
Foulds, Clerk-Treasurer, Brant County. 

Secretary-Treasurer—Eric Hardy, 32 Isabella 
Street, Toronto 5, WAInut 4-9717. 


194 


ONTARIO MUNICIPAL BOARD 


Chairman—J. A. Kennedy, Q.C. 
Vice-Chairmen—R. L. Kennedy and J. R. Turnbull 
Members—C. F. Nunn, W. Greenwood, D. 

Jamieson, V. S. Milburn, A. L. McCrae. 

Acting Secretary—B. Vickers. 

OFFICES: 145 Queen Street West, Toronto. 
TELEPHONE: EMpire 3-3063. 

The Ontario Municipal Board is an adminis¬ 
trative Board appointed by the Province of 
Ontario and given a great variety of functions 
under general and special statutes, duly sug¬ 
gested interpretations and delineations, amongst 
which are: 

Approval of municipal debenture issues; dis¬ 
pensation of vote of ratepayers under certain 
circumstances or emergencies; approval of all 
municipal Restricted Area or Zoning By-laws; 
annexations and amalgamations; assessment 
appeals; arbitrations; supervision of street 
railways operated under Province of Ontario 
Charters. 


195 


THE TORONTO HUMANE SOCIETY 


The Toronto Humane Society was incorporated 
in the year 1 887 “for the purpose of promoting 
and developing humane public sentiment, and 
to secure the enactment and enforcement of 
suitable laws for the prevention of cruelty to 
animals.” Its aims and objects are protective 
and educational. It strives for justice and mercy 
and well-being for all animals. At the Head¬ 
quarters of the Society, 1 1 Wellesley Street 
West, it operates the City Pound, issues dog 
licenses and performs the duties of Dog Control 
for the City. 

TORONTO BUILDERS EXCHANGE 

Peter D. Dalton, President; Norman M. Fraser, 

Manager. 

Offices—1 104 Bay Street. WAInut 5-4233. 

The Toronto Builders Exchange is a trade 
organization consisting of General Contractors, 
Trade Contractors, Manufacturers, Supply Firms 
and Services joined together to consider and 
take action for their common problems in the 
Construction Industry. Established in February, 
1 867, it is now in its 93rd year. 

The Exchange has 820 member firms employ¬ 
ing thousands of workmen constructing industrial, 
engineering, commercial and institutional build¬ 
ings in Metropolitan Toronto. 


196 


Toronto Builders Exchange —Continued 

The Exchange offices are situated in its own 
building at 1104 Bay Street where a 48 table 
Plan Room is operated enabling members to 
review Plans and Specifications that have been 
made available by Architects, Engineers and 
Government Departments. 

In its 93rd year of operation, the Toronto 
Builders Exchange has the largest membership of 
any Builders Exchange in Canada, is the oldest 
construction organization in North America and 
is recognized as maintaining the finest Plan 
Room of its kind in this country. 

A Membership List and Classified Trade 
Directory is published each year. 


TORONTO AND DISTRICT 
LABOUR COUNCIL 

(Active in Toronto since 1871) 

The Toronto and District Labour Council is 
chartered by the Canadian Labour Congress 
which is the National Body and is also affiliated 
with the Ontario Federation of Labour, There 
are two hundred and sixty-five local unions 
affiliated with the Council with a membership 
of over one hundred and ten thousand. Regular 
meetings are held on the first and third Thursday 


197 


Labour Council— Continued 


of each month at the Labor Temple, 1 67 Church 
Street, commencing at 8.00 p.m. 

The Council is kept abreast of affairs through 
its Standing Committees which report regularly 
to Council meetings. 

Standing Committees of Council are: Educa¬ 
tion, Labour Day, Legislative, Municipal, Political 
Education, Public Relations, Union Label and 
Welfare Services. 

Evidence that the Labour Council is keenly 
interested in community affairs can be found 
in the fact that representatives from the Labour 
Council serve on such Boards and Commissions 
as the Canadian National Exhibition Board, 
Red Cross, Toronto Safety Council, Social 
Planning Council, Parking Authority, Toronto 
Transit Commission, Harbour Commission, Hydro 
Commission and many others. 


Officers for the year 1960 are: 


PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 


William Jenoves 
Donald Montgomery 
Purdy Churchill 
Robert McCormack 


Offices: 33 Cecil Street, Toronto 2B, Ontario. 
Telephone: EMpire 4-5641. 


198 






CO 

O' 

o 





CN 

o 

CN 





o- 

O' 

o 





00 


K 


o 

o> 


CO 

■N - 

S3 


wo 

« 


o 

IN 

« 


o 

O' 

wo 

s» 

st 

o' 

cn" 


•“* 

r- 


IN 

wo 

CO 





wo 

00 

<o 


k- 



s* 

N, 



<1) 



W0 

st 

w> 


_Q 







E 







<D 



o 

K 

CO 


d) 



00 

CO 

IN 


Q 



00 

N» 

wo 

*N 

o 

N. 





CO 

o 

W-> 


<✓3 

00 


P— 

CO 

wo 


*— 

«n 


O' 

r— 

00 


CO 

o 

wo 

*■« 

CN 

*•* 

CN 

S'. 

O' 


O) 

*— 


S3 

CO 

o 


# c 



IN_ 

00 






n" 

st" 

N 


c 







<D 






ui 

</» 

i. 



o 

CO 

St 

(A 

o 



WO 

wo 

CN 

3 

<D 



00 


In 

o 




oo 


N. 

o 

mm 

<V 

In 


CN 

st 

K 

•E 

> 

m 


O 

CN 

CN 

o 


O' 

wo 

o 

N. 

so 

s* 

wo 

<v 



CN 

IN 

wo 

z 

JO 



’’4 

O 

CN 





*N 


Sw 

Of 

L. 



s* 

Sf 

st 

< 

o 






UI 

*4— 






•J 

00 



In 

00 

00 

u 

D) 



CN 

CN 

-o 


C 



CO 

CN 

o 

o 

Z 

o 



««* 

S3 

N» 

o 

h* 


<o 


o 

wo 

W0 

z 


m 


r“ 

o 

|N 

o 


o> 

wo 

co" 

w-r 

", 

CO 

Of 




O' 

CN 

wo 

0 

JZ 



■o 

•— 

00 


c 



co" 

co" 

co" 


o 














*4- 



S3 

st 

wo 


o 



O' 

CN 

St 





In 

oo 

CN 


c 

d) 



in" 

N, 

st 

N. 

Sf 


c 

m 


IN 

st 

O' 


t 

a> 

m 

wo 

S3 

*■» 

O 

N, 

so 

. *v 



O' 


00 

r— 

IN 


0 

•+- 



o 

O 

wo 


cO 



00 

K 

CN 





N. 


"N 





CN 

CN 

CO 


> 







‘Z 







o 







L. 







o 







a 







E 







o 







u 



>- 

k_ 

k_ 

o 






D 

D 

D 

L. 

JO 

u 

k_ 





C 

-Q 

o 





o 
—> 

<V 

U. 

3 


IN 

K 

O' 

CO 

00 

K 

In 

CN 

wo 

CO 

st 

wo 

In 

o 

S3 

in" 

st 

O'" 

k" 

o' 

r— 

i— 

CN 

r— 

st 

O' 

co 

CO 

CN 

o 

•N 

N» 

■N 

■N 


st 

f— 


st 

CO 

wo 

00 

r— 

04 

S3 

00 

IN 

CO 

N 

St 

wo" 

wo" 

<r 

■o" 

wo" 


CN 

CO 

CO 

CO 

00 

00 

wo 

o 

p— 

wo 

•— 

CO 

— 

In 

CO 

In" 

O'" 

co" 

o" 

O'" 

O- 

wo 


co 

o 

co 

00 


00 

■— 

k" 

oo" 

cn" 

In" 

cn" 

IN 

CN 


IN 

•o 

WO 

p— 

f— 

co 

N- 



N« 

N» 



so 

wo 

wo 

'N - 


O' 

IN 

wo 

00 

O' 

S3 

O 

CN 

O' 

O' 

CN 

O' 

O' 

CN 

p— 

•N 


*N 

N. 

N. 

CO 

CO 

00 

wo 

O' 


00 

In 

o 

wo 

CO 

wt 


00 

CO 

In" 

•o" 

In" 

oo" 

co" 

CN 

In 


wo 

CO 

O 

IN 

WO 

CN 

o 








Nf 

wo 

NT 


WO 

O' 

O 

CN 

00 

S3 

o 

N- 

wf 

wo 

p— 

p— 

S3 

N3 

wo 

*N 

*N 

•N 


•n 

N- 

o 

IN 

Nf 

wo 

IN 


O' 

CN 

N’ 

In 

00 

p— 

00 

00 

co" 

wt" 

in" 

,-.*■ 

In" 

1 — 

W0 

•o 

N- 

N - 

O' 

wo 

o 

wo 

00 

■N 



N. 

N. 

CO 


N- 


CO 


O' 

o 

Nj- 

o 

CO 

CN 

NT 

CN 


00 

p— 

00 

<— 

K 

wo 

Nf" 

O'" 

co" 

o' 

o" 

o 

O' 

IN 


S3 

O' 

In 

O 

»o 

oo_ 

cn" 

o" 

O'" 

<r 

V 

o 

S3 

In 

CO 

wo 

o 

N’ 

cn 

CO 

CN 

co" 

co" 

co" 

CO 

co" 


o 

S3 

CN 

IN 

p- 


CN 

00 

O' 

S3 

O' 


wo 

CO 

O 

IN 

o 



*N 

"N 

N, 



O 

S3 

St 

CN 

K 


K 

O' 

IN 

O' 

O 


•O 

00 

S3 

00 

CN 



Ni 





wo 

O 

O 

O 



N" 

CN 

O 

wo 

- - 


O 

Nf 

O' 

In 

CO 


■>« 


N 

N 

•N 


wo 

o 

o 

o 

K 


o 

CN 

o 


' _ 


wo 

oo 


o 

N 


O' 

CN 

f— 

r— 

CN 


_ *>» 






IN 

o 

S3 

St 

CN 


O 

o 

CN 

O' 

00 


CN 

00 

i— 

, — 

00 


N. 


N» 




CO 


W0 

CN 

WO 


00 

r— 

K 

st 

o 


CO 

r— 

CN 

IN 

wo 






N 


wo 

o 

•o 

wo" 

CN 

S3 


CO 

o 


st 

O' 


o 



O 

In 


wo 

CO 

o 

CN 

oo 




N. 




wo 

Nf 


O' 

CN 


W* 

W0 

00 

■— 

st 


CN 

CO 

00 

st 

S3 


N* 






K 

In 

CN 

S3 

00 



O 

CO 

O 

00 



S3 

CO 

CO 

S3 


■N 



N, 




WO 

wo 

wo 

S3 

WO 


P— 

CO 

St 

wo 

S3 


K 

In 

p— 

t— 

r- 


O 

O' 

o 

O' 

IN 



N» 






CO 

CN 

CN 

oo" 


'<* 

S3 

st 

W0 

S3 


ao 

wo 

00 

O' 

>o 



*>. 


■*•» 



. 

K 

N’ 

p— 

o 

cn" 


CN 

O 

st 

00 

wo 


'4 

CO 

p- 

st 

O' 


N 






CO 

s* 

St 


k" 

st 


O' 

CN 

WO 

o 

CO 


o 

N" 

CO 


st 


-o 

IN 

st 


wo 








00 

•O 

IN 

S3 

O 


W3 


O 

St 

st 


O' 

CN 

N 

00 

CO 





>» 

N, 


i — 

IN 

CN 

O' 

O' 


CO 

IN 

CO 

S3 

p 


,— 

CO 

00 

N 

CN 



*N 

*N 

•n 



CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

O' 






CO 



w. 

<D 

SI 

E 

<\) 

i. 

<D 

S 

1L. 

<u 

_Q 

E 

t. 

aj 

_o 

E 

•*- 

0 

<D 

4) 

CL 


> 

u 

<b 

u 

O 

<u 

</) 

o 

Z 

Q 





























TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE 


Canadian Market trends did not keep 
pace with economic recovery. 

In a year of rising economic recovery, and 
against an ebullient Wall Street, Canadian 
stock markets in 1959 acted in a placid and 
colourless manner. Not that the dollar turnover 
was light, the figures of the Toronto Stock 
Exchange, for instance, being comparable with 
the high 1 957 year, but the share volume was 
small and the price movements were without 
vigour. 

Even in the industrial issues, where the trading 
was steady and responsible for the high dollar 
values, the market lacked spectacular action, 
except for one period in July when it followed 
the New York trend, but in a more subdued 
manner. As for the mines and oils, both groups 
operated at times at the slowest pace since 
1952. 

Chief among the contributing factors to the 
situation were, the tight money; high bond 
interest rates that contrasted with compara¬ 
tively low stock yields; lack of the usual 
American participation in view of their own 
robust market; and for the mines, a dearth of 
field development news in addition to the fact 
that primary products were still in over-supply 
on a world-wide basis. 


200 


Toronto Stock Exchange— Continued 

Each of these factors in themselves was 
capable of bringing about a definite trend, 
but all of them coming practically at once, were 
too much for the market to absorb and remain 
buoyant. 

Yet economically, conditions were good, un¬ 
employment low and spending for capital and 
Government purposes at high levels. Moreover, 
most quarterly statements as they appeared, 
continued to show increased earnings, while 
total dividend payments by Canadian corpora¬ 
tions ran each month consistently ahead of the 
corresponding period of the previous year. 

Value of shares traded in 1 959 on the Toronto 
stock market climbed more than $350 million 
above the comparable 1958 total. 

Share turnover, however, was lower at 
763,249,61 3 against 828,599,059 the previous 
year. 

The sharp gain in dollar value arose from 
activity in higher-priced industrial shares as 
contrasted with the lessened volume in lower- 
priced mining and oil shares. 

Industrial trading was tabulated at 69,1 14,- 
430 shares, some 28 million higher than in 1 958. 

Daily volume was 3,022,766 shares and 
average daily values were computed at 


201 


Toronto Stock Exchange —Continued 

$7,368,008. Issues appearing for trading 
number 1,172, of which 394 showed gains 
over the year and 744 lost, the latter being 
mostly in mining stocks. 

Through the year the Toronto industrial index 
opened at 514.90, made a high of 555.65 in 
July, dropped to a low of 489.77 and closed 
practically unchanged on the year. The base 
metals and western oils acted similarly, while 
the golds were scarcely changed from their 
opening prices. 


ALCOHOLISM RESEARCH FOUNDATION 
OF ONTARIO 

The Alcoholism Research Foundation of On¬ 
tario, located at 24 Harbord Street in midtown 
Toronto, was established in 1949 by an Act of 
the Ontario Legislature. Its function is (1} to 
conduct and promote a programme of research 
in alcoholism and (2) to conduct, direct and pro¬ 
mote programmes for (a) the treatment of alco¬ 
holics, (b) the rehabilitation of alcoholics, (c) 
experimentation in methods of treating and 
rehabilitating alcoholics, and (d) dissemination 
of information respecting the recognition, pre¬ 
vention and treatment of alcoholism. 

The treatment team includes psychiatrists, 


202 


Alcoholism Research Foundation 
of Ontario —Continued 

social workers, psychologists, general physicians, 
other medical specialists and graduate nurses. 

Although financed by the Government of 
Ontario, the Foundation is self-governing. All 
policies are set by its own 10-member Board of 
Trustees which is broadly representative of the 
business and professional community. 

The Foundation operates Brookside Clinic, 
where in the course of a year a 1 5-bed hospital 
and an out-patient service provide treatment 
for approximately 1,000 patients. 


THE CANADIAN NATIONAL INSTITUTE 
FOR THE BUND 

929 Bayview Avenue, Toronto 17, HU. 5-8644. 
President—R. S. Misener 
Managing Director—E. A. Baker 
General Manager — A. V. Weir 
Superintendent Ontario Division—A. N. Magill. 

CNIB SERVICE 

Designed with a double aim CNIB provides 
a Prevention of Blindness programme for the 
sighted and a rehabilitation service for the 
sightless. 


203 


The Canadian National Institute for 
the Blind —Continued 


in addition to arranging eye care for those in 
danger of losing their sight but unable to pay 
the cost, CNIB operates the Eye Bank of 
Canada to provide tissue for the sight-restoring 
corneal transplant. CNIB also directs a clinic 
for the provision of low vision lenses for those 
unable to read with regular glasses. Through 
a constructive education campaign by lecture, 
folder and film, CNIB strives to make all 
Canadians aware of the need to protect good 
sight. 


CNIB SERVICE TO THE BLIND 

CNIB service to the Blind begins with special 
counselling for the parents of pre-school children 
and continues all through life. For blind adults 
training helps bring about adjustment to the 
handicap and teaches touch-type skills neces¬ 
sary to take the place of vision. An employ¬ 
ment service locates suitable positions in 
industry and in cafeteria or canteen operation. 
An active recreation programme is offered for 
the leisure hours. 

For the elderly alone in the world, the CNIB 
offers residence accommodation in modern 
buildings. Carefully selected staff provide sym¬ 
pathetic understanding. 


204 


The Canadian National Institute for 
the Blind —Continued 

Numerous special services such as the library 
of recorded books, travel concessions and dis¬ 
counts on the purchase of appliances makes 
CNIB a valuable asset to blind citizens in 
every walk of life. More than 23,000 Cana¬ 
dians are blind. 

THE CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY 

Founded 1896. Incorporated 1909. 

Organization — National Office, 10 Provincial 
Divisions. 

Membership—There are more than 1,600,000 
members of the Canadian Red Cross Society 
in 1,205 Branches. Junior Red Cross mem¬ 
bership totals 1,372,316 in over 40,000 
Branches. 

An Organization of Volunteers As a member 
of the world-wide organization of mercy the 
Canadian Red Cross works for the improvement 
of health, the prevention of disease and the 
relief of human suffering throughout the world. 
Many thousands of Canadians volunteer their 
services to assist others in need and form a 
ready nucleus of capable workers in every 
community for times of emergency. 

Red Cross obligations include Disaster Ser¬ 
vices, Free Blood Transfusion Service, Outpost 


205 


The Canadian Red Cross Society —Cont. 

Hospitals and Nursing Stations, Veterans’ 
Services, International Work, Junior Red Cross, 
Water Safety, Home Nursing, Women’s Work 
Groups, Enquiry Bureau, Visiting Homemakers 
and Sick Room Loan Service. 


TORONTO BRANCH ACTIVITIES IN 1959 

Arts and Crafts—Veteran patients completed 
a total of 1 3,664 projects. 

Blood Donor Service—In association with seven 
other Red Cross Branches obtained 72,009 
donations at 507 clinics in Metropolitan 
Toronto and Toronto Township. 28,231 
patients in 22 hospitals benefited. 

Canadian Red Cross Corps—1 16 members sup¬ 
plying own uniforms, gave 31,302 hours of 
voluntary service and drove 75,424 miles. 

Disaster Services—Assisted 41 families com¬ 
prising 221 individuals; help included emer¬ 
gency accommodation, food, blankets and 
essential clothing. 

Film Services—Operated regularly in seven 
hospitals and lodges. 

First Aid—48 volunteer Instructors taught 35 
classes, involving 990 enrolments. 

Home Nursing—234 persons, including 5 blind, 
completed the course. 


206 


The Canadian Red Cross Society— Cont. 

Hospital Services 67 volunteers made 1 50,692 
visits in five hospitals. 

Junior Red Cross—82,591 members in 1,823 
branches contributed $18,878.32. 

Overseas Information—Handled 204 new en¬ 
quiries, located 1 62 persons in Toronto area 
and wrote approximately 2,400 letters. 

Overseas Reception—Greeted and assisted 82 
individuals from Eastern Europe. 

Red Cross Soldiers’ Club—Provided a year- 
round home for 127 veterans of First and 
Second World Wars. 

Sickroom Supply Service — 3,025 sickroom 
articles were loaned. 

Sunnybrook Red Cross Lodge—129,439 meals 
served in canteen, 2,211 house guests ac¬ 
commodated. 

Voluntary Services-—Interviewed and placed 
283 new volunteers. 

Volunteer Home Nursing Services—Gave 
30,142 hours of voluntary work. 

Water Safety Services—21 3 adults and children 
taught in classes for “Recreational Swimming 
for the Handicapped”. Made 1,629 awards 
and qualified 258 Instructors. 

Welfare Service—Served 1,386 people, 721 
of whom were given material relief including 
emergency orders for groceries, fuel, clothing, 


207 


The Canadian Red Cross Society —Cont. 


layettes, dentures, glasses and transporta¬ 
tion. 

Women’s Work—Made and shipped 14,338 
articles and 253,000 swabs to Ontario 
Division, National Headquarters and other 
Toronto Branch departments. Gave 22,169 
hours of voluntary service. 

President: J. R. M, Wilson, F.C.A. 
Executive Secretary: Don S. Brandt 

UNITED COMMUNITY FUND OF 
GREATER TORONTO 

85 Richmond Street West, Toronto, Ontario 
Telephone: EM. 6-4241 

OFFICERS—1959-60 

Honorary Chairman of the Board—Edgar G. 
Burton. 

Chairman of the Board—C. F. W. Burns. 
President—W. P. Gilbride. 

Vice-Presidents—Harold W. Thomson, M. O. 
Simpson, Jr., Wilfrid Sanders, Richard R. 
Smith, John J. Wilson. 

Treasurer—Kenneth LeM, Carter. 

Secretary and Executive Director—John H. 
Yerger. 

Date of Incorporation—May 1 6, 1 956. 


208 


United Community Fund —Continued 

The membership consists of all those who give 
one dollar or more through the United Appeal. 

Its affairs are managed by a Board of Trus¬ 
tees, elected by the members. This in turn 
elects the Officers, the Executive and other com¬ 
mittees and appoints the permanent staff. 

Its basic objectives are: 

(1) To unite the financial campaigns of 
properly qualified agencies. (Any re¬ 
cognized welfare agency is eligible to 
join the Fund.) 

(2) To promote social welfare through the 
orderly distribution of funds, and 

(3) To raise the money. 

The seven Red Cross branches in Metropolitan 
Toronto are not members of the United Com¬ 
munity Fund, but participate as partners in the 
fund-raising campaign in October which is 
known as the United Appeal for Metropolitan 
Toronto. 

The number of organizations participating in 
the 1959 United Appeal was 88. 

The third year of the United Appeal in 1959 
raised $9,066,000 on an objective of $9,187,- 
500. 

The third annual meeting of the United 
Community Fund was held on April 19, 1960. 


209 


SOCIAL PLANNING COUNCIL OF 
METROPOLITAN TORONTO 


Room 201, 160 Bay Street EMpire 3-4971 

OFFICERS 

President—M. Wallace McCutcheon, Q.C. 

Vice-President and Executive Director—Miss 
Florence L. Philpott. 

Vice-President and Director of Community Rela¬ 
tions—Arthur V. Pigott. 

The Social Planning Council of Metropolitan 
Toronto is a council of individuals, public and 
voluntary community organizations and citizen 
groups, working together to assess the health, 
welfare and recreation needs of Metropolitan 
Toronto and to encourage the orderly develop¬ 
ment of well-balanced community services. It 
promotes measures for the raising of standards 
of social services and the development of public 
understanding and support of them. It offers its 
assistance in co-ordinating the services of the 
various welfare agencies both private and pub¬ 
lic. Another important aspect of the Council’s 
activities is the assistance provided the United 
Community Fund through the preparation of 
reports on agency services and the undertaking 
of special studies. The programme of the Coun¬ 
cil is carried out through Area Planning Councils 
throughout the City and suburbs; Planning Sec¬ 
tions in Family and Child Welfare, Old Age, 


210 


Social Planning Council —Continued 


Health, Recreation, and Immigration; and the 
Research Department. 

It also provides the following services: Central 
Volunteer Bureau; Information Service, providing 
accurate information to the general public on 
health, welfare and recreational services; the 
Christmas Bureau, which provides a clearing 
house for applications for Christmas assistance, 
and channels gifts from donors. Co-ordination 
of classes in prenatal education in Metropolitan 
Toronto. 

The Council publishes a Directory of Health, 
Welfare and Recreational services in Metropol¬ 
itan Toronto, a Directory of Social Centres for 
Older Persons, and a Directory of Summer 
Recreation. 

The Council is supported by grants from the 
United Community Fund and municipalities, 
membership fees and Foundation grants for 
special projects. It holds membership, and 
participates in the Canadian Welfare Council, 
Ontario Welfare Council and United Community 
Funds and Councils of America, Inc. 


CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP 
REGISTRATION BRANCH 


Department of Citizenship and Immigration 
Clerk of the Court—Mr. L. E. Fox, 1 200 Bay 

Street. Telephone: WA. 5-4121. 

Application for Canadian Citizenship should 
be made at the Court of Canadian Citizenship, 
1 200 Bay Street, Toronto. 

The Court was established in April, 1955 and 
in the meantime has received over 145,000 
applications. These were submitted by persons 
who came to Canada from many countries, 
including the United Kingdom, Austria, China, 
Estonia, Germany, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, 
Poland and the Ukraine. 

A newcomer to Canada may apply for 
Canadian citizenship when he has resided here 
for four years and nine months. However, 
wives of Canadian citizens may apply after 
one year’s residence in Canada. Applicants 
should bring their passports, birth certificates 
and landing cards to the Court. The fee for 
other than a British subject is $10. 

Three months after making application the 
person is called in for a hearing. At that time 
he is examined by the Presiding Judge, as 
to his knowledge of the English or French 
language, as well as his knowledge of the 


212 


Canadian Citizenship —Continued 


privileges and responsibilities of Canadian 
citizenship. If this is satisfactory, he is called 
in again a few weeks later to take the oath of 
allegiance and receive his Certificate of Cana¬ 
dian Citizenship. 

In the case of the British subject, the require¬ 
ments are practically the same. However, he 
is not required to appear before the Judge, 
and the fee is only $5.00. If his application is 
accepted, his certificate is mailed to him. 

Parents who have become Canadian Citizens, 
are entitled to apply for Canadian Citizenship 
on behalf of their minor children, born outside 
of Canada. These certificates are also mailed 
directly to applicants, and the fee is $1.00 in 
each case. 

Mention should also be made of the miniature 
certificate, a laminated card 4” x 2%” in size, 
which bears the holder’s photograph, and is 
available to Canadian citizens for a charge of 
$2.00. Applicants for miniatures should bring 
in their Canadian birth certificates or certificates 
of Canadian Citizenship, as the case may be, 
and two passport photographs 1 3 / a ” x IV 2 ” in 
size. 


213 


WEATHER RECORDS 


FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS 


The following information is supplied by the 
Director, Meteorological Branch, 315 Bloor St. 
West, Toronto; telephone WAInut 2-2164. For 
Forecasts, telephone WAInut 5-481 1. 


Year 


Temperature 



Win¬ 

ter* 

Snow¬ 

fall 

(ins.) 

Mean 

Extremes 

Pre¬ 

cipi¬ 

tation 

(ins.) 

Jan. 

July 

Year 

High¬ 

est 

Low¬ 

est 

1950 

31.5 

68.8 

46.7 

88 

-12 

33.69 

69.9 

1951 

27.8 

70.8 

48.0 

90 

-4 

35.40 

52.8 

1952 

27.4 

73.7 

48.9 

94 

-5 

26.18 

70.0 

1953 

29.9 

71.4 

50.0 

100 

5 

27.25 

18.4 

1954 

21.3 

70.2 

47.9 

93 

-6 

33.35 

53.4 

1955 

24.9 

75.8 

49.2 

98 

-9 

32 14 

49.6 

1956 

24.8 

68.1 

46.9 

95 

-1 

33.61 

68.3 

1957 

20.6 

70.4 

48.3 

92 

-10 

33.23 

52.2 

1958 

25.6 

70.2 

46.8 

90 

-8 

25.88 

31.3 

1959 

21.7 

72.5 

48.1 

94 

-3 

31.1 1 

66.2 


^Winter snowfall includes the amount falling in the previous 
autumn months and is the total of all the amounts of freshly 
fallen snow. 


214 






























Weather Records —Continued 


Season Day Degrees Below 65°F. 
(September 1st to May 31st) 


Season 

Total Day 
Degrees 

Season 

Total Day 
Degrees 

1949-50 

6778 

1954-55 

6316 

1950-51 

6413 

1955-56 

7056 

1951-52 

6615 

1956-57 

6477 

1952-53 

6214 

1957-58 

6470 

1953-54 

6336 

1958-59 

7043 


Extremes of Temperature, Precipitation 
and Sunshine 

Highest temperature, 1 05°, July 9 and 1 0, 1 936. 

Warmest day, mean temperature, 92°, July 10, 
1936. 

Lowest temperature, -26.5°, January 10, 1859. 

Coldest day, mean temperature, -16°, Feb¬ 
ruary 8, 1 934. 

Warmest year, mean temperature, 50.0°, 1 953. 

Coldest year, mean temperature, 40.5°, 1875. 

Heaviest rainfall in 24 hours—3.88 inches, July 
27, 1897. 


215 


Weather Records —Continued 

Heaviest snowfall in 24 hours—20.5 inches, 
December 11-12, 1944. 

Greatest yearly precipitation—50.17 inches, 
1843. 

Least yearly precipitation 23.84 inches, 1933. 

Greatest winter snowfall-—! 23.5 inches, 1869- 
70. 

Least winter snowfall 1 8.4 inches, 1952-53. 

Greatest total hours of sunshine—2,306 hours, 
1900. 

Least total hours of sunshine—1,844 hours, 
1942. 

Weather Averages—1959 

Mean temperature—48.1°F. or 1.1° above 
average. 

Precipitation—31.11 inches or 0.18 inches 
above average. 

Snowfall for the winter 1958-59—66.2 inches 
or 1 1.7 inches above average. 

Sunshine—2,1 19 hours or 81 hours above aver¬ 
age. 


216 


THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 


The idea of the University of Toronto took 
form late in the eighteenth century while Toronto 
still was forest, its only mark of destiny a sandy 
peninsula which hooked into Lake Ontario pro¬ 
mising safe anchorage for warships. The man 
who could see the towers of a university rising 
in a wilderness was John Graves Simcoe, first 
Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada. In 
1792, before leaving Devonshire to take up 
his appointment. Governor Simcoe included 
“a college of the higher class” among the 
institutions he proposed to establish. 

“It would be eminently useful,” he said. “It 
would give a tone of principles and manners 
that would be of infinite support to government.” 

After four years in the New World, Governor 
Simcoe advanced his plan with even more 
conviction. 

“I am daily confirmed in the necessity for a 
university,” he wrote to the Bishop of Quebec. 
“It would have great influence in civilizing the 
Indians and, what is of more importance, those 
who corrupt them.” 

In 1 827, Governor Simcoe’s vision began to 
take tangible shape with the granting by 
George IV of a Royal Charter for a university 
to be known as King’s College in the Town of 
York, Capital of Upper Canada. 


217 


The University of Toronto —Continued 

Upper Canada now is Ontario, Canada’s 
wealthiest and most heavily populated pro¬ 
vince. York is Metropolitan Toronto, the 
country’s economic capital and one of her great 
centres for the arts and sciences. And King’s 
College, which clung to life through the bitter 
controversies of its first years, has been the 
University of Toronto for more than a century. 

Geographically, the University is the heart 
of Toronto. Four of the city’s principal north- 
south arteries bound or cut through University 
properties. College Street is the southern 
boundary and Bloor Street, site of the east- 
west underground, the northern. 

The University has frontage rights on Uni¬ 
versity Avenue from Queen Street to Queen’s 
Park: wise use of this authority has contributed 
to the Avenue’s dignity and beauty. Queen’s 
Park is ringed by University buildings. The 
Park itself, including the land on which the 
Ontario Parliament Buildings stand, belongs to 
the University. It is leased for $1 a year. 

Elsewhere are other University properties in¬ 
cluding the Faculty of Dentistry building in the 
hospital district, one-time country estates on 
the city’s periphery, and the University Forest 
of 17,000 acres far to the north. 

The University faced perhaps its greatest 


218 


The University of Toronto —Continued 

challenge in 1 958 when it embarked on a build¬ 
ing plan to almost double its size in 10 years. 
The 1958 enrolment of 13,000 was not large 
compared with the University of London and 
many United States institutions. But tremendous 
problems were involved in maintaining the 
University’s high academic standards during a 
period of such rapid expansion. 

Future historians of the University will look 
back on the decade ending in 1968 and judge 
how steadfastly the University kept the faith 
with scholarship. One may speculate about 
their verdict with optimism, for expansion is 
proceeding according to a master plan which 
in meticulous detail, safeguards and in many 
areas improves facilities for teaching and 
research. 

Much of the University’s strength comes from 
its federated system. In the Faculty of Arts 
are four colleges: University College (the Pro¬ 
vincial non-denominational college), and the 
federated church-related colleges, Victoria 
(United Church), Trinity (Anglican), and St. 
Michael’s (Roman Catholic). 

Each Arts college has its own teaching and 
administrative staff, giving the University flexi¬ 
bility to a degree not found in monolithic 
institutions. This was one of the factors which 


219 


The University of Toronto —Continued 


inevitably led to leadership in meeting Canada’s 
crisis in higher education. The University will 
be ready for an enrolment of 23,000 in 1968. 

Total cost of the 10-year building plan has 
been estimated at $85 million, the funds coming 
from the University’s triple alliance of govern¬ 
ment, business, and the people. The University 
of Toronto takes pride in being the Provincial 
University of Ontario. But, economically, the 
line between private and state institutions is 
thin in Canada: all universities in Ontario receive 
about the same proportion of their total re¬ 
venues from the Provincial Treasury. Without 
private benefactors the University of Toronto 
would not be the institution we know today. 

Annual operating cost of the University and 
its federated and affiliated institutions is in the 
area of $30 million, most of this in salaries 
which in turn benefit the economy of Metro¬ 
politan Toronto. The teaching staff, which 
numbers more than 2,300 including junior mem¬ 
bers, will increase in proportion to student 
enrolment. 

Divisions of the University include the Faculties 
of Arts, Medicine, Law, Applied Science and 
Engineering, Household Science, Forestry, Music, 


220 


The University of Toronto— Continued 


Pharmacy, and Dentistry; Schools of Graduate 
Studies, Architecture, Physical and Health Educa¬ 
tion, Social Work, Nursing, and Hygiene; 
Institutes of Aerophysics, Business Administration, 
and Child Study; the Ontario College of Educa¬ 
tion, the Connaught Medical Research Labora¬ 
tories, and the Division of University Extension. 

Federated with the University are three theo¬ 
logical colleges: Knox (Presbyterian), Wycliffe 
(Anglican), and Emmanuel (United Church). 

The Royal Ontario Museum and the Royal 
Conservatory of Music are also within the 
University framework. 

The Ontario Agricultural College and the 
Ontario Veterinary College at Guelph, Ontario, 
are affiliated. 

The most recent affiliate is York, the new 
University for the Metropolitan Toronto area, 
which will open its door to students in September, 
1960, on Queen's Park Crescent, just south of 
Bloor Street. Commencing with the 1961-62 
session and for a number of years thereafter, 
York University will be located on the 87-acre 
estate known as Glendon Hall on Bayview 
Avenue, near Lawrence Avenue. 


221 


The University of Toronto —Continued 


During the period of affiliation—which, by 
agreement, will not be less than four years and 
not more than eight years—York will specialize 
in the General Course of the Faculty of Arts 
at the University of Toronto. York University 
will have its own staff which will, even in the 
first year, be responsible for about 80 per cent 
of the instruction. During this early period 
University of Toronto professors will assist with 
teaching, and students enrolled at York will 
receive a University of Toronto degree. Thus, 
during its formative years, York University will 
receive the encouragement and stimulus of a 
long established institution of high academic 
standing. By 1968 or earlier, York will be an 
autonomous institution granting its own degrees. 

The University of Toronto has students from 
60 different countries and its graduates and 
former students, who number over 115,000, 
may be found in all parts of the world. 

Graduates of more than 150 universities are 
enrolled in the School of Graduate Studies, now 
the principal centre of advanced studies in 
Canada. 

Four hundred and thirty-one professors are 
involved in the work of the School. Some teach, 


222 


The University of Toronto —Continued 


some direct research; many do both. Their 
activities are spread over 54 different courses 
leading to doctoral and masters’ degrees 
which range from aeronautical engineering to 
zoology. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Chairman—Lieut.-Col. W. E. Phillips, C.B.E., 
D.S.O., M.C., B.A.Sc., LL.D. 

Vice-Chairman—Henry Borden, C.M.G., Q.C., 
B.A. 

Chancellor—F. C. A. Jeanneret, B.A., D. es L., 
O.A., LL.D. 

President—C. T. Bissell, M.A., Ph.D., D.Litt., 
LL.D., F.R.S.C. 

Secretary—W. W. Small, B.Com., M.A. 


223 


FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

SUMMARY OF ESTIMATED REVENUE AND 
EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR 1960 

ESTIMATED EXPENDITURE 

General: 


Debt Charges, General.$ 

5,623,480 

Libraries Public... 


1,764,405 

At Large. 


4,379,652 

Administrative Departments: 


Audit Dept. 

$249,820 


City Clerk’s Dept. 

480,313 


Finance Dept. 

782,912 


Legal Dept. 

326,474 


Mayor’s Office.. . 

55,915 


Personnel Dept.. . 

107,089 


Purchasing and 



Stores Division. 

259,003 


Real Estate 



Division. 

1 17,002 


City Council 



General. 

751,934 


Grants. 

92,976 



3,223,438 


224 












Estimated Expenditure —Continued 


Operating Departments: 


Department of Buildings and 

Development. 

City Property Department. . . . 

Fire Department. 

Department of Parks and 

Recreation. 

Department of Public Health . . 
Department of Public Welfare 
Department of Public Works. . 


$ 816,756 

1,983,130 
6,467,447 

4,718,230 
2,666,349 
8,851,510 
13,209,91 1 


$ 53,704,308 


Special Services— 


(Including Debt Charges): 


Abattoir—Municipal. 

$ 

525,787 

Airports—Island and Malton.. 


85,619 

Canadian National Exhibition . 


791,151 

City of Toronto Ltd. Dividend 



Housing Corporation Ltd . . . 


51,103 

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair 


65,156 

The Housing Authority of 



Toronto. 


832,1 13 

The Parking Authority of 



Toronto. 


607,736 


$ 

2,958,665 

Waterworks . 

$ 

8,587,803 

Total Expenditure—City . . . . . 

$ 

65,250,776 


225 















Estimated Expenditure— Continued 


Metropolitan General Levy 
(City’s Share)— 

Assessment— 

Agst. Resid. $ 7,701,678 

Agst. Comm. 15,044,099 

-$ 22,745,777 

Total Affecting General Rate.. $ 87,996,553 

Education: (Net Amount to be raised 

by Taxation) 

Board of Education— 

Maintenance . $ 1 8,890,907 

Debt Charges. 2,227,166 

-$ 21,118,073 

Metropolitan School Levy 


(City’s Share). 1 9,878,776 

Separate School Board. 1,675,777 


Total Affecting School Rates.$ 42,672,626 

$130,669,179 


Total Expenditure 











ESTIMATED REVENUE 


General: 

Dog Licenses.$ 63,000 

Emergency Housing. 10,300 

Financial Items. 20,000 

General Rentals. 398,000 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes.. . . 47,500 

Sundry. 142,978 

Taxation Percentages. 300,000 

Toronto Housing Co. 35,280 

Audit Department. 49,500 

Department of Buildings and 

Development. 31 8,000 

City Clerk’s Department. 9,000 

City Property Department.. . . 24,500 

Finance Department. 24,150 

Fire Department. 1,000 

Legal Department. 1,600 

Department of Parks and 

Recreation. 199,849 

Department of Public Health.. 7,450 

Department of Public Welfare 252,585 

Department of Public Works.. 595,500 

Purchasing and Stores 

Division. 20,000 

Real Estate Division. 1 1,500 


Total—General Revenue $ 2,531,692 


227 




















Estimated Revenue— Continued 


Special Services: 


Abattoir—Municipal. 

$ 

500,000 

Canadian National Exhibition. 


205,450 

The Housing Authority of 
Toronto. 


216,000 

The Parking Authority of 
Toronto. 


607,736 

Total—Special Services 
Revenue. 

$ 

1,529,186 

Metropolitan Corporation— 
Recoveries contra to 

City’s Expenditure. 

$ 

2,235,755 

Province of Ontario . 

$ 

8,121,802 

Government of Canada. . . . 


1,064,000 


$ 

15,482,435 

Waterworks. 


8,587,803 


$ 

24,070,238 

Surplus brought forward from 
1959. 


426,041 


$ 

24,496,279 

Taxation (Net). 

.$106,172,900 

Total Revenue . 

$130,669,179 


228 





















TAXATION, ASSESSMENT AND POPULATION, 1950-1960 


Year 

O’-(N CO Tf lO OK 
ir)U“>ir>*0‘0‘0U">‘0 
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

1958 

1959 

0961 


o 


o 

ao 

>o 


i_ ."tl 


CO 

N- 

to 


4) Q_ 

t o-o e » 5 0C>O'^C>'W lr > 

CO 

N- 

CO 

"D > 

, 0 , 

OcxjoOOOO'-CN 

CO 

to 

>o 

C ^ 

u 

1— • — 

r— 

■— 

•— 

O 






— x 






o O 






£ 


f> K O — tKKn 

•— 

to 

CO 



COO-CNOOOOCNO 

CO 

IN 

00 

« o 


OroO'^fCN'^KCN 


00 

CN 

OS 


O'CNCNOOCStNC'iO 

CN 

o 

co' 

o 


fe^OlOCNCOKOOOCO 

•o 

CO 

o 

CN I 

__l 

INCNOO'OO'OO 

In 

CN 

CO 

cj 


N- V O' O' M K CO CN 

In' 

o' 

o 

m 


TtiO'O'O'O'ONCD 

00 

o 

o 



,„00000>0>0 l o l 0o0o0o0 


o 

= cocooont-)KCNO lr >o 0 9oK — ® 

to 

o 

•SOC^ r ---O^KK<NoO-o(>od' - l 

— 





DiUaUaUocU 

JI 

O ,/ 

l/1 l 0'0 l 000 , 0 l 00000 t 0 1 0i0 l 0 


0 ^ 

~ *0 O O > C ' iO*—iO l OCNCNCOiO' — »“ 

4) 

-C CO 

<on't , »'0’Ooooo-ooTt-<f^^ 

O 

CO 

— — •“CNCNCNCNCNCNi 

O' 






X 

o 


ioioioooooio'ooO'o'oio'o 

h- 


= MNKK't(N'-TfO®'OT(^o'0 


4) i_ 

5(N-oK-oK®own(>o —>ooiK 



CNCNCNCNC^CNCNCNtOrtfOcOfOcOtO 



c£<^oz<Ucz{Jcit{J 


O 

'0>O^KCNOOOCO 


N" 

CN 


u. .‘t 

N'O'OCN'-K'OO 

00 

IN 

N" 



V>o-— — CNCNCN-^IO 

to 

>o 

K 


u 

CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN 

CN 

CN 

CN 

c 






4) 






E 








fS|lOCNOOOCOCMOO 

CO 

CO 

O' 

4) 


— oo-oio-^rcNK-o 

00 

r— 

o 

to 


o »o O CO — O r\ o 

CN 

IN 

to 

< 


K *“ — Xfr CN 00 — o 

CO 

CO 

CN 



rf CO CN CD >0 CO CM)' 

o 

N" 

CN 


E 

^'O'OOcocNionN 

CN 

O 

CN 


< 

>0 V) Tt - CN CO o o 

CN 

IN 

»o 



CO - xt 00 o >o CO lO 

CN 

O’ 

CN 



CO N- ^ N- »0 »0 to O 

o 

IN 

IN 



NO-^M'OK-O 

o 

O' 

o 



ooooo — lOO-t-) 

CN 

O 

o 



-«J'<tC0>O'^00fs.CN 

N- 

N - 

o 

a 


K oo K >o CN — ro oo 

00 

CO 

CO 



'0 l 0'0'000a0'<t>0 

to 

to 

to 

a 

O'O'O'O'O'O'O'O 

o 

>o 

>o 

0 

CL 





CO 

L- 


C-tSOTfuioK 

00 

CN 

o 



LOtOOOtOOOO 

to 

•O 

>o 

>- 


OOOOOOOO- 

CN 

CN 

CN 



I 

- 

- 



a> 

“D 

u 

E 

to 

C 

<L 

E 

t/l 

to 

<D 

to 

to 

o 

C 

o 

“O 

4) 

*> 

4> 


to 

0) 

>< 

o 

»o 

4 ; 

•O 

~ 

c 


c 

<D 

E 

> 

o 

a 

E 


to 

D) 
c . 


= ^ O 


o >^,_ 


> 
"O <D 

<D —Ji 

"D *-*— 
O O 
CD 4) 
a, > 

5- ^ 

o _2 

u 
<D X 

CQ UJ 


• 4 ) 

a> -J- 

1“ 

X * 


c 

O 

U ■ 
D 00 

CO £ 
»- O 

-sj 

C to 
D UJ 


5-S 


® E 

S o 
a: U 


naU 


































SUMMARY OF DEBENTURE DEBT, DECEMBER 31st, 1959 

(Exclusive of Debenture Debt assumed by the Metropolitan Corporation) 


— _Q 

o a) 

z a 


o ~ 

"tj 

< ^ 

-o £ 

a 


2 c 

I i 

3 

O 

u 

< 


o 


a> 

«j 


<u 

CO 


</> 


COO''tKOCNlOCNCOOCNO 

qn[\n-^i;co'0 0>qioo 

CO *0 —• CN ^ CO O' <-• O ^ O' 

'OntOOKKO"ONO'-t)> 

O'K'O'-'OMK'OO'OCS’f 

*** oo' cn ao w-T O'' o' o' o' o' o' ' 

OO — K — COCOCNOKOO 

O'OO't — oooooooo'oo^r 

CN CO 


CN CN 


CN O 


— O' CN 


<o 


O' O O CO o 

O "t; o o- co 

d V> 00 C0 0' 

0 O ''t 00 — 

o oo 0 — o 

K O'' K o' o' 

O O' O O' 

CN — 00 


K oo 

CO CO 

—’ K 
Nf O 
KO 
oo' cn' 
O CN 
— -O' 


Tt O 

O' O' 

00 — 
V) 00 
O' o 
oo' o' 
O' o 



tv. 


O' 

o 

CN 

CN 

U"> 

O' 

,— 

o 

o 

CN 


r— 

00 

CN 

CO 

00 

''t 

00 

o- 

CO 

o 

Nf 

o 


d 

,— 

o 

irj 

r— 

d 

00 

o 

O' 

o 

co" 



CO 

O' 

O' 

o 

O' 

K 

O' 

1— 

CO 

o 

K 

00 

.a 

o 

lO 


CO 

NO 

00 

K 


o 

o 

•— 

o 

a) 


O'' 

NO 

<o' 

o' 

o' 

o' 

•"t' 

co' 

o' 

o' 

K 

Q 

■o 

o 

CN 

CN 

o 

CO 

CO 

O' 

O' 

K 

CO 

o 


■— 

o 

NJ- 

CN 

O' 

00 

o 

>— 

CN 

O' 

O' 

00 


co' 

co' 


cn' 

o' 



—' 

o' 

cn' 

cn' 

co' 


D 

in O 

O .t: — 
Cl CJ -Q 


4) .E •- 


i) 

c 

a> 

O 


O) 

•- a u 
t> 3 a> 

^0-0 
2 to »- 

CD Q_ 

. a 
>> •> o 

UUiZO 


Q .E 


o 

_c 

CO 

vt 

*>» 

0 


V 
CD 

_o 
a 
E 
c u-i 

o U 


«/> 


<1> 

■el 

o 


<u 


.? -Q 


3 
O 

. a> 

Cl c 

E a 
— ID 

O a 

{J (/) 


<U U 

V_ 1 

<D I 

“ § 




^ o 


^ p 

^r 

oo d 

00 

CN O 

CN 

— o 

l-m 

^ N. 


o o 

o 

•O O' 

O 

CO — 

*— 

o' I 

o' 




E 

<D 

TI 

C «/> 
<D >v 

E ^ 

CL 4) 
c _2 o> 
o c <d a 
o > >~ 

j* « 2 > 

i- C T3 > 

o <d a> a) 

Q_ O- OC CO 


CO O 

o O 

co o 

CN o 
O' <3 

o' ^0 

CN O' 

“IT 

cn -r 


co 

o 

co’ 

CN 

O' 

*■» 

«o 

K 

>» 

CN 


K 

tN 


^t 

t— 

r— 

O 


•o 

O 


o 



•h 

r— 



K 


to 

00 

00 

cn' 

cn' 

■'t 



~a 

c 

3 

u_ 

c 

o 

a. 

E 

4 ) 
"O 
a> 
a£ 
•*— 
JO 
(V 

Q 

•*- 

c 

a> 

E 

o 


o 

♦- 

o 


































Summary of Debenture Debt, December 31st, 1959—Continued 

r Gross Accumulated Actuarial Net 

Debt Sinking Fund, etc. Debt 


oo »o 

co 

ts 

CN O 

CO 

Is 

st «0 

O 

ts 

NO O' 

CO 

00 

NO CO 

CN 

CO 

co' oo' 

st 

O'" 

o — 

CN 

Is 

CO CO 

00 

O' 

IN* st 

N, 

r—- 

r— 

r— 

CN 

NO 


OO-* 00 O CN O' >0 O 

o o co o; n <o o « 

O O sf‘ IS <—■ CN CO CN >6 

O O co 'f Tf 10 CM*) CO 

O O O KIO>OCMOCN 

^ N N S N S S s. s 

— O' *0 sf |N. st O 00 CN 

IS •— — St CO O O St o 

O St 00 IT) CN IS CN 

K <—' —Is' co' 


— CN 

CO 

no 

st NO 

o 

o 




— CN 

st 

Is 

CO O 

00 

o 

O' so 

CO 

CO 

s. N 



00 is 

so 

CN 

CN IS 

o 

CN 

O' CN 

CN 

O' 

s>» 

CO 


CO 

CN 

o 

o 

CO 

so 

O 

CO 

CN 

o 

00 

CN 

00 

>6 

Is 

O' 

CO 

co 

o 

r— 

O' 

CN 

so 

CO 

Co 


S. 



N* 

oo 

CN 

o 

CO 

o 

so 


o 

w— 

CN 

s t 


•— 

CO 

CO 


O' is 
•o o 

co n 
st o 
o — 

~ st'o' 
CO O' 
St CO 


-o 

CO 

CO 

St 

00 

o 

CO 

o 


CO 

00 

St 

O' 

00 

o 

O' 


O O O' O O CN O O SO 

o o st o o t oo o co 

o o co o o cs o o -6 

O O ‘O O O >0 O' W) oo 

OOO OCN'OCNOCN 

—' O'' st' Is' oo st o' O-' CN 

Is — oo st CN -O 00 -O o 

st sf O S") *0 O CN 


00 st 


CO co 
CN NO 


IS 


CN 


IS st 


O 
TO 
U C 

3 8 

3 0) 

Q- lO 



JO 



• O) 

• • 




<D 



• c 

• • 

<D * 

x- • 



o 



• in 

• • 






in D 


O • 



X 



a> o 

• • 

jc . 



<D 



c X 

• • 

c/> . 



0 



2 -D 

• 0 

X- O 


c 

ft 

1 

>» 



£ 

• c 

£ C 



c 

.2 o 

o 

O -C 
CJ CJ 
3 CO 
X 


p 

o 


o 

u 

3 

X 

LU 

X 

c 

o 


<1) 

c 

4) 

O 

3 

o 


u 

CD 

a 

to 

X 

c 

o 

o> 

c 

o 

3 

X 

o 

al •- 

i i 

c ° 

S -c 
> < 
« 
oc 


c ~ 

o > 
E a 

-Q 


o 

L_ 

o 


.X r 


II 

.2 o 

c *: 

I Z 

I c 
« .2 
w T> 

s ° 

a c 
.2 o 
< u 


X 

CD tJ 
CD 

II 


O 

1! 
° 8 
^ o 

Q. 

° 5 

o 


O 

a 

CD 

*•» 

o 

Q£ 


I 1 

< I 

o> o 

C w 

a 

S-§ 

X — 
o 

CD <J 
-c O 


2 E 
O ® 

h— CO 
.. ^ 
o ^ 

*X- U 

o a> 


< 2 
_ "n u> 

D) r* 

C ^ V- 

*3 X O 

1i> £ 

a. c <d 

CD 2 o 
-C 0 > 
t- t- > 


43,466,142.16 1,295,733.12 42,170,409.04 

instalment Debt Redemption Funds. . +278,000.61 —278,000.61 

Total. 43,466,1 42.1 6 i, 573,73 3.73 417892+08743 

Grand Total. 109,3 68,036.99 5,496,240.79 103,871,796.20 
















































WATER RATES 


Rates charged on a flat-rate basis are pay¬ 
able semi-annually. 

The City is divided into five districts one of 
which is payable in each of the months January 
through May, and again in July through 
November. 

Scale of General Water Rates 
Schedule A 

Dwelling houses: $1.10 cents per room per 
annum, subject to a minimum charge of $3.40 
per annum. 

Rooming-houses: $1.95 per room per annum. 
Schedule B 

Factories, office buildings, stores, garages, 
warehouses, and similar places of business: 
$3.40 for each flat per annum. “Flat" is 
defined as being each floor or part thereof of 
a place of business, or a place of business 
separately occupied on one floor of a building. 

Private hospitals, rest homes, schools, frater¬ 
nity houses, clubs, hotels, and similar places: 
$1.95 per room per annum. 

The following rates per annum are in addition 
to the above-mentioned rates: 


232 


Wafer Rates— Continued 


Residences 

Other 

Basins—each 

$2.13 

$4.25 

Baths—each 

2.13 

4.25 

Shower Baths—Not attached 
fo bath-tub, each 

2.13 

4.25 

Sinks—each 

2.13 

4.25 

Urinals: 

Self-acting, each 

2.55 

5.10 

Not self-acting, each 

10.65 

21.25 

Water Closets: 

Self-acting, each 

3.40 

6.80 

Not self-acting, each. 

1 1.05 

22.10 

Laundry Tubs: 

For pair of tubs (in one 
fixture). 

2.13 

4.25 

For single or additional 
tub, each 

1.28 

2.13 

Schedule C provides rates 

in addition to the 

foregoing in respect of a variety of fixtures. 

Meter Rates 

Meter rates are payable 

quarterly 

in the 

months of January, April, July and October. 

The charge for water su 

pplied on 

meter 

measurement is 26.775 cents per 1,000 gallons. 


There is a minimum charge of $4.25 per 
quarter year. 


233 












Water Rates —Continued 
Discount 

A discount of 10 per cent is allowed when 
payment is received within the prescribed 
period, and applies to all accounts except those 
for water supplied to the Island, or for water 
used without permission. 

No charge is made for the use of a garden 
hose or lawn sprinkler where rates are paid on 
the flat-rate basis. 

Water Rates at Toronto Island 

Water supplied other than by meter measure¬ 
ment is charged at the same rates as are in force 
in the City except that the minimum charge for 
each half-year period shall be $8.50, and shall 
become due in each year on the first day of 
May for the half-year period ending on the 
Ihirty-first day of the following October, and on 
the first day of November for the half-year 
period ending on the thirtieth day of the follow¬ 
ing April. 

Information 

Full information may be obtained regarding 
water rates at Room 103, Main Floor; and for 
metered accounts, Room 101, Main Floor, City 
Hall. Telephone EM. 6-8411, Local 324, for 
general information and Local 322 for informa¬ 
tion regarding meter accounts. 


234 


LICENSES 


All municipal licenses, with the undernoted 
exceptions, are issued by the Metropolitan 
Licensing Commission. For information as to the 
procedure to be followed and for application 
forms and schedule of fees apply at the Metro¬ 
politan Licensing Commission Office either at 
171 Eglinton Avenue East or Room 105A, City 
Hall. 

The Department of Buildings and Develop¬ 
ment, City Hall Annex, 465 Bay Street, will 
continue to receive applications for Elevator 
and Dry Cleaning Licenses, and for licenses 
relating to the operation of Cleaning and 
Pressing establishments. 

Dog licenses are issued by the Toronto 
Humane Society, 1 1 Wellesley Street West, on 
behalf of the Corporation of the City of Toronto. 

Applications for lodging house licenses should 
be submitted to the Public Health Department, 
City Hall Annex, 465 Bay Street. 

All licenses expire on December 31st, except 


the following: 

License Expiry Date 

Cartage Owner and Driver March 31st 

Coal or Coke Dealer and Fuel Oil April 30th 
Journeyman Electrician April 30th 

Master Electrician April 30th 

Old Gold May 3 1 st 


235 







Licenses —Continued 


Second Hand Dealer 
Second Hand Shop 
Second Hand Junk Yard 
Second Hand Books 
Salvage Collector 
Lodging House 
Shoe Repair Shop 
Shoe Shine Shop 


>May 31st 

..May 31st 
May 31st 
Sept. 30th 
May 31st 
May 31st 


Any information concerning Licenses may be 
obtained from the Metropolitan Licensing Com¬ 
mission, either at 171 Eglinton Avenue East, or 
Room 105A, City Hall. 


TAXICAB TARIFFS 

Extracts from By-law No. 23 of the 
Metropolitan Licensing Commission 

TARIFF “A” 

BY DISTANCE 

One to Four Passengers: 

For the first one-third mile or part 

thereof.$ .40 

For each additional one-third mile or 

part thereof.1 0 

For waiting time while under engage¬ 
ment, for each two minutes. .10 

For each additional passenger in excess 

of four . .20 


236 



















Taxicab Tariffs —Continued 

Baggage, for each trunk (32” x 18” 

x 9” or 3 cubic feet).$ .50 

Hand Baggage, free if carried inside 
vehicle. 

Hand Baggage if not carried inside 
vehicle, per parcel.10 

Brief cases and parcels of compar¬ 
able size. free 

BY THE HOUR Fixed Rate 
For the first hour or any part thereof $4.00 

For each additional 15 minutes. 1.00 

For each passenger in excess of four, 

per hour.75 

Baggage, for each trunk (32” x 18” x 9” 

or 3 cubic feet).50 

Hand Baggage, free if carried inside 
vehicle. 

Hand Baggage if not carried inside 


vehicle, per parcel.10 

Brief cases and parcels of comparable 

size. free 

CHILDREN 

Children under the charge of an adult: 

Eight years of age and under free 

Over eight years and under twelve 

years of age. Half Fare 

Over twelve years of age. Full Fare 


237 














Taxicab Tariffs —Continued 


AMBULANCE 

For any journey within the Metropolitan 

Area between the hours of 7.00 a.m. 

and 1 1.00 p.m. following.$12.00 

For any journey within the Metropolitan 

Area at any other time than the above 1 5.00 

TARIFF “B” 

DRIVE-SELF CAB RATES 

MINIMUM RATES 

Upon an hourly basis: 

(1) For light imported automobiles and 
domestic automobiles of comparable size 
(herein called light automobiles)—85 
cents for each hour and in addition 6 cents 
for each mile. 

(2) For automobiles other than the above 
(herein called heavy automobiles)—$ 1.00 
for each hour and in addition 8 cents for 
each mile. 

Upon a daily basis of twenty-four hours: 

(1) For light automobiles—$5.00 per day 
and in addition 6 cents for each mile. 

(2) For heavy automobiles—$6.00 per day 
and in addition 8 cents for each mile. 


238 



Taxicab Tariffs —Continued 

Upon a weekly basis up to and including 4 
weeks: 

(1) For light automobiles—$30.00 per week 
and in addition 6 cents for each mile. 

(2) For heavy automobiles—$35.00 per 
week and in addition 8 cents for each 
mile. 

For periods over 4 weeks—as agreed upon 
between owner and hirer. 

TARIFF “C” 

Rates for Livery Vehicles; except vehicles serving 
Weddings: 

For each 15 minutes or part thereof ... $1.00 
Minimum charge per trip . 2.00 


23? 




MUNICIPALITY OF 
METROPOLITAN TORONTO 

(For List of Members of Council, Committees 
and Officials, see pages 329-334) 

Population—1,487,348 
Area—153,402 acres 

The Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto Act, 
as amended, provides for a federal system of 
municipal government, for certain financial and 
other purposes, for the City of Toronto and its 
1 2 suburban municipalities. 

The I 3 area municipalities of the federation 
retain their autonomy in respect to local matters 
and have representation on the Metropolitan 
Council, which is the legislative body of the 
federation and is responsible for the provision 
of the Metropolitan Services. 

The Metropolitan Council is composed of the 
mayor, 2 senior controllers and the senior aider- 
man of each of the 9 wards of the City of 
Toronto (senior according to votes at the pre¬ 
ceding election), and the head of the council of 
each of the foregoing 12 suburban munici¬ 
palities, making a total of 24 members. 


240 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

The powers and responsibilities of the Metro¬ 
politan Council extend to the following: 

ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE—Administration 
of justice within the area and maintenance of 
courts and jail, including Juvenile and Family 
Courts. (York County is required to contribute 
to these expenses.) 

ASSESSMENT — Establishment of a uniform 
assessment system as a basis of taxation for 
both metropolitan and local area purposes. 

WATER WORKS SYSTEM—The Metropolitan 
Toronto Water Works System comprises in¬ 
takes, filtration plants, pumping stations, 
reservoirs and tanks for production, treat¬ 
ment and storage of water, and all trunk 
distribution mains. The water is sold on a 
wholesale basis to the 1 3 Area Municipalities 
which operate their own local distribution 
systems. 

DRAINAGE AND SEWAGE TREATMENT—The 
construction and maintenance of trunk sewers 
and sewage treatment plants to provide a 
Metropolitan sewerage system. 

The local sewage collection systems remain 
the responsibility of the local municipalities. 


241 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

AIR POLLUTION CONTROL—The emission of 
contaminants to the atmosphere is rigidly 
controlled through an existing by-law and a 
competent staff of technical and engineering 
personnel. Extensive research in a modern 
laboratory is conducted on various problems 
to ensure that any emission is kept within 
acceptable limits. 

EDUCATION—A Metropolitan School Board to 
correlate the educational facilities in the 
metropolitan area and through the Metro¬ 
politan Corporation finance the local school 
boards in each of the area municipalities to 
the extent of: 

$190 per year for each primary pupil; 

$315 per year for each academic second¬ 
ary pupil; 

$350 per year for each commercial secon¬ 
dary pupil; 
and 

$535 per year for each technical pupil. 

Assumes total cost of operation of ap¬ 
proved special education classes. 

Assumes responsibility for repayment of 
cost of school projects which are approved 
for legislative grant purposes. 


242 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

CIVIL DEFENCE—The Metropolitan Corporation 
is responsible for civil defence within the area. 
The Metropolitan Toronto Civil Defence 
Organization is responsible for the organiza¬ 
tion, administration and operation of all civil 
defence services including headquarters staff, 
operations, public works, fire, police, health 
and welfare services, the recruiting and co¬ 
ordination of volunteer personnel with the 
staff of municipal departments and the train¬ 
ing of all personnel. 

All municipalities have been activated and 
enrolment and training undertaken. In¬ 
formation may be obtained from Head¬ 
quarters which has been established at 278 
Davenport Road and is equipped for natural 
disaster and civil defence operational train¬ 
ing. 

FINANCES—The Metropolitan Corporation has 
exclusive power to issue debentures for the 
Area Municipalities and their boards of 
education as well as for its own purposes 
including the Toronto Transit Commission, sub¬ 
ject to approval of the Ontario Municipal 
Board. All Metropolitan Debentures are 
direct, joint and several obligations of the 
Metropolitan Corporation and the Area 
Municipalities notwithstanding the fact that 


243 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

the whole or any portion of the rates imposed 
for the payment thereof will be levied only 
against one or more of the Area Municipali¬ 
ties. 

The net requirements (i.e. ; after Provincial 
Government grants and other revenues) of 
the Metropolitan Corporation and the Metro¬ 
politan School Board are levied against Ihe 
Area Municipalities on the basis of their 
relative assessments. Each Area Municipality 
levies against its taxpayers both for its own 
purposes and for its share of the Metropolitan 
levy. 

LICENSING—With very few exceptions, all 
licenses formerly issued by any of the thirteen 
area municipalities are now being issued by 
the Metropolitan Licensing Commission. 

Licenses which are of a metropolitan 
character, such as taxicab owners and drivers, 
cartage owners and drivers, electricians, 
plumbers, etc., are being issued from the 
Head Office of the Commission at 171 
Eglinton Avenue East. In so far as the City 
of Toronto is concerned, all other classes are 
issued at Room 105A, City Hall, as formerly, 
where applicants may obtain forms and in¬ 
formation as to procedures to be followed. 


244 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

PARKS—The Metropolitan Parks Department 
has under its control: 

The Metropolitan Toronto Don Valley Golf 
Course (Yonge Street); The Humber Valley 
Golf Course (Albion Road); The Toronto 
Islands; The Metropolitan Toronto Riverdale 
Zoo; Marie Curtis Park (Long Branch); James 
Gardens (Edenbridge Drive, Etobicoke); Ed¬ 
wards Gardens (Lawrence Avenue at Old 
Bridle Path, North York); Lower Humber Park 
(south of Bloor Street at High Street and 
Stonegate Road); Highland Creek Park 
(South of No. 2 Highway and at Morningside 
Drive) and Cruickshank Park at Weston. 

In addition, the Metropolitan Parks Depart¬ 
ment has under development a series of 
recreational parks and parkways pre¬ 
dominantly in the valley lands of Metropolitan 
Toronto. 

PLANNING—The Metropolitan Toronto Planning 
Area comprises, in addition to the 1 3 muni¬ 
cipalities forming Metropolitan Toronto, 13 
other municipalities as follows: 

The Townships of Toronto, Toronto Gore, 
Vaughan, Markham and Pickering, the Vil¬ 
lages of Port Credit, Streetsville, Wood- 
bridge, Stouffville, Markham and Pickering, 


245 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

and the Towns of Ajax and Richmond Hill. 

At the same time the Toronto and York 
Planning Board, having jurisdiction over the 
whole County of York, was dissolved. Plan¬ 
ning Boards in area municipalities retain their 
right to formulate or amend local Official 
Plans subject to approval by the Metropolitan 
Toronto Planning Board and the Minister of 
Planning and Development. 

The Metropolitan Planning Board has pre¬ 
pared a draft Official Plan for the Metro¬ 
politan Toronto Planning Area which is subject 
to approval by the Metropolitan Council and 
the Minister of Planning and Development. 
This plan deals with the land uses, trans¬ 
portation and transit, sanitation, parks and 
open spaces, schools and housing. 

POLICE—Since January 1st, 1957, Police ser¬ 
vices within the City of Toronto and the 
twelve suburban municipalities in the Metro¬ 
politan area have been provided by the 
Metropolitan Toronto Police. 

Jurisdiction of the Force is under the Metro¬ 
politan Toronto Board of Commissioners of 
Police composed of a full-time Chairman (a 
Magistrate appointed by the Province of 
Ontario), a County Court Judge, the Metro- 


246 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

politan Toronto Senior Magistrate, the Chair¬ 
man of the Metropolitan Toronto Council, and 
a member of the Council, presently the Mayor 
of the City of Toronto. 

Under the Commission the Chief of Police 
exercises command of the Force assisted by 
four Deputy Chiefs, each in charge of one 
of the four major functions, i.e., Administration, 
Detective, Traffic and Uniform. 

The Metropolitan area is divided into five 
Police Districts, each supervised by a District 
Chief. The territory formerly contained in 
the City proper has been divided in two with 
suburban municipalities having been added 
to attain greater management and opera¬ 
tional efficiency. 

Total strength exclusive of school crossing 
guards stood at 2,466 at the end of 1 959. 

ROADS—Establishment of a metropolitan road 
system and the designation of such highways 
as Metropolitan Roads for such purpose. 

Metropolitan roads are financed to the 
extent of 50 per cent for the construction 
and maintenance by the Metropolitan Cor¬ 
poration and 50 per cent by the Province 
of Ontario (for list of streets in City of 


247 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

Toronto designated Metropolitan Roads, see 
pages 250-251). 

The Metropolitan Council appoints two 
Members to the Toronto and York Roads 
Commission, in addition, two Members are 
appointed by the York County Council and 
a fifth by the four elected Members. Its 
duty is the improvement and maintenance of 
suburban roads under its jurisdiction. The 
cost is borne 25 per cent by the County, 
25 per cent by the Municipality of Metro¬ 
politan Toronto, and 50 per cent by the 
Province of Ontario. 

TRAFFIC ENGINEERING—The Metropolitan Traf¬ 
fic Engineering Department is responsible for 
traffic control signals, pavement markings, 
and traffic signs on all roads within its jurisdic¬ 
tion and acts in an advisory capacity to the 
Metropolitan Council. 

TRANSPORTATION—Appointment of a five- 
man Toronto Transit Commission responsible 
for all public transportation in the metro¬ 
politan area, other than railways and taxis. 
(Also see under Toronto Transit Commission.) 


248 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 
WELFARE AND HOUSING SERVICES— 

1. The hospitalization of indigent patients. 

2. Post-sanatorium care for consumptives. 

3. Provision and operation of Homes for the 
Aged. 

(For citizens of the City of Toronto, appli¬ 
cations are taken by the City of Toronto 
Department of Public Welfare, Private 
Nursing Homes Unit, 345 George Street, 
Toronto.) 

4. The maintenance of wards of Children’s 
Aid Societies. 

5. The maintenance and education of Chil¬ 
dren in Ontario Training Schools. 

6. Riverdale Hospital: 

(A) isolation division; 

(B) chronically ill division. 

7. Housing—The Metropolitan Corporation 
has all the powers of a municipality with 
respect to housing and redevelopment. 

Four elderly persons low-cost housing 
developments are in operation and three 
are under construction. 


249 


Metropolitan Toronto —Continued 

City of Toronto Streets Designated 
as Metropolitan Roads 


Annette St. 

Avenue Rd., Bloor St. 
W. to Lonsdale Rd. 

Avenue Rd., Oxton 
Ave. to North City 
Limits 

Aylmer Ave. 

Bathurst St. 

Bayview Ave. 

Bayview Ave. Exten¬ 
sion, Queen St. to 
City Limits 

Beverley St. 

Bloor St. W. and E. 

Broadview Ave., Dan- 
forth Ave. to North 
City Limits 

Cherry St. at Lake 
Shore Blvd. E., 
approx. 750 ft. 

Coxwell Ave. 

Danforth Ave. 

Dufferin St., Dundas St. 
W., to North City 
Limits 


Dundas St. W. and E. 

Dupont St. 

East Don Roadway 

Eastern Ave., Leslie St. 
to Queen St. E. 

Eglinton Ave. E. and 
W. 

F. G. Gardiner Ex¬ 
pressway 

Glen Echo Dr. 

Jane St. 

Jarvis St. 

Keele St. 

Kingston Rd. 

Lake Shore Blvd. E. 
and W. 

Leslie St., Lake Shore 
Blvd. E. to Eastern 
Ave. 

Lawrence Ave. E. and 
W. 

Lonsdale Rd., Avenue 
Rd. to Oriole Pkwy. 

Moore Ave. 


250 


Metropolitan Toronto-Continued 


Mount Pleasant Rd. 

Old Weston Rd. 

Oriole Pkwy., Lonsdale 
Rd. to Oxton Ave. 

Oxton Ave., Oriole 
Pkwy. to Avenue 
Rd. 

Pape Ave. 

Park Dr. Reservation, 
Mount Pleasant Rd. 
to East City Limits 

Parkside Dr. 

Queen’s Pk. and 
Queen’s Pk. Cres. 

E. and W. 

Queen St. E., Eastern 
Ave. to Kingston Rd. 

Queensway, from 
Roncesvalles Ave. to 
West City Limits 

Rees St., Lake Shore 
Blvd. W. to Queen’s 
Quay 


River St., north of 
Gerrard St. 

Riverside Dr. 

Rosedale Valley Rd. 

Roxborough St. E. and 
W. 

Russell Hill Dr., 

Spadina Rd. to St. 
Clair Ave. W. 

St. Clair Ave. E. and 
W., West City 
Limits to Mount 
Pleasant Rd. 

St. George St. 

Spadina Ave. (include 
Spadina Cres.) 

Spadina Rd., Bloor St. 
W. to Russell Hill Dr. 

University Ave. 

West Don Roadway, 
north of Queen St. 

Weston Rd. 

Woodbine Ave. 

Yonge St. 


251 


MUNICIPALITIES IN METROPOLITAN TORONTO 

Municipality Mayor or Reeve Clerk Offices Pop. Acreage Assessment* 


CO 

— K CO o 

00 CN O 

NKttNM 

CO 

CN K O CN 

CN CO CO 

o <o — n •— 

CD 

K 00 'O 

O K 

-tKCNCOCO 

•—* 

<T CN V CN 

K O CN 

o^ o’ n —'o' 

co 

O CO K CN 

CN WO O 

oto'oon 

CD 

N^aoo 

K 00 K 

— K O <N O 


wo co — — 

CO K CN 

<0 O-' *0~ CN IN 

O 

'O CN ^ CN 

O — CN 

— OOCO'O' - 

00 



— m co ra cn 

o 

CN CN 00 O 

O O O 

O co oo o O 

CO 

wo — 0 

O K n 

K CN O co CO 

CO 

— CO K >0 

Cn wo O 

K CO -O O C5 

CN 



CO K NT - co' co' 

CN 



(Ntt 


'■'t 

o 


>©'On‘o co oo — 

'- — OK 00 CN CN 

lO ao CN co K cn 


l ONN^ l O 
•O O CO *0 'O 


CO 

»o 

NO 


•O ‘O CN O' 


CN O CN 


K wo 00 wo CO 

O CO CN 00 CN 

— CN — 


Q to 
0 ) _c 
o y 


“O 

o 

o 

z* 

c 

i: o 
to t; 

r- *> 


~D 

O 

£ s § 

O J" 

T> .0 


"a 

<u o; 
E o 
•x a. 


<u <u 

O 

5 c c 

-o E <u o o 

§ ° ®| c 


o 

X 


c o C 
o — 1 ’> 
“*o J 3 

= E ^ o> o) 

4 ) D>UJUJ 

2 00 o — o 

>- 

W0 — W-) o 

CO o 

x o o o o 

.t: 

co 'O oo o 

CO wo wo 

o W 0 O O K 

u 

CN CN — CN 

CO — O' 

U WO WO CN CN 


V* 

u 

t_ 

o 

z 

LU 

u 


c 



v_ K 

4) >. _ C 

-s ® ? o 

u c 

<d o 

U— ^ ^ +- 

1 fl) r- Q_ J— 

U= >S 

b u Q) 

w C la. 

5 -5 2 % o 

< 


£ s - 

s £ o < 6 

-j-;z 

5 i/i < UI 


vT 

to 


T 3 

Q_ 

Ic 

Q_ 

c 

o 

f— 

. Hiscoft 

A. Edward 
. Russell 
Holley 

Simonsky 
M. Curtis 
D. Hague 

Allen 
. Waffle 
Goodheai 
Campbell 
Tonks 

a 

X ; _j 

• s • 

L_* t/> CO 

Q£ O U 5 < 

Z 

u > a 


x z < ^ 

o M 

o o o o 

a; a> a) 

<D <D <D 0 ) 

oO 

>N >N >N >N 

> > > 

> > > > > 

o o o o 

U <D <V 

<D d) <D d> <D 

5 


HUH 

QC Of. Cm: 

(D (D (D <D (D 
CX. CXL CL CXL OC 


O c 

s * ® 

o 2 o -o 


u 


*■» *r > 


t/t 

Hz c 
Cfc:f O o 
0 - 1 - J: a> 
— co 

™ v» _ C 

> d> u> o 

k c > 
O o > 
U- to 


•S’ ^ o) 

X j* 0) £ 2 
«* >r -* ,9 2 

c o o >- o 

> >- .y jc s> 

it- >- -* 

8 & 
J Z c/> >- 


0 “ o O 


Metropolitan Chairman of Council, 

Toronto Frederick G. Gardiner, W. W. Gardhouse 67 Adelaide St. E. 1 , 487,348 153,402 $ 3 , 702 , 320,473 

Q.C., Room 203 , 

City Hall, Toronto. 

*Latest taxable assessment figures, compiled by assessors for 1960 taxes, including Section 51 A, not revised. 





STEELES AVE. 



Municipalities Forming Metropolitan Toronto 




































































































HISTORIC TORONTO 


THE FRENCH PERIOD 

The history of Toronto dates back almost 
three hundred years when the present site, long 
before the advent of the white race, was the 
southern end of the most important of the Indian 
trails connecting Lake Huron and Lake Ontario. 
During the 16th and 17th centuries, this site was 
called "The Toronto Carrying Place”. The 
trail ran from the mouth of the Humber River to 
the Holland River, thence by water to Lake 
Huron. A monument and plaque marking the 
Indian trail was erected at the corner of Weston 
Road and Clouston Road, Mount Dennis, on May 
8, 1948, by the York Pioneer and Historical 
Society and the Toronto and York Roads Com¬ 
mission. To that intrepid explorer, LaSalle, must 
go the credit in large measure for making 
famous The Carrying Place. While his exploits 
are almost forgotten in the Province of Ontario 
which knew him so well in those early days, his 
name is held in reverence elsewhere across 
Canada, even to the Rocky Mountains. At that 
time, what is now the Province of Ontario was 
covered with dense hardwood forests pene¬ 
trated only in a few directions by means of 
Indian trails. The name “Toronto” is of 
Huron Indian origin, signifying either 
"a place of meeting” or "plenty”. At 
first, the name “Toronto” applied to the area 
surrounding the northern end of the trail at Lake 


254 


Toronto —Continued 


Simcoe, but in later years, the name became 
associated with the southern end of the trail on 
Lake Ontario. In those early days there was 
great rivalry between the French and English 
fur traders for control of the lucrative business 
in furs. The French had a fortified trading post 
at Niagara, and the English built one at 
Oswego further to the east on the south side of 
Lake Ontario, in an effort to divert the trade in 
furs from the French. To counteract this loss in 
trade, the French established a fortified trading 
post in 1750 at a site which is now at the foot 
of Dufferin Street. This post was built by the 
order of the Governor of New France, Le Mar¬ 
quis de la Jonquiere, and was named Fort Rouille 
after the Colonial Minister of that time, but was 
generally called Fort Toronto. There had been 
temporary trading posts in the vicinity of the 
Humber River from as early as 1678. 

As a phase of the Seven Years’ War on this 
continent between the British and French nations 
for colonial empire, Fort Rouille was burned in 
1 759, in order to prevent English occupation, the 
French garrison withdrawing to Montreal. Fort 
Niagara was, at that time, being besieged by 
British Forces and soon fell. 

By the Treaty of Paris in 1763, France sur¬ 
rendered to Great Britain all claims to territory 
east of the Mississippi. Great Britain, by this 


255 


Toronto —Continued 


time, had eliminated all foreign claimants to the 
region east of the Mississippi and from Hudson 
Bay to the Gulf of Mexico. 



— From, the Imperial Oil Collection. 

LaSALLE 

Crossing the Toronto Portage, 1681, on his way to 
the Mississippi. 


256 







Toronto —Continued 
THE BRITISH PERIOD 

The Toronto Purchase 1788 

As part of a plan for the re-opening of the 
route between Lake Ontario and Lake Huron, 
and for the control of the rich fur trade, Sir Guy 
Carleton, 1 st Baron Dorchester, during his second 
appointment as Governor-in-Chief of Canada, 
1786-1796, arranged in 1788 for a conference 
to be held between representatives of the 
Government and the Chiefs of the Mississauga 
Indians, to negotiate for the purchase of the 
lands on which the city is now situated. Part 
of the price paid to the Indians was 149 barrels 
of goods, blankets, bolts of doth, axes and a 
wealth of articles dear to the hearts of the 
Indians. 

Town Planning 

It had been previously decided by the British 
Government to establish a town at Toronto, and 
in 1788, on orders from Lord Dorchester, a site 
was surveyed by Alexander Aitken. 

Later in the same year Captain Gother Mann, 
commanding the Royal Engineers in Canada, 
made similar investigations. Nothing resulted 
from these activities and plans at the time. 
Captain Mann had completed a survey and laid 
out a town of considerable size on the very same 
site where now stands Toronto. His survey took 


257 


Toronto— Continued 


in the whole territory surrounded by High Park, 
Broadview Avenue and Bloor Street. The resi¬ 
dential area laid out consisted of 43 blocks, 
divided by streets laid out at right angles to 
each other. The military buildings were to stand 
in a great square, right in the centre of the area 
surveyed. This square today would comprise all 
the lands in Toronto south of College Street to 
the Bay, between Dufferin Street and Parliament 
Street. Captain Gother Mann gave the name of 
“Torento” to his proposed town, and it was 
under that name that the plan of the town 
including a full set of particulars, was forwarded 
to England with the Colonial Correspondence in 
the year 1790. 

The Province of Upper Canada 

By the Constitutional Act, 1791, Quebec was 
divided into two separate provinces, Lower 
Canada and Upper Canada. The Province of 
Upper Canada comprising all lands west of the 
Ottawa River, was constituted to meet the needs 
of some six thousand settlers mostly parties of 
veterans of American birth, who had fought 
on the side of the British against the Revolution, 
in the Queen’s Rangers, Butler’s Rangers or 
other regular or irregular troops. These settlers 
were of English speech, unfamiliar with the 
French Civil Law as exercised in Quebec. By 
the Constitutional Act, these settlers living west 


258 


Toronto —Continued 


of the Ottawa River were given the right to 
establish a government of their own, with an 
elective legislature patterned on the constitution 
of Great Britain. The King sent out a Lieutenant- 
Governor, a Chief Justice, an Attorney-General 
and other officials to organize the new govern¬ 
ment. 

Lieutenant-Colonel John Graves Simcoe, who 
had commanded the Queen’s Rangers against 
the American revolutionists and had returned to 
England on parole and, at the time, was living 
in retirement on his rural estate in Devonshire, 
was chosen by the King in 1791 as the first 
Lieutenant-Governor of the newly created Pro¬ 
vince of Upper Canada. 

Simcoe set sail for Canada on September 26, 
1791, and landed at Quebec. The next year he 
proceeded by batteaux to Kingston, arriving 
there July 1, 1792. He issued the writs for the 
election of the new government of Upper 
Canada the same month, after which he moved 
to Niagara, later to be renamed Newark, where 
the Provisional Capital of Upper Canada was 
established. The first meeting of the legislature 
for Upper Canada was held at Newark on Sep¬ 
tember 17, 1792; it numbered 23 members in 
all, seven councillors and sixteen elected mem¬ 
bers. 


259 


Toronto —Continued 
The Founding of Toronto 

Governor John Graves Simcoe favoured lay¬ 
ing out the new capital of the Province of Upper 
Canada on the site of the present City of London, 
it being his opinion that the frontier of an enemy 
state was an unsuitable place for a capital. As 
a temporary arrangement, however, he decided 
to establish the seat of Government on the north 
shore of Lake Ontario where now stands the 
City of Toronto. This, because of its strategic 
location and easily defended natural harbour, 
he had selected as a site for an arsenal. Gover¬ 
nor Simcoe had had his first glimpse of Toronto 
on May 2, 1793, when accompanied by his 
officers, he was rowed from Newark around the 
head of Lake Ontario in batteaux. 

On July 20, 1793, Governor Simcoe sent a 
hundred men of the Queen’s Rangers, a new 
corps with the old name, who crossed the Lake 
from Newark. This corps landed somewhere 
near the foot of Bathurst Street, and commenced 
the work of laying out the site for the new 
town. Governor Simcoe officially arrived in 
Toronto Bay on July 30, 1793, which is the date 
observed as Founder’s Day by the citizens 
of Toronto, especially those of United Empire 
Loyalist descent. 


260 



Mrs. Simcoe sketching the first picture of Toronto 
Bay, 1793, while her husband , Lieutenant-Colonel 
John Graves Simcoe, first Lieutenant-Governor of 
Upper Canada, looks on. 


























































Toronto —Continued 
The Town of York 

Governor Simcoe, on August 26, 1793, 

changed the name of Toronto to York, in honour 
of the Duke of York, son of the then King George 
III, a salute being fired at noon the next day, in 
celebration of the change. 

York, in 1793, consisted only of the military 
works; it was not until the next year, 1794, that 
the erection of buildings was commenced to 
house the various officials. 

The Legislative Assembly continued to meet at 
Newark until 1796. In that year Governor Sim¬ 
coe issued instruction for the erection of the 
Legislative Buildings at York. These were com¬ 
menced in July, 1796. The first session of the 
second Legislature of Upper Canada was held in 
York beginning June 1, 1797, but in temporary 
quarters, the new buildings being unfinished. 

Because of ill health, Lieutenant-Governor 
Simcoe was granted leave of absence and set 
out for England on July 9, 1 796, never to return. 
In the same year he was promoted to the local 
rank of Lieutenant-General which was later con¬ 
firmed in the Army. In 1806 he was appointed 
to succeed General Lake as Commander-in- 
Chief and Governor of India. While he was 
making preparations to go to India, the British 
Government, alarmed at the threat of Napoleon 


262 


Toronto —Continued 


to Portugal, decided to send Simcoe with an 
Army to Tagus to join the British Navy there. On 
the voyage out he was taken ill and had to 
return. He died at Exeter on October 26, 1 806, 
and was buried at the family seat, Wolford 
Lodge, Devon, England. 

War with the United States 

During the War of 1812-14 the town of York 
was occupied by the United States Forces in 
1813 at which time the Legislative Assembly 
Buildings and Archives were burned; and the 
Mace, emblem of sovereignty and authority for 
many centuries in the British Empire, was carried 
away. In reprisal for the burning and plunder¬ 
ing of the Town of York, the British forces 
captured Washington, and burned all its public 
buildings. It is said that before setting fire to 
the President’s Mansion, a regiment of Scottish 
soldiers devoured a fine dinner prepared for 
the President, then they burned as much of the 
house as possible, leaving only an outer shell. 
The President’s Mansion was restored after¬ 
wards, and is now called the White House, for 
the reason that it had to be covered with many 
coats of white paint to conceal the marks of 
its severe burning. In 1934, during Toronto’s 
Centennial Celebrations, the Mace was returned 
to the Ontario Government through the good 
offices of the late President of the United States, 


263 


Toronto —Continued 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, as a gesture of 
international goodwill. 

This historic Mace now alternates between the 
Royal Ontario Museum on Bloor Street West and 
Fort York, Fleet Street at Strachan Avenue, 
where it is on display during the open season. 
On occasions this Mace is used in the impressive 
ceremonies carried out at the official opening of 
the Provincial Legislature. 

The City of Toronto, 1834 

In 1834, the population having increased to 
over 9,000, the Government of the Province of 
Upper Canada passed an Act, dated March 6, 
1 834, to extend the limits of the Town of York 
and to incorporate the said Town into a City, 
under the name of the City of Toronto. 

The preamble of the Bill declared: 

Whereas, from the rapid increase of the 
population, commerce and wealth of the Town 
of York, a more efficient system of police and 
municipal government than now established, 
has become obviously necessary; and 

Whereas, none appears so likely to attain 
effectually the objects desired, as the erecton 
thereof into a City, and the incorporation of the 
inhabitants, and vesting in them the power to 
elect a Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council- 


264 



Toronto, 1834, from the East, showing the Gooderham Windmill. 


































Toronto— Continued 


men and other officers, for the management of 
the affairs of the said City and the levying of 
such moderate taxes, as may be necessary for 
improvements and other public purposes; and 

Whereas, the name of York is common to so 
many towns and places that it is desirable for 
avoiding inconvenience and confusion, to desig¬ 
nate the Capital of the Province by a name 
which will better distinguish it, and none ap¬ 
pears more eligible than that by which the site 
of the present town was known before the name 
of York was assigned to it: 

“Therefore, His Majesty, by and with the 
advice, etc., etc.” 

The first municipal elections in the City of 
Toronto were held on Thursday, March 27, 1 834. 
At this time all voting was by open vote. 

It is of interest to note, in passing, that voting 
by ballot was introduced first in Toronto muni¬ 
cipal elections on January 1, 1 867. At Federal 
elections, however, the system of open voting 
continued until 1874. All male householders 
had the franchise, whether owners or tenants. 
The City was divided into five wards: St. 
Andrew, St. David, St. George, St. Lawrence, 
and St. Patrick, and, in each, two aldermen and 
two councilmen were elected. The mayor was 
chosen, by council, from among the aldermen. 


266 



*+■ 

(V} 

Oo 


267 


Location—82 Bond Street. 







Toronto —Continued 
Toronto’s First Mayor 

William Lyon Mackenzie, the grandfather on 
his mother’s side of the former Prime Minister 
of Canada, William Lyon Mackenzie King, was 
chosen by his fellow members of Council, as the 
first Mayor of the City of Toronto, in the year 
1834. Mackenzie moved to York in 1824 and 
was elected a member of Parliament in 1828. 
He was founder and editor of a newspaper, the 
Colonial Advocate, in which he denounced the 
government in no uncertain terms for mismanage¬ 
ment and corruption caused by nepotism in its 
appointments to office. It is interesting to note 
that following the rebellion of 1837, William 
Lyon Mackenzie fled into exile to New York 
State, where his youngest daughter was born, 
who afterwards became the mother of the 
former Prime Minister of Canada, the Right 
Honourable W. L. Mackenzie King. 

The home of the first Mayor, located at 82 
Bond Street, is maintained as a historic site. 

TORONTO PORTRAITS 

The Opening of Yonge Street, from a 
point about three miles north of the waterfront 
to Holland Landing, was one of the notable 
achievements of Governor Simcoe. The work 
of clearing, which was carried out by the soldiers 
of the York Garrison, was commenced on 


268 


Toronto —Continued 


December 28, 1795, and occupied most of 
the winter. It was named after Sir George 
Yonge, Secretary of State for War of Great 
Britain. 

A public notice appeared in the Upper 
Canada Gazette of March 27, 1801, giving 
notice of the proposal to complete that part of 
Yonge Street between the Town of York and the 
three mile post. The work was completed in 
1802, and paid for by public subscription. 
Yonge Street, south of Lot Street (Queen), was 
not opened as a public thoroughfare until 1 820. 
York then comprised only twelve blocks im¬ 
mediately north of the Parliament Buildings, 
which were situated close to the waterfront 
at the foot of what is now Berkeley Street. 

Governor Simcoe saw the urgent need for the 
opening of roads for the future economic devel¬ 
opment of the Province of Upper Canada, as 
well as from a military standpoint. Under his 
direction a party of the Queen’s Rangers from 
the Garrison of Fort York also commenced the 
opening of a road from the head of Lake 
Ontario to the River Thames. It was named 
Dundas Street in hour of the Secretary to the 
Colonies, Henry Dundas, first Viscount Melville. 

The first extensive industry was estab¬ 
lished in Toronto in 1812 when Jesse Ketchum 


269 


Toronto —Continued 


started the business of tanning hides at what 
is now the southwest corner of Yonge and 
Adelaide Streets. At that time, in the Town 
of York, there was a blacksmith, a wainwright, 
a candlemaker, a clock maker, a hat maker 
and a cobbler. 

Toronto’s first street lighting system 
was placed in service during the year 1 842, the 
illuminant being gas; at that time Toronto was 
one of eleven cities on the North American Con¬ 
tinent to have a street lighting system. Electric 
arc lights made their appearance in 1 884. To¬ 
day, there are approximately 40,000 street 
lights in the City of Toronto. Toronto is con¬ 
sidered to be one of the most modern-lighted 
cities of its size on this continent. 

The first local public transportation 

service was operated by a cabinet maker by 
the name of Williams who inaugurated in 1 849 
an omnibus service from St. Lawrence Market 
to Yorkville near Bloor Street, by way of King 
and Yonge Streets. In 1861 a franchise was 
given the Toronto Street Railway Company for 
the operation of rail transportation with horse- 
drawn street cars to operate at not more than 
thirty-minute intervals, and at a speed of six 
miles per hour. The first street railway in 
Canada was operated on Yonge Street on 
September 11, 1861. 


270 


Toronto —Continued 


In May, 1 842, just eight years after incor¬ 
poration as a City, Charles Dickens wrote this 
most illuminating description of Toronto: “The 
town itself is full of life and motion, bustle, 
business and improvement. The streets are well 
paved and lighted with gas; the houses are 
large and good; the shops excellent, many of 
them having a display of goods in their windows 
such as may be seen in thriving towns in England, 
and some which would do no discredit to the 
metropolis itself. There is a good stone prison 
here, and there are, besides, a handsome church, 
a court house, public offices, many commodious 
private residences and a Government observa¬ 
tory for noting and recording the magnetic 
variations.” 

The discovery of insulin, one of the most 
accurately planned scientific developments that 
the world has ever known, was made at the 
physiology laboratories of the University of 
Toronto in the year 1921, by the late Sir 
Frederick Banting, Dr. Charles H. Best and Dr. 
J. B. Collip, working under Professor J. J. R. 
McLeod. The Nobel Prize for the discovery of 
insulin was awarded to Doctors Banting and 
Best, who, in turn, divided the gratuities attached 
thereto with Doctors Collip and McLeod. The 
prolongation of life made possible by the 
discovery of Insulin has made Toronto a name 


271 


Toronto —Continued 


revered to all those who have suffered with 
Diabetes and the mecca for all scientists, the 
world over, interested in the study of such an 
important disease. 

The Invention of Standard Time by 

Sanford Fleming, in 1879, was one of the 
notable achievements of a citizen of Toronto in 
the earlier days. After Mr. Fleming had read a 
paper on his invention before the Canadian 
Institute in February, 1 879, the Marquis of Lome, 
then Governor-General of Canada, sent out 
copies of the address to all Governments. The 
Czar of Russia called an International Time 
Convention which met in Rome in 1882. This 
meeting was adjourned and met at Washington, 
D.C., in 1883. At the Washington Conference, 
Standard Time was adopted by most countries 
of the world, the system going into effect on 
November 18, 1883. Toronto’s clocks were 
advanced 17 minutes to bring them into line 
line with the 75th meridian. 

Mr. Sanford Fleming was knighted by the 
late Queen Victoria, in recognition of the 
importance of his invention. 

The first municipal offices and City Hall 

were located in the upper portion of the new 
Market building which had been erected by the 
Town of York in 1 833 on lands on the south side 
of King Street, between Jarvis and Market 


272 


Toronto —Continued 


Streets. Here the first city council meeting of 
the newly created City of Toronto was held in 
the year 1834. This building was demolished 
in 1849. 

The first City Hall was erected in the year 
1 844, on the south side of Front Street between 
Jarvis and Market Streets, and now forms part 
of the St. Lawrence Market. It was designed by 
an English architect, Henry Bowyer Lane, who 
also designed an addition to Osgoode Hall and 
three churches, Trinity, 1 843; St. George, 1 844; 
and Holy Trinity, 1847. 

The site of the present City Hall, expro¬ 
priated in 1884, is a large parcel of land 
bounded on the south by Queen Street, on the 
west by Bay Street, on the north by Albert 
Street, and on the east by James Street. The 
frontage on Queen Street is 331 feet. For 
1960 the land is assessed at $1,886,790.00 
and the building at $2,970,200.00 for a total 
assessment of $4,856,990.00. The building 
was intended, originally, for Court House pur¬ 
poses only, but it was decided, subsequently, to 
erect a combined City Hall and Court House. 

The cornerstone of the present City 

Hall is located at the southwest corner of the 
tower foundation, and was laid by Mayor E. F. 
Clarke on November 21, 1891. The building 


273 


Toronto —Continued 


was opened for public business on September 
18, 1899, with Mayor John Shaw presiding. 
The total cost (including site, clock, bells and 
furniture) did not exceed $2,500,000.00 al¬ 
though it has a floor space of 5.4 acres. 

The tower of the City Hall rises to a 
height of approximately 300 feet from the side¬ 
walk. In the tower is installed a massive clock 
of British manufacture with three bells which are 
used for striking the quarter hours, half hours 
and the hours. The smallest bell (quarter bell) 
weighs 1,904 pounds, the next largest (half 
bell) 3,339 pounds, and the largest (hour bell) 
1 1,648 pounds. The bells were rung for the 
first time at midnight, December 31, 1900, 
ushering in the twentieth century. The diameter 
of the clock face is 20 feet. The architect of 
the City Hall was Edward James Lennox, whose 
name and profession are carved on blocks of 
stone, one initial on each block, underneath the 
eaves of the roof, on the south, east and west 
sides of the City Hall building. 

The great stained glass window in the 

City Hall depicting “The Union of Commerce and 
Industry”, symbolizes the upbuilding of Toronto. 
The Civic Queen stands hand in hand with the 
sponsor of Industry, behind whom are grouped 
representatives of the various trades, while on 
her right, representing Commerce, are figures 


274 



4%i8«» iffflijji. 


: 




««>>££■»» 


The Great Stained Glass Window and Memorial on 
the main staircase of the City Hall. The Memorial 
contains “The Golden Book of Remembrance", dedi¬ 
cated to the citizens of Toronto who gave their lives 
in the Second World War. 


2 75 




































Toronto —Continued 


symbolic of the continents. Toronto’s shipping 
and building interests are also depicted in the 
design. The distant building surmounted by a 
cupola is a faithful representation of the old 
City Hall front, while the portion of the structure 
with scaffolding surrounding it is the south-west 
corner of the new City Hall, from a careful 
drawing specially made for the window at the 
time the building was in the course of construc¬ 
tion. The rising sun, emblematic of activity, 
spreads its rays across a wide expanse of sky 
and sea. In the top panels, the Arms of the 
City of Toronto are shown with the Motto: 
“Industry — Intelligence — Integrity’’, flanked 
by symbolic figures of “Peace” and “Honour”. 

The window, owing to its originality of design 
and special artistic excellence, has long since 
become well known, and is ever a source of 
pleasure to visitors, more particularly to persons 
familiar with the technical details of such work. 
The window measures 16 x 23 feet. It was 
designed by Mr. Robert McCausland of Toronto, 
and carried out in his studios under his personal 
supervision in 1 899. 

The Toronto Cenotaph, inscribed with 
majestic simplicity: “To Our Glorious Dead”, 
stands on a wide stone approach in front of the 
City Hall, a symbol of Toronto’s sacrifice. The 
Cenotaph, “dedicated by the citizens of Toronto 


276 


Toronto —Continued 


to the undying memory of those who fell in 
the Great War 1914-1918”, was designed 
after the style of the great Cenotaph in London 
and cut, fittingly enough, in granite from the 
heart of Canada—the ‘‘Canadian Shield” of 
the geologists. 

Each year on Remembrance Day at the sound 
of Big Ben striking the hour of eleven o’clock, 
the enwreathed shrine becomes the scene of an 
impressive ceremony. The clamour of the city 
is hushed for two minutes. Heads are bowed, 
and Toronto remembers with gratitude and 
sorrow those who fell in World Wars I and II. 

More than five thousand Toronto men gave 
their lives in the First Great War of the 20th 
century. Of the many thousands more who 
fought in the second great conflict, World War 
II, over thirty-five hundred fell. 

The Toronto Cenotaph was erected seven 
years after the Great War, its erection being 
noted by a tablet which bears this inscription: 
‘‘This stone was laid on June 25th, 1925, by 
Field Marshal the Earl Haig, Commander-in- 
Chief of the British Forces in the Great War. 
Thomas Foster, Mayor.” 

On its sides appear the names of nine of the 
many historic engagements in which the men of 
Toronto played a valiant part in World War I 


277 


Toronto —Continued 

—Ypres, Somme, Mount Sorrell, Vimy, Paaschen- 
daele, Amiens, Arras, Cambrai, Zeebrugge. 

The Golden Book of Remembrance is 

contained in a Memorial, erected by the Cor¬ 
poration of the City of Toronto, on the landing 
of the main stairway in the front corridor of the 
City Hall. The Memorial is dedicated “To the 
glorious memory of brave men and women of 
the City of Toronto who gave their lives for their 
Country in the War, 1939-1945.” It was un¬ 
veiled by Robert H. Saunders, C.B.E., K.C., 
Mayor of Toronto, on December 28, 1 947. The 
Book contains the following inscription: “This 
Golden Book of Remembrance is dedicated to 
the glory of God and in loving memory of 
Toronto’s sons and daughters, who gave their 
lives in the cause of Freedom, during the War, 
1 939-1 945. Herein are inscribed their names.” 
It contains some 3,500 names. The following 
inscription is on the two front pages of the 
Golden Book of Remembrance: 

“They are not dead, for to live in hearts one 
leaves behind is not to die.” 

“They shall grow not old as we that are left 
grow old.” 

“Age shall not weary them, nor the years 
condemn.” 

“At the going down of the sun and in the 
morning we will remember them.” 


278 


HANDY FACTS ABOUT TORONTO 
DECEMBER, 1959 


Altitude— 

At Yonge and Wellington 
Streets, above the mean sea 
level at New York Harbour.. 268 ft. 

Mean Level of Lake Ontario 

1861 to date 246.01 ft. 

Mean Level of Lake Ontario— 

1959 245.30 ft. 

Area— 

Land—square miles. 35.03 

Water—square miles. 5.60 

Assessment—(see Taxation) 

Buildings— 

Total value of building and 
other structures for which 
permits were issued in 


1959.$106,561,674.00 

Number of permits issued 5,668 

Number of buildings and 

structures erected . 5,872 

Canadian National Exhibition— 

Attendance—1959. 2,906,500 

Value of buildings and 

plant (approx.). $50,000,000.00 


279 










Handy Facts about Toronto —Continued 


Dates 1960—August 24th 
to September 10th, in¬ 
clusive (excluding Sun¬ 
days) 

City Hall— 

Foundation stone laid 1891 

Total cost $2,500,000.00 

Height of tower 300 ft. 

Election Data—Municipal, December 1, 1958 
Number of electors 337,545 

Number who voted 105,601 

(31.3%) 

Employees— 

Fire Department 1,210 

Other Departments (permanent 

and temporary) 4,961 

Total 6,171 

Harbour— 

Total number of vessels entering 

and leaving port in 1959. 4,680 

Total tonnage, cargo entering 

and leaving port 4,740,940 

Entrance and clearance of vessels 
engaged in direct overseas 
business 1,724 


280 














Handy Facts about Toronto —Continued 

History of City— 

French Fortified Post—1750. 

First British Post—1793. 

Incorporated as City—March 6th, 1834. 


Homes (1 959)— 

Occupied by owners. 90,109 

Occupied by tenants. 14,893 

Vacant, unfinished and uninhabit¬ 
able. 1,538 


106,540 
No. Living Units 

Apartment Houses (1,085) 29,571 

Apartments over stores. 12,269 

Dupl exes, triplexes. 14,796 

- 56,636 


Grand total, number of living units.... 1 63,1 76 
Housing— 

Regent Park (North) Housing Project— 

Low Rental Housing. 1,398 units 


281 











Handy Facts about Toronto —Continued 


Emergency Housing (as at 
February 1, 1960)— 

Halliday Houses. 19 units 

Wartime Houses. 60 units 

Miscellaneous Housing. 16 units 


Total. 95 units 


City of Toronto Limited Dividend 
Housing Corporation Ltd.— 

Phin Park. 34 units 

McCormick Park. 106 units 


Total. 1 40 units 


Greenwood Park 

(under construction). 81 units 

Parking and Stopping— 

Number of curb parking 

meters. 4,705 

Meter revenue 1959. $525,892.65 

*Rush Hour Routes: 

A.M. No Parking 145.53 miles 

A.M. No Stopping 132.65 miles 

P.M. No Parking. 148.401 miles 

P.M. No Stopping. 140.029 miles 

*Miles of curb-mileage. 


282 




















Handy Facts about Toronto— Continued 


Number of Municipal Car¬ 
parks operated by Park¬ 
ing Authority. 39 

Number of revenue cars 
parked on these lots in 
1959. 4,863,204 

Parks and Playgrounds—- 

Equipped Playgrounds (including 40 

wading pools). 1 43 

Baseball Fields. 51 

Cricket Fields. 6 

Football Fields. 29 

Horsehoe Pitches (10 courts). 2 

Tennis Courts. 123 

Bowling Greens. 26 

Skating Rinks (Natural). 63 

Hockey Rinks (Natural). 21 

Skating and Hockey Rinks— 

(Artificial outdoor). 1 1 

(Artificial indoor). 2 

Bathing Stations. 4 

Boating Stations. 2 

Fieldhouses. 53 

Running Tracks. 2 

Picnic Areas (accommodation for 

over 100 persons each). 62 


283 




















Handy Facts about Toronto— Continued 


Swimming Pools—Outdoor. 5 

Volleyball. 2 

Basketball. 1 

Shuffleboard Courts. 2 

Swimming Pools (5)—Outdoor: 

Attendance 1959. 444,395 

Taught to Swim, 1959. 900 

Swimming Pools—Indoor. 1 

Registration, 1 959. 3,025 

Attendance, 1959. 54,933 

Taught to Swim, 1959. 2,400 

Acreage (Land and Water). 1,833.53 

Park Areas (total number). 136 

Summer Playgrounds. 143 

No. located on Park Areas.. 49 
No. located on School Areas 54 
Wading Pools in Parks.. 40 

Winter Playgrounds. 69 

No. located in School Buildings 63 

No. located in Park Centres. 6 

Registered: 

(Children)— 

Winter-Summer. 127,031 

Total Attendance.3,982,009 

284 




















Handy Facts about Toronto —Continued 


Community Centres. 20 

No. located in School 

Buildings. 19 

Registration. 9,152 

Total Attendance 132,529 

Swimming Classes in School 

Buildings. 24 

Total Registration. 6,097 

Total Attendance. 43,341 

Trees on Street: 

No. Removed in 1959. 836 

No. Pruned in 1959. 24,400 

No. Planted in 1 959— 

City Streets. 2,869 

Parks. 1,626 

Population. 653,404 


Postal Revenue, etc.— 

Total from Greater Toronto 

area in 1959 exceeds . . $40,000,000.00 

Average No. of pieces of 
mail handled daily at 
Toronto exceeds.6,000,000 pieces 

Peak Christmas Handling 

Day.1 3,000,000 items 


285 















Handy Facts about Toronto—Continued 

Schools—- 

Board of Education Schools—- 
Sp ecial Classes in Public Schools, June, 1959 

Classes 

Academic Vocational. 33 

Opportunity Classes. 46 

Classes in Health Centres. 22 

Junior Kindergarten. 73 

Manual Training Centres. 32 

Home Economics Centres. 32 

Commercial Classes, Grades IX & X 17 

Classes for Deaf Children. 1 3 

Classes for Hard of Hearing. 3 

Sight Saving. 4 

Speech Correction. 8 

New Canadians. 8 

Orthopaedic. 15 

Visiting Teachers—Extramural. 5 

Institutions. 7 

Aphasic. 2 

School Statistics at December 31, 1959 

No. of Teachers on Day School Staff: 

Public Schools. 2,357 

Collegiate Institutes. 416 


286 



















Handy Facts about Toronto—Continued 


Technical Schools. 343 

Junior Vocational. 58 

High Schools of Commerce. 154 

No. of Teachers on Night School Staff: 

Public Schools. 6 

Collegiate Institutes. 1 34 

Technical Schools. 569 

Junior Vocational. . 

High Schools of Commerce. 31 1 

Average Daily Attendance for Year 1959: 

Public Schools. 59,81 1 

Collegiate Institutes. 9,189 

Technical Schools. 4,822 

Junior Vocational. 809 

Commercial Schools. 3,243 

Average Nightly Attendance for the Year 
1959: ' 

Public Schools. 87 

Collegiate Institutes. 584 

Technical Schools. 2,264 

Junior Vocational. . 

High Schools of Commerce. 2,712 


287 






















Handy Facts about Toronto —Continued 


No. of Schools—- 
Public Schools— 

(including Hospitals and 

Institutions). 92 

Collegiate Institutes. 10 

Technical Schools . 4 

Junior Vocational. 3 

High Schools of Commerce. 4 


Value of Buildings, Sites and Equipment— 

Total.$96,907,075.30 

Street Lights— 

No. of lights, public streets and 


parks. 32,675 

Sewers—- 

Total mileage— 

(Combined sanitary and storm).... 709.39 

Storm. 87.68 

Streets, etc., Mileage— 


Street (miles).487.216 (paved 481.157) 

Lanes (miles).1 57.669 (paved 73.237) 

Sidewalks (miles) 938.1 12 

98.496 miles of streets are Metro roads. 

Taxation and Assessments—- 


Total Assessment- 

Real Property.$ 1,499,665,505 

Business. 295,634,004 


Grand Total.$ 1,795,299,509 


288 
















Handy Facts about Toronto —Continued 


Total assessed value of 

exempt properties.$ 342,728,115 

(not incl. above) 

Total assessed value of dwel¬ 
lings exempt from general 
taxation under Partial Ex¬ 
emption By-law$ 55,761,606 

(Incl. in total assessment above) 

Tax Rates— 

Total Tax Rate: Public School Supporters— 

Residential..58.10 mills 

Commercial.61.80 mills 

Total Tax Rate: Separate School Supporters— 

Residential.58.10 mills 

Commercial.61.80 miils 

Telephones— 

No. in City Exchanges, December 

31st, 1959. 505,812 

No. in local calling area. 758,184 

Daily local calls, 1959 (average). 6,275,51 4 
Daily outgoing long distance calls 

(average business day). 98,902 

Total outgoing overseas calls, 1 959 37,432 

No. of employees in Toronto 9,1 17 

No. of vehicles in Toronto. 1,073 

Transportation 

Public Transportation (Metropolitan System)— 
Total passengers carried in 

1959 290,201,026 


289 














Handy Facts about Toronto—Continued 

Total miles operated. 47,21 1,243 

Vehicles owned: 

Electric street cars. 877 

Trolley coaches. 145 

Motor buses and coaches. 838 

Subway cars. 140 

Miles of route: 

Street car tracks. 211.9 

Trolley coach. 23.5 

Motor bus. 271.0 

Subway track. 1 3.4 

No. of Employees. 5,599 

Traffic Control—- 

No. of automatic signals. 317 

Arterial stop signs (estimated). 7,260 

No. of street name signs. 1 1,908 

No. of flashing signals (overhead).. 14 

No. of interconnected traffic signals 200 

Flashing Signals (pole mounted). 81 

One-Way Streets (miles). 103.636 

Yield Signs—81 locations 

Pedestrian Cross-overs. 250 

University of Toronto— 

Enrolment. 1 5,000 

Teaching staff (approx.). 2,300 

Vital Statistics (Toronto Residents)—- 

Deaths—all ages, 1959. 7,358 

Crude rate per 1,000 population . 1 1.3 


290 





















Handy Facts about Toronto —Continued 


Average age of death—all ages ... 66.0 

Excluding 0-4 years. 69.6 

Infants 0—1 years. 394 

Rate per 1,000 births. 24.3 

Maternal. 10 

Rate per 1,000 births. 0.6 

Tuberculosis. 26 

Rate per 100,000 population ... 4.0 

Diphtheria. Cases— 1 Deaths—Nil 

Typhoid fever. Cases— 8 Deaths—Nil 

Scarlet fever. Cases—564 Deaths—Nil 

Whooping cough. Cases—919 Deaths—Nil 

Poliomyelitis.. Cases— 15 Deaths—Nil 


Births— 

Residents.1 6,200 

Rate per 1,000 population. 24.8 


Water— 

Consumed in City (Imp. gal.). 41,61 3,022,000 
Consumption per inhabitant 


of City daily (Imp. gal.).... 174 

Meters, No. in service. 9,233 

Miles of mains—domestic.. 669,831 

High Pressure Fire System. 1 7.43 

Hydrants, No. (including high 

pressure fire systems). 8,588 


Weather Records (see pages 214-216.) 


291 
















PRESENT CITY HALL 



The building was opened for public business on 
September 18, 1899. The tower rises to a height 
of approximately 300 feet from the sidewalk. 


292 







































































APPENDIX 

MUNICIPAL DIRECTORY 


City Council. 294 

Board of Control. 294 

Standing Committees of the Council and 
Local Board of Health. 298 

Committees, etc., appointed by City 

Council. 300 

Boards, Commissions, etc. 303 

Representatives of City Council on Hospital 
and other Boards. 314 

Civic Departments. 316 

Court and Judicial Officers. 322 

Metropolitan Toronto, Council, 

Committees, Officials, etc. 329 

KEY 

(C) appointed by City Council. 

( BC) appointed by City Council on nomination of 
Board of Control. 

( B ) appointed by Board of Control. 

(BE) appointed by Board of Education. 

( BT ) appointed by City Council on nomination of 
Board of Trade. 

( D ) appointed by Dominion Government. 

(DD) appointed by Dominion Government on nomina¬ 
tion of Board of Trade. 

(E) Representatives of Employees. 

(H) appointed by Heads of Departments. 

( 0) appointed by Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
of Ontario. 

Date after Names —End of Term. 


293 











CITY COUNCIL 1960 


NAME, First Address Business, Second Address 
Residence with telephone numbers. 

Mayor 

Phillips, Nathan, Q.C. 

Mayor’s Office: 

Room 207, City Hall EM. 6-8411 


Controllers 


Newman, Mrs. Jean D., B.A. 

(Vice-Chairman, Board of Control, 


and President of Council) 
Board of Control Office, 
Room 208, City Hall 


EM. 6-8411 


Allen, Wm. R. 

62 Richmond St. W. 
40 Ridge Drive 


EM. 6-9254 
HU. 3-9482 


Summerville, Donald D. 

Room 208, City Hall 
2094 Danforth Ave. 


EM. 6-8411 
OX. 4-4400 


Dennison, William 


Room 208, City Hall 
23 Pricefield Road 


EM. 6-8411 
WA. 1-5253 


294 


City Council— Continued 


Aldermen 

Ward 

1 Waters, Kenneth G. 

445 Danforth Avenue HO. 

48 Jackman Avenue HO. 

1 Beavis, Fred 

12 Lewis Street HO. 

1041 Logan Avenue HO. 

2 Birchard, Mrs. May 

100 Gloucester Street WA. 

(Apt. 513) 

2 Campbell, Mrs. Margaret, Q.C. 

657 Yonge Street WA. 

64 Rowanwood Avenue WA. 

3 Archer, William L. 

Room 1906, 372 Bay Street EM. 
50 Lawton Boulevard HU. 

3 Tidy, Charles 

67 Heath Street West EM. 

(Local 

WA. 

4 Orliffe, Herbert, Q.C. 

Ste. 202, 133 Richmond St. W. EM. 
55 Ridelle Avenue RU. 


3-0980 

3-9002 


5-0735 

5-7488 


1-6176 


5-5101 

3-2759 


4-1375 

9-4096 


8-6767 

22059) 

1-5883 


3-7721 

7-4036 


295 


City Council— Continued 


Ward 

4 Chambers, Francis, Q.C. 

6 Adelaide Street East EM. 

4 Wychwood Park LE. 

5 Givens, Philip G. 

Ste. 605, 133 Richmond St. W. EM. 
76 Caribou Avenue RU. 

5 Menzies, Harold 

869 Bloor Street West LE. 

867A Bloor Street West LE. 

6 Robinson, Mrs. May 

83 St. Clair Avenue West WA. 

(Apt. 601) 

6 Clifton, W. Frank 

Apt. 705, 79 Jameson Ave. LE. 

7 Temple, Mary 

264 Kennedy Avenue RO. 

7 Davidson, Wm. C., Q.C. 

6 Adelaide Street East EM. 

75 Oakmount Road RO. 

8 Cranham, Albert G. 

47 Linnsmore Crescent HO. 

HO. 


4-1922 

3-0238 


8-2771 

2-1809 


6-4532 

4-1037 


1-3551 


2-7776 


9-1977 


4-1459 

9-6505 


6-7882 

6-0720 


296 


City Council— Continued 


Ward 

8 Hodgins, Alex 

5 Firstbrook Road 


OX. 4-9649 


9 Nash, Frank L., Q.C. 
97 Mildenhall Road 


HU. 3-4575 


9 Ostrander, Kenneth M. 

2485 Yonge Street 
175 St. Leonards Avenue 


HU. 5-0375 
HU. 3-7580 


CITY COUNCIL—Meets every alternate Monday 
afternoon at 2.00 o'clock (except during summer 
vacation). 

BOARD OF CONTROL—Meets every Wednesday 
morning at 9.30 o'clock. Deputations are heard 
at 10.00 o'clock on alternate Wednesdays (week 
preceding Council Meeting ). 


297 


STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
CITY COUNCIL 


His Worship the Mayor is ex-officio a member of 
all Committees and Local Board of Health 


Committee on Public Works 


Alderman Chambers, Chr. 

Controller Summerville 
Alderman Birchard 
” Davidson 

” Hodgins 

Meets Wednesday (week of Council Meeting) 
2.15 p.m. 


Alderman Menzies 
” Nash 

Robinson 
” Tidy 

Waters 


Committee on Buildings 
and Development 


Alderman Orliffe, Chr. 

Controller Dennison 
Alderman Archer 
Beavis 
Campbell 


Alderman Clifton 

Cranham 

Givens 

Ostrander 

Temple 


Meets Wednesday (week of Council Meeting ) 
2.00 p.m. 


Committee on Public Welfare, 
Fire and Legislation 


Alderman Hodgins, Chr. 
Controller Allen 
Alderman Archer 
Birchard 
Chambers 


Alderman Clifton 

Davidson 
Menzies 
” Nash 
Waters 


Meets Thursday (week of Council Meeting) 
2.15 p.m. 


299 


Standing Committees— Continued 


Committee on Parks and Exhibitions 


Alderman Tidy, Chr. 
Controller Newman 
Alderman Beavis 

Campbell 

Cranham 


Alderman Givens 
” Orliffe 

Ostrander 

Robinson 

Temple 


Meets Thursday (week of Council Meeting) 
2.15 p.m. 


Local Board of Health 

Aid. Menzies, Chr. His Worship the Mayor 

” Ostrander (ex officio) 

” Tidy Medical Officer of 

Health (ex officio) 

Dr. C. C. Goldring, 68 Cheltenham Avenue, 

HU. 9-7038. 

Dr. E. A. Linell, 253 Blythwood Road, HU. 9-3469 

Meets Wednesday (week of Council Meeting ) 
11.00 a.m. 

Secretaries of City Council, Board of Control, Standing 
Committees, Local Board of Health and Special 
Committees, at the Department of the City Clerk, 
Room 209, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 


299 


COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY COUNCIL 


Committee on Civic Awards of Merit 

(Composed of Representatives of the 
Following Interests) 

Education—F. C. A. Jeanneret 
Music— Sir Ernest MacMillan, Chr. 
Community—Mrs. J S. D. Tory 
Business—David M. Woods (BT) 

Labour—William Jenoves 
Sports—Ted Reeve 
Press—Pat Ussher 

Secretary —Gordon T. Batchelor, 

City Clerk’s Office, Room 209 

Committee of Adjustment 
Re Zoning By-law 

Judge Robert Forsyth (1-61), Chr. 

George A. Lister Professor H. H. Madill 


(1-63) 

W. Frank Holden 
(1-61) 


(1-62) 

Paul McLaughlin 
(1-62) 


Sec.-Treas. —Chas. E. Taylor, 465 Bay Street, 12th 
Floor. 


300 


Committees of Council— Continued 


Housing Authority of Toronto 


(BC) William C. Dies, Chr. (5-62) 


(BC) Con. Jean D. 

Newman (5-62) 

(BC) Aid. K. G. Waters 
(5-62) 

Executive Director —F. E. Dearlove. 
Executive Secretary —F. H. Cormack, 

415 Gerrard Street East, EM. 3-7453 


(BC) Mrs. S. J. Allin 
Vice-Chr. (5-62) 

(BC) C. J. Woolsey 
(5-62) 


Parking Authority of Toronto 

Ralph C. Day, Chr. (6-61) 

Alfred Ward (6-61) John F. Ellis (6-61) 

General Manager —Robert G. Bundy 

Office —36 Adelaide Street West, EM. 8-7021. 


City of Toronto Planning Board 

(BC) W. H. Clark, Chr. (12-60) 

Nathan Phillips, Q.C., Mayor, Vice-Chr. 

(BC) Harry G. Kimber (BC) J. Sydney Midanik 
(12-61) (12-62) 

(BC) Stuart M. Philpott (BC) G. F. Plummer 
(12-62) (12-60) 

(BC) C. J. Woolsey (BC) Lewis W. Lawson 
(12-60) Vice-Chr. (12-61) 

(BC) Mrs. E. B. Dustan Controller Wm. Dennison 
(12-62) (substitute for Mayor) 

Commissioner of Planning and Secretary-Treasurer — 
M. B. M. Lawson, 4th Floor, 129 Adelaide Street 
West, EM. 6-8411, Local 437 or EM. 6-8569 
(after 5.30 p.m.) 


301 


Committees of Council— Continued 


Toronto Civic Employees 
Pension Committee 


(BC) Aid. Hodgins 


Chr. 

(E) J. F. MacDonald 


City Treasurer 
City Solicitor 
(E) J. J. Andrews 


Toronto Civic Historical Committee 


Leslie H. Saunders, 

Chr. 

H. R. Alley 
T. Wilbur Best 
J. C. Boylen 
(BC) Con. Wm. Dennison 
H. C. Campbell 
Hamilton Cassels, Jr. 
John M. Gray 
Mrs. E. C. Guillet 


F. C. Hamilton 
Lome Pierce 

B. Napier Simpson, Jr. 

C. H. J. Snider 
William L. Somerville 
Philip Torno 

E. L. Weaver 
Chairman, Committee on 
Parks and Exhibition 


Secretary-Treasurer —J. A. McGinnis 

Office —Old Fort York, EM. 6-6127. 
Marine Museum, LE. 13301. 


Toronto Fire Department 
Superannuation and Benefit Fund 


(BC) Con. Donald D. 

Summerville, Chr. 
City Treasurer 
City Solicitor 
(E) James W. Thomson 


(E) T. Kendall 
(E) Bernard Bonser 
Leonard Leigh 
Chief of Fire 
Department 


302 


BOARDS, COMMISSIONS, ETC. 
Board of Education 

Ward 

1 Oscar T. Sigsworth, 58 Frizzell Ave. 

William R. Stainsby, 835 Queen St. E. 

2 Robin S. Harris, 305 Inglewood Dr. 

Mrs. Evaleen Barker, 357 Blythwood Rd. 

3 Edward M. Davidson, V-Chr., 85 Duggan Ave. 
Mrs. J. Isabel Ross, 500 Avenue Rd., Apt. 401. 

4 J. Sydney Midanik, 336 Walmer Rd. 

Keele S. Gregory, 3 Dacotah Ave. 

5 Lloyd White, 394 Dovercourt Rd. 

Henry L. McKinstry, 1030 Davenport Rd. 

6 Mrs. Irene McBrien, 1447 King St. W. 

W. C. Dymond, 32 Maynard Ave., Apt. 805 

7 Rev. J. V. Mills, 21 Harcroft Rd. 

Mrs. Hazel C. MacDonald, 51 Oakmount Rd. 

8 Thos. A. Wardle, Chr., 67 Rivercourt Blvd. 
Miss Myrtle A. Down, 20 Bellefair Ave. 

9 Miss Margaret E. Perney, 89 Brookdale Ave. 
Roy C. Sharp, Suite 905, 50 King St. W. 


303 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 

Representatives of Separate School Supporters 

Thomas E. McDonnell Lawrence Hynes 

Z. S. Phimister, Director of Education. 

D. Hillis Osborne, Q.C., Solicitor. 

Administration Building—155 College Street, 

EM. 2-4941. 


Board of Trade 

W. E. Williams, President 
Clifton H. Lane, 1st Vice-President 

G. Allan Burton, 2nd Vice-President 

H. T. O’Neill, Honorary Treasurer 
Sydney Hermant, Immediate Past President 


COUNCIL 
(Board of Trade) 


J. P. Anderson 
George M. Black, Jr. 
R. J. Blacker 
John T. Bryden 
A. H. Creighton 
Alan Y. Eaton 
T. J. Emmert 


S. M. Gossage 
W. H. Kyle 
A. T. Lambert 
David B. Mansur 
G. E. Phipps 
Chas. H. Poole 
R. D. Poupore, Q.C. 


304 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


H. A. Sword 
John H. Taylor 
O. W. Titus 
Donald K. Tow 


General Manager — 

J. W. Wakelin 
Asst. Gen. Mgr. and Sec .— 
G. H. Stanford 


Offices—Board of Trade Building, 11 Adelaide St. W., 
EM. 6-6811. 


Bureau of Municipal Research 


A. H. Lemmon, 

President 
H. K. Macintosh, 
Vice-President 


J. Aubrey Medland, 
Hon. Treasurer 

D. W. Lang, Q.C., 
Imm. Past President 


Director and Secretary —Eric Hardy 
Office—32 Isabella Street, WA. 4-9717 


Canadian Manufacturers’ Association 

W. H. Evans—President 

T. T. McLagan, F. D. Mathers, 

1st Vice-President 2nd Vice-President 

T. A. Rice, Honorary Treasurer 

General Manager — General Secretary — 

J. C. Whitelaw, Q.C. E. G. Reburn 

Offices—67 Yonge Street, EM. 3-7261 

Ontario Division—D. M. Chisholm, Chairman; 

G. C. Bernard, Manager. 

Toronto Branch—Ray A. Engholm, Chairman, 

G. C. Bernard, Manager 


305 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


Canadian National Exhibition 

Harry I. Price, President 

W. P. Freyseng, 1st Vice-President 
J. M. Fraser, 2nd Vice-President 

LIFE DIRECTORS 

J. A. Scythes J. A. Northey 

Col. K. R. Marshall Wm. A. Harris 

R. C. Berkinshaw 


BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
SEC. “A" 

(CITY COUNCIL AND MUNICIPALITY ) 


Mayor Nathan Phillips 


Controller Allen 
Aid. Clifton 
Aid. Cranham 
Con. Dennison 


F. G. Gardiner 


Aid. Givens 
Aid. Temple 
Aid. Tidy 
Reeve Waffle 


SEC. “B” (GENERAL MANUFACTURERS 
AND LIBERAL ARTS SECTIONS) 


Thos. E. Boyce 
W. H. Evans 
W. P. Freyseng 

G. G. Brigden 

H. H. Lawson 


T. A. Rice 

F. G. Rolph 

G. H. Sheppard 

H. M. Turner 

Col. Mackenzie Waters 


306 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


SEC. “C” ( AGRICULTURAL SECTION) 


Percy Bone 
John Bull 
J. Elliott Cottrelle 
Kenneth E. Deacon 
J. M. Fraser 


Jack Fraser 
Dr. C. D. Graham 
Geo. C. Hendrie 
H. I. Price 
George Rodanz 


General Manager —H. E. McCallum. 

Secretary —R. J. Dixon. 

General Offices—Exhibition Park, EM. 6-7551. 


Good Neighbours’ Club 

Board of Management 

Mrs. Gordon N. Kennedy, Chairman 

(C) Aid. Birchard Rev. Noble Hatton 

Mrs. J. H. C. Clarry (C) Aid. Ostrander 
Ralph W. E. Dilworth Mrs. C. G. Stogdill 

Executive Secretary —A. J. Elliott, 

298 Sherbourne Street, WA. 3-9453. 


Redevelopment Advisory Council 


R. C. Berkinshaw 

Col. G. Allan Burton, 

Chairman 

Dr. W. H. Cruickshank 
Alan Y. Eaton 
Col. J. F. Ellis 
Bertrand Gerstein 
Brig. W. P. Gilbride 


S. M. Gossage 
Conrad F. Harrington 
Sydney Hermant 
Allen T. Lambert 
John S. Proctor 
G. H. Sheppard 
J. P. R. Wadsworth 
Brig. F. C. Wallace 


Secretary—Office of Commissioner of Planning, 
129 Adelaide St. W., 4th Floor, EM. 6-8411. 


307 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


Royal Agricultural Winter Fair 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
J. H. Crang, President 
Geo. Rodanz, Vice-President 


Geo. T. Bell 
S. G. Bennett 
W. E. Breckon 
John Bull 

Hon. G. Peter Campbell 
W. M. Campbell 

E. M. Carroll 

F. C. Fletcher 

J. Grant Glassco 

General Manager —C. S. McKee. 

Secretary —James R. Johnston. 

Offices—Royal Coliseum , Exhibition Park, 
EM. 6-7551. 


John W. McKee 
J. A. Northey 
Gordon F. Perry 
O. D. Vaughan 
F. C. Wallace 
Trumbull Warren 
W. P. Watson 
D. B. Weldon 
Harry Willis, Q.C. 


Ravina Gardens Arena and Lands 
Board of Management 

William A. Bothwell A. Gilbert 

Roy J. Brown W. R. McKee 

R. W. Chisholm Aid. Harold Menzies 

Aid. Wm. C. Davidson 

Secretary —Albert Gilbert, 2229A Dundas Street W. 


308 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


Runnymede Hospital 

Board of Directors 
E. C. Roelofson, President 
(Mrs.) E. B. Dustan, Vice-President 


Robert H. Brown 
R. N. Bryson 
Norman S. Caudwell 
Chief of the Medical 
Staff 

H. G. Harvey 
J. Palmer Kent 
Rev. G. A. W. Lark 
Frederick Moore 
W. J. Moore 


Miss R. J. Morris 
Mayor Nathan Phillips 
Leslie H. Saunders 
N. V. Sawyer 
W. J. Stewart 
Con. Donald Summerville 
Aid. Mary Temple 
C. J. Weeks 
Sam Wilson 


Miss Bianca M. Beyer, Reg. N., Superintendent , 
274 St. John’s Road, RO. 2-1167 


Ted Reeve Arena Board of Management 

(C) Aid. Cranham (C) D. G. MacGregor 

(12-60) (12-60) 

(C) E. M. Robertson (C) W. Earl Upper 

(12-60) (12-60) 

Con. Summerville and Messrs. Ross Lipsett and 
Wallace Scott appointed to act in an advisory 
capacity only. 


309 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


Metropolitan Toronto Convention 
and Visitor Association 

Frederick G. Gardiner Nathan Phillips, 

Honorary Pres. Hon. Vice Pres. 

Oliver B. Mabee 

President 

Alex Maurice, A. G. Cardy, 

Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. 

General Manager —William M. Murdoch. 
Secretary-Treasurer —Frank Scammell. 

Office—37 King Street East, Room 28, EM. 2-4791. 

The Toronto Harbour Commissioners 

(BC) Geo. A. Wilson ( Chairman ) (6-60) 

(D) Harry G. Kimber (BC) William A. Bennett 

(6-60) 

(DD) J. Stewart (BC) Wm. Jenoves 

(6-60) 

General Manager —E. B. Griffith, Q.C. 

Secretary —W. M. H. Colvin. 

Harbour Master —H. J. Snelgrove. 

Comptroller —D. Weir. 

Director of Development —Capt. E. C. Hopkins. 
Offices—60 Harbour Street, EM. 4-1451. 

Toronto Humane Society 

W. G. Fraser Grant, Q.C., President. 

City Council Representative —Aid. Ostrander. 

General Manager —George Hulme, 

Director of Public Relations —Col. E. George Reade, 
11 Wellesley Street West, WA. 2-1191. 


310 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


Toronto Hydro-Electric System 

(BC) Bertram Merson, Chairman (10-60) 

(O) John McMechan, Vice-Chairman 
Nathan Phillips, Mayor. 

General Manager and Chief Engineer —H. Hyde. 
Assistant General Manager —M. White. 

Secretary —J. C. Ramsay. 

Offices—14 Carlton Street, EM. 3-2261. 

Metropolitan Toronto 
Industrial Commission 

C. L. Burton —Honorary Chairman of the Board 
R. C. Berkinshaw —Honorary President 

N. P. Petersen —Honorary Vice-President 

G. H. Sheppard, President 
Vice-President 

D. M. Allan G. Allan Burton O. L. Jones 

Directors 

Frederick G. Gardiner, Q.C. 

Chairman, Metropolitan Toronto Council 

Wm. A. Bennett W. H. Palm 

H. E. McCallum J. A. Scythes 

John McMechan C. A. Walton 

J. A. Northey 

Secretary-Treasurer and General Manager — 

W. A. Willson. 

Offices—Canada Permanent Building, 320 Bay Street, 
EM. 8-1616. 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 

University Settlement Recreation Centre 

Board of Management 

Prof. G. deB. Robinson, Chairman 

(C) Aid. Chambers (C) Aid. Orliffe 

Mrs. D. T. Fraser W. W. Small 

Prof. John Morgan Prof. George Tatham 

Executive Director —Harry Morrow, 23 Grange Road, 
EM. 4-9133. 

Toronto Public Library Board 

Hon. Mr. Justice J. Maurice King, Chairman 
(C) Controller Wm. Dennison 
John M. Bennett 
John E. Corcoran, Q.C. 

(C) Mrs. John W. Falkner (12-62) 

(C) Dr. Edmund T. Guest (12-61) 

W. Harold Male, Q.C. 

Mrs. Peter Sandiford 

(C) Hon. Mr. Justice Dalton C. Wells (12-60) 

Chief Librarian —Henry C. Campbell 

Secretary-Treasurer —Newman F. Mallon. 

Offices —Central Library Building, corner College 
and St. George Streets, WA. 2-1151. 


312 


Boards, Commissions, etc.— Continued 


Metropolitan Toronto Traffic Conference 


H. W. Tate 

, Chairman 

C. LaFerle, 

Vice-Chairman 

T. B. Aikenhead 

S. W. Hare 

R. F. Anderson 

W. B. Hastings 

R. J. Blanchet 

W. F. Irvin 

H. D. Bradley 

J. H. Joslin 

R. G. Bundy 

Deputy Chief R. R. Kerr 

H. R. Burton 

A. E. Kress 

S. Cass 

E. K. MacKay 

E. F. Coke 

Mrs. I. McBrien 

S. Cole 

A. P. Martin 

T. M. Daglish 

Aid. F. L. Nash 

E. Davidson 

S. Neill 

S. G. Davis 

K. H. Newinger 

R. J. Desjardins 

E. N. Nourse 

Mrs. G. Dunn 

L. Purves 

C. B. Gibson 

T. J. Shoniker 

N. C. Goodhead 

H. W. Tate 

J. 0. Goodman 

J. E. Tutty 

G. 0. Grant 

J. R. Walker 

E. B. Griffith 

N. D. Wilson 

Secretary — c/o Toronto Board of Trade, The Board of 


Trade Building, 11 Adelaide Street West, 


EM. 6-6811. 


313 


REPRESENTATIVES OF CITY COUNCIL ON 
HOSPITAL AND OTHER BOARDS, 1960 


Art Gallery —Aldermen Archer, Cranham, David¬ 
son, Menzies and Orliffe. 

Canadian Red Cross Society, Toronto Branch 
—Aldermen Robinson and Tidy. 

Health League of Canada, Council of —Con¬ 
trollers Dennison and Summerville. 

Lake Ontario Anti-Pollution Association— 
Alderman Davidson and the Medical Officer of 
Health. 

Laughlen Lodge —Aldermen Campbell, Robinson 
and Tidy. 

New Mount Sinai Hospital —Aldermen Givens 
and Orliffe. 

North Toronto Community Corporation — 
Controller Dennison and Aldermen Nash and 
Ostrander. 

Our Lady of Mercy Hospital for Incurables— 
Alderman Beavis. 

Runnymede Hospital —Controller Summerville 
and Alderman Temple. 

St. Joseph’s Hospital —Alderman Clifton. 

St. Michael’s Hospital —Controller Allen and 
Alderman Beavis. 


31 A 


Representatives of City Council on 
Hospital and Other Boards— Continued 

Toronto East General Hospital —Aldermen 
Hodgins and Waters. 

Toronto General Hospital —Aldermen Archer, 
Campbell, Nash, Orliffe and Robinson. 

Toronto Western Hospital —Aldermen Menzies 
and Chambers. 

Woodgreen Community Centre —Board of Direc¬ 
tors—Controller Allen and Aldermen Beavis and 
Waters. 

Women’s College Hospital —Alderman Birchard. 


315 


CIVIC DEPARTMENTS 


Mayor’s Department 

Room 207, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

Nathan Phillips, Q.C., Mayor. 

Executive Assistant —F. C. Hamilton, 24 Heddington 
Ave, HU. 9-8116. 

Abattoir 

Foot of Tecumseth Street, EM. 8-6169. 

Audit 

Room 303, City Hall, EM. 6-8411, Local 425 

R. A. Stephenson, City Auditor, 122 Mavety Street, 
RO. 9-7927. 

J. F. H. Connor, Deputy City Auditor, 57 Tower 
Drive, Scarborough, PL. 5-2933. 

Buildings and Development 

11th Floor, City Hall Annex, 

465 Bay Street, EM. 6-8411, Local 571 

F. E. Wellwood, Commissioner, 196 Coldstream Ave., 
HU. 8-0439. 

Ronald H. Milne, Director of Building Regulations, 
29 Ashgrove Place, Don Mills, HI. 4-1764. 


316 


Civic Departments— Continued 
City Clerk’s 


Room 209, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

C. E. Norris, City Clerk, 67 Delisle Ave., WA. 5-0937. 

Morey J. Gordon, Deputy City Clerk, 99 Cuffley 
Crescent North, Downsview, ME. 3-1736. 

Secretary to Board of Control 

Gordon T. Batchelor, 440 Glengarry Avenue, 
RU. 1-1303. 

Director of Elections and Court of Revision 
Richard S. Scott, 26 Kildonan Drive, OX. 1-1912 


Finance 


Room 104, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

W. M. Campbell, Commissioner of Finance and City 
Treasurer, 39 Panmure Crescent, AM. 7-6940. 


DIVISIONS 

Accounting 


DIRECTORS 

Vacant 


Room 104, City Hall 

Budget and Organization 
Room 333, City Hall 


C. E. Brannon 
317 Horsham Ave., 


Willowdale, 
BA. 5-7625 


Treasury 

Room 104, City Hall 


W. A. Wilford, 

31 Grangemill Cres. 


Don Mills, 
HI. 4-3575 


317 


Civic Departments— Continued 


Fire 

Headquarters: 152 Adelaide Street West, 

EM. 3-3579. 

Enquiry - EM. 3-2138 

Alarms of fire - - EM. 1-1111 

Leonard Leigh, Chief, Fire Department, 11 Douglas 
Avenue, HU. 3-8580. 

F. Coakwell, Deputy Chief, 39 Douglas Avenue, 
HU. 9-7552. 


Health 

City Hall Annex, 465 Bay Street, EM. 6-6481. 
City Ambulance — EM. 3-5678-9. 

Dr. A. R. J. Boyd, Medical Officer of Health, 84 Colin 
Avenue, HU. 9-1378. 

Dr. G. W. O. Moss, Deputy Medical Officer of Health, 
67 Rose Park Drive, HU. 5-0165. 

Legal 

Room 309, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

J. Palmer Kent, Q.C., City Solicitor, 279 Glengrove 
Avenue West, HU. 9-2240. 

R. C. Baird, Q.C., Deputy City Solicitor, 470 St. 
Clements Avenue, HU. 3-5443. 


318 


Civic Departments —Continued 


Parks and Recreation 

9th Floor, City Hall Annex , EM. 6-8411. 

Geo. T. Bell, Commissioner, 111 Prennan Avenue, 
BE. 1-6471. 

M. F. Matthews, Co-ordinator of Services, 167 Hanna 
Road, HU. 8-3104. 

C. Coates, Director of Parks, 124 West Rose Avenue, 
BE. 3-9740. 

W. G. Colhoun, Director of Recreation, 30 Warlaw 
Crescent, Thistletown P.O., CH. 4-0036. 


Personnel 

Room 320, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

Albert C. King, Commissioner, 88 Ferris Road. 

Robert G. Humphrey, Director of Personnel Services, 
16 Martorino Drive, AM. 1-6638. 

Donald R. Johnston, Director of Labour Relations, 
1 Rock Elm Road, PL. 5-0980. 

Property 

7th Floor, City Hall Annex, 465 Bay St., EM. 6-8411. 

Harry H. Rogers, Commissioner, 470 Castlefield 
Avenue, HU. 5-1367. 

William J. Irons, Administrative Assistant, 407 
Gerrard Street East, EM. 8-7370. 

John G. Sutherland, Director of Architecture, 51 
Alhart Drive, Thistletown P.O., CH. 1-5953. 

Harold A. Wooding, Director of Services, 371 Davis- 
ville Avenue, HU. 3-7506. 

James A. Snider, Director of Maintenance, 25 Pine 
Avenue, OX. 4-9583. 


319 


Civic Departments— Continued 


Purchasing and Stores Division 

Room 18, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

Douglas G. Judd, Director, 15 Rathgar Avenue, 
BE. 1-8969. 

Real Estate Division 

Room 202, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

David Alexander, Director, 324 Cranbrooke Avenue, 
RU. 3-2617. 


Welfare 


City Hall Annex, 465 Bay Street, EM. 8-1081. 

Miss Robena J. Morris, Commissioner, 2745 Yonge 
Street, HU. 9-4514. 

William A. Turnbull, Director of Welfare Services, 
56 Heather Road, Agincourt, AX. 3-7005. 

Walter L. Warriner, Administrative Assistant, 

14 Broadleaf Road, Don Mills, HI. 4-1514. 


Works 


10th Floor, City Hall Annex, EM. 2-5711. 

H. D. Bradley, Commissioner, 240 Oriole Parkway, 
HU. 5-7201. 


Planning and Control 
10th Floor, City Hall 
Annex, EM. 2-5711 


DIVISIONS 


DIRECTORS 
A. D. Ford, 

78 Heathcote Ave., 
HI. 7-7420 


505 Richmond St. W. 
EM. 2-5711 


Engineering 


D. F. McCarthy, 
4 Avalon Blvd., 
OX. 1-3678 


320 


Civic Departments— Continued 


DIVISIONS 

DIRECTORS 

Surveying 

511 Richmond St. W. 

EM. 2-5711 

W. J. G. Wadsworth, 
4 Plumstead Court, 
Islington, BE. 1-1549 

Operations 

505 Richmond St. W. 

EM. 2-5711 

J. D. Near, 

11 Agar Crescent, 
BE. 1-6187 

Streets 

90 Albert Street 

EM. 2-5711 

G. E. Taylor, 

21 Coldstream Ave., 
HU. 8-2507 

Equipment 

786 Dundas St. East 

EM. 2-5711 

L. G. Osborne, 

140 Bowood Avenue, 
HU. 5-4203 

Traffic 

129 Adelaide St. W. 

EM. 2-5711 

H. R. Burton, 

56 Langmuir Cres., 
RO. 7-6413 


321 


COURT AND JUDICIAL OFFICERS 


Assize Court Office 


Assistant Registrar—Room 219, City Hall. 

C. C. Bradley, 277 Monarch Park Avenue, 
HO. 5-3045. 


Chief Coroner 

Coroner's Building, 86 Lombard Street, 
EM. 3-5670. 

Dr. Smirle Lawson, 189 St. George Street, 


WA. 2-1200. 


Secretary —Edward Armour, 116 Park Home Ave., 
Willowdale, BA. 5-2991. 

County Court Judges 


Senior Judge 


Robert Forsyth, Room 107, City Hall, 
EM. 6-8411. 

377 Glengrove Avenue West, HU. 8-0626. 


Junior Judges 


Ian McL. Macdonell, 

15 Ormsby Crescent, 
RU. 2-5544. 


Alfred H. Young, 
2837 Yonge Street, 
HU. 1-2315. 


Samuel Factor, 

493 Spadina Road, 


H. J. M. Donley, 

299 Forest Hill Rd., 
RU. 3-5736. 


HU. 3-2222. 


322 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 


Frank G. J. McDonagh, 
69 Cheritan Avenue, 
HU. 3-1967. 


Farquhar J. Macrae, 
211 Forest Hill Rd., 
HU. 1-2540. 


Frank Denton, 

16 Killarney Road, 


HU. 9-5621. 


Harold W. Timmins, 

323 Cortleigh Blvd., 
RU. 2-0751. 


J. Ambrose Shea, 

46 Castle Knock Rd., 
HU. 5-2972. 


E. L. Weaver, 

43 Chestnut Pk. Rd., 
WA. 2-9319. 


Judges' Secretary —Archibald Perkins, 174 Balsam 
Avenue, OX. 1-8153. 

Office — EM. 6-8411, Local 260. 

County Court Clerk 

Room 109, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

J. H. Kennedy, 116 Van Dusen, BE. 1-9801. 

Clerk of the Peace 

Room 13, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

Morgan L. Piper, 39 Churchill Avenue, 
Willowdale, BA. 1-1874. 


Crown Attorney 


Room 176, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

William O. Gibson, Q.C., 176 King Street, Oakville, 
Telephone, VI. 5-2403. 


323 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 


Assistant Crown Attorneys 

Henry H. Bull, Q.C., 976 Avenue Road, HU. 8-4068. 

Arthur O. Klein, Q.C., 103 Gordon Rd., Willowdale, 
BA. 5-6433. 

J. Bowman Galbraith, Q.C., 2199 Harcourt Cres., 
Port Credit, AT. 9-1385. 

William H. Langdon, Q.C., 27 Glenborough Park 
Cres., Willowdale, BA. 1-2558. 

Stanton B. Hogg, 7 Moccasin Trail, Don Mills P.O., 
HI. 4-4854. 

L. K. Graburn, 52 Gwendolyn Crescent, Willowdale, 
BA. 5-5952. 

N. McRae, 565 Avenue Road, W T A. 2-2646. 

P. J. Rickaby, 565 Avenue Road, WA. 2-2646. 

R. A. Cormack, 113 Farnham Avenue, WA. 5-7618. 


Juvenile and Family Court of 
Metropolitan Toronto 

311 Jarvis Street, WA. 4-0631; 

WA. 4-1273 {nights). 

Senior Judge 
V. Lome Stewart 

Miss V. Fantham, Secretary to Senior Judge. 


324 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 

Judge —D. Webster 
Deputy Judges 

John G. Grudeff N. K. Bennett H. Shaw 
Executive Officer —P. Ambrose 
Clerk of the Court —J. H. Rose, J.P. 

Director of Clinic —Dr. J. Verhulst 
Supt. of Observation Home —W. Rutledge 
Supervisor Prob. (Juvenile) —B. Lane 
Supervisor Prob. (Domestic) —W. O. Stuart, J.P. 

First Division Court 

90 Albert Street 

Clerk —Mrs. E. Flett 

Deputies —Mrs. Marguerite Smith 
Miss June Cardwell 

Magistrates’ Courts and Offices 

Ground and First Floors, City Hall, 

East Corridor, EM. 6-8411. 

Senior Magistrate 

Thos. S. Elmore, Q.C., 8 Anglesey Boulevard, 
BE. 1-5309. 


325 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 


Magistrates 

F. W. Bartrem, Q.C., 54 DeVere Gardens, 

HU. 5-6708. 

S. Tupper Bigelow, Q.C., 1 Mallory Gardens, 
WA. 4-5504. 

N. A. Gianelli, 208 Balmoral Avenue, WA. 3-5156. 

D. F. Graham, 42 Tremont Cres., Don Mills P.O., 
HI. 4-1318. 

John L. Prentice, Q.C., 113 Haddington Avenue, 
RU. 2-1855. 

W. F. B. Rogers, 40 Grangemill Cres., Don Mills 
P.O., HI. 4-0633. 

Charles A. Thoburn, Q.C., 119 Welland Avenue, 
HU. 9-4812. 

T. H. Wolfe, 12 Lawrence Ave. East, HU. 8-8741. 

Solicitor-Prosecutor 

M. M. Kelso, Q.C., 110 St. Leonards Avenue, 
HU. 9-4574. 

Administrator of Magistrates' Court Office 

R. W. Ruggles, Room 12, City Hall, EM. 6-8411; 
Local 563. 

Assistant Registrar, Civil Jury and 
Non-Jury Sittings 

Room 217, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

W. F. Shaughnessy, 8 The Maples, Bain Avenue, 
HO. 1-1335. 


326 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 


Sheriff, County of York 

Rooms 113 and 114, City Hall, 

EM. 6-8411, Local 295. 

J. D. Conover, Sheriff, County of York, EM. 6-8411. 

Deputy Sheriffs 

John F. Gillis, 450 Winona Drive, RU. 7-1913. 

C. L. Stark, 40 Elengowan Road, HU. 8-3682. 

R. Y. Cory, 2A Wilberton Road, HU. 3-5632. 

Special Examiners 

357 Bay Street, EM. 3-9605 and EM. 3-9938. 
Patricia Foy Singer Mary L. McEvoy 

Surrogate Court 

Judge 

Ian McLean Macdonell 

Registrar—Room 111, City Hall, EM. 6-8411. 

A. Herbert Ingram, 12 Leona Drive, Willowdale, 
BA. 1-4113. 

Deputy 

Morgan L. Piper, 39 Churchill Avenue, Willowdale, 
BA. 1-1874. 

City Registry Office 

Corner Albert and Chestnut Streets, EM. 6-8411. 

Registrar 

Ian T. Strachan, Q.C., 148 Stibbard Avenue, 

HU. 5-2233. 


327 


Court and Judicial Officers— Continued 


Deputies 

Austin Johnson, 31 Tichester Road, LE. 4-3915. 
Ernest Lynn, 36 Seven Oaks Avenue, BE. 2-0353. 
William Edwards, 228 Deloraine Ave., HU. 9-4631. 

Master of Titles for Ontario 

W. Marsh Magwood, Q.C., EM. 6-8411, Local 564; 
45 Baby Point Crescent, RO. 2-6789. 


328 


1960 

THE MUNICIPALfTY OF 
METROPOLITAN TORONTO 


Metropolitan Council 

Frederick G. Gardiner, Q.C., Chairman 

Tor onto Representatives 

(E&W) Mayor Nathan Phillips, Q.C. 

(E&H) Controller Mrs. Jean D. Newman, B.A. 

(E&R) Controller William R. Allen 

(W) Alderman William L. Archer 

(H) Alderman Mrs. May Birchard 

(R) Alderman Albert G. Cranham 

(P) Alderman Philip G. Givens 

(W) Alderman Frank L. Nash, Q.C. 

(P) Alderman Herbert Orliffe, Q.C. 

(H) Alderman Mrs. May Robinson 

(P) Alderman Mrs. Mary Temple 

(R) Alderman Kenneth G. Waters 

Suburban Representatives 

(W) Reeve Jack R. Allen, East York 
(E&R) Reeve A. M. Campbell, Scarborough 
(E&H) Reeve Mrs. Marie Curtis, Long Branch 
(R) Mayor W. A. Edwards, Mimico 
(W) Reeve Norman C. Goodhead, North York 
(H) Reeve Mrs. Dorothy Hague, Swansea 
(P) Mayor Charles H. Hiscott, Leaside 


329 


Municipality of Metro Toronto— Cont. 


(R) Mayor Jack L. Holley, Weston 
(P) Mayor Donald R. Russell, New Toronto 
(H) Reeve Laurie T. Simonsky, Forest Hill 
(W) Reeve Chris. A. Tonks, York 
(E&P) Reeve H. 0. Waffle, Etobicoke 


Key Committee 

(E) Executive 

(W) Works 
(R) Roads and Traffic 
(H) Welfare and Housing 
(P) Parks and Recreation 


Chairman 

Frederick G. Gardiner, 
QC. 

William L. Archer 
Albert G. Cranham 
Mrs. Dorothy Hague 
Charles H. Hiscott 


Metropolitan Licensing Commission 

Magistrate Frederick W. Hall, Chairman 

Magistrate C. A. Thoburn, Q.C., Vice-Chairman 
Frederick G. Gardiner, Q.C. 

Office—171 Eglinton Avenue East, HU. 1-5256. 

Metro Board of Commissioners of Police 

Magistrate C. O. Bick, Chairman 

Judge Ian M. Macdonell, Vice-Chairman 
Magistrate Thomas S. Elmore, Q.C. 

Mayor Nathan Phillips, Q.C. 

Frederick G. Gardiner, Q.C. 

Office—67 Adelaide Street East, EM. 2-1711. 


330 


Municipality of Metro Toronto— Cont. 

Metropolitan School Board 

Miss M. Perney, Chairman 
T. H. Goudge, Vice-Chairman 


Toronto Representatives 


Oscar Sigsworth 
Robin S. Harris 
E. M. Davidson 
J. Sydney Midanik 
Lloyd White 


Mrs. Irene McBrien 
J. V. Mills 
T. A. Wardle 
Miss M. Down 
Miss Margaret Perney 


Suburban Representatives 


Mrs. A. Ross, East York 
Thomas H. Goudge, 
Etobicoke 
Mrs. E. Grossberg, 
Forest Hill 
W. C. Farrow, 
Lakeshore 


H. Royle, York 
D. Brown, Leaside 
Mrs. J. Pearce, 

North York 

Geo. Peck, Scarborough 
A. Adamson, Swansea 
Mrs. E. Norman, Weston 


Separate School Representatives 
F. J. Boland Geo. C. Power 

Executive Secretary —W. J. McCordic 
Office—10 Eglinton Avenue East, HU. 5-6585. 


331 


Municipality of Metro Toronto— Cont. 


Metropolitan Separate School Board 


Ward 

1 M. J. Duggan, Chr. 

2 G. Godin 

3 Right Rev. B. Kyte 

4 Leo H. McLaughlin 

5 J. E. Masterson 

6 Rev. W. L. Gavard 

7 Jas. G. Culnan 

8 Gerald Kavanagh 

9 Rev. Edward T. Madigan 


Ward 

10 J. W. Heary 

11 Very Rev. Percy 

Johnson 

12 Rev. Thos. McCabe 

13 Dr. J. J. Andrachuck 

14 Geo. B. Heenan 

15 Edward J. Brisbois 

16 Alan J. Denning 


Business Administrator and Secretary-Treasurer — 
John Middleweek. 


Office—477 Jarvis Street, WA. 3-2403, 4, 5. 


Metropolitan Toronto Planning Board 

J. P. Maher, Chairman 


Hiram E. McCallum. Vice-Chairman 


E. W. Anstey 
Aid. William L. Archer 
J. Wilson Berry 
A. M. Campbell 
(Substitute for 
N. C. Goodhead) 
Aid. Albert G. Cranham 
Cecil R. Forsyth 


F. G. Gardiner, Q.C. 
N. C. Goodhead 
B. Michael Grayson 
Mrs. Dorothy Hague 
Wm. A. Harris 
George Heenan 
Sydney Hermant 
Charles H. Hiscott 


332 


Municipality of Metro Toronto— Cont. 


C. F. Laurin 
Mrs. Irene McBrien 
W. Grant Messer 
Mrs. Ella L. Norman 
Nathan Phillips, Q.C. 


Gordon Shephard 

Robert W. Speck 

C. A. Walton 

Aid. K. G. Waters 
(Substitute for 
Mayor Phillips) 

C. J. Woolsey 


Commissioner of Planning and Secretary-Treasurer — 
M. V. Jones. 

Offices—790 Bay Street, Room 513, EM. 6-6263. 


Toronto Transit Commission 

(Appointed by Metropolitan Council) 

Clarence C. Downey, Q.C., Chairman 


Allan A. Lamport 

Vice-Chairman 


Ford G. Brand 
Commissioner 


Wm. G. Russell, 
Commissioner 


Chas. A. Walton, 
Commissioner 


General Manager of Operations —J. G. Inglis. 

General Manager (Subway Construction)—W. E. P. 
Duncan. 

General Secretary —H. E. Pettett. 

Offices—1900 Yonge Street, HU. 1-4252. 


333 


Metropolitan Officials 


Assessment Commissioner —A. J. B. Gray, 387 Bloor 
Street East, EM. 6-8411, Local 341. 

Auditor —Gordon Cuthbertson, 160 Bloor Street 
East, WA. 5-6361. 

Chief of Police —James P. Mackey, 149 College 
Street, EM. 2-1711. 

Civil Defence—Acting Co-ordinator —H. H. Atkinson, 
278 Davenport Road, WA. 4-9761. 

Clerk —W. W. Gardhouse, 67 Adelaide Street East, 
EM. 8-3851. 

Commissioner and Co-ordinating Officer of Courts of 
Revision —J. A. R. Mason, Q.C., EM. 6-8411, 
Local 529, 387 Bloor Street East. 

Commissioner of Finance —G. A. Lascelles, 160 Bloor 
Street East, WA. 5-6361. 

Commissioner of Property —F. D. Cavill, 171 Eglinton 
Avenue East, HU. 1-7247. 

Commissioner of Roads —George O. Grant, 75 
Eglinton Avenue East, HU. 1-6171. 

Commissioner of Welfare and Housing —R. J. Smith, 
380 Christie Street, LE. 1-5771. 

Commissioner of Works —Ross L. Clark, 55 Eglinton 
Avenue East, HU. 1-3411. 

Governor of Jail —D. Dougall, 550 Gerrard Street 
East, HO. 5-2497 or HO. 5-2498. 

Parks Commissioner —T. W. Thompson, 681 Bay- 
view Avenue, HU. 5-9491. 

Personnel Officer —G. W. Noble, 387 Bloor Street 
East, WA. 4-7411. 

Solicitor —C. Frank Moore, Q.C., 160 Bloor Street 
East, WA. 5-6361. 

Traffic Engineer —S. Cass, 171 Eglinton Avenue East, 
HU. 1-5695. 


334 


INDEX 


Municipal Directory—Listing Members 
of Council, Committees, Boards, 
Commissions, Civic Departments, 

Courts and Judicial Officers, Metro¬ 
politan Council Committees and 
Officials, including location, tele¬ 
phone numbers of offices, etc.293-334 


Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 

Abattoir. 63 316 

Act of Incorporation.55, 264 

Airports. 131 

Alcoholism Research Foundation 

of Ontario. 202 

Altitude (See Works Dept.) 

Ambulance Service. 101 

Architect New City Hall.17, 122 

Area of Toronto (See Works Dept.) 

Art Gallery. 181 

Assessment and Taxation.229, 288 

Assistant Registrar 

Civil Jury and Non-Jury Sittings 326 

Assize Court Office. 322 

Association of Ontario 

Mayors and Reeves. 191 

Audit Department. 65 316 

Births, Marriage and Death. 73 


335 















Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 

Board of Control: 

Duties and Responsibilities. 38 

Members of. 294 

Board of Education: 

Members of. 303 

Qualifications Required to be 
Trustee. 46 

Statistics. 286 

Board of Management: 

Good Neighbours’ Club. 307 

Ravina Gardens. 308 

Ted Reeve Arena. 309 

University Settlement. 312 

Board of Trade. 168 304 

Book of Remembrance. 278 

Builders Exchange. 196 

Buildings and Development. 67 316 

Statistics.68, 69, 279 

Bureau of Municipal Research. 192 305 

Canadian Citizenship Registry. 212 

Canadian Manufacturers’Association 171 305 

Canadian National Exhibition. 149 306 

Statistics. 279 

Canadian National Institute for 

the Blind. 203 

Canadian Opera Company. 187 

Canadian Red Cross Society. 205 

Casa Loma. 91 


336 
























Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 


Cenotaph. 276 

Census (Dominion). 55 

Changing City. 13 

Chief Coroner. 322 

City Clerk’s Dept. 70 317 

Births, Marriages and Deaths. 73 

Marriage Licenses. 75 

City Council: 

Duties and Responsibilities. 38 

Former Members’ Association. 190 

Members of. 294 

Qualifications Required to be 

Member. 45 

Record of Service. 53 

Representatives on Boards and 

Commissions. 314 

Standing Committees of. 298 

City Hall. 272 

Business Hours. 2 

Cornerstone. 273 

First. 273 

New.17, 122 

Public Holidays. 2 

Stained Glass Window. 274 

Statistics. 280 

Tower. 274 

Civic Awards of Merit Committee.... 34 300 

Civic Employees Pension Committee 302 

Civic Square.13, 18, 122 


337 


























Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 

Civil Jury, Registrar. 326 

Clearing House Statistics. 199 

Clerk of Peace. 323 

Consumers’ Gas Company. 160 

County Court Clerk. 323 

County Court Judges. 322 

Court and Judicial Officers. 322 

Crown Attorney. 323 

Daylight Saving Time. 2 

Debenture Debt. 230 

Division Court. 325 

Election Statistics. 47,280 

Employees Statistics. 280 

Finance Department. 317 

Statistics. 224 

Fire Department. 76 318 

Statistics. 77 

Superannuation and Benefit Fund 302 

First Industry. 269 

First Public Transportation. 270 

Gifts Received by the Corporation.... 29 

Good Neighbours’ Club. 307 

Government of Canada 

Local Senators. 56 

Toronto and District Members.... 57 

Governor General of Canada. 56 

Handy Facts about Toronto.279-291 


338 

























Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 

Harbour Commissioners. 128 310 

Statistics. 280 

Health Department. 95 318 

Statistics. 290 

Historical Committee. 174 302 

History of Toronto. 254 

Statistics. 281 

Homes Statistics. 281 

Hospitals and Institutions. 102 

Housing Authority of Toronto. 131 301 

Statistics. 281 

Housing Registry. 139 

Humane Society. 196 310 

Hydro Electric System. 161 311 

Insulin Discovery. 271 

International Jury, New City Hall 17,122 

Juvenile and Family Court. 324 

Legal Department. 318 

License Data. 235 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. 58 

Limited Dividend Housing Corp. 

(See Toronto Housing Authority) 

Local Board of Health 

Members of. 299 

Composition of. 40 

Magistrates Court Offices. 325 


339 
























Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 

Marriage License. 75 

Master of Titles. 328 

Mayor Nathan Phillips, Q.C. 6 

Mayor’s Department. 61 316 

Mayor’s Chain of Office. 4 

Mayors and Reeves Association of 

Ontario. 191 

Mayors of Toronto. 48 

Mendelssohn Choir. 177 

Metropolitan Government 
of Toronto 

Duties and Responsibilities. 240 

Licensing Commission. 330 

Members of Council and 

Committees. 329 

Metropolitan Roads in Toronto... 250 
Municipalities forming Metro¬ 
politan Area, including Popula¬ 
tion, Area and Assessment. 252 

Officials. 334 

Planning Board. 332 

Police Commissioners. 330 

School Board. 331 

Separate School Board. 332 

Toronto Transit Commission. 333 

Metropolitan Toronto Convention 

and Visitor Association. 172 310 

Metropolitan Toronto Industrial 

Commission. 173 311 


340 























Gen¬ 

eral 

Metropolitan Toronto Traffic 

Conference. 188 

Municipal Elections 

Information Relating to. 41 

Statistics.47, 249 

Voters’ List—Municipal. 41 

Resident. 42 

Voting on Questions and 

By-laws, Qualifications. 44 

Municipal Government. 37 

Municipality of Metropolitan 
Toronto (See Metropolitan) 

Museum (Marine). 176 

National Ballet of Canada. 184 

O’Keefe Centre. 25 

Ontario Municipal Association. 193 

Ontario Municipal Board. 195 

Parking (See Works Dept.) 

Parking Authority of Toronto. 141 

Statistics. 283 

Parks and Recreation Department.... 80 
Statistics. 283 

Personnel Department. 87 

Planning Board. 116 

Population of Municipalities in 

Metropolitan Area. 229 

Population of Toronto. 55, 252, 285 


Names of 
Members 
& Officials 

313 


301 

319 

319 

301 


341 






















Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 


Postal Revenue Statistics. 285 

Prime Minister of Canada. 56 

Prime Minister of Ontario. 58 

Property Department. 89 319 

Province of Ontario, Executive 

Council. 58 

Toronto and York Members. 60 

Public Holidays. 2 

Public Hospitals. 102 

Public Library Board. 145 312 

Purchasing and Stores Division. 320 

Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada 

(Centenary). 20 

Ravina Gardens Board of 

Management. 308 

Real Estate Division. 320 

Redevelopment Advisory Council. 307 

Regent Park Housing 

(See Toronto Housing Authority) 

Registry Office. 327 

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. 155 308 

Runnymede Hospital. 126 309 

St. Lawrence Hall. 94 

Senate Members. 56 

Sewers (See Works Dept.) 

Sheriff. 327 

Social Planning Council. 210 

Special Examiners. 327 

Standard Time Invention. 272 

Stanley Barracks. 175 


342 


























Names of 
Members 
& Officials 


327 


309 


Toronto Builders’ Exchange 
(See Builders’ Exchange) 

Toronto City Planning Board 
(See Planning Board) 

Toronto Historical Committee 
(See Historical Committee) 

Toronto Clearing House Statistics 
(See Clearing House) 

Toronto Convention and Tourist 
Ass’n (See Metro. Toronto 
Convention and Visitor Assoc.) 

Toronto Fire Dept. Superannuation 
and Benefit Fund 
(See Fire Dept.) 


Gen¬ 

eral 

Stock Exchange. 200 

Street Cleaning (See Works Dept.) 

Street Lights (See Works Dept.) 

Street Mileage (See Works Dept.) 

Surrogate Court. 

Surveying Division (See Works Dept.) 


Symphony Orchestra. 178 

Taxation.229, 288 

Taxicab Tariff. 236 

Ted Reeve Arena, Board of 

Management. 

Telephone Service. 157 

Emergency Calls. 2 

Statistics. 289 


343 











Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners 
(See Harbour Commission) 

Toronto Housing Authority Statistics 
(See Housing Authority) 

Toronto Humane Society 
(See Humane Society) 

Toronto Hydro-Electric System 
(See Hydro Electric) 

Toronto Industrial Commission 
(See Metro. Toronto Industrial 
Commission) 

Toronto Mendelssohn Choir 
(See Mendelssohn Choir) 

Toronto Public Library Board 
(See Public Library Board) 

Toronto Symphony Orchestra 
(See Symphony Orchestra) 

Toronto Stock Exchange 
(See Stock Exchange) 

Toronto and District Labour Council 197 


Toronto Transit Commission. 164 333 

Statistics. 289 

Traffic Control (See Works Dept.) 

Traffic Engineering (See Works Dept.) 

Trees on Streets. 285 

United Community Fund of 

Greater Toronto. 208 

University of Toronto. 217 

Statistics. 290 


344 








Names of 
Gen- Members 
eral & Officials 

University Settlement, Board of 


Management. 312 

Vilijo Rewell (Architect). 17 

Vital Statistics.74, 290 

Voters’ List (See Municipal Elections) 

Water Rates. 232 

Weather Records. 214 

Welfare Department. 104 320 

Works Department. 110 320 

Divisions 

Planning and Control. 320 

Engineering. 320 

Surveying. 321 

Operations. 321 

Streets. 321 

Equipment. 321 

Traffic. 321 

Statistics 

Altitude. 279 

Area. 279 

Parking. 282 

Sewers. 288 

Street Lights.270, 288 

Street Mileage. 288 

Traffic Control. 290 

Water. 291 

Yonge Street, Opening of. 268 

Zoning By-law Committee of 

Adjustment. 300 


345 


100 























































































































JS Toronto 

17 39 Municipal handbook 

A1A3 

I960 

-*veramenl 

'.catioaf 


please do not remove 

SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 


UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
LIBRARY